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INTERNATIONAL 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


He* 


Paris, Friday, September 2, 1994 


No. 34.683 


Estonia and Its Jews Remember a Nazi Horror 


By Fred Hiatt 

Washington Post Service 

KLOOGA, Estonia — Fifty years ago 
this month, Nazi officers committed one of 
the most brutal crimes of the Holocaust 
here. With their Estonian collaborators 
standing guard, the Germans forced more 
than 2,000 Jews to build thdr own funeral 
pyres and then shot most erf them before 
setting them all on fire. 

Thursday, in a sunlit forest clearing 
cooled by a Baltic Sea breeze, Estonians 
and Jews, including a handful of survivors 
of the Klooga massacre, gathered on the 
concentration -camp site to unveil a new 
memorial to the victims. 


To the mournful music of a solo violin 
and the Jewish Prayer for the Dead, in 
Hebrew and Estonian and some Yiddish, 

A deserted Baltic Sea training center symbol- 
izes Russia's lost empire. Page 1 

Israeli and Estonian leaders paid tribute 
and remembered. 

For Estonia, a tiny Baltic republic just 
emerging from five decades of Soviet occu- 
pation, the memorial represented another 
step in a sometimes painful coming to 
terms with history. It was no coincidence. 
Prime Minister Man Laar said, that the 


ceremony took place a day after Russian 
troops finally left Estonia, putting an end 
in Estonians' minds to World War II. 

For survivors like Avram Wapnik. 68, 
there was pain in the return but also some 
satisfaction in finally seeing a memorial to 
the fallen Jews. The Soviets had erected a 
monument here before turning the area 
into a military base, but their monument 
had honored only “Soviet citizens” — 
which most of the victims were not. 

And for Estonia's 3,000 Jews, official 
support for the memorial from the coun- 
try’s new democratic leaders held out the 
promise of a new era of tolerance. 

“We don't forget that some Estonians 


participated in the action against Jews," 
Gennady Grain berg, leader of the Jewish 
community in Estonia, said. “It’s true, and 
we don’t forget. 

"But on the other hand, I think this 
monument will raise some consensus in 
our society,” he said. “We cannot blame 
one another all the time." 

Unlike its Baltic neighbors. Lama and 
Lithuania, Estonia was home to only a few 
thousand Jews before the war, and the 
Nazis, after occupying Estonia in 1941, 
killed all who had not fled. But from 1942 
to 1944, the Germans dqponed Jews to 

See ESTONIA, Page 5 


British Hedge Reply 
On IRA’s Trace Call 


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j LOST CHILDREN Rwandan refugees lining up for photos near Coma, Zaire, in a L ntcef program to reunite IQ.OOU children and their families. 

Behind Veil of Segregation, Saudi Women Push Ahead 


By Nora Boustany 

Washington Post Servke 

RIYADH — Three years after the Gulf 
War prompted the first stirrings of a move- 
ment by Saudi women for greater free- 
doms, the public campaign has long since 
been suffocated by new official restric- 
tions, and a lower-profile struggle has en- 
sued for advancement in the business and 
professional world. 

The brief spark from a protest by 47 
women who drove cars in downtown Ri- 
yadh on Nov. 6. 1990, has been extin- 
guished. Saudi women are forbidden from 
driving, and many of those involved in the 
proiest lost their jobs temporarily and 


were reprimanded for causing embarrass- 
ment to the kingdom at a time of more 
pressing national issues. 

In addition, the setback has left ev en the 
most outspoken of women fearful of voic- 
ing their frustrations or views. 

As Saudi women prepare for careers in 
business and the professions — outnum- 
bering men in some of the sciences and 
medical fields and mastering the use of 
computers — they are still excluded from 
public debate. 

Women run investment firms, manage 
shops and work in hospitals. Except for the 
hospitals, however, all work sites in Saudi 


Arabia are segregated. The secret hope 
many harbor is that changing needs will 
reshape the role and participation of wom- 
en. “But whatever we do. we are in a 
pioneering role." said Shuaa Rashed. a 
radio broadcaster. 

One prominent businesswoman running 
her father's investment concern said she 
ignored the rules. 

“I deal with men.” she said with a shrug 
as she served Thai cany-out food in her 
kitchen while fielding calls from male em- 
ployees seeking instructions. “Am ! legal? 
No, but I do*iL Everybody knows, and 
nobody is stopping me." 


"The worst thing you can do in the Arab 
world is ask for permission.” she said. 
"The answer will always be. ‘No.’ ” 

Leila Tnulaima, head of a Studies Com- 
mittee on Preventive Medicine, said: 
“There are all these fields for men. Some- 
how, we are struggling and getting through 
the holes, pushing forward.” 

Abdullah T. Dabbagh. secretary-general 
of the Council of Saudi Chambers of Com- 
merce and Industry, said there were 6 male 
doctors and 10 female doctors in his ex- 
tended family, “which gives you an indica- 

See WOMEN, Page 5 


North Korea Seeks the Return of Carter 


N t V s I 


By James Steragold 

New York Tutus Service 

SEOUL — Kim Jong U, the reclusive 
Communist leader who is expected to suc- 
ceed his father us the absolute ruler of 
North Korea, has invited former President 
Jimmy Carter to Pyongyang to mediate the 
dispute with the United States ovct the 
North’s nuclear ambitions, according to 
American officials. 

Though Mr. Carter has reportedly not 
accepted the invitation yet — his second in 
recent months — the move was important 
for giving some insight into the t hinkin g of 
Mr. Kim, a mysterious man who dropped 
out of sight shortly after his father. Kim 11 


Sung, died in early July, and whose official 
status remains uncertain. 

Mr. Kim reportedly indicated in a letter 
to Mr. Carter that be would continue to 
follow the flexible policy on the nuclear 
issue that his father adopted shortly before 
his death from a heart attack. But he ex- 
pressed no interest in rescheduling what 
would have been an historic first meeting 
with President Kim Young Sam of South 
Korea. The meeting was to have taken 
place just two weeks after Kim H Sung 
died. 

The invitation was reported here Thurs- 
day in a major daily newspaper, the Joong- 
ang Daily News, and was confirmed by an 


American government official in Washing- 
ton, who said that the letter had been 
received several weeks ago and that Mr. 
Carter had yet to accept the invitation. 

It was clear, however, that the .American 
government — which, thanks to an earlier 
effort by Mr. Carter, is already engaged in 
high-level negotiations with North Korea 
— was un enthusiastic about the prospect 
of Mr. Carter’s opening a new and uncer- 
tain channel to the North Korean govern- 
ment. The South Korean government has 
been little short of hostile to the idea. 

"This has to be looked at a liule nega- 
See KOREA, Page 5 




CBS and NBC Are Subjects of Sale Talks 






By Geraldine Fabrikant 

Srve York Times Service 

NEW YORK — In moves that could 
lead to a change of ownership for two of 
the three major American television net- 
works, Time Warner Inc. is negotiating to 
buv NBC. and Walt Disney Co. has appar- 
ently contacted CBS Inc. about buying 
that network. * 

Time Warner, which already has exten- 
sive holdings in cable television, has held 
talks in recent weeks with General Electric 
Co. about buying its NBC Network sub- 
sidiarv and some of NBC’s cable services 
v for about $2.5 billion in stock and cash. 


several people famili ar with the negotia- 
tions said. 

To bear its critics, NBC has never bsen a 
good fit for General Electric, which ac- 
quired the network in 1985 and has since 
seen it slip to third place from first in the 
prime-time ratings. 

Disney, meanwhile, has expressed inter- 
est to CBS about a buyout, a person famil- 
iar with the talks said. Earlier this summer, 
CBS nearly merged with QVC Inc., a ca- 
ble-channel home-shopping company. 

[Representatives for Time Warner de- 
clined" to comment, Reuters reported in 
New York. Robert C. Wright, president of 


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France 9.00 FF South Arabia JMOR. 

Gabon 960 CFA Senegal ....^OCFA 

Greece 300 Dr. Spain ...... 200 PTAS 

Italy -IfiWL.re Tunisia ,. ..LOW Dm 

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the NBC network, said The New York 
Times report was "grandiose.” 

["That story is no; accurate." he said. 
But Mr. Wright declined to detail any 
inaccuracies or talks that were occurring 
among the companies.] 

An industry executive familiar with 
NBC’s side of the negotiations said: "It’s 
all true. Time Warner has held talks both 
with Jack Welch and Bob Wright.” 

He was referring to John F. Welch Jr.. 
the chairman and chief executive of Gener- 
al Electric, as well as Mr. Wright. 

Representatives for Genera! Electric 
and Time Warner declined to comment on 
any talks, as did Judy Smith, an -NBC 
spokeswoman. A person close to Time 
Warner said he would give the deal less 
than a 50-50 chance of happening. 

In the case of CBS. the company's chair- 
man, Laurence A. Tisch, denied that there 
were any discussions with Disney. Disney 
declined" to comment. 

Two executives with knowledge of the 
discussions said Disney had also held talks 
recently with Mr. Wright of NBC about 

See TV, Page 5 


U.S. and Cuba 
Meet on Exodus 

NEW YORK i‘AP) — Hoping to 
halt the flood of Cubans trying to 
reach the United States, U.S. officials 
met with a Cuban delegation Thurs- 
day to discuss the exodus and the 
possibilities of legal migration. 

Michael Skol, the chief U.S. dele- 
gate at the talks, rejected suggestions 
that discussions might cover wider is- 
sues, such as lifting the 32-year-old 
U.S. economic embargo against the 
Caribbean island. Cuba has been 
seeking broader talks. 

Several hundred refugees were 
picked up at sea by the U.S. Coast 
Guard and a navy ship early Thurs- 
day. On Wednesday. 2,159 Cubans 
were picked up, as the exodus re- 
sumed in earnest after several days of 
bad weather. 


Books 

Bridge 

Crossword 


Page 9. 
Page 9. 
Page 19. 


In Ulster , Elation 
On One Side hut 
Gloom on Other 

By William E. Schmidt 

AVh 1 York Tima Service 

LONDONDERRY, Northern Ireland 
— The day after the Irish Republican 
.Army declared an unconditional cease-fire 
and ordered its units to put down their 
weapons, people in this town where the 
"troubles" began 25 years ago emerged 
into the sun and wondered if this was what 
peace felt like. 

As in other towns across the troubled 
province, it was quiet in Londonderry on 
Thursday. Not only was the unconditional 
and complete "cessation of military activi- 
ty" that had been promised at midnight by 
the IRA still holding, hours later, but the 
rival loyalist paramilitaries were keeping 
their fire, too. 

For people in the republican Bogside. 
the mostly Catholic area where the first 
gasoline bombs were tossed in 1969, the 
IRA’s promise of peace rather than war 
elicited a mixture of elation and relief and 
a sense the worst was now over. 

"For the first time in years I feel like I 
can walk on the streets without worrying 
about getting shot," said Rita Doherty. 71, 
who watched the 1 969 battles in Bogside 
from her front window and lost a son-in- 
law to British soldiers. “I'm just glad 1 
lived long enough to see this day.” 

Across the road, Ann McKinney was 
pushing her son in a stroller and studying 
the road to watch for passing army patrols. 

"Usually by now I’d have seen two or 
three patrols," she said. "But there hasn’t 
been a one. I think that's great. Not one 
British patrol in two hours.” 

But in the Protestant neighborhoods 
across ihe River Fyle. the only calm most 
people admitted was the kind that comes 
before the worst storm. 

Gregory Campbell, a city councilman 
from Londonderry’s unionist quarter, 
agreed that it was nice to wake up knowing 
for the first time in years that he was not a 
target of an IRA assassin. But as for the 
future, he was gloomy, worried like other 
members of the province’s Protestant ma- 
jority that the price for the IRA cease-fire 
‘iad yet to be counted. 

“I do not trust the British government.” 
he said, suspecting like others that Lon- 
don, despite its insistent denials, had al- 
ready chosen a course that would slowly 
loosen Britain’s ties to the province. The 
British, he said, are setting the stage for the 
day when Northern Ireland can be unified 
with Republic of Ireland to the south. Lhe 
overarching goal of the IRA and other 
nationalists in the province. 

"I think of myself as British first not 

See LUSTER, Page 5 


Major Holds Out 
For ‘Permanent’ 




By John Damton 

VVw W-JL Time; Service 

LONDON — The British government 
found itself locked in a war of words, or 
rather a war over a single word, in its 
dilemma over how to respond to the Irish 
Republican .Army’s cease-fire, which took 
hold in Nortiiem Ireland early Thursday. 

The word is “permanent.” For eight 
months, the government of Prime Minister 
John Major has insisted dut for Sinn Fein, 
the political arm of the IRA, to enter into 
exploratory talks about peace it must re- 
nounce violence once and for all. 

The cease-fire announcement Wednes- 
day. widely hailed as a breakthrough that 
could hasten an end to 25 years of blood- 
shed, sidestepped this particular linguistic 
formulation and spoke instead of “a com- 
plete cessation of military operations." 

For the British government and for the 
Protestant unionists who want Ulster to 
remain part of Britain, this was not quite 
enough. Even if the cessation were "com- 
plete," that did not mean Lhe campaign of 
violence could not be resumed at some 
point in the future, they argued. 

Accordingly, Mr. Major issued a dou- 
ble-edged statement in response. Although 
he said he was "greatly encouraged" by the 
IRA’s announcement, he wanted more as- 
surance that "this is indeed intended to be 
a permanent renunciation of violence, that 
is to say, for good.” 

His stand comforted the moderate Ul- 
ster unionist politicians, grouped around 
James Molyneaux, head of the Ulster 
Unionist Party, who hate the IRA, are 
suspicious that deals may be struck behind 
their backs and yet are also attracted to the 
idea of eventual peace if it does not mean 
joining the Irish Republic. 

The position of half-accepting, half-re- 
jecting gives the Ulster moderates and Mr. 
Major time to reflect and work out a more 
studied reaction to events that suddenly 
seem fast-paced. 

But it also leaves the prime minister 
open to accusations of being obdurate and 
nitpicking. Throughout the day, pressure 
was building from many quarters for him 
to be more flexible and to proclaim that 
the IRA statement was sufficient to launch 
a three-month testing period to see if the 
peace could hold. 

John Hume, head of a Roman Catholic 
nationalist party and the key figure in talks 
leading up to the breakthrough this week, 
was first to express astonishment at Mr. 
Major’s interpretation. “1 am just amazed 
at the playing of words that is going on." 
he said. He added that the IRA statement 

See IRA, Page 5 



, , ucm Rennr. < Agnu( Francc-Prow 

A British soldier was all smiles in Belfast on Thursday after the IRA cease-fire. 


3 R’s : Rights , Religion and Revised Lenin 


By Margaret Shapiro 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — Clutching bouquets for 
their teachers, millions of Russian children 
began a new school year on Thursday with 
textbooks wiped clean of communist ideol- 
ogy and filled instead with information 
that educators hope will be a preparation 
for the post-Soviet era. 

Civil rights, freedom of expression, ba- 
sic business ideas and regional histories 
have replaced beginner readers featuring 
"Grampa Lenin” and history books heavy 
on class struggle. 


Writers acclaimed by the old regime 
have been downgraded in favor of better 
ones long-suppressed. Pictures of commu- 
nist leaders are gone, and their sayings 
have been exchanged for quotes from the 
Bible and Koran. 

“What is changing today is not the tech- 
nology or the methods of education, but 
the very world of education,” said the 
deputy education minister. Alexander As- 
molov. “With the help of the school books 
we may change the mentality of Russians." 

Although the communist system and the 


Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, there wa 
no instantaneous change in schooling. 

Students and teachers continued to us 
the ideology-laden texts and improvised a 
best as they could. Some found foreigi 
textbooks and translated them; other 
wrote information out by hand. Many sim 
ply did nothing, and continued to teacl 
what they had always had. 

The result was an odd disconnect be 
tween the drastically transformed Russi; 
and its schools that many here felt was no 

See SCHOOL, Page 5 




Karadzic Threatens 
Sanctions on Foes 

He Demands Belgrade End Embargo 


Return 

PALE, Bosnia-Herzesovina 
— The Bosnian Serbian trader, 
Radovan Karadzic, threatened 
Thursday to cut gas, water, 
power and food supplies to Bos- 
nia's Muslim and Croatian 
communities unless Belgrade 
ended an economic blockade 
against its ethnic kin. 

“We have the full right to 
impose sanctions against the 
Muslims, to prevent even a bird 
from flying to them, until the 
world compels Yugoslavia to 
lift economic sanctions,” he 
said in a speech to the Bosnian 
Serbian assembly. “You can ex- 
pect within the next few days 
the strictest possible sanctions 
against the Muslims until Yu- 
goslavia lifts its embargo 
against us.” 

Assembly members had gath- 
ered to ratify the result of a 
referendum last week rejecting 
the latest international peace 
plan for Bosnia. 

Belgrade imposed a trade 
embargo on Bosnia's Serbs four 
weeks ago to punish them for 
refusing to agree to the plan, 
which would force them to give 
up roughly a third or the territo- 
ry they now hold. 

■ U.S. General Criticized 

Daniel Williams of the Wash- 
ington Post reported from Wash- 
ington; 

An American general has met 
with a Serbian general suspect- 
ed of ordering the deaths of 
civilians in a campaign of eth- 
nic deansing even though. State 
Department officials said, they 
had advised him not to do so. 


Lieutenant General Wesley 
Clark, the Joint Chiefs of Staffs 
director of strategy, plans and 
policy, met Saturday with Gen- 
eral Ratko Mladic, who was 
named a war crimes suspect by 
a previous secretary of state. 
Lawrence S. Eagleburger. 

A spokesman for the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff said, however, 
that General Dark had not 
been aware of any directions he 
not meet with General Mladic. 

What State Department offi- 
cials said they found especially 
disturbing was a photograph of 
General Clark and General 
Mladic wearing each other's 
caps. The picture appeared in 
several European newspapers. 
U.S. officials said. 

General Clark accepted as 
gifts General Mladic's hat, a 
bottle of brandy and a pistol, 
U.S. officials said. 

The spokesman said General 
Clark would not elaborate on 
the conversation he had with 
General Mladic. As for the 
gifts, die spokesman said they 
were a customary feature of 
military meetings. 

The ’Muslim- led Bosnian 
government inquired about the 
meeting, incenskl that the State 
Department had recently re- 
jected a trip by one of its gener- 
als to Washington. 

Some European allies asked 
whether Genera . 1 Dark's visit 
portended a change in U.S. pol- 
icy, which bolds that the Serbs 
are the aggressors in Bosnia. On 
Wednesday, the State Depart- 
ment cabled its embassies in 
Europe to say that there had 
been no policy change. 


Kohl Party Outlines 
Reforms for EU 


Reuters 

BONN — Chancellor Hel- 
mut Kohl’s Christian Demo- 
cratic Union on Thursday pro- 
posed far-teaching reform of 
the European Union and said 
member states should move at 
different speeds toward closer 
integration. 

In a paper presented by the 
party's parliamentary leader, 
Wolfgang Schauble, the party 
called for more majority voting, 
curbs on the right of individual 
states to veto EU decisions and 
the development of common 
foreign and defense policies. 

Mr. Schauble said the 12-na- 
tion bloc would have to adopt 
the concept of “variable geome- 
try" to ensure the admission of 
new members did not slow 
down the process of political 
and economic union. 

Explaining the concept, he 
added: “For a transitional peri- 
od we must accept as the lesser 
evil that not all members will 
take part in every step of inte- 
gration at the same time.” 

The paper said new forms of 
majority voting should be con- 
sidered to replace the principle 
of unanimity. “It is essential 
that no country should be al- 
lowed to use its right of veto to 
block the efforts of other coun- 
tries more able and willing to 
intensify their cooperation and 
deepen integration," it said. 

Although the party’s paper 
has no official status, the fact 
that it was presented by a politi- 
cal heavyweight such os Mr. 
ScMublc and distributed in 
English and French as well as 
German suggested it reflected 
Mr. Kohl's views. 

The document, drawn up by 
Christian Democratic Union 
foreign policy experts in both 
the German and European Par- 
liaments, called for more de- 
mocracy mid openness in the 
EU. It said Parliament should 
become a genuine lawmaking 
body with the same rights as the 
Council of Ministers, which 


should take on the functions of 
a second chamber. The execu- 
tive commission should take on 
features of a European govern- 
ment. 

The paper said five former 
communist countries — Po- 
land, the Czech and Slovak Re- 
publics, Hungary and Slovenia 
— should be admitted to the 
EU around the year 2000. but 
there would have to be long 
transition periods before they 
acquired the full rights and ob- 
ligations of membership. 

The party’s paper echoed in 
part a call by Prime Minister 
Edouard Balladur of France on 
Monday for a three-tier Europe 
in which the strongest states 
would form the hard core. 

“The existing hard core of 
countries oriented to greater in- 
tegration and closer coopera- 
tion must be further strength- 
ened,” the paper said, referring 
to Germany, France, the Neth- 
erlands, Belgium and Luxem- 
bourg. 


T .'£: V : /plTTST' 



Mintfauga* Kulbu/Auocmcd I 


President Lennart Men of Estonia celebrating the departure of Russian troops. 

Relic of Russia’s Lost Empire 

Baltic Center Deemed Irreplaceable Is Now Deserted 


Wa shin g t on Pan Service 

PALDISKL Estonia — In this long-closed 
Baltic Sea port, generations of Soviet sailors 
trained to operate the strategic submarines 
that kept the United States under constant 
threat of attack by nuclear missiles. 

More than 2,000 navy men at a time cyded 
through the center, where one building alone 
held more than 700 classrooms. Two reactors 
gave the sailors practice in operating nuclear- 
powered engines under the sea. 

Now the central academy is deserted, its 
perimeter patrolled by a few Estonian sol- 
diers with guns and dogs. 

Its classrooms have been stripped bare by 
retreating Russian sailors, and only a few 
unwanted objects provide a haunting remind- 
er of the empire Russia has lost: an accordion 
on a dusty windowsill, an empty vodka bottle, 
a black-and-white photograph of former 
President Mikh ail S. Gorbachev. 

The re maining 6,000 residents of the town 
that served the naval base, of whom only 250 
are Estonian citizens , wonder how they will 
make a living. 

Few of the losses of Russia’s withdrawal, 
which was completed Wednesday, will be 


regretted as sharply as Pal diski, according to 
officials in Estonia and Russia. 

During three years of thorny talks over 
troop withdrawals, Moscow insisted that the 
base was strategically irreplaceable and had 
to be maintained. In the end, though, Esto- 
nia’s demand that all foreign troops leave its 
soil won out. 

As a remit, Russian experts began decom- 
missioning the first of the two nuclear reac- 
tors Aug. 24. In an operation so delicate that 
Paldiski’s residents were encouraged to spend 
the day at the zoo in Tallinn, about 40 kilome- 
ters (25 miles) to the east, the experts lifted 
the roof of the reactor and began withdrawing 
the spent fuel rods, which will be sent back to 
Russia for disposal. 

According to an agreement reached in July 
between Presidents Lennart Mcri of Estonia 
and Boris N. Yeltsin of Russia, those 210 
Russian experts and their families will be 
permitted to stay in Pal diski for about a year 
to complete the decommissioning. 

Then they too will leave, ending any official 
Russian presence in a port captured by Peter 
the Great from the Swedes in 1710. 

— FRED HIATT 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Pasqua 

Defends Zaire Wants Refugees Out in Month 

Expulsions 
Of Muslims 


ConpM by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — Interior Minister 
Charles Pasqua on Thursday 
defended France's expulsion of 
20 Algerian Muslim militant 
suspects to Burkina Faso and 
said he would deport more if 
necessary to assure security. 

“Do I have to wait until 
bombs blow up in our country 
and kill French people, or 
should I intervene ahead of 
time in order to dismantle the 
networks?” he said on Europe 1 
radio. 

“As soon as they cross the 
yellow line in some way and 
become a men ace to the repub- 
lic and to the safety of the 
French people, one must inter- 
vene,” Mr. Pasqua said. 

“That’s what we did, and we 
will do it again,” he added. 

In another development, the 
French police arrested at least 
1 1 Algerian and Moroccan im- 
migrants on Thursday linked to 
suspects in the recent murder of 
two Spanish tourists in Moroc- 
co. Those arrested were accused 
of association with a terrorist 
operation, suggesting that the 
Moroccan police believe the 
suspects in the Marrakech inci- 
dent were terrorists. 

Authorities said Judge Jean- 
Locris Brugui&re ordered the 
sweep on the basis of informa- 
tion provided by the Moroccan 
police after the arrest of four 
suspects in an Aug. 24 murder- 
robbery at a Marrakech hotel. 

Mr. Pasqua said the Algeri- 
ans were deported because they 
had used French soil to support 
a terrorist network. - 

Human-rights leaders and 
lawyers for me expelled men, 
stunned by the swiftness and 
secrecy of the government’s 
move, protested that it had 
been timed to head off a court 
hearing due on the legality of 
the internments. 

The crackdown, ordered by 
Mr. Pasqua, was seen as a dec- 
laration of all-out war on Mus- 
lim fundamentalists who are 
fighting the Algerian govern- Stockhoi 
meat- (Reuters. API 


GOMA, Zaire (Reuters) — Zaire said Thursday (hat it wanted 
the 1.2 millioD Rwandan refugees on its territory to leave by the 
end of the month and promised to stop Hutu militiamen who are 
terrorizing refugees into staying. 

“Our wish is that all the Rwandan refugees should leave by 
Sept. 30, 1994,” Justice Minister Kamanda Wa Kamanda said. 
Speaking at the start of a ministerial meeting with the Rwandan 
government, he said Zaire would encourage the refugees return by 
halting the activities of Rwandans hostile to the new government 
in Kigali and disarming and encamping members of the former 
Rwandan government army, 28,000 of whom are in Zaire. 

Aid officials say many Hutu refugees wishing to return have 
been frightened into staying by Hutu militiamen who accuse those 
thinking of leaving of taking sides with the Rwanda Patriotic 
Front, which won the dvfl war and is dominated by members of 
the minority Tutsi community. 

Panama’s New Leader Takes Office 

PANAMA CITY (Reuters) — Ernesto Ptrez Balladares took 
office Thursday as president of Panama. The businessman is the 
country’s first freely elected leader in nearly three decades. ' 

Mr. P6rez Balia dares took over from former President Guil- 
lermo Endara, who was installed during the 1989 UJS. invasion of 
Panama that ousted strongman Manuel Antonio Noriega and 
ended more than two decades of military rule. 


China Said to Bar Disabled Athlete 

BEUING (NYT) — A Chinese athlete whose legs were 
crushed by an army tank during the June 4, 1989, militar y 
crackdown around TiananmenSquare has reportedly been 
prevented from compering in China’s handicapped. athletic 
games 

A spokesman for China's national sports commission and 
the Far East and South Pacific Disabled Games would-ioot 
comment Thursday on reports that Fang Zheng, whose legs 
were amputated after he was run over, has been ejected from 
the games, which started Thursday. 


German Youth’s Letter Admits Arson . 

DUSSELDORF (Reuters) — One of four Germans on trial for 
the arson murder of five T urkish immigrants admitted the attack 
in a letter to a friend, the court was told Thursday. 

The chief judge revealed the existence of the letter after it was 
passed on to him by a lawyer for a young woman. 

The judge said Christian Reber, 27, wrote that he alone set fire 
in 1993 to the home of the i mmig r an t family in Solingen. It was 
not dear whether the letter would carry the same weight as a legal 
confession. 

Carlos Interests the Swedish Police 

STOCKHOLM (AP) — Policemen investigating the murder of 
Prime Minister Olof Palme in 1986 want to look at revolvers 
found at the home of the accused terrorist Carlos, officials said 
Thursday. 

Carlos, whose real name is filich Ramirez SAnchez, had two 
357-caliber handguns in a safe when be was detained in Sudan 
last month, the Swedish newspaper Aftonbladet reported. The 
same type of powerful gun was used when Mr. Palme was shot in 
holm. 



V 1 : 


itf* 1 


Gadhofi Seeking Ways to Ease Sanctions 


Jtntlanian to Visit Kuwait 

The Associated Press 

AMMAN, Jordan — A rank- 
ing Jordanian diplomat. Mash- 
hour Zeben, will visit Kuwait 
for four days beginning Satur- 
day. 


By Robin Wright 

Lot Angeles Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — In one of several 
attempts to ease the tightening grip of 
United Nations sanctions. Colonel Moam- 
mar Gadhafi's troubled regime in Libya 
has held out the prospect of turning over 
an indicted CIA renegade to appease the 
U.S. government, according to American 
sources and a former CIA official. 

Libya may also be willing to pay mil- 
lions of dollars in compensation to families 
of those who died in the 1988 bombing 
over Scotland of Pan American World 
Airlines Flight 103, in hopes of eliminating 
its most outspoken critics and thus easing 
international pressure, according to fam- 
ilies and their representatives. 

But neither the Clinton administration 
nor the families of victims appear interest- 
ed in either possibility because they want 
to maintain pressure on the regime and 
bold it accountable for the disaster. 

United Nations sanctions imposed in 
December and plummeting prices have cut 
annual oil revenues from S21 billion a 
decade ago to about $6 billion, making this 
the most difficult year of Colonel Gadha- 


fi’s rale, according to U.S. and Arab offi- 
cials. 

As a result, Tripoli has spent at least 550 
million in two years on ploys first to pre- 
vent sanctions, then to negotiate an easing 
of the punitive economic, arms and air 
travel restrictions, a U.S. official said. The 
sanctions were imposed after Libya failed 
to cooperate with in vestigations of the Pan 
Am 103 disaster and the bombing in 1989 
over Niger of a French airliner in which 
171 died. 

“The Libyans are out there trying to 
make as many inroads as possible,” said a 
senior U.S. counterterrorism official. “Ev- 
ery third person who has ever held a gov- 
ernment position in this town has called us 
and said they've been approached." 

One of the latest incidents centers on 
Frank Terpil, the CIA renegade communi- 
cations expert indicted with a CIA under- 
cover agent, Edmund Wilson, in 1980 for 
conspiring to kill a Libyan dissident and 
for selling tons of explosives to Libya. 

Mr. Terpil — convicted in absentia and 
sentenced in New York to 30 years on 
arms charges — has spent the iniervenir ‘ 
years in Libya, Syria and Lebanon, as wc 


as in Eastern Europe before communism's 
demise there. According to a former gov- 
ernment official, Mr. Terpil recently has 
spent limited time in Libya and has been 
spotted throughout Eastern and Western 
Europe. 

Abdullah Sanousst chief of Libyan in- 
telligence, was scheduled to meet in late 
June in Cairo with Vincent Cannistraro, a 
former CIA counterterrorism expert, to 
discuss possible assistance with Mr. Tcr- 
pil's capture, according to Mr. Cannistraro 
and U.S. officials. 

The meeting did not take place, but 
Libya’s approach to Mr. Caruustraro fits 
what has become its modus operandi of 
trying to hire well-known figures to plead 
its case. Having appeared on many U-S. 
television programs and served as an ABC 
News consultant, he is now the most visi- 
ble former CIA counterterrorism official. 

Mr. Cannistraro said he agreed to talk 
with the Libyan intelligence chief as a 
“volunteer” and did not stand to benefit 
from the meeting financially or otherwise. 
He described Libya’s motive as “an at- 
tempt to get out from under sanctions.” 


Court Rule on Gay Petty Officer Casts Doubt on Clinton Policy 


"ihecngmol' 

Just tell the taxi driver, 
“Sank n» doe new"® 

5, rue Dmmcni Paris (Opfra) 
TpL: (1)42.61.71.14 


By Jane Gross 

Ne*> York Times Sernee 

SAN FRANCISCO — A 
U.S. appeals court has ruled 
that the navy cannot discharge 
a homosexual flight instructor 
merely because he said he was 
gay, a holding that challenges 
the military’s old policy and 
casts legal doubts on the Clin- 
ton administration’s revised 
regulations. 

The ruling Wednesday, by 
the U.S. Court of Appeals for 


the 9th Circuit here, upheld in 
part an earlier decision by a 
federal judge in Los Angeles. 

The Los Angeles judge said 
that “a military service cannot 
discharge a service member 
solely because of a statement of 
sexual orientation devoid of a 
concrete, expressed desire to act 
on his homosexual propensity." 

The appeals court ruling de- 
ferred to the navy’s judgment 
that homosexual conduct “seri- 
ously impairs the accomplish- 


jua ask the butter... 


Vim uT*itt i> ft* i tent it it it. 




S-I -N ■ C- A-P-0 • R - E 


meat of the military mission.” 
but the court rejected the argu- 
ment that a declaration of ho- 
mosexuality was reason enough 
for discharge. 

“No si mil ar assumption is 
made with respect to service 
members who are heterosexual” 
unless they are guilty of such 
prohibited conduct as adultery, 
sodomy or bigamy, the court 
said in a unanimous ruling by 
the three-judge paneL 

The decision came in the case 
of Keith Memhold. a petty offi- 
cer with a distinguished 13-year 
record who two years ago told a 
television interviewer, “Yes, in 
fact, I am gay.” , 

Petty Officer Meinhold’s 
forced discharge in 1992 and 
court-ordered reinstatement 
shortly afterward came under 
the old military regulations bar- 


ring homosexuals from service. 

Representatives on both 
sides said the ruling could influ- 
ence the courts as they consid- 
ered lawsuits challenging the 
newer regulations, the “don't 
ask. don’t tell, don’t pursue" 
policy. 

Petty Officer Meinhold's 


lawyer, John McGuire, said the 
message freon the ruling was 
that “you can be gay and be in 
the military; you can say you 
are gay and be in the military. 

“What you can't do,” he said, 
“is offer explicit evidence that 
you will engage in homosexual 
acts.” 


Iraqis Discuss flushing Trans-Turkey Pipeline 


Reuters 

ANKARA — An Iraqi dele- 
gation began talks in Ankara on 
Thursday on the flushing of the 
trans-Turkev pipeline, which 
has been idle since the United 
Nations imposed sanctions in 
1990, oil and Foreign Ministry 
officials said. 

The talks focused on the dis- 


tribution of humanitarian aid in 
Iraq from Turkey in return for 
up to 27 milli on barrels of crude 
to be flushed through the pipe- 
line if the project goes ahead, a 
spokesman from state ofl com- 
pany Botas said. Iraq and the 
United Nations have been un- 
able to agree so far on the distri- 
bution of the aid. 


UN Aid Wo Aers Quit Liberian City 

MONROVIA. Liberia (Reuters) — United Nations aid workers 
withdrew to Liberia's capital Thursday from the central city of 
Gbarnga, saying security in the region had eroded to a point 
where they could no longer operate there. 

Gbarnga. stronghold of the militia leader Charles Taylor, is 
under attack by opposing guerrilla groups from at least two 
directions, and there has bran fighting there between rival factions 
within Mr. Taylor s National Patriotic Front 

The United Nations’ World Food Program said its convoys had 
been stopped and harassed by Front fighters, and 9 out of 18 
vehicles seized by Mr. Taylors guerrillas were still missing, 
despite a pledge by the warlord to return them. 

U.S. Troops in Russia for Maneuvers 

MOSCOW (Reuters) — American soldiers arrived in Russia's 
southern Urals on Thursday to take part in a nine-day joint 
peacekeeping exercise, a Russian Defense Ministry spokesman 
said. 

Russian troops welcomed General Leonard Holder, co mman d- 
er of the U-S. Army’s 3d Infantry Division, to Totsk, in the 
Orenburg region, not far from the Kazakh frontier. The two 
countries' national anthems were played at the ceremony. 

The maneuvers, involving 250 U.S. servicemen, are code-named 
Peacekeeper 94. They are designed to work out tactics, techniques 
and procedures for future UJS. -Russian peacekeeping operations. 
The troops win practice mounting patrols, setting up refugee 
camps and escorting humanitarian convoys. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

I 

U.S. Extends Ban on Lebanon Travel 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Warning that travel to Lebanon 
carries “unacceptable risks,” the United States government has 
extended into an eighth year its official ban on American citizens' 
going there. Continuation of the restriction, imposed after a wave 

a mixed reaction from Ara^Amencana^ Lebanese-American 
groups. 

“We recognize and support progress in the reconstruction of 
Lebanon bong made under Prune Minister Hariri' s leadership,'* 
the State Department said. “However, events there continue 
show that Lebanon is still a dangerous place. No U.S. citizen in 
Lebanon, official or private; can be considered safe from terrorist 
acts” 

At a news conference, Albert Mokhiber, president of the 
Amencan-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, condemned the 
ban’s extension as “arm-twisting” that was aimed at getting 
Lebanon to sign a peace accord with Israel. 

European airfines continued to benefit from a travel boom in 
July, with passenger traffic 8.5 percent hig her than the same 
month last year, the Association of European Ai rline* said Thurs- 
day in Brussels. (Reuters) 

A total of 93 people woe ldBed in accidents in the French Alps 
from June through August, and 726 were injured. The figures last 
year were 70 dead and 630 injured. Rescue officials traced the 
increase to good weather in June and July that attracted man) 
more people tc the mountains. 





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THE AMERICAS/ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 2, 1994- 


Page 3 


POLITICAL NOTES 


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Wlffrtdo Le'C'Tht A*Miatcif P«w 

DECISIONS, DECISIONS — Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, 
holding a strategy conference during a bicycle outing on Martha's Vineyard. 


or MasH’iiw 


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Clinton and ^asty* TV Mown 

WASHINGTON — President Bill O in ton 
has been badly battered by television news 
coverage since taking office, with negative 
assessments filling the airwaves in every 
month but one. a new study says. 

At a time when some journalists are ques- 
tioning whether media coverage of politicians 
has become too cynical, the report from the 
Center for Media and Public Affairs may 
help fuel an emerging argument that, whatev- 
er nis own mistakes, Mr. Clinton has been 
unfairly painted as a failed president. 

From Inauguration Day through late June 
1994. Mr. Clinton has been the target of more 
than 2,400 negative comments on the net- 
work evening newscasts, an average of nearly 
five per night, the center found. He drew far 
greater coverage, and far more negative cov- 
erage, than George Bush did in the first 16 
months of his presidency. 

The study, which tabulates explicitly posi- 
tive and negative comments from all sources, 
found that nearly 62 percent of the evalua- 
tions of Mr. Clinton were negative. When 
obvious partisans, such as administration of- 
ficials or congressional Republicans, were 
excluded, nearly three out of four assess- 
ments of Mr. Clinton were negative on “NBC 
Nightly News," “CBS Evening News" and 
ABC’s "World News Tonight." 

“We've hit the point where the coverage is 
so nasty and there’s so much of it that it’s 
produced a qualitative difference in the way 
people feel about their president,” said Rob- 
ert Lichter, the center’s director. “There’s a 
feeling that this guy is a scoundrel because 
there’s such a hostile media environment. 
He’s had the misfortune of being president at 
the dawning of an age that combines attack- 
dog journalism with tabloid news." ( WP) 

Air Force Uniform Grounded? 

WASHINGTON — Friends of General 
Ronald R. Fogleman are predicting that one 
of his first changes as new air force chief of 
staff later this year will be to scrap the con- 
troversial officers' uniform launched by his 
predecessor. General Merrill A McPeak, in 
1991. 

The design, which combines an ainine- 
stylc jacket and trousers with naval officers’ 
stripes on the sleeves, was intended to bring 


U.S. Air Force uniforms closer to those of 
Britons and other North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization allies. But it bombed here at 
home, where air force veterans derided it as 
“looking like a bunch of Delta Air Lines 
pilots who are working for the navy.” ( LA Ti 

National Pqbt Hits the Road 

PEORIA, Illinois — David Wilhelm, who 
is leaving his job as chairman of the Demo- 
cratic National Committee after a string of 
election defeats, probably can be blamed for 
the political bus. too. 

It was Mr. Wilhelm who. in 1992. con- 
ceived the idea of the campaign bus tour, 
which became the cemcrpiccc of Bill Clin- 
ton's and At Gore's march to the While 
House. The device was so successful that by 
1996 there could be gridlock on the nation's 
highways as candidates for everything from 
president to sheriff take to the road in a 
motley assortment of veh icles. 

There alread> has been a health-reform 
bus this year, and now this: a white rental 
truck hauling a long blue trailer attached to 
which is a 3.300-pound digital “clock.” 
which, when last seen, displayed the number 
S4.678.06l, 157,557. It embarked from Peoria 
on Wednesday on an eight-week. 10.000-mile 
journey to 29 states to remind Americans of 
what most vaguely recognize as a serious 
national concern: the deficit and the national 
debt. 

The clock belongs to the Concord Coali- 
tion, an organization founded in 1992 by two 
former senators. Warren B. Rudman. Re- 
publican of New Hampshire, and Paul E. 
Tsongas, a Massachusetts Democrat, to pres- 
sure Congress to eliminate the annual federal 
budget deficit and begin to whittle away the 
S4-trillion-pIus national debt. Usually, the 
clock is kept in a warehouse just outside 
Washington and hauled out for special occa- 
sions. But Washington, where the deficit is 
approved each year, has not been particularly 
receptive to the coalition's message. ( HP ’ 

Quoto/Unquote 

Ken Bode, host of “Washington Week in 
Review" on public television and a teacher at 
DePauw University in Indiana, on Mr. Clin- 
ton: “His problem is he doesn't seem to know 
what he stands for, and the people out here 
don’t trust him." f HP > 


Simpson Secrecy Order Delayed 

Judge Ponders How to Curb Flow of Leaks to Media 


Hip*? f ' L "” 


By Christine Spolar 

Washington Pat Service 

LOS ANGELES — Judge 
"Lance A. ho of Superior Court, 
'poised to take what he called "a 
very large step" to stem news 
‘reports of the murder trial of 
■O. J. Simpson, has backed off 
bis threat to pm a damp on 
public documents filed in the 

case. , , 

' Judge Ito had proposed seal- 
ing all documents and barring 
anyone associated with the case 
from publicly discussing evi- 
dence, documents or exhibits in 
an attempt to aid in the selec- 
tion of an impartial jury to hear 
the evidence in the highly publi- 
cized case. 

On Wednesday, he testily 
agreed with attorneys for news 
organizations and the Ameri- 
can Civil Liberties Union that 
imposing a blanket protective 
order on all court documents 
was inappropriate. 

But Judge Ito, who has re- 
Tused to supply his proposed 
gag order to reporters, said he 
was still considering whether to 
take the unusual step of barring 
comments from participants m 

die case. , . . , 

‘ “The problem is that I think 
we're in a different dimension 
in this case because of the im- 
provements in the electronic 
media.” he said. 

Judge Ito discussed news 


coverage on the same day that 
he ruled against a defense re- 
quest to review personnel files 
of two detectives in the Simp- 
son case, Mark Fuhnnan and 
Philip V&nnatter. indicating 
that the files were irrelevant. 
Pu blish ed reports had said the 
defen se hoped to use such ma- 
terial to make the argument 
that Mr. Fuhnnan was a racist 
and to assert that he had plant- 
ed evidence cm Mr. Simpson's 
property. 

The judge also delayed by 
one week, from Sept. 19 to 26, 
the start of jury selection in the 
case of the former football star, 
who is accused of murdering his 
former wife, Nicole Brown 
Simpson, and her friend Ron- 
ald L. Goldman on June 12. 

Judge Ito, who has openly 
questioned the number of news 
leaks in the case, wondered , 
whether some of the sensational | 
reports could taint prospective 
jurors. 

Kelli Sager, an attorney rep- 
resenting the Los Angeles 
Times and other news organiza- 
tions, appeared to argue effec- 
tively that reports of sensation- 
al crimes “haven’t changed that 
much” in recent decades and 
that nothing in the Simpson 
case warranted a secrecy order. 

She suggested that proper 
questioning of the prospective 
jurors and then a subsequent 


decision to sequester the jury — 
a move that the prosecutors 
said they would request — 
would eliminate fears that any 
juror would be biased. Judge 
Ito, who is taking a vacation 
next week, said he would recon- 
sider his proposal. 


s~ — : 



2 Key Lawmakers Split on Using Force in Haiti 


By Eric Schmitt 

York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Shortly after the 
Clinton administration delivered a 
harsh warning to Haiti’s military lead- 
ers, two leading members of Congress 
expressed sbaxpiy divided views on us- 
ing force to restore democracy there. 

Lee H. Hamilton, chairman of the 
House Foreign Affairs Committee, said 
on a CBS News program Wednesday 
that he believed Congress and the public 
would support an invasion. But Richard 
G. Lugar, who serves on the Senate's 
Foreign Affairs Committee, strongly 
disagreed in comments on an NBC 
News program. 

“I think we're right at the point of 
invasion.” said Mr.~ Hamilton. Demo- 
crat of Indiana. “I don't t hink you can 
send two high-ranking officials to the 
Caribbean making the kinds of com- 
ments that they made yesterday without 
following through." 


He was speaking of a visit to Jamaica 
on Tuesday by Deputy Secretary of 
State Strobe Talbott and Deputy De- 
fense Secretary John M. Deutch to con- 
fer with representatives of 13 Caribbean 
nations. The countries agreed to con- 
tribute a token force of 266 troops to 
support an American-led invasion to re- 
store Haiti's exiled president, the Rever- 
end Jean Bertrand Aristide. 

In a news conference at the State 
Department on Wednesday. Mr. Tal- 
bott and Mr. Deutch repeated a message 
to Haiti's rulers that they had to leave or 
would soon be forced from power. 

Senator Lugar, a Republican who like 
Representative Hamilton is from Indi- 
ana, said: “The American people are not 
convinced that we have vital interests in 
invading Haiti, despite immigration, 
which we believe might continue even if 
Mr. Aristide was restored. And we've 
really not had a policy of forcing democ- 


racy on a country, however despicable 
that regime might be.” 

A contradiction is undercutting the 
administration's threats. Senior .Ameri- 
can officials say the Haitian generals 
must go soon or face an invasion. But 
they also say they want to exhaust all 
other options, including a trade embar- 
go and other economic sanctions im- 
posed against Haiti since Father Aristi- 
de's ouster in 1991. 

If the United States is serious about 
giving sanctions a chance, it could be 
several weeks or months before Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton orders an invasion. 

An S 8- member, multinational observ- 
er force that is supposed to help the 
Dominican Republic seal its border to 
prevent smuggling into Haiti has yet to 
begin its mission and will not be operat- 
ing fully until mid -September. 

Training for the 266 troops from Ja- 
maica, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados 
and Belize will begin over the next two 
weeks at a U.S. Navv base in Roosevelt 


Roads, Puerto Rico, but will take two to 
three more weeks to complete, a senior 
Pentagon official said. 

About 30 U.S. Army special opera- 
tions trainers stationed in the Caribbean 
who have special language stalls will 
instruct the troops in crowd control, 
first aid. roadblocks, communications, 
peacetime rules of engagement and the 
use of weapons. 

The Caribbean troops are to form 
part of a 10.000-member, .American-led 
Force that would go into Haiti whether 
the generals left on their own or were 
forced out. 

B Rush Challenges Policy 

Former President George Bush on 
Wednesday attacked President Clin- 
ton's threatened invasion of Haiti. Reu- 
ters reported from Buenos Aires. 

"I don’t want to see United States 
soldiers occupying foreign territory.” he 
said at a banking conference. "We 
should not use force against Haiti." 


The Slow Way to Escape Cuba 

Those Who Avoid the Sea Keep Waitingfor US . Visas 


By Tim Golden 

Men Tirol Times Service 

HAVANA — Just beyond the green-glass of- 
fices of the United States Mission here, a few 
hundred yards from the seas dotted with the rafts 
of fleeing Cubans, scores of people gather each 
morning on a small patch of gravel and cement 
known as the Park of Lamentations. 

Sitting in the shade of almond trees, they have 
become a steady reminder of bow difficult it is 
for Cubans to travel to the United States by legal 
means. They are all waiting to see about visas 
and, under the current procedures, they may 
keep on waiting for months or even years. 

“I don't want to throw myself into the sea, but 
what else can you do?” asked Jo$£ Miguel G6- 
mez, a young man in the park. “You can sit here 
a long time and nothing happens.” 

If successful, the negotiations between Cuban 
and American officials that began Thursday in 
New York may not help the raft refugees but 
could deliver some of "tie Lamenting Ones." 

American officials say they will offer to quick- 
en the flow of legal immigrants in return for 
renewed efforts by Havana to stop those who, as 
it is said here, “throw themselves into the sea." 

Yet after days in which thousands of Cubans 
have braved sharks and storms in the hope of a 
better future, many diplomats and other analysis 


have grown skeptical that such a deal would 
relieve the growing pressure for emigration. 

“If there is a migration deal that satisfies 
20,000, there will be 200,000 who want to go.” a 
diplomat said. 

Speaking of Cuba's president, Fidel Castro, he 
added, “He will not be able to stop people from 
leaving now without using force and drawing 
blood, and I don't think he is going to do that." 

Analysts perceive varying degrees of intensity 
in the desperation that is driving the refugees 
from the island. But they generally agree that the 
economic suffering and political discontent that 
have caused the exodus will not decline signifi- 
cantly over the next several years, barring an 
unexpected reversal of government policies. 

Most of those taking to sea are men in their 20s 
and 30s, starkly pessimistic about their futures 
and often without family in the United States. 

Describing them as largely less employed and 
less educated than other members of their gener- 
ation, a Cuban official called them “almost un- 
desirable" — an allusion to the criminals and 
psychiatric patients released among the 125.000 
Cubans who fled in the Mariel boatlift in 1980. 

Among the 19,700 Cubans awaiting action on 
immigrant visa requests, the average age is closer 
to 50, U.S. immigration officials say. 


Time Inc. Is Said to Pick Editor in Chief 


By Doron P. Levin 

AW York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Norman 
Pearlstine, former executive 
editor of The Wall Street Jour- 
nal, has been selected as editor 
in chief of Time Inc., according 
to a top executive of Time 
Warner Inc. 

The executive said Gerald 
Levin, chief executive of Time 
Warner, and Jason McManus, 
the current editor in chief, had 
informally indicated to Time 
Inc.’s executives in recent days 
that the search for Mr. McMan- 
us’s successor was over. 


Mr. McManus, 60, has not 
formally announced his retire- 
ment. but he has told associates 
that he is planning to retire. 

Mr. Levin and Mr. McManus 
were understood to have con- 
sidered several in-house candi- 
dates, chief among them James 
Gaines, managing editor of 
Time magazine, and Henry 
Muller, editorial director of 
Time Inc. 

The selection of Mr. Peaxl- 
stine must still be presented to 
Time Warner’s board for ap- 
proval, which is expected later 
this month. 


As editor in chief of Time 
Inc., Mr. Pearlstine would be in 
charge of one of the world's 
most influential magazine em- 
pires. Time Inc. operates Time, 
Life. Sports Illustrated, Enter- 
tainment Weekly, Money, For- 
tune and People. 

Mr. Levin was said by several 
people at Time Warner to be 
attracted to Mr. Pearlstine's 
journalistic credentials and in- 
terest in pursuing new and in- 
novative ways to package and 
distribute information. 


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GABONESE REPUBLIC 

MINISTRY OF EQUIPMENT AND BUILDING 

REHABILITATION WORKS OF THREE ROAD STUMPS 
NOTICE TO THE APPEAL FOR TENDERS 

Date: 

The Gjbnnese Republic Givemmenr has got a poan from Islamic Development Bank U.D.B.1 and 
from Arab Economic Development Bank in Africa I'A.E.D.D.Aj for the financing of rehabilitation 
works of" three rnad-srumps divided into two geographical lots: 

- Lor N«1 : - ASSOK NGOUM-RIEVIERE SO: 25 km 

- Lot N*2 : - M LWOUL-NK OLMENGOA : 92 km 

- Lot N e 3 : - KOI; L\MO UT O U-LAST O U RM LLE : 45 km 

2 - The Ministry of Equipment and Building invites, through this notice to appeal for tenders the 

companies to present under enclose covers their tenders for the carrying out of the following works: 

- Lot .\ Q 1 : - 11“ km of grounJ-road 
Those works include the following tasks; 

- overhauling of plat form 

- earth works 

- eml'ankin.c 

- bterite wearing course 

- drainage and small works 

- overhead sign 

- Lot N'-’Z : - h 5 km of tarred-road 

Those -A-orks include the following tasks: 

- overhauling of plat form 

- earth- v/urks 

- embanking 

- bierire <ubhase 

- iieuw -crushed granular base 

- asphalt concrete wearing course 

- ground sign 

- overhead sign 

- drainage and sm.il! hydraulic works 

- building of eight ferro-concrete bridges 

Works will Yk subdued ;>.» an Insurance Quality Programme with internal and external checkings to 
the producer 

3 - All the companies are allowed to tender for except those subdued to the boycott of the Arab 
League, of the Organisation of African Unity iO.A.u. - ' and of the United Nations Organisation 

lU.N.O.l 

•i - The eligible lenders interested can get some funher information and go through appeal for 
tenders record.*' in the offices of. 

Minister* Je i cquipement a de hi Construction 
Direction C«enerile dec Etudes ei de la Program mat ion 
Boi’.e iv.-ule -Vi Libreville - GABON 
Telephone: 3V 56 el ~2 J5 22 - Fax: 74 SO 92 

Telex: D G T P SOS GO 

3 - Anv eiteihle company interested in liter present notice can huv a complete tender documents set 
on -Anting form from above service anJ at cl urge of payment of non refundable amont of: 325 009 
CFA Francs j iui io the order of the company responsible of records reprography: 

SNGE 

]t P VI. v. Libre. illv GABON • Telephone: 7».2H in 

in case of postal ‘ending or another mode of mjil, die Ministry of Equipment and Building can not 
I* responsible of the non receipt of the record by the company. 

6 . The established tender- in French language and in four specimen fan original and three copies 
Libelled as -uclsi will have to reach to the above address, including a lender warranty of two 
hundred million ■ 209.000 .000 1 CFA Francs later on September lpth. 1994 »t 12 o'clock. 

