Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats



**no c 


» l« 

r hfi.- 

thu 1 1. 

*t »■ ■.. 


% 


- IV. PV V?\ 
i '* 

• N P 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Wednesday, October 26, 1994 


Broken and Beaten, Iraq Slides Into ‘Surreal Poverty’ 


- - By Youssef M. Ib rahim 

• '.v ^ ^e* T<*k Tima Service 

1 4 . BAGHDAD — Children lie on filthy hospital beds. 
I : J • Jnunntinng in pain as they die of diarrhea and pneu- 

l" 1 ‘vii^ uio ma. Some of the Arab world's finest artists peddle 

• | ’ their work for as littie as $U a painting. A 50-year-old 

’ : **• Ktocd pc^ceman, victim of a stroke a year ago. limps 

• - . > 7 .-n 1 . from merchant to merchant in a food market looking 

• •••••. .• % for what he can afford on a pension driven down by 

- ^'■i-Tinw ntfmtion to the equivalent of $2 a month barely 
- .... 'y v^p.enoughto buy one chicken or a handful of rice. 

. , . "' ?ar iiii^ . * In this city, which only five years ago ranked as one 
■ „ ji . of the most vibrant ana prosperous ga ni tak of the 
> ...> Middle East, the phghi of Iraq is amply evident, but 

1 ^ Ofh P°Btical improvement is not. Gone are the mounds of 

imported goods, sweets, pistachios and varied nuts 
-..that were a fixture of many Baghdad street markets. 
' ; ' v ^ They have been replaced by spontaneous flea markets 
' 1 t '} * .where sullen middle-class men and women offer their 


th'Oi. ; .. 

. 5e 

»»•*.. .. 

• . 

•• •• • 

1 v * ; 

r». .. 

' : 1 ., ’ 

1 . - \ 

• • •: 


1 ' * w; ± • .. , 

V. 

f\ri\ ■ 

•af;. 


t j-.'..-, • " 


M.* . 

Wi 

- a. . 

• ••.! ..,■■■> Uni 


cutlery, used furniture and family possessions for sale 
to make ends meet 

In the two weeks since Iraq moved some of its best- 
trained troops toward the Kuwaiti border, only to be 
rebuffed by U.S. military countermeasures, the world 
has been duly reminded of the stringent trade sanc- 
tions imposed four years ago by the United Nations. If 
that was President Saddam Hussein’s intention, he 
was successful If it also was his hope that the UN 
could be persuaded somehow to lift the embargo, he 
was not 

This country of 20 million people — which sits atop 
oil reserves second only to Saudi Arabia's — remains 
financially broken, lurching from one crisis to anoth- 
er. Unable to sell its oil and buy food, medicine and 
spare parts except under UN conditions that it refuses 
to accept, Iraq faces famine and economic collapse. 

Despite the hardships, Mr. Saddam, his two sons 
and potential political hears, Uday and Qusay, and his 


Takriti family dan continue to rule virtually as royal- 
ty. Behind the walls of sumptuous palaces and cor- 
dons of security men, Mr. Saddam remains invulnera- 
ble to public dissent, protected by an intelligence and 
security apparatus directed by his son Qusay and a 
handful of relatives. 

Although the Iraqi president has rarely been seen in 
public in the last few years, his presence re mains 
overwhelming. He appears in taped television pro- 
grams broadcast daily. His face peers down from 
thousands of posters and statues throughout the coun- 
try. He continues to cl ai m victories and inveigh 
against enemies. And his government does not dis- 
courage journalists from the West from reporting 
firsthand on the economic ruin that he blames rite 
international community for. 

“This used to be a rich country,” said an Iraqi 
intellectual who described himself as having been a 


fervent supporter of Mr. Saddam’s government. ‘To- 
day, I'd say not more than 1 million Iraqis are Hving in 
any real sense of the word. They axe those who uphold 
Saddam's rule and those who protect him. They are 
given food and plenty of money. The rest of us are 
drifting into this surreal kind of poverty where univer- 
sity professors sell their family’s possessions to eat. It 
is breaking down the very fabric of this society. 

“Sometimes, when I hear foreign radio broadcast 
assertions from America or Britain that the only wav 
to salvation is to get rid of Saddam, I say to myself, 
*Do they think we are some kind of video game or 
what?’ ” said the man, who, tike everyone interviewed 
outside government circles, insisted on anonymity. 
“You are looking at a people whose energy is drained 
simply looking for the next meal.” 

For their part, Iraqi officials axe eager to enforce the 

See IRAQ, Page 6 


b*. lv; ; 

i"’ 

iv-ir-. . ■ , 


. 

• ‘ M. 

. fy . ' 
ail:: 

• :••• 

..... kj 

h: F _» - .“ 


Tl., ... 

•--•xv*. '• 

• ' if. 


Til - * i.: .. u 

.. v.-.:** ^ 

dir 


tVtr- • 


V-: \; 




Kf.ljV,! 

• -• 1-l.tVI 




k is* _._v 

“rr* 

- 

Till .1,.;. ,_i 

:• J.X'U-at 


' ■ i»i 

Cl*;-. 

■■ ■■ “‘’*'^ -jin— l'; 

.u..’.’ : :• 

a.- ; 

-•'•"* ut • . , .. 


Consortium 
Plans Mix 
Of Cable TV 
And Phones 


By Lawrence Malkin 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Sprint Corp. and 
three of the largest American cable 
operators said Tuesday that they 
would join a radical new venture to 
provide consumers with telephone, 
television and computerized informa- 


• «j*; ii’ jui"; 

' 

•• : :*■::£ »v; 
r-. 
w JSSf! 


r,». . . . : v .• r. 


I tout \n% 


Iti'hk 
■ v: 


t.ltina SI."tiK hl 

\v¥ 1 * ’ • ' - 


*.r 


television and computerized informa- 
tion services — au through a single 
wire in the waH 

The consortium will attempt to 
shoulder aside America’s regional 
“Baby BelT telephone companies, 
winch now monopolize local tele- 
phone service. 

Taking part with Sprint, which op- 
erates the nation's thxrd-largest lang- 
, ^distance network of fiber-optic cables, 
^are Tele-Communications Tn c , , Cox 
Enterprises Inc. and Comcast Corp.. 
' which together serve 30 million 
homes. 

If their corporate alliance holds to- 
gether and attracts other local cable 
TV companies, as they hope, the ensu- 
ing battle against the giant AT&T 
Corp. and the regjanaTBdl companies 
wiD be the Hugest eadnsost strategic 
since the breakup of the Bell System in 

■ 1984 opened the way to unparalleled 
confusion, opportunity ana, finally, 
innovation in the telecommunications 
industry. . . 

LikeHBe earlier realignment, this 
one alstrjs likely to penetrate abroad, 
however slowly. TCI and Cox already 
provide combined phone and televi- 
sion service in Britain and say they are 
increasing their market steadily. And 
Sprint recently sold a 20 percent stake 
to the German and French national 
telephone companies for $4.2 billion, 
which its chairman, William T. Esrey. 
said would become a war chest for 
e xpanding and upgrading service in 
America.- 

“Tbis means the end of the Baby 
Bdls,” said Philip Scrim, a communi- 
cations analyst at Werthedm Schroder 
& Co. He based that obituary on his 
calculation that the television compa- 
nies can upgrade their coaxial cable 
/systems to provide telephone and digi- 
tal-quality service at half the tele- 
phone companies’ cost. 

\ The only remaining barrier to a free 
flow of calls between traditional 
■■ phone service customers and potential 
customers of the proposed televiaon- 

■ phone package is (he Bell companies’ 
nigh access charges. A bill to limit 
those charges severely made it halfway 

' through Congress before it was 
blocked by intense Baby Bell Iobby- 

■ ing. 

The bill also sought to allow the 
regional Bells to compete in offering 
” long-distance and cable TV services. 

But John Malone of TCI, the most 
; powerful cable operator in the United 
States, said the new consortium was 
able to leapfrog competition “with 
. seamless connections before anyone 
else can get there,” 

The stakes are huge: Local tele- 
phone: service in the United States 
generates about $85 billion a year in 
- re venu es —four to five times the size 
of the nation's cable business, which 
has wired up about half the nation’s 

homes and has more or less reached its 
limi ts. 

Cable operators thus are left with 
See PHONES, Page 6 


Down 

4.71 

3850.59 



SSS 011 ”- 

DH 

Pound 

f Yan 

FF 


Tuei.dOM 

1.4953 

1.637 

ggjO 

5-1205 



m r 


Newsstand Prices 

Andorra „...9.QDFF Luxembourg 60 L Fr 

Antilles 11.20 FF Morocco 12 Dh 

Cameroon./! ,400 CF A Qatar 8.00 Rials 

Egypt E. P.5000 R6union....ll.2QFF 

France 9.00 FF Saudi Arabia .4.00 R. 

Gabon... ... .960 CFA Senegal — 960 C FA 

Greece.; 300 Dr. Spcrin .....J0QPTAS 

Italy ...... woo Lire Tunisia ..,.1,000 Din 

Ivory Coast .1,120 CF A Turkey ~T.L. 35,000 

Jordan..,.........! JD uae aJO Dirh 

Lebanon ...USSIJO U.S.MII.(Eur.)S1.10 



Rot Edmoods Thc AMocuucd Pres« 


President Bill Clinton with his foreign policy team at the White House before embarking on his six-nation trip Tuesday to the Middle East. 

The Coming of Peace Strangles Jericho’s Palestinians 


By Barton Gel 1 man 

Washington Post Service 

JERICHO — The abundance of his pro- 
duce stand, piled high with eggp lant pom- 
do and lemon, comes across as a bitter 
joke to Fahed Walaji. Up to half his stock 
is rotting each day. and what he does sell 
goes at prices he can barely believe. 

“Just yesterday I bought from him a box 
of 15 kilos of bananas for 10 sbekds — you 
know how cheap that is?" interjected Abu 
Heshem Jalayta, who runs the Love Life 


Restaurant nearby. Mr. Jalayta regretted 
the purchase anyway because his custom- 
ers order nothing but coffee to kill the 
time, and some of them cannot pay for 
even that. 

Jericho is strangling. Cordoned tightly 
between sealed-off markets in Jordan and 
Israel, this Palestinian self-rule town is 
surrounded by lush groves of banana and 
citrus trees with no one to buy what they 

E roduce. “There is no way out,” Mr. Ja- 
tyta said. 

As Israel and Jordan make peace 


Wednesday and begin planning for shared 
prosperity, they are leaving out — and 
squeezing out — the 1 million West Bank 
Palestinians who live between them. 

Jericho stands astride the most direct 
route between Jerusalem and Amman, and 
the family ties of West Bank Palestinians 
would seem to make them natural benefi- 
ciaries of open new borders. 

But the dismantling of the Israel-Jordan 
war frontier does not look as though it will 
do the Palestinians much good. Most of 


the new flow of people and goods is 
planned for two new crossing points: one 
in the far north, east of Haifa, and one in 
the far south, at the boundary between 
Aqaba and Eilat. 

“The center of activity will be an these 
new passages, and we’ll be kept in the 
middle without benefiting from the trade 
or the tourists.” said Samir Abdallah, a 
director of the Palestinian Economic 
Council, in a gloomy interview at his East 

See JERICHO, Page 6 


Japanese Insist Europe Aid 
With North Korea Reactors 


By James Stemgold 

New York Tuna Service 

TOKYO — The Japanese finance minis- 
ter unexpectedly added a new condition to 
his government’s pledge to help pay for 
construction of modem nuclear reactors in 
North Korea on Tuesday by saying that 
Japan would only supply its financing if 
European countries also made contribu- 
tions. 

In what could prove to be the first of 
many questions over how the politically 
sensitive, multibilHon-dollar project will 
be paid for. Finance Minis ter Masayoshi 
Takcmura argued in Parliament that since 
Japan had helped pay for the cleanup of 
the Chernobyl disaster, Europe was 
obliged to help cover North Korean reac- 
tor costs. 

Previously, it had been suggested that an 


international consortium would provide 
part of the more than $4 billion required 


for the project, but that roughly 90 percent 
would come from South Korea and Japan. 
South Korea’s share has been put at as 
much as 70 percenL since the plants would 
eventually be merged into a broader Kore- 
an power grid if and when the two are 
reunified. 

There had been no explicit mention of 
European financing. Nor had Japan indi- 
cated before that it was establishing pre- 
conditions for its critical role in the pro- 
ject, which is aimed at eliminating North 
Korea’s suspected nuclear weapons pro- 
gram and drawing it out of its menacing 
isolation. 

[President Bill Clinton has written the 
North Korean leader, Kim Jong U, promis- 

See REACTORS, Page 6 



T e r en ce Witter Atcnce Fnnce-Preoc 

HEAT OF BATTLE — Dust flying after a soldier loyal to the Afghan 
president fired his weapon In fighting Tuesday with rival factions in KabuL 
Later, Iran's press agency said Tehran had brokered a 24-hour cease-fire. 


No. 34.729 

Clinton Asks 
The Mideast 
To ‘Follow 
The Brave’ 

Meeting With Arafat 
To Precede Historic 
Israel-Jordan Accord 

By Ann Devroy 

Washington Post Service 

CAIRO — With a call to “all parties to 
follow the brave and hopeful inspiration of 
Israel and Jordan,” President Bill Clinton 
arrived in Cairo Wednesday for a four-day 
trip filled with ceremonies of peace and the 
challenge of nudging holdouts closer to the 
goal of a comprehensive Middle East 
agreement. 

Mr. Clinton, accompanied by a large 
contingent of American officials, security 
agents and Jewish and Arab- American ac- 
tivists, was greeted by President Hosni 
Mubarak of Egypt and was to visit the 
tomb of Anwar Sadat, the Egyptian presi- 
dent who made peace with Israel ana was 
assassinated in 1981. 

Mr. Clinton also was to meet Wednes- 
day with Yasser Arafat, chairman of the 
Palestine Liberation Organization, for dis- 
cussions mi the agreement signed by the 
PLO and Israel in Washington a year ago. 

[The Israeli Par liamen t overwhelmingly 
approved the Jordan- Israel treaty Tuesday 
mght at the end of a 12 -bour televised 
debate, Reuters reported. The vote was 105 
to 3, with six abstentions. 

[Islamic militants demonstrated against 
the treaty in the Jordanian capital, Am- 
man, while Syria, the PLO and the militant 
Islamic group Hamas voiced hostility to 
the accord. Mr. Arafat denounced the role 
that the treaty gives to Jordan in supervis- 
ing Muslim sites in Jerusalem, a dty he 
wants as the capital of a future Palestinian 
state.] 

As Mr. Clinton left the White House on 
Tuesday for the overnight flight here, he 
asserted that his journey was more than a 
ceremonial celebration of its centerpiece, 
which is the peace treaty signing Wednes- 
day between Israel and Jordan. 

“It is an opportunity to pursue new 
steps,” he said. “My goal is to make clear 
that the time has arrived for all parties to 
follow the brave' and hopeful inspiration" 
of Israel and Jordan. 

Continued participation by the United 
States, he said, “is crucial” to building a 
comprehensive peace, and his intent here is 
“to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with those 
who are moving the peace process for- 
ward." 

He portrayed Ins visit as part of a bipar- 
tisan United States effort that began with 
Jimmy Carter's Camp David accords, 
signed at the White House 15 years ago, 
and included the Bush administration’s 
laying of the groundwork for a compre- 
hensive peace in Madrid in 1991. 

Referring to the signing ceremony be- 
tween Israel and Jordan, Mr. Clinton said 
he was helping to fulfill “a mission pur- 
sued by the United States, and of presi- 
dents of both parties, since the end of 
World War II." 

“Peace in the Middle East is a funda- 
mental interest of the United States,” he 
said. 

To celebrate the historic signing and the 
See MIDEAST, Page 6 

Kiosk 

Candidate's Widow 
In Sri Lanka Race 

COLOMBO (Reuters) — The widow 
of Gamini Dissanayake, the slain Sri 
Lankan opposition leader, was chosen 
by his United National Party on Tues- 
day to run in the presidential elections 
next month. 

Mr. Dissanayake was among 52 peo- 
ple killed by a suspected Tamil rebel 
suicide bomber at a campaign rally Sun- 
day. 

Sources said the party picked Mr. Dis- 
sanayake’s widow, Srima, a lawyer, in 
order to win the sympathy vote in the 
Nov. 9 presidential election. 

“She is our only hope of winning," a 
senior party official said. 


Book Review 
Crossword 


Page 4. 
Page 2L 


For Solo Sailor, a Battle Not to Go Down With His Sinking Ship 


By Barbara Lloyd 

New York Tima Service 

Rough seas had been damming against the hull of 
Josh Hall’s 60-foot sailboat for five straight days. An 
experienced ocean racer, Mr. Hall was familiar with 
the sounds and the fed of a turbulent sea, the dapping 
and banring of the waves, and the seismic motion that 
runs the length of the boat as it rides up the front side 
of a wave and falls off the back. 

But at dusk, alone in the middle of the Atlantic 
Ocean on his 31st day at sea in the BOC round-the- 
world race, the sound Mr. Hall heard was different. In 
retrospect, it would make the pounding of the previ- 
ous five days seem melodious by comparison. 

“There was an almig hty crunch, and then a re ndin g 
sound,” the British sailor said during a ship-to-shore 
telephone interview from the yacht that had rescued 
him. “The boat staggered on its feet, so to speak, 
and I was forced up against the wheel Obviously, 


something very serious had happened up forward." 

Thus began a wrenching night of struggle and fear 
for Mr. Hall, during which he battled the torrents of 
water that rushed through a gaping hole on the star- 
board side of the bulL He was finally picked up eight 
hours later by a fellow race competitor in the type of 
high-seas rescue that gives ocean racing its aura of 
danger and adventure. 

This was the second time that Mr. Hall, 32, was 
com pering in the BOC Challenge, a 27,000-mile 
(43,700-kSometer) yacht race around the world for 
solo sailors. He had had a fairly uneventful trip 
aboard his boat, Gartmore Investment Challenge, 
since leaving Charleston, South Carolina, on Sept. 17 
on the first stage of the race, a 6,800-mile ( 1 1,000 
kilometer) passage to Cape Town. Although he was 


race to get to Cape Town first. 


But there was no comfort for Mr. Hall at dusk on 
Oct. 1 7 when he heard the thud at the front ofhis boat 
Regaining his balance, but stunned and frightened, he 
walked, ran and stumbled through the interior of his 
sailboat. What he found could not have been worse — 
a huge hole that he estimates was about two by three 
feet (60 by 90 centimeters) — on the starboard side of 
thehufi. 

The watertight bulkhead that is supposed to head 
off such onrushes of sea water had split And a six-foot 
crack in the hull loomed like a lightning bolt shot out 
of a thunder head. He had no idea what the boat hit, 
but guessed that it might have been a submerged 
container from a pasting ship. 

“I was just absolutely devastated,” said Mr. Hall. 
“Then panic set in, and my heart went to my stomach. 
I ran up and down the deck of the boat a couple of 
times saying, *Whai do I do? What do I do? 1 " 


He was about 700 miles southeast of Recife, Brazil. 
The time was 7:46 PJkL, or 1946 Greenwich Mean 
Time, the standard by which mariners record their life 
at sea. And it was no time for all hell to break loose. 

First, Mr. HaQ triggered his boat's emergency but- 
ton, an alarm installed on all 19 of the BOC sail tx>ats. 
It is part of a sew communications system set up by 
The BOC Group, a Bri tish multinational company 
that sponsors the solo competition. Its technology was 
developed for the race by Trimble Navigation, Com- 
sat Mobile Communications and IBM. 

Mr. Hall benefited from technology that was not yet 
in place when Mike Plant, an American ocean racer, 
was lost at sea in 1992. The emergency radio beacon 
on Mr. Plant's 60-foot sailboat. Coyote, sent out a 
brief distress signal, but the satdhte transmission 

See RESCUE, Page 20 


/ 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 26, 1994 




Judge Bars U.S. From Evicting Refugees in Guantanamo 


Complied ini Our Susfj From Dispatcher 

MIAMI — A federal judge tempo- 
rarily barred the U.S. government on 


Cuba. 

Judge C. Clyde Atkins of U.S. Dis- 
trict Court issued the temporary re- 
straining order in an attempt to stop a 
military plane from leaving the base 
and returning 23 Cuban refugees to 
Havana. 




Judge Atkins ruled just before the 
flight was scheduled to lake off. Major 
Don Eaton, of the U.S. Atlantic Com- 
mand in Norfolk. Virginia, said the 
plane did not take off as scheduled. 

The judge issued the order at the 
request of a group of Cuban-American 
lawyers who sum the federal govern- 
ment Monday in an attempt to prevent 
any further repatriations and to ulti- 
mately win freedom for more than 
30,000 Cubans held in detention 
camps at Guantinamo and in Panama. 




“This is the last resort." said Xavier 
Suarez, a former mayor of Miami and 
one of the lawyers who filed the law- 
suit. “AH political solutions are not 
working. It's time for a legal solution.’’ 

The Clinton administration has e- 
fused to let the detained Cuban refu- 
gees into the United States, saying they 
must return to Cuba and migrate legal- 
ly. Many of the refugees say they 
would rather die first. 

During the emergency hearing. As- 
sistant U.S. Attorney Dexter Lee ar- 




gued that the Cubans had volunteered 
to return to their homeland and that 
the scheduled repatriation Tuesday 
should be allowed to take place. 

The class-action lawsuit filed in 
U.S. district court here by the Cuban 
.American Bar Association and two re- 
lated groups, seeks to grant the refu- 
gees access to attorneys and a chance 
to apply for refugee status and politi- 
cal asylum in the United Stales. It 
charges that the government is coerc- 
ing the refugees~to return to Cuba. 


where they allegedly would face ha- 
rassment and imprisonment. 

The lawsuit was filed just two weeks 
before the Nov. 8 election, which pits a 
surging Jeb Bush, a Republican, 
against the incumbent governor. Law- 
ton Chiles, a Democrat whose political 
ads tout his tough stand againsL the 
Cuban influx. Many political analysts 
consider his opposition to increased 
immigration one of his strongest cam- 
paign points. 

(AP, IVP) 






B6fbr*-tr£;x 




SSSSfpl 








^ 




Oirii. K».nvrhc /Wealed Prei 

HELLO COLUMBUS — Passengers waiting to board a Spanish-built Talgo train in Columbus, Ohio. The train, 
with a low center of gravity, has a passive tilting mechanism that allows it to travel on existing tracks at 125 mph. 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

A Call From Academia to Give 
Semi-Human Status to Apes 

After years of intensive studies with 
pygmy chimpanzees and other apes, a 
Georgia State University scientist says 
their human-like emotions, intellect and 
ability to acquire language should make 
them eligible for “semi-bum an” legal 
status. 

Dr. Sue Savage-Rumbaugh acknowl- 
edges that such status would raise im- 
mense moral and legal issues concerning 
their use in medical experiments and 
keeping them in zoos. 

But in a new book, “Kanzi: The Ape at 
the Brink of the Human Mind," written 
with a science writer, Roger Lewin, Dr. 
Savage-Rumbaugh says she is convinced 
that their emotions, intellect and con- 
sciousness are at least “morally equiva- 
lent” to those of profoundly retarded 
chi ldren . 

™We certainly would not put these 


is ask the butter... 


children in a zoo to be gawked at as 
examples of nature,” she says, “nor 
would we permit medical experimenta- 
tion to be conducted on them.” 

Short Takes 

The Coors Brewing Co, will ask the 
U.S. Supreme Court next month for the 
right to print alcohol content on its beer 
labels. The federal Bureau of Alcohol, 
Tobacco and Firearms wants the court to 
uphold a law that bans that information 
on labels unless required by state law. 
Congress passed the law in 1937 to put 
an end to strength wars that broke out 
among brewers after the repeal of Prohi- 
bition. Coors said it is concerned about a 
rumor that its beer is weak. 

With the backing of several corporate 
sponsors, Fernando Mateo, a New York 
businessman, has announced a nation- 
wide effort to take guns off the streets for 
Christmas. A publicity campaign will list 
a wide variety of gifts to be exchanged 
for guns. Mr. Mateo is credited with 
taking 3,000 guns off New Yoxk City 
streets last year by offering gift certifi- 
cates. This year, in a coordinated effort 
called Goods for Guns, police depart- 
ments and corporate sponsors will swap 


apparel, footwear, toys, sporting equip- 
ment, electronic equipment and music 
recordings for weapons. Mr. Mateo said 
he hoped to take 18,000 guns off the 
streets by exchanging SI. 8 million worth 
of goods. This works out to gifts averag- 
ing SI 00 per weapon. 

Prince Hamlet of Denmark was found 
gnOty of multiple murder before a packed 
house at Lhe City Bar Association in 
Manhattan. In an evening of infinite jesL 
The New York Times reports, the de- 
fense attorney. Daniel J. Kornstein, ar- 
gued that Hamlet was the product of a 
dysfunctional family and Had a flair for 
delusional behavior. Haring survived a 
poison-tipped sword, “he’s been rotting 
in jail for these 400 years," Mr. Kom- 
stem said, calling this an example of 
what his client once called “the law’s 
delay." The prosecutor, Stephen Gibers, 
said Hamlet “has been able to buy into 
contemporary notions of victimology — 
he’s a victim'of his victims!” The three- 
judge panel agreed that Hamlet should 
be convicted of murdering Claudius and 
Polonius; they disagreed about Laertes. 
Rosencrantz and GuQdenstcm. 

International Herald Tribune. 




1 ^/carets 

' F *l’f !#»»!.•# II llrlillf VHl If II l|. 


S-l-N-G-A-F-O-R- £ 

■iW.'M ...r wi. 



«U 1W ’»*. wt TTw ad TV Dm 

LIVING EV THE U.S.? 
Now Printed in 

NEW¥)RK 

for Same Day 
delivery in key Cities 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1-800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-752-3890) 


Moscow Uncertain 
On Size of Oil Spill 


Japan Thiefs Vast Arsenal 
Trips Him Up in Getaway 

Reuters 

OSAKA, Japan — A robber armed with a crossbow, axe. stun 
gun, smoke grenade and a can of Mace and wearing a gray wig was 
in jail Tuesday after tripping over his own feet. 

The police said the thief was so laden down with equipment, 
plus a stolen metal box full of money, that he tripped during his 
getaway from the crime at Osaka’s main railroad station. 

The thief had fired a rubber-tipped arrow from-his crossbow at 
three bank employees as they carried 120 million yen (S1.2 
million) in three boxes from a travel agent’s office io a bank 
branch at the station. 

Startled by the unusual attack; one employee dropped his box 
of money, which the thief swooped on and made off with. 

But after running less than 100 meters, he tripped over his own 
feet and was seized by a passer-by. 

“I just heard someone shout ‘thief and I ran after him,” Etsuro 
Nakajima said. “Then he fell over, so I jumped on top of him ." 

A bank employee hit in the chest by the arrow was slightly him. 


By Steven Erlanger 

.Vfw York Times Snviff 

MOSCOW — Russian offi- 
cials had differing and some- 
times conflicting accounts on 
Tuesday of a large oil spill from 
a pipeline in the Russian Arctic 
republic of Komi, near the city 
of Usinsk. 

But they agreed that the main 
damage occurred more than a 
month ago. that some form of 
cleanup operation had been un- 
der way, and that the spillage of 
oil, while large, was considera- 
bly smaller than American offi- 
cials said on Monday. 

Still, the Russian Ministry 
for Environmental Protection 
and Natural Resources sent a 
delegation of officials to the 
area on Tuesday to see for 
themselves. 

"The Komi local authorities 
assert that they' are taking all 
necessary measures to eliminate 
the consequences," said Vera A. 
Lubyako, a ministry aide. 

“But since the information 
we are receiving is contradic- 
tory,” she added, aides from 
various ministries, including 
the Ministry for Emergency Sit- 
uations, and officials involved 
with water purity and fish sup- 
plies, were traveling to Usinsk. 

In Washington, the U.S. dep- 
uty secretary of energy, William 
H. White, said Monday that the 
spill was over 2 million barrels 
of oiL or eight times the size of 
the spill when the Exxon Valdez 
ran aground off Alaska in 1 989. 
He said a dam holding back oil 
from a badly leaking pipeline 
burst in heavy rains over the 
last few days, sending a massive 
spill toward the Pechora River. 

But Russian officials, includ- 
ing spokesman from the oil 
company concerned, Komineft, 
said the spill was not so vast 
They said the amount of oil 
involved ranged from 10230 
barrels, the figure provided by 
Komineft. to 219,000 barrels, 
the figure provided by the Min- 
istry for Emergency Situations, 
to as much as 438.000 barrels, a 
figure provided by the Environ- 
ment Ministry. 

Komineft said the oil was 
mixed with other drilling by- 
products. including salt water, 
and the total liquid involved 
was 219,000 barrels, covering 
nearly 70 square kilometers (27 
square miles). 

A local official who was re- 
cently fired as chairman of the 
Environmental Committee of 
Usinsk, a city nearby the spilL 
told a Moscow ecologist, Alexei 
Reteyum. that the spill was as 
much as 51 1,000 barrels. But 
even that is only a quarter of the 


figures cited by American offi- 
cials. 

The spill from the Exxon Val- 
dez, by comparison, was 
240,000 barrels, while the 
Amoco Cadiz, which ran 
aground off the Brittany coast 
of France in 1979. spilled 1.6 
milli on barrels. 

As another point of compari- 
son, Thane Gustafson, an ex- 
pert on Russian oil for Cam- 
bridge Energy Research 
Associates, said that the Rus- 
sians, “almost as a matter of 
routine,” spill from 36-5 million 
barrels to 51 .1 million barrels of 
oil on the ground each year. 

“The environments stan- 
dard up there is routinely poor 
at best,” said Mr. Gustafson, 
who had traveled through Komi 
in December and January with 
Mr. Reteyum. Local environ- 
mental officials, he said, have 
little money, equipment or legal 
powers to enforce regulations. 

Russian officials acknowl- 
edged Tuesday that oil had 
leaked into the Kolva River and 
fish-rich Usa River after a dike, 
built to bold back large leaks 
from an oil pipeline, burst on 
Oct. 1 after heavy rains. The 
Komi region declared an emer- 
gency that day. 

But the officials said that no 
oil had reached the Pechora 
River, which runs into the Arc- 
tic Ocean, and that so far some 
35314 cubic feet of oily soil had 
been collected and 353,140 cu- 
bic feet of “oily liquid." They 
also said there was “no new' 
leak” of oiL 

On Tuesday night Russian 
Independent Television news 
showed scenes from the area, 
including oil-filled streams and 
oil-covered fields. 

The Russian officials said 
that a Komweft pipeline had 
been leaking oil since at least 
late August, despite various 
patches, and that Komineft and 
local officials had been building 
a series of small dikes to hold 
back the oil and other liquids. 

Valeri I. Cyio, the press offi- 
cer for Komineft, reached by 
telephone at company head- 
quarters in Ukhta. said the 100- 
kiloraeter (60-mile) pipeline 
connecting oO fields to the 
Usinsk terminal had been in use 
since 1975 and had started to 
spring holes as early as 1988. 

Most Russian oil companies 
have financial difficulties. They 
do not make a profit on domes- 
tic sales, especially since the 
Russian government takes 60 
percent of their income off the 
top in taxes, Mr. Gustafson 
said. 


WORLD BRIEFS f 

Ru%ia Flans ^Stage Army Cal in ^5 

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia will reduce its armed forced 1.9 
million men by January, Defease Minister Pavel $. Grachev «kj 
T uesday. General Grachev, on a visit to Russia’s Far East, told Of 
Interfax press agency that the army would further cut its staflfy 
1.7 million by the end of 1995. down from 2.3 million at the 
beginning of 1994. - 

President Boris N. Yeltsin has said the army will gradually 
shrink to about 1 .5 million men, 1 percent of Russia's population. 
The former Soviet Army had about 3.7 million soldieis. 

Mr. Grachev, who in the past has criticized plans to trim the 
army, has pledged to carry out Mr. Yeltsin's orders. He has, 
however, continued to fight budget-cutting measures by the gov- 
ernment and Parliament. 

50 Rwandans Slain at Refugee Gamp 

GENEVA (AP) — About 50 refugees were killed and 12 
wounded in an attack on a Rwandan refugee camp on the border 
with Burundi, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refu- 
gees said Tuesday. . . 

An agency spokesman, Ron Redmond, saia uie refugees, in- 
cluding women and children, were Hutu. He said they told relief 
workers they had been attacked by men in uniform. 

3 Reported Killed in Somali Clash 

MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP) — Rival factions fought with 
mortars and rocket-propelled grenades in southern Mogadishu on 
Tuesday, and Somali sources said that at least three people were 
killed. 

A United Nations spokesman. Major Rich McDonald, de- 
scribed the fi ghting as “quite intense" but said the United Naiie. 
had no reports of casualties. 

It was the second time this month that the Abgal and Murusade 
factions have fought in the same district of the city. Twelve 
Somalis died and 45 were wounded in the earlier clash. 

Ex-Mayor of Nice to Plead for Asylum 

MONTEVIDEO (Reuters) — Jacques Medecin, the former 
mayor of Nice whose extradition was agreed to by Uruguay last 
week, will ask President Luis Alberto Lacalle for political asylum, 
one of his lawyers said. 

Mr. Midecin, 65, who governed Nice for 30 years, was arrested 
in Uruguay’s beach resort of Punta del Este almost a year ago 
when France requested his extradition. He was tried in absentia 
by a French court, convicted of fraud and embezzlement and 
sentenced to a year in jail. 

“Our request for asylum will have political overtones, became 
Mfiderin believes that, for political reasons, his life could be . 
endangered if he is sent back to France,” said his Uruguayan , 
lawyer, Mario Beja. 

For the Record 

Vandals uprooted eleven gravestones and a memorial plaque at 
a Jewish cemetery in the eastern German state of Thunngia, the 
police said Tuesday. They said no graffiti was left at Bleicnerode 
cemetery. (AP) 













TRAVEL UPDATE 

Another TEccup’ on Channel Train ■ 

BRUSSELS (Reuters) — The Channel Tunnel train, plagued by 
breakdowns on its trial run to Paris, on Wednesday came to a halt 
under the sea and had to switch tracks on a promotional trip from 
London to Brussels. But the delay caused by signaling work inside 
the tunnel lasted only a few minutes, and a railroad spokesman 
assured the 400 reporters from around the world on the state-of- 
the-art train, that “everything is safe.” The train arrived in Brussels 
17 minutes late. 

A Eurostar passenger service spokesman said after the unsched- 
uled stop 40 meters (130 feet) below the seabed: “It was a very . 
minor hiccup today. We are not embarrassed at alL" 

Last week’s promotional trips from London to Paris were a 
public relations disaster, with one train failing to start and another 
breaking down outside Calais, on the French side. 

OfynqBc Airways will resrane flights to Amman. Jordan, and cut 
its route to Damascus. The Greek airline said its thrice-weekly 
service would start Nov. 2 and include a stop in Beirut. (AP) 
Work wfll begin in Venice this week to dean out the algae in 
canals that sometimes cause a foul odor in the city, local officials 
said Ttiesday. An operation to dredge the central San Luca canal 
will begin on Wednesday, the first step in a 10-year program to 
clean up 1 70 waterways at a cost of about S100 nnllioiL (Reuters) 
Biman Bangladesh Airlines has announced that it will resume 
service to India on Sunday. Officials in the Gulf states of Qatar, . 
Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates also lifted a ban on flights 
to India. Bixnan’s flights to and from Calcutta, Bombay and New’ 
Delhi were suspended Ocl 1 because of the plague epidemic. The 
national airline of Bangladesh said Tuesday that all flights arriv- 
ing from India will be fumigated before passengers are allowed to 
disembark. (A p t Reuters) 


y\ New \ 

f 

nor Back) 


UN Team Finds Indian Cities Tlague-Free’ 


By John Ward Anderson 

Washington Post Service 

NEW DELHI — A team of 
American and Russian doctors 
said Tuesday that India's major 
rities “could be considered to 
be plague-free” and called on 
other countries to end travel re- 
strictions and relax medical 
checks on travelers from India. 

Dr. David Dennis, a plague 
expert from the Centers for Dis- 
ease Control in Atlanta, who 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELOR'S • MASTER'S ■ DOCTORATE 
For Work. Life and Academic Experience 
Through Convenient Home Study 

® <310)471-0306 EXT. 23 
Fax: (310) 471-6456 
Fax or send detain! resume for 

FREE EVALUATION 

Pacific Western University 
600 N. Sepulveda Bh/d.. DepL 23 
Los Angeles, CA 90049 


headed a special investigative 
team for the World Health Or- 
ganization. said there was no 
evidence that plague had bro- 
ken out in New Delhi, Bombay, 
Calcutta or Madras. 

“There’s no reason not to 
have normal international trade 
and travel” with those cities and 
most other pans of India., he 
said. 

Many countries have re- 
sumed normal trade and trans- 
portation links with India, 
which was isolated by the inter- 
national community when an 
epidemic of the highly conta- 
gious pneumonic plague was re- 
ported in the western costal 
town of Surat on Sept 20. 

About a quarter oF the city’s 
1.2 million residents fled, rais- 
ing the fear that the deadly dis- 
ease, which is passed by cough- 
ing and sneezing, would be 
spread across India as panicked 
people returned to thar ances- 
tral vi llages. The disease spread 


quickly and mortality was high 
in the initial days before it was 
diagnosed 

But Mr. Dennis said the dan- 
ger of serious health disaster 
was averted by India’s rapid re- 
sponse. After health officials 
knew what they were up 
against, he said, “the outbreak 
of true plague appeared to be 
brought to a halt fairly quickly” 
by saturating high-risk neigh- 
borhoods with antibiotic drugs. 

While there were reports of 
thousands of suspected plague 
cases across the country, Indian 
health officials said that 57 peo- 
ple died of the plague and that 
280 more cases of it had been 
confirmed 

The analysis by the World 
Health Organization team. Mr. 
Dennis said, showed that India 
had adequate surveillance to 
detect outbreaks of plague in 
people, but that further study 
was needed to determine how 
the disease had originated in 


Surat and “to see if there's an ' 
ongoing plague cycle in the So- 
rat rodent population” that 
could lead to another outbreak. • 

■ WHO Report on Malaria * 

The World Health Oiganizar 
tion said Tuesday that the re- ‘ 
cent malaria outbreak in India '■■■■ 
was caused by parasites' in- 
creasing resistance to anti-ma- 
larial drugs and by heavy man- 
soons that helped mosquitoes ; 
breed, Reuters reported from “ 
Geneva. 

The UN agency also said the 
Indian government had official- 
ly reported that malaria had 
killed 287 people since August. 
Some health groups and local 
newspapers have reported that 
cerebral malaria has taken up to ^ 
4,000 lives in the Indian north- T« 
era province of Rajasthan, bor- j I 
dering Pakistan. ? 

The agency said India had 
taken strong measures to com- 
bat the outbreak. '■ ' 


taco 


Induce 


ter Foreign 
Relations 


To call from country to country, or to the U.S., dial the WorldPhone® number of the country you're calling from. 


Antigua 


DenmarklCC)* 8001-0022 Iceland* 

1 phones only.) #2 Dominican Republic 1-800-75 1-6624 (ran-r 

001-800 333-1111 Ecuador-!- 170 Iretand(CC) 

022-903-012 EgyptfCC)* tomellCC) 

1-800-624-1000 (Outside of Cairo, dial 02 first.) 355-5770 ItalylCC)* 

£00-002 El Salvador* 195 Jamaica 

0800-10012 Finland! CO* 9S00- 102-80 Kenya 

1 -800-623-0484 FrancelCC)* 19T-00-19 (Available fr 

0-800 2222 Gambia* 00 1-99 Kuwait 

0006012 Germany! CCI 0130-0012 UbanonlCC 

1600-888-8000 (Limited availability (n eastern Germany.) (Outside of I 


(Available from public card phones only.) ttz Dominican Republic 
Argentina-*- 001-800 333-1111 Ecuador -f 

AustrialCCl* 022-903-012 EgyptfCC)* 

Bahamas 1600-624-1000 (Outside of Cairo, dia 

Bahrein 800-002 S Salvador* 

BelglumiCd* 080IM0012 FrniandlCCl* 

Bermuda- 1-800 623-0484 FrancelCC)* 

Bolivia* 0-800 2222 Gambia* 

Brazil 0006012 GwmanyiCCl 

Canada(CC) 1600-888-8000 (Limited availability li 

cayman islands 1600-624-1000 GreecalCQ* 

ChilelCC' OOT-0316 Grenada* 

CotombialCCl* 980-16-0001 Guatemala* 

Costa Hica* J62 Hahi(CC)* 

Cyprus* 08090000 Honduras* 

Czech RapubflcfCO 00-42-000112 HungaryfCQ* 


195 Jamaica 800-674-7000 Paraguay* 

9£ !2L 1 2il"f2 Peru (Outside of 

19T -00-19 (Available from most m8jar cities.) 080011 Poland(CC) 

00-1-99 Kuwait 800-MCl(800-624> PortugalfCC) 

0130-0012 LabanonlCC) 600-624 Puerto RieoICCl 

n Germany.) (Outside of Beirut dial 01 first.) 425-036* QatariCC)* 

00-800-1211 LiechtensteinICC)* 155-0222 RomaniutCO* 

1-300-624-8721 Luxembourg 0800-0112 Russia(CC)* 

„ .2®? 5?“*°* 95 800-674-7000 San MarinofCCJ* 

001-800-444-1234 MenaeofCa* 19Y -00-19 Saudi Arabia 

001-800-874-7000 Netherlands! CO* 06-022-91-22 Slovak Republic 

007-800-01411 Netherlands AntfflestCO* 001600-950-1022 South Africa ICC 


999-002 Niearagua(CC) Spam(CC) 

(Special Phones Only) (Outside of Managua, dial 02 first.) 166 Sweden (CCl* 

N«vray(CC>* 800-19912 SwSandICO* 

177-150-2727 Panama 108 SyrialCC) 

onn^MSH “ ilitar Y Bases 2310-108 Trinidad & Tobago 

800-674-7000 Paraguay* OOB-11-BOO Turkey* 8 

Peru (Outside of Lima, dial 190 first.) 001-190 Ukraine* 

,,ar S, 1(fl S OT-01-04.800_.222 United Arab Emirates 


900-99-0014 

020*795-922 

155-0222 

0800 

(Special Phones Only) 
00-0)01-1177 
8T10-013 
800*111 


19T-00-19 Saudi Arabia 
06-022-91 -22 Slovak Republic (CC> 
001600-950-1022 South Africa ICC) 


05-017-1234 United KlngdomlCC) 

1-800-888-8000 1b call rhe U.S. using BT 0800-89-02^1 
0800-012-77 To call the US. using MERCURY 0500-894)2221' 

01-800-1800 To call anywhere other 
8T1 0-800 -497-7222 than the U.S. 0500-800^00 

172-1022 Unjguay (Collect not available.) 000-412 

1-800-11 US. Virgin blandh(CC) 1-800-888-8000 

00-42-000112 Vatican CrtyfCC) 

0800-994)011 Venezuela -r* 800-11144) 


0800-994)011 Venezuela 


*i:;» n 
r i • 




l -~*n I 




■" t2! 456 fcSD.TW*- 




Use your MCI Card," local telephone card or call collect— eH at the same low rates. 
ICC) Country-to-country calling available. May not be available taflrom all international locations. Certain 
restrictions apply Limned availability. ▼ Wait for second dial tone. A Available hpm LAD ATE L public 
phones only. Ram depends on call origin m Mexico, f International communications carrier. * Not avail- 
able front public pay phones. ♦ Public phones may require deposit of coin or phone card for dial tone 


WomPHONE" 

From N 


Vlj Let It Take You Around The World 

From MO 



Imprime par Offprint. 73 rue Jc 1‘Emn^ilc. ? 50 1 R Pans. 



Hera 


.;ST- - 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1994 


Page 3 


fori* i 


-:.., **■ lot 


THEAMERICAS / 



« ^ *-in. 
foHn-: ... 

h*. 
$» *« (far 
*'• »*„■ 

ate«l 




* 1 V 

«**»} \ 


\.\ 

Aii*.. 

a'.i a. v 

i 

sm^k. 'i. 

I* *■*;.. 


t. 

.: L, n«S - 

■> * -. 


Ill s 




•'JiCiai 


lil 2 


5 r » 


■:&‘v 

'■>■'■ 5> 


” -i - 
S*H4lii 
Urifcr * 
11 *.- 


* «■•»*» hi:-!,. •• i^: 


H - 

^lik ‘.i.j. 3 


\b:. 


‘- ‘'ii 


rm ) 
yvj 

»*•’ + r. 

w*«its . : 
i«%i J v. 
K*nvis.i,.; 

n r^ii 

i'liiKV. 
ta: • . 

*f'i» s* T. > 


“n'to 


••'■ ncpe^ 


hi 


• v ? b!*£ 


»nl 

dnni p-iitM.mn ^ • nM* 

Ite - ’ - • 7 v ‘*.‘ ^ 

w - ■:•».!• Slat : 


APOLITICAL AsOTESA 


Pol Oi¥«8 Clinton a Light Pat on the Back 

WASHINGTON — Americans may be giving credit — 
though not much — to President Bill CKnton for an improv- 
ing national economy and the administration's recent foreign 
policy initiatives in Haiti and the Gulf, according to a new 
Washington Post-ABC News poll. 

"Hie survey found that a growing number of Americans 
believe the nation’s economy is getting better, not worse- 
Four out of 10 rated the overall health of the economy as 
excellent or good — more than double the percentage who 
offered a similarly positive evaluation just over a year ago. 

Although few Americans believe that Mr. Clinton deserves 
most of the credit for die nation’s improving economy, more 
than 8 out of 10 said the president was at least' partly 
responsible for the upturn. And Mr. Clinton's approval 
rating for handl i n g the economy went up in Post-ABC News 
polls for the first time in six months, to 45 percent, from 43 
percent in September. 

Overall, Mr. Clinton’s job performance rating increased to 
49 percent in the latest Post-ABC News poll, up from 44 
percent ip September. Forty-eight percent of those inter- 
viewed disapprove of his handling of the presidency, down 
from 51 percent last month. ( IVP ) 

Raagati Officiate Defend Oliver Worth 

ARLINGTON, Virg inia . — Two senior officials in the 
Reagan . adminis tration have defended Oliver L. North, the 
Republican candidate for Senate in Virginia, against asser- 
tions that he ignored information about drug activities by 
rebel forces in Nicaragua that were fighting the leftist govern- 
ment there a decade ago. 

Elliott Abrams, the former assistant secretary of state for 
Inter-American Affairs, and former Attorney General Edwin 
Meese 3d disputed the assertions, made in The Washington 
Poston Saturday, calling them false, malicious and politically 
motivated. Mr. Abrams and Mr. Meese said that The Post 
and Mr. North's Democratic opponent. Senator Charles S. 
Robb, were engaging in a political ploy in a close race by 
raising issues already resolved by Congress and a special 
prosecutor. 

In 1989, Mr. North was convicted of obstructing the work 
of Congress, destroying documents and accepting an illegal 
granxfry, all of which were overturned on appeal. No one has 
ever ban prosecuted on drug charges arising from the Iran- 
contra affair. (NYT) 

Qtwjt/jJnquote 

Robert D. Reischauer, director of the Congressional Bud- 
get Office, on the painful choices that will have to be made to 
reduce the U.S. budget deficit: “Talking about this is like 
talking about sex in public. Everybody knows how you reduce 
the deficit, but no one wants to talk about it in front of 
everybody else.” ( LA T) 


Republican Senate? The Scenario Looks Ugly for Clinton 


By Eric Pianin 

WaUmgion Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — In the last two years, the 
Senate has eviscerated President Bill Clinton's 
economic stimulus package; battered bis budget, 
mugged his crime bin and blocked his universal 
health care proposal — and that was with Demo- 
crats in control. 

Now the administration is facing the vnnejrv- 


Bertrand Aristide, mentally unbalanced and a 
“murderer.” 

Democrats hold a 56-to-44 edge in the Senate, 
a fragile majority that frequently has been un- 
able to withstand Republican filibusters, which 
take 60 votes to break. 

With polls showing widespread disenchant- 
ment with the Democratic-run Congress, giddy 
Republicans are savoring the possibility of trans- 
forming the Senate into an incubator and testing 


mg possibility of a Republican-controlled Senate ground for their conservative agenda of tax cuts, 
led _ by Bob Dole of Kansas, who has begun a b alanced -b udge t amendment, de regula tion 

and increased defense spending. 


laying the groundwork for a challenge to Mr. 
Clinton in 1996. 

Die White House also might confront a Senate 
Banking Committee headed by Alfonse M. D'A- 
maio of New York, the Republicans' Grand 
Inquisitor of the administration’s messy 
Whitewater affair. And a Foreign Relations 
Committee whose chairman would be the cur- 
mudgeonly Jesse Helms of North Carolina, the 
sharp critic of Mr. Clinton’s foreign policy who 
called the president of Haiti, the Reverend Jean- 


“I think we’ll be strong enough to insist that 
Clinton come to our agenda rather than letting 
him establish the terms of the bar gain, ” said 
William Kristol, once a top aide to former Vice 
President Dan Quayle ana now the head of a 
conservative think tank. Project for the Republi- 
can Future. The mam goal, be said, is for Repub- 
licans “to lay the predicate for the 1996 

campaign." 

With Republicans running ahead, even or 


dose in contests for 10 seats held by Democrats, 
the party is in the best shape to recapture control 
of the Senate since Democrats took over in 1986. 
A net shift of only seven seats would give the 
Republicans control of the Senate and its power- 
ful committee system. 

Such a development would mean an extraordi- 
nary transfer of power from Democrats to Re- 
publicans. 

For example, Sam Nunn of Georgia, chairman 
of the Armed Services Committee, would relin- 
quish control to Strom Thurmond of South Car- 
olina. The chairman of the Appropriations Com- 
mittee. Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia, would 
be supplanted by Mark O. Hatfield of Oregon. 
And the Judiciary Committee's chairman. Jo- 
seph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware, would be succeed- 
ed by Orrin G. Hatch of Utah. 

Daniel Patrick Moynihan of New York would 
step aside as chairman of the Finance Committee 
for Bob Packwood of Oregon. 

The House minority whip. Newt Gingrich of 
Georgia, and other Republicans in the lower 


chamber also arc vigorously pressing to gain 
control of the House for the first lime in 40 years, 
although analysis view that as a more difficult 
task. 

If the Senate under Democrats was difficult 
terrain for the president during the first two 
years of his term, it would be downright hostile 
to the remnants or his tattered legislative agenda 
under the Republicans. 

It would be virtually impossible for Mr. Clin- 
ton to pass any major legislation, including bills 
on health care, welfare, campaign finance, lobby- 
ing and the environment — unless the legislation 
were framed in conservative Republican terms. 

“They would haw the veto pen in the Con- 
gress that is normally reserved for the White 
House and the president.” said Senator John 
Breaux, Democrat of Louisiana. 

By the same token. Republicans would have 
great difficulty passing cneir legislative agenda 
because Democrats could use the favorite toot of 
the minority party in the Senate — the filibuster. 


Romney’s Appeal: 
He’s Not Kennedy 



(Cni|i‘nn('hunwlTij. 


I 

Nil !V:- - 

d !.■'«» 

Ikrtv 
I* * !» :* 

**%*?!••*»• 


• ■ \~r 

•v 

■v 


Nervy New Yorker: 
a Mayor Backs Cuomo 


fj** 






ilr • «r<k 


t • ■ 1 

t«S trcipir !« 

'ilH ' ■■■ ■ ■’ ■■ 

i Vn»i 

lil«~ ‘ 

HT 

'•••• 

!Y» ■!! •• •• 

5 Afcfcttr- 

5 

id * . 
sjl<* !• • 

‘ 

i&i- 
i h>'-' 1 


\iTunai - 1 
.... 7^ 

; r Kv- 

Irsnd?f- 


jutihwliKVb 


.J Ml- 


....I 


*Plaaw 


A »fu d 

4 l - • 

a ntti. , 


* .Nil" 1 M 
netl »-■ 

* 

“* > 

i-i r.. * y ■ 

HH**.»»* 
r*4t- 
if> by-' 

# »**•! t‘ r ■* 
ted 

fcf « 

ifeA' LC- 

*i*r- 


By Alison Mitchell 

New Yak Tima Service 

1 NEW YORK— In a dramat- 

ic break with the state's Repub- 
u Hcan Party, Mayor Rudolph W. 
Giuliani has endorsed Mario 
M. Cuomo, a national symbol 
" of the Democratic liberal tradi- 
tion, for a fourth term as New 
’ York’s governor. 

Standing alone at a lectern in 
Qty Hall, Mr. GiuHani, the 
; dt^s first Republican mayor in 
, a generation, said Monday that 
■ he remained committed to his 
r party’s ideals, but could not en- 

- dorse its candidate, George E. 

' PatafcL 

He dbaracterized Mr. Pataki 
as unsympathetic to the down- 

- state r^ion and a captive of 
others — a dear reference to 
Mr. Giuliani’s rival, New 
York’s Republican senator, Al- 
fonse M. D” Amato. 

*“Geqrge PataJri’s only essen- 
tial chaianexistic is that he of- 
fers am alternative,” said Mr. 
Giuliani, sweating and somber * 
as he read from a prepared text 
: “Strangely, however, after 
f » lengthy analysis, I’ve come to 
the ccmduaon that it is George 
Pataki who best personifies the 
status quo of New York politics 

- — a candidate taking as few 
‘ positions as possible, all of 
. them as general as possible, tak- 
ing no nsks and being guided 
and scripted by others. He has 

U fit * Hrf 1 " 11 L|V - simply not made the case that 
•• v he is the agent of change.” 

V Mr. Giuliani, who has ap- 
' peered at Mr. Cuomo’s side of- 
ten since becoming mayor in 
1 January, said that, even after 12 


n 


; „ i ■ 



years in office, the Democrat 
was a leader who offered the 
best opportunity for change. 

Having decided to cross par- 
ty lines, Mr. Giuliani leveled a 
merciless barrage against Mr. 

Pataki, saying that he was ‘mthriUmg,” 
spoutmg slogans ‘Trorna polm- Maralillg: 
cal consultant s playbook, and rTer 
that his positions would not 
hdp the city or the region. He 
also suggested that Mr. Pataki 
would ultimately have to renege 
on his sweeping proposals for 
tax cuts. 

Mr. Giuliani’s endorsement 
startled political strategists in 
both camps and left them 
scrambling to assess the en- 
dorsement's effect on the close 
and bitter race, and on Mr. Giu- 
liani’s political future. Republi- 
can officials insisted that Mr. 

Gi uliani ’s endorsement would 
have little bearing on the race. 

But ebullient Democrats said 
that the mayor could provide a 
surge of momentum at a critical 
time and that he could hdp Mr. 

Cuomo bold conservative Dem- 
ocrats in Queens, Brooklyn and 
Staten Island who had crossed 
jarty lines last year to back Mr. 


party Line 
GiuHani 


. -.X 


.'..'is*' 




jiji Oi “ 


A New York Times/ WCBS- 
TV News poll conducted be- 
tween Sept. 29 and Oct. 2 found 
that 1 1 percent of the 1,148 reg- 
istered voters polled said a Giu- 
liani endorsement of Mr. 
Cuomo would make them more 
likely to vote for him, while 9 
percent said they would be less 
likely to do so. The vast major- 
ity, 77 percent, said it would 
mak e no difference. 


By Sara Rimer 

New York Tuna Service 

BOSTON — In the hush of 
his library at 7:30 A.M., Min 
Romney was a formidable 
sight. His white shirt was im- 
maculate, his gray-and-black 
pinstriped trousers were sharp- 
ly creased, his black wing tips 
shined. 

The man who is giving Sena- 
tor Edward M Kennedy. Dem- 
ocrat of Massachusetts, the 
toughest race of bis 32-year po- 
litical career had already jogged 
three and a half miles. And be 

was whittling 

He had not had a drop of 
coffee. Mr. Romney, who like 
many fellow Mormons tries to 
avoid caff one, says be has nev- 
er had coffee or tea. His press 
secretary arrived with a con- 
tainer of hot chocolate for him. 

Mr. Romney was asked 
about a debate with the senator 
scheduled for Tuesday night. 
With the prevailing political 
wisdom putting Mr. Kennedy 
slightly ahead these days — a 
view supported by a recent poll 
in the Boston Herald — many 
people in Boston say the race 
could hinge on the debate, the 
first of two between the candi- 
dates this week. 

“Of course, Tm nervous," 
said Mr. Romney, a Republican 
who is in his first race for politi- 
cal office. And then he smiled. 
“It’s thrilling.” he said. “It’s ex- 
a new experi- 
ence. My goodness.’’ 

The phone rang, and Mr. 
Romney jumped up from the 
green leather sofa to answer it. 
“It’s probably the boss,” he 
said, referring to Ann Romney, 
the high school sweetheart who 
bas been his wife for 25 years 
and is the mother of their five 
sons, aged 13 to 24. 

In an election year in which 
challengers are presenting 
themselves on the bass of what 
they are not — not incumbents, 
not career politicians, not in 
thrall to Washington lobbyists 
— Mitt Romney may be draw- 
ing the starkest contrast of all: 
that he is not the 62-year-old 
senior senator from Massachu- 
setts with a liberal legacy and a 
scandal-sheet past. ( 

“Mitt Romney is the dream 
candidate to run against some- 
one like Ted Kennedy,” said 
Gerry Chervinsky, who heads 
KRC Communications Re- 
search, in Newton, and who has 
been conducting polls during 
the campaign for The Boston 
Globe and WBZ television. 

“He’s younger, he’s well-spo- 
ken, he’s good-looking, and he’s 
in good shape,” the researcher 
said. “He has a pretty blonde 
wife and five kids. He doesn’t 
smoke and be drinks milk. He’s 
the perfect anti-Kennedy.” 


N -■ 


...\y 






ry yu £ * 


:.nil 


y 




e****** 
•w****"*' 

5 **-*;■ 

* :w 

v»? 








* k-.V 


ft 1* 


On November 29th, 
the IHT will publish a Special Report on 

Telecommunications 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ Phone company privatization around the world. 

■ The global mobile phone standard. 

■ Overcrowding on the information superhighway. 

■ The competition to wire up the fast-growing 
nations in Asia. 

■ Alliances among media providers. 


The newspaper wM also be distributed at SITCOM in Paris on the same day. 

Paris 


INTERNATIONAL 



KIUBI aim rm an i«n> «■ '«r 


Or at least the perfect “anti- 
Ted Kennedy.” For in many 
ways. Mitt Romney has supple- 
mented the Eagle Scout image 
by borrowing from the Kenne- 
dy mystique of old, casting him- 
self as a young, high-minded, 
vigorous politician flanked by a 
photogenic family: the Kenne- 
dy image that the senator can 
no longer live up to. 

Yet, Mr. Romney has at least 
one thing in common with Ken- 
nedy: Both are rich men from 
political families. Mr. Romney 
is a son of George W. Romney, 
87, a former governor of Michi- 
gan who made a short-lived run 
for the Republican presidential 
nomination in 1968. 

The younger Romney, 47, is 
also a shrewd businessman who 
made millions in venture capi- 
talism. 

Mr. Romney has cast himself 
as a moderate Republican, so- 
cially liberal and fiscally con- 
servative. Politically, he says, be 
is a lot like W illiam F. Weld, the 
popular Republican governor 
of Massachusetts, who is ex- 
pected to win re-election easily 
on Nov. 8. 

Mr. Romney says he sup- 
ports a woman's right to abor- 
tion but opposes forcing states 
to help pay for the procedure, 
except in the case of rape, incest 
or a threat to the mother's 
health. 

.He supports federal legisla- 
tion that would prohibit dis- 
crimination in the workplace' 
aga ins t homosexuals but op- 
poses legalizing gay marriages. 
He favors the death penalty, 
which Massachusetts does not 
have, and would require welfare 
recipients to work and to be 
regularly tested for drugs. 

But with two weeks lot in the 
campaign, a frequent complaint 
about Mr. Romney continues to 
be heard: that after he is fin- 
ished attacking his opponent, 
his message grows vague. 

Mr. Romney, who easily won 
his party’s nomination in’a pri- 
mary election against a busi- 
nessman. is making his first for- 
ay into electoral politics, he 
said, because after all his suc- 
cesses and privileges, he wants 
to give something back 


HELL 


c o rui f to 



T he nightman of anarchy 
and bloodshed in th» 
African nation of Rwanda 
defies description. The hearts 
of everyone at the African 
WBdRfe Foundation go out to 
the people of Rwanda. 

Our hearts also go out io the 
mountain gorillas, popularized In the 
film “Gorillas in the Mist” who live in 
the Pare DesVolcans in Rwanda. 
Understandably, many of the park 
rangers who guard this endangered 
specie* fled during the righting Others 
bravely remained at their poet through 
most of the civil war, monitoring the 
gorillas' whereabouts and wen -being. 

It is imperative for the gorillas' 
safety that these wardens and 
rangers receive the food and basic 
equipment they need in order to 
return to the park and cat up regular 
patrols to protect the gorillas. 

That’s why the African Wildlife 
Foundation has established the 
Moantain Gorilla Emergency 
Fend. Our goal is to raise S8S,I>00 to 
re-equip Ihe rangers, and provide 
park personnel with food and equip- 
ment and money to Irve on for the 
next six months. 

Please send a donation to the 
Mountain Gorilla Emergency Fund c/o 
African Wildlife Foundation. 1717 
Massachusetts Avenue. N.W.. Suite 
602. Washington, D.C. 20036, or call 
(2021 265-6393 for more Information, 
Together, we can ensure the sur- 
vival of one of Earth’s true wildlife 
wonders — lha magnificent mountain 
gorillas of Rwanda! 




UUI 

■ or non 

DlJU'II.WWIyi ra— i 


ol „ 



M. tlior.ie Kcnim 


ON DISPLAY — Framer Prime Ministers Kim Campbell and Pierre Trudeau of Canada 
laughing at a doctored photograph of Mrs. Campbell (hat was shown at an Ottawa exhibit. 


Away 


From Politics 

• Three chemical compa- 
nies have tentatively agreed 
to reimburse consumers 
who have defective polybu- 
tylene pipes in their homes, 
a settlement that could cost 
the manufacturers a mini- 
mum of $750 million. The 
property damage settle- 
ment could affect six mil- 
lion U.S. homeowners. 

• The former owner of 
Chippendales, a chain of 
male stripper dubs, Somcn 
Banegee, committed sui- 
cide in his Los Angeles jail 
cell on the day he was to 
have been sentenced for ar- 
ranging the murder of a 
former partner. 

• The Mashan tucket Pe- 
quot tribe, whose Connecti- 
cut casino is the largest in 
America, donated $10 mil- 
lion to the planned Nation- 
al Museum of the Ameri- 
can Indian. It is the largest 
cash gift in the Smithsonian 
Institution’s history. 

• The Reverend Benjamin 

F. Chavis Jr., dismissed in 
August from his job as ex- 
ecutive director of the 
NaaCP, has agreed to 
withdraw his lawsuit 
against the organization for 
wrongful termination with- 
out receiving the substan- 
tial sum he had been seek- 
ing. HP. Return. NYT 


Room with a view. 



in selecting a business location 
emotions understandably should 
take a back seat. In that respect, 
the view from the new Frankfurt 
Airport Center -FAC 2 at Frankfurt 
Airport offers very little in the mat- 
ter of distractions. Even though, 
admittedly, no other office in the 
world does in fact offer quite the 
same perspective of the sky above 
one of the world's busiest airports. 


So let's look at it from a strictly 
rational point of view: Frankfurt 
Airport is no doubt at the cross- 
roads of Europe, and at the heart 
of the most impressive road, rail 
and air travel infrastructures 
by and large. The new Frankfurt . 
Airport Center - FAC 2 is the most 
modern facility of its kind. Be. 
it the architecture, the equipment 
or the technology, it all comes 


together here perfectly. So, if 
there’s an ideal business location 
in Europe for a business operating 
worldwide than this is it. it's really 
quite that simple. Interested? Then 
come by personally to take a look 
at your new office. And let yourself 
exceptionally be guided by fasci- 
nating prospects. 


Telephone: +49 69 690-66010, 
-70702 

Fax: +49 69 6 90-2 11 71 


Frankfurt Airport Center 
I Office and .Communication Center 


FAC 


Internationa 







Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 26, 1994 


BOOKS 


3 Guilty in Towns 


FAMILY 

By Ian Frasier. 347 pages. $23. 
Farrar Straus Giroux. 

Reviewed by 
Jonathan Yardley 

I AN FRAZIER, a frequent 
contributor of humorous 
pieces to The New Yorker and 
the author, previously, of a 
best-selling work of nonfiction 
called “Great Plains," is a writ- 
er of grace and charm who 
seems to have taken the heart of 
the heart of the United States as 
his principal subject. Though he 
has a facile gift for light satire 
on matters urban and/or liter- 
ary, his chief interest lies in the 
America “Out There” in the 
Midwest and West, an America 
that he apparently — and prop- 
erly — believes has more to tell 
us about real life than does the 
Manhattan in which he lives 
and works. 

“Great Plains” was an effort 
to explore that world on a large 
if not exactly grand scale. 
“Family” seeks to explore it in 
comparative miniature, by 
reaching back through the gen- 
erations to locate Frazier’s own 
family in the American land- 
scape, in American history and 
in the American psyche. It is an 
earnest and good-hearted book; 
it is also disorganized, ill-fo- 
cused and self-absorbed. It of- 
fers still further proof that few 
tasks in writing are more chal- 
lenging and difficult than that 
of telling one's own story in 
such a way as to make it perti- 
nent and interesting to others. 
One of Frazier’s problems — 


a problem, incidentally, that an 
editor should have identified 
and helped him solve — is that 
he thinks the stories of his an- 
cestors are as interesting to oth- 
ers as they are to him. This is a 
common misapprehension 
among those seeking to write 
family history with the hope 
that it will be read outside the 
family. The difficulty lies in lo- 
cating the fine if not invisible 
line between telling enough 
about one's ancestors and tell- 
ing too much. Obviously they 
need to be there, for a family 
without ancestors is no family 
at all; but if they are there to 
excess, the reader gets lost in a 
swarm of names. 

The family participated in 
virtually everything that hap- 
pened to the country itself. This 
included vast movements more 
clearly understood by later his- 
torians than by the participants 
— the move to the West, the 
move to the cities, the move to 
the suburbs — and great even ts, 
most notably the Civil War. It 
also included all the ever- 
changing minutiae of ordinary 
life, the details of which Frazier 
chronicles — or. more accurate- 
ly, lists — in exhaustive detail; 
some readers no doubt will find 
these passages charming, but in 
my view they take the easy way 
out, substituting compilations 
of the quaim for a deeper 
knowledge of the particular 
time and place. 

This is in keeping, though, 
with the overall mood of “Fam- 
ily,” which is nostalgic and ele- 
giac. Like many of us who re- 
gard America at the shank end 


of the mille nnium as a dimin- 
ished place, Frazier laments the 
passing of a time when the na- 
tion was more orderly, more 
rooted in religion and tradition. 
even though he readily ac- 
knowledges that these good 
people “often held secret dis- 
likes against blacks, Jews, peo- 
ple who were not intelligent, fat 
people, foreigners. Southerners, 


Catholics, Indians (both kinds) 
and Mexicans.” Perhaps it is a 
misstatement of Frazier’s pur- 
poses to say that a central 
theme of “Family” is that the 
country has gained much but 
lost more, but it is difficult to 
read the book otherwise. 

Jonathan Yardley is on the 
staff of the Washington Post. 


BEST SELLERS 


The New York Times 

This list is based on repairs from more than 
IfiOO bookstores throughout the United States. 
Weeks os fist are not necessarily eosreeunvii 


Tto lest Weeks 

w«k Wk m tin 

1 INSOMNIA. bvSrephcn King 1 

2 DEBT OF HONOR, by Tom 

Clancy — 2 8 

3 TALTOSL bv Anne Rice I 3 

4 THE CELESTTNE PROPHE- 
CY, bv James Rcdfidd 4 34 

5 NOTHING LASTS FOREV- 
ER, bv Shiney Sheldon 3 : 

6 POLITICALLY correct 

BEDTIME STORIES, by 
James Finn Gamer 6 18 

7 THE BODY FARM, by Patri- 
cia Corn®ell . — 5 6 

8 WILD HORSES, by Dick 

Frauds ... H 3 

9 THE BRIDGES OF MADI- 

SON COUNTY, by Robm 
Jame s Waiter 7 115 

10 THE GIFT, by Danielle Steel 9 13 

11 THE CHAMBER, by John 

Grisham , ,_, ] ’ 20 

12 MUTANT MESSAGE 

DOWN UNDER, by Mario 
Montaa — 13 t 

13 ONE TRUE THING, by 

Anna QuiDCflen 16 4 

14 BROTHERS AND SISTERS. 

by Betoe Moor CampbeD II 3 

15 A SON OF THE CIRCUS, bv 

John Irving '. 10 8 

NONFICTION 

1 BARBARA BUSH: A Mem- 


oir. bv Barbara Bush 
2 JAMES HERRIOTS CAT 


STORIES, bv James Herriot 2 4 

3 dont Stand too 

CLOSE TO A NAKED 
MAN. by Tim ADen 7 3 

4 THE HOT ZONE, by Richand 

Preston 10 2 

5 COUPLEHOOD. by Paul 

Reiser ....... 3 " 

6 DOLLY, bv Dolly Pawn .... 4 2 

7 BASEBALL by Geoffrey C. 

Ward and Ken Bums 3 3 

8 ALL'S FAIR, by Maty Maia- 

lm and James CarviHc with Pe- 
ter Kuoblcr 6 4 

9 THE BOOK OF VIRTUES. 

bv William J. Bennett 9 44 

10 MIDNIGHT IN THE GAR- 
DEN OF GOOD AND EVIL. 

bv John Bercndi — 8 33 

11 NO ORDINARY TIME, by 

Doris Kearns Goodwin 13 2 

12 MOTHERLESS DAUGH- 
TERS. bv Hope Edeiman — 12 13 

13 EMBRACED BY THE 

LIGHT, by Betty J. Eadie with 
Corns Tavkir - II 76 

14 THE LAST BUT TO ALBU- 
QUERQUE. by Lewis Griz- 

zard 3 

15 TRUE NORTH, by Jfll Kcr 

Conway 5 

ADVICE. HOW-TO 
AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 MEN ARE FROM MARS, 

WOMEN ARE FROM VE- 
NUS, by John Gray — I 74 

2 IN THE KITCHEN WTTH 

ROSIE, by Rosie Dalev 2 26 

3 MAGIC EYE m, N. E Thing 

Enterp ris es 3 4 

4 REAL MOMENTS, by Bar- 
bara De Angelis 4 2 


By Paul Taylor 

Washington Post Service 

JOHANNESBURG — 
Three young black men were 
convicted Tuesday of murder- 
ing Amy Biehl, an American 
exchange student, in a mob at- 
tack 14 months ago motivated 
by anti-white hatred 

Judge Gerald Friedman of 
the Supreme Court ruled that 
the three — Vusumzi Ntamo. 
23, Mongezi Manqina, 22. and 
Mzikhona Nofemela. 19 — 
“had the direct intention of kill- 
ing the deceased” when they 
stoned and stabbed her repeat- 
edly after she drove imo Gugu- 
letu, a black township outside 
of Cape Town, to drop off three 
black friends. 

The 26-year old Fulbright 
Scholar from Newport Beach, 
California, had been in South 
Africa to help with voter educa- 
tion and to research women's 
rights issues. 

The murder occurred in Au- 
gust 1993, as a tense, violence- 
prone and racially divided na- 
tion began preparing for its first 
election in which blacks were 
allowed to vote. 

The slaying drew worldwide 
attention because it cast light 
on the anti-white racism among 
a generation of militant black 
youths who came of age in a 
society notorious for having le- 
galized anti-black racism. 

Miss Biehl, an idealistic, hi gh 
achieving scholar-athlete who 
wore a “Free Mandela” sign on 
her mortarboard when she 
graduated from Stanford, was 
drawn to South Africa by a de- 
sire to help bury the racist sys- 
tem known as apartheid. 


Instead, she became the only 
American murder victim of the 
political violence that claimed 
20,000 lives in the decade pre- 
ceding the historic election in 
April. She was killed two days 
before she was to have complet- 
ed her 10-month stay in South 
.Africa and relumed to the 
States, where she planned to 
continue her studies and get 
married. 

There are no jury trials in 
South Africa. Judge Friedman, 
who is white, presided over the 
politically charged 11-month 
trial with the assistance of two 
assessors, one of them black. 

Technically, the three could 
receive the death penalty. But 
because South Africa's new, 
democratic government is ex- 
pected to outlaw capital pun- 
ishment. they are more likely to 
be given prison terms. 

The case against Miss Biehl's 


attackers almost collapsed, be- 
fore the trial began. On the 
opening day last November, the 
state was forced to drop charges 
against three of six original de- 
fendants when three eyewit- 
nesses indicated that they 
would not testify, citing a com- 
bination of political reasons 
and intimidation. 

The trial’s shaky start trou- 
bled the Biehl family, and early 
this year the deceased’s mother 
and sister traveled to Cape 
Town to observe the proceed- 
ings. 

Their appearance triggered 
another racial incident. As they 
entered and emerged from the 
courthouse during the first 
week they were here, they were 
showered with anti-white slo- 
gans and taunts from friends, 
relatives and political support- 
ers of the defendants, who were 
all members of the militant Pan 
Africanist Congress’s youth 


league. The following- wo*k 
however, the leadership of the 
Congress apologized to; the 
Biefals. ■••••-• * 

The defendants were found, 
guilty on the basis of tixarcea* 
fessions, the testimony of Mbs 
B iehl’s friends who were hub? 
car with her. and the testimony 
of three eyewitnesses who east 
forward late in the trial and 
gave evidence privately. 

The eyewitnesses were ahie to 
identify the attackers, wfrjjf 
Miss Kohl’s friends were not. 

According to the judge; the 
three all testified that they saw a 
mob of more than 10 young 
blacks stone Miss Biehl's car as 
she was stopped at an imcrscc- 
tion. She got out of the car aft® 
she was hit in the face by abriek . 
that smashed through thewind- 

shield. The youths attacked her, 

throwing stoiws at her and stab- 
bing her repeatedly. 


U.S. Weighs Naming Envoy to Zaire 


Star York Tima Service 

KINSHASA. Zaire — In a sign of support for 
a new prime minister's reform efforts in a coun- 
try led by one of Africa’s most corrupt and 
repressive governments, Deputy Secretary of 
State Strobe Talbott has made a brief visit here 
and said Washington was considering sending an 
ambassador to Zaire. 

Mr. Talbott, who is on a tour of several Afri- 
can countries, met with Prime Minister Kengo 
Wa Dondo. 

[Mr. Talbott met Tuesday in the ivory Coast 
with government officials and human rights ac- 
tivists to discuss preparations for the country's 


elections next year, Agence France-Presse nj-i 


In carefully worded c omm ents about the visit 
to Zaire, he said that U.S. backing for the new 
prime minister would be closely coordinated 
with his reform efforts and did not represent ah 
embrace of Zaire's long-reigning dictator, Mo- 
butu Sese Seko. 

Officials in Mr. Talbott's party said that Mr. 
Kengo could not succeed in office without a 
measure of support from Zaire's traditional for- 
eign partners: the United States, Belgium and 
France. 

“We axe c onsi d ering sending an amhamd^ 
which would be a modest step,” Mr. Talbott said. 



BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 


tuH of trxmtocHona *»■ 
matg Asm advtrtSmnmts 
which appear in our paper, 
it a 6 iiifuft reccmmend- 
td thjf raadan mob qp- 
praprtate inq uir i es baton 
sencSag any money er en- 
terin g into any bbtdbtg 


IMPORT/EXPORT 





• READY MADE COX FULL ADMN 

• TRADE DOCUMENTS AND L/C 

• B/U-434G & ACCOUNTING 
■ CHINA BUSB'ESS SERVICES 

Contact SMhi Ho for rrnmeriate 
serwoes & company brochme 
NACS LTD. RoomPW, Albion Pima, 
2-6 Grannie Rood, Tom 5ha Top, 
Kowloon, Hang Kona 
Tel 852-7241223 Foot 852-7224373 


AVAILABLE CAPITAL 

Mid Eos and CMant capital sources 
avdbUe for nvatmantt worldwide n 
rad estate, business Startups or debt 
cor n o M abL No front fees. Our fas 
era named bored tfnoty an perfor- 
mance. Long terms, best rates, train* 






HIM 




PARTNER 

WANTS) 

Interested m mcremng his business with 
USA. Write fedy Bos 5417, LH.T, B50 
Thed Ave. 8lh n, NY, NY 10022 U5A 




ATLAS (ntaraafiend TraEna foe | mmctl Long terns, best rate, 


fees pad and protected . 

Fax your proposal summary kt 
Far East l uwiium i t Group, toe. 

Ado: Ffoandd Department 
Free (507) 63-5035 (Panama). 


DELAWARE INC* LLCs 

Ded direct with Delaware agent, km 
money on USA company rormotan. 
Delaware Inc or UC, USD. Fart, 
ratable, compete service in al US 
StMS. Free nfa. CoS or ram 
CorpArocrjca, Inc. 

1050 5. SMe Street, Dept H 
Dover, DE 19901 
Tel: 302-736-5510 
Fate 302-736-5620 


INVEST IN VETNAM 

Creadon of the 1st Nautied Center 
Nfca Tresg, Exceptional see 
600,000 taxim/ year. Licences aid 
authornestians secured. Equipment 
ponded for 25JOOO dents /year, 

All awalic activities ■+■ pub/naoirant 
Professional manogemert. SEEKS, 
PARTNER with US320oixjo to 400,000 
CKe ption d rentobimy. GormxJ 
AGEMO Pans Fax P3-1) 42 66 99 62 


NORWAY 

Beautiful vocation land. Finn wanted 
to develop, build and set vacation 
homes. Very beautiful scenery. 
Contact; Mr. Bjam Seieba, 
N-4380 Haige i Datane. Norway. 


li I I I lii B 


AGENTS WANTED 
D-DAY SPECIAL LIMITS Cofecftxs 
edtion of FrancoAmencan postcards 
tndivtAciy numbered, both US & french 
commemorative postage stance a 1st 
<ky cover poamr Jo. Fox (33)32U 5450 


m#;?m 





Introductory Offer 

50 U.S. CENTS 
PER MINUTE 

AT&T Network 
Worldwide • Anytime 

Service Representative Unas 
open 24 lira, a day! 

Our Customers 
Continually Enjoy 
Discounts of 15% to 50% 
On AS Cafe 

US TEL 1-407-253-5454 Ext.126 
Ui. FAX: 1-407-2534130 

AGENTS WELCOME 

CORPORATE 

PLANS 

AVAILABLE 


TELECOM. 




CONSULTANTS 


MEXICAN FOOD 

Ameriam Combat 5 yts experience in 
Europe w8 heto you to greater p r o fi ts 
trough Mexican food 
Restaurant Start-up/change over 
Food shops 
Catering 


Urae special events 
Cooking, bar monag 


FOR S ALE 

Offshore lax ssmp finance conpmy. 


INTERNATIONAL 
FRANCHSNG INFORMATION 
if you ore mterated in obtaining 
information on U3. Franchise compare" 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


TOP LEADERS 

FRANCE + EC Countries 

TO PAimOPATE IN THE MOST 
IhWOVATlVE AND EXCITING 
EUROPEAN MUlTUEVa vrnnjRE 
Fax Motivation & Records to- 
Bernard Pend. TOP MVEAU 
1352) 36 64 41 (luambowg) 



‘TS™ 1 **.** G J. Coates. Touche that are expanding mtematmtily, 
Ross I.O-Mi Fax; 44624A72334 UJC Franchise UPDATE has |ust what you 
Pnnapds Only reed 

Two special pubkaftons then wtil supply 
you with both detailed information on 
EJpQndtg US. faxichoc Tfi a rg mid 
expert oracles on .. >j o. , in ton ed fnmehire 
trends and events. To receive your 
copes of 

The World Franchise aid Badness 
Report ond The Executive's Guide to 
IWfoe 'Oycrfa mfra via Afnnctil 
send a cheat or money order for 
525X0 (U3.| to. 

Fraidure UPDATE 
P.0 Bax 20547 
5on Jose, CA 9515D-0547 USA 
or order by VISA or MosterOxd by 
foxing your order with account (umber, 
expratian date & approval agnatwe ta 
40*4974377 U5A 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


International Detective Agency 
Experts & greoafisn in corporate 
mooal probng, bdnoppmg/iuqooo- 
han, hfotviedi video surveftmee. 
'AraTcmfe - Anytime - Anywhere" 
CAP. & ASSOCIATES. INC USA 
(309 262-9000 Fax (305) 377-1664 


RELIABLE EUROPEAN CONNECTION 
M PARE, fm^xfity & A taie to y 
research - Coniads - A aia ance - Buones 
Agreamn NegaSmon and Fo/knr op - 
Highly Bip thenad ft afasfa md Staff. 
CbnfirfcnsinSty Guaranteed - Engfah, 
French, German, baton, Spuinti Russian. 

REASONABLE FH5. 

EJtC Tel: 1+33) 1-45 56 05 22 
Fax: (+33) 1-47 06 44 01 


ling, bar man a ge m ent 
3 Amigo's Consulting 
Coll Gemtony 149)6172-79270 
Fax 49B17278521 




CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


INVESTMENT CAPITAL 


Abo avaSable 


MI;'|,r.V’"; 


If year bank evidences a loan, we wi 
cofaerafire their ban with a Major 
World Bank guarantee namra the bank 
for tiw authentication first 
AB offer? herein am subject to artftxt 

FORWARD PROJECT OUlUhE 
NOW 10 

INVESTMENT SUISSE SA 

Batahofshnsre 86, 

Zurich BOOT Swtoerimd. 


INTERNATIONAL 1EASING 
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE 

FOR FINANCING 
of purchase of heavy equpmatf. 
or crafts, merchant and pleasure 
sbp& industrial real estate. 

Broker s commiB i on gumcrieed 

Far ary in fo rmation 
Messieurs m~LP.KJL aidCe. 
FINANCIAL INSTITUTION 
Brasseb - B&JGfUM 
Fa*. 32-2-53* 02 77 & 32-2-538 47 91 
TELEX 20277 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 

FOR 

Alt BUSINESS PROJECTS 
OR FOR 

LET7SS OF CREDIT 
BANK GUARANTEES 
OTHER ACCEPTABLE COLLATERAL 

Broker s contnu»i guaanfeed 

Messieurs MJ.PJCB. 6 Ge 
FINANCIAL WSTTTUTTON 
Brussels - BELGIUM 
Information by fox 32-2-534 <Q 77 
or 32-2-538 47 91 
THEX: 20277 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 

FOR 

AU Busies PROJECTS 
OR FOR 

LETTERS OF CREDO 1 
BANK GUARANTY 
OIHBi ACCHTABLE COUATQE4L 

Brokers conmvsscri guaramred 

Messieurs NLLP.ICB. A Ge 

financial ncrnunoN 

Brussels -mGIUM 
Info n ixeiuii by fax 32-2-534 02 77 
or 32-2-538 47 9T 
THEX: 20277 


* Miramum USS 250j000 

* No Maxvnum 

• Term loans 

■ Eqwty Fmtxice 

• Broun Protected 

ANGLO AMERICAN GROUP PIC 

Fax +44 924 201377 


CONFSMABU DRAFTS 
BACKS) BY CASH 

■ Issued m Yaw None 

• Ccnfinned by Mger k*l Banks 
to Prove AvcfaNMy of Funds 

• Backed by Private Investors 

^CAPITAL SUPPORT CORP. 

U-S. (71 4J 757-1070 Fax 757-1270 


MONEY FOR RBir 
1 year letter of deposit avoiUile in 
your none. Minaum 5100,000 - no 
fans. Borrowing made easier through 
services of ofwrere bank. No qucAfira- 
tons or guaroitees needed. Fee is 1-2%. 
Fax requeements for quota to USA: 

305-86B4468 


" IMMEDIATE A UNUMITED ** 
Capitd availaUe for 
ALL bus ness protects! 

