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INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




Paris, Wednesday, September 14, 1994 


No. 34, 6*53 


■0 


White House Intrusion 
Reveals Old Problem 

A ‘Sad Little Secret’: Safety Systems 
For Presidents Have Often Failed 




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By Ann Devroy 
and Pierre Thomas 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Hie crash of a 
small plane onto the White House lawn 
has revealed what a former senior securi- 
ty official said was the “sad little secret” 
of presidential security: Numerous sys- 
tems devised by the Secret Service to 
protect the president have been 
breached, strengthened and then 
breached again. 

The piercing* of the protected airspace 
over the White House came despite 
strengthened procedures pul in place af- 
ter & 1974 incident in which a U.S. Army 
private stole a helicopter and landed it 
cm the South Lawn, about SO feet (IS 
meters) from, the crash site on Monday. 

Presidential helicopters are the only 
aircraft allowed to fly in the patch of 
airspace from the Capitol to the Lincoln 
Memorial to three blocks north of the 
White House. Under the guidelines put 
in place after the 1974 incident, the Fed- 
eral Aviation Administration monitors 
the area 24 hours a day, and any unoffi- 
cial intrusion is to be reported immedi- 
ately to the Secret Sendee. 

Federal sources said that the plane 
was detected by the aviation agency’s 
radar minutes before the crash. The pre- 
liminary investigation suggests that the 
information was not relayed to the Secret 
Service in time for agents to prepare for 
some type of threat, the sources said. 

[Senior administration officials did 
not publicly find immediate fault with 
the security system or Secret Service 
agents Tuesday, but they pointedly 
failed to guarantee that current proce- 
dures were adequate to prevent a similar 
incident. The Associated Press reported 
from Washington. 

[Secret Service personnel, sources said, 
are trained to follow a series of "emer- 
gency response” procedures to cover a 
variety of Dreaches of White House secu- 
rity. But one official said the response to 
a plane undetected by. radar, unavailable 


for voice contact and unidentified as a 
particular threat "has always been a hole 
in the fabric.” 

[Frank Corder, the 38-year-old Mary- 
land man who died after crashing the 
stolen airplane onto the White House 
lawn, had trace amounts of cocaine in his 
system and a blood-alcohol content 
slightly above the legal limit, officials 
said. 

[Apparently unfazed by the security 
breach. President Bill Clintonjogged one 
of his usual routes along the Potomac 
River on Tuesday morning.] 

The Treasury Department has sought 
hundreds of thousands of dollars over 
the years for better plane-detection 
equipment, but has always been stymied 
by budget constraints. 

Secret Service officials said their first 
warning of the plane had come when 
members of the uniformed division as- 
signed to observation posts on the White 
House perimeter saw me craft approach- 
ing. Carl Meyer, a Secret Service agent, 
said that agents then became preoccu- 
pied with "what was the situation.” 

“I mean,” he said, “was this just a 

E lane that ran out of gas, did somebody 
ave a heart attack, what was involved 
here, was it a diversion, was something 
going to come?” 

Under the Secret Service and aviation 
agency rules, no planes are allowed near 
this white House or near presidential 

{ (lanes. Yet, in addition to the helicopter 
an ding in 1974, a small plane came with- 
in ISO feet of former President Ronald 
Reagan’s Marine One helicopter in 1 987, 
The problem has not been restricted to 
threats from the air. White House visi- 
tors are supposed to pass through sophis- 
ticated security checks, and outsidersnot 
regularly granted access to the building 
are to be monitored during their entire 
visits. On Inauguration Day in 1985, 
however, a man wandered into the White 
House in the guise of a musician and 
walked around for a half hour before 
being arrested. 



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A policeman swinging a whip on Tuesday in Port-au-Prince to keep order in a line of Haitians waiting for free food. 

Clinton May Call Reservists for Haiti 


By Ann Devroy 
and John M. Goshko 

Washington Past Semce 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clin- 
ton may have to ask “several hundred” 
military reservists to go on active duty to 
take pan in any invasion of Haiti, senior 
American officials said. 

[The aircraft carrier America left Nor- 
folk, Virginia, for Haitian waters on Tues- 
day carrying special forces troops, Reuters 
reported. The carrier Eisenhower will de- 
part Wednesday with additional troops, 
attack helicopters and other arms. 

[An administration official said Tuesday 
that a U.S. force of troops, warships, air- 


craft, armor and sophisticated communi- 
cations gear would be “in place and pre- 
pared for orders" by the end of next week. 

[It was also announced that Mr. Clinton 
would be making a national address on his 
policy toward Haiti on Thursday night. 

[The House speaker, Thomas' S. Foley, 
meanwhile, said the House might vote next 
week on whether Mr. Clinton should order 
U.S. troops to invade Haiti.] 

As military plans went forward. Mr. 
Clinton’s national security adviser. W. An- 
thony Lake, made the case for use of U.S. 
power in Haiti by saying that the nation's 
“essential reliability" was at stake. 
“Having exhausted all other remedies. 


we must make it dear that we mean what 
we say” about removing Haiti's military 
leaders, Mr. Lake said in a speech to the 
Council on Foreign Relations. "Our ac- 
tions in Haiti will send a message far 
beyond our region, to all who seriously 
threaten our interests." 