7 - file tenderers are abided' bv their tenders for 120 days from the deadline fixed for the tenders 
receipt 

y. ■ Tlw .-.pomng >>f tenders will take place in the presence nf tenderers representatives who desire to 
al'm it on iepivmbvr J 2'h. iM-j at 5h30 pm .it 
Minister e vie I cquipement et de l.t Construction 
Se-. return. General - M !’ Librev itle GABON 

Lc Minister d'Etat, Ministry de 1‘Equlpement 
ei dc fa Construction 

Zac baric MYBOTO 


Away From Politics 

• An NBC television stagehand was shot and killed in front of 
the network's “Today” show studio window in midtown 
Manhattan's Rockefeller Center shortly before the evening 
rush hour, the police said. The)' arrested a suspect. 

• The man suspected of assaulting the chil-rights pioneer Rosa 
Parks was captured in Detroit by several neighborhood resi- 
dents. who held him in the trunk of a car until the police 
arrived, authorities said. 

• John Wayne Bobbitt was sentenced to 60 days in jafl after a 
Las Vegas judge found him guilty of misdemeanor domestic 
battery for hitting his former fiancee after a night of drinking. 
Die judge suspended 45 days of the sentence and ordered Mr. 
Bobbitt to begin serving 15 days immediately. “I firmly 
believe you have an attitude problem," the judge told Mr. 
Bobbitt, who gained international attention last year when his 
wife sliced off his penis. 

• NASA said it might have to delay the space shuttle Discov- 
ery's Sept. 9 launching because of problems with the craft's 
propulsion system. 

• Almost ISO people have been evacuated from the Koyukuk 

River Valley in Alaska after flooding pushed the river to 
record levels. ap. Reuun. N)T, wp 


Damages Sought From the 1HT 

Reuters suggested that Lee Hsien Loong 

^S ap ? r L-k'° 7™ SOTi^fJGfS* 

senior minister. Lawyers are 
and hi s son. Deputy Prime Min wor k[ng on the issues of costs 

SS'iSSf and damages, and the case will 


srioesaiffiftirjis 

uonal Herald . Tribune for an Simt, Mr. Tan said. 


tional Herald Tribune for an 
article that alleged nepotism, 
their lawyer said Thursday. 
Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong 
is doing the same, said the at- 
torney. Tan Kok Quan. 


The newspaper’s lawyer, K. 
Shanmugam, said, “The parties 
are now dealing with issues of 
damages and costs.” Both attor- 
neys declined to state the 


The newspaper printed an amount being sought as dam- 
apology Wednesday for having ages. 


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September 29 & 30, 1994 

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DERIVATIVES IN INVESTMENT 
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Company: 
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Fax. No. . 







Page 4 



Egypt Aide 
Criticizes 


Boycott 


Ttte Associated Press 

CAIRO — Population Min- 
ister Maher Mahran criticized 
countries on Thursday that are 
boycotting the United Nations 
population conference here 
next week, saying that they 
maintain a “negative and isolat- 
ed” attitude. 

Addressing private Arab 
group s taking part in the con- 
ference, Mr, Mahran denied as- 
sertions by some Muslim oppo- 
nents that the United States 
had threatened to cut off aid 
funds to countries that reject 
the conference's resolutions. 

“This is nothing more than 
nonsense,” said Mr. Mahran, 
who has played a major role in 


organizing the conference. 
“This a very narrow-minded 


very 

understanding of the whole 
meeting based on ignorance.” 

Some Islamic radicals have 
asserted that the meeting, the 
United Nations Conference on 
Population and Development, 
which opens Monday, is an at- 
tempt by the United States to 
impose Western values on Is- 
lam, adding the charge of a 
threatened cutoff in U.S. aid. 

Saudi Arabia, Sudan and 
Lebanon have refused to take 
part. 

Mr. Mahran said the confer- 
ence “succeeded even before its 
opening” because of the discus- 
sion it has engendered about 
population, women, and devel- 
opment issues. He added that 
both the public and government 
officials have become more 
aware of the problems. 









Erik dc Cesiror Rows 


MINE DISASTER — Rescuers preparing to enter a coal mine in Malangas, on the island of Mindanao in the Philippines, daring their continuing 
search for bodies. At least 82 miners died in a methane gas explosion on Monday, which ranked as the nation's worse muring disaster. 


Faster Test Found 
For Heart Attacks 




« ** 


By Thomas H. Maugh 2d 

LtB Angeles Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — An inex- 
pensive new blood test could 
improve the treatment of heart 
attacks and save as much as $4 
b illion in medical costs in the 
United States each year by 
quickly identifying which pa- 
tients who show up at emergen- 
cy rooms with symptoms are 
ac tuall y having an attack. 

The test, which is already 
available to hospitals, could 
speed the treatment of heart- 


attack patients and reduce the 
of p 


Lindsay Anderson, Nonconformist British Film Director, Dies 


By Sheila Rule 

/Vo, York Tunes Service 

Lindsay Anderson, 71, the 
British film and theater director 
whose distaste for conformity 
and class-conscious English tra- 
dition infused such anarchic 
films as ‘If . . and “O Lucky 
Man'.,” died in the Dordogne 
region of France where he was 
vacationing. 

He lived in London. The 
cause of death, which occurred 
Tuesday, was a heart attack. 

Mr. Anderson made a name 
for himself as a cinema rebel 
during the 1960s and *705. He 
was artistic director of the Roy- 


al Court theater in London 
from 1969 to 1975. 

He also appeared in cameo in 
a number of films, including a 
comic role as a Cambridge 
schoolmaster in “Chariots of 
Fire” in 1981. 

Naohiro Amaya, 68, Forged 
Japan's Industrial Policy 

TOKYO (NYT) — Naohiro 
Amaya, 68, a major architect of 
the industrial polity that has 
contributed to Japan s dramatic 
economic growth, died here on 
Tuesday of lung cancer. 

Mr. Amaya worked at the 
Ministry of International Trade 
and Industry from 1948 until 


1981, rising to deputy minister 
for international affairs, the 
highest post available to a ca- 
reer civil servant. He was in- 
strumental in drawing up plans 
by which the government aided 
the development of Japanese 
industry. These measures in- 
cluded protection from im- 
ports. 

Vasily Sdyunin, 66. an econ- 
omist and member of the Rus- 
sian Parliament who was 
among the first advocates of 
market-oriented economic re- 
form, died Saturday in Mos- 
cow. 


sian-bom head of the Milan 
Symphony Orchestra, died Sat- 
urday of cancer in Bologna, Ita- 

] y- 

Tusfaar Kanti Ghosh, 95, the 
dean of Indian journalism who 
crusaded with Mahatma Gan- 
dhi for independence from Brit- 
ain, died Monday of heart fail- 
ure in a Calcutta hospital. 

Roberto Goyeoecbe, 68, one 
of the last great tango stars, 
died Saturday in Buenos Aires 

Michael Peters, 46, who won 
a Tony award for choreograph- 


video, died Saturday of AIDS 
in Los Angeles. 

Colonel Hubert Zemke, 80, a 
World War II flying ace in Eu- 
rope who commanded the tight- 
er group called “Zemke’s Wolf- 
“ack,” died Tuesday in 
roville, California. 

Hart Leroy Bibbs, 65, a pho- 
tographer and poet who was a 


6 


familiar figure in Parisian jazz 


Vladimir Deknan, 71, Rus- 



clubs for many years, 
Wednesday in Paris. 

Jonathan Whitcomb Strom, 
48, an international investment 
banker with Goldman, Sadis 
Asia, LuL, died Sunday of a 
heart attack in Hong Kong. 


use of potentially hazardous 
dot-bus ting drugs on patients 
who have symptoms but turn 
out not to be in the midst of an 
attack. 

Only 10 percent of the 5 mil- 
lion patients who enter U.S. 
emergency rooms each year 
with symptoms of a heart attack 
are actually having one. None- 
theless, a majority of them are 
admitted to expensive inten- 
sive-care units as a precaution- 
ary measure. 

Determining whether they 
are having an attack can require 
12 to 24 hours, by which time 
the Homage from the attack is 
complete. 

In contrast, the new test, de- 
veloped at Baylor University's 
College of Medicine in Waco, 
Texas, can identify victims in 
less than two hours, the team 
reported Thursday in the New 
England Journal of Medicine. 

*Had this test been used as a 
screening test, we could have 
reduced our coronary care ad- 
mission rate by 70 percent,” 


said Dr. Peter R. Puleo, a Bay- 
lor cardiologist. 

About half of all heart at- 
tacks can be diagnosed by an . 
electrocardiogram, or EKG, 
which measures electrical activ- . 
ity in the heart. 

For others, the EKG reveals ’ 
little. In that case, physicians 
must rely on a detailed clinical, 
history and blood tests. 

The most useful test looks for ‘ 
the presence of an enzyme * 
called CK-MB that leaks into 
blood from damaged heart tis- ■ 
sues. Existing tests for CK-MB 
take five to six hours and are no ■ 
more f h»rr 50 percent accurate ' 


V* 


•wW 

-* 1 ' 


. ....js-j 


* 


„ . fc 


m 




The new test, developed by 
Dr. Robert Roberts and his col- 
leagues at Baylor, can detect an 
unusual form of CK-MB pro- 
duced in heart attacks at the* 
extremely low concentrations 
present shortly after an attack. . 
The test is currently manufac- 
tured by Helena Laboratories 
Inc. of Beaumont, Texas, and. 
has been approved by the Food a 
and Drug Administration for, 
monitoring the progress of 
heart-attack victims. 

“If this turns out to be as ' 
good as they say it is, it win give 
an enormous economic and pa- 
tient-care benefit,” said Dr.' 
Pravin Shah of California’s 
Lama Linda Medical Center, a* 
member of the American Heart 
Association’s Council on Qmi- 
cal Cardiology. “At the present 
time, emergency room phya- 


fi 

** 


* 


«»ns tend to pliw it extra sme, 
largely for medico-l 


sons. 


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attorney period v»4h a nthxit con- 
sent. fet 357+659149, Fax 354- 
620878, PC® 2874 Lament Cyprus. 


COLLEGES & 
UNIVERSITIES 


PRESTON UMVHSmr, USA 
B8A, BS, MBA, MS, PhD. etc pra- 
aam. name Study or OtvConoo. 
Gl by the Deal, of Eduafton Z727 
0>W An, Cheyenne. WY 82001 
147432-750 


Fax: ' 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


, * • * ♦ i 

> 

nuut 


Hcral b^B Sribunc. 


PLANTING TO RUN A CLASSIFIED AD? 

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You wifl be informed or the cost immediately, reid 
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48 hours. Al mqor Credit Cards Accepted. 


EUROPE 


NORTH AMBUCA 


FRANCE HQ); Pam. 

Mj (11 4637 93 85, 
Fac{1]46 37937Q. 


GBMANY.AUSISM&OMItAL 
EUROPfc FmAfurl 

fob 1069) 72 67 55. 
fee (069| 72 73 I0t 


NEW TDK 

Tel: (212} 752-3890. 
TolfarjBOOl 572-721 2 
Tefa: 427 175 • 

Ftw (2 1 2) 755-87B5 


AStA/PAdFK 


SMnaiAt©:FV*t 

728»21. 


TeLl 

Ftnct 


,728 J 

1)7283091. 


UN1H) KMGDOM: Lmdon. 


fee (071) 240 2254. 


HONGKONG: 

Tel: (852) 9222-1188. 
«c 61170 WHU 
Fdc (852) 9222-1 190. 
94GAPORE: 

TiL- 223 6478. 


fee (AS 224 1566. 
oc 2B749. WT 5M 


Tefal 


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REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


BELGIUM 


BSUSSBS/TERVURDI 


Ew aphond popetty for ide, IS nn. 
from Btwdi and 8 nn. rtl arport. 


The I w f to d ityto, wg’Hixvrwut v*j, 


paidenei awret, Fgh 

fia dering fontf era nn. 


4/00 ttjjn 
dam avenue 


Urge, modvn, healed pod. 5 bg bed- 
rooae, 4 baw ro ows, aiperb tedien. 


Bf 52.000,00a 

Contact Teh 32-3-725 13 41. 


CARIBBEAN 


& fftetevqueL (F.WJ.J 


ST. KITTS, 


WEST INDIES 

20 or I© aae sle vnft bcacMrorfl. 
World dan Ftatd 8. contfa vrth caw» 
hm 8 fa abatement MaJy Bead) 
Front. Broker uunxdue m guaranteed. 
Priced from $22 m*oo IB KmCor. 


Td. NYC. USA 
i) 888-7555 


(212) 884-7555 
(312) 377-9133 


DUTCH, ST. MAARTEN, Outer Pond, 
4 bwoom/4 bath Estate. Pool, deep 
water dock, 25+ acrei mdwfci 
2 addbotxx buASng Me*. 503 Ft 
W<*erhort+ oou er nmenl water lecne 
nohtv SI -9M. ft few 4Q7-8SITXT8 


BARBADOS Untpte rautenM wdi 
panormie wew. kfody tocated for 
tonjnoui King. 3 bedroom. 3 bath- 

1 bedroom 0001*00*, iww 

00L sauna imd aher UWpan 


room* . . 

mng pool, sauna cmd ah«r utapan 
Fecfa^Td/Fae: B0M37-3622 


ST. MAARTBi HA. 120 Mmmfaiede 
acres with 2400 ft. on Attmtfjr a®* 1 - 
View of St. Barth*. Can boil smde 
r. mufh-FtxnJy. 250 room ho«& 




t aeff coont- ttofoced to 
Tel-4076266825 ’ “ 


HAUTE SAVOS - EVIAN * GBCVA, 


E-MfitciniK ! HAT, V1UA. CHALET: phone Frarae 
Fcx.407 6275653 US < ^50 71 69 19. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


EXCEPTIONAL OH9 
450 HA OF PARADBS FOR SAIE 
Seifc of F rance -Haut Leae— de ~ 


40 km from Hede tn ar ton *ea bo 
or 1125 aenn [3 j Monaco) of 
freedom, beauty & trcraxSfv, very 
hedihy dmate. 3,000 sun hwin yearty. 
6OtM0ftti obmide, 150 fan frao sfa 
resorts (Pyienese). or-stnp posifafo. 
lastorcd former ond 


Bod. terms. fWt go » course (nororoll 
' 12 Fm “ 


par 34. stcUes, 12horses, ftodc of 
sheep, magn fa t x huntmg growid 
Wed as a prrvato pooase or to 
dmrelop ptae For hofcday resort 


Wee erty 11551,950.000. 

Eed^3tM,lHT, 


92521 


Cedei, Franca 


BS 8 BREAKFAST: Boms &/ or 
PleoBve. Spedo oi tor antiect vdoge 
home, 6 bedrooaB, 5 bothroam, ter- 
race, view near Ar«i Presence. 


SlJkl Owner fa SI 42 28 87 27 or 
f&Wwt 


Fro - (331 42 a 87! 


(BRGORDnearSeriro.oU stone bone, 
daocter. F90 iron, view, (tarn, 5 ooe* 
private rood on « acre* bid preserve. 
FIJM. Td owner France 33-&41 0318 
or 4651 2299 or USA 1-203 242 6651 


FRENCH RIVIERA 


NEAR CAFMB, bnnu vfc, beouti- 
fd sea & mowtron views, B bedroom*. 


DYUJC PtOVHKE HOTB. 14 rooms. 
© acre deer forest, 1 haw hfce 

arson F4D00AXL Fax 33-93 SO 71 97 


j » JOHN I 
S TAYLOR i 


SOTHEBY'S 

DTTElOMnoeiAL BlAUr 


Ttm GEMS of fa flWTOf «VDM 

CAP FERRAT 


Stonoing WAT5FRONT Property 
wdi private harbour ond b«4 house. 
500 sajn. house towfwJ oondeon. 
Moor pooL flftftivV wi avef 
VWtroidw Bay. MU OPPORTUNITY 


Od: Maafa Brota 92 38 00 66 

er fat 93 39 13 65 


HOLLAND 


UNIQUE JVI91 RESIDENCE. 
Amsterdon/Netheitands 15 fa from 
Schfohol oirport, dtxfa 

FWTHOUX iforatd Ode . 7/8lFi 


tap) floor 443 + 160 sqjn. Fee color 
brochure ad +31 2518 52548 or Fa 
51837 EUROBNANCE 


GERMANY 


FOR SAIfc red e** m Germviy 
tt Fraocb-La xe ndio w ig border, 


2 bu JiAws, partly famhod an re- 
ed, on 13 


oaes of fad. beaotifd, 

pie in We vfa*. outobdxi 

writiB 1J mies. One baMng teitobfo 
for school, offices, ivcnsfej u rnr, wme- 
houee, efoercare home, dta etc. 2nd 
uefl a a 2-foody home wdh heot o oe 
pod on Iroge lot w* owden + bee*. 
Wee: DM- 750,000 jndudng Ue- 
chtendein AG fCorjx] ownmg the estate. 

Address enqune* to: From AG, 


TO Bax 22i. OiSC&J Zuexh 
Fro +41-1 


1-1-371713)6 


GREAT BRITAIN 


I Sipnv. WWh OU*u3tSngj 

0L6 ocre garden Sofa vedey/sport- 
mg locSOoa fleggn £1 20D0O. Corta O 
bsn let 44(5)31 228 4111 Fac 44 


ITALY 


FRANCE 

Auction fair al liter I’ubi* tip JtMirr in MCE, nlniv flu I’jlai?. 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER IS. 1994 at 8s30 a-m. 


VILLA in 

ROQinim CAP MR 1 TV ( 06 ). 


Airene DOUIiVE - Seafiront 


“"Villa Zamir 79 

Ground floors 7 room*, entrance, kitrhen. panlrv. WC Garden 
lev Hi cmcrcd Icrracr-f. suinmrr kilt licn, A nwnu. Imtltrnnm. kiu-lirn 
- 2 stidint with kilrlirn am! bathroom . 1 A t floors 7 rooms. 3 
drewings S bathrooms, pHomit. panlrj. OlTBtllJHil'CS. 

CARETAKER’S HOUSE, LARGE + SMALL POOLS 
dsc of 25,980 sq.m, park 

UNOCCUPIED 

STARTING PRICE: FF 30.000.000 

(not including rhaim) - Tor information, ronititi: 

M.jtw tpan-Pii-rrr HKKDAH. Ias*>vr in Nicp (OhtWO) 
ft Hd. Virtor-1 Ineo. Trl.: (33) ‘13.87.‘)7.05 from 3 to b p.m. 

Kax; 03) 93.88.tW.7l. 

VISITS* Tlirflday 6 and (3 Srp|i-nilu-r. 1994 from 3 to - r * [..m. 


Pampclonne Bay • near St Tropez 


600 sq.m, villa with uninterrupted 
sea view over the entire bay. 

Located directly above the beach at 200 meters. 
The property is unfinished and represents a unique 
opportunity for the discerning buyer. 




Principals only fax : (33) 92.05.72.70 
or call from the 5th September on (33) 92.0532.95. 


ITALY 


MONACO 


Near Monaco 


VIP) Villa’s 
neiir Houses 
it sea view. 

icrnu.es. 
mstraciit© cnntml. 
ircct sales. 
41-W/248085. 


UJJL 


EXCEPTIONAL ESTATE 

Commanding view. Excflingiy 
restored on 2^7 private hillside 
acres 90 minute* from N.Y.C. in 
foothtts of Pennsylvania Rococo 
Mountains. Goffiskmg moments 
away. Incomparable pal room 
and master side. Truly one of a 
kind. 5489,900 complete. 

717) 421-1748 

17)476-4828 


Phone{717) - 
Fax (717) 41 


Direct Sale by Family 


TUSCANY 

between Siena & Volierra 

Medieval Casxlc/Vfllage 
ph» 10 farms 
2J0 ha fields, 470 ha wood 
Price: US$ 6 million 


VCrtte: Ref. SIT. IHT 
Via Cassoia 6. 20122 Mihiut, lufv. 


SPAIN 


i 


REAL ESTATE GU2MAA 


Marbfila - Los Moxteros 

VII1A ■ « -p iilm »b1i fTivliJ iiTT.ir. 

irJ wU ]|«i7 re. • H Halt. 1 1 »-.* 


.-srv:. Ir.r nufUr unli piiun » Atwn jnJ 

l-iin.ip- >vi 1 rf i." il* «-.i 

I A lV' m-' pii. t II' rij knh 

C-WjON freehold 

TEL: 5+5^1010: -FAX. J+^^iTTtV 



Looking for 
property in 
Switzeriand? 


LAKE GENEVA- FECHY 

CfaningfeiwdfKictefn house. Itarioms/ 
3 ra^cn rams. 9.790 afi ua surtara 


sSseotFecte. 
tewnUiai 




Price Sft.fiJQWiiqofttH 
CMKt Sfa MfaofaAl 
cwa,sM2afaAw- m»«mm 
DLIIiIMBNIIO- Foe 41*2144628018 


un UAGGtOSE 
(Mfei 4 0 miml 8 -5D0 sam, property & 
LAKESDE LUXiSy V1I1A 


(350 hjju. wuft nxrondnq vert 
and la^e Luvtrsd patio, fitortw 
roam wn fid ben, shower, p 


bed- 
. privofo 

torraoe. 3 double beefeoaro w4h brth, 
single bedroom vrdh slwer. Living- 
dmng and hroefoe*. KMwn. tu ra an . 
gtxBesroom, foun dry, room, wme eelar. 
Lorn bflwtrfwy nnsjiSiawd 


swmxmn g pool, sauna, boar- 
d«k. SF 32 “ 


. _ twKcn. 

Contact TeVFro (+4?| 37 41 12 22 


RSTAURANY 84 CHIANTI Proper^ 

+ fe erc e . perfoo foaxfon, typea 

Tuscan home, b«x>ful vows, mtenxs 
herd odone. Td/fa 39-577 741121 


ROME 1MPBHAL FOHJAR, Perttoua, 
patanHc 3 rooms, wnxs, La 

SnfiSSbL fa_^W89872 


MONACO 


MONTE CAB© 
PSBtdftUiTr Of MONACO 


luxury O tAX t n wre, dd bjl hwngroan, 
forge roasssr wlw^ 


, _ _ _ . .2nd bedocm, 

+ both* in soisg. guest tofa, 
forge egutoped kitufroi + (fining noab 
consenratoty, farms*, 
prrjato heated peef wiihjef stream. 

2 ceSarS. 



INTStMBWA 

SOEACB^T 


let 33-93 50 66 84 
Fn 33-93 50 45 52 


International 
Herald Tribute 
ads work 


PBNClPALrTT OF MONACO 

Fodng (he port of Mode Grto. Grrod 
Pit* view fang room wift terra ce, 
two bedrooos. good csnitoL 
Color and pwfang «xfoded- 


PARK ♦’AGENCE 


le Fork fence 
25 Anew dt to Costa 
MC 98000 ModKorlo 
fa 93 25 15 00. Fas 93 25 35 33 


MONTE CARLO 

New prafa with stoefio to Sroaa 
aprotrriern avtdoUe. PronranK view, 
ifaatfo office space, cJtrodfa gras. 
Fw+er detrob: ws Bodroacn - SMJ, 
9 aro sfOsfad. MC 98000 Mroioeo. 
Tel: (33) 92 14 90 00 


MONTS CARLO 


KD OF SUtSSE, Exapbortal 2 roo m 
t yro afa ifa sad pri\rtc gardes to 
renovate pJfy 


AAGEDI 


7/?, Bd dm Afotfa MCPSCOO *tanoai 
Td 33-92 ]63>99fat33f350 1942 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


EXCEPTIONAL 

, PUCE FRANCOS 1H 

bf FLOOR ■ BALCONY 
349 SQJ(L, Freestone, hah dass 
aakfs sftfa let (I) 4471 87 96. 


HlPL 

TOPI 


192}, PANORAMIC VIEW 

rCULLY / M. BARRS, SRi #o«f 
80 sqm, 2 rooms, bdearry. 1-44 718782 


IE VESI9® faety sum of (he eertery 
in 2J3Q0 sqm. estate, 6 


home set _ , T _ _ 

bedrooms, © sqm. recepfian, 10 fa 
wdk from EBL ammo* to British . 
Alia fas and Btemotenol sdxsols. 
Td Owner 111 34J069J1 


AVENUE MONTAIONf, luxury 


aprotnwrt fodrg Hotel Ffazi, 80 sqm. 

retni-gaisfr ■ 


1 06 roomings- 


ST GSMAM DB PWSS. end IMi cert. 
2/3-roarn Couple cpJtme nt, g +11. tap 
floor, view, re e a ewne. 1-43294294 


SWITZERLAND 




UKE GENEVA & 
MOWTAIN RESORTS 


Scfota 


IE 


mi 975 m 
• ouisre 
■GSTM 


C2ANS-MGNTANA. fa 1 to 5 fad 
roaoa, SFr. 200000 to 35 fa 
BEYACSA. 


52, MonSxSrotL 0+1211 
Tee 4122-73415 40. For I 


tax 734 1220 


For ede due to faudy renwo 
cdetoched 
CHALET 


with 4400 sqm. Irving a w- 
“ ■ 9 G5TAAD. 


- nwf to < 

Lmmnty ti ni uhed with 2600 sqm. 
fad. fe mmetfitfa sale to qfa- 


PneeSFr. Id fa 

Freeze send defa with tefafvm 

afo Ord Foerf Werbe AG 
P.a Box, CFVS200 Bragg. 


SWIlZBtlAND. LAKE Gti«VA won- 
derful kfade & aounfBn resort*. 
A n thon a sbon to id to farefaer s . h 
the re^on of Mrotoeux. Townhsw 


iqu faaen t. Ijyng - 2 bedreon 2 
bath ro om s , wdti terrace, jk rdeo, 
brobecua. perfag. SF ijMfm. 


fm bufar. fa 41 21-963 02 28. 
fer4l 21-968 10 51. 


USA GENERAL 


1500 ACRES FDR SAIE >50 fa 
from New Yorfc Qy in the mod 
b eo u tif ii CotskS M ux tout area sx 
ho me s My reread, hoy ere o rimw, 
wonfirord. 2 pond*, and nge number 
of SOTOS goad for batlfing dmfong 
wane. Add ng US SZSOO^RL Gener- 
ous term gvrekfa. Write or Fro to 


MenUe fern, 224 W. 30ih Sfo, New 
York, NT 10001 fee (212) 239-0632. 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


*r Jersey 15 Mh. to NYC 
Came &*dty to fat GALAXY 


7000 BM. £ GuHenbero'Loner Mai 
Terris, to 4 Outdoor Pools, Oub 
1-24 3 Be d room s & IfaAouses 
R04IALS . 51200440® 


SALES $90jOOO-S565/XX) 

' BEIOCATON 


CORPORATE I 



201-861-6777 

OfW 7 DAYS FAX: 201-861-0677 


IAJOUA, CA-ARQflTECniRAL 
Digest, Ocerofrere Estate. Bat toefaon 


4 c a fa gq. pod, gfaqr 4 ssanty. 


56300.000. Cal Mr. 

SGSW WBI5,« 


CA. Bdorado Cogrtry 

hrosq pool 4 garden 

Wrfioet Toyfor. Furnish*}, 
bedlocoBon 4 Lo ndicn. Ceil Mr. Frio, 
Frio & Co. {415] 931-45® x 1®. USA. 


NORTHERN TIP OF MANHATTAN 
seduded area For sole by owner. 


Grand* bndc tuder s^to hoes*. Land- 


axw er far . 3 bedrooms, 2 

. fang room, gram frtpfooe, 

dnrg room, forge lifdan, sin, 
feah ed teseraert & toundy room, 
central air condrtiowiq indoor 


garage, low taxes. Asking SSdDOQ. 
faunae Herry Gofer 914-7843930 
FAX 9147B2-2S48 USA 


CALtfORNUt PA5ADBIA IS minutes 
from du w fa w n las Arnetos. Broont 
Dryish Tudor exeeudve home. 3 tod- 
314 baths, gore fa ro om, ksft 


office, fany room, forme/ dining 


MAhWATTAfWtoDTOWN E. 40's 


Lam 1 bodroom. fare. Ufa STM® 
ALSO Wes 7Vi StM roduardfo 


S500K. Ouafity, 


doorman, 

2 


beeufifti 


marble fceth. 2I2631-S85 For.- 211 

3193093 US Wire Ms. Sorocer/brofer 


USA CO MMER CIAL & 

INDUSTRIAL 


CMWB. VAUET. CNIOMt 

wr — 1 —I 4 ,, J, C. ,, . . J 

rfC UAtoito'tRR MWW 

sonny Cromd Vfay. Appremnwi 
3RD sqJt. plus covered wakvray* 
balconies. Seaofcful setting 4 views 
offer serene wnriqfae and tofaed 
country Bfestyfe. (dad owner/inxr 

J /rotoi Tdk 405/659-5757 

USA 


F0K SUL It MB m f 
repan rf Sacrcmenlq CaEforna 
Appeared for 81 custom home tots 
ready for dewkuxBero. Prime invest- 


RELOCATION 

SERVICES 


RHOCA1MG TO MFBS7 
Need a fanxshed or arfurmhad 
qut w* or house in fen or Be de 
Froce, short 4 long term? Cc£ 
BRU9ET ACCUBl ViteENATlONAL 
fa HI 40 84 9251 
For (1) © 84 0i 88 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


CARIBBEAN 


BARBADOS: FDR EXECUTIVES Ah© 
□R.OMAT5 Three Id Ftw bedro om 
foaey hemes. ftimabed/Uafuroai«d 
Best bfetora. Tel /Fat 809-437-362Z 


AUSTRIA 

VBMA, AUSTRIA 

Mow exdueive mstoanoB fviflrijnme 
best area oF Vienna for rert. 800 apn. 

ivfog spots, 2000 sqm. grxde n. 

Abo various exdueive flats/werf v4a* 
ftmefed/urfurrished Fix ret*/toy. 

Crf or Fn to Slefw Auer rf Mart & 
Raedifa Austria +43-1-369 1527. 
Fax: +43-1-3621 14 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

BURGIMIY VB1AGE HOUSE with 
dxxDdw. 8 be Moa&crd. 1 hour 
TGV Pons. 19fo cert, stone, oak 
beamed ceina. FJty renoualed. 
Large modern todwi 4 napfiances. 
Bedric cetord heating. SaatKuraahed. 

4 bedroom^ aTwfo. Rrwfom. 
tarrocB, ocRutn. Long Iviul r 4,500/ 
n*x + dxraa. Tet 8092 1612 

NORMANDY, 16th cent seaside 
tciirfoouse, 250 sqm, dl comfort*. 2 
hows Parts. Long term red. 1-4727 2923 

FRENCH RIVIERA 

4 KM ROM MONACO. ON THE 
BEACH, moanfficienf 2 bedroom 
apartment. 12D sqm, bcautrfdty for- 
rxshed fdartf TV ween, stereo ate.) 
for rert hern 1» October 74 Fro min. 

6 mortht F27JXX) per marth. fa 03) 
92 16 16 61 or faxT03) 92 16 16 OBl 

CREAT BRITAIN 




HOLLAND 



PARSIADBBISE1 

HARMONE 

HomRBIOBKX 

Spoauus 2 or Jroon apnfiMrt* 
to m for 3 days or morn. 

WSnCUKJte ACXH vUIMBi 

Tdh (33-1 ) 4T 25 16 16 

Fas (33-1) 41 25 16 15 

RATora 

BUB. TOWER OR 

EXPO PORTE DC VR5AIUB 

From sttxfias to five-rocnr de kme. 
Daly, weddy a enrthty. 

Free shuttle service to 
Euradfatimd 

Tab (33-1) 45 73 62 20 
ft»»: (33-1) 45 79 73 30 

Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT ft PARIS 

Tat (1) 47.20.30.05 


74 CHAMPS S.Y5EES 

CLAB1DGE 


• ;.t* . 

•■fo. .•«'-* 


FOR 1 WfflC OR Mas high dm 
'ATtONS 


high da 
. 2 or 3-room aparfmenis. RU.Y 
i*H). IMMEDM 
Tel: (1) 44 13 33 33 


■Wirn Hair., > Ifrpty 

-^5 V: 




LAMY, 75116 PARIS 

5 Avo. rrerre Ter de Serb* 
fa 1-40 7018 84 or M7 23 53 14 
Short and long Terns Fends 




Sfe-UIXURY WfflEX, off t Avwu« 
Mroidgne. New, berwtifuBy Funfad 
fang room, tfinng area, T bedroom, 
lVi mroble brfa modem euslom 
btdien. SnetB/tStnes, fporefca. 3 
months to 1 yt. USA fa 914-762-2891 


••''.•I. ’ ^ 


St* 


’* -.*41 l » « •. 


- 

i ■ «• 

'• ■■ * “Jr! 

• •■*■4 A 

■ ~ 

• Sal 


CATOA1E • PAMltBS 

W SBB5. rof® oro wwow 

Tel 1-4614 1211. Fan 1-47733096 




2nd, IRS MONTORGUBL, odMi 
Sat 100 sqjn. fivng, bedroom. oT 
faBy equmped. 3 mar4s +. F13 
Tab fl j-G 21 99 02 (Wove 1 


HE ST LOWS view on Noire Dona, 100 
iqm. tap floor p ntstjq fo xa flat. Rea 
1 b edroom. FF2^0CO. 1-430613 


t ouvna 4 ueawnto- iwwl 

F9J00. fa 0147 4T B622. 


PARS 168* - ICAR AVENUE FOOI, 
STUDIO, 56 tqnL, new comtton. 
F7 jOQO oer monlh. Tab 1-45 74 27 66. 
IATM CRJARte, 2-room lb in town 
house, efaaro , Udwo/both, sunny; 
vfow.hedxta Owner Tet 1-4354 6549 


16*, ETORE. 80 sqm, 7th Boor. Kfl, 

terrace; al comforts, coble tv. For 1 yr. 
from wd Sac*. FlOflOO nit 1-4727 2K3 


3*: STUDIOS ROM K5fXL 6#i 4 

7flt 2-3-* room*. 3rd: nmy 3 rooms. 

C/A fa l.«m019a Fan T-4C265094 


RAXE, FONTAMBUAU, Fine howe. 
hm 4 beds. 2 baths. Body, pool 4 
port F14J00. Tflbni4273oizr 


7* CHAMP DE MARS, 2 rom^met. 




PARIS AREA UNFURNSHED 


14*, 73 3QJNL 2 BEDROOMS + 


FBOOa 


London 71 -435- j 


LEE- 


NEWLY, BOB, METRO, 7 ROOMS, 
160 sqm. + needs room. FT9JOOO + 1 

jiaj£ Free roe. fa 1-39 52 77 75 


SPAIN 



V ‘ * 

- "fl. 

* 

- • f 

-'• ■t fin 

■ - j; 

**" ** 




• f, 






L - \ 

* F* 




IK 


7 RAZA DE ESMNA APARTMBfTS- . 
fo foe heart rf Madrid, Hfa das. 
Afa* to fa Deity weekly, nenMy. 


Fair eafaed. Direct reserve- " 
tern, fa 3USC 85 


34.1JA43BQ 


85- Fa» 


LOS JERONIMOS AftUTTMBfTS 
M arfa. 9 Madrid, Between Prada 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1994 


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Israel and Morocco Open Ties 

Liaison Exchange to Include Link to Gaza 


{?■.- 


By Gyde Haberman 

New York Tima Sendee 

JERUSALEM — Israel and Morocco took the 
first formal step toward diplomatic relations 
Thursday, making the kingdom in northern Afri- 
ca the only Arab country other than Egypt to 
establish official ties with the Jewish state. 

Although Israel and neighboring Jordan 
agreed with fanfare in late July to end their 


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ive yet to sign a peace treaty and have no 
offidal links. 

In the Arab world, only Egypt has full rela- 
tions with the Israelis, since 1979, but Morocco 
Thursday signaled that it was ready to follow suit 
after many years of amicable, behind-the-scenes 
dealings. . 

Separately, the Israelis and Moroccans an- 
nounced that they would open so-called liaison 
offices in Tel Aviv and Rabat to deal with 
matters like business and cultural exchanges. 

When this will happen was not made clear, 
and an Israeli official said it may take a few 
months. 

Another official said that s imilar arrange- 
ments may be worked out with Tunisia in coming 
months. 

At the s am e time, Morocco said it would set up 
a similar office in the Gaza Strip, which has been 
f under Palestinian self-rule since May, along with 
the West Bank town of Jericho. But that bureau 
seemed Hkdy to deal only with technical issues. 

An official Moroccan statement said the dip- 
lomatic connection to what it called “the Pales- 
tinian state” — something that does not exist — 
would remain as before in Tunis, headquarters of 
the Palestine Liberation Organization. 

In contrast, the Israelis stressed that the new 
offices they and the Moroccans are creating 
would be run by diplomats. 

It was dear that Israel regards this action, 
which in fact had been expected for several 
months, as a precursor to eventual full diplomat- 
ic relations, although it is difficult to judge when 
— or even if — they would come about. 


Israeli offidals were delighted at the latest 
development, for it spotlighted the continued 
crumbling of a once-soiid wall of Arab hostility 
to their nation’s very existence. Opposition lead- 
ers also quickly praised the announcement. 

As with the new open friendship with Jordan, 
most Israelis want relations with Morocco, 
whose king, Hassan II, is seen here as a benign 
monarch. 

Some 600,000 Israelis are of Moroccan de- 
scent, accounting for nearly 15 percent of Israel's 
Jews. 

The government of Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin hopes that the diplomatic move will also 
prove to be a political bonanza. 

It reinforces, some offidals said, their argu- 
ment to skeptical Israelis that the Gaza-Jericho 
arrangements are not Israel's gift to the Palestin- 
ians but rather a key to regional peace and to the 
international acceptance. 

“We have to recognize the fact that very often 
patience pays off in the end,'* Mr. Rabin said. 
“Step by step, we will have a belter outcome." 

Foreign Minister Shimon Peres, who met with 
King Hassan in Rabat on June 2 and paved the 
way for the new relations, said: “Until now, we 
focused mainly on bilateral relations with our 
neighboring countries. This is the opening of 
relational relations.” 

There are presumed advantages as well for 
King Hassan, who beads a committee on Jerusa- 
lem for the Arab League. 

He reportedly was concerned when Israel an- 
nounced in July that it recognizes Lhe role that 
King Hussein of Jordan plays as guardian of 
Muslim holy places in Jerusalem. Now, some 



T-n\j MnJu.->cv»yThc AvMUieti Plej 

Flower-bearing students greeting their first-grade teacher in Moscow as Russia introduced new textbooks on all levels. 


political commentators here argued, the Moroc- 

a str0DSCT SCHOOL: Russian 3 R's Now Include Rights, Religion and a Revised Lenin 

Although Mr. P=r K insisted that Israel was individual schools are being en- 

couraged to develop their own 
books. 

At the schools, pressed by 
chaotic funding, tiny salaries 
and the exodus of many teach- 


not throwing Jerusalem open to negotiation, he 
repeated the fact that it has committed itself to 
discuss the city’s fate with the Palestinians bv 
mid- 1996- 

King Hassan, he said, “has his own opinions 
on that issue, and we’ll take them into account." 


new 



WOMEN: Progress Behind Saudi Veil of Segregation 


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Continued from Page 1 
tion that women are out there 
getting ready.” 

Women who want to survive 
work within a system of social 
segregation to maintain an aura 
of respect and untouchability. 
At the Institute of Public Ad- 
ministration, where hundreds 
of young women train for man- 
agement jobs, accounting, pub- 
lishing and computer work, the 
only link to the male world is by 
- telephone or fax. When termi 
w nals break down, male techni- 
cians come at night 

“This is a Third World coun- 
try; men and women have prob- 
lems,” Miss Thai aims said 
forcefully. “But if I am strongly 
rooted in my heritage and reli- 
gion. 1 can adapt and drill a 
path ahead of me.” 

Ilham Dakhed, a consultant 
in work-force and resource de- 
velopment, said of the all-fe- 
male institute: “Before, we had 
to beg gjrls to get trained. We 
had five or six women in each 
course. Now we have a waiting 
list of 600 to 700 for each of the 
160 programs. There is a differ- 
ence between veiling and seclu- 
sion — they are not synony- 
mous.” 

It is custom here for women, 
m the presence of men other 


than their father, spouse or 
brother, to wear the ankle- 
length abaya, cover their heads 
ana pull a black veil over their 
faces. But the way they dress in 
public is the least of their wor- 
ries. 

“Before driving and taking 
off the abaya, we need more 
important thing s — you need 
your identity as a woman,” a 
Saudi psychologist said. “Here, 
we are still part of the men.” 

The bravado of the high-pro- 
file driving protest by 47 mid- 
dle-aged professional women 
shook a kingdom where every- 
thing is solved quietly and be- 
hind the scores, but the issue 
remains unresolved. When con- 
fronted with an emergency and 
a relative has to be driven to 
hospital, what should a woman 
do? , 

“These are extremely limited 
incidents,” Prince Nayef ibn 
Abdulaziz, the interior minis- 
ter, answered matter-of-factly. 
“She will not drive, because she 
won’t know how and she does 
not have a license. A woman is 
compelled to seek the assistance 
of a man.” 

One prominent prince noted 
that “before the establishment 
of the kingdom, women were 
considered as cattle.” 


Saying that what has been 
accomplished so far should not 
be overlooked, he added: “Ask 
women in their 70s and 80s 
what it was like when they were 
5 or 6 years old.” 

May Rimaya, an obstetri- 
cian, said the first generation of 
female doctors in Saudi Arabia 
had to go into research. Now 
more patients are asking to be 
treated by female physicians. 

But in the hearts of those who 
are trailblazing the narrow path 
allowed them in Saudi Arabia, 
there is a strong desire for rec- 
ognition. 

“We want to be part of deci- 
sion-making,” said Johara An- 
gari, a columnist and writer. 
“We are not dreaming of the 
impossible. 

“We would like to have com- 
mittees at the Majlis al Shura 
who are in touch with women's 
issues,” she said, referring to a 
consultative council appointed 
by the king. 

“If that writer wants to start 
that process by writing a peti- 
tion to the authorities, she 
should do it," a senior security 
official suggested, adding that 
the wives of members of the 
Majlis could initiate it by telling 
their husbands. 


CLAHICGI IRA: London Hedges Reply to Cease-Fire Declaration 




*■ 

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Continued from Page 1 

could only be seen as intending 
a permanent end to violence. 

Others took the same view, 
including most notably the 
- Irish prime minister, Albert 
Reynolds, whose government is 
partner to the British in the lat- 
est peace initiative. Mr. Reyn- 
olds said the declaration meant 
that “there is now the historic 
opportunity to take the gun out 
of Irish politics forever. 

And he added: “Why get 
hung up on a word? It does not 
worry me in the least. It is a 
total end to violence. That’s 
enough for me.” 

As the debate continued, 
Sinn Fein turned up the heat on 
Mr. Major. Appearing on a ra- 
dio news show, his words spo- 
ken by an actor because of a 
ban on t ransmissio n of his 
voice. Marlin McGuinness, in 
effect the No. 2 official in Sinn 
Fein, said it would be “very 
stupid” for the government to 
delay talks by “getting them- 
selves on hooks over one partic- 
ular word.” 

He then went a bit beyond 
the communique by saying he 
took it to mean w ’a complete 


cessation of military operations 
under all circumstances.” 

It was announced, mean- 
while, that four republican pris- 
oners had been transferred 
from English jails to jails in 
Northern Ireland. Irish nation- 
alists have long demanded that 
prisoners be allowed to serve 
sentences at home, closer to 
their families. 

Among the four men serving 
life sentences was Patrick Ma- 
gee, convicted in June 19S6 of 
setting a deadly bomb at a 
Brighton hotel filled with Con- 
servative Party figures. 

The Northern Ireland office 
of the British government in- 
sisted that the transfers were 
not connected to the cease-fire 
announcement and had been in 
the works for some time, but 
comments tore appeared skepti- 
cal Of the claim. 

■ U.S. Economic Aid 

The United States is hole 
out the possibility of inc 
economic aid for Northern Ire- 
land to help cement the IRA 
cease-fire, The Associated Press 
reported. 

But Senator Patrick J. Leahy, 
Democrat of Vermont, the 


chairman of the Senate sub- 
committee that would deal with 
any request for additional 
funds, said there was no chance 
Congress would act this year. 

“There’s money already in 
the pipeline,” Mr. Leahy said. 
“There’s no urgency.” 

The Irish Republic is dis- 
patching Deputy Prime Minis- 
ter Dick Spring to Martha's 
Vineyard, Resident Bill Clin- 
ton’s vacation island off Cape 
Cod in Massachusetts, for a 
meeting on Friday to discuss 
the prospects for peace and for 
an aid package to help keep it 
glued together. 


Continued froffl Page 1 
properly preparing the 
generation. 

Finally, the Russian govern- 
ment has completed publica- 
tion of 100 basic texts, most of 
them entirely new. It took sev- 
eral years to put the books to- 
gether and win their approval 
from a panel of Russian intel- 
lectuals. 

Textbooks are being distrib- 
uted this month to the nation's 
68,000 schools and 20 J milli on 
students. Mr. Asmolov said the 
new texts, unlike the old ones, 
would not be the only accepted 
teaching materials. Regions and 


ESTONIA: 

Horror Recalled 

Continued from Page 1 

Estonia from Lithuania, Hun- 
gary, France and elsewhere in 
Europe. 

At first, the Jews were placed 
in prison work camps, with rel- 
atively mild regimes. But by the 
time the Red Army recaptured 
the country in 1944, the Nazis 
had murdered almost all of 
them — more than 20,000 in all. 
The final killings took place 
here, when the Red Army was 
only hours away. 

In a panic to finish their work 
and destroy afl evidence, the 
Germans sent a special SS de- 
tachment to Klooga. In groups 
of 300, the Jews were ordered to 
gather slacks of logs and lie on 
top of Lhem. The officers then 
shot those Jews and ordered the 
next group to stack wood on 
top of the dead and injured, lie 
down and be shot in turn. Even- 
tually, the soldiers set the entire 
construction afire. 

Many Estonians, like many 
citizens of Ukraine, Lith uani a 
and other newly freed nations, 
have been reluctant to acknowl- 
edge their compatriots’ role in 
Nazi crimes. Because Soviet 
rule was so brutal — tens of 
thousands of Estonians died in 
Siberian labor camps — many 
here have tended to see any 
anti-Soviet resistance as heroic, 
even if it included aiding Nazis. 

Mr. Laar expressed regret 
Thursday that Estonians took 

S art “in both red terrorism and 
rown terrorism." 

“Today, we can be sure that 
in the new Estonia a repetition 
of this tragedy will be impossi- 
ble," he said. "In the new Esto- 
nia, there is freedom of belief." 


mensely popular cartoon char- 
acter known as Crocodile Gena. 
Middle grades will read the 
“Wonderful Adventures in the 
Country of Economics." Upper 
grades will have “Economics 


ers for lucrative jobs, the new Without Secrets.’ 
texts and the new emphasis they Mr. Asmolov said the new 
place on inquisitive learning lexis and curriculum might be 
has been welcome. Soviet-era disorienting to some parents 
education tended to emphasize and teachers, who grew up un- 
official-line rote. der the Soviet system with the 

“Children are now about to old set of officially approved 
see different viewpoints.” said facts. For them, the Education 
Nina Kulikova, director of Ministry is putting out guide 


Moscow School No. 1276. “The 
point is that no one has the right 
to say the final word." 

In addition to a slew of new 
textbooks, Lhe schools have sev- 
eral new courses to teach, from 
the “Psychology of Manage- 
ment" in upper grades to “Envi- 
ronment” and “F undame ntals 
of Life Safety" on d ealin g with 
emergency situations in the 
lower ones. The latter, she said, 
was “based on the American 
system.’* 

All grades will get a thorough 
dose of market economics as 
well The smallest children will 
learn about it through a very 
simple series, based on an im~ 


books explaining the change- 
over, and how to adapt with 
their children to it, he said 

The most disorienting area 
for many parents will probably 
be that dealing with the history 
of what for seven decades of 
Communist Party rule was cele- 
brated as the Great October So- 
cialist Revolution of 1917. 

The new ninth-grade Russian 
history book, for instance, de- 
scribes the Bolshevik revolution 
as the “Victoiy of the Aimed 
Uprisin g in Petrograd and Mos- 
cow.” and a socialist “coup” 
made possible by the lack of 
representative democracy in 
Russia. It states that the regime 


that eventually developed was a 
totalitarian one in which people 
were just cogs to be used bv the 
stale. 

Lenin is far from the gentle 
father figure he used to "be in 
school texts, although he is not 
painted as a total villain. 

That is reserved for Stalin, 
who Lhe text said unleashed a 
period of “fundamental law- 
lessness” and used trumped-up 
show irials to have his enemies 
shot or sent to spend the rest of 
their lives behind barbed wire. 

At school No. 1276, where a 
sea of frilly white hair ribbons 
on the heads of little girls her- 
alded opening day. parents 
were only upset that the new 
curriculum and books look so 
long to arrive. 

"It’s better this way,” said 
one mother, whose fourth- 
grade daughter just three years 
ago was still reading about" 
“Grampa Lenin." Soon she will 
be reading from a literature 
book that contains long stories 
from the Bible. 

“They are learning freedom 
of thought,” she said. “Not like 
we did. That's the most impor- 
tant thing now.” 


KOREA: 

Carter Invited 

Continued from Page 1 

lively." one Soulh Korean offi- 
cial said. “At this stage, what 
can he do in Pyongyang? G ear- 
ly, North Korea has been trying 
to drive a wedge between" the 
United States and South Ko- 
rea.” 

Relations with Nonh Korea 
have been in a tense and critical 
phase for the last IS months, 
ever since Nonh Korea refused 
inspectors from the Interna- 
tional Atomic Energy Agency 
access to nuclear sites. The re- 
fusal stoked fears that North 
Korea was producing plutoni- 
um for building nuclear bombs. 

The United States threatened 
to impose economic sanctions if 
North Korea kept its sites 
closed, and North Korea 
warned that such action would 
be taken as an act of war. 

With the countries heading 
toward a possible military con- 
frontation, Mr. Carter visited 
Pyongyang and met with Kim 11 
Sung in June. Mr. Carter's ef- 
fort was played down in both 
South Korea and Washington 
because of worries that he was 
overly sympathetic to Nonh 
Korea's view, but he seemed to 
have extracted several conces- 
sions from Mr. Kim that led to 
a new opening. 

North Korea agreed to freeze 
its nuclear program and to al- 
low inspectors to monitor a 
cooling pond where some spent 
reactor fuel rods were being 
stored. If the rods are repro- 
cessed. they could produce 
enough plutonium for four or 
five more bombs. 

In return, the United States 
agreed to resume high-level ne- 
gotiations with the North Kore- 
ans without other conditions. 
And Mr. Kim agreed to take 
pan in a meeting with South 
Korea's president. 

Kim II Sung's death put ev- 
erything on hold, and the Kore- 
an summit meeting has been 
indefinitely postponed. But the 
high-level talks with the United 
States resumed in Geneva and 
produced the outline of an 
agreement several weeks ago. 

■ U.S.-North Korea Talks 

U.S. and North Korean ex- 
perts will meet in Pyongyang on 
Sept. 10 to discuss technicaf de- 
tails of setting up liaison of- 
fices, Reuters reported Thurs- 
day from Washington, citing 
American officials. 

But no such offices will be set 
up in the two countries' capitals 
before the dispute over North 
Korea's nuclear program is re- 
solved, the officials said. 



TV: CBS and NBC May Be for Sale 


at*. 







ULSTER: Two Varieties of Calm 


* ill 


U. » 







fe -r 


Continued from Page 1 

Irish ” said Mr. Campbell. “For 
unionists, the struggle is just 

in &” . . . 
ie skeptical reaction of 
many Protestants in the prov- 
ince was fueled by television 
news dips showing republican 
demonstrators marching 
through the streets of London- 
derry and Belfast late Wednes- 
day night, banging pans on the 
side of police and army bar- 
racks. . 

At midday Thursday, anoth- 
er group of about 1 50 protesters 
led by Martin McGuiness, a se- 
nior official of Sinn Fein, the 
political arm of the IRA, gath- 
ered outside the British Army 
barracks north of town, a 
brooding fortress surrounded 
by security cameras and barbed 
wire. 


At one point several protest- 
ers clambered up a wire mesh 
fence surrounding an observa- 
tion post and draped a banner 
that read: “Time for Peace. 
Time to Go." 

“I am not sure anyone would 
have wanted to try climbing 
that fence before today," Mr. 
McGuiness said, chuckling at 
their audacity. “But I think it 
shows you the mood. People are 
emboldened by what has hap- 
pened." 

But Tony Crowe, a local 
school administrator who runs 
a community program in the 
onlv Protestant housing project 
on "the west side of town, said 
such demonstrations did not 
serve the cause of peace. 

“People see lus, and they 
think the nationalists are say- 
ing, ‘We’ve won,’ " Mr. Crowe 
said. 


Continued from Page 1 

buying that network, though 
neither person put a date on the 
discussions. Disney a gain de- 
clined to comment. 

Merger discussions are ex- 
tremely delicate, particularly in 
the television business, which is 
subject to complex government 
rules, and can easily come un- 
raveled, as did the planned CBS 
merger with QVC. 

Whatever the outcome of the 
discussions, they reflect an in- 
tense interest on the pan of 
Time Warner and Disney, both 
leading producers of television 
programming, in entering the 
network business. 

Companies like Disney and 
Time Warner, which owns 
Warner Brothers Television, 
have enjoyed significant profit 
from the sale of programs they 
make to the networks and later 
from the sale of renin rights to 
those shows to television sta- 
tions across the country. 

But that will change with Lhe 
lifting next year of f«leral regu- 
lations that have prevented tele- 
vision networks from produc- 
ing much of their own 
programming and selling the lu- 
crative rerun rights. The net- 
works will need to rely less on 
the big studios to produce pro- 
gramming for them. 