MIN U.5. 52 ml/ no max. 

(7171 397-7490 [US. FAX) 




Bancor of Asia 

Comnmaon earned only upon Funfog. 
Broker's Comm sa on Assured. 

Fax (63-21 810-92S4 
Tel: (63-2) 110-2570 or 812-3429 


INTERNATIONAL RMDMG 

D & B fated Gompany. 

30 Years m Busmms. 

FINANCING , 

• Venture Capital 

• Bbsnms loans 

• New Project firemong 

• Commorcta Red Estate 
• No Adraice Fee 

G.CC FUNDOIG GROW 
1H. 407-394-3901 USA 
FAX 407-394-4568 


FINANCING AVABABLE 


AUCOMMaOAL PROJECTS 

Noras 




Td 2127024821 Fro 212-867-5127 


gESEBPSPg 




GOLD & CURRENCIES 


BUYMG GOLD: 

nan refined, in powder, 

tt - - x Jr 

UlgRKtnD, lltyiVIJt BH.. . 

Al quontafees, moke often 
by fax (322) 534 11 52 
Bdgom lefee 20277 


Sf/ PURCHASE A SALE 

„ JT/ of ajrrendm. InfonnAon 

I CB/ by fox (32?) 334 16 88 
<7 Bsigiwx. Telmc 20277 


SERVICED OFFICES 


• FORM AND RUN A COMPANY e 
• M5WI2BILAND9 4 
efaefet# legd - lax fiientSy 1 
prestigais address ta Zag 
kdarmctoanFau +4] 36 32625 




leg 

■ :r 



Wr-.v'im 





COMMERCIAL & INVESTMENT PROPERTIES 



SALES 


RENTALS 


SWISS 

OFTKE LOCATION 
RoUdmz/Zos 

EURO 1 - Office rmd oomraanoal 
mace to red in modem, attroctivo 

cot id income/ LTwajoia nKXorwuy 

and Pufcfe Gaff. 

Ojtiions m indhndual offices with «Sf- 
forent fneffities {such as conference 
roam mUives. Iatchmi«e, etc) or up 
to complete Roan of 1,500 K^n. eadt. 




mb 

1*4 fit* J. 


I 


Tab -Ml 42 645255 
Fax Ml 42 645755 


's acs 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


Countries for Sale: 

TTA TalkBack is Seeking Qualified Partners to Partiopate 
in The Exploding Multi-Billion Dollar Telecom Industry. 

TTA TalkBack provides a turnkey program including credit card 
processing, billing, 24 tirs. 7 day a wk. multi-lingual Customer 
Service, proven ads, referrals & leads, regulatory counsel, 
advanced technical support, and unparalleled profit margins 
of 30% to 50% for our Partners with virtually no risk. 

As a TTA TalkBack Partner you can provide int'l. lelephone 
rates to end-users saving them 20% to 70% when compared to 
local telecoms, calling cards, and hotels. 

Exclusive territories begin at $25,000 U.S.D. Call or FAX 
Mr. Donald Long to discover your 
significant return on investment £ rnRi\p. 7 fafXrp7 

U.S. Tel. 407 -253-5454 

U.S. Fax 407-253-6130 SOONwhUS*! - IW»ume.H.EffliUSA 


Tax-Free US. 



IncmtiMM-fite Sevidi oar spccaky Serna in 
iD 50 Sure! GuimiH of comp for amnvntitjr 
Wc offer US. address with phone & In service, 
oflke services. U S hank account*, U5 arums 
w snr as dirtaoa cwnpfoe legal services 8 
assurance, including OTC marker entry 6 
Immrereton Hease regrxsi our free broebinc. 
arjBaWe In English 1 rformin. 

Dr. Jur. William A. Wright 
Anorney a it Law 
l T S. Corporation Senrlees. Irtc. 
MMTDjlmnral Drive. Suite “ID, 
Sacramento. California 95S21 

= Fax (USA) 916/783-3005 


INCORPORATE IN 
TAX-FRIENDLY 
DELAWARE USA 

for as CQQ plus stale 
little as filing fees 


Easy ordering by fax or phone 

FAX; 302-421-5753 
TEL; 302-421-5752 


American 

mCOBPOHATORS LTD 


OFFSHORE CENTRE 
ST. KITTS & NEVIS 

International Business Companies 
Asset Protection Trusts 
Tax Free Domicile 
Giewirh Hamilton & Associates 
Lnimir 

Miriam House. 5 Lotac Road 
? 0 Bo« 450, Basselerre, St Kitts 
Wes I indies 

Fax.: 1-B09-465-I147 




iNSURANCEfflEWSURANCE 
COMPARES OFFSHORE BANKS 
ASSET/INCOME PROTECTION 
62 years established - provtang 
prcrtossional services rtematcnaDy 
for a4 types of bu&ness. 


wmmm 


IB Peel Road. Oouofos. 
Isfo 0« Man. IMT 4LS 
ToL 0624 626591 
Fa* 0624 625126 
O' London Tgl (71)2228866 
Fax (71)233 1519. 


2nd CITIZENSHIPS 
2nd TRAVEL DOCUMENTS 


> Immediate delivery • Confidential 
Tax free countries • Visa free travel 
' The best programs, legally guaranteed 

Maritime International Carp. 

P.0. Bax 2294 43C Reddlffe Street 
St. Johtfs Antigua West Indies 
Fax; (80?) 442-2718 or (BO?) 461-2024 


OFFSHORE BANKS 

• Mer d i w rt/oommatdd bank 
I - Accept depos i ts 

• Oaree Aficenoe 

- No quaSSeaticn raquiraments 

• No knew or Irootio* 

• Total anonymity 

- fo am rihateiOJC. 

• Nommoo efiradors O.K. 

- Immscfide defivery 

• US$15,000 or $25^00 with a 
Innt company 

Caff or fax for free details! 
Ron Jensen 

London Tel 71 3S4 5157 Fu 71 231 9928 
Canada Tel. 804 942 8169 Fax 942 3179 


Tired of Negative Responses? 
Or people who take the protect 
package and do nothing with it? 

FUNDS NOW AVAILABLE 

lor capable applicants, seriously 
ready to move, with sound projects 
In U.S A, Canada, Europe. 
South America, and Australasia 
Prompt and Professional 
Intermediaries Protected 
Jnlerfinanc'e Limited 
Contact Office - Europe 



Off-Shore Company 
Incorporation 

m a zero taxation (utetidfon tvtinmd wtti a 
Lrtque M>fleferen(»s4 ; te(^ 
ctnancy European Bank Acoourt. You are 
guarertwd 100% anonymfiy, wcur*y. 
ccrftfenBaitv .& absrtie contrct. 




Tel: (UK) 44 709 828408 / 830138 
Fax: (UK) 44 709 830703 





* HOW TO LEGALLY * 
OBTAIN DUAL NATIONALITY 

llfcritf wcw m dual uinwfiiv onhmw 100 
creflUncs tum'ncd kfmc a P.T. < PRirVtiAiS 
TAX PAYFRi Al tnH* jnnd liir. p<cnmiein5 
Hd tonic LliKflrri tbe intidcr fsci: ahnai ui 
hnnR Alhnu lnhanmc 3 lepi TAX FXII J. 

Fnriwr FRKfc IIRi M'lUIRKnnd PRI- 
VArY KEWS l.fTTHI ihai »BI help 
neke end win «w arih W. 
,Vnpc Im'l UiUlVu-LW. 
ll-vr.- • (TK'lvuti' 

R.iwIjiO-Vjlk- Hate' PiHHT.-1'k 

Tri ‘ 44 T*l' MI75I • • 44 i.MI” 


SCULPTURE WORLD™ 

Discover A Gold Mine In 
New Acrylic Sculpture Art 

You Transform 
Posters Into Art 
That Sells from 
SI 00 -32,000+ 

Great Profit 6 
Return Potential 

No Direct Sales 


At i EQwpmenUFult Control 

Investment Sl5’S25,000u£o ( . 

716-691-1750 

FAX: 716-691-1766 



OFFSHORE 

COMPANIES 

BY LAWYERS 

IMMIGRATION 

& TRUST EXPERTS 


OFFSHORE TRUSTS. COMPANIES. 
BANK INTRODUCTIONS. NOMINEES 
& ADMINISTRATION BY UK LAWYERS 
Burnt Konuunoe ms txo. mmnsnmm 


■ IRISH m RES £16540 

■ ISLE OF MAH £13540 
m DELAWARE uc £495.30 



LONDON OFFICE 

SCORPIO HOUSE. 102S v Of:EV3rReET 
CHELSEA. LONDON SW3 CNJ. 

: . tt 44-71 352 2274 

-S 44-71 8739688 


ALL BUSINESSES 

Large, Mediem, Small 
Increase Productivity, Sales, 
Cash Flow.~Reduce Costs. 
'Trader Status' on e uniqw. 


I.integreup.ttxiv 




OFFSHORE WORLDWIDE 
Ready made companies (shells) 

• full management 

• address services 

Ftorhechm 

INTERCOMPANY MANACEMEAfT 
P.O. Bos 160. 949 J Lbm 

>,W Licfhtautcin 

Tn 41-75-373 4062 

lLi day ivn 


u. j 1 A ' jj j uaj w .iui 1 u” ryt 


PROJECT FUNDING 
NOW H VATT.BRT.F 
Far principals only with imnovable 
aswia/eqmiy. Prtjcd badatg a row 
avaihbfo workhnde. 

Mjaunnm ten million USS. na manmnrn 
No upborn fees, send 2/3 page propel 
summary lor nulial consderabon to 
(ax number (44)454 2021(6. 


Acromrooaa>ion Adaran Facilities 
Moil Forwarding 8 Handling 
Full Secretarial Services 
Dedicated Phone Line* Available 
Advertising 8 Artwork Design 
Offshore Companies Formed 
Bonking Introductions 
Computerised Database Formation 
Foe Receipt & TreniiHiulM 
Legal A Professional Services 
* THE FULLEST RANGE OF 

BUSINESS SERVICES 
fe [&iadDm> often ^ q Lonrfgn offico 
witfi a unfouefy PROFESSIONAL service at 
affordable pncec Ail, and vie do mem All^ 
harnesses welcome. 

RJanUtebz* 

Hie INSTANT PmlltaUe ReadrMade Business 
Opoortunjlr. Fiancfiuer lor meaty CITIES diH 
AVAILABLE, Oik lor a FREE brochure. 

Hots WmjJlfciw 

SEVENVfAYS 3C ■ ILFORD IG2 AXM 
ENGLAND 

TWr | Ml) SSl-;j?7 . Fa^(0S|J SS1-M90 
iCenml Lee! IMmurartd 


sappfler of waff-known brands of photo- 
films aid photo-paper (Fuji, Agfa, Kodak) 
18 lookfog far strong buyers fnbotacelerx. 
discount-stom) In Japan. 

Please contact 

B.C.I. 

Fax: 31-72-613366 In the Netherlands 


SERVICED OFFICES 


NEW YORK CITY 

Etoflontty Appointed Offeree 
tor the demanding Executive ... 
h the heart of Manhattan 

Alliance 


B ■ ■ I n en Cmicri 

ProtexdonaSySfaflaKi. Fumtahad 

& Equipped ORcei A SidlBt 

230 Park Avenue 

Premier USAadCbes 
(2121972-5700 fax: (212) BOS- 3030 


FRANCHISE 

OPPORTUNITIES 


LONG 
DISTANCE 
SAVINGS 

4- Save 261-a to 50 c ’-'o cm 
International Long Distance 

<r Pay U.S. Rates 

♦ No Changes to your current 
system 

<5* No long term contracts or 
monthly commitments 

* Distributors needed 


RAPID LINK USA. INC . 
1000 Circle 25 £50 
Atlanta. GA 30339 
Tel.: 40-1-952-5465 
Fax: 404-980-1122 



MASTER FRANCHISE 
OPPORTUNITY 

Join dte wriTt largest wsdNoober One 
nttd co mmercia l claming fismcUter. 

• tSjataqfezptriaaL 

1 JteiruMg in C_S. and on-j&j. 

’ Ma"*an4A00mititfnuickuKa 

trarhhride. 


pnfrems aepandlrUd (m rtv miertrj. 

FOBlNFOnuriOH Contact 

MR. CHUCK CBSO N: 
TbrecpMiW-OTO fee (234)991-378 
4580 KdSer Spire* Itoxf 
IUb.'Bm 75248 USA. 


Save on 
International 
Phone Calls! 


Save over 50‘V» on phone 
calls compared to local 
phone companies. 
Call for rates - 
Lines open 24 hours . 

Tel 1-206-284-8600 
Fax 1-206-282-6666 


Aw W . Vaik-. « A «l lu .USA 




























































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1994 


o 


l 




HJiai m v 


Wt. hr 
* ««r. 









f**'- 


wne or *up 


* “vnii.i 





-••'1 


vVvw.''*'? 

k*K-*y 






amumV£$TV£KTPftf 


{*■& 


jjw/ r-’-" •• . " • : -' ; 

i . ’• '->. i ■?: *r ' 

- >.• . • , - . . • 

iferA : -V-'V-. ' -••• ’ 


a-.-T-T.- -.=•■ • ■ • 


“V-j: 


.i v v-" • : : 


’*■ — . - ‘"f 

.... «. .. \ y.f- ’■'ii \ -i'v- - 


(C/sing WorldPlus SM Communication Service.) 




85*54 « 




/ /' 



* 




: fJ v- <• ' -ty&g 7 .. y 


5.^ 


Iiw « 

pho"l 






Down under, thejfre just starring, work for the day. The perfect rime ro speak to 
riie Sydnejr office. Except for one thing. Where you are it’s night-time and your 
evebmg with foiends ;is. in foil swings Once again you have to pur your life on 

holdi just 50 . a business assodare gets the message. 

' Not any more* WorldPlus Communication Service from AT&T has been 
dei gne d to help you do business ihtemarionally on your own terras. As a 
calling . service,' it allows you to make calls from almost any phone in 46 
countries. No "plastic required and no hotel surcharges to pay. In fact, you'll 
find, qur rates' are very competitive. 

WoiidHus Is a sen/fca mark of AT&T thPOUflhbiit the world 


- But as a business service, it offers for more. For example, with oiir 
Message Forwarding facility you .can take rime zones in your stride. 
Ybu simply record your message at a rime that suits you, and' its sent at 
a rime that .suits die person you want to speak to. 

So with WorldPlus Service your rime is. your own, whoever you have 
to talk to. 

For more information, FREEPHONE 0800 83 84 85 in the UK, a 
or call (0-40) 65 66 41 44 in Germany; from other countries, call 1 I 
44 71 925 8416 reversing the charges, or fax 44 71 925 8360. — 


Making communications work for you 


Wor 

















Page 6 


ENTERINATIONAL HERALD TRIBUINE. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26. 1994 


■vH 4 


Israel Hints at Harsh Treatment for Hamas Suspects 


By Barton Gellman 

K'ashingion Pvti Semu- 

JERUSALEM — The Israeli govern- 
ment is leaking details of a wide-ranging 
manhunt for Islamic militants in the 
occupied territories, suggesting that the 
■dozens arrested thus far are in for espe- 
cially rough treatment by security and 
intelligence services. 

The operation was described in war- 
like rhetoric bv cabinet members as an 
attempt to destroy the foundations of 
Hamas, which claimed responsibility for 
■three traumatic terror attacks inside Is- 
rael this month. 

Hamas, the Islamic Resistance Move- 
ment. vowed in a leaflet to “retaliate 
severely," and security services braced 
for attempts to disrupt the signing of a 
peace treaty with Jordan on Wednesday 
and President Bill Clinton's scheduled 
visit to Jerusalem on Thursday. 

Government spokesmen denied re- 
ports by a British newspaper and The 
Associated Press that there were “'kill on 


sight" orders for a list of key Hamas 
leaders. But a senior official said the 
security services presumed that those 
targeted for arrest would resist authori- 
ties. 

The official added, “U there’s a com- 
bat situation of course we’il do our ut- 
most to kill them." 

Although the cabinet rejected a sug- 
gestion from Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin that the civil rights of suspected 
terrorists be sharply reduced, govern- 
ment ministers in recent days have em- 
phasized their latitude under existing 
law. A 1987 guideline permitting “mod- 
crate physical and psychological pres- 
sure" during interrogations — but not 
“torture” — has an exception For “lick- 
ing bomb" emergencies. 

“This is an emergency, and in an 
emergency you have to take extraordi- 
nary measures," the senior official said. 

Mr. Rabin and his government ap- 
pear eager to show the Israeli public that 
they are responding with an iron fist 
against an enemy who killed 23 people 


with a Tel Aviv suicide bomb, shot a 
captive soldier as commandos tried to 
rescue him and killed two more people 
in a spray of automatic weapons in a 
Jerusalem' pedestrian mall. 

It has become a common view among 
Israeli commentators and political fig- 
ures that Mr. Rabin's coalition, with its 
brittle mandate for peace with Palestin- 
ians and Syria, would not long survive a 
continued pattern of catastrophic at- 
tacks. 

Mr. Rabin allowed the military censor 
to permit local news reports of the Ha- 
mas arrests. He also told a Labor faction 
in Parliament that those in custody in- 
cluded the brother and cousin of the 
suspected Tel Aviv suicide bomber and 
two religious leaders associated with ihe 
militants. Sheikh Abdel Rahman Ha- 
mad Daoud and Sheikh Anwar Muraa- 
beh. 

But Mr. Rabin's crackdown is at least 
as conspicuous for what it does not 
include. 


Mr. Rabin thus far has not invoked 
other measures that his opposition has 
demanded: slowing peace negotiations 
with the Palestinian self-rule authority, 
sending security forces after Hamas 
leaders in the autonomous areas of Gaza 
and trying to deport militant Palestin- 
ians, as he did to Lebanon in 1992. 

Even as Israel hunted Hamas, the 
Palestinian authority continued to re- 
lease Hamas activists and supporters 
detained earlier in Gaza. Of about 300 
arrested by Palestinian police during the 
captivity of the Israeli soldier. Corporal 
Nachshon Waxman. Palestinian offi- 
cials reported that about 30 remained in 
the Gaza Central Jail. About another 50. 
Hamas spokesmen asserted, continued 
to be held in other Palestinian police 
stations. 

Colonel Ahmed Metre}, a Palestinian 
intelligence commander in Gaza, said 
that all the Hamas prisoners would be 
released soon because it had not been 
proved that any of them was involved In 
attacks on Israel. 


Continued from Page 1 

L'.S. role in the peace process, the White 
House has assembled a who's who of fig- 
ures in the American Jewish and Arab 
communities accompanying Lhe entou- 
rage. ai their own expense. Washington 
has arranged for meetings of the group 
with senior Egyptian and Israeli officials, 
sealing at the signing ceremony and places 
at Mr. Clinton’s address to the Israeli Par- 
liament. 

The president noted the “new wave of 
violence and terrorism" in the region by 
extremist groups opposed to the move- 
ment toward comprehensive peace, such as 


; Clinton Calls On All Parties in Mideast to Follow the Brave 9 Vatican Sets Link 

i Page 3 Hamas. The heightened security surround- Mr. Clinton's goals is to “deliver a firm With PLO to Help 

irocess, the White ing the presidential entourage here bore message to the international community a 

who’s who of fig- testament to that that the time has come to “thwart and lre&€6 i*TOCGS$ 


Hamas. The heightened security surround- 
ing the presidential entourage here bore 
testament to that 

The rush-hour bus suicide bombing in 
Tel Aviv last week, which killed 23, and the 
killin g of a kidnapped army corporal in a 
shoot-out with Israeli commandos the 
week before made it all the more impor- 
tant. officials said, for the president to 
move forward with this trip. 

The State Department spokesman, Mike 
McCurry. said Lhe United Stales believed 
“we are at a moment when the enemies of 
peace have risen up because of the success 
of the peace process." He said that one of 


Mr. Clinton's goals is to “deliver a firm 
message to the international community’' 
that the time has come to “thwart and 
throttle" those enemies. 

A senior official said Prime Minister 
Yitzhak Rabin of Israel had told U.S. 
officials that the PLO leader was “at a key 
moment." that is, he must decide whether 
to go fully forward with peace with Israel 
and a full split with Hamas. 

U.S. officials said they expected that 
Mr. Arafat would also raise his concern 
that the agreements between Jordan and 
Israel did not disrupt the negotiations on 
the final issues. 


I Jordan-Israel Peace Agreement Is Strangling Palestinians 


Continued from Page 1 

Jerusalem office. “They will not need even 
'a cup of water from us." 

The AJIenby Bridge, just down the road 
from Jericho’s central square, remains a 
hostile and forbidding passage. Only re- 
cently did Israel slop strip-searching every 
Palestinian who crossed it, and it can still 
take a day or more to pass the gauntlet of 
inspectors, fee-collectors and license lak- 
ers. 

Still worse, there are fewer and fewer 
reasons to bother. For six months now. 
according to truckers and merchants here, 
Jordan has issued no import certificates 
for fruit and vegetables from the West 
Bank. 


Kuwait to Buy British Missiles 

The Associated Pros 

KUWAIT — Kuwait will buy an esti- 
mated 575 million worth of Starburst low- 
level air defense missiles from Britain to 
help rebuild defenses destroyed during the 
Iraqi occupation. Defense Secretary Mal- 
colm Rifkuid of Britain said Tuesdav. 


Here in Jericho, the impact is crushing. 
For lack of anything better to do. Ziad 
Darwish slept one afternoon this week on 
the hard stone floor of his empty tire repair 
shop. A skilled mechanic, be used to work 
on the Allenby Bridge reassembling cargo 
trucks that Israeli soldiers ordered 
stripped to their frames in security checks. 

But even that humiliating employment 
has disappeared. So few trucks now cross 
the bridge that there are not many me- 
chanics needed there. 

Nabil Dnmeri 39, used to carry loads of 
grapes from Hebron in his aging Mercedes 
truck. Now Jordan accepts only building 
stone, and not much of it. 

Resting near the Allenby inspection 
post, Mr. Dumeri said he once drove the 
route to Amman two or three Limes a week. 
“Now, in the last 20 days, I had only one 
trip,” he said. 

Mr. Abdallah, the Palestinian econo- 
mist, said King Hussein of Jordan began 
squeezing the West Bank to demonstrate 
his displeasure with Yasser Arafat, the 
PLO chief and a long-time rival who came 
to a modest share of power under limited 


self-rule in July. Israel, for its part, is 
openly favoring Jordan in an effort to 
increase its bargaining strength with Mr. 
Arafat and his Palestinian Authority. 

“The fact that Israel has reached an 
agreement with Jordan will strengthen the 
Israeli position vis-a-vis the Palestinians 
by reducing the leverage the Palestinians 
used to have, namely, that progress with 
the Palestinians would help deliver other 
Arab states," said Ghassam katib. a for- 
mer member of the Palestinian negotiating 
team. 

King Hussein, in an interview published 
Tuesday with Israel’s mass-circulation dai- 
ly Yediol AharanoL put the two govern- 
ments' shared view as succinctly as this: 
“Arafat is our problem, and yours.” he 
said. The Yediot reporter noted that his 
majesty wore a “sour expression." 

Mr. Abdallah and other Palestinian 
leaders said Israel was playing “a danger- 
ous game" by taking sides. 

“If we have economic problems here it 
will affect the Israelis also by worsening 
their security," he said. “Who" is the gain- 
er? It’s Hamas and the Islamic move- 


The Only Reason 
to Leave Your Desk 





Imagine a machine that does it all - 
faxing, copying and printing. Imagine the 
Ricoh MV715. Despite its modest dimen- 
sions this machine combines the most 
important telecommunication and office 
automation functions, all 
— ^ in one single unit 
•C \ In fact, with the Ricoh 

MV715 almost the only 
reason to leave your desk is 
for a well-deserved cup of 
jg-'r*”’ • V- coffee after a job well done. 


RICOH MV715: 

Fax, Copier and Printer 
all in one 





DIGITAL 

S0LUTI0HS 


Rte*Ca..Utf., 

15-5. MJnaml-Aoyaro 1-drams, 

Minato-Ku. Tokyo 107, Japan, 

Td: -rtl 43479*31 1 1 , fts +81 -3-3403*1 578 


mcoh Basham MicWsw LM.. 

23/1, CNra Overseas Bidding, 

139 Hanessy Road. Wanchd. Hong Kong, 
Tet +852-682-2888. FK +852-866-1120 


Ricoh Empt B.V., 

Groemhan 3, P.0. Box 114. 

1180 AC AmstetaM. 7hfl Nfltabmts, 

Tat +31*20*5474111, Fax: +31*205474154 


The Aiymuitii /'-cs 

VATICAN CITY — The 
Vatican established official ties 
Tuesday with Lhe Palestine Lib- 
eration Organization, saying its 
action was intended to protect 
church interests in the Middie 
East and to keep its hand in the 
peace process. 

The move falls short of full 
diplomatic relations. The Vati- 
can signaled its desire for such 
an accord after recognizing Is- 
rael nearly 10 months ago. 

The agreement calls for an 
office of representation of the 
PLO at the Holy See. The papal 
envoy in i unisia. headquarters 
of the PLO. will be responsible 
for contacts with the organiza- 
tion. 

A Vatican statement said the 
agreement would enable the 
Roman Catholic Church to cur- 
ry out its "spiritual, educational 
and social service in favor of 
Palestinian Catholics and of all 
Palestinians" and help the two 
sides contribute to the “search 
for peace and justice." 

The announcement came a 
day before Israel and Jordan 
sign a peace treaty. The Vatican 
also established relations with 
Jordan this vear. 


New Consortium 

‘\ Continued from Page I 

! two possible routes for expan- 
i sion. One is interactive televi- 
sion and simiiar futuristic turns 
along the information super- 
highway — whose constantly 
receding technological promise 
has begun to earn" it the indus- 
try nickname of ihe "super- 
bypeway." The other is to enter 
the heavily defended territory 
of the local phone companies." 

The first skirmish is coming. 
The reason the consortium v. 
announced now is that Fnd-> i.> 
the deadline for telephone con- 
sortia to announce themselves 
and register for the Dec. 5 auc- 
tion by the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission of licenses 
to operate the next generation 
of pocket phones, known as 
personal communications sys- 
tems. AT&T acquired McCaw 
Cellular Communications and 
will bid for markets where it 
does not have franchises, and 
four regional Bell companies 
will also be bidding against the 
new Sprint consortium. 

An almost frantic search for 
partners has been the outstand- 
ing feature of the telecommuni- 
cations industry both here and 
abroad for the past year, and 
some deals announced with 
great fanfare have later been 
abandoned when government 
regulations changed or partners 
got a closer look at each other's 
books. 

This one offers more breadth 
than many of the previous ones. 
Mr. Malone said that ihe cash 
flow from the telephone service 
would help finance the invest- 
ment that many heavily indebt- 
ed cable systems need to up- 
grade their systems and join Lhe 
national network. 


Ste.C-*' 





■h K* 

I low ' 1 

I’ll 1 1*1 


fpo ^ : J 




'Jr*'*, 








■l._ J-.'-v 


. S' > 


^jssw ; «y 











DiiiiJ 5* IitMi.w JT . 


The truqi flu** going up Tuesday next to that of the United States, in error, at the site »rf 
the israel- Jordan treaty signing. Officials later replaced Iraq’s flag *ith the British flag. 

IRAQ: Broken and Beaten, Nation Slides into Poverty 

Continued from Page 1 a development in a country where 

people are noted for their pnde. 

idea tha; the government is. indeed, solidly “The Gulf War has fundamentally changed i 
entrenched. the social structure.” said an artist. “Ihe middle » 

"You don’t make heroes — you comer them.’’ class is wiped out. Being a doctor or an engineer ' 
jays Abdelrazal: Hashemi. who heads the foreign means nothing anymore since you can’t feed 
relations, bureau of the governing Arab Ba’ath your family anymore.” 

Socialist Party of Mr. Saddam. Asked if this posed a threat to Mr. Saddam's 

Recalling the brief popular uprising that was rule, the artist responded: “Not necessarilv. be- 
put down by the Iraqi Army in March cause people are terrified of what thev see. If the 
J 99 1 ui ter j is defeat and expulsion f rom Kuwai t. regime falls, you can imagine the duo* that u ;I ! 
Mr. riasherru said: "That was a time when 14 of result with the poor attacking the less poor, 
the country s IS provinces were outside govern- Nearly everybody here has arms, and Lhe court (r\ 
men ’ centre., bu t the regime did not fall. Do you is slipping into chaos,” 

think, it ingoing to fall now because of these Much of this collapse was caused by a devas- 
tations?" rated economy. Five years ago. before the sanc- 

Mr. Hashenu. who served as a cabinet minis- tions, an Iraqi dinar was worth a little more than 
ter, ambassador to France, and in several other $3. Today, $1 fetches anywhere from 500 to 600 
top positions in the last two decades, then added dinars. But salaries have not increased. An Iraqi 
for emphasis: "Listen. The president is manag- engineer, doctor or government employee makes 
i r .£ the country, i hose who think the sanctions at most 3,000 to 5,000 dinars a month, or Sb to 
will bring him down will have to wait for a long SI0. Retirees live on as little as $3 a month, 
time.” The only salvation is a rationing system thjt 

Managi ng. however, may not be the right word guarantees a minim u m of essential food every 
*.e describe Mr. Saddam's hold. In some ways, month to every Iraqi. : 

•rzq is a showcase of mismanagement. At his office, the minister of trade snowee 

While the government finnlv controls central 1 Iraqis are entitled to since the ramming 
. is* str.f.i Muslims and Christian Iraqis w^h^ v edonSept.2v. An hat,.*-::. ... .> 

live, Kir. Saddens hold over the north, inhabited ^ pouads (6 Kilograms) of '-hvai 

bv Kurds, and die south, heavily populated bv ^^viw* ,0Ua ? ° v^okmg 

Shiite Muslims, is questionable. ' ' oU \ a “If-pound of detergents, and some tux. tea 

_ n and soap. 

ago. a busload of journalists and The World Food Organization - and other 
ot.iuals oi die .raq. Information Ministry ac- agencies concerned with nutrition said that these 
comparing them were stopped on the way to quantities barely met one-third of a p S 
the southern city cf Basra m the day tune by a Nutritional requuements. ^ ‘ 

group Oi armed pandits. . “I know too many families, middle-class fimt- 

They were beaten. Men were stnpped of their ihes, that were considered by any standard v c rv d 
clothes. Women were roughs up. The bandits comfortable only four years ago who are re-“ 
took thousands of dollars in cash, photographic duced to eating one meaf a day.” said Monsianor 
equipment and jewelry. Passpom and identity Emanuel Delli. a patriarch of the Chaldean or 
cards were confiscated. The bandits, who num- Nestorian Church, to which most of Iran's esti- 
cereo a cozen or so. shot up the bus tires and left mated 1 million Christians belon* 1 
l S e ^ ler briefly debatin S whether they- Asked whom they blame for theTr pi iehl Mon- 
should aJi. the passengers. signor Delli responded without hesitaiion: 

Some passengers wondered later whether the "Most of them consider that their kid* are bein*' 
incident could have involved a conspiracy be- starved by the Americans who control the Umt- 
tween the bandits and array troops in the region, Nations." 

who. like other Iraqis, are in dire need of money. Rather than directly addressing the crisis fdc- 
“The road was conspicuously deserted, as ^ ^ r ‘ Saddam appears at times discon- 

though someone had blocked it after we passed,” uected from reality. . -■ 

a passenger said. last month, he promised his downtrodden 

The most striking change in Jaw and order is in umwree” to them^inmfeH^ C ^ ^ 
Bagndad and in Lhe center cf the coun try, where rarimSS’ a r f r ter , f !a * shin S ,hc 

the government appears uncompromising in its ihaAv onlt-rincA;!?? 
political pobciag. amvilliag or unable 10 

protect people from ordinary crime. of^he l b P rda " : 

Thefts, burglaries and rapes are rqwned to postponing any possible Iiftine ohhT 
have increased by 40 to 50 percenujveXe years ^ RomisS lo “X fcS 
ago. The police force appears unable to cope. As quiet the people, give them' bread ^ ? l ** 

a raulL homes are now locked with chains at said the I^mteUectwl who^^Sb^ h,Wlf 
night wner. the streets are deserted in large cities, as a forraerSipporter of lheSw35£?L 
mciudmg Jus capital. they are giving them circusesb^3?h ev S 

Elsewnere. public employees are easily onbed. give bread anymore." wf-ause mev tan l 



Japan Insists Europe Help Pay for North Korean Facilities 


Bt 111)1 
*M» D 
1 W 4 

tL+ijif,, 

’ i * 1 l I'lj, 


Continued from Rage ! 

ing to oiganize financing for a 
$4 billion nuclear plant. The 
Associated Press reported from 
Washington. 

[Ambassador-at-Large Rob- 
ert L. Gallucd said Tuesday 
that the letter assured Mr. Kim 
that the United States would 
seek to put together the consor- 
tium to finance the reactor, as 
I long as North Korea abided by 
its new agreemenL] 

DEATH NOTICE 

The hiiniK and Frivnd- ‘.*f 
URS REEDER 
will* "aurirtv .innuumv in** i.k-ittl: im 
Tui-sj.Liy '>-1'4 k.T 2 nIi. I'i'+i. 

.\ Ki.f|iiifm M.iv, will !v ii'.-Ki 
Flid.lV LM-Jvr iAIl Ji 
( 1 l-ju am ai Si. J.inu.**, uilmlu- 1. huivh. 
11 flair)?.* Sian. 1 1 'Hi tin Vi I. 

Nn timer*: pli-.u**. flm>:ili> >rt*- ii • ihi* 
impvrcil CntV'.T Hw.in li l*i nn.l 


Japanese Foreign Ministry 
officials sought to soften Mr. 
Takemura's stand, saying that 
he was merely expressing his 
expectation that other major in- 
dustrial countries would also 
play a roie in ihe deal. 

Several officials also insisted 
that neither the level of Japan's 
contribution nor the method or 
financing had been determined. 

But another official conced- 
ed, “Ultimately, it is a political 
decision, and it’s not clear yet 
what is politically acceptable to 
the Japanese people.” 

The critical element in lhe 
new pact will be construction of 
a type of modern nuclear reac- 
tor thai produces substantial 
amounts of power but little 
weapons-grade plutonium, the 
key element in nuclear bomb 
production. North Korea cur- 
rently has one small reactor; 
and two larger ones under con- 
struction. that generate signifi- 


cant amounts of this highly 
dangerous and toxic material. 
Those facilities would be dis- 
mantled under the pact. 

The United Slates conduded 
the deal only after coming up 
with a very general understand- 
ing with Japan and South Ko- 
rea on their role in underwriting 
construction of the new com- 
mercial reactors, known as 
light-water reactors. Now some 
of the potential problems may 
be surfacing. 

One little discussed problem 
that some government officials 
have mentioned here in recent 
days is that the cost is likely to 
come to well over the 54 billion 
that such reactors would cost to 
build In an industrialized coun- 
try. Some experts have estimat- 
ed that the cost <muld come to 
as much as 510 billion. 

. One major reason for the 
higher price tag is the primitive 
nature of North Korea's econo- 


my and its crumhlinif, uiii-j- 

smicture. Hundreds of uriHious 
of dollars of ro.id.v and r;til lines 
may have to be constructed or 
upgraded just to begin plant 
construction. 

B UN Agency Split ou Part 

The International Atomic 
Energy Agency wckonted tm 
Tuesday a nuclear deal between 
North Korea and the United 
States, but some members re- 
gretted that full nuclear inspec- 
tions would be pul off fi* Uf> Ul 
five years, news agencies re- 
ported i rom Vienna. 

The director-general of { hc 
LN agency, Hans Bl»\. :hj- 
dressed the 121-menibcr body 
m a dosed briefing.' “O n «t pr 
two European countries and j 
couple of AMun cou nines were 
hesitant about the time dclav,” 

Hi? official ^‘d. “But ibe 
North Koreans arc committed 
at a future stage to alluw-us it» 
do everything we want," 




Hr 



ESTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1994 


Page 7 





i-: 

NIL.. 



a i Hil\ •> 
lliJI ill f . 


*»!«•/! \ 

jtnii'if. • 

*■ m; 
fa- * • 1 


»*«• 

*** i - 
ifaU - 

s **-.•.• . 

sWt 

*1 ‘ »■ 

tfU- .• 


1 • J’ -I 

fa*** 


French Executives 
Play Down Impact 
/Hf Corruption Cases 


By Joseph Fitchett 

huemanonal Herald Tribute 

PARIS — As corrupt Jon 
scandals rise around them, 
French businessmen accused of 
paying bribes appear less panic- 
stricken than the politicians 
who are alleged to have taken 
bribes and who now are claim, 
xng that France is going down, 
the lubes Italian-style. 

Business in France has been 
hit hard. Foreign investors are 
putting French deals on hold 
because of doubts about who 
will be in charge tomorrow. 

But while visibly shaken, in- 
dustrialists still contend that 
France's crisis about unethical 
business-government relations 
is comparable, not to Italy, but 
to the United States 30 years 
ago during the Nixon adminis- 
tration when illegal political 
payments came under tough 
scrutiny and tighter regulations 
were put into effect. 

That probably underrates the 
disruptive potential of the reve- 
lations about collusion in 
France between business and 
politics. The scandal is reaching 
higher and wider than any pre- 
vious episode in postwar 
French history. But the busi- 
ness community insists on the 
point that corruption in France 
is a relatively recent affliction, 
still confined mainly to compa- 
nies dealing in big public con- 
tracts. 

“Italy had a state that was 
totally corrupt, so everything 
was corrupt, but corruption 
only became a problem here in 
the ’80s, and we are seeing a 
brutal reminder that France 


Bosnians 
Reject UN 
Demands 


The Associated Press 

SARAJEVO, Bosoia-Hexze- 
. $ govina — Defiant Bosnian sol- 
- ' diers refused Tuesday to obey 
UN demands that they leave a 
demilitarized zone, and they de- 
clined to take blame for a 45- 
minute gun battle with French 
peacekeepers in the zone. 

The shoot-out Monday, fol- 
lowed by Bosnian demands for 
the dismissal of the peacekeep- 


still has gendarmes.” said an 
international executive in a ma- 
jor French corporation. 

What is liable io be exposed 
in France, other executives said, 
mainly implicates companies 
doing government business, not 
the bulk of France’s companies, 
which compete to sell mass- 
market products and services. 
None of the curren t uproar con- 
cerns bribes and kickbacks for 
exports. 

The political payoffs have 
come mainly from French com- 
panies seeking contracts and 
subsidies decided by cabinet 
ministers and their key aides, 
who took money either to fi- 
nance their political parties or, 
in some cases, for their pockets. 
< A second pattern of corrup- 
tion invojves local govern- 
ments, which now control fat 
budgets due to administrative 
decentralization. France's two 
leading water companies, both 
privately held, are suspected of 
systematic payoffs to local po- 
litical leaders for lucrative con- 
tracts at the cost of higher water 
prices for consumers. 

Even as industrialists insist 
privately on the limits of cor- 
ruption, they are reticent about 
their own defense because busi- 
ness is so often seen in France 
as a system for bosses to exploiL 
workers a sulfur oas »m ag<» 
liable to revive. 

There have been few expres- 
sions of sympathy as the police 
have summarily hauled in lead- 
ing French corporate heads for 
interrogation and threatened 
then with bong locked up un- 
less they cooperate. 



‘Post -Fascist’ Leader 
In Italy Is Soaring 


Rntv.il Pialt J. Rnurf- 


Pierre Gascon, first secretary of the dty of Grenoble, France, going through security on his arrival in court Tuesday for 
a hearing on corruption charges against the Grenoble mayor and former communications minister, Alain Carignon. 


The threat is credible since, 
in France, chief executive offi- 
cers arc responsible for every 
action of their companies, and 
there are no provisions for ha- 
beas corpus to challenge deten- 
tion. 

“We used to worry in France 
about whether there' was justice 
for the poor; now we wonder if 
there is justice for the rich,” 
said a defense lawyer. 

In this climate, several chief 
executives, including Jean-Lou- 
is Beffa, head of St Gobain. 


reportedly have started helping 
the investigating magistrates 
compile dossiers full of bribery 
leads that will keep French 
courts busy during the current 
presidential campaign and per- 
haps for months afterwards. 

While they woijy about what 
they see as magistrates' high- 
handed methods in wide ning 
their nets, many French busi- 
nessmen privately welcome the 
prospect of a cleanup in 
France's campaign financing 
that will relieve companies from 
pressure to make payoffs. 


Some businessmen betray 
quiet satisfaction at seeing poli- 
ticians brought to book: In 
1990, the French Parliament 
voted an amnesty for any mem- 
ber who had received illegal 
payments but left the bribers 
open to prosecution. 

The amnesty, unpopular at 
the lime, was a belated, unsuc- 
cessful attempt to cut short the 
investigations that are bearing 
fruit now. The process started 
in the 1980s when the Socialists, 
arriving in power after 25 years 
in opposition, acted to end gov- 


ernment controls that had kept 
the judiciary on a short lease. 

Ironically, magistrates pro- 
ceeded to lay bare the Socialist 
government's corruption in a 
series of scandals that contrib- 
uted to a center-right electoral 
sweep in 1993. 

The new government, appar- 
ently overconfident about its 
own fiscal ethics, was surprised 
in turn when the corporate pay- 
masters of the left disclosed 
that they had also given money 
to certain conservative politi- 
cians. 


Major Says He Was Target of a Blackmail Attempt 


By Fred Barbash 

Washington Peat Service 

LONDON — Prime Minister 
John Major told a stunned Par- 
liament on Tuesday that he was 
the target of a political black- 
mail scheme a month ago engi- 
neered by the owner of Harrods 
department store. 

He said that Mohamed al 
Fayed, the chairman of Har- 
rods Ltd., had attempted 
through an intermediary to ob- 
tain an appointment to' discuss 
getting the government to with- 


draw or revise a report critical 
of his company. 

During the conversation, Mr. 
Major said, the intermediary 
told him that Mr. Fayed was “in 
possession or allegations of 
wrongdoing within Mr. Majors 
Conservative Party and “was 
contemplating passing them on 
to others." 

Mr. Major, who did not name 
the intermediary, said he de- 
clined to “enter into" further 
communications. Asked during 
Parliament’s question time 
Tuesday whether he considered 


it a “blackmail attempt" worthy 
of criminal prosecution. Mr. 
Major responded that he had 
referred the matter to prosecu- 
tors for investigation. 

In a statement to BBC televi- 
sion. Mr. Fayed denied that he 
bad sent anyone seeking favors 
from the prime minister. He did 
not return phone calls seeking 
elaboration. 

Mr. Fayed caused a storm 
last week with assertions that 
from 1985 to 1987 he paid thou- 
sands of pounds through a lob- 
byist in exchange for favors 


from two Conservative mem- 
bers of Parliament, later offi- 
cials m Mr. Major's govern- 
ment 

During that period, Mr. 
Fayed was seeking assistance in 
a bitter and ultimately success- 
ful battle to take over Harrods 
from The House of Fraser. The 
two members of Parliament he 
said, raised the issue on his be- 
half repeatedly during the par- 
liamentary question period. 

One of them, Tim Smith, ad- 
mitted wrongdoing and re- 
signed his position last week as 


a junior minis ter. Another min- 
ister. NeO Hamilton, denied the 
allegations and said he would 
remain in office. 

On Tuesday, however, Mr. 
Major said additional allega- 
tions involving Mr. Hamilton 
had since come to his attention 
and that he had now accepted 
Mr. Hamilton's resignation as 
well. Mr. Hamilton had been in 
charge of corporate ethics in the 
Department of Trade and In- 
dustry. Mr. Major declined to 
specify the nature of the new 
allegations. 


By William Drozdiak 

KeiAingjon Post Service 

ROME — He looks like a 
quintessential Italian yuppie in 
his well-tailored suits’ and de- 
signer glasses. And in stark con- 
trast io the stiff -armed salutes 
of his political forebears, he 
projects an image of cool mod- 
eration instead of ruthless au- 
thoritarianism. 

To the dismay of allies and 
enemies alike,’ the political 
stock of Gianfranco Fini, the 
42-year-old leader of the “post- 
fascisi" National Alliance, is 
rising faster than anybody 
could have imagined just a few 
months ago. According to some 
opinion surveys, the heir to 
Mussolini’s legacy has even sur- 
passed Silvio Berlusconi, the ty- 
coon- turned-prime minister, as 
the politician with the highest 
approval rating in Italy. 

Mr. Fini's telegenic appeal 
and political shrewdness have 
helped his party emerge from 
ostracism to respectability. He 
has brushed aside frequent con- 
troversies, such as his praise for 
Mussolini’s statesmanship, and 
now plans more frequent trips 
abroad, including to the United 
States, in a bid to reassure for- 
eign audiences that fascism is 
truly extinct. 

“I think there are two reasons 
that may account for my popu- 
larity," Mr. Fini said in an in- 
terview. “Nobody in my party 
has been arrested on corruption 
charges, so we are seen as com- 
pletely honest. And I think 
young people tike me because I 
am the first major politician to 
represent their generation." 

while Mr. Berlusconi has 
been distracted by frustrating 
battles with Italy's prosecuting 
magistrates, the leftist opposi- 
tion and his oLber coalition 
partner, Umberto Bossi of the 
federalist Northern League, 
Mr. Fini has been quietly trans- 
forming his rightist pony into a 
broad conservative movement. 

Indeed. Mr. Fini appears to 
be positioning himself to pick 
up the pieces if Mr. Berlusconi, 
plagued by conflict of interest 
questions over his $7 billion 
Fininvest business empire, 
should feel compelled to stop 
running the government and re- 
turn to the private sector. 

A poll published Monday in- 
dicates that support for Mr. 
Berlusconi's free- market Forza 
Italia party has slipped to 23 
percent, while Mr. Fim's Na- 
tional Alliance has jumped 
nearly five percentage points to 


17 percent since entering the 
government with five cabinet 
posts in May. 

Mr. Fini recognizes that his 
biggest problem may be con- 
vincing skeptics that be and bis 
party have truly severed their 
fascist connections. 

To that end, Mr. Fini an- 
nounced Sunday that the Ital- 
ian Social Movement, founded 
in 1946 by officials from Mus- 
solini's rump fascist republic of 
Salo. will be formally dissolved 
in January. 

Mr. Fini said: “I want to 
build a modern rightist move- 
ment, one that can be compared 
with the Gaullist party led by 
Jacques Chirac in France. We 
need to face the problems of 
today, not worry about the post. 
Right now the priority is to re- 
form the sLate by creating a new 
constitution and a system of di- 
rect elections so the' people can 
choose a strong president, who 
in turn will select a prime minis- 
ter and the government." 

Despite his soothing words, 
Mr. Fini has failed to persuade 
many skeptics that he and his 
party have undergone a com- 
plete democratic conversion. 

In Parliament last week, two 
of Mr. Fini’s deputies gave an 
embarrassing demonstration 
that they had not yet dispensed 
with thuggish habits of the past. 
After a Green party member, 
Mauro Paissan, charged that 
the ruling rightist alliance was 
guilty or “corrupting public in- 
formation" they charged the 
podium in a violent burst of 
mayhem and provoked a brawl 
that shut down the chamber. 

Critics charge that Mr. Fini 
was an avowed fascist until two 
years ago, when he decided to 
alter his message in order to 
attract votes from the center. 
While he says he wants to see a 
thriving private economy, di- 
rect elections and fairer immi- 
gration laws, his true commit- 
ment to democracy remains 
untested. 

Most of all, Mr. Fini has dis- 
played a penchant for dema- 
gogy whenever it seems politi- 
cally expedient. In an effort to 
strip voters from Mr. Bossi’s 
party in the north. Mr. Fini 
went to Trieste last week and 
gave a rabble-rousing speech in 
which he demanded that Slove- 
nians “kneel down before the 
Italian people" and make 
amends to those who were 
forced to leave their homes in 
the former Yugoslavia after the 
past world war. 


ire! f * 


i ’ 

t 1 

4 ! ‘ 

torr •• 

i u.*" 

J-Ja,' .r- 


■ d l?K 

J*e r*- -j 
s* I *-»».•• 


ing force’s commander, brought 
relations between the Muslun- 
led government and the United 
Nations force to perhaps their 
lowest level ever. 

The commander for UN 
troops in Bosnia, Lieutenant 
General Sr Michael Rose, said 
he obtained assurances Tues- 
day from President Alija Izet- 
begovic that an estimated 500 
Bosnian soldiers would with- 
draw from the demilitarized 
zone on Mount Igman, just 
southwest of Sarajevo. 

But Mr. Izetbegovic’s vice 
president, Ejup Game, later 
said sane of the soldiers would 
remain until the peacekeepers 
provided security for a key sup- 
ply route over the mountain to 
Sarajevo that has come under 
frequent fire from Bosnian 
Sabs. 

is? Mr. Ganic said the Bosnian 
soldiers would withdraw from a 
part of Igman when the UN 
peacekeeping force secures the 
road. 

“Igman is our only way in 
and out," Mr. Ganic said in 
Zagreb, Croatia, “We must 
keep it." 


Ex-Minister Quits German Party Post 


DUSSELDORF —The chief 
rival to Foreign Minister Klaus 
Kinkel for leadership of Ger- 
many’s Free Democrats has re- 
signed his party post. 

Jfrrgen Mfillemann, a former 
economics minister, quit as 
head of the party’s North 
Rhine- Westphalia branch late 
Monday as a result of his con- 
stant attacks on Mr. Kinkel’s 
leadership. 

The party is the junior part- 
ner of Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl’s center-right coalition, 
which narrowly hung onto pow- 
er in last week’s federal elec- 
tion. 

Mr. Mbllemann refused to 
concede total defeat. 

“I don’t want to say anything 
today about my future inten- 
tions,” be told reporters. 

He added, “What happened 
went very deep.’’ 

Party leaders said the resig- 
nation would bring peace 
among the Free Democrats as 


the party begins hammering out 
a new government pact with 
Mr. Kohl. 

In the federal balloting, the 
Free Democrats’ share of the 
vote slid to 6.9 percent from 1 1 
percent in 1990. 

Mr. Mdllemann blamed Mr. 
Kinkel for the outcome and de- 
manded a leading role for him- 
self. 

He agreed with voters who 


said the party had watered 
down its free-market and civil 
rights ideals beyond recogni- 
tion and needed a clear new 
liberal profile. 

Mr. MOUemann resigned as 
economics minister last year af- 
ter admitting that he had writ- 
ten to supermarket chains on 
official paper recommending a 
product that was manufactured 
by a relative. 


HALLOWE’EN PARTIES 


- JAMES JOYCE PUB - 

Presents HALLOWE'EN fancy dree party. Wear you 
notional cosrune. prize for best costume 
•' om each country represented, grand 
raffle; Hoflday week-end In iretancL 
MONDAY OCTOBER 31st 1994 
71 bd Gauvton St Cyr. CM" REP Porte MaiBot) 
TeL: 44 09 70 32 - Fax; 42 56 49 54 


* 


~.y&itty O’Shea’s 

“'THE IRISH PUB 

-t<9n Presents HALLOWE'EN wHd west fancy dress party, five 
- country music, spot prizes for Pest dressed cowboys and 

Indians, grand raffle; Holiday week-end in Ireland. 

SUNDAY OCTOBER 30 1994 

10, rue das Capuclnes PARIS (M° Opera) Tel.: 40. 15.00.30 


W/'* 


i fee ’ 

i 


Art?: * 

* 

!** 

m « t**' 


'•*v 

■ ■ ^ HRs 


;|6 »»■ • • 

'■ 

0 fe***' 

m*#*' 


Building Peace 

AND DeVEWPMENT 

[1994 

■ Boutros Boutros-Ghali, 
ft Secretary-General 
H of the United Nations 

jlpP The Secretary-General, in this 
*' annual report on the work of the 
Organization, focuses on the centrality 
of development in the efforts to build 
peace. The report emphasizes that 
development has long been a major 
component of United Nations work. 
But in an era which has witnessed 
genocide, ethnic cleansing and other 
crimes against humanity, the Secretary- 
General asserts that the Organization 
is paying increasing attention to 
economic and social development, 
which is the foundation for peace. 

Building Peace and Development 
1994 provides the reader with a 
comprehensive overview of the 
activities of the Organization, including 
peace-keeping operations, over the 
past year As such, it is an invaluable 
reference for any person interested in 
the United Nations or the global issues 
in which it is so deeply involved. 

ISBN 92-1-1005414 US$10,00 299pp. 


CARR'S iwsh 

3 RESTAURANT BAR 

Hdkwe'en Pony oi CARR'S (3 1 Oct.) 

In pub. ndCMont or cefcr be*. 
T/odVora menu 195 F {win* fndudedp. 
Fancy cbea obtqataryjpice fcf besd 
I, R. Afcrf ThabOf. Bos. 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


AMSTERDAM 

BRASSERIE DE ROODE LEEUW 


Domra* 03-9J Ansar Sam 
ORIGINAL DUTCH CUISINE 
RaconimavMbyMIOeUN 
lunch/Kwer. Open. 12 nooo-10 p.m 
Td- P0| 5550666 08 mopi c-c. oc cc ptgj 

NEUUY-5t/R-5BNE ~ 


JARRASSE 


LTCAH1ER 
DE PARIS 


Mow M0F Wvotburgwloi 14 Vr&nafag. 
dosed Sunday nwmnq. &. me.de Maid. 

Ttt: HI 4634 (0. 5& fac |1) 40.88 35 60. 

PARIS 2nd 

AUX LYONNAIS 

Tiottand bfeso cooling in artherte 1900 
decor. ExcqUenl wmas & mineral — OlCfi. 
32, we 54 Merc. Tel- [1)4? 9ft 65 04. 

PARIS 3rd 

LTMPR1MERIE 

ThpmaMgFkxecffeAmcnfaFigltSxLnfe 
heart of fa Maw Modem and raMoncf Fwidi 
aisnt 101, njeViefacW triple. T 42 77 $ 3 80 

PARtSAtb 

NED KBITS AUSTRALIAN BAR 

B uBe ip weJ mm br sole, oww hengod, 
fl,n»d8sE>x<fa.t | nrtW5o<ntPi3ij 

PARIS Mi 

YUGARAJ 

U nfed u fa fail Indian lasnrani in Franca 
fa fa feodma tudm {oh condrtioned. 14, 
me Dwsfaw i . 43.26.44.9! 


THOUMIEUX 

5pecia5hOT of the SouiKWmI Conhi do 
.coresd & aasajJ® au eonfif de conoid. Air 
cooAiitned Open everyday '«i J rndnighl 
79 me Si aoriiniqua Ta ( 1 ) 47.05 49 56. 
Nwy IfwaLdg fairwid. 

PAWS 8ffi 

LE TEXAN TEX-MEX 
CUStNE 

But terms in Paris. COOgr Thorn dec*, 
sfczSng Vsfwjj. bawi muyuma. 
3.me5cin«fhifrt)c duEwleTd-J2J5.Q9.Ba 

PAMS 15 th 

l£ TOfT DE PARIS 

0e*» JfaVei every Sat* day nigh 
SErtng a 8 p m. with nxeonomc 
ipeaoKei and mne al If lOff 
DEPAMScefalMifeor 

bowing a supabdevafa 
CdyardfaEAdToumi 
FF 295 rtid tinner & Janata 
ftrt 18, ov- Sifter Td ■ 4253.92.00 

PAMSldfli 

DANIEL'S PIANO BAR 

Unity Heavy houre f»l to fa Fixe 
delBMe.fiwn4 30p.ni d 1000pm 
5, rue tCAsffentne ■ Id 40.6790.12. 

PARTS TTWs 

CHEZ FRED 

One cl fa elded teWB ol Pwis. 

Fiendi todAend cooling 1901ns bd 
P4Mta.Btaevmi5re.TeJ. 0145 74.2048 


KERVAN5ARAY 

TutUih 8 Mil sponalhos Ww«w bar, best 
seafood iniowoni, Itf floor. MoHwitr 0. 
Tef 5126043 Air conditioned 00m 

Opera Noon3pjn 6 6 pm. lam. map 

Sunday. Cy<en hobdeys. 


For more than a century and a half* Patek Philippe has been known as 
the finest watch in the world. The reason is very simple. It is made 
differently. It is made using skills and techniques that others have lost 
or forgotten. It is made with attention to detail very 7 few people would 
notice. It is made, we have to admit, with a total disregard for time. If 

a particular Patek Philippe 

movement requires four 
years of continuous work to 
bring to absolute perfection, 
we will take four years. The 
result will be a w atch that 
is unlike any other. A w atch 
that conveys quality from 
first glance and first touch. 

A watch with a distinction: 
generation after generation 
it has been worn, loved and 
collected by those who are 
very difficult to please: 
those who will only accept 
the best. For the day that 
you take deliver} - of your 
Patek Philippe, you will have 
acquired the best. Your watch 
will be a masterpiece, quietly 
reflecting your own values. 

A w atch that was made to 
be treasured. 



PATEK PHILIPPE 

GENEVE 


Piiirk l*liiii|>i it* S. V. 

-f I. nu* tin Kln’me - 1 1 Gnirva .'5 - Swiixn'liiiiti 




P*ge8 


licralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sri b unc 


Pubtuhed Whh The NVw Yni-k Timw and The Washington Po*l 


Back to the Bosnia Plan 


The latest Balkan word Is dismal but 
clarifying. Previously the Europeans, in- 
cluding Russia, with peacekeepers on 
the ground had said they would not 
support lifting' the arms embargo on 
Bosnia’s Muslim-led government: too 
incendiary, too dangerous to their own 
forces. Now President Bill Clinton has 
made clear that the United Slates will 
not do it on its own. 

Mr. Clinton will ask at Lbe United 
Nations, he said, as he had promised 
Congress. But when the United Nations 
says “no,” as it surely wifi, he will come 
back and tell Congress that a unilateral 
lift is a mistake and a bad precedent. 
Congress could overrule him only if it 
were ready, which it is not. to have the 
United States take over Bosnia. 

Let there be no false regrets that the 
United States is missing a last chance to 
help the under-armed Muslims to even 
the odds against Serbian aggressors. 
There may be a moral debt, but the 
political logic is lacking. 

On their own. the Muslims have al- 
ready determined that slipping the em- 
bargo now would merely embolden the 
well-armed Bosnian Serbs to hit them 
hard before they could materially repair 
their mili tary weakness. 

The fact is that on the basis of many 
ast derisions, none of which can now 
e taken back, American choices are 


l 


limited. Unless Washington is prepared 
to see the war run free indefinitely, the 
single option is to support the plan for 
partitioning Bosnia drawn up by the 
^contact group” of the United Slates, 
Britain, France, Germany and Russia. It 
is a sad plan that condones much “ethnic 
cleansing” and forcible border changing. 
But the Muslim government to which 
most American sympathies and obliga- 
tions flow, swallowed it all the same. 

By keeping open the notion of arms 
relief, the American government en- 
couraged lingering Bosnian illusions of 
a military deliverance. In this way it 
undercut the UN plan. By stepping back 
from the notion, Washington finally and 
more firmly supports the plan, of which, 
of course, it is a signatory. 

Serbia’s tightening boycott of the so 
far defiant Bosnian Serbs becomes the 
leading instrument of pressure, through 
the long winter now setting in, to induce 
them to respect the international peace 

S ian. Serious NATO air strikes to curb 
osnian Serb violations become a neces- 
sary companion instrument. The peace- 
keepers have resisted such strikes up to 
now, fearing Bosnian Serb retaliation 
against themselves. An American shar- 
ing of the risks of peacekeeping would 
be the best answer that Washington 
could give its allies — and the Muslims. 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Long Haul in Haiti 


What will happen in Haiti when the 
American Lroops go home? United Na- 
tions officials are pressing the United 
States to disarm the thugs — allies or 
employees of the ousted military regime 
— who continue to make trouble. But the 
menace in Haiti is mostly handguns, and 
the idea of house-to-house sweeps to try 
to seize them doesn’t seem very promis- 
ing. The Clinton administration is surely 
right to say that security has to depend 
essentially on political stability. 

The United Nations is uneasy because 
the United States intends to hand over 
to it, sometime shortly after the turn of 
the year, the job of supervising the fur- 
ther development of democracy in Haiti. 
By then, the United Nations hopes, the 
level of violence will have fallen and 
political intimidation will have ceased. 
Whether that happens will depend on 
what else is happening. 

In a country where malnutrition is 
endemic and the unemployment rate ap- 
pears to be around 70 percent, it doesn't 
lake any veiyr subtle analysis to suggest 
that economic growth is going to be 
crucial. Some growth will now take 
place simply because people are no 
longer- living under a predatory regime 
-whose soldiers stole with impunity. 
There are already signs of increasing 
activity in local markets. Foreign aid 
will be necessary, and more than a bil- 
lion dollars is now promised over the 


□ext five years. But there is one more 
thing that Haiti badly needs, and that is 
access to the American market. 

The United States puts a lot of barriers 
in the way of the kina of products that a 
low-wage, resource-poor country can 
produce. Under the Caribbean Basin Ini- 
tiative, Haiti will get some modest but 
useful breaks on the usual tariffs and 
import quotas. But the Aristide govern- 
ment has reportedly raised the question 
of wider trade benefits. Trade, over the 
long haul, is a much more reliable creator 
of jobs and prosperity than foreign aid. 

The American involvement in Haiti is 
only for the short term, in the sense that 
President Bill Clinton wants to end the 
occupation and withdraw most of the 
American troops within a few months. 
But this relationship is also for the veiy 
long term It was the flow of destitute 
refugees that forced the United States to 
act in the first place, and that flow will 
resume immediately if democracy fails 
and the hope of prosperity fades. 

The American troops have created an 
opportunity for Haitians to end their 
country’s long tradition of abominable 
government. While it prepares to bring 
its troops home, the United States needs 
to keep working to strengthen that op- 
portunity — especially through invest- 
ment and trade that encourage Haitians 
to help themselves. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Who’s for Budget Debate? 


Newt Gingrich, the House Republican 
whip, raised political hypocrisy to new 
levels last weekend when, citing a leaked 
White House memo, be accused Demo- 
crats of threatening Social Security and 
Medicare. This from the author of a “Con- 
tract With America” which, by pledging to 
whack a trillion doDars out of the federal 
budget, would virtually guarantee huge 
cuts in entitlements. The decision by the 
memo's author. Budget Director Alice 
Rivlin, to put budget options in writing 
during election season may not have been 
the brightest political move. But at leasi 
she. unlike Mr. Gingrich, tried honestly to 
confront the nation’s fiscal problems. 

The federal deficit is expected to rise 
from about SI 70 billion next year to 
about S235 billion by the end of the 
decade. That would keep the deficit at 
about 2.5 percent of gross national pro- 
duct. which many economists do not find 
worrisome. The deficit problem does be- 
come threatening after 2010. when it 
should begin to rise to about 6 percent of 
GNP. Even this level would not hurt the 
economy if the extra federal borrowing 
were devoted to investments like schools, 
telecommunications and transportation. 
But Mrs. Rivlin fears that the borrowing 
will siphon money away from capital 
markets, and thereby from private invest- 
ment. in order to pay for what she fears 
would be congressional frivolities. She 
favors budget surpluses so that U.S. sav- 
ing rises closer to the rates of other indus- 
trialized countries. 

Her memo outlines, without recom- 
mendations, dozens of ways to reduce the 
long-term deficit. For example, it esti- 
mates the budgetary savings of limiting 
cost-of-living allowances for Social Secu- 
rity beneficiaries, cutting tax deductions 
for mongage interest on second homes. 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED li&7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
CtiChaimen 

RJCHAR D McCLEAN. Publisher A. Chief Executive 
JOHN V1NOCUR, fixuufn-ffiifiwr * \hxPreukm 

• WALTER WELLS. Son Efinr » SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR and 
CHARLES MnCHELMORE.fl 7 wn Eda-rs* CARLGE\\TR7ZA««^fiiJtor 

•ROBERTJ. DONAHUE Et&or.ifilr Edito/id Ajjjct • JONATHAN GAGE Busbvssand Finance Edit,* 

• RENE BONDY. Dtpu!) Publisher* }AMES ZXreaMr 

•JUANITA L CASPAR!. f&emakwjlbn lirpmertt Diietur* ROBERT FARRE CiraJoiat DiiMttr. Eumpt 

Durihui Jc la PuhhaiiiotL RtdunlD. Suttmons 
Diretteur.\d/iivitik:lulhd4kzaiat : Katharine P. Oxnmr 


International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Qurks-ile-Gautlc. 9252 1 ffeuilly-sir-Scine, France. 

Tel : 1 1 1 46.379.100. Fen : Cnu. «37JD6 lS I : A*Jv_ 46J751 11 Internet IHT£eun*omje 
Fifcn f f/r Midttui Richonhtn, S Canterbury RJ, SinfjfotF 051 1. Td. [65} 472-7768 Fax [65)2742334 
Mm>. 

On 

PretUS: . - 

V K Advertising Office: 63 Urn? Acre, London WC2. TcL t07 1 ) 8364802. Fax: (07/1 240- 5/ 

5 A. au capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Naiuemr B 7 3202 II 26. Commission Pariiaire No. 61337 
© /VW. IntemamdHenM Tribune. AB ri&s reserved. ISSN: (DHS0S2 




WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1994 

OPINION 


A Bomb in Tel Aviv Meant to Blast Arafat and Peace 


W ASHINGTON — For one 
horrifying moment last 
Wednesday, a fanatic with a 
bomb turned downtown Td 
Aviv into Beirut- Now the dan- 
ger is that Israel and the Pales- 
tinians may turn their mutual 
homeland into Lebanon. 

Israel intends to seal off the 
Gaza Snip and the occupied 
West Bank indefinitely ana de- 
mands that Yasser Arafat use his 
police force to hunt down mem- 
bers of the Islamic Resistance 
Movement, or Hamas, which 
was responsible for three brutal 
attacks on Israelis in recent 
weeks. If he fails to do so, Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin will me 
the army to do it for him. 

The goal of the movement is 
to shatter the fragile peace pro- 
cess and ultimately to ectipse 
Mr. Arafat’s Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization. A military 
crackdown may well serve its 
purpose if the move further in- 


Bv Glenn Frankel 


flames a Palestinian population 
already disappointed in the pro- 
cess and in Mr. Arafat. 

For the Palestinian leader, ev- 
ery option is bad If be accedes to 
Israel’s demands, he will be 
viewed as a traitor by some Pales- 
tinians and branded as an Israeli 
puppet, as were the Christian mi- 
litia leaders who sided with Israel 
in southern Lebanon. If be fails 
to do so, he risks losing his Israeli 
peace partner. Mr. Rabin's clo- 
sure of the territories to 65.000 
Palestinian workers is certain to 
aggravate economic hardship, 
eroding Mr. Arafat's control. 

There are crucial differences 
between Israel and Lebanon, but 
one frightening similarity looms: 
In both countries, things began to 
fall apart when the hard men on 
all sides wrested control from 
moderates. In Lebanon, where 
they succeeded, 20 years of war 


ensued In IsraeL, the struggle be- 
tween moderate and radical, be- 
tween fragile peace and war with- 
out end. continues. 

With the signing of the Lsrael- 
PLO accord on the White House 
lawn 13 months ago. moderates 
in both communities asserted 
control, consigning radicals to 
the sidelines. Israelis were tired 
of war and of the continuing 
militar y occupation of another 
people; the human and financial 
costs of both are staggeringly 
high. Palestinians, too, were pre- 
pared to put the conflict behind 
them if it meant an end to their 
suffering and humiliation and 
the prospect of independence. 

But it only takes a few bombs 
and bullets for radicals to reas- 
sert Lheir claims. After a Jewish 
settler’s attack on a Hebron 
mosque in February left at least 
30 Palestinians dead. Mr. Rabin 


cracked down on a fledgling net- 
work of Jewish extremists by us- 
ing some of the same ruthless 
tactics his security forces once 
reserved for Palestinians. 

It is harder for the Palestinian 
majority to assert itself. It has 
no firmly entrenched democratic 
institutions and no elected lead- 
er. Mr. Arafat's performance has 
inspired Utile trust. Promised 
prosperity has not arrived. The 
Palestinian mainstream may de- 
ride that the hard road to peace 
is not worth the trip. 

Hamas is well-placed to ex- 
ploit this. It was founded in De- 
cember 1987 at the beginning of 
the Palestinian intifada by a 
Gaza sheikh. Ahmed Yassin and 
a group of acolytes — mostly 
middle-class clerics and profes- 
sional men. Although Hamas's 
covenant called for Israel’s de- 
struction. Sheikh Yassin him- 
self spoke of ending the occupa- 
tion. not of reconquering the 


Some Travel Suggestions for Bill Clinton in Syria 


N EW YORK — When President Bill 
Clinton visits President Hafez Assad in 
Damascus. I hope it is not one of those quick- 
in-and-out trips. Mr. Clinton should stay a 
couple of days. There are a lot of interesting 
things to be seen in Syria, and fun to be had. 

For instance, it won't take him but a few 
minutes' limo time to visit the downtown 
office of Hamas. He should ask for Musa 
Abu Maizuk, who is one of the top three 
officials of Hamas worldwide. 

They can chat about the Hamas leader's 
many years of residence in Virginia prepar- 
ing. Other suggested topics: the Hamas 
bombing of the bus in Tel Aviv, and how the 
Damascus branch keeps in touch with the 
Hamas bomb units in Gaza. Israel and the 
United States and trades tips and specialists. 

Then, how about an editorial board meet- 
ing at Radio Al-Quds? Over coffee, they can 
tell him bow with the permission of his 
host’s regime they broadcast ecstatic praise 
of the Td Aviv massacre. 

From ihere, President Clinton u>uld visit 
Mr. Assad’s Militaiy Interrogation branch 
to inspect Saha al-Ta'dhib, probably the 
best-equipped suite of torture chambers in 
the MideasL The president could see Al- 
Khursi al-Almani. or the German chair. 
Knives cut into the victim’s flesh as the chair 
is rotated. He might ask for al-abd al-aswad. 
or the black slave, in which a prisoner is 
strapped down while a heated metal skewer 
is tnrast into his anus. 

Now, off to visit the Palestinian terror- 
ists. For decades. Syria has been haven and 
training ground for about a dozen of these 


By A. M. Rosenthal 


groups. Without Mr. Clinton's host, Mid- 
east terrorism could not have so flourished. 
That is why Syria is on the LLS. list of 
terrorist nations. 

Mr. Clinton might enjoy Ahmed Jebril, 
chief of the Popular Front for the Liberation 
of Palestine — General Command. Some 
Western intelligence agents are sure he 
planned the destruction of Pan Am 103. He 
could chat about what Mr. .Assad knows 
before and after terrorist operations. He is a 
Syrian army officer, and pan of Syrian intel- 
ligence. a branch of Mr. Assad's presidency. 

Mr. Jebril's office is in the Al-Mazra'u 
section, not far from the Damascus office 
of Islamic Jihad. Then the Clinton. Jebril 
and Jihad panics could all drive to the four 
PFLP-GC bases in the Damascus area, 
including the Ruwad air base and the heavy 
weapons unit. 

How about a bit of adventure snooping 
around about Alois Brunner? He was Adolf 
Eichmann's deputy slaughterer. He es- 
caped. to prosper year after year in Syria. 
President Assad refers to him as Alois 
Who? He may be dead by now. but Presi- 
dent Clinton could check around on Had- 
dad Street, where Alois Brunner lived — 
investigative president on the job. 

Side trip: Mr. -Assad drives Mr. Clinton to 
Hama, in the Orentes River valley. Not 
much to see there since Mr. Assad had about 
20,000 Syrians massacred because some 
raised opposition to his role. Still, there is a 


great parking lot where their homes were 
bulldozed. Mr. Clinton could have a tailgate 
kebab with his host. 

No visit to Syria is complete without a 
visit to beautiful Bekaa. Actually it is in 
Lebanon, but given the Syrian colonization 
of Lebanon and occupation of the Bekaa 
that is a quibble. Mr. Clinton could see pie 
pretty poppy fields. He might stop at Syrian 
army posts, for details of the millions of 
dollars the Syrian army rakes in turning 
poppies into heroin. 

Mr. Clinton could relax. His presence is 
not needed to talk Mr. Assad into a peace 
treaty. Israel offers a world-class bargain: 
for a treaty. Syria gets the commanding 
heights of Golan. Mr. Assad will decide in 
his own interests and lime. 

In Washington, the Center for Strategic 
Policy released a worried study by former 
high-ranking U.S. officials and retired gen- 
erals warning that putting any American 
peacekeeping forces on the Golan would 
endanger the troops and undermine Israel's 
standing as a self-reliant American ally. 

But for Syria, the Clinton visit is a deli- 
cious American ennoblement. Mr. Assad 
will respond with some gesture. Bui the 
terrorist list is dead, politically and morally. 

Before he leaves Damascus. Mr. Ginton 
should return for another look at Saha al- 
Ta'dhib, the garden of tortures. He could 
think about it as he flies home. Maybe it will 
help him face the question he keeps raising 
himself, and which is poisoning his presi- 
dency: Who is Bill Clinton? 

The Ne*- York Tima. 


Holy Land or evicting the Jews. 

Yet if Sheikh Yawn lacked 
radical fervor, he never lacked 
for followers. Small bands of 
voung men flocked to Hamas s 
banner and committed kidnap-, 
pings and killings in its name. 
Sheikh Yassin htmself allegedly 
masterminded the abduction 
and killing of two soldiers. But 
after his imprisonment in 
Hamas earned on, recruiting fol- 
lowers among Palestinians im- 
prisoned for the intifada and 
among younger worshipers at 
mosques! 

The military wing of Hamas is 
tiny — perhaps 50 to 100 mem- 
bers, according to Israeli intelli- 
gence estimates. The real 
strength of Hamas is its support 
among some Palestinians; It is 
home-grown and finely attuned 
to the moods of its people. Iis 
leaders largely desisted from ter- 
rorist attacks within Israel over, 
the past year because they 
sensed a lack of popular support 
for such moves. Now they sense 
the public mood is shifting. 

It may be, as some Palestinians 
suggest, that there is a split within 
Hamas between leaders who 
want to operate as an above- 
ground political party in the new 
Palestinian autonomous zone 
and militants who want literally 
to blow up the peace process. 

But the ultimate goal remains 
supplanting Mr. Arafat and the 
PLO as the main Palestinian na- 
tional movement. In this sense, 
the Td Aviv bus bombing was 
actually aimed at Mr. ArafaL A 
bloody reckoning among Pales- 
tinians seems inevitable. 

Israelis are in shock. They 
know there is no going back to 
the days of occupation in Gaza. 
But they are angry that the Isra- 
el- PLO "accord has not produced 
security. Many on the right ar- 
gue that the deal has increased 
terrorism by inciting the mili- 
tants while replacing vigilant Is- 
raeli enforcers in Gaza with per- 
missive PLO policemen. 

Tel Aviv is the capital of the 
new Israel, the showcase for its 
affluence and Americanized 
dreams. Its residents survived 
Iraqi missiles and now they want 
to get on with living the good 
life. To blow up a commuter bus 
in tiie center of Td Aviv is to 
strike at the heart of those who 
seek accommodation. It returns 
the conflict to its original terms: 
winner lakes all. 

The Washington Past. 




Japan Isn’t Ready Yet for a Permanent Seat on the Security Council 


taxing capital gains (profit on invest- 
ments) of deceased investors, imposing a 
national sales tax. eliminating tax deduc- 
tions for state and local taxes. Her memo 
also outlines ways to cut taxes on middle- 
class families. Mr. Gingrich did not em- 
phasize those optionsL 

Mrs. Rivlin knew that such ideas were 
incendiary, so she retrieved copies of the 
memo she distributed at a White House 
gathering. Apparently, someone — a se- 
nior administration official, according to 
William Kristol of the Project for the 
Republican Future — leaked a draft copy 
to Republicans. Mr. Gingrich pounced. 

Mrs. Rivlin may exaggerate the benefit 
of deficit cutting — especially since Con- 
gress would probably achieve the goal by 
eviscerating job retraining, research and 
development, infrastructure and other 
valuable investment. But when govern- 
ment and business are accused of econom- 
ic myopia, she deserves credit for taking 
the long view. Her options include modest 
ways to control the rate of growth of 
entitlements; she outlines no bloodletting. 

As the Social Security Trust Fund runs 
dry and health expenditures of an aging 
population soar, Congress will have to cut 
spending or raise taxes sooner or later. 
Made sooner, the cuts need hammer no 
one hard Made later, they will hurt. 

The political fallout of Mr. Gingrich's 
opportunistic barrage is that he and a 
defensive President Bill Gimon have 
now launched tit-for-tat promises to vot- 
ers that they would, for example, unalter- 
ably oppose touching Social Security or 
Medicare, even for the rich. By r uling 
huge chunks of tbe budget undiscussable 
— and ridiculing a public official who 
dared face unpleasant facts — Washing- 
ton threatens to smother serious debate. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


W ASHINGTON — In an un- 
usually direct speech to the 
General Assembly on Sept. 27. 
Foreign Minister Yohei Kono 
launched a drive to achieve Ja- 
pan's goal of a permanent seat on 
the UN Security Council, an effort 
reinforced by Emperor Akihito’s 
recent European visit 
Japan’s interest in such status 
should be welcomed by the inter- 
national community in principle. 
But in practice Japan is not yet 
prepared to assume the full re- 
sponsibilities of global leadership 
that a permanent seat entails. 

Japan should not be allowed to 
treat the Security Council seat as 
just one more leveraged buyout 
So far, Tokyo’s chief argument is 
that by contributing 123 percent 
of the UN budget it has bought 
an entitlement 

With the veto that a permanent 
Security Council seat permits 
comes real responsibility. Tokyo 
wants the seat with a caveat that 
it need not send Japanese forces 
into situations where armed hos- 


By Robert A. M a nn i ng and James J. Przystup 


tiliiies might occur. Its quaint no- 
tion that one can simply purchase 
great power status reflects a lin- 
gering mentality of being in the 
world but not of the world. 

Japan must realize that it can- 
not be allowed to simply finance 
tbe risk of life by others in the 
service of international peace and 
security. If Japan wants to make 
decisions that send the youth of 
other nations into harm’s way. it 
must be prepared to risk its own 
blood as well as its treasure. 

The issue of a permanent seat 
raises fundamental questions in 
Japan regarding the right of col- 
lective self-defense and the de- 
ployment of military forces out- 
side Japan. Article 9 of its 
constitution, often cited as the 
reason for Japan’s inability (o par- 
take in such activities, proscribes 
neither. It merely renounces war 
as a sovereign right, and the 
threat or use of force as a means 
of settling international disputes. 


Over the years, Japan has dis- 
played a flexible interpretation of 
its constitution when necessary. 
The issues are fundamentally po- 
litical, not constitutional. 

Japan is an emerging major 
power with major stakes in the 
system. No country has benefited 
more from the international eco- 
nomic and political system that 
took shape after World War 11. 
The open trade system shaped by 
GATT, particularly access to the 
U.S. market, and the security al- 
liance with America have played 
no small role in Japan's impres- 
sive postwar success. 

Only veiy slowly is the realiza- 
tion taking hold in Japan that it 
must assume the burdens as well 
as the benefits of this system. 

After the Gulf crisis, Japan did 
write a $13 billion check to the 
UJS. Treasury and even sent mine- 
sweepers to the Gulf to assist in 
postwar cleanup operations. Next, 
the Diet adopted a peacekeeping 


operations bill that allowed the 
government to send Self-Defense 
Force engineers to Cambodia for 
“nonmilitary" activities. Now 
nonmilitary deployments are 
planned for Rwanda and Zaire. 

Socialist Prime Minister Tomii- 
chi Murayama has reversed his old 
opposition to tbe very existence of 
the Self-Defense Forces. Should 
Japan truly wish a permanent seat, 
its political leadership must be 
prepared to take the next steps 
and lead the Japanese people to 
accept the whole spectrum of in- 
ternational responsibilities incum- 
bent upon a permanent member of 
the Seoirity Council. 

These responsibilities go far 
beyond responding to peacekeep- 
ing requests. As the world’s sec- 
ond-largest economy, Japan is a 
key factor in global economic 
well-being. Yet it has been reluc- 
tant to fully open its markets to 
competing economies. And not 
only has it shunned world eco- 
nomic leadership, it virtually hid 
under the table during the diffi- 


cult conclusion of the Uruguay 
Round of GATT while the Unit- 
ed States and Europe slugged it 
out, Only after the deal was cut 
did Japan uneasily agree to a 
modest opening of its rice market 

What tbe international system 
requires of Japan and its political 
leadership is a new maturity — a 
willingness to bear international 
burdens however onerous. If one 
lodes bade over the 'course of this 
century, it is clear that the inter- 
national system is not self-sus- 
taining, It works only when lead- 
ing powers with major stakes in 
the system assume responsibility 
for its effective functioning. 

Mr. Manning a farmer State De- 
partment Asian policy adviser, is a 
senior fellow at the Progressive Poli- 
cy Institute. Mr. Przystup, a former 
member of the polity planning staffs A 
at the Departments of State and 
Defense, is director of Asian studies 
at the Heritage Foundation. They 
contributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


So America and Japan Can’t Merge, but Neither Should They Divorce 


T OKYO — Because of their 
wish to reach consensus be- 
fore a decision, Japanese are fast 
at executing a project but slow at 
reaching agreement Americans 
can make a deal quickly but take 
longer to implement iL 
Many Japanese complain of 

sures. Americans de- 

lighted to learn how Japan man- 
ages to keep its streets so safe that 
young women can walk almost 
anywhere at midnight without 
concern for their personal security. 

The explanation lies not in the 
number of Japan's cops, but pre- 
cisely in the lands of social pres- 
sures that Japanese place on one 
another. A little less m Japan and 
a little more in America might 
make both places better. 

It is often argued that Japanese 
lack an entrepreneurial culture 
and are not innovative enough. 
Yet tens of thousands of Japanese 
would be excellent entrepreneurs 
if they were not embedded in an 
over-homogenized, centralized, 
over-bureaucratized Japan. 

If the Japanese economy were 
increasingly deregulated, making 
it more compatible with that of 
the United States, both parts of 
Jamaica — as we call a hypotheti- 
cal merger of the two countries — 
might experience a great burst of 
innovation. Americans would 
learn to raise the quality of their 
products. Japanese would improve 
their services. Americans would 
do better at manufacturing chips, 
Japanese at writing software. 

In short Americans and Japa- 
nese have a lot to learn from one 
another, and a marriage might 
improve both cultures. 

One of the major consequences 


By Alvin and Heidi Toffler 

This is the second of two articles. 


of Jamerican wedding bells would 
be a change in the strategic rela- 
tionship of Japan and the United 
Stales to the rest of the world. 

The roots of power in the global 
system are a combination of eco- 
nomic strength, military strength 
and informational strength or 
knowledge, especially in the form 
of science, technology and popular 
culture. If one combined the eco- 
nomic strength of Japan and the 
United States with America's mili- 
tary potential, plus its enormous 
informational power, the resulting 
alliance could dominate much of 
the earth for decades, even per- 
haps generations to come. 

The new merged entity could 
impose a Pax Jam erica on much 
of the rest of the planet. 

There are, in short, many ap- 
parent reasons for the two coun- 
tries to go to the marriage altar. 
But is such a merger remotely 
possible? Yes, if the two nations 
were to be thrown together by a 
renewed threat to their survival 
from China or Russia, or by some 
other combination challenging 
their joint survival 

But there are three reasons to 
believe that Jamerica will remain 
a myth rather than a reality. 

First, tiie very contrasts between 
the cultures stand in the way, not 
to mention a hidden layer of rac- 
ism and a not so hidden national- 
ism. Americans are, unfortunately, 
not ready to think of the Japanese 
os their equals, after half a century 
of mentonng Japan. And Japan is 
beyond the point of acquiescing in 
any marriage based on inequality. 


Second, if Asian nations still 
harbor suspicions about Japanese 
intentions, half a century after 
occupation by Japanese troops, 
what would their reaction be to a 
Jamerican merger? Asians would 
immediately start reshuffling their 
alliances to create a counterbal- 
ancing coalition, armed with suffi- 
cient nuclear and other weapons 
of mass destruction to protect 
themselves against being pushed 
around by the new duopoly. 

