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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Saturday-Sunday, September 3-4, 1994 


No. 34,6S4 


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Quietly 9 Brazil Ignores 
Vatican on Birth Control 

Within a Generation, the Size of Families 
Has Been Reduced by More Than Half 


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By James Brooke 

Nw York Times Service 

RIO DE JANEIRO — At a health clini c 
for working-class women, the gynecologist 
initially thought the question was a joke: 
How often do women make religious ob- 
jections when birth-control techniques are 
discussed? 

“Well, I do remember a case last year,” 
Dr. Josfi Antdnio Aviles, who treats about 
» 80 women a week, finall y answered. “I 
■ think, she was a Jehovah's Witness.” 

When a major United Nations confer- 
ence on population policy opens next week 
in Cairo, Vatican envoys are 
lobby hard to keep all mention 


atican envoys are expected to 
keep all mention of abortion 
and artificial birth control out of official 


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documents. 

Brazil, however, with the world's largest 
Roman Catholic population, is a study in 
the limits on the reach of the Vatican. In a 
country where Catholics account for 75 
percent of the nation’s 154 mini on people, 
every relevant statistic shows that most 
members ignore the church’s teachings on 
famil y-p lanning methods. 

In a survey of more than 2,000 Brazilian 
adults in June, 88 percent of die respon- 
dents said they did not follow church 
teachings on birth control and abortion. 


Kiosk 


Berov’s Cabinet 


ViVi' 





SOFIA, Bulgaria (AP) — After 
months# political turmoil Prime 
Minister Lyuben Berov’s cabinet said 
Friday (hat it would resign. 

Mr. Berov said later that Parlia- 
ment was so hamstrung by contradic- 
tory opinions that he saw new elec- 
tions as the only solution. “In these 
circumstances, the government 
doesn't want to take the responsibility 
for postponing early elections,” Mr. 
Berov told national television. He sug- 
gested be would be willing to head a 
reshuffled transitional government for 
a limited period if Parliament failed to 
choose a new cabinet. 


Books 

Crossword 


paged 
page 19. 


Among women from 25 to 44, that per- 
centage expanded to 90. 

“My mother went through 13 pregnan- 
cies, but only .6 of us survived," Edilza 
Rodrigues said at the Praia do Pinto clinic 
as she rocked her newborn son, Gabriel “l 
decide what I want. And for me, two is 
enough.” 

Played out on a national scale, such 
attitudes toward birth control have led to 
one of the most radical reductions in fam- 
ily size recorded in modem history. In the 
space of one generation, the average num- 
ber of children bom to a Brazilian woman 
has gone from 5.75 in 1970 to 2.35 today. 

“The Brazilian population is controlling 
its birth rate a great deal” said Simon 
Schwartzman, president of the Brazilian 
Institute of Geography and Statistics, a 
government agency that issued new census 
data in August “And the trend is toward 
continued reduction.” 

The census found that Brazil’s popula- 
tion increasingly lives in urban areas — 75 
percent — and is increasingly literate, 80 
percent. The share of households headed 
by women increased over the last 25 years 
from 13 percent to about 22 percent. 
About 40 percent of adult Brazilian wom- 
en work outside the home. 

Census statistics show that the fertility 
rates are particularly low in Brazil’s devel- 
oped south, where they have fallen below 
the replacement level of 2.1 children per 
woman. In the impoverished northeast, the 
rate is 4.0, relatively high but well below 
the 5.8 recorded in the region in 1980. 

About two-thirds of the married women 
practice some form of birth control. Of this 
group. 43 percent use oral contraceptives, 
and 42 percent have been sterilized though 
tubal ligations or other methods. 

“It has gotten into the heads of lots of 
women that tying their tubes is the solu- 
tion,” Dr. Aviles said. “Increasingly, it is 
younger women who want to be sterilized 
after their second child.” 

About 1.4 million Brazilian women un- 
dergo abortions every year. That repre- 
sents about 30 percent of all pregnancies, 
studies show. Nevertheless, abortion is ille- 
gal except in cases of rape or a threat to the 
mother’s health. The safety of the abortion 
therefore depends on the woman’s ability 

Xcnng with the National Conference of 
Brazilian Bishops, based in Brasilia, the 
Catholic Church has successfully lobbied 
to maintain laws against abortion and ster- 
ilization and to block legislative efforts to 

See BRAZIL, Page 2 



Agcncc France-TrcMC 


Cubans Keep Coming as the Talks Go On 

A Cuban refugee being helped aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Key Largo in the Straits of Florida. Coast Guard and 
navy ships picked up more than 2.000 Cubans on Thursday and Friday as talks between U.S. and Cuban representatives ' 
continual at the United Nations in New York, amid signs Havana was weighing U.S. proposals to end the crisis. Page 5. 


Ulster Protestants Ask: Who Are We? 


By Steve Coll 

Washington Fust Sent ce 

BELFAST — The bloodstains on Ske- 
goneill Avenue in Belfast on Friday pro- 
vided a useful reminder that the search for 
a negotiated settlement of Northern Ire- 
land’s long civil war will be impeded by a 
factor often overlooked or wished away’bv 
outsiders to the conflict. 

It is this: A clear majority of the reli- 
giously divided British province’s popula- 
tion, its Protestants, as vet sees little "to be 
gained and much to be feared in the inter- 
nationalized peace process now under way 
here. 

The reasons are many. Behind the vi- 
cious pamphleteering and the occasional 


bursts of gunfire from Protestant terror- 
ists. a complex process is under way among 
Northern Ireland’s majority Protestants — 
a process that some leaders characterize as 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

a desperate search for identity, within the 
community and in its relations with the 
outside world. 

This search for identity is becoming a 
vital part ol Protestant involvement in the 
young, fragile peace process that has been 
kicked forward by the Irish Republican 
Army's cease-fire announcement. 

To say that Northern Ireland’s Protes- 
tants have an image problem is an under- 


statement. When they receive any sus- 
tained attention at all. both within Britain 
and abroad, they are frequently depicted 
as violent obstructionists, infused with re- 
ligious obscurantism and desperate above 
all to cling to the British motherland, to 
which they have been politically and eco- 
nomically attached for centuries. 

Their opponents in the mainly Roman 
Catholic Irish Republican Array, which 
seeks to draw the Protestants into’ a united 
Ireland, have one of tne highest political 
and media profiles of any terrorist group 
in the world. Hollywood memorializes 
their exploits. Geny Adams, the leader of 

See BELFAST, Page 8 


Ulster Killing 
Won’t Derail 
IRA’s Truce, 
Adams Says 

Catholic’s Murder Seen 
As Extremist Attempt 
To Wreck Peace Steps 

Compiled Our Sutf Frem Di spMches 

DUBLIN — The Irish Republican 
Army’s cease-fire will not be derailed by 
Protestant terrorist attacks like the killing 
of a young Roman Catholic man in Bel- 
fast. according to Gerry Adams, president 
of Sinn Fein, the IRA’s political wing. 

“The IRA is a disciplined force and will 
not be provoked by anyone who is trying 
to wreck the peace process.” he said at his 
first news conference in Dublin since the 
Irish Republican Array cease-fire. 

Mr. Adams spoke fours afieT the out- 
lawed Ulster Freedom Fighters look re- 
sponsibility for the first ten-orist killing 
since the IRA announced its peace move 
on Wednesday. 

The murder on Thursday night of a 
Catholic appeared intended to provoke the 
IRA into breaking the cease-fire. 

In the United States, President Bill Clin- 
ton interrupted his vacation in Martha’s 
Vineyard to meet with the Irish foreign 
minister, Dick Spring, who said Mr. Clin- 
ton had pledged additional economic aid 
to support the peace process in Ireland. 
(Page 8.) 

The White House press secretary. Dee 
Dee Myers, said Mr. Clinton had told Mr. 
Spring that he would like to find a way to 
help bolster peace but also “made clear” 
the “severe budgetary constraints” under 
which he is operating and the need to 
obtain congressional approval for direct 
assistance. 

Protestant hard-liners have condemned 
the peace process as an invitation to civil 
war, but more moderate Protestants, who 
favor British rule, do not want their side to 
be seen as the only source of violence. 

“The violence can only damage the 
cause of unionism at this difficult time,” 
said Jim Wilson, general secretary of the 
Ulster Unionist Party, the largest party in 
Northern Ireland. 

“These attacks explode the myth once 
and for all that the loyalists are reacting to 
IRA violence,” said Alban Maginness, a 
Belfast City Council member for the Social 
Democratic and Labor Party, the main 
Catholic party. 

In Dublin, Mr. Adams, whose party 

See ULSTER, Page 8 






Stunning Seoul, 
Beijing Leaves 
Armistice Panel 


By James Stemgold 

New York Tunes Service 

SEOUL — The Chinese government 
stunned South Korea on Friday by an- 
nouncing that it was withdrawing its dele- 
Sgate from the four-decade-old military 
commission that oversees the armistice be- 
tween North and South Korea. 

On the surface, the move was more sym- 
bolic than substantive, since the commis- 
sion’s once critical role in m a n a gi ng day- 
to-day problems at the demilitarized zone 
separa ting the two Korcas, which are still 
technically at war, has diminished greatly. 
As the number of confrontations have 
been reduced, .so have the functions of 
what is known as the Military Armistice 
Co mmissi on, which consists of China, 
North Korea and the UN Co mman d, 
dominated by the United States. 

But in a region where everything has a 
deeper meaning, the announcement was an 
unmistakable blow to South Korea. 

It was perceived here as part of Commu- 
nist Norm Korea's unceasing efforts to cut 
Seoul out of any diplomatic maneuvering 
over the Korean Peninsula Ever since a 
South Korean replaced the American gen- 
eral on the commission in 1991, North 
Korea, which does not recognize the South 
Korean government, has snubbed the 
body and sought to eliminate it. 

Earlier this year, North Korea estab- 
lished what it described as a separate office 
at Panmunjom and pulled its delegation 
out of the commission. North Korea has 
iso said it wants to scrap the armistice 
and instead negotiate a formal peace trea- 
ty, but only with the United States. 

The announcement only added to South 
Korea’s growing discomfort over the fact 
that, in another critical area. North Korea 
recently began negotiating directly with 
Washington over Pyongyang's suspected 
nuclear weapons program. 

South Korea is being consulted on the 
talks, but it has no formal role. That has 

, See KOREA, Page 8 



France to Resume Seat 
*j At NATO Military Talks 

Minister Will Attend Meeting in Spain 


AyTKC France- Pre we 

SMAS HED — South Korean protesters tipping over an exhibit of Japanese arts and crafts at a Seoul museum Friday. 
They were demonstrating against Japan’s plan to atone for wartime acts by creating a vocational-training fund. Page 5. 

U.S. Closes Skies to Airlines of 9 Nations 


By Don Phillips 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The Federal Avia- 
tion A dminis tration has banned airlines of 
nine countries from flying to the United 
States because of inadequate safety over- 
sight 

Belize, the Do minican Republic, Gam- 
bia, Ghana, Honduras, Nicaragua. Para- 
guay, Uruguay and Zaire have been told 
that their c omm ercial airliners may not fiy 
to the United States unless the deficiencies 
are corrected. Transportation Department 
officials said 17 airlines were involved, but 
did not name them. 


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The list was compiled as part of a world- 
wide administration safety survey of the 92 
governments that have commercial airliner 
service to the United States. The survey is 
to be completed by the end of 1996. the 
issuing of the list on Friday marked a 
change in the administration's policy of 
keeping the names secret. 

“The FAA found thau in many cases, 
countries were simply not meeting their 
international obligations.” Transportation 
Secretary Federico Pena said. 

The nine nations were told that they 
might work with third countries to certify 
safely compliance or that they might lease 
U.S. " airplanes with American crews to 
operate service under the country name, 
giving the administration direct jurisdic- 
tion over safety. 

Officials said Ghana. Zaire and Gambia 
dropped plans for air set rice, and six other 
countries have decided to lease planes and 
crews. 

Mr. Pena said traveling to the listed 
countries “is not necessarily unsafe.’" 

“To fly lo these destinations, travelers 
should consider using U.S.-flag carriers 
and the carriers of other countries that 


have adequate civil aviation safety over- 
sight,” he said. 

Four other countries — Bolivia, El Sal- 
vador, Guatem ala and Netherlands Amil- 
See SAFETY, Page 8 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — France has derided to resume 
its seat at NATO's military discussions for 
the first time since de Gaulle pulled his 
country’s forces out of the allied co mman d 
in 1966. 

“It was simply a question of when we 
were going to do it publicly,” said a French 
official. The derision, disclosed Friday, 
further diluted a boycott of the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization, which 
successive French governments have de- 
scribed as a U.S.-dominated institution. 

Publicly, French officials minimized the 
significance of Defense Minister Francois 
Lyotard's attendance at a ministerial meet- 
ing of the alliance late this month in Spain, 
insisting that it did not mean that France 
would regularly attend future sessions. 

In fact, the move was foreshadowed in a 
major military policy statement this spring 
that advocated deeper involvement with 
NATO as a way to retain the U.S. defense 
guarantee for Europe while at the same 
time promoting greater military indepen- 
dence for Europe wi thin the alliance. 

The policy shift, gratifying to allied gov- 
ernments as a step toward greater realism 
in French diplomacy, is still far short of 
reintegrating NATO or abandoning 
France's independence in deciding how its 
armed forces are used. 

Allied officials said that ihe shift reflects 
the strategic realities of the post-Cold War 
era, in which France needs to be more 
involved in NATO because ihe United 
States seems to be less and less involved in 
European security. 


As a result, French military authorities 
need to participate fully in NATO's prepa- 
rations for crises, such as the Gulf war and 
the Bosnian conflict, that end up involving 
French forces. 

Two years ago, France acknowledged 
the need to resume military cooperation 
when Paris and Bonn agreed that tne Euro- 
corps, a French-German force intended to 
bolster the European Union, would work 
with NATO in peacekeeping. Despite en- 
thusiasm in the French military establish- 
ment for closer ties, the government barred 
more visible links. 

Now, however, French officials appar- 

to change 


emly believe that they can hope 
NATO by working more strongly inside 
the alliance. 

Nudging French policymakers, the Gin- 
ton administration has convincingly dem- 
onstrated its readiness to see France and 
other European cations assume more au- 
thority in NATO, allowing a reduced U.S. 
role. 

Trying to seize the moment when Wash- 
ington is ready to make concessions on 
NATO’s structure and still remain en- 
gaged in Europe, French policymakers 
have finally derided to broaden their com- 
mitment to the alliance. 

As one of them said: “If you want Euro- 
pean defense, you discover that NATO has 
most of the bricks, and you want to get 
your hands on them.” 

Typical of this trend, a plan is ripening 
for the Western European Union, the Eu- 
ropean Union's defense arm, to bonw 

See NATO, Page 8 


New Chicago Gangster Era: Killer Is Dead at 11 


By Don Terry 

New York Times Service 

CHICAGO — The search for an 1 1- 
vear-old murder suspect here ended in a 
aank, graffiti-scarred pedestrian under- 
pass. He was found dead in a pool of 
blood and mud. 

The boy had been shot at least once in 
the back of the head, apparently, the 
police said, by the same street gang that 
put a gun in his hands and shoved him 
into the grown-up world of violence and 
death. 

Two fellow gang members, a 16-year- 
old and a 14-year-old, were arrested Fri- 


day and charged with the youth's mur- 
der. 

For three days, the boy, Robert San- 
difer Jr., bad eluded the police and sad- 
dened the city because he was so young 
and because there are so many others 
like him. 

He was neglected and burned with 
cigarettes before he was 3. He bounced 
from his grandmother’s home to group 
homes and from the back of police cars 
to detention centers most of the rest of 
his short life. 

Last Sunday night, the police said that 
on behest of his gang Robert fired a 


semiautomatic pistol into a group of 
teenagers playing football on the far 
South Side. One boy was hit in the hand, 
and Shavon Dean, 14, was struck in the 
head and killed a few yards from her 
front steps. 

Robert lived around the comer from 
Shavon. Both he and Shavon attended 
the same school before Robert was sent 
to a group home. Shavon graduated and 
was headed for high school 
“The boy’s death just makes the whole 
situation sadder," said Tawana Thomas, 
a friend and neighbor of Shavon’s. “Him 

See CHICAGO, Page 8 




Mitterrand Sheds 
A Veil on the Past 

Book Tells of Rightist Years 

By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 

PARIS — It would be an exaggeration to say that the early 
life of President Francois Mitterrand was a state secret, but as 
long as be was a politician with another election ahead of him, 
be ensured that an aura of mystery surrounded the years 
before be emerged as a Socialist leader. 

But now, at 77 and just eight months before retiring from 
the £Iys6e Palace, Mr. Mitterrand has helped a French writer 
reveal new details of his hidden past, fir$L as a rightist student 
in the 1930s and then working for the collaborationist Vichy 
regime in World War n. 

“I fed that he wanted to put things in their place,'* said 
Rene P6an, the author of “A French Youth: Francois Mitter- 
rand 1934-1947,'* "that the time had come to clarify what had 
been years of mystery, that he was persuaded that all tins 
would become known one day or another.*' 

Coming just days after the president presided over com- 
memorations of the liberation of Paris from German occupa- 
tion, pubiicatioa of the book has stirred enormous interest 
here, prompting a front-page article in Lc Monde and exten- 
sive press reports. 

In a sense, because rumors of Mr. Mitterrand’s prewar 
rightists have long made the rounds here, the book serves him 
well because it demonstrates that he was never a member of 
either the violent extreme rightist group known as La Cagoule 
or of the neo-fascist Action Fran^aise. 

Mr. P&m also said that after extensive research and seven 
interviews with the president, he became convinced that Mr. 
Mitterrand had never been and- Semi tic even though be was 
working in 1942 for a government that had already begun 
deporting Jews from France to German concentration camps. 

*‘I didn't think about the anti-Semitism of Vichy,’* Mr. 
Mitterrand was quoted as having said. He said he was aware 
that “unfortunately** some anti-Semites were dose to Vichy’s 
head of state. Marshal Philippe Pfctain. “but I didn't follow 
the legislation of the day or the measures being taken.” 

The book nonetheless details how, upon arriving in Paris 
from the provinces at the age of 18 to study law and political 
science, Mr. Mitteuand was drawn into a rightist group 
known as the National Volunteers. 

In his research, Mr. P6an also found many of Mr. Mitter- 
rand’s articles from the late 1930s. While published in rightist 
newspapers, however, they were in fact literary criticisms, 
early signs of Mr. Mitterrand's lifelong interest in literature 
and philosophy. 

When France declared war on Germany in September 
1939, he joined the army as a sergeant. But the following year, 
as German troops swept into France, he was captured and 
was held as a prisoner of war until, on his third attempt, he 
escaped in December 1941. It was then that he went to Vichy. 

In the Vichy government, be worked first as a documemal- 
ist and then for a co mmissio n dealing with escaped French 
prisoners of war and families of other POWs. The most 
interesting revelation from this period, though, was his admi- 
ration for Marshal Pfctain and his so-called National Revolu- 
tion. 

The cover of Mr. Plan’s book is illustrated by a previously 
unpublished photograph of Mr. Mitterrand meeting Marshal 
Pfctain in October 1942. The bode also details how, the 
following year, the future president was awarded La Fran- 
(jisque, the Vichy government's highest civilian award. 

Bui by then, Mr. Mitterrand was beginning to work with 
the Resistance. In November 1943 he made a secret trip to 
London and, a few weeks later, met dc Gaulle in Algiers. By 
the time Paris fell in August 1944, Mr. Mitterrand, known as 
Morland, was a prominent Resistance leader. His conversion 
to socialism would come later. 

Today, after over 13 years as a Socialist president, he 
sounds stoical about his past 

“During troubled times, moreover when you are young, it is 
difficult to choose," he told Mr. P6an. “I managed to come 
out all right. It is unfair to judge people by mistakes that can 
be explained by the atmosphere of the times. But politicians 
are never forgiven.” 


Bonn Minister Turns Aside 
Calls for an EU Core Group 



Reuters 

BONN — Foreign Minister 
Klaus Kinkcl dismissed calls on 
Friday by leading members of 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s 
Christian Democratic Union 
for five European Union coun- 
tries to form a closely integrat- 
ed core group in the bloc. 

Mr. Kohl's spokesman also 
declined to endorse the propos- 
als, made on Thursday in a pa- 

6 x presented by the Christian 
emocralic parliamentary 
leader. Wolfgang Schduble, 
who called for extensive institu- 
tional reform of the European 
Union. 


play. 


Kinkcl said. 


y/jl 




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Education Directory 
every Tuesday 


Veto Stands 
In Poland 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Abortion 


lussian Spacecraft Docks With Mir 

_ _ . MOSCOW (Reuters) — A Russian cargo craft, which failed 

I |ti |h n Gill or twice last month to dock with an orbiting space station, success- 

Uil I tfln l ll G fully linked up with the station on Friday, a ground-control 

official said. , , . . 

Alexander Malencbenko, crew commander of the Mir station, 
had been ordered to cany out the operation manually after the 
failure of the docking on automatic systems Aug. 27 and Aug.30. 

“The do cking was a success,” the official said. “It went without 
a hitch.” The Progress cargo craft carried food, water, fuel and 
equipment for a manned mission to the space station in October. 

Nigerian Refinery Working Again 

LAGOS (AJP) — Reportedly using bribes, threats, new workers 


Compiled by Ota Stiff From Dispatches 
WARSAW — The Polish 
Parliament failed on Friday to 
override President Lech Wale- 
sa's veto of legislation that 
would have relaxed the over- 
whelmingly Roman Catholic 
country’s strict anti-abortion 
law. 

The lower house of Parlia- 
ment, the Sqm, voted by 232 to 
157, with 22 abstentions, to re- 
ject the veto but fell 42 votes 
short of the required two-thirds 
majority needed to override it 
The amendments vetoed by 
Mr. Walesa would have allowed 
a woman to have an abortion on 



ianck Skmzjnifc/Ajn** Ftantc- P ttaec 

Abortion foes demonstrating in front of the Polish Par li a m e n t before tfae vote on Friday. 

Police Kill 3 Militants in South Egypt ES333SS S|= 

t-'* A. in m ahmod Ia nnt ,lwr. ... - , . 


The Associated Press 

CAIRO — The police killed three people in 
southern Egypt on Friday suspected of rang 
M uslim militants, a day after extremists shot and 
ViTlari a policeman and a police guard, govern- 
ment security officials said 

The officials said the suspects, who were shot 
in the town of Sohag, are believed, to have been 
involved in an attack last week on a Spanish tour 
bus. 

The latest violence came as thousands of dele- 
gates were pouring into Cairo for the United 
Nations International Conference on Population 
and Development, which opens Monday. 

The radical Islamic Group had warned in a 
statement that participants should stay away or 
risk violence. 

The police cracked down on the extremists in 


the spring, breaking up several cells that had 
been operating in Cairo and in southern Egypt 

But on Aug. 26, Muslim radicals raked a tom- 
bus with gunfire in the south, killing a 13-year- 
old Spanish tourist and wounding three others, 
including the boy’s parents. The Islamic Group 
took responsibility. 

Security officials said the three militants were 
killed Friday in a police raid in Sohag, about 380 
kilometers (240 miles) south of Cairo. 

The police also detained more than 20 young 
men suspected of involvement with extremist 
groups, apparently as a security precaution for 
the UN conference, the officials said. 

The policeman and guard were killed Thurs- 
day night at Qena, 460 kilometers south of Cairo, 
the Interior Ministry said in a statement It said 
the attackers fled. 


lies. 

The law now allows far abor- 
tions only when the woman's 
life or health is in danger, if the 
pregnancy results from a crime 
or when the fetus is irreparably 
damaged. Doctors who perform 
abortions in any other cases 
face up to two years in prison. 

The law, ap proved early last 
year, replaced Communist-era 
regulations that allowed abor- 
tions virtually on demand. Un- 
til 1992, when abortions were 
first restricted, about 500,000 
cases were reported each year. 
Last year, the number of offi- 
cially recorded abortions 
dropped to 770. 

The parliamentary health 
committee voted Thursday for 
tbe veto to be overturned on the 
grounds that the strictness of 
the law had led to an increasing 
number of clandestine abor- 
tions as well as to children be- 
ing abandoned by their mothers 
afterbirth, 
ed out that Polish women tend- 
ed to go abroad to get abor- 
tions. 

After the vote Friday, a 
spokesman for Mr. Walesa, 
Leszek Spalinski, said: “The 
president welcomes the Parlia- 
ment's acceptance of his argu- 
ment that human life should be 
protected.” 

But pro-choice deputies have 
already said they will seek a 
nationwide referendum on 
abortion. “We will strive for a 
referendum, so that views of the 
majority of Poles find a reflec- 
tion in the country’s laws,” said 
Barbara Labuda, who beads the 
Women’s Parliamentary 
Group. (Reuters, AFP, AP) 


BRAZIL: Largest Catholic Population Is Study in Limits of Vatican Reach 


Continued from Page 1 

provide free contraceptives through the 
national health service. 

“On the level of daily life, the influence 
of the church is very limited,” said Jacque- 
line Pitangoy, a sociologist. “But it really 
influences government.” 

Unlike Colombia and Mexico, which 
have strong government-led family plan- 


ning programs, Brazil follows a laissez- 
faire policy. With tbe government on the 
sidelines, family planning was first pushed 
by foreign aid organizations in the 1960s. 

No women serve as state governors or 
on the Supreme Court, and women hold 
only 4.7 percent of the seats in the 580- 
member Congress. Although 52 percent of 
the members of the Brazilian Bar Associa- 


tion are women, it has no female directors. 

For the population conference in Cairo, 
the government has adopted a policy of 
supporting language in conference docu- 
ments that would be consonant with Bra- 
zilian law, specifically, allowing contracep- 
tion but permitting abortion only in the 
case of rape or a threat to the mother’s 
health. 


Mr. Kinkd, leader of the 
Free Democrats, rejected the 
concept of “variable geometry” 
that is at the heart of the Schfiu- 
ble paper. 

“It makes an already difficult 
process even harder if concepts 
such as variable geometry or 


Wall Street Looms Over Vote in Quebec 


several speeds are brought into 
y,” Mr. Kir ‘ 


Mr. Schfiuble’s paper said a 
core groupconsisting of Germa- 
ny, France, the Netherlands, 
Belgium and Luxembourg 
should be allowed to move fast- 
er than other members toward 
political and economic union. 


By Anne Swardson 

Washington Post Service 

MONTREAL — In one of 
(he most idling moments in the 
campaign for the future of Que- 
bec, both candidates sought to 
recruit the same behind-the- 
scenes ally — Salomon Brothers 
IntL, the U.S. investment house. 

About halfway into a debate 
between the two men vying to 
head the French-speaking prov- 
ince, Jacques Parizea u , head of 
the separatist Parti Qu&becois, 
reached into his jacket pocket 
and pulled out a citation from a 
two-month-old Salomon Broth- 
ers report that he said support- 
ed his case for an independent 
Quebec. 

“Bravo Salomon Brothers,” 
sneered the incumbent premier, 
Daniel Johnson. “Look at the 
profits they make on the backs 
of Quebec taxpayers.” This was 
a reference to Wall Street's ex- 
tensive bond business with 
Quebec. 

Mr. Johnson then proceeded 
to say that according to his 
reading of the report, Salomon 
Brothers supported him, his 
Liberal Party and keeping Que- 
bec in Canada. 

The exchange was a reminder 
that the wizards of Wall Street 
are, albeit inadvertently, play- 


ing a significant role in Que- 
bec’s most important election in 
18 years. 

As Quebec moves toward the 
Sept. 12 election, when Mr. Par- 
izeau and his separatists are ex- 
pected to capture a majority in 
the provincial legislature, the 
economic impact of an inde- 
pendent Quebec is a subject of 
hot debate. 

Would the cost of separation 
bankrupt the new country? 
Would separating bring on a 
recession? Would Quebec auto- 
matically become a member of 
the North American Free Trade 
Agreement, or would it have to 
negotiate entry? 

And a Parti Qu6becois vic- 
tory does not ensure separation. 
Instead, Mr. Parizean has 
promised to hold a pro- 
vincewide r e f er endum on inde- 
pendence within a year of gain- 
ing power, a risky move, since 
Quebecers like separatism but 
not separation. If a referendum 
were held today, as many as 60 
percent of the people would 
vote against leaving Canada, 
according to surveys. 

This fact explains why finan- 
cial markets have remained 
fairly calm during the campaign 
season. 

Some experts here say uncer- 


tainty in Quebec still poses risks 
for investors. Perhaps the great- 
est cause for concern is not sep- 
aratism but expansionism. Mr. 
Parizeau has laid out a numb er 
of new programs he would en- 
act if dected, some of them po- 
tentially quite expensive in a 
province whose accumulated 
debt already exceeds the size of 
the provincial economy. 

The direct costs of separation 
remain an unknown. Mr. John- 
son pointed out during tbe de- 
bate that, for example, new em- 
bassies would have to be 
constructed around the world. 
In addition, Quebec receives 
about SI billion more from Ot- 
tawa than it pays in federal tax- 
es, which would end under sep- 
aration. And bond buyers 
might well demand higher in- 
terest rates on the bonds of an 
independent Quebec, raising 
tbe new country’s interest costs. 

On the other side of the led- 
ger, Mr. Parizeau claims fre- 
quently that more than $2 bil- 
lion would be saved by the 
elimination of overlapping fed- 
eral and provincial services, al- 
though it is not dear how he 
obtained this figure. He also 
says the costs of separation can 
be absorbed over time by an 
expanding economy, driven by 


tbe measures he vows to put 
into place. 

Economists say costs should 
not be the principal factor gov- 
erning Quebecers’ decision 
about whether to separate. 

“There will be costs, but they 
will not be large and they will 
be temporary,” said Pierre For- 
tin, a professor of economics at 
the University of Quebec at 
Montreal. “If you are deciding 
whether to stay is Canaria, it 
has to be a matter of the heart.” 


Angolan Leader Rejects 
Rebel Peace Proposal 


Reuters 


dent Josh Ed 


. Angol 
uardo ( 


dos Santos 


rejected on Friday a compro- 
mise offered by l/NTTA rebels 
to break a deadlock in peace 
talks aimed at ending nearly 20 
years of civil war. 

The proposal by the National 
Union fix' tbe Total Indepen- 
dence of Angola was handed to 
United Nations mediators in 
Lusaka, Zambia, on Tuesday. It 
would give UNITA veto rights 
over tbe government’s choice 
for governor of the rebels’ 
stronghold of Huambo prov- 
ince. 


country. 

The government is slowly overcoming domestic problems 
caused by striking o3 workers, who are demanding democracy. 
But there was no sign erf improvement in exports of crude oil, 
which have been halved by the nine- week strike. . 

Arthur Onoviran of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Senior 
Staff Association said the government had hired new worms to 
replace striking tanker-truck drivers. In a telephone rail from 
where he is hiding. Mr. Onoviran said the government had used 
bribes and threats to get some workers bade to Nigeria s biggest 
refinery at southern Port Harcourt, which was sabotaged by 
strikers last month. 

Israel Now Hopes for Tunisia Links 

JERUSALEM (Reuter) — Israeli officials said Friday that they 
hoped Tunisia would follow Morocco in opening diplomatic ties 
with the Israel „ * . 

They said Tunisia and such Gulf states as Oman, Qatar and 
Bahrain were in the vanguard of Arab states interested in rela- 
tions. 

Italian Parly Chief Offers to Resign 

MILAN (AFP) — The Northern League leader, Umberto 
ftnssi, said Friday that he would resign if his supporters want ed i t. 
The move followed a series of run-ms with the press and Prime 
Minister Silvio Berlusconi 

Mr. Bossi who is founder of the party and has sworn he would 
never give Mr. Berlusconi any respite as long as its reforms were 
not adopted, holds no government post but he has considerable 
influence. 

Rightist Russian Aide Is Dismissed 

MOSCOW (Reuters) — A Russian junior minister was dis- 
missed Friday for his extreme nationalist views and for demand- 
, that freedom of the press be strictly limited. President Boris N. 
Itsin approved the dismissal, a spokesman said. 

A spokesman for Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin said 
Boris Mironov, head of the State Press Committee, a post with 
minis terial but not cabinet rank, had been dismissed after declar- 
ing that “if Russian nationalism is fascism, then I'm a fascist” and 
urging state control of tbe press. 

Mb-. Mironov had offended the liberal Russian press by a recent 
oratorical defense of nationalism that led one Moscow daily to 
compare him to Hitlers propaganda chief. Josef Gocbbels. 

Rafsanjani Cates Argentine * Apology 5 

NICOSIA (AP) — President Hashemi Rafsanjani of Iran 
praised Argentina on Friday for what he called an “apology” for 
implicating Tehran in the bombing of a Jewish community center 
in Buenos Aires. 4K 

In a Muslim Sabbath sermon at Tehran University, Mr. Raf- 
sanjani said Argentina was “courageous” in its “retreat” from 
allegations that Iran was linked to the July 18 bombing, which 
killed 95 people and injured more than 200. 

Chinese Leader in Moscow lor Talks 

MOSCOW (AFP) — President Jiang Zemin of China arrived 
here Friday for talks with Resident Boris N. Yeltsin mined at 
drfusing a border dispute, ending nuclear tension and moderniz- 
ing trade relations. 

Mr. Jiang’s visit is the fust by a Chinese president in 37 years. 
He and Mr. Yeltsin were to meet Saturday and sign a slate of 
accords, including an agreement on do-targeting strategic nudear 
nrissfles currently aimed at each other's countries. They will also 
sign an agreement on the western section of the 4,400-kilometer 
(2,730- mile) Chinese-Russian border. 

For the Record 

King Letsie m of Lesotho has agreed to reinstate the govern- 
ment of Prime Minis ter Ntsu Mokhehle, which he dissolved last 
month, state radio reported Friday. A palace statement read on 
the radio said that the king and Mr. Mokhehle had agreed to 
“restore constitutional order* and engage in a national debate cm 
the future of the monarchy. (Reuters) 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

Amsterdam Airport to Go on the Air 

AMSTERDAM (AP) — Schipbol International Airport will 
launch its own television station, one of the first of its kind, tOf 
provide round-the-clock entertainment for passengers, an airport 
spokesman said. 

The station will broadcast international news, sports and enter- 
tainment programs beginning in November. News will be provid- 
ed by NBC Super-channel and updated four times a day. Other 
will come from production companies worldwide, 
spokesman said 250 television monitors would be be 
installed in lounges and waiting areas. Viewing will be free of 
charge. 

Flight crews of Middle East Airlines went cm strike Friday, 
stranding more than 2,000 travelers bound for Europe, Norm 
Africa and Gulf states at the Beirut airport. (AP) 

Scandinavian Airlines System will inaugurate a direct route 
between Copenhagen and tbe new airport at Osaka, Japan, on 
Saturday, the airline said. There win be nonstop flights to Osaka 
on Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays, with return flights on 
Tuesdays, Fridays and Sundays. (AFP) 

American Antilles win offer daily nonstop service between 
Frankfurt and Miami starting March 26, 1995. The airline also 
said it would discontinue Chicago-Munich flights on Jan. 30. The 
company said the moves were of an ongoing plan to withdraw 
from unprofitable routes. (Reuters) 

The U.S. automobile rental company Avis Inc. has agreed to 
install hand controls for the disabled in more of its cars, the 
Justice Department announced. Attorney General Janet Reno 
said the agreement was part of a broad effort to improve compli- 
ance with 1990 legislation that requires companies serving the 
public to allow access to disabled people. (NYT) 


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* _ INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATORDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3-4, 1994 3 

THE AMERICAS /T WE JURY'S MESSAGE 


Ex- Secretary at Law Firm Wins $7.1 Million in a Sexual Harassment Case 


By Jane Gross 

New York Times Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — A former secretary at the 
world’s largest law firm who said she had been 
sexually harassed by a partner there has beat award- 
ed S7.1 million in punitive damages, a staggering 
judgment that is likely to send a chill through the 
LLS. legal and business community. 

The judgment against the firm of Baker & 
McKenzie, based in Chicago, and one of its former 
Martin R. Gmeastan , is believed to be the 
;t ever in a sexual harassment case. It is also 


almost twice that sought by the plaintiff, Rena 
Weeks, 40, who worked at the firm’s San Francisco 
office for less than two months. 

In a statement issued Thursday from its main 
office, Baker & McKenzie said the firm was “ex- 
tremely disappointed" with the jury's award and 
planned to appeal. 

The awara implies, experts said, that employers 
have a grave responsibility to respond promptly and 
vigorously to complaints of harassment, even when 
they come from low-level employees against power- 
ful bosses. 


“The imy s decision sends a message about enti- 
tlement/* said Freada Klein, the president of Klein 
Associates, a Boston company that advises business- 
es about bias in the workplace. 

Ms. Weeks was awarded $50,000 in compensatory 
damages by the same jury on Aug. 27 for the 
emotional distress she suffered as a result of Mr. 
Greenstem’s clumsy gropings and crude remarks. 

The jury of six men and six women found in the 
first phase of the trial that Baker & McKenzie had 
known of Mr. Greenstem’s harasring behavior and 


had failed to rein him in, despite previous com- 
' ‘ its against him by other women employed at the 


In the second phase of the trial, after two days of 
further testimony and a day of deliberations, die 
jury awarded Ms. Weeks $6 3 million in punitive 
damages from Baker Sc McKenzie, which had the 
highest gross revenue of any law firm in the United 
States last year, and $225,000 more from Mr. Green- 
stein, 49, who was dismissed in the midst of the 
lawsuit and now runs a one-man firm in San Jose, 
California. 


The total punitive award of 57.1 million far ex- 
ceeded that requested by Ms. Weeks's lawyer, who 
had sought $3.5 million from firm and 5200,000 
from Mr. Greenstein. 

Several jurors said their judgment had . been 
roughly calculated by taking 10 percent of the firm's 
capital. 

“When you get. religion, you should tithe,” said 
one juror, Bill Carpenter, alluding to the -firm’s 
testimony about its new attitude toward harassment 
complaints. “A tithe is 10 percent” 



POLITICAL MOTES 




VtmaB. Laforci/Rmcn 


ON THE POLITICAL LADDER — Former Mayor Marion Barry of Washington 
stapling campaign posters to a telephone pole. Mr. Barry, who resigned as mayor 
after being videotaped using drugs in a hotel room, for which be served six months in 
jail, wants Ins old job back and is in a dose race for the Sept 13 Democratic primary. 


Blazing Away in Texas Race 

HOUSTON — On the first day of the dove 
hunting season in Texas, both Governor Ann 
Richards and George W. Bush, her Republi- 
can opponent were out at the crack of dawn, 
hunting for birds — and news coverage. 

But this obligatory macho political rite in 
the Lone Star State turned into an embar- 
rassment for Mr. Bush, a son of former 
President George Bush, when he pointed a 
borrowed 20-gauge shotgun at the sky in 
rural Hockley, Texas, fired seven shots — 
and killed the wrong kind of bird. 

Mr. Bush bagged a killdeer, a protected 
Texas song bird whose killing is a crime 
under state law, punishable by a fine of $25 to 
$500. Mr. Bush was fined 5230, his office 
said. 

The killdeer has distinctive white markings 
and Hies in a different pattern than the dove, 
meaning that an experienced hunter would be 
unlikely to confuse the two. 

And aides to Ms. Richards, a Democrat, 
wasted no time hi ridicnling Mr. Bush, -sug- 
gesting that in a state where hunting is woven 
into the historical ethos, a real Texan would 
never have committed such a gaffe. 

‘'This is like not knowing what a bagel is in 
the City of New York,” said George Shipley, 
a consultant to Ms. Richards. “This is on the 
order of Jerry Ford not shucking the tama- 
le,” a reference to an infamous campaign 
swing through Texas in which President Ger- 
ald R. Ford ate the com husks wrapped 
around a Mexican delicacy. 

Mr. Bush made no attempt to excuse the 
misfire. Mr. Bush, who said he hunted fre- 
uently, broke the state law moments after a 
:15 A.M. news conference in which he as- 
sailed Ms. Richards as being soft on crimi- 
nals. 

“I've spoken to a game warden,” he said. 
“He's going to write a citation and T wili pay 
the fine. I thought it was a dove. I made a 
mistake, and I'm going to pay for it.” 

(NYT) 


Clinton HoaHfi Czar Chides Ads 

NEW YORK — Ira C. Magaziner, the 
administration's chief health-care planner, 
has blamed “fear-mongering” and dishonest 
advertisements by special interest groups for 
the difficulties encountered by national 
health insurance legislation on Capitol Hill. 

But he said the battle was not over yet, for 
health-care legislation would be first on the 
agenda when Congress returned in Septem- 
ber. “As was proven with passage of the 
crime bill.” he said, “special interests do not 
always succeed in undermining the interest of 
the American people.” 

He did not discuss what the administration 
might be willing to settle for this year as he 
addressed a group Thursday at the annual 
meeting of the American Political Science 
Association. 

Answering questions, he dismissed the sug- 
gestion that political naivete had contributed 
to the administration's difficulties. “Nobody 
thought this was going to be easy," he said. 
•“It's always easy for- people to take potshots. 
We are going to continue to fight until we 
succeed.” 

He dted advertisements that newspapers 
had characterized as false, like the assertion 
that people would face five years in jail for 
buying extra health care. 

This and other ads, he said, reflected the 
fact that “never in this history of this country 
have modem technology and scare tactics 
combined to produce the degree and tone of 
misinformation that was spewed out so 
quickly about health-care reform.” f N YT) 


Quote/Unquote 

Marvin Gordon, chairman of Iroquois 
Products, a Chicago company that picks up 
its mail from the local poh office, on a U.S. 
Postal Service proposal to impose a fee for 
the practice: “It's not the S400 they want to 
charge that makes me mad. It's the audacity 
of trying to do this: have us pay for doing 
their work.” (WP) 


$4.25 Billion 
Awarded in 
Implant Suit 

Washington Peat Service 

WASHINGTON — A UK 
district judge in Birmingham, 
Alabama, has approved a $4.25 
billion breast-implant settle- 
ment, the largest product liabil- 
ity agreement in U.S. history. 

Once the biggest manufac- 
turers of implants, Dow Cor- 
ning Corp~, is now the biggest 
contributor, at 52 billion, 
among 60 companies. Dow has 
consistently denied that its 
products caused health prob- 
lems. 

More than 90,500 women 
have already agreed to the set- 
tlement, winch would provide 
Americans with payments rang- 
ing from $105,000 to 51.4 mil- 
lion each, depending on their 
age and severity of symptoms. 

The 500 foreign claimants 
will receive between 40 percent 
and 90 percent of the U.S. pay- 
ments. Judge Pointer increased 
the amount apportioned to for- 
eign claimants from $81 million 
to 596.6 million. 

About 15,000 women have 
rejected the settlement; half of 
those live outside the United 
States. 

The Food and Drug Admin- 
istration declared a moratorium 
on all silicone breast implants 
in 1992 after hearing com- 
plaints that the devices were as- 
sociated with disorders of the 
immune system, including 
rheumatoid arthritis. 

The agency later allowed im- 
plantation for reconstructive 
surgery as part of clinical stud- 
ies, while maintaining the ban 
on cosmetic surgery. 


L. A. Cruise Ship 
Is Hit by Illness 

Lai Angela Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — A 78- 
year-old passenger died and 415 
other tourists and crew of the 
Los Angeles-based cruise liner 
Viking Serenade were reported 
ill with a gastrointestinal ail- 
ment that brought the ship back 
to port a day early from Ba/a 
California. 

Investigators were aboard the 
ship, operated by Royal Carib- 
bean Cruises Ltd., but an agen- 
cy spokesman said it was too 
early to confirm suspicions of 
widespread food poisoning or 
an infectious disease. 

At least six people were hos - 1 
pitalized in Ensenada, Mexico. 


Mock ‘Jury’ of Arizonans Would Acquit Simpson 


By Andrea Ford 

Los Angela i Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — To gauge 
how press coverage of the OJ. 
Simpson case might affect po- 
tential jurors, a consultant for 
the prosecution has surveyed a 
focus group of Arizona resi- 
dents and learned that most 
would acquit the former foot- 
ball star, according to two 
members of the group. 

One of the participants, 
Lance Kingston, 33, a real es- 
tate agent, said a dozen mem- 
bers of the group would not 
have convicted Mr. Simpson. 
Mr. Kingston said he had been 
one of three or four who were 
undecided. 

“I told them I couldn't fin d 
him guilty based on what I 
knew, but that I didn’t know if 
he was scot-free innocent ei- 
ther,” Mr. Kingston said. 

The group’s responses, he 
said, were based on what he and 
the 16 other members, all from 
Phoenix, knew about the case 
from news reports, with only a 
few facts provided by the ques- 
tioners. The six-hour session 
was held Aug, 19 at a Phoenix 
hotel. 


Among other things, most of 
the 17 men and women indicat- 
ed that they were put off by 
Deputy District Attorney Mar- 
cia Clark and charmed by Mr. 
Simpson's lawyer. Robot L. 
Shapiro. 

When asked to give a one- 
word description of Ms. dark, 
Mr. Kingston said most of the 
group members used negative 
terminology. He said some of 
the words were “pushy” and 
“aggressive.'’ Words used to de- 
scribe Mr. Shapiro, he said, 
were “smooth,” “chutzpah" 

and “sharp” 

The participants also said 
they were suspicions of Mark 
Fuarman, a detective who testi- 
fied that he found a bloody 
love at Mr. Simpson's estate 


after Nicole Brown Simp- 
son and her friend Ronald L. 
Goldman were found slain in 
front of her condommnxm. 

Mr. Simpson has pleaded not 
guilty. 

When asked whether they 
thought the case had racial 
overtones because Mr. Simpson 
is black, most of the group 
members — nine blacks and 


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eight whites — said they did 
not, Mr. Kingston reported. 

The Los Angeles district at- 
torney’s office confirmed 
Thursday that the locus group 
had taken place, bui it said no 
ballots had been taken or “ver- 
dicts” rendered. 


Mr. Kingston agreed that n< 
written ballots had been taken 
but be insisted that the focu: 
group members had been ver 
bally polled about verdicts. Hi 
account was confirmed by an 
other member of the group 
Charles Scruggs, a Phoenu 
truck driver. 


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Cost of Haiti Invasion Put at $427 Million 


By Eric Schmitt 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Pentagon analysts 
havt estimated that an invasion of Haiti 
would cost 5427 million, on top of the 
nearly $200 million already spent rescuing 
Haitians who have fled the country by 
boat and building camps for them. 

A senior Pentagon official said that the 
Defense Department was assuming that 
the first three weeks of a U.S. -Jed invasion 
would cost $55 million, to cover transport- 
ing equipment and personnel, food and 
water, logistics, and combat pay for an 
initial force of 12,000 soldiers. 

The goal would be to restore to power 
the exiled Haitian president, the Reverend 
Jean-Bertrand Aristide, within 10 days af- 
ter the troops landed 

The Pentagon es tima tes that the next 
seven months of the operation would cost 
$372 million, with 2^00 to 3,000 American 


troops remaining at the end of that period. 

Once order was restored, a UN-led force 
of 6,000 troops, including the remaining 
Americans, would replace the initial inva- 
sion force to maintain order, retrain the 
country’s police and reorganize its mili- 
tary. There is no estimate yet of what this 
might cost 

By the end of the fiscal year, Washing- 
ton will have spent $187 milli on on picking 
up thousands of Haitians from the sea and 
enforcing economic sanctions against the 
mffitaiy-appointed government there. 

The Pentagon’s latest estimates do not 
include what the United States would pay 
to equip, train and transport 266 troops 
from four Caribbean countries that would 
join any invading force 7 to 10 days into 
the operation in Haiti. The nations agreed 
this week to supply troops after a visit by 
U.S. officials. 


■ Haiti to Let 1,000 Go 
Haiti’s government has agreed to allow 
the departure of more than 1,000 people 
who have been granted political asylum in 
the United States, The New York Times 
rted from Port-au-Prince, quoting 
Embassy officials. 

The first 91 left on a bus, malting it 
safely across the border into the Domini- 
can Republic. They were the first political 
refugees to make it out of the country since 
the United Nations sanctioned a UK-led 
invasion of Haiti. 

- A spokesman for the U.S. Embassy in 
Port-au-Prince, Stanley Schrager, said that 
the Haitian government had agreed to let 
about two buses make the trip each week. 

While news of the departure gave refu- 
gees hope, some said that they would re- 
main in hiding because they were certain 
that the military and its civilian backers 
would hurt or even kill them. 



Away From Politics 


• The killer of a British tourist in New Orleans 
has been sentenced to life imprisonment with 
no chance for early release. Lester Jones, 33, 
was found guilty of first degree murder in the 
shooting of Julie Stott, 28, of Manchester, 
England, during a robbery attempt in 1992, 
but the jury then declared itself deadlocked 
on the question of punishment, requiring the 
judge to impose the sentence. 

• Sharp redactions in the output of (fioxm, 
heavy metals and airborne toxins from mu- 
nicipal incinerators nationwide have been 
proposed by the Environmental Protection 
Agency. The rules, which would take effect a 
year from now, are designed to achieve com- 
pliance with the 1990 Clean Air Act 

• A bill reqtnring up to life in prison for first- 
time violent sex offenders has been approved 
by the California legislature. Governor Pete 
Wilson has promised to sign it 

• A man who helped capture the suspect ac- 
cused of assaulting Rosa Parks, 81, a heroine 


of the civil-rights movement, was arrested in 
connection with a 1991 bank robbery in De- 
troit, officials said. FBI agents arrested Mario 
Jefferson, 27, after he was interviewed about 
how he and a friend had identified and appre- 
hended the alleged attacker. 

• Eleven stowaways who endured four days 
locked in a shipping container with little food 
or water win almost certainly be sent back to 
the Dominican Republic, American officials 
said. They were discovered when a deckhand 
cm the container ship Carolina at the Eliza- 
beth Marine Terminal in New Jersey heard 
them yelling and pounding on the container. 

• A Food and Drag Administration advisory 
panel has recommended that the agency not 
approve the Sensor Pad, an experimental de- 
vice designed to help women better detect 
breast lumps during self-examination, until 
its manufacturer submits scientific studies in 
women that show the product works. 

AP, Roam. NYT. WP 


Albino Buffalo 
Inspires Tribes 

The Associated Press 

JANESVILLE, Wisconsin — 
News of the birth of a rare 
white buffalo is spreading 
among American Indians and 
inspiring pilgrimages to see 
what many tribes beneve to be a 
sacred, apocalyptic animaL 

“This is like the second com- 
ing of Christ on this island of 
North America,” said Floyd 
Hand, a Sioux shaman from 
Pine Ridge, South Dakota. 
“The legend is rite would return 
and unify the nations of the 
four colors — the black, red, 
yellow and white." 

The calf was born two weeks 
ago at the Wisconsin farm 
where Dove Header raises a 
herd of 14 buffalo. . 



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Page 4 


SATURDAY -SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3-4, 1994 


©PINION 


Hcralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 



Srtbune. all the Tough Talk, Americans Are Soft on Crime 


niBMKHKD WIT1I THK \M* KJRk TIMMS AND tllK WAKHINfflWi POST 


N EW YORK — Everybody in 
America is touch on crime. 


A Breakthrough for Ulster 


It is encouraging news that the Irish 
Republican Army has declared a break- 
through cease-fire in its effort to expel the 
British from Northern Ireland. Only last 
week, IRA units were mortaring British 
soldiers in a struggle whose quarter-centu- 
ry toll of 3,000 (dead has made it, after 
Yugoslavia, Europe’s bloodiest conflict 
since World War IL Now the IRA and its 
political arm, Sinn Fein, are positioning 
themselves to join the peace talks envis- 
aged by the British and Irish governments. 

