Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats


made . 

**■* tn! ll>v ;: 

t3fs.XqfU-u-.il. '-/iii 

Fi ; ~ ^ilili'M. ’i.\ 

^ ihi* v> ■• ;** ; 

frpubiu i ». 4 c: v.- % 

ensf^th.- 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune. 


b Fran v y h.,. 

W# «*t1l Si-, ; 

1 Dutch d, i :• 

rfwragfc h u :.; t 

hruixiiuv 
wVii j i 

* ' 


i 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


** 


London, Thursday, September 8, 1994 


No. 34,688 


I - 1 


■' .I-' 


ir- 


■-i!o 


5 - 1 - - . 


vNiCl;’,.. 

sOwmbit }-. . , 1 

Utkluic-.. ,,,v 

Np *r: f 

* <W ru, 

u*t 

Hitt i vo« f»:.. 

* ft'Mn i*si- 
T Ai hCT-i 

*md ch-d. 

a Itt a 

V l:.". 

WIB arr. 

itfv hr;:,-.- 

Wllfl 1}JI; ‘.',. 1 ,. 

ttuminau' , 

Ml llw K-cr, ■; 
rtoct u . 
rayiu 1 

Cf\ hv'UiL'! ■ 

W ex !rr : 
towidcj*:; . 

4lilV tics;*-.;... 

S h\ hj;. 
nbairi* 

*r-!d. ^ 
uhsJr 

;b pub!:. 

ipws MBv.i 
*(W «K y:\i 
jompis. 

*i ^pTs:.c :: 

(Oi«C fac-j.)-: - 
tl 

HfV i\ ti:'?. - . 
anJ iii; ■ ■ 

r exilic 

■tk nor::.* 

riittat 

RttiH .i!" r*: 

Cl. ?j. .*■- 
1x*ft ’ 

WtiATfi ■•. 
iMICUX ■ 




1 . F 

k. 

■P- 


r* _ 


■ r <- : 


imp ■• — 


• r ■*•. 

y 

tm m* 

lv 

■ ’l - 1 . 

■ * 

-• • -1 

vh 


-w 



Britain Curbs 
Its Security 
In Ulster as 
Truce Holds 

Gore Tells Irish Leader 

Of High U.S. Priority 
On the Peace Initiative 

By John Damton 

r New York Times Service 

BELFAST — Security operations have 
been somewhat scaled down in Northern 
Ireland after a week in which the Irish 
Republican Army has stuck to its uncondi- 
tional cease-fire, the senior British repre- 
sentative in the province confirmed 
Wednesday. 

Sir Patrick Mayhew, secretary of state 
for Northern Ireland, said in reply to a 
question from a reporter that commanders 
of the 18,000 British troops and 13,000 
police in the Royal Ulster Constabulary 
had relaxed certain security procedures in 
response to what the}’ saw as “a reduced 
threat.” 

An example that he cited was largely 
symbolic: British soldiers’ switching from 
helmets to berets for street patrols through 
hostile neighborhoods. But residents noted 
that vehicular checkpoints around Catho- 
lic and Protestant areas of West Belfast 
had also disappeared in recent days. 

And a sight that was jarring to outsiders 
but had become as f amili ar to those here as 
rain clouds over the skyline had all but 
gone: the green-and-brown-speckled ar- 
mored personnel carriers moving omi- 
nously down streets with guns swiveling, 
manned by soldiers whose darting eyes 
peered through thick plastic shields. 

The U.S. vice president, Al Gore, slop- 
ping off at the Shannon airport in Ireland 
on his way back from the world population 
conference in Cairo, was briefed by the 
„ .-wlrish prime minister, Albert Reynolds. Af- 
_ '■ terward, he said the peace initiative was at 
the very lop of Washington’s foreign poli- 
cy agenda. 

Mr. Gore refrained from criticizing the 
British prime minister, John Major, for his 
insistence upon clarification of ibe IRA 
declaration, and both U.S. and Irish offi- 
cials sought to play down any differences 

See GORE, Page 4 



US/;/ -IsifS Vatican Stalls Debate 

; .... . . .a v A d VS.<. * .« r - .. ... /. . 

Oil Role of Abortion 

Move Takes Delegates by Surprise ; 
Host Nation, Egypt, Assails Tactic 


AbiiurRcuicr* 


Egyptian 


Latin Recovery Passes 



By Nathaniel C. Nash 

New York Times Semce 
PENALOLEN, Chile — The much- 
hailed economic recovery in almost all of 
Latin America has politicians and gov- 
ernment economists preaching the bene- 
fits of open markets, privatization, fiscal 
discipline and deregulation. 

It would seem they have good reason. 
Having pul aside the politics of protect- 
ed markets and nationalism, and wel- 
comed vast new foreign investment, the 
region’s economies are expected to grow 
an estimated 3 percent this year. That 
would be the fourth consecutive year of 
such growth, the most robust economic 


expansion in Latin America io decades. 

But if things are so rosy, why did 
peasants rise up this year in southern 
Mexico? Why has Venezuela had two 
coup attempts and continued unrest? 
Why have Bolivian workers staged na- 
tional strikes? .And why. in Argentina, 
considered a stellar example of economic 
transformation, did workers bum a pro- 
vincial government building last Decem- 
ber and march on the capital this sum- 
mer? 

Bernardo Ruz, a 22-year-old electri- 
cian living in this Chilean shantytown 
outside Santiago, the capital, has one 
explanation. 


“The rich are making a lot of money, 
but we’re not.” he said. 

“There are a lot of fancy buildings that 
have been built, making the big business- 
men richer. The humble people like us 
got jobs for a while, but that is over. I 
haven’t had work in months and every- 
thing is now more expensive. We’ve for- 
gotten what meat tastes like.” 

Indeed, for ali the benefits of Latin 
America’s new economics — the re- 
vamping of industry, the new jobs, the 
controlling of inflation, the stabilization 
of currencies and the relatively stable 

See LATIN, Page 3 


By Barbara Crosset te 

•Vtfir York Times Service 

CAIRO — In an unexpected maneuver 
that angered many official delegates to the 
United Nations population conference 
and representatives of nongovernmental 
organizations, the Vatican on Wednesday 
managed to forestall for two more days 
any debate over how to deal with abortion 
in a plan to stabilize world population over 
the coming decades. 

The Vatican maneuver, which in effect 
reopened an unproductive discussion on 
language used in only one paragraph of a 
1 1 3-page document, brought sharp con- 
demnation from Egypt, the conference 
host. Delegates from" several nations with- 
drew into private meetings to try to find a 
way to force the issue back onto the con- 
ference floor. 

“Does the Vatican rule the world?” 
asked Egypt’s papulation minister, Maher 
Mahran, speaking at a press conference 
Wednesday morning shortly after discus- 
sion on the agreement was derailed by new 
objections from a group of Latin American 
nations. “We respect the Vatican. We re- 
spect the Pope. But if they arc not going to 
negotiate, why did they come?” 

The Vatican’s willingness to hold an 
international forum to ransom to make a 
point on abortion has isolated it from 
several large Islamic nations, including In- 
donesia, Iran and Pakistan, as weD as 
Egypt — leaving only a few independent 
conservative voices, and .Afghanistan, in 
opposition on the margins of the Confer- 
ence on Population and Development, 
scheduled to end Tuesday. 

At the same lime, right-to-life groups 
and Islamic radicals have stepped up psy- 
chological pressure on those attending the 
conference by displaying graphic illustra- 
tions of fetuses or monopolizing micro- 
phones at press conferences and seminars, 
participants reported. 

The Vatican restated its concerns about 
the direction the conference was taking in 
an address Wednesday by Archbishop 
Renaio R. Martino, the Holy See’s dele- 


gate to the United Nations. He not only 
condemned abortion and contraception 
but also sought to ally the Vatican wiih 
Third World demands for more equitable 
sharing of global wealth and technology. 
He drew’ a connection between "permis- 
siveness” and the abuse of women, and 
suggested Lhai many family planning pro- 
grams were coercive and harmful. 

The Vatican's tactics provoked ques- 
tions from a range of nongovernmental 
groups, which claim to be closer to the 
populations of Roman Catholic countries 
than the Vatican, about the fate of fonh- 

Oerpopdation Is a refatirely recent wor- 
ry. • A fixation on sons makes family planning 
(fifficirft in many Thud World nations. Page 5. 

coming United Nations conferences on 
social and economic topics, including a 
gathering on the role of women scheduled 
for next September in Beijing. 

“How come this is the only religion with 
a permanent observer seat' at the UN?” 
Prances Kissling, the president of Catho- 
lics for Free Choice, asked at a press con- 
ference Wednesday. “How come we don’t 
finally stand up and say we're not talking 
about abortion. We're not talking about 
family planning. We're talking about the 
role of women in church and state." 

Timothy E. Winh. undersecretary of 
state for global affairs and leader of the 
United States' delegation, said Wednesday 
night that this was “a time of respectful 
disagreement.” 

He acknowledged that the .Americans 
believed on Tuesday night that the confer- 
ence was close to an accord on a paragraph 
that dealt with the dangers of unsafe abor- 
tions as a public health matter. Agreement 
on that paragraph was holding up consid- 
eration of other sections of the confer- 
ence’s action plan still in dispute. 

Rachel Kyle, a political analyst for the 
International Women’s Health Coalition, 
a New York organization that assists wom- 
en's health groups and clinics worldwide, 

See CAIRO, Page 4 


:-rI 

..:i 


S » * \ 

apfcii - 

Ttftji* 1 ! •• • 
i h* tL'i *• 

if 


Kiosk 


Blasts Level Moscow Police Station 


MOSCOW (Reuters) — Several peo- 
ple were killed and many others injured 
when three explosions ripped through a 
police station in Moscow on Wednes- 
day, reducing it to nibble. 

The Emergencies Ministry said ini- 
tially that at least 10 people were killed 
when the two-story building in the east- 
ern district of Vykhino collapsed fol- 
lowing the blasts. News agencies and 
Russian television later reported that 
the death toil stood at six but said 
several people were critically injured. 

Several hours after the blast, firemen 
were still tearing at the wreckage to free 


casualties who could be heard groaning. 

Witnesses said three explosions, two 
of them very powerful tore through the 
building. A spokesman for the Emer- 
gencies Ministry had no immediate in- 
formation as to wbat might have caused 
the blasts. 


Books 

Bridge 

Crossword 

Weather 


Page 8 . 
Page 8 . 
Plage 17. 
Page 1& 


Pope’s Cancellation Leaves Insecure Sarajevo in Limbo 


By Roger Cohen 

Sew York Time* Semcc 

SARAJEVO- Bosnia- Herzegovina — 
The cancellation of Pope John Paul IPs 
visit to Sarajevo underscores the continu- 
ing limbo of insecurity in which the Bosni- 
an capital lives, and Lhe failure of the 
United States and its partners to carry out 
threats of tough action against the Bosnian 
Serbs. 

It is more than six weeks since the Clin- 
ton administration and its partners in the 
so-called contact group — Russia. Britain. 
France and Germany — presented a take- 
it-or-Jeave-ii proposal for a settlement in 
Bosnia that was supposed to lead to severe 
punishment for any party rejecting it. 

The Bosnian Serbs, who surround Sara- 


jevo and hold 70 percent of Bosnian terri- 
tory. stalled briefly and then dismissed the 
settlement, which offered them 49 percent 
of Bosnia, as ludicrous. 

Their rebuttal has been met by silence. 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

division, disarray and embarrassed inac- 
tion, responses that the contact group was 
formed to avoid. 

“Given the fact that a month and a half 
has gone by without any action, the out- 
look for the contact group has to be rather 
pessimistic.” a U.S. official said. “Bui we 
are trying hard to hold it together.” 

The Bosnian Serbs' rejection was sup- 
posed to lead quickly to tighter trade sanc- 


tions on Serbia, a stricter enforcement by 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organization of 
the wea pons-exclusion zones around Sara- 
jevo and Gorazde and the establishment of 
similar areas around other Muslim-held 
towns. But nothing has happened. 

Just before the Pope postponed his Sara- 
jevo trip, the Serbs fired several artillery 
rounds from the area around Sarajevo that 
is supposed to be free of heavy weapons, 
exactly the kind of provocation that the 
United States and its partners had prom- 
ised to punish. 

[The United Nations suspended its hu- 
manitarian airlift into Sarajevo on 
Wednesday after at least one UN aircraft 
was hit by small arms fire at the airport 
Tuesday, Reuters said. 


[A spokesman for the UN High Com - 1 
missioner for Refugees said : "This comes 
after a string of incidents in July and 
August that frequently interrupted die air- 
lift. Sarajevo’s cupboards are hare and we 
will resume aid flights as soon as condi- 
tions permit,”] 

Problems have also arisen within the 
contact group. For example, the idea of 
tougher trade sanctions on Serbia was 
thrown into confusion when the republic's 
president, Slobodan Milosevic, imposed 
his own embargo against the Bosnian 
Serbs in an effort to persuade them to 
accept the peace plan. 

Now Russia is pressing for sanctions on 

See POPE, Page 4 


Pockets of New Prosperity 
Dot the Old East Germany 


n 1 

x : s * 

* 


« 

* h + 

taUg'-* - 


Vr*' 


ls'Z 


1 * 


By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Past Service 

G RIMMA, Germany — An East Ger- 
man by birth and a roofer by trade, Peter- 
Michael Eisner these days is as prosperous, 
driven and overstressed as any workaholic 
West German. 

He toils 16 hours a day, often seven days 
a week. He grouses about long hours and 
high prices and skinflin t customers. He 
bemoans the difficulty in finding good 
help. 

He owns a new house and a couple of 
rental properties. For relaxation, he pilots 
a Cessna. He is learning English because 
English is the language of commerce in the 
new Europe. 

Taking a rare weekend off this summer, 
he flew to Chicago to watch the German 
soccer in the World Cup. And, in a 
backhanded tribute to Mr. Eisner’s afflu- 
ence, a thief recently stole his new Mer- 
cedes-Benz. 

palmy days are here again in the former 
East Germany, at least for a growing seg- 
ment of the region's 16 million residents. 
Pockets of prosperity have taken firm root, 
nurtured with Eastern enterprise and 
Western money, giving rise to a vision of 
an East that in a decade or so will be 
largely indistinguishable from the West. 

Peter-Michael Eisner' is one of those 
East Germans who have made it 

Five years ago, on the eve of Commu- 
nism’s collapse, Mr. Eisner employed 10 
people and booked $640,000 in annual 


fc h i '- 




Newsstand Prices 


Bahrain ...0-800 Din Malta 35 C. 

Bahrain 1Q0 Nigeria .70,00 Naira 

S^rkVjMDKr Norway ISN.Kr. 

DenmarkUM D.wr. Qman 1#000 Rjals 

Finland 11FJW. s.00 Rials 

Gibraltar....—^ 0.85 ReP . j r e!ondJR£U» 

Great Brrtain_£ 0^5 saudi Arabia 9.00 R 

Egypt E.P.50Q0 South Africa R 6 

Jordan. I J D U-A.E 8J0 Dirh 

Kenva....K. SH. 150 U.S.MII. <Eur.)SU0 

Kuwait 500 Fils Zimbabwe. ZtmS&M 


business. Today, at the age of 45. he has 
300 workers on the payroll, five branch 
offices and S32 mill i nn in job orders. Al- 
though the stacks of slate and shingles 
outside his office window imply Mr. Eisner 
builds only roofs, what he and thousands 
of entrepreneurs like him are really making 
is the proverbial light at the end of the 
tunnel in Eastern Germany. 

“A lot of things have gotten belter in the 
East since the Wall fell." he told a recent 
visitor to the Eisner Roofing compound in 
Grimraa, a few kilometers outside the 
southeastern city of Leipzig. “Not every- 
thing was crap in the old days, but most of 
it was. 

“There was no way I could have built up 
ray company in East Germany like I’ve 
been able to since *89.” he continued. “I 
don’t want the old times back Td shoot 
myself first.” 

This “robust recovery period/' as the 
Institute for Economic Research in nearby 
Halle calls it, is by no means universal. 
Unemployment in the East remains 17 
percent. Large-scale manufacturing is 
moribund. A half-century of Soviet occu- 
pation and state-dictated socialism have 
left a detritus of physical dilapidation and 
mental disquieL 

At this juncture on the long road since 
German reunification, the country is not 
so much one as three: the well-heeled 
West, which created the world’s third -larg- 
est economy; the emerging East, with 
boom towns' in Leipzig, Dresden, eastern 
Berlin and elsewhere, and the hardscrabble 
East, where genuine prosperity remains a 
distant rumor. 

Yet signs of rguvenation are as evident 
as the forest of construction cranes now 
looming over so many Eastern cities. 
Wages are rising, and living standards con- 
tinue to climb. An estimated 75 percent of 
all Eastern homes have freezers, half have 
video recorders, almost 20 percent have 
personal computers. In the West, a nasty 
recession has been succeeded by a modest 

See EAST, Pagp 4 



MkIukI Urban 'Kcuicn 

Oskar Lafontaine, left, the last Social Democratic candidate, talking to the party's current nominee, Mr. Scharping. 


Back on Top, Kohl Relishes the Campaign 


By Stephen Kinzer 

Sc*’ York Times Scrritc 

BERLIN — .An explosion of cheers and 
applause burst from the crow d as Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl strode toward the podi- 
um to address a campaign rally in Pots- 
dam. As always, his speech was full or 
enthusiasm and optimism. 

“The landscape here in the East is begin- 
ning to bloom, and if ti takes four or fi\e 
years longer than we had hoped, that 
means nodting in the sweep of history ." he 
cried out in his booming baritone. “Ger- 
many is free. Germany is united ana Ger- 
many has a great economic and social 
future.” 

Things are going so well for Mr. Kohl 


that he felt compelled to warn his support- 
ers against complacency. 

“Elections are not won by opinion polls, 
but on Election Day.” he reminded them. 
"What you are reading and hearing now 
are just reports. Your vote is what de- 
cides.” 

Mr. Kohl has every reason to be jubi- 
lant. With the federal election less than six 
weeks away, he appears to be riding to- 
ward a victory that only a few months ago 
seemed utterly beyond his reach. 

The Forsa public-opinion poll, which 
tracks voter sentiment on a week- to- week 
basis, showed Lhe chancellor trailing his 
Social Democratic opponent. Rudolf 
Scharping, every week until mid-May. Pol- 


iticians and commentators were almost 
unanimous in pronouncing Mr. Kohl po- 
litically dead. 

Suddenly, however, the numbers shifted 
dramatically. With the campaign heading 
into its final phase, the latest Forsa poll 
showed Mr. Kohl with a commanding 13- 
point lead. 

Many stunned Social Democrats now 
say they can take power in October only if 
Mr. Kohl’s coalition partners, the Free 
Democrats, fail to win the minimum vote 
to qualify for representation in Parliament. 

Mr. Scharping has a reputation as a 
serious thinker with a deep grasp of com- 

See KOHL, Page 4 


Malaysia Lifts 
Ban on Contracts 
With U.K. Finns 

Compiled hy Our Staff From Dispatches 

KUALA LUMPUR — Malaysia on 
Wednesday lifted a ban on awarding gov- 
ernment contracts to British firms, ending 
a seven-month dispute. 

In London, a spokesman for Prime Min- 
ister John Major said Mr. Major would be 
pleased with the news. 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad 
imposed the ban on Feb. 25 after British 
media reports alleged that senior Malay- 
sian politicians were taking bribes to 
award government contracts to British 
businesses. 

But recently, government officials, in- 
cluding Mr. Mahathir, appeared to have 
softened their stand, 

in announcing the lifting of the ban. 
Deputy Prime Minister Anwar bin Ibra- 
him said that British bids for official con- 
tracts would now be considered on the 
basis of “competitiveness, price and ability 
in terms of tangible expertise.” 

Mr. Anwar said that Malaysia had 
sought no assurances from the British gov- 
ernment or media in its decision to enathe 
ban. 

Private companies in Malaysia have 
been allowed to continue their business 
with British companies, but the ban on 
government contracts had soured relations 
between the two countries. 

In recent months. Britain sent at least 
nine trade missions to Malaysia in an at- 

See MALAYSIA, Page 2 


Dow Jones 


'd>< 


liv 1 


F'i 

h! 

■ a ■■ 


Down 
12.45 ,* 

3886.23 J&. 

v ■ . O jpjj. . 

The Dollar 

Nw> Yotfc. W«L OaPM 

DM 1.5515 


Trib Index 


Down 

0.67% 
_ 116.18 





1.5459 


Yen 


99.45 


FF 


5.3145 


1.5338 

1.5525 

98.65 

X286 















Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 


Major Rejects Plan 
For 2 - Tier Europe , 
Kohl Stays on Fence 


Return . 

LEIDEN, Netherlands — 
Prime Minister John Major of 
Britain ruled out Wednesday 
the idea of a two-tier European 
Union floated by Germany's 
Christian Democrats last week. 

But in Bonn, Chancellor Hel- 
mut Kohl spid that Germany 
would remain the motor of clos- 
er integration in the European 
Union and that it did not want 
progress to be held up by the 
“slowest ship in the convoy.” 

Mr. Major, making a keynote 
speech on the future of the 12- 
nation bloc in the Dutch town 
of Leiden, said, “I see a real 
danger in talk of a Tiard core,’ 
inner and outer circles, a two- 
tier Europe. 

“No member state should be 
excluded from an area of policy 
in which it wants and is quali- 
fied to participate,” he said. 

Mr. Major welcomed Ger- 
man and French proposals to 
make the Union more flexible 
and diverse, saying, “It seems to 
me perfectly healthy for all 
member states to agree that 
some should integrate more 
closely or more quickly in cer- 
tain areas.” 

But be added ‘To choose not 
to participate is one thing. To 
be prevented from doing so is 
quite another — and likely to 
lead to the son of damaging 
divisions which, above all, we 
must avoid” 

‘There is not, and should 
never be. an exclusive hard core 
either of countries or policies," 
he said. 

Before the European elec- 
tions in May, Mr. Major rallied 


his divided Conservative Part}- 
with a call for a multispeed Eu- 
rope, but officials expressed 
concern this week that France 
and Germany wanted to push 
Britain to the outer rim or the 
Union. 

Mr. Kohl, addressing the 
Parliament in Bonn, explicitly 
avoided either supporting or re- 
jecting his party's proposals, 
saying it was “perfectly all 
right” for politicians to present 
ideas about Europe's future. 

But he said Germany did not 
want the Union to be a glorified 
free trade zone. “We were and 
remain the motor of develop- 
ments” in Europe, he said. 

“We want political union in 
Europe,” he said. “That is our 
goal. We do not under any cir- 
cumstances want the slowest 
ship in the convoy to stop devel- 
opments in Europe. We want 
progress to be made.” 

Foreign Minister Klaus Kin- 
kel, making a fresh attempt to 
soothe ruffled feelings in other 
European capitals, again dis- 
missed the Christian Democrat- 
ic proposals, saying Lhe Union 
could not be split into first-class 
and second-class members. 

Referring to the close ties be- 
tween Bonn and Pans, the Free 
Democrat said: T would like to 
underline very clearly that no 
one has any intention of mak- 
ing a directorate out of this.” 

“Europe cannot thrive on 
Franco-German shoulders 
alone,” he said. “Without the 
contributions of the others, es- 
pecially of Britain, Spun or Ita- 
ly, nothing can come of Europe- 
an integration.” 



■ ... ........ ‘ivh « • i "vV ' 

■. . ... " .... i ■■ tfc v ■ .■!■■■ . ■■■■ *■■■ ■ at— 

■*■■■■ ■' % ,/ . ■■ i? ? v x : : ; ' ;v 

■ aly' •• rV ■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■■ ■ ■■■■ ■■ ■■■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ " VV ,,, tt 


■ £ " ■■ 

■ ' " ■ ■ 



Petr Joscfc/Rnitm 


COUNTDOWN — Workers in Bratislava putting up a poster of Vladimir Meciar, 
opposition party leader of Slovakia. Elections are set for Sept 30-Oct 1. 


BaUadur Seeks to Assure 
Small Nations ofEU Role 


U.S. -Russian Exercises Hailed 

Grachev Looks to Bigger Things in America Next Year 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Seeking to dispel impressions that France’s 
vision of Europe neglects smaller countries. Prime Minister 
Edouard Bahadur of France said Wednesday that leadership 
in a developing European Union should be assumed by any 
grouping of countries ready to move ahead in a particular 
field, from monetary union to common foreign poliev or 
defense. 

He described the EU* s likely future organization as several 
overlapping circles of nations, each likely to comprise differ- 
ent sets of countries. For example, if Britain opted out of a 
single currency, it could nonetheless be a policymaker for the 
EU in security affairs. 

Mr. Bahadur, speaking to reporters, left no doubt among 
his listeners that France saw a pivotal place for itself as a 
member in all the decision-making core groups of EU nations. 

Mr. Bahadur's emphasis on Europe's need for flexibility — 
and not another inflexible arrangement based on a hard core 
of countries with similar economic situations — also served to 
underline France's special position as the leading advocate of 
stronger defense commitments by European countries. 

And his thinking clearly gives pride of place to the French- 
German duo as the force that can bring about a powerful 
Europe, although his vision is phrased in broader, more 
accommodating terms than a controversial economic-cen- 
tered plan that surfaced last week in Germany. 

Mr. Bahadur took pains to distance himself from that hard- 
edge approach, mainly by stressing the disparity in tone. 

Mr. Bahadur's formula could help defuse complaints from 
small er countries that they would be relegated to second-class 
status if France and Germany pushed ahead with monetary 
union, making it the main criterion of European unity. 


MALAYSIA: Business Ban Lifted 


Continued from Page l 

tempt to persuade the govern- 
ment to end the ban. 

A British trade minister. 
Richard Needham, had carried 
a personal letter from Mr. Ma- 
jor to Mr. Mahathir, pressing 
his Malaysian counterpart to 
end the boycott. 

But Mr. Mahathir had re- 
fused to budge. 

At the height of the contro- 
versy, Malaysia's government 
was under pressure from within 
the governing party to widen 
the ban to a trade boycott with 
Britain. 

The Malaysian government 
had said it had been particular- 
ly incensed by a report in the 
Sunday Times of London on 
Feb. 20 alleging links between 
Mr. Mahathir and a British 
construction Arm, Wimpey In- 
ternational. 

Malaysian officials had also 
objected to a press and parlia- 
mentary probe into links be- 
tween a British loan for the Per- 
gau dam in Malaysia's 
Kelanian State and the govern- 


ment’s purchase of British de- 
fense hardware worth £1 billion 
in 1988. 

The ban cost British busi- 
nesses millions of dollars in lost 
deals. Most of these concerned 
a proposed, 9 billion ringgit 
($3.6 billion) new airport pro- 
ject for Kuala Lumpur, officials 
said. 

An Anglo- Japanese consor- 
tium, involving the British Anns 
Balfour Beatty LuL, General 
Electric Co. and Trafalgar 
House PLC and Japan’s Maru- 
beni Corp., had been awarded 
the contract to build the airport 
but was subsequently dropped 
after the ban. 

The government later an- 
nounced that it had short-listed 
10 international group® to un- 
dertake the project with local 
partners. 

Mr. Anwar said that Malay- 
sia had sought no assurances 
from the British government or 
media in its decision to end the 
ban. (AFP. AP. Reuters) 


By Fred Hiatt 

Washington Pm Service 

TOTSKOYE TESTING 
GROUND, Russia — Defense 
Minister Pavel S. Grachev said 
Wednesday that he planed to 
send 500 Russian soldiers to the 
United States for a joint mili- 
tary exercise next year, after 
what he called the success of the 
first’ such operation here this 
week. 

General Grachev flatly re- 
jected criticism from Russian 
nationalists opposed to work- 
ing more closely with the U.S. 
military and brushed aside 
doubts from lower-ranking 
Russian officers. He said the 
scale of next year's training 
should be about twice that of 
the current exercise and that 
“even more" soldiers should 
participate together in Russia 
the following year. 

About 250 American sol- 
diers, operating for the first 
time ever in Russia's heartland, 
concluded the principal part of 
their joint exercise with the 
Russian Army, aimed at im- 
proving peacekeeping opera- 
tions. 

The soldiers of the U.S. 3d 
Infantry Division, based in 
Germany, and the Russian 27th 
Guard Motorized Rifle Divi- 
sion, which not long ago was 
based just across a hostile bor- 


Mitterrand Says 
He’ll Finish Term 
Despite Cancer 

PARIS — President Francois 
Mitterrand says he expects to 
serve out his term of office, 
which ends in May 1995, de- 
spite his prostate cancer. 

But in an interview with Le 
Figaro to be published Thurs- 
day, the Socialist head of state 
also said he might have only a 
few months left to live and was 
philosophical about his own 
death. 

“Everyone knows about my 
illness because I asked that 
medical bulletins be issued,” 
said Mr. Mitterrand, 77. who 
has been in office since 1981. 
He said he hoped his cancer 
“will be obliging enough to al- 
low me to complete my term.” 

In the clearest indication yet 
of his preferred successor, Mr. 
Mitterrand said Jacques Delors 
was the leftist politician best- 
placed to run in France's presi- 
dential election next year. 


der in East Germany, are sched- 
uled to play sports and hold 
picnics at the garrison here 
Thursday. The Americans will 
then begin to pull oul 

Major General Leonard D. 
Holder Jr., who shared com- 
mand of the operation with his 
Russian counterpart said the 
“operations have proceeded 
successfully.” 

General Grachev called the 
exercise “deeply symbolic” and 
a “vivid example of new rela- 
tions” between the two coun- 
tries. 

Many Russian Communist' 
and nationalists have fell differ- 
ently, attacking the joint exer- 
cise as the first step in an Amer- 
ican plot to invade Russia and 
take advantage of its weakness. 

President Boris N. Yeltsin, 
bowing to nationalist opposi- 
tion, was forced last spring to 
postpone the historic exercise, 
originally scheduled for July. 
General Grachev's proposal to 
expand joint peacekeeping 
training is likely to arouse more 
anger. 

But the defense minister at- 
tacked those seeking to rekindle 
Cold War-style confrontation, 
saying the Iron Curtain had 
only caused Russia to fall years 
behind the developed world. 

General Grachev also said it 
was symbolic that the first U.S.- 
Russian exercise took place in 
Totskoye, a testing range on the 


Steppe 1,100 kilometers (700 
miles) southeast of Moscow, 
where in 1954 the Soviet Union 
exploded an above-ground nu- 
clear bomb, with many soldiers 
and civilians nearby. This “bar- 
baric act, " General Grachev 
said, envisioned “the future de- 
struction of humanity.” 

“Now, 40 years later, we are 
conducting a peacekeeping ex- 
ercise at the very same site, with 
the aim that such a monstrous 
thing won’t happen again.” he 
said. 

In a scene that struck many 
Cold War veterans as improba- 
ble, General Grachev, a former 
paratrooper and Afghan war 
veteran, played the role of pro- 
fessor as General Holder acted 
as student and reported on the 
peacekeeping exercise. The de- 
fense minister found fault with 
some aspects of the operation, 
but he said that overall he had 
given General Holder “a solid 
marie.” 

Before General Grachev's ar- 
rival, American and Russian of- 
ficers said that the timing and 
scale of any follow-up exercise 
remained in doubt, in part be- 
cause of Russia’s financial trou- 
ble. 

But General Grachev swept 
aside such caution, saying this 
week's experience showed that 
it was “necessary and useful” to 
conduct more exercises, and on 
a “a larger scale.” 


U.K. Moves 
To Bar End 
Of Bosnia 
Embargo 

By William E Schmidt 

Ne*> York Times Service 

LONDON — Foreign Secre- 
tary Douglas Hurd opened a 
new diplomatic offensive on 
Wednesday aimed at blocking 
proposals by the United States 
and others to lift a United Na- 
tions-backed embargo on arms 
shipments to the Muslim gov- 
ernment in Sarajevo. 

Instead, Mr. Hurd urged the 
United States to give more time 
to efforts to put pressure on the 
Bo snian Serbs to accept an in- 
ternational plan for dividing 
Bosnia, even though it was re- 
jected by 96 percent of the Bos- 
nian Serbs in a referendum. 

In an interview in London, 
Mr. Hurd repeated warnings 
that Britain and France would 
almost surely withdraw their 
peacekeeping troops from Bos- 
nia- Herzegovina if a proposal 
being considered by the Clinton 
administration succeeds in 
overturning the embargo. 

“Our troops and French 
troops, the United Nations 
troops, are not mandated and 
they are not equipped to act as 
allies for one side in a civil 
war." said Mr. Hurd, arguing 
that they would be seen to be 
siding with the Muslims if the 
embargo were lifted. 

If the Bosnian Serbian lead- 
ers fail by Oct. 15 to accept the 
partition plan devised by the 
so-called “contact group" of the 
United States, Russia, Britain, 
France and Germany — the 
Clinton administration has said 
it intends to ask the UN Securi- 
ty Council to lift the arms em- 
bargo. 

Mr. Hurd would not say 
whether Britain would veto the 
U.S. proposal in the Security 
Council. But he said he had 
been working closely with Sec- 
retary of State Warren M. 
Christopher. “We are very anx- 
ious, I think, to keep the contact 
group going, and (o keep the 
joint effort going," he said 

■ Bosnian Reaction Bitter 


WORLD BRIEFS 


■ 


m 

•? 


5 Spied for Greece, Albania Rules 

TIRANA, Albania (Reuters) — An Albanian court convicted , , i| 
five ethnic Greeks oti Wednesday of spying for Greece andv. ‘ 
sentenced them to between six and eight years m jail, pnovokmjQ^ 

an angry response from Athens. . 

Th c Greek government announced that it was recalling us;; 
ambassador in Tirana and would protest the convictions to the 

United Nations and European Union. ; ■■ .« 

Tensions between Greece and Al bama reached new highs aftet*- 
the trial began in mid-August, despite pleas for dialoguefrom the_ 
United States and Russia, which want to avoid another crisis 

the volatile Balkans region. Li. 

Algeria Puts Toll in Strife at 10,000 

TUNIS (Reuters) — President Uamine Zeroual of Algeria, 
wiring a negotiated settlement to civil strife, has acknowledged to * 
opposition parties that the violence of the last two and a half years, i 
has cost about 10,000 lives, far more than have been official^ 

^Conflict between the army-backed authorities and Islamic^ 
f undame ntalists has caused damage estimated at S2 billion, die. « 
president told the party leaders. The figures were published by the 
National Liberation Front two days after its secretary-general,. r 
Abdelhamid Mehri, took part in a meeting with Mr. Zeroual. . -1 
The authorities have reported about 4,000 deaths in attacks apd. 1 
clashes since a multiparty parliamentary election that Muslim^ 
fundamentalists were on the brink of winning when it wasii 
abruptly scrapped in early 1992. •• 

«| 

Nigerian May Resign Over Decrees ^ 

LAGOS (Rollers) — Nigeria's minister of justice has disowned^ 
recent decrees by the military government that “sweep sway oui®? 
liberties” and has threatened to resign. The new laws, which/ 
became public knowledge Tuesday, give the military rulers wide' 
powers of arrest in their battle agai nst democracy campaigner^ 
and bar any challenge to their actions through the courts. ' 
Justice Minister and Attorney General Olu Onagomwa, a pro- 
democracy campaigner himself until he^ was recruited into -the. . 
government by General Sani Abacha, said at a news conference, 
Wednesday that he had had nothing to do with to new decreeSsHe , 
said laws were supposed to be made by the Provisional Ruling, 
Council, of which he is a member* and drafted by the Ministry of 
Justice but that these procedures had been bypassed. 

24 Detained by Palestinian Police : 

GAZA CITY (AP) — In its biggest confrontation yet with _■ 
Muslim extremists, Palestinian police detained 24 more people^- 
Wednesday in the Gaza Strip, bringing the total in the two-day- 
arrest sweep to 45. 

Those arrested were activists in Islamic Jihad, a Muslim extrem— 1 1 
ist faction that has pledged to continue attacks on Israelis to derail' 
the accord on Palestinian autonomy. Islamic Jihad has claimed 
responsibility for a roadside ambush Sunday in Gaza that left one 
Israeli soldier dead and two wounded. 


Correction 

Prime Minister P.V. Narasimha Rao of India and Do Muoi,' 
Vietnam's Communist Party general secretary, were incorrectly 
identified in a photo caption as each other in some editions 
Wednesday. 




Roger Cohen of The New 
York Times reported from Sara- 
jevo: 

The Bosnian president, Alija 
Izetbegovic, on Wednesday ac- 
cused the top UN official in the 
former Yugoslavia, Yasushi 
Akashi, of sabotaging the 
planned visit to Sarajevo of 
Pope John Paul II by exaggerat- 
ing the dangers and deceiving 
the Pope. 

In an unusually bitter public 
attack, made the day after the 
Pope canceled his visit, Mr. 
Izetbegovic said Mr. Akashi 
had shown consistent hostility 
toward Bosnia and declared 
that his government would like 
to see him replaced 

Michael williams, a spokes- 
man for Mr. Akashi, said that 
the letter had laid out the po- 
tential dangers of coming to Sa- 
rajevo. But he added: “We did 
not make a recommendation to 
the Pope. 1 deny that categori- 
cally. An assessment was made. 
What would you do if your 
mother said she was going 
down to Sarajevo?" 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


.4 


South African Tourism Is Booming 

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) — The number of foreign taur-J 
ists visiting South Africa now that apartheid is gone is soaring 
despite a crime wave, industrial unrest and the image of anarchy-' 
and violence elsewhere on the continent. 

“As long as nothing drastic happens on the political front, we ' 
are in for a good year,” said Chris du Toit, executive director of. 
the Association of Southern African Travel Agents. “But it is a ; 
volatile situation. Crime and strikes here don’t stop people com- 1 
Log, but if you have a political incident, like a bombing, then you * 
get big cancellations.” 

Despite the problems, including a wave of strikes by workers ' 
seeking the better life promised by President Nelson Mandela,' 
tour operators have sold all their South African vacation packages . 
until the end of the year, he said. The South African Tourism* 
Board said it hoped fora 10 percent increase this year from the 3.2' 
million visitors who came to South Africa in 1993. 

Greece's airport staff unions have postponed a one-day nation-/ 
wide strike scheduled for Friday. Air transportation is already^ 
laboring under long delays caused by an air traffic controllers' 
work-to-ruje protest (AP) 

Swissair is halting flights between Algeria and Switzerland! 
because of threats to foreigners. (AP) ' 

Hilton International, in a joint venture with a property develop- ,' 
meat company in Northern Ireland, will build a 187-room hotel in ! 
the center of Belfast. (Reuters) ' 


• ■ -, _ 


EUROPEAN 


TOPICS 


Tiny Jewish Community in Portugal 
Emerges From 5 Centuries of Hiding 

After five centuries of clandestine worship. 


a 
ese 
s- 


small gathering of Jews in the remote Portugue 
town of Belmonte has shed the pretense of Chri 
tianity and is relearning its past. 

The 200-raember community is the only sizable 
group of Jews in Portugal to have clung secretly to 
its identity since the government began persecuting 
Jews in the late 15tb century. 

“This community has wailed 500 years —it was 
Catholic on the outside, but Jewish within," said 
Rabbi Shlomo Sobag, 31, who came from Jerusalem 
last year at Belmonte's request. 

Jews were prominent in medieval Portugal, but in 
1497 the government ordered them all to convert or 
leave the country, following the Spanish precedent 
by five years. 

Few of Portugal’s Jews departed. Most publicly 
rejected their old religion and became “New Chris- 
tians" instead. 

Many converts adopted names of trees or places 


as surnames to disguise their Jewish origins. Names 
like Oliveira (olive tree), Pereira (pear tree) and 
Lisboa (Lisbon) are common. 

Belmonte's Jews continued to observe the Jewish 
Sabbath al home while attending Catholic Mass on 
Sunday. They rarely married outside their communi- 
ty. Jewish couples would wed publicly in church, but 
a private Jewish ceremony would follow. 

On Friday night, at the start of the Sabbath, 
Jewish women would light candles at home and 
chant Hebrew prayers passed down for generations 
by word of mouth. 

Judaism was not granted legal status until 1921. 
Six years ago, most Jews in Belmonte finally cut 
links with the Roman Catholic Church, encouraged 
by growing religious tolerance in Portugal, and 
wrote to Israel for support. 

Around Europe 

i SUps that now appear on radar screens only as 
Mobs could be identified by name if a new compul- 
sory automatic system is adopted, making it easier to 
track polluters or ships involved in accidents, British 
officials say. 

Britain has proposed to the International Mari- 
time Organization that a ship-borne transponder — 
a signal-emitting box that would automatically give 
a ship's name, position and route — be made com- 
pulsory. 

Work on the system began after a British fishing 
vessel, the Ocean Hound, was sunk in a collision in 


the English C hann el in 1991. Five crew members 
were killed, but the other ship left and was never 
identified. 

Automatic identification of ships was recom- 
mended by a British government report into the 
prevention of pollution after a tanker, the Braer, ran 
aground in the Shetland Tslanrk last year, spiffing 
tons of oil. 

Abusive consumption of vodka is such a problem hi 
Poland that doctors and health-care workers have 
mounted a campaign to persuade people to drink 
beer instead. They say that while beer is fattening, it 
has other advantages, including its vitamin and 
mineral content. For now, average beer consump- 
tion in Poland is relatively low, at 38 liters (10 
gallons) per year, compared with 120 liters for Czech 
drinkers and 150 liters for Ger many Specialists 
iiope the ca m pa ign will make beer the nation’s most 
popular alcoholic drink within 20 years while reduc- 
es the rate of alcoholism — which affects 10 per- 
cent of the adult population — by one-third. 

Swed^ policemen say their payments to inform- 
ers snaulo be tax-free to better protect these people's 
anonymity according to Le Point of Paris. So far 
this year, the police have paid out 8100,000, at the 
rate of about $300 to $900 per informer. 


Brian Knowlton 



f 

I •• 

! ’■ ■- 

• ■ 

» ■ . 


r 

: : 
* 

« 

< \ 




To call from country to country, or to the U.S., dial the WorldPhone® number of the country you're calling from. 


Antigua 


DenmarfciCo* 

8001-0022 

Iceland* 

999-002 

NiceraouaiCCi 


l Available from public card phones only.) 42 

Dominican RepubBc 

7-800-751-6624 

KfWKr 

(Special Phones Onlyj 

(Outside of Managua, dial 02 first.) ififi 

Argentina* 

007-800-332-1111 

Ecuador*:- 

170 

IraiandtCO 

1-800-55-1001 

Norway ICQ* 

BOO- 199 12 

Austria* ecu 

022-303-012 

EgyptiCCv* 


bredtCD 

177-150-Z727 

Panama 

IQS 

Bahamas 

1 •600-624-1000 

l Outside of Cano, dial 03 Virst.i 355-5770 

ftatyiCC* 

172-1022 

Military Bases 

2810-108 

Bahrain 

800-002 

□ Salvador# 

195 

Jamaica 

600-674-7000 

Paraguay* 

ooe-n-aoo 

BetgturwCCi* 

0800-10012 

Rnlandiccv* 

9800-102-80 

Kenya 


Paw rOuiaida of Lima, tfal 190 first.) noi ion 

Bermuda* 

1 800623-0484 

FrartceKiO* 

19V-00-19 

(Available from most major cities.) 080071 

PolandiCCi 

Ot-01 -04-800-222 

Bolivia* 

0-600-2222 

Gambia* 

00-1-99 

Kuwait 

800-MCl(600-5Z4i 

Portugal* CO 

05-017-1234 

Brazil 

000-6012 

GaminyCCi 

0130-0012 

Lebanon* CO 

600-624 

Puerto FtieofCG 

1 -600-888-8000 

Canadatco 

1-6TO-888-S000 

(Limited availability in 

eastern Germany.) 

(Outside of Beirut, dial 01 first) 425-036* 

QatartCCI* 

0600-012-77 

Cayman Islands 

1-30*624,1000 

Greac#CD* 

00- B00-12H 

Liechtenstein icq* 

155-0222 

Bomaniaicck- 

07 800-1800 

Chteco 

0QT-03I6 

Grenada* 

1-800-624-8721 

Luxembourg 

0800-01 12 

Russia'CCH- 

8^1 0300 -497 -7 222 

Cofombia’CC* 

980-16-0001 

Guatemala* 

189 

Mexico* 

95-800-674-7000 

San MansKriCO* 

172-1022 

Costa Hu* 

102 

HoMicch- 

001 >600 -444 7234 

MooaeoiCClt 

19T-00-19 

Saudi Arabia 

w w Wm ■ if m m_ 

1-800-11 

Cyprus* 

080-90000 

HonduraaK- 

001-800-674-7000 

IMherlandatco* 

06-022-91-22 

Slovak Republiacci 

00-42-000112 

Czech RepobltaCCj 

00-42-000112 

HungaryiCLi* 

ClOr-SOO-01417 

Netherlands AntiBeaiCCVr 

007-300-950-1022 

South AfrfcaiCG 

oaoo-aa-oou 


Spairt'CCl MO-99-001 A 

SwvdanfCO* 020-795-922 

Swh 2 «ilandicOf 155-0222 

SyriaiCQ qboo 

Trinidad dr Tobago [Special Phones Only) 
Turtutye. 00-8001-1177 

Ukraifi+f. StIQ-013 

Untied Arab Emirates 600-1 1 1 

United Kingdom CO 

To carl the U S. using BT 0800-69-0222+ 

To caK tha U-S. using MERCURY 0500-89-0222* 
To call anywhere other than the U.S. • 

0500- now 

Uruguay [Collect not available.) 000-412 

U-S- Virgin UmdsTCO 1 >600-886- 8000 

Vatican CftyiCCi 1720022 

Venezuela** 800-1714-0 


■■■■ 


AM AM" . ." 

■ ■ ■ ■■ ■ 
bdteiMw a ■ ■ ■ a 


Use your MCI Card, 1 local telephone card or caB collect- all at the same low rates. 
iCCj Country - to - conn try calling available. May not be available to/from all international locations. Certain 
restriction'; apply ■=■ Limited availability, ▼ Wait lor second dial tone, A Available from LADATEL public 
phones only. Rate depends on call origin m Menco. r International communications carrier. * Not avail- 
able from public pay phones. • Public phones may require deposit of com or phone card for dial tone. 



i.'i 


From MCI 


Let It Take You Around The World 


. 4 ’ • 

'S. 

l \ * 

.V .- 

• ■?'*, • 


1 \ 

ft 


- j ' ■ ■* . 




■: V 

. N * 


‘iSl 


4 * 


1 <i «* 

■ . 

■ 1 


• <;i. i. 

i A . 


* . • 


Printed by Vi rurtfax International, London. Registered us a newspaper a / the post office. 






BRIEF? 


Albania 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 


Page 3 




THE AMERICAS/ 


, ■ #V> Af 




r-»J 


_ i 




i* _ 


■A 


y -V/ 


• 

■* Mi W ■* 




<* 


Uv/.w 




in 


1 ■ 
.til __ 

-tv- 


* '•“ An MK. 

•?*? 1 ' 1 1 . , 

t 

ih.iT ;l 
iW (SVJcM t ! v 
VtUrtt *' 11 Mj 

J Alb, mi l i/,), |. r , 

Appears 


l 'u 


r <?i ■!- 


Exile Pact 
With Cuba 


■Hln^ 


*T 


n Strife ;u {0 Possible 


\ m zt. 


ma#|r r.fu.. 
Thi ftjMsj;-* 

i S gS'^-j 

» 4 Uncllii.- 
aNfcUi 4 ««|t> 

hamr-it.m 

itl lily i , 


i v i 


r ■ 


.... 


■. .v 




^ i 


I.. 


% i. 


M 


-J!. 


a ■ | 
l'" 1 * 


'ft 


'k 


'niiiiFvj-jt .1 
incfHuj-u: • 
K* ( 

Att\ v m i\i m 
• d£.}i iff,. 
K'*ton> ;*i:,... 
> lleuer.ii i » 
nm;i Ik •« 
b-H'tt.i. -,iij 
~u;ig ii* tji* « 
BlauC l \ i .•, 

PT, dtl%l or. I’: 

a Itihi hsV* - 


li’^tinian P t> ! 


— 

Tl. 


^ 1 ^- 
'■ ,m, dv 


"A 


fc .1 *: 


M .. s 


S v. 

pl'Eu i 1 i':'f 
hlBn/iP.i: 


<>nc? 




l. 


»1 l*Lvi*u j; 

h‘li;‘ It.:.:'. 
H *u v b S,>, 
i»tt A »>*■ 




-It ’■ 




*. _ 


STU l -uni* j !ir 

'"-.ivi V. ComptW by Our Staff From Otspaidia 

rSS^- I® YORK - U.S. and 

' nr u.. " k 1 -. Cuban officials continued their 

talks here Wednesday amid in- 
dications that they might reach 
an accord to end the exodus of 
people trying to escape Cuba by 
sea. 

The talks came as the number 
’•V of refugees picked up in the 
Florida Straits by the U.S. 
Coast Guard had shown an un- 
explained decline, dropping to 
. . 589 amid fair weather Tuesday 

tftl l/V^r j L,. from about 1,000 a day for the 

“We are very flexible,” said 
Ricardo Alarc&o, the former 
. foreign minis ter who heads Cu- 
ba's team at the talks. “We are 
prepared to sit down and dis- 
cuss with the American side any 
pertinent matter concerning 
our bilateral relations.'’ 

The State Department 
spokesman, Mike McCurry, 
said the Clinton administration 
was showing “as much flexibili- 
ty as possible in trying to reach 
an agreement that wall bridge 
the differences that do exist in 
the positions of the two delega- 
tions." 

An administration official 
described the Cuban response 
to a new U.S. offer on immigra- 
tion as “serious" though still 
containing “some material we 
can’t accept." 

The United States has of- 
fered to expand legal immigra- 
tion from Cuba in return for 
Havana’s promise to halt the 
refugee flood. Cuba hopes to tie 
an agreement to the easing of 
the 32-year-old U.S. economic 
embargo. 

Asked whether it was possi- 
ble to sign a limited immigra- 
tion agreement and put the 
question of the embargo aside, 
Mr. Alarcdn answered, “May- 
be." He did not elaborate. 

He denied reports that Ha- 
Ifana was seeking entry for 
100,000 migrants a year. 

Mr. Alarcdn said Cuba 
would not halt the exodus with- 
out an accord. Cuba, criticized 
in the past for forbidding its 
citizens to leave, now will not 
deny their fundamental right to 
emigrate, he said. 

Western and Latin American 
diplomats, speaking on condi- 
tion of anonymity, said Havana 
appears willing to strike a deal 
if larger issues of U^.- Cub an 
relations and the embargo are 
discussed at a later date. 

A Miami newspaper reported 
Wednesday that Havana had 
substantially reduced its de- 
mand for U.S. visas but was 
insisting that Washington lift 
its recent ban on cash remit- 
tances to Cuba. 

U nnam ed sources dose to 
the t alks told The Miami Her- 
ald that Cuba had offered to 
settle for around 28,000 U.S. 
visas for prospective immi- 
grants, the newspaper said. 

The proposal also includes 
demands that the United States 
restrict its radio broadcasts to 
Cuba, it said. 

: Cash remittances accounted 
%>r an estimated $400 million 
annual infusion into Cuba's 
Economy. (AP, Reuters, NYT) 


iha U.!. 
uur.i: 


"1 - 


un>vn 


rfcm V B 




5 - ■ * i 

jji:*' ;.f 

; 

l*r. 

Ap: * • 

Itr 

ri* 

tli 

v- x 

Tt.r* • 

liif ' - 

i f - 
S-.o 

41^ 1 i 

-• - 


i v v- \- 




» r .« 


. -1 




a-i 




rm of 4**s :*■ 


fj C* 


i J 2‘ 


V-’-. 


li 


.t 


* V 


w Mh 


i.. 


z * 


• r 


ft r 


■ 




4***" 


-'I s 4 




Away 

From Politics 

• The Pentagon report on 
the TaObook Assodatiou's 
1991 convention has been 
barred from evidence in a 
federal lawsuit in Las Ve- 
gas brought by Paula 
Coughlin, a former navy of- 
ficer who was one of the 
women sexually abused 
there. The judge called the 
report “not sufficiently 
trustworthy^ in a legal vic- 
tory for the Tailbook Asso- 
ciation , an organization of 
naval aviators. The report 
concluded that 83 women 
had been assaulted or ha- 
rassed at the convention. 

• The space shuttle Discov- 
ery was d eared for bunch 
on Friday from Cape Ca- 
naveral after engineers 
ironed out several mechani- 
cal problems. 

• About 90 homosexual 
couples registered as do- 
mestic partners in Seattle 
under a law that took effect 
this week. The couples paid 
$25 to have their relation- 
ship recognized under the 
ordinance. Seattle follows a 
dozen or so other cities with 
similar lavra, including New’ 
York, Minneapolis and San 
Francisco. Ending the rela- 
tionship requires only a no- 
tarized signature and costs 
nothing. 

• A manhunt for (WO SBS- 
pects after an interstate 
crime spree in which they 
killed as many as four peo- 
ple ended when they were 
arrested in Santa Fe. New 
Mexico, the police said. 

NYT. AFP. AP. Reuters 



Major Shake - Up Is Expected 

White House Staff Braces for Panetta’s Broom 


Manu Tapii Rcmcr* 

Cuban refugees arriving in Panama, their new temporary home after leaving the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay. 


By Douglas Jehl 

■YtfU’ York Timer Service 

EDGARTOWN, Massachusetts — As Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton ended his vacation here 
Wednesday and headed for Washington, some of 
his senior aides were awaiting his return with 
more than a little apprehension, expecting the 
first of a series of staff changes. 

For two months. Leon Panetta. the new White 
House chief of staff, has quietly been weighing 
big changes in Mr. Clinton's team, and White 

House officials say that, an overhaul could be 

announced next week. 

Mr. Panetta has already moved to install a 
longtime aide. Jodie Torkelson. in the vacant 
post of While House director of administration. 
He has also decided to bring Billy Webster, the 
chief of staff at the Department of Education, 
into the inner circle as Mr. Clinton’s scheduler, 
replacing Ricki Seidman. who will mote to an- 
other White House job. 

Christine A. Varney, the cabinet .secretary, is 
expected to leave by year's end to go to the 
Federal Trade Commission. 

But those changes are relatively minor com- 
pared with what many aides expect: a shake-up 
of the White House communications and politi- 
cal operations that might revamp the job of press 
secretary to give the holder more access to the 
inner circle. 

Mr. Panetta is said by associates to have con- 
cluded that the current structure has too often 
left Dee Dee Myers, the spokeswoman, unable to 


speak for the president with authority, but it is 
not clear whether she would get the enhanced 
role. 

Mr. Clinton has also made it clear that he was 
dissatisfied by his administration's overall fail- 
ure to communicate its achievements to the pub- 
lic. And although Mr. Panetta moved earlier to 
install Tony Coelho, the former House Demo- 
cratic whip, as de facto Democratic Party chair- 
man. many of Mr. Clinton's advisers believe that 
the White House political team remains in need 
of election-year reinforcement. 

Mr. Paneua. who took his post on conditior. 
that he get broad latitude in hiring and firing, ha- 
made his belief clear that much more needs 
fixing. 

That has led to speculation even in the White 
House staff about whose jobs may be in jeopar- 
dy. In addition to Ms. Myers, those most often 
mentioned are Mark D. Gearan. the communica- 
tions director, and Joan Baugeit. the director o! 
political affairs. 

Any of these changes would give yer auotlie: 
new look to a White House that, since Mr. 
Clinton took office, has already had two chiefs of 
staff, four deputy chiefs, two counsels, two com- 
munications directors and two congression:u 
liaisons. 

But when asked at a White House briefing in 
Edgartown on Tuesday whether personnel an- 
nouncements could be expected soon. Ms. Myer- 
said only: “Leon has not made clear what hi-, 
plans are.’’ 


* POL 

ITICAL 3 

OTES : 



A Tenure Tied to Heal t h Care Fight 

HARRISBURG. Pennsylvania — Harris Wof- 
ford's victory in the 1991 special Senate election in 
Pennsylvania not only buttressed the Democrats' 
majority in the Senate, but helped to put health care 
— Mr. WofTord's No. I campaign issue — atop the 
national agenda. 

Now, however, the drive in Washington for com- 
prehensive health reform has faltered and both Mr. 
Wofford’s future and Democratic control of the 
Senate are imperiled. Rick Santorum. a two-term 
Republican representative from Pittsburgh, is wag- 
ing an aggressive battle for Mr. Wolford's seat and 
is challenging the senator's view of health reform. 

This is a race of sharp contrasts and high stakes. 
Mr. Wofford. 68. is at the apex of a public career 
rooted in the liberalism that flourished in the l%0s. 
when he won distinction as a civil rights champion 
and one of the founders of the Peace Corps. 

Mr. Santorum. 36. brings to the campaign his 
own version of the militant conservatism forged by 
the Republican minority in the House, where he 
made his mark by helping to expose the House post 
office scandal and by becoming a spokesman for his 
party on welfare reform. 

The outcome of this confrontation could help 
decide not only whether the Democrats maintain 
their grip on the Senate, but also the future course 
of the national debate on health care relorm. 

Mr. Wofford's approach to health care. Mr. San- 


torum declared at a recent campaign stop, exempli- 
fies his overall belief “that we solve our problems in 
America by taxing you more, sending the money to 
Washington and hiring more bureaucrats to make 
decisions on how to run vour life." f LAT) 


D emocrats Talk Like Republicans 

WASHINGTON — A review of campaign televi- 
sion advertisements for a dozen Democrats running 
for the Senate shows most of them, whether incum- 
bents or challengers, are scurrying to portray them- 
selves as political outsiders and distance themselves 
from President Bill Cl inton's brand of liberalism. 

Democrats are campaigning for November's elec- 
tions on themes of small government, family values 
and law and order — traditional Republican issues. 

The ads show all are fighting Congress and what 
they see as institutional corruption in Washington. 

"He hasn't forgotten where he comes from. He 
totes for what he believes in and not just for the 
party." says one fairly typical spot for Senator JefT 
Bingaman of New Mexico, who faces a tough re- 
election battle. 

The advertising makes clear Democrats are run- 
ning scared. 

"You can't tell from their spots whether these 
guys are Republican or Democrats." Gary Koops 
of the Republican senatorial campaign committee 
said. "They rarely even say they are Democrats and 
never over mention President Clinton." f Rcun-rx ) 


Finding Fat in the Pentago n Budg et 

WASHINGTON The Pentagon's operating 
budget could be cut by S4.5 billion next year with- 
out harming overall military readiness, a congres- 
sional report has concluded. 