Possible permutations could de- 
stabilize Asia for years to come 
and destroy or distort the entire 
region's economic development. 
Except under extreme conditions, 
it is unlikely that either American 
or Japanese leaders would be will- 
ing to risk the consequences. 

But. most important of alL his- 
tory has already passed Jamerica 
by. Jamerica is 50 years too late. If 
General Douglas MacArthur had 
incorporated Japan into the Unit- 
ed States in 1945, there would have 
been a Jamerica. He didn’t. 

In the early postwar era, as 
throughout tKe age of Second 
Wave industrialism, big countries 
with big populations and big 
economies had enormous ad van- 
tages in the world economy. But 
what economists call “economies 
of scale” are diminishing with the 
rise of Third Wave, knowledge- 
based economies. Small states 
like Singapore or Taiwan, relying 
on brain rather than brawn, out- 
perform many of the giants. 

Nor does sneer size necessarily 
confer military power. 

Indeed, the future may lie not 


with Jamerica but with Kyucon, a 
merger between Kyushu and Sili- 
con Valley, or between other re- 
gions linked with one another 
across national boundaries. 

As Kenichi Ohmae, the Japa-' 
nese management guru, and we 
have long argued, regions, some 
of them oinational or even multi- 
national, may well prove to be 
more important centers of eco- 
nomic and cultural activity than 
nations, even super- nations. 

The real threat to the world, is 
not that America and Japan will 
merge, despite all the seeming ad- 


vantages, but that they will split. 
They may be driven apart by irre- 
sponsible nationalist demagogues 
in both countries, waving their . 
racist and/ or protectionist flags. 

Dangerous though it may prove 
to both, divorce is more likely than 
ma fnage — and Jamerica will re- 
main a fascinating might-have- 
been future of the past. 

This comment, adapted from 
Jamerica " (published by Fuso 
Sha in Tokyo), is distributed by 
New 1 ork Tunes Special Features, 
® 1994 Alvin and Heidi Toffler. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894; Alleged Jump 

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. — It 
has remained for Captain Monta- 
gue Martin, late of tbe English 
army, to snatch from the brow of 
New York's own “Steve” Brodie 
his crown of fame as a bridge 
jumper. The doughty Englishman, 
upon his own statement, jumped 
from the 212 foot Poughkeepsie 
Bridge at a quarter to seven this 
evening [Oct 13}. Alleged bridge 
jumpers are veiy common here. 
Investigation invariably fails to 
bear out boastful assertions. The 
citizens, therefore, are chary about 
accepting such statements without 
ocular demonstration. 

1919: Fashion Statement 


ROME — The Pope, receiving a 
deputation of ladies yesterday 
[OcL 23J. spoke of the new rights 
and duties of women, and con- 
demned certain modes of dress 


now prevalent, which, he urged, 
are an offence against morality. 

1944: Naval Victoiy 

WASHINGTON _ [From oiir 
New \ ork edition;} President 
Roosevelt jubilantly revealed late 
todayJOct- 25] that America’s Pa- 
nfic Fleet has ‘-defeated, not only 
damaged and routed” the Japa- ; 

nese Navy m the seas off the PhiF 

Jppme Islands. The President de- 
hvered the announcement at a 
forty-five second press confer- * 

en« held immediately after he i 

tod received word from Admiral ? 

Halsey jr H of thagreat ? 

victory. The scope of the triumph * 
and the fact that it may go far -i 
22P 1 shortening the war m the j 
ractftc — was emphasized by the 1 
remark of Admiral Ernest J. King, 
commander in chief of the Uttitetf 

85-2* thai - he Japa? 

^l^L ,ts J nl,re oav y inw a* 

pronged attack. 




!!• 


$] 

; ■ 








• d t 

' a*-? 

r Irtfc 

. 1 


V h 




■r *s 

xk 

■ 

• i'*.r 

.... K 

rr ft 

- : 

'■:■.* tin- 
* *1 

■ 





^ 3* 

:*!V 

• " 

M 

■=* *J *- 

VI ijj 

• r,4 




mu 1 p.' 

"... 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRI BUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 199* 

OPINION 


Page 9 


• » iH 

j. 


The Hazard of Stereotypes: 
History’s Many Reminders 


- 

• “W!| t 

•: ..v! 9 14 
-‘Im, * 

v.V^U^ 

ft* 

’ • ^ 
1 -J: t 

. "^ : 
-*'1* 

• '“‘"‘’S-lK ’’ 


By Edwin M. Yoder Jr. 




•••• ■ ... 

v*; 

; ;i 1 * 
J J -* fe 
i V " ' l!r ^ tal: 

. .. •. - i,| Nt 

• 'Vrtmft. 

•"• v^tscs 
■ • •’ i": naiaj 

• • i . 1 1 ' 


W ASHINGTON — In its less 
invidious forms, heredity is 
among the more fascinating of 
topics. I have thought so, anyway, 
since I read a little essay by John 
Maynard Keynes years ago and 
learned that three geniuses of 
18th century English literature. 
Dry den. Swift and Horace Wal- 
pole, were cousins. Put this to- 
gether with the Mozart and Bach 
families and who can doubt that 
genes matter? 

But what about invidious theo- 
ries of heredity, especially those 
that promote distinctions among 
racial and ethnic groups? You will 
hear a lot, soon, about “dysgene- 
sis,” a theory that dullards, 
spurred J>y misguided social poli- 
cies, are degrading the American 
genepoolby outbreeding the more 
mtemgent folks. 

This supposed threat is among 
those discussed in “The Bell 
y Curve,” a new study of intelli- 
gence by Charles Murray and 
Richard J. Hcrrnstein. They note, 
correctly, that mass IQ testing 
establishes group differences in 
“average” intelligence, some of 
them quite large. 

Mr. Hermstein, a respected 
Harvard psychologist, died a cou- 
ple of months ago. As it happens, I 
knew him slightly. His provocative 
writings on the social and econom- 


terurih Com* 


ic implications of IQ heritability 
20 years ago brought him much 
abase from strident ignoramuses 

* who take it as their mission to 

• { - stigmatize arguments they dislike 

? ly : (or don’t understand) as “racist.” 

! nG- Mr. Hermstein was no racist. He 
1 1‘k did believe that the best studies of 

Nt heredity (usually of identical twins 
reared separately) indicated a na- 
aeQ lure-nurture ratio in the develop- 
meat of cognitive intelligence of 
'iplsai about 80-20. And if IQ is so largely 

• -:i5 r heritable, he argued, the egalitarian 

: policies widely favored by liberals 

■ii c? : would tend to make America less 
i-ifor* equal and more rigidly stratified. 

Mr. Hermstein's syllogism was 
.t,;. simple: If genetic endowment is 
tv. the major dete rminan t of brain- 
; 5 -.’ power, and if brainpower makes 
-v> 2 - most of the difference in economic 

and social fortune, then the more 
s. theoretically equal we try to be, 
■ the less equal m practice we are 
likely to become. The argument 
was plausible; it may matter even 
more in the dawning information 
and service economy than in the 
— industrial economy. 

When I wrote a couple of criti- 
* cal but friendly pieces about Mr. 
[IF Hermstein’s theories In the Wash- 


ington Star, of which I was an 
editor, I soon heard from him . He 
clearly longed for a sympathetic 
hearing. We had a couple of long 
lunches. Then the issue faded. 1 
never saw him again. 

What is surprising about the 
commotion over “The Bell Curve" 
is how quickly we forget that theo- 
ries of dysgenesis have a long his- 
tory — a history of which Mr. 
Hermstein’s Harvard colleague 
Stephen Jay Gould makes merry 
sport in his book “The Mism en- 
sure of Man." 

The development of mass IQ 
testing, especially of World War I 
recruits, produced some bizarre 
results. It was concluded, for in- 
stance, that the average “mental 
age" of Americans at that time 
was 13, barely above the level then 
deemed “moronic." Somehow this 
race of morons managed to thrive 
and to win a second world war, but 
not before the grim tidings about 
“average” intelligence spurred eu- 
genics crusades (and sterilization 
laws) and legislation to shut out 
defective immigrant stocks. 

It is a great irony that the “eth- 
nics" who suffered most from in- 
vidious immigration laws were 
Asians, who now are said to have 
the highest average group IQs. 

The Murray-Herrnstein anxi- 
eties over dysgenesis were fore- 
shadowed in the 1920s. Wide- 
spread intelligence testing, 
followed by various eugenic and 
immigration measures, were ad- 
vertised as “curtailing the repro- 
duction of feeblemindedness and 
the elimination of an enormous 
amount of crime, pauperism and 
industrial inefficiency.” That 
was in 1923. 

In short, the most meager his- 
torical perspective on the “Bell 
Curve” controversy would incline 
us to be leery when glib inferences 
about national policy are drawn 
from IQ tests. IQ data have been 
invoked in the past to justify 
laws and attitudes best described 
as cold-blooded. 

That is the hazard of group ste- 
reotypes. whether racial, ethnic, 
regional, cultural, historical or in- 
tefiectual, although in fairness it 
should be noted that Mr. Murray 
and Mr. Hermstein explicitly dis- 
claim the wish to implant or en- 
courage such stereotypes. 

Americans are overeager, some- 
times gullible customers of over- 
weening “social science,” even 
when it reflects 19th century sci- 
entism in its most dubious form. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 



Dignity and Burt Lancaster: 
Many Times a Great Actor 


By Tom Shales 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A Debate’s Ground Zero 

The recent correspondence re- 
garding the role of the atomic bomb 
m the surrender of Japan in World 
War II takes me back to August 
1945. I was an artillery officer at- 
tending a course at the Staff College 
in Quetta; the 33d Corps of the 
Indian Army was preparing to in- 
vade the Malay Peninsula, though 
most of us believed it would not be 
necessary — it was no secret that the 
Japanese were in a hopeless situa- 
tion. The German ally had col- 
lapsed; the Japanese navy and air 
force were shattered; Japanese gar- 
risons in the Pacific islands and 
Manchuria were cut off. and a com- 
bined Allied assault on Japan was 
expected soon. Kamikaze attacks 
were wily signs of despair. 

Looking hack, one can consider 
various factors in the calculus of 
U.S. polity toward Japan during the 
final phase of the war; punishment 
for the perfidy at Pearl Harbor and 
atrocities against prisoners of war; a 
restoration of American dominance 
in the Pacific region; geopolitical 
factors involving China and the 
Soviet Union. 

But did. in fact, the atomic bomb- 
ing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki save 
countless American lives by render- 
ing invasion unnecessary? Since au- 
tumn 1944 Japan had been sending 
out peace feelers. As the Nazi re- 
gime tottered, Japan sought a face- 
saving formula for peace. The Japa- 
nese conquests could be given up, 
but preservation of the emperor's 
status, which symbolized the conti- 
nuity and identity of the nation, was 
not negotiable. Even so, Japanese 
peace moves became urgent and ex- 
plicit as doubts arose about Stalin's 
intentions. The emperor himself 


participated in the peace process. A 
telegram from Foreign Minister Shi- 
genori Togo to Ambassador Sato in 
Moscow, dated July 12, 1945, men- 
tions the emperor’s concern over the 
“daily calamities and sacrifices of 
the war” and the emperor’s “desire 
to see the swift termination of the 
war.” In a telegram dated July li, 
Mr. Togo renounced the annexation 
or retention of occupied areas. 

AH of this was known to President 
Tr uman. It is reasonable to surmise 
that if the Japanese were reassured 
on the preservation of the emperor’s 
status, the war would have ended in 
July. It is not dear why there should 
have been — if indeed there was — 
any serious consideration of plans to 
invade the Japanese homelands. 

In the event, the atomic bombs 
were pressed into service. The pro- 
posal of the Nobel laureate James 
Franck (and his committee) that the 
power of the bombs should be dem- 
onstrated in a desert or barren is- 
land instead of dropping them over 
Japanese dries was rejected. 

And so Hiroshima and Nagasaki 
were consumed in the blinding 
flashes of flame and blast on Aug. 6 
and 9. Stalin declared war on Aug. 8, 
Japan surrendered on Aug. 14 — 
but kept the emperor. 

DWARKA NATH CHATTERJEE. 

Luxembourg. 

1 worked on the atomic bomb at 
Los Alamos beginning in 1944. 

Later, as a dealer in Japanese art, I 
rams into dose contact with Japa- 
nese artists and intellectuals. These 
thoughtful and cultured Japanese in- 
variably made the following points 
regarding the atomic bomb's use: 

1. It allowed Japan to surrender 
without loss of face. 

2. It allowed the preservation of 


Japanese institutions and. in partic- 
ular, of the emperor’s status. 

3. It saved an enormous number 
or Japanese lives that would have 
been lost had a full-scale invasion 
taken place. 

4. Despite the recognition that the 
war was lost, the fanaticism of the 
army would never have pemriued 
surrender; even after the atomic 
bombs it was touch-and-go. 

DAN E MAYERS. 

Wadhurst, England. 

I wonder whether there has ever 
been a public debate that sailed so 
far from the central issues. 

The United. States did not start 
the war against Japan by bombing 
Hiroshima and Nagasaki First. I 
would r emin d the revisionists, there 
was Pearl Harbor. And whether we 
are talking about a potential of 
30,000 or 1 million casualties in an 
invasion of Japan is absolutely im- 
material to the men who would have 
been on the list. As an infantry offi- 
cer in t rainin g for that invasion, 
guess what I think — and what my 
children and grandchildren think — 
about President Truman's decision. 

LAWRENCE ELLIOTT. 

Luxembourg 

Takin g any human life by whatev- 
er means is “wrong” but it has to be 
admitted that uniformed soldiers 
have accepted in advance the risk as 
well as the goal of killing one another. 
Bui how can the killin gs of innocent 
civilians ever be “right”? I think the 
only conclusion possible to the 
Smithsonian debate is obvious: It is 
the military killing of civilians that 
has to be condemned, everywhere. 

LESLIE SCHENK. 

Chevilly-Larue, France. 


W ASHINGTON — Some of 
the strong men really were 
strong some of the tough guys 
really were tough, some of the wise 
guys really were wise. Burt Lan- 
caster specialized in proud, stub- 
born, independent characters on 

MEANWHILE 

the screen and, from all indica- 
tions, it was typecasting. He was 
an actor for whom standing tall 
was no stretch. 

Perhaps the chief difference be- 
tween today’s movie stars and yes- 
terday’s is that yesterday’s seemed 
larger than life off the screen as 
well as on it. When Burt Lancas- 
ter’s death was announced in Los 
Angeles recently, it was another 
unhappy milestone in the long, 
slow passing of an era. 

And yet Mr. Lancaster tran- 
scended' eras as he transcended 
movie genres. He started making 
movies in 1946, when the studio 
system was beginning to wane, 
and did not stop until bad health 
forced him to in 1991. To projects 
lofty or lowly, he always brought 
an incomparable authority, and he 
imbued each character he played 
with his own visceral dignity. 

Tight of lip. clenched of jaw, 
clipped of phrase, Mr. Lancaster 
seemed a towering figure even 
when playing the malignant or the 
downtrodden. More than perhaps 
any other actor of his time, he 
showed a willingness to be unlov- 
able on the screen, playing nearly 
as many heels as heroes. As J. J. 
Hunsecker, the ruthless gossip col- 
umnist of “Sweet Smell of Suc- 
cess," Mr. Lancaster was bitterly 
unforgettable. When Mr. Hun- 
secker’s toadying flunky, played 
by Tony Curtis, falls from grace 
late in the film. Mr. Lancaster says 
menacingly: “You’re dead, son. 
Go bury yourself." 

His most famous role, of course, 
was as the firm but fair-minded 
sergeant in “From Here to Eterni- 
ty," where he tumbled through 
what has become a quintessential- 
ly Hollywood love scene: Mr. Lan- 
caster and his leading lady, Debo- 
rah Kerr, stripping aown to 
bathing suits and rolling about 
in the surf. 

Burt Lancaster was a Holly- 
wood liberal before it was fashion- 
able (and later, cliched) to be one. 
The movies of his that stand out 
most dramatically are those with a 
social consciousness: “Elmer 
Gantry,” for which he won an Os- 
car playing a cynical evangelist; 


“Birdman of Alcatraz,” in which 
he played a defiant prisoner and 
victim of the legal system; and 
“Seven Days in May,” in which he 
played the kind of megalomania- 
cal military man only an Oliver 
North could admire. 

Even when the . characters he 
played were contemptible, they 
were charismatic; they were in- 
tiieuingly loathsome. 

His range and versatility were 
remarkable. With Nick Cravat, his 
former partner in a vaudeville acro- 
batic act, he swashbuclded blazing- 
ly across the screen in the escapist- 
romp “The Crimson Pirate"; the 
same year. 1952, he played the 
tense and moody husband of Shir- 
ley Booth in “Come Back. Little 
Sheba." As his stardom endured, 
he could go from a mainstream 
crowd-plcaser like “Airport” to an 
Italian art film like “The Leopard” 
to gentle and intimate comedy-dra- 
mas like “Local Hero” and “Rock- 
et Gibraltar.” 

When be appeared in “Atlantic 
City" in 1980, a new generation of 
moviegoers saw him as a venerable, 
enigmatic, wily old man, the epit- 
ome of faded glamour. In this film, 
for which Mr. Lancaster got another 
Oscar nomination, he managed io 
make even seediness sexy. In “The 
Rose Tattoo," he traded earthy his- 
trionics with Anna Magnahu In 
“The Rainmaker," he romanced a 
repressed Katharine Hepburn. In 
“Sony, Wrong Number," he ter- 
rorized Barbara Stanwyck. 

Not all of Mr. Lancaster's films 
were distinguished, and a few were 
downright loopy, but he never did 
anything on the screen to disgrace 
himself, and he was able to walk 
away from even the clunkers with 
head held high. “I never got to bat 
in the major leagues,” he said in 
“Field of Dreams,” one of his last 
movies, but of course he did. 

Some of the tough guys really 
were tough. And some big mode 
stars really were great actors. Burt 
Lancaster had presence to spare, 
a presence so strong that it will 
survive even, yes, his absence. 
Burt Lancaster was 80. It was still 
an untimely death. 

The Washington Post. 

Latent intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor” and contain the writer's si- 
gnature, name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject 
to editing. We cannot be responsible 
for the return of unsolicited ma- 
nuscripts. 


WfE*’ 
** T- 
V* 

I* 

four-- 
1 *.»«!■ 

h» 

WW* I J . 

**!••• 

an 

In’ 

I ■ 

sVf 

mwr- 
salfi « * 


: M i 

l. 


! 17 ■: .A'-fc 
.i :'C" 

• . • rS5 


. t i .!•* 






■ 


fc:-.'. ■ ' 


■■ -I-. - . ■' ■„ 


(tribune 


The IHT/Delta Air Lines 
Destinations Competition 


ft *t*n< t»»*: V* 




4 

£!% 

. *ri: 


hi TIhy Pi'** 


TToi'--"'* ‘ , 


;■ !•**» 


1 

^ -V 

SW* J.-- 

m ***" r - 

: . 

$ TW - 
I*** *.:■ 


• \ JiiiF 






■ " . ,1 ■ I. 

. ■ i J 


I Haifa 

million readers 
get more out 

ofiht. 


: As regular readers, you tell us that you spend 30 minutes engrossed in your 
paper. It appears you look at every single page and most importantly of all, 
gain a great deal of enjoyment from doing so.t 

You also tell us that you have an average household income of a substantial 

US$ 147,600* . 

/ ' Convincing evidence that both you and the companies who advertise within 
'■our pages get more out of the International Herald Tribune. 

For summaries of the srnveys from which these facts are taken, please call, 
in Europe, James McLebd on . (33-1). 46 37 93 81; in Asia, Andrew Thomas on 
(65) 223 6478’; in the Americas, Richard Lynch on (212) 752 3890. 


Here's How to Enter. 

Test your travel knowledge! Each day for 18 
consecutive days, a clue describing a city to which 
Delta Air Lines flies will be published. Using 
Delta’s Map, fill in the name of the city correctly 
for at least 12 of the 18 days and qualify to win. 

Once you have at least 12 answers, put 
them in an envelope and send them to us with the 
completed coupon below. 

Winners will be selected from an official 
drawing. Tlie first 10 entries drawn with the 
correct responses will be the winners. 


Win Fabulous Prizes 

First Prize: 

Two round-trip Trans-Atlantic 
First Class tickets. 

Second Prize: 

Two round-trip Trans-Atlantic 
Business Class tickets. 

4 Third Prizes: 

AT Cross, gold plated, diamond cut, 
roller ball pens, the Signature Collection. 
4 Fourth Prizes: 

Gold Pfeil men’s wallets. 


Del ta Air Lines’ Destinations Map 

Stockholm^ 1 


O Helsinki 

gen °St Petersburg 

O Moscow 


Amsterdam 

OtMno VBwburgQBeriin OWarsaw 


Detroit O 

Cincinnati 

ODallas': 


oBbstoft 


0 Bucharest 


Etcetera ° Rd,TC Istanbul 
Lisbon O 


O Atlanta 
oOriando 


OTelAviv 


O Nassau 


Source: • VIVA Surveys V2 / '93. * Reader. Survey '94. 




e.OSanJoan 
O St Thomas 


RULES AND REGULATIONS 


® Airline tickets are non-transferable and seats subject 
to availability. 

® Travel must be completed by December 31st, 1995. 

(?) Entry must be postmarked no later than November 
7th, 1994. 

® Valid only where legal. No purchase necessary. 

@ Entries will not be accepted from staff and families of 
the IHT newspaper, Delta Air Lines, their agents and 
subsidiaries. 

® No correspondence will be entered into. Proof of 
postage will not be accepted as proof of receipt 

® No cash alternative to prizes. 

® Winners will be drawn on November 15th and 
published thereafter in the newspaper. 

® On all matters, the editor's decision is final. 

® The editor reserves the right in his absolute 
discretion to disqualify any entry, competitor or 
nominee, or to waive any rules in the event of 
circumstances outside our control arising which, in 
his opinion, make it desirable to cancel the 
competition at any stage. 


Delhi O 
^Bombay 


YOUR RESPONSE: 


_ s ~ . A nave 

€€€ SO* in Austrian Church. 


lame of City: 


JOB HUE. 
COMPANY. 


POSTCODE. 


COUNTRY. 


Send coupons to: IHT/Delta Competition, 
International Herald Tribune, 

181 Avenue Charles-de -Gaulle, 
92521 Neuilly Ccdcx, France. 

actaUu SSribunc 

AJM3AAIRIJNES 

Ton'll loti Tat w*y wt Fit ■ — — 


24-10-94 


i 







■ International Herald Tribune 
Wednesday , October 26, 1994 
Page 10 


STAGE /ENTERTAINMENT 


Being Woody Isn’t Easy, Ask John Cusack 


N EW YORK. — The eyebrows 
hop, writhe, point at each 
other like toy swords. The 
hands fly out to the camera, 
bounce up and down, flap, nestle togeth- 
er. There is the pleading look, the cring- 
ing look, the fawning look, the meek, 
inoffensive, attentive look. 

The stammer, the broken phrase, the 
mumbled aside. The flashing glasses. 
The Brooklyn whine. Not since Grou- 
cho Man has a screen persona invited 
mimicry like Woody Allen's. 

- All of which was sure to be terrible 
news for whoever got the “Woody Alien 
■role*’ in the director's new period come- 
-dy, “Bullets Over Broadway.” The 
Woody Allen character in the film is 
David Shayne (John Cusack, as it turned 


By Ellen Pall 

New York Tima Service 


out), a playwright of vaulting ambition 
but limited talent Given a chance to 
direct his new play on Broadway. David 
rinds that one actress's bodyguard, 
played by Chazz Palminteri, is a far 
more gifted playwright than he is. 

Though Allen has written comedies in 
which he has not appeared, only once 
before has he created a part so perfectly 
suited to his own skills, then did not play 


it. (His 1966 Broadway play “Don’t 
Drink the Water” had Tony Roberts as 
the nebbish-in-chief; Allen recently di- 
rected a television version with Michael 
J. Fox playing the lead nebbish.) 

Critics have referred to Cusack as the 
"Woody surrogate” or the director’s “al- 
ter ego,” and a great many Iflmgoers are 
seeing Cusack's jumpy, bespectacled 
David as a simple homage to the master. 

But that was never Cusack’s inten- 
tion, nor was it Allen’s. So, since Cu- 
sack's usual comic style — nuanced and 
carefully grounded in a particular char- 
acter — is light-years from Allen's 
broad, stylized comedy, the question 
arises: How did it happen? 

Of course, not even the gifted Allen 
could play David as written. At 58, Al- 
len is too old to play a young playwright. 
(Cusack is 28.) He and ms co- writer, 
Douglas McGrath, thought at first of 
making David Shayne older — a college 
professor, an academic at heart but one 
who fancied himself an artist and occa- 
sionally wrote a plav to prove it. 
McGrath was strongly in favor of Allen 
taking the part. Allen resisted 

“I thought it’s really got to be a youn- 
ger, more idealistic type,” Allen said. “I 
would have to have had a completely 
different relationship with Dianne 


Wiest,” who plays a theatrical grande 
dame. “A younger man and an older 
woman was more fun than the college 
professor and the Broadway diva. In the 


end. I lust thought it fell slighdy more 
naturally to a younger person.” ’ 


naturally to a younger person. 

The younger person it fell to was 
Cusack. Allen had cast him once before 
in a minor role as a university student in 
his 1992 comedy, “Shadows and Fog.” 

“I always regretted that I had such a 
small pan for him.” the director said. 
“He makes things seem natural when he 
speaks; he’s not one of those actors who 
sound like they're acting. And he’s got 
an intellectual quality, so he's believable 
as a writer." 


In Cusack's view, “David Shayne is. 
in a way, a typical Woody protagonist a 
tortured intellectual struggling in a mor- 
al gray land. And anyone who’s doing 
the Woody Allen role, unless he makes it 
his own, is a cheap imitation at best.” 

He added: “I felt if people said, 'Ob, 
John is doing a Woody Allen,’ then I 
failed in what 1 wanted to do. It isn’t 
nice to hear you’re 'doing a Woody Al- 
len.* " 


Sometimes, trying to get what he want- 
ed from Cusack, Allen would actually 
demonstrate how to play him. “There is 
no better physical comedian than him,” 


said Cusack. “He would jump in and do 
the scene, and the whole crew would 
crack up. I would say, “Woody, you can’t 
do that to me. It’s humiliating.’ " 

Cusack dropped his voice and some- 
how shrank his shoulders as he imitated 
Allen. “He said, ‘Yeah, but it’s an entire- 
ly different relationship. I pay them. 1 ” 

Whether it was the demonstrations, or 
the script, or the mere strength of bis 
personality, or even a trick of the be- 
holder’s eye summoning up that familiar 
image, Allen's screen persona surely 
rubbed off on Cusack’s performance. 

“I was son of depressed when I read a 
review that said, ‘He does the Woody 
Alien to a T,’ " Cusack said. “Because 
then I thought 1 didn’t create a charac- 
ter." On the other hand, “If you’re going 
to have someone’s presence overshadow 
you, why not someone you consider to 
be a genius? It could be worse” 

For his part, Allen says he sees little of 
hims elf in Cusack’s David. Cusack 
made the character his own, Allen said, 
improvising many lines. If the actor was 
suffering from the anxiety of influence, 
“he certainly never mentioned it to me." 

He went on, “I don’t see much of a 
similarity between us, either physically or 
in terms of playing style. Maybe now and 
then because I wrote it and I’m directing 
it, maybe a mannerism will creep in.” 


This ‘ Romeo and Juliet’ Is Not for Purists 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — Coming to the Bar- 
bican's Shakespeare Festival for 
only six performances next 
week (Nov. 2-5) is a “Romeo 
and Juliet” from the Schauspielhaus in 
DCsseldorf of considerable if bizarre fas- 
cination. The first main-stage work of a 
28-year-old director. Karin Beier, who 
made her name with a German student 
group that performed Shakespeare in lo- 
cations ran g in g from ruined castles to 
disused garages, this one looks as though 
its principal influence has been the musi- 
cal version of “A Clockwork Orange.” 

In Dflsseldorf, this “Romeo” has al- 
ready caused a certain stir, not least 
perhaps because the balcony scene is set 
on trapezes, Juliet is already more than 
halfway to the madness of Ophelia, Ty- 
balt wears full Nazi costume and the 
Nurse is a gorgeous young blonde in an 
evidently lesbian relationship with her 
charge. 


Not to be outdone. Lady Capulet 
plays the ball scene stuffing a pizza 
down her face. Mercuric commits sui- 
cide on Tybalt’s dagger, and Paris is 
evidently more in love with the mother 
than the daughter. This is not. then, a 
“Romeo” for purists. 

At his Haymarkei Theatre in Leices- 
ter, Paul Kerryson, one of Britain’s 


folly in itself, still oddly unfinished as 
James Goldman's book, which effective- 
ly runs out at intermission, tries to paral- 
lel lost lives with lost scores. 


LONDON THEATER 


Mary Millar as Sally and Buster 
Skeggs as Caxiotta are very strong in an 
otherwise patchy company, but from 
“Losing My Mind” and “I’m Still Here" 
all the way through to “Could 1 Leave 
You?” this has to be Sondheim's most 
brilliantly evocative and acidly disillu- 
sioned score. 


ablest and most loyal Sondheim direc- 
tors. has a revival of “Todies” that draws 
on the Broadway original of 1971 and 
the much-revised London premiere of 
1987. Though somewhat undercast, the 
new amalgam wonderfully captures the 
cynical spirit of a show about a group of 
ex-Ziegfeld girls coming back to the rub- 
ble of their old theater as it is about to 
become another New York parking lot. 

What they are searching for is not just 
their scenery but their own hopes and 
dreams, for this is both architecturally 
and musically a fascinating theatrical 


At the Playhouse, once his old Lon- 
don home Frederick Lonsdale’s “On 
Approval” had been done no favors at all 
by a slapdash and lazy Peter Hall revival 
in which neither director nor cast seem 
to have more than the vaguest interest or 
involvement. Though we hardly ever gel 
to see him nowadays, Lonsdale was in 
fact a dramatist of considerable comic 
and social importance, the playwright 
who built the bridge from Wilde to Cow- 
ard and enabled a whole generation of 
gentlemen actors to invent the showbu- 
siness of elegant relaxation. 


This is also a chilling little quartet 
about aristocratic loathing and romantic 
despair, ending with one of the bleakest 
lines I have ever heard in the theater — 
man to wo man who has told him she 15 
locking her bedroom door against him 
in a frozen Scottish castle: “Don’t wor- 
ry, only the snow will want to get in." 

And finally, at Riverside Studios in 
Hammersmith, an intriguing solo from 
the Edinburgh Festival: the director 
Guy Masterson and the writer Mark 
Jenkins have created “Playing Barton,” 
a 90-minute monologue in which Josh 
Richards attempts to recapture the spirit 
of the great Welsh actor while explain- 
ing the demons that haunted him, not 
least the unplayed “King Lear." 

Often rambling, indulgent and like 
the man hims elf very Welsh, this is nev- 
ertheless an intelligent attempt to come 
to terms with one of the greatest classi- 
cal actors of the century who, like the 
Antony and the Faustus he played on 
screen and stage to Liz Taylor, threw it 
all away for love or profit.' 


Charpentier: Revival of a Great 'What-If 


.. By David Stevens 

Jnuautioad Herald Tribune _ 


— Marc-An tome 


pen tier is certainly one of the 
great “what-ifs” of operatic his- 


■ great “what-ifs” of operatic his- 
JL tory. Although he was one of the 
most immensely gifted dramatic com- 
posers of the late 17th century, he had 
relatively little access to the machinery 
of theatrical production. 

The main roadblock was Jean-Bap- 
tiste Lully, the Florentine-born inventor 
of French opera and, thanks to a nation- 
al monopoly granted him by Louis XIV. 
And the younger composer was suffi- 
ciently present on the Paris musical 
scene that Lully must have recognized 
him as a potential threat. 

Although Charpentier never held an 
appointment at the royal court, he was 
■ well enough connected among the nobil- 
ity and with the Jesuits. Most of Chax- 
pen tier’s vast output falls under the 


heading of sacred music, but this in- 
cludes dramatic motets or oratorios, and 
he kept one foot in the theater with 
-pastorate and- incidental music for the 
stage. 

One break came when the Lully-Mo- 
lifcre collaboration ended, and the actor- 
playwright-impresario took on the 30- 
or-so-years-old Charpentier for a 
lamentably short-lived collaboration. 
Their major joint effort, with a substan- 
tial score by the composer, was “Le 
Malade imaginaire.” It ended with Mo- 
litre’s death after the fourth perfor- 
mance in 1673. although Charpentier 
continued with the company for several 
years. 

His major opening came when Lully 
died in 1687, a victim of gangrene in- 
curred when he banged himself on the 
foot, presumably while too vehemently 
beating time with his heavy staff. The 
following year, Chaipemier’s “David et 
Jonathas" was staged at the College 


Louis-le-Grand in Paris, and in 1693 his 
major stage work, the tragedie-lyrique 
“M6dte” made it into Lully’s former 
stronghold, the Academic Royale de 
Musique. 

William Christie has been a vigorous 
and eloquent advocate of Charpentier s 
music, both sacred and theatrical, most 
recently a production of “Medee.” Now 
he has turned his attention to “David et 
Jonathas," in a semi-staged production 
that began at the Festival of Ambronay. 
near Lyon, before going on tour. 


This time, it does not involve only 
Christie's Arts Florissanis ensemble, but 
is a production of the festival's pedagog- 
ic operation, entrusted this year to 
Christie, and involving musical forces 
drawn from conservatories in Paris. 
Lyon, The Hague and London (Guild- 
hall School). 


Originally rite acts of this sacred dra- 
ma were interspersed with a Latin dra- 


ma, “Saul," which carried the burden of 
the action in this idling of the story of 
Saul’s hostility to David. David’s friend- 
ship with Jonathan, and the latter's 
death at ihe moment of David’s tri- 
umph. 

Unencumbered by many demands of 
plot and recitative, Charpentier concen- 
trates on expressive arias. It is that, 
indeed, that distinguishes him from Lul- 
ly. The Italian-born founder of French 
opera expressed himself mainly in 
heightened declamation. The French- 
bom, partly Italian-trained Charpentier 
relied more on dramatic song. 

Under Christie, the temporary forces 
performed like professionals with a 
strong unity of purpose. At the Opera 
Comique in Paris. Otto Bouwkncgt and 
Patricia Petitbon sang the title roles with 
expression and commitment, and Javier 
LOpez Pinon’s staged action in front of 
the orchestra was convincing enough to 
whet the appetite for the real thing. 


When Designers Take Over the Opera 


By Henry Pleasants 


L ONDON — The new London 
season has offered a vivid dem- 
onstration of the extent to 
which opera is now dominated 
by the producer — and his designer. 

The consequences have been variable. 
At one pole we have bad a brilliant 
production and a strong cast salvage a 
weak opera. At the other we have had a 
strong cast and a fine conductor and 
orchestra salvage a deplorable produc- 
tion of a masterpiece. 

The Royal Opera opened with a reviv- 
al of the Andrei Serban- Sally Jacobs 
production of Puccini's “Turandot.” 
now livelier, more colorful and more 
enjoyable than ever. No need here to 
salvage a slack performance. The Amer- 
ican Sharon Sweet, singing her first Tur- 
andot, made it on auspicious Covent 
Garden debut, and Giuseppe Giaco- 
mini, also a Covent Garden debutant, 
was a stalwart Calaf. 


of “Tosca” about which the less said the 
better. But the company came back 
strongly with a new Graham Vick pro- 
duction of Massenet's “Don Quicbote” 
(given here in English as “Don Qui- 
xote”), written by the 68-year-old com- 
poser for Chaliapin and first performed 
in Monte Carlo in 1910. There bad not 
been a professional performance here 
since 1912. 


lional costuming for his principals. 


Superb performances by the veterans 
licbard Van Allen and Alan Opie help 


Richard Van Allen and Alan Opie help 
to make it an evening not to be taken 
seriously, but to be admired for the 
finesse with which it is all carried off and 
to be relished simply as a show. 


This is an opera about which Law- 
rence Gilman wrote in the New York 
Herald Tribune when it was heard in 
New York in 1926, again with Chalia- 
pin: “A maddening trickle of banalities, 
shallow, tepid, tasteless. If Massenet 


Which bring us to “Das Rheingold” 
and “Die Walkure” at Covent Garden, 
the initial installments of a new “Ring” 
cycle conducted by Bernard Hai tink- and 
produced by the English team of Rich- 


had not already gone to his accounting, 
horribly would the ghost of Cervantes 
haunt and reproach him for this miser- 
able, degrading travesty.” 


mg ui tvuemgoia was greeted oy a 
full-throated chorus of boos beyond 
anything previously heard at Covent 
Garden, and from every part of the 
house. “Die Walkure" fared better, but 
not much. 


The English National Opera at the 
Coliseum opened with a new production 


Gilman got it right, but here Vick has 
come to the rescue, opting to have fun 
with iL He mounts the deluded knight 
and his faithful Sancho Panza on horse 
and donkey ingeniously contrived from 
electrically controlled tricycles, uncon- 
cerned about the incongruity of tradi- 


How to describe these productions? 
What to make of Alberich in bowler hat 
and frogman’s flippers; the giants as 
Siamese twins; Br flnnhil de in a track 
suit with skimpy cheerleader skirt; Erda 
as a nonsinging flamenco dancer. Fricka 
emerging from a battered limousine in a 
wedding dress for her confrontation 


Henry Pleasants is a London-based au- 
thor and critic who specializes in music 
and opera. 



Access NUMBERS COUNTRIES 


ACCESS NUMBERS COUNTRIES 


American Sanaa 
Arafguo [ded u cted phones) 
Antigua (pay phones) 
Argentina 
Armenia 

AinMJw (Opful) + 
AudraHa (Telstra) * 

Austria ■ 

Bahama. 

Barbados J 
Belgium + 

BeTr-e (howrt) 

Belize C- 
Bermuda/ 

Bolfna 

Brazil 

Mflih Virgin UI. A 
Bulgaria A 
Canada - 
ChBc 

China (English) +/ 

CNna (Mandarin) +S 

Colombia (Englith) 
Colombia (Spanish) 

Crrao ^-ca * 

Croatia* 


633-1000 

SO 

1 -SCO- 3 66- 464 3 

00- l-S00-7?7-mi 

8-10-1 W 
00*+511-10 

1- 800-8*1-877 
022-903+14 
1-800-084-21 1 1 
1-600477-8000 
0800.10014 
556 

*4 

3600.3333 

0008016 
1 -800877-8000 
0O809-1010 
1-800-877-8000 
00+0317 
108-13 
108.16 
0*0-130-010 

O80.l3D.no 

163 

99-3-800-13 


Cypnn/B 
Cxach Republic +/ 
Denmark + 

Dominican RopuMe A 
Ec u Briery 
* 8 TPt ICeira} ♦ 

Egypt (all oihar) * 

El Salvador * 

Fi(l Islands 
Finland + 

France + 

Germany + 


G u a m 

Guatemala +• 

Honduras A 
Hong Kang 
Hong Kong 3 

Hungary +✓ 

kelc— d +■■ 
India + 
Indormia 
Ireland * 
Israel + 

Italy * 
lUnoka - 


oeo-ow-oi 

00424*7.187 
800-14)877 
1-80075 1-7877 
171 

356-4777 
02+ 56-4777 
191 

004-890-100-3 

9*0014)2*4 

19+0087 

01300013 

00*001-411 

MO- 116* 

195 

00 1 OOO-l 212000 

800-1877 

Oil 

00*80001-877 

999003 

000137 

001001.15 

I -800 55- 2 001 

177-102-2737 

172-1877 

1 - 600 - 877-8000 



Brett Anderson: Not far from the nitpicking press. 


An Echo of David Bowie 


Suede’s Leader Calls Rock a ‘Responsibility’ 


By Mike Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — Suede is a great name for a 
rock band. Even better than Leather. 
Music with a soft napped surface. 
But is it perhaps some sort of kinky 
Kensington code? Should minors be warned 
by sticker? You wonder why nobody thought 
it up before. In fact it turned out that there is 
already an act named Suede in the United 
States. And in France, Suede means Sweden. 
This has confused rock fans on two conti- 
nents. In the United States it has become 
London Suede, which sounds like a trench 
coat, but never mind. The French are still 
confused. 


And the going remains dear and straight- 
ahead in Britain and Japan, where Suede’s 
first (eponymous) album sold 260,000 and 
95,000 copies, respectively. A rock band that 
is big only on islands can't be all bad (this one 
is a lot better than bad). And there’s hope. 
“Dog Man Star,” released this month, was 
hailed by a headline in Billboard magazine: 
“London Suede Ready for the World?” The 


magazine goes on to describe the band as “a 
mixture of sexual androgyny, "70s overtones. 


Anderson has a good act The poor young 
man fighting to get rich. Will he retain his 
sensitivity? The best thing about it is that it 
just might not be an act at alL Or, better yet, 
he may rally think he’s acting. 

“My stage persona is completdy me. Fm 
not an actor. I can’t put on masks. My stage 
personality is real life fired through a million 
accelerators- The stage can turn you into a 
caricature of youredf. On the other hand, 
who wants to watch a singing electrician?” ' 

“What are you then?’ 

“Fm quite thoughtful. I think about music 
a lot Music is my passion. The opportunity 
for communication music gives you is incredi- 
ble. Fve heard that because of us certain 
people have come out of the closet as homo- 
sexuals because their sons and daughters have 
been listening to our music and that gave 
them the courage. Every society tdls you that 
you must be a certain stereotypical person. 
Rock gives us a chance to speak out It’s quite 
a responsibility, actually, when you get in a 
band that has a certain name, power comes 
along with it and people believe any surreal 
thing you say. If you're not careful, it can 
crush you into a moronic cabbage.” 


mixture of sexual androgyny, "70s overtones, 
and passion for clothes from charity shops” 


with Wotan, and so on and so on? 

The word that comes immediately to 
mind for this sort of thing is “surreal- 
ism,” defined by the OED as “purport- 
ing to express the subconscious mind by 
images etc. in sequences of associations 
such as may occur in dreams." A less 
charitable term might be the vernacular 
“send-up." 

Again, cast, conductor and orchestra 
come to the rescue. They were applaud- 
ed on first nights as thunderously as the 
producing team was booed. John Tom- 
linson and Deborah Polaski, Bayreuth 
veterans, are -splendid as Wotan and 
BrunnhiMe, as are Ekkehard Wlaschiha 
as Alberich, Jane Henschel as Fricka 
and Robert Tear as Loge. Nowhere, to- 
day, will one hear Wagner better sung 
and better played. 

Additional performances of “ Turan - 
dot” Ocl 31 and Nov. 2 and 5; of “ Don 
Quixote" Oct. 28 and Nov. I, 3 and 9; of 
" Die WaOcOre" Ocl 29, at 4 P. M. 


It takes only half a listen and a mere byte of 
video to realize that Suede’s founder, leader, 
singer and heart throb, the androgynous Brett 
Anderson, is influenced by David Bowie. He 
looks tike him, sings tike him and the band is 
good but secondary: “Bowie is open, he’s 
childlike. He is so uncymcal about everything. 
I don't mind sounding like him. He taught me 
what a great business this can be if you don’t 
let yourself be pulled down by the nitpicking 
press.” 


“Do you get recognized on the street?" 

“I live in Netting Hill Gate. Around there, 
or on any High Street, sure. But I live half my 
life in supermarkets and the other half I find a 
gang of girls in front of my place. Totally 
schizoid. We’re both known and totally un- 
known. We’re not U2. We played for, like, 20 

S le in Dallas. In England we can draw 
. For sure it's either up or down after 
this. We get attention in the press because we 
make good records not the other way 
around ” 


The press has been flag-waving rather thap 
nitpicking about Suede. Their two thick 
press-clip files in three languages contain the 
hysterical headline: “Hysteria Rising” (an- 
other good name for a rock band), and the 
description: “The most audacious, mysteri- 
ous, perverse, sexy, ironic, hilarious, cocky, 
melodramatic ana downright mesmerizing 
band you're ever likely to fall in love with." 


T HE jacket of Suede’s first album, a 
photo of two women kissing, was 
controversial: “You should have 
seen the original picture. It was 
worse. We couldn’t use it The two women 
were naked, one of them was in a wheelchair 
and the other one was sitting on her lap. 


My eye fell on Anderson quoted: “Honest- 
ly I think lack of sex is vital to my writing 
process.” Can this be true? 


“In the music business today, everything i 
based on compromise. It becomes just one Bit 

Set nf rfmlApm™- HAi .1 * 


act of diplomacy; not offending the wrong 
people, plearing the right people. You end up 

UIV 1 T 1 P dnlnn T , 


“No. It’s completely false." Brett Anderson 
tamed the trademark lock of blond hair fall- 
ing over an eye. *Tm rampantly sexually 
active. When you’re doing interviews all day 
you might as well make it interesting for 
yourself and the person sitting there: So I find 
. these weird things flitting through my brain 
— oh, that's an interesting idea — and play 
with them. Then they follow me around. But 
Fve completely changed my mind the next 
day.” 


saying and doing nothing. I guess we wanted 
to say something about the beauty of devi- 
ance. Two things are completdy taboo. Lesbi- 
ans™ and disability. If a woman is disabled, 
she can be beautiful and sensual too. 


Beauty is not only about models. Beauty is 
more than skin deep. That seems to me to be 

fin imnnrl 4 nl frlirnn tA TL. • . , 


an important thing to say. The beautiful peo- 
ple of the world are ordinary people who live 

nrninnrv 1 ium and -i. ■ . . v . 


- Hwiiro whu live 

ordinary lives and say ordinaiy things. It’s 
luce m ‘Lady Windermere’s Fan.’ Oscar Wilde 

CQin* ‘Wa qm nil Zwu * 1 . * 


said. We are all m the gutter, but some of us 
are looking at the stars.’ " 


ACCESS NUMBERS COUNTRIES 


ACCESS NUMBERS COUNnUES 


Japan IIDQ |EngTsh] * 

Japan (KDO) (EngBpi) * 

Jepcn (Japanese) + 

Kenya / 

Korea (Doom) + 

Karen (ICT) ♦♦ 

Ktmah 

Liechtenstein + 

LQliuuiiia / 

Lusembourg 
Macao a 
Malaysia + 

Merles* 

Monaco * 

N*h. Antm*, 

(Geoma & Bonaire) * 
Nrithertn ad s +• 

Now Zealand ,3 
(In-country eoJIt] 

Me— Zealand 

Nicaragua ( M anagua l— thti l a 
Niasngoa HUnag u u SganHW o 
Nicaragua launUa Wa ng , n ] 

Norway * 

Panama 
Paraguay A 


0066 - 55 - S77 

0039-131 

0066 - 55-888 

0800-12 

0039-13 

009.16 

800-777 

155-9777 

8+197 

0800-0115 

0800-121 

800-0016 

95 - 800 - 877-8000 

19+0087 


Peru/ 196 

PhiEppinoi (Em nudum paly) 010541 


ACCESS NUMBERS 


OOI - atO - 745.il 1 1 

06+0224119 

UU.n.uA.rinnt 


000 999 

171 

161 

QZ + fegSsli or Spanish no. 

*00-19877 

115 

OOB-T 2-800 


Phi li ppines (PMGoffl) A 
Philippines (PLOT) 
Poland + 

Portugal + 

Puerto Rico — 

Romania +■ 

Rum is (Mokow) + 
Rauia (all other) +■ 
Saipan 

Tinian aid Roia +■ 
San Marina + 

Saudi Arabia 
Singapore * 

Saalti Africa + 

Spain 
Si. Lucia O 
54. Lucia A 

Sw eden + 

Swfaeriand + 

S/ria +■ 

Taiwan a 
Tfxrio ne t / 

Trinidad & Tobago 
(parts Of Ofltr r only) 


103-611 

505-16 

00104-800-115 

05017.1-177 

1+00-177-8000 

01-600+877 

133-6133 

•095-1 55-61 33 

335+333 

1-235-0333 

172.1877 

1800-15 

8000-177-177 

0- 800+9-0001 
900+9-0013 

1 800-377-7468 
187 

030+99-01 1 T 

155-9777 10 

098 B 'N.- 

0080-14-0877 

001- 999.13+77 


Tbrfcvy + 

US. Virgin Islands — 

U&A.- 

Wdqm 

Arab Entrant + 
lln'dod Kingdom (BT] 
UnSmd Kingdom IMamay} 
IMsguay-. 

Vatican Cty + 

Venezuela (EngfUi) 
Venezuela (Spaniih) 


O0+CQ-M477 

1-800-677-8000 

1+00+77+000 

8-100-15 

eoo-131 

0000+90677 

0500-89+177 

000417 

172-1877 

Bw-nn-o 

fiOO-llll-l 



Sprint. 


lw ** *W Jul i‘x *.n, juwAt fjr 

■•'""■"V 1 -; r ; r,w ";s t * w - *it. wifbcf^uj a, 

■ w will* SpnM < J, 1 , 


i JUI. J 1 - ..-T-.i/rrc, ,U ciKnan for Cjunni nuntrjf’. CUUomn asiKeoi nOAltontR can ila Snnr acca , rCmear .;Z 4w cuaiftwcam ji a, I HJS?' OAt, .» Bw US told au*. m — — r n |L.„ - . ■ w t _ 

OH!.,' I T ' 1 ■ —- 11 -. «. T I W ******* ■ ...-* 1-1 OS *■!' Cni-r. -Cl- . .ppf, 9 w,.i | C . *cond ion ▼ AAlic ohms im .**■*•* w* » ■' *«>**<- „i ovsf phamr. A rioi o-i.kiD- j.'. i*u.— ' K> 6 >tD bft^L Cu»oci ( 4 >US wimwii.cn cl. ■* *ONC«*D lnFbg LIm GLoul 

'll ♦♦ f ’ ■n in. fih.i.-.. A .--J oai.-.. *.» i ... '•«— ih— . H.nl ir.*a • V A.a.Lobir. . i— Scaled i*o« ar po. ■ Irrnl long chacom >u. auui. a uv o.oiuiUr hca m nsjio. »mi, i.. OpweMi UCaanaul vauln A* 

* — — - * l8B * **•*> Cjamu K sman Coupnay LE 


€D1A MARK! 


anal Pirn 






v ' “ ** 

.. ' « 5419 

’♦ 1 - V * . , ''** 

**** ■ * We* 

v h «V 


2 . 

• . , or ‘l 









J$?w!3. ■ "■**■ '**4fci* 

«*«*** 

:.;j*’;i ! ri ."SJk:i"';* Htyxv&i, M‘$?W 

ttjtoHRS&EW 

NSIn* 



* * 


**§■• 




if 



jBSSt* 

International Herald Tribune, Wednesday, October 26, 1994 


. y:. ,.*': :? ,v '' -V 

■I^V^ ?«%SBSW[iv ! .f ; . 

V ' 1 ‘ ‘ <(S,4s« : ' 

{BK1DM, ’LX/ft*- - 

* ' --" - : -- 


®s \H-.r 


Page 11 




ivi<l Bow 


:• :'C ..;• J.: 0:. as? 

#* .tr.=-. :'• • l ':■;■■ 

#% 4'48-v '■■•:■■.•:. .* . .T:r:0 
IN acv- ; . :■: ; ; u; .”: 

KOu ! ‘ : a- V*. 

tartu-i* »":<■ ■:..%■ .r umV.: 

««flr I.-..:-*.' »•■:: :*•: .■'&: 

»w •■••'■ •« • ■■•: "; {'s!K 

«'• »w 

8* s’ ■•■■•■:«'■>- ! »-r.i 
: Mw«k - -. .1 

a a- • : ■•:«• ;•..«« 'i«*I 

r«< K- Sv. f /• ~ 

ilti hAir t. ;■; . ■••■ !?•?» •‘ c y_' 
jftfohn.Bv-* ‘fir:* 
fciift : ■••.£ ••■ ■" 
s uk 1 1 *1* n- t ' f 1 ' ' u ‘*' :lv 

lm*T* 

mmK:-!'-- 
1 |fc«l »:«' - : 

3 #mI* 1 .*• *• ■• • l ' V 
I *.* ■* ‘ ■•;; 

# 9“»J '•••• a ■ * • 

.— • .-•'—•is 

It* Vi^ti i» ■ ' * * - :.•*• * “ ^ 

V*... ^ 

* *rtT ? 1 :t»* V. • ' *■ : ;= • y -'“V. 2 st 

*» >■■• " ••"- V : L‘,"^7 fc . , 

; ** ».£'• «« •• • • •;. 

tat Wi r :• •: ■• ' ,.~S 


..M* t 


; :v - ■: 

■ - _ *“*' 


■•■».*. -' :V y *.fr" 

• - 4 " i:1 

■■ . . -s.\ *• 




■ 1 k , a 





THETRIB INDEX115 

International Herald Tribune World Stock Index ©, composeTof 
280 BitemationaJly inves table stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1 , 1 992 = 1 00. 

12 a ..... 






150 ‘ 


North America 


Approx weighting: 26% 
Ctosa 96 l20 Ptbv^ S5.77 


Ki © V . ‘J ; j, ' C( 'I 1 ' .' ‘ 

M J J A S O 
1994 


Latin America 


Approx weighting: 5% 
Ctostc 134.13 Ptbvj 134.41 


ISO' 









s 0 

1994 


Thu Mac tmeks US. doBar to lues 0 i stocks Ire Tokyo, Now Yoric, London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, ChUa, Danmark, Finland, 
Franca, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Nathertand a . New Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. Now York and 
London, ttw Max to composed of tho 20 top tomec to farms of mari tal capttaHathn. 
offHuwtoa the tan top stocks ora tracked. 


fspunsibik' i 

II Industrial Sectors j 


Vm. 

dot* 

Pm. % 

otoa* cteogi 


lb*. 

dm 

Pm. 

doa* 

% 

chang* 

1 

Enemy 

114.50 

114.12 40.33 

Capital Goode 

116.82 

11769 

-063 

■■ - a.1 Tls-ar.- 

(Jtjfitiu 

12139 

12567 -0.22 

RawHMeriih 

13563 

137.22 

-1.16 


Rram 

11136 

117.09 -062 

Consumer Goods 

104.16 

104.45 

-028 


Services 1174 a 11854 -0,89 Miscellaneous 


123.43 125.12 -1-35 


For more information about the Index, a booklet is avadabtofrae of charge. 

Write to Tib Index, 181 Avenue Cheries de GeuBa. 92521 NeuSy Codex, France. 


Escaping the Past in East Europe 

Ventures With Western Partners Start From Scratch 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Post Service 

WARSAW — An empty 
warehouse off a gritty indus- 
trial artery once known as Sta- 
lingrad Road is an unlikely 
place to find hope in Eastern 
Europe — especially when it 
combines a lumbering state- 
owned enterprise and one of 
the biggest corporations in the 
capitalist world. 

But the $30 mil linn joint 
venture between General Mo- 
tors Corp. and the Polish car- 
maker Fabryka Samocbodow 
Osobowych, known as FSO, 
that is taming this cavernous 
building into a brand new fac- 
lects one increasingly 
method for Eastern 
to deal with its trou- 
j: Padlock the past 
and stan over. 

GlvTs philosophy is simple, 
according to Richard Thorn- 
ton, general manager of GM 
Poland: Keep the workers, as 
long as they leave everything 
behind. Under terms of the 
deal, GM's joint venture part- 
ner has no right to influence 
the business plan, and the cur- 
rent FSO factories will not be 
involved in the project at all 
Instead, GM has gutted the 
old warehouse and is install- 
ing its own machines. 


The reason GM has little 
financial interest in allowing a 
Polish business to make deci- 
sions is that for four decades 
the factories of Eastern Eu- 
rope specialized in producing 
one thing — junk. Quality 
control was nonexistent. 
Communist accounting didn't 
factor in profit and aid not 
care about losses. A culture 


flourished, the old saw goes, 
in which the state pretended 
to pay the workers and the 
workers pretended to work. 

But since 1989, investors 
from the West and business- 
men from wi thin Eastern Eu- 
rope have experimented with 
differeut ways of making 
money. Gradually a pattern of 
success has emerged The for- 


eign companies that have in- 
sulated themselves from the 
past — bad debts, absentee- 
ism and bocndnjg on the job, 
moribund thin fang and dicta- 
torial ways — generally suc- 
ceed; those that get stuck in 
the mire of faltering Commu- 
nist monstrosities usually fail. 

“If they can put a protective 

See CHANGE, Page 18 



Economic Growth 


in percent 








■ toltei' UT 1 i 1 immO >*'■ 

M 

& ' ■ . ■ '"■■■ 

0 

— t c 'MMnrr 



* 


•"V$v J| 

7.1% 


-7% 


>v;.V<v -.I’Y- 


~ 15 :<- r Y .. 

A • '• s fh9»'Bl993 0lifi..OfWr 

-20 .V. •/: '■■■<>: • Y V *" 


MS • 



-17% 


Source: Deutsche Bank 


‘estimate 


The Wjdnnpcin Pus 


Toyota Plans 
A Car to Offset 
Yen’s Surge 


Kodak Disappointed With Quarter Net 


O International Herald Tribune 


Compiled by Ow Staff From Dispatches 

ROCHESTER, New York — Eastman 
Kodak Co_ struggling to cut costs and 
refocus its business, said Tuesday it posted 
a weaker -than -expected third-quarter 
profit. 

The company earned $193 million on 
revenue cf$333 billion in the quarter. A 
year ago, largely because of S3S3 million in 
restructuring costs, it posted a loss of $68 
milli on on revenue of $3.18 bQlion. 

Without the one-time charge, earnings 
were down nearly 31 percent in the third 
quarter. 

Anticipating a second-half earnings de- 
cline, Kodak has begun a deep cost-cutting 
program through the end of the year that 
its chief executive, George Fisher, said 


may include “a restructuring program.'' 
He did not elaborate. 

The third-quarter result is a setback for 
Kodak, whose credit rating and stock price 
have, improved this year as it sola off 
certain operations and refocused on its 
main photographic and electronic imaging 
operations. 

Kodak has raised S7.88 milli on from this 
year's divestitures of health care, consumer 
products and other nonphotography sub- 
sidiaries. The businesses were acquired in 
the 1980s for around $5.4 billion in an ill- 
fated diversification that weighed the com- 
pany down with debt 

In an internal memo last month, Kodak 
said it would freeze hiring for the rest of 
the year, speed staff reductions, cut re- 


search costs and halve the number of hired 
contract workers. The company is already 
in the process of laying off 1 0,000 workers, 
which will reduce its work force to about 
90,000. 

“Our cost management efforts contin- 
ued during the third quarter and will carry 
into the fourth quarter, possibly including 
a restructuring program consistent with 
these efforts," Mr. Fisber said. 

“Kodak will not inventory its problems 
and carry them forward,” he said. “We will 
emerge from 1994 with a strong balance 
sheet and a solid benchmark for measuring 
future performance." 

On the New York Stock Exchange, East- 
man Kodak shares rose 25 cents, to $48.00. 

(AP, Bloomberg) 


By Steven Brail 

International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Toyota Motor 
Corp., determined to make the 
strong yen more a blessing than 
a competitive burden, is design- 
ing a subcompact car that can 
be produced for 30 percent less 
than current models, company 
officials indicated Tuesday. 

The vehicle, not expected un- 
til late this decade, will be de- 
signed to compete with low- 
priced challengers such as 
Chrysler Coip.'s Neon, accord- 
ing to the company. 

In addition, the car is to be 
cheap enough to produce so 
that it can be exported from 
Japan even if the dollar falls to 
less than 90 yen. Toyota hopes 
thereby to avoid a “hollowing 
out” of production and jobs in 
Japan. A lower dollar makes 
Japanese exports more expen- 
sive in the united States and 
tends to raise prices of Japanese 
goods elsewhere. 

It remains unclear exactly 
how, or whether, Toyota will 
realize this ambitious goal, 
which was outlined Tuesday in 
the financial daily Nihon Kei- 
zai but was confirmed only as 
“consistent with our principles" 
by company spokesmen. The 
newspaper said Toyota would 
build the new car using a mod- 
ule-based assembly technique. 

But what is dear is that Ja- 
pan's largest automaker intends 
to remain aggressive in cutting 
costs. 

“They're moving back the 
goal posts," said Stephen Ush- 
er, an analyst at Kleinwort Ben- 
son Securities. “Their original 
goal was to be profitable at 100 
yen to die dollar with domestic 
production. Now it's gone back 
to 80” 

Toyota's plan could cause of- 
ficials of foreign governments, 
as well as currency traders, to 
revise the view that the strong 
yen will act as a weapon to 
blunt Japanese competitiveness 


and trim the nation’s lowering 
trade surplus. 

Indeed, it adds weight to the 
argument that Japan is mfa"£ 
the strong yen as a bitter but 

f iowerful medicine that will 
orce its manufacturers to 
ratchet up their efficiency and 
competitiveness to ever higher 
levels. 

“Our intent is 10 raise the 
global benchmarks for produc- 
tion-cost competitiveness,” a 
Toyota spokesman said. 

Ever since the Plaza Accord 
of 1985 — an agreement among 
world leaders on exchange rates 
— kicked the yen into over- 
drive, many have said that a 
stronger yen would reduce To- 
kyo’s surplus by making ex- 
ports more expensive ana im- 
ports cheaper m Japan. 

And Japan is importing far 
more soft drinks, computers 
and even cars. But exports have 
remained robust because many 
Japanese products — from liq- 
uid crystal displays to machine 
tools *— ■ still are competitive, or 
because there is no other major 
source for them. Accordingly, 
Japan’s trade surplus has 
soared to record proportions 
and begun to subside only slow- 
ly and selectively. 

Meanwhile, and against the 
odds, Toyota has managed to 
remain profitable, largely by 
making adjustments in its sup- 
ply network and increasing its 
overseas production. Last 
month the company announced 
it would double production in 
the United States over the next 
three years. 

Nissan Motor Co., Honda 
Motor Co., Mazda Motor Corp. 
and other domestic competitors 
have adopted strategies similar 
to Toyota's but have fared las 
well. But like Toyota, these 
companies are expecting im- 
provement in earnings as the 
domestic economy begins a 
gradual recovery. 

See TOYOTA, Page 18 


MEDIA MARKETS 


Canal Plus Aims for More 


By Richard Covington 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

PARIS — It had to be one of the most 
unwelcome birthday presents ever. 

On its 10th anniversary. Canal Plus was 
handed a bill by Nicholas Sarkozy, the budget 
minis ter and acting minister for communica- 
tion, requiring the pay-TV network to neatly 
triple its contribution to French television 
productions by 1999. 

Currently, Canal contributes 1.8 percent of 
its revenue to production. This will be raised 
gradually to 45 percent in 1999. 

On its current revenue, that would amount 
to 335 wiilH nm francs ($65 million), compared 
with 120 million francs. The government or- 
der also will oblige the network to produce 
made-for-TV films , documentaries and ani- 
mated features — none of them pan of its 
core business. 

The mainstays of Canal Plus’s program- 
ming are feature films previously released in 
cinemas and sports, largely soccer and box- 
ing. 

The network already forks over 9 percent 
of its. revenue to finance French c in e m a pro- 
ductions and to air virtually all new French 
films. 

Pierre Lescure, chairman of France’s only 


“The network is sore,” Mr. Siritzky said. 
“They don’t understand why they are being 
forced to invest in uncommercial program- 
ming to renew their license.” 

But G«nal Plus may be able to turn the 
government's requirement to fund more local 
television production to its advantage. The 
network has done it before, managing to turn 
it d eman d to air some unencrypl- 



Mr. 

Lescure, who took over the company in Feb- 
ruary after the abrupt departure of Andii 
RoiBsdeL “You have a concession; you have 
to pay after thaL” 

Save Siritzky, a media analyst at Teles- 
coop Conseil in Paris, characterized the nego- 
tiations between Canal Plus and the govern- 
ment as “fundamentally bitter.” 


progr amming — an unheard-of practice 
for a pay channel at the time — into a 
promotional window to attract new subscrib- 
ers. 

The government’s latest order, announced 
Oct. 10, came with Canal Plus poised to 
launch several international ventures. The 
ambitious aim, according to Mr. Lescure, is to 
make the network’s name as recognizable as 
those of Time Warner, Disney and Turner. 

As major American studios and networks 
race to invest in European networks. Canal 
Plus is forming strategic alliances to preserve 
its dominant position in France, extend its 
reach within Europe and expand further into 
the U.S. market 

And with an unbroken string of profitable 
years and 1994 profit forecast in the neigh- 
borhood of $160 million — although that 
would be down from 1993's high of $226 
milli on — Canal Plus would be is one of the 
few major European companies capable of 
mounting such an offensive. 

With 3.7 milli on subscribers in France, 
Canal Plus is approaching saturation point 
and needs to reach a wider audience to fi- 
nance its ambitions in film, interactive ser- 

See CANAL, Page 18 


StocksSag 
On Europe’s 
Exchanges 

By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — A weak dollar 
and f alling bond markets on 
Tuesday once again unnerved 
European equity markets, as 
major exchanges showed de- 
clines of 1 percent to 2.5 per- 
cent 

Analysts cautioned that trad- 
ing volume was thin and that 
there had been little news to 
affect the markets. “Most inves- 
tors are still sitting on the side- 
lines,” said Roger Monson, 
chief equity strategist for 
Daiwa Europe. “They seem to 
have made a habit of it.” 

Germany was the big loser as 
the DAX index slumped 2.51 
percent amid concerns about 
the effect of the weak dollar on 
exports and a report from Ger- 
many’s leading think tanks pre- 
dicting strong growth and thus 
little prospect of interest-rate 
cuts. 

The London and Paris ex- 
changes each dropped nearly 1 
percent, and falls in Madrid 
and Milan exceeded 2 percent. 
The European component of 
the International Herald Tri- 
bune World Stock Index fell 
1.51 percent, to 115.95. 

Concern in all markets con- 

See MARKET, Page 13 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


/MMm 



S C ELM. 
UK i7o l.noe 

sues 2 UH 

IAN ZOT 

(0] UK — MCI 

Motrtd IJMB mm *MJ 1 

MUM UHJS M*S4 WUD 

Hew York (b) U»fl MW 

s.ms utu W 2 C 

NJO Utti tSM 

iM> an m® 

ZnKN 1 M 5 2 JM 11 OSJII 

18 CU U(M Ulto IMS* 

ISM MHS !» 

Ctarinsw In Amsterdam, Lmtotl 

rates of Jam. 

0 ? To bur one pound: b: To bur 
ova noble. 




Oct- 25 

EuroGurrmey Dopoetti 




OCt 25 

BJ=. 

sMn- 

SJ=. 

U«5 

Y» CS 
U2M* 12415 

Paula 

1244 • 


Dollar 

D-MOTK 

Swiss 

Franc 

Sterling 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

ecu 

48577* 

sen 

L2U9 

U10 224975 
14401 * L09SJ 

3U7S* 

LWte* 

l month 

4?W 

4 9W4 V» 

34b-3U 

5 7^5 9. 

SHrfil. 

2 W2 v. 

5 y^5 

50201 

mss 

I5UU 22047 

2DL99 

Jmonttts 

sa-* 

5 Yir5 *n 

3 "W v» 

STSHi 

SYj-SSA 1 

2Y>-V* 


Aim* 

uun 

12*441 ■ urn 


C monttis 

55W 

57*5 9. 

4Uh4U> 

6 ’V4W. 

5-7WG 

5Afc.2Vj 

6 Vd». 


L231J5 

ISAM 1.13940 

1327] 

1 war 

6MK 

SiwSH. 

4 tv4 'y 

7Vi-m 

6 7V6*k 

a*w-2 1. 

6 “-Vi A". 


rTotero 


uzb ante" — 


S.BB IAJUM — — 

U 1 M» ISSSl BJMS *.1132 UTU* 1773 i * 1 W 

UK UK nos 3.1415 7 U 5 — — 7175 L 7 M 7 

UK* UK* 1 JRU USW* — 1 JM * 

mat sms* tw usm* — iaw* mn* i*bz* 

in UKU 3 2 .UN JM 3 U 2 UW 12 U 17 1.7371 1 S 7 JI? 

mil HA znH NJS. U 63 UU 0 MW HUM 

Hast York and Zurich, fixings In other centers; Toronto 

one dollar; Units of WO; N.O.: not quoted; NJL: not 


Other DoBar 

C wtu ct Part 
ArMflfcPM 099W 
Awfart.1 1J4W 
Amtr.SCM. 1 M* 
BnotlrMi 005 
05113 
2705 
JJB 73 
BmL pound 1382 
no Hi Hln 4523 


CMononoB 


Values 

Currency Pw* 
Brack drac ZW0 
how Komi M2N 
Huns, forint WM* 
IndtoniwK 3133 
lode. rupWi 2171 JO 
irMI M1W 

HrtMtljMfe. UXD 
Kowoflt dlMT 02M3 
Motor, rim. 25*57 


Currency PorS 

Max. peso 3416 

KZictaiid* U335 
Horw.krm <4714 
PUL poo 2*JW 

PolMiitoty 23001 
Pori, escudo 15114 
Russ, ruble 3M5M 
Sauflrtral 17505 

Stop. 5 1-4M 


C u rrency Pert 
3.Afr. rand HH5 
S.KOT.WOO 777 JO 
SMMLkraM 7JO 
TO (wen I 2605 

Thai bBM 34.91 

TorfcWiUra 35611 
UAEOrtum 14727 
Vene&boflY. 16957 


Sources: Reuters. Uuvds Bonk. 

/Tares aspUcabte to Interbank deposits of Si million minimum toreouhroicnt). 


Kay Mort«y Rates 

united suites 
DisBMiatrata 
Prim# rate 
Federal tends 
monte COS 
Comm, paper uo days 
Hoortfc Treasury Mil 
l.yoar Treasury wn 
SSreor Treasury note 
5-vear Treasury note 
7-iraar Treasury note 
1 0-rear Treasury note 
Jd-yoar Treasury bond 


Merrill Lynch 3Mer Ready asset 4.28 
Japan 

D beam! rate 
Call money 
t-month totertttuut 


Close 

Pro*. 

Britain 



4 JD 

LOO 

Bonk bau rate 

5 U 

*» 


7 16 

Call BMW 

505 

5 te 

4 % 

4 y. 


59 k 

5 Vi 

465 

445 

Smonth bnerbaaR 

600 

5 % 

S£7 

162 

OHMomti internarti 

6 9 . 

6Vi 

5 J 0 I 

5 JW 

HFvear GOt 

U 4 

bM 

SJ 6 

596 

France 



6-79 

6 J 9 

tntervaihoo rate 

5 J» 

$40 

7 JO 

7.50 

Can money 

5 M. 

5 * 

755 

7 J 3 

l^nonth Interbank 

5 9 . 

5 % 

7JS 

7.84 

3 -Bnmth toteitwok 

SVu 

5 9 . 

8 L 04 

8 JM 

Fmontb Interbank 

5 V. 

59 . 

Xt 428 

425 

10 -year OAT 

BJ 2 

&24 


IK IK 
2.19 2.19 


216 
2 H> 


Sources: Reuters. Bloomberg, Merrill 
Lynch, Bonk of Tokyo, Commerzbank, 
Greertmu Montagu. Credit Lyonnais. 

Gold 


JMoy into JUtoy 
15531 15531 15537 

9626 9601 9449 


* 


Forward Ratos 

f Cerreoer Mr ^ '^Zeunnr 

t rnonfl Ttorlhil 14377 14373 15372 Conod ion donor 

| DMKMnvt 14872 14878 U8» Jopa»MW« 

I Swlra franc 1-2186 1-WOJ lJ® 

L rrmxna); IMP (SOM. other <*m tram Oruters MAP. 


Muidii Interbank 

2 Vm 

2 7. 


AJYL 

PJ9L 

aitee 

UHrearoovernmeat bent 

475 

433 

Zurich 

39025 

389 JO 

Undt 

Germany 



London 

3B943 

38020 

— Old 

umbardrate 

600 

600 

New York 

391J0 

391J0 

— 020 


Con money 
T.moflrti toterboJ* 
s^nonlb teterbonk 
t-fnOflttl interbank 
lfwu Bead 


4.95 
SJB 5J» 
550 520 

5J0 5J0 

750 747 


IXS- dollars per ounce. London otftdat ftk- 
hios; Zurich and r/cw York ooentna and c*as- 
top prices; now York Como* tOacamoarJ 
Source: Reuters. 




Our Philosophy of Banking 
Goes Back 4,000 Years. 



I t was the ancient traders 
who first established 
many of today's banking 
practices. They accepted 
funds for safekeeping. 
Bartered goods for services. 
And extended credit. It was 
a business based on crust, 
and a handshake contract 
was binding. 

The world has changed 
immeasurably since then, 
but Republic National Bank 
still holds ro the principles 


established nearly four mil- 
lennia ago. 

We believe in the primacy 
of personal relationships, the 
importance of crust and the 
protection of depositors’ 
funds. This emphasis has 
made us one of the world’s 
leading private banks. 

As a subsidiary of Safra 
Republic Holdings S.A. and 
an affiliate of Republic New 
York Corporation, we're part 
of a global group with more 

REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


than US$5 billion in capital 
and more than US$50 billion 
in assets. These assets con- 
tinue to grow substantially, 
a testament to the group’s 
strong balance sheet, risk- 
averse orientation and 
century-old heritage. 

Though cuneiform tablets 
have given way to modem 
computers, the timeless 
qualities of safecy, service and 
personal integrity will always 
be at the heart of our bank. 



TIMELESS VALUES. TRADITIONAL STRENGTH. 


HEAD OFFICE GENEVA 1204 ■ 2, PLACE DU LAC * TEL iOZ2i 70S 55 55 ' FOREX: I02ZI 70S 55 50 AND GENEVA 1201 • Z. RUE DR. ALFRED-VINCEHT (CORNER 
OUAi DU MONT-BLMICi BRANCHES: U/GAWO «M>I ■ I. VIA CANOWI - TEL 409l> 23 95 32 * ZURICH 9039 ■ 57DCKER57RASSE 97 • TEL 1017 299 14 14 • 
GUERNSEY ‘ RUE DU PRE ' ST. PETER PORT - TEL (4SII 711 761 AFFILIATE REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK IN NEW YORK OTHER LOCATIONS: 
GIBRALTAR * GUERN5EY ' LONDON - LUXEMBOURG * MILAN ■ MONTE CARLO • PARIS • BEVERUf HILLS • CAYMAN ISLANDS ■ LOS ANGELES - MEXICO CITY • MIAMI * 
MONTREAL ' NASSAU ' NEW YORK • BUENOS AIRES - CARACAS ■ MONTEVIDEO ' PUNT A DEL ESTE - RIO DE JANEIRO ' SANTIAGO ' BEIRUT - BEIJING ■ HONG KONG - 

JAKARTA - SINGAPORE • TAIPEI - TOKYO 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1994 


Page 12 


** 


MARKET diary 


Stocks Burdened 
By Profit Outlook 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

’ NEW YORK — Concerns 
luat rising interest rates will clip 
CO'porate profit growth next 
year were blamed for pulling the 
stock market lower Tuesday. 

Hie Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage finished down just 4.71 

U.S. Stocks 

points at 3,850.59, but losing 
issues outnumbered gaining is- 
sues by a 2 -to-l ratio on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

The price of the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond was 
steady at 93 27/32* with the 
yield at 8.04 percent. 

Analysts said that with bond 
yields above 8 percent and the 
Federal Reserve Board still in a 
tightening mode for monetary 
policy, prospects for a stock ral- 
ly were slim. 

Higher rates mean “the econ- 
omy is likely to slow materially 
during 1995. and that suggests 
much weaker earnings growth 
next year than this year," said 
Donald Straszheim, chief econ- 
omist at Merrill Lynch. 

Telefonos de Mexico’s Amer- 
ican depositary receipts were 
the most actively traded Big 
Board issue, plunging 3ls to 
57% after the company said its 
third- Quarter earnings were 
lower than anatv«ts expected. 


Steel, heavy machinery and 
paper stocks also were among 
the biggest losers. Profit at 
those companies is particularly 
sensitive to economic and inter- 
est-rale cycles. 

USX- U.S. Steel slid 2W to 
3616. also burdened by an earn- 
ings report that fell below' most 
analysts' expectations. Bethle- 
hem Steel which lost 116 to 
1816. Deere, down Va at 72, and 
Caterpillar, down % to 57%, 
were among the big cyclical is- 
sues that lost ground. 

Baxter International fell 1% 
to 25 after the medical supply 
company reported earnings 
that were just below analysis' 
expectations. 

But oil stocks were strong, 
helped by reports of higher prof- 
it from Texaco, which rose % to 
63, Chevron, up M at 43W, and 
Phillips Petroleum, up I to 34%. 

Strong earnings also lifted 
Wm. Wrigley Jr. Stock in the 
world’s biggest chewing-gum 
maker jumped 2% to 43% after it 
said an increase in Internationa] 
sales helped the bottom line. 

Capital Ciries/ABC rose 1% 
to 79 on a buy recommendation 
from an analyst at Alex. Brown 
& Sons a day after the media 
conglomerate posted strong 
earnings. 

(Bloomberg, Knight-Ridder) 


Late Recovery Saves 
Dollar From New Lows 


Bloomberg Business News 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
tumbled to a post-World War II 
low against the yen Tuesday 
amid speculation that the 
world's central banks probably 
would not spend their reserves 
trying to rescue the flagging 
U.S. currency. 

_ A rebound in the U.S. Trea- 

Forolgn Exchange 

suiy market helped the dollar 
recover from two-year lows 
against other major currencies. 
Bonds recouped early losses af- 
ter tepid economic reports 
eased inflation concerns. 

“The dollar is struggling," 
said Steve Flanagan, a trader at 
PaineWebber. "No one wants 
to hold the currency.” 

The dollar fell to a low of 
96.42 yen but recovered to dose 
at 96’83 yen. down from its 
dose Monday -of 97.15 yen. 

The dollar fell to' 1.4860 
Deutsche marks, its lowest level 
in two years, before closing at 


1.4967 DM, up from 1.4915 
DM on Monday. 

The dollar rose to 5.1225 
French francs from 5.1135 
francs Monday and to 1.2492 
Swiss francs from 1.2428 
francs. The pound rose to 
$1.6360 from SI. 6325. 

Steady in early European 
trading, the dollar fell after a 
news service reported that Eu- 
ropean monetary offidals were 
reluctant to join the Federal 
Reserve should it try to support 
the dollar. 

The Bank of Japan bought 
dollars for yen in Tokyo, trad- 
ers there said. Few traders ex- 
pect the Bank of Japan to have 
much success defending the 
dollar unless other central 
banks cooperate. 

U.S. reports on consumer 
confidence and on employment 
costs “helped bonds recover a 
little', and that 1 helped the dol- 
lar " said Richard vulio, a deal- 
er at Bayerisehe Hypotbeken- & 
Wechsel-Bank AG. 


Va AjMXiated hm 


Op 25 


The Dow 


Daily closings of the 
Dow Jones industrial average 



AW J J A S O 
1994 

1HT 


NYSE Most Actives 


TeiMex 

GnMofr 

FordMs 

BoxttH- 

IBM 

R JR NOB 
Sprint 
GOfiB s 

WStsEI 
EKodt* 
K men 

Qirvslr 

AfnExB 

USTUSS 

□tlcorn 


VaL 

High 

Low 

Lost 

OHS. 

109342 

57* 

55 

57* 

— D'« 

54172 41* 

<0* 

41* 

-* 

49492 

29* 

28* 

29'.* 

-* 

38126 

26* 

23* 

25 

— 1V| 

2B318 

74* 

72* 

73* 

-* 

27389 

ft* 

ft 1 ** 

6* 

-* 

25411 

35* 

33 

33* 

— 1* 

25296 

48* 

47* 

47T« 

... 

22B27 

14* 

13* 

13* 

— * 

21389 

48 

4ft 

48 


M507 

16* 

15 

15* 

- ',* 

20426 

47* 

45* 

47* 

-1* 

20344 

30* 

29* 

29* 


20162 

38 

35* 

36': 


19573 44* 

43* 

44* 

— * 


NASDAQ Most Actives 



VoL 

High 

LOW 

Last 

Chg. 


76828 

42 

37* 

37* 

—9* 




II 




41655 

99 

27* 

28* 

-* 

Intel 

35734 

59* 

58* 

58'.ii 

— * i k 







MCI 

31974 

22* 

32 

22* 

— ’^i 


299S4 

40*. 

39 

39" • 

— 1 y 




16* 




27702 

59* 

58* 

59" 'it 

-*« 




41* 




26662 

25 

20* 

21P*= 

—yin 



29* 

28* 

28* 


TriCmA 

23914 

22* 

22 

22* 

- '/• 


23638 

14* 

10 

14 

—2'. 

TetefMPA 

23215 

2'V.. 


2- n 

V.8 


AMEX Most Actives 



VoL 

High 

Low 

Loll 

OlQ- 

VlOC VTt 

25298 

1 

1* 

1* 


rA'Tlm 

11474 

22 "a 

21* 

22* 

'*0 

ViocB 

8698 38 1 '. 

38 

38 

— -1; 

OtevSfts 

7ns 

II* 

10* 

11 


Am am 

5484 

9* 

9'i 

4* 

- X* 

USBtoSCi 

Kfra 

7* 

6* 

7 


Echo Bay 

3575 

13* 

12* 

13 

— v a 

MomHrw 

3410 

10 

10 

10 


GcevLnc 

3153 

TV.. 

2* 

21* 

„ , 

CosXrta 

313ft 

9 

8* 

8* 

— .Km 


Market Sales 



Today 

Prev. 


Close 

cans. 

NYSE 

326.11 

34706 

Amn> 

1707 

2205 

Nasdaq 

26901 

HAM 


In miliums. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
10 utilities 
10 industrials 


Close Ctvos 

9504 — 0.4D 

WJ4 — 023 

10033 —036 


Standard ft Poor’s Indexes 


industrials 

Tronss. 

Utilities 

Finance 

SPS00 

SP too 


High 

55030 

357 M 
14808 
rt.40 
Ml .95 
428.39 


Low Close 
54575 5£J2 
355.14 357.25 
147.77 KM? 
4101 4158 
45826 4JI.S3 
42424 4T7.7S 


am 

+ 1.04 
-*■ u» 
+ MS 
Uneh. 
+ 0.70 
+ 1.19 


NYSE Indexes 


H«rti low Last Chs. 

Composite 25375 252 25 253.51 -QJ1 
Industrials KO.Si 31830 320 36 • 0J8 

Tronto, 229 18 32196 278 64 —0.25 

Utility SOI .OS Iff it 20065 —047 

Finance 200.93 I90.M 2C0 68 — 0.45 i 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 

Close 

AM Ash 
ALUMINUM (NieR Grade) 
Dalian pm- metrician 
Spot 171600 171700 

Forward 1741.00 174240 

COPPER CATHODES (High 

Delian per metric ton 
Spat 258200 2SS3J0 

Forward 256930 257030 

LEAD 

Delian per metric ton 
Spot 6 USC 64150 

Forward 459.00 659 JO 

NICKEL 

Dot lari pgr metric ton 
Seat 694500 695500 

Forward 705500 706000 

TIN 

Dalian per metric tan 
Spot 55203X7 553800 

Forward 5602510 56103X1 

ZINC (Special High Grade) 
Dalian per metric ton 
Seat 106550 106650 

Forward 108800 1089,00 


Previous 
Bid Ath 


171800 1719310 
17403)0 17413X1 
Grade] 

25603)0 2562370 
2555.00 2557390 


64600 64 750 
tax 66800 


48553X1 5845330 
696S3X) 697000 


546(7.00 5470370 
55453X1 '550370 


10613X1 10623X7 
108100 1084.00 


HMh Lew Last settle am 

152.75 15250 15175 15173 -125 

I52L25 151.75 15200 15125 Uneh. 


Mar 

Jims _ 

(July 150-75 15X00 15X00 15100 UncTL 

Aug 155J5 1S5J5 15X25 15190 Unc*. 