Sinn Fein’s declaration comes in re- 
sponse to a proposal issued by the British 
and Irish governments lost December. 
While those governments sought a “per- 
manent" renunciation of violence and 
have been promised only a “complete” 
one, all parties appear to be willing to 
work this out as they go along. 

If the truce is kept for three months, 
negotiations over this and other matters 
wiU begin. The questions on the table are 
difficult: Under what conditions and time 


rorists" by the British? Hew will Protes- 
tant terrorists react? Providing reassur- 
ance to this community will be a major 


responsibility of leaders on all sides. 

The overriding question of the prov- 
ince’s future has not been settled. Nor is it 
the responsibility of the negotiators who 
now begin their work. It is a matter for the 
people to decide, and the promise of politi- 
cal leaders not to force uruon with the Irish 
Republic must be reemphasized. 

Sinn Fein’s leads, Gerry Adams, de- 
serves some credit for moving toward 
peace, but the real heroes in this story are 
the moderates in Northern Ireland such as 
John Hume, a Catholic political leader, 
and James Molyneaux, his Protestant 
counterpart, who continually renounced 
violence and moved the agenda toward 
peace. President Bill Clinton, who wisely 
abandoned his campaign talk of sending 
in a U.S. mediator, can take credit for 
allowing Mr. Adams to come to America. 

The cease-fire, a culmination of years 
of effort, is only a beginning. But if it 
holds it will be seen as the breakthrough 
concession that made real peace possible. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


span will Britain begin to remove troops 
from Ulster? WiU the IRA turn over its 


from Ulster? Will the IRA 
arms? What will happen to 
are called “political 1 ’ by the 


ners who 
and “ter- 


1N America is tough on crime. 
Parents, teachers, cops, judges, 
rich people, poor people, ditch 
diggers and brain surgeons — 
just ask them. 

So, listen: How come there is 
so much crime in America? How 
is it that we no longer possess our 
baric civil liberty from which all 
others flow — freedom to walk 
our streets without fear? 

Squirm, duck, run — there is 
no biding place from the answer. 
We Americans are not tough on 
crime at all We are pudgUy soft, 
with great rolls of fat hanging 
from our bellies and brains. 

AH we are is tough about se- 
lected crimes or some of the con- 
ditions that create crime — and 
only when action does not inter- 
fere with our own self-interest, 
comfort, desires and particularly 
with our own rigidities of intel- 
lect, if that is the word. 

Here is a story. Across Ameri- 


By A.M. Rosenthal 


the little darlings do that every 
day. I am not talking about big 
nasty dries like New York or 


Washington, but places like 
Kings Mountain, North Caroli- 
na; Corpus Chris ti, Texas, and 
Eugene, Oregon. 

Guns are legal in some of those 
down-home places and are as im- 
portant to the spirit of manhood 
as testicles, maybe more, because 
they hang the guns out for every- 
body to admire. 

But taking guns to school does 
not fit federal guidelines for high 
school safety. So some principals 
have taken action in schools 
where the kids like to park their 
handguns and sawed-off rifles in 


school, took out the lockers, par- 
ents who should have been clout- 
ing their young gun-toters across 
their pistol-packing ears instead 
denounced the principal. 


They said the kids would get 
unchback from carrying books to 


hunchback from carrying books to 
high school every day. I mean, how 
cruel can a prindpal be? 

Other parents complain (hat 


power to get the first congressio- 
nal bill that takes a package ap- 
proach to fi ghting crime — more 
police and prisons, anti-drug 
therapy and neighborhood effort. 

But the concept of a total anti- 
crime struggle has not yet taken 
hold in our collective minds. 

l ike it or not, the list starts 


governors like Ann Richards of 
Texas and Mario Cuomo of New 


with effective punishment, which 
means swift and hard. Swift in- 


York are ordering. The rule 
should be: No therapy, no parole. 

Real anti-crime toughness 
means working everlastingly at 
the connection between poverty 
and crime. Poverty is not itself 
the root cause of crime. I walked 


often at night through the im- 
Dovcrished streets of Calcutta 


tie folk will have nothing to do 
but hang around the streets. 

Apparently it never occurs to 
anybody that gun carriers should 
be sent to a nice reform school 
where they might learn to study 


lockers. They know they do not 
have to go through the metal de- 


despite locker deprivation. 
Tough? AH most Amelia 


ca, youngsters are carrying guns 
to High school. About 135,000 of 


have to go through the metal de- 
tectors that are almost as impor- 
tant as football teams to Ameri- 
can secondary education. 

Bill Celis, a New York Times 
reporter, writes that when Jim 
Ford, prindpal of a Eugene high 


Tough? AH most Americans do 
about crime or potential crime — 
those high-school guns have been 
known to go off and kfll people — 
is to select one or two anti-crime 
pills and reject the total cure. 

President Bill Clinton had to 
use every ounce of his political 


volves re-thinking the judicial 
system that allows endless delays. 
Hard means looking at the parole 
system to mak e sure it has enough 
probation officers to supervise 
criminals released early. 

Gun control. If you want to kfll 
dock and deer go right ahead — 
with a registered gun. But tdl 
your kids that if they are big 
enough to sneak any guns into 
school they are big enough to go 
to jtul for it 

Toughness means mandating 
not only prisons for addicted crim- 
inals but also the kind of strict 
long-term, compulsory physical 
and mental group therapy that 


poverished streets of Calcutta 
with never a tremor. 

But crime is created fay the 
“concentration in disorderly 
neighb orhoods of people at risk 
of failing" and the refusal of the 
United States to keep ba ntin g for 
ways out for the residents, partic- 
ularly the children. James Q. Wil- 
son, the sociologist, writes that in 
Commentary. 

Unless Americans put their 
minds to that and to the rest of 
the anti-crime list, we have no 

right to call ourselves tough on 
creme. We are just sitting there. 


soft and pudgy, with the rolls of 
fat around our bellies and brains. 

The New York Tunes. 


On a Park Bench in Hiroshima, United by the Bomb’s Fallout 


It’s Still a U.S. Invasion 


J ERUSALEM — My mother and I are 
standing in Hiroshima Peace Park, at 


The State Department is askin g Ameri- 
cans to believe something ridiculous. That 
is the proposition that an agreement this 
weds by four Lilliputian Canbbean armies 
to take part in a U.S.-led invasion force 
signifies regional support for an armed 
strike against Haiti’s military regime. 

Appending 266 soldiers from Barbados. 
Belize, J amai ca and Trinidad to a U.S. 
force of at least 12,000 cannot hide the fact 
that an invasion, if it comes, would be a 
foolish and unnecessary act driven solely 
by the Clinton administration. 

By the same token, the escalating rhet- 
oric issuing from Deputy Secretary of 
State Strobe Talbott and Deputy Secre- 
tary of Defense John Deutch cannot dis- 
guise the lack of a necessary political 
consensus at home, as quick rebuttals 
from Senator Richard Lugar and former 
President George Bush have already 
made clear. Even congressional Demo- 
crats are divided, with many endorsing 
an invasion only out of misplaced fealty. 


But as morally and legally reprehensi- 
ble as their actions have been, the United 
States has no calling to invade countries 
in the absence of ary dear threat to vital 
UJS. interests or to international peace. 

True, the UN Security Council a 
month ago declared the Haitian regime a 
threat to international peace. But that 
was a peculiar exercise in circular logic 
that is hard for anyone to take seriously. 

Washington felt it could not invade 
without UN authorization. The UN char- 
ter only permits such authorization when 
there is a threat to international peace. 
Therefore, a threat was duly declared, 
founded in large part on the supposedly 
destabilizing dangers of a continuing 
flow of refugees throughout the region. 

How can the administration morally 
justify launching the mighty American 
war machine and getting Ameri cans and 
Haitians kiUed because it finds the arrival 
of miserable refugees so politically incon- 
venient that it has asked other countries 


the monument marking the epicenter of 
the atomic explosion. 


By Sarah Shapiro 

This is the second of two articles. 


A group of Hiroshima maidens, along 
with the petite Koko Tanimoto, the 
daughter of Reverend Kiyoshi Tani- 
moto; cluster around us. 

Most of the maidens are in their 60s 
now. Yet they are still there, as I remem- 
ber them, having aged so negligibly that 
I recognize each and every one of than 
from my childhood, except for Koko, 
whom I haven’t met before. 


They exclaim and coo over me as they 
lid when I was 5. I'm now 41. 


Unfortunately, what aU this new public 
posturing does is squeeze another droplet 
from the a dminis tration’s almost empty 
vial of foreign-policy credibility. That can 
only narrow even further the range of 
choices Mr. Clinton has left for himself, 
choices that some of his advisers want to 
reduce to (a) invade or (b) give up. 

Lieutenant General Raoul Cedras and 
his cronies in the Haitian military leader- 
ship are practically daring the adminis- 
tration to act. They have no claim to 
international legitimacy, having shot 
their way into power at the expense of a 
government that won two-thirds of the 
vote in a democratic election. They have 
defiantly rgected aU diplomatic entreat- 
ies from the United States and the United 
Nations. They have looted a wretchedly 
poor economy and brought international 
sanctions down on their fellow citizens. 


to provide them with temporary shelter? 
while restoring the democratically 


Every day they prolong their thuggjsh 
tie brings the wanton and brazen murder 


rule brings the wanton and brazen murder 
of stffl more defenseless Haitian civilians. 


While restoring the democratically 
elected government of Haiti is a legitimate 
aim of U.S, foreign policy, military force 
is, at this point, an inappropriate means 
for accomplishing iL Sanctions and diplo- 
macy should be the principal policy tools, 
even though these have not achieved their 
aims so far. and possibly may not achieve 
them before President Jean-Bertrand Aris- 
tide’s terra runs out in 1996. 

Unless and until the American people 
and others throughout the hemisphere 
are more willing than they are now to 
bear the risks of an invasion and its likely 
sequels, including prolonged occupation 
and deadly clashes with civilians, invad- 
ing Haiti is a bad idea. 

Even with an international brigade of 
266 Barbadians, Belizeans, Jamaicans, and 
Trinidadians trailing along, the large UJS. 
force will be asked to do the biggest share 
of the fighting and, inevitably, the dying. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


We have been here three days. The 
mayor of Hiroshima invited my mother to 
attend their memorial ceremony for my 
father a year after his death, in commem- 
oration of the Japanese government's 
Norman Cousins Law, whereby all vic- 
tims of the atom bombing are entitled to 
free lifetime medical attention. 

My mother, dreading the prospect of 
making this trip alone, invited me. 

This is an escape from childhood. This 
is the fulfillment of a childish wish, had 
it ever occurred tome to wish iL For now 
I'm not left out. I'm not left behind. 

It is In a circle around me, me and my 
mother, that the Hiroshima Maidens are 
lovingly hovering. The only problem, 
though, is that it took my father’s death 
to get me an invitation. 

A young journalist has just asked Nor- 
man Cousins’s daughter for her thoughts 
upon having just seen the atom bomb 
museum adjoining the Peace Park. 

AU my life people had related to me 
the way this man is doing, the way I 
often relate to the children of celebrities. 
That’s why I fled from my father's public 
self, because it was scary being constant- 
ly erased by his fame. It was a fear not 
unlike the terror of bong extinguished 
by a nuclear device. 

At this moment, however, in Hiroshi- 
ma Peace Park where so many pictures 


He looks up, lifting his eyebrows, 
questioning, and for a second I can’t tell 
if he has understood my English, then 
see that it is the idea itself that is foreign. 
“Oh yes, my whole generation of Ameri- 
can children was very scared of the same 
thing happening to us.” 

I want to say: I thought nothing in life 
was worth investing in, since there was 
always the chance we’d be extinguished 
any minute; and to explain how at an 
early age 1 was distanced psychologically 
from my own life, since compared to the 
suffering of the Hiroshima maidens, my 
own sorrows seemed to me but the petty 
dramas of a spoiled American. 

I want to say that the possibility of 
nuclear war, against which it was impos- 
sible to protect anyone or anything — 
the mere idea of tortuously slow death 
from radiation sickness and of fire 
storms reducing the whole world to a 
cinder — rendered pitifully insignificant 


cut black bangs. She must be about my 
age, I think. And I don't know her mar- 
ried name. 

“Yes," said Koko, “you and I never 
met before you came on this trip to 
Hiroshima, but when I was a child, I 
used to think of you.” 

“You did?" 

"Yes, very often.” She gives me a big, 
warm smile. “Very often through the 
years. 

"You see, while I grew up, my father 
and mother were always involved with 
the Hiro shim a maidens. They were 
working very hard on the church project, 
to help them. Because anyone who was 
damaged by the bomb was shunned by 


her chores with me in her arms. That is 
why I survived. When the house col- 
lapsed in the atomic explosion, I was 
protected by ha arms and I was not 
hurL 

"My father tried to come home from 
the church, but there were so many peo- 
ple who needed help on the way that it 
took him a long time. At last he thought: 


‘I must go heme!’ He heard us crying 
under the house and dux us out He 


everything mundane, commonplace and 
small, including me. 


small, including me. 

I want to get through to this man, my 
mother and to the Hir oshima maidens 
that no matter how ridiculously self- 
centered and self-dramatizing it may 
have been to say so, I, too. had been 
blasted by the Americans' Hiroshima 
bomb. It fell on me, too. 

The journalist again smiles politely. 
One maiden steps to the side and lifts her 
Nikon for a picture. 

In a flash they've reassembled, their 
aims encircling us. my mother and I at the 
center of their devotion. For the hun- 
dredth time during these past three days, 
they are leaning in toward us like smiling 
flowers obeying the law of tropistn. 


I want to say that the 
possibility of nuclear war, 
against which it was 
impossible to protect anyone or 
anything, rendered pitifully 
insignificant everything 
mundane, commonplace and 
small, including me. 


And on my own face for the ump- 
enth time I feel that smile again, the 


of my parents had been taken through 
the decades, I am standing not at the 


Vatican vs. the Vice President 


It was considered very unusual when 


the chief Vatican spokesman, Joaquin 
Navarro-VaUs, publicly lot* on Vice 


on this subjecL But that pledge, says Mr. 
Navarro, doesn't square with the plain and 


Navarro-VaUs, publicly lot* on Vice 
President A1 Gore last week, criticizing 
him for allegedly misrepresenting the in- 
tentions of the American ddegation to 
the United Nations conference on popu- 
lation and development set to begin 'in 
Cairo on Monday. The attack was even 
more surprising because it followed a 
recent conciliatory speech by the vice 
president aimed at stressing the common 


goals of the United States and the Roman 
Catholic Church. What has always been 


catholic Church, wnai has always Been 
clear, though, through aH the planning 
sessions for the conference ana in fact 
since the election of the Clinton-Gore 
team in 1992 is that this government and 
the Vatican disagree profoundly about 
abortion and that neither is likdy to be 
persuaded by the other to change. 

The Vatican points to language in the 
document proposed for conference con- 
sideration and argues that the use of cer- 
tain phrases such as "fertility regulation” 
and “reproductive rights" actually signals 
the intent of planners to gp on record in 
favor of abortion on demand. The docu- 
ment also urges all countries to strive to 
make accessible through primary health 
care systems various family-planning ser- 
vices, including those for pregnancy termi- 
nation. Mr. Gore, in bis earlier speech, bad 
stated that “the United States has uot 
sought, does not seek and will not seek to 


establish an international right to abor- 
tion." rdteratins the responsibility of each 


lion," reiterating the responsibility of each 
sovereign nation to reach its own decision 


Navarro, doesn't square with the plain and 
the code words of the text 

International declarations such as the 
one to be considered in Cairo are moral 
statements meant to convey the collective 
wisdom or the signatory nations on mat- 
ters of policy. There is no room for secret 
understandings about the meaning of 
phrases or conspiracies among some of the 
signatories to kero others m the dark 
about the intended meaning of the decla- 
ration. Any consensus achieved by these 
means would be meaningless. We don't 
think that is what's intended in Cairo — 
although the Vatican apparently does — 
but there is nothing disastrous about hav- 
ing this debate in the open. Perhaps lan- 
guage changes can satisfy all parties, but 
that s a long shot. Perhaps only 98 percent 
of the document wiH be accepted by all 
nations represented, but that would be a 
substantial achievemenL But the Vatican 
is wrong to assume that Mr. Gore and this 
government have prepared a surprise at- 
tack to fool the world and trick others into 
supporting abortion on demand. 

As for future relations between the 
United States and the Holy See, the vice 
president's spokeswoman struck the right 
note: “As we deal with the Vatican on a 
host of issues, there is much more on 
which we agree than we disagree." Abor- 
tion is in the latter category, as both par- 
ties know. But that disagreement needn't 
destroy the conference or permanently 
damage relations between the two states. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


epicenter of the explosion, but at the 
center of my own glory. For the first 
time in my life, the question of whether I 
am getting undeserved attention on my 
father’s account doesn’t bother me at alL 

Furthermore, I consider myself some 
son of civilian representative for the 
American people, because our visit has 
coincided with a news item receiving a 
lot of coverage in the local press. Presi- 
dent George Bush has refused to issue a 
formal apology to the Japanese govern- 
ment for dropping the atom bomb. 

“Well, I would like to say that I’ve 
waited aH my life to come here." The 


ruroamma maidens murmur apprecia- 
tively. The journalist nods politely and 
scribbles something in his notebook. 

“When I was a child I was always 
frightened of the Hiroshima bomb and I 
thought about it aH the time." 


teenth time I feel that smile again, the 
oue that I recognize from aU those group 
shots my parents used to bring back with 
them from their trips to Japan. It's the 
smile of my mother. So warm, so eager, 
the smile is trying to reach out to the 
Japanese people over the American 
wrongdoing. 

How incredibly satisfying it is now to 
be over here on this side of things. The 
adult in one of those group photographs, 
not the irrelevant child holding it later in 
her small hands ! 

Somebody taps me on the shoulder. It 
is Koko Tanimoto. “I have wanted to 
talk to you.” she says. “Can you come 
with me?” 

A couple minutes later we are seated on 
a park bench, with dozens of pigeons 
fluttering at our feeL, peeking for crumbs. 

“I have wanted to talk to you not only 
during this trip," Koko begins. “I have 
wanted to talk to you my whole life." 

She apparently spoke fluent En glish. 
“Your whole life, Koko?" 

Her round face tilts up at me with her 
large, dark eyes underneath the straight- 


the rest of society. They had lost face. 
They were flawed. 

“Those girls used to go around in veils 
to cover themselves because of the feel- 
ing against them. So my father opened 
up his church basement to make a work- 
shop and got many sewing machines and 
they would all come there, aH the girls. 
They spent their time there sewing. It 
was their honorable work. 

“Pearl Buck came to see the workshop 
and it was she who went back to Ameri- 
ca and told your father about i'l In the 
beginning, when your father and mother 
came, many of the girls would not show 
their faces, they were so ashamed. 

“I myself had no scars from the bomb. 
But the maidens, everyone paid much 
attention to them. So I felt left out I felt 
my father did not pay attention to me. I 
was not so important! 

"Your parents told me that they had 
four young daughters in America. One 
time I asked my mother, “Who is taking 
care of Mr. and Mrs. Cousins’s daugh- 
ters?* And she said they were surely 
being taken good care of. But I won- 
dered about those girls in America. I 
wondered about you. I wanted to say 
something to you. 

"On the morning that the bomb fell, I 
was an 8-month-old baby. I was a very 
active baby, my mother tells me, and she 
was busy that day. 

“She didn’t have the time to run after 
me through the house, keeping me from 
trouble, so she just picked me up and did 


under the house and dug us out He 
saved us. 

"The American television program 
This Is Your Life' brought us [my par- 
ents and me] to the United States to do 
one of their shows about the Reverend 
Tanimoto, who saved the Hiroshima 
maidens. He was famous by now. My 
father didn’t know that the moderator, 
Mr. Ralph Edwards, had arranged far 
me and my mother to come from Japan 
also to be on the show. 

"My father heard me and my mother’s 
voices and he was very surprised and we 
came out to embrace him. My father 
cried. 

“Then we got a shock. There was the 
voice-over of someone who was saying 
he was the pilot of the plane that 
bombed Hiroshima. 

"I could not believe what I was hearing 
at aH! I had always imagined this man 
and hated him Fd grown up thinking that 
if I could JriH that man. J would We met 
him. He cried. He couldn't stop crying on 
the show. That man I came to like very 
much. He was a fine sensitive man!” 

Koko continued. “As the years went 
by, though, in one respect it graduaHy 
became apparent that I was not normal. 
1 did not grow. So I was taken to the 
Atomic Energy Commission, because 
they were tabulating the effects of radia- 
tion on the population that had been 
near the epicenter. They found that this 
is how the radiation affected me. No 
other sign. 

“Every year after the bomb, the AEC 
hdd a convention in Japan, to discuss 
their studies and their findings. I was 
one of their case histories. 

“So every year. I was brought to the 
auditorium where they had their big 
meeting and I was taken up on stage. 
Each year I was supposed to stand in my 
underwear and the doctors and scientists 
examined me and discussed my pro- 
gress. To help me. 

“When I turned 12, 1 was beginning, 
you know . . Koko gestured to her 
chest “To develop, a girl. The AEC 
convention was meeting and I was sum- 
moned as usual. They told me to undress 
as always. And I did not know how 
to . . . refuse them. So J did as they 
expected. The audience — it was full erf 
male doctors and scientists, hundreds of 
than. And I stood on stage. They 
looked. That was my atomic explosion. 

“That was my Hiroshima bomb." 

© The Jerusalem Past. Distributed by 
New York Times Special Features. 


document v^Se* aedy tedPbylSl For Northern Ireland, the Future Depends on Transcending the Past 

ten resented, but that would tv. n ' R 


W ASHINGTON —The Clin- 
ton administration was 


TV ton administration was 
quid: to boast of its role in pro- 
moting the cease-fire in Northern 

Ireland. 

A harmless vanity, perhaps. 
This administration seems to 
view foreign policy as a minor 
extension of domestic politics: If 
its Irish- American constituents 
are happy, God's in his heaven 
and all’s right with the world. 

The rest of us must take a 
more complicated view. The 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED IS& 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Cn-Chuinn/n 

RICHARD McCLEAN. PuNuher A Chief Executive 
JOHN V1NOCUR. Fjundrr EiHw A VirPrauie w 
• WALTER WELLS. Ann Etiatv ■ SAMUEL AST. KATHERINE KNORRand 
CHARLES MITCHELMORE. Drpur. EEian • CARLGEWIRTZAwnnaff £fi»r 
, ROBERT J. DONAHUE. EJenrtfihr EJamd Paga •JONATHAN GAGE, Business and Fmanct Efiw 
•RENE BONDY. Drpitn PuHcJter- JAMES MeLEOD. AdoerddngDueaor 
» JUANITA LCASPARL Intenutkewinnrk^^DiiKttir^ ROBERT FaRRE Gmisfcn Dinraor. Eumpe 
Duntcvrdrki AMturiwi; Kchurd ft Sanmeu 
Dmulmr.Aifyiini dr la PubUctUkm; Kuihttrme P. Darme 


No party to this tragic 
argument can escape 
history. It must be lived 
with and, if possible, 
transcended. 


KciaM Trihuie. W 

ft* : Qrc. 4637.0651; AMUULU taw** ftn^eurako irne 


. | Cl. , 1 1 " 



P , / ytkj. Intern rf HimitI Tnhmc. MnyJiiittVnwt JSV> 


Irish Republican Army's an- 
nounced cease-fire is a slender 
ray of hope, but no more. If the 
IRA may be taken at its word — 
a big if — it is admitting that a 
quarter century’s campaign to 
break the will of the British gov- 
ernment by violence has failed. 
Bombings and assassinations — 
including the assassination of 
Lord Mounibatten and the at- 
tempted assassination of Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher and 
principal members of her cabi- 
net, acts worthy of North Kore- 
an or Libyan thuggery at their 
worst — have uot forced the 
British government to abandon 
majority rule. That is the essence 
of what the IRA is now acknowl- 


By Edwin M. 

edging, if again it in fact means 
what it says. 

The issue has never been, well 
understood in the United States, 
where IRA propaganda goes far 
to muddle iL especially in Wash- 
ington and Hollywood. Not long 
after the present troubles began, 
Senator Edward Kennedy articu- 
lated the romantic “Irish- Ameri- 
can” view of the struggle when he 
compared the role of the British 
Army in Ulster to the role of U.S. 
forces in Vietnam. 

The senator's comparison was 
not well received and little has 
been heard of it since, at least 
from him. But behind the scenes, 
militant Irish-Axnerican organi- 
zations continue to supply finan- 
cial aid and comfort to the IRA, 
its gunmen and bombers. Their 
sanctimonious hands are spat- 
tered with the blood of IRA vic- 
tims. Worse still, the appease- 
ment of militant pro-IRA 
elements has been the centerpiece 
Of Clinton administration policy, 
highlighted by the visa given last 
spring to the IRA’s political front 
man, Geary Adams. 

They’re still at it The announce- 
ment of the cease-fire was accom- 
panied by the news that the White 
House has again broken the rule 
against U.S. visits by known ter- 
rorists by granting a visa to a 
founder of the IRA, Joe Cahill 
His errand is said to be to explain 
(o American sympathizers why the 
terror has beat called off. Did be 
teQ them the truth — that it has 
been called off because it failed? 


Yoder, Jr. 


While celebrating their role in 
Irish realpolitik, the optimists in 
the White House should pay at- 
tention to the demands that Sinn 
Fein, the IRA’s political arm. 
continues to make: The British 
Army must get out of the six 
counties, and the six counties 
must become a part of the Irish 
Republic. The Protestant fanat- 
ics, of course, say never. 

If the IRA reaUy is going to 
give up trying to bomb the British 
out of Northern Ireland, the Brit- 
ish Army can be thinned out and 
no one will be happier than the 
British public. You don’t learn 
from IRA propaganda, so plenti- 
ful in the American media, that 
the troops were sent as much to 
protect Roman Catholics from 
Protestant rowdies as to protect 
the peace against terrorists. But it 
is true. Now as before, the pres- 
ence of the British Army is a to- 
ken of Britain’s attachment to 
majority rule and to the principle 
that legal political arrangements 
must not be changed by — must 
in fact be reinforced in the face of 
— terrorism. 

Assuming that aU goes well the 
three-month trial of good faith 
and after that the peace talks, 
what might the Irish future look 
like? Both London and Dublin 
agree that the issue must be set- 
tled by talk, not by communal 
violence. The IRA and Sinn Fein 
are at least pretending to agree. 
We may aU wish that Ireland had 
a less embittering history — that 
Irish patriots had never made 


their island a springboard for the 
attempted Catholic reconquest of 
England in the distant past, or 
that British officers had not mu- 
tinied over the home-rule issue in 
this century. But no party to this 
tragic argument can escape histo- 
ry. It must be lived with and, if 
possible, transcended. 

The case for transcendence has 
never been stronger. With the end 
of the Cold War, the world has re- 
entered an age of destructive na- 
tionalist and tribal passions. Yu- 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Dangerous Fishing 


PARIS — During the past two 
days, some of the Mowers of the 


days, some of the Mowers of the 
gentle craft of angling in the 
neighborhood of Bony have met 
with unpleasant incidents. One 
gentleman who was fishing on the 
quay on Saturday [Sept. 1] eve- 
ning watched his float so long 
that he dozed and feH into the 
river. Fortunately his fall was wit- 
nessed by a bargeman, who 
brought him out of the water. 


wodd now manifests, but slight in- 
terest in its labors and their result. 
As Renner remarked yesterday, 
somewhat sadly: “When I came to 
Saint-Germain the trees were -in 
bloom, now the leaves are faffing.” 


1944: Hitler to Speak 


LONDON — [From our New 
York edition:! Adolf Hitler, re- 


ported by German diplomats to 
be planning a sensational speech 
Sunday [SepL 3], probably wiH 
announce the crossing of the Ger- 
man frontier by General George 
S. Patton's tanks and summon the 
German people to battle on their 
“holy soiL” Hitler, who five years 
ago set out to conquer the world 
and succeeded in Bestriding the 
Continent before the tide turned 
disastrously, is expected to offer 
his nation what Prime Minister 
Churchill did the Britons in their 
1940 extremity — “blood, toil 
tears and sweat” 


1919: No Pomp Treaty 


PARIS — With no pomp at all 
and very scant ceremony, the 
Peace Conference has presented 
to the world its second achieve- 
menL' the Treaty with Austria was 
handed yesterday, at Saini-Ger- 
main-en-Laye, to Carl Renner, 
head of the Austrian delegation. 
So protracted have been tEe sit- 
tings of the Conference that the 





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goslavia stands as the rfiiTKng 
example of what happens when 
fossilized religious, communal and 
ethnic hatreds boil over into civil 
war. Ireland is not i m m une to such 
an outcome. But the now ancient 
enmities to which Irish fanatics erf 
both Catholic and Protestant per- 
suasion are so wedded make less 
sense today than ever. 


a'* ■ . ■ 




Some peoples remember too 
little history. The Irish, tragically, 
remember too much. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


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Adalbcno Boqiic'.\f(encc France Pnsie 

A Cuban sleeping while two companions repaired their raft on the beach at Cojimar as the refugee flight continued. 

How Communism Honed Boaters 9 Skill 


By Gabriel Escobar 

Washington Pool Service 

SANTIAGO, Cuba — The socialist 
revolution gave these men a trade and 
taught them wdL How else could a rusty 
bed frame, aluminum gutters, wood 
scraps salvaged from the port plumbing 
leftovers, tar, tarpaulin and old green 
paint have been turned into this? 

The sum of the parts is a 12-foot boat 
a beauty built in just 96 hoars on a hot 
roof in a rundown neighborhood. And 
now, with the work done, the builders are 
about to take hold of the oars they made 
and set off for the detention, camp at the 
U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay. 

‘This can go from America to Eu- 
rope,” said Diosdado Shombert Fernan- 
da, a 50-year-old refrigerator repair- 
man.Tt is a Cuban Kon-Tiki.” 

“You can go out on a trip that's sup- 
posed to take three hours, and then the 
wind comes, and then what?” he said. 
“That’s why we’re making this as if we’re 
going to Europe.” 

The boat is, in many ways, a measure 
of the men who made it As other Cubans 
rush to leave on inner tubes tied with 
twine, these men have weighed the con- 
sequences of the journey with the same 
precision they used to construct the sleek 
prow. 

Among the nine are believers and non- 
believers and half-believers in the revolu- 
tion. They are the sons of parents whose 
loyalty to President Fidel Castro was 
cemented by the government’s first ef- 


fort here: converting a garbage dump 
where people lived and foraged for food 
into a cutlery factory. 

The best the men can hope for if they 
reach the UJS. base is indefinite deten- 
tion, the same fate faced by the hundreds 

'Over there, a 
technician who works can 
buy a car after a year. 

Here I don't even have a 
bicycle.’ 

Diosdado Shombert Fernandez, 
a refrigerator repairman 

who have fled southeastern Cuba in the 
last two weeks. 

The worst fate of all is not reaching the 
base and being confronted with the now 
well-chronicled terrors of the open seas. 
In these poor, predominantly black 
neighborhoods, the apocryphal stories 
include vivid descriptions of floating 
limbs, ghostly rafts and insatiable 

shar ks. 

In conversations with the men who 
built this boat and with others, these 
tales are set against the reality of life in 
Santiago, Cuba's second largest city, 
whose commitment to Mr. Castro is held 
up as a national model 
In the neighborhood where the boat is 
being built — - and it is not the only such 


construction project here — people have 
not seen an egg in four weeks and have 
survived mostly on the 2.7 kilograms (6 
pounds) of rice allowed monthly to each 
f amil y. Children started school Thurs- 
day wearing the same clothing they wore 
all summer. 

What are referred to as “shopping" 
places — the dollar-only stores frequent- 
ed by tourists and Cubans who can af- 
ford them — are held up as examples of 
how the system has failed in Santiago. A 
pair of cheap children's shoes in these 
stores cost S4, the equivalent of two 
months' salary. 

T have never liked the system," said 
Mr. Shombert, a father of two who is 
prepared to leave his family behind. “1 
am totally Cuban, but I think capitalist. 
Time is money. Time lost is money lost." 

“Over there," he added, referring to 
the United States, “a technician who 
works can buy a car after a year. Here I 
don’t even have a bicycle." 

Humberto Fayola, a 33-year-old radio 
and television repairman, sat silently in- 
side the boat while Mr. Shombert spoke. 
He was putting bathtub caulking along 
the cracks between the wood bottom and 
the side. The decision to leave was diffi- 
cult because, at heart, he still bdieved. 

“I don’t like the United States, to be 
honest," Mr. Fayola said. "The problem 
here is all economic and not political. I 
had a lot of hope in the revolution. What 
happened? I have sacrificed a lot and 
gotten nothing back." 


U.S.-Cuba Talks, and the Exodus, Go On 


TJ; f: • 

an t - 


tin 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — U.S. and Cuban offi- 
cials resumed talks Fziday on 
immigration, amid indications 
that Cuba was seriously weigh- 
ing Clinton administration pro- 
posals to resolve the crisis creat- 
ed by thousands of refugees 
setting sail for Florida. 

Negotiators refused to speak 
to reporters before the talks be- 
gan at Cuba's UN mission, and 
it was not clear if the two sides 
wore close to an agreement But 
public statements by American 
and Cuban diplomats after a 
first session Thursday suggest- 
ed that some major differences 
remained. 

• According to American and 
Cuban officials, the Cubans 
were seeking to use the talks to 
rail for elimination of Havana's 
biggest grievance with the Unit- 
ed States, the trade embargo, 
while the Americans were in- 
sisting on talking about immi- 
gration matters only. 

President Bill Clinton has re- 
peatedly said that he will not 
discuss the embargo with Presi- 
dent Fidel Castro and will do 
nothing to lift it until Mr. Cas- 
tro, who has led Cuba since 
1959, takes steps to restore de- 
mocracy. 

The talks came as the exodus 
of Cuban refugees in m a k e shi ft 
rafts and boats continued. 

U.S. Coast Guard and navy 
chips picked up 1,903 Cubans at 
sea Thursday in flimsy row- 
boats, crude rafts and sailboats. 
Another 145 were picked up in 


the' early moroi 
All will be t 


to a camp 


set up at the U.S. Navy’s base at 
Guant&namo Bay in Cuba. 

Since Mr. Castro said in early 
August that his Coast Guard 
would no longer prevent Cu- 
bans from leaving, more than 
20,000 people have fled the is- 
land in rafts, boats and inner 
tubes. 

The two sides' differing goals 
made some members of the 
American delegation fear that it 
could be hard to persuade Cuba 
to accept a deaf that involved 
only immigration matters. 

Although the United States 
has long treated Mr. Castro as a 
mortal enemy, the Clinton ad- 
ministration agreed to the talks 
with the hope that Mr. Castro 
could be persuaded to stop the 
exodus of refugees. 

The main subject of the talks 
was an American proposal that 
the United States grant entry 
rights to more than 20,000 Cu- 
bans each year in return for 
Havana's calling a halt to the 
chaotic exodus. 

The U.S. strategy has been to 
offer Mr. Castro something he 


11 Killed in Indonesian Bus 

Reuters 

JAKARTA — Eleven Indo- 
nesians were killed when their 
minibus was hit by an express 
passenger train in central Java, 
the Antara press agency report- 
ed Friday. 


has long clamored for: a firm 
commitment from Washington 
to grant the entiy rights. This 
would give the Cuban leader a 
safety valve that would help 
him get rid of thousands of dis- 
contented Cubans. 

The spokesman for the U.S. 
delegation, David Johnson, de- 
scribed the talks on Thursday 
as "serious 1 ’ and "businesslike." 
He said the United States had 
made an offer that "can meet 
what we believe is a a mutual 
objective: channeling the desire 
to immigrate into a legal, safe, 
orderly, predictable and de- 
pendable process and stemming 
the uncontrolled outflow- " 

But Ricardo Alarcdn de Que- 
seda, the former Cuban foreign 
minister, who is heading Cuba's 
delegation, said the only serious 
way to resolve the exodus of 
Cubans was to address the 
three-decade-old embargo, 
which Havana insists is fueling 
the exodus. 

“All they have to do is change 
that basic issue," Mr. Alarcon 
said on Cuban radio Thursday. 

Mr. AlarcOn, who is the pres- 
ident of the Cuban Nauonal 
Assembly, accused the U.S. side 


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Protesters Wreck 
Japanese E xhib it 
In Seoul Museum 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SEOUL — South Koreans 
angry at a Japanese plan to 
atone for wartime atrocities at- 
tacked an exhibit of Japanese 
ceramics on Friday, damaging 
valuable artifacts, witnesses 
said. 

A group of about 150 people 
threw eggs and rocks at the Jap- 
anese Embassy in Seoul, pro- 
testing as inadequate Tokyo's 
plan, announced this past week, 
to set up a SI billion fund for 
cultural and vocational projects 
to atone for Japan's acts during 
World War II. 

The protesters included sev- 
eral elderly women who had 
been among the 200.000 wom- 
en, mostly Asians, forced to 
serve as prostitutes by the Im- 
perial Army. 

Several dozen of the protest- 
ers then disrupted the exhibit of 
traditional Japanese ceramics 
at a Seoul museum, smashing 
glass boxes containing object^ 
staging a sit-in and chanting 
anti-Japanese slogans. The 
demonstrators dispersed after 
about two hours, and no arrests 
were made. 

Witnesses said attackers 
smashed about 15 glass exhibit 
cases in which more than 100 
items of traditional Japanese 
arts and crafts were displayed. 

The exhibition hall was lit- 
tered with porcelain, shattered 
glass, dolls and earthenware, 
the witnesses said. 

Japanese Embassy officials 
said the objects on display were 
works of famous craftsmen des- 
ignated "national human trea- 
sures” and were highly valued. 


A protest statement said the 
Japanese fund, announced on 
Wednesday by Prime Minister 
Tomiichi Murayama, did “not 
help at all to solve problems." 

“We know the fund will be 
used as a gateway for cultural 
invasion." it added. 

In Manila. Filipino women 
who had also been forced to 
serve as so-called comfort wom- 
en during the war rallied out- 
side the Japanese Embassy on 
Friday to denounce the plan. 

“By not consulting the com- 
fort women on its proposed so- 
lution. or addressing their de- 
mand for direct compensation, 
the Japanese government vio- 
lates their rights." said a state- 
ment issued by Lila-Pilipina, a 
group supporting the women. 

Japan refuses to pay direct 
compensation to the comfort 
women, saying all claims of rep- 
aration had been paid for by a 
peace treaty in the 1950s. 

Japan's planned fund will in- 
stead be used to set up voca- 
tional t rainin g centers and un- 
dertake other projects in a 
gesture of atonement to the 
comfort women. 

North Korea dismissed Ja- ‘ 
pan’s plan on Friday and called 
on Tokyo squarely to face up to 
its responsibilities and pay 
compensation. 

“The Japanese authorities 
can never be allowed to dispose 
of the liquidation of the past 
this way," a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman was quoted as say- 
ing by the Korean Central 
News Agency, monitored in To- 
kyo. (Reuters, AP) 


Mickey’s Ears? Goofy , 
Flight Attendants Say 

The .Us*ciuh'J Prtff 

TOKYO — Flight attendants working for Japan's biggest 
airline never dreamed they had signed on with a Mickey 
Mouse operation. Until they were asked to wear ears, that is. 

In a publicity campaign aimed at bringing the company oul 
of a business slump. Japan Airlines last month introduced 
jumbos with Walt Disney characters painted on the outside. 

The company also asked its female flight attendants to 
wear oversized mouse ears — with big red bows — to welcome 
passengers aboard and promote Disney character goods for 
sale in flight. 

One flight attendant said that wearing the ears would make 
her and her colleagues look silly. “We're not children." she 
said. The flight attendants union says it is negotiating with 
management to modify the plan. 


The AssocuUed Press 

KUALA LUMPUR — The 
head of the banned Islamic sect 
Arqam, Abuya Ashaari Mu- 
hammad, was deported to Ma- 
laysia after the police in Thai- 
land detained him Friday, the 
nauonal news agency and po- 
lice sources said. 

The government-controlled 
Be mam a agency said here in an 
unattributed report that be was 
brought back but his present 
whereabouts were unknown. It 
was not known if Mr. Ashaari 


was arrested or whether he had 
gone underground. 

The action, however, suggest- 
ed that the government might 
have decided to arrest and 
charge him. Bemama gave no 
details. 

In banning AJ .Arqam lost 
week. Malaysia condemned the 
cult-like following of Mr. 
Ashaari and his allegedly devi- 
ationist view of Islam. The gov- 
ernment said the group had be- 
come a national threat and was 
sowing disunity 


AMSTERDAM 

BRASSERIE DE ROODE LHEUW 


of seeking to sour the atmo- 
sphere by suggesting that the 
Castro government had re- 
leased about 100 prisoners in 
August and encouraged them to 
join the exodus. 

"That information is prepos- 
terous." he said. "It's a way to 
create a very negative atmo- 
sphere, not only for the talks 
but also for those Cubans that 
are seeking a new life in the 
States." 

The Clinton administration 
sought the negotiations because 
its initial effort to hall the flood 
of refugees failed. On Aug. 19, 
Mr. Clinton ended a three-de- 
cade-old policy of admitting all 
Cubans, confident that Cubans 
would prefer to stay at home 
rather than be detained indefi- 
nitely at the GuamAnamo Bay 
Naval Station. But since then 
more than 15,000 people have 
set out by sea. 

(NYT, Reuters, AP) 


NEW FALL 
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THE CENTRAL SOURCE 

ON 


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INVESTMENT 


JUv - September 


\i\ 


Volume 3, Number s 
a Quantfi, Puescwon 


International Fund Investment 



*!foundHt b1*tf0MMmsL” 

■ Gitetde Soto - Cftafrman * Global Asset 
Management - ■ - - • ; ~ . . • • 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 



ART 

Saturday-Sunday, 
September 3-4, 1994 
Page 6 


Exploding the Myth of Pont-Aven 


{numantmat Herald Tribune 


P ONT-AVEN. France 
— Powerful myths get 
entrenched in art histo- 
ry as in other fields. It 
will take more than just one 
exhibition to dispel the Gction 
of a solid, stylistically consis- 
tent group of artists gathered 
around Gauguin at Pont-Aven. 

But H Le Cercle de Gauguin 
en Bretagne” with 70 works on 
view at the Musfce de Pont- 
Aven until Sept. 26 and an im- 
portant catalogue by the cura- 


SOUREN MEUKIAN 


tor of the museum, Catherine 
Puget, is a first step. The focus 
is on 1894, the year when Gau- 
guin. devastated at losing a 
court case against an innkeeper 
who retained all his paintings, 
left in mid-November, never to 
return to Brittany. 

The truth is that Gauguin, a 
stockbroker who turned full- 
time painter in 1883, was too 
complex, a man and too excited 
by tne novelty of his discoveries 
in his art to stick to one formula 
for very long. The flagship of the 
show, the portrait of a girl paint- 
ed in the autumn of 1894, widely 
deviates from lhe manner associ- 
ated with bis “Pont-Aven peri- 


od." The memory of the juxta- 
posed patches of lavender blues. 


rusty reds, dark greens all subtly 
which the master 


blending, with wt 
handled the Breton countryside 
in the vintage years 1888 to 1890, 
merely lingers around the monu- 
mental figure that fills the can- 
vas. The mass of deep yellow, 
toned with orange and shot 
through with almond-green sliv- 
ers looks like a color explosion. 


M entally, Gau- 
guin was already 
turning his back 
on Brittany. The 
portrait, “Bretonne en Prifcre” 
(Breton Girl at Prayer), is not of 
a Breton girL She wears the yel- 
low smock that missionaries in 
Tahiti forced on the girls in 
their care. Puget notes that the 
cap is not Breton either. Nor are 
the angel’s wings, for that mat- 
ter. Not even pious Breton girls 
grow wings. Gauguin’s “por- 
trait*' is a flight into fantasy 
with an ironic farewell to the 
Symbolists in Pont-Aven who 
had played a role in the devel- 
opment of his style. 

They were no longer relevant 
to him. That same year, Mau- 
rice Denis, the man who wrote 
down the rules of Gauguin's 
teaching In an article published 
in 1890. came to Loctudy in the 
summer and painted one of the 
masterpieces of Symbolism, 
“LeSoir, Loctudy.” 


Seeing it in the same room as 
Gauguin’s praying giri is enough 
to convince anyone that there 
was no question of a “Pont-Aven 
School” at that point. The two 
pictures are light-years apart. In 
“Le Soir. Loctudy,” the bust of a 
woman springs out of the lower 
comer left as in a Japanese print 
and the handling of her blouse, 
done in swirls of juxtaposed 
dots, sends bade echoes of Poin- 
tillism. 

A different heritage was kept 
up in the work of o there, equal- 
ly distant from Gauguin’s mon- 
umental style and from the 
Symbolist dreamlike evocation 
of Denis. When Henry Moret 
met Gauguin at Pont-Aven in 
1888 and- became very dose to 
him, the group of artists around 
Gauguin disparagingly dubbed 
Moret “the Impressionist.” 
Looking at “Waiting for the 
FishermenTs Return," done in 
1894, one can see that Moret 
deserved the label. 

A group of women is scan- 
ning a choppy sea handled in 
Neo- Impressionist brush- 
strokes. Three tiny boats loom 
on the horizon. The artist paints 
what the eye sees, not what the 
mind conceives, as Gauguin 
and Denis alike would have it, 
albeit in vastly different styles. 

But the identical labels could 
conceal huge variations. There 
is little in common between the 
Denis and a picture by the En- 
glishman Eric Forbes-Roberl- 
son at Pont-Aven about the 
same time, even though Forbes- 
Robertson took part in several 
of the “Exhibitions of Symbol- 
ist and Impressionist Painters” 
organized by le Bare de Boutte- 
villc. “Great Expectations” has 
a sculptural quality to its fig- 
ures, a sense of depth and per- 
spective and a painterly quality 
to the highly structured compo- 
sition that set him apart. 

Georges Lacombe. despite 
the “Nabi” denomination con- 
ferred upon him by Paul S6ru- 
aer. and Lacombe’s would-be 
Symbolist allegiances, could 
have been working on another 
planet. “Le Nabi ala barbe ruti- 
lantc” (The Nabi With the Red 
Beard), portraying Sferusier, is 
little more than kitsch with lit- 
erary pretensions. Charles Fi- 
liger fell into the same trap 
while turning for inspiration to 
the seventh-century Rav enna 
mosaics and medieval enamels. 
There is little in his spoofy 
“Sainte Cfecile,” done yet again 
in 1894, to indicate that Fifiger 
was ever part of Gauguin's “cir- 
cle in Bnttany.” 

Interestingly, the same is true 
of artists the great man got to 
know very well, like Ernest de 


German and 0, 



Emil Nolde (1867-1956), Herbstmeer XVI. 
Estimate: £350.000-450,000. 


Christie's second highly important sale of German and 
Austrian Art will take place on 1 3 October in London. 
The sale will include works by C D. Friedrich, A. von 
Menzel. C. Spitzweg, R. von Alt, L. Corinth, 
M. Liebermann, E. Nolde, E. L Kirchner, K. Schmidt- 
Rottiuff, F. Marc. C. Felixmuller, K. Schwitters, 
W. Kandinsky und M. Ernst. 

A selection of works included in the sale will be on 
exhibition in Germany on the following dates: 


9.- 1 1. September, 
Dresden, 

Albertinum, 

Galerie Neue Meister 
1 3.- 1 4. September, 
Christie’s Berlin, 
FasanenstraBe 72 
1 6.- 1 7. September, 
Christie's Diisseldorf, 
JnselsoraBe 15 


1 9.-20. September, 
Christie’s Hamburg, 
WentzelstraBe 21 

22.-24. September, 
Christie’s Frankfurt, 
SavignystraBe 42 
26.-27. September, 
Christie’s Munich, 
ResidenzstraBe 27 


For further information please contact Mayella Rggis in 
London on (4471) 389 25S I or Birgld Seynsche in 
Dusseldorf on (4921 1) 498 2986. 



CHRISTIES 


S King Sttvd. St. J-inwA LwkIuii SWIY WJT 
Td: 144711 X.VJ 'Xlttl Fax: (4471) S.W Iftl I 



Paul Gauguin's “Bretonne en Priere. ” at the Musee de Pont-Aven exhibition. 


Chamaillard. They met at an 
auction in Pont-Aven in 1888 
and Gauguin came to see de 
Chamaillard as Us pupiL This is 
remarkable concerning a painter 
as short on ideas as he was on 
skills. De QiamafUar ri’s land- 
scapes, composed like the pic- 
ture postcards of his time, do not 
bear the remotest connection to 
Gauguin's teaching, despite the 
years he spent at Pont-Aven. 

Louis Roy. with whom Gau- 
guin struck up an instant 
friendship in 1889, presenting 
him with two of his own still 
lifes and painting his portrait 
that same year, had on the con- 
trary considerable talent. 

A still life of pears and apples 
gathered near a fruitbowl. 
which Roy did in 1894, is one of 
the gems in the show. But al- 
though he continued to be close 
to Gauguin, who asked him that 
year to take care of the printing 
of a series of his own woodcuts, 
Roy’s picture bears no resem- 
blance to Gauguin’s work. The 
color is predominantly in nu- 
ances of ocher yellow. There is a 
vigorous relief to the fruits and 
the intense lighting is reminis- 


cent of 17th-century Spanish 


17th-century 
still fifes. It is entirely original. 

The real surprise in the exhi- 
bition, however, is “Paysage de 
Pont-Aven” (Pont-Aven Land- 


scape) by the Irishman Roderic 
O’ Conor. 


Born in County Ros- 
common in 1869, O’Conor had 
academic t raining in Dublin 
and Antwerp. He was in Paris 
by 1887, exhibiting his work at 
lhe Salon. After spending a year 
at Grez-sur-Loing, where Eng- 
lish and American painters con- 
gregated, the Irishman found 
his way to Pont-Aven in 1892. 
came back in 1 893 and through- 
out 1894 was among the artists 
gravitating to Gauguin. 


Y ET, ©’Conor’s Pont- 
Aven landscape, un- 
like any by Gauguin, 
is far ahead of his 
master’s work, on the path to 
modernity. Undulating stripes 
of emerald green and ocher ren- 
der a hilly countryside in which 
swaying trees are done in blue 
and red streaks. Fauvism, a de- 
cade later, was not nearly as 
bold. Probably before that; 


O’Conor had painted a view of 
the forest path at Lezaven, 
which is much doser to Gau- 
guin, in a poetic vein. He also 
did, in yet another manner, an 
undated portrait of a Breton 
woman using color in rhythmi- 
cal curves that herald 20th-cen- 
tury Op Art. 

Neither the landscape nor the 
portrait really make it to the 
grade of masterpiece. They find 
their limits in a certain clumsi- 
ness and bold out a prospect of 
wonderful things to come that 
never did. Once Gauguin was 
gone, the Irishman's talent 
withered. He sank back into the 
academic rot. 

Gauguin's Pont-Aven had 
hardly been a school. It was an 
alchemy that touched off 
sparks in some. Marvelous at 
times and crassly mediocre at 
others, it simmered in a diver- 
sity that was so far barely sus- 
pected. 

The backyard view that the 
exhibition gives of the “Pont- 
Aven circle,” by bringing in its 
most obscure participants, is a 
refreshing novelty. 