Unless the studios control 
the networks, that is. “The stu- 
dios want to own networks so 
that they assure themselves of a 
guaranteed outlet for their 
product," said David London- 
er, an analyst at Wertheim 
Schroder & Co. “Owning a net- 
work and controlling an aver- 
age of 12 million viewers every 
night gives them an enormous 
amount of clout.” 

Television network compa- 
nies have two operations: the 
networks themselves, which 
produce some programming 
and buy more, and the televi- 
sion stations the companies 
own and operate, which broad- 
cast that programming along 
with many affiliated stations. 

What Time Warner and Gen- 
eral Electric are discussing, ac- 
cording to those familiar with 
the talks, is a deal in which 
Time Warner would buy the 
NBC network, as well as "cable 
television services, including 
CNBC. It would not acquire the 
seven television stations that 
NBC owns and operates. 

That structure could work 
well for General Electric, which 
acquired NBC as part of a take- 
over of RCA Corp. in 1986. 
Wall Street analysts said they 
thought the company was valu- j 
lug NBC on its books at about [ 
54 billion. I 


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Page 6 


FRIDAY, SEP TEMBER 2, 1994 

OPINION 


* 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW TORE TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Peace in Northern Ireland? 


Hardly had the Irish Republican Army 
promised a “complete cessation” Wednes- 
day of its 25-year guerrilla war is North- 
ern Ireland than doubts began crowding 
in. Well and good, said Prime Minister 
John Major of Britain, but why not a 
"permanent” cessation? In the British- 
ruled province; Protestant doubters were 
.quick to recall that in 1972 and 1975 the 
IRA also proclaimed a cease-fire, which 
within months literally went up in smoke. 

Who really can control individual gun- 
men and death squads on all sides who 
have turned Belfast into a sectarian battle- 
field? True, other bitter quarrels have 
yielded to compromise elsewhere. Yet, 
skeptics pointed out, neither side in this 
bloody struggle can offer a leader with the 
towering influence of a Nelson Mandela 
or an F. W. de Klerk — the kind of influ- 
ence required to make agreements stick. 

Grant the doubters their doubts. Never- 
theless, this is a breakthrough — and 
things ought to go very badly for any 
faction that shatters this yeamed-for 
cease-fire. Most of Northern Ireland's 
900.000 Protestants and 600,000 Ro man 
Catholics are weary of violence rooted in 
ancient quarrels that outsiders find hard to 
fathom. Besides, when leaders shift gears 
and talk of “entering a new situation, a 
new opportunity," they become hostage to 
the very hopes they arouse. 

Those were phrases used in Wednes- 
day's five-paragraph IRA communique, 
presumably blessed by Gerry Adams, 
leader of Sinn Fein, the political wing of 
the outlawed army. Earlier this year, the 
British government unwisely pressed 
Washington to prevent Mr. Adams from 
speaking in America. President Bill Clin- 
ton decided otherwise, and over State De- 
partment objections a visa was granted to 
the Sinn Fein leader — whose voice; under 
a bizarre restriction, cannot even be law- 
fully broadcast on British television. 

In America, Mr. Adams was rightly 
warned that repeating old slogans like 
“Brits out!” wouldn't do and he had to 
offer something more substantial in re- 
sponse to a December peace declaration 
by Mr. Major and his Dublin counterpart, 
Albert Reynolds. So in successive inter- 
views Mr.’ Adams said it was his hope 


finally to “take the gun out of Irish poli- 
tics,” and he quickly came under pressure 
to deliver. For now at least, Mr. Clinton 
can say that his visa gamble worked. 

The IRA pledge was a response to a 
declaration by the British ana Irish gov- 
ernments at 10 Downing Street in Decem- 
ber. They offered Sinn Fein a seat at the 
bargaining table if the IRA permanently 
renounced violence. Mr. Major stipulated 
a three-month cessation as proof of good 
faith. He should not allow things to fall 
now over a semantic quarrel about 
constitutes “permanent." 

Granted, when and if talks begin, the 
old, tall hurdles remain. The majority of 
the North's Protestants want to remain 
part of the United Kingdom, while most of 
the province’s Catholics favor union with 
the Irish Republic. But the last year has 
provided new signs of hope. 

In the declaration, for example, Britain 
moved into fresh terrain by asserting that 
it had no strategic interest in Northern 
Ireland. That, in turn, provides an opening 
for Dublin to remove a territorial claim in 
the Irish Constitution to the six comities of 
the North. Britain could then rescind the 
1920 Northern Ireland Act that estab- 
lished partition, and consider a different 
framework for relations between two Ire- 
lands that already share a common open 
frontier within the European Union. And 
now comes the IRA pledge 

There axe many able supporting actors 
in this drama, including a persistent Brit- 
ish secretary of state Tor Northern Ire- 
land, Sir Patrick Mayhew; a pragmatic 
Northern Protestant, James Molyneaux; 
a widely respected leader of the North's 
nonviolent nationalists, John Hume; and 
a determined peace-seeker, Dick Spring, 
the Irish foreign minister, who will meet 
this week with Mr. Clinton. 

In short, the permafrost seems finally 
to be heaving. Experience warns against 
building hopes which a single bomb blast 
could shatter at any time. But it should be 
possible soon to test the sincerity of the 
IRA declaration. And if violence truly 
ceases, it should be possible finally to 
reduce Britain’s garrison of 18,000 sol- 
diers in Northern Ireland. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



Russia Withdraws at Last 


With the departure on Wednesday of 
Russian troops from Germany and the 
Baltic countries, the great army that once 
confronted NATO across Europe is now 
-cntirelv dismantled. The last vestiges 
have disappeared of the military struc- 
ture that once maintained Soviet power 
• over most of Central and Eastern Europe. 
The German withdrawals were complet- 
ed exactly on the schedule agreed on two 
years ago to cany out a commitment 
made in 1990 by a state, the Soviet 
Union, which no longer exists. 

There was a civilized ceremony in Berlin 
in which Russia’s President Boris Yeltsin 
and Germany’s Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
spoke of peace and hope for the future. 
Mr. Yeltsin also dwelled on the Soviet 
troops who wiD not be going home — the 
320,000 soldiers of the Red Army killed in 
the final battles of World War II and 
buried in Germany. It was a reminder of 
the hideous price that the Soviets paid in 
that war. Mr. Kohl acknowledged the ter- 
rible things that were done to Russians by 
Germans in the name of Germany ana 
promised that no military threat to Russia 
will ever again arise from German soiL 


The last Russian army units pulled out 
of Latvia and Estonia during the day, 
except for one small detachment to de- 
commission two reactors at a naval base 
and another to operate a radar station. 
(The Russians bad evacuated the third 
Baltic country, Lithuania, last year.) The 
celebrations are reported to have been 
muted, with the rejoicing tempered by 
memories of the long occupation and a 
dear sense that the Baltics 1 security de- 
pends largely on the stability of the new 
democracy in their much larger neighbor. 

These were, in a sense, routine events, 
the final steps in the long process of 
carrying out pledges that a government 
had made some time ago. But they were 
routine events that no one was foolish 
enough to take for granted, least of all in 
the Baltic states or Germany. There had 
been moments in the Baltics when it 
seemed that the Russians might change 
their minds. But in the end, recognizing 
that the world saw it as a test of Russia’s 
good faith and reliability, Mr. Yeltsin 
and his government pulled out their 
troops, punctual to the day. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Rosa Parks at 81 


One report said something about Rosa 
Parks becoming a victim of the tiroes. The 
subject was the attack on the 8 1 -year-old 
heroine of the American civil rights move- 
ment by a burglar on Tuesday night Luck- 
ily, Mis. Parks was not seriously injured, 
but the conjunction of the Parks name and 
“the limes" was evocative. 

Mrs. Parks knows about tough times 
and being forced into a victim’s situation. 
Those were exactly her circumstances in 
1955 when she got on a bus in Montgom- 
ery, Alabama. Her refusal to take a seat in 
the back has now hardened into legend, 
but even as she was venerated Mrs. Parks 
was not always fully appreciated. 

Seldom has such moral toughness 
come in a frailer looking form. Seldom 
has physical courage spoken with a quiet- 
er voice or assumed a more modest man- 
ner. That contributed to a misunder- 
standing. of Mrs. Parks. Journalists and 
some historians have taken too literally 
her ironic remark that she refused to 
move because she was tired. 

She was weary, but not politically naive 
about segregation and the need to con- 
front it. She had what she called a “life 
history” of dissatisfaction with the South- 
ern way of life. Long before she got on that 
bus on Dec. 1, 1955. she had beat touched 
with the spirit of rebellion through her 


contacts with the National Association for 
the Advancement of Colored People and 
the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters 
through their local representative. E. D. 
Nixon. She bad visited pioneering integra- 
tion workshops at the Highlander Folk 
School, founded by a Tennessee hill coun- 
try activist, Myles Horton. She was friends 
with the Montgomery attorney Clifford 
Durr and his wife, Virginia, virtually the 
only prominent white people in Alabama 
willing to support Mrs. Parks and the 
Reverend Martin Luther King, the young 
preacher who led the boycott she inspired. 

All these original actors in the Mont- 
gomery drama are dead now except Mrs. 
Parks and Mrs. Dure, who is 91. Segrega- 
tionists used to defame Mrs. Durr as a 
Communist They also maintained that 
Mrs. Parks had been “put up to" her 
lonely act of rebellion by the people she 
met at Highlander and elsewhere. 

No one put Mrs. Parks up to anything. 
Hers was an independent, spontaneous act 
prompted by her conscience and by one 
other factor. Mr. King defined it when he 
wrote that she “had bom tracked down by 
the Zeitgeist — the spirit of the time.” 
Now a mean and violent modem Zeitgeist 
is at work in the country. It touched Mrs. 
Parks, but it is not likely to defeat her. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED 1887 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 


Cn-Chaimea 

RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher Jt Chief Execanve 


j JOHN V1NOCUR, Exreudfe EiStor & Vice President 

I • WALTER WELLS. .W Hike • SAMUEL ABT, KATHERINE KNQRR ai»J 

CHARLES MTTCHELMORE Depart Editors • CARL GEWTRTZ, Ak«s»* EeStor 
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i • RENE BONDY, Defeat publisher ■ JAMES McLK)D. AAvmsi^ Dirracr 

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9 1 


How Hiroshima Came to a Daughter in Connecticut 


J ERUSALEM — Norman Cousins 
died three years ago. But for one of 
the little girls who knew him as their 
father, he was taken away a long time 
before that, by the atomic bomb. 

Every year, it seemed, my parents 
packed their bags, our grandmother Sa- 
rah came to take care of me and my 
asters, and off flew my mother and fa- 
ther to Hir oshima. There they were in- 
volved in the care of a group of young 
women, 10 to 20 years my senior, all of 
whom had been maimed or crippled by 
the Americans’ atomic bomb. 

My father’s magazine, The Saturday 
Review, working in conjunction with the 
Reverend Kiyoshi Tanimoto's Nakar- 
egawa Church in Japan, was sponsoring 
a project that would bring these Hiroshi- 
ma Maidens, as they came to be called, to 
the United States for plastic surgery. 
And throughout the years following 


By Sarah Shapiro 

This is the first of two articles. 


of my parents’ attention and concern as 


were my Japas 
In 1955 they 


anese counterparts, 
arrived. I tned not to look 


Fd wander, bored, into his study, twirl 
around in his swivel chair, open up draw- 
ers, look for paper clips or sharpened 
pencils or unused writing pads. 

Pd contemplate the bag framed paintin g 
above his desk, a collage in red and orange 


of a woman running naked through fire, 
head thrown back, Bair 



up on the maidens' complicated 
medical and personal progress. 

Back home in our Connecticut suburb, 
I waited. It fell as if the whole house had 
been unplugged from its power source 
each time my parents went away on one 
of those trips. I yearned for my mother’s 
competent, no-nonsense presence, her 
fast pace. I missed the sight of my sweet, 
kina father hunched over the piano each 
evening, after my mother had picked him 
up from the commuter train, picking out 
his 1920s and 1930s tunes by ear. 


flying, horrified 
eyes wide open, mouth open in a silent 
scream, arms outstretched in a useless 
gesture of self-protection. Her body, hid- 
den partly by the flames that enwrapped 
her, was composed of tom-out newspaper 
clippings: “Atomic Device Dropped on 
Hiroshima,” “Japan Surrenders” and 
“AEC Discloses Radiation Data.” 

During these bouts of parental ab- 
sence, God's absence, too, seemed espe- 
cially noticeable. It was frightening, this 
universe without a benevolent higher 
power capable of neutralizing the radio- 
active mushroom cloud. 

Life was an uncertain thing. How 
could I taire my homework seriously? 

Our mother and father would, of 


course, always reappear eventually, 
awer or lack thereof returned tc 


God’s power or lack thereof returned to 
the bade burner and the household's light 
and power were instantly restored. 

But I felt there was nothing I could do, 
no suffering I could ever hope to come up 
with there in slick, comfortable New Ca- 
naan, That could ever make me as worthy 


at their scars. Their hands and feet were 
twisted and gnarl e d, their limbs mul tied - 

ly shaped bums, some drawn tight and 
shiny and some a darker, duller hue. 

Their faces were contorted and 
stretched in all kinds of strange ways. 
They were shy and so was L a little 5- 
year-olcL They smiled at me. 

Farfr maiden was settled with a differ- 
ent American family for the duration of 
her operations. One of them, Shigeko 
Nimoto, came to stay with us. 

When she first moved, it was her face I 
tried most not to stare at The lower half 
was welded with variously toned scar tis- 
sue down over the chin onto the neck, 
iny, l 

; she stood at the bath- 
room mirror grooming herself that she 
took pride in that thick mane. It was a 
relief to discern this classic sign of femi- 
nine vanity, having heard her on a few 
occasions explain: “When the bomb fall. 
I 15. That the age girls fhfrik very much 
about beauty, right?" (I didn’t know. I 
wasn’t anywhere near there yet.) 

“When the bomb fall. I lose everything 
beautiful the body, so I can’t think about 
thing s tike that anymore. 

“in a way, was good. Many oper- 
ations one after one, skin graft. But 
I already know I have to be person not 
thinking about beauty. Have to get love 


for who I am person — the spiritual? 

On that summer morning, Shigeko had 
been a schoolgirl engaged in a municipal- 
ly organized street cleanup. She heard a 


lane and looked up to spot it, shielding 
Tht 


rat’s how she 


Her hair was shiny, black and full and 
it was apparent as 


sr eyes from the sun. 
saved her eyes and lost her hands, and 
the lower half of her face. 

There was a flash of light more bright, 
she said, than the sun itself, then the 
world disappeared. She felt a colossal 
wave of heat and looked down to see her 
skin hang in g from her body. Her hair had 
been singed right off. 

Shigeko ended up staying with us in- 
definitely. One snowy Connecticut day, I 
sat with her in front of the dining room 
fireplace. I loved her by now. She called 
herself my mommy number two and I 
trusted her and was accustomed to her as 
much as I was to anyone else in my 
family. She was my sister now. 

I was staling at the blue and orange 
flames and the sparks flying upward, 
lulled into the dreamy warmth, when 
Shigeko, goring into the light, remarked, 
“What would you fed if you a small, 
small ant in that fire?" 

I stiffened, ashamed, not daring to re- 
ply, then looked back into the fireplace 
and visualized a tiny ant crawling across 
the brick hearth toward the bottom log. 
Somehow I must have felt what was com- 
ing. There was no safety in the world. 

“I was ant,” said Shigeko. 

© The Jerusalem Post. Distributed by 
New York Tones Special Features. 


ft' 

\\h iu 


Russians Leave at Last, Rescinding Yalta, and Russia Enters Europe 


B RUSSELS — This Thursday, 
General Matvei Burlakov, 
the 16th commander in chief of the 
Russian Army stationed in what 
was once East Germany, was 
among (he last Russian soldiers to 
leave German soil. It was a historic 
moment for Germany, for Russia, 
for Europe and for the world. 

For Germany, the ceremony in 
Berlin ended nearly SO years of 
Russian military presence. Only 
five years ago, before die fall of 
the Berlin Wall. 400,000 Soviet 
troops were stationed in East 
Germany, as well as 200,000 de- 
pendents. There were 4,000 tanks 
and 1,500 fighter planes. 

For Russia, it is the first time 
since 1939 that it has no soldiers 
west of its borders. The official 
borders of today's Russian state 
are approximately the same as for 
the Russia of three centuries ago, 
before the union with Ukraine. 
To Sergei Karaganov, an adviser 
to President Boris Yeltsin, tins 


By Leopold Unger 


means that Russia can again be 
viewed as a normal country. 

For Europe, Wednesday was 
important because of General 
Burlakov’s departure and also 
those of Russian generals from 
Latvia and Estonia. With Lithua- 
nia free of the Russian military 
presence as of a year ago, the 
Baltic states have now recovered 
their territorial sovereignty (with 
a few minor exceptions — a rent- 
ed radar base in Latvia and a 
naval base being denuclearized in 
Estonia). Russia thus remains a 
Baltic stale only because of its 
Kaliningrad enclave, the former 
Prussian Kbnigsbere. 

And for the world, the depar- 
ture of the last Russian soldiers 
from Germany and the Baltics 
completes the evacuation of the 
former Red Army from European 
countries occupied in 1945 and 
subjugated by the Soviet empire. 


With Wednesday's retreat, the 
Russians finally put an end to 
their mam Soviet-era territorial 


conquests to the west Only now 
can Work 


forid War II be declared 
truly over in Europe. 

History loves paradox but not 
iwanipnlafi/wv The be ginning and 

the end of the war have been the 
subject of, to put it delicately, 
certain misunderstandings. 

For the Poles, the war began 
with the first German bombard- 
ment of Warsaw on SepL 1, 1939. 
For the French and the English, it 
started two days later with the 
declaration of war against Hitler. 
For the Belgians, the war did not 
break out until 1940. And for the 
Russians, it was in June 1941, 
with the Nazi aggression. 

In fact. World War II began on 
Aug. 23, 1939, the day Hitler and 
S tatin, the two crudest dictators 
of this century, signed their “Pact 


of Nonaggression.” The secret 
clauses ofthat pact left the field 
wide open for the Nazis and 
called for Central and Eastern 
Europe to be divided into zones 
of influence. Among other things, 
that meant the fourth time Po- 
land would be divided between its 
two big neighbors; the seizing of 
the Baltic countries; the amputa- 
tion of Romania, and more. 

Nor is there agreement on the 
end of the war. For the Western 
nations, it ended in May 1945 
when, upon the mins of the 
Third Reich Hitler’s marshals 
signed their capitulation, ending 
the Hitlerian state. 

But the Yalta conference in 
February had sealed for 50 inter- 
minable years (the Russians were 
already at the Elbe) the fate of 
the East European countries, 
leaving proud, mainly Christian, 
Westward-looking countries in 
the totalitarian, retrograde, un- 
derdeveloped Soviet zone. 


Paradoxically, it is only the be- 
lated but total and irrevocable 
retreat of Russian soldiers that 
provides credible proof of Rus- 
sia’s arrival in Europe. The act of 
evacuation by the Russian army 
is a symbolic but historically in- 
dispensable annex to the fateful 
accords of Yalta. 

For 100 years, the base at 
WOndsdorf , south of Berlin, was 
headquarters first far the Ger- 
mans and then for the Russians. 
Today it is empty. We must hope 
that it will stay that way. 

With their suffering and sacri- 
fices, the countries that were Yal- 
ta’s victims have in a sense paid 


for the peace and prosperity of 
the West For 50 years, the Hitler- 


Stalin pact continued to exist, al- 
though *n another form. Only to- 
day do wc dare announce the true 4 
end of that Satanic pact — with ’ 
the hope that its poisoned heri- 
tage, too, will soon disappear. 

International Herald Tribme. 


TJ ’ ’ . X 


■-? % ■ 
r * _ • ! 


Rid American Foreign Policy of the Miami Crowd’s Designs on Cuba £ 


P ARIS — After she stepped 
through the looking glass, the 
world Alice found was never so 
topsy-turvy as the surrealistic xdar 
don that Washington and Havana 
are creating with each other. A 
Communist dictator threatens to 
let his people flee unless America 
gives them refugee visas. Wash- 
ington used to call them defectors 
and welcome them as heroes. 

Then, for humanitarian rea- 
sons, the dictator agrees to pre- 
vent children and women bom 
risking their lives in un-seaworthy 
barks from which they may or 
may not be picked up by the U.S. 


By Flora Lewis 


Coast Guard and returned to 
Cuba — to the barbed-wire- 
fenced, American-leased enclave 
at Guantdnamo. The two sides 
limit their contacts to “technical 
talks" about these people. 

As usual with surrealism, there 
is a hard reality underneath. 
Cuba is certainly a foreign coun- 
try, but all this has nothing to do 
with U.S. foreign policy. 

That period is past The Bay of 
Pigs invasion was certainly a for- 
initiative. The 1962 
le crisis was the most dan- 


it of tiie Cold War. 
sn Che Guevara promised 
“one, two, three more Vietnams" 
in Latin America and when Fidel 
Castro sent his army to help Sovi- 
et-barked regimes in Ethiopia 
and Angola, U.S. strategic inter- 
ests were involved. 

Now, Moscow hasn’t the time 
of day for Cuba. Washington is 
nourishing relations with Russia 
and China and sidling up to Viet- 
nam and North Korea. 

Cuba is still important to Wash- 
ington, but for a angle, shortsight- 


America 9 s Reputation Is in Decline 


P ARIS — Power lies in repu- 
tation, and American power 
is in decline because the na- 
tion's reputation is in decline. 
Commentators tend to blame 
this on the Clinton administra- 
tion for its inconsistencies, but 
there is more to it than that. 

The Sunday Telegraph in 
London has always been the 
newspaper of traditional Brit- 
ish conservatism. One of its 
commentators, John Casey, 
has just published what begins 
as a criticism of the Clinton 
administration’s Cuban policy 
but rapidly becomes a vitriolic 
attack on American conduct 
toward the Caribbean and Lat- 
in America since the time, 40 
years ago, when Cuba “was a 
client state of the Americans 
and a world center of crime." 

In Haiti and Cuba, Mr. Casey 
now foresees the United States 
imposing “a misshapen crea- 
ture,” its “New World Order," 
thejproduct of an American im- 
perialism that, unlike the impe- 
rialism of the past, or even of 
the Soviet Union, refuses “to 
take real responsibility for [its] 
subject nations.” 

A similar charge has just 
been made in France in the 
magazine of the influential and 
conservative newspaper Le Fi- 
garo. An article suggested that 
the United States sponsors the 
Ugandan-based ( and English- 
speaking) Tutsi army that 
seized control of Rwanda last 
month, intending to drive 
French influence from Africa 
and substitute its own. This ac- 
cusation has since been echoed 
in Le Monde, the most impor- 
tant French daily. 

Despite the implausibility of 
the notion that after Somalia 
the Clinton administration 
wants anything more to do 
with Africa, these accusations 
express a cultural hostility to- 
ward the United States that is 
by no means confined to the 
French right. It is a hostility 
that would not have been ex- 
pressed in the same way in the 


By William Pfaff 


States no longer gives the im- 


post, when America’s dyna- 
mism and evident sense of pur- 
pose seemed to justify its “im- 
perialism.” 

Perhaps the most prominent 
of Britain’s conservative com- 
mentators, Peregrine Wors th- 
eme, wrote recently that de- 
spite his liking for Americans 
and his past championing of 
the United States against a left- 
ist anti-Americanism, be now 
has concluded that the United 
Slates is a dangerously failing 
society and a bad influence on 
Britain. He suggests that Brit- 
ain give up its slavish imitation 
of American ideas and look to 
Asia for a new model of how 
economic progress can be com- 
bined with social stability and 
conservative values. 

This in part is provocation, of 
course. Behind the advice, how- 
ever, is a very significant shift in 
the perceptions of someone who, 
during the Thatcher-Reagan 
years, was an extravagant admir- 
er of the United States. 

No American today needs to 
be told that the United States is 
in a serious social crisis rooted 
in racial tensions and the situa- 
tion of the American family. 
The decline in the country’s for- 
eign reputation is a conse- 
quence of its failure to deal with 

problems that are, in part, those 
of modem society itself, but in 
important respects also are 
problems of its own creation. 

There certainly is no excuse, 
for example, for the fact that 
the United States, alone among 
the major Western nations, not 


only has no program of umver- 
1 lie 


sal health care, but when it at- 
tempts to legislate one is pre- 
vented from doing so by self- 
interested lobbies and 
factional conflict. 

The dement of hypocrisy in 
American foreign policy is an 
did story, and hypocrisy in any 
case is no American monopoly. 
What is new is that the United 


3 longer _ 

pression to others that its for- 
eign policy reflects a coherent 
conception of American and al- 
lied interests. 

Mr. Clinton must be held ac- 
countable for this. He has tried 
to do what be thinks the public 
wants, deaf to the reality that 
in international affairs the 
public does not specifically 
know what it wants, and that 
presidential leadership consists 
in telling the public what toe 
nation needs and should want. 

His flagrant reversals of 
American policy on Cuba were 
caused by his (doomed) wish to 
satisfy contradictory pressures 
from Florida interest groups. 
His Haiti reversals were driven 
by pressure groups. His admin- 
istration’s abject abandoni 
of human rights considerations 
in dealing with China, con- 
firmed by Commerce Secretary 
Ron Brown in Beijing on Mon- 
day. suggests that, for Wash- 
ington, the only “outlaw na- 
tions’’ are those in whom 
American business has no cur- 
rent trade interest. 

Mr. Clinton earned respect 
for toe United States when he 
assumed office because he 
seemed determined to deal with 
toe country’s internal problems. 
His neglect of foreign affairs 
was forgiven by America’s al- 
lies. Now the respect is gone, 
and the American crisis seems 
to toe allies endemic, and per- 
haps insolvable. 

Mr. Clinton can be blamed 
in that when he became presi- 
dent he held toe possibility of 
American chang e in his hands. 
To succeed, he had to impose 
his own convictions, at toe cost 
of displeasing others. 

But the need to please seems 
not only a part of nis own char- 
acter, but a disabling charac- 
teristic of toe modem presiden- 
tial institution itself. It has 
become another element in toe 
American crisis .cwO 

International Herald Tribune. 

® Las Angeles Times Syndicate. 


ed reason: ^domestic American 
politics, essentially Florida poli- 
tics. Legitimate foreign policy 
problems, which are likely to get a 
good deal worse before they get 
better, have been pushed aside. 

This is toe result of deliberate, 
assiduous long-term planning by 
toe right-wing leaders of toe Cu- 
ban-American community. 

A decade ago, I asked Jorge 
Mas Canosa, its chief in Miami, 
what his strategy was. He said, 
“to copy the Jewish lobby.” I was 
surprised. “Wdl," he answered, 
“if you want to be No. 1, you 
don’t imitate toe second- and 
third-rate pressure groups.” 

The early Cuban exiles came 
with nothing, but they were well- 
educated, middle-class, many of 
them professionals. They estab- 
lished themselves quickly, began 
to make money, and learned how 


to use the U.S. political system, 
to toe B 


They turned 

who were delighted. The Demo- 
crats, still busy proving they were 
v aliant anti-Co mmunis ts, scarce- 
ly realized what was happening. 

It is this political action group 
which has unrelentingly demand- 
ed an ultra-hard line on Cuba and 
maintenance, even ti ghtening , of 
toe unilateral U.S. embargo, ha 
more than 30 years it has not 
brought Castro down. If any- 
thing, it gave him excuses for ms 
own grievous mismanagement. 

Lifting the embargo now 
would no more save or help Mr. 
Castro. His people are suffering 
more than ever, essentially be- 
cause of the loss of all the subsi- 
dies they were living on from toe 
Communist bloc. 

This is a perverse U.S. policy 
for a country which proclaims hu- 
manitarian concerns and a desire 
to promote democracy. Mr. Cas- 
tro is doomed and everybody 
knows it, but not because of 
Washington's policy. 


The real issue notoriirfKrw he 
will fall and what happejo&'then. 
The Miami crowd knows vtoai it 
wants — to go back, take over, 
establish its own regime and so 
far as posable oblige toe United 
States to support it, with military 
force if necessary. From this per- 
spective, an upheaval, even a vi- 
olent upheaval, is preferable to a 
“velvet revolution which could 
bring new, local democratic 
forces to the top. 

This is the opposite of U.S. 
national interests, and could im- 
ply another long period of strained 
relations, perhaps another dicta- 
torship, right-wing tins time, im- 
plicating toe United States. In 
terms of foreign policy, the 
smoother Cuba’s transition, to a 
market economy and a stable de- 
mocracy, the better for toe Unit- 
ed States, as wdl as for Cuba. 

There is no reason not to be 
talking to Mr. Castro about spe- $ 
cific U.S.-Cuban government pro- 
blems, and very good reason to use 
all available contacts with disgrun- 
tled Cubans to help promote prep- 
arations to free elections and a 
new home-grown Cuban regime, 
as would be possible with normal 
relations. That is exactly what the 
Miami crowd is trying to prevent. 

It could deny them power. 

Their tool is American politics 
and toe American lobby system. 


IheAnnu 





i I , 


iW: 


More and more people in the U.S. 
establishment, from xi] 


right to left, 
have come to understand this and 
see that it will undermine U.S. 
foreign policy needs. They, too, 
axe interested in domestic poli- 
tics, but they recognize that this is 
too high a price for a few electoral 
college votes. 

It is time for toe Washington 
administration to remember that 
Cuba is a foreign country, not a 
domestic political firidom, and 
put foreign policy needs first. 
to Flora Lewis. 


BV OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894; Pori Arthur Safe 


SHANGHAI — A telegram re- 
ceived to-day [Sept. 1] from Che- 
foo announces that H.M. gun- 
boat Redpole has returned from 
Fort Arthur and reports that the 
news of an attack having been 
made by toe Japanese on that 
pat is unfounded. Great uneasi- 
ness prevails among foreign resi- 
dents at the northern ports, owing 
to recent outrages cm missionaries. 


such proportions that toe Tennes- 
see National Guard were called 
out The killed indude two sol- 
diers and two negroes. This list is 
likely to be increased, as whenev- 
er toe mob captured a negro be 
quickly disappeared. 


1944: Atrocity in France 


1919: Race Rioting 


NEW YORK — A serious race 
riot broke out in Knoxville, 
Team, to-day [Aug. 31] when a 
mob of more than 1,000 whites 
attacked the county jail with the 
intention of lynching a negro who 
is held on the charge of murder- 
ing Mrs. Bertie Lindsey, a white 
woman. The negroes of toe city 
rallied to resist the mob and fierce 
fighting ensued. The riot assumed 


FLOMION, France -—[From our 
New York edition:] In tire little 
schoolhoose of this village four- 
teen French male civilians mur- 
dered by the Germans He tonight 
[SepL 1] is a angle terrible line. I 
have just seen them today and 
they have been grotesquely muti- 
lated. From each toe arms and 
legs had been severed and each 
head bears axe wounds. Relatives 
of those slam —the murders oc- 
curred yesterday afternoon be- 
fore the German garrison of two 
hundred fled from this town east- 
ward into Belgium — stand be- 
fore toe school and weep. 


ii 


p ra| 






CVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. SE PTEMBER 2, 1994 

OPINION 


Page 7 



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More About Those Papers 
La a White House Closet 


By William S afire 


vr «|. 


o.r. 


• T'l’i* 


' OH (ilk 


W ASHINGTON — The 
Whitewater House chief of 
staff, Leon Panetta, wrote to The 
Washington Post this week to com- 
plain about its reporter's account of 
a pattern of Qintonite deceit 
“Factual mistakes or overreach- 
ing by the press occur in our time- 
pressured environment all the rime,” 
wrote Mr. Panetta, my fellow Old 
Nixon Hand. “Recall the front-page 
suggestions in some newspapers of 
Whitewater document shredding 
that never occurred.” 

Facts: Couriers of the Rose Law 
Firm in Little Rock have said that 
Hillary Clinton twice summoned 
them to the governor's mansion in 
the summer of 1992 and gave them 
records to be shredded at the firm. 

In December 1992, eight more 
boxes from Mrs. Clinton and her 
partners Foster, Hub bell and Ken- 
nedy were shredded. In January 
1994, just after special counsel be- 
gan to investigate, Rose partners ad- 
mitted that they then shredded more 
“VWF" files which they claimed 
were unrelated to Whitewater. 

How can Leon Panetta say that 
relevant document shredding “never 
occurred”? Because nobody has yet 
proved that the shredding that took 
place so hurriedly was of 
Whitewater-related documents. But 
rational people can wonder why the 
Clintons ana Mrs. Clinton's part- 
ners were so anxious to destroy cer- 
tain files at crucial moments. 

That secrecy in the handling of 
Foster fifes was discussed in this 
space last month . I charged that 
Mrs. Clinton misled us when she 
insisted at a press conference that 
her staff chief, Margaret W illiams, 
did not “remove” files from Vincent 
Foster's office, but that they “went 
to our lawyer” as if directly. 

The Clintons’ private lawyer, Da- 
vid Kendall, wrote to complain. He 
put the first lady’s deception artful- 
ly: “Mis. Clinton did not add that 
Ms. Williams played a minor role in 
this subsequent transmission (ar- 
ranging for the documents’ storage 
until they could be picked up by the 
Gmtons’ lawyer after Foster’s fu- 
neral), but she accurately set forth 
the process and result.” 

No wonder this guy is reputed to 
get $400 an hour, he makes bad look 
' good. Let’s examine the sequence. 

• Mr. Foster’s body is discov- 
' exed on July 20. White House aides, 
unobserved, are in and out of his 
office that night and next day. His 
possession of the Whitewater file is 
kept secret. 

• On Thursday, July 22, White 
House Counsel Bernard Nuss- 


baum, with intimidated cops near- 
by, gives Mr. Foster’s box of 

Whitewater Files to Ms. Willi am*; 

(not, as was long said, to the Clin- 
tons* lawyer). 

• After talking to Hillary Clin- 
ton, Ms. Williams locks the files in 
a closet in the third-floor family 
quarters of the White House, lb 
which she had the only key. 

• Not until Tuesday, July 27, are 
the Whitewater files retrieved by the 
lawyer, then Robert Barnett 

Why was Mr. Foster’s possession 
of the files kept secret for six 
months? Why was their “storage” in 
Hillary din ton’s closet kept secret 
six months more? Why was a sweet- 
heart subpoena arranged to keep die 
files from congressional probers? 

Some of us overreachers suspect 
that the files may have been sani- 
tized along the way. 

Mr. Kendall tells me he is certain 
that the box he ultimately received 
was not tampered with, but he has a 
lawyer's faith in his clients. Any 
reasonable outsider would con- 
clude from the pattern of delayed 
and reluctant revelations that in 
those files there is — or was — 
something that the Clintons be- 
lieved to be profoundly d amag ing 

That is why a sequence like tins 
raises suspicion: 

• Whitewater honcho Bruce Lind- 
sey learns that the Feds are after 
Governor Jim Guy Tucker of Arkan- 
sas for sewage dealings with the same 
Madison S&L cast of characters. 

• A week later. President Bill 
din ton meets with Mr. Tucker, os- 
tensibly to talk about the National 
Guard. 

• Not until after that meeting 
does Mr. Lindsey tell Mr. Clinton 
of Mr. Tucker’s vulnerability. Sen- 
ator Alfonse D’ Amato, Republican 
of New York, no tooth-fairy believ- 
er, says: “I believe the real subject 
of that meeting was the c rimin al 
referral.” 

So whither Whitewater? In two 
weeks, the staff of the Senate Bank- 
ing Committee will transmit records 
of contradictions in testimony and 
depositions to the independent coun- 
sel for comparison with grand jury 
testimony and possible prosecution. 

In the week of Sept. 19. Senate 
Banking Committee Co-chairmen 
Don Riegle, Democrat of Michigan, 
and Mr. EX Amato expect to meet 
with the independent counsel, Ken 
Starr, to discuss the sensitive area 
about which Robert Fiske persuaded 
Congress to delay taking depositions: 
the removal of the Whitewater files 
from Vincent Foster' s office. 

7 Tv New York Times. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A Militant Whose Mission 
For Peace Will Continue 

Bv Colman McCarthy 

* V 


Women in China's Market 

Regarding the editorial “ China's 
Gender Balance" (Aug. 23): 

The editorial correctly attributes 
China's growing shortage of mar- 
riageable women to the combined 
effects of the one-child policy and 
traditional bias against girls. It 
points out that recourse to abortion 
following ultrasound fetal sex de- 
termination is widespread, even if 
China’s (wholly unenforceable) of- 
ficial policy is not to allow ultra- 
sounds to be used for that purpose. 
That also is true. 

However, it goes on to assert that 
an unforeseen result of these devel- 
opments is that young women are 
suddenly valued and treated with 
new respect and have been rescued 
from disdain and oblivion by a high- 
ly impersonal and newly potent 
principle in Chinese life — market 
forces. That is only partly true. 

Official Chinese statistics and 
the assessments of Western social 
scientists point to a steep rise in 
the last few years in prostitution 
and the abduction for sale of wom- 
en and children. The government 
publicizes its prosecutions of ab- 
ductors and tries to clamp down on 
prostitution, but these practices 
continue unabated. 

With fewer and fewer men able 
to entertain realistic hopes of find- 
ing a wife, many young women find 
their “value” enhanced in that they 
can earn more in a day of prostitu- 
tion than in a month of factory or 
farm work. Similarly, young girls 
are being abducted and sola to 
farmers to meet a demand height- 
ened by the scarcity of this "re- 
source.” 


Moreover, the market has started 
to undermine the employment securi- 
ty of young women in ways that 
enthusiasts of market economics 
should find unacceptable. It is not 
rare for factory managers, suddenly 
concerned with the bottom line, to 
arbitrarily dismiss women workers 
after they have given birth, citing as 
a reason that mothers might have to 
stay at home with sick children, and 
thus make for unreliable workers. 
This is illegal but happens anyway, 
and given the current underdevelop- 
ment of the legal system there is little 
practrical scope for recourse. 

It was high time that China 
abandoned the dead end of central- 
ized stale planning, which proved 
economically disastrous here and 
elsewhere. The market is a wonder- 
ful thing; it has allowed millions of 
Chinese to pull themselves out or 
dire poverty and is letting millions 
of men and women exercise previ- 
ously undreamed-of choices about 
where to live, what son of work to 
do and what to consume. But be- 
fore exulting uncritically, one 
would do well to observe what hap- 
pens when, suddenly, everything 
has a price. 

ANDREW HAL PER. 

Beijing. 

The Messenger to Castro 

My friend Pierre Salinger, whom 
I knew well when he was White 
House press secretary in the admin- 
istration of John Kennedy, seems to 
have forgotten my name. Anyway, it 
was indeed me he referred to in 
“Cuba: Embargoes Hun People In- 
stead of Helping” (Opinion. Aug. 
29). 1 am the "French journalist" 


who was received by President Ken- 
nedy three weeks (not five days) 
before he was assassinated. 

I take no exception to Mr. Salin- 
ger’s analysis with regard to the 
U.S. embargo, which he denounces 
as suffocating the Cuban people 
without overcoming the resistance 
of Fidel Castro. 1 believe John Fitz- 
gerald Kennedy would have agreed 
with his former aide. 

But Mr. Salinger is mistaken in 
his belief that the president gave 
me a “note” to deliver to Fidel 
Castro. He gave me only a verbal 
message, long indeed, but which 1 
can summarize as follows: 

• Everything is possible with 
a Cuban nationalist state, even one 
ihat is Communist (the United 
States maintains good relations 
with Tito's Yugoslavia and Sekou 
Toure’s Guinea). 

• Nothing is possible with a Cu- 
ban state that is a vassal of the Soviet 
Union and has received from it the 
mission of spreading armed subver- 
sion in Central and Latin America. 

a I. John Fitzgerald Kennedy, 
have promised [Nikita] Khrushchev 
to try nothing else against Cuba if 
Fidel Castro gets back his indepen- 
dence from the Soviet Union, but 
only under that condition. 

It is m> impression — as Mr. 
Salinger believes — that President 
Kennedy thought it possible to 
overcome the harsh nationalist grip 
and Bolshevik radicalism of Mr. 
Castro through exchanges, but not 
through the embargo. 

JEAN DANIEL. 

Paris. 

The writer is editor in chief of 
Le Nouvel Ohservctew. 


ASHINGTON — If weather- 
ing well over the decades is 
a test of intellectual meiile, the 
ideas of Linus Pauling, covering a 
half century, are as strong as gird- 
ers of unrusted steel. 

At his death at 93 on Aug. 19 in 
California. Mr. Pauling ranked as 
the father of the American peace 


MEANWHILE 

movement, having come forward af- 
ter World War ifas both a scientist 
2nd an anti-war iheorisL 

The militancy that earned him 
the Nobel Peace Prize in 1962 is as 
relevant as this month's news that 
the United States is the world’s 
largest arms seller with 73 percent 
of the market. 

In "No More War.” Mr. Pauling’s 
I95S book that was revised in 19S3, 
he wrote: “My own country has 
been taking the lead in militarism. 
The tremendous waste of the wealth 
of the world on militarism is respon- 
sible in large pan for the economic 
ills that beset us.” 

One of his last interviews — in Los 
.Angeles in 1992 with Daisaku Iked a, 
a Japanese scholar — became the 
1 1 8-page book “A Lifelong Quest for 
Peace.” In it Mr. Pauling offered a 
valedictory that summarized his own 
fulfilled commitments: 

“The prevention of nuclear war 
and the elimination of war in gener- 
al constitute the most important of 
all problems. I believe that every 
person, every group, every city and 
every country should work on this 
problem in all available ways.” 

Of his two Nobels (the first was 
for chemistry in 1954). Mr. Pauling 
placed higher value on the one for 
peace. He joked that the prize 
“made working for peace respect- 
able.” He needed a sense of humor, 
what with the 1950s anti-Commie 
fanatics hounding him from one 
flank and such media centrists as the 
New York Herald Tribune grousing 
on the other that his w*ork represent- 
ed the “posturings of a placarding 
peacenik.” 

Mr. Pauling irritated moderates 
and reactionaries because be pre- 
ferred the diction of directness. 
“Does the co mmandm ent 'Thou 
Shall Not Kill' mean nothing to us?” 
he asked. “Are we to interpret it as 
meaning Thou shall not kill except 
on the grand scale’ or Thou shall 
not kili except when the national 
leaders say to do so*?” 

He became a threat in the late 
1950s when he twinned his agoniz- 
ing with organizing. He enlisted 
more than 7.500 fellow scientists to 


sign petitions calling for an end to 
nuclear testing. He knew that this 
was only a first and tentative step 
toward the abolition of war. But the 
arousal of conscience among scien- 
tists, be ginnin g with the deep think- 
ers at Cal Tech where he studied and 
taught for more than 40 years, held 
out hope for conversions. 

His own had come is 1945 when 
he realized that "the Second World 
War was fought almost entirely with 
weapons and by methods developed 
by scientists." 

He had worked on explosives 
himself. "At the time I saw no hope 
of ridding the world of war. I 


Of his two Nobel prizes , 
Mr. Pauling placed higher 
value on the one for peace . 


changed my views only after the 
development of the atomic bomb." 

In his other life, the scientific one. 
Mr. Pauling became known as the 
Vitamin C Man. Take C (ascorbic 
add) in heaps, he advised, and the 
common cold can be stopped. Such 
conventional treaters of colds as 
physidans beholden to drug compa- 
nies and their high-priced pills tried 
to dismiss him as a dabbler in 
quackery. 

Perhaps he had moments of over- 
ly ardent faith in vitamin C, but it 
was minuscule compared with the 
blind allegiance much of the public 
places in analgesics, antihistamines 
and other toxic concoctions hyped 
as “fast relief” for colds. 

Beyond his intellectual battles on 
the peace and health fronts, Mr. 
Pauling had uncomplicated tastes. 
He and his wife, Unitarians, 
bought some land on the Big Sur 
coastline of California in 1 955. He 
went to bed at 8, awoke at 4, wrote 
and read in front of a fireplace. 
Until his recent illness, he had no 
plans of retiring. 

A lifetime of peacemaking, plus a 
daily jolt of vitamin C, produced in 
Linns Pauling the happiest of 
chemical reactions: longevity, ben- 
eficial to all. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed "Letters to the 
Editor" and contain the writer’s si- 
gnature. name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject 
to editing. We cannot be responsible 
for the return of unsolicited ma- 
nuscripts. 



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The Annual Oxford Summit 



SEPTEMBER 21-24, 1994 - BALLIOL COLLEGE • OXFORD 

Renowned scholars and corporate leaders assess 
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International Herald Tribune 
Friday , September 2 , 1994 
Page 8 


z z 



Z Z 






Contrast in India: Ancient and modem modes of transportation. 


By Thomas Fuller 

International Herald Trtbtme 


A MA RI LLO. Texas — I'm sitting 
in a Taco Bell in this Texas pan- 
handle town watching four 
young women devour burritos. 
Everything about them is big. Their food, 
their clothes and themselves — hair in- 
cluded. They even ordered large soft 
drinks, which is odd because they could 
have ordered s mall ones and refilled them 
for free. But this is Texas and it could be 
that people just don't order small soft 
drinks in Texas. 

It’s very hot outside so 1 hate to think of 
getting back on the road, especially be- 
cause looking out of the restaurant’s win- 
dow the vinyl seal of my motorcycle looks 
as if it has changed color with the heat. 

Exactly one year and one day ago I left 
Paris on a motorcycle trek across Europe, 
Asia and the United States. The United 
States is the 23d country on the itinerary 
and the last before my return to France. 

I spent the morning and pan of the 
afternoon tiding from the foot of the 
Rocky Mountains in New Mexico on a 
road that seemed to have a total of two 
turns. Something about driving at high 
speed in a straight line across a barren 
landscape has put me in somewhat of a 
trance, leaving me quite sentimental about 
the places I visited during the past year. It 
must have been the dotted yellow line 
continually jumping up at me on the high- 
way. Flash, flash, flash, right below my 
boots. The Texas sun made the yellow 
dashes flash even brighter. 

The four women's enormous drinks 
make me think of India and the tiny 
bottles of Limca that were so refreshing 
there. It’s as if the bottles in India needed 
to be smaller to be able to quench the 
thirst of all 900 million people. 

I think back to the two months spent on 
hectic Indian roads — the ox carts stacked 
with gravity-defying piles of hay; suicidal 
truck drivers and their blaring horns; traf- 


fic jams on small market streets; elephants, 
monkeys, stubborn cows crossing the road 
at their own pace — and to a piece of advice 
given to me from an Indian man in New 
Delhi When driving in India, he said, never 
stop for 1) toll booths, 2) people in uniform. 
3) anyone in distress. If you stop, be said, 
officials will assume you don't know the 
rules of the Endian roan and they might try 
to extort money from you. 

I successfully followed that advice for 
several weeks, zooming past men waving 
their arms in the air and driving around 
roadblocks, until one day I arrived at a 
border between Indian states where a man 
in uniform signaled for me to stop. I had no 
choice but to park and get off the bike. 

For the first tune since leaving Europe. 
I was asked for my license and registra- 
tion. As the man fed me into the stuffy 
shack that was his guard post. 1 handed 
over my French registration and New 
York state driver’s license. The documents 
must have seemed fairly foreign to him, 
but he copied into his English-colonial- 
style ledger what he thought were the 
appropriate numbers and then came out 
with what I had been waiting for. 

“Ten rupees,” he said. Thirty American 
cents. 


I 


SMILED at this very modest at- 
tempt at extortion and asked what 
for. “Excess weight,” he said point- 
ing to the motorcycle. 

I couldn’t hide another smile and after a 
short silence told the man that I knew this 
law wasn't written down anywhere but that 
because "excess weight” was such a novel 
idea for a motorcycle it was worth 10 ru- 
pees, which can buy two coconuts or five 
oranges in India. He had, I told him, made 
my day. 

India was not the only country where I 
bad the pleasure of meeting uniformed 
men. There was the border guard in Thai- 
land who despite all the stamps in my 
passport and official documents in my 


hand refused to let me cross into Cambo- 
dia, telling me that he felt personally re- 
sponsible for my safety there; the border 

S i in Turkey who persisted in telling me 
with Andrew as a middle name I was 
not an American but a Bulgarian with an 
American passport, and the host of 
men who strongly suggested that 
my wealth with uwm was the easiest way 
out of a “problem” that I found myself in. 

Albanian police were different. In that 
small and impoverished country, I was 
stopped on average every 40 kilometers by 
officers who just wanted to talk and com- 
pare motorcycles (they had Italian bikes 
that ran on what smelled like kerosene). I 
was traveling with a friend who at one point 
was stopped on a busy street by a police 
officer who approached him and shook his 
hand. That's all the poHceman wanted, a 
handshake. 

Albania is also the country where I 
came to understand how foreign the con- 
cept of camping is to some people. After 
having spent the night in a field, we were 
greeted by a man from a nearby village 
who pointed to our dew-drenched equip- 
ment banging out to dry in the morning 
sun and asked why we had slept outside. 
He saw our motorcycles, guessed we had 
the money for a hotel, and knew from 
watching reruns on Italian television that 
Americans lived well in big houses. So 
why bother with the inconvenience? 

We liked sleeping outside, I told him. It 
was peaceful under the stars. 

The man was far from convinced. 

“You get wet,” he said as he pointed to 
a cluster of houses. “We have a home for 
friends.” It was too late, unfortunately, to 
take advantage of his hospitality. 

Back at the Taco Bell, sitting across 
from me a woman has just finished inter- 
viewing for a job at the restaurant. The 
manager tells her she should report to 
work on Thursday. “Wear your hair back, 
only stud earrings, only one watch,” she is 
told. I get up to refill my soft drink glass 
for the fourth time. 

Six months earlier I was at another fast- 
food restaurant, but one where 1 doubt the 
employees had to be told not to wear more 
than one watch. It was in Singapore, a few 
hundred feet from the causeway that links 
the island-nation with Malaysia. With me 
were three men 1 had met in Singapore who 
had very kindly offered to escort me to 
Kuala Lumpur, which was my next stop. 

One of the escorts was an American 
who collected not watches, but Harley 
Davidson T-shirts. He and his wife owned 
400. “Most of them,” he said, “1 haven't 
even worn.” 

Parked in the restaurant's lot was my 
muddy, travel-worn Honda and their 
gleaming, spit-shined and chrome-laden 
Harleys. They wore tasseled leather jack- 
ets, funky sunglasses, leather cowboy 
boots and, of course, Harley T-shirts. 

We left the parking lot and headed 
•toward the border checkpoint, joining the 
lines of Singaporeans fleeing to Malaysia 
for the weekend. I handed my documents 
to a stone-faced border policewoman who, 
in Singaporean style, stayed as expression- 
less as a U. S. state trooper writing a 
speeding ticket 

After a series of dour faces it was on to 
customs where the last thing I remember 
seeing — indeed my last memory erf Singa- 
pore — was the smile on the face of a 
customs agent watching as the Harleys 
paraded by. 

The table of four women has broken 
into uncontrollable giggles. Perhaps they 
know about the Singaporean border guard 
smiling. Or maybe its just tbe heat. Time 
for me to get back on the road Oklahoma 
beckons. 


Pizza Hut’s Last Frontier: Italy 




By John Tagliabue 

Ncv York Tim* Service 


P 


ARMA, Italy — They were never 
exactly to pizza what Gucci was 
to loafers. But after opening res- 
taurants in 88 co unities, Pizza 
Hut was certainly as well known. 

Now the Wichita-based pizza giant has 
signed an agreement to open a shop in the 
land where — in a misty, earlier age — 
some anonymous chef struck on the idea 
of combining a thin circle of dough with 
tomatoes and mozzarella cheese to create 
the pizza. It was a profitable idea. 
Throughout Italy, so-called “pizza mon- 
ey” has been used to finance major devel- 
opments. 

For its first franchise, to open later this 
year. Pizza Hut searched all of Italy's 
boot. It settled on Parma, a s m a ll , busi- 
nesslike town of 170,000, situated perhaps 
fittingly midway between Milan, the fi- 
nancial capital, and Florence, the center 
of culture. 

Pizza Hut. which operates about 10,800 
outlets around the world, apparently 
chose Parma because — as Romeo Medici 
of the local Chamber of Commerce says 
— the town “likes to call itself ‘Food 
Valley 1 — you know, like California has 
Silicon Valley.” 

Parma produces hams — 20 million of 
them a year — and Parmesan cheese. With 
big companies like the pasta-maker Bari- 
lla and Parmalat, a dairy specialist, about 
20 p erce n t of the local economy comes 
from food production, with annual busi- 
ness of $9 billion. 

For most Italians, having a Pizza Hut 
move in would probably seem like carry- 
ing coals to Newcastle. But in Parma there 
was curiosity. 


Over on Sira da della Repubblica, l/go 
pari wii, so, a restaurant owner whose son 
works the kitchen while his wife, Leila, 
does the desserts, bubbled as he served a 
customer paper-thin slices of cured Parma 
ham followed by a plate of anolini, little 
pasta dumplings, smothered in butter and 
— wbat else? — Parmesan cheese. 

“It’s exciting, something new, and 1 will 
certainly go to see what it’s like,” said 
ParizzL 

Still, there were some who recalled how 
painfully slow Parma was to accept even 
the Italian variety of pizza. Over at A1 
Corsaro, a pizzeria just off fashionable 
Strada Cavour, Luigi Tagliafierro re- 


To succeed here, 
you Ve got to satisfy the 
palate of Parma. ’ 


counted how his father, Mario, emigrated 
34 years ago from Salerno, just south of 
Naples, which lays claim to being the 
birthplace of pizza. 

“We brought the first wood oven to 
Parma,” said Tagliafierro, whose pie-sized 
pizzas, which come in 29 varieties, are 
eaten from porcelain dishes with knives 
and forks on tables with linen cloths. 

Most of his guests wash it down with a 
glass of the white sparkling wine that is 
the local favorite. For many in Parma, he 
said, pizza remains an imported Neapoli- 
tan dish And he has seen how they react 
to fast food. 

