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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Wednesday, September 7, 1994 


No. 34,687 


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Pope Cancels 
Sarajevo Trip, 
Citing Safety 
Of Residents 

Shelling of Mountain 
Near Site of Papal Mass 
Prompts Vatican Move 

By Jonathan C. Randal 

Washington Post Service 

i SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovica — 
TPope John Paul IX on Tuesday canceled his 
■planned visit to Sarajevo hours after 11 
Bosnian Serb artillery rounds slammed 
into a mountainside less than two miles 
from where he hoped to say an open-air 
Mass on Thursday. 

^ The decision, announced by the Vatican 
in Rome and by the office of the 
president, AKja Izetbegovic, ended weeks 
of speculation and repeated warnings from 
rebel Serbian leaders that they could not 
guarantee the Pope’s safety. 

“The Pope, after consulting his principal 
aides and inspired by a deep sense of 
responsibility toward the population, has 
therefore decided to postpone the visit to 
Sarajevo, scheduled for Sept 8, with the 
aim of carrying it out as soon as circum- 
stances permit,” the Vatican statement 
said. 

The cancellation represented yet anoth- 
er setback to city's population —the ma- 
jority Muslims as well Roman Catholic 
Croatian and Orthodox Serbian minorities 
— and followed what UN military spokes- 
men termed the worst violation of the zone 
protecting Sarajevo from heavy weapons 
are since February. 

Residents of all rehgiaus persuasions 
had hoped the papal visit would galvanize 
flagging international support for their 
plight and their increasingly ignored pleas 
ZOT maintaining Bosnia &S a mul tiethnic 
jodety. 

Instead, once again the rebel Serbs, who 
occupy more than 70 percent of Bosnia 
and maintain their blockade of the capital, 

demonstrated ^the effectiveness of their 
stranglehold. 

planned 24- hoiA foft tt^Saiajevo. l5ey 
sad it^ Waite phliticSl gesture to the pre- 
fonrhi ap^ »fas5oi Bosnian government. 

■ spokesmen, commenting 

Ga thejyiS&tion of the heavy-weapons ex- 
clusion zone around Sarajevo, said UN 
radar showed that the 1 1 rounds were fired 
in a 20-minute period ending at 11:50 
AM.: The spokesmen said they suspected 
thc;Serbs used a mobile 76mm mountain 

- ? = See POPE, Page 2 



Crispin Fl.i3.ril PeuiCT. 

Relatives of John O'Hanlon, a Catholic killed by unionists on the first day of the IRA cease-fire, grieving on Tuesday at his funeral in North Belfast. 

Progress in Cairo Held Up by Vatican Objections 


By John Lancaster 
and Boyce Rensberger 

Washington Post Serrice 

CAIRO — Delegates to the Cairo con- 
ference neared agreement Tuesday on an 
American-backed compromise aimed at 
defusing religious controversy over abor- 
tion, but progress stalled at the last minute 
over objections from the Vatican. 

U.S. and other delegates had hoped — 
and predicted — that agreement would be 
reached Tuesday night on the second day 
of the conference, removing what many 
participants say is the biggest hurdle to 


reaching consensus on a formal plan to 
stabilize world population. The sudden ad- 
journment startled many delegates, who 
were uncertain about its implications for 
the rest of the meeting. 

Clinton administration officials who 

Tea nations are joining together to share fam- 
ily pi— tag drilk with Third World. Page 4. 

briefed reporters after the dosed session 
had adjourned said the Holy See appeared 
to be the prindpal holdout, and that it had 
cited support for the compromise from 
such unlikely sources as Iran as well as 


African and Latin American countries that 
are traditional allies of the Vatican. 

“It is a surprise," said a dqetted U.S. 
official. “Muslim countries, Nicaragua, 
Latin American countries agreed. It’s 
striking, in any case." 

Working to resolve differences in a key 
paragraph on abortion, envoys of most of 
the 180 nations represented in Cairo set- 
tled on a formulation sought by the Vati- 
can, which stated that "in no case should 
abortion be promoted as a method of fam- 
ily planning" and that governments should 
do their best to reduce its use. 

At the same time, the proposed compro- 


Paris and Bonn Play Loose on Unity Issue 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — - The sudden flap about calls 
for a hard-core Europe organized around 
Germany and France have little to do with 
a blueprint fair the future European Union 
and ouch to do with electoral pressures in 
Bonn and Baris, government officials said 
Tuesday. 

i| Both Chancellor Helmut Kohl and 
Trime Minister Edouard Bahadur appar- 
ently felt compelled to reassert French- 
Gennan primacy in shaping Europe, main- 
ly as a way of heading off nationalistic 
revolts from members or their own parties 
disillusioned with European cooperation. 


“If they stick together about France and 


it helps both of them with the Social Dem- 
ocratic left and reduces the risk of a revolt 
on the right," a French policymaker said. 
If the French campaign took on an_ anti- 
German tenor, it could hurt Mr. Kohl's 
claims to have reconciled Europe to Ger- 
man reunification. 

Given that Mr. Kohl faces elections in 
October and must maintain his anti-infla- 
tion reputation, any early drop in German 
interest rates is excluded. For Mr. Balla- 
dur, that policy is a potential handicap — 
and a potential target for anti-European 
rivals — because France would welcome 


cheaper money to ease social tensions. 

Talking up the French-German alliance 
helps both leaders transcend these poten- 
tial complaints. 

But the swift backlash suggests that 
these domestic considerations blinded Mr. 
Kohl and Mr. Bahadur to the way in which 
statements that once might have been dis- 
missed as campaign rhetoric have become 
the stuff of domestic politics in other coun- 
tries in a more integrated Europe. 

For example, Prime Minister John Ma- 
jor has been exposed to fresh attacks that 
he has been duped about Britain's future in 
Europe. Britain and Italy were irate about 

See EUROPE, Page 2 


Kiosk 


Sampras Is Upset 
InU.S.Open 

NEW YORK (Reuters) — Pete 
Sampras, the defending champion, 
was upset in the fourth round of the 
U.S. Open tennis championships on 
Tuesday by Jaime Yzaga of Peru, 3-6, 
6-3, 4-6, 7-6 (7-4), 7-5. 

Sam pras, ranked No. 1 m the world, 
bad been seeking his third U.S. Open 
championship. He won the tourna- 
ment in 1990 and 1993. Yzaga is 
ranked 23 in the world. 

Earlier article. Page 19 


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Books 


Page 8. 

' 3tam 

8 1- 


The Dollar 

Vi mm rinse 

pfwmwckiw 

DM 

1.5336 

1.555 

Pound 

1.5525 

1.5475 


96,65 

99.13 

FF 

5.286 

5J3255 


Piece by Massive Piece, Chinese 
Ship Home an American Symbol 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Service 

FONTANA California — It was a sym- 
bol of America's industrial might, one of 
the world’s biggest, most sophisticated, 
most expensive steel mills, employing 
thousa nds of workers and producing 2.3 

A world surrey of competitiveness ranks the 
United States first dspbdng Japan. Page 13. 

milli on tons of high-grade carbon steel a 
year when it went on line in 1979. 

But almost immediately, the 23-story- 
high, S287 million Kaiser Steel Corp. plant 
became a symbol of wrenching changes in 
the economy, its roaring furnaces affected 
by international competition, environmen- 
tal regulations, labor disputes and the un- 
its of coiporate raiders. 


Within three years it was closed. This 
desert town 45 miles (70 kilometers) east of 
Los Angeles, once home to citrus groves, 
then part of Southern California’s indus- 
trial engine, slipped into the shuttered 
slowdown that has gripped the region. 

Now, since early last year, the mill has 
been the soene of one last burst of activity: 
300 Chinese workers from Shaogang Steel 
Corp. of Beijing have been cutting, unbolt- 
ing, dismantling and crating the 55,000- 
ton mill and shipping the pieces to south- 
ern China for reassembly. 

Amid sprays of sparks from cutting 
torches and the roar of giant cranes, each 
piece — some nearly 200 tons — was 
photographed and marked in Chinese 
characters to be matched with blueprints 

See STEEL, Page 4 



John G MabaufJO' *£tDcr Fraiuc-Prej* 

NFL MARK FOR RICE — The 49ers’ Jerry Rice, beating a Raiders’ 
defender, broke Jim Brown’s record with his 127tb touchdown. Page 18. 


Robbers Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and Clean the Plate 


Newsstand Prices 


Andorra 9M FF Luxembours 60 L Fr 

Antilles 11.20 FF Morocco 12 Dh 

Cameroon. . 1.400 CFA Qatar .8.00 Rials 

Esypt E. P.5000 Reunion. ...11.20 FF 

France ..,,.,.9.00 FF Saudi Arabia ..9.00 R. 

Gabon 960 CFA Senegal 960 CFA 

Greece .300 Dr. Spain ^ooptaS 

Maly .....1600 Lire Tunisia — 1.000 Din 

Ivory Coast .1.120 CFA Turkey ..T.L. 35,000 

Jordan. 1 JD U.A.E. .....8J0 Dirh 

Lebanon ...USS 1 JO U.S. Mil. (Eur.j ST-10 


By Robert D. McFadden 

flew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — With trickery, threats, 
timing and bravado, two armed robbers 
invaded Tiffany’s in Manhattan, the police 
said, and — after binding four guards and 
defeating the alarm systems — made off 
with about 51 million in jewelry and the 
videotapes that had recorded the escapade. 

No shots were fired and no one was 
injured. It was the costliest robbery in the 
157-year history of Tiffany & Co. 

The drop bad been victimized nine times 
previously by ambitious shoplifters. 


smash-and-grab thugs, con artists with 
elaborate tales and once by a man who 
shot a hole in a sidewalk display window 
and tried to snare a diamond-and-ruby 
necklace with a wire. 

Investigators said the robbers intercept- 
ed an unarmed security guard near mid- 
night Sunday on his way to work at the Art 
Deco building at Fifth Avenue and S7ih 
Street The thieves were selective, choosing 
about 300 necklaces, bracelets, watches, 
rings and earrings encrusted with dia- 
monds, rubies, emeralds and other gems. 

They appeared to know a lot about Tif- 


fany security: its guard schedules, the use 
of intercoms at locked doors, how to turn 
off alarms and the location of video cam- 
eras and keys to the sales floor, with its 
archipelago of treasure in mahogany-and- 
glass display cases. 

“It was a very, very professional job.” 
said Captain Salvatore M. Blando. the 
commander of the detective unit. “They 
were definitely on a schedule. They might 
have cased the place for a long time. We're 
looking into it being an inside job.” 

Tiffany, whose name has come to sym- 
bolize luxury and elegance, issued a dis- 


creet statement saying only that the store 
had been robbed, that no one had been 
hurt and that its doors would be open For 
business as usual. No estimate of the loss 
was given, but a police spokesman said it 
was “upwards of SI million." 

[Lloyd's of Loudon offered a 325,000 
reward for information leading to the re- 
covery of the jewels and the arrest and 
conviction of the robbers, The Associated 
Press reported.] 

With bulletproof glass covering the dis- 
plays in its windows, with steel doors. 

See ROBBERY, Page 4 


mise makes clear that in countries where 
abortion is legal, women should have ac- 
cess to safe abortion services and “reliable 
information and compassionate counsel- 
ing." Thar guarantee was apparently unac- 
ceptable to the Holy See, according to 
participants in the Tuesday night sessions. 

Administration officials said that while 
the Vatican delegation was the only one to 
object to the latest version of the compro- 
mise language, other countries had ex- 
pressed their' desire to seek changes. Amid 
fears that the debate would last all night. 

See ABORTION, Page 4 


Dublin Tries 
To Calm Fear 
After Meeting 
With the IRA 

Protestant Unionists, 
Suspecting Secret Deal , 
Hear Some Reassurance 


By John Damton 

New York Tunes Service 

DUBLIN — With government workers 
leaning on window sills to watch every 
move and a knot of cheering well-wishers 
waving the Irish tricolor on the sidewalk, 
Gerry Adams, the radical republican lead- 
er of Northern Ireland, entered Govern- 
ment House on Tuesday for his first meet- 
ing ever with the Irish prime minister, 
Albert Reynolds. 

The session was denounced even before 
it began by Protestant unionists in the 
North. They saw it as a charade designed 
to confer sheep’s clothing on Mr. Adams 
now that the Irish Republican Army on 
whose behalf he speaks has declared an 
unconditional cease-fire in the 25-year sec- 
tarian struggle over Northern Island. 

The 90- minute session was also attended 

In Belfast, the rise of a new Catholic muhfie- 
dass helped bring about the cease-fire. Page 1 

by John Hume, leader of the moderate 
mainstream Catholic party in the North. 

It ended with a one-paragraph state- 
ment and a brief news conference. 

“We are at die beginning of a new era in 
which we are all totally and absolutely 
committed to democratic and peaceful 
methods of resolving our political prob- 
lems,” the statement began. 

All three men said they wanted to in- 
clude the Protestant unionists in “an equi- 
table and lasting agreement” over the fu- 
ture of Ulster. 

Though many Protestants welcome 
peace, their leaders worry that the cease- 
fire has come about because of a secret 
back-room deal between Britain and its 
enemy, the IRA. Both of them deny this 
strenuously. 

Mr. Adams seemed particularly elo- 
quent in calling upon the Protestants to lay 
down their fears. At one point he said: “I 
extend in generosity a hand of friendship 
to my Protestant brothers and sisters in the 
North. A negotiated peace settlement 
holds no threat for them.'* 

The ostensible puroose of the meeting 
was to plan for a “forum of peace and 
reconciliation” that the Irish government 
wants to sponsor in October. It would 
include all political parties of the North, 
although the Unionist parties are highly 
unlikely to attend. 

The idea for such a forum was largely as 
a way of bringing Sinn Fein, the political 
wing of the IRA, into some kind of larger 
political dialogue. 

But undoubtedly the real intent behind 
Mr. Reynolds's decision to meet with Mr. 
Adams was to give the Sinn Fein president 
a political boost that be can point to in the 
Catholic neighborhoods of Northern Ire- 
land. Mr. Adams needs to convince hard- 
line dements within the IRA that the deci- 
sion to abandon military actions is bearing 

See IRELAND, Page 4 


On the Steppe 9 
Ex-Enemies 
Make Historic 
‘War 9 in Peace 


By Fred Hiatt 

Washington Post Service 

TOTSKOYE TRAINING GROUND, 
Russia — The Russian officer approached 
the checkpoint after oightfalL By the rules 
of the joint U.S. -Russian training military 
exercise taking place here, he should have 
been detained for violating curfew. 

But the officer, calling a kind of time- 
out in this first-ever exercise, said he just 
wanted to tell the Americans how happy 
he was they had come. 

Specialist Eddie Cox, 26, handed him a 
photograph of his own family in Pitts- 
burgh. and the soldiers from formed)' ene- 
my armies hugged as the wind gathered on 
the steppe. 

“Myself, I don’t really believe we should 
have been enemies," Mr. Cox said Tues- 
day. “1 told him he would always have a 
friend in America." 

For the first time ever, U.S. soldiers are 
in Russia’s heartland, conducting training 
maneuvers with the Russian army. Hie 
number of Americans is small — just over 
300 including air force crews — but many 
American and Russian officers alike here 
said they considered the cooperation his- 
toric, not least because the two divisions 
involved were facing each other across the 
Fulda Gap in Germany only a few years 
ago. 

“It’s interesting how quickly you can 
make friendships." said Colonel Richard 
M. Bridges. 44. “It’s hard to believe we 
were ever watching each other through 
binoculars across the inner Ge rman y bor- 
der.” 

I expected a lot more tension in the way 
See FRIENDS, Page 4 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1994 


Belfast’s Catholic Middle Class Helped the Push for Peace 


By W illiam E. Schmidt 

New York Tana Sewer 

BELFAST — During Sunday 
morning Mass, the Volvos and Mer- 
cedeses belonging to worshipers at 
Sl Brigid’s spill up and down the 
fashionable streets along Malone 
Road, Belfast's most exclusive neigh- 
borhood and once a redoubt of 
Northern Ireland’s moneyed Protes- 
tants. 

Built more than a hundred years 
ago to serve the servants who worked 
in the area, SL Brigid’s is now Bel- 
fast's fastest-growing and most pros- 
perous Roman Catholic parish. 
These days, Catholic teachers, law- 
yers, and businessmen fill nearly half 
the houses in this leafy enclave, and, 
in a muddy lot next door, a new $2.3- 
million sanctuary is rising. 

“Twenty-five years ago. Catholics 
were treated like second-class citi- 
zens," said John Kearney, a parishio- 
ner who runs his own contracting 
business. “I'm not going to say there 
still isn’t unfairness and discrimina- 
tion. But as far as I'm concerned, 
there is also a real sense of possibility 
and opportunity, loo." 

In a city scarred by 25 years of 
killing and sectarian violence, the 
quiet lanes along Malone Road and 
other green neighborhoods illumi- 
nate an important fact of life: the 
emergence of a growing Catholic 
middle-class that has subtly altered 
the political and economic landscape 


of this province over the last two 
decades. 

United by their own more modu- 
lated aspiration for a united Ireland 
— or at least a fairer Northern Ire- 
land — they have given voice to more 
mainstream Catholic republicans 
like John Hume, the bead of the 
Social and Democratic Labor Party, 
the province’s largest Catholic party. 

Mr. Hume, along with Irish lead- 
ers in Dublin, helped nudge Sinn 
Fein and the Irish Republican Army 
into declaring a cease-fire last week, 
in which the IRA agreed to lay down 
its arms and pursue instead a place at 
talks on the future of the province. 

As the cease-fire seemed to hold, 
there was cautious hope on the side- 
walks outside Sl Brigid’s. 

“It almost seems too good to be 
true, doesn’t it?" said the Reverend 
Ambrose Macaulay, the parish 
priesL “People are asking them- 
selves, ‘Is this a dream? When will I 
wake up and face reality a ga i n ?’ ” 

For the most part, it is usually - 
peaceful along Malone Road, one of 
Belfast’s few truly integrated neigh- 
borhoods. The loyalist Protestant 
gunmen and bombers usually attack 
the poor Catholic ghettoes a few 
miles away. 

There the broken walls are covered 
with the angry republican slogans of 
struggle, and wary British soldiers 
patrol in combat gear, scanning the 
streets through gunsights. 


Over the last 25 years, while the 
IRA practiced terror in the province 
and in England in a bid to drive the 
British out of Ulster, many other 
Catholics here have been the benefi- 
ciaries of fundamental if uneven 
change. Fair-employment laws have 
begun to redress discrimination, and 
Catholics are now proportionally 


'Fifteen years ago, I 
never would have been 
able to live in this 
neighborhood. 9 

Alex Gallagher, 54, 
a Catholic bnsiiieceman 


represented in local government 

As Catholics have slowly climbed 
the economic and soda! ladders, they 
have discovered, said John Me Dart- 
land, a high school principal, that 
“there is life beyond the Falls Road." 

In an interview last month in The 
Independent, a London newspaper, 
Mary McAleese, a Catholic and a law 
professor at Queen’s University in 
Belfast said: 

“The Catholic population has un- 
dergone an almost phenomenal 


change in terms of its sense of confi- 
dence, its willingness to articulate its 
nationalism. For years, largely be- 
cause of the IRA’s campaign of vio- 
lence, people did not feel comfort- 
able about openly espousing 
nationalism when others were killing 
and bombing." 

Moreover, fair-employment laws 
and the participation of the Irish 
government in talks on the future of 
Northern Ireland now offer what she 
described as structures that “allow 
Catholics to believe that there is the 
possibility of being regarded as 
equals." 

In some ways, the emergence of a 
Catholic middle class has only shar- 
pened the contrasts within Belfast; 
income has become as much a factor 
as religion in defining the great di- 
vide. 

For both Catholics and Protes- 
tants, Northern Ireland is increasing- 
ly a society of haves and have-nots. 
While as many as 8 in 10 workers in 
the poorest neighborhoods, Catholic 
and Protestant, are without jobs, 
people in Northern Ireland have the 
highest disposable income of any 
part of the United Kingdom. 

This year, the British government 
will pump some $5 billion into the 
province in subsidies and financial 
support, including salaries for a vast 
civil service that accounts for nearly 
half of all jobs here. 


Coupled with as much as $1 billion 
a year in new housing, much of it in 
Catholic neighborhoods, the reality 
of Belfast is much different from the 
enduring 1970s image of grimy, rain- 
soaked terrace houses. 

Still, the picture for Catholics is 
mixed. Paul Teague, an economist 
with Ulster University, says that the 
percentage of Catholics employed is 
now roughly equal to their propor- 
tion in the population, or about_43 
percent of the province’s 1.6 million 
people. 

But be says that other studies sug- 
gest that a Catholic man is 2 J times 
more likely to be unemployed than a 
Protestant man, and that Catholics 
are stiS woefully underrepresented in 
managerial ranks. 

People like Alex Gallagher, 54. a 
Catholic businessman who lives off 
Malone Road and runs his own con- 
struction business, worry that the 
war is not over. But he also acknowl- 
edges that his life has changed in 
unimpgina hle ways in the 25 years 
since a the troubles" began. 

“Fifteen years ago, t wouldn’t 
have been able to own my own com- 
pany,” he said. “And 15 years ago, I 
never would have been able to live in 
this neighborhood, either.” 

Was that because of housing dis- 
crimination, he was asked. Mr. Gal- 
lagher laughed. “Back then, no Cath- 
olic could have afforded it anyhow,” 
he said. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


German Parties Trade Insults 
In Legislative Budget Debate 


Reuters 

BONN — Germany’s gov- 
ernment and opposition ac- 
cused each other of incompe- 
tence in economic policy on 
Tuesday in what was likely to 
be their last major parliamenta- 
ry confrontation before the gen- 
eral election on Ocl 16. 

Finance Minister Theo Wai- 
gel defended the way he had 
financed German reunification 
in the past four years and said 
the Social Democratic opposi- 
tion leader, Rudolf Scharping, 
was not good with figures. 

The Social Democratic Par- 
ty’s shadow finance minister, 
Oskar Lafontaine, accused Mr. 
Waigel of incurring more public 
debt than all his predecessors 


put together, and that Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl presided over 
the most unjust distribution of 
wealth in German history. 

Both were speaking at the 
start of a two-day debate on the 
1995 federal budget which will 
be rewritten if the Social Demo- 
cratic opposition ousts the 12- 
year-old coalition of Mr. Kohl’s 
Christian Democratic Union. 

Mr. Waigel launched a spirit- 
ed attack on Mr. Lafontaine, 
Mr. Scharping and Gerhard 
Schrhder, the state prime minis- 
ter of Lower Saxony — the 
heavyweight trio of the Social 
Democratic campaign. 

“Wherever your leadership 
team has responsibility, public 
finances are brought to their 


knees,” he said. “In Saarland, 
Rhineland-Palatmate and Low- 
er Saxony, where you have had 
a chance to prove your worth, 
the dvO service is bang inflated 
and debt driven higher.” 

In a gibe at Mr. Schaiping’s 
shaky presentation of the Social 
Democratic Party’s tax propos- 
als earlier this year, Mr. Waigel 
added: “Counting is not the 
Rhineland-Palatinaie prime 
minis ter’s strong point.” 

Mr. Lafontaine, who was 
beaten by Mr. Kohl in a bid for 
the chancellery in 1990, said the 
government was responsible for 
the highest state debt, the high- 
est taxes, the worst housing 
shortage and the worst crime in 
modem German history. 


POPE: Safety of Residents Cited as Trip Is Called Off 


Cantinaed from Page 1 

gun with a five-mile (eight-kilo- 
meter) range. 

Despite the violation of the 
zone banning heavy weapons 
within a circle of 12.4 miles 
around the besieged Bosnian 
capital, UN personnel and Bos- 
nian police on Tuesday after- 
noon conducted a dress re- 
hearsal of security measures for 
a papal visit. 

With sirens blaring, a convoy 
of UN armored vehicles drove 
from the UN-operated airport 
along Marshal Tito boulevard 
— better known as Sniper Alley 
to Sarajevo’s residents since the 
fighting in the capital began in 

Also heightening speculation 
that the Pope would brave any 
danger to visit Sarajevo was the 
arrival this afternoon of the 
pontiffs bulletproof vehicle. 

“By evaluating all circum- 
stances," the Bosnian govern- 
ment statement said, “it has 
been decided that the 
should postpone his visit to 


rajevo. Monsignor Francesco 
Monterisi, the papal nuncio, 
formally informed Izetbegovic 
of the Vatican derision which in 
Rome was justified to avoid 
risking civilian lives." 

Tens of thousands of resi- 
dents had been expected to at- 
tend a Mass conducted by the 
Pope in the former Olympic 
speed-skating rink. The com- 
plex, heavily damaged in the 
fighting, now serves as a UN 
military facility, but is directly 
exposed to Serbian gunners 
bardy a half-mile to the north. 

“The Serbs have a direct tine 
on us," remarked Ivica Cetinac, 
a construction engineer who su- 
pervised the erection of the 
platform from which the Pope 
was to have said Mass. “They 
watch us and can choose to hit 
you in the left eye or the righL" 

Privately, UN officials ex- 
pressed relief at the decision. 
Despite weeks of increasingly 
detailed daily meetings with 
Vatican and Bosnian govern- 
ment officials, UN security spe- 


cialists kept stressing that no 
one, much less the Pope, was 
safe in a city where more than 
10,000 residents have been 
killed in the past 29 months. 

In recent days Bosnian gov- 
ernment authorities, who at the 
best of times entertain ambiva- 
lent relations with the United 
Nations, have become con- 
vinced the peacekeepers were 
subtly discouraging the papal 
visit 

Denying official UN charges 
that government forces fired a 
shell at the airport on Aug. 18, 
for example, Mr. Izeibegovic's 
office on Monday said the accu- 
sation was designed to compro- 
mise the government and its 
army and “sabotage the Pope’s 
visit to Sarajevo.” 

The postponement was an es- 
pecially Utter blow for Bosnia’s 
Roman Catholic Croatian com- 
munity. Bosnian Croatian and 
Muslim leaders were reconciled 
only last February, thanks part- 
ly to behind-the-scenes Vatican 
diplomacy. 



Palestinians Arrest 21 Extremists 

GAZA CITY (AP) — Responding to growing procure from 
Israel Palestinian police on Tuesday arrested at least 21 Muslim 
militants 0 f Islamic Jihad who were wanted in & shooting attack ^ 

on Israeli troops. . _ 

Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin has threatened to suspend nego- 
tiations on expanding Palestinian self-rule until the Palestinian 
leader. Yasser Arafat, cracks down on the nrilitanis. Mr. Rabin 
complained that Mr. Arafat was not being tough enough and that 
the Palestinians were “nearing the limit" of what Israel could 
tolerate. ... _ . ., 

Islamic Jihad had claimed responsibility for a roadside ambush 
Sunday that killed one Israeli soldier and wounded two. Israeli 
radio said an Islamic Jihad activist who was wounded and 
captured in the attack led the police to others involved. 

Lagos General Takes Absolute Power 

LAGOS (AP) — In the aftermath of a defeated anti-govern- 
ment strike in the oil industry, Nigeria’s military ruler Tuesday 
armed himself with new dec re es giving his regime absolute pow- 
ers. 

General Sant Abacha also banned three more newspaper and 
magazine groups, including the most influential and respected in 
the country, The Guardian of Lagos. The others are Concord and 
Punch. 

The new laws apparently are aimed at scuttling two pending 
court cases challenging the legitimacy of General Aba eta's rule.' 
The cases were brought by a Nobel prize author, Wole Soyinka; 
and a coalition of human rights groups. One of the eight decrees 
sets General Abacha and his officials above the courts, denying 
them any jurisdiction over actions of the military government and 
its agents. Another allows people to be detained for three month^r. 
without any charges. 

Haiti Invasion Is Imminent, U.S. Says"; 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (Reuters) — A U.S. official said; 
Tuesday that American troops would be in Haiti soon, either, to) 
remove military leaders from power or to restore order if the* 
generals left voluntarily. ’ 

“American and international troops will be in Haiti and they* 
win be in Haiti soon," said Stanley Schrager, the U.S. spokesman] 
in Haiti. . 

He warned of the “increasing inevitability of some kmd of an' 
intervention,” saying the likelihood of an invasion had increased ] 
after the slaying of a prominent Catholic priest last week, the* 
failure of a UN mission to Santo Domingo in the Dominican; 
Republic, and a visit by senior State Department officials to a. 
conference of Caribbean states. ! 



0 


politic* 






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Japan Opposition Weighs New Party ■ 


TOKYO (AFP) — Opposition party leaders, including three; 
former prime ministers, met Tuesday to create a new party to> 
challenge Prime Minis ter Tomikhi Muxayama’s governing coali-' 
tion. ! 

Some 50 officials from 10 opposition parties met at a Tokyo* 
hotel and agreed that they should adopt a basic common political; 
platform before the next parliamentary session begins in late- 
September, officials said. ; 

As a first step, the opposition plans to register as one political 1 
group in Parliament by SepL 29, and officials said that a new party; 
might be formed by the end of the year. The former prime] 
ministers involved are Morihiro Hosokawa. Tsutomu Hata and- 
Toshiki Kaifu. ' 


Si ^ 

% 7v- 


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p 


Mexico Election Protest Gogs Roads .... 

SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, Mexico (AP) — A# - 
estimated 20,000 peasants blocked roads and bridges in the- titf 'jrv'i 
southern Mexican state of Chiapas on Monday, demanding the' 
resignation of the ruling party’s governor-elect. 1 

The protesters claimed that Eduardo Robledo Rinc6n of the- 
Institutional Revolutionary Party was elected in August through] 
fraud, intimidation and bribery. 

The protests began last week as sympathizers backing the leftist; 
Democratic Revolutionary Party blocked bridges in 19 communi-! 
ties, including the international bridge at the Guatemalan border.- 
The police reported no major violence. ] 

For die Record 

The new U.S. ambassador to Singapore, Timothy A. Chorba,* 
presented his credentials Tuesday, Ming a post that had been] 
vacant for 14 months. He has said he hoped that friction over the- 
caning of Michael P. Fay would stop do minatin g the relationship' 
between the two countries. (AP)'. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

Swissair wfll begin flights Wednesday between Geneva and' 
Osaka, Japan, the company said Tuesday. The flights, on Wednes-' 
and Friday 


Jr. ’»:* 

j.'- •• 

aw- -' k 

i; - 


• : r: \ : 




Chancellor Helmut Kohl and Chancellery Minister Friedrich BohL, background, 
the debate Tuesdaty on the proposed 484 billion Deutsche mark federal budget for 


days and Fridays, with a brief stopover in Zurich, are aimed at 
meeting a demand for business and tourist travel to Japan's' 
second city. . (Reuters) , 

The Lido music haO in Paris will close next month for remodel- 1 
ing, its managers said. Founded in 1928, the 1,200- seat theater on ! 
the Champs-E3ys6es will shut from Oct 29 until Nov. 28. (AFP)' 
Romanian airport workers have postponed until Oct 19 a strike, 
originally set for Tuesday after winning some concessions ($k 
salary and reorganization plans from the government, a trade r 
union leader said. (Reuters) • 




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EUROPE: Reaction to Hard-Core ’ Union Talk Shows Domestic Politics Now Cross Borders '■ 


Conffimed from Page 1 
talk that they might be excluded 
from a hard core of Europe ce- 
mented by monetary union. 
Spain acted lukewarm; so did 
the Netherlands, a candidate 
for the core. 

“It was very unfortunate that 


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the statements in Bonn and Par- 
is seemed to suggest a conspira- 
cy," a Kohl aide acknowledged. 
Exactly how European nations 
will manage a range of coopera- 
tive ventures “are legitimate 
questions, but they involve sen- 
sitive political judgments, not 
sloganeering," he said. 

Explaining the timing, offi- 
cials said that the center-right 
governments in in Germany 
and France- face rising chal- 
lenges from their own rightist 
factions hoping to depict Euro- 
pean unity as a hollow ideal. 

To preempt that challenge, 
Germany’s Christian Demo- 
crats and the French govern- 
ment chose to brandish mone- 
tary unity, even in truncated 


form, as proof that European 
cooperation can work. 

Since monetary union is the 
only major area likely to see big 
strides in European coopera- 
tion, a British official said, 
“they must have decided to 
■make it another French-Ger- 
man operation” — a political 
stand-by in both countries. 

But the assertion that Bonn 
and Paris could form a director- 
ate, as distinct from providing 
momentum for consensus, runs 
counter to the idea of a Europe 
combining national strengths to 
safeguard stability. Britain can 
hardly be denied a voice in eco- 
nomic policy when its military 
strength is essential for a credi- 
ble defense policy. 


Increasingly, the need for 
more flexibility is accepted by 
governments trying to bridge 
the gaps between Bonn and its 
neighbors, with Britain appar- 
ently hoping that the admission 
of East European nations to the 
European Union will loosen 
rules even more. Worries have 
become more acute as Italy, a 
founding member of the Euro- 
pean Community, has struggled 
to find a new democratic equi- 
librium. 

Still, there is little enthusiasm 
across most of the Union for 
the idea that Bonn and Paris 
dictate the terms of flexibility. 

_ Aware of this sensitivity and 
livid at not being consulted, the 
German foreign minister, Klaus 


Kinkel, who also heads the Hb- - 
era! party that is Mr. KdhTs; 
junior coalition partner, imme- 
diateiy rejected public proda-;.^'- 
mations of a two-tier Europe; . 

Seeking to c alm the uproar,, •/ 
Mr. Kohl has distanced himself • 
from the Christian Democratic; .:; - . 
paper that outlined a monetary. ■ 
core group of Germany, . ' 
France, Belgium, the Nether- 
lands and Luxembourg. Lasi< . 
week Mr. Balladur offered on; 
identical view, without naming! 
the nations. ' , 

Mr. Kohl's office said Tues- 
day that Italy had accepted his'- ';' 
reassurances, but Christian .. * . 
Democratic parliamentarians, 
in mid-campaign, stuck to their j 
position. 


Mil Is 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1994- 


Page 3 


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Gay (and Proud of It) Neighborhoods Form Enclaves Against Urban Decay 


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By Karen De Witt 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — As cities 
around the United States continue 
to sh rink, urban planners say the 
neighborhoods molded by homosex- 
uals in recent years are takin g on a 
new importance as bastions against 
further decay. 

Although there are no authorita- 
tive statistics to track the migration 
of gay people to various urban 
neighborhoods, the presence of ho- 
mosexuals — and with it their eco- 
nomic power — has become increas- 
ingly visible. 

In addition to well-known areas 
like Greenwich Village in New York 
and the Castro district of San Fran- 
cisco, predominantly gay neighbor- 
hoods have arisen in a dozen major 
rides over the last two decades, at 
once bolstering those cities' sagging 
tax bases, pumping thousands' of 
dollars into the economy and some- 
times making tired neighborhoods 
safer and more attractive to hetero- 
sexuals. 

_ "They’ve stabilized a lot of neigh- 
borhoods where they’ve stayed" 


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said Dianne Welchko, a real estate 
agent in Chicago. 

Seattle’s Capitol Hill section, for 
instance, has in the last IS years seen 
an influx of gay men and women 
who have rehabilitated houses in the 
working-class area. Houston’s Mon- 
trose neighborhood, once a declin- 
ing working-class section, is now the 
geographic center of a lively gay 
community. 

In Miami, there is South Beach, in 
Denver the Cheesman area, in Cin- 
cinnati Liberty Hill and Northside, 
and in Sl Louis the South Grand 
Street area. There are also concen- 
trations in smaller cities throughout 
the heartland. 

“We surprise a lot oF people." said 
Howard Harris, a te chni cian with 
the Federal Aviation Administra- 
tion in Oklahoma City. "And we're 
the buckle in the Bible Belt.” 

George Chauncey, a social histori- 
an at the University of Chicago, said 
statistics on gay neighborhoods have 
been elusive, largely because the 
Census Bureau does not identify 
diem as such. But he said anecdotal 
indicators point to their growth. 


"The evidence comes from gay 
and lesbian voter drives, the prolifer- 
ation of gay-oriented businesses and 

They bring in a lot 
of people, and that 
helps the local 
economy. Their 
deposits look the 
same, their taxes look 
the same. 7 
Mark S. Schwartz, an 
Oklahoma City councilman. 

the addresses of people on gay mail- 
ing lists or political action commit- 
tees,” Mr. Chauncey, the author of 
“Gay New York," said. 

"These neighborhoods are like 
earlier ethnic enclaves," W illiam 
Frey, a demographer who studies 
min orities at the University of Mich- 
igan’s Population Studies Center, 
said. 


Robert Bray, who travels around 
the country for Fight the Right, a 
grass-roots project of the National 
Gay and Lesbian Task Force, 
summed it up with a twist on a 
recent war cry of advocates for gay 
rights: "We’re here. We need a real- 
tor.” 

Perhaps nowhere is the phenome- 
non of gay neighborhood as urban 
pillar truer than in the Dupont Cir- 
cle section of Washington, a half- 
mile from the White House. In the 
past 20 years, it has been trans- 
formed from a rundown area to one 
of Lbe most vibrant and desirable 
places to live in the District. 

Today, a mix of restaurants, 
nightclubs and businesses keeps it 
awake long past the time ihe rest of 
the city has shut down. 

A town house in the area that cost 
$350,000 in 1970 would have in- 
creased in value to 5750,000 in the 
mid-1980s, the height of the real es- 
tate boom, according to figures from 
the agency Washington Realty 
Group Inc. And monthly rents for a 
one-bedroom apartment there rose 
to S750 From $400 during the period. 


the last for which figures are avail- 
able. 

"The gays get a lot of the credit for 
turning this area around,” said Jack 
Evans, a city council member whose 
district includes Dupont Circle. 

Sociologists and demographers 
alike say the concentration of homo- 
sexuals in core neighborhoods has 
grown in the last two decades out of 
gay political advocacy and the AIDS 
crisis, as well as generally more toler- 
ant attitudes toward homosexuals. 

That visibility has translated into 
demarcated gay neighborhoods, 
whose residents demand recogni- 
tion. Dozens of large and midsize 
cities have gay pride events each 
year, and proposals to ban discrimi- 
nation against homosexuals appear 
regularly on local ballots. 

New York Ciiy and Cincinnati, 
for example, have passed such legis- 
lation in the last five years, and ft is 
pending in other cities like Oklaho- 
ma City, where the International 
Gay Bowling League and the Inter- 
national Gay Rodeo Association 
stage events each year. 

Steve Collier, the executive direc- 


tor of the Oklahoma City Conven- 
tion and Visitors Bureau, said the 
two events have accounted for hotel 
bookings of several thousand rooms. 
Mark S- Schwartz, a member of the 
Oklahoma City Council whose ward 
has the most visible gay population 
in the city, said: "They brine in a lot 
of people, and that helps the local 
economy. Their deposits look the 
same, their taxes look the same." 

The Reverend Kit Cherry, public 
relations associate of the Metropoli- 
tan Community Church in Los .An- 
geles, said the influx had benefited 
urban areas as much as homosex- 
uals. The church, whose members 
are mostly homosexual, has 270 con- 
gregations in the United States. 

"We’ve offered cities faith in 
themselves." she said. "We went into 
cities at a time when many people 
were abandoning them for "the sub- 
urbs. We fixed' up buildings that 
were f alling down and got involved 
in local and regional politics to en- 
sure the well-being of cities." 

The concentration and visibility 
of gay men and women in urban 
neighborhoods have not come with- 


out cost. Such distinct neighbor- 
hoods, also attract hostile outsiders. 

Stuart Michaels, a research sociol- 
ogist at the University of Chicago, 
lives in Lakeview. an area that has 
been steadily gen trifled into a gay 
enclave. 

"People looking for gay people U> 
bash know where to come," he said. 
"If you’re walking down the street, 
it’s not unusual for some young kids 
in a car to yell ‘faggot’ at a man or 
‘dyke* at a woman with short hair.” 

In addition, as buildings and 
housing in these areas are revived 
and property taxes increase, some 
lower-income residents are driven 
out. And not everyone is enthusias- 
tic about living in a neighborhood 
with a large homosexual population. 

“There have been times when I’ve 
felt uncomfortable in my own neigh- 
borhood,” said Pam Taylor, who 
works for the Voice of America and 
lives in Dupont Circle. Heterosex- 
uals avoid parts of the area, she said, 
“because of what they feel is an in- 
your-face attitude by ’gays that they 
don’t belong there." 


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Away 

From Politics 


•A mysterious ffluess that 
sickened more than 600 
sengers and crew memt 
aboard a luxury cruise shit 

has been identified as 

losis, a common bacterial" 
fection. A passenger with a 
history of heart trouble died, 

• The District of Columbia 
will delay the opening of all 
city public schools while it 
tries to relocate students from 
the 49 schools deemed unsafe 
by a city judge. 

• After an afternoon at a fam- 
ily barbecue spent drinking 
and arguing over plans for his 
bachelor party, a New York 
City police sergeant was shot 
and killed by ms older broth- 
er, also a police officer. 

• A light aircraft crashed in 
flames, killing all four people 
on board shortly after taking 
off from the Truckee-Taboe 
airport, in central California’s 
Sierra Nevada mountains. 

• Two pit bull terriers at- 
tacked a Bronx, New York, 
couple who were taking care 
of the dogs for their son, kill- 
ing die woman and putting 
the man in the hospital. 

• Four New England fisher- 
men were nrinring and pre- 
sumed drowned off NoVa Sco- 
tia, Canada, after their trawler 
capsized in swells as the crew 
of a military plane watched 
helplessly. The 75-foot Italian 
Gold, based in Gloucester, 
Massachusetts, sank 125 miles 
(200 kilometers) from shore. 
The pilot of the military air- 
craft, which had been called to 
the area to watch over another 
fishing boat, made repeated 
passes over the Italian Gold 
out had trouble seeing in die 
bad weather. 

AP. NYT, Reuun. F VP 



Ctiiilr, Re - .^-ha&sii'The Arccuitd Pmi 

ON THE MARCH — Hotel and restaurant workers demonstrating for better wages 
and benefits during a pro-union rally on the Boardwalk in Atlantic City, New Jersey. 
The Reverend Jesse L. Jackson addressed the crowd, estimated in the thousands. 


it i.n*s 


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POLITICAL /VOTES 


7 », 


Jesse Helms Loses a Prop 

‘ WASHINGTON — Throughout the 
1980s, Senator Jesse Helms, a North 
Carolina Republican, and the nonprofit 
Coalition for Freedom were synony- 
mous. Mr. Helms, as honorary chair- 
man, touted the group in promotional 
materials as a small but effective vehicle 
for telling the public about free enter- 
prise, government waste, communism 
and media bias. 

. But recently Mr. Helms abruptly and 
quietly broke off the relationship. The 
split came after many of the Raleigh- 
based group’s practices were questioned 
by the Internal Revenue Service in an 
ongoing tax case that has challenged the 
legality of some of the interlocking fund- 
raising organizations that once formed 
Mr. Helms's financial power base. 