ART EXHIBITIONS 


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MUSEUMS 


CLAUDE MONET MUSEUM IN GIYERNY 

THE HOUSE - CLAUDE MONETS GARDENS 
THE WATER-LILY POOL 


Open everyday except Monday, from 1st April to 31 October 
10 i.m. • 6 p.m. without interruption. 

West highway, dir. Rouen, exit BonnJ&rcs near Vernon (Eure). 

Information: (36) 32512821 ■ ■■■■■ . . 


Penny Arcade Arcana 

Coin-Operated Devices Up for Auction 


By Rita Rdf 


Here York Tima Service 


the Rock 
West Vi 
month 


N EW YORK —Whea he was L 
mg up in the 1930s in East Lh 
pod, Ohio, James Smith 2d lived a 
trolley-car ride away from paradise: 
amusement park in Chester, 
i family outings there twice a 
was 6 or 7, be loved riding the 
Ferris wheel, fistemng to the oom-pah-pah of 
the carousel and eating cotton candy. 

“As soon as I could sneak away from the 
adults," says Smith, now a New York plastic 
surgeon, “Td head tor the penny arcade.” As 
a teenager, be continued playing the coin- 
operaied baseball and horse-racing games at 
the local pod hall. “To my father,” be recalls, 


“that was gambling — outright sinning. So 
t caught, he read me the riot act” 


when I got 
Smith’s childhood 
1964 when his wife, 


ion was rekindled in 
ancy, gave him a birth- 
day present of a penny-operated gambling 
machine That modest gift spawned a ccfflec- 
tion of 1,000 bits of arcade and fairground 
pa raphernalia, one of the largest and most 
comprehensive ever formed. Sotheby's in New 
York will auction the kit on Soil 16 and 17 in a 
sale ejec t ed to bring about SIB million. 

“Tins is American history as seen through a 
fun-fair mir ro r ,” said David N. Redden, a 
Sotheby’s senior vice president Although 
coin-operated vending gambling and mnsic 
machines were also made abroad, he said, 
those produced in the United States are among 
the most prized by collectors. “There's some- 

said. raucous form of Americana.” 

The penny-drop gambling machine that 
inspired Smith to acquire more of these de- 
vices is not for sale. “We’re toping it as a 
memento of the collection in which the entire 
family shared,” he says. The Smiths' five 
children helped buy many others at flea mar- 
kets. They also helped restore and maintain 
them, a skill they learned from their father, 
who had apprenticed as a teenager on the 
broken wheels, gears, tumblers and house- 
hold appliances in his own home. “I was the 
one to fix the docks, the door locks and the 
washing machine,” Smith says. 


V IRTUALLY evejy one-armed ban- 
dit and Chiclet dispenser owned by 
Smith is in working order, thanks to 
tiie efforts of his family and Gary 
Taplin, a restorer who was made curator of 
the collection in 1984. Now that the Smith 


children are grow n and live elsewhere, says 

the 


their father, who is 67, it's time to close 
private museum in Greenwich, Connecticut. 
To ease the separation from his pinball ma- 
chines and carousel beasts. Smith is focusing 
these days more on another holding amassed 
over the last 15 years: postcards of hospitals. 

Among the surgeon’s pro- 1 950 coin-operat- 
ed devices that come alive when fed a coin is a 
1930s life-size belly dancer from the Palisades 
Amusement Park in New Jersey. Deposit a 
dime and it rolls its eyes and shimmies. Soth- 
eby’s expects that the novelty will sell for 
about $1,500. With a 1908 red-white-aod- 
blue metal “shake with Unde Sam” strength 
tester, it costs a cent to grip the symbol's hand 
hard enough to ring the bdL Tie auction 
price may be as much as $9,000. 

The machines are a cast-iron time line of 
popular obsessions and objects that Ameri- 
cans romanticized: baseball, football, hockey 
and horse racing. Transportation via balloon, 
bicycle, ocean finer, airplane and automobile. 
And war. One early 20th-century jambfipg 



For a cent, a test of strength. 


machine depicts Admiral George Dewey at 
the Battle of Manila Bay of 1898. In another, 
a successful player shoots poison pills into 
Adolf Hitler’s mouth. 

“These machines reflect what people 
thought about, worried about and the ways 
they had fan,” Smith says. “And in the years 
when they were popular, there really wasn’t a 
lot dse to do for amusement. What I still 
marvel at is how well those iron and oak 
machines worked And today, only about 1 
percent survive.” 



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Montepulciano Celebrates a Famous Son 


f A.:. 


By Susan Lumsden 


M ONTEPULCIANO, Italy — 
Called the pearl of the 16th 
century, this noble Tuscan 
town of 14,000 might be bet- 
ter promoted as an oyster full of pearls of 
Renaissance architecture. Its 23 amassed 
palaces and churches are grouped in great- 
er density than those of Florence, its his- 
toric protector. 

Even the town’s shape is that of an 
oyster, served cool at 605 meters (2,000 
feet) above sea level on a ventilated forti- 
fied rock ledge overlooking vineyards. 

At first, Montepulciano seems like a 
miniature Florence, its Palazzo Comunale 
by Michelozzo having the same medieval 
tower as the Palazzo Veccfaio. But with its 
Renaissance symmetry of windows and 
doors, it is quite different. Across the Piaz- 
za Grande, the Palazzo Contucri by the 


elder SangaDo looks like a cozier version of 
the Palazzo Media, now public property in 
Florence. The Contucd, Momepulciaho's 
oldest wine family, still five here. 

The real pearl, by the same SangaUo, is 
the large, glowing travertine church of San 
Biagio, built away from its oyster for clear- 
er viewing on the road to Cniantiano. 

Until the end of the year, all the monu- 
ments are numbered labeled furnished 
and catalogued for a grand walking tour in 
honor of the 500th anniversary of the 
death of Montepulriano’s most famous 
s on, not an architect but a poet, Agnolo (or 
Angelo) Ambrqguoi (1454-94) better 
known as Poliziano, which he took from 
the town’s Latin name, Mods Politianus. 

P olizian o (or anglicized as Politian) was 
a child prodigy who translated The Iliad 
from Greek to Latin at a time when Tus- 
cans were discovering humanism. After his 
lawyer father was killed in a vendetta, the 


boy fled to Florence, where be found pro- 
tection from Lorenzo de’ Medici. 


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From 2473, the Palazzo Media was his 
home. He tutored Lorenzo’s heir, Piero, 
and the other Medici children, including 
two future popes, Leo X and Clement VH, 
all the while writing his first epic poem “Le 
Stanze della Giosira.” It was dedicated to 
Lorenzo’s brother Giuliano, assassinated 
in the 1478 Pazri conspiracy, which Poli- 
ziano helped Lorenzo escape. “Le Stanze” 
revitalized the Tuscan dialect. 


-.01 

- 


■ i 


Poliziano’s second masterpiece, “La Fa- 
vola d*Orfeo” (1480), resurrected the myth 
of the poet seeking eternity through muse 
and poetry. The play has inspired artists 
from Monteverdi to Cocteau. Films on the 
Orfeo myth will be shown in Montepul- 
ciano from Sept. 15 to 30. 


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Susan Lumsden -writes about the arts from 
Florence. 


BOOKS 


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BABY, WOULD I LIE? 

By Donald £ Westlake. 291 
pages. $19.95. Mysterious. 


Reviewed by Bruce Cook 

L ORDY folks, it’s murder in 
Taney County — that’s 
Branson, Missouri, the pleasure 
dome of the American heart- 
land. And Donald E. Westlake 
is right there on the spot to tell 
the whole, dark, sinister tale. 
Considering the author, it 
should not surprise you to learn 
that in his hands, the brutal 
facts arirfg , the whole matter 


becomes funny (peculiar as weD 
as ha-ha) and occasionally 


opposite the title page — 43 in 
all — he has given a separate 
category to what he calls “com- 
ic crime novels.” Some of his 
best — “High Adventure” and 
“Caps and Robbers” — are 
tiirirfri under this heading. If be 
did not invent this sub-genre, he 
is certainly its master. 

As with any Westlake book, 
perhaps better than most, 
“Baby, Would 1 Lie?” is set in 
recognizably authentic territo- 
ry. The Branson he presents is 
the real thing, from the creeping 
“one-mH e-an-hour” traffic on 
the Strip to the backstage lives 
of the star performers whose 
theaters fine iL 


and new as wet painL And these 
people are Ray Jones’s people, 
honest, simple, slow to anger or 
judgment.” 

Her editor. Jade IngersolL 
supposes she has gone bonkers, 
of course, and flies out immedi- 
ately to set her on the right 
path. Thezr relationship is com- 
plicated by the fact that they 
are lovers and apartment- 
mates. Both, too, are reformed 
alumni of the Weekly Galaxy, a 
tabloid that excels in scurrilous 
reporting. 

It is not long before we find 
that “Baby, Would I Lie?” has 


whfle Sara may wax as lyrical as 
she likes over Branson, Middle 
America and Ray Jones, the 
hero of the great unwashed. 
Jones is, sure enough, in a 


stew. He is accused of the rape 
iHardwiat, 


developed a plot parallel to the 
y. We follow I 


downright hilarious. 
He’s had 


plenty of practice. 
In the impressive list of works 


[new authors 

PUBLISH YOUR WORK 

ALL SUBJECTS CONSIDERED 
\ Authors WwW-wldo Invited 

Writs or send ytxir manusoM to 
MINERVA PRESS 
2 qpflROMFTONRP. LONDON SW 73 QQ 


He doesn’t ridicule. He 
doesn’t patronize. When Sara 
Joslyn, a writer from Trend 
magazine in New York, goes 
down to Branson to report on 
the murder trial of country star 
Ray Jones, she finds him out on 
tail and perforating two shows 
a day at his theater. 

“Branson is country-western 
star Ray Jones’s spiritual home, 
as exciting as Atlantic City, as 
dean as Disneyland, as fresh 


murder stoty. We follow Ray 
Jones and his stalwart (and very 
expensive) defense team 
through the p lanning and exe- 
cution of its strategy. And along 
with it, we see Galaxy’s team of 
spies and snoops en gaging jjj all 


manner of dirty tricks as they 
defendant and his 


hound the 
lawyers, as wefl as the prosecu- 
tion, every step of the way. 

Iugersoll sees it unfold and 
decides they deserve an expose 
all their own. He, of course, is 
the one to report and write it. 


and murder of Belle 

an employee at the Ray Jones 
Country Theater. Whfle the evi- 
dence is purely circumstantial, 
with the wrong sort of jury it 
just might be enough to send 
him to the gas chamber. He 
knows it, but ole Ray, who is 
craftier than anybody realizes, 
has a plan, a way out of his 
troubles so daring that it may 
just free him from them alL 
Westlake has made Joses his 
own man. IBs attitudes, dia- 
logue, everything about him 
may be taken on faith by the 
reader. And the songs he sings 
are pure country. If Westlake 
wanted, he could open shop as a 
lyricist in Nashville and make a 
second fortune for himself. 




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Bruce Cook, the author <4 


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many books, including a guide to 
lutemys- 


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Branson. Missouri, and: 

tery novel "Rough Cut," wrote '■ 
this for The Washington Post. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3*4, 1994 




- — Guiding the Visitors 
cana , Around the Museums 


ART 


Venice Honors the Man 
Who Invented the Book 


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By John Russell 

New York Tima Service 

N EW YORK — Once upon a time, the 
great European museums did not see 
it as a moral duty to guide their visi- 
tors. It was assumed, on the contrary, 
that if visitors were bright enough to walk into 
the museum they would also be bright enough to 
find their way around. They did not want, and 
did not need, a semaphore system to keep them 
on track. 

If quite another point of view was put forward 
in the United States, it was because it has always 
been the role of American museums to provide a 
co mm unity service cater to the specialist first. 
Sometimes that role seems to have grated. 

As lonj* ago as 1954 there was a director of the 
Metropolitan Museum who said, “We get them 
into the museum, and what do they look at? One 
thing after another. If they come to a fire hose, 
they look at that too." But those days are gone. 
Today the nurturing of the visitor' has a high 
priority in major museums. 

What is now called signage, or the science of 
j^signs, is the topic of the hour. The idea that 
visitors should not get to see what they want is 
abhorrent. Even more so is the idea that they 
might get lost and stumble around like zombies. 

At the same time, visitors have to be maH? to 
fed at home without being subjected to an infor- 
mational overload. It is at the very outset of their 
visit that they should be taken gently by the hand 
and sent on the right way. The key ingredient in 
that affectionate welcome is the brochure that is 
available at the information desk. 

Anyone who doubts the use of these brochures 
has only to go to a major museum in high 
summer. At the Metropolitan, for instance, more 
than SO percent of the public is made up of 
foreign visitors. Hardly one of them is not Hold- 
ing a brochure, which functions as visa and 
menu, talisman and passkey. 

It might seem that the museum brochure is a 
one-size standard-issue. But even a casual perus- 
al of a group of brochures from all over will show 
that on the contrary, the brochure is a volatile 
and a highly personal affair. National character, 
local pnde, fashions in photography, internal 
rivalries and rival marketing strategies — all play 
a part. The performance of other museums in the 
matter of the brochure is also monitored. 

A brochure can look clunky and long overdue 
for revision. But it is also possible for a brochure 
to be too beautiful. In 1988, when I. M. Pei's 
pyramid first became the point of departure for 
almost every visit to the Louvre, an orientation 
guide was produced after a long period of in- 
formed agonizing and collegial discussion. 

It was a triumph of French intelligence. Order, 
0 logic and lucidity were everywhere paramount. A 
great deal of information was conveyed in a 
concise and unhurrying way. It was magical to 
look at. It might have been waiting for Maurice 
Ravel to orchestrate it. Folded, it measured no 
more than three by two inches. The paper was 
thinner than. thin. It weighed nothing and had 
everything. 


But alas! It was a busk Nobody liked iu 
Opened out to its full size, it crumpled. The 
uncluttered plans did not correspond at all to ibe 
rough-and-tumble of finding one's way across 
huge spaces that were being mobbed in the name 
of novelty. User reactions were unanimous. This 
was a brochure that didn’t do the job. 

So it was back to the drawing board, with 
headaches and bruises everywhere evident. But 
the Louvre came back strongly. Its present bro- 
chure is — guess what? — a 12-page handbook. 

It is tall and narrow, with the information 
stacked up at the top of each page and the maps 
nestling at the bottom. It, too, is beautiful, but 
sturdy, and built for hard wear. 

Meanwhile, in the United Stales, the brochure 
still wins out over the handbook. But as between 
one museum and another, it is strongly charac- 
terized. In Washington, the cover of the’National 
Gallery of Art's brochure makes the most of its 
commanding position in the architecture of the 
capital (It doesn't stint on the vegetation either.) 

At the An Institute of Chicago, the floor plans 
barrel down the page as if to indicate that the 
museum has its full share of the thrust of the city 
itself. The point is r amm ed home, moreover, by a 
hefty bunch of small-scale illustrations. 

At the Getty Museum in Malibu, an unhurried 
luxury is the mark of a brochure that makes 
much of the enormous gardens and touches with 
a gentlemanly discretion on the ramified nature 
of its collections. 

My prize, if I had one, would go to the Geve- 
land Museum. Its brochure not only sites the 
museum precisely in the landscape outside but 
manages to suggest that it is a friendly and 
hospitable place in which family outings will 
never feel out of place. 

That point is heightened at the foot of page 
after page by the presence of a husband and wife 
mar ching along and clearly having a very good 
time. They are not from Geveland. Nor are they 
of our own time. They are taken, in fact, from the 
work of a German artist called Hans Sebald 
Beham, who lived nearly 500 years ago. 




By Roderick Conway Morris 

Intenuiicml Herald Tribune 


m 


V ENICE — Compact, portable, capa- these small 

ble of storing tens of thousands of he called c 
words, with random access and re- He pionee 
quiring no power — the book, as reference. 
Arthur C. Garke has observed — is an infer- new stand; 
mation tool of the future as well as the past, page to co 

That the modem book, as we would recog- measurefr 

nize it today, was bom so soon after the c 

invention of movable metal type in the mid- While hi 
1 5th century, was principally the work of one of publish 
man — Aldo Manuzio, founder of the cele- numerous 
braied Aldine Press in Ven- 
ice 500 years ago this year. 

To mark the anniversary, Aldo McUlUZW Set 
the Bibhoteca Nazionale . _ . 

Marciana, Venice’s national Tie IF publishing 
library, has staged an attrac- j j -/ivT 

tive and thought-provoking St3nQ3TuS OLHJ 


handy, portable and pocket-size. His texts 
were "exceptionally clear and crisp, with wide 
margins and, to increase the ease of reading 
these smalier-format books, he invented what 
he called cursive type, better known as italic. 
He pioneered page numbering to aid rapid 
reference, and though his books ushered in 
new standards of care, he initiated the errata 
page to correct fugitive errors. Even the sim- 
ple, elegant and practical bindings set the 
measure for centuries. 




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1/ 

* £ 


A T the Met, where roughly a milli on 
brochures are printed every year and 
every one finds a taker, a new and 
revised one, printed on a two-color 
Japanese printer bought for the purpose, will be 
ready in good time for the museum's 125th- 
anniversary celebrations next year. 

Its publication is one of the many fine-tuning 
operations that the Met has in hand. Some of 
them have to do with signage. Others are in the 
more conspicuous arena of rooms remodeled and 
collections set out to greater advantage. 

In parentheses, I must admit to thinking that 
there is nothing terrible about being lost from 
time to time in a big museum. Conjunctions and 
revelations may occur at such times that would 
never occur elsewhere or otherwise. 

Not for nothing did I at one time give as my 
favorite recreation “Getting lost in big muse- 
ums." This is a context in which “Break loose on 
your own!" is not necessarily bad advice. 




m v v 


exhibition of more than 150 

Aldine books and related VCdfS cL§0. 

manuscripts, “Aldo Mann- I 

zio and the Venetian Milieu, 

1494-1515," which runs until Sept. 15. The 
setting is the first-floor vestibule and main 
hall of Sansovino's library, opposite the 
Doge’s Palace, not usually open to the public. 

Manuzio was born near Rome in about 
1450, at about the same time as the dawn of 
printing, and led the life of a wandering 
scholar and teacher until in his 40s, he 
launched himself on a new career as a pub- 
lisher. Venice had already established itself as 
the superpower of early publishing. 

The Venetian government was quick to 
appreciate the possibilities of the new tech- 
nology and the favorable conditions the city 
offered, from a skilled work force and an 
abundant local supply of paper to access to 
one of the largest and most cosmopolitan 
markets in the world. 

For Manuzio, Venice had an added attrac- 
tion. It was his primary ambition to publish 
Greek classics and, after the fall of Constanti- 
nople to the Turks in 1453, the city had 
become the refuge of so many Greek scholars, 
bearing thousands of manuscripts, that it had 
been dubbed “almost another Byzantium." 

Manuzio's program to publish books in 
ancient Greek may seem ratified. But the flair 
and imagination he brought to the enterprise 
made him rapidly the most influential pub- 
lisher of that, or possibly any other, age. 

As a glance at any of his productions con- 
firms, for him a book was a book, a new 
phenomenon that demanded a distinct form 
of its own. Thus, when many other backward- 
looking printers were issuing books that re- 
sembled manuscripts, Manuzio squarely ad- 
dressed the newly emerging secular “reading 
public” who wanted to read for education and 
edification, certainly, but also for pleasure. 

To this end he created the octavo format. 


While he never losi sight of his central goal 
of publishing Greek books, he brought out 
numerous others in Latin and Italian, and 
even Hebrew, which 
. achieved for him additional 

UZIO Set publishing firsts, including 

■ i . war memoirs, an instant 

Stling medical book ou gonorrhea. 

then ravaging Italy, and a 
OlfLf modern-style travel’ book on 

the Caucasus. With Eras- 
mus's “Adages" — a tome of 

Greek and Latin quotations 

— he created the first best 
seller. To produce it. he suspended the print- 
ing of other titles, obliging the Dutch human- 
ist. then in Venice, to write against a deadline, 
printing as the copy came in. 

His capacity for work was astonishing. He 
edited, set and printed almost the entire 
known works of .Aristotle — nearly 3.S00 
pages — within three years. His high-pressure 
style of production ’was clearly not always 
understood by his contemporaries, hence the 
sign outside nis printshop. which read: 

“Whoever you are. .Aldo earnestly begs vou 
to state your business in the fewest possible 
words and be gone, unless, like Hercules to 
weary Allas, you would lend a helping hand. 
There will always be enough work for vou. 
and all who come this way. 

T HE famous logo of the Aldine Press 
— a dolphin entwined with an an- 
chor. denoting speed combined with 
reliability — was in due course imi- 
tated by other publishers as the ultimate sym- 
bol of publishing quality (often with scant 
justification). 

Needless to say, Manuzio's books were 
extensively counterfeited. He helpfully 
warned his customers that you could literally 
smell such substandard fakes, as he used only 
the best paper and ink, a boast confirmed by 
the books in the Venice exhibition. 

A perfectionist to the last, in 1513 he de- 
clared that “i have never been satisfied with 
any book I have published." But, in reality, by 
the time he died two years later, through his 
unique vision and superhuman energy, he had 
not only guaranteed the survival and diffu- 
sion of ancient Greek literature, but also set 
standards of production in publishing that 
have yet to be surpassed. 


W ill mm t SjiiJii T hc Np* York T 


A ’90s Architecture 
With a ’60s Vision 


FOR SALE /SOLD 


By Herbert Muschamp 


New York Tima Service 


N EW YORK — For 
architects, it’s too 
soon for a Wood- 
stock reunion. In this 
patient, not to say plodding, art 
form, the '60s counterculture 
never had a union in the first 
place. 

Architects seldom get to do 
much building before they're 
50, and beyond that, a move- 
ment that defined itself in op- 
position to authority was bound 
.%io have a rough time claiming 
an art that is traditionally 
bound to the status quo. 

But a countercultural vision of 
comm unity has emerged in re- 
cent projects by some prominent 
survivors of that generation. 

Stewart Brand, author of a 
recent book, “How Buildings 
Learn," is not an architect but 
as editor of the Whole Earth 
Catalogue, he was the leading 
champion of Buckminster 
Fullers geodesic dome, a de- 
sign that came closest to pro- 
viding the counterculture with 
an architectural symbol But 
Brand writes now that domes 
“were a massive, total failure." 
They leaked. They offered no 
privacy. They resisted alter- 
t a lions. 

Beyond that, Brand has come 
to feel that innovation in archi- 
tecture simply isn't worth the 
trouble. Though he has kept 
abreast of changing times in the 
field of electronic communica- 
tions, he condemns architects 
and the architectural press for 
promoting novelty at the user’s 
expense. 

He agrees with Peter Cal- 
thoipe, the San Francisco archi- 
tect and planner, that “man}’ of 
the follies of his profession 
would be avoided if architects 
simply decided that what they 
do is craft instead of art." Like 
Bernard Rudofsky and Sybil 
Moholy-Nagy, Brand cele- 
brates the tradition of vernacu- 
lar building: bams, bungalows, 
k Cape Cods and pueblos. 

Yet as Brand romantically 
represents them, all these forms 
are domes — forms of sheltered 
innocence uncorrupted by wily 
. urban ways. Unlike Plato, 
Brand wouldn’t exile artists 
, from bis ideal community. He 
would simply forbid them to 
practice architecture. 

“Art must be inherently radi- 
cal." he writes, “but buddings 
r are inherently conservative. Art 
• must experiment to do its job. 

« Most experiments fail." 


<Cs3t 


Calthorpe designs grown- 
up, prosperous versions of the 
hippie commune. In doing so, 
he shows that the hippie com- 
mune was actually not that dis- 
tant from the postwar suburb 
that its wayward progeny 
sought to reject. The suburb 
promised community but de- 
livered alienation. The com- 
mune held out a hope of realiz- 
ing the values advertised by the 
family room and the white 
picket fence. Now Calthorpe 
repackages that hope in the 
form of solid real estate. 

This seems a noble undertak- 
ing. And Calthoipe's plans, os 
outlined in his book “The Next 
American Metropolis," proba- 
bly go as far as design can to- 
ward shaping private suburban 
development to humane ends. 

With their links to mass tran- 
sit, pedestrian scale, higher den- 
sity, and provision for such 
amenities as open space, scenic 
vistas, bike paths and day care 
centers, communities like Lagu- 
na West, a development outside 
Sacramento, California, repre- 
seal an enlightened way to con- 
trol suburban growth. 


Two wheels, Forbes-style: Malcolm Forbes, the wealthy pub- 
lisher of the business magazine bearing his name, owned one 
motorcycle for each year of his life before his death in 1990 at age 
70. He recounted his passion for bikes — and hot air balloons — 
in a monograph tided “Around the World on Hot Air and Two 
Wheels." One item from his collection, a 1988 Harley Davidson, 
was auctioned off for SI2.000 in Pebble Beach, California. Pro- 
ceeds from the sale went to the AIDS Care Center at New York 
Hospital Cornell Medical Center. 






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B UT they are also con- 
trolling in less enlight- 
ened ways. The funda- 
mental decency of Cal- 
thorpe’s intentions may obscure 
the fact that his designs do little 
to alter what the sociologist 
M. P. Baumgartner describes as 
the “moral minimalism" of the 
American suburb. 

The image of harmony they 
present is the result not of social 
cohesion but of transiency, iso- 
lation and an underlying belief 
that “conflict is a social con- 
taminant, something to be pre- 
vented if at all possible and to 
be ended quickly once begun." 

“Weed,” Michael Sorkin's 
proposal for a military base 
conversion in the southwestern 
United States, may well epito- 
mize what Brand thinks is 
wrong with architecture. Exhib- 
ited earlier this year at the Los 
Angeles Museum of Contempo- 
rary Art’s "Urban Revisions” 
show; it was the only theoretical 
project on view, and it served as 
a kind of emblem of the vision- 
ary spirit. 

Certainly the swirling, organ- 
ic forms of the large model did 
not resemble a conventional 
city’ or suburb. The catalogue 
described it as a utopian com- 
munity, combining visionary 
and agrarian ideals, “where car- 
penters and artists work along- 
side engineers and scientists. 


/ • 

■ <-~W* «• 


Marc Chagall (1S87-1Q85), Young Bride Among Roses. 

gouache and pastel over pencil on paper, 

24 x 20 in. (61 x 51 cm). Estimate: 5250,000-5350,000. 

19th and 20th Century Paintings, 
Drawings and Sculpture 

Auction: 

25 September at 7.30 pm # Dan Hotel, Tel Aviv 

The sale will include works by 
Mane-Katz, Chagall, Kisling. Mokady, 

Gutman, Rubin, Danzigerand Arikha. 

Viewing: 

Dan Hotel, 21-25 September 

Enquiries: 

Anke Adler-Slottke or Mattnijs Erdman 
in London on (4471) S3 9 9060, 

Nathalie Zaquin in Paris on i331) 40 7 1 35 7°.. or 
Maria Reinshagen in Zurich on (41U 262 05 05. 

Catalogue Sales: 

London (4471) 389 2820 Paris (3315 42 56 17 6c 


jfjl 

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. ABOCKOFGREATFRCSPfr^ 

report^tiMmajo^e^^ 

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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, SEPTEMBER 3-4, 1994 


White House Denies 
Irish Aide’s Report 
Of Clinton Aid Offer 


By Rath Marcus 

Washington Pest Service 


the North-South Irish border. 
Mr. Spring said he and Mr. 


EDGARTOWN. Massachu- dinton “didn’t actually go into 

n ■ . -V... .. .L. -f C k..r a- 


setts — President Bill Clinton the detail of figures” but ex- 
interrupted his Martha’s vine- pressed hope that “substantial 
yard vacation Friday to meet sums would be forthcoming. 


with the Irish foreign minister, 
Dick Spring, who said Mr. Clin- 
ton had pledged additional eco- 
nomic aid to support the peace 
process in Ireland. 

“President Clinton gave his 
pledge drat he wanted to assist 
further.” Mr. Spring, who also 
serves as deputy prime minister, 
said after a 45-minute meeting. 
“1 would take it as a firm com- 
mitment.” 

But the White House press 
secretary, Dee Dee Myers, said 
Mr. Clinton had promised no 
such thing. She said he had told 
Mr. Spring that he would like to 
find a way to help bolster peace 
but had also made clear the “se- 
vere budgetary constraints' 1 un- 
der which he was operating and 
the need to obtain congressio- 
nal approval for direct assis- 
tance. 

. The United States currently 
contributes $20 million annual- 
ly for prefects on both sides of 


Mr. Clinton, speaking at a 
news briefing at his vacation 
retreat, said only that the Unit- 
ed States was “prepared to take 
some steps to do whatever we 
can to help.” Mr. Clinton said 
he was “delighted” by the news 
that the Irish Republican Army 
had declared an unconditional 
cease-fire after 25 -years of hos- 
tilities. 

The disagreement over how 
far Mr. Canton had gone in 
promising financial help was 
the second time that situation 
had arisen since the announce- 
ment of the cease-fire Wednes- 
day. 

Prime Minister Albert Reyn- 
olds of Ireland said Wednesday 
that Mr. Clinton had proposed 
a mul H mil li on-doll ar aid pack- 
age, but the White House said 
that day that he had made no 
promises. 

Mr. Spring, in his comments 
at the briefing, said the Clinton 
administration’s decision, to 
grant a visa to Gerry Adams, 







.\ * ' • : 
vir* ' 



ULSTER: 

Provocation Seen 


Cmthmed from Page 1 

seeks the reunification of Brit- 
ish-ruled Northern Ireland with 
the Irish Republic, demanded 
that Britain withdraw its forces 
from Catholic areas of the 
North. 

“Crown forces, including the 
RUC, are not acceptable in na- 
tionalist areas,” be said, refer- 
ring to the 18,000 troops and 


Fresh Expulsions 
By Bosnian Serbs 

566 Muslims Shifted, UN Says j 


By Chuck Sudetic 

New York Tima Service 


placed people said Mr. Djurko- ! 
vie and nis followers had- 


12,000 policemen of the Royal 
Ulster Constabulary who patrol 


SARAJEVO robbed them of afl their money ' 

£&?&£ MS; 

instance of ethnic deansing P p f 





methods, and that Muslims driven from their town, UN officials said. . , . 


■» t a rrA president of Sinn Fein, the po- 

htical wing of the IRA, “has 
proven to be a correct move." 

Paris Steps Closer 

Continued frail Page 1 role m showing Mr. A& the 


wing of the IRA, “hai 
a to be a correct move.” 




Ulster Constabulary who patrol 
the province day and night 
John Hume, the Catholic po- 
litical leader who was instru- 
mental in drawing Sinn Fein 
into seeking negotiations, said 
in a BBC radio interview that 
Mr. Adams “is now making 
these demands politically ana 
not by other methods, and that 
is a fairly major change” 

Mr. Adams emphasized that 
his agenda was negotiable. 

“We accept totally that other 
people will have different views 
an this, and in fact there may be 
other issues,” Mr. Adams said. 
“So, all of this needs to be 
talked about and resolved, 
through dialogue.” 

Mr. Adams brushed aside 
questions about whether or not 
the IRA’s cease-fire was ‘ “per- 
manent,” the adjective the Brit- 
ish government wanted tagged 
to its statement. 

“The conflict that arose in 
the British cabinet has been re- 
solved,” he said, without elabo- 
rating. 

Irish government sources 
said a speech by Prime Minis ter 
Albert Reynolds on Thursday 
night, in which he said the 

I 4= __ u n 


SSS&XSttESZ Muslims’ real estate itself. 


Serbs has driven 566 Muslims 
from their homes in Bijeljina in 
northern Bosnia, United Na- 
tions officials said Friday. 

The latest expulsions, carried 
out Thursday xught by a private 
militia under the command of 
Vqjkan Djurkovic, brings to 


py 


NO** 


“No one is doing anything to | 
stop it," Mr. Kessler said. 

At least two women expelled 
from Rogatica several weeks 
ago had been repeatedly raped, : 
including one who was m bond- • 
age to the former commander 1 


role in showing Mr. Ac 
correct path to follow.” 


jl uidi vim ptayvu a jiauuiwoui — bease-fire was “complete,” ap- 

rnnrimiMt fmm Pa» 1 role in showing Mr. Adams the , „ *»> b^W'. pcared dose to dispelling any 

uwumKa ^ correct path to follow ” Mr. Clinton with the Irish foreign minister, Dick Spring, on Martha’s Vineyard Friday, doubts Britain might have had 

warships and cargo planes from about the duration of the cease- 

NATO — in practice, the Unit- fire, 

BELFAST: Ulster Protestants Dig Through History in Search for Identity 

missions. _ _ .. _ . . ... ______ lowed to iom alf-nartv talks on 


Despite these U.S. overtures. 


ConfimKd hum PRga 1 


France has blocked bids for the IRA’s political wing who 
closer ties, apparently because has led his movement toward 


of President Francois Mitter- the negotiating table after two 
rand’s fears of losing domestic decades of violence, commands 


stature if he breached Gaullist attention and sometimes re- 
doctrines of keeping the alii- spect here and overseas. 


acce at arm’s length. As recent- But Mir. A dams has no coun- 


ly as last spring, the French terpart among the Protestants 
ambassador to NATO was with whom he must eventually 


abruptly ordered out of a meet- make peace if Northern Ireland 
ing on military matters by a is ever to return to normalcy. 


telephone call from Mr. Mitter- 
rand's office. 


“They don't know how to 
play the political and media 


Echoing that, a presidential game,” said Robert Bell, a his- 
aide said Friday that Mr. Mat- torian who grew up in a Protes- 
t errand had agreed this time to taut public-housing project and 


terrand had agreed this time to tant public-housing project and 
French participation “because today supervises ahuge archive 
the principal question of the on Northern Ireland’s war at 


the principal question of the on Northern Irelands war at 
day will be Bosnia,” where the Linen Hall Library in Bel- 
French troops will be exposed fas*- M ft’s a dosed society. It’s 


to the fallout from any NATO 
military action. 

In fact, Bosnia does not fig- 
ure prominently on the agenda, 
NATO officials said. 

The political position of Mr. 
Mitterrand has weakened se- 
verely because of the risingpop- 


monolithia That comes from 
bong under siege for such a 
long time." 

“What is so sad about it is, 
they’ve got the best cause of all 
— they’re the majority,” he 
said. 

This Protestant identity 
problem is not merely a conse- 


ularily of Prime Minister qiucuce of poor media relations 
Edouard Bahadur, a conserva- or failed political lobbying. It 


tive who is now a front-runner nms deep into the community 
to win the presidency next year, itself. 


Confronted with the rum- 
blings of an international peace 
process they neither sought nor 
encouraged. Northern Ireland’s 
Protestants have embarked in 
recent years on an energetic, 
unfinis hed search for their own 
history and culture, and for les- 
sons mat can be applied to the 
□ew political challenges. 

For many Protestants, when 
they hear the famous IRA slo- 
gan, “Brits Out of Northern Ire- 
land,” which is the key IRA 
goal in peace talks. “We would 
not perceive that as being about 
the British Army," said George 
Patton, general secretary of the 
80, 000-member Orange Institu- 
tion, the province’s most influ- 
ential Protestant religious, po- 
litical and civic organization. 
“It’s us. It's us they want out" 

So. as Britain has moved to 
bargain first with Ireland and 
now with the outlawed IRA 
over the province’s future, Mr. 
Patton said: “We were brought 
face-to-face with the reality that 
we were not being treated as the 
rest of Britain. So we asked, 
‘Who are weT We don’t think of 
ourselves as Irish. So. we’ve em- 
barked on a great rediscovery of 


literature, culture and history issue of New Ulster Defender, 
— the whole concept of what the organ of the outlawed Ul- 


makes a nation.” ster Defense Association 

Uls .er cultural society 

bined to suppress knowledge of 


have sprung up around North- 

Ulster and to deprive Ulster- 
era Ireland Lost Protestant po- irt *w 


era ucuinu. ^ loritimate pride in their 

ets have been “discovered” and 


nave nccu umwneu hcrita _ e ^ d identity" a piece 

S^^ESw^Ul gf Bdfast graffiti tells the city’s 


dren are dispatched on field pn^tanti - Do you 
trips to France, to see where y 


mps io riauee, iu ace «vueic 

thousands of Belfast Protes- history. 

rants died for the British Em- The history these activists 


pine in World War I battles. 
Great warriors of old even 


^ peace process, is a centuries- 

prehistonc mythological fig- j ^ of siegCi religious con- 
ures, have been resurrected as fljcfwith Irish CathoUcs, dis- 


symbols of Protestant detenni- trust< belrayal , and such 
nation to fight their cause, if 1 8 Lb-century Protes- 


necessary, to the last man 


This iconography is now and civil liberties. 


tying out these attacks,' 


turning up repeatedly in the Northern Ireland’s present said “You may ponder on the 


propaganda and street murals Protestant majority is a legacy weapons that are in the hands 
of the key Protestant terrorist of a 17th-century event called of the death squads courtesy of 
groups. the Plantation The English the British military” 

„ T , ,k„, 4 u_ monarchy, having just crushed Britain, meanwhile, insisted 

a rebellion by N^thera Irish that it was simply coincidence 
Catholics, encouraged loyal that three IRA prisoners and 
SMJLMZSSS objects in Scoilanffto move oue from art 


the Plantation The English the British military ” 
monarchy, having just crushed Britain meanwhile, insisted 


Ulster people, bewildered and 
bedevQed by the international 


that it was simply coincidence 
that three IRA prisoners and 
one from an IRA splinter 


against 


cww across and take their land Pre- group, the Irish Nati 

should become 


lies were unhappy about these Thursday from Britain to 
but of identity, aid the latest ftoteslmt l£S and the two Northern Ireland. 


dictabiy, the remaining Catho- ation Army, were transferred 


RELIGIOUS SERVICES 


sides have been in conflict ever 
since. 


The move looked like an im- 
mediate concession to Sinn 


AMSTERDAM 

CROSSROADS MTERNATIONAL CHUR- 


MMCNi (49) 821-47-34 86 muOs 4#i Sun- 


CH tateidananwialnnal A Evanooical Sun- 
day Sennce UMJ0 am. & 1130 am/ Kkh 
Wolcoma. Oe Cunntnial a S. Amstmten 
Into 02940-1 S31 6 cr 0250341399. 


day each mo. al 2 pjn„ Peace Church. 
RausnlotMb'. 5, Mxtok 


HANNOVER 

ffJTERNATICNAL FELLOWSHIP meets « 


LKG, Ptotasc. 7. Fra and tMd Sundays « I 
TOno am. Al domnotfcm Tot.: 051 1-551846 

KIEV 

INTERNATIONAL CRIST1AN ASSEMBLY 
1 AOG 1 Evanoefco! FaBowship. Sundays. Kiev 
Coirefl Trade Umcn. 16 Khreechatk Street, 
cal Pa^jf Brown ptH4) 244-3376. 

LYON 

LYON CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP, 1 bis rue 
PLBemaw 69100 VBeurtyanna SuxJays 
7C0 pm. Tel 7236355a 

MUNICH 

NTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY CHURCH. 
^.Bt*BeiemL5ervicB8iiErsS- 


Rwenlobab-. 5, Mrm 
NURENBKflQ: (49) 911 -46-7307. 
NEIMEMANDSc (31) 71-12-10 85 or (31) 
71-14-0988. 

PAWfc 03)1-405998-19. 

UKj (44) 61 1-71-9451. 

WIESBADEN: (49) 611 71-94 61. 
Next conference: Oct. 14-16. 

For into: (33) 1-47 0509-77. 


BREMEN 

INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH (En- 
gtah language) meals al Evangefish-FraWr- 
cmich Kreuzgerminda, Hohantoheatrasse 
Hormarweose-Str. (around the comer tram 
the Bahnfol) antJay worship 17.60 Ernest 
0. Wafer, pastor. Tet 0479M2B77. 
BUCHAREST 

INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 


WUPPERTAL 


A key climax came decades Fan. Mr. Adams had demand- 
later when King James II of ed Wednesday that LRA prison- 


Irtemaftonal Baptist OwCh. Engfish. Ger- 
man, Peretan. Wbrahp 1030 am, Saferstr. 
Z1, Wuppertal ■ BberieKL Al donomtoatons 
welcome. Hans-Dleler Freund, pastor. 

Tet: 0202/4698384. 


pngtand, a proselytizing Catho- ers in British prisons be brought 
lie, was overthrown by a Protes- home. 


tant relative known as W illiam The prisoners included Pat- 


i PqpaRusu 22. 3TO pm Contact Pas' 
BKenper. Tel 3123860. 


r.Tet 312 3860. 

BUDAPEST 

pfct Ftikmshp. II BMjo u. 56 


ZURICH -SWITZHtLAND 

INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH ol 
WSdensvri (ZOrich). Worahip Services Sun- 
day mornings 111XX TeL 1-7242862. 


of Orange, from Holland, rick Magee and Gerard Mo- 
James fled to Ireland, and reli- DonneQ, both serving life sen- 


giously motivated armies loyal tences for Hying to assassinate 
to the rival monarchs clashed at foraaer Prime Minister Maiga- 


THEH*ISCOPAL CHURCHES 

Of EUROPE (Angfeon) B£SSEEgg^S£^& 

PARIS ond SUBURBS 

THE AMEBCANCATHBDRALOFTHEHO- BULGARIA 

LY TRtWTY, Sin 8 IS 11 amttoreery rtoing INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 
II a.mBefvrce. 23. ayCTueGgorgeV, world Trade Center, 36. Drahan Tzanktw 
47 20 17 9Z. Metro Bfcd. WOretvp HOT. James DUke. Pastor. 
GeoigeVarAtfnaMatsau. TeU704367. 


ASSOC OF INTO. CHURCHES 
IN EUROPE & MIDEAST 


the gates of Londonderxy, a city ret Thatcher in a 1984 hotel 
in Northern Ireland still segre- bombing that killed five people: 
sated by violence between Aides said the transfers had 


gated by violence between Aides said the transfr 
Catholics and Protestants. WH- been scheduled in July. 


Ham ultimately prevailed. 


(Reuters, AP) 


BML Worship HOT. Jamas DUka, Pastor. 
Tat: 704357. 


Thereaonstr.J 1089)93 45 74. Yli 

PARIS and SUBURBS 5011 

EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH, 56 Ruo 
das Bons-Raismo. Rueti-Malmalson. An rvn 
Evengetaal church for tha EngSsh spedong ^ 
community local od In ine waslam SVn 
subutsS S 945; Vttxshn 1D.45. Cham's 
Chuchmd Nuoary. YouBi mlrtstitos Dr. B.C. 


FLORENCE 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, Sin 9 am RIs t & 
11 ojn. Rita II. Via Bernardo RucaRai 9, 
50123. FtormcB. bUy. TeL 3955 29 44 17. 

FRANKFURT 

CHURCH OF CHRIST THE KNG (Episco- 
paPAngfcari) Sul Holy Communion 9 & IT 
am SirdDy School md Nursery 1045 am 
Sebastian RhzS.22. 60323 RoTdm Ger- 


CELLE/HANNOVER 


BERLIN 

AMERICAN CHURCH W BERLIN, cor. ot 
Clay Atee & Potsdamar Sn. SjS. 9OT run. 
Worship 11 am. TsL 030-81320^1. 

BRUSSELS 

THE INTERNATIONAL PROTESTANT 


SAFETY: I/.S. Bars Some Airlines 


INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH. CHURCH OF BRUSSELS. Swday School 


Windnuien Sttassa 45, Cele 1300 Worst*. 
1400 Bfota Study, Faster Wert Canpbel. Ph. 
p)51 41) 46416. 

DARMSTADT 

DARhSTADTiE^STADT BAPTIST MS 
SION. SUe Study & Worship Sunday 1030 


930 am and Oudh 1046 am Kattenbonj, 
19 (at the Int. School). Tel.: 673.05.61. 
Bus 96 Tram 94. 


Continued from Page I Three of these — Guyana, 

Marshall Islands and the Orga- 
]es — were given “conditional” nization of Eastern Caribb^n 
ratings that allow them to con- States — will be identified as 
tinue flying under stepped-up giving adequate safety over- 
administration scrutiny. sight to U.S. operations but not 

These nations were among 30 to flight s to oth er countries, 
in the first round of safety as- The assessments concentrat- 
sessments, conducted over sev- ed only on governments, not 
eral years; teams are surveying au T lui ? s - - . . . , 

.i J i - «„j: In itc first oinrnnwine cmwv 


COPENHAGEN 


47.49.1629 tor nformapoa 


22, 8Ub study 930. worship 10:46 Pastor 
Jim Wfabh. TdL: 061556009216 


INTERNATIONAL CHURCH of Copenha- 
gen. 27 Ffen/ergarfe. Vertov, near Rfidhus. 
Study 10:15 & Worahip 11:30. Tel.: 
31634786 


HOPE INTERNATIONAL CHURCH (Every 
gpfcaf) Sun 930 am HcW Onoa Metro 1 : 
Esotaneda de La (Whm TeL: 47.736354 
a 47.761457. 

THE CONSERVATIVE JEWISH COMMJNI- 
TV n Pans ‘Adoto Shoforif irMes you to joh 


GENEVA 

EMMANUEL CHURCH Itf, 3iti 8 5Bh Sul 
10 am Eucharist & 2nd & 4th Sin. Morning 
Prayer. 3 rue da Manhour; 1201 Geneva. 
Swkzertaid.TeL4i/22 732 60 78. 

MUNICH 


DUSSELDORF 


FRANKFURT 


INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHLffICH En- TRfftfTY UJTVSWJ CHURCH f*el[jMen 
Worahip and Children's Chundi Sun- ABae 54 (Across from Bugor Hospital), &in- 


at 1230 
Evangstsch 


far Fteh ibsligiah and Yom Kipp<4 the CHURCH OF THE ASC0HON, SUi 


Serrpararty al tie 
Gememde in Ra- 
il). Friendly 

welcome. For 


day School 9OT worship 11 am TeL- (0695 
999478 or 512582. 


GENEVA 


other countries, including ma- . 111 ^ I ? r ? 1 worldwide sinvey, 
jor inspections of Russian and * e wlmmistranon sent four- 

member teams to each nation 


services. For details and seals, phone 
4553 84 09 Of wn» Adah Shalom, 22 Ws, 
ruedctsBetouFeutes. 75016 Paris. 

SAINT JOSEPHS CHURCH (Roman 
CatoAcl. Masses Sunday: 9:45 am, 11OT 
am. 12:15 pm. and 630 pm Satorday: 
HOT am. and 6.30 pm Monday-FrkJay. 
830 am Sa avenua Hoche. Paris 6tfv TaL 
4C2?ra56. Metro. Charles da GaiAo - Etofe. 

SALZBURG 


Eucharist and Sunday 


cafi lhe pastor Dr. WJ.De HV. LUTHERAN CHURCH ol Geneua. 20 


se 4. 81 545 Munich 
Tel: 496964 81 86 


830 am Holy Eucharist Rte t 1030 am 
Eudiarist We H; 1030 am Church 


4227^856. Metro. Chartes da GaiAa-Eloa*. Choral Euchartat R*s H; 1030 am. Church 

CBiTBiiun SdhodtarcWdrenSNuraHycareprtMdMtl 

SALZBURG pm Spanish EucharisL VaNapd 58. 00IB4 

BEFEAN BIBLE CHURCH to Beiea. They Rana TeL 396 488 3339 or 396 474 3560. 
searched ttie satoturw daiy' Acts 17:11. watmloo 

Ewanoefcal Engfch service rt 1030 am. w*i 

^ Aa SANTS’ CHURCH 1st Srn 9 A 11:15 


Pastor Davri bbostort. Fiatt Josef Strassa 
23 For into cafl 43 (©66245563 

STRASBOURG 

ST ALBAN (Angtoar^ a fEgisectes Domini- 
cans. Eudhard 1 030 am comer BM. da la 
Victowe A roe de flfnwenrita. Strasbourg 
(33)88350340 

TOKYO 

ST. PAUL INTERNATIONAL LUTHERAN 
CHURCH, near Idabtehi Sin. Tel.: 3261- 
3740. Worship Servita: MO am andayi 
TOKYO UNION CHURCH near Omatasan- 
do vubway sta. Tel. 340CM»47. Worahip 
services Sunday MO S 11:00 am. SS el 
945 am 

USA 

B you wxto fee a tmeBtto CPuraatym«. 
ptose contact- LfGUSE dcCmBT. P.0. 
Beer 513, Saurton. kxtoia 47881 USA 
Z UR KH -SWITZERLAND 
ENGUSH-Sre.AWNGCATHOUC WSSK3N 
St AnlcwKrypl.Mn«vos«raBse6aSw^ 
Mass 11 30 am Located near lOeuzpHr 
TramNO. 15pr11. 


am Hdy Eucharist wtti CMtSerhi 
1 1 rt 6 Al otoar Sundays: 1 MS am 


ich fiarfadwo). Germany. FRANKFURT 

Kx INTERNATION AL CHFIISTIA N FELLOW- 

DnM F SHIP EirangafechPre W ichkhe Gematoda. 

Kumt Sodenmir. 11-18, 6380 Bad Horrijurq, oho- 

ST. PAUL'S WITHIN-THE-WALLS. Sun. oe/ Fac 0617362728 servng toe Frankfurt 
ixtoarist Rte t 1030 am and Taurus areas, Germany. Sunday wor- 
Rfe Hj 1o ao am - Ow h ship 09:45. rwsery + Smdayechoot 10OT. 
L“ !*”ety jae poweet 1 women's bfoto sutes. Houseotiups ■ Sun- 
hareLVaNapoi 58.00164 day + Wrictoesday 1 930. Pastor M. Levey, 
188 3339 or 396 474 3569. mentor Europe®! Bapbst Oanvertkn. "De- 
ATERLOO dam Hfe gforyarroigsi toenafans. - 

URCH 1st Sui 9 & 11:15 BETHEL INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST 
- ji a CHUFtCH, Am Daehslsg 92. FtarMurt aM 
SundaywurahpllOTBmaid6OTpm,Dr. 
de Thomas W. Ffl. pastor. TaL 069649559. 

6. HEIDELBERG 

ES&ADByi GRACE INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST 

3P ST AUGUSTINE OF CHURCH, taduteta Sfrl 1 . €902 Sandhi 
lOnm sen. BWesfttov 0945, Worehp 11OT. Pastor 

"JJW.fggPgg- PajIHertow. TaL- 06224-5206 


rue Venteine. Sunday worrf^p 930. In Ger*- 
mai 11OT in En£feh.Tet (022) 31O5OJ00. 

JERUSALEM 

LUTVERAN CHURCH of toe Redaemer, OH 
City. Muistan Rd Engfish wo raN p Sul 9 
am Alare wNcome. TeL- (02) 281-049. 

LONDON 


Chinese aviation operations. , , 

„ . for a week or more to assess 

Seventeen countnts passed whether the country has a civil 
muster: Argentina, Bahamas, aviation authority and whether 
Bangladesh, Brazil, Bulgaria, has the expertise and wifiing- 
Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, ness to enforce safety standards 
Guyana, Marshall Islands, 0 f the International Qvil Avia- 
Mexico, the Organization of don Organization. 

Eastern Caribbean States, Of the 63 countries still being 
Oman, Panama, Peru, Ukraine officials said that the 

and Venezuela. United States had cooperative 

■ agreements with 22 and that 


lesh, Br azil , Bulgaria, 
Colombia, Costa Rica, 


AMERICAN CHURCH to London 78 Tot- 
tenham CL Rd. Wl. SS al 10.00 a.m.. 
Worship al 11OT am Goodge St lube. Tet 

071-5802791. 