In a broad array of activities from pilot training 
to commissaries to the management of spare parts, 
the military could gel along with less than President 
Clinton has requested, said the General Accounting 
Office, the investigative jrm of Congress. 

The report touches on a most sensitive issue in the 
defense debate. As military spending continues to 
decline. Republicans and moderate Democrats 
warn that the nation's readiness to fight is slipping. 

More than half of the cuts could be achieved by 
reducing army operations accounts by S2.4 billion, 
the report said. The air force request is too high by 
SI. 1 6 billion, it said, while civilian Defense Depart- 
ment accounts could be cut by S69(j million. Navy 
excess totals S274 million, it said 

r.4 P> 


Quote/Unqu ote: 

Tim Spring, the golf pro who played with Presi- 
dent Clinton during his just-ended Martha's Vine- 
yard. Massachusetts, vacation, describing the presi- 
dent's slate of mind: "He seemed kind of depressed. 
I don’t think he wants to uo home." ; Renter* } 


Women in Congress 
Girding for a Fight 

Voter Cynicism Ends Euphoria of *92 


Drinking and Womanizing Rife at CIA 9 Agent Says 


By Robert L. Jackson 

Las Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A federal lawsuit 
filed by one of the senior female spies at 
the Central Intelligence Agency por- 
trays the agency as nfe with womanizing 
and drinking and says this conduct has 
been ignored for years by internal inves- 
tigators. 

The charges are contained in previ- 
ously confidential court filings made 
public Tuesday by the career spy, who 
has been protected by a pseudonym, 
“Jane Doe Thompson.” Her suit con- 
tends that she was treated unfairly be- 
cause of her gender. 

The Thompson complaint partially 
surfaced in July when a federal judge in 
Alexandria, Virginia, allowed some legal 
motions to be made public but kept the 
lawsuit itself under wraps. 

However, Lhe court has now made 


public a 140- page amended complaint The new court papers allege that the CIA officials have declined to corn- 
filed bv Ms. Thompson’s attorney. Vic- “plaintiff is aware of two current mar- ment on the merits of Ms. Thompson's 
toria Toensing. a former Justice Depart- ried directorate of operations division allegations on the ground that they were 
ment official, which paints a bleak pic- chiefs who have had affairs with subor- in the hands of agency lawyers, 
lure for women employees of the CIA. dinates; one was in fact found ‘in fla- According Lo the complaint, none of 
“There has not been a station to granie delicto' on his couch in his of- the unnamed CIA officials who engaged 
which plaintiff has been assigned where fice in womanizing or heavy social drinking 
senior male officers did nof drink and The suit also charges that a former were ever subjected to an inquiry’ by the 
womanize and creale an adverse work high-ranking official “announced open- agency’s inspector general, although Ms. 
environment for women." the brief con- ly at an agency meeting that he had been Thompson offered to provide their 
tends. drunk the evening before while meeting names to investigators. 

The Thompson lawsuit was filed ear Li- with foreign liaison officials and could The court papers said Ms. Thompson 

of her senior not recall whether he had revealed to was chief of a CIA station in the Carib- 


By Kevin Merida 

Waxhingbn Pwi Service 

WASHINGTON — If 1992 
was the Year of lhe Woman in 
U.S. politics, is 1994 the Year of 
the Woman in Trouble? 

Two years after .American 
voters sent a record number of 
women to Congress, the politi- 
cal landscape has changed, and 
many of the incumbent women 
in office are in tough re-election 
figfils- 

Thirleen of the 48 women in 
the House of Representatives 
— including 10 in their first 
term and virtually all Demo- 
crats — are in danger of losing 
Lheir seats, according to Ben 
Sheffner of the nonpartisan 
Cook Political Report. 

“People are still looking for 
outsiders," said Mr. Sheffner. 
“and now these women are in- 
siders. and it's hard to hide that 
fact." 

Republican strategists say 
the difficulty Democratic wom- 
en face is another reflection of 
voters' growing doubts about 
the majority party, and espe- 
cially about President Bill Clin- 
ton." 

The only Republican woman 
in the House considered to be at 
risk is Barbara F. Vucanovich 
of Nevada. 

In the Senate, Dianne Fein- 
stein. Democrat of California, 
who is in her first term and is 
one of seven women in that 
chamber, is struggling to fend 
off a strong challenge from 


these officials highly sensitive informa- bean area in 


a strong 

Representative Michael Huff- 
1989 when her troubles ington, a Republican. 


began after she reported a male denutv 


Although 


many, perhaps 



er this year, and because 
status, it has helped prod the agency to 
begin negotiating an administrative set- uon. 
tie men I in a larger case. Thai case is a 
class-action discrimination complaint overseas 
broughL in 1991 by women employed in drunken division chief tripped 
the CIA’s operations directorate, the di- cocktail table while grabbing for a fe- "became the target of an inspector gen- waned. The expectauons wom- 
vision that handies foreign espionage male guest-’’ Another official was regu- eral investigation initiated by the male en once had of adding to their 
and covert actions, in which Ms. Iarly "too hung over to come lo work in deputy” and several other "employees numbers in Congress have been 
Thompson works. the mornings," she said. she bad disciplined for other reasons. dramatically lowered. 

Concerned about defeats 
within their ranks, a group of 
freshmen Democratic women 
have formed a traveling road 
show to raise money and cam- 


LATlN: Open Markets and Privatization Have Failed to Solve a Continents Poverty Problem 


Con tinned from Page 1 

recess of democracy — mil- 
ons of people have been left 
out. 

Some politicians at the na- 
tional level invoke the need to 
fight poverty and to help those 
living on the margins of society. 
But they are generally far more 
inclined to point to economic 
successes such as the rise in for- 
eign investment, their latest pri- 
vatization deals or the renegoti- 
ation of debt with international 
lending organizations. 

The neoliberal economic 
model came to be adopted as 
governments realized that 
closed economies, with their 
high barriers to imports, left 
them isolated and woefully out- 
moded in their industrial base. 

In many countries, the last 
four years of growth will statis- 
tically almost make up for the 
vast loss of spending power in 
the 1980s. often called the “losl 
decade" because of the region's 
debt crisis, a deep recession and 
a loss of investor confidence. 

But economic growth has 
been highly uneven. The new 
wealth has flown mostly to the 
rich, as wealthy families that 
made money doing work for the 
government made even more 
money buying up government 
assets' New jobs lend to be ei- 
ther short-term, low-paying 
construction jobs or highly paid 
managerial jobs. Many in the 
middle class lost work when 
state payrolls were cut or when 
managers at newly privatized 
companies slashed work forces 
to make the businesses compet- 
itive. 

Others say investment has 
been focused on the capitals, 
leaving more remote areas 


struggling, with little hope in 
the near term that new foreign 
investment will reach them. 

Nor is there much optimism 
among the tens of millions of 
people living in vast shanty- 
towns throughout the conti- 
nent. with little or no access to 
running water, electricity, sewer 
systems, adequate housing, 
education and health care. 

“The resumption of econom- 
ic growth has been bought at a 
very high social price, which in- 
cludes poverty, increased un- 
employment "and income in- 
equality. and this is leading to 
social problems," said Louis 
Emmerij, an economist and 
specialist on social reform at 
tne Inter-American Develop- 
ment Bank, in Washington. 

United Nations economists 
say that despite projected eco- 
nomic growth through the end 
of the century, no progress will 
be made in reducing poverty, 
creating the potential for more 
social unresL 

Poverty is even likely to in- 
crease slightly. As of 1986. 37 
percent of the region’s families 
were living in poverty; by 2000, 
the economists say, the figure 
will be 38 percent, or 192 mil- 
lion people. 

“The coming years will be 
quite difficult for these coun- 
tries,” said Peter Jensen, region- 
al coordinator for human settle- 
ments at the UN Economic 
Commission on Latin America 
and the Caribbean, in Santiago. 

“Growth has been really on 
only one end of the spectrum, 
the wealthy. The rich are getting 
richer and' the poor are getting 
poorer. And this will generate 
social conflict.” 

For the purpose of statistics. 


turing provincial governments, 
creating competent bureaucra- 
cies and gelling the private sec- 
tor to accept higher taxes. 

The return could be a better- 
trained work force and surer 
prospect of political stability. 

Finally, social programs re- 
main to’ be developed, econo- 


the UN defines Latin America has yet to tame inflation and 
as stretching from the Rio open its economy to imema- 
Grande to Tierra del Fuego, tional competition and invest- 
embracing the Caribbean is- ment. 
lands and Central and South Countries such as Chile, Co- 
America. lombia, Costa Rica and Argen- 

Mr. Jensen estimates that 10 tina have shown the most eco- 
million families, or 46 million nomic growth since the 1980s, 
people, are without homes in but Lhat does not exempt them 
the region. Another 1 S.4 million from social unrest, 
families, or 85 million people. Chile has made the greatest 
live in homes in such poor con- inroads against poverty, bring- 
dition that they should be de- jug almost a million people out 
molished. Still another 23 mil- D f poverty over the past four 
lion homes, housing more than y earSj p ul ' has been unable to 
1 00 million people, many of improve living conditions much mists say. without returning to 
whom consider themselves part in the shantytowns. deficit spending. 

of the middle class, lack waler. 

electricity or proper construc- 
tion. The population for the re- 
gion in 1990 was 441 million. 

The bill for providing proper 
bousing for the poor and the 
middle class would exceed SI 10 
billion, Mr. Jensen said, and 
that does not include the invest- 
ment needed to offer health 
care and education. 

All this is not to say that the 
economic experiment over Lhe 
last five years was misguided, or 
that the flood of new invest- 
ment has not been critical to the 
region's recovery, or that new 
investment and economic 
growth in the long term are not 
the answer to reducing poverty, 
most economists say. But long 
term means several decades, 
and misery and unrest are 
growing. 

To be sure, not all Latin 
American countries are experi- 
encing the same income gaps, 
nor the same rate of economic 
change. According to the UN, 

Brazil continues to have the 
widest gap between rich and 
poor and is the one dominant 
country on the continent that! 


What most economists say is P 3 !.®!? ^°£. one mother. 

Lhat the “obvious" poliev Our first goal is to hold our 

changes — privatization and ov ' , £ ° o1 lose these «’om- 

opening doors to investment — ^ sajc * P res l' 

have been made and that the National Womens 

hard pan now begins: res true- Political Caucus. 


In 1992, the combination of 
sex-based anger resulting from 
the Clarence Thomas- Anita F. 
Hill hearings, voter disgust with 
Washington politicians, and 


new seals created by retire- 
ments and redistricting led to 
Lhe election of four new women 
to the Senate and 24 new wom- 
en to the House. 

K.ay Bailey Hutchison, Re- 
publican of Texas, was later 
elected to the Senate in a special 
election, bringing the total 
number of women in Congress 
to a record 55. 

This year is different. There 
is no presidential election to 
bolster turnout, and fewer op- 
portunities to run in districts ir 
which there are no incumbents. 
Despite a rash of congressional 
retirements, as of last week 
there were 50 open House seats 
and 9 open Senate seats, com- 
pared to 91 open House seats 
and 8 open Senate seats two 
years ago. 

The significance of ope;- 
seals to women is underscore; 
by 1992 electoral statistics: 
Twenty- two of the 24 women 
elected to the House did not 
have to face incumbents in the 
general election. 

Now these same women are 
incumbents themselves, many 
of them Democrats, elected in 
marginally Democratic or Re- 
publican-leaning districts, whe 
would have faced difficult re- 
election contests regardless c.‘ 
their sex. 

“Women are definitely hur- 
by the fact that crime is the No. 
1 issue," said Celinda Lake, a 
Democratic pollster, who iy 
w-orking for several women who 
are congressional and guberna- 
torial candidates. 

“It’s very hard for women to 
show toughness,” she said. “1 
think women can get over that 
barrier, but it's one of the big- 
gest barriers facing them.” 

Linda DiVall, a Republican 
pollster, said this trend largely 
affected Democrats. 

“Liberal Democratic women 
in particular are perceived as 
not being tough on crime,” she 
said. 

Women must also confront a 
more cynical electorate this 
time around, according to some 
analysts. 

"I think lhe mood of the elec- 
torate in ’92 was different than 
in ’94.’’ said ELIen Malcolm, 
president of EMILY’s List, a 
fund-raising network for Dem- 
ocratic women who support 
abortion rights. 


For investment information, 

read 


THE 


E P O 


every Saturday 
in the IHT. 


JCmrn 






■ SM: • - V- U ££ 


The annual 

VISIT USA SEMINAR 

January 25-29, 1995, Zurich, Switzerland 
with its attendance of 

1 ,200 ttrayeS protfesssoniaSs 

& 

35,000 consumers 

provides you with an outstanding 

PROMOTIONAL PLATFORM 

American tourist industry organizations 
and manufacturers of consumer products are 

invited 

to join this event as exhibitors 
and co-sponsors 

Contact the VISIT USA COMMITTEE 
do U.S. Embassy. P.O. Box. CH-3001 Bern 
Phone (41+31) 357 73 42 
Fax (41+31) 357 73 36 












* ■»! 


h Me* 


■ " VJ- -': 


'."p 


Page 4- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 




J. Gavell, EAST; Entrepreneurs Bring New Prosperity to Parts of Old East Gerrrumy GORE 


Author of 


‘Shogun,’ 


Continued from Page I 

recovery^ in the East there is an out-and- 
out boom, with 9 percent growth anticipat- 
ed this year. 

For the first time since reunification in 


Dies at 69 


1990, per capita investment is now higher 
in Eastern Germany than in the West. In 
the past four years, roughly $255 billion 
has been funnelled into the East, more than 


The Associated Press 


LONDON — James ClaveU, 
author of “Shogun” and other 
best-selling books, has died in 
Switzerland after suffering a 
stroke. He was 69. 

The Australian native, who 
lived in Switzerland, was the 
screenwriter of such popular 
movies as “The Great Escape," 
“To Sir, With Love” and the 
first version of "The Fly.” 

Mr. ClaveU died Tuesday, 
said his publisher, Eric Major, 
of Hodder & Stoughton. 

Mr. Cl a veil’s novels about 
the Far East include “King 
Rat” and “Tai-Pan.” Two other 
novels set in the Far East, "Sho- 
gun” and “Noble House,” were 
made into television miniseries. 


half of it in construction. The service in- 
dustry, too, is mushrooming; banks, for 
example, now employ 80,000 people in the 
East, double the number in 1990. 

Public attitudes reflect the upswing. A 
poll of East Germans, published last 
month in Der Spiegel magazine, showed 
that 54 percent judged their own economic 
circumstances to be good or very good, up 
from 38 percent two years ago. Only 9 
percent described their lot as bad or very 
bad, compared with 13 percent in 1992. 


As Eastern and Western economies have 
grows together, so have political alle- 
giances. In 1992, pollsters found that only 
45 percent of Easterners considered them- 
selves German, while 54 percent still 
thought of themselves as East German. In 
the recent survey, however, 61 percent 
classified themselves as German and 36 
percent as East German. 

“We can assume that most of the rubble 
of socialism has been cleared away,” Ger- 
man/s economics minister, G Outer Rex- 
rod t, said recently. "Everything points to 
us achieving growth in Eastern Germany 
that will accelerate itself in the foreseeable 
future.” 


East German exports have nearly van- 
ished, bringing in only $8 billion last year 
and accounting for barely 2 percent of 
total German sales abroad. 


Meets Reynolds 


CoBtinoed from Page 1 


Moreover, Eastern Germany remains 
afloat on a tide of money washing in from 
the West Transfer payments this year 
alone will total $115 billion, and the feder- 
al government recently announced that 
massive subsidies were likely to continue 
at least through 1998. 


Not everything is rosy. In some areas, 
when job retraining, make-work programs 
and early retirement are added to the offi- 
cial unemployment figures, the jobless rate 
jumps to 30 percent 


“A flourishing landscape for all of the 
East is still nowhere in sight," said Alex- 
ander Eickelpasch, an economist at a Ber- 
lin research institute, alluding to Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl’s much-mocked 1990 
campaign promise of immin ent prosperi- 
ty. "Sat there are small islands of flour- 
ishing landscapes scattered throughout 
the East” 


KOHL: Back on Top in the Polls, Chancellor Is Relishing the Campaign 


Continued from Page 1 


plex issues, but a series of political gaffes 
has cost him dearly. 


His latest novel, "Gai-Jin,” 
published last year, was also a 
best-seller. 


When Mr. Kohl's candidate for the 
largely ceremonial presidency, Roman 
Herzog, was elected in May, Mr. Schaip- 
ing protested in a manner that struck many 
voters as petulant and nnsTait»<nianiiir ft 


this country!” he shouted into the micro- 
phones in Potsdam on Saturday night. 
“We are fighting to preserve this republic, 
and we are not going to allow it to be 
pushed to the left!” 


"He was one oF the great epic 
storytellers of our age,” Mr- 
Major said, "a man who was 
deeply imbued in tradition, and 
also enormous fun to work 
with.” 

Explaining the popularity of 
“Shogun ” Mr. Major said: "It 
took the Western mind into a 
completely different world. It 
was the first time that one be- 
gan to understand the Japanese, 
litis came from the period 
when he was incarcerated as a 
POW at Chang Yi prison in 
Singapore, as a young man in 
his early 20s.” 

Mr. ClaveU was imprisoned 
by the Japanese at the camp 
during World War II, an experi- 
ence that led to his first novel, 
"King Rat," in 1961 


Most recently, he has allowed Social 
Democrats in the eastern state of Saxony- 
Anhalt to form a minority government 
that relies on votes from the former Com- 
munist Party. 


By playing on the instinctive fear of 
r adi c ali sm, Mr. Kohl has shown he is close 
to the pulse of the electorate. He did so 
again by denouncing Mr, Scharping’s pro- 
posal to impose speed limits on the auto- 
bahns. 


Mr. Kohl never misses a chance to re- 
mind voters that Social Democrats govern 
Saxony-Anhalt with tacit support from 
former Communists. 

“We want no Communist influence in 


■ Candidates Mix It Up 

Mr. Kohl and Mr. Scharping exchanged 
insults Wednesday in a stormy and rare 
parliamentary showdown. The Associated 
Press reported from Bonn. 


Mr. Scharping accused the chancellor of 
cowardice, slander and lying. Mr. Kohl 


said the Social Democrats were incompe- 
tent and too cozy with the reformed East 
German Communists. 

Tuesday, Mr. Kohl's party used its par- 
liamentary majority to make that day’s 
session of the Bundestag, the lower house 
of Parliament, the final one before the Oct. 
16 election. 

Mr. Scharping said the chancellor had 
arranged the recess to avoid another de- 
bate with him. “You chicken out repeated- 
ly,” the Social Democrat said. 

He asserted that Mr. Kohl has been 
making campaign promises — such as to 
increase some social benefits — that he 
will not keep. “You have five and a half 
weeks left,” Mr. Scharping said, glowering 
at the chancellor, “we will give you no 
opportunity to keep quiet about your true 
intentions.” 


POPE; Canceling of Papal Visit to Sarajevo Underlines City’s Shaky State 


Continued from Page 1 

Serbia to be eased, but the 
United States wants to act more 
cautiously. 

On the military front, offi- 
cials said that British and 


French officers had argued vig- 
orously that tougher enforce- 
ment of weapons-exclusion 
zones would involve NATO di- 
rectly in the conflict. 


Tourist Charged In Spanking Cas< 


With the largest military con- 
tingents in the UN Protection 
Force here, Britain and France 
have always been wary of in- 
creased NATO air strikes. 


Reuiers 

LONDON, Ontario — A 
U.S. tourist has been charged 
with assault for spanking his 5- 
y ear-old daughter's bare bot- 
tom in a restaurant parking lot, 
police said. 

Witnesses said the man, who 
had stopped for lunch with his 
family, pulled down the girl's 


underwear, put her on the trunk 
of his car and spanked her with 
the palm of his hand at least 
eight times, 

"One witness approached 
Him and told him that she 
thought it was excessive,” po- 
lice Sergeant Jack Churney 
said. The man, from Warren- 
ville, Illinois, was freed on baili 


Those tensions are running 
high once again. President Bill 
Clinton's plan to press for end- 
ing the arms embargo to the 
Bosnian government after Oct 
15 has caused great unease in 
the contact group. President 
Boris N. Yeltsin of Russia is 
firmly opposed, and the French 
foreign minister, Alain Juppft, 


said lifting the embargo would 
be “a grave error.” 

In general, France, Britain 
and Russia are much more 
ready to try to end the war by 
accommodating Serbia and the 
Bosnian Serbs than is the Unit- 
ed States, which does not have 
ground troops in Bosnia. 

Mr. Jupp6 said this week that 
the contact group should for- 
mally accept a confederation of 
the Bosnian Serbs and Serbia, 
providing that Bosnia's interna- 
tional borders remain at least 
formally intact. 

But one U.S. official said: "It 
is absolutely premature to talk 
about a Serbian confederation. 
First they have to accept the 
proposed map.” 


“The map," the proposal to 
reduce Serb-held lands to 49 
percent is utterly unacceptable 
to Bosnian Serbs. “The war will 
go on and we will get our Bosni- 
an Serb state in two years,” a 
Bosnian Serb official, Aleksa 
Buha, said this week. 


the proposal to 


with Britain over the question 
of how to respond to the events 
in Belfast 

The relaxation of security op- 
erations may have made a dif- 
ference to the people who five 
on Fails Road m Belfast and it 
certainly lightened the mood of 
the city. But there was no sug- 
gestion yet that it included a 
strategic redeployment or a re- 
duction in the number of troops 
in Northern Ireland, as de- 
manded by Gerry Adams, the 
head or the IRA's political 
branch, Sinn Fan. 

In this sense, the moves ap- 
peared to be a normal opera- 
tional response rather than a 
dear political concession or 
sign of good faith from the Brit- 
ish government. Martin 
McGumness, the vice president 
of Sinn Fein, said Wednesday 
that raids and other acts were 
continuing against the IRA, 
which is still lllegaL 

Though there have been two 
provocations from terrorists be- 
longing to Protestant paramili- 
tary groups — the killing of a 
Catholic and the explosion of a 
bomb near Sinn Fein headquar- 
ters — the IRA has not re- 
sponded with violence. 

In the name of the Catholic 
minority in the Protestant- 
dominated province, the IRA 
wants to end British rule and 
join up with the Irish Republic 
to the south, where Catholics 
are in the majority. Most Prot- 
estants in Northern Ireland 
want it to remain part of the 
United Kingdom. 

The extremists among the 
Protestants, known as loyalists, 



fl' 


til 


fm 




». 

a" ■<■ 




. i 









sfeg 



: : 1-w - . :: 

' ; : -i ;• •• : ; : ;.i : : ;r.v 





*» < 






, ... . . . «> * .u .* . . 




tl f 


4h* 


i y 


Martin Ooaver.'Tbe 





Mr. Gore, left, with Mr. Reynolds in Shannon. 


have long taken as their hero 
the Reverend Ian Paisley, head 
of the Democratic Unionist 
Party. On Tuesday, Mr. Paisley 
did not disappoint them. 

He had insisted an a meeting 
with Mr. Major in London to 
read out a demand that the Brit- 
ish not “surrender” to the IRA. 
Mr. Paisley has made Mr. Ma- 
jor’s fife more difficult by insist- 
ing, with little to go on, that the 
IRA cease-fire must have come 
from a back-room deal with 
London. 

But barely had he stepped 
inside No. 10 Downing Street 
than he was virtually ejected. 
Mr. Major asked him several 


times if he accepted bis word. 
When Mr. Paisley refused to j 
reply in the affirmative and in-J 
sisted instead on reading biJt, 
prepared text, the meeting was | 
summarily ended. „j 




Mr. Paisley returned to Bet* 
fast with a grudge mtactefta 
said at a news cxmferencc tp ac 
Mr. Major was acting EEgrW 
dictator. No prime mmisterfia? 
the right to insist upon being 
believed before listening to a 
ormalcer. he said. 9 




speaker, he said. * 

“This is what Hitler said,” he! 
added, “you are to believe mey 
or you will go to the gas cham>| 
ber.” i' 



CAIRO; Delegates Angered by Vatican’s Stalling TactUif 


Continued from Page 1 The issue had to be referred views of the Vatican and ncatj! 

to a special committee charged governmental groups from 1 - 
said that when the conference with reporting back by Friday Catholic nations, some of which! - 
resumed its meeting on the text morning. have seats on official delega-j' 

Wednesday morning, expecting “These Latin American na- dons, demonstrated a split bev, 
to cement the consensus tions are trying to make the tween the Vatican hierarchy 1 ' 
achieved Tuesday night, more Vatican happy,” said Miguel and millions of lay Catholics, j! 
than a dozen countries that had Trias, head of Colombia's Iarg- “There are two churches,” be 1 
not spoken Tuesday raised ob- est government-backed f amil y said, “one where the hierarchy! 1 
jections. Among them were planning organization, Profa- talks to the presidents of coun-t> 
Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, inilia. “But in 2,000 years the tries, and then there's theil 
Honduras, Guatemala, Panama Vatican has never been happy.” church of the people. The peoi> 
and Malta, as well as Guam, a Alexander C. Sanger, the pie are picking and choosing 
United States territory, accord- president of Planned Parent- what parts of Catholicism they* 
mg to people close to official hood of New York Gty, said in want to cany over to their per$ - 
delegations. an interview that the divergent sonal lives.” ft . • 


Thus if Mr. Clinton ends the 
embargo on the Bosnian gov- 
ernment, the contact group will 
certainly fall apart. Britain and 
France may also withdraw at 
least some troops. 


views of the Vatican and noso^! 
governmental groups from 1 
Catholic nations, some of which! 
have seats on official delega^ 
tions, demonstrated a split beT, 


U.S. officials say the best 
hope for continued cooperation 
may be an agreement on easing 
sanctions on Serbia, provided 
Mr. Milosevic accepts interna- 
tional monitors on the border. 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


■•i \r - 




Data Genera! ts on open computer sterns company speckdi^ in servers, swmge 
products, and services for tnfbrmahon systems users; worktwtie. Data Gen&tfi people 
tint/ partners are comrotaed w helping customers achieve success si their enterprises 
The complewty of ow buSHiess roquirES that we ottodi gfeai impartoncE to trie /ego/ 
support o/'our soles and service organizations cirri oar dsmbtrion partners. 

We are therefore taking javrard for an 


Senior Executive 


Consumer Products 


r The BUREAU OF ^ 

EXPORT TRADE PROMOTION, 

an agency of the Department of Trade ft 
Industry of the Philippines, invites experts 
in all areas of fine jewelry manufacturing. 




Asia Pacific Region o Hong Kong-Based 




enced Lawyer 


The Expert wBl spearhead the Implementation 
of a one-year (Aug. 1994 - July 1995) 
government project titled 


Warner Bros. Consumer Products is pursuing an aggressive expansion strategy for its highly 
successhil retail stores and licensing operations around the world. 


To provide legal support principally to the southern European countries - 
France, Italy Spain and Fbrtuga], There may also be some involvement with our 
international distributors. The position is based at our French Headquarters in 
Meudon, outade Paris. 


We are currently seeking an experienced executive to manage our expansion plans for the 
Asia Pacific region. This person will be responsible for overseeing retail stores and licensing 
operations in the region, and building a strong team of marketing, sales, retail and administra- 
tive professionals to support the WBCP business in the region. 


EXPORT ENVELOPMENT PROJECT 
FOF? THE PHILIPPINE 
Ft NE JEWELRY IN D USTRY 




*■ i* - „ 






Candidates should have a French legal degree aid some years of experience in 
an industrial enterprise or a lawiirm specialised in commercial iaw They tould be 
knowledgeable m contract, intetectual property, commercial, competition and EC 
law. Candidates with less experience in these areas but w£h good mtefectuaJ and 
personal skilbwdlaisobe considered Frequent contacts with the direct sales force, 
senior management and customers require a good genera! business understanding 
and attitude and very good communication and negotiations dak displaying the 
ability to combine commercial sense with legal mtegtiy. 


The qualified candidate will have extensive retail, consumer products marketing, licensing, 
product development, and administrative experience within the key regional markets. 
Individual should be a proven leader with problem-solving capabilities and able to work 
at senior management levels while demonstrating a sensitivity for unique regional business 
practices and cultural issues. This person will report directly to senior executives in the 
Burbank, California headquarters. A BA/B5 degree (or appropriate equivalent) in Marketing/ 
Business Administration is also required, post graduate degree is preferred. 


aj Degree in Jewelry manufacturing or in any relevant field 
(Industrial or Mechanical engineering) from a 
recognize institution: 

b) Have at least a 5-year extensive knowledge & 
experience in all areas of fine J ewe by manufacturing: 
cj Preferably has managed a fine jewelry factory for at 
least two years; 

dl Preferably with background In jewelry designing; 


e) Preferably has knowledge of the International markets 
(USA, Japan. Western Europe): 


(USA, Japan. Western Europe): 

Q Be fluent in written Qc oral English; 

g) Must be willing to have two local understudies at his 
own expense. 


The successful candidate must be fluent in English. Another European language, 
preferably Spanish or Italian, would be desirable. 


Warner Bros, offers a competitive compensation and benefits package. Interested candidates 
are invited to mail a resume to; Warner Bros., Human Resources Dept., Box 141-94, 4000 
Warner BlvcL, Burbank, CA 91522, USA/ or fax to 818-954-4265. EOE. 






al Conduct technical seminar, training programs on all 
aspects of fine jewelry manufacturing in the different 
Lndusty centers: 


on all 


Please send you 1 complete application m English to the European Personnel 
Director. Mr. Michael Aha at Data General Europe. 6/8 rue Andres Beck. 92366 
Meudon -U-for&t Cede*. 


I rDaia General 



b) Conduct one-on-one consultancy assistance to selected 
companies in the Industry in the different Identified 
jewelry centers in the Philippines: 

c) Assist in establishing & upgrading jewelry training 
centers. 


pre-quaUfuing 

mberl9$4to? 


Bringing Common Sense to computing 


Warner Bros. 


The Director, Bureau of Export Trade P r o m o ti o n . 
6th Fir., New Solid Bldg., 367 Sen. GU Pnyat Ave., 
TWnlraH, Metro Matifia Philippines, 

TeL: (632) 619-1811 - (632) 818-6466. 

Fax: (632) 819-1816. Attn: Mr. Vhxcente A. Pita. 




A Time Vkrpef EntenMomejiC Co., LP. TM & O 1994 Vtewr Brut. 


In order to consolidate and develop iLs current world-wide expansion (2500 employees, turnover : 2 billion French Francs). 

a world leader in his sector and a growing company is currently seeking 




Vice-President of Marketing and Sales 


France and international 


Rtf. AK 111 


very attractive salary package 


Reporting ro the CEO you will be in charge of che entire marketing and sales organization of the company, our clientele is 
quire diversified from small retailers to large multinational firms. 

Ideal requirements: aged 38*45, top academic education plus 10-15 years of Sales and Marketing management in an 
inremntionid Group, preferably selling professional equipment to large consumer networks : such as office equipment, - 
photography and photocopy, computers... 

You speak French and English fluently, another European language will be appreciated. 


Research and Development Manager 


Ref. AK 1 12 very attractive salary package 

Reporting to ihe Executive Vp. Industry, you wi‘U be in charge of a department counting 60 people. Therefore you have 
control of all techniques : photo, mechanics, electronics, optics and new digital technologies. 

At least -iO years old. with top engineer degree, you have at least 10 years experience in a similar position. 

These 2 positions require true entrepreneurs, charismatic leaders, fully at ease in an international environment 

Please send your application ( letter plus resume and compensation) quoting the appropriate reference to Antoine KAMPHUIS. 


& associes 


CokscU cn recrutemcnt 

l , me Magellan - 75008 PARIS - 7W_- (1) 44.43 9S.S9 - Ftix (1) 44.43.9897 


CASABLANCA MOROCCO 


PROGRAM DIRECTOR, 


; i im h i xyl o \ i a y;, i *ct no a l vj i* K 


A well-established successful, non-profit organization seeks a 
qualified individual prepared to commit to up to 3 years as 
Program Director located in Casablanca. The goal of this US 
Govemment-fuunccd program is lo identify and assist qualified 
Moroccan firms to take advantage of specific trade and investment 
opportunities through linkages with US and European firms. 
Specific duties include planning and organizing marketing 
opportunities for Moroccan products in the US; organizing 
industry surveys as well as training and promotional activities; 
hiring and training Moroccan staff; managing a staff of seven, three 
of whom work in the US office. 


This person will be fluent in French, with at least 10 years 
international business experience in multi-produa management, 
including agricultural products. At least 3 years overseas 
experience, and demonstrated leadership, analytical and 
communications skills arc required 

Competitive compensation and benefits package is offered. 

Send resume and salary requirement not later tim October 7 to: 

Vice PitsidcntiAfrica 
P.OB. 10005 
Stamford, a 0690) 


EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 


SECRETAIRE DE DIRECTION 

BILINGUE ANGLAIS NEUILLY-SUR-SEINE 

pour le President d'un cabinet de conseil 
international : 35 ans environ, BTS Secretariat \ 
de Direction, st£no anglais et franpais, 
parfaitement bilingue anglais, capacites ' 
r€dactionneiles dans les deux langues (sulvi 
des relations & I'international). 

Adresser lettre manuscrite, C.V., photo 

et pretentions a Box D434, IHT ' 

92521 Neuilly Cedex , France 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 

IN 

Hrral 


wua.\moaAL 


ribune 


Almost half a million readers see this section every Thursday. * . 
For more information of how to place your adver ti s em ent > ' * 

please contact in Paris: 


Philip Oraa V 

Td.: (33-1) 46 37 93 36 Fax: (33-1) 46 37 93 70 



I aJV* 


EUf 


■ ■» , X" 


- ^ 






4>. 

V ' 




■ [Ml 1 
,fc T l- 




- 


■"Ml ■<_ 


* -r v - 



r " 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBINE. THIERS DAY. SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 


Page 5 


ation Has a Brief History 








%E~ 


^* lhh «> 


fthc:; 
fa>K i.i : l : 

piCf-.ltfiv ; 
NSt 

id *i’ : 

Mr ■ 

fk : * ■ ! ■ 

• ^ i U »Y/, 

•■Jtf / 

■ — * 

I':-.' ■ 
ddiiv.l 


• -TIim k 
' l; l I'n.V 


T • . By Bany James 

! { International Herald Tribune 

A .-The United Nations conference in 
W Cairo is a reminder that concern about 
*l>ooming population increase is of com- 
, paradvdy recent origin. 

*; Only in the 18th century did intellec- 
tuals, the most famous being Thomas 
'Mai thus, begin raising the prospect of 
people one day outstripping the Earth's 
^resources. 

But for most of history, mankind has 
; been more concerned with increasing its 
numbers. War, plagues and high infant 
mortality ensured that populations grew 
. slowly, despite high birth rates. 

Some researchers estimate that, during 
' the 750 years preceding the Industrial 
Revolution, the world's population hard- 
ly budged. According to George Moffett, 
the author of “Critical Masses: The 
Global Population Challenge,” the 
world’s population remained under 250 
mfllicra throughout most of history, 
“capped by birth rates and death rates 
locked in a seemingly permanent equiKb- 

■ ___ if 

nm 

Now, more than 250 million people 
are added to the world's population ev- 
ery three years, and the billion people of 
p Maltfius’s day have swelled to 5.6 biLHon- 
. The population curve swung sharply 


upwards with the Industrial Revolution, 
which broke the ancient link between 
land and population. Whether popula- 
tion growth has brought about an in- 
crease in food supplies, or whether the 
greater availability of food has increased 
the number of human beings is an old 
chicken-and-egg question. 

The idea that mankind would outgrow 
its resources originated with the physio- 
crats, a French-led intellectual move- 
ment in the 18th century that maintained 
that wealth was defined by land. Since 
the amount of land is finite, the physio- 
crats argued, it would not be able to 
support an endlessly increasing number 
of people. 

An opposing philosophy was known 
as mercantilism, which held that a large 
population was a form of wealth, making 
it possible to create bigger markets and 
armies. 

Marxists adopted the mercantilist idea 
that population growth fosters economic 

growth. Kail Marx dismissed Maithus's 
warning as “a repulsive blasphemy 
against man and nature.” 

Although high-bom ladies right back 
to ancient Egyptian times knew a thing 
or two about preventing unwanted ba- 
bies. pregnancy was historically as inev- 
itable as the weather for most women. 


Queen Victoria lamented that “men nev- 
er think, or at least seldom think, what a 
bard task it is for us women to go 
through childbirth very often." 

The words “birth control” entered the 
language in 1914 wiLh the American re- 
former Margaret Sanger. Effective con- 
traception for the masses has been 
around only since the 1960s. with the 
development of the pill and intrauterine 
devices. Barrier methods such as the con- 
dom have been around much longer, but 
were seen primarily as a means of pre- 
venting disease, not pregnancy. Casano- 
va in the 1 8th century was one of the first 
to boast that he used “assurance caps” to 
prevent impregnating his mistresses. 

The development of artificial contra- 
ception brought with it oft-repeated con- 
demnation from the Roman Catholic 
Church, which teaches that every sexual 
act must remain open to life. Saint Au- 
gustine set the tone in his “Marriage and 
Concupiscence,” in which he condemned 
any attempt to avoid procreation. 

But by the spirit of his age. Saint 
Augustine was expressing a lusty and 
liberal view against Gnostic preaching 
that all sex was evil, even wi thin mar , 
riage. His views were taken largely from 
Roman Stoic teaching that procreation 
was the rational aim of marriage. 


A Third World Focus on Sons 

Family Planning Loses Contest With Cultures 


y' rA *< 

lift?' 

11 I'.Tt 


• :inL r 

^ in 


By Molly Moore 

H'OfAinpw Post Service 

GOVTNDPUR, India — Ba- 
bita Kanwarpal, wife of a vil- 
lage milkman, mother of two 
daughters and one son, has an 
obsession: to continue having 
children until she produces a 
second son. 

“I want to have two sons," 
said Mrs, Kanwarpal, a shy 21- 
year-old member of India's 
lowest caste, who was married 
at 15. “Only after that will I 
stop having children.” 

As the United Nations Con- 
ference on Population and De- 
velopment meets in Cairo to 
work out an action plan to sta- 
bilize world population, it is up 
aga i nst the entrenched cultural 
fixation on sons in India and 
many other Third World coun- 
tries. 

“Sons are an insurance poli- 
cy, unemployment policy, sick- 
ness policy and old-age pension 
all rolled into one.” said Ashish 
Bose, at Jawaharlal Nehru Uni- 
versity's Population Research 
Center in New D elhi “Indian 
families will not accept family 
planning until they have two 
sons.” 


Indian families depend on 
sons to work the fields to bring 
additional income to the family, 
to support it when parents be- 
come ill or disabled, and to pro- 
vide financial aid for aging par- 
ents. This is particularly true of 
rural families in the poor north- 
ern states, where population 
growth is most acute and f amil y 
size is almost double the nation- 
al average of 3.6 children. 

“The preference for sons is 
very strong,” said Usha Vohra, 
until recently India's minister 
of health and family welfare. “It 
is predominant in agricultural 
areas. The desire for having five 
or six children so you have more 

sous to till the soil is very 
strong.” 

And perhaps even more im- 
portant, most devout Hindu 
parents — both poor rural and 
educated urban — believe they 
cannot go to heaven unless they 
are cremated by a son when 
they die. Because the mortality 
rate is so high for infants and 
young people in India, most 
parents consider it essential to 
have two sons as additional in- 
surance in the event one dies. 


A 1991 survey of Indian cou- 
ples by the New Delhi Opera- 
tions Research Group found 
that 72 percent of rural couples 
polled said they wanted to have 
at least two sons. Among urban 
couples, the preference for 
more than one son was 53 per- 
cent. In absolute numbers. In- 
dia’s population is growing 
faster than any other country's. 

The same tradition that 
places such a high priority on 
sons contributes to the low' sta- 
tus accorded women. In the 
eyes of many parents, particu- 
larly the poor and illiterate, 
girls are seen as a burden, re- 
quiring a hefty investment of 
family finances to pay the dow- 
ry that is necessary to find her a 
husband. 

After marriage, a woman 
moves into her mother-in-law's 
bouse to care for her husband’s 
parents. In most cases, accord- 
ing to sociologists and scores of 
interviews with Indian women 
of all social strata, it i& the 
mother-in-law. not the hus- 
band, who dictates the number 
of children a woman will bear. 


ToFightAIDS f 

HA. Supports 

Needle Swaps 

Los Angeles Tones Service 

LOS ANGELES — Say- 
ing that AIDS had reached 
epidemic proportions. 
Mayor Richard Riordan 
has declared a local state of 
emergency in an effort to 
sidestep state law and allow 
the distribution of clean 
needles to drug users to 
continue without police in- 
terference. 

At the urging of the City 
Council, Mr. Riordan di- 
rected the city attorney' and 
the police department on 
Tuesday to avoid investiga- 
tions of the needle ex- 
changes. 

Needle exchanges, de- 
signed to reduce the trans- 
mission of the virus that 
causes AIDS through con- 
taminated syringes, have 
had the tacit approval of 
many city officials. 

The state legislature has 
twice voted to legalize the 
exchanges, but both mea- 
sures were vetoed by Cali- 
fornia’s governor, Pete Wil- 
son. 



OFFICE 

ADMINISTRATOR 

Major hi-tech U.S. company 
soon to be based in 
Rotterdam, the Netherlands, 
is seeking an Office Admi- 
nistrator to help run and 
grow the office. 

This individual will be res- 
ponsible for travel arrange- 
ments, banking coordina- 
tion, telephone answering/ 


office coordination duties. 



Excellent English written 
and verbal skills a must, as 
well as traditional office 
skills, to include PC usage 
and database familiarity. 
Salary commensurate with 
experience. Send your re- 
sume, references, and sa- 
lary history immediately to: 

BOX D-419 

International Herald Tribune 
850 Third Avenue, 8th Floor 


JREAt: o 

BE PRO 

top* it me r 
jtfwrliy 

" ■ 1 * 

V" '" ' " 




o tJ 

: «■! Tv l 

v;!{-c r?£ 

• v\ v 


FOSmONS AVAILABLE 


UKCA1S BENCH BUSME55 
TMV&MAGAZME 


ADVemStNOSAtBMAMOBt 
for ufeiiidioiul afemsfag, 
Deftramdj dnonk; wad Id fogh tevd 

C— ■ - ■ | . ft! -I m — ■ - 

comas. engwst roomer nqgMt 


comm cogue roomer vrfwt 
fluent French prararobfa. 
CVito! V— § C n frtu i ii oi 
22 me St Dmrique, 75007 PAMS 
or fax to IWtHI 45 55 29 25 


UKGHT - Mmafiond Law Finn 
Pm l&fi web young qurffied buyer 
with 2 to 3 years experience fufr-nroe, 
e xp erienced in company low, as 
weti os Frarwo-Garrnarac rektto m 
(fluent Genrnxi aid good Engfaty 




Tei in 5370.24 
SCJflOEDBt/ Mme EMPEREUR. 


- VI- ■ ■ , 


I • 


<. V- • 




EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


MUNGUAL AUSTRIAN MfESTMENT 
BANKER, 30, seeks dyrib iyii weS 

co wpwiMW oppoTumy n wesxem 
Europe (non-Gannon speaking court 
fries) or Aurirafia. Seeling new chal- 
lenge outside baling sorter, *-g-: Art, 
Entertoinroenf or ora*. fidtaaSon h 
UX, MBA in Economcs in Vienna 
fiaamve e xperience m Corporate Fv 
nacq, M&A and Business Develop 
raent m Centred Europe, BSnguoS 
Genmi/Enakih, some Trench. Foe 
AUSTRIA, +4 3 p) 513 13 823, Ref. 
Pfl. 1L 

HSPAMC AMStfCAN EXECUTIVE, 
™i socnsNc oxpenem n Doaong, 
oper a tkxfl and moA ti ro g . seeks 
rmploynent/rcproenfation with 


• ■ 


it 

l.X r'. 

* l \ 1 • r 

%iir. ' 



iceiausA 

CAUFOBMA CPA 

Experienced in auuny globe d growth 

through contracts, negotiations, 
and/or resolving deputes. Ahwoys 
avoflabto, aw ctforcA & ford. 

Vet 707-874.2563 liSA 


HOTR MECTOft 

French/ Anwnoeui seeb to manage an 
develop Resort {or Chateau} Hotel 
asninged North American dwmdd. 
tei \& A 305/761-9971 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


iNTl CAKB OPPOflT UTflTY 
We ora »i mfl FOSS & ADVECT1SNG 
AGB4Ct s e el dhg sdes oooreSnodors, 
kboRy you ore; 

• B et we en 24 ond X ym M. 


DE D!H 


EC^ : 


■A • 


S L-'i ■ 1 




H l 
I r* ►» 




\ .A 

■ . * L - ■ ■ 

• i ■ f ' * 

**■1 » ‘ .isT - 


• Enhnl command of Engfeh. French 
«rikrwiriedgtofSpm^ 

a Dynoni^ extrovert, cormdwi!, opn- 
maK, indeponded letf'mottvrted, 

9 humd lo travel 10 months a year 

wtfireddBncy ond extended stays m 

different awnina 

• No experience in ides memory. 

The job eradb corRods on the highest 
level d over she world aid a reword- 
ing t ri flT Y . 

yeu Sunk wu haw the drive and are 
anbaku enwgh to lake fte chafange. 
vw would fte you s sand w your CV 
togrfw w* a ncma ptoogr q di 

c/.NOA 

9 \. mt DU no STHONOtE 

75006 PAHS 


WANTS front Odnbar V« 


. : i i .■ *■ 

6 IS f-» - 
y C> 




r.r€ 


M Kl ' Kl !l ' f ; 

^ 7riM"' : 


t* “ ■ - 


i«V*r »«•* 

us l 3 ' 


vows sawfliANi 'udy 

{Umordty student) 

« COMPANION to refined bdy. 
donsicM m Swrtzerkmd, on her travels 
and to eufturd mnts. 

IT* piettsshd oppSamt k of Engfah 
mtfher ftongue, has a cheerW prvnci- 
ito and excafcm nows. She shorty 
and aAurafiy iwraled 

pw* reply wrih thefio and refencm 
to Bo* 3687, Uil 
92521 Neuitiy Cedex, nonce. 


HE-IANCE JOURNALIST MAJOR 
ROTfRNATlONAL CITIES. .Com news 
ebouf fortson trends, fashion and Sa- 
tie mduaries. Must haw enhnl 
written EnaWv Send leswue, di p pog 
to Pubfishcf, Suite 500, 6 Wal32*J 
York, NY 10001- Fax; (212) 


-1 TROMANAGK e > 




SEVENTH YEAR -BRUSSELS 


94 


15 & 16 DECEMBER 1994 



T 1 I 

i i I 


KPMG Peat Marwick have been retained by a leading trading house to recruit 

GENERAL MANAGER - DUBAI, U.A.E 



The Company: 


The Job: 


Person Profile: 


INTERNATIONAL 


Hr.V» toriHns ud IV Va 


Remuneration: 


The company is a large diversified trading house having interests 
in automobiles, marine products and construction with ambitious 
plans ter expansion of its operations in the U.A.E. 

The General Manager will be responsible for formulating a 
strategy to develop a much larger and more profitable and 
dynamic business in the U.A.E. He will be responsible for initiating 
and managing change directed at the enhancement of 
performance in all aspects. He will be required to streamline and 
provide focus to the company's diverse trading activities and 
direct efforts towards a complementary group of business. 

The successful candidate will be aged between 40 and 50 with 
around 1 5 years of experience in the trading sector and at least 5 
years experience in managing a trading business as head of a 
company or of a large profit centre. He should have a successful 
record of managing change including implementing systems and 
providing leadership to a diverse culture workforce. We are 
looking for a high achiever with strong marketing orientation 
combined with a good understanding of finance and commercial 
affairs. Candidates who have automobiles and related products 
and services sector experience would be preferred. Knowledge of 
Arabic and the Middle East would be an added advantage. 

Remuneration would be commensurate with qualification and 
experience. 


with EMDS and media partners in ten countries invite 

EUROPE’S TOP 400 YOUNG EXECUTIVES ' 

to attend a two-day meeting with central recruiters from : 

• ABB • AGJP • AIR LIQUIDS • AMS MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS • ANDERSEN CONSULTING • ARTHUR D. LITTLE • AT&T • BARCLAYS BANK - 
BAT ■ BERTELSMANN • BNP • BOOZ-ALLEN & HAMILTON • BOSSARD CONSULTANTS • BP OIL • CARNAUDMETALBOX • COMMERZBANK 

• CPC EUROPE CONSUMER FOODS • DEUTSCHE BANK • DRESDNER BANK • EDF-GDF • EUROPAY • GOLDMAN SACHS • 

• HEWLETT-PACKARD • KERRY GROUP • MCKJNSEY & COMPANY • PREUSSAG • RWE • SHELL • SOCl^Tt GENERALE ■ 

> SWISS BANK CORPORATION • VOLKSWAGEN - WEST LB - 

Applications are welcome from professionals of all disciplines and 1995 graduates able to demonstrate the following : 

- outstanding intellectual and interpersonal skills - ability to operate in at least two languages - international mobility - 
- a maximum of five years' professional experience - availability for employment in 1 995 - 

To receive an application form and supplementary information, please send our Brussels office a postcard, to arrive 

no later than 1 October 1994, stating clearly your name, address and date of birth. 

EMDS International, P.O. Box 2, Ixelles 2, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium 


If you are interested in this opportunity, send your resume within ten days (from the 
publication of this advertisement) quoting ref : ES/58/94 to KPMG Peat Marwick, 
P.O. Box 3800, Dubai, U.A.E. All communication will be treated in strict confidence. 


Selection & Search 


r 


Bloomberg 

BUSINESS NEWS ^ 


“I 


COMMERZBANK sBi. 


E UR ES 


official carrier 



RWE 


flWEEnergfe , &RHBNBRAUN , RKGHHEKnu 




HClOCLBCPG 


▼ 


Bhockts 7 


RWE* Enoargung 


* AM vationaJWfw mtaom* firapoan & non-European oSke 


^>EMDS 

bspcrtisc la Lutmaoiui P.rautruw 

. Cradians • Vaanjj'fWenjotfiJi ■ 


MIDDLE EAST 
OPERATIONS MANAGER 

UJS. Company » bob* far a Mdde 
East Operations Managor, We are o 

manufacturer of rtffacerneri fife* 

cor t n dges far gas turtms. The 
tndrodud woubf function os the 
company's ides & teehnied advisor tc 
oovb in (tie Mdde fxA 

CONTACT; Mr. Ted Greenlm 
IDC fflfar Mmrfadwfag Inc 


MUSTANG CAFE IN PARIS, T» Me- 
restaurant & bv r soda very respon- 
sible young manager for openng of 
new restarom in Paris. BikngucT En- 
qfatvFrend i . Enai&h mother tongue 
preferred. Mo fa oictfL Ruible, rty 
name Votd work poriraL Conroe? Eric 
Fax 1-43 27 68 08. Tel 143 35 41 72. 


1331 1 55th Court, Goern 1 60650 
Tdrtuaaoo f«jomS4WU5a 

QUAUTY B4GBCBK5 4 M5PECT0KS 
far part Ira eroployTTictni in sourex 
impedioa oudts and first piece n 
ipfation auignmems afl turopean 
suppfan, owp sp o c c and coararoaf 
produdL Aui gnm cn b eritf in mooi 
European countries inducing Eastern 
Europe. Locd language and Engfch 
copabii y nqunsL Sm trawl may 
be requvwl Forward CV in En^in 
i unuec fetrt y far Goscq. P.O. Bo> 
50403, Phoenix, AZ W6 ISA or 
FWtULS.WB 491-5167. 


OH. MAGAZINE 

fa PAHS see ki ng experienced btfagud 

• Actaffesrg safesman/wim) 

# Secretory, experienced 
Express, Word 5. 

Send CV toe AFflQ 7 avenue Ingres 
75016 Pons, France. 


ACCOUNTANT 

International organisation seeks 
an acc ountant to supenw on annd 
budget of FT90 Mffon and a itoff of 4. 
Good Cngfi di a esseieiaL Starting 
sdary: FFlS^fiBr'nionih goo. Apnfa- 
tkm by 15tnScpt«nier to; BoiTSu. 
IJiT % 92521 Ffaiiy Cedex, Fnm 


HO5T/H0STBS tWB* far US trend 
progr mra . TV eswimed (aged 

toTkCaU (33-1142 78 70 00 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
WANTED 

YOUNG AMERICAN WOMAN, 
deeply fascinated wih worid culture, 
wist eg to und htr hor z ons. fiadc- 
ground ifl eenbnty tofani axxcfaanon. 
pubke/medn relations wrmng. Seeb 
new cholfenge Q& preu/unnar 
penonot seaetory/(pofasperson for 
prominent mtematonal busmess/a4- 
turd/dipfainafic leader /organatiicn 
EuepnonoKy talemed, resourceful 
bngud, htefo4e f cteplned. Demons 
of travel/ for e*fln refaasnem Reply- 
Box 5396. LHX. 850 Tferd Ave. fth Ft. 
NY. NY 10022 UiA, 

GSMAN KONOMBT, uigk. per- 
Tedty mobile, univer^ry degee, mam 
subjects nfastnd o raonia rfo n eco- 
name pychabey: EndcK French 
(Ruent). Arabic, naBan [basic knowt- 
edae}. soofa portion in rWTwtond 
finance. Reply Boi 3695, IJlT.. Fred- 
richsir. 15, O603S Fneikturt/Man, 


S INGLE ENGI£H/ FRENCH LADY 50. 
resdem French A viera. perfecriy 
bJingud, office & Travel exsenenae. 
seeks pootna All senate offers cot> 
iderea Relocation a posabiity Reply 
to 3W. LKT. ?2S21 Neuity, France 

INTEKNATVONAU5T SEEKS PR 

POSITION n tQunsm/iravel.'hoidL 
Burnt Spcnsh, French, ,‘yfard o r i a 
Masters decrefl/'lm'l Mancaemenr. 
m retocai^Tel:9T9-335JT93 US 

WARM, PRETTY, ARIGHT 
Wbflttn seeb p pad m-m housekeep- 
ing pciahon fe a businessmen tec 
busy to make a h era. USA fou [6l2j 


NUNKVE 

Engksh mail 


VC S«S faf AM59CAN 

• vc FIRMS ro PAWS: 
mother tongue secretaries. 


EXPERIENCED PA mothef 

tongue fluent Frentfi unth bnk- 
Leepng and computer Too 
yourti to retire, too old to fed sur* 
able job, S B*S AITFNATIVS PARS 
ttCW Any offers Reply to 36*9, 
UjT, 92521 Neuffly Cedex. Frqice. _ 

BI-aHTURAL French Amenco n woman 
wife experience *n Irtl hading corn- 
pones, Inti bus ness law degree, wb 
portion a attSfOtf, free to rebate 
Td Ptftt 03-11 47Q7M»wto 
iP. (3*11 43* 50 50. 


SOUTH OF FRANCE trflingud soph ts- 
ticated French PA. i reTiable, operr 
minded, seeks pan: fult-hme position. 

Td (331 9301^24 


MUiJTUNOUAl AMWCAN MAN 
seeb PR portion wife trofrg or tour- 
cm company. Win rebate. Tdte. 
Mt (391-2-781936 


FRENCH: VSY FLUBUT MAM3ARK 

5 yean in Om. seeb to represent 
comoany m Ova. fat 853^11^997 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


CerUrd Eurapeirt VP c it* 
fe-ledi company seeks amfcrtous 

PA/ SECRETARY 

far ehafengrog Para based pertw. 
English mother tongue, fltieni frtvn 
evened Good ommoton. Thw 
year s nvwiwm bipmeKB required 
Aged 25-33 yeert. Piuse forward 
O' Old pnota ro- 

MISS RJSI1 
MA5STOR SYSTEMS 
23/ 27 AVENUE DE NEUILLY 
75116 PARIS 


knowledge of French required 
422, Baa Saint Honara 
75006 Peril. Frm 
T«fc IT) 42 61 76 76 


JUWOR SECRETARY 
For smaB Pm based consulting 
company. Erafeh mother tongue, 
hAngual Freni. Genvwn ** asset 
Swung sdory: ff8,000 gross. 
CViteflferftfc Sax 
92521 NewHy Cede*, France. 

BILINGUAL SECRET AAV, (English 
mother tongue), for mw* national LAW 
FRM \N ONtlRAl PARS. Mirvmim 2 
yen eepenem reguied CV to: to 
3703, LKT. F-92521 Nndly Cedu 


SfiCRETAJOB Engfah Mother Tongue 
weh upenence needed far Demnoneti 

E ihons in Pam. Cal Gff Interim. 
42 01 B? II 

TM INTL - Have humor om permanent 
lobs at ofl levtis far EnglefePrench 
mother tongue Mnoud seoetanu/ 
assulun ti CaL Para M 7 03 38 67. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 

EUVOFEAN Off, single male, wel 
tranod. evpanenced os oft-found chef 
is asiwable oa c4 Oiober 1st W4. 
res waired lot many years or pnvefe 
homes, castles and embassies ro places 
bke London, New York. South of 
France. Caribbean bfandi. Amsterdam. 
Switzerland and Qnda Ruera ro 
Engfish. a wekrog a full lime yetr 
iDund employment with five-ro ar- 
rangement. E>ceHrm references 
ovokblB an request. Ptaca wntad 

for resume by Foc^phane: 599-5- 
24264 or home p hm 599 5-23^3 
(Island ol Si Moartyi) ask far hko 


Reporters and Editors 

Bloomberg Business News, 3 24-hour global news service, seeks reporters tor 
bureaus in Europe. Asia and rhe Americas. 

Experienced newspaper and news agency desk editors are also soughr for 
BBN's London bureau. 

BBN’s strategy is ro marry rhe highesr quality journalism to curring-edge forms 
of news distribution. In addition ro writren stories, BBN reporters also contribute 
ro Bloomberg’s radio station, Television programmes and business magazines. 

Qualified reporter and editor applicants will have three to five years 
experience in business journalism ar a top newspaper or news service. Recent 
college graduates will in some cases be hired for the reporting jobs. 

Reporters are sought for: 

• STOCKHOLM and COPENHAGEN - To cover company and market news 
in Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland. Fluency in Swedish and Danish 
is preferred but not required. 

• FRANKFURT - To cover German economy (experience required', companies 
and markets. Some knowledge of German is required. 

• LONDON - To cover the UK economy, company and marker news. 

• DUBLIN - To cover the Irish Economy, company and marker news. 