Two years ago, the IRS revoked the 
Coalition for Freedom's tax-exempt sta- 
tus after agents concluded that the 
group, between 1985 and 19S7, had ille- 
gally participated in political activities 


and improperly benefited individuals 
who are connected to conservative 
causes. 

The coalition, which says it has made 
changes in its operations, is challenging 
the decision. 

( WP} 


Will Cuomo Do It Again? 

NEW YORK — In raucous parades 
in Rochester and Brooklyn and in 30- 
second attack ads aired from Long Is- 
land to Buffalo, New York’s gubernato- 
rial candidates kicked off the traditional 
fall campaign that this year will deter- 
mine whether Mario M. Cuomo is writ- 
ten into the state's political lore for win- 
ning a fourth term. 

Both parties and their leading candi- 
dates — Mr. Cuomo for the Democrats. 
State Senator George Pataki for the Re- 
publicans — face primaries on Sept. 13. 
And leaders of both parties say that Mr. 
Pataki has not used the last two months 


to persuasively establish his political 
persona. 

Despite Mr. Cuomo's vulnerabilities. 
Democratic and Republican strategists 
agree that the Republicans cannot sim- 
ply run against him without offering a 
credible alternative, both in a candidate 
and a platform. And some Republicans 
are concerned, and Democrats are cau- 
tiously optimistic, that nine weeks may 
not be long enough for the Republicans 
to do that. ~ [ .V YT t 


Quote/Unquote 

Oliver L. North. Republican candi- 
date for the U.S. Senate from Virginia 
and a key figure in the Iran-contra af- 
fair, taking a swipe at the Democratic 
candidate, Charles S. Robb, whose has 
admitted to sexual indiscretions in the 
’80s: "There arc those who want to cre- 
ate a moral equi\alenc> between what 1 
did as a frail, flawed human being to 
save lives and the repeated behavior of 
other candidates. There is none." < li'P ) 


M; 


Luis Beltran Is Dead at 58, 
Leading Filipino Journalist 


• r I 




The Assoeicaed Press 

MANILA — Luis Beltran, 
58. one of the Philippines' best- 
known broadcasters and news- 
paper commentators, died 
Tuesday of an apparent heart 
attack, his staff announced. 

Mr. Beltran was born in Ma- 
nila. He wrote for several news- 
papers until 1972, when the late 
jpesident Ferdinand E. Marcos 
declared martial law. Mr. Bel- 
tran was among thousands of 
journalists, politicians and oth- 
ers who were arrested. 

He wrote columns for The 


Philippine Star and later The 
Manila Standard. 

■ Other deaths: 

Hans Gabor, 71, director of 
the Vienna Opera House, on 
Sunday during a game of golf in 
Biarritz, France. 

David Wright, 74, the South 
African-bom lyrical satirical 
and narrative poet who said to- 
tal deafness since childhood 
meant he perceived the world 
like an eccentrically-sited cam- 
era, on Aug. 28 of cancer at 
Waldron, England. 


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At Cabinet Level, a Friendship Quandary 


Los Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON — As 
schoolmates at Howard Uni- 
versity in the 1970s, Mike Espy 
and his friend Richard Douglas 
sometimes sat up deep into the 
night in their dormitory, drink- 
ing beer and fantasizing about a 
day when they would become 
powerful figures on the national 
scene. 

Two decades later, still dose 
friends, they have succeeded 
beyond their wildest dreams. 

Mr. Espy entered politics, 
and in 1986 became the first 
black elected to Congress from 
Mississippi since Reconstruc- 
tion. In 1993, President BUI 
Clinton named him secretary of 
agriculture, the first black ever 
to hold that cabinet post. 

Mr. Douglas, meantime, be- 
came the first black to earn a 
doctorate in agriculture from 
the University of Maryland, 
served in the Agriculture De- 
partment under President Ron- 
ald Reagan and today is senior 
vice president for corporate af- 
fairs for Sun Diamond Growers 
of Pleasanton, California. 

As their careers have soared, 
however, Mr. Espy and Mr. 


Douglas have become pan of 
an FBI inquiry — of the sort 
that is all too f amili ar in a time 
of heightened sensitivity over 
ethical conduct. 

The FBI is looking into 
whether Mr. Espy may have im- 
properly accepted gifts, favors 


happens to work for an agricul- 
tural company. 

Mr. Espy declined to be in- 
terviewed. He contends that the 
allegations stem from unhappi- 
ness over changes he is trying to 
bring to the department. 

Some of the allegations — 


'They went to college together, dreamed 
together and now are realizing their dream/ 
James Lake, Washington lobbyist 


and travel expenses from a vari- 
ety of private agribusiness com- 
panies that receive funding 
from, and are regulated by, the 
Agriculture Department, in- 
cluding his friend Mr. Douglas 
and Sun Diamond. 

Acting on the basis of prelim- 
inary FBI findings. Attorney 
General Janet Reno has asked a 
three-judge panel of the U.S. 
Circuit Court of Appeals to ap- 
point a special prosecutor. 

Both Mr. Espy and Mr. 
Douglas deny wrongdoing. Ac- 
cording to the Agriculture De- 
partment, Mr. Espy views Mr. 
Douglas as an old friend who 


that Mr. Espy improperly used 
a corporate jet, acceptra free 
tickets to professional basket- 
ball and football games and 
fraternized too much with indi- 
viduals who deal with the gov- 
ernment — may seem like mi- 
nor transgressions, if that. 

There is no question that Mr. 
Douglas enjoys unusual entree 
to Mr. Espy and his closest ad- 
visers. Their parallel careers as 
advocates for agricultural inter- 
ests have been intertwined for 
nearly a decade, with benefits 
for both. 

"These guys are like broth- 
ers." said James Lake, a veteran 


Washington lobbyist who is 
close to Mr. Douglas and active 
in Republican circles and Cali- 
fornia agriculture groups. 

"They went to college together, 
dreamed together and now they 
are realizing their dream.” 

But they represent one of the 
most important ethics issues in 
present-day Washington. 

At a time when even arcane 
and obscure programs and poli- 
cy decisions can mean millions 
of dollars in profits or costs to a 
business or industry, the exis- 
tence of close relationships be- 
tween decision-makers and po- 
tential beneficiaries can raise 
concern about the objectivity 
and fairness of the process. 

Department officials and 
others say investigators are 
looking at a 40th birthday party 
for Mr. Espy that Mr. Douglas 
co-hosted and helped pay for at 
a Georgetown restaurant, a trip 
to Greece arranged by Mr. 
Douglas where Mr. Espy ad- 
dressed the International Nut 
Council, and numerous New 
York Knicks basketball games 
that Mr. Espy apparently at- 
tended as guest of Mr. Douglas. 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1994 



10 Third World States to Offer 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Tima Sernce 


wails," Haryono Suyono. the 
state minis ter for population. 


political factors can play a ma- 


CAIRO — Challenging the “ mierview here. This 

notion that birth control is a ST 3 *® 111 was 4* bora of ne- 


lor role in setting the stage for 
birth control. ' 


Western idea out of keeping «ssity becau« of a shortage of 
with traditional cultures, 10 de- doctors, » added. 


vdoping nations with success- 
ful famil y planning programs 


“We have one doctor for 
thousands of people,” he said 


will announce here this week “So we had to build a clinic 
that they are establishing an in- without walls so that everybody 


ternational partnership to share “P®*?*. ^ staff: the ularnas 
their «wn« and experience with (“* rehjpous leaders) and half 


Other Third World countries. 
The 10 nations — Bangla- 


of the village get involved." 
Colombia, like Indonesia, 


desh, Colombia, Egypt, Indone- has found that offering the wid- 
sia, Kenya, Mexico, Morocco, « l ***& contraceptive op- 

tl _ -i j >r ■ - . . . ' linne nvwnlifiii aMriuui nac 


Thailand, Tunisia and Zimba- ^ons, excepting abortion, has 
bwe — include Muslim, Bud- contributed to success. Miguel 


dhist and Christian lands; some Trias, executive director of Co- 


poor and some newly richer lombia’s preeminent nongov- 
Because they Drove familv “““d I?™?,*- 


Because they prove family cm ¥ I ™ uu 
planning can work in a diversity ? rofa S? d ? a ’ “V 1 

of settings, They are in a sense an interview here that people on 
models for theUnited Nations whole make rational 

International Conference on , , . 

“We always use what in a 


Population and Development ^ wnai “ a 

now in session here. rather dgwecalMy manne r has 

_. . _ . «_ been called the cafeteria ap- 


Moiu Staiaf/ Rouen 

Vice President A1 Gore, in Cairo for the UN population conference, speaking Tuesday at a press conference with President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt. 


STEEL? An American Factory Is Moved to China, Piece by Massive Piece IRELAJVD? 


Continued from Page 1 


and painstakingly fitted back 
together. 


— why try and reinvent the plant stood will be cleared and 


wheel?” 


together. 

Shaogang Steel, otherwise 
known as the Capital lion and 
Steel Corp., estimates that the 
operation will cost S400 mil- 
lion. California Steel Industries 


leveled. The last components 


It has been a long ordeal for are bong loaded onto railroad 
tire Chinese workers, who have flatcars and onto trucks so big 


point where everything's come IRA'DlibUn Talks 
down and nothing is up m its 


now in session here. 

Their program, called “Part- 
ners in Population and Devel- 
opment: a South-South Initia- 
tive," will be the conference’s 
first tangible result. 

Almost all of these develop- 
ing countries have cut birth and 
fertility rates drastically in the 
last decade or two; all have em- 


p roach,” he said. “We like to 
have a lot of methods available 
so that the couple can chose 
among many possibilities. 


birth control. “ 

In Buddhist Thailand, forex- 
ample, the extraordinary ac- 
complishment of cutting fertil- 
ity from more than 6.5 births to 
2.1 per woman in a quarter of a 
century had a lot to do with 
both government support and 
the efforts of the nongovern- 
mental Population and Com- 
munity Development founda- 
tion. Its founder, Meechai 
Veeravaidhaya, played on the 
imagination of a run-loving, tol- 
erant culture by offering free 
vasectomies on the king’s birth- 
day, blowing up condoms as 
party balloons and opening a 
restaurant called “Cabbages 
and Condoms” to raise money 
for his organization. - 
In Tunisia, a Muslim country 
where abortion is legal and free, 
the political equality granted to 
women under the 1956 Code of 
Individual Rights put a strong 
base under not only family 
planning but also other social- 
programs, said Nebiha Guectyl 
dana, director-general of the 
National Office of the Family 


% K-* 

vVirtui 


many options. National uruce ot tne ramuy 

Where family planning often and Population and a professor 
fails, as in northern India, ex- of pediatric medicine m Tunis. 


phasized the importance of 
women as agents of change, and 


pots say the cause may lie in But Tunisian history and the 
the lack of choices. Most poor intellectual rigor of its Islamic 


place yaJ 


Continued from Page 1 


Inc., which bought the plant, 
along with related steel-finish- 
ing operations, from Kaiser in 
1983 for S120 million, wil] get 
just SIS million for it The main 
plant never resumed operation. 

“That was the only offer 
there was with people that had 
the money to pay for it,” said 
Don Duffy, vice president of 
operations for California Steel. 
“The price they are paying us is 
a pittance by comparison with 
the total costs for them." 

Nevertheless, the deal makes 
good sense for the Chinese, who 
do not have experience in build- 
ing sophisticated steel mills, 
said Matt MacFadden, Califor- 
nia Steel’s vice president for hu- 
man resources. 

“Ten yeans ago, this was the 


lived virtually sequestered in a they can travel the hi; 
motel in nearby San Bernardino only after 20 P.M., hear 
with little contact with Ameri- the Port of Los Angeles, 
can society other than occasion- Two shipments have already 


It is not certain how the land fruit in terms of increased inter- 
^ K national recognition for their 


talk of building a minimi!! to 

process scrap sled, or the area So far, the IRA's uncondi- 


al visits to places like Disney- arrived in China. The last will 
land and Chinatown, their own leave soon. 


might be used as a transport tional cease-fire has not met 
and loading yard for the smaller with reciprocal concessions 


women as agents of change, and 
most have based family plan- 
ning in community settings, in- 
volving local religious leaders in 
counseling and publicity. 

In Indonesia, a Southeast 
Asian nation with the world’s 


Indian women are forced into 
sterilization, done in an assem- 
bly-line fashion. Fear of the 
procedure, rather than religious 


scholars also played a part 
“For 50 years Tunisia has 
been at the center of Arab dvffi- 
zation,” she said. “Muslim ex- 


or cultural barriers, turns many pens come to the Zitouna 


cooks have trucked lunches to 
the work sire. 


At the dismantled plant the 
last members of the Chinese 


eel-processing milk around it from the British. John Majors 
In China, where the economy Conservative government is in- 


largest Muslim population, 
famil y size was nearly halved 


women away. 

In 30 years in Colombia, the 
total fertility rate has dropped 
from 7.1 children for each wom- 


As they began to arrive, the work crew are breaking its con- 
Chinese were the subject of pro- Crete foundations into chunks 


mm v. Hina, wijwo me cwuum y conservative government is m- 
grew by as much as 13 percent siting oa some further declara- 


tests by labor unions here, an- that will be used as filL 


last year, the plant will add to a tion that the cease-fire will be 
burgeoning industrial base and permanent. He and other mem- 


gry that the dismantling jobs “It was like peeling a ba- 
did not go to American workers nan a,” Mr. MacFadden said. 


feed a voracious appetite for bers of the government call re- 


family size was nearly halved 
from 1971 to 1991 — a drop 
from 5.6 births per woman to 
3.0 — and infant mortality has 
plunged. Many family planning 
centers are “clinics without 


mosque to debate and discuss 
the teaching of the Koran.” But 
no serious challenges to the role 
of women have come from the 


an to Z9. The national popula- scholars. Tunisia now leads the 
tion growth rate has fallen from African continent in family 


3.4 percent a year to 1.9 per- 
cent 

Experts from successful 
countries all say that social and 


pl anning , with a population 
growth rate of only 1.9 percent 
and an average family size of 
3 3 children. 


pcatedly upon Mr. Adams or 


in the sire 
Southern G 


niggling ec 
California. 


economy of 


“First the outer structure came 
off. Then the equipment itself. 


Richard S. Masco, prqect someone else in a leadership po- 
engineer for the Diversified sition to use the word “penna- 

Farlcamnp Dcvelnnmwit Com — 


“These jobs don’t belong to The casters. The last thing left 
those Chinese guys,” Joe Perez, was the furnaces, huge ladles.” 


racKagmg Development <~orp„ nent " or something similar as 
an American subcontractor for pr00 f of their good intentions. 


ABORTION? Vatican Objections Stall Compromise 


executive secretary of the Build- He looked around the dusty 


mg and Construction Trades site, where one crew, using a 
Council, in Riverside, said at crane, was loading a section of 


the time. “They belong to us. steel frame onto a flatcar, an- 
We put this thing up, and we other was leveling the concrete 


Shaogang, said that the Chinese 
could have the plant up and 
running in as little as two years. 
“These are some of the finest 


The British government has 
not lifted a broadcasting ban on 


Mr. Adams and other IRA Wednesday morning. 


Continued from Page 1 

the session adjourned and was to resume 


very best in the world," he said. 
“There haven't been that manv 


“There haven't been that many 
dramatic improvements. Look- 
ing at this facility, knowing that 
it ran, knowing that the config- 
uration worked together, know- 
ing its heat, its tonnage per hour 


we put this thing up, and we 
should be able to take it down. 
We want those 300 jobs." 

But the protests soon died; 
the sale of the plant was contin- 
gent on employing Shaogang 


base of the last of six massive 
elevator shafts, and a third was 
pulling bon reinforcing bars 
from piles of broken concrete. 

“This is what's left: massive 


workers, so they could become rubble." Mr. MacFadden said, 
intimately familiar with the “They’ve gotten the ladles out 


structure they would rebuild. 

The deal with Shaogang in- 
cludes a promise that the 76 
acres (31 hectares) on which the 


of here, the bag house, the wa- 
ter-treatment facility. It's wild. 
I couldn't believe it would come 
down so quickly. We’re to the 


“These are some of the finest leaders. That means, for exam- The compromise would steer a middle course 
eiqpneering'People I have ever pie. that his remarks of Tuesday between the Vatican, which rejects abortion on 
ran across, said Mr. Masco, win be spoken by an actor on moral grounds, and family-pl anning advocates 
who coordinated the work of the BBC's news program. md women *s groups, which saytfft access to 
crews of American subcon trac- In what was taken as another caf „ anA : c _ u-, „„„ 

tore, including heavy equip- sign of British intransigence, ^»“<i^^™»ak=y«™PO«"tofany 
ment operators, technical adv^ barriers between Northern Ik- global papublmn strattsy. Some Islamic reh- 
ers and truck drivers. “They are land and Ireland that were tak- authorities also object to abortion. 
fantastic, organized, everything co down by republicans over Throughout the day Tuesday, the position of 
in its place, everything in its the last few days were recon- the Holy See was the focus of much speculation 
order. The heavy lifts were all stracted by the British Army. In after its spokesman issued a cryptic press release 
engineered u> the point of ex- the past people living close to that praised much of the action plan but said the 
aclly what angle the booms on thebontar say. some of the bar- Vatican “cannot give explicit or implicit support 
the cranes were to be. nere had been allowed to re- 1hncj . Z, n i: no ,L. 


the cranes were to be.' 


CONCISE, 

VET C OMPREHE NSIVE. 

That’s what our subscribers 
are saying about us.* 


main down for weeks at a time. 

Mr. Reynolds's recognition 
of Mr. Adams was symbolized 
by a handshake on the steps of 
the government building. It 
drew a collective gasp from on- 
lookers and set photographers’ 
shutters snapping. Historians 
said they thought that no Irish 

E riroe minister had met the 
ead of Sinn Fein in the 70 


years of partition. 

Mr. Reynolds was soundly 


the Holy See was the focus of much speculation 
after its spokesman issued a cryptic press release 
that praised much of the action plan but said the 
Vatican “cannot give explicit or implicit support 
to those parts of the document regarding abor- 
tion." 

In an interview, the Vatican spokesman. Joa- 
quin Navarro-Valls, called the proposed com- 
promise on abortion a “basis for discussion;” 

. “It could lead to a formulation on which we 
could eventually agree.” he said. 

The apparent softening of the church’s posi- 
tion made it easier for countries with strong ties 
to the Holy See — including Chile, the Philip- 
pines, Benin, Malta and Ivory Coast — to back 
the compromise, moving the conference closer to 


its goal of unanimous agreement, said U.S. offi- 
cials participating in the dosed sessions. 

“I think we're well on our way to a consensus,” 
Timothy F. Wirth, undersecretary of state for 
global affairs, said late Tuesday afternoon. The 
compromise paragraph, proposed by the Euro- 
pean Union, was “language we have supported 
for a long time,” he asserted. 

Administration officials noted that the cod! 
promise language was supported even by Paki- 
stan, a predominantly Muslim country whose 
prime minister, Benazir Bhutto, inveighed 
against abortion during a passionate opening 
speech on Monday. 

But the Vatican has never budged on its insis- 
tence that the final document abandon even the 
implication that abortion is legitimate, a demand 
that U.S. and most other delegations are unwill- 
ing to grant The document makes frequent ref- 
erences to providing “reproductive health ser- 
vices,” a category understood by international 
health experts to include abortion. 

“No one should have any illusion that there's 
going to be some kind of result that causes the 
Vatican to sign this document” Vice President 
Al Gore, wbo heads the U.S. delegation, said 
after a meeting Tuesday morning with leaders of 
the Vatican delegation. 


m .41 \ 


f o. .*•* 

:sr«..i v 


£nd to the 


Zjl S’ v -“ * -* 


■5 


chastised by unionists for the _____ ______ ___ 

meeting. The prime minis ter -- 

scene haste to have dealings ROBBERY: Breakfast at Tiffonr’s Leaves Plate Clean 

with Mr. Adams, charged one " oo •/ 


- ... 

- • • 


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Ulster Unionist Party politi- 
cian, David Trimble, in a radio 
interview. 

Asked about this, Mr. Reyn- 
olds was indignant. “To those 
who say, *Why so soon?' my 
answer has to be — it is never 
too soon to save a life and never 
too soon to stop the trifling,” be 
declared! before a duster of mi- 
crophones. 

Meanwhile in London, the 
Reverend Ian Paisley, bead of 
the Democratic Unionist Party, 
which is more extreme than the 
Ulster Unionist Party, was to 
have a session with Mr. Major 
at No. 10 Downing Street But 
it was quickly aborted when the 
fiery Mr. Paisley was asked by 
Mr. Major if he accepted the 
prime minister's word and re- 
fused to reply yes. 


Continued from Page I they knew who he was.” One 

bomb-resistant vaults, alarms, around the 

hiddra^ineL; luiriTand should® ^ and an auto- 

other precaurionsfrofany’s ™ his rita. mvrali- 

was thought to be only slightly sai - . . 

W vulnSnWe tha* n Jnn’« Following mStTUCtiOIlS, the 




less vulnerable than the nation’s f. uuu ^ 
gold reserves at Fort Knox, 5 


The robbers, however, ap- 
peared to breeze through the 


i breeze through the 
technical problems with the 
right combination of timing, 
tricks and threats, investigators 
said. It began at 1 1:40 PJSL on 
Sunday as the first of two Tiffa- 


guard told a guard inside that 
he was with “my cousins” and 
a P" was buzzed in. The three guards 
The and a fourth who arrived for 
the wor i£ minutes later were bound 
with duct tape. 

tors In the security office, the in- 
* ° n traders obtained a key to the 
main retail sales room on the 


about 20 minutes in the sales S—r.' ; :.w . 
room, investigators said. ' • 

Theujpolice said, one robber 
asked, “who’s going to take tne ,4 ! :! 1 ' ' 

upstairs?” apparently referring ^ . 

to another security office on the r - 
second floor where the video 
cameras were located. . . ^ ' '* : : 

When there were no vohs^ 
teers, the police quoted the - " 

guards as-telling them; “He be- 
came very irate,'* and said, 'V'- i • 




s. s 'i 1 1- », 

. . 

S Vk, . . 


n y 1 *f9 ur S t 7 guards oxt a mid- ground floor and electronically 
mght-to-8 AM. shift arrived to disabled a set of alarms linked 


replace two guards who were 
inside, waiting to go off duty. 

The guard wore jeans and a 
windbreaker. The police 
spokesman said, “Obviously 


to the merchandise display 
cases in the room, a baronial 
chamber. 


While one robber watched you say anything to the police *>5 - * , 
the guards, the other spent we’re going to get you.” o."' 


volunteered. kv.* ! - Vr ; 

When they left, the robbers 
issued a final war ning, accord- 'V 
mg to the police, who quoted 
one as saying; “We know who ■ • - :r.; 
you are and where you live, so if l:C t - 

irfni cqv 1 ” >i S! 1 ■ 


get you.” 


FRIENDS: On the Steppe, U.S. and Russia Engage in a ‘War’ in Peace 


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THE NEWSPAPER YOUU ENJOY READING EVERY DAY. 


Coatmaed from Page L 
the Americans relate to us,” agreed Artur 
Gulko, 36, a Russian captain. “But it turns 
out most of them are normal guys." 

pie exercise in peacekeeping activities, 
which lias been in the planning for a year, 
aroused strong opposition from Russian 
nationalists, who called it the first step of 
an American invasion and another plot to 
weaken a cmce-great superpower. 

Former Vice President Alexander V. 
Rutskoi condemned the exercise, and sev- 
eral dozen Communists and their sympa- 
thizers camped outside the training ground 
here, 2.125 kilometers (700 miles) south- 
east of Moscow. 

Opposition in the Parliament last spring 
prompted President Boris N. Yeltsin to 
postpone the maneuvers, originally sched- 
uled for July. But U.S. offers to move the 
exercise to the United States met with a 
chilly reception from the cash-strapped 
Russian Defense Ministry, which could 
not afford to transport its troops across the 
Atlantic. And so the nine-day operation 
began here Friday. 

ToLskoye was also the site of a Soviet 
above-ground, 20-kfloion nuclear explo- 
sion in 1954. Americans who conducted 
tests here say that an hour at the epicenter 
still gives about as much radiation as one 
X-ray. Radiation at the exercise sites 10 
kilometers from the epicenter is normal 
they said. 

“There are two tourist sites in tins area 
— the natural springs, and ground zero," 
said Lieutenant Colonel Ray B. Shepherd. 

The speed with which the world has 






inouies to soviet heroism m World mat Bosma-Herzegovina was “in the back £Sss 
War H and banners calling for the prole- of everyone’s mind” when the script was - a 

lariat of the world to unite compete with being developed. 

posters for the movie showing this week at Russian officer! iu .. S' is 

theofficcre’ dub— .-EmmanueDe.” More- pJSTVSfMta&Jrf S 

“L 8 < ^ clc k < ^ departure from Soviet Americans and their precision in following - ■ 

r ? orteis UN procedures and their own guiddinS - j • 
alike were permitted to walk anywfiere on The Americans said they were impressed V 


base without escort and talk to anyone 
without a chaperone. 

“We have no secrets — no secret maps, 
no secret cadres, no secret equipment,'’ 
said Colonel Nikolai Malyshev. 
a Some experts in Moscow said the exer- 
cise was mostly of symbolic value. But 
officers here said that, while it may have 
started as a political exercise, both sides 


by the Russian troops’ directness in, for N \ . ■ 
example, separating fighting gangs. ' ' i . . I 

“We tend to hang bade and wait until ' . j 

things escalate," said Specialist Gavin ^ V,: : ■ - . } 

Krat 2 ^ 25, a translator. “The Russians just v! " - ’I j 

went in there and fired a few shots in the •• ^ : 

air and separated the two groups. It works ■■ - fr : „ *i 
better.” ■. ■' • 


were now learning from each other. 
Soldiers from the U.S. 3d Infantry 


Soldiers from the U.S. 3d Infantry Divi- 
sion were practicing with their Russian 
counterparts in a scenario staged in the 
imaginary countiy of “Atlantis,” where 
warring factions had called an uneasy 
truce and asked the United Nations to 
keep the peace. 

Together, with command alternating be- 
tween Russian and American officers, sol- 
diers have been manning a checkpoint, 
facing challenges from hard drinking 
“hooligans” and ornery reporters, search- 
ing cars for hidden weapons, escorting 
convoys and practicing other activities on 
what Colonel Bridges called, “the border 
between low-intensity warfare and peace- 
keeping." 


The soldiers are 


living j 
hey ha 


in separate tent 


every other day, so that on Tuesday Mh iW- 
Kratz ate for lunch, porridge, sardines, . 

noodle soup, tea “and lots of bread.” $>?;•: Y/- ' : , 

“It’s filling,” he said. If l '"-- f 

The Russians, for their part, have rts* ’ s 

learned the joys of MRJEs — the “meals ?i_, •*'.*** •. 
ready to cal’ that the army carries with it 
into the field. ^ 

“Everybody likes MREs but the Ameri- • vV ‘ 
cans, Mr. Kratz said. ' 

The two sides haw: agreed in principle to • 

conduct a second exercise next year; but L ' * 


the time and place have yet to be decided. Yft . ' I 


M ■ . 









** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1994 


Page 5 


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Cuba’s Woes Affect 
Country Folk, Too 

Village’s Cohesion Suffers, 
But There’s No Rush to Flee 


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By Tim Golden 

JVew York Tima Service 

LA FE, Cuba— There are 
no rafts in the quiet gulf that 
presses up to this small town 
on Cuba's western end, only 
children splashing around 
under the not late- summer 
sun and fishing boats teth- 
ered to the shore. 

Though some hungry 
townsfolk have taken to 
stealing rood from their 
neighbors' homes, no one 
has yet tried to steal any of 
the boats. In a town whose 
name translates as Faith, no 
one seems to have turned 
decisively against the Revo- 
lution. 

But stories of the thou- 
sands of desperate people 
fleeing the island have domi- 
nated conversation for 
weeks. The people of La Fe 
are asking the same ques- 
tions asked by those who 
take to the rafts, and getting 
many of the same answers. 

“What can you hope for?" 
demanded Ldzaro .Rodri- 
guez, a young laborer who is 
the father of three small chil- 
dren. “These is no future 
here." 

Among the great majority 
of Cubans, the ones who 
have stayed, there are some 
who ding to the Revolu- 
tion's promise of a more de- 
veloped society and others 
who, on its worst days, re- 
member thing s as having 
been worse before. 

There are people, espe- 
cially in the provinces, who 
could not imagine abandon- 
ing the homeland. And there 
are those wito would leave in 
a flash but will not risk their 
lives to be confined indefi- 
nitely at a U.S. base. 

Yet even for some of the 
die-hard revolutionaries in 
Havana who lode mi the 
continuing spectacle of the 
rafts with disgust or disbe- 
lief, the exodus seems to 
have heightened a sense of 
urgency about Cuba’s steep 
economic decline. 

“At the beginning, we 
thought all of this could 
come apart," said a woman 
studying to be an army 


counterintelligence officer. 
She was referring to the hi- 
jackings of slate-owned 
boats and a riot in Havana 
that prompted the govern- 


ment to stan letting people 
leave the island freely last 
month. 

“Maybe it will help that 
they leave,'* the woman said. 
“In the provinces people are 
more tranquil. But they have 
to struggle to eat, and they 
get crazy.” 

As in the past, the bitter- 
ness of Cubans* private com- 
plaints may be a poor mea- 
sure of their patience with 
the Co mmunis t government 
that Fidel Castro brought to 
power 35 years ago. 

The government has been 
quick to stop the daily power 
blackouts and to put scarce 
cooking oil back in the 
stores. Some rationed foods 
that for months existed only 
on the thriving black market 
have become available 

a gain. 

But what the government 
has not provided is any clear 
sign that it will take the sort 
of radical measures that for- 
eign economic advisers say 
are needed if Cuba is to sal- 
vage its crumbling industrial 
plant, revive food produc- 
tion in the countryside and 
attract foreign investment. 

“The question Z ask my- 
self is the same one that 1 
think everyone else asks: 
What is going to happen 
here?" a 48-year-old archi- 
tect said in his home in a 
working-class Havana 
neighborhood. “And I can- 
not see a way out of this, not 
in the direction we are head- 
ing now." 

As a stream of his friends 
have traveled abroad on pro- 
fessional delegations and de- 
fected, the man said, he has 
only struggled harder to sur- 
vive in Cuba. Though be 
does not hesitate to criticize 
the government elite, he ap- 
preciates the Revolution's 
social achievements. 

But even with a good job, 
be earns only 340 pesos a 
month, about $4 at the 
black-market exchange rate. 


I - jr* 



Tutsi Troops Move 
Into UN ‘Safe Zone’ 


nominuCumunUun-Rnd/The Aswlaird Pm> 

Rwandan refugee children in Goma, Zaire, waiting to have identity pictures taken in the UN's effort to reunite families. 


Complied by Cfur Siaf) Fmm Dispatches 

KIGALI. Rwanda — Troops 
of Rwanda's Tutsi-dominated 
government moved Tuesday 
into UN-protected “safe zones” 
in the southwest, where hun- 
dreds of thousands of Hums 
have fled for fear of revenge 
attacks. 

As many as 150 soldiers of 
the new government moved 
into the protection zone set up 
by French troops, who with- 
drew last month, said Shahar- 
yar Khan, the UN special repre- 
sentative for Rwanda. 

Platoons went to Cyangugu, 
Gikongoro and Kibuye to se- 
cure a radio relay station, a tea 
factory and local government 
offices, Mr. Khan said. 

The move contradicted earli- 
er statements by the govern- 
ment that its first personnel in 
the region would be civilians. 
The only civilian officials there 
were four customs agents on the 
Rwanda-Zaire border. 

The Rwanda Patriotic Front 
soldiers are likely to bring the 
entire area under government 
control within a month, be said. 

“It doesn't mean that the 
date the RPF completes its 


presence in the sector we will 
withdraw.” Mr. Khan said. 

He said the UN troops might 
remain in the zone despite the 
presence of government sol- 
diers. The transition from UN 
to government control in the 
sector is being controlled joint- 
ly with the government, he said. 

" French troops moved into 
Rwanda from Zaire on June 23 
and established the protection 
zone as a sanctuary for hun- 
dreds of thousands of fright- 
ened Hutu fleeing the advance 
of the Patriotic Front troops. 
Mr. Khan said the United Na- 
tions puts the number of refu- 
gees m the zone at 480,000, 
down from a high of 1.2 million. 

An estimated 500,000 people, - 
mostly Tutsi civilians, were 
massacred in three months of 
fighting and ethnic slaughter in 
Rwanda. Many of the Hum 
were afraid the Patriotic Front 
would kill them in retaliation. 

President Pasteur Bizi- 
mungu, Prime Minister Faustin 
Twagiramungu and their cabi- 
net ministers have been touring 
the country, trying to raise pub- 
lic confidence in the new gov- 
ernment. (A P. Reuters) 


Seoul Questions Fresh U.S,- North Korea Contacts 


By T. R. Reid 
and Lee Keum Hyun 

Washington Post Service 

TOKYO — South Korea’s 
foreign minister is undertaking 
a hastily scheduled visit to 
Washington this week amid ris- 
ing fear in South Korea that the 
United States might be gening 
overly friendly with the Com- 
munist government in the 
North. 

The minister, Han Sung Joo, 
is expected to convey to the 
Clinton administration the nag- 
ging worries in Seoul about 
Washington’s increasing con- 
tacts with North Korea — just 
as a U.S. government team is 
preparing for a visit to Pyong- 
yang next weekend. 

South Korea fears that, amid 
U.S. efforts to persuade the 
North to give up its alleged nu- 
clear weapons program and, ul- 
timately, to abandon commu- 
nism. Pyongyang could start to 
rival Seoul as an American 
partner. 

Policy makers and journalists 
in South Korea have worked 
themselves into a state of near- 


Junior Kim in Charge, Seoul Analysts Say 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SEOUL — North Korea has suggested that 
Kim Jong H is now carrying out the duties of 
head of slate, a report in Seoul said Tuesday. 

The state-funded Naewoe Press, which 
monitors and analyzes North Korean media, 
said that Kim Jong fl had indirectly “ex- 
changed greetings” with the presidents of 
Sudan and Mali, according to North Korea’s 
Central Radio. 

Mr. Kim’s greetings were passed on by Vice 
President Pak Sung Chul ‘during a visit to 
Libya. 


“The fact that Kim Jong II exchanged 
greetings through a North Korean govern- 
ment delegation with foreign heads of state 
and that it was reported by the official media 
suggest that Kim Jong D is virtually carrying 
out the duties of head of state,” Naewoe Press 
said. 

Kim II Sung, who died July 8 , designated 
his eldest son as his political heir. But the 
junior Kim has not yet been formally named 
as state president or party chief. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


panic at the thought that Wash- 
ington might strike an indepen- 
dent diplomatic deal with the 
North. 

U.S. officials deny any possi- 
bility of a break with Seoul. 
Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher and other officials 
presumably will assure Mr. Han 
that the U.S.-South Korea alli- 
ance is still strong. 

Whether or not Mr. Han's 


worries are well-founded, there 
has been a remarkable change 
in U.S.-North Korean relations 
since the start of the summer. 

Less than three months ago. 
relations between Washington 
and Pyongyang were icy. Clin- 
ton administration officials re- 
peatedly declared that North 
Korea was a menace to the re- 
gion and one of the most seri- 
ous threats to world peace. 

North Korean radio returned 


the compliment in daily blasts 
at U.S. policy. 

But now, U.S.-North Korea 
negotiations are moving ahead 
so fast that the U.S. delegation 
going to Pyongyang is expected 
to discuss, among other things, 
possible sites for a U.S. diplo- 
matic mission in North Korea. 

The United States has never 
had diplomatic relations with 
the North. 

The foreign policy team of 


President Kim Young Sam is 
often criticized by the local me- 
dia for an alleged lack of philos- 
ophy or basic framework, espe- 
cially in dealing with the 
Communist North. 

“South Korea faces a total 
crisis in foreign affairs, espe- 
cially in dealing with North Ko- 
rea," the Chosun Ilbo, the 
south’s most-widely read news- 
paper, editori alized Sunday. 

“This is mainly due to an 
erosion in cooperation and col- 
laboration with the U.S.. and its 
rippling effects is likely to be 
serious.” 

In his four-day Washington 
talks. Mr. Hon is expected to 
emphasize two issues. One is 
that opening liaison offices in 
Washington and Pyongyang 
and any improvement in the 
U.S.-North Korean relations 
thereafter must be done “in 
parallel" with improvement in 
relations between two Koreas. 

The other is to persuade 
Washington not to sign a peace 
treaty with North Korea, 
eluding South Korea. 


ex- 


Authors Allege 
Cannibalism 
In 1960s China 

Reusen 

NEW YORK — A new 
book alleges that Chinese 
government cafeterias 
served human flesh after 
Communist Party officials 
ordered “class enemies" 
eaten during the 1966-76 
Cultural Revolution. 

The publisher. Times 
Books, said classified docu- 
ments used for the book 
indicated “the biggest epi- 
sode of cannibalism in 
modern times” occurred in 
south China, mostlv in 
1967. 

"China Wakes." written 
by Nicholas Kristof and 
Sheryl WuDunn, who are 
married, says that govern- 
ment cafeterias not only 
served human flesh but dis- 
played corpses dangling 
from meathooks, according 
to the publisher. 

The authors were Beijing 
correspondents for The 
New York Times in 1988- 
93 and won a Pulitzer Prize. 


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An End to the Anastasia Mystery? Maybe 


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By Michael Specter 

New York Tima Service 

■ MOSCOW — Saying they 
' have resolved one of the endur- 
. ing mysteries of 20 th century 
history, a Russian government 
commission reported Tuesday 
-that Princess Anastasia was in- 
deed murdered along with her 
-family by the Bolsheviks in 
-1918. 

The commission, directed W 
-Deputy Prime Minister Yuri F. 
Yarov, reached its conclusions 
■after two yean of forensic, an- 
--thropological and molecular 
Z analysis of nine skeletons found 
-in a shallow pit near the city of 
' Ekoterinberg. 

^ As article revealing the com- 
'vusoq’s findings appeared on 
' the front page of Tuesday's is- 
sue of the newspaper Sevbdnya. 
^Although a news release issued 
- Tuesday stated flatly that Anas- 
i-tasia’s bones were lying with 
’ those of her father, Cur Nicho- 
las n, and all but two of the 
"other members of her family, 
the commission stopped short 
b of releasing the 'entire repeat, 
"'saying it wanted to wait until 
-experts from Britain who had 
** already worked on the analysis 
reviewed the findings. 

„ If. true, however, the report 
could bring to an end one or the 
most bizarre and intriguing 
quests of the century: Did the 
young princess slip away to 
' safety? Could she have been liv- 
ing all this time in the West? 

I 1 Over the yean women daun- 
ting to be Anastasia have sur- 
faced almost as often as Elvis 
"impersonators, and her fate has 
been debated as vigorously, and 
*as frequently, as the chain of 
« events leading to the murder of 
v President John F. Kennedy. An 
entire industry — of royalists, 

1 immigr ants, awti- mmmnnigfc 

- and above all romantics — has 
grown up and thrived on the 

; conjecture that Anastasia sur- 
,, vivod the brutal murder of her 

2 family. Molecular evidence, 
l whatever it shows, is unlikely to 

silence the storm, 

7h!s * me they think they 
, re_^ oave found her,” said Ed- 
vard Radrinsky, author of “The 
'’last Czar," an extremely de- 
railed, best-selling history of the 
'-events leading to the execution 
of Czar Nicholas U, his family 
> and: their retinue on the morn- 
ing ofJuly 17, 1918, "For you in 
the .West if is incredible news. 
'‘For me, there are many other 

- questions. When they find 
»• Alexei and Maria then it will be 

sensational. But for you, I 
think, the legend .will never 
end.’’ . 

The report said that the 
bones of Aiexei'.the heir to the 
throne, and Maria, his older as- 


ter, were not among those 
found with the family. Mr. 
Radzinsky, a member of the 
commission, said in an inter- 
view Tuesday that he was aware 
of the findings but not that the 
it had deckled to re- 


He said he had assumed that 
there would be no announce- 
ment until every scientist who 
had studied the issue signed off 
bn the final papers. Queen Eliz- 
abeth n of England is sched- 
uled to visit Russia next month, 
and the article in Sevodnya sug- 
gested that the government 
wanted to announce its findings 
then. 

The story surrounding Anas- 
tasia’s escape was one of the 


sustaining myths of Communist 
times. But there was never any 
proof to support it, and few 
who knew much about Lenin — 
who personally ordered the exe- 
cutions — believed that he 
would have permitted mercy to 
be directed toward any member 
of the royal family. 

“In the West they never un- 
derstood tire nature of the Bol- 
sheviks." said Geli T. Ryabov, 
who has written often on the 
czar’s death. "They killed tens 
of millions of people and they 
never spared anyone. It was a 
nice legend about Anastasia, 
but always only a legend.” 

After the Bolsheviks seized 
power in 1917, Czar Nicholas, 
Czarina Alexandra and their 


five children were sent into exile 
in eastern Russia. They lived 
there until the next year, when 
they were shot in the basement 
of a house in Ekaterinburg. For 
political reasons, Lenin allowed 
speculation about the where- 
abouts of the family. Eventually 
the government announced lhai 
only the czar had been killed. 

In 1991, a grave was discov- 
ered in Ekaterinburg with nine 
bodies. They were thought to be 
those of five members of the 
imperial family, three servants 
ana the family doctor. 

Russian anthropologists ten- 
tatively identified the remains 
as belonging to the imperial 
family, a conclusion that was 
later supported by a team of six 
American experts. 


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Page 6 


WEDNESDAY,, SEPTEMBER 7, 1994 

OPINION 



Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


India’s Dirty Little War 


A relentless, deadly struggle goes on 
and on in India's mainly Muslim state of 
Kashmir, where New Delhi is (tying to 
crush forces seeking independence or 
union with P akistan . The violence comes 
from both sides, but India's obdurate 
insistence on resolving a political pro- 
blem by force has increasingly enmeshed 
it in a campaign of lawless state terror- 
ism. The ugly results are documented in a 
new study by H uman Bights Watch/ Asia. 

Regrettably, Washington, instead of 
raising its voice to defend human rights, 
has lowered it in an effort to improve 
commercial and diplomatic ties. The 
United States may have little power to 
deter India from repression, but the Clin- 
ton administration should assert Ameri- 
can disapproval more forthrightly. 

Kashmir's political status has been dis- 
puted almost since the subcontinent was 
partitioned in 1947. A local Muslim up- 
rising drew armed support from Paki- 
stan. The Hindu maharajah then called in 
Indian troops who recaptured most of his 
lost territory. The two countries have 
confronted each other over tense cease- 
fire lines ever since. Meanwhile, on the 
Indian side, a promised plebiscite was 
never held, and the state was formally 
incorporated into India in 1954. Separat- 
ist agitation continued on and off, flaring 
again into open conflict in 1989. 