Several years back, in the little 
□ext door that now houses an 
boutique called Nichols, an Italian chain 



try, whose hamburger shops 
compete with McDonald’s in many Italian 


dries; opened for business. Within slx 
months, he said, Parma’s first and — thus 
far, only — attempt at fast food dosed. 

“At first, the young kids came for the 
novelty erf it, but then the novelty wore 
off ” said Tagliafierro, whose two brothers 
also own pizzerias in town. 

“To succeed hoe,” he said, “you’ve got 
to satisfy the palate of Parma.” 

“We’re not a fast-food town," con- 
fessed Maurizio Rossi whose restaurant, 

exquisite 
* curious 
green tomatoes. 

Pizza Hut remains undaunted. 

“Our top-grossing units are in Paris and 
Hong Kong, two centers of cuisine," said 
Robert A. Doughty, Pizza Hut’s vice pres- 
ident for public relations in New York. 
“Outride the United States we're seen as a 
bit of Americana, a treat. 

“We’re not seen as fast food, but on the 
cusp between formal dining and fast food. 
It’s an opportunity to taste America, and 
it works everywhere else, even on the 
Champs-Efystes.” 

Out in the Ol ii et or rente neighborhood 
of Parma, where Pizza Hut is eyeing a site, 
this all came as little consol anon to Soli- 
man Wagdy, a native of Cairo in his 20s 
who opened the Robin Hood pizzeria two 
months ago with his wife, who is Italian. 

The first he heard of tbe American 
invasion, he said, was when two Pizza Hut 
executives dropped in for lunch this week. 

“In Parma, you’ve got two things in 
abundance,” Wagdy said glumly. ‘'First 
the bants, then die pizzerias. There are 
too many in the neighborhood already.” 

Then, stiffening as he picked at a slice 
of veal be added: “Well be the first to go 
ova: and taste it. If it’s good, well make it 
like they do.” 


In Tokyo, Go-Go Dancers Cool It 


By Paul Blustdn 

Washington Pat Service 



T T OKYO — Female customers 
dad in ultra-skimpy dresses gy- 
rate to the throbbing beat atop a 
platform above the dance floor. 
Down below, male customers gape at the 
shimmering array of thig hs. 

That’s the formula that made Juliana’s, 
a Tokyo disco, a nationwide sensation 
when it opened three years ago. All over 
Japan, discos sprang up offering women 
the opportunity to dance provocatively on 
an otachi-ded (honorable platform); TV 
networks broadcast shows with names 
such as “Live From Juliana’s Tokyo”; and 
a toy company launched a Juliana doll for 
little girls who dreamed of shaking their 
hips before appreciative men. 

But Juliana’s announced last week that 
it is shutting its doors at the end of August 
— and for a peculiarly Japanese reason: 
The management followed “guidance” 
from authorities to make the atmosphere 
more sedate, and the place started losing 
money. 

“I’m shocked. It’s so depressing.” 
moaned Mie Ohashl a 21-year-old de- 
partment store clerk, who started coming 
to Juliana's two years ago, several times a 
week, to dance on tbe otachi-daL Sipping 
a drink near the bar with a friend, Ohashi 
added: “This is the only place we could 
have fun. This was my place for making 
my stress melt away. Now where am I 
going to go?" 

The announcement of the disco's pend- 
ing demise was widely interpreted as a 
milestone in the history of Japanese popu- 
lar culture. 

Ever since tbe Juliana’s phenomenon 


arose, tbe media here have devoted con- 
siderable effort to analyzing it, attempting 
to explain why large numbers of “office 
ladies” would shed their prim woik attire, 
slip into bodi-kon (body-conscious) outfits 
and exhibit themselves in public. 

A common view was that appearances 
notwithstanding, the dancers weren’t nec- 
essarily trying to snag boyfriends. Rather, 
frustrated by Japan’s male-dominated so- 
ciety, they were seeking self-expression, 
flaunting their sexuality after spending 
day after day working at dull jobs, wear- 
ing drab uniforms and treating male co- 
workers ever so politely. 

The sober Asahi Shimbun, Japan's sec- 
ond-largest daily newspaper, published a 
long feature in which various psychia- 
trists, sociologists and other experts 
opined on the subject. In one view, the 
closure of Juliana’s symbolized the final 


■ In New York, a group of 
women rode the subway trains 
topless earlier this summer and 
were charged by the Transit police. 
The Transit Authority’s lawyers 
consulted with the Manhattan district 
attorney’s office before deciding 
that bare-chested women on subways 
should be arrested only if they 
create a “disruptive or dangerous 
situation in the subways.” But a 
spokeman told AP that while it may 
be O. K. far women to ride 
topless, they still can’t smoke or beg. 


belated blowout of Japan's late-1980s 
“bubble economy.” 

But otc of the most revealing aspects lof 
the whole affair was the way in which 
Juliana’s came to grief, for it underscores 
the extraordinary deference that Japanese 
business people tend to show toward gov- 
ernment officials. 

Tbe disco's problems began early last 
year when the dancers started wearing 
increasingly ou tlandish clothing, includ- 
ing G-strings, and a Tokyo magazine pub- 
lished photos in June 1993 (staged with 
professional models, the disco's manage- 
ment insisted) erf nearly nude women 
dancing on tbe otactn-daL 

The Tokyo Metropolitan Police De- 
partment summoned Juliana’s manage- 
ment for a meeting in November 1993. 
“We gave instructions that the otachi-dai 
is not a preferable place for customers to 
dance,” said a police official who attended 
the meeting. According to Yoshinori Ka- 
sano, Juliana's chief business manager, 
the disco’s management had also been 
thinking of impoang limits on the dis- 
plays of flesh. 

In any event, a month after the meeting 
with the police, Juliana's removed the ota- 
chi-dai and replaced it with a “crystal 
stage” on which professional dancers were 
to perform; moreover, a dress code was 
instituted prohibiting excessively reveal- 
ing clothes. 

“We tried to create a new atmosphere," 
Kasano said. “But we suffered a decline in 
business.” That’s putting it mildly: Atten- 
dance at Juliana’s sank from about 3,000 a 
night to about 250. So before the losses 
ballooned to catastrophic levels, “we de- 
cided to dose in order to preserve the 
honorable name of Juliana’s,” Kasano 
said. 


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I E E E 9 1/ E 6 E I E E 


F riu a y Chocohrtt 

Directed by Tomas Gutierrez 
Alea and Juan C Tabio. 
Cuba- Mexico- Spairt 

A dever script (by Send Paz). 
superb acting acid intelligent 
directing are still tbe key in- 
gredients fra- a memorable 
movie. No big budget pro- 
duction here, and no cheap 
violence necessary. Instead, 
tbe film uses resourceful hu- 
mor and drama to sharply 
criticize Fidel Castro’s re- 
gime while paying homage to 
Cuba’s endearing values that 
are sure to outlast the aging 
revolutionary. Diego (Jorge 
Perugorrifl) is a worthy ho- 
mosexual in Havana who suf- 
fers discrimination in a land 
where racism and discrimina- 
tion are officially barred. He 
falls in love with David (Vla- 
dimir CruzX an idealistic, 
heterosexual univexaty stu- 
dent who plans to carry the 
revolution forward. David re- 
sists Diego’s sexual advances 
but the two gradually become 
friends, discussing politics. 


the arts and sharing prized 
contraband like Johnnie 
Walker Red whisky. Pro- 
duced in 1993 but released 
this year in Europe, the film 
is a glimpse of a modern, 
suffering, take-it-as-it-comes 
Cuba, file movie’s cobesive- 
ness is another triumph, giv- 
en that the veteran Cuban 
director Tomas Gutierrez 
Alea became 21 during the 
filming and his friend Juan 
C Tabio had to step in to 
finish the job. 

(At Goodman. IHT) 

Wagons East! 

Directed Peter Markie. V. S. 
“Wagons East!” is a ghastly 
western parody that does not 
honor John Candy's memo- 
ry. but exploits his last, piti- 
able appeal for laughter. The 
premise, reportedly written 
by a New York expatriate 
disappointed in LA, had 
promise: Fed up with the 
filthy, barbarous frontier, a 
group of settlers forms a wag- 
on train and heads back East 
The end product, however, is 




50409465 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


i — ikralu t Ate fcribtttt<? — i 

NXMWIVV.MI«._ITk'Um^lU 

LIVING IN TBE U.S.? 
ivow Printed ev 
New York 
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TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1 - 800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-752-3890) 


puerile swill written by Mat- 
thew Carlson, formerly of 
TV’s “Wonder Years.” It’s 
difficult to pick a moment 
that is the film's lowest; how- 
ever, one is sorely tempted to 
select the scene in which a 
steer-hugging drover pur- 
chases a copy of “Pride and 
Prejudice" from a flitty book- 
store owner (John C McG in- 
ley). He has no intention of 
reading it; he’s thinking of 
the pages as 19th-century 
two-ply. One of the few ac- 
tors capable of getting a 
laugh in this fiasco is McGin- 
ley as Julian, a predatory 
queen with a cappuccino 
maker in his prairie schooner. 
But even those gags are all at 
the expense of gay men. 

(Rita Kempley, WP ) 

Natural Bom KDlsra 

Directed by Oliver Stone. 
U.S. 

Meet Mickey (Woody Har- 
rdson) and Mallory (Juliette 
Lewis), two renegades living 
out the oldest story in the 
teenage wasteland. They’re 
young, they’re in love and 
they kfl/ people, in thrill-cra- 
zy, rock-video style. “If I 
don’t kill you," Mickey says 
to one soon-to-be victim, 
“what is there to talk 
about?” For Mickey, it’s 
more than just a rhetorical 
question. With more soph- 
istry than poetry, Oliver 
Stone apotheosizes these 
trash archetypes in “Natural 
Bom Killers,” his supposed 
satire about an America de- 
spoiled by violence and ex- 
ploitation. Satire? In his skill 
as a manipulator of thoughts 
and images, in his short-cir- 
cuiting ordinary narrative 
and in his intuitive visual 
brilliance, Stone could well 
turn out to be the most influ- 


ential American filmmak er 
of his generation. But as a 
satirist, he’s an elephant bal- 
lerina. Scratch the frenzied, 
hyperkinetic surface of 
“Natural Bom KfflerT and 
you find remarkably banal 
notions about Mickey, Mal- 
lory and the demon media. 
(“Media's like weather, only 
it’s man-made weather,” 
says Mickey, delivering one 
of the rare memorable lines 
in the screenplay.) To wiu 
Bom bad. Blame society . The 
sins of the fathers. Lost inno- 
cence. True love. W3d hors- 
es, deadly rattlers, fireworks, 

freight trains. Elements like 
these would appear more 
honestly threadbare if Stone 
were not a match for Mickey 
and Mallory in the area of 
ove rkill- But he has exploded 
the slender premise of^ “Natu- 
ral Bran Killers” into a fires- 
torm of quick cuts, hot col- 
ors, gyroscopic camera 
movements and emblematic 
visions. Despite isolated mo- 
ments <A bleak, disturbing 
beauty, it is finally less an 
epiphany than an ordeal 
(Janet Muslin, NYT) 



Ellen Greene in “ Wagons East!' 


SUIT CUTS 


• JANE BUNNEIT: “The 
Water Is Wide” (Evidence): 
The Canadian soprano saxwo- 
man, who studied with Steve 
Lacy, has been a talent deserv- 
ing wider recognition fra sever- 
al years. Haring recorded with 
renowned but off-the-beaten- 
path Cuban musicians in Ha- 
vana, here she’s into straight- 
ahead finger-popping; 


lahsaan Roland Kirk 
and herself. Muscular melodies 
and harmony, her own sound. 


great band, crystal-clear pro- 
duction. 

• JAN GARBAREK AND 
THE HILLIARD ENSEM- 
BLE, “Offidum” (ECM): On 
the 25th anniversary (rf the re- 
cord company that gave birth to 
the concept of Eurqjazz, this 
may be ECM’s biggest success 
mice Keith Janet* “The Keln 
Concert." Early polyphony, 
medieval music sung by a fonr- 
part male choir with the Norwe- 
gian soprano saxman on top. 


You can’t call it jazz and an 
improvising saxophone isn’t 
really classical The 15 th- and 
16th-centuxy compositions of 
ChristobSI Morales, Pierre de la 
Rue and GinUaume Dufay are 
at the same time sobering and 
soaring, ice-warm as it were. 
The texture is so enveloping 
yon don’t want to listen to any- 
thing less pure than Bach or 
Billie Holiday afterward. 

MIKE ZWERIN, IHT 


a 


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International Herald Tribune 
Friday, September 2, 1994 
Pa$e 9 


Cutting Phone Costs on the Road 


:• : .•: .Ii - . 

■. . :. in 

\ l*i !■ 
, -ixX*.: 


•. . >- 


iku 'X 




By Roger Coilis 

International Herald Tribune 

F REQUENT travelers know that 
the best way to brat outrageous 
hold phone charges (.markups of 
900 percent and more) is to use a 
telephone charge card, with which you are 
connected via a toll-free number and 
billed back home on your charge card or 
residential phone. But deciding which 
card is cheapest and most convenient de- 
pends on the countries you are visiting 
and the countries you are calling 
What’s more, hotels are fighting a rear- 
guard action by blocking toll-free calls in 
some cases, or making an “access charge,” 
or even connecting you to'a high-priced 

Fit FrtfHMt Tnrfhr 

phone service of their own choosing. You 
can no longer just rely on an AT&T 
WoridPlus card or USA Direct for all 
circumstances. Choosing the right phone 
system when you’re on the road requires 
serious shopping around. 

Major telephone carriers like AT&T, 
MCI, Tdcor and Sprint in the United 
States and BT and Mercury in Britain all 
market phone cards. Trawling the small 
ads, you are likely to find almost as many 
offers for “low cost” international phone 
calls (“UK to USA save 50 percent!" or 
“Portugal to Brazil save 65 percent!”) as 
cheap air fares from bucket shops. 

A growing proportion of my junk mail 
consists of invitations to sign up for “sig- 
nificant savings" with phone card prod- 
ucts under a galaxy of brand names — 
many being provided by the same “sec- 
ondary” earners like Inal International 
Telecom, Interglobe and MTC, which buy 
and resell capacity from the major inter- 
national telecoms. Then you have so- 
called “callback” products, like Kali back, 
MTC One Card, which can save you 
around 50 percent on intercontinental 
calls by switching you through the U. S. 
telephone network from wherever you are 
in the world. 

Phoning from overseas — either to your 
office or famil y back home or clients and 
colleagues around the world — needs both 
a strategic and tactical approach. 

The one thing you don't want to do is 
call from your hotel room. A recent survey 
found that a 10-minute call to America 
varied from $75-50 at the Frankfurt Shera- 
ton to $53.60 at the London Selfridge and 
$42.80 at the Paris Hilton. A hotel in Paris 
charged $270 to send a 23-page fax to one 
travelers New York office. This was 
equivalent to one night at the corporate 
Tate. 

So whenever possible, get people to call 
you. One device shared by both consul- 
tants and students is to place a person-to- 
person call through the operator to “Mr. 





M;? 

W /X . £■ 

:A L 


f U • • 


number and PIN and then the number 
you waul lo call. If you need help you can 
talk to an English-speaking operator, 
which can be reassuring in gritty places. 
Bui it may cost slightly more. 

You normally need to use a touch loue 
phone (except with a Telcor card, which 
can be used with a rotary handset). But 
man y phone companies give you a free 
portable “auto dialer" which converts any 
phone to touch tone. 

Phone cards compete with frills and 
gizmos as well as phoDe charges. Most 
allow sequential dialing — rather than 
putting the phone down and dialing an- 
other 28 digits, several calls are registered 
as pan of the original call. This is not only 
convenient but a way to reduce hotel ac- 
cess charges. You may want to look for 
speed di alin g on frequently used numbers, 
the ability to choose and change your PIN 
to reduce the risk of a thief hacking in, 
voice mailbox, fax and modem access, and 
conference calls. Telcor has a Call Me 
service, which allows you to book a line to 
a country where communication is a prob- 
lem, and keep it open for a specified time; 
itemized billing with details such as origi- 
nation and destination numbers, duration 
and cost. Most phone cards are free, the 
major exception being AT&T WoridPlus, 
which has an annual fee of S70. 


,// l [ujiii tjji turn mu 


T HERE are wide discrepancies in 
the rates that phone cards 
charge. For example, a 10-min- 
ute rail from the United States to 
Britain costs about S22 with a BT Charge- 
card. whereas the same call with an MCI 
phone card would cost no more than $12. 

A call from Continental Europe to Brit- 
ain. on the other hand, is about half as 
much with BT or Mercury than with 
AT&T, MCI or Sprint. A three-minute 
call from Australia to Britain ranges from 
about $5.50 with Telcor lo about $7.50 
with BT and $9.50 with AT&T. 

The rule is to shop for cards that pro- 
vide the best rates for the countries you 
are traveling lo and those you are most 
likely lo call. And beware of making inter- 
nal calls in overseas countries, or local 
regions, with foreign cards. 

If you make a lot of calls from one 
continent to another — Japan to Europe 
or America; America to Europe or Aus- 
tralia — you should sign up with a call- 
back system. You can often save 50 per- 
cent or more on major phone card charges 
and the local phone company. 

Callback services give you a personal 
“trigger” number. You dial it, let it ring 
once, then hang up. The digital switch has 
been programmed to recognize your num- 
ber, and immediately calls you back, a 
computer-generated voice asking for you 
by name and extension or room number if 
necessary. You are then connected to a 
line in the United States, allowing you to 
make calls anywhere in the world. 


NicnlaeAscu'lH f 

Zflch,” for which you will not normally be 
charged, although the hotel is sure to stick 
you for a few dollars. This is the signal for 
your secretary or loved one to call you at 
the hotel where they know you are stay- 
ing. Or else make a brief call home from a 
pay phone in the lobby. In some countries, 
like France, pay phones often have a num- 
ber so people can rail you straight back. 

In many countries (except the United 
States), you can buy a prepaid phone card 
for a certain value — the equivalent of $5 
to $20 — which avoids the need for a 
pocketful of strange change. To make a 
call you insert the card into a slot on the 
phone. The cost of each call is automati- 
cally deducted from the card’s remaining 
value, which is either printed on the card 
or shown on a screen. There are some 
public telephones where you can simply 
“swipe” your favorite plastic and be deb- 
ited in the normal way. Local phone com- 
panies typically charge twice as much for 
calls from pay phones than private 
phones. Credit card companies typically 
add around $2 to the cost of the calls. 

Phone cards are simple to operate from 
practically anywhere. You dial an access 
code (through local 800 numbers available 
in about 60 countries) plus your account 


Carrier/Hotel 
Air France 


Continental Airlines 


Flnnair 


Marina Mandarin Hotel 


Marriott 


Marriott 


Regent International 
Hotels/American Express 


Royal Brunei Airlines 


Royal Garden Resort 


Shangri-La 
Palm Beach Resort 

Sheraton Rio Hotel 
& Towers 

Siam City Hotel 


SilkAir 


Thai Airways 


United Arilines 


Westin 


Location 
Britain to France 


Britain to United States 


Britain to Helsinki 


Singapore 


Europe 


United States, Australia, Mexico 


Worldwide 


London to Middle/Far East 


Pattaya, Thailand 
Penang, Malaysia 


Rio de Janeiro 


Bangkok 


Southeast Asia 


Australia/New Zealand 


United States to Europe 
and Asia/Pacific 


New “Business in France" fares offer saving of up to 30 percent on 
normal business-class fares on flighls lo 29 French provincial cities. 
Valid for direct flights or via Paris. 

Two-for-one for full-fare business-class passengers flying from 
Gatwick to Newark. Passengers must travel together. Until Sept. 9. 

Round-trip business-class fare from London to Helsinki reduced 
from £526 to £475 (S730), and Manchester-Helsinki and Stockholm 
from £684 to £576. Until Oct 31 . 

Pay with a Visa card and get special rate of 300 Singapore dollars 
($200) per night Rale includes upgrade to a suite, saving 600 dol- 
lars. 

Discounts of 50 percent lor stays including a Saturday night at 
hotels in Germany, the Netherlands. Austria. Hungary. Greece and 
Poland. Until Sept, 15. 

Stay three nights and get the fourtn night free at participating resort 
hotels in Alabama. California, Florida and New Jersey 3nd Australia, 
Bermuda and Mexico. Until Dec. 16. 

Pay with an American Express card at any one of 11 Regent 
International Hotels before Sept. 15 and qualify for a free night's 
accommodation at any Regent International or Four Seasons hotel. 
The free night can be redeemed at resorts until Dec. 15. and hotels 
until Dec. 30. 

Two-for-one in first and business class on flighls linking London 
(Heathrow) with Dubai. Singapore, Brunei and Perth, Australia. 
Plus £50 (first class) or £25 (business class) worth of Hanods gift 
vouchers. The free ticket is transferable and can be used on the 
same or a later trip. 

Summer package for 1 ,500 baht (S60) includes deluxe ocean- 
view room and American breakfast for two. Until Sept. 30. 

Stay one night and get the second night free; applies to 
single or double occupancy in a standard room. Until Sept 15. 

35 percent off rack rates, free breakfasts and 20 percent discount 
on food in certain restaurants. Until Dec. 27. 

Suites for 3,500 baht ($ 1 40) per night - normal rale 4,900 baht - 
includes Continental breakfast, free tea and coffee all day, compli- 
mentary cocktails and light pressing, and 500 baht credit for food 
and beverages in selected restaurants. Until Oct. 31 . 

“Discover Asia" air pass allows you to fly any SilkAir route for S1 19 
per flight over a 90-day period. You must buy the pass before you 
arrive in Asia. 

Royal Orchid Plus members can claim a round-trip economy ticket 
between Sydney and Auckland for only 15,000 bonus miles; 25,000 
miles required for business class. Until Feb. 28. 

United Premium members can claim two round-trip first-class tickets 
to anywhere United flies in Europe for 160,000 bonus miles (instead 
of 200,000), and to any Asia/Pacific United destination for 180,000 
miles (instead of 200,000). From SepL 15 till Jan. 1 . 

Introductory rates from opening on Oct. 14 of 19,500 yen 
($195) for a “superior' 1 room. Until Feb. 28. 


AtfiougninelHTcaretufychedis these c/fen. please De forewarned that sorrv travel agents mjy be unaware of them, or unable la book them. 


HOES 


THE J E / / GUIDE 


MANDATE OF HEAVEN: 
A New Generation of Entre- 
preneurs, Dissidents, Bohe- 
mians ami Technocrats Lays 
n»im to China’s Future 

By Orville SdidL 447 pages. 525. 
Simon & Schuster. 

DENG XIAOPING: 
Chronicle of an Empire 

5v Ruan Ming. 300 pages. 
$69.95, $19.95 paperback. West- 
view. 

THE STUBBORN POR- 
RIDGE AND OTHER STO- 
RIES 

By Wang Meng 186 pages. 
$18.50. Bra^iller. 


Reviewed by 
Steven Mufson 

S INCE becoming China’s su- 
preme rul ex in 1978, Deng 
Xiaoping has molded the coun- 
try according to his own vision, 
with light Communist Party 
control over politics and a free- 
wheeling atmosphere of experi- 
mentation and market-oriented 
policies in economics. 

As he turned 90 on Aug. 22, 
three new books provide vastly 
different yet complementary 
looks at Deng’s China and the 
tensions within it. 

Schell's wen-written “Man- 

date of Heaven,” his seventh 

book about China, is the most 
accessible. In choosing his title, 
Schell is comparing Deng to the 
emperors who ruled Ch i n a until 


191 1. Their power was believed 
to be based on a cosmic sanc- 
tion, signified by peace and har- 
mony within the realm. 

To Schell former vice-chair- 
man of the human rights group 
Asia Watch, the moral bond be- 
tween the latter-day emperor 
Deng and the Chinese people 
was severed on June 4, 1989 
when Deng ordered troops to 
crush the political protest 
groups that had congregated in 
Tiananmen Square. 

Deng, Schell writes, has at- 
tempted “to goad one side of 
society into radical change 
while leaving the other frozen in 
place. In this sense he is much 
more in the tradition of 19th- 
century reformers who had 
imagined that China could bor- 
row technology and manage- 
ment techniques from abroad 
without affecting the existing 
society’s culture and values, or 
political ‘essence.’ ” 

While Schell is outward- 
looking, Ruan Ming looks in- 
ward. In his account of the 
Deng years. Party factions wage 
battles against one another us- 
ing code words such as "the 
struggle against bourgeois liber- 
alism." His universe is one of 
Party plenums and congresses, 
memoranda and official news- 
paper editorials. 

Roan’s detailed account is 
tough for the casual reader. But 
it contains new insights about 
the Deng era and portrays a 
much more fierce struggle over 
Deng's reforms than most out- 
side observers perceived. 

Before moving to the United 
States, Ruan was an associate 
of Hu Yaobang, the Commu- 
nist Party general secretary in 
the mid-1980s. Hu was Deng’s 


i - 


By Alan Truscott 

Z IA MAHMOOD held the 
East hand, and defended 
three no-trump. North's two- 
diamond bid at his second turn 
was “new minor forcing," ask- 
ing South for information 
about bis m3jor-suit holdings. 
West therefore led a diamond, 
that was the only suit that 
had not been genuinely bid. 
First, consider how the play 
would proceed with normal de- 
fease. South plays low from 
dmnsnv and East wins the long 
and returns, the suit. South sees 
that he can make at most eight 
tricks unless he brings in at least 
three spade tricks, so he plays 
for West to have the spade 
queen and finds he has 10 
tridcs. That sequence was fol- 
lowed when Zia’s teammates 
hdd the North-South cards. 


As East, Zia knew that the 
spades were favorably placed 
for South, so he tried to confuse 
the issue for the declarer. When 
the diamond six was played 
from the dummy he played the 
unexpected jack instead of the 
routine king. This play was not 
going to cost anything, whoever 
held the queen. 

When South won with the 

3 ueen, he was now convinced 
lat the diamond king was on 
his left, which meant that he 
could take three diamond 
tricks, not two. This offered the 
prospect of taking seven tricks 
in the red suits plus two spade 
winners, so he played three lop 
hearts. When the jack failed to 
drop he confidently finessed the 
diamond ten, and was consider- 
ably deflated when Zia pro- 
duced the diamond king and 


first chosen successor — and 
the first to be cast aside. Hu’s 
funeral in 1989 provided the 
spark for the demonstrations in 
Tiananmen Square. 

In Ruan’s account, Deng ap- 
pears not only as a mediator 
and manipulator of contending 
factions, but also as a target of 
manipulation by radical re- 
formers and die-hard Commu- 
nist Party conservatives. 

Wang Meng’s short stories in 
“The Stubborn Porridge" pro- 
vide a glimpse of the innermost 
thoughts of ordinary Chinese 
during the Deng era. 

Born in 1934. Wang was la- 
beled a “rightist" in 1957 be- 
cause one of his short stories 
criticized Party bureaucracy. As 
a result, be spent 16 years in 
rural Xinjiang, a harsh, barren 
province on China’s northwest 
border. Rehabilitated in 1979, 
he became Minister of Culture 
in 1986, but stepped down after 
the 1989 crackdown. 

Later an official publication 
accused Wang's story “Stub- 
born Porridge” of being a veiled 
attack on Deog. in a novel 
twist. Wang sum his attacker 
for falsely accusing him. 

The story, translated into 
English for the first time, is os- , 
tensibly about four generations | 
of a family trying lo decide j 
whether to change its diet in j 
accordance with the principles j 
of Reform and Modernization. 
In the satire, various family 
members try changing the 
menu nidi disastrous conse- | 
queuces for their digestion. j 

Steven Mufson is ihe Wash- I 
ingion Post's Beijing bureau I 
chief. 


shifted to the club queen, 
frating the contract. 

nor’th 
* A J to s A 
O K52 
A 10 6 
*107 


AUSTRALIA 

Sydney 

Powerhouse Museum, let: 1 2) 2t7- 
0111. open daily. To Oci. 23: "Chris- 
tian Dior: The Magic ot Fashion ’* 
More lhan 60 gowns chronicle the 
rise of Christian Dior from the launch 
of his "new look" in 1947. and docu- 
ment his influence on Australian 
fashion during the 1940s and l&Kis. 

AUSTRBAM TOUR 

Orchestra de Paris. Sept. 23 to 27: 
Will perform m Lmz (Bruckner's 
Ninth Symphony i. in Vienna and 
Graz t Berlioz's 'Symphome Fantas- 
tique" and "Carnav&J Remain, over- 
ture" and DutHieux's "Metaboies."! 

BR1TAIM 

London 

British Museum, tel. i 71 \ 323-8525, 
open daily.To Oct. 23: Greek Gold: 
Jewelry of the Classical World." 


Drawn trom the collection of the Her- 
mitage in St. Petersburg, the Metro- 
politan Museum in New York, and the 
British Museum collections, more 
than 200 pieces ot jewelry created 
between 500 and 300 B. C. by Greek 
artisans throughout the Mediterra- 
nean and Black Sea areas. 
Serpentine Gallery, tel: t.71 j 402- 
0343, open daily. Sept. 3 to Sept. 1 1 . 
A nonstop performance ot “The 
Blindings" by Brian Catling who will 
recite his text throughout the day, 
among sculptural installations made 
by the' artist to entice the audience 

FRANCE 

Paris 

Centre Georges Pompidou, tel: 44- 
78-12-33. closed Tuesdays. To Oct. 
3: "Joseph Beuys." A chronological 
presentation of the works ot the con- 
troversial German artist Joseph 
Beuys, including drawings, objects, 
sculptures and more than 70 installa- 
tions. 


r / 9 n i f sot) 


On Sept. 4. "Ft. 3. Krtaj: A Fietrospec- 
tive." Tate Gallery, London. 

On Sept. 4. "Rov Liechtenstein ” 
Musde des Beaux-Arts. Montreal. 
On Sept. 5; "La Retorme des Trois 
Carraci: Le Dessin a Bdogne, 1580- 
1620." Mus£e du Louvre', Paris. 

On Sept 4: "Picasso and tne Weep- . 
ing Women: Tne Years ot Marie-The- 
rese Waiter ana Dora Maar "Metro- 


politan Museum of Art. New York. 
On Sept. 4: "Der Meeler von Gross- 
iobming."Osterreichische Galerie, 
Austria 

On Sept. 4: "British Landscape Wa- 
tercolors 1750-1850." The Rtzwil- 
liam Museum, Cambridge. 

On Sept. 4; Caspar David Friedrich to 
Ferdinand Hodler. A Romantic Tradi- 
hon."National Gallery, London. 


Metz 

Arsenal, tel: 44-78-25-00. open dai- 
ly. To Oct. 2: "L'Or des Dieux, I'Or 
des Andes." From the collection of 
Peruvian banker Guillermo Wiese, 
640 pieces of pre-Columbian jewelry 
from Peru, Ecuador and Columbia. 

GERMANY 

Frankfurt 

Schim Kunsthalle, tel: (69 ) 299- 
882-0, closed Mondays. To Nov. 13: 
"Expressionistische Bilder.” About 
50 masterpieces of German Expres- 
sionism, , including works by Beck- 
mann. Kancfinsky, Kirchner. Macke 
and Marc. 

Wuppertal 

Von der Heydt-Museum, tel: (2021 
563-6231, closed Mondays To Oct. 
9: "Carl Gross berg - Retrospek- 
ttve ” More than 150 paintings, draw- 
ings 3nd water colors spanning the 
years 1 920 to 1 940 on the themes of 
industry and technique, reflecting the 
German artist's vision of the engine 
as a symbol of progress. 

ITALY 

Florence 

Museo Santa Croce, tel: (55) 234- 
28-14. open daily. To Oct. 16: "Sal- 
vador Dali: II Surreal ismo nefia Terza 
Dimensione e neil'Ane Grafica." A 
selection of sculptures as well as 
etchings illustrating literary works, 
such as "Gargantua and Pantagru- 
el." "Tristan and Isolde" and "Ham- 


let" Also features 105 illustrations 
lor the Bible showing the deep reli- 
gious beliefs of the Spanish artist. 

Singapore 

National Museum, tel: (65) 332- 
3656, dosed Mondays. To Nov 1 3. : 
“AJamkara. 5000 Years of India." 
This exhibition, which covers the pe- 
riod 3000 B.C. to 1900 A. D.. in- 
cludes stone, bronze and terra-cotta 
images of deities, paintings ol court 
life, everyday tile and nature, jewelry 
and other examples of decorative art 
on loan from the National Museum, 
New Delhi. Singapore instil utions and 
private collectors. 

SWITZERLAND 

Lausanne 

Musde Cantonal des Beaux-Arts, 
tel: (21) 312-83-32, closed Mon- 
days. To Nov. 27: "Rene Auberion- 
ois." A retrospective of the works of 
the 20th-century Swiss painter. More 
man 100 portraits, still lifes and interi- 
ors and 150 drawings document the 
painter's sources ot inspiration: Im- 
pressionism. his friendship with writ- 
ers, composers and sponsors, and 
the Swiss region of the Valais. 

Musfie de I’ElysSe. tel: ( 21 ) 61 7-48- 
21 , Closed mondays. To Oct. 30: An 
exhibition of four photographers: 
Saudi Arabia as seen by Humberto da 
Silveira from Brazil, views of the Arab 
world by Lebanese artist Samer Moh- 
dad and ot the Middle East at the end 
of the 19th century. 



r %• 

' :W 

#■ 

sm il- 

lL ..i mk 


Detail from “ La Servante" 
by Rene Auberjonois. on 
show in Lausanne. 

UNITED STATES 

New York 

Bard Graduate Center, tel: (212) 
721-4245, closed Mondays. To Oct. 
30: “Baroque Splendor: The Art of 
the Hungarian Goldsmith." Examines 
the development of goldsmiths ' and 
jewelers' an from the Renaissance to 
the Baroque periods. Features 200 
silver vessels, ecclesiastical trea- 
sures, lewels. arms and armor, lex- 
tiies, paintings and engravings. 


This Year 38 Million Hotel Guests In 27 
Gties Will Turn To WHERE Magazines 
For Directions & Advice 








WEST 

♦ Q73 
? J983 
0 973 

* A K9 


EAST 

*985 

0 K^J 5 4 
*QS 6 3 


SOUTH lD) 

♦ K 2 

7 A Q 10 6 
O QS 2 

* J 54 2 

Both sides were vulnerable. The 



bidding: 

South 

Wesa 

North 

East 

1 + 

Pass 

1 + 

Pass 

1 N.T. 

Pass 


Pass ! 

2 ? 

Pass 

3 N.T. 

Pass ! 

Pass 

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1 


FSSKNTUl HKUMM; HH1 V IHWKS SINCE 1*13* 
5udap c “election? 36 i 2113 Fai:36 1 1186316 
Cccta 26' Te:vp“one 2- 5 282 ?J &8 ra>. 3“ 5 282 2496 

Lone;* Teiepiii'e -- 71 5553 Pa»' 44 ?i 436 4507 

ra::; Teiesnone 22 1 44 55 31 Fax: 23 l 42 66 49 11 
Djat.n Teifeunsns 353 1 651 4?52 Fax 353 1 831 4769 

The English' language magazine for alfluent tourists 


Rate the world's best restaurants 
with Patricia Wells. 

The DTPs restaurant critic has set out 
on a rare and ambitious gastronomic journey, a 
search for the 10 best restaurants in the world 

She will be rating, in month-to-month 
articles, the top restaurants from region to 
region, and comparing them to one another. 

Whether it's the best in dim sum, 
delicious but secret sushi bars or the finest of 
French tables, she will guide readers with 
articles about inexpensive restaurants as well 
as the grand ones in the world's major cities. 

She will also share her tips on how to select 

quality restaurants in unfamiliar territory. 

Don't miss this series. 


COMING SEPTEMBER 19th 

GERMANY 


• .XYsr/.v ,:x’ 
X ' ■„ Tv 


West led the diamond three 


Patricia Wells is the author of The Food 
^^Lover's Guide to Paris, now in its 
third edition. 




Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1994 


NASDAQ 


Thuraday’s 4 p.m. 

This list compfled by ttw AP. consists of the 1,000 
most traded securities in terms o( dollar value, n Is I sa 
updated twice a year. jg 


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International Herald Tribune, Friday, September 2. 1994 


Page 11 


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THE TRIB INDEX: 117.599 

International Herald Tribune Wortd Stock Index ©. composed 
280 internationally investable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 = 100. 

120 


•»' * ■' ■* j ■ , 

100 • • * ■ . 

? 2#L r v ■”} !-,■ ! ' ’■ .. 
•> • ~ & - 

J m..t I . V r ) 1 1 ,.. ; 
A M J 


ease Firms on Alert 

t to Be Formidable Competitor 


A&ia/Pacitic 


Appro k. weighting: 32% 
Oosa 132.66 Prav.: 132 97 


Approt. weighting: 37% 
Qosa: 117.55 Pin.: 117J0 


110 ^rr 


%".i ■ vr ;> : -f - i J; ' ' .: 'r £ ' ='>; ; * 


A S 
1994 


| North America 


Latin America 


Approx. WBlgWing'. 26% 
Ooss; 97.06 Prev.: 97.03 

0 

ei 

Approx, wdgttng: 5% 
Close: 146.15 Prevj 144.71 

■SI 


By Joseph Fitchett 

hticnuuiorul Herald Tr.bure 

PARIS — The sudden emergence of 
Lockheed Martin bas alarmed European 
defense contractors, who fear that it 
marks a competitive gain for the United 
States in the world's arms-expon mar- 
kets, executives and analysts said Thurs- 
day. 

But few of these insiders said they saw 
a strong chance that the European de- 
fense industry would match the U.S. 
competitor's rapid moves to consolidate 
and restructure anytime soon. 

Some looked for a silver linin g. They 
predicted that the proposed SI 1 billion 
merger of Lockheed Corp. and Martin 
Marietta Coip., the second- and third- 
largesi U.S. military contractors, would 
spur faster consolidation among Eu- 
rope’s weapons- makers and the creation 
of cross-border firms to compete more 
strongly in world markets. 

“In Europe everyone is conscious that 
we have things to do. and we're not doing 
them fast enough, but there is a kind of 
cultural inertia both in companies and in 
government bureaucracies,” said Jean- 
Louis Gergorin, a board member of Ma- 
tra-Hachette SA of France in charge of 
the company’s strategy. 

Matra has bucked Europe's inertia, set- 
ting innovative joint ventures with British 
companies to combine the production of 


military and telecommunications satel- 
lites and the missile operations. 

But another executive at Matra said 
that this deal took months, even years, to 
reach fruition, in contrast to the weeks 
required for Lockheed and Martin Mari- 
etta to team up. 

Mr. Gergorin called the U.S. merger 
“a very positive development" that 
should foster similar moves in Europe's 
defense industry to ensure it remained 
competitive. 

But many analysts were skeptical 
about the readiness of most countries, 
each with national champions dominat- 
ing their defense industries, to absorb the 
political pain of job losses implied by 
closing excess capacity as radically as 
U.S. defense companies have done in a 
wave of mergers over the last five years. 

Consolidation goes along with any 
move to forge defense companies strad- 
dling European borders, thus gainin g a 
home markeL large enough for manufac- 
turers to develop new products — the 
key to success in the export business. 

Exports "are what matter because they 
are much more lucrative than any con- 
tract you can sign with cost-conscious 
Western defense ministries," a British 
executive said. 

International market share is what Eu- 
ropeans see as the goal of the Lockheed 
Martin merger, according to Paul J. Frie- 
drich, an independent consultant in 


Bonn. He said there was particular con- 
cern about “the Americans achieving 
critical mass." allowing them to domi- 
nate world sales, particularly in fiabier 
aircraft. 

Some Europeans, particularly such 
leading French defense contractors as 
Thomson SA and Dassault Aviation SA, 
see the proposed merger as the latest 
evidence of a grand U.S. design to cap- 
ture a bigger market share in all sectors 
of world trade. 

[Prime Minister Edouard Balladur of 
France said his country would empha- 
size defense, along with employment and 
“cultural identity" when his country as- 
sumes the rotating European Union 
presidency in January, AFP- Ext el News 
reported from Paris. He called on mem- 
ber countries “to start thinking quickly 
on drawing up a white paper on Europe- 
an defense.”] 

To some extent. Lockheed Martin will 
gain a new edge in foreign sales, partly 
through savings from merging opera- 
tions in key countries in Asia and the 
Middle East, partly by having a stronger 
calling card. For example, the new com- 
pany's range of operations will enable it 
to come up with better offset deals, offer- 
ing some local manufacturing, perhaps 
on another product, as part of a weapons 
sale to a government. 

To strengthen Europe's defense indus- 

See DEFENSE; Page 13 


ines to Ease 


1,0 


7 ? Wortd Indo* 

The Me* tracks U.S. datiar values of slocks trr. Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, BalgLum, Brazil, Canada, ChSo. Danmark, Finland. 
Franc*. Garmany, Hong Kong, Italy, Maxim, Nethettands, Now Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore. Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Vanazutia. For Tokyo, New York and 
London, the Me* Is composed ol the 20 lop issues in terms of market capttsBzatlan, , 
otherwise the ten top stocks are tracked 


il tnduatfiai Sectors 




m 


Vu. Pm. % 

ekue das. dung* 


Tta 

rioee 

Prrt 

don 

% 

riange 

Energy 

115-09 115.44 +022 

Capital Goods 

120.17 

12020 

-0.02 

(MKe» 

130^8 130.77 40.08 

Rmrttateriahi 

13608 

136.83 

40.04 

Hnance 

117JS 11738 -0.45 

Consumer Goods 

104.92 

104.76 

40.15 

Services 

12132 123.55 -0.19 

Miscellaneous 

137.17 

13722 

-0.04 

For moTB information about the Index, a booklet is avafabte free of charge. 

Write to Tnb index, 181 Avenue Charles de Gaufle, 92521 NeudyCedex, France. 


Compiled by Our Staff Fnem Dispatches 

WASHINGTON —The bar- 
rage of late- summer statistics 
pointing to slackened U.S. eco- 
nomic growth now exhibits a 
pattern that could imply some- 
what faster inflation as well, ac- 
cording to various government 
and private-sector reports. 

While not yet setting off 
alarms, the price pressures seem 
to support the persistent credit- 
tightening by the Federal Re- 
serve Board this year in its ef- 
fort to prevent inflation from 
accelerating. 

U.S. manufacturing slowed 
in August to its lowest level in 
eight months, but raw materials 


prices rose to the highest level 
in six years, the National Asso- 
ciation of Purchasing Manage- 
ment reported Thursday. The 
association said its manufactur- 
ing index based on survey re- 
sults declined to 56.2 percent in 
August from 57.S percent in 
July. An index reading above 50 
percent indicates an expansion, 
while a reading below 50 per- 
cent indicates a contraction. 

Production and new orders 
both grew at a lower rate in 
August than in the previous 
month, the survey showed. 

But the survey's price compo- 
nent suggested ihe economy has 
not slowed enough to stave off 


WALL STREET WATCH 


CGM Blazes Its Own Trail 


By Stan Hinden 

Washington Post Sernttr 

W ASHINGTON —This is how the 
future looks to G. Kenneth Heeb- 
ner, one of America's top mutual- 
fund managers: The rise in inter- 
est rates is not going to derail the economy; 
stable food and energy prices will keep infla- 
tion in check; and real estate will once again 
become a money-making investment. 

It is not surprising that these forecasts 
sound contrary lo what one hears from Wall 
Street. Mr. Heebner. the 53-year-old manager 
of the top-rated CGM Capital Development 
Fund in Boston, has always liked to blaze his 
own trail through the investment jungle. 

"I want to have a viewpoint that is not 
widely believed,” said Mr. Heebner. His rea- 
son: If others do not share his investment 
ideas, be can buy the stocks he likes before 
they rise. 

CGM Capital Development has been the 
second-best performing stock fund for the 
last 10 years and the third best for the past 
five years, according to Lipper Analytical 
Services Inc. CGM Capital, which invests in 
growth stocks, is now closed to new investors. 

One of Mr. Heebner's best years was in 
1991, when health and food stocks helped 
power his fund to a 99 percent gain. This year, 
though, has been a tough one. He has made 
big bets on industrial companies in the belief 
their earnings and shares would benefit from 
a strengthening economy. 

Those stocks were knocked back when the 
Federal Reserve Board raised interest rates. 
Some investors became convinced that busi- 
ness would weaken and the country might go 


back into recession. So they sold the stocks 
that Mr. Heebner favors. 

As a result, Mr. Heebner's fund, which has 
5457 million invested in 25 stocks, dropped 
15 percent by June 30. Recently, economical- 
ly sensitive stocks have started to rebound 
and Mr. Heebner’s fund is now down about 
10 percent 

Trying to slay ahead of the crowd is not a 
risk-free strategy, and Mr. Heebner admits he 
has made his share of mistakes. The impor- 
tant thing, he said “is to position yourself in 
front of a big winner.” 

When Mr. Heebner talks about "big win- 
ners,” he is talking about companies such as 
Stone Container Corp.. a maker of corrugated 
containers and liner board which is used for 
the outer shell of boxes. 

Mr. Heebner has more than 5 percent of his 
fund's money in Stone, whose shares sell for 
about $18, up from S6.50 a year ago. A 
strengthening economy has increased de- 
mand for boxes, allowing Stone to raise its 
prices for liner board from $290 a ton last 
year lo $425 a ton starting Sept. 1. 

Mr. Heebner also has invested heavilv in 
steel, gypsum and chemical companies. Un- 
like man y on Wall Street, Mr. Heebner is not 
afraid of rising interest rates. He said the rise 
in short-term rates “is not going to interfere 
with very strong growth in our economy and 
the other economies around the world.” 

As for inflation, Mr. Heebner said he fore- 
saw no great pickup in the next 12 months 
because there is little pressure for wage in- 
creases and the cost of food and energy has 
been stable. 

However, Mr. Heebner said he expected 

See CGM, Page 13 


Argentina 
To Speed Up j 
Privatization | 

Compiled by Our Staff Fnm Dispatches, j 

BUENOS AIRES — Argen- 
tina has announced a sweeping 
plan to sell ail major companies 
now in government hands to the 
public within 16 months. 

By the end of 1995, all air- 
ports. three nuclear power 
plants, the national post office, 
the mint and .Argentina's big- 
gest petrochemicals plant will 
be privatized, Domingo Ca- 
vallo, the finance minister, told 
a group of Argentina's top 
bankers Wednesday. 

“This is the start of a second 
round of reforms of the state,” 
he said. "All business activity 
will be transferred to the private 
sector so that more resources 
can be devoted to justice, secu- 
rity, health and education." 

No estimate was immediately 
available of how much money 
the privatizations could bring 
into the state's coffers. 

President Carlos Sail 
Menem, since coming to office 
in 1989, has raised about S20 
billion through privatization of 
companies including utilities, 
the national airline and the na- 
tional petroleum company. i 

The country also plans to j 
raise funds through a govern- I 
mem hiring freeze and adminis- j 
trative cost cutting, j 

(Reuters, Bloomberg \ j 


inflation. Manufacturers contin- 
ue to see higher prices for the 
materials they use to produce 
goods. The survey’s price index 
rose for the fifth consecutive 
month, to its highest level since 
the summer of 1988. 

“Economic growth is strong 
and inflation is getting ready to 
break out into the general econ- 
omy,” said Robert McGee, 
chief economist at Tokai Bank 
Ltd. in New York. “Financial 
markets have been living in a 
dream world over the past few 
weeks trying to convince them- 
selves that the economy is slow- 
ing down." 

The specter of inflation 
raised in the purchaser's data 
briefly sent the price of the 
benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond lower and weighed on the 
dollar because slow demand for 
U.S. securities means reduced 


need for the currency in which 
they are denominated. 

Factories also reported that 
they were having a difficult 
time getting supplies on time. 
Supplier delivery performance 
was substantially slower in Au- 
gust, compared with July, the 
report showed. 

"On Wednesday, corporate 
purchasing managers in the Chi- 
cago and New York areas re- 
ported higher readings for Au- 
gust in tneir indexes of prices 
paid, while a Commerce Depart- 
ment tally showed a sharp jump 
for July in the price of materials 
particularly sensitive to the pace 
of business activity. 

“We believe dial inflation 
likely will surprise on the up- 
side," Salomon Brothers Inc. 
told clients Wednesday, con- 

See INFLATION, Page 12 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — European stock 
prices tumbled Thursday amid a 
return of inflation worries and 
signs that the recent decline in 
interest rates may be ending. 

The Bundesbank's policy- 
making council, meeting in 
Frankfurt, decided to leave its 
interest rates at current levels, 
reinforcing a growing suspicion 
in the market that the trend to 
easier credit in major European 
markets was becoming a thing 
of the past. 

German shares finished the 
official trading session lower, 
dropping from their intraday 
higbs after the Bundesbank de- 
cision, and prices slipped fur- 
ther in after-hours trading. The 
DAX index ended the session at 
2,200.80, down 12.05 points, 
and was quoted around 2.185 in 
later unofficial dealing. 

Daimler-Benz AG moved 
against Lhe vend, climbing 3.50 
Deutsche marks to close the of- 
ficial session at 841 ($532), add- 
ing to the gains it made 
Wednesday on better-than-ex- 
pected first-half results. 

The Financial Times- Stock 
Exchange index of 100 leading 
British shares ended 34.80 
points lower, at 3,216.50. 

Reckitt & Colman fell 25 
pence, to 627 ($9.62). after first- 
half results came in below mar- 
ket forecasts and the company 
forecast no improvement in 
vading conditions for the rest 
of the year. 

French stocks tumbled 1.7 
percent, their biggest one-day 
loss in two-and-one-half 
months. Shares also fell on 
most other European slock 
markets except for Stockholm, 
where the index was lifted by a 
4 percent rise in the pharmaceu- 
tical concern Astra AB. 

The CAC-40 index of leading 
French companies fell 34.17 
points to 2,034.91, wiping out 
much of a recent rally. Most of 
the 40 companies in the index 
fell, led by the telecommunica- 
tions and electrical-engineering 
concern Alcatel Alsthora. which 
lost 19 francs to 580 ($107). 

Investors' suspicions about 
interest rates were buttressed 


by signs that the German econ- 
omy was growing more rapidly 
than thought: West German in- 
dustrial production rose 2.2 
percent in July and 7.5 percent 
m the latest year. 

The French economy is not 
recovering as strongly as the 
German one, and investors in 
Paris would like to see further 
rates cuts to stimulate invest- 
ment and profit and to cut the 
cost of debt service. 

But, in a sign that the 
Bundesbank still sets the direc- 
tion of interest rates in major 
European economies, the Bank 
of France announced it was 
leaving its intervention rate, 
which acts as a floor rate in the 
official money market, un- 
changed at 5 percent. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg, AFX ) 


Schneider Chief 
Snubs Summons 
To Go to Belgium 

Compiled by Our Stcff From Dispatches 

PARIS — Didier Pineau-Va- 
lencienne, the chairman of 
Schneider SA, plans to defy a 
summons by Belgian authori- 
ties for an interview in a fraud 
inquiry on Saturday, the French 
company said on Thursday. 

A Schneider spokeswoman 
said: “He will not go." 

On Wednesday. Schneider 
said it had taken steps to get an 
annulment of the legal proceed- 
ings taken against Mr. Pineau- 
Valencienne in Belgium, which 
led to 12 days in prison in late 
May and early June. 

Belgian sources said that even 
though Mr. Pineau-Valenrienne 
had agreed, as one condition of 
his release, to return to Belgium 
in compliance with anv sum- 
mons from a Belgian judge, his 
refusal now would not put him 
back in jail because he is protect- 
ed by French exvadition rules. 

Schneider has said its chair- 
man was still willing to cooper- 
ate with Belgian justice, but 
only in France and under super- 
vision by French legal authori- 
ties. (Reuters, AFP) 


Trust, discretion, understanding, dialogue. 

In fact, what you need is a bank that isn’t like yours. 



CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rsts* s®**- 1 

t i AM. Ff. Uni DiFl BJF. Si=. Ym CS Pweto 

ARH^ai lhb am un* ami win- — insi ub* i» ijo» 

ju, joe Hit UfcS 10S4J* 1U4I 2UD Wtf 334C !W 

um i«rs — asm uwi* o»i5 use* us uw* u» u** 

— u« us i» aw u» «« 
uoom m ^ E91 jcji 133- 71SW us tttf m hi* WJ — 

™ 2JJUI TfltLK 30 IS — - tun 1.1KU7 li«* I.WUfi U»5 

fh , _ |uj 4 s U7U SJ01 l-SHflO KM3 XLC 1-1225 W7J 13443 13Qal 

S3. 5 ns IMS 3421) M4«- U4W 0.1443 UtM S«M* MB tlW 

ms IOT US W! WO UK 7MI - M Uffl 

Tn™L, 2!!!f U #77 0336 £MU- 1*725 04715* MW U®* 1044* 

™ I* ;S 3 H BM1 aM* “*** Si®* — U!W* D.wp 1X153* 

lieu LilN SUMS 1JM U47 \SrHM 11517 XJ69 MTS lit* 1.4541 11M9 

isro util aw raw usu* )37i? *Jua iw usw iw now 

Ob turn to Amsterdam. London, Now York and Zurich, Holms In other canton: Toronto 
» ** «* M,ori *' «*» * ,BC; **■' mt NJL: "* 

f cwttattt. 


Eurocurrency Deposits 

Swiss 

Dollar D-Mark Franc 

Srerilna 

FrenOl 

Franc 

Yon 

Sept. 1 

ECU 

1 month 

44i-41b 

AVi-S 

4-41% 

A 'r-5 . 

5'-4-5Vz 

: -j-. 

s . 

3 months 

47V5 

49D-5 

4V%-4'« 

Pb-Fi 

5 VS . 

; . 


6 months 

5 4wJ >» 


4 1^4 !, 

576-6 

5 ' -5 -- 

2-^2 . 


1 year 

5^-5% 

iwr. 


6 ^,- 6 'D 

b'.K-o 1 * 

2 iy- 2 : 's 

6 *.-6 


In a highly volatile financial environment, where change is the order of the day, Union Bancaire Privee 
offers its clients a unique approach to international asset management. 