Mr. Lake listed U.S. credibility as the 
first of four reasons why the United States 
must move beyond sanctions to military 
force if the Haitian generals refuse to step 
down. Haiti is also a test of U.S. commit- 
ments to defend democracy, to prevent 
further destabilization in the region and 

See HAITI, Page 8 


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Separatists 
Win Quebec, 
Margin May 
Deter Split 

By Anne Swardson 

Washington Post Service 

TORONTO — One day after Quebec’s 
t separatist party was elected to govern the 
province, Prime Minister Jean Chrttien 
and leaders across the country expressed 
optimism on Tuesday that the separatists' 
iqs lim margin of victory meant Canada 
would not break apart, 

Jacques Parizeau, leader of the separat- 
ist Parti Qu6b6cois and Quebec’s premier- 
elect, has promised to hold a referendum 
on separation in the next 10 months. On 
Monday, he achieved a substantial major- 
ity in Quebec's provincial legislature — 77 
seats, or just under 62 percent, to the 
Liberals’ 47, or nearly 38 percent, in the 
125-seat assembly — but barely captured a 
plurality of the electorate. The Parti Qu6- 
bicois gained 44.7 percent of the popular 
„ v vote, and the liberal Party won 443 per- 
. cent — only a 15,000-vote difference. 

Reacting at a news conference on Tues- 
1 ‘ day, MrTChrttien said, “When both par- 
ties get almost the same share of the vote, 
it’s a good indication Canada is here to 
stay.” 

The financial markets appeared to 
agree. The Canadian dollar rose against 

■ the U.S. dollar as investors bought into the 

notion that Quebec will not break from 
Canada. Stock and bond prices also went 

■ up. The opinion of Wall Street is particu- 
larly important here because Canada, one 
of the most heavily indebted nations in the 
developed world, pays high interest rates 
on monev it borrows on the bond market 
because of uncertainty over the future of 
Quebec. 

The last time Quebeckers voted on 
** whether to leave Canada, in 1980, they 
• - * rejected it by a 60-to-40 margin. This time 
. around, Mr. Chrttien and the leaders of 
. Canada’s nine other provinces are plan- 
ning a coordinated strategy to ensure a 
“ntr vote prevails again. Mr. Chrttien, 

who as justice minister was a central figure 

. in the fight against the 1980 referendum, 
. * said Tuesday, **I will be the Jean Chrttien I 
was in those days.” 

In the rest of Canada, however, citizens 
^ . are less inclined than they were then to 

See QUEBEC, Page 8 



Britain Puts the Continent 
In a Tough Spot on Rates 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Britain’s interest rate increase 
on Monday, aimed at squelching future 
inflation, is’ likely to limit continental Eu- 
rope’s ability to make further interest rate 
cuts aimed at promoting recovery. 

The move by the Bank of England — 
although domestically motivated as a pre- 
emptive strike against the threat of re- 
newed inflation accompanying economic 
growth — is a sign that the rate-cutting 
cycle in the rest of Europe is probably 
coming to a gradual close. 

"The U.K. rate move hinders chances of 
rate reductions on the Continent," Nigel 
Newman, international economist at Bar- 
clays Bank, said Tuesday. 

This does not mean that British rate 
moves directly affect European interest 
rate policies, nor does it suggest that rates 
on the Continent are likely to be raised 
immediately. Indeed, there may still be 
scope for one more small cut by the 
Bundesbank after Germany's general elec- 
tion on Oct. 16. 

But the British half-percent age-point 
rate rise is being perceived in financial 


markets as a harbinger of monetary poli- 
cies on the Continent. As such, the psycho- 
logical impact of the British change in 
monetary policy should not be underesti- 
mated. Many investors and economists 
said they now believed the timing of an 
eventual rate increase by the German cen- 
tral bank, an even more important policy 
change, could well be accelerated and oc- 
cur earlier in 1995 than expected. 

In addition, if continental interest rates 
stay on hold or rise, the pace of recovery 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

could slow over the next year or two. which 
would hurt Europe's campaign to lower its 
record unemployment levels. 

This likelihood is largely the result of 
perceptions in the bona markets, which 
fear inflation and have been anticipating 
higher rates since the U.S. Federal Reserve 
Board launched the first of its own interest 
rate rises in February. The truth is that 
throughout the industrialized world cen- 
tral bankers and policymakers are wary of 

See RATES, Page 8 


Vatican Adds 
Its Partial 
Approval to 
Cairo Talks 

But Abortion Wording 
Draivs Objections From 
Muslims and Catholics 

By Alan Cow-ell 

Sew York Times Service 

CAIRO — The UN population confer- 
ence ended nine grueling days of diplomat- 
ic maneuver and insurgency- Tuesday, 
broadly approving a new- concept of stabi- 
lizing the world's population through the 
empowerment of women in a 20-year pro- 
gram that drew unexpected, if partial, en- 
dorsement from the Vatican. 

At the dosing session, however, many 
Muslim and Latin American nations as 
well as the Vatican registered objections to 
the program's acknowledgment of legal 
abortion as a pan of health care and to 
language suggesting approval of extramar- 
ital sex, particularly among adolescents. 

The last conference, in Mexico City in 
1984, alluded to abortion only once — - to 
exclude it from the catalogue of family- 
planning methods. At the previous confer- 
ence, in Bucharest in 1974, it was not 
mentioned. 

Archbishop Rena to Martino, the Vati- 
can delegate, stressed, “Nothing is to be 
understood to imply that the Holy See 
endorses abortion or has in any wav- 
changed its moral position concerning 
abortion or on contraceptives or steriliza- 
tion nor on the use of condoms in HIV- 
AIDS prevention programs." 

However, he also recalled that “the Holy 
See could not find its way to join to con- 
sensus of the conferences of Bucharest and 
Mexico City. 