• ZURICH - To cover financial markets and companies in Switzerland. 

German fluency is required. 

• VIENNA - To cover financial markets and companies. 

• MOSCOW - An experienced, Russian speaking reporter to open bureau. 

• WARSAW - An experienced. Polish speaking reporter to open bureau. 

■ DUBAI- A fluent Arab speaking reporter to cover business and financial 
news in the Gulf States. 

• TOKYO, SINGAPORE, JAKARTA and BOMBAY - To cover the markets, 
companies and economies of these countries. 

• CLEVELAND and CHICAGO - To cover companies and general business 
news in the regions. 

Interested applicants should send or fax resumes and any clips ro 
The Freshman Consultancy in London, quoting reference IHT/5 


L 



The Freshman Consnliancy, Coppcrgjrc House, 16 Brunc Sneer, London El ~NJ, ILK. 
Telephone: (44* 71 721 06 J Facsimile: (44 j “1 “21 ?5*2 



SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. Ruenr French. 
Engle*. Cweh koine German. seefaK® 
m south erf France Cad Nice 9316 1B49 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

B4GUSH SfflOOL web 
longue Engfah taadnn. UforV. pfrfflrf 
obtaaiory, fafl-tm bad Pl«sc cat 
PoraI-44 »99 71 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


j 











Page 6 


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 



OPINION 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONA 



eribunc 


nreUSIIKD WITH THf i*BW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


New Russian Schooling 


Talk about about starting school with 
a clean slate. The schoolchildren of Rus- 
sia return to classes for the 1994-95 
school year wiih textbooks rewritten to 
reflect the changes in their world. As 
reported by Washington Post corre- 
spondent Margaret Shapiro, the new 
books contain no Marxist/ Leninist dog- 
ma, no Party-distorted history or hagi- 
ography; they offer in their place lots of 
Introductory management and econom- 
ics. ft might seem a bit late to be purging 
the curriculum of Leninist doctrine, but 
cash is short Tor everything in Russia, 
and schoolbooks, however important, 
ore a major endeavor. 

In all the change- wracked countries of 
the once Soviet bloc, education has 
turned out to be one of the larger, gum- 
mier problems. From the “wall in the 
head” that persists among Germans to 
the retraining needs of entire popula- 
tions of lawyers and judges, intellectual 
change has proved no less daunting, and 
far less denned, than economic change. 

The difficulty of keeping the two 
realms even partially separate comes 
through in reports of the new school- 
books, which are long on practical eco- 


nomics and management — even, it is 
reported, at the grade school level 
where the lessons of capitalism are in- 
stilled via cartoon characters. 

Glasnosl- watchers of the 1980s can 
probably still summon up the memory 
of that dramatic spring moment when 
Mikhail Gorbachev canceled university, 
final exams because, so he said, the text- 
books were all wrong. As with other 
dramatic moves, this one was less a con- 
crete educational reform than a leader’s 
way of making a point; and as with 
other apparent repudiations along the 
way, the degree to which it proves real 
below its surface symbolism was unclear 
and remains so now. Nor does Russian 
culture seem to have settled into a new 
orthodoxy or a new consensus stable 
enough to be comfortably enshrined in 
the educational system. 

Textbooks usually represent some 
sort of conventional wisdom, but, as 
Americans have found, too, for that very 
reason they serve as convenient cultural 
battlegrounds. The big public revision 
may have been a hard step to take, but it 
can be only the first of many. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Over-Isolating Cuba 


In the face of the growing crisis in 
Cuba, the Clinton administration has 
tightened restrictions on both financial 
transactions and travel to the island. 

- Seeking to increase pressure on and 
strengthen the isolation of the Castro 

- regime, new regulations published within 
*■ the jasi 10 days curtail charter flights, 

- forbid the sending of money to family 

- members and restrict travel by relatives. 
These changes have personal implica- 
tions for Cuban- Americans and their 

- families. But in addition, the new rules 
V make it more difficult for others engaged 
l- in information gathering and related ac- 
• liyities to travel to Cuba. These changes 
j will have a broader impact on Americans 
& seeking to leant more about Cuba, to 

- bring certain forms of .American arts and 
culture to the island and to inform citi- 
zens in the United States about what is 
going on in that country'. 

Congress has traditionally viewed 
_ these now curtailed activities favorably 
r and only this spring enacted a sense of 
j Congress resolution urging that they 
i should be exempt from the general em- 
i bargo. In June. Secretary of State Warren 
■ Christopher assured Congress of the ad- 
1 ministration’s understanding that “the 
i free flow of ideas and information is also 
r consistent with the maintenance and en- 
forcement of economic embargoes.” Yet 
~~tEe changes made at Lhe end of last 
month move in the opposite direction. 
Specifically, the old regulations grant- 
ed general travel permission to “persons 
who are traveling for the purpose of gath- 
ering news, for] making news or docu- 


mentary films.” The new rules limit this 



reporting organization, 
free-lance writers are no longer in this 
category. Professional researchers were 
also given blanket exemptions from em- 
bargo restrictions. Now they, too, must 
apply for permission on a case by case 
basis. While specific licenses had been 
available to permit travel “for purposes 
of public performances, public exhibi- 
tions or similar activities,” such travel is 
now prohibited. And while specific li- 
censes were available for people involved 
in “activities of recognized human rights 
organizations,” permission can now be 
granted only to those “investigating hu- 
man rights violations.” 

This tinkering with the law may seem 
inconsequential but it is not. The whole 
thrust of the changes is to restrict just the 
kind of First Amendment activities that 
Congress has sought to protect. In practi- 
cal terms, moving from general exemp- 
tions to case bv case ones requires time, 
paperwork ana delay — particularly now 
when government officials are swamped 
with family-related requests for exemp- 
tions — and places the applicants entirely 
at the mercy of government officials who 
can turn them down with no explanation. 
The regulations were hurriedly drawn 
and may now be seen by this government 
as overly restrictive. They should be 
changed so that the flow of information 
about Cuba can continue during the cur- 
rent crisis and beyond. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Treasures to Be Returned 


Russian officials acknowledged 
blushingly last year that whole ware- 
houses of art treasures seized during 
World War [I had been hidden away for 
decades. The great prizes included the 
so-called Treasure of Priam, unearthed 
by Heinrich Schliemann at Troy, and 
a stunning Gutenberg Bible, each calf- 
skin page illuminated with floral decora- 
tions. The Trojan gold was seized in Ber- 
lin by the Red Army, and the Bible carted 
from a book museum in Leipzig, once 
Germany’s publishing capital. 

As months passed, however, the blush- 
ing stopped, and President Boris Yeltsin's 
government found excuses for rebuffing 
German claims for restitution. Now the 
argument is taking a new turn. The lower 
house of the Russian Parliament is consid- 
ering a law saying that wartime booty 
should be kept os reparations. This has 
been taken up as a holy cause by extreme 
nationalists. More surprisingly, the idea is 
supported by some academics and muse- 
um curators, who have come to view the 
objects as national property. 

In reality, seizing war booty is not just 
a bad but a terrible idea. Doing so would 
dishonor treaties that Russia has signed, 
sow enduring ill will in countries with 
lawful title, and undermine Russia's own 
claims for restitution of czarist gold 
worth S2 billion and various properties 
valued at SIQ billion, including mansions 
in Paris, an Orthodox monastery in Italy 
and land in Jerusalem. 

Pilfering another country's art. through 
arms or imperial fiat, opens wounds that 
persist for generations, as in Greece's long- 
standing clamor for the Elgin Marbles. 
When American forces entered Germany 
in 1945 and came upon paintings and 
sculptures from Berlin museums stowed in 
salt mines, some in the White House and 
Treasury wanted to seize those treasures. 


President Harry Truman instead ordered 
the return of the art — but only after 202 
pointings were brought to the United 
States for a lavish traveling exhibition. 

As freshly retold by Lynn Nicholas in 
“The Rape of Europa,”’ even that pro- 
voked controversy, including a protest 
from the Soviet foreign minister. This was 
during the Nurembetg trials, in which 
Nazi plunder of other countries’ art was 
treated as a war crime. In 1954, the war- 
time victors signed the Hague Convention 
for the Protection of Cultural Property in 
the Event of Armed Conflict It expressly 
stipulates that captured artworks “shall 
never be retained as war reparations.” 

The Soviet Union signed the conven- 
tion, as it did a 1980 bilateral agreement 
with Germany calling for reciprocal re- 
turn of all art treasures seized during 
World War U. Nevertheless, some Rus- 
sians now say this is unfair because Sovi- 
et museums took good care of wartime 
trophies, while treasures taken by Nazi 
armies in the East either disappeared, like 
the celebrated Amber Room from Cath- 
erine's palace outside Leningrad, or were 
dispersed on the art market This argu- 
ment would have greater moral weight if 
Moscow hod not for decades denied the 
very existence of quantities of precious 
objects, most of which have never been 
shown to the public. 

U lacks logic or sense for blustering 
nationalists to condemn Boris Yeltsin for' 
not doing enough to get back church 
properties in Western Europe; while at 

the same time crying “robbery” when 
German owners seek the rightful return 
of a Gutenberg Bible. Mr. Yeltsin has a 
glorious chance for a grand finale: a mov- 
able visual feast, a traveling show of all 
the hidden treasures that would conclude 
with a splendid homecoming. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABIJSHEP ISS7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

('ii-CfcflMIfRf 

RICHARD McCLEAN. PuNivlicr it Chiej Evnumc 
JOHN VINOCUR. EueamuEA* A M-ehrsukre 

• WALTER WELLS, EtB»v • SAMUEL ABT, KATHERINE KNURR and 

CHARLES \1TPCHELM0RE 0 * 7 x 1 * Edison • CARL GEWIRTZ. .te. 

ROBERT! DONAHUE EJn'r«f'iticEJa>iidP,i$ts» JONATHAN GAGE Businns ini Fame Editor 

* RENE BOND Y. Otjuk AMA-r* JAMES McLEOD. Advemamt Durru* 

*1 'ANITA I. CASPAR!. !>&\ r*3b ml frit&ymnr IXnxJar* ROBERT FARR£ Gmdntkr. Dirtruv. Einrfw 

Oirviieurdcki Pid4ictiarwv Richard D. Smmntf 
PHnntarAiUi'tnlik'ki PiiWrnnoA- Katharine P Diimv. 


ii(Urra ; i«J Hcrjkl Tnhuia INI AwnvClail»MMlte9=CI NaiiOy-MU -Seine. Franct 
TeL : 1 1 iJWWOO. Fox :Cit.46_17«i5l: Adv_ 463751 12. Internet tHTfetairaknuk: 

rft. v \ftlnrl A dkml&n 5 Gewihm RJL Sincere irfl I. TcL Fac (65) 274-1W 

.1*. : Dir. bat Rati A Knrqvhl Si GhvceHer RL H,wig Ktag. Td KS2f 222-1 IK , fijte ■ < b2-V222-fM>. 
Geii tier. T. SxUuh'r. FncJn-har 15. tiUZ* FnmlgunM. Td H ft 55. Fax; (Of#) i* >110 
/Yrs.FX JtiiWGnniv. RW TlardAiv^ ASu- J'.ni NT. ltXJ22 Td Cl 2) 752-31NU Fax: j2!2l 
»‘ r V, t 'win. ft* long Vrr. Lnndtvi WC2. Tel *<•"/ 1 S5K4SU2. Fax: id’ll 2-U1-— 5^ 

S a nj. ,«.«„/ 'jr I.W'JK* 1 F'. RCS Nantern B 73202112*. Cimmiruw t Parnuirv No. hl337 
;wj bBCinttind HtvJJ Trilaar. .ttfnytemrmxt B3ft:ftWiW2 



While Experts Bicker , Women Turn to Birth Control 


N EW YORK — When Tun Wiith, 
U.S. undersecretary of state for 
global affairs, first began to lay the Clin- 
ton a dminis tration’s rhetorical ground- 
work for this week’s global population 
conference in Cairo, the note he sounded 
seemed inspired. “Sustainable develop- 
ment cannot be realized without the full 
engagement and complete empowerment 
of women,” he said in a speech in March. 

Bypassing the contentious divisions of 
overpopulation vs. overconsumption, de- 
veloped vs. developing nations, the rights 
erf women could unite all in strategies for 
a world whose population has doubled in 
the last four decades and might triple by 
the end of the next century. 

Unity, of course, is not what has come 
out in tite coverage of Cairo so far. Much 
has been made of the conflict between 
the majority of nations represented there 
and an alliance of the Vatican and Islam- 
ic fundamentalists who oppose legal 
abortion and decry the secular modern- 
ism they find in the conference aims. 

Too tittle has been made of the fact 
that this conflict is. in some measure, 
irrelevant While experts bicker over 
whether the problem is population or 


By Anna Qnindlen 


economic development, the battle to 
bring down the world's birthrate has al- 
ready been joined, and by precisely those 
people styled by Mr. Winh as the linch- 
pin of the Cairo conference. 

The world’s women are increasingly 
moving to bring the birthrate down on a 
do-it-yourself basis- Not because of de- 
forestation or famine per se, but because 
it is belter for their children. Trying to 
divide their attention among four, trying 
to divide a small stock of food among six, 
many now embrace a standard of moral- 
ity that emphasizes the quality of life 
they can provide over the quantity of 
children they can produce. 

Consider Cairo itself, where crowded 
apartment buildings are being raised ever 
skyward to accommodate more human 
beings in a city that can ill afford them. 
While Islamic orthodoxy has been on the 
rise in Egypt, so has the use of contracep- 
tion. The average number of children an 
Egyptian woman will have has dropped 
from five in 1980 to 3.9 today. 

In Brazil with the world’s largest Cath- 


olic population, two-thirds of married 
women practice birth control In 1970 the 
average family had close to six children; 
today the number is slightly over two. 

The Catholic Church will not bend in 
its opposition to contraception, which 
means it has tittle more to contribute to 
this discussion than a cardiologist who 
does not believe in surgery could offer at 
a symposium on heart disease. 

Vatican representatives have instead 
focused on the “demographic colonial- 1 
ism” and selfish individualism of devel- 
oped nations. One cardinal reoeatly 
waxed poetic — and paternalistic — 
about the “love of life” among the poor, 
as Though raising children in squalor 
should be counted as a great blessing. 

None of that obviates this bedrock fact; 
millions of women simply want fewer chil- 
dren at greater intervals. A study by the 
Alan Guttmacher Institute of women in 
sub-Saharan Africa, for example, showed 
that as many as half in some countries 
reported that they did not want their most 
recent pregnancy at that time or at alL 

The Vatican has engineered shameful 
alliances for the Cairo conference, send- 
ing emissaries to both Libya and Iran in 


its pursuit of ar-any-and-all-costs oppo- 
sition to legal abortion. It is an opposi- 
tion that seems grounded in the belief 
that illegal equals nonexistent, a belief 

bdied by the evidence. 

Brazil serves again as a model The 
Church has lobbied bard to keep abor- 
tion illegal there, yet as many illegal 
abortions are performed in Brazil as legal 
ones in the United States. 

The difference? Only 10,000 American 

women are hospitalized for complica- 
tions of abortion each year, while in 
Brazil the number is 400,000. It is bard to 
find the greater good in that statistic. 

The Cairo conference is not a colloquy, 
about abortion, much as these few ortho- 
dox religious leaders have tried to make it 
so. It is about a complicated web erf educa- 
tion and employment, consumption and 
poverty, development and health care. 

It is also about whether governments 
will follow where women have so clearly 
led them, toward safe, simple and reli- 
able choices in family planning. While 
Cairo crackles with conflict, in the homes 
of the world the orthodoxies have been 
duly heard, and roundly ignored. 

The New York Times. 



Spread the West Eastward, Putting Germany in a United Europe 


P ARIS — The Russian army 
has marched out of Berlin 
with panache, taking with it the 
Cold War — and leaving Germa- 
ny with its historical problem: 
that it lies in the center of Europe. 

A German official said recently 
that the goal of German policy 
today is that the country never 
again finds itself “with the West 
on our western border and the 
East on our eastern border." 
What Germany wants, he said, is 
to have the West on its eastern 
border as well. 

That is the reason Germany 
has been so anxious to bring Po- 
land, Hungary, the Czech Repub- 
lic and Slovakia into the Europe- 
an Union and other Western 
institutions. 

This German preoccupation 
with the East has been interpret- 
ed by the suspicious as an attempt 
to re-establish the national zone 
of influence that Germany pos- 
sessed before the war in Eastern 
Europe. It is a mistaken interpre- 
tation. This is Germany’s effort 
to escape the dangerous ambigu- 
ities created by Germany’s geo- 
graphical position and its history. 

The critics would be better ad- 
vised to promote a greater in- 
volvement in Eastern Europe by 
the other West Europeans and 
by the United States. The politi- 
cal tendency has been in the oth- 
er direction. 

The United States blocked 
bringing the East European 
states into a close relationship 
with NATO and opposed any 
formal extension of NATO guar- 
antees to existing state frontiers 
in Eastern Europe, a measure 
which could have provided a 
fundamental guarantee of stabil- 
ity to the region. 

The United States has wanted 
to settle the Central European 
problem by way of Russia, seeing 
in Russia’s stability and democra- 
tization a guarantee for the states 
that live between Russia and Ger- 
many. It has mistakenly seen one 
policy as excluding the other. It 
has assumed that Western inter- 
est in Eastern Europe would be 
taken by Moscow as hostile. 


By William Pfaff 


France and Britain have been 
reluctant or laggard in attempting 
to re-establish their own influ- 
ence in East-Central and Eastern 
Europe. This has tended to leave 
the Germans uncomfortably alone 
in the field. 

Partly responsible for this has 
been the crisis currently experi- 
enced by the European Union it- 
self, a result of the negative popu- 
lar reaction provoked by (he 
Maastricht treaty on further Eu- 
ropean integration. 

French Prune Minister Edouard 
Ballad ur said a few days ago that 
Europe’s future is one of concen- 
tric circles, the inner one incorpo- 
rating the original Six, with France 
and Germany the core, surround- 
ed by the less committed Europe- 
ans. such as the British, Danes and 
other Scandinavians, with outer 
circles made up of the present 
candidates for membership, in- 
cluding Eastern Europe. Thus un- 


doubtedly is a realistic appraisal 
of the existing situation, but it 
leaves Germany with the East on 
its eastern border, not the West 
and it leaves Russia out. 

Henry Kissinger has rightly ob- 
served that the great challenge 
after any war, cold or otherwise, 
is to reintegrate the defeated into 
the international system. When 
they are excluded from the sys- 
tem. they are given a motive to 
subvert it This is plainly appar- 
ent from what happened after 
World War I, when the Germans 
suffered ostracism and indemni- 
ties, provoking that sense of in- 
justice and bitter nationalism 
which Hitler exploited. 

With Russia, after its Cold War 
defeat, the need for constructive 
reintegration has generally been 
recognized. This has motivated 
Washington’s policy. Russia, for 
all of its internal difficulties, has 
reciprocated with a constructive 


and conciliatory policy, including 
these troop withdrawals from Ger- 
many ana the Baltic states. 

The Baltic problem has, of 
course, been complicated not only 
by the strategic sensitivity of the 
region but by the fact that since 
Stalin annexed the Baltic states, a 
great many Russians have will- 
ingly or unwillingly been settled 
there, and most do not want to go 
back to the chaotic conditions 
that prevail in Russia itself. 

However, 50 years of Russian 
military occupation ended in Es- 
tonia and Latvia on Aug. 31. It 
ended in Lithuania last year. The 
status of the Russian nationals in 
the Baltic states remains unset- 
tled, but, given, the severity of the 
problem and the emotions at 
work, the situation today is a 
great deal better than it might be. 

The future of the rest of what 
used to be the U.S.S.R.. or the 
czarist empire, is unsettled, the 
successor nations all very shaky 


mies. The Baltic nations are . in 
very good condition by compari- 
son with Ukraine. Tbe risk in the 
future comes much more from this 
national fragility in the successor 
states than from a putative revival 
of Russian imperialism. A re-as- 
sociation of some of these nations 
with Russia may be inevitable.; 

People have spent so long 
thinking in Cold War terms that 
they are inclined to see these 
changing circumstances as rein- 
venting Europe's division in the 
guise of Russian empire or a 
threatening “strategic partner- 
ship” among the ex-Soviet 
states. But the essential fact to- 
day is that Europe has been un- 
divided but is not yet united. 

The West's great interest is to 
perpetuate an impartial coopera- 
tion across Europe to Russia so 
as to avoid Europe's redivision 
into an East and a West, leaving 
Germany in the middle. 

International Herald Tribune. 


as autonomous states and econo- © Eos Angeles Times Syndicate- 


Phase Out the Cuba Embargo and Phase In Democracy 


W ASHINGTON —The Clin- 
ton administration may yet 
stumble to a success in dealing 
with Cuba. The problem isn't that 
hard, and Fidel Castro is helping 
in his fashion. 

The first requirement of policy 
Is to keep faith with refugees flee- 
ing communism. This was a stan- 
dard Cold War policy — and tbe 
right one for a country that 
speaks for liberty. It brought a 
million Cubans to Miami over a 
period of 30 years. The end of the 
Cold War was bound to dim the 
urgency of rescue and to give a 
sharper profile to, for instance, 
Florida's carrying capacity. But 
in Cuba the Cold War survives in 
the form of an anomalous and 
discredited but still live Commu- 
nist tyranny. This imposes a con- 
tinuing obligation on the United 
States to care for Cuban refugees. 

Not gracefully but effectively, 
President Bin Qinion is meeting 
this obligation by offering Cuban 


By Stephen S. Rosenfeld 


refugees “safe haven" in Guanti- 
namo- Safe haven is denigrated in 
some quarters as an immoral re- 
versal of the traditional automatic 
asylum. But the recipients of safe 
haven are not being thrown back 
to Cuba, and they are living under 
an American Hag. It is an adequate 
expedient to buy a bit of time. 

The question is how to use that 
time. Here Mr. Clinton has had 
difficulty in moving past mind- 
less nationalist assertions to the 
effect that “Castro will not be 
allowed to dictate American im- 
migration policies.” 

Someone should have told him 
that Mr. Castro, by generating 
refugees in the first place through 
repression and by his openings 
and closings of the emigration 
tap, has been dictating U.S. im- 
migration policies practically 
since his revolution took power in 
1959. Until Soviet communism 


Time to Fix the American Jury System 


W ASHINGTON — Can a 
creaking jury system sur- 
vive the deadly modem combi- 
nation of celebrity murder tri- 
als. intrusive media and 
arrogant, acquisitive trial law- 
yers? That question is raised by 
two California trials that should 
change tbe way Americans 
think about American justice. 

Tbe Simpson and Menendez 
trials turn a harsh spotlight on 
America’s system of putting the 
question of guilt and innocence, 
and of punishment by prison 
term, death or monetary dam- 
ages, to 12 ordinary citizens al- 
legedly chosen at random as a 
cross section of tbe co mmuni ty. 

That system is not the envy 
of the rest of the world, as 
many Americans seem to 
think. And these two murder 
cases help explain why. 

Few other countries have 
dared try sucb a populist ap- 
proach io the law. Countries as 
diverse as Japan and India have 
tried citizen juries and quickly 
dropped them. Even Britain, 
which bequeathed the jury sys- 
tem to the American colonies, 
has turned away from it. Today 
only 1 percent of civil trials and 
5 percent of criminal hearings 
are beard by juries in Britain. 

America’s commitment to the 
jury system has to do with de- 
mocracy more than with any 
pretense or a jury s infallibility. 
Alexis de Tocquerville observed 
in the 19th century: “By oblig- 
ing men to turn their attention 
to other affairs than their own, 
it rubs off that private selfish- 
ness which is the rust of soci- 
ety.” Entrusting the final say 
about a citizen’s fate to his or 
her peers was a strong counter- 
weight to government abuse. 

But the society Toequevffle 
analyzed did not have to cope 
with tabloid leieviaon. Public re- 
lations agencies working for ac- 
cused murderers and alleged 


By Jim Hoagland 


child molesters were not pan of 
the frontier he surveyed. Nor 
were “jury consultants” who use 
marketing skills,- opinion polling 
and psychological profiling to 
stack juries in their clients’ favor. 

While the lawyers’ ability to 
manipulate the system against 
itself grows exponentially as tbe 
20th century ends, thejuiy re- 
mains straitjackcted in rural 
habits of the 19th century. This 
is shown in unsettling detail in a 
new book, “The Jury,” by Ste- 
phen J. Adler, a New York- 
based legal journalist 

Mr. Adler details bow unrep- 
resentative juries have become as 
trials get longer and more com- 
plex. Few jurisdictions bother to 
make citizens honor jury sum- 
mons today. More affluent, bet- 
ter educated citizens who do 
show up can often wangle a 
work-related exemption. Law- 
yers use preemptmy challenges 
to knock out r emaining potential 
jurors who might not go along 
with thar elaborate strategies. 

The technology of modern 
communications gives defense 

lawyers unprecedented access 
to potential jurors and unprece- 
dented opportunities to identify 
and manipulate the emotions of 
jurors or, if all else fails, to over- 
whelm the jury with technical 
details and confusing, irrelevant 
information. 

And, Mr. Adler writes per- 
suasively, judges rarely help ju- 
rors understand legal procedure 
or tbe substance of the cases 
they hear. Serving on a jury to- 
day is like watching a baseball 
game and being told the rules 
only after it is over. 

But it is the defense lawyers 
who attract most of Mr. Adler's 
attention. To understand what 
the lawyers for O. J. Simpson, 
and for Lyle and Erik Menen- 


dez, are attempting to accom- 
plish for their clients as jury 
selection and die trials proceed, 
keep Mr. Adler’s book handy. 
While he does not write directiy 
about either case, he tells you 
how we got to this seeming dead 
end in criminal justice, and 
what can be done about it. 

Despite the admissions by the 
Menendez brothers that they 
gunned down their parents and 
then went on a shopping spree 
with their inheritance, a jury re- 
fused to convict them last win- 
ter. A mistrial was declared 
largely because of what Eliza- 
beth Hardwick, writing recently 
in The New York Review of 
Books, calls “the very useful 
claims of sexual abuse and self- 
defense” that the brothers’ de- 
fense attorneys and their expert 
witnesses quickly “organized or 
scripted” as the trial approached. 

Mr. Simpson’s team of attor- 
neys, publicists and experts use 
his millions to stage a heavy 
publicity blitz to script an alter- 
native narrative to the one pre- 
sented by the prosecution. Ac- 
quittal in the face of the evidence 
gathered so far is likely to height- 
en public cynicism about the 
functioning of the modem jury 
system, and thus about Ameri- 
can justice as a whole. 

The system can be made to- 
perform better by eli minating 
preemptory challenges altogeth- 
er (as Mr. Adler says the Su- 
preme Court may do), broaden- 
ing the jury pool by abolishing 
most juror claims for exclusion, 
and helping those jurors who are 
chosen. They should be allowed 
to take notes, for example, and to 
ask direct questions through the 
judge. And jurors should be told 
in clear detail what they are 
about to hear, and do. 

That is Mr. Adler’s argument 
for reform. Let us hope he is 
right, and Lbat it gets done. 

The Washington Post. 


went under, most Americans re- 
garded the flow as a burden that 
they were proud to sustain. 

But never min d. Mr. Castro is 
saving Mr. Clinton from his slo- 
gans by offering to negotiate out 
emigration. This is the focus of 
the talks that opened in New 
York on Thursday. A deal sits 
waiting to be confirmed. Cuba 
would discreetly pen up the ille- 
gals who are now setting out dan- 
gerously on rafts to Florida. The 
United States would agree to in- 
crease numbers of legals. 

There is a strained quality to 
Mr. Clinton's approach to Ha- 
vana. Even as he enters talks that 
offer a promise of personal relief 
to some thousands of Cubans, he 
tightens the embargo pressures 
that inflict further suffering on 
some millions of Cubans. This is 
an inconsistency and, considering 
the human costs, a pity. 

It is due, as far as anyone can 
tell to Mr. Clinton’s kowtowing to 
the Cuban emigration’s right wing, 
a faction he started courtin g dur- 
ing his campaign for the White 
House. Cuba, of course, is no long- 
er any sort of security threat. 

In any event, the talks begun in 
New York are eventually more 
likely to go Mr. Castro’s way into 
broad political discussions than 
to stay tightly focused on techni- 
cal emigration matters, as Mr. 
Clinton says he prefers. This 
seems to me the logic of events. 
Mr. Castro seems to understand 
it better than Mr. Clinton does. 

Mr. Castro is not out to em- 
brace the United States and its 
ways. Better than anyone, howev- 
er, he understands that his regime 
is failing now that Moscow no 
longer supports it. This is what 
has led him to take the huge risk 
of starting to bargain for a lifting 
of the American embargo. His 
release of some of his citizens to 
the rafts put one of his few still 
available cards in play. 

Strangely, Mr. Clinton evident- 
ly fears that Mr. Castro will out- 




1894: Royal Pretensions 

PARIS - — [The Herald rays in an 
editorial:] The throne of France is 
vacant but it seems to be in good 
quarters at the garde-meuble in 
Paris, where it has been stored 
away for twenty-four years. Nev- 
enheless, there are plenty of pre- 
tenders who cast their eyes on it 
from afar. The latest addition to 
file crowd is one of the Spanish 
Bourbons, who has just put him- 
self forward as a candidate for 
the throne on his own authority, 
and has dubbed himself D uke of 
Anjou a title which belongs to 
the head of the house, the grand- 
son of Louis XIV. 

1919: Clocks on Stri ke 

PARIS — Public clocks in Paris, 
never excellent timekeepers at the 
best, went out of commission for 
the most pan with the war. Of 
late, efforts seemed to be made 


YEARS 




1 m i. 




•Rt 


smart him in political talks and 
that the Cuban leader will end up 
replacing Soviet subsidies with 
American subsidies for his other- 
wise sinking enterprise. Some of 
Mr. Clinton's domestic critics 
share this apprehension. 

But almost everyone else real- 
izes that there is a second, broad- 
ly political deal that Mr. Clinton 
is in a position to offer. The Unit- 
ed States would phase out the 
embargo. Cuba would introduce 
democratic elections. End of the 
Cuba problem. 

Why would Mr. Castro accept 
an approach that puts him on the 
slippery slope of negotiations that 
may cost him powerf There is a 
whole industry of people who try 
to get inside his head. Some be- 
lieve him to be obsessed if not by 
power then by rage at the United 
States, and hence an unlikely can- 
didate for a political compromise. 

But having come this far, how 
can an American president shy 
away from supporting a plan 
that satisfies the two fundamen- 
tal considerations of Americans 
democratic principle and Cuban 
national pride? 

The Clinton administration 
regularly asserts that it favors a 
peaceful transition to democracy 
in Cuba. But its actual policy of 
unrelieved pressure and isolation 
shows a glint of the old American 
premise that in the right circum- 
stances the Cuban people will re- 
volt and throw Mr. Castro out. 

This is the belief that led Pres- 
ident John Kennedy to launch a 
disastrous invasion by Cuban 
exiles at the Bay of Pigs in 1961. 
No invasion is imaginable now. 
But a trace of an underlying 
American resentment at an up- 
start Cuba may remain from the 
earlier period of American colo- 
nial hegemony. 

The trace is faint to Ameri- 
cans. but perhaps not so faint to 
some number of Cubans whose 
nationalism Mr. Castro shrewd- 
ly stirs. With respect, the United 
Slates can steal that card. 

The Washington Post. 



:t r> 


■ 


s 


i t ■ 
\ 






to start them going again, but the 
clocks now seem to have caught "V 
the spirit of the times and to 
have gone on strike. Not the kind 
of striking that clocks are sup- 
posed to do, but ibe kind which 
some of the music-hall employ- 
ees started and in which the taxi- 
drivers engaged recently , during 
the luncheon hour. 

1944: Japanese POWs 

WASHINGTON — [From our 
New York edition:] More than 
900 Japanese prisoners of war, ^ 
arming themselves with baseball 
bats and mess knives, made a % 
mass escape attempt at a prison > 
camp in Australia last month, v. 
and 231 were killed or committed 
suicide and 108 were wounded, 
Prime Minister John Curtin of 
Australia announced today [Sept- jV 
?] in a statement made public by 
the Australian Minister at Wash- 
ington. Sir John Dixon. 7 





Page 7 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8. 1994 

i 

OPINION 


au tii . 

* • ? 

W -Cqilmv ' ':i It.’.. 




. .** II-! ... 

«*rih.v-n, 

,*** M v. 

Atarti,i U i., . 

wtomwv: 

l ’K|‘ 


4 J». 


H»«t I:.,.!.'" ; 

• ’I'H i * ■ , '» • 

intiitl lUv;!!,.*. ( ' ' 1 '' l »• • 

dnuMisi...,; 


VlV«?L li», 5 C! . j: ;\ 

Ai’feitf ■> « . . . 

?!■%' i ■■■**, . 

Ifvl. bIS14| Siiim< ■ 

m ■ I t ■ li 

SL. i 

• i i ii ■ 


I" V, 


n't 
l ..r " 
’ l 


I' 


"7 4 
'■‘i 
1 is . 


»ted r.uro^ 

***»<*• ri!;* 
va\ i\u .- 

Wl> Wili; I ... . . ' 

fmsju-t :i ■■- 

,, '" V 

■ * I I *1 

*4^1*.’' lis.ii- ■ ■ , , ‘- 

ot Km...:.. . 

i • i i 

VkilhKiiv . r 

ilunii.-v ■. , 

•Jycv 

t'hanvv;. 

Vl'j! I jl! ;* 1 i i: . 
yvi^c , i «■ 
lllftMU 1 ::-.. 

-■‘H :]* ’ ‘ 

• Maiv* \v ■■ ; 

tl.H ■ : 

iJlll.ji.M 

I V. : 

I.C 

lum .■■„■. • : 

■ it 5 ! r 

j m 

- J . * ■ *• . * 

( till III • 


I 

■ \ . w 

■» J' 


.’k 


I- 


a i)t 


‘IIKHTJf 


MT:»: * 

!hr 

A, i • ■ >.■ i 

to- 


Liberals Need to Reclaim Liberty 


T17ASHINGTON — There is 
W a sen lime nial quality to the 
celebrations of organized labor 
that take place every year around 
this time m America. But all the 
Labor Day talk about the glorious 
victories wrought by worker soli- 
darity seems a trifle antique when 
only one private-sector worker in 
eight actually belongs to a union. 

The difficulties faced by trade 
unionism and its traditional ally. 
American liberalism, are frequently 
attributed by their friends to broad 
trends over which neither union 
leaders nor liberals had much con- 

By accepting a rhetoric thai 
emphasises stale-fostered 
'compassion’ and 
redistribution, liberals 
fume ceded the high ground 
to conservatives. 


troJ. There is, above all, the increas- 
ingly powerful hold of a fierce and 
highly competitive individualism on 
the American imagination. 

More prosaically, a Jot fewer peo- 
ple are woriting in factories and on 
assembly lines. These were the great 
spawning grounds for union activity 
because the solidarity' preached by 
labors organizers made a lot of 
sense to people who really did feel 
that they were treated as removable 
parts of a large machine. 

There is also the “We’re the victims 
of our own success" argument. The 
vety fact that unions and liberals 
have managed to spread prosperity 
around has encouraged a lot of peo- 
ple to decide that solidarity, unions 
and the welfare state are all bunk. 

There is truth in all of this, partic- 
ularly the troubles that unions face 
because of the decline of factory 
work. But these explanations may 
also be a bit too comforting. 

Competitive individualism, for 
example, has always been a power- 
ful force in the United States. Much 
in evidence in die speeches of Abra- 
ham Lincoln, it can hardly be seen 
as a creation of the 1980s. 

Similarly, a lot of people still 
think they are treated as cogs in 
someone else’s machine, but are less 
likely than in the past to turn to 
unions or liberals for relief. 

And while there is a lot of prosperi- 
ty about, there is also a good deal of 
anger bred by economic insecurity. 
But angry people these days are just 
as likely to listen to Rush Limbaugh 
or vote for Ross Perot as to pick up 
a union card or support a liberal. 

There is an alternative explana- 
tion for the troubles confronted by 


By E. J. Dionne Jr. 

unions and liberals that may help to 
explain why so much of that popular 
unrest gets Tunneled through move- 
ments of the right. The real problem 
for liberals and labor is that many of 
their leaders have lei Americans for- 
get that their whole reason for exist- 
ing is not to create bureaucracies, 
enhance government power, inhibit 
change in the marketplace or redis- 
tribute somebody else’s money. 

Rather, both the unions and the 
liberalism of the Progressive Era and 
the New Deal arose to defend the 
autonomy of individuals and to en- 
hance their capacity for self-reliance. 

Before the rise of the factory, 
a large proportion of Americans 
worked for themselves, owning their 
own tools and their own shops or 
farms. The factory and the assembly 
line engendered protest not because 
workers were against the free market 
but because they objected to the loss 
of autonomy, personal freedom and 
dignity that they saw woiking for 
wages, for others, as entailing. 

Unions were, of courseTalwavs 
interested in improving wages and 
working conditions. But. most im- 
portant. they were about restoring 
some semblance of control and cine 
equality to the average worker. 

Liberalism, for its part, ha* . -me 
to be associated primarily w the 
creation of the ‘‘welfare state " in- 
cluding good and popular programs 
such as Social Security and Medi- 
care. But the liberalism of the Pro- 
gressives and the New Deal was pri- 
marily an effort to use the power of 
government to enhance the liberty 
of those who felt powerless before 
large new economic institutions and 
the terrifyingly strange conditions 
of the Great Depression. 

Franklin Roosevelt, it should be 
recalled, did not require workers to 
join unions. He simply signed the 
Wagner Act, which set up rules un- 
der which workers could organize 
themselves voluntarily. He did not 
have government take over the 
farms. He established a price system 
aimed at keeping farmers in busi- 
ness. The point was to use govern- 
ment to help workers be self-reliant. 

By accepting a rhetoric that em- 
phasizes security, state-fostered 
“compassion” and redistribution, 
liberals have ceded the rhetorical 
high ground to conservatives. The 
conservatives now are the ones who 
talk incessantly about liberty, op- 
portunity and personal responsibil- 
ity. Liberals and trade unionists are 
cast — and sometimes cast them- 
selves — as the friends of bureaucra- 
cy, restriction and rigidity. 

They ought to lake this as a terrible 
slander, since their movement histori- 
cally looked to collective action and 


government intervention not as ends 
in themselves but as a means Lo en- 
hance the range of choices available 
to individuals and communities. 

One of the most devastating com- 
ments about the failed campaign for 
President Bill Clinton’s health plan 
came from a union official who 
foughL hard for the proposal. He 
said that audiences were shocked to 
leant that one of the central features 
of the Clinton plan required employ- 
ers to offer their workers a choice 
among at least three health plans. 

For the many workers whose em- 
ployers offer only one plan, this 
was a huge selling point. What as- 
tounded this supporter of the Clin- 
ton plan was bow little use the ad- 
ministration made of the liberating 
aspects of its design to counter 
charges that Mr. Clinton wanted to 
restrict personal freedom. 

In the case of health care, it would 
appear that liberals became so ob- 
sessed with arguing for compassion, 
intelligent central planning and dis- 
tributive justice that they failed to 
deal with the central concern of so 
many Americans, the freedom to 
decide how to care for themselves 
and their children. 

There is a lesson here. If liberals 
and trade unionists let conservatives 
paint lire rose Ives as the only true 
allies of personal liberty, account- 
ability and self-reliance, the liberal 
side will continue to lose. 

The Washington Past. 


Urban Apocalypse or Improved Public Space 


W ASHINGTON — A quarter-century 
from now. what will urban America be 
like? Ravaged wastelands? Or supportive, pro- 
gressive communities with parks and children 
at play? Little noticed amid summer 1994’s 
political rancor, the season has produced two 
disparate, compelling visions of where the 
country may be headed. 

One was penned by Robert Guskind, in 
National Journal's 25th anniversary issue. 

MEANWHILE 

Looking speculatively forward to 2016. Mr. 
Guskind contemplated “An Urban Night- 
mare Come True?" 

The alternative vision comes from the San 
Francisco-based Trust for Public Land, a con- 
servation group that has traditionally worked 
quietly to preserve key pieces of scenic or his- 
toric lands, rural and urban. Now the trust is 
going public with a dramatic, nationwide 
“Green Cities Initiative.” 

Outside of science fiction, it would be tough 
to equal Mr. Guskind's apocalyptic view of 
America’s urban fate. In 2016. inner-city youth 
are supporting, with guerrilla tactics reminis- 
cent of the Palestinian uprising, a gong of 
former drug dealers and users calling them- 
selves the Homeland, led by an African-Ameri- 
can nationalist named Brother Khalid. The 
Homeland stages robberies and shooting sprees 
in affluent neighborhoods, it uses the proceeds 
to finance housing, schools and social programs 
in ghettos where young black males suffer 90 
percent unemployment and 95 percent of them 


By Ne^il R. Peirce 


have been arrested and served time in jail. 

After a massive 1999 urban uprising that 
claimed more than 1 ,000 lives nationwide. Wash- 
ington formed an Urban Defense Force that has 
been expanded to a million troops patrolling 
“urban military zones” in more than 100 afflict- 
ed cities and suburbs coast to coast. A sprawling 
federal penal colony in the Arizona desert holds 
a milli on prisoners, many sentenced b> federal 
urban tribunals. Congress has just voted to ex- 
pand the colony’s capacity to 3 million. 

There has been wholesale abandonment of 
such places as Gary. Indiana, and East Sl Louis. 
Illinois. Municipal bankruptcies are running 
rampant. In principal cities, office buildings in 
the centers are ringed by heavily armed private 
guards, and employees enter through parking 
garages or mazes of tunnels. 

To compare that chilling prognosis with the 
proposal the Trust for Publie Land may 
seem a mismatch. The trust is simply saying 
that if citizens want to combat urban crime, 
they must provide recreational space and su- 
pervision for young people in poor neighbor- 
hoods. But given the demagoguery of crime 
bill opponents in deriding midnigfu basket- 
ball, or almost any social investment to pre- 
vent crime, the case for prevention needs an 
eloquent exposition. The trust’s document — 
titled “Healing America’s Cities: Why We 
Must Invest in Urban Parks” — does that. 

Public open spaces in cities nationwide, the 
trust discovered in a survey last year, are deterio- 


rating — budgetary orphans when city 
get tight Urban parklands for sports, socializing 
and fresh air are general inadequate and over- 
crowded. Yet from Phoenix to Newark, Tampa 
to Philadelphia, the trust cites neighborhoods 
where crime has dropped when recreation pro- 
grams were expanded. It quotes Newark’s may- 
or. Sharpe James: “We are going to recreate or 
we are going to incarcerate. The choice is ours. 

The trust says it will try to leverage govern- 
ment, private and foundation outlays of 52. 5 
billion to make up for some of the urban 
parkland deficiencies of the past quarter centu- 
ry. If governments and citizens respond, one 
can imagine city parks flourishing as they did a 
century ago, when such great landscape archi- 
tects as Frederick Law Olmsted were at work 
and parks were the objects of civic pride and 
opportunities for divergent classes to mix. 

This one organization's voluntary program 
is emblematic of the new’ effort that all of 
American society needs to make, on every 

front from schools to family care to housing, 
to pull inner cities back from the brink and 
avert the social catastrophe now building. 

The naysayers may deride ail crime preven- 
tion outlays as “social pork.” Of course, dollars 
have to be spent prudently and thoughtfully. 
From welfare to public housing, many of the 
country’s systems cry out for reform. Bui to 
withdraw, io spurn the park and recreation, 
housing, health cure and job education needs of 
inner cities and troubled older suburbs, is to 
invite the urban apocalypse. The Trust for Pub- 
lic Land shows that there is another way to go. 

It'iis/iiriK/un Past Writers Group. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Crosscurrents in Cairo 

If the learned men of the Vatican 
and the M uslim scholars at A1 Azhar 
University in Cairo really cared 
about people, particularly women, 
and if they waste! to reduce the need 
for unwanted abortions, they would 
use their considerable influence to 
assist in the adoption and implemen- 
tation of the draft program under 
consideration at the Cairo conference 
on population and development The 
pursuit of decent health care, equal 
education of all kinds, environmen- 
tal protection and sust aina ble devel- 
opment for women and men of all 
faiths is hardly heresy. 

JIM KULSTAD. 

Rome. 

No government has the right to 
come between a husband and a wife 
or a mother and her child, or to 
dictate the future of marriages and 
families by political force or per- 
suasion. May Cairo be a place 
where the world affirms the dignity 
of human life. 

JAYMTE STUART WOLFE. 

Salem, Massachusetts. 


Regarding the editorial "Front 
Rwanda to Cairo" (Aug. 26}: 

It is not only the poor countries 
that should be reducing birthrates. 
High rates may be seen as beneficial 
to rich counlries. but only under an 
accounting system that treats natu- 
ral resources as inexhaustible and 
ignores pollution and other damage 
to Earth. Alternative technologies 
can help, but we all must learn to use 
and pollute a great deal less and 
keep our numbers down. 

M. SCHNEIDER. 

Penzance, England. 

Portable-Phone Pollution 

Regarding “Forced to Listen In" 
(Observer, Aug. 31} by Russell Baker: 

Mr. Baker asks: What do you do 
about the guy who takes the last 
available seat on the commuter 
train, beside you, pulls a phone out 
of his dispatch case and does busi- 
ness for the next hour, eight inches 
from your ear. 

It has happened to me: maybe it 
was the same guy. He boarded ex- 
actly as described, just as I was 


settling comforabiy into my news- 
paper. and proceeded to give or- 
ders, instructions, dressing downs, 
etc. His voice was not faint, and 1 
knew my journey home was not 
going to be a happy one. 

I had to do something, so ex- 
tracting a legal pad from mv brief- 
case I scared at him as he spoke and 
oslentatiouslv noted down everv- 

# m 

thing he said in as dear and large 
a hand as I could muster. .After 
a while he noticed. 

“Hey. what are you doing.” 

“I’m taking notes.” I said. 
“Thai’s interesting stuff.” 

“That's confidential,” he said. 

“Oh, 1 though L it was for every- 
body." 1 pointed to a guy using a 
lap Lop computer a few rows away. 
“See? 1 think he’s taking notes, too.” 

He gathered his belongings mid 
continued his conversations in the 
corridor near the toilet. 1 chortled 
quietly all the way home. 

FRANK STREICH. 

London. 


I carry a toy telephone with me at 
all times. When tbs guy starts talk- 
ing to Hong Kong I get out my 


phone and become the party at the 
other end. complete with accent. It 
works even - lime, especially in tight- 
ly packed compartments. He has no- 
where else to go. 

NORMAN SANDERS. 

Drammen, Norway. 

Diana and the Bulls 

Regarding "/.• Search of Diana of 
Ephesus" (Leisure. Aug. J6J: 

The writer tdis us that the noted 
Ephesian Diana may have been 
misinterpreted, that what have 
been taken as multiple rows of 
breasts on the statue ore actually 
bulls' testicles, according to the 
dassicist Gerard Seitele. She adds 
that “the steer” and its testicles 
were symbolic of fruitfulness. 
From what we know about steers, 
this seems unlikely. 

JON WIN ROTH. 

Saint-Quentin-les-Troo. France. 

'Gratuitous Mud* 

Regarding “ A Militant Whose 
Mission for Peace Will Continue" 
(Meanwhile. Sept. 2): 


In the course of praising Linus 
Pauling. Colman McCarthy throws 
gratuitous mud on American physi- 
cians. Far from being a part of his 
“scientific life.” his advocacy of vi- 
tamin C as a cold-stopper was pure 
mythology, not based on any scien- 
tific obse rvations. Very few physi- 
cians are “beholden to "drug compa- 
nies.” How? 

Furthermore, Mr. Pauling's "bat- 
tles for peace" were not advanced by 
his very-left position, which earned 
him the Soviet Union's Lenin Prize. 

Mr. Pauling’s merits os a chemist 
are beyond discussion, but his 
peacemaking and medical propos- 
als should be taken with quite a few 
grains of salt. 

WILLIAM KON1GSBERGER. 

Geneva. 


Letters intended fee publication 
should be addressed “ Letters to the 
Editor’’ and contain the writer’s si- 
gnature^ name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject 
to editing We cannot be responsible 
for the return of unsolicited ma- 
nuscripts. 


sJr..'- *. 

■ * • 

. : -1 . . 

f i ! ■ » * » 1 

1 . 

«■ J ^ I | j 

■ 

A. •: r .* 

r..* . . 

:$*■ -A \ 

ii.Vj'i 
“J- 1 » 

r . - .• : ■ 

r— ■ 

. , 

-1 ** ’ ■ * 


9 '. 



f’V. 




•Li " 


l ■* , 


.5-, t * • 
r '• i 

, • 

e • 

V.: 

k I _ ■ i 


7 - .* 




SIEMENS 
NIXDORF 

Financial Multi-Conferenc e Exhibition 

Linder the aegis of the 

Hellenic-German Chamber oT Commerce and Industry 
Official Sponsor ASTIR INSURANCE COMPANY 
Multi-Conference Sponsor: 

COMMERCIALBANK OF GREECE 

On N«»ven/ F -® h - * nves| meni and Ii.ianciaJ mulliconfcrencc-exhrhirion “MONEY SHOW” is orjanfred, Tor the third vt-nr. under ihe 

aegis of ihGwek-lrcmiaii Chamber n( C'lmmen'&aqd Industry. The organization b manured by the Innovative Applications Centre of the 
Croup. 

ne fieetivc of the “MONEY SHOW" 

jj_ -yippromorion oi finunciai products and services offered in the Greek market 
I, y presentation of various possibilities in dynamic and t\jfi table sectors of the Greek Economy . 

liut h offered by the "MONEY SHOW 

, Jprcseniiilions and collaboration dbuiuions with the muM iminihant represetilitlise, of the New Muncy Market and/or investors. 

/* Presentations oi services andcoilubomtiun iK$ociulions in the potion of each exhibitor. 

/ / * Contacts, agreements tutd specialized otlidaf information and updai 

/ / * Direct communication with u socioeconomically upgraded puhiic. seeking services and products *il the highest siandanb. 


/ 


H . - » 

' t ■ * 
% 

J r. • 


r \M 


.1^? 


■% k 


• . -- # • 

* 1 • 

It.: '. ' i ’ 

, I ■ ■_ k 

■ 

» *' ' - " 

V 

. ' l ■ 

9 * 

_ ■ t ■ ; , 

* • 

jf • " ■ 

1**11 

J*. i. • 

•« ■ . 
ii ' ' 

»*,■» * 

*• 

% 

% 

• #*.. 

U' 1 ' 

■ ■ a 


It 


|V ; 


The aim of Ihe “MON FY SHOW is to create, yeur allcr year, the frame work w nhtn which ail faclors of fhu Investment Market, the Money Market, 
as wdl us significant Institutions ol the Economy, can communicate, exchange iikas. identify tmd formulate mutually beneficial partnerships and 
relationships, and final fre agreements and eollahonu ions. 

The operation of the “MONEY SHOW”' 

The 'MONEY SHOW” will be organi/nl in the Ailienaeuin intercontinental Hotel. 

its core will be the Muluconfervnce. to be held In ihe specially modified three -pan Ballroom. The about oO speakers, as well as ail the participant:; oi 
die Conventions, are selected from the sector ol the money and investment markers. The subjects of rhe Mufticonference are divided into 12 
independent categories (detailed information is available on request!. 

The lower two doors o( the Hotel are organized us Oflkes-Puvillions of the exhibitors, in allow for independent contacts and negotiations. This is 
most important and different iaies die “MONEY bHOYl “ from other simple presentations, rendering ir both creative and efleetivc. 

Die centra/ design philosophy of the "MONEY SHOW" 

The exhibition operates as an area for discussions and coniucl* and. secondarily, as an area lor present at ions, but in all casts lor a pre-selected 

audience. The participation to the exhibition does nor faff solely under the logic uf the promo; ion of u company profile, but extend: into the 

can rail/cdorgan tuition of all necessary procedures lor faalilaJtng negotiations and/or agreements with lire most significant prospective customers of 

each exhibitiur. Our collaborators In each parallel convention jrc the most .significant representatives of ihe specialirord press in the pari iculur sector. 

The 5.000 visitors oi the exhibition are made of the .'tudience of ihe conveniiuns. 

■ 

Information management of the "MONEY SHOW" 

The flow control is computerized and monitored ceni roily. 

Additional.! nroraiarion: 

Orpmntccnica. Group 
Th.Sofouii 12 
GR- 154 5 i Neo Rsyhico 
Greece 

rd. + 3rt(|)ftZH77S-'i 
fa\ + .WU>M73234 


Communication Sponsor 


: NAFTEMBORIKI 


I t is the most profound social revolution of our 
time. For the last hundred years, women of many 

• Of 

nations have struggled to change the world's view 
of women as property and producers of children. 
We have fought for equality and are now in Cairo to 
defend a document that women helped write — the 
20-vear Plan of Action for the U.N. Population and 
Development Conference. 

Our hard-won advances are vividly apparent. 
But so are the reactions against them. 

Resistance persists among 
those who would cast aside 
women's vital interests for other 
goals, whether they be calculated 
by social engineers or theocratic 
reactionaries. 

In the meantime, the reality 
of women's lives is that 500,000 
die from pregnancy-related 
causes each year. Millions more 
are maimed by unsafe abortions 
and sexually-transmitted diseases. 

That is why we are insisting 
that family planning be trans- 
formed into comprehensive 
reproductive health care. Why 
we promote gender equality so that men, too, can be responsible for their 
fertility and sexuality. And why we demand that people are supported and 
financial resources are redirected to assure health and human rights, as well 
as population stabilization. 

The world will change only if we all return home committed to 
■ ensuring women’s leading roles in the programs that affect our health 
and our economic security, ■ delivering the new resources pledged, and 
■ holding our governments and other institutions accountable. 

Cairo is just one stop on a long journey we ah share. Join with women from 
around the w orld in the social revolution of our time. Please write or call us. 




Women s Health 
For A Chance. 


LR 

1WHC 


International Women’s 
Health Coalition 

IV IjiaI tl l a/ Vi trhak. \J Wti 10 {H/'jyjTO- S500 

Jtsiiti /Jfi/i/iyj. 1‘rrsiilrrtl 







Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 


HEALTH /SCIENCE 


A System 


To Guide 


The Blind 


Obstacles 4 Talk 9 


In Landscape of 
Virtual Reality 


By Daniel Goleman 

Vw York Tima Service 


EW Y ORK — The other day Dr. 
Reginald Golledge, who is blind, 
took a stroll through the campus 
of the University or California at 
Santa Barbara. As Dr. Golledge walked 

• _ i i • i« . ■ i < ■ 



along, places and impediments in his path 
seemed to call out their as 


call out their names to him — 
“library here, library here," “bench here, 
bench here" — guiding him through a 
Disneynssque landscape of talking objects. 

Dr. Golledge, a geographer at the univer- 
sity, was testing a prototype navigation sys- 
tem for the blind that announced the where- 
abouts of objects through headphones 
mounted to a computer in his backpack, 
creating; a virtual-reality landscape. 

The information came not from some 
mini ature radar but from the si gnals broad- 
cast by the military’s network of global 
positioning satellites. One day, its develop- 
ers hope, miniaturized versions of this navi- 
gation device, which now weighs 28 pounds 
(about 13 kilograms), will help the blind 
navigate unfamiliar neighborhoods. 

“with this system you don't need to 
know a thing in advance about where 
you're going," said Dr. Roberta Kiatzky, a 
psychologist at Camegje-Mellon Universi- 
ty who is working with Dr. Golledge to 
develop the navigating device, which is 
used in conjunction with either a cane or a 
guide dog. “Blind people can find their 
way through totally unfamil iar terrain." 

The “personal navigation system,” as it 
is being called, promises to expand blind 
people’s horizons to unfamili ar streets and 
neighborhoods. Seeing Eye dogs, by con- 
trast, rely on their owners for cues to tell 
them where to go. 

“This system will potentially improve 
tremendously the freedom of movement 
blind people have," said Dr. Michael 
Oberdorfer. branch chief of the Visual 
Processing Program at the National Eye 
Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, which is 
financing the research. “A blind person 
could walk down the street and know not 
just that he was at SOth and Broadway, but 
what stores are around, and that Zahar’s 
delicatessen was up ahead." 

The developers estimate that everyday 
use of such devices is at least a decade 
away, buL as other technologies have 
shown, advances can come much more 
quickly. Simpler devices, like eyeglasses 


Talking Maps 


Signals from Global Positioning 
System satellites are relayed to 
antenna and coordinated with 
computerized Geographic Information 
System map of immediate 
environment. Blind person hears 
obstacles identify themselves with 
recognizable sounds or words. 
Electronic compass indicates 
head position, so computer 
knows what sounds to send 
to each ear. 



Source - 
Carnegie Melon 
University 


What Made the Pterosaur Fly? 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

New York Tima Service 


that pterosaurs, flying reptiles that were 
contemporaries (and relatives) of the dino- 
saurs, had fleshy membranes extending 

m , m m m ■ I .k • I - -9? 1 1 




EW YORK. — Disagreement 
over the wing structure of extinct 
flying reptiles has led to a lacerat- 
ing scientific debate between pa- 
leontologists. 

Important issues, including the precise 
relationships between dinosaurs, ptero- 
saurs and birds, could eventually be affect- 
ed by the debate. But for the moment, 
attention centers on the fossil remnant of a 
single reptile about the size of a crow that 
flew over what is now Kazakhstan 136 
million years ago. 

Given the erroneous scientific name 
Sordes pflosus, meaning “hairy evil spirit," 
this little pterosaur had a pointed beak lined 
with needle-sharp teeth, and a long, flexible 
tail that may have helped it maneuver. 
Paleontologists no longer believe thaL 


from their wing tips alongtheir bodies all 
av to their hind feet. The authors said 


Sordes pilosus had hair, but its original 


name has stuck. The creature had long, 
membranous wings, in which an elongated 
string of bones equivalent to those in the 
fourth Unger of a human hand served as 
the supporting structure. 

The latest volley in the debate over 
pterosaur wings was fired in a report in the 
British journal Nature. The article argued 


the way 

a membrane extension, caDed a uropata- 
giunx, bridged the space between the ani- 
mal's ankles, giving it a dive brake or flap 
useful for maneuvering in low-speed flight, 
but severely hampering the pterosaur’s lo- 
comotion on the ground. 

The authors of the study, Dr. David M. 
Unwin and Dr. Natasha N. Bakhurina. 
paleontologists at the University of Bristol, 
England, said the fossil evidence suggested 
that pterosaurs were agQe flyers, but as 
ungainly as grounded bats when crawling. 