Some pro- Pakistani militant groups 
have resorted to terrorist deeds like kid- 
napping, assassination and extortion and 
even to common crime. No political 
grievance can justify such acts. But Hu- 
man Rights Watch/Asia reports that In- 
dian forces, which are obliged to follow 
higher standards, have resorted to repri- 


sal killings and burning down villages. 


They axe also said to be executing marry 


suspects without trial; 200 in the first 
of this year and 50 in one month alone, 
according to local human rights groups. 
There are also many reports of torture 
and “disappearances," two other com- 
mon features of state terrorism. 

India insists that it has prosecuted 
some responsible for these crimes, but it 
has offered no information about such 
prosecutions. The U.S. State Depart- 
ment, in its latest annual human rights 
report, said there was “little evidence 
that the responsible officials received 
appropriate punishment." 

Until rhis year, American o fficials 
were equally candid in their public state- 
ments. But more recently, after New Del- 
hi warned that continued human rights 
criticism could damage relations, the 
Clinton adminis tration has gone silent on 
the subject. Meanwhile, India has aggres- 


sively courted help from the likes of Chi- 
na and Iran to block 


condemnation by 
the UN Human Rights Commission. 

The Clinton administration needs to 
find a firm and consistent voice on hu- 
man rights, whether in powerful coun- 
tries like India and China or puny ones 
like Haiti and Cuba. Selective denuncia- 
tions carry no moral authority. Criticiz- 
ing the weak but not the strong is bully- 
ing, not leadership. 

Meanwhile India, which captured toe 
world’s moral imagination with Gandhi] s 
nonviolent struggle for independence, is 
now in the unflattering company of coun- 
tries that use deadly force to keep their 
unhap py citizens in line. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Real Solution for Cuba 


“To find a real solution," says Cuba's 
delegate to so far slow-moving talks with 
the United States in New York, “you 
have to deal with the causes of the emi- 
gration.” On that basic point, Ricardo 
Alarcdn is on the mark. The emigration 
issues lying between the two countries 
arise from fundamental causes and can- 
not usefully be treated apart from them. 
The Qin ion administration’s effort to 
distinguish an emigration agenda from a 
broader political agenda is artificial and 
cannot be sustained. 

Still, Mr. Alarcdn’s complaint is itself 
inadequate, one-sided and unresponsive 
to the full requirements — and opportu- 
nities — of the new crisis in U£.-Cuban 
relations. For he wishes to treat only one 
of the “causes” of Cuban emigration, the 
American embargo, which feeds the mis- 
ery pushing desperate freedom-seeking 
Cubans to dangerous flight. He altogeth- 
er ignores a second and deeper cause, 
Fidel Castro's one-party — or, more ac- 
curately, one-man — rule. The embargo 
plays into the Cuban Communist leader’s 
hands now by handing him a nationalist 
banner. But in fact the regime is cause, 
not consequence, of the embargo. End 
the regime, and there will be no embargo. 


The trouble is that President Bill Clin- 
ton has handicapped his own diplomacy 
— kept himself from raising the larger 
issue of the Cuban Co mmunis t regime 
— by refusing to put the American em- 
bargo on the table at the same time. 

He has done so by following his Re- 
publican predecessors in embracing the 
agenda of one hard-line faction among 
the Miami Cubans. This faction favors 
an embargo to put pressure on Havana. 
Similarly, it favors limiting as much as 
possible what is for Havana the safety 
valve of emigration. It is scandalous to 
learn now chat although the United 
States agreed in the 1980s to admit 
20,000 Cubans a year, only 1 1,000 visas 
were granted in the eight years that the 
agreement has been in play. 

Does the administration not believe 
that the United States should be contrib- 
uting to freedom in Cuba, not to misery 
and not to the possibility of explosion? 
Has it not noted that the Cold War, 
which made Cuba a necessary American 
security concern, is over? Certainly the 
embargo should be on the table. So 
should a transition to a democratic Cuba. 
There the true American interest lies. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Get On With the Trade Bill 


The minority leader in the Senate, Bob 
Dole, says there is no need to rush on a 
trade bill, arguing that there would be no 


harm in putting it over until next year, 
think be is wrong. We also think he is 


We 


taking his party, with its admirable mod- 
ern free-trade history, onto new and risky 


ideal ground. This bill will bring U.S. 

/odd trade 


aw into conformity with the work 
agreement finally negotiated this year. 
The agreement was a project that, to their 
credit, the Reagan and Bush administra- 
tions both vigorously pursued. The Clin- 
ton administration has finished it up but 
has not much changed its contours. 

In expanding the volume of world 
trade, the pact would have an enormously 
healthy effect on the U.S. and other 
world economies. Some industries none- 
theless resist because they would lose 
protected status. Other critics claim — 
they are wrong — that the pact could lead 
to a weakening of U.S. labor and environ- 
mental standards and loss of sovereignty. 

Delay at this moment is a bad idea. 
Hie trade talks went on for seven years. 
Members of Congress and parties at in- 
terest were richly consulted throughout 
by three administrations. US. failure to 
approve the result could be a setback to 
approval worldwide. The House Ways 
ana Means and Senate Finance commit- 
tees (Mr. Dole is a member of Finance) 
are well along in the process of producing 
a bill that under the wdl-csiabhshed fast- 
track rules that govern such matters 
would then be put to an up-or-down vote 
in both bouses before adjournment. The 
process ought to go forward. 

Senator Daniel Patrick. Mqynihan, 
chairman of the Finance Committee, fol- 
lowed Mr. Dole on the Senate floor last 


month. The trade bill he said, represents 
“an enormous opportunity.” He contin- 
ued: “A curious left and right alliance has 
risen up against iu l think we can answer 
their questions. We will certainly have an 
opportunity.” In the end, the chairman 
said, “there will be more jobs, more 
wealth and more revenue for the federal 
government” That was the basis on 
which “a substantially unanimous Fi- 
nance Committee” had approved its ver- 
sion of the bilL Senator Dole had been 
part of that action, “one of the leaders.” 
He should stay a leader on the bin and 
work for its passage now. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


A Changed Vision After Cairo 

Never have the economic and environ- 
mental effects of population growth had 
such serious implications for the future of 
mankind. The UN Conference on Popu- 
lation and Development in Cairo has 
accordingly attracted widespread inter- 
est The long-term success of the Cairo 
conference will not be reflected in its 
final document, but rather in the fact that 
the latest knowledge on the interrelation- 
ship between education, health care, the 
status of women and population change 
is more widely spread through the media. 
It is up to the people of the South to 
decide how to put that knowledge to use. 
But the North has another responsibility: 
to lead the transition to a more environ- 
mentally sound mode of development 
that the world as a whole can afford. 

— Neue Zurcher Zeitung (Zurich). 



ft* 


The Subcontinent Doesn’t Need Indian Ballistic Missiles 


W ASHINGTON — India will soon 
decide whether to start mass-pro- 
ducing and deploying its short-range bal- 
listic missile, the Prithvi, which can carry 
myJear weapons. New Delhi should re- 
sist such a move. It would damage Indian 
security, trigger a ballistic-missile arms 
race with Pakistan, risk destabilizing an 
already volatile region, and increase the 
chances of a fourth war between the two 
m aj or military powers in South Asia. 

With a 500-kilogram warhead, the 
Pritbvi missile has a range erf 250 kilome- 
ters, but its inaccuracy leads many ana- 
lysts to suspect that it is really designed 


By Sunlit Ganguly and Mitchell Reiss 


legitimate security concerns on^both its 
lortbem 


to carry nuclear weapons. 
R. Ja 


ernes Woolsey, director of the ' 


western and northern flanks. Relations 
with Pakistan remain tense, as the two 
sides continue to joust over Kashmir and 
quarrel in a host of lesser disputes. Al- 
though India signed a series of confi- 
dence-building measures with China in 
September 1993, New Delhi is wary 
about Beijing’s military buildup, its con- 
tinued testing of nuclear weapons and its 
aspirations for Asian leadership. 

However, deploying the Prithvi would 
be contrary to India’s strategic interests. 
The missile cannot deter Beijing because it 


U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, has 
build nuclear 


cannot reach China’s mam population 

Delhi is 


stated that India could bi 
bombs within a short time if it decided 
to do so, and that South Asia is the 
“most probable prospect” for a nuclear 
war. Tensions have been aggravated by 
a recent assertion by Nawaz Sharif, the 
former prime minister of Pakistan, that 
his country has a nuclear weapon. 

New Delhi is understandably proud of 
the scientific and technological prowess 
that toe Prithvi represents. And it has 


centers. For that reason. New 
developing a longer- range missile, (he 
Agni, which should be ready in a few 
years. The Pritbvi also would add little to 
India’s military superiority over Pakistan, 
which it has defeated in three wars. Nor 
would it stop Pakistan from continuing its 

SUppOrt Of Kashmiri militants 

Further, Pakistan would be compelled 
to match India’s missile deployments by 
deploying the M-ll ballistic missiles it 
has received from China. Currently, 


these missile s are in storage crates, unas- 
sembled. Pakistani officials have private- 
ly told the Clinton administration that 
Pakistan would imm ediately assemble 
and deplqy the M-l 1 should India start 
up the Prithvi production line. 

Neither India nor Pakistan could afford 
the costs of a ballistic-missile arms race. 
Fa^h would be obliged to devote ever 
greater resources to missile programs and, 
as a hedge, to nuclear weapons as well. 
Major lenders and aid donors, such as 
Japan and Germany, would take a jaun- 
diced view of scarce financial and scientif- 
ic resources being used in this way. 


Deployment of the Prithvi would ag- 


gravate New Delhi's relations wi 


Washington, which launched a major ini- 
tiative earlier tins year to freeze nuclear 
and ballistic miss ile programs in toe re- 
gion. The Clinton administration is dis- 
cussing toe tr ansf er of technology to im- 
prove toe safety and security of the 
nuclear reactors used by India to gener- 
ate electricity. It is inconceivable that toe 
UJS. Congress would allow this in the 
face of ballistic missile deployments. 


Making Waves in the Murky Nuclear Potion 


D UBAI — The assertion by fanner 
Prime Minis ter Nawaz Sharif that 
Pakistan has an atom bomb is a disturb- 
ing development for peace in toe subcon- 
tinent. If indeed it is true that Pakistan 
has a bomb, it will come as no surprise to 
toe world. But toe claim by a person who 
should know destabilizes an equilibrium 
that had been painfully constructed. 

Pakistan ana India have maintained a 
calculated ambiguity on their nuclear 
status. Both say that although they are 
capable of making nuclear weapons, 
their programs are geared to peaceful 


By S. Nifaal Singh 


Pakistan for retaining toe nuclear option 


ng me 

while declaring that they did not actually 


purposes. Pakistanis in some authority 


[declared in toe past that they had toe 
bomb, but this is toe first time a former 
prime minis ter has acknowledged it. 

Nawaz Sharif s motive in making the 
Aug. 23 pronouncement, whose import 
he fully knew, was primarily domestic. 
He was trying to embarrass his arch rival 
Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto. He de- 
cided that he had more to gain from the 
embarrassment it would cause her than 
he would lose in toe international reper- 
cussions it would have. 

India's reaction was predictable, with 
Prime Minister P.V. Narasimha Rao 
saying that his country could quickly 
assemble the bomb to meet a threat He 
needed to reassure his people that with 
this seeming confirmation of Pakistan's 
possession of the bomb, his government 
was mindful of India's security interests. 

The stance of calculated ambiguity on 
the bomb was important for India and 


possess toe bomb. Also, it made toe task 
of toe two countries' interlocutors, espe- 
cially the United States, easier in their 
efforts to cap, if not roll back, the nuclear 
programs. Nawaz Sharif's declaration 
means that it will be difficult for either 
country to display greater flexibility. 

While India exploded a nuclear device 
in 1974, Pakistan's nuclear program has 
assumed a greater domestic salience be- 
cause it is being increasingly equated 
with nationhood. Benazir’s late father, 
Tulfilrar All Bhutto, vowed that his coun- 
trymen would eat grass to acquire a nu- 
clear capability. Any effort to forgo toe 
bomb is equated with treason. 

Neither India nor Pakistan has signed 
toe Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. 
New Delhi’s consistent stand has been 
that the treaty is iniquitous, and it is no 
secret that it views retention of toe nucle- 
ar option with an eye on a possible threat 
from nuclear-armed Ghina Pakistan says 
it will sign the treaty when India does, 
knowing toe Indian position. 

Washington has recognized for some 
time that no P akistani or Indian govern- 
ment can « gn the nonproliferation treaty 
and survive in office. It has sought to get 
the two countries to agree to a regime 
toe treaty — in effect, trying 


The United States now recognizes the 
Chinwa dimension of the Indian ap- 
proach, but a U-S.-inspired proposal 
first articulated by Pakistan, for a confer- 
ence of India and Pakistan with the Unit- 
ed States, Russia and China did not By 
because New Delhi suspected that it 


More worrisome from India's perspec- 
tive is that toe U.S. Congress might react 
to toe Prithvi deployment by rethinking 
toe wisdom of the Pressler amendment, 
which has prevented Pakistan from re- 
ceiving UJS. military and economic assis- 
tance since 1990 because of Islamabad’s 
nuclear weapons program. The amend- 
ment was not intended to give India a 
free band to develop its own ballistic- 
mitgfie and nuclear programs. If toe 
amendment is lifted* India will have 
achieved for Pakistan what Pakistan has 
been unable to achieve for Itself. 

Indian officials and analysts have so 
far dismissed these points. They have 
wwtqiHwl that ballistic missiles are not 
very different from the advanced jet air- 
craft ♦bat are already present in the re- 
gion and that they will contribute to 
deterrence. Such arguments overlook the 
cjyygni characteristics of ballistic missiles 
and toe strategic environment in which 
they would be deployed. 

Because they fly very fast and high, 
they are far less likely than aircraft to be 
shot down. They cannot be recalled after 
l aunching Hundreds of ballistic missiles 
in toe subcontinent would strain fragile 
command and control links, incre asi ng 
the chance of accidental la u nchin g . 

Psychologically, ballistic missile de- 
ployments would make each side fed far 
more vulnerable and less secure than be- 
fore. At the very least, they would intro- 
duce one more element of uncertainty into 
an already strained relationship. 


To prevent a ruinous preemptive mili- 
tary strike, each side would be sorely 


from toe absurdity of converting 
into a possible guarantor. 

Nawaz Sharif’s declaration comes at an 
awkward time for toe Bhutto government. 
Islamabad’s efforts have been attuned to 
getting the country out of the ambit of the 
Pressler Amendment, which bars the 
United States from gr anting military assis- 
tance until the president can testify to 
P akistan ’s nuclear virginity. A consign- 
ment of F-I6s, ordered and paid for by 
Pakistan, remains in the United States. A 
conditional American offer to release 
them on toe basis of a Pakistani commit- 
ment on nuclear policy has got nowhere. 

Pakistani officials have of coucse de- 
nied Nawaz Sharif’s Haim But the Unit- 
ed States, still strug gling to resolve toe 
North Korean nuclear crisis, can hardly 
welcome this new twist to toe subconti- 


nent’s nuclear capabilities. 

Washington’s initial reaction has been 
to let toe domestic storm in Pakistan blow 


tempted to adopt a launch-on-waming 
strategy. Given the short distances in- 
volved — Lahore, Islamabad, Bombay 
and New Delhi could all be reached within 

ten minutes of a launching — missile 
forces would require instantaneous deci- 
sions matfe under enormous pressure on. 
the basis of twufagnate information. This 
is a recipe for disaster. 

A ballistic-missile aims race in Sooth 
Asia would not necessarily lead to war, 
but it would undoubtedly increase the 
level of mistrust and anxiety in an already 
tense region and exponentially enlarge the 
degree of devastation should a new war 
occur between India and Pakistan. 

Deploying Pritbvi would not enhance 
India’s security vis-i-vis China or pro- 
vide a meaningful advantage over Paki- 
stan. It would offend international lend- 
ers and greatly irritate relations with the 
United States. Self-interest alone should 
: I ndian decision-makers not to 
jloy toe missile. 


to have them cap their programs. 


over. But with Pakistan’s tactic of seeking 
to embarrass India on the disputed Kash- 
mir state at every forum it can, there is 
greater incentive for India to exploit its 
neighbor’s embarrassment on toe bomb. 

International Herald Tribune. 



Siamt Ganguly 
cal science at City 
York’s Hunter College 
Mitchell Reiss is a guest scholar at the 
Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington. 
They contributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune 






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‘Never Again’ in Rwanda Means the United States Can’t Walk Away if 


W ASHINGTON — The cycle 
of honor in Rwanda is far 
from over. This became dear last 
week to members of an American 
presidential mission touring the 
region. Led by Representative 
Donald Payne, Democrat of New 
Jersey, and C Payne Lucas of 
Africare. the multiracial delegar 
dan, of which I was a part, inspect- 
ed toe vast refugee camps at 
Goma, Zaire, met with officials of 
toe UN High Commissioner for 
Refugees and visited hospital and 
aid facilities in the war-battered 
Rwandan capital of Kigali 
The group also met with the 
president and prime minister of 
the new government formed by the 
Rwanda Popular Front and inter- 
viewed the president and minister 
of defense of Burundi the country 
adjoining Rwanda that could be 
swept into the holocaust of re- 
morseless killing that cost some 
1 million lives in Rwanda itself. 

True, toe picture we saw had 
a few bright spots. Americans 
can take pride in toe way the 
U.S. armed forces and private 


By S. Frederick Starr 


g -oups opened supply routes to 
wanda and provided ' 


t wan da and provided water and 
sanitation that cut the death rate 
at the sprawling refugee camps 
from several thousand a day to 
barely 100. Beyond this, The 
Tutsi-dominated government in 
Kigali seems ready to welcome 
Hutu into positions of leader- 
ship and to discipline members 
of its army who engage in repri- 
sals against those suspected of 
having participated in this 
April’s genocide. And in Burun- 
di a few sober voices genuinely 
seek reconciliation and democ- 
racy as an alternative to a further 
blood bath in their country. 

Yet we also detected danger 
signs on every side. More than 2 
million Hutu refugees from 
Rwanda have created makeshift 
cities in Zaire, Tanzania. Uganda 
and Burundi Among them are 
thousands who participated in 
the genocide. The former govern- 
ment of Rwanda never surren- 
dered and instead called for tacti- 


cal retreat across the border. Its 
leaders are now in the camps. 
They have enough money to pay 
the’ 25,000-man Hutu army, 
which is also in the camps and 
still partially armed. 

This government in exile is 
able to maintain a network of 
tens of thousands of militiamen 


da can offer little encouragement 
to those in the camps who yearn to 
return to a normal life rather than 


te in a new round of 
. With neither electricity 
hall- 


nar working telephones in its i 
deserted capital it is incapable of 
providing even the most rudimen- 
tary services to the traumatized 
population. And if farther strife 


throughout toe camp system. It 
irly ii 


clearly intends to return to 
Rwanda and eventually reclaim 
the reins of power. Until then, 
the Hutu army and militia forces 
have shown themselves to be 
ready to murder anyone who sets 
out for home on his own. 

Many may soon choose to do 
so. The approach of the rainy 
season is threatening to reverse 
recent gains in sanitation in toe 
camps. Disease-beating flies al- 
ready are resistant to several pow- 
erful pesticides. Thus, the refu- 
gees are caught in a deadly grip 
between their own exile govern- 
ment and the forces of nature. 

The new government in Rwan- 


erugts, can tins Kigali government 


Singing Ireland’s Sad Entanglement 


N EW YORK —“It’s Over!" 

said a headline in The Bel- 
fast Telegraph when the Irish 
Republican Army announced a 
cessation of its war against Brit- 
ish rule in Northern Ireland, This 
time, it may be so. But you can 
be sure there will be no cease-fire 
in Ireland's truly abiding con- 
flict, tile war of words. 

Other disputes between kin- 
dred peoples may have lasted 
longer and involved bigger pieces 
of territory. But no quarrel I can 
think of mis generated more elo- 
quent speeches, songs, novels 
and plays, and more reams of 
poetry, than that in the Emerald 
Isle. Hoe if nowhere else, in 
Shelley’s memorable phrase, po- 
ets have been the unacknow- 
ledged legislators of mankind. 

Alas, it cannot be said that 
this has helped the quest for 
peace. The songs, the slogans 
and heroic folktales all have 
tended to harden toe conflict 
between Republicans who want 
a united Ireland and unionists 
who wish indefinitely to remain 
part of Britain. 

This is notably the case in 
Belfast during the summertime 
“marching season,” when con- 


By Karl E. Meyer 




list and a Stuart, was beaten 
William of Orange. Pathos 
mingles with defiance in the op- 
posing songs of the North’s 
Catholic minority, which keep 
fresh the memory of abundant 
tragedies past The presenti- 
ment of death forms a common 
theme, as in the poignant song 
“Londonderry Air”: 


out?” “When Strongbow invad- 
ed Ireland!" “When will it end?” 
“When Cromwell gets out of 
hell!” (As every Irish nationalist 
knows, Strongbow was a Nor- 
man who invaded in 1 170.) 

Stifl, all this eloquence flows 
from the tragic entanglement 
resulting from England’s at- 
tempt to change, even eliminate 
toe culture ana religion of a dif- 


ferent people. 

that end. Scottish Protes- 


To 


Oh dartin’ boy, the pipes, the 
pipes are calling 

From glen to glen, and down 
the mountainside. 

The summer's gone and all the 
roses falling. 

It’s you, it’s you must go and 
/ must bide. 

But come ye back when sum- 
mer’s in the meadow. 

Or when the valley’s hushed 
and white with snow. 

77/ be here in sunshine and 
in shadow, 

Oh dartin’ boy, I love you, 
love you so. 


tending communities emerge 
from their ’ ■ ’ 


respective barricades 
to cheer parades that resound 
with drum and brass and martini 


ie North’s Protestants 
know by heart toe scores of 
songs recalling toe Battle of toe 
Boyne is 1690, wires James H, a 


Poetry comforts, but it also 
keeps alive toe sorrows of de- 
feat, betrayal and sacrifice long 
past. When Beaverbrook, the 
British press lord, learned of the 
disastrous Easter Rebellion in 
1916, he called his Irish friend 
Tun Healy (later the first gover- 
nor-general of toe Irish Free 
State), and this exchange fol- 
lowed: “Is there a rebellion?” 
“There is!” “When did it break 


tahts colonized Ulster. Catho- 
lics were denied political rights, 
land laws enthroned a Protes- 
tant ascendancy, recurrent pop- 
ular uprisings were crushed and 
their leaders hanged. 

The meaning of this history 
was wisely expressed by George 
Bernard Shaw, Dublin-bred and 
a Protestant, whose other politi- 
cal judgments were often fool- 
ish. Bat on toe matter of Ire- 
land, he was surely right in his 
preface, written in 1907, to 
“John Buffs Other Island”: 

“Nationalism stands between 
Ireland and toe light of toe 
world. Nobody of any intelli- 
gence likes nationalism any 
more than a man with a broken 
arm likes having it set. A 
healthy nation is as unconscious 
of its nationality as a healthy 
man of his bones. But if you 
break a nation’s nationality, it 
will think of nothing else but 
getting it set again” 

Ireland’s war of words is just 
one expression of that pain. 

The New Yak Times. 


control its army of AK-47- 
wi elding 16-year-olds? 

Burundi too, remains a tinder- 
box. Only last October some 
1 00.QQQ people were slaughtered in 
the country. The international 
community scarcely took notice. 
Members of the misaon sensed 
that Burundi's acting president, 
Pasteur Bizrmimgu, understands 
the need for ethnic reconciliation 
and democracy. But only days be- 
fore we arrived in the capital Bu- 
jumbura, there were rumors of a 
coup, and nightly murders in both 
the city and the countryside have 
continued for months. These acts 
of violence are toe wodc of rival 
ethnic bands, many inflamed by 
calls for genocide spread by a chut- 
destine Hutu radio station. 

What, if anything, can be done 
to avert further horrors in Rwan- 
da and Burundi? 

The former Rwandan army en- 
sconced in toe refugee camp near 
Goma in Zaire must be disarmed. 
United Nations forces are not au- 
thorized to cany out this mission, 
which will require the coopera- 
tion of Zaire’s dictator, Mobutu 
Sese Seko. The United States 
must work to broker this dead, 
distasteful though it may be. 

Leaders of the former govern- 
ment and army must be separated 
from toe camps at Goma m order 
to prevent further intimidation of 


those seeking to leave peacefully 
and repatriate themselves. 

The United States and other 
countries must provide toe aid to 
re-establish rudimentary infra- 
structures in Rwanda. Private or- 
ganizations should redouble their 
efforts to improve sanitation in 
toe camps. The U.S. Air Force 
should again be charged with fer- 
rying supplies as needed. 

The United Stales must work 
with other countries to establish 
an international tribunal to bring 
those responsible for toe genocide 
to justice This is an essential for 

rec onciliation among the ethnical- 
ly divided population of Rwanda. 
It would provide the strongest pos- 
sible signal to Burundi as wdL 

The United States should un- 
dertake each of these tasks in conj 
sort with other countries, throngs 
toe United Nations or otto 
groupings. This should not be 
America’s responsibility alone, 
but it should provide leadership. 
America did, after all sit on the 
ridelines while a Trilli on people 
were hacked to death in ApnL 
This passivity crippled the ability 
of toe United Nations to take 
action when it was most needed. 

Now U.S. attention has shift- 
ed to Haiti and Cuba, as if 
America has somehow fulfilled 
its moral and political obliga- 
tions in Central Africa. Nothing 
could be further from the truth. 
To walk away from Rwanda and 
Burundi would be to admit that 
we have learned nothing from 
the other instances of genocide 
in this century. It is time. to say ' 
“Never again” and to mean it. 

f 


&er Franchise Qpj 




* , s x 


The writer is president of the As- 
pen Institute. He contributed this 
comment to The Washington Fast 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 



: Will 


1894; Abyssinian’s Visit 

PARIS — King Menefik of Abys- 
sinia is coming northward with 
toe object of obtaining a recogni- 
tion of his independence. He may 
not reach Rome until he has visit- 
ed all the other capitals, in order 
to proclaim in unmistakable 
terms that he does not mean to 
be regarded as toe prot&gi of Ita- 
ly. Now that African questions 
are absorbing the attention of 
European Powers, his visit has a 
special significance. Abyssinia, 
by its geographical situation, be- 
tween the Red Sea on one ride 
and the Lower Nile on the other, 
may become an important factor 
in the great African problem, 
which is still far from a solution. 


stone of toe replica of the statue 
of Liberty which will commemo- 
rate the arrival of the first Ameri- 
can troops in France. 


1944: Poor GJLs in Paris 


1919: liberty Replica 

BORDEAUX — - At the mouth of 
the Gironde River was laid fhfc 
morning [Sept. 6] the comer- 


PARIS — [From our New York 
edition:] For the first ime smee 
toe war began toe American sol- 
dier is a poor man. Mto Ins high 
rate of pay the GX has been 
comparative plutocrat in \ 

parts of the world, but when be 
comes into Paris now he finds 
that the old American dollar Is a 
puny sort of thing which is good 
for uttle more than a tip. Under 
the Germans, prices rose to fan- 
tastic heights. American soldiers 
go into a Paris restaurant think- 
ing they have enough t0 oover 
anything they may eat or drink. 
Then, when the bill comes there 
comes that awfnl moment when a 
man realizes he has bought some- 
thing he cannot pay far. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 7, 1994 


Page 7 


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A Major Advance in Cairo 
Against Genital Mutilation 


By A. M. Rosenthal 


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N EW YORK — In all the talk, 
hope and fury about the Cairo 
conference, one agreed sentence has 
received almost no public or press 
attention. That is a pity. The sen- 
tence is of importance to women 
specifically, but it touches every 
man because it is an achievement for 
hitman rights and human decency. 

The sentence is to be treasured for 
still another reason. It was inspired 
not by governments, international 
agencies or great political or reli- 
gious movements but by individual- 
ity — the individual determination 
by a small number of people that a 
dreadful cruelty should not endure. 

The grass-roots toorkers 
against this cruelty put 
themselves at risk. The 
declamtwnwiU give them 
status and authority. 

In the forthcoming Cairo declara- 
tion, the sentence reads: 

“Governments are urged to pro- 
hibit female genital mutilation 
wherever it exists and to give vigor- 
ous support to efforts among non- 
government and community orga- 
nizations and religious institutions 
to eliminate such practices.” 

For centuries, nobody cared that 
every day thousands of human be- 
ings were put to the knife, in a form 
of torture that could leave them per- 
manently damaged, physically or 
mentally, or shorten their lives. 

AH these human bangs are girls or 
very young women. The specially sad 
was that the sufferers did not 
that they were victims. 
_ it that was the way things 
had to be for them, being female. 

Then, here and there, people said 
they did care and how dreadful it 
was, female genital mutilation: the 
excision of the efitoris or all or part of 
the labia minora or part of the labia 
majors, the sewing together of sides 
of tire vulva, all without anesthetic, to 
prolong virginity and reduce the 
threat of female sexual pleasure. 

Two million times a year it still 
happens — 80 million living vic- 
tims. But most of the people who 
said they cared did not actually do 
anything. Colonial or independent 
rulers in the 28 African countries 
where the torture is common, for- 
eign governments or international 
agencies, all did nothing. They did 
not want to risk “interfering with 
local customs." 

Journalism and a few major West 


em women's organizations spared a 
little time and heart — a little. 

But now some people are begin- 
ning not only to care but to do. 
Nobody ever brought them together 
in united, well-funded large organiza- 
tions. They are just people, maybe a 
few thousand around the world, who 
decided that as individuals they could 
not stand it anymore. 

Some Weston women are among 
them, contributing with their talents, 
energies and money. Most of the 
small group of doers are African 
women. They have known the muti- 
lation knife and want to spare their 
daughters — everybody’s daughters. 

They call themselves “grass-roots" 
workers. They go into the villages and 
towns of their countries talking, talk- 
ing with moth os and with women 
trained to mutilate. Whenever they 
can they talk with officials of their 
countries. They put themselves at risk 
physically and socially. 

There are a few in the United 
Slates. One of them is Mimi Ram- 
sey, mutilated at age S in Ethiopia, 
who came to America about 20 
years ago. She says mutilation is 
practiced in the United Slates by 
some immigrants from Africa. She 
searches out African families, using 
money earned from nursing to travel 
the country, talking and pleading. 

Efua Dorkenoo, bom in Ghana, 
helped put together an organization 
called Forward and an anti-mutila- 
tion project in Gambia. This Wed- 
nesday, Queen Elizabeth n will hon- 
or Ms. Dorkenoo and Britain by 
making her an honorary officer of 
the Oraer of the British Empire. 

By now, a little bouquet of organi- 
zations, small and underfunded, ex- 
ist in the West to fight genital muti- 
lation. Information can be obtained, 
among other places, from Equality 
Now, PO Box 20646, Columbus Cir- 
cle Station, New York, N.Y. 10023, 
tdephone/fax 212-586-0906. 

Nobody expects the sentence urg- 
ing prohibition of genital mutilation 
to wipe it out But generation after 
generation, the world would not 
even consider the idea of interna- 
tional prohibition. The declaration 
at least will give the grass-roots 
workers status and authority. 

Who knows, it might even spur the 
U.S. Agency for International Devel- 
opment, Unicef and the World Bank 
to contribute more than a pittance 
from their fat budgets. 

Anyway, for the small group of 
individuals who made Cairo a land- 
mark in the struggle against female 
genital mutilation, three thing s are 
certainly now in order. They are 
attention, funds and embraces. 

The New York Times. 


Of a Mouse and Friends, and Passage From Cell to Liberty 


Fifty years ago this Wednesday, Mickey 
Mouse was welcomed back to France as a 
symbol of ihe A Hied liberation by Leon Bancal 
editor of the Marseille daily Le Provencal. Mr. 
Bancal (1893-19661 gave the welcome in a 
sequel to an editorial he had written two years 
earlier. “Au Revoir, Mickey" had appeared on 
Oct. 1, 1942, in Le Petit Marseillais after the 
German, occupiers banned American films. 

"The times we are living through are not 
for smiling, ” he wrote then. Indeed they were 
not, as he was soon reminded — and as he 
recounted in 1944 in " Bonjour , Mickey.” 
translated here by Arthur Higbee for the 
International Herald Tribune. 

M ARSEILLE — Hello, Mickey! You're 
back! You haven't aged a bit. You're 
always the same, with your Buie bubble nose, 
your fan-shaped ears, legs like wires and shoes 
of a kind we haven't seen around here for a 
long time. How happy the children will be to 
see you again! And their parents, too! 

You didn't come back done. We were hop- 
ing you wouldn't. I’m not just talking about 
your faithful companions: the delicate and 

MEANWHILE 

lender Minnie, your sweetheart; Donald, the 
eternal grumbler, and the long-faced Pluto. I 
am thinking of all those young men with clear 
eyes and suntans who wear tire initials “U.S." 
on their caps and who. with their friends on 
this side of the ocean, the British and also the 
Russians (whom we don’t see because they're 
far away), bring back to us an exiled goddess, 
liberty. How welcome you all are! 


By Leon Bancal 


Humans are strange animals, as you well 
know. Their hearts are full of secret turnings. 
They often have an unconscious sympathy for 
those who have given them trouble. I'm hu- 
man, Mickey, and for the past two years I 
have liked you even more. 

One evening, soldiers in green, like grass- 
hoppers, burst into my house. They seized 
me and led me to a huge building whose 
doors, thick and heavy, had triple locks, 
and whose windows, high and narrow, had 
solid bars. They locked me up. first in a 
large room, and then in a small one with 
neither bed nor furniture, where 1 found 
numerous and brilliant company. 

And there 1 lived as if in an animated 
cartoon, which was both interesting and 


% 



ainful. The soldiers in green bayed all day. 
e ate raw vegetables and poorly cooked 
turnips. We played beloie with card’s so worn 
that we could barely make out the figures 
and the suits. Now and then we got a son of 
promenade in a sunless courtyard surround- 
ed by high walls. When night fell, battalions 
of bedbugs parachuted onto our heads and 
into our mess tins. In the shadows, one 
would have called it a rain of tiny swastikas. 

Every day new companions arrived. Often, 
alas, their faces and bodies were bloody. They 
were returning from a villa on the rue Para- 
dise. where a certain Mother ruled over all. He 
had summoned them to a “correct" conversa- 
tion , as so many idiois said at the time — that 
is, accompanied by severe “corrections." 
From time to lime, some of them left in 
groups with a slender bundle of clothes. 
Where to? We didn't know. But they- still 
haven't come back and we would be happy to 
hug them again in our arms, when your 
friends will have liberated them. 

One day. your name came up. With his eyes 
on a long typewritten sheet, after numerous 
questions about matters that were very deli- 
cate at the time, a man with a shaven bead and 
gold-rimmed glasses said to me, in the most 
serious way in the world, “Why did you say 
L au revoir' "to Mickey in a newspaper?" 

He was speaking, ’in the name of a person- 
age you well know, because you surely have 
seen him on the screens and in the illustrated 
magazines. A little fellow with a comical 
mustache and a hotel porter's cap. He looks a 
little like Charlie Chaplin. 

But he has never made anybody laugh. In 
his country they call him the Filhrer. Every- 
one says he is ad readful man. He claimed to 


have conquered Europe and he wanted to be 
master of the world. In pursuit of that goal he 
unleashed millions of warriors with helmets 
and, above all, boots. 

And this Fflhrer took offense at one little 
mouse — you. Hiller against Mickey! In my 
whole life, I had never felt so much like 
laughing, l almost exploded. But I contented 
myself with smiling. 1 replied to the question 
that had been put to me by praising you. The 
farcical interview, of a grotesque buffoonery, 
went on for a good quarter-hour. 

This ogre wasn’t wrong to be afraid of you 
because, after all, it is you. my old friend 
Mickey, with your Iitlle nose, your skinny 
legs and your big feet who got the best of this 
invincible Fiihrer with his innumerable air- 
craft, his huge cannons, his invisible subma- 
rines and his series of secret weapons. 

It could not be otherwise. Many of us in 
France, a great many of us. knew- it. You 
went through some very bad moments, with 
your friends, just as you do on the screen. 
But the hour of justice has come . . . 

No. I was daydreaming. The buzzer 
sounds the end of the intermission. The main 

film is be ginni ng. It is set in Germany. 

Bravo, Mickev. And thanks. 


Leon Bancal got the U.S. Army public rela- 
tions office in Marseille to obtain a picture 
l reproduced here) of Mickey Mouse from the 
Wall Disney studio in Burbank. California. 
He published it with a reprint of both editorials 
— the sad one of 1942. and its exuberant 
sequel in 1944 — under the title “To Mickey's 
Friends. ” 77ie two years of passage from op- 
pression and censorship to liberation, he wrote, 
“will remain graven in our memory. ” 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Nigeria Needs Democracy 

Regarding the report “Fraud Does 
a Thriving Business as Nothing Else 
Moves in Nigeria " (Aug. 31): 

The major singular contributory 
factor for the environment in which 
these fraudulent activities thrive has 
been the lack of democracy in Nige- 
ria. which has been under military 
rule for 24 of its 34 years of indepen- 
dence. Without democracy, there 
cannot be a transparent, account- 
able and responsible government or 
business environment 

The United States has shown ad- 
mirable leadership in opposing the 
present military junta by refusing to 
grant entry visas to anyone, including 
members of the junta^ who is derail- 
ing democracy in Nigeria. It also has 
threatened publicly to freeze the as- 
sets in America of Nigerian govern- 
ment agencies. The U.S. House of 
Representatives has adopted a reso- 
lution calling on the junta to resign 
and hand over power to Chief Mo* 
shood Abiola, the widely accepted 


winner of the presidential election 
held on June 12 last year. 

Europe has been somewhat re- 
miss in supporting pro-democracy 
groups in Nigeria. This attitude is 
not in the enlightened self-interest 
of Europe, which has the largest 
investments in Nigeria and which 
holds the largest percentage of the 
country's external debt. 

The United States. Europe and 
pro-democracy groups in Nigeria 
should work hand in hand to pre- 
vent the world from being saddled 
with another crisis along the lines of 
Bosnia, Rwanda. Somalia and Haiti. 
The world has enough tragedies on 
its hands right now. Nigeria does 
not need to join the list. 

A BOLAJI AKINYEMI. 

London. 

Castro and Washington 

An effective U.S. strategy for deal- 
ing with Cuba must start with the 
abandonment of policy from another 
era, an epoch when communism ran 
rampant and served as the buzzword 
for all forms of xenophobia. 


First. Fidel Castro must be given 
respect, which he demands because 
of his position as a leader and de- 
serves by virtue of his command of 
the situation. His ego got him where 
he is, destroying a beautiful country 
in the process and making the people 
hungry and angry — but also helpless 
to politely ask him to step down. 

Mr. Castro must be talked to. Not 
about how to resolve the temporary 
problem of a refugee outflow, but ih 
the way the United States has talked 
to others over the years — Moham- 
med Farrah Aidid after his Somali 
militia killed U.S. soldiers, the lead- 
ers of Russia after years of Cold War 
hostility, China after the Tiananm en 
crackdown — to name just a few. 
Send Jimmy Carter if necessary, or 
Jesse Jackson, but talk. More impor- 
tantly, send in the troops: business 
leaders, planners, social workers. 
Give Chiba some money, and open 
discussions of trade. Stop sending 
empty signals. Right, of itself, wifi 
become cogent policy. 

LAWRENCE R. GORDON. 

London. 


Fidel Castro has lost control of his 
people because of his insistence on 
continuing the anachronistic Com- 
munist system. Dissent is starting to 
surface now in spite of threats and 
coercion because Cubans simply 
cannot take it any more. 

ALVIN STILLER. 

New York. 

Current U.S. policy toward Cuba 
and Haiti is cruel to the people of 
those countries and counterpro- 
ductive. I suggest lifting the block- 
ades, inviting Mr. Castro and Lieu- 
tenant General Raoul Cedras to 
Washington on state visits and wel- 
coming both countries back into 
the world community. 

PETER GERHARD. 

Fayence, France. 

Was it not Fidel Castro who was 
responsible for stripping Cubans of 
every civil right inherent in a civi- 
lized and free society, forcing them 
into commumzed slave labor cut- 
ting sugar cane? Isn't this the ty- 
rant who has imprisoned thousands 


of Cubans for expressing their de- 
sire for self-determination and exe- 
cuted countless others whose 
"crime” was to seek democratic re- 
form? The world must never over- 
look these acts against humanity. 

RONALD WALKER. 

Madrid. 

Oearly, the Clinton administra- 
tion has aligned itself with the in- 
transigent, vengeful thinking of the 
Cuban-American community in 
Miami. This is a prescription for 
bloodshed in Cuba in the short 
term, and for never-ending politi- 
cal uncertainty on the island. 

NICOLAS SAPIEHA. 

Lisbon. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “ Letters to the 
Editor “ and contain the writer’s si- 
gnature, name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject 
to editing We cannot be responsible 
for the return of unsolicited ma- 
nuscripts. 


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International Herald Tribune 
Wednesday \ September 7 % 1994 
Page 8 


STAGE /ENTERTAINMENT 




A highlight of the auction Thursday will 
be the sax Charlie Parker played in a 
1953 concert with Dizzy Gillespie. 


Bird Stars 
In Bebop 
Garage Sale 
In London 


By Mike Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 

I TS hard to know whether to laugh or cry. 
“Bird — The Chan Parker Collection: A 
Bird's Eye View of the Private Genius” is 
being auctioned on Thursday by Christie's 
in London. The auction house hopes that the 
more than 80 items will realize “in excess of 
£100.000," or more than $150,000. 

Included are Charlie Parker's driver's license, 
correspondence, concert posters, Christinas 
cards, musical scores and the cream acrylic Graf- 
ton plastic saxophone (serial number 10265) he 
played at the Massey Hall “Quintet of the Year" 
concert in Toronto on May 15, 1953, with Dizzy 
Gillespie, Bud PowelL, Charles Mingus and Max 
Roach (estimate: £30,000 to £40,000). 

1 wrote the above, on the terrace of a caffe, in 
blank spaces around Bird's photograph on a 
page of Christie's slick, full-color brochure, 
which probably cost more to produce than he 
was pam to record “Blues for Alice." How much 
will this page be worth one day? Everything has a 
price, it seems. An S-by- 10 glossy publicity photo 
of Gillespie signed “To Yard My Better Half* is 
estimated at £600 to £800. 

After his death, Henry Miller's manuscript of 
“Tropic of Cancer" was sold by Sotheby’s for 
$165,000. As the book was being published in 
1934. MiDer wrote his publisher to say money 
was no problem because he had “solved the 
problem of living without money." But Miller 
was rewarded in his lifetime. On the other hand, 
a contract with the Associated Booking Compa- 
ny contains the clause: . . If for any reason 
whatsoever Charlie Parker shall fail to appear for 
any scheduled show . . . then it is understood 
and agreed that the employer shall have the right 
to deduct $50 per show for each show missed by 
said Charlie Parker." (£700 to £900). 