“The current Program of Action, how- 
ever, opens out some new paths concern- 
ing the future population policy” so that 
“on this occasion the Holy See wishes, in 
some way. to associate itself with the con- 
sensus, even if in an incomplete or partial 
manner.” 

His statement drew loud applause from 
other delegates. Specifically, the archbish- 
op said the Vatican endorsed the principles 
of the declaration and chapters on the 
family as “the basic unity of society," on 
between population and economic 


ties 


i popi 

growth, on “gender equality, equity and 
the empowerment of women” and on mi- 
gration. 

It withheld assent, however, from the 
most contentious chapters of the whole 
document — Chapters 7 and 8. which deal 
with reproductive health and safe abor- 
tion. 

Registering the Vatican’s “grave con- 
cems,” the archbishop said: 

“The chapter also contains reference 
which could be seen as accepting extra- 
marital sexual activity, especially among 
adolescents. They would seem to assert 
that abortion services belong within pri- 
mary health care as a method of choice.” 

At its broadest, the 113-page UN decla- 
ration enshrined for the first time a new 
concept of population policy that goes 
beyond traditional family planning to such 
areas as reproductive-health care, the em- 
powerment of women to make their own 
family planning choices and equality of the 
sexes. 

It means that, apart from supplying con- 
traceptives. nations and aid donors will be 
urged to promote the equality of men and 
women, educate girls to play roles in eco- 
nomic development and give women a 
wide choice of family planning and health 
care. Where it is not against the law, the 
declaration implies that health care should 
include abortion in conditions that are 

See CAIRO, Page 2 


Paris Treads Carefully With Renault Sale 


Didicr DcbuMclvrC'Knjicrt 

Jacques Parizeau and his wife, Lisette, welcoming the victory in Quebec. 


fr-~ 




Newsstand Prices 

Andorra 9.00 FF Luxembourg 60 L Fr 

Antilles 11.20 FF Morocco.....^ Dh 

Cameroon ..1 .400 CF A Qatar AH Rials 

£gypt„....E 1 P. 5000 Reunion ....11.20 FF 

France 9.00 FF Saudi Arabia ..9.00 R. 

Gobon 960 CFA Senegal 960CFA 

Greece ...300 Dr. Spain 200 PTAS 

Holy .......... ..1600 Lire Tunisia ....1.000 Din 

Ivory Coast .1.120.CFA Turkey ..T-L. 35.000 

Jordan,-..... 1JD U.A.E; BJJODirh 

Lebanon ... USS 1.50 U.S. Mil. (Eur.) $1.10 


Kiosk 


Algeria Releases 5 Muslim Militants 


ALGIERS (AFP; — The president 
and vice president of the outlawed Islam- 
ic Salvation From were released from 
prison and placed under house arrest, as 
official statement said late Tuesday. 

Three other senior members of the 


from were freed unconditionally. Abassi 
Madam and Ali Belhadj were moved 
from Blida prison south of Algiers to 
"another place of residence," the state- 
ment said. They were jailed in 1992 for 
attacks against state security. 


Quiaral News 

Willy Claes, 56, Belgium’s foreign 
ter, is to get the top NATO job, 
mats said. 


minis - 

diplo- 

2a 


The health care wrangle leaves most 
Americans sour, pollsters say. Page 3. 
A monthlong experiment with migration 
by raft ended in Cuba. Page 8. 



The Dollar 

New V«h. 


Tuea daw 


WW5 CtoM 


DM 


T.5433 


1.M3J 


Pound 


1.564 


1.5705 


Yen 


9S.84 


99.15 


Book Review 


Page 7. FF 


5.2775 


5.2645 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — France will sell up to 28 
percent of the automaker Renault this 
year, while providing S380 million in fresh 
capital, ministers announced Tuesday, 

The relatively cautious step toward pri- 
vatization appeared designed to prevent 
political turmoil in the campaign for next 
year’s presidential elections. 

Renault, which the government nation- 
alized at the end of World War II. has a 
record of labor militancy. Immediately af- 
ter the government’s announcement, the 
Communist-controlled General Labor 
Confederation, or CGT, at Renault said 


unions would launch an unspecified plan 
of action to oppose the sale. 

The government owns 79 percent of Re- 
nault SA. and will retain 51 percent after 
the partial privatization. Analysts said the 
government might deride to give up its 
controlling interest if a conservative candi- 
date wins the presidential elections. Prime 
Minister Edouard Ballad ur and the mayor 
of Paris, Jacques Chirac, are vying to be- 
come the official candidate of the conser- 
vative coalition. 

Once the government relinquishes ma- 
jority ownership Renault will become at- 
tractive to institutional investors and inter- 
national partners, analysts said. A merger 


with Volvo AB of Sweden decided exactly 
a year ago fell apart in December because 
Volvo shareholders opposed French state 
control of the joint company. 

The industry minis ter. Gerard Longuet,' 
said the government would sell up to 28 
percent of the company to private inves- 
tors. Volvo, which holds 20 percent of 
Renault shares, also will sell at least 8 
percent and up to 12 percent of its hold- 
ings in the company, the minister and 
Volvo said. 

Edmond Alphandriy, the finance minis- 
ter, later announced a 2 billion franc (5380 
million) increase in Renault's capital 

See RENAULT. Page 8 


Rwanda’s Refugees Face a Fresh Misery 


By Donatella Lorch 

Ne*>' York Times Service 

GOMA, Zaire — Muddy streams and 
stagnant pools dot the refugee camps here 
as daily rainstorms soak the thousands of 
thatched huts stretching for miles across 
this stark volcanic land. 