The scientists concluded that all ptero- 
saurs, not only the small Sordes pilosus, 
probably had much more extensive wing 
membranes than those depicted in tradi- 
tional restorations of these anim als. 

The Sordes pilosus Dr. Unwin and Dr. 
Bakhurina studied was excavated in the 
1960s from a rich Jurassic period fossil bed 
near Karatau, Kazakhstan, by Soviet pale- 
ontologists. The stone in this deposit is 
very fine-grained, and the details of fossils 
embedded in it, even the outlines of fleshy 
membranes, have been superbly preserved. 

An opposing interpretation of pterosaur 


nia at Berkeley. Dr. Padian believes that 
pterosaurs bad walking gaits tike those of 
modern birds, and that their hind legs were 
unencumbered by linkage to wing mem- 
branes. 



R. Padian believes that the hind 
limbs of pterosaurs more closely 
resemble those of birds and dino- 1 
saurs than they do those of bats, 

and that since birds walk erect on two feet, 
pterosaurs did, too. For one t hin g, he said, 
the top of a pterosaur femur, or thigh bone, 
is set off at an angle of 90 degrees to its hip 
bone — an arrangement that would have , 
movement much more natural if the 
animal ’s legs extended directly downward 
from the body than otherwise. Also, he said,' 
the fibia leg bone of the pterosaur is much 
smaller in relation to its tibia leg bone than . 
is the case with crocodiles and lizards — 
typical crawling reptiles. 

“So the reconstruction of Sordes pilosus 
proposed by these guys," Dr. Padian said, 
“would effectively dislocate the animal's 
hind limbs.” 

Dr. Padian said that neither he nor some 
of his colleagues have been given a chance 
to examine the contentious fossil directly. 







\ t* 


- . - d 



New Schizophrenia Treatment 



rv 


Joint Pflflttian/Thc New York Tones 


using sonar signals to warn of looming 
obstacles, are much closer to market. 

[The Japanese electronics maker NEC 
Corp. says it has installed a system in Vaxjo, 
Sweden, that allows the blind to navigate 
streets using a cane fitted with magn etic 
sensors, Bloomberg reported from Tokyo. 
The cane vibrates when it touches pieces of 
magnetic iron an bedded in pavement.] 


T HE navigation system uses signals 
from a satellite-linked positioning 
device and a computerized map to 
create a “virtual acoustic display," a 
kind of talking map in which large objects 
seem to announce themselves in the head- 
phones with the precise timing and loudness 
that would be the case if the objects were 
actually making a sound. 

This allows the blind person to sense 
immediately their distance and direction 
and use that information for guidance. 
While no one knows whether it’s because 
blind people tend to devdop a sharper 
sense of hearing, those who have tried the 
system say they quickly adapt to locating 
an object through the sounds. 

“One of the crucial features of this sys- 
tem is that it takes advantage of sensory 
psychophysics — how the brain interprets 
signals from outside to make a map of your 
surroundings so you can navigate,” Dr. 
Oberdorfer said. 


Tbe device relies on a triangulation of 
si gnals from four to eight Global Position- 
ing Satellites to find the person's precise 
location. That information is transmitted 
to the computer, which contains the map. 
An electronic compass on the person's 
head tells the computer the exact position 
of the ears, so that it can then send mes- 
sages calibrated to mimic a voice from the 
location of the object. 



■ On a walk through the campus at the 
University of California at Santa Barbara, 
for instance, a simple version of tbe system 
mig ht simulate a steady sound that would 
get louder as Dr. Golledge approached. 


jVot York Tima Service 

EW YORK — Among the most 
intractable symptoms of schizo- 
phrenia arc those that are the most 
subtle, including social withdraw- 
al, emotional flatness and apathy, which do 
not respond to most existing medications. 

But new studies are finding that very 
large doses of a form of glycine, a common 
amin o add, may offer relief from these 
“negative" symptoms. The finding, reported 
in The .American Journal of Psychiatry, is 
potentially of great importance, because the 
negative symptoms are more persistent than 
more blatant ones, like delusions and hallu- 
cinations, and account for some of the most 
debilitating effects of tbe disorder. 


But before such a glycine remedy for 


schizophrenia is possible,- a synthetic form 

devia 


Tbe developers are testing different 
messages, tike “library is 30 feet ahead. 20 
feet ahead, 10 feet ahead," or compass 
readings, like “library is at 30 degrees,” to 
see which work best A more sophisticated 
version, narrates a journey down the street 
in terms of the main landmarks being 
passed “You'd hear Tra the library. I'm 
the library,' coming from the direction of 
the library, and it would alternate with 
other landmarks calling their name, like 
‘art museum here, art museum here,' to 
orient you,” Dr. Kiatzky said. “Then as 
you reached the building you’re going to, it 
would tell you, ‘entrance here, entrance 
here,' coming from tbe right direction.” 


Glycine, which appears to have only 
minor side effects, could one day offer an 
alternative to other medications that help 
with negative symptoms but have risky, 
potentially fatal, side effects. 


wiD have to be devised which penetrates 
the brain more effectively than does gly- 
cine in its natural form, researchers say. 

In the study, .14 patients who had been 
hospitalized for schizophrenia on and off 
for 5 to 10 years were given masave doses of 
glycine. Those who took the glycine showed 
a marked improvement in negative symp- 
toms, while a comparison group taking a 
placebo showed no improvement. Tbe pa- 
tients were evaluated by psychiatrists who 
did not know who was taking the glycine. 

“We used extremely ill, chronic, deterio- 
rated patients," said Dr. Stephen R. Zukin, 
a psychiatrist at the Albert Einstein Col- 
lege of Medicine in in New York, and a co- 
author of the study. “Most had schizophre- 
nia for 15 to 20 years.” 

One patient, for example, was a 39-year- 
old man whose first symptom of schizo- 
phrenia. in his 20s, was the belief that aliens 


had implanted a radio in his brain. “He 
bears voices commanding his activities,” 
said Dr. liana Zylbennao, another co- 
author of the report. 

Over the years since that first episode, 
the man, lie most of the other patients in 
the study, suffered from increasingly se- 
vere negative symptoms — tike withdrawal 
from former activities and apathy. 

Dr. Zylberman began giving him the 
glycine. After eight weeks, the man started 
malting small but significant efforts to re- 
connect with the world around him. 

Heartened by such small victories, the 
researchers are beginning a second round 
of testing on 30 patients doubling the dose 
of gjlydne. 

The idea that glycine might help with 
negative symptoms was first proposed in 
1988 by Dr. Rafig Waziri, a psychiatrist at 
the University of Iowa. 







w 




i.t v* Tv 


4 . ^ 

— ■ fWi* 


I.*""* 


Daniel Goleman ' 



BOOKS 


* 

s 


JUKEBOX AMERICA: 
Down Back Streets and 
Bine Highways in Search of 
the Country's Greatest 
Jukebox 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


By William Bunch. 293 pages. 
S22 St. Martin's. 


Flu Virus Yields Important Clue 


Reviewed by 
David Nicholson 


By Tim Hilchey 

New Torjfc Tones Service 



EW YORK — Shedding light on 
the inner workings of the flu vi- 
rus, researchers say they have de- 
termined how a protein on the 
surface of the virus undergoes a radical 
transformation to help infect human cells. 
Their findings may also prove useful in 
understanding other viruses, including the 
one that causes AIDS, they said. 

Tbe protein, called hemagglutinin, is a 
triple-stranded molecule with identical 
subunits. In its neutral state, the molecule 
is shaped a bit like a broccoli floreL 


Three globular heads containing recep- 
tor-binding sites are mounted on three 
connected stalks that protrude from the 
membrane surrounding the virus, said Dr. 
Don C. Wiley, a researcher with the How- 
ard Hughes Medical Institute at Harvard 
University. The stalks are helical. 

“Before it binds with a cell, the protein 
on the surface of the flu virus is in one 
shape,” Dr. Wiley said in a telephone in- 
terview. “Afterwards, it changes its shape 
radically in order to be able to fuse viral 
and cell membranes together.” 

Dr. Wiley suggested that the finding 
may have wider implications. “Many dif- 
ferent viruses have proteins that cause this 
kind of fusion event.” he said. “So you 


have the feeling that if you understood the 
fundamental mechanism of fusion, you 
might understand something not just 
about one virus, but about lots of different 
viruses, for example, measles virus. HIV-1 
and flu.” 

The researchers discovered the basic 
structure of the protein in 1 98 1 . Last week, 
after 13 more years of molecular detective 
work, both by their own team and others, 
they announced their latest discovery: the 
structure of the protein after it binds with a 
target cell Binding of tbe protein with a 
cdfs surface receptors, then fusion of tbe 
viral and cell membranes must occur be- 
fore infection takes place. Their findings 
were reported in the journal Nature. 


“THE FRONT PAGE 1887-1992 


A BOOK OF GREAT FRONT PAGES FROM THE 
INTERNATIONAL WERALD TRffiUNE 
REPORTMG THE MAJOR EVENTS OF THE PAST CENTURY. 


Rcpmduction.H of ISO from pages, many with Herald Tribune exclusive 
anicles: like fira-hand re pons from the sinking Titanic, the Dreyfus trial, the 
1081 failed coup in Madrid, the hurried departure of Marcos from Manila — and 
ihe Venice campanile caught in mid-collapse by a Tribune photographer! 

Fotkiw coverage of the First World War by one of the few newspaper 
ih.it .slaved in Paris and was virtually edited at the front. 

Read about people — Queen Victoria, Lindbergh. Jack the Ripper, the 
Windsors. Khomeini. Gorbachev — a century of news headliners and the events 

that surrounded them. , _ 

Hardcover. 2“ x 3" cmsOO.5 x 14 ins). 168 pages. readablc«ze text. The 

hook is divided into six chronological sections, each with an introduction 
describing the penod from historical and journalistic viewpoints. 

TTflE FRONT PAGE 1887-1992 is a distinctive personal or business 
Order one — or several — today. 


-v* tv nTEBiVtinnu.M » t 

Itcralb^i^enbunc. 

" ^ "" Return vi vur order to International Herald Tribune Offers. Lambton Road, London SW20 OLW. England. 

For taler service, fox under to: (4*1-80 94+8243 



NAME 


Please send me 


copies 


of THE FRONT PAGE. 


itf DftiAkOEVM 

ADDRESS. 


cm yo ©e. 


Price per copy UKJW9 lUSSSSl. plusposose: 
Europe. JErl 80 per copr t 
L SA/Cmada: ST * Sft 
Rest of world: JE.I3. 

Please allow up lo three weeks forddjray. 


rUl'NTRY 


Rzymcttf by redif can/ ‘Yt/C'. Hew cfargrcumyiTcdR cant 
□ .\coev* □ Amo □ Diners □ Eunxanl □ MasterCard □ Vba 

Cnd N° 1 I 1 I l -1 r 1 I i r 1 i I t i i Expin due . 


Stfsrucusr. 


CudipsuTi EEC VAT ID V 1 l l ■ » ■ ■ ■ l ■ ■ 1 I- 1 - 1 J 


8 - 9-94 


T HIS has got to be a joke, 
right? A reporter in his 30s, 
about to marry and buy a 
house, has an epiphany while 
listening to Nancy Sinatra's 
“These Boots Are Made for 
W alkin ' ’* in a New York bar. 
This “personal message from 
the Spirit in the Sky, spoken 
through a strange female 
muse,” turns out to be a com- 
mand to travel across America, 
looking for the country's great- 
est jukebox, the “Juke of the 
Covenant” 

Fortunately, after its faux- 
hip, self-infatuated beginning, 
“Jukebox America" gets a 
whole lot better. Once author 
William Bunch gets on the road 
and outside himself, he proves a 
pretty fair reporter, observant 
and adventurous, capable of 
writing fine, evocative prose. 
Until then, however, he's just 
another thirty something guy 
whining about being a member 
of a generation that never got to 
do any of tbe good stuff. 

Over a period of about two 
years. Bunch traveled from Ho- 
boken, New Jersey, where he 
works as a reporter for News- 
day, to the Mississippi Delta, to 
Detroit, Seattle, Chicago and 
Baltimore. He went looking for 
jukeboxes, and he found them. 

What he really found, and 
what I suspect he was looking 
for all along, was America. 

In Hoboken, the ati-Sinatra 
43 rpm jukebox at Leo's Gran- 
devous restaurant, a “neon al- 
tar** to the city's native son, was 
gone. In its place was a new CD 
jukebox with only two Sinatra 
selections. 

Like the good reporter he is. 
Bunch kept digging and turned 
up some good stories — like 
how one-time band leader Mike 
Milo, now proprietor of a Ho- 
boken record store, gave Sina- 

tne 


• John Nix, a U. S. State De- 
partment official dealing with 
international narcotics traffic, 
is reading “ Driving Force” by 
Dick Francis. 

“All his novels are wonderful 
and instructive. His knowledge 
of horses and horse racing is 
quite remarkable.” 

( Michael Kalknbach, IHT) 



when Bunch visited it in subur-j 
ban Chicago, and its founder, \ 


l <*• 


David Rockola, was in a nuis- 1 
mg home. (He died last year at! 
age 96.) 

“Jukebox America” is, at its. 
best, a celebration of America 
and its hardscrabble, conten- 
tious diversity. Bunch finally 
finds his ultimate jukebox in* 
Detroit. There, at Honest?; 
John's Bar (the question marie is 


A- ' 


► - *! 
■I 


part of the name) in that racial- ; 
fvta 


SHATIONAL Mu 


y tom city, blades mingled eas- , 
fly with whites, and tbe jukebox j 
was stocked with everything! 
from Louis Armstrong to the; 


of a movie short with Major non. Once there were as many Temptations, from Elton John. 
Bowes of “Amateur Hour'’ as half 'a.miliion jukeboxes in to Pnnce. Bek of all, with 2,600’ 
fame in 1935. America; >ow there are half 45s at home, the owner, John, 

Farther on down the road, in that numbe^, and jukeboxes Thompson, plans to keep his j 
Little Blue's Cafe in Longwood, with CDs are^ replacing those old jukebox for a while. i 


Jrrots, Slit’li 


- -V 


Mississippi, he found a candi- with 45 rpm records, 
date for the Juke of the Cove- Meanwhile, the 




Rock-0 la David Nicholson's reviews op- i 

nant, “one of those ancient con- com p any, makers ''of the -Jast pear regularly in The Washing - j 
sole models, designed to look American jukebox, was for sale ton Past " 5 

like a home hi-fi of the late ’40s, , 


n 

*j.- . 


with a heavy brown lid that was 
pulled open and a big speaker 
in its base.” The jukebox was so 
covered with dust that the selec- 
tions — 2JL Hill, Albert King, 
Freddy King, Clarence Carter 
— were written on several 


BRIDGE 


- • i- 


pieces of paper taped to the lid. PoLii^mid 


By Alan Truscott held tie guarded heart king , -; 
r-j-iHE freak hand shown in md fed a spade. He was worried,’ 


Tbe jukebox didn't work, ex- East and West, 
when Little Blue played a Pair Chanrnim 



Sr 


tra his start during the filming 


cept when LitUe Blue played a Pair Championshh) at the would take no tricks., 

tape deck through the speaker. East Championships, in pew S™ 11 could have resigned him-; 
Still. Bunch not lo hear the TmtanR / self u. taking six tricks by put-, 

blues of John Horton and his Soopassed as dealer Wui his tmg ^ the spade ace, bit in- ; 
Special Occasion Band, featur- 1 0-card suiL He follffved by stead ie took a desperate i 
mg Old Blind Jebby on har- jumping to four hearts, and finesse tid made no tncks at; 
monica, with their “rollicking North doubled. Soujo did well “1- 

uptempo sound, the kind of to retreat, but he dj/i not realize Down & gave East-West the; 
contemporary blues one might that be had reachar the par con- score f 2,600 en route to; 

hear today from Son Seals.” tract with four smdes. That was vietwy 
The names are so perfect that headed for a two-trick defeat, 
he couldn’t possibly have made and he shou/a have passed 
it up. when doubled, his partner 

It’s no accident that so much fenrw that the four-spade bid 
of Bunch’s travels centered on must be based on a tour-card 
blue-collar, working-class suit, andiie could retreat if he 
towns or the rural South and saw fit * 

Midwest. There's still a tradi- Instead South, frightened by 
tion of neighborhood bars in East's double, ventured four 
places like Chicago and Bald- no-trump, assuming that North 
more, and jukeboxes, as he ob- bdd a heart stopper. Both play- 
serves, are cheap entertain- ers stood their ground when this 
meat They’re democratic, to was doubled, and North was 
boot. You put your money in surely wrong to do so, holding a bidding: 
and you get your choice, but fit in both his partner’s suits, 
you also have to listen to what five diamonds doubled would 
everyone else plays. have cost a mere 300, although 

And that is the subtext of it is likely that West would have 
“Jukebox America.” It’s a cele- continued to five hearts, 
b ration of a dying phenome- West assumed that South 




■- —i 


, .ORTH 

* Ai to g 
O J 

* j i<r 4 

west < d > east 
♦ 87 *’ T? 

0 A Q 10 9 87850 V l 

O- 

*2 * A 75 

SOUTH 


- ‘ ' I ‘ 


f 

J 



* J652 

O 2 

<> 3 10 8 5 A 
*Q»8 

i 

a 

m 

Neither side was vulnerable e 
bidding: 

West 

North 

East 

Sow 

Pass 

1* 

Pass 

J 0 

49 

DbL 

Pass 

4 A 

Pass 

Pass 

DbL 

4 N.T 

Pass 

PUS 

Pus 

Pass 

DbL 

Pass 


*1- 





West led tbe spade eight. 


% 


CM**! 


COUNTRIES 


ACCESS NUMBERS COUNTRIES 


ACCBS NUMBERS COUNTRIES 


Arrgss NUMBERS COUNTRttS 


ACCESS NUMBERS COUNTRIES 


ACCESS NUMBERS 


TO CUT THROUGH 


THE HASSLES OF USING 


A FOREIGN PHONE, 


CUT ALONG THE DOTTED LINE. 




633-1000 

Cyprui / ■ 

080-9004)1 

Japan (IOC) (Englldi) +■ 

0066-55-877 

Pbni / 

196 

Anriguo {dodfcotect phonti) 

*0 

Czacfa ftipafafte +/ 

0042487.187 

Japan |KDD) (Eng Hi) 

0039-131 

PhiHpplnee (ETP1 teftm ody) 1 

‘t* 10541 

Africa (pay phamt) 

1-800-366-^663 

Denmark + 

800-1-0877 

Japan (Japanese) + 

0066-55488 

Philippine* (PtrirCni) A 

103411 

Argvottfia 

00-1-800-777- HU 

Dominican Republic A 

1400-751-7877 

Kenya / 

0600-13 

PfaJUppIne* (PLOT) 

105-16 

Armani* 

8- VO-135 

UnmiffT / 

171 

Kmn (Dococn] + 

0039-13 

Mond + 

00104400-115 

AvsMio (Optus) + 

008-551 M0 

Egypt (CairaJ + 

W4-4777 

Koran (KT) ♦♦ 

009-16 

Portugal + 

05017-1477 

Aa«n*fi« (Tdtfm] + 

1-800-881-877 

Egypt (oil othwr) + 

02-454-4777 

KiMmT 

800-777 

Puerto Rico ■* 

14004774000 

Austria ■ 

022-903-0M 

S Salvador + 

191 

Liechtenstein + 

155-9777 

Romm la +■ 

014004877 

BahoMs 

1-800-389-21 11 

RJ1 hhrii 

00449CM00O 

Lithuania J 

B#197 

Russia (Moscow) + 

155-6133 

Bnrfaodgf ^ 

1-800477-8000 

Finland + 

9800-14284 

Urambevrg 

06004M5 

Russia fall ether) +■ 

1095-1554133 

Mglvm + 

0800-10014 

France + 

19+0087 

Atacao a 

0600-13! 

Saipan 

7T5-WI1 

■ f ■■ 11 • • # 

Mize (hoTtfbj 

556 

Germany + 

01304013 

Malaysia + 

1004016 

Tima and Rota +■ 

1-2354333 

DnAznO 

*4 

Greece + 

008-001-411 

Me*kn * 

954004774000 

San Marina + 

172-1877 

taBudaS 

1400423-0877 

Oven 

950-1366 

Monaco + 

19+0087 

Saudi Arabia 

1800-15 

Bolivia 

0800-3333 

Guatemala * 

193 

Noth. AnriBei 


Singapore + 

6000-177-177 

BpbzH 

000-8016 

UjUyL 

nopouros A 

001-800-1212000 

(Curoeoo & Bonaire) + 

001400-745-1111 

South Africa + 

M004MOO! 

British Virgin 111, A 

1-8004774000 

Hong Kong 

800-1877 

Netheriands + 

06+022-9119 

Spain 

900494013 

Birigontf A. 

00400-10)0 

Hong Keng 1 

Oil 

Hew Zealand A 

0124-rara m. 

S L Lucia O 

1-800-277.7468 

Canada *■ 

14004774000 

Hen gray +Y 

00 #8004 1477 

(ln-cewidry EoPa) 


SL Lucia A 

187 

CUIa 

00 #03 T 7 

lettond +■ 

999403 

New Zeohmd 

000-999 

Sweden + 

020799411 

China (IngMil +/ 

108-13 

India + 

000-137 

Nicaragua (M—pia IngWfc) o 

171 

Swltiaiiund + 

155-9777 

Chinn (Mandarin} 

108-16 

Indonesia 

001401.15 

Nicaragua tW— i— Ipanlihl o 

161 

Syria * 

0888 

Colombia (EngTishl 

f«0- 130-0 10 

Inland 6 

1-80045-200! 

Nicaragua (amide 

02+ Engtiih arSpradkfc no. 

Taiwan a 

0080-144877 

Colombia (Spanish) 

no- 1 30- no 

hiooi*’ 

177.1094727 

Norway + 

800-19877 

Thailand / 

001-999-13.877 

Casio Rica * 

163 

My * 

172-1877 

Fmrana 

115 

Trinidad & Tobago 


Croatfa+ 

9*3400-13 

iemoico - 

1-800477-0000 

Paraguay A 

008-12400 

( pom a! entry ortyj 

23 


TurUy + 

U£, Virgin Mandft 

U5JL- 

UkroiM 

United Arab Enlrtfm + 

Uritt Kingdom [BT1 
United Kingdom (JVIoncwy) 
Uruguay w 
VtaftmCfy* 

Vimraki (EngldiJ 
Venezuela iSpCnldi) 


OM0O-1-44J7 


1400477-8000 

8-100-15 

800-131 


5* • 

r • 


0500-89-0877 
000417 
172-1877 
000-1 1 1 1-0 
800-1 lll-l 


*1 


¥ 

-* 




.V 

\ 





Sprint 




i. 




Tc t dB, just usr shk bdivk ffaJr dnJ Jnsl Ar urmr numtft fa 
fk AMfry m «■ iwhrg. lit «u ww ar JL mV h awia 
m» Eitfnt-§pulo% Spurn ( ipmvtv It s it* Arty 


K 

V 


• » 


A 

Vi- r 


'*nn 


* 





!N 




i 


*Ni 




* 




■* A 


'<V. 

I 

•••* •*- , . 

^ 

‘I* • 




... 

— 

, 


" ’‘S 






.’Fly, 


j. 


r'ivJSS 1 " 
JSpe. ? ‘ v . jjf j .... 


-v 

SI 


?■-■ >rSV 

fl*£ar 

y. v Of^> 

■v^ ,,, % |'. 


353i 

V'ffl 'WT - -' 


"* 

/%W;VV‘- .<V- ■' 

•'■y*: l/ . . *■•■• «■.«*• 

«■■ . ■■. *■ 
,jfx" ;Jy5 

■^•••'. 1 i*gs 

**:»■-.-•** sx- 


.■W 1 f fly' 

L v - v. "5 ^..*]r...- 

feS? A* -tear - *1 


A 


+' \r " 

■" [ v . 
/ • . •»■» * 


*■ ■:■«! ' ■,v. J ibX v . a . , 

• •A.i # ■■ u _ ■ ■■■ B 

Vv;' ‘ ■/■£;•*? «.w. V 

^ - *' 

V-V 


,; ' • * ■ 

■■ • .. ..V •• 

V^v- . . .j. * /„ .. 

v . a ■■■ . ■■■■>.■ . y„* . . ■■« 

- ■ • :•■ 

* ■■ 1 /• y. .A " .... 


*zcy. 

< ,SaV * ^ ■■' 


1 SvA^ ' (■ 

""S’fjff ■ ■"; 


m 






W'JW •• 
.flfcV'V" 

K'-JM 

.-.JT-iA-'w # 


- /»■•«■■ 
‘ % ‘ # "!•■ " 

W"^ /v. v 

■ 

■ •■■■■■■■*Va ■ 


1 V ' 


?:&• -*•• 
?.*> /dp 

affSFSr.5 



A««% 

t. A * ■ , 

£*& ■* > <v 


■ «p ■ ■■■•« . . • jip ^ 

M,, W ,>//.-:.< v - 


■ ■■miuyUj ■ 

*"¥- /Wr. 


■ # ■• 
•s m P..M m 


• • • ■ A. .. 

■«■ ■ tw 

*■ ■. « « ■■ 1 ■ 
v 7 ■ ■ " ■. 

# 


^ *M Hiai - ! V.fi 


International Herald Tribune, Thursday. September 8, 1994 


Page 9 


* 1 1-1 


R. ftblun iv 1 — 1 
■ w«mtMv. ;;r;'; u";/ 

****** Uv, ,t ’j -".i 1 
J* ft pfe\or..r,i » 1 " *' r. : 

1,1 v.,..- ■ 

- »* W!4lIKr:ilr:-. \ r ' C: 

k** 6 *™ nm,:, 

» kjw tSIEV..:, .. ; -!rtrj 

4 M% J «i 

iifiSbi'ffc-,-} 

« «... ,-.. 

*iW; t » ' : : ''-n. 

WaHiiUJ- Iv-j'-ir’..- ■■■ - • Sl - 

rttr rtv^juir,,. ;,,, . , 

*4 K Ihc.-i- . b : 4 V- “• : -:’' 

i \* , •’■*; '■ 

mh*;- ; 

Rfdiii.; -x »: k 

•.- - , ... ’" ^ r • 

IftfCP sW :;. 1 . ’ ' : "..*i 


tllHMlt 


.J ! 

wfe.c> 

|)r. IWtJ / 
liir *tf }:■>■. 
Ifaf. \e.»: 
t»fi. :'>r *r. ••: 
ftwrtv. ’■r. 

^ fuctiiv] a::.-. 

il)f Ml.-'l-;' 1 

JUTial. fi.. 
Mkf Uith :•;■• 

1 * 

WXSWI' .»>:■ •• 

- : 

ftiic 

r %*X -■ 

hlh H . . 
: L'n»> «"■*.: 


Btt ***' 




m ^ " 



BRUM. I 




r» r 

f*, .Jf. 









r-4T-’ 


SW* 




st 


• - t • 







M Chief 


THE TRIB INDEX: 116.17® 

International Heratd Tribune World Stock Index G, composed of 
280 internationally invesiable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 = 100. 

120 


=■: 


W--" 



V • .'■ 


•few 


■.* - 



V 1 L.... 
itl - • U 









s 

1994 


Asia/Pacific 




Approx, weighting: 32% 

Close: 12859 PiFVj 131.28 

0 

§ 

Apprcx. weighting; 37% 

Ctase: 11 7.76 Pm: 137-fig 

LJ 







S 

1994 


S 

1994 


North America 


ApfttOtx weighting: S6% 
Close: 96.41 Piw.: 96.79 


Latin Amertcff % 


Approx, weighting: 5% 
Close: 141.00 Pm: 140.53 





A M J J A 5 

1994 




s 

1994 


WortdtndBx 

•* # 

TTw index Hacks U.S . dottar values of stocks t v Tokyo, Now York, London, end 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chfle, Denmark, Rnfand. 
Franca, Germany, Hong Kong, Itrfy, Mexico, Nathertanda, New Zb aland, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Swlt w lan d and VeneauaAs. For Tokyo. Afew York and 
London, the index Is composed of the 20 top Issues in terms of market capsohzstton. 
otherwise the ten top stocks m tracked 


In Europe 
Decides 
To Leave 


Bloomberg Business Atat? 

PARIS — International 
Business Machines Corp. said 
Wednesday the head of its Eu- 
ropean operations had resigned 
after a year on the job. and a 

spokesman described the move 
as “a surprise to people outside 
and inside the company." 

The American computer 
maker said Hans-Olaf HenkeL, 
54, would be succeeded as chief 
executive officer of IBM World 
Trade Europe/Middie East/A- 
frica Corp. by Lucio Stanca, 52, 
general manager of IBM’s 
Southern Europe. Middle East 
and Africa unit, 

Mr. Henkel and Mr. Stanca 
could not be reached for com- 
ment.” 

Mr. Henkel, who has worked 
for IBM for 33 years and was 
the first German national to be- 
come the head of the European 
operation, is retiring from the 
company to “pursue personal 
options in his home country.” 
IBM said. 

He will remain chairman of 
the division for the rest of the 
year and is expected to be nomi- 
nated to the post of chairman of 
the supervisory board of IBM 
Germany. 

Analysts sought to quell 
speculation that Mr. Henkel 
had been a victim of the major 
restructuring at IBM. 

**IBM is in much better shape 
than last year at this time;'' said 
Jane Doorly, a British-based an- 


The Race for Development 

Calcutta Must Outrun Its Past to Win 


By Kevin Murphy 

httCntetional Herald Tribune 

CALCUTTA — Once 
grand but now decrepit, like 
the rest of the crumbling city 
center and many of India’s 
state-owned businesses, the 
country's oldesi hotel may 
soon be sold to foreigners and 
renovated as a five-star estab- 
lishment. 

Its glory days decamped 
with the British raj, but the 
Great Easiem Hotel is now a 
prominent test case for the 
future India's economic re- 
forms. 

Long identified with a co- 
lonial past, the Great East- 
ern’s standards slid steadily 
with a Calcutta wracked by 
militant unionism in the 
2950s and 1960s, nationaliza- 
tion in the 1970s and recent 
operating losses. 

But if a deal between 
France's Accor SA hotel 
company and the state of 
West Bengal's Marxist-led 
government can be struck in a 
trade union stronghold like 
Calcutta, anything might be 
possible in India these days. 

Despite its troubled image, 
Calcutta and West Bengal 
have aggressively entered the 
race for private investment, 
pledging to rein in the union 
power base and open the ail- 


ing infrastructure sector to 
private investment. 

“Senior stale officials — 
we used to chase them, now 
they're coming to us.” said 
Anil Am bani, joint managing 
director of Reliance Indus- 
tries Ltd H India's largest pri- 
vate-sector company. 

Indeed. Calcutta hopes to 
reclaim its pre-independence 
dominance of Indian heavy 
industry, with less interfer- 
ence from New Delhi bureau- 
crats and the repeal of nation- 
al freight subsidies that 
nullified West Bengal’s ad- 
vantage of proximity to natu- 
ral resources in India's miner- 
al-rich east. 

A skilled work force, 
cheaper land and lower labor 
costs than in oibeT major cit- 
ies. the strongest rural growth 


.Ay 

^1/ New* 
F C MW 


CHINA 


Wes t Bengal 


1 - 


INDIA 

Bombay 


8AHGLA-; 

pesH j 


Arabian 


OJVfelSK 


SRI LANKA. 


of any state in India and its 
position near Southeast Asia 
form the planks of a major 
campaign to attract invest- 
ment that relies on coopera- 
tion with the unions. 

The stakes are high, both 
for West Bengal and for the 
country. Whether Calcutta 
falters or succeeds in the in- 
creasingly competitive scram- 
ble for investment among cit- 
ies and 5 tales may help 
determine the long-term suc- 
cess of India's economic lib- 
eralization and the spread of 
its benefits, analysts say. 

Given New Delhi’s bid to 
repair its fiscal deficit, mosi 
Indian states now find them- 
selves in largely unknown, 
uncomfortable territory, 
competing for investment 
once largely doled out by bu- 
reaucrats. 

“Today you will find a lot 
more competition, a lot more 
awareness among state lead- 
ers of the importance of cre- 
ating a more hospitable cli- 
mate for enterprise,” said 
Manmohan Singh. India's fi- 
nance minister and a catalyst 
for economic change in New 
Delhi. 

In the race to attract inves- 
tors. two states nearest the 
financial and national capi- 
tals, Maharashtra and Delhi, 

See INDIA, Page 11 


Bundesbank 
Says Markets 
Heard Wrong 

Central Bank Claims Chief 
Sees Scope for Rate Cuts 


By Brandon Mitchener 

fnit'rvaianaf Herald Tnbmt 

FRANKFURT — In an un- 
usual move, the Bundesbank 
sought Wednesday to put a re- 
verse spin on comments by Us 
president that have pushed up 
interest rates in the bond mar- 
ket this week and sent stock 
prices plunging. 

The Bundesbank said that 
the markets vvere incorrect in 


flagpole on interest rate cuts,” 
Mr, Heimeyer also said Sunday. 

“Short-term interest rates 
have already fallen considera- 
bly and — as far as we’re con- 
cerned — set the stage for a 
continuation of the economic 
recovery. Bui I never say nev- 
er.” Mr.,Tictmeyer told a Ger- 
man newspaper on Monday. 

Meanwhile, in an interview 
with The European weekly new- 


assuming the remarks b\ Huds spaper. excerpts of which wrere 
Hetmever meant that German made available Wednesday, 
rates could go no lower. Hans-Jiirgcn Krupp. president 

Far from ruling out cuts in of the regional central bank in 
official interest rates, a central Hamburg, said the Bundesbank 
bank spokesman said, Mr. Tiet- must position itself to raise rates 
meyer only hinted that the de- when the German recovery 
dines should not be expected in picked up speed by cutting them 
the next few weeks. The spokes- sufficiently in advance, 
man made the commenLs in an “1 can see room for rate re- 
unsolidied phone call io the In- duciions despite good econom- 
temational Herald Tribune. ic progress and some need for 
Rising yields in the bond action on the rate front so that 
market trouble the Bundesbank the Bundesbank has its instru- 


because they increase the cost ments at its disposal when de- 
of German government and in- velopments begin to move in 

d us trial borrowing and thus See RATES, Page 10 
work against economic growth. 

Separately, the president of « j r n j r» 
the Bundesbank's regional cen- tteCLCL Of (/pel o€BS 
tral bank in Hamburg said there * * 

was room for German interest Solid Sales Gain 
rate reductions despite the re- 
cent strength in the German Bloomberg Busuu-u vmi 

economy. FRANKFURT — The chief 

Yields on long-term German executive of General Motor 
government bonds have risen Corp.'s Adam Opel AG took is- 

1 - f % ■ P If ^ hT m ___ _ _ jT — - _ — P W 1-1 


Indonesia Asks Logging Stake 


Head of Opel Sees 


industrial Sectors 


Energy 115-56 115.45 40.44 CapBai Goods 

Utlttes 127.88 12830 -025 RwHateMs 

finance iu .49 ne.17 -1.45 Cwttwnar Goods 

Services 121.53 122.45 -051 msceHaneous 


119.03 119.72 -0-58 
136.50 13657 -0.05 
104.47 105.08 -0.58 
137.57 13752 4)55 


For more WbmHitofi atwul the index, a bookie! is avaSabfe free ofehargo. 

Writs to Trib index, 181 Avenue Ctarias de Gaulle, 92521 Neufy Cedex, France. 

C fritefnettonaf Herald Trttune 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


1 DIVL d U 1 muui TOiicr saape Con^led by Our Staff From Dispuicha CfiSSion areas of Barilo Pacific 

than last year at this tune, said . „ Timber m rak* a aq 

axs's 

Awass 

moving to a better job with an- to cancel Barilo's concessions, 

other company. She did not newal . of !o SS ua ° concessions D . 

eiahnnt* covering an area bigger than Prayogo Pangestu, who con- 

__ Switzerland. trols Banto, rejected the govern - 

The company said the change p orestrv Minister J amal udm meot proposal in August, offer- 
m personnel would not affect Mnu ' ter J J ai T iiuam : ns instead a 25 oercent stake 

the overhaul of worldwide oper- Suiyohadikusumo said the gov- S perce . 

ations that IBM put in place eminent, which found extensive Meanwhile, Banto said the 

this year. forest destruction within con- forestry minister was referring 


cession areas of Barilo Pacific to two companies that w ere not 
Timber, has offered to Lake a 49 part of the publicly traded Bar- 
percent stake in the logging ii*> Pacific, 
subsidiaries, with a further 2 The government move was 


tn viewed as a wav of backiiie uo a stock prices have fallen sue with gloomy forecasts of Eu- 

KT2X"22‘2Z2 *»« s^. «h» m,. ri«- 


Carrots, Slicks and Growing Pains 


By Bamaby J. Feder 

New Ytirk Timex Service 

E UCLID, Ohio — For two de- 
cades Lincoln Electric Co_ the 
largest American maker of arc 
welders and welding supplies, 
has been studied by Harvard Business 
School students as a model for how to 
motivate workers. 

Students and managers from other 
companies are intrigued because Lincoln 
has gone further than any other large 
manufacturer in matching compensation 
to each employee’s productivity and to 
the profitability of the company. Since 
1934 Lincoln has parceled out almost as 
much in bonuses as in salaries. 

The bonus pool is divided among em- 
ployees on the basis of ratings of each 
one’s output, quality, dependability and 
degree of cooperativeness with other 
workers. 

The system includes a no-layoff guar- 
antee that the company has never violat- 
ed. But it is also brutally demanding, 
forcing workers into constant competi- 
tion with each other to produce more 
with fewer mistakes. 

Lincoln offers few of the fringe bene- 
fits that many workers elsewhere take for 
granted: no pay for sick days or holidays, 
for example. 

These days, though, problems at Lin- 
coln are forcing Harvard to update its 
case study. Many stem from the mess the 
company made of a rapid buildup over- 
seas in the late 1930s. 


The most immediate concern is how 
the company can keep domestic produc- 
tivity growing at past levels while work- 
ers in Euclid resent seeing their bonuses 
shrink. 

The resentment was tempered in 1992 
and 1993 when Lincoln paid sizable bo- 


Lincoln’s predicament 
is a warning about how 
easy it is to 
underestimate the 
challenges of other 
cultures. 

nuses to American workers despite post- 
ing the first overall losses in its 99-vear 
history. Now comes the harder pan. 

Donald F. Hastings, the chairman and 
chief executive, has made a video telling 
U.S. workers that bonuses might decline 
this year, even though the company ex- 
pects record sales and profits. 

Mr. Hastings said shareholders had 
already given up bonus dividends for 
two years. 

He said the workers would have to 
cany a bigger share of the burden this 
year to let Lincoln reduce its debts from 
the expansion abroad and invest in new 
equipment. Otherwise, he warned, the 
company could be bankrupted by the 
next domestic downturn. 


The news left many workers feeling 
“ripped off,” Percy Robinson, a tool and 
die maker for the company, said. 

Lincoln's predicament is a warning to 
American companies about bow easy it 
is to underestimate the challenges of oth- 
er cultures. 

From 1986 to 1992, Lincoln expanded 
from five plants in four countries to 21 
plants in 25 countries. “We did it too 
fast, paid too much; we didn't under- 
stand foreign markets and cultures, and 
then we got hit by recession,” Mr. Has- 
tings said of the strategy in his video 
presen rntion. 

The extent of the problems was a so- 
bering experience for the company. Mr. 
Hastings recruited outside board mem- 
bers to bring fresh perspectives to plan- 
ning, including Edward E Hood Jr., the 
recently retired rice chairman of General 
Electric Co.; and Paul E Lego, the for- 
mer chairman and chief executive of 
Westinghouse Electric Co. 

Lincoln has also focused on building a 
more cooperative relationship with its dis- 
tributors. It also loosened some rules, such 
as a ban on investing in new equipment 
that could not pay for itself within a year. 

The cloud over all this is the debt piled 
up to finan ce overseas expansion. Initial- 
ly, the debt load made the company more 
determined to cram the labor system that 

See EXPANSION. Pagi 11 


Trade Group 
Set to Discuss 
GATT Issues 


By Alan Friedman 

Iniemaiuynal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Nations represent- ? 
mg nearly two-thirds of total 
world trade will begin debating 
market-opening measures this 
weekend in sectors that were 
left out of last year's ground- 
breaking Uruguay Round trade 
accord. U.S. and European offi- 
cials said Wednesday. 

The three days of talks in Los 
Angeles will be bested by Mick-' 
ey Kantor, the U.S. trade repre- 
sentative. who on Friday will 
convene the Quadrilateral 
Group, consisting of trade min- 
isters from the United States, 
European Union, Japan and 
Canada. 

The “Quad” meeting will dis- 
cuss ways to lower trade barri- 
ers in the telecommunications, 
financial services and aviation 
sectors, along with w-hat Mr. 
Kantor described on Wednes- 
day as “a whole range of issues 
we didn't address in the Uru- 
guay Round'* of the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade. 

Separately, high-level U.S. 
and Japanese officials kicked 
off a round of meetings in 
Washington on Wednesday j 
amid speculation that progress 
was being made to defuse the ‘ 

See GATT. Page 10 


forests outside Brazil. powerful German central bank . Maybe his sales won t rise. 

The World Bank said in a would pursue a “steady band” said the Opel chiei executive 
1993 report on Indonesia that on monetary policy in coming officer, Davnd J. Hetman. re[er- 

harvests from tropical forests weeks. p Q jL-° 

were running 50 percent higher The yield on the benchmark erdinand riech. _ We doru 

than estimated sustainable aits. 10-year German bund was 1 '\ e c' 

The government said in July steady at 7.49 percent on „ u ‘ 

that it would reduce timber har- Wednesday, but it was 7.29 per- car wou ^ ^ ^ al 

vests by nearly one third over cent before Mr. Tleimever's ,or »/ ,ve ?i 
the next five years. comments on Sunday. Meanwhile. BMW AG an- 

The Banto group has inter- Markets have apparently duction workers to its assembly 
ests ranging from umber and overlooked other comments by plant to handle increased de^ 
vehicles to construction. Bamo the Bundesbank president that mand for its autos in the second 
Pacific is one of the worlds him at further opportunities for ha if, The company said it 
leading plywood suppliers. rate reductions, the spokesman reached agreement with its 
“Barilo has done consider- s&id Wednesday. workers* counci] to add the po- 

able damage to forests under its Keeping a “steady hand” on sitrons by extending short-term 
comroL*’ the m ini s ter said. German rates "does not mean contracts to an unlimited-con- 

(AFP> Reuters) that we’ve reached the end of the tract-ierm status. 


“Quadratus”. A solid gold watch 
with the dial engraved in 
the “Clou de Paris” pattern. 



CORUM 

Maitres Artisans d'Horlogerie 


SUISSE 








^ ■- ■■ vA L ■Uv 


■\\ rS- 


- - 
l" 






r. 


r 




Automatic mechanical movement with date :md second hands. Water-resistant. Als< 
in white gold. For a brochure, write 10 : Curum, 2301 Lt» Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerlanc 


Cross Rat®* 


CURRENCY A INTEREST RATES 

Sept 7 Eurocurrency Deposits 


Am*** 1 ** 0 
Borne** ^ 

Ef qafr glt t-WE 

Sm u* 

&M77 

jcwYorftW — 

MIS UT2 

■Tokyo W 

Toronto 

Zurich U6 


£ ELM. 
US l.ttu 

UH 

— lira 
wm sun 

IQL* U>RSD 
15445* 15SDS 
lH2S 14304 
1535* «.« 

am 

20027 OJD44 


1 ECU !£& WI7 I.WW 4 

1SDR U«2 WS\ USn 7. 

OqsAmb m Amsfonaam Lane*** Nt 
rptosat 3 pjtl 

a: To Oov one pounds To ow cr 
available* 

Other Dollar Values 

Cumner Pw* CurreBCr Pw* 
a runt, puo 0lW 9^ Cwfc On* 25^35 

ZXlT 8 £ hwk ««* vo 

OMhunmo »3i ^ 

5S»=S S »«».«» ass 


FJ. Uro ! 

«zn QJt # 
dm vm* m 
ojn 5 aw* 

02035 244055 
2UU 

*745 »1U 4»^» K23&10 15.737 1.1S3J0 \ U* 

5M 157U0 1JBS 31J7 1A IJ671 1290* 

— 03341 • MSW W W 4.1177 UT U82 i 

1UU 0*9 5714 3.1045 7U8 724 0747$ 

US» QM 7- UCU U» a U)M- — lM* 

03441 DJB821 * 07455 4J41" UOB* mi 1J03T 

ksm )MJ4 zm15 vm i3c m usn 150 ^ 

7J774 13U25 25C5 4U5S UK UiBTO UH0 IB9J33 

At w York MS Zurich, ibtfnoo In of ner centers: Toronto 

Qfn, dollar; m : Units of 109; NjQ.: o of 4 voted; n -a. : not 


lUtf 

am 

7*444 

91051 

1JKS 

usn 

57J4 

07F* 

57455 


43* 

49i I 


SJ=. 

}J4 as 

UMZ 
Uhl 
2J0Q51 
9f«3 
KW 10 
1J96 
4.1177 
7US 
1 105U 


YM 

US** 
o m 

U613 * 
1S2JE5 
73aac' 
15.937 


cs 
Uti 
2US75 
llffi 
2.1TS6 
1 9143 
1.1S3J0 

usn 


Pestfo 

7JI5 # 

UiSP 


Swiss French 

Dollar D-Mark Franc SterJiw Frcmc Yen 


12216 
1290* 
4.I05P 
07471 
1 M* 
uni* 


1 month 
3 mwittn 
& months 
1 rear 


4%-5 
5 ^irS 
5^*5^ 


*?b-5 
454-5 
5 V5 
5 !v5 ^ 


4 '+*4 


MU 

S**S a - 
6 


W-S* o 
6 * 


2 -7 1 - 
2^-2- 
2 '-2 -s 


sept. 7 

ECU 

5 “-^S 

o'a-A 1 *® 

A -H5 


Sources Reuters Lkjrtis Sceik. 

Rates opotkable to frtfg rto n* deoasirsafSl million minimum termrivatentl 


Key Money Rates 


United States Close Prov. 

Dficoum rase ^stu cm 

Prime rate 7** A* 

Federal hmds 4^ 4%* 

^cnentti CDs AM • 138 

Coiiirl paper 100 do/3 5.Q& 505 

s-entmth treasury biff 453 <53 

l -year Treason MU 125 5J5 

J-ywr Trcmorr nefo 420 MB 

S^rvorTreasorv note 0£7 

7‘year Treasury note 092 fl.70 

ISvtor Treasury note 7JJ 7 2b 

>M rear Treasury bond 756 7JW 

Meifll Lynch JMoyReadyoisei 1«1 188 

iapun 

BMseoiiat rale ^ 

Call money 1W 

1 -month Interbank 2 2 ** 

3- month inttrbaak 2 'a 

4- momti ifiteftNtnk 2 ^ 7* 

ie*y ear owcn M Wd bend 4^i 4J1 

Oermoav 

U u nbq r d rate 600 080 

Can money <95 5.10 

1 hr on lb interbank S.oa 5.00 

Mwntfl rt tetedf 5 jOO SM 

6-moatb intHWte 5.10 5.10 

lS-yeorBwtd 7J2 7,40 


Currency 


N.Ztafmtf s 
Hone, krone 
PtliLptU 

Pribh itoty 


Russ, ruble 
Sauditaf 
SM.S 


per s Currency Per 1 

3JM ±Afr.rasia 1 M 

$.Kor. won «nJ0 

MSS kwod. krona 7J>77B 

26.19 TatwaaS 2*40 

230*8. Thai baht 24-98 

ISUQ Turkish lira 3tt5& 

2177 Jto UAEdimam 15727 

17$ Veoec. bativ. r vjttt 

1-4992 


- : U4ay fMay CwTeaey worn shot w 

^7 vSS 1 sea Cmodten dollar UAB6 1-3*93 UH 

M-n! 94 13V32 1JM0 U« 

kft an* t&msi«wt}: indosvoz Ban* <anjssds>; Bonce Commerioi* Jtouano 

^ r ^° {Toky * }; ^ *•* * Cona<fa 
(Tonmto): omcrAXOinsm Reuter* and AP. 

\ 

. \ 


3Mov 

13666 

9475 


6frdur 9WOV 
\2M UTOfi 
«J3 «W7 


Brltaio 

Bonk base rote 
Call DlDACV 

1 -month Interbank 
3-month I n terbank 
6-mopTh interbank 
to-ym&n 


m m 


France 

rafervenfM rate 5JIQ S.00 

Call rru dot 5^ 5 v * 

1 -month interbank SH 5^ 

3- month interbank H 5^- 

frmuQtti inrerboRk re 51* 

fO-year OAT 4W 

Sources; Reuters, etoomoero, Merrill 
Lynch, Bank at Tokyo. CommtrzUunk. 
Greetwrtn mntoou. Credit Lronnate. 


Gold 

A/dL 

Zurich 28?J3S 

London 38&40 

MOW York 3113b 

U.S. doltor* per ounce. 


PJA. Ch^e 
3 Wj45 +200 

389J0 + 110 

39440 t-220 

London pfficla* tf v- 


)m: Zurich and New rorr oocntr* ana cto 
i/so prices: New York Come* \ December. I 
Source: Revtm. 


On October 4th, the IHT will publish a 
Special Report on 

Global Banking 
& Finance 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ The value of the dollar. 

■ The booming market for derivatives. 

■ The European Monetary Institute. 

■ The outlook for Japanese banking. 

■ Investment prospects in Latin American, 
Asian and other emerging markets. 

77ms supplement coincides with the International Monetary 
FundWorfd Bank meetings in Madrid, ai which 
2,000 extra copies m be distributed . 

For further intimation, phase contact BUI Mahder in Paris 
at (33-1) 46 37 93 73. lax: (33-1)46375044. 

licral u^rJ^gte (£rtounc 

H’BJMirft HTTb me ^ lifti nm N lib TTtr VWIhI.pHi PiM 


International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

• Monday 

International Conferences and Seminars 

• Tuesday 
Education Directory 

• Wednesday 

Business Message Center 

• Thursday 

international Recruitment 

• Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 

• Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 

Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 

For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 3794 74 - Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 

•yt- * k ivrotim>vu m - 4 


•KVa f< mrm «c 





















1 




market diary 


EVTERINATIONAJL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 


Rate Rise Fears 
Burden Wall Street 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


via Awecfatod P t ma m 


Stpl. 7 


Comp, ltd by Our SiaffFrfm Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Wall Street 
Wfls weighed down Wednesday 
by concern that accelerating in- 
flation would prompt the Fed- 
era! Reserve Board to raise in- 
terest rates for the sixth time 

this year, putting pressure on 
co yorate profits. 

. ‘‘Inflation could reheat as a 
^gnificant factor once again ," 

U-S. Stecta 

said Eugene E. Peroni, market 
analyst at Janney Montgomery 
Scott in Philadelphia. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage finished down 12.45 
points, at 3 , 886 . 25 , while on the 
New York Stock Exchange, I os - 1 
ing issues outnumbered gaining 
ones by an 11 -to - 10 ratio. 

Weak Treasury bond prices 
weighed on stock-market senti- 
ment. The benchmark 30 -year 
Treasury bond fell 6 / 32 , to 99 
S/ 32 , sending its yield to 7 J 6 
percent from 7.54 percent. 

Bond prices fell after thegov- 
e rumen r said revised up its esti- 
mate of labor costs in the sec- 
ond quarter and lowered its 
measure of productivity. The 
fall in productivity suggests 
higher fabrication costs. 

Rising commodity prioes also 


flashed an inflation wanting to 
the bond market. Inflation 
erodes the value of fixed-in- 
come securities. 

Hanson PLCs American de- 
positary receipts were Lhe most 
actively traded issue on the 
NYSE, slipping Vi to 19 % in 
dividend-related trading. 

American Barrick Resource 
rose Vi to 23 % after the compa- 
ny said it won control of Lac 
Minerals, gaining more than 80 
percent of its common shares. 

Semiconductor stocks were 
strong, led by Nextel, which 
rose 1 to 24 % after being rated a 
buy at Lehman Brothers. 

America Online rose 3 V 4 to 8 1 
after the provider of computer 
on-line services reorganized 
into four operating companies. 

Lotus Development added 
2 % to 4414 after the software 
maker introduced a bundled 
version of its 1 - 2-3 Release 5 

S preadsheet software for Wid- 
ows and' Approach 3.0 data-' 
base program. 

Philip Morris slipped W to 
60 %. The company was sued 
Wednesday t>y the state of Flori- 
da, Which accused it Of inflating 

its stock price temporarily by 
failing to disclose that nicotine is 
addictive. (Bloomberg, AP) 



Open Hfeb Low 33 M ON. 

Indus 3809.37 390141 388134 389100 — 3 30 
Trxn 1425 J 1 182190 141193 1679.23 — 175 
UN 18130 18176 Jflf .91 18244 — 1.25 
Comp 1334 JS 7 133481 132843 1330-83 —343 


Standard A Poor's Indexes 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


High low dose Ctrte 

Industrial 55550 552.92 55450 —053 

Trartjp. . 38758 38191 38171 — M 2 

yjimiK is *49 isi» i sub — i.w 

Finance 4127 4 AU 2 44.17 —Old, 

SR 500 47241 47020 470 . 94 — 090 ' 

5 P 100 437.13 434 J 3 43144 —059 


!'■■ .■ ' ■ y‘ .. . . ■ . 

■ 'I? 

\ ' man, "■ • v. % . < * ' * * : 

■ M"v 

, ^994 •=- 


IHT 


PrtvNHn 
BW Alfc » BW Alfc 
ALUMINUM (High Grade) 

DoUor? per metric tat 
3 «rt 154350 154450 153100 153400 

EEwra 156000 156850 155100 1559 JJ 0 

COPPER CATHODES (Hiftfv Graft) 
per metric ten 

toot 2467 JO 2468 JB 24020 0 248100 

Forward 248840 248740 249740 249840 

lpaw 

Dollars per metric ten 

A 0 L 50 60250 60440 60450 

61650 61740 6)100 62040 


NYSE Indexes 


Htah LOW 3 pm Chg. 

Composite 26027 25927 25956 -025 

Industrials 32413 32220 32161 — 0 X 1 

Transp. 347.62 24451 24651 —04 

UW 1 Y 30754 20653 20655 -095 

Rnonco 21756 31653 717.15 —041 


Forward 
NICKEL 
Dollars 
Spot 
Forward 
TIN 
Donors 
Soot 

Forward 

ZINC (Special Hten 
Doffar* per metric ton 
Spot 96740 968 JD 0 

Forward 99000 99150 


nmtrlclBn 

61 J 100 613100 523050 923100 
63 KU 0 632000 532100 533050 

metric ton 

528550 539550 531100 522050 
536050 27050 52 655 Q 537050 


96130 96650 
98950 98950 



Utah 

L am 

Feb 

1612 

160 X 5 

Mar 

161 X 0 

1 * 1 X 0 

Alte 1 

100 L 7 S 

10025 

May 

15 M 30 

15050 

June 

WLT. 

15 

JMY 

N-T. 

N.T. 

Hitv^Juipe; 

T£ 4 to. 


1415 S 16155 +025 
16150 16 L 75 +150 
16075 1*075 +150 
15850 15150 +150 
N.T. 15650 + 1 J» 
NX 15175 +075 
Open Pit. 707554 
BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPB) 

(JJLMJaa Mr bamHab «f \m barren 


Financial 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Low 3 pm . Cfap> 


NYSE Most Actives 



VoL HfOll 

LOW 

3 pm 

Hanson 

52075 Ifta 

! 9 Vi 

19 H 

ABar* 

3050 1 Z 3 ?b 

23 H 

23 U 

Merck 

TO 35 3 *V> 

33 M 

34 

ToWtoC 

23846 

63 

63 V 

CUmpaas 

26567 36 ta 

25 *m 

36 * 

PhDMr 

20400 All* 

60 *i 

61 

AtoExp 

21948 309 b 

30 Vt 

30 Vi 

FanJi 

21944 30^4 

27 V» 

29 Vi 

GnMotr 

20706 52 Vi 

5 W 

57 *a 

RJRNdb 

20034 6 W 

6 to 

6 K 

GroOv 

19 S 64 26 U. 

2 » 

25 M 

Glaxo 

17 B 84 19 Mfl 

18 ^* 

19 


15707 72 *f 

22 

22 M 

NrSenrti 

15612 17 V* 

I 6 te 

17 

OodPet 

15465 21 H 

21 H 

21 H 


am. 

—■4 

HA 

t £ 
+ 1 

— l A 

—te 

*lte 
— V. 
-Ft 
—VI 
+ te 


AMEX Most Actives 


RATES: Bundesbank Clarifies 


Continued from Page 9 
the opposite direction.’' Mr. 

Krupp was quoted as saying. 

The Bundesbank last cut its 
discount and Lombard rates, its 
cheapest and most expensive 
forms of bonk financing, respec- 
tively, on May 13 . The discount 
rate stands at 4.5 percent and the 
Lombard rate at 6 percent. The 

Foreign Exchange 

central bank's market-sensitive 
securities repurchase rate has 
been fixed between the discount 
and Lombard at 4.85 percent for 
almost seven weeks. 

In his comments on Sunday, 

Mr. Tieimeyer differentiated be- 
tween trends in short-term and 
long-term rates. While short- 
term rates are steady and have 

potential to fall, long-term rates * , 

appear bound to rise, be said. ,. ConiMsal erwa Page 9 

“This rise is clearly tied to “spute <wer the UK- Japanese 
international de^Sopm7n£ trade talks. ^ 
which we cannot entirely es- . ^ th® United States 
cape,” he told the regional Ger- 
man daily Neue WestfSlische. 

He said he hoped that long- 


day, Bloomberg Business News 
reported from New York. 

“Krupp’s comments gave the 
dollar a pop," said Matt Forio. 
a trader at Chase Manhattan 
Bank. “He caught the market 
off guard because many people 
think European rates are bot- 
toming.” 

The dollar finished in New 
York at 1.5505 DM, up from 
1-5338 DM Tuesday. The dollar 
also rose to 99.45 yen from 
98.65 yen, to 53140 French 
francs from 5.2860 francs and 
to 13980 Swiss francs from 
1 3945 . The pound weakened to 
SI 3445 from $ 1 . 5525 . 