1 irl 6 Alotoor Sundays; HhSamHolyEu- 
riurist and Srnday SmooL 583 Chau« de 
Louvain, Chain. Belgium TeL 322 3B4-X36. 

WS5BADEN 

THE CHURCH OF ST. AUGUSTINE OF 
CANTERBURY. Sun. 10am Fomly Eucha- 
rist FrenMuiar Swasaa 3. Wieabocfen, Ger- 
many. TeL’ 4961 130.6674. 


EUROPEAN 

BAPTIST CONVENTION 


UNITARIAN UNIVERSAUSTS 


BARCELONA; (3H3-3149154 
BRUSSELS: Tel. (32) 2-260 0226. 
w 1321 2-762-4293 meets 3rd Sun. ol iWtoto. 
OOCVAfiERN: (41 ) 3 1 -3S2 3721 . 
HCfflEISERO: [49) 6221 -472 1 16 


BARCELONA 

FAITH FELLOWSHIP INTEFWATIONAL 
meatoaiSOTajn.BonaNcMBBaptiaaxjr- 
dh Cairo da ta Cuw de Baiaguer 4Q Peettr 
Lance B 0 rtton.Ph. 4395069. 

BERLIN 

INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 
BERLIN RotoertoAsSto >3. (Stoote). Btoa 
study 10.45. mrahjp a 12OT eat?i Sunday. 
Onto A. waitoro. Pastor. t«l: 030 - 774 - 
■4670. 

BONN/KOLN 

THE INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH 
OF BONNiKQLN. Rhetoeu Sbasso 9. Kgto. 
Worship 130 pm. CMvin Hogue, Pastor. 

T 0 L (07236) 47021 . 

BRATISLAVA 


HOLLAND 

TRMTY BAPTISr SLS. 930, Worehp 1030. 
nursery, warm fellowship- Meats al 
Bloemcampiaan 64 m Waasenaar. 
Tati 01 761-78024. 

MADRID 

WMANUEL BAPTIST. MADRID. HERNAN- 
DEZ DE TEJADA. 4. ENGUSH SERVICES 
11 am.7 pm TeL: 407-4347 or 302-3017. 

MOSCOW 

INTERNATIONAL BAFHST FELLOWSHIP 
MeebrH 1100: Kno Center DufcSng iSDoi* 
OfuititoJkMkaya UL 9h Roor. Hal 6 Metro 
Station Banfcadnaya Pastor Brad Stamay 
(095)1503236 

MUNICH 

INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH OF 
MUNICH. Hotsfr 9 English Language Ser- 
vices. Btota study 16.00 Worahg Setvn 
17OT. PBStortsphone: 0908534. 

PRAGUE 


PARIS 

AMERICAN CHURCH IN PARIS. Worst*) 
11 OT am 86 Qua tfOrsav. Parte 7. Bus 63 
at door. Metro Afria-Marceeu or hvafidfes. 

STOCKHOLM 

MMANUEL CHURCH. WoraWp Chga n 
Swedish. EngSsh. or Korean. HOT am 
Sunday. Birger Jarteg. al Kungstensg. 
IT. 46/08/ 15 12 25 x 727 far more 
information. 

T1RANE 

WTBWATIONAL PRCrTESTANT ASSEM- 
BLY. toterdencrraiabonal S Evangefcat Set^ 
vices: &ii 1030 am, SOT pm. Wed. 5OT 
pm. Ftm ga My dym Shyd. TetfFax 355-42- 
42372 or 232S2. 

VIENNA 


Worry on Sowing 
Of Rwanda Crops 


NAIROBI — The interna- 
tional community might have to 


they were certain to be found 
capable. The 22 countries were 
the 18 European nations of the 
Joint Aviation Agreement, in 
addition to Canada, Japan, 
Australia and New Zealand. 

Until now, the administra- 
tion has assumed that if a coun- 


try certified an air earner, the 
H SS2? JSSSlTfi She was in compliance with 


53 SS US £ SSLiSfi: international safety standards. 


VIO^IA COMMUNITY CHURCH. Sunday 
worship to English 11:30 AM., Sunday 
school, nusaty. in terna tional, al donomina- 
fans welxm DoittfiewgBsro 16 Vtarra l. 


civil war and its catastrophic 
aftermath, aid workers said an 
Friday. 

With the onset of seasonal 


Inspectors, however, began to 
notice incidents and problems. 

Finally, administration ac- 
tion was spurred by two events. 


rains tins month, relief agencies The Jan. 25, 1990, crash of a 
say they have a matter of days Colombian Avianca Boeing 707 


WARSAW 

WARSAW INTERNATIONAL CHURCH, 
ProtasiartEnglGhlsnguagQef»lriate$,Sun- 
day3 11OT am (SapL-M&y), io am (June- 
Atg.); Sunday School 9SS (Sept-May) UL 
Mfodowa 21. Toti 43-29-70. 


dh ZmSteho 2 16OT-1745. ' 
JoapKuiac*,Tat3i 5779 


Intamarionri Baptist Ftefawshfo meds ai the 
Czech BapteS Church Vinohradska H 68. 
I Chur- Prague 3 Al metro sop Jirthor Podebrad 
Pmor Sunday am. HOT Paslor Bob Ford 
(02)3110693. 


ZURICH 

INTERNATIONAL PROTESTANT CHURCH 
Engfaft spaaHng. wodoffa sendee. Suiday 
School ft Nuraery. Sundays HOT am. 
SchBn z angaee e 26TeL (01) 3625826 


to persuade Rwandan fanners that ran out of fuel near New 
to return m tune for planting York Gty focused intense news 
the next cycle of crops. media and public attention on 

“If they miss the planting foreign airlines. Additional 
season this month, they will de- pressure was applied by House 
pend on food aid until mid-next hearings on “loophole airlines” 
year,” said Jflrg EgHn, an that would be allowed to fly a 
agronomist with the Interna- country’s flag but essentially 
tional Committee of the Red were leased aircraft with “pick- 
Cross. up” crews. 


Muslims driven from their town, UN ^officials said, 
homes in Bijeljina since the A^taSdJamJdielft. 


nnmes in Dijcijiiu - . — - _ n , 

Serbs began a new wave of eth- gtwlav Army, the Bosnian Serb f 

. . . ... » . _ haw mneted an 


nic cleansing in mid-July. rebels have rqect 
Bosnian Serbs have driven tional P*®* Pj* 
over 3 J00 people from their require them to r 


rebels have rqected an interna- 
tional peace plan that would 
require them to recognize Bos- - 
ilia’s sovereignty and return a ! 


homes m me dijcijiiw, «uya — 

Luka and Rogatica areas over toW of the 70 percent of Bos- . 

UieWie period, UN officials in mas tontray they have ( 

Sar^evo padding that they se^d nnthe start of the war 


ocinycvu wu, . - iq<v? 

expected the Serbs to expd an be ^^ T j 9 ^ 

additional 600 Muslims from On Thursday, Bomian Serbi- 


Banja Luka this weekend. 

“This is a final push to create 
a Serb-only state,” said Peter 
Kessler, the spokesman in Sara- 
jevo for the UN High Commis- 
sioner for Refugees. “These 
kinds of movements cannot 


an militiam en forced down a# 
French Puma helicopter flying; 
into a United Nations head-: 
quarters in Sarajevo with 11! 
peacekeepers aboard, UN offi- 1 
dais said. - 

The Serbs hit the aircraft 1 




icinn.s oi movements rauuui - — . , — « , . — i 

happen without the full support with six roimds of machine-gun < 
oTthe Bosnian Serb auffiori- fire, mdudmgfoin- rounds mto; 
des n the fu^ tank and two more mto , 

“bjuikovic and his people the gyroscope, forcing the pOoti 
are makina millions of doflars to make an emergency landing: 


fire. 

Search for Identity Jaffa'S 

issue of New Ulster Defender, 

the organ of the outlawed Ul- momhs after the cease-fire has 
ster Defense Association. ^en effect, according to the 

English ascendancy and tsnas ^ ^ yeafs Anglo-Irish 
Irish chauvinism have com- peacc blueprinL 
toted to suppress knowledge of * ^ Ad ^ ms ^ he 

was sure 

Ulster and to deprive Ulster- the IRA ^ ^ 

men oflegininate pnde m their attacks as the slaying Uinisday 

of John O-HanlinTa 22-yea/ 
of Belfast graffiti tells the city-s oi d CathoUc, in shaping its new 
Protestants. “Do you know sranaT^ 
your history?” And he repeated Sinn Fein 

The history these activists allegations that British security 
seek to revive, and to apply to forces, especially the Protes- 
the present predicaments of the tan t-domin ated RUC police- 
peace process, is a centuries- men, were colluding with Prot- 
long tale of siege, religious con- estant extremists to fight the 
diet with Irish Catholics, dis- IRA. 
trust, betrayal, and such “There is indeed evidence of 
enduring 18th-century Protes- collusion between them and the 
tant values as religious freedom very death squads that are car- 

/Mini liViArtipC nt»nnL-. " 1,. 


ties. 

“Djurkovic and his people 
are making millions of dollars 
in the process,” Mr. Kessler 
said, referring to repents by ref- 
ugees that they had been re- 
quired to pay Mr. Djurkovic 
and his men from $60 to $1,800 
in “exchange fees” to cross over 
a front line to territory con- 


st Sarajevo’s airport, the offi-, 
dais said. : 

“An attack like that on ahdi- j 
copter flying with clearance had i 
to be proneditated,” a UN offi- , 
dal said. < 

The Serbs warned the United : 




a LIUUl UUW tv WilMWIJ wu — “ 1 

trolled by the Bosnian govern- Nations earlier this wedc not to , 


meat. 

In addition to the “fees,” 
practically all the arriving dis- 


use helioop ters to track arms 1 
seized from the wcapons-exdu- ; 
sioa zone around Sarajevo. I 


W 


CHICAGO: At U, Killer Is Dead 


Tirt’-i' * _ . 


Co^imed from Page 1 
being dead doesn't prove noth- 
ing. Shavon’s not bacL It’s just 
more grief and sorrow for our 
neighborhood.” * 

“I wasn’t happy that Robert 
died,” said Christopher Dean, 
one of Shavon's cousins. 
“That’s another brother off the 
street Black folks is getting 
slaughtered.” 

Shavon's aunt, Ida Falls, 
standing on a wooden porch 
two houses away from her 
niece’s home, hugged a friend 
and told her not to cry, that 
God was looking out for Sha- 
ven and Robert, too. 

After the friend left. Mis. 
Falls said: “I don’t think I can 
take no more of this. When I 
heard the boy got killed. I just 
broke down. He’s a baby. He’s 
just a baby." 

Many in Robert’s neighbor- 
hood have said since the shoot- 
ing that they expected him to 
end up as he did. 

“Bad little boy” was a com- 
mon phrase they used to de- 
scribe him. 

He stole bicycles and started 
fights with other children, they 
said, and he had been arrested 
at least 10 times for armed rob- 
bery, arson and auto theft. 

Mrs. Falls said one of Rob- 
ert’s aunts bad walked around 
the corner on Thursday to tell 
Shavon's parents that she was 
sorry, and that Robert bad also 
been killed 

Robert’s aunt said it was time 
for the block and the city to 
come together to end the vio- 
lence. 

Mrs. Falls said Robert had 
caDed his family on Wednesday 
afternoon, scared and wanting 
to come home. His family ar- 
ranged to pick him up, but 
when they arrived he was not 
there. 

“I believe the boy was killed 
because he wanted to turn him- 
self in and because he knew too 
much about the older guys in 
the gang,” Mrs. Falls said 
“Who could be so cruel to shoot 
this little boy in the head like 
that?” 

At a news conference Thurs- 
day. Superintendent Matt Ro- 
driguez and Commander Earl 
Nevels of the Chicago Police 
said they believed they blew 
where Robert had been Hiding 
since the Sunday night shoot- 
ing. But they would not say 
much more about the investiga- 
tion. 

Mr. Rodriguez said Robert 
was killed between 11 P.M. 
Wednesday and 12:15 A.M. 
Thursday. His body was discov- 
ered shortly before 12:30 AM. 
on Thursday. 


race on the streets of America. < 
You only need one 12-year-old ‘ 
with a gun, then other 12-year- , 
bids fed they need a gun.” ; 


Dr. Kostdny recalled asking] *_ 
9- and 10-year-olds in a survey: . 
“What would make you fed saf-d? - 
er7** The overwhelming re-J ^ 
sponse, she said, was “a gun.” ; 


KOREA: 

Seoul Stunned 


Coutiined from Page 1 ! 

caused simmering resentment 
among many officials here, par-* 
ticulariy since Washington and 


WMIC SCENE 


Pyongyang have agreed to take L 1X - \1 

steps toward possible diplomat-; JljJ 1 1 f * fl- 
ic recognition if North Korea 1 E 


abandons its efforts to build a 
nuclear arsenaL 

It was disclosed Thursday 
that North Korea had sent an 
invitation to former President 
Jimmy Carter to mediate the 
dispute, a fact that also leaves 
the government here cold since 
Mr. Carter is seen as taking a 
more sympathetic view of the 
North than the Clinton admin- 
istration. 

In a statement carried on 
Xinhua, the official Chinese 
press agency. Deputy Foreign 
Minister Tang Jiaxuan said the, 
withdrawal effectively re n de r ed^ 
the commission inoperative. " 
Mr. Tang was said to have 
agreed with North Korea that a 
new agreement should be nego- 
tiated to protect the peace on 
the peninsula. 

With the collapse of the Sovi- 
et Union, China is North Ko- 
rea’s last major ally. China is 
seen by the United States and 
South Korea as playing an im- 
portant role in moderating 
North Korea’s behavior and 
persuading it to halt its nuclear 
wrapons program. 

The countries also hope that 
China will encourage North 


Korea to emulate its policy of 
economic liberalization. The 


economic liberalization. The 
announcement on Friday was 
thus seen as an attempt by the 
Chinese to back up its ally and 
lift its confidence. 

China’s withdrawal will 
weaken the commission, but of- 
ficials in Seoul stressed that it 
did not appear to create new 
military tensions at the Demili- 
tarized Zone or make hostilities 
any more likely in what is out 
of the most heavily defended 
frontiers in the world. | 

South Korea’s Foreign Mm- 
istry said in a statement that the; 
Chinese had infonned the gov- 




c Uft*KM 


h."- * 


The superintendent said the eminent of its move in advance. 


boy had other been “taken or “We believe the derision was 
walked” a short distance into made at an inannronriate 


walked” a short distance into 
the underpass, _ a few blocks 
from where be lived and where 
Shaven had died. Then he was 
shot, “apparently becoming a 
victim of the gangs.” 


made at an inappropriate ;j . 
time.“ the ministry said. ' -I 4 

The news left many South • 
Korean officials in a somber vy - 1 ' 
mood, as they found themselves ^ V ^ 
more dependent on the United, ■, - - 


at this time of year when they 
increase their efforts at recruit- 
ment as schools start the fall 
term. 

Kathleen Kostelny, who 
studies the effects of violence 
on children as a senior research 
associate at the Erikson Insti- 


deep political fault lines in this | > S*L 

"fc S'.T' 


. \ i\ 

Basically, North Korea has 

n , . . j. 1 1, 


a very flexible attitude toward 


n iui; uuuuib UUIUUC UiWOlU 

the United States but has main-, ^ 

tamed a Stmnalv hnrhl* atfi. !■ 


tained a strongly hostile atti- 
tude toward South Korea,” said. \ 

Lee Sei Kee, chai rman of the 


tute of Child Development in pohey committee of the govern-' 
Chicago, said: “it's an arms ^8 Democraiic Liberal Party. . 


r ^ ^ 

^ * • 











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THE TRIB INDEX: 118.11ft 

International Herald Tribune World Stock Index ©, composed of 
280 Internationally Investable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 = 100. 

120 

... rrnmm^rn 

‘T .a ■ .• vts* 1 ; 


An Inspiration for Diversification 

Reliance Industries Buys Into India’s Infrastructure 


•Vl'l,**.- 

-1lX. 

*'• ud. ]■•’ 

1 

1 

15D 

5 A? 

130 

1 l '*‘ 

110 

r -• •v.'i’.' 

90 


Asia/Pacific 


Appm weighting: 32 % 
OOSK T 33 .T 7 PIWJ 132.66 


North America 


ApptOX. Mighfin^ 26 % 
Close! 96.66 Prev. 97.09 


Approx. vw#ghttng: 37 % 
Close: 119 L 10 Prau 11755 


? . vv ■^> > f . . • ; ' . 

PA ux» ^4.- . . :4.y 


Latin America 


Approx weighing: 5 % 
Oosa: 144.67 Prev.: 146.15 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 

PATALGANGA, India — Those who 
survive the drive to tins industrial area 
will find plenty of clues as to why Reli- 
ance Industries Ltd. is, by all measures, 
the largest company in India. 

About 75 kilometers f47 miles) out of 
Bombay along a bumpy stretch of bro- 
ken pavement otherwise known as the 
main highway to Pune. Reliance has 
managed to build a 200 -acre world-class 
complex that is the backbone of its rap- 
idly growing empire that ranges from 
offshore oil drilling to sari weaving. 

On a good day, the drive to Patal- 
gflng a, where the outdoor telephones of- 
ten don't work and the local power sup- 
ply is unreliable, takes less than three 
hours. On bad days, it can double. 

Overloaded trucks, jam-packed buses, 
oxcarts, scooters, cars and pedestrians 
vie for space on the road, making it easy 
to see why Reliance, despite a multf- 
bfllion-dollar investment in its core in- 
dustries, is preparing to spend big on 
infrastructure, a major diversification. 

The company has committed to spend 
$1 billion a year for the next four years to 
fund a massive expansion plan in all of 
its core businesses. 

Started 25 years ago by Dhirubhai 
Ambani with his savings from a job at a 


gasoline station in Aden, Reliance is now India are unsustainable without a flood 
among the world's top producers of of private money into the inadequate 
polyester and many of its raw material infrastnicture. 


U.S. Jobs Data 
Show Growth Is 
Solid but Slow 


components. 


The situation will become even more 


First a trader of rayon and polyester pressing as India further dismantles tar- 
textiles, pepper and cashews, Reliance is iffs on many imports that will force its 


*In India, de man d will 
always chase supply; if 
you can produce, you 

can sell.’ 

Anil Ambani. joint managing 
director of Reliance Industries 


now increasing capacities throughout its 
supply chain, building its own oil refin- 
ery and developing proven Indian oil 
and gas reserves with Enron Oil & Gas 
Co. of the United States. 

“In every major product area we oper- 
ate in, we’ve seen double-digit com- 
pounded growth for the past 10 years.” 
said Anil Ambani, Reliance’s joint man- 
aging director and son of the founder. 
“In India demand will always chase sup- 
ply; if you can produce, you can sell. If 
you can afford to install pre-emptive 
capacity, you are way ahead.” 

But the company knows — as do many 
of its peers — that high rates of growth in 


economy to compete internationally on 
pricing, quality and timeliness. 

“The potential in India is truly hu- 
mongous," Vyas Mahesh. executive di- 
rector of the Center for Monitoring the 
Indian Economy, said of an infrastruc- 
ture sector now starved of funds but still 
without the final policy framework to 
channel them from the private sector. 
“But a possible crisis is looming.” 

Done properly, India gets the roads, 
phones, power and ports it needs but 
which its central and state governments 
can't afford, analysts say, and individual 
companies, local and foreign, develop 
strong new tines of business. 

Mishandled, the kind of diversifica- 
tion that goes against recent internation- 
al business trends overstretches the par- 
ent groups and India gets a hodge-podge 
of poorly conceived ventures, hobbling 
long-term growth. 

“We’re not jumping the gun. not leav- 
ing our core strengths,” Anil Ambani 
said, defending a series of potential 
moves into telecommunications, private 

See RELIANCE, Page 13 


By Robert D. Hershey Jr. 

Ne*- York Times Seme e 

WASHINGTON — Em- 
ployment figures published Fri- 
day offered the clearest evi- 
dence so far that the U.S. 
economy has slowed from last 
year’s unsustainable pace but 


over the past three mouths to 
just 1.5 perceciL This portended 
a slowing of consumer spending 
as the holiday shopping season 
approaches. 

“With wages f allin g below’ in- 
flation, consumers are not go- 
ing to have the discretionary 


retains enough strength to buying power to give the econo- 
:j i “ _i_. my much sunnorx Mid Lacv 


avoid braking too severely. 


said Lacy 


The Labor Department said economist at 

a solid 179,000 jobs were creat- HSBC Holdings Inc in New 


ed outside the farm sector in 
August, but that number was 
considerably less than the 
200,000 or more expected by 
economists. The unemploy- 
ment rate stood at 6.1 percent. 


essentially the same level for the D H sm “ s P™P! C - “ 
founh straight month after fall- mes faced , Wlth shar P increases 
ing markedly in early 1994. ^ 00515 of commodities but un- 

The data,' which provide ihe able *° raise their own pnees are 

.. . _ . _ clAiiflir n.vMi n rv f no Ti rt#* Art 


York. The Consumer Price In- 
dex rose at a 3 3 percent com- 
pounded annual rate for the 
three months through July. 

What seems to be happening, 
according to economists and 
business people, is that compa- 
nies faced with sharp increases 
in costs of commodities but un- 


first broad view of economic 
performance for the month, 
seemed to further reduce the 
chance that the Federal Reserve 
Board will raise short-term in- 
terest rates again at its next pol- 
icy meeting. 

At the same time, the growth 


stoutly holding the line on 
wages, their biggest cost. 

■ Bonds and Dollar Drop 
The employment data failed 
to extinguish’ fears of inflation 
in financial markets Friday, 
where Treasury bond prices and 
the dollar finished lower, news 





Pay Isn’t So Bad, U.S. Jobs Study Finds 


World Index 

The Index tracks U.S. dokar values of stocks irv Tokyo, New York. London, and 
A r ge nti n a , Australia, Austria, Belgium, BrazK, Canada, CMa. Denmark, Finland, 
France. Germany, Hong Kong, Rafy, Mex ico , Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore. Spain, Sweden, Sw i tzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo, New York and 
London, the index is composed of the SO top issues m team of market capkatiaton. 
otherwise the Ion top slocks am tracked. 


Industrial Sectors 


FH. Pr*. % Fii. Ptnl % 

daw deee dang* awe dew dangc 

Energy 116.33 115.68 +055 Capital Goods 120.79 120.17 +052 

UttMw 13158 130.88 +053 Raw Materials 137.74 136-88 +0.63 

Finance 1 17.91 117.35 +0.48 Consumer Gooda 105.39 104.92 +0.45 

Sendees 123^8 12332 +0.13 Htecettanaous 137.99 137.17 +0.60 

For more Information about the Index, a booklet Is available free of Charge- 
Write to Trib Index, 181 Avenue Charles de GauBe, 92521 Neuify Cedex , Fiance. 

O International Herald Trfcune 


By John M. Berry 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
U-S. economy is creating rela- 
tively high-paying jobs at a rap- 
id cUp rather than just provid- 
ing work for more hamburger 
flippers and discount-store 
clerks, according to a new La- 
bor Department study. 

While the study found that 
most of the nearly 4 million jobs 
added from 1988 to 1993 were 
in low-paying industries such as 
services and retailing, most of 
the job growth actually came in 
relatively high-wage occupa- 
tions within those industries. 

In recent years, some labor 
leaders, politicians and econo- 
mists have complained that job 


growth was strong only in low- their average pay levels. He also 
wage industries and that the ranked nine occupational 
number of manufacturing jobs, groups within industries by av- 
which pav relatively high erage pav. 
wages, was shrinking rapidly. ^ resullJ . sh(WKj dcar 

The Labor Department study dichotomy,” he said. Although 
did find that the number of peo- the industry breakdown showed 
pie working in manufacturing job growth concentrated in low- 
fell by nearly 2 million in the er-paying industries, he said, 
last five years. But it also found the occupational data showed 
that most of the jobs that had most of the growth to be in 
disappeared were in factory oc- higher-paying occupations, 
aipations paying the industry’s Mr . N „ done found thai 
lowest wages. frrj _ 1Q oo tn 1Q oa th . niimh<M . 


Using figures from the de 


partment’s monthly survey of ing occupational categories — 


60,000 households, Thomas 
Nardone, an economist with the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, 
ranked industries according to 


sir average pay levels. He also million. The median wages for K 

nked nine occupational those categories ranged from Me1 ^ 

oups wi thin industries by av- 5495 to S635 a week. 
ige pay. By comparison, the median (j,, 

The results showed “a clear weekly pay for all workers was milli on 
rhotomy," he said Although $394- created 

e industry breakdown showed in the middle three job cate- 

b growth concentrated in low- gories by pay — precision pro- ues lo , 
■paying industries, he said, duction,' craft and repair; ad- 
e occupational data showed ministrative support, including 
ast of the growth to be in clerical; and operators, fabrics- j^d G f 
>her-paying occupations. tors and laborers — 1 .2 million oI ^ 
Mr. Nardone found that j° bs were losL Mos . 1 of them overf s j 
from 1988 to 1993 the number wcre m manufacturing, but a ^gn of 
of jobs in the three higbest-pay- significant number were m con- fi at iona 
g occupational categories — struction. report.' 

ecutive. administrative and At the same time, though, the Priva 
magerial; professional spe- three lowest-paying occupa- average 
tlty; and technicians and re- tional categories expanded, the skimpy 
;ed support — grew by 3 J study found. ting the 


in factory and other jobs was agencies reported from New 
sufficient lo blunt concern that York. 

the economy, which is now be- Bond prices shot up sharply 
ing restrained by monetary pol- just after the jobs report, but 
icy, might sink to an unsaiisfac- they fell back as traders scruti- 
torily low pace of expansion. nized data and focused on the 


Merrill Lynch called the fig- small increase in hourly wages 
ures “constructive" on the hi August. 


whole, while the White House The price of the benchmark 
took the occasion to boast of 3. 1 30-year bond fell 1 5/32 point to 
milli on new jobs baving been 100 4/32. sending the yield up to 
created in the past year. 7.49 percent from 7.45 percent. 

“Xh-uc The dollar tracked bonds 

^he U.S. econv. my cc n tin- j ower because less demand for 

government securities trons- 

“ItTn ^Tv^n. ^ ** 

^ dollar Sed in New 


executive, administrative and 
managerial; professional spe- 
cialty; and technicians and re- 
lated support — grew by 3J 


rd FiSnomf TfefeLL ijZZ ^ dollar ck>Sed “ New 

York at 1.5550 Deutsche marks. 

m^SftcSton of m dow" from L5744 DM TW 

fMonrny P rKsures in tod ^' s from ” 5?3255 

n vPV- French francs from 5.3910 


Private analysts noted that L 3661 Swi* 

^CSK francs from 1.3225 francs. The 
ting the annual rate of increase See JOBS, Page 10 




SCENE 


Do Japanese Methods Always Work? 


Renault Profit Soars Despite Flat Sales 


By Patrick Lannin 

Reuters 

L ONDON — Companies all 
over Europe have rushed to em- 
brace Japanese production 
techniques in an effort to im- 
prove efficiency and cut costs, but a 
recent British report highlighted the dif- 
ficulties of adopting techniques devel- 
oped in a different economic climate. 

The report found that European com- 
panies that were heavy users of Japanese 
methods had slimmer profit margins in 
times of recession than other companies. 

But one of Ihe report’s writers, Nick 
Oliver, a lecturer at the Judge Institute in 
Management Studies at the University of 
Cambridge, said companies should not 
panic. 

“The lesson I would learn is to be' 
patient, because on the other side of the 
recession the picture should reverse it- 
self.” Mr. Oliver said. 

Two companies — Porsche AG and 
Presswork Metals, a small British com- 
pany that makes pans for car safety 
equipment — are confident that lean 
production methods such as just-in-time 
stock control, total quality management 
flnrf continuous improvement win work 
in the long run. 

A spokesman for Porsche, Michael 
Schimpke, said the German automaker 
had adopted the continuous-improve- 
ment approach, known as kaizen, in 1992. 

Japanese consultants helped introduce 
more worker participation. Gutter in the 
workshop, which also had been used as 


the storeroom, was minimized and two 
layers of management were stripped out. 

Inventory has been cut from 30 days' 
worth to a few hours' worth, and the time 
to make one Porsche car has fallen by 30 
percent. Mr. Schimpke said greater effi- 

The thing the Japanese 
have taught os is that they 
are prepared to wait a 
long time for a return.’ 

Reg White, chief executive of 
Presswork Metals 

deucy had led to cost saltings at Porsche. 

The study found that although compa- 
nies that made extensive use of Japanese 
methods benefited from reduced stock 
levels and increased sales per employee, 
these companies showed a faster fall in 
operating profits from 1990 to 1992. 
when Britain was going into recession, 
than concerns which had adopted the 
practices to a lesser extent 
Mr. Oliver said it would be premature 
to assume that Japanese methods were 
unsuitable to conditions in Europe. 

He said some companies in the study 
might have been vulnerable because they 
were less willing to lay off workers, a 
result of the closer ties that had devel- 
oped between employers and employees 
under the Japanese approach. This could 
be an advantage as conditions improve. 
“Those who shed labor would have all 


the problems of having to get people in. 
recruit them and train them," Mr. Oliver 
said. 

He said at certain points in the busi- 
ness cycle, Japanese production tech- 
niques would cut into profitability. 

Mr. Oliver said he was horrified by 
some reactions to his report. He said 
those who said that industry should halt 
the application of the lean production 
philosophy typified a knee-jerk reaction 
found in some sectors. 

“Short-termism" is something that 
Reg White, chief executive of Presswork 
Metals, which employs 260 people and 
has turnover of £18 million (S2S million), 
says he abhors. 

“The thing the Japanese have taught 
us very clearly is that they are prepared 
to wait a long time for a return,” he said. 

His company is pari of a British-gov- 
ernment-sponsored program called 
Learning From Japan, which aims to 
help second-tier motor industry suppli- 
ers pick up Japanese techniques. 

Mr. White said he had introduced the 
idea of teams and passed more informa- 
tion on company performance along to 
employees. 

As at Porsche, where the consultants 
got rid of storage shelves so staff would 
not have to climb up and down to get 
supplies, Mr. White said a lot of the 
Japanese approach was simply common 
sense. 

“The biggest thing about going to Ja- 
pan was how simple a lot of their pro- 
cesses were,” he said. "Simplicity seemed 
to be the kev issue with them.” 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — Renault SA, the 
French state-owned maker of 
cars and trucks, said Friday its 
first-half pretax profit more 
than doubled over the like peri- 
od last year, despite only a tiny 
increase in sales. 

The increase was due mostly 
to capital gains. 

Renault reported a first-half 
pretax profit of 1.72 billion 
French francs (S3 17 million), 
compared with 764 million 
francs a year earlier. 

Bui its flat revenue under- 
lined remaining problems in the 
French car industry, where 
overall sales are up 6.5 percent 
so far this year after falling 15 
percent last year. 

Overall auto sales in France 


jumped almost 19 percent in 
August, compared with the cor- 
responding month in 1993. The 
French automaker PSA Peu- 
geot Citroen and the Italian 
brand Fiat led the way in the 
August sales. 

Sales by Renault’s auto 
branch were 68.94 billion 
francs, or 76.7 percent of group 
sales. 

Income from financial opera- 
tions jumped to 640 million 
francs from 160 million francs, 
thanks to a capital gain of 488 
million francs from the sale of 
shares in Renault’s one-time 
merger candidate Volvo AB. 

Renault also bad a one-time 
gain of 302 million francs from 
the sale of a stake in the Argen- 
tine joint-venture Ciadea. That 
gain was counted as income 


from associated companies, 
which totaled 394 million 
francs, compared with a loss of 
192 million a year earlier. 

The French government's 
plans to sell part of its 80 per- 
cent stake in Renault to the 
public are not expected to be 
affected by the results, analysts 
said. The state plans to retain at 
least 51 percent of the company 
and will decide if and when to 
begin its sale by Sept. 15. 

Friday’s results “may even 
facilitate a sale if the price is 
lowered because of these re- 
sults.” Jean-Louis Cochard, an 
analyst at MIA in Paris, said. 

Renault and Sweden's Volvo 
bought stakes in each other ear- 
ly in 1991, but both agreed last 
December to untangle their 
crossed shareholdings when 


Volvo backed out of a full 
merger agreement. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters , AFX) 

■ VW Optimistic for Year 
Volkswagen AG’s superviso- 
ry board said it expected a 
“continued positive” business 
trend in the remainder of the 
year at both group and parent 
levels, AFX reported from 
Wolfsburg, Germany. 

In a statement, the company 
said its supervisory board de- 
cided at a meeting that the com- 
pany’s Autoeuropa joint ven- 
ture with Ford Motor Co. in 
Portugal should be reviewed. 

It said ihat“negative curren- 
cy influences and a heightened 
competitive situation" have 
made it necessary to reassess 
the economic viability of the 
venture. 


Broadcasters Become Juicy Targets 

Imminent Rule Change Whets Interest in NBC and CBS 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross flctMl 

I » UAL 
AmMarriaai OUS MB 
•imaM 5DI7 2BM 

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nb.Rwkkt, 1IR MHttr.flW. 


Sept. 2 
a Peseta 

• in US* 
turn 55«5* 

■ 1.154 UBS** 
2.117J S02e 

» KM 

1,157+0 110*? 

1JM 12923 

• ZX0> *1 »* 
73* UtSl 

» MB* 

• 0 MU U 12 S* 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


D-Mark 

Swiss 

Prone 

Sterling 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

ECU 


4 'V4 V, 

4 V<-5 v. 

5Wi 

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5 ---5 " 

41*5 

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634-67* 


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6 *-«-6 


3 moons 47*-5 
6 months 


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Rons mUcebfe to Interbank deposits o*Sf mutton minimum tor eawvoient/. 


iMB WM IKU 3M73 IJIJI BUM UW W* 

Ttsa MA. ISM *7-1*3 1JM WJ* '■*« VI ° 

Now York, and Zurich, fixings In other canters. Toronto 

one donor; •: Unfit of Wl N.Q.: not we tad: njl: not 


Kay Money Rates 

United States Close Prev. 

DiieMiflf rme 

Prime rata 7X. 7J. 

Federal funds 4 ii *v 

34I9MINI CDs iJt> 43ft 

Comm, poser 13S days SJJO 10* 

5inonfl) Treasury bin 453 453 


DaeWitaMM 
Herat, round 
Phi, markka 


CWTBIKV 

Perl 

Currency 

Pw* 

Vyaor Treasury note 

6.13 

6.12 

Mts-MSO 

1943 

S. Air. rand 


5-yMr Treasury boIb 

630 

67» 

N-Zeataads 

l.*543 

5. Kar. won 

S0050 

7-rter Treasury now 


6S3 


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SweCLkraaa 

73234 

linear Treasury non 

730 



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Treasury Moa 

7.49 

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Morrill LraekSMw MW assei 1S7 


Pnn.HCuaa 

16137 

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9M7 9M3 **.11 


Forward Rates _ __ 

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IXM U30* 1JM __ 

"7 . fAmtNMxnJ: H*X*u*i Bar* CBrviaatsI; Banco Ccmmerctaie imUana 

SSSlffffffnSSnS'v (Tatoo); M to* - 0»» 

ITufWtol; tSORI. Other data from Roofers andAP. 


3- meaHi HttarbeaK 2^ 

4- metrfft Intcrkaak 2*t 

lIHreor QevcrniMRt bond 4-74 iJ* 

Bermonv 

Lombard rate *■“ “S 

Call Money 4.95 4.95 

1-fiMitfb iBtarba* 5-00 5.00 

unoalti IntarttaiW 5 .00 5J» 

tmonta taterbart 5.10 5.10 

IS-year Bund ‘Z9 757 


Brttaln 

BanK Bate ran 5 1 j 5 1 ., 

Cali mmi 5J» 4 1 ? 

1- month Interbank 550 SJOO 

3- month Interbank 5*b JV:- 

4- month Interbonk 450 6.00 

KLyear cut B 55 BAl 

France 

Intervention rate 5.00 500 

Cnil money 5 *. 5 *» 

l-momn imerbank 5^ 

I-menni uneroank 5^: 5 "i 

4-niHtR Interbank 5 5^ 

1 (Mr ear OAT 7^8 7.90 

Sources.' neuters. Bloomberg. Merrill 
Lvncn. Bank al Tokyo. Commerreank. 
Sr sen w e ll AWDfBW. Credit Lrunnols. 

Gold 

AM. PM. ai'oe 

zurtcn 32575 3S7AS 4 1 Ml 

London 387.10 33470 +0,70 

New York 3*1 n0 Hl^O +0.10 

U. S. dollars per ounce. London official Ac 
logs; Zurtcn and New York opening end dos- 
ing prices; New York Cemex {December.) 
Source: Reuters. 


By Bill Carter 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — There is a basic reason 
that one, and possibly two, broadcast tele- 
vision networks may be close to being sold 
to companies that operate Hollywood stu- 
dies: For both buyers and sellers, the time 
is right and may never be more so. 

The broadcast business, once consid- 
ered shaky, has made a strong financial 
comeback in the last year. And the owners 
of the two networks in question, NBC and 
CBS, have indicated a desire to relinquish 
control. 

Perhaps most significant, the two stu- 
dios in the middle of the rumors have 
powerful incentives to protect their lucra- 
tive positions as suppliers of network pro- 
gramming. 

Time Warner Inc. is in the middle of 
negotiations to buy the NBC network, and 
Walt Disney Co. may be moving toward 
talks to acquire CBS.’ 

Both Tune Warner and Disney produce 
many popular prime-time shows that rely 
on network television for their distribution. 

But that relationship could start to 
change next year, when federal regulations 
that have kept networks from producing 
much programming for themselves are set 
to expire. 

Networks will almost certainly reduce 
the number of programs they buy from 
outside suppliers, giving the studios strong 
reasons to want to control the distribution 
system themselves. 

“Broadcast television is not going to go 
away,” said Larry Gerbrandt, senior vice 
president of Paul Kagan Associates, a me- 
dia research firm. “And if it’s not going to 
go away and you're a studio, then you 
ought to own one." 

Officials of Time Warner and General 


The Battle to Be No. t 

cStooe-Geneta! ©ectrfe baughrtsieft? ih‘ 1985, ihe netwotk’s rating has slipped to third 
amarig trie tfcfeemajor networks. Vi/Me NBC. dominated prime-time programming ■ 
/through ihe iafe 1980s with Sw most shows' ranked in the tap 25, If now has far 
fewer foan ettaer ABC or CBS. Here are the prime-Sme Nielsen ratings since the 
7934-85 seasaft . . 

*, ,• . Each rating point represents one percent 

f “ gihouseholds with tafevisaons in the 

■ — U.S. During 1993-34, one rating 

■ pant equaled 9424 X 30 households. ■ 

}; ■ 1 SM- 8 S- 1985-86 - 1986 #? 1987-83 1 SSS-S 9 1989-90 18 WMW 1991-92 5992-93 1903-94 

Source: Nielsen Media Research News The Xe» Yart Times 


Electric Co., which owns NBC declined to 
comment on their discussions, leaving 
Wall Street uncertain how to react CBS 
executives continued to vigorously deny 
that they had received any recent overtures 
from Disney. 

Both NBC and CBS have longtime own- 
ers that have previously tried to walk away 
from the network business. 

Just two months ago, Laurence A. Tisch, 
the chairman of CBS Ino, agreed to nun 
over control of that network to Barry DiDer 
before the proposed merger between CBS 
and Diner’s company, QVC Inc., collapsed. 

At the time, Mr. Tisch, 71. said he had 
simply had enough. But it is also true that 
analysts for years have criticized his stew- 
ardship of CBS as far too cautious. Alone 
among the networks, for example, it has 
failed to diversify into the cable business. 

GE, which has owned NBC since 1986, 


The Nr* York Times 

has seen the network decline in almost 
every area. The chairman of GE, John F. 
Welch Jr_, came close to selling the net- 
work to Paramount Studios in 1992. Now, 
an executive close to Mr. Welch said he 
had concluded that everyone in the media 
business needed to consider new forms of 
alliances “in order to survive." 

Certainly GE’s bottom-line results have 
been discouraging. The network, earning 
about $500 million a year at the time of the 
acquisition, has seen years since then when 
it lost money. 

Under the plan being discussed, GE 
would retain the one pari of NBC that has 
consistently earned money: The seven tele- 
vision stations in large cities that are 
owned and operated by the network. 

Another inducement right now is that 

See TV, Page 10 






Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3-4 , 199 4 


. ** 


MARKET DIARY 


Lower Bond Prices 
Drag Stocks Down 


Cotaplled by Oar Staff From Dapatdm 

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks 
declined Friday amid concern 
that weaker-than-expected Au- 
gust job growth might signal an 

U.S. Stock* 

economic slowdown and dimin- 
ished corporate earnings. 

A sagging dollar and bond 
market also pressured stocks 
before the Labor Day weekend. 
The Dow Jones industrial av- 

n e closed 15.86 points lower 
>885.58. Eleven stocks fell 
for every nine that rose on the 
New York Stock Exchange, 
where volume totaled 218.9 mil- 
lion shares. 

The Labor Department said 
the economy added 179,000 
jobs in August, below expecta- 
tions. 

“If the numbers are as they 
appear, it doesn't bode well for 
the economy and profits,” said 
Anthony Dwyer, chief invest- 
ment strategist at Sherwood Se- 
curities Inc. 

RJR Nabisco was the most 
active issue on the NYSE It 
closed unchanged at 6%. 

Casino Magic fell ft to 8% 
despite speculation that Cae- 
cor\ World may be preparing a 


IS 


Continual from Page 9 

id strengthened to SI. 5475 
51.5454. 

The jobs data convinced 
many traders that the Fed, 
which raised interest rates five 
times this year to head off the 

Foreign Exchange 

higher inflation that often ac- 
companies quick economic 
growth, would now stand pat 
on rates. That deflated enthusi- 
asm to buy dollars. 

“There's absolutely nothing 
to suggest that the Fed will have 
to raise rates again anytime 
soon," said Allen Sinai, chief 
global economist at Lehman 
Brothers. 

Labor Secretary Robert B. 
Reich cautioned against relying 
too much on a single economic 
report. 

There are perils in reading 
too much into a single month’s 
figure, particularly when it is 
not that far removed from the 
average job growth over the 
past year,” he said. 

Adding to an already jittery 
market was an unwelcome 
reading on U.S. inflation from 
Columbia University's Center 
for International Business Cy- 
cle Research. The group’s 
monthly inflation index 


Via Auodcfed Pmi 


the company. 

parties declined to comment. 

Ventritex plunged 4 %, to 
1 8%, after the maker of defibril- 
lators, which are devices that 
regulate the heartbeat, told ana- 
lysts that fiscal first-quarter 
earning s and revenue would fall 
below their expectations. 

American Express rose %, to 
29ft, after a magazine reported 
that General Electric might be 
considering a takeover of the 
financial services company. But 
GE said there were no such dis- 
cussions with American Ex- 
press. General Electric shares 
ft, to 50. 

Limited shares rose 1, to 21%, 
after the retailer’s monthly sales 
report flashed signs of a turn- 
around at its women’s apparel 
business, analysts said. 

Cott Coip. rose 1ft, to 13%, 
after bullish comments on the 
beverage maker from analysts. 

High-technology stocks ap- 
peared to stabilize after broad 
declines on Thursday. Intel fell 
ft, to 64, and AST slumped ft, 
to 56. 

Among other issues, Oracle 
fell %, to 41ft. Novell rose 1/16 
to 15 7/16. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


JOBS: Data Drag Dawn the Dollar 


climbed to 111.4 in August 
from a revised 109.5 in July. 

Analysts at the research cen- 
ter said there were growing 
signs of inflation from higher 
import prices, a development 
that was not surprising given 
the rebound in foreign econo- 
mies and continued weakness in 
the dollar. 

Dealers said the news led to a 
further sell-off in bond prices 
and the dollar. 

Some dealers bad taken large 
dollar positions as the currency 
rose this week, on expectations 
for an employment report that 
would bolster the bona market, 
said Matt Porio, a vice presi- 
dent at Chase Manhattan Bank. 

“When the market turned 
against them, they had to get 
out,” he said. 

Further fueling the dollar 
sell-off were unconfirmed ru- 
mors that European central 
h anks were buying Deutsche 
marks and selling other curren- 
cies, Mr. Porio and other trad- 
ers said. 

Thin volume, with many U.S. 
dealers leaving work early for a 
three-day holiday weekend, ex- 
acerbated the dollar's losses. 
U.S. markets will be dosed 
Monday for the Labor Day 
holiday. 

(Reiners, AP, Bloomberg) 


Sept.2 


The Dow 


Dow Jones industrial average 



-ifr > J' A - 

1994 • • 


NYSE Most Actives 


RJR Nob 

Umitd 

aitExb 

RhS? 
Compoas 
LILCb 
NklMP 
Occfftet 
AT&T 

FOrd* 


WbUMcrf 

Gob 


VOL Mtoh 

Law 

Last 

CM. 


6 *h 

89b 

BO* 

3SSS5 71% 

20 % 

21 %b 

+ 1 

29387 29% 

289b 

29% 

+ % 


22 % 

23% 

+ kb 

26604 41%b 

60% 

80% 

— % 






139b 

16% 



13 

13% 


20569 21Vb 


21 % 




54% 



29% 

29% 

—Vi 

19850 23W 

21 % 

22 % 

— % 

19243 23% 

22 % 

22 % 


ISC7D 247b 

34% 

249b 


10051 38V: 


38 



NASDAQ Most Actives 


IMXtefCm 
Cosmos ic 
Venrrirx 
Intel 
Cones 

Mlcrtts 

AST 

MCI 

Acclaim 

Ciscos 

Navas 

OrocteS 

McCoy* 

AMU 

3Com s 


VeL High 

Low 

Last 

aw- 

12820 23% 

22 % 

22 % 

-2% 

46220 9% 

7% 

8 

7. 

34720 19 

18% 

10 % 

—4% 

31009 64% 

S9a 

64’%, 

—Vu 

30819 14 

17% 

13% 

+ 1% 

29343 58% 

55% 

58 

— w 

27798 13% 

12 % 

13% 

«-¥h 

25001 34% 

34% 

24% 

+ % 

24716 20% 

18% 

20 % 

+1V U 

19721 24% 

24% 

24% 

+ % 

19510 15% 

15% 

15% 

+ % 

18403 43% 

0 % 

41% 

—9b 

15850 54% 

53% 

53% 

+ % 

14733 23% 

as 

29% 

+% 

13863 33% 

32 

32% 

6 % 


AMEX Most Actives 


AnvM 

Vtacmrt 
TWA vro 
PeoGM 
VIocwtE 
Epitope 


VOL 

tfigh 

Low 

Last 

Chg. 

18020 

10 % 

9% 

10 % 

+ % 

12276 13% 

12 % 

12 % 

+ % 

7177 23% 

32% 

32% 

— % 

6907 

12 % 

11 % 

12 


*075 

8 % 

6 % 

6 % 

— % 

5385 

5% 

5% 

5% 

+ % 

4V83 

2 % 

37A» 

3% 

*v M 

3507 

14% 

16 

18% 

+ % 

3*09 

3V„ 

3Vu 

3% 

+uu 

2939 20% 

19’A 

19% 

— 1% 


Dow Jones Averages 


OEM MgM LOW Lao dig. 

Indus 391X33 3V19J9 3380.40 JB85J8- -lift 
Trans 1833 AS 109 JO 10429 107.98 — LSI 
Ulfl 18433 1B4J3 18416 18455 — 1.12 
Comp 13CJJ0 134423 1331.1? 133144 — £49 


Standard A Peer’s Indexes 


industrials 
Tramp. 
umiTfas 
Finance 
SP 500 

sp ioo 


High Low 

35779 SLQ2 
VaR 384.95 
15874 15439 
MSS 88.18 

47409 47X67 
43871 43444 


Ctost an* 
35127 — 188 
388817 — 1.10 
15421 —088 
48.18 —0.11 
47099—118 
43402—127 


NYSE Indexes 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Previous 
BM Ash 


Close 

AM Ask 

ALUMINUM (KM Grade) 

Dalian p«r mottle ton 
Soot 1S9JU 154000 153000 153100 

Forward 158800 154500 1583JBJ 150500 

copper cathodes chm Grade) 

Dai lore per metric tan „„ 

5001 2(9000 249100 249100 249900 

Forward 250450 250500 250700 BOS® 


80100 80200 
81800 81700 



Htoh 

Law 

Last 

Chg. 

CoiTipesite 

tadustrials 

Trams. 

utmtv 

H nance 

261.7? 

37X48 

20ft 

209.70 

21Bft 

259 JB 
323.® 
2*7.72 
20778 
21778 

259.93 —175 
323.19 — 1A7 
24X20 —040 
208.05 — 0.93 
217.40 —Oft 

i 

NASDAQ Indexes 


High 

Law 

Last 

Chg. 

Composite 

industriats 

Barks 

Insurance 

Rncnce 

Trtxao. 

76170 

78X52 

78274 

932.57 

96034 

74375 

75X88 

766.93 

7B0ft 

93076 

95X46 

74014 

799.08 
767.15 
78172 
933-03 
959 70 
740-99 

♦0.13 
-0.74 
+048 
—0.10 
n 77 

+ 175 

AMEX Stock Index 


Mot) 

LOW 

Last 

aw. 


45539 

45X01 

4SSJ4 

+ 172 


Dottorapermatrlctan 
Seal 10450 flFP 1 

fa rword 81700 41000 

NICKEL 

Datum per metric ton 
Seat 825000 624000 

Forward 834000 ««na 

TIN 

Dollars ear metrician 
soot 337500 530000 

Forward 5433® 544000 

ZINC (Seedal MM Grade) 
Dollars ear nwtrtcl 


Seat 
Forward 


nssn” 98100 
100700 lOOOJOO 


634500 635SM 
643500 844000 


540000 340500 
547000 547500 


90350 91450 
100800 100700 


Financial 

High Low Ctesa Change 
3-MONTH STERLING CUFPE) 
(SOMM-ntsef WOpct 


Sep 

9433 

9479 

9479 

—am 

Dec 

93ft 

9X38 

91ft 

083 

Mar 

9278 

7X68 

92ft 

— a* 

Jun 

9275 

9X16 

9X18 

— 003 

Sea 

9172 

91 76 

9171 

— 004 

Dec 

9142 

91J3 

9173 

— OJB 

Mar 

91.14 

*173 

9173 

— 006 

JOfl 

9TJ4J 

9088 

9087 

— OJB 

Sep 

9086 

9078 

9076 

— 005 

Dec 

90J7 

9071 

9&M 

— OC3 

Mer 

9M7 

ttS4 

9054 

— OJJ7 

Jun 

90-57 

90ft 

90ft 

—005 


EsLwtome: 40055 open Ini.: 544151 
MHONTH EURODOLLARS OJPPE) 
n mnOni-Ptsaf lMpct 

SOB 

Dec 


N.T. 

N.T. 

9X97 

+ ojn 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9473 

+003 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9X04 

+om 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9373 

+ 002 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9X43 

+ 071 

volume: a Open Int: 

8791. 



Daw Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
10 Utilities 
10 Industrials 


envoi 

98.10 +0.14 

WJQO +004 

10129 +023 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issue; 
NinHMs 
N ew Lows 


Ocwe Prav. 