At times, the rain is so heavy even the 
shoulder-to-shoulder huts disappear. No 
one can escape. Some refugees huddle un- 
der the leaves of banana trees. An old man, 
back to the wind, sits stooped on a stump 
holding a dilapidated umbrella as the 
storm whips at him. 

After surviving an exodus from Rwanda 
and the cholera epidemics that followed. 


killing more than ‘50,000 people, the refu- 
gees huddled in camps in eastern Zaire 
finally have enough food and water. But 
the coming of the rainy season is the latest 
misery to afflict the 800,000 Rwandan 
Hutu refugees here. 

Daily life in the sprawling camps is full 
of violence and extortion. There is also 
tension between Rwandans and Zairians, 
whose economy and lands have been over- 
whelmed by refugees. But despite looting, 
attacks, stortings and the sheer monotony 
of refugee life, only a trickle of refugees are 
returning to Rwanda. 

Relief workers say many refugees of the 
majority Hutu tribe refuse to return home 


by ruts 

sSgaK, 


because they are afraid they will be killed 
Tutsi soldiers. The new government in 
formed by the Tutsi minority, has 
denied any killings in retaliation for the 
massacre of Tutsi civilians and is urging 
refugees to return. 

"There are too many risks to go back to 
Rwanda,” said Jean-Paul, 19, a student in 
a ragged windbreak er in the Kibumba ref- 
ugee camp who, like others, refused to give 
his full name. 

“Life is very bad here," he said. “There 
are many bandits. Bui the Tutsis will kill us 
because they hate us. They want to be 

See RWANDA, Page 8 





'■ Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HTBATI) TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1994 



Golan Settlers Mobilize to Turn Back the Tide 


By Clyde Haberman 


New York Tana Service 


MAALE GAMLA, Golan Heights 
— Normally, Yehuda Hard worries 
about the farmlands and industries of 
his kibbutz, Merom Golan, but these 
daws he has gone into salvage work. 

what he is trying to salvage is his 
future on the Golan Heights, and, 
while he is at it, he says, the security of 
his country. 

Like many of the 13,000 Israelis 
living on the Golan, Mr. Hazel is con- 
vinced that his government has made 
a critical mental leap and is ready now 
to give up this entire strategic plateau, 
captured in the 1967 Arab-israeli war, 
in return for peace with Syria. 

Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin de- 
nies h. There may be slight Israeli 
withdrawals, he says, but absolutely 
nothing has been decided. 

But the word of Mr. Rabin, once 
widdy admired on the heights, is no 
longer coin of the realm here. Settlers 
have been thrown into a crisis by new 
rumblings that agreements with Syria 
may not be far off. Their response has 
been to go head to head with the 


bumper stickers and banners pro- 
claiming: “The People Are With the 
Golan." The slogan is understood to 
mean no to any territorial compro- 
mise. 

In movie theaters, sandwiched be- 
tween ads, pro-Golan commercials 
have begun to appear, with Mr. Rabin 
declaring in a 1992 speech that to give 
up the Golan is to abandon Israel's 
security. 

Now, Mr. Hard and a few dozen 
other Golan residents have begun a 


know we have a big majority of the 
people, at least until now," said Mr. 
Hard, who was among the founders of 
Merom Golan, 25 kilometers north of 
Maale Garni a. It was the first settle- 
ment cm the heights, created barely a 
month after Israel’s victory in the 
1967 war, and Mr. Hard has watched 
as children and grandchildren were 
bom there. 


Domestic public opinion is particu- 
larly important on this 


The word of Mr. 
Rabin, once widely 
admired on die 
heights, is no longer 
coin of the realm. 


government in the hope that they can 
kill any po " ' ' ‘ ^ ~ 


, any possible deal with the Syrians 
before it is too late. 


Over the last two years, they have 
flooded the country with millions of 


hunger strike among stone ruins here. 
Most Israelis catch the symbolism im- 
mediately. On that spot stood the an- 
cient town Of Garni a, where thousands 
of Jews martyred themselves by com- 
mitting mass suicide in 68 A.D. during 
a revolt against Rome. 

While no one expects these settlers 
to maintain their strike so long that 
they starve to death, their new deter- 
mination to resist the government has 
captured considerable attention. “We 


issue because, 
unlike the case of the peace agreement 
with the Palestinians a year ago, Mr. 
Rabin has promised to put any "sub- 
stantial withdrawal” on the heights to 
a national referendum. 

So as he tries to strike a deal with 
President Hafez Assad of Syria, he 
must also persuade Israelis that he is 
not selling than out — that security 
considerations are so altered that they 
can risk leaving the Golan. 

His political difficulties are compli- 
cated by a small rebellion under way 
within his own Labor Party, which is 
closely identified with Golan settle- 
ments much as the rightist Likud Par- 
ty is seen, often incorrectly, as the 
creator of settlements in the West 
Bank and Gaza Strip. 

Seven or eight of Labor’s 44 mem- 
bers of Parliament are opposed to ter- 
ritorial concessions to Syria, and when 
their votes are added to those of oppo- 


sition parties, doubts are raised about 
whether Mr. Rabin can muster a legis- 
lative majority for an eventual agree- 
ment 

If anything, settlers here want to 
make his task more complicated yet, 
by bringing their argument again and 
again before fellow Israelis: that Syria 
used the heights to fire on Israeli 
towns before 1967, that the Golan is 
an important water source, that only 
Israeli military might on the plateau 
keeps tiie Syrians at bay. that Mr. 
Assad is a despot and no one can 
predict what will follow him. 