EehoBov 

VfcscB 

ChevSfT s 

TWAtrtg 

RoyoIOq 

Vloomrt 

Arncttf 

Oiodei 

XCLLW 

Hasbro 


VOL 

HWi 

Low 

LM 

a«g. 

10224 

13 VS 

13 

13 

— u 

86 U 339 * 

32 te 

33 

♦ 'A 

7411 

12 I>V 

1 iVh 

12 

+ te 

6935 

4 !e 

3 t*ii 

4 V* 

+ te 

6 O 6 Q 

4 V h 




6039 

Ste 

5 1 * 

5 V. 

—to 

5757 

9 Vi 

ate 

9 Mi 

— 4 ft 

4781 

T* 


3 te 

— V U 

4144 

IV 11 

ite 

Ha 

—Vi* 

4092 31 H 

31 Vi 

31 'A 



NASDAQ Most Actives 


Gsgds 

NexletCfti 
VLSI 
Intel 
MCI 
Micstt & 

WrfcRoc 

LtftTS 

Me ttmx 

Novdl 

ToiafMex 

DSCfi 

3 Com & 

APkUAri 

BcArr 


VoL High 

36948 26 
33398 24 H 
7817 ? 131 * 
778*0 66 Y> 
34094 
235 T 7 
22976 
20065 
79401 
10708 
17823 
T 7284 
16330 
15821 
15492 


MYi 

24 ft 

5 Wi* 

65 

16 H 

I S'* 

3 V* 

30 

33 

4914 

78 * 


LOW 

24 ft 

235 ft 

i 2 te 

6416 

2416 

56 ft 

2'4 

42 U 

> 5 % 

1 FA 

3 Vr 

38 V 

31 ft 

48 

17 ft 


3 am 

36 

24 ft 

72 ft 

U*iu 

36 ft 

571-0 

jcv s 

44 *i 

16 ft 

75 V 4 

30 

32 ft 

48 

781.4 


at* 

J-lfti 

♦ 7 
— % 

♦ ltote 
—ft 

♦ lft 

+ Ufc 

+ 2 ft 
—ft 

tSs 

♦ lft 

♦ft 
♦ ft 


Market Sales 


Composite 

Industrials 

Bants 

insurance 


Tramp. 


76247 

760-45 

787.03 

**U 3 

960.01 

738 J 9 


76059 
76678 
779 JB 

99038 

957.96 

736.04 


76056 + 4.10 
769.45 + 4 J 1 
78044 

933.43 + 5.72 
96004 +156 
73009 —054 


Dow Jones 

Bond Avoragos 


OOP 

cam 

20 Bonds 

97X8 

— 020 

1Q Utilities 

93.9S 

— 023, 

10 industrials 

10201 

— 017 
- 

ABB EX Stock Index 


High Low 3 PM Chg. 

45 &J 9 455.14 45 L 36 -OjM 


NYSE Diary 


+ 005 
+ 0.10 
+ 005 
+ OA 3 
+ 0 JDS 
+006 
+ 006 
+ 007 
+ 002 
+ 052 
+ 004 
+ 0 JQ 2 


Advanced 
Dadinaa 
Unchanged 
Totcrf tssua* 
NewHao 
New Lows 


Ndoq Pw. 

837 956 

1055 1142 

839 755 

2731 2853 

35 45 

17 32 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


Naan Prarv. 

185 
219 
248 232 

768 
73 
10 


10 

7 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Dedined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
NewHTgfts 
New Lows 


Close Prev. 

1650 1361 

1488 1625 

1945 2097 

5083 
98 01 

4 « 35 


Spat Commodities 


NYSE 

Amex 

Nasdoo 

In miliiora. 


29030 

1821 

25757 


25059 

1457 

185.15 


Commodity Today Prev. 

Aluminum, lb 0701 0596 

Copper atecfrafyfllc, lb 170 120 

Iron FOB, km 21350 21350 

Lead, lb 038 058 

Si Tver, trav az 5 A 9 S MS 

Steel I scrap), ten 1 TOI 7 170.17 

prulb 35093 16045 

Zinc. ID 0484 8 0 L 4922 


HIM Low a 

MMUfTHSTERLING CLIFFE) 
fROOM-ptsef 180 PCt 

94 A 8 9456 9459 

9357 9147 ■ 9155 

_ 9255 9257 9 Z 72 

Jui ra .16 9259 92 ; 14 

SW 97 JT 0 9155 9159 

gee 9 TJT 91^7 9151 

MOT 9151 9097 915 ] 

Jim 9081 9078 9083 

9068 9056 9058 

WL 55 POS 2 9055 

*U 6 9041 9046 

-ten 9036 9032 0035 

e«, mum: open Inf.: 550087 . 

WWNTH EURODOLLARS (UFFE) 

Sl fflOUan ■ m of in pet 

H 2 . •}*? M .97 HS 7 UnctL 

Due N.T. N.T. J 430 +W 

Mot N.T. M.T. 9 X 98 

J"» N.T. N.T. 9 X 64 

SW N.T. N.T. 91 iS 

est. votwiw; 100 . cnen tot.: 6 a 26 . 

MJOfrTH eUROMARXS (UFFE) 

DM 1 mutton ■ pts oi VM pet 

Sw 9 JU» 94.96 94.98 

Dec 9483 94 J 6 9481 

MOT 9 X 45 WJ 8 9442 

J" 9409 9401 9406 

«■ SOTS 9 X 69 9174 

DK 9 X 45 9 X 38 9 X 44 

Mar 9 X 22 93.18 9 X 22 

JOB 92.99 9233 92.98 

SgP 9288 9177 9 X 80 

Me 923 9255 9260 

9243 9243 920 

9230 9225 9229 . 

Est. volume: 10 X 996 . Open Ini.: 787 , 20 a 

*WHTH PISOR {MA 7 TFI 
FFS mHUon ■ ab of IWpct 
SaP ■ 9434 9431 9433 

D 6 C 9186 9179 9183 

M£f 93 A 6 9139 9 X 43 

J*» 9116 9 X 88 9113 

W 9286 9282 9283 

Dec 9263 9257 9259 — Oflj 

MW 9244 9241 9241 —CUD 

Jon 9228 9221 9223 —053 

Ect volume; 3 X 292 Onen InL: 30028 S. 

‘ 3 NeeU.T(UFF 6 J 
(SUM - pts X Dads of Ho pci 

Sffi 3E1-SS IfiO-M IDD-3D +0-13 

Dec 100-18 99-26 100-07 + 0-11 

MW N.T. N.T. 9419 +p-H 

Est. volume: 54651 . Open Ini.: 1 1226 a 

buhd n - ,FFB> 
SJ S 3 SS MB Unen. 

2!^ S-S SHJ fi- 14 

6 tar SaJO 8&23 8 R 41 —059 

Est. volume: TkStt Open Tal 14 X 10 L 

S 2 Effi F 3 S 5 fi!L®®y- BO,,D ® uaatif) 

FFSMUNe - pts of MO PCt 

1 11150 


— 052 

— 054 

— 055 


+ 002 
+ 055 
+ 003 
+ 0 lO 4 
+ 055 
+ 004 
+ 053 
+ 052 
+ 053 
+ 0 JM 
+ 0.01 
+ 051 


+ 002 
Unch. 
— 051 


Oct 

IMS 

: 16 X 3 

1 L 54 

1053 

+ 030 

NOV 

14 

uE 

| 1*51 

1665 

16 X 4 

+ 014 

D*C 

14 

35 

: J 0 y 0 l 

1075 

1075 

+ 017 

Jem 

14 

34 

1061 

1072 

1074 

+ 013 ' 

Wi 

VL 70 

16 X 3 

16 X 5 

1072 

+ 0.12 

Mar 

16 lZ 0 

l 16 X 3 

16 X 8 

1068 

+ 006 

Apr 

w 

30 

VM 

1068 

1468 

+ 013 

MOV 

H 

-T. N.T. 

N.T. 

1071 

+ 014 

J*n 

H 

■T. 

NX 

NX 

1071 

+ 016 

JtY 

H 

X 

M.T. 

NX 

1671 

+ 016 

AU» 

H 

-T. 

. N.T. 

N.T. 

1071 

+ 0 M 

Sop 

NX 

N.T. 

N-T. 

1071 

+ 014 


U.S. Woricers’ Productivity Declines 

WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — American workers' produ 

tivity declined a revised 2.5 percent in the second quarter * 
- • • 1 iL - ' - 1 — - ru— *ai(J Wedu 


iir^t 


Est. voteme: 3 L 104 . Open inf. ISMS 


Uw CIusq oaon 


Stock Indexes 

FTSE TOO CUPFE] 

t 25 per Index petal 

top 32275 32005 33065 +55 

Dec 324&0 32165 32 Z 15 + 4 JS 

Wgr 32595 MW 3 W 85 +55 

fiP. volume: 3 ( 1755 . Open Int: 6 X 404 . 

CAC 49 CMATIF) 

FF 2 D* per hrtn MM 

2 S 1 W 50 196250 197250 +650 

Ocf 199250 197450 I 9 Q 250 +650 

M.T. N_T. N.T. Unch. 
^1650 199350 200150 +S 50 

2 Q 21-50 202950 +559 

M 201950 201950 2 BZLQ 020+2250 

Bat. volume: 29544 . Open Int.; 5 & 4 S 4 . 

S parge s: Mattf, Associated Frees, 
inn rrmmmt Excnunge. 

OMdondm ~ 

Cemewiv Per Amt Pov rqc 

IRREGULAR 
Great Wall Elec 
Korea Fund 
Sabine RoyTr 
fjwnw amf Per ADR. 
d-front oapttol sains. 

STOCK 

Swttt Energy _ 10 % 9 - 1 ? 9-29 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 

vsr B f ttefp j for 5 reverse sent subf to ap- 
proval sept &, 

INCREASED 
pst Stamm Bcd 


c 57 MT IN 
d .135 9-16 ?20 
- .1092 9*15 9*29 


sffissa 


Plf FJnl 


o 57 9-30 10-08 

Q 50 11-15 12-1 

Q .14 9 - 1 S 9-30 


INITIAL 

GenJa Inc 

NadDnsJBorrorpMat 


- 153 % 9-12 9-24 
M 56 W 6 9-29 

REGULAR 

Amercap inerr 

AuxtANZBlco 9 ft% 

Berry Petr a 
C ardinal Basra 
Col Inhrnw incl 
Col tavGdMim 
Gemfls Inc A 
JmlfP 5 qJnc 


-- 11252 11150 11252 —054 

DjK 111-44 Hdffl T 1 I 58 —054 

mot mjo noAO noA4 —054 

JIM N.T. N.T. 10952 —054 

Est. volume: 18 & 7 KL Open InU 155564 . 

Industrials 

hwi Low Lost settle am 

GASOIL (I PE) 

U 5 L dollars per metric ton-lots otlOO teas 

2 * JS 4 S !?•» jsiso +ojs 

Nmr 15650 1 S 475 1552 S 15550 +<L 75 

Dec 15150 157.25 I 57 J 5 15775 +050 

Jan 16055 15925 14000 160 j 00 + 175 


LrtfAWCA TF Fd 

LrdAbb TF Fd Natl 
LrdAbb TF Fd NJ 
LrdAbb TF Fd NY 
LrdAbb TF Fd TX 
LrdAbb TFFdWA 
NotlonoJ Re Carp 
Nations Gvlc 2003 
Natfons Gvic 2 m 
New Anw Kline Fd 
Petrol Kt&PwrA 


5 oudmesf Bcp 
TJ Irjftj lnc 
T emp let on Glblnc 
Totori Petroleum 

UM Marts 
Voyaotur AZMuii 
Vdyopew CO Mun 
Voraoeur FLMun 
VavQpeurMMMunJl 
Voiriipeiir MN Mun 
c-aaarox amt nor ADR- 
a-avmuaJ; o-poraMe fa 
moanffy; ‘ — 


M A 537 
C 5703 
Q .70 
Q 50 
M JOS 
M 554 
0 .135 
M .115 
- MS 
JJ 551 

M J 06 
M IE 
M 554 
M 525 
M 553 
M 55 
M 524 
Q 54 
M 56 

a 

M 545 
Q .1375 
A 50 
Q 55 
Q 555 
M 55 
Q 55 

S jP 95 

M 5643 
M 5625 
M 5637 
M 5687 
M 5773 


9-16 
MS 
9-16 
J -15 
9-15 
9 - 1 S 
W 6 

9 - 22 
99 

10-17 

10 - 17 
10-17 
10-17 
10-17 
10-17 
10-17 
10-17 

9-15 

9-16 

9 -T 4 

9-16 

9-15 

9 - 3 D 

9 - 19 
923 
916 

10 - 7 
921 
916 
9 M 
916 
916 
916 


K» 

930 

929 

10-15 

KW 

1 M 

193 

■ ^ 3 S 

923 

10-17 

1917 

10-17 

10-17 

10-17 

10-17 

KM 7 

10-17 


93 

929 

930 
10-3 
107 
930 

10-19 

9 - 30 

10 - 20 
10-19 
927 
927 , 
927 
927 
927 


CtaDMfiao tends; n- 


Labor Depart 

day. The decline was the largest in five years. 

The second quarter's decline in productivity was initially es 
mated as 12 percent, after a 2.9 percent increase m the «■ 
-quarter. Unit labor costs for nonfarm businesses rose 3,4 pe . ... 
during the quarter, compared with 2 percent in the first estimate. 

The report M is a little more nerve-wracking’' for Wall Street, 
because me rise in labor and production costs suggest inflation 
could accelerate, Astrid Adolf son of MCM Money Watch said. 

Daimler Buys More of Detroit Diesel .« 

DETROIT (Bloomberg) — A subsidiary of Daimler-Benz AG ( ' 
has exercised its option to purchase 2.4 million newly issued, 
shares of Detroit Diesel Coip. for $ 38.6 minion, boosting its stake ' 

in the company to 20 percent. - , 

DetroitDiesel is developing an engine for heavy-duty trucks.;,. 
Now in testing, the engine is scheduled for production next year at ■ 
Detroit Diesel's plant in Redford Township, Michigan. 

Ronald Haft Increases Stake in Dart 

WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — Ronald Haft raised his stake in 
Dart Group Carp, to 79 percent of its Class B shares in a move to 
wrest control of the retailing concern from his father, according to 
documents filed with the Securities and Exc h a n ge Conunisaon. 

Haft family members have been feuding for months. “I have di- 
fficulty reconciling my father's behavior with the legal standards 
that I understand to apply to companies that accept the public’s 
money as investors,” Ronald Mr. Haft said in a letter to Dart's out- 
side directors. He was referring to an $18 milli on loan his father 
tried to obtain from Dart. The SEC documents were filed Tuesday, 

.1 

Compaq Predicts Slimmer Margins * 

HOUSTON (Bloomberg) — Compaq Computer Corp. proba- » 
bly will have s limm er gross margins through the remainder of the ■ 
year, and its closely watched inventory level could grow, the J 
company's treasurer said Wednesday. 

Compaq's gross margin of 27 percent in the second quarter is 
probably unsustainable if the company wants to continue build- . 
mg market share, said David. J. Schempf. Compaq's goal is to ‘ 
maintain a gross margin of 23 percent to 2 5 percent of sales. ! 

Campbell Soup Reports Higher Net 

CAMDEN, New Jersey (Reuters) — Campbell Soup Co. said - 
Wednesday that growth in its U.S. businesses helped its fourth- J 
quarter net income increase 16 percent. 

The company earned $ 1 42 million in the quarter, up from $ 122 
million in the same period last year. Sales were flat at $ 1 .47 bflhon?, 
For the year, net income before charges rose 13 percent to $ 630 -- 
mfllion, while sales increased 2 percent to $ 6.69 billion. Campbell 
Soup shares were up $1 to $ 39 , 625 . 

For the Record 

Home Shopping Network Inc. has bought Internet Shopping;! 
Network, which offers users of the Internet computer network the 
opportunity to shop on-line for approximately 20,000 computer- ,» 
related products from nearly 1,000 companies. (Reuters)* ) 

American Home Products Corp. said Wednesday it had agreed-’ 
to invest as much as $44 million in Ligand Pharmaceuticals Inc. to . 
develop drugs involving female hormones. (Bloomberg) 




* 

*Kea<I' 


GATT: Quadrilateral Group Prepares to Meet on Remaining Uruguay Round Trade 


threatened trade sanctions 
against Japan unless Tokyo act- 
ed to end discrimination in gov- 

term rates had “more or less ernm ^ n t purchases of telecom- 
reached their peak.” munications and medical 

r* — »r „ , •«. n ii equipment. Mr. Kan tor set a 
■ German Talk Lifts Dollar deadline of SepL 30 for Japan 

The regional Bundesbank of- 10 satisfy U.S. demands, 
fltiars'cdmments suggesting rate One sign that Washington 
cuts were not out of me question and Tokyo are keen to avoid a 
shored up the dollar on Wednes- trade showdown was the flurry 


of meetings in Washington. 
Ryu taro Hashimoto, Japan’s 
minister of international trade 
and industry, had separate ses- 
sions with Mr. Kan tor, with 
Robert Rubin, assistant to Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton on economic 
policy; and with Ronald H. 
Brown, the secretary of com- 
merce. 

Mr. Brown, who was discuss- 
ing ways to open Japan's auto 
market, prod aimed hims elf op- 
timistic ahead of the talks. 

Mr. Kan tor will also meet 


Thursday in Los Angeles with MacLaren, Canada's trade min- 
the Japanese foreign minister, ister. agreed that the Quad 
Yohei Kono, who will join the group should back Mr. Ciin- 
Quad meetings. The presence of ton's proposal to review obsta- 
Mr. Kono was deemed in To- cles to trade in sectors not set- 
kyo to be a hopeful sign, as was tied by the Uruguay Round, 
his expected return to Washing- Reu lers reported from Ottawa, 
ton for a meeting with Mr. Clin- Mr. Clinton made the proposal 
ton this month. during the Group of Seven sum- 

Mr. Kantor said Wednesday, mit_in Naples in July but with- 
however, that it would be wrong drew it in the face of oppoatioh 
to expect an immediate break- from France and Germany, 
through in the framework talks. On Wednesday, an aide to Sir 
Looking ahead to this week- Leon Brittan, the EU trade 
end, Mr. Hashimoto and Roy commissioner, said there was 


no objection to “informal dis- 
cussions at the Quad.” But be 
warned that the G -7 and Quad 
meetings should not be used to 
“upstage” post-Uruguay 
Round talks at the new World 
Trade Organization, the succes- 
sor to GATT, which is to be 
launched in January. 

Also to-be discussed at the.. 
Quad meetings will be progress 
on ratifying the GATT accord 
and the status of applicants 
such as China, Taiwan and 
Russia. 


IMF Says Recession Is Over 


Agatee Fnmce-Presse 

WASHINGTON — The 
International Monetary 
Fund said Wednesday it was 
more optimistic about the 
world economy than it had 
been six months ago, and 
announced that industrial- 
ized countries had* emerged 
- from a global recession. 

In the United States, eco- 
nomic growth hit 3.7 
percent for 1994 and 2 J 5 per- 
cent for 1993 , the IMF said. 


Germany should see 2 
percent growth this year, 
better than the 0.8 percent 
the IMF predicted in ApriL 
France should not be far off 
the 1.1 percent that the IMF 
predicted in ApriL 
In Japan, signs of recov- 
ery are also beginning to ap- 
pear, -it -said . 

Developing countries wQl 
continue to outstrip the in- 
dustrialized nations, posting 
roughly 6 percent growth. 


4 


ia 


■ 

m ■ 

.L> 

■ 

I 


m\: h 

t ■* i 



WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


ScpL 7 
OootPnrv. 


Amsterdam 


«ABN Amro NW 
•ACF Hold mi 
Aegon 
Ahold 

Aku Nobel 
AMEV 

Bote-Wessonm 

CSM 

DSM 

Elsevier 

Fofckcr 

GHt-Brocodes 

HSG 

Hclnefcen 

Haooavtns 

Hunter Douglas 

INC Caiond 

idler Mueller 

inM Nederrond 

kLM 

knp BT 

KPN 

KedHovd 

Oce Orbital 

Pokfioed 

ptudps 

Polygram 

Rooeco 

Rodamco 

PoHnco 

Rorento 

Potts! Dutch 

5 IDTK 

Unbtver 

Van Ommeren 

VNU 


5950 59 JO 
3750 3 L 60 
9850 98.90 

49.70 4850 
216 21750 

7 A 70 74 

3650 37.10 
69 

143.10 14130 
16750 16750 

'Cl 40 14 J 0 
4550 45*60 
29950 299 

23850 23*60 
7950 79 

82 82 
4290 
9650 
79 JD 7140 

49.90 50.40 

5150 51 

5450 54.40 

63.70 6350 
74 7450 

4950 49 JO 

57.90 5750 
7550 75 J 0 
119 . 9 U 11950 
5250 £M 0 
119.90 120.10 
84.60 6450 

19850197^0 
47 JO 4750 
20050 2 Ml 20 

49.10 49 

190 193 


4250 

njo 


Rhetemetall 

5 cheiing 

Stanero 

Thvssen 

Varfo 

Vdbe 

VEW 

VTog 

voikswom 

Wella 


Clasp Prev. 

309 310 
94093550 
6075069050 

54150 541 

373 376 

5 1350 513 

148450 


Close Prev. 


dost Prev. 


484 . 

1050 


104 S 





FAZ 




mttera/KHAver 1 H 50 11950 


0 Fbi 

Itiwnil 

rbed 

irea 

SUt 

MB 

iCMill 

ftteoa 

rfruvt 

HbenLn 

aciraM 

edroffno 

B 

u- 

voert 


rnoM 

edtetbav* 


iroflna 
werfta 
ctlcer 
vote Beige 
;Gen Banaue 
: Gen Bate*** 

ina 

VQV 


rfieoei 

B 

enMhilere 
pons Lite 


rmlS Mte n 

vbws : 75 SU 7 


2570 

■tboq 
4775 400 
2530 250 
4300 4280 
26325 26400 
12775 12500 
2510 2515 
2040 2020 
W 209 
5790 MO 
7620 7600 
1288 1294 
5750 5770 
3170 3160 
1426 1440 
4430 4390 

9710 «f 0 

4890 4720 
2920 2820 
6500 66001 
U 70 U 5 D 
T 0475 1 W 25 

3600 2970 
542 542 

am woo 

0090 oioo 

2250 Z 25 D 

14425 14450 
15900 15850 
10725 10750 
10375 11025 
3000 24900 
2680 2605 
7050 7010 

■: 7577 J 8 


Aitiv-YhlYma 

EnwGtrfxefl 

Huhbamaki 

icap. 

Kvmmene 

Meira 

Nokia 

Pon lota 

Ropoio 

Stockmann 


ESJSSSt 


Flows : 1 




US 114 
4750 47.90 
15 B 158 

1030 10.40 
145 142 

163 163 

553 554 

64 64 

121 ”i 

335 234 

AO 


Genl Acc 

Glaxo 

Grand Mel 

GRE 

Guinness 

GU 8 

Hanson 

HUlsfem 

HSBCHMgs 

ICI 

inchcope 

Krngftsnor 

Locftrrakje 

Land sec 

Laporte 

Lasmo 

Legal Gen Grp 

Lloyds Bonk 
Marks $p 
MEPC 
Nan P ow e r 
NafWesf 
Nitivw water 
re or son 
P&O 
Plfktngton 


.Bamtnrdfer B 
Camhfor 
Dominion Tent A 
Donohue A 
FCAinfl 
MacMJUan Bl 
Natl Sic Canada 
Power Corp. 
Proviso 
Quebec Tel 
'Quebtoor A 
QuetecarB 
Tetealo be 
Vkfeotnon 

Industrials index : 

Prevfms : 199758 


20 ft 

18 ft 

8 ft 

14 ft 

4 

20 ft 

9 ft 

30 

5 ft 

19 ft 

19 ft 

19 ft 

18 ft 

14 


21 

18 ft 

8 ft 

14 ft 

4 

20 ft 

9 ft 

2 QVb 

5 ft 

19 ft 

19 ft 

19 ft 

18 ft 

13 ft 


Close Prev. 


Close Prev. 


Stockholm 


AGA 


6 X 50 


1 MU 4 


Paris 


Frankfurt 

lrugiruo 

let SEL 325 315 

fiz HoM WW 

M 4 SBJ 0 <73 

vn wo 
s nun aa 

f tnsnsa 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 3450 3400 
Cathay Pacific 
Chw/nv Kona 
China Lfenr pw 
Golry Farm Inn 
Hang Lung Dev 
Hone Sena Bank 
Henderson Land 

HK Electric 
mk Land 
HK Real tv Trust 
HSBC Holdings 
HK 5 hang Htls 
HK Telecomm 
HKfterrv 
rtiiteh Whampoa 
Hyson Dev 
jordte mattv 
j online Sir HW 
Kowloon Motor 
NVanOortn Orteni 
Mira mar Hotel 
New world Dev 
5 HK Proas 

Sill UK 

Swfrt Poc A 
TflJ Chfuno Pros 
TVE 

Whorl Hold 
wtweiockco 
Whig On Co Infl 
Wlnsar Iaol 

E 5 sasr?r BB 


1 X 20 1 X 30 
,3 3^50 
4 l«B 0 41 

12 .95 12 J 0 
1455 14 JQ 
5 X 23 
47 4570 
3550 34*40 
1 X 25 I 486 
27-20 2660 

23-55 2 i 5 o 
7 T 55 21 X 5 
94 92 

12.70 12 

1650 1650 
1445 14 

3 X 20 3850 

74.10 2355 

7 X 29 73 

H J 250 

14.10 1 X 00 
11.40 1150 
2050 2 X 40 

27.70 2750 
58 Jg 5755 

XV 3-21 

64.75 6 X 75 

11.25 1 X 95 
L 2 D 4 J 3 
34 J 0 3170 
1 BJS 1 X 20 

7150 M 50 
11.90 UJ 0 

1014 X 80 


Prudenilorl 
Banka re 
RecklH Cor 
Retold 
Reedirvh 
Reuters 
RMCGraa 
Rolls Rover 
Raffimn (unit) 
Rand Sdot 

Salnsburv 
Sad Nwfe o B 
Soof Power 


Accor 
Air Lknilde 
Aioatel Aisthorn 
AXO 

Baneoire iciel 

BIC 

BNP 

Bouvgucs 


640 646 

738 735 

560 563 

24234 X 30 
47050484.10 
1275 1279 
23 S 233 

633 624 

798 792 

2096 2100 
2065070 X 40 
11450 11450 
1488 1490 
310 310 

430 425 

399 394.90 
Buno Disney 950 9 J 0 

Gen, Eaux 5 T 4 511 

Havas 446 44 X 90 

Imttol 588 590 

Lofcrge Coppg e 42750 436 


Asfna A 

AtfasGopao 

Electrolux B 

Ericsson 

Es$e 1 te-A 

Handeisbankef) 

investor B 

Norsk Hydro 

Prooonfla AF 

Sondvfk B 

SCA-A 

S-€ Banken 

Skandio F 

5 kanska 

SKF 

siofo 

Trelieborg BF 
Volvo BF 

t^SGSS^i 


6 X 50 
57 B 
ISO 180 
n 9250 
315 374 


Toyota 

Yamoktutoc 

a:xM 


2130 

830 


2150 

855 


U.S. FUTURES 


Via Anodoted Pjou 


Sept. 7 


Season Season 
Ugh Low 


Open High Law Close Oig Oo-lnt 


jssatsS 1, 


4 IT 

96 

9150 

ES 

259 

131 

122 

119 


411 

97 

8850 

175 

257 

130 

119 

116 


Toronto 


4 X 30 4270 
114 112 

1 ST 148 
136 133 

431 432 

102 102 

143 141 

187652 


Canrefour 

C.C.F. 

Cerus 
Chorgetjrs 
Clmcnts Franc 
Club Med 

EK-Ajgrftabta 


Sydney 

Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 
Banal 

Bougolmriile 
Coles Myer 
Comal co 
CRA 
CSft 


Severn Trenl 
Shell 

Slide 

smith Neohew 
SnuthKiloe B 
Smith <WH) 
Sun Alliance 
Tate 8 . Lyle 
Tosco 
Thom EMI 
Tomkins 
T 5 B Grotto 
Urtfevvr 
Uhl Biscuits 
Jtedofone 
War Loan 3 ft 
WelJcnmt 
WhiThreod 
w/HiamsHdos 
WUllmConroon 
r-T. 30 hid* 



fwil 


Leg rand 
Lyon. Eaux 
Oreo I |L 1 
L.VJVUL 
Metro- Hocftette 
MtcheltaB 
Moulinex 
Paribas 
Peodney inti 
Pa rood- R I cord 
Peugeot 
Pi nouit Print 
Rodlo technique 
Rh* Poulenc A 
teff.si.Loub 
Sonofl 

Saint Gobaln 
SJE.B. 

Ste Generate 
Suk 

ThomsorvCSP 

Total 
UA.P. 
vaiee 


Goodman Field 

540 A 59 D I i£l e ^SrSSC a,l ° 

rj ,g & T 0 " 

1,46 ‘MatAust Bank 
News Corp 
Nine Netaortc 
N Broken JhHU 
Pac Dunlop 
Pioneer Inti 
NrwidY Posrtdon 
OCT Resources 
Santos 
TNT 

western Mining 
WKtMCSORfcMg 
WoodNcte 


1145 
C 16 
111.10 71150 
23850 335 

13050 133 

36234750 
162 16150 
32531950 
844 83 A 

a 954 
535 540 

13350 133.10 
1536 1 S 12 

MS SS 

541 M 
,, 560 559 

257.90 259 

15750 15850 
30750 304 J 0 
14550 148 L 70 
206 


955 956 
357 3.92 
2050 2056 
X 46 143 
1.18 1.15 
4.15 4.16 
555 5 A 5 
\ 9 JA 19 JO 
455 4 j 63 
U 9 1.16 
158 151 
11.10 11.10 
IJS 1.95 
3 3 

1048 1056 
855 9.10 
4 J 9 459 
3.94 192 
450 457 
352 350 
Z 43 252 
150 158 
359 451 
257 258 
8.10 7.90 
452 452 
455 A 76 




Johannesburg 


Hypo bonk 

/erotoshk 

Bank 


rwnral 
lerBero 
isa 


las 

Mr Bank 
iiHhie 


410 413 

4425044650 
715 730 

397 M 

81 J 8 T 050 
32632 JM 
24124150 
82840 128 

490 493 

249 231 


^Howen awjzaw 

IT 

Sf k 1 

m 52 

380 TM 

% 

Bl nuonuo 

70 S 706 SP 

rax «i 

<iwn| 43 S 204 K 5 O 

uSl w 184 

SvRWCit WJ 

e 815 

5 - 4 TO 4765 D 

09 25750 » 

470 


nsa 


aeci 
A ired) 

Anote Amer 
Bor taws 
Brwoor 
Bull ete 
De Beers 
Drtete nt em 
Geocor 
GF 5 A 
Harmony 
High v e ta Steal 
Khtof 

NedbankGro 
Ranafonteln 

PuRPfal 
SA Brews 
Si Helena 
ScioJ 
Western Deep 

Cemra 8 elndfx : 
Prevloui ; 9 MM 


29 

121 


20 
121 
2&1 
33.25 33 . 7 S 
1073 WJ 5 
54 53 

no m 

7150 72 

147 S 1475 
129 129 

3475 3455 
3275 32 : 

72 71 

33 3350 
57 5750 
134 120 

87 87 

4 CL 75 48 

36 35 

220 219 


London 


AbMvNan 

4.14 

4 X 0 

Arriffd Lyons 

oos 

6 uQ 7 

Arlo Wwins 
Argyll Gtqvp 

27 V 

vn 

Z 71 

230 

AuBrltFoodS 

053 

5 X 4 

BAA 

4.73 

092 

BAB 

S .10 

0)5 

Bank Scotland 

2.13 

2.11 

Barehm 

598 

53 a 

BAT 

565 

567 

4 X 5 

038 

BET 

u> 

1.17 

Blue Orcte 

XI 5 

X 18 

BOC Group 

724 

738 

Boats 

sa a 

SA& 

Bawota 

099 

4.91 

OP 

433 

4 .U 

Brit Airways 

411 

007 

Brit Gos 

2.96 

2.92 

BrtJ 5 tv*i 

1-55 

168 

BHf Telecom 

195 


BTR 

3 X 2 

3 X 7 

Cable Wirt 
Cadbury Seh 

4 L 4 T 

4 J 4 

106 

2 X 3 

4 X 6 

4 X 7 

012 

2 X 4 

SaSvtyftita 

Comm Union 

564 

5 X 4 , 

Cotirfaulds 

530 

5 X 8 

ECC Group 

4 X 1 

2.96 

Enterprise Oil 

3 X 5 

091 

Eurotunnel 

VSa 

260 

F Isons 

1 J 3 

1.49 

Forte 

137 

235 

GEC 

2.94 

2 . 9 ft! 


Madrid 

BBV 1000 

8 co Centred Htep. 2610 
Banco Santander <995 
Bmsto 10 OS 

£Epsa an* 

Drogado* 2095 

Endesa siso 

Eroros in 

iDerdrota 837 

fttpsoi 4075 

Topqcal^o 3315 

Telefonica 1755 


2960 


4940 

1005 

3125 

2125 

5300 

141 

823 

4010 

3270 

1720 


1650 

8.15 

735 

1270 

II 

462 

tM 

17 


UJ 0 

ft 

1270 

1170 

tu 

17 


iitea : BU 7 


Milan 

Altamza 1 SS 08 1 S 56 S 

AnJtqflO 13330 13800 . 

Autostrada pHy 1600 1668 
BcoAcrtaarturo 28 SD 2890 
BcaConvner Hal 3540 3570 
BCO Nqz Lovora 12 m 12 BSD 
BoaPoa Novara 
Banco di Romo 
BCDAmbrosfavto 
Bo Napoli Hsp 
B enetton 
cranio HoHane 

EfHchetn Apg 
Ferfln 
Flat spa 
Ftoanz Asralnd 
FlomecamiGB 
Fgncflorki spa 
MmrailAoH: 


Singapore 

Alta Pec Brew 
Coretoos 

City Dmtopvrmt 
Crete A Carrtoge 
DBS 

DBS Land 
FE Levirasson 
Fraser & Neave 
Gt Eerstn Lhe 
Hong Leona Pm 

Inchcaoe 

Jurong Shtevard 1440 i <40 
Kay Htan J Cooel 253 202 
Ktopel 
Noteteel 
Neptune Ortont 
OCBC foreign 

c 

O'Seas union Enl 
Semhawong 

fftn* Singapore 
Sing Aerospace 
Sing Afnines tern 
JjW BU 95 VC 
sine Land 
Stag Peflm 

5 Ing Press fora 
SlngWpOWg 
StogTetecomm 
Strolls Steam 
Sir att* Trading 
Tat Lee Bank 
uwinmameti 
utdO^sta Bktero 
UU 0*0106 Land 


v 2750 
450 450 
550 


TT 5 D 

235 

1450 

6 AS 

855 

12 

T .10 


202 

1150 

374 

250 

14.90 

65 Q 

850 

12 

tjob 

249 

1450 

9 j 40 


frateementt 

(tarcai 

Mcdfohanca 

Mon ted Ison 

OhvettJ 

Firom spg 

RAS 

Rinoscw f e 

San Paolo Torino 

SIP 

SME 

5 nfthed 




1450 
955 

n •** 

259 270 
3 M 0 26 wta 
255 258 
2 M 350 
452 442 
356 354 
f 40 456 
153 1 ^ 
145 C 1450 
Z* 145 


TbMtod. : 33 Z 7 JI 


srer 

Tore Attic 




8600 
1800 tB 40 
4140 4235 
1321 1330 
22300 23400 
SOTS 2095 
3060 3000 
1449 1680 
6280 6275 
10500 10WS 
1 W 1767 
10690 10750 
4 OW 406 OO 
5810 5890 
12000 12190 
5110 5130 
13800 11990 
1344 1349 
7015 2QI0 
3430,3480 
23700 2993* 

932* 9480 
9290 7500 

4370 4405 _ 

§S #| Markets Closed 

Sao Paulo stock 
26 J 002 WM gjajjjgj was closed 

Wednesday for a 
holiday. 


Alton Aluminum 35ft 
BaflkMontrete Mk 
Bell Canada 43ft 


, 35 
toft 
47 ft 


Tolqro 

Akol Etectr 
AsatH Chemical 
Asohf Glass 
Bank of Tokvg 
Bridgestone 
Canon 

Dal Nippon Print 
Dal wo How 
Datwa SecuHNes 
Panjc 
Full Bane 
Full Photo 
Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Coble 
Honda 
Ue Yefcocto 
Itochu 

Japan Alrtlnesi 
Kali mo 
JCansaJ P ower 
Kmoaafcl Steel 
Kirin Brewery 

Komatsu 
Kutaia 
Kyocera 
WaHu Glee Ina 
Matsu Efeewks 

MffsuotehJ Bk 
Mitsubishi KaM 
Mltaibipil Efec 
WltwbUW htev 

AAUsubisto Coup 
M itsui and Co 
Mitsui Maine 
Mlteukcohl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
Nlkteo Securhtes 
Htam Kfiooku 
Nippon Oil 
Ntonngted 

"t£Sn Yuun 

NacmiraSec 

NTT 

Olympus Optical 
Pioneer 
Rtaoh 

Sanyo Elec 
Sharp 
Ohfnriazu 
SUneteuOiem 
Sony 

Sum 1 tome Bk 
Sumitomo Oka 
S ami Marine 
Sumitomo Meftf 
Tbbei Coro 

Taktda chem 
TDK 
Tdlln 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Tepp on Printing 
Turov Ind- 
Toshlho 


785 

1200 

1480 

1570 

1740 

1230 

1870 

1480 

1460 

4610 

20 fi 0 
2230 
1070 
9 U 
863 
1600 
ST SO 
69 B 

972 

2570 

.423 

1180 

904 

712 

7210 

1700 

1100 

2440 

539 

672 

780 

T20O 

835 

775 

1010 

1450 

1200 

10 » 

1140 

725 

367 

646 

739 


455 

798 
1230 
1510 
1580 
1748 
1240 
1900 
1500 
1510 
4660 
21 10 
2230 
1080 
790 
B 67 
1650 
5170 
706 
706 
992 

9 

718 

7360 

1750 

1130 

2560 

550 

678 

786 

1230 

543 

785 

1020 

1540 

1210 

1078 

1170 

990 

731 

372 

649 

742 


AMithl Price 
AsnlGoEapto 
Air Canada 
Alberto Energy 
Amer Barr kit 
BCE 

Bfc Nava Scotta 
-BC Gas 
bc Telecomm 
Branwtea 
Brunswick 
CAE 
Chvndev 
CJBC 

Cdn Pacific Ltd 
Canadian Tire A 
Omtor 
Caro 

CCL rnd B 
cmepiex 
Com toco 
Cdnwest ExfH 
C 5 A flAgt A 
DfHOSCo 
Dy toe A 

Echo Bay Mines 

EavritY Silver A 

FCA IfltJ 

Fed Ind A 

F art cher ChoJl A 

FPJ 

Centra 

GuH Cda Res 

Heeslnn 

Hemlo Old Mines 

Hal linger 

Horsham 

Hudson's Bov Co 

tmusco 

Inca 

JPL Energy 
JcHfrtocJc 
Lobatt (John) 
LohfowCos 
Modwuto 
Mom inti a 
M oPteLeof Fds 
Maritime 
Mark Res 
DtononA 
No m a Ind A 
Noranda lnc 
Norondo Forest 
Noroen Energy 

Nmtrn Teicown 
Nova Corp 
Oshawa Group A 

Pogurkxn A 
Placer Dome 
Poco Petroleum 
PWACatP 
Royrodc 

Renaissance Eny 
Rogers Comm B 
ftti lt i mof a 
Rovoi Bonk Cda 
Sceptre Res 
Scott* Hasp 
Seagram Go 
Sears Cgnedo 
Shell Canada A 
Sherri tt 
SHLSvstemhse 

Sou mam 


19 ft 

18 ft 

m 

20 ft 

32 ft 

47 ft 

26 ft 

74 ft 

25 ft 

4^0 

10 ft 

7 ft. 

5 

32 

23 ft 

lift 

20 ft 

VS 

455 

23 ft 

24 ft 

11 

22 ft 

054 

18 

050 

4 

4 ft 

19 ft 

5 ft 

Oft 

m 

14 ft 

13 ft 
2 Tft 
28 ft 
3 Sft 
39 ft 
29 ft 
T 6 ft 
30 * 
21 ft 
8 ft 
53 ft 
lift 
25 ft 
BK 


Stefc o lnc A 
Tollwnan Emr 
Ted iB 

Thomson Corp 
TorDom Bank 
Torsfar B 
Transarto Carp 
TransCda Mae 
Triton Fhn a 
T rimac 

Unicom Energy 


71 ft 

4 ft 

26 ft 

12 ft 

US 

47 ft 

13 ft 

19 ft 

195 

32 ft 

8 ft 

054 

17 ft 

28 ft 

■0 
2 Bft 
lift 

8 

42 ft 

7 ft 

42 ft 

12 ft 

7 

17 ft 

lift 

Ste 


19 ft 

17 ft 

7 ft 

20 ft 

32 ft 

47 V 

26 ft 

15 

25 

430 

10 ft 

7 V 

5 

32 ft 

23 ft 

lift 

20 ft 

350 

9 ft 

495 

24 V 

24 ft 

10 ft 

22 ft 

Oft 

18 V 

078 

NA 

6 ft 

20 V 

5 ft 

Oft 

5 

13 ft 
14 V 
13 ft 
21 ft 
28 ft 
38 V 
3T 
29 V 
16 ft 
21 
22 
8 ft 
53 ft 
lift 
25 ft 
9 


WHEAT 

177 

356 

IWk 

282 

3 L 57 V, 

160 


Grains 

(CBOT) l^ODObuminbturi' aoumparbutfigi 


382 Sec 94 172 
UP Dec 94 357 
327 Mir 95 191 
116 KMav 95 352 
111 JulV 5 356 V 
157 Sep 95 160 V, 
155 Dec 9 5 1489 a 


177 ft 

3 J 1 

196 

357 

161 

163 ft 

172 ft 


10577 


171 ft 
Itoft 
189 ft 
350 ^ 
355 V 
IS** 
168 ft 


176 fD 56 1*571 
190 ft - 4 -OOSft 4 &Z 9 
155 ft +006 U 3 S 4 
356 +006 1572 

140 V +004 0758 

UJft +OC 3 ft 4 
172 ft « ODOft 30 


Season Season 
High Low 


Open High Low Close Chg OoJfrit 


Seam Season 
hish Low 


Open high low Oast Os OPJnt.r 1 


IT 56 11.18 May 96 

Esr. sales NA. Tue's.sdes 
Tile's open int 


10 mairtc larp- sgr I 


643 


ESI. soles 24500 Tue-tactfes 
Tu^s open inf 70518 off 749 
WHEAT QCBOT) ^Wm Wi r w hOWtebiiOil 

102 ft Sec 94 IQ 183 160 ft 187 V ^ 052 V 

112 Vi Dec 94 3 J 9 193 ft 1 M 193 + 005 ft 25599 

125 Mar 95 3 . 92 ft 354 ft 191 196 9522 

XtfftMavW IfiOV 181 153 ft lh + 0 JD 748 

lV 6 ftJd 95 358 164 158 164 +006 1562 

SjP« 166 4006 75 

160 ft Dec 95 174 +Q 56 1 

Tue' 5 . sates 


180ft 

359 ft 

191 ft 

3 JQ 

159 

159 

340 ft 


225 

226 B 

234 ft 

lAft 


228 
UFA 
253 
147 V 
148 ft 147 ft 
251 ft 149 ft 
25 ^. U 1 
29534 


25 ft 

16 ft 

20 V* 

2 *ft 

14 ft 

17 ft 

3.93 

15 ft 

159 


71 ft 

450 

26 ft 

12 ft 

17 ft 

46 ft 

14 

19 ft 

4 

8 ft 

Oft 

17 ft 

28 ft 

22 ft 

77 

ttU 

lift 

8 ft 

43 V 

7 ft 

43 V 

12 ft 

7 ft 

17 ft 

17 ft 

8 ft 

30 ft 

25 V 

16 ft 

2 Dft 

24 ft 

14 ft 

18 

190 

15 V 

NA 


Esf.sdes NA 
Tue'sqp enlnl 

CORN (CBOT) UDObumifliiTVin* 

292 V 114 Sep 94 225 Mr 227 

1 77 117 Dec 94 226 ft 

252 ft 224 Mar 95 135 

255 222 ft May 9 5 140 ft 

USft 136 ftJuV 95 155 ft 

170 ft 139 Sep 95 148 

263 135 ft Dec 95 149 ft 

14 ) 157 JUI 96 161 

Esr.saktf 31000 Tue's, sales 
Tue'smcnW 200626 uo lSTB 
SOYBEANS (CBOT) SUOUDunUnamun- 
788 ft 5 J»ft£ap 9 J 520 552 £87 

757 ft 551 Nov 94 183 ft 184 ft 179 

7 j 0 d 580 Jem 95 190 192 ft 587 

7 JU 149 Mar 95 199 101 196 

705 ft SJ 5 ftMav 95 684 ft 687 fcJQQft 

7 J 3 6 ft 528 ft Ari 95 &J 8 ft 6.12 A 07 

6.12 579 Aug 95 659 6 . 11 ft 657 ft 

6.15 177 Sep 95 

6 -S 0 ft S 78 ft Nov 95 6 . 12 ft 

421 620 Ji 4 9 » 

Esi. sales 34500 Tue's. safes MO 
Tue's open im up 1697 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) HO 
21058 ITM&SepW 
mjo 
70950 
207 50 
207 J 0 
M 750 
20650 
18160 
W 170 

Est . sales , . 

Tue's open tot 


Rate 

226 ft 9*909 

227 ^ +051 139-457 

237 +OL 01 U 29/925 
147 ft + 051 ft 1 X 526 
147 ►O.mft 1 Z 195 
148 V > 051 V 937 
ISIV+amft 5513 
Z 42 U *Q 51 V 35 


A 14 4.70 


IITOiOSepH 
169200 a 94 


17130 
17170 

V 6970 DOCM 174.40 

T 71 50 Jan 95 17520 
17250 MOT 95 17750 
17450 AAav 95 179 JO 
T 7 S 20 JUI 9 S 18150 
77450 Aug 95 
Y 76 l»S*p *5 

22500 Tue’s. sales 21^20 


17140 
17190 
t 74 -w 
17550 
17820 
17950 
181 JO 


77190 
> 71.90 
> 73,90 
173 J 0 
17650 
177 j 
11 


per bushel 
558 ft —051 
550 ft— 052 V 78-010 
558 -OOlft 14.162 
196 V — 003 6500 

«C - 053 V 4566 
6.08 - 401 ft 7,973 
658 —052 241 

456 ft — 054 ft 77 
411 —407 3^403 

62 b f 055 1 


17420 —120 4320 
1 72 J 0 -150 11465 
17110 — 1 JB 37,264 
17350 —150 /j V 
17140 —150 7,930 
17850 — 150 4518 
18410 —150 2,707 
18247 — UO 201 
>8440 -A.\b 332 


150 1020 Sep M 12 »f 

T 5 B 0 lOODecM 133 S 
1605 1077 Mar 95 1362 

UV 1 1071 May 9 S M 15 
1600 12255495 1440 

7560 1447 Sep 95 

1633 1290 Dec 95 

>676 1330 Mar M 

1*0 1225 May 96 

Estates NA Tue's. sales 
Tuff's cpan inf 
MAJNGEJ 4 ME (NCTTO 
134-50 0405 Sep 94 8400 

13400 89. 10 Nov 94 9 T 5 D 

1 3250 9350 Jan 95 94 J 5 

12 OS 9650 Mar 95 9859 

11425 9750 May 95 10250 

119.00 1 0150 Jui 9 S 16550 

\ni 0 l>tLt& 

11250 H 150 Sep 96 10750 
Es». sales NA Tue's. sales 
Tue's mn int 


U 

TM 

1393 

1420 

1449 


1281 

1330 

1375 

1415 

1431 


8400 

9125 

9550 

9925 

TOQJ 0 

1 IB 50 

>>445 

10750 


1153 

>150 


1284 

1344 

1385 

1415 

7437 

1457 

1480 

1501 

1525 


8750 87 JO 
9095 91 JO 

9425 MJ 0 
9450 9470 

10250 10250 
10550 10555 
>>445 »>55 
71155 
T 075 D 10855 


tOJ 28 

+tL 38 


1-19 100 

* 19 41.219 
*15 13551 
*15 3565 


15462 

15440 

15363 

15414 


*15 
*15 
*15 
*15 
+ 15 


im 

1505 

4419 

3451 

185 


+080 376 

+040 10411 
+035 44 
+040 1120 
+095 856 

+ 150 494 

+ 25 B 305 

+ 25 D 
+ 24 Q 16 


07370 

07293 

07273 

07245 

O 72 T 0 

07180 




-92 36524 ’ j 
-92 3515 _ 
—102 l.Q 
-402 103 


36556 .r. 
12521 '5 
1536 a 
39 I ,V 
80 1 * 
15 11 




Hi 

I 17 J 20 

116.15 
11580 
114.10 
1 TAM 
1 1450 
112 J 0 
11150 
11470 
11550 
71575 
10850 
10050 
11110 
10850 

172.15 


7 AW^« (B T? 43 o ) Y!i $0 11550^^655 
75 J 5 Dac«< 11420 11440 11250 
76 J 0 Jon 95 
7 lD 0 Fefa 95 

7100 Mar 95 I 12 J 0 11340 11228 
11150 111.90 
71050 110.90 


7455 Mov 95 111.90 
79.00 Jlri 95 71050 
79 . 10 SCP 95 
75 JOOcf 95 11550 
7755 NOV 93 1 1470 
8850 Dec 95 10950 
B 84 Q Jan W 
6250 Mar W 10755 
91.18 Agr 96 
TOBJOMayto 
104.10 Jun 96 
MA 96 


11550 

114 JB 

10950 


11425 

11350 

108.95 


TA 775 W 7 J 5 


NA 

Tints open im 
SILVER CNCMX) 
6155 

5465 


.ns 


’s. sates 


11475 

11425 

113.75 
17035 
11225 

111.75 
11055 
11525 
1122 ) 
10955 
10855 
10103 
UUA 
10745 
11 I. 7 D 
10725 
11050 


+ 0.15 6,950 
34416 


+ 0 l )0 

+ 0.10 

+ a lS 

+ 0.10 

♦ 0.10 
+OL 10 
+ 0.10 
+ 0.10 
+ 0.70 
♦MB 
+ 0 J 0 

^a?o 

+aio 

♦ 0.10 


1,134 


1488 

835 

134 


NA Tue's. sales 251^02 
Tue's open tnr Z 7 ? 4 jw eft >2346 
BRITISH POUND (CMERls perpaand- 1 
15764 1 4440 SeP M LK 20 14320 UOQ 

14760 14310 Dec 94 14502 1-5902 74404 

14470 1.5390 Jim 95 15390 L 53 M 

lJ 5 m 14 MAW 96 14390 15420 15390 

Esi, sates NA Tue's. sates 13513 
Tor's open tat 39,923 up 2100 
CANADIAN DOLLAR CCMER) tnartfr.T 
07740 0 JUISep 94 07305 0 J 313 07302 

07670 07038 Dec 94 0729 ] 07295 07290 

07605 07030 Ma 1 95 0.7271 DJ 273 QJTH 

07323 06990 Jun 95 07240 07345 07240 

07250 04965 Sip 95 

07190 07040 Dec 45 07175 07175 07 T 7 S 

EsLsale* NA Tart. sales 13496 BI 

Tue's apanmr 51,099 up 1398 
GERMAN MARK (CMER) i Mrmvk-i poM«quabffUQOi 
0 JSX f 5 ffl 0 Sro« 06475 OJMl 0^4 90307 

06606 S-graDeC* 06471 06480 OM 5 0*454 — 3 s 55 s 2 #“ 

0*595 0 J 980 Jun 95 06409 — 3 S Ittt 

04450 0634759 95 06477 —OS 9 , 

04 TO O 5 M 0 Mcr ^6 —25 

.i NA Tue's. soles 57,131 * 

Tbe^eponint 127,746 up 6889 
JAPANESE Yei (CMSD 1 nrr ran I ptemettoa milNffili 
Qfl 1 M)HLQ 0 ggSgpW 0 J 101 45001 01 530 0100380 X 1007 ) —12 56 ^Z 7 . 

omogqLOWSaOec 94 QJ^ -82 u£»' a 

OOlO 67 aL 0 O 9776 JUn 95 0 X 70295 . 82 274 

^ 077 SiXT 0200 Sep« OXlO<loaXlOfl 0 OOTCO 85 OXlnj 75 —82 47 

Qjn 056 OUXJHS 0 Mar M 0 Jn 07 TOWT(CT 0 O 0 W 2100 jn 0271 —92 

Est. sates NA Tue's. sates 20542 

Tue's open mt 70539 up 375 

SWISS FRANC tOtfft) f MTtiWic-lQQWcaucRsiOJBOl 

S- 21 I S - 7730 017750 07695 0 J 77 ! —19 36,505 

07840 0 ^ 885 Dec 94 0775 D 07757 07710 07737 —17 9^5 

07880 0746 * Jun 95 07780 17 If 

- 

Tur SOPOT El* 45*660 up 476 


' 


- . 1 * - 


Industrials 


up asm 

SOYBEAN OfL (CBOT) (ftmw- 


JOJ 4 2 Z 4 QSC 0 94 2190 

29-54 22.1000 44 2166 

28 X 7 23.00 Dec M 2045 

2155 ZU 5 J 0195 2 SJ 0 

28 J 0 2 U 3 Mar 95 25 X 5 

aX 5 ZL 91 MOY 95 24.92 

77-85 23 X 0 Jk 495 2475 

2770 22-95 Aua 95 U 5 & 

24 .75 22.93 Sep 95 2475 

2110 21100095 

3175 22 X 0 Dec 95 

Est. sates 21000 Tue's. soles 


76.15 

3094 

25.74 

23152 

2132 

73.12 

24.92 

2470 

2440 


25 X 5 

TSJA 

2144 

3 i 27 

94114 

3450 

M 70 

24 X 8 

2425 


Tuo'i open Int 79,223 oft 2084 


21^14 


160 wn. 
26 . JJ 
25 X 6 
2 fLM 
25.47 

25 X 2 

2484 

2437 

2190 

2175 


+ 0 JJ TuM 
♦ 423 \ 6 j£l 
+027 31*32 
+ 02 T 1414 
+073 7 X 94 
+ 0.17 4,005 
+ 014 1337 
*414 503 

+ 012 83 

♦002 1 

— 0 X 3 3 


Livestock 


tgJSZP&ig”'’ 


TIM 2200 
mOatODd 
1130 
3740 2800 

w 575 

JVS 7 B 

2050 3 D 7 D 

flSf % 

a s 

319 330 
*47 m 

122 122 

559 580 

m JW 

3780 2990 
% 

750 963 

743 75 H 


Zurich 

Adia M\ B 
Aiustdsae B new 
BBC Dnsn Bov B 
Ctoo Getgv B 
C 3 Holdings B 
Elefetraw B 
FbCM-B 
intadbcDunf B 

Jet moll B 
Londl* Gyr R 
M oewto fe h B 
Nestle R 

OeriilL Buehrle R 
Pom»HldB 

Sofns Republic 
SonduB 
Sdtlndhr B 
Sutter PC 
Surveillonce B 
5»toank Corps 
Swiss Rtlnsur R 
Swissair R 
UBSB 

winwihur B 
Zurich Ass B 


252 254 
576 . 675 
1179 1181 
804 792 

556 55? 
354 355 
1450 1450 
3370 2280 
897 895 

740 735 

415 4 H 
1229 1536 
144 . 142 
1575 1520 
6315 ; 6290 
100 toe 
719 . 7 T 4 
7600 7450 
,j £5 933 
1970 1970 
378 378 
543 548 

£5 070 

7201 1197 
687 «I 7 

1276 1 1270 


7 QJ& 
69.10 
68.12 
69 JO 

6442 

67 X 0 


CATTLE iCMBRj «X»tek-ca 

74.10 6 i 7 oaa «4 71 JD 71 X 0 

74 JO 6720 Dec 94 69 JO 69 JO 

7425 PJDFtbK 66.70 4620 

75.10 69 J 0 Aar 95 7035 7 V AO 

6930 66 JflJUR 9 S 67 J 5 CAS 

68.10 66.45 Aug 95 66 J 0 6680 

6755 67.25 Oei 95 €735 £ 7-25 

Esi. sales H -A. Tumttea SSBO 
Tue’s OPgi mt 78.797 Off 2 W 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMER> 

75 X 0 74-90 5 ep 94 75^3 

BIJS TP 95 Da 94 75.60 *. 