95? 852 

107? 1321 

■17 712 

28(1 3885 

43 43 

28 27 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 
Dadlned 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Hiatts 
Now Lows 


dose Prav. 

316 244 

228 311 

242 252 

784 007 

II 17 

0 17 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advwcod 


Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


□nt Pr«v. 

1595 1335 

1433 IBM 
2037 1928 

5085 5087 

98 SB 

39 85 


■la 

3-MONTH EUROMARKS (UPPE) 
-etsof leopcr 


DM1 nmsn 

95JJ2 9498 9499 — OJB 

9484 9477 9479 —SUB 

9458 9440 9443 —0.12 

9424 9407 9409 — 0.14 

9352 9376 9377 —0.13 

9184 9347 9349 —M2 

9343 9129 9377 —M3 

9120 9305 9104 —M2 

9277 92JI7 9263 —MO 

9276 9245 9385 —Ml 

9242 9246 9243 — 007 

JOH 9249 9277 9279 —0X7 

Est. volume: 154485. Open hit.; 730779. 


OK 

Mar 

Joe 

sea 

DOC 

MB’ 

Jen 

Sep 

UC 


3JHOHTH PIBOR (MATIP) 
FP5 mlinofl-ptSOUMpc! 



sw 

9475 

9871 

9473 

+007 

Dee 

91M 

9387 

9383 

+074 

Mar 

93ft 

9X52 

9158 

+072 

Joa 

9378 

9X24 

9375 

+071 

Sap 

9372 

9X97 

9289 

+ 072 

(Me 

9280 

7X74 

9277 

+ 003 

Mar 

9283 

9X57 

9X60 

+ 073 

Jon 

92ft 

92ft 

9243 

+073 


Est. volume-. 39495. Open tat.: 200401 


LONG GILT (UFFEJ 
(SMM - gts X 32nde at lo 


IN pet 

50P 1 02-27 101-10 101-17 —031 

Dec 102-09 100-21 100-29 —1-02 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1004)9 -1-02 

Est. volume: 71781. Open bit: 122783. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFE) 
DM 25*000 -ptiDf 100 pet 

See 9142 9082 9094 —035 

Dec 90® 90® 90.12 — 038 

My 9012 9008 0947 — IU8 

Est volume: 178X112. Opan hit: 14&887. 
W-YBAH FRENCH GOV. BONDS {MAT IF) 
FF50BXM0 - pis if 101 pcJ 


SOS 

11180 

11130 

113-42 

+078 

Dec 

11370 

112ft 

11X50 

+074 

Mar 

11188 

nun 

mu 

+004 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

11172 

+076 


Spot Commodities 


Market Sales 

Catamodlty 

Today 

Prey. 

NYSE 

Amu 

Nasdaq 

InmOBam. 

Today 

data 

21X15 

157S 

214-94 

Pre». 

coax 

34X05 

19ft 

32174 

c^Kd^graivncB 

Load lb 

Sirvar.travoz 

1 Steel il scrap), ton 

Tin. lb 

Zinc, lb 

171 

211® 

030 

5A55 

nan 

1471 

Oft 

LIB 

213® 

OJB 

5425 

nan 

14785 

0ft7 


Est. volume: 197447. Open tat.: 147480. 


Industrials 

Mob Low Lost Settle Ctfge 
GASOIL OPE) 

U5. doner* per metric tofrtota ef 1M tons 
£5 Ifl-S S* 15050 15050 -ZOO 

Oct 15425 153J0 15375 15400 — LSD 

NOV 15625 15150 15600 15400 -W 

D*5 U*® '2- 50 1»® UU0 -ITS 

Me 15*25 15473 15925 15925 —125 


High Low Lon Settle arge 
Feb 15978 159 JO 15973 15975 —079 

Mar 15925 15875 15929 15920 —LOO 

Apr 15720 1574)0 157.00 137® —140 

May 15U0 155J0 155J0 15SJ0 —LOO 

JOM 15(75 15125 1505 15473 —120 

Est. volume: 9.174. Oom hit. 1IH.1S3 
BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPS) 

U2. dellan per BamMots of UN barrels 


Od 

Mar 

□K 

Jon 


APT 

May 

Jon 

Jlr 

Am 

Ms 


1633 16.14 

1645 1824 


1847 

1649 

1840 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


1623 

UJ2 

1821 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


1629 

843 

1649 

w? 

a* 

N.T. 

N.T. 


1822 -HUH 
1841 +027 

1648 +024 

1649 +027 
1840 + 927 

1640 +028 
1878 +028 
1620 +oxe 
1620 +MB 
1828 +028 
1821 +020 
1878 +028 


EsL volume: 28.925 . Open bit. 137248 


Stock Indexes 


FTH H8 tUPFEj 
dose POtm 


Low dose Change 


index 

Sep 32812 321 42 m*o +5_0 

Dec 32460 3239J 3241JJ +55 

Mar 32852 fawn jmto +92 

E*t, volume: 1*282. Open lnt.; 63735. 
CAC48 CMATTF7 
FF2B0 per Index point 

Sep 207440 203400 202520 -1620 

oet mam ■hkhim nrwnn ,<im 

NOT N.T. N.T. 205400 +2000 

Dec 200970 207829 310400 +1320 

Mar N.T. N.T. N.T. -HDD 

JIM N.T. N.T. N.T. Unch. 

Estvotumc: 34099. Open ML: 55776 
Sourer 3 : Mow, Associate* Frau. 
London intt F/noncia! Futuna Exehon m, 
tun Pttr w e um ExetmagA 


DMdencti 


Company 


Per Anrt Pay Rac 


IRREGULAR 


China Tire - 22 

Dreyfus GNMA Fd . 277 

Dreyfus c 7U3 

FstProlr DfvAssaTA - JH2 

FdPralr D tv Assets . 274 

Genl MunBdFd e .1213 

Stamp* USA • 48 

oenp ad ns <Ssfc 

STOCK SPLIT 
Exar Core 3 for 3 split. 


INCREASED 


Snyder (HI 


Vintage Pe troleum 
ForestatYBMH 


I BRE Properties A 

Cdn Imperial Bk 
Cent Jersey Bcp 
DstoGro Dnr&lne 


a jw 

Q JO 

Enterp B - 70 

INITIAL 

Columbia Bara „ 23 

REGULAR 

735 

23 
Q .1875 
M 29? 

. nwt M .ttS 

Gib Ptnrs Inc M .1107 

Kemper MultMfct M 2725 

KenwcrAAunlliic “ 

Kemper Strati nc 
Lakevfew SvasBk 

SS 

Resource MtO 

ScrtHrai 300BWWGV 

SdBrasHlinc 
SdBrosWWInc 
vanKamMAdvPA 
VanKomMCAQItY 
VonKamM CA Val 
VaiKamM FL Mun 
VanKamM FLGttv 
VoiKamM invGd 
VanKnmM LtdHIinc 
VanKamM MunlOp 
VwlKomM MunlOaa 
VanKamM Manny 
VanKamMNYOttv 
VanKamM NY V0I 
VanKamM Oh QttY 
VanKamM PA Olty 
VanKamM Strat Sac 
VanKamM Trim 
VaiKamM Tr InvGd 
VanKamM ValManl 
d-inctudes JXQS cop aali 
e-approv amt per ADR. 


9-16 HO 

8- 31 9-1 
040 HI 
Ml 9-1 
HI 9-1 
M0 8-31 

9- 12 >M 


9-15 930 
9-15 10-4 
13-1 IMS 



Continued from P*ge 9 
finandal-interest and syndica- 
tion rules that have prevented 
networks from collecting the 
enormous profits possible from 
sales or syndication of pro- 
grams will expire in November 
1995. 

The networks have already 
begun to use in-house produc- 
tion companies to generate more 
of the programs they put on the 
air. 


“Warner knows what’s going 
to happm when the fin/ syn rules 
end,” said John S. Reidy, a me- 
dia analyst for Smith Barney 
Shearson, referring to the com- 
monly used term for the rules. 
“It’s going to have a huge impact 
on the programming business." 

Warner has been the biggest 
producer of prime-time televi- 
sion programs in Hollywood 
for the last several years. Its 
shows include “Murphy 


Brown” on CBS and “Full 
House” on ABC Disney pro- 
duces fewer shows for prime 
time but some very important 
ones, including the top-rated 
series, ABCs “Home Improve- 
ment.” 

Warner executives, who have 
been among the most adamant 
defenders of the financial-inter- 
est rules, have worried that op- 
portunities to place their shows 


U.S- /AT THE OOP 

MCI Kills Deal With Nextd 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — MCI Communications Coip. for- 
mally ended a proposed $1.3 billion deal with Nextd Communica- 
tions Inc. the company on which it had bawl its plans for 
building a nationwide wireless telephone network. _ 

Nextel was the most active over-the-counter usue Friday, 
faffing $2.75, to close at $22.50. Almost 12 million shares changed 

Siting intractable disagreements with Motorola Intx, a major 
shareholder in Nextd that had veto power crrcr a deal MCI said 
Thursday it had definitively broken off all talks. 

“Although discussions were proceeding along positive luxes 
with Nexte^any new transaction would have required Motorola’s 
consent,” the company said in a terse state men t^ “MCI and 
Motorola were unable to reach agreement on terms.” 

MCI executives declined to elaborate on the obstacles, saymg 
merely th«* they were based on terms and pnee. 

The company's brand-new technology, developed by Motorola, 
has been running into problems in delivering sound quality on a 
par with cellular telephones. 

Western Union Bid Tops $1 Billion 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — First Financial Management 
Corn, grabbed the eariy lead Friday in the contest to control the 
world’s money- transfer business, offering s total of more than $1 
’ hffiinn for Western Union Financial Services Inc. 

As part of its bid, Atlanta-based Fust Financial said it would 
pay $800 million in cash plus assume about $265 million of 
Western Union’s unfunded pension liabilities. 

That bid tops the $970 million cash offer b 

Co., winch does not indude the pension bat 

$660 mil Hon cash and stock offer from First Data Corp-> which 
would take on the liabilities. > 

“First Financial is the winner of the first round as I read it," 9 
Robert V. Bolem, an analyst at J. C. Bradford & Co- said. 

The bids are part of a bankruptcy court-supervised auction of 
■the unit of New Valley Corp-, bared in Paramus, New Jersey. New 
Valley changed its namt* from Western Union in September 1991 
and has been operating under court protection since March 1993. 

Any potential buyers were required to submit their lads by 
Friday. 

Abbott to Buy Part of Spanish Firm 

ABBOTT PARK, Illinois (Bloomberg) — Abbott Laboratories 
said Friday it would broaden its reach in Europe by acquiring the 
nutrition operation of the Spanish company Puleva Um6n Indus- 
trial y Agroganadera SA for about $120 mulion. 

Puleva Uni6n Industrial is a dairy and nutrition company. 

Abbott makes pharmaceutical products, nutritional aids and 
posonal care proaucts. The company dominates the pediatric and 
medical nutritional products in the United States, with products 
such as Similac, Isomil and Ensure. 

Federal Paper to Restate Earnings 

NEW YORK (Knight-Ridder) — Federal Paper Board Co. said 
Friday it would restate earnings going back to the second quarter 
of 1993 because of charges from losses on derivative securities. 


lion cash offer by Forstmann Little & 
liabilities. It also beats a 


§ 


TV: Broadcasters NBC and CBS Attract Interest as Change in Rules Nears 


on the networks will begin to dry 
up as the networks produce 
more of their own programs. 

Until now, Warner’s re- 
sponse was to try to begin its 
own network. It plans to start 
with one night of programming 
on a group of independent sta- 
tions in January. 

“Going for NBC represents a 
strategic shift for Time 
Warner,” Mr. Reidy said. 


the second, third and fourth quarters of 1993 and an 58 
charge for the first half of 1994. 

The charges will reduce earnings for 1993 and the first two 
quarters of 1994 but will not affect future earnings. Federal Paper 
said. The company said the restatement of earnings would not 
affect cash flow. 

For die Record 4 

AffiedSignal Inc. said it would acquire Textron Inc.’s Lycoming 
turbine engine division for $375 million. The transaction, u 
approved by regulators, would put AlliedSignal into a new aircraft 
market and reduce Textron’s dependence on government defense 
work. ( Bloomberg) 

General Computer Corp- said it agreed to be acquired by 
National Data Coip. for $14.25 a share, or about $26 mulion. The 
buyout would combine two leading suppliers, of information 
services to the health-care industry. (Bloomberg) 

Citibank was fined $163 million % the Indian government for 
its role in a stock market scandal. Sources said the bank had 
received the largest fine of all the financial institutions involved in 
the $1.8 billion scandal (AP) ‘-fcj' 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Aganot franca had* Sapl. 2 
CtonPrev. 


Amsterdam 

ABN Anna HM 
ACF Holding 


AlnM 

AkioNoM 

Art tv 

BaOkWenaMU 

CSM 

D5M 

ElMvtar 

F Bluer 

CW-Bracodei 

HDD 
Heine* ta 

1 Iminein — - — 
nuuWUawie* 

Hunter DovsMa 
I HC Coland 
Infer Mueller 
Inti Nederland 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 
Neauova 
OceGrlaten 
Poklwad 
PWltos 
Potygram 
Robeco 


Romeo 


Roval Dutch 
Stork 
Un I1*««r 
VbnOflunenn 
VNU 


8020 5970 
3040 3040 
10070 9970 

47.10 4770 
31940 7W 

7480 74 

37.10 3840 
8970 *9.10 

M5J0 W4JD 
18940 189 JO 
187U 1640 
4570 4570 
30029840 
SOLDO 381J0 
7940 7920 
03 KU V 
43J0 4340 
»* JO 95 

•0180 7940 
51 51.10 
J1J0 S0J0 
5*40 5440 
•440 63J0 
73 7140 
4840 47 JO 

58.10 5770 
70-70 70J0 

120.40 130 

5430 5470 

122.10 122.10 
MJO MJD 
19970 191170 

47 47 

30120 20170 
4M) 4870 
196 


____ mao ... 

WOHW-1/Klvteer 121J0 12140 


Brussels 



Demote* 

marmsl 

EieOrnflna 

GIB 

GSL 

Qevaort 

OteverM 


Kredletoonk 


Powerful 
Racttcei 
Roval# Beta* 


2550 2535 
7710 7710 
*830 (800 
2*50 2800 
4320 430D 
28825 26700 
12850 12550 
2585 2S2S 
2080 2070 
214 210 

5920 5U0 
7510 7420 
1310 >290 
5810 5550 
3255 3155 
104 1870 

4470 4480 

9800 9820 

5150 5120 

3000 3030 
8790 6740 
1480 1480 
10825 10650 
3040 3000 
53* 538 

5230 5300 




soften 

TiMn 

Tnetabat 

UCB 

Union Mlnier* 
WagoniLRs 


■ 2250 2255 
14575 14J75 
15975 16971 
10825 10500 

>0700 70800 

24900 2S2SD 

12715 3700 
NJL 7010 


Frankfurt 


1744017840 
*1 SEL 330 230 

»HoM 2488 3485 

a *7440 472 

m 956 

f mm 329 

r J76J0377J0 

htvnabank 421 42? 

/enrimbk 4W50 455 

735 741 

Bank 39150 m 

f 819 128 

nerzfean* 332J0 330 

nentol 251 210 

iter Bern khuq mi 

in 509 509 

fflcock 389SLM 

KM Bank 73140727^ 
rkn 580 538 

JnerSWk 

IKMtll* 30940 » 

iiaa Ko e ac h 238 229 

oner 345 348 

el 62062640 

TK1 WO 

IBt 3594036220 

nm too 910 

HI 214 215 

6 39(39340 

Sail 151 ISO 

tacit 833 829 

Mf 338. 531 

13312140 

rknerWerte 1S3J0 

I 940 939 

iaraa 2134021AM 

43? 437 

439 839 

207 205 
2900 2865 
035 005 

80170 *00 

2604025040 
87047340 


BiTWfin 
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dt Rueck 


CkNf Prev. 



Helsinki 

Amer-YWvtno 

Emo-Outxalt 
Hutdomakl 

leap. 

Kvrantene 
Metea 
Nokia 
Potifota 
Reeoia 
Stockmann 


7)3 IM 
40J0 4U0 
159 155 
10.10 9.90 
147 139 

185 185 

5*0 551 

6540 40 

113 108 

235 232 


Hong Kong 

Bk Eart Ado 32J0 32.10 

Cathay Pod He iz*5 izfls 

“ 3940 39^0 

40.90 4040 
12 1140 
U20 M0S 


Ciwuna Kona 
UgtitPwr 


anno 

Dairy Forailnn 

Hang Lung Oev 

Hano Sang Bank 56J3 5475 
Hendeoan Land 44.70 4*jo 

sssba, ssii 

HK Electric 2640 38JH 
HK Land 2140 21 

HK Realty Tnni 21.15 2170 


HSBC Hatdlnu 

HK snotrahtttM 

HKTMamra 
HK Firry 

efi wtwmaoa 


9025 9075 
1740 ;;jo 
MAS 18J0 
14JJ5 14J0 
3&40 3840 
2375 2340 1 
7151 71JJ 
3270 3U0I 
11575 1575 


Hutch 
HveanDev 
JardteeMaih. 
jamineStrHM 
Kowtoon Motor — — 
Mandortn Ortant 1170 1035 
Miramar Haw 21.10 2140 
New world Dev 24.75 2440 

sar- ^*33 

Swire Poc A 8X25 8375 
ToJ Cheung Pros 10.90 1145 
TVE 4J0 A 15 

wnorf HoH 3X90 33 

wneetock Ca 17.95 1740 
Wlno On Co Inti 1140 1170 
Wknorind. 11J0 1145 

BSS^JDffe :mW4 

riaiHiua ■ mm 


Johannesburg 


AECI 
Aitoch 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
Blvveor 
Buflall 
DeBean 
Drletortem 
Oanear 

eg* 
Harmony.. 
HlahveU Steal 
Kkxrf 

Nadoonk Grp 
Rund Ionian 
Rueotot 
SA Brews 
SI Helena 
Sosot 

WMtgmDcop 


2X15 2X15 
NA 122 
259 259 

3340 32 

1X75 7075 
48 8840 
10510340 

to a 

1X90 1375 
13140 129 

3140 29 

3340 3240 
88 87 

33.75 34 

55 5175 
121 110 
8X75 8840 
81 4740 

3X25 3X79 
207 30 


Comootlt* tafes.-. 591X77 
Printout : HJiJ* 


London 


AbOevNOPI 
Anted Lyons 


244 

251 

Foods 554 


XU 


Arte Wiggins 
Argyll Gnwn 
An Brit Food 
BAA 

BAe «... 

aonkScottond vn 
martian 
Boss 
BAT 
BET 

8 me Circle 
DOC Grow 
Boots 
Bawoter 
BP 

Brit Airways 
Brit Gas 


4.19 All 
6.10 X14 


2.74 

240 
— 549 

543 5.07 


<St 

109 


545 SJB 
541 S47 

440 444 

1.1* 1,1* 
120 370 

775 7«48 

X4» 549 

448 442 

4,18 ADO 
XU All 
199 2.98 

144 149 

Telecom WO XM 

BTR „ XM UO 

coWe Wirt 
Sadburysch 
Ca radon 
Coats vtnrtta 
Comm Union 
Courto alds 

EntowtSoOtt 3J9 

tssr" is a 

Forte 2J6 2 M 


Kr 


447 447 
443 *49 
108 346 
222 270 
5JSS 546 
5.15 571 
340 143 


GEC 
Genl ACC 
Gknw 
Grand Met 

GRE 
Gulnmss 
GUS 


HUtadown 

HSBCHtao, 

Incham 

Kingfisher 

Loffljrako 

bond Sec 

Laparte 

Launo 

lagatGenGrp 
UaydsBank 
Maria Sa 
MEPC 
Nart Power 
NatWgsr 
NttiWst water 


PAO . 
PiikteBtan 
PawerCan 
Prudential 
Rank.Ora 
Redd tt Cal 

Redkmd 
Read Inti 
Reuters 

RMCGraaa 

Rons Rove* 
RotMnntunlt) 
Royal Scot 

juh nvnusi 

Scot Power 

Sears 

Sjemn Tram 

Shaba 

Smith N eph e w 

SmllttKHneB 
smite Iwhi 

Sun Alliance 
Tot# & Lvte 

l!*® 0 .. 

Thorn EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 

woaaion* 

War Loan 1W 
weileame 
wmmraad 
wniiamiHdai 

Wlim Corroon 

l-T.l 


Close Prav. 

3® 

373 

STD 

571 

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182 

171 

482 

479 

575 

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252 

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335 

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lift 

129 

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201 

273 

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375 

171 

171 


Madrid 

BBV 2995 3010 

Bco Central Hlax 2565 2*05 
Banco S an tan d er son 5128 

SSpSa ^ 1935 


_ PSA 
Dragoon 
Endesa 
Ercras 
iserdrolo 
Renal 
Taoacaieni 
Tetefonica 

K?ASf^l5S“ i 


3200 32(0 
2100 2111 
5580 5600 
160 182 
883 B74 

4125 4140 
3300 3300 
17*5 1795 


Milan 


AltoMUa 18050 18270 

AUltntla 14200 14330 

Autoflrwenrtv 1769 1740 
Boa AartCDlfcJra 2935 2990 
Bca Cammer ital 3475 3*05 

BcaNazLavora 13290 13150 

Ben Pop Navoro 0700 0880 
Banco dl Rwtw 1063 1902 
BCDAmbrcelm 4355 43(5 
BCO Nope 1 1 rUp 1389 076 

Tjjon MW3M0 
lUa Itallaaa 2205 2215 
Aug 3040 317* 
Fjtrtln 1700 1791 

PtetNM im ms 
FJnanxAoroM njl ssoo 
F lrnnecconlcn 1705 nso 
Famflariaspa H2so it«o 
Generali Asslc 41700*1730 


Itatcementi 
I taigas 
Madtobanea 

Monted is on 

OHwatti 

Pirelli soa 
RAS 

Rlnoscent* 


12400 12440 
5305 5330 
14350 14290 
1379 torn 
2M0 2110 

2 S 8 S 2570 

24900 25200 
9*70 9JS0 

Sen Pooto Torino 9560 9575 
SIP 4570 85 N 

SME 3700 3710 

SnloBpd 2250 2150 

Stanaa 36200 36000 

Star 5085 SOTO 

Toro Asslc 27650 anoa 

KffiW 


Montreal 

Alcan Aluminum 35 35W 
Bank Montreal MW 2*M 

BMI Canada 47W 47VS 


Dominion Text A 
DonohueA 
FCAIntl 
MocMIlton Bl 
Natl Bk Canada 

Pravlga 
OuatweTel 
Quehecor A 
QtMfaecorB 
Taira lob* 

VUMotron 

wsttssm 


data Prav, 

2tB6 20V. 
1816 IM 
M 0V> 
78#* I8IO 
4 8 

19H 19M 
It) 9V. 
2016 2016 
516 5« 

1986 1986 
198k 1986 
1936 19V> 
1886 1H 
MM IM 
1 19*74* 


Parts 

Accor 880 <71 

AlrLlquktc 83* 832 

Alcom Alsfbom 572 580 



Lyon. Eaux 
OreaiCL'l 
L.VJVUL 
Mofro-Hariiette 

Pitwat 

Nnawr print 

gssar 

RatL st. Louis 


5aint GeDafai 

JteOifienite 

Suez 

TBomsoivCSF 
TMH 
UAP. 
vat eg 


KS&SIWSF" 



Sao Paulo 

Bonce do BrasM 2440 24JO 
Bonmoo 1177 117B 

BroMKO X40 X7Q 

Brotana 2B0Z7U0 

ra7 ^™^ 
iSS 0 " 0 * g s 

Pwonapanoma 15.10 1&DB 
Pe i rabras 18S u* 

ge mgcn n am 8800 
Teiatiras sun 5270 

an 450 865 

-Jttunas Ui 1A0 

(Vole RIO Does 14978 iso 
Vortg 12X01 127 




Singapore 

AstoPocBrow 1X80 1X50 

t CerefcM X23 X3S 

tevelepmn t 770 7 JO 
A Carriage 1250 12J0 

. 11.10 11 

-and 454 

FELevtranton XSf A2S 
Pruer X Neave 17A0 17jo 
Gl EftitaUfe 2&J0 27J0 
Hang Leoag Fin 448 459 
inctcane SJD 500 

Jweng SWword VUO U 
KoyHwnj Corel 201 2 

Kttetel 1170 1170 

Nateteal 372 374 

Neanme Orient 273 276 
oaBCtaralgn M50 1490 
OMae union Bk 850 XA5 
O^ea* UMcn Eat BBS 7 » 
SemBawaag 1270 12J0 
fjme Shiaapare ljtf U)e 
StapAerasnoce 14 0 248 
Slno Airlines tarn M W 
Sine Bus sve 940 940 
Stag Land X20 7J0 

fteo JNrttm 249 280 
StagPrastora 2x40 m 
in z u 

... 348 350 

Steam 440 4X4 

...Traaine 350 154 

Jgt Lot Bank 478 474 

UM industrial 149 1J9 

yssssW ^ ^ 
R2SS2?»a& ! “ ! 


CIom Prev. 


Stockholm 


AGA 
AseoA 
Astra A 
Attos Copco 
Ekctrotux 8 
Ericsson 
Essette-A 
Hendetstankon 
Investor B 
Norsk Hydro 
Procardia AF 

ISK" 

Shansko 

SKF 

Sima 

TreUeboro BF 
Volvo BF 


6450 85 

591 508 

188 181 

92 91 

388 389 

42® 418 

98 98 

93 93 

103 180 

259 250 

134 129 

123 123 
117 118 

4570 45.10 
113 112 
155 155 

138 138 

438 43* 

107 103 

147 145 


mmsf”"" 


Sydney 

ts$“ r 

BMP 

Horal 

Boaoalnvltl* 

Coles Myer 
DvbqICQ 

ST 


Foster* Brew 
Goodman HM 


.... Field 

ici Australia 
MaaeUan 
MIM 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Corp 
Nino Network 
N Broken HID 

sontos 

W es te rn Mining 

WwKctoMng 

^ssr^sr :tw 


946 948 
195 193 
20138 2074 
X4« 145 
1.08 LQS 
4.1* 4.19 
125 370 
1952 1954 
458 472 
1.14 T.14 
143 148 
11.10 11 
ITS US 
299 3 

1072 1050 
9.12 9JH 
455 450 
3.93 359 
849 847 
350 376 
374 277 
157 157 


259 251 
751 759 
440 445 
458 4J5 




Tokyo 

Electr, 482 481 
. ICItemkDl 799 798 

A«ah[ GtaSS 127D 12S0 

Bo«c at Tokyo 15*8 isao 
Bridgestone ion uoo 
Conan 1770 1740 

Casio iso i?40 

MNlnaon Print 1900 ll» 
Dahra House 1520 132D 
Datwa Sec u ri t lea ISO I960 
Ftmwc 


I'i 


Bonk 
FUliPtato 
Rsu 


Coble 


4690 4700 
2230 ZH 
2250 2280 
1120 1100 
7020 WTO" 
UT 850 
I860 1670 
5300 5710 
714 712 

750 752 

1030 1020 
2990 2500 
430 434 

UDO 1208 
910 913 
724 732 

7400 7400 


UOYokodo 

iteenu 

Jenon Airlines 
Koiima 
Kauai P ower 
KowokSU Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Kamatow 

MetSiElaeJMi T7S0 1780 
MarsuElecwks 1110 1110 
MBMM Bk 
MlteuBIsM Kael 
Mitsubishi flee 
Mitsubishi Hev 
Mitsubishi Cora 
Mitsui and Co 
Mitwi Marine 
MiisukaNit 
Mitsumi 
NEC 


sissar*” 

Mhoi steel 
Nippon YUsen 


2930 2590 
a 0 sa 
<92 <95 
797 781 
1270 1270 
*48 081 
793 79$ 

MHO 1USD 

is® im 

. . 1260 OIO 

NGK Insulakn 1070 M70 
Njua Seeurlfte* 1190 1200 
MHO 1010 

743 741 
38S 381 
882 882 
773 774 

222 0 2210 
9300a9200n 
Otompas Optical 1150 1150 
P ioneer 2850 2810 

971 973 
591 577 
1830 1810 

736 740 

SWnetsu Ocfn 20m 2070 
Sony.. 6W0 6150 

Samttamo Bk 1970 1970 
Sumitomo Qiem 57* 5*Q 

Sumi Marine Ml 954 
Sumitomo Mefal 345 348 
Totoei Corp 7*s 70a 
TgkedoOwm 1280 r 
TDK 8350 

Tgnln 597 

Tokyo Marin# 1210 
Tokyo ElecPw 3030 
Taaaan Printtna 1400 14 
TerayiM. 77* 

Teggittn 772 


Nom ura Sec 
NTT 


Ricoh 
Sanya EMC 
Sara 
SNfllBBI 

Own 


Close Prey. 



Toronto 

AMtlbl Price 19J4 lew 

Agnico Eagle 17 Vj 17Vj 

Air Canada 7tfe 7lh 

ARwrta Energy 2OT4 im 

Amer Barr k* 31M 3116 

BCE . 47% 47Vj 

Bk Nova Scotia 2m 2 tte 

149k 149k 
249k 25V* 

£43 

Tie re 

32V*. 33M 
.24 24U. 


BC Gas 
BCTetocomm 
Bra ma lea 
Brunswick 

CISC 

’ ' 1 Pad tic Ltd 


Cdn Pi 
Canod 


lion Tire A 1196 im 

Cantor 20Vi je 

Cara IBS 355 

CCLIndB 9Vk 9Vk 

anuriex 495 455 

Comlneo , M 239b 
Conwasf Exnf 24V 244k 
C3A Mot A 11 KHb 

Dofasco 22tk 27K 

Dybnc A 09k m 

Echo Bay Mines 1796 1746 
Equity Silver A 050 0JB 
FCA inn 4 4 

Fed Ind A 69k 61k 

Fletcher Chall A 20 1916 
PPf 59k 59k 

Oentra 096 075 

Gulf Cda Reg 5Vk sic. 
Hoes Inti 1316 139k 

Hernia Gld Mines 139k 139b 
Mallinger 13VS im 

Horsham 2ivb m 

Hudson's Bay Cs MV6 29V. 
Imar — “ 

Inca 


389b 39 

WM 394b 
..29 289k 
161k 16Vk 
21M 21 

2216 2116 


I PL Ene rgy 
Mcft^JOa) 

LohlawCos 

Mackenzie 816 

Manna inti A S3U. 5316 
Mite Leaf Fds nib 12H 
Montiipt "■ 

Man Res 

Matson A 
Noma Ind A 
NerandaliK ^ 
Naranda Forest 124k ravs 
Norcen Energy 179b 1716 
Nthern Telecom 4716 47H 
Nava Cera 139b 1316 

Oshawa Group A 1916 1946 
PpaartanA 4.10 4.1 0 

Placer Dome 3?Vk 3116 
Poco Petroleum 84k *16 

PWACwp 064 051 

Hoyroc k 17H 17W 

Rfialasnct Eny 2BVb 28 
Raoirs Camfn B 229k 22K 
Hott ima ns 77 77 

Rural Book Cda 2816 2816 
- — — les ire nn 

__ _ » ns m 

Saars Canada 
shell Canada a 
S herrttt 

SHLSyetemhM .„ ... 

souttwtn 17tt 179k 

Saar Aeromce 1l» 1U6 
sStodlncA 8H m 

Talisman Eny 30tk sovh 
Teck B 


25Vk 249k 
9 9 

2116 2196 
** 455 
27 2846 


4416 
796 7R| 

<3 439k 
l»b 129k 

.ZJ? 71k 


Tntenson Cwji 


TarDam. 

Torsta r B 
Transetfa Cera 
Transuta Ptoe 
Triton FW1A 

Trlmoc , m 

Unknra enarav US US 

VGBSmiM’'- 


25 2416 
1696 T79k 
2Vte 2096 

m fSt 

1596 159k 


Zurich 


Ada Inti B 253 254 

tS^n^B ^ 1% 

EtefctrowB 383 361 

FhcherB USD 1830 

interekawntB 2380 2355 

Jelmolf B 9S 910 

Landis Gvr R 722 720 

MaatnnpKh B 410 410 

Nettle R 1237 izu 

OertOLBuehTteR 1*3 143 

— Hid B 1500 M90 

' <210 8129 

n«8 ™ 

709 700 
7500 7800 
936 959 
2015 2020 




matt'™' 

Sailndlcr B 
Sutter PC 
SurveliianceB 

SkriSt Bnk Cora 8 385 

Swiss Retnsur R 554 S50 

Swissair R bS 675 

UBSB.. 1199 1172 

Wtatcrthur B an eta 

Zurletl ASS B 1302 1290 

JH 71 

•‘■••Hill i 


U.S. FUTURES 

Via Auadalad has* Sapt. 2 


Season Season 
Hah Law 


Open High Low Oom O 19 OoJnt 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBOT1 JAoaiainMnium . OAont 
3591k 352 SWN 3551k 35896 355 

3J3V. 359 DflCW 3J0'A 2XP4 37# 

uavk 377 Mores 387 UBh 18Sy» 3J716 ♦ 05814 


I5T* 

252 lb 
255 
255h 
2.TOV. 

163 

Ul 


16796 +05116 2703 
35198 +051 4X900 

„ _ 3575b +05054 1S.W1 

352 1181b MOV 9J 3J9 250 1779* 37V —051 Ull 

1571b 111 JUK 35416 35*16 351 35494-052 ’4 2,720 

350 357 Sap 95 38S —052 4 

UM 355 Dae 95 1849* -051 '4 20 

Est. soles 13500 Thu's. Ettm 24726 

Tlarscgenint TlfiO up 1650 

WHEAT (KBCT) funoou mk+wv oohnawbuPwi 

179 352 lb Sep 94 374 378 374 3J79i +05316 15*0 

358 l 4 112V: DfC 94 UQW 355*5 352 355 + 651 2659* 

35996 3JS Mcr»5 154V. 35*% 354V. 357V, +X0096 9772 

353 371VbMoy 95 3791b JJSPb 17?> 350y> +XS116 7B2 

3589b 1149b Jui 95 355 354 Vk 35A6 IS -653 97* 

359 329 Up«S 35) -052 IS 

14816 350V. Dec 9S 341 -OJB 1 

Est. sales NA Tl«rt.iotei 

ihrtcwW 

COHN tCBOT) MmbunenMKnvdgeariMrBuMI 

2.W Sap 94 122 223 22196 22294. +001 12519 

2.17 DK94 22396 224% 22296 27396 ♦ 050% 121 .OM 

228 MW9S 22294 1339b 272, 233% +05096 29.110 

2323b May 95 279% 2799* 2389b 279V6 +050% / 1.737 

2J8ftJUt« 253% 143% 14296 25394 +OJDM1 11595 
279 Sep 95 247% 247V. 14) VO B81 

233V: Dec 9J 14096 149ft 24896 149, -070% 

257 Jul« U9 1591b 159 2J9Vk-050ft 32 

EsLialei 22JRO. toWisal** 29730 
; Off 4W 

UMbunaami+wewwbem „ 

.. r 552 053 STVVb 552 +DJ71% X292 

7571% 351 Nov 94 0741% SJ7 3739b 0731% +051% 7*5M 

540 Jan9S 552 55496 111% 5539* +05196 WJCT 

549 Mar *5 191 5.93 109% 572ft +051 ft 8700 

375ft Mov 95 577 l*»lb SM 550 + 051ft 4,727 

5.71ft Jut 9 5 453 85*ft 451 4«% +O01ft 7510 

579 Aus n 8529% 853ft 4023% 402ft +QJ»ft 21* 

077 Sap 90 „ 4OT +X0I . 4D 

STaVtNovfS 854ft 850 8JM1b 454% +0Jni% 3789 
Jul9* 870 421 420 871 +051 

Est. sates 21000 Thu's, solas 21799 
Tibi's open W 11X9W oft 700 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) lOOara-doBarspartoi 
21050 17040 San 94 17X50 17X40 17X10 17X30 +X10 10419 

207 JO UMOOtfM T7170 

20 JO 
207 JO 
2D750 
20400 
1Z240 

10270 


7JM 

755 

755ft 

7581% 


*J0ft 


% 


17X30 jm 93 179 JO 
174J0AUg9S 16050 
174J0S#P3 11150 


7410 173J0 17X90 +040 7501 
7490 17X50 17470 +090 7JM 


T7450MHV9S 177 JO 17750 17740 177 J# +040 


Est. solas 11500 Uv/s. sates HL547 
■nbrtoeenw exrajeH 283 

(CBOT) enM.deinMfTPi 


(650 179 JO 10050 + 040 2MS 
sua 14X10 1(0-30 --- — 

1*150 18X10 IIXW 


SOYBEANOfL 

DJI 2240 See 94 ’23JS" 24H M 

2XlDOd94 25.15 2558 25.13 2552 

2750 Dec *4 2473 2114 Z4J8 25M 

2245 An 95 2454 2*. 77 2450 24.92 

22.9JMarW 2475 7400 34J0 2477 

27.93 Mov 93 24J5 2447 24H 2442 

ZLOOJuIVS 3450 2453 2449 24S2 

2295AU095 2*75 2440 2435 2440 

2X95S*p9* 2423 2425 2425 2435 

zxiooats 2X93 

2X10 Doc 9i 2355 

— 11000 Thu's. sates 174® 

Ttoi'seeviW oiJEM off u*a 


»J4 

2UP 


2855 

2755 

2730 

2A75 

2X10 

2X75 


+X19 9.122 
+X17 14583 
♦X14 365SI 
+X11 5719 
+050 4929 
+O0* 4058 

+ X<M 7.110 

*055 502 

+055 13 

3 


Livestock 

CATTLH (CS4GR) 40000 te^oani+pvaL 
7410 85300094 7140 7135 7150 7147 

7450 67.3) Dec 94 0JO ®JS 49-37 ®32 

7455 g-»Pri>*5 6435 4470 6425 6457 

7X10 4940 Apr 95 70J0 7022 7X03 7X50 

49 JO 8840 An *5 87.10 67JJ <753 67-25 

48.10 8845 Aug 95 6652 6497 1478 *455 

47.55 WJSOrfJS 67JS BJU OSS BJA 

Est. SOUS NA. JtejriL sates 

Ttv/iooen WJUH ua u 
P»D«R CATTL6™1CM1HU 


35,774 
I 17599 


7550 7U0Seo94 7540 7340 7S-2D 

*1-15 7X9500 91 75.10 7570 7485 

1X00 7740*^94 7646 7640 7425 

■US 7195 Jan'S. 7400 7415 7355 

BUS 77-33 Mcr 93 7460 7480 7430 

7490 7245 Apr 9S 

743D TSJSMnyVS 

7X05 71BAin» 

BL.vHes ka wiiibs 1780 
Tnyamenlnt BJ43 alt 3S 

H0G5 (CMERtjUeo w (l 
(9-73 38700094 3X70 3X70 3757 

30 JO 3972 Dad 9l 3948 3970 3977 

950 3B40Feb95 3955 39.95 39J5 

3545 Apr VS 39JO 3975 3X90 

4X75JU195 4420 4430 4400 

4X75JUK 4475 4423 0.97 

4U0AU0H 4112 4X12 *250 

4X5D 39J0M93 4X00 8X00 39J8 

4X75 40-00 DaC 95 4X22 4022 dtn 

Est. sales kA JVbrtB 4834 
Ttbrt oeen htf 27 r '. i ) OH 33 
PORK HLLKS JGUBR1 exoaeta-cntip*. 
4X05 41 50 Feb 95 4115 dll 4X45 

8020 4042 Mar 95 43JB 4375 4240 

SU5 GSOMovn 4X30 OJB 005 

5400 4350 Jut 95 4470 44ft 4410 

4450 4XB5AU09S 

-^fcSffVSi 


7545 

7527 

7645 

7418 

745J 

7190 

njs 

TUB 


£S 


74U 
-OJB 1J21 
+ ojn 1ft 
+ X15 5 


—0.10 1^91 
-055 ua 
—027 27*3 
-0,10 708 

+052 210 

227 
95 
3 


—0/3 11477 
-070 9JB7 
-02* 3557 
— 020 ITS 
-0.15 S8S 
-XII U9 
—on «9 
-117 39 

— 053 1 


-085 7473 

— X72 474 
—XT* « 
— X40 139 
-073 31 


Hu's* 


Hot 


Food 

C «L50Secl>* V y£R~ WJS^Eim 


27400 SBJOSepM 207J3 20775 20550 20425 

21475 77.10 Dec (4 21X70 2MS) K975 209 JO 

2*400 7X70 Mar 93 21X40 217.00 21270 21115 

2*4*0 KJ0May9J 217A0 71X43 21175 213J0 

245.10 SSJBJriU 31X71 JUTS 21770 21410 

309 JO U5J05OB95 31X70 

747.00 HJODecRf 25X00 32X00 22000 21X80 

SLIwte, NA. Tlbj'L soles X983 
Tlirsooenlnr 34333 up 126 

SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NC3S irairai 

mo 

1X24 


1X16 

tiro 

lUl 
TUB 
11 Ji 


4J90St«4 I2J» 12JM «J9 
9.17Mer9S 1X13 1X14 1X03 

10L57Msy9S 1X07 1X0* 11-98 

10J7JUI9S 11-97 1X00 11 J2 

TBJTQaW 
Kin Mar 96 
IMBMOVH 


IS**. 

110* 

1X10 

1104 

11J8 

1179 

1172 


—SJB 338 
—120 2X877 
— 375 6jm 
-ISO 3JT13 
—IB 713 
-ISO A37 


-X01 SXJB 
41.93* 
—DUOS 1X481 
*8.01 47U 

•am ias 
-am *99 
-am 5 


Season Seasai 
High Low 


0pm High Low Close Chg Opjnt 


1178 


1170 JK *8 


Est, sates »*A. Ttw'>siees ji 7^73 


Tmrt 

COCOA 

1543 

1580 

1605 

1612 

18® 

1580 

1831 

1876 

1842 


129,499 off 

nmantem-saerten 

See* fete g 

1403 1395 

1430 1423 

1450 1445 


1041 Dec 94 1349 
1077 MOT 95 1397 
1078 MOV 95 1423 
1225 Jut « 7445 
1505 Sal 95 

1290 Dec 95 
i3S0Mar96 

WTWLnre 7.939 

Tty's Diyi kTl 70389 up 285 
CHANGE JUtCS (NCTTO 1S4Ba»i.>0*MSB*rl 
134ft 8X05 Sep 94 92X5 9X25 9X80 

13400 09,1 0 Nov 94 96.03 94® 94-80 

13X00 9X00 Jan 95 W-S WJS 9X50 

1*425 StaiiyicrJS 10X95 10X95 101.73 

11425 97.00 MOV 95 105.95 10X95 105-75 

119.® 101 A) Jut 95 10U0 10X® 10X00 

1060 111 JO NOV 93 

11X50 lllAOSwfS I1IJB 111® HUB 
Est.sriee NA. Thu's.! ‘ 

Tim's open bit 


1400 


1306 

1352 

1397 

1425 

tor 

ua 

1480 

1514 

1535 


9X90 
*5j00 
90-55 
1D1J5 
10473 
10475 
I11J5 
111.75 
109 75 


—19 173 

—20 4X184 
— « 1X70* 

—is \m 
-tj zm 
-U 1705 
—IS 4788 
-15 3JB0 
—15 185 


—0.90 033 

-0.95 9431 
—0.95 4735 
—ITS 2419 
— 170 856 
— ITS 471 
—170 291 

— 170 

—ITS 15 


Metals 



lW 






115® 


+0® 

7478 

11X15 

7X73 D*CM 114® 

115® 

11423 

114® 

+0® 34J07 

115® 

7X90 Jon 95 114® 
7100 Feb 93 

11490 

114® 

114® 

+0® 

487 

11410 



113® 

+0® 

317 

11480 

7100 Ma- 93 113® 

114® 


113® 

+0® 

371* 

11320 

76TSAAQY9S 114® 

114® 

111.90 

+0® 

1.133 

112® 




110® 

■<■030 

936 

110*0 

7V.nS*Pf5 110® 

111® 

m 

10® 

+0® 

692 


nsoann mjs 

71X70 



1775 







11571 

88® Dec 95 10® 

10ft 

10® 

10X70 

+ 0® 

033 


H® Jan 98 ... 



108® 



IDS® 

4X70 Mor 96 108® 

101® 

100® 

10® 

+0® 

134 

11110 

91.10 AIT 98 



11275 

+U0 

212 


BtoyT* HBft 

100® 

10MB 

10® 

+0® 


10® 

10410 Jun 98 11115 

11X15 

I1XU 

111® 

+0® 

113 


Jul 96 



108® 

+0® 









EsLsrie 

HA Tlbrt. sates 

IMHO 





Tbu'seaenkit 






SAVER 

INCMX) UDDHiifaLp cards 




*157 

03750014 5*77 

507 

5397 

541.9 

-07 

1®1 

5177 

511.50094 546.0 

5487 

5487 

5442 

—07 

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5AU 

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597 JJ 
5840 
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55X0 
557 j0 
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mn 

55X0 


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WADecfS 5917 5917 5917 

57X0 Jm 98 

. Jut » 

&4»ates NA. Thu's, sates 


61X0 

8187 

5877 


Thu's open H 
PLATINUM (NMERJ 
*0070 MUHEepf* 


137® 


54X7 

551.1 

556J 

58X* 

56X4 

574* 

5BX5 

5147 

307 

6044 

6074 


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2.192 


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43X40 36X000094 41170 419.® 41470 41480 

■OS- 50 37+80 Jan « 421.80 *2430 419J0 42X60 

439 JD 29QJ]OAnr95 426® 471DC 4X4® 426.50 

*27 JO 419J0JU195 SUM SUM SUM 43GUH7 

421 JO. 42X000095 42X50 

Est sates NA. Tib/xeatee X**» 

Thu's apwi bit 

GOLD (NCM1Q MatrsrBL-daeaneerbmox. 

38970 377J0S«B 94 387.10 

41770 3*45300*4 30X70 38970 38X20 BU0 

Nov 9* 3*9 JO 

424J0 34370 Dec 94 39170 39270 »070 39170 

41170 343JDPMI95 39420 393-20 39370 39440 

417® 3*4.40 Aor 95 397 JO 

42150 36170 Jim 95 40170 

41 U0 3B0L3OAuo« «1«.70 

£13-30 miMOatf 40BAO 

429J* 400L50DOC95 41270 

«45D 41 3J0 Feb 4« 41870 

43070 41X30 APT 96 419® 

«8.® 41X00 Jun 98 42390 

@t. sates NA. Thu'xeates 227® 


—07 


• IM 1 

+X40 17A58 
+1W 5,230 
+270 1.928 
+X8U 452 
+270 in 


+070 

+XI0 9,215 
+X10 

+XI0 90709 
-Q.10 1X320 
*aia 447* 
+L10 10.137 
+X10 4-313 
+ X10 

+310 5761 
+0J0 
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Financial 

U$T,BXJA (CMBU sinaaan-etiaimnd. 
9442500 94 93J8 9572 9577 


9410 


9475 BaeM H78 9495 

9UBMer95 9483 940 9454 

HieJunn 


9577 

9487 

9456 

9427 


1270 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3-4, 1994 


Page 11 


t With Nev* 

ifgg^Roche Shares 
Jump on Strong 
First-Half Net 


EUROPE 


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' Bloomberg Business Newt 

BASEL, Switzerland — 
Roche Holding AG, the Swiss 
pharmaceutical and chemical 
giant, reported first-half earn- 
ings Friday that outshone its 
two Swiss rivals, and investors 
stock 


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Roche Holding, which re- 
ported half-year results for the 
first rime, said net profit was 
1.62 billion Swiss francs (S 1 bil- 
lion). 

Roche said the earnings gain 
was due to higher operating 
margins and higher revenue 
from investments, which should 
lead to a “significant rise” in 
full-year net profit. 

Roche’s net profit in 1993 
•rose 29 percent to 148 billion 
francs. 

No comparison to the first 
half of 1993 was available, it 
said. Operating profit in the 
first halt was 1.56 billion Swiss 
francs. 

Roche share prices ended at 
6,280 francs, up 135. 

Roche’s first-half perfor- 
mance was in sharp contrast to 


that of Ciba-Geigy AG and 
Sandoz AG, which this week 
disappointed investors with 
meager first-half profit gains 
and modest full-year forecasts. 

The results also appeared to 
have assuaged concern about 
Roche’s recent S5.3 billion 
takeover of Syntex Corp., a 
U.S. pharmaceutical company, 
and to have overcome disap- 
pointment about its July 12 an- 
nouncement of first-half sales. 

The company said sales rose 
2.4 percent in the half, to 7.33 
bilHon Swiss francs, despite a 
gain of 73 percent in local-cur- 
rency terms. 

Roche said that despite the 
slack growth anticipated for the 
pharmaceutical market as a 
whole, sales are expected to 
continue expanding in the sec- 
ond half, although at a “slower 
pace" than a year earlier. 

Analysts said the latest 
Roche figures also suggested 
the takeover of Syntex would 
not dilute earnings. They also 
said the company’s decision to 
release a half-year report might 
have been motivated by recent 
market worries. 


til 


Altai S!.«: 


I- 


Prosecutors Open Inquiry 
Into Fust Share Trading 


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Bloomberg Business News bllS to become 

ZURICH — Prosecutors on second-largest 
Friday opened an insider-trad- store chain, 
mg investigation into Grands ‘The preliminary investiga- 
Magasins Jelmoli SA's acquisi- bon looked at the trading vol- 
tion of DipL log. Fust AG. ume and the share develop- 

They win try to determine ?“£“ d on lhos<: ^ r 9™ d f 1 
who was responsible for last decked to open a aimnalm- 
month-s sntge hi share prices a v « t ‘S«>on, said Marhn Bur- 
week before the Swiss depart- *>», P r , osecutor who . Wl11 
tnent store chain said it Xld 

take over the household appli- °^ y m “ c «> ntext ° f a cmm- 
anc* retato PP nal “vcstigatioo are bank doc- 

_ , , „ uments and other information 

Fust shares jumped 12 per- available." 
cent, JelmoH shares climbed 7 _ T . - TT 

•percent, and volume in Fust ■ Iwdrtenstem Tightens Up 
W soared to 13.000 shares a day Liechtenstein, better known 
from an average of about 200. for its letter-box companies 
Jelmoli said Aug. S that It than for tough legislation 
would buy 5 1 percent of Fust’s against criminals, said Friday it 
voting capital for 1413 million planned to outlaw money laun- 
Swiss francs ($107 million), dering and insider trading, Reu- 
overtaking Magazine thhi GIo- ters reported from Vaduz. 


A Halo Becomes a Target 

Body Shop Battles to Repair Image 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

A tfw York Times Sen-ice 

LONDON — Body Shop International 
PLC. the rapidly expanding British retail cos- 
metics chain, has carefully crafted its image 
by pledging sensitivity to the environment, 
promising not to test its products on animals 
and seeking to be a progressive force in the 
communities where it operates. 

Body Shop’s success, its 1993 annual report 
intoned, “proves that profits and principles 
can go hand in hand and that business can be 
a force for social change.” 

Now the company is under attack by an 
American journalist, who in an article pub- 
lished Thursday by the Minneapolis-based 
journal Business Ethics, takes issue with the 
Body Shop's contention that the company’s 
walk matches its talk. 

The journalist, Jon Entine. said the compa- 
ny’s charitable contributions, environmental 
standards, efforts to buy materials from de- 
veloping nations and use of “natural” ingredi- 
ents in its products all failed to live up to the 
company’s stated goals. 