There is a difference of great degree if not kind 
here. Jazz was a particularly poor idiom when Bird 
was building his body of work in the late 1940s 
and early 1950s. It was not honorable work, one 
step above an exotic dancer. Lately it has become 
respectable, with the “'Round Midnight” and 
“Bird" movies and a tourist-oriented explosion of 
economy-stoking festivals around the globe. It can 
be argued that none of them would be possible 
without Bird’s injection of genius. 

In Marciac, France, last month. I heard a 25- 
year-old from Toulouse play the tenor saxo- 
phone straight out of prewar Lester Young, total- 
ly bypassing Bird, which is rare and hard to do. 
Listening to early Bird, you hear how ecological- 
ly he evolved from Lester. How much am I 
offered for a genuine Lester Young pork-pie hat? 
Four of Bird’s clarinet mouthpieces were esti- 
mated at £400 to £600. 

How we have Miles Davis neckties, and his 
image advertises Gap denims. Miles would have 
loved that It may very well have been part of bis 
game plan. Miles played money like the trumpet. 
Bird, on the other hand, was “on the losing side of 
financial transactions" in the 1950s: “. . . One 
music publisher sent Bird a check for $150 for five 
compositions, a figure so gallingly low that his 


partner Chan Parker refused to cash iL . . . This 
payment followed Bird's voluntary admission to 
Bellevue Hospital Psychiatric Division for depres- 
sion." 

You might wonder about the taste of the whole 
idea but mat would mean questioning a society 
in which millionaire baseball players strike 
against billionaire owners. Anyway, the money is 
going to his direct descendants. Nobody seems to 
be getting ripped off hare. Except, of course, the 
creator wno died young and broke, broken by the 
same sort of profit-oriented mentality that is by 
now so pervasive that sophisticated people find 
this bebop garage sale perfectly normal. 

A two-page typescript letter, signed, on a letter- 
head from Dial Records, Contemporary Jazz, 
Hollywood, California, February 1947, from Ross 
Russell to Chan Parker. “Charlie is now at a most 
critical pouit in his career. He has ridden just 
about as far as he can hope to go on the ‘screw- 
ball ’ genius kick. It's either go straight (within 
reason) from here out, or wind up a derelict within 
a year or two” (£1,500 to £Z500). Of course it can 
be said that to a large degree Bird had only himself 
to blame. What price alienation? 

A contract for 10 concert dates in the North- 
west for a grand total of $1,000 plus transporta- 
tion (not including hotels) is expected to bring 
£500 to £700. And a contract for one week at the 
Three Deuces on New York’s fabled 5 2d Street, 
10 P. M to 4 A. M. (four or five sets, an exhaust- 
ing gig), also for $1,000 is estimated at £600 
to £800. Both contracts are now worth as 
much as he was paid for creating time- 
less art 

We conclude with the words 
of the “Private Genius," writ- 
ten on one of six Western 
Union cables (£500 to 
£700): “Forgive me 
my mistakes.” 



Yeltsin Orders Shift at Bolshoi 


By Michael Specter 

New York Times Service 


M OSCOW — Striding into 
one of his country's most 
painful cultural disputes. 
President Boris Yeltsin of 
Russia has ordered a major change in 
the way the Bolshoi Theater hires its 
employees. 

All 2,100 Bolshoi staff members — 
from cleaning workers to artistic direc- 
tors and prima ballerinas — will be hired 
only on a contractual basis, as is com- 
mon with most Western ballets, operas 
and orchestras. 

Until now, the theater had operated 
under a system of creative fiefs estab- 
lished in the era of Stalin; to many people, 
these retained the aura of dictatorship. 

The Bolshoi’s once lustrous reputation 
has fallen precipitously in the last few 
years, just as it has become possible for 
Russian artists to work creatively at 
home again, and many have blamed a 
rigid system that has little regard for 
anything bold or new. 


Decisions were unilaterally carried out 
by the artistic directors, especially Yuri 
Grigorovich of the Bolshoi Ballet, and 
dissension or discussion was unaccept- 
able. There were bitter dashes between 

the imperious Grigorovich and the the- 
ater’s general director, Vladimir Ko- 
korin, who is formally Grigorovich’s 
boss and who has long sought a contrac- 
tual system as a way to introduce more 
innovation and faster change. 

Yeltsin’s decree firmly sided with Ko- 
komo, stating flatly that “the manage- 
ment of the Russian Bolshoi Theater is 
«<«ignwri to the general director, who_ is 
entitled to appoint Iris or her deputies 
and artistic directors on a competitive 
and contractual basis." 

Alexander Kolesnikov, the director of 
public relations for the theater, said, 
This is the decision the theater has been 
waiting for.” 

“Everyone knows there was a very 
serious conflict between the managing 
director and the artistic directors of the 
Bolshoi,” he said. “It made it hard for 
everyone to concentrate and work. We 


hope that this decision will bring all that 
to an end and allow the companies to 
move on.” 

It is undear how Grigorovich will re- 
spond. He is traveling abroad and could 
not be reached for comment. 

Kokanin has told associates that he is 
not specifically seeking to replace Grigor- 
ovich or the other creative directors of the 
theater — Vladimir Leventhal at the op- 
era and Alexander Lazarev at the orches- 
tra — but that he needs to be able have 
flexibility in the performance program if 
the Bolshoi is to survive at a time when its 
subsidies have been severely cut 

Kokonin’s decision to introduce a 
contractual system for Bolshoi employ- 
ees enraged the artistic directors when he 

first announced it last season. They suc- 
cessfully blocked bis attempt, and Yelt- 
sin, who appoints the managing director 
of the Bolshoi, agreed to resolve the 
dispute himself. 

the decision dearly means there wul 
be major changes in the direction of the 
Bolshoi, which has for years relied heavi- 
ly on recycling opera and ballet classics 
with little thought to improvisation. 


Another Angle on French Film 


By Bany James 

International Herald Tribute 


P 


ARIS — Anatole Dauman, a 
fiercely iconoclastic producer of 
innovative and often classic mov- 
ies for the past 45 years, laments 
that unfriendly monopolies' are making it 
difficult for independent filmmakers to 
stay in business. 

Al though French intellectuals like to 
paint Hollywood as the villain, Dauman 
says the main threat to his venerated Argos 
Films company comes from France, where 
two powerful groups controlled by two 
brothers dominate the production, distribu- 
tion and exhibition of movies. What they 
like to distribute and show — Dauman is 
not alone in saying it — is quick-return, 
usually Hollywood-made mass-audience 
entertainment, while the art movies that 
were once the glory of French cinema find it 
increasingly difficult to get exposure. 

“Monopoly is not the same as culture,” 
Dauman says. He warned that such a con- 
centration of power “will lead to the death 
of the cinema in France” as it did in 
Britain for similar reasons. “In the history 
of the cinema, big integrated corporations 
have never created anything. Creation is 
the work of independents,” he said. 

Dayman's warning appears to be sup- 
ported by recent figures from the Ministry 
of Culture, showing that the proportion of 
French-made films exhibited in France has 
fallen to 34 percent from 50 percent 10 
years ago. 

Even if the path has turned rocky and 
the future looks uncertain, Dauman has 
had an extraordinarily fruitful run dating 
back to the foundation of Argos Filins in 
1949. A current retrospective in Paris (at 
the Accatone cinema, until March) cele- 
brating Araos’s 45th anniversary shows 
how much the industry owes to his quirky, 
independent way of thinking. 

Movies that he has produced or co- 
produced include Alain Resnais's “Hiro- 
shima Mon Amour” and “Last Year at 
Marienbad"; Jean-Luc Godard’s “Two or 
Three Things I Know About Her” and 
“Masculine, Feminine"; Robert Bresson’s 
“Au Hasard Balthazar”; Nagjsa Oshima’s 
“Realm of the Senses”; Wim Wenders’s 
“Paris, Texas” and “Wings of Desire"; 



K.iynh<nJ Dqxmton Mjpnu* 

Anutole Dauman, movie producer. 

Volker SchlondbrfFs “Tin Drum” and An- 
drei Tarkovsky's “The Sacrifice.” 

Dauman comes across, at first, as hard- 
nosed, caustic and somewhat intimidating 
behind his hooded, watchful gaze. But de- 
spite his reputation for toughness, friends 
say he is a man of unexpected warmth and 
sly humor, and directors with whom he has 
worked praise him for consistently putting 
art before profits. “He has all the ambigu- 
ity and the mystery of an artist,” Elia 
Kazan once wrote. Unlike producers who 
are essentially lawyers, accountants or 
publicists, Dauman's chief concern was 
always to “help the director,” Kazan said. 


/*■ 


9 


Bom in a family of industrialists (Dau- 
man Vodka) in Warsaw in 1925, Dauman 
was taken to Nice as a boy. There, in 1942, ■ 
he joined the French Resistance. He orga- 
nized a clandestine print shop to forge doc- 
uments and identity papers, was arrested by 
the Gestapo and deported to Germany. On 
the way hn managed tnjnrapomof the train 
and escape. He then took part in s everal 
«;nh<itagt» and amhnsh operations. Dauman 
received the Croix de Guerre for bravery 
and after the war was given a government 
post to investigate people accused of col- 
laboration with the Nazis. 

Dauman's first idea had been to estab- 
lish a fine-arts publishing house, and it was 
his interest in painting that most influ- 
enced his early short films, the first of 
which was Jean Aurd’s “Fetes Galantcs, ” 
a tribute to Watteau recited by Gferard 
Philippe, followed by “L’Affaire Manet," 
also by Aurd, and a short on Goya’s “Di- 
sasters of War." 

W ORKING with directors like 
Jacques Bara tier (“Paris, La 
Nuit") Chris Marker (“La Je- 
tfte”), Georges Franju, Henri 
Grud, Agnfcs Varda, Mario Ruspoli and £ 
Walerian Borowczyk, Dauman has always 
promoted the short movie, which he sees as 
a genre mart, as different from the feature- 
length ffim as a short story is from a noveL 
Perhaps the best known of the short films 
Dauman produced was Resnais's “Night 
and Fog," a searing description of the 
Auschwitz death camp made in 1955. 

Throughout his career Dauman has 
been interested in the marriage between 
literature and image, which in his case does 
not mean adapting books from the screes 
bnt in pushing to the limit the possibilities 
of dialogue between writer and director. 
This was the case in “Hiroshima Mon * 
Amour" with the then unknown Margue- 
rite Duras and Resnais or in “Marienbad" 
with Alain Robbc-Grillet and Resnais. 





Dauman's career has earned him a place 
in the Larousse Encyclopedia, which says 
he combines a demanding taste with ait- 
dacity. Yet Dauman, whose education was ' 
truncated by the war, describes himself 
modestly not as a possessor of culture but 
of “a pretended culture, acquired with dif- >.~t- 
ficulty and poorly enriched by the bitter 
demands of commerce.” 


At Venice Festival, a Meeting of the Simpletons and Psychopaths 


By Roderick Conway Morris 

International Herald Tribune 


V ENICE — The first days of this year’s Venice Film 
Festival suggest a world — as viewed through the Film- 
maker’s lens, at least — sharply divided between natural- 
bom psychopaths and natural-bom nincompoops. Mi- 
chael Radford, whose previous films include “Another Time. 
Another Place" and “White Mischief," opened the proceedings 
with u n Postino" (The Postman). This production will make film 
history, if only because the lead actor, the immensely popular 
Neapolitan Massimo Troisi, succumbed within 24 hours of the 
final takes to heart problems. 



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Troisi plays Mario, an apparent simpleton, who gets a job as a 
temporary postman. His sole task is to deliver the mail to the 
Chilean Communist poet Pablo Neruda (Philippe Noiret), who has 
been allowed by the Italian government to live on an island in 
political exile from his homeland during the early 1950s. A friend- 
ship blossoms between these two seemingly incompatible men. 

That this film, shot in Italian by an English director, was ever 
made represents an extraordinary act of will on Troisfs part and 
faith by the rest of the team. (Troisi was too weak to act more than 
a few hours a day — though you would never blow this watching 
the film — and consequently the enterprise took 18 months to 
complete.) Artfully but unobtrusively directed, beautifully shot 
and rich in comedy, the film tackles the nature of chance friend- 
ship and of poetry in an unusual and highly satisfying way. 

Idiots savants also took center stage in Robert Zemeckis’s 
“Forrest Gump,” already released In the United States to huge 
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8 4 

11 20 

12 12 

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33 


ADVICE. HOW-TO 
AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 IN THE KITCHEN WITH 
ROSIE, by Rosie Daley ~ I 19 

2 MEN ARE FROM MARS. 

WOMEN ARE FROM VE- 
NUS, by John Gray 2 67 

3 MAGIC EYE n. by N. E 

Thing Enterprises 3 19 

4 MAGIC EYE. by N.E. Thing 

Enterprises ... ■ 4 33 


satirical novel set in a Russian village in 1941 and made by the 
Czech director in Russian. It is perhaps a sign of the abiding gulf 
between expectations in East and West that Zemeckis’s dimwit 
(Tom Hanks) becomes “a zfllionaire” and national hero, while the 
delightful Chonkin (Gennadi Nazarov) wins only the heart of a 
bonny, buxom country girL 

Menzel is a rare director in that he takes an explicit stand 
against violence in cinema. “We all see plenty of cruelty and 
sadness around ns. Only a person who is spoiled and whose senses 
have been dulled can bear to watch evil on the screen as well," he 
wrote in his presentation of “Chonkin.” 

It is, therefore, not difficult to imagine what Menzel might make 
of two in-competition films, “Little Odessa" and “Pigalle." “Little 
Odessa,” the 24-year-old James Gray’s slickly made, fashionably 
somber and unpleasantly violent film, will undoubtedly rocket him 
into the front rank of super-bankable young directors. The story is 
of the return of Joshua Shapiro (Tun Roth), a professional hit man, 
to the New York Russian fenrigrfe suburb of the title. His mother 
(Vanessa Redgrave) is dying of a brain tumor and his younger 
brother (Edward Furlong) is cutting school and in conflict with his 
patriarchal Jewish father (Maximilian Schell). Gray’s own mother 
died during his teens, and this aspect of the film displays genuine 
observation and feeling. The rest owes more to the self-referential 
world of “movie culture” than real life and is often implausible. 


Equally unconvincing is the plot of the French director Karim 
DridTs “Pigalle," whose self -pitying, bisexual, petty- thief antihero 
heads an unsavory cast of low-lifers in the title's Pans setting. Some 
of the players, according to the publicity, are the genuine article, but 
this fads to achieve the “authenticity" the director was seeking, and 
in the end the impression is more of sleazy fiction than fact 

The policy of the festival’s director, GiUo Pontecorvo, of 
welcoming back American films, after they had been stuffily 
excluded by his predecessors for being too commercially appeal- 
ing to be counted as Art, has proved a triumph in b ringing the 
wider public back to the festival in large numbers, and Harrison 
Ford is as big a pull here as anywhere. 

He was reputedly paid $11.5 million plus 11.5 percent of the 
take to play the CIA supremo Jack Ryan again in Phillip Noyce’s 
“Gear and Present Danger." Action-packed, full of surprises, 
twists and toms, with a seismic sound track and an elemrat of 
violence that is ritualized rather than gory, the film has box-office 
blockbuster written all over it. 

Again in Venice, again cut of competition, Woorfy Allen 
presented his latest, “Bullets Over Broadway," the tale of an 
aspiring young ) 920s playwright, whose debut production rads up 
being financed by a mobster. Stylish, in tellig ent, wonderfully shot, 
brilliantly acted, frequently hilarious, the fum reveals that Allen is 
still on a rolling high. 


BOOKS 


A BUNDLE 
FROM BRITAIN 

By Alistair Home. 333 pages. 
$23.95. Sl Martini 

Reviewed by 
Jonathan Yardley 

A MONG the innumerable 
footnotes to World War II 
axe the stones of those British 
boys and girls whose parents, 
fearful for their safety, sent 
them across the Atlantic to stay 
with American families. Up- 
rooted at trader ages, all too 
mindful of the perils confronted 
by those they left behind, 
plopped down in a country 
where they found little common 

not much in that — these chil- 
dren fought their own small 
wars and won their own small 
victories. 

Home is the author of a num- 
ber of first-rate works of popu- 
lar history as well as the biogra- 


pher of Harold Macmillan. His 
predilection for deep research 
and the long view is reflected in 
his decision to tell his own story 
against the background of the 
battles bang fought in Europe. 

Horne was the son of Scottish 
parents. His mother was 18 
years younger than his father; 
when she died in an auto acci- 
dent in 1930, she left her hus- 
band a widower at the age of 57 
with a 4-year-old son to sup- 
port Not surprisingly the gap 
between father and son was 
wide, and the father’s clumsy if 
well-intentioned efforts did lit- 
tle to narrow it 
Upon deriding to said young 
Alistair to New York in 1940, 
the elder Horne was able to 
summon up these memorable 
words: “We're going to lose ev- 
erything, old boy. But you’re 
my only son — and my most 
precious possession, and I just 
want you to come through it, 
even if I don’L" 

In the fall of 1940, Alistair 


was sent to a small private acad- 
emy In New York state and was 
joined there by six other young 
Brits, all of whom were, in 
clear-eyed recollection, “gener- 
ally odious, supercilious and of- 
ten arrogant." 

Eventually Alistair was cut 
down to size, and eventually he 
began to find a comfortable 
place for himself. In this he was 
helped to no small degree by the 
friendship that blossomed be- 
tween himself and a wealthy 
youngster from Connecticut 
named W illiam F. Buckley Jr. 

At first Alistair “regarded 
this precocious intellect with 
gravest suspicion and distaste,” 
sentiments compounded by 
Buckley's isolationism, but 
character won out and theirs 
became “the longest and deep- 
est friendship of a lifetime." 

A similar evolution took 
place in Alistair’s feelings 
about his temporary home- 
land. He was “too unsettled, 
too torn by all that was hap- 


tt> 


petting 3,000 miles away," 
fall rapidly and easily into 
American rhythms, but in time 
he did. He developed a love for 
New York City that has never 
faded and a liking for Ameri- 
can enthusiasm as contrasted 
with British reserve. 

All of this was hastened and 
intensified by Pearl Harbor, 
after which “we were, as Roo- 
sevelt declared, all in it togeth- 
er,” wi th the result that differ- 
ences between Alistair and his 
schoolmates soon nearly van- 
ished. 

In 1943, Alistair returned to 
Britain and a reunion with his 
father that was cruefly ended 
when Allan Home died early in 
1944 after an accident during 
the WackouL But the note on 
which this memoir ends is one 
of cheer and gratitude. Home’s 
life as a writer has bora produc- 
tive and accomplished. 

Jonathan Yardley is on Out 
staff of The Washington Post 


tk 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1994 


Page 9 



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27 UWDavdsnA 
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39 15WDylOiC 
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41 19toHutcfiT 


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1061 

628 

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277 

73 
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27 

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70 TOW —to 
31 31% —W 


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29 17tolntoSotl 
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27V. 9 Inputs 
leto iflto InsilTc 

45W JVWInSAul 

30 9toimegOrc 
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37V. 14% InfSISv 
74V, 50% Intel 
MW 12% Intel «n s 
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37 Tt Iwerks 
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30’. 18 JCtirastnA 

31 15% JunoLi 
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32 72 Kellys A 

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_. _ 414 tW 
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_. ... 43 279. 

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_ 39 34 I3to 

_ 44 952 34’-. 
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_ _ 41 259, 

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17 106 U 
19 3174 179. 
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JO 1.1 34 770 17% I? ITW „ 

- » 340 19 18'.) llto —V) 

35 1735 40% 39% 39% — W 

_ . STB 5W 5W SW _ 

._ 15 214 3% 3Vi| 3% “'/u 

.. 12 1766 1«% Uto 19" V, 

.68 3J U 60 21’.« 20% »V. — W 

- 46 149 19% 18% Uto x% 

_ 46 1016 XP* 30'. 30% xV» 

_. 88 1092 79V, 28% 29 Vk —to 

_ .. 132 13% 13V. UW 

.60 1.5 16 1183 40 to 39’k 40 -to 

...408 1206 13W UW 12 V* —to 
JOS A 31 374 19% 19 19% -% 

.- 22 117 17V. 14% 16*. —to 

_. 35 30 21V. ato -V. 

,M .7 70 3630 39'Vi, 38 35% * % 

^4 J 20 428 25 av, »v._ ]'* 

34 77 21% 20V* 21% -to 
65 2BTB 39V, 38 39 -W 


J7e J 
J4 3 8 


17 778 8% 

26 1950 35’ * 
.. <52 16 
13 142 aw 
.. 348 33'-. 
13 6366 
9 I I9 T 9% 
16 920 55'. 


?V, 7% —l, 
35 35 — 'T 

15% 15’*— ii, 
22 ti — lto 
31 to 31 to ... 
2a 2a' Vi, -to 
9". 9V*_ ' „ 
34V* 35 — '.< 

*98 »"J » 35 -lto 

1725"- 25*to25’ r - — lH- 
76 40 r. 3?’ • 43V* -. 

9*6 9Vl ^ 
45 47V* -2% 

171* )0'k -v. 
ii w ir. — t-i, 
15V* 1* -to 
8' i 8to _ 
JW 4% 

40’ . 41 to - V. 


... If 648 10 

... 4515269 48 
.. . 176 IS'* 

.. . 7448 13'* 

... 18 3708 16'* 

... 17 465 8% 

_ 574 5 

- 17 415 Vito 

.12 J 21 50s lJto Uto UW — W 

- - 20 '2 B’k 7% 7H„ - 

. a 4S0 IB’* 17% 18% - 


T-U-V 


14"* 9WTBC 
30W17WTCA 
U’.IOWTFCEnl 
33 1 7* j TJ inns 

29’.* 191: TNT Ft S 
12% SWTPIEn 
lUk lOtoTRFnf 
HtolOtoTocoCdOJ 
26% 14 TornelT 
aWIItoTchDpts 
Uto IllxTeCMIM 
63 to 36 TeCumB 

55to 34‘TTecumA 
15% 7’.Tetco 
33V. IB' .TetCrnA 
IS'* I'.Trteb'l 
24’* BViTitedla 
44’ *18'.', Trilab* s 
24% 6'kTririar 

18' < 7WTrixon 
27 W 9>,Tencor 
M':22V„Teva 
34tol2'.3C«n s 
48V. 9 JOO Co 
19V, 7%TQdOVM 

91* S’.TOPPS 
»V,ri TrocSap 
16% 6WTrnmed» 
27 17’ .TmPcCp 
47V.ra'*Tmwo 
17V* lOV.TriPoa 
30 3%TrtcorB 
17W 3 Trimcd 
18 4V:Tnaulnt 
TO 12V* Triim 
leto frWT*ena 
25 18V, Tv son 
18% U US Can 

a'i 8% US Long 

It*. 7 USA AW 

14% y'.USTCP 

30’, 12' rUltraSlep 
6% 4'sUnilri, 

22'- MtoUnSwtch 
48 nv.unCokF 5 
I9v* 12 U'alni * 
28%a>*U5 BcOR 
47' i 26% US Him 5 
46 a US Root 
55%e»’:USTrH 
74'.* lov.utdWire 

SltoUtoUnllrir, 

30 4WUnvEIC 

31 % 19%UrtMiOul 
lB’a 9% VLSI 
33% 2% ValTecn 
15% 4 VdVr.A 

29 17% VordCl S 
I TW 2<v- Venorid 
46 ISWVemrllA 
»% U'/:VerMnc 
20 9%Vort>Pb 
30'.15’*Vlcor 
2i%13toVi«ro 
23 StoViacoL 

30 HWVIewtD 
29V* 16H VlMno 5 
28% 12', VISA 

a to SWVllMte 
23' , u VmarK 
20'., 9'.* Volvo* 



.. IJ 

IBS 

lfl’.k 

V* 

ID'* 

44 

1.8 2; 

48 

744* 

24'ft 

l’l'. 





17’* 

12% 


1.1 19 

545 

19". 

18** 

19", 

■37 

1.5 21 

J 61 

34% 

34 

24 




167 

6’e 




... 16 

243 

1 6lk 

l*'k 

16' i, 


_. 18 

24J9 

U'ft 

in** 

11 


.. 31 

108 

25 

74', 

24 'ft 


-. 20 

■*724 

19’ j 


19' « 


... 20 

38’ 

15'.* 

M’. 

IS 

JOt 

1.6 10 


48", 

47'. 

48' J 

.801 

1.6 10 

636 

49", 

40'J 

49'h 




12 

11% 

11% 


_ ...12978 

724k 

22 

22% 


11 

iraa 

5' ■ 


S' 



44V 

10' : 

9' A 

10': 


... 38 

3019 

404. 

39% 

40% 


_ 

61 

9’, 

9*.* 

9*. 

Jl 

.1 523 

665 

16 

IS'-. 

15"-', 


... 30 US7 26'* : 25% 26V. -to 



911 

29% 

28% 

79' : -1 



9652 

32% 

37 

ra** ... 


ia 

19', 

19 

19 

TJ 

391 

n% 

1?' 

12'* 

11 

551 

:» i 

6’* 

6'* 


left 

J7 1 j 

I6'T 

36' , — ' . 

28 

U1 

12'r 

IP. 

i: 


333 

23 

1JI, 

23 — 

14 

»IS 

39": 

39'-, 

39', 

15 

1 

12'* 

12% 

I? 1 * .. 


... 9 289 S», 

- -. 207 4 

.. .. 516 6% 

. - 1 13% 

28 16 501 7', 

J ... 20ws 24% 
9 40 17 ' , 

.. 27 1162 10'. 


S’, S') —to 
3% 4 - % 

6', 6% 

13% 13% — % 

24’* 24% Ti* 
I’to U% — '. 
10' 




So 

ra- 

T' 4 

7'. 



37 

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i:% 

12% 




RlJ 

28', 

27'* 




6-' 

SB7 

S’, 

Sto 

Ito 

I x 


J3 

lj 

|7‘« 

17'ft 

ir* 


1.1 

10 

7& 

35 






34 

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14'.- 



37 

19 

7562 

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26', 


* a 

20 

1915996 

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41 

41'.*— P. 

... 

17 

7CI0 




— 

18 

i? 

100 

S2»* 

U', 

S2''i 



7? 

380 

:j« i 

23' i 

73’, 

4 



J/V* 

'.*» 

JB 

48' * 

— 1 m 


... 20 2 a 6'* 

81 ?4' , 
... 17 3108 13’. 

1199 3'. 

_ _. JtO 

U06 27% 

_ _ 3034 4', 

- 41 7423 18% 
* 21 JW 20’* 
_ 56 15 

.. Ti 124 J5 
... U 580 17 
_ II 33’ 10 
... a «I6 U 
39 7473 U29 1 * 
— 1713 711 17% 
_ . 267 S'* 

... 43 332 20'* 
_ .. 277 18’. 


24 

Uto 

3'* 

64* 

77 

1% 

17', 

M'. 

14 

V! , 

16 to 

9 

17% 
29 
14% 
J J i 
19' i 
18': 


6'* -to 
24. „ — 
13% -to 
jv, _■* 
^6% t . 

Vj -% 

18' to — 

70’ : 

IS •%, 
24' , —i) 
17 - V, 

10 -V H 
77% —to 
»') - % 
1 7% 

5 —to 
20 —to 
18% — W 


W-X-Y-Z 


32% UV.WLRFd 
33%20')Walbro 
13'* 6 WolKlnt 
60 24% wailData 
21% laHWangLab 
75n.. r 7P'’)WFSL 
78% IB’.WMoB 
38": 12% WaRnPh 
TV TO’aWattslns 
35 JI’.WowPs 
17i, * wcbcoind 

30 13 WellMal 
43’. 18%Wctim * 

33 V. av. wemer 
a'.)1Jto WsIMor 
24>. 10':WNcwln 
37W 73% We* tOne 
24% e’.Wstcoli 
14% IT 1 . We*!erted 

2oi. 9%w*mPb 
MV. 17 Wsiwotr 
19% 12<kW*r$y& 
10% 3%WstwO, 
37% 29 WhiteRwr 
25’i 14 WhIFdi 
30% 6'kWhriHtv 
24’, 17' .WiCkLu 
591, JS%Willaml 
44V. UVkWmSon 5 

31 Ov.WilmTr 
41%.a',W*cCT & 

29’. 12 Wondwrt- 
77 16’* Worltid * 
59% 27 vain, 

78% U’.vircom 
22 12 Xpedlle 

73 13' . cvtogic 

J9’.« liv* Avaiex 
30". itWYemwCp 
78 , .U l *5d)9#.cr 
11V. 8 ZittCa 
60V. M% Zebra 
38% 13 ZcnLdb 6 
40%76%ZilOB 
45% 36 ZnnBcp 

43". eWZOlIMM 


J4 19 
J? 33 


... 6ft 9% 
39 1348 37'. 
. 693 Uto 

9 S3* 21% 
a A43 21 ', 
. 25 721 23% 
528 34 
308 27 


.9 1? 

.9 1 ... 

_ _ 14 


_ 77 57 _ 

74 5793 23W 

A 19 IJ4 25'. 


.10 

.40 .!. 

.72 2J 12 
.. 24 

.10e ." ... 


442 31 'k 
1449 UV, 
178 M 
540 Uto 

6? a% 

39 MV* 
_ _ 96 10 

_ _ 3 34", 

_ 33 723 15 
_ 67 1313 14'-. 
163 IS 
898 51 
3167 42% 

131 37% 
219 40V* 

38 19% 
3V8S 71% 
3739 44". 14 
1072 19% 
6« 21’, 
270 21% 
175 IB’ 4 
440 20 
124 17 
519 10!* 
167 401, 
1762 25% 
16a 33% 

132 40% 

51 9% 


- 38 


1.9 25 
.. 45 
4 0 12 
... 22 
... 47 
1.9 7} 
... 24 
... 77 
... 42 
19 
... 14 
48 _ 
_ * 
_. 17 
_ 75 
_ 37 
... 20 
2.8 10 
_ 14 


21% 22 -% 
9' . *'•* _ 

35% 35 to— I % 
11% Uto -% 
21% 21% —V. 
2U. 211, _. 

S' : TJ * % 
35' > 76% —V. 
8 8' , ... 
M% 

a% a% — % 

24% 35% .. 

20% 

24** _ 

Mto 31% _ 

11% 13to — ', 
13W 14 x % 
11". 13% — % 

a% a% . *••* 

14 14 — 

9to 10 . to 

34% 34% —V, 
Uto IS -I, 
13% 14'%—"% 
14', Uto •% 
»% SOW — W 
41 % 42* i. - 1',, 
36% 37 *% 

39": j*,, _% 

18% 19V. .% 

20V: 21 x I., 
43% 44% t*. 
19 19 

7l' k 21% . % 
21% 71V. — ". 
17% 18% -% 
19% 19’* —v, 
16% 14W -W 
IDto 10W .. 

39v. 39... _% 

24': 24W —l* 
32% 32V, _'.* 
40 40", 

9 9". — Vk 


AMEX 

TuMday's Closing 

Tables Include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on WaU Street and do not reffec 
date trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


U Month 

Hlgn Low Stock 


Ss 

loos toph 


low Latest Or op 


Jl 


6.1 _ 
- 23 


1J5 


_ 17 
7JI „ 
- 6 
_ 3 


_ 100 
_ 11 


_ 52 


81 _ 


fto B AIM Sir 
37 23% ALC 

l».k W AM In wt 
14Tk 914 AAftC 
36% 20% AftftC p * 

5 2V.ARC 

SW IWARlHId — - 

26 to a ARftAF pf 3J8 9.7 — 

3 1 'ft. ASR J3e 9.9 _ 

75W61W ATT Fd 171 e 4J _ 
aw 4 AckCom - 25 

5 3'kAoneU - - 

3V U I W Action 
ato 4 AdmRsc 
AW IWAdvFHn 
17W 10V.AdvMoo 
2W WAdvftftedT 
TOW 31, AdMd pt 

5to 2 AdvPnot 
lew 7'AAlrWot 
r. SWAtertan 

13 to 16 AHooonnlA4 
2W >V>4 Alfir, 

16W 3W AlktRsh 
11 W Tto AOouH 
AT. 3 AlphtOn 
11 4WAtoinGr . 

1 WAmaxGwt 
10' 4to Amdhl 
1 Ik WArnflim 
14V* QVkAFstP? 

20V. 16% AFSWT 

35V)20WAB«rr 
30 15% AmBffl S 

BVm 2%AmECQ6 
l'Vi, ItoAExpl 
14% 3v»AiM84 
161* I3W AIM 85 
15 ITWAIMBSn 
52 36W Alsrari 

18% 13 Am US1 
ntii 5v, aaavba 
21% UtoAAAzeB 
Uto 6 to Am Paa n 
12Vi TtoARestr 
n r-lASCrE 
4W WAmShrci 

5 3VuATo<7tC 
I3to WAirwai __ 

7W % Amool Wt 
341k 9’kAndroo 

6 IWAflBMlB 
9V, 39kAmtfiai 

UW SVkAproonn 
111. 6WArkRst 
10 6 attomA 

11% 3to Arttytti 
4'., 2 As*re*c 
12% SWAIorl 
W I’.AteCM 
lBto BtoAudvax 
2to I'kAudne 
9W 6 Aurodsl 
2!k 2Vi*A4can 


1 1W 

10 uw 

6 24*. 
45 2Yu 
4 5to 

J e 

71 2V M 
82 68 to 


15 3W 
17 2Vi* 
2 6Vk 
94 1 

53 15W 
164 W 
14 70W 
28 2 Ik 

62 8W 
01 3 % 

9 17V* 

30 lto 
22 3to 
57 8W 
83 6to 
59 7*. 

10 M 


1JS 117 
150 8.8 

1-32 S.7 

.15 A 


10 


IA3841J 8 
lA4a 9J 10 
.96 BJ 11 
-53 e 1.1 23 
■BOb 4A 16 

A4 11 13 
64 10 13 

M 7J 5 


282 l'to 
28 Uto 
7 im 

6 33 

u 26 w 

a 2V4 
» iw 
49 3W 
24 UVk 
60 UW 
2 46W 

1 iaw 

15 20% 

2 21 to 


•w 

3>Vu 

Vi, 


_ 39 

~417 
- 34 
._ 25 


_ 10 
Z I* 


17 12 to 
10 S'A 
608 u icy, 

22 low 
17 7to 

6 SW 

79 4 

7 Jto 
3230 SW 

512 Ki* 
489 9W 
530 to 
88 Bto 
228 2Yi* 


8W 
34 V* 
lto 
uw 

Mto 

ffls 

23% 

2to 

67% 

6to 

3 to 
2 

6to 

lto 

15W 

to 

9to 

2 

Bto 

3W 

17V* 

lto 

IW 

aw 

6 

7to 

to 

9to 

tv. 

U 

17Vk 
27% 
25% 
dTV't 
IW 
3Vi* 
14W 
11% 
46W 
1SW 
20% 
21 to 
7% 
Bto 
3% 
Vu 
3W 
Bto 
lto 
I2to 
5to 
9to 
low 
7% 
8W 

4 

3ta 

4U 

W 

9% 

to 

8 

JV» 


Bto — W 
35% -to 
lto — Vk 
11W _ 

2J% _ 

2W _ 
5 1 * -% 
24 _ 

TV. xv u 
68 

6W x V. 
3W —W 
2 —to 
Ato _ 
Uk _ 
15to — W 
"ft. — V. 
low .. 
2Vfc x Ik 
8W —to 
3to xto 
171k xto 
1% _. 
3% - 

Bto —V, 
6 —to 
7V, — to 

to— Vk 
9to — W 
lVu - 
Uto x% 
17to - 
23 -to 
2SW — W 
2% - 
lto —>.•>* 
VU - 
Uto _ 
llto _ 
46W ♦ W 
isto xi» 
3(rk — vk 
21 to —to 
8 -to 

aw _ 

3<Vi» — Vu 

w. ... 

3>Vu — ’to 
8% - 
IW -to 
uw —W 
5V: _ 

loto -to 

low -vk 

Tto x% 
ay* xto 

4 

3to —to 
5W — W 
Vi «. 
9to — to 
'V„ — ’/» 
Bto —% 
JW -V* 


E 


5% 3% BA HO 
17'ullWBATs 

83%nV,BHC 
J4W 19 BodBrM 
11 5 Baker 

5% 4’kBolOw 
nDIWBoflFfl 


J8e 5.7 
73 2J 

1.9) e 8J 


2S to 21 v* BJcv7 W TJBU- 
36to JI W BT cv7Vk t.W u - 


'. vc Bony HI 
2to ikuBonynSn 


.lie J 


.. 18 
... S9 
2.O0C It - 

J3o L4 33 
28 


73W18toBomwl 
24% M to BdnUs 
21% e'jBoryRG S _•= 

71 11% Bay Mm ,J . 

5 J'V„BdYOU - 1 

6'u 3’uBSHK Wl - 

7W SWBSHKpw" 

3W, 1%BS Jpnowr - 5 

36% MW BSMRK n 2.01 &B 

Jto IWBUonjCo 
'VriBClTTOC 

2ttoii'.'*B*ncnE 
Bto 6VkBcnEV* 

104 BJl')8«CO 
15W 4toBelpWeU 
23tol9WBmW« 

34% 10 BfcsRA 
jto ’to.BtephfH 

TAiV-iiSSSr £ 

UtoiltoBFLtO 

14% ll%BNJia 

Mtoll'.BNYlD -j x-i 

47% 3A''i BlOlrCP ietU 
35W7146 BIDSSlfVO .70 ?■“ 

42 15 BlauntA 
16W13WBO0M 
2JW16WSOIMIA 
SW iwBowmr 
MWUWaawrw 

9% 7WBrodRC 

17’/, ato Brand" -- 

SV» ilk Bran av* J'pu.o 
14% itoBrscno i- 0 * 'j 

y m TVuBroekCp 
3V|* li.auftton n- 


1 2*% 
214 13% 
16 77 
22 WW 
43 6to 
72 5W 
xi? 22% 
117 av. 
30 22W 
107 Vi* 
10 1'Vu 

4 iaw 
15 Jlto 
135 9014 
I 17% 

Jto 
3S'„ 
3to 
3 Ik 
34% 
Jto 
to 


2W, JW.— Vu 
13W T3W —W 
IVm TI ’V| 
25% 24% xto 
5% 5% — 1 to 
to » - 

221 * 


20 

2 

12 

15 

11 

1 

596 


22 


277 24to 
89 Jto 
II 94 
131 7V., 

17 22W 
IS? 23% 


790 6.B 

.77 6.5 

.79 6-7 


JO 1.2 
1.74 BJ 
.72 « 

64 BJ 

■» .!? 


Ml 

107 

41 


■to* 

2W 

11% 


40 UW 
15 11% 
& UW 
3 45W 
J? 3S 1 * 
259 41 
3 Mto 
1 16% 

39 3% 
136 J2W 
103 BV) 

44 17% 
28 4% 

34 14to 

40 3% 
33 IV., 


% 

31W 72 — % 

22% ato -to 

l'Vi* lUftt — 'ft* 

18% 18% ... 
21% 2l'A -to 
199. 20 
17% 17to —to 
4V, 4V,_ 1ft* 
3»U SW -Vu 
3 3 

3 2% 

34% 34% _ 

Jto 2to - Vu 
tt to *Vw 
33tt ZT. —tt 
Jto Tlk - 
93% 93% — 1 
aw aw — v* 
22% a% —v, 
23% 23% 
to % 

2to JVk ._ 
11% Uto x'k 
llto llto -to 
llto llfi —to 
llto llto — % 
4SW 451k —% 
34to 35 - 

40% 40% — % 
141k 14% * to 
Mto 1|%_ S 

Jito —to 
—% 


— v* 

► to 


->ft* 


3 

*r o 

16tt 17 
4% 4*0 

14% 14% 
1% 

Wl, 


3% 

lVi, 


• to 


aotoiStoCFxca 
7V, 4%CIIFIn 
8% TWC1M 
9to 4V.CMICP 
3% "•uSIH* 

MWU'.CVBPfl 

Sto I'.iCVDFifl 
1- v„CXR 
72 39 CoWVSF 


84 0 4-6 
J49UJ 

J2b 2J 


11 18% 18% 16 to — « 
36 5% SW SW ■ % 

7to 7W 7W 

« «* 7% % 

ra lto IV) lto— v* 

IS 15to Mto Mto “V* 
Ji JV, 1% lto •% 

- — w w .. 

56to 57 -’,* 


36 

416 

75 


25 

131 57 


12 Month 
rfri, Low 5rw> 


Div yw PE 10(H ttab LomLcegOrce 


31 UtoCOdleA i 
J'V'u IV.. Co iron 
13% UtoCombrn 
J4W UWComom 
25V, 16 CdnOcs 
I3to lOWCopftTVl 
12% 10toCooRI2 
14% 11 CodRIS 
78% 62 CoroPpf 
l«Vi B Carlnom 
16% SWCaSttCA l 

28 22V,Cd5Fd 
12% JliCataiLl 
17 9V,CavolHs 

BW W.CenlTcn 
2% "uCnnlTcwt 
21 to 17%CnrrPrn 1 

6 4'.', CFCOOB 

49 '■* 36’* CenMat 3 
UW U% Cents* l 

131k 7 CTvCm 

9% SWChodAs 
5W ldfi.ChDevA 
37 15>kChpEn 
28W 19 QvrrMed 
15Vk WkChlPwr 
30% 6 ChevSKs 
34%26toOuRv 1 
30tol3WChiet 

32 to 24 Oiflnt pf 1 

7 Ik 3% Owes 

29 TO '.k Chiles pt 1 
15% dWCircoPn 
20% 3'-* Citadel 

9V. 6%OzFst 

8% 6%aiizlnc 
49 27'4 CleorC S 
BV* 6 CoastD 
10% »".C0henSir 
22% IStoCohu 
71k l'h.ColDalo 
6% 3%CriLb 
lov. Tv.CotuEna 

17 10% Com Inc 
7% 6%CmctAs»n 

25% llWCdmptek 
10% 6V)ConcdF 
16% 12% CnsTom 
17% 7%ContMD 
19V. StoConvrsn 
9 SlkCavstE 
11% 9 Copley 
31* U.CorNGn 
IS 1 * 6 CCBcshn 
17% irwc/oss 
74V) MWCmCP 
23% 13 OmCP B 
21to MtoCwnCr 
5V, iWCniisAm 

27W2DtoCrvsKJI 

23% 17% Cubic 

18 UWCurtoe 
4% 2toCusftnd 
4V* WCVcomm 


JO .9 
AO - 
1.08 9.8 

1.08 10J 
1.48 14A 
5.00 7.4 

JJ 2A 
lAOa 7.0 



IB 28to 

28% 

28% 



17 1') 

IV„ 


_ 



13": 




1 aw 

a% 

?J’k 

'i 

47 

154 14% 

19% 

19% 





II 


1 (6 

75 


lot 

10': 


JO 


1 1 Vft 


_ 

rlbO 68 

68 

68 

IV. 