08 X 0 7140 Nov 94 7 U 0 76 JD 

90.95 7 l«Jm 9 S 76 30 74 J 0 

88-25 7285 Mar 95 74 J 0 74.50 

76.90 72 J 5 APT 95 74 X 0 74 X 0 

76 J 0 73-25 May 95 73 J 0 7130 

7 X 05 73 X 0 Aug ?S 73 X 0 73 X 0 

Esi. sates HA Tue'Si sates 727 
7 open Kit itt& eh 41 
HOGS (OAERJ 

49 J 5 37 J 50 ct 94 38.95 39 J 7 

SQXD 39 X 5 Dec 94 VJ& 40.17 

«L 0 O 38 XQM 95 3930 4037 

XUQ 38 X 5 Anr 75 3 ? 15 3 * JO 

47 JO 4175 Jun »5 4 430 44 J 0 

45 X 0 CL 75 Jd 95 43.95 44 J 0 

4140 CtTOAugW 41 » 4100 

40-50 39 jOOct 95 40 LOQ 40100 

41 X 0 40 X 0 Dec 95 40 J 0 40 » 

EV. vdtt HA T’je'LSteM UW 
TuB'sepenW 27,474 off 396 
FORKBSJJES (CMER 1 AWte-ovhMrlL 
60 X 5 . ilXDFebH 42 X 7 42 X 7 42 X 0 4230 

6030 4 DA 2 Mtr 9 S 42 X 0 4275 41 J 5 42 X 7 

AU 5 42 JMMoy« 43 X 0 43 JQ 42 X 0 4110 

54 X 0 43 X 0 JJ 05 44 .T 0 OJQ 43.90 *J_» 

44 X 0 42 X 5 Aug 95 4135 

Esi. com nA Tue^.B 0 te» vm 
Tue’s open W 8,137 eft 180 


74 J 7 

7*33 

75 J 0 

7 SA 5 

7100 

7 U 7 

73 X 7 

72.90 


38 X 5 

39 X 0 

3935 

39 JH 

4405 

4 X 93 

49 X 2 

40 X 0 

4 U 0 


Taay 

69 X 7 

A&JCP 

WJ 2 

66 JP 

MX 

67 X 0 


74 X 7 

74 X 7 

75 J 5 

7 SJ 2 

73 X 0 

73 J 7 

7 lJI 7 

72.90 


37X2 
39.97 
40 X 2 
39 JQ 


— M 8 34,903 

- 0 X 9 17348 
— 060 11 X 37 
-Ofi 7316 
— 0 JB 1 X 16 
-ft« 678 


1.940 


- 4 L 78 
—090 
-XXO 
—■OXO 
- 0 X 0 
_ 4 L 68 
- 4 L a 
— 0.10 


597 X 
564 X 
604 X 
60 L 5 
61 OX 
5793 

6 I 2 X 

6 TEX 

587 X 


w/«, 


nf 

271 

236 

94 

3 


44 X 5 

43 .ro 

CUB 

40 J 0 


-OOSMJ 13 
— 0 X 3 10 X 25 
_ __ 3 L 1 I 4 
+QJ 0 LTO 
+ 0.15 617 

♦JH 165 
♦005 7 ft 
* 0.10 00 
-OBI 3 


tSS 

40 X 1 

+ 0 .T 5 


7 X 32 

442 

79 

M 

30 


5 X 00 mnr os.- cants par frm oz. 
491 X 5 ep 94 549 X 552 J 548 X 5500 

51 1 J Oct 94 5523 

NovW SS 4. 2 

380 X 0^94 55 &X SALS 551 X 556-7 
401 XJan 95 S 62 X 5620 562 X 559.1 

4 T 4 JMOT 93 564-5 56 BX SSLS 564 J 
4 l 8 XMdTY 9 S S 7 QX S 72 X 565 X 5705 

420 XAH 95 576-5 57 L 5 5765 5764 

5325 Sep 95 5 B 4 J 58 dX 5 B 4 X 5025 
SnXCfetK 99138 9 HS TOO »>J 
mxjenW 594.9 

554 X/Aor 9 d 601-9 

547 XMdy 96 6086 

Jut 96 6117 

EH. tOteft NA. TueT*. sal«S 
Tuff'scpenlni 

PLATINUM (NM 6 R 3 3 D wva-M 

jobxo 4 Uxosep «4 

435 X 9 360 X 00094 42 KB 42 C 5 D 43030 47150 

43550 374 X 0 Jan 9 S 427 X 0 428 X 0 474 X 0 42550 

439 X 0 3 WX 0 AOT +5 430 X 0 430 X 0 428 X 0 429 JD 

434 X 0 4 T 950 JU 95 < 2 X 00 

43 T.S 0 422 XQOCST 5 43550 

Esf. sates na Tue’s.sales 
Tile's aoen Int 

GOLD fNQIU) 100 in)rc.-tttaijaar Itopol 
389 X 0 377 X 0 Sep 94 377 JO 377 JD 377 X 5 390 X 5 

417 X 0 344 . 000 CI 94 390 X 0 391 JO 389 X 8 391.40 

Nov 94 39150 

£650 MO 0 Q ^94 393.30 394 X 0 393 X 0 3 WA 0 

417 X 0 36 X 50 Fob 95 397.00 398 X 0 3 MX 0 397 X 0 

1 K-S 2 &S Sl-SS «nSS 

42850 361 30 Jiff 95 04-08 404 X 0 OT .50 BOO 

41250 38 QL 50 Aug 95 407 JO 

47130 401 X 0 Ocr W 41150 

429 J 0 400 D 0 C 9 S 415 X 0 41100 41100 41 UO 

43450 41 250 Feb 96 419.10 

430 X 0 diaXOAprto 42 X 00 

43 QJ 0 413 X 0 Jiff 9 * 427 ,* * 7 X 0 427 X 0 42750 

Esc. sates NA Tim's. ua» 
tub's ooenM 



7050 59510094 69 J 0 

77-25 59 X 8 Dk 94 6170 

78.15 6150 Mor 95 7005 

7055 64 X 0 May V 5 7 L 30 

7 L 75 OJOJulK 7180 

74 J 70 66 X 00090 

7180 fe 25 Dec 93 075 

NA Tun's, sates 
mint 



92 X 01 tea.- i 3 m*s 


7 L 73 
69 JB 
71.15 
7 U 5 
7135 


i’- 1 - 


69 X 0 




+ 030 

♦ 030 16 X 72 

♦ 0 X 0 Wi? 
+ 8 X 0 1(856 
+ 0 X 0 461 
+ 0 X 0 


4 A 90 Od*& 

46 X 0 Nov 
46 X 0 Dec 
4135 Jon 
473 SFeb 
47 X 0 Mar 

47 X 0 Mo /95 50 X 3 

42.70 tfg 95 Si JO 
95 
95 

Dec 95 
Jan 9 ft 
Feb 96 
Marts 
Tue's. sates 


9,189 


♦130 
4 2 J 0 
+230 
+230 90 X 41 

♦ 220 13*342 
►230 6 J 27 
♦230 >L >93 

♦ 220 
+220 

+ 2.29 5346 
*230 

+230 1 X 14 
+220 U 90 


Financiol 


US T. BILLS (CMSO 

«xa 94X2 Sep 94 

96.10 94 X 5 Dec 94 

91.05 92 MMCT 95 

9*34 94.10 Jun 95 


Vs 39 

94 X 6 

9 LST 

9432 


lift 100 ML 

9 SX 2 9&39 

ton 94 X 6 

94 X 1 94 X 9 

943 S 9432 

OX 53 


95X7 

94 X 7 

94 X 9 

9432 


+033 9 X 1 ? 

+ 0 X 1 10 X 70 

— 0 X 2 



6930 68 J 5 


5070 

51 X 0 

52 X 0 

5235 

5035 


51 X 5 5015 


51 X 0 51 X 0 


7075 

70 X 5 

69-71 

71 X 0 

7228 

S* 

70.15 

69.15 


VHP 

51 X 5 

•VM 

SL 71 

ffljg 

57 X 7 

50 X 3 

50 X 7 

50 L 77 

51 X 3 

5232 

53.12 

54 X 2 

54 X 7 

55 X 7 

55 X 7 

S 4 X 2 


+070 __ 

+070 

♦Ota 28 X 04 
+ 0 X 2 9 X 73 ^ 
+ 0.98 4,938 - 
+ 1 X 5 IMT\ 
+ 0 X 5 415 J 

+0158 1 X 59 * 


+ 0.12 41 X 94 * 

+ 0.11 22 X 36 ' 

+ 0.16 

9JW 
1 HI 3 X 4 ? f 

+071 £ 3 j 

+021 tSx 

+S?! 1,1B ^ 

+021 302 

+ UL 7 T 

+021 2 L 384 1 
+ 021 
+021 
+021 


>-1 


Tub's open Inf 


4 X 5 Ocr oi 
1 4 X 2 No / 94 

lAttDecM 
1 5 .U Jon 95 
19 L 28 Fftb 95 
15 X 3 Mar 95 
15 X 5 APTW 
15 X 9 May 9 S 
I5jg*n95 
14 X 5 Jul 95 
10.16 Aug ?5 
17 X 7 Sep 95 
14 X 200 9 S 
lT. 1 SVta #95 
I 6 J 0 DBC 95 
17 X 5 Jon 96 
18 X 9 9 ft 

17 . 15 MV 90 
17 X 2 Jun 96 
NA TUtfotates 


? 7 J 2 

18 X 2 

17.95 

18 X 2 

tog 

10 X? 

18 X 2 

1007 

18 X 5 


17 X 1 

17 JU 

1779 

17 X 3 

17.90 

17 X 0 

17.98 

17.95 

18 X 7 

18 X 3 


CNM »1 

17 X 5 T 7 JD ? 7 XI T 7 XT 

T 7 . 9 Q 

rj? 


HA TUffTs. 

Tuff' s Opm Inf 20141 a(f 917 

5 V?LTf£A 9 X{r (CBOT) sraoooowte-MSAShKbarttepa 
110 - 19 S 1 D 2 - 1 ? S*»W 104-17 l 04 - 18 fl 0 A*lO 3 108 - 13 - 035 
105-20 101-20 OeC M? 03-225 103-25 103-14 103 - 18 - 035 
103-00 103-20 Mar 95 1 Q 2 - 28 - Q 3 & 

EsL sates 40 X 00 Tub^. sates 3?(&22 
Tue's open W V 63 XC 1 aft 4605 
tfl YR. TREASURY (CBOT) smuBevte-pi 8 >»iastff ioopa 


H 5 - 0 ? lflt -10 
114-21 100-25 
W\-& 100-05 
MS -22 99-20 
MI -06 100-17 


5 ap 94 104-23 
DM 91 T &44 
NtaTTSIOO^Q 
Jun 95 
Sea 95 


104-30 1Q4-M TD4-17 — 
103-28 183*11 103-15— 
HQ-22 TCD-TS 109-18 ~ 
101-74— 
101-42- 


Food 


™ — — - (were 37 -MBtel 
274 X 0 60 X 0 Sep 94 272 X 0 

tous 77.10 D«c 94 272 X 0 

744 X 0 ? 5 . 90 taor 9 S 225.15 

244 X 0 SLSOMavOS 7&90 

24510 1100 Jul 95 976 X 0 

221 JO 185-0 Sap 95 

242 X 0 81 X 0 DCC 9 S 2 * 8/0 

EX. safes NA Tuft's, softs 
Tue's open irt 

SUGAR-WORLD U (NC 5 E) 


,-PHl 

322 X 0 207 X 8 710 JQ — 1 . 9 ft 251 

22175 212 X 0 9 ?U 5 - 1 X 5 29 XR 

325.15 317.18 1 WJ 5 HUA LSU 

235.90 219.00 2 XU 0 + 0 JO 3 X 29 

226.10 220 X 0 CTJD HL 7 D 708 

222 X 0 t A 70 412 

22 B .60 228 X 0 223 X 0 +070 381 




Est.ftM 105*105 Turt. sates 111X37 
TUt'SOMRlnr 260Xffl Off 5549 
US TREASURY BOHDB KBOD 
lid-76 90-12 Sea 94 102-20 102-25 102-03 702-08 — 
Doc M Ml -26 Ml -30 1S1-0B 
Mar 951 01 -01 101-05 100-17 
Jiff 90 loom? 100-07 99-40 



41100a M 
4275 NovW 
SUWOacto 
50L3OJcn« 
SL10FU95 
33X0 Mar 95 
DJOAprW 
May 95 
Junto 

55-30 JuiW 
top 95 
SL 590 Q 9 S 


Tue's open im 




(NMBn 

JPJUS 

48.15 48 X 5 

sun &U& 

53X0 53X0 


SAtt 56X0 
5435 5435 


Wo. Ktes 



+AI 9 8 L 487 * 
♦ 0 X 0 € 2 X 19 . 
+020 51 X 57 . 
*019 SW 9 S 
t A70 Tf^sa 1 

4 S L 3 I ?^M 4 

+074 1 QLQB 5 > 
+ 8.18 KV 03 
♦015 M 4 ‘ 
\l+W 7 M 
10.15 4 X 64 
L15 8X17 

15 U 7 T 

t .T 4 *€n 


mi 
—087 14X35 
♦OM 9 .YA 4 
+00 4 * 0(3 
+058 
+ 0 X 3 
+ 07 B \AB\ 
♦078 44% 

+ojg m 
♦am 715 
+083 2SB 
40 X 3 

+083 290 



p 

t 


- M 


Slock Indexes 


iie-« 

116-20 

115-19 

112-15 

173-14 

114-06 

KKtaO 


91-19 
98-20 
98-12 
97-20 
f-\4 
-27 
90-13 


/I 

101-13 — -11 
100 - 22 — i ni 

loo-oi — ; id 

99-13 — 09 
98-26 — r D? 
98-09 -r 09 
97-26 - » 


12/0 

1234 

12.10 

in 

UI 40 


43+00 94 
9 ,l 7 Mar 95 
1057 Mov 95 
>057 Jul 95 
10570 CV 95 
1088 ****** 


] 1 J 0 

UX 1 

11.97 

11 X 8 

VI-75 

lrxs 


I1240O tok;M 
1039 17 JO 

T2X5 . 12.01 

12 J 2 ?U 6 

n n 

11X5 11-35 


iwrh 

1138 

12 X 1 

1231 

12.15 

T 1 . 9 B 

11 X 9 


1048 46X20 
+0/0 62,938 
tOJS 11.742 
+Q 3 + xm 
«0J8 1*657 
+0X8 501 


Dccto 
Mar 96 

Jun to 

&L tales gSXOO Tuff's, idtei 297,382 
TUff'sapenint 442357 

Mwaas^LBTODO tcavn am* cm* 

rt-17 86-13 599491-08 91-06 90-26 
91-1/ 87-71 Dk 94 89-34 89-25 89-10 
£9.ufe9 4*580 Tue's. soles 3X05 
Tu^IWtrt 17X93 Off 547 
aJTOOQLLARS «34EW 
9&570 9OJ60S4P74 94X70 94X80 94X60 04.970 

91188 90710 OK 94 94,90 

toJJO «X40Mar« 5wS 
to730 90710 Jun 95 *L64fl 

94 X 50 71 X 1030095 9 U 00 

sas zhsKc* 93 S 0 

to 22 D 90750 Mar 96 9 X 020 

91100 9U2D Junto 9109ft 



& 3 Mt^rifl 0 pct 
91-00 - 03 1 

59-14 — 07 


94310 

tooio 

ttxto 

0139B 

91098 

91020 

92X90 


90290 

93 . 9*0 

91/40 

923/0 

IfllOBI 


92.980 

92X50 


90300 

919fft 

93X50 

91150 

93 X 60 

92990 

92X60 


500 X 27 
—10304,915 
-10961X86 
— MWIXM 

—»15VX7ft 

-20133*305 
—tt 109.935 


ttPGQMP.lNOEX (CMBI tei 
48&20 430J55PPM 47U5 47X36 469X5 

487.10 42970 DiC 94 4 74/0 474X0 47X30 

451X0 JUn93 479.10 481 JO 479.10 
-r_* - ?*A TUff'ft.ages. 0 OJ 94 

Tuf^S open inf 25ZJ7I oft 1752 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFB) paoww 
267X0 2f1X0 Septo 260.10 36045 »U 

764X0 237.15DKH 201.10 2OJ0 5L\S 

Etf.WteS NA TWs.ftffteft 2337 
Tu/ioptnlm 


4701s 

473 X 5 

429.10 


259X5 

21000 


-0X5100091 
-Ota 06X00 
— 1 35 1,645 


•• 1 


1 » 


—050 

- 0 X 0 


2*901 

70S 


Moody* 
Reiters 
3J. Futures 
Com. Research 


Commodity Indexes 

Clan - i*reriaus 
WS2J« 
i mm 

2 K 23 21 X 20 


,« n 
* • 


> « 


» ■ . . » 





1 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1994- 


Page 11 



EUROPE 


't 


Ripu,,,- , 


ntt- 0 i Higher Metals Prices 

Help RTZ Profit Rise 


«M-S1Vuji k 4 „ 
.aiaKirtbn, 


K' 


S 

V jranpdW fy (hr Staff From Dupaidus 

i. i' ^ 1, LONDON — increased gold 
•M-rt'..'*’ 1 1 ‘ 1 1 . ^ copper production 

- £ ; :i <;, ; ilk and a one-time gain helped 

; ‘J* "™ k RTZ Core, post a 6 percent rise 

■ ^ j,. in' first- naif net profit on 

.'PHuh.'cni , ,, ‘«: i: Wednesday. 


i’-U J 


'v.„ 
Ml 


tS-fcht ; 

1SI 

niut Is . 


The company earned £280 
. "hi'' million (5434 million) in the half, 
1,1 ‘to,/ up from £264 nrilikm in the first 
, six months of 1993. The results 


•»ii 


Ltd. by RTTs partied Aus- offset by nai copper and zinc 
trahan subsidiary CRA Ltd. prices and reduced iron and 

RTZ’s sales slipped to £1.86 coal prices. The net effect was 
billion from £2.41 billion, part- to lift earnings by £16 million, 
ly because of the Pas min co sale, said Robert Wilson, the chief 

Increased production contrib- cxecu ^ ve °f RTZ* 
uted £25 million to net profit, A fall in tax charges contrib- 
mostly from better perfor- utc d a further £17 million to 
mances in RTZ’s U.S. copper. P^ 11 - 
gold and coal operations and its “RTZ’s first-half perfor- 
Escondida copper mine in Chile, mance in 1994 benefited 


acnitiivt 




^ iV 






itfrr w« t 
‘iUll ‘.jlj- 




'• ifl" 
-> 1 


\ 1 1] j ; ; 

Iftc I'.ifli,* : 

- Hi fuilfid!-. 
A i it ‘ . s 


,,s : * 


' '? Hi. 


^ mattdeda«B«M ? unof f45 Incroissd prices for gold, only from U^eTm^jlriS 
V'-H; ‘" fll K> n for « Pasmioco lead, silver and aluminum were and improving economic com)]- 

tions in most major markets, 
but also From continuing eco- 
nomic growth resulting from 
our ongoing capital investment 
program,” Mr. Wilson said. 

The results exceeded ana- 
lysts’ expectations and sent 
RTZ’s shares up to 883 pence 
from 871 pence. 

But Mr. Wilson warned that 
over the next 12 months there 
would be Fewer production in- 
creases and the company would 
rely more on metal prices and 
cost cutting for earnings growth. 

Additionally, he said the im- 
proved economic outlook, part- 
icularly in the United States and 
Germany, may already be “fully 
discounted in metals prices." 

He said current strong U.S. 
demand for copper was unsus- 
tainable but die shortfall should 
be taken up by rising demand in 
Europe. ( Bloomberz. AFX) 


edE 


ur 


gMhj 


opt 


. r '- l ln -n. , 

*•<*1 Ul.t I}"' ^ 

Hl.il Jr;...,!. 


*» than i r-i. -»ii 

. . iMtu ! 

■ KtlSM.; 
Opli' hi<n- 
.•IDg )i: i . 

arc 

’ Hg i It: ■>{>,. ■ 

1 4 lti:-.v. 
.itth 'V. ■ 

■ Mm 
.. * Uu; ! 

• 'd Hu: i 

: Wc-r 

tll.it i- ,:i: 

1 

; iiiOl.i | 

o t\i-: .i 
• niiv - 




X.- 




"k'U;-, 
"m 


‘C fTV 


Total’s Half Is Unchanged 

Bloomberg Business News 

PARIS — Total SA weathered a slump in oil prices to 
.report a net profit virtually unchanged at 1 .83 billion French 
francs ($340 million) in the first half of this year, thanks to a 
rise in oil output and profit from chemicals. 

The net profit for Total, France's second-largest ofl compa- 
ny, trailing only Elf Aquitaine SA, compares with 1.81 billion 
■francs-a year earlier and was in line with most expectations. 
Analysis stud il reflected Total’s efforts to trim costs under a 
’three-year program designed to lop 2 billion francs off its 
fixed costs by end oF 1996. 

Operating profit, excluding financial and onetime items, 
was also virtually unchanged at 3.52 trillion francs, compared 
‘with 3.49 billion. It came despite a falling dollar, the currency 
in which oil is priced; and drops in the Brent crude price and 
reduced refining profit ma rgins 

total's chairman. Serge Tchuruk, refused to predict the 
outcome for the full year, citing; volatility in crude prices and 
.refining margins. “I am not b rimmin g with optimism about 
the coining months,” he said. 


I! 


I lV|| 






l , 

■i'li 


- v 


'■-'hr/. 


■ * - 


P'-w 

» .11 


Airbus Ready to Solo on Otrajumbo 

7 Compiled by Our Staff From Diepatdm Said JeaD-JacqueS Huber, the project manager. 

FARN BOROUGH, Eng land — Airbus In- By releasing proposed configurations for the 
dustriesaid Wednesday it was prepared to devel- jets. Airbus was attempting to move a step 


Hungry for Growth, 
Nestle Is Expected 
To Stalk New Prey 


11- 


m/ /, - 

■ r-rr. 




IS 


K 


.1 w 




V t 


lem or ran 


hint •; 

r f i\r\ 
it y N. 
lAi\ • l.! 

nV.: 

yr 

III ■ 




,:i: i f 


op an ultrajumbo jetliner without the help of 
Bbeing Qx, its laiger rival. 

Airbus, the European aircraft consortium, es- 
timated the cost at $8 billion. It would be able to 
begin developing the so-railed A3 XX by 1995, 
taking orders by 1997 or 1998 and putting the 
plane into service by 2003. 

Although ultrajumbo jets with twice the ca- 
pacity of existing airplanes sound alluring when 
air traffic is forecast to double and then triple in 
!{ie next century, many industry executives have 
said they had their doubts. 

' Routes into congested Asian airports are the 
Aost likely candidates for the big jets, but if 
primes develop point-to-point services between 
large numbers of cities in the Pacific region as 
they have over the Allantic, critics say the planes 
would be too big 

■ Airbus on Wednesday released the most de- 
tailed plans yet for a double-decker long-range jet 
dial could carry up to 850 people. The four-engine 
airplanes would cost about S200 million apiece. 


ahead, at least on the public-perception front, of 
Boeing which is Dot yet convinced the airlines 
w£U be interested in such an airplane. 

Boeing is nonetheless discussing possible co- 
operation on such a project with the individual 
companies from France, Germany, Britain and 
Spain that make up the Airbus consortium. 

Supersonic jets could provide another form of 
competition in the next century. Boeing and Mc- 
Donnell Douglas Corp. are looking into technol- 
ogy for a big supersonic jet that could fly round 
trip between Los Angeles and Tokyo twice a day. 

At the Fani borough International *94 air 
show, Jean-Jacques Huber, the Airbus project 
manager for the ultrajumbo jets, said the craft 
could take off and land on airport runways now- 
used by big airplanes, and use existing engines. 

The size of the airplane could give airlines 
freedom to build rooms on the bottom cargo 
deck that could be used as fitness centers, busi- 
ness areas or lounges. (AP, Bloomberg) 


Rouen 

ZURICH — NesLle SA, 
the world's largest food and 
beverage company, has an 
insatiable appetite. 

Last month, il increased 
its interest in the San Pelle- 
grino SpA mineral water 
concern in Italy. This 
month, it made clear it had 
its eyes on a northern Ger- 
man ice-cream maker, 
Wamcke. Next month — 
who knows? 

The Swiss-based multina- 
tional has ambitious targets. 
Its chairman, the German- 
born Helmut Maucber. 66, 
wants to raise ann ual sales 
by more than 70 percent, to 
100 billion Swiss francs ($75 
billion), by the end of the 
decade. 

Much of the growth in the 
last 10 years has come from 
multibiilion-dollar take- 
overs of brands such as Car- 
nation milk in America, Bui- 
toni pasta of Italy, the 
British Rowntree chocolate 
concern, and Perrier mineral 
water in France. 

But the 128-year-old com- 
pany, based in the western 
Swiss town of Vevey. plays 
down speculation that it 
plans more mega-acquisi- 
tions. It says it has filled 
most of the gaps in its prod- 
uct line. 

“Now we can be calmer 
and concentrate more on in- 
ternal growth than on acqui- 
sitions. although well keep 
our eyes open,” Mr. 
Maucher said in a recent in- 
terview with the German 
magazine Wirtschaftswoehe. 

The company is trying to 
keep ahead of its (wo main 
rivals, the Anglo- Dutch Un- 
ilever Group and the U.S.- 
based Philip Morris Cos., 
which owns Kraft-General 
Foods. All three companies 
are trying to eat into each 
other’s markets in products 
ranging from instant coffee 
and breakfast cereals to 
chocolate bars and pel food. 
Each sees rapid growth and 
the development of new 
products as the keys to suc- 
cess. 

Nes tie’s move on San Pel- 
legrino. raising its stake in 


the controlling company to 
49 percent from 28 percent, 
was typical of its determined 
approach. It hates minority 
stakes but seems ready to 
wait until a controlling fam- 
ily chooses to selL 

Another possibility lies in 
Branded Consumer Prod- 
ucts of Sweden, the former 
food, beverages and tobacco 
operations of Procordia AB. 
Branded Consumer Prod- 
ucts, now held by Volvo AB, 
owns the Ramlosa mineral 
water brand. 

Analysts said Nestle's 
strong cash flow and com- 
fortable debt-to-equjty ratio 


The company 
says it has Riled 
most of the 


gaps in its 
product line. 


leave it with ample muscle for 
more takeovers. Apart from 
mineral waters, possible ac- 
quisitions are seen in: 

• Pet foods, a sector where 
Nestle is strong in the United 
States but weak in Europe. 

• Breakfast cereals, in 
which Nestle already has a 
joint venture with General 
Mills Inc. 

• Ice cream, a sector in 
which Nestle is No. 2 world- 
wide, behind Unilever. 

• Candies, where Nestis 
could make further small 
takeovers. 

But the most attractive 
candidate on Nestle's list of 
potential acquisitions is 
probably L’Ordal SA. the 
French cosmetics company.. 

Under a 1974 agreement. 
Nestle owns 49 percent of 
Gesparal, a holding compa- 
ny that controls L'Oreal, 
while Liliane Bettencourt, 
the daughter of L’Or6al’s 
founder, owns the rem ainin g 
51 percent. Miss Betten- 
court, who is in her 70s, has 
said she will not sell out to 
Nestle, but the position of 
her daughter, her potential 
heir, is unknown. 


Recovery 
la France 
Quickens in 
2d Quarter 

Reuters 

PARIS — France’s recovery 
gathered pace in the second 
quarter of this year, with the 
economy growing by 1 percent 
as business investment and con- 
sumer spending showed signs of 
life, government data showed 
Wednesday. 

T 

The national statistics office 
said second-quarter growth fol- 
lowed a rise of 0.7 percent in the 
first three months of the year. 

The return to year-on-year 
growth of 2 percent follows an 
economic contraction last year 
of I percent, which tipped 
France into its deepest reces- 
sion since World War II. 

The figures will be comfort- 
ing for the conservative govern- 
ment. which is hoping that 
growth will bring unemploy- 
ment off its near-record of 12.6 
percent between now and next 
May’s presidential election. 

Private economists, however, 
said the figures could be bad 
news for the bond market. In- 
vestors have already been 
dumping European bonds re- 
cently in the belief that with 
economic growth returning 
there is liide likelihood that 
central banks would reduce in- 
terest rates. 

German economic figures, 
doe to be released on Thursday, 
are expected to show second- 
quarter growth of 0.9 percent in 
gross domestic product, con- 
firming the picture of robust 
recovery in Europe. 

The French statistics showed 
that exports, which have been 
growing since the second quarter 
of 1993, rose by 2.6 percent. Im- 
ports, underpinned by demand 
for manufactured goods from 
abroad, grew by 2.8 percent. 

Many French companies, 
anticipating renewed consumer 
spending, rebuilt their stocks in 
the second quarter. Investment 
and consumer spending showed 
first signs of life since the third 
quarter of 1993. 

There was a 1 percent rise in 
consumer spending after two 
stagnant quarters. Investment 
was up 1 percent, reversing the 
decline of the previous six 
months, with business invest- 
ment up 0.9 percent. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

m 


London 

FT5E 100 Index 






M / J' A'S' ■ 
.1964 

Exchange index 

Amsterdam AEX 


'vvrrjrrr 

1994 


Nf j J’ A S' 
1904 


Wednesday Prev. % 

Chase- - Close Change 

415.17 414.28 +0.21 


Brussels 


Stock index 


7,57738 7,583.27 -0.07 


Frankfurt 


DAX 


2,163,82 2,165.90 -0.10 


Frankfurt 


FAZ 


818.59 822.36 -0.46 


Helsinki 


HEX 


1,944.40 1.942.57- *0.09 


London 


Financial Times 30 2.475J0 2,479.00 -0.13 


London 


FTSE100 


3,203,90 3,205.40 -0.05 




General Index 


296.17 294.85 +0.45 


Milan 


M1BTEL 




10602 


-0.77 


Paris 


CAC40 


1,964.20 1,961.45 +0.14 


Stockholm Afteersvaertden 1,876.22 1,867.73 +0.45 


Vienna 


Stock Index 


460.69 


459.67 


+ 0.22 


Zurich 


SBS 


944.03 


941 36 +0.28 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


l(Kcmaru*ul I IcraFd TnNmc 


Very briefly: 


• Christian Dior SA said it was launching the capital increase it 
postponed in July because of market conditions; the offering of 
stock and warrants would raise as much as 4.2 billion French 
francs ($793 million) for the French perfume and fashion house. 

• The European Commission cleared the acquisition by a News 
Corp. unit. News International PLC, of a 49.9 percent stake in the 
German television channel Vox. 

• Halifax Building Society. Britain’s biggest mortgage lender, said 
the country’s housing market was weak despite economic recovery 
and warned ihe government against raising interest rates as it 
reported pretax profit of £486 million ($753 million) for the six 
months ended July 31, up from £41 1 million a year earlier. 

• Hilton International, a unit of Ljtdbroke Group PLC plans to 
build a 187-room luxury hotel in the center of Belfast: executives 
said the project was under discussion before the Irish Republican 
Army said it sought to end violence in Northern Ireland. 

Bloombtr^. Reuters, A FP 


Tatra’s U.S. Managers Resign 


Bloomberg Business Neves 

PRAGUE — The U.S.-slvle 
management experiment at Ta- 
tra Koprivnice AS dissolved 
Wednesday as the three would- 
be American rescuers resigned. 

The truckmaker, which is 
struggling with a large debL said 
its chairman Gerald Greenwald, 
hired in July to run United Air- 
lines parent, UAL Corp.. and his 
two partners. Jack Rutherford 
and David Shelby, had resigned 
effective immediately. 

The management team, which 
arrived at Tatra in March 1993. 


cut short a two-year contract 
that included promises for a mi- 
nority stake in the company. 

Tatra said the thrc.* :> 
had agreed lo leave bit-dusc ■ 
Greenwald’s recent decision to 
accept the UAL chairmanship 
suggested “it’s a suitable time to 
finish the participation” of the 
management team at Tatra. 

The trio, under criticism for 
the company's poor perfor- 
mance, bad been demanding 
promised stock and warrants in 
Tatra as a condition for staying 


Hi » • i « 


< : 

lists; **.: . ■ . .. 

i *?!r\ h* 

i-_j! t.\ i : . : V. i w 

r- : j. • 

■; : 

f !;!v. • i .* .*:i 

.. ii Lii. I : 

.. If 

_ !: !•: ;• I’.: • ' . 

f»'i ■. ■ • 

* 

- i ... . 

M ; »■■ ■ • ■ • 

ki"a ?■ . . :■ • •' : 

?;■ *■ 

■ »' ff. • r . . ’ '■ 

fr* r ' m . 

■ . '.Il# . ■ ■ 

: .i J'* 1 :.. 

• » ! . •' v 

\"-K 7 - • 

•»'?n 

• V - . . ■ 


* . 

EXPANSION: Incentive PUui Didn't Export Well INDIA; Calcutta Scrambles for Investment in a Bid to Reclaim Its bidustrial Dominance 


. i ■' 1 


; Continued from Page 9 

had been so successful at home 
dbwn the throats of its employ- 
ees abroad. 

The problems were that in 
BraziL for example, employees 
can regard any bonus that is 
paid for two consecutive years 
as a part of their base salaries.. 
In Europe, meanwhile, workers 
considered vacation time more 
valuable than bonuses, and 
unions at the acquired compa- 
nies wanted nothing to do with 
a system that sought to make 
workers feel more like indepen- 
dent entrepreneurs. 

In France, the system began 
to lake root but fell apart after 
rapid expansion left the subsid- 


iary with no profit to distribute 
as bonuses, infuriating emplov- 


Mr. Hastings said the system 
worked best in “ immig rant cul- 
tures." 

“1 doubt that Lincoln’s sys- 
tem is exportable." Mr. Hood 
said. 

This year, with the most un- 
profitable non-U.S. operations 
dosed and others trimmed, Lin- 
coln made nearly $23 million on 
sales of almost $445 million in 
the first six months. It railed on 
workers to give up their August 
vacations to keep up with de- 
mand, and hundreds did. 

The overtime may help those 
counting on big bonuses. But 


for many, working more has 
added to the discontent, despite 
the $100 milli on in bonuses 
paid the last two years when the 
company was in the red. 

“The employee attitude has 
been. ‘We didn’t create the 
problem, so whv should we pay 
for it?* " said Richard Sabo, as- 
sistant to the chief executive. 

Whether that thinking can 
survive challenges such as the 
need to deal with customers and 
competitors globally remains in 
doubt The current system has 
the backing of the Lincoln fam- 
ily’s heirs, who collectively own 
about 51 percent of the stock. 
At least 30 percent is held by 
employees. 


Continued from Page 9 

have led all others in the foreign 
investment stakes. 

Most Indian state govern- 
ments have serious budget 
problems of their own and must 
find ways to pay for services 
infrastructure cannot provide, 
while also increasing revenue lo 
reduce debts to New Delhi. 

“It’s going to be a problem. 
Regional disparities will in- 
crease, and that can lead to pos- 
sible social unrest,” Mr. Ani- 
bani said of a trend toward 
development in a relative hand- 
ful of states. “Unless they tight- 
en up their performance and 
become industry-friendly, these 


other states will be left b ehin d.” 

Mr. Ambani’s comments 
echoed growing concern that 
India’s economic revival will 
exacerbate differences between 
its classes and its regions along 
an east-west divide. 

According to the local maga- 
zine Busin ess World, nine of In- 
dia’s 10 largest cities, 90 percent 
of all routes flown by private 
domestic airlines, all but one of 
several “fast track” power pro- 
jects and 90 percent of all joint 
ventures involving foreign in- 
vestment lie west of an imagi- 
nary north-south drawn line 
across the map of India. 

But in Calcutta, the lone “top 


10" city in the eastern part of 
the country where half of the 
population lives, progress may 
be on the way, judging from 
improved electricity supplies 
and telephone exchanges, as 
well as from government rheto- 
ric. 

“Unless a change of attitude 
toward industry by the govern- 
ment and unions and a change 
of view by industrialists comes, 
we cannot go forward at all,” 
said S.N. Menon, principal sec- 
retary to West Bengal’s chief 
minister, Jyoti Basu. India’s 
leading Marxist politician. 

“There may be some tears if 
some workers lose their jobs. 


but there will be more tears for 
everyone if changes aren't made 
here," said Bidyut Ganguly, 
West Bengal's minister for com- 
merce and industries. 

Negotiations between the 
slate government and unions 
opposing the job losses includ- 
ed in Accor's involvement at the 
Great Eastern are continuing 
after labor leaders took to the 
streets m protest. 

While Mr. Ganguly and Ac- 
cor refused to comment on talks 
that have set off a power strug- 
gle within groups of the ruling 
Left-Front coalition, the West 
Bengal government remains 
strongly committed to making 


the project work and has ear- 
marked funds for early retire- 
ment oT Great Eastern workers 
over 50. 

“Without a shade of doubt, 
the attitude of the unions and 
the politicians has turned 
around,” said P.K. Dull vice 
president of the West Bengal 
Chamber of Commerce and In- 
dustries and managing director 
of Bata India Ltd. “Labor dis- 
putes for little reason are now a 
thing of the past." 

Few industrialists say all 
their problems have been 
solved, and serious difficulties 
remain in unprofitable state- 
owned industries. 


1 I. 

v- 1 . 




i -5 * . ■ ■ 

• ti;:-?* 

■ m 
I m m • • 

J i'*< ’ ' r J 

irr'vi. ■’ 1 

: » i • % ■ 

:* • ’ 

5 . ■? : . ■ 

. iTl :J t.. J’- 
l. • 


NYSE 


Wednesday’s Closing 

- Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


UMvtm 

High Low Stock Drv 


Sh 

YW PE lOtts High Low Latest OV9P 


HMOrttti 
High Low Slock 


n*v 


as 

YU PE loot Kta h 


LQwLGtatCVBt 


1 I . ■ B % 

i ■ *• 

Cu 9 • 


. I 


I 7 r 
1 i p ■ ■ • 
i:-- - 



i t tit- 


V-Ii ■' 

»U LLtl 1 ’ ' 

- i *. 1 
Z L ■ 


,-r 


. ; v' 1 

■ , J 

• it < 


l ■. "• 

• * aft i ■ ^ 

t; -* 1 

• ■ * 
.ft . •' ' 


t*. u - 

i ii* 




;■ 

i ■-iTi' 1 ‘ . •*' 

■ ke 

%•' V r ’ * '■ ' 

• . » ■ * 
4 j’- • 1 L 

, c..’-' - - .»-v 

‘ J lt ■ * ... „ 






fl ■ 


i f i ^ > l! ■ . 

r 

' i i.i. k k " ^ 

. , ^ . ,i * ■ ■ . , r 

■ l -«‘ # j i b /■ * 

, . * • • 

, l,ii ^ S ‘ | • 1 k 

•I lift I" %V , .. il 




%iii * 



■ e 1 1 ^ 


% -i% 

% ;fe 
few aN -}- 

44* T „ 

.sa ift .s 


p p -5 



A if loSti 



12 Month 
Hied] Low Sloe* 


bfiori LowLo!fsiOr 9 C 



12 Mcnfn 
Hiah Law Slock 


as 

Dtv YU PE 100s Higli Lfw Luted QTpe 




Astra Jet 

introduces the first 
business jets 
your stockholders 
will applaud. 


a Ltwiad „by design 

Contact: Brian Edwards. UK. Telephone and Facsimile: +44 25 882 0346 


HAtanm 
High Low Stock 


Div Yld PE 


1? Month 

High Lew Slock 



Sh 

Div YU PE 1005 Hfen low Latest Oi'oe 


2_DO eA 





<f8 kl ' 6 2 

K 5 1 

^ 8 it i 



i IIS-5 

5 & JS vf; 

IS 5s j- 

si i 



— H 


Coutiniied on Page 14 


TO OUR REAPERS 
IN BELGIUM 

It's never been easier 
to subscribe 
and save. 

Just call toll-free 

0 800 1 753 8 


« i ■ i 1 .* • 

J. Tit' 


>4 































































* 3 P-m. 

rastfSsssaS 






jlSSj>S5I3c 


3 .'* -Vit 


"tea- a 

i — 

iTi i . j 


*• .i 1 s 


fsJjiS' Z£ “ yit IL &,^g 

f®. — sSi| RJsH! 

SsOHi :*.JlS®S-2 


Zl 


25 


- » iw «h 2 « SJ *lf 

jL'ransr * * ? j s Srir* 

5 Sip& = 2 XUp&** 

gg &* 8 ! rtw - f't? +& 

2Sl®%S8& ~ 43 * « 'J* Is » - 

3S& *S3K& - “ «» 7*5 «X ** 


- “ m i*2 iJ5 ** 
jo ?S » ws Eiis *5 

■* J » «?« fr M A £s *# 

- - -17* SV» **" f % 


Sjjjj, 222% f 

95 1«Va AoSb^U 

IIS&£ 


3 BU 

|?tt 


“ - W IM | 3 fX£T T 

? “fl. 3 Bl.Ss 7 i 


illpS ? 8 

P#®r 


RW I 

ftfeSSSSP i »^5 i** l*' nS£^*£ I “j 1 

uv* j-SSiSE? 1 . r w 22 ?»* TO *3c"*" f 


“ w »< 2 *vJ 1 ^ IK” — y * 

*a 1 #r -T •$..* 

gS^^a*, = -* | $ % ft *! 

Pfwsg = g $ i» 

cffiSfe'isJSSH'g* 

£*>KM£S 8 L - ?3 

ns -=i«ii*a 


$ 

r 


m§gs? 

flff 

jpipiii? 

™ 8 ’’§ 8 ? r 

2 ® it gj^£ 5 

sa.f'gS* 


i •— »n» 

«" « 73 

»5 

■» 3 £i 7 gl 

zSftg 

■m a i! lei? 

- s « 

-«. 74 7 63 
■— _■_ 341 
m )* 142 } 

- - 742 i 

^ - 4» : 

- 143 1 

- « 1 

12 aS a inj | 

8*8 f 4 M 


zs 

1 Vii £ 

; revs jK «£-* 

• ™ «S 3 fc_« 

© »«4 

R 6 $ 3 . 

R 3 £:f 

RPR* 

?» S* -* 


H » 3?2 38 * 34 

o ! "J ® »fe 


»»MW 

& 30 » 




■12 l.fl 


wflBEE. 

® s* ft* ^ ~ 

BTszr “ s g S B 5 ssia 

Jf jgag g i3g^ 'J® T 

Si.lugaf, ; ™ ^=?s *« 


=jijh 
"as 28 

S jSt 


a?.s> 8 BW 
«“ mfegf" 

4*Hn7rvsPfw»vSL 


^ iS 

- 4 ? 


* W f g 

= 

— 74 wS 

— g 1 ® 

— 27 24) 

— I7J afis 

>■* a 5 is ^ 

■ 77 ■* » «S 

— &I2SS 


am — ' 

ig 8 * us if 

*rP 3 

ftSSil, 
? f Si 


* »f if gjK ,s: ,» _s 

11^ * ill 111 4 


np 

2»3i£4a9SL 


^275 43V] aa» —ft 

inZ»?? | (-MtaEhl ri 6% 7i2 IT? 

ite* =iisi>b 5 
fgSr-vafE&il 

2 f" ^ 25 35,4 2 d Hr jf 4 + Jf 

gj 3 r :?SSC’S% 


- « ^ + * 
=«“*‘'-n« ~ ^ 2 iw ZT 5 2 o 5 ~5 

■“ 13 « w If 5 si ". s 

»T ffi gg 

» « » iJ4 z*6 isaaat'*-* 

S?.«6G<fcv - M 454 nZ rate MS *■'* 

IP^‘ -^J|s“p = ? 

*SS*SS«1 Z 2S lf> Wi MW ~ 


UpggF 

t®&2! 


SL 7/7 ^ [ 


p iBsy 




= 5 s* b ms 

z 5 *S “«5 B* !SS t§ 

- *2 *2* JtSr* 

- ]• am 'us I*" ® — w 

- 3i tut 4?v, If,, 'll* +« 

- «.!« »£ ff 4 *. +H 


pH. 84 

SSJij 

ff J^iAhanw 

S««w.Sf!f ,rD » " ffl ^ 4514 -B" 1 IS 

- 10 ,’SS i«s i* uu, + JJ 

S m*aS£3‘ ■“ 2 15 5S if , r L |f**i 


3 *l» 

i&fS 

r ASSffl 

PI® 


■if. 1 1 -I 

- fi # 

- » ? 1 { 

i°*ai 5 if 

1 *2*3 

-4 — 4^30 

■“ ^Lgj^S . 

-2713 344 - 

-w ij 1” 'S ; 

— T55 *64 1 

■10 3 P Si 


52 nu, J n 

lV 6 

ft* f? s«£-r 

£ *m 4 § 

50 qt 5 »I 4 * 7 ?!* 


Piir*® 


SMBaB 1 

ssr 


- J 3 aw £ n jS! ^ —14 

p« « « "lit 81 ^ 


z ^ 'g & 2 s = 
• " ffi "5 ®f if 
z - ^ «* »* ;S 

Z Z Tig ^ fg * 

3 ?" 2 »SE^ 


-S J S iw 34 V 4 

JP'nSpwScT 2 K 

’^s^PwrS, * “ n ,» Bib 

«■?» SSS?* - a 12Z A& 


— — 4 B 1%4 

^ 2 ? 5 + ? 
as% 2 ^+ 7 ^ 


■ ■» m 


MT 

gS’ffligSSP ■“• ■* - g ji* S*g rs 

^ .SfjSa" = - I !ffi fi> !». .S 

IPS - 

SfiSSSSSS # i? IS id. »S IS* §#’'» 


ss® 

ffffifSSg, 


*■■ «■ irw 3 'A 

^ 55 Mi 44 V4 

— ^ rauf 

:” a B 8 S 
::J8 88 

^ g ^ jlft 

- 5 as 3 i*m 

r 3 ? IS 2 Z* 


ss&, ^ f ; b iss S 2 

r®® 5 ^ B •» at 

$ 2 'S 88 &£ - - .5 88 

®$SSffi, raJIJ* 


« ft. ;fi 

jW«I» 

§m 

£P«» 

+* 

3 J >5 SIS — S 
2 » Si* ” I 


, ffiS fu 

^!i» 

£, 

TOft 

3 WTJ% 

gg }$**«<*. 

giaaw 

^ 5 15 % 

2 % 15% 

ail* sms 

rfiA iiu _ 


UMtt* _ 

WiUwSMC vMr ndffW,. ^ 


"““ .ijfESja 

filb» w 


-S 3 s is 

■« saS« 3 r 
-» a «i2? 35 «St 5 


j* aii » fflf,® r 5 

aaiTST’ ; 1 ,1 B MB *5 4 

-a 7 S«o g£ ** 4 

* fa 

z T* B B +]* 

.ff* JaiS 4 ajs... 


Mu StVzt 

S» § S3 

ss 

2 T* 

■a ®«8 : 


i Jf 


■S 4 


2 s”m^S 2 &- 


l£& iH*sb£-~ 
P J® - 1{4 ® g$4 

ttlHW =li 1 1 p i z 

S?* ?! Vi ASSES, .“ lay ^2 13„ Wv +v» 


»*iA’ 

»wziU 

% . 5 ^' 

9. re < 

nun 1 
2 ?* is. 
gW»M< 

TO 14a • — 


L®^> 


sj 'sk 1 ;is. ,a &£ &* s« T r 

B^SB? * * « « S“ ga jf* i% 
«“ ssasa r ; ^ ^ ^ + * 

m s 15 J£ .f* ss ^ ZJ* 


P£S& * 

Is'JkSS. -■ 


- 1 J P 64 *® 

-_ w ^ as as 


igi^! 


s*'i®s 


. - 32 2260 

- i *% 

' z io g 

- » S? 

■* 13 Z to 

= ?'s2 

- j4 aa 

r ; 

Z 25 is£ ■ 

TO — « Sr? T 

' T0 - 2S 6023 1 

* .TS.^f 

14 3054 1 

- 2 J£ 2 

^ J59 

^ *3 I? °2 j 

- If 560 w 

- 27 U3 23 

- — 327 7 

- W 1758 24 

- ^ - I4J 4 


M 3H 5K - 

f «JJ Tp -a 
imj a ss?iSSrt^ 

ns iBA » a 


Z Sag? i? w JvSjgTf 

z 1 h 3 b S^tt 

;!H If -5 

1-0 24 240 jfS 4% ^4% ; 

-. _ jft ss a» +« 


Ignite,* Z g ag? j? w S TS 

fcsss - • 1 * 4 si5 

* f - 1 1 # r ^ 
M i\ s « 1 f 4 

~ * ®* MW ITS C 

ES®B?"j. 3§gg®S«’B3S^! 
b $ £agg* c a i gL gsg'tig 

SSSBR -J»S£5 ssl» *S , 


if 13^13^3 

r s^s -3 

17 TitUr r? T.7 


' If 76V ^ 72 

! ffi* ^ ^ -2 

■jfi LSflirg 

^ stsmSTS 

IS I5VS TSS ZvJ 

a »» sa^S 

J «* 7 Z« 

»« 3 a®;, 1 * 
^ ss aS!l^ 


I a7 17 75 15 " 

uw^smS!^ z” ^ sf as 3 W :a 
*»®gr ■“ “ ?f ”91 «» {«* iss - 

|.jB :.i ,?g tr ^ J 3 

34^I‘ v .£tofne T Bj " S ^SS 3 

U»nS/3SfSfc ^ ^ ^ ^5 SS Su: 3 3 ^ +% 

iS?10lAHuoot& — 17 53ZJ 72#* iftc ?£? “"2^ 


BB *?W ff 111 

I Z « ag If* ||^ ilvb --£ 

MKB& '^BSSlS-* 

P ■ifassas’ z *j ^ % §T fe* tft 

Z M 323 Jffl 3!% ns * u 

PP^ ;fiS£P£*.f 

» A iSfcJw®e r z 75 IS ikn^TS 

ms m£SSS? s ■« ii is vm S w ?s io * 

££& - ?iSls*s»=* 
prm “ ? 3 ritp««=i 

ns - «mS % 

» - JL-MIP 3 


r 76 15^ iJN 
^ 45^? 2u? 

P 2 SBSK. : J 1 ® S 8 

fepfflS; :^S3.j5“ 

%i&8&£’£ 6 SIP 

ina = i s r 

®!^HHPrDtDe — IS 311 32V 

il IsS^* Z ” iSI ^ 

pywr - -* s s a 

pqgfip ^ i ; I P 

PP®!. r f J . 


i*S!:g 

£8s8rS 

•; 

a* L» *5 


** ^ 2 ® JSJ* 3M 35 U 4.C 

Es j,aa iil ! l if 

jPnW * SfllfiaiiSss! 
sssssss^. - 2? as a® 


SS^t 


z 75 M s a* ts 

8».%SS* ■“ « S .10 S* »’S !9„ i 


--I’ll C |J^ 

fHE £ pzg 

= "t I SI 3 * 

.7 fS Ij3 ]}$ }* - +iZ 


3 

1 2514 72 

rSJ^SS 

rvvsfl* 

g^io% 
SS, 9 ^* 

3VV74S 

iS SaSSS? 

jg jCTO 

w^JSSS* 


1 o^is SSS 

III 


pgg 

I pc 


z z ® k ?BS iSs ^ 

M» 2* " 348 gg&J *« 

“ 5 ;sIPI ; ? 

- 135 «5 » *S + m 

z zijg r 

Z 302351? S7w£ as mS 

- - 640 15 “ iSJ? 

- £ »» a ww J;* 

rj sSBttB** 


•» 3 » 3 S s* 

- 13 «J5 s 

M S-’ffift. 

- .» H! B* 
"■ — SJ re 
-a a .as 

"to ”S it US 
a .3 Zt no uiZ 

a I I u fg wJ 


s S®*jg 

. 5»BbD!( 

& as :g 
! Kgs-rS 

I agaSzJJ 
& if ^ 

if ft* 

Stf«- 

4£« 4W— vC { 
13% 14 +U I 

SJJ 1 S., +% 1 . 


TVSunTV 

SSfSSSfiJSSl 

bfS 

l bB 

SSaT'ligBl 

M IIS 






- M.JW »s f -» 

z? 99-8M* 

:»!? RIB 

? ?I | fff 

- a »» »g lffl-ila tft .. 


rTBC 


nULV 
*"s S J * 6 

w 27 nj 24V 


gg ;w7R^ 
»WlM*T«Srts 


:9jfa» ikg 


f££ 16*^,“" ^ '*A Z 3 36 I? “ 

IS -s? « 19 3431 ia\fc 

l,^S c = ? I R 

ggirssr. ~- l? - n3 ^ 

m glBssr 


fi :k a 

if aS :$ 


sx, »®°i Ddnctec — 

tfeHEPaBSi j 3 

giifflygww S 

“ v iissSK^ 

• ; . " 

,J0 

«> “Kg 

JgJ^gwrtOG 
T 53 37\4m^ 

- WA flSSSSS 

61A R SE3J5 
t3V» Rl^ di_l£0. 


» {55S55««| 

RREg? 

|J, 25 p» 

ISF* 

sCifftsase 


ys ] ? ffl 

- » 13 * 
- X tsm 

— - 13 874 

•aO 23)92 xn 
ha ■s 10 223 
^ *3 72 360 

g H io IS 
■” r t Z IAU 
g w ft »7 

® 1 ^ 15 1668 

M - 5 121 144T : 
■" -5 21 Mi 1 

- sr as* 1 
» 33 S fS J 

- * 915 2 

- }1 €95 

- » 1M l! 

' >3 « ^ 3< 

.3 1 £ g 
« 5 jBS ft 

« S iS g 

-J 3 f 

~ S® A» uv 

- VO 833 Ju 

~ Jg «6 9 

- » £f las 
"* A -595 TBV 6 

- 50 1339 

^loR X? US 
•g 190 622 1 ]U 

3J 1 ? 30K «u 

- a uK t?c 


SS? -■* 28 *£ 

TfV i« ?Si? T7* 


874 I fit ■)« ?J}J '—Mr 

SJC*w 3 

j|i*=g 

dJt SJ? 52% 6314 +5 
?SJ 32% 31U SvI + ** 

ils ffiR-J 

1 ,% if IBtS 

a 36% afu -JS + J* f 

|,PRS :S 

\ {»» -res so* Z§ I 

$M=$ 

b g. Jg i 

fllzfi 
BB§3 t 

»» »ft if* =4f f; 
ft 1 * ils ifij Jt 1 6 


i c« 

r I if- fos s£ 

• ] 2 ,, 1 j%PowltnA 

I I ^awS^" 

jilS 

|“'j#SS 1 

Sa?asS£!KL 

rf ffigsar 

aftffSSSjRy 

15S !»& 

S - 

aii /SiS^fi 
3£* bhbmpi *■ 

IrBKC J 

ft Stlg^ 


- * ,je zt« 
• z5e 5 

:§i» as 
, * a » «B as 

- S sg a* 

- H ,s 2 SS 

- ’J l» I7S 
30 4i 4 n fl* 

“ 5ia*S 5 ^ : 

- fy laS ^ : 

- 2? 2094 9 % 

=£SRf 

- 25 i° TO* a 
jo 3 S , 2 S gw * 

-ft w 11 % g 

■» 14 » ^ ^ XS X 


2 *!*■"= Ji* 

1 ss 

lima :S 

; BWk ^ 

im* S5Z5 

®®=af. 

i a i a ** 

&&:§ 

23% 24* Z?J2 

PS if 


5™7o%T5tat 

Ssaf4»SSS‘* 


3 ft 8 *% 

w'i k?* 

SIM 

NET 


uwe iX 

r a 's ;a ;a b 

Hffttl 

= |g J* z 

z S 82 gg SfflfiE 

j 1227 S IfSJiJiity-w 


-s il * ao^ £2 g£ as z 

S»PS" 

Mkm l fliliui 

S_. ]6%m35J3a M ,T 33 .278 391 A SJ? + % 


Sfni 

T kS 22 S^ 


^45 iS* 
- 4 ?f 2 ]g 17% 

— *5 837 15 
-* 51 W 19V 

1 -W 33 ll 3& 

- - l436uml 
-.25 s T 8 U 

M r ; 7S 

JS 24 q ^ 


82 S5Jr )ntp » lAS S5 ?° 1W4 TWA 

^S^^jjosoom ju 3 ,w 2 J ia 12 HiJ 
_ ftw irmgh 14 iS J m m ” 

r 7 * ” JisaiS-C 

£i®~5^rSii :: = 1 

sslSs ■* ^ o 1 P S R tS 

E a 88 s PJa** 

P Sffi© =j w ^ ft. IT-? 


i?fa - a^RR 

prS « i s i r 

asps’* - S H ft. 

JiJJ,n.SS5S* ■ ,0 3 § ato* w* 

— i5 S r 10 % 

«aS*Sssx T ^° m ■ ss 
ffPESfJ* .« 4g^.S ; 


*0 4 Z 14 SJ? »« aJ^^gsvtfRn* .44 22 74 »% 2SH 

,-# ?2 49 Ss ws n ftiikSSaf Jl ” a» a* jffi ® 

= * If A 24 lR 4 fi 


Z 5 S 'g£ w ns * 1 ? 

z “ ft Jp 

- 36 M 7 ^L* — % 

— 395 33 14 % lift ,£?* —\<t 

~ 16 S67 y£ ? 3?» 4-% 

»■* ?! £ iS! iS? >3* * 


I »s3S s 

IBS KggfSl 


AMEX 


£3 «SK5£* 

fSafftiSP ,F * 

SSiKaSSt. 

ssffiSSP 

Sft’lfiHSrE 


f * Wg BS 

* * £2 ft % ft£ 

* ?lflB 

■ ** 13 ft ^ 

r Za2 ^ 

z i 3 ^ is 

* : S'a a 

■“ ft .Jj J«% 

•“ > 3 1 % B 8 
= i 

1# w g .is as j 
; s ’iis 

.10 3 £ SB 2 

; 1 .8 a s 

- ijgis 2K £ 

~ 3? CT3 22 JO 
- 04 3T » U3 39 3? 

g 


% ?2 iSZ 

JS 2 fiJ ijifc +■% 

ft 24% 24V rs 

JL 5 O _ 

J 21 21 % +t£ 

^ 25 25 — % 

NaR- 8 , 

1 ,®3S4S 
1 H3f w _ 
nj* mV, J 

tin as — s I 
IBM. IBS Zjs [ 

]k lis+ift I 

S., +IU I 

Jf Slg rg 

J5?A 14S — ^ I 

iffiJSSz^ 

BlB 3 , 


13 9,8 iis ,f ,1-^ 

gisa£t?»ni - a I«3 9 * is t* 


p^. 3 5 mis^fRttF ^ i?i 


I kkSI E s 'f » ’.ft 'is yg 

rPW HfRRlt^R 

PPISgg ' - r«8 8,. '£’£-« 

Mgkissss 

* 13 aJ £ & a 3 1 

[ fejtas f “ ^ T A 

1 ^ ^ ,7 ? ® a a * a 

SkfSj^., * .3 8 *8 g» a"Sk..- 

SkiSkffiF" •» .3*? ,gs ft P |. a 

MS S»iel&a _ S »S !Sf ’1* » +W 


SiSfBSs . 17 3ab ~H£ '52 'JSJ 

R'jggE = 9 RR 8firC 

fifise sil^ 4 =FJ*^ 

?*aglS»P:S 

«™SwmSPS^ = f IS S ft? i 4 * ^w. . 

aif® z s 1 % ® 

z Siwob ??5 H? ffl* Z3S I 


** i3 JI w» 
** H «* 

"■ 30 ]77D 9 

i 3 ■hi: 

5L* ■S ,2S 


ivT ,'ss ms r« 

* fi*4 

I & 34 

I* }«* 17 Tg 

i 7 kif 4 t 

* 296 496 <+1a , 

* W* 35% —2 

’« % :S 

R P » 

Sf 5S* +v “ J 

4g% -_£ 

f* «* +fi 
1514 1st Is J 

^s»s 3 

S*»w3 

P#=« i 

PF3 i 

i 


>Bs: =^ilte 

i'f# „ 

NK - ? »|t IIH 

fjg* 7% Today M * is ® 19 w5 +£ 

|r*S - * § S 5 h^®;» # 5 

27*17$"^^' "« -» MV* 26V? 2«S * VS ‘*‘ 


m a3 § 55 7 k 7a Sb *0 


20 i2i&Trton 

^rSf^SS S ^1 fi 3 * ^ ftS ’k ^ 

I**!! ’f r 

I;psft -= I i C fitf! « 

6iS ,: 3 f j a l^f 

Hur-sfli mi 

s“pssa= ’•* s g j a s“f*^ 

a* »as°” - ,LS si? a . . a. de 


tK'«55S w 


BSiawZS 

JSft + '* 

a* fi ~ 

w* re* — 5 ; 

30* +7* 

?7wiw* zi£ 


■" a 2 7,7 « 3 

fifcSb : a N P £f:.;- B 

Skift®?" .« .3ft’ ,g ft a & is 

IftlftiaSiL ■» a a IS 5$ S*B - 

1 Pffijgsgj. u« <3 g 1 ? as &. ff =# 
R^sasr -Z bI i* 'is 1* *s 

:*s g a P g* .w 

Ip'tSSF 

iSizT 


PI 

nj* tfi* 

'£ sssasa 


Pp^ E “f « r S 0 fE!S | Sim- = i f R 

S 8 's g»S5 A 3,338 #. Pi T^ ig * ? ; HU £ 

»“R&. ,.. i s I a *s 1 — Z ?'S 5 ? 