They also hope to make the most of 
the fact that they are sympathetic 
characters to most Israelis. Unlike 
some West Bank and Gaza settlers, 
they are not burdened with a public 
image of being religious zealots or 
political radicals. 

An opinion poll commissioned by 
Israel Radio this month showed that 


only 27 percent of Israelis support the 
full Golan withdrawal that Syria de- 


mands of Israel, although a majority 
accept at least a partial pullback. 

While heartened by figures like that 
27 percent, settler leaders acknowl- 
edge that surveys taken in the abstract 
may not accurately foretell public 
opinion once an actual agreement has 
bon reached and its security provi- 
sions made known. 


Hamburg 
Suspends 
27 Police 


Officers Accused 
In Racist Attacks 


Belgian Official to Get Top NATO Civilian Post 
Willy Gaes 


Is Seen as a 
Conciliator 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — NATO's top civil- 
ian job is to go to Willy Claes, 
the foreign minister of Belgium, 
diplomats said Tuesday. 

Although Belgium has drasti- 
cally curtailed its military rede, 
Mr. Claes, 56, is admired by 
other Europeans for his knack 
at conciliation, and the Clinton 
administration has reportedly 
accepted him as the successor to 
Manfred Wdmer, who died last 
month. 

On Western security issues, 
Mr. Claes, a Socialist, has been 
a leading advocate of strongs’ 
efforts by European nations to 
develop their own military ca- 
pabilities. That approach, once 
fiercely resisted in Washington, 
is viewed more positively by the 
Clinton administration. 

Barring a major upset, the 
sources said, Mr. Claes will be 
formally named late this month 
as the new secretary-gen sal — 
in effect the diplomat handling 
political coordination in the 16- 
nation alliance. 

Mr. Claes comes to the job 
with little personal experience 
in Washington to press NA- 
TO’s interests there or broad 
international experience of the 
kind needed to manage the alli- 
ance’s expanding work as a 
partner with the countries of 
the former Soviet bloc. 

But alliance officials, relieved 
at the prospect of filling the job 
quickfy without any public 
squabbling, expressed hopes 



the memo was put on 
my desk, I asked myself wheth- 
er I should let myself suffer 
through this any longer, and 
whether it mig ht be better to 
resign to send out a signal that 
wakes up the people," Mr. 
Hadcmann told the Hamburg 
Morgenpost newspaper. 

A statement from the city In- 
terior Ministry said the 27 offi- 
cers had been suspended for 
suspected mistreatment of for- 
eigners. 

One of the officers has had 
contacts with the far right, the 
statement said, adding that the 
officers may be charged with 
wrongful arrest and causing 
bodily injury. 

An Interior Ministry spokes- 
man said the beatings by the 27 
officers were believed to have 
occurred this year. The foreign- 
ers were being held on changes 
of being in Germany illegally, 
possession of drugs and other 
counts, he said. 


Euthanasia Rule 


Joaefc Skanyuki/Agencc Francc- P rc w .* 


A U.S. infantryman discussing the workings of his M-16 rifle with a Czech counterpart Tuesday near Poznan, Poland, Eased in GemUUVV 
during NATO exercises called Cooperative Bridge 94. Troops from seven fanner Warsaw Pact nations took part 


that Mr. Claes, who gained Eu- 
ropean prominence last year 
during Belgium’s turn as head 
of the European Union, will 
find fleer range for his talents 
once he is no longer confined to 
national politics. Mr. Wdmer, 
an unprepossessing German de- 
fense minister, proved to be a 
galvanizing figure at NATO. 

The NATO post, reserved for 
a European because the su- 
preme Allied military com- 
mander in Europe is always an 
American, was due to go to a 


small country — an info rmal 
protocol that neither Germany 
or Britain challenged strongly 
with a candidate of its own. 

Initially backed by France 
because he is a French speaker, 
Mr. Claes gradually garnered 
European support, even though 
Belgium was cautious about 
supporting him too openly after 
the embarrassing recent experi- 
ence of seeing their candidate 
for the presidency of the Euro- 
pean Commission blocked by a 
last-minute British veto. 


Mr. Claes’s closest rival was 
Thorvald Stoltenbeig, a former 
Norwegian foreign minister 
who is currently the top United 
Nations’ mediator in Bosnia. In 
that capacity, Mr. Stoltenbeig 
has often found himself at odds 
with NATO in recent months, 
and that friction apparently 
outweighed the Oslo's claim on 
the job. 

The former Norwegian for- 
eign minister, John Jurgen 
Holst, a defense specialist rec- 
ognized throughout the alli- 


ance. had been slated to become 
Mr. Warner's successor. But 
Mr. Holst died last year. 

The other top contender for 
the NATO post was Hans van 
(ten Brock, currently the Euro- 
pean commissioner for trade in 
Brussels. As foreign minister of 
the Netherlands until two years 
ago, Mr. van den Broek was an 
opponent of what he saw as 
attempts by France and, on oc- 
casion, Germany to downgrade 
the trans-Atlantic alliance in fa- 
vor of European defense. 


Reuters 

KARLSRUHE, Germany — 
Germany’s highest court ruled 
Tuesday that doctors could al- 
low the terminally ill to die if it 
was their desire, and if strict 
rules established their wishes. 