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OthsrDoUsr 

Currency Pw* 

Arawf.jatta 

MiirtH.li 

Aantr.scMl. nil 
ferubrW W* 
CMoncfUOd U79 
CMCBkMV* ** 
DHUnnvK 
GWlN.nOWMS 13*5 
krnn 


Values 

• lirrtMy 
Greek dree 
hum Kona 5 7J27 

HoM.forlar 1 W« 
IlMlan rupee 31.M 
Inflfl. PUPhUi 717103 
irtah t S4W* 
IWWfcWrtL 1D33 
Kuwaiti diner 0 JW 8 
Mjobn. rtns. 


Currency 

Mn.pno 

N. Zealand 4 
Norw. krone 
Ptill. peso 
PeH 1I1 zloty 
Port, escudo 
Russ, reue 
ScmH rival 

5UH.S 


Currency Per* 

5. Afr. rand 3JH72 
S. Kor. won B 01.10 
Swan, krona 7.7043 
Taiwan ( 7425 

TIM) Miff 25.04 

TurtIMi lino 33760. 
l)AE dirham 3-4727 
Venet tnllv. 193.00 


Forward 


.. nor M4av Currency XWov 4Mav »-dav 

TjE; 1.5335 Canadian dollar U718 U7N 1JHI 

asst s »s .*» — — «■ - « 

tuhilfolll UM 1 3J55 1J27I 

, .... iAmsferaon i. rndosurr Bank (BnnStlS); Banco Cowwmw noUenn 

r tank); vSDAi. Other W* tmm Ketrtm and AP. 


Sources: Reuters Uorcts Bank, 

Rates aeoHeaD/c to tntertan# deoasits of S ’ million minimum tor ecu: went 


Key Money Rates 

um»d Slates Close Prev. 

Discount rale 4JX) <00 

Prime rate 7*« 7V 

Faaerol duds 4V* 4V. 

frraonm CDs AM 06 

Comm, oaoer TO Bom 5JJ6 506 

frmoatn Treasury Dill 4.53 

Wear Treasury Dill 5.23 534 

j.rear Treasury nole 6.12 1 14 

5- year Treasury note 6.79 OO 

7-year Treasury note 6^3 03 

KFvear Treasury note '.!< '.18 

jD*tar Treasury Dead 745 7.45 

Merrill LvncDM-dav Ready aurl 346 3 £1 

Jpuon 

Discount rale 1V< IV. 

Call money 2 0* 209 

i-mwtn Intertwnk 1 2 •* 

s-majBtn interaank 2 ‘j I 1 - 

4-mootn InrerDaKK 21s 

10 -year Government Dead 4.74 4.7. 

Germany 

Loratxird rate 6.00 63)0 

Coil money 4.95 iM 

l -month mierDanfc 5.00 5.00 

Hnontn Intertwnk 5.00 500 

6- month Interbank 5.10 5.10 

liFyear Bund 7-7 7^2 


Bank bale rate 5 1 . S': 

Call money 4'; f j 

1-monih Interbank 5.00 5310 ! 

1-month Interbank 5^ 5h I 

6-month Interbank 6.00 SM j 

1 (Freer Gin B4l 155 

Fro nee • 

Intervention rote 5.00 5JU • 

Coll money 5 v , 5*.; 

1-raonm Interbank 5*? i 

3-monrn interaank 5 ■■ S' r : | 

6-monm inlcrtmnk S’- 6 JO I 

tfrreor OAT 7.90 7 79 

Sources • Reuter i. Bioomoe'o. Merrill s 
i. inch. Bank ol Takta, CammerrOank ; 
Greenweii niontacv- Credit L • annals. 


UNION BANCAIRE PRIVEE 

gen Eve 

TRES PRIVEE 



A ML 

PM. 

Ch'oe 

Zurich 

33L25 

39c^£ 

-0.1C 

London 

71655 

386 K 

tC-J5 

New York 

mso 

371.23 

-OJfl 

U.S. ilallors oer ounce. 

Canaan 

official lit- 


inp s; Zurich cna Vew rcr* aaenmg ana Clos- 
ing prices: hew tor* Cemew meeemeer > 
Source' Reefer*. 


H»mJ * ifliiv vn-V.H. rur Ju Rhrtnc • 1204 i,FNEVF 

I \ t . II . II , , loN’nnN > NASSAU » KPW UiKK . IOKYO ■ HiiNt', KONii • ISTaNKL'L ■ AMFkk'A LATINA 





Page 12 

MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1994 



New Inflation Fears 
Pull Dollar Down 


Conpi&Jta Our Staff Frrm Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
followed the U.S Treasury mar- 
ket lower f.Tter a manufacturing 
* t+on au^acsud lMiaiioa muy 
be teeeieralint 
r.i the dollar's decline was 
limited as traders wait for the 
release Fridav of the U.S. ern- 


Foralgn Exchange 


ploymeni report for August, 
which is considered a better 
measure of the economy's 
strength. 

The National Association of 
Purchasing Management's man- 
ufacturing index fell in August, 
but the prices-paid index, which 
Investors see as a guide to the 
outlook for U.S. inflation, rose 
to 74.5 in August from 73.1 in 
July. “Normally, things that are 
bad for Treasuries are good for 
the dollar, and '.ice versa, but at 
the moment, the dollar's trading 
off the back of Treasuries,” said 
Warwick Lightfoot, an econo- 
mist at Royal Bank of Scotland 
in London. 

The dollar ended trading at 
1.5744 Deutsche marks, down 


from 1.5818 DM on Wednes- 
day, at 99.75 yen, down from 
100.19 yen. The dollar slumped 
to 1.3225 Swiss francs from 
1.3325 francs and to 5.391 
French francs from 5.4135 
francs. 

The pound rose to SI. 5454 
Irom SI. 5355. 

In Europe, the dollar was 
steady against the mark after 
German/s central bank left in- 
terest rates unchanged, a move 
most traders expected. 

Now the focus is on the em- 
ployment report. But a too- 
strong employment report 
could also unnerve investors by 
heightening concern that the 
Federal Reserve Board was not 
raising rates fast enough to con- 
trol U.S. inflation, traders said. 


Via AlxXiOMd Pratt 


So*. I 


The Dow 


Daily dosings of the 

Dow Jones industrial average 



Dow Jones Averages 


Oven Urn Los dig. 


Imam 

Tron, 

Util 

Comp 


3099.50 J91W2 3887 43 3901.44-1 1.98 
143a. 77 144J.22 1432.79 1(03-48 —8.74 
187.45 TMX3 IB5J4 18147 —3X9 
134) 79 1344.43 1334-55 1338.93 —7.88 


Standard A Poor’s Indexes 


m 


M A M J J A S 

1934 


NYSE Most Actives 


“The way things are in the 
market right now, strong eco- 
nomic data isn't that good for 
the dollar," said Paul Farrell, 
manager of strategic currency 
trading at Chase Manhattan 
Bank. “People want to see a 
stable environment that en- 
courages investment.” 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


ComMSS 

PJP Not> 

PwMr 

PSEGPtD 

Fora 4 

Rnaertw 

Gao 

NrSomi 

PSETGpff 

Foams 

T«HMox 

PSEGofE 

:&m 

AAfT'Jc 

NioMP 


VoL High 

Lew 

Last 

O19. 

83405 36 

74*. 

34% 

—2*6 

87653 7’k 

6"# 

t’l 

— V6 

71023 62*6 

40'T 

61’, 


-H8S0 4IV e 

61*E 

6lv a 

IV- 

43459 30 

79’,. 

29** 

-*» 

*□898 J*v, 

22 7l 

23’* 


40343 39’W 

38 

3H', 

—4*. 

40000 17*1 

16*6 

17** 

_|*a 

15770 91 

C9*'m 

tr*/ a 


34791 72(« 

21V. 

23'-, 

- 1*6 

29 IB* 4J'l 

62*6 

42*. 

-'■* 

28900 63<v„ 

63'Vi, 

63'Vi, 


27334 U’ < 

66’. 

67+fc 

— *4 

2584* 3*W 

14 

3*1* 

- 1 , 

73479 14*6 

13V* 

13'e 

— IVj 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


INFLATION: WhU Street Slips 

1 percent, up from 50 per- 
— reported slowing deliv- 


Coutmued from Page 11 
tending that the Fed probably 
would raise interest rates at its 
November policy meeting. 

The government said Thurs- 
day that construction spending 


U.S. Stocks 


rose 0.6 percent in July — the 
fifth straight advance — led by 
the highest government outlays 
in eight months. 

Meanwhile, the number of 
Americans filing first-time 
claims for state unemployment 
benefits rose by 9.000 last week, 
to the highest level in six weeks. 

The country’s chain stores re- 
ported that sales slowed in Au- 
st, evidence consumers were 
inning to resist rising prices. 
Although reports of purchas- 
ing managers are seen by some 
analysts as unreliable inflation 
gauges, the Chicago group 
raised eyebrows in citing “tre- 
mendous strength” in prices 
paid. Production also rose 
sharply, while new orders 
showed a small decline. 

The New York chapter of the 
National Association of Pur- 
chasing Management said, 
meanwhile, that its price index 
climbed in August to match the 
highest reading since the survey 
began in mid- 1993. A sharply 
higher proportion of members 


— 58 
cent 

eries from suppliers. 

(7VJT, AP. AFX) 

■ Technology Issues Fall 

A sell-off in technology stocks 
and inflation jitters sparked by 
the purchasing data kept Wall 
Street pinned down Thursday, 
news agencies reported. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage closed down 1 1.98 points, 
at 3,901.44, while losing issues 
outnumbered gaining ones by a 
3-to-2 ratio on the New’ York 
Stock Exchange. 

The price of the 30-year bond 
finished steady at l’OO 19/32 
and the yield was 7.45 percent. 

Compaq Computer was the 
most actively traded stock on 
the NYSE, falling 2% to 3474 on 
sentiment that the computer in- 
dustry was slowing as a whole. 

That sentiment was sparked 
by AST Research, which fell 4 
15/16 to 13 1/16 in active trad- 
ing after it said late Wednesday 
that it would post a loss in its 
first financial quarter and reve- 
nue would be flat. 

International Business Ma- 
chines lost to 67% and Micro- 
soft dropped 1% to 56%. 

Soundview Financial down- 
graded its opinions of Compaq 
and Microsoft because of con- 
cern about shrinking gross prof- 
it margins. ( Bloomberg Reuters) 



voL High 

Low 

Lost 

Qta. 

AST 

148439 13 'k 

13 

l3Vu 

— 4’Vr, 

Micslts 

7I6A5 57 

55*. 

SAW 

—2 

Con Co 

54002 12** 

ll’i 

12'-', 

-14k 

Ci-xm 

50736 34’ . 

2*'/i 

24’6 

— Sft, 

Inici 

49489 AS 

64 

64'., 

—IV, 

Co-AVJOlc 

46774 

7*6 

a*. 

+ l*fc 

Doucwr 

38334 32-. a 

30*. 

3l*rt 

—1 

VLSI 

33437 13V. 

12'*. 

13'.. 

— 1A* 

Adctaim 

31955 19 

lA", 

IB 1 *,, 

-IWh 

3Com S 

29295 331k 

32 

33*6 

— : iW 

Novell 

27903 15** 

15*6 

15*6 


MCI 

26*85 2* ’.6 

231a 

24 


Crrus 

23IS5 27', . 

76'.. 

77 

— *1 

AptaMtl 

22772 50 

47*6 

48W 

-3*. 

DSC 5 

22694 SB’, 

ZT6 

29 ■'6 

—’6 


AMEX Most Actives 



VoL 

Htoh 

LOW 

Last 

Cho. 

Trifon 

15447 

s >. 

T’Vl. 

2 

— *6 

ArrKtm 

116*0 

9*4 

r. 



NoDars 


6*6 

6’.* 



RovdOa 

5472 


4 ’A 

4V„ 


QtavSrts 

5336 

12V, 

12 


—■6 


5187 

13 

12’,'j 

12*4 

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IVOiCp 

5059 

20 V* 

19V. 

20<rt 

+ *4 

VtocB 

4711 

33'* 

32*6 

23 


TWA via 


3ta 

3>W 

TTIu 

+ 'A» 

XCL Ltd 

3632 

1>„ 

116 

!'« 



Industrials 

TrnnSB. 
Utilities 
Finance 
3P500 
SP 100 


Htyh Low Claw Ch-ve 
558.19 554.15 555.93-234 
39082 388-9) 389.17—1.45 

157.24 155.17 TSS49 — 1.75 
*659 Men 4646—023 
47549 <71.74 473.17 —032 
437,46 435X0 43*49 —0.77 


NYSE Indexes 


High LOW Last Cha. 


Composite 

industrials 

Tronsp. 

utility 

Finance 


241.99 U0.27 260.98 —1.01 
325-53 322-48 32458 —0.95 
249.52 248.35 248.40 —0.81 
211.02 208.72 308.98 —2.04 
218.86 217.55 218.02 — OB4 


NASDAQ Indexes 


High Law Last aw. 


Comoesne 

industrials 
Sanies 
Imuran r* 
Finance 
Tronso. 


7ML33 757 70 759-32 —640 
766.87 764.76 766.63 —462 
782.52 779.74 782.24 —1.08 
939.44 930.89 937.10 — 746 
96SUS 95&44 960.11 — 129 
741.74 nuts 741.19 -0.13 


AMEX Stock Index 


KW LOW Las* Owl 
454.® 455.94 454.02 —0-32 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


28 Boncb 
10 uniliies 
10 inauMrtart 


Close COVe 

WJM —0.13 

94.D4 nj; 

10304 — 0.25 


NYSE Diary 



OOM 

Prev. 

Advanced 

848 

1236 

Deduwa 

1323 

965 

Uncbonoed 

711 

685 

Total tssues 

2884 

2SBft 

NewHlani 

43 

as 

New Laws 

27 

19 


AMEX Diary 


dose Prew. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Toiai issues 
New Wafts 
New Lows 


243 290 

3)1 269 

257 767 

806 026 
17 22 

17 11 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
now Hiatts 
New Laws 


dose Prev. 
1335 1777 

1824 1456 

1928 1854 

5087 5087 

88 139 

65 73 


Spot Commodities 


Market Sales 


Commodify 

Today 

Prev. 




Aluminum, lb 

0®8 

0.683 


Today 

Prev, 

Capper electrolytic, lb 

1.18 

1.18 


Close 

com. 

Iran FOB, tan 

Lead, lb 

21XC-3 

038 

213® 

038 

NYSE 

•nttiu 

430,02 

Silver, troy az 

5X25 

5® 

Amex 

1X18 

25JD4 

Steel (scrap), tan 

nan 

110.17 

Nasdaq 

292X7 

323.99 

Tin, lb 

3A70 

16428 

m millions. 



Zinc, lb 

0X87 

0XSZ7 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Close 

BM Ask 
ALUMINUM (HU Grade) 
Dalian per metrician 
Seal 153408 5 £36.00 

Forward 156100 1565.00 

COPPER CATHODES (High 
Dollars oer metric ten 
Spa) 2496.00 2499® 

Forward 2907 JM 2S08JM 

LEAD 

Delian per metric ten 

5oot 601-50 602-50 

Forward 616JH 617® 

NICKEL 

Denari par meme lee 

Spot 634uo 

Forward 643S® 644000 

TIN 

Donors per metric ten 

Spot 5400.00 S40SJM 

Fonmrd 5470 jm 5*75® 

ZINC (5pectallJMi Grade) 
Deflan par metric ton 

Seat 9B3X0 984.50 

Forward 1006310 100700 


Previous 
Bid Ask 


1505® 150*00 
153400 153500 
Grade) 


249900 258000 
250900 251000 


589.50 £9£L50 
60500 60*00 


<17500 

<26000 


971.50 972-50 
99508 99*1X1 


Financial 


High Low Close Change 

3-MONTH STERLING (LIFFE) 

anon -pis of too pet 


Sen 

Dec 

Mar 

Jan 

Sep 

Dec 


Jn 


92J4 

9221 

9177 

9128 

91-09 


9428 
9X41 
9272 
92.18 
91.73 
9103 
91 JM 
9007 
9077 

9068 

Mar 9060 

Jon 9051 90.4V 

Ed. volume: 41020. Ooen Inl.l 539770. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIPPE) 

ti nmion-Ptset impel 


93^7 
927< 
9273 
91.78 
91 J? 

as 


+ BJ3 
+ 005 
+ 0® 
+ 006 
+ 005 


5092 +0 X« 

9081 +005 


9071 

9067 

9051 


+ 004 
+ 003 
+ OQ5 


sea 

94Xft 

94.96 

9+96 

+ 0® 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9430 

+ 001 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9+03 

Uncffc. 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9171 

+ 031 

Scp 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9144 

+ 002 



9X16 —007 

92.95 —007 


Eat. volume: 130 Open Inf.: 0599. 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

DM1 mmien-PtsetlMPCi 
Sep 95-05 9500 

DOC 9*89 94X3 

Mar 9480 94.53 

Jun 9478 94.20 

Sap 9X96 9X87 

Dec 9X66 9158 

MOT 93.46 SOJ9 

Jm 9123 9X15 

SCP 9182 92.94 

DOC 9181 92.73 

Mar 9X66 9X60 

Jim 92.5B 9Z47 

Ext. volume: 88.120 Open Ini.: 760931 
3-MONTH PIBOR (MATIP) 

FF5 million -pts of 160 Pd 
Sep 9442 94.27 9442 +085 

Dec 9X89 9387 9X89 +006 

Mar 9354 73^7 93J* +005 

Jon 9124 9117 9374 +004 

Sep 9X97 9271 *2.77 +082 

Dec 9X74 9X70 72.24 +003 

Mar 9X57 9X52 9X57 +081 

Jan 9X42 9X36 9X40 + 081 

Est. volume: 3*240. Open Int.: 198871. 


9X76 —087 

9X60 —086 


9X46 —007 


LONG GILT(UFFE) 
tSXndsef 1 


SSA880 - pte A 3tods of 180 act 
Sep 102-17 1B2-00 102-16 +0-16 

Dec 102-02 181-M 181-31 +0-12 

Mar N.T. N.T. 101-11 +0-12 

Est. volume: 5040* Open hit.: 122449. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM ZSOJMi - Pts of 108 Pd 
SOP 7150 9141 9149 — 046 

Dec «T8B 9040 90.4B —066 

Mar N.T. N.T. 8943 — 046 

Est. volume: I52J9* Open Irtf.r 147450. 
10-TEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FFSOMOS-Plsof IMpct 


Sep 

11156 

11192 

11136 

—012 

Dec 

112® 

111® 

112X6 

— 012 

Mar 

111® 

111® 

III® 

—012 

Jim 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1HX6 

— 012 


Est- volume: 220195. Open Int.: 144811. 


Industrials 


hm low Lost Settle CTree 
GASOIL (IRE) 

US. dollars per metric ton-iota of loo toot 
Sep 15380 15145 15X50 15X50 —045 

oa 15*80 154S0 15575 155S0 UiKft. 

No* 15000 15780 15745 15750 -025 

Dec 16080 15000 15945 13945 - 045 

Jen 16145 16045 16045 16050 — 045 


High Low Last Sente CITW 


Feb 

Mar 

Apt 

June 


16150 16020 16020 16*50 — US 

MAM 15920 MAM 1*080 -0.75 

15845 15880 15)20 ISAM ”93 

13*75 33*75 13*75 15780 —1.00 

15*50 15620 15520 15*75 -0X5 


Est. volume; 9287 . Own bit. 105292 
BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPE) 


Oct 

1A58 

16X2 

16X7 

1627 -0» 

NOV 

16.65 

1630 

1633 

1634 — 0® 



16J9 

16X2 

16X2 —013 


)A® 

1639 

1642 

16X2 -OflS 








16X4 

1645 




1630 

1620 

1630 —0.10 


16X9 

16X9 

1649 

1630 —0.10 


10.50 

1650 

1650 

1630 — 0.10 



N.T. 

N.T. 

1630 —0.10 



N.T. 

N.T. 

16® —O10 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

16® —aio 

Est. volume: 30X35 . 

Open Int. 136200 


Stock Indexes 


High 


FTSE 108 (LIFFE) 
Index point 


Lew Close ctiaaea 


<23 peri 

Sep 32658 32148 32218 — <28 

Dec 327*5 32348 32352 — 428 

Mar N.T. N.T. 325BL0 — 412 

Est. volume: 1*637. Often Int.: 6X50* 
CAC.4Q (MATIF) _ 

FF2M per Index petal 

SCp 207X00 2CM0® 2MI80 -3880 

Od 208*00 2055.00 205)80 ■ 36.09 

Nov NT. N.T. N.T. UnctL 

Dec XI 11480 206980 2071.00 -3AM 

Mar N.T. N.T. 210080 -38® 

Jim N.T. N.T. N.T. unen. 

Est. vafu me: 22401. Open inf.: SMI IX 


Sources: Motif. Associated Press, 


London Inn Financial Futures ExcftonM. 
Uiti Petroleum 


t Exchange. 


Dividends 

Caanaay 

Per 

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Roc 

IRREGULAR 



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0130 84 85 85 


U.S. /AT THE CLOSE 


TWA Reaches Accord With Pilots ’ 


ST. LOUIS, Missouri (Bloomberg) — Trans World Airlines 
Inc. and its pilots union said Thursday they had reached -a 
tentative agreement that provides from $30 million to S35 millicfci 
in annual cost savings through modified work rules and enhanced 
“participative management." > 

The new agreement, which covers TWA’s 2,700 pilots, is subject 
to a ratification vote. The. accord was reached after 25 days of 
negotiations. . __ . ■ 

Talks with the flight attendants’ union continued. TWA s 
machinists approved work-rule changes Wednesday expected to 
result in savings of $80 million to $85 million on an annual basis.' 

AST Stock Drops on Profit Warning 

IRVINE, California (Bloomberg) — AST Research Inc. shares 
fell sharply Thursday after the personal computer maker stud it 
expected to post “disappointing” first-quarter results because of 
product delays and lower computer prices. 

AST, one of the top 10 makers of personal computers world-* 
wide, said a shortage of components, and delivery problems had 
contributed to the company’s financial problems. The news was 
released after the stock market closed Wednesday. Shares of AST) 
fell $4,938, or 27 percent to $13,063 on Thursday. - ; 

AST's rivals Compaq Computer Corp., Digital Equipment 
Carp, and International Business Machines Corp. recently have 
cut prices on their personal computers. 





* i «+* 


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, *■<* * 


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Sterling Slashes Knowledge Ware Bid’ 


ATLANTA (Bloomberg) — Sterling Software Inc. cm the pri<^ 
it will pay for Knowledge W are Inc. by more than 50 percent after 
the computer software company posted large losses. Sterling said! 
Thursday. 

Dallas-based Sterling agreed to pay about $7.85 per share iue 
stock for KnowledgeWare on Aug. 1. The company said if 
reduced its stock-swap offer to about $4.88 a share because of 
Know] edgeW are’s finances. 

KnowledgeWare said Thursday it posted a fourth-quarter loss* 
of $15.4 million partly because it took a charge to cut jobs by 25) 
percent. 


-i **1 




Bradb to Buy Brock in Sweets Deal 


CHATTANOOGA, Tennessee (Combined Dispatches) — 
Brock Candy Co. said Thursday it agreed to be bought by a rival) 
but sunilaity named candy maker, EJ. Brach Corp., for $L40! 
million, or $20 a share. 


Both companies are family controlled, but Brach is not publicly) 

& Brock) 


traded. The combined company will be called Brach 
Confections Inc. 

One of the better-known Brock family members is Bill Brock,) 
die forma: labor secretary and UJS. senator from Tennessee who 1 
is currently running for a Senate seat representing in Maryland.) 
Brock Candy's stock jumped $6,563, to $19375 on Thursday,* 
following a gain of $4.00 on Monday, when the takeover talks) 
were announced. (AP, Bloomberg)'. 


Colgate Expected to Trim 3,000 Jobs 


Tiny Rowland Keeps His Job at Lonrho 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Dupmdta 

LONDON — Lonrho PLC said Thursday 
that Roland “Tiny" Rowland would remain 
joint chief executive of the London-based con- 
glomerate, refuting speculation that the board 
would oust the 76-year-old executive who has 
spent 33 years at the conglomerate’s helm. 

“As far as speculation in the press regard- 
ing Mr. Rowland's role in the company is 
concerned, the board confirmed this was to- 
tally unfounded and that it remains un- 
changed," Lonrho said. 


In January, a boardroom struggle at 
Lonrho shifted control of the company to the 
German property developer Dieter Bock and 
away from Mr. Rowland. 

Mr. Rowland, whose nickname is derived 
from his large size; continued to serve as joint 
chairman. There had been speculation recent- 
ly that Mr. Rowland would be forced out 
because of disclosures that he costs the com- 
pany more than £53 million ($8 million dol- 
lars) a year in salary and expenses. 

(AFP. Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Japan Pimiahes Drug Finn 

Compiled br Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japanese health 
authorities on Thursday ordered 
a drug company to stop produc- 
tion for more than three months 
as punishment for withholding 
information about an anti-can- 
cer drug blamed for 15 deaths. 
The penalty against Nippon 
i Ltd. of C 


NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Colgate-Palmolive Co„ which- 
has undergone three restructurings in the past 10 years, is about to ) 
embark on another one, a source said Thursday. I 

Details are still being ironed out, but the company has decided ) 
on a revamping that wfll cost at least $100 million and eliminate! 
up to 3,000 jobs, or 11 percent of its work force, a management > 
consultant familiar with the situation said. Another 3,000 jobs win ‘ 
probably be relocated, the consultant said. 

“This should be a good, proactive event," said Walter Beach, an' 
analyst at Widmann, Siff & Co. “When you have a company thfrt 
has strong solid growth potential it makes a lot of sense to realigqu 
your operations every once in a while.” Colgate refused to comment; 



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For the Record 


-A ■ 
. * 1 * 


Shoji Ltd. of Osaka was the most 
severe ever by the Health and 
Welfare Ministry. The compa- 
ny's one plant in western Japan 
will be forced to shut from Sept. 
5 to Dec. 18. (AP, Reuters ) 


Lord Day & Lord, Barrett Smith, a New York law firm, said its! 
partners approved a plan that would dissolve the firm Sept. 30' 
After Sept. 30, the film's practice groups are expected to join other 
firms. (Bloomberg). 

KeyCorp said it had agreed to acquire Omnibancorp, a Denver, 
Colorado, company, for $132 million in stock. Omiubancorp, a- 
privatety held bank, has $500 million in assets and 18 offices in thi" 
Denver area. (APt 

General Re Corp. and Colonia Konzern AG Group said they) 
would form a joint venture that would provide reinsurance covef-- 
age in Europe. (Knight-Ridder 'y 


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8220 0250 
23M 


1*375 14400 
16875 16025 
10500 10500 
10600 10*50 
25250 25425 
2100 36*0 
7010 6960 


Frankfurt 

7 S 8 


176 

343 

74*5 3480 
*73*77 JO 

M < «S 


339331X0 

377X0 380 


AtG 

A Marti SEL 
Allianz Hold 
Altana 
AskO 
BASF 

Hyir 

Bov. Hvaobow 
Boy Verainst* 

BBC 

BHF Dank 

BMW 

Coromerjbant' 

Conllncntol 

Daimler Benz 

D*5S?Swznli KTM ™ 

DrSawr Bonn 407 ^? 4 ' w 
F*wmueftjie ^ 

F KrvPP HoeiCh 22*229 n 
Ha r aenor 
H*nfc*i 
HKMMI 
MoechtJ 
Houmann 
Horten 
IWKA . 

Kail Salz 

KarMadt 

KauiMt 

KHD 


422 m 
5“ IK 

748 748 
396 401 
8at82*M 
330 335 

250 252 
84183750 

509514JO 
256 AO 


34* 343 

43*50 103 

1002 1000 
342 JO 367 JO 
910 927 
21521XM 
39150 3*9 

1W150J0 
*29 <28 

533 537 

Kloeehnerwwnie in 
Unde 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Moflnamaai 

Mumn Rucck 
P wacn* 

Prevnaao 
PWA 
RIME 


*3* 943 
21470 711 
437 441 

43*43920 
205 211 
28*5 90S 
603 650 

<80487 JO 

^»2S9J« 

47150 475 


CiQM Prw. 



Helsinki 


Aitwr-YMvma 

Enso-Gutzalt 

Huhtomakl 

KJOP. 

xymmene 
Moira 
Nokia 
Pah tola 

Rbpow 

Stockmann 


114 111 


*8J0 4* jo 


155 ... 

9.90 I0l6Q 
139 140 

145 1*7 

551 S55 
60 69 

106 m 

232 245 




Hong Kong 

Bk East Alla 3X10 31.70 
Camay Pacific 1X85 u 
CMuno Kono J9.A) 39.10 
China Dot)! Pw 4030 39.90 
Dairy Farm IntM 11J0 11 JO 
Nona Luna Dav mjm u.as 
Ham Seng Bank 5*25 ssjg 
Hwrweraon Land 4430 <4.90 
HK Air Ena. 35JK) 3670 
HK Chino Gai 14A5 I4A5 
MK Electric 3*B0 27J5 
hk Lana 21 30.<j 

HK Really Trust 21J0 21 ja 
hsbc Haiamea *ojs *i 
HKSnonaHth 1130 1X05 
HK Tewconun 1*70 17 

HKFwry 14J0 14.10 

Hutcn yvnomooa m.« 3ajo 
h nan Dev 2 Z50 zuo 
Jardlne Math. 71.75 7175 
JortOrw: sir Hid 3X30 32 

Kowloon Motor I5J5 15.40 
Mandarin orient iojs 10.75 
Miramar Hofei 21.40 21.40 
New World Dev 2*80 2*95 


SHK Prom 
Stclin 
Swir« Poe a 


5675 57 

X2Z U4 
6X25 65 


TalCheunoPm IL05 ll.io 


tve 

wnort Heta 
Wing On Ca Inti 
Wlrnor ind. 


4.15 4,15 
33 3X20 
11.70 11J0 
11-85 U.95 


jjMjjgMjWteitltUl 


Johannesburg 

28.15 29 

122 121 
259 

32 32 


AECI 
Alledi 
Anglo Amer 
Bor tawi 
Btyvoor 
Bui tell 
MBwn 
Drtefomein 
Gencor 
GF5A 
Harmony 
HtatnnHa Steel 
Kloot 

Nadbonk Grp 


1075 IQ.75 


Ru»ta1 
SA Brnn 
stHeteno 
Sasai 

western Deep 


4*50 

10X3010X10 

67 4/JO 
1X75 1X50 
12*12930 
Vt X 
32J0 32 

& ms 

34 35 

5X75 53 

.118 IIS 
■6JD B6J0 
4 7 JO 46 

32.K 3275 
203 199 




London 


amxv Nan 
Allied Lyons 


Arlowipgina 

Group 


ArovJI ( 

Aj» Brlf FooOl 


BA*. 


*14 

*16 

274 

Z9D 

139 

*07 

*98 


Bank Scotland Z09 


Bvckdyi 
Bau 
BAT 
BET 

Bill* Circle 
BOCGreaa 
Beat* 

Bofcvortr 

BP 

Brtt Airways 
BrltGoa 
B/ll steel 
Brtt Teleconi 
BTR 

Cow* Wire 
Cadbury SOI 
Cdrodon 
Coots V Ire I la 
Comm union 
CourteiuM* 
ECC Grwm 
EniernrtseOll 

Earafwmet 

Fisons 

Forte 


STB 

5J7 


1.14 

x» 

7A0 

*67 


4JJ4 

*25 

278 

534 

113 

83)3 

XU 

SJU 

*94 

443 

1.14 

121 

TAJ 

U7 


*11 

196 

1 J» 

188 

XM 

437 

*89 

106 

X29 

146 

571 

3J3 

339 

2.90 

130 

2J4 


4.16 

4.17 
X03 

133 

391 

US 

445 


XI* 

X36 

535 

573 

187 

XM 

237 

131 

2 J 8 



Close 


GEC 

103 


GenlAcc 

5J1 


Gtaito 

631 

6X5 

Grand Met 

4X4 

4.44 

GRE 

1.91 

1X3 



696 

GUS 


593 

Hanson 


E52 

Hlllsdawn 

1.79 

1X2 

HSBC HMaS 

7J4 

>66 

ICI 





4X6 

Kingfisher 


538 



1.4 V 

Land Sec 



Lnpartc 






Legal Gen Grp 







4X9 

433 

ME PC 

4-67 

4.71 

Nall Power 

5.13 

517 

Ndfwest 

4X9 

4.90 

Nttiwst wafer 


591 



658 

P&O 


El 

Pllklnatan 

1.97 

1.97 


539 

S.99 

Prudential 

331 

3X7 

Rank Ore 
Reckltt Cal 

4L20 

426 

62S 

633 

Red land 

S57 

56* 

Reed inti 

7.74 

7X7 


511 

512 

RMC Group 

9 M 

939 


1X9 

189 

Rattimn (unll) 

3X5 

191 

Royal Scot 

OO 

425 

RTZ 

8X8 

8® 

Salrtstxirv 

*J1 

*31 

Scot Newcos 

533 

sxs 


*39 

*35 

Sean 

1® 

1X1 

Severn Trent 

5J1 

593 

Shell 

7XS 

7J1 


57S 

580 

Smith Nephew 

I® 

157 

Smith*: line B 

4X3 

454 

Smlttl (WH) 

513 

514 

Sun Atltance 

541 

3X4 

Tote 8. Lvie 

07 

45C 


2J0 

251 

Thorn EMI 

10.21 

102! 

Tomkins 

zxa 

2X7 





11® 

1150 





2.05 

2J7 

War Loan 3V, 

vTJrj-l 

41.19 


Ki ri 


v*ttbr««J 

H Vi.1 

581 

WUUamsHdgs 

■ ri ■ 

353 

wills Corroon 

■ P-jI 

153 

P-T.30 kMtak j 2509® 



Madrid 


BBV 30X0 3075 

BCD Central Nbp. 2*05 2630 
Bunco Santdflder 5120 S31D 


Banes la 
CEPSA 
DrmadOJ 

Endesa 

Ercrns 

Iberd/Mo 


Mm 


1035 1040 
3240 3380 
2115 =205 
5*80 5850 
162 161 
874 860 

4140 4200 
3300 3350 
1795 1815 
index : 2MM7 


1X51 


Milan 


Alleanza 14270 16500 

ASlllalta 14330 14500 

AuHHtrade priv 1740 1755 
Bca AsHcotturo 2990 V» 
Bar Cummer lial 3685 37s® 
BCD Naz Lavoro 13150 13250 
BCG Pap Nooaro B8M 9000 
Banco dl Rama 1W2 1916 
Bco Ambmiano 4365 4340 
BCO NapaH rim 1376 137a 
Benetton 248CC 

Creailo Kaiione 2215 2250 
Enlchem Auo 3176 3000 
Ferfln 
FUJI SO0 
Finanz Aardod 
Finmeccanica 
Fondlartaspa 


1798 1800 
6505 *545 
NA. 8500 
1750 1740 
11400 11560 


Gentroll A»ic 41750 41750 


IF1L 
liatcemenll 
itauas 
Medooonca 
MantedtUMi 
Olivetti 

Plrctnspo 

RAS 

Ina scenic 


6090 6120 
12440 12300 
53)0 5340 
14290 1439D 
1410 1401 
2110 7130 

2570 2S95 

25200 25700 

9950 9775 


Son Paolo Torino 9575 ft*5 

51 P 4590 4620 

SME 3760 3780 

SfUO BPd 2IM 2195 

ShgndO 34000 37600 

5 let 5070 SOM 

Toro Aisle 29(00 290» 




Montreal 


AU»n Alumtmiffl 3SW 35W 
Bank Montreal I4V 25 ’m 
B etl Canada 47 vj 


Bombardier B 
Comb lor 
Dominion Tent A 
Donohue A 
FCAinri 
MacMillan Bl 
Natl Bk Canada 
Power Com 

Provtoo 

Tel 
A 
. B 
•lealobe 
Vtdeatron 


Close Prev. 
20W 20’s 
18’. 5 H-'s 
BU> 8H 
(4W M'i 




19*4 20 

94, 9*4 

^ fS 

191i 19H 
19*6 19--6 
19i6 NH 
IK, WW 
13« 14 

: 1939 JM 


Paris 


Accor 671 682 

Air Uculde 53? so 

Alcatel Aisttiam 580 59v 


2S6 262 

505 520 

12W 1300 
24230 2S0J0 
650 67* 

825 834 

2161 2176 

21*77720 

Jit 11630 
1482 1498 
316 317 
435 437 


Ana 

Bancalre (Clc: 
llf C P 

Bauvoucs 
Danone 
Carrefeur 
CX.F. 

Cenrs 
Cnargeurs 
Ctments Franc 
Chib Med __ ... 

Elf-Aaulfalne 41060 416 

Euro Disney 9^0 9J0 
pen. Eou* 

Havas 

tmotal __ 

Laiarae Caaaee *4X20 4*7 
Uararxf 6670 6730 

LvoiLEoux 538 552 

Oreol tL l 1208 1230 

LVAAH. . 8*7 691 

Matro-HacfKfto 114.10 utsa 
Mlctielln B 23X30 237 JO 
Moulinex 127 izuo 

Paribas 364JD370JC 

Pechinev Intt l*ijo 1*1.10 
Pernod-RIcard 329 33X50 
Feuonot 357 m 

Pinault Flint 951 950 

Raatotecmiaue j*o so 
137 JO 137 JO 


544 5*0 
462 *70 
58* 584 


Rh-Poulenc A 
Raff. Si. Louis 


Sanafi 
Saint Gobatn 
S.E.B. 

Ste Generate 
Suez 


1*05 1413 
957 959 
685 668 
567 558 
573 582 
27* 275 


Tbomsan-CSF 1J9J0 161.70 
Total 317 32X50 

15020 1S5 

Valeo 28830 296 

CAC 46 laden : 2034.91 
Prertaoi : 2069J0 


Sao Paulo 

Banco do Brastl 2430 »sn 

■Wnw 1178 1IA0 

IrodeSCO 8.70 R70 

ronma 27Z50 m. 

Comto 10*50 102 

Eletrobras 379 374 

Itaybanco 275 273 

Want 335 32X9 

Paranapanema 1SXQ txxn 

Pelrabras 168 157 

SouxaCna 
Txlrbrm 
Tehne 
Usiminas 
Vole RIoDace 
VariR 


4601 MUO 
52-30 SX30 
485449.99 
140 1-40 
U0 138 

. _ 727121 JO 

SSSSfSfc*" 


Singapore 

Asia Poe Brew 1*50 1*40 
Certbm 8J0 *2S 

City Develoemni 730 7 Jo 
Cycle * CcrrJoce 1X80 u« 
DBS 11 11 

DBS Land 434 456 

FE Lev mo s ton 675 *20 
Fraser 4 n«m itjo J7ja 
Gt EdStn Ufc 2736 2*80 
Hone Leona Fin 430 430 
mcncane sjo 580 

Jurona Shtarard 15 1*40 
Kay Hkm JComH 2 3 

K etwel . 1170 11.70 

Notseei 134 138 

NeotuneOrient 25* xjt 
OCBC foretan MJ0 1490 
OUeas Union Bk us 6AS 
O'HOs Union Enr 7.90 715 
Semoawano 1230 1210 
Simc Stnaa n ar e 1.08 14* 
51 no Aero sp ace 
Sing Airlines totn 
SlnoBusSvc 
StaoLand 
SingPeiim 
Sins Press lam 
SIiwSMpbUS 
Slno Te l eco mm 
Slralti Steam 
sfrmrs Troamo 
Ted Ler Bank 

UW industrial ._. 

UhttyseaBktom 1440 U90 
Utd 0*seas Land 2JI X2B 


248 246 
14 1*10 
940 940 
7.90 730 
X69 2 JF 
76 2640 
268 2.71 
150 348 


134 146 
4J4 432 
139 135 


8 S S5SJS ,ffl “ 


Close Prev. 


Stockholm 


AGA 
Asea A 
Astra A 
Allas Caaco 
Electrolux B 
Ericsson 
Esseite-A 
H an delsbOPhen 

Investor B 
Norsk Hydro 
Procardia AF 
SantvikB 
SCA-A 

S-E Bonk err 

Skondla F 
Skanska 
SKF 
SToro 

Trellebarg BF 
Volvo BF 




65 44 

584 596 
183 176 

91 93 

389 399 

418 416 

98 98 

93 93 

180 181 
25826130 
129 129 

123 123 

118 118 
45.10 45J0 
112 111 
155 153 
138 139 
434 *34 

103 100 

145 146 

198571 


Close Prev 
Tovota 2170 2160 

YamalcM Sec 856 861 
atxnOL 

rauel 225 520*43 
Previous : 29619 

RKSJSfW 4 * 


Toronto 


Sydney 


Amcor 
ANZ 
SHP 
Bora I 

Bausalnvfllo 
Coles Mver 
Comalca 
CRA 
CSR 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Field 
1C1 Australia 
AiaoeMan 
MIM 

Nat auh Bank 
News Corp 
Nine Network 
N Broken Hilt 
PacDuntas 

Pioneer Inn __ 

Nmndy Poseidon X27 234 
OCT Resources 157 157 
Santn 4JU *i?j 

TNT 161 165 

Western MM no 7A9 e.o* 
westpoc Banking 445 *45 
waadside *75 437 


948 937 
193 374 
3034 2050 
345 349 
1JB 138 
4.19 435 
530 530 
1934 197* 
*72 <72 
1.14 1,16 
146 148 
.11 1130 
7.95 1.93 
3 333 
1080 1X98 
MS 9.12 

440 *.70 

339 193 
447 435 
336 334 


:ni “ 


Tokyo 


AimJEiecfr 
Asatu a»emkol 
Asahi Glass 
gaik el Tokyo 

Bridgestone 

Canon 

CcnJo ... v 

Do) Nippon Print 1870 1900 
Ddlwe House 1520 ISO 
Dalwa Securities 15*0 1550 

Kilton* ™ “ 


461 462 

JSS 796 

1250 1250 
1550 1560 
1580 1600 
1740 1750 
12*0 1240 


Full Photo 


Fujitsu 

Itochl 


2250 2260 
22*0 2250 

1100 1090 
1000 992 

as» B5a 

1*70 1660 
5310 5300 
752 758 

1020 996 

2580 2600 
434 423 
1200 1190 
913 90S 

732 733 
7400 7430 


HI 

Hitachi Cable 

Honda 

ita Yak ado 
Janon AJriJnes 
Kallma 
Kansai Power 
Kamsakl Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec inds 1760 17*0 
:wks 1110 110a 

Bk 259D 2620 

Mi tsubishi Kasel 5*3 538 

MllSU bhhJ EMC 695 691 

Mitsubishi Hev 791 785 

Mitsubishi Corp 1770 1360 
Mitsui and Ca 861 863 

Mitsui Marine 795 aDO 
Mnsukoshi ioso ioso 
1560 1560 

— mo 1220 

WOK Insulators wro icso 
Nlkko Securities 1200 1190 
Nippon Kaoaku 1010 1000 
NtoBOn 011 745 750 

Niopon steel 3Si 375 
NtoDOn Yusen 662 *51 
Nissan 774 771 

Nomura Sec 2210 2710 
NTT 9209a 912<k) 

Olympus Optical 1150 list) 

Pioneer ““ 

Rian 

Sonro Elec 
Sharp 
SMmozu 
SWretsoOmn 
Sony 

Sum Homo Bk 
Sundtomo Chem 
Suml Marine ,,, 

SumltomoiHeiof 3*4 3*1 

Tobol Core 702 *90 

TakMa awn 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 

Tokyo Elec Pw „. w 

Toppoa prmttno 1480 1*90 
Torav ind. 7g 775 


2810 2730 
973 947 
,577 578 

1810 1830 

M” 738 
2070 2070 
6150 *110 
1*70 1990 
5S0 574 

954 941 


1360 1270 

4 9S ‘S 

590 see 
1250 1240 
3000 3010 


Toshiba 


759 


AWNbi Price 
Aonloo Eoaie 
AlrCanodo 
Alberta Enerov 
Amer Banick 
BCE 

Bk Nova Scalta 

BCGOS 

BC Telecomm 

Bromalea 

Brunswick 

CAE 

Camdev 

CISC 

Cdn Poctflc Ltd 
Canadian Tire A 
Cantor 
Cara 

CCLIndB 

Ckwolex 

Cam Into 

Conwest E»pl 
CSAMOtA 
Dofoica 
Dytes A 


ie * B M" A 


Eaulty 
FCA Inti 
Fad Ind A 


Fie Idler Qiail A 15°* 


19W l9Vs 
17VS I7H 
71k 7W 
20 W 20te 
31Vi 31*11 
47W 47^i 
26Vi 7Tb 
I4H 141k 
2SVS 2*9# 

4JB 414 
OTA ID’J 
TVs 71* 
5 5 

3T»* 33 

24 Vi 24V* 
iWk 119k 
20 20 ^ 
X85 3.95 
flVi 9’a 
*95 4.25 
23*k 23 

24M 2446 
1046 10 'A 
2Z46 225k 
j i?k 086 
1746 17*k 
X7B 033 
4 416 

*W 6V3 


19 


5*6 5Tk 
0J5 DL34 
5ta 544 
13H 13H 


FPI 
Gen Ira 
GuHCda Res 

Heeslntl .... .... 

Hernia GkJ Mines 1346 Wt 
Hoi I Inner 13*4 134, 

Her j wom 2046 20 

Hudson'S Bay Co 29V* 3716 
Imasco 39 39W 


Inco 

1 PL Energy 
Jannock 
Latest! (John) 

Lob taw Ccs 

Mackenzie 
MaonalnflA 
Matee Leaf Fds 
Maritime 
Mark Res 
Motion A 
Nemo Ind A 
Nuranda Inc 
Noranda Forest 
Nor cm Enerar 
Nthern Telecom 

Nova Cora 

Oshawo Group A 1946 19W 
Paaurtan A 4.10 *J» 
Placer Dome 
Pan Petroleum 
PWACorp 

— 

ItUlTQW 

Renotaonce Eny _ 
Rogers Comm B 224* 
Rothmans 
Royal Bank Cda 
Sceptre Res 
Scott's 


394k 3946 
2816 2846 
16W 16V6 
21 204k 
2146 2146 
846 848 

53% 54 

1216 IH6 
247k 2446 
9 9V6 

214* 214k 
435 435 
264k 2676 
12W 124k 
17V, I7V2 
<74k 4816 
13% 1316 


Scars Canada 

iSSl£T* A 

SHLSysternhse 
Soulham 
Soar Aercsooce 
Stolen Inc A 

Talisman Eny 
Tedt B 
Thomson Cora 
TorDom Bank 
Tamar B 
Transalla Cora 
TronsCdc Ptoe 
Triton Phil A 
Trlmoc 

Unicorn Enerov 


J&SSftSii. 


3146 31 

846 W 
0*1 0J8 

1746 1646 
SB 2746 
73 
77 77 

2846 284k 
IU 6 11 W 
84k 8W 
446* 4446 
7W 74* 
4346 4396 
1»6 1246 
74* 4% 
174k 174k 
1V« 114* 
SVr 8 Vi 

30V* 30 

2446 2346 
1716 16V6 
2046 2116 
MV* 2*V2 
1446 1446 
1SU UMr 
4 AOS 
1596 1596 
IAS MO 


Zurich 


25* 254 


Atfla uni B _ 

Ahraujsse B_new_ .685 ^6 


BBC Brwn Bov B 1206 


CRM Getfly B 
CS HohHnosB 
Elek trows 

Fischer B 
intenBs c ountB 
JetmoH B 

)g£2&\ 

Nestle R 

OerntBuehrleft 

ParaesaHHB 

RocneHda PC 

Sotra RepuWle 
Sondaza 
WrtnflerB 
Sutler PC 
Survolltaice B 
Swiss Bnk corps 

arr H 

0 BSB 

Wimedhur B 
Zurich AssB 




U.S. FUTURES 


Via Auodcted ft*» 


Sepc\ 


Season Seawn 
H«h Low 


Own Hum low Oom Cna QpJnt 


Grains 


149’, 


3X6 -0JHV, 

7.716 

1 mv- 


3XOH, >601 W 48305 

190»', 

IBS 

187’rt >0JM'4 15X19 

1B7 

3X7 

Jxu ►OJDV, 

1-564 

157’.', 

153 

is**! -amv, 

2*2 

INI 

160 

160 ><UO 




168 • 0.034 

X 


WHEAT (CBOT) MMnimnmwn-aMinrwiw 

36*’* 3JH 5«j9J 143" 

179+. 109 C«9* 160 

337V, 377 Mar 95 187 

ITB’t 1I6VJMOV95 377 
3J5’/* 111 JU95 154 

3L57 157 Sep 95 1*0 1M 

l**Vi 155 Dec 95 

Ed. sow na. w«rj. saws 1 Mil 
Wed's ooen l« 70*97 o« *7 

WHEAT dCBOT) MOOBun+nmim- MiWtMr tfcimol 

179 107 '•i fee 94 173 *.j X7S’'« 169V, 1749: * DM 2.151 

184’'i 3 l2’.-,Dee94 X82 336’u 179’/, 3.8*_ -0.01 'A 23.740 

337 
XM 
1J5 
151 
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125 Mar 95 3J4V- 1B94V 123Vi 187 1 /* *917 

121 ”i May 95 378 1B3 177 179’-, *(L03''* 735 

1V*ViJuI9S 153 15BV, 153 337 *0.07',, 967 

129 pp9S 338 139 156 3J9 -0.07VV 

1W6Doc9S 167 


Ed. sorts NA. w*Ti. tales 1X95 2 
wttfs o oen Int 38.007 an 118 
CORN (CBOT) 5 0OPbu wwifcllh — si wmiw 


X97'.« 

2.77 

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114 feo 94 232 737 119*6 X2I*'< *031 11609 

117 Dec 94 123 123 l » X50Vi X23’6 >000*6 IM.942 

736 Mar 95 732*1 X33 X30’ . 7J7’'> >H.Q0'<t 7X695 

X37’6Mav95 XJ8 l i 239',. X37 


235 1 , 7J6'6JUI9S X42M 1*3 V, X4I 
*- Sep 95 246. 


2.704, 

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739 <0.004. n.657 

X*3"* -ILOOVi H A** 
747 *001’*. 944 

L*»i„ .(LQav, 1642 
7J0 fcXOON 19 


239 Sep 95 2 46 1*7 145 

X35V,D«C95 7M“2 X49*. X« 

237 JU96 2J9 230 U9 

E5I. VSe4 NLA. Wed-S-SOrtS 75322 
Wed s ooen int 701.103 rtf 91 

SOYBEANS (CBOT) MOOwmHniuro- ifcwnoef MW ^ 

MB'4 5409,5*094 18016 537V, 5JB 580’S -030'u 6.568 

531 Nov 94 17* 53<fti 570' . 57* * DAD'S 77307 

SJO Jan 95 587 587% 57B'6 582 1*87H 

549 Mer»S 591 591 587 591 — a00’4 6.115 

S3 SYi May 95 5.9sh 597’6 593V, 596' , -O-Ol *JH» 

736W 53BV,Ju(95 6.07 632 , 'i 598V, 68l>*-OM4* 7474 

608 579 Aug 95 683 599 682 -081 211 

— ... — 699 tm -ailOVj 37 

60s 607b 60S -081 3JI3 

620 *08* 


7STS 

784 

785 

MUVt 


486 

6JQV, 


577 fen«5 682 
578ViNov95 60S 
Jul96 

Est. sorts NA wwrv sorts 74859 
wed's ooen Ml 119398 up 370 
SOYBEAN MEAT (CBOT) 10G ian>- egHan Mr Mr 


1 71160 Sep 94 17X40 17X50 17X30 17X20 11397 

16920 Dd 9* 17180 17190 171.00 17130 -020 1X1 67 

16920 Dec 94 17X50 17X70 [7180 17X40 -020 36337 

171008*191 17170 173.ro 17X00 17XJ0 —0.40 4853 

ITlMMarH 17620 176*0 1 7SSJ I7S BO -M 7^67 

17* 00 May 95 17730 177 JO 17690 1T720 -0 4) 4323 

175308895 179 JO 179 JO 17980 179.20 —0*0 2. MV 

17630 AUO 95 IflOJO 18030 17980 17980 -100 189 

174 JO Soft 95 17980 17980 17980 17980 —180 3H 

EsI. safes HA, Wed’s, sates 11,790 
wed's open m B32W uo 213 


21080 

20730 

20980 

20730 

20730 

20700 

20600 

18230 

1B2.70 


SOYBEAN (HL (CBOT) 4C DOOrts-MloniBW IMM^ 

30 34 2X40 Sen 94 24.98 2133 24.97 2131 *033 10353 


2934 

2887 

2HJ5 


2X1000 94 7*95 7518 2484 251S -022 16432 

2X00 Dor W 74 70 »H 


2*85 

7785 

*730 

2675 


SUJ 2690 -awatwi 

2X65 Jan 95 2465 2488 7655 2481 >614 52 SI 

2X72MOT95 24JB 2*75 24*5 2467 *089 68W 

2X93 Mav 95 2445 2456 243S 2438 - 0.13 4021 

2JOOJUI95 24J5 2448 7425 VM *0.13 X200 

2X95 Aug 95 2430 2435 24 JO 243S " “ 

219SSeo« 2415 2430 24.15 2420 

Esi. sates NA wed's, srtes 15321 
Wed’S open kit B2324 UP 864 


1.12 

* 0.10 


Livestock 


CATTLE (OMERJ *u00fe>-arHfcvifc 
7410 6570 Od 94 7085 7210 7082 7IA7 

7430 67.70 Dec 94 69.15 69.97 69 07 tAI3 

6780 Fee 95 6785 6640 6785 SMI 

6940 Apr 95 4987 7030 4980 7030 

6680 Jim H 67.02 67 JO 6697 6737 

6645 AufttS 6480 47.17 4435 6697 

67 JO Ocr 95 6735 6»J5 4735 6735 

Est sorts 13873 WWTS, sorts HUB* 
WWSeWflW 75JB5 UP 9*7 
FEEDCDI CATTLE (CMER) BMIa-cMii 
14 7487 " 


7435 

7510 

HJO 

68.10 

47*0 


>082 36839 

♦ 0J5 17841 

♦ BJ5 11809 
♦0J3 7.791 
>117 1888 

♦ 0.13 835 

-0.15 2 


7SJS 
1135 
8880 
80 95 
8035 
7690 
7630 
73.05 


74305eo94 


7100 A« 95 


WBtfs oner irt 8,778 oil 70 


*9X5 

SOJO 

5080 

«J 0 

47J0 

45.06 

*4Ji 

4030 

4X75 


4L70Au?9* 


4080 Dec 95 


6005 
6030 
61.15 

5400 <I«Ju)9S 
4400 *285 Aua? 