^ S* 

iri»l=f 


S^I 7 g^®Tcs - S Jgf 

806 * a|« 

28* 2*S(*ji£S^ - re 635 

A lOWsSw MS 

fSj^ gP WBdc ' z “ 2 

^»m3I3SS ■» j ~ i 

- ft ** 

* iSSJr 

Zrm^^ 

eJNS- ' ^sfiR 

e • 4 ; P 

J^.^Swwj* — — 322 48% 

2L 7 1%5^M - - ^264 

^*Rns 


! 5 ; 88 "? 

JP* 

aj*.t 

R^i 8 

■®% an* —5 
3% 21 * 
ny. 11 * ;g 

2Jb 27* -IE 


3RJ®« 

a «IvS 

fS. ?i«vS 


4.T fc f ww n««e 


::g *3 

zg ssg if a*zi 
z I? » ig5 ] $g 3 

z g 7 & sS jT i«i3 

—12751001 77% miSSSzSJJ 

z * 2 4 

— f 103 1»% 14 £ u.Jt 

km ^ 


E«S “ ? f H « 

- “■ Ui2 US 11?* +4T 

ir’h^ “• 

saiftS 1 : “ jm£. * jP *5 

fflOg* =HTFftS^ 
BBSS'* *a 73 8 f 1:3 


jiifa 5 | ^ S 0 ^? I£^ 1916- ly% 

ft &gjft . „ ; s ® «? &*?■ .‘5 

^iatsg» a aafg Rjg'jg 


ftjig!— W m£ 


rgLj ^gaoc* a . vid pb iSS 

^lMCnnj— * ~ *** I** 1 LmI — — fi-T|- 

23% 27 V 


. 5 Month 
. ^QftLo* apefc 

: 

- 13% 


WAtatf 1 
^ oft Sipefc 

3wikgss 


a# 5 

aS'j sgB i» ■" 

S? 

•S ■'•• 


ttv Vld Wr Jj 


• » afciffig Mr J’ u 7 «« .ZT 
1 1?J* ■^Sfeumfrt - S I* uSj 

' If*5 •waSSc^' z Z a? 

i ’•» * . » a 


Pfe *« i j 


LUwtotetfQyo* 

»i£ aP* +SS 
1130 11 % Jg 

J?lZSl 


llg 



is if 
jap 


8 Si? ■" 1 ?f S 3 

* U^ w £*gfvmoo ~ 5 >0 n£ 

; -s' jgjaagr = “ S ’58 

,| 3 kSSSS :,- IS 

: S jgasss ® P 

.S’&ssgs : - S P 

1.#^°“ -s I ’55 

lag ==JS 
s^BS® ’£ ’S = S B 

■a afflbi f r ® 3 i5fc 


ft a :S 


= 

Jttr* £ 

3% 


«srj 

3H< 

b*bb 

«je 


iT « JJA 
- 17 £ 8% 

: - s St 
**■ »-,?? 7 % 
- 5751 9V* 


j'io Amffi -as u ii ; is* 

r'l^SflSK * Si if i S* 

■p sat , 44 7 ? ^ s f 

h WST^ ~ ‘ 


zjj f 

;i!SB 36 

f- 9MS m z s I fi 

=S ft 2 F 


f 5s 5* +fi 

1! % $ z 

| B B *« 

? <2 i&It 

* Jk 3SH ZZ*t I 

f 14V* _« 

■ rei* reS " I 

Rl* 

V i^j 

fsj bS *s 

S i 5 / 
10* ,0»zS , 

i«6 m% w 1 1 
fl? t£ = 


M. . 7- I 

f.lSi 

48 

8M 

iiffl 

{fj 

4 i»i 

,g{,ai 

ssPl 


Ss . =1 ^ « «?E i 

§*... 

fc- ‘jsiiRR-f 
37 “ -*j£PI-ii 

S— •» as® a “s az& 

£ =« 3 a if i? 

™ fi z ?SJSsl« z 

b — *»« *S at S, 

8’*ii: 8”'S8 'ffi'B-is 

s • = ; S 'a hS’St* 


«. Ykl— 1 ^ Wtan , 1|| 


» Month 

.Hi*. Low Start. 


1 45. 71 

| 24V 20V 

20 49j 

I pw 

J 41 2D 

£4% 
SSt 1 ? 4 

23 709 

f ftSf 

^ji«! 

6 V, 

3 S 1 P 

awiwsooS jr 


^5 . ** *tft 

"St a »S 
^s®e 25 !_ 3 T g „>> 

- - 7746 

33 l3 j| M* 

■ 05 ° 3 if 

z J 7 fK u 3ff 


~ M 127 30 

- £ 12827 , M 


Hki 1 f V I f 


P»V Ykl 


RRW ■"*“ 

%r = 


^z^-^iisEiassEa I wJiSJ 


z S' 2 ^ g» 

Z ff- £.'& 

ri» | 

Z a ® 

d£ s 9 nS JSS 

\ $5 a 3 *% 


g% 2S% 

.fcM 

h aSf dgf 

2 aj S^-'-ZVi 

f S.. 38 +n* 
j i9% 20 + % 

fc 4% 41 A __Vfc 

L ® w +V4 

I 23W 24% 

: .£l*ifi 

^ iif 

M* »3 8| 

^?%:s 

ft*: ■*■’* J 

125 I3W +*c 

XS a** + 3 f 


HWY ^g ~ *-i 

s -IJRRR** 

slss^s .. .; ? ’s i?s ♦* 


» amwSSE h ~ w iiS S* 3J5 av? 

I 3 SB 23 S 7 5 iI JS S» 

IT* * WatraiiU "** -8 W 33a jw* S2 2" “JJ 

» !J WoflMoi - - 41 flvi a ^ -J* 

S* llbHUnf - 2? « 21 30V* Ml 

R1S; Z 

Skay gass 3 a ff ,„ 4 1“ ™3» r 

R’ntiffis? 0 ■»• 2 - “ !J“ 


. Stifsig 
IP 8 

9 9 u? 

496 5 + 1? 

w 9 ^ 

«n +S 

m*1n* fft 
zf^^S 


•"* i = j £ rip 7 ? 
&pfg£ E=ilfplf 

®?®S. - **jgRRR3f 
5 tggas. - «2R§8r£^ 
- asJ ftps 


rias ;t'i Firsts 

•a^.> sIMfikSt* 


- 1 1” a 

® “Sas ’•« * J J * 


&W *5 

I ■& = 

^ IhmS*! -isb a5 

jo t3 

S% rkfe&fy 


z ft ’k ? Sf ^ - 

43 is* iSr & 3H _. 


2X22*’ 

ft.1 z# 


■" ? § | jfg aa 

= * JBSiBa 

.E 1 1 '! ’I R *= 


^i^wSraff 

% gsw 

lft IwSlSlit— 

33% J* )S3£XE 

RRBt 


- Z is nj* 1 JU- " 

- - j| W «• «S +v “ 

- - aj 4w 52 J* - 

; ' ® 1 4$T*L. - 

- — 3 284* mT rr 


i a 

g^gfr = 

i «• ■** 73 

jI.’IS, s.a 
’»SSSL a a 

’ft f «g^ ^ a 

7% AvfcjuiKTL^ — 


Z Z J 2S*L 77 X 77»* Z 

aa® 8 * :? s I.® 

l *.g j f f’f F ^ 

gate ^mb 3 - »f f p ft + « 

%M — - ijSl'Ii, 

: a?tgjS2t JSt 5J ~ ,( J IS ’C 1*‘ -V ’ I< 

CJSSK ■“* ” * *P S3 IX |g-s 

w.hS3?o* - a . g fa 2H SH-w 


* *5 i? ? ^ p **“ i* 



t a^agg^ 

e,% 

-S5^. 


, J» IJ s 7 32 sg |» ?: 
n H z "f »S ^3J 


Jla 3J — ? 'S 10 10 TCf 

^ « g ls 3 ,« | :x 
Z S J :!— j$a 
JJ 3 M km k J22 IJg zS 


- « jtf ffl Jt St 4 g 

-Z>1$£’k3 
i ; i3 ’SSi^ 

■ - M f 3W,ZvJ 

'?Bfe 

z » ft* fts +1 ? 
i-s-i® i s'.?* 
j| | ..St ,)S ,ib ;S 

i-eiil 


HAta* ._ Wl! * — Vi 

regi^a** ^■■nrrniff 

J&.swpsW ag-agLtjwLatMo— f _ a, — 

% ■“ lT lT aS lk ,9^ ;5 I ^MViTTMiw l «4 WUi In wt JMKya, 

« « 1 if “I I ».'i s 3 5? SS%ia 

; s p p 18*’ igtJB&Si. 


cm 


- it ¥ 

I f£Jj| 


s If® :'M I pP ^ 1 

$ I i RW Jf a II J f r §Ef 1 6 ii 


15 . is ® *& ^ i-jj 
ffiS ot3^STs J5t 1J> xi M 14% u% iSi ^ 

I*® liiissa 


iTV^Snov 


Jf 

? ^ R afe 


<*$£*1* 
4% 2%HmSf 


,fe 5W 'S 
85 ’15 ’» z 


IHP a 81 (RfS* 

f A- jS ? 5 ’a ja JSj - 

p® iJuiii'? 


f E : 

g*i#“ «: 

’]JS ,z 1 5 


to ^*t£S2£ j>» 55 " 1 ? iX iX~ v “ 

«£ :&£K& ^1 ” z ui ss si »-s 

— : 8 ,«J il f £ -5 

IS;,. „; = ■« « 


4 7 S » w S-C 

' sg f f 

- 1g 72% 77% ir*L 

f^lllz 

r 8 » P'».r 


is a® 5 . a? J ® $ xti '1 

feRB^C8 = 4bb£ ; 

i»*stis?. “ - « '» w sit-* 


fM *.jS 33 ni'k* 

f %fS?§' z - 8^ %, jgf + S 

af^fe>» - M 73 7 1 ^ * if ,§ & 

Ifflsf* E - J I a |-5 

a «.E : 'B % a S 3 

4 | g 

a’affisy *%-%!■[ |t ips^f 


3 ? j SSS2S, Z 
n^ixS 33 ^ J4 si 
PijXStez ^ 8 

1 iV&Sf n s « 

2 *® = 

I igb 2J ! 

4M0 ai 

ftJSEg! ^ ?* 

im TWNrrto * 31 Z ~ 

TOwSSSi. ^ e : 

.siXKSS? is 


- M P* JS 1 + S 

4s f 21Vb MvS^-* 
Z ire rv? «& & 

- ,|« Ss a- ta 

?|IIM 

- *» $5 ft;S 

■7: __ 9 1 ja i2t ?7? + % 


V* %. 
3% j’® 


- 1351 
- - 253 

Z S T§ 

-400 30? 


is ER^ 

P S a : 


Mi 



■f kjBP 

tS ® 

■ x? 4 

7% ftwA^eon 


:s 3t 

E 5 'sl 


BWW 


-- i £ M 

Z ii f!! s * 1 

-y 50 ?14. 


5L8 


^rEp >Sfis 

s* fiwSSE - - aa xS 


11 s 

P a.K 

intwt 

tass 


fis 


3.& 



■A4Bjfc. 

life, 


'■*»• «3 f I JJ 

» fi r -I R 

- Ef 1 £ 

- w S 31% 

JO i3 m 2 g ^ 

-109 £ T i^ 

- - * 31b 

r - J j»y. 


1TO HW&j&Z 
aw .■v»a?aciiii 
/•MHlUbicfio 


SS 8 S 

SS^ti 


n « - Ji 35fi 

Z« Jg* 

aafc ?«3^ 

Z * «’ <6 

82 L 3 33 T?X 

•■^’a - i is 

SB 

■i « S '3 SB i 


e jis ^ 

if *s t?7| 

?g|? 

h ^ ftza i 

'im=a 

* J%J* tS I 

' irjfc rrvE *2 { 

fta:f 

S’StS I 

jg f ;* i 

if is i 

^0&-R 1 j 

Tit Tlx n J 91 


( |& fBSSE, 

I Sat 

il 

pfe 

fc $§££?" 


f f| j 

= 3 ^ 

- M jj 

- aT ua 


a | la ;.| 

>¥» 3H? ffl r,^ 


'*g .4% 4V U £3 -T.vT 

f is j* S * ft 

» 'a 'a 'fit : 

Jl f* SjISzS 

1 Q8 11% life lift* +l fi* 


iSi kj®*® 0 


=f If liif 

* ? 1 1 s I a js 

I s 98 jff M 


R « 

-»■ a S S ft ,jg t* 

SfM -- = ':JpWi 

HP 

«* 5 Z ,7 3 ^ *S |3 

if- Z 14 Jf J* 7 j| 1W *s 

RESg, s ^ 2 s lR^is=£ 

£,£®® - a « ”« .a a C. T4 


■bnei-Sr 


u J3% IJW I3Ifc - 

* ?5 ’S\ 

Z z S 'S >g & z 

:i|f I ^z?!r 

-iao iJ as j£ >{S{ tS 


1 1 il~5 1 IBS' - 1 *s 

5* Ii ?J j£ w % 7 8* 7 ^ 

,ij^£ 


m j 
® + ^- 


loT 5£ P* TO 

8 fE J J 


Jtf 3 jD 
-40« l3 


z 1 ? a ♦* 

RR.ftiaS.fi Z 




L 5 j f« 

a » ftx 


2 TO +« 

*x 


R 6 

341623% 
7 TK 
J%3g 


-« z 




^15 ajfJS. _ - lams srZr-- J 

|te — ! “ i | RfiaL, 

s 1 1 8Bt ’"*'- 5 4 P I |i| 

,1 Rsr E g ii’P f f ZS 

ag^sisar = - xg ii ? 

^JiTOiSS?{y " -*!jS AM sSJaSbZ^i 

1305 ’■* 73 !?.M 


U ’I ® TO n* Uk — ® I 4iw j 

S « # ^ aS * 5 I “SEft 

hjMiSnlm 


Ihm r§ 

d#S I f 


fl 

jgE 

flSis 


£ 3 j % is n z 

z * 5 ^ if? £$ 


a iy 

A3 

5.9 


- ™ >3S 

I *?«£& IX 


r* 3sgM^ 

fi^lfc 


JlS .£ 


s* il iiil 

1 jfljfliiS 

f||r= 

^1 ”4 n * - l 


"SSI "2J& 

J F # gter 

k&St 

kiss'"- 

isv*\i*bteSS?" 


a tt 


$ r SM 


«»5S W ffX S£ T r 

««i3; ’f % B ® 

« .Sg 55 S +vff 


)%,?X = 

as «f 

5gj gw z 

Si** *s 


* Ere £2 13 ig 155 1 TO 14 _.e 

■ j* S » J? % ft®-® J* 

.fi kS I fl 4 1 C i ^ 

iiS ^rijj u ^2 7 » w 17 * 

rsgffs? >" » 


w j 

-o 4 


rI®*? —»■ 


17 * 

«R 4V 
74% 

1 % Wu ♦£ 


TH&Sai 

iii 

.1 'S^ 
» 

If If 

HkM 

s^ixsss?* 

iftsxiils? 


" SvJ sg« 
Z 53 '© 7 IS^*« 


- Z 58 '«? ’TO in* *« 

P ,a - If |w 8S 4*3 

m ;« ii 2 a » 


I RR 5 2 R R R3 

s-rssllW 

, J.9s 2 '£ ’£»$*'£ 


fvZ %ii222f? 

« figs*. 

XRfii 


Z " a «JI 

^ S iS affi JJ +% 

flMifii 


1 g« 4 l#fJS ; 

-ililll’f 

3 *8 I R PM, 

::| I* In | 

ii S’g ftaqx 


S5 5 5S M jj.)?, 

to si^fes » » 

' TOTOWgg, -BblTfa 
;Z? RuESfifyi Z m 

- rjH^ggSS-H “ - 

j * ttfcCornbwf Z " 


4 il V 

« W S6 

14 a 

R *? 13 J 

- 13 ’5 

_ m ®«/ s 

- | IX 
: SftB 


’85 ig* +h 

?X &z:g 

ri W ri tt 4 

Ajjs-f 

» § 4 

$3 liX * J I 

TO 3» + 4 * I 


' A 
% 
s 

g in 

IS 


3a t"* 6 a — < - n 


= f 1 1 ?I 3 

*i* Ilffe 

£| 

z r tItuIIS iff.® *5 


l =* * .a j= jg z 

I# -|j Iff II 

® Ej f ^ f |:| 

J Irf’Ssgrl = ” | I s S a =s 

^■fttsse* - 1 ,'s p ft je **a 

Rra» * si 

9 lS5£ _ _ { ii? 7W 7H 4 1L 

= g s ’» 'ft'f =s 


I 9% 6 %SSSb^ 

7 ?& OneUi Of 
1 M &2SSn 

« i MSfr 

ssaB^ 




' m *SS?S* Z 91 J 14 » SgZ2 

Us31SS"<S' S = 1JS % C~s a J^’ 

U “ ^ 2>5 +tt *TOWWmSSC. 

^ z i2 u P ^ ^ Z5 IS 

iff £ J *3C* *S ^ 

m i ft 1 ife lilM 



Sf ■” ? ,1 *$ 1 ’sir 

d E ^ ffit 

r -r JS .1 .5c 


9% iifcjSZE? 1 


8 » ftt ftX TX 
- ~ 1 RS # £ 

~ 19 ? ta 15 Si +S 


iro 5^oJS^ n Z ; » t* ’g* tm* -5 

£ *■ S 'i J 1 « ^ t! 


1 IBB 

isssili i 

fmgR i 


- rw « M 2 1’i “g7F —34 

if i ?“« § HE 1 !-^ 

liMliij 

i« K = Iff^lPpia 

fS H Z 7 g& »s S* ♦« 


s|g= j £tfejb*c 

8 87 = llRR^S 

s « - - 1 1 WliS 

&. r E § S S 83 


J-ft w Z ao Sis a 

15 ii ; 8 S3* ff 

ijj U “ s S'* IT 


lilt- 5 5 1 ,1 1 1=1 

ife JJ*b*wdJ* — Is 1* L tfe 


’ffiii 

I -v* In; 

Lgffi 

RJH 

PI 

fsl 8 ! 

Ill 

<Iii 



^-S 

,^IEs 


m2 JHt 

" AM9 ®* i 

= =R ,a . 

*’ *? = 'f , 

3*8 E I ii ii 



ant +fi 

<tt +J* 
S* TO — V* 

; 

i?*i35zSf 

§m 



1- • , - . v-l 




£" — M - 3* TTO &" ? 

I il g = ’ R R j 




»ra‘if If 

ftvtftwSSSF 1JM «3 ft 40 S5 SI3*«*« ~ 
’TO SXgSSfc ■» « M re ft* ft* ft* -5 

iftT Z "| if* _TO _♦» 

fea. ** * j,M a; .p ..»> -£ 

^ =feP»WN« -. 24 M JKj 1M. , 


ito f5fs™3" : : 1 » s 

^wSq^lig^re? “ - Ira aS ra 

’is* ^ is 2 » Km, J 
* % re ^ J * ^ 

St £& •“'"? i i R R 

'st st^§« ■*. s ~ ^1 'i: R > 

^ Calk z S ft u J£ ® 
^^£S2tf ^ z - ft J& JS I 
t 7 *4® = ? ftf ^ « 

lA%11SSuySn» m S M ?L ,3?^-] 


*% I ^ 

lflBP BBIB 

+ « / ** W »«S3?* M * **** **ae*c titvkMncL 

£5 tSrSf'r.VTOlVta,,. 


+»5 j B j^* nw H**»»dir»eBrK*jio9 > £2J5^”2gjo»ewiiarra mamnn. 

4 V* T£ jLr^WTOwtfetKyiD-^inB- WwT * 1, «■ no setton' V 

a?* <s-SSSl^i£S« rn vwxr. 


1 TOU<{ 
J 4V* 
« 3M 


I’S - z 

- ■ » re ns fgr^i 


2 9 SkTr 

2 T7Vj 7JT4 int K 


i 8 €S - ia S Sis «5 

S3fet gte* * ’? ? J .f ^^tJ; 

| .■'© “ Sirs ife 88 ?, 

TO TOSSS « « » JTO ?5 S? - 


? s I i a a II pgflr ■ aft a R si 

■■IfiAAX RAdil 3 j 81 


IBQnH -- « 


g .s^tEa 

js *» 

>X 'S5 '£* t5 


i-fi 

tk j# ?wzft»t!«isr 


"^^® s& ®gssjsa' 


a* «• 4 % -.2 

z« 



k Jhfu4£ 


\ 














.* |", ., »lr^ ’;>. S£ *■ 


* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 


"« ss 


* «; 
;> ft 


'» • '-j f 
•?-, Jf,* 

* *W 


Page 13 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


*» M 


5 ft i” 1 K 


«£ 


u; £. < 
& 1 


Toyota to Sell 


* A 

*?* 
* 

to 


ilHflGM Cars via Top 



1* 


■■-"V-V 

;; ■* 

:im 

> ' 

«» . 1 " 

*■■■% - 

. '■* 1 
# . 'j 


- j 


V 


£b 

ft-..’ 


.v. 

*’s: 

S’* 

. ■ ■' 

'?'< 

J’ ■ !S 

.*i 

\ m f 

v «; 

■i-a 


Dealer Network 


H <1‘*. k«- 


‘V 


»-Vw 


** ■ 

't-J 


r « p 



« 1 




i ^ ■ 


h-u i & 

? m 




Ha 


•JR I £ 



■* 


i HQ 


:,■ * 


T« '* 



w 


■c 


i. 


u-. .r 




la, 


« 


n mj 1 


■tf 


1 Vi 


\ ' 


,ml " * 

,* ^ - = 

■; *»■ Z 

. . *t « 


c > 




■c-i 


■■i- 
■ ■ 

-■ ■ 




■ c 


is -■ 


5, 


»• 


IfS 

RJ 

& 


ar 
ir - 

■i’ 




la 


•m 


4 ■» 




%* 

sv 

sr 

tt 

& 

S£i 

s* 


J5 


to 

5? 


*1 


♦.a 


is/ 1 


: j 


- ^ 

.■JC- 


.■tf 


f!. 




<« 


* I 


< 4 




l.W 


to ^ 


f?’ ■ 

& 

VI 




i i 


► 


pi 


s 


b 

V t 

ev 

« 


_• f. 
K 


*r 




r* 

MM 

!* 

•*- 

* V*t 

k 

*1P 

• 1 * 


4f 


. . '• 


,r 


£ 

M »* 

31 

+■ 

* r 

t 


• St/ • 

i. 

• **• * 


* 

/ 

P 


* T . 

*: ■ -7 - 

Y *■■■ 

• " r ■* “ 


J.--- 


Jl ' P 


A f . 

i?- 

r 


itt 


*• 

*.■ 




^ .v* J 


*■; 


rt 1 ' r 


r “ -,BP _ 
|#*f ** 1 

-T* 1 


-k I 


^ » 


Compiled hy (hr Staff Fnrni Dispatches 

TOKYO — Toyota Motor 
Corp. said Wednesday said it 
bad chosen the largest of its five 
domestic dealer networks to sell 
cars made by General Motors 
Cop. for the Japanese market. 

| The move is likely to give an 

extra boost to U.S. automakers’ 
efforts to expand sales in Japan. 
It also comes just as Japanese- 
U.S. talks on autos and other 
trade issues are gathering speed 
ahead of a U-S.-imposed dead- 
line of Sept 30 for an agreement. 

A Toyota executive said 
Wednesday that the cars would 
go on sale in January or Febru- 
ary 1996. 

Toyota agreed last year to 
buy 20,000 Chevrolet Cavaliers 


Japan Telecom 
Burdens Market 

m 

Bloomberg Business ,Vrwj 

TOKYO — Stocks closed at 
their lowest level in four 
months Wednesday as disap- 
pointment over the debut of a 
closely watched Japan Telecom 
Co. spread to other shares. 

The Nikkei average fell 
370.18 points, or 1.8 percent, to 
20,023.80. 

Japan Telecom shares fell 

50.000 yen, to 4.65 million on 
Tuesday, their first day of trad- 
ing On Wednesday they fell 

220.000 yen, to 4.43 mill i nn yen. 
The current price for Japan Tele- 
com is 19 percent below the 
weighted average of 5.44 million 
!yen garnered at the public auc- 
tion of the shares in mid-August. 


annually, starting in 1996, for 
resale in Japan under its own 
brand name. The right-hand- 
drive cars are being made by 
GM specifically for the Japa- 
nese market 

Their introduction would 
make the Cavalier the first 
model made by one of the Big 
Three American automakers to 
be sold in Japan by Toyota, the 
largest Japanese automaker. 

Toyota calls its five domestic 
dealer networks by the names 

of Toyota, Toyopeu Corolla, 
Auto and Vista. The Toyota 
channel that the company has 
chosen for the Chevrolet cars is 
the largest with more than 
1.000 sales outlets and a sales 
force of 35,000. 

U.S. automakers have long 
complained that unofficial ar- 
rangements between manufac- 
turers and dealers have kepi 
foreign cars out of Japanese 
dealerships. Those arrange- 
ments have been eroding in re- 
cent years, however, allowing 
foreign carmakers some access 
to Japanese dealers. 

■ Opel Is Picked for Asia 

General Motors expects the* 
Asia-Pacific region to be its fast- 
est-growing market and plans to 
base its sales and production 
strategy there on its Opel range 
of vehicles, Bloomberg Business 
News reported from Bangkok. 

“Opel has been chosen lo be 
the GM brand for vehicles de- 
signed, built and sold outside of 
North America," said Lotus R. 
Hughes, president of GM Eu- 
rope and executive vice presi- 
dent of international operations. 

(AP. Reuters) 


9 


End of a Street Fighter \ 

Video Game Takes a Beating in Market 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — Street Fighter took a beating 
— but on the stock market. 

That could indicate a trend. Maybe one of 
the most successful video game fads has run 
its course. 

Capcom Cq_, based in Osaka, Japan, 
spawned a new genre of entertainment and 
rose to more than $800 milli on in soles on the 
strength of the Street Fighter II series of 
games for arcades and home video. 

But sales of the latest version of the game, 

EVTERNATIONAl STOCKS 

introduced in June, are short of expectations, a 
result of a slowing of the video-game business 
and the growth of rival games, particularly 
Acclaim Entertainment's more violent Mortal 
Kombat (in which the victor can rip out the 
heart or tear off the head of the vanquished.) 

Capcom execuives said the company's 
American subsidiary has fallen into un profita- 
bility. caught with 1.65 million unsold gomes of 
various tides as of the end of March. On 
Friday, the company slashed its estimates of 
sales and earnings for the current fiscal year. 

The company’s stock, which was selling for 
about 9,000 yen ($90) at (he beginning of the 
year, plunged to around 4.500 yen by April. 
Capcom, traded on the second section of the 
Osaka Stock Exchange, has lost more than a 
quarter of its value since Aug. 1. and now 
trades at about 2.560 yen. 

“Capcom needs something new," said Mit- 
suko Morila, an analyst with Morgan Stanley 
& Co. in Tokyo. “The Street Fighter II boom 
was too huge for the company." 

It will be difficult to come up with another 
blockbuster like SLreet Fighter II, which ac- 
counted for 57 percent of revenue in the last 
financial year. 

Nobuhiko Toyoshima of Smith New Court 
Securities, however, said the recent fall of the 
stock provided a buying opportunity. 

The video-game industry is entering a peri- 
od of extensive change with the introduction 
of more powerful machines and the entry of 
new suppliers. That could provide opportuni- 
ties for software companies like Capcom. 

Capcom was founded as an arcade game 
company in 1979 by its president. Kenzo 


Tsujimoto, who had been in the arcade- ma- 
chine-rental business. With its young soft- 
ware developers dressed in jeans, it has been 
considered a rare example in Japan of a 
Silicon Valley-style creative company. 

In Street Fighter II, a player controls a 
video character who fights against another 
character controlled by a second player or by 
the machine. 

There had been fighting games before 
Street Fighter II, including the first Street 
Fighter. Bui Street Fighter II, introduced in 
arcades in 1991 and for the Super Nintendo 
home game machine in 1992, ignited a boom 
because it offered a certain sophistication in 
movement and allowed players to choose 
from among a dozen video characters, each 
with a distinct personality and fighting style. 

Capcom sold 6.5 million copies in its 1993 
financial year and an additional 5.4 million 
for Nintendo Co. and Sega Enterprises Ltd. 
machines combined in the period, which end- 
ed in March. Sales in the last financial year 
rose to 86.9 billion yen, more than double the 
level two years earlier. But net income fell by 
nearly half, to 3.5 billion yen. 

The company had been projecting gains, 
but now expects sales to fall to 63.3 billion 
yen. One reason is that sales of the new Super 
Street Fighter II. introduced in June, are 
running b ehin d. 

One of Capcom's problems is that video 
games are slowing. The current generation of 
16-bit machines is aging and consumers are 
awaiting 32-bit or 64-bit machines to be intro- 
duced by Nintendo and Sega as well as Sony 
Corp„ a newcomer to the field. These ma- 
chines, plus perhaps a new model by 3 IX) Co., 
will reach the market between this fall and next 
fall and should spur software sales. 

Capcom has the resources to develop pro- 
grams for all the game machines. Moreover, 
the software business could become even 
more profitable with the next generation. 

Software will mainly be sold on compact 
disks, which are inexpensive to make, with 
several game machines on the market, software 
companies will be able to pay lower royalties to 
hardware manufacturers than they did when 
Nintendo had a virtual monopoly. “The bal- 
ance of power is going to shift from hardware 
manufacturers to software manufacturers," 
said Joseph Osha of Baring Securities. 


China’s Li 
Calls Prices 
Top Worry 

Compiled bv Our Staff From Oupizdies 

BEIJING — China must 
control skyrocketing prices, or 
runaway inflation could jeopar- 
dize its market reforms. Prime 
Minister Li Peng said in a 
speech published Wednesday. 

“Many years of experience 
have shown us that controlling 
inflation and maintaining price 
stability is a vital link lo the 
success of implementing reform 
measures," Mr. Li said7 

His comments were primed 
on the front pages of all major 
newspapers, a sign of the im- 
portance the government places 
on controlling inflation. 

Mr. Li’s speech, delivered 
Tuesday to economic and prov- 
incial officials, was the second 
official warning this week about 
inflation, which the prime min- 
ister called China's most press- 
ing domestic problem. 

On Monday. China Informa- 
tion, an official newspaper, said 
that if food-price inflation did 
not slow considerably, “it will 
be hard for people to live." 

Public anger over price in- 
creases and corruption has 
aroused concern that the gov- 
ernment might decide to curtail 
its market reforms, which have 
brought unprecedented pros- 
perity to many Chinese but also 
created wide disparities in 
wealth and income. 

Figures released in July 
showed that consumer prices 
had risen 24 percent from a year 
earlier. 

In 1989. inflation of more 
than 30 percent helped fuel the 
Tiananmen Square pro-democ- 
racy demonstrations that drew 
as many as 1 million people into 
the streets of Beijing and set off 
similar protests in about 80 other 
cities. (AP, AFP ) 


Filipinos Cheer Petron’s Bullish Debut on Exchange 


Reuters 

, MANILA — Half a million Filipinos. 

.Anany of them entering the stock market 

Tor the first time^ more than doubled 
their investment instantly on Wednes- 
day when Petron Girp. shares made 
their debut. 

Slock in the country’s largest oil refin- 
er and distributor opened and closed at 
21 .25 pesos (81 cents), although they hit 
an intra-day high of 22.75 Deseed The 


stock, to the public as part of the compa- drop in Philippine Long Distance Tele- percent in 1994 after inflation even 

- phone and other blue chips. though the government will likely record 

“Petron opened strong because retail- only 5.5 percent to 5.75 percent, Agenoe 
ers are bolding onto their shares," said France- Presse reported Wednesday 
Gregorio KiJayko, president of Baring from Manila. 

Securities Philippines. “This means the The Philippine Chamber of Commerce 

man on the street is learning to be an and Industry said underestimation of . 
investor." growth was due to the country's large 

Peuon is owned 40 percent^ each by underground economy of unregistered 
Saudi Arabia Oil and the state s Philip- busin esses as weD as to understatement of 
pine National Oil. The re m a in i n g 20 eanunes bv manv comp anies 
percent h now public* held. Tr/chiber' said J 5.07 percent 

_ . _ , _ , GNP growth officially registered in the 

■ Real Economic Lrwth first half of this year would r eall y be as 

The gross national product of the much as 7 percent with this un reported 

• • -11 t. pi _ . p-* » ■ _■ 


ay’s sale into private hands. 

It was the nation's biggest public of- 
fering and the 9 peso price was designed 
to encourage as many people as possible 

to participate. 

■ 

“Through this issue, we have kindled 
the interest of a multitude of Filipinos in 
the stock market as it has never been 


kindled before," the Philippine Stock 

public, offer price was. 9 pesos, .BfSkers : Exchange president, Eduardo de los An- 
suggested the stock could appreciate : 'gyes; said. - ’ 

from the current level. 'r irr ^ ^Fhe exchange’s composite index. 

The government distributed a billion which does not include Petron, fell 46 
shares, or 10 percent of Petron’s capital points, to 3,040.32, reflecting a sharp Philippines will grow by 7 percent to 7.5 economic activity. 


Silence Golden 
In Ch ina Press 

Reuters 

BEIJING — Chinese 
journalists who heard that 
China produced 90 metric 
tons of gold in 1993 — a 
commercial secret — were 
ordered not to report it 

Song Ruixiang, minister 
of mineral resources, re- 
vealed the figure at a news 
conference on Monday. 

Reporters were told not 
to mention itbut the semiof- 
ficial China News Service 
reported the number. 


Air New Zealand Disappoints 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WELLINGTON — Air New Zealand Ltd. said Wednesday 
that rising tourism and an increase in international air traffic 
helped it post a 37 percen t increase in net profit for the first half of 
1994, but die results fell a little short of expectations. 

The company said profit rose to 190.6 million New Zealand 
dollars ($1 15 million), or 43 J New Zealand cents a share, from 
140 million dollars, or 32.7 cents a share, a year earlier. Many 
analysts were expecting earnings of 200 million dollarc, and some 
bad recently raised their forecasts above that level. 

: James McCrea, chief executive, said that while the carrier 
would r emain profitable, it would be “irresponsible” to expect 
tprofit to rise as much in the current year as in the one just ended. 

The net result included a tax payment of 7.5 million dollars that 
%axne as a surprise to analysts. The company had no tax liability a 

year earlier. 

Bruce McKay, an analyst at Cavill White Securities, said the 
airline would probably pay tax at a rate of between 8 percent and 
12 percent in the year ending June 30. 1995. 

‘It’s a bit of a guessing game " he said. “It's all tied up with the 
lins and deliverv of new aircraft and also with the method of 


tinting and delivery 
financing.' 


(Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


'*91* 4 k IffiKHNAIHHUI.M 

Itcralo^fe&nbune 

|‘Mlli4bi 4 ■ nl.TV V. id IV Hi4ldV.i 

DYING IN THE U.S.? 

Now Printed in 

NEWARK 

For Same Day 
Delivery in Key Cities 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1-800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-752-3890) 







• *1 



ti 


r r 


• u 


- —Pit “ " 

..v-rr; 






* 


m •' 




Thailand 
Increases 
Bank Rate 

Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

■ BANGKOK — The Bank of 
"Thailand raised its bank rate bv 
half a percentage point 
Wednesday, lo 9.5 percent, to 
stem inflationary pressures by 
sending a signal to commercial 

bonks. 

Supoi Kittisuwan, of the 
Bank of Thailand’s banking de- 
partment, said “It is a signal to 
commercial bonks to exercise 
caution in lending, given the 
continuing strong growth of the 
.economy and the accompany- 
ing inflationary pressures." 

The Bank of Thailand has 
revised its inflation estimate for 
calendar 1994 to 4.8 percent 
from 4.2 percent, versus an ac- 
tual 3.3 percent in 1993. 

^ “It’s actually good news be- 
cause it sends a signal that the 
central bank won’t object if 
lendin g rates go up.” said Ke- 
sara Manchusree, of Standard- 
Chartered Securities. "The cen- 
tral bank wants to control 
inflation, and higher rates will 
help curb demand.'’ 

in practice, commercial 
banks only apply to borrow 
funds from the central bank af- 
ter exhausting the possibilities 
of the short-term money and 
bond markets. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


FIDELITY WORLD FUND 

Socicte d'lnvesiissement a Capital Variable 
Kunsaltis House - Place de I'Etoile 
L-1021 Luxembourg 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the Shareholders of Fidelity World 
Fund, a societe d'investissement a capital variable organised under the laws of the Grand 
Duchy of Luxembourg Uhe "Fund"), will be held at the registered office of the Fund, KansalLis 
House. Place de I'Etoile. Luxembourg, at 1 1:00 a.m. on September 27, 1994. specifically, but 
without limitation, for the following purposes: 

!. Presentation of the Report of Lhe Board of Directors. 

2. Presentation of the Report of the Auditor. 

3. Approval of the balance sheet and income statement for die fiscal year ended May 3 1st. 
" 1994. 

4. Discharge of the Board of Directors and the Auditor. 

5. Election of six (6) Directors, specifically the re-election of Messrs. Edward C. Johnson 3rd. 
Barry R. J. Bateman. Charles T. M. Collis. Charles T.M. Collis, Sir Charles A. Fraser, Jean 
Hamilius and H.F. van den Hoven, being all of the present Directors. 

6. Election of the Auditor, specifically the election of Coopers &. Lybrand, Luxembourg. 

7. Declaration of a cash dividend in respect of the fiscal year ended May 31. 1994. qnd 
authorisation of the Board of Directors to declare further dividends in respect of fiscal year 
1994 if necessary lo enable the Fund to qualify for 'distributor' status under United 
Kingdom tax law. 

8. Consideration of such other business as may properly come before the meeting. 

Approval of items 1 through 8 of the agenda will require the affirmative vote of a majority of 
ihe shares present or represented at the’meering with a minimum number of shares present or 
represented ih order for a quorum to be present. 

Subject lo the limitations imposed by the Articles of Incorporation of the Fund with regard to 
ownership of shares which constitute in the aggregate more than three percent t3‘ t j of the 
outstanding shares, each sltare is entitled to one vote. A shareholder may act at any meeting by 

proxy. 

Dated: Aueusl 29. 1994 

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


Fidelity 



Investments 


Look for 
the upcoming 

travel 

competition 
with a chance 
to win 


fit 

ze ai 

time 

1 

tickets. 



nmjuira mm rrn vim ieman iw •nuihcm 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

IttOO- 


Singapore - 
Straits Times 1 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 





a‘ id. j j' a s 

1994 




A' M J' J A S' 
1994 


19000'- 


18000-,-; 


A M J J AS 
1994 


Exchange : index 

Hong Kong Hang Seng 


% 


Wednesday Prev, 

Close Close Change 

10,165^0 10,035.90 +1.29 


Singapore Strata Times 2,327.01 2.338.55 -0.49 


Sydney 


All Ordinaries 


2,104.40 2,103.60 +0.04 


Tokyo 


Nikkei 225 


204)23.80 20,393.98 -1.82 


Kuala Lumpur Composite 


1,163.15 1.172.24 -0.78 


Bangkok 


SET 


1,532.41 1,535.14 -0.18 


Seoul 


Composite Stock 972.68 977.50 -0.49 


Taipei 


weighted Price 6,695.93 6,630.47 +0.96 


Manila 


PSE 


3,040.32 3.086.46 -1.50 


Jakarta 


Stock Index 


532.05 


524 50 


+1.4+ 


New Zealand NZSE-40 


2,163.75 2,179.22 -0.71 


Bombay 


National index 


2,121.14 2,136.29 -0.71 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


Inicnunnosl Hnild Tnhtmc 


Very briefly: 


• The Hongkong Standard, an English-language daily, on Wednes- 
day is to become the first foreign-language newspaper io be 
printed in China. 

■ Toyama Chemical Co. and Mitsui Pharmaceuticals Inc. aban- 
doned two years of merger talks Wednesday, blaming a deteriora- 
tion in the local pharmaceutical industry climate. 

• Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp. plans to set up nine 
regional subsidiaries in October for a "personal handy phone 
system” that will begin service for semimobile phones in April. 

• Wool worths Ltd-, the largest food retailer in Australia, earned a 
net 200.1 million Australian dollars iS14S million) in the year to 
June 26, up 17 percent from the previous year, helped by a 12 
percent jump in sales and growing market share. 

» Acer Inc. said sales rose 47 percent in August from August l Qvi 3. 
to 2.77 billion Taiwan dollars <S1 million [."while sales for the first 
eight months of the year were up 73 percent. 

• Goodman Fielder Wattie Ltd. has agreed to change its board in a 
compromise with dissident shareholder: seeking to shake up the 
oiling company. 

• Indonesia plans to curb inflation, which rose 0.S7 percent in 
August, by holding down food prices. 

• Maruri Udyog Ltd., the largest automaker in India, plans to build 
a third factory to meet the growing demand for its cars. 

• STAR TV has signed a five-year deal with Media Asia Distribu- 
tion Ltd. to distribute its collection of Chinese films. 

• China on Wednesday signed a series of deals with French 
companies worth a total of 2.53 billion francs (S47S million), of 
which about 765 million francs were for film contracts. 

AFP, Bh*?nibcr£. Reutcry. AP 



renwen ussw 

jFTWRJ5*l^=MIWTR9 ' 
HiVSSfA 



tit 

tErandumtinental 
finaatu &roup 


• UNITED tuTON-S 

irJDUSTRJAL FEVEtCPfCr.T 

ORGAUiZATON 


•MtaAaD 


Three-day International Conference 

TRENDS IN RUSSIA 

Economy, Politics, Laws 

in 

Vienna, Austria 
October 20-22. 1994 

With the main focus on: 


• Russian-Western investment projects 

• Inner workings of Russia's politics 

• Latest tendencies in Russian legislation 

IB 

and law-enforcement 

• Construction, banking, insurance and defense 
industries in modern Russia 

Featuring many prominent Russian speakers 

For more information, please contact: 

Transcontinental Finance Group GmbH 

Tel. 443-1/534-39620. +43-1/534-39621 
Fa x+43- 1/534-39777 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


« Clirrfncy Management Corporation Plc 
4 1 1 Old Jcwrv - London EC2R 

I flfllM ; TeLs 071-865 0800 Faxs 071-972 097U 

Wv r t7 i wV i ? kb yj j 1 ^ 

24 Hour London Dealing Desk 
Competitive Rates* & Daily Fax Sheet 
- - Call for further /ir/n/ 7 iid//nii &• 


I 


Catch The Big Moves 

Commtrac. the computerised trading system is now available by lax. 
Commtrac covers over 75 commodities/fmancial futures/lndicies 
with specific “Buy”, “Sell" or "Neutral" recommendations 

Request your 5-day free trial by sending a fax 
to Carol on 0624 662272 int +44624 662272 


Signal 


O 130+ software applications O 
O RT DATA FROM SI 0 A DAY O 
O Signal SOFTWARE GUIDE O 
Call London: COO* (0) 71 231 3556 
ior your guide and Signal price lisL 


SWIFT CALL '-’COMMUNICATIONS' 


LONDON - NEW' YORK - LONDON 
PRIVATE VOICE CIRCUITS - £10K PER ANNUM 
Calls to USA - 2Qp per minute Japan/Hong Kong • 5bp per minute ~1 


CALL: LONDON 071 488 2001, DUBLIN fOl) 67 10 457 


FullerMoney - the Global Strategy Newsletter 

. Cc-x.'f ir-c'borrd s, ‘ fleets, cut & commcdiji^s, including %vlv_ i rc to 'nvest. 

: Fuller/ /.c-noy is- written by David- Fuller fa r.irdemaficnc .1 inve^lory.' 1 6 pcqw, 

• mor:!h;y.. Sincle issue £15 cr U5522 nnudXl 56- in UK '& Europe, tlsewnere -; 
• Ej'BC or USS28Q, cheque or credit ca r c.'Cc!] jane rorr.ct •• 

• CbcrFAVidlV:’:!' Ltd, 7 SwaSlsw Stteet, Londo-r. W1 R-7HD, UK • ■_ 

Tel: '.cr.dcn‘71 -d-u? J96- (071 -tn.UKJ-or Fc*: 71 -j!39 A966 • 

... ‘ • ' J " t riv.=s RAS'<.T>ir /• ' '' . ‘ ! '• ' 


USD/DEM 3-5 pips DEM/JPY 2-3 pips 


Competitive FX spreads with no further costs 
Experience - Security - Analysis - Strategies 
Tridinq facilities Laseo on margin or company balance sheet 
Dtrec! Deaiinc 24 Hours - London - Berlin - Copenhaoen 
RUBICON - 43 30 Tel.: £85 933d / Fax SS2 42ca 



ECU Futures PLC 
29 Chesham Place 
Belgravia 

London SW1X 8HL. 
TeL: +71 245 0088 
Fait: +71 235 6599. 
Member SFA. 


FUTURES & OPTIONS BROKERS 


$32 


ROUND 

TURN 


EXECUTION ONLY 



Margined Foreign 
Exchange Trading 

Fast. Competitive Qiinlcs 2 i Hours 
Td.: ■*■-11 T1 u+ijO 

Fax: + -h “1 3— 11 5 , M'> 





Technical Analysis Software 

» - w . Ill, . J . 


1 INDEXIA 


jj-rf Tel: +44 ;'f|442 87801 5 ; ■ rax:- +44 i\r : 4d2 576334 

High Street, Berkhamsted, Herts HP4 2DJ, United Kingdom 



For further details 
on bow to place your listing contact : 
WILL NICHOLSON in London 
Tel: (+-i) 71 836 48 02 
Fax: ( 4+) 71 240 225-t 

Hcralb“SteL£ribunc 


J. - 


r 


















































































































































































K * 


' v. 


IrS 

it - $E 

- -8 

5W 

* a? • - ■- 
£>. ■* 


“ ^ 'Tt 

V- r~ % -K 

■* - r- •<■.- . „ 

V- «■ i I# “ V. 

’ J ■“ '* 1 * • • 0 . 

\ .. k ?■ ■ »: n* 
■4.’: r?:. •:.* 

rr\ 

i* ... t.- 

’» * ''i\ 

- . f." *i 

*¥i '■ /:<• 

.1 ■ •: 7 > ! 

• - H J' 

\i * '!? ,i. 

«: . • * H, 

f ■: f 1 r ' A ■ "■ 

. .*■ * i *i 

} ft 

■ * * , ■ • <• ■ 

t ;■? - 1 - I - - 

4 4 , ■ • ■ V ■ f 

*■ •* % ,i: >,) 

- 1 ' . \ v: 

i* *' ‘j.T’ 

■ * .% ■ i ■• 

■ ■ •; 

. • - . . ■ . !■ 
m i. n 1 

■ < • I . H 

i p ■ _i‘ v* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 


Page 15 


Mm»flo!ttWivPO Ml F* S3M2 II 

m Afl C Futures Fund Lid J 

ill ABC Womte Fund (E.OJ 


ffrABCGIoteJ R«owt W-J 
jhABCGIoM BowtFd. \ 


w conm*ta sconittv^ . . fi 
it Irons Evm Fund Fl__F| 

* Tram Europe Fund J s ■ 

# Alima . FI 

AIN AMRO FOM! 

nit Jewi MonneL Lirl 3&4M4U20 


* ’:*■ -*? ! ?r. p 

#i- '■ t- i. 

i • c , i ■ ■ Vi f. 


'Vt 


ft* £ 

F- *® 

V 

J- 

r:$ 

lie !} 

!S 

* 

* * v 


i* .* 

Br ■? 

k:' * 


» i ■ . ■ 

e 4 . . 

♦ r' . .. 'V A 


t i 

^ " V 

■ 4 t 


** - : 

s 1 I ■ 

1 ■ : 
■ ■ • 

■ 4 

• 1 ■" H 


r- ^ '■ 

■ ^ 

■'i Y-t'. 

. ■ 

i • t 

;v : >:i 

■ - i . i 

" i ■ i 

' . ; i' 

i* '< , 

l » 


. " < : - 

V 1 1 

i- . I. <.» 

: ' : . :■ 1 

. . % *. 


•\ . 


r". r *z 




.. . f O B . 

I • «•' . 


•4 ‘ 


;S j 

i j* £ 


k i > ' p} i jlf >; | 




ALPHA FUND MAHAMMENTb LTD 
48 Pnr-UhVWe Ra Homiiftn. HMI1 Be 
ir Alpha Atio Hedpt (Aug 31) A 
n Alpha Earoa# Rd (July 31>_£cu 
m Alpha Fi/ttms Fd UMirtDA 
m AMa GW Prp Trod Jul 3U 
M Alpha GMwi Rf umy tl)-s 
ai Alpha hMoo Fd (July 31 ) _s 
mAJpna Japan Skc (Apt mjjs 
in AW» Laftn Anw IJaiY 31 J S 
M Alpha Pacific Fd Uuf 3T)^JS 

m Alpha SAAL- s 

cnAtaba Short Fd I July 31! S 

m Alpha Sw-T Fix inc/Jul 31-S 
in Alpha nwott Fd LM 311 -A 
in Aloha Wart Mo gtan (Jut 311 3 
w BCO/AWw Gr HtdOt Jul 31 s 
IV BCO/AMKJ Mtt hind JidTIS 
in BUdwAMha EurHdo M 31 .Ecu 
mCmoat Aston Hedse Jut 31 3 
mGWxiJy*aJ Value (AuoJi) j 

w HeW Japan Fwa, y 

m Hemisphere NeutiuJ Jvhr 31S 

m Lof Unreal Value [M 311 S 

mNldiAPpl AureUa 1 Jul 31 1 S 
mPod f RIM Op p BVI Aub »j 
mRtooom uni Fund/jutv 3U 

D35aps run Fd rJufrlfl s 

mSaUflfrm Fd LhiJIl 1 

ASRAL ASSOCIATES LTD 
ir AfTOl American Quort F«L_S 
w Airgl Asian Funrt.. .1 

vArrofl Jrtfl Hedoe Fund _S 

ATLAS CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LI 
pr AhOS GtOtMd Fd S 

BAIIr12PlaotVefldoai&7S8tT Parts 
m InTermarkcf ^ * 

/ ademftl Convert ftrft FF 















£ r 



INTER STRAY EOT E 

wAoshnaHe^, A 

iv Fmnffl - - 

nr Europe da NonJ 

w Europe dt Ctnh T PM 

pr Europe da Su d - . . — Fen 



| M 'J 
hi ill 
bd 

h ►rv'j 

L~] [ w] 

|IQ 

l.-l ;] 


1 I’" * 1 

ir.vi 

f i'- ►, A 

1 In p 

llK'll 



t - misquoted wteTiwirt 


fit-fttK 1 - 0 Offer Price IncL 3% pre&n. charge; • - P»is «Sunge;-K- Amsterdam atchange; 
of Ud and offered price. E: esthnated price; y: price caailated2 days prior to pubneation; r. bid price. 




For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33, 






'■f * 


fi .* 


Attend this major 
international conference to 
meet and question the region s 
key decision-makers. 


THE MIDDLE EAST £i 
EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN 

ASTIR PALACE HOTEL, VOULIAGMENI, NEAR ATHENS 
_ 10-11 OCTOBER, 1994 /SD* 

Hcralb^Eribunc CT 


FOR FURTHER DETAILS 
PLEASE CONTACT: 

Fiona Cowan. International 1 1 era id Tribune 
63 Ij-rng Acre. London WCJK'J.IM, UK 

Tel: (-JH / 1 ) 836 w,S0L J 
Fax: HH 71 ) 83(i U7I7 






MM 




















































Pag® 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1994 


SPORTS 




Macedonia Ties 


Mighty Danes 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

Macedonia, playing its first 
match in a raqjor international 
soccer competition, stunned de- 
fending champion Denmark 
with an early goal Wednesday 
and held on for a 1-1 draw in 
qualifying for the 1996 Europe- 
an Champion ship 
Only a desperation goal from 
Borussia Dortmund striker 
Flemming Povlsen with three 
minutes to play kept the team 
from the former Yugoslav re- 

E ublic from pulling one of the 
_ iggest upsets in Euro qualify- 
ing history. 

“We never managed to get 
enough chances to scorer said 
the Danish coach, Richard 
Moller Nielsen. “They were 
fast, sure and very aggressive. 
And I .want to compliment 
them." 

Denmark, which has a histo- 
ry of stru ggling against weaker 
teams, opened the defense of its 
title with lackluster play and 
errant passes — even after Mac- 
edonia was reduced to JO men 
when Inter Milan striker Darko 
Pancev was sent off with a red 
card for elbowing in the 46th 
minute. 

“We played well, even 
though we are an inexperienced 
team,” Macedonian coach Ari- 
el on Doncerslri said H i wonder 


Djurovskd nearly made it 2-0 in 
the eighth. 

/n other matches played 
Wednesday: 

Group 1 

France 0, Slovakia 0: A 
floodlight failure during the 
first half in Bratislava blacked 
out the game for 20 minutes, 
and the lights partially failed in 
the second, but the teams com- 
pleted the match, playing to a 


goalless draw, 


what would have happened If 
Pancev wasn't sent off. 


Defender Mitko Siojkovski, 
who plays for Red Star Bel- 
grade, put Lhe home team ahead 
m the fourth minute and Bosko 


Romania 3, Azerbaijan 0: In 
Bucharest, Miodrag Belodedid. 
scored in the 43d minute, Dan 
Petrescu in the 58th and Florin 
Raducioiu in the 87ih against 
newcomer Azerbaijan. 

Group 2 

Belgium 2, Armenia 0: Bel- 
gium started its qualifying cam- 
paign well at home with a early 
goal from striker Luis Oliveira. 
But after the initial burst the 
Belgians lost their way in the 
face of gritty resistance from 
Armenia, which was making its 
debut in major international 
competition. Marc Degryse 
scored the second goal in the 
73d minute. 

Spain 2, Cyprus 1: In Limas- 
sol, Fr&ncicso Higuera got 
Spain off to a good start with 
goals in the 18 th and 26th min- 
utes before Andros Sotirou got 
the home team on the board in 
the 37th minute. 

Group 3 

Hungary 2, Turkey 2: Jozsef 
Kiprich scored in the 5th min- 
ute and Gabor Halmai in the 
45th for Hungary, playing in 



English, Avenge 


(h 


Defeat by U.S. 



* ■*** 

*sS i ~- 


By Ian Thomsen 

Intenatiimal Herald Tribune 


Rutan Spncfa'Rcuien 

Anton Polster, right, battling defender Patrick Hefti, scored three times during Austria's 4-0 victory’ in Liechtenstein. 


Budapest. Turkey evened it up 
with goals by Sukur Hakan in 
the 66th and Korkmaz Bulent 
in the 71st. 

Group 4 

Italy 1, Slovenia 1: The de- 
feated World Cup finalists, 
playing without the injured Ro- 
berto Baggio, were fortunate to 
escape with a 1-1 draw against 
an inspired Slovenia, playing its 
first competitive international 
in Maribor. Striker Saso Udo- 
vic had given Slovenia a 13th 
minute lead but Alessandro 
Costacurta tied the score two 
minutes later. 

Lithuania 2, Ukraine (k The 
prize of a luxury car, offered by 
a local sponsor to the first 
Ukrainian scorer, failed to help 


the home team at Kiev. Imantis 
Shtumbris, in the 54th minute, 
and Aurelthis Shkarbelius, in 
the 61st, accounted for the 
goals. 

Group 5 

Netherlands 4, Luxembourg 
0: The visiting Dutch t eam took 
a 1-0 lead at halftime and went 
on to score three more goals in 
the second half to top Luxem- 
bourg. Ronald de Boer scored 
two goals and Bryan Roy and 
Wim Jonk had one each. 

Norway 1, Belarus 0: In Oslo, 
Geir Frigaard scored in the 
88th minute as the Norwegians 
edged Belarus. Frigaard, a 70th 
minute replacement, headed 
home a pass from Kjetil Rek- 
daL 


Group 6 

Portugal 2, Northern Ireland 
1: In Belfast, Jodo Costa led off 
the scoring with a goal in the 
Sth minute. Jimmy Quinn tied 
the game in the 58th minute on 
a penalty shot, then Domingos 
Oliveira put Portugal ahead in 
the 8 1st minute. 


Ireland 3, Latvia 0: In Riga, 
John Aldridge scored in the 
16th min ute, then again in the 
75th on a penalty after John 
Sheridan got a goal for Ireland 
in the 29th minute. 

Austria 4, Liechtenstein 0: At 
Esc hen, Liechtenstein, Anton 
Polster got a hat trick and 
Franz Aigner added another 
goal as Liechtenstein fell to 0-2 


m its European Championship 
qualifying debut. 

Group 7 

Wales 2, Albania 0: In Car- 
diff, Chris Coleman and Ryan 
Giggs scored for the winners. 

Moldova 1, Georgia 0: Igor 
Oprya scored the only goal in 
the 40th minute in front of 
40,000 at Tbilisi's National Sta- 
dium. 

Group 8 

Greece 5, Faeroe Islands 1: 
Visiting Greece got off to a fly- 
ing start, winning by four goals 
in Toftir. 