Some Body Shop products use “outdated, 
off-the-shelf product formulas filled with un- 
renewable petrochemicals,” Mr. Entine, a for- 
mer ABC News producer who spem much of 
the last year working on the article, wrote. 

The Body Shop, he added, has had quality 
control problems that on one occasion led to 
it selling products containing formaldehyde. 

And despite generating considerable pub- 
licity about its efforts to develop suppliers 
among local people in developing countries, 
only a tiny nraction of the company's pur- 
chases actually come through its “Trade Not 
Aid” program, Mr. Entine reported. 

He also wrote about disillusionment 
among the company’s franchisees, some of 
whom are coo panting with a Federal Trade 
Commission investigation into the company's 
franchise practices in the United States. 


The company, in a 32-page rebuttal that 
was distributed before the article was pub- 
lished, acknowledged the commission investi- 
gation but dismissed it as a routine and 
groundless response to a complaint by a sin- 
gle franchisee. 

Body Shop also said that Mr. Entine’s criti- 
cisms of its purchasing policies were unjusti- 

IMERMTIONAL STOCKS 

fied. “His numbers are wrong, but more im- 
portantly his percentages are beside the 
point,” the company said, adding that it had a 
deep and growing commitment to developing 
Third World suppliers. 

Body Shop dismissed the article Thursday 
as “recycled rubbish.” Its stock, whicb had 
fallen about 15 percent amid rumors ahead of 
the article’s publication, rose 6’/i pence Fri- 
day in London to close at 230't ($3.55). 

Nevertheless, the publicity has proved cost- 
ly to Body Shop, both in public relations 
terms and in its standing with investors. 

The dispute, analysts and investors said, 
may also prove to be a cautionary tale for 
companies that project a righteous image. 

Increasingly, they said, journalists, regula- 
tory authorities and so-called socially respon- 
sible investment funds are peeling back cor- 
porate facades to see if operations justify 
companies’ claims to “green” or socially en- 
lightened business practices. 

Body Shop was founded in 1976 by Anita 
and T.’Gordon Roddick. Over the years, their 
chain of retail stores, selling cosmetics, soaps 
and other beauty products, grew into one of 
Britain's most successful and best-known en- 
terprises. 

The Roddicks sought to position Body 
Shop as a store with a conscience. Mrs. Rod- 
dick, its managing director and public face, 
spoke out about human rights, environmental 
protection, cosmetic tests using animals and 
fair trade with developing nations. 


Net Rises 
At Pearson; 
Sales Fall 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Pearson PLC 
said Friday its first-half profit 
jumped 50 percent, but it 
warned that results may not be 
as strong in the second half be- 
cause first-half results were bol- 
stered by one-time gains 

Pearson earned £69.3 million 
($107 million) before taxes in 
the first six months of 1994, but 
it would have earned only £50.7 
million if not for one-time 
gain$ 

Sales were £648.8 million, 
down 21 percent because of the 
spinoff of its fine china busi- 
ness, Royal Doulton. 

Pearson said it planned to 
complete its transformation 
from conglomerate to media 
company with the sale of the rest 
of its stake in the oil services 
group Cameo International, val- 
ued at around $162 million. 

Pearson’s book division, 
which was its strongest sector in 
1993, had a loss of £7 million. 

The newspaper division, 
which includes the Financial 
Times, was the best performer 
in the half, increasing operating 
profit by 66 percent, to £36.8 
million. 

Thames Television, the core 
of the company’s new television 
division, contributed £18.3 mil- 
lion to profit. But Pearson said 
it would withdraw its bid to run 
a fifth broadcast television 
channel in Britain if the govern- 
ment did not increase the chan- 
nel's planned geographic cover- 
age from 53 percent 

(Reuters, Bloomberg ) 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 



London - 
-FIRE 100 Index 
aftj 


.^'a'Wj j-a's 1 

1994 



Exchange 

Amsterdam 

.. index 

AEX 

Friday . 
Close 

419.14 

Rrev. 

Close 

416.11 

% • 

Change 

+0.73 

Brussels 

Slock index 

7,677.84 

7,650.74 

+0.35 , 

Frankfurt 

DAX • 

2^04,71 

2500.80- 

+0.18 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

831.66 

828.59 

+037 

Helsinki - 

HEX 

1,961.16 

1,033.79 

+1.42 ; 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2,50650 

2.509.40 

-0;i3 = 

London 

FTSE100 

3522.70 

3.216.50 

+0.19 

Madrid 

General Index 

303.96 

31C.67 

-2.1 S 

Milan 

M1BTEL 

10935 

■10937 

-0.02 

Paris 

CAC40 

2,02047 

2^34.91 

-0.71 

Stockholm 

Affaarsvaerlden 

1,9153)4 

1,005.0! 

+0.48 

Vienna 

Stock Index 

464-06 

_46511_. 

^■0.23 

Zurich 

SBS 

946.91 

935.44 

+1.23 j 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


[Menuuml HrraJii Tnhorte 


Very briefly; 


Slovakia Retries Privatization 


Compiled by Our Sufi From Dispatches 

BRATISLAVA Slovakia — 
After more than two years of 
delays, Slovakia on Monday 
will resume sales of state-owned 
companies through the voucher 
program in hopes of boosting 
the economy. 

Its success or failure could 
have major political implica- 
tions, because economic prob- 
lems are a key issue in the cam- 
paign for national elections 
Sept 30 and Ocl 1. 

Authorities hope the sale will 
get privatization back on track 
after the voucher program was 


a vote by Parliament in the 
spring to remove Prime Minis- 
ter Vla dimir Meciar. 

Mr. Meciar, whose party cur- 
rently leads in the pre-election 
opinion polls, has said be will 
stop the voucher sales and re- 


: \ 


abandoned when the former 
Czechoslovakia spliL 
Slovakia has struggled with 
economic reforms since inde- 
pendence Jan. 1, 1993, with 
double-digit inflation and 15 
percent, unemployment 
Under the program, Slovaks sume them only after they have 
will be able to bid for shares in been “radically altered.” 

380 state-owned companies val- But the government of Prime 
ued at more than $1.5 billion. Minister Jozef Moravcik is 
But critics said the program banking on heavy participation 
was awash in confusion because this time. An estimated 2 mil- 
rules for the sale remained un- lion people who obtained books 
clear. of special coupons for nominal 

Foreign investors have been sums will be eligible to trade 
pul off by political infighting them for shares, 
and uncertainty that resulted in “I think the number of peo- 
ple will be similar, maybe more 
than in the first wave of privati- 
zation” when nearly 80 percent 
of adult Slovaks participated in 
the sales, said Ivan Miklos, a 
political consul tan L 

(AP. Bloomberg) 


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Schroders Posts 
Higher Profit 

Bloomberg Business Sews 

LONDON — Schroders 
PLC posted an 8 percent 
rise in first-half profit as the 
merchant banking concern's 
asset management arm per- 
formed well despite recent 
turbulence in markets, the 
company said Friday. 

Bolstered by a doubling 
of earnings at Schroders In- 
vestment Management, to- 
tal pretax profit rose to 
£1033 million ($159 mil- 
lion) in the period, 

“Given the state of the 
markets, this is a remark- 
able performance from 
Schroders* investment 
management side,” Martin 
Cross, an analyst at UBS 
Ltd., said. 


• De baize “Le Lion” SA said first-half net profit rose 73 percent, 
to 1 .74 billion Belgian francs ($54 million ). on cost-cutting at its 
U.S. division and higher sales. 

• La Caja de Ahorros & Pensiones de Barcelona said it would 
acquire a 58.9 percent stake in Sodedad de Aparcamientos de 
Barcelona SA from Banco Santander SA for 13.7 billion pesetas 
($104 million). 

• General Electric Co. of Britain said sales and profit in the year 
ending March 1995 were running slightly ahead of a year earlier. 

• Russia's anticipated budget revenue could be short by 55 percent 
this year because of a steep fall in industrial output, inefficient tax 
collection and lower-lhan -expected inflation, a government offi- 
cial said. 

• France’s economy as measured by gross domestic product will 
grow 2 percent of more this year. Finance Minister Edmond 
Alphandery said. 

• Germany’s economy expanded 2.3 percent in the second quarter 
from a year earlier. Transportation Minister Matthias Wissman 

Said. Bloomberg, A FX, Reuters 



impany 
Renews U.S. listing Plan 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

COPENHAGEN — Interna- 
tional Service System AS. one 
of the world's biggest cleaning 
companies, said Friday it would 
try again to list its stock on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

The president, Poul Andreas- 
sen, said he expected more than 
500 million kroner ($80 million) 
in proceeds from the issue of at 
least 6 million American depos- 
itary receipts, representing 3 
million B shares. 

“We are planning for the is- 


sue and the introduction to lake 
place in October.” he said. 

ISS withdrew plans for a Big 
Board listing in May, citing 
what it called difficult market 
conditions. 

With the ISS B share trading 
at around 180 kroner, against 
225 kroner in May, Mr. An- 
dreassen said the company's fi- 
nancial consultants had advised 
it to try again. 

He said that because of U.S. 
regulations, he could give no 
more information about the 
planned move. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Look for 
the upcoming 
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INTERN A3TONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3-4, 1994 


Page 13 




ASIA/PACIFIC 


4? 


1 

■J 

'•i 


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Japan Trade Gap 
Widens to Record, 
’Led by Electronics 


.* ■ i-: 7 he Associated Press 

•: TOKYO — Japan’s current 
’’ account surplus rose 0.9 percent 
in July from a year earlier, to 
: 111.74 billion, wanks to a re- 
. ■ : cord trade surplus, the Finance 
. : (' Ministry said Friday. 

‘ i,‘ The current account is a broad 


Japan Outlook: 
Takeovers Seen 

. Bloomberg Biamess News 

TOKYO — Japan’s cor- 
porations could eventually 
sell off enough of the stock 
they bold in each other to 
mate American- style take- 
overs possible, the presi- 
dent of the country’s larg- 
est brokerage said Friday. 

“There should be more 
active mergers and acquisi- 
tions,” said Hideo Saka- 
maki, president of Nomura 
Securities Co. 

But Mr. Sakamaki said 
manufacturers, insurance 
companies and especially 
banks would continue sell- 
ing each others shares as 
they struggle to makeup for 
poor results and bad loans. 


measure of the How of money 
between countries, including 
trade and services such as tour- 
ism. Japan's trading partners say 
the growing surplus shows Japan 
isn't buying as many foreign 
goods as it ought to. 

In July 1993, the current ac- 
count surplus was $1 1 .63 billion. 

Expressed in yen, however, 
the current account surplus fell 
7.8 percent, to 1.16 billion yea. 
The yen-denominated surplus 
has been falling for several 
months because of the yen’s 
sharp rise since last year. 

According to the ministry, 
exports rose 6.6 percent in July 


from July 1993, to $33.40 bil- 
lion, while imports rose 8.1 per- 
cent. to S18.9o billion. 


A Hot Stock in Taiwan 


Bloomberg Businas Sens 

TAIPEI — Taiwan Semiconductor Manu- 
facturing Co. shares start trading on the stock 
exchange here Monday, and many analysis 
said Friday they expected the price to jump at 
least 50 percent soon after. 

Viewed by many as Taiwan’s best new 
Hsting this year, the company last month sold 
40.6 million shares to the public through an 
initial public offering prices at 90 new Taiwan 
dollars (53.50) a share. That represents a 5.25 
percent stake. 

The stock is already trading in the when- 
issued market at 135 dollars, and it will rise at 
least to that level after formally listing next 
week, Thomas Chien, research mana ger at 
Baring Securities Ltd, in Taiwan. 

With shares initially expected to be in short 
supply as current owners wait for higher prices, 
the big question among many investors is how 
the rising shares might help or hurt others 
traded on the Taiwan exchange, analysts said. 


“The initial question is, what are investors 
going to do when they find out they can'! get 
TSMC shares," said Michael Hung, electronics 
industry analyst with Jandine Fleming Securi- 
ties Taiwan. After that, investment decisions 
will be based on where Taiwan Semiconduc- 
tor’s price begins to settle, analysts said 
Sales and profit at Taiwan Semiconductor, 
which is 36 percent owned by Philips Elec* 
tronics NV, are growing rapidly. It is the 
biggest player in one of Taiwan's healthiest 
industries, Mr. Hung said. 

The company’s net profit in 1993 almost 
quadrupled, and strong growth is continuing 
this year. Net earnings in the first half of 1 994 
soared about 160 percent from the first half of 
the previous year, to 3.7 billion dollars, on 
sales that climbed to 8.8 billion dollars from 
5.0 billion dollars a year earlier. 

Taiwan Semiconductor, spun off from a 
government research organization in 1987, 
has thrived on rising global demand for com- 
puter chips. 


The trade gap of $14.45 bil- 
lion was a record, a Finance 
Ministry official said 
The official said exports of 
ships and most care were down 
but semiconductors, electronic 
goods aid some care and car 
parts continued to gain in over- 
seas markets. 

Meanwhile, foreign direct m- 
vestmeat in Japan fell to $46 
billion in July from $222 billion 
a year earlier, in part because 
the strong yen discouraged in- 
vestee, the official said 


Manila Looks Into Interport Trades 


Bloomberg Business News 

MANILA — The Securities 
and Exchange Commission be- 
gan an investigation Friday into 
eight directors and officers of 
Interport Resources Ccnp. for 
possible insider trading. 

The Philippine Stock Ex- 
change on Thursday urged reg- 
ulators to investigate and me 
criminal, administrative and 
civil charges against Interport 


executives after finding evi- 
dence of violations. 

The investigation stems from 
Interport's one-day price rise of 
47 percent, on Aug 8. in heavy 
trading. The gain triggered a 
one-day suspension of trading 
and a preliminary investigation 
by the stock exchange. 

After a three-week inquiry, 
the exchange found that the 
company had not disclosed the 


fact it had negotiated and 
signed a stock-swap agreement 
with Ganda Holdings Bhd, a 
Malaysian company, until after 
trading closed Aug. 8. 

Interport executives and' 
family members traded the 
stock, acquiring as many as 2.9 
billion shares on the basis of 
privileged information about 
the Ganda deal, a stock ex- 
change audit report said. 


China Delays 
New Cuts in 
Workweek 


The AsseaeUed Press 

BELTING — The Labor Min- 
istry said there were no immedi- 
ate plans to further shorten the 
workweek, the official China 
Daily reported Friday. 

In March, the government 
shortened the workweek from 48 
hours, or six days, to 44 hours, or 
five and a half days, allowing 
workers to have a two-day week- 
end every second week. 

Rumors have circulated in 
China that the 40-hour work 
week would be introduced Oct 
1 to coincide with the 45 th anni- 
versary of Comm unis t rule. 

But the Labor Minis try gp id 
it would not switch to the 40- 
hour week until it was persuad- 
ed that the 44-hour week had 
been effective in boosting effi- 
ciency as well as giving workers 
more leisure time. 

So far, the evidence has been 
favorable. In the first six 
months, China’s gross domestic 
product rose 11.6 percent. 

Separately, analysts said Chi- 
na was releasing' food stocks 
and stocking up on imports to 
try to control inflation and pre- 
vent food shortages, Reuters re- 
ported from Hong Kong. Bad 
weather in various parts of the 
country has affected grain, oil- 
seeds and sugar crops, making 
it essential that stocks be re- 
plenished, the analysts said. 


RELIANCES After Bolstering Capacity in Its Core Industries, India’s Largest Company Plans Diversification 

Coatianed from Page 9 


power plants, transport and 
eventually financial services. 
“Five years down the road, the 
majority of our assets will still 
be in the core businesses.” 

“In the 1980s we didn't know 
petrochemicals,” Mr. Ambani 
«rid, recalling the group's then- 
daring move into a complex, 
capital-intensive new business 
area. “In the 1990s we don't 
know telecoms; there is always a 
learning process." 

With the In dian government 
only recently warming to pri- 
vate participation in infrastruc 1 
ture as it ends the “permit raj 
Jthat required bureaucratic per 
mission for most individur* 
business decisions, few prr 
projects’ performance can 
fully assessed. 

But even before it gets 
on this path, potentially as 
partner with Enron, Bech4 


Enterprises and GE Capital 
Cop. in a $2_5 billion power 
plait or AT&T Coip. and U S 
wet Inc. in baric telecom ser- 
vice in the states of Maharash- 
tn and Gujarat, Reliance has 
trong approval for its 
from analysts and inves- 
atike. 

“The company is doing all 
right things in the right ar- 
said Jonathan Boyer, who 
i ages India funds for Jar- 
ine Fle ming Securities in 
'Hong Kong and has Reliance as 
his largest single holding. 

“With the whole infrastruc- 
ture sector being thrown wide 
open. Reliance has unrivaled 
contacts and influence in In- 
dia," Mr. Boyer said. “They 
have as good a chance as any- 
body to do it right.** 

Those contacts, built up 
when bureaucrats in New Delhi 
and state-owned financial insti- 


tutions called the shots in a 
tightly controlled economy, 
have earned Reliance its fair 
share of controversy. 

“Questions have always been 
asked about how Reliance gets 
what it wants in the first place,” 
a Bombay financier said “But 
none are asked after they latch 
onto a project. Their implemen- 
tation and ability to make it 
profitable is always excellent.** 

While Reliance was making 
friends in New Delhi, it was 
also assiduously courting indi- 
vidual investors, sidestepping 
the powerful Bombay institu- 
tions with a dedication to im- 
proving shareholders* returns. 

Where other companies' con- 
trolling shareholders allowed 
their share prices to languish if 
that suited their personal tax 
considerations. Reliance soon 
gathered a strong following 
through constant attention to 


improved returns and an inno- 
vative financial strategy. 

That course has seen the 
number of its shareholders rise 
from 53,000 in 1977 to more 
than 2.4 milli on today. While it 
means shareholders' meetings 
now convene in s tadiums , the 
group enjoys unparalleled clout 
when it comes to raising money. 

“Very few companies of our 
size have offered 25 percent 
compound annual growth in 
earnings over the past five 
years," Mr. Ambani said. He 
expressed frustration with cur- 
rent government policies that 
seek to control the overall pace 
of Indian companies' money- 
raising in international capital 
markets. 

“We are completely con- 
strained,” he said. “If you are 
asking Reliance to compete in 
the global chemical industry. 


we should have same financing 
opportunities as our global 
competitors." 

In 1992, Reliance was the 
first Indian company to issue 
shares to foreign investors 
through the use of global depos- 
itary receipts, or foreign-cur- 
rency-denominaled securities 
held and traded overseas. 

It also made the largest equi- 
ty-linked convertible Eurobond 
issue, which it soon followed up 
with a controversial second 
global depositary receipt issue. 
India's largest to date. 

Critics say the second issue 
was a purely opportunistic 
cash-raising exercise that came 
at the high point of a flood of 
Indian issues that had over- 
whelmed demand and prompt- 
ed a temporary plunge in prices. 

But supporters argued it was 
a typical move from an aggres- 


1 Investor’s Asia I 

Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 




to 



iUUw 

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9000 Y Y" 


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WWIH" 







A M- J J A'S J'A’S 1 

1994 . 1994 • 

Exchange Index Friday 

Clgae 

Hong Kong Hang Seng * 9.901.56 

,sca} TfcTJ“ 

1994 

Prev. 

Close 

9,690.90 

j‘ a's 1 , 

% 

Change 

+0.11 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2^30.61 

2,336.83 

-0.27 

Sydney 

AH Ordinaries 

2,107.00 

2,105.50 

+0.07 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

20,653.83 20,642.93 

+0.05 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1,160.68 

1. 156.34 

+0.^ 

Bangkok 

SET 

1^39.06 

1,525.84 

+0.S7 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

944.52 

950 52 

-0.63 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

7,010.63 

6.974.15 

+0.52 

Manila 

PSE 

3,096^6 

3.079.39 

♦0.55 

Jakarta 

Stock index 

515.58 

512.71 

+0.56 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2,178.75 

2.167.02 

+0.54 

Bombay 

Natrona) index 

2,140.10 

2.146.09 

■058 


Souroas: Reuters. AFP 


Very briefly: 


rive company following its own 
agenda. 

“There was a lot of talk that 
they didn't need the money 
then and would merely use it 
for interest-rate arbitrage be- 
tween U.S. rates and much 
higher rates in India,” a fund 
manager based in Singapore 
said. 

“At first it soured me on 
owning their stock,” the fund 
manager said. “But it was a very 
dever move by management 
that will ultimately be to share- 
holders* benefit if they are long- 
term investors.” 

With analysts predicting sol- 
id earnings growth — Klein- 
wort Benson Securities expects 
Reliance's earning per share to 
increase by 42 percent over the 
next three years — Mr. Ambani 
remains confident that Reli- 
ance can raise the money it 
needs. 


• Aiwa Co., a subsidiary of Sony Corp., said it had not revised its 
current profit forecast of 7.2 billion yen ($72 million) for the year 
ending in March 1995, citing the uncertain yen-dollar rate. 

• Diversified Resources Bhd. of Malaysia plans to assemble and 
manufacture Korean infantry fighting vehicles and similar heavy 
equipment in Malaysia, Lhe company said. 

• Central China Display Laboratory, an electronics company, is 
suing Goldstar Co. of South Korea and is demanding 42.5 million 
Hong Kong dollars ($5 J million) for “unethical competition.” the 
first such case in China, an official report said. 

• Kerry Group, owned by the Malaysian-Chinese tycoon Robert 
Kuok, has reduced its stake in Television Broadcasts Lid., Hong 
Kong’s largest television company, to 19 percent from 26 percent. 

• Japan’s market share of new ship orders soared to 54.9 percent in 
the first half of 1994, helping it to retake the lead in shipbuilding 
orders from South Korea, whose share slipped to 16.5 percent. 

AP. Bloomberg. Reuters 


Goodman Fielder Profit Falls 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SYDNEY — Goodman 
Fielder Ltd., Australia’s largest 
food group, said Friday that 
full-year net profit tumbled 49 
percent amid an effort by dissi- 
dent shareholders to try to re- 
vamp the company's board. 

Profit was 93.4 million Aus- 
tralian dollars ($69 million), 
down from 1 82 million dollars a 
year earlier. Sales fell 5 percent, 
to 3.71 billion dollars. 

The dissident investors, led 


by Doug Shears, a Melbourne 
businessman, and three institu- 
tions control just under 20 per- 
cent of the company. 

Brokers said Lhe latest Good- 
man results gave more ammuni- 
tion to the group seeking to 
launch a boardroom coup. Mr. 
Shears proposes to appoint 
himself and three other nomi- 
nees to replace four directors. 

Goodman stock fell three 
cents to 1.43 dollars. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


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•* ZURICH ” VIOLET •• 
bcort Srvro Cretft cords accepted. 
Tet 077 7 63 83 32. 


LONDON BRAZILIAN Escort 

Scmce 071 724 5997791 - oedt arris 


yCMA*MHS"RIV0A*ZU8IQ! 

RJRQCONTACT tail Escort + Trow}- 
SernceTCoB Vb»a +43-1-310 63 19. 


' (JOIOON ESCORT SERVICE ■ 

“ — KIMBEUEY—’ 

»* — * TBj ATT 486 4461 *" * 


BLONDS ESCORT SBVKX 

FCWYOKCITY 
Please rf 2125358200. 


ANNAUSE escort agency 

Q4ELS&A LONDON 
AH 3S1 746B 


LOS ANGELES- GAMY INTL 
Excel 6 Gtide Service. Beverly HSs 

Id. B101 2B1-8225 USA 


LONDON HEATHROW GATWtCX 
JAPANESE GSL5 ESCORT SERVICE 
TH.09S6 572SQ 

HtANWURTKOtN D055SDOIff " 

d treas. Escort Service. 

OSS-473294 


• • 'AMBIENCE* * * •• 
LOWON HEATH80W Exart Service 
TEL OTl 722 5008 Credi Cords 


LONDON-MCE ESCORT SBtVKE 

“"-•raxnY*- — 

•TEl:071 486-4515* 


MUNICH* WELCOME 

ESCORT ft GU05E AGa^CT. 
PLEASE CALL D89 - 91 23 14 


ZUKH * BN * LUZON 

NATHAUE Exart Servia 
TeL 01 / 463 23 34 


AMSTERDAM BBtNADEITE 
Esari Service. 

Tek 631 63 36 or 631 06 43. 


’ LOBDON ' ESCORT * SERVICE 

~ “* “ C A S S I £ ** ~ "* 

Ta-07!-:62-0B40 


■ZURICH* SU5 AN’ 

Escort SarvioB 

Tet 01 / 381 99 <8 


HALT * PAMS * COTE D'AZUR 

Frendi B«ro Escort Agency ■ 
PwtflmH +39 lBc 


STOCKHOLM 

.... SBMCE 
10:0815782) 


SVffiZERLAND - PAIS - VBMA 

Escort. Tiovd ft Buaness Service 
Swieerfand +41(0 77 727230 


PAMS’ ZURICH' VBV4A 'PRAGUE 

SUPREME ESCORT INTHJNATX3NAL 
Cot Vienna f.<3 1) 532 II 32. 


■FRANKFURT 1 

Pnncess Escort and Travel Service. 
Please a* 0161 - 26 32 572 


FRANKFURT ft AREA 

Mercs Escxt Agency 
PteaeCofl069-Wfi6i6. 


ABSTOCATS BCORT SHWKE 

1 Si. Maghoeb Place. Larefon W2 
Tefcflil-402 5544 


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SERVICED OFFICES 

BRUS5&S - BEGAJM 

Tow offire ft d urvicos 

Tab 32-2-634 85 54 

Free 32-2-534 02 77 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

HOLLAND 

MfifU 

MONACO 

IK 1 * ■ • 

RL1SS1AN REPUBLIC 

MOSCOW SUBURB, 7700 s*™. 
betxmfu land, nets nrer, 25 rranutos by 
car from KremSn. Very lecue. in the 
mou pngiaiont datoha park. For nfo 
Mr 077/D95/279 3514 or 2W 06 41 

REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

GREAT BRITAIN 

LONDON KENSMSTON, WIT. 1 mm 
tube, la floor apartment, 2 beds, 
lounge, modem kitchen, rentrot/heat- 
mg. E&S/week. Tet UK 71 22V 478' 

ITALY 

FUMWCE HBTOfBC CBN1BL 1-bed 
fta, deeps 24. weekly Ltf 600^0 
todreiw, monthly Ll 1400,000 4- 
kdk. Spazoa 3J-5S 245739, 

PARIS AREA RIRNISHED 

74 CHAMP5 aYSTO5 

CLABIDGE 

FOR 1 wa OR MORE hgh d as 
snida. 2 or 3re«n oearenenti. FULLY 
EOUFPTO. IMMEDIATE RESSWAHONS 
W. (1) a 13 33 33 

15 th METRO VOU3NTAWSL 2 bed- 
room flat. 4th ftoar. frit, 75 sam. 
quW, bright, fully equipped FI0.TO7 
month oTinduded. Tef (1)473406 IB 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 

PARS 14ft - PARC MONI50URE. 
5uperb 60 sqjii arttt aieher, newly 
renowned + modem firem looSiei 

FFB,000-'rnonth. Tet (1) *5 89 61 » 

VUTNAM 

HOUSE FOR SBIT - VETNAAL Beau- 
tiful. spooore. modem renenm. quet 
teta. upicofe orooin HCM Qy. Info 
5m«aoore 6M1 50089 Fax 33eri51 

AUTO SHIPPING 


5AVE ON CAR 5H5PHNQ. AMESCO, 
(Ufebestr 2, Antwerp Belgium. Tcv from 
US, Africa fends Eoio xslma free 
hotel T1 32/1^31-4239 F> 7J243S3 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRANSCO BaGHJM 

The fcegjsi ct» export company 
re Europe fry the pan 20 yean. 
All mates and modek 
Erort idesteganoHn. 
Shppng - reurroe 
Europetxi, African ft Ui specs. 

T romco . 51 VaBe-tcNfnnr.. 
2030 Antwerp. Befoint. 

Tel: 03/54262.40, tax 03?54l58.97. 
tefoji 35207 Trans B 


tww TAX-FREE mtd 
AIL LEADING MAKS 
Same day regairorion pcmUe 
'wewoble up too yetu 
We oto reuser cars with 
(expired) fore^i (tot-free) plates 


HEALTH/MEDICAL 

SERVICES 


REJUVB4AT10N C0UNS8JIN& » 

“ ‘ ' low in PAiE. Style 

Fax 1-45 74 84 48. 


Erofeh £ frendi. now in PADS. Efcxle. 
Tefl-47 66 80 74. 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


WDRIDWIDE. Spead depomxe of the 

kwefl ever docount: eronomy uufta e. 

Credh cods paaible. Teh Parr; (I) 42 
89 10 81 Fox 42 56 25 B2 


WOR1D AVIATION SCHEDULED 
FLIGHTS. 1st. busfoea. economy at 
^^foj^yjFPga^l^4g51 


ARTS 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 
GALB9E ALT-AMEBKA, Sdrwabor. E2 
D-70193 auttport. Fox -t- 4971 1.63491 3 


TOWARD LADSI arde of oil on 

15"i12'‘ fruit and wme glass. Tel/ tax: 


Alfred ocher Street 10. CH8027 Zundi 
Tef- 01/202 76 10 Tele* 81W1S 

Fat 01/202 76 30 

EDUCATION 

IMPROVE ANYO» QUICKLY? 

Al ages, better grades. 5^f-«steen 
happreo. bron damage recovery. 
Great for manaatvitshiaentt/talesiien 
World fomous Dr. John Hrecon. 
htventor of Q£T. Qukfo Effective 
Therapy. Workshop! for therapists, 
psycbcJcflisBv teachers, 
optenietnsts, etc. 

Brxftaren 23 Sept, Paris 9 Oa, Los 
Angeles 19-20 Nov- Worldwide senna* 
Fro +31 40-815448. 

USA +1-310+43-8559 

OCEANWIDE MOTORS 

Sine* 1972 brokers for Mercedes. BMW, 
Porsche, GM ft Ford. Wartdwxle 
deSrery. ruetratirei ft shipment 
OCM-GatMANY 
Teroeegenstr 6, D-40474 Duessefdorf 
Tel: W2I1 - 434646, Fax: 4542120 


COLLEGES* 

UNIVERSITIES 




EUROPE AUTO BROKBS, Inc 

TeL rtofand pi) 3402+4494 Fta lont 

VAUD COLLEGE DEGREES. All 
Subjects. Heme Study. FAX.- (319) 354- 
6335 Phone: 1319] 35&6620 USA 


FRIENDSHIPS || 


EUROPEAN MARRIAGE BUREAU 

Confidontiafriy. Brtnh Management. 
REHAY MTL CosteOc™ 93 - Plonro 4 
2804a Modrid. Span TekVl 556.1*27 
Fcm 34-1-5S&99-57 / 3G1^0J2. 
^formation 24 hr*. TeL- 34-1-355 8? 76. 


EUROPEAN MAKIAGE BUREAU 

CitofidertKAly. British MoncgemenL 
RfflAY WTL CtBJdtaro. 93 - Ptama 4 
28046 Madrid, foam Tel; 34-1-556.1427 
Fro 34-1-55599.57 . 361^052 
. Information 24 hn, Teb 34-1-155 89 7A 


JAPANESE WRITER living m Paris 
would Ba to meet a tics woman. Bor 
1690, 1.H.T., F-92521 NeuiBy Cedex. 



EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


BllMGUAL AUSTRIAN INVESTMBIT 
BANKS!. 30. seeks chd le njna, wel 
compenwied opportmrfy in Wedetn 
Europe (non-Gaman ipeaking coutv 
Ine4 or AuttroSa Seeling new chal- 
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UX, MBA in Econom n Vienna 

Executive experience in CorfCX ate Fv 

nena, MftA and Busnes Develop- 
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German/Engfah. some Freisdt Fox. 
AUSTRIA, 743 |l) 513 13 B23, Rei. 
PI TL 


WI5HB4G TO EXTB4D your acfrvHies 
woridwkfc 1 Frendi woman, 30, US ft 
East Europe extensive fo renal i ond 
business expenener. seek! chaBeninq 
and revrooing opporhnety. Hard- 
warh no, free to travel, ambhouj. 
Please call (33-11 46.027235. 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


FRB4CH PERSONAL ASSISTANT. Fto 
ent En^rsh. 13 yem UK, German, 
sokd toiemmioiKjl experience (tiansto- 
hore. marketi n g, legafl, dynamic mo- 
twe, seela teoetoral/assonrt 
bon with int i Paris breed 
Tet 1-42522725 (eves at 


sed ccfltotsiy- 
are«crphone| 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


LANGUAGE SCHOOL PARIS, Metro 
Nation, iceto experienced English 
reexheft. faaness knowledge nda- 
penwbe. Speaakbes a plut outomo- 

Mes, axrpuim, occounbng, secretar- 

ies. moftehnq. We are reoutmg for 
Seprembrr. Heose send CV. phao and 
hrofareton letter to LANGUES 2000. 
16 bd de Otoronne. ^020 Paris. 


DYNAMIC AMHUCAN LANGUAGE 

TEACHERS (preferably honed in 
Busmexs at Pubhc Speaking) needed to 
run leranarv Experience ft weximg 

papers required JAL[1)42 6331 00 


FRIENDSHIPS 


a> 


SOUND 

IND1VTDUAL 

CONFIDENTIAL 


Edith Brigitia 
Fahrenkrog 

INTERN.\T10NAL PARTNERSHIP-AGENCY 
GERMANY - FRANKRTLT/MAIN 

S\Y yiA— TO A PABTNFRSH1P. 

MATCHING TIC RKHT PARTNERS IS 
MY BUSINESS. FEXSCN AL INDIVIDUAL 
ASSISTANCE IS MY 5ERVICE 
CONFIDENCE IS MY HJGI EST FRJOfilTY. 

You CAN Rt-JVCH ML DAILY: 3-7 PJIL 
I ALSO Sat.'Siin) 

GERMANY. £0316 FRANKFURT ! MAIN 
ELKENBVHSTR. 51 

TcL: + 49 - 171 - 2 45 52 52 
TeL: + 49 - 69 - 43 19 79 
Fax: +49- 69- 43 20 66 

PERSONAL APPOINTMENTS 
AREPOSSIRLEIN: FRANKFURT 
NEW1TJRK - LOS ANGELES - SINGAPORE 


O A CHARMING ITALIAN BEA ITY WITH CLASS... 

EARLY VJS. 1 10. WITH A GREAT TEMPER AMENT AND A LOT OF 
CHARM SHE IS A MANAGER iMBA* IN A WORLD- KNOATt F.ASHKW 
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WONDERFULLY FEMININE CXTL&ON. AND A GRACEFUL MODEL LIKE FIGURE A 

sinnrncATED udy who loves culture and sports acttvities. gof, 

TENNIS AND SHE HAS A PASSION TOR WATERSPORTS (SAILING, SURHN0. ETC-X 
THIS ENCHANTING WOMAN 15 LOCKING FOR THE RIGHT PARDiER TO SHARE 
GREAT ASPECTS LIFE BASED ON LOVE AND TRUST. 

PLEASE CALL- GO GERMA.NY+49- ni-WS2S«+4P-0-43 1979 

O rsTLimsimffr owyork - momec«loi„. 

W/1.86 A VERY DYNAMIC AND ACTIVE BUSINESS-MAN WHO IS 
EXTREMELY SUCCESSFUL WITH HK WORLDWIDE COMPANES. THIS 
O (ARMING ijLNTLEMAN IS DARK HAIRED WITH BU<E EYeS AND A MASCULINE 
OUTLOOK A SPORTY AND ELEGANT APPEARANCE. WITH AN EXCELLENT 
BACKGROUND. HE IS ALSO WARM HEARTED ROMANTIC GENEROUS. WITH A 
GCOD SENSE OF HUMOR. A MAN WHO LOVES FAMU.1 LIFE. HIS SPORTS 
INTERESTS ARE GOLF. TCi [.TS . WATERSPORTS AND SWING HE IS LOOKING FOR 
n IE RIGHT WOMAN TO ST ART A WONDERFUL FLTURE TCCFTHBL. 

PLEAS; CALL: (X> GERMAM +49- 171 - 215 52 S rat 1 49- A9- 43 1979 


. WORLDWIDE EXCLUSIVE MARRIAGE AGENCY • 



EXCLUSIVE IN MUNICH 

gabriele thiers-bense 

Fax: +49 - 89 - B42345S - TeL +49 - 89 - 6423451 

THE SUCCESSFUL*. 

DALLAS - TEXAS CHICAGO - LAKE MICHIGAN 

AN INTERNATIONAL BU5B4E5SMAN AND COMPANY OWNER - 48/6’2" A GENUINE BEAUTY! - 35/5*6” tnB, sSm - A FASCINATING, MOST 
- with sufastforia in EUROPe and ASIA - A mad nKcessful end wedrfiy RfllRESTKG YOUNG LADY OF K5T&KTKX, on american <fie unrverrity 

..J ^1L ...Lil. I.. — --J -«---i - - J- - 1 -- — I J i — -t- — I ~ nr »■ IV H _i- i' 


SOPHISTICATED INTRODUCTION 
TO THE BEST 

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Daily 10-19 hr a. D-ST 545 Munchen/Gennany Harthausar Sir. I O-B By oppa'nhnent 

For responsible people 


































































Page 14 


NASDAQ 

Friday’s 4 p.m. 

This list compiled by the AP, consists of the 1 ,000 
roost traded securities in terms of dowar value, it is 
updated twice a year. 


UMovn 
Won Low Slock 


It 1 * A AAONi -20 108 13ft 

»%I2 ABCP.oJ ,. ... SIS 30'% 

30 14 AAfjT Bid .. 10 VIS 14V) 

M". IJ 1 - ACC Cp Ho J IS 90S 189, 
34 9*1 ACS Bn s _ _ 43a 12% 

43 M’-iACXTc 38 U 33V. 

471131 ADC Tel _ 34 M 44V. 

1 7>.io'. aes enn _. .. 30? iaw 

23ftlS’*AESCot .M» 3.8 17 798 17V, 

37 l?'.«AKSlcel - 14S4 MV. 

JV'dlS'.APjHM - 1J S 25% 

144. 4'iA&C - - 10 13, 

33 12 AST _ 1127794 13% 

29’ ,14ft acpqvH _ 35 173 18% 

3] i'. H'.AnJaun - 3324714 30V. 

27'. 13 AcmeMCl _ 10 291 35 

20ft 7'. ACTH ... 29 113 9% 

14% (S'lAOocLO M 4.4 9 337 7V. 

ntilT.AdapIc* _ 1410512 18% 


S3 1 1 IT. Adapts* 
241'. 10 AOctStin 
37 v i20 AOaSv 


_ 1410513 IB*-’, 

-. 45 I4'4 

.14 A 19 6 36V. 


3.'. 16V. Aaoecte .30 .7 24 3554 31 


46* 1 36Vi AsStftmia 5 JO A 14 BO 32’* 

38' .25 AttranTBs 24 .B 16 B3S MV. 

14*8 ID Agmeoa .toe A 54 3630 1211 


14V. s'vAaourn ... ... 43 114* 

U'l !’• AirAAem ._ _ 753 2% 

6JU451kiU40 I.We 26 581 4246 

gift 9'lAJonloC ... - 114 13% 

SB 1 '. IB Aloank AO 1.5 U x32 ZMk 
lfftllAAkf.lai - 22 985 1246 

38'.. 23 AtexBM 4B 3.5 1714733 25% 


19'.. 6% Aliens _ 3fl 7B58 19 

3'a !•*!, AKASjvtt ._ 14 399 ?>%, 

l7'.i P.AlionPh - .. 102 10 

16 I 1 ', AJnScmi ._ 20 1488 15W 

32 , .22’.AIIrf>dCp 40 2.1 7 1184 2966 

27'.jl3"«A0<Mao .. 8 58 161 

74". 1' . Alpha 1 ... 940 1% 

Jill 7'iAlpnoBfa .. ... 337 73*a 

WftJIAAtlero _ TO 12223 296% 

24ft 101 1 Akron* „ 12 35 1 5V. 

93 46'.«AmerOn Ole _ 100 1192 74 'A 

MV.20+*ABnwr .72 SJ 8 503 2266 

19'*. 13*1 AcmVOV .11 1.0 46 118 l»% 

S IO'jAC oMoifl .24 1A 19 339 M*» 

lS'.AmFfoht - 31 251 24V. 

Mft 25ft AGreeis .34 10 H 11995 2946 

74V. StaAHItncps .11 190 7 

a ft 15ft AMS - 23 498 2516 

17ft 6ftAMed£ .. 1} 208 BW 

72 )2ftAmMBSCt — SB 1114 

JO'.- 14V. APwrCv 8 _. 29 2381 19 'A 

28'. lSl'i AmRosJa -13 4 MV* 

39".22"lAmSupr ._ 154 32 

27 12'6AmTc» 14'* 

16 lOftATrovct — It 723 u 16ft 

lav. 7' .AmerCos _ ... 797 9 >m 

26ft IVftAmtBd J4 1.0 23 594 24 A 

STftWftAmgen ... 19 B777 S4V* 


hAHRPCPS . 11 190 7 

• AMS _ 23 498 2516 

■ AMedE .. 13 208 By. 

’.AmMOSot _ .. 3B 1114 

jAPwrCv* _. 29 2381 19'A 

iAmKMia _ 13 4 2BV6 

lAmSupr ._ 154 32 

iAmTcte 404 14'* 

■ ATrovd — It 733 II 16ft 

■ AmerOs — ... 727 9W 

. AmtBd J4 1.0 23 594 3416 
.Amgen ... 19 B777 54%. 

Airman* _ 17 47 716 

.AimdlCp .OS A II 922 10 V. 


161k 1 1 1 . AnetiBcD 
19*. lov.AncnCm 
49 I9’i Andrew 4 
Sl'413 Andros 
OT’ i IB'S Amec 
38*122 AppleC 


... 10 115 16ft 
_ 1| 406 1BV| 
- 31 1957 41* 
_ 10 48 161. 

_ - 276 36'-. 
48 1.4 32 9039 35'* 


381)32 AppleC ,4fl 1.4 37 9039 35'* 

18' ) II ApiSaui .02 .1 39 3415 14 

351.1) Aptroees ,04 J 33 3490 17 

35 13AAodEJCfl _. _ 345 21% 

M 12'aApdlnovs - 74 1 37 1 41* 

Si'S 28V. ApIdMrs - 22 5S33 49V, 

SI ISftArtnrDrg J4 1.2 22 1570 Mft 
2S 12*'.Ait«rHI -23 1 21 'A 

19 IJlkArchCm _ .. 100 17ft 

35'* 24*'. ArgoCP I.1A 3.9 9 135 MV, 

? J'-i IJftAraaSv _ 10) 1111 19% 

5*. 8VaArCB««l £4 J 31 116 141* 
32*6 IS'* Armor 44 2.9 20 1345 3116 


ft IttnArchCm _ .. 10S 17ft 

35'* 24*'. ArgoCP 1.16 3.9 9 135 30 ft 

? 3>-i IJftAraaSv _ 301 1111 19% 

5*. 8V6ArCB««l .04 J 21 116 141* 

3216 16'* Armor A* 2.9 20 1345 3116 

3216 IB Arnold 1 M 10 IB 14 20'A 


24V. 7 Artffi 
13*. 71. Asnwtn 
44 24 AspctTI 
34'-. 22 ASdCmA 
33 V. 21 « AscCmB 
201*11 Astec* 
J4»n37 l kAsJDrftjF 
3B1. 211. Ante Air 
301811 Aimed 


_ 14 7918 lS'u 
„ 30 747 896 

_ 36 1399 3716 
-1281 18S 259. 

-.1263 71 25 V. 

11 711 13V6 
... 3S2 331* 

.33 13 17 1394 2856 

- 26 2443 371* 
_ 37 B! 17 
_ _ 4998 766 


12V. 3’tAuipex 15 1704 516 

44 37 *jWK M A 3A 2950 42'* 
34'6 231. Aulolnd ... 17 283 27 


W.13V.AlHOtnlS 
35 16 AvkTTch 


34 2S*BaST 1.16 

35", BA6BHC Fn l .03 
241,16 81SYS 
71 BMC sir 
30V: 1 116 BMC Wl S 
27'«)5 BWIP .40 

3916 av.BoDoge 
23'* 154% BokerJ .06 

24 lu.BolvGm 
3J'*38'*aemPonc 1J» 
7M6 57V, BcOne DfC3 JO 
45H TJVt BncGalk: 30 r 

21 l7V.Bandec 
21'.1216BKSoutn J2 

38', 31 '-. Banta .52 

21Vi 12A6BanvnSy 
19 lTHBaretT* .08 

19*4 10 BarefR* 

7 2V6BarTetJi 
45'6 43V. BavBK* UB 

57A.44 1 ’. BeBBcp 

49; : 1 18 V, SeOSot 1 

48"*K ‘bEkiw M 

76 BVjBcrtud 

28 13 BattPwr 

13* .1* 

53 27i.Biogen 

13' 6 ShBnjmd 
6' * 2 &0TcC> 

131* BVkfBckBx s 

29 1 8'* Book Mill 
27 U'/iBoamiv«n 
19 B'jBortnd 
25": 16’’«BoilOl t 
1416 41k BoxITc 
1418 7V6Box£7l B 
1516 StaBrKeV 

SiiiUg^ c 

3116 OAkBraCaur 
17V«10'8BrTom 
Ilk 4 '.Bruno* .26 

2r.*i5 , -iButtei* 


_ 37 1425 18'j6 
_ 38 594 34 


13 V. 13'A — V6 
1918 1918 — V. 
1516 1556 -U 
1716 in* —66 
13 1216 ■‘•'A 

37-h 33>-6 _ 

45V« 46 _ 

llik 121* -48 
141. 171. .1 
39'* 30 ■* 

12H 1316 -V u 

IB 18V) _ 

1B16 20 Vi » 1 Vii 
74'* 25 
?'« 9'A _ 

T»6 7Vi —46 
18'* IB'* *tfii 

13*6 14 . V. 

34'.* 344* .'A 
30V. 30V. ... 

SH S*9„ »V H 
546 5>* .. 

32 32'A - 

29 301**1 

KWi, 1218 _ 

11 II 
7 2'* - V6 

421* 6246 - I 

13 13 — W 

2618 28V8 —'4 
1318 12’/, i -. 
25 25V, ♦ V) 

18 19 * 1'Vu 

»i 26W —Vi 
16 161* -46 

,y ; - 

3716 281* — !6 
MVi 14*8 — V* 
741* 7516 +V> 
211. 22 —V. 

16'* 161* *'A 

14 MV6 ♦'* 
234* 94'A -'A 
281* 2816 —V| 

6*6 7 * 46 

25 2548 —V, 

Bto BV) - 
)4V* 16 Vh — 
18V, lB4k — 
2816 Ml* - 
39V, 32 .11* 

13 iaw —It 
15*8 1546 —'A 
B'.* 84a, *16 
3416 24'A — 1% 
5348 54 
7 7". _ 

flh 916 — <* 
154* 1546 * Vm 

18 1B<* _ 

45 45P.6—2V) 

16V. 1646 *16 
35<* 35*6 ♦’* 
35 3546 * 46 

1516 16 *4. 

14*6 1646*1*6 
19V, 2016 —\i 

16 livi _ 

48 491**116 

20 M 

20V. 20V. —'A 

1746 17)6 — Hi 

294* 29*. _ 

1B'6 >8*6 *'* 
13*8 1346 —1* 

21 V„ 2146 *18 
19V, 20 *ki 
12*% IS** —VS 

846 64* —1* 
1516 371**146 
25V8 2546 » '* 
25’A 23' 6—1 
124* 13'* *46 
3244 32W *Vfe 
274* 2746 —'A 
2646 2616 —V. 
1141 17 * V) 

7",i 746 » Vl 

5 5H *V* 
10W 6046—1*6 
2616 2646 *Vi 
I7W 1746 —46 
33'/. 33V, *** 


19 9 515 

J 7 11 

.. 25 204 
_ 19 5191 
_. 13 538 
3.4)88 352 

3 12 1031 

_ „ 374 
3.0 10 IB 
15-25 
.9 7712 

- 17 1409 

7J n ins 
\A 16 374 
-121 2047 
J 31 568 

- 38 255 

- 207 

10 13 68 

- 38 4715 

.. 17 15 

... 17 199 

- 15 2075 

1J 17 ^ 

: 1 ? 

“ SiS 
: 

AOT?^ 

35 xn 

l“lW 

:S§^ 

._ 43 <64 

- 28 7m 
_ - 1341 

58 1B71 

- - 1081 
-18a 319 

3J 17 2907 
- 26 500 


30 2946 

1016 10'A 
214% 213’a 
441* 43 Vi 
191* 19 

S W 1646 
1IW 
*6 20W 
law 124k 
33V. 33 
13'6 6246 
3?'* 32 
2546 241* 
1916 191* 
331 3246 
171A 1646 
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AMEX 

Friday’s Cloihtfl 

Tables Induce the nationwide prices up to 
the dodng on Wall Street end do not reflec 
W ate trades etanvherv. Via The Associated Prass 


1? Month Si 

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INTERNATIONAL 




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Saturdav-Sundav, September 3-4, 1994 

Page 15 


FIRST COLUMN 




ANewLook 
At a Very 
Old Story 

T HERE is, as yet, no official com- 
petition for Great Typographical 
Errors of the Twentieth Century. 
When somebody does finally get 
: round to organizing one. the following will 
be this column’s entry; Workers of the 
, World Untie!. 

Thai a g ain, maybe it’s not so much a 
typographical error as a hidden truth. Af- 
’ -0 all, the failure of ( workeis around the 
isorid to unite and smash capitalism, as 
they were exhorted to do in the Commu- 
nist Party manifesto, has left them with a 
thriving, but complex system of b uan ess 
and commerce. And the more successful 
the workers within that system become, 
the more complicated the finan^a i knots 
that they are asked to untie. 

In theory, working outside one’s home 
country should be a major finan cial bo- 
nus. The remuneration — or compensa- 
tion for those who prefer headhunters’ 
jargon — is supposed to provide financial 
benefits to counterbalance the stress of 
c han gi ng countries, perhaps learning a 
new l ang u a g e, etc. The dream scenario is 
that the company picks up the tab for 
accomodation, the executive has a big 
living allowance, and the salary goes 
straight into a bank account domidledin 
a pleasingly obscure location. 

The reality is all too often a practical 
mess of conflicting tax laws and adminis- 
trative headaches, especially if there is still 
a house to be taken care of in the home 
country. 

Of all the topics that the modem finan- 
cial world addresses, relocation is among 
the things it does worst. This is surprising, 
given what appears to be an ever-increas- 
ing trend for business to be done across 
international borders. Though you might 
argue that this is an old story: Good 
manag e r s are good at manag in g most 
things, but often not their own finances. 


= For U.S. Corporations, the Modern-Day Byword Is ‘Globalize or Die’ 


C ORPORATE downsizing may 
be the order of the day at home, 
but more and more U.S. compa- 
nies are buying into the ‘global- 
ize or die’ theme, sending executives out to 
open new offices and factories abroad 
In a 1993 survey co-conducted by 
Windham International, a firm specializ- 
ing in cultural integration for executives 
moving abroad, and the New York-based 
National Foreign Trade Council, 85 per- 
cent of participants said they expected 


By Judith Rehak 




pants, mostly Fortune 500 firms, had an 
average of 1 84 executives posted overseas, 
about 20 percent more than they had five 
years ago. 