Est. sms 1893 wnrs. sorts 3,3a 
Wad'SePBlM 7.988 UP 249 


7580 

74X0 

75J5 

<0X8 

2519 

7180 

7460 

7132 

+ 05! 

1185 

7695 

7585 

7672 

+OB3 

2JU 



76JS 



74X0 

74X0 

7*-50 


20* 

7430 

7390 

7190 


233 


7330 






7100 


3 

1352 





M liter o. 





38AS 

38J0 

38X0 

+031 11,901 

39.B 

J9J2 

19X2 

-037 

9.730 

J’»5 

3950 

39 90 

+0J1 

1001 

39 JO 

38.95 

39.10 

♦MS 

1X87 

4640 

4605 

4430 

+ 0LD5 

584 

4435 

44.15 

4430 

♦MO 

149 



43.17 

*.n/n 


40.10 

4005 

40X7 

♦ao7 

35 



4035 

-Q2S 

I 

6771 





BO fcv- (am tv* B. 



43X3 

42X0 

4332 

•430 

7391 

4U7 

BUS 

*0.17 

<037 

4SU 

4600 

4115 

*a.w 

>OJO 

ft 

44X0 

*436 

44X0 


13B 



4190 


31 


Food 


24421 
744 DO 
74440 
24X80 


CDPFEEC (NOE) VlHIlA-a+nrb 
77480 6UQ58P94 20600 20600 20435 

77.10 Dos 94 W».» 71*75 309M 
76*0 MOT 95 214 JO 217J0 7U35 
8X5Q Mar 95 71 530 21150 21430 
*I.BBOR«S 
EB. sorts 5853 wed's, sales BAU 
WarsepenM' 34307 up 209 
SUGAR -WORLD 11 (NCSE) iri4»p(n.-cnm 
1X40 4390994 1X06 1211 1X03 

9.T7lWnr9J 12.14 IXIR 
10J7MOV95 I7JP 1X10 
IQJ7 Jul95 11.98 I3JU 
10JJOO95 1181 U87 

ia«Mar'>8 11 JO II JO 
ll.HMsvM 


20735 

21100 

715.10 

21450 

719.® 


>130 365 

►610 3X794 
-I JO 6566 
-640 X984 
>280 3D 


1734 

12.16 

1707 

11.91 

1180 

1)86 


1289 

IMS. 

11.97 

1181 

IIJO 


Per IB. 
IXQS 
1X10 
1286 
11.97 
1182 
lija 
1134 


—089 52896 
—600 63807 
-089 10342 
—610 4*39 
—a 10 1850 
-610 4W 
—610 5 


Season Season 

rtBfi low 


Open HW Law dose On QoJnt 


1138 11.78 Jul 96 

Esi. sorts 7816 wed's, sales 17,954 
Wed's open Ml 32838 UP 0*6 


COCOA 

(NCSE) HrattVs-tisv 




211 






1325 


1580 

1041 Dec 94 

IJSS 

1J77 

IJSS 

1372 

* 15 41,985 

1405 

1077 Mar 95 

1398 

1*17 

1396 

1415 

• 15 




IAJ0 

7X45 

1430 

IXM 

>15 

JAM 

1*00 

1225 Jul 95 




14*2 

>15 

1478 






14B2 

>15 

1X0S 

1633 





1505 

■ 15 

4X88 






1529 

+ 15 

XtWl 

16*7 

1225 May 96 




1550 




Ed. sates 2,9S0 wed's, wies 7805 
Wed’s open int 7080* oft s* 

ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) u.mn-amw 
13430 8685 Sep 94 91 JO 9110 «1J0 

J9.I0NOV94 KM *6)3 95.60 

9380Jrtl95 9930 9985 99J0 

96J1 Mar 95 10X60 10100 10X60 
9780 May 95 11WM 1D600 106.00 
!0M0Jut95 10650 108J0 10650 
111 JO Nov 95 11X50 11X30 11150 
Jon 96 

11180 Sea 96 111.75 I11JS 111.75 
Est. sales NA Wed's, saws 53® 
wed's wen M 


13480 

13280 

17425 

11475 

11980 

11160 


11X30 


*. 

9130 

93J5 

9930 

ieioo 

10595 

106® 

11X95 

11X95 

■1180 


—625 IASI 
6754 
>605 4722 
>0X5 2303 


Metals 


Hi GRADE COPPER (NCMX) OMBt-crtiMB 


11690 

74.70 Sen 94 

11645 

117X0 

115X5 

11685 

-0X5 

7,944 



11650 

11615 

114.10 

11620 

-IJ5 31X90 



11440 

11610 

11630 

H3X0 

—1® 

421 

111® 

73J»Feb9S 

113X0 

114.10 

113X0 

■ 13X0 

—1® 

272 




116*0 


U2X0 






112® 



1X78 



111® 

111X0 

111® 


—1® 

9J4 



naxo 

110X0 

110X0 

W® 

—1.90 

*9* 



11675 

116X0 

1T4J0 

1 14X0 

—1X5 

1X4* 

115-50 

77X5 Nov «S 




11650 

-1X5 

III/ 

11675 

88X0 Dec VS 

111X0 

111-00 

110 JO 

108® 

—2.15 

824 









W600 

62X0 Mar 96 




107® 

—2X5 

134 



H190 



712.15 




May 91 




107® 

—2® 


107® 

10630 Jun 96 

104.10 

10610 

10610 

111X5 

—1X5 

113 


Jul 96 




10660 




Augw 




109X5 




Est. sorts 158® Wed’s, sorts 15347 
Wed’s open M 49J71 up 1771 
SILVER (NCMX) U»mvoi.cen4,Dcr»pya4 
6158 - 


5178 


5978 

5648 

6040 

606J 

6100 

958 

6788 

61X0 

6160 

5B7.0 


49U5ep94 

541X 

5460 

54QX 

GK 

— IS 

3X81 





— 1 J 


NOV 9* 




547X 

—IX 





S47X 



All .0 Jot 95 

551.0 

551.0 

551 X 

S57X 

-IX 

56 

41* 5 MOT 95 

557 J) 

589.0 

1560 

557 J 

—1.7 

8X8/ 

JiaOMovK J KM 

5565 

500 

543X 

—IX 

3,977 

420XJUI95 

549X 

SX3 

549.0 

569X 

—1.7 

3X67 









583.0 

SBSO 

5S2X 


— ix 









554XMar96 





-1J 


S87XMOV96 




601J 

—IX 



Est. safes 138® Wars, sales 2878 
Wed's ooen int 1 108*4 oH 1123 
PLATINUM (NMER) U l^y oz. - «Bn ear n, m. 
mJX 406® Set) 9* *15® 

43540 368® Oct 94 414® 41630 *M® 41640 

*3530 374® J(Pi95 *17.00 420® 4IT® 419® 

439® 396® Apr 95 4 77 .® 423® *72® *23X0 

427 JO 419J0JUI95 427® 

431 SO 42X00 Od 95 42970 

Est. sales NA wed's, sorts 2887 
wed’s open Int 25391 up 60i 

GOLD CNCMX) Iflfcera-inHnwfcnm 
389® 377®Se«94 38+90 

' J**®CWP4 X?A0 38UM 387® 388® 

Nov»4 39® 

3*3 W Dec 94 39DJS0 391® 389® 391® 
363-50 R* 95 393® 394J0 393® 394® 
36650 Aorf5 397® 397® 397® 397® 
361® Jun 95 401.10 

3®® Aug 93 40660 

an® aa 95 «lm 

*00® Dec *5 41X10 

4IX50FeD«6 41590 

*1630 Apr 96 419® 

413® Jun 96 *33® 

Esi srtes 228® Wed'S sorts 30.430 
Wed’s Open Wit 1S68S3 OH 191 


* 1 ® 

>1.10 16024 
H® 587* 
+1® 1.931 
♦ 1 ® 

* 1 ® 


417.00 


436® 

*11® 

417® 

42650 

412® 

413® 

*29® 

424® 

*30® 

430® 


*0® 013 

*0® 9.167 
* 0 ® 

>0® 09331 
♦a® 1X310 
+0J8 

*0® 16117 
*€L50 5.268 
* 8 ® 

♦o® 

>asj 

• 8 ® 

* 0 ® 


Fmandai 


US T. BILLS (CMER) 11 muavenrtlDPDei 

9662 Sep 9* 95® 95® 95® 9SJ7 


94® 

9656 


9684 

8653 


9686 

9656 

9627 


1X555 

-0® 10816 
>0® 3J90 
*087 55 


96® 

9610 9625 Dec 94 9685 

95® 9196 Mar 95 9656 

9434 94.16 Jun 95 

Est. sorts X974 WBCfSIrteS 1377 
Wed's open Wit 26316 rtl 500 
5 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) staUOOerw-DK&UnaaMnpcl 

110- 195102-12 Scp9» 104-34 104-255 1 04-305 104-25- OU 103313 

104- 1B 101-24 0«9J 103-31 103-315103-265 103-31** 01 6X373 

103-75 107-70 Mar 751 CD-00 103-09 10-07 1049— 01 

Ed. tarts NA Wed's, tarts 51J71 
wed's ooen int 166JBS an S» 

10 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) sl«0JM6Brln-eis6BnheriDDi>cl 
115-01 101-10 Sep 94 10647 105-00 104-31 10548 136895 

114-31 1 OB-75 Dec M 104-06 104-07 103-29 104-06 - 01 I19J16 

111- 07 10X05 Mar9S 103-09 — 01 

105- 22 9M0 Jun 95 107-15— 01 

191-00 100-17 Sep *5 101-®— 01 

Est. sites NA wed's salts 116833 
Wed’s open Wit 757 Jfl tm mi 


1.247 

3 


US TFEASURY BONDS (CBOT) aoo-tUXLODOK«*.nn«ty loosen 
HI 103-74 103.10 183-19 — 04 192866 


110-26 70-12 Sep 94 103-71 . 

I J 8-06 91-19 Dec 94 107-38 707-29 U7-15 107-2S— 04 21X47? 

116- 20 98-70 Mtr 95107-03 102-05 101-24 103-03— 03 

115-19 90-13 Jun 95 101-08 W1-13 101-03 101*13— KJ 

117- 10 97.® Sep 95 100-18 100-24 100-18 W0-24— 03 

113-14 97-14 Dec 95 99-31 100-05 99-31 100-05— 01 


99-® — 03 
9M5- a 


7,210 

513 

248 

1 J 6 

42 

24 


114-06 90-71 Mar 96 
100-20 96-1} Jun 96 
Est sorts na wed's, sates 377846 
Wed's ooen int 446J11 up 4101 

MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBOT) HDDS* 

95-17 84-72 S*PM»-t4 J1-J9 91-11 

91-17 87-21 D*c9490-I4 90-17 90-05 90-12 — Q3 7955 


rt+imtsstlHiKl 
«-i7 > si ns* 


Ep.mms NA viMds-sarts (WOO 
Wed s open ml 21813 Otf 307 
eWpDOLLARS (CMER) tunumotioriweeT. 
95-570 0X360 Seo 94 «*WO 94.940 98.9*0 98.950 

*5 190 907 10 Dec M «*J1B 98JZ0 98X90 94J10 

*5-580 90X40 Mar 95 98840 98850 98101 94.040 

91L7IO Jull95 9X770 9X750 91710 93 740 

91JI0Sep95 9X4® 93J70 9J4® 9X4® 

97.mOK9$ 9X1® 9X1® ®l« 73170 


94730 

9*S» 

94-260 


3MJW9 

>10489448 

370,711 

*20254.53* 

>26209,576 

+30ISUBt 


Season Season 
Wi Loo 


Open Hrtti LOP dose On Oo tnt 




*2013X616 


0.7405 

0-7527 

07250 

0-7135 


—2 1811 
-2 389 

— 2 70 

-2 0 


98X70 907 50 Mar 94 91090 93.110 9X870 9X100 
9X130 9X420 Jun 96 9X940 9X980 91940 9X970 
EsL Sorts 213485 Wwfs. sorts 216806 
wed's open Wd 2J65.254 w> 2535 

BRITISH POUND (CMER! ,«r™+ 1 WVeouoMMlOO! 

1J764 144® Sep 91 1J356 1J496 1J344 1.5*48 *102 33807. 

IJTsO 1 4580 Dp; 94 1J340 1J400 1J320 1-5*26 +107 2J17 

1J770 146® Mgr 96 1-5420 IJOO IJflO 1-5397 *10* 197 

Est. sales 1*803 Wed's, sorts 4.9SS 
wed's anon M 34J21 up 709 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) |p*ra,-i MneaechWOni 
0X7® (L7MSCP94 07313 0X333 0X301 07312 -7 30851 

0X470 OJttHDneM 07300 07312 07289 07790 -5 *817 

anraoMcrW ojtto arm ojko ojtu - 

0699CJun95 07266 0X2® 07260 0X30 

06965 Sep 95 07225 0X225 07225 0723* 

0-70® Dec 95 0.72M 

Est- sorts *.9® wr i. soles 1X558 
Wecfscpeniiv *9454 up 5991 
GERMAN MARK (CMER] (MrmsrL- laMTMuelSI 
D6S9S 05400 Sop 9* 06120 04345 04317 043*6 

06606 05590 Dec 94 04325 0434a 06310 063*7 

06595 0.5930 Jun 95 04331 04365 04333 04364 

04450 053*7 Sgp 95 

04591 0®10Mor96 04322 04165 04322 04355 

EST. sorts 334*7 Wad-s-KteS 2X328 
Wed's 0P«1 W 11+799 ofl BO* 

JAPANESE YEN I CMER) I pbw>I w w«wi,WiiWQ1 
00104080008942SOP M 080999700100570808900-0100(5 >44 58®*, 

OOIO*9COJ»W25D«: 9* 0810040001 01 22081 00400.01 01 12 +46 ” 

0.01047nUKH77thln9S 0810247 +46 

081077Sj-D10KnSeo 95 0010335081034500103350810345 +46 81 

OD1056fi009600Mar 94 00101*010101 9000W1 *08101 84 +46 1,747 

Ed. sorts 16,151 Wed's, sales 1X739 ■ 

Wed's open int 71872 ett 718 , 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) sMrvanc- 1 nMeaurtIWaon _ 

OTB17 0 4600 5*p 9* 07508 0JS74 07505 O7S50 * 50 307® 

07B40 06885 Dec 9* 07540 IL7S67 07534 07571 +51 5J67 

0_7B80 07446 JM195 07618 +53 15 

O7B20 07*20 Mgr 96 07595 17605 07595 0759* +52 « 

Est. sites 11414 Wea's. sorts 11,644 
Wed'S Open Wit 4X342 Oil 588 


. • -» --_iv 


UYSE 

^aClaeht 


r ’. 


*27 96,999 
+2 14463 

:§ H 

*73 3 AM 


>r. 


■“7 


SB®*,* 


i 

r • 


n ! 




Industrials 


COTTON 2 (NCnq SUNbfc-iBAnili. 


70X5 

70X5 Sep 94 




0® 

♦ 0X9 



78® 

59.51 Od 9* 

69® 

0X5 

0® 

0X5 

+0X9 

4,143 


77X5 

59® Dec 94 

4650 

*8X0 

*8.07 

0X3 

*0417 28X07 


78.15 

62-50 Mar 95 

0X5 

7120 

69® 

70-05 

>0.15 

9X21 


7BJS 

6600 May 95 71® 

71.10 

70® 

71® 

♦ 0® 

4X87 


78X5 

69.30 JU 95 

71.90 

71 JO 

71® 

71X5 

+025 

3X81 


7670 

*6X000 95 

0® 

0® 

49X5 

0® 

— mu 

414 


72X0 

6625 Dec 95 

46BS 

*8X5 

68® 

*0X5 

—MO 

14*1 



Est. sorts NA wed's, sorts +121 
Wed's open w SUM alt 707 
HEATING OIL (NMER) *2800 art- cent) overt 


5740 

46900a 9* 

HAS 

5840 


0.10 

-0.U 

5840 

46® Nov 94 

50X5 

50.95 

49.95 

50.13 

+0® 

0® 

4680 DOC W 

51® 

51.95 

SL«5 

5120 

+021 







+U1 

58.75 

47.95 F«0 95 

53X5 

52X5 

52® 

52.10 

<0.1* 



S2® 






*105 Apr 95 

5T.10 

51.10 

51.10 

S0A5 

+U6 

5130 

47® May 95 5035 

50® 


*9X0 


5150 

46X9 Jun 95 


50® 



♦ Ml 

5630 

47X5 Jul 95 

50® 

50X0 

49J0 

0X5 

+0X1 

suo 

42X0 Aug 95 

5045 

5045 



-04N 


52® Oct 95 






5340 

5190 Nov 95 




5190 

♦ 0X1 







♦ 0X1 

58X0 

5040 Jon 96 





♦ am 

99 40 

59.30 Feb 96 




5*45 

>0X1 


Mar 96 

54X0 

5690 

5690 

53® 



V 7 


J. \ 


Esi Sites NA .Wad's, sorts 5X889 
wed's ope nlnt 
UGHT SWEET CRUDe (NMER) l«M-*a>n 


2073 

2049 

70® 

1945 

19® 

2066 

19® 

19® 

2030 

1987 

1*87 

18.12 

19.17 

1986 

7010 

21.15 

IOB4 

1080 

20 ® 

10 ® 


U450CIM 17® 1880 17X5 1747 
lASNbvM 17-70 17JB (74* 77® 


I7JU 1730 17® 17JA 
15.15 Jones 1770 17J9 17-53 17® 


15X9 Feb 95 17® 17X6 17® 17® 
1542 Mar 95 17X4 17^4 17® 17® 


liStjforW 1747 17® 17® 17® 

1549 May 95 17® 17J4 17.70 17® 


JKI'ifflff ,7M ,7J * ».« 1 7M 

1*85 JW +5 17.77 17® 17® 17X1 


14.14AOB95 


17® sw 95 1741 17® 1741 17X4 
]6®Oct95 T7 X9 17X7 17X7 17X0 


17.1SNOV 95 


17® 


lJ®Dec95 17® 17® 17® 17® 


17.05 Jan 96 

1849 Feb 96 17® 

I7.UMOT96 n.« 

1885 1KB UUU 1881' 

.. . 10X7 Sep 94 16.1* 

NA wad's, {tries 107.33a 
WKTtfipeneri 

IM®ADEDGAU)(JNR (NMER) 

5-1° OdM *9-50 49X5 4000 *8® 

«.75Nov?+ 49® *19.10 *8.10 «X3 

4035 50®Dec« 55.40 55 JO SA2S S*J* 

91® 505DAm9S 14.15 54® 505 5343 

SOU SI.I0Feb9S 54® 54® 54® 52® 

Jul 95 56® 56® SS® 500 

Efl.iorts NA wed's. sorts 79X29 
wed's ooen im 


Stock Indexes 


MPCDMP. INDEX (CMER) 

SS SJSSP’S 1 <74 - ,B 474AS 471® 473® 

497.10 429X0 Decs* *74X0 476® 474® 476X5 

25-18 1S^'U or ^ mjS0 enM 

487® 451® Jgn9S 412X5 

Efl-tarts NA Weds. sorts 74.991 
WacrswenlM 2*4,725 us ZH6 
WraECOMP.iNOEX (WVFE) 
w® 2n®5epf4 msa 241.15 259® 341® 

SIS *6135. 261. M 26115 

SfiBLtt 1 JWT 


Moody's 
Reuters 
□J. Futures 
Com. Rsuorai 


Commodity Indexes 

Chao 


U9M0 

154.98 

TOM 


r 





A * n 





IMTEKWAITONAt HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1994 


Elf Aquitaine Profit Falls 
But Beats Its Forecast 


. Compiled by Our Staff From Dispaeha 

PARIS — Elf Aquitaine said 
Thursday its first-half net profit 
fell 11 percent from a year earli- 
er, mainly because of weak oil 
prices, but the decline was 
smaller than the company itself 
predicted a little more than two 
months ago. 

.-The former state-owned oil 
company, in which a majority 
stake was sold to private inves- 
tors eariy this year, said it earned 
1.22 billion French francs ($225 
mSlioo) in the six months, com- 
pared with 137 billion francs a 
year earlier, as revenue improved 
to 105.48 billion francs from 
102.67 billion francs. 

But in late June, Elf said it 
expected a 20 percent drop in 
first-half net income. 

Elf’s chairman, Philippe 
Jaffrfc, refused to make any fore- 
casts about full-year results, cit- 
ing “the volatility of oil prices.*’ 

Elf, one of the world’s largest 
companies, said & turn- 
around in its chemical opera- 


UBS Chief Sees 
Good 1995 Net 

Bloomberg Business /'fern 

GENEVA — Robert 
Snider, Union Bank of Swit- 
zerland's chief executive, 
said Thursday that he ex- 
pected a “very good” perfor- 

■ mancc for the bank in 1995. 

Mr. Studer also said he 
expected income from trad- 

■ ing in the second half of 
1994 to be higher than in the 
first half, when UBS posted 
a 68 percent decline in that 
category, to 493 million 

1 Swiss francs ($371 million). 

“We have good reason to 
believe that trading income 
.will be better than in the 
first half,” Mr. Studer said. 


bans was not enough to offset 
poor trading conditions in the 
cal sector. 

Operating profit from its 
chemical businesses rose to 713 
million francs from 176 million 
francs because of cost-cutting 
and Europe’s economic recov- 
ery, Elf said. 

A spokesman said that a 
strengthening European econo- 
my had helped the chemical sec- 
tor, but he said conditions in the 
oil sector were “really bad” in 
the first half as 02 prices fell 13 
percent and the dollar declined. 

A fall in crude oil prices de- 
pressed Elfs refining margins 
to an average of $2.62 a barrel 
in the first half, compared with 
$286 a band a year eariier, 

The company also said it 
planned to mess ahead with its 
program of selling 5 billion 
francs of assets this year despite 
a delay caused by a slide in 
share prices. An official said Elf 
had sold 13 billion francs of 
assets so far this year. 


Bond Fall Hits Sandoz Profit 

Com/rikd by Our Staff From Dapacha 

BASEL — Sandoz AG said Thursday that losses on invest- 
ments limited a rise in first-half net profit to 2 percent, which was 
below analysts’ expectations and caused some to revise down their 
predictions for the drug company’s full-year performance. 

Sandoz earned a net 1.01 billion Swiss francs ($760 million) in 
the half, up from 998 million francs in the first six months of 1993. 
First-half sales rose to 822 billion francs from 8.03 trillion francs. 

The company posted a first-half loss of 90 million francs on its 
investments, compared with a profit of 79 million francs in the 
first half of 1993, because of a rise in long-term interest rates in 
major band markets. About 90 percent of Sandoz's investment 
porfolic is is fixed-income securities. On Wednesday, Sandoz's 
competitor Ciba-Geigy AG said its investment income fell to 82 
million francs in the first half from 90 million francs a year earlier. 

While Sandoz said it was “confident” its full-year net income 
would reach last year’s result of 1.71 billion francs, some analysts 
said they had expected stronger full-vear results before Thursday's 
disappointing results. “The outlook for the future is not as good as 
was previously assumed,’' said Birgit Kulhoff, who follows the 
company at Union Bank of Switzerland. i Bloomberg. AFX ) 


f Bloomberg, AFX) 


.Ladbroke Seeking Casinos 


Bloomberg Business News 

LONDON — Ladbroke 
Group PLC announced a drop 
in first-half profit Thursday and 
said it planned to return to the 
casino business, from which it 
was barred almost 15 years ago. 

. The company, which has hotel 
and retail interests in addition to 
the soccer pools and betting and 

S ing centers for which it is 
-known, said pretax profit 
fdQl to £573 million ($91 million) 
in the six months from £623 
million a year earlier. 

- Martin Ainscough of Nomu- 
ra Research Institute in London 
said the result was in line with 
expectations. 

Ladbroke also said it planned 


to buy three London casinos — 
Maxims, Chesters and the 
Golden Horseshoe — from 
TJH Group Ltd. for £50 mil- 
lion. To do so, it will have to 
persuade the Gaming Board to 
allow it to operate the casinos. 

Ladbroke dosed its last Brit- 
ish casino in 1980 after a court 
ruled that the company then 
was not a “fit-and-proper” casi- 
no operator. 

Peter George, chief executive 
officer, called the proposed casi- 
no purchases the first “signific- 
ant” step in Ladbroke’s strategy 
of “building a broadly based in- 
ternational business in regulated 
ga ini n g alongside Its existing 
betting interests.” 


Cellular Boosts 
Telefonica Net 

Bloomberg Business Sms 

MADRID — Telefonica 
de Espafia SA said Thurs- 
day its first-half net profit 
rose 5 percent from a year 

S as demand for tele- 
ne services grew 18 per- 
cent 

The company said a 69 
percent rise in cellular 
phone subscribers offset 
declines in data transmis- 
sion services. 

Profit totaled 5205 bil- 
lion pesetas (S3 96 million), 
up from 49.69 billion pese- 
tas last year. Sales rose 7 
percent, to 672215 billion 
pesetas. 


NYSE 

Thursday's Cl osin g 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Wane Associated Press 

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Page 13 


Operating profit, which ex- 
cludes financial and one-time 
items, feQ 12 percent, to 4.95 
billion francs from 5.61 billion 
francs. 

Mr. Jaffrfe said that Elfs in- 
debtedness, which had been 
soaring is recent years, was ex- 
pected to remain at 50 percent 
of equity in 1994, unchanged 
from last year. 

Its pharmaceuticals subsid- 
iary, Sanofi SA, said its net in- 
come in the first half edged up 
to 460 million francs from 456 
million francs a year earlier. 

Sanofi, which counts Yves 
Saint Laurmt, Van Geef & Ar- 
pds and Nina Ricci among its 
perfume brands, said sales im- 
proved to 123 billion francs 
from 10.6 billion francs. A com- 
pany executive said analysts’ 
forecasts of a full-year prom of 
130 bQHan to 135 billion francs, 
compared with 823 million 
francs last year, was achievable. 
(AP, Reuters, AFP, Bloomberg) 


Leaked Profits 
Stain Daimler’s 
Reputation 


Bloomberg Business News 

STUTTGART, Germany 
— Daimler-Benz AG offi- 
cials said Thursday they 
were “embarrassed” and 
“baffled” by the premature 
disclosure Wednesday of the 
company's half-year earn- 
ings — a move that gave 
some investors an inside 
track on significant gains in 
the company’s shares. 

The premature disclo- 
sures at Germany’s largest 
industrial enterprise, maker 
of Mercedes- Bern cars and 
trucks, highlight the difficul- 
ty German companies have 
in adapting to strict rules on 
information disclosure en- 
tailed by a new law banning 
inrider trading, which goes 
into effect Jan. 1. 

It is espedally embarrass- 
ing for Daimler, the only 
German company listed on 
the New York Stock Ex- 
change, because it has touted 
its ability to conform to strin- 
gent rules set by the Big 
Board and the U.S. Securities 
and Exchange Commission 
in financial reporting and in- 
formation dissemination. 

While one leak took place 
through faulty organization 
within Daimler-Benz group, 
the other may have emailed 
“criminal machinations,” 
said Ursula Mertrig-Stein, a 
spokeswoman for the Ger- 
man company. 

“We see it as a great an- 
noyance,” she said. “It’s 
made us angry because we 
tty to do everything with 
precision.” When asked 
about the premature disclo- 
sure of the figures at a press 
conference Wednesday, Ed- 
zard Reuter, chief executive. 


said, “We are trying to put 
an end to things like that, 
but apparently we are not 
able to stop them.” 

Two news agencies trans- 
mitted Daimler's half-year 
earnings 30 minutes before 
the release of the figures to 
other services. 

Daimler said it earned 369 
million Deutsche marks 
($233 mflion) in the first 
half, following a loss of 949 
million DM last year. 

The figures were higher 
than expected, and the reac- 
tion in the stock price was 
immediate. Wi thin minutes, 
Daimler shares jumped. 
Daimler closed higher 
Wednesday, at 83730 DM. 

The German stock ex- 
change, Deutsche Bfrrse AG, 
said it had no legal way to 
punish listed companies for 
allowing leaks in their infor- 
mation policy. 

■ Loss at Track Unit 

Mercedes-Benz AG said 
Thursday h expected its com- 
mercial- vehide division, the 
world's largest heavy- truck 
maker, to report a loss this 
year because of depressed 
markets but to return to prof- 
it in 1995. Reuters reprated 
from Hanover, Germany. 

Helmut Werner, the Mer- 
cedes management board 
chairman, said that commer- 
cial vehicle sales would rise 
around 7 percent to just un- 
der 28 billion DM this year. 

Mercedes does not pub- 
lish the results of its car or 
commercial vehicle divisions 
but indicates whether each is 
making money. 


Rolls-Royce 
Cost Cuts 
Aid Profit 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Rolls-Royce 
PLC said Thursday its first-half 
profit jumped 29 percent as the 
impact of restructuring offset a 
14 percent drop in sales. 

The British aircraft-engine 
maker earned £40 million ($61 
million) before taxes in the half, 
on revenue of £13 billion. 

Sir Ralph Robins, the chair- 
man of the company, said the 
profit increase showed restruc- 
turing paid off. The company 
cut 5,900 jobs over the year, 
taking the total staff to 43,000. 

He said ‘'extremely competi- 
tive conditions” seen by the 
company were not likely to ease 
before 1996. But he added, “We 
are in a good position to exploit 
the long-term growth potential 
of both aerospace and industrial 
power from an increasingly com- 
petitive cost base.” 

Although the results were 
within analysts* expectations, 
investors bid Rolls-Royce 
shares down to 179 pence from 
189 pence Wednesday. 

Aerospace engine sales for the 
half fell to £924 million from 
£1.08 billion a year ago, with 
industrial power sales slipping to 
£576 million from £674 milli on. 

Rolls-Royce ranks alongside 
General Electric Co. and Pratt & 
Whitney of the United States as 
one of the big three jet en gine 
makers. All have reported a de- 
pressed market as unprofitable 
airlines postpone aircraft orders. 

Also on Thursday, Vickers 
PLC which makes Rolls-Royce 
automobiles, said its first-half 
profit nearly doubled, to £15.9 
million, despite flat sales or 
£3293 milli on 

Vickers attributed the results 
to extensive restructuring the 
company started last year rather 
than market improvements. But 
it said the outlook was strong. 

Sales at the Rolls-Royce Mo- 
tor Cars Ltd. division were up 
26 percent 

(Bloomberg. AFP, Reuters) 


Frankfurt 

D/WT ^ . 


0,0 ■ Farfev 
FTSe ipQlratex; .' CAC 4 Q 






* a.-'. 





■ Btm&efr :fj' -StocklndW;' Af a 7,646.86' ,^0.05 - 

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• Zurich- - • r >.;83&44 y;^-asfr> 

Sources: Reuters, AFP imcmniooal Hexthl Triboac 


Very briefly; 

■ Olivetti SpA said first-half sales rose more than 7 percent and 
reaffirmed its forecast it would break even for the year; the 
company also said it did not plan a capital increase in the near 
future to fund its recently acquired cellular phone business. 

• Gamer & Jahr AG said pretax profit rose 20 percent, to 534 
million Deutsche marks ($845 million), in the year ended in June. 
The subsidiary of Bertelsmann AG said sales rose 2 percent, to 
3.85 billion DM, and. said it would invest 700 million DM to 
launch periodicals in the United States, France and Poland. 

• T&N PLC, a British maker of bearings and other industrial 
products, reported a 55 percent rise in first-half profit and said it 
was still in talks to acquire MeCaOgesdacfaaft AG's 47 percent 
stalre in Koflienscittwit AG. 


• Waterford Wedgwood PLC said its first-half pretax profit surged 
to 5.1 million Irish punts ($8 million) from 400,000 punts a year 
earlier. The maker of china, crystal and ceramics said sales rose 16 
percent, to 44.9 million punts. 

• Independent N ew sp ap ers PLC said its Irish-based newspaper, 
advertising and other media operations all contributed to a 35 
percent rise in operating profit and a 4 percent rise in pretax profit 

tor the first half. AFX, Reuters, Bloomberg 


DEFENSE: Lockheed Martin Puts Europe on Alert 


CGM: Contrary to Popular Belief... 


Continued from Page 11 

try, Germany has been pressing 
for the creation of so-called 
Eurofirms in the defense sector, 
jointly owned by several coun- 
tries but run by an independent 
management team. This form 
of cooperation has worked for 
Eurocopter Holding SA, a 
French-German joint venture, 
and for the Airbus Industrie, 
the plane consortium, but often 
runs up against European com- 
panies’ insistance on absolute 
parity in any venture, largely 
out of national pride. 

Conspicuous exceptions in- 
clude Lord Weinstock, head of 
General Electric Co. of Britain 


and Matra’s Jean-Luc Lagar- 
dere — both heads of private 
companies who seem to feel an- 
swerable only to their stock- 
holders and thus have been will- 
ing lo relinquish some 
operational control in promis- 
ing international ventures. 

The merger of Lockheed and 
Martin Marietta involved team- 
work between their respective 
chairmen, Daniel M. Tellep and 
Norman R. Augustine. Veter- 
ans of corporate takeover wars, 
both men are viewed as “super 
gentlemen" and industrial 
statesmen, who are able to cre- 
ate a company that will account 
for nearly 20 percent of the Pen- 
tagon's contracts. 


More man just us sl^c makes 
th deal unusual, said Jerrold T. 
Lundquist, bead of the aero- 
space practice at McKinsey & 
Co_ citing the range of weapons 
produced by the two compa- 
nies, with little overlap that 
would suggest economic pres- 
sures behind the accord. 

“What is truly unprecedent- 
ed is that this is a merger be- 
tween two leaders, between two 
companies certain to be survi- 
vors in any foreseeable shake- 
out." Mr. Lundquist said. 

In contrast, most leading Eu- 
ropean manufacturers want 
leadership that they are too 
small to conquer. 


Continued from Page 11 

increasing demand and rising 
prices for a variety of industrial 
commodities. Beyond his inter- 
est in steel and liner board, Mr. 
Heebner said he prefers not to 
be specific about the commod- 
ities that he expects to rise — he 
does not want to tip his hand on 
which stocks he is buying. 

Mr. Heebner, who has man- 
aged CGM Capital since 1976, 
considers himself an old-fash- 
ioned “earnings-diiven" inves- 
tor. “I would have lo tell you 
that stocks respond to earnmgs 
the same way now they did 20 
years ago," he said. Strong 
earnings send stock prices up, 
weak earnings send than down, 
be srid. • . 

What has changed, he ac- 


knowledged, is the speed with 
which electronic systems alert 
all of Wall Street to financial 
events. 

That, in turn, causes stock 
prices to respond to news much 
more quickly than before. Mr. 
Heebner was asked whether 
that bad made his job as a mon- 
ey manager more difficult 

“You’re sort of raising the 
question: With, all that exper- 
tise and all those smart people 
out there, is it hard to make 
money? You know something? 
Fm heavily invested in the steel 
industry. I was able to get into 
the sled industry I think at a 
time when no one was paying 
much attention. And all these 
brains and ah this money hasn't 
really changed that.” Mr. 
Heebner said. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1994 


China Reports 
Problem Loans 
Plaguing Ranks 


Reuters 

' BEIJING — China said 
Thursday that one third of 
loans held by its banks are ei- 
ther in default or overdue: 

' A front-page article in the 
official Economic Daily said 
that the problem was slowing 
Beijing’s plans to set up a mod- 
em banking system in which 
loans are assessed on the basis 
of creditworthiness and not by 
government decree. 

The biggest debtors are state 
companies involved in com- 
merce, marketing and raw ma- 
terials. These concerns are often 
unable to keep up with compe- 
tition from private companies 
in these sectors, the report said. 

This year China is setting up 
lahree banks that are supposed 
to take over the state-decreed 
loans of the four large nation- 
wide banks, freeing them to be- 
come commercial entities. 

But economists said Beijing 
had not solved the problem of 
what to do with the bad debt. 

A Japanese banker said Beij- 
ing had not yet tackled difficult 
policy questions about how and 
whether these debts should be 


MTV Returns to India 


HONGKONG — MTV, 
locked in a battle with its ex- 
partner Rupert Murdoch, 
will return to India in Sep- 
tember in a deal with state 
broadcaster Doordarshan, 
MTV said Thursday. 

MTV Networks, which 
split with Mr. Murdoch’s 
STAR TV in May, said it 
would air two-and-a-half 
hours of programs daily on 
the DD2 Metro Channel, 
which reaches more than 10 


million homes in India's mar 
jor cities. 

MTV videos that ran on 
STAR stirred accusations in 
India that Western culture 
was being forced on a con- 
servative Asian society. 

But MTV said the Door- 
darshan programs would 
“reflect local music tastes 
and cultural sensibilities.’’ 

MTV will be the first for- 
eign programer to air daily 
blocks on Doordarshan, 
which has been criticized for 
running boring programs. 


To Some, China Means Headaehes 

Complaints About Business Practices Are Piling Up 


paid, delaying the establish- 
ment of real commercial banks. 

Wu Jinglian, one of China's 
top economists, said reform of 
the banking system was lagging 
reforms in other sectors, be- 
cause of the government's deep 
involvement in running compa- 
nies, which he likened to a “fa- 
thcr-and-son” relationship. 

“The People’s Bank has not 
become a real central bank,” he 
said. He added that negative 
real interest rates in the first 
half of the year had left the four 
main banks with no choice but 
to use administrative controls 
to limit credit. He also said cor- 
ruption among bank staff re- 
mained bard to control. 

One reason for the problem is 
that debtors see no need to re- 
pay since, they argue, their 
companies and the banks are 
state-owned, so that ownership 
Of the money is the same, the 
report said 

The newspaper said that fac- 
tory chiefs spent money freely 
on mobile telephones, expen- 
sive cars and other luxuries, 
even while their companies 
were deeply in debt. 


By Peter Behr 

Washinpon Post Serrice 

WASHINGTON — China 
was a land of opportunity this 
week for several U.S. corporate 
executives, who signed con- 
tracts valued at $5 billion or 
more as Commerce Secretary 
Ronald H. Brown looked on. 

But ask Honeywell Inc. 
about doing business in China, 

The Minneapolis-based 
electronics company has been 
operating in China’s coastal 
aty of Tianjin since 1979, and 
its sales have tripled in the last 
four years. But Beijing officials 
recently ruled that Honeywell's 
Tianjin affiliate could not open 
an office in Beijing because it 
was not registered there; it 
could not register because it 
did not have an office. 

That head-spuming para- 
dox, which has been resolved, 
represents the day-to-day 
problems confronting foreign 
businesses in China, as Hon- 
eywell’s Washington office 
wrote to the U.S. trade repre- 
sentative's office. 

Far more serious are the 
widespread complaints from 
U.S. companies of discrimina- 
tory treatment, theft of pat- 
ented inventions and copy- 
right materials and controls 


over investment, manufactur- 
ing and marketing operations. 

Their comments, which in- 
clude the following, fill a thick 
folder at the trade representa- 
tive's office: 

• DuPont Co. protested 
what it called “rampant” pira- 
cy of formulas for agricultural 
chemicals. 

■ Ralston Purina Co. cited 


state and local taxes it called 
discriminatory and illegal. 

• Mars Inc. said trade rules 
that prevent efficient import- 
ing and exporting of confec- 
tionary ingredients had taken 
20 percent out of its Chinese 
sales. 

The complaints reflect the 
contradictions of Chinese 
commerce, tantalising for its 


SSjJjS Brawn’s Trip: Oversold? 

smcc 1979, and i 

ripled in the last Bloomberg Business News 

: Beying officials BEUING — How much business did U.S. Commerce 
that Honeywell’s Secretary Ronald H. Brown drum up for American compa- 
e could not open nies during his visit to China with executives this week? 
eijing because it At last count. Commerce Department officials were calling 
stered there; it their boss a $6 billion man, claiming that was the value of 
jister because it contracts signed during the trip. 

n office. But executives at two of the companies whose joint ven- 

sp inning para- hires were included in that count said Mr. Brown had little do 
s been resolved, with their deals and bad exaggerated their significance, 
be day-to-day “Deals signed this week didn’t just happen because a Clinton 
fronting foreign administration official came over,” said George Jackoboice, a 
China, as Hon- director of Wing Group, an energy company based in Aspen, 
ihington office Colorado, that won a contract valued at $2 billion or more to 
J.S. trade rep re- build a liquefied natural gas plant in China, 
ice. U.S. officials also announced that AES Corp. had won a 

serious are the $1.5 billion contract to build a 2, 100-megawatt power station 
omplaints from at Yangcheng in Shanxi Province. But according to Jeff 
es of discrimina- Salford, vice president of the company’s AES China Generat- 
it, theft of pat- ing Co. subsidiary, AES Corp. and Chinese officials had 
ons and copy- signed a document in April saying they would enter into 
Is and controls negotiations to build a power plant in Yangcheng. 


incredible potential yet frus- 
trating for several of its ways 
of doing business. 

This gulf between China's 
practices and those of the rest 
of the industrial world is 
viewed by many as a source of 
potential conflict 

The United States is insist- 
ing chat China agree to change 
its trade and investment poli- 
cies before it can be admitted 
to the Woild Trade Organiza- 
tion, which is to rake over man- 
agement of global commerce 
from the General Agreement 
on Tariffs and Trade. 

The WTO is expected to be 
established early next year, 
and China wants to be a 
founding member. 

Changes are coming in 
some areas. On Monday, Mr. 
Brown and Oiina«» officials 
announced a series of joint' 
committees to handle trade 
and investment issues and 
hear complaints. 

But China has taken a bard 
line against other U.S. requests 
for reforms. “We are not pre- 
pared to get into GATT at any 
cost, and we will not trade die 
fundamental interest of the 
country,” Miao Fuchun, the 
Foreign Trade Ministry’s 
spokesman, said last month. 


Malaysian Stocks Rise as Unrest Fades 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

KUALA LUMPUR — Malaysian 
stocks soared Thursday in active trading as 
investors cast aside last week’s fears that a 
major confrontation was brewing between 
the government and the A1 Arqam Islamic 
movement. 

The benchmark Composite index on the 
Kuala Lumpur Stock Exchange jumped 
233 percent, to 1,15634 points, and gain- 
ing issues led losers by an 18-to-l ratio. 

Volume was 367.1 milli on shares, worth 
2.18 billion ringgit (S8S4 million), up from 
220 milli on shares, valued at 1.2 billion 
ringgit on Tuesday; the exchange was 
dosed Wednesday for a national holiday. 

The government last week declared the 


A1 Arqam movement illegal, leading inves- 
tors, mostly from overseas, to worry that 
the conflict could destabilize Malaysia’s 
delicately balanced political situation. 

But the lack of unrest since that declara- 
tion and strong rallies in other world stock 
markets have lured investors back to Ma- 
laysia, analysts said. 

“It’s a delayed reaction from Wall 
Street,” said Quah Soon Tong, head of 
research at 7-aliV Securities. He added that 
recent strength in Hong Kong stocks also 
underpinned buying in Malaysia, although 
the Hang Seng index edged down 0.39 
percent Thursday, to 9,890.90 points. 

( Bloomberg, AFP) 


■ Hong Kong Toughens listing Rules 

Comp anies applying to list shares on 
Hong Kong’s stock exchange will have to 
meet new profit requirements as of Sept. 
15. Bloomberg Business News reported 
from Hong Kong. 

A listing candidate will be required to 
have at least 20 milli on Hong Kong dollars 
(S3 million) in profit attributable to share- 
holders in its latest financial year, Herbert 
Hui, executive director of the exchange’s 
listing division, said. 

The applicant also must show that profit 
attributable to shareholders totaled at least 
30 million dollars in the two previous fi- 
nancial years, Mr. Hui said. 


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MANAGEMENT RECUMTIONS 
(modifications taking effect on September 1, 1994) 

Ri'frrriup to the version dated January I, 1**04, the follow- 
ing modifications have lwrn brought about. 

New I ersimi: 

ARTICLE 5 and ARTICLE 10 

The Hr nominal ion M Bam|iie Srtindinavc a I .u\i-ni In iiirjf is replaced 
by “S-K-Banken ljixrniliourg**. 

ARTICLE 7 - NET ASSET VALUE 
Tin* net awrl valiir nf unite in n St di- Fund in lln- base mmwy or 
that Suh-Kiind. is ralrulalrd by lln* M.-inugeniciil Company. Tim m:l 
awel valm- may lie expressed in other currencies than the base 
currency by using the 6a me exchange rati* than I hum used for l lie 
net asset value raindation of that same Valuation Hay. 

The Management Company is anil* wised lo delegate this function In 
anv other liody, with the rnnsenl of the Depositary Dank. This 
calculation is done each day in Uirmlmur* which is a [lank 
Business Hay in Luxcmltmirg and in Sweden; this day is called the 
Valuation Day. 

ARTICLE 14 

PUBLICATION OF PRICES, FINANCIAL REPORTS, ETC 

The net asset value per unit in each Suit-Fund as well as the issue 
and redemption prices are made public at the office of the 
Depositary Bank each day which is a Rank Business Day in 
Luxembourg and in Sweden. 

ARTICLE 15 - FINANCIAL YEAR, AUDIT 

Starting 1994. the accounts of the Fund arc rlused on December 31 
of each year. 

Luxembourg. 26.08. 1994. 

Because of these modifications, an audited rrpurt will be issued on 
December 31, 1994 covering the period from October 1st, 1993 up 
In Doccmhcr 31, 1994. No annual report will he published on 
September 30lh, 1994. 

THE DEPOSITARY BANK SKANDIFOND CURRENCY 
S-E BANKEN FUND MANAGEMENT 

LUXEMBOURG SJL COMPANY S.A. 


Page 15 

ASIA/PACIFIC 



Very briefly; : . 

• Boms PbBp A Co-’s annual profit rose 12 percent, to 123 million 
Australian dollars ($91 million), helped by rising revenue as the 
company expanded into global food markets. 


• Amcor Ltd. said its full-year net profit fdl nearly 19 percent, to 
25 6.6 milli on Aust ralian dollars, largely because of a one-time 
restructuring charge for its newly acquired Associated Paper & 
Pulp MiHs business. 

• Western Mining Corpus annual profit surged to 132 million 
Australian dollars from 64 million dollars in the previous year, 

by increased revenue and a favorable comparison because 
one-tune charges lowered the previous year’s results. 

Bloomberg, AFP, Reuters, AP 


Memorandum 

In order to regulate transactions with die shares of TCoodnefV* to 
provide safety of dispositions' funds and to assure the legitimacy of 
certificates, the joint stock company "Komineff nominates as its exclusive 
agent the company "’Komllux international 5. A." established in 
Luxembourg, as the sole representative authorized to issue certificates to 
foreign investors giving tire right to hold a fixed number of shares of 
"Kaminefr. These certificates are issued against deposits of an agreed 
upon number of shares at Russian banks or against presented shares held 
by corporate entities and private persons. This certificate is the sole legal 
(aider supporting the right? of foreign investor's share holdings in the 
Joint stock company "Korraneft". A sample of this company's share 
certificate, subnutted to the CUenfs approval, mil be published in the 
press during the month following the publication of this Memorandum. 

From the publication of this Memorandum, ail certificates and other 
documents representing deposited shares of the company TContineft’’, 
which were issued previous to the publication of this Memorandum, will 
be declared null and void and will be subject to exchange during a three 
month period. All requests will have to be made to: 

KomOux International &A. 

29, av. Monterey. L-2163 Luxembourg 
Attn: Alex Yerncri 
101:052)224428. 


publication of this Memorandum will be exchanged at no charge u me 
request is made during the first month period alter publication of this 
Memorandum. 

Requests made during the period from one month to three months 
will be satisfied against a commission payment at the rate of 0.1% of the 
nominal value of the certificate, but no leas than 100 USD and no more 
than 500 USD. Requests made after the three month period will not be 
satisfied and any claims for exchange of these certificates will not be 
accepted. 

Legal addresses of the Purtkr: 

Client: dKflfc . 

Thejoml stock company TComineft' "KomOux International SLA. 

13, Octyabrakaya Street 29, av. Monterey 

L-2163 Luxembourg 
TeL: 052) 22 44 28 
Fax: 052)224431 


169400 Ukha 


"Diffusion Finance" 

100, rue de Gasperich 
L-1617 Luxembourg 
TeL- 052)400 960 

Comments 

The present procedure was worked up by management of the joint- 
stock company "Komineft" as agreed with specialists of Central Bank, 
Stale Privatisation Committee and Ministry of Finance of Russia. In 
accordance with this procedure these certificates will be circulated 
outside of Russia. 

Certificates wiU be printed using the highest method of security 
' printing by Thomas De La Rue and Company Limited. 

Certificates are not registered yet at any western stock exchange. 

Places of depositary, issue and payment on presentation of present 
certificates are the following: 

East-West United Bank. Luxembourg 

P.O. Box 34 (2019) 

10, Boulevard Joseph H 

L- 1840 Lux e mbo ur g 

Bank In Switzerland (name and address of this Bank will be 
informed later). 

But foreign shareholders may deposit their certificates at any other 
foreign bank of their own choice. 

Certificates will be issued in strict accordance with Register at the 
joint-stock company "Komineft". The name of a concrete foreign 
shareholder recorded at the Register will be changed on concrete 
numbers of certificates. 


MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS 
(modifications taking effect on September 1, 1994) 
Referring to the version dated January I, 1994. the follow- 
ing modifications hove been brought snout 

Ncu- J'ersion: 

ARTICLE 5 and ARTICLE 10 

The denomination “Banqur Scandinavc a Luxembourg" is replaced 
by “S-E- Ban ken Uixcmhourg". 

ARTICLE 7 - NET ASSET VALUE 

The net asset value of units in a Sub-Fund in the base currency of 
that Sub-Fund, is calculated bv the Management Company. The net 
assel value may be expressed in other rurrenries than the base 
currency bv using the samp exchange rates than those used for the 
net asset value calculation of that same Valuation Day. 

The Management Company is authorised lo delegate this fimrtian to 
an> other body, with the consent of the Depositary Bank. This 
calculation is done caeh day in Luxembourg which is a Bank 
Business Day in laixcmhourg and in Sweden; this day is called the 
Valuation Day. 

ARTICLE 14 

PUBLICATION OF PRICES, FINANCIAL REPORTS, ETC 

The net asset value per unit in earh Sub-Fund as wdl as the issue 
and redemption prices arc made public at the office of the 
Depositary Bank earh day whteh is a Bank Business Day in 
i jixrmltourp and in Sweden. 

ARTICLE 15 - FINANCIAL YEAR, AUDIT 

Starting 1994, the accounts of the Fund are rinsed on Derember 31 
of earn year. 

1 .11 vend mu rg. 2fi.0H.l991. 

Iterauw uf Ihrw modi lira! inns, an audited report will he issued on 
Deeemlh-r 31. 1991 covering the [tcriml from Ortolier 1st, 1993 up 
In Dereinlier 31. 1994. No annual report will hr published on 
September 30ih. 1991. 

THE DEPOSITARY BANK SKANDIFOND EQUITY 
S-E-BANKEN FUND MANAGEMENT 

LIX EMBOURC S.A. COMPANY & A. 


SKANDIFOND BOND FUND 

MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS 
(modifications taking effect on September 1, 1994) 
Referring to the version dated January 1. 1994, the follow- 
ing modifications have been brought about. 

AW I VrsiVuu - 

ARTICLE 5 and ARTICLE 10 

The denomination “Banmie Scandinavc a I^ixembourc” is replaced 
by “S-K-Bankcn Luxembourg”. 

ARTICLE 7 - NET ASSET VALUE 
The net asset value of units in a SuIrFund in the base currency nf 
that Sub-Fund, is calculated hv the Management Company. The net 
asset value max be expressed in other rnrrcni-ics lhan the base 
currenry bv usfna the same cxrhangp rates than those used for the 
net asset value calculation of that same Valuation Day. 

Hie Management Company is authorised lo delegate this function to 
anv other body, with the consent of the Depositary Bank. This 
calculation is done each day in Luxrmlmur!; whieh is a Bank 
Business Day in l^ixembourg and in Sweden; tn>c day is called the 
Valuation Day. 

ARTICLE 14 

PUBLICATION OF PRICES, FINANCIAL REPORTS, ETC 

The nrt asset value per unit in earh Sub-Fund as well as the issur 
and redemption prices arc made public at the office of the 
Depositary Bank each day which is a Bank Business Day in 
Luxembourg and in Sweden. 

ARTICLE IS - FINANCIAL YEAR, AlIDrT 

Starting 1994, the accounts of lhe Fund arc rlnvd nn December 3 1 
of earh year. 

Luxembourg. 26.08. f994. 

Because nf these modifications. an audited report will be issued on 
December 31, IWI rnvrring the period from f li tuher 1st. 1993 up 
to IJecrmlter 31. 1994. No annual report will lie published on 
Si'plimbcr 3ftlli. 1991. 

THE DEPOSITARY BANK SKANDIFOND BOND 

S-E-BANKKN FUND MANAGEMENT 

LUXEMBOURG SLA. COMPANY SL A. 