Scotland 2, Finland 0: In Hel- 
sinki, Duncan Shearer and John 
Collins scored in each half. 


(AP, Reuters) 


WEMBLEY, England — 
Much has changed since the 
United States last met and beat 
England. The Americans made 
their names in the World Cup, 
reaching the Final 16, while the 
Fngiish sat home watching. It 
has to be said, however, that the 
interim 15 months has most 
helped — England. 

The mother country of soccer 
beat back its aggrandizing colo- 
nists by 2-0 Wednesday night 
It took Alan Shearer all of 40 
minutes to reverse score of the 
2-0 victoiy in that 1993 Boston 
friendly match. 

Having lived up to the de- 
mands placed on them as host 
of the world Cup, the Ameri- 
cans were rewarded with an in- 
vitation to play here for the first 
time, in the cradle of the game. 
It was their first international 
match as well since the July 4 
stalling of Brazil at San Fran- 
cisco, but within a half-hour the 
celebrating had been overtaken 
by the panic of having to make 
payments in this utterly new 
and glamorous neighborhood 

As fate would have it. Shear- 
er’s victim was the red-goateed 
American who cashed in most 
from last summer. How Alexi 
Lai as reacts to his hard intro- 
duction to the real world win 
tell a lot about the imm ediate 
future for soccer in his country. 

In becoming the rim from 
the United States to reach the 


Italian S«ie A, he suffered a 5-0 * 
defeat with Padua against.: 
Sampdoria (and David Platt, < 
the English captain); ty half- _ 
time here, the happy star of last , 
summer was facing a roasting - 
from the British press —when, 
really, everything that has be-; 
come of both teams is a funo-;» 
don of that upset 15 months 
ago. The England of 1993 never > 
could have focused so much-; 
trouble on Lalas. ? 

For England to reform as the 
att acking , inventive te am or - -? 
chestrated Wednesday by Terry * 
Venables — now undefeated 
and unscored on in four games | 
as manager— it seems that the,, 
failure to qualify and the Azner- j 
lean loss had to happen first. ^ 

With a new appreciation fodb, 1 
the experience that separates 
these two nations, the E ng l is h- 


t 

■ A. 




‘ 9* 

w 


>■ 




4 ***> ■ * 

Vi* 


- ■* 


. T"a»» 


built patiently, assuredly, with ] 
the opening minutes belonging . 


me opei 
to John Barnes. 

His personal booing had 
been a sad anthem of manag er i 
Graham Taylor’s tenure; now 
30 and in a new position just , 
behind the front line, he worv 
cheers with signature invert- 1 
dons like his chip over the top ^ 
t ea singly just beyond Platt. 

Whereas the English used to ' 
fret over every wasted chance,, 
they learn from it now: Shears- \ 
just wide from inside the box, 
his striking partner, Teddy" 
Sheringham, whacking a shot 
off of goalkeeper Brad Friedel, j 
and die on-charging Plait pick- * 
mg Thomas Dooley’s pocket to _ 


. *- J 


- 




\. 


51 DELI 


\ W liitr 


FIA Clears Benetton, 


SCOREBOARD 


set up Sheringham's shot de- 
iust wide. 


But Not Schumacher 


SS22P a 


Japanese Leagues 


Central Lea 9uo 


Compiled Ay Our Staff fr • . J,. patches 

PARIS — Benetton, the lead- 
ing Formula One motor racing 
team, escaped punishment 
Wednesday for tampering with 
refueling equipment but did not 
get the disqualification of driv- 
er Michael Schumacher over- 
turned. 


Schumacher won the race, 
but afterward it was found that 
the skid-block under his car — 
a speed-reduction device intro- 
duced midway through the sea- 
son — did not meet FIA specifi- 
cations. 


Yomlurl 

Hiroshima 

Oiunlchl 

HanShln 

Yofcolt 

Yofcfihora 


W 

63 

59 

57 

58 
52 
51 


L 

52 

55 

56 

57 
59 
61 


T 

0 

0 

D 

0 

0 

0 


Pci. OB 


518 

-504 

504 

.463 

ASS 


3 Vs 
5 
5 
9 

lQVz 


Wednesday* 
Yokohama Z Yomlurl 1 
Hanshln 7, Hiroshima l 

Padfic League 


Results 


Women's Similes 
QnrMMls 

Arantxa Sanchez VI carlo (2), Spain, def, 
Kimlfco Date (5), Japan. M. 6-0; Gabrteia 
Matin! (B>. Argentina, dot. Glel Fernandez. 
U.S* 6-2. 7-5. 1 

Doubles 
Qoarierflnota 

Katarina Maleeva Bulgaria and Rabin 
White. U5. dvf. Nicole Broatke. Australia 
and EJna Rglnadi# South Africa 64, 6-1 ; 
Larisa Naflond. Latvia and Gabrleta Sabots 
m. Argentina (10). del. Patty Fondle*# U.S., 
and Meredith McGrath. Midland# Mich. (3M- 
6. 7-6 (7-5). 6-4. 


The International Automo- 
bile Federation ruled that Ben- 
etton had made an “honest mis- 
take" in removing a filter from 
its pit crew’s refueling device at 
July's German Grand Prix, 
where a flash fire engulfed the 
car of Jos Verstappen. 

“We had no evidence to sug- 
gest they had deliberately done 
something to earn an advan- 
tage," said FIA's president. 
Max Mosley. 

Benetton said the refueling 
pump manufacturer, lntertectn 
nique. had given instructions to 
another team on how to remove 
the filter and it was considered 
part of the process. 

But FIA’s world council re- 
jected Benetton's appeal con- 
cerning the disqualification of 
Schumacher’s car at tbe Belgian 
Grand Prix last month. 


Last week Schumacher lost 
an appeal for ignoring a black 
flag at the British Grand Prix 
and is suspended two races. 


Stfbu 
Kintetsu 
Orix 
Date I 
Lotte 

Nippon Ham 


w 

65 

tfl 

60 

59 

47 

41 


L 

48 

49 
49 
53 
65 
69 


T 

0 

2 

2 

1 

1 

4 


Pet. 

575 

555 

550 

527 

420 

573 


GO 



Tfl 

3 

5W 

17Vi 

22V* 


INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLY 
Switzerland 1. United Arab Emirates 0 


He leads the standings by 
21 points over Britain's Da- 
mon Hill. But Hill can close 
the gap to one point if he wins 
the two races — this Sunday's 
Italian Grand Prix and the 
Portuguese Grand Prix on 
Sept. 25 — that Schumacher 
will i 


Wednesday's Results 
Stffbu 5w Nippon Ham 2 
uotte X Kimelsu 2 
Date! &. Orix 2 



U.S. Open 


ONE DAY INTERNATIONAL 
Australia vs. Pakistan 
Wednesday, In Colombo 
Australia innings; 179-7 <50 overs) 
Pakistan innings: 151-9 (50 overs) 
Result: Australia wins by 28 runs 




miss. 


In another decision 
Wednesday, McLaren was 
fined S 100,000 for not provid- 
ing the access codes to its 
computer software but was 
not penalized for a gear-box 
infraction. 

FIA said there are many in- 
terpretations of the new rules 
and McLaren’s explanation 
showed it was not trying to de- 
ceive. (AP, Reuters) 


Mnl Shnries 
Fourth Round 

Jonas B lor lemon. Sweden, dot. Joam Ren- 
zfnbrtnk, Germany, 3-fc 6-3. 6-2. 6-7 (3-71,6-3; 
Karol Novacek. Czech Republic, del. Javier 
Frana Argentina, 6*3, 6-3- 6-7 (3-7). 6-3; Jaime 
Y^oga Pent, def. Pete Sempra* (0,U5« 3-6,6- 

14-6.74 (74). 7-5; Michael SlkJi (4), Gonna- 
ny, dor. Yevgeny KoteJnflcov, Russia, 7-6 (70- 
8). 6-X 6-2. 

Doable* 

Quarterfinals 

Wayne Ferreira. South Africa, ana Mark 
Knowles. Bahama* (16). del. Tom Nitssen. 
Netherlands, and Cvrii Suk. Czech Republic 
IB)# 64; Todd Woodbrldge and Mark 
Wbodforde. Australia (4). del. Marlin Da mm 
CM Karel Novocefc, Czech Republic (12). 64 
7-6 17-5); joeco Ettlngh and Paul Hoarhuis. 
Netherlands (3).def. David Adams. Australia; 
and Andrei (Mhovskly, Russia (5) ,7-6 (9-71.5-7, 
7-6 (7-3). 


freestyle relay: 1, Sweden (Chrlster 
Waller, Tommy Werner, Lars Fnokmder. An- 
ders Holmertz). 7:1754; Z Russia (Yurt Muk- 
Wb Vladimir Pvofinenho. Denis Pankratov, 
Roman Tchegdev). 7:18.13; 3, Germany ( An- 
dreas Szlgat. Christian Keller. Oliver Lampe; 
Steffen ZesnerL 7:19.10; 4r United Stales 
(Chad Garvin, Uaur Toner. Chrh Eekerman, 
Josh Dovfs). 7:1954. 

5. Australia (Daniel Kowalski. Matthew 
Dunn, Gisn Hausman# KJersn Perkins), 
7:20SA; A Italy (Pier Mario Sid liana Emon- 
uete idlrti, Massimo Trsvtsan. Alessandro 
Bert I). 7:2206; 7. Now Zealand (Trent Brav, 
Craig Font Guy GaHaghan. Dmran Loader), 
7 : 25-35; 8. Frtmce f Chrtstupne Marchani, Fre- 
deric LePevre. Thierry LeLeucIi, Lionel 
Polral). 7:2169. 

Vfevnee 

2M freestyle: 1, FranzJsko Van Almsick. 
Germany, 1 :SUX Helfce Frtedrkh, East Ger- 
many; 2. Lu Bln, China 15659; 3, Ctaudio 
PalLCosta Rica 1:5741; 4, Crlsfflno Teuscher, 
U5L2: 00.18; & NFcofe Molsletf. UJX. 2:0050; 6. 
Susan 0*14011 1, Australia 2:0062; 7, Le Ylns. 
China 2:0045; X Metle Jacobsen. Denmark. 
2:0157. 

200 breast st roke: 1, Samantha Rllev. Aus- 
lrana2^657; 2. Yuan Yuaa China 2^758; 3. 
Brlgltta Becue. Belgium. 2:2855. A Rebecca 
Brown. Australia 2:2857; 5. Dal Guohong. 
China 2:2893; 6. Kristine Quonce. U5- 
2:2944; 7, Guvtalne Cloutier, Canada 2:3048 
41 Hltoml Motfiara Japan, 2:3151 

wafer Polo 



BASEBALL 
American League 
TORONTO— Signed Andrew 
shortstop. 


Thompson, 


Nattoml League 

CHICAGO— Extemted the agreement with 
Daytona PSL tor 4 years. 

SAN Dl EGO— canceled the pFaysr develop- 
ment contract with Wichita Tl_ 

ST. LOUIS— Renewed agreements with 
Louisville. AA; St. Petersburg, PSL; Savan- 
nah, SAL; and New Jersey, NY-Peim League. 


BUFFALO Agreed to terms with Pat Lo- 
Fontalna center, an 5- year contract. 

DETROIT— Stated Yon Golubovsky, de- 
fenseman, to multiyear contract. 

EDMONTON— Signed Bill R o n ford goal- 
tender, la 1-year contract. Agreed to terms 

with Luke Rfcferdsaa defenseman, on 2-year 
contract. 

LOS ANGELEMtaned Rob Bloke, de- 
fenseman, to 4-year contract. 

N.Y. RANGERS— Signed Mark Osborne, 
left wins. 

PHILADELPHIA— Traded the right* fa Al- 
exander Sell vmvav. right wing, to Tampa Bay 
tor a 1995 fourth-round draft choice. 


fleeted just wiae. 

With the English drum beat- 
ing louder and faster with each' 
run, tbe Americans were miss- -, 
ing their midfielder John* 
Harkes. out with a tom calf. 

Not only does he know these . 
opponents from the EngiBsh 

emi 


BASKETBALL 

Holtenol B a s k e tb all Association 
DALLAS— signed Jason Kidd, guard, to *- 
year contract. 

DENVER — 5 toned Darnell Mee. guard. and 
Regule Slater, forward. 

MINNESOTA— Named Mike SehuJer assis- 
tant coach. 


World Swim Championships 


Swimming 

Hurts 

Men 

IPS bu tt er fly: 1, Ratal Szufcnfa. Poland, 5151 
seconds; 2. Lor* Frofander, Sweden, 5345; 3, 
Denis P an krofov , Russia# 5358; 4, Milos Milo- 
sevic. Croatia, 5354; x Mark Henderson, U5* 
53.95; 6b Franck Esposlla France. 54.16; 7, 
Anthony Nesty. Surinam. 5426; 8. Denlslav 
Kaldiev. Buloorfla, 5440. 

mindlvfdaal medler: l.Tqm Dolan, United 
Stores 4 minutes. 1250 seconds; 2# Jan! Ste- 
vlnen. Ftataia 4:1329; 1 Eric Namesnfk, 
U5-4 : 1549; K Curtis Mvden, Canoda.4 : 1 7.93; 
1 Mardn MallnsM, Poland, 4:1948; 6, Luca 
Socchl, ltalv.4 :2053; 7. PWHo Bryant, Austra- 
lia 4 : 21 J8; 8, Robert SOI bt, Germany, 4 : 22.97. 


Q uu rter n iiqi* 
Spain 16. Netherlands 7 
Croatia 9, United Slates 7 
Hungary 11, Greece 6 
Italy 7, Russia 6 

Consolation Round 
South A/rfco ID, Canada 5 
Romania 7, Australia 5 
Germany 1% New Zealand 2 
Cuba 5, Kazakhstan 4 


FOOTBALL 

Nattanrt FoatbaU League 

ARIZONA— Signed Jay Schroeder .quarter- 
back. Waived Shawn Moore. Quarterback. Cut 
Perry Carter, cornet-back, from the practice 

DALLAS— Wdlved Lincoln Coleman, run- 
ning bock. 

DENVER— Signed Brett Wallerstodt, fine- 
backer, waived Gfenell Sanders, llnebedter 

INDIANAPOLIS— Signed Barry Wagner, 
wide receiver, to the practice 

L-A» RAMS— Waived Todd Klnchen, wide 
receiver. 

SAN FRAN SI SCO— Waived Rhett Ha II, de- 
fensive lineman. 

MINNESOTA— Signed Soon Salisbury# 
quarterback, Wohred Andre Ware, quarter- 
back. 


women 

Preliminary Round 
Australia 12, Kazakhstan 4 
Italy 16# Germany 7 
Canada France 5 
Australia IX New Zealand 4 
Russia 11, Brazil 6 
Germany % Kazakhstan 5 
Netherlands 10# Hungary 8 
Italy 7# United State* 7 


WASHINGTON— Placed Keith Taylor, 
safety, an the littered Usf far the remainder of 
the season. Signed Leslie Shephard, wide re- 
cel wr. Added Sebastian Savooe. safety, to tae 
practice SQuad. Released Dan Onev# tight 
encL Claimed Leslie Shephard, wide receiver, 
off waivers from Pittsburgh. 

HOCKEY 

National Hockey League 
BOSTON— Agreed to terms with Com Nee- 
ly. right wing# an 1-Year contract. 


COLLEGE 

AUBURN— Named Kim Davis women's 
golf coach. 

DENVER— Named Greg Dreehsel and 
Steve Miller assistant hockey c o a d ie6. 

GEORGIA— Announced Sterling Boyd.loU- 
bock, has decided to leave the team and trans- 
fer. 

MIAMI— Announced I hat Oirfs Wntai 
sophomore quarterback, has withdrawn from 
the school. 

NOTRE DAME— Named Brian O'Connor 
asafcrtortf baseball coach. 

NAVY— Fired Greg B liner quarterbacks 
coach. 

PEPPERDINE— Named David Rhoades 
assistant baseball coach; Gar! Strong men* 
o sslstont basketball coach; Richard Gal lien 
assistant tennis coach; and Thn Ward wom- 
an's assistant soccer coartv 

SAN DIEGO— Announced the resignation of 
Hank Egan, men 1 * basketball coach. Named 
Randy Connell acting men's basketball 
coodt. 

SAN DIEGO STATE— Fred Milter. atWetfc 
director, will retire effective December 31. 

5E MISSOURI— Named Scott McGowan 
man 1 * assistant basketball coach. 

SOUTHERN CAL— Jim Bush, men's track 
coach, restawd. Named Ron Aliloe director of 
men's and women's Iradfc program. 

TENNESSEE STATE— Named Howard 
Gentry Jr. athletic director. 

TEXAS— ^Suspended Lovell Pinkney and 
Mike Adams, wide receivers# T gome for vfo- 
kzUng NCAA* amateurism rule. 

TEXAS SOUTHERN— Bill Thomas, foot- 
ball coach, has been named athletic director. 

UN LV— Announced Dennis Jordan, basket- 
ball center, and Brian Hocevar. forward# will 
not enroll for the upcoming semester. 


League, but his absolute rehisal * 
to lapse into a defensive mind-, 
set could have helped the Amer- 
icans counterattack. As it was^r 
they were almost as passive here j 
as m their previous loss to Bra-' 
zUL. and it’s no coincidence that ‘ 
Harkes missed that game, too. 

Ominously, then. Shearer' 
nudged wide to Sheringham for 
a shot saved by Friedel, who, by. , 
the way, appeared to disprove 
the English players’ union, 
which has deep-sixed his work- 
ing papers with Newcastle for 
fear that he isn't up to a high 
enough standard. 

Moments later, in the 33d 
minute. Shearer returned down 
the right side into the box, 
where Lalas backed off just a 
step. Shearer attacked the space 
and jammed his fourth interna- 
tional goal inside the near post* „ 


! f-r ih** 


■-L ±J**ta* 


through a slot hardly bigger 5 


than the ball itself. 

Seven minutes later, he came j 
back for a cross from Graeme ; 
Le Saux. Lalas backed off, on- j 
able to anticipate Shearer’s div- j 
ing header, and England’s best , 
played it 90 degrees inside the • 
near post, with no hope for ; 
Fried eL As far as England was 
concerned, back to normal 


* 






"X 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



HERE, I 3R0USHT YOUR 
LUNCH 3A6 FOR YOU 


«.* ■*- 




9-6 




r 


IN IT? 





nte FENSU5S SfWEMAKSREfl 
IS EBNG PURSUED ACROSS 
THE GWJWf ^ OREMJSb 
SQMBEINSS.' 



TffifRE GNH 1 NS.' SPIFFS 
CWU QUsNCE TDVOSETVCM 
\s to release, a. gvaht 
smoke aa» behw vis 
SitaxMPc: aje hero 
TUCSlrtS WE LEVER./ 


HBtUBUJUST 
UH, CLAPPING 
THE ERASERS, 
HEH MEN. 
Ccowsh) 




W ftfiWN? ] 4 SKSWHH+ 1 
I OHTBQieff 


qs W3TS<EN 

83o 'cr. 



=*N „ . 



GARFIELD 


w 

v a 


j . 
► - 




# WHAT DU) T0U USE 'ttXJR VCR FOR BEFORE 
THERE WAS TELEVISION, toRAUPA 



I HUT SCRAMHM9 WORD QAM 




lo fra | m 


DOLDY 

m 


TRAPSY 


nrrr 

Ll_ 



NO, iT'S 
JUST RIGHT 





WIZARD of ID 


paw-i c».fi 




WAtfJW £ 


$1 AfFA It? ro\i Ate 

a/ef-quAuriep 


BEETLE BAILEY 





J 4 






/5|W gK 


PORTSY 

rm 


-i | w 

J I Nm am 
n I s SR 


WHftT THE ITOfrv 
^DRTOTOK EXPERT 
Y &5 KNOWN A*. 


by (ho i 


^. unmuna 





YOU'RE FI&HT. 
HE HAS A 
PgFfNlTE 
PROBLEM WITH 
SELF-ESTEEM 


THE FAR SIDE 


BLONDIE 


juoMK lOPY ORZF MCBY DUFtfX 
Aim**- rtm uuuiuuw mniibii wtttoma w pm 


DOONESBURY 


SOWHAr well I 
„ . AuaSiO/ atonEP 
| } 00OSEUHL- AQUAUTf 
BEESON? BOXXnON. 
SSL, 


Bed Estate Marketplace 


Every Friday 
Lcntocr tree Konan 

Td.: {33 1)46379391 
Fcdc ( 33 1)^6379373 
or jour nearest IHT office 
or raprasanlaiwB 



l&Btr TO A SBf-eStSlA 
AOVBWM CMfCKNtA, 
ANPFRAmf. I MAS A 
tmiEWDS&HAlLBtiB?-. 

\ 



IftGUF&rrmSTlMBTU 
fVSHmS Bfj RNP ANBJrS. 
H&wmmmmcctiBse 

WB&ZeOWeSEM& PUBr 
SURWfACABmiCiraBteStB! 


m 


h 



use 

towr? 

/ 


AELLIME. 
ZHtlBBUY 
entassTB? 
*it£Am JUS 
HCWTOFSap. 




"Whoa wtioa nhoal ...You’D lave logo 
bade and wplkthnuohagain.- 


last wwth was the sesri 

ONE IN THE HISTORY OF 
THE JrC. WTHERS 
COW.PANV 



AND TOU'SE THE ONES WO 
DID IT/ YOU AND YOU AND 
NCU/ 



AND YOU'LL ALL K IN MY 
FONDESr THCXJSWS... 



WHILE I'M ON VACATION 
IN HAWAII 





*» 






Z*. . 




> . 


lfti ft * 




A .. 


‘W» 





































* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 8. 1994 


SPORTS 


Pape IT 


1WMM' 



n ♦ ki' n 


Did Gw* 




MAYFAIR INTL 


QBCV A • GLAMOUR • HUBS M 
BASEL •Csoort Agency* 02Z/3A6 58 IP 


JMMUUUA Bean * cuob 


uXm M WI R7 47R MOTZWW 


LONDON 

PLEASE PHONE 071 225 3314 


SWITZERLAND - PARS ~ YBWA AR8T0CAI5 ESCORT 5HVTCE 
Eamrt, Tranl £ Business Sense. '* ™ " 

Swtacrfand +41 B 77 72 72 30 

PWZUHOPVBMA'PRAGLff 
SIPKMf BCW WTHJNATONAL 
Crf View* M3 I] 532 II 32. 


1 Si Mdtvh note, London W2 

TctOT-flg 55*4 

VIENNA *MfBS 'MYIBM 'ZURICH 
EUTOCONTACT Ml Eiewt t TrovcL 
Service. Cd Vienna + 0-1 310 65 If. 


Tel 0330 3*2567 


• 0 FRANKFUBT 00 

WGHUGWT INTL ESCORT SERVICE. 

please Call otf ■ b 88 m 

FRANKFURT KQiN DUSSHOORF 

all arm, &®r» Saraw. 

0SfJ73?M 


Deieb F® Ireland, +353-51 


NEXT SPECIAL HEADING 






.*■ 

4* 




ro OUR READERS IN FRANCI 

It's never been easier to subscribe 
and save with our new toll free service. 
Just call us today at 05 437 437. 



will appear on September 23. 

For information, cnnian vmir loml ll|T 

rr|iri'*r-iitafi*«.' »r in l^irU: 

Tel.: 16 37 93 35 - Fas: M 37 93 70 


Meuawi tAJJPXM. & Go 
RNANQAL INSTITUTION 
fimaab - BttCWiW 

hformoron by fa» 22-2 534 02 77 
or 32-2-538 47 51 
TELDt 30277 


COftfffiMABLE DRAFTS 
BAOCB>BYCASH 

- Issued in Yout Nwt 
i * C&tfrnwd by Maty btfl Berli 
tD Prove A*dobny of Funds 
■ Bociud by fri vote tovoston 

88 CAPITAL SUPPORT COUP. 

Ui 1 7 14} 737.1070 fox 737-1270 


EUROPE 

FRANCE |HQ|: Pons, 

76L. [I] 4* 37 93 85. 
fm.(l)J637937a 

GStMANY AUSnaA4C&llRM 
EUROPE: FraJAn 
«.. {069) 72 67 55 
f«.pd9l7273 10. 

SMTZB&AM): PkAr. 

Tel. (021 1728 3021 
far ICC 11 728 30 9 1 

Ut€IH) KNGQOM: London, 
hi 1071)836 «J2. 

Tele. 2020OT 
fa..|0H|2£022ii 


PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED AD? 

ROPE NORTH AMERICA 

** NEWTWfc 

T«L (2121752 3MU 

7 93 7a Tql Fw 1800; 57J-72I2 

a*®"“ MSrSww 

17310 AHA/PACWC 

.j, NONGKONCk 

U.flHiTCMItt 
SnSo, TeW 61ITO IHTHX. 

Fat f852J9772-MW 

M: tendon, SNGAPQKfc 

14 4802. Td. : 723 4470 

9 Fat (651724 15*4 

3)2254 Td» 28749 IHTSW 


jtfOe- ■ 

i 


& 
















































Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1994' 


ART BUCHWALD 


The Casino Bonanza 


OJ. Simpson: The New National Pastime 


lyARTHA’S VINEYARD. 
■iVx Massachusetts — Many 
moons ago, long before Bill and 
Hillary discovered Martha's 
Vineyard, and when you could 
still find a parking place in Ed- 
gartown, there lived a tribe of 
Indians at Gay Head called the 
Wampanoag. They were happy 
because they never had to worry 
about a ferry reservation or their 
USAir Express to Boston being 
canceled. 


their property. Nothing 


changed^until the day a man 


the 


Then 

white man 
came and start- 
ed taking all 
the land. What 
they didn't 
take they 
bought be- 
cause, as ihey 

explained to 
the Indians, 
they needed 
second homes in tbe summer- 



time to rest after dumping tea 
into Boston Harbor. 

The Indian land on the island 
and Cape Cod shrank and 
shrank until there was hardly 
enough left for a lobster clam- 
bake. The Wampanoag h ad no 
choice but to drive tourist buses 
and sell postcards showing tbe 
cliffs at Gay Head. 

Hundreds of Indian summers 
went by, and all the Hnw the 
tribe prayed that their land 
would be returned to them. 
When their prayers weren’t an- 
swered, they hired high-priced 
Washington lawyers to sue the 
United States for the return of 


wearing a painted vest and a 
black derby rolled into Gay 
Head in a brand-new Ferrari 
with Las Vegas license plates 
and said. “I have a proposition 
for you. I can get you bade your 
land and a lot more, without 
firing a single shot” 

The man took a deck of cards 
out of his pocket and shuffled 
them. “You're gang to learn to 
play blackjack, and because 
you're going to own the gam- 
bling casino, you'll always win." 

Then he took out a pair of 
dice. “The white man goes crazy 
when he sees a pair of dice and 
thinks he can roil any number 
he wants to. Now, pay atten- 
tion: Do you know what the 
payoff is on a slot machine? The 
casino owner gets 98 percent 
and tbe person pulling the lever 
gets 2. There are millions of 
dollars in these three dungs.” 

“How does that get us our 
land back?” 

“With the money you win 
from them in the casino, you 
can buy you r land back.” 

“If we open a casino, will 
Barbra Streisand sing in it?” 

“Sing in it? With the money 
you offer her, she'U wait on ta- 
bles if you ask her to.” 

And so it was. By the f ull 
moon of 1999, all of Massachu- 
setts was once ayi™ owned by 
the Wampanoag, and only the 
white man was selling picture 
postcards of the cliffs and driv- 
ing tourist buses to Gay Head. 


By Howard Kurtz 

Washington Past Service 

W ASHINGTON — “It seems 
dear,” says “A Current Affair” 
“that O. J.’s defense team is in fact 
exploring the possibility of blamiqg 
the murders on Nicole's drug use, 
claiming she and Ron Goldman were 
killed by Colombian drug dealers.” 

“The Double Life of O. J. Simp- 
son,” says Newsweek, describing a 
man “who cruised bars and indulged 
in drugs and random sex. His wife 
believed he was a cocaine addict; his 
friends . . . thought his real addict 
don was white women." 


Chung, Opera Settle Dispute 


P 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ARIS — The Paris Op6ra 
and its music director, 
Myung-Whun Chung, ended a 
bitter monthlong dispute 
Wednesday with an agreement 
that will allow Chung to conduct 
the season’s opener. The con- 
ductor would then leave with 
compensatory damages stipulat- 
ed fcy his contract. 

The opera bouse thus agreed 
to drop its appeal of a judge’s 
ruling in favor of Chung. The 
compromise was worked out 


with judges of the appeals court 

Chung was fired Aug. 12 for 
refusing to renegotiate his con- 
tract, which runs to tbe year 
2000. On Aug. 29, a judge or- 
dered the opera to reinstate 
Chung so he could rehearse the 
Sept 19 premiere of Verdi's “Si- 
mon Boccanegra” at tbe Op6ra 
Bastille. A day later, Chung was 
blocked from entering the house. 
The court then fined the opera 
50.000 francs fabout $9,400) a 
day for each day Chung was 
refused rehearsal time. 


“©. J.’s Women: Nobody Could Es- 
cape the Sex-Crazy Star ” says the Na- 
tional Enquirer, quoting “leggy model 
Cheryl Lynn” as saying “O. J. attempt- 
ed to make her his ‘sex slave’ by bribing 
her with a car and piles of cash.” 

The images race by on the screen, 
the headlines shout from the news- 
stand, the conspiracy theories fill the 
talk-radio airwaves. With baseball on 
strike. O. J. has become the new na- 
tional pastime, only with better rat- 
ings. And with Simpson's murder trial 
scheduled to be gin this month, the 
most intensely covered c riminal case 
in modem history is about to become 
an even bigger story. 

“We’ve reached the saturation 
point,” said Greta Van Susteren. who. 
like legions of other lawyers, analyzes 
the case on television. “I’ve heard so 
much I can’t remember what I’ve 
heard. I can’t remember what's true 
and what’s a rumor.” 

Indeed, it now seems that no charge 
against Simpson, now matter how out- 
landish, is off-limits. Many attorneys 
say potential jurors have been influ- 
enced by this journalistic barrage, and 
it is clear that public percepuons of 
the former football star have been 
permanently altered, regardless of the 
trial’s outcome. 

As hundreds of journalists from 
around tbe world head, to Los Angeles 
for a trial that may last until Christ- 
mas, the entire media landscape is 
about to be transformed. 

While the networks will probably 
rely on hourly updates and live cut- 
ins, they are wary of ceding a substan- 
tial trial audience to the CNN and 
Court TV cable networks. NBC is 
considering providing a live daily feed 
from the tnal that local affiliates can 
carry at their discretion. But some 
network executives worry that a West 



yer) to the psychological 
Nicole Simpson' 
stone has been 


Cut to the chase: The great O. J. media frenzy. 


AP: Rcmcn 


left unturned. 

“You have a Lany King show about 
the O. J. judge, the O. J. this, tbe O. J. 
that,” said Steven Brill, president of 
Court TV. “AD that stuff will get to be 
too much, and people may get sick of it 
Can someone explain what ‘Entertain- 
ment Tonight* is doing with O. J.? The 
sole purpose of the show is so when you 
go to a commercial you cao have a 
‘bumper’ showing the car chase.” 

The supermarket tabloids, not sur- 
prisingly, have engaged in a fair 
amount of hype. The Enquirer’s “Se- 
cret Videotape Reveals O. J. KNIFE 
ATTACK.” turned out to be from the 
Simpson TV pilot “Frogmen.” The 
Globe’s “O. J. Talks for First Time!” 
was a report on what he has supposed- 
ly told “prison pal Lyle Menendez.” 
The Enquirer, which lias 20 reporters 
on the story, reported the week after 
the murders that Simpson regularly 
stalked Nicole, that Nicole told Simp- 
son she would never reconcile with 
him and that she went out for ice 
cream on the fateful evening — all 
details that have since surfaced in the 
mainstream press. 


PEOPLE 



Charles h Not Amused 
By Beefcake in BUd 


Coast trial could play havoc with East 
Coast news schedules. 

“A real trial is about as interesting as 
watching paint dry,” said Rkk Kaplan, 
executive producer of ABCs “World 
News Tonight” “I don’t think you can 
allow O. J. coverage to bump out health 
care and all the rest If you start pre- 
empting the news, the only thing that 
happened in the world is O. J.” 

Ed Turner, CNN’s executive vice 
president, says his network will carry 
every minute of the trial. 

“We've found over the years that 
even though there are slow times, 
there is a certain fascination with 
watching a real drama unfold,” be 
said. As for suggestions that CNN is 
exploiting the Simpson case for rat- 
ings. Turner said: “We have paid our 
dues with plenty of Nigerias and So- 
mali as and Bosnias over the years.” 

Court TV’s ratings increased five- 
fold during the preliminary hearing, 
and CNN’s numbers tripled, which is 
why “Larry King Live” has aired 
more than 20 Simpson shows. USA 
Today, which has run more than 300 
stories on the case, has seen its circula- 
tion jump by as much as 150,000 when 
Simpson is on the front page. 


The public fascination with this 
tragedy remains as intense today as 
when Nicole Brown Simpson and 
Ronald L. Goldman were murdered 
on June 12. “You can have a lot of 
complicated theories about it — it’s a 
class thing, it’s a race thing, it’s a 
celebrity thing — but 1 just think it’s a 
great story," said Evan Thomas, 
News week's Washington bureau 
chief. Or as writer John Taylor put it 
in Esquire: “Everyone loves a good 
murder.” 

Lewis H. Lapham, editor of 
Harper’s magazine, has written of 
television’s attempt to elevate the 
saga: “Surely there had to be some- 
flung more to the story, something 
important, for God’s sake, some dvi- 

1 ! J i 


“We’ve been out in front of the 
coverage the whole way,” said David 
Perel, an Enquirer editor. “Any detail 
that gives you more insight into what 
his life was like is relevant and impor- 
tant. It’s one of the greatest celebrity 
stories we’ve ever seen.” 

Moreover, it was Newsweek that 
reported that Simpson allegedly at- 
tended orgies and that Simpson’s fa- 
ther was a homosexual “On this story, 
we’re all tablcrid,” said tbe Scripps- 
H award columnist Martin Schram. 


preji 


message about spot 

nent of women, or 

dice, or the system of criminal justice 
-—something that could be dressed up 
in the costume of an issue.” 

All these elements and more have 
been tossed into the journalistic Cui- 
sinan From Simpson friend Brian 
(Kato) Kaolin to the man who operat- 
ed the camera at the preliminary hear- 
ings, from Simpson girlfriend Paula 
Barbieri (interviewed by Diane Saw- 


The Enquirer, in a piece on “Marda 
Clarfs Tragic Secret Life,” reported 
that the prosecutor’s first husband 
was a professional backgammon play- 
er who was shot in tbe head by his best 
friend (accidentally, it turns out) after 
the couple’s Tijuana, Mexico, divorce. 

Ruth Seymour, general manager of 
KCRW public radio in Los Angeles, 
said she’s had to defend ho- decision 
to intensively cover the Simpson saga. 

“You have listeners who hate this 
story,” she said. “I’ve had people call- 
ing up screaming. There are also jour- 
nalists who hate this story because of 
its sensationalism.” But, she said, “it’s 
about race and sex and class and the 
LAPD and Hollywood — it’s got ev- 
erything.” 


mm 

Prince Charies is said to b&. 
furious over a photograph of 
him nearby nude that was print- 1 
ed Wednesday in the German, 
mass-circulation newspapd? 
Bdd, and royal aides are consnL 
ering what steps to take. The 
picture of Charles, on vacation 
at a French cMteau, with just a 
robe draped over iris shoulder, 
left little to the imagination. 
“You can compare it with the 
David of Michelangelo,” Pnd 
Martin, dowry editor of BDd, 

. , ’■ justifying his 




■ 

4 -• 


. -i'-'P* 



# _j 


decision to publish the photo- 
>h on the front * ' ' 



page. And the 

ly Mirror reports that the 
photo win also be printed in the 
French magazine Paris Match 
on Thursday. 


klti^r 

4 


iso* 1 " 


An appeals court in North 
Carolina has upheld a $487,000 
judgment against tbe Belgian- 
born actor Jean Claude Van 
Damme, who was found negli- 
gent in an injury that left anoth- 
er actor partially blind. Jackson 
Pinckney, a soldier hired to play 
a villain in the film “CyborgJ 
was stabbed in his left eye witffs 
rubber knife during the fihnin^ 

□ 

Tbe John F. Kennedy Center 
for the Performing Arts in 
Washington has named five art- 
ists who will receive its 1994 
honors for lifetime contributions 
to American culture: the actor 
Kirk Douglas, the singer Aretha 
Franklin, the composer Morton 
Gould, producer and director 
Harold Prince and the folk sing- 
es and songwriter Pete Seeger. 
They will be saluted at a perfor- 
mance and fund-raiser at the 
Kennedy Center on Dec. 4. 

□ 

Almost three years after the 
death of singer-actor Yves 
Montand, a court has ruled that 
he was the father of a young 
woman who, along with her 
mother, has battled for such 
recognition since 1989. A Paris 
court found that Aurore Dros- 
sart, now 19, was Montand's 
daughter. Her mother is Anne 
Fleurange, an actress who was 
Montand's friend during the 
1970s. - Montand died in No- 
vember 1991. 


' rV (!W 


.IVr"' 

■ 1 A 


fl‘ 




■» 


-A 


1 1 


.. *-»» 

- V 


% * 


i ■ ■ ■*. 


.is* 






■’■I 


. : » 
^ .V 


m ,*5 


u 




m t 


4 

k ■ 


j 


«• 

, . ■ 

. * * 


■ 1 1 


f ..V 


• • 1 -■ t 

• 


:T-~ ; ■ 


- - t 




WEATHER 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


Europe 


Today 


Tonwnow 


Hlofi 

Low 

W 

Mg* 

Low W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 

Ai^iive 

24/75 

lS/50 

a 

2*m 

19*8 pc 

Anamdun 

17*2 

1305 

pc 

1702 

1305 9h 

Anion 

27/80 

1050 

m 

31*8 

18*4 9 

Alton* 

33/91 

20/80 

a 

31*0 

23/73 pc 

Brohna 

27*0 

17*2 

■ 

25/77 

1908 a 


33*1 

17« 

a 

31*8 

10*4 1 

— » — 

CMfwt 

22m 

1305 

■ft 

19*6 

7/44 aft 


17182 

9/48 

afi 

T7/62 

9/48 C 

BudtpnJ 

31*8 

17*2 

a 

20*2 

1801 pc 

COMttMfl 

18JB4 

13/55 

pc 

1804 

8M0 *1 

Cotta DrtSd 2MB 

1604 

a 

28*2 

22/71 a 

Dut*i 

13/55 

6/43 

sh 

1509 

7/44 th 

Edntugh 

13*8 

11/52 

r 

1609 

9M8 ah 

Hortnco 

20 /m 

17*2 

PC 

27/BO 

1601 0 

FnnMiid 

23/73 

|4/57 

sh 

21/70 

8/40 pa 

Gmim 

18*4 

B/40 

1 

1908 

11/52 pc 

HaMU 

13/55 

0/48 rfl 

17*2 

10*0 pc 

taMul 

29*4 

17/02 

a 

30*6 

21/70 pe 

InsPahvofl 

77 AM 

2000 

9 

27*0 

22/71 a 

Laban 

?srra 

1407 

1 

28/73 

it*4 pe 

Landon 

10*) 

9/46 

pc 

1601 

9/48 «ft 

MaM 

26/79 

9/48 

■ 

20/79 

15*9 a 

hitot 

24/78 

lflVBl 

«ii 

24/75 

1407 a 

Moacow 

10*4 

1102 

c 

22/71 

1407 pe 

Murech 

21/70 

1102 

aft 

1906 

8/46 c 

Wee 

26TO 

1601 

pa 24/76 

1601 a 

Oslo 

15/?9 

11/52 

th 

1702 

7*4 a 

Palm* 

28.-79 

1004 

a 

23H3 

20*0 a 

Pant 

IT'S? 

8/48 

pc 

1004 

1060 ah 

Rwpia 

24/75 

13/55 

pc 

21/70 

8*6 aft 

Rfyiipflk 

10*0 

7/44 

ib 

1102 

S/41 c 

Homo 

27*0 

18.64 

■ 

29*4 

17*2 ah 

SI PWtntora \dJS7 

0/46 

rti 

1906 

1305 pe 


t4J57 

11/5? 

PC 

18*4 

6/48 C 

S traabowg 

IBM 

0/46 1 

1702 

0M0 c 

TdWvi 

13/56 

1000 

»h 

18*4 

vroz pc 

vmo 

27i ao 

19« 

pc 28-W2 

1804 a 

v«w 

22/71 

14157 

PC 

21/70 

1203 1 

VWMN 

24/75 

1509 

pc 

20/79 

1203 pc 

Ztach 

ram 

11/5 2 1 

20*0 

1102 pc 

Oceania 

Auditoid 

1407 

7/44 

■ft 

15/M 

8/46 pc 

Sjtito 

18*64 

9/48 

■ 

1707 

1203 1 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


Asia 



Today 
Mgti Uoff m Mtfti 
©F OF OF 


Law W 
OF 


Barak* 

Hang Kong 

ManRtf 

NwM 


T 

Tokyo 


31/89 
2B/B2 
32/89 
32/89 
34/93 
29 /BA 
26/0 2 
32/89 
32/83 
31/88 


24/79 

1641 

27/80 

24/73 

28/82 

14®7 

23/73 

25/77 

23/73 

22/71 


#1 31/88 
tfi 24/75 
pc 31/88 
0h 30/WJ 
K 36W 
9 29/84 

e 2944 
pa 3209 
pc 32/88 
1 23/84 


24/75 pa 
12/53 3 
28/79 ah 
24/75 rfi 
28/79 pc 
IB/64 aft 
23/73 pa 
24/75 I 
24/79 pc 
20/88 a 


SATURDAY 



SUNDAY 


ai tomcistt and dab prwted 

fry AcaFWwamy.inoc 1994 


Europe and Middle East 


Location 



Untosaonsbiy 

GaM 


UnMttMfty 

MU 




Heavy 


North America 

Wa rn) weather from Chicago 
to Indtanapofe tale ihb week 
will spread eastward to 
Boston and New York City 
by Sunday. Dallas to Dos 
Moines wilt tiava dry, hoi 
weather Friday into rhe 
weekend. Thunderstorms 
wB strike the nonhem Rock- 
ies and northern Ptakia. 


Europe 

A storm from the Atlantic 
Ocean will push rain and 
wind ames the Brtish tales 
and Fianc e Friday and on to 
Germany by the weekend. 
Glasgow to Oslo will have 
chBy weather the nest sev- 
eral days wfih a few show- 
ers. Hot weather win extend 
from Athens and Istanbul 
nort h wa rd to Kiev. 


Asia 

Heavy rafna end gusty winds 
from a tropical storm may 
reach the northern Philip- 
pines and Taiwan by the 
weekend. Japan will remain 
warmer than normal, but 
Tropical Storm Klnna may 
brush the southeastern coast 


with locaffy heavy rains. 
'5im 


Hong Kong and Singapore 
wB be warn) with some sun. 


Middle East 


Latin America 



Today 


Tomorrow 


Today 

Tomorrow 


H*h 

Low 

w 

Htafa Low W 


Mgti 

Low 

w HHF* 

Low W 


OF 

OF 


OF OF 


OF 

OF 

OF 

OF 

BMwl 

31*0 

23/73 

s 

32*9 36/78 a 

Qutnoa Aita 

1306 

3/37 

a 1407 

0/43 a 

Cato 

33*1 

22/71 

a 

34*3 2^73 » 

Cavacro 

26*2 

20*0 

pc 28*2 

19*9 PC 

Duwoa 

30*8 

1702 

% 

33*1 10*4 a 

Lima 

1804 

1601 

C 18*4 

15/58 c 

Janjaabm 

28*2 

1804 

a 

30*8 26*8 a 

Mm too C 4 y 

25 m 

14/57 

pc 24/75 

1509 1 

Luxor 

35*7 

21/70 

a 

40/104 22*1 ft 

RfedaJmfc) 22/71 

10*4 

ah 23/73 

18*4 c 

FVyaA 

40/104 23/73 

t 

41 / 10022/71 a 

SaMpo 

20*8 

8 M 

pe 21/70 

7144 pc 


LugwMfc eeunny, pcwBy dowry, odoutfy, 
sivsnow, kfcs, W-WWhef. Alt 


data prodded by Accm Weather. Inc. 01994 


Africa 

Afcpv? 

28*2 

22/71 

ft 

28*2 

22/71 

pc 

CftpaTwwi 

1004 

11/52 

8 

23/73 

1407 

to 

CvPbbraa 

20/79 

16 *1 

B 

28/79 

1804 

pc 

1 1 ■ 

ItWO 

2008 

9/48 

pc 

22/71 

1102 

pc 

Laooa 

27*0 

24 m 

r 

28*2 

24/75 

ah 

NmU 

2008 

9 MB 

c 

23/73 

1006 

pc 

Tgn» 

32*9 

23/73 

8 

34*3 

22/71 

a 

North America 

Antoagv 

1305 

SM 3 

r 

16*1 

7/44 

pc 

AftrtB 

29*4 

1906 

pc 28*2 

1804 

pc 

Pnatm 1 

26 m 

1601 

a 

23 m 

12*3 

PC 

Chicaao 

26 m 

1407 

pc 

28*2 

16*1 

a 

Damr 

33*1 

1305 

V 

30*8 

1203 

ft 

Don* 

20/79 

1305 

po 24.75 

14*7 

pc 

KbrakAi 

31*0 

24/75 

pc 31*8 

24/75 

pc 

Houaton 

32*9 

19*8 

1 

33/91 

20*8 pc 

LomAroafas 

31*6 

18*4 

P® 

30*8 

1906 pc 

IM 

3209 

26/79 

1 

31*8 

24/75 

1 

ttra poia 


1606 

1 

29*4 

1702 

ft 


19*0 

1000 

oft 

20*0 

9/48 

rfl 

■ 1 

NDSSOD 

32*9 

24/79 

pc 

32*9 

24/75 1 

NawYorft 

27/80 

18*4 

9 

24/75 

16*1 

PC 

ftnanb 

42/107 27*0 

ft 

38/102 27*0 ft 

SonPmn. 

2008 

13*5 

PC 22/71 

1305 

pe 

SeaSSe 

21/70 

1203 

ah 

19*6 

10*0 ah 

Tmrto 

20*0 

11/52 

pe 21/70 

10*0 

pc 

Wadupun 

29*4 

17*2 

pc 28*2 

16*1 

pc 


Cannes 

Deauvifle 

Rimini 

Malaga 

Cagliari 

Faro 

Piraeus 

Corfu 

Bn^tsn 

Offend 

Schevermgen 

Sytr 

Izmir 

TeJ Aviv 


Wtattwr 

High 

Tamp. 

OF 

Low 

Tamp. 

C/F 

Water 

Tamp. 

OF 

»««— - 
wave 
■ ■ . -■ - 
IWpiB 

(Metroa) 

Wind 

Spoad 

(kph) 

Location 

WeatTar 

High 

Tmp. 

C/F 

Low 

Tempt 

C/F 

Water 

Temp. 

C/F 

Wave 

Haights 

(Mam) 

Wind 

Spaad 

m -a 

partly sunny 

25*7 

16*1 

24/75 

1-2 

NW 

20-35 

Cannes 

parity sunny 

25/77 

16*1 

24/75 

1-2 

W 

1635 


clouds and sin 

16*1 

9/46 

17*2 

24 

W 

40-70 

DoauvWe 

doudsAndsun 

17*2 

1050 

16*1 

2-3 

w 

30-60 

■ 

sunny 

27*0 

19*6 

24/75 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Rimini 

sunny 

28*2 

18*4 

24/75 

0-1 

NW 

8-16 

j * ■ 

sunny 

28/82 

18*4 

24/75 

0-1 

N 

8-16 

Malaga 

sumy 

28*2 

22/71 

24/75 

0-1 

N 

10-20 


party sunny 

28*2 

22/71 

24/75 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Cagliari 

sunny 

31/38 

22/71 

24/75 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

- — ■ • 

sunny 

24/75 

15*9 

20*8 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Fans 

partly sunny 

24/75 

19*6 

16*6 

0-1 

W 

12-22 

^ - . J 

sunny 

sunny 

doucy 

33*1 

20*8 

24m 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Piraeus 

sunny 

31*8 

23/73 

24/75 

0-1 

NW 

1020 

* % • _ 

30/86 

18*4 

24/75 

0-1 

NW 

12-22 

Corfu 

sunny 

clouds and sun 

30*8 

22/71 

24/75 

0-1 

NW 

12-22 


18*1 

506 

17*2 

2-3 

w 

40-60 

8rk*rton 

17/62 

9/46 

16*1 

2-3 

NW 

40-60 

P ‘ 1^1 _ 

■ Vi % 

showers 

17*2 

12/53 

17*2 

1-3 

w 

30-60 

Os»nd 

cloudy 

17*2 

11/52 

16*1 

2-4 

W 

30*0 

ft 

showers 

17*2 

12*3 

17*2 

1-3 

w 

3060 

Schaveningan 

cloudy 

cloudy 

17*2 

11*2 

16*1 

24 

SW 

30-60 

" “ft ■ 

mJn 

19*6 

12*3 

16*1 

2-4 

w 

35-70 

Sytt 

17*2 

9*48 

15*9 

2rA 

SW 

35-70 

■" *1 - . 

■■ ■ ft 

parity sunny 

34*3 

21/70 

25/77 

0-1 

w 

15-25 

Izmir 

sunny 

33*1 

24/75 

25/77 

0-1 

W 

1242 

■ ■ 

■ ■ 

•ft 

sunny 

31*8 

25/77 

27*0 

0-1 

s 

10-20 

TeJAviv 

sunny 

32*9 

25/77 

28*2 

0-1 

s 

12-22 

to ~ ‘ 


Caribbean and West Atlantic 


Caribbean and Wtaet Atlantic 


Barbados 

_ 

rsJTOSton 

St. Thom as 
Hamtfeon 

shown 
party sunny 
pairiy sunny 
parity sunny 

31/88 

33/91 

34*3 

32*0 

24/75 

22^1 

24/75 

24/75 

28*2 

26*2 

28*2 

28*2 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 

0-1 

E 

E 

SE 

SE 

25-50 

25-50 

2545 

15-30 

Barbados 

Kfrigston 

St. Thomas 
Harrofcon 

partly sunny 
partly sunny 
thunderstorms 
partly sunny 

32/89 

32*9 

32*9 

32*9 

24/75 

23/73 

24/75 

24/75 

28*2 

28*2 

28*2 

28*2 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 

0-1 

SE 

E 

E 

SE 

20-40 

2&50 

20-40 

1530 

A9te/PacMc 








AsfiaflPacUc 







1 

Penang 

partly sunny 

31/88 

25/77 

29*4 

0-1 

SW 

10-20 

Penang 

thundemtorms 

32*9 

24/75 

29*4 

0-1 

SW 

1020 

Phuket 

clouds and sun 

32*9 

25/77 

29*4 

0-1 

SW 

15-25 

Phuket 

clouds and sun 

32*9 

25/77 

29*4 

0-1 

SW 

1530 

Ban 

clouds and sun 

32*9 

23/73 

29*4 

0-1 

SW 

12-25 

Baft 

sunny 

33*1 

22/71 

29*4 

0-1 

SW 

1530. 

Cebu 

thmderstamis 

30*6 

23/73 

30*6 

0-1 

SE 

15-30 

Cebu 

partly sunny 

31*8 

23/73 

30*5 

0-1 

SW 

15-25 

Palm Beach. Aus sunny 

20*6 

12*3 

18*4 

1-2 

w 

15-30 

Palm Beach, Aua. showers 

18*4 

13/55 

18*4 

1-2 

SE 

2035 

Bay 0 * Islands. NZ partly sunny 

17*2 

9 MB 

15/59 

1-2 

w 

25-50 

Bay of islands, NZ sum y 

18*4 

10/50 

15*9 

1-2 

NW 

20-40 

Srarahama 

showers 

30*6 

24/76 

28*2 

2-3 

SE 

30-60 

Smahama 

thunderstorms 

29*4 

23/73 

28*2 

2-3 

SE 

4030 

Honolulu 

partly sunny 

31*8 

24/75 

27*0 

1-2 

ENE 

20-40 

Honolulu 

partly sunny 

31*8 

24/75 

27*0 

1-2 

ENE 

204(J 


- -i 

-j 

z ■ i. ■ - - 


s 




.1 


Tiwel in a world without borders, time zones 


AES' Access Numbers. 

How to call around the world. 

1. Using die chan below, find th e country you are calling from. 

2. Dial (he corresponding XKT Access Number. 

3. An AEST English-speaking Operator or voice prompt will aste for the phone number you wish 10 call or connect you to a 
customer service representative. 

To reoave your free waBet card of ABETS Access Numbers, just dial the access number of 

the country youfire in and ask forCustomer Service. 


-i v:,*. ^ 

■! . 1 3 •• % 


or language barriers. 



Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn't speak your 
language, since it’s translated insiandy. Call your clients at 3 a.m. knowing they'll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with AISEE 1 

To use these services, dial the AIKT Access Number of the country you’re in and you'll get all the 
help you need With these Access Numbers and your ABET Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an ARST Calling Card or you‘d like more information on AKT global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 


COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

■ Plan 


ASIA 

Italy* 

172-1011 

Brazil 

000-8010 

Australia 

1-800-881-011 

Liechtenstein" 

155-00-11 

Chile 

00a-0312 

China, PRO** 

10811 

TJrtimmfci* 

8*196 

Gotombia 

980-11-0010 

Guam 

018-872 

Luxembourg 

0-800-0111 

Costa Rica"* 

114 

HOf^Kong 

800-1111 

Macedonia, F.YJL of 

99-900-4288 

Ecuador* 

119 

” * V 

India* 

000-117 

Maha“ 

0800-890-110 

EJSalvadona 

190 

. % %m . 

*, m * ■ . 

- ’ l 1 . ■- 

Indonesia*- 

001-801-10 

Monaco* 

19a-0011 

Guatemala* 

190 

*■ ' 1 

■ 'V- . ’ 

japan* 

(XJ39-111 

Netherlands^ 

06-022-9111 

Guyana*** 

165 

■ 'v . " 1 . "■ 

■'-fc ■ - . ■ • 

sore* 

009-11 

Norway 

800-190-11 

Honduras 

1 23 1 . - 

Korea** 

11- 

Poland**— 0*010-480-01 1 1 

Mexico*** 

95-800-462-4240 * 

ll 1 - . 

Malaysia" 

800-0011 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 

Nicaragua (Managua) 174 

. • t 

New Zealand 

OOCW11 

Romania 

01-8004288 

Panamas 

109 

■■v. ■ 

Philippines" 

105-11 

8tetia**(Moscov) 

155-5042 

Peru* 

191 


Saipan" 

239-2872 

Slovakia 

40-420-00101 

Suriname 

156 

* • ■ 

Singapore 

800-0111-111 

Spain* 

900-99-00-11 

Uruguay 

00-0410 

» S C _ 

. ^ 1 ■ 

Sn Lanka 

430-430 

Sweden" 

020-795-611 

Venezuela"* 

8O-OIM20 

P 't 

i ■ 1 . • ■ 

*■ • . i 

; 

Tahrah* 

0080-10288-0 

Switzerland* 

155-00-11 

CARIBBEAN 

Thailand* 

0019-991-1111 

UJL 

0500-89-0011 


1-800-872-2881 

L J ' - 

EUROPE 

Armenia** 8*14111 

Ukraine* 

MEDDLER 

8*10011 

AST 

Bermuda* 

1-800-872-2881 





a sr 


Austria**^ 

022-903-011 

Bahndn 

8*X>-001 

Beighnn* 

0800-100-10 

Cyprus* 

iWWOOIO 

Bulgaria 

00-1800-0010 

Israel 

177-100-2727 

Croatia"* 

99-384)011 

Kuwait 

800-288 

Czech Rep 

00-420-00101 

Idnnoo (Bednitl 

426-801 

Deamaric 

8001-0010 

Qatar 

0800-011-77 

Hniaacf 

9800-100-10 

Saudi Arabia 

1-800-10 

France 

19 A -0011 

Turkey* 

00-800-12277 

Germany 

0130-0010 

UA£.* 

800-121 

Greece' 

00-800-1311 

AMERICAS 

Hungary* 

OOa-800-01111 

Argentina* 

OO1-80Q-20Q-1 11 1 

Iceland** 

9994)01 

Belize* 

555 

Ireland 

1-80O-550-0OO 

Bolivia* 

(^aoo-1112 


Cayman Islands 


1-B0047HB81 


orwuefci' 


1-600-872-2881 


Haiti' 


001-800-972*2083 


Jama ta** 


0300 - 872-2881 


Nctfa. Amfl 


001-800472-2881 


St Ktas/Nevis 


I -800-372-2881 




Egypt* (Cafro) 

Gabon* 


$104200 




u 

■8 

. 


* m 


’ O *■ •' ■ „ 
■ ’i- 




M 




Gambi a* 


00111 


e 

I V 


Kenya- 


i : m 


■10 


797-797 


South Africa 


1 IBS Cdteyc Coni not ja jnbbtc fa a0 caunBle. ar Wtadd Coattecf 5c*vigc 
perroto oxrogry to QQWPy qUpy hetwrci more dun T 1 * craintna. inrhrftoQ rtv^ . 
dWuvcd In baU shm. 

upfuss jd&tKtfulcbariK 


0-80049-0123 


AM" UMZXrca* Service Umilade from nl tbc 4 Mnri 0 Jbwi Above. 

ABT Language Line* Sevka Oder <*a-ttefhant imerpicctibMi in mcr 140 Ui- 


“Miynca be avaflabtafiwri every nhooc. 

Rot yciJvaibbfc Cram all man 
A AttBitamdddpne 


i* i 


*** * 
***** i* 


‘■a ft. 


phones wqube dcpgm of coin orpbonc cud fbrtfetr Me. 

"Ftirflc phones require dcposR of coin 4f photecacd tar dbj m DoltHfMeMl 1 1 
hnDbfDrVaaifthuidii 


*** «l twan.Mli inr.tol i^- dhl 


L99 i AIKl" 


ft > »ji 

I* 1 IP t ■ , , 

■ tr . ». .. 

j Z j' - - - - J *• 

v ■ ■ • 

i ■: 

‘ V v, 1 »; i 

l .. ■ * : - -ft v 


i 

\ 


\ 



m 

i 


' r • 


8 
* A 


fc 


I 


. j ■ j " 




■■ • 


- • r