SOB 157 JS 157.00 157 JS 15525 —125 

Oct 15951 159 jo 159 JO 154.75 Unch, 

Est. volume: 8589 . open Int. 1MU71 

l 

i BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPE). 
u A dollen per barreMoti Of liNO barrets 

165S 1820 16-56 1854 +0.14 

74,44 1821 1844 1843 +0.12 

1837 1816 1837 1« +109 

1828 1810 188 1827 +MJ 

16.19 1806 1813 1821 +803 

1813 1808 1813 1815 -Ml 

16.15 1810 1815 1814 -0.W 

1813 1812 1813 1813 —102 

N.T. N.T. 


. Dec 
JOB 
Feb 
Mur 
Apr 
Mav 
Jim 
Jhr 
aim 
S ep 
oat 


NASDAQ Indexes 


High LOW Last 

Composite *S?7t 754.98 75*71 

indusriols 749.02 7 4 r.08 76*00 

Banks 735 0* 733 JS 73*02 

Insurance 91)48 909.26 

Finance 903.8 69945 903 45 

Trursp, 69B.IS 694.15 *96 33 


AMEX Stock Index 



Dec 

93.48 




eng. 

MW 

92A2 

9153 

920* 

— 110 

Jon 

0202 

91.90 

91.94 




9109 




-409 

Dec 

9104 

91.13 

91.17 

— 112 

-5.27 

MOT 

90.99 

9005 

90.91 

-114 

— 2.57 

Jun 

9an 


9003 


—4 25 

Sep 

900* 

9003 

9005 


—5.71 

Dec 

9005 

TO44 

9047 





90X0 

9CU2 

— 11* 

' 

See 

9144 

9133 

9007 

— 0.14 


ESI. volume : 70634. Ooen 

nt.: 483051 


High Low Lost Otg. 
45X74 461.49 452 65 —CAB 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bends 

10 Utilities 

10 Industrials 


previous Today 
Close Hooo 

95.74 95-46 

90 J9 90-53 

100319 10179 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 

unenonged 
Tolal issues 
New Higns 
New Laws 


Close Pm. 
796 *98 

1411 1537 

687 657 

1894 JS92 
U 26 

230 158 


AMEX Diary 


Financial 

High Low nose Change 
MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 

ttXMOO-PfSBl 100 PCI 


N.T. 1818 — M2 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 1817 —O-K 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 1816 —0312 

1825 1820 1820 1835 +118 

Em. velum: 34JQ3. Open Int. 158200 


Stock Indexes 


Close Prev. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Uncmnwa 
Toro) issues 

New Highs 

Mew Lows 


220 

341 

751 

814 


226 

351 

217 

814 


NASDAQ Diary 


Close Prev. 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

Tolal issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


1370 

1386 

1854 

5110 

59 

143 


1333 

1917 

1861 

5111 

73 

101 


Spat Commodities 


Commodity Today Prev. 

Aluminum, lb 0.779 O.r* 

Coooer electrolytic, la 1J3 124 

Iron FOB. Ion 713.00 21XOD 

Lead, lb o.« 0 -t 

Sliver, tray az 5JO -,325 

Steel (scraol. ton 139.00 ijv.iM 

Tin. lb 17448 17272 

Zinc, lb 05379 OSOB 


1-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

ST million -PIS of 100 pet 
Gee N.T. N.T. 9176 -D3T2 

mot N.T. N.T. 9154 — 001 

Jon N.T. N.T. 7106 —801 

s«p N.T. N.T. 92.71 unen. 

Est. volume: 0. Ooen Int.: 4.271. 

I-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE1 
DMI million - pis of loo set 
Dec 94-80 9877 9878 — 03)3 

MOr WAS 04J8 - “ 

Jun 9404 9X95 

5ec 9X64 9356 

Dec 93.27 9X19 

Mar 92.99 9294 

JUD 9277 9272 

5ep 9258 9252 

Dec 9241 7233 

Mar 9230 9223 

Jun 92.19 92.12 

Sep 9210 9202 — 

Est volume: WAV. Ooen Ini.: 655541. 
3-MO NTH PIBOR (MAT1F) 

FF5 mUllan - Pis of 100 pet 
Dec 9A20 94.15 

Mar 9172 9166 

Jun 9132 »134 

Sep 9292 92B3 

DM 9257 9247 

Mar 9231 92Z4 

Jon 9213 923M 

S€P 9200 91.93 

Est volume: 37,089. Open Int.: 192780. 
LONG GILT (L1FFE) 
csaoQQ - pis & sands of too pd 
Dec 100-14 99-15 99-23 - 0-27 

Mer N.T. N.T. 9B-26 — 0-25 

Est. volume: 71327. Ooen inr.: 9953a 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 25M00 • Pts Of 100 pet 
Dec 8936 3830 8868 — 0-79 

Mar £834 8705 87-«0 — 178 

Est. volume: 190.109. Open Int.: 188499. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FF5OU0OO - Pts Of 100 pet 
Dec 10954 109 30 109.73 —060 

Mar 109.02 10344 10893 — 0.62 

Jun 108.22 10822 10814 — 862 

Sep N.T. NT N.T. unch. 

Est. volume: 314077. Open int.: 135.988 


High 

FTSE 108 (LIFFE) 
125 per inflex Mbit 

LOW 

Clou 

Change 

Dec 30160 

29010 

30090 

—210 

MOT 30330 

30090 

30310 

-220 


ESI. volume: 19.951. Open Ini.: 58461 


CAC 40 (MATIF) 
FFWNrMu P 


Oct 1834.00 1797 JIO 142400 -1450 

Nov 184150 1807.5:3 ISJ10O -1490 

Dec 184650 1B1800 18S3.ffi} -1550 

Mar 186400 1 85650 186108 -15.00 

Jim N.T. N.T. ISMS -15,00 

Sep N.T. N.T. 1B7Z00 -15-00 

Est. volume: 52866. Open Int.: 64,904. 
Sources.- Motif, Associated Press. 
London tun FlnancXif Futures Exatange, 
inti Petroleum Exchange. 


9443 —804 

9401 —005 

9X61 —005 

nSX 

9227 —mo 
— ao7 

92S3 —0.10 

9235 —an 

9223 — 0.12 

9213 —0.11 

9204 —811 


9420 + 001 

9171 —007 

9330 —032 

»29l —03)2 

9255 — 005 

9231 —006 

9211 -005 

91.97 -0.Q4 


Industrials 


High Low Lost Settle aide 

GASOIL (I PEI 

US. dollars per metric ton-lots of 100 tons 
Nov 15200 15050 15750 15125 Unch. 
15350 15200 15250 15275 Uncle 

154 JS 15350 15425 15425 - 025 

15875 15520 1SS2S 15525 —225 

1S850 15520 15525 1SS25 - 025 

15425 15250 153-75 15525 —025 


Dec 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 


Dividends 


Company Per Amt Rec Pay 

IRREGULAR 

Templeton China - 1.165 17-3 11-74 

Templet EmergMkt . 113 11-3 ll-l* 

Templeton Gib Util , 1225 11-3 11-14 

5TPCK SPLIT 
Brians & Strati on 2 for I split. 

INCREASED 

Fst AmCorp Term Q 25 71-15 11-30 

Fit Citizens NC Q -20 12-15 1-2 

Flowers Indus! Q 2025 11-4 11-18 

Mamnckrodt Grp O .14 12-16 12-31 

Miruitemon Inn a .10 m-31 ii-is 

Pta Inc Fd M .106 11-30 

Ptd tncMgmt Fd M .0925 no® 

pfd IikOpP Fd M .0515 11-30 

RutiBennaid Q .125 11-11 12*1 

USLIFE Corn Q 23 11-15 12-1 

CORRECTION 

Care Indus ex 0* 13-12 1-2 

Super Food Svcs cm OK 11-21 IMS 

Dcmlnkxn Textile a 05 72-13 I-7J 

c-revtsoa record dale. 

REGULAR 

Alliance 

CapMnomnt Q 

Amur Brands Q 

Amoco Caro Q 

Atirwao Asia Pae O 

Boor Steams Q 

Bergen Brunswig A Q 

CtiemlTrol Owm O 

Columbia Health- 
care Q 03 11-1 12-1 

Computer Lang G .10 11-8 11-22 

Duke Power Co Q >9 1MB 13-16 

Eotonvn Mvnf Bo M JBl 11-1 11-15 

EnserchCorn Q J35 11-18 12-5 

FranKim Multi into m .dm hmt 11-15 

Frankln PrlncMat M .05 10-31 11-15 

Franklin Unlv M to? n-15 11-3# 

Kemper Corp Q 23 11-9 11-30 

Lexlnolon Corn Q 27 10-28 11-15 

Liberty BncoOK O .IS 10-31 11-14 

Merldkm Ba> O 24 11-15 13-1 

Patriot PrmDvIi M jm 11-411-21 

Property Tr Am O 2S 11-1 11-14 

Scherlno-PkJuoh Q 51 1M ll-» 

Shopko Stores a .11 12-1 12-15 

StiMStrn PunSvc O 55 12-1 1-20 

Snort Supply . .03 11-21 11-28 

Suburban BncctnOH a -073 11-2 11-11 

USX-Marathon Q .17 11-4 12-10 

VainCorp Hldas O OB 11-1 11-15 

Warner-Lambert O 51 11-4 12-9 

Zum Influst Q 22 12-16 1-15 


51 10-31 11-7 
50 11-3 13-1 

v» 11-18 12-16 

.16 71-8 11-23 
.15 11-11 11-25 
.13 11-1 12-1 
M lt-5 11-15 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — Kubota Corp., the Japanese 
tractor manufacturer that tried to become 
an electronics company by investing in 
American technology start-ups. gave up on 
much of its dream Tuesday. 

The company, based. in Osaka, said it 
would scale back its computer business, 
stop making engineering workstations and 
close its Silicon Valley subsidiary, Kubota 
Graphics Corp., by year-end. 


Kubota said it would give up on hard- 
ware and concentrate on software. It will 
sell some of its technology to Digital 
Equipment Corp- and to Picker Interna- 
tional Inc., a medical imaging company. It 
said it would continue developing three- 
dimensional graphics technology for per- 
sonal computers by setting up an Ameri- 
can company that would employ some of 
the workers from the company being shut 
down. 

Kubota attracted headlines in the late 


U.S./AT TOCCLOSi 


Japanese Firm Gives Up U.S. Technology Dream 


Data Point to Slowing U.S. Grow* 

NEW YORK (AF) - pS 

tracks consumer behavior through & nw _ - ,u a - consumer 

Sta£ E£p* iSESt' K e Vomh straight mon*^ 

and economists said that showed S wters said sales of 

In contrast, the National AmommmoJ KM*** « 
preowned homes rose 1 percent m September t q 
3 970,000 on fear of inflation and higher rates. 

Core Growth Makes RJR Profit Soar 

NEW YORK CAP) — RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp. said 
Tuesday that earnings nearly tripled in the durd qvuner^^w* 
ing accelerating growth in its core tobaao and food busm«s«.- 
^RJRNTb^ posted a profit of S 216 million m dM 
compared with $76 mfflion a year earlier. Revenue rose 10 percent 

10 OpS Sg profit at the company’s tobacco unit, w hi^i 
the^Eoi Omd and Salem brands, rose 54 pwent jhef^ 
business, including the Oreo and Ritz brands, posted a 24 percent 
gain in earnings from operations. 

Salomon Brothers Weighs Job Cuts ; 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) —Salomon Brothers Inc., battered 
by two consecutive quarteny losses, is considering job cuts ana 
other changes to convince investors ibeir money is safe at the linn, 
an executive said Tuesday. . . . , 

The Salomon Inc. unit is considering paring some ot its o^u«r 
employees amid Wall Street’s worst slump in four years. The firm 
also is reviewing whether to modify its proprietary trading, where 
it bets billions of dollars of its own money on the markets, an 
executive involved in the planning said. 

Car Sates Give Boost to Goodyear 

AKRON, Ohio (Bloomberg) — Goodyear Tire St Rubber Co.; 
benefiting bom the continuing boom in U.S. auto production and 
higher international sales, said Tuesday that third-quarter profit 
rose on record revenue. 

Goodyear’s net income rose to $151.3 million, after profit from 
continuing operations of $131.2 million a year earlier. A gain of 
$5.2 million from the sale of its Reneer Filins subsidiary boosted 
income to $136.2 million in the 1993 period. 

Mobil Announces Heavy Job Cuts 

WASHINGTON — Mobil Corp. said Tuesday it plannedw 
make significant reductions in support staff jobs worldwide. The 
company denied a report in the Washington Post that said as 
many as 15.000 jobs would be cut. \ 

Support staff jobs range from clerical workers to accountants. 
Worldwide employment at Mobil is currently about 60,000. Mobil 
said it had not yet determined how many jobs would go. 

Separately, three major U.S. oQ companies announced strong 
third-quarter results. . 

• Chevron Corp. said its profit edged up to $425 million for the 
third quarter, from 420 million. The figures reflect an $18 million 
gain this year and a special charge of $145 million a year ago. 
Chevron’s sales rose 3 percent, to S9.Sl biiSon. 

• Texaco Inc. said profit from continuing operations rose 6 
it because of increased production and higher oD prices. 

r • - : - — .vn1..4:«» nwnal itMneanH 



1 980s by taking stakes in several American 
companies. 

In an interview in 1 988, a Kubota execu- 
tive said the company hoped to get 50 
percent of its revenue from computers by 
the mid- 1 990s. But a spokesman said Tues- 
day that sales by the computer business 
had amounted to only 30 billion yen ($300 
million). Kubota's total revenue in the fis- 
cal year ended in March was 979.5 billion 
yen. 


year ago- Net income nearly doubled to $281 million from $142 
million. Revenue rose 6 percent to $8.96 billion. . - ! 

• Phillips Petroleum Co. said moves to cut costs and streamline 
operations helped its net income rise to $119 million from S41 
million a year ago. Revenue rose 5 percent to 53,35 billion. 

(AP, WP r Bloomberg, AFP) 

For the Record 

Quaker Oats Co. said its earnings fell 37 percent, to $57.3 
milli on, in its first quarter because of a courtroom defeat in a 
battle over a Gatorade slogan, higher marketing costs and lower 
pet food sales in Europe. ( AP J 

Tde-Communications hoc-^aid it would pay $290.3 million in 
stock to buy Comcast Corp.'s 19.9 percent stake in Heritage 
Communications Inc., a cable television operator. (Bloomberg) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Aflwa Fiwwe Prow Oct. 25 
OoMProv. 


Amsterdam 

ABN Amro Hla 56.70 5740 
ACF Holding 3870 35.9Q 
A*»<xi 10850 10440 

Ahold 47.90 4810 

Akzo Nobel 20150 202J0 
AMEV 68 69 40 

Bols-Wcuanen 3320 3340 

C5M 67-00 6820 

DSM 144.90 

EISCUkST 16.70 ItBO 

Fofckrr 1540 1570 

GKI-Bracade5 45 4499 

HBG 290 ISO 

Keuwken 341 MMo 

Hootjovens 74 40 76 

Humer Douota, 73.00 74 

IMC CQiand 42JQ 4110 

Infer Mueller 91 9850 

Inn Nederland 7550 7720 

KIM 45.80 44J0 

KNP BT 49.10 4800 

APR 52 5Z40 

Ncdllovd 4920 -M50 

Oce Grlrlen 7450 72e0 

Pokhoed asa 45.bs 

PnilliH 52 52-80 

Polygram 72 71 .M 

Kooeco 11130 11220 

Rodamco 51 J0 52 

Rollnco 11420 115 

Porcnlo B240 0240 

Roral DUtCtl 1B65D 1B7.6B 

Stork 44.10 44.10 

Unilever 197.40 199.10 

Van Ommeren 45.90 m 

VNU 175 177 

Wolters/KluvKr 11940 12120 

EDE Index : 39830 
Pmloin : 40123 


Brussels 


Aimanil 

ArbesS 

Barra 

BBL 

Bek part 

CBR 

C/JIB 

CNP 

Cackerill 

Cabana 

Colruvt 

Deinalzc 

Eiectrooel 

Electraflna 

Forth AG 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevoert 

G KJvcrticI 

Immobei 

KredMrttxmk 

Mawnr 

Petratlno 

Pawerfln 

Pedicel 

Ravale Beige 


7440 73N) 

am 4950 

2410 2450 
4160 4150 
23100 22850 
11850 1 1975 
2500 2525 

1980 2000 

193 797 

5300 5380 
6950 7210 
1224 1234 

5440 5490 

2900 29B0 
2390 24]0 
1228 1240 
3820 3*»?0 

8*00 *9 JO 

4410 4540 
2760 77fl0 
6150 6160 
1380 1380 
mu 94oo 
2810 2930 

470 401 

4460 4560 


CioMPrrv. 


Rhelnmetol) 
Sobering 
Siemens 
Thyssen 

Varla 
Vetoa 
VEW 

vjog 

VoUuvnaen 
yweiia 
PAX In dee : mfLS3 
Previous : S075- 
FAZ index :75i 
Previous : lets 


KISS 27050 
951 969 

607.5061740 
274J03825O 

301 312 

485 498 

370379 JO 
45946850 
42850 04 

1010 1 Q 20 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yhtvma 104 103 

Erao-Gutrelt 40.90 42 

Hufuamakl 144 144 

K.O.P. 870 860 

Kvmmene 127 ua 

Metra 143 141 

Nokia 662 691 

Pohioia 70 70 

Reno la 95 9V5Q 

Stockmann 252 2&0 

HEX General index : 1910 
Previous : 1946J9 


5oc Gen Bonaue 7 230 7330 
SocGcn Belgkiuc 2m 2)85 
Sauna 129«J 12®2S 

Sotvav 14G0D 14825 

Tessendcrio «E50 9880 
Troctelwl 96B0 9830 

UCB 23725 24400 

Union Mlnlere 2685 7680 

Waoons Lit* N A ASM 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

Alcatel SEL 
Aiiionz Halo 
Altana 
Asks 
BASF 
Baver 
Bav. Hypa bank 


14850 149 
290 2#» 

2188 2239 
630 631 

82084250 
3OO3Q5J0 


3303034170 


381 


Bsy.Vfrr'eimM 417J04KX 


BBC 
BHF Bank 
BMW 


679 670 

385 391 

737 7J9 


Commertocmk 3055031150 
Continental 21! 222 

Daimler Bent 72550 749 

Deaussa 426 453 

Dl Babcock 224 229 

Deutsche Bank 7105072820 
Domns 487 494 

DreMnerBanii 38639350 
Feidmuehie 300 3oo 

FKrUDOHQKCtl 19050 194 

Haraener 30850 310 

Henkel 57357850 

Haehttet in 9js 

Hoechst 308 316 

Holimann 767 793 

P»3S" 20620850 

I WKA 32532850 

KatlSai* W if; 

Korstodt MX) 614 

KjUthOt 48850450 

KHD 12250 124 jo 

Kloecknerwenie 13350 138 

"“** 855 877 

18350 186 

39039750 
3752038050 
14750 15850 
2745 279S 
640 6401 
431 443 
22222950 
44145450 


Linde 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Mannesmonn 
Mefaitgneii 
Muenen Pueck 

Poncne 

a ttvsm 

PWA 

RWE 


Hong Kong 

Bk East AM 23.10 33 

Camav Poclllc 11.30 11,40 
Cheuno Kona 36 3820 
China Light Pwr 3950 3950 
Dairy Farm mi l 10.10 1020 
Hang Lung Dev 1115 13.45 
Hano Sena Bank 54.75 55.25 
HondorronLand 4860 48B0 
HK Air Ena. 30.10 29.20 
HKCntnOGas 14.10 UJM 
HK Electric 2170 2190 
HK Land 1865 1870 

HK Realhr Trail 1840 1830 
HSBC Homings B9.25 90 

HKShangHNj 1025 10.40 
hk Telecomm ties 15.70 
MK Ferrv 1875 i(L70 

Hutch Whomcoo 34 .W 34,40 

Hvsan Dev 2015 281D 
JardlneMam. ®Z5H 6125 
Joralnestr Hid WJS 29A5 
Kowtoon Motor J4JS 14.90 
Manddrln Orient 9 AS 955 
Miramar Hotel 19.15 1870 
New WWW Dev 2415 24JB 
SHK Props 54JO 5ftjo 

smu* 110 no 

SwIraPacA 5875 55.75 
Tai Cheung Pros lO.io 1810 
TVE . 415 4.15 

Wnorl How 29.1 S 59JS 
ivneetockco i&ao 16M 
Wing On Co Inti 1020 10 

Wlnsor Ina. 1810 18CS 


Johannesburg 

AECI 2750 2750 

Aitech 

Anew Amer 23650 237 jn 
Boriows 31.75 3150 

Blyvoor flA. — 

Button sa 51 

DeBoers 1®® W 

OrietwiteJn 6655 6650 

Gen cor 1485 I8M 

GFSA 125 12t 

Harmony 42 

HlahveM Steel 32» 

Klooi 70 TO 

Nodbanl Ora 3125 31.50 

Randtenteln 
Rusotat 

SA Brows 9125 91M 

5t Helena 45J0 49 

5asai 3875 

western Deep 227 227 

Composite Index : 5720.13 
PrOvrtWS I 5753J4 


CIom Pr«v. 

GEC 179 181 

Gonl Acc 552 555 

Glao , S54 5J0 

Grand Met 197 4 

GRE 152 157 

Guinness 454 <61 

GUS 5-57 859 

Hanson 25B zzs 

Hlllsdown 1^4 1 M 

HSBC Hldw 697 7J» 

Cl 7.96 813 

inchcooe 415 421 

Kingfisher 473 428 

Lodbroke 1.49 ijo 

Land Sec 5.99 sm 

Loporte 888 6.95 

Laima 148 1 JO 

LesatGenGrp <26 434 

LMVdS Bank 529 S.42 

Marks Sp 420 425 

MERC 431 425 

Na+i Power 479 45a 

Ntrtwesl 485 486 

NthWst Water 5.40 529 

Pearson 5.91 895 

PIO 893 897 

Piikinatan 1.92 1.93 

PaworGen 592 858 

Prudential 2.97 IDI 

Rank 0« 483 414 

Reckltt CM 520 877 

fimllond 455 460 

Read trrtt 7J9 7X2 

Reuters 457 4JB 

E*fC Grain) 920 923 

Rotls Raver 121 123 

Rotnmn (unit) 4JH 412 

Rovol Scot 419 421 

RTZ 856 866 

5a bistoury IBS trh 

5a»f Newcas 5 . 18 822 

Scot Power I4i 148 

Sears UK 1.07 

Severn Trent 5 M 5J0 

fheti 495 7.01 

Sietoe 813 523 

Smith Nephew ljo 1X2 

SmllhKHne B 403 4.10 

Smith IWH) 457 454 

Sun Alliance 116 133 

Tate & Lrie 4.14 4.1s 

Tesco 212 133 

Thorn EMI 927 927 

Tomkins ZU5 2.05 

TSB Group 119 224 

Unilever ti.13 1121 

Utd Biscuits 293 3J11 

Vodafone 1.97 tm 

War Loan JVi 4813 4 qbi 

Wetlcnme &ja 627 

wnitDreaa 847 ui 

WUUamsHdos 3. JO 134 

wmis Carroon tj«a ijj 

FT 38 Index : 238128 

BSE®®? 306098 
Previous : 3029.10 


Madrid 


London 

Atotoev Non 422 410 

Allied Lyons 525 523 

ArloWtoglra £48 147 

Argyll Groan 256 166 

AssBrll Foods 820 526 

BAA 4,« 5 

BAe 463 467 

Bank Scofland 1.95 I9fl 

Barclays 547 5.71 

Bass 831 528 

BAT 423 429 

BET 124 1.05 

Blue Orcte 280 183 

BOC Geoua 669 6JV 

Boats 527 5J1 

Sown ter 443 445 

BP 410 410 

Brit Airways 347 169 

Brit Gas 228 283 

Bril Steel 158 1J9 

Brit Teleram itv ia5 

BTR 103 383 

Caoie wire 198 4 

Cadbury Sen 427 434 

Caradon 249 248 

Coats Vlyelfa 1.96 1.99 

Comm Union 516 527 

CqurjaukJs 430 424 

ECC Croup 322 326 

Enterarfse 011 327 J26 

Eurotunnel 2.17 223 

Flsons 1.15 1.15 

Forte 726 2.29 


BBV 3170 3190 

Bco central Htap. 7975 3025 

Banco Santander 49iS 4980 

Banesto SW 860 

CEPSA 3125 3150 

Draaados 1745 16U0 

Endtsa 5500 ssro 

Ercros 145 147 

Iberdrola B09 819 

Reosol 3858 3880 

TobocaHra 3330 3d3S 

Telefonica 1600 16BS 

ss 8 snar*** 


Milan 

Aileanza 14910 15460 

Assllalla 11500 12320 

Autostrada wlv 1590 1601 
BC8 Aortcairura 2550 2580 
Bca Commer I tot 3550 3651 
Oca Nat Lftvora 11E» 12i« 
Ben Pop Novara 7820 7900 
Banco dl Romo 1546 1560 
Bco Amtoraslono 3845 I960 
Bee Napoli rise 1075 ion 
Benetton 19510 19615 

Credlto Itollaro 1662 1677 
Enidwm Aug 7940 3030 
Fertln U90 1247 

Flatsoa S950 6133 

Flnara Aoroind 9320 9510 
Finmeccanica 1230 1250 
Fondlarle 5Pfl 10800 1107c! 
Generali Assic 3&eoo 37 mm 
IML _ 5025 5200 

itateemOM! 10000 10190 

tialaas .4525 4690 

Mediobanca 12430 12810 

Montedison ups 122 s 

Olivetti 1794 1 840 

Plfilll SPO 2225 2J90 

RAS 17790 1(910 

RlfKKCCflte 6175 8280 
San Paak) Torino 8750 9025 
SIP 3990 4070 

5ME 4015 4028 

StiWBPd 

Stando 3 !2S 3 ?2 

Stet . Jg* 44« 

ToreAssIc 22850 22980 

Vt&tt&Qt P :W * 


BCE Mobile Com 
Cdn Tire A 
Cdn Util A 
Cascades 
Crnwnx Inc 
CT FbVISvC 
Gaz Metro 
Gt west Ltfeco 
Kees mriBcp 
Hudson's Bay Co 
Imasco Ltd 
Investors Grp Inc 
Labatt (John) 
Labkiw Cos 
Molsan A 
Natl Bk Canada 
Osnawa A 
Poncdn Petrotm 


Ss 


Power Fhil 
Ouebeoor B 
Rogers Comm B 
Royal Bk Cda 
SearaCanoda Inc 
Shell Cda A 
Saulhom inc 
StetcoA 
Ttllon Fln'l A 
Indeitrkils Index: 
Prevtous : 193887 


Close Prev, 

40* 40 

live in* 
24* 24 Vh 
7* 

17* 17* 
IB 18 
12* 1214 

20 * ao« 

13* 13* 

26* am 

38*6 30* 
16 16 
2SPU 71 

71 21 * 
21 * 21 * 
9 m# 
18* 19 

40* 40*. 

law ib* 

28* 23 Vj 
16 16 
18* 19 

27* 2SU. 
»'* BH. 
44 
16 16b 
9 

3.70 3.70 
194489 


Paris 

Accor 507 509 

Air Uoutde 709 707 

Alcatel Aisthom m2 470.m 
Axa 239 239 

Bancolre tael 489 m 
BIC 614 624 

BNP 244.60 2*W.ai 

Bouygues 511 515 

Danone 700 7tn 

corretour 2213 2212 
C.CF. 212 210 

Ceras 101.60 naso 

CharaeutT 127? J285 

Clments Franc 25B 245 

Cluto Meq 410 430 

EH-Aaultalne 35980 343.40 
Euro Disney 6.70 4.70 

Gen. Eaux 43250 429 

Havas 414A0 4KLSO 

I me tat 540 553 

LofaroeCoPsee 395J0 39860 
Leorand 6650 6650 

Lyon. Eaux 438 445 JO 

Drool {!.') 1031 1052 

L.VJVUL 804 811 

Matro-Hodiette 10ZJW 100 JO 
Michel In B 213^0 219.70 

Moulinex 112 115J9 

Paribas 33030 334 

Pecft trier I reft 15450 158 

Pernod- Rl card 289 291 JO 
Peugeot 760 77B 

Plnoult PrhH 9*6 955 

Radloieamlgue 512 512 

Rh-PoukncA T1&B0 121450 
RaH. St. Louis T398 im 
Sroofl 24250 247 

Saint Gobohn 634 ao 
5.E.B. 551 536 

SM Generate 560 567 

Suer 237 233.90 

Thomson-CSF 136 13840 
Total 31080315^1 

UAP. 126 *-• 13150 

Valeo 2752028191 


Montreal 

A tco Ltd I 13b 13* 

Bank Montreal 24* 24* 


Sao Paulo 

Banco 00 Brasil 14 30 1630 

Banesoa BJi 9 

Brodeaca 7 j89 1S3 

Brohmo 275 200 

CeirUo 79 76.01 

Eletrabras 28S 243 

Itaubonca 2S5 250 

Lignr 279 283 

Paranapanema 11.12. UM 
Petrabms I28*i7.ai 

Sauza Crm 7500 7510 

Telebros 39.90 38 

T«1KP 413 390 

UElminas 1J8 1J3 

Vale Rio Doce 1M 159 

Varig IBS IBS 


Singapore 

Asia Pac Brew 1L90 17 

Ceraton 8.15 0.1s 

Cllv Devekxunnt 2.30 EU5 
Cycle A Carriage 1340 iuq 
DBS 11 11 

DBS Land *10 5.15 

PELevhmlon 7.U 730 
Fraser & Keave 1738 1730 
Gl Eastn Lite 28 2740 
Hong Leong Fin 436 439 

Inr hmp db 5 55 5 <65 

Jurang Shipyard 1330 13.18 
KavHiaajcapei l.*j i* 
Keaael 12.90 1110 

NOHtttl 336 128 

Neatuneoriem 246 249 
QCBC foreign 1540 1540 
O'seas Union BK 745 745 
Oieas Union Ent 940 MS 

setneowong H-70 iuo 


Close Prev. 
SJme Stnaopore 1.15 1.16 
Sing Aerospace 234 Z34 

sma a l runes fora ii?o u 

Stag BusSvc 930 935 

Slno Land 150 955 

Sing Pellm 249 250 

Skip Press tarn 2630 2640 

Slno ShtabMp 2A3 264 

Sing Telecomm 11B 330 

Straits Steam 110 110 
Straits Trading 192 3.94 
Tat Lee Bank 446 A46 

utd Industrial 152 150 

UtdCaeo Bkfarn ii70 1530 
Utd CTseas Land 332 108 
StreJfi Times Index: 235254 
Previous : 337636 


Stockholm 

AGA 67 6650 

Asea AF 518 527 

Astra AF 1845018550 

Atlas Cocoa 95 9650 

Electrolux B 372 375 

Ericsson 43143450 

Esoeite-A 99 ioi 

Handetsbank BF 92 92 

Investor BF 1785017850 
Norsk Hydro 262 266 

Pharmccia AF 1295013050 
Sondvlk B 1)6 117 

SCA-A 115 115 

S-E Banken AF 4540 45J0 

Skondia F I2B 129 

Skanskq BF 1S050 150 

SKF BF 13450 136 

5toraAF 436 439 

Trelleboni BF 11150 113 

Volvo BF 139 140 

Affaerrvoeriden : 1BS7J9 
Prev loos : 187653 


Sydney 

Amcor 851 845 

ANZ 350 354 

BHP 30.16 204s 

Bora l 335 136 

Bougainville 0.96 0.95 

Calcs Mv-r 4.12 4.13 

Comat CO 550 550 

CRA 1850 1896 

C5R 438 4 AS 

Fosters Brew 742 143 

Goodmi*, Field 129 149 

1CI Australia II 10.W) 

Atoomton 151 151 

MIM IBS 25S 

Nat Aval Bonk iojo 1052 

News Cora 828 830 

Nine Network ISO 350 

N Broken Hilt 348 183 

Pac Dunlop 406 459 

Pioneer Infl 344 349 

Hmndy poseklon 242 243 

OCT Resources t JS 152 

Santas 193 441 

TNT 250 251 

Western Mining 819 824 

Westpoc Banking 437 439 

WbodsWe 554 813 

a&rasar 1 ™ 


Tokyo 


Altai Electr <29 421 

Asctll Chemlcnl 760 763 

Asohl GluSS 1240 1250 

Bonk Of TakYO 1500 1520 

Bridgestone 1570 1S60 
Comm 1750 1770 

Casio 12&SI 1J60 

Dal Nippon Print 1630 1830 
Dalwa House 1340 1350 
Dalwa Securities 1390 1400 
Pontic 4650 47W 

Full Bank 2140 2150 

Full Photo 2270 2»8 

Fulltsu 1080 1080 

Hitachi 989 997 

Hitachi Cable 029 m 
Honda 1710 1730 

ltd YokOdo 5220 5240 

Itochu 742 744 

Jancn Airlines 734 736 

Kollma 951 951 

Kaitsol Power 2450 24» 
Kawasaki Steel 438 443 
Kirin Brewery 1160 1160 
Komatsu 906 B9V 

Kubcln 725 720 

Kyocera 7190 7190 

Matsu Elec Inds 1610 1500 
Akatsu Elec Wks 1050 losa 
Mltsubldjl Bk 2430 2450 
musuo Chemical 555 556 
Mitsubishi Elec 72D 720 
Mitsubishi Hev 760 764 

Mitsubishi Cora 1290 1270 
Mitsui and Co 84? B52 
MJtsuj Marine 726 743 
MltSUkajM 962 963 

Mitsumi 1400 1400 

NEC 1200 1200 

NGK insulators 1010 1070 
Nlkko Securities 1090 1110 
Nippon KDtfOku 9AS 9B5 
Nippon 011 685 60S 

Nippon Steel 389 388 
Nippon Yusen M9 651 
Nissan B37 6*4 

Nomura Sec 1990 ssse 
NTT tS2Sa S9tXki 

Olympus Oaticol 1080 1090 
Pioneer 2saa 2520 

Ricoh *48 940 

Sanyo Elec 578 582 
Shora 1780 1790 


Shimazu 
Shinetsu Chem 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sum I Marine 
Sumlloma Metal 
label Corp 
Tokeda Chem 
TDK 
Tellln 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Toepan Printing 1 1 

Toroy ind. 

ToUlibo 

Toyota 
Yamaldil Sec 
a: x 100 . 

Nikke i 225 : 19772 
Previous : 198S2 
Toulx Index : 1569 
Prev toes : 1575 



Toronto 

AbltfW Price 17* 17* 
Air Canada 8* 8’- 

A Iberia Energy 19 19s* 
Alcan Aluminum 3o* 36* 
Amer Barrick 34* 34^ 
Avenor 24* 24* 

Bk Nova Scotia 26* 26* 
BCE 47 47* 

BC Telecomm 2516 25* 
Bombardier 8 21* 21* 

Bramaiea 3JB 405 

Brascan A 1+L 19* 

Camera 2 ffw 29* 

CISC 31* 31* 

Cdn Natural Res 16 16 

CdnOccid Pet 32 3ITk 

con Pacific 21* 21* 
Cascades Paper 6 7 

Com Inca 25* 25* 

Consumers Gas 16* 16* 
Dotasco 22* 22% 

Demon fitd B 12* 72* 
Du Pont Cda A 19Vi 19* 
Echo Bav Mines 17V* 17* 
Empire Co. A 13* 13* 
FalconbrWge 23V* 2 J* 
Fletcher Cnoll A 17 IT^^ 
Franco Nevada 82* 82* 
Guardian Cap A 8* B* 
Hernia GaM W* 14Si 
Horsham 2ff* 21 

imperial 011 45* 45* 

Inca 39* 40* 

IPL Energy 28* 28* 
Laid law A 10* 10* 

Laid law B to* 10* 

Loewen Group 32* 32V, 
London Insur Go 22* 22 

MaanIK etavmt ib tai*. 
Mogno 1 nr 1 A 47* 47* 
Maple Leaf Fits 11* 11* 
Moor* 25* 25* 

Newbridge Netw 40* 4C* 
Norando Inc 26* 

Naranda Forest ll* 11* 

Nor con Energy 17* ITu 
Nttiern Telecom 48* 49 

Nova 13* 13* 

Onex 13* 13* 

Peiro Canada 11* ll* 
Placer Dome 31* 32* 
Potssh Carp Sask 45* 47* 
Proviso 5* 5* 

PWA _ . 0M 861 
Owbeear Print 14* M* 
Renaissance Eny 2B* 28* 
Rio Algam 76 26 

Seagram Co 401* 40* 
Stone Console 16* 16’A 
Tolhrntm Eny 28 27* 
TelMlobe 14* 14* 

Telus 14* 76* 

Thomson Ml m* 

rorDom Bonk 20* 20* 
Transolta 14U> 14'A 

TransCdaPlge ir«, 17* 
Utd Dominion 24* 26* 
Utd westbvme i| upg 
Westcoast Env 71* 71* 
Weston 40* 41* 

Xerox Canada B 49 4ffW 

Pre^^^g^" 


Zurich 

AdtolnHB 212 215 
AJutaJsse B new 631 642 

§•■«!" Bp»B lte» 1078 
CU»Getgv8 733 737 
CS Holdings B £H n6 
Elektrew B 227 331 
F'3«HtrB 1415 iS 

B 19*0 1975 
Jeimaii b Bfi btd 

LpnaisGvrK m 730 
{fpjyenpick B 399 395 
Nestle H 1 1 *" 1™ 

Oerllk. Buehrie R 127 128 

PorgMOHIdB 1410 14W 
RocneHdpPc ssio 56ig 
Satre Republic 77 99 

Sondai B 441 asq 

SchtadtorS 60oo 7000 
Sulzer PC (So bm 
Swveillance B 1490 1?S 
Swiss Bnk Cora B 366 347 
^“Relnsur R ri4 ?2S 

Sg» lr « ■« 

JiSl®. _ '?3S 1250 




,M5 644 

IT44 )15| 


U.S. FUTURES 


V* Astadated PreM 


Swoon 

Season 






«Bh 

Law Ooen 

Wgti 

LOW 

Qase 

Chg 

OP-Int 


Grains 








4.1SW 


405'*! 


400 

-404 V. 

39X30 

406*1. 

307 Mar 95 4.15 

4I5”. 

4J»9i 

410'. 

23J7S 

198* 


191 

184*ft 

185'a— O.OSij 

4097 



156 


152 V. —002". 

9001 



306'.- 

156 

IMlj— OJTh 

232 

3 7S 


307 V, 


IAS'S -0.02’* 

138 

304* 

3> Jui9* 



3024.-OJJ31,'. 

8 

ESI. SOWS 15.000 Men's, sates 16065 




Atari's open in 77079 up 13*0 





WHEAT 

(KJBOT) S^ftutwfc^miFn-ilploripcrbuw 



*23’. 

il2'yCtec«4 412 

0U'.v 

407 

4J» 

-OJNIi I902J 

4.27'. 

125 Mar 95 4.I6T 

418 

ill'l 

412 

— {Lfl5 T .j 

13097 

4.03 

121 '7: Mov 95 303 

194 

188 V, 

Itato^aOd'i 

1000 



161 

157'/. 

309 

-401 

1598 

m 

029 toJlS 



161V, 


79 

3099, 

1004 Dec 95 



168 '6 


J 

Esi. sates NA Man's, sates 

4077 





Men's open iri 37.502 up j85 








2.77 

2.13'. Dec 91 lift* 

117* 

Z1S 

2.15V4— 001 X. 122039 

ZBVi 

JJ3''iMor 95 228 

208* 

126’4 

226 V] -0.01V. 5I.2B8 

205 

May 95 2369: 

2064, 


205 

-401ft. 25.131 

205* 

2JS’iJul95 242 

202". 

Z«0’. 

200V.— 0.01 V, 294)92 

2.70''j 

239 S» 95 247 Vi 

147* 

205’/. 

205V.-O01W 

2063 

263 

2J5 ,, :Dec 95 2Jl‘i 

201* 

200V. 

15WA-O01 

12065 

2.5 ! 

2ifl’.iMot-«£ 2S7": 

207S, 

206 V> 

207 

-401 

745 

2.65 

iSSVtJuita 



IM 


418 

Est. sates 3SM0 Mart's, sates 44,775 




Man's OPOT irt 251426 UP 

27B 








5.2ft 3 ‘*Nov94 5J3 

504* 

506V. 

508 '--404V. 41741 

7.W 

SJ7‘m Jan 95 504 

1+4 

508Vi 

5091ft— 4 JI4Vi 39088 


5.47V. Mar 9S SJS 


508 Vl 

5-70 

-40416 22010 


506 May 95 502 

503 

5J6'/< 

508 '1— 404'* 10,107 

74)6 Ui 

IfJ'VJf’TS 508V, 

5.90'j 

503'ft 

S04'/,— 404V] 17032 

6.17 

S0ft , 'SAug9S 19I'-: 

5.9? 

507 

507Vj— 404'.5 

1,153 

6.15 

171 Sen95 5.92 

5.94 

5081,1 

189 

-402 Vi 

420 







607* 

6JM Jan 96 6.07 

607 

Am 


KK 

671 

19? v iJul96 



620 


27 

Esi. SQUIS 44,000 Mott's Mies S2JJT7 




Mot's open Iri 142^N8 ott 

5715 





SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) '« w- Honors ■» 

ion 



209 00 

140J0Dec94 16400 

16500 

16300 

16130 

-490 43001 

707S0 

l6l«Jan?5 166.00 

Hi . » 

144 70 

16480 

—100 16,938 

20700 

lb* 90 Mar 45 169.40 

lift, to 

168.10 

16800 

—490 14041 

20700 

14760MOV95 17200 



171.40 



706 00 

170.70 A4 95 17600 

1 77 JO 

17500 

17500 




l»3JWAuo95 17800 

178.20 


17400 



IB2JD 

1 7300 Sep 95 18000 

18000 

17100 

17850 



10100 

I75j0Oci95 181 00 

’81.70 

18000 

18000 

-100 

2019 

16400 

17600 DacH 18200 







Jon 96 



18200 


1 

Est. solos 15000 Man's, sates 13072 




Mot's open ?ni 96JS5 up W 





SOYBEAN OO- (CBOT) WWWi&t- aomoer lODIn. 









2805 

22*5 Jot 95 2502 

2507 

2489 

2491 

-O06130M 

jajo 

2291 Mar 95 9405 


2405 

2446 


28.05 



2412 

2414 

—009 ii,i2i 

2705 

22J6JUI95 34.12 

2412 

2190 

2191 

—406 

7015 

27.20 




Z2.90 



24.75 



2300 

2180 



73.* 

22.7500 V5 73 K 


2175 

217S 










23>5 

23J5JOT96 2175 


2375 

2375 




OCt 94 TS32 



2302 



Bf. rates 18000 Man’s, rates i9jai 




AAon's Often M 85027 up 10 






Livestock 




CATTLE 

(CMBl) AMb- 

cental** to. 




as 



6905 

69J1 







75.10 

6707 Apr 95 6905 

6905 

007 

£482 

-OJO 12083 

69 JO 

£400 Jun 95 6500 

6560 

45J o 

6507 

-415 

178* 

*8.10 

£300 Aug 95 6405 


64JQ 

64 42 



67JJ 

64000095 4500 

£505 


65.25 

-415 

243 




6605 




Est. sates 13015 Man's, sates 17.258 




Man's ooen im 60051 OT *80 



SIJ5 

70.95 Od 94 7285 

72B5 

7205 

72 57 


1.228 

88J10 

71 J5 Nov 94 7270 
7100 Jon 95 7400 

74.80 

74J0 

74fl 

—405 

4045 

33.75 


7407 

7402 



80 JS 

7025 MV H 7 ISO 

72-to 

71X0 

7265 



76.90 

70. 10 ACT 95 7205 


7100 

7100 

-435 

483 

tue 

69 0OMaV9S 7102 


7105 

7100 



7105 

6900 Aug 95 7100 

7100 

7IJ0 

71 JD 



70.92 

£900 Sen 96 

2016 


7000 

-410 

13 

Est. sales i.rao Mars, saw 



Man's ooen mi 9048 uo 142 





SOJO 

2280 Dec »J 33.77 

3430 

3325 

33X0 


suo 

1505 Fee 95 3670 

37.15 

3600 

3605 

—405 

7,326 

48.80 

36. 10 Apr M 3675 


36.70 

36.72 



4700 

*107 Jun 95 4207 

4200 

a?m 

42.10 






4105 

4210 




4l.)5Aua<>5 4105 


4100 

41 JD 




38000395 31*2 

30.90 

3805 

3805 

-407 

270 

4IJ5 

39.00 CtC 9) 39JB 


3905 

3960 

-420 

33 

ESt. SMS 

6099 mot's sole! 

50.’) 



Mon's Often rt 32.660 on 608 

PORK BELLIES (CMER! AON as- 

wna nr 

•» 




37 40 Feb 95 4000 

40.75 

3905 

3901 

-492 



rjDiwsB-vs 4000 


3905 

39.97 




3195 Mav 95 4100 



4477 




3905 Jui« <220 



4100 

-100 

301 

4400 

3B.7SAU0 95 

2038 



-105 

66 

Esi. 1.7M Mot's- sates 





MOT'souenint 10JJ3 Oh *4 






Food 


74425 77.10Dec94 l«JS 

24400 7H.90Mtr95 20I.W 

744 49 8250 MOV 95 20400 

245.10 65,MJkil»5 2BLH 

23800 H5J0SOPH M4-50 

74200 81 OO Dec 95 20150 

197.00 Mar H 

Eu. sates 6087 Men’s, som 
tcvn'i ooen Int 33.486 UP 19 
EUCAR-WORLO 11 fNCSfil I 

1204 9.I7M0T95 1209 

1205 11157 MOV ?S K6f 

12.75 ISOtJulH 12-5J 

1244 1 007 Oct 95 1215 

12.07 1 008 Mar 96 1100 


19900 

194. OT 

19&43 

— IJO 12067 

moo 

20000 

30000 

-1,15 12.743 

20700 

30100 

30205 

—100 

4,737 

20800 

20BJ5 

HK2S 

moo 

30475 

30300 

-3-75 

-too 

1000 

893 

30300 

20300 

20300 

—200 

844 



20400 

—2.00 

102 

6J"1! 





■wrfe 



12.78 

IlftO 

12J0 

-401 95.106 

1174 

12 41 

1261 

-M2 nut 

1205 

1203 

1106 

—010 14,519 

12J4 

1112 

1200 


12.997 

11.88 

1100 

1107 

♦002 

1.784 


Season Season 
Htfi Low 


Ooen High 


1100 ll.l8Mav96 

1108 11.70 Jut 96 

Est. sales 9J7S Mon' v sates HJOfl 
Man's open W U70S5 Off 233 
COCOA (NDEI Kinenclm-lneHi 


ism 

ms 
1600 
15M 
16X1 
1676 
1442 

Est. sales 


1041 Dec 94 1327 
1077 Mar 95 1375 
1078 May 95 1411 
1225JUI9S 1418 

1388 Sep 95 
1390 Dec 95 1490 
USD Mar 96 

1225 May M 
JW96 


1339 

1383 

1413 

1422 

1490 



m ^ m 

" 

m 

Season Seaton 






LOW 

Close 

do 

OPlW 

High 

low Own 

Wgh 

Low 

Qoie 

are 

Oa up 




43 


1090 Dec 94 10314 

10392 

10300 

10374 

♦64 42049 


1102 

♦ 402 

S 

103® 

I064QMOT95 10370 

10370 

10300 

10351 

♦ 64 

481 





10360 

10348 Jun 95 



10323 

♦61 

8 





EM. sales NLA. Man’s, sales 

HJW 









Morfsacwilnl 43038 Oft 1036 





1311 

1320 

—10 27,390 

CANADIAN DOLLAR ICMERJ t par rtr- 1 » »< nud, aJCCl 


135* 

1345 

-10 22063 


43ID8DRM 47*02 

47418 

4738* 

47414 

+ 13 35045 

1389 





0JQ2O/War95 47388 

07418 

47388 



1090 

MIS 



A«W 


00990 Junta 47400 

47404 

47380 


♦ 17 

766 






40K5Sep95 47370 0.7395 

0.7369 

0J395 







47400 

OJOdODecta 




♦ T9 

62 








47364 

♦ 21 


1)33 

— J 


Erf. sates HA. Mon's rates 

1789 




4^15 Mon'S, sates 5JMS 
Mon’s open int 71.797 off 84 
ORANGE JUICE (NCTtO liteh-wtiws 
13400 BSJlONovW 10505 105.25 10175 HELM -200 4099 

132.00 B9 00 Jon 95 10900 10900 10600 106.60 -175 11.136 

72425 93. 00 Mar 95 1)225 11140 10900 10905 —2.90 «U 

12000 97J»Mqy 95 11500 11500 11325 10.10 — 2-W U» 

12209 1OD0OJU195 11600 11600 11600 11600 —275 850 

175.00 107 .25 to) 95 1183 —220 SO 

17450 10900 t&w »5 11700 11700 11700 11600 -200 1.146 

12700 1 05J0 Jan 9* H6‘3 -240 402 

Mar 96 116.90 —2.40 

E®. sales 4000 Man's sates 3.105 

Mon’s open Int 24J88 OH 621 


Metals 


HI GRADE COPPBl (NCMX) AUk-cm 
122.10 7500 Oct 94 11955 121.10 11905 

777 5 Nov W 11900 11900 11900 
7 5J 5 Dec 94 11820 11*20 117.90 
76.90 Jan 95 
7300 Feb 95 

7300 Mor 95 11620 11740 116.15 

91.10 Apr 95 

7645 May 95 115.10 11520 114.70 

104.10 Jun 95 

7S.onjul95 11300 11300 11300 
11100 Aug 95 

79.1050.95 112.90 112.90 11200 
S8ffl)Dec95 11100 11120 11100 
S8_50 Jan 94 
62.70 Mor 96 
107.00 Mav 96 

Esi. sates 8008 Man's, sates 6459 

Man’s open bit 61039 off 194 

SILVER (NCMX) SA4tmu-umpri>9fi 


11900 
12000 
119.40 
117.70 
11840 
116-50 
11610 
11545 
11610 
116.90 
11500 
11675 
10800 
11)00 
109 JO 


1 pgr A 
12105 
11905 
11925 
11845 
11800 
11735 
[1655 
11665 
11450 
11435 
11340 
11305 
11135 

110.75 
ID*. ?5 
10835 

107.75 


♦ 1.70 1.113 
-140 I486 

♦ 135 41,106 
♦130 8U 

♦ 1-25 

*130 8522 

M 0 J 

♦ 000 2.183 

♦ 0*0 

1040 1.747 

♦030 121 

♦ 030 1.108 

♦ 0.10 1.315 

♦ 005 


$410 

51100a «4 




5390 

—11 

106 


Nov 94 




5290 

-12 


S97.0 

3811 ODBC 94 

5360 

5370 

5310 

5320 

—12 75.993 

S760 

4010 Jan 95 

541.0 

5410 

5350 

5340 

-12 

73 




54£0 




4045 

41 80 Mor 95 

5480 

S3 

547 0 

5460 



6140 

4700 JU 95 

55*0 

5510 

5S3J 


J«M0 






559.1 


£280 

SN A Dec »5 

5750 

5750 

5690 

5690 



£12.0 

5750 Jan 9* 




5720 



6220 

5540 Marta 




5790 



5990 

JB7JMay9£ 




5870 

-22 


4000 

Esi. sales 

6000 JulM 




5940 



12000 Man s, sates 11.509 





Mot's open vrt 111321 up 43 

PLATINUM (NMER) simaL. 

435.-M J<4.00 Oa 94 42600 4260B 42690 43440 -030 

43550 37400 Jgn 95 427.00 42800 43610 42640 — CUO 20352 

43900 39000 Apr 95 43150 43150 42900 439 Jo —030 3,553 

43900 41950 Jwt 95 43620 947 

43630 42ZOOOCT9S 43400 43400 43600 *33.50 *070 

09 JO 439 JO Jan 96 441.90 ♦070 

Est. sates HA Man's, sates 1532 
Man's ooen int 25096 up IBS 
GOLD (NCMX) roilwo!-*«(, Mr n> oi 

417.00 3*40OOa«4 390.10 39000 39000 389.40 — 000 39 

Ndv 94 38900 — 4L3D 

<2650 34300 Dec 94 39100 392.10 39070 391 JO -050 92,901 

41100 36300 Feb 95 39610 39500 394J0 39670 —OX19J8B 

41700 36650 Apr *5 39850 39650 39830 39830 —000 8,198 

42850 361 ja Jun 95 402J0 40200 401.90 401.90 -030 9087 

414J0 38050 Agg *5 40680 -0JO 

419 JO 401 00 Od 95 41000 -0.10 IA14 

479.00 «B50DeC*S 4(615 -0.10 7044 

43450 41250 Feb 96 4)800 -0.10 

4J0-SJ 41630 Apr 94 42200 -0.10 

43150 41 300 Jun 96 42700 5082 

Aug 96 43150 

Est. sales 18.0M Man's, sales 16099 
Mon'S open ml 157049 up 157 


Financial 


US T, BUS (CMER) 

1) nUMI-BKOMOOM 




96.10 

9405 Dec 94 

9403 

9408 

9403 

9407 


10049 

9505 

7198 Mar 95 

9*05 

*4.12 

94.05 

9109 


9,937 

9404 

9303 Jun 93 

*162 

9306 

9303 

9163 

— 0 in 

3.989 

7307 

9305 Sep 95 




9120 

~4LDT 

S 


Est. sates nla. Man's, soles 2.110 
Mon'! wen inr 31,980 up 794 
SYR. TREASURY (CBOT) ligDJOBprte-wiUSnoaaf inta 
106-20 101-05 Dec 94101 -145 101-17 101-08 101-125— 02 173544 
103-09100-265 Mcr 9900-225 100-29 100-22S 100-25B- 025 7JS4 
Est. sous 4M0Q Man’s, sates 24547 
Mot's ooen Im 1 60098 off 6646 
10VR. TREASURY (CHOT1 itBUKDorm- wit aw-.m iwoa 
114-71 100-04 Dec 94 100-10 100-13 10M0 100-07 - 04 272,759 

111-07 99-13 Mar 95 99-17 99-50 99-ID 96-15 - 04 9.00 

105-22 98-24 JtinH 98-23 99-00 98-23 98-27 — 03 IDS 

101-06 98-28 Sep 95 9B-05— 02 

110-31 90-10 Dec 95 97*20 — 02 

Eit. sates 101.101 Mars, sates 635+) 

• J82.3M up JM4 


Man's open Int 


97-18 94-30 
96-39 96-0» 
9M7 25-26 


02 

2 

02 


up m 100 pen 

04 

354,77* 

04 

27/85 

0* 

11,234 

04 

256 

04 

133 

04 

50 

04 

23 

100 CO 

07 

20065 

07 

391 


118-08 9I>19 Dec 94 97-11 
llk-20 94-15 Mar 95 96-23 
115-19 96-00 Jun VS 95-29 
112-15 95-1B SepfS *5-12 
111-14 95-00 Dae *5 
114-0# 94-70 MarV 
100-30 9*4)5 Junta 
Es.wes 350000 Mon'S- HIM 217^58 
Marrsooenlnt 433,989 UP 1423 


B8-09 84-02 Mar 9584-0* 84-09 81-31 83*1 
Eg. sales 4000 Man's, sides lABT 
Man'jppenlnr 21556 up 93 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 11 tnWaMMi oMOOpa „ 

95.180 90710 Dec 94 93.960 93.990 93.920 93070 439^33 

95J80 90040 Mgr 95 WJ30 91570 93490 93353 392067 

94.7M 9Q.71DJun93 91030 93.110 930» 93070 W2.0B 

96550 *lJ10Sep95 93710 91760 92070 92J30 „»•* * 

MM 91.100 Dec 95 *1370 *2050 92J30 92000 — 1017L76I 

96330 90.750 Mar M 92JH 92J60 92070 91310 -20154051 

n.i® w.190 Junta *1160 njxs viuo viioa -S127.3T8 

92070 9Z09O Sap 96 92050 92.130 93050 92000 -30118009 

ea. sai« n.a Mai's, tees as.ns 

Mot s open ko JJ46J53 up 4752 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) tpwwwna- 1 aa.nl MUCH M6001 


Mon's open W 38JM off 367 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) tnerrextec- lOTteimunMAOOt 
04719 0-5590 Dec 94 066 M 06731 06678 00497 *1 90534 

06730 0-58 ID MOT 95 0.6716 06745 06694 06709 ll 4054 

00730 05980 Jun 95 00747 04747 00710 00726 *1 613 

00740 a«3475ep95 00742 *1 113 

Est. sales NLA Man's, soles 19004 
Mon'iDpenlnl 95714 up 704 

JAPANE 5EYB j (CMER) imtot- 1 -ortMOHJOOOWU 
aOia49OO0O9525Dec 94 0010338001041600103350010387 ‘43 58045 

001054000096aoMOT 95 0010460001049600104250411 0472 ♦id 8042 

O01O67tD0OWJ6Jun 95 00105700 in 059000105700010575 4«S 443 

001077 5001 CQOOSep 75 0010660001066000106600010*74 -46 179 

0010760001 044lOec 95 00107500010750001075000111774 *47 38 

Est. sales HA. Man's, sales 17.725 

MOT'S Often ini 66359 oh 138 , 

SWISS FRANC I CMER) 1 per Irene- 1 oauv mats SOXCOl £ 

00105 00885 Dec 94 000*9 0.8100 00020 00039 _lj 

OJip 0JTOMOT95 08133 OB136 00050 0.8072 —14 

00164 07193 Junta 00110 00110 0011 0 00112 —14 

00150 0.8I30SBP95 00150 —14 

Est. sates NA. Man's, sales 13.253 
Mon's open kit 43032 up 19 


I 41078 1 
1017 


Industrials 


COTTON J INCTNl JO.OWI 

2J5 590# D« 94 70.® 7120 7009 

SI! !!0O 7300 7100 

78J5 
74JD 
7200 
7000 


64.0a MavO 5 72.95 74.(0 72*3 

6»J0Julffi 7170 7505 73.70 
660OOcf95 7000 7100 89.90 

6625 Dec 95 4925 70.00 492S 

...„ 6800 Mar N 7000 7005 7100 

Est. sates IS.B00 mot's, sales 9020 
MOT'ioroiim 49087 ott 515 
MBATING ml (NMER) ASK ri-cM>PVi 
5830 4600 NOV 94 4935 4905 48.65 

»■« «0O 4905 4900 

6205 4305 Jan 95 50.10 5035 4900 

«-75 OJSFM95 305 50.90 5035 

S-5? SSiS'i? SUM 50.50 5000 

55.15 43.18 Apr 95 

S4JM 470OMOT9S 

SXM *629 Jun 95 4865 4900 4805 

IKS ££i ll *L «■« «L*S 

S50O 42.70 Aug 95 

SI? ftSSKH s ® 10 so- 1 ® ai.w 

S'* 50-90 58.90 

5440 SZOONavPS 

S-SteS s 3 - 00 SI 00 5100 

SS60 50J0Jan96 

59JO 5X82 Feb 96 

5AW 54^0 Mot 96 

5450 4600 Aorta 

Efl. SOlflg 76-392 ..Mot's. sates 27, 130 

LIGHT 


71.97 


7500 

7005 

7600 

7005 


49 JO 
»75 
5033 
5073 
30.43 
4908 
4903 
48.73 
■4|.fB 
W.43 
50J3 
5103 
52.18 
5X13 
5X73 
S3J3 
5208 
52.03 


MoirsOTenni 160.004 cw 7793 
7 SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 1.KSOT1- 


U93DK94 1705 1700 1705 

1S.lSJcn95 1702 1767 17,44 

15J»Frt« 1701 1709 1706 

£S“or« 1700 1706 1705 

J505 Apr *S 1708 1703 1706 

1173 Jun 95 1701 J705 1708 

1605JUI95 1706 1704 |jn 

6.164UB95 I7J0 iriS 

7.40 Sep *5 1701 1761 1701 

1A42CW95 1783 1703 1703 

1768 

ItSSS 17 - M 1705 

I7JU ton 96 17 J1 17JI 1771 
JJ-{8Fflb96 1775 17,75 1775 
JT.1S Marta 1777 17.J7 1777 

n'SVSS ,7J> ,7J ’ ,7 -*' 

172 Junta 
-- IB-38 Sac 96 

MOfrS OHM WK 3QT,6Z3 off AMR 

4LTOWB- 


2000 

1905 
19 60 
2006 
1908 
1908 

auo 

19JJ7 

I9JP 

1800 

19.17 

1906 
2000 
71.15 
1006 
1800 

18.17 
2000 
1807 


5500 

6070 

5060 

5805 

54.95 

60J0 

5000 

5020 

57.94 

S6J5 

5505 

S5JJ0 

54.75 

5779 


CJ5Nov94 51.70 w in 50,75 
? 4i30OecM 57M 5605 57 J5 

5000 Jon 9$ 55.® Slid jjH 
51. 10 Feb 95 5400 5400 54I5 

uSstgg MJJ SU5 5400 

M-aiMay« 

55.90 Jun 95 

a« u ^ 

5-SOOCIV5 
53-6QNM9S 
p0ODeef5 

54.46 Aug 96 

Efl. sales 72,604 Mon's, sates 33 jm 
Mot's open un njie eft 616 


1708 

17.61 

1708 

1707 

1706 
17J7 

1708 
17.60 

1703 
1705 

1707 

1708 
17.70 
1773 
17.77 
1701 

1704 
1700 
1106 


5204 

5SJB 

5£88 

5400 

5405 

5X35 

54.99 

5604 

5509 

5U9 

53.54 

5L14 

5204 

5504 


♦107 22.701 

♦ 102 13065 

♦ 1.12 6,767 

♦ 100 40» 

+ 8.35 537. 

♦ 80J Z33Z 

♦ 000 16 


♦M4 17.125 
♦007 44055 

♦ 000 32052 

♦ 003 18.192 

♦ O03HJW 
+003 6.97* 

♦ 003 5.604 
♦033 6003 

♦ 003 

♦ 003 

+ 003 - 

♦003 

♦ 133 1064 

♦ 003 4JP1 

♦ 003 1 

+003 

♦003 

♦ 003 


» 0.13111,128 
*009 61080 

• 00 7 28,966 

• 807 23.906 

• 006 17 JM 
♦006 11 .773 
t<LOSZ 10 B 
+004 12,954 
♦004 AM 
-0.03 11.07 

• 003 ■ 

♦003 5,433 
♦0.03 15J01 

• 003 7J15 
♦OJM - 

• an) 6,718 
♦005 

• OJB 

♦80S 1004 


UK 

—009 22002 
—0.09 I4ja4 
-0.10 6,471 
— 0.10 3J» 

—004 4^71 

♦ BBS LOU 
♦80S 
•0.15 

♦ 000 

•000 * 
*820 W 
♦000 153 

♦an 


Stock Indexes 

£00 Z£i£ll «■« «um K! 

II 


MoodYs 
Reutera 
DJ. Futures 
Com. Resewrh 


Commodity indexes 
. ao» 

1040.90 
2B930O 
15123 
23205 


Pftvtaus 

2 JCTJ 0 

15873 

23104 


Ink 


- 1 Cl ^N 

- ! * tc > W Q| 




Think Tanks 

•’ift ’/•• : . ’. • - r J 

S**;. ;-:|3^Fwesee German 

Growth of 3% 


. 4 l*f *i 7 

*. } •• • •••! j£ '■* Ak I 




■• sc-V'^TX 
•:.■." ,7 ^c rV W 

. ,k &J? 




t» Hi-*.' 
Tfi ; 

A , 
tiLr.-. t{- . 


By Brandon Mitchener 

Inrnmutmai Herald Thbune 

FRANKFURT — Genna- 


msntutps said they expected 
West German union wage gams 
to average 3 percent and West 


! iht . 

srthr, ; :v 

aUh r, ‘ Wfi.rhs I L 

!±.-; • ' y°S 


. . **'**»*& 


wntv . . 

«■***£•' i. .. 
a* 

M.i • 
bWtt I* ; 
SlrtV , ‘ . 
hft !.' 
tXf* ,•! 
life ; !.i - 

» IttHl 

.H'rtlV- ; • . 

Mnn.il, . 
5 |HlTL_ ■*-5V' 


“■ OQi n/s six leading economics re- German inflation to fall to an 
(vj search institutes warned the average of 2.5 percent for the 
rA federal government, unions and from * percent this year. 

the Bundesbank on Tuesday East German inflation was’seen 
iCft not to do anything that could falling to 2.5 percent after aver- 
stunt the country’s tentative re- a S * n 8 percent this year, 
covery. The Bundesbank “must not 

■ If the government cuts hcsi **“ to “crease interest 
' ^‘ ri Qn[j spending and taxes, if unions rates . ** mo ° e y ^PPty growth. 

p ^ea a ^ moderate wage demands and if primary barometw of infla- 
* . ft the Bundesbank continues its “?“■ ou ^P a ^ its ^defxniuon of 

* *i!O.S Ink r» vigil against inflation, the Ger- w *Vt r 15 
'. ... man economy should grow 3 , Tjetmeyer, the pres- 

percent next year and unem- dent^of the Bundesbank, who 
. - . V. :! ' k ployment should fall io 3.6 raU- £rusal«i\ for f ““ting 

'• ’v\ i,;,^ lion, the six think tanks said in aI ^5 Ba S ,°f Is ??’ *¥. d J* e 

ihdr semiannual snapshot of sa ^..®° ^ ce ^ 100< ^ * OT higher 
(ViP Hmnnn ppiwnm Tales m the next few months. 


* 1 <T? 

M.r 

1 - 

v«n 

.'•'i 

irtfr' 
it *t M 

:i . 

H-t l V 


J 51 tu «-aia? f 

- : • -.Iiiv 

n< ' a \vJ()bCub 

“ > a ‘“ ri»tl tBj, t 

••\i*ulag,t 

’ 

' • * • ■*- 
... •* * • »-■ 

• ■ ' t.’ ::' :c .'TCita..;. 

’’ • -:.»l hijhajj- 

■ : '. r. 


( i “iina Vn . the German economy. m the next few months, 

„ Wage .eltlements should “* food 

"• T, Tft. i !a v '5?-i‘^iake account of the need to ere- f inflation will come 

Vdse, thwwaraed. not only will ci ^^ c j 2ct j ^ mimg coalition 
VOOdVfa, ocaumued recovery be m goveramMt 

danger, but the chances for w h lc t, Mw q. . institute,’ r-p L , r -’ 
crealmg newjobs, which are bo- « a vote of confidence. 

“J ^ ,S. Wl11 " 01 be “This is no occasion for eu- 


: ■ ~-r.. 


danger, but “the chances for 
^ creating newjobs, which are be- 
j, ginning to be seen, will not be 
iised to the fullest 7 * 

* Aides to Chancellor Helmut 
k Kohl interpreted the forecast 
(. for Europe's largest economy as 
^ kn overall vote of confidence in 
the federal government’s eco- 
nomic and fiscal policies, while 
employers and unions differed 
about whether and whom wage 
2 Restraint would help orinrrL 
1 - As bullish as they were about 

^ growth — forecasting an in- 
crease in the gross national 
- product of 3 percent both this 
• year and in 1995 — the insti- 
tutes were skeptical of the likeli- 
hood of maiung a big dent in 
unemployment. 

^ ; Their forecast of an average 

3.6 mill inn jobless Ger mans 
.next year is an improvement of 
just 100,000 from the average 
for this year and is equivalent to 
an unemployment rate of 8.2 
•percent in Western Germany 
A and 13.9 percent in the East, in 
reach case an improvement of 
r -^only a single percentage point. 

: » Among other predictions, the 


phoria or glassy-eyed opti- 
mism. 7 ’ said Uwe Jens, an eco- 
nomics specialist with the 
Soda! Democrats. 

Unions said wage gains 
would give the economy a 
nudge by helping to boost pri- 
vate consumption, which so far 
has trailed big-ticket invest- 
ment spending by businesses. 

The institutes’ forecasts were 
roughly in line with those of 
commercial banks that have al- 
ready published their expecta- 
tions for next year. Dresdner 
Bank AG forecasts 3.1 percent 
economic growth in Germany 
as a whole, while Commerz- 
bank AG expects 2.5 percent. 

The six institutes are the Ifo 
Institute in Munich, the Insti- 
tute on the World Economy in 
Kiel, the German Institute' for 
Economic Research in Berlin, 
the Rhineland-Westphalia In- 
stitute for Economic Research 
in Essen, the HWWA Institute 
in Hamburg and the Economics 
Research Institute in Halle. 


lM KKiNATIOINAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1994 


Cleaning Up Starts in Slovakia 


By Jane Perlez 

Noe York Times Service 

Z1AR NAD HRONOM, Slovakia — 
Rudolf Camaj doesn’t quite know 
whether to trust the stories that one day 
the aluminum plant here will be so clean 
there might tie an outdoor sw imming 
pool for the workers. 

“It is almost unbelievable to us that 
the old factory will be replaced by a new 
factory that won’t be ba nning the envi- 
ronment,” said Mr. Camaj. 39, a fire- 
safety worker who has toiled inside the 
smelters among the noxious fumes since 
be was 16. 

He remembers that when he was a boy 
an entire village nearby had to be emp- 
tied when people became sick and build- 
ings ruined. That was just six years after 
the plant opened in the late 1950s. 

He has seen the grass shrivel up, the 
animals die and the trees wither. Even so, 
Mr. Camaj said, people were grateful for 
the plant because it provided jobs. 

Instead of closing the Statin-era dino- 
saur. as has been the case with many 
plants that supplied material for the 
weapons industry in Warsaw Pact coun- 
tries. efforts are being made to convert it 
into something like a purist’s dream of a 
21 st-century factory. 

Plans are under way to have the ZSNP 
plant meet the toughest environmental 
standards, though the problems at the 
works make it seem like an unlikely ex- 
periment in environmental and finanriai 

reform. 

To achieve this, financial backing is 
coming from the European Bank for Re- 
construction and Development, which 
says it has set stiff environmental stan- 
dards for the plant, including such aes- 
thetic improvements as planting grass on 
the Immovable mountain of brown mud. 

When experts from the European Bank 
visited to work out a rehabilitation plan. 


they were “shocked by the occupational 
conditions,” said Timothy Murphy, an 
environmental manager at the 

The health record of the workers is 
bleak: chronic poisoning from overexpo- 
sure to fluorides and a high incidence of 
lung cancer and respiratory diseases. 

An orange haze tints the sky. A huge 
heap of brown mud covering nearly 100 
acres (40 hectares} and composed of 8 
million tons of waste soars above the 
factory, dwarfing some of the buildings. 

In Western Europe, such waste was 
often dumped into the sea; in the Ziar 
valley it just piled up and now threatens 
the groundwater supply from the Hron 
River, a tributary of the Danube. 

Of all the heavily polluted countries in 
the former Eastern bloc, Slovakia has 
one of the worst records. 

Much of the metallurgical and chemi- 
cal industry was built in the eastern half 
of the old nation of Czechoslovakia. Be- 
fore the ^plil into the Czech Republic 
and Slovakia, the Prague government 
wanted to close the plant. 


But there were arguments in favor of 
trying to pump in Western money to 
keep it alive through modernization. 

From the Slovak point of view, there 
was the need for jobs: The site was cho- 
sen in 1953 to provide industrial jobs in 
an agricultural region. Some 5,500 peo- 
ple work here now, down from 7.000 in 
1989. 

But beyond jobs, Slovaks could point 
to environmental efforts, however mea- 
ger, that had been tried just before the 
collapse of communism. While those ef- 
forts may have had only minimal impact 
at the plant, a nascent environmental 
movement in the late 1980s was the ha- 
ven of Slovak dissidents. 

“In the 1980$, the managers were in- 
terested in change,” said Dr. Eleonora 
Fabianova, director of the Institute of 
Hygiene and Epidemiology at nearby 
Banska Bystrica. By 1988, she said, the 
health hazards were recognized to the 
extent that shifts were cut from eight 
hours to six and workers were given an 
extra week of vacation. 

Die Slovaks also made a fairly persua- 
sive financial argument. 

Work has started on an environmen- 
tally sound smelter to replace the two 
smelters that spewed poison into the air. 
There was a good chance that the Ziar 
valley plant could become a big seller on 
the world market in light of dwindling 
competition. 

“In other ex-Communist countries, 
al uminum production has been pretty 
much stopped,” said Richard Kafka, the 
technical manager at the plant, who has 
welcomed a parade of foreign experts in 
the last several years. 

“We are in the middle of all these 
graveyards,” he said “We will be a mod- 
em, ecologically sound factory.” 


its in favor of 


trying to pump in Western money to 
keep it alive through modernization. 


.POUND - 


1 CZECH •- 
y rep. • 1 




Autfroni 
Bratislava _ . 


1 'MjsnrrtA 


CROATIA 


HUNGARY 


yuoa- 


Weak Markets Hurt Credit Suisse Profit 


Compiled to ChrSwg From Dispatches was “muted”- ant 

ZURICH — Crtdit Suisse, “unfavorable con 
the main banking subsidiary of nandal markets.” 
CS Holding, said Tuesday that r < 4 ;. - „ 
itS third-quarter p rofil iforc ■ 


was “muted”- and affected by from its securities arm, Cr&tit 
“unfavorable conditions on fi- Suisse said 
nandal markets.” F^miny at Crtdit Suisse Fi- 

Crtdit Suisse said results for “““l Pro*i«s, die specialist 


its third-quarter profit before derivatives house. ^ S 

srtsrsj ^ u " vcar,shca, ^ icvds -” 

comparable 1993 period. DOt ^ SpCafiC CgUreS - Bloomberv Knirhi Rhhterl 

The banking company, which Profit was denied by narrow- Bloomberg Kmghz-Ridder) 

includes Swiss Volksbank, said er interest-rate margins and 
its performance in the quarter lower trading profit, espedally I 


44 t., • 
;*»• ' '■ 

ek 

# 

h fife 

1 . • 

S 


■m 

i 

;■ $>• :ir 


Cadbury Discloses Merger Talks With Dr Pepper 


' Bloomberg Business News 

* WASHINGTON — Cadbury 
^Schweppes PLC disclosed Tuesday that it 
dtad held merger talks with Dr Pepper/ Se- 
'ven-Up Cos^ reviving speculation that the 
-British company intends to buy out the 
‘U.S- soft-drink maker. 

Cadbury, which already owns 23.3 per- 
’cent of Dr Pepper, held exploratory talks 
with Dr Pepper on a possible business 
combination this year, according to docu- 


ments filed with the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission. 

- Buying Dr Pepper would make Cadbury 
the third-largest soft-drink maker in the 
United States as it seeks to position itself 
as the worldwide leader in the growing 
market for noncola drinks. 

For more than a year, the soda industry 
has pondered Cadbury’s plans for Dr Pep- 
per, seeing a hostile takeover for as much 
as SI . 8 billion in the works. 


“They’re not going to buy 23 percent of 
a company without making h a pan of 
their long-term strategy,” said Roy Burry, 
an analyst with Kidder, Peabody & Co. in 
New York. 

Dallas-based Dr Pepper controls about 
1 1 percent of the UiL soft-drink market and 
sells the Dr Pepper, 7-Up, Welch’s fruit 
drinks and IBC Root Beer brands. Cadbury 
has only about a 3.4 percent share with its 
Canada Dry, Crush and Sunkist brands. 


Scribona Is Target of Bid 
Led by 2 Board Members 

Bloomberg Business News 

STOCKHOLM — Scribona AB, one of the largest suppli- 
ers of office machinery- in Scandinavia, became the mrgel 
Tuesday of a 1.78 billion krona ($250 million} takeovcr'bid 
led by two of its board members. 

The bid, launched by two investment companies, was for 52 
krona a share. One of the companies, Andersson & Bennet 
AB, is owned by two Scribona board members. 

Scribona’s B shares on the Stockholm stock exchange 
rocketed 23 percent on the news, dosing at 53 krona. 


Page 13 


T* Tvr.1 


1! Investor’s Europe 1 

Frankfurt 

DAX 


London 

FTSE 100 index 

Paris 

CAC40 


2300 


3400 


2300 


“'l 1 

2100 1 J 

2300 J! 

\ 

3300 

3200 

\ 

2100 \ J 

2000 1ft r 

1900 V 

\ 

1M0 « JJ 
1994 

A S O 

J J 
1994 

A S O 

jj 

1994 

A S O 

Exchange 

Index 


Tuesday 

Close 

Prev. 

Close 

% 

Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX 


398.20 

401.33 

-0.78 

Brussels 

Stock Index 

7,036.22 

7,148.28 

-1.57 

Frankfurt 

DAX 


1,974.63 

2,025.38 

-2.51 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 


751.02 

767.B8 

-2.20 


London 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Parts 

Stockholm 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Sources: Reuters. . 


Financial Times 30 
FTSE 100 
General index 
MIBTEL 

CAC40 

Attaersvagriden 

Slock Index 

SBS 


2,301.70 

3,000.90 

287.33 

9,750.00 

Tj*24.42 

JLB57.79 

jiJiT 

868.48 


2,325.20 

~3Pg9.10 

293.37 

■ 9 , 975 . 66 " 

1.841 59 
J 376.63 

li aTaf 

699 87 


-1.01 
^-0 93 
-2.06 
" -2.26 
~ -0 .93 
-IDO 

„-i3a 

-1.15 

i.J.! J 11K1. . 


Very briefly: 


■ Sandoz Sales Edge Up 

Sandoz AG said Tuesday 
that its sales rose 3 percent in 
the first nine months and that 
the gain would have been great- 
er if not for the strength of the 
Swiss franc, Bloomberg Busi- 
ness News reported from Basel. 


• The European Commission, as expected, proposed abandoning .1 
restructuring plan Tor the steel industry because producers refused 
to make necessary cuts in output: the commission u!m> upproxed a 
German government plan to gram 910 million Dem-tchc murks 
($610 million) to hdp restructure Eko Stahl GmbH 

■ Lauda Air Luftfahrt AG postponed its attempt to force France 
into opening Orly airport to European competition. But Lufth- 
ansa AG and KLM Royal Dutch Airlines NV said they would fly 
into Orly on Monday. 

• British industrial orders grew at their fastest rate since tX tober 
1988 over the past four months, the Confederation of British 
Industry said in its quarterly survey of industrial trends. 

• Iberia Air lines said it had canceled an order for eight Airbus A- 
321s, estimated to be worth 69 billion pesetas <$551 million i. 
because of the airline’s cost-cutting program. 

HU *mlvr& I/'. 4 F.\ 


International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

I Monday 

international Conferences and Seminars 
■ Tuesday 
Education Directory 
I Wednesday 
Business Message Center 
I Thursday 

International Recruitment 
I Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 
I Saturday 

Arts arid Antiques . . ......... 

LPtus over 900 headings in International-Classified • • 
Monday through Saturday 

For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 3794 74 - Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 

7* 4 K UVTERMTIuNAL Rtoi « 4 


} WOTI 7W XII rafts •» nil 


MARKET: Exchanges Across Europe Turn Bearish 


' ± - m • 


jM-Jitstriali 


*■ * •- : 

*1 - •• 


j* v **- ‘ • 

nu * , . . 


Continued from Plage 11 

tinued to focus heavily on the 
scheduled release Friday of 
U.S. growth data for in the 
third quarter. The bond mar- 
kets in particular seem to have 
concluded that a strong figure 
would force the hand of the 
Federal Reserve and lead to a 
quick half-point rise in U.S. 


In. die second quarter, the 
U.S. economy grew at a 4.1 per- 
cent rate. Although analysts ex- 
pected to see some slowing 
from the interest-rate increases 
that began in February and 
have now added 1.75 percent- 
age points to short-term rates, 
they doubted that the slow- 
down would be sufficient to 
prevent further jumps in infla- 
tion. 

i Some analysts said the Fed 
could act as early as Friday by 
raising rates half a point, gjving 
some support to the dollar and 
allaying investors’ fears that in- 
flation is about to rise. Analysts 
noted that as the wait for the 
next move from the Fed has 
dragged on, expectations of the 
fee of that move have grown. 

^ “The move has to be at least a 1 
half .a point,” said Peter; 
Widtnes, chief strategist at I 
Bank Julius Baer in Zurich. “It 
is like a toothache. The longer ; 
they wait, the more it hurts and ; 
■the more that needs to be 
done.” 

The' weakness of the dollar is 
already beginning to hit the 
. earning s of European exporters 
by cutting their competitiveness 
fh international markets and by 
reducing the value of their in- 
come from the dollar zone. 

What worries analysts is that 
in the process of bolstering me 
Sollar and responding to m2r " 


For 

investment 

information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the IHT 


ket fears about rising inflation, 
the Federal Reserve could se- 
verely cut growth. 

“A rise erf more than 50 baas 
points . would be good for 
bonds, but it could hurt 1995 
corporate earnings,” warned 
Bert Jansen, European equity 
strategist at Banque Paribas. 

Few analysts see any pros- 
pect for a substantial upward 
move in share prices soon. 


Peter Sullivan, European in- 
vestment strategist at Merrill 
Lynch, predicted a fall in Euro- 
pean markets of an additional 5 
percent to 10 percent by the end 
of the year. He blamed con- 
cerns over rising interest rates 
as well as new share issue vol- 
ume that in the final quarter of 
the year that may exceed the 
record set in the first quarter. 


U.S. $400,000,000 

A National Westminster Bank 

Floating Rate Capital Notes 2005 

In accordance with the provisions of the Notes, notice is hereby 
given that for the six months Interest Period from October 25. 
1994 to April 25, 1995 the Notes win carry an Interest Rate of 
6% per annum. The interest payable on the relevant interest 
payment date. April 25, 1995 against Coupon No. 20 will be 
U.S. $303.33. 

By; The Chase Manhattan Bank, NJL 
London, Agent Bank 
October 25, 1994 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


| Foreign Exchange direct dealing 24/24H 
-TBBDeaDng room*: Slngapcre-London-Ntw-Yoric 
M ED 10 years experience - advanced technology 

■ IS 5% Margin deposit - US* / DEM 5ptpa 

■ B1 Fra* daffy fax analysis - strategies 

■ CALL BRUSSELS (322) 512 0121 
I CALL PARIS (331) 4622 1920 


Competitive FX spreads with no further costs 
Experience - Seoarity - Analysis - Strategies 
Tr adin g facilities based on margin or company balance sheet 
Direct Dealing 24 Hours - London - Berlin - Copenhagen 
RUBICON +49 30 TeL: 885 9330 / Fax; 882 4266. 


O Signal Realtime ! US AO 

O Stock & Futures Quotes that CO NNEC T to 100* applications O 
O Now in Europe O 65,000 QUOTES from just S3 day! O 
O Call NOW’ for YOUR free Signal Investment Software Guide & price list O 
V Call London 44 + (0) 17) 231 3556 V 


3monfn.Tenma* 


SubKrib' W far USS 2^00; or 6 inmfe ferlSS 6,500; or 1 yw far S12.000. 

*N 01 tDIOIHASWILMOWf-MOCCtWWNIH.Wi«ii«lCrASifc>"iij)n»»«ip«A,im»r»el)edJ 
L, MANAGS ACCOUNTS USS35.000fc a4 oboal CUSTOM KOSMMrier TOW fcm« ioumlJ 

\ Cdl 305-251*4762 er 800-392-2664 - Fwc305-254-3272 / 

X. UMJTHJ AVAJtABEJTY. ACT NOW1I * 


Tu utaui juur free Guile U lw»' ywr financial 
Roctmakcr ujs help juu. taO Michael Murray 
of hie JenLui* on 071 K2B 7231 ur wnie W uv > 
KJ lode* Pfc.'MI Gnavcnfif Gardens. V 


.iwraniivfwiujuiuN. 


LrtklmSWIWOBD 


■Unfcf ana kpWan »6«hn v dbapr 


/<r 
‘ K 


Catch The Big Moves 

PIP YOU SELL DEC DAX AT 2142? 