61 10 9 T * 9% — Vk 

42 13'k 13'.. 13‘* —to 
1 23 23 23 

60 11% llto I1H _ 

73 13% 13% 13% — % 

65 8% 8% 8% » % 

ki 2'* 2 2% — 


7.2 


25 

IT* 

20% 

20% —to 

J 


740 

S', 

S% 

5% 


8.9 


Z500 

39% 

39% 

39’., 


9.2 


lot 

10 

17% 

1?’« 

-% 

3J 


47 

9% 

87* 

9V* 

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19 

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51 

as 

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14 

167 

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35% 

... 



477 

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ra 

raw 

... 

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10 

UV* 

14% 

14% 



14 

2778 

17 

ll% 

11% — 

j3 

9 

40 

29 

27% 

27W— 1 



1 

lA 

It 

16 — 

6.9 

m m 

7 

26'k 

76 

26'k 

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15 

269 

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45, 


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5 

a’. 

a 

22'.. 

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453 

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13% 

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4 

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IJ 

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25 

64 

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8 

8'k _lft 


52 

425 

42 

46’* 

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11 

10S 

U'ft* 

7% 

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7 - i 


9 

9% 

9'ft 

9W 


IJ 

ib 

5 

lBto 

I8'k 

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-1. 


30 

183 

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10J 

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51 

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189 3Vi. 
5 SW 
30 10 


40 

_ SO 794 
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33 213 16'* 
38 13 19': 

18 256 18. 
M 247 Ie% 
4 J'k 
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128 


9'.. 9' 
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12V. 12% 
3V, . >4 ■ 
SW SW 
9% 10 


Si. Ml. 

9% 9'* 
16% 16». 
19% 19% 
17% 17% 
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3% JV, 
26 26% 
19% 10% 19' 


82 17% 171ft I7W 

32 3’7'u 3'k 3% 

_. 218 7 !W I'W* • 


3% IWOoVotan 
2 WDckvol wt 
9’* 6 DanO-fd 
4% lVuDatamf 
10% 4V«Datarom 
7W7^uDovstr 
4 ll»Davs.rwi 
0% SWDcnor 
12% 7'kDemrot 
8«- 5',.DetEJc 
25W 21 Del Lab S 
77V« 1 7'k DevnE 
3% 'Vi,DSicon 
9 'A 7V, .owner 

19% 9% Dlrrark s 
10 3 Diodes 

9V* JiDivCam 
10% SWDixnTic 
111. BWDrvtftftu 
llto 9%DrvtNY 
SW 2V.Docom 
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■24 2.1 

A3I AA 
J6 1.0 
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A9a 7 S 

M 6.5 


IJ 238 
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19 
■ 06 
10 
10 
5 

282 


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4 

St* 

4% 

1% 

6% 

11% 

6’k 

25% 

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17% 

5% 

l".u 

9% 

9 to 

9% 

Jto 


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6% 6'u 
11% II": 
6% 6*. 
25 25 

70% 20% 




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17 1714 

5to 5% 
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9'.. •'.-* 

9 to 9 to 

4to Jto 
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294 

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190 

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5 




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3 

21% 

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21V* 

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10 

uto 





IJ5 

4J _. 

85 

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40% 


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,07 

S 9510559 

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U'k 

131* 

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14V, PlkECMEn 

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15 

10% 



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3 




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70 


214 

7% 



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32% 15 V) FI on wt 
MW 27'kElan un 
3Jk I'.tEIcOim 
8% 2% Els. nor 
9V. OWEliwth 
6% SWEmoCar 
19to 9to ENSCO s 
13V. 7'AEnaex 
21% 7WEiROBt 
24'.* 13% Eoltope 
12% fWEoGtU 
12V. 9'k EdGtn3 
IB',. lOtoEPUUSlI 
BV, lWEsraon 
3% ’iEsexFn 
13% 5lk Ft7Ly A 
1 *Vm WEwrJenn 
20% UWEtnl 
3kul'»iiFPA 
14% iWCrteCBl 
39% 21 '.kFibr DO 
79% 63% Find 
14% 9%RAUS1 
11 9’.kFAUSPr 
7to 5\, FtCntn 
23 17'kFCRBsn 
Uto ID FstCJtv 
165 132'AFtEmp 
1A 13WF1FAIO 

10% 7 Ftlbor 
37 lAWFlaRUI 
34% JStoFloRck 
32 22% FJukO 

127 9>%ForoCna 
44% 34 FerstCA 
52% 34% FontLO 
Vk iuFanPtwt 
4% lWFartPDt 
S'to lWFwumR 
4% ?tol=MinPuiE 

BH StoFrkAdvn 
6% 4%FrkREn 
5% 3 FrkSol n 
5% iwFrfcSuPn 


1.40 I6J 
1.60 16.6 
.680 4J 


.28 e 3.9 
J6 2J 


4J» 5J 
-31 e 7j 
.99 9A 
.10 1.4 

J80 2.7 
JO 1.8 
ZAD 1J 
J2 47 

1.16 64 

JO 1.9 
.56 1.9 


45 10J 
JO 100 
A0 93 


77 330 
_ 54 

„ 12 
8 

- J0e 
_ 6 

2 

21 313 

- 74 

_. 196 
_ 1418 
... 71 

48 29 

... 47 

_ aS 
... if 

10 5 

_. 10 
17 39 

_ ra 

.. 41 

12 149 
23 25 

.. 462 

- 1035 

8 17 

5 

12 1 

11 4 

11 3 

... 353 
14 6 

10 » 
26 UB 
... 1200 

14 

75 830 
_. » 


14 3 

48 107 


35% 

30to 

26% 

3% 

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9% 

6to 

15% 

7% 

10% 

19% 

9'. 

9% 

14". 

2ii* 

■vi. 

16% 

1% 

7% 

30% 

75»* 

11% 

10% 

7". 

21% 

11*4 

159% 

15'* 


18% 

27% 

J9'k 

99 

36") 

46% 


35% 354k 
30V* 20% 

26 J6'u 
3% 3% 

T'h 7% 

3% SW 
6% 6'-* 

15% 15V. 

7% 7 to 
10% 10% 

18% 19% 

9’k 95k 
9% 9% 

14% MV, 

2 2*r.. 

Jlk 3 

7'k 7'* 

■V,. '*1. 

1ST* 16% 

I -If., I'M 
7% 7% 

299. SOW 
75V, 75% 
llto 111* 

10"» 10"k 

7 7% 

21% 21% 
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159 159% — % 
15% ISto —to 
7’.* »V, 


—to 


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-Vk 
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18 lBto 
27 37 

TB'-j 29 
98 99 

Mto Mto 
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to to —to 
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3 3 3 

6% 6to 6% 

5 5 5 

4% 4'.k 4Vi 

3% 


3% 3% 


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ill 

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t 13% 12*. 12'. • to 

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33% 18’. Gar an 
6'. 1'uGaylCn 
5% lWGovICwrt 
15'. 7 GelmSs 
2>v„ Vu GenKinet 
v* "uGenisco 
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26% If ,GianTFd 
9 6% GtomCR 

17% 1 1 laGICVVolr 
19% IJtoGlotttl 
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33% 16 GrSimec 

3% 'y^Grdna 
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9 aWHalEP 
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7’* 3% HanpOr 
1% 3%HarvDir 
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17% HHiT-yard 
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MWlltoHemlnd 
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8 3% Helnwr 

7% 2%He0c"iei 
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23%13WHrtaMd 
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15 V. 12%H«nlncn 
3'V„ %Ho<o 

33W25lkHollyCD 
14', 7V.HOOOHI 
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18’ * 7>*Hown6n 
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20% 10%HudGn 


J4b 2.2 12 
.72 J.3 15 

16 2 1 15 

. 23 

70 4.3 41 
.05* 2.2 _ 

I 91 
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368 

13 

10 

32? 

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30 

?e 

671 

24 


39 

19? 

216 

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10 

536 

15 

24 

793 

121 


9V, 9 

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13'. 12% 
l'Vu I"* 


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21*. • 
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17 

16‘. 
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12’. 
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34 

11% 

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J6 3.7 8 

SOOll 9 U 


191 

5 

4 

5 


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I'T 


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29 1478 

... 302 'V 
1538 I"-, 
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JB 9 16 586 31 ' 
JJ M 10 13 IJ’ 


.15 1.4 25 
J9l 5J . 
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4'V,, 4, a 4'V„ 


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24' 1 26'. 
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3% 

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7% 


1-J— K- 


15 19 


31 


417 5% 

60 9V» 


43 3" 


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,12a 1 1 71 144 ii‘-» 

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.70 4.3 9 2 16'. 

_ _ l«5 

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06 J 16 1149 raw 

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12% 7%1maHlv AS IJ ... . 

38'-i 29 ImcOflo I SO .. 25 310 31;* 
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1% Hlnffiks 
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25% 9Wlntelcm 
3', 1 WlnHoSys 
3'*i* 2tf„lnCtPd 
17% 14 InFinSx 
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25V: llTklnfnrrdn 
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18’. 11 InlPtvB 
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17V* e kriyOG 
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5% 3-kKmntk 
23% 15 to Kirby 
18’* etoKilMfs 
1C* 4 KlerVui 
lOW 6'iKaarEa 
6 3 LXRBio n 

3% 1 LOBV? 

22% 1 J ' .Lancer 
16' : laiiLandavr 
41* J'toLnasPc 
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9% 5 Loser 
7"i 2’-’.*LarT«cn 
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359.24 LcnGTeln 

19*. 171. LcnMU n 1J0 8 4 . 

37 28% LcnORCL rl Jl 6J - 

5'.* AtoLcHKViwt - „ 

13 2"uL*J> 95«n . - 

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21% M". L.ivem J8 
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77V, 3*>: L.ltldAe 
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14% 9 Lure. 

15to 7%Lurlo 
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223 6> 


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_ 10 13 4V| 

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... ._ 6 8’« 
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1585 ?' i 

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J8 6J 14 


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40 

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22 

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_ _ 48 4'i 

14 14 167 19', 
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llto 

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5% 

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11% 

U'k 




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94to 

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5 5 

16 211 
20 S 
51 1‘ 

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16 *22 17% 
86 60 13% 

.. 2137 7>. 

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11% 8V,.5SullvnC 
9% 6%.3criol& 

37 ",35% Olsten .74 7 

17% 16 to OneLd pi 160 9A 
3% 'wOreiicELn 
14 Vj 5V. Gringo 
30% 18'/. OnemBT 
12V: 6 OrlplH b 

7% 3'ikPLC Sri 

3% 2 PLM 
17% 12% PMC 
102'k88'4PcEn pfE 
23% 18 PGEriA 
21W16'.)PGEplB 
19'k MTkPGEpfC 
19% MHPGEPfE 
19 'ft 14% PGEptC? . „ 
28to23VkPOEriM 194 
28l':74y*PGEp!0 TOO 
a%J4 PCEpfP 
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26%S0VjPCEptY 
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11% 4 PWHkwl 
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10 9 PWSPMid 

3% 1%PWUSJw1 
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8% —to 
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131 
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1-25 
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1.86 
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1.72 


154 

1 


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4 17 17 17 


Sales tloures ore unattlcioL Yearly highs and i*wi relied 
the previous 57 weeks plus the curreni week, but not me laiesi 
irodlno dav. Where a split or Mode dividend amounting la 25 
pareent or more has been paid, the year's h ton-low range and 
dividend ore shown tor the new stock only. Unless otherwise 
noted, roles ot dividends ora annual disbursements Dosed an 
I ho latest declaration, 
a —dividend alio extra (si. 
b— annual rate of dividend Plus stock dividend, 
c — ffciu Wcf ins dividend, 
aa — coiled. 
a — new yearly low. 

e — dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 months, 
a — dividend in Canadian funds, sub loci re lSN, non-rmldene* 
la*. 

I — dividend declared after lPlltuP or stock dividend. 

I —dividend paid this v ear. omitted, deferred, or no action 
taken at latest dividend meeting. 

k— dividend declared or paid this year, an accumulative 
Issue with dividends In arrears. 

n — new issue in the pan 52 weeks. The hfgn-iaw ranae Deal ns 
with the start ot trading. 
rta — next day delivery. 

P/E — arlce-eamlngs ratio. 

r— dividend declared ar paid In preceding 12 months, plus 
stack dividend 

s — slock split. Dividend begins wtin aaie at spill, 
sis— sales. 

t — dividend bold In smek In preceding lj months, esHimled 
cash value on r*-dlvldend ar ex-dlsirlcullon dale, 
u — new yearly high, 
v— trading nailed. 

vl — In bankruptcy or receivership ar being reorganized un* 
Her the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such com- 
panies. 

mri — when distributed, 
wl— when Issued, 
ww —with warrants. 

* — e*-dl vidend or ex-rights, 
xdls — ex-tiisiriouiian. 
xw — without warrants, 
v -- ex-diuidena ana sales in tulL 
vld- yield, 
s— sales In full. 


(«“* 






ii 



In the 

past year, 
we’ve seen 

our storage 

business grow 30%, our 


PC business grow 100%, 

and our Alpha AXP sales 

increase 164%. 


Some people think those figures already 
represent a comeback. To us, ir's just a 
beginning. Because what we’re coming back 
with is a whole new way of doing business. 

At our new Computer Systems Division, 
were taking the lessons learned in our PC 
operation and applying them to our core 
business. The result: a division with its own 
manufacturing, engineering, sales and mar- 
keting — one that lets us pay more attention 
to your needs. And helps us develop better 
products more quickly. At even more com- 
petitive prices. 


In short. Digital is changing. From a 
company famous for a complicated decision- 
making process, to one famous for decisive- 
ness. From a company legendary for its 
proprietary products, to one unequaled in the 
openness of its systems and its range of choice. 

THE BEST OF CISC, 

THE BEST OF RISC 

That choice begins with two equally sup- 
ported platforms — Intel™ CISC for very high 
volume and high performance PC clients and 
servers, and our 64-bit Alpha AXP™ RISC 
for absolutely blinding performance in 
workstations and servers. And if you want 


to switch from CISC to RISC, we offer the 
only products you can convert. 

Now the industry is finally beginning 
work on 64-bit RISC, and we’re happy to 
see this endorsement of Alpha AXP. But HP 
and Intel say it’ll take a few years. We have 
64-bit RISC now. With 6,000 applications. 

OUR SYSTEM: 

MANY SYSTEMS 

Fact is. Digital is a multiple operating system 
company because that’s what most of you aie. 
In DEC OSF/1? we have the most standards- 
compliant, highest quality UNIX® in the 
industry. It gives you outstanding high 


Cfyi F- r ,—~ ’ Ofpai.rtr mCUALl# DEC -CO! IiaMlafa. MTHRWUl* War »4«irb tt.-M tpifm rxLXu t UMX Jjra* Utnawfa, 1st hfc/u ■ hbJom* rfhtd OjraOun. DSP/I lit KpmrimttmiktfOpn Spurn FmHam, Ik MunqftbK 


WMm NTm otfniBfa cfMkntf CqnXa 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1994 


Page 11 




1 





* 


4 



> 


* 


t . «•. 


availability features through clustering and 
the fastest recoverability of any UNIX on 
the market. And ours is the only commercial 
64-bit UNIX system, which experts say will 
keep us the price/performance leader for years. 

We offer OpenVMS™ because millions 
need it, as it provides the best clustering 
capabilities on the market for high-security, 
high-throughput, business-critical work. We 
plan to support it, invest in it, keep customers 
fully operational with it, and introduce it to 
new customers as well. 

What's more. Digital has partnered with 
Microsoft® to bring you the Windows™ 
operating environment. Window’s NT™ 
Workstation and Server. 

All these system options give you one very 
important thing. Choice without compromise. 


OUR SOFTWARE: TRULY OPEN 

This attitude of openness of course extends 
to software. One excellent example is our 
PATH WORKS™ application, which lets you 
connect with anybody, on virtually any net- 
work operating system, no matter what client 
you’re on. And our LinkWorks™ software lets 
you share and edit work regardless of appli- 
cation, on most any network operating system. 

OUR STRATEGY: 

YOU CALL THE SHOTS 

So why do we think this multiple platform/ 
multiple operating system strategy is the way 
to go? Because it means we never have to 
force a migration on you. You choose what’s 
best now and we support it. You decide 
when, where, or if you want to migrate and 
we provide what you need. Simple. 



worry, we re 

planning a 
comeback. 




We think our technology leadership goes 
without saying. Nothing proves this better 
than our pioneering 64-bit RISC architecture. 
Where else in this industry’ are so many com- 
petitors so far behind a single leader? Right 
now; our Alpha AXP clients and servers offer 
the highest performance and the best price/ 
performance you can buy. Which may have 
something to do with the more than SI billion 
in Alpha AXP systems weve already sold. 


THE EASIEST TO 
DO BUSINESS WITH 

One of the few things at Digital that defi- 
nitely isn’t changing is the world-class service 
and support we provide. But we’re always 
looking for ways to meet your needs more 
quickly, more comprehensively. That’s why 
we’re now’ dramatically expanding our rela- 
tionships with resellers. VARs and System 
Integrators. Of course, if you need a direct 
relationship with Digital, were here, with 
our partners, delivering the products. 

In any case, our goal is to become the 
easiest company to do business with. 

With the products, technology and sup- 
port that wil 1 keep you competitive into the 
21st century. 

Just like us. 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD 






WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1994 














































































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Page 13 



THE TRIB 


TMTA 


: 116. 


International Herald Tribune World Stock Index ©, composed of 
280 Internationally investable stocks from 26 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1. 1992 = 100 
120 — 



miwm 


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. ] 

Asia, 'Pacific 


Europe 'w 

mm 


- • 


Approx muffins: 32% 

Ctoss: 131^8 Prav: 131-98 
150 

EHmi 

ApprajL waghfrig: 37% 

Close: 117J2 Prev.: 11830 

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A M J 


North America 


Approx, wejghfing: 2G% 
Close: 96.79 Ptsv: 96.66 


A M J 


Latin America 


Appro, weighing: 5% 
CtoSK 14053 Prey- 138.89 




Iff WnUIndn 

The meter tracks US. dollar values of stocks hr. Tokyo, Nan* York, London, and 
Aigwidfa, AuitraRa, Austria, BtfgiuR, Brazil, Canada, CJiBe, Denmark, Finland, 
Franca, Qarmany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Netftartand s . New Zealand, Norway. 
Singap or e, Spain, SweldBn, Swttzarland and Vanaznaia. For Tokyo. New York and 
London, ff» index is composed ot the 20 top Issues in terms o t market capitalization, 
othemise the ten top stocks are hacked. 


Industrial Sectors 


Tut. Pm % Tub. Pitt. % 

do— daaa chap do- tews chmge 

Energy 115,45 115.72 -023 CapM Gooch 119.72 118£4 -0.1P 

Utfltto 12820 128.46 -020 RwMaWah 13657 136.32 *0.18 

Finance H6.17 116.07 -riMB Consumw Goods 1QSJ8 104.94 *0.13 

Sendees 122.45 12236 <0.07 WeceBaneous 137.92 138 JO -0.D6 

For mon infonvaHon about the Index, a booklet cs aveiable Iwe ot charge. 

Wrto to Tito Index, 181 Avenue Charies da GatOa, 9221 Neutty Codex, France. 

Otnftsmjufenal Herald Tribune 


Europe 
Burdened 
By Rate 
Rise Talk 


Compiled ty Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Indications 
that European interest rates 
have hit bottom drove bond and 
stock prices lower on Tuesday. 

A warning from a European 
Union official about the high 
budget deficits of most major 
countries highlighted a glut of 
European bonds already on the 
market. This added to pressure 
from weekend comments by the 
Bundesbank president that 
German rates would hold firm. 

Analysts said equity investors 
see more dangers than sources of 
satisfaction in the speed-up of 
the European economic recovery 
and the resulting upward trend 
in interest rates. 

“While companies are start- 
ing to report better results and 
upgrading their earnings fore- 
casts, the market is down be- 
cause the more there is econom- 
ic growth, the less the chance of 
further rate cuts.'* a Paris ana- 
lyst said. 

Hans Tietmeyer. the Bundes- 
bank chief, sparked a sell-off 
across the European bond mar- 
ket when he said over the week- 
end that German rates would 
not be lowered in the coming 
weeks. 

His comments, together with 
recast rate rises in Sweden, Ita- 
ly and France, were seen as evi- 
dence that the two-year cycle of 
rate cuts has come to an end. 

On Tuesday, the 10-year 
German government bund 
price fell, r aising its yield to 
7.49 percent from 729" percent 
last week. 

The 10-year French govern- 
ment issue’s yield rose to 8.06 
percent from 7.88 percent, 
while yields on British 10-year 
gilts rose to 8.67 percent from 
8.55 percent last week. 

“It would be good for the 
French economy if rates were 

See STOCKS, Page 14 



A German Magazine War 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Hendd Tribune 

H AMBURG — In the beginning, 
Dcr Spiegel, Stern and Bunie 
formed a sleepy trio of weekly 
magazines that changed little over 
the years and raked in profits with welcome 
regularity. Thai German unification excited 
the local media and advertising industries in 
1991 with the prospect of 15 million East 


dons after four decades of subsisting with 
Communist Party propaganda. 

Now euphoria has succumbed to recession- 
ary reality and increased competition is dent- 
ing publishers' profits. 

While Focus, a splashy newsweekly that hit 
the newsstands on Jan. 1 , 1993, recently made 
German media history by passing the venera- 
ble Dex Spiegel in the contest for paid adver- 
tising pages, traditional titles are suffering. 

The success of most new publications has 
come at the expense of their entrenched com- 
petition. not from the expansion of the pan- 
German market. Industry insiders say the 
crowding-out phenomonenon will be com- 
pounded by a second spurt of magazines now 
preparing to enter the fray: 

• Gruner & Jahr AG, the print media divi- 
sion of the German publishing giant Bertels- 
mann AG, announced last week the Sep. 29 
launch of Tango, a heavily illustrated news- 
weekly aimed at a young, well-educated and 
well-to-do readership bored by Der Spiegel 
and unwilling to switch to Focus. 

Tango will come out on Thursdays, the 
cnnv» day as Stem, Gruner & Jahr’s flagship 
magazine. Stem's editor-in-chief ended up 


quitting, not convinced that the two maga- 
zines' readerships didn't overlap. 

• Heinrich Bauer Verlag KG. Gruner & 
Jahrs crosstown rival, will counter Tango 
with Feuer (Fire), a Monday newsweekly 
aimed at the same audience. 

• Burda, the Munich-based publisher of 
Focus, plans to introduce a second, still- lo- 
be-named newsweekly in addition to a wom- 
en’s magazine named Lisa. 

• Der Spiegel, which usually sneers at up- 
starts* attempts to nip at its heels, has an- 
nounced that its previously sporadic Spiegel 
Spctial, each issue of which is devoted to one 
topic, will soon appear monthly. It has also 
added a considerable amount of color pic- 
tures and graphics to its flagship magazine. 

Meanwhile, Axel Sp ring er Verlag AG said 
it bad canceled plans to introduce a German 
version of News, its successful Austrian news- 
weekly on grounds that the market was get- 
ting too tighL 

Perhaps the biggest clash of German media 
titans, however, will target the nation's 50 
milli on television viewers. A jungle of new 
cable TV channels has expanded the market 
for guides to help viewers decide what to 
watch. Circulation of TV magazines has in- 
creased from 16.3 milli on m 1990 to 215 
million today. Industry analysis estimate that 
the market has another 4.6 milli on potential 
readers. 

Media insiders predicted an aggressive 
pusb-and-shove for advertising and reader- 
ship that will leave many long-time contend- 

See MAGAZINE, Page 15 


U.S. Rises to Top 
Of World List on 
Competitiveness 


Saint-Gobain’s Chairman 
Indicted in Bribery Case 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The United 
States, emerging from reces- 
sion more quickly than other 
industrialized countries, has 
displaced Japan as the most 
competitive economy in the 
world, an authoritative new 
study says. 

Singapore took second 
place among the 42 advanced 
and developing countries in 
the 1994 scorecard, compiled 
by analysts at the Institute 
for Management Develop- 
ment in Lausanne, Switzer- 
land, and published with the 
Geneva-based World Eco- 
nomic Forum. 

This left Japan, hobbled 
in recent months by eco- 
nomic and political uncer- 
tainty, in third place; Tokyo 
had been ranked at the top 
in every year since 1985. 

Singapore outperformed 
Japan on the basis of its or- 
ganizational abilities, for- 
eign trade and partnerships 
with foreign companies, fi- 
nancial services, emphasis 
on research and develop-' 
ment, and its infrastructure, 
the report said. Hong Kong, 
despite uncertainty related 
to its scheduled reversion to 
Chinese control in 1997, 
came in fourth. 

The report, based oo eco- 
nomic data and a survey of 
16.500 business executives, 
defines international com- 
petitiveness as “the ability of 
a country to proportionally 
generate more wealth than 
its competitors in world 
markets.” 

Professor Stephane Gar- 
elli, director of the world 
competitiveness report, said 
Japan had lost its top posi- 
tion partly because of its re- 
cession but also as a result of 
a growing mistrust of its po- 
litical system. 

Mr. Garelli also said that. 


Government 
Raids Japan 
Companies 

By Paul Blustein 

Washington Parr Service 

TOKYO — Government of- 
ficials raided the offices of ma- 
jor trading companies Tuesday 
in a search for evidence that the 
firms rigged bids for projects 
funded by Tokyo’s Official De- 
velopment .Assistance program, 
according to local press reports. 

A finding that trading com- 
panies colluded illegally on 
such projects would deal a blow 
to the prestige of SI 12 billion 
government program. 

Critics have often contended 
that Tokyo skews its develop- 
ment assistance to help Japa- 
nese industries win overseas 
business. Japanese authorities 
heatedly deny such charges. 

But some foreign companies 
involved in competing for Japa- 
nese development contracts 
complain the system strongly fa- 
vors Japanese companies, espe- 
cially trading companies, which 
allegedly enjoy special advan- 
tages and knowledge through 
their close contacts with officials 
involved giving aid. 

According to the press re- 
ports, officials of Japan’s Fair 
Trade Commission searched the 
headquarters of trading-compa- 
ny giants including Mitsubishi 
Corp., Itochu Corp.. Nichimen 
Coip. and Marubeni Corp. 



Cross Rates sept. 6 

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i-i . Ur Amsterdam, Lender. New York and Zurich, /trims In artier centers ; Toronto 

ttUu flfiML 

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225.1 U5M NMSK*SS TJBS N-Monds USW MCnr.won 801 JO 

IS* IlSwtaW IM nwr.lw» 63M Swd.kn» 16S3 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


1 month flt-dvti 4%-S 
3 months 4?*-5 4’fr-5 

6 months 5 *v5 * S-SV 


Sources.' Reuters, Utrrds Bonk. 

Rotes applicable to Interbank daeaUtsotSl million mtntmum (or eoulrcuenll. 


sits 

Swiss 

Franc 

Sterling 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

Sept. 6 

ECU 

4 k . 

4 «-*4 i. 

SVSls 

2 '« 

546.5*4 

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Key Money Rates 

United Slate Close Prev. 

EUsaumt rate 4J» 4.00 

Prime rat* 73n n, 

Federal funds 43a 4 r *. 

ZouBth CDs 4JS 4 Ji 

Comm, pqw ut days 5J4 5J0 

Treasury bill 453 453 

l-yoor Treasury bill 5J5 £23 

9-yaar Treasury note £18 £13 

S-yw Treasury note £37 £30 

Triter Treasury note £90 £83 

llhnar Treasury Bale 7.2S 700 


‘ if ; ; 


Indian runt 

JUS 

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Germany 



154*2 IMS 

WW 

Canadian dollar 

1.34*5 

U704 

1.3714 

Lombard rate 

£00 

LOO 

isar IMP 

1.5437 

JVMHIM 


HIM 

WHS 

98,13 

Csllinnwr 

S.10 

£10 

um um 

user 






Mnoatti bitereank 

5-00 

£03 


Britain 

Bank Dose rate 
Call money 
1 -month interbank 
3* month interbank 
4-month Interbank 
10-veer cut 
Franco 

UdeniMilon rate 
Udl money 
1 -month interbank 
Mtonth Interbank 
s-montti interbank 
lG-vearOAT 


S'u 5V, 
5 JO 5-00 
5 St. 

5V: 5Mi 

fiXfl £00 
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v -y tt.- mg Bank (Amsterdam!.- Meetm Bonk (Brusseait Sanaa Commentate mtmo 
fjtUan/.' Amor Frown Pnoae (Ports); Bonk ot Tokyo (Tokyo); Roytd Bonk ot Canada 
(Toronto); IMF (SDR). Other data from Reuters and AP. 


j-meoth Interbank 
t-moan mterbaak 

IB- year Bund 


Sources: neuters. Bieomhero. Merrill 
Lvncn. Bank of Tokyo. Commerzbank. 
G iMimvn Montnuu, Creait Lyonnais. 


Zurich 387.95 387.75 + 0J0 

London 387 JO 38750 f OJO 

New York 391 JO 3912) +0J0 

US. Cottars per ounce. London official fix- 
ings: Zurich and New York amino end c/as- 
ine Prices; New York Comer iPccemper.) 
Source: Reuters. 


because of the relatively low 
labor cos 15 in East Asia and 
Latin America as well as re- 
cent international trade 
agreements, a Third World 
work force of more than 1 
billion people would soon 
pose a serious competitive 
threat to manufacturing in- 
dustries in Europe and 
North America. 

Western Europe, with its 
high-wage economies, risks 
gradual “deindustrializa- 
tion.” Mr. Garelli said. He 


Japan lost its 
top position 
partly because 
of mistrust of its 
political system. 


said unemployment in Eu- 
rope remained serious and 
warned that a conventional 
economic recovery would 
not change the situation. 

The dilemma for Europe, 
he added, is whether to try to 
improve competitiveness “at 
the price of destroying the 
income of a significant part 
of its population, while at 
the same time reducing so- 
cial benefits.” 

Among European coun- 
tries, Germany was deemed 
the most competitive, de- 
spite the impact of absorb- 
ing the states of the former 
East Germany in the middle 
of its worst recession since 
World War II. 

Germany ranked as the 
fifth-most-competitive 
country in the survey, fol- 
lowed by Switzerland, Den- 
mark and the Netherlands. 

Italy fell from 20th to 
32nd place, the study said, 
largely because of “numer- 
ous political and business 
scandals.** 


Compiled bv Our Staff From Dzpaicha 

PARIS — The chairman of 
Saini-Gobain SA, one of the 
world's largest glass and build- 
ing-materials manufacturers, 
on Tuesday became the latest 
French executive charged in 
connection with corruption in- 
vestigations. 

The 329-year-old company 
said its chairman, Jean-Louis 
Beffa, had been indicted by 
Judge Renaud van Ruvmbeke 
in connection with a bribery 
case involving a water contract 
awarded to a Saint-Gobain sub- 
sidiary by the French city of 
Nantes. 

A spokesman said the magis- 
trate visited the headquarters of 
Saint-Gobain in the La Defense 
suburb of Paris, on Tuesday 
and demanded a meeting with 
Mr. Beffa, who received him 
immediately. 

Mr. Beffa, 53. was not taken 
into custody, and the exact 
charge against him was not an- 
nounced. 

“Having not obtained certain 
elements of information from 
the subsidiaries concerned in 


the Nantes case, Mr. van 
Ruymbeke considered it neces- 
sary to indict the chairman of 
the group,” Saint-Gobain said. 

A Saint-Gobain subsidiary, 
Pont-a-Mousson, is alleged to 
have paid 4.4 million French 
francs (5827,000) through a 
Swiss account in 19S8 to obtain 
a water services contract in 
Names. 

Pont-a-Mousson at that time 
was headed by Pierre Blayau, 
now- chairman of the retail com- 
pany Pinault-Printemps-Re- 
doule SA, who is already under 
investigation in the same case. 

Mr. Beffa was president of 
Pont-i-Mousson from 1979 to 
1986, when he took over as head 
of Saint-Gobain. 

On the Paris stock exchange, 
where trading closed moments 
after the indictment was an- 
nounced, Saint-Gobain shares 
plummeted 28 francs, or 4.2 
percent, to 63S francs in a late 
burst of selling. 

Saint-Gobain last year had 
revenue of 71.54 billion francs 
and profit of 1.2S billion francs, 
down 45 percent from 1992. 


The company has 315 subsid- 
iaries and affiliates and em- 
ploys about 92,000 people, two- 
thirds of them outside France. 

Founded in 1665, Saim-Go- 
bain is the biggest glassmaker in 
Europe and a leading maker of 
insulation material. 

Saint-Gobain predicted in 
June that it would report a sig- 
nificant increase in first-half 
net profit from the year-earlier 
452 million francs, a figure that 
was barely one-third of its first- 
half 1992 neL profit of 1.3 bil- 
lion francs. 

Many French executives 
have been charged in the past 
two years as judges have be- 
come" more aggressive in pursu- 
ing allegations of political and 
corporate corruption. Among 
the most prominent arc Didicr 
Pmeau-VaJencienne of the elec- 
trical company Schneider SA, 
Pierre Suard of the communica- 
tions and transport company 
Alcaiel Alsthom and Pierre 
Berge. head of the Yves Saint- 
Laurent fashion house. 

{AP. Bloomberg) 


Mexico Searches for Banker 


By Anthony DePalma 

New York Times Service 

MEXICO CITY — Mexican federal police 
and international law enforcement officers were 
searching Tuesday for the head of one of Mexi- 
co's largest banks who has been charged with 
making insider loans totaling as much as 5700 
million. 

The banker, Carlos Cabal Peniche, allegedly 
used the money to buy several companies, in- 
cluding Del Monte Foods Co. of San Francisco 
in a tentative deal that now is uncertain. 

The Mexican government on Monday night 
took control of the Grupo Financiero Union- 
Cremi financial conglomerate, which includes 
two large banks that recently merged and im- 
posed a government manager" 

Finance Ministry officials said Tuesday that the 
bank would continue to operate normally and that 
depositors were backed by a federal insurance 
program. The manager will try to clear up the 
tangled lines of credit by which Mr. Cabal Peniche 
arranged millions in insider loans that he then 


used to make flashy purchases that raised the 
suspicions of the financial community in Mexico. 

The loans began within a few months after Mr. 
Cabal Peniche purchased the Banco BCH. said 
Guillermo Ortiz, undersecretary of finance. 

News agencies reponed earlier : 

Arrest warrants also have been issued for Maur- 
icio Madero O'Brien, chairman of Pragma, a fi- 
nancing unit belonging to Grupo Financiero 
Union-trend; and the executives Hector Gomez 
L6pez and Eduardo Hernandez Torres, who are 
suspected of wrongdoing. 

Union-Cremi includes two big hanks, Banca 
Cremi SA and Banca Union S A. and at least nine 
financial companies, underwriters, currency 
houses and insurance companies. Banca Union 
and Banca Cremi Bank have combined assets of 
36 billion pesos ($11 billion) making the concern 
the eighth largest in Mexico, news agencies report- 
ed on Tuesday. 

(AP. Bloomberg, Knight-Ridder) 


Our Philosophy of Banking 
Goes Back 4,000 Years. 



I t was the ancient traders 
who first established 
many of today’s banking 
practices. They accepted 
funds for safekeeping. 
Bartered goods for services. 
And extended credit. It was 
a business based on trust, 
and a handshake contract 
was binding. 

The world has changed 
immeasurably since then, 
but Republic National Bank 
still holds to the principles 


established nearly four mil- 
lennia ago. 

We believe in die primacy 
of personal relationships, the 
importance of trust and the 
protection of depositors’ 
hinds. This emphasis has 
made us one of the world’s 
leading private hanks. 

As a subsidiary of Saha 
Republic Holdings S.A. and 
an affiliate of Republic New 
York Corporation, we’re part 
of a global group with more 

REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


ASATRA BANS 

TIMELESS VALUES. TRADITIONAL STRENGTH. 

HEAD OFFICE GEN EVA 1204 ■ 2. PLACE DU LAC -TEL- 1022) 705 55 55 ■ FOREX: iOZZi 70S 55 SO AND GENEVA 1201-2, RUE DR. ALFRED-VINCENT i CORNER 
aUAI DU MONT-BLANCl BRANCHES: LUGANO 6901 * I. VIA CANOVA - TEL. (091 1 23 85 32 - ZURICH 8039 • STOCKERSTRASSE 37 • TEL. iOt> 268 IB !fi - 
GUERNSEY ■ RUE DU PftE - ST. PETER PORT - TEU >4BI< 711 7bt AFFILIATE! REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK IN NEW YORK OTHER LOCATIONS: 
GIBRALTAR * GUERNSEY - LONDON - LUXEMBOURG - MILAN - MONTE CARLO ■ PARIS ' BEVERLY KILLS - CAYMAN ISLANDS • LOS ANGELES - MEXICO CITY • MIAMI ‘ 
MONTREAL • NASSAU ■ NEW YORK • BUENOS AIRES • CARACAS • MONTEVIDEO • PUNTA DEI ESTE 1 RIO DE JANEIRO - SANTIAGO • BEIRUT ■ BEIJING - HONG AONG ■ 

JAKARTA - SINGAPORE - TAIPEI - TOKYO 


than US$5 billion in capital 
and more than US$50 billion 
in assets. These assets con- 
tinue to grow substantially, 
a testament to the group s 
strong balance sheet, risk- 
averse orientation and 
century-old heritage. 

Though cuneiform tablets 
have given wav to modem 
computers, the timeless 
qualities of safety*, serv ice and 
personal integrity will always 
be ar the heart of our bank. 


i- 









Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1994 


MARKET DIARY 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 




Sho 


Firm German Rates 
Drive Down Dollar 


Vio Associated Pieu 


Dow Jones Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Daily dosings of <he. / 

Dow J 0 fte& industry average 


om Htoi Low Lost an. 


Metals 


Lot Mh OrtK 


intJUS 3885124 38*8.70 3877.1 7 389830 - 1112 
Trans 1627.96 162907 1620.61 1834,98 —2.98 
UIB 184 JS 184.48 182.77 18189 -0 84 
Corns 1333,38 1334.94 132834 133425 -OBI 


Complicity Oar Staff From Dapatcka 
NEW YORK — The dollar 
fell against most major curren- 
cies on Tuesday as dealers bet 
the Bundesbank would not re- 
duce German interest rates to 
keep the country's economic re- 
covery on track. 

Many traders sold dollars for 
Deutsche marks after the Ger- 


Forolgn Exchange 


man government said western 
German manufacturing orders 
rose more than expected in July. 

German unemployment rates 
in August, released Tuesday, 
also feD slightly. 

Both reports were the latest in 
a series indicating the German 
economy is rebounding from re- 
cession faster than many ana- 
lysts had expected. “The num- 
bers out of Germany indicate 
that the economic recovery -s 
under way," said Peter Wadkins, 
senior vice president in currency 
trading at MTB Bank. 

Steady rates in Germany 
could buoy the mark by making 


deposits there more attractive 
Many traders expected German 
rates to continue their two-year 
decline for another month or 
two at least. 

The dollar closed at 1.5338 
Deutsche marks, down from 
1.5550 DM on Friday. New 
York markets were closed Mon- 
day for the Labor Day holiday. 
The dollar also closed at 98.65 
yen, down from 99.13 yen, aL 
1.2945 Swiss francs, down from 
13065 francs, and at 5.286 
French francs, down from 
5.3255 francs. The pound rose 
to $1.5525 from $1.5475. 

Earlier in Europe, the dollar 
was pressured by concern about 
the size of budget deficits after 
the European Union an- 
nounced it was set to lake ac- 
tion against those EU countries 
with excessive budget deficits. 

A published report prior to 
the EU action highlighted the 
oversupply of bonds which af- 
flicts many European markets 
and prompted investors to buy 
marks, analysts said. 

(Bloomberg. Knight- Ridder) 


m . ' 



! Standard A Poor’s Indexes 


Industrials 

Tramp. 

I utilities 
I Finance 
SP50C 

sp mo 


NU Lew Cta* CMrt 
gL61 5S1J2 35441 1 134 
38844 3*544 38743 -0.74 
155.19 15283 15*48 —033 
USB 4L03 4L27 +0J» 
471.92 469.64 47184 + 087 
43*43 434 .14 43*43 + 1.61 


NYSE Indexes 


Hian Low Lost cue. 


! I 3500 


I Composite 

■ Industrials 

■ Tronic. 
lutotv 

I Finance 


260.25 259.12 240.11 -0 10 

323.46 322.27 32262 -044 
24*40 24**9 247.4? -072 
20O2B 20603 307-50 -4-55 
2174.1 21638 217.56 - 0.16 


Clow 

KM AS* 
ALUMINUM [High Grade) 
Dollars p«r metric tan _ 
Spot 153100 104.00 

Forward 1 50.00 155980 
COPPER CATHODES [High 
Dollars per metric ton 
5pot 24000 248100 

Forward 2*7700 2498.00 

LEAD 

Dolter* 9tr metric ton 
Seal 00450 404 JO 

Forward 61100 62000 

NICKEL 

Dollars per metric tan 
Spot 423000 6235.00 

Forward 432100 433000 

TIN 

Dollars per metric tan 

soot S3i<u» 5320JW 

Forward 536500 537000 

ZINC (Special HWi Grade) 
Dollars per metric tan 
Spat 94150 94150 

Forward 989.00 989 JO 


Prey loo s 
Bht ASX 


153400 153500 
1S590O 154000 
Grade) 


FM 16000 157.50 

Mir 16000 15025 

APT I59J5 159.75 

May 157 JO 157 JO 

■IBM 155 JO 155 JO 

Johr N.T. N.T. 

EM. volume: 14,107. 


14000 14000 +225 
16000 14005 +200 
159-75 159.75 +235 
157 JO 157 JO +200 
155-50 155JD +1J5 
N.T. N.T. + 103 
Open In*. 105055 


J&J to Buy Diagnostic Unit 
As Kodak Exits Health Care 


P' w: 


247050 247900 
2*9* SO 2S0i.H0 


BRENT CRUDE OIL OPE) 

UXdonors per aarraf-Ms of M60 barreli 


40900 61100 
42100 42.00 


521006 521500 
S3O50O 5310.00 


529300 530X00 
536500 537500 


Oct 

1639 

1509 

143* 

1633 

+ 838 

Nev 

1604 

1603 

1606 

1608 

+035 

DOC 

1601 

1630 

1658 

1658 

+ 033 

Jan 

1603 

1633 

1601 

160) 

+ 034 

Feb 

1857 

1823 

1857 

1659 

+ 030 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1600 

+ 032 

APT 

1638 

1638 

1638 

1605 

+ 039 

May 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1603 

+ 039 

Jun 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1605 

+ 029 

Jhr 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1605 

+ 029 

A UP 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1605 

+ 029 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1605 

+ 029 

EsL volume: 33044 . 