Until now the court had only 
allowed life support to be 
switched off or resuscitation at- 
tempts to be stopped if the pa- 
tient was already dying. 

Now, even in the case of the 
terminally ill whose death was 
not imminent, “allowing death 
by ending action is not ruled 
out from the be ginnin g ” 


CAIRO: Vatican Unexpectedly Adds Partial Approval 


Continued from Page 1 


safe. “This is an historic docu- 
ment, unlike anything that’s 
ever been drafted before," said 
Timothy E. Wirth, the U.S. un- 
dersecretary of state for global 
affairs. 


The declaration also foresaw 
a tripling in the amount the 
world spends on population 
stabilization, from around $S 
billion to S17 billion by the year 
2000. Its aim is to stabilize the 
world’s population at 7.27 bil- 


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lion by 2015 — compared to 
5.67 billion today — so as to 
avoid an explosion that could 
put the figure at 12.5 billioo in 
2050. 

Of more than 150 delega- 
tions, about 20 registered reser- 
vations to language on sex and 
abortion as the conference 
closed. The final declaration is 
not binding on governments. 

The question of winners and 
losers, however, was much more 
ambiguous. The Vatican 
claimed victory in shaping 
abortion language so that it de- 
nied any universal right and ex- 
cluded abortion from the for- 
mal lexicon of family planning. 


But the very fact that abor- 
tion was so widdy discussed, 
defined and acknowledged as 
part of women’s health care 
represented a long-term defeat. 
And the Vatican’s decision for- 
mally to approve parts of the 
population document seemed 
to show growing concern to 
avoid being marginalized in the 

S ‘on debate. 

know they have a lost 
an they have gained, 
and that they need to start 
budding bridges if they are to 
maintain any sort of voice in the 
UN in the future,” said Frances 
Kissling, president of Catholics 
for a Free Choice. 


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Excerpts of Cairo Text Changes 


The Associated Press 


REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS 

Proposed: 

Reproductive health is a state of complete 
physical, mental and social well-being ... in 
all matters relating to the reproductive system 
and to its functions and processes. Reproduc- 
tive health therefore implies that people are 
able to have a satisfying and safe sex life and 
that they have the capability to reproduce and 
the freedom to decide if, when and how often 
to do so. Implicit in this last condition are the 
right of men and women to be informed and 
to have access to safe, effective, affordable 
and acceptable methods of fertility regulation 
of their choice. 


of 


their choice for regulation of fertility which 
are not against the law. 

THE FAMILY 

Proposed’ 

Governments should take effective action 
to eliminate all forms of coercion and dis- 
crimination in policies and practices related 
other unit 


to marriage. 


Approved - 

Govemme 


unions and the family. 


Approved: 

Reproductive health is a state of complete 
physical, mental and social weD -being ... in 
all matters relating to the reproductive system 
and to its functions and processes. Reproduc- 
tive health therefore implies that people are 
able to have a satisfying and safe sex life amj 
that they have the capability to reproduce and 
the freedom to decide if, when and how often 
to do so. Implicit in this last condition are the 
right of men and women to be informed and 
to have access to safe, effective, affordable 


iovemments should take effective action 
to eliminate all forms of coercion and dis- 
crimination in policies and practices. 

MIGRANT RIGHTS 

Proposed: 

Governments of receiving countries must 
ensure the protection of migrants and their 
families, and recognize the right to family 
reunification. 

Approved: 

Consistent with Article 10 of the Conven- 
tion on the Rights of the Child and all other 
relevant universally recognized human rights 
instruments, all governments, particularly 
those of receiving countries, must recognize 
the vital importance of family reunification 
and promote its integration into their nation- 
al legislation. 


WORLD BRIEFS 



Crowd of Angry Protestants Clashes 
With Police at aBelfast Courthouse 


The Associated Pnea 

HAMBURG — Twenty-sev- 
en police officers were suspend- 
ed Tuesday over accusations 
that they beat jailed foreigners, 
and the officers may face crimi- 
nal charges, city officials said. 

There have been several scan- 
dals over alleged police brutal- 
ity against foreigners in Germa- 
ny since the country’s 
reunification in 1990, but the 
one unfolding in Hamburg — 
Germany’s second-largest city 
— is the worst so far. 

Last week, Hamburg news 
media disclosed that two 
drunken officers had beaten up 
an African in January because 
he was wearing an anti-Nazi 
sticker. 

Hamburg’s top law enforce- 
ment official, Werner Hack- 
resigned late Monday as 
the state’s justice and interior 
minister after a police officer 
complained in a memo the same 
day that some of his colleagues 
had beaten 11 foreigners in the 
cellar of a jail near the train 
station. 

Mr. Hackmann said police 
battering of foreigners in Ham- 
burg had grown to worrisome 


BELFAST (Reuters) — Protestants dashed with police -Wj 
troops outside a Belfast courthouse on Tuesday, burning a van 1 
and threatening the police with sticks m the worst disturbance * 
since an IRA cease-fire was announced 13 daw ago. 

The trouble broke out during the trial of Stephen. Laima, a 
Catholic, who is accused of trying to kill John Adair, an alleged 
Protestant extremist Mr. Adair is himsdf bring held on charges of 

"directing terrorism.” _ . . „ -Vj , 

The police said one plastic bullet was fired m an effort tocalm 
the angry crowd, which gathered when supporters of Mt^Adair 
were gee ted from the courthouse after they dashed wit hgya ls. 

The authorities said it was the worst street violence hc rfcg nce 
the cease-fire started. The trial had been seen as likely to provoke 
trouble because the Crumlin Road courthouse is at the edgexjf me 
of the most inflamma ble Protestant areas. 