DID YOU SELL DEC S+P 500 AT 472. 557 
DID YOU BUY COFFEE IN MARCH? OUR CLIENTS DID 
CttwnftK the rampuferwd trading system is now available by tu and crows dybt 75 
I OTwnwflfejfipajinal lutoresfrafefes wi&spttific ^ 'Baj*. ^ n Tfeu&tf reamntendatarc 
Request your 5-day free trial by sending a fax 
to Carol on 0624 602272 Int +**62* G62ZT2 


C-f 


ECU Futures PLC 
29 Chesham Place 
Belgravia 

London SW1X8HL 
TeL +71 245 0088 
Fax: +71 235 6599. 

Member SF A 


MEMBER SFA 


Rramnal CoMaa Group 

Keystone 

- ri«M| piniMi 

WetserMacwli, Manager 

laSOradefta CbojuIfanWai 


Margined Foreign 
Exchange Trading 

Fast, Competitive Quotes 24 Hours 
Tel.: + 44 71 815 0400 
Fax; + 44 71 329 3919 


Everyday Offer To Professional Traders 

US ComfTKxfcy ExeMngw 

800-967-4879 $0^75 
312-207-0117 

HBUdlinnMFut 




Currency Management Corporation Plc 
11 Oldjewrjr- London EC2K8DU 
TeL; 071-865 0800 Fax; 071-972 0970 


MARGIX FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


24 Hour London Dealing Desk 
competitive Rates * Dally Fas Sheet 
Call for further information & brochure 


FDR TRADERS ON THE MOVE 

Watch the markets move with the screen In your pocket 
that receives Cunency, Futures, Indices and News updates 
24 hours a day. For your 7 day free trial, call Futures Pager lid 
on 071-8% 9400 now. 

mmm futures pagerm 

' ' For further details 

on bow to place vour listing contact 
WILL NICHOLSON in London 
TeL : (44) 71 836 48 02 
Fax: (44) 71 240 2254 


Hcralb^^fcSribune. 


MINISTRY OF SURFACE TRANSPORT 

(Government of India) 

TENDER NOTICE 


The Government of Intfa. Ministry 
of Surface Transport invites 
proposals for Govt of National 
Capital Territory of Delhi (NCTD) 
for provision of High Speed Trams 
(HST) from refuted fnctian/forergn 
agendas on Build, operate and 
Transfer (BOT) basis for tee 
foHovringconidorainDeBij(UKSa) :- 


HIGH-SPEED 
TRAMS 
IN INDIA 


considered as an independent 
Project The parties selected will 
have the rights to collect the fare, 
develop properties onTram Stations 
and advertise on the tram system. 

The interested parties should submit 
thev proposals in two parts viz. a 
Technical Bid and a Commercial 
Bid. 


/. Inner Ring Road 42 Kms. 

£ Bal l ab h gertvFaridabad-Ashram Chowk 17 Kms. 

of. Round about NH -8 between 

Sector 15 & 32 Gurgaon-Rangpuri- 
Mahipalpur-Dhaiia Kuan 24 Kins. 

iv. Piapati IWdan-MayurViiar- 
PatparganH’ieM Vihar-Kristna Nagar- 
Sshwas Nagar-Vtvek Vtiar- 

Diishad Garden 15 Kms. 

v. KhanpunMadangir- 

Ma^d Mote NPiara- 

GXaflash- 

OfcNa Industiia! Area- Wool Chand 15 Kms. 

Tughlaka Bad Ban- X’NJ 

Govind puri _ 

vi. Natatgarh-Dwarke-Uttem Nagar- 
Vnraspurklanakpuri-Hari Nagar- 

Tilak Nagar-Raja Garden 19 Kms. 

vS. Waarpur fnctistrial Area-Asbok Vhar- 

Shakti Nagar-Shastri Nagar- 
Sarai Rdflla-Anand Paibai- 
Raru Jhansi Road-Oesh Bandhu 
Gt^rta RoxfConnaught Place 12 Kms. 

vBL Raja Garden4Grti Naga-Pandav Nagar- 

Was* Patel Nagar-Rafendra Place- 
Sat Nagar-Oash Bandhu Gupte Road- 
Unk Road-ManSr Marg- 

Trfkaora RoadCrotral Seat 14 Kms. 

be. Budh Whar-Vgay Vtrs-Rohlni- 

Prasham VBar-Pitani Pura- 
Vfazapur Depot 9 Kms. 

The High Speed Tram wtil run on elevated track 
supported on single row of columns erected in Central 
Verge (Median) of 4 to 6 lane wide roads (15 to 20 M. 
wide). 

Interested parties should submit detailed proposals 
indicating the finance, design, plans for construction, 
operation and maintenance of the system.^ The GovL of 
India wSi provide tee right of access on the land. The 
concerned parties have to plan the* activities fri such a 
way so as to cause minimum hindrance to tee existing 
roads and traffic. The interested parties can lad for one 
or more of the above corridors. Each work wilt be 


TECHNICAL BID 

The technical bid should Include tea concept of tee 
system, detailed design, technical and operational 
information on which the soundness and technical 
capability of any party can be judged. The system 
should have the latest technical features as operating 
anywhere in tee world. 

COMMERCIAL BID 

The parties whose technical bids are found feasible win 
qualify for getting their commercial bids opened. The 
commercial bid should include tee tenderer's concept 
ot ticketing, concession period to operate tee system 
and any other relevant commercial and financial 
information. The work is likely to be awarded to tee 
parties whose financial position is sound and offer is 
most attractive and operationafiy feasible. 

The tender forms for ail tee corridors can be obtained 
from the Office of the Consultants of tee Ministry of 
Surface Transport 

THE INDIAN ROAD CONSTRUCTION 
CORPORATION LTD., 

Cora 6. Floor 6, Scope Complex, Lodi Road, 

New Delhi-110 003 (INDIA). 

Telephone . 91-1 1- 4380437 & 4360441 
Fax No. 91-11- 4360451 Telex No. 031- 61691 IRCC IN 

from 15.11.1994 (10J30 amj to 12. 1 1395 (5.00 pm) at 
ftecnsro/fls 150001- or USD 500 per tender foim set 

The^ Tenders complete In all respects canbe submitted 
upto 30.1.1995 (5.00 p.m.) in the Office of IRCC, New 
Delhi. The Technical Bids received in time wKI be 
opened on 31.1.1995 at 10.00 am in the Conference 
Halt, Ministry of Surface^ Transport. Transport Bhawan, 
1 , Parliament Street New Delhi. 

Any clarification on the subject can be had 
from either the 
Joint Secretary (Transport) 

MINISTRY OF SURFACE TRANSPORT 
Transport Bhawan. No. 1- Parliament Street, 

New De6ii-100 001 (INDIA) or the Office of the 
INDIAN ROAD CONSTRUCTION 
CORPORATION, LTD., 

New Delhi. 

(as per address given above) 

















































































































Jydi AJU9t-. / 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1994 


- -i •> . 
, .*.• • 

. 4 

ji : 

: a ; 


Page 15 

asia/pacific 


Rebound in U.S. 
And Japan Aids 
Matsushita’s Net 


Beijing Resists Trade Plan 

Objections Raised to APEC Timetable 


Cmfikd by (kr Staff Fnm Dtspotdm 

TOKYO — Matsushita Elec- 
tric Industrial Ox, Japan's larg- 
est consumer electronics maker, 
said Tuesday that the economic 
recovery In Japan and the Unit- 
ed States helped pretax profit 
rise 26 percent in its first six 
months. 

The maker of Panasonic and 
National brand goods reported 
corrent profit for the period of 
37.41 bubon yen (S384 million), 
up from 29.69 billion yen in the 
period last year. Sales rose 3 
percent, to 12 trillion yen. 

"The domestic economy is on 
the mend, although a full recov- 
ery is stiD a way off," said Sn- 
sunni Ishihara, a Matsushita di- 
rector 


China WUlBuy 
Intel Networks 

Bloomberg Business News 

BEIJING — Intel Corp. said 
Tuesday it had signed an agree- 
ment to provide networking 
and conferencing technology 
for China’s nascent information 
superhighway. 

Under the toms of a memo- 
randum, the American comput- 
er-component maker’s 
networking and conferencing 
products mil be distributed by 
Jitong Communications Co- a 


c r 


Ministry of Electronics Indus- 
try. 

China has said it plans to 
invest $150 billion over the next 
26 years in building an informa- 
tion superhighway. 


A hot summer in Japan 
helped Matsushita’s earnings 
by pushing up sales of air con- 
ditioners and refrigerators, Mr. 
Ishihara said. 

Audio and video products 
continued to perform poorly. 
Sales of video cassette recorders 
fell 14 percent. 

_ Improved economic condi- 
tions in the United States and 
Asia helped push sales higher, 
although there was no improve- 
ment in Europe. 

Regarding the company’s 
dispute with management erf its 
subsidiary, MCA Inc., Mr. Ishi- 
hara repeated the company’s 
position that the Hollywood 
movie studio was not /or sale. 

Mr. Ishihara said the compa- 
ny’s results in the year to March 
1995 would improve, but he 
cautioned that the strength of 
the yen “may mean difficulties” 
for the company 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 

■ Accord («a Disk Standards 

Hitachi Ltd. and Sony Corp., 
along with Minnesota Mining 
& Manufacturing Co. of the 
United States, announced a ba- 
sic agreement on specifications 
for the next generation of com- 
puter disks. Agence France- 
Presse reported. 

The companies said as much 
as 650 megabytes — or 650 mil- 
lion units — of data would fit 
on one of the new disks, which 
will be about the same size as 
conventional 3.5-inch (8.9-cen- 
timeter) disks. The storage ca- 
pacity of existing disks is limit- 
ed to 230 megabytes. The new 
disks also are to have a higher 
access speed than existing ones. 


Reuters 

BEIJING — A Chinese official said Tues- 
day that Beijing would not accept a binding 
timetable for free trade in the Asia-Pacific 
region, blocking a movement for next 
month’s APEC forum to lay plans for a free- 
trade zone by 2020. 

Li Enheng, director of the Department of 
International Trade and Economic Affairs in 
China’s Trade Ministry, said Beijing support- 
ed trade liberalization. 

But he said it did not want the Asia-Pacific 
Economic Cooperation forum, a group of 18 
economies that account for 40 percent of 
world trade and about half of total world 
production, to become an institutionalized 
means of imposing decisions on member 
countries. 

China’s opposition to formal timetables 
means APEC, meeting in Indonesia next 
month, will probably only adopt a vague 
statement of intent to have free trade by 2020. 

Some members of APEC have been push- 
ing for a free-trade zone by 2020, and a 
business advisory group said the goal should 
be set 10 years earner than that. 

“We support the long-term goal of free 
trade in the APEC region, but as far as 


region, but as far as 


timetables, we do not stand for timetables, 
because with timetables it may mean actions 
or decisions or measures will' be binding on 
members," Mr. Li said. “This is not consis- 
tent with the nature of this organization.” 

Mr. Li said China could accept a looser 
timetable as long as it was dear that countries 
still had the right to adjust the schedule to 
their individual circumstances- 

Qrina Says It Enforces Copyright Roles 

China said it had lived up to the letter of a 
1 992 memorandum of understanding with the 
United States on protecting copyrights, pat- 
ents and other intellectual property, the Asso- 
ciated Press reported. 

The statement appeared to be a reply to 
Charlene Barshefsky, the deputy U.S. trade 
representative, who said this month that pira- 
cy of compact disks and computer software 
remained extremely serious in China and that 
enforcement was inadequate. 

She said the United States wanted China to 
impose stronger penalties for piracy, prevent 
pirated goods from crossing China’s borders 
and buy legi tima te U.S. goods such as com- 
pact disks to meet the consumer demand now 
filled by pirated goods. 


Indonesia-Made Jet to Debut 


The Associated Press sia’s state-owned Nusantara them for $13 5 milli on e ach, he 

BANDUNG, Indonesia — Aircraft Industry in Bandung, added. 

Indonesia's first entirely locally West Java, would receive an air- Since its inception in 1976, the 
designed passenger plane is to worthiness certificate from the company has built and delivered 
be introduced Nov. 10, an offi- Federal Aviation Adflrinistra- more than 300 aircraft, 
rial said Tuesday. tion in 1998. »♦ 


designed passenger plane is to 
be introduced Nov. 10, an offi- 
cial said Tuesday. 

Bucharaddin Jusnf Habibie, 
ministw of research and tech- 
nology, said the 64-seat turbo- 
prop commuter plane would 
undergo ground testing before 

making hs tnan gnral eight in 

July 1995 to coincide with the 
country’s 50th anniversary of 
independence. 

He said he hoped the N-250, 
designed and built by Indone- 


uuu m yyo It also may set up a joiut- 

Mr. Habibie, who is also the venture manufacturing plant in 
aircraft maker’s president-di- the United Stales; the location is 
rector, s aid that because of mar- to be decided in December, 
ket requirements, the fuselage Mr. Habibie died cost as well 


NYSE 

Tuesday's Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on WaB Street and do not reflect 
Me trades elsewhere. VlaThe Associated Pros 


12 Month 
Hflh Low Start 


□hr Ykf PE IBS Hutfi LowLtfesJOl'se 


i;«wh 
Wgh Low Start 


had been lengthened from the as availability of facilities, the 
ori g i n al plan, which had envi- skill ed labor force and deregu- 
sioned a 50- to 54-seat plane, fction 0 f the U.S. airline indus- 
The company has spent more pas reasons forjecon^any’s 

than $650 million todevelop d** 00 J® 

the aircraft and hopes to sdl can location for its N-250 plant 

In addition, a joint-venture 

subsidiary in the united States 

»w L^Lnwwo.'- wonld Provide Indonesia with a 

— — 7ah ^***°"* foothold in the North American 
= = «?sK ,2? free-trade zone. 


Ota YM PE laih W UwLrtBtOi'ge 

- - .AS 9a *'* 


Futures 
Stir Rift in 
Hong Kong 

Bloomberg Business Sen 

HONG KONG —The Hong 
Kong Futures Ex change said 
Tuesday it would introduce fu- 
tures contracts on two individ- 
ual stocks before year-end, 
prompting a strong public reac- 
tion from the colony’s slock ex- 
change. 

The first two stocks to have 
contracts wJQ be the interna- 
tional banking group HSBC 
Holdings PLC and Hong Kong 
Telecommunications Ltd- said 
I vers Riley, chief executive of 
the futures exchange. 

They are the two largest com- 
ponents of the Hang Seng In- 
dex of Hong Kong’s top shares. 
HSBC has a 13.973 percent 
weighting in the index, and 
Hongkong Telecom accounts 
for 10.561 percent. 

The move follows a decision 
by the government to amend 
laws to allow* stock futures con- 
tracts, which are agreements to 
buy or sell a specific amount of 
a security at a specific time and 
price. 

The Hong Kong Stock Ex- 
change, annoyed that it had just 
been told about the futures con- 
tracts Monday, said it feared 
that the introduction of such 
contracts on individual stocks 
would make share prices more 
volatile. 

“We believe the market 
should be consulted before the 
introduction of such a prod- 
uct,” the exchange said. 

■ Shanghai Adjusts to Cuts 

The Shanghai Cereals and 
Oil Exchange will be badly af- 
fected by China’s decision to 
suspend trading of rice and 
rapeseed oil futures, the Shang- 
hai Star reported Tuesday, ac- 
cording to a dispatch 'from 
Agence France- Presse. 

The suspension “will affect 1 
the exchange seriously” because 
rice contracts account for 85 
percent of trading volume, an 
official said. 


Jflnvestor’s Asia 1 

Hong Kong 

Singapore 

Tokyo 


Hang Seng 

Straits Times Nikkei 225 


11000 

2400 • 

"is M - 


m 

u IS. 

iV 

0 2m L 




mf™ 

V 

®M JJASO 2150 

A S O 19500 M"JJ“ 

Tso 

1994 

1994 

1994 


Exchange 

index 

Tuesday Prev 

% 



Close Close 

Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

9,321.06 9.364.29 

-0.46 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2.362.54 2.376 86 

-0 60 

Sydney 

All Ordinaries 

2,021.80 2,037.40 

■0.77 

Tokyo 

Nrkkei 225 

19,732.15 19,852.37 

-0.61 

n.ua<auimpur composite 

1,102.23 1.109 07 

-0.62 

Bangkok 

SET 

1,501.58 1,522.48 

-1.37 

Seoul 

. Composite Stock 

i^9i"o2 _ HTosi.ss" 

+0.88 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

Closed 6,742 39 

- 

Manila 

PSE 

3,089.34 3.113.15 

■0.76 

Jakarta 

Stock Index 

514.53 512.48 

+0.40 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2,061.84 2,061 57 

Unch. 

Bombay 

National Index 

AFP 

2,049.72 2.045.06 

+OJ23 


Via The Associated Press 


(Continued) 


T2 Monti Sis 

tfcn UmrSIPrt Dw VM PE 100 s WWLwLdHJOl'M 


14? m -« 


I 2SI3 

ra-8ji 

| -2li 

Mijjl 

Pn i:fi M « i? 


zsm 

isf: 


,i£ B ?! 1 

'%ih 

ass? 

2fl *2 ^ J 


% m 

f \ lit? 


Very briefly; 

• Hino Motors Ltd’s current profit rose 39 percent in the first half 
of its financial year, to 2.79 billion yen ($29 million), helped by a 9 
percent increase in sales. 

• Nippon Television Network Lid raised its pretax profit forecast 
for the year ending in March 1995, to 1 1.6 billion yen from 6.8 
billion yen, riling cost-cutting measures and higher ratings that 
are allowing it to charge more for advertising. 

• West Japan Railway Co. might defer its listing on the Tokyo 
Stock Exchange, which was to take place before March, because 
of the weak demand shown for shares in Japan Tobacco Inc., 
Shizuka Kamei, the country’s transport minister, hinted. 

• China will double its investment in infrastructure to about 5500 
billion over the next 10 years to relieve bottlenecks hampering 
economic development. Finance Minister Liu Zhongli said. 

• Japan’s leading economic index stood at a seven-year high of 100 
points in August, up from a revised 03.6 in July; it was the eighth 
consecutive monthly reading above 50, the dividing line between 
economic expansion and contraction. 

• Japanese department store sales in September fell 2.1 percent 
from September 1993 after a 3.6 percent decline in August, the 
31st month in a row- of year-on-vear decline, the Japan Depart- 
ment Store Association said. 

• Morgan Stanley & Co. opened an office in Beijing on Tuesday, 

one day after it announced it was helping start China’s first 
international investment house. ap. Kmgh-RidJer. 4 F\\ afp 



IS P g 

v-w 


REPUBLIC NEW YORK CORPORATION 
SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDINGS S.A. 


Consolidated Statements of Condition 
and Summaries of Results 


These statements and summaries represent the consolidated accounts of Republic New York Corporation and its 
wholly owned subsidiaries and of Safra Republic Holdings S.A- and its. wholly owned subsidiaries. Republic 
New York Corporation owns 48-8% of Safra Republic Holdings S A-,, which ^ accounted for by the equity method. 


REPUBLIC NEW YORK 
CORPORATION 


SAFRA REPUBLIC 
HOLDINGS S.A. 




4 sa 
INI 

ii a? 

lii 


Sis a* 7 IS 

in J* 3 « 1 

MS: 

t*>sav 

if- = 

ilii» 


Assets 

Cash and due from banks - - 

'Interest bearing deposits with banks .... 

Precious metals—. — .. — - 

Investment securities 

Trading account assets - - 

Federal funds sold and securities purchased 

under resale agreements 

Loans, net of unearned income 

Allowance for possible loan lasses - 

Loans (net) - 

Other assets - — 


September 30, September 30, 

1994 1993 1994 1993 

l in thousand* of USS except per share data) 

$ 638,380 $ 557,003 $ 60,731 J 52,123 

9,530,875 6,130,430 4,754,683 3.376.354 

1,577,081 745,681 

11,777,082 13,875,719 5,881,392 5,650,486 

3,062,180 1,225,570 49,617 59,930 


838,621 

9,383,733 

(319378 ) 

9,064,15 5 
4,721,359 


1.625.694 
9,031,447 
(281,193 ) 

8.750,254 

5.051.694 


1,287,237 

(122,798 ) 

1,164,439 

457,127 


1,133,678 

(96,931 ) 

1,086,697 

335.398 


Total assets | $41,209.733 $ 37,962,045 | $ 12,367,989 $10,560,986 


& » a - 


.«• d Z 
j* a » 


$ i ? 

a at 


4 Si. 

*38 'H = \ 


? w a 


i 

I 

i 

k 

f 

m 


; i i f if 

’ & 2 a 

» 4 




liabilities 

Total deposits 

Trading account liabilities 

Short term borrowings 

Other liabilities - 

Long term debt 

Subordinated lcng-tenn debt and perpetual capital notes 

Shareholders’ Equity 

Cumulative preferred stock - 

Common stodc and surplus, nee of treasury shares — 

Retained earnings — — - 

Net unrealized depreciation on securities available 
for sale, net of taxes— 

Total shareholders’ equity 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity 


$22,226,145 $ 22379,887 $ 9,140,280 $ 7,153,245 


1.356,775 

229,101 

650,000 


902,204 

269,063 




a i o ■< 

96 tl 

si¥ 

i* ii iS 


i3 3 * J 


ralueper 

Client portfolio assets in custody — 

Net income, for the nine months ended — 

Net income per common share (primary) 

Average common shares outstanding (primary) — . 


2,763,022 


225,308 



4,486,868 


2,S86,00I 


974,332 

4,069,514 


5,267,507 


377,331 

2,588,991 


2,643,263 


648,600 

2,405,843 


2,130,635 


- 

672^00 


556,425 



704,877 


719.254 


903,560 

1,401,255 


1,153,765 


407,316 

(109^82) 


- 


(83,430) 

2,669350 


2,429,444 


1327,446 

$41309,733 

$ 37,962,045 

$ 12367,989 

$ 37.79 

$ 

35.56 

$ 

69.21 




$ 

5,604,254 

$ 250,624 

$ 

221378 

$ 

119,771 

$ 4.28 

$ 

3.82 

$ 

6.75 

52,738 


52390 


17,739 


1,171,867 


85,029 

4.S0 

17,701 


T-U 



' »:ra t3 o nr 

f ii d ! 4 

cn 127 113 ” 4 


m T-x ^ 

Is lisfi 

IS: -4 a * 1 1- 


Risk-Based Capital Ratios 

As of September 30, 1994, Republic New York Corporation’s risk-based core capital ratio was ] 6.45% (estimated) and 
total q ualify ing capital ratio was 28.00% (estimated). The ratios include the assets, risk-weighted in accordance with the 
requirements of the Federal Reserve Board specifically applied to Republic New York Corporation on a hilly consoli- 
dated basis and capital of Saha Republic Holdings S.A. Total consolidated assets exceeded US$ 50 billion and total 
consolidated capital, including minority interest and subordinated debt, exceeded US$ 5 billion. 


Republic New York Corporation 
Fifth Avenue at 40th Street 
New York, New York 10018 


Safra Republic Holdings S.A. 

32 , hiulevarJ Royal 
2449 Luxembourg 


New York, New lork lOOlo Raniritig Locations -4-fV Luxembourg 

Copenhagen, Geneva. Gibraltar, Guernsey, London, Lugano. Luxembourg, Milan, Monte Carlo. Moscow, Pnrjs, Zurich, Beverly Hills, 
Cayman Islands, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Miami, Montreal, Nassau. New York, Buenos Aires, Caracas, Montevideo, Puma del Erte, 
Rio de Janeiro, Santiago, Beirut, Beijing, Hong Kong, Jakarta, Singapore, Sydney, Taipei. Tokyo 


PRICE PLUMMETS 

BUT NOT FOR LONG 


A year’s subscription to the Herald Tribune To start your subscription just fax us: 

f ets you up to 50% off the cover price. In Europe Paris (+33-1) 46 37 06 51 

Equally exciting short-term offers. I R Asia Hong Kong (+852) 9222 11 99 

Or refer to the subscription advertisement in this edition. 

The world’s most powerful news-gathering 

network is making a deal with you. Hml b^^ Ertbttltr I 

But only ii you act now. nmuHW) with the m ion tmb amp ihe nuaecm mr Jj 


ITIBUSIH) *n THE KK MM TMB AMP IHE nUHKTA POST 





Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1994 


NASDAQ 


UMcntn 

man Low Skx* 


Tuesday’s 4 p.m. 

ty •» AP. consists of the 1,000 
sraaad securities in terms of dollar value. It is 
updated twice a year. 


llMomn 
High Low SMr 



Uv YU PE lfflta rtgti Low Latest Qi'M 

= u sw iss isa -5 


„ i5c 23 5 ii» 33^ 


RB]|&3 


llMonlti 
High Low Stock 

19% jw c Knead 
MW 1 » VaEnvIrolj* 


Oiw yu PE ia®> Htgn low Latest Gh ge 


J * "T3 


Bw •ntJ PE IDOl Hion LOwLOtestaYBe 
A 1 


1.36 33 fB 
_ <3 


13% jl’A ]f% 
iJfadll IIW-4W 

fc mM 


I Eatv'na 
fa EriCTel 
VuCmOHm. 


Me (la ... 
■Me i.o X 


a'MiijSgwrMcd 
fyJZ jaVi£iLaDviB 


iaHEwiovw 

fa 1«faE*or 1 

*ti*wE»nae 
! l3%E-wns 
fa in Easre 

5%fhp .. 


S $ ££ Sfalfg-. 


mM 

KiW 

WW r.iAi 

ftm 
feu ft 

»%20 A 


_ Jtsa ii% io’.» iT’.i * % 

?iffi isS sasft r,/ : 
3 A na ??„?ra=s 
; m fe , k 0ws 

t| ‘t|[7 jrjk, i/% 17% * 

a So 3?ft sift 

. U 12 11V. 1} -% 

16 IS 35fa 35% 3Sfa — % 
V 36W 184 m% »% -in 


3i e .5 j 


W ^ Jl 
w T '» 
a 1; u 

6B3 33% S 


27% 38% + % 

jr as =£ 


I 19% FHP 
ay> 23%FHPrtA 


:. is HI! 

10 i ii 'jS 

.. 17 S ZH 

.04 n JB Si 


itIts 


^jFSS&n 

wja a camstr 

I’T^ 1 


i ill igp3 


P'&ES. 

40 WWPatAlert 

“ IBSSb 

30. 73Y>&%- 


U4 ■& ta i 


i.oo u 1 m 

40 1? S30 


5 'Q SS 

91 a h 


_. 19 241 

z 3 a J8 

._ 10 4 

■“ 1 H! 

— j. 1075 


,SS 4>r~r 

i ewe - % 
l?% 14% 14%-^T% 

\l» 1S5S !I% -ft 


T7%12ViAavTLb 

USB jS 

ftgSS 0 

Wfigr 

19%])%AklilDS 


50 1 ” W BE SK Mi? :JS 
z”? 6 § 1 » 11 % lift J 

.30 7 i'i 7W 2aE jr%-l W 
J4 9 II 816 37V< 76% 74% — V. 

_ SO 31% 20% 70% -Ji 

,De i » St ffft JS! l? te is 
i5s 0 i? '_ 7 m & 


” " I07S ISV» 14% 14% -fa 

e ; a p 

= E a | l» li?r^ 


KE^BBSSw 

KKaES 1 

47% 36 FstTenn 

S % 18 HS*^ 

Vi BHRaxtm 
to*. H%Foame« 


4J II 465 M 

_ - 45*0 »'* »'•• 7% -% 

.. 16 3*3 17% 17 17". — 

dT3 10 2167 26% IS'.« 25ft. - '■> 

4.1 10 1383 45% «*'. £5 W ... 

I ?i 3 }i ‘1, 

1 % 95 IBM SXt d t% 5>'fi -'/?! 


70% I’iFoamee 
7% SuFdLJoEi 
7% SWFOUpA 
S4V, SO PoroSvS 


/a'/i uniua 
43 


r'Lift. 


UWAMilos 
23 AlexBkl 


?p R^0h | 


17 SB 71 26% 26% —Yi 

- 444 40 % 5V% 60% ♦ % 
_ 301 13% 17'1 12% — % 
11 345 22!'i 22% 23% — 

?0 1705 13 13% 13% i-V. 

IS 4JJ 34% 23% 24 -% 

35 347f U 23% 25%^ .'q. 


- ^ 7^ m 

r _ 44OT 77% 14% 14ft -% 
1.17 19 10 d 2|% ag 

~ 34 Bl4 41% 4D% 40% —fa 


f i*99%PurHB 
'/j 17%FWT1C0, 
94 14% Fusions* 

27% BfaFuturHls 


1.4 95 IBM S^< S'/l i' ''U -'7ti 
1.7 91 3073 5% S% O'-.— 

... . 641} 49% 451 i 4 s 

_ 34 101 3* J5% K% — 
3J 1? 101 30% X 30 —'5 

i i rot i& fl i|^: 


■" SHtt »"* Rv, 


j?? ^ 


- S M 4g nS 

7V, 3%pi MTc ~ M 1876 ^5% S% SW — 

%zTW“ "lift Sr to 

-A 9 g j i ir-fti 

5® Sl'fe = ® JC ®rj 

r laaK :|J1 fc S - 

- B sis p p-s ■ 
4 ^*s%^„ s.B $ 3* 2ft S*- 

24% 16 Cofle»ap Jle M „ ,2» E. 22 « — 

lewH’wErcnSm- M IS -. ’Sin i»vi 1?% “ 

n }*KsSr “ l3 16® S'A 22%gfa- 

f'bplli 5? i njS I Ufagg * 

Pilfe ii 8 .? 1 KSIK 
Z r>f Si 8& fi« K- 

is; 2 ^a¥^ ,c ■" ^ iBi 2E =5% - 

S Rs ^^& " 4 ik&r* 

Jafiut.CncEFPt Z 33 3^ 23% »??.23. — 




37%l£'4AllRe>c 


31 >4 16% AllResc 
21% low Aimon 


7S 4245 a<.. 23% W% - % 

7 351 2»% W% H% — > 

- in «% 9% 9% — % 

16 m 20 19 19% — % 

81 949 62 % 60% 61V— 1% 

8 743 JO%Hl3 70 ->'J 

... 531 18 17% 17% — % 

48 505 17% 16% 17V* —fa 


himTc _ 7s 

K^S 47, 43 ’fi 


30 584 
_ 10 l Sfi 
„, 40 3301 
- » 1816 


53% 54% — 1 ”’ 


fi% .S%AHmKDs 


9 48 SOS 17% 16% 17V. —fa 
I.S 21 176 16*.. 15% 16 
_. 3d 643 27% 76% 26% — '% 
” 78 974 21% 21% ill. — % 


44% 24%QrTU5 
Wi IBVQscOi 
73% iswaticaar 

S lT%a!nlcom 

77% CilHttti 


Ift ’SG -- 
6% ”E -ft 


MW ldWAPwitnv 

39 1 i 27V) AmSuar 
18 lOJ.ATrnwel 
Mli 19*5 Amted 
S99’.34*.Airwen 


... 447 14% 13% 13% — 1 % 

i3 70»fl 17% 17% ]J% 

... 414 13% 17 17 

i 471 18% IT’-, I}', _% 

244 34% 93 34% -IV. 

)} 766 17% 16% 16% —l, 

TO 7® Slli 21% 21% — % 


i7wn%Ancn@co 
38% left Anlec 

]SGi2SftSS 5 


20 insn 59 58 58 V| —<n 

It 7t30 10% lo 10 — % 

9 249 14% 14% 1415 -1 


“ IS 177 19% IB’/i 18Vj — Vi 
._ 37 3178 48% 46% 48% -7% 
_ 10 179 17% 17% 17V, — ’% 


_. 1947 76 25V« 75% _ 

_. 1472 10% 9% I0W — W 

.. 129 17% 17 If r . 

1626918 42% 41% 42% *• fa 

36 JZ7 IK. 16% 1*W -V, 

31 1094 16% IPi 16 

... 537 11 10% 10 


JF^fe"" 0 

B^lSftgSSUr. 

18% ?%Gasato 
74% 9 '.’.Gate 2000 
46Vi26VjSnCmit 
33fa lSWGenNutr, 

35% 18 Genre* 
MV) 24. genwni 


21% 21 V. :i% — % 
17 16% 17 .1| 

15% 14% 15% 


- »'% ??G :G 
i ^ Hb ilft fift-'SS 

- ”*S as 8ftSE=ft 

- « 5115 3'. 4% S'* -w 


.60 1^1 12 
40 2.7 .. 

.12 8 li 


= S3 S iii 23% 72 4 G 2*3 -ft 

_ 12 1536 31% 30V. 31% -% 

_ _ 2324 4fa 9% 9W _ 

.0 12 75 40 W 60% 60% _ 

L7 .. 796 TS_ 14% I4'«„ 




L i rsM S % jr'jsi? 

_. _ 101 fil'd 10 10% -% 

_ 31 149 57% S7 57fa -fa 


_ I? ua n*. 1 1 ii*. — 

.an 3^ 70 140 22% 71% 22% -% 

JO 3 25 7B 21% 21% 2T% -W 

„ A58 16'i 1P*J 15% —fa 


KUr J2 

nests A* 

CSPS 319 
nrnnet 


H% KZ 
fF f2' A 


h if-J 
p If&a - 

WZ 22 9% -% 

^ 37% 3^*4— 


4fiW 17 %Hoboot„ 
35V, 18 HamlmBc 
18% lr'jHOTtXjO 
IB 5%Harvinfl 
76% l9%Horvi pf 


21% ,6 ArborDro 


S % TdliArooGo 
12", Arpoiv 
15%10%AtfcS«t 
34 j 6 '..Armor 
23% IS Arnold s 
24W8'Vi,Amn 
34% liv.AscandC 
13% 7%A5Hv«wn 
46 74 Aspcin 
31% 22 AsdCrnA 
11 V,2l%A5dCinB 
20W12 Astec 

S ’A 2 Tli AtrarloF 
% IffaAHSeAir 
351. llljAlmrts 


... 537 II 
A 1355 25% 
& 676 25 

?4 ^0? 20% 

” ™ & 

^8 4?5 28% 


11 10% TO’i —V. 

25% 27W 24<'. * 1 
25 22% 24% -% 

46% 47V. 40% - % 

?>% 70V, 30% . ... 


1 -,W 

70 V Autadt 

34v.SwAummo 
29% 13% AutotQle 
39% 17 Awcrrai 


8 41$ 28% 28 v* 2SYi| — >' u 
93 583 17% 16% 16% _. 

20 341 13% 13% 13% — % 

20 214 23% 22% 22W — % 

19 562 71% 21% 71% — % 
II 3464 9W d8% 9 -% 

„ 36<£2u34Y. 32^. 34% - 1 
fl 858 10 % 9% 10% +% 

21 4045 33% 30 33% *2% 

5 25 25 25 — % 

_ 60 25% 24% 259a *W 

It 44 Ufa 13*4 Ufa -% 

Z' a % if- %% pi * v “ 

It 1 n Ufa 16% 17 —v.. 
_11 S 4Vu 3'vL 4«'i t -V,a 
a 4415 19| 6% 69. — % 



- «rs« 


tt c 

Bft B TS&3 
'&*% ’sazts 

14% 12% 17V, — 1% 


. . h hb)s?* 
Mfttlb&s 

26% \3%HeonTc 
3 a% lafaHnfiHE 

kirara 5 

’siiJsfKsfK™ 

lafalOfaHomcrM 

M| s 

34 24 konind 

S2 

TSv, 16%Huntim 
27% 16%Hum&6 

^.HTSSS&i 


_ 25 1 044 
“ 1? 

- ^ 
- i 5 


»% 58'/. SVfa *fa 

lift )5G IkzS* 

7% !7% 17Wu — 1/u 


S'- gassrifc 

35 35 34% 35 +94 

762 8% 7% 79a — % 

2S S * ?9% Wfa - ' -. 

f \ Aw-fft 


1MI 7 J f3 742 25’lfa 25% 25% —fa 
_ ... 372 1 8% 9 

XX J i2 295 23% S% 23% " 

M IS 17 43 23V. fl’., 73% - £! 

_ 27 930 IS 16% ff —1 

_ .. 940 30V. 30’', 30% — % 

_ .. 1695 13% Q% 13% —V. 

. 42 2766 79 M'S 28'* — W 

.16 J 38 8779 30% 28% 30% — 1 

JO JB 9 x270 25 24 74 — '/. 

_ 10 37 2 7% 27 27% -fa 

JO 15 15 225 13% 13 13V. ... 

... _ 3170 17% 14% I7fa _. 

: m 13% 13 ?5ft -fa 

_ 77 aOduMW 769. 27% -■* 
.. 21 3814 76 % 25 fa 25% _ 

_ 38 46? 34'.. 33% 34% *% 

_ U 1137 5% 21 V> fl%— I 

.16 16 U 5^ lift 11% lift .*1% 

* K 17 a 3 1% w 3 ft ^ - w 

M 50 II 313 18 17% 17% _. 


_ .. T69S 13% 12% 179. — V. 

_ 42 2766 79 M'i 28'* — % 

J 38 8779 30% 28% 30 - 1 

JB 9 x270 25 24 74 — '/. 

_ 10 37 1 7% 27 27% -fa 

15 1$ 225 13% 13 13V. ... 

... _ 3170 17% 14% 17% _. 


_ 75 392 29 28'" —fa 
_ 127 947 14% 13% 14 — % 


_ 43 92J 14% I4'i ISfa— I'i 

iPif-zG 

-. 15 ISA n 31% 32% —V. 
,.6 «*& M 27% JaG TG 


A X 169 26 


l-J-K 


6 24% 25% — ' 1 

a 17% 171. —% 

TV. 27'/. 27V.— 1 
i'Vc 5% SV'.-'Vg 




t 1IM 1 7% 16% 17 — y„ 

,-lllS 4V U 3'V, 4’% -Vi, 
& 4415 7 V, 69a 497 —fa 

26 7677 47V, 45fa6S'6,— 1%. 

I S 1568 2 P* 24% ?4% — '* 
I 1006 17 14% 14% —fa 


33% 6V.DS Bnc 
35jg J^Q|gS n| 

pfa 3 %BsPGP 


- 28 1427 34% 33 fa 33V,— I 


* 

_ 5} 642 
_ 1817961 
_ 12 1620 
23 444 7078 


29% 29% 79% —fa 
2?ii 7lft 2?fa “ 

]8 1/fa 179a — J, 



Sfa 79% BonPonc 1.00 
71fa 52% BCOirw piC3JS0 

pis ; r 

38% 30 Bmia 32 

teJMSSSfc M 


3J "9 io? 

BJ _ 135 
“ .7 1|? 

i P^i 

3-0 1 241 

- 2 _ ,4 ^i 


J}% 41% 4195 +Yi 
17% 16+, 1796 —V* 
14 13V. 13% — H 


24% llfaftedcOut 

27% lOfaDli™^ 
47. 30% Dentally 


14 13'-'. 

30% 30 
57% 053% 




Z 13 14 26% S% 24 V, — % 

J56 13% ,S ^ 

I if 410 11 fa ?o% low -j* 

:S'2S l?v. JC z 

1.00 43 flf 'iil 239* is* 6 2&% — vT. 

_ 18 lJo 27% 27 27% —fa 

r M 7138 m fc«^S 

Jt 3 16 5124 3?fa —ft 

2?^4 30 *u 


WSv.^U 

ISfa 6. ItnuLoa 


_ , 484 18% 179. 17% — % 

_ in 3799 9 8V, BVa — V„ 

_ 37 839 29% 28 7B —1% 

_ _ 754 1% J 5> i -fa 

_ 9 685 15 14% 14% — '.. 

_ 31 AUB 29% 28'. 78 fa 

_ 32 1047 35% 34% 34fa ... 


- 1087 15 
_ 77 7% 

224 Bfa 


25%lSj'. nFacu 

OiS 

Sfallfa ntoRes 


IS dU'i 15 -% 

7% 7% 7% -l. 

flfa SW 8% —v. 

Ufa 13 13 —fa 

25% 22' . 24% -2% 
9 8% 89. _ 

179. 1 6", 16% — C* 


179. 16", 16% — % 

ir 

13% 13. 13% -fa 


Sft tf* 
lift 1?‘ 

e ip- 

13% 1294 


Me 3 16 5126 31fa 30% 30% — % 

’■ u J i 7 2? 1 J ^ ^ ^ tS 
q iiW ftS ?2ft?2ft+-Tt! 

JU 33 _ 652 27 fa 21 22% -fa 

- 14 560 U'A ISfa IS 1 * —fa 

- « js ny? b.. 


it ve v inwi a 

14% IDW nsilTc 


2% 24*1 ruAut 

4% nil ntoDv 
Jfa 149a ritSilSv 


ift HfafiV-’v. 

Jfa 14% 14% +fa 


_. IS 
J4Q ~a ra. 


29fa22%5eiifq>s JO 


C 1 ? lili 


m^]|%B3S5Se 

BUS 

to ldfaDunren s 




■21? ,2 
11 15/2 




aaE^s 


694 14% Dure 
8 r59? Dur " 

Ift'ISIg 


J4 ? n 
_ 29 
A 2 15 17 


fa 13 % nteiEl 
1594 3% nINIwk 
17 11% ntrtcln 

1194 7fa nleptl 
649732% nig HI 1 

17% 9 InlrCm 
33 fa 17 % mCbie 


-40 2.6 fi 7 

j4 i f ra 1 


30 9523 27% 26% 27 -9,. 

18 3240 22% 20' k 71 —IV, 

? Ji Su fczft 

fi aSit lift $5 

_ 807 4 1%.3%-fa 


i:ll 


n .fLiSW^ 


* *u 


ifa BWBorlnd 

1%29 Bostec 


3® J* 


l/'Al 

ssSSefe" 

BlPfifr 


14 1 ju r^'-« 

.10 J 14 60 09W 

JO 3.4 15 99 24^ 

■20 2 9... 7? 35^ 


ia M ’io W ji{3ii 


JO A 9 71 

= « n 2? 
JB l3 i5 STB 
.14 1J 9 69 


3% " !? 


Br-5 



PANEL 


1994 


The Search for new Relationships 
17-18 November 1994 
Maastricht 


500 opinion leaders and decision makers from the international business community 
arid political world will meet at the 7tb annual Global Panel Conference. 

Pie conference includes plenary sessions, parallel sessions, networking lunches and 
receptions. These will give the participants the opportunity to exchange ideas about 
the latest developments in the field of global politics . economics and business. Pie 
Global Panel offers the participants excellent networking opportunities. 


Some of the main plenary sessions include: 


The Search for new Relationships 


Supachal Panltchpakdl, vice-premier of T hailan d 
Zheng Ffongye, chairman China Council for the 
Promotion of International Trade 


Moving out to tfxe 21st Century 


Gordon Sullivan, chief of staff United States Army 
Richard Pascale, business consultant, USA 


World Economist Forecast 


Franz Vranitzky, chancellor of Austria 1 
Andreas van Agt, ambassador EU, Washington 


The Global Automotive Industry 


Louis Schweitzer, chairman & CEO of Renault, France 
John Vinocur, executive editor and vice president 
international Herald Tribune 
Pehr GyUenhammar, former chairman Volvo, Sweden 
Frans Sevenstern, president of Nedcar, Netherlands 


Business in a Competitive Area 


Stan Shihu president & CEO Acer, Taiwan 

Florls Maijers, former chairman Unilever, Netherlands 


New Paradigms for the 2 1st Century 


Gyula Horn, prime minister of Hungary (invited) 

David Owen, EC-mediator on former Yugoslavia, UK 
Allen Weinstein, president Center for Democracy, USA 


Global Panel is sponsored by: 
UPS, 

Paribas Asset Management, 

Randstad, 

van Hecke, 

Fmpac, 

Microsoft, 

Polynorm, 

Ward Howell/Maes & Lunau, 
Rank Xerox, 

Renault, 

Unocal, 

Steel weld, Division of Ambac, 
CEBECO, 

Hoogovens Group, 

Reuters, 

Concord Corporation, 
NVS-Verzekeringen, 

Port of Rotterdam, 

Meyn Group, 

Tillekc & Gibbins, 

City of Maastricht, 

Province of Limburg, 
International Herald Tribune, 
Singapore Airlines. 


o Please send farther information on Global Panel 1994 

o Yes. I shall attend Global Panel 1994, USS 1950,- excL VAT (excL dinners & hotel, incl. lunches & farewell drink) 

Name PC/City 

Company Country' 

Address Tel.: 

Send to EUROPEAN RESEARCH CENTER, P.O. Box 218,3130 AE Vlaardlngen, the Netherlands, 
id: + 3MO.234.OI.55, fax: + 31-10.460.49.69 


IKTEKNATHWAI. 


in association with: 


i7Monm 
tfteti Lb» Ste* 


f^SiKA* 

32. 23 Kelly SA 
2ifa i] Kernai 
29% lT'4Kon*%ef! 


YU PE 109s H!bii Low Lores* Or ec 

4,fa«4 f ..4 §S -,U 


UMamn 

hBgh Lon Stock 


Div YId PE IMS Utah urn Latest OYo* 


HiQtlLO* 


In J8ft Is-; -}4 

13 129* 12% —fa 

17% lafal »*/«-!% 

iSfa itfa llii —fa 


#ftn.*5SS»ch 

lift’KBSJbf 


48V. 46J... 48fa -lfa 
2.6 21 "H 77fa 3^5 -ft 

= *4 ffe 
4i $ 3? li 

- J 6 12Z l*L'» I2>< 13'.* -9. 


-fa ^ 

Mu **av, 


n Pi? BW-* 

.. l-*?a 24% 73 74'-. . '.. 

_ 30 18*8 72". 21% STfa— 1"; 
rf 48 gji 42% 4iV« «fa -'5 
... _ 5S0 22% 21% gl» - fa 

;; «'{?? 

-. _ 2597 34' i 34% 35fa - '■ 


E’.lHtLfiiinrs 

%2'S 


r i& mS 18% 

L-M 


h if?; - % 


-B*. 77 J. LamRsch 
£fa 29% Lancsfri 
239a SOfaLonce 


35fa l^'iLOrnkach 
26' i 17V. Lorrjryi 
34 16V, UjnOStr 


1911 SHLOSrmTc 


}£'•■ 75*. Js'.a ... 
}I% 31 31 -% 

70%d7Dfa »% —'A 
15 14% IS 

I7fa 1* 17'. — '. 

2Sfa IS'.. 25% -'■» 

4Sfa 4S". 45% ... 


tsr =i3«5r»i 
tSfe 1 'Ift 1* -ft 


3i Ufa Elcwvr 
2991 ]4*« LecarPn 
24fa 1 1 LmcCo 
19 10',. Lecnters 
34% 19 LeOCfiT 

10% 4*.[_jposm 

27% 20 Ufalluse 
II % 4V*:iLOJOCk 
27% 23 Loowpng 
»Yi isWLngSSSi 
17% 11% u 6c P 
yjA faVtUilSfk 


VA fv ^ T 51ft gft 
S3 19 749 l|y. }?fa ji _ 
53 5029 19 dl4 f|%-1<; 
.„ .. W 25fa 25 24V. -fa 

.-.. 76 4ffl? J "ft 

“jigs ^ IftTft 


7S SVjPnSiC 

3 1 ; Jift^orSa 


jo a 

l.wo 2.4 8 71* 41 

= i '4 h r 




n - — »e H«" L0 «L»«»Oi-9. 

nvs'Mtf-Si 


wanuwi sw* - .■ini 'y- TP-i TV'* 

'ssi^isBsa^ 4 tt 5 JB 

Hfal/falffin’r™' * L, ?■? ^ 4 Sfl 9% 8% 9% — Ifa 


fm 

®is 

«* 

11 fa 9% 

7$fa 17% 

tu 

aft if i 




- 121 1258 135% 134'',I3SJ4 - % 
-j it 239 75 74V, 74% — % 

2^ i! .5*2 ifl', 16% 141, _ 


ii .S'i •?/* >»fa '*}» ^ 

A 28 iM 47% 44 46% — SJ 

= a W JSft 34% 

= 'M \$l jT Sl&m 

_ 34 4249 {4% a%33- ;M -li% 


ycBt 1 * 431 h - ™ 

TSV.lS KwBn J2 33 10 364 14% 14 )4% ~ 

asi'^^A fils's- 1 

la.aassaa ; " f h ® ]te -# 

IftiiftpSA = if IS M ff;lssjjs 


es4 


3‘* « WtS 


“ ‘ 4851 wu! “'■* 

? II P 

= s’g kBs-^s# 

iTtf IPS -JS 

ill nii 


Bfa 1«%Phy* 


Wi%\ 

h ». 
MM 


86'i39%Lc/lft 


48V. 30 Vj MPSCm 

&£S8MS 

pss’panar 

21 7Vi Mocromd 

avflessi 

21 % !7%«ftocGo 


SKsstaassi 


141* 7%Marc«*n 

+5 6 MOTHffl 

W, IflfaMcrvilli 
73% UfalUVUHnfl 
15% 9fa«toCTHIJ 


; “sss !Si a*"srie 
i Ml « hfi 
a ^ « fcra 

_ 770 14%dl4 14 — V U 

~ 6 ,445 24 23% 2M4-I, 

Z 42 2?M Ufa IfV* 14% _ 

_ _ 160 11% Ufa 11% 

oll'BHt IjSSS^S 

- * —% 
_ 17 88 4 3fa 4 

- ” <470 22% 22% — *5 

.. 51 130 13", 13% 12% — % 


mm 

bssrsEBS 1 


B 243 IS 14V, 14% _ 

M 1.4 70 748 46% 44V, 46fa + 1 . 

-:r.2$u.s ik lift =ft 


40%I7US 

mi'® i 


b«.» 

zid 


imm 

n To> *% 19,, 


514 _ 14 t -Jfa 

ISr* l|% “ _ 
Ufa 11% 


?S:3SS-S 

I7 1 * ISfa +’* 


= s3|tellip3 

“ iS S2 4?% a - 




3.0 is so« »fa so to — % 

.9 H 3732 I4fa ISfa 1ST, — % 

- 28 3887 14% 13% 14% +V-, 

- « m isy. ip* — 


24fal7faMcCor 

t?, 4 3 3ftKSS?’ 


- *fi HA is 1 ^ — v'i 

_ S 6S 63 V, m A i|| 

23 1* ^ fa iJSiift- 1 : 

- 39 «m 3B. 37 37VS — % 




- « «4 jfa .ffa !?:• -fa 


KfaJSl.wiSiWre 

l?ft 9%MlfitSr 


23 Z S8 

i r lift ns -? 

... 23 2659 ■»« IDfalttfa. — A, 

_ 9 TT? 14'-, 13% 14% fa 

- 29 Sm 24". 23", 23:7—1 


§fa 26% Alrdf 
5% 7 Merf 
37% 17 Meril 


f !2 ® 

” U 5t?S 


iip-r 7%A6eTfraw 
MViU wmoA 
« i3%MeirOT 

44%29%Vjd&r 
80%54%MlcnN1 
34% t5'/.MtcWari 
32% 9'1/W iCrAgs 
44 18 Mlcrcho 8 
a% TfaMlCfOOT 
a Vi «%AIUcraci 
36' . 17% Micro* 

5? fa 38 AAicsfls 
18}. 4%Micrt6S, 
SvfallfaMCKnSv 
30%94%Mjd(£» 
25V. 18% WKSPn 
31% 22' <MKH Co 


_ 14 4133 8' . 

- 39 7828 15% 
.6 19 535 19% 


Ufa lOfa 
20% 20 
IS 1 '! 14 

r|'i raft 
li** ir'j 


16% 16% — 1 % 
10 fa 11% -fa 
20 20% -V. 


^ *fa 
27V, 27% — fa 
78% 28% — % 
9 9V. - % 

IT 1 ', IB -fa 
TT, flfa - Vfa 



IP« 

m —4 


Hi 


.12 a 8 

:: s S8 j «* 

~ * T-U- V 

»J it 1 / v; 

IBIfil 


g ft 3?ft iu i« 

K |sfes=a' 

SV. 44fa4S'.« . 


mm 


•% j*. -& 

io* . ufa Ufa — a 


V ts=? 

i 1 ' 1 4?fa fa Ift 

u u.fa i£v. -V 


i9% ibh i» 




._ io Ti 3% Ufa T3% *1% 

’sasifflna 


H 

lifa 9%1 


-IE 


>.<17% 7%—' ■<- 

iSVjBS.aj 

l/'.T !?% *fa 


S^J S '4 =:ft 
“Si i?’- ^*5 -ft 

41. 4% 4% -fa 

49 47*j 48> * . 

ofa s% 7|i5 — % 
i5w >5fa u, -fa- 

jj% 

sft r-.ji'-s: 


01 

J40 1J) 22 Jg 


■” i a iffi Sft ? 
18 1^ 17 ft 1 

JO 3 21 jSmW,, 7 


r a .a « jb Ba m ^ 

LflTlH „ 21 8V 19% 19% 19% -fa 


I9Vi TfiTojk 

Ml 


IS I9fa 18fa 19V. 

3 14% 14 14 — % 

\ lift yft u v ‘ =ft 


761 39''. J7% » 
671 76% 75V. 76% 
2770 31 ■ 4 30% 31 


z 1! >1 % ® = 


41% 47 

7% ru 

7% 8 
3J%J4. 


_. fe 18? 3? 34% 34 _ 

3027902 5?% S8%59>V»-IV„ 

_ 37 1711 17% 17 IJV14— Wi, 

_ 57 948 57fa 55>ii 561. — M 


^ 41 842 34 fa 34% — % 

3.0 10 1793 S% 3lfa S — % 
4j - 29?y apfa 9% ?% — % 
- a IS? 27% 26% 27% *% 
„ 37 294 I9'A IB 19!«4-1% 


5 %2l%Tr 

*'Mi 



31% 22 ' 4 AMU Co 

S 23%M4lmr 
fa liV.ArttaC'l 
I»V45^'mMiSSQi 
24 12fa Mitekjjr 


J2b£? 


2M 16 412 25V, 74% 25*4 - 
_ _ isa S"> 77% 27% 

_ ... Z347 ISfa 17% 18 * 
_ 23 1241 21% 19% 20fa— 1 


iStl fell 


31 % 23V. MmSiW 
34% 13% A/lo howl: 
44% 30". Mole* 


K 14' , MonenM 
22'/. 13%Man«vSi 
19'.i DUMiinlPos 
17% 4'.Moicorn 
74fa14V.MDv«Gal 
21 % lJ'.Muitcre 
3? 1 -: rT i‘jiuttmd h 


,3^ 'B 8 T 

13 m. is% i4% fs — •« 

J 27 302 41 3 43'-’. —fa 
.1 2) 1655 41% 5#% 40'.— Ifa 
_ 245 20 19% 1»t’. —fa 

1.0 9 102 19% 15V. 19% —fa 

— 117 324 13% 1?V’i 12% —fa 

J 215 S'-. 7% Jfa _ 

_ _ 348 74 73% 23% - fa 

_ 17 341 Jflfa |9fa 20 —Jfa 

_ 13 243 29V. 28% 29’/. _ 


.10 3 ii v 

.16 3 il ifft iift — § 

t ii z « is is* *4 


10% 9% 10% —ft 

4% 4fa 4% T % 




- 3 J *8 i»s EBv 1 

100 ** ° 7« Sft ■ 

= M 3i:|T? 

s ililll=r 

13 * ^ S'*. 3 * 

13 ff ^ S% = 1 % -ft 

i: f s ,! i it 


« a * 

1JW 43 6 

M l!S M12 
1,00 is I J 


P H -fa 

a 


?Aft]3ftSg^n T i3 ="» tt Lift 
3 iiftRft^s" s a* a »ffli r «a 

38.. 18 Roper -20 ..9 fS 4T7 22% 


37 24 NACRe 

711. 14'. NN Bail 
33 27 NSBSj 

IS IDfaNACC 
14>. IDfaNTCotr 

SJV. 25 NaiC-vo? 
9fa 3>’.NTearn 


17". 11"; Ntv«JO 
74". 6 NCtrSty 
Hfal* , '«NBUtCos 
31 fa 21% Nenoqr 
26 17*. NelwiT 

18V, 7% rjetfrttnt- 


8 HV.Nelmnas 
3fal2faNlwfcG 

3fa S’aNwklme 
9fa tfaMtwfcSv 


16 flfa NowWna 


20% 7". T/wOKRs 

54V, iB'.NevtEtOn 
9". 6%N0leCh- 
40 73V,Norond 

s fl-Ksstr 

M 14 NorreU 

EiDSF 

52 22V. NOulus 
1»". lO’.Noyefl 


w-o-p-q I 

A 13 951 2flS.ii" "35% 25 fa— Ifa 

• A . *86 20% 19% T?'.l — IV. 

IJ II 233 77 d?6% 27 — % 

_. 15 6? 12 1 '. 12 12% ♦% 

2S - 16? 14V, 14 14% - 

_. 10 1695 33fa 32% 33fa -% 

36 76 7". 6", 6% — % 

-.340 147 17 16% 17 _ 

_ 14 2261 7% 6fa — Vj 

_ 18 1108 27% 28% — 1 

.. 23 1441 29", 59 79% —V. 

8 23 46 20 19". 20 

_. 14 4147 8% 8". Bfa ... 

_ 38 144 25 1 . 25 25 —fa 

I ? W ’3% T T ‘Zffit 
«”,? m ii iSft,sft=;ft 

_ _ 925 4'i 5*. 6 _ 

- _ BO* !3fa 13". 13% — % 
_ 40 1 9250 »’■ : 19% 20% ► fa 
_ ... 12221 20*i 20 20% —fa 

_ 22 2817 6*. 6% 6% _ 

_ 27 344 38 37>. 38 -% 

1.0 23 28 55*'. 54% 54% —fa 

.9 20 3571 45V. 44% 44 fa —V. 

I J .. 543 IB 17". IB *-% 

_ 19 848 7* Tfa 7% *% 

U 11 1221 36fad35"j 36 — % 


18% 1 J'iRoSstr 
27% ijv.Roiech 
20% 16% Rouse 


1 i tt 73 ? aft w* 
& * 3 * ar ^ sft 
“ a JS f?% 

= iJ<^ lj|ft i|h 

.14 3 W 66 ** \L 


~ « aM S*' 1 ??% irft-lvu 

= 1 j h bh^n- 

~ =i® m 3ft®s-is 

EijjiiSs? 

r. a i®i «% 23 % -j? 

“ !_ ISM 21% 20k. Jl% •„% 
-G lS5 30 >'. 28% 30% 4 1% 
Jljffi IBS? 14% lifa 13 — »% 
“ 34 Ba 18% 17% IB 


33fa7b%SfiV'lii 
3«v. 74% st iude 
24fa l*%St$£2Bs 
31 % 1 5% Soiwnino 
11 4fa^antCn 


J8 1.6 — U 

1.94 44 t S 


ffaW-s r 

ifa 


S%l7’AWLRFd 
JlUlMWohrO, 
60 29%Wg g&g 


2.40 ~ 5-7 26 28 42% 41*. 42% ►% 

3 L2 1b“ 26% 2*. ?*% '% 

40 U 11 244 18 iri I7fa —fa 


jo j ii 

_ 2ft 19 


jn iTJ 34 

27%"jfa5Sai5»e" _ _ ~6H 6 ' ~6 —Si 

sissr-psT = iS ft Sfa f; 

SI 23 f- afS 2«S Si 2** -S 

= « J lift $ Jft tS 

7fl% ^Bfagojicite — H 24% pi W* -4* 

z'*ts \C & 3^“ 
t: ttft 13 ft is vs 


aft aft 

8 



7^1 


_ _. 5710 20 T9fa 19% — % 
,. 16 677 6>.« d 4 6% _ 

Z 14 5 17", 17% 17V. —V, 
_. 21 14445 16 15% 16 -% 
_ 74 37301152". sav. 51% -fa 

ii 1 r s f iBs=3 

... 14 472 1. 

- - 1 m 


% « 9M 

1600 6J „ Fi 
J2 5 § 

% is ri 
* iii 


(91 35 34 34* 

143 13% 13% 131 
33 lifa 17% jl 
3S 18% 18% 18’ 
xj efi% |jfaj| 

S w% n%2?< 

26 51 fa 31% 21 
47 26% 26% W 


pftlSfa^ 3 

ij". ofaSraw 


35%79l.OtaK6fn 
16". s’.oiicom 
Ufa 41. QmeaaEi 


: 43 77 

& 3 1 
’£ Z I 


46fa 76 V. Oracle s 


rSisafi 


7i*i 204. 21 * % 

13 12% 17V. —fa 

30*. 29V’, 30% *> 

I ill 


[CVWMT 3350 3 


ft vs 
S 

ft T 

liJ 

H i«S-% 




a “.“y*s HHdJ5j. 3 % -a : 

^ -. 914 lg» 127* ijfa —fa 
Z 46 919 28% »fa »% - t ■ 
_ _ 273 14% 14 14% ifa 
— — n5 10 9% 9% -fa 

~ ji in, ?k ?4% a — % 

= ” I iF tts Ir -a 

-. 48 7 - ft 


.96 

1J» 43 Tf *4 

r. ’3 P J 



Z a 

Ml* 


ift ’i 7 " m% ^ 

17% 16% 17% ifa 
20 19% 19fa— 1% 

iflig 

13fa Ufa Ufa — % 

1 Eli! 


We can’t 


keep on meeting 


like this. 


In planes. In hotels. In the street. Oh it’s exciting every time 
we feel your hands on us, your eyes on us. And we know it 
does something special for you as well. Couldn’t we see if we 
can turn this into something more serious? Here’s an offer 
that should make us irresistible - the International Herald 
Tribune for three months, or even a year, for as little as half 
the newsstand price! So fax or mail the coupon now. 


New Subscriber Offer 


Mail or fax to: International Herald Tribune. 

181, avenue Chari es-de-Gau Be, 92521 Neuilly Codex, Prance. 

For full information: Fax (+33-1) 46 37 06 51 


Country/Cunency 

12month9 .% . 

+2 months -SAVM3S 
FREE .tori year 

3 months 
+2 weeks 

FREE 

Austria A. Sch. 

6,000 

37 

1,800 

Belgium 

B. Fr. 

14,000 

. . . 38 ■ - 

4,200 

Denmark 

D.Kr. 

3,400 

. ••S3" * 

1.050 

Francs 

F.F. 

1,950 

': ; 4D 

590 

Germany 

D.M. 

700 

:/ '32 ; . 

2(0 

Great Britain 

£ 

210 

■ ;32 - 

65 

Ireland 

£H. 

230 

■ ■ s? . 

68 

Italy 

Ure 

470,000 

So- • 

145.000 

Luxembourg 

LFr. 

14.000 

- ..36 . 

4.200 

Netherlands 

R. 

770 

. 40 

230 

Portugal 

Esc- 

47,000 

38. 

14,000 

Spain 

Ptas. 

43.000 

34- 

14,500 

-hand Oetiv. Madrid 

Ptas. 

55.000 

. 24 

14.500 

Sweden (airmail) 

S.Kr. 

3.100 

34. 

900 

-hand delivery 

S.Kr. 

3,500 

. as 

1.000 

Switzerland 

S.Fr. 

610 

44 

185 


Yes, I want to start receiving the International Herald Tribune everv dav ■ 
The subscription term I prefer is (check box): ■ 

□ 12 months (+2 months free). ■ 

□ 3 months (+ 2 weeks free). I 

□ My check is enclosed (payable to the Internationa! Herald Tribune). * 

□ Please charge my: □ American Express □ Diners Club □ VISA ® 

□ Access □ MasterCard n Eurocard I 

Credit card charges will be made in French Francs at current exchange rates, { 
Card No. I 


Exp. date Signature 

For business orders, please indicate your YAI number: 


{IKT VAT number FR 47320211261) 
□ Mr. □ Mrs. □ Ms. 

Family name i 

First name 

Mailing Address: □ i 


26-10-94 


□ Home a Business 


City/Code, 
Tel. 


_Country__ 
Fax 


?i| 

EYTEmmoNAL ill 

WMfUwme 'I 

'^wai«*m» W n BWIFMT | 

J 



/ ^ 

• f 





*1 





v. 


ixip 





AMEX 

Ttowtay'* Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the donna on Wall Street and do not raflec 
ttaie trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


5sfi jj Mootti 
J - — LwiW 


VW re tMt Wall UroUHfSlOfog 


St U 


B AIMS* 

73*i ALC 

1% '.vWWtnwt _ 

tit-, OHiAAJtC _ 

'.? , tL I. il/, 2 1 .':. ARC _ 

!■ V?.2*%»T%ARMFP» 2J8 11.1 
. £.;• 3 Hu ASR ■ .(Be 8.7 
1 if V ’jV, 6 I % ATT Fd 2.736 « 


- 23 


5't; 8% 5'/SAOtCcm 

• AW 3WAOTICU 
3v„ 1'tfi.AeflM; 
t gw AMAdrnRic 
f. sS IHAdvFln 


>100 

_ 13 


- M 
I 


> 1 
ZX 6 

_ 14 
... IB 


1.55 M* _ 

1-50 96 _ 

1 .32 5.9 B 

.IS A 9 




j- < 

Si; •: 

'V: 

f-:2 -■ 

i'.vr: - ' 


X-:.- 


■T'-t-' 5 1V„AdvPbO« 

■*■7. J'* IhAMSM 

: • i?V is' i SWAirtMt 
•• S*5 s'% 7 1 Vu AjfQse 

1 ) :■ 3w. iWAJrew 

7*4 4 AJtancD 
5% 2V»Aj8Tign _ 

% WuAtolCwl _ 

W%I5=*AH(iOOnn I* . 9.1 _ 

2% WAIft" - - 

u% ruAflaiKn _ to 

I1H TWABouH - 11 

7 V, 3 AWwIn _ „ 

9* 4%Ata«Gr _ .. 

'»« IWUnwfiwl - -. 

. Af iota 4v^Amew 

Hi %AiyV8#1 
E*'/ 144, jwafww 
I- v WalStaAfWRJ 

u ' 1 1 24% 20% ABkCT 
* > 30 ISHAmBBs 
i IV, i%AE»l _. _ 

I,. * y. a s AfWnRn _ _ 

t i- 14 Vi 3V, AIM W .162*406 8 

•SV liV.13%AIMB5 164 lOJ 9 

■‘•f l4**ll%AlM86n IJO 10.3 9 

15 UMAJMSIn 1.940117 11 
A-H' MWIS'AAMMA 64 24) 12 

V.-C, nil MfhAMzflB .<4 2J 12 

Tv M% 6% Am poo n 
11 % 7V.ARi«tr 

Wv 2WA&E 

-• t i%, VaAmShrd 
& 5 4?I 3-taAT«hC 
■®i :. la'4 6*6Arr*xfl 
p-i "j 1 , ViAmpaiwt 
i:‘" -rf'4 IflWAmw**! 
k-‘£ SI 9, 9%Andn» 

Pi?* 4 IWAnoAUD 
15% WAnaPor 
10V. 4WAIWM9 
14% 5%Aprognx 
4 ArtUd 
Ilta 6%AridZ*f 
10 6'AArrawA 
12V. TWArtiyth 
An,, 3 Astride 
13% 2% Atari 
71% StaAflonHi 
’A UAftsCM 
1BW MkAuaum 

34% ■ UjtAiKtro 
9% 4 44 Aurora 
2% 2 Azoon 


70 BV« BV, 
494 3SW )41% 
4 1 1 

n iiw nw 

192 7't, 2Vk 

70 9Ht 21W 
18 2'.% 3'H. 
jQ 44% 44Vi 
*KN 4W &<u 
24 3>'/« 

30 3 

41 7% 

W 2 
99 ISM lr/i 
tg V* % 
45 Mil 1% 
11 2'* 71% 

207 7 4% 

45 3V U -3 

10 71 m eu 

6Vr 


3'/i 

2 

7W 


399 

12 

205 

174 


<«1 

8<A 

4W 

S*o 

% 

9'A 

IV. 


36 


BJ 4 


„ 13 
- 34 


; *'f 
‘ *i I i 

1 Kp 


2.9 8 
-.604 
_ 34 
14JDC . _ 1 

36 

40r bS I 
_ 38 
. > 12 
_ 12 
_ 29 

. 10 - i3 io 

Z 9 

I io 


SO □'/!. 2'Vi. 
81 Vi! 

139 1». 15W 
233 % V.. 

4% 

81% 

4% 

5% 

3D *» 

9484 «U 
150 1W . . 
x34 10%. 10W 
13 15W 15W 

8 22W 22W 
1 23W 23% 

937 IW IV U 
385 5 5 

92 3W 3W 
X42 14V. 141% 
xia irw m% 
X40 llWdlita 

19 22% 22W 

9 33% 22% 

93 7'% 7W 
19 tV, r* 

242 u 4% 4 

UO Vu W 
44 3'% 3>.. 

341 7W 7W 
S 1 1 

17 T7U 17!% 
287 18V* 181% 
16 5Vj SW 
9 'v, t 
11771)10% 

100 BV, 

41% 

8 

n% 

3 

2% 

4% 

5*4 
A. 

7% 

19, 


XlO 

10 

11 

10 

V 

1410 

27 

51 

348 

2030 

112 

411 


9W 

8W 

4'% 

8 

7% 
3% 
2W 
6 V, 
5W 
V., 
7% 
... 1W 
4% 46/, 
7V, 21% 


8% _ 
33H, 

1 -v, 

11% -■% 
3% — % 
31% — '/• 
3'/u —'ii» 
44W —Vi 
‘ 6'% — >% 
TV,— J/u 

7% ” 

1% > 
1P'» — ■)■* 
«%-*,. 
1%% -ft. 
2% _ 

7 ♦’« 

3V„ > 

w *v 

4% -'A 

3>9u - 

Vn - 
1S% *W 

#U _ 

AIV,! .u, 
SVa - 
6% — W 
5% —'fa 
W— 

98 . -% 
IV. —1% 
10% - 
15% _ 

22% -<% 
23% .*% 
1», — V, 

31% — ’% 

14% — % 
11% _ 
11% 

22% — % 
23% - 

7V, _ 

7V, — % 
4% * 1 
v« _ 
3% — % 
7% _ 

1 - 

13'4 _ 

lav. — % 
51% *'.% 
"% _ 
10% .% 
8%. — Vfc 
4V* 

8 _ 

7% ♦■% 
3 *% 

2% > 

6% 4% 

5% — % 

%. -Vi. 
7% _ 

l¥u * v > . 

4% — V„ 

2V, _v. 


_ 27 
1.91a 93 14 
_ 8 
Z9 17 
9.1 ~ 
93 „ 


32 


JO 


_ 27 
U 24 
„ 97 



1% % B&H Mr 

17%11%BAT5 
a3»i 72*%BHC' 

II 38. Baker 
4% SiABaMw 
23% T9%BanFd 
1«’% lOViEtoislro 
9% 7%Bk9ba 
25V) 21 BTcv7Vi 1 
25% 30% BT cv7% 1J» 

W VsBanvHl 
24 14%BorrtJ> 

24% TWBorvRGl 
21 IlWBavUMo 
5 3. u Bayou 

4% TWBSHKwt 
7% 3%BSHKPWt - - 

3% 2VuB5JPi\"t - - 

JAWTTWKli^A^Ml SJ Z 

2% l%Becn-da>' - 4 

3% IfeMinBC 
24% 19 V, BetichE 
B% &W BenEro 
1IM 82%BeroCO 
IV, %B04K» 

26% 10 BWt'A. 1 
25% lQWBiaRB. 

31% WBfoeona 
10% 4*'.8kmaD 

l"/l!l 

14V. 9% 

14% 10 BCAia 
14%10%BFUQ 


1 % 1 % 
14 13% 

77% 77% 
4% 4V|* 


_ 19 

J6 

200a 23 _ 

I 31 
- 31 


UWIOWBNJIQ 
10% BNYIQ 


1'1 


44% 34%Hd^ 
45%17%Bt0UntA 
45 17% BioantS 
1S%13%BDM<0 
5% 2 Bowrw . . 

73 35 StowBTrpf 3J>Q 
28V,15%Bawna. J4 
17% 9%BTOndn 28 


1.05 104 
J9a7J 
290 73 
37 7;i 
39 73 
205 e 5.1 
SI 
32 
124 


_ 13 


10 
1J 19 
12 19 
8.9 19 
_ It 
73 _ 
Z3 7 
U IS 


... ,Vlr I'.Broivlyw i7a2»LB 1 

: • % «' *Js’* 9%Brscr»0 1JM 72 45 

• 7.V W»3%iBnxMj) - 34 

" 3W. lVSBufmm ,. 4 


re 


15 
22 
55 
51 

M4 6% 6% 

15 20% 20% 

13 101% 10W 

1 TV, 7% 

1279 3! >4020% 
69 31% 20% 
48 •/» Wji 

63 23 23% 

813 u 24% 23% 
19 14% I4W 
35 3% 3% 

3 3 3 

115 3% 3% 

10 2% 2% 

4 21% 2V, 

11 34% 34% 

1 2 2 

% 

26V. 24 
4% 6W 
91 90 

lVi. tv,* 
M 25% 
25% 35% 
% ’Vi* 
8 % 8 % 
2V, 2W 
44 10’% 10 

14 10'/. 10% 

5 10W 10% 
23 10W 10% 

3 10% ID'A 
27 mm 4o% 
145 43 42% 

3 43% 43 
>34 14 13W 

111 2<Vu 3W« 
19 41 38 

954 15% d 15% 
22 15% 15% 
13 4% 4V U 

38 1416 14% 
7 2V U 2V, 
32 1% 1% 


454 

6 

506 

5 

6 

29 

3 

93 

25'. 

130 


1% — % 
13% — V. 
77% — W 
4W 

6% — ’■» 
MW — % 
10V, — % 
7W — % 
20% — % 
am — % 

»t> —> 1-0 

a - 

24 — W 

16% *% 
3% - 

3 

3% - a 
2% —Vi. 
2W .V, 
34% ■>% 
2 

% ._ 
24W *% 
4% * W 
91 

ft-fi 

25% — % 
V. _ 
8%— W 
2V„ . + V, 
10% + Vk 
10’A _ 

10W —-v. 
10% - 
low ♦ w 

40% - 

42V, —V, 
43W — % 
14 *% 

2«Vr. — Vk 
41 — Vk 
15% — % 
15% — W 
4V, _ 

14W — % 

VI, t ~ J/ n 
1% — % 


: „=: 

i... 

■r’S 

I l.'l 


M%45%CFXCp 
7% 4%aiFm 
8% 7%OM . . 
*'• 4W CM1C P 
JWVaCSTEllt 
16**11 WCVBFn 
I V, » 

■I S» 

3% 3 

'.I J1 COOt«A 
3% 116. Colon 


S7b 5.4 13 

- 7 
.B4«n.a _ 

- 7 


A 8 

- 6 


49 17 
33 S'A 
71 7% 

443 7% 

_ > 13 1% 

33b 73 11 5 14% 

_ _ 51 "/, 

134 58% 

3fiD 31A 
176u31 V. 
1245 IV, 


1416 17 *% 

7 716 — 

1?* Ml 

5^5^-% 
3 3 —On 

29% 31% *1% 
d 'V, 1 — % 



INTEKJNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1994 


Pa“e 17 


12 Month 
Wpi Lot, Slock 


Sis 

DM TB PG loth Wgh Lwyglcsl Cli'ea 


u% 12 ■. Comar n 
37Wl9WCamDrr 
IT*.'. 10 cr/iareg 
25% 16 CdnOco 
13/. lOWCapRlvl 

13V, 9%CopRO 
13% >0WCapRI3 
14% awCaimel 
78% 63 CoroPpf 
14", 8 Connain 
15% BWCasMeAs 
77 , 6 22WCasFO 
12% 8 CaraJU 

17 11 CavalHs 

916 4 W Cent Ten 
2V, Vi.CentTe wt 
J1W 17%Cntrf»r n 

6 4%CPCdOfi 
49%35%CmMrt 

18 MWCetltSe 

13% 7 CtvCm 

B% 5% Chad A 
516 lWi.QlDevA 
5Vi 2'/,ChDovB 
<0%l6WCrssEn 
28 V* 21 wainwied 

16% VVCWF^j 

30% 6 QievSWs 

34% 24% OUR V 
18 12WOH0I 
288. 23'.. Chftni tff 
16% BWOrcoPh 

17% ’WCltodel 
8% 4% Clila me 
51 39 ClearC s 

3% V”C0nicD 
8% 4 CoutD 
10% BWCcrtsnStr 

iow mcoiDsia 

6% 4 Col Lb 
19% 1 1 W Com re 
7% 6 OnclAsJ 
25V* 11 WComplek 

1", VitCnwtrc 
15% 12 Vk QnTgm 
14 THContMtJ 
9 SWCnvstE 
3W rwcorNCn 
I5W 71*CCBnc5h 
8% 4%Courtkl 
17% 19WCT0U 
12V* TixCrovWM s 
24 W 14%CmCP 
23% IJ CmCPB 
3l%14%CWnCr 
5V, 2%CniisAm 
29Vh20%CrvsKM 
23% 17% Coble 
18T. 12% Ciance 
4% SWCiistmd 

4V. VsCvcomm 


9S 15.3 1516 15 V, . 
7 24% 34% 34% —% 
4 11V, I1Y, 11 W -W 
116 23% 23% 33% - >* 
*48 18% io 3 * 10% — 
*8 »% 9>. 9% -% 

mt lov. io% io 1 . -% 
& 8% 8% 8% — % 
Z36Q 42 42 47 —I 

42 10% 10V. 10U -'.4 
10 14% 14'.« IJ'5 ~'t. 
59 35 34% ?4Y. 

SO 11% 11 11V. .. 

j.123 I3’l 13»i 11 -% 

B 8'6 B% BVa — V. 
M 1»V„ 1% 1%-<W 

13 18% 18% 18% — % 

114 5Vi 5W S’A - W 
2300 34% 34 36", — W 

23 17V. 17V. 17% _% 

1579 8% B% 3% — % 

214 8 7V, 7% — % 

944 3 1% 3 -w„ 

30 2'., 2% -% 

253 39% 39 39 — % 

2526 25% 25 25W - V, 

2 15% 15% 15% 

7713 11% I0t» IV 

1 29% 29% 29% —V. 
431 13% 12% 13% — % 

24 23% 23V. 23 W — 

476 15% 15 15% — % 

44 3% 3% 3% _. 

38 8 8 a — % 

313 46 47% 48 — 

544 Va % % —Vk 

2 7’k 714 7W _ 

10 8% a B*u B% — W 

3134 9 8% 8% — W 

307 4% 4>„ 4V|, — 

2 19% 19V. 19V. _ 

V 6". 6% 6% _ 

I 14% 14% 14% —>•. 

- _ 23 >«i, '■* 16— J", 

AUK 15 13% 13 13% - W 

- 8 1 13k. 13% 13% - % 

_ 23 1 5% d 5% 5% — % 

_ _ 772 2% 3W 2% ,. 

35 ZA _ 12 10W 10% 10% — % 

-28e 3J _ 1 7% 7% 7% _ 

"" 1139 15% 15% 15% — % 


30 A 14 
2B _ S 
AO _ _ 
.94 8.9 34 

M 9S 23 
1J4 15J IB 

MO BJ ' 
- 51 
JS 23 15 
I -MO 4 3 - 
.. 14 
JOB A 11 
.. 40 

IJO u ~ 
Jl J _ 
150 9A _ 
lASe 96 .. 
Jit 4.1 
■401 53 23 
_ 40 
-. 45 
_ 15 


.. It 
1 JOo 4.1 10 


■_ 11 
A 8 7A > 
- 55 


AOe 65 _ 


_ 5 

31 




- 35 

IS 

17% 

17% 

17% 

14 

:</ 

ln% 

lft". 

16% 

A 15 

386 

16". 

15% 

16 



5 

2V, 

T’h 

2V, 





7HV. 

29 

£6 126 


19 



_ 16 

75 

18% 

18% 

18% 

-. 11 

11 

3'V, 

2% 

TP-u 

- — 

285 

2% 

15. 



1% WOllnd 
4 2%DRCA 
3% IWDcAoioW 
9W 6 DorfHd 
SW TWDotomat 
10% 4%Dc4pram 
7*7V„Dmstr 
4 1 Davstwi 

8% 5%Dexor 

12% 716 Decorat 
8W SWDelEJC 
M TTWDelLab v 
34% 17%DewnE 
5V. 2'Vr.DlaB A 

5% 5% Chao B 
3% ■Y.Difiicon 

9% 2Vi.DlB.-1CT 

irwia DIMAC 
19% 9t6Dbnarlcs 
10 4% Diodes 

7% T.DivCorn 
10% 6 DixnTIc 

20% 14%DoneDv 

10 V, 7% DrvCal 

im 8%DrvtMu 

11% BWDcvtNY 

S% 2%Ducom 
11% B% Duplex 
4 aWDycamn 
7% l%EO Ira 
13WI1%EXXAwi 
13%ll%EXXBwl 
3% 1%EZServ 
17% HWEtJnCo 
48'6 33W EchBF pf 

15% 9%EchoBav 

1516 9%EaUEn 
4 lWEdtatnwt 
10W SVkEdWo 
5% lWEditefc 
47% 30% Elen 
33%15WBon*ri 
34% 23V, Ekm un 

1216 6 V. Ektofod 

3V. 2WEtO\m 

7 1 6 2%ElsJnor 
9% SWElSwin 
6% 5%ErnpCar 
19W T1 VkENSCOs 
19V. 7%EnzoBi 

24 W 13% Epitope 
16% 13%EqGthl 

13W 8WEaGttl3 

12% 8%EqGttl3 

18W11 WEqutiSlI 

7 I'AEscoon 
3% WEssxFn 
14% 6%ElzLav 
1'Vii WEvrJenn 
20V. 14 Excel 
6% 31.FFP 
T/i* 1WPPA 
34% 30% Fablnds 
14% 6%FalcCnt 
39%21V.F»rbd 
79%47%Rno 
19lvl2%RnRI 
14% 9y.RAusf 

11 9 FAusPr 
7% SWFtCntri 

7>A 3%Flonlgn 
20% !4%RaPUt 

34%23%RaRcfc 

33 aaWRuke 

5a%38WFeroiu> 

,v “ M9RT 

tWForumR 
... 2VkF0iinPws 
8% FAFTKAdvo 
6% AWFrkREn 

» l%FrKSupn 
9 SWPresenhas 


ja=&E_ 


> _ 15 1 



24 

7% 

2% 

2% 







36 

45 

8 

a 

8 




4'V.i 

45* 

4% — V, 


28 

4*1 

4*1 

4* 

% 


443 

3% 

3% 

3% —V* 


30 

IV* 

1% 

1 Vu 

10 

4 

5% 

5W 

5% 



M 13 ! 4 11 10% II _ 

-43! 6.6 15 118 6% 6% 5% — Vh 

-24 .9 13 Ilia28% 28% 28% *% 

.12 A 35 459 21V. 21% 21 W — W 

- 13 3 4% 4 4 — % 

_ 13 IS 4 3% 4 — % 

455 1«6, 1% 1% 

50 3iV u IV, TV ,,— '/,» 

_ _ 3 11% 11% 11% _ 

_ 30 232 !5»6 15% 15% *'A 

_ 12 118 5% 5% 51. .% 

- > I lit lVi. IVi, — ift. 

1 8% 8% 8% - 

» 17% !7V< 17% — % 

7%d7% 7% — W 

BWdSV. 8% -% 

8% 

4% 

9% 

4V. 

IV. 


_ 23 


.. 19 
JS 13 11 
S 6 73 — 91 

-69a 8.1 .. 274 
AO AS _. 50 

. I » 


8% 8% _. 

4W 4% — % 

9>A 9% _ 

4% a'r. _ 

IVi. IV, „ 

II V. 12% — % 
11% 12% —4. 
1% 1% - 

40 13% 13% 13% — W 

515 40% /n 40 _ 

JOT J 93 3575 13% lr-. 13 — % 

JO b 2.9 9 12 10% 10% 10% - V. 

10 1% 1V6 1% -. 