Open kit. 147315 


97400 97500 
99700 99800 


Stock Indexes 


Financial 


M A MJJA S 
199* ! 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Hlflh Law Last Chg. 


AmEn 

RjRNri, 

ULCO 

ABarck 

Gtaro 

Com pea t 

GnMofr 

TcUvtex 

PhOMr 

Fards 

SunMn 

EKtxk* 

Ctirvslr 

OtwoGd 

Merck 


* Actives 

High 

Law 

Las* 

CM. 

304+ 

29 V# 

MW 

+ 1 Vi 

1 7 

I’M 

tv. 

—Vi 

Uff 

15'4 

IS’a 


23H 

23 V. 

2346 

-V. 

19H 

19Vh 

19* 

—'A 



35V, 

- W 


494* 



63 V* 

61 Vk 

63W 

+ 1^ 

6o:v 

40 ff 

6016 

♦ Vi 

30'A 

29H 

30 

+ V* 

2’P 

2 

2% 

■* V* 

51 '7 

SO 

51 Vi 

+ 1Vi 






1BV* 

IBff 


3* 

334* 

33W, 

— 


Composite 

Industrials 

Bank! 

Insurance 

Finance 

Tramp. 


759.19 757.78 759.01 —022 
74604 76408 76X11 —211 
7*2-13 77804 77903 —202 
93341 92401 9J4.93 —AS 8 
758-71 957.23 95707 —101 
74104 73X5) 73X78 -1H 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages. 


10 Utilities 
10 industrials 


AMEX Most Actives 


BONDS: Weakness Hurts Stocks 


Continued from Page 13 
lower," the Paris analyst said. 
“But if rates rise in the U.S. and 
Germany they will also go up in 
France." 

The Financial Times-Stock 
Exchange 100-share index in 
London lost 1.11 percent, to 
3,205.40 points, while the CAC- 


percent from 2.25 percent a year 
ago. Speculative attacks against 
ERM currencies made the nar- 
row bands untenable. (AFP 
Reuters, Bloomberg) 



Vet 

weh 

LOW 

Last 

Chg. 

EcnoBav 

10S59 

134* 

Iff* 

13'A 

+1* 

RovnID B 

6563 

JVi 

4H 

*Vx 

■+*+ 

Amrilt 

6260 

10 

9Vi 

9% 

—V* 

XCL Ltd 

4556 

»*„ 

l>* 

lVi 

— V„ 

PraG4d 

4223 

17V* 

161* 

17’A 

*Vt 

RoaciBs 

3505 13*4 

IT* 

13’A 

—ta 

Atari 

3230 

5*6 

4*4 

5V. 

—VS 

ChevStts 

2978 

12 

m* 

llta 

— >4 

jo 0 BoO 

2536 

7 

6V, 

7 

+ *i 

ViocB 

2477 327* 

32V, 

32ta 

-Vi 


AMEX Stock lnde: 

K 

High Low 

45432 45502 

Lest Chg. 

456.00 +a*6 

NYSE Diary 



Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
ratal Issues 
New Hiahs 
New Laws 


953 953 

1146 1066 

753 822 

285? 2841 

AS 43 

32 24 


, AMEX Diary 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


U^. Stocks 


40 index in Paris shed 1.84 per- 


cent, to 1.961.45 points. In 
Frankfurt, the DAX index lost 


Frankfurt, the DAX index lost 
0.40 percent, 2,165.90 points. 

Turbulence in the currency 
markets also undermined Euro- 
pean securities. Many invest- 


ment managers are converting 
their assets to cash because of 
the trend toward higher interest 
rates, which would increase the 
return on cash deposits. 

Renewed talk among politi- 
cians about the possibility of a 
core of European Union mem- 
bers going ahead with monetary 
union underpinned the mark, 
seen as a safe haven. 

Alexandre Lamfalussy, head 
of the European Monetary Insti- 
tute, said Tuesday that the fluc- 
tuation bands in the European 
Union’s exchange-rate mecha- 
nism did not have to be reduced 
before a single European curren- 
cy could be introdured. 

European Union finance min- 
isters were forced to widen most 
of ERM fluctuation bands to 15 


■ Bonds Slow U.S. Stocks 
U.S. stocks finished mixed 
Tuesday, with blue-chip issues 
rising but the broader market 
undermined by weak Treasury 
bond prices, news agencies re- 
ported from New York. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage closed up 13.12 points, at 
3,898.70, but falling fo sses out- 
numbered gainers II to9on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

The price of the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond price 
dropped 20/32 point, to 99 


Oscos 

NextelCm 

total 

MO 

Novell 

Mlestfs 

AST 

US Whs 

Acclaim 

Svtxnes 

DSC s 

TeJCmA 

Oracles 

Call Co 

FdLloA 


VeL HWt 
36219 2516 
30047 231+ 
26S45 45V, 
23444 25 
17983 IS 1 * 
17854 56V) 
17110 13*. 
19996 43 
15533 21 
19249 48 
13926 28* 
12978 22*i 
12173 <21« 
11947 1446 
11395 6Vu 


Advanced 
Declined 
uncticneed 
Total Issues 
New Mans 
New Lows 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Mate 
New Laws 


Market Saks 


Spot Commodtttes 


Ktah Lm Close CBann 
3-MONTH STERUNG (LIFFE) 

*880800 -ots el ICO pd 

Sea 9438 9401 9404 +802 

Dee 93JC 9X40 9145 +003 

Mot- 9203 9205 9207 Urtcti. 

Jan 92.15 9208 9209 —004 

Sep 9170 9103 9104 — 005 

Dec 9101 9175 91-25 —00a 

Mar 9102 9X94 9075 —007 

Jan 9004 9076 9X76 —009 

See 9X73 9X70 9006 —009 

Dec 9000 9000 9003 —112 

Mar 9030 90A5 9X42 — 009 

JOH 9X42 90J9 9033 —0.10 

Est. volume: 71.153. Oeen ML: 54X774. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (UFFB) 

17 million -ptsefmpct 
Sep 9497 9407 9457 + 001 

Dec 901 901 9429 — 002 

Mar N.T. N.T. 9400 —002 

Jea N.T. N.T. 9X68 —003 

See N.T. N.T. 9140 —004 

EsI. volume: IX Open Ini.; 6027. 

3-MONTH EU ROMAN K5 (LIFFE) 

DM1 mllBon - ets of 1 00 pet 
s«p 9499 9496 9496 — 001 

Dec 9479 9476 9476 — 001 

Mar 9441 9438 9439 — 003 

Job 9406 9401 9402 —003 

Sep 9172 9308 9X09 —004 

Dec 9142 9339 7X40 —004 

Mar 9331 9119 9119 —004 

Jen 9239 9196 9196 —004 

SW 9230 9238 9237 —005 

Dec #260 9208 9206 —006 

Mar 92X7 9144 7142 — 007 

JlIP 9130 9237 9128 —007 

Esi. volume: 74686. Open Int.: 784079. 

SOP 9434 *428 9431 +001 

Dec 9185 9177 9183 +002 

Mar 9346 9138 9X44 +001 

JOB 9115 9108 9114 +00! 

Sep 9186 9180 9206 +001 

Dec 9164 9158 9201 UnefL 

Mar 92.50 92-41 9144 —002 

JOP 9230 9125 9126 —004 

Est. volume: 45010. Open lnt: 199054 
LONG GILT (LIFFF) 

8SO0OO - PH A 32Pds of WO Pd 

Sep 101-12 100-16 100-17 -1-04 

Dee 100-29 9*25 99-M —1-04 

Mar N.T. N.T. 99-06 — MM 

Est. volume: 64J92. Open Int.; 113034 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 

DM 2SX008 - pts of 100 pet 
Sea 9X61 9006 90.15 — X55 

DOC 8901 8X96 8905 -007 

Mgr N.T. N.T. BX50 —007 

Est. volume: 191826. Open fart.: 14X028 
ID-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS CMATIF) 
FF5O000O-pt| Of IW PCS 
SOP 1)266 11202 11206 — 030 

Doc 11130 11106 111.12 — 03D 

Mar 11106 11008 11X48 —032 

Je> N.T. N.T. 10906 —030 

Est. volume: 192.1 IX Open Int.: 144,155. 


MtoO Low C3ose Orange 
FTSE 1M (LIFFE) 

OS per Index pah* 

Sep 33480 31960 32010 —460 

Dec 32620 32150 321X5 —415 

Mar 32720 32720 32430 —450 

Est. volume: 22065. open Ml.: 64956. 
CAC40 (MATIF) 

FF2S0 per Index petal 

SOP 199600 199600 196600 - 3900 

Od 200200 1990 JO 197400 -3900 

NOV N.T. N.T. N.T. Uncn. 

Dec 202500 199900 I99SJB -38J0 

Mar 2Q44J0 304000 202400 -4000 

JIM N.T. N.T. N.T. uneft. 

EsJ. volume: 2X420. Open Int: 5*076- 

Sources: Motif. Associated Pres*. 
London Inn Financial Futures Exchange. 
Inn Petroleum Exchange. 


NEW YORK (AP) — Eastman Kodak Co. made a big move out 
of the health care business Tuesday, announcing the sale of its 
dinimj diagnostics division to Johnson & Johnson for $1.01 
billion in cash. 

The deal comes a week after Kodak said it was selling Sterling 
Winthrop fpc- .. its over-the-counter products division, to SxnilhK- 
line Beecham PLC for $2.9 billion. 

The diagnostics division brought in $535 million in revenue to 
Kodak last year and has about 2,800 workers. 

Kodak is selling its health-care divisions to reduce its debt and 
concentrate on its i m a ging businesses. The sale “demonstrates our 
resolve to rapidly achieve our strategic goal of total dedication 
and resource commitment to our core imaging businesses,** said 
George Fisher, the Kodak chairman. 




Company Per Amt 

IRREGULAR 

AIM Strut Inc - 0425 

INITIAL 

Nuv Sel Ports - .07 

SPECIAL 

Meridian PtRtyVlll _ 02 

REGULAR 

S 09 


Intar caroa Corp 
Mentor incFd 
Nuv CA IncOtvMun 
Nuv CA MunMktOPP 
Nuv CA PrfPIMun 
NuvCA Prmlna 


Nuv CA Otylnc 
Nuv CASmOtv 
Nuv FL invOty 
Nuv FL Otylnc 
Nuv Isd CA Prmlnc 
Nuv Isd MunOpp 
Nuv lid DtVMun 
Nuv Inv OTyMim 
Nuv Ml Prmlna 
Nuv Ml Prmlnc 
Nuv Ml Otylne 
Nuv Mun Afjv 
Nuv Mun AdvOpp 
Nuv NC Prmlnc 
Nuv NJ invQty 
Nuv nj Otylnc 
Nuv NY InvOtvMun 
Nuv NY MunMktOPP 
Nuv NY PrfPIMun 
Nw NY Otylnc 
Nuv NY sett 




Nuv OH Qtyf 
Nuv PA Prmlnc 
Nuv PA Otylnc 
Nuv PA InvQtv 
Nuv PrfPlus 
Nuv PrmlncMun2 
Nuv PrmlsdMun 
Nuv PrmMunlnc 
Nuv Prmlnc 
Nuv QtvincMun 
NuvSetQtyMun 
Nuv Sol Por12 
Nuv Sri Pori 
Nuv TX Prmlnc 
Nuv TX Otylnc 
Nuv VA Prminc2 
Nuv VA Prmlnc 
Nuv VA PrmlncMun 
OH5L Fin I CP 
Onfamcorv Inc 


Today 

Close 

NYSE 19907 

AmM 1X09 

Nasdaq 16705 

In millions. 


15/32, taking the yield to 7.54 
percent, up from 7.49 percent. 


Commodity Today 

Alum Mum, 1b X696 

Copper rioefrofytta lb ijd 

Iron FOB, tan 71300 

Lead. It) 008 

Sliver, tray ax 505 

Start (scrap), tan 110.17 

Tin. JO 16045 

Zlnclb 00922 


Industrials 


HWi LOW Lost Settle COtae 
GASOIL (IPE) 

US. duller* par metric toa+ots of 180 tom 
Oct 15100 14X50 15100 15100 +2.00 

NOV 15505 151 JO 15475 15473 +250 

DOC 15705 15400 15705 15705 + 250 

Jan 15X25 15600 15X75 15X75 +205 


Ml 9-15 
9-15 M0 
P- 70 I0O 
90S 10-3 
9-15 103 
*•15 16-3 
9-15 W-3 
9-15 10-3 
9-15 1M 
9-15 10-3 
*■15 10-3 
9-15 103 
9-15 103 
9-15 10-3 
9-15 1O0 
9-15 100 
9-15 10-3 
9-15 103 
9-15 103 
9-15 103 
9-15 103 
9-15 103 
+ 15 103 
9-15 103 
9-15 10-3 
9-15 103 
9-15 103 
9-15 103 
+15 103 
+15 103 
+15 103 
+15 103 
9-15 103 
9-15 103 
9-15 103 
+15 103 
+15 103 
+15 103 
+15 103 
+15 103 
+15 103 
+15 103 I 
+15 10-3 
+15 NKJ , 
+15 103 
930 10-14 . 
+19 103 I 


American Express Deals New Card 

NEW YORK (Combined Dispatches) — American Express 
Co. on Tuesday ann ounced a new credit card apparently aimed at 
winning back market share it has lost to competitors such as Visa 
and MasterCard. 

The new card, called Optima True Grace, allows customers to 
pay off just a portion of their balance each mouth and does not 
accrue interest charges on what they owe on new purchases until 
25 days after the end of each month’s billing cycle. - 
The card is a departure from American Express's traditional 
American Express Card, which does not provide a credit line, 
although its gold and platinum charge cards provide access to 
bank credit Imes. American Express also offers the Optima card, 
which does carry a line of credit, but it is only available to holders 
of its charge cards. * 

The new card will have a six-month promotional interest rate of 
7.9 percent. The rate wQi then be set at 8.75 percentage points over 
the prime rate. (Reuters, AP) 


Fleet to Buy Plaza Home Mortgage 

PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island (Bloomberg) — Fleet Financial 
Group Inc. said Tuesday it agreed to acquire Plaza Home Mon- 
gage Corp. for $10,125 a share, or $120 million in cash. 

Fleet Financial said the acquisition would give it the right to 
service $9.2 billion in residential mortgages. Plaza Home shares 
closed up $1,375 to $9,625, while Fleet Financial Group's stock 
rose 12J cents to $39,875. 


Wookond Box Office 


The Associated Pros 

LOS ANGELES — “Forrest Gump” dominated the U. S. box 
office with a gross of $1 1.6 million over the weekend. Following 
are the Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday ticket sales and 
estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


1. "Forrest Gamp’ 

(Paramount) 

8110 million 

Z "Natural Bam Kilters" 

[Warner Brothers) 

8100 minion 

l"Cleor and Prwenf Danger" 

(Paramount) 

89 million 

* "Milk Money" 

( Paramount ) 

350 million 

5. "The Mask" 

(New Une Cinema) 

*50 million 

6. True Lies’ 


S*2 million 

7. "Corrina Cerrbia" 

(New Une Cinema) 

*33 million 

8. The Lion Kina" 

(noil Disney) 

*30 minion 

9. "Fresh” 

(Miramax) 

*3.1 million 

10. Thedlenr 

(Warner Brothers) 

S3 million 


3\h: lijit tor f 


percent, up from 7.49 percent. 

American Express was the 
most actively traded NYSE is- 
sue. rising IVi to 30*6 after it 
announced plans for a new cred- 
it card and a recent report identi- 
fying the company as a posable 
takeover target 

General Motors jumped 1)6 
to 52 after the company posted 
a big increase in car and truck 
sales for August. 

Eastman Kodak rose 1*6 to 
5 1*4 after the photographic film 
and copier maker agreed to sell 
its diagnostics unit to Johnson 
& Johnson for about $1 billion. 

(Knight-Ridder, Bloomberg) 


Dassault Seeking Partners for Fiahter Research I Japan Telecom Stock Falls 

O Compiled br Our Staff From Dispatches Pflmered at the nublic au 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

FARNBOROUGH, England — Das- 
sault Aviation SA of France is looking for 
a partner to share research costs on a new 


fighter and does not exclude a European 
merger, the company’s vice chairman. Bru- 


merger, the company’s vice chairman, Bru- 
no Reviilon-Falcoz said Tuesday. 

He said at the Famborough air show 
that Dassanlt was considering a joint ven- 
ture to replace its Rafale fighter, due to 
enter service in 1996. 

In another development. Airbus Indus- 


trie announced an $850 million sale of 14 
aircraft to International Lease Finance 
Corp. of the United States. 

Jean Pierson, the Airbus presidentt said 
the consortium had captured more than half 
the world market for airliners with more 
than 100 seat capacity, but Boeing Co. dis- 
putes the figure. 

The Airbus announcement was an indi- 
cation to some analysis that the industry 
may at last be about to emerge from its 
recessionary doldrums. 


If there seems to be light at the end of 
the tunnel for the commercial aircraft in- 
dustry. the prospects for military manufac- 
turers remains uncertain because of cuts in 
defense spending. 

European manufacturers are shaken by 
the merger plans of Lockheed Corp. and 
Martin Marietta Corp.. and there is in- 
creasing merger talk on this side of the 
Atlantic. It was in this context that Mr. 
Reviilon-Falcoz made his announcement. 

(Reuters, AFX) 


Compiled by Ow Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO— Shares in Ja- 
pan Telecom Co. ended their 
first day of trading on Tues- 
day far below what many 
investors paid for them, 
causing some analysts to 
warn that the entire market 
could be dragged down. 

Japan Telecom finished at 
4.65 million yen (547,000), 
well below the weighted av- 
erage of 5.44 million yen 


garnered at the public auc- 
tion of tiie shares in mid- 
August. Some investors paid 
as much as 6.6 million yen. 


Many analysts drew a par-., 
alld with last autumn's issue 
of East Japan Railway Co., 
or JR East, shares that 
caused a market collapse be- 
cause they were overvalued at 
their initial public offering. 

. (Bloomberg. Reuters) 




IliClMttM 

’t-r: . 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Aganca Fronw Prana Sapt 6 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro HM 
ACF Holding 


AMM 

AkzoNobrt 

AMEV 

Bol+IAtaSKmen 

C5M 

DSM 

ElMvtar 

Fokkor 

GHi- Brocades 

HBG 

U rination 


Rnafnmetall 

ScMrina 

Slattern 

Thmen 

Varto 

Vetta 

VEW 

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VoHcsmaoon 

walla 


93150 

69UO69IJ0 GrmdMel 

303 301 Gubowss 

541 549 GUS 

51351550 Hinsdawn 

iSS E BCHW ~ 


Season Season 
MW L6w 


Open High Low CJas* Oig Oo.lnt 


MacMillan B* 


Humor Douuta* 

IHC Co land 

Inter Mwrilar 

InlT NOdart on d 

KLM 

KNF BT 

KPN 

Nodiiovd 

OcaGrtntan 

PoUwad 

PUMPS 

Potvaram 

Robeco 

Rodamco 

Rrilnco 


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Helsinki S c J flC t rs 

Amer.YMvma IW 114 

Ens»GotZril 4750 4700 Kfpc 

HuliKmwki 13B 160 

KT 

K Yrnm ano 142 145 Nthwif Water 


ComWor 18H TIV. — ■ ■. Toyota 

Dominion Ta*t A 8W 8W Stockholm Yamotehisoc 

OonoteraA Mta 144* S'taklfL. . 

MacMillan B* 20 Vi 1999 BJKfts*.*! 

Natl Bk Canada 9% 10 -, 1 ®} TteffSteM 

Power Carp. 20W 2t»v Attca Copco 92J0 91_S) 'wu«waax. 

P?oJm 5te » Electrolux B 374 379 PtwtWta.UH 

QuatecTal Iff* Iff* Ericsson 411 412 

Ouetecm-A 19W Iff* Eta a tta a 97 95 

OtietecDr B Iff* 19U. HaTWelsPankBn BX» 89J0 TOH 

Teleolote 18H IBM iESfSj* 12 

Vl d totran 13% 1416 Hydro 257 255 Acltlol Price 

ProCordloAF 130 131 AanJco Gaole 

l9BM SondvIkB 119 119 AMCanada 

Prmoai . !Tf7 Vi. A 1M 11A Anwtrr Cnern 


2150 2140 
655 557 


63 * § ™- 

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Hteh 

Lwr 

(teen 

weh 

Lew 

ciom 

Che Ckura 

1207 

10J7 Jul 95 

1118 

n.« 

1)00 

1106 

-an 

*772 

95.180 

907iODec#4 

#4310 

94310 

9*290 

94300 

—10505.193 

11.91 

l#570ct» 

11.79 

11.79 

1108 

mo 

-0.13 

1 MO 

93080 

#0243 Mot 95 94030 

#4030 

91990 

9400# 

-30305-939 

1100 

1008 Mot« 

11.40 

1103 

1130 

1131 


4 ta 

#4730 

90714 Jot 95 

93090 

#1700 

93030 

93060 

-30362301 





110 a 

11-35 

♦am 

3 

9*530 

91 31 D Scuta 

93010 

#3020 

#3360 

*3370 

— 70210-942 



1108 




3 

94280 

91.180 Dec 95 

91110 

#1130 


#30(0 

-70161368 


L661 











Fn'sapenmt 139.134 

011 3*5 





93.180 

92020 Junta 

91930 




—70109046 

COCOA 

INCStj ID metre vm 

k - 1 per ran 




| Est. soles NX Rfs-sriss 

479014 




Toronto 


Enso-Gatzrti 
KuPtamaKi 
K.OJ>. 
Kvmmano 
, Metro 
Noma 
PoWala 
; Repala 
Stockmann 


SCA-A 

5kffoka 


Paris 

^ IS jSStebarBBP 


ui l ie nin»8B* mil 

JH iS Pcanwn 

^ P*o 

it? PHWnotan 


SmSTSSS nem % SO Y?! vo8F .. A 1 - ** 

SSccraia.) 3SS ^ ZtoSttSta'™ cfUv 


130 131 Aanlco Eagle 
119 119 Air Canada 

116 116 Alberta Enerur 
42.70 43 Amer Barrtck 

112 111 BCE 

148 150 Bk Nova sootta 

133 134 BC Gas 

431 BCTriecomm 
102 1B3 Bramalea 

W1 1C Brunswick 

184703 CAS . 




PewarGan 

Prudential 


Rank Ore 
Rackltt Cel 
Redland 
Read Inti 

Reuter* 

RMC Group 
Rolls Rovce 
Renuim (unit) 
Rovol Scot 

RTZ 

SabBbury 
Scot Newca* 
Scot Power 
Soars 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

State 

Sm» Nephew 
SmlttiKIlne B 


Rovol Dutch 
Stark 
Unllevar 
van Ommeran 
VNU 

weltm/Kluwar 




Brussels 



Ceckerill 

Coteea 

Calrwvt 

Deiftatze 

Etactrabri 

ElectraHna 

GIB 



Glffrartel 

imiMtei 

Krwfletbank 


P error no 
Pew erfl n 
Radical 
RovotaBaiea 
Sec Gan Banaue 

socGanBattrteua 

wng 

Setvev 

Tassenderki 

TrodaM 

UC8 

Union Mkitarr 

wagon* Uta 


| Hong Kong 

3400 
1300 
3900 
41 

1200 
14JO 
5B 
4X70 
34.40 
1405 
2600 
2100 
2105 
92 
12 
1X80 
14 
3X80 
2305 
73 
3250 

14 171 
11 JO 
2X40 
3700 
3705 
301 
6135 
10.95 
4-23 
3130 
1X20 
1100 
1100 

Haaa Sana Index : 1803508 
Prevtaas: 196208 


Bj. c P 

Bauveues 

Danone 

Carretaur 

CCF. 

Cerus 

Charnears 


1279 1280 
233 23X70 

624 632 

792 797 

2100 2128 
31X40 207.90 Arocar 
114J0 115 ANZ 

WO 1494 BHP 


aments Franc 310 311 gorat 

Club Med 425 430 Bowgairvlita 

EH-Aaultaina 3*4.90 40400 g°*”M yer 

Euro Disney 9 JO 9 JO CormUco 

Gen. Earn 511 531 

Havas 44X90 45400 UB „ 

I metal 580 574 Fostar* Brew 


COn PaclHe Ltd 
C angdl on Tire A 

Sydney cSf 

906 902 “Linda 
193 303 ClrweiM 

2006 3024 

303 308 reSTESI” 1 
dlta 1.15 1.10 

vr xi 6 xi7 

505 5jj gyje* A 


545 5>< pyjr* A 

403 400 iSVNYSiiver A 

1.16 1.14 ESf. 1 '?. 


Lotorpe Ceepee 426 434J0 f Gydmrai Field .101 103 


11.10 11.10 Ftatcher ChallA 
1JS 105 g. 


Sun Alliance 
Tale & Lyte 
Tosco 
Thorn EMi 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
Utd Biscuit* 
voaotane 
War Lean 3H 
Wellcome 
WMTWeod 
wnitamsHde* 
Willis Carrean 


Leerate 6550 (MO 11.10 11.10 ™cter Chall A 

feS* LT 1^46 IW }S i 2J7 Giafra 

LvSlJt. 839 84S Not Aiat Bonk 1056 1X58 R ” 

Matro+tetetta 11100 IW ggp. Cqrp . 9.10 904 

MWiriln B 235 237 NlneNetvtarii 4J9 X55 S2"»«d Mines 

Mouitoax 132 131 JO N Broken Htll 3.92 asy 

Paribas 3470D 3552O gPFUunlW. 4J7 X36 _ 

Prch loey Inti 1610016170 Pionee r jntn . 130 ia 

Pernod- Rknra 31950 32200 NggiCV Poseidon 202 222 "g 503 

Peugeot 836 846 QO ^Resources 1J8 1A 


>hnult Print 954 963 Switas 

RaaWeriwlcraa 540 554 TKT 


401 407 Energy 


Wi-FouloncA 13110 136 Mlnta g 7.90 702 

Raft. SL Louis 1512 1540 Wtastnoc Banking X32 406 

Sandl. . MO WVtffW, 4J6JJ2 SJSMa 


taKrfl 930 9*7 Woodslde X76 X72 JSgE",??, . 

S SKUSSSTfelS-^"* 

5/e Gcncrale 53? 56* 

TTwnson-CSF 15^0 160^ ITT” NonwliSlA 

Total 30X20 30900 Tokyo 

Akajejaor 455 461 Noramta Forest 


S C 4* Ww : 1*6105 

wioatTmui 


i * »ohl Chemical 798 807 Nercen Enemy 
1230 1230 Nthorn Telecom 


Madrid 


Johannesburg 

AECI 
Attach 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
Blvvoor 
Buffris 
Do Beers 
Drlatantrin 


BBV 2960 3000 

Bca Central Him 2535 2550 
i Banco Santander 4940 5010 


Singapore 




Banesto 

CEPSA 

Dr o eodos 

Endesa 

Ercras 

Iberdrola 

Reaiat 

Tooocalaro 

Teietanrca 


ioos ioi5 
3)25 3175 
2125 2000 
5300 5430 
141 15« 

823 853 

4010 4030 
3270 3279 
1720 1755 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

Alcatel SEL 
Allianz Hold 
Altana 
Asks 

BA5F 32232350 

Sever 372J0373.H) 

Bay. Hypo bank 413 415 

BOVVerrinsbk 44X50 Wt 
BBC 730 700 

BMF Bonk 397 3M 

BMW 61X50 807 

Com mention* 32X50 327 

Continental 241J0245J0 

Dabh lor Benz 
Deetnso . 

Of BaOCOCk 25) 23100 

DeulKte Bank 71 9.2071 9 JO 

Douglas 538 535 

»s5E.aLs 

F Kruse Hoexh 223.10JSXCT 


GF SA 
Harmony 
Hiehvrid Start 
Kloal 

Nedbank Grp 
Randfanieln 
Ruse lot 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Basel 

western Dteo 


S&v‘BSf%!3P x:; 


London 


AObev non 
Allied Lyons 


241J0245J0 
828 830 
493 495 


Aria Wiggins 
Argyll Group 


Alice ran 
ASM tails 
Autostrada nr tv 
Bco Agrlcomiro 
Ben Cam mar ttaj 
Ben Naz Lavere 
: 5T98J4 Ben Pap Novara 

Banco dl Roma 

Bco Ambraslana 

in Bee rj 00011 rlsp 

Benetton 

A20 407 Cfedlta llalla no 

X07 XM Enfchem Aug 

HI JS Ferfln 

rli rK Plot spo 


ASS Bril Foods 554 EM I FlOOnZ ASTOllM 


5 1 Flnmecawico 


5-5 Fondloriaspo 


Bank Scotland 2.11 lio Generali A me 


Harafflcf 

HenKri 

HocMjd 

Heechst 

Hriimann 


340 345 
6TBJ0 631 
IHC 1004 
3513S3JD 
878 892 

216 217 
3W 390 

150 151 JO 
620 677 

52X50 531 
12100 123 


K^kncrWerkeiSlM Jg 

Br- 

Munnesrnejjn 43XM437M 

PrauSao f» 

Ml - s 


BAT 

BET 

Blue arete 
BOC Group 
Boots 
Bawater 
BP 

Bril Airways 
Brit COS 
Bril Stool 
I Brit Telecom 
BTR 

Cable wire 
CoflBurv 5rii 
Cn radon 

Coots VlyeNa 
Comm Union 
Caurtnuks 
ECC Group. 


SM X W ipil 

Ttalcementl 

1.17 1.15 MMMxmca 

116 W MSdMte? 

Vk Olivetti 

Pirelli spo 
X9[ ras 

I'm Rln««nta 

US 4<B ! 6* Paolo Torino 

, J sip 

JS 5 mo Bpd 

>5 5tonda 

M* 12 SIB 

Tore Asslc 



Asatn Glass 1230 1250 Httern Tetacom 

Bank of Tokyo 1510 1510 Nova Cera 

Bridgestone 1580 1580 Ostxiwa Group A 

Canon 17M 17« Pagurian A 

1740 1260 Placer Dome 32W 
Do Nippon Print 1900 1890 Poco Petroleum 89s 

Daheq House . 1500 1510 PWA Cflrp Ms 

Dahro Sucvrttta* 15M 1530 Rarrocfc |5S 

HmalswneeEnv 28* 
2110 2170 Ropers C omm B 22*6 
2230 2260 Rothmans 77 

’S ’£2 P°TOJ B onk CdQ 2BW. 
no 989 Sceotre Res nv> 
867 855 Scoff s Huso *2 

1450 1450 Stterama au 
^ Canada 7*4 


WHEAT (CBOT1 5J00bvmiPr*m-iioeeniw.Ditai*i 
3091+ 102 Sea 94 IMIS 3J2 145 Vi 170 

103+1 109 Dec94 160*1 106 17+4 105 

lta+I 137 MarfS 186 1RH4 IBS'/U J09V, 

182 1 l«'n MOV 95 3 JTt 102 177'- 180 

XS7Vi 111 Ju|95 152*4, 157 IflW IS# 1 *. 

300 IS Srp« 15+j 

164V> 138 Dec 95 145 301 165 168 

Eszsdei 1 Loco wx salts 12073 

Frt't open Int 70047 oft 1068 

WHEAT CKBQT1 smninMnvn-aieiPcriMw 

3J*» 102 V5 See 94 176*4 UOW 175^ 180 

□J6U 1I2+. Dec 94 1B4V. 309 h 183*4 187+, 

18914 125 Mcr?5 114 19116 306 191ft, 

183 121\*iMav95 3J9 302Vi 171 Vj 101 

Sja.-i 116*/tJul95 154 309 154 158 

139 329 See 95 300 

30m M0HDK9S 308 

EsLSOttS NJL Frt's.MlH 

F1T1 ootti Ira 

CORN ICSOT) MeeeumH*wi^iMsMweuM 
202% 114 SepM 223*J 2279, 222 2 26V, 

177 117 Greff 123*4 227 123 124V. 

202V, 226 MOT 95 133 136 Cl 132 V, 135L 

205 203 V, May 95 139 14P4 138k. 201*0 

| 205V, 206 W All 95 203V. 206 202’i 105 s -. 

2.709, 229 Seo« 1479, 208 204V, 147V, 

203 225V, Dec 95 208V, 2J0 208V. 149V. 

201 207 Julta 160 201 160 201 

Esi-sries 4X000 Fri'L stars 19076 
Fr+SDcmlte 199.048 ott 1645 
SOYBEANS (CBOTJ SMeumwun.MnK.M 
7JH9-I 50OV,Seo#4 S03V, 593V, 576 5099, 

707VS 501 Nov 94 5.76V, 517 173 5024. 

7.04 540 JtaltS 504*0 5.94 V, 501 509^. 

7.05 509 U*r 95 502V. 601 X90’ . 597+1 

705V, X7SV;Mav95 5.98 AD7 5969, 605ta 
706 V* 521 15 Jut 95 504'*. 513 6019, 6299, 

608 579 Aug 95 504 6.12 6.03 510 

506 577 5CC95 5u6 515 503 XII 

5509, 571 Vj Nov 95 508 514 505 513 

531 *28 Julta 521 

EB. sales 403)00 FrTL sales 17080 
FtrsonenW liXTW ott 214 

SOYBEAN MEAL fCBOTl ,to km- asea* per lm 
21000 17X60 Sea 94 17320 17X70 17140 1755a 

207 JO 16920W94 171 JO 77300 17X70 17X80 

30900 1 69. 70 DeC ff 177^1 T75« 17100 ,74Jo 

20700 171 00 Jan 95 I7XB 17520 172J0 17550 

2S7JD 17700 Mar 95 (7530 178J0 T7XX 17X00 

20700 174JX) Mav 9S I7B0O 18000 17600 179 JO 

20500 17XXJU9S 179 JO 18220 17X70 18120 

M160 17X50 Aija 95 17920 161 JO 179J0 161 JO 

13220 17550 Sep 95 1SXS1 161JO 17920-18100 

Estsohs .2X0® Frt'x stars IRlta 
FfT* open iff 11079 tal 1450 
SOYBEAN CHL (CBOT) aoooa Bs-ooeon per into. 
30X4 22.40 So, 94 2X55 2513 2XS4 2509 

29J4 22.1000 94 25X5 25 92 25X5 2543 

2847 2200 Dec 94 2X08 2X67 2X03 3407 

2S05 2X45 Jot 95 2X00 2505 34J0 2522 

2X30 25J3Mar95 240 4 25X5 2573 2500 

2X05 2W3Mav95 2A6S 2X 00 24J5 2405 

2705 23J30JU.9S 7405 2*00 2400 2X70 

27 JO 2205 AUB 93 24 J0 24J0 24J0 24J0 

2A7S 2205Sep9S 2405 3405 2405 7X25 

23.KJ 23.10Od95 2308 

2175 2200 Dec 93 23.78 

EsJ. stars 2X000 Fri*s.sa»» 15095 
Fri'sooenita 8IJ07 aft 227 


•IUBV. 1.570 

•ajnv. 4X5*3 

.003 150P4 

• 001 1.S7A 

-aoita 2022 
•aOIL 4 
*001*4 28 


■002’/. 898 

■ 0029, 25.505 
■003'/. 9057 
■OJOW 760 
•0.03 »ta 
■003 15 

003 I 


•00346 10469 
003 138.177 
•002 Vi 29X79 
• 002 11.797 

‘0.E 12097 

‘0001, 864 

■OJXfti 5,731 
■00193 S 


1543 1 020 Sep ff 1285 12X5 

1580 1041 Dec ff 1322 1331 

1605 1077 Mar 95 1371 1376 

1612 107BMOV9S 1404 1404 

1600 !225Jul95 1432 1438 

1560 1505 Sep 95 1447 1447 

1A33 1290 Dec 95 1470 1470 

1676 1 350 Mar 96 

1642 1 225 May 96 

EsJ. soles NX FrTxsMS 4743 
Frt's ocen Int 71027 u> 73B 
ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) ISAOOtov-. 
13L50 8605 Sep 94 9040 9040 

13400 89.10 Now 84 9410 900 

13200 7X00 Jan 95 9700 97J5 

174J5 96J0 Mar 95 101.10 101.10 

11425 9700 MOV 95 10X75 102J5 

1 19.00 lOlJOJulfe 10700 10700 

11X60 IMJDNovfS 

Jan 96 

112.50 111 00 Sep 96 

Esi. star* .NX Frr+staes 

Fn 's open inf 


1363 1265 

mo 132 s 

1357 1370 

1388 1400 

1415 1422 

1447 1442 

14*4 1465 

1489 
1518 


-41 121 

-27 42J09 
-27 12J4H 
— 25 3X49 
-25 1471 

-as 3451 
-as 185 


Firs open lot 2.787054 up 12790 
BRtTlSH POUND (CMBO SvarsouMS-l BBUIaqmiitlUSn 
1-5764 1A44059M 1J444 1J568 1J450 1JS54 +96 34571 

10760 L4500Deeff LS4« IJ55D 1J432 1JXO +96 300 

JOT 95 1JJ90 10470 10390 10466 
LS7M 1A64Q MCTff 10516 4)08 111 

Eskitaes NX FrTs.wle» 18070 


Frt's ocen Hi 37023 UP 633 

CANADUNDOLLaH KMER) SDtr tap- inehtAeuDb 160001 
OJ740 OJOMSepff 0JB1 OJ330 0.7303 OJ310 -6 37,973 

0J670 0JC38 Decff 0J3B4 0J3O6 0JST 0J293 -9 10038 

0J6O5 (L7030Mar95 07275 07275 07270 07273 —16 1013 

Ojm Q6990JOT« 0 7245 07245 07245 07245 —21 390 

07250 0.6965 Sro 95 07220 07220 07220 0J2W —28 79 

07115 _ 07D40DBC?5 87190 07190 07196 07110 -38 8 

Esr.ooles NX FIT*. sales 3095 
Frt's open Ita 49001 011 300 

GERMAN MARX (CMSU S Ota murk- 1 PoHiwtaSOJOPl 
(L65K 0J6MSf(,« 0**S* 00496 06434 <L6«9 -+63 98007 

2^ tL64M 06440 00419 +62 18-521 

00995 00910 Junta 00477 00487 00477 04504 +62 101 

£L6*50 CL63475ep9S 00512 +62 9 

D03M DJJTOMarW 00480 00500 06480 00496 +62 2-919, 

Esf.sDes NX Frt's. iota* SSUU9 i 

Frt's ooenint 120057 

(CMERi sotavtn-1 eehweeutaHOAOOOOl 
0J1OkHL II(»942S OTW OD101C70J1 01 570J10D93QJ11H 53 +51 57758 

a010490U»9S25DeC« 00101490010223001014900111220 +52 12030 

“^0WM.0p9776Jun95 00103500.010355^035000111177 + 51 274 

(UnD775LOia200Sep9S 0010457 +52 42 

a£Q56fla4O968&MtataO0NQ*W01<EV()a01OZ75D01l)2f3 +52 I7S5 

Est. sates NX ftPs. solas 27,137 
Frt's open Int 72,164 UP 520 
^FRA^(Q4aq*B> |r OT C - | OTeeOTvta, « tagi 

0J746 07668 07740 +88 3X175 

07840 00885 Dec 94 07624 07764 0704 07754 +89 ltk 

07880 07466 Jot 95 07797 +88 U 

07820 07420 Mar 96 07760 07770 077X5 07774 +88 59 

EsLstaes NX Frt*x.xales MX20 
Frt's open Ht 410B4 ok 423 


B60O 8*70 
9070 KS0 
9*75 9475 

98J0 9030 

10275 10105 
105.00 10405 
10905 
10905 

10605 


—470 739 

— 4.10 10077 
—470 4J71 
—045 3,033 
-370 855 

—270 494 

—270 386 

—270 

—370 16 


—4 37073 
—9 10038 

=Sf T « 


♦62 1SJ21 
+62 101 
+ 61 9 

♦62 2JH, 


Metals 


O07S S.9A9 
00752 76002 
OOA 13.959 
1 007* AJ4S 
007*- 4755 
006* 7090 

0.O7V: 2Z3 

008 3B 
006V, X299 
1 


•200 36051 

‘160 Tit* 

•1JC 70*4 
-1.70 4J43 
+ 170 2074 

+100 )« 

*10# 325 


axisepff 2tS5 24.13 2SJJ 2509 
22.1000 9* 2575 25 92 2505 2563 


• 039 X640 
•031 17062 
+ 038 35004 
-Q0O 5784 
-073 6.915 
♦073 4.253 

• 0.1# 2056 

•aio an 

84 

-007 1 

—007 3 


JS Sire 


4198 * 


Livestock 


Hitachi 

HMwwcaWe 


era M niivwn VWf 

^ iksr* 
38 


S? ~ I StellCatmdoA 43V. 


736 728 Sherri ft 


,?92 999 SHLSvstemlne 7)5 


iT^il sorao 1 Power 2588 2580 Southam l+yj 

'I'd? KawtaokJ Steel 424 430 Soar Aerosoace 1l5 

^ Kirh Brevranr llta 1190 Stales Inc a ■+ 

55 ™ Eny 3DV, 

718 72B Teck 8 25*4 

Kyocera 7360 7370 Thomson Corp m 

l+OT E*ee Inds 1750 1760 TorDom Bank jm 

‘iS MtaeuEtacWta 1120 1140 Tamer 8 5.2 

MRwbbhJBk 2500 25H3 TrofMCIta Corp UM 

MltaubWiI Kcaat 591 549 TraraCduPbe 18 

«m Elec 678 680 TrUanFMfA 

’S ^ U^«Enerev NX VS 
1540 1540 

rro 1220 


CATTLE [CME21 ««efet.aniBf 

74.10 65700a M 7107 7107 

7400 67 0D Dec 94 4972 7003 

7*25 OjOFeata 6805 53.90 

75.10 ffAOAWta 702! 70J0 

6900 6600 JOT 95 6720 6705 

68.10 66JSAuo« 64.95 67.10 

6705 670! Da 95 

ESLSOteS NX Frt'LKMS 7MS 
Frt's n oen he 75,083 tat 160 
FEBKR Cattle icmsh moose, 
7580 7*08540 94 75.30 7500 

0105 re.noaM TiiO 7500 

*300 71® NOV 94 76.70 7670 


7107 71 J5 
6905 69-97 

m n mp ; 

70.15 70.45 

67.15 6705 

6675 67.1# 

4700 


-O It 35003 
•025 17735 
-023 11067 
*025 7085 
•070 1.922 
-0.15 66* 


7507 7565 

7M0 7507 

7435 7605 

7568 7 A 35 

7440 7400 

7400 74 05 

7150 73JD 
7100 


nuisui uiu u, 

t** Mlteil Marine 
JE MitateasW 
Mitemri 


#025 7USMDr« 7470 7*70 7440 7*60 

76.90 7245 Apt 95 7*03 7405 7400 74 05 

7620 7225 May 95 7150 7150 7320 7320 

7105 7100 Aug 95 7100 

Eslsom Nx Frrs.wte! 669 
Frt's open rrt 8047 up IW 
HOGS (CMer) 4unfeL-eM>N>e 
4925 370700 9* 17.77 W20 37J^ 39.07 

SBJO 372JCWW 2940 4810 3905 4800 

5000 38 90 Feu 95 39*0 *0.15 1945 4003 


•020 l.*92 
•020 3255 

• 020 1251 

• 017 ni 

• 0.09 713 

*0.15 327 

*0.15 95 

3 


HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX) xugbb 
11720 7*50 Sen 94 11AJ0 117JD 

1)6.15 75.75 Dec « 11520 1)520 

7L1UJOT95 
730OFAh9S 

7100 Mn- 95 11195 11185 
7605 May 95 10800 11135 
780OJUI95 
79.105TP95 

752000 95 11540 11540 
77J5Nov 95 11500 11500 
88. DO Dec 95 
8800 JOT 9* 

A2J0Marf6 10828 10820 

91.10 Aorta 
10840 10840 May 96 108 JO loejo 

11115 104.10 Junta 

Juita 

Aug 96 

Est. saw NX Frt's. sales 

Frt'soaenhu 

SILVER (NCMX) IDOOmnL-Mir. 