Crimean Leader Reopens Parliament 

SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine (Reuters) — The president of 
Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula backed down Tuesday in a struggle 
with Parliament, lifting a blockade of the assembly two days after 
he prod aimed personal rule over the region. 

Parliamentary leaders komedialdy began a sessio n on the 
peninsula’s catastrophic economic situation after President Yun 
Meshkov’s guards allowed flee access to the building. 

Mr. Meshkov had dosed the Parliament after deputies passed a 

law reducing his powers. He said the assembly had become 
corrupt and unfit for legislative activity. . ^ 



Peres and Arafat Vow to Cat a Deal 


*■ 


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OSLO (Reuters) — Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and the 
PLO leader. Yasser Arafat, vowed Tuesday to uy to break a 
dffldlo dr over Jerusalem that could unblock $2.5 billion of aid for 
Palestinian sdf-rule projects. 

They arrived in Oslo for talks with international donors and 


They arrived in Oslo for talks with international donors and 
Norwegian mediators exactly one year after an Israel- PLO peace ;i« 
accord was si gned in Washington, ihey were originally invited to 


first- 


l . 


ouwi u Ul muuuugiVMi » J 

attend a concert marking the first anniversary of the. pact, but 
their visit took on urgency after the collapse of talks in Paris on 
Pales tinian development projects and financial issues. 

Disagre ement between the PLO and Israel over East Jerusalem 
forced the adjournment of the meeting without discussion of 
development projects and financial issues. 


Russians Kill 2 Fishermen Off Kurils 


VLADIVISTOK, Russia (Reuters') — Russian border troops 
shot and killed two crewmen on a Chinese fishing boat, the first 
fatalities in a growing fishing war around the disputed southern 
Kuril Islands. “We are categorically warning other countries 
against trespassing in our territorial waters," a spokesman for the 
Foreign Ministry said Tuesday in Moscow. 

According to the official announcement, six ships poaching in 
Russian territorial waters ignored orders to stop. As they flea, a 
Russian Coast Guard ship first fired into the air and then targeted 


them directly. Coast Guard planes helped detain one boat, the 
Shan Yu-621. One man was found dead and another died later of 
his wounds while the ship, which had a 22-member crew, was 
escorted to the island of Smkotan. 

Another fishing boat, tbeKun Sun Siur-880, belonging to South 
Korea, was detained later. Both ship had large amounts of frozen 
squid aboard, the announcement said. ^ 


Correction 


An article in the Business/ Finance section of Tuesday’s edi- 
tions misspelled the name of the Swedish newspaper that carried a 
statement by the leaders of four big exporters. It is Dagens - ' 
Nybeter. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Crash Leads to USAir Cancellations 



NEW YORK (NYT) —Travel agents around the United Stales &Si|ni the C* m* Ml 


reported that a large number of travelers have canceled flights on 
USAir, * 


while others are trying to steer clear of flying on the 
Boeing-737, the type of twin-engine plane involved in the USAir 
crash lat week that killed all 132 passengers. 

“A lot of people canceled their flights on USAir, even when it 
meant booking another airline at a higher fare,” said Judy Dwig- 
gins of Advantage Travel and Tours in Charlotte, North Carolina. 
“One client even decided to drive bade to Charlotte from Califor- 
nia rather than fly." 

Ellen Fogarty of Pittsburgh International Travel in Pittsburgh 
expressed confidence in the safety of airplane travel and of USAir. 
Tm going to fly in a week and Til fly USAir,” she said, adding, 
“but maybe not a 737 ” The no-frills 737 is the workhorse of the 
UJS. aviation industry. Twenty-one percent, or 921, of the 4,320 
aircraft in the fleets of the major U.S. carriers are 737s, far more 
than any any other plane. 


Albania and Ukraine Report Cholera ^ 

SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine (Reuters) — Cholera has broken out** 
in Albania and Ukraine, officials said Tuesday. 

In Tirana, Health Minister Maksim Cikuli of Albania said four 
people had died from cholera over the past week. More than 100 
people were ill with the disease, he added. 

The authorities in Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula said they were 
setting up emergency facilities to cope with a cholera outbreak - 
that had already infected 19 people. An official described most of * 
those ill as “anti-social dements or vagrants.” 

British railroad signal workers called their 17th stoppage Tues- 
day in a series of strikes, and accused the management of eroding 


:ety standards on Britain’s rail network. 


(Reuters) 



flights 

(Reuters) 

Motorists blockaded Lisbon's only bridge over the River Tagus 
on Tuesday, causing traffic chaos. The drivers were angered by a 
50 percent increase in tolls. (Reuters) 

Temperatures in northern brad bat a record high of 41.8 degrees 
centigrade (108 degrees Fahrenheit) on Tuesday. (AP) 

A haze h a nging over Singapore for the past month became even 
heavier on Tuesday, and for the first time the government said the 
pollution level had reached unhealthy levels. ( Reuters ) 

Thousands of Tati turn residents angered by a new income tax 
marched and blocked streets on the fifth day of & strike that 
paralyzed the island’s capital Union leaders urged that the strike 
continue while they met with officials late Tuesday. (AP) 

Lufthansa is to introduce a third weekly flight between Katman- 
du, Nepal, and Frankfurt beginning Sunday. (AFP) 


V 


f. 


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0NE M 


Let It Take You Around The World 

FromMO 






Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de I'Evangile, 75018 Paris. 