S-E-BANKEN FUND 

MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS 
(modifications taking effect on September l, 1991) 
Referring lo the versinn dated January I, 199*1, the follow- 
ing modifications have born brought about 

New t rrsiim: 

ARTICLE 5 and ARTiCJJE 10 

The denomination **Bunqui- Srnndinnve A l^ixcmltourg" is replaced 
by “S-K-Bankcn bivrmlmurg". 

ARTICLE 7 - NET ASSET VALUE 
The net asset value of unite in a Suh-Fuml in the luse currency nf 
that SuIrFund, is calculated by the Mannpcmml Company. The nrt 
asset value may he expressed in other currencies than the base 
currency by using the same exchange rates than tliosc used for lhe 
net asset value calculation of that same Valuation Day. 

The Management Company is authorised to delegate this function lo 
any other body, with (he consent or the Depositary Bank. This 
calculation is done rarli day in Luxembourg which is a Bank 
Business Day in Luxembourg nnd in Sweden; this day is called the 
Valuation Day. 

ARTICLE I f 

PUBLICATION OF PRICES, FINANCIAL REPORTS, ETC. 

The nrt awl vahir per unit in p.-h-Ii Suit- Fund as well as the Imiic 
and redemption prirrs arc made public at the office of the 
Depositary Bank each day which is a Bunk Business Day in 
laixrmhoiirgnnd in Swcdrn. 

ARTICLE IS - FINANCIAL YEAR, AUDIT 

Starting 1994. the aepettitte o I the Fund are rinsed mi December 3 1 
nf rarh yrar. 

Luxembourg. 2(i.flB.I99-t. 

Bri-aiisc of these modifications, an audited report will Ire issued on 
IWcmber 31. 199 f rnvrritic the six month's iicrind from Julv 1st 
1 99 1 in Deeemlier 3 1, |W|. 


THE DEPOSITARY BANK 
S-E-BANKFJV 
IAIXEMROURG S.A. 


S-E-BANKEN FUND 
MANAGEMENT 
COMPANY' S.A. 


MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS 

(modifications taking effect on September 1 , 1994) 
Referring to the version dated January I, 1994, the foDow- 
iog modmeadoas hsxc been brought about 

New Version: 

ARTICLE 5 «nd ARTICLE 10 

The denomination “Banquc Scandinavc i Luxemboure’* is replaced 
by “S-E-Bankcn Luxembourg”. 

ARTICLE 7 - NET ASSET VALUE 
The net asset value of units in a Sub-Fund in the base currency of 
that Sub-Fund, is calculated by the Management Company. The nrt 
asset value may be expressed in other currencies than the base 
currency by uane the same exchange rales than those used for the 
nrt asset value calculation of that same Valuation Day. 

The Management Company is authorised to delegate (his function to 
anv other body, with the consent of the Depositary Bank. This . 
calculation is done each day in ! Luxembourg which is a Bank 
Business Day in IjnembouTE and hi Swedon; tm> day » railed the 
Valuation Day. 

ARTICLE 14 

PUBLICATION OF PRICES, FINANCIAL REPORTS, ETC 
The net asset value per unit m each Sub-Fund as wdl as the issue 
and redemption prices are made public at the office of the 
Depositary Bank each day which is a Bank Business Day in 
Luxembourg and in Sweden. 

ARTICLE 15- FINANCIAL YEAR, AUDIT 

Starting 1994. the accounts of the Fund an? dosed on Dcwmber 31 
of each year. 

I jixcmbourg, 26.08.1994. 

Because of these modifications, an audited report will be issued on 
December 31, 1994 covering the period from -October 1*1,1993 up 
to Derember 31, 1994. No annual - report will be published .on 
Seplembrr 30th, 1994- 

THE DEPOSITARY BANK SKANDIFOND FAR EAST 
S-E-BANKEN FUND MANAGEMENT 

LUXEMBOURG SA. COMPANY S-A, -. . 











Page 16 



I 










































































smmmmmmrnsm 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TOlBUt'OE, FRIDAY. 


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the World 


fj§fec* ■"«. -y* 

New Investments 
Transform Region 

Around 22,000 new jobs have been created. 


.' • %. vaJECv 1 "/ •*»■■ 

■ # . . 3 - .# ' 


ICansai, the western part 
of Japan encompassing the 
cities of Osaka, Kobe and 
Kyoto, is experiencing 
tremendous regional devel- 
opment in the form of pro- 
jects that are transforming 
the area's cultural, economic 
and physical landscape. 

The new Kansai interna- 
tional Airport is foremost 
among more than 600 devel- 
opment projects in western 
Japan that amount to a total 
of 40 trillion yen ($400 bil- 
lion). The airport, estimated 
to have cost 1 .5 trillion yen, 
is creating 22,000 jobs in the 
area. 

Engineering feat 
The airport's official open- 
ing on Sept. 4 marks the 
achievement of a major ar- 
chitectural and engineering 
feat Planning for the airport 
began TO years ago, and 
construction of a man-made 
island to house it started in 
1987. The facility is located 
in Osaka Bay, south of the 
city of Osaka. 

With over 300 weekly in- 
ternational and 60 daily do- 
mestic flights projected, the 
new 24-hour airport replaces 
Itomi, Osaka International 
Airport (located between 


Osaka and Kobe), which 
will now handle domestic 
flights only. 

A total of 44 countries 
have negotiated landing 
rights with Japan’s Ministry 
of Transportation. Those 
opening routes to Japan for 
the first time are Brunei, 
Ethiopia, Hungary, Jordan, 
Mexico, Mongolia, Burma, 
Nepal, Poland, South Africa 
and Vietnam. 

The new airport’s 3,500- 
meter runway is capable of 
handling 160.000 takeoffs 
and landings a year, while 
the passenger terminal 
building can accommodate 
31 million passengers annu- 
ally. Plans are emerging for 
second and third runways. 

Bridge to mainland 

The aiiport is linked to the 
mainland by a 3.75-kilome- 
ter bridge, and passengers 
can travel to the airport by a 
variety of train, bus and boat 
services. The passenger ter- 
minal was designed by Ital- 
ian architect Lorenzo Piano 
and the Aeroports de Paris, 
and Is shaped like a plane or 
a bird spreading its wings. 
With almost 30 hectares of 
total floor space, the passen- 
ger terminal is one of the 


• V : s •• , .. . -JC. ; *i . : . 

. - y ; 

- . : Rkmeatf of PybKt En- Kansai Ecotmic Fed- '■ 
: • ; •: : i " o. station (KankeSra*) 

•:< Otemamb^o, Chu64«vy Nakaatjshima, s ■ 

• • .Os&a ■ £ : :S ’• ;!'• Kija-ku ; ■ . . ; 

;■<&&*' , 

, : ‘ . 
/• - - 5347; ■ ; 

' . ; International Relations : ! Osaka dhaml^ier of * 



: CSty.nTKobe yy.'.rj 


■'■" 6 -T-S, fUtipdtf TOBte; ' OrganiscatioftiOsafca, . 

' .’leu- • . : v./. -..r. •; ^ ■> 2-i -8; ' 6iugo.-machi, 

• - Kobe' ' " ' . ^ A ..;-'--<3iao4cu ; ; v: • 

‘ .- Tel- (078);322i5010;; ; ':.^; Osaka ... . \ ... 

Fast: v " Td,:. (06)2033601.'. 

- ; r '/■ , Fac W : 222.»?5/232 0696; ; 

Cityof Kyoto ' ! •. ; r • . ■ r .... ' ' . 

•. laterreatKKud : Kansai International 

•"<WBee: -/ s : r.'.-Aftcrtv' r'-r : - 

488 Kamihdmiojimae- TdepteMJ? v. 

.cho • " ; ' *. v v ''^( 0724 ) 552500 ; 

Teramaehidori Qike . • ' •• • ' ' './• • • • 

. A8«u \ v Japan TraveI Pbone 

Nbkbgyb4cu •••.•' Toil-frw, . 

Kysfcfr.' ** .• ••' '• • •• '• • -Vipe:' ' 

TeU #n $) 222 3072 ! ' (0120) 444 800 v 


most open and spacious 
complexes of its kind, its 
north and south terminals 
are 1 .66 kilometers long. 

The airport facility in- 
cludes an auiomated guide- 
way transit system - Wing 
Shuttle - and a shopping and 
dining area on the second 
and third floors. Passengers 
on international flights" ar- 
rive in the airport on the first 
floor, and international de- 
partures leave through the 
fourth floor. The second 
floor serves passengers on 
domestic flights. 

For tourisms and business- 
people, traveling through the 
new Kansai International 
Airport means easier access 
to a region of great commer- 
cial and cultural signifi- 
cance. 

The Kansai economy's 
gross regional product to- 
taled dose to $700 billion in 
1993. The region supports 
21 million people, roughly 
17 percent of Japan's total 
population, and many of the 
country’s top chemical, 
food, machinery, pharma- 
ceutical, textile 'and trading 
companies. The area is par- 
ticularly proud of being host 
to some of Japan's biggest 
and most high-tech compa- 
nies, such as MatsushiLa 
(Panasonic). Sanyo Electric. 
Sharp, Kyocera and Ninten- 
do. 

Historical treasures 
The area is also rich in his- 
torical treasures. Kyoto, 
north of Osaka, was the cap- 
ital of Japan from 794 to 
1868, and this year marks 
the 1, 200th anniversary of 
its founding. Japan's first 
capital. Nan, is near Osaka 
and offers many fine wood- 
en temples and cultural trea- 
sures. 

Kobe, west of Osaka, con- 
tinues to thrive as one of 
Japan's leading ports. Re- 
cently, urban developments 
in Kobe have added to the 
city's cosmopolitan charac- 


The airports open-plan terminal (top) is passenger-friendly ; Osaka Business Park forms a contemporary background for one of the city's 
historic attractions. Osaka-jo castle (left); the airport is located on a man-made island (right). 


ter and poienlial as an inter- 
national trade center. 

The diversity of the Kan- 
sui region and’ its traditional 
role as Japan’s cultural and 
commercial capital gives it 
many advantages in terms of 
lower costs, better standards 
of living and business sup- 
port. 

According to reseurch 
conducted by the U.S. and 
Foreign Commercial Ser- 
vice. business operating 
costs in Kansai are substan- 
tially lower than in the Kan- 
to region surrounding 
Tokyo. Local authorities 
claim that office rents in key 
downtown areas of Osaka 
are one-third to one-half of 
what they are in central 
Tokyo. 

Lower costs 

Studies conducted by Osa- 
ka's municipal government 
reveal that residential rents, 
household expenses and 
commuting costs are also 
cheaper than in Tokyo. The 
time spent traveling between 
home and office "in Osaka 
averages 40 minutes, while 
in Tokyo the average is 80 
minutes. 

Access to a hiehlv educat- 


ed lahor force in Kansai is 
another advantage. The re- 
gion has more than 100 uni- 
versities. including top- 
ranked Kyoto University. 

People coming to Kansai 


to engage in commercial or 
cultural activities also find 
Kansai government officials 
and business leaders gener- 
ally available and agreeable 
when it comes to meeting 


with their foreign counter- 
parts. 

Over the past few years. 
Osaka Prefecture, Osaka 
City. Kobe City and other 
local bodies have been en- 


couraging the dev dopment 
of human networks as well 
as physical infrastructure to 
support the region's interna- 
tionalization. Results are ev- 
ident everywhere. 

“Several years ago." says 
Charles Besford. general 
manager of the leading ho- 
tel. The Wesiin Osaka, 
“when the Westin group 
chose Osaka as the site of its 
First hotel in Japan, planners 
cited many reasons for their 
decision, chief of which w as 
the opening of the new air- 
port. Japan's first 24-hour 
airport.” 

Foreign countries and or- 
ganizations have responded 
by opening consulates and 
commercial offices in Osaka 
and sending numerous mis- 
sions to the area. More and 
more international business- 
es are considering Kansai as 
a point of entry into Japan 
and n place to establish long- 
term commitments 

Janel Purdy Levaux 


AT ITOCHU, 

A GLOBALLY INTEGRATED CORPORATION, 
WE HAVE A WORLD OF INTERESTS. 


DISTRIBUTION 



TRADING 


\tr> w35SSr& : > 






-Kansai” 

wtiy produced in iis entirety by the Advertising Department cf the International Herald Tribune. 
Writers: Eric Johnston is based in Osaka. Janet Purdy Lei-aux is based in Osaka and California. 
Section editor: Emily Emerson. Program director: William Mahder. 


CONSULTING 

V-, 


ENTERPRISE 

MANAGEMENT 














Easier than 
ever to get to. 

Osaka has just gotten closer to 
international cities with the opening of 
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That means The Westin Osaka is also 
a lot easier to get to. 

In a city justly proud of its world-class 
hospitality. The Westin Osaka's 
excellence stands out. 

* Easy access with an advanuccnus location 
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the inimitable Westin service to relav travelers. 

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The Wutn Osaka is ccnvaMnDy I scaled near J'l Osaka Stanon. 


FINANCIAL 

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At ITOCHU, a globally integrated corporation, we take pride in 
offering various types of services concerning information, products 
and people. With over 10,000 people working in over 200 offices 
in 90 countries on 6 continents, ITOCHU conducts a wide variety 
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Committed to the global good. 

ITOCHU Corporation 


THE MAI NIC HI NEWS PAPE nS 





Page 17B 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1994 




A Welcoming 
Home for Expats 


More than 700 foreign companies operate in Kansai. 


F or visilii 


A or visiting executives and 
their families, the Kansai 
area offers many interna- 
tional schools, residences, 
and professional and social 
organizations that help make 
living in Japan a fruitful and 
pleasant experience. 

More than 700 foreign 
companies call Kansai 
home, together with numer- 
ous offices of foreign gov- 
ernments and trade organi- 
zations. A total of 200,000 
non-Japanese live in Kansai. 
Nestle S.A.. Bayer AG, 
CIBA-GEIGY, Caterpillar 
Inc. and Eli Lilly are among 
the large firms operating in 
western Japan. 

“Foreign businesses are 
doing well in western 
Japan," says Masaki Kaida 
of Meiko Securities, adding 
that most small and large 
foreign enterprises in Kansai 
arc profitable. 


unavailable to Tokyo resi- 
dents. 


Rokko Island 

Kobe's Rokko Island is one 
hub of the international 
community in Kansai. The 
Asian headquarters of Proc- 
ter & Gamble, the local 
chapter of the American 
Chamber of Commerce in 
Japan, the Foreign Buyers’ 
Club, the Canadian Acade- 
my and many new high-rise 
apartment complexes are lo- 
cated there. 

The Osaka International 
School is in northern Osaka 
near Senri. Other schools 
with courses in English as 
well as several different Eu- 
ropean and Asiatic lan- 
guages operate in various 
parts of Kansai. In the areas 
between Osaka and Kobe, 
many Western-style resi- 
dences are offered for rent or 
purchase. In many parts of 
Kansai. apartments catering 
to the needs of foreigners 
and Japanese who have lived 
abroad are increasing in 
number. 

Many visiting executives 
and their families Find Kan- 


Foreign community 
Professional and social orga- 
nizations support members 
of the foreign community by 
putting them in touch with 
needed contacts, informa- 
tion and resources. The Osa- 
ka Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry hosts an inter- 
national forum on a regular 
basis, publishes an English- 
language magazine about 
developments in the area 
and organizes the Global 
Business Opportunities Con- 
vention each October. v “Osa- 
ka’s Chamber of Commerce 
is very positive in coming up 
with new ways to moke the 
area an attractive place to do 
business," says Ira Kasoff, 
the principal commercial of- 
ficer of the American Con- 
sulate General Osaka- 
Kobe.The 721 non-Japanese 
participants at last year’s 
Global Business Opportuni- 
ties Convention came from 
50 countries. More than 
4,600 business forums were 
held during the year to intro- 
duce overseas businesses to 
potential Japanese partners. 



Many international corporations have offices in Kobe's Rokko Island City, with its high-rise apartment complexes and various amenities. 


Region Hosting Major Conventions 

New air links will boost visitor numbers even further, and additional facilities are planned. 

-Abound 1,500 international conventions were held in Umeda Sky Building, whose tall towers are conn< 
Japan in 1993. and 40 percent of these were in the Kansai top by a garden terrace that has the city’s most : 


cities of Osaka, Kyoto and Kobe. The opening of Kansai 's 
new airport is expected to attract even more international 
conferences and trade fairs to the region. 


Government offices 
The Japan External Trade 
Organization. Osaka, and 
other offices supply data and 
import-related information 
to interested parties. Two 
new public centers, one at 
the Asia and Pacific Trade 
Center in western Osaka and 
another near Kobe Port, 
should further facilitate im- 
ports. The prefectural and 
municipal governments of 
the greater Kansai region, 
known as “Kinki," recently 
opened the Subaru Comer 
office in Osaka as part their 
efforts to increase regional 
collaboration on the provi- 
sion of information to in- 
vestors. Foreigners, in coop- 
eration with local residents. 


Airport opening 

The opening of the Kansai International Airport will certain- 
ly lead to an increase in the number of conventions held in 
the area by providing links with more international and do- 
mestic destinations. JAL will begin new services from the 
airport to Los Angeles. London. Paris, Denpasar, Brisbane 
and Auckland, and will continue to offer flights to Hong 
Kong. Seoul, Pusan, Guam. Beijing, Shanghai, Bangkok. 
Singapore, Taipei. Jakarta (via Denpasarl, Sydney (via Bris- 
bane or Caims). Auckland, Los Angeles, Honolulu, London 
and Paris. The airline will offer new daily flights to Singa- 
pore. Bangkok. Sydney and Guam in addition to its current 
daily flights to Hong Kong, Seoul and Pusan, thus helping to 
make the airport a true “gateway to Asia" JAL passengers 
traveling in first or business class will be provided with spe- 
cial services at the new airport, such as the Sakura Lounge 
for those traveling first class and the Executive Lounge for 
those traveling business class. JAL also plans to open a spe- 
cial lounge for families. 


sai’s numerous parks, recre- 
ational districts and historic 


have organized groups ac- 
tive in the areas of architec- 
ture and engineering, cultur- 
al exchange, international 
business and professional 
development. JJP.L. 


sights simple to reach and a 
welcome relief from Japan's 
crowds - a benefit generally 


Hotel services 

The recent or planned opening of several new hotels in and 
around Osaka will help provide top-quality accommodations 


for convention-goers. Westin Osaka .is leading the way in 
this effort. The Westin is part of Shin Umeda City, a state- 


this effort. The Westin is part of Shin Umeda City, a state- 
of-the-art urban renewal project that contains the futuristic 


• v r v 

• - • r>: 

■m * 




CSa-CA .iC'JA-'lLV 


Fascinating exhibits of life from the 
“Ring of Fire ”, around the Pacific Ocean. 


KAIYUKAN 


»*»**»• SftMMfWi 


Admission Fees 
(Inc. Tax) 

Aduto 

(ChenG years old) 

Children 
(School aoas) 

Warts 

(4 -6 years old) 

Individual 

1950 yen 

mssm 

400 yen 

Group PO mm.) 

1750 yen 

810 yen 

360 yen 


1560 yen 

720 yen 

220 yen 




KYOTO 

Direct link by KANSAI AIRPORT EXPRESS "HARUKA " 






.ii.j 








Japan's leading convention centre in the capital of classic yet modem culture 
1 00 rooms of varied sizes ranging from 1 0 to 3,500 seats 
Equipped with high technology 
Staffed with professionals 


KYOTO INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE HALL 

Tak*iraB8-ike.Sukjr,-ku, Kyoto 606 JAPAN Phone* 1-075-705- 1 234 FaxsS! -075-705-1100 


Umeda Sky Building, whose tall towers are connected at the 
top by a garden terrace that has the city’s most spectacular 
view. The Westin Osaka is ideally located and is easily ac- 
cessible to Osaka's train station by regular limousine bus 
service (three per hour). The Westin Osaka offers personal- 
ized business services and unique facilities such as a special 
Child Care Room staffed by highly trained professionals. 


Waterfront and aquarium 

Along Osaka Bay in the southern part of the city, other pro- 
jects have recently been completed that should add to the 
city's appeal for convention-goers. One of these is the Tem- 
pozan Aquarium, which offers visitors a chance to see 
around 35,000 aquatic creatures from 380 species, from the 
tiniest fish to a huge whale shark. The aquarium, which has 
already attracted almost 17 million visitors since its 1990 
opening, is conveniently located near central Osaka. Tem- 
pozan Harbor Village, as the surrounding area is known, in- 
cludes restaurants serving a variety of international cuisines, 
as well as many exciting shops. 


Trade fairs thriving 

INTEX Osaka already provides excellent services for trade 
fairs. INTEX Osaka has the largest exhibition area of any fa- 
cility in Japan (70.000 square meters) and is home to some 
of the largest trade fairs in Asia, including the International 
Textile Machinery Show, which attracts almost a quarter of 
a million visitors" from around 25 countries. Other events 
scheduled here are the International Machine Tool Fair and 
New Earth, a global environment technology show. 


New conference hall in Kyoto 

The ancient capital of Kyoto also provides excellent conven- 
tion facilities, such as the Kyoto International Conference 
Hall, with a total floor area of 33,400 square meters, the 
city’s newest conference center. Designed by University of 
Tokyo professor emeritus Sachio Otani. the building is a 
blend of old and new: the steep roof is in the traditional 
Japanese style, while the main building is very contempo- 
rary. The center includes 100 conference halls, from small 
meeting rooms to a large conference room that can accom- 
modate up to 2,000 people. Simultaneous translation of eight 


modate up to 2,000 people. Simultaneous translation or eight 
languages is only one special service the center offers. This 
year, as part of the celebration of the 1200th anniversary of 


year, as part of the celebration of the 1200th anniversary of 
the founding of Kyoto, the Meeting of the Plenipotentiaries 
of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) will 
be held here in Sept.-Oct. 


Rokko Island project 

Another of Kansai's planned new convention facilities will 


be located on Rokko Island, an ambitious project begun in 
1985 and beine developed by Planners International, a 


1985 and being developed by Planners International, a 
Kobe-based company thin specializes in developing urban 
infrastructures. The 580-hectare man-made island is already 
home to some 14,000 people. The Rokko Island project is 
now entering its final construction phase and will include an 
international business complex in a 4.4-hectare business and 
commercial zone called Business Park. EJ. 



HDunr 


5EK1SUI HOUSE, LTD. 

Rokko bland Development Dept. 
1-88 1- drome i Oyodo- naka, Kha-ku, 
Osaka 531, Japan 
Phone : 06-440-3507 
Facsimiles : 06-440*3515 


FOREIGN BUSINESS PROMOTING CENTER 
PLANNERS INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

Phone 1 078-858-0800 
Facsimiles s 078-858-0805 


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Trade Centers Set 
To Boost Region’s 
Overseas Links 


Foreign partners have more opportunities. 


The construction of sever- 
al new trade centers promis- 
es to boost business ties and 
dramatically expand the 
Kansai region's imports, 
which rose from $50.3 bil- 
lion in 1992 to $52.8 billion 
in 1993. according to the 
Kansai Economic Federa- 
tion. or Kankeiren. 

With a gross regional 
product of roughly $700 bil- 
lion and total trade of $130 
billion in 1993, the economy 
of Kansai already rivals that 
of Canada in size and sur- 
passes those of Hong Kong, 
Singapore. South Korea and 
Taiwan combined. 


Osaka leads the way 
Many of Japan's leading 
trading companies, such as 
C. Itoh & Co., are based in 
Osaka. “Osaka wants to take 
the leadership in opening the 


tion and retail facilities for 
importers of products such 
as clothing, jewelry and 
gems, and sports equipment 
Featuring the International 
Trade Mart, the center has 
been designated a foreign 
access zone. Over 100 for- 
eign companies are involved 
in die project which has the 
capacity to support more 
than 400 tenants 
The government-spon- 
sored Integrated Import Pro- 
motion Center is located in 
the Asia and Pacific Trade 
Center. With a shop and 
events space, the center is 
managed by the Japan Exter- 
nal Trade Organization. 
Hopes are especially high 
for the center considering 
the large growth in Kansai's 
trade with Asia and the re- 
gion's proximity to the vari- 
ous Asia-Pacific nations. 


Japanese economy to for- 
eign countries and compa- 


eign cou nines and compa- 
nies,” says a local business 
leader. 

Rinku Town, an extensive 
commercial and business 
zone linked to the airport via 
a 3. 75-kilometer bridge, is 
being developed by Osaka 
Prefecture. Its goal is to inte- 
grate foreign businesses into 
the Kansai economy. The lo- 
cal communities of Izu- 
misano City, Sennan City 
and Tajiro-cho have collabo- 
rated in the development of 
several beaches located di- 
rectly across from the air- 
port. The white sandy areas 
give Rinku Town and the 
new airport an added dimen- 
sion as a unique waterfront 
development 

With striking red, white 
and blue exteriors and interi- 
ors, the Asia and Pacific 
Trade Center opened in 
April of this year. The ultra- 
modern business center is 
roughly 30 minutes away 
from the new airport, west of 
downtown Osaka. It serves 
as a wholesale center and 
comes complete with mar- 
keting, distribution, exhibi- 


Asia trade is going strong 
Asia accounts for 45. 1 per- 
cent of Kansai's imports, 
compared with 33.7 percent 
of Japan’s total imports. 
Likewise, 49.8 percent of 
Kansai's exports go to Asia, 
in comparison with only 
37.2 perrent of the country's 
exports. Near the Asia and 
Pacific Trade Center is the 
55-story Cosmo tower, 
which includes Osaka's 
World Trade Center, set for 
completion in December 
1994. The World Trade 
Center will be a subsidiary 
of the World Trade Center 
Association and will be ca- 
pable of extending support 
services and information to 
domestic and international 
businesses interested in ex- 
panding their global ties. 

“If local businesspeople 
go to these new trade cen- 
ters, they have access to 
products and can communi- 


cate with foreign suppliers,’ 
says Masaki Kaida, directoi 


says Masaki Kaida, director 
of Meiko Securities and for- 
merly with Sumitomo 
Bank’s corporate business 
department in Osaka. JJ*.L 


Hitachi Zosen bunt Japan’s first double-hull VLCC. 
Double-sided and double-bottomed, its superior 
design greatly reduces the risk of splBage. 


With more than 1 1 0 years as a leading shipbuilder and 
manufacturer of heavy Industrial machinery, Hitachi Zosen 
plays an increasingly assertive role in projects to preserve 
our earth. We' ve built Japan's first double-hull VLCC. 
space-saving parking facilities, and air and water cleaning 
devices that protect the environment After all, we won't 
have it tomorrow if we don't take care of it today. 


We build industries 

Ktachi Zosen 


HITACHI ZOSEN CORPORATION 


1-1-1 Hitotsubashi. Chiyoda-ku. 

Tokyo 100, Japan 

Phone:03-3217-8418 Fax:03-3217-8545 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1994 


Page 17C 




ism 




Overseas Investors Offered 


j Most people think of Tokyo 
! when they think of Japan, but 


many Japanese and non- 
Japanese alike will argue that 
the heart of Japan is actually 
the six prefectures and three 
major urban centers (Osaka, 
Kyoto and Kobe) that make up 
the Kansai region. 


Many tourists are familiar with Kyoto, Japan's ancient capi- 
tal and home of traditional Japanese culture. Kobe, a port city 
nestled between the sea and the mountains, is widely recog- 
nized for its role as Japan's busiest port Kansai's nerve cen- 
ter, however, is the city of Osaka. Of the 20 million people liv- 
ing in Kansai, 9 million live in the greater Osaka area. 

The Kansai region's gross domestic product totaled ap- 
proximately $500 billion in 1 991 . or 17 percent of Japan’s to- 
tal GDP. This represents 2.3 percent of the global economy, 
equal to the GDP of Canada. 

Around 300 fbreign-affiliated companies are now located in 
the Kansai area, along with a number of prominent Japanese 
companies. Despite the current recession, Kansai’s econom- 
ic growth is continuing at a steady pace. The opening of the 
Kansai International Airport - the world’s first airport built on 
a man-made island - is expected to usher in a new era for 
both Kansai residents and the nation, attracting new busi- 
ness investment from all over the world. 

Yet the airport is only one of several projects being under- 
taken by local business and the Osaka Prefectural Govern- 
ment Another is Pacific City, the commercial zone of the de- 
velopment known as Rinku Town, located immediately 
across the bay from the new airport. Pacific City will comple- 
ment the airport by offering an ultramodern base of opera- 
tions for international businesses looking to expand in Japan 
and the rest of the Asia-Pacific region. 

Located just five minutes from the airport terminal building, 
this new city offers convenient access to the airport and the 
surrounding region and is expected to play an important part 
in the development erf both. The original idea for Rinku Town 
dates back to 1978, when the local government chose a site 
across the bay from the proposed airport as a location for a 
new development project. In 1983, environmental impact 
studies began, and three years later the South Osaka Devel- 
opment Project Plan was announced. Land reclamation be- 
gan the following year, and the proposed development be- 
came known as Rinku Town. 

According to Tomizoh Imahori, director general of the Bu- 
reau of Public Enterprise, Osaka Prefectural Government, 
Rinku Town's primary advantage lies in its accessibility to the 
airport, to downtown Osaka and to other urban centers in the 
region. Located within sight of the airport's runway, Rinku 
Town will be only five minutes away, over the new airport 
bridge. Two train lines (Nankai and Japan Railways) will ser- 
vice Rinku Town, and travel time to Osaka's Namba Station 


' TIME. AVAILABLE “ON LOCATlGtN* 
DURING A ONE-DAY BUSINESS TRIP? 


i yo 

Pacrffc 
City . 

.Tokyo' 

.. Bong • 
KtonQ*” 

Sfr^ajxsre 

| Tokyo 

12 

. Ha ; 

■®’ 5 

'• t ;. 

I Seoul 

10 

; 5 ■' 

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9 

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.‘6.5 


.' Taipei 

e 

S 

5 

11.5 

5 

j Shangtet 

B 

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: Hong Kong 

7 

3 

N.A. 

• 6 

I Jakarta 

2 

- 

5.5 

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Kuala Lumpur 

1 

- 

5.5 

12 

Singapore 

1 

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5.5 

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Bangkok 

- 

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6.5 

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Cities accessible lor a one-day trip 


' Batswi an leaving Ox Gt]r ai r AM jndmiumirsgMt 1 1 PM Afcwnam stay ‘an 
bcaUcn' ossbmed to tfo 7 haws. TVm at h&jr% 1 


(Nankai) and Tennoji Station (JR) wili be less than 40 min- 
utes. Travel time to Kyoto station will be approximately 75 
minutes, while those going to the port city of Kobe will have a 
choice of traveling by hydrofoil across the bay (30 minutes) 
or going by car (about one hour). 

Another advantage of Rinku Town is that it will contain 
many of the amenities of a true city, including a commercial 
zone (Pacific City), a residential area, amusement facilities 
and even a beach. Officials hope that Rinku Town will draw 
both foreign and Japanese companies out of the overcrowd- 
ed and overpriced areas of downtown Osaka into a more fu- 
turistic and environmentally friendly atmosphere. 

For those looking to establish their businesses in Japan or 
elsewhere in Asia, Pacific City offers the ideal setting for a 
branch office. The Kansai International Airport is expected to 
be Japan s gateway to Asia, with direct flights to all major 
East and Southeast Asian metropolitan areas, making one- 
day trips from Kansai to many cities a possibility (see box). 

Companies based in Pacific City will find that they can dis- 
tribute their goods and services throughout Japan much 
more quickly than from Narita airport in Tokyo, Japan’s other 
major international airport Kansai airport will offer many do- 
mestic as well as international flights; given the very limited 
number of domestic flights from Narita, a two-hour transfer 
by car to Haneda, the domestic airport, is often required. In- 
ternational travelers whose final destination is Sapporo on 
the northern island of Hokkaido, for example, wiH actually ar- 
rive there in less time if they travel via Kansai International 
Airport, despite the fact that Sapporo is closer to the Tokyo 
region than to Kansai. 

For small and large corporations, especially trading com- 
panies, Pacific City offers special cost benefits. The cost of 
living in the Kansai area is already between 30 percent to 50 
percent cheaper than the cost of living in the Tokyo area, and 
rents in Rinku Town will be even cheaper than Osaka’s. "We 
envision Rinku Town as a place where foreign businesses 
can spread their wings to Japan as well as to the rest of 
Asia," says Daitelsu Kobori, president of Osaka Prefectural 
Rinku Center Foundation, which is overseeing the Rinku 
Town project. 


Easy Way Into Japan 




% 


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South District 


Riprap Embankment 
, Artificial Beach 

)K/ Gentle Slope 

. Embankment 






Rinku Town is being con- f ** " r ' r 

structed in several stages. | Kane* 

Facilities scheduled for com- l -- 

pletion when the airport > 

opens include an area for * Land Use 
preparing the airlines in- £ . - 

flight meals and an emer- [ PI3I1 TOT 
gency medical facility. The | p ar .jf! n 
Kansai Sky Catering building * raCITIC vlly 
for in-flight meals Is now 3 IRfflkU TOWfl) 
making preparations for the I ^ 9 

first flights from the new air- { 
port. Once the airport opens, j 
up to 10,000 in-flight meals j 

per day will be prepared at [ South District 

the center. The medical l Riprap Embankment 
complex is known as the Os- f , Artificial Beach 

aka Prefectural Senshu I Gentre Slope 

Emergency Center, and was ) Embankment 

completed at the end of Au- j i l'~'l 

gust. Construction has be- i ^*<^4 — ) —j ' - v - 

gun on izumisano Municipal | 

hospital with 348 beds in two 

nine-story buildings and one four-story building. 

The Rinku Pacific Paradise, or PAPARA, zone of the de- 
velopment will include the Doors & Doors (D & D) shopping 
center. Divided into four areas, including a restaurant zone, a 
retail merchandise zone, an imported goods zone and a fac- 
tory outlet zone, this 6,700-square-meter shopping center 
complex will include 35 shops. The restaurant zone will offer 
a range of international cuisine, from crepes to curries, avail- 
able in other restaurants or fast-food outlets. The retail mer- 
chandise zone will feature apparel as well as lifestyle goods 
and accessories, while the imported goods store will handle 
sundries imported from such countries as China and Aus- 
tralia. 

Australian companies in particular have set about estab- 
lishing a presence in Pacific City, in April of this year, Aussie 
World Inc. was established by three Australian companies to 
promote the sale of Australian products in the D & D com- 
plex. They are the first foreign companies to officially an- 
nounce their plans to participate in the PAPARA zone. 

Peter Lagerlow, managing director of Lagerlow Pty. Ltd. of 
New South Wales, was appointed CEO and chairman of 
Aussie World. Established with a capital base of roughly 10 
million yen (SI 00,000), Aussie World wili lease approximate- 
ly 290 square meters in D & D to sell a variety of foodstuffs, 
jewelry, apparel, leather goods and other products from Aus- 
tralia. 

Adjacent to the D & D complex is Rinku Park, an amuse- 
ment park containing rides, restaurants and outdoor food 
stalls, and a 1. 9-hectare events space that can accommo- 
date approximately 10,000 people. The Osaka Prefectural 
Rinku Center Foundation hopes to begin scheduling events 
for this space in the near future. 

The heart of Rinku Town will be the Pacific City Business 
Promotion Center, to be relocated to the Gate Tower Building 
when it is completed. This center was created to serve as a 
starting point for those foreign firms wishing to do business in 
Pacific City, Japan and the Asia-Pacific region. 

Also managed by the Osaka Prefectural Rinku Center 
Foundation, the Business Promotion Center will offer a wide 
range of business services, including offices, convention 
space, business libraries, secretarial services and advice on 
Japanese business practices, laws and taxes. 

Perhaps the biggest attraction for those firms looking to re- 
duce costs will be the business offices. Two types will be 
available. The first wiH be offered rent-free on a short-term 
basis (perhaps up to two months). These offices will serve as 
entry points to the Japanese mar- 
ket Other offices will be available : . 

for rent on a long-term basis at a r . . ■ ^ 

rate of 13,000 yen (SI 30) for 3.3 . . 

square meters: this includes a ■••• “ • : 

management fee. This means that f. ' 
the Promotion Center wili be one of j* • .. ; ijSSZ 

the most cost-effective business j.*-* ' ■ ; 

centers in the nation. i * . '• 

Foreign companies and public 
organizations from Hong Kong, 

China, Australia and Vietnam have ‘ — 

applied for tenancy. The Japan Ex- 

ternal Trade Organization 

(JETRO) will also occupy several innrafflnMg jsv-jj# 

offices within the center, serving as ■raWPjpg 

another information source for for- j j HflM ppjr*- ” -g 

eign companies. This center will be ^ . 

called the JETRO Osaka Rinku 

FAZ (Foreign Access Zone) Cen- SkmL 

“We firmly believe that this busi- 
ness promotion center will serve as ; 

the most convenient location for 
foreign companies entering the ifliall giB BPre--' 
Japanese market," says Mr. Ko- 

Sandy Taubenkimel, a U.S. SBPgiPW* V «j| 
management consultant based in 
Osaka, has identified the impor- 
tance of such business facilities to 
those from outside of Japan. 

"Companies take office space into 


Kansai International Airport 


Rinku Gate 
Tower Building ' 


Opportunities 
For Investors in 
Pacific City 


Commercial Zone (Pacific CHy) 


(Rinku Town) 


Central District 
Riprap Embankment 


Gentle Slope Gentle Slope 
.Embankment Embankment 


North District 

Riprap Embankment 
7 | Caisson-type 


Composite 

Embankment 








SRSpHSI 


consideration first when they start anew in foreign lands he 
says. 

In order to attract foreign firms. Rinku Town officials recent- 
ly unveiled a plan to promote the area. The plan includes pro- 
motion, business support, investment incentives and city 
planning. The promotion section contacts foreign companies 
overseas and invites them to participate in seminars and 
conventions in their own country. The business-support sec- 
tion is involved in the Pacific City Business Promotion Cen- 
ter. In the investment-incentives section, advice on utilizing 
the Japan Development Bank to finance and support one's 
business is offered. Perhaps the boldest part of the plan is 
the city-planning section, which will be concerned with the 
needs of expatriates concerning housing, schools, medical 
care, working environment, leisure and sports, shopping and 
other facilities. 

One addition to the PAPARA area currently under discus- 
sion is a facility that is being touted as a “fantasy museum." 
Last April, the Senshu Development Corporation announced 
that it would establish a special art museum which would dis- 
play, on permanent exhibition, approximately 200 works by 
such artists as Salvador Dali and Edvard Munch. Senshu 
also announced that it would be developing foreign hotels 
and an amusement complex within the area. The Osaka Pre- 
fectural Government is selling the area in lots and began ac- 
cepting bids last month. The government has said it will ac- 
cept applications until March 1995, so that construction can 
begin in 1996 for completion in 1999. 

Pacific City’s Foreign Access Zone has been set up by the 
Japanese government and includes facilities, businesses 
and activities designed to expedite import procedures, in 
March of last year, a special cargo-handling facility was 
opened in Rinku Town. Two other facilities will be construct- 
ed to handle imported goods. The first is an international lo- 
gistics center that will support air cargo handling at Kansai In- 
ternational Airport; the second is a special jewelry market for 
jewelry wholesalers and retailers. 

The other facility expected to play a large part in Rinku 
Town's future is the Rinku Gate Tower Building. When com- 
pleted in the autumn of 1996, it will be the tallest building in 
western Japan, with a height of 255 meters. This building will 
be a virtual city within a city. Within its confines will be a high- 
rise hotel, restaurants, "intelligent" offices, business facilities, 
an international conference center, banquet halls and a fit- 
ness center. 

This will be an intelligent building," says Toshio Kazahaya, 
president of the Rinku Gate Tower 
Building Co. Ltd. "It will involve the 
;• <■ latest technology, designed for maxi- 

' ' ’ ' mum tenant comfort," he adds, 

u .... .. * Conference halls are to be inte- 
• grated with the hotel facilities and 

; • vy-.v . . feature a high-level security system 

' ' '• ' 1 and simultaneous interpretation fadl- 

• . ... ities, An information center for Pacif- 

'■ « : ;?-jr S ic City companies, to be operated by 
the Osaka Prefectural Rinku Center 
' T \ Foundation, will be available, while a 
':|j: : ^ business “incubator" facility, espe- 

daily designed for those foreign 
i : »:: com P anies preparing to enter the 

■■ji: . . : Japanese market, will offer secretari- 

Lij Jv ; . al, interpretation, translation and oth- 
er services. 

' y. .■■ The hotel will be managed by ANA 

" ‘ J : • -J Enterprises, and will offer 360 guest 
pjJj.'.: ' V: ££"3 rooms ranging from single rooms to 

pSW**' i''- : suites, restaurants serving a variety 
: r ■ of cuisines, and special facilities in- 

fer ' eluding a full range of wedding ser- 

tpZ ' - ; j vices. 

The Kansai International Airport 
■ i will no doubt bring the world ctoser to 

Mr the Kansai region and vice versa, but 

B _ ! *t wili be the combination of Pacific 

9D City and the new airport that may 

S GMUBBHr have the greafest impact on the 
economy of the Kansai region. 

Eric Johnston 


• Large concerns can buy land and build their own 
buildings. 

• Slightly smaller firms are encouraged to rent a floor 
of the luxuriously appointed Rinku Gate Tower Building. 

• For more modest requirements, it is possftle to rent 
an office in a building that offers full communications fa- 
cilities, secretarial services and consultancies. 

For further information, contact these offices of Inter- 
national Business Organization of Osaka, Inc. 


Rotterdam Office 

Karttorengebouw Westblaak, 7th Floor 

A Tower, Westblaak 140.3012 KM Rotterdam 

The Netherlands 

Tel.: (31)10 414 9834 

Fax: (31) 10 412 3672 

Telex: 44-23221 OMC NL 


Hong Kong Office 

Unit 1503, Dina House, Ruttonjee Centre 
11 Duddetl Street, Central Hong Kong 
Tel.: (852) 5 257 166/5 258 790 
Fax: (852) 5 218 099 


Singapore Office 

5, Shenton Way, 37-01, 38-01 UIC Building 
Singapore 0106 
Tel.: (65) 233 8101 
Fax: (65) 223 1712 


Australia Office 

Level 25, Gateway Building 1 Macquarie Place 
Sydney 2000 Australia 
Tel.: (61) 2 247 7433 
Fax: (61)2 247 8759 


Shanghai Office 
Shanghai Union Bldg., Room 804 
100, Yan An East Road 
Shanghai, China 

Tel.: (86) 21 320 0802/21 326 5180 
Fax: (86) 21 373 4693 
Telex: 33615 OMC SH 


New York Office 
c/o JETRO, New York 

McGraw-Hill Bldg. 1221 , Avenue of the Americas 

New York, N.Y. 10020 

U.SJL 

Tel.: (1)212 997 0434. 

Fax (1)212 997 0464 
Telex: 23-236863 JETRO UR 


Osaka California Linkage Technology Canter Inc. 
160 West Santa Clara 
San Jose, CA 95113 
U.S.A. 

Tel.: (1)408 283 1010 
Fax: (1)408 283 0344 


--vSKfiSBI 




Osaka Prefectural Government 
Bureau of Public Enterprise 
Otemaeno-cbo, Chuo-ku 
Osaka, Japan 
Tel.: (81)69451739 
Fax: (81) 6 944 6853 


v . ! > 


Osaka Prefectural Rinku Center Foundation 
Otemae EST BWg. 5F 1-13-19, Tanimachi, Chuo-Ku 
Osaka, Japan 
Tel.: (81) 6 945 5661 
Fax: (81) 6 945 101 8 


Rinku Gate Tower Building Co, Lid 

Kitahama Center Bldg. 7F 1-12, Hlgashi-koraibashi, 

Chuo-ku 

Osaka, Japan 

Tel.: (81)6 949 1233 

Fax: (81) 6 949 1232 


7 






Page IS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1994 


SPORTS 


Golfs Young New Phenom Has More Than Winning on His Mind 


The Associated Pros 


Earl Woods knew he had a golfer on his hands the 
day he looked up from his own practicing and found 
his 6-month-old son staring back. What struck him 
then, and what strikes him now, was that the boy’s 
expression never changed. 

Hour after hour, swing after swing, for as long as 
the father could pound balls into a practice net in the 
garage, his son could sit still in a nighchair, hypno- 
tized. By 10 months, little Hger loved the routine so 
much he insisted on being fed there. At one year, he 
waggled a sawed-off dub over the ball and began 
pounding them into the net himself. A few years 
after that, he was beating his father at the game. At 
age 5, he was featured on the television program 
“That's Incredible." 

It was just about then that Earl envisioned not just 
another golfer, not just the next superstar or golfs 
first black superstar, not even just the next Jack 
Nicklaus, but something else. 

Something grander. Something on the order of a 
folk hero, something very much like the boxer Joe 
Louis had been for him when he was growing up. A 
source of pride. An inspiration to his people, to all 
people, maybe. 

“Awwwww," Tiger Woods said, letting his silence 


on the telephone carry a moment of embarrassment, 
*T don’t know about that." 

The first time the subject is broached is the first 
time in 20 minutes of talking that Tiger sounds like 
what he is: an 1 8-y ear-old kid hying to squeeze the 
last few days of fun out of summer before he leaves 
home for the first time, to attend Stanford- University. 
The usual good-byes have to be crammed in between 
the celebrations of one more ground-breaking feat. 

On Sunday, Tiger won the U.S. Amateur, the 
most prestigious amateur golf tournament around, 
in the most dramatic fashion imaginable and be- 
came the youngest victor in the tournament’s 99- 
year history. 

Now everybody wants a piece of him — family, 
friends, tournament officials, the golf team, the media 
and who knows who else. People are waiting every- 
where he turns, but Tiger takes pains to give a 
thoughtful answer. He wants people who only see him 
play golf to know there is substance behind the sizzle. 

Through his play and the dozens of clinics he and 
Earl have staged in inner-city neighborhoods, he is 
attracting kids to the game in a way that cannot yet 
be measured. 

"I think being a role model, in some ways, is 
already a reality," said Tiger, who grew up in Cy- 


press, California. “And I know some responsibility 
goes with it. Sure, it would be great if everything 
works out, but who knows?" 

His given name is Eldrick. but his father called 


Through his play and clinics in 
inner-city neighborhoods, Woods 
is attracting kids to golf in a way 
that cannot yet be measured. 


him Tiger almost from birth to honor a friend and 
fellow soldier in Vietnam. 

“Will he be one of the great ones?" Earl repeated 
the question. “Let me say this first: As long as he is 
educated, a productive citizen and happy, that’s 
enough for me.” 

“And if he chooses golf, I believe he will have — 
how should I say this? — comparable skills and 
ability to the great ones." he added. “Whether he 
will be as successful depends on the competitive 
nature of the PGA Tour when he gets out there. 
Obviously, the Tour is eons stronger than it was 
during Ntcklaus's tune." 


But the s? me thing could have been said about 
any of the fields in which Tiger has played. 

His love of the game, and his start, came from his 
father. But the brilliant shot-making, the touch, the 
nerve, the imagination, the cold-blooded putting 
stroke, the way he draws attention to himself, the 
unceasing desire to practice — those are all Tigers. 

For most of his young life, he was spotting his 
competition as much as 10 years. Because he hit the 
ball long and wild then, and now he hits longer and 
wider, the victories weren't always preuy. But they 
were always victories. 

He would hit die ball into the trees, find it, knock 
it on the green. If he hit two shots wildly, like some 
precocious Seve Ballesteros, he found a way to get 
the third into shooting range. 

Tiger was 3-down with three holes to play trying to 
win die U.S. Junior Amateur for the third straight 
time last summer. He made three birdies and won the 
playoff with a par. He was 6-down early in the U.S. 
Amateur, made par twice from the trees' birdied two 
of the last holes, and clinched with a par on No. IS. 

“Surprised?" he said. “No. You’re not supposed 
to get rattled. The most surprising thing was that 
every time I had to play out of the trees, ! had very 
good lies. All I had to do then was execute the shot.” 


“Surprised?" the father said. “No. I know how 
absolutely beautiful and pure he can strike the ball. 
He doesn’t hit that way all the time, he's a kid. But if 
doesn’t seem to bother him being in any comer, of 

the course." 

“He has." he concluded, “the heart of an assassin.” 
AH the great ones do. Nicklaus, Hogan, Watson 

the thing they have in common is that all were 

great dosexs. On early form. Woods looks to be the 
best closer of them alL < 

“I played with him a couple of times,” said Wat- 
son, who also played golf at Stanford, “and he seems 
solid in every part of the game. He’s got length, he 
can putt and he looks like he can play at less than 
full speed. That’s a real sign of maturity. 

Watson, however, stopped short of predicting 
greatness. The kid, after all, has barely started shav- 

■ mv-i 1. . II " ha cats? 


mg, “Only time will tdi.” he said. 


Jut right now, the son has places to go and people 
to see. He has folded his father’s plans into his own 
heart, carrying them with him always. He has hit 
every mark so far, but the only schedule Tiger feels* 
pressured to keep at the moment is the one that calls 
For him to meet his girlfriend for a late dinner. 

“She’s ecstatic about the whole thing," he said,, 
sounding 18 once again. “Gotta go." 


FIFA Snubs 
IOC Over 
Drug Rules 




PARIS — Soccer’s world 
governing body, FIFA said on 
Thursday that it would contin- 
ue to defy the International 
Olympic Committee over dop- 
ing rules and had did not fear 


threats that soccer could be 
kept out of the 1996 Summer 
Olympics in Atlanta. 

After addressing die IOC 
Congress in Paris, FIFA's gen- 


eral secretary, Sepp Blatter, 
officials saw no 


said that soccer i 
need to comply with IOC stan- 
dardization of doping rules. 

FIFA is the only Olympic in- 
ternational sports federation 
that has refused to sign an IOC 
agreement binding it to con- 
form to standard doping proce- 
dures, including a common list 
of banned drugs and common 
sanctions. 

The agreement stipulates that 
only federations signing the 
document may take part u the 
Games. 

“You should ask the Atlanta 
Games organizers what they 
think of football being thrown 
out," Blatter said. “I don’t see 
how football can be thrown out." 

Soccer was a huge success at 
the last Summer Games held in 
the United States, in Los Ange- 
les in 1984, and this summers 
World Cup in the United States 
attracted record crowds. 

Blatter said FIFA was pre- 
pared to accept IOC roles on 
doping only during the Olym- 
pic tournament. 

He said mandatory rules on 
out-of-competition testing were 
not needed in soccer. 

Soccer was involved in the 
most prominent doping scandal 
of the year when Argentina’s 



After 123 Years , 
FA Accepts Deal 
To Sponsor Cup 


SIDELINES 


The Associated Press 


era 


IrurioTelnni/Ttac Awncalcd Pica 


ARGENTINES WIN CLUB SOCCER CUP — Marcel o Adrian Gdmez, of the Argentine dub Velez Saisfidd, 
dribbling past a SSo Paolo defender in the final of die Liberators Cop soccer tournament in S5o Paulo. Die 
Argentines won on penalty kicks, 5-3, ending the Brazilian team's two-year reign as South American club champion. 


WEMBLEY, England— -The 
Football Association Cup, con- 
sidered the world’s oldest elimi- 
nation soccer tournament, has 
succumbed to the mod- 
ay lure of sponsorship. 
The FA on Thursday an- 
nounced a deal for the 123- 
year-old competition with the 
Littlewoods Pools company, 
which runs a weekly national 
soccer pool 

The four-year contract is 
worth £20 million ($30 million) 
and is the biggest-ever deal of 
its kind in Britain. 

While the FA long ago sold 
off sponsorship rights to its soc- 
cer leagues and the League Cup, 
it has resisted selling off its 
most famous attribute. 

But England’s failure to qual- 
ify for the 1994 World Cup cre- 
ated a shortfall of FA funds. 

“We know how special this 
property is," said the FA’s com- 
mencial director, Trevor Phil- 
lips. “It is a marvelous national 
asset, but the reality is that the 
FA needs funds to safeguard 
the future of the game, although 
we won't ever forget our re- 
sponsibilities of maintaining 


NHL Won’t Impose Camp Lockout j 

NEW YORK (NYT) — National Hockey League officials have 
told member clubs that there would be no lockout of players from! 
training camps, which begin next week. • • 

The NHL made the announcement Wednesday night. AMraugh; 
no formal threat to close the camps had been officially isstie&it, 
was widely expected throughout me league that camps won y be- 
closed by Gary Bettman, commissioner of the league, unless there! 
was progress in negotiations toward a new collective bargaining- 
agreement to replace the one that expired last September. ; 

The two sides met for five hours Tuesday in Toronto and were; 
expected to resume negotiations Thursday or Friday, possibly in 
New York. 



Indians Acquire Twins’ Winfield 



CLEVELAND (AP) — Despite doubts about whether the 
baseball season will re 


resume, the Cleveland Indians moved te 
improve their postseason chances by acquiring Dave Winfield 
from the Minnesota Twins just before the 1994 trading deadline, 
Winfield, 42 and a 12-time All-Star, will be available for the 
postseason if the strike ends, and if the Indians make their Erst 


A* 


. -w ... 

- * • 


trip to the playoffs since 19S4. The Indians would be the Ameri- 
can League wfl 


7 S 


Id-card playoff team based on team records up t$ 
the start of the strike on Aug. 12. 

The deal was announced just before Wednesday’s midnight 
deadline for postseason rosters. Winfield, under a $2 million 
contract, played 77 games this season and hit .252 with 10 home 
runs and 43 RBIs. He will be a free agent at the end of the season; 
but reportedly waived a no-trade clause in his contract to join the 
Indians. Minnesota’s general manager, Andy MacPhail, said tbU 
Twins made the trade to give Winfield “another chance at partial 
paring in postseason play.” 


\ > *• 


••• 

T — 


1 •-« « 

.. ■. 