Only IS percent of participants, mostly 
financial service companies and banks, 
said they planned to cut back, and many 
of those have reversed their positions since 
the survey was talcan, said Rick Swaak, a 
vice president at the Cottndi. 

Moreover, the type of U.S. company 
that is deciding to enter the global market- 
place is widening significantly. High-pro- 
file corporate giants like AT&T, Motor- 
ola, and IBM are being joined by a rush of 
new arrivals — smaller companies like 
GTech Corp., a developer of lottery sys- 
tems, Mary Kay Cosmetics, and MTV, the 
music video television network 

“We’re getting calls from companies 
which you’d never anticipate would be 
gong overseas,” said Patricia Digh, who 
heads the international division of the 
Virginia-based Society for Human Re- 
sources, a non-profit, member-supported 
group which advises companies on over- 
seas labor regulations and salary struc- 
tures. “Many high-tech and blue collar 
manufacturing functions are being out- 
sourced, not only because there’s a great 
opportunity for reduced labor costs, but 
because there’s a greater market for wid- 
gets and phones out there.” 

Miss Digh, who said she has been han- 
dling inquiries from companies interested 
in a wide range of activities — making 
auto parts in China, drilling for oil in 
Russia, and opening bookshops in Eastern 
Europe, to name a few — added that she 
has seen membership in the Society’s in- 


Source: Windham Intematkmat/Nathnai Foreign Trade Council 


temational division balloon from 200 to 
2,000 in the last three years. 

And where are these companies head- 
ing? The most favored destination right 
now is the Asia-Pacific region. China is 
perceived as the country with the most 
market potential, although few firms are 
braving life on the mainland. 

“Companies are looking for jumping- 
off spots, like Singapore, until China's 
infrastructure grows to accommodate a 
larger number of expatriates,” said Mi- 
chael Schell, president of Win dham Inter- 
national “There’s also been a dramatic 
increase in people going to Malaysia, es- 
pecially in telecommunications and appli- 
ance manufacturing, and to Indonesia. 
There’s even interest in Korea, despite the 
political unrest there.” 

Also coming on strong are Central and 
South America. Mr. Schell said he is hear- 
ing from clients that have derided to set 
up shop in Brazil Chile and Argentina, 
and that are now organizing their advance 
teams. 

Experts also say that females make up a 
growing parentage of the expatriate work 
force. According to the Windham /N FTC 
study, 10 percent of American expatriate 
executives are women, up from only 3 
percent five years ago. Mr. Swaak said he 


Stepping Overseas 

Sorwgr of 12D U.S. companies which hav&sent or are sending employees overseas. 


Chahgeforpcast in number of 
expatriates aver the next five years 


Marital statusfilving arrangements 
abroad 


J mw- • NotAccompaniecL..- r — . 

• .... ; • by Spouse 


No change 
24% 





BSsiffiD*?- 




expected that figure to hit 11 percent with 
this year's survey. 

But even as women are gaining as expa- 
triate executives, they are losing out in 
another arena: finding a job when it is 
their husbands who have received the for- 
eign assignment In the era of two-career 
marriages, only 10 percent of executive 
spouses ever a* find a job in the country 
where their partner has been posted, ac- 
cording to the study. The result: male 
executives who turn down a foreign as- 
signment often cite their spouse — who 
doesn’t warn to derail her own career — as 
the primary reason. 

“Companies are finding it difficult to 
get talent because much of it is married to 
other talent,” said Mr. Swaak. “And the 
pool is shrinking because we aren’t very 
successful in helping the ‘trailing* 
spouse.’ ” 

Another stumbling block to successful 
expatriate assignment* sometimes lies in 
the companies themselves. While big mul- 
tinationals like AT&T and General Elec- 
tric have careful selection processes for 
chosing executives to send abroad, offer- 
ing language and cultural programs before 
departure, the picture can be quite differ- 
ent for smaller companies. 

“I can’t tell you how many times I get 
calls saying something like. ‘We’re open- 


Relocation 


Page 17 

Culture shocks / 

Avoiding catastrophe yS 

The partnership factor -■* 

Currencies' taxing problems 


ing a subsidiary in France, and 1 need the 
employment laws for a meeting at 1 :00,’ ” 
said Miss Digh. “Often, t raining or chos- 
ing a person to go overseas is done at the 
last minute, particularly in companies do- 
ing this for the first time.” 

So why not just hire more nationals 
overseas?’ Many companies do, especially 
in sales, where language, and connections 
in the local marketplace can be a tremen- 
dous asset. But there are compelling rea- 
sons for a company to send a home-grown 
executive abroad. 

One is ‘technology transfer,’ in which, 
for example, an expatriate sets up finan- 
cial and accounting systems that tie an 
overseas operation into headquarters. In 
the case of a manufacturing facility, the 
executive might institute U.S. quality con- 
trols. Typically, the expatriate stays 
abroad for about three years, analysts say. 
selecting and training a national as a re- 


Single 

22 % 




■'‘'^fttorrpanfed. 

Spouse ■ •• 

'•mv'-vv-;'-. ; 


Inbmuliuvu/ IL-'r-UJ Tribute 

placement before returning to the United 
States. 

Another reason for not hiring more for- 
eign nationals as executives, at least in the 
beginning of an international expansion 
program, is Lhat companies going global 
need their managers to be able to function 
effectively in as many foreign lands as 
possible. ’ 

“To maintain a corporate culture that is 
globally competent,” said Mr. Schell, 
“you need to have an exchange of execu- 
tives so that it permeates the entire organi- 
zation and doesn’t just remain at head- 
quarters. It isn't just Americans going to 
other countries, it’s outsiders coming to 
the U.S. and moving among other coun- 
tries.” 

The ideal of course, is the “global exec- 
utive” — that multilingual citizen of the 
world who moves effortlessly through sev- 
eral cultures. But for most U.S. compa- 
nies, that individual is still in the future. 
Only an estimated 25 percent of chief 
executives at the 20 largest American 
companies, as determined by annual reve- 
nues, have worked outside the United 
States. 

However, say analysts, it’s a fair bet 
that nearly all of those now moving up 
through the ranks to the CEO's office will 
have nad the expatriate experience. 


The Survey’s la: Although Costly, Good Expatriate Executives Are Sound Investments 


Education & Settling-in 



Sources: CBI, Ernst & Young. 


By Jack Anderson 

T HE human resources director of 
a U.K. subsidiary of a U.S. mul- 
tinational oil and chemicals com- 
pany recently said: “Relocation 
is now expected to increase as (our) com- 
pany starts to recruit more. On interna- 
tional relocation, the view is that the com- 
pany must keep moving people." 

Such an outlook is typical of those 
voiced in a comprehensive survey of the 
expatriate relocation expense policies of 
over 600 multinational corporations and 
their subsidiaries in North America, Eu- 
rope and Asia recently completed by the 
London-based Confederation of Business 
and Industry and Ernst & Young. 

The participants represented all busi- 
ness sectors and the survey covered both 
international and domestic relocations. 

Is there a future for expensive expatri- 
ate executives? In fact, nearly all survey 
participants anticipated at least some 
growth in their number of expatriate em- 
ployees, with the largest multinationals 
expecting the greatest growth, although a 
minority comment was registered by some 
European multinationals. 

“Changing business practices such as 
video Hnics, electronic mail and modems 
from home mean that people do not have 
to move in every instance,” responded 
one. 

The survey showed that the large major- 
ity of multinationals, particularly those 
based in Japan, considered their interna- 
tional relocation strategy extremely im- 
portant to the overall success of their 
company. Many also forecast that their 


64% 


48% 


total relocation expenditures will increase 
by 150 percent over the next three years. 

What is more, interviews conducted af- 
ter the survey’s completion show that hu- 
man resource directors estimate interna- 
tional relocation costs for each expatriate 
executive at between two and three times 
the executive’s annual salary. 

How does this jibe with the cost-cutting 
approach of the 1990's? One North Amer- 
ican multinational voiced a common opin- 
ion: “International relocation costs are 
rising as a result of greater freedom of 
movement. Certain benefits are becoming 
more expensive, such as removal expenses. 
But on the whole, (our) company is not 
giving more money — it is cutting back if 
it can.” 

While the responses of survey partici- 
pants varied from company to company, 
some similarites emerged in the responses 
received from companies that were based 
in the same country. Following are general 
outlines of typical expatriate relocation 
ex p ense policies for companies based in 
Belgium, France, Germany and The Neth- 
erlands, as reflected by the survey. The 
policies relate to expenses provided by the 
companies for their own executives who 
leave the stated home country to work 
abroad. 

Belgium 

• Policies on housing for international 
transferees vary across companies, but 
provision of a housing allowance is com- 
mon, as is payment of host-country utili- 
ties and insurance expenses. Home pur- 
chase expenses are available from some 
companies, as are rental management 
costs of the executive’s house in the home 
country. The provision of a house-hunting 


Housing 


■ House-hunting 



insurance In host country 


39% 


trip and professional home-search help in 
the host country is also generally avail- 
able. 

• Outbound education assistance (such 
as for foreign-language lessons) is usually 
riven, along with a settling-in allowance. 
For transport of belongings, the cost of 
sea freight, insurance and storage is usual- 
ly paid. Travel and home leave fares are 
also paid for the employee and family. 

• Tax equalization, or the guarantee 
that the employee will pay the same 
amount of tax — no more, no less — in the 
host country as in the home country, is the 
norm. (Tax “protection” refers to a guar- 
antee that the employee simply will not 
pay more tax than at home, although be 
could pay less). 

• Communication of the company’s re- 
location policy is usually carried out ver- 
bally with employees, backed up by letter. 

• External suppliers are typically used 
for tax and social security planning, as 
well as for cost-of-living information. Re- 
location companies might also be used for 
help with the sale or rental of the execu- 
tive's home-country dwelling. 

France 

• A range of assistance is given with 
housing — from a housing allowance 
(which could involve company housing) in 
the host country, to rental management 
help at home. Assistance with the sale of 
the executive’s home dwelling, as well as 
with the purchase of a new dwelling in the 
host country, might also be available. 

• The transport of belongings, travel 
and home-visit expenses, cost-of-living al- 
lowances and medical insurance costs are 
also usually given. Tax equalization is the 
norm. 


U Moving Arrangements 1 Tax & othur payments jll 

| Insurance In transit 

Medical insurance » 

I 

1 100% 

Sea freight 

■ Cost of living allowance provided 

| P.3% 

1 99 - 1 

Storage 

' ' : T«c •qtteffzatfbo provided 

9 73 % »|§|il|S 

1 ^11 

Airfreight 

.Tax protection provided 




Travel & Leave 


Employee's air fare to host country 


Spouse’s air fare to host country 



Employee's home leave fares 


Ch&dren’s home leave fares 


iMCfititiraial HrrMTnHwv 


• External advisors might be used for 
home search activities, vacant property 
management, area familiarization, mov- 
ing expenses and cost-of-living calcula- 
tions. Advisers are also likely to be used 
for tax and soda) security planning and 
work permits. 

Germany 

• Policies on housing vary widely on 
assistance with home sale and purchase, 
the provision of a housing allowance, and 
rental management assistance. House- 
hunting and settling-in expenses are usu- 
ally met. Moving costs are paid, but not 
for pets or cars. Expenses associated with 
travel to and from the host country (in- 
cluding home visits) are met for the whole 
family. Medical insurance costs are typi- 
cally met. 

• Tax equalization is the norm. 

■ Communication of the company's re- 
location policy might be through individ- 
ual discussion or group meetings with the 
executive's family, as well as by letter. 

• Consultants are likely to be used for 
home search, briefing, legal advice, tax 
planning, work permiis and worldwide 
administration coordination. 

The Netherlands 

• Housing policies are varied, with 
companies offering a range of benefits 
from company housing in the host loca- 
tion to the provision of a rental allowance 
to home purchase help. Insurance and 
utility costs in the host location are fre- 
quently meL Occasionally, house-hunting 
expenses are given. 

• Moving costs are generally paid, espe- 
cially sea freight, insurance and stor^e. 


although payments toward the cost of 
shipping pets and cars are rare. 

• In some instances a settling-in pay- 
ment is made. Also, the provision of a 
cost- of-living allowance is common, as is 
tax equalization. 

The above results do not appear to be a 
“sea change,” particularly as companies 
overall are predicting an increase in total 
expatriates and total costs as shown 
above. 

As one North American telecommuni- 
cations executive said: “What will happen 
is that companies will control relocation 
in terms of expense and make slightly 
more considered move decisions. But in 
terms of the overall cost of running a 
business, relocation is insignificant.” 

However, in response to the “cost-effec- 
tiveness challenge” facing human resource 
directors, the survey showed lhat expatri- 
ates should see certain changes in how 
relocation expense packages are designed, 
calculated and communicated. 

For example, the survey forecast that 
cost-of-living allowances will decrease, 
and will be calculated on an “efficient 
purchaser” index. Some companies will 
completely eliminate cost-of-living allow- 
ances or pay them in lump sums for only 
the first year or two of an assignment, 
particularly in the case of expatriation 
within a relatively narrrow geographic re- 
gion. 

More external advisors will probably 
also be used, predicted the survey, to bring 
down costs without taking away benefits 
from the expatriate. Moreover, U.K. legis- 
lation on relocation costs that took effect 
this year should place additional pressure 
on cost containment for U.K. expatriates. 

The one-third of polled companies cur- 


rently without a written relocation policy 
will formalize their practice, and others 
will enforce policy more strictly, suggested 
the survey. There will also be more com- 
munication with expatriates and their 
families regarding what the relocation ex- 
pense policy is, and what its limitations 
are, as well as an effort to get the expatri- 
ate to “buy into” the relocation policy and 
share some of the economic burden. 

The survey’s overall conclusion was 
lhat although current and future expatri- 
ates will have to undergo some belt-tight- 
ening, they are increasingly recognized as 
key players in determining the success (or 
failure) of companies competing in the 
mul tina tional and multicultural market- 
place. As one U.K. human resource direc- 
tor said: 

“Because the company has so much 
trouble in getting people to go abroad, the 
packages are almost individually negotiat- 
ed. The company does have an interna- 
tional policy which is very generous and it 
lends not to think of costs but simply of 
getting somebody out there. It costs an 
arm and a leg bu£ if we want people to go, 
we have to pay." 

JACK ANDERSON is a partner in the 
Paris office of Ernst & Young, the global 
auditing consulting and expatriate services 
concern. The survey referred to in this arti- 
cle, as well as a companion survey on mobil- 
ity policy, will be discussed at the annual 
Brussels International Human Resources 
Seminar on October 5-7, 1994. For further 
information on the seminar, contact Ste- 
phen Grant at the following address: Ernst 
& Young Lintas House, 15/19 New Fetter 
Lane, London EC4A IAP, England. 
Telephone: (44.71) 931.2980. 


INVEST YOUR FUNDS IN DENMARK 


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N l Account High-risk, investment in USD or USD-related currencies. Gea- 

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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3-4, 1994 


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Attend this major 
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key decision-makers. 


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FOR FURTHER DETAILS 
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ASTIR PALACE HOTEL, VOULIAGMENI, NEAR ATHENS 
10-11 OCTOBER, 199*1 

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Fax: (4*1 71) 836 0717 


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Heading Off Culture Shock Aids Success 


By Barbara Wall 


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ULTURE shock is one of the 
meet expensive and least under- 
stood aspects of international 
corporate relocation, say human 
< ; i resource managers. 

\\ is easy to scoff at the notion of 
; • • cultural maladjustment,” commented 

• jQary Wederspahn, vice president of Pra- 

• idential Relocation Services in Boulder, 
i ; Colorado. “Some doubters even go so far 

i ! as to say that it is all in the sufferer’s head. 
; -However, research indicates that expatri- 
: • ale failure rates in U.S. companies due to 

• .culture shock syndrome are commonly as 
, ‘hteh as 10 to 20 percent'* 

; ! Twith the cost of foreign assignments 
1 -steadily increasing, and with cross border 

• ! alteration continuing its upward trend, 
: ? companies are keen to ensure that their 
j Jt^nsferees adjust to the new work envi- 

• 'raiment as quickly as possible. Foreign 
; -service premiums and hardship allow- 

jahees continue to be paid, but these are 
j rincreasingly being supplemented with 

• | cross-cultural training courses. 

;. • ■ “The attitude of corporate America is 
;i 'gradually changing,” said a spokesman 
~ r I for International (Mentation : Resources 
“j ■ in Chicago, a relocation firm. “Companies 

■ ;aj£e acknowledging the fact that to operate 
: -competitively in today's global market, 

‘ ; employees have to be culturally sensitive 
» '.and flexible in their business dealings." 

- - Many expatriates will experience their 

taste of culture shock in the new job 
. -itself. Cultural induction courses, which 
typically last two to three days, emphasize 
!the importance of an open-minded atti- 
i ■ tude in the workplace. As well as provid- 
[ iirig information on the destination coun- 

- try, cultural trainers will also try- and make 

■ transferees aware of their own cultural 

• .baggage. 

, ; According to Polly Platt, manager of 

• ! Paris-based Culture Crossings, a consul- 

tancy for corporate transferees, the unpre- 
■_ pired transferee can inadvertently put up 

• Darners on the first day on the job. 

-“Anglo-Saxons are often perceived by 
;• tHe French as lacking basic manners sim- 
r pK because they forget, or are not aware, 
;that one should always shake hands with 
!*' (Hleagues on arriving at the office and on 
\ d^}arture, M saidMissPlatt,whoisalsothe 
j author of “French or Foe,” a witty and 
■ informative analysis of Franco — Anglo- 
Saxon communication. 

• But sometimes transferees can try loo 
1 jhjtrd to assimilate into the new culrure, 
added Miss Platt- She said she knew one 


bewildered transferee who, on realizing he 
had omitted the French handshaking ritu- 
al, immediately corrected hims elf. But in- 
stead of shaking hands when required, he 

insis ted on shaking hands with his col- 
leagues every time he happened to bump 
into them, be it at the photocopying ma- 
chine, the fax machine or in the board- 
room. His colleagues naturally assumed 
he had a very poor memory. 

Business methods and management 
styles are a constant source of stress and 
cultural discord among transferees and 
their hosts, say analysts. Miss Platt noted 
that Anglo-Saxons are often “fact and 
cash** orientated. 

“Goals and objectives must be reached 
by the quickest and most efficient route, 
and profit is invariably the motivating 
force/* she said. “By contrast, the French 
are suspicious of profit. They are much 
more influenced by notions of perfection 
and tend to think in terms of concepts." 

The pragmatic, short-term approach to 
business in Anglo-Saxon countries is- also 
out of sync with the way business is con- 
ducted in occidental countries and in Lat- 
in America, say experts. 

“In these countries, bonds must be 
formed and trust established before any 
business can be conducted,” said Mr. We- 
derspahn. “The Japanese frequently find 
Anglo-Saxons opportunistic and short- 
sighted in their business dealings, while 
Anglo-Saxons can quickly get discouraged 
with their apparent lack of progress.” 

Differences in business methods can 
strain relationships, but differences in 
management styles can lead to a loss in 
productivity. “In Indonesia, China, Japan 
and Latin America, subordinates expect 
to be given dear instructions and directed 
forcefully, otherwise they will sit back and 
do nothing,” said Dean Foster, director of 
cross-cultural training for Berlitz, known 
chiefly for its foreign-language training 
programs. 

“Managers in the U.S., however, expect 
staff to take the initiative. Brainstorming 
and teamwork, which is anathema to 
many cultures, is an integral pan of the 
American management philosophy." 

There are occasional assignments where 
the unexpected happens and even human 
resource managers are caught unaware. For 
example, Prudential Relocation was recent- 
ly commissioned by a leading U.S. telecom- 
munications company to study the special 
problems that female managers might en- 
counter On tr ansf errin g to Japan. 

“There were problems, but not exactly 
the sort we anticipated,” said Mr. Weder- 
spahn. “It was assumed that women 


would expedience difficulties being ac- 
cepted by Japanese workers. However, 
women managers were actually held in 
higher esteem than their male' counter- 
parts. This is because powerful women are 
still something of an oddity in Japan. The 
Japanese presume that they must be very 
special indeed to merit such a high rank." 

Prudential Relocation found that the 
main problem for female managers was 
adapting to Japanese business methods. 
“Business often takes place in the evening 
and in social settings such as restaurants, 
kareoke clubs and geisha bars." said Mr. 
Wederspahn- “As it is not always accept- 
able or possible for a woman to take part 
in these business get-togethers, she will 
have to discover other ways of gaining 
access to Japanese business'rirdesT” 

One of the greatest challenges facing 
human resource managers is to help the 
'trailing spouse* — usually the female 
partner in a relationship — assimilate into 
the new culture. Rita Bennett, director of 
Bennett Associates, an international relo- 
cation consultancy specializing in cross- 
cultural training, rioted that while the hus- 
band is typically offered some form of 
moral support in the new office, the wife is 
often left to face linguistic and lifestyle 
barriers as well as differences in values 
and perceptions completely alone. 

“An unhappy partner can put an intol- 
erable strain on foreign assignments," she 
said. “Confronted with the realization 
that a cup of coffee and a good cry are not 
viable solutions to career and lifestyle dis- 
ruption. companies are starting to design 
programs to help the accompanying 
spouse.” 

Miss Bennett said that pan of the an- 
swer may lie in better candidate/ spouse 
assessment and selection, as the partner s 
opinions and concerns are often mini- 
mized in the selection process. A few per- 
tinent questions at the outset, she said, 
may be all that is required. 

Bell Atlantic, the U.S. telecommunica- 
tions company, has been sending transfer- 
ees and (heir families on cross cultural 
training courses since 1991. “Many com- 
panies are still hesitant about allocating 
resources to cultural training because the 
results are not always apparent and easily 
measured,” said a company spokesman. 
“However, we have found that recent 
transferees who received training adapted 
to the new culture and became productive 
in a shorter time span than those who were 
transferred before 1991. 

“We now have fewer failed assignments 
and our transferees generally stay on as- 
signment longer." 


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Navigating the Do-It-Yourself Move Minefield 


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By Michael D. McNidkle 

ARIAN Balladin 
was livid. Eleven 
months ago. she 
selected a compa- 
ny out of the Yellow Pages to 
move herself and her family 
fr$m New York to the Caribbe- 
an. Today, she says, despite the 
payment' of thousands of dol- 
lars, her furniture and virtually 
all of her possessions are being 
“held for ransom" by shippers. 
; -“Everything I own is sitting 
in' a container,*’ Miss Balladin 
said, adding that the problem 
arose when the relocation bro- 
ker she hired failed to pay the 
full amount to the firm that 
actually did the shipping. As a 
result, she’s been asked to pay 
an additional SS,000 to get her 
property back. 

” Problems such as Miss Balla- 
din’s can cause nightmares for 
relocating executives and man- 
agers whose companies leave the 
responsibility for the moving 
orocess on their shoulders alone. 
& Agencies who police the in- 
dustry are careful to point out 
that while the majority of mov- 
ing companies are legitimate 
and reputable, there are a sig- 
nificant number that are not. 

“Lots of things can go wrong, 
and there are a lot of fairly 
unreliable operators in. this 
business," said Joseph T. Far- 
rell, director of the U.S. Federal 
Maritime Commission's Office 
of Informal Inquiries and Com- 
plaints. which has jursidiction 


over international moving com- 
panies. 

“People make the mistake of 
looking in the Yellow Pages un- 
der movers, calling up a bunch 
of them and picking the one 
who is charging about one-third 
of what everybody else is charg- 
ing,” said Mr. Farrell. “There’s 
usually a pretty good reason 
why they’re doing that — you 
kind of get whaL you pay for." 

A common problem, Mr. 
Farrell said, is consumers fre- 
quently don’t scrutinize the 
terms of the deals they sign with 
shippers. u People often don’t 
get a clear idea of what the 
estimate they’re getting covers,” 
he said. “They might think that 
it covers everything, but it turns 
out. for example, it only covers 
shipment to a foreign port, then 
you’ve got to arrange move- 
ment from the port to your red- 
deuce. packing fees and every- 
thing else,” 

Marc Wurzel, an attorney at 
the New York City Consumer 
Affairs Department said that 
consumers need to declare val- 
ues if they have certain priceless 
items. Without a detailed inven- 
tory and valuation, he noted, 
executives will have a hard time 
insuring the goods or gaining 
compensation on any damage. 

A common scam, say ana- 
lysts, is that of moving firms 
offering to provide insurance 
for customers. For example, the 
firm might charge an extra $20 
per thousand pounds moved. 
The problem is that the insur- 
ance policy may be fictitious. 


The consumer can thus be 
cheated twice: once for the non- 
existent cover, and again if 
there is any significant damage 
to goods. 

Analysts say that people who 
are relocating should verify any 
policies purchased through 
movers with the insurance com- 
pany itself, or simply buy the 
insurance independently. 

Linda Mitchler, a transporta- 
tion industry analyst for the In- 
terstate Commerce Commis- 
sion in Washington, D.C., said 
consumers should pay particu- 
lar attention to whether a mov- 
ing company is licensed, and 
whether there have been an un- 
usually large number of com- 
plaints filed wilh regulatory 
agencies such as the I.C.C.. 


N ioibc Akfu*IHT 


By Robert C Siner 

BROAD new rule aimed at 
stopping abusive tax practices 
by partnerships is likely to cause 
new headaches for Americans 
overseas doing business under the part- 
nership rules, tax experts say. 

Last May the Internal Revenue Service 
proposed regulations targeting partner- 
ships formed with the “principal purpose 
of reducing the partners^federal tar. liabil- 
ity in a manner inconsistent with the in- 
tent” of the partnership rules. “In such a 
case," read the rules, “even if the partners 
comply with the literal language of ..the 
code, the Commissioner can recast the 
transactions for federal tax purposes as 
appropriate.” 

According to the IRS, these proposed 
regulations should become law by the end 
of year, although the final form in which 
they emerge is still open to modification. 

The basic idea, however, which is likely 
to remain intact, would allow the IRS, if it 
decides that a partnership has been set up 
mainly to avoid taxes, to declare that a 
business is not a partnership but a corpo- 
ration or some other business entity which 
is susceptible to substantial additional 
taxes and penalties. 

This development has alarmed lawyers, 
accountants and others who do business 
in partnership form. They argue that the 
rule is so broad that almost any partner- 
ship could fall within its scope. And tax 
practitioners warn that the rule is so vague 
that it is impossible to tell what is abusive 
and what is not. 

Not so, says Paul Kugler, IRS Assistant 
Chief Counsel for Passthroughs and Spe- 
cial Industries and one of the authors of 
the new regulation. “We certainly don't 
intend to undercut businesses using the 
partnership form,” he said. 

. Mr. Kugler said that the new rules are 
anaJagous in some ways to those dealing 
specifically with real estate partnerships 
that are not set up for the legitimate busi- 
ness purpose of running a shopping cen- 


ter, or hotel or apartment complex. In the 
1980s, many such entities were set up to 
reap the tax benefits of the investment, 
then dissolved after the benefits ran out. 

Mr. Kugler said that the IRS had in- 
creasing anecdotal evidence that abusive 
partnership was on the rise again, not so 
much involving individuals, as in the real 
estate deals, but involving large corpora- 
tions. 

Mr. Kugler said that under the new rule, 
a partnership agreement formed to cany 
on a legitimate business would have no 
trouble, “and if there are tax benefits, 
that's fine." But a partnership that is 
drawn up or revised to avoid taxes, he 
said, would be at risk. 

But Clint Stretch, a senior tax specialist 
at the global auditing and tax consulting 
firm Deloitte & Touche, said that this type 
of “common law” doctrine could cause 
major problems for Americans overseas 
who are members of foreign partnerships. 
He explained that there was no foreign lax 
system he knew of that had this type of 
rule, and that under tax laws in other 
countries, you're safe so long as you fol- 
low the letter of the law. 

Thus, an American partner in a foreign 
firm that restructures itself to avoid taxes 
could be in compliance with the law of his 
counuy of residence, but in violation of 
the new U.S. rule. The result could be a 
hefty tax bill from Uncle Sam. Plus, if the 
j'ynerican tried to explain his problem to 
his foreign partners “they wouldn't know 
what he was talking about." said Mr. 
Stretch. 

Moreover. Mr. Stretch and other tax 
experts pointed out that most partner- 
ships are established because of the lav 
benefits. Why? Because a partnership is 
not taxed itself: instead, any profits and 
losses are passed through to the individual 
partners and taxed on their personal re- 
turns. A corporation, on the other hand, 
has to pay taxes itself. It can deduct loses 
but its shareholders cannot. 

The new rule could have a “chilling 
effea” on partnerships, according to Mr. 


Stretch. He said that IRS agents could 
possibly use the new rule as "an implied 
threat' 

Mr. Kugler, meanwhile, said he was 
sympathetic to the concerns of the lax 
practitioners and those in partnerships. 
“We understand where they're coming 
from" he said. “We're mainly after a few 
big players" who “lake the partnership 
rule turn it inside out and try to rip off the 
system.” He conceded, however, that the 
line dividing legitimate from abusive part- 
nerships might be very hard to draw . 

The obvious abuses involve setting up 
partnerships that channel income to one 
of the partners, which is usually Itself a 
corporation that has losses to offset them. 
Conversely, losses can be channeled to 
partners who need them to offset profits. 

Less obvious abuses involve multiple 
deductions of the same loss. Since there 
are times when these are legitimate, Mr. 
Kugler said, each determination would 
depend on the facts and circumstances of 
each individual case. 

Other abuses can involve manipulation 
of ‘phantom income’ (income that is tax- 
able, but produces no increase in the part- 
ners' net worth;. 

Mr. Kugler said that a special IRS task 
force was working to identify specific cir- 
cumstances where the new rule would ap- 
ply so that field agents would know when 
the rule should be invoked. He expressed 
the hope that this work and the final 
version of the regulations would be com- 
pleted by the end of the year. 

Mr. Stretch, however, remained uncon- 
vinced. He said that from the IRS's point 
of view, it would be best to “let things 
fester" as long as possible. The way it is 
now, he explained, people are being very 
careful — not even taxing some legitimate 
losses — because they just don ? t know 
exactly what the IRS is going to do. 


The Money Report is edited by 
Martin Baker 


BRIEFCASE 


Midland’s Guaranteed Fund 
Has Attracted $57 Million 

Nothing succeeds like success. That, 
more or less, is the message emanating 
from Midland Bank international, part of 
the HSBC group. Midland’s launch of a 
multi-currency guaranteed fund this sum- 
mer attracted around SS7 million, and the 
bank plans to launch another product, the 
fifth in a series, in November. 

The formula for the products is to offer 
a guarantee of capital return and the pos- 
sibility of profit if the markets move fa- 
vorably. This summer’s investors had the 
choice of investing in U.S. dollars or Brit- 
ish pounds. 

Those who were prepared to make a 
five-year commitment will receive 120 
percent of the growth in the S&P 500 share 
index, or 120 percent of the growth in the 
FT-SE 100 index of U.K. shares. 

Alternatively, if investors were pre- 
pared to commit capital for just three 
years, they will receive a similar capital 
guarantee and the promise of 100 percent 
of any gain in the respective indexes. Nat- 
urally, the guarantee aspect is only rele- 
vant if the indexes should fall over the 
investment periods. 


States 

of 

jersey 


Bank Deposits in Jersey 
Show Mild Quarterly Gain 

The amount of money managed in mu- 
tual funds in ihc British Channel Islands is 
slightly down, as reported last week, but 
bank deposits are strong. The financial 
services department of the island of Jersey 
reports a 1 .5 percent rise in deposits to just 
under £59 billion i$8S billion) for the last 
quarter. Nearly two thirds of the deposits 
held on the island are denominated in 
cun-encies other than British pounds. 

Guernsey Thrift Society 
Opens Hong Kong Office 

A contributing factor to the Channel 
Islands' continuing financial health is the 
opening of a Hong Kong office by a major 
U.K. thrift society based in the other ma- 
jor Channel Island, Guernsey. 


Woolwich Guernsey is hoping to attract 
expatriate money into dollar- and sterling- 
denominated accounts. The top interest 
rate on the dollar l<. :ount is 4.25 percent, 
while the best yield for sterling deposits is 
7 percent. 

A fast currency exchange facility for 
those seeking to make deposits in curren- 
cies other than dollars or sterling is also 
planned. 

Fund Association Offers 
Impartial Words of Wisdom 

The Association or Uiut Trusts and 
Investment Funds, the representative 
body of the U.K. mutual fund industry, 
has published a new fact sheet on emerg- 
ing-market funds. For more information, 
write AUTIF, 65 Kingswav. London 
WC2B 6TD, or call (44.81) 207.1361. 


In next week's Money Report; Interna- 
tional small companies. The major argu- 
ments for and against investing, best find 
managers, small company indexes, and 
small companies as long-term, retirement 
investments. 


Currencies Can Create Expatriate Tax Problems 


By Headier Timms 


M 


which has jurisdiction over in- 
terstate moves. 

Some of the large companies 
which the I.C.C. regulates, 
moreover, are also international 
movers. By checking their do- 
mestic record, consumers may 
be able to gel some sense of how 
they will perform in an overseas 
move. 

The size of the firm retained 
can also be critical in overseas 
moves, sa> analysis. With 
smaller undercapitalized firms, 
there's always the chance that 
the moving company will fold 
or experience financial difficul- 
ties. Companies unable to meet _ 
their financial obligations can ! 
wind up having customers’ 
property frozen in transit until 
debts can be sorted out. 


OVE across inter- 
national borders 
and. like it or not, 
you become a 
player on the foreign ex- 
changes. Of course, foreign cur- 
rency gain or loss is more usual- 
ly thought of in connection with 
futures and option exchanges 
and large investment funds in- 
vesting in option and hedge 
strategies. 

But the rationale for their in- 
volvement is to protect the val- 
ue of their assets against other 
currencies. In microcosm, this 
occurs in many seemingly less 
complicated situations incurred 
by individuals. 

For the expatriate communi- 
ty. there are many events that 
can result in fordgn currency 
gain or loss. 

An example could be the sale 
of a residence located in the 
country where the expatriate re- 
sides — not the country of his 
nationality. Another instance 
could involve the sale of securi- 
ties which are denominated in a 
currency different from the one 
in which the expatriate usually 
works. 

The real estate example is in- 
structive. Upon the sale of a 
residence, one reasonably ex- 


pects to realize a gain or loss on 
that sale. What one does not 
usually expect is an element of 
foreign currency gain or loss 
that goes along with that sale. 

Moreover, because it is one 
of the certainties of life, there 
will also be tax consequences 
relating to that gain or loss. 

For example, a U.S. citizen 
Living in France who purchases 
a home in France will recognize 
a foreign currency gain or loss 
upon the sale of that home, 
why? Because of the difference 
in the exchange rate between 
the U.S. dollar and the French 
franc on the date of purchase 
and the date of sale. 

This is perhaps best illustrat- 
ed by a simple example. As- 
sume that a house was pur- 
chased in 1985 for a purchase 
price of 1,050,000 French 
francs. Given that the exchange 
rate at the time was approxi- 


mately 8.06 francs to the dollar, 
the dollar price would be 
SI 30,273. 

Assume also that the house 
was sold in 1994 for 1,050,000 
francs, and that the applicable 
exchange rate was 5.4 francs to 
the dollar. The sale price in dol- 
lars would be 5194,444. 

The difference between the 
U.S. dollar bases provides the 
foreign exchange gain that 
would be realized, which is 
$64,171. 

Even though there was no 
gain on the sale in terms of 
French francs, there would be a 
gain recognized because the val- 
ue of the dollar had decreased. 

It would also be possible to 
incur a loss in terms of French 
francs on the sale, yet still make 
a foreign currency' gain. 

In some instances, the identi- 
fication of foreign currency 
gain or loss will only reclassify 


the character ol a portion of the 
resulting economic gain or loss, 
such as whether it is capital or 
ordinary in nature. Ln the worst 
of situations, the taxes owed 
due to an underlying gain in the 
value of an asset could not be 
offset by a loss realized in the 
movement of the applicable ex- 
change rale. 

Thus, as if the uncertainty of 
finding a buyer at an acceptable 
price for a home or deciding 
when a security has reached its 
peak were nol enough, expatri- 
ates must also consider foreign 
cuiTency exchange risk. And 
while the measurement of that 
gain or loss is important, the 
taxation of that gain or loss is 
just as important. 

HEATHER TIMMS is a 
principal in the Paris office of 
Arthur Andersen’s International 
Executive Services group. 



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SPORTS 


Steeler Offense 
Puts Cowboys 
On the Defensive 

The Associated Press 

PITTSBURGH — The Dallas Cowboys know what’s coming: 
all 218 pounds of Barry Foster right down the middle of their 
rebuilt defense, relentlessly, ceaselessly, until they stop him. If 
they ever do. 

Play after play, quarter after quarter then'll see it Sunday: No. 
29 off-tackle left. No. 29 off-tackle right, No. 29 straight up the 
gut behind All-Pro center Dermontti Dawson. 

There are no secrets about the Pittsburgh SteeLers' battering ram 
of an offense and no secret weapons. They’ve been waiting months 
to unleash a healthy Foster for four quarters, and they plan to do 
exactly that against the two-time defending Super Bowl champions. 

Ana if Foster gets tired or needs a few plays off, they’ll throw in 
rookie Bam Morris, their top exhibition rusher. 

First ram, then Bam. 

“We can't let them control our defense with their running 
game,” the Cowboys’ coach, Barry Switzer, said. 

“There’s nothing in the world I love more on the sideline than 
seeing Russell Maryland and Charles Haley and Tony Tolbert 
sitting there on the botch, resting, while our offense is eating the 
dock up. Pittsburgh will try to ao that to us." 

Perhaps the only thing Foster dislikes more than a pack of 
blitzing linebackers on a third-down draw is a pack of reporters, 
and he usually dodges the Pittsburgh media as effectively as he 
does a tentative comerback. Just as his powerful, unyielding 
running punishes defenses, Foster himself sometimes takes batter- 
ing from the media for his unfriendly behavior. 

What Foster has said so far about his surgically repaired ankle has 

Sojcareful to^^rotect^to^aturc bacif for the grindtf the 16- 
game regular season, the Stealers' coach. Bill Cowher, gave him 
the ball only 21 times in three exhibitions. 

“We feel good about where Barry’s at,” Cowher said. 

Right now, that’s back on the field, ready to play Sunday 
against the team he watched as a youngster. It's a big game, not 
only because it matches the National Football League's two top 
rushers in 1992 — Emmi tr Smith and Foster — but also because 
all the folks back in Foster’s hometown of Duncanville, Texas, 
will be watching. 

“I’m getting pumped up just because it's Game 1,’’ Foster said 
“I want to go out and set the tempo for the rest of the season for 
the team and myself.” 

Beating the two-time defending Super Bowl champion Cowboys 
would set a positive tone for the Steelers, but keeping Foster healthy 
and productive would be even more important Foster, the AFCs 
top rusher with 1,690 yards in 1992, was again gaining nearly 100 
yards per game when he was hurt midway through last season. 

How much did Foster’s injury hurt? The Steelers were 6-3 with 
Foster playing and 3-5 without him. 





New Player in Strike Talks ? 

New York Times Service 

_ NEW YORK — Bud Selig, baseball's acting commissioner, 
hints that he may soon directly enter the negotiations with the 
players in an effort to end the three-week-old strike. In a 
telephone interview late this week, Selig was asked if he 
thought it was time for him to meet with Donald Fehr, the 
players’ labor leader. “My only response," he replied “is 
that's a very good question.” 

Until now, Selig, owner of the Milwaukee Brewers, has 
chosen to remain away from the bargaining table, consulting 
long-distance with Richard Ravitch, the clubs’ chief labor 
executive; the council the owners' labor relations committee, 
which he also heads, and the owners generally. He deliberately 
did not name hims elf to a group of 12 owners and other club 
executives who met with players at the bargaining table over 
two days last week in the most recent bargaining sessions. 


Jets and Bills: Will Kelly Make It IT: 


filial 

Thom Baur/Tbc Anodsied Press 


Miami Dolphins’ linebacker Chuck Bollough, getting 
ready for action in Sunday’s game against New England. 


New York Times Service 

Sunday Games 

N.Y. JETS ax BUFFALO: KEY STAT: 
Jets kicker Nick Lowery has missed just 
four PATs in his career (4S6-of-490). Bills 
quarterback Jim Kelly is 10-1 against the 
Jets since 1988. 

COMMENT: Instead of waiting to see 
how they measure up in their division and 
in the AFC, the Jets will get an idea right 
away. Jets quarterback Boomer Esiason 
had an awful preseason. All the Bills are on 
deck for another run at the Super Bowl 

ATLANTA at DETROIT: KEY STAT: 
Falcons quarterback Jeff George has com- 
pleted 202 passes without an interception. 
Lions punter Greg Montgomery led the 
league with a 45.6 yards per punt average 
last season. 

COMMENT: Both teams have new 
quarterbacks (Scott Mitchell for the Li- 
ons). Both teams have big play receivers — 
Andre Risen for the Falcons and Herman 
Moore for the Lions. But there's only one 
Barry Sanders, and he plays for Detroit. 

PHILADELPHIA at GIANTS: KEY 
STAT: Giants quarterback Dave Brown 
has thrown just seven passes in three years 
in the NFL. Eagles comerback Eric Allen 
returned four of his six interceptions for 
touchdowns last year. 

COMMENT: The Giants’ coach, Dan 
Reeves, shook up his defense a week before 
the season opener. It's the kind of move 
some coaches would make after two pre- 
season games. The Eagles have to wonder 
whether the elbow of quarterback Randall 
Cun ningha m’s throwing arm is all right. 

CLEVELAND at CINCINNATI: KEY 
STAT; Browns quarterback Vinny Testa- 
verde posted the highest quarterback rat- 
ing of his career (85.7) last season. Bengals 
quarterback David Klinger rushed for 2S2 
yards last year. COMMENT: A great 
early test for the Bengals, because it's one 
of their most heated rivalries. It should be 
a big game for Cincinnati’s front four, 
anchored by two first-round picks, tackle 
Dan Wilkinson and end Danny Copeland. 

HOUSTON at INDIANAPOLIS: KEY 
STAT: Houston quarterback Cody Carl- 
son has a .714 winnin g percentage (10-4) as 
a starter. Colts quarterback Jim Harbaugh 
is 35-30 as a starter. 

COMMENT: Carlson has watched 
Warren Moon run this offense for many 
years, and now it’s his turn. He should be 


just fine. The Oilers defense will miss pass 
rushers William Fuller and Sean Jones.' 

KANSAS CITY at NEW ORLEANS: 
KEY STAT: Saints defensive end Reyn- 
aldo Turnbull led the NFC with 13 sacks 
last season. Chiefs quarterback Joe Mon- 
tana is 14-2 against the Saints and leads 
active quarterbacks with a .718 winning 
percentage. 

COMMENT: It’s early, and Montana 
looks sharp. The Saints nave a new quar- 
terback in Jim Everett, but basically 
they’re running the same old offense. 

MINNESOTA at GREEN BAY: KEY 
STAT: Vikings quarterback Warren Moon 

NFL MATCHUPS 

has completed 62 percent of his passes 
since 1990. Green Bay kicker Chris Jacke 
has not missed a PAT since opening day 
1990 (121 in a row). 

COMMENT: The Vikings had the No. 1 
ranked defense in the league, and the Pack- 
ers were ranked No. 2 last year. There have 
been some shake-ups on both teams, but 
Green Bay came out ahead with the addi- 
tion of defensive end Jones from the Oil- 1 
ers. 

SEATTLE at WASHINGTON: KEY 
STAT: Seattle quarterback Rick Mirer set 
NFL rookie records in attempts (486), 
completions (274) and yards (2,833) last 
season. 

COMMENT: Redskins quarterback 
John Friesz did not have a ste rling presea- 
son. But neither did any of the other Wash- 
ington. quarterbacks. Washington is still 
going to make its fortune on the ground, 
with Brooks leading the pack. 

TAMPA BAY at CHICAGO: KEY 
STAT: Bucs quarterback Craig Erickson 
completed 72.9 percent of his passes in the 
preseason. Chicago punter Chris Gardodd 
put 28 punts inside the opponents 20-yard- 
line last season. 

COMMENT: The Bears get to display 
all the new offensive toys they splurged on 
during free agency. Running back Lewis 
Tillman, a former Giant, should shine 
brightest. 

ARIZONA at LA. RAMS: KEY STAT: 
The Cardinals have won the last four 
straight against the Rams. Los Angeles 
r unning back Jerome Bettis rushed for 
1,429 yards as a rookie last year. 

COMMENT: We Finally get to see the 


unveiling of Buddy Ryan’s “46" Desfe 
Storm defense. Let’s see how they are 
against a tank Uke Bettis. 

DALLAS at PITTSBURGH: KEY 
STAT: Dallas has the NFC’s best record 
a gains t AFC opponents (5 1-29). The Steel- 
ers have won their last three games agaiftst 
Dallas. ' 

COMMENT: A marquee matchup Jjje- 
tween two of the best pure running backs 
in the game — Pittsburgh’s Barry Foster 
and Emxnitt Smith of the Cowboys. Before 
the day is over, both could have 100-pfiis 
yards rushing. I- 

NEW ENGLAND at MIAMI: KEY 
STAT: The Patriots' offensive line gave-ftp 
just three sacks in the preseason. MUohi 
quarterback Dan Marino needs only tvro 
touchdown passes to become the second 
NFL quartoback (Fran Taikemon is tile 
first) with 300 or more touchdown passes. 

COMMENT: New England quarter- 
back Drew Bledsoe threw for a season ~ 

329 yards and four touchdowns against 
Dolphins last season. This will be a ; 
yardstick for the Patriots to measure 
much progress they’ve made since last sea- 
son. a£. 

SAN DIEGO at DENVER: KEY 
STAT: The Chargers’ Ronnie Harman his 
led all NFL running backs in receptions 
over the last two seasons with 152. Over 
the last 10 years, the Broncos have had the 
best home winning percentage (.750)-of 
any team in the NFL. 

COMMENT: Denver quarterback Jqhn 



* ^ 
■y •. • 


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r » ' : 


V . • 

k* ■, • 

\ m m * 
v , -■ , 

, r m m " ■* 

■’*. v ■*' 


■ _ \'.- 
- *' 


Elway led the league in attempts (551), 
completions (348), yards (4,0; 
touche 


s. - 

V 


completions (348), yards (4,030) and 
ldown passes (25) last season, and he 
didn't have receiver Anthony Milica: -Jo 
throw to. Li 

Monday Night Game 
LA. RAIDERS at SAN FRANCISCO: ' 

KEY STAT. Raidas quarterback Jeff * ' - 
Hostetler’s 13.8 yards per pass led t^e 
NFL last season. The 49ers led the league * 
in scoring with 473 points. ... 

COMMENT: The Raiders have some vay . . . 
fast receivers, and 49ers quarterback Steve . 

Young isn’t averse to tucking the ball afrd ■-f .. 1 
running when the mood strikes him. Seine 
people think this could be a sneak preview 
of the Super Bowl. It should be entertain- s - “ \ 
ing. ‘ ' I , ; 

These maukups were written by Timotfty ‘ v 
W. Smith of The New York Times. ;- "V 


SCOREBOARD 


TENNIS 


U.S.Optwi 


Mm* SIMM 
Second Round 

Thomas Muster (13), Austria, dot. Maurice 
Ruoh, Venezuela. 64,44,6-4.6-2; Marc Roaset 
U5), SwHurlantL dnf. Nicklas KuHl Sweden, 
64. 62. 6-7 (7*D, 6-2; Richey Renebera, US. 
dot. Jardl Burlllo, Spain M. 7-5. 4-3; Patrick 
Rafter, Australia, oof. JmApoB. Sweden, 7-5, 
4-4. 7-4 (13-10). M; Todd Marlin (f), 

Andrei Omnakov, Russia 4-1 6-1 7-5; Mor- 
kusZoecke,Germany,<tof. Rabble Wetss.UA, 

6- 1,7-5.62; Rkhord Frwnbera. Australia. (ML 
Ranald Aoanor. Haiti, 6-1 61 64. 

Serai Bniguera (3), Spain. dsL Andrei Ol- 
hovsXlv. Russia 7-5. 62, 7-6 (7-5); Thomas 
Bnavtst, Sweden, daf. Hendrik Draefeman, 
G erma n y. 7-6 CM), 7-6 (7-2), 6-7 (7-4), 7-6; 
Marc Gootinsr, Cjermcnv, del. Tomas Corbon- 
•II. Santa. 7-6 (74), 32. rat. Gtontoca Pood. 
Italy, del AmasManedarf, Israel, 44, 74, 34. 

7- 5. 6-3; Wayna Ferreira 02). South Africa 
def.Morceio RhM, Chile, 6-4, 6-2. 6-4; Andrt 
AoassL U.S»def. Guy Forovt, Prone*, 6-3, 7-5. 
6-7 (7-5). 4-X 

WOmen’l SIMM 

SccomI RP U ffti 

Steffi Graf (1), Germany, def. Sandra cade 
U-S.62.6J; Undsay Davenport (6), U-S.d*f. 
Pom 5h river, 110,6-1,6-3; I vaMoloH, Croatia 
deLEIno Retaadv South Aft 1 lca44^-2; Patri- 
cia Hv, Canada, del Angelica Gavatoam Mex- 
ico. 6a 6-3; Shaun Stafford. UJL dtf. Undo 
Harv*y-wna US. 6a 6-7 (7-3), 62; Radka 
Bobfcovo. Cwcti Republic dot. Nicola 
Bradfka Australia 6-7 (7-3). M 62; 

Mano Enda Japan, dal. Julia Haiora 
Franca 6-1, 7-S; Anna Smoahnova I stoat daf. 
Nlcsfa MumHWaannan, Nomartandadasa 
62; Jana Novotna (7). Ciach Raaublla <M. 


Karina Hatsudova, Slovakia 62, 62; Mar- 
taan da Smo rdf. South Africa dot Marianne 
Wsrdai, UX. 64.26, 7-6 (13-11); MOBdafana 
Maleeva (15), Bulgaria, daf. Rwandra Dra- 
uomlr, Romania 7-5, 6-3; Mary Plaro* (4), 
Franca daf.KatartnaStudanlkavaCxtcti Re- 
puB0aM,MM. 


outs and 30 stolen Maes In 41 attempts. He has 
212 patauts, six assists and 11 errors In the 
oufflcM. 