44 6 5% 6 

714 IV* 1% 1% _ 

-3 753 37% 36% 34% — % 
„ fi 22% 21W 21% — ! % 
29% 29 29% — % 

9% 9% W4 _ 


> > 207 13 

_ _ 44 13 

_ 15 28 HV, 

M 3.5 IT “ 

1J5 


_ 6 


jJBe 3 18 


J4a BA 


2J0 15J _ 
1 jU, 194 „ 
1A0 18A 43 
A8e 53 _ 


J8e 3J 10 


27 

3 

20 

124 

52 

IS 


*% 


JMe 1A 29 373 
_ _ 5 

A4 2.1 12 


3% 3V, 3%. —Vi* 
7’* 2% r/u *1% 

8% 8% 8% *% 

6 5V* 5% — W 

_ 21 1113 1376 13% 13% — % 

482 12% 12% 12% — W 

347 20% 19% 19% —‘/i 

1 14% 14% 14% — % 

30 8*6 d 8V1 BV. — W 

44 8% 8% B% — % 

6 13% 12** 13% -V. 

44 HVu 1% 1% _ 

6 T»u 2d% 7%w 

3 8% ffVi 8% 

_ _ I % % <’4. _ 

36 U 10 2982 15 14% 15 

P/,5- 5 — W 

1W 1", 1%— % 
31% 31% 31% +% 
7% 7% 7W —V. 
X 29% 30 “% 

74% 74% 74% _ 

17% 17% 17% +% 
J1 e 3.1 -. 282 10V. 10% 10V* —V* 
.90 9A -X1126 9% 9% 9V U * V„ 

7 7 7 — % 

13 151 150W151 * % 
61 7% 7% 7% > 

2 3% 3% 3% - 

8 17% 14% 16% - 

28 26% 24% 26% *% 

1.9 27 107 29% 2956 29% — % 

21 30Hd30% 30% — W 
. 1 32%d32V. 32% — % 

_ 24 an 47% 46% 43% — v, 
494 1% IVlt 1% — % 

- 3% " ‘ 

T/u 

5% 

5% 

4% 

3% 

2V. 

7% 


_ 6 
4J10 5J 23 
.. 17 


2 

51 

145 

3 

5 


1A 

1.6 10 


8 10 


;} Mtann 
rtBhUgy* Swck 


_ 5 

1.16 6.9 14 

JO 1.9 IB 

Si ... _ 

Joe .7 _. 
JOe a _ 


AS H J _ 
SO 10J 13 
AO 107 42 


_ 29 


32 

23 

X 

51 

61 

317 

2 


3% 3W»— 1% 
29* SVu— V„ 
5% 5% _ 

S% 5% -V. 
4% — V, 
3% 3% —V, 
2% TV, — V, 
7% /%— % 


SIS 

Piv YM Pg 10% High UwrUnwaOl'Bc 


4% JWFrkKim 14b A? 13 4 T*, 3% 3Mt. _. 

JSWllWFrusehVi J4B 2.0 18 6 12 ". 12 U 

3% 3% From Adi .11 3 8 13 170 7% 7% 7% — % 


C-H 


11% T'-iConscO JUD 5 1] 14) 
IBWUWCoIvCbl 1049c ... 34 

10 

13 


.10 3.1 18 

AOa 4J 7 

... . 1412 

- - 594 
._ 17 888 

to 

- 3? 

J5e IS 18 


24b 2.2 12 


J2 11 U 542 


.16 2.T 15 
24 


JO 4 J 42 744 


.05 e 1.7 


7% aWGamoB 
33% 15 16 Goran 
9% 3%GavlCn 

8% 2ViCaylCwl 
15% 7% ColmS 6 
1> ■',* VjGnAuiD 

8 lWGnEmp 
10% 7V.Cn)UUc 

’fa 'WOfiHSCn 
13% »v,GenvDr 
24% lOWGiantFd 
9- 6*.&trsnCR 

19% 12%CfcWWr 

19% 14%GICItn 
4% 7 : i t C<bl0cn 
imiiwoiobSmi 
17 7%CtoWinK 
]% 1W GO Video 

'.iGcVdwt . .. 

6% £%G«dcpAn .lOe _ _ 

17V. 8WOB5WR „ > 

% HCktPld „ > 

13 RiGJduiSam .. 34 

39 TTWGarRiapa .72 It 14 

14% 10'. Graham 

3% iWGronaa 

7'.', 5 Grenm 

7 3’tGntTein 
llWimCrStCAn 
>5% lWGrevLne 
33% 17 GrSmec 
W» ’V,( Grave 
4", TWGlfCdoo 
3% THGUCOOpr 
51. 3",GunLb 
11 H 4V,Gundle 
8% SWHNVGDol 

9 irWHollftW 
8% 6%HolEP 
3% lWHdlRty 
7", IWHolsev 
7% SWHomsti 
7% 3< *HanaOr 
7% SnHonvOir 
'V, 'VcHcnwIB 
2% 'V, Harken 
S 3%Hwlyn 

14W 7',Htxo!d 
I '■.Harvey 
39 28%Hasbra 
4W 2%HlinCh 
19% 1 1 W HtthMor s 
1% '.* HlthPro 
3% V.HBhAin 
MWllWHsarOnd 
14% 9'..Heta) 

7% iH'iiHeDonet 
11% 8% Hernia a 
24% ISWHrtaMa 
5% 3%HlSlvTcn 
14% 12 Hianlnc n 
3 >.' h WHoiCO 
33% 23%HBIlyCP 
22 5% Honda 

14% 7WHOOPHI 
18% SWHovnEn 
11% 4 HowiBfc 


29 


» 

152 

82 


-.112 
>244 286 
20 
25 
5 
30 
4 


_ ._ 70 

_. _ 6 
-. - 1717 
, .. 155 
... _ 3153 
- 17 48 

_ _ 430 

_. _ 479 
_ -- Ml 
48 


_ S3 
-. 18 234 
_ 53 

J4 U B 1 
JBOalll 77 30 


J4tl4.0 -. 6 

._ 27 195 
-. 24 2916 
_ _ 940 
... - 446 
. 11 326 
2 


17 

317 

43 

72 


8 % 8 % 8 % 
18 17!k 17!* 

4% 4% 4% 

17»i 17% 17% 

8% 8% 8 v* 

7 6% 6% 

13% 13V, 13’* 

•<!* 

7 6% 7 

7% a 7V* 7V| 
'h 7 u "h 

II 10% II 
22% 22% 22V. 
7*, 7'/, 7% 

19% 19% 19% 
16% 15% 16% 
3 Mu 3 
17 11% 12 

15% .15% 15% 
2% 2% TV, 

*■*— ", ", 
6% 6% 6% 
13% 13% 13% 
% % % 
7% 7% 7W 

23 Vi 23% 33% 
11% 11% 11% 
TV, 2% 2% 
6W 6% 6% 

5% 5 S 1 *. 

m*diiw n% 

2'Vi* 3% 2'* 

25'.* 25% 25 W 
IVi IV, 1v„ 
3W, 3% 3 'S', 

2t* 2%, 
5 5% 

5% P-4 

6% 6% 
7W 7% 
6<> 
2% 2W 
396 2% 
6 


J7l 

5.1 

25 

36 

9 

l7 



74 

30 

2.1 

11 




J nr 

1A 


JOo 

- 

-. 


11J 

- 

.99 e _. 

21 

■40 

1.6 

10 


W9 

172 
19 
22 
10 

-. > 143 

JO 3.9 14 53 

- 13 264 

— — 170 


2'l'u 

SW 

5% 

6% 

7% 

4W d 6 

Mk 

3% 

6 6 
3W 31* 3% 
4V, 4V U 4% 
>"c d Vii "a, 
2%, 2 7 

3% d3!6 3V, ■ 
10% 10% 10% 
W W Vi 
31 30W 31 

21* 2% 2’.* 
14% 14W 14% 
'V„ % 

Hi* tv, IV, 
72% 17% 12% 
TV. 9% 9V> . 
TV, 7% 2Vn 
11 10'-. 10% 
23V. 22% 23 
4k, 4Vh 4% 
12 % 12 % 12 % 
3V* 2'Vi, 2'Vi* ■ 
25 24 % 24% 

15". 14% IS * 
7% 7% 7% 

6% 6 6 

8 % 8 % 8 % 


— % 

— '■« 




12% e IGI _ 34 345 11% 

flu 3%ldenti> _ 383 3", 

11% 7WfmpHTv AS 5A _ 7V 8% 

38W39 bnnOila IJOa _ _ 1598 331* 
A0e 3.3 _ 6 18 

_ _ 33 3% 

_ 91 716 

- - JS 9H 

223 % 

-12a 1.0 23 S3 1IW 

_ _ 1455 14% 


uttoGii a 
SOWHWmcOoRT 
4V, lwincsttr 

11% 6%bicv1e 

11V, 916inelMl(i 
IV, WlnfOis 
13V, 9V6lnstran 
251. 9W Inleton 
T>u IfnlnfloSw 
TV, 2 v, Inert’d 
I6W 14 InPinSv 
7W 3 InlerDia 
3(vv. 9'* inn-mans 

5 WlnPnOM «vt 
6W iviilnPnY At 
7% 2 /; InFnDY «ri 
6% SWInFnYBW 

13% 6%lntLotrv 
% kiilmMavic 
7V. SWIrdMur 
7 V« 3% IRIS 
BW mimThrah 
9*4 P'» InlslGC 
21i % Intrvyvtm 

% V, imrsv Wt 
38%14 WIvq*CP 
15% 9%Jodyn 
1216 frUJblaren 
13V. a%JanBell 
13 BWJonHnt 
60V, 39% JuoNdl 
11*6 A16KV Ph B 
I1W BWKVPHA 
TVu 13% Keane i 
16 4%KdyOG 
4% ?<6vlKanwin 
15% llWKetema 
6% 4V, Key Ena 

6 3%K9em 
4% SWKjnorfc 

23% 15 WJCTrbv 
19% BV.Kil Mfg 
9% 4 KierVus 
10W iWKoorEa 
3% 2WiKoeEqwt 
6 1 LXRBia n 

2% 1 La Barn 
22% 13". Lancer 


_ 44 


rw 
2% 
24 14 


10% _% 

24% — 

8% 

33% -. 

18 

3"u-"„ 
7% — % 
9W —V. 
V» ‘V, _ 

11% 11% — w 
13% 14% >1* 
2'* 2%— % 
2% 2% — v„ 
lA 16 1 1. 


10 % 

2'Vi, 

8V6 

33% 

18 

Tt, 

7W 

9W 



678 

3V* 

TVu 

3 — V, 

... 1S4 

477 

14 

134* 

131* — % 


4 

V* 

v u 

“u 

__ 

49 

1 

% 

% — V* 


30 

2% 

254 

2% 


95 

6 

5% 

6 


31 

7% 

74k 

7U .. 


189 

Vi 

% 

V, _ 

ww £ 

233 

5 

47. 

5 -V» 

n 

19 

6 Va 

6’* 

6% '% 

16 

78 

4% 

4 

•V* _ 

.05e .6 72 

90 

8!'. 

7% 

8V* * H 

69 

30 

1% 

1% 

1*t — V. 

M. H. 

70 

*’2 

!’, 

", — 

J06 3 \i 

2360 

30% 

19% 30 

30 5.1 17 

82 

9% 

9% 

9% 

_ w- 

8 

9% 

B?. 

9% -'.* 

_ _ 

107? 

SV. 

5** 

5*i 

j60 6J> - 

66 

10". 

10 

10 — 1* 

mh 

4 

47 

46V, 47 +'.* 


35 

7% 

7V< 

7 V. »V. 


221 

7% 

7’* 

7*11 <W 

„ IB 

191 

19V, 

18% 

19% ♦«* 

JO 16 JQ -. 

837 

5% 

5 

5 -’A 


5 

?r. 

7% 

2V. * 'A 

~ 98 

104 

137. 

13% 

13U — 

_ II 

4 

4<V U 

£ 

41% JTh, _ 


_ 11 174 3", 

_ 38 1619 17% 

- 15 28 15% 

.... 8 8% 
-. 54 147 BW 
_ > 6 T\ 

- -. 604 IV, 

._ 9 81 IV, 

_ 16 1 17 


17 13% Landaur M 5J 17 236 17 


3% TWLndsPc 
9% 4% Lata 
<% 5 Laser 
7V, TVuLsrTecn 
9'* 6 LtoJCnp 
3W 'ViiLeePhr 
9% 3%LB Eor wt 
51 W 39 LehAMGNl 
25% 24 LahGTel n 
19% 16% LetiMU n 1 
X 26%LehORCL2 
5% 4WLBHK94W1 
13 1'"i,LeJY9Swt 
8W 2%LeJY96«vr 
E% l6WLilVern 
27% SWUlfldAd 
14% 9 Lume* 

I S' 6 6% Lurid 
32V. 22 LvnchC 


_ 4 

_ 7 27 _ . 

- 10 43 5% 


2% 

5% 


- 41 41 
> 18 2 


4% 

9V, 


_ _ 3 n. 


3W 3% •* V* 
16 % 16 % — W 
141* 14% —V. 
B% 8% -% 
BW SW -. 
W, !Y, -% 
I IV, - "I. 
IV, I % — ", 
17 17 

17 17 _ 

2% 3% - 

S’.* 5% -1* 
5V, 5V6 —V* 
4 4V, .V, 

9W 9V, _ 

... 


5A 


4 

50 V, 50% 

SD% 




30 

34% 2J% 

24% -'.i 

BA 


571 

18% 18 

18% -% 

6J 


13 

37% 36% 

36% — W 



20 

4>A 4% 

4% 




237 

1% d 1% 

1% 

*■ v. 



718 

2% d 2% 


1.6 

12 

35 

17% 17% 

17% 


43 

76 

6", 6% 

6% 



17 

191 

12?* 12% 

17% 

-V* 


8 

101 

6% a 6% 

6V-. — % 


11 

20 II 32", 32 

32% 

"4 


-45=!! L 


4% TWMCShD 
2% »6.MIPPr 


_ 55 >54 3V. 3>V|, 31. 
_ _ 74 7*. 2", lh„ 


12 M Orth 
High Lor. 5MO 


D'tf YU PE 130s Hign LonLoreMOroe 


12 


JO 


35e 

.72 

40 


33 

S* 


I", 

15% IDWMacNSc .64 
% tuMoaPwtwi 
30 »%MeP5 1J4 
II 5 Mam Hr" 

1% U'ltMartfan 

15%10!,MOSSHE .76 

44W29'.aAAa>am 
14% lO'.r/iedcR 
11% OW/Aeaeva 33 

»%2l %M«ia 44 

6". >v,Med>aLofl 
2'», l .MedRA 
3 *••, Mdcane 

4'* S'.Meaa 
/■/« 4'.iNtedOM 
7% 3%MenilHir 
17*. MWIWaiGp 
7 3 1 '., MeriAir 

7% l'.Merm 
I’l ':,MerPI6 
£>•’; ?> !.WVerP6P! 

Sir ?'.*MerP?Pf 
3% ".MorPnte 
5% 'jMLOMPwI 
13% 8' .Mcrmlc 40 
ir. 17WAWPro 
liWiswueaBcsh 
lBwiO'.iWeabK 
9!-. JV.MiehAnt 
Ml. l6!-*MldABc 
UP. B'VMidaTRtv 
4’-. 2%Midlby 
7'* 6**MUwLnd 

lSWIO'.Minruvkal 
II", 8%MmnTr3 
SV* 2’*Ma5M)W 
9% 7 MOOBA 

14 9>.MbobB 

18 lO'.MMed 

3 l'iiMoronF 
8% 3'aMSHK W19* 

3W •V„AA5JYp»it 
7 3%MSJ96wt 
44 59%M5TMXnl7B 
71% I8WMS IGT n 1.33 
7% 4 //Ioithh 
3% l MowteSi r 

11 V. B%Muniln 55 
10V« 7%Munws, .46 
15% lOl.MunvtAZ A5 

15 IDWMunAZan A1 
19'..15WMverlns .16 
al’6 13!'. -NFC 
IO", 4v,NTNCom 
II". S'.NVR 

S’. IWNVRwt 
8% WiNown 
7% 2% Nordck 
30W23«.NMtC 
5% rWNIPahu 
13% 4% Mat Ad 
ID". Bt.NMx.Ar 
23% J6’iNY Bcp 
13% 9WNYTE1 
29 W 21', NY Tim 
11V. BWNorex 
9 SWNAAdvn 
JSV, 7V.NAVDCC 
I IV, 7%NCdOo 
6 v* 2%NmnTcn 
14W10WNCAPI 
15% 9WNCAP12 
15 1DWNFLPI 
15% 10". NGWPi 
14% IO NMOP13 
14WI0%NvMIP2 
14% 10% NMOPi 
14% 10 NNJPQ 
13V.10V.NNYMI 
731* 10% NMYPI 
ir*u%Nvowi 
14% 1DV.NOKPI2 
14% 10V.NPAPD 
14% 1 1 WMvTXPI 
14% 10WNVAP12 
14’* lO' sNuvWA 


7 14 

14 371 
... 179 

8 1 

11 3410 
28 1 

_ 78 

... 50 

_ 77 

15 417 

75 88 

_ 143 
19 200 


. 35 

> 60 
7 42 

- M 
B 7 
15 ID 
U 11 
10 6 
10 HO 
60a 3A 13 16 

M 


IV. 11 IT. 

a<; 22H J aw 
10 10 10 
r* !'.. 

10W 10", 
31 W 33 
11% ir. 

ID', 10% 
27? • 28". 
2* r 2»» 
IV, Iv, 
2W 7% 
3’. 

6W 
?*. 

15 
5' 


IW 

low 

32 '* 

ll'k 

10 % 

29 ". 

j,* 

l", 

U 3'i 

6% 


»J VjtiRI 

M.9“l LTW VtOii 


3.V VK PE tos. High L P» LtBoxt Dl'Dv 


IT Month 
w Lae.' Slock 


SIS 

piy va PE IMl wgh LwtLOWtQt'aa 


15% 

«w 

I': 

3*4 

3 

7*. 


17 


2% 

3 


3» 

6’, i 

3-". 

15 

6 

IV, 

SVa 

3 

3'a 


T. 1 I 


v. 


.67e 


JO b 

A4 

St 


.ote 

JBa 

A9a 

.75 

J4 

M 

.74 

.70 

J3 

.72 

.74 

J8 

A8 

J6 

J3a 

AS 

.78 


33 16 

5 
189 
34 

41 1 

49 7 

74 10 

II 60 
-. 25 

5 

.. 70 

5 

_ 229 
39 

43 87 

3 
79 
1262 
... 85 

S 

16 191 

> 50 
_ 397 
_ 175 

I 

16 1160 
5 

15 > 

_ 1377 
13 45 

17 14 

9 44 

— 60 
121,474 

4 3 

_ 50 

> 1807 

- 55 

20 165 
_ 14 

... 41 

-. 4 

_ 133 
_ 349 
... 39 

-. 34 

-. 34 

28 

-. 84 

31 

-. 33 

_ 19 

15 

_ 43 

- 54 


14% 16W 16'-. . 

W’i 24W M*. 
io'* lk la'* *' 
6% 4*i -'. 
17% 17". 
flV. 81. — 1 


I0W 13 W 
0W 9% 
4W 4W 
8". BV. 
13W 12'., 

14’. 14W 
IW 1% 
4% 4% 


6% 

17% 


4V, 

7 
11 
9% 
aw 
8% 

12V. 

14% 

1% 

4% 

iv„ ie„ 

35* 3(. 3?. 

58 dS4W 5^1 
iB%aia% lav* 
4V. 4% it. 

IV, I 1 * IV. 
BW a 8 Vi BT. 

7% d 7% >W 

u%dio io*,. 
10’* Hr* 10'. 
<6’.» 17% 
14% IS 
7"; 7V, 
5% 5% 
1W 1W 
4* 4‘* 
6 6 

, . 27% 27>. 
2V* 0 2 2% 

S’, 5 5 

9 81. 8', 

18% 18% 18% 
9' , 9W 9 Vi 
22 W 21% 22% 
9% 9W 9H 
2V. 2’.. 
9". 9% 
10% 10". 
5% 5% 

10V* low 

9% 9’» 
10 s . 10% 
low low 
10 10% 
10% 10% 
10% 10% w * 

10 V: 10% 10% 
10'-| 10% 10% 
10% d 9% 10 

11% m. ip* 
low lO’.a low 
10% low IO’.-i 

11V* 11V* 11% 
lDWdlOW 10% 
IT, 0 9’. 10". 


17% 

IS 

7% 

5% 

1% 

4X. 

6 

271. 


2% 

10W 

IO". 

6 

10 *. 
9% 
10 % 
low 
10 V. 
I0W 


- w 
-7% 


- W 


— •* 

-!» 


14% 7i.OOkiea 
low bwdsuhvtic 
«W 6%OcetatB 
36 21 on An 
38 r» 35'.* Olsten 
3% V.-OmMEn 
15% 7V*Orsngn 
23% 16W Orients 6 
12% 6%Orio!HA 
12 W 6 OrMHB 
7% 3WPLCSV6 
31* 2 PLM 
174. 12% PMC 
I6W 14”. PS BP 


16% 13V, PGEpfl 


4% JWPacGole 
18% lSV.PacGIln 
77 61 Pacifof 

AW 3 PooaAm 
11% 4 PWHKwl 
6% 2 PWHKDttfl- 
K * 3WPWHK.30WT 
9% 9 PWSPMJd 
3 Vi l’.PWUSJwt 
4V* WPWUSDwt 
14% IOWPWFI 
71* I'V, PamHId 
40 JMWPorkN i 
MWUWParPM 
15% 13 PerPO 
16V* 141* ParPfS 
m ViPeerTu 
34% 13", PevGId 
44W34 PerwiTr 
25%21ViPnnHE 
13% 9'* FeriniC 


X 
10 
IS 
102 
... 254 
— W 
-. ._ 478 
J5 5J _. 337 
55 

.93 2.3 1" 

1.00 7.7 i: 

1.04 7.9 11 

1.28 O 11 


24% 21 PemCpf 2.13 IL7 _. 


4W 2". Peters 
4% ".'uPhnxLtK 
7% 3WPh.Net 
395* a V* PnnxRs 
5 1W Pico Pd 
6W T-.PlrottRU 
34W24W PUDsm 

40% 27 Pinwav 
33%34%Pinwv A 
9% SWPlnftsc 
25% UWPlyGem 
10V, 5WP1VRB 


18 
IS 
33 
6 

_ _ d 

JOe .7 192 3078 
_. 29 733 
1J8 8A 8x593 

-• -. s 

6 
40 
54 
97 
83 
45 
1 
I 

36 

_ _ 77 

J 24 282 

7 1 


3V* 3 3 —V* 

4% 41", 44. -V* 
2% 3% 2% .V H 

3% 3% 3%' ... 

9% 9". 9W _ 

1W 1% 1% _. 

V. •* •Vi, _ 
10% 10W low — w 
6’* 6% 4% — W 

40 391* 40 - ’* 

13 13 13 -•* 

13% 13W 13'* — % 
14% MW MW — W 


_ 30 


A 13 
_ 14 


- •■'H 

15% 15% 
42% 42 
21’i 21W 

10 W low 

34% 24% 


.90 3.0 12 
40 1.1 14 

JO 1J 13 

.12 


2'i 

1W 

3% 

31 

k 


2% 

I 

VA 

It 

3& 


461. 2?W Pdarind 253 S.7 14 2» 


7% aWPatynh 
13% dWPartSvs 


_ 41 123 

732 


377, 37% 
37". JAW 
4% «% 

22V, 22% 
9W 9% 
44% 43'.* 
5'* 4% 

5% 41* 


15% 

42 -1% 
21% * V* 
10 ’.* _ 
34% -% 
2% 

P* t", 
3% -% 
31 

3% — 1’„ 

aw 

*9'. 


3P. 'Vi 
37% *'. 
0% .. 
22 % — % 
9W . 
44% *% 
4*. — % 
Pm *Vj 


4% ’wPortaae 

1 O', e-aPraireo 
8% =' iProlHtl 
2* * 1’ .PrpOLa 

i :i:.:i ptsolp< 

! T; iiPmSi 
j 6 J PrcCom 
13'. SWPK9CD 
I 7'. 5 %Pt;pCT 
3>» JWPrvono 
IO'* MW Pr --Ena 
ir. ickPa&tr 
is:. ir.paatT 

is% it raj* id 

IBW 15' s POST 11 
IB' , 14% PCS! 1? 
1BW15WPB5I14 
17V* 13-,’ PPSII5 
15W12'.PbSH6 
16W12'.PbSI17 
law i? Postia 
11% 9 Pt75l!9 
15 11WPSSM 
IS 5 . lOHPumCA 

14’ . llt*PI5,V. 

15 lOwPIW.Vnn 
IV 13 PuCJY 
15-. 2'<&LO!PO 
IT. MWGuebcor 
?W4 - ,rb*w 

1U* ’jRX MO* 
34 27 Rcgcn 

1C. S’.Rcucn* 
2’, lWRCtSCr 
4'. Jt-iRedEoul 
29 23%R«a.n 
S*. PiRiMlm 
3 , '.Rdlw >wlB 
14 " j 9’sRcdEmp! 
It*. SWRerac 
I5 1 : lC-.ReaalB* 
5% ?%Rel<r 
4W 2 RcpGUSg 
14 9 Ruiin 

3 WRsllnt 
5% TWRe^RO 
3% lWRMTai 
7% dS.PevMn 
tfrWll.RWB 
IO". 13>.RiaAlD 
9% AWRiter 

5'»2i^Roca.'ni7 

35! >74 '.-Rogers 

1 V„ ’.RaKMIlC 
5W ’’■jROrtUOg 

2 i.Rtnoc 


. 3j 
_ 15 


2.43 11 


41 2’ »•, 


41 

55 

5 

111 

18 


5’ 

2' 

29-’ 

I 

5% 


2W 

B% 

S’,. 

S'. 

39W 




_ 19 

111* 

11% 

11% 



29 



9% 

9'..- 

^V| 



... 4 

U*» 

8*. 

8% 


24 1 

1 

23 2 

34V, 

33V, 

34", 


36 

J 

... 999 

35>J 

35% 

35", 

-% 



... 72 

4* 

W. 


-V. 


U. 

... 495 

15% 

14% 

15 


.15 

.9 

7 7 

16** 

14% 

16". 

— ta 

AO 

03 

9 5 

7’.1 

7’, 

7% 

_l, t 

JO 

9.7 

9 28 

7% 

7% 

7% 




176 

5% 

S 

S"j 

* l 4 



_ 42 

3*. 

3*. 

3Vi. 


.94 

6.7 

16 195 

14 

13% 

14 


1.60 

102 

13 3 

15% 

15% 

15% 


4.75 

9.1 

-. 250 

92'* 

'52'.. 

92'.— Hi 

IJO 

8.5 

48 

18 

17% 

17>. 


US 

8.6 

.. 34 

14% 

14V, 

14W 


120 

06 

_ 2 

14 

14 

14 

_l{| 

109 

0.5 

4 

1.1 

12?. 

ITT. 

-'* 

1.96 

82 

... 49 

23% 

23** 

21% 


2AS 

BJ 

17 

34% 

24V, 

24% 


1.86 

86 

_ 31 

22 

2H. 

21% 

«,> 4 

1.76 

AS 

3 

TO*-. 

TO 5 - 

20% 


1J2 

SJ 

_ 63 

30 

19% 

79% 




_ 51 

3U% 

.1% 

3’V, 


J7c 

36 

_ 14 

151* 

15% 

15% 


5.00 

BJ 

_ Z325 

60 1" d 59% 

60% 




.. 15 ? 

!!% 

11% 

1l'-» 

.1* 

59 14 112 


A 



6? 133 13 


Jjj 


; os 

6 1 15 76 


16-'. 

l#* 1 A 

1.12 

6-D U I Is 

>6% 


1A 1 r 


B J ID 8 

It) 1 . 

18% 

ini ■ 

I 43 

a.: i: is 

17% 

1’ 


IJ6 

63 12 91 

17% 

16*. 

16% 

1 78 

an i? x 




1JA 

Si ll 12 




1 M 

6 7 :j 7» 

U*. 

16% 


1.08 

7S 13 13 

1J-. 

13'. 

iy m 


M 17 12 

!«’. 

14% 

14-* 1 

1 30 

70 14 :» 

M 1 , 

14% 


At 

4.1 33 a 




60 

60 15 2 

>3-. 

I3>. 


.93 0 76 . :*3 

17% 

1? 

12% 

6*0 6 1 _ 113 

11% 



80 

' 5 ._ ?5 




93o 7.1 .. \3 

\3% 



.056 ?A IW 

2 ' t 



30 

i: 5 

i.’% 

1?% 

1^J> 


- 35 114 

6% 


(|1.| 


70 



)■ p 


.. IS I 




J3S 

9 12 ?ll 


D 8". 

S'. 


— • 

- 1 


- '* 


.. 3» 
9.5 31 


78 ao .. 
JOe sj n 
JT 72 15 
Ole J :n 

ijo irs 'i 


I!0 

S6 


I"*. l'i 
S'. SW 
T3>.o23W 
4 3", 

Pi 1% 
9,. 9'. 

7--« 


1-, 

5'. 

23% 
3'«h 
I W 
9% 
a 


M's MW W. 


578 

188 

3IB 

13? 


5 s * S'* 5% — ■ 


- _ JOS 6% 


60 


> |7 
.. 16 
. 39 

- 13 
... 32 
_. 9 

-. 14 
C4e 4.9 - 


3'", J'*, 3V, 

35% 35 35% 

IW IW 1% 


S-T 


2.10 &0 10 


30 15 
63 .. 


4.9 . 


80 


i doo as io 
io ?i 9 


6W 4WSCBSP 
4?",34WSJW 
4V, IW5DI Ind 
T6'.12’.SPlPh .S6D 1.1 
197.11 ioooCom 
&'• iv.SoaoC wt 
IS 4W&3RGoms 
1% ViSahaGiPf A7t 112 
16% 12 Sdciws 40 
531,41 EalA//.GNi«.IS 
39W23'.5eIDEC 3J3 

84 74'*SdHWPn 4.01 
17% 6<*5oiHK<M96 
93 76-" . SdVMSFT 3 99 

3ZV. 78 V. 5aIORCL TJ3 
49% 34 SatPPIn 3 03 . . .. 

29% 16 SalWJPL H2.I2 11.9 .. 

3%$oIPh£> 

13% 8!,SamuMt 
37W 9 SnFrans 
9% 4W5ondv 
10% 6%SMW)Bk 
?% ".ScandC 

II W 7 W Sceptre 

6% 3WSc2ma 

ir. i?%scnuii 

26% 24 Scope 
205 168 SMCp 
15% 10 Setos 
6% 3 ScrrvPck 
It. ". . SemPk M 
3% l%Semlcn 
9’. 4 , .,Scn>aca 
S’. J».,Serv«r 
9". 3%ShefldMd 
16% EWSnitCms 
8'. SWShwdGp . . 5 

4". r.Sboocj 50 15.7 .. 
7% 3>.SonlTect, _ 6 

7% 3%5ihFdsn . 

M«, 4% Simula _ 39 

12% 3W Sloan Sup . 183 

»".24%SmlhAOA A4 16 10 
40 23 : *SlTUtnAO J? Z1 10 
HW TVaSrolBln 6&0 tJ _ 
lS%12WSmtBmM 85 □ 6.6 . 
9 <%Scflnet .. - 

16".11WSCEepfB 1.03 
ir«12'.SCEdPfC 1.06 
i6"..ir%scEdpro ljna 

191 . 13’iSCEdptE 1.19 
23', 16%SCEd P(G 1.45 
104>.*87%SCEdPIK 7JB 
26 21 SCEdpfP 164 


21 

3 

490 

TDD 

747 

2 

182 

16 

80 

22 


4" , 4"% • 

35% 35 W 35% 
7 1 ". 2‘* ■ 
23% 23 23 

15W 15% 15% 
iv* l". 1% 

5 4 1 , 4V, 


.16 

.40 

1.00 

.70 


at 


.. 18 

1*2 9 

?J — 
J 13 
l.S 11 
... 81 


13 W 
55% 
32% 
84 
6% 
93 
36% 
37t. 
18 W 
4W 
11% 
a 5 . 
6% 
8% 
1% 
8% 
4% 
13% 
75% 
184", 
IP. 
4’. 
1% 
7W 
9% 


704 

347 

11 

7 

3? 

?8I 


73% 16%S0UC0 
7W 3’.S*nLN 


B.T 

68 

8.5 

8-5 

86 

86 


.911 5.4 30 


19'. M?.S«mLfepf 1.75 1U .. 
6% 3W Span eh ... b 

7W 3'iSccOvn • ... _ 

12’/* TiSoeOUiS ... . 

S't TWSDtSitnwl * .. 

9*. awSpansCn . .. 

s 5 , 2 %skwj 


35%34>iS!cPOn 

21% 14 Stephan 
7". a’.STDCop 
7". 5 SlvGPA 
BW 6WSIVGPB 
5V. 4%5»fPr 
11% lwSIrulher 
17% BWStvteVid 
10% 7" w Sulcus 

12 B-ViSumlTx 
6': SWSunCtv 
4V, l',SunNur 

18% TWSundwn 

13 4»,SunshJr 
lkWUWSuprSrg 

! '* 4",Suprmlnd 
% "i^uotn wt 
6 3%SEMKpwr 
6". 4 T5F 
40V, 3WT5X Cp 
11% 7WTabPrd 
15W12 Tasty 
5% 7 V, Team 
IP* 8?.TecOp5 
16 8WTeC»dr1s 
17% TWTWasPw 


.12 2.6 .- 
M8a 3A ... 
35 37 14 

40 U 20 
_ 17 
.7SH0.9 ... 
_ 48 
- 52 
?8a 5.6 10 
.. 78 
_ 14 

64 9 5 7 


_ 19 
- X 
23 15 

_ 8 

1 3 

.. 94 
2A 14 
4J 15 

_ SO 
il 27 
3.6 15 
. 33 


xl 

*197 

119 

4G 

45 

11 

3 

34 

17 

25 

1 

27 

7274 

20 

397 

14 

325 

7 

45 

80 

918 

30 

92 

1 

204 

100 

174 

177 

MO 

256 

60 

54 

31 
162 

2 

7 

36 

82 

55 
30 

?45 

16 

11 

9 

7 

33 

64 


12% 

6 

3v, 

4 

41, 

18% 

5% 

25 

24% 

9% 

12 

7 

12 '.. 

17% 

1?% 

14’* 

17 

88 % 

27 

16% 

4% 

15% 

5% 

3*. 

lk, 

5"* 

8% 

4% 

46V, 

34'i 

14% 

6T* 

7% 

7% 

5 

1?W 

3'V, 

9 

*'■ 

l'Vt. 

18% 

11% 

14% 

5% 

1", 

4% 

5>. 

38% 

8 % 

13% 

3 

18% 

14-, 

10 


13 13% 

57V. KP. 
32V: 32% 
84 84 

6W AW 
93% 93 
36% K’l 
37' i 37 % 
17% 17% 
4", 4->f 
11% 11% 

0 8 % 8 % 
6W 6% 
8 % 8 % 
H, IV, 
8'.* 8' . 
4% 4". 
13% 13% 
35% 25% 
179 184", 
10 % 11 % 
4". 4% 
>% 1% ■ 
3% 7W 
9% 9’* 
4Vj 4W 
3% 4'.« 
12% 17'.4 
6 6 
3W 34, 

4 4 

4 4% 
MW 18"; 

SW SW 
25 25 

24", 24W- 
9% 9% 
12% I?"'. 
6* 7 
12% 12% 
13% 12% 
12% 12% 

14 14 
16% 17 

saw H-i 

T1W 21W 
16% 16% 
4V* 4% ■ 
15V. 15% - 
5U 51* 
3% 3*. 
I'-, I", 

r. 2 % 
61. 6% 
4V* 4W 
46 4e'V 
6% 6% 
341. 34% 
14% 14% 
6'. 6"* 
7% 7% 
7% 7% 

5 5 

IW, I", 

11% 17% 

r, 21%, 

5% 5% 

r. i’v„ 

18% IBW 
11% IP* 
14V* 14% 
SW 5% 
1", IvW 
4% 4% 
5’.. 5% 
37 38t. 

8% BV. 
13’* 13% 
a a 
15% 157, 

MW 14% 

10 w 


— w 

— w 


■ V, 


— V. 
— ’* 


— V* 
*V„ 

— % 
■ V. 

— w 
-’* 
-'* 


-% 


-% 


16% 
M « 
18 


16% 
19 
23% 
16 ". 
341* 
IP. 
10% 
15>^ 
10% 
16 % 
I * 
SO 
6% 
1% 
56’, 
96 
104 
9 

18 ", 


5 

10 % 

2-'» 

15 "; 

7% 

4* 

10% 

7‘; 

1QW 


.10 7 

.36 A 
A80 3 6 


lie 10 


03 3 1> 


27% 

TP. 

9'. 


13 TeinR 
35WTeiDra 
i3 5 .TemoC4J 

WTencra 
I’.TcxBiun 
7%Tp*NVDi 
lPiTIwimas 

14 TnmeCrd 
l3%TnroF«s 
27-gThrinst 

7 ThrtttPw 
7',ThnnP 
IJWThrtRm 
TWTnmolM’n 
12 Thrmctu 
P.ntrDB 
irwThrrcF s 
?%Tipoorv 
•St.TotUhi 
41 TdEplB 4.?S 10 0 
7? TolEPfC 7.76 108 
TCWTcdEPlD 10.00 10 S 
3 TooSfCC 
10% TutlPet 
r.TuwnCtv 
■v,Twa vtg 
■-,Tt«AP( 

JWTriKL* 

WTrnrtsCii 
lO'.Trnzn 

2%Tn-UW 
’..TriaCD 
5 TridP* 

7 Trittilecn 
a%TroAG77 
IWTr.tr>n 
4'., TuDAW, 
14%TumBA 
l6’-i TumB B 
A'.TurnrC 


AJ 539 


JOe 14 


.SO 5.7 


A7 


110 

1458 

89 

II 

195 

115 

104 

7H 

IV 

81 

4>? 

a 

S3 

EU 

107 

160 

47a 

65 

I5J 

iJ" 

nun 

,i» 
a t ta 
SJI 

494 

1663 

1506 

TO 


is :• 
... S' 9 
601 I' 
107 

lid 191 IS 

149 2£3 IB 


4? v. 
13 ’, 
1% 
7% 
tJW 
15% 
IBW 
l s>. 
IHo 


Ii>, 

r : 

3e% 

}•■■ . 

IW 
4?‘ ; 

*, 

95’. 

I4’l 


14 M% 
47% 47 W 
13% 13% 

1 .. !• 

1?; 1'j 

13% 13'. 
14% 15% 
18% IBW . 
15% li% ■ 
31'. 11% 
r, 9% 

8% SW 
!5W ISw 
EW 8% 

15 - :i% 
1% P 

35". 3i ; 

J'- > 

; , iv., 

.■ j: 1 - 

95% Hi 1 . 

:• i '% 

13’. 14% 


1 „ 1 
IV . il 

J 

‘j’. 1 
*>• l 

3>i i 

1% I 
3% 5 
t’% % 


15% 

15% 

8 

7% 

P, 

4% 

59% 

53% 

8 

?% 

5% 

I3>., 

l/i. 

IS 1 * 

I5W 

14,. 

17 

15"r 

15 1 -. 


JWU5 AlC 
9 us Aim 
17WUSFGP 
4> , UTI Enn 
l>*i.UnarPn 

JWUnJutn 
fiimnw 
4 WUniaMbl 
1- ..UFoodA 
l'.UGtdn 
5%U5 EMivcl 
72%U5C>-'II 
4-.Urt.lclV 
IS%UNITIL 
iWUnyPDl 
W.V1X 
9'aVKCOI 
Id'.VKMAil? 
T'.VkFLCi 
II VNAAAw 
1D%VKNA’ 

10 VKS^iin 

ta%Vh.OHu 

5WVREF I 
5%VREF 1! 
%Vrt?4h 
wuendf 
24'. .-Viacom 
71%Y'ocB 
3‘*Viami n 
P ,vioevrt 
1 ,Vkx wtC 
2WVWC wIE 
7 Virnwrh 
WVitronic 

11 VovAZ 
11’kVBvCO 

10%vavF*a 

17 VovMN 
10’iVD/MN. 1 
10 VoyMNJ 


18 

HI 


35 

SOW 

x54e 


I' I % it — • 


31% 


J7o 7 3 . 
81 80 . 
r»a 60 
•KM 7.5 .. 
’So 7 I .. 

■U 8ft 

77 a 72 -. 
1 69.-77 0 19 
60c 9 8 T9 


10 
I Nil 
U648 
7UJ5 
25T«i 
7 ? 4 
497 

j 

a/e 

91 


.19% 3HW .W . 


3". 

I % 


.via ’4 
83a 7 5 
77 "0 


11 <1 lo- 
ll % 1 1’, 
in .a in'. 


13% 

11% 

low 

I ?% 


21’. 16’. WRIT 
6 ', HlWlhSVDl 
5". DWWi-ICri] 
l ’-.Wendt Br 

142M13>jW«CO 
15% 17 WlRET 
2% WWichRO 
21 W I’-uWiehTe 
3% >,WrolR'. 
20 JWWinieiiT 
37 20' ; Wartltn 
1'V, ti.XCLLId 
9J. 3i,Xylion 
19 15’. Tauter 


■ I" 
. J* 
illi‘ 


|9rl 

a:: 


I", 

16% 


i% V-. — - 


Sain Hoorn are unoiHcial. Yearly higlu ana kwt rnCect 
the ore v loin 57 weeks plus I he currenl week, but not the fates! 
trading dov. Where a spin or stock dividend amounting la 25 
percent or mote has been paid. I he year's tilah-iaw range and 
dividend are shown for Hie new slock only. Unless other who 
noted, rale* of dividends are annual disbursements based an 
Ihe latest declaration, 
a— dividend alia extra Is), 
b — annual rale oi Dividend plus slack dividend 
c — liouktatino dividend, 
ckt— catted, 
d— new yearly tow. 

•—dividend declared or paid In preceding IT months, 
a— dividend In Canadian funds, subiecf ta 15% non-mdence 
fax. 

I — dividend declared alter solll-wor stack dividend. 

I — dividend paid this year, omitted, deferred, or nc action 
token at tales! dividend meeting. 

k — dividend declared or paid this year, an accumulative 
Issue with dividends in arrears 
n — new Issue In Itw past 52 weeks The high- law range beams 
with the stan of trading, 
nd — next day deliver y. 

P/E — nr lce-earn)ngs ratio. 

r — dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 months, plus 
slack dividend. 

s— stock, spill. Dividend begins with date at spill, 
sis — sales 

t— dividend paid In stock In preceding 12 months, estimated 
cash value on ex-dividend or ex-Olstrlbultan dale, 
o— new yearly high, 
v— trading halted. 

vl — in bankruptcy or receivership or being reorgan Led un- 
der Hie Bankruptcy Act. or securllies assumed by suen com 
oodles. 

wd — when distributed, 
wl— when Issued, 
ww— wtih warrants 
x —ex -dividend or ex-rtgnts. 
xdls— e*-dlslrfbutk>a 
xw —without warrants 
v— ex -dividend and sows in full, 
y Id— view. 

z — sales In fun. . 



"„s 


.A ' ’ ^v : ‘l 


’l’ . 

-it 4 -'. - 




Ami i\<- kn>'" 11 
ill ! iv 
Urn- iin 
riiiti"ii-‘l 
H* liltlr ;i' li:1 

hif! n**w 




-- ^ • * 


m-* 1 * ' 


VA' 1 







* * . . . _ -4 . . . ■% . . * 





A; W; ' - : A ; ^ •; O i'-v 


-• f -- ’->7 





















w 


There ere no easy names for th^ tcinds'df service we’ve given our 
Cardmembers over the years. Because every day, everywhere around 
• the world, «f many of our Servfce Representatives have gone beyond the call- 
helping to solve problems hot just about lost Cards or Travelers Cheques, but 
. • about the unpredictable nature of We itself. .So whether you're upriver without a . 

paddle or downtown wfthout a hotel, American Express is there for you and reatjy/^'; 

.5 to be of 'senhcfc Whatever name you want to give it Just give us Ptallr - \ ’-TV: 







^saaao afiMa.aawaaQQtf. 


r . dwsaBat-’lwrf o* a 3l laswicas, or pcowM «r sMte«5 wtwn pnvMWd by legal restncBcra or-rpatten beyond cw u«iiA 


:r tyj 





rxVj. ^3. 


■■ 



* Page 20 


Page 1 




Co 


envelops 
halfway 
pax,chie 
Europe 
nance C 
ing arm 
Wher 
away in 
mists 
through 
the We 
erybod; 
free ec< 
one, bv 
go bad 
The. 
rope ji 
some fs 
ers. A 
spilled 
rope - 
reform 
siriclio 
and frt 
Chit 
was ac 
to disc 
curren 
them.' 
cult in 
been t 
oneru 
vietU 
a doll 
Ant 
easing 
promi 
lands 
Lines 
lemor 
replat 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1994 


SPORTS 


Striking Down Angels With a Graceless Game 


fmernatjonal Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — He moves like a firefly through the 
streets of San Frandsco. Cali his name. Fio Mara- 
vilha, and he stops, he hovers, he moves stealthily on. 

He has to, otherwise the pizzas he delivers will get 
cold. But as he goes. 


the limp in his stride 
reminds you that this 
was once an athlete, a 
great one, who dodged 


Rob 

Hughes 


and wove between the hardest men of his time. 

Many who followed soccer in Rio de Janeiro during 
the 1960s need nothing more than a musical tape to 
recall his art. It is recorded in song by Jorge Ben. 
whose “Beleza Tropical” collection includes a (rack 
labeled Fio Maravilha. That name, given by the fans, 
translates as Ugly Marvel, an affectionate tribute to 
the protruding teeth and the wizardry in a player 
baptized JoSq Carlos Baptista Desailes. 

A mutual friend in San Francisco introduced me to 
Maravilha during the World Cup. His shyness, and the 
pressure on his tiine to deliver, made for a fleeting 
acquaintance. But. back at the friend's apartment, we 
listened to “Fio Maravilha.” 

It is a love song, a fan's adoration to the trickery, claw 
and courage that culminated in “the goal of an angel." 

The song played on my mind this week as I watched, 
on cable television, a match between Maravilha's club 
Flameogo and a Rio rival, Palmeiras. The affair was 
bittersweet; the beauty of Brazilian soccer in conflict 
with savage foul play. 

I couldn't help thinking of Maravilha's premature 
end. his wrecked knee, his overnight reduction from 
prime footballer to dishwasher at a San Francisco hotel. 

He was grateful for any job. Like thousands of 
Brazilians, he had given up an education for the 
adolescent seduction of fame and fortune dressed in 
Flamengo red and black. 

Don't accuse me of exaggeration. Flamengo is 
proud of its “factory,” which sifts through 3,000 re- 
cruits a year and turns the best, the luckiest, into 
worldiy talents. Flamengo has groomed SO Brazilian 
internationalists over 20 years. 

In today’s market, few angelically gifted Flamengo 
boys stay. They fly away: Bebeto. for example, cur- 
rently shoots goals for Deportivo la Coruna in Spain. 


Zico, perhaps second in fame only to Pele. has just 
retired, aged 41, a very wealthy man in Japan. 

Once Brazil’s minister of sports. Zico warned years 
ago oF the thuggery laced into Brazilian jogo boniio. or 
pretty play. He, and Fio Maravilha. would haye shud- 
dered at the reckless and wretched fouls between 
Flamengo and Palmei/as this week. 

Opponents were hacked down. Shoes cleaved into 
calves, thighs, even higher into ribs, with gross disre- 
gard for the welfare of fellow professionals. 

Silently. I cried for Brazil. It is now precisely 100 
years since Charles Miller, bom of an English father and 
a Brazilian mother, took a ball and the game to Sac 
Paulo — and for the last third of that the British have 
wondered whether they might ever get their ball back. 

Brazilians, as they proved in regaining the World 
Cup this summer, apply imagination to that inanimate 
object beyond most other people's wit. Their exports 
are everywhere, which explains why on successive 
Sundays, Carlos Alberto Parreira. coach of the World 
Cup side, has tried to stop his own countrymen from 
scoring. 

Parreira now coaches Valencia, in Spain, and two 
weeks ago his new side managed to keep quiet Ro- 
mano, the leading scorer for Barcelona. The plan was 
obvious: Parreira first hired another Brazilian. Ma- 
zinho, then positioned him a yard in front of Romano 
with instructions to intercept whatever passes came. 


The referee half-heartedly waved yellow cards, ig- 
noring FIFA's latest order that makes cynical fouls 
punishable by mandatory' red cards. 

So ugliness rose like a boil, like in fact that moment 
of horror at Palo Alto on July 4 when Tab Ramos, an 
American player, was chopped down by the elbow of 
Brazil's left back. Leonardo, with such force that 
Ramos suffered brain damage. 


B EBETO watched and when his turn came against 
Valencia, he ducked and he dived (a firefly you 
might say). He artfully scored a penalty and later stole 
a brace of goals of ius own. taking them with swift 
delicate economy. 

Meanwhile, back in Rio. Flamengo has a new star- 
let. His name is Savio, his age is 20. he is white, slight 
and on Sunday's form he has a predator's instinct. 

After 13 minutes. Savio rode the Palmeiras tackles 
with a sinewy run and a st unning shot from a seeming- 
ly impossible angle. The goal of an angel? 

Then he lay quiet for an hour — a destructive hour, 
as Flamengo, desperate for die victory, insulted the 
game with scything, sometimes wicked fouls. Pal- 
meiras was just as good at being bad. 


F IFA came down hard on Leonardo, making him 
effectively the first player to be thrown out of a 
World Cup. Nevertheless. 'in New York this week. 
FIFA is honoring Brazil with its Fair Plav Trophy for 
“style and conduct in w inni ng the World Cup.” 

Style yes, conduct no. Surely Brazil had won enough 
without this award, and surely a team without such a 
disfiguring moment deserved "the fair play accolade. 

Anyway, while in New York, another inappropriate 
prize — the Brazilian-American Chamber of Com- 
merce’s “Person of the Year” honor — is being be- 
stowed upon Joao Havelange. 

He. of course is Brazilian. He is FIFA's president. 
And he barred Pele from the World Cup stage at the 
start of tbe year and did not deign to address the 
president ana the people of the United States in a 
word of English. 

Still, his speaks his son-in-law's tongue. Therefore, 
Havelange should tell Ricardo Teixeira. Ms wife’s 
husband and Brazil's soccer federation president, that 
the cleanup campaign applies universally. 

Teixeira. recemly elevated io FIFA's executive pan- 
el, must explain why his federation has abandoned the 
practice of suspending players who acquire three yel- 
low cards. 

Brazil's federation intends instead to fine offenders 
SS0 per card, thus licensing thugs to kick artists for a 
fraction of their daily bonuses. 

Those of us who cherish Brazil’s skills above all 
others are dismayed. We love the style, we abhor the 
betrayal of rules designed to allow’ creators to play 
without fear. 

We lock at Fio Maravilha, too quiet to harm a fly. 
and we ask how many more will be kicked into touch 
for a S50 fine? 

Hughes a en the su ? d Tnr Tuna. 



Sw'r HirneiK^Tlic Amnciaied I 


TIGER EYE — Tiger Woods, 18, the U.S. Amateur golf champion, following a shot en route to a 5-imder 139 at the 
Jerry Pate Intercollegiate in Birmingham, Alabama. Woods was three strokes off tbe lead heading into Tuesday's 
final round on the Shoal Creek course that in 1990 became embroiled in controversy over its all-white membership. 



FIFA Made 
$60 Million 
At ’94 Cup 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — Joao 
Havelange. president c*f 
FIFA, praised the U.S. or- 
ganizers of last summer's 
World Cup and said the in- 
ternational soccer federa- 
tion’s share of the proceeds 
would be about S60 mil- 
lion. 

“We should congratulate 
the U.S. organizing com- 
mittee for the success that 
has been reached at the 
World Cup,” Havelange 
said from FIFA's New 
York offices on tbe eve of 
its three-day, year-end 
meeting. 

Havelange said FIFA's 
operating budget would be 
enhanced by about $45 mil- 
lion after deductions for 
FIFA-sponsored programs. 

A spokesman for the 
world body, Guido Tog- 
□oni. said that FIFA's 
share represented a 20 per- 
cent gain over the funds 
generated at the previous 
World Cup, in 1990 in Ita- 
iy- 

The 21 voting members 
of FIFA's Executive Coun- 
cil. which includes the con- 
federation presidents of 
LfEFA Africa and CON- 
CACAF. were to begin 
meeting Tuesday. 


SIDELINES 




Peugeot Joins Jordan Prix Team ^ 

PAWS (AP) - I Peugeoi *■» Priv, ihc to' 1 

mula One team and join ' 

of Automobiles Peugeot said aviation uitfi 

The move will terminate the s Frcderw 

one year of a plaimed four-year yrflabor - division of F> A 

Occurs, director of Automobiles Peuy-VL J 
Peugeot-Citroen, France's larges; ■*< irJ^ikiJcr cosine to ^rdar 
Peugeot will supply us threo-hter. MtUivn 

beginning next season for *** ««£ *ill aunounee 

is looking elsewhere and mea^uon ts that 3. ^ 

with the British team in btuttgan 4 « 


in Wt « 

NHL Reduces Schedule by 4 Games 

NEW YORK t AP) - Finally .tf* Ifccko 

its entire season because of its lockout, jn * ■ % |p lt 

League has canceled four games for each of ts -o 
an 80-game schedule instead of 84. .. . | WR „e 

“Each team will lose two home and two road &unu ’ 

said in a brief statement Monday. _ lrt . ... the 

Meanwhile, the NHL commissioner. Gary BcthWJ- m 
union head. Bob Goodenow. met in Ctaeago but nuJf 
grass. It was their first meeting since Oct. 10 m it n 
Goodenow presented die union’s last proposal. 

2 Ffle Suit to Lift NBA’s Salary Cajp , 

NEW YORK (NYT) —The National Basketball A^ocutK^j 
labor problems worsened when two players sued in. 
federal court, alleging that the league artificially reduced inc 

salary cap for the coining season. . _ lsw'.rk 

In Monday's action, filed in US District Court .n Newark. 
New Jersey, Golden State's David Wood and Minnesota s now- 
ard Eisley alleged that the league should add a payment oi 5^ 
million to the cap. or $2.75 million per team, that would have been 
made to a prepension benefit plan the players canceled in June. 

th* noummt anH rwi^tinc the mini- 



9 






r 


For the Record 


‘•b 


Bobby Hammond, a Philadelphia Eagles assistant coach, w'a.s 
named head coach Tuesday of the London Monarch* oi the 
World League of American Football, which resumes play in April 
after a two-year hiatus. Mr/ 


RESCUE: A Solo Sailor 9 s Night of Struggle and Fear on a Sinking Ship 


Continued from Page 1 

failed. Almost a month later. Coyote was 
found floating upside down. 

The British Coast Guard received Mr. 
Hall's distress signal and relayed the infor- 
mation to BOC race headquarters in 
Charleston. In the meantime. Mr. Hall had 
switched on his boat's main bilge pump, 
then an extra emergency pump. The mech- 
anisms were spitting out as much as 3,600 
gallons (13.600 liters) of sea water an hour. 

Rick Vizgjano. an electronics expert in 
Portsmouth. Rhode Island, who was pan 
of Mr. Hail’s shoreside team, said that the 
boat w as close to sinking. 

“He was fighting a losing battle." Mr. 
Viggiano said. “It's a tribute to his cool 
that he kept it up so long." 

Alan Nebauer of Australia, skipper of 
the 50-foot boat Newcastle Australia, was 
the closest competitor to Mr. Hall, sailing 
about 90 miles northwest of him. Alerted 
to his plight during a scheduled short-wave 
radio transmission. Mr. Nebauer changed 
course. He headed toward Mr. Hall imme- 
diately, knowing, as all BOC racers do. 
that in an emergency, they have to rely one 
another. (He did not have to worry about 
lost time; race officials give 3 time allow- 
ance to the rescue boat.) 

In the 1990-91 race. Mr. Hall had been 
instrumental in passing on messages to aid 
in the rescue of John Martin, who was the 
leader in his boat class at the time. Mr. 
Hall was seventh in his. Class I. when his 
boat was hit 

As he struggled to survive aboard Gart- 
more, Mr. Hall said, his emotions ran wild. 

“At first I thought, my time is really up 
this time,” he said. “I've got a lot of miles 
at sea now. Oh my goodness. I’ve used all 
my nine lives up now.” 


During the seemingly endless hours of a 
life-and-death struggle. Mr. Hall's on- 
board telephone rang eight times. Some- 
where in the flurry, he placed a call to his 
wife, Laura, in England. Filled as he was 
with remorse about putting her and their 2- 
vear-old son. Sam. “in harm’s wav,” Mr. 
Hall said he broke into tears upon hearing 
her voice. 


knew that if the bulkhead broke complete- 
ly, the boat would go down in 20 minutes.” 

It was a sweet sight, he said, when he 
spotted the lights of Newcastle on the 
horizon. At 0330 GMT, the next day, Mr. 
Hall abandoned Gartmore in the dark. He 


stopped the bilge pump and opened the sea 
codes before he left. He wanted the hull. 


‘It took awhile to get my composure. 
^•.a **ck- about the situation. 


he said. “She knew 
and she said: ’Don’t worry, you'll be all 


f At First I thought, my 
time is really up this time. 
IVe got a lot oi miles at 
sea now. Oh my goodness, 
IVe used all my nine lives 
up now/ 

Josh Hall, ocean racer 


right. Help is on the way.' From that point 
on. I knew I would be all right. It was a 
turning point in my mind.” 

He set about inflating his life raft and 
lashing it to the side of his yacht, which 
was making slow headway west to rendez- 
vous with Newcastle. Then he started put- 
ting items into the floating raft — two bags 
of clothes, food (knowing that Mr. Ne- 
bauer certainly had not planned on a 
guest), and personal items, the most im- 
portant of which were pictures of Laura 
and Sam. 

“I was getting increasingly worried," 
Mr. Hall said. “There were these horren- 
dous groaning and creaking sounds. I 


already awash with water, to sink so that it 
would not be a hazard to others. 

Getting over to Newcastle was its own 
saga. Ten-foot seas pitched the yacht UljA 
toy in a tub. And having loaded his life raft 
so fully, Mr. Hall nearly sank the inflatable 
vessel when he stepped off Garunore. Mr. 
Nebauer threw him a line and then 
dragged the raft to Newcastle's side. 

The two sailors are settled into life at sea 
now. Isabelle Autissier of France won the 
first stage in the BOC race, arriving in 
Cape Town early Sunday. Bat Newcastle 
Australia has another 2, 100 miles to go — 
about 12 more days at sea. 

Mr. Hall is trying to sort out his life. He 
sits as a passenger on a boat that, under the 
race's rules, he is not allowed to help sail 
And he has a lot of time to think. 

“In some ways it's good I had to stay out 
here,” he said. “I’m not affected so much 
anymore. But for a while, I was lookin 
over every wave expecting something 
didn't know about on the other side.” 




pEBOARC 


■<32 


For investment 
information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the !HT 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



As he turned to leave, 
he paused.and said. 



to- 2* 


"Toodle-oo, Caribou! 

In a while, Crocodile! 
Stay loose, Mongoose! 
It's been neat, Parakeet!" 



Please," she said, 
‘Just leave!" 



tSNT rr GREAT TO GET cwr OF 
"TOE: MOUSE. NXNE TOGETHSl 
R*. A. CHANGE? 


GARFIELD 



1 SOUHE 

L_ 

nnrr 

rn 




L_ 

mmmm 

lD 


HEtf.LOOKIOPIE. AND 
I HAVE BEEN AAAKlNGr 
FONNS* FACES 


PAN1CT 


nrr 

MW\ 





WIZARD of ID 


( TriftMAH m 

peed sei-wwfr a$m> 

\ TO 0U£ &4&A\e&\ 


IB- % 




THE FAR SIDE 


BLONDIE 


>; :\t 


- 1 ,1 


l — _ ^ 




TVS CAMERAMAN 
MET HIS NEWWfEP 

PSACUIE WITH TH*. 


WE NEED MORE lOA&ttOOO\ 
COCKTAIL. SAUCE > IS 
?CS THE MAKING 

SEAPOOO J f SOME NOW 


I THINK DAfiWOOO IS 
EATING ALU OUR SHRIMP 
IN THE KITCHEN 

A OH, HE 
WWLbNT 
VS DO THAT 


> MV M I j ko» arang. *>• Man B 

XI [ ] tar. ■» anna ma ■» W 

■A. -J — .fkMl geWANMEMVi 


(Anjwni tonxmjvrt 

JumsM BULLY R.OUP ZEALOT MJMJH 


\ 

A#®' 


Am wt HMnimgtnaiiM'Oi'HitUBlM 
«r.-WFJUr 


DOONESBURY 



To subscribe in F ran c e 
just call/ toll free, 
05437437 



H was over. But the way the townsfolk called it, 
neither man was a dear winner. 

















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1994 


Page 19 


•• s‘v.C'V' 




•. . ., *!'* A 

; «> ix- tf 


ABC iNVjSTMW fL A CTJjVICas CO (JLCJ 
MmnwAAntoPO 5XIU7 Tl S2SXS 

ftiABC Firfures FuraJ LM— 5 ]3Ui 

mABC Wank: Pond (E.CJ_I 
raABCGU»ltewwvFa_s na.il 

m ABC Gtobol Bood Ftf j 

ABN AMRO BANK, PD. Box XL Amtfntom 

w Cotombte feartttes H nffi 

wTnmtRuwRmdFi FI £a 

nr Tnm Eonm Food s i c in 

MAImtfO .FI »enui 

ABNAMltOFM 

A rat jeon Moanel Lux. 352-04HU28 


■ isisasaffiB™-* 

tf AJG Emerg MKtS M ~ 

d UK EaroOpHmiw Fund-Eeu 

d UK Ucsrtfflv Fww SF SF 

ALFRED BIRO . 
d Allred Berg Morten S 


'‘X'j 


S 




5*33 
5042 
WJB 
500 
19JU 

xxo 

10*476* 
10L5T42 
102M10 
1363*34 
1003271 
0*5056 

ts» 

150*343 
101.11*7 
247-301* 
*42 
1140 
11S9O0 
127.100* 
1274*55 
1232*21 

21*41 

17142 
22U3 
177.37 
1142000 

11*42 
17145 

TMi 

ALPHA FUND MANAGEMENT. LTD 
4B Por-Lo-VHIe RO, HoroHtoiv HM11 Bermuda 


tf GMT 


d netherta 


d Norm Aimrtau 

as 


dux.. 



wAHuAriO Hedge 100121 .5 
fflAWn Eum HI (Aug 3i)_Eai 
mAMhoFufltfWWrtep 301-5 
m Aloha GW PIBTVW See 384 
m Alpha GtoOot Fd ( Aub 31) _J 
niAUn hob m a a/scp 30^1 

fliAJpta HdB MCI B/Sep36 — I . 
hiAWd Hdx.Fd a C/OcuK-S 

£a£w Start Fd (Sip 30) — * 
ro Alpha SM-T Ft* Iik/Sop 30J* 

mAjpna TBWoM ra is*p an_s 

!’ jS ScS/AtoboGl Hedge Aup 31* 
ctfw BCO/Afcha MM Nfri SW 38 S 
^mBucb'AMwEurHdgAugSl Ecu 
in Creseof /Won Hedea Sop as 
raGtobotvertVotae (5*e3U-4 

ivHelietJnpaiFteid Y - 

m rtemdpbere Neutral Sap los 
OlLdllMftyMM I5*P 30) —4 
in NknAepi Aorada (5oa 30} _s 
roPodf RJMOppBVI 0017-5 
nRbvcm Ml Fond7Sw3(l-S 


0 


■- 3*1 




• : cW 
• — * 

" ;- iV ifie rCasi 
" < !«&: ‘ai^ 

. • v 

• “ 'kc.-pljaj: 

' •- iNacil 

. ' v 


120*9 

20.13 
21054 

*647 
1013.10 

421.13 
10347 
loon 
35045 
3*147 
12344 
6540 

11220 
171.25 
111 JO 
8*42 

mi* 

15187 
11075 
15144 
*815 
1044* 
13305 
17143 
18538 
TUB 
1K97 

AMSTEL (ASIA) LTD Til: KEUH 1752 WM 
toSP rtblU JltanSrootlCol— * 1027 

ro Theta Cawnuny Fdi— — Y tozdjb 

ARISTA CAPITAL GROWTH RIND LTD 
2iKtd)4M-3nMM 

AJ^LWDOATCS LTD 5JM 

vArral AiMrlamOMint FO_S 14.10 

wAird Allan Fund S 3*143 

w Atm mn HMto« Fund S 212L90 

ATLAS CAPITAL MAMAOEMEMT LTD 

l^AWaGtobolHI I 9956 

■AIL ttPOOiViaOkMio TStoi Parte 
m hte fmorlMPBWd — ^js 54521 

t McmtlC*nv«nBdS FF 26UB2 

t lrUnptfl Ml BdU 5 5T1J7 

r lirienrtffOMCMverHble*-S 6*4.13 

latewiartMMuW oi nancyPinid 

mCIauA^L— FF 227134 

mCtotn — l 21748 

IAM( IRD33EL5 LAMBERT (22-21 5472817 
417.33 
1267200 
3551540 
68321 
6200* 
23523 
14150 
1321740 
338640 
56170 
4T243 
146*226 
356240 
1*61140 
12128340 
52184S 
304247 


d BBLIhvmI America - 

d BBL hwMlBtWuin BF 

d BBL lm«<l Far Eoal.- Y 

d BBL hnmt AND 5 

d BBL fM0t Lnf*l AiMf 
d BBL hnanHIK. — c 

d BBL (U;mv GoMralnai s 

d BBL lUigiM Europe LF 

088L(p1nwN World LF 

d BBL bjtajeF&sirMan^lS 
cl BBL innwrt Franco. . .ff 

d BBL <n RMaAHKl FRF FF 

rfBBLRaito'NlRH LF 


d BBL PtUrtmontoJ Bol LFl 

rfRentoOteB S MMHura BEFBf] 
dRenfciCmhSAlKBamDEMDM 
d Rinla ConfcSMedian USDS 
BANQVE BEL0E ASSET MGMT FUND 
5hm DteHtanlor Qtwmnv 0481 7M614 ■ 


or Ml I 

IT inn Bond Fond. 
wDdtorZdneBdFOL 


■vANoPadflcMatanFd. 

wlnri taHiM 


I BANQUE INDOSVEZ 

. Ck , nr H* Oram Fund Slew s 

: - - 1 ^hrimJapanGMraAI3VOB04)_S 
nmilapDnASaUfMB (3rT4WJM»_S 
T 1 — >-l mOual FtrfiMKFtfn AlinltcC 


i-\ rai. 

'r t: .-•*ks- 
- ^ 

F:=:-3l 


i 




fi'nn 


i. c 4 

■■ ^ i 

: ..“%-2p 

i^nt 
iV P‘ 


,^1-V 
r . T;.t 

i' 

N.vf 




m \l: 


v ft. W if 


jflOuri Futures Ftf a A Unites 
/nDuol Futures Fd a CUnltsJ 
mMonimoFW. Fd S*r. 1 Cl AS 
aiMnxMBFuL MS*r. 1 CL BS 
mMadaoP&L FUSor.2a.es 
aiMaodma FuL Fti S*r. 2 a. Dl 
mtadoWKCMT.a A Unfti_s 
mlndosotr Cnrr.a ■ Unlts-4 

»JPMA.,3. S 

4- BA Aden Growth Fund J 

d ISA Japan Reg. Growth Fd-Y 

dUAPocWc Gold Food S 

d ISA Aim Income Fond- s 

d indOMB Korea Hmd s 

wShooelKd F.i* * 

-wNtaatoWFoad % 

wffloolta Fund— % 

wNUkxxa Fond S 

w Siam Fund- 


d lodosaoz Hono Kang Funa_S 

d Sagan B Motor Tnnf S 

tf PodflcTtuN. HK» 

d TmmnBM t 

d Jaoan Food 


wMaoagpdTnnl. S 

d Gartman Japan warrant _S 
nrlndnaeoMoh Yld Bd FdAJ - 
nr bldawnHM Yld Bd Fd B4 

B Maxi Espana Pisa 

BAtat Franco FF 

-FF 


wManl France 95- 


1037 
1559 
11.94 
11.72 
1051 
1.1*3 
1435 

*U0 

12650 

1UL52 

12*41 

11541 

125741 

11&2M 

105451 

104527 

102511 

11223* 

41540 

8740 

92740 

2055 

1L32 

134* 

1143 

2142 

3190 

1842 

6172 

4*585 

424*5 

38450 

4715 

15*45 

37.135 

041 

9296 

**.14 

*054440 

480078 

467046 

1074 

1Q8S 


d Jmtawor Lotto Amertcn 

w Indoauez IKuMmofia FO 

BANQUE 5CANDJNAVE EN SUIS5E-GENEVA 

wl n totooodad . AF TUI 

win mmc cm sf win 

r&WMidan — SF MBA* 

WW W SCI ALLIANCE-CREDIT BANK- 
Htt)3«M3ILI 

10344 
12843 
*7 JO 
•8.17 
*771 
TOSA3 
10546 
8*70 
102.18 
10141 
10340 
10548 


wPMade Norfll Am EqdlHesJ 
wEWad» Strep* Eaotttea — Ecu 
urPietadp Asia Pacific Ea — s 

■rPWadp Envtrenment Eq S 

wPltfada Dollar Bands s 

wPMadt ECU Bonds Ecu 

toPMadP FF Bonds FF 

nr PMacte Emu Conv Bands— SF 

wPWatto Donor Rssenre S 

nrPWtM ecu Raserve Ecu 

nrPMatteSP Rasarvo SF 

w FMoril FF RBSWV* FF 

BARCLAYS MTL FUND MANAGERS 

?W?&[ aaonb ™ 


d Mono Kona 
d mdonasto- 
d Japan 
d Karaq, 


i d Monyteo 

d Stawmare— 
d Thafload. 


rirtn 

11342 

10748 

11*74 

277*3 

31770 


wAusfratta 

nr Japan Tcchnalaov 

nr Japan Fund 

w Japan 


J . 41.3*2 

d South East Ada S 354*7 

BARING INTL FD MANORS (IRELAND) LTD 
(SIB RECOGNIZED] 

IF5C HSEXusfem MSP DodULDuD. 44716386000 

nrHtoh Yield Bond s Ml 

wWarld Band FFR — .FF 5441 

BARUM urn. FD MN8RS (IRELAND) LTD 
UtOHSMRKOemZlD) 

- 3636 

67.W 
2673 
2272 
137.90 
2644 
43.95 
11444 
1L11 
1743 
1 0670 
3195 
16.16 
1692 
1640 
5151 
10.91 
1443 


nr Malaysia A Singapore—* 

w North America S 

wWamnPund— — % 

w PocMc Fond s 

w UMnaHanal Band S 

wEuraoo Fund S 

wtMgKang. 


wTrtstarwtorront I 

wGMat EmoretnOAUdi S 

w Latin America S 

w Cummer Fond. 


.W Currency Fund Manauad . 
w Kern Fund. 


w ’Baring Emarg WPrtd Fd S 

BO. CURRENCY FUND 
OlBCLUSD. 



BDO GROUP OF FUNDS 
w BDO US1 Cash FUfW_« 
prBDD ECU Cash FihxjJ 


-ECU 


w BDD Swttx Franc Cad>. 
to BOO fad. Band Fund-U5S-J 
w BOD InL Band Fund-Bat _J*ai 
wflOO N Amarlcan ewlty FdS 
w BDD European Equity Fund Ecu 
m BDO Aslan Knotty Fund — 3 
m EDO m Small Cop Fund — s 

mnDD Jaoan Fd . -J 

m BDO Emerakm MMs Fa S 

to EuroHnanciera Fixed Inc — FF 

' to Eurofir MultLCy Bd Fd FF 

■EUNVEST MGMT (CSY) LTD 

toBttinvmt-BnizlI s 

to Befinvetf-GUbal 8 

wBenawst-liratl— 5 

vBeflnuest-MuttlboMl % 

to BtH Invest- Supertar- 


BNP LUXEMBOURG 
INTER CASH 

t Franc FRF 

l Franca spcurll 

1 Inter CaA DAL 
( inter Cosh Era- 
J Inter Cosh GBP 
t Inter Can USD. 

t utter Cash Yen. 

INTER MULTI INVESTMENT 
toPrt v rtfcBHaw inN lrpre*t_l 

toT el ecnm Invest 3 

INTER OPTIMUM. 

tolnlcrtianclUSD J 

WBEF/LUF. 



toMultktevtaesDM- 

WUSD 

toPPF 
» ECU. 


. INTER STRATEGIC 
wAiatmlle 

to France. 


to Europe ttu nwO— 

iv Eutom du Centre- 
•v Eerapc du 5ud— 
w Japan. 


-DM 

J!cu 


toAmerlaueouNard- 
wSnd-EnAjlatteue- 
'GWMl. 


BSS UNIVERSAL FUND SICAV 
d Eurasec ECU a (Dhil— — Ecu 
9 Eurasec ECU B (Cap)— Ecu 
d Intetsac USD A (Dhr)_ — S 
a Intetesc USD B fCaoi — S 

d InfeteidUSOAJOM 5 

d m*maMU$OBIO») * 


51636 

86441 

9247* 

436548 

826*540 

2657600 

542141 

/nun 

5111*6 

512358 

668073 

500161 

5*4742 

147150 

1061*7 

94773 

♦KM 

104817* 

906277 

135875 

928.13 

6*S39 

92240 

*4179 


1508046 
IMlMto 
278150 
195Q73 
1507J0 . 
13052 

165)7* 

1236671 

1025.15 

141642 

1053040 

291025 

134483 

10M4D 

121043 

limn 

1060SAI 

12071 

272196 

99744 

114134 

15*639 

181877 

34042 

137.5050 

1384*40 

214817 

2271*5 

154211 

1*721* 


Flnraac Global fm a ICHvj fm 
F famiee Global FM B (CaplFM 
intetoana FRF A ID)v) ,,cp 

InteRtand Frf B icopj FF 

P»IWUSDA(Dhr). * 

For ecsl USD B ICncl r 

Jwwn JFY A (Dtv) y 

Japan 4PYB (Cap)-. y 

Parsec FRF B team pp 

Win America USD A [Dlv» 
Latin A merica U5Q b [caais 
North AOTrtcnuSDA IDhr)* 
Nth America USDS ICocJ-S 
A^USOA rohfl--Z_J 
AstaUSDS icani , 


2006214 

7109331 

101*421 

134J4H 

274642 

274036 

10*61599 
1096159* 
1134*73 
263970 
267*70 
T 67597 
167697 
100253 
mows 
101 058 

muss 


d World USD A IDhrt 

d World USD B (Cos)— j 

■UCHANAN FUND LIMITED 
CT Bant ofBcmiudo Ltd: (BOO) 2954000 

I Gkta u&nSS * 1374 

I G wool Htttoe GBP — _ t uni 

/ Global CHF I- « u» 

I n, W m ’° n&Attan,l ' : * 

I j t. in 

l_ Emerging Martxts____j mi 

S^“ECENTRALB DE5 SANGUIS POP. 

d FruOUtax-Obi.FiaA— FF eme* 

9 P r HctlUg - ObL Ev(a B— Ecu 18)247 

•f By3!{UII* Actions FsesC_FF 8UR61 

5 ewo D - ecu 

“ P*iKJJhB - Court Tenne E_FF B74665 

cjuUlSuder 0 M ° r * F “* UW57 

w Emer - Gnnwti j i b w 

w Cal tender F-An*t 5 isS 

toCPttoder F^Mfrtni* . « 11*072 

to Col] ureter F-Soank h w . BOOOOO 

■vCaiaaderF-uSHeoltn Caras 
toCaHmder Swiss Grawttu_SF KsCte 

“JPhELL HUERMUDAI LTD 
to GW InsUtuitanol (21 Octl — % *4607 E 

CANA DtAH IN TERNA TIP NAL OROUP^^ 

tf CJ Canadton Growth Fd Ct 

d Cl Norte American Fd cs 

d Cl Pacific Fund. CS 

d Cl Global Fund re 


i £[ |™n» 66aniets Fa 

d Cl Eurapcan Fu«j cs 

d Canada Guar, Martaaae Fd CS 
CAFTAL INTERHATKMAL 
W&arfttH Inn Fu nd. e 

wCaoHal ItoliaSA \ 

CDC INTERNATIONAL 

to CEP Court Torme FF 

“GFI Lang Terms. 


g£=2* ^IRELAND FD ADM LTD 

tv Korea 23s: Century in vf i 

w The Yellow Sea Invt Co s 

CmpAM BRAZIL FUND 

d Cbidam EauUv Fund % 

0 Ondam Balmcod Fund S 

CITIBANK (LUXEMBOURG) £JL 
FOB 1373 Luxembourg TeL47J 9571 

- cntmresl Gtooal Bond. S 

Cltlnvesi FGP USD s 

d CJtjnvest FOP ECU Ecu 

d Chlnvest Selector 


6S2 
&I9 
IBM 
976 
law 
SJO 
1846 

lwn 

43.15 

17*0*1.12 

151728640 


1147 

1177 


162.9510 

121,1335 


d OtteurranclesUSD. 
d attairrandes DEM. 
d CHtajrmieies GBP— __ 

d DtIcumenetes Yen y 

Cjtteart na. Eaitliy s 

Clftoort CoaL Eura Eaulty-Eai 

1 ^lI lpor> Equity c 

2 French Equity ff 

d Oltoort German Eoutty DM 

i Ent 1 ^ J'®™ Entity -Y 

d G upon iapec » 

pflPOTl Emw « 


a I toon HAS Bond- 

atom Eura Bo nn 
Monmd Currency Fond. 
India Focus Fund. 


-Eat 


■ " wag rit h U J > 

gaggg g-U”y 

a^T„ C iSf 10,, "* tspd ~- J 

toUSSEauWes % 

to US SNlonev Market j •, 

w US 1 Bonds I 

mQftoertbrmance Pffl SJL—J 

to The Good Earth Fund— s 

aSMOEST (33-1) M TOTS 10 

9 CF.E. Lotus Fund S 

toComges! Asia j 


— 5F 


toComaest Euraoa. 

CONCEPT FUND 

b W AM Global Hedge K. 

ft WAMinffBdHrdueFd S 

CONCERTO LIMITED 

to NAV 14 Oct 19*4 S 

COWEN ASSET MANAGEMENT 
Cawcn E nterpris e Fund N.V. 

to Class A Sh* S 

toCkusBSns—— S 

CREDI5 INVESTMENT FUNDS 

d CS Portf lac DMA DM 

d CS Portf Inc DM B DM 

d CS Portf Inc (Lire) A/B Lit 

d CS Portf Inc SFR a SF 

d CS Portt Inc SFR B 1SF 

d CS Portf incUSSA 


d CS Portf Inc USS B— % 

d CS Portt BaiOM DM 

d CS Portf Ba i (Ure) A/B ur 

d CS Portf Bd sfh -.. e c 

d CS Portt Sat U3 5 

dCS Portf Growth DM dm 

d CS Portt Gra (Lira) A/B Lit 

tf CS Portt Growth SFR SF 

dC5 Portf Growth USS S 

d CS Money Market Fd BEF-BF 

d CS Money Market Fd CS cs 

d CS Money Market Fd DM DM 

d CS Money Market Fd FF FF 

d a Money Market Fd Ecu-Eai 
d CS Money Market Fd HH— FI 
dO Money Market Fd Lit— J.W , m , rJn 
d CS Money Market Fd Pta_Ptos 128*0340 

d CS Money Market Fd SF SF SB97.ll 

<r CS Money Market FdS—s 182278 
d CS Money Market Fd Yen-Y 14610840 
d CS Money Market Fd C—S 239849 
d Create Eq Fd Emerg Mkte_S 1266*4 

d Credb Eq Fd Lnl Amer — 5 109456 

d CradteEoFd Small Cap EurDM 85638 

dCradbEaFd Small CdpGerDM 96X0 

dCredteEaFd Small Cap JapY 9*56240 

d Credls Eq Fd Small Cap 
USA 


98LII 

121357 

122641 

146552 

165741 

14679 

16SJ7 

2UJ9 

171,23 

132.15 

131696 

*055 

478*40 

2360) 

M5J7 

157J7 

WIB 

14643 

101658 

*65577 

970851 

25160200 

1625300 

1674400 

1667496 

1211152 

104337 

135752 

121641 

1036.14 

*8*44 

9296 


106X95 

163395 

9*542 

1Q29J6 

9549*640 

*4842 

*8191 

*5640 

98145 

1(0616 

*3616600 

97755 

100843 

9*559 

*1733600 

*3543 

7017J5 

5811540 

132858 

178353 

630679 

141846 

122684 

126817940 


d Credls Korea 
d Create SmlH-Mkl Cap SwltdSF 

d CrecBl SuteM Fds Inti SF 

d CS Euro Blue Chips A — -DM 
d CS Euro Blue CMh B 
d CS France Fund A 
d CS Prance Fund B— 
d CS Gennceiy Fund A 
d CS Germany Fund B 

d CS Gold Mines A 

dCSGoM Mines B 5 

d CS Gold Valor 5 

dCSHtepano Iberia Fd A Pta 

d CS Htenaao Iberia Fd B Pta 

d CS Italy Fund A. 
d CS Italy Fund B. 



-Lit 

ur 


dC5 Japan Megatrend SFR-SF 
d CS jaeon Megatrend Yen _Y 

d CSNefhertoxoFdA FL 

d CS Nether tend s Fd B FL 

dCSNorth-AmerfamA * 

d CS Norm- American B 

d CS Oeko-PretecA 

d CS Oeko-Proiec B — 

dCS Tiger Fund 

d CS UK Fund A 

d CS UK Fund B 

d Enenrie - voter 

tf Euraoa voter 


-DM 


d Pacific-voter 

d 5cinveberaMNn 

d Band Voter D-Mark _ 

d Bond Valor Swf 

d Band Valor US -Dollar, 
d Band Valor Yen 


-SF 


tf Band Voter cstert Ire... — r 

d Convert Voter Swt SF 

d Convert voter US - Dollar _s 

d Cenvirl Valor c Starting t 

d Credit Swim Fds Bds SF 

FdAusSA AS 


1 HOSTS 
*8248 
22140V 
12240 

TI6M 
3044 
857 J* 
*2619 
34571 
25*46 
28295 
2*747 
15230 V 
26S79J* 
2837UJB 
23847640 
24428340 
25270 
2480240 
4089* 
41652 
23741 
25042 
21447 
23251 
126661 
10843 
11614 
130L50 
204JS 
127J5 
75350V 
11148 
11625 
12127 
1076240 
1026* 
15*35 
1*864 
16.17 
814 5 
23377U0 


d Credls Bond FdAusSA AS 

d Create Bend Fd Ausl fl— Al 

d CredteEtend FdConSA CS 

dCredto Band Fd Cars B CS 

d Crrdte Bond Fd DM A DM 

dCradteBondFdDMB DM 

d Credls Bond Fd ff A — _FF 
d Credls Bend Fd FF B— ff 
d Credte Bond Fd Lire A/B— Ut 23417590 

d Create Band Fd Pesetas A/BPtos 1856140 

Credte Bond Fd USS A I 

tf Create Bond Fd USS B 
d Credte Band Fd Yen A. 

a w’cwmm , DM19*7_ — —DM 172570 

d C5 CaaitaS DM 2900 DM 141358 

CS Capital Ecu 2*00 Era 135868 

- ' FF 2000 FF 132539 

1521-33 
994S 
17098 
21626 
340.13 
10745 
10826 
10641 
**645 
106841 
10141 
15244 
8579 
12503 
10140 
15644 
10278 
161J0 
26451 
2*262 
105.17 



d CS Fixed I DM 8% 1/96 DM 

d CS Fixed I ECU 8 V4% 1/96-ECU 

tf CSFlxedlSF7%l/96 SF 

d CS FF Bond A- 
d CSFF BandB. 


d CS Gulden Band A. 
d CS Gulden Bend B. 
tf CS Prime Band A- 
d CS Prime Bond B. 