Ferrari’s Berger Hurt in Taxi Crash 


British Team Won’t Quit Track Cup 


The Associated Pros 


LONDON — British track’s 
governing body announced 
Thursday that it would not pull 
its women's team out of next 
week’s World Cup, despite 
pressures to do so after a posi- 
tive drug test against the runner 
Diane Modahl. 


World Cup captain, Diego 
ma, tested 


tivc for 


Maradona, 

the stimulant epheonne. 

Maradona was suspended for 
15 months by FIFA last month. 


“The British Athletic Federa- 
tion will not be withdrawing its 
women's team from the World 
Cup final," said a federation 
statement. “The federation be- 
lieves that it is an important 


lie that guilt is never as- 
it must be proven.” 

The International Amateur 
Athletic Federation had called 
for Britain to pull its team out 
of the World Cup, Sept. 9-1 1 at 
London’s Crystal Palace, say- 
ing it had a “moral obligation" 
to do so in the light of the re- 
sults of Modahl’s tests. 

She tested positive for testos- 
terone at a meet in Lisbon on 
June 18, A week later, she won 
the 800 meters at the European 
Cup, qualifying England for the 


The results of Modahl’s “A" 
>le were reported to the Brit- 
federation last week. The “B” 
sample was tested on Tuesday; it 
revealed a level of testosterone 42 
times higher than normal 
In its statement, the British 
body cited IAAF rules that 
state that Modahl would not 
become ineligible until a bear- 
ing was conducted into the pos- 
itive drug results. 

The statement decried the 
long delay between the original 
test and the date the federation 
was informed of the result. 


Baseball’s Non-Talks Fail 


New York Times Service 


MONZA, Italy (AP) — The Austrian Formula-One driver 
the dignity and traditions of the Gerhard Berger was hospitalized briefly after a taxi in which he 
FA Cup." was riding was rammed by another car near tile Monza racetrack* 

. the Italian news agency ANSA reported. 

Berger, who drives for the Italian team Ferrari, suffered a light 
neck lash but was dismissed from a hospital late Wednesday, the 
report said. The Austrian driver was expected to be at the Monza 
track Thursday for a series of tests of his Ferrari car for the Italian 
Grand Prix, which is scheduled on Sept 1 1. 


r-.t 4i-. • 


*. * 

— WN 


NEW YORK — The owners’ negotiators took three and a 
half hours to tell federal mediators they had nothing new to 
talk about The players* labor representatives said the same 
thing in 15 minutes. 

The result: No further talks are scheduled in the season- 
shattering baseball strike that on Thursday completed its 
third week. The mediators met Wednesday with both sides 


separately, then departed without public comment But their 
silence shouted volumes about the state of 


the negotiations. 

Call the talks recessed, adjourned, on hiatus, broken off or 
collapsed; the meaning is the same: No foreseeable hope 
exists that any part of the remainder of the season or the post- 
season can be salvaged. 


For the Record 


Prosecutors dropped assault charges against the New Jersey 
Nets forward Derrick Coleman, 27, saying they could not prove 
the case, in which the National Basketball Association player had 
been accused of beating up three teenagers outside a Manhattan 
bar on April 30. (A Pi 

Miguel Induram, the four-time Tour de France champion, will 
not be allowed to use an innovative wheel fork or a laser beam to 


pace him in his attempt to break the world one-hour cycling 
record on Friday in Bordeaux, the International Cycling Uniofi 


said on Thursday. 


(Reuters) 


Gheorgbe Hagi, the Romanian World Cup star, will miss his 

tnip qualifier against 


national soccer team’s European Champions’ 

Azerbaijan next weds because of a strained thigh muscle. (Reuters) 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


i" r r m 


E2EZ23! 



NO* ■W'B* O'* !■•*» •# 

Mil OJ 


tawTHE i 1 1 l 1 1 -QraLLH! 


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»N BELGIUM 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1994 


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Vinomio Pit hi’ RculfTt 


TAKING THE PLUNGE — Fu Mingxia of China performing Thursday as she took 
I the llNneter platform lead at the World Swimming Championships in Rome. 


Page 19 


Inj ury Forces Lendl Out, Graf Charges On 

Compiled h' Our Staff From Dispatches 


NEW YORK — Ivan Lendl 
was forced to retire from his 
second-round match at the U.S. 
Open on Thursday, withdraw- 
ing because of a back injur.' in 
the third set against Bemd Kar- 
bacher of Germany. 

Karbacher was leading 6-4, 
7-6 (7-5), 1-0 when Lendl pulled 
out. but the veteran right- 
hander had held a 5-0 lead in 
the second set before his game 
collapsed. 

In women's second-round 
matches. Steffi Graf, the de- 
fending champion and No. I 
seed, made quick work of San- 
dra Cacic of the United Slates 
after lOth-seeded Zina Garri- 
son Jackson made quick work 
of a shoe. 

Two points into her match 
against Taola Suarez of Argen- 
tina, Garrison Jackson left the 
court when her shoe fell apart. 

“I didn’t have a pair,” Jack- 
son Garrison said. “One of the 
players let me use theirs. I was 
pretty lucky that there was 
someone in the locker room 
with the same size foot” 

With the borrowed shoes. 
Garrison Jackson defeated 
Suarez. 6-4, 6-3. 

As fate would have it. Garri- 
son Jackson's borrowed shoes 
came from Cacic. 

“She said she had a new pair 
and an old worn-out pair,” said 
Garrison Jacteon, who took the 
old pair. “Once it finally mold- 
ed to mv foot, it was fine. At the 


beginning, it kind of felt I was 
walking like a duck or some- 
thing.” 

Graf made Cacic feel even 
worse, defeating the 19-year- 
old right-hander. 6-0, 6-2. 

In other early matches. 
No. 1 1 Amanda Coetzer of 
South Africa defeated Eugenia 
Maniokova of Russia 6-2, 6-0; 
Austrian Judith Wiesner 
downed Caroline Kuhlman of 
the LTniled States, 6-2. 6-2, and 
Alexia Dechaume-BailereL of 
France stopped Maria Jose 
Gaidano of Argentina, 7-5, 6-3. 


In men's second-round 
matches, No. 13 Thomas Mus- 
ter stopped Maurice Ruah of 
Venezuela, 6-4, 4-6. 6-4. 6-2, 
and No. 15 Marc Rosset defeat- 
ed Sweden's Nicklas Kulii. 6-4, 
6-2. 6-7 (2-7), 6-2. 

On Wednesday, Michael 
Chang used his speed and Pete 
Sampras used his power. Both 
ways worked, as Chang moved 
into the third round while Sam- 
pras grabbed a second-round 
spot. And where Sampras had 
what for him was the perfect 


foe. Chang found a familiar and 
dangerous combatant. 

“We're not players who can 
really serve you off the court or 
blow you off the court," Chang 
said of his opponent and fellow 
American. MaliVai Washing- 
ton. “It’s more or less a chess 
match. 1 tried not to take it into 
the fifth set because 1 knew be 
was not going to get tired." 

Chang, seeded sixth, boosted 
his edge in their rivalry to 6-3 
with a 4-6. 6-2, 6-3. 7-6 (7-3) 
victory. 


Sampras, top-seeded and the 
defending champion, overpow- 
ered the South African qualifier 
Kevin UUyett, 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. 

Sampras had not played a 
match since mid-July due to 
tendinitis of the left ankle. 

“The ankle is feeling fine.” 
said Sampras, who has won 
four of the last five Grand Slam 
events. “I was pretty much hap- 
py with every aspect of my 
game.” 

From the 206th- ranked Ul- 

lyett's vantage point, the Aus- 
tralian and Wimbledon cham- 
pion had not suffered much 
from the six-week layoff. 

“His game is on another lev- 
el." Ullyeu said. “1 think he 
looked pretty good today." 

Another seeded women's 
player was knocked out of the 
year's final Grand Slam tourna- 
ment. 

Leila Meskhi of Georgia 
ousted No. 14 Anke Huber of 
Germany, 6-2, 6-2. 

In other matches involving 
seeded women. No. 2 Arantxa 
Sanchez Vicario. the French 
Open champion, downed Nata- 
lia Tauziai of France, 6-2, 7-6 (7- 
5): No. 3 Conchiia Martinez, the 
Wimbledon winner, stopped Ni- 
cole ArendL 6-3, 6-3; No. 5 Ki- 
miko Date downed Yone Ka- 
mio. 6-0. 6-2, in an all-Japanese 
battle, and No. 8 Gabricla Saba- 
tini of Argentina, the 1990 U.S. 
Open champion, stopped the 
American Meredith McGrath, 
6-4. 6-7 (5-7), 6-1. f.4P, Reuters i 


What’s in a Name? Excitement! 


Sew Yerk Times Service 

NEW YORK — As Lhe crowd filed from 
the subway to the National Tennis Center, a 
voice above the din lamented the fact that it 
was downright hard these days to know who 
any of the piayers were. 

it is a widely shared complaint. 

“We try to come out every year, but we don't 
find it as exciting," said Jean" PedricL *1 don't 
think the names are out there that you used to 
see, and therefore the matches aren’t there.” 

The yearning for a player with a personal- 
ity strong enough to elicit love of hate was 
most evident during the final match of Mon- 
day night's session. As Richey Reneberg and 
Boris Becker battled through a grueling fifth 
set, the Stadium Court crowd repeatedly 
chanted during change-overs: “We want 
Johnny Mac! We want Johnny Mac!” 

Eventually, McEnroe, who now analyzes the 
Open for a cable television network, stuck his 


head out of his box to acknowledge the cheers. 

On Tuesday night, the featured match was 
Jim Courier versus Aaron Krickstein. and 
that seemed to be enough for at least one fan. 

“It's not a premier matchup, but it is still 
exciting," said Charlie Dellavecchia. “But in 
any kind of sport personality is always a plus. 
If performance means everything, personality 
adds excitement." 

Much of the personality in tennis has disap- 
peared with McEnroe, Jimmy Connors, Chris 
Even and Martina Navratilova, who dominat- 
ed the game and the stage in the 1980s. 

But not everybody minds the notion that 
te nnis is more v anill a than rocky road. 

“We look forward to the Open.” said 
Zenon Czujko. an annual visitor. “1 find Ga- 
briel a Sabatini or Steffi Graf just as enjoy- 
able. I found Mary Joe Fernandez pretty 
interesting this morning. She played nice.” ’ 


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U.S.Open 



nm Round 

- Andrei Medvedev ((). Ukraine, del. Gilbert 
Sdnller. Austria. *a H 6-8; Jaime Yzooa. 
Peru. deL Gabriel Markin. Argentina. 7-6 <?- 
41.6-2.6-2; David Witt. U&. del. Wally Mawr. 
Australia, 6-2. 3-4. 7-5. 6-1; Karel Novacek. 
Czech Republic dei Alexander Voikov, Rus- 
sia. 6-3. 34, 6-1, 7-5; Daniel Vacek. Czedi Re- 
paMCrdet Yovnes El Aynaaui, Morocco, 6-7 
(571, 7-5, 6-1, 51 ; Mark Petchcv. Britain, del. 
Karel Kuccra. Slovakia. 6-4 7-6 (7-31.6-3; Ycv- 
jSny KaMnlkov (14), Russia, dot. Jacco Eh 
Rob. Retbertand s. 7-4 €7-4), 7-5,64; Martin 
Damm,Czecfi Republic del. Fernando MeD- 
oent, Brazil, 6-2 64, 44, 6-4 
Karim Alaml, Morocco, del. Aberlo Costa, 
Spakv 6-L 7-5, 6-2i Joem Renzenbrink, Ger- 
many.deL Grant Staftard,Sotitli Alrtca6-t 6- 
464; Pele Sampras (1), UX. def. Kevin Ul- 
fyett, South Africa, 62.61 6-2; Alex O’Brten. 
U5.det. Paul HaartNils, NettMnondc63,7-6 
(7-1), 64; Christian D er ust r u m. Sweden, del. 


Tommy Ha Ui, 64, 63, 74 (7-1); Jama 
Blonanan, Sweden, del. Jonathan Stork, US- 
62. 62, 74; Marcos Ondruska South Africa 
de(. Alberto Berasatewl na>. Spam, 61,24,6 
3,6-3; Francisco Clavet, Spa In, del. Jean-Ptil- 
impe Fleurfan. Franca 64,4-4 64.6474 (S- 
7). Byron Black. Zimbabwe, def. Patrick 
McEnroe. ILS~ 74 (67), 62. 64 
Second Round 

Jim GraMz, U5- del Ellis Ferreira. South 
Africa. 4-4 6-4 62, 63; Mfrhael Cnang (6j, 
U5udeL MaliVai Washington. Ui 46.6-2. 64. 
74 (7-3); Bernd K ar ba ch er . Germany, def. 
Ivan Lendl, U.5L 64, 74 (7-5). 1-0, rel. 

Women's Slnales 
Seamd tuwnd 

dnper Hefgeson, UJL, def. Asa Cartssan, 
Sweden, 61.61; Isabelle Demonaeot, France, 
del. Radka Znibakava Slovakia 34. 61, 62; 
Motalla Medvedeva, Ukraine, def. Amy Fra- 
sier (16). U.S. 62, 67 (3-7), 64; Mary Joe 
Fernandez (*>, US. def. Pally Fendlck. UA. 
6X2-474 (7*4); Arantxa Sandies Vicar lo 121. 
Spam, def. Nathalie Tauziai. France. 62. 74 
(64) ; Elena Ukhovtseva, Kazakhstan, del. 
Silvia Farina Holy, 7-5, 24. 64. 

Sandra Czech mi, Italy, dei Audra Keller, 
U5.63.34, 64; LeOa Meskhi, Georgia, del. 


Anke Huber 114], Germany, 61 62; Klmika 
Date (5), Japan, del. Yone Korn la Japan. 6a 
62; SM-TIna Wana. Taiwan, del. Kyoto No- 
Dotsuka Japan, 4-4 64,62; Barbara Rlltner, 
Genwany .imf.Bmonuela Zarda Switze r l an d, 
6a 6-3; Lteo Raymond. U5.del. Aievandra 
FusaL France, 62, 34, 61; 

Gobrtem Saballnl 18), Argentina, del. Mer- 
edlth McGrath. U5. 64 67 (67), 61; Gisl 
Fernandez. UJL deL Sanarlnr Teslud. 
France, 7-664; Ann Grossman, U 5. del. Ka- 
terina Maleeva. Bulgaria. 6-4 1-4 61; Con- 
chita Martinez r3), Spain, del. Nicole Arendt. 
U.S. 61 6-3, Jud I m Wiesner, Austria, del. Car- 
oline Kutiiman, U6. 62. 62; Zina Garrison 
Jocksan (10). U6.dcL Poola Suarez. Argenll- 
na. 6-4 64; 4lexla Dachaume-Ballerei. 
France, def. Marta Jose Gakkmc, Argentina 
7-6 63: Amanda Coetzer (11). South Africa, 
def. Eugenia Maniokova Russia 62, t-fl. 


INTERNATIONAL TEST 
Japan 64 Malaysia 11 




ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Wednesday's Results 
Arsenal 0. Blackburn 0 
Chelsea 3 Manchester cirv 3 
Leicester Cl tv t. Queens Pori Pcngtrs I 
Manchester Untied X Wimbledon 0 
Sheffield Wednesday 0. Norwich Cirv 0 
Soutnampfon 0. Liverpool 2 
West Ham t. Newcastle United 5 
DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Wednesday's Results 

Sparta Rotterdam a Feyerword Rotterdam 1 
FC Twenle Enschede Z Dordrecht "TO 2 
NAC Breda 0, vllesse Arnnem 0 
RKC Waal wilk 1, Rode JC Keritradr 1 
MW Maastricht I. NEC Nllmraen 2 
FC Utrecht 4, Heerenveen 0 
FC Groningen 3. Willem II Tlltxjrg 1 
PSV Eindhoven 4. GA Eagles Devenler 1 
FRENCH FIRST DIVI5ION 
Tuesday's Result 
Cannes 1 Auxerre 1 

Wednesday's Results 
Boslla 1. Paris stGermaln 7 
Met: 1. Lille i 


Lyon I, Coen 0 
Le Havre 1, Bordeaux 1 
Lens D. St. Ellenne 0 
Sochaux Z Montpellier 0 
Strasbourg 6 Mortloues 0 
Nantes Z Remcs 0 
Monaco D. Nice ? 


BASEBALL 
America! League 

CLEVELAND— Acquired Dave Winfield, 
outflriaer -designated hitter. Irem Minneso'.a 
tar a atover la be named. 

TEXAS— Recalled Jet! Kuson. mtiHder. 
tram Oklahoma Cl tv. AA. 

Hattonci League 

HOUSTON— Agreed la terms with Russ 
Johnson, shorts lop. on ml nor- 1009 ue centred. 

FOOTBALL 

Notional Football League 

CHICAGO— Signed James Burton, comer- 
back. Released Dwayne Joseph, comer bock. 
Signed Ervin Collier, defensive tackle, to me 
practice sauod- 


CINCINNAT I— Signed Ronald Edwards. of- 
fensive tackle. Stoned Jett Hill, wide receiv- 
er; Kevin Jefferson, linebacker -snapper; 
Jerry Reynolds, offensive lineman; and Ro- 
mondo Stallings, defensive end. to the prac- 
tice Muod. 

KANSAS CITY— Waived Dunstan Ander- 
son. defensive end: Trevor Cobb and Ernie 
Thompson, running backs: Tom Neville, 
guard: Keith Troylor. defensive tackle; and 
Barry Wilburn. carnerixKkSlBnod Greg 
Manusky.llnebocker.Slgned Dunston Ander- 
son. defensive end: Anthony Daigle, running 
back ; and Alan DeGratftnreM. wide receiver, 
to the practice squad. 

LA. RAIDERS— Waived RJ. Kars and 
Cary Brabham, defensive bocks; Randv Jor- 
dan and Derrick Gainer, running backs: John 
Morton, wide receiver; and Alberta White, 
defensive UnemanSlgned Donald Frank, de- 
fensive bock. Placed Torln Dam, defensive 
bock, on Inlured reserve. Signed Wes Bender, 
naming back; John Morton, wide receiver; 
Cary Brabham, defensive back. Willie Stub- 
bins. offensive tackle; and Alberto While, de- 
fensive lineman, to the practice squad. 

MIAMI— Jonn Offer dahl. linebacker, re- 
tired. Waived Mark Dennis, offensive tackle; 


CROSSWORD 


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20 ipecac is one 

21 Penned 

23 Gathers data 
2 SKLM rival 

27 Nod 

28 Rower part 
31 Pick users 

37 Remove from 
the bulletin 
board 

38 Sartre novel 

39 Debark 

«2 Belgian seaport 

43 gestae 

(deeds) 

44 Grant 
43 Frank 

conversations 
51 Toots 
ss Castle of Sl 
G eorge site 
56 Pelvic bones 
58 BiWical judge 
58 Acquire 
so Suspect 

s2 Moves in on 
63 Tea. hand or 
bath. e.g. 

M Garner 
85 Driving 
maneuver 
SB Surfers' mecca 


DOWN 

1 Large plums 

2 Unhidden 


a Soleil 

(Louis XIV) 

4 Calendar abbr. 

s Triple-decker 

6 Not excited 

7 Agreements 

8 U.S. Army 
medal 

8 Sprinkle 

10 Type opening 

11 Gods of 
Asgard 

12 Panicle 

14 Four-time 

Japanese 

premier 

is Fictional 
detective 

20 Spanish for 
Spanish 

22 Miss Ketf el al. 

24 Corrode 

26 A sacred 
scripture 

28 Bulldog's 
cousin 

29 Odysseus' 
rescuer 

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Solution to Puzzle of SepL 1 


32 Marlins' 

47 Jazz bassist 
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BELGRAVIA 

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(Continued From Page 4) 





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| Dump Intematicnol 

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Correction: An erro- 
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Donf miss the upcoming 
Sponsored Section on 

Shipping 

in the September 6th 
issue of the newspaper. 



International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

• Monday 

International Conferences and Seminars 

• Tuesday 
Education Directory 

• Wednesday 

Business Message Center 
© Thursday 

International Recruitment 

• Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace i. Holidays and Travel 
© Saturday 
Arts and Antiques 

Pius over 300 headings in international Classified 

Monday through Saturday 
For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 37 94 74 - Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 


Aaran C raver, running back; Demons John- 
son. wide receiver; George Rooks, defensive 
tackle; JavWillia ms. defensive end; and Rob 
Coons, i torn end. Stoned Ethan Albright, tack- 
le; Calvin Jackson, comerback; Demcrls 
Johnson, wide receiver; and Pot Johnson, 
safety, to the practice squad. 

MINNESOTA- Waived Pete Berdch. line- 
backer; Carr Blanchard, ptaceklcker; La- 
mar McGrloas. safetv; Robert Stolen, full- 
back; Mike wells, offensive lineman; Brad 
Culpepper, defensive tackle. Shelly Hum- 
mond^defenslveback. Bryan Barker, punter. 
Re-stoned Lamar McGrlggs. safety, and Rav 
Rowe, light end. Signed Mike Saxon, punier. 
Stoned Pete Berdch, llnebocker. and Robert 
Stolen, running bock, to the practice saved. 

NEW ENGLAND — Waived Tror Brown. Uck 
returner; Dion Lambert, sal tty; John Washing- 
ton. defensive tackle; Mike Staten, offensive 
tackle: Joe Burch, center; Mario Henry, wide 
receiver; aid Paul Frond sen. tlonr end. 

NEW ORLEANS— Waived Eric Martin, 
wide receiver: Reggie Freeman, linebacker; 
Royce Netson, guard; Israel Byrd, corner- 
back; Alan Kline, lockle; and Poll Evans, 
fight end. Put Tom Ricketts, offensive line- 
man. an inlured reserve. Added Mott Camp- 


bell. right end. and Ralph Dawkins, running 
back, to developmental squad. Stoned Matt 
Campbell. fto hi end; Ralph Dawkins, running 
back; Pat Evans fight end; Alan Kline, offen- 
sive tackle; and Israel Bvra, comerback, to 
the practice squad. 

n.y. giants— W aived Chuck Johnson, 
guard; Kurt Btoedom, punter; Mike Alexan- 
der. center; John Brown and Donald Douglas, 
comerbacfci; Jarred Bunch and Eric Gant, 
fullbacks; Brian Fox. quarterbac k ■ 


The Michael Jordan Watch 

WEDNESDAY'S GAME: Jordon went 2- 
lor-4 with two singles in Birmingham's 54 
victory against Chattanooga. 

SEASON TO DATE; Jordan ts batting JOS 
(Bs- tor-430) wtiti 44 runs. 17 doubles, one triple, 
three home runs. 51 RBis.« walks. 1 10 strike- 
outs and 30 stolen bases in 4B attempts. He has 
211 Put outs, live assists and 11 errors In lhe 
outfield. 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH AFFECT 
YOUR UFE THIS YEAR : 

VS. Action Against Haiti- 
An End inSight for Bear Market l 
Slow Recovery in Europe 
China 9 * Trade Agreements 

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Page 20 


EVTERINATIOJVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Amazements Galore 


If Clinton Is a Waffle, What Is Lincoln? 


PEOPLE 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — Whai an 
amazing country. We 


amazing country. We 
crossed 434 miles of it by land 
and 20 or 30 more by sea the 
other day and ended in a motel 
room for the handicapped, who 
are not called handicapped any- 
more. 

You had to put on eyeglasses 
and go hands and knees to die 
floor looking for directions for 
operating the shower, which, af- 
ter much fumbling among the 
plumbing, were found in small 


print on the bathtub faucet 
what amazing physical chal- 


What amazing physical chal- 
lenges we put to our physically 
challenged. 

We passed through Massa- 
chusetts, whose governor, ac- 
cording to the papers, was 
working hand in glove with In- 
dians to mak e Hew Bedford the 
Las Vegas of the clamshell belt 
New Bedford's fishing industry 
is said to be kaput modem fish- 


erabie for low-lifers and com- 
piling computer dossiers to 
blackball you at the employ- 
ment office or keep you out of 
the insurance club. 

Still, it was a surprise when 
the ferry commandant after 
broadcasting directions to the 
lifeboats ana warnings to keep 
dogs away from the food 
counter, announced that smok- 
ing was prohibited by state law 
everywhere aboard ship. Every- 
where. 

Including the open decks. 

O 


By James Barron 

Nttr York Tima Service 

N EW YORK — Sony, "Doones- 
buxy President Clinton is not 
the first world leader to be caricatured 
as a breakfast food: a century and a 
half ago, the much-hated Louis-Phi- 
lippe of France was savaged as an 



overripe pear. The image stuck, and in 
French “pear” became slans for “fat- 


J've always regarded grapefruit Juice 
as a great dentifrice. It’s the only way 
you can actually have your breakfast 
Juice and clean your teeth without much 


ZeffirdtiSuesMagpr^ 
For Libel in London ~ 



ofaneffort. That’s what I think of when 
I think of Mr. Nixon. 

James Shenton, prof 


ing technology having succeed- 
ed apparently in fishing the 
ocean bare. 

An Indian gambling opera- 
tion is now regarded as the 
town's best hope. It's amazing 
how governments everywhere 
have muscled in on the old 
gangster enterprises. Horse- 
race bookie, numbers-racket 
czar, booze dispenser — in 
many states government is now 
one or all of these things that all 
governments once fought as 
sources of corruption. 

* The governor wants Massa- 
chusetts to get 25 percent of 
whatever the Indians take off 
gamblers presumably eager to 
pour into New Bedford to re- 
place the fish. Thus, salvation. 
□ 

The Indian, once hailed as 
''the noble red man** (while be- 
ing nearly exterminated by his 
high-minded admirers), is 
transformed into a Native 
Americanhood that grants him 
the right to become — what? — 
the heir to the legacy of Bugsy 
Siegel. 

In Massachusetts, too, we 
traveled two hours by feny 
through a damp blustery morn- 
ing. Health tyrants, of course, 
ore everywhere making life mis- 


It is amazing how quickly 
politicians issue tyrannical de- 
crees under the influence of 
panics, like the assault on the 
tobacco industry. 

The highways swarmed with 
amazements. Gargantuan 
trucks going 70 miles an hour 
bore alarming placards: “Ex- 
plosives," “Corrosives," “Mu- 
nicipal Waste.” Outside Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania, we came on 
a three- truck caravan with one 


French “pear” became slang for “fat- 
head.” 

For 10 days the comic strip 
“Doonesbury" has been portraying 
the president as a waffle. Sinught- 
comered, not soggy from syrup, the 
waffle chats with a well-dressed aide 
who appears to be Joshua Steiner, the 
Treasury Department wunderkind 
who disavowed his damaging diary 
about the Whitewater affair. 

Ever since the 19th-century car- 
toonist Thomas Nast p inn ed the don- 
key on the Democrats and the ele- 
phant on the Republicans, cartoonists 


SUP? 


James Shenton, professor of histo- 
ry, Columbia University 


GERALD R. FORD 
A 2-by-4. He was both solid and 
stolid and held things together and the 
roof didn’t fall in, for which I give him 
more credit than in 1975, when I wrote 
that book and had him as Bozo the 
Clcrwn. 

Richard Reeves, author, “A Ford, 
Not a Lincoln” 


have been mapping the iconography 
of American politics. But food? Draw- 
ing the president as a waffle seems like 
an all-American update of the 1942 
comedy ‘To Be or Not to Be.” 

In a scene with Jack Benny, one 
character observes that a herring had 
been named after the German Chan- 
cellor Bismarck and a brandy after 
Napolton. And of course there's that 
beef dish that was nami-H after the 
Duke of Wellington. 

When George Bush was in the White 
House, “Doonesbury” showed Him as a 
vanishing point of light, poking fun at a 
presidential program intended to re- 
ward volunteers. Vice President Dan 
Quayle was depicted as a feather. 

As for Clinton, Gariy B. Trudeau, 
who draws “Doonesbury,” invited 
readers to choose a symbol — a flip- 
ping coin or a waffle.* He did not say 
how many readers he heard from, but 
a week later the waffle appeared. 

Trudeau's First Waffle was not the 
first waffle, however. Signe Wilkin- 
son, the cartoonist for The Philadel- 
phia Daily News, showed Clinton as 


large sauarish ugly metal con- 
tainer chained aboard each flat- 


tainer chained aboard each flat- 
bed truck. 

There was no identification, 
though the first truck's contain- 
er bore two words in large let- 
ters: “CAUTION HOT." 

Moving through this sea of 
corrosives, explosives, munici- 
pal waste, mysterious “HOT” 
matter and who knows how 
many armed felons, maniacs 
and drugged losers was an 
amazing reminder of America's 
incurable lawlessness. 


Although a 55-miIe-per-hour 
speed limit was everywhere pro- 
claimed to be t) 


claimed robe the law, every one. 
absolutely everyone, ignored it. 

Corrosives and explosives 
drivers, maniacs and felons, 
drugged losers and show-offs 
chatting on their cellular 
phones — all blithely drove a 
constant 65 to 75 miles per 
hour. It was harrowing as well 
as amazing, and harrowed we 
surely looked at the end, which 
doubtless explains why they put 
us in that room with the shower 
designed to torment the physi- 
cally challenged. 

Ate w York Times Service 


FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT 
That cigarette holder that he had, 
which was a sort of indicator of his 
mood, usually upbeat and optimistic. 






Geoffrey C. Ward, author of “Be- 
fore the Trumpet: Young Franklin 
Roosevelt” and “A First-Class Tem- 
perament: The Emergence of Frank- 
lin D. Roosevelt” 


D*vSd Suter/IHT 


Finding that twist has long been the 
cartoonist's challenge. The first half 
dozen presidents got off easy. “News- 

Hi H n’t huua mHaaup 91 


JOHN F. KENNEDY 
A pair of aviator sunglasses. There 


papers didn’t have cartoons,” said 
John Stag g, a professor of history at 
the _ University of Virginia. “The 
equivalent was' handbills and wood- 
cuts, rather cruder sorts of things, 


was something dashing and glamorous 
about them, out you also didn’t know 


about them. But you also didn’t k 
what was going on behind them. 
Richard Reeves, author, “Presi- 


where you did get fairly basic sorts of 
drawings. The humor and the satire 
derive not like Clinton with the waffle, 
but more from the situation itself.” 

And then there was New York’s Boss 
Tweed. He wasn’t a president, but after 
Nast began depicting his corrupt Tam- 
many machine as a hungry tiger de- 
vouring New York, Tweed bellowed, 
“Stop them damn pictures.’' 

But not just yet. Historians, biogra- 
phers, cartoonists and comedians 
were asked last week how they would 
draw a sampling of presidents — if 
they could draw. Here are the images 
they chose: 

HARRY S TRUMAN 
Harry Truman was a swallow of 
Wild Turkey: reliable, bracing and very 
American : strong, with character, 100 
proof, the real thing And if Truman 
ever took a sip, he swallowed. 

David McCullough, author, “Tru- 
man” 


the proprietor of “International 
House or Waffling” in ApriL 
“There are only so many images to 
go around,’’ said Wilkinson, who won 
the Pulitzer Prize for editorial car- 
tooning in 1992. “Put 100 cartoonists 
in a room and say, ‘Bill Clinton 
changes his mind,' and probably 75 of 
them would say waffle. You're trying 
to get across the idea of flip-flopping, 
but there has to be a twist” 


Richard Reeves, author, “President 
Kennedy: Profile of Power” 

GEORGE WASHINGTON 
Oatmeal or hominy grits, because 
they’re down to earth and he had no 
teeth and they’re the simple kind of 
things people ate in the 18th century. Or 
maybe Cap'n Crunch, because he had a 
military career. But he might have had 
trouble crunching. 

Dorothy Twohig, editor of the Pa- 
pers of George Washington 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN 
A black Bicpen. The cap looks like a 
stovepipe hat and he was tall and thin 


JAMES MONROE 
A puff of smoke, rather vague. He 
had no literary style. His letters are 
difficult to read. He so befuddled and 
obscured an issue that it ceased to be 
controversial 

Harry Ammon, retired professor. 
Southern Illinois University, and a 
biographer of Monroe 

WOODROW WILSON 
A box of Grape Nuts. They are hard 


The film director Franco .**»- 
Urdu is suing a film indu.- 
trade magazine that said he v > - * % 

a fascist member of the Italian . f It 
Parliament Zeffirelli is a senator if 

of Prime Minster Silvio Berios- SjM * 
cold’s Forza Italia, winch gov- ij l* 
eras in a coalition with the two- P . , 

fascist National Alliance and the' , Jill 

separatist-minded Northern 1 ulji l ** 
League. Zeffirelli’s lawyers be- .jffl** 
gan Hbd proceedings against ji> 1 
Screen International in Lon- ("ill 

den's High Court mi Thursday, j *‘[{0 1 
saying the statement was “highly 
damaging to Franoo Zeffirelli's f fl 
international reputation.” hjill 1 ' 

□ 

Tiie Paris Optra faces a fine if " .. , 

it does not allow Mynng-Whm 
Qmng to return to his post as * . . 

musical director. Judge Prim- - 
^oiseRamoff ordered Chung re. ' , 
instated on Monday, but offi- r 
cialsat the Qp6ra Bastille locked * i.. 
him out of a rehearsal hafl. 

Chung is seeking 88,000 francs ; 

($16,000) in damages for each . • 

time the order is violated. Ra- ' * • 
moff said at a hearing that riie 
supports his demand, and possi- t •' 
bly even further penalties. ^ : 



v«, 


and crackfy arid good for the health. 
Wilson wasaharaman to deal with. He 


Wilson wasaharaman to deal with. He 
had his own ideas and he carried them 
out somewhat rigidly. He wasn’t an easy 


man to caricature. Wilson himself used 
to joke about his lack of good looks. He 


stovepipe hat and he was tall and thin 
and he signed the Emancipation Procla- 
mation. Even in the Lincoln Memorial 
for such a beloved president, he looks so 
miserable, you feel like handing him a 
six-pack and saying “Hey, Abe Lin- 
coln , it’s Miller time.” 

Carol Leifer, comedian 
RICHARD M. NIXON 
A glass of grapefruit juice, sour but 
invigorating. When Nixon was at his 
mast sour, he was the most interesting. 


to joke about his lack of good looks. He 
had a limerick: “My face I don’t mind it 
because I’m behind it, it’s the people out 
front that I jar.” 

August M. Heckscher, author, 
“Woodrow Wilson” 


The British saxophonist - 
Tony Coe will receive the 
200,000 Danish kroner.. 
($32,000) International Jazzpar 
Prize on Thursday for his “ex- . 
treme instrumental skill-” Coe, - 
59, is the first winner from out- .- 
side the United States since the 
annual award was created in 
1 989 by the Danish Jazz Center. 

D ^ 

Keith Richards concedes that \ 
he was surprised when BIH Wy- - 
man left the RoSing Stones. He ■ 
never imagined anyone “retir- ' 


JIMMY CARTER 
A can of spinach : you don’t expect 
much, but he turned out to be a better 
president out of office than he was in 


ing.” Answering questions by 
computer on the Prodigy net- 


office. When he was president, the way / 
drew him, he got smaller and smaller 
and smaller. His feet didn’t touch the 
floor. And the teeth. He changed the 
part of his hair and then he tried to talk 
without showing his teeth. 

Pat Oliphant, cartoonist 


computer on the Prodigy net- ■' 
work, Richards said, “My gut - — 

reaction was, nobody leaves ^ 1 

this band, except in a coffin." |[|q||( 

Burt Reynolds is back in the — 
hospital suffering complies- , .•> i » * 

lions from recent hernia sur- *51 ilhllH't 
geiy. The setback forced him to - 

cancel plans to appear this _ « • 

weekend on the Jerry Lewis La- .n Kill tr!l TUI 
bor Day telethon, for which he ** 

was to be co-bost. ' 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


Europe 


Tods* 


Tomorrow 


H**h 

Low 

W 

Wgk 

Low W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

CIF 

4J0NV0 

M-TE 

19*0 

■ 

27/00 

19 86 pc 


17*2 

13/55 

pc 

1004 

14/57 pc 

.flr/iani 

37,00 

IS/Sft 

■ 

29/04 

14«7 , 

ftme/w 

33/91 

50/60 

• 

31/00 

22/71 1 

Parcrkna 

54.75 

17.05 


2879 

20*8 pc 


3Z.W 

1004 

pc 35/09 

18101 t 






Qnraels 

17.1C 

g/4B 


19/68 

13.55 pc 

tLrfUMBl 

31.00 

18.04 


30,08 

18*1 1 

*T«r-*»gm 

lomUttiSoi 

10.04 

3000 

ww 
rec 1 

sh 

■ 

5OJ08 

59*04 

15/53 pc 
2271 pc 

I't+n 

10.04 

13^5 


1004 

11/53 <0 

fei.-*Mgn 

1001 

13 /sc 

1 

17/85 

1Z/W «h 

ilwimr* 

50/79 

17/05 I 

57/00 

17*5 1 

FrviJul 

53.73 

14.37 

1 

5571 

13.55 pc 

ijtncv* 

10-04 

10/50 

1 

5170 

13-55 pc 

5W»k*J 

10/01 

»M0 


17/05 

11*2 pa 


50.05 

17/05 

• 

50/02 

10«S . 


57/00 

2571 

» 

29/04 

2S71 ■ 

Lwten 

57/BO 

17*65 

■ 

2879 

19*6 pc 

Lmtnn 

10.00 

10/» 


50*8 

15.53 ah 

Mwkd 

57.00 

13/55 

B 

29/04 

17*5 a 

.•.Man 

5J/73 

10.01 

K 

20.79 

1**2 I 

rAwrrw 

19 W 

7/44 

■ 

10/0* 

1503 pc 

kladt 

50-08 

13.06 

1 

siz.ro 

1233 pc 

?lr* 

5373 

1001 

PC 

50/79 

1 * 04 pc 


1001 

I3« 


19/08 

11.55 pc 

ra*T» 

54/75 

19*08 


3*75 

21.70 pc 


19«0 

9 -’48 


SITU 

13/55 pc 

.Tff'jie 

53.73 

1509 

1 

55/71 

15*3 pc 

r-r.*jnv J 

15/53 

8*40 

ah 

15/53 

0/40 pc 


5904 

ifi.’BI 


57/80 

17*2 1 

rt r«imitwa '8S» 

7/44 

■ 

18*64 

11/55 pc 


10/31 

12153 


19/8* 

11/55 PC 

r-.r*».vg 

10.04 

8.48 

1 

50.08 

1335 pc 


lew 

9-48 

pc 

1801 

15*3 pc 


57.00 

50« 

1 

.row 

18*0 1 


55/71 

1861 

1 

52/71 

1333 1 

V.-r+aw 

50.79 

170? 

t 

»79 

13 55 «n 

1 

l»M 

75/50 1 

55/71 

14.57 pc 

Oceania 






/J'rV«nl 

1ft >59 

7 44 


15:59 

9/48 pc 


25/71 

13 '53 

■ 

51770 

13.55 pe 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weattier. 



To day 
High Lav 
OF OF 


Bmgtafc 
B«^g 
Hoag Kang 


30/06 24 m 
30/00 23/73 
33W 27«0 
31/M 24/75 
35/90 2 7/BO 
20/82 19/00 
29.04 22/71 
31/M 24/75 
32/S 23.73 
31/BB 24 75 


T omo r r o w 
W High Low « 
OF OF 
l 31/00 24/75 pc 
I 20/04 21/70 pc 
pc 32 *9 27/80 pc 
I 30/06 24/75 I 
•It 35/95 20/71 pc 
pc 20/82 19/66 pc 
pc 29/04 23/73 pc 
pc 31/00 23/73 pc 
pc 32/09 23/73 pc 
pc 3/04 21/70 pc 


] UroeasonBMy 
Cold 


U/ueucmMi. 

Har 


North America 

Pittsburgh through Boston 
•HU be Quito cool this week- 
end. then sunny, warmer 
weather Is expected Mon- 
day Hat weather tvfi extend 
northward from northom 
Mexico through the southern 
Plans Sunday Wo early naxt 
week. Heavy thunderstorms 
wM soak the nonham Plains. 


Europe 

A soaking rain will settle 
across Italy Saturday. Show- 
ers and heavy thunder- 
storms wi0 drill across south- 
east Europe Sunday into 
Monday. London to Pars wd 
have dry. seasonable weath- 
er Saturday into Monday. 
Poland to southern Sweden 
writ be coo* with rain over me 
weekend 


Asia 

Tokyo will be warm and 
humid this weekend Into 
Monday. Seoul wui turn cold- 
er with scattered thunder- 
storms. Heavy rains from the 
remnants d Typhoon Gladys 
wil soak southeastern China 
Saturday. Hong Kong and 
Manila will be warm and 
humid with daily afternoon 
thunderstorms. 


Mpan 29/84 

Capa Torn 20/08 

C« ntlaa 29AM 

Hum 19/00 

L» m 27/M 

tarot. 22/71 

Tins 34/93 


21/70 9 20/82 22/71 pc 
12/53 9 22/71 12/M pc 
15«4 s 29*4 19/66 pc 
10C0 1 22/71 11/52 pc 

23/73 I 20*2 24/75 pc 
S/46 pc 23/73 11/52 pc 
19*8 • 31/0S 21/70 s 


North America 


ArOKnge 

Marla 


Middle East 


Latin America 



Tetter 

— 




Tatar 

— 

Teaienero 


I0gh Low 

W 

«9** 

Low W 


«9h 

Low 

W 

Mgh 



OF CIF 


Clf 

OF 


OF 

OF 


OF 

Cri* 


31/00 54775 


3T.W 

2475 % 

BumaAMf 

1559 

7744 


18704 

SM8 pc 

Cafco 

33*1 51770 


33*1 

ssm 1 

Caracas 

32*9 

5879 


32/09 

20779 pc 


31*0 16?1 


32/09 

18*4 a 

lima 

1654 

15-59 

pc 

18/64 

15/59 pc 


2./B0 18*4 


29/04 

19*8 a 

MaocoG/iy 

Z5'7f 

11/55 

f 

53773 

12/93 1 

(lH*V 

39-TOT 20«n 


41-108 

,5571 a 

RjodeJ*r*«n 

55/77 

1906 

*h 

25777 

13*08 1 

R^adh 

39/105 54.75 


41.10853.73 a 

SamagD 

51770 

7/44 

PC 

2571 



Ctecngo 

Darner 

Dew* 

K»nk*j 

HwMon 

Lo* Angela, 


Legend; s-sunny. KparOyctoudy.cctaudy.sn-ahowers.F'fwidemBvmj.i-mln.s.'snowlkBites. 
gn-anow. l-ice, W-WaaiMr. Aamape.«orecM» and date provided by Accte-Weathar, fnc. ©1 #94 


1457 6/43 

20102 1UM 
21/70 11.52 
21/70 0*40 

31/00 14/57 
21/70 6;48 

32/09 25/77 
31.08 22/71 

re /82 i9» 

33/91 24/75 
17/62 9/46 

19*6 6/43 
31106 24/75 
22/71 12/53 
39HO2 20.02 
22/71 13/55 
20*68 11/52 
10/64 9*40 

24.75 14/57 


I 14/57 6/43 pc 
pc 26/79 14/57 » 

• 19/56 9/48 pc 

pc 21/70 n/52 pc 
6 29 '04 12/53 pc 
9 19-66 10/50 pc 

pc 32/98 26*79 pc 
1 32,89 21/70 pc 

pe 29.04 19/66 i 

1 32/09 23*73 I 

•ft 21.70 13/55 pc 
pc 19*66 2/35 5 
pc 32/89 25/77 pe 
s 21/70 11/52 pc 
pc 30/10026/79 pc 
» 23*73 14/57 pc 
C 21/70 11.-52 rfl 

• 10/08 B/43 i 

pc 23*73 13/55 pe 


SATURDAY / 

Europe and Middle Eaat 
Location Weather 

High 

Low 

Water 

ivnv«i 

Wind 



Temp. 

Temp. 

Temp. 

Heights 

Speed 



OF 

OF 

OF 

(Metros) 

(kph) 

Cannes 

paniy sumy 

27/BO 

18/64 

26/79 

1-2 

NW 

10-20 

Deauville 

partly siXT/y 

20/68 

15/59 

17/62 

2-3 

W 

25-45 

Rimtni 

sunny 

29784 

21/70 

27/80 

0-1 

N 

12-25 

Malaga 

sunny 

2BS4 

22/75 

27/80 

0-1 

W 

12-25 

Cagkan 

partly sunny 

33/91 

24/75 

27/80 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Faro 

sunny 

28/79 

17/52 

20/88 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Piraeus 

sunny 

33/91 

22/71 

27/80 

0-1 

NW 

12-25 

Corfu 

sunny 

32*99 

22/71 

27/80 

0-1 

NW 

15-25 

Bngnon 

cloudy 

20/68 

13/55 

17162 

1-2 

W 

30-50 

Cterend 

sTwwers 

20/68 

lfl/61 

17/62 

1-3 

W 

20-40 

ScfwvBimgen 

showers 

2058 

16/61 

17/62 

1-3 

W 

25-50 

Syt 

rain 

21/70 

16/61 

16/81 

1-2 

w 

20-40 

Izmir 

partly sunny 

33/91 

22/71 

28/82 

0-1 

NW 

1525 

Tel Aviv 

sumy 

30/86 

23/73 

28/82 

7-2 

SW 

20-35 

Caribbean «nd West Atlantic 







Barbados 

partly sumy 

33/91 

25/77 

28/82 

1-2 

E 

20-35 

Kingston 

partly sunny 

43/91 

24/75 

28/82 

1-2 

E 

25-50 

SLTbonas 

partly sunny 

34/93 

23/73 

28/82 

1-2 

SE 

25-15 

HamJton 

partly sunny 

32/B9 

25/77 

28/82 

1-2 

SW 

20-40 

AsWPHdfic 








Penang 

partly sunny 

31/86 

24/75 

29®4 

0-1 

SW 

10-20 

Ptiuka 

clouds and sun 

31/88 

24/75 

29/84 

0-1 

SW 

15-25 

Bali 

clouds and sun 

32/89 

23/73 

29/84 

0-1 

SW 

12-2S 

Cebu 

nmdMMonu 

31/88 

24/75 

3MK 

0-1 

SE 

15-30 

Pa/m Beech, Aus 

pertly sunny 

21/70 

13/55 

18/64 

1-2 

w 

15-30 

Bay ot Islands. NZ 

partly sunny 

18*4 

10.50 

16/61 

1-2 

w 

20-40 

Shrabama 

parity sunny 

31/88 

23/73 

28/82 

1-2 

SE 

20-10 

Honolulu 

partly sunny 

30/86 

24/75 

27/80 

2-3 

ENE 

30-50 



SUNDAY 


M forecasts and Oto noiMod 
by Accu-Waetiar. I nee 199* 


***** 
** urn 


Europe and Middle East 


Location 

weather 

Mgh 

Low 

Wetar 

Wave 

Wind 



Tamp. 

Temp. 

Tamp. 

Heights 

Speed 



OfF 

OF 

OF 

(Metros) 

(kpft) 

Cannes 

partly sunny 

24/75 

16/61 

2879 

1-2 

NW 

12-25 

Deauville 

partly sunny 

21/70 

14/57 

16/61 

1-3 

W 

20-40 

Ranlrt 

sunny 

28/82 

18/64 

27/80 

0-1 

N 

12-25 

Malaga 

sirrry 

31/88 

2373 

27/80 

0-1 

W 

12-25 

Cagbart 

Bursty 

32/89 

2373 

27/80 

0-1 

W 

10-20 

Faro 

clouds and sui 

28/82 

21/70 

19/66 

0-1 

w 

12-22 

Praeus 

sunny 

32/89 

2373 

27/BO 

0-1 

NW 

12-25 

Corfu 

surmy 

32/89 

2373 

27/BO 

0-1 

NW 

15-30 

Bnghton 

partly sunny 

22/71 

1355 

18/61 

1-3 

NW 

15-30 


cloudy 

21/70 

14/57 

16/61 

1-3 

W 

20-40 

Schevenwgen 

cloudy 

21/70 

14/57 

16/61 

1-3 

w 

30-60 

Sytt 

cloudy 

21/70 

13/55 

15/59 

1-3 

w 

20-40 

Izmir 

sunny 

34/93 

2271 

28/82 

1-2 

N 

15-25 

Tel Aviv 

sunny 

31/88 

2373 

28/82 

1-2 

SW 

15-30, 

Caribbem and Weet Atlantic 







Barbados 

partly sunny 

32/89 

2475 

28/82 

1-2 

SE 

20-40 

Kingston 

pertly sunny 

33/91 

2373 

28/82 

1-2 

E 

25-50 

SLTfiomas 

pan/y sunny 

34/93 

2879 

28/82 

1-2 

E 

20-40 

Hamilton 

showers 

30/86 

2475 

28/82 

1-2 

S 

18-35 

Asia/Pacific 








Penang 

thunderstorms 

30/88 

2475 

29/84 

0-1 

SW 

10-20 

Ptiuka 

thunderstorms 

32/89 

2475 

29/84 

0-1 

SW 

1530 

BaS 

clouds and sun 

32/89 

2475 

29/84 

0-1 

sw 

15-30 

Cebu 

partly surmy 

32/89 

2475 

30/BG 

0-1 

SW 

15-25 

Palm Beach. Aus. 

sunny 

23/73 

14/57 

IB/64 

1-2 

sw 

12-25 

Bay of Islands. NZ 

showers 

20/68 

12/53 

17/82 

1-2 

NW 

25-50 

Slurahama 

munderfflorms 

29/84 

2475 

28/82 

1-2 

SE 

20-40 

Honolulu 

showers 

29/84 

2373 

27/80 

2-4 

ENE 

40-70' 


Sr 

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/QKT Access Numbers. 

How to call around the world. 

1 Using the chan below, find the country you are calling from. 

2. DLil the corresponding /08T Access Number. 

3- An AKT English-speaking Operator or voice prompt wil! ask for the phone number you wish to call or connect you to a 
customer service representative. 

To receive your free wallet card of AJKTs Access Numbers Jus* dial the access number of 
the country' yenrie in and ask for Customer Service. 


Iravel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


Australia. 
China, PRCee* 

Guam 

Hong Kong 

India* 

Indonesia* 

Japan* 

Korea 

Korea** 

Malaysia* 

New Zealand 

Philippines* 

C-iliim* 

PMpau 

Singapore 

Sri tanka 

Taiwan* 

Thailand* 


Italy* 172-1011 Brazil 

1-600-881-011 Liechtenstein* 155-00-11 Chile 

10811 Lithuania* 8*196 Colombia 

018-872 Luxembourg 0-800-0111 Costa Rica*a 

800-1111 Macedonia, F.YJL of 99-8004288 Ecuador 

000-117 Malta* 0800690-110 E Salvador* 


000-117 Malta* 
001-801-10 Monaco* 


EUROPE 


QM^ ont | Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 

reach the US. directly from over 1 25 countries. Converse with someone who doesn't speak your 
language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 ajn. knowing they’ll get the message in 
y° ur voire at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with AISC 1 
t To use these services, dial the A1XT Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 

help you need With these Access Numbers and your A 1ST Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an ARET Calling Card or you’d like more information on AIKf global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 




Armenia** 

Austria—" 

Belgium" 

Bulgaria 

Croatia** 

Czech Rep 

Denmark* 

rinJufld* 

France 

Germany 

Greece* 

Hungary* 

igcjantTn 

Ireland 


0039-111 Ncthrrtanrt** 06 

009-11 Norway 8 

IT Poland**- 0*010 

800-0011 Portugal* 05 

000-911 Romania 01 

105-11 Russia— (Moscow) 

235-2872 Slovakia 00H 

800-0111-111 Spains 90 

430-430 Sweden- 02 

0080-102880 Switteriaad* 

0019-991-1111 UJC 050 

Ukraine 4 - 

8*14111 MIDDLE EAST 


19*-O011 Guatemala* 
06-022-9111 Guyana— 


800-190-11 Honduras** 
0*010-4800111 Mexico*** 


000-8010 

00*0312 

980-11-0010 

114 

119 

190 

190 

163 

123 

95-800-4O2-4240 


t • ■ — 




05017-1-288 Mcsragna (Managua) 
01-8004288 Panamas 
155-5042 Peru* 

0042000101 Suriname 

900-9900-11 Uruguay 

020-795-611 Venezuela** 


174 

109 

191 

156 

000410 

80011-120 


V--' - ' V ' 

ft;- - : 


a v . 

J. N v ■ ■ 


8*14111 MIDDLE EAST British \ 

022-903011 Bahrain BOOOOl Cayman 

0800-100-10 Cyprus* 080-90010 Grenada 

00-18000010 Israel 177-100-2727 Haiti* 

99-380011 Kuwait 800-288 Jamaica 1 

0042000101 Lebanon (Bei rut) 426-801 Neth. A 

8001-0010 Qaiar 0800-0H-77 St. Kins/ 

9800-100-10 Saudi Arabia 13*00-10 

194*0011 Turkey* 00-800-12277 Egypt* 1 

01304)010 UAE* 800-121 Gabon* 

_ 00-800-1311 AMERICAS 

OQa- 800-01111 Argentina* 001-800 -200-1111 Kenya* 

999-001 Belize* 555 Liberia 


155-00-11 CARIBBEAN 

0500-894011 B a hamas 1-800872-2881 

8*100-11 Bermuda* 1-800-872-2881 

1ST British VJ. 1 -800-872-2881 

800-001 Cayman Islands 1-800-872-2881 

080-90010 Grenada* 1-800-872-2881 

177-100-2727 Haiti* 001-800-972-2883 

800-288 Jamaica** 0-800-872-2881 

426-801 Neth. Andl 001-800-872-2881 

0800-011-77 Sc Klts/Nevls 1-800-872-2881 

jggMg AFRICA 

00-800-12277 Egypt* (Cairo) 510-0200 

800-121 Gabon* pfo-ooi 

S Gambia* OOlll 




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AFRICA 

(Cairo) 


1-800-550-000 Bolivia* 


0-800-1112 South Africa 


510-0200 

QQa-001 

OOlll 

0800-10 

797-797 

0-80009-0123 


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AT&T 


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