BASEBALL 


J ap a n — L e pgu eB 


Central Unaae 


nssm 

Major Collage Scores 

■AST 

Now Haven 38. Bloomsbuni 6 
SOUTH 

Artama 19. Gvnmkt Tact; u 
Austin Peay 62. Kentucky Westoyon 7 


Group B: l, Kevin McMahon. UX. 339^2; Z 
Edwin Jonoei ans. Netherlands. 33128; 1 
Dmitry Soutla Russia 315.54; 4. Andrei Kous- 
lov, Russia 311 JM 

SamHlMls 

Oraa* A: 1. Brhm Earley. 34M6 points Z 
Barrb Lietxow, Garmairv. 363J)3 ; x Fernando 
Plates. 35146; 4. Haisar Schlepps. Germany, 
347.88 

Oram B: 1, Lai WeL China 361^4; Z Evan 
Stewart, Zimbabwe, 35442; X Kevin McMa- 
hon, 347 JB; *, Edwin Jansalara. 344J4 
Ftaal 

1. Stewart 382.14; Z Lon WeL 175.1 B; X Ear- 
lay 3613V; 4, Lkrfmw 35146 



W 

L 

T 

Pet 

GB 

E. Tennessee SL 42. Catawba 0 

WATER POLO 

Yamluri 

62 

SO 

0 

.534 

_ 

N_ Carpi tea SL 2ft Bawling Green 15 

Wothfla 

Hiroshima 

58 

52 

0 

SO 

3 

TemeeaM Tec* 27, Lock Haven 0 

Oraup A 

Chunktu 

55 

55 

0 

J00 

6 

W. Carolina 2X Lmair-Rnyne 14 

Russia 7. Netherlands 6 

HaraMn 

55 

57 

0 

-4»1 

7 

W. Kentucky 24, E. Kentucky 21 

Franca IX Brasil 9 

Yakutt 

51 

57 

0 

jtn 

9 

MIDWEST 

Hungary 13. France 7 

Yokohama 

49 

59 

0 

A54 

11 

Murray St. 3l B. Illinois 15 

Oraup B 

Fridays Resalts 
Honshln X Yomluri 2 
Hlrasfitma X Yakutt 5 

Pacific League 
W L T 

Pet 

GB 

Oklahoma St. 31 N. Illinois 14 

SE Missouri 3X Kentucky SL 6 

Stephen F. Austin IX Youngstown Si ID. tie 
W. Illinois 42. Iowa westevan 0 

WMhlnuton «. ia Illinois 9 

Australia TX Germany 8 

United States TX Kazakhstan 5 

Italy IX New Zealand 2 

Men 

PraBminary Round 

Orix 

59 

46 

2 

-M2 



SOUTHWEST 

Grow A 

Selbo 

61 

41 

0 

MO 

— 

Kansas 35, Houston 13 

United States 9 Romania 7 

Kintetsu 

59 

47 

2 

-557 

ft 

North Texas « Abilene Christian 0 

Group B 

Oolel 

57 

51 

1 

J2M 

3ft 

Taxes AAM- Kingsville 45, SW Texas 51. 14 

Australia 38 New Zealand 4 

Latte 

Niuean Ham 

45 

40 

63 

66 

1 

4 

A17 

30 

15ft 

Wft 




OOk X Selbu 6. TO Innlnm 

The Michael Jordan Watch 

THURSDAY* GAME: Jordon went 04OT-X 
whti two stri keoutg a mlk In a V-3 loss to 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan Is battlnu JOS 

(■Mor -432) with 4* runs. T7 double*, one Mote, 
three home rum. 51 RSIs. 51 walks. 112 strlke- 


I t. 




World Swim Champtonshlpa 

OIVINO 

Mon* 1. M eter Springboard 
Quarterfinals 

■map A: \ Fernanda Plates. Monica 344.14 
points; Z Brian Eartav, UA, 336J0; XOwn 
Shots, China 32541; 4, Alexei Kogalev, Bal- 
ohim. 3082V 


BASEBALL 
AlMffcm LfiDMV 

NEW YORK— Acwi rod Scott Bankhead, 
pitcher, from Baaton for a playar to be named 
later and an undisclosed amount of cash. 
Traded Paul Gibson, pitcher, to Milwaukee 
for a ptayar to be named later. 

TEXAS— Read led David Hulse. outfielder, 
from Oklahoma Qtv.AA. Bought contract at 


Rob Oucey, outfielder, from Oklahoma City. 
Natlmal lmsm 

CHICAGO— Recalled Steve TroetwH, 
Pitcher, from Iowa, AA. 

PITTSBURGH— Recalled Randy Tomlin, 
pitcher, ham Bufta to. AA and nut him m the 
15-day dlsabtad list 

BASKETBALL 

Natkwal Basketball Asso cia t ion 

DETROIT— Named K.C Janes assistant 
coach. 

UTAH— Stoned Brvon Russell forward- 
POOTBALL 

Notional Football League 

CLEVELAND— Signed Mike Bedasky, 
ward. Waived Patr Wt Newman, wide receiv- 
er. 

INDIANAPOLIS— Stoned Loace Telctiet- 
mabdetenstvelinemaband Mike Cook, wide 
racalvar, to the practice squad. 

N.Y. GIANTS— Waived Keith Crawford. 
G«y Marroll and Eric WWr. wide rocetvcn; 
Milton Jones and Leonora Roy, detenstve 
ends; tvary Dillard, tackle; Tammy Thigpen, 
Shawn Smith and Pete siwfelt. linebackers, 
and Darron Rease#guard.CtoimedPateStw- 
fett, linebacker, off waivers ham Kansas City. 
Signed DavW Treadwell, kicker. Stoned 
Garry Harrefl, wide recto ver; Milton janes, 
defensive end; and Pete Shutolt. linebacker, 
la the practice squad. 

N.Y. JET S - P erry William* comerback. 
retired. Waived Kyle Adame and Terrence 
Wisdom, guards; Rob Davis, center -guard ; 
DavW McLeod and Alan Allan, wWe receiv- 
ers; Paul Burke, tight and; Lindsay Chap- 
nenrannlna back; Gary Bcckferd and Cecil 
Doggette, defensive backs; LavarBaLdetan- 
slve enCMlght end, Tony Meala. kicker; Harris 
Morris, rtrafaadcer; Jeff Blake, quarte r bac k ; 
Fred Lestar.fuHbadu and Chico Nelson, safe- 
ty. Put Tory Johnson, linebacker, an Injured 
reserve. Reached Injury settlement with De- 
mon PJerL safety. Waived Pat Chaffer, toll- 


bock. and Tulnaau Alloata and Mike Ander- 
son, linebackers end David ware, guard. 
Stoned Clifford Hicks, defensive back. Stoned 
Chico Nelson, defensive back. Tubieau Alipfe, 
linebacker, and Terrence Wisdom, guard, to 
the practice sauod. 

PHILADELPHIA— Waived Bruce Walker, 
defensive tackle; Joey Hickey, ttoht end; 
Erlc Floyd, ward; Tam Garflck, wide receiv- 
er; Marian Thomas and Al Wooten, running 
bodes; Jack Jones, linebacker; Thao Adatnx 
offensive lineman, and Jimmy Smith, wide 
receiver-kick returner. Put Corey Boro low, 
linebacker, on Inlurod reserve. Claimed Mike 
Finn, offensive lineman, off waivers from 
PlttsburatLClaimed Rickie Shaw, tackle, off 
waivers from Seattle. Released Kan Rose, 
llnebocker. Stoned Ken Rose, linebacker. 

PITTSBURGH— Stoned Thn McKver. de- 
fensive back. Waived Ricky Sutton, defensive 
end; Charlie Baumann, kicker; Brice 
Abrams, fullback; Frank Adams, earner- 
bock; Dominic Calloway, defensive back; 
Corey Holliday, wide receiver; Lot [ah 
KInsler, safety; Pheattwr Edwards and Chris 
Williams, defensive tackles; David Tread- 
well. kicker; Randy Cuthbert and Chuckle 
Dukes, running backs; Elbert Ellis, wide re- 
ceiver; Gary Brawn and Tim 9 mason, tack- 
les; Reggie Barnes and Patrick Scott, line- 
backers; and Andy Kelly, quarterback. Put 
Rica Mach, linebacker, on Injured reserve 
Ibt-Stonca Elbert Ellis, wide receiver; Tim 
Simpson, tackle.- Kevin Breihen, offensive 
linemen; and Patrick Scott, llnebocker, to the 
practice squad. Stoned Eric Green, ttoht end, 
to a one-year contract. 

SAN 0 1 EGO— Waived VDnce Johnson. Ear- 
nest Wyatt end Way de Butler, wide recti vers; 
Groa Lane. Herachei Currie and Mike Wil- 
liams, comerbacfcs; Chris Thompson and Is- 
rael Stanley, defensive ends; Blaine Server, 
defensive tackle; Mike Hollis, kicker; Juan 
Lang, Tom Johnson and Zone Beehn, line- 


backers; Jose Munaz and ChrU Rodahafter, 
offensive linemen; Trent Green, quarter- 
bock; Tarry Vinson and Walter Dutnon. run- 
ning bodes; and Chris Johnson, safety. Put 
Eric Malta guard, on phvsIcaliy-uiiaMe-to- 
Ptriarm list. Waived Darren Bermett.punfer; 
Ray Smoot, guard; Alphonse Tavtor, defen- 
sive tackle; Chris Thomas, wide receiver ; 
and Damian Lyonx comerback. Pat an Dar- 
ren Krefa linebacker, and Earns! Groan*, 
offensive tackle- on Inlurod reserve. . 

SAN FRANCISCO— Stoned Toi cook, cor- 
ncrbach. to 1-year axitroct.cmd Adran Walk- 
er. ram big back. Waived Ron Cad Insand Bret 
Kworta wards; Jan Klrksey,detenBlva tack- 
le; Kurt Wilsoiv defensive end; Martin Harri- 
son and Junior Bryant, defensive linemen; 
Garry Pay.cantar; and Damien Russel I, safe- 
ly; Signed Aitonzo Browning and Larry Wal- 
lace, wide receivers; Bryce Burnett, ttoht 
end; aid John Ivtow and Swum be’ wright- 
Falr, running backs, fa the practice squad. 

SEATTLE— Waived Jeff Graham, quarter- 
back; Muhammad Shameld-Dcen, running 
bat*; Clarence WTTTTams, fight end; Jason 
Atkinson. Hllkry Butler and Anthony Davis, 
linebackers; Marcus Carter aid James 
McKntghl, wide receivers; Jason Childs, 
goad; Jed DeVries, offensive tackle; and 
Curtis McDaniel and Matt Werner, defensive 
tackles. Re-signed Orlando Waftorx comer- 
bock. Stored Larrv Whfsham. safety; James 
McKntohf, wide receiver; and Mat! Wbraer, 
defensive end, to the practice squad. Vetoed 
their trade with New England tor Darryl 

Wren, coroarboefc, and get bock tn«trT7V56tt>- 

rauna draff choice. 

TAMPA BAY — Waived VkM Mills, line- 
backer; Roger janes, comerback; Tvrae Da- 
vis, wide receiver; Pete Pierson, hrekta; Isra- 
el Stanley, defensive end; Curtis Buckley, 
defensive back, and Jimmy Williams, llne- 
bocker. Put Lawrence Daweey.wMe receiver 
an Ptnrslcallytonable-f»«erfbrm list. Stoned 




Brad Culpepper, defensive tackle. Stoned Ty- 'J. ‘ 
roe Davis, wide receiver; vidol Mills, 
backepaofetvand Keith Power 
la Ihe practice squad. 

WASHINGTON— Waived Ran MlddMan. . 

tight aid; Thn KakiL punter; Pat O’Hara, “ . , 

quartefback; Chris Hall safety ; DandraOw- ^ - 
ess. comerback; Grog Huntto g ton, center; — n 
TIco Duckett, running bade Terminated con- .. 

tnictiofR><*GniLdetensfvaend, and Robert •— " 
Wll0am*,corwerbacfc. Traded PBnvI M g p rg , i; 3 ; ;■ » 

guard. toGroen Bay tor conditional lV95dpifl _ . 
cbalcajte-stoned AJ. Jatowaiv comerback, ' v 
and Cedric Smith, tot Dock, waived me* K . 1 c. r: 
Hamilton, nnabacker. Signed WBHam Bell 
and Twwto Rush, running backs; Anfhpnr 
'■Abrams, detenstve tackle; Daman Wright, 

■: whte receiver; and Don Chaney, ttoht end, to 
the practice squad. 

HOCKEY 

National Hockey League » 

NHL An no unce d that Bryan ManJunfnt. 
detensenum. hoe been awa r ded to the Edmon- 
ton 01 tors m cwnpeneatton for the H a r tford 
Whalers' signing of fra* agent Steven Rice, 
right wing. 

ANAHEIM— Stoned Paul Kartya forward, 
to Swear contract ■ 

BUFFALO— Agreed to terms with S(ev* 

Shields, goal lender. 

DALLAS— Signed Neal Breton, center* ond 
Rk hord MatvKhuk, de f e ns eman. 

DETROIT— Stoned Mark Howa. defense. » 
man. la 1 -yete contract 

EDMONTON— Matched after to Scott 
Thornton, forward, by Los Angatas. 

HARTFORD— Acquired Glsn Wesley, de- 
tenseman, from Boston for 1W5, 1*W and H97 
1st -round draft ptoksAgread to terms with » 

John Stevens, defenseman, on multiyear can- 
tract. 

N.Y. ISLANDERS— Agreed to terms with 
Bob Beer* defen se m an , and Nietos AnSere- . 
son and Jeff Madlll forwards. 


•* *: rci . 


VLWIM 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



Intenxitwnd Raqwtment 

Ev«ry Thursday 
Contact PWrpOma 
Tel: [33 1)46 3793 36 
foe (33 })A6 37 93 70 
or your naarast MT office 
ortcprexnMfve 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATORPAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3-i, 1994 


Page 19 



SPORTS 


*} l One Man’s Hopes 

.w JL 

;i :f J TO . T 4 n • ¥ 


* "*i r w\And South s Pride 

" ‘-'.V, JV. International Herabi Tribune 

tjARIS — That he sounds more like a southern American 
, ± football coach is Billy Payne’s gift; he inhales hope and 

; exhales guarantees. But that is the only way to get anything done 

! . Atlanta, or anyplace else. Atlanta, though, especially. 

, , ^ : In 1987, after he'd raised a few milli on dollars to build 


I 


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I a church 

r 'H in Atlanta, Payne decided he could bring the Olympic Games 
1996. So he quit his job as an expensive lawyer. 


Ml 


'therein 
•that, he 


had been 


Ujj. at the University of 

Where the fans are known for get- 
ting down on all fours and bark- 
' ,y nut Eke dogs. These are the same 
' ' ' tothe 


an All-American 
Georgia, -- 


before 
defensive end 


Ian 

Thomsen 


* 


the July after next when the Olympics come; that these 
- ^ people used to bark like dogs for the same raa™ now in charge of 
~ cm the Games — not William, not Bill, but 46-year-old 


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y Payne — well, this incestuously Southern relationship has 
left much of the country feeling doubly nervous. 

> • * But before Payne, who is attending the Internationa] Olympic 
Congress here, is allowed to respond — and he seems to love this 
issue, the way he's hunching down to attack it the way the best 
football coaches do — the question of Atlanta’s capability goes 
Ml n mxh deeper than the South’s religious devotion to football. 

' - ^The trouble started with the notorious mascot Whatizit, a 

■ • \ awnputer^enerated blue thing whose only apparent value was its 

-...•I . oaieric ability to be linked with any and all commercial products. 

• . v.'.; . -Was that what the 1996 Olympics were going to be all about? 
, Well, Atlanta restyled the mascot and in a contest. 100,000 
■American kids came op with a new name — izzy! 

■:v~ So, amazingly, a silly mascot has come to implant suspicions that 
Atlanta, lacking the culture and history of Barcelona and LUleham- 
'. ■ mer, wffl allow itself to become a blank slate for the Olympic 
■ ’ corporations, that these Games, on their 100th anniversary, wifl see 
{ - the marketeers finally running the asjdum. In fact, Payne says, 

• having wmted patiently for his turn with the ball, the exact opposite 
■-sir is going to happen. Yes, he begins by admitting, kC We’rc not a 1,500- 
> RV\| year old rity, we’re a 100-year old city. What do we have? We do 

* -have inordinaldy friendly people. 

' r. ■. 7 **the Games, historically, have been an opportunity to justify 
' or go overboard on nationalism. It's a good time to brag. 
Knowing how the world feels about Americans, they know we're 
.. going to brag a lot. They're expecting that So it’s to our great 
advantage, maybe for the first time, to embrace the opportunity of 
what the Games is: the greatest example of international coopera- 
' 1 - Don and friendship in the world today." 

- o.-JV ' What he is doing here, he is laying out his strengths like a game 
^ 1 plan. The best coaches do this, and by the time they’re done 
they’ve made you forget they ever had any weaknesses. 

‘‘Long stray short: as wonderful as the ceremonies were at 
. - ' Barcelona, Los Angeles, Lfflehammer, they weren’t about the 
power of the Olympic movement. At our Games, we're going to 
tell a bigger story. How do we top a Barcelona or wherever?” 

Now he's instilling confidence. “We are going to communicate 
an overall sense of welcome. We're going to come up with 
architecture: Our people are the fabric of our architecture.” 

Ami the ceremony? “It will be our intent and priority to connect 
the importance of the athletes to the actual ceremonies them- 
selves. Not just an assemblage of athletes well be looking ax — 
we’re going to connect those athletes to the people in the stands.” 
7 How? “It won’t work without the element of surprise," be says; 
and he's smiting, having reeled you in. 

■ The problems for Atlanta include its decision to alter some terms 
.of its bid, a shrinking contingency fund to handle possible cost 
overruns, and the confederate Georgia flag. Payne has called for 
state politicians to do so mething about the flag before the world's 
cameras capture it as a segue into the South's racist history. 

, The Atlanta Games have raised up a complicated fear shared 
by a country still divided, and the dividing line runs down the 
middle of Bffly Payne. “As an opportunity, this is something we've 
been looking for as Southerners for 100 years," he says. “The 
historical perception of the good ol' boys has come to affect our 
own self-esteem over the years. While we’re very proud, there’s 
probably been a tittle introspection built into us over time: Do we 
not quite measure up?" 

For the Americans so upset by his mascot, that might have been 
the core question. “The answer," Payne says, and here the coach 
has no choice; the Olympics demand reconciliation, “the answer is 
a resounding yes. We measure up in every respect, and finally we 
have a chance to prove it" 



Eric CiiBard f Rn ten 

Evan Stewart of Zimbabwe, winner of World Swimming Champion- 
ships one-meter s pringb oard eveni. China's Wei Lan took stiver. 

Diver’s Gold: African First 


Reuters 

ROME — Evan Stewart of Zimba- 
bwe stunned Lan Wei of China, the 
favorite in the one-meter spring- 
board diring finals Friday to become 
the first African to win a gold medal 
at the World Swimming Champion- 
ships. 

Stewart, 19, from Harare, pro- 
duced a superb final dive to total 
382.14 points and snatch the gold 
from the Lan, who registered 375.18 
points. Brian Earley of the United 
States took the bronze. 

China won four of the six diving 
tides at the last world championships 
in 1991 and three of four at the Bar- 
celona Olympics. The one-meter 


springboard is not an Olympic event. 

Lan built a co mmandin g lead over 
the first four dives. But his last two 
efforts were poor while Stewart con- 
jured up a superb two-and-a-half 
piked somersault with his last dive to 
take the title. 

“I'm incredibly elated. My legs 
were s hakin g on the podium because 
1 was so exicted,” said Stewart, based 
in the United Stales at the University 
of Tennessee. 

No African nation had never pre- 
viously won a medal at the world 
swimming championships, being 
staged for the seventh time. 

Competition in swimming events 
begins on Monday. 


Edberg and Stich Zoom Ahead 

Martinez , No. 3 Seed , Is Eliminated in U.S. Open 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Two-time champi- 
on Stefan Edberg and fourth-seeded 
Michael Stich served and volleyed 
their way into the third round Friday 
at the U.S. Open tennis champion- 
ships. 

loiling side-by-side under bright 
blue skies — Edberg on Stadium Court 
and Stich in the Grandstand — the two 
great volleyers seemed to be racing 
each other into the third round, rather 
than worrying about their opponents, 
who presented no problems. 

While the two former Wimbledon 
champions were romping into the 
third round, however, a reigning Wim- 
bledon champion was going down in in 
the women’s competition. 

Ginger Helgesoo of the United 
States stunned No. 3 seed Conchita 
Martinez, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1. in two hours 
and seven minutes to claim a place in 
the round of 16. 

The 40th-ranked Helgeson, who had 
never beaten Martinez in six previous 
meetings, played a near flawless third 
set to cut short the Spaniard’s bid for a 
second major title. 

Meanwhile, the fifth-seeded Edberg 
won his race with Stich by three min- 
utes, taking out ]06th-ranked Ameri- 
can Jeff Tarrango, 6-2. 6-3, 6-2. in one 
hour and 31 minutes. 

Stich rolled over 122nd-ranked 
American, Steve Bryan, 6-1 6-4 6-2, his 
finish slightly delayed by a blistering 


passingshotfrom Bryan in the penulti- 
mate game that even brought polite 
applause from the German. 

“I played well,” said Stich. a first- 
round loser at the Open last year. “I 
have found my style on the haidcourts. 
Tm very happy with the way I played.” 

Edberg said, “I played a good 
match, a solid match. Basically 1 did 
everything well today." 

No. 2 seed Arantxa Sanchez Vicario 
and eighth seed Gabriela Sabatini 
staged a race of their own to swiftly 
claim places is the women’s round of 
16. 

Sinchez Vicario. who won her sec- 
ond French Open title this year, lost 
the first two games of her third-round 
contest with Saodra Cecchini of Italy. 

But the Spaniard was not about to 
suffer the same fate as her Federation 
Cup teammate. Snchez Vicario ripped 
off 12 of the next 13 games to win. 6-2, 
6-1, in 63 minutes. 

Sabatini, the 1990 champion, took 
66 minutes to crush Isabelle Demon- 
geot of France. 6-0.6-2. Kimiko Date 
of Japan, the fifth seed, also moved 
into the fourth round with a 6-4, 6-2. 
victory over American Lisa Raymond. 

Joining Edberg and Stich in the 
third round was last year’s surprise 
finalist, Cedric Pioline of France, and 
Todd Woodbridge of Australia. 

Pioline downed countryman Ro- 
dolphe Gilbert. 2-6, 6-3, 7-6, 6-3. while 
Woodbridge ousted Mark Petchev of 
Britain, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. Marcos On- 


dniska of South Africa stopped Chris- 
tian Bergstrom of Sweden, 7-6. (7-3), 
6-3, 6-0. 

Elena Likhovtseva of Kazahstan 
won the other early women’s match, 
defeating Natalia Medvedeva of 
Ukraine, 7-6 (7-3), 7-6 (8-6). 

On Thursday, an upset stomach al- 
most forced an early exit from the 
tournament for fourth-seeded Mary 
Pierce. But after taking some medica- 
tion from her trainer, Pierce rallied to 
take a three-set victory over Katarina 
Stixdenikova of Slovakia, ranked 
103rd. 

Andre Agassi continues to advance, 
fter a crowd-pleasing if somewhat 
sloppy 6-3, 7-5, 6-7 (5-7). 6-2 victory 
Thursday night over Guy Forget of 
France. 

Although not seeded in Lhe 128- 
player field. Agassi is still considered 
one of several players who could cap- 
ture this tournament. He was a finalis t 
here in 1990 and a semifinalist the two 
years prior to that. 

“This was a key match.” Agassi said. 
Forget, out nearly two years with the 
injury, began a serious' comeback in 
June. At Wimbledon, in his third tour- 
nament back, he reached the quarterfi- 
nals, upsetting Courier in he second 
round. 

In the women's singles, top-seeded 
and defending champion Steffi Graf 
rushed into the third round with a 6-0, 
6-2 victory over Sandra Cade. 

(Reuters. AP) 


Indurain Breaks Track Cycling Mark 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Triumphantly switching 
from the road to the track. Miguel 
Indurain broke the world one-hour bi- 
cycling record, the most esteemed indi- 
vidual mark in the sport, in Bordeaux. 
France, on Friday. 

He covered 53.040 kilometers (32.96 
miles) to exceed Graeme Obree's 
52.713 kilometers on the same track 
last April. Obree shattered Chris 
Boardman’s mark of 52X1 kilometers 
set in Bordeaux in July 1993. 

Indurain, a 30-year-old Spaniard 
who bas won the Tour de France the 
last four years, started slowly as a 
crowd of several thousand in the cov- 
ered velodrome cheered him on. The 
midaftemoon ride was shown live on 
television throughout Europe. 

He was almost five seconds behind 
Obree’s pace after the first five kilome- 


ters — 5 minutes 43.9 seconds for 
Indurain, 5:38.99 for Obree. After 10 
kilometers, Indurain was 1.9 seconds 
behind and after 15 kilometers just 1.1 
seconds behind. 

The Spaniard nearly matched 
Obree's time at the 20th kilometer. 
22:38.54 to 22:39.03. and then began 
p ullin g ahead. 

At the 25th kilometer, he was 3.6 
seconds ahead and at 30 kilometers 5.9 
seconds. By 40 kilometers the gap was 
16.9 seconds and rising. As the hour 
ended, Indurain had just passed the 
53-kilomeler barrier. Removing his 
aerodynamic helmet, he punched the 
air with his right hand while slowing 
his high-technology bicycle on the 
wooden track. 

Both Obree, a Scotsman, and the 
Englishman he bettered, Boar dman, 
are track champions but Indurain had 


competed only once before on the 
track, in a six-day race in Spain a few 
years ago. 

He and his Banesto team officials 
devoted only three weeks to training 
for the attempt, which included a dif- 
ferent bicycle and seat position than be 
has used in the many races against the 
clock he has won in road competition. 

Fears that he might have been un- 
dertrained. or even diverted by a con- 
troversial doping charge leaked by 
French officials last weekend, were 
heightened when he got off to his rela- 
tively slow start. 

What he lacked in training, howev- 
er, he more than compensated for in 
power and equipment. His carbon fi- 
ber Pinarello bicycle was specially 
manufactured for this ride in a vivid 
contrast to Obree’s homemade ma- 
chine. 


Morceli Eyes IAAF Jackpot 


The Associated Press 

PARIS (AP) — Noureddine 
Morceli, the world's dominant 
distance runner, is in line for a 
J130,000 jackpot Saturday at 
the International Amateur Ath- 
letic Federation’s Mobil Grand 
Prix final, which will be held at 
the refurbished 20,000-seat 


Cbarlety Stadium. The Algeri- 
an is one of seven male athletes 
in contention for the prize go- t 
ing to the winner of the overall i 
1994 Grand Prix title. 

Morceli. the world-record | 
holder in the mile. 1.500 meters 
ana 3,000 meters, has a six-point 
lead over the other contenders. 


PLAYING THE ANGLES By Wayne Robert Williams 


l+t - 


w - 




JE 


- ACROSS 
1 Blurred 
. 8 Straighten, as 
the legs 
15 Of a minor 
- domain 

20 Cassava dish 

21 Little Warsaw, 

1 H- 

upr Missouri 
' v tributary 
23 Extra effort 

25 Hereditary 
factors 

26 Barrels 

27 Wizened 

28 Prefix with 
meter or motor 

29 Senior 

30 Author 
profiled in 
“Shadovdands* 

32 River of 
Amiens 

34 Botanical suffix 
.36 Moola 
38 Baths 
34 Dum-dum 
|44 Like Coast 
Guard rescues 
46 1 953 Ricardo 
Montalban 
western 


54 


48 Country singer 
Steve 

49 Excuse 

51 Welcome 
uncivilly 

52 Shows 
excitement 

■ Fail 
(ancient 
crowning 
stone) 

55 Medicinal doses 

59 Gorge 

60 Ex-superpower 

62 Blackthorn 

63 Easily imposed 
upon 

65 South American 
monkey 

6b Thin layer 

68 Changing pitch 

71 Editor's marks 

75 Steve Martin 
song "King 

77 Not a neauiik 

78 Cigarette 
substances 

80 Invitation 
notation 







n 


€ B€ L 

th. •* ri " B 


SI Another 
finisher 

85 Amplify 

88 Osaka O.K. 

89 Funnel-shaped 
flowers 

91 Mod ending 

92 Piano 

composition 

94 Perform 

95 Lacking 
support 

99 Laundry stinker 

100 Square element 

102 Dance in 
France 

103 Appropriate 

104 Playwright 
Avxkboum 
etal. 

105 Desert lilies 

107 Car style 

1 10 Murder, e.g. 

114 TV' host John 

116 Singer James 

11$ Columnist 
Bombeck 

119 Cutting out 

120 Monopolize 

123 Himalayan 
kingdom 

124 Make 
unnecessary 

125 “The Doctor in 
Spite of 
Himself* 
dramatist 

136 Tea treat 

127 Hand of diving 

128 “The End of the 
World" singer 

Davis 

DOWN 

1 Unbelievable 
bargain 

2 “My Dinner 
With Andre" 
director Louis 

3 1970 Creedence 
Clearwater 
Revival hit 

4 Most 
underhanded 

5 Sticky stuff 

6 Old French 
coins 

7 Genrudc and 
Ophelia, c.g- 

S'Fast-paced 

9 Japanese drama 

10 One of 
baseball’s 
Boyers 

11 Kimono 

12 Unusually 
narrow, in a 
way 

13 No-show job 

14 Blue 

15 Fairway 
description 

16 Played fora 
fool 

17 Bamboo stalk 





'S 

ia 

17 

18 

" 1 

22 





25 












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© Afeir York Tones/ Edited by TTUl Shortz. 


18 Years and vean 

19 For fear chat 

24 Refuse 

29 Lighr-colored 
wood 

31 Ice fall 

33 Dance in 4/4 
time 

35 Bargain model: 
Prefix 

37 Takes to the 
limit 

39 Danish change 

40 Former 
Canadian P.M. 
Wilfrid 

41 Highland 
tongue 

42 Dog dogger 

43 Experiment 

44 Top-notch 

45 Relative of 
4 1 -Down 

47 Aussie flier 

50 Drying powder 

53 Boob tubes 

56 Old French 
coins 

57 Celebrated 
hostess Mesta 

58 Former Pac. 
pact 


61 Prepare tabloid " 
pictures 
64 Trunk bulge 
67 Petrify 
6 M Architectural 
spiral 
70 Snatch 

72 Leslie Caron 
film, with 
“The" 

73 Duck 

74 Peeping Tom 

76 chi 

(meditative _ 
exercise) 

79 German city 

81 Mimic 

82 Film maker 
Ricfcnsuhl 

83 Unaccompa- 
nied 

84 U.S.-Mex.-Can. 
concordat 

86 Wide receiver 
Don 

87 Inventor Howe 
90 Coming 

93 Pelec Island 
location 
96 Not down a 
break, in tennis 


97 Herbal quaff 

98 One of the 
deadly sins 

101 Shifty 

105 Skating gold 
medalist John 
et al. 

106 Parts of pipes 

108 "That’s ’ 

109 Firs: to spot a 
comet, usuallv 


110 Strikes out 

1 1 1 Head honcho 

112 Contemporary 
oiTuFu 

113 Son of Judah 

1 15 Slight person 

117 One way to run 

120 Atlantic food 
fish 

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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3-4, 1994 


DAVE BARRY 


Comets and Haircuts 


‘D’Artagnan’s Daughter’: Swashbuckler With Roots 


M IAMI — Gather ’round, 
young people, because it’s 


1YX young people, because it’s 
back-to-school time, and Uncle 
Dave wants to give you some 
important advice to help you 
excel in the classroom ana have 


excel in the classroom and have 
successful, rewarding careers, 
assuming that Earth is not dc- 


Just recently, giant comet 
ch unks wbomped into Jupiter 
and caused destruction so mas- 
sive that it would have wiped out 
all human life if there had been 
any, which there probably 
wasn't because the atmosphere 
on Jupiter has the same chemical 
composition as Drano. 

Of course the astronomy 
community carried on as 
though the mass destruction on 
Jupiter was just about the coo- 
lest scientific thing to happen 
since the invention of the pock- 
et protector. Every night you'd 
see astronomers on the TV 
news, holding up blurred pho- 
tographs of what appeared to 
be a pizza, pointing to a round- 
ish smudge that appeared to be 
a pepperoni, ana announcing, 
in happy voices, that it was the 
equivalent of 19 hjRion jillion 
atomic bombs. 

They claim we don't have to 
worry. They claim that the 
mathematical odds of a large 
comet chunk hi tting Earth in 
our lifetimes are infinitesimal, 
even smaller — if such a thing is 
possible — than the odds of the 
Buffalo Bills winning a Super 
Bowl. But whenever we hear the 
astronomy community making 
claims, two words should spring 
into our minds: “Comet Ko- 
houtek." 


smudges on their binocular 
lenses, etc. But ultimately they 
had to accept the uglv truth: 
THERE WAS NO COMET 
KOHOUTEK. 

Oh, sure, the astronomy com- 
munity, desperate to save face, 
produced some blurred photo- 
graphs of a “comet," but it 
turned out. upon close inspec- 
tion, to be a human sperm cell 
magnified 400.000 times. 

My point is that if the astron- 
omy community claims we're 
not going to get hit by giant 
comet chunks, then we probably 
are. The result would be mass 
destruction on the most horren- 
dous scale ever seen in the histo- 
ry of this planet, causing famine, 
disease, death and — in the 
United States alone — literally 
millions of personal-injury law- 
suits. 

This would lead to a major 
boom in the legal profession, a 
career field Unde Dave feds 
you young people should defi- 


Intaruaional Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Bertrand Tavernier is a 
French phenomenon: a citiiphile 
or film buff who became an industry 
leader. He began tracking down 
golden oldies at the age of 14. found- 
ed a film dub called Nickel Odhon, 
became a distributor and press agent 


MARY BUiME 


for such then neglected, and often 
obstreperous, heroes as Raoul Walsh 
and John Ford, is an encyclopedic 
film historian, a producer, scenarist 
and since 1973 has directed 19 pic- 


tures ranging in subject from French 
provincial life to American jazz in 
“'Round Midnight,” in time from 
the Middle Ages, to present-day po- 
lice precincts, and in style from an 
exceptional documentary on veter- 
ans of the Algerian war to his new 
release, a swashbuckler called “La 
fille de d*Aitagnan,” or “D’Artag- 
nan’s Daughter." 

Tavernier of course knows all 
about films of the cape »nrf sword as 
swashbucklers are called in France, 
and especially admires George Sid- 
ney’s version of “The Three Muske- 
teers” and “Scaramouche" with 
Stewart Granger. What he didn't 
know Is how hard they are to make. 

“It takes 10 seconds to write The 
horses jump on the boat' but when 
you are faced with terrified horses 
and three cameras you think what a 
dumb idea to write such a scene.*’ 

His other idea, pious rather than 
dumb but in the end disastrous, was 
to have the film directed by Riccardo 
Freda, whose version of “Les Mis6ra- 
bies” he adores. Freda is now 84 and 
hasn't directed in 25 years. A week 
before shooting started, the star. So- 
phie Marceau, threatened to walk out 


nitely be considering as you 
head back to school. Even in the 


head back to school. Even in the 
unlikely event Earth is NOT hit 
by giant comet chunks, experts 
believe the legal field will con- 
tinue to grow rapidly, as more 
and more Americans realize the 
practical benefits of suing ev- 
erybody about everything, in- 
cluding dandruff. 


Back in 1973, the astronomy 
community claimed that Comet 
Kohoutek was going to pass 
close to Earth and produce this 
spectacular celestial phenome- 
non, so big and bright you'd be 
able to see it EVEN IN THE 


DAYTIME. People were afraid 
to go outside for fear they 
would suffer comet bums. 

And what happened? Noth- 
ing. AH over the world, millions 
of people spent hours squinting 
at the sky, pointing excitedly at 
airplanes, moths, beer signs. 


So the economic future looks 
bright, young people. But no 
matter what career field you ul- 
timately choose to enter, you’re 
not going to £et very far if you 
have a stupid haircut. Uncle 
Dave is especially concerned 
about a hairstyle that is show- 
ing up more and more often on 
young males: It’s the one where 
the sdes and bade of the head 
are shaved completely naked, 
while the hair on top is grown 
really long and pulled straight 
bade into a ponytaiL 
You young people cannot seri- 
ously expea to get a high-pay- 
ing, long- term-growth-potential 
job, such as business magnate or 
member of the O J. Simpson de- 


sion, Le Monde suggested that “La 
fille de d’Artagnan* is his anti- 
GATT film. 

“When you take on a film a week 
before shooting you don't think of 
such things,” Tavernier said. “The 
only thing I did think about in that 
respect was how awful the last adap- 
tation of ‘The Three Musketeers’ by 
Disney was, a stupid lamentable film 
with California beach boys who 
don’t know how to wear a costume or 
walk. It showed a gigantic scorn for 
the European cultural heritage. I hat- 
ed it so much that maybe uncon- 
sciously I tried to give my film its 
proper roots.” 

Many French films are, in Taver- 
nier's words, anorexic and distant 
from the problems of young people 
facing unemployment and what he 
calls the country's terrible mood of 
corruption and the dictatorship of 
money. “We have a responsibility to 
fight this or people will turn only to 
films of distraction which are Ameri- 
can films. 



Paris in which fact was transformed 
to myth. France, Tavernier has 
pointed out, is weak in making films 
about the troubled moments of her 
histoiy — there is no good feature 
film on the Commune or on the 



Dreyfus case and precious little that 
is worthwhile on World War 11. 


is worthwhile on World War 11. 

“I am sorry there aren't more his- 

ftl ft Tn.wm’fr “TMe 




aving Tavernier, as co-producer, 
with debts that would have crippled 
him for the rest of his life. So he took 
over. 

Planned as a summer film, “La 
fille de d’Artagnan” opened strongly 
in French beach resorts and in 45 
houses in the Paris region. Marceau 
is the eponymous heroine, with Phi- 


is the eponymous heroine, with Phi- 
lippe Noiret as the aging d’Artagnan 
makin g a precarious living from 


fense complex, if you go around 
looking like Davy Crockett with 


looking like Davy Crockett with 
a scalp disorder. 

Knighi-Ridder Newspapers 


fencing lessons. 

Because the respected but some- 
times stolid Tavernier seemed an un- 
likely director of a commercial action 
film and because he is an outspoken 
defender of the French film industry 
against the so-called American inva- 


“The drama in France is not that 
we lack auteurs but that our commer- 
cial films are flops. ! think we must 
all ask questions of ourselves and 
think of storytelling rhythms and re- 
discover the* pleasure of filming.” 

In making h is swashbuckler, Ta- 
vernier amused himself by putting in 
references to films he likes such as 
Richard Lester's “Robin and Mar- 
ian,” about the aging Robin Hood, 
and. “Indiana Jones.” He also tried to 
bring the audience into the film by 
playing on their familiarity with the 
genre: While the obligatory carriage 
usually moves as smoothly as a Rolls- 
Royce, Tavernier filmed ins carriage 
on an unpaved road with a hand-held 
camera, showing the passengers in 
tooth-ratlling discomfort. 

“And in all historical films when 
people ride up to an inn they always 
find a room. So we put in something 1 
have never seen before, an inn that is 
dosed for a day off.” When the Mus- 
keteers ask where the castle is of the 
wicked duke, a peasant reasonably 
replies that ail the castles in the area 
belong to the duke, leaving the 
troupe as lost as they were. 

One critic took this as parody. T 
don’t like parody,” Tavernier said. 
“It implies a superiority to the 
genre. The comedy is between the 
characters and what they must go 
through. Dumas does it all the lime 



lorical filing, Tavernier said. “This 
spirit of commemoration is a terrible 
kind of censorship, a way of rranforc- . 
ing forgetfulness." 

One of his strongest films is “La 
Vie ct rien d’autre” (1989), about the 
afte rmath of World War 1 in which 
families tramped the battlefields 
searching for missing soldiers — who 
numbered 350,000 — while the gov- 
ernment was choosing one unidenti- 
fied corpse to bury beneath the Arc 
de Triomphe. “They wanted all the 
missing to disappear from the collec- 
tive memory m making that one 
tomb.” 

Maybe one day he will make a film 


.ft 


about World War II, Tavernier says 
(be already has a subject in mind). 


Bertrand Tavernier, film historian, producer, scenarist and director. 


in ‘Le Vicomte de Bragdonne.' I 
wanted to make a film that Dumas 
would like." 

At 53, Tavernier r emains a film 
buff. Writing abOUt it. or ganizing 
homages ana put ting on his answer- 
ing machine a bite from an old 
sound track that he changes every 
month (the current one features 
Louis Jouvet). This could make him 
a crank. Instead he is an impas- 
sioned enthusiast with two pluses 
rare among self-referring directors: 
He cares about his audiences and he 
cares about memory. 


“I wanted to show that in the lives 
of these cops what wears them down 
is that (bar never is a resolution, 
never an end, never a conflict easily 
solved. 


(be already has a subject in mind), 
but it will have to be after the com- 
memorative mood has faded. “May- 
be in three or four or five years one 
win be able to do something. As a 
filmmake r you cannot foDow too 
closely on what has been shown on 
televirion because people drown in 
images." 

Every country, Tavernier says, 
has historical subjects that are ta- 
boo and the taboos are unconscious- 


ly reinforced. “For example, one 
Paris newspaper was outraged by 


Memory is probably the link be- 
tween his varied films but it includes, 
most unusually, memory of the pre- 
sent His film before he took up 
swashbuckling was “L.627,” about 
the life of Paris cops and written in 
protest against television series 
which obliterate contemporary prob- 
lems by offering easy resolutions in 
time for the commercial break. 


“In American films you have the 
conflict between Mickey Rourke and 
Ms boss in The Year of (he Dragon’ 
or between a cop and someone pow- 
erful. That’s not it These men are 
demolished by the repetition of daily 
tasks, by an endless wearing-down 
process for which they are not 
trained and in which (bey are not 
helped.” 

He regards “L.627” as an allegory 
of France today: “It can be applied 
to all French institutions.” In “La 
fille de d’Artagnan” he says he was 
frying to combat the ambient moros- 
ity of France. 

One aspect of mcrosity is forget- 
fulness, as seen in this summer’s 
commemorations of the liberation of 


Paris newspaper was outraged by 
my making the Musketeers old. Yet 
Dumas did it himself in ‘Le Vicomte 
de Bragelonne,' in which Porthos 
dies because he can no longer walk. 
The sense of ‘respect* that makes Le 
Journal du Dimanche criticize the 
aging of the Muriceteers explains 
that certain thing s here cannot be 
touched.” 

Forgetfulness is so self-serving, 
Tavernier added, langhing at his star, 
Sophie Marceau, dong dozens of in- 
terviews about “La fille de d'Artag- 
nan” without mentioning another 
member of the cast: “She 
more about her Yoriries and doves.” 
Ever the film buff, Tavernier says 
Marceau managed to beat the record 
of the writers of the 1937 Hollywood 
film, “The Life of Emile Zola”: 

“They wrote all about the Dreyfus 
case without ever mentioning the 
word Jew.” 


tiible i<» 

jOivi-inn* 


... ■ 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Forecast for Sunday through Tuesday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


Ccoaniwocn 

CoMHSol 

Dub* 


Today 
Molt Low 
or OF 

»0Z 1UM 
1801 1601 
ZMO 1M1 
wii 2i m 
as m him 
3i . -m time 
IB/M 1103 
3006 1305 
2904 1BA1 
1703 1203 

n/M 2i mt 
1601 

1601 1203 
asm iB/M 
20/BB 1203 
21 /ID 10*0 
1407 1102 
26 04 1604 
!W 23/13 
27/60 17/62 
1604 1407 
2604 1306 
24/IB 1702 
1608 11/62 
1606 1203 
26/16 1702 
16/61 1203 
CB/J7 2006 
71/70 1203 
1606 1203 
1102 6/4# 

26/17 1102 
I 17.02 11/62 
1601 1102 
2006 8M« 

18.06 1102 
26/76 2006 
2006 1309 
24,76 16168 
21/70 1203 



Today TomOfTOW 

Ms* Low W Wgh Low W 

OF OF OF CO 

3006 24/75 I 3106 24/75 pc 

2602 2006 I 26/76 1604 Oi 

3206 26/73 po 3006 26/73 pc 

3006 24/76 ill 3006 24/75 1 

3106 2700 I 3901 2700 pc 

3106 1606 pc 3006 1806 1 

2804 24/76 pc 2604 24/73 pc 

3206 26/76 po 3209 28/78 pc 

3208 2700 PC 3208 2S/7B pe 

3209 23/73 pc 33/91 23/73 pc 


T HE dismissed musical director at the 
Paris Optra. Mvnne-Whim flump. 


North America 


Cool weather In Now Eng- 
land Monday will Gradually 


land Monday will gradually 
g/v» way to warmer weather 
by midweek Dana*, Denver 
and Amarillo wM be fax this 
weak. Detroit enough Ctiai- 
katlo wHi have dry. pleaiant 
weather early this waak 
while showers and gusty 
winds buffet eutem Florida. 


Europe 

LoeoVy heavy ttimdarsto/ma 
will soak the region tram 
Athens to Bucharest and 
Istanbul early next week. 
Parte to Geneva wilt have 
dry, seasonable weather 
wine • tow showerawW race 
from London to Stockholm. 
Madrid and Roma will be 
sunny and Quite warm by 
Wediesday. 


Heat and humidity in Tokyo 
early next week mfl give way 


CapeTmm 


26/02 20/66 ■ 27/00 21/70 PC 
21/70 1407 S am 12/33 pc 


26 /M IB/M a 2700 16/M pc 
16/66 1000 1 22/7! 1102 pc 


to midweek showora end 
thunderstorms. Seoul will 
have thunderstorms Mon- 


20/02 24 73 I 200? 24/73 PC 
21/70 6/48 pc 23/73 1000 pc 

31/00 1001 • 2604 3)08 ( 


1 Paris Opira, Mynng-Whun fling, 
won another court victory on Fridav, when 
ajudge ordered the Optra to pay him 50,000 
francs ($9,250) a day as long as it fails to 
obey a court order to reinstate him. Judge 
Fnnfose Ramoff ruled earlier this week 
that Chung could proceed with rehearsals 
for the season's Sept. 19 opener, Giuseppe 
Verdi's “Simon Boccanegra,” but the next 
day Chung was barred from the rehearsal 
hall at the Optra Bastille. Opera officials 
said they were appealing the ruling and, 
therefore, need not respect it But Ramoff 
said Friday that the ruling was to be “cxe- 


dey. then &y. cooler weather 
Tuesday Into Wednesday. 
Bailing wll be diy and pleas- 
ant early next week. Hang 
Kong and Manila will have 
daOy Ihunderahawera. 


North America 


cuted immediately” despite the appeal and 
that any more delays in allowing Chung to 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Oceania 

Auckland >3136 6)46 pe 1BJB1 6<4B pe 

0y«wr 21/70 12*3 pe 21/70 1203 pc 


Hfali Low W teqh Low W High Low W High low W 

C/FC/FCIFC/F OF OF Of OF 

BfM 30/66 24/73 ■ 3208 24/76 ■ Buma/hl 1604 6/46 pe 21/70 1102 po 

Cairo 3301 21/70 • 3301 22/71 ■ Ones* 78/02 2000 «/■ 2700 2006 pe 

Dwnacu* 26.02 16/01 ■ 3301 17AZ • Umt 1604 1601 po 1604 1609 pa 

Jwuwlwn 27/89 1804 ■ 2304 1806 a JtafeoGly 24/75 1407 pc 24-75 14*7 I 

Luwr 38/ICC 1606 ■ 41/10023/73 ■ WoMJmtai 3106 2006 I 2802 1606 pe 

RVKRi 40/104 20/76 a 42/10720/77 ■ Swrtago 21/TO 3/37 pc 21/70 0/43 pc 

Laganifc t-dunny, Pc-perty dcwly. c-dc\»jy. */v*hcw». l-Cmndcrafijnr*. r-rtti. sJ-unow Vnw. 
•moow, Met, W-We«ilid/. AJI nwpo. fora ca a n and d«t» pmhhd by Accu-Wtathtr. Inc. C 1684 


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38/ICC 160B ■ 41/10023/73 ■ 
40/104 26/78 C 42/10720/77 • 


1306 409 

24/75 1801 
1006 BUS 
22/71 1305 
2002 1306 
21/70 1000 
3006 24/75 
3203 21/70 
2904 1800 
3301 S/77 
23/73 1606 
1800 206 
3301 24/75 
22/71 1203 
36/1002700 
23/73 1306 
2008 1203 
1606 6/43 
23/73 1*07 


rehearse would irreversibly damage “the 
personal quality erf the performance.” 

□ 

The actor Jon Voight has been sued for 
libel by a former associate, who Voight 
said backed out of a movie-production 
deal because he wouldn't become her lov- 
er. Laura Pels, in a libel suit that follows 
her earlier suit charging Voight with em- 
bezzlement, contends that Voight and his 
lawyer intended to embarrass her into 
dropping the first suit by p lanting mali- 


cious statements in their breach of con- 
tract suit against her. 

□ 

Jeff Gfflooly, the ex-husband of Touya 
Hanfing who was sentenced to prison few 
his role in the January attack an the figure 
skater Nancy Kerrigan, has applied to enter 
the Oregon Department of Corrections pris- 
on boot-camp program. BUI Beers, superin- 
tendent of the program, said that if he's 
accepted and completes it, he could shave 
1 1 to 18 months off his two-year term and 
be paroled as early as March. 

□ 

Roseanne is upset about two planned 
made-for-TV movies about her. The star of 
the popular ABC sitcom that bears her 
name says NBCs script “makes ‘Momxnie 
Dearest look brilliant.” “It’s the worst, 
stupidest script — like this twin comes out 
of me and sits next to me on my bed as my 
inner self and I have these conversations 
with it,” she said in an “Entertainment 
Tonight” interview. She’s not too thrilled 
about the Fox network’s movie, either. 
Roseanne called Demy Dfflon, who is cast 
to play her, a “midget woman.” “I wish 
they’d wait till I die before they do these 
kinds of things,” she said. 



* 

■■ 

g:-r. 

ff *r 

tel--: ... 

■ • 

t'rii-t. r 


:::a:c 




“WOLF* MAN JACK — Hie actor 
Jade Nicholson and friend in Venice, 
where Ms new fQm, “Wolf,” is to be 
shown at the animal f3m festival. 


•2<:- -~ 

... 


vV ‘ 


r . -i 


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0019-991-1111 tig: 050 

!_ Ukraine* 

8*14111 MIDDLE EAST 


194 -OOU Guatemala* 
06022-9111 Gvyanar* 


800-190-11 Honduras** 
OaOIO- 480-OIU Mexico aaa 


05017-1-288 Nicaragua (Managna) 
01-800-4288 Panama* 

155-5042 Peru* 

00420-00101 Su rinam e 

900-99-00-11 Uruguay 
020-795-611 Venezuela** 


000-8010 
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980-11-0010 

114 

119 

190 

390 

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156 

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022*903-011 Bahrain 

0800-100-10 Cyprus* 

00-1800-0010 Israel 

99-38-0011 Kuwair 

00420*00102 Lebanon (Beirut) 

8001-0010 Qatar 

9800-100-10 Saudi Arabia 
19A-0011 Turkey' 
01304010 II.AJL* 


OPROO-1311 

OOAjjOOOUll Argenflr 
9994)01 Belize* 
3 -800-550-000 Bolivia" 


grfand* 155-00-11 CARIBBEAN 

0500-89-0011 Bahamas 1-800-872-2881 

jpg' 8A100-11 Bermuda* 1-600-872-2881 

MIDDLE EAST British VI 1-800-872-2881 

In 800-001 Cayman Islands 1-800-872-2881 

5^ 080-90010 Grenada* 1-8 00-872-2881 

[ 177-100-2727 Hold* 001-80 0-972-2883 

ir 900-288 Jamaica** Q-8QQ^72-Z88i 

ion (Beirut) 426-801 Netb-Antll 001-800*372-2881 

0800-011-77 St-Ktet/Nevls 1-800^72-2381 

Arabia I-800-1Q AFRICA 

7* 00-800-12277 Egypt* (Cairo) 5104)200 

* 800-121 Gabon* QOa-001 

AMERICAS riamhh' 00 X 11 

,tina* 001-800-200-1111 Kenya* 0600-10 

» 555 Liberia 797.797 

3* 0-800-2112 South Africa ftAKua/ wM 


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0600-10 

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