-FF 

-FF 


— Fl 
-SF 


d CS Shart-T. Bend OM A DM 

d CS Shnrt-T. Bond DM B DM 

d CS Short-T. Bonos A 3 

d CS Shart-T. Bend S B 5 

d CS Swim Franc Band A— SF 

d CS Swiss Franc Bond B SF 

d CS Eurareal DM 

CREDIT AGRICOLE 
INDEX IS 

d Indaxb U5A/S8.P 500 5 

d indexte Jaeon/NlUcel Y 

d Indexte G-Bret/FTSE 1 

tf Indtxll F ranee/ CAC 48 FF 

d Index Is CT — _FF 

MONAXIS 

d Court Terme USD 5 

tf Court Tenne DEM .DM 

tf Court Terme JPY— ■ — ■ .V 
d Court Tonne GBP ——I 

tf Court Terme FRF—— J=F 

rf Court Terme ESP -Pta 

tf Court Terme ECU ■ Ecu 
MOSAIS 

tf Actions Inri DtvenHlees— .FF 
d Acl tens Nord-Am erlculnea-5 

d Actions Anglotees— -I 

tf Actions AUemaades- DM 


rf Actions FrancOteee. 
tf Actions Esl 8. Port- 
d Actions Ike leones. 


-FF 

-Pta 


d Actions Banin Paefftaue 8 

tf OMIa Inn Diversiiiees FF 

tf Obltg Nord-Amertcalnes — J 

tf Obllg Japonatees r 

tf Oteiig Anptatse c 

rf OMlo Allemondes DM 

« ooilg Fnmcotetn FF 

-Pta 
JF 
-Era 


tf OftUa Esc. s Pert 

tf Dbde Convert Intern.. 
tf Court Term* Era. 


tf Court Tenne USD- 


1898 

176*5* 

1295 

13399 

11847 

1747 

3943 

227099 

1347 

14043 

381697 

20.11 

12049 

2241 

182617 

13.14 

3824 

13298 

339658 

31*036* 

l«.« 

11640 

1129 

22*742 

1346 

8923 

14453 

265664 

Mtil 

22JB 

1799 

U652 


tf Court Terme FRF FF 

CREDIT COMMERC IAL ME FRANCE 
tf EhWWMenetalra FF *130.71 


d Sam Act! cash USDS. 

• UR5IT0R FUND 
d CursHor East Aslan Ea— _4 

tf CursHarGn BdOpoort I 

d CunJtnr Gihl Gwfh Sub-Fd J 
DARIER HEHTSCH GROUP 
Tel 41-23 788 68 37 

d Hentfdi Treasury Fd -SF 

d DH Malar Morten Fund _SF 
tf DHMondarinPortfoMo— 

tf Samurai PortfeUe SF 

DISCOUNT BANK GROUP 
w Euroval Equity — . 
iv N, America Equity, 
to PocWe Equity - 
toDohmlBe 


w Mult IcuTr Bond 


toMulHeurreney Bond 


Mumrarrenev Bon d— — - .- DM 


111*49 

10*31 

9108 

102.16 


908978 

*537.16 

943744 

2*3.13 

12474$ 

145443 

137676 

114442 

134688 

4699JT 

*3126 


ADVERTISEMEMT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


OcL25,1994 


The 


Guotatiaas etqtpSed bg femde Ustod, and transmittKl by MK80PAL PAMS [TeL 33-1 40 2B OB DSL 
Nat anal vote quotations are supplied by the Route fisted with the exception of soma quotao based on taueprlCM. 
i Mfeata treqiMRcy at marfaUmi* SMtedod; (d) ■ diRi; (w) * weakly; (b) ■ bienonddyi (f) fartnffhtty [ewy two weetes); (i) ■ reMdmtw p) -twtea weekt yi tm}- meafaty. 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
d Concersrat-. DM 


o ran Rententead+- 


_DM 


5047 

6652 


DRESMfER INTL MGMT SERtf KBS 
La TKieM Hone - (FSC - Dublin 1 
OSO Thermal Lot Am Set Fd 

tf Coaootefottor Fund S 1096 

DUBIN ft SW1ECA ASSET MANAGEMENT 
TW : 189*1 1*5 1400 Fax ! IBM) 945 108 

t> Hlgnorldoe CooHal Cora s 12277.93 

™ Overtook Performanc* Fd-S 2037.96 

m Pacific RIM On Fa t me 

BBC FUND MANAGERS (Jersey) LTD 
14 Scale SL SI Heller ; 0534*331 
BBC TRADED CURRENCY FUND LTD 


tf CuXtai- 
d Income. 


INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 
tf Lam Term— } 

d Long Term - DMK__— dm 
ERMTTAOE LUX (3S3403 M) 
to ErmHoae Inter Rote 5trot_DM 

wErmUoaeSeUFund S 

ir Ermltoge as Km Hedge Fd-S 
toErmltooe Eura Hedge Pd -DM 
iv E ramose Crosby Asia Fd_S 

iv Erminge Amer hog Fd S 

toErmltage Emtr Mkts Fd__ I 
EUROPA FUNDS LIMITED 

a American Eaulty Fond S 

tf American Obi lor Fund— _* 

to Aslan Eaulty Fd s 

iv European Eouiry Fd s 

EVEREST CAPITAL (M9) 212 22N 

m Everest Control Util Ltd 5 

FAIRFIELD GREENWICH GROUP 

m Advanced stratenies Lid S 

to Fairltatd Inrt Ltd * 

to Fairfield Sentry Ltd. 


to Fairfield Strategies Ltd. 
mScntTY Sated Ltd. 


FIDELITY I NTT INV. SERVICES (Lux) 

d Discovery Fund 

d Far East Fund _ 

o PKL Amer. Assets 

tf FM. Amer. values i v. 
tf Frontier Fund 

a Giooai ind Fund 

tf Giabol 5eledton . 
tf New Europe Fund 
d OrfmJ Fund. 


2440 

15460 

31.927B 

107JJ0* 

1089 

6197 

183 

ltun 

1*50 

797 

1754 

16742 

12102 

1260S 

13630 

T 629707 
wiwi 
34610 

ms 

5137333 


2047 
8551 
1*846 
11057340 
37.70 
1*47 
2131 
1663 

7369* 

rf Special Growth Fund t 4295 

a World Fund I 11844 

FINMAMAGEMENT SA-Lug«(4191/23nC) 
w Delta Premium Com.. . S 122540 

FOKUS BANK AA472 <28 555 
wScantonds inn Growth Fa _5 09* 

FOREIGN ft COLONIAL EMERG MKTS LTD 
Td : London 0*1 628 1134 
tf Argentinian Invest Co SJcovS 3758 

tf Brazilian Invest Co sicnv S 4357 

to Cotombton invest Co Slcov J, 1SJ0 

tf GibiEmMftniiwCOSrcavft li.lt 

tf Indian invest Co Slarv s in* 

tf Latin Amer Extra Yield FdS 94948' 

tf Latfai America income Co_5 9J1 

rf Lotte American invest Ca_S 120 

d Mexfam inves Co Staiy 1 4519 

to Peruvian Invest Co Slcov__S 1610 

FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID) 

P-O- Bax 2001. HamlHoa. Bermuda 

mFMG Global 130 Sep) S 

m FMG N. Amer. (JO Sw) s 

m FMG Euraae (30 Sen) S 

mFMG EMG MKT (30 Sep)-5 
mFMG a (30 Seal 


mFMG Fixed (30 Sea) S 

FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA) LTD 
to Concepts Forex Fond— S 
GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 

to Goto Hedge II 5 

to Gaia Hedge ill I 

C GAIA FX. 


mGaia Guaranteed CL I. 

m Gaia Guaranteed a. 1 1 

GARTMORE INDOSUEZ FUNDS WWH 
Tel: (352) 46 5474 4W 
Fax: (352) 46 54 23 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 

d DEM Band Dte 524. 

d Dlvertond Ote253. 

d Dollar Band Dte 115- 

d European Bd Dte L12. 

d French Franc— Dte 997. 
d Gtoftal Bond— Dis 211- 
EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 

tf ASEAN 

d Asia Podflc. 


116* 

1050 

1061 

11*0 

•47 

10.14 

*60 

Twii 

1677 

12241 

8495 

8445 


tf Comkrentnl Europe-, 
tf Developing Marten, 
rf France. 


d Germany 

rf International, 
tf Japan. 


tf North America, 
tf Switzerland— 
rf United Kingdom. 


RESERVE FUNDS 

d DEM DIS3476. 

d Dollar .0111120. 

rf French Franc 

d Yen Rt 


■DM 

63* 

JSF 

3fJ8 

J 

243 

-era 

138 

-FF 

044 

J 

252 

-S 

*95 

Jt 

554 

-Era 

141 

s 

494 

-FF 

1807 

-DM 

534 

5 

242 

-V 

26050 

Jt 

246 

J5F 

348 

X 

150 

-DM 

641* 

5 

11*4 

JF 

1357 

-Y 

2W.1 


GEFINOR FUNDS 
London :7T-09 41 7LGene«o:41-2273SS5 30 

wScnttWi World Fund 1 4799*00 

to State SL American S 34897 

GENESEE FUND Ltd 

■v (A) Genesee Eagle J 1567* 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 
OFFSHORE FUNDS 
11 Athol SLDoaala&l of Mat 44626626037 

wGAMfrtca 

to GAM Aroitrege. 


iv GAM Combined 

w GAM Cross-Market- 

w GAM Eurapeai 

toGAM France. 


to GAM Franc-vaL 
toGAM GAMCO„ 
w GAM High Yield. 
toGAM Bast Asia. 
toGAM Japan. 
wGAMMone 
d Do Sterling 


d Do Swiss Franc — 
d Da Deotsehemoric. 
d Do 


•to vrun nNirt-m WNV WDft . 

toGAM Mitt- Europe DM- 

to GAM MHt-GloboJ USS- 
toGAMMftt-US. 


wGAM Trading DM- 
to GAM Trading USS. 
w GAM Overseas — . 
toGAM Pacific. 


w GAM Relative value, 
iv GAM selection 


toGAM SF special Bond. 

'GAM Tyche 

GAM U-S 


toGAMat investments. 

toGAM Voter 

iv GAM Whitethorn 

w GAM Worldwide. 


to GAM Bond USS ora 

to GAM Band uss Speckti. 
toGAM Band 5F_ 
iv GAM Bond Yen. 
toGAM Bond Di 

toGAM Bond c 

toGAM£5oecM Bond-, 
to GAM Universal USS— 

w GSAM composite 

to Gtobol Strategic A 

to Global Strategic B 

iv European Strategic A. 
to Eurapeai Strategic B. 

iv Trading Strategic A 

to Trading Strategic B_ 
ir Emerg Mkte Strategic 
to Emerg Mkte Strategic 
SWI5S REGISTERED FUNDS 4I-1-4I 
MunlebartiSrasse I71CH 80J42urlch 

d GAM (CHI Europe 5F 

tf GAM (CHI Mondial SF 

d GAM(CH) Podflc SF 

SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 
135 East SWl StreeLNY 10B22212TO4200 
toGAM Europe 
toGAM Global 


5 

4715* 

5 

4085* 

5 

46270 

5 

23154 

5 

31651 

DM 

12294 

5 

112.17 

3 

•482 

FF 

167452 

5F 

3475* 

S 

21538 


15954 


75*44 


mm 


10132 


18143 

F 

10L12 

M 

10134 


1005000 


16153 


18438 


1233* 

IM 

12437 


17254 

M 

12193 


160M 


10546 


*7344 


107.7B 


63889 


8039* 

F 

12857 


360.12 


217 JB 


8781* 


12242 


189.15 


67834 


14453 


10848 

F 

10823 


1445150 

M 

11058 


159.10 


14836 


1047 


33S91 


10054 


*9.96 


*■54 


*800 


>0097 


10194 


11196 


11160 


*056 

160.90 


w GAM Intenxtilonal- 


*T4i 

141J7 

20143 

*747 

*292 

196*8 


toGAM Japan Capimi 

ie GAM North America— 

toGAM Pacific Bosin — . 

IRISH REGISTERED U CITS 
6546 Lower Mount SLDubJbi 25S3-1-676QU 

toGAM Alta Inc Y 10045 

toGAM EuropaAcc DM T2H37 

to GAM Orient Acc DM 15687 

to GAM Tokyo AM— DM 17175 

to GAM Taftrf Bood DM Acc — DM 1CSJ0 

iv GAM umveraal DM Acc DM itojh 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bemwao: (8B«) 295400a Fax: (SOW 29H180 
JWH GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 
ir (A) OrkXnat investment * 
w 1C) Financial ft Metals —5 

iv (D) Global Dlvenltled s 

to (F) G7 Currency S 


63.13 

U9J8 

11047 

9117 

158.15 

11*46 

11847 

7610 

1843 


w IH) Yen Froviol 

b-(J) Diversified RbkAdl— JJ 
tv (KJ Inti Currency ft Bond_5 
to (L) Global Financial — 8 
w JWH WORLDWIDE FUND, 

GLOBAL FUTURES ft OPTIONS SICAV 
m FFM lnl Bd Progr-CHF □ -SF 9892 

GOLDMAN SACHS 

wGS Ad| Rale Start. Fd II— Jf *90 

mGS Global Currency 5 126196 

W GS World Band F.x xr _ - - -, 10.14 

toGS World Income Fund S *96 

GS EQUITY FUNDS SICAV 

toGS Eura Smalt Cao Port DM *656 

wGSGlnhni Fifty — * 11. *5 

toGS US COP Growth Fort. 5 1020 

wG5 US Smell Cop Part s *96 

to GS Asia Portfolio— 7147 
GOTTEX FUND MANAGEMENT 
w G. Swap Fund- Ecu 


09315 

07771 

0.9402 


GRANITE CAPITAL INTL GROUP 
“ - Capital Eaulty S 

_ _ 

GEM ENT (IRELAND) LTD 

Tel: I44J71-7M4S*7 
rf GT Aseon Fd A 
tf GT Asean Fd B 
tf GT AND Fund A 

rf GT Alta Fond 6 

tfGT Allan Small Coma A 
tf GT tatian Small Comp B 
tf GT Australia Fd A Share-5 
d GT Australia Fd B Stxjres-S 
tf GT Austr.SmoH Co A Sh— S 
tfGTAiahr. small CoB Sh^J* 

tf GT Berrv Japan Fd A Sh— 5 
tf GT Berry Japan Fd B Sh — * 

tf GT Band Fd A Shares- 5 

tf GT Bond FdB Snare s 

tf GT Bio ft ap setenen A Sh J 
dGTBte&Ap Sciences BShJt 

dGT Dollar Fund A Sh I 

d GT Donor Fund BSh s 

tf GT EmerglaRMfcTiASn S 

tf GT Emareln* Mkte BSh— S 
tf GT Em MM Small CO A Sh J 
d GT Em MM Smofl Co B Sh _* 
ir GT Eure 5moll Co Fd A Sh J 
to GT Eure Smoll Co Fd B Sh Jl 
rf GT Hood Kong Fd A Shores 
d GT Honp Kona Fd B Shares 
rf GT Honshu Pathfinder A 9iS 
tf GT Hounu Pathfinder B ShS 
toGT Jao OTC Slocks Fd A sns 
to GT Jop DTC Stacks Fd B ShS 
wGT Jea Small Co Fd A Sh_» 
to GT jop Small Co Fd B Sh— 5 

wGT Latte America A S 

wGT Latin America B— S 
d GT Strategic Bd Fd A Sh —5 

tf GT Strategic Bd Fd B sn s 

tf GT TetaComm. Fd A Shores 
d GT Teleeamm. Fd B snores 
r GT TecnnotoBV Fund a sn -5 


B621 

8744 

2644 

2648 

19.15 

1*46 

1741 

3296 
2558 
2624 
2392 
2392 
1873 
1882 
20.18 
2023 
3541 
3649 
2100 
2221 
1057 
104) 
4345 
4328 
71.13 ' 
7142 ‘ 
1148 
1353 
UJ3 
1146 
1557 
1590 
T4M 
2591 
870 
191 
1539 
1546 
6145 


r GTTechnoiagyFunaBSiu 61.93 

GT MANAGEMENT PtC (6671 71*45 67) 
rfG.T.BtotKflSHMmPunrf.Ji 2U4 

tf GT. Deutschland Fund . 5 1177 

tf C.T.Euroa#Fund^ 8 49.9S 

to G.T. Gtabol SmaU Co Fd — 5 30.11 

a GT. investment Fund 1 Z7J2 

iv G.T. Karra Funa S 6 jl 

toGT. Nawly IM Covntr Fd-S 4201 

US Smell Companies _s 2i.ii 

GUERNSEY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

t GCM GtoOOl Set Eq. S 10756 

f GCMUSSSaeckti— __S 100547 

GUINNESS FLIGHT FD MNGRS (Gmer) Ltd 
GUINNESS FLIGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 

rf Managed Currency S 3*53 

rf Global Bo nd- t J«J7 

d Global High Income fiend _5 21 9e 

d Gift ir Bond i iyj 

tf Euro Hian Inc. Bond c jai6 

tf Wood Eadty— — — S *668 

tf American Blue Chip S 2841 

tf Japan ana Porttlc— S 13482 

tf ux t 2640 

rf European— i 12L7< 

GUINNESS FLIGHT INTL ACCUM FD 

tf Deunchemark Money DM *0.741 

tf US Dollar Money S 39.051 

tf US Dollar High Yd Bend s 26» 

0 mri Balanced Gnh s 3a.*s 

HASENBICMLER ASSET MANGT GejnbH. 
w Hoienbicnler Com AG— 4 64S49 

tolfajenMcMerCOmliic 3 11959 

to Haienblcntar Ota s 131.4-? 

wAFFT « 145630 

HOF F I MAHC&TeiaJ- 1 >«7H4549=ax 407*4455 

toMandlnvestEuroae _FF 124573 

wAtandlnvestCrabsonce FF 1336c* 

toMondnvetOpp Inttas FF 117422 

to Mondnvtst Emerg GrcwttiFF 13107; 

wMonainvest Futures— —FF 1)6398 

HEPTAGON FUND NV (50F61S55S) 

1 HoMogonQLBFund 3 B842 

C Heptagon CMO Fund s 66te 

HERMBS ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 

Bermuda ; 1809)29! 400a Lux : 13521404 64 61 
Final Price 

m Hermes European Fund— Ecu 
mHerme North American FdJ 

m Hermes Aston Fund _i 

m Hermes Emerg Mkte FundJ 

m Hermes Strategies Fund J 

mHerme Neutral Fund s 

m Hermes Global fum 


mHerme* Band Fund. 
mHerme Sterling Fd. 
mHerme Gold Fima. 


-Era 


333J1 

WHI 

386.91 

13803 

688.95 

115.11 

M751 

123X90 

109.43 

47107 


HUTZLER BROKERAGE 

mPegana P.P. Porttalfa s 11.15 

IFDC SJL GROUP, LoodonJax(44-7T>43I *172 
m ifdc Japan Fund. — . - •* 2371440 

w interaond Fund Ecu 10479.15 

iv Korea Dynamic Fund s 230743 

»r Matocoa Dynamic Fund — J 192661 

toMaroc Investment Fund FF 95862* 

INCOME PARTNER5 (ASIA) LIMITED 

to Asian Fixed Income Fd s 10689 

INTERINVEST (BERMUDA) LTD 
C/b Bank of Bermuda. Tel : 809 295 4000 
m Hedge Hag ft Conserve Fd_l *51 

INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
2, Bd RovoL L-2449 Luxembourg 

w Euraae Sud E ——Era 


INVES CO INTL LTD, ROB 27L Jeney 
Tel: 44 534 73114 

tf Maximum Income Fund c 

tf Sterling Mnaa Pffl t 

rf Pioneer Markets t 

tf Global Bond s 

tf Dkasan Global Strategy _Zs 
tf Asia super Growth— — j 

d Nippon Warrant Fund S 

d Asia Tiger Warrant s 

tf European warrant Fund $ 

d Gtd N.W. 1*94 % 

d Global Leteore S 

PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 
tf American Growth ... * 

tf American Enterprise— S 

d Asia Tiger Growth 5 

tf Dollar Reserve S 

tf European Growth s 

tf European Enterprise S 

tf Global Emerging Markets J* 
tf Global Growth S 


8894 


tf Nippon Enterprise. 

tf Nippon Growth 

rf UK Growth 

tf Stem no Reserve. 


24*70 

64470 

177600 

277800 

21100 

82000 

2*100 

9.900 

sow 

6JJ500 
8J900 
127200 
50300 
54880 
641N 
104400 
55300 
LI 100 
54300 
57200 

74400 


0 Greater China Opps — 5 
IRISH LIFE INTL Lid, (lax) 353-1-704 1*21 

d International Cautious — J 1410 

tf International Balanced _s 1417 

rf I ntemattonol Growth S 1417 

rTAL FORTUNE INTI- FUNDS 
■vCjareA (Aggr. Growth ItaIJS 7818*40 

to Class B (Global Eaulty) 5 1244 

wCIohC (Global Bond) I 1L15 

w Class D (Ecu Band)— Ecu 1091 
JAB DINE FLEMING, GPO Bax 11448 Mg K» 

d JF ASEAN Trust S 6230 

d JF Far East Wmt Tr— 5 3Q6I 

d JF Global Conv. Tr X I19S 

tf JF Hong Kang Trust- 5 1795 

d JF Japan Sm. Co Tr- Y 4155140 

tf JF Japan Trust— Y 1157600 


tf JF Malaysia Trust, 
tf JF Podflc lnc.Tr.. 
tf JF Thailand Trust. 


JOHN GOVETT MANY (LOJIU LTD 
Til: 46624-62*420 

wGoveti Man. Futures. l 

wGoveftMan.Fiit.U5S S 

wGoveftSGear.Curr S 

wGovetisGibi BaLHrtae 5 

JULIUS BAERGRDUP 


3923 

1167 

4555 


Hnwtewr 

SF 









Swhriw — 

SF 


d Ltautocxtr. 

d Europe Band Fund. 
tf Dollar Bond Fund- 
tf Austin Bond Fund, 
d Swiss Band Fuid- 
tf DM Bond Fund- 


tf Convert Bono Fund. 
d Global Band Fund— 
tf Eura Slack Fund— 
tf 115 Stock Fund. 


-Era 


tf Pacific Stack Fund 1 

tf Swiss 5 rock f — 1 w 

tf Spedat Swiss Slock SF 

tf Japan Stock Fund— ^_Y 
tf German Stock Fund— DM 

tf Korean Stock Fund J 

d Swiss Franc Cosh SF 

tf DM Cash Fund— DM 

tf ECU Cam Fund _Ecu 

tf Sterling Cash Fund — c 

d Dollar Cosh Fwid. 


tf From Franc Cash— — .FF 
KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

m Key Asia Holdinss S 

m Key Global Hedge % 

m Kev Hedge Fund 1 


11-83 

7.*8 

11J8 

108314 

83667 

16*345 

24QS8* 

15515* 

100080 

225691 

283741 

229580 

14699 

127.90 
12604B 

11*60 

11790 

8770 

8570 

12880 

128.90 

140.90 
151*0 

moo 

*51000 

10260 

9840 

122040 

127740 

12*340 

112040 

105400 

113040 

10L» 

25280 

15094 


Kl PACIFIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 


ro Kl Asia Podflc Fd Ltd- 
KIDDER, PEABODY 
ft Chesapeake Fund Ltd. 
b Kl Fund Ltd. 


ft Inri Guaranteed Fund, 
ft Stonehenge Ltd. 


1203 

2*8543 
114240 
137216 

175*97 

LEHMAN BROTHERS 24718/94 
d Asian Dragon Part nv A— J 1045 

tf Asian Dragon Part NV B — A 1043 

d Gland Advbors 1 1 NV A $ 1099 

tf Gtebol Advisors 1 1 NV B S 1097 

tf Global Advlws Part NVA-S 1094 

tf Globed Advisors Port NV B A 1046 

tf Lehman Cur Adv. A/B 5 749 

tf Natural Resources NV A % 977 

d Naturai Resources NVB—S *87 

d Premier Futures Adv A/B J *7* 

LIPPO INVESTMENTS 
24/F LiPOO Tower Centre. 8* QueenswovJilC 
Tel I0S) 867 088 Fax 1652) 5*6 0388 

w Java Fund s *45 

wAseon Rxed me Fd t 843 

w IDR Money Market Fd — J 11*3 

w U5D Money Market Fd —A 1045 

to Indonesian Growth Fd S 2619 

to Aslan Growth Fund— —S 879 

to Aslan woman Fund S 448 

LLOYD GEORGE MHGMT (8521 8454433 

w Antenna Fund S 1846 

to LG Asian Smaller Cos Fd I 19.1898 

w- LG India Fund Ltd— Jl 1783 

ir LG Japan Fu. j hub 

«r LG Korea Fd Pic S 1087 


LLOYDS BANK INTL (BAHAMAS) Ltd 
to LlorQS America* Porttoilo-S 
LOMBARD, ODIER ft CIE - GROUP 
OBLIFLEX LTD (Cl) 
d Multicurrency 


*4* 


d Dollar Medum Term. 

d Dollar Lons Term 

rf Japanese Yen. 


rf Pound Sterling. — 

rf Deutsche Mart 

d Dutch Florin 

rf HY Euro Currencies-. 
rf Swiss Franc. 


-Ecu 

-SF 


rf US Dollar Short Term 

rf NY Eure Curr DivM Pay —Ecu 

d Swiss Muttleurrencv sf 

tf European Currency Era 

tf Belgian Franc BF 

d CanvertCsle S 

tf Frendi Franc FF 

a Swiu Mum-Dividend SF 

d Swiss Franc Sun-Term— SF 

tf Canadian Dollar cs 

tf Dutch Florin Multi Fl 

tf Swiss Franc Divio Pav— SF 
d CAD Multicur. Dfv. CS 


tf MedlterranecmCurr. 
tf Canverflbies. 


SF 

-SF 


tf Deutschmark Shan Term_DM 
MAGNUM FUNDS ItiO Of Man 
Ttf 44-624 688 320 Fax 44-634 688 334 
w Magnum Fund- 


3347 

2638 

1*94 

493740 

2648 

1756 

1695 

1553 

1343 

1342 

1066 

1699 

2143 

13647 

1691 

15464 

*52 

10823 

1253 

1645 

1037 

11.0 

1091 

*45 

1045 


9215 

*254 

9892 

*613 


toMagnum Multi-Fund— s 
iv Mognim Emerg Growth Fd* 
to MAgnum Aggres. Grwlh FdS 
MALABAR CAP MGMT (Berm Pda) LTD 

m Malabar mn Fund 5 1847 

MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 

DJMtaJ Limited - Ordlnorr J 3875 

fliMiiUUmlled- Income-— 4 1167 

nMfan Gtd LW- Soec Issue-J aJ6 

mMJni Gld Ltd - Nov 2002— S 2818 

ntMintGld Lid- Dee 1994 s 1741 

mMlnl Gtd Ltd - Aug 1*9S_J 1475 

mftUnlSpResLMIBNPl S 9539 

mMInf Gtd Currencies A 643 

mMmi Gtd Currencies 2001—S 670 

mMlnt G GL Fin 9003 S 544 

m6Alnt Phis Gtd 2003 3 9.17 

mARiend Gtd Fuferes 5 1241 

m Aihena Gtd Currencies s *94 

a Arrwna Gtd Financials Cos 9 1043 

mAtheiKi Gtd Financials Inc-S 1048 

fllAHL Capital Mkte Fd— S 1144 

mAHL Cammwfity Fund 5 11.17 

mAHL Currency Fund S 76* 

mAHL Reel Time Trod Fd s 822 

mAHL Gtd Real Time Trd— 5 8tf 

mAHL GldCim Mark Ltd S 100* 

mAHL Gtd Cammorfllin Ltd Jt 455 

mMoft Guaranteed 1W* Ltd— I 881 

fflMon Leveraoea Reco*. Lid J 1CL56 

mMAP Guaranteed 2000 S *94 

mMAPGMMOl t *J* 

MARtTIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
73 Front St Hamlnon Bermuda (8091292*78* 
w Marillme Mtt- Sector I Ltd -5 **325 

a> Maritime GIN Beta Series js 82170 
w Maritime GDI Delta Series S 78529 

MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MGT 
EMERGING ASIAN STRATEGIES FUND 

m Class A S 11623 

d CtassB 5 11790 

PACIFIC CONV STRATEGIES FD LTD 

mClOSSA — — S 9745 

dOossB — S *89* 

MAVERICK ICaymaaMM*) 949-7942 


mMawerlcJfFmd— __ s 153.9*81 

MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS, LTD 

raTite Corsair Fund ua t 7770 

mTheDmmtlessFaLtd s HUB 

MEESPIERSON 

Rakln 55, mack. AMfleraam (20-5211188) 
w Asia Pat Growth FdN.V._S 4846 

ur Aslan Capitol Heidlngi. . _1 6245 

h> Asian Selection Fd H.V— .Fl KH69 

ur DP Amer. Growth FON.V.-5 mm 

w EM5 Offshore FdN.V. Fl 10152 

toEume Growth Fund h,v._fi mts 

w Japan Dlversmea Fund —5 5195 

to Leveraged Coo hold 4 6091 

MERRILL LYNCH 

d Dollar Ateete Portfolio s 140 

rf Prime Rate Portfolio S i nnn 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TE RM 

WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

rf Clou A I 628 

tf Cum B » *28 

MERRILL LYNCH 

GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SERIES 
AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

tf Category * « 

rf Coteoory R At 


CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
d Category A CS 

tf Category 0. 


CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 
tf CtrtM 6.1 c 

tf Doss A-2 X 

tf CMS B-1 « 

tf Class B-3. 


DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 
tf Category A DM 


tf Category B 


DM 


EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (DM) 
neamA-l t 

tf OassA-2 s 


tf Class B.I 

tf Class B-2 I 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (USS) 
tfCtaSSA-1 
tf Class A-2 
tf Class B-l 
tf Close B-2 


POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 

rfOiteonrya r 

tf Category B. 


US DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

tf Category a 

tf Categcry B 

YEN PORTFOLIO 

d Category A 

tf Category B. 


MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 

tf Clou A * 

tf (to'B . 

US FEDERAL SECURITIES PTFL 

d ClnwA * 

to riM» a I 

MERRILL LYNCH 
EQUITY /CONVERTIBLE SERIE5 
BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 

tf ClBMA e 

tf CtassB s 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

tfChwsA i 

a Class B— s 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL (USS1 

tf C leu A } 

tf CtassB— S 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

rf Class A— 5 

d eimxn . x 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

d class A S 

d class B s 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

d Class A J 

tf Ckwe ft ■ » 

PACIFIC EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

d Class A - . - S 

d Class B s 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 


1744 

1766 

1623 

1344 

940 

*44 

9.00 

940 

1347 

1271 

1168 

152* 

1141 

1513 

*97 

1832 

997 

1093 

15*4 

1962 

1367 

1346 

1288 

1245 

2292 

2171 

*47 

*45 


1514 

1467 


1446 

1361 


1093 

1094 


1057 

».*S 


1456 

1440 


1817 

17.75 


*76 

9.75 


tf ClaaA 

tf Class B 

DRAGON PORTFOLIO 

tf Class A . 

d Class B 


12.13 

11^ 


1790 

1440 

MERRILL LYNCH EMERGING MARKETS 
dCtaMA C 1146 

d Ckm R e ff 05 

MERRILL LYNCH INC S PORTFOLIO 

dCtoJA S 861 

d Class B - S 861 

a Class f « ui 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

d Mexican Inc J Ptff Cl A 5 973 

d Mexican Inc 1 Pffl a B— s *73 

rf Mexican Inc Pew Pffl a AJ 893 

d Mextaei Inc Peso PHI CJB4 893 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
toMameidum Nayaffler PerfJS 9798 

m Momentum Rainbow Fd— S 11662 

tnMamentam RxR R.U i 7668 

m Momentum Stocfcmosler s 159.92 

MORVAL VONWILLER ASSET MGT Co 

” 21540 

1840 
1036 
1570 
12J9 
1363 
117040 
11.15 


to Wilier Jam 

to Witter South East Mi n t 
w Wilier Telecom » 

w Wlllerfundg-WIUertand Cod* 
to Wlliertands-Wllterband EurEra 

to wmertunds-VNflereq Eor Ecu 

toWUrerfunds-Wlllereq lts0v_t.ll 
to WKlerfunds-WUlerea NA— * 
MULTIMANAGER N.V. 

m Wbrtd Bond Fund Ecu 

m European Equiliei P p. 

m Japanese EmBix . . v 


m Emerging Markets. 
m Cash Enhancement. 
m Arbitrage 


052 
146* 
854 
2356 
*40 

— 941 

HI CHOLASAPPLEGATE CAPITAL MGT 1 ” 
d NA Strategic OpPortunitlesA 10079 

toJWFteribteGrwttlFd J 14794 

to NA Hedge Fund J 133.19 

NOMURA INTI. (HONG KONG) LTD 
tf Nomura Jakarta Fund— 3 1191 

ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
2 S^'^ nor SU/M WIX 9FE6471-49* 2**8 


d Odev European 
w Daev Euroaeon 


-OM 


■r OttyEurao Growth inc — OM 

to OdevEurao Growth Acc DM 

>» Obey Eura Grth Sler lne_ 1 

wOdey Eura Grth Star Acc t 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL. INC 
WlUlams House, Hamlttar HMll.Barmuaa 
Tel: B0* 293-1018 Fax: 80* 29S-Z10S 

i* Finsbury Group _—_j 

iv Otvmpio Securtte SF SF 

to Otymelo Stars Eatergtwkts* 

to Winch. Eastern Dragon J 

w Winch Frontier 


121.18 

13150 

I3S78 

13698 

5695 

5665 


ir Wfaim. Fut. Ofympta 5tor_S 

w Winch. Gl Sec Inc PI (A) * 

w WlndLGl Sec Inc PI tO— J 
miMnck Gla&af Heatthcare_JEra 
toWmOLHIdg inH MtxSsan_Ecu 

W vwndL Hidg inrt Ser D Ecu 

w Winch. HUg 101 SerF .Ecu 

w Winch. Htag Oty Star Hedge* 
iv Winch. Reser. Muni. Gv Bd5 

►r Winchester Thaikma * 

OPPENHEIMER & CO. INC Fds 
ft Arbitrage internal lonot - * 

ft Emerg Mkts inti II * 

ft Infl Horizon Fund II _* 

OPTIGEST LUXEMBOURG 
ft Optigesi Glbi Fd-Flxed incJJM 151748 
b Oat I pest Glbi Fd-Gen Sub FJJM 179.191 
OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 
73 Front SI. HamlitchBermuaa 809 29S-8658 
toOatlma Emerata Fa Ltd * 
w Optima Fund 


2 2296 

1£2J» 

9*871 

1756 

28840 

16194 

8*2 

*.18 

103940 

15265* 

17*4.17 

178395 

101147 

1826 

3*11 

10552 

W83J 

9958 


1* Mima Futures Funa —S 

to Optima Global Fund S 

nr Optima Perlcula Fd Ltd—! 

to Optima Short Fund 1 

ir The Platinum Ftf Ltd * 

ORBITEX GROUP OF FUNDS 
d Orhltex Asia Poc Fd— S 
tf Oral lex Com ft into Tech Fds 

tf Orbltex Growth Fd s 

rf Orbltex Health ft Envtr FdJ 
d Orairex Japan Small Cap FdS 

tf Orbltex Natural Res Fa C 

FACTUAL 

tf Etemltv Funa Ltd 1 

tf inflnJlY Fund Ltd S 

d Navostar Fund i 

tf Star High Yield Fd Lid 1 

PARIBA5-GROUP 


d Parvest USA B 

d Porvesf JaoonB — 
d ParwesTAifoPactfB. 

tf Parvest Euraae B 

d Porvest Holland B — 
d Pnrvesl France B. 


d Parvest Germany B. 

a Pervea Oblt-Daliar B . 
d Parvest Obll-DM B— 
d Parvest OULYen B— 
d Parvest ObH-G«den B. 
rf Parvesr Obil-Franc B_ 
d Porvesi OWI-ster B_ 
d Parvest Obil-Eai B. 


-Fl 

_FF 


tf Parvest Obil-Behm B . 
tf Porvest S-T Dodar B. 
d Porvesi S-T Europe B 
tf Porvesi S-T DEM B_ 
d Parvest S-T FRF B— 
d Parvest S-T Bel Plus I 

d Porvest Global B 

tf Parvest iniBandB. 

tf Parvest OblLUra B 

d Parvest lnl Equities B. 
tf Parvwt UK B. 


— Y 
-Fl 
-FF 
-i 

-Ecu 

-LF 

J 

-ECU 

-DM 


d Parvest USD Plus B 

tf Porvest 5-T CHF B 

tf Porvest 00 Katuda B CS 

tf Parvest ObtFDKK B 
PERMALGROUF 

f Enuratna Mkts 

/ EuraMir (Ecu) Lid Ecu 

I FX. Flnanclob ft Futures _6 

t Growth N.V— * 

I Investment Hkte N.v s 

I Medio 8 Communlcatkins—S 

1 Nosca l LM S 

PICTETS CIE -GROUP 
tf Amerosec. 


to P.CF UK VOt (Lux). 


w P.CF Ger moral (Lux) n M 

nr P-CF Noramval (Lux) S 

to P.CF Valtber (Lux) Pros 

* P.C.F Valitaita (Lux) Lit 

w PC.F vofirance (Lux) FF 

wP-U-F. VotbondSFR (LuxI_SF 
w P.u.F. VOlband USD ILinl J 
w P.W.F. Vaftwnd Ecu (Lux) -Ecu 
w P.u.F. vaihond frf «Lux).FF 
w P.u.F. Vaibcmi GBP (LuxU 
w P.U Jr. Vaihond DEM (Lux) DM 
to P.U.F. US S Bd PHI ( Lux )_* 
w P.UJ. Model Fd , .. Fm 
*P.U.F.PIcilte 


1051 
1751 
177* 
1496 
1043 

742 

1857 

577B7 

51373 

794U 

51704 

45*1* 

144954 

3644280 

5429140 

1149913 

1575*08 

853 

2372 

567140 

7145 

2447 

19145 

1176.94 

20761 

171.95 

37172 

1616500 

31803 

*6462 

79.1* 

131.16 

850*40 

1224* 

LOW 

27867 

*265* 

534340 

742540 

WM 

52139240 

11196 

8757 

*855 

25596 

18855 

926.90 

93U3 

15062 

«7662 

272868 

131240 

107148 

186656 

5394 

6443 

*293 

2156 

905440 

10405640 

117819 

28143 

23141 

1»9fl 
*3457 
*596 
28872 
9*30 
1 1563 
471*4 
21333 
14174 

14129 

21564 

6I85S 

49873 


wP.u.T. Emerg Mkis cliw)_5 

ivP.U.T. Ew.OMWrt 1 Lux) Em 

ft P.U.T. Global Value (Lu<0 -Ecu 

ir P.U.T. Euroval (Lux) Ecu 

tf Pictet VabulualCH) SF 

otlitii Small Cop (lOMI—S 
PREMIER INVESTMENT FUND5 LTD 
c/o P.O. Bo« 1 108 Grand Cayman 
Fra: (809) *4M99J 

m Premier US Equtly Fund -5 120660 

m Premier inn Eq Fund s 12745* 

m Premier Sovereign BdFd_5 75355 

m Premier Global BdFd, s 1474,90 

m Premier Total Return Fd s *875* 

PRIVATE AS5ET MGT GAM FUND INC 
Guernsey :TeL (0044 4*1) 723432 Fa*;723488 
ie Private Asset Mgt gam Fds 108*2 

PUTNAM 

tf Emerging Hffli 5c, Trust S 1A17 

wPuTtxjm Em inta Sc Truss J 4239 

tf Putnam Glob. High Growths 17.11 

tf Putnam High Inc GNMA Fas 755 

tf Putnam tan Fund .. « 1«1 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 
w Aslan Deveteoment— j 103.70 

w Emerging Growth Fd N.V—S 18964 

iv Quantum Fund n.v -_j 1718334 

ir Quantum Industrial s 10765 

to Quantum Realty Trusl— . * 136.14 


w Quantum UK Rnity Fund-K 1079s 

w Quasar Inti Fund MV j mw 

ie Quota Fund H tf s leljg 


REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 


w Hew Korea Grgwtn 

toNawaLatPoDflc invCa 

ie Pacific Arid trage Co s 

m RJ_ Country Wmt Fd * 

tf Regent Gihi Am Grin FdJ 
tf Resent Glbi Eura Grth Fd-S 

tf Regent Glbi tall Grtn ta S 

d RtgtW G0X JOB Grth Fd—5 

tf Regatu GM Paefi Basin s 

tf Rigent GUx Reserve 
tf Reoenl GttJ Fesot 

tf Regent GIN Tiger 

tf Regeni GfW UK Grth Fd. 
to Regent Moghul Fa Ltd s 

« Regent Pocmc h«i Fd 5 

w Regent Sri Lanka Fd— s 
d Undervol Ass Taiwan Ser35 
to Undervalued Assets Ser <_s 

tf WMte Tiger fnv Co Ltd S 

REPUBLIC FUNDS 

to RwMrtltc BAM « 

to RcDuaie GAM Antertec_5 
w Reg GAM Em Mkts Global J* 
w Rea GAM Cm Mkts Lot Am* 
w Republic GAM Curopa CHFSF 
w Republic GAM Europe USS5 
w Republic GAM Grwtn CHFJSF 

w Republic Gam Grawtii c t 

to Pepvblle GAM Growth U58S 
w Republic GAM Opportunity ( 
w Republic gam Pacific—— * 

to Rep Gtao Currency j 

iv Rep Glob Fbfd me i 

to RenobUe Gnsev Dol Inc S 

to Repuauc Gasey Eur Inc —DM 

to Restablic Lot Am AHoc 1 

to Republic Lot Am Argent, _s 

ur Republic Lor Am Brazil 1 

w Republic Lot Am Mexico * 

iv Republic Lot Am vertex. 1 

iv Rm> Sotamon Strategies— s 
ROBECO GROUP 
POB V7U0G0A2 Pan i nlu iiy|31>l»224 1234 

a RG America Funs Fl 15740 

tf RG Euraoe Fund Fl i n in 

d RG PneHle Fund — -- m utS 

a RG Dfvtrenfe Fund Fl ci an 

tf RG Money Plus F f i . ci 11632 

More Roboco see Amsterdam Stacks 

! , ^5^ , SliS OUPE “" NDM, 

to AsJan Capita) Hakfangi Fd_* 
to Daiwn LCF RMtHchlld BO J* 

toDolwa LCF Rolfuch Eq 1 

to Forex Cash TradHIgn CHF-SF 

-1 *lmwi ft 


U64 

83940 

1837 

234.7* 

6,1346 

4,1005 

296» 

26*31 

46063 

11024 

2.7355 

39074 

ljffln 

1067 

1297469 

1140 

1162 


13838 

115.17 

ISL16 

12890 

1123S 

V094 

10410 

*966 

14743 

11354 

14833 

103191 

1026.71 

102* 

1095 

10143 

*697 

ITU6 

100 . 1 * 

8153 

■897 


to Lew raped Cop Holdings * 

to OOJ I- Valor 5F 


to Pri Challenge Swiss Fd. 
ft Prlewliv Fd-Eurape—— Ecu 

ft Prieflutty Fd- Helvetia SF 

ft Prieqidiv Fd-Lotki Am * 

ft Priband Fuad Era Era 

ft Prloond Fund USD— S 

ft Prtbond Fd HY Enter MktsA 
to Selective Invest SA—j* 

ft Source— s 

tv US Bond Ptia 3 

w Varianius- 


-Ecu 


ROTHSCHILD IGROUP EDMOND DE) 
OTHER FUNDS 
tf Asia/ Japan Emerg. Growth* 

iv Esprit Eor Partn Inv Ts) Ecu 

iv Europ Slrateg Inveshn td-Ecu 
ft integral Fuhmes— 
tf Pacific Nles Fund - * 


6245 
100268 
104690 
104*665 
271493 
6091 
*4*6* 
107478 
11*935 
103559 
10583 
118455 
109.967 
119.143 
367510 
18631 N 
93140 
103244 


t Selection Horton- 
ft Vtctolre Arloiw. 


-FF 

Jt 


1766310 
133171 
10550 
92147 
*68 
817*817 

2)0661 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT (CJ) LTD 

mNcmrad Leveraged Hk) I 85871 

SAFD1E GROUP/KEY ADVISORS LTD 
mKey Diversified me Fo Lttu tiTim 

ft Tower Fund Global Bend * *97351 

ft Tower Fund Global Brainy _s 
SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 

mCommanarr Fund— 5 108771 

m Explorer Fund— I 122931 

SC FUNDAMENTAL VALUE HVI LTD 
Tel 599 * 322000 Fax 5*» * 32201 
mMMV | 132951 

SKANDIHAVISKA ENSK1LDA BANKEN 
S-E-BANKEN FUND 

d Euraoa me * 

d FlorranOstera lnc_ s 

tf Gtabat inc S 


tf Lakomedel Inc 

d Vnrtdcn loc 

tf Japan Inc 

d Mills utr- 

rf Sverige Inc- 

tf Nardamcrlka Inc. 
tf Teknotaol Inc- 


tf Sverige Rontefand inc. 
SKANDIFONDS 
tf Eauilv Inri A«to t 

tf Eauilv llltl 1 nr « 

d Eaulty Global. 


tf Eauilv Nat Resources- S 

tf Equity Japan- Y 

d ExmHv HonOr « 

tf Equity U.K.. 


d Equity Continental Europe Jt 

d Equity Mediterranean * 

tf Equity North Anterico S 

tf Equity Far East s 

tf inti Emerging Markets 3 

tf Band um Are < 

tf Bond mn inc s 

tf Bend Europe Acc s 

rf Band Europe Inc- a 

d Band Sweden acc. 
tf Bond Sweden lnc_ 


tf Bond DEM Acc. 

tf Band DEM Inc- 

dBondOolloruSAec. 


-soft 

-DM 


-DM 


tf Band DoNar us inc s 

tf Curr. US Dollar s 

tf Cure. Swedish Kronor Sek 

tf Sweden Restate Bd Acc — Sek 
tfSweden Ftextaie Bd Inc — Sek 
SOCIETE GEMERALE GROUP 

d Asia Fund— Y 

d BTWCat A_ * 

d BTW Cal B. 


toSGFAM stmt Fd Dtv. FF 

to SGFAM 5 trot Fd Fin S 

SOGELUX FUND(SF) 
toSF Bonds A UAA— _— * 
to 5F Bonds B Germany DM 

ivSF Bands C France FF 

to SF Bands E G4_( 

to SF Bands F Japan Y 

to SF Bonds G Europe— __Eai 
a- SF Bands H world Wide— * 

to SF Bands l Italy Ut 

toSF Bonds J Beta him BF 

to SF Ea. K North America S 

toSF Ea. L W£uropo Era 

» SFEq-M Pacific Basin Y 

toSF Eo. P Growth Countries J 

wSF EaO Gold Mines J 

toSF Eq. R World Wide S 

to SF Snort Term S France— FF 
toSF Short Term T Eur Era 


SODITIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 
to SAM Brazil. 


to SAM Diversified I 

to SAMfMcGorr Hedge * 

to 5 AM Ooportunitv $ 

to SAM Oracle S 

1* SAM Strategy S 

tf! Alpha SAM. 


w GSAM Composite——* 
SR GLOBAL BOND FUND INC 

mama A Distributor - I 

m Class A Accumulator * 

SR GLOBAL FUND LTD 

IT! SR European. * 

mSR Alton * 

m5R International. 


150 
143 
141 
0.93 
1.10 

•5*2 

a.w 

1830 

a«7 

1.11 

iota 

1792 

lit* 

156 

161 

*815 

17* 

151 
16* 
5*7 
245 

593 
150 
1262 
752 
1.71 
145 
1657 
1840 

196 

594 
198 
154 
158 
1267 
HUH 
1054 

5458140 

1494 

4365 

53*93 

*490 

1556 

319* 

12S22 

1170 

2350 

1795 

1197 

2*61440 

80740 

179* 

1546 

1520 


3095 

15*D 

14282 

166* 

Z6S56 

131.92 

12250 

131.18 

11520 

11455 

12164 

33571 

1089* 

10293 

loan 

105.12 

10360 


17 


SVENSKA HANDEL3BAHKEN SJL 
M* Bd de la Petnrase. L-23J8 Luxembourg 


ft SHB Band Fund. 


wSvensko 5d. FdAmerSh— S 
toSvemka Sel Fd Germany— J 
w Svenska 5e1. Fd IntT Bd Sh A 

toSvmtskaSetFdlnn Sh 3 

«r Svrn&ka SeL Fd Jaaan — y 
ir Svenska Sel. Fd MIH-Mkt— Sek 

iv Svenska S«. Fd Nordic SEK 

to Svenska 5ei. Fd PncilSn * 

»r Svenska SeL Fd Swed Bds-iiak 
SWISS BANKCORP. 

tf SBC 100 Index Fund SF 

tf 5BC Equity Ptfi- Austral ki—AS 
tf SBC Equity PffFCanadb— CJ 

tf SBC Equity PtfLEurape Ecu 

d SBC Eq Ptft-Netherkmds_Fl 

tf SBC Govl Bd B S S 

tf SBC Band PtfiAupr s A— AS 

tf SBC Band PHFAUStr S B AS 

d SBC Bond PtfLCanS A .Cx 

rf SBC Band PtfLCons B ...CS 

d SBC Band Ptfl-DM A DM 

tf SBC Bond PHI- DM B DM 

rf SBC Bond Ptfl-Dutch G.A—FI 
tf SBC Band PtfFOutch U B_FI 

d SBC Band Pffl-Era A Ecu 

d SBC Bond Ptfl-fcu B Era 

tf SBC Bond Ptfi-FF A FF 

d SBC Bond Pffl-FF B FF 

tf SBC Band Ptfi-Ptas A/B— Ptas 
tf SBC Band Ptfl-5tarllngA — x 
tf 5BC Band PM-Sfertlitg B — 1 

tf SBC Band Parttallg-SF A SF 

tf SBC Band PorttoUa-SF B sf 

a SBC Band Ptfl-US* a s 

tf SBC Sana Pffl-USS B S 

tf SBC Bood Ptfl-Yen A Y 

rf SBC Band Pffl- Yen B Y 

tf SBCMMF-AS. AS 


d SBC MMF-BFR. 
tf SBCMMF-f 


JF 


-CS 


5484 

1573 

1062 

1277 

4090 

387 

11399 

10264 

891 

140471 

167140 

20740 

22140 

18740 

38540 

102054 

*990 

1184* 

10261 

12668 

15573 

17806 

1565) 

17771 

10462 

12760 

53199 

65450 

*2*750 

053 

5*95 

106194 

137294- 

«42 

10*92 

10453540 

11433440 

440540 

114*0*40 


tf SBC DM Short-Term A— —DM 

tf SBC DM Short-Term B dm 

a SBC MMF - Dutch G Fl 

tf SBC MMF - Era. 


tf SBC MMF ■ Ex- 
it SBC MMF - FF _ 
tf SBC MMF -LI I. 


10487T 
135*95 
751138 
3851.17 
-EK 47735740 
-FF 2501052 
-Lit 55700040 


tfSBCMMF-Ptn pta 37588340 

tf SBC MMF ■ Schilling AS 32(2860 

tf SBC MMF - Staffing — c 219152 

tf SBC MMF ■ SF SF 


tf SBC MM F - US ■ Doltar— I 

tf SBC MMF - USS/I I — 5 

tf SBC MMF - Yen— Y 

tf SBC GRH-Ptti SF Grt h X F 

tf SBC GlbFPtfl Era Grth Ea 

tf SBC Glbh-PHI USD Grth S 

tf SBC Glbi- PHI SF Yld A SF 

d SBCGIM-Pffl SFYkJ B SF 

rf SBC Glbi- Pffl Era ym A— Era 

rf SBC GOD-PHI Ea Yld B Ea 

tf SBC G flti- Pffl USD Yld A l 

d SBC GIBI-Ptfl USD Yld B J 

d SBC GM-Pffl 5F inc A SF 

tf SBC GIBI-Ptfl 5F inc B— SF 

tf SBC GM-Pffl Era Inc A Era 

tf SBC GM-PHI Era Inc 8 Gca 

rf SBC GtaFPffl USD Inc A 
0 SBC GIDI-PIfl USD Inc B —5 
0 SBC Glbi Ptfl-DM Growth— DM 
tf SBC GIW Ptfl-DM Yld B— DM 
tf SBC Gbl Ptfl-DM Inc B —DM 
tf SBC GIDI-PHI DM Bal A/B-DM 
d SBC Glbi- Pffl Ecu Bat A/B. Ecu 
tf SBCGIbl-PtflSFR Bal A/B4F 
tf SBC Glbi* pin uss Bal A/B S 

tf SBC Emerging Market* 5 

rf SBC Small 8 MW Cops Sw-SF 
d sbc Not Resource USS— 5 

tf SBC Dm Floor CHF *5, SF 

tf SBC Dvn Floor USD *9 5 

rf AmsricaValar—— — * 
d Anoio Voter— I 

d Asio Portfolio- 


tf Csnv«rrB«idSe<edtaa— JF 
d D-Mark Bond Selection —DM 

a Dodar Band SeteOfaxi— s 

d Era Bond Satoctkxi— -Ecu 
d Florin Band Selection ..Fl 
a Franravaiar ff 


tf Germontavnur. 
a Gold Port taUo— 
tf ihertavalor 


-DM 

J 


600151 

735298 

213818 

60242240 

IM8LS1 

<22*46 

117444 

<025.94 
115667 
1177.18 
130072 
10U92 
11017) 
101144 
108062 
105045 
113848 
95650 
103445 
101660 
Ml 554 
KBITS 
*8668 
*1990 
97SJ2 
100074 
121199 
50340 
48357 
9*250 
9*340 
341*2 
21068 
7*06 
9899 
1M42 
13630 
10L63 
11*75 
185891 
4*961 
<1377 
53*3688 


tf ttalVotor. 


-Lit 


43*76240 

2396450 

11366 

10*97 

52350 

7440 

KUO 

1174250 


tf Jopoworttoilo— __Y 

d Staffing Band Selection c 

d Sw. Foreign Bond Selection .SF 

d SwiHVMW SF 

d Ufflvenei Bond Seieaton —SF 

tf Unlvenoi Fund SF 

rf Yen Band 5eterftan Y urara 

TEMPLETON GLOBAL STRATEGY SICAV 

- 1173 

1098 
1877 
Utl 
1610 
*.90 
1811 
189* 
Hit 
1496 
164 

176* 

1057 

*.»* 

1092 
U97 
1175 
1627 
1842 

fv06S 
11.97 
I6X 
*90 

1093 
1045 
1043 


tf GtaMiGrgwma^ 

rf Gtabat Crowro ci b 5 

tf pMGteoelGrawm DM 

tf Smaller Camaanln a A 5 

fl Smofif Compantea O B * 

tf lmraxir. ft Communlcattaas 

tf Ponnmericon Ci a s 

d PoiMmerieonClB— _J 

d Euranni ce 

tf for Ea*f- * 

tf CnteaGgiewav— — 5 
a Emerging Market* a A— j 

tf Bmrrguig Manwn Cl B 3 

a Gteftw Utilities— k 

d Global Convertible 
a Global Balanced. 

tf Global income Cl„ 
tf Gtebol income Cl B 
d DM Gtabat Bond. 
tf Yen GlaOai Bona_— — , 
tf Emerg Mfeta FU me (3 A-t 
tf Emerg MM* Fix incCIB— S 

tf UtdawiwMiii « 

a HOVMV— SF 



tf USS Llouid Reserve 

tf DEM Urauf Reserve dm 

TEMPLETON WJMIDE INVESTMENTS 
GROWTH PORTFOLIO 
if ClmxA.1 « ijxx 

a CknsA-2 x 173 , 

d Ckm A-.1 l Ysm 

a doss B-1 « iuj 

JdwgJ- ■ 1747 

INCOME PORTFOLIO 
tf CtassA 
tf CtassB 


THORNTON INVESTMENT MOMT LTD 
U (hem SLUndon EC4RIAX 071 246 SOW 


tf PocH Invt Fa 5A 1 

tf PocJI Invt Fd SA DM— DM 
tf Ewtern Crraatter Fund — * 
tf Thor. Util Dragons Fd Lid J 
tf Thornton Orton) inc Fd Ltd S 

tf Thornton Tiger Ftf Ltd * 

a Managed Median s 

to Jnknrtn __ » 

tf Kargg— « 

NEW TIGER SEL. FUND 

tf Hong Kong I 

ff Japan « 

r Koreo— 5 

tf Phil Inn Inn 1 

tf Thailand * 

0 Malaysia, 
tf indannta 


tf USS Uautahv * 

a cm™ - . « 

tf Singapore * 

THORNTON TAIWAN FUND 
d Equity income——* 

tf Eaulty Growth S 

tf LtaiDOtty I 

UEBER5EEBANK Zurich 
tf B-FuM 


tf E-Fund, 
tf J - Fund— 
tfM-Fund. 


-SF 

-SF 


tf UHZ Euro-Income Fund SF 

tf UBZ Wand Income Fum —Ecu 

d UBZ Gold Fund S 

tf UBZ Nippon Convert 5F 

tf Asia Growth Convert SFR -SF 
d Asia Growth Convert USi_S 

d UBZ DM -Bam Fund DM 

d UBZ D ■ Fund_ DM 


rf UBZ Swiss E rarity Fund 

0 UBZ American Ea Fund— A 

tf UBZS-Bom Fund 1 

tf UBZ Southeast Asia td * 

m UBZ Diversified Straw a j 
m UBZ Diversified Strafes B J ran 
UNION BAHCAiRE ASSET MGT (UBAM) 
INTERNATIONAL. NASSAU 

to Ardei invert _—_—S 
wArmlnval 


M40 

3421 

1316 

4TJ5 

27.*6 

57.17 

2391 

1461 

1877 

5063 

u.*i 

*53 

B394 

2592 

:«47 

836 

1095 

1686 

2878 

1698 

1857 

1040 

TU3J6 

5*542 

35663 

111253 

1021 

52** 

1339* 

116442 

117A92 

11566? 

10048 

9*56 

10856 

*396 

*2.18 

162.74 

180092 

100131 


w Beck invest. 
wBrodnvcst. 
toDlntutures- 
wDfaivesf— 
to D Invest Altai- 


to Dtawest Gold & Metals. 
toDfnvest India. 


w Dimes] Inti Fix Inc Stral— ! 5 

ie joginvesi « 

toMonslmiest— t 

* Mart Invest * 

toMourfaivest. 


ur Mourtmett Comlnated . 
toMourtnvesf Fm 

toPuhnr 

to Pulsar Overly 

wQuantinvest- 

toQuantinvcrt *» — 
to Stein Invest 
to TudhtveN ______ 

wUrelmeif 


-Ea 


UNION BANCAIRE ASSET MGT (UBAM) 
INTERNATIONAL, LUXEMBOURG 
w UBAM 5 Band- _ * 

■v UBAM DEM Bond * 

to UBAM Emerg Ing Growth -S 

to UBAM FRF Band FF 

to U BAM Germany ——DM 


3488661 
WL*T« 
1878002 
1278*2 r 
111844 1 
101566 2 
252811! 
10*9642 
9*8571 
*40981 
058342 
1*98561 
*7325 2 
1371562 
30 US 2 
*6551 x 
1594322 
1140941 
17016*2 
240864 2 
13686*1 
280820 z 
10091 2 
62061 z 


-DM 


to UBAM Global Bond 
to UBAM Japan 


to UBAM Starting Bond— 
to UBAM SM Pad! ft Asia 

to UBAM US Equities. 

UNION BANK OF 5WITZERLAND/INTRAG 
tf Amco — — 


110902 
1132.112 
100932 
540942 
100911 
1*4493 2 
*223401 
*7147 
317.152 
1153532 


tf Bond-Invert, 
tf Brit-Invert - 
tf Ca 


_SF 

-SF 


-SF 


tf Convert-invert- 
O D- Mark-invert— 
0 DoUar-lnvert— 
tf Energle-lnvesi. 
tf Esaoc- — 


-SF 


-DM 


tf Eurit 

tf Foma— 
d Frondt. 


JF 


-SF 


tf Gehnac 

tf Gtabinvqrt.— 
tf GaU-lPvesi— 
tf Gulden- invest- 
ti He! vet Invest— 
d Holland- 1 revest. 

tf HOC. 


-SF 


-SF 


-SF 


-SF 


-SF 


-SF 


tf Jaaan-invert— 
tf Pacific- invest, 
tf Sadi. 


$ 


d Skandlnovlen-lnvest. 

rf Slerllng-lnvest 

tf Swiss Franc-Invert— 
tf Sima 


-SF 

-SF 


-SF 

-SF 


tf SwtewwH rc 

tf UBS America Latina SF 

d UBS America Lailna s 

tf UBS Asia New Horizon— SF 

d UBS Asia New Horizon S 

tf UBS Small c. Euraae SF 

d UBS Small a Europe DM 

rf UBS Port Inv SFR Inc SF 

tf UBS Port ire* SFRCOPG-JF 

tf UBS Part Inv Era Inc SF 

d UBS Part Inv Era Inc —Era 
tf UBS Port In* Ecu Cap G_SF 

rf UBS Port inv Era Cop G Ecu 

d UBS Pan inv USS Inc J 

d UBS Port Inv USS inc. SF 

tf UBS PUT? Inv USS Cop G SF 

tf UB5 Part Inv USS Cop G S 

d UBS Port Inv DM Inc SF 

rf UBS Part Inv DM Inc— J3M 

tf UB5 Port Inv DM Cop G SF 

tf UBS Port inv DM Can G— DM 
tf UBS Port invLff Inc . -—SF 
tf UBS Perl Inv Utl nc ——All 
tf UBS Port Inv Lit Cap G — SF 

tf UBS Pori (nv LK Cop G Lit 

a UBS Port Inv FF Inc SF 

d UBS Port inv FF Inc— FF 

tf UBS Port invFF Cap G SF 

tf UBS Port Inv FF Cop G FF 

d Yin-Invert. 


-Ea 


tf UB5 MM Invest- USS. 
tf UBSMMInvert-C5t- 
tf ubs MM invert-Era. 

tf UBS MM Invest- Yen Y 

d UBS MM Invert-Lit— LK 

d UBSMMinuert-SFRA SF 

tf UBS MM tnvert-SFR T SF 

tf UBS MM lavert-FF FF 

d UBSMMllwert-HFL Fl 

tf UBS MM Invert-Can S_ CS 

a UBS MM invert-DFR BF 

rf UBS Short Term Inv-DM— DM 
tf UBS Bona Inv-Ecu A. r— 

d UBS Bend lnv*Ea T. 
d UBS Bend Inv-SFR-. 

tf UBS Band inv-DM 

tf UBS Band Inv-uSS 


-Ecu 

-5F 

-DM 

-* 

-FF 


d UBS Dana InvFF __ 

tf UBS Band InvCon I CS 

tf UB5 Bend Inv-Ut LU 

tf UBS B.I-US* Extra YFeta—J 
tf UBS Fix Term Inv-SFR *6-5F 
tf UBS Fix Term inv-DM *6— DM 
tf UBS Fix Term lnvEai*»-Ecu 

d UBS Fix Term InvFF *6 FF 

tf UBS Ea invEurepe A— DM 

tf UBS Ea invEurape T dm 

d UBS Ea InvS Coo USA * 

d UBS Part 1 Fix inc (SFRi^sf 
d UBS Port I Fix Inc (DM) _DM 
d UBS Pert l Fix Inc (Era! —Ecu 
rf UBS Part l Fix Inc (US*)— * 

tf UBS Port 1 Fix inc (Lit) U1 

tf UBS Port P FU Inc (FF) FF 

tf UBS Cop InvWia U5S s 

tf UBS Cop InvHVTO Germ— DM 
WORLDFOLIO MUTUAL FUNDS 
tf S Daily Income. 


d DM Dally Income 
rf S Bona Income — 
tf Non-SBonds_ 
d Global Bondx_ 


_DM 


tf Global Balanced s 

tf Globa! EatritltS * 

tf US Conservative E rarities _s 

tf US Agressfve Erarittos s 

tf European E rarities. 3 

d Pacific Equities 5 

d Natural Resources S 


Other Funds 

to ActlCT otaonc* Scav . 
toActUteanceSicav— 
to ActHutures Ud — 
ir Act kmt tan Sk 


w Activea Inn Slcav. 

iv Adelaide. 

toAdtlakte. 


-FF 

J 


-FF 


ft) Advanced Lotte Fd Ud 5 

in Advanced Pacific strut s 

w AIG Taiwan Fund i 

w Alexandra GBti Invert Fd 1 j 
m Anna investment.— _s 
tv Atari la intern at i on al Fund_s 

» Anri fin Investment s 

to Arou* Fund Balanced- SF 

w Argus Fund Band— SF 

a Asia Oceania Fund. S 

to ASS (Global) AG. Dm 

bi A ssociated Investor* Inc.—* 

w Athena Fund Ud S 

wATO Nikkei Fund———* 
to Banal Hedged Growth Fd _* 
w Beckman in) Cep c 

iv BEM international Ud S 

tf BikubcmMurval EEF F m 

mBleemar Gtehai Fd A Sh S 

mBleanar Global Fd BSh s 

m Bleanor Gtabol Fd Caymans 
to BraC InltiHdfpnnl FF 

d ecu s 

mCai Eura Leverage Fd Ltd-S 
m Capitol Assured Itxfla Fd— s 
d MGwnwn.in dex Fund— D M 

mCenrin Growth Fun d x 

m CM (ton inti (BVI) Lid S 

wmutwWtow « 

w Clhxfoi Umiied SF 

tfCMV 


toCMi inve B i n wi i Fund s 

mCML Strategic Bd Fd Ltd— S 
mCML Strategic Inv Ftf Ltd-S 


4150 V 
55.10 y 
13450 y 
7150 y 
TOJOy 
1*S.)Dv 
18433V 
lOflJBy 
WJ50V 
33430y 
2*540 y 
18750 y 
23*40 y 
10550 V 
23850V 
25140V 
IDUBy 
321J0 V 
14150 V 
24040 V 
44340V 
23150 V 
2S750V 
1*824 y 

23650 V 

ll?20y 
8*23 y 
9880V 
7*90 y 
*l«v 
11260y 
16295 V 
1D290y 
9A Wy 
062 V 
*695 y 
*149 V 
7490 y 
93J0y 
*490 y 
7SJ0y 
9290 V 

injov 
*340 y 
11198* 
MjMv 
1176*400 y 
*595y 
11706640 V 
*745 y 
40290* 
*795 y 
40M0V 
8403340* 
101*90 
41141 
5287* 
10171140 
W7493800 
SI 7363 
50*873 
527390 
10*556 
WC4i 
271*440 
5669) 
WI4?y 
15249 V 
**44 v 
10281V 
*568 V 
104540y 
10295* 
1118*2140 y 
*345 y 
10658V 
1WJ1 * 
10756 V 
10863 V 
22160 V 

22760 V 
11*53 V 
*812* 
9994* 
UUly 
10026 V 
WH2140Y 
40348 V 
10814 y 
122.18 V 

140 

140 

1750 

2740 

2098 

1880 

1*62 

1462 

1449 

1148 

14.1? 

148 


50552 
10.78 
356.1* 
50797 
2691 
*91.96 
19268 
*874 
ffcM 
140463 
1141 
92106* 
551 JB 
*8U* 
117268 
101964 
1523 
66295 
902JQ 
*81132 
74093 
517297 
192 
1190 
11117 
2*2.1} 
95344 
2465* 
5*0034 
4995 
21600* 
818 
139.28 
*09.41 
8694 
1D2S79* 
1838 
1419* 
77664 
107817 
THUS 
10045 


mCotumOtn Hoktegs ■ -. * 

/TtCpncprcte inv Fond...-. ,. s 

to Conttveo Aatom Infl BF 

wContlvert Otffl Beta* CT— BF 
to CoatlveN OMI World DM 

t« Convert. Fd Infl A Carta— S 
to Convert. Fd Infl B Carta— 5 
m Craig Drill Cop. 


w CRM BXP.FdLM- 


-SF 


mCRM Futures Fund Lw s 

wCRM Gtabol Fd Ltd — * 

w Croat* AsuiMomtLM * 

w Cumber Inti N.V.. 


ir Curr. Conceal 2ND — — -5 
0 D. Witter W» Wide Ivt T«-S 
to DOC.. 


tf Dohw Jaaan Fund, 
rf DB Argentina Bd Fd. 


tf DBSC / Nafin Band Fund— S 
iv Dertvattve Asset Allot—* 
to DcfKfor On* Ltd — — I 

tf Dreyfus America Funa 3 

I 6vT Performance Fd S 

iflpvnorty Fund * 

to Box Overran* Fund Ltd— -4 

m Elite World Fund LW SF 

tf Eml Beta. Ind. Plus*—— BF 
tf EmlBNfl.lnd.PtwB BF 

tf Eml Frond ind. totes A FF 

tf Eml Prance Ind. PteaB FF 

tf End Gann. Ind Plus A OM 

tf Eml Germ. ind. tom B DM 

tf Eml MHv index Pius a Ft 

tf Eml Ktttk tnoex Phi* B. Fl 

d Eml Spain Ind Pha A— Pta 
tf Eml Sbatn tnd Pka B— Pta 

tf Enti UK Index Pha a c 

d Eml UK index Pha B t 

w Mr. STo in*. Bn Eur Fd_* 

a Europe 1*12 * 

d Europe Owig«tan*_— era 

w FJH.P. Portfolio * 

mFotum Fu 


mFIrcbfatf Overseas Ltd- 

to First Eagle Fund 

toFlrrt Era Ltd. 


m First f ran Her Fima. 

toFL Trust Alta. 


.Ecu 


w FL Trail Stoltartand- 
tf Fondllglfa——— 

» Fan lux 1 Money. 


■vFMuxl-lnflBoptf 

to Fanmutiflan tointi— 
to Formula Selection Fd . 
d Fortitude Group inc- 


-SF 

JF 


-SF 

_s 


m Future Generation Lid. 
mFXC MvcrtmantsLItf— * 

ie G.I. M I Muffl-Strateav I 

mGEM Gemrotm Ecu Ci— * 

fit GEM Generation Ltd I 

m Gemini Car* LW * 

mGams Prograsilre Fd Lld-1 

nr General Fund Ltd t 

m German 5trL Associate*— DM 

to Global *3 Fund LMS * 

w Global *4 Funa LM SF SF 

iv Global Arbftrape Lid 5F 

m Gtabol Band Pond— — :* 

w Global Futures Mgt Ltd 1 

to Gannon* SF 


0 OreenLme France— —FF 
mGuarantaed Caelkri imm N LF 
iwGuoronietd CanimadirvFOS 
m Guaranteed Currency Fd— 5 

/ Haussmam Ktegs N.V 1 

m Hamhphere Neutral sen 30. * 
wHestto Fung— 1 


SF 


ft Hlgftbridge Conttal Caro, 
iv the* Holdings Ltd—— 

rf IDF Global 1 

6 ILA-IGB I 

O ILA-IGF 1 

ft ILA-INL 5 

to Indfoo Currency Fd Ltd 3 

r Inn SecurttlM Fund— Era 
nr inter Mgt Mlti Fo-Mlxte _OM 
tf latertundSA. 

.4 

-DM 


d inti Network invt. 
d investa DWS. 


w Joean Pacific Fund. 

m Japan Selection Asset— Y 

if Jape*) Selection Fund * 

ie K enmor Gtd. Sh1h2 S 

w Keiunar Guaranteed —.* 
m Kfaigaii Gtoftal Fd Ltd— * 

w KM Global * 

tf KML- II High YlefaL— — 3 
w Korea Growth This* - * 

w La Fayette Hokflnos Ltd. * 

ft La Favetta Regular GrawOi* 

ft) La Jolla IM Gnh Fd Ltd s 

w Leal Slcav— s 
m Leu Performance Fd— — J 
toLF iittemattami— . s 
m London Portfolio 5ervtcKk-S 
m LPS Inti H P a « 

mLux lofi Mgl Fd lw . - * 

tol.mrtun ri * 

mLvrw SeL Hoidfaigs. 


-SF 


toNLKinodpn OHshora. N.V.. 

ro Master Cos 8 Hedge Fd 5 

to Matterhorn Offshore Fd S 

* MBE Jaoan Fund LF 

m McGinn Is Gtoftal (Sea 301—1 

fflMCM lnl. l imited t 

w Millennium tatemathmai s 

mMjM Inter national Lie * 

d ml Prmdp Protec Pkn * 

m Momentum Guikl Ltd S 

wMondtawai Slcav SF 

01 Mnril Blanc Hedge 5 

w Multi tutu nu__-_—FF 

tf New Mllatmlum Fut LM s 

tf Newftonk Debentures— —S 
roMnatyflirae Mutual Fd NVJEcu 

roNMT Asm Set Portfolio 5 

to Noble Partners InH Ltd— J 
to Nova Fin Fd LM-Prqp Ser-S 

roNSP F.I.T. LW % 

ro Ocean Strategies Limited—* 
ft otfrtwre Strategies Ltd— s 

toOkf Ironside Inti LM * 

m Omega Overseas Partners 9 

mOpoerthefaoer Ui Arb. * 

m Optimum Fund t 

w Oracle Fund Lw. 


roOvertook Perfermanra— s 
roPacH RIM OOP BVI Oct 17-S 
«Pan Fixed Inc Fd (Jan 31JJ* 
m PANMInternolionM LW i 

wPonoo FundP ta- 


ro Panpipes Ottsixn (Sep 30)6 

SSaBSSBCi^ 

mPaauat inti Fund— s 

mPerroal UodvkeUd * 

to PnarmafWHeottri. 


toPlurfgertian Pttaflortu FF 

toPkirtatstian Plurtvofawr — FF 

xt Pturtv-est Slcav — FF 

mPombay Overseas Ltd S 

m Portuguese Smaller Co 5 

ro Portuguese Smaller Co a C* 

fflPrtma Crorilal Fund LW S 

mPrimeo Funa s 

tf ProflrenrSA. 


»r pyramid Inv Fd Coro 
d RADIni.lnv.Fd_ 


tf Regal Inti Fund Lid— — 1 

m ReflCam Investment N.V * 

t Rta laavart Fond B— s 

to RM Futures Fund Staov 5 

to So Bor’s mtt Eaulty Ecu 

to Sailor's lltil Fbcca Ecu 

0 Sanya Klc. Soain Fd S 

d Sarakreak Hohflne H.V. s 

to Saturn Fund. 


roScwav Fund Ltd. 


d SCI / Teen. SA Luxembourg* 

mSetacta Global Hedge Fd s 

d Selective Fut. Pffl LW— S 

w Sindcrir MuiutiKid Ltd S 

toSntra Fund Ltd S 

to SJO Globa) (091921 -6595 * 

a Smith Baraev Wrttfwd See-* 
tf Smith Barney Wrtffwd Soec t 
toSPlMernMlanalSAASii_4 
toSP international 5A BSh—* 

m Spirit Hedge HU * 

infipim Neutral Htd. 


toStehiharai Oleas Fd ud— S 

w Sleitihantt Really Trail s 

mSfrtaer Fund * 

mStramoOftihgraLid s 

tf 5waet Gtoftal III Ltd * 

tf Sunset Global One I 

m Sussex McGorr. 


w Tvchno Growth Funa ___SF 

tf Templeton Gtabol Inc { 

m The Bridge FraidH.V % 

mThe GemGtabai Oftstiortf J 

tf The inrt It Multi Advbars— S 

mThe J Funa 8.V.I. Lld * 

ritjw Jaguar Fund N.V. I 

tf The M“A*R*S Fd slcav a i 

tf Tha M‘A‘R’5 Fd Sicnv L— OM 
tf The Moeus Era Fd Ltd— Ecu 
tf TheMogtaUSlFdLrd s 

BiTheSeychelle* Fd LW I 

ro The Smart Band Ltd SF 

mThe Smart Band LW— * 

toThomoM-M Futures J 

m Tiger Selec Hold NV BM t 

0 Tiic (OTC) Job. Fa Sloov-4 
ft Tokvn (OTC) Fund Staov —S 

w Trans Global Invt Ltd— S 

tf Transpacific Fund— Y 

to Trinity Futures Fd Lid 5 

m Triumph i- « 

in Triumph iv_ s 

tf TuraaaHe Fu 


w Tweedy Brown InH SFR, SF 

mTweedy Browne IntT n.v I 

w Twaaay Browne av. Cl A— * 

tf Uba Futures FF 

d UbaFutures Dollar. 


t Ultima Grown) Fd Lni s 

tf Umbrella Debt Fund LM S 

d Umbrella Funa LW— s 

to Uni Band Fund Ecu 

w Uni CooHal Aiiemaone— DM 
w Uni Capitoi canverttaia —Era 
to linl- GBlI FS SrUemotiaue _SF 
to Unl-Gtw sic F5 Hax 3 an* -SF 

to Unj-Gtobal Staov DEM DM 

w Unl-Global Slcav Ecu Era 

to UnKHotxri Staov FRF FF 

1* LtaWHobal Staov FS SF 

w Unl-Global Staov USD s 

tf UnJra Equity Fund 
0 Uni co inv. Fund 

m UnHrades CHF. 

mUnrtrodes CHF Rea 

mUMtradesFRF 

m UnitradM USD S 

eUfaxinnud— — j 

mVWbonne —Ecu 



m vega Fd Ltd don i 
ro Victor Futures I 
b Vovc 

w Vulture Lid. 

mwwes Wilder mil Fa 

dWfai Global Fd Bd. Pm Era 

tf Wfal Global Fd Dtv PHI Era 

d wbi Gtobol Fd Ea. Pin __E« 
d Work) BokmcM Fund SA_* 

toVVorld Invert Mxvd S 

ft! WoridwMe Limited * 

w WPG Forber O’seas Port _S 
m ww crorilal Grth Fd Lla_s 

m Young SF 

m Zeohvr Hedge Fimd s 

mZweig Inn U4 3 


21341 

HASH 

*18788 

135*400 

4*357 

3663 

7644 

13141 

*0593 

82*44 

100040 

51597 
10444 
2140 
J 14.94 

6171 

99*54 

MS65JI 

102*52 

B817 

2191 

11871 

161 

1SUO 

921256 

1839800 

T109S4I 


H40 

1026* 

66823 

679.91 
IllSftOO 
M63-00 

177/8 

138*5 

7.1* 

1817 

10053 

86*51 

123644 

14049 

617*244 

2*47 

64.11 

T7S66 

13811 

0615 

*41JI 

*2697 

94046 

3890 

f£92 

88154 

*7008 

•64.45 

*0294 

8*691 

52266* 

155087 

«M»t 

1773.91 
1248 

ru* 

I4J7J5 

*814 

13097 

2601 

835.71 

S*S26840 

*46 

?68 

•2047 

10409 

ns 8> 

12377 *3 
2381* 
*113 
1254 
119* 
1030 
saoa 
2*42 
•5744 
419* 
7.75 
7*41 
2B5J1 
AM 
1*7.19 
110800 
1193 
*239 
1821200 
04745 
4133 
15793 
11236 
true 

1317.7* 

1B24H53 

136212 

1153 

18711 


13*46 
13*41 
1800 
*744 
1441 136 
19*4.00 
150175 

mn 

1351 

101 47 

8*9* 

72621 

9*90 

5*40 

H4IS 

12*800 

100838 

324JQ 

17243 

107247 

113* 

1313* 

*62.70 

174* 

1534073 

17150 

16110 

11238 

20746 

10531 

108155 

1S0JU 

1*73* 

101955 

10890 

1800 

M50 

2(244 

2Z7J0 

*697 

93157 

4751 

5610 

108292 

13.14 

1882 

11875 

♦J« 

116841 

7.10 

147*96 

0675308 

1097 

9146 

22278*2 

112192 

13TJ0? 

871 

4.70 

V42746 

1321.18 

1*46 

i*9.no 

*65.15 

73885 

1556 

131*55 

62-DO 

ms& 

1325740 

79408H 

161.71 

9*43 

*8676 

8*7551 

138*9 

21245 

*6048 

1*454 

105800 

3645 

7.95 

1L7? 

*7243 

1008634 

*2191 

5*755 

1*6154 

2*4856 

12311 

100*2 

8579620 

87*38 

*001 

122S45 

*658 

1141 

1857 

2M92 

2060758 

1023486 

80652 

023* 

1614* 

953 

2153 

46.16 

2*037.0* 

•42S443 

645 

146M 

1074* 

2315.97 

3416.12 

144807 

10014* 

1U153 
121235 
126874 
441510 
116441 
10*795 
A68S 
6130 
i3ao* 
1104* 
14381.16 
121356 
47 IM40 
13631 
*600 
1*803 
189157 
2701*7 
84115 
13887 
13845 
11*32 
IKU 

8749 

1665057 

10)546 

1919* 

27255 

1*7050 


For 

investment 

information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the IHT 


lCS- am«to DWto DM • Itote ECU - Ewwffln ( 

i. P: Mfddte d BH and offered price. E: estimated prion; yipnea 1 


ssa-.wa?&, Du “ Ro,, " : 

, exchange;^- Areslerdani exch 

fl days priar to pubDcatot! c DM | 


For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 





Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 26, 1994 


•" ; if:-:-. 


OBSERVER 


The Angry A 


mencans 


Stealing the Muse: A Poet on 


• •• •-. -# 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Anger has 
become the national habiL 
You see it on the sullen faces of 
fashion models who have obvi- 
ously been told that anger sells. 
It pours out of the radio all day. 
Washington journalism hams 
s 0 ^ and shout at each other on 
television. Generations ex- 
change sneers cm TV' and printed 
page. Ordinary people abuse 
congressmen and president with 
shockingly personal insults. 

America is angry at Washing- 
ton, angry at the press, angry at 
immigrants, angry at television, 
angry at traffic, angry at people 
who are well off and angry at 
people who are poor, angry at 
blacks and angry at whites. 

The old are angry at the 
young, the young angry at the 
old. Suburbs are angry at cities, 
cities are angry 3t suburbs, and 
rustic .America is angry at both 
whenever urban and suburban 
intruders threaten the peaceful 
rustic sense of having escaped 
from God's Angry Land. 


opinion, from its determination 
to pursue war ad infinitum in 
Vietnam. Massive, irritating and 
even scary expressions of anger 
— from Americans both black 
and white —were needed for the 


By William Grimes 

A'ch- Karf Times Sen-ice 


N EW YORK — David Sumner is not a 
famous name in the world of poetrv. Nei- 


Uiumph of Martin Luther King 
and the civil rights movement. 

But what monumental strug- 
gle confronts us now? Giving 
young black people a stake in 
.‘America is our most pressing 
problem, but nobody shouts 
much about that. Most other 
problems are so unmonumemai 
that we might think the times 
ripe for greatness: an era of 
civility conducive to good feel- 
ing among neighbors of all 
races and persuasions, a golden 
age oT progress in learning and 
the arts and science . . . 

Is this making you angjy? It’s 
easy to imagine the cries of rage 
from a people habituated to 
crying rage:' Are women not 
still oppressed by glass ceilings? 
Do black Americans no longer 
have to suffer the disrespect of a 
racist world? Who dares talk of 
prosperity when the wealth is 
distributed so unfairly? 

T rue, all true. There is far too 
much poverty, racism remains 
an affliction, women still don't 
have economic equality with 
men. These present economists, 
philosophers and statesmen 
with exceedingly complex prob- 
lems not amenable to solution 
by red-hot anger. 

Politically minded people 
concerned with these issues have 
always known that low-grade 
anger must be maintained, that 
political feet must be kept to the 
fire, that the squeaky wheel gets 
the grease, and so oh. The high- 
intensity fury now seething 
through the land on these and a 
hundred other issues, however, 
doesn't seem focused on any so- 
cial or economic goal. It's as 
though the nation got mad as 
hell a long lime ago, got good 
results, and now can’t shake the 
anger habiL 


Enough: A complete cata- 
logue of the varieties of bile 
spoiling the American day 
would fill a library. The question 
is why. Why has anger become a 
reflexive response to the inevita- 
ble vagaries of national life? 