6150 JflOSepff 5450 5*90 

5*60 51120a ff 

Nov 94 

9970 38O0Dec9* 5*90 5560 

5640 *r]0Jcn95 

60(0 4165 Marta 5580 5615 

6062 J1BJMCV9S 56*2 567J 

610.0 42D0JU195 5710 5710 

575.0 STOJSrP 95 5790 5790 

i2SJ> SJVCDecn SUM SUM 

6130 S 50 JOO 96 

618.0 5540 MOT 9 A 

5870 5370 May 96 

juiff 

E«. sales NX Firs, sales 
Fri'soce+iim 

PLATINUM (NMEA) Ubwa-oAn 
troer, 43300 Scoff 
43523 36800 Oct 94 42100 42400 1 

*35 JO J7A80JOT9! 42500 42720 4 

437.00 39000 An 95 4J9JD 43100 i 

43400 41920 Julta 

43120 *Z20OOta«5 
Est tries nx Fri's. fries 
Frt sopenira 

GOLD (NOW wi+ra-nnw* 
3frt.00 377005*0 9* 

41700 34400009* 38680 38920 J 

NOVff 

4265# OOMDecff 37100 39220 2 

411.00 3*320 Feb 95 J95.DQ 395JB 3 

41700 36*50 Apr 95 

47820 36120 JOT 95 <02.00 40200 * 

4 1 220 33030 Aug 95 

41 320 4fl[0O Data 

47900 40023 Dec W 

43420 41Z50FCU9A 

4X00 41 820 Apr9* 

43000 41100 Jun 96 

Est.KNes NX Fits, soles 
Frt's open in, 


+82} 7030 
+025 34283 

♦ tg 535 

*025 315 

♦ 025 6474 

*025 1,123 
+025 936 

+ 025 493 

+ 025 1095 
*02! 61! 
+ 02S 835 

+025 59 

+ 025 13* 

♦025 212 

+ 025 8 

+025 133 

+ 025 

♦ 025 


+52 12230 
+51 Z74 

+52 47 


+H 33,171 
+89 6235 

:s 3 


Industrials 


+42 1077 
+40 5 

+48 

+ 40 MU 
+ 40 57 

+40 8081 
+*9 3,919 
+40 1267 
+ 50 I^U! 

*S.t Ilfs 

♦ll 1 

+81 477 

♦81 14 

— 51U 


COTTON 2 (NCTN) 5000# Bs- ante wte. 
7075 7075Sep94 

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Stock Indexes 


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Commodity Indexes 

NmGfS 1 3S3J0 

Reuters 

DJ. Futures 1567? 

Com. Research 23325 


1 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1994 


Plage 15 


EUROPE 


.Mi,:-:;,." uiKv 


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Figures Show 
Germany Faces 
Jobless Growth 


OUI ioir 

itftfMn 




By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — West Ger- 
' ■ mm unemployment rose slightly 
i in August after two months of 


percent from the previous two* 
month period and up 7.1 percent 
from a year earlier. 

Coining just six weeks ahead 
of German Darliamentarv elec- 


s Beals \,. K ( , declines, confirming economists' tions, the decline in unadjusted 


1 

m K covery would initially w 

as !taf i.i,.,. mosU y of jobless growth." 

‘ 1 • 1 1 * ’I . ... “• A rts#» in Wprf Hwimn 



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l -3hj forecasts that the country's re- unemployment levels and rise in 
' coverv would rniiinlW consist orders to industry are likely to 

support Chancellor Helmut 
, .. rise in West German sea- Kohrs Prospers for re-election, 
-.sooafly adjusted unenmloyment ec ^, nomists sai< ^ 

* But they provide little conclu- 

sive evidence that the net- man 
recovery is helping ordinary 
Germans, particularly the unem- 
ployed Business and consumer 
confidence remains low, and an- 
alysts said the economy needed 
sustained growth to encourage 
companies to start rehiring. 

“After the heavy job shed- 
ding during the last few years, 
we expect companies to be fair- 
ly reluctant to take on addition- 
al labor for the time being,” 
analysts at Deutsche Bank Re- 
search said in a report pub- 
lished last week. “The signs of 
recovery on the labor market 
still give no grounds for relief.” 

Economists and bond mar- 
kets are concerned that the pace 
of German growth and return 
of many companies to profit- 
ability will make it difficult to 
sell austerity to workers in next 
year’s wage negotiations. 

Rising wage expectations 
probably will mak e companies 
think twice about adding per- 
sonnel and could even prompt a 
rise in German interest rates. 

“The stabilizing labor market 
and surging company profits 
are not a good sign for the 1995 
wage round,” said Stefan 
Schneider, an economist at S.G. 
Warbtug & Co. in Frankfurt. 



Compiled by Our S’.aff From Dispatches 

PARIS — The luxury-goods company 
LyMH Moist Henaessy Louis Vuitton SA 
said Tuesday its net profit in the First half of 
1994 jumped on increased sales, improved 
operating profit in each of the company’s 
divisions and lower financial costs. 

The group said provisional, unaudited fig- 
ures showed a rise of 35 percent from the first 
half of 1993, when falling sales of champagne 
contributed to a 28 percent drop in profit, to 
935 million French francs ($176 million). 

“This stems from a good recoveiy of our 
sales in Japan and in Europe and the launch of 
new products,” a company spokeswoman said. 

The company said that if current trends 
hold, its full-year profit would be up “at least 
20 percent,’' in line with a forecast made in 
June. It gave no detailed figures, saying that 
more information would be disclosed' Sepu 22. 

“These are undoubtedly good figures," said 


Franqoise Etienne, an analyst at EIFB in Paris. 

She said LVMH had already indicated that 
profit would rise at least 30 percent in the first 
half, and Tuesday's statement meant the in- 
crease had been even larger than expected. 

LVMH stock fell 6 francs to 839. a substan- 
tially smaller decline than the 1.8 percent loss 
in the CAC-40 index of blue-chip shares. 

The company reported Aug. 10 that sales in 
the first half had risen 20 percent, to 12 billion 
francs, and were up 13.7 percent after exclud- 
ing the effects of currency fluctuations. 

LVMH’s brands include Moet & Chandon 
and Veuve Clicquot champagnes, Christian 
Dior perfumes and Louis Vuitton luggage. 

Sales improved in all sectors in the first half, 
especially in the luggage and leather-goods 
business, where demand outstripped supply. In 
the cognac sector, a change in pricing policy in 
Japan, one of LVMJTs main markets, helped 
revive sales growth. (Bloomberg. Reuters) 


Overhaul 


iiii-v 


man manufacturing industry 
; .. ■ rose. 

‘‘ic.-V “Unemployment is the most 
■y : 'tv -serious problem facing our 
'--'i? ■ country," Oskar Lafontame, the 
economics spokesman for the 
1 " 'opposition Social Democratic 

•‘ic ?-* 1 Party, told the German parlia- 
-rnenL Despite signs unemplqy- 
\s ' >ment is poking, the German 
-*8urtua„ f economy is still “six million jobs 
, ,y?‘ short," he said, referring to a 
F- ( number including short-time 
••■fji workers and participants in gov- 
j' h. eminent jobs programs. 

l!t- - The unadjusted Western Ger- 
( man unemployment rale fell 
-slightly to 8.2 percent in August 
from 83 percent in July, while 
Eastern German unemployment 
fell to 14.7 percent in August 
‘from 15.1 percent in July, ac- 
- cording to the Federal Labor Of- 
, free. German unemployment in 
‘;;" r M . August stood at 3.64 million. 

‘ 7 - ■ •’! - The unemployment repeat co- 
■' i sodded with news that orders to 
West German manufacturing in- 
1 dustry rose 0.7 percent in July 
from June and were 8 percent 
higher than a year earlier. 

Ji; In June and July together, 
c ! manufacturing orders were up 3 


Axa Grows in Europe and Asia 


m Stock Fall 


MAGAZINE: Fight for Readers 


<U» 

alk- "«•. 
«U 1 

•yAt'-’a .. 

V ' 

.* 


■ *i .■* 




Continued frnn Page 13 
ers bruised and a lot of their 
challengers gating for breath. 

' Hans Werner KHz, editor-in- 
chief of Der Spiegel, has de- 
scribed the approaching show- 
down as “throwing money out 
the window" because there are 
too many newcomers. 

Nevertheless, publishers con- 


tinue to rush new titles to press 
to avoid losing market share 
with advertisers and subscribers. 

“New magazines are cannib- 
alizing existing titles,” said Rolf 
Wickmann, a Gruner & Jahr 
board member. “But because the 
overall market is stagnant, bri- 
nging out new titles is the only 
way to avoid losing money.” 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — Axa SA said Tues- 
day it would expand in Europe 
and gain access to insurance 
markets in Hong Kong and Sin- 
gapore through two acquisitions. 

The French insurance com- 
pany said it would pay 1 billion 
French francs ($188 million) for 
Victoire Belgium, a unit of 
Union des Assurances de Paris. 
Victoire Belgium had sales of 
920 million French francs in 
1993. Nonlife insurance made 
up 80 percent of its business. 

Axa also said it would buy 
Wing On Life Assurance Co. 
$110 million from Wing On 
(Holdings) Ltd., a Hong Kong 
conglomerate that owns and 


Economic Growth 
Benefits Bowater 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Bowater PLC. 
the British maker of packaging 
materials and building supplies, 
said first-half pretax profit rose a 
better-than -expected 2 percent 
as strengthening world econo- 
mies increased sales. 

Profit before taxes and after 
one-time gains and losses rose to 
£105 million ($162 million) in 
first half from £103 million a 
year earlier. First-half sales rose 
12 percent, to £1.16 billion, bol- 
stered by sales in Australia, Asia 
and the Americas. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


operates department stores in 
the colony. 

Wing On Life writes life insur- 
ance policies and invests in 
Hong Kong, Singapore, and Ma- 
laysia- The deal calls for Axa to 
acquire the entire share capital 
of Wing On Life before selling 
its Malaysia operations. 

Those will be taken over by a 
joint venture consortium 
formed by Edaran Otomobti 
Nasional Bhd and the Colonial 
Mutual Life Assurance Society 
Ltd. of Australia. 

Axa’s adviser on the deal. 
Wardley Ltd, did not put a val- 
ue on the Malaysian operations, 
saying only that the divestment 
was needed because the French 


company already had a life in- 
surance business in Malaysia in 
a venture with Sime Darby Bhd. 

Axa said it made an $1 1 mil- 
lion down payment for Wing 
On and would pay the balance 
upon completion of the sale. 

Wardley said the deal would 
have to be approved by the In- 
surance Authority of Hong 
Kong, the Monetary Authority 
of Singapore, Malaysia's direc- 
tor-general of insurance and the 
Foreign I a vestment Committee 
of Malaysia. 

The European acquisition 
also must be approved by regu- 
lators, the company said. 

( Bloomberg, AFP. AFX) 


U.S. Sales Help Medeva 

Bloomberg Business News 

LONDON — Medeva PLC said Tuesday its first-half 
pretax profit surged 70 percent, fueled by strong U.S. sales of 
drugs to treat hypertension, hyperactivity and respiratory 
diseases. 

The British drugmaker earned £22. 1 million ($34 million) 
before taxes in the six months to June 30, on sales of £107 
million, up 34 percent. About 27 percent of sales came from 
product growth in the United States. 

Last year's acquisitions of Ribosepharm GmbH of Germa- 
ny and Evans Medical SA of France contributed about £5 
milli on to sales. Medeva executives said they were still looking 
for acquisitions, both in products and companies. 

The results sent Medeva's stock price soaring to 144 pence 
from 128 pence. 

Among Medeva's products, the strongest performer was 
methylphenidate, used for the treatment of hypertensive 
children. Methylphenidate sales rose 124 percent 


.* w- 
< •! -* 

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■« M 

IM i- “ 


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Bloomberg Business Sews 

FRANKFURT — Credit Lyonnais may face an unwelcome 
S 1 .5 billion call on its cash if two large shareholders in its German 
unit, BfG Bank AG. exercise an option to sell their shares to the 
unprofitable French bank. 

Hans MatihOfer, chief executive of the BGAG. a holding compa- 
ny owned by trade unions that in turn own one-quarter of BfG, 
raised the possibility when he said Tuesday that the two sharehold- 
ers, which own 49.9 percent of BfG. held options to sell their stakes 
to Credit Lyonnais for about 2.4 billion Deutsche marks. 

Mr. Matlhofer said BGAG and AMB Aachener & Munchener 
Beteiligungs AG. the insurance bolding company, negotiated the 
options when they sold the majority of BfG lo Credit Lyonnais in 
1993. The options run for five years, he said. 

AMB confirmed that it had a put option and said it was valid 
until 2000, but the insurer said it had no plans to sell its BfG stake. 
“At present, we still intend to keep it until the date of the year 
2000,” a spokesman said. 

But some analysts said AMB might be better off selling the 
stake. “It doesn't make a lot of sense to keep it,” said Olaf Conrad, 
an analyst at Trinkaus Capital Management. 


Improved Sales Bolster Ahold. Profit 

Compiled by Our Stiff From Dispatches 

AMSTERDAM — Royal Ahold NV said Tuesday its second- 
quarter net profit rose 24 percent on strong sales at its U.S. 
supermarket chains Fmast and Edwards and growth in Dutch 
market share. 

Ahold said it earned 92.4 million guilders (S53 million > in the 
quarter, up from 763 million guilders in the same period last year. 
Sales rose 8 percent, to 6.9 billion guilders. (Bloomberg, AFX) 


By Robert D. Gray 

Special to the Herald Tnhuno 

PRAGUE — The truck- 
maker Tatra Koprivnice AS is 
expected to make sweeping 
changes Wednesday at its annu- 
al shareholders meeting in an 
effort to turn around the com- 
pany’s financial fortunes. 

The board met Tuesday, but 
its decision was not made pub- 
lic. Analysts, however, said 
they expected it to recommend 
drastic measures to sharehold- 
ers. including a management 
shake-up. 

Tatra executives refused to 
comment on reports that the 
company’s chairman, Gerald 
Green wald. who recently ob- 
tained a job at the U.S. carrier 
United Airlines, would not be 
retained in his post. 

Mr. GreemvaJd was given a 
two-year contract in February 
1 993 and asked to lead the debt- 
ridden former state-owned en- 
terprise to profitability. He was 
hired as pan of a management 
(hat also included the American 
businessmen David Shelby and 
Jack Rutherford. 

Mr. Rutherford and Mr. 
Shelby are expected to be dis- 
missed from their current posi- 
tions on the board as well, peo- 
ple who know the company well 
said. It was unclear whether ei- 
ther would remain with Tatra in 
some other capacity. 

No names were mentioned as 
possible successors . 

Tatra also is thought to be 
planning a major corporate re- 
structuring. The company has 
already cut nearly 1,400 jobs 
this year as demand for Tatra 
trucks has fallen. 

A spokesman said the com- 
pany currently employed 8,300 
people, but Tatra say’s the fig- 
ure must be cut further because 
sales have fallen far more steep- 
ly. declining by more than 80 
percent since 1989 while the 
work force has been cut by 
about 50 percent. 

The truckmaker. which was 
sold to investors in the Czech 
Republic's first wave of privati- 
zation and became a joint-stock 
company April 1, 1992, is also 
battling lingering Communist- 
era debt problems. 

In 1993, Tatra had a loss of 
2.2 billion koruny (S78 million) 
on revenue of 5 billion koruny. 


Investor’s Europe 



London 
FTSE 100 Index 

3400 - 

- 3300- 
3200- 
3100 
m 
m 


Paris 
CAC 40 






1994 

JAS ‘"'A'llJ 
1994 

J A S' 

,wu Xn? j 

1994 

JAS 

Exchange 

Index 

Tuesday 

Close 

Prev. 

dose 

% 

Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

414.28 

417.97 

-0.88 

Brussels 

Stock Index 

7,583.27 

7,653.34 

-0.92 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,165.90 

2,174.52 

-0.40 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

822236 

624.29 

-0i3 

Helsinki 

HEX 

1,942.57 

1,951.62 

-046 

London 

Financial Timas 30 

2,479,00 

2,51220 

-1.32 

London 

FTSE 100 

3,205.40 

3,241.50 

-1.11 

Madrid 

General Index 

294.85 

301.73 

-2.28 

Milan 

mibtel 

10602 

10703 

-0.94 

Paris 

CAC 40 

1.961A5 

1.998.20 

-1.84 

Stockholm 

Atfaecsvaerlden 

1,867.73 

1,87S.&1 

-0.59 

Vienna 

Stock Index 

459.67 

460.78 

-0.24 

Zurich 

SBS 

941.36 

947.44 

-0.64 


Sources Reuters. AFP 


Inirmaumul ilcrakl tribune 


Very briefly: 


■ Generate de Banque SA said first-half net profit rose 9 percent, 
to 6.30 billion Belgian francs ($196 million), on reduced loan-loss 
provisions because of improved economic conditions. 

• General Motors Corpus Corsa subcompact car saw British 
demand fall 9.6 percent in August from a year earlier, while 
overall sales of GM models slipped 2 percent, according to the 
British carmakers association. 

• Bank of Portugal is lowering the minimum reserve requirement 
of banks to 2 percent of total deposits from 17 percent to increase 
Portuguese banks’ competitiveness. 

• Air France is creating two separate units for its two lines. Air 
France and Air Inter, under a common holding company. Sodete 
Group Air France SA. 

• Philips Electronics NV has increased its slake in the Sunnyvale, 
California-based Navigation Technologies Corp. to more than 50 
percent; the U.S. company is developing auto-route guidance 
systems. 

• Constructions Mecaniques tie Normandie has withdrawn its bid 
for the bankrupt British shipbuilder Swan Hunter. 

• British manufacturing output rose 0.4 percent in July to the 
highest level in more than four years. Bloomberg, -tp. Reuters, afp 


O’Reilly Buys Into Portugal 


Bloomberg Business Hews 

LONDON — Independent 
Newspapers PLC said Tuesday 
it had bought a 6.6 percent 
stake in Portugal’s largest news- 
paper group, Jomalgeste. 

The Irish company, controlled 
by Tony O’Reilly, "recently ac- 
quired stakes in the Independent 
newspaper of Britain and Argus 
Newspapers of South Africa. 

“This is our first publishing 
investment on the Continent, 
and, while modest, represents a 


significant strategic move," 
Liam Healy, chief executive of 
Independent Newspapers said. 

Mr. Healy said there were op- 
portunities "to expand Jomal- 
geste in Portugal and its former 
territories in Southern Africa. 

Independent said it paid for 
500,000 ordinary shares in Jor- 
nalgeste by issuing the company 
1.95 million new shares in Inde- 
pendent Newspapers amounting 
to 5.9 million punts ($9 million). 



GROUPE 




CALOR. ROWENTA. SEB. TEFAL 


com SSL! DATED RESULTS FOR THE 1 st HALF-YEAR 
Growth of sales and income 


IFF millions] 

30. QB. 1934 

30.06.1993 

Sales 

Operating income afeer interest 
Net income 

Net income + depreciation 

3.900 

221 

67 

276 

3.730 

170 

54 

246 


Sales show an overall growth of 4.5%. 

The stronger increase of income figures reflects 
Groupe SEB's constant determination to favor 
profitability over growth at any cost. 

We are continuing to improve our control of current 
assets, and net indebtedness is down again, by 
FF 380 million over one year. 

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BOJ Poll Finds a Mild Recovery 


By Steven Brull 

I nimuukmat Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — A Bank of Ja- 
pan report confirmed! Tues- 
day that the world’s second- 
biggest economy had entered 
a recovery but said it would be 
a gradual and uneven one. 

Tbe central bank's quarter- 
ly tankan survey, taken in Au- 
gust, showed a significant, if 
' expected, improvement in 
Japanese corporate sentiment 
and profit projections, partic- 
ularly among manufacturers. 
But it also revealed an unex- 
pected reluctance to invest in 
plant and equipment and 
stubborn concerns over em- 
ployment and the strong yen. 

“Despite the improvement 
in sentiment, there’s nothing 
in the study that offers a 
promising sign for a strong 
recovery,” said Mineko Sa- 


saki- Smith, an economist at 
Morgan Stanley & Co. “The 
economy is still adjusting to- 
the excesses of the 1980s. 

The central bank's gover- 
nor. Yasushi Mieno, said the 
survey “shows economic re- 
covery quite clearly.” But the 
bank stressed it had not 
changed its formal view of the 
economy. Economists inter- 
preted the comments as a tacit 
admission of disappointment 
and a signal that monetary 
policy would remain neutral. 

The survey's key measure of 
business sentiment, the diffu- 
sion index, improved to minus 
39 in August from minus SO in 
the previous survey, in May. 
The figure, which was at the 
high end of expectations, 
compares percentages of com- 
panies expecting business to 
improve with those expecting 
it to deteriorate. 


Also positive was the result 
that manufacturers, except for 
oil refiners, said they expected 
profit to rise 18.2 percent in the 
year ending in Match 1995. re- 
versing a forecast a year earlier 
of a 28.1 percent slide. The 
outlook among nonmanufac- 
turers, excluding electric power 
and gas companies, also was 
brightening, though profits 
were still expected to fall 3.7 
percent; that compared with 
20.6 percent the year before. 

But the survey dashed ex- 
pectations that improved senti- 
ment would lead to increased 
spending on plant and equip- 
ment and spur a vigorous re- 
covery. Big companies predict- 
ed a 3.8 percent fall in capital 
investment in the current fi- 
nancial year, an improvement 
from last year’s 1U percent 
slump but not from the 3.7 


percent decline they predict- 
ed three months ago. 

This figure “shows that the 
economy is still weak,” Su- 
sumu Kato, chief economist at 
CS First Boston (Japan), told 
Reuters. “If capital spending 
doesn’t improve, the recovery 
cannot be Strong." 

Economists said the reluc- 
tance to invest underscored 
the lingering excess of produc- 
tive capacity built up in the 
1980s and die financial bur- 
den imposed by those invest- 
ments. It also highlighted a 
growing tendency among 
companies to invest overseas 
rather than in Japan, with its 
high currency and high costs. 

“Corporate Japan is not in- 
terested in budding factories 
in Japan, only in the Asia- 
Pacific region.” said Jesper 
Koll. head of research at J. P. 
Morgan & Co. in Tokyo. 


Big Steelmakers Stitt Staring Dawn a Yawning Gap 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dapauha 

TOKYO — The five biggest 
Japanese steelmakers forecast 
Tuesday they would have pre- 
tax losses totaling more than 
120 billion yen ($1 billion) in 
the six months ending Sept 30 
and said they saw no signs of a 
recovery in the second half of 
the financial year. 

The projected loss, which 
exceeds the companies' com- 
bined losses for all of last 
year, reflects a slumping econ- 
omy and the strong yen. 

Nippon Steel Corp-, the 
largest steelmaker, predicted 


its parent-company pretax 
loss would swdl to 30 billion 
yen from 16.7 billion yen a 
year earlier, with sales f allin g 
15 percent, to 980 billion yen. 

“Production and shipments 
by tbe steel industry have fi- 
nally started to recover ” the 
company said. “But the busi- 
ness environment continues to 
be acute, with competition in 
the domestic and internation- 
al markets intensifying.” 

It added that the industry 
would “see the continuation 
of the severe business environ- 
ment” in the second half. 


NKK Corp- forecast a loss 
of 40 billion yen. compared 
with 15.4 billion yen, ana said 
sales would be off 22 percent, 
at 520 billion yen. 

Sumitomo Metal Industries 
Ltd., Kawasaki Steel Ltd. and 
Kobe Steel Ltd. also forecast 
wider deficits and lower sales. 

“Although personal con- 
sumption snows signs of recov- 
ering private-sector capital in- 
vestments have continued to 
slump, and the yen has further 
appreciated." Kobe said. 

But Sumitomo Metal’s vice 
president, Matao Kojima, 


said that although the compa- 
ny still expected a depressed 
second half, “I think we can 
say earnings have bottomed 
oul” (AFP, Bloomberg ) 

■ Car Imports Reach 10% 

Imports accounted for 10 
percent of Japan’s car market 
in August for the first time, 
Reuters reported, quoting the 
Japan Automobile Importers 
Association. 

The group said imported 
vehicles accounted for 1Q.7 
percent of overall August car 
sales in Japan. 


Philippines Allows 
Petron to Be Listed 


A genre France-Preae 

MANILA — Governmental 
regulators on Tuesday approved 
the listing on Wednesday of Pe- 
tron Corp., the biggest company 
in the Philippines, but excluded 
a block of 100 million shares 
reserved for its employees. 

The Securities and Exchange 
Commission chief, Rosario L6- 
pez. said it would be up to Pres- 
ident Fidel V. Ramos to decide 
on Petron’s employee stock- 
ownership plan in which some 
obtained aDotmenls of more 
than 300.000 shares, while ordi- 
nary Filipinos were allowed 
only 1,600 shares each- 

Petron offered a 20 percent 
stake to the public — compris- 
ing 600 million shares at a fixed 
pnee of nine pesos (34 cents) 
each, a tender tranche of 300 
million shares to foreign and 
institutional investors, and 100 
million shares reserved for com- 
pany employees. 

State- run Philippine Nation- 
al Oil Co. sold a 40 percent 
stake in Petron to Saudi Arabi- 
an Oil Co. for $532 million in 
January. 

"There’s loo much disparity 
between shares allotted to Pe- 
tron officials and employees as 
compared with shares given to 
the public,” Mrs. Ldpez said. 

Mrs. L6pez said she had sug- 
gested the Petron employees be 
given the same amount of scrip 
allotted to the public and that 
the company get rid of a 28 
percent discount for employees 
who paid in cash. 

There have been suggestions 
the commission postpone the 


listing pending a decision on 
whether to issue additional 
shares to meet demand for the 
issue, which is informally trad- 
mg at nearly twice its issue price. 

But Mrs. Lopez said she did 
not consider delaying the listing 
because “there are so many 
stockholders involved, around 
500,000, we don't want them to 
be affected.” 


China Can 9 t Stop 
Rally in A Shares 

Bloomberg Business Sews 

SHANGHAI — Despite 
comments to the contrary by the 
China's top securities regulator, 
speculation that foreign compa- 
nies would be allowed to invest 
in China's domestic stock mar- 
ket sent shares soaring for the 
second straight day Tuesday. 

The^ Shanghai stock " ex- 
change's A- share index ended up 
7 percent, at 1,041.95. A broker 
said rumors that foreign securi- 
ties houses bad reached agree- 
ments with Chinese brokers to 
set up joint ventures helped fuel 
the rally. 

Analysts said the recent surge 
was based on speculation about 
foreign investment rather than 
fundamentals, and Liu Hongru. 
the chairman of China's Securi- 
ties Regulatory Commission, 
was quoted in the official press 
as saying that for now, foreign 
funds would come from Chinese 
companies listing abroad, rather 
than foreigners investing in do- 
mestic bourses. 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

110 D 9 -- -• -• 

10900 - t 

8000 v 

j JAl 

1994 

Exchange indi 


Singapore . 
Straits Times 

2400- ■ 

• 23 M -mAj • *• 

.2200 ■/ — y 
21(10 1— — 
2000 t* r r 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 

23C0 

Zfie 

lUKfil— 


A‘tiTf J A S‘ 
1994 


I Hong Kong Hang Seng 

Singapore Slraits Times 

Sydney AW Ordinaries 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 

Kuata Lumpur Composite 

Bangkok SET 

Seoul ^Composite Stc 
Taipei Weighted Prici 

Manila PSE 


A M J'J'A S 


Change 


Jakarta 


SET 1,535.14 

Composite Stock 977.50 

Weighted Price 6.83047 

PSE “* 3,086.4b 

Stock Index 524.50 

2.179-22 
2,136.23 


JA S‘ ®A tl j'j'AS 
1994 

Tuesday Ptsv, % 

Close Close Change 

10,035.90 9,962.04 +0.74 

2,338.55 2,323.06 +0 45 

2.103.60 2.095.50 +0.39 

20 393 98 20,409.18 -0.07 

■J.172JM 1.159~5l +1 10 

1,535.14 1,531.30 +0 25 

977.50 97L46 ^062 

6,830.47 6,866.32 -0.52 

3,086.4b 3,104.30 ^o!57" 

524.50 519/12 +0.38 


New Zealand NZSE-40 
Bombay National Index 

Source s: R outer*. AFP 


2,176.51 +0.12 

2.135.03 +0.06 

Ir.irrn.tli.'nal IkilU Triteiw 


Very briefly; 

• Mitsui O.S.K. Lines Ltd. of Japan. American President Lines 
Ltd.. NedBoyd Lijnen BV of the Netherlands and Orient Overseas 
Container Line of Hong Kong, four of the world’s largest shipping 
companies, said ihey had agreed to an alliance on trans- Pacific 
cargo services to begin by 1996. 

■ Taiwan officials said seven insurance companies from France, 
Bri tain, ihe United States, the Netherlands and Switzerland 
applied to set up offices after Taipei relaxed restrictions in a bid to 
enter the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

• United Engineers Malaysia Ltd. has signed a pact to construct a 
$222 million sports complex for the government in exchange for 
free use of two property sites worth a similar price. 

Reuters. AFP. Bloomberg 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE- WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 


1994 


... r.-yt 


SPORTS 



Nobody Does It Better: Rice Sets TD Record 


By 


■ Thomas George 


Ji'ii Times ftervue 

SAN FRANCISCO — The 
touchdowns usually come by 
air. They are often a thing a 
beauty, jerry Rjce races down 
field, speeds past his defender, 
soars through the air and 
makes the grab. Rice jukes 
and shakes and runs past the 
defense into the end zone. 

But the touchdown that 
Rice made in San Francisco 
on Monday night to tie Jim 
Brown’s National Football 
League career touchdown 
mark was on a 23-yard re- 
vcr>c. That score made it -t9ers 
37. Raiders id. with 12 min- 
utes 15 seconds to pL>. 

Rice had already scored on 
a 69-yard bomb on the 49ers’ 
first possession. The scoring 
run that tied Brown, who 
played For the Cleveland 
Browns in the 1950s and '60s. 
made it two. And then Rice 
made it three, leaping high, 
oerforminc ail his usual acro- 
batics. and making his record 
catch on a 38-yard score over 
comerback .Albert Lewis with 
4:05 to play. That made it 44- 
14. It finished that way. 

That made it 127’ career 
touchdowns for Rice. The re- 
cord. The best. 

Rice made i* * special night 
for the 68.032 ions at Candle- 
stick Park — the largest crowd 
to watch a 49ers game — and 
the national TV audience. 

The game began with the 
focus on the Raiders’ blinding 
speed at the receiver position. 
It ended with camera lights 
flashing and the crowd on its 
feet saluting Rice. He has 120 
touchdown catches and -seven 
touchdown runs. He made 
seven catches for 169 yards in 
this game and helped the 49ers 
dismantle the Raiders. 


Otorjc NiUtui/The Amomed Press 

Jerry Rice making die catch for Us NFL-record 127th touchdown in the 49ers* 44-14 thrashing of die Raiders. 


The Raiders' defense just 
couldn’t keep up. 

After the 49ers took a 23- 
14 halftime lead, the game 
was scoreless in the third 
quarter. 

But in the fourth, the 49ers 
scored 21 points and the blitz 
was on. 


In the fust half San Francis- 
co looked as if it was ready to 
run the speedy Raiders quick- 
ly out of the part The 49ers’ 
speed, quickness and execu- 
tion led to the game’s first 14 
points. After that, each time 
the Raiders scored, the 49ers 
responded with one of their 


own on their way to the half- 
time lead. 

The Raiders are known for 
their fleet group of receivers, 
but Rice immediately made 
sure that everyone knew he is 
still one of pro football's best 
deep threats. 

On the 49ers’ fourth play of 


the game, be lined up wide left 
at the San Francisco 31-yard 
line. With comerback Lionel 
Washington opposite him. 
Rice took an inside route, 
blew past Washington, caught 
a pass near the Raiders’ 30 and 
sped past safety Patrick Bates 
for a 69-yard touchdown. 


SCOREBOARD 


Monday's Gam* 

Son Francbco 44, Los Angeles Raiders 

NFL Standings CFL Standings 


AMERICAS! CONFE HENCE 
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Hamilton 2 7 0 202 274 4 

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Western Division 

Calgary 8 1 0 3*2 149 T4 

Bril. Columbia 7 1 1 363 220 IS 

Edmantm 6 3 0 259 273 12 

Saskatchewan 5 4 0 241 260 10 

Sacramento 3 5 1 1B2 262 7 

Los Vegas 3 6 0 269 297 * 

Monday's Oontei 
Calgary 48. Edmonton 
Toronto 31. Hamilton 1* 



U.S.Opeo 

Man Singles 
Fourth Room) 

Berna Karbacher. Germany, def. Glanlirco 
Paul. Italy. 4-L **, 4-1 4-4; Thomas Muster 
( 131. Austria, dot. Serai Bruowra (3),Saain. 6- 
4. 7-4 17-41. 6-4; A.Ktre Agassi. U.S. dcf. Ml- 
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Todd Martin (9), U.5.. del. Richer Reneberg. 
U.S- J-4, 3-0. retired. 

Women's Slneln 
Foertb Round 

Juno Novalna (7). Czech ReeuMlc def. 
Mogdotara Maleeva (131. Bulgaria 64. 64; 
Shill* Grot (i), Germany, def. Zina Garrison 
Jastson 00), U.S . 6-1, 6-2; Amanda Coeteer 
I ill. So ultt Africa, Set. Mono Endo, Japan, 64L 
64; Alary Pierce Ml. Franca del- iva MafofL 
Cr satic. 4-L 4-2. 


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Orb X Dalai 1 





World Swim Championships 


SWIMMINO 

Men 

1*0 1 re ar ) stroke: 1, Herbert Rauo. Hunga- 
ry, 1 minute. 1-24 seconds. Z Karol v Guttler. 
Hungary, 1 MMiRiMrlc DeburghBretve. 
Betotum. 1:01.74. 4, PMIIp Rogers, Australia. 
1:01.80. & Akira HavoshL japan. |;01J1. 6. 
Erie Wunderlich. United States, l :01.?1.7. Va- 
sily Ivanov, Russia, I :02.17. s. Seth Van Neer- 
den. United States, 1:0249. 

see Freestyle; l, Anftl k asvto F intam. 
1 :47J2. X Anders Holmort*. Sweden. 1 :4M4. 3. 


Dan van Loader. New Zeoiand. 1:4124. 4. Ra- 
man Tctwoolov, Russia. 1 : 43.79. S. Trent Bray. 
New Zealand, 1:49.13. 6, Atnia Czene. Hungn- 
rv. 1:49.21, 7, Steffen Zesner, Germany, 1 : 49.23. 
B. Cnad Cory In, United States. 1 \*>M. 
women 

led Freatrto: i. Le J Ingvl, Chino, 5L01 sec- 
onds (world record; old record: Jennv 
Thompson. Untied States. 344*). X ua Bin. 
China. 54-li X Fronilska Van Aimslek. Ger- 
many, 34.77. 4, Jennv T h omason, united 
States. 33.16. 5, Matte Jacobsen, Denmark, 
35.57. 6. Angel Myers Martina United States. 
S3. 77. 7. Suzu CM bo. Japan, 33.79. B, Karon 
Pickering. Britain. 5S.79. 

4*0 lad hr Ideal Medley: 1. Dai Guanong. Chi- 
na. 4:39.14. X Allison Wagner. United States. 
4:39.91 X Krfsltna Quanca, United Slates. 
4:4121. A Joanne Molar, Conoda. 4144.79. 5, 
Hovlev Lewis. Australia, 4:4388, 4. Hana 
Coma, Czech ReeuMIc. 414346. 7. Henry 
Sweetnom, Canada. 4:410- Dleauallfled -HI- 
daka Hlranaka, Jaean. 800 
Freestyle Relay: l, Chino (Le YHig. Yarn 
Alhua Zliau Ojenbln. Lu Bln), 7:57.94. 1 Ger- 
many (Korstbi Kleloass, Franz bha Von Aim- 
sick. Julia Juno. Dogma r Hose). 8:01.17. 3, 
United States (Cristina Teuseher, J««w 
Thompson, Janet Evans, Nicole HoWettl, 
1:01.16. 4. Australia (Suson O'Nod l, N kale Ste- 
venson. EIU Overton, Hovlev Lewis), 8:09.79. 

5, Canada (Marianne Umeort. Nikki Drvden. 
sreehane Richardson. Joanne Malari.SiDJL 

6. Romania (Carla Negrea Lorcno Dta- 
cenescu. Carmen Horca Lumlnlta 
Dabresai;. 8:13.94.7. Italy iCatorinaaorgato. 
Francesco Salvolola Cectila Vianini, Darla 
Toccr-lni!. 8 1217*. X Chinese TolPel IKus Fu- 
Jen. Tsot Shu-Mln. Kaa Chl-Chuan. Lin Chi- 
Chon). 1:41.89. 

WATER POLO 
Preliminary Round 
Women 

Netherlands ?, Canada 5 
United States 14, New Zealand 5 
Hwtoary 7. Brazil 3 
Russia 10, France 8 


French Panel 
Clears Indurain 
In Drug Case 

Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — Miguel Indur- 
ain, four-time winner of the 
Tour de France, was 
cleared of doping charges 
on Tuesday by ihe French 
Cycling Federation. - 

The Spanish cyclist had 
tested positive for taking 
salbutamol, a stimulant, 
during a three-day race in 
France in May. 

He used an asthma spray 
that contains salbutamol 
for a respiratory problem. 

Jean-Franqois La- 
chaume, a federation offi- 
cial, said there was no proof 
he had used it improperly. 
The use of salbutamol is 
accepted by the sport’s gov- 
erning body, the Interna- 
tional Cycling Union. But a 
French law requires ath- 
letes to prove they are tak- 
ing it for medical reasons. 

(AP, Reuters) 





to 


The Party’s Over, and the iVen» y/ ( of 
For the IOC Is Good: No News r' 


'T 


By Randy Harvey 

Los Angela Tima Seri ice 

P ARIS — Turn out the lights in the City of 
Light, the $16 million birthday party is over. 
Also known as the Olympic Centennial Con- 
gress, it was conceived as a high-minded think 
tank chat would 


bring together 
not only interna- 
tional and na- 

tional Olympic 

officials but also academicians, historians, jour- 


Vantage 

Point 


+ 


naiists. sponsors, marketing mavens and, yes, 
even athletes, to discuss and debate their roles at 
the start of the Olympic movement’s second 
century. 

Come together they did last week in the under- 
ground h alts of a charmless convention center on 
the city’s outskirts, more than 3,000 strong; to 
hear 430 three-minute speeches over a five-day 
period on every subject from ambush marketing 
to the ambush of Nancy Kerrigan. 

But as for discussions and debate, there was 
little of either as speakers were herded to and 
from the stage like winners of the lesser Oscars at 
the Academy Awards. John MacAloon, a re- 
spected Olympic historian and University of 
Chicago sociology professor, fumed at the lack of 
opportunity for formal give and take at the end 
of sessions, as is usually a feature of academic 
conferences. 

Even informal exchanges in the lobby subsid- 
ed after it was discovered that Olympia, a metal- 
lic green robot that wandered the halls, had 
super-sensitive hearing powers. 

AH this occurred to the delight of Internation- 
al Olympic Committee president, Juan Antonio 
Samara nch of Spain, who declared that the 
theme of the Congress would be unity and then 
gave no one a chance to disagree. That assured 
that the theme for the press would be boredom, 
which hardly distressed Samaranch. 

About to step onto an escalator one afternoon, 
he spotted a reporter in the lobby and abruptly 
turned on his heels to go speak to him. 

“No headlines,” Samar anch said, his eyes 
twinkling. 

He liked that thought so much that, in his 
closing speech Saturday, he said, “Good news is 
no news.” 

Most of his deputies were eager to accommo- 
date him. In the opening speech of the first 
morning session, the IOC vice president, Kevan 
Gosper of Australia, said the movement needed 
the courage to eliminate sports from the Olym- 
pics that were no longer popular or modem; the 
coinage to assure that professional athletes com- 
peting in the Olympics in increasing number 
were true lovers of sport and not merely gladia- 
tors; the courage to insist upon the continuing 
participation of athletes from developing na- 
tions, and the courage to open stadiums to the 
common man instead of reserving all the seats 
for corporate sponsors and celebrities. 

But uten Gosper, fearing that he had been too 
blunt, went to the press room to inform reporters 
that he was merely tossing out some suggestions, 
that he was not sure when or even whether the 
IOC should act upon them and that what really 
bothered him was “extravagant, unrelated" en- 
tertainment at sporting events. He was unable to 
describe what he was talking about, but he pre- 
sumably knows it when he sees it. After that 
performance, some of his IOC colleagues began 
sarcastically referring to him as "Captain 
Courageous." 

But if speakers were somewhat circumspect 
because they were concerned that their words 
might come back to haunt them, who could 
blame them? At the most recent Congress in 
1981. one conclusion of the final statement’s 
drafters was that there was “no place in the 
Olympic Games for professional or open compe- 
tition." Eleven years later, the Dream Team 
pretty much ended that notion forever. 

So it was time for a new Congress, the 12th in 
100 years, and Paris certainly seemed to be the 
place because that is where a French baron, 
Pierre de Coubertin, convened the first meeting 
of the IOC in 1894. 