Living perpetually at the 
boiling point seems to leave the 
country depressed and pessi- 
mistic. The popularity of anger 
is doubly p uzzli ng- not only be- 
cause the American habit even 
in the worst of times has tradi- 
tionally been mindless opti- 
mism, but also because there is 
relatively little nowadays for 
the nation to be angry about. 

□ 

The explanation, l suspect, is 
that the country got itself ad- 
dicted to anger iuad can't shake 
the habiL It was hooked long 
ago when there was very good 
reason for anger. 

Massive, irritating and even 
scary expressions of it were vital 
in shaking an obdurate govern- 
ment, contemptuous of public 


1 N famous name in the world of poetry. Nei- 
ther is he unknown. Like hundreds of other 
people, he has had reasonable success in plac- 
ing work in tiny poetry reviews, most of them 
published at lesser campuses, and from time to 
time he has managed to break through to mid- 
level publications. 

Sumner does stand out from the struggling 


poetry pack in one important respect, however. 
He doesn’t exist. 


New Kurt Times Service 


He doesn’t exist. 

For a brief but impressive run that lasted 
from 1990 to late 1993, 59 poems by "David 
Sumner” appeared in 36 literary journals, and 
12 others had been accepted for publication. 

That success rate becomes more understand- 
able considering that many of the poems were 
lifted wholesale from the’ published work of 
other poets and simply adorned with new titles. 

Sumner plagiarized the work of at least five 
poets (only 14 of the 59 poems have been 
matched with the originals so far), but he spe- 
cialized in the work of Neal Bowers, a poet and 
teacher at Iowa State University und until re- 
cently the editor of Poet and Critic magazine. 

In the fall issue of The .American Scholar, in 
an anguished, angry article utled “A Loss for 
Words: Plagiarism and Silence." Bowers has 
outlined his two-year quest to track down the 
man he calls “the Ted Buudy of the poetrv 
world." 

Bowers fast learned that his work had bet., 
plagiarized in January' 1992, when he received a 
telephone call from Carrie Etter. the editor of 
Out Loud, a monthly poetry calendar and re- 
view in Los Angeles. She informed him that his 
poem “Tenth- Year Elegy." which had been 
published in the well-known journal Poetry in 
September 1990, had shown up. under the title 
“Someone Forgotten." in the December 1991 
issue of the Mankato Poetry' Review. 

The author of the poem was identified as 
Sumner, who, the contributor's note stated, 
lived in Aloha. Oregon, and had published 
poems in the Hawaiian Review, Ihrerto del Sol 
and Mississippi Review. 

Bowers enlisted his wife. Nancy, and the two 
began leafing through stacks of poetry periodi- 
cals in his office to see if Sumner's name turned 
up. It did. TU bet it wasn't IS minutes into it 
before we found the plagiarism of Mark 
Strand’s ‘Keeping Things Whole.’ a famous 
poem." Bowers said in a telephone interview. 

Bowers began c allin g and writing editors at 
poetry journals to warn them of submissions by 
Sumner, and gradually, as he received respons- 
es, a dossier began to build, and the facts about 
the mysterious Sumner gradually emerged. 



nois and in Oregon. The rest of the 
largely' faked. - 

McKee said the plagjan'stns represent^ 
dear-cut case of copyright infringement- M they* 
was not an issue on either side, howev et 
said he simplv wanted to swp .the plaga^* 03 .f 
For his pari. Jones could not have ctwifc V 
less promising route to riches. If they are UsSty,- 
contributors to poetry magazines recede a 
small payment, perhaps S5Q or S10U. UsiaSy, 
they get ’nothing more than a couple oT free 
copies of the issue in which then poem apwirs; 

Using a telephone number suppl«d by#owv ' 
ers' private investigator, .Anne Bunch. «&Kee- 
called Jones at home, but a man on (he 
end of the line convinced him that 
reached the wrong Jones. • . ./.;. 

Oddly enough, one week later Bowers*^ 
caved a letter from "David. Sumner,* wfth ^ 
Odawara, Japan, postmark, fit the letter, the - . 




,i. \M' 


man apologized for submitting “Tenth-Year 
Elegy” and explained that after having studied 
it in a poetry workshop, he had come to betid* 
it was his own work. “1 have read it and redid 


Imenwowul Herald Tribune 


The chronology of the plagiarist's activities, 
assembled by Nancy Bowers, now runs to near- 
ly 60 pages. It begins with the first known 
poems published under Sumner's name, in 
spring 1990, and runs to the fall of 1993. when 
Sumner made his last known appearance in 
prinL in Writer’s Journal. _ 

A survey of various contributors notes yield- 
ed this profile of Sumner: he was born in 
BelfasL lived in England until the ase cf 11. 
held a master's degree from Pacific University 
and had studied poetry with William Stafford. 

He certainly had made a close study of two 
short poems by Bowers. “Tenth- Year Elegy." a 
tribute to the author’s late father, and 
“R. S. V. P.,” a meditation on death. Lri.sr 
various titles, he managed to have them pri. vu 
in 13 journals and accepted at six others, t -ng 
with poems by Sharon Olds. Marcia h. ir ow 
and Robert Gibb. "The two poems he stole are 
very autobiographical, and that's a creep;, thing 
to me," said Bowers. "U's a very uneas> feeling, 
a bit like having a stalker." 

Along the way . Sumner took some suange 
turns. In early 1^90. for example, he submitted 
10 poems to" Bowers's magazine. All of them 


were returned with rejection notes. On one 
occasion, he sent a plagiarized version of 
“Tenth-Year Elegy’” to a journal that had ac- 
cepted it six months earlier. 

In a coup for Sumner, Whiskey Island Re- 
view published, in the same issue, poems by 
Sumner and "Diane Compton," a pseudonym 
he began using toward tne end of his spree. 

“He’s sort of like a young aspiring poet with 
an MFA." said Bowers. "He knows the hustle. 
This may sound cynical, but the system is set up 
perfectly for him.” Like any aspiring poet Sum- 
ner worked from Poet’s Market, a standard 
guide to the roughly 4,000 magazines that pub- 
lish poetry , and steadily built up his resume. 

Bowers hired a lawyer. Bruce McKee of Des 
Moines, and eventually a private detective, to get 
to the bottom of the mystery. Working from 
return addresses on Sumner’s submissions to 
various journals, he found that his plagiarist's 
real name was David S. Jones, of Aloha, Oregon. 

He was bom in 1953, has a bachelor's degree 
from Southern Illinois University and, indeed, 
a master’s degree from Pacific University. He 
had taught elementary school in southern lUi- 


it was his own work. “7 have read it and recital 
it many times since, and now l find out that I 
also took it to be my own," he wrote, He 
promised to stop submitting the poem, and-he 
enclosed a SI 00 money order payable to Bow- 
ers. 

In the meantime. Bunch determined that the 
man McKee had been speaking- to was none 
other than David S. Jones, the would-be poet, 
she said. Acting on the information, McKee - 
called again. 

This time, the man admitted his identity and 
a two-year game of cat and mouse ensued,' with 
Jones admitting to specific instances of plagia- 


; |r* T 

L : /( ok I W* 

U0>' iM)U 


rizing Bowers's work, though purely by whal he 
caOed “an accident of process,” but neglecting 
to mention any journal. or poem that 'was not 


to mention any journal or poem that 'was not 
first brought to his attention by McKee. Bow- 
ers also received abject letters of contrition and 
more money orders. Jones refused to sign a 
statement admitting his guilt 

"I am sorty for all that I have done against 
you,” one letter read. “In a perfect world, an 
artist like you — a creator of beauty — should 
never have to come in contact with such an 
ugliness as me.” 

As the circle tightened around Jones, be 
began withdrawing submissions from poetry 
journals, saying he now realized that the works 
were unconscious plagiarisms. And then he 
simply disappeared. 

“He could still be operating, simplv by mutat- 
ing new pseudonyms,” said Bowers, who says he 
can no longer read “R.S. V.P.” and "lenth- 
Year Elegy” in the same way. “Those poems are 
mined for me now, in some wavs.” he said. 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 

Forecast ic 


Today 






Low 

w 

High 

Ip* W 



C/F 

OF 


C/F 

C/F 


Al0snw 

21/70 

16/61 

ah 

21/70 

15/59 1 


Anralmiwii 

lil 53 

9/48 

«h 

11. sa 

7/44 r 


Ankara 

21/70 

7/44 

p= 

19/66 

6/43 pc 

■ ‘Ml 

M*n 

23/73 

IB/53 

pc 

22/71 

17*2 to 

V^ v 

Bacckre, 

20/60 

13/55 

PC 

19*6 

15/59 r 

Bdemto 

18*4 

9/48 


10*4 

9/48 to 

|VV y 

Bcton 

9/48 

4/39 

to 

8/46 

2/3S r 

1 [ 

Biunek, 

11/52 

6/43 

Bh 

11*2 

4/33 r 

k v 

Budopcit 

15*9 

7/44 

pe 

14/57 

6 m to 


Cofranl»om 

9/48 

GWj 

ih 

8/46 

3/37 t 


Cotta Od Sal 

UR\ 

16*4 pc 53/73 

17*2 1 


Dublin 

9/48 

4/39 

r 

10/50 

1*4 ah 


Edinburgh 





6/43 I 


Rcrcnce 

16*1 

9/48 

pe 

13*4 

11/52 pe 


FitoUul 

11*2 

6/43 

r 

9/48 

3/37 r 


Qntavi 

11*2 

SMI 


12. *3 

5/41 to 


Hdaota 

*/«6 

E/M 

so 

7/44 

4/37 r 

1 

> 

3 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu- Weather. 

I te. -/*&r i —y 


iitl 


& ^ 


i UfiMUQiubly 
CM 


I Urtt^tnonstfj- 

Hoi 


Hcmn 
ai c» 


London 

Marfnd 

M*n 

Mo»eow 

Modch 

rte 

Q* 

Patou 

Pmw 

Prague 

Rone 

StPdcnBuiq 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Triton 

Vance 

Vnm 

Wwmu 

inch 


21/70 12153 pc 21/70 13/56 pc 

25/77 19/66 pe 24/75 31/70 to 

19/68 16/59 pc 19/66 13/55 I 

1103 7/44 to 1303 4/M to 

15i64 9/46 pe 17/62 3 Ml 1 

1407 1/46 s IB/3: 9 MS to 

11/53 9K3 to 1103 403 r 

9M6 J07 to 3U8 3/37 to 

17/63 3 M8 pc 10/64 1303 to 

7/44 4/33 to 8 MS 2/35 r 

19/66 1407 pc 18164 17/62 i 

13/53 6/43 to 12/53 4/M to 

3/48 3/37 to 1/48 205 r 

4/36 3/32 to 4/39 002 pc 

18«: 11.-32 pc 21/70 1203 to 

10/50 6/43 to B/46 J/37 r 

7/44 S/43 to 7/44 3/37 r 

3/48 4/39 to 10/50 3/3/ to 

7/44 7/44 to 7/44 3/37 r 

16*1 9/48 e 17*2 1102 to 

1102 6/4J to 1102 6/4] to 

1203 6/43 to 9/48 2.-35 r 

3M8 5/41 to 11/5! 409 to 


Ncyi York end Wwhirifilon, 
D C . ml have duly woaiher 
on Thursday, followed by a 
wanning trend Friday aid 
satu/dr/. A ivorrrinj irend 
will also occur in Chicago 
and Torcnto through the 
period. There will be Aomo 
rflfn fc SeatTto. Portland and 
Vancouver Thursday, dten it 
wU turn dry. 


Europe 

Heavy rains wfll soak north- 
ern Spain and laulhwcot 


Franco Friday inlo Saturday 
London and Paris will be 
chilly with periods of ram 
Thursday and again Satur- 
day. Rome wil be sunny and 
warm sito Friday, then show- 
ers will srrivo Saturday. 
Athens will be sunny and 
warm through Saturday. 


Asia 

Typhoon Teresa will bring 
heavy rams to southern Viet- 
nam Thursday, then wil df» 
sipate over Laos Friday 
Typhoons Vane and W4d3 
wt dnft through The western 
Pacific later this week, but 
will probably noi directly 
affect any land masses. Rain 
wil move uway from eastern 
Japan Friday 


Asia 




Tomorrow 



High 

Low 

W 

High 

Low 

* 


C/F 

C/F 


OF 

OF 


Sanckck 

31*0 

22/71 

DC 

31/ 68 

24/75 

*h 


19*6 

7 / 4 J 

(K 

16*1 

4*9 


hong King 

29/84 

21/70 

| 

29*4 

22/71 


Mamin 

11/88 

25/77 


31/88 

am 


Ne>« Oda 

35/35 

20/68 

« 

34193 

torn 

* 

SmU 

21/70 

S /43 

i 

20*0 

am 

f 

Slrangnal 

21/70 

11/52 

• 

21/70 

12/53 

* 

Sngapcra 

31/68 

24/75 

1 

J 1 /B 8 

24/75 

to 

Smpc 

26/79 

19*6 

c 

26/79 

19*6 


Tdqa 

17/62 

12/53 

f 

10*4 

U*S 

to 

Africa 

Alfleti 

23/73 

13/66 

rih 

24/75 

I 9 KE 

, 

CtocTewn 

70*8 

9/48 

B 

22/71 

ia *7 


Cwtotanca 

23/73 

16*1 

sti 

23/73 

14/57 

to 

Hmro 

13/66 

fl /48 


22/71 

3/48 


Lsffna 

29/84 

23/73 


30*6 

24/75 

to 

Maoobi 

21/70 

12/53 

T 

24/75 

12*3 


Turns 

am 

17/52 

Pt 

27*0 

;a *4 

( 

North America 

4 nehorage 

4/39 

■ 3/27 

*1 

3/37 

5/24 


AUmt. 

16/64 

4/33 

• 

17/62 

7/44 

s 


I S A gathering of Nobel prizewinners a 
branch, a bush, or a iree of laureates? 


L branch, a bush, or a free of laureates? 
Anyway, nine of the 16 living literature 
laureates, said to be the most ever assem- 
bled at once, will meet in Atlanta next 
April 2.i — Shakespeare's birthday, by the 
way — for a panel sponsored by the .Atlan- 
ta Olympics Committee, which is ready to 
do anything to put the city on the map. The 
nine and the countries or languages they 
are most closely associated with are Czes- 
law Milosz (Polish!. Claude Simon 
(France). Wole Soyinka (Nigeria). Joseph 
Brodsky (Russian). Camilo Jose Ceia 
(Spain). Octavio Paz (Mexico). Derek 
Walcott (Trinidad). Toni Morrison (Unit- 
ed States) and Kenzaburo Oe (Japan). 


chief Joe Roth said the company had vio- 
lated an agreement, and “we apoiozize for 
it.” Disney discounted reports that the 
dispute was about money, because Wil- 
liams had been paid a mere $75,000 for a 
movie that grossed more than $200 mil- 
lion. “None of these issues are ever about 
money," Roth said. “Thev are simplv 
about principle." 


& 


Can Warren Beatty ever go outside 
without being recognized? Well, sort of. he 
says. He told of waiting to use a payphone 
at a gas station: "There was a guy on the 
telephone. I came up to the phone and ! 
was standing there and 1 was land of 
waiting for him. He looked at me. His 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Oceania 


Tooay 
Hlgn Lew 
C/F C/F 
27 .H 0 20/66 
28/62 17/62 
26/79 13/58 
26/73 16/61 
34/83 19*8 
31*8 15*6 


Tomorrow 
W Hlgfi Low W 
OF OF 

* 26/79 21/70 « 
s 25 r? 17*2 pe 
si 26 .T 9 12/53 S 

* am i6*i * 

* 36/97 15/59 I 

3 33/91 17/62 3 


Today To mo rrow 

Hgh LOW W High Lew W 
CF C/F C/F C/F 

Borneo Are* 21/70 5/46 2 19 *6 9/48 PC 

Ciracfts 28*2 20*3 to 27/30 >],- 7 C pc 

-ms 19/66 •6161 to 19*6 16*1 pe 

MncvCOy 23/72 12/53 pc 23/73 12/53 pc 

aoeuren 24/75 22/71 I 25/77 20 *8 pc 

amtaco ZI /70 11/52 * 22/71 0/46 pc 


Soslan 

CMaga 

Dui-tr 
□arm 
Horakrij 
Houston 
Los Angola 


6/43 c 12/53 
2/39 pc 13/55 
3/37 • 13/66 
1/37 e 11*2 


18/64 13/55 pc 19*6 12*3 to 
26/73 15*1 pe 24/73 14*7 to 


Legend: s sumy. pc parity 
wi-snew i- icc, WWeUha 


cloudy c-doudy. sh-tootaisra, Hhunderslorms.inm. if-wiou liume*. 

Ml map*, forecasts and data provided by Accu- Weather. Inc. n 1994 


Mmnapoii 

Mantra* 

Nkmu 

N» 70* 

Phoenn 

San Fiat 

Son* 

Torarao 

Wwrangien 


32*9 Z4/75 pc 31*8 26/78 pe 

22/71 11/52 pc 19*6 11/52 to 

26/79 16/61 • 26/79 15*9 » 

30/86 20/68 to 28/82 21/70 pe 

12/53 3/37 * 13/55 3/37 EC 

8/46 2/29 to 8/46 -2/29 pc 

31/88 22/71 pc 31/88 24/75 pc 

14/57 6/43 RC 14*7 7/44 * 

30/86 17/62 I 32*9 17*2 * 

20 *6 11*2 3 22/71 12*3 pe 

16*1 10*0 r IB/59 9/48 to 

9/48 -1/31 to 11/52 1/34 |C 

16/61 6/4J pc 16*1 6/43 a 


Hank Ketcham, the creator of "Dennis 
the Menace,” will retire at the end of the 
year. But the cartoon will continue to ap- 
pear, drawn by two cartoonists under Ket- 
cham’s supervision. The cartoon has ap- 
peared since 1951. 


mouth dropped open, and be said, ‘Oh my 
God, Dustin Hoffman!’ " The two did star 
together in the flop “Ishtar." Hoffman was 
the short one. 


Wait Disney Co. has apologized to Rob- 
in Williams for using his Genie voice to 
hawk merchandise from the 1992 animat- 
ed hit movie "Aladdin." Disney studio 


Prince Charles is in the doghouse again, 
according to London's tabloid press. His 
offense? Introducing his sons William, 12, 
and Hairy, 10. to the sport of fox hunting, 
much to the reported displeasure of Diana. 
Princess of Wales, from whom Charles is 
separated. 



r Is lu 
Hr Ho 


Kevin Costner and his wife. Cindy , are 
efivordng after 16 years of marriage 
and three children. They asked to be' 
allowed to sort Through this most 
painful part of our lives in private " . 




: - : 


.. . ■>■■■■; v r - • 




iug T«»«» H 

-itn/i//) Shits 




,3^’ turnings 


ATStl' USADirecf and World Limneii 
Service lets you quickly place calls 
on \our own. 


Calling ihe Slates or tine of over !UU oilier v'ouiitnea.* 


There's no easier, more reliable wav than Al'&l 


USADirect and World Connect Sen ice Especially if 


you take this shortcut After dialing the AT&T Access 


Number for the country you're in. instead of wail- 


ing For the English-speaking operator, follow the 


voice prompts. Your call will gel through Faster and 
can be charged to your AT&T Calling Card. Suffice it 


• v-l; v 

.; ... a 


to say, for experienced business travelers, the choice 


isn t which international long distance couipaiiv in 



use. Il > which AT&T speed to use, East. Ur Faster 


er » Ma 


ASIA /'PACIFIC 
AUSTRALIA IBW-B81-IH1 


CHINA. PRC*** 
HONG KONG 
INDIA* 
INDONESIA* 
JAPAN'. 

KOREA 

MALAYSIA' 


10811 

800-1111 

000-117 

001-001-10 

OOW-111 

0W-11 

i-i 

800-0011 


hw/:lalamo iihw 

PHILIPPINES' 105-11 

RUSSIA' '(MOSCOW) 155-5043 


SAIPAN' 

Oirj&iFQfiE 
S» LAfJKA 
TAIWAN' 

IHlliiJlL* 


235-2872 

aun ir;:i.;i l 
41U-UJ/ 

0080*10288-0 

mi'* Tit-mi 

EUROPE 


AUSTRIA 1 ™ 

BELGIUM* 

BUL&ARJ- 

CHOATW* 

CZECH REPUBLIC 

DENMARK' 

FINLAND ■ 

FRANCE 

GERMANY 

GREECE' 


022-903-011 
. 0-880-100-10 
ua-lbOG-uOM 
99-38-001', 
00-420-00101 
8001-0010 
8800-100-10 
19- -0011 
0138- D0I0 
00-800-1311 


HUNGARY' 

ICELAND'. 

IRELAND 

ITALY" 

LIECHTENSTEIN' 

LITHUANIA* 

•JJ<£UWllAG 

MALTA 

MONACO' 

NETHERLANDS' 


Q0>-KHHmn 

9S9-D01 
1-BS0-SSO-B80 
172-1011 
. 155-00-11 
. 80196 
m-SW-UUI 
0800-090-110 
192-0011 
OB -022- 01 11 


NORWAY . . . 

POLAND 1 * 1 

PORTUGAL 1 

ROMANIA 

SLOVAK REP. 

SPAIN. 

SWEDEN* 

SWITZERLAND* 

UKRAINE 1 

U.K. 


,l * -1 .'*>•«■ •' j- » i-... if, 1 lK.IIL4i: 1 il •.ii-miinmh.-n ,»!>« i.lV.n.i. imori ittirdirini; ll»- rru-. iuiIIBot 

*h«IJ Nr.,, • *....1 1 |.[> I-..-.I ) i, ■ ,1 ,-< ■ .in. .i . I i jII.iil l*».tn ■•wn ■! V' •"••• oi-fti.* l-.Hir. -IIi-isi- in 1 .14. >1.. I ' ...|, T.VT W.irld I'ranKM 

7"": '•« -'-'"i - •• •'! I"- < - * -Vi il. .jlMiirin.il to,* nail.i 


B0M9M1 

.09010-400-0111 
05017-1-288 
01 -800-4288 
. 00-420-00101 
900-99- BI-11 
020-785-011 
15S- 08-11 
B4100-11 
0500-89-0011 


MIDDLE EAST 


BAiBAlN .. . 
CTFRUS- 
EGYPT* (CAIRO)' 
ISRAEL 

KUWAIT 


sm-coi 

. 08U SU010 
... 510-B2DQ 
177-1W-2727 
MKU6 


AMERICAS 

ARGENTINA* tlJl-SOO. 200-11 11 


LEBANON (BEIRUT)' <20-801 

SAUDI ARABIA 

TURKEY' 08-800-12277 

UWABEMBATtS' 6T0-I'Z» 


BOLIVIA' 

BRAZIL 

CANADA. 

CHILE .. 
COLOMBIA 
R SALVADOR*. 
HONDURAS 1 . 
MtVlCO' - :.' 


0-800-1 1 12 

000-8010 
l-W»-57i-272: 
00'. '*0312 
SflO-1 1-0010 
190 
123 

5s-500-i6Mr40 


PANAMA. 109 

PERU 1 . . 191 

VENEZUELA'... 80-011-120 

AFRICA 


lYit^orltt Cum/ivt:ms 


GABON' . ... 
GAMBIA' 
IVORY COAST 
KENYA 1 
LIBERIA 


OOMKH 

00111 

00 - 111-11 

‘BCU-IO 

.797-707 


- . . r f _ 


SOUTH AFRICA 0-800-99-0123 


ART 


m>r 14 VMWml' riii* jific- an il cli.i'j? .«i ilv .M'mn * 

BJil.il'lr |n«,i jaililk- jtom- ***V4 i.l .T.ailaWr hui: .81 ,mv- ;.V/'I .IJ Si* 


' uyr ^'Mrnr Vila' .. nailaliri. i™. .Jl If*.' 1,4,8 toinr TubUr iJmia* mam,' , , 

. - m , nuilnJ l.htiSi -i'.-Jlai* pHLiWr in ni'U l<n.*«-.in wanin' .l.n TT\f 9 , iw'r ' J " ^ lB ' U '"‘ K ’ ' |lul tV KISs li-ni MjM 



-A 

' \ ^ 

,i?i * » 

■ SB 


\ZV> 


•rr,-7.-r=# 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1994 


Page 21 



SPORTS 




V. 




5;^ 



■■''Sr. 


“«*NR t; 

w- . ... , ; > ‘Uarv& 


w«» 

■ 

*»< = U -. 

?tj! L-.\\ . 
Miif' ; \ 
*ttfc |b. ' •.. 

S.‘ . . 

•ti 

fcc*.- 

»r<J 

* »'! '.i.:.- 

f ar, •.. 

ill 






Rjy StubMebfftr/Rruico 


• Britt Hagler recovered a fumble in the fourth, adding to Houston’s woes. 




’Uai o 


M.TJ 






Eagles Thriye on Oilers’ Woes 


f tear 

i -V« c .. 

!> '.'ir *■ 

1‘ u> : 

■M’-’tuv 
h» *r » - . . i 

H.l- : :»*•• 

* 1 * t 

ft i 1 . 

*i f » -•-. • 

* -ti-.. 
ir\ 

i» rw ! ;& 
4FV*C: i . 

N>:-j i. • 

r.. 

ftv'i* : ■-..< 
?ir»f : 14 

L *i Y : ■ 


on 


The Assodtued Press 

PHILADELPHIA — Fred Barnett got what 
{-'he was looking for, proof that a serious knee 
,* injury is nothing more than a painful memory. 
The Houston Oilers helped convince him of 
n S/n Lin a -■ that with a performance typical of their season of 
*‘H(Arf£g- r agony. 

“With all the blitzing they do, Calvin and I 

Barnett said 
Williams, for 
_ Pd get a 

. , . . . »wiil{ £ ? lot erf balls thrown my way.” 

- • r Vi He did, and made the most of it in Pbiladel- 

1 i phia's 21-6 victory Monday nigiht. Barnett, re- 
J C.-F.*! ‘^t -f turning from a knee injury that cost him the last 
' r n * »sejfe 12 games of the 1993 season, caught five passes 
'• • - . ''d 04 s ,. jfor 187 yards and a touchdown. 

: i’’* ' Philadelphia improved to 5-2. Doubt seems to 

• c' : >ra, Kji- 83 ^ be the only constant for the Oilers, who dropped 

i -6 * 

; \!»rc .-asnsfrS' This time it was the qoarteitoadc Cody Carlson 
riU 1 who kept the Oilers on the road to ruin. He gave 

Tjft.irusBB. 'the Eagles their first touchdown when he un- 
( "“5 ■: a: > derthrew Haywood Jeffires and was intercepted 

v-iKriat 


\v 


by Eric Allen, setting up a 1-yard run by Eagles’ 
rookie Charlie Gamer m the second quarter. 

Barnett got loose in the Houston secondary in 
the third period for a 53-yard touchdown that 
increased Philadelphia's lead to 14-6. The Oilers’ 
defense made it easy for Randall Cunningham, 
who, despite completing only 13 of 24 passes, 
threw for 310 yards. 

Houston missed a big opportunity with the 
Eagles leading 7-6 in the third quarter. Carlson 
moved the Oilers to the Philadelphia 26, but the 
drive ended when Gary Brown fumbled while 
being dropped for a 6 -yard loss. 

The Oilers’ biggest mistake came early in the 
fourth period after backup quarterback Billy Joe 
Tolliver drove than 74 yards to the Philadelphia 2. 
Brown was unable to handle Tolliver’s pitch on a 
sweep, and the ball bounced into the arms of 
Eagles linebacker Britt Hager. 

Carlson has been injured twice this season, 
and left Monday’s game in die fourth quarter 
after taking several hard hits on his sore right 
shoulder. He completed 11 of 24 passes for 164 
yards in his first start since getting knocked out 
against Pittsburgh on Oct. 4. 


SCOREBOARD 

0 !*■ rjis3s 'it _ 
r 1 L'taf 


At-'** ■ • •' 

, .. 2 iiup- -41 

kU _■ 

• ’• j: .1 

M ; :«’ 

' : ■..••.r./Jtiib **• 

lltll f .. M 

- r . -jh.ctEisB 

f4»« - .. . 



■■ A . •- « v .'.''uri. • 


, «,.* ; 

*£*»• " ' < ■ 

• ; r'Atf-i'l - ! tj 

Lit » . 

. • .. *\.i isairf Ctl 


...... i i/st r " 


,1 FOOTBALL 


NFL Standings 


5i.V 


•.•xsOfiS 


For invcstnient 
information 

\L«.*C 

, ^ t » '\ii' 




- • AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
w East 

W L T 

MtajM 5 2 0 

4 J 0 

Jets . 4 3 0 

. Cnotand 3 4 0 

fltfStOPoHs 3 5 0 

" “ Centnd 

W L T 

demand o I o 

PHtabuntfi 5 2 0 

Houston 16 0 

. OncinflaH 0 7 0 

West 

W L T 

San Diego 6 1 0 

! Kansas CUv 5 2 0 

' LA Rawer* 3 4 0 

r Seattle 3 4 0 

Demur 2 5 0 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
End 

W L T 

Dallas 6 10 

PbJkxtoMiJa 5 2 0 

-N.Y. Olatfs 3 4 0 


Japan Series 


PCt PFPA 
J14 180 146 
sn 134 143 
-571 116122 
ASO ITS US 
J75 167106 

Pet pp PA 
BSl 166 79 
J\4 124117 
.143 V3 1» 
M0 101 100 

Pet PF PA 
J57 US 126 
J14 15*131 
M> 163176 
AS 153 124 
Mb 156 192 


Yemfmi 


OAME3 
to Tokyo 

HI W W 1—3 5 1 

NO IN NO 0-1 10 1 
no kMton) 

Jam Hashlmato (6), isMoe <01, Kuwata 
(10) and OMuiba, Munda (6); Omv IsNI (?>■ 
Svsrivoma OM ant Itotv W— isWge 1-0. L— I- 
NiD M. 


1992— Gres Maddux. Chicago 

1993— Greg Maddux, Allan ha 
19M— Gres Madffcm. Atlanta 

NOTE: From 1956-1966 mere was one selec- 
tion from bom leosuee. 





Pet pfpa 

J50 337150 
J00 158 784 
J75 135 156 
J75 1562N 


Mpad a>*» Game 
PtdladetpHa 21, Houston 6 


NLCy Young Award Wlnncra 

1*56— Don Ncwoombe. Brooklyn 
195 7 - Warren Spahn, Asnwaakee Brava 
I960— Vernon Law, Pittsburgh 
1963— Don Drysdaht, Los Ansetes 
IMS— Sandy Koufax, Los Ansetes 
1965— Sandy Koufax. Lai Ansela 
1M6— Sandy Koufax, Lot Anseies 
110— Mike McCormick. San Francisco 
i960— Bob Gibson, SL Louis 
190— Tom Seover, New York 

1970— Bob Gibson. St. Louis 
1971 Fer guson Jenklnx Chicago 
tm-Steva coman, PWKxhHmita 
1973— Tom Seover. New York 
l*M— Mike Marshall, Las Anseies 
1973— Tom Seaver, New York 
1976— Randy Jones. San Diego 
1*77— Steve Carlton, pnliadelpwa 

1971 — Gaylord Perry. San Diego 
W79— Bruce Sutler, Chicago 
I960— Sieve Carlton, Philadelphia 

19«1 Fern ando valwutiela. Las Anseies 
IfOS— Steve Carlton. Philadelphia 
1*63— John Denny, PNtodcfPtiJo 
B04— Rick Sutdlffe, Chicago 
1505-Dwigfrt Gooden, New York 
190 6 Mike Sam. Houston 
110— Steve Bedrosian, PWkxJefPhla 
IMS Orel HenMser, Las Ansetes 
1 90 Mark Davis. San Diego 

1990— Doug Drobek. Pittsburgh 

1991 — Tom Gtavlne, Atkmta 


ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Leeds Z Leicester 1 

Standings: Newcastle 29 paints. Notting- 
ham Forest 27, Manchester United 22. Black- 
born 21. Liverpool 24 Norwich 19, Chelsea 18 . 
Manchester aty IB. Leeds Ik Arsenal 17. 
Southampton 15, west Ham 14, Tottenham 14, 
Sheffield Wednesday 12, Coventry 12. Aston 
Villa ia Crystal Palace 10, Leicester 9, Wim- 
bledon 9. Queens Park Rangers 7, ipswtct>7. 
Evertan 1 

NBAPreseason 

Monday's Games 
Detroll IK Charlotte lot 
Atlanta 129. New Jersey 101 
Cleveland 122. Houston 111 
Ufttfi 131. PtiikxMphia IN 
Plwenlx 135. Orlando 129 


BASEBALL 
American League 

BALTIMORE— Named Lee May, hitting 
coach; Al Bumbry, first base cooch; Chuck 
Cottier, third base cooch; and Steve Boras, 
bench coach. Announced Elrod Kendricks 
will remain bullpen cooch. 

KANSAS CITY— Announced turn Dave 
Henderson, outfielder, and Keith Miller. Irv 
fMder, refected outright assignments and 
ejected free agency. 


Maddux Wins a 3d Straight NL Cy Young 


By Claire Smith 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — It will be 
years before Greg Maddux 
knows whether he wlU grace the 
stage at Coopersiown and join 
the likes of Sandy Koufax, Jim 
Palmer, Whiiey Ford. Tom 
Seaver, Bob Gibson and Sieve 
Carlton. 

But Maddux already knows 
that he has achieved something 
none of those Hall of Fame 
pitchers has. 

In a unanimous selection fora 
season curtailed by a strike, 
Maddux on Monday was voted 
the National League Cy Young 
Award winner for a third 
straight year by the Baseball 
Writers Association of America. 

It marked the first time that 
the voting body for both the Cy 
Young and league most valu- 
able player awards has ever 
honored one player three con- 
secutive years in one category. 

The Atlanta Braves' right- 
hander, who admits that his 
first Cy Young with the Chica- 
go Cubs in 1992 will always be 
the most special one, was none- 
theless honored when informed 
that No. 3 elevates him into a 
category all his own. 

“You always set goals, but to 
win a Cy Young, or to even win 


U.S. Mediator and Players to Meet 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The UX government me- 
diator, W. J. Useiy, was to meet with the 
baseball-player union’s staff on Tuesday, but 
it appeared that the sides in the major league 
baseball strike would not meet jointly until 
the end of next week at the earliest. 

Usery. appointed by President Bill Clinton 
on OcL 14, wants to familiarize himself with 
each side. He has yet to schedule a meeting 
with management, and some owners will be 
busy next Tuesday with expansion presenta- 
tions in Chicago. 

Eugene Orza, the union's No. 2 official, 
said players' representatives would be at their 
association's office in New York on Tuesday 
to speak with Useiy. 

Owners intend to modify their proposal 
when the sides meet again to put it in a form 
they can impose if they declare an impasse. 


In a memo outlining the changes, manage- 
ment negotiators told dubs that signing bo- 
nuses given this offseason helped players con- 
tinue the strike, but they' left each dub free to 
make its own decision/ 

The union claims the memo may be a veiled 
instruction that violates the colluaon prohibi- 
tions in the labor agreement that expired Dec. 
31 but remains in effect. 

“The question is whether or not a reason- 
able man or wo man who knows about this 
industry sees it accompanied by a wink or 
not,” Orza said. “If you could find a reason- 
able man or woman familiar with the industry 
who doesn't see that wink, he’s going to need 
some really, really thick glasses." 

A management lawyer. Chuck O’Connor, 
said the memo did not block dubs from 
giving signing bonuses to free agents, who can 
sign with other teams starting Sunday. 


three of them, was never really a his career since the award was 
goal," Maddux said from bis instituted in 1956. But none of 
home in Las Vegas. “I think the other five — Carlton, who 
that any time you exceed your won a record four Cy Youngs; 
own expectations, it’s even that Koufax, Seaver, Palmer and 
much more gratifying.” Roger Clemens — can boast of 

Maddux is the' sixth pitcher Maddux’s lightning-quick pace, 
to win the award three times in Palmer (American League 


winner in 1973, 1975, 19761 and 
Koufax (major league winner in 
1963, 1965, 1966) came closest, 
and few doubt that Koufax 
would have been a winner four 
years in a row had he not lost 
out to Dean Chance of the Cali- 
fornia Angels in 1964, when 


only one Cy Young was given in 
the majors. (See Scoreboard) 

That Maddux joined such 
company at age 28 amazed him. 

"It's not the same way I look 
at myself, that’s for surer he 

said. “When you have guys of 
that magnitude you never imag- 
ine being as good as those guys. 
Those guys always seem to be 
what you strive for as a pitcher 
to be like." 

Nevertheless, he was named 
first on all 28 ballots by the 
committee comprising two writ- 
ers in each National League 
city. Ken Hill of Montreal was 
second and Bret Sabcihagen of 
the New York Mets third. 

Maddux became the 13th 

E 'tdier to be unanimously sc- 
ried. and the first since the 
Dodgers' Orel Hcrshiserin 1988. 

Maddux won 16 games, 
which tied Hill for the league 
lead. No National League 
pitcher came close to his pris- 
tine 1.56 earned run average. 
His three shutouts and 10 com- 
plete games also led the league; 
seven of his complete games 
came in his last nine starts. 

And he was the only pitcher 
in the major leagues to work 
200 or more innings ( 202 ) in a 
season ended 52 days early by a 
players’ strike. 


Angry Fan 
Asks Court 
For Action 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dupaicka 

LOS ANGELES — Still 
angry about the major- 
league baseball strike? 

One disgruntled fan de- 
cided not to take Lhe af- 
front sitting down any- 
more, beginning legal 
proceedings against those 
who have deprived him of 
his favorite spoil. 

Hie lawyer for the fan 
who sued the Los Angeles 
Dodgers argued Monday 
that baseball owners violat- 
ed a contract with season- 
ticket-holders by not fin- 
ishing the 1994 season. 

William ScbeObach filed 
suit Thursday in Los Ange- 
les Superior Court on behalf 
of himself and other season- 
ticket-holders, daiming they 
should have all money for 
tickets and parking re- 
turned, plus interest. 

‘The underlying premise 
of the suit is very simple,” 
said Schelfbach’s lawyer, 
Philip Aidikoff. “In pur- 
chasing season tickets, fans 
bargained for and were 
promised a meaningful sea- 
son of baseball culminating 
in pennant races, playoffs 
and a World Series." 

“What they gol was a par- 
tial season consisting of 
what tamed out to be mean- 
ingless exhibition games," 
he added. “That's because 
the commissioner last 
month declared that for of- 
ficial record-keeping pur- 
poses, there were no Nation- 
al or American League 
champions. That, for all in- 
tent and purposes, renders 
the 1994 season a wash." 

“We believe that they’re 
entitled to be compensated 
for the fact that an entire 
season was not played," he 
said. “That’s the very heart 
of the season-ticket agree- 

~™'' ' (LAT, AP) 


mem. 


CROSSWORD 



ACROSS 

; i Chief 
i s Opposite of 
t fern. 

>• t ■ Carries on 
i J 14 "That’s a laugh* 


ts Capital on the 
60th parallel 
18 Newbery- 
winning author 
Scott 
it Tied 


A.TVTTA AIRLINES 

TaB'lL LOfE Til »|| Hi flT* 

DESTINATIONS 

COMPETITION 


WIN FIRST CLASS TICKETS! 
LOOK IN TODAYS PAPER 


ia Object of 
devotion 
i» Playwright 
Maxim 

so Three-time 
Wimbledon 
champ 

23 Kind of image 

24 Swordsman 

zr'Jane * 

as Whai a vacuum 
vacuums 
30 Car radio 
feature 

si Goal 
33 Brouhaha 
35 Scumer 
as 'Ruthless 
People* actor 

40 Account exec 

41 Prof. — 
(ex-academic) . 

42 Swindle 

43 Things to be 
hedaed 

45 German river 
47 D'Urbervilles 

lass 

so Triathlon 
competitor 

S2 Cultural 
$4 Longtime role 
for Shelley Long 
57 June honorees 
so Golf stroke 

80 Popular cookie 

81 Norman's motel 

82 Soprano 
Te Kanawa 

83 City south of 
Salt Lake City 

84 Cubic meter 
8s British weapon 

88 Actress Carol 


DOWN 

i “Beg pardon" 
z Desolate 
a Sundae garnish 

4 Parked, at 
O'Hare 

5 Rippled fabric 
a Mount 

7 Type of 
machine 
a Mozart 
compositions 

9 Miscreant 

10 Cherishes 

11 Plumb 

12 Lodge 
member 

13 Stone or 
StaJlone 

21 Payback 

22 Showing a 

preference 

25 Smooth, in a 
way 

26 Cable network 
2 * Grenoble is its 

capital 

32 Humiliate 
34 Beat 
36 Boo 
07 Current 

38 Some rubes 
os Kind o! exam 
40 Diamond stat 
44 EDbeis Field 
hero Duke 

46 Terminate a 
termination 

48 ‘High 
(1941 film) 

49 Filter 

si Minnesota Fats 
stroke 


n 

TIT 

r 

t jr 

73" 

16 





TS“ 







PubM »r fUen Norris 


'f? New York lanes/ Hiked trf Witt S htwb. 


S3 Hakeem 

Olaiuwon score 

as 1.0 U 

56 Several 

57 Literary 
monogram 

88 Squeal (on) 


Solution to Puzzle of OcL 25 
1CIPILJSI 


nonca aciEiaa 
□raHiii 00i9a naana 
□□HQ □□□□ mnnaa 
ran000E2O00Q[2EE 
□□□ riiuau 
□□□□□□0I3000 0300 
190 □□□ 000013 

0000 B0Q3ESE1 00110' 
unnoD D 0 Q □□□□ 
H 00 □□ 0 Q 0000000 
□□□□ Q 00 


P O PC OR N POP PE R 


00000 00Q0 I3HGJ0 
□0000 0 U 00 0 HQ 0 

uqsqo DHsa anafl 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


TODAY’S 

BUSINESS 

MESSAGE 

CENTER 

Appears on 
Page 4 


PERSONALS 


HNW5MI 
Ruth Dual 
akaREMDB 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


VENNA, AUSTRIA. T* 713-3374. 

Are you jod cr warned? Lonely or 
Are you despairing or su*- 
lo talc about it. hxjne 

m total cunM a m a. 

Moru-Fri 9 JO am • I pa and every 
day &30 pm • 10 pm 


AtCOHOUCS ANONYMOUS 

dan MeUngi doily. Tefc K 

46 34 59 to ROME 678 (020, 
5974265. 


BHONL The finest hondenoda surt. 
leanest selection in Switzerlond 01 
WBNBSG *e leocfing mini Pore. 
Bohrfmfar. 13, Zurich fff.211 295a 


MOVING 


INTERDEAN 

FOR A FREE ESTIMATE CAU. 

PAHS ( 1)39201400 


HOMESMP. Same 8 mafiom nova, 
bo-gags, cr*i worldwide. CaB Chocfc 
Pans 




EDUCATION 


FRENCH MADE EASY Pore 5th. SretJ 
flrocipj, communkation slab. Lhr/wfc. 
FlJXj0/ma 1-43296106 Id lesson Free.! 


REAL ESTATE 
INVESTMENTS 


REAL ESTATE 
restart. Baoulifd 


GOLF COURSE 1 

deuefap w tf seib i 

sit just outside Rerem, Italy, 
Amo rrrer with 17th oMury v8a 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


COMMERCIAL — 
INDUSTRIAL 
GERMANY 


RLE SANT LOUS 

In priveta kwnJouse 
and hskxcsfy dashed bulling: 

SRENDfl) 189 SOM APARTMENT 
dmhta (142 sqm. & 4 J tqmj 
2 bathrooms, eaeflert common, 
a# Danforts, partma. 

SoleAaM 
AGMXVAMAU 
25, me Vcneau. 75007 PARIS 
Tet (I) 45.55.46.63- 


AKHBD S0UTKST GERMANY 

SWY Asph, Hongon for sde. 
04 Foe 0W9/V436'!562 


MONACO 


MONTS CARLO 

SEilDENIW. ASCAi spaaoa 5-roon 
aparltaent m perfect CMtew 
X0 stfjn , s to new, oeftr an d 
paring spaa. F6M.OOO. (lU8f 

AAGEDI 

7/9. BddaMoob*. MCPBOX Monaco. 
Tel 33-92 16 5P 39 Fa* 33-93 SO 19 C 


MONTEC ARLOSUN 

SROOMAPAtTMBO 
ISO SQJH in Ngh das fauUaB 
with girden & Mtmneig paaiherroce, 
sea view, cetfar. par Jury*. 

ACBfle ABSTAIN. 
(33)92 16 S 8 90 


MONIE CARLO 

Now protect with ttwfes to 5-room 
apartments avafable. Panoranac wew, 
divisible office space, atnciivr pries. 
Further defcrin Mrs Bodensen - 9M, 
9 are cf Ostende - MC 98000 Monaco. 
Tot (33) 92 1690 00 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


PLACE DB VOSGES. 100 tarn, aport- 
med n batoned lownhcune, fully 
restored to high re«*y. Exceptiand 
finings- Cota, parking. F45M Sole 
Apert Si. Ahvna Fan fll3059346L 


HISTORICAL MARAIS, LOVRY IOFT 
On 2 (ban, redone. Professond use 
pcuBe. F1A man. Tet 1-4551 1351 


PA OS 8 * - AVENUE MONTAIGNE 
defightfd. Ngh class ped4-terre 

a * JTU pwflt Tet HI 


AUTOMOBILE MARKET 


CCfl - FRANCE 

AUTOMOBILE 

IMPORT -EXPORT 

All makes - All models 
Volkswagen - Audi - BMW 
Mercedes - Jeep - Chiysler 
Ferrari - Porsche - Nissan 
4x4 Cheiolcee 


Phonos 

Fax: 


(00.33)1 


l-69.5i01.15 

-695X01.14 


AUTOMOBILES 


MAS5NE SAVINGS ON RMVUD 
4WID vehicles, prestige vdvdes, 
bull orders & itsedwhides. 

We rn now European ogenb tar 
sufwb ooochbw cocms of 
Testarons, tfetio, TOtrod 
Agerts retpured worldwide 
prestige vedvdec pwdicaed 
worfdwefe regtxtles of hoiory 
W.V5. Ud (EJdjfahed 12 yevs) 
Teb (44) 71 255 2655 
Fine (44) 71 580 4729 


AUTO RENTALS 


R94T FROM DHtGt AUTO 
WfflHDrff 515 
SPECIAL ora - 7 DAYS: FF 1500 
PARK TB.- (1) 45 87 27 04 


AUTO SHIPPING 


SAVE ON CAR SWUNG. AMESCO, 

KAbeatr 2, Antwerp Betdm. To/rare 
US, Africa Regular Rd-Ro saina Free 
hotel TI 32/&33M239 Fx 2324053 


kdrav/tt 
uk from can ; 

Allred Esther Street 10 
CH-4K7 Zurich 
Tbc 816615. Fd*r OtctflO 78 30 
Tel.: 01/202 7B SO 
nun TAX-FREE used 
ALL LEADING MAKE5 
Seme day regWretton patsUe. 
renewable iv to S yean 
We also register cars with 
(arpned) tOffeQn Itan-Vee) ptaiea. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TSANSCO BEGUM 

The targen car report company 
nEwassflfw the past 3D yean. 
A« makes ana modek. 

I sdreregishdioa 


European, 'African & US. specs. 
Transect, 51 Vtoswdiqnstr, 
Tet 

teJex352b Trans B. 


FRB> OPBrr RACING WORUMflDE 

NewUirejd* - " 

JeepGrondCheri 
VWGotfOMr 101 a/c cosset 

BMWSOiA BBc/bATi 

BAMrSlfiCabnoktRed/lan a/< 

jre 

SmfaViloreCUio&top ABS pi $11,991 
Fas tar quotes on other vehicles. 
Phone! -20KI2711 11 Far 1 JO I -3278222 


AIK WORUJVnDt TAX FR& CARS. 
Export 4- ituppmQ 4- reg i sir u tion of 
new 8 w ed con. aTK NV, Ternaddei 
2930 Brcauhocd, Befcnrm. Phone; 

Telex; 31535; Few (3) 

1959. 


17*. 200a 

cuduy 

(A comforts. . 

room, fitted 

R 325000. Tel PI 45 


ETOU, beaming of the 
fag, ?/3 rooms, ffi 34 m, 
, doebie fceng, one bed- 
bathroom. 
327. 


SWITZERLAND 




UKEGQIEVA4 

HOUNTMN RESORTS 


Side to 


aa*wfaM( 
ere 1975 
A CHAIETS 
G5TAA0, 


CXANS-MONTANA. etc 1 to 
r. 20 
REV, 


S 


rooree, 5fr. 300000 to 3 J mkv 
EVACSJL 


4122-734 15 40. Fax 734 12 20 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURMSHEP 


AGBKE CHAMPS ELYSES 

specnish in furnished apretmefei, 
reudadul areas, 3 tnontla and more. 


Tok. 

Fax 


ill, 


4225 32 25 

45 43 37 09 


IDEAL ACCOMMODATION 

READY TO MOVMN 
Ore 4J10O opartmertj 
- TOP QUALITY omit cards nrrrfprd 

De Crcourt Associates 
Tel 1-17 S3 80 1 1 Fax 45 51 75 77 


HATOTEL 

BFT& TOWER OR 
EXPO PORTE DE VBBAH 1 ES 

From sufcs to five-room de hat. 
OoSy. weeUy or nxM-t. 

Teh (33-1)45 75 42 20 
Fan {33-11 45 79 73 30 


PARS - 74 CHAMPS BYSS 

CLABXDGE 

Mgh dan. ready to use Bats 
-’iff eqnreped ond furnished. 

For Rent: b* (he day. week or nore. 
tearvAiiONS 

Tet 1 - 44.133331 Fa* 142 J 5 MJBB 


CAPITALE • PAJQMBR5 
Hondbdnd qwdty apartments, 
fi sen. Paris and lubwtx. 

Tal 1-4614 S211. Fax 1-4772 3094 


CHAMPS^ UY5EB, 


•fa - NEAR 

3 room. 75 



STUDIO, 40 Kyiv, ei dan 
mduded. 


buUng F4J00 charges 
Tefc Pm 8 74 26 98. 


bkben, old booms, uierptane, eodn. 

F6300 4- drew. Tit 1-4346 0121 
or prowncei 9373 B443. 


1 6th- VICTOR HUGO 
Freestone bu*faa*h floor, 
fcwng 4- bedroo m . FTyOO 4- charges. 
Tel: (1] 45.87.01.98 


10ft, RUE DE PARADIS, bnuhtal 4 

room, sutny, terrace, beams, large 
fireplrttol comforts, deanng ter- 
wee. F7JOO. 3 maffhs mm. Tefc owner 
111 48 00 01 13 0 cun.1 


14*. MONTPARNASSE 3room fltV. 
65 sclsl. 2 bedroom^ faefwi,_ba>K 


fidy eremped, creel. FllJXB. Owner 
Tefc 1-Q tfe 31 Afar 1-43 22 35 62 


5th, JUSSSJ. COfaUed lane, 145 urn. 

nptax, equipped tmchia, 2 badte. OW 
Amencon turnthn. on courtyord. 
FF15JOOO 4- drean. Tel: 1-4354 &4 


French Country Properties 


will run on 
October 28, 1994 

For more information, call the 
\nlemalional Herald Tribune Paris : 

Tel.: (I) 46 37 93 85 
Fax: (!) 46 37 93 70 


IASTUE 17 fen oHkxtyia ora 

merit Wi cert, bukfag, on tar, 

coortyred. Very cokn, renovowd, W 

Owner: 1-3965 015 




t iijp ‘f. 


. j 









EMPLOYMENT 

EDUCATKXSAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

EXPBnB4CH> NATIVE AMBBCAN 
Ehglah toother*. Papers rearired. Col 
Hanehon Longues Porn 1-69 28 >8 18 

LEGAL SERVICES 


Second Trawl Documents/ (Sf-5hwe 
Companfeiful Itgri (eprewnWhon. 
ConrocN Edward P. Gallagher, 
Attorney-at-law ■ 3 Bedwsdo Metro 
Center I4F750L Bcfhesda Mtrjtand 
20614 RJSA1 FAX: D0I19&3439. 


MTHNATK3NAL IEGAL 
SBVIOES - GOIEVA 
A high qucAly. cnntidtrtai and 
cfccreet serwee ofitred m al aspects 
of U teirraond L 5wss end ILK. law. 

Tekphonejll) 22 347 46 4S 
SK Bnintia {Conwthrt Soiotar] 


Canadlrei * e ti we« « Irem l gml i wi 
Soaoal gorenreani progren a ore 
offered to mrestan, naanMi and 
fannen. fearing to Conadan aezen- 
thip. Cd B. Huh (5141 875-9695 
Mortied- Fob ISMt B75-tS79. 


DtVOKCE BY MAX M TWO INGBO, 
attorney mtomty m* or vMhoetcon- 
ten. T el: S7-44S9149. Fat. 357-4. 
620878. P08 2974 tornoca Cvarus. 


DIVORCE FAST - $495 

Certified by Ui embassy- ul/fimc 
[714] 968-6&9S USA 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


ACCESS VOYAGES 

THE BBT FARE TO 
THE UNTH) STATES 

and aver 500 mare deshnahore world- 
wide on 40 tffetent scheduled comers. 

W: PARS 1-40 13 82 02 or 42 21 46 94 
Fare 1-4221 44 20 
MIMTE: 3615ACCBSVOYAGB 
Tefc LYON 78 63 67 77 or 72 56 15 95 

BOOK NOW by phone wife oedi card 
Government Ucenoes 175111 


WORLD AVIATION - SCHEDULE) 
FLIGHTS. 1st, tueness. emnamy at 
kswest fares. Tel BT Para (1147551313 


BOATS/YACHTS 


OCEAN HKN performance speed bool 
1990 -ARONW" Alpha 45 V*od- 
New bare thfed. 47 S H . 3 tpeoai 
rang enana 68) hp. each only 70 
hours. Two 44 "Merc Speetfaager " 
out drives one S100K spent over 
the cast to bald this boot. Lots of 
option. Luted rt S3KK tar emer- 
gency trie. TeL 3107317-4759 USA. 


PLANNING TO RUN A CLASSIFIED AD? 

Place your Ad quickly and easily, confad your 
nearest HT office or representative with your text. 
You wil be informed of Hie cost immediately, and 
ones payment is mode your ad will appear within 
48 hours. Ail major Credit Cards Accepted. 


EUROPE 

FRANCE HOI: Peril. 

TeL [I 46379385, 

Free (!) 4837937a 

GERMANY. AUSTRIA A CENTRAL 


Ti 

fW. 


7267i 
72 7310. 


SwnZEUAMknjIy. 

7283021. 


Id.: I 
Fo*\ 


1|738;__.. 
1 1 728X91. 


UNTB) KNGDOM: landan. 
TeL (071)836 4802 
Tefac 362009. 

Fax 1071] 2402254 


NORTH AMERICA 

NEW YORK: 

Tel : (213 752-3890. 

■tal tree: (BOO) 572-721 2 
Telre 427 175 
Fare (212)755-8785 

AStA/PAOgC 

HONGKONG: 

Td-I852J 9222-1 188. 
T*s: 61170 HTHX. 

Fair (85219222-1190. 
SMGAPORE: 

Tel: 223 6478. 

Fo*. 165)2241566. 

Tefar 28749. HTSVL 



CHELSEA ESCORT SBtVKX. 

51 Beajdxmpi Place. London SWfl 

Tet &71 -584 6513 

BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON PARS GEMVA ZUBCH 
Eioart Agrecy Crecfit Cards Wekarne 

UK 071 589 5237 

LONDON BRAZILIAN Escort 

Service 071 724 5597791 - crerit cards 

ARETOCATS ESCORT SERVICE 

W 071 -402 5544 

MBNATIONAL ESCORTS 

Saim-WoricMe 

Tck 212-765-7996 New York VSA 
AAafar Credl Ords Accepted 

AMBERS 

London 0956 431364 Escort Senna 

NATASHA MANN 

LONDON ESCORT SHVKE 

071 352 1013 

•• ZURICH •' VKXET •• 

Escort Service. Credit cards aeceptod. 

Tet 077 7 63 83 31 

LONDON’S NO. 1 ESCORT 
AGENCY 071 258 0090 

Debut Escort Swice of NYC 

212-228-2100 

Atafor Owdfe Oeds Accepted 

GENEVA * GLAMOUR • PARIS 
BASa •Escort Agency* 0227346 00 89 



it wW ■ 







hmmm 

moan- juua esam saana 

CAU. *6 54 39 

0 M 8 HAL SCOW SBVKE 

LONDON 

PLEASE PHOhE 071 22 S 3314 

PHHI 

STAHIGHT ESCORT SBtVKE 

NEW YORK CITY 

Please cal 212 - 5354200 . 









ENCHANTE EXCLUSIVE E 5 COST 
Smtz^MbMh, Boston, Qiicoge. Tefc 



•ZURICH ‘SUSAN* 
Escort S«r«in 
Tefcfll 7 381 99-48 


njBOi-WW™- MONACO 

AW6THY 5IE In ti Escort /Trovnl Smvire 

CA1L SWUttHAM) 0896102259. 


VBW*PARB‘ROMS* 2 MHCH 

tatOCONUCT fet'l brert + Trowd. 
Sevg. OH Vienna +43-1Q1Q ffl 19. 


—ZUWCH — GMVA — 

Escort Service ■ Ctedk Cants 
01 7 252 7359 or 022 179) 4DM 


feiMUIt IWH UI RJULI 

Iko n Agency 

Amsfetdort 4-3120^75086 


OUBSaDOW* COLOGNE' 

Escort and Gride Service. 
Tri02TM35 0687. 


BONN 


AMDU HARAAONY Eseert «. Grift 

■ Sonnet. Deuteh ft Endeh Speel^^l 
1 Cards. Tefc 90 Mt &64 orSOMOllI 


FIANKPURT ft ATTa 

Mm s Eteort Agmy. 

Hoorn OtwFW & u. 


LONDON ESCORT 5 BtVlCE*~ 

“KIMBERLEY 




■0WEVA ■ WNG« ■ wuas- 

bcort Service 
Tefc 0227731 W 81 


••GBgVA'NTHNATIONAL- 

EsmrtSerace 

Tefc 022 7 731 «3 52 . 0777259280 

























Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. OCTOBER 27, 1994 


Election in Moscow: A Little Strange but Very Normal 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Steven Erlanger 

New fork rimes Server 

MY TISHCHI, Russia - This is a 
measure of politics in the new Russia. 
There will be a special election here 
Sunday to replace a member of Parlia- 
ment gunned down outside his apart- 
ment house in late April, in a killing 
thought to be mob-related. 

One of the 12 candidates is Kon- 
stantin Borovoi, the founder of the 
first commercial exchange in the Sovi- 
et Union, whose posters show him in 
audience with the patriarch of the Rus- 
sian Orthodox Church, Alexei II. Mr. 
Borovoi says he narrowly escaped as- 
sassination twice in a year. 

There is a nationalist candidate, An- 
drei Siddnikov, whose posters show 
him with the grieving mothers of sol- 
diers killed in Afghanistan. Another 
candidate. Leonid Barashkov, a busi- 
nessman, boasts of financing a soccer 
team and creating a new bus route, 
then offers three “Barashkov Family 
recipes” using mushrooms. 


And then, there' s the requisite qua- 
si-fascist, Alexander Fyodorov of the 
Russian National Unity parly, whose 
symbol is an elongated white swastika 
on a black field. Mr. Fyodorov calls 
for Russian purity and the fight 
against crime, in that order. 

But the favorite in the race is Sergei 
Mavrodi, the mysterious boss of the 
MMM financial pyramid, who was re- 
leased from jail to run and who can 
slay out of jail by winning the seat. 

Given the stakes for his future. Mr. 
Mavrodi is pulling out all the slops in 
this suburban electoral district just 
north of Moscow: making big prom- 
ises that remind everyone of his MMM 
advertisements, buying lots of air time 
and newspaper space, sponsoring con- 
certs, posting placards and distribut- 
ing leaflets. 

But Mr. Mavrodi has not set foot in 
the district, said the deputy chairman 
of the local election committee, Vya- 
cheslav M. Zhigulin. Mr. Mavrodi’s 
spokesman, Sergei Taranov. said Tues- 


day night that personal appearances 
were "ineffective.'' that Mr. Mavrodi 
was \isible on television, and that he 
did not want to “push it” with the 
courts by leaving Moscow. 

Avoiding prison, “of course, is one 
key aim." Mr. Taranov said. "But the 
main aim is to use the immunity to 
protect the interests of MMM share- 
holders through politics.” 

Mr. Zhigulin said he thought Mr. 
Mavrodi had a good chance. “After 
all.” he said. “36.000 MMM share- 
holders live in My Tishchi alone." The 
same number live in nearby Khimki, 
another of the five towns in a district 
of some 2.5 million people and 500,000 
voters. 

“The shareholders are probably 
enough to win.” Mr. Zhigulin said. 
Some shareholders are angry with the 
MMM collapse, which took most of 
their investments. But the fund itself 
never really died, and many believed 
Mr. Mavrodi. who portrayed the col- 
lapse as the act of a willful government 


that feared his power and wanted to 
cut him down. 

MMM's advertisements became 
famous, featuring a shambling Rus- 
sian ne’er-do- wefi who finds all the 
choice sweets of life — tropical vaca- 
tions, an apartment in Paris — through 
lus investments in MMM. 


contacts” will bring SI. 5 million to the 


Bosnian Serbs Fire On UN Tanks 


“Mavrodi's campaign is exactly the 
same." said Anna Sikder, a 23 -year-old 
shopping in the local supermarket. 
“Mavrodi promises to turn My Tishchi 
into a liule Switzerland.” 


He has some way to go. Only 56 
percent of the families in the district 
have telephones. In Khimki, cuts in 
military spending have crippled three 
big factories that once employed near- 
ly 50.000 people and controlled 70 
percent of the town's bousing stock. 

Mr. Mavrodi not only promises vot- 
ers that he will spend S 10 million on 
improving the district, but that every 
household will get a telephone. Mr. 
Borovoi promises that his “business 


Yegor V. Babichev, a physician, law- 
yer and deputy mayor of Khimki, does 
not try to hide his disgusL Khimki is 
one of the few towns where the entire 
leadership changed after the failed 
coup of August 1991. and the adminis- 
tration. at least, is rife with liberal 
democrats. 

“But there is a counterreformaiion 
going on now,” he said. “There's al- 
ways the personalization of politics 
here.” 

As for real local issues, like the three 
big factories in trouble, Mr. Babichev- 
said, “I’m not even sure the candidates 
are aware of them." 

“All our elections are a little strange 
these days,” he said. “Mavrodi is al- 
ready at the stage where he has to enter 
the political establishment. It’s also 
some protection for him, it's true. I 
hope Mavrodi and his type won’t come 
to power. But they’re getting closer, 
maybe.” 


SARAJEVO. Bosnia-Herzecovma (Keuieraj — ^ wmgttnw 
under fire from Bosnian Serti forces on ^ 

United Nations decided against ordering an air strike in r«gpas£ 

a TheDMbhLe^nl tanks returned fire fnm ia ^^iapScri 
tank and recoilless gun near the northern town of Or^ca corforc 
withdrawing. A UN military spokesman, Colonel 
said: “We believe one Leopard was hit but there are no reports of 

casualties.” , f VI ~. 

The United Nations set in motion the procedure lor a NATQ- 
air strike before deciding such a response was not warranted. In 
explaining why an air strike was not ordered. Colonel Spicer said 
that “in fact the best tank-killing weapon is another tanL- ta the 
end air was not needed." 


***** 


Migr ation Accord at Risk, Cuba Says 


Alexander Shelepin, 
Ex-KGB Chief, Dies 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Alexander N. 
Shelepin. 76. the head of the 
KGB during Nikita S. Khru- 
shchev's rule who was once con- 
sidered a contender for the 
leadership of the Soviet Union, 
died Monday. 

The Itar-Tass press agency 
reported his death but did not 
give the cause or say where he 
had died. 


All but One Freed 
In Hij acking in 
Southern Russia 


Reuters 

MAKHACHKALA Russia 
— Two crew members were 
freed from a hijacked plane in 
southern Russia late Wednes- 
day, leaving only the captain 
agd the hijacker on board, said 
the commercial radio station 
Ekho Moskvy. 

“The terrorist is demanding 
another $2 million.” Ekho 
Moskvy said. Die hijacker, be- 
lieved to be acting alone, has 
already received S2J million 
ransom in exchange for releas- 
ing 23 hostages since dawn. 

Prisoners released earlier said 
the hijacker was carrying only a 
parcel, which he said contained 
explosives, and was behaving 
without undue aggression. In- 
terfax news agency said. 

Commandos have surround- 
ed the plane and emergency ser- 
vices took up positions nearby. 
The plane has been refueled, 
but its possible destination was 
not clear. Russia has asked Iran 
to let it land there. 

The hijacking started late 
Tuesday when a passenger or- 
dered the plane bound for the 
southern city of Rostov to re- 
turn to Makhachkala. 


Mr. Shelepin followed a clas- 
sic career path for Soviet lead- 
ers, joining the Communist Par- 
ty in 1940 after graduating from 
the Moscow Institute of Histo- 
ry, Philosophy and Literature. 

He became a propagandist 
for the Komsomol, the Soviet 
youth organization, and headed 
it from 1952 to 1958. Mr. Shele- 
pin was KGB chief from 1958 
to 1961 and, in 1964, was ap- 
pointed to the Communist Par- 
ty Presidium and was widely 
viewed as a potential Soviet 
leader. 

BuL as Itar-Tass reported. 
Leonid I. Brezhnev, a senior of- 
ficial under Mr. Khrushchev 
and his successor as Soviet lead- 
er. “saw Shelepin as a serious 
rival, and removed him from 
the political scene.” 

Myron S. Malkin, Physicist 
Who Guided Space Shuttle 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — 
Myron S. Malkin, 70. a physi- 
cist who was the first director of 
the space shuttle program and a 
former Defense Department of- 
ficial, died Monday of heart 
failure at a hospital in Beihes- 
da, Maryland. 

From 1973 to 1980. Mr. Mal- 
kin led the effort to bring to- 
gether all the components that 
became the space shuttle, which 
remains the principal U.S. 
space launching vehicle. 

Robert Lansing, 66. TV Star 
Of Series ‘12 O’Clock High' 

NEW YORK <NYT)— Rob- 
ert Lansing, 66, an actor whose 
rugged good looks and deep 
voice served him well on stage, 
as well as in films and televi- 
sion. died Sunday of cancer at 
Calgary Hospice here. 

Mr. Lansing starred in the 
television series “12 O'Clock 
High” and in Broadway plays 
including “The Great God 
Brown,” “Suddenly Last Sum- 
mer” and “The Little Foxes.” 


WARNING: REPUBLICANS THREATEN 
TO SEIZE U.S. SENATE 

Bob Dole, Phil Gramm, Jesse Helms and ODle North 
guarantee return to gridlock. That's the threat! 

Fight back. Vole now lor Democrats. 

Only tha Democratic Majority will contnue constructive change. 

Voted baJtote are due soon, by Nov. 4 in some stales. Mail yours immediately 
or use the free DHL Worldwide Express service by Ncrv. 1 . 

If you haven! received a baflo! by Ocf. 24, but have appfiod, get a Federal write- 
in ballot as a substitute from your Consular voting officer or Democrats Abroad 

Democrats Abroad 

Fax U.S.: (703) 768-0920 • Fax Europe (Rome): (39-6) 487 1 1 49 

Pam tar by demons Abnad 


B era l t b u n c, 

rMMiUTW. nwMiiwv^uivvxrui 


Now Printed in Tokyo For 
^ Some-Day Delivery to Most 
£p Homes & Offices in Japan 

-7 . To subscribe call our Tokyo office 

T* (03)32010205 

Or write: TJM, 4F. Mainichi Newspaper, 

1-1-1 HitotsubasK, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100 
^ Or Telex: 33673. Or Fox: (031 3214 4045. 


Improve 
The World's 
Economy 



Lvw-v* f " :•! 

riHr: . • I j 

*§|: 



EU Leader 
Puts Off 


HAVANA (AFP) — The decision of a U.S. judge temporar- 
ily halt the repatriation of Cuban refugees from Guanranamo 
threatens the implementation of a migration accord between th6 
United States and Cuba, the National Assembly president, Ricar* 
do Alarcon, said. „ l. . 

“This is a serious and negative develop men t, said Mr. Aiarcdi^ 
who is representing Cuba in talks with the U.S. government on 
carrying out a Sept. 9 agreement that ended an exodus of Cuban 
boat people to the United States. 

U.S. District Court Judge Clyde Atkins issued a temporary 
restraining order Tuesday in Miami, one minute before a U.S, 
military plane with 23 Cubans on board was to take off for 
Havana from the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, on Cuba’s 
southeast tip. About 32.000 Cuban refugees who were refused^ 
entry to the United Slates after being picked up at sea are beingi 
held at Guantfrnamo and in Panama. 




Leaving 


Russian Team Flies to Site of Oil Spill 


PARIS — The president of 
the European Commission. Jac- 
ques Delors. said Wednesday 
he would remain in his post in 
Brussels at least until Jan. 25 
because of a delay in approving 
a new commission. 

Mr. Delors. widely expected 
to be the Socialist candidate in 
the French presidential elec- 
tions in the spring, was sup- 
posed to vacate his position on 
Jan. 6 but agreed to stay on 
until Jan. 25. He said the length 
of his stay beyond Jan. 25 
would depend on when the Eu- 
ropean Parliament endorsed 
the new commission. 

Mr. Delors has said he will 
not announce whether he is a 
candidate for the French presi- 
dency until he ends his Brussels 
term. 


MOSCOW (Reuters) — Russian officials flew to the northern 
region of Komi on Wednesday to investigate an oil spill .that U.S, 
officials say could have a disastrous impact on the fragile Arctic 
environment. 

But local officials tried to play down the significance of the 
spill, the result of pipeline leaks and the breakage of a dam 
containing the leaked oil. “There are all these fairy stories about a . 
leak of 200,000 tons of oiL" said Nikolai Balin. head of the 
regional environment committee. “It is stupid. The most plausible 
figure is 14,000 tons.” That would be just over 100.000 barrels, , 
The Russian Environment Ministry nas said the spill is as much 


as 438 million barrels, while the U.S. Energy Department has said 
it was estimated to be more than 2 million barrels by U.S. experts 
at the site. 


For the Record 


Three blades were Jailed for IB years each on Wednesday by a 
South African judge for the murder oT Amy Biehl, an American 
exchange student “Taking all mitigating and aggravating circum- 
stances into account the court comes to the finding that the death 
sentence is not the only appropriate sentence.” said Judge Gerald 
Friedman. Mzikhona Noferoela, Vusomzi Ntamo and Mongezi 
Manqina had pleaded not guilty. (Rouen) 


m From Poll! 


PAPERS, PLEASE — Alerted that rival gangs planned a “duel,*' Moscow police 
stepped In. A detective checked the drivers’ license of an armed suspect at a restaurant 


Germans Cite Fewer Neo-Nazi Attacks in 1994 


The AHOCMlcd Press 

BONN — Neo-Nazis have tried to kill six 
people in separate aUacks in the first eight 
months of this year, the parliamentary press 
office said Wednesday. 

No fatalities have been reported this year. At 
least 30 people were reported killed in the first 
three years of neo-Nazi violence. 

Law authorities have been battling rightist 
extremists for four years, and attacks — mostly 


against foreigners — have fallen from a peak of 
about seven a day in 1992 to about four a day this 
year. 

That is apparently because Germany’s legal 
system, sometimes accused of being too lenient 
with the far right, has started getting tough. 
Courts have begun giving longer semences- 

Most of the victims have been foreigners, but 
elderly and handicapped people have also been 
targeted. 


Political analysis said the de- 
lay would strengthen Mr. De- 
Iors’s position, since it would 
enable him to remain above the 
fray while the rival contenders 
for the conservative nomination 
go at one another. 

The 12-nation European 
Union has chosen Prime Minis- 
ter Jacques Santer of Luxem- 
bourg to replace Mr. Delors, 
but Parliament wants to defer 
approving his full team of com- 
missioners until after four new 
member slates join the EU and 
can vole. The four, Austria. 
Finland. Sweden and Norway, 
are scheduled to join in Janu- 
ary. 

Opinion polls show Mr. De- 
lors has almost drawn even with 
Prime Minister Edouard Balla- 
dur and has overtaken the 
Gaullist party leader, Jacques 
Chirac, the two leading conser- 
vative contenders, by keeping 
out of politics. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Chunnel Train’s Debut Facing Strike 


PARIS (Reuters) — Eurostar, the high-speed train designed for. 
the Channel Tunnel, faced a new challenge Wednesday when ar 
French union threatened to strike on Nov. 14. the scheduled 
commercial launching date of the high-technology rail link. 

A union statement said the management of the French rail 
operator SNCF had ignored its claims about the. safety of Euros- 
tar engineers and trains and the pay for staff specifically working 
on the train. 

The Association of European Airlines said its members will 
likely report their biggest increase in traffic in 15 years in 1994. 
Based on travel through September, it said passenger traffic on the 
25 carriers should increase by more than 8A percent, and freight 
traffic should rise by about 13 percent ( Knight -Ridder) 

A fire destroyed the sted-and-copper cupola of the German 
Church in central Berlin. The church, m the city's historic district 
in former East Berlin, was undergoing renovation. (AP) 

Italian pilots have agreed to call off a series of strikes over the 
next month. Pilots for the state-run carrier Alitalia and the 
commuter subsidiary AH made the announcement following a 
meeting with Transportation Minister Publio Fiori (AP) 

Cathay Pacific Airways will introduce two additional flights 
between Hong Kong and Hanoi and one between Hong Kong and 
Ho Chi Minh City, with Vietnam Airlines, starting Sunday. (A FP) 


.. 

.r J 


• J M • 


() 


Kohl, With Tiny Majority, Is in for Tough Bargaining 


Bv Rick Atkinson 

Woshingm Post Service 

BERLIN — German politics, for !2 years a 
predictable and orderly a/fair, suddenly got very 
messy this week. 

Bickering within the ruling coalition, elbowing 
for government posts and a constitutional chal- 
lenge have underscored the fragility of Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl’s 10-vote majority in the 672- 
seal Parliament which is set to convene next 
month. 

The victory of Mr. Kohl and his Christian 
Democratic party in the Oct. 16 elections has 
been quickly overshadowed by the obstacles 
looming before his badly weakened coalition, 
that was whittled down from a 134-seal majority. 

As coalition leaders began meeting Monday 
night for three weeks of hard bargaining over the 
new government’s goals and cabinet appoint- 
ments, it became apparent that even Mr. Kohl — 
a three-term chancellor with a reputation as a 
master politician and eternal optimist — has his 
work cut out if his tenure is not to end in a lame- 
duck whimper. 

Although often arcane and parochial. German 
parliamentary politics will not only determine 
Mr. Kohl's success in pressing his foreign agenda 
for tighter European unity and a broader Ger- 
man role in international affairs, but it will also 
be critical in such urgent domestic issues as 
economic competitiveness and immigration 
policy. 

Foremost among coalition woes is the sad 
shape of Mr. Kohl's junior partner, the liberal 
Free Democrats. 


Having survived a near-death experience — 
the Free Democrats were humiliated in nine 
consecutive state elections before surpassing the 
5 percent minim um needed to remain in the 
federal assembly by less than 2 percentage points 
— parly faithful promptly fell to squabbling 
among themselves. 

The party leader, Klaus Kinkri. who also is 
foreign minister, this week repelled a challenge 
from former economics minister JQrgen Molle- 


The chancellor's objective: 

Not to end his tenure in a lame- 
dock whimper. 


mann. his political rival who accused Mr. Kinkel 
of leading the Free Democrats “into the abyss.” 

Mr. Mbllemann resigned his party post Mon- 
day, leaving the field to Mr. Kinkel. 

But discontent bubbles just beneath the sur- 
face. The Free Democrats are at odds over how 
best to halt the free fall in their popularity among 
the German electorate. 

The party is short on glamour and its tradi- 
tional core agenda — Tree-market economics, 
government deregulation and a commitment to 
civil rights — has largely been co-opted by the 
major parties. 

Some liberal leaders insist that in negotiating 
with Mr. Kohl, who needs the Free Democrats’ 
47 votes to maintain the status quo in Bonn, the 
party should play hardball in an effort to sharp- 
en its identity. 


Among ideas bandied about: cutting corpo- 
rate taxes, insisting on tbe right to dual citizen- 
ship for foreign residents, slashing red tape, and 
— in an effort to resuscitate Free Democratic 
strength in Eastern Germany — declaring the 
East to be a “low-tax zone.” 

“We are a dinosaurs' club,” a liberal from the 
East lamented during the campaign. “We're dy- 
ing out” 

But the Free Democrats hardly resemble a 
hardball team. 

Tbe party’s boss in the state of Rhioeland- 
Palatinaie said publicly that the party is so weak 
it must show “restraint." 

As to suggestions that some liberal malcon- 
tents might rebel against Mr. Kohl when the 
Bundestag, the lower bouse of parliament, votes 
for chancellor in mid-November, tbe party stal- 
wart Otto Lambsdorff, a former economics min- 
ister, warned, “Whoever does that knows per- 
fectly well that be will have given the party a 
death blow.” 

Poised to profit from Free Democratic weak- 
ness are the Christian Social Union, the Bavarian 
sister party of Mr. Kohl’s Christian Democrats. 

After grabbing more votes than the liberals in 
elections, the conservative party is reeling its 
oats. 

Erwin Huber, the party’s general secretary, 
warned the Free Democrats this week not to 
press for foreigners’ rights, while asserting that 
his party “will be pushing harder for effective 
crime-prevention laws with no messing around," 

Difficulties will likely develop when it comes 
to handing out cabinet ministries. The Free 


Democrats now hold five of 19 posts; haring 
advocated a smaller cabinet, they may find them- 
selves victim of their own policy suggestion. 

Discontent has also roiled the normally placid 
Christian Democrats. A Kohl plan to save nearly 
$3 billion a year by curbing unemployment bene- - 
fits was challenged last week by the pro-labor 
wing of his party, which called for tax breaks for 
the poor. 

At the same time the chancellor is under pres- 
sure from the Bundesbank, or central hank to 
cut the burgeoning federal deficit and from Ger- 
many s employers’ federation to cut expensive 
social welfare benefits. 


Such countervailing pressures are symptomat- 
ic of the delicacy with which Mr. Kohl will have 
to navigate on many issues. 

Further complicating the post-election ma- 
neuvering is a legal challenge by the consti tu tion- 
. expert Hans Meyer, who contends that a quirk \ 


al expert Hans Meyer, who contends that a quirk * 

v Sf 1 ™ 3 ? election law illegally boosted Mr. * 

Kohl s majority from 2 to 10. 

The chancellor got the extra cushion through i'Fi\ * t 
an electoral wrinkle that permits creation of ' ' ^ • A J ■ 


an electoral wrinkle that permits creation of 
additional seats under certain conditions; the 
issue may be headed to the country’s constitu- 
tional court. 

All of which brings good cheer to the opposi- 
tion Social Democrats and their leader, Rudolf 
bcharping. 

Mr., Kohl “will have to fight incessantly for a 
^ th / Bundestag," predicted Rudolf 
Soaal Democrats’ deputy parlia- 
mentary leader. 

* cann T ot . s®* •ins coalition doing that, and 
therefore I don i think it will last 12 months.” 


Vhochtr, 








To call from country to country, or to the U.S., dial the World Phone® number of the country you're callina from 

113 DafitnarktCCW nflOI-007? Ireland* OdOjim ^ 


Antigua 

(Available from public card phones only ) #2 


Argentina* 

Austria! CO* 

Bahamas 

Bahrain 

Belgium CO* 

Birmudtl 

Bolivia* 

Brazil 
Canada i Oil 
Cayman Islands 
Chita ’JO 

Colombia 1 CC>* 

Costa Rica* 
Cyprus* 

Czech Republic!'.'!' 


001-800-333-1111 
022-903 012 
1-800 624 1000 
300 002 
0300 10012 
1-800-623-0484 
0-800 2222 
0008012 
1 800^888000 
I -800-624- 1000 
00*0316 
980 16-0001 
162 

030 90000 
00 42-000112 


Denmark'CO* 

Dominican Republic 

Eeuador-:- 

EgyptiOCi* 

(Outside of Cairo, dial 02 first.) 

0 Salvador* 

Hnlandi'icu 

Franeatcci* 

Gambia* 

Gemunyito 



8001-0022 
1-300- 751 -662 4 
170 


355-5770 

195 

9800-102-80 

19*-0fr19 

00-1-99 

0130-0012 


iLuiiiiod availability in eastern Garmany.l 
Greece CCr* 00-800-1211 

Grenada’. 1 - 1-900-524-8721 

Guatemala* 189 

HartilCCK- 001-800-444-1234 

Honduras-i- 001-900-674-1000 

Huaguy'CCi* QQ-* -800-01 *11 


Iceland* 999-002 

Iran* (Special Phones Only) 

kreiand-CCi 1 - 800 - 55-1001 

Israeli CCi 177 - 150-2727 

ItaiyiCD* 172-1022 

Jamaica 800 - 674-7000 

Kenya 

(Available from most major cities.) 08001 1 

Kuwait 800 MCK 800 - 62 -H 

LataanomCQ 600-624 

(Outside of Beirut, dial 07 first ) 425 - 036 * 


NicaragualCCi 

(Outside of Managua, dial 02 first.) 
Norway! CCi* 

Panama 
Military Bases 
Paraguay^- 

Peru (Quisido of Lima, dial 190 firsLl 


UechtenstaimCO* 

Luxembourg 

Mexico* 

MonJHXCO* 
Nattwriandsiccx 
Netherlands A^WIes-KHr 


1550222 
0800-0112 
95600 - 67 . 1-7000 
19 V- 00-19 
00022 91 22 
001 9 W- 950- 1022 


Poland! CO 
Portugal CC) 
Puerto Rlcoicci 
Qatjwiccu 
Romania! CD-'.- 
RuasialCO-i- 
San Manner CO* 
Saudi Arabia 
Slovak Republlccc 
South Alrieatcci 


16S 

800-13912 

108 

2 B 10-108 

008 - 11-800 

001-190 


Ov - 01 . 04 - 800-222 

05 - 017-1234 
1 800 - 888-8000 
0800 - 012-77 
01 - 800-1800 
8*10 800 497 7222 
172-1022 
1 800-11 
00-42 000112 
haoo-99-oon 


t?J4 

•« 


mu ■r.r.frv - *>*. 


Use your MCI Card,* local telephone card or call colled... all at the same low rates. 

(CCI Country- io- i-ouniry calling available. May not be available [o-from all Iniemarional locations. Certain 
restrictions apply, v Lmited availahilir/. V Wait (or second dial tone. A Available from LADATEL public 
phones only. Rate- depends on call origin in Me«to t Iniarnaiional convnunttaTions carrier. * Not avail- 
able I'lm public pay phonos • Public phonos may reauire deposit of com or prions card lor dial tone. 




Swtaerlandica. 02 °iJ5£l 

Syria"*) 

ICS? * T0b89 ° (Spcciai Ptwn « Only! 

Ukraine* 00*WM!77 

Unh^ Emirrte3 8 SS:™ 

Unftad KlngdonrCCi 800,11 

aSffJffS'Sam SKS 

To call anywhore other than ihc U.S. 

Urugi ny (C o'lnct not available ! 050 °okmi; 

SiiJKST** 0 ’■*»««; 

u "— ^ JSS 



Wqwfh 


^ , ,, T 

/ *.»» Mo Le t Take You Around The World 


■ 1 irri. .* *,| ;i fail rn.ttt, ind/. LnnJti/i Registered tis u Htn ipzpt'r a: thv /<>»/ ''itfit c