In an interview before the Congress, Samar- 
anch proudly included among his accomplish- 
ments in 14 years as president: the election of 
women to the IOC, including two executive 
board members; the creation of an athletic 
commission; the opening of the Games to profes- 
sionals; the development of a fund foT athlete 
from eme rging nations; the intensification of the 
fight against (bugs and racial discrimination; the 
establishment of a coon of arbitration for dis- 
putes between athletes and federations; the ■ 
schedule change that placed the Winter and. 
Summer Olympics in different years; the com 
s miction of new IOC facilities, including an 
Olympic museum, and the significant improve- 
ment m the IOC’s finances. 

If all Samaranch, who will retire in 1997, 
wanted to do was call a Congress to celcbmtchis 
reign as president, few would have argued. •. 

But SAfnarawnh promised much more, includ- 
ing open discussion that would result in a pro- 
gram, particularly for the Summer Olympus, 



i 

• 


The IOC president, Jnan 
Antonio Samaranch of Spain, 
declared that the theme of the 
Congress would be unity and , 
then he gave no one a chance 
to disagree. 


■?- 


that included primarily sports that are 
today. Some, he said, would have to go. ' 
all the IOC did was add two sports, tnathlonand 
taekwondo, for the 2000 Summer Games in ' 
Sydney. 

Evolution, not revolution, said the IOC mem- " . 
ber Jacques Rogge of Belgium. 

Not all IOC members were satisfied with that " 
philosophy. •' 

“You might have to speculate that if the IOC 


doesn't eliminate anything and adds two more 
to take it 


sports, who's going to take it seriously?” said 
Richard Pound, an executive board member 
from Canada. 


Yet. the IOC did score some points for its 
overdue recognition of athletes as forces within 
the movement. Donna de Varona, a gold medal- 
ist swimmer from the United States, said that 
when she attended her first Congress in 1973, the 
credential was literally ripped from her neck by 
an IOC official because she applied for it 
through the organizing committee instead of th 
IOC. De Varona was one of many current 
former athletes to participate last week. In fact, 


iEnglnm 


she was asked to present two speeches. 
Afterward, the IOC 


seemed poised to give the 
athletes more of a voice, if for no other reason, as 
Rogge explained, than to prevent a situation in 
the future like the United States has now with its 
baseball strike. 

Like many others, de Varona said she was 
offended by the $16 million price tag. 

With tittle else to report daily, the media fixed 
on that figure. IOC officials were sensitive about 
it, choosing an alternate site for their grand gala 
in fear that the first choice, the palace at Ver- 
sailles, would inspire Marie Antoinette and “let 
them eat cake" references. They also scurried to 
explain that they were contributing only $6 mil- 
lion, while the rest came from the French and 
Parisian authorities, perhaps as a down payment 
on Paris’s proposed bid to stage the Summer - 
Olympics of either 2004 or *08. 

Still, the IOC, which often boasts of the finan- 
dal assistance it has given to athletes, such as the • . 
world champion runner Maria Mu tola of Mo- - . 
zambique, should consider that $6 million would 
finance training for many athletes for many, 
many years, 

Besides, it is possible that reflection upon the : 
Olympic movement is, like prayer, best doiie in ! 
private. 




DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1994 


Page 19 



SPORTS 


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l/.S. Comes to Soccer’s Temple Van Almsick and Dolan Set World Marks 
In Search of Some Respect . . . 


International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — David Platt came around the 
comer of Bisham Abbey, the elegant 
grounds of stone and brick where the England 
team trains, and there he found the photogra- 
phers waiting for him. This is something the U.S. 
press doesn’t do any longer, stage photographs 
— that went out with Mickey Mamie. 

The English like to believe the Americans are 
innocent optimists, and in many ways that's true 
— but not here, and not on Wednesday night. 
UJS. soccer had 

jingoistic sup- | an _ 

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World Cup, but the general rule is that Ameri- 
cans — outside of the Olympics — rarely band 
together in the manner of the En glish The tab- 
loids may be ready with the turnips for England's 
manag e r , Terry Venables, if he loses, but the all- 
for-ono-and-one-for-country rhy thms of Fngiich 
soccer are foreign to the popular U.S. sports — 
ffokih basically are played only within America. 

- England has invited the U.S. team Tor a first- 
ever meeting at Wembley on Wednesday, even 
posting a $25,000 reward for the Americans to 
win. Thai has brought out criticism on both sides 

— the American players call it ridicule — but it is 
the most sporting of English gestures, done for 
the Americans’ own sake. The En glish rhinV they 
are going to win, and they don’t want anyone to 
call it a false victory. It is the ultimate compli- 
ment to U.S. soccer that the En glish would want 
the full respect of having beaten this team. 

So when Platt, England’s cap tain, camp; around 
the comer, he came to pose automatically for the 
English cameras. From the crowd of lenses was 
tossed a balled-up American flag, and Platt held it 
at first like he didn’t know what to da He tried 
wearing it in a shawl over his shoulders. At last he 
grabbed each cornea: and hdd it high behind his 
head as if stretched out by the wind; they loved 
that one — he looked like General Patton. 

I T IS historic, in my opinion,” Sepp Blatter, 
general secretary of the international soccer 
federation, FIFA said last week in between 
Olympic meetings in Paris. “That the U.S. is 
invited to England and invited to play in the 
temple of football which is Wembley — this is 
recognition of the value of American football. It 
is not becanse they beat England last year, but 
because of their performance in the World Cup.'’ 

The concern is that the Americans will lack the 
inspiration of their hosts, whose failure to qualify 


The Associated Press 

ROME — The German 
swimming star Franzi Van 
Almsick broke the world record 
and collected the gold medal in 
the women’s 200-meter free- 
style at the World Champion- 
ships on Tuesday after not even 
qualifying for the final. 

An American newcomer. 
Tom Dolan, also set a world 
record, in the 400 individual 
medley, only minutes after Van 
Almsick's swim. 

In an apparent tactical move. 
German team officials had 
withdrawn the eighth-fastest 

a ualifier, Dagmar Hase. from 
le women’s 200 freestyle final 
so that Van Almsick, who was 


ninth fastest but figured to be a 
better medal prospect, could 
swim instead. 

Van Almsick said later it had 
been Hase’s own decision. 

The 16-year-old freestyle star 
responded with a stunning 
fourth length surge, powering 
past China’s Lu Bin and touch- 
ing first in 1:56.78. That broke 
the eight-year-old mark of 
1:57.55 set by Heike Friedrich, 
another German, in Berlin. 

“Without Hase I would never 
have done it," said Van Alm- 
sick, who wiped away tears on 
the medal podium. “I don’t 
know how to thank her and, 
without her, there would never 
have been this record.” 


Lu Bin collected silver, also 
beating the previous record in 
1 :56.89. Claudia Poll won Cos- 
ta Rica's first-ever medal by 
placing third in 1:57.61. 

Dolan took the lead in the 
medley after a powerful breast- 
stroke leg that put him inside 
the world record. In a close bat- 
tle with countryman Eric Na- 
mesnik and Finland's Jani Sie- 
vinen, Dolan, 19, increased his 
lead over the final freestyle leg, 
and touched in 4: 12.30. * 

Thai was 0.06 inside Tam as 
Darnvi’s world mark set at the 
last World Championships 
three years ago. Sievinen took 
silver in 4:13.29 and Namesnik 
won the bronze in 4:15.69. 


for the World Cup finals was signaled by its 
shocking 2-0 loss to the Americans in Boston 1 5 
months ago. This really is something to consider, 
that the English would be more ftred-up to play 
the Americans; and that the Americans, for their 
part, might be slightly . . . uninspired? 

Technically, perhaps, the Americans might 
lack the stuff — as well as some players — from 
their World Cup victory over Colombia. Emo- 
tionally. and from a strictly American point of 
view, this match with England is the one every- 
one had imagined for the World Cup. - Never 
mind the sorry state of English football; until 
Brazil came along with Rom&rio and his samba- 
dancing public, the U.S. audience mostly had 
seen soccer through En glish glasses — theblack 
and white photos of the queen passing forth the 
trophies, the violence in the stands. That is how 
Americans typically see soccer internationally. 

So, in a sense, this game really is an all- 
expenses-paid reward for what the Americans 
accomplished last summer; but it’s also the next 
significant step. If U.S. soccer is going to main- 
tain respect and grow in its public’s eyes, the 
Americans have to win the attention of England. 

For England really is the only potential rival 
capable of igniting some sort of response from 
the American public; the Mexicans, the Canadi- 
ans, the Germans, I talians . Brazilians — none of 
them can make a stir. But if the U.S. soccer team 
could grow up to antagonize the English on a 
regular basis — now there’s something to win 
ratings j>amts back home. 

E NGLAND is fresh after a summer's rest, 
and its Premier League took last weekend 
off in anticipation of this friendly and other 
internationals Wednesday. England figures to 
give its best effort, then, while the Americans 
have the look of a rock band going on tour after a 
first platinum album. If they look slightly over- 
whelmed. it's not permanent. Indeed, they’re 
already acting the part with Alexi Lai as com- 
plaining that teammates Cobi Jones and Brad 
Friedel are being stiffed by the English players 
union, which will decide Thursday whether to 
ratify their transfers to the English' league. 

It's part of the union's struggle to protect 
English players. For their part, the Americans 
are complaining about a lack of respect. All 
underdogs tend to complain like that, but in this 
case, with this team, the words ring true. So the 

final score Wednesday might not be so important Coral Nr* om Apnir Frame- Prase 

as the circumstances' created from it; and this Arantxa S&nchez Vi carlo made the U.S. semis Tuesday for die fourth time in five years, 
rivalry begins with an edge the Americans always 
dreamed u would possess. 


Unlike Monday, when China 
won all three women's golds, its 
swimmers failed to win any of 
Tuesday's five races. 

In th'e women's 200 breast- 
stroke, Australia's Samantha 
Riley went out fast and stayed 
there to win in a championship 
record 2:26.87, China's Yuan 
Yuan won the silver in 2.-27.3S 
and Belgium’s Brigitte Becue 
got the bronze in 2:28.85. 

Poland's Rafal Szukala. the 
Olympic silver medalist and 
European champion, powered 
away from the field to win the 
100 butterfly in 53.51, the fast- 
est performance of the year. 
Sweden's Lars Frolander 
placed second in 53.65 and De- 


nis Pankratov of Russia was 
third, 0.03 behind. 

Frolander and Pankratov 
swam against each other again 
in the 800 freestyle final and 
both again collected medals. 

Both were third -leg swimmers 
in the final and. thanks to a swim 
by fourth-leg Anders Holmertz. 
Sweden won the gold in 7:17.74. 
The other Swedes were Christer 
W allin and Tommy Werner. 

Yuri Mukhin. Vladmimir 
Pyshnenko, Pankratov and Ro- 
man Tchegolev came home sec- 
ond for Russia in 7:18.13 and 
Germany (Andreas Szigat, 
Christian Keller, Oliver Lampe 
and Steffen Zesner) took the 
bronze in 7:19.10, 



Sanchez Vicario, 
Sabatini in Semis 


. . And England Will Deliver It, With a Vengeance 


International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — The stars and 
stripes are flying over 
Wembley Stadium for Alexi La- 
las and Co. It has taken three 
score years and eleven, but fi- 
nally the English have conde- 
scended to receive the United 
States of America in London 
for a game of soccer. 

The way some Catholics 
dream of a blessing in Rome, so 
pioneers of U.S. soccer craved a 


Rob 

Hughes 




match in the cradle of the world 
game. Those early Americans, 
affiliated with FIFA in 1913, 
might never have believed that 
their country would in 1994 
stage the biggest World Cup in 
history, and then be granted an 
audience at Wembley. 

Those old moi would have 
chuckled at England's supposed 
imperious rulers of the game 
begging Americans to come. 

When negotiations between 
the two soccer federations be- 
ctpne a trifle sticky in the World 
Cup swelter, England agreed to 
a match fee plus a $25,000 bo- 
nus if the Americans should win 
at Wembley. Such a bonus to 
the opposition is unheard of in 
sports. It could be interpreted 
as extreme arrogance or as a 
foolhardy insult. 


“The idea was to put a little 
carrot therefor the Americans.” 
said an FA spokesman. “It puts 
a competitive edge to this 
friendly match." 

Is that friendly as in friendly 
fire? Whatever tie ai m , the in- 
ducement backfired somewhat 
when a more senior FA official 
insisted that the bonus was "a 
commensal deal, suggested in 
the first place by America.” 

But Sunil Giriati, the U.S. 
federation negotiator, believed 
the $25,000 was for a tie, not 
necessarily a win. 

So after 71 years, a linguistic 
misunderstanding divides Brits 
and Americans. Over there, a 
tie is a drawn game, scares lev- 
el; here, a tie is simply a fixture. 

If cash were the motivating 
factor England thought it to be 
— rather than a publicity gim- 
mick to stir interest where less 
than half the tickets have been 
sold — the bonus presumably 
was intended to persuade 
America to come out attacking. 
Instead, the Yanks think they 
are in the money if a cautious 
approach ties up the game. 

This type of mercenaiy hype 
came long after the pioneers. 
But what would they have made 
of the irreverent Alexi Lalas at 
the heart of America’s defense? 

Red-haired, red-bearded, 
and red-hot on the guitar, Lalas 
sprawls, gawky as an ostrich, 
yet somehow gets the job done. 


Summer turned Lalas into a 
cult figure, elevated him from 
college player to World Cup 
personality, and induced Pado- 
va to pay $750,000 to take him 
from America, a country with 
no pro soccer league, to Italy, 
the multimillionaire's mecca. 

True. Padova was outclassed 
to the tune of 5-0 against Samp- 
doria in his first match there on 
Sunday. By all accounts. Lalas 
was valiant in a chaotic defense. 

It takes more than five goals 
to dent the gung-ho confidence, 
the defiance of this man. In the 
summer, his spirit overcame 
taunts. One American chris- 
tened Lalas “the love child of 
Phyllis Diller and Rasputin.” 

Lalas laughs all the way to 
the bank. Mention his name, 
spell out how much a maverick 
he is in appearance, and he lays 
back while advertising men 
throw bucks his way. I Uke the 
guy’s spirit but cannot fathom 
why European clubs should 
clamor for him while ignoring 
his gifted and unattached com- 
patriot Marcelo Balboa. 

Balboa came back from knee 
suigeay to star at the World Cup. 
He organized the American rear- 
guard, he covered and tackled 
and made up for Lalas's some- 
times impulsive rushes, he 
looked smooth and calm while 
all around him lost their heads. 
Yet Balboa has just learned that 
his only offer, from the Mexican 


club Puebla, has fallen through. 

Meanwhile, our man Alexi 
has been ticking off the British 
Home Office and the English 
Professional Players’ Associa- 
tion over their protectionist 
policies in failing to open doors 
to two of his countrymen. 

Lalas called the delay in 
granting work peraiits to Cobi 
Jones and Brad Friedel “a joke." 

“It's just another form of the 
lack of respect that we American 
players get,” he said. “I really 
hope they grant these guys per- 
mission to play because in es- 
sence its you guys who are miss- 
ing out on two characters who 
could add an unbelievable ele- 
ment to English football. Jf you 
go through life with blinkers on 
you miss so much on the periph- 
ery. If they don’t come to Eng- 
land the/fl go somewhere else." 

Lalas concluded. *Td love to 
play in England, but I'm not 
going to go where American 
players aren’t wanted.” 

Spoken like the sportsman he 
is. with plenty of heart and little 
elegance. Lalas has a point; Eng- 
land still has a superior air and a 
door half closed to foreigners. 

But Jones, largely used as a 
World Cup reserve, and Frie- 
del, who has played for no one 
since last May, have lately been 
more evident on the beach than 
the playing field. 

For what it matters, I foresee 


England, orchestrated by the 
midfielder John Barnes, who 
was born and bred a Jamaican, 
comfortably beating the U.SA. 

The pioneers never got to 
Wembley. Even the Americans 
who shocked England. 1-0. dur- 
ing the 1950 World Cup in Bra- 
zil never received an invitation. 
But now the modern Ameri- 
cans, players who humiliated 
England, 2-0, in Boston 15 
months ago, are here. 

Lalas and Tom Dooley, who 
headed a goal apiece, are back 
for more. But vengeance is 
more powerful than money, and 
England, nowhere near as con- 
fused a team it was in Boston, 
can pay off those three goals 
and more. After that, America’s 
second coming at Wembley will 
probably be in the year 2065. 

A* Huffta u tin I hr mqf ef 7V Tuna. 


Ill Secret, Selig 
Meets U.S. Aide 

The AifoaateJ Press 

NEW YORK — With 
four days left until the 
deadline he set canceling 
the season, the acting base- 
ball commissioner. Bud Se- 
lig, met secretly with Labor 
Secretary Robert B. Reich. 

“I think there is a very 
good possibility we are not 
going to have a World Se- 
ries this year and that 
would be the first time 
since 1904,” Reich said. 

Neither Selig nor Reich 
announced the meeting, 
which took place Monday 
in Milwaukee and was dis- 
closed by another owner. 

Selig confirmed the 
meeting took place but 
wouldn’t comment on what 
was said. 


Compiled In- Our Su>ff From Dupaiehcs 

NEW YORK — Second- 
seeded Arantxa Sanchez Vi- 
cario of Spain and No. 8 Ga- 
briel a Sabatini of Argentina 
fought into the semifinals of the 
U.S. Open on Tuesday. 

In a battle of mistakes. San- 
chez Vicario outlasted No. 5 
Kimiko Date of Japan, 6-3. 6-0. 
before Sabatini hung on to beat 
the unseeded American Gigi 
Fernandez. 6-2, 7-5. 

In a men's fourth round 
match, Jonas Bjorkman of Swe- 
den beat Joem Renzenbrink of 
Germany in a five-set struggle, 
3-6. 6-3, 6-2. 6-7 (3-7). 6-3. 

Fernandez, a surprise semifi- 
nalist at Wimbledon earlier this 
summer, dropped the first set. 
then took charge in the second 
until Sabatini, the 1990 U.S. 
Open champion, found the 
range with her top-spin passing 
shots. What followed was a 
comedy of errors. 

Neither player wanted to 
make a mistake, so both became 
overcautious. One Sabatini 
serve was clocked at 58 mph (93 
kph). so slow that Fernandez 
got way out front with her 
swing and sent her return cross- 
court wide. 

Later, a Sabatini second 
serve didn’t reach her own ser- 
vice line, landing less than 10 
feet (3 meters) in front of her. 
She nearly repeated that perfor- 
mance in the last game of the 
match, and finished with eight 
double-faults. 

“I had some troubles, espe- 
cially at the end," Sabatini said. 

The semifinal berth was Sa- 
ba tini's first since 1990. 

In the opening set of the first 
match, it appeared as if neither 
Sanchez Vicario nor Date could 
hold sen e — there were senice 
breaks in the first, second, fifth, 
sixth, seventh and ninth games. 

For Date, things then got 
worse. In all, she had 39 un- 
forced errors, two-thirds of 
them in the opening set, against 
only 12 winners. 


“I think my body was tired, 
physically tired, but my spirit 
was up " for it.” Date said. 
“However, there was no good 
balance in between those two.” 

S&nchez Vicario, who lost to 
Monica Seles in the 1992 final 
here, reached the semifinals for 
the fourth time in the last five 
years. She had 16 winners and 
14 unforced errors. 

On Monday night, Andre 
Agassi showed he could take his 
act to Broadway. It was. after 
all. great theater. 

Spicing his tremendous shot- 
making with a dash of Hash. 
Agassi hooked up with sixth- 
seeded Michael Chong for five 
sets of crowd-pleasing tennis. 
And when it was over, the un- 
seeded Agassi had a spot in the 
men's quarterfinals. 

A finalist here in 1990. Agas- 
si’s ranking had dropped pre- 
cipitously since he won Wim- 
bledon two years ago. He came 
into this year’s last Grand Slam 
event unseeded but playing his 
best tennis since 1991 ’ 

“I am hitting the ball as well 
as I have ever played,” Agassi 
said after eliminating Chang, 6- 
1. 6-7 (3-7), 6-3, 3-6, 6-1. “1 am 
excited to come back. I can't 
wait to get back out on this 
court.” 

He will do that against 13th- 
seeded Thomas Muster, a 6-4. 
7-6 (7-4), 6-4 fourth-round win- 
ner over No. 3 Serai Bruguera, a 
clay-court specialist and two- 
time French Open champion. 

The other quarterfinal pair- 
ing in the bottom half of the 
draw will pit No. 9 Todd Mar- 
tin against unseeded Bernd 
Karbacher of Germany. 

Martin advanced when Ri- 
chey Reneberg suffered a 
pulled hamstring in his left leg 
and was forced to retire. 

The women's quarterfinal 
pairings were completed when 
No. 4 Maty Pierce ousted Iva 
Majoli of Croatia, 6-1, 6-2. 

(AP. Reuters, N}T) 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Horoscope 
6 Pachaculi was 
one 

is Safety 

specifications 


14 Persona! care 
workers 
is Dickensian 
orphan 
ic Stormy 
greeting? 






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QUALITY THAT LASTS 


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17 Fat City 
dwelling? 

20 Loudness unit 

21 Jots 

22 Actor Davis 
2 a GatsOy 

portrayer, with 
36-Aaoss 
25 Just those ot 
Juan things? 

27 Outwit, in Fat 
City? 

33 Was a 

busybody 

34 Gibbons 
ss Common 

Market money 
38 See 23-Across 
37 Warp 
as Parts of 
matches 

40 Unstop, 
poetically 

41 Germany's 

Mountains 

42 Munchkins 

43 Fat City office 

attire? 

47 Bearing 

48 Inspector 

49 Sphere, e.g. 

52 Paraphernalia 
54 Final words 

SB Be insincere, m 
Fat City? 

61 Crow's-nest cry 
82 “Little Sheba' 
playwright 
ea Yellow-lever 
mosquito 
64 'Ladders" in 
hose 

65 Turned gray 
68 Take by force 


DOWN 

1 1983 Tony 
musical 

2 “Farmer in the 
Dell" syllables 

3 Arabian 
Peninsula port 

4 Prepared 
leftovers 


a General on 
Chinese menus 
B Bonkers 
7 Requisite 
a Zoom-lens 
shots 

9 Ador-di rector 
Kiellin 

10 Ballroom gride 

11 Boating couple 

12 Actress Conn of 
“Benson" 

13 Besides 

18 Bountiful's state 
l» Despoils 
24 Old Ford 

26 Printer's mark 

27 Plot 

mathematically 

28 Place to get 
down from 

29 Fabric akin to 
left 

ao Chaucer pilgrim 

31 Bghtsome 

32 Ado 

33 Novelist's 
concern 

37 Race's end 
3sU5ing extortion 
39 Barely mention 

41 Johanna Spyn 
classic 

42 Canton lintsh 

44 Dickinson and 
Brom£ 

45 Halted 

46 Rochester's 
beloved 

49 Practice 3 la 
Marciano 
so Kauai neighbor 

si Where the 
Rhonemeets 

theSadne 
53 Sidle 

ss Remain 

56 Finishes the 
cake 

57 Examine 

59 mater 

(brain 

membrane) 

80 Like sushi 


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International 


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Infrastructure 
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Among the topics to be covered are: 

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IVTEKVATIOVAL < 


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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1994 


OBSERVER 


A Small Oversight 


Paris by Night: A New Reason to Call It City of Light 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — I see that 
somebody else has drawn 


IN somebody else has drawn 
up a list of New York's living 
human treasures and that they 
are to be honored soon at one of 
the better hotels. 

My feelings are not hurt just 
because I am not on that list. 
Indeed one of these living trea- 
sures,, John Guare, is a man I 
count as a friend, and 1 shall be 
proud to boast of that friend- 
ship in the years to come. 

If 5 honor enough to be able 
to say, “It’s nice. Mailer, that 


He telephoned. *Tvc heard 
Lyndon Johnson once told Dean 
Rusk you were a man he could 
go to the well with,” he said 
Would I sit for an interview? 


'Actually,” I explained, 
yndon didn't tell Dean Rusk 


“Lyndon didn't tell Dean Rusk 
that I was a man he could go to* 
the well with. I told Lyndon 
that John Guare was a man he, 
Lyndon, could go to the cheese 


shop with." 
Halbersta 


to say. It s nice. Mailer, that 
you nave the Nobel Prize for 
Literature, but one of my 
friends happens to be a living 
treasure of New York City.” 

Well, my friendship with 
Guare is not so deep as a well 
but it is at least as wide as a 
cheese-shop door. That's where 
I met him — is a cheese-shop 
door in Nantucket He had just 
bought some feta cheese. 

“This is the great playwright 
John Guare,” said the actor ac- 
companying me, juicily caress- 
ing his diction on the chance 
that Guare had a new role up 
his sleeve full of juicy diction. 

“Would you believe they’re 


Ealberstam’s sharp report- 
er’s gaze suddenly became ra- 
zor-like. “Did Johnson ever go 
to the cheese shop with Guare?" 
he demanded. 

Over the years I saw him often 
in restaurants on the Upper East 
Side, and he always said, “How’s 
the cheese treating you?” 


So when Halberstam com- 
piled his list of New York’s liv- 
ing treasures, I was not really 


hurt about being omitted. It did 
seem a little odd, though, that 


passing this off as feta cheese?” 
Guare asked me, urging me to 
take a bite. “This isn't feta 
cheese,” he said to the cleric. 
“Ifs Wensleydale.” 

Since then I have seen Guare 
several times at a distance, and 
he has always waved back. 

As I once told Lyndon John- 
son, "John Guare is a man you 
can go to the cheese shop with.” 
And now, aliving treasure . . . 


seem a little odd, though, that 
he had included my friend Jules 
Feiffer, the cartoonist. 

Now mind you, Feiffer is a 
friend of mine too from way 
back. How far back? Let's just 
say that I call him “Jules.” 

So I was glad to see Jules 
pronounced a living treasure by 
Halberstam, and wasn't hurt at 


all about not getting the same 
honor. Look, I mean, if you're 


By John Rockwell 

New York Tuna Service 

P ARIS — Paris calls itself the Gw of Light In 
the daytime, despite subtle shifts caused by 
pollution and worldwide weather patterns, the 
diffuse northern sunlight has remained fairly 
constant over the centuries. Or so paintings, 
photographs and novdistic descriptions suggest 
But nighttime is different, ana the notion of 
a city of light, a slogan adopted with the wide- 
spread electrification of Paris in the late !9th 
century, has meant different things in diff erent 
decades. 

Now, reflecting rapid technological evolu- 
tion in the last 15 years — and the rapidity with 
which the centralized French bureaucracy can 
respond to such changes — the nighttime illu- 
mination of Paris has become more pervasive, 
striking and subtly beautiful than ever. 

Paris lighting is everywhere, bathing ancient 
neighborhoods in a soft, enveloping glow. The 
art of public lighting has grown into a full- 
fledged, artistically self -conscious profession, 
with public support, the active involvement of 
politicians and, now, an influence that is spread- 
ing throughout Western and Eastern Europe. 

The most dazzling recent addition to the 
ill umina ted Paris skyline came last fall when 
the Cour Napolfcon of the Louvre was lighted 
for the opening of the Richelieu wing. That 
elaborate and costly display, with thousands of 
tiny lights pinpointing every architectural de- 
tail of the palace’s vast central courtyard, 
turned out to be an all the more flamboyant 
expenditure of public funds by being merely 
temporary. It has been dismantled now, with 
the Grand Louvre awaiting a comprehensive 
lighting scheme when the refurbishment of the 
museum is completed in 1997. 


All this has been made possible by the com- 
mercial development since the late 1970s of 
high -efficiency halogen lights, which 
permit a range of color without the use of filters 
and which brought the cost of electricity for 
such projects, to public officials made nervous 
by the energy crisis of the "70s, to within rea- 
sonable limits. 


Electricity de France has been particularly 
active in exploring such technology (although it 



was Philips, the Dutch electronics concern, that 
handled the Eiffel Tower). In the workshops of , -y ». 
the Service Eclairage Public, alongside the-.; 1 ,f||\ 

computer realization room, arc a host of newly ' V 'I fl * * 
designed rigs and housings that can project and ; 1 

reflect strings of small fights and be installed ■; »• 
directly onto the ledges and cornices of ornate- T .» » ,■» ‘I* 
ly decorated Renaissance, Baroque, rococo and Lf{ i ** 
19th-century structures. .[»• » 

“These buildings were conceived at a time- - * t LJ 

when electricity did not exist,” Kaczmarefc 
sq jd “You can’t illuminate b uil d in g s from. y tjJ i 1* 
above, like the sun; you blind the people below-;. jit 
But iH nrrrinating from the bottom up reverse* j t t i 

natural light. You need small reflectors to , • 1 ' 

avoid darir pits and shadowy blac kn ess and to 
diffuse the light in a harmonious manner.” ■ \ ! ' k ' * 
Not all public lighting designers are French; <.'■ ' ' . r 

but most of them are, and it is the French i 

whose ideas and techniques arc spreading ^. f1 ' 
throughout Europe. Electnciti de France last 
year combined with the state electricity compa- 
ny of Italy to ill umin ate several major Italian 
monuments. And the French recently coznplet- ,jg - 
ed another project to light the castle that 
broods over Prague. „• 

It is in France, however, that French ideas 
have been most extensively and elaborately 
realized. And those ideas most definitely reflect 
a FTCnch sensibility. Despite the color possibil- 
ities opened up by halogen lights, the color 
range £n Paris remains primarily white through 
a warm yellow to gola, a palette that Bideau 
called “more subtle, more refined” than the 
sometimes garish public lighting in New York. 

That harmonious sameness reflects the una- 
nimity, or perhaps the uniformity, of the Paris 
cityscape. It is comparable to the 19th-century 
architecture that defines the “newer" parts of 


{Ufi 




illd'l 


The Pont au Change, an example of the new lighting of Paris landmarks. 


honor. Look, I mean, if you're 
really a living treasure, you 
don't need somebody to tell 
you, do you? Who cares that 


people who confer the prize 
don’t always get it right? 


A few years ago another list 
of New Yolk’s living treasures 


don’t always get it light? 

Sooner or later my turn will 
come, and it's in anticipation 
that I'm asking New York’s 
Senator D* Amato to provide 
the city’s living treasures with 


was compiled. That one was 
drawn up by David Halber- 
stam. the distinguished author 
and book salesman. 

Yes, it was Halbeistam. I re- 
member well because he is a 
friend of mine. An even closer 
friend than the living treasure 
John Guare. Our friendship was 
forged in a chance meeting years 
ago when he was writing “The 
Best and the Brightest” and was 
interviewing people who had 
known Lyndon Johnson. 


special legal recognition. 

Why Senator D* Amato? Be- 


Why senator u* Amato? Be- 
cause he is, after all, the cham- 


pion of many a new death pen- 
alty in the crime bill: 

To show that living treasures 


are really special to New York, 
I suggest D 5 Amato press for a 


I suggest D* Amato press for a 
new law that will make capital 
punishment mandatory for 
anybody who kills one. They 


don’t let you get away with kill- 
ing bald eagles, do they? 


New York Tuna Service 


hr ambitious. Jacques Chirac, the mayor of 
Paris, had long sought to ill uminat e the historic 
bridges over the Seine. On July 4, the Pont 
Notre-Dame and the Pont au Change, which 
are the first two bridges to the east of the Pont 
Neuf on the northern side of the He de la Gift, 
were introduced in their new electrified dress. 
By the end of 1995, 1 1 more bridges in the heart 
or the city will be similarly illuminated 

The bridge project reveals the roles played by 
the various personalities and agencies in the 
lighting of Paris. The initiative came from 
Chirac and the Street Directorate of the may- 
o's office, which is responsible for the illumi- 
nation of monuments and for basic street light- 
ing. (The national Minis try of Culture gets 
involved only when a building is a state-run 
national monument, like the Louvre.) 

Until recently, nearly all French public light- 
ing was handled both conceptually and techni- 
cally by the state electricity monopoly, Elect ri- 
dte de France. The company has a special 
division, the Service Eclairage Public, devoted 
solely to public lighting. 


The company also has its own Paris art 
gallery, the fcspace Electra on the Left Bank. 
Among recent exhibitions there were “Paris 
Ville Lumitoe," which offered projects by inter- 
national artists including the Americans Bill 
Fontana and Max Neuhaus, and a one-man 
show devoted to Yann Kersale, whose lighting 
projects and building illuminations have been 
installed all over the world. 

Electrititfe de France’s lighting division re- 
mains the principal resource for the technical 
realization of lighting designs, but the designs 
themselves arc now often farmed out to the 


trasts sharply, for better and for worse, with the 
more cumbersome American tradition of pub- 
lic hearings and political dashes in the connnis- 
sioning of public art. 

The design Chirac chose, the softest and 
subtlest of the four, epitomizes French aesthet- 
ics and technology in this field. Conceived by a 
father-son team called Etudes et Creations 
d’ Ambiance, it uses a myriad of small high- 
efficiency lights mounted directly on_ the 
bridges to cast a searching but sensuously indi- 
rect glow onto the structures. The most obvious 
contrast to this scheme was a proposal to place 
strong spotlights on the banks of the seine, 
casting black, dramatic shadows under the 
bridges’ arches. 

“In the 1950s, the idea was to show a monu- 
ment as if it were day,” said Pierre Bideau, a 
creator of what he likes to call “raises en lu- 
mi&re.” It was Bideau who, eight years ago, 
designed the golden new lighting for the Eiffel 
Tower, which remains the most striking single 
piece of public lighting in all of Pans. 

“Now, Bideau continued, “we try to trans- 
late the night, to evoke different sentiments 
than the day, to reveal different details. We 
seek to create an atmosphere, an ambiance." 


growing field of independent lighting designers 
and to lighting artists like Kersale. 

For the first two bridges in the Seine bridge 
project the mayor’s office organized a competi- 
tion in which four finalists emerged. The Ser- 
vice Eclairage devised computer realizations of 
what the projects would look like, which con- 
sisted of computer-screen images resembling 
brilliantly realistic color photographs. 

Chirac then requested their display on four 
adjacent monitors, said Dominique Kaczmarek 
of the Service Eclairage, strode into the room, 
cast a glance and made his personal decision 
“very quickly.” This imperious process con- 


the city and whose facades are religiously pre- 
served no matter how high-tech the in tenors 
behind them. 

That conformity is enforced by a fierce atten- 
tion to budding and lighting codes, mixed with 
an unwritten pressure against deviation from 
accepted aesthetic norms. Which pressure, in 
turn, might seem to dampen any French equiva- 
lents to the unbridled individuality that charac- 
terizes much American public lighting. 

“Every project, from state to municipal to 
private, has to conform to the rules of the city 
of Paris ” Kaczmar ek said. “But above aJU, 
there is a consensus.” 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



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Oceania 



T oday Tgnrraw 

Hlfltl Low W Hfti Low W 
OF OF OF OF 


I N Paris, Jean-Louis Scherrer and the 
fashion house that still bears his name 


Bngfcok 

rang rs/ony 


1 fashion house that still bears his name 
have settled a dispute over his dismissal in 
1992. The firm and its former head said 
Tuesday that the settlement involved an 


unspecified payment to Scherrer and 
would allow him to design clothing for 


razak Gurnah, “Paradise,” and JIB Patou 
Walsh, “Knowledge of Angels.” The prize, 
with carries a £20,000 (331,000) award, will 
be announced on Oct 11. 

□ 


would allow him to design clothing for 
projects mutually agreed upon. Scherrer 
set up the fashion house in the 1 960s hut in 


IMHMiuUy 

Cold 


UnwniwWy 

Hoi 


1990 sold the majority of his company to 
Seibu of Japan (60 percent) and Hennes of 


North America 

Boston will have dry, cool 
wMthor Thursday ami Fri- 
day. Warmer weather will 
reach Chicago and SL Louts 
later mis week. Hot weather 
will extend northward from 
Dallas and Albuquerque 
through Denver. Thunder- 
storms will dampen the 
northern Rockies and north- 
ern Plain*. 


Europe 

London will have breezy, 
coal weather late this week 
with a few showers. Parts 
through Geneva will have 
mainly dry, pleasant weather 
lata this week. Rome will 
have acottered thunder- 
atorms Wednesday and 
Thursday. Athens to 
Bucharest wfl remain sunny 
and very warm. 


Asia 

A new tropical storm threat- 
ens Id bring vary heavy rams 
to Taiwan and perhaps 
northern Luzon by the week- 
end. Manila to Hong Kong 
wffl be warn whh a few scat- 
tered afternoon showers. 
Much coaler weetfw wfll set- 
tle southward m» northeast- 
ern China later this week. 
Tokyo wtt remain very warm. 


Mgina 
Caps Tom 


2700 Z8W9 PC 30AM 23/73 pc 

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France (30 percent). He was dismissedby 
Seibu and Hermfes in December 1992. 
Meanwhile, Erik Mortensen, announced 
that he would not renew his contract as 
artistic director of the fashion house. 

□ 

“Once Were Warriors,” a New Zealand 
movie about racism and domestic violence, 
directed by Lee Tamahori, won the award 
for best picture at the 1994 Montreal 
World Film FestivaL 
□ 

Six authors have been short-listed for the 
1994 Booker Prize for fiction; Romesh Gun- 
esekera, for “ReeT; Alan Hoffingfaurst, for 
“The Folding Star”; James Kehnan, “How 
Late it Was, How Late"; George Mackay 
Brown, “Beside the Ocean of Time”; Abdul- 


North America 


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Jerry Lewis and other celebrities raised 
$47.1 milli on from TV viewers in the co- 
median’s ""final telethon and corporations 
gave $36.4 million more to the Muscular 
Dystrophy Association. But the 24-hour 
program ended with a protest by a Los 
Angeles group that claimed the telethon 
exploited the handicapped and had failed 
to find a cure for muscular dystrophy de- 
spite the millions of dollars raised over the 
years. 

□ 


«*t. IV * 



Kiosk 


Lwl Mii-niu 1 


Michael Jackson and his wife, Lisa Ma- 
rie Presley, visited the Euro Disney theme 
park near Paris in an effort to revive the 


park near rans m an extort to revive the 
fortunes of the financially ailing park. The 
newlyweds left Disneyland Hold on Tues- 
day after a 4S-hour stay, in which they 
appeared on the hotel balcony two nights 
in a row. Last week the couple visited the 
Riviera and stayed with a Saudi prince, 
Wafid ibn Talal 3m Abdtalaziz, who is in- 
vesting in Euro Disney. 


SWAN’S WAY — Supermodel Na-.. 
omi Campbell at an autographing par- 
ty in London for her novel “Swan,” 
which is about a model who wants to- 
get out of the fashion biz." 




ABET Access Numbers. 

How to call around the world. 

1. Using che chart below, find the country you are calling from. 

2. Dial the corresponding ABET AecehS Number. 

3. An AKr English-speaking Operator or voice prompt wtUask for the phone number you wish to call or connect you t 
customer service representative. 

To recdreyourfnrcwallacardcrfADsa^ Access Numbers, just dial the access number of 
the country youYe in and ask for Customer Service 


h °J Vit* 


Tiwel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


AnstraBa 
Chlfla,P80w 
Guam 

Himg Kong 

India* 

Indonesia* 

Japan* 

Korea 

Korea** 


1-800-881-011 Liechtenstein’ 
10811 Lithuania* 


_172-1031 Brazil 
WjHl Chile 
8*196 Colombia 


018-872 Luxembourg 0-800-0 1U CostaRlca** 

800-1111 Macedonia, F.YJL of 99-8 00-4288 Ecuador 

000-117 Malta* 0800-890-110 El Salvador* 


000-117 Malta* 
001-801-10 Monaco* 


New Zealand 

Philippines - 

Saipan* 

Singapore 

Sri Lanka 

Taiwan* 

Thailand* 


EUROPE 


lip aw : . oaaygenr.] Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 

• reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 

laHSuage* since fr’ s translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 a.m. knowing they’ll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with AKED 
' % ! To use these services, dial che AIKT Access Number of the country you're in and you’ll get all the 
help you need. With these Access Numbers and your AB3T Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don't have an ATST Calling Card or you’d like more information on AKSET global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right. 


8%* 

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Armenia** 

Austria - *** 

Bdgbun - 

Bulgaria 

Croatia - * 

Czech Rep 

Denmark* 

Finland* 

France 

Germany 

Greece* 

Hungary* 

Iceland - * 

Ireland 


0039-111 Netherlands - 06 

009-11 Norway 8 

IV Poland*#* - 0*010 

8<HHXm FOrtogaT 05 

000-911 Romania 01 

105-11 Russia TMoscoiv) 

235-2872 Slovakia 00-4 

800-0111-111 Spain* 90 

330-430 Sweden* 02 

0080-10288-0 Switzerland* 

0019-991-1111 OK. 050 

: Ukraine* 

8*343 U MIDDLE EAST 


15U-0011 Guatemala* 

06-022-9111 Guyana - ** 


800-190-11 Honduras** 
0*010-480-0111 Mexico*** 


000^010 

00*0812 

980-11-0010 

m 

119 

190 

390 

165 

123 

95-80CM62-4240 


05017-1-288 PBcaragna (Managua) 
01-8 00-4288 Panama* 

155-5042 Peru* 

00-4204)0101 Soriname 

900-99-00-11 . Uruguay 
020-795-611 Venezuela"* 


17* 

109 

191 

156 

00-0410 

80J31M20 


8*34311 MIDDLE EAST British vj 

022 - 903-011 Bahrain 800-001 Cayman 1 

0800-100-10 Cyprus* 060-90Q 10 Grenada^ 

00- 1800-00 IQ Israel 177-10 0-2727 Haiti* 

99-38-0011 Kuwait 80 0-288 j amai^a* *' 

00- 420-00101 Lebanon (Beirut) 426-801 Neth.An 

8001-0010 Qanr 0800-011-77 St.KItts/N 

9800-100-10 Saudi Arabia I -800- IQ 

19*-0011 Turkey* 00-800-12277 Egypt* (C 

01304)010 UAE* 800^121 Gabon* 

00-800-1311 AMERICAS ’ 

OQa- 800-01111 Argentina* 001-800-2 00-1111 Kenya* 

999-001 Belize* ' 555 

1- 800-550-000 Bolivia*” 0-800-1112 South A* 


155-00-11 CARIBBEAN 

0500-89-0011 Bahamas 1-800-872-2881 

8 * 100-11 Bermuda* i -800-872-2881 

1ST British VX i -800-873-2881 

800-001 Cayman Islands 1-800872-2881 

080-90010 Grenada* 1-800-872-2881 

177-10 0-2737 Haiti* 001-800-972-2885 

£00-288 Jamaica - * 0-800^72-2881 

4z 6*01 Neth. Antfl 001-800-872-2881 

0900-011-77 SLKftts/Nevbs 1 - 800 - 872-2881 


AFRICA 

(Cairo) 


555 Liberia 
0-800-1112 Sooth Africa 


5104)200 

OOa-OOI 

00111 

0800-10 

797-797 

0-800-99-0123 


AT&T 


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0 1994 ABET