THE AMERICAS/ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1994 


Page 3 




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DANGER CRUISE— -A German tourist was shot through the shoulder on the open upper deck of fhi< sightseeing 
boat on the Hmlem River. Passengers beard two or three more shots as the boat beaded for shore. The wounded 
passenger, Ran Botowski, 31, a postal sopervisor from Hamburg, was expected to spend a few days in the hospital. 

In a First , [7.S. Admits to Rights Lapses 


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By William Claiborne 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
State Department has issued 
the United Stales* first account- 
ing to an international body of 
its own human rights practices, 
and has simultaneously issued a 
candid acknowledgement of 
hnman rights lapses that was 
held up for more than a month 
because of concerns that it 
would fuel anti-American pro- 
paganda abroad. 

While human rights protec- 
tions at home have advanced 
over the years, “many chal- 
lenges and problems remain,** 
the department said in a preface 
to a report that was issued at the 
same time to the United Na- 
tions H uman Rights Commit- 
tee. 

Among the more recent areas 
of concern cited by the depart- 
ment were police brutality, the 
death penalty, attacks on abor- 
tion rights activists, lang ua ge 
rights infringements and sex 
discrimination. 

The State Department regu- 
larly issues judgmental reports 


on h uman rights records of oth- 
er nations, rot never before has 
assessed the record in the Unit- 
ed States. It did so in a 21 3-page 
report prepared to conform 
with the 1966 International 
Covenant on Civil and Political 
Rights, which the United States 
did cot sign until two years ago. 

But the 10-page preface ac- 
knowledging hnman rights vio- 
lations at borne was not includ- 
ed when the report was 
submitted on July 26 — a year 
after it was due. 

Instead, in issuing the report 
Monday, the department at- 
tached the preface, written by 
Mm Shaituck, an assistant sec- 
retary of state who heads the 
Bureau of Democracy, Human 
Rights Labor. The preface 
had been the subject of an intra- 
agency dispute over its lan- 
guage, department sources said. 

The mam body of the report 
is largely a compendium of 
state and federal statutes and 
case law that was written to 
conform to a narrowly pre- 
scribed format required by the 


UN rights committee. In con- 
trast, the preface is a more sub- 
jective and critical analysis of 
the country’s triumphs and fail- 
ures in protecting individual 

human rights. 

“It is of little use to proclaim 
principles of human rights pro- 
tection at Lhe international level 
unless they can be meaningfully 
realized and enforced domesti- 
cally,** Mr. Shattuck said in 
calling attention to some of the 
darker chapters of American 
history in the field of individual 
rights. 

Throughout its history, Mr. 
Shattuck said, the United States 
has experienced “egregious hu- 
man rights violations" in the 
ongoing struggle for justice, in- 
cluding enslavement of blacks 
and discrimination against 
them, destruction of Native 
American culture and societies, 
111 treatment of immigrants and 
the continuing denial of full 
rights to women. 

Department sources said that 
disagreements “both in sub- 
stance and style" over the pref- 


ace had not been resolved until 
late last week. 

Some officials involved in ap- 
proving the report were said to 
have objected to Mr. Shattuck’s 
preface because they fell it 
would be exploited for anti- 
American propaganda pur- 
poses by countries such as Chi- 
na and Cuba, which have 
regularly been criticized in the 
department's annual reports on 
human rights records. 

The covenant is one of three 
documents that make up the 
“International Bill of Rights," 
and is regarded as one of the 
most important worldwide hu- 
man rights documents. 

Critics, however, say the 
United States never fully ac- 
cepted international scrutiny of 
its own human rights record, 
because the Bush administra- 
tion had conditioned its accep- 
tance on a series of restrictions 
designed to ensure that U.S. law 
would not be affected by the 
treaty. Most of the nations that 
signed did so with restrictions 
or qualifications, human rights 
activists here concede. 


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POLITICAL ISOTES 


Clinton Signs the Crime Bit 

President Bill Clinton, in an elaborate 
White House outdoor ceremony, signed 
a S30 billion crime bill and proclaimed 
that it would “roll back this awful tide of 
violence" in America.' 

Surrounded by members of Congress 
and mayors from both political parties, 
as well as police officials, Mr. Clinton 
said a sense of bipartisanship had al- 
lowed passage of the hotly disputed 
measure. 

“The American people have been 
waiting a long time for this day," he 
said. The legislation had been in the 
works for six years. 

“In the last 25 years, half a million 
Americans have been killed by other 
Americans,” Mr. Clinton said. “In the 
last 25 years, crime has been a hot politi- 
cal issue used too often to divide us." 

Despite the toll of violence, Mr. Clin- 
ton continued, “still some people in this 
town tried to keep this day from happen- 
ing. But today, at last, the waiting ends. 
Today, the bickering stops. The era of 
excuses is over. 

“From this day forward, let us put 


Away From Politics 


partisanship behind us and let us go 
forward, let us roll up our sleeves and 
roll back this awful tide of violence and 
reduce crime in our country. We have 
the tools, now let us get about the busi- 
ness of using them." 

Pointedly uninvited to the ceremony 
were critics of the bill, including the 
Senate minority leader. Bob Dole of 
Kansas. (AP) 

Shrinking the Government 

Since the Clinton administration took 
office, 78,000 federal workers have de- 
parted. They will be followed by at least 
60,000 others in the next year as hiring 
freezes, buyouts and layoffs shrink the 
bureaucracy 1 . 

This “downsizing" of the government, 
under way in almost every department 
and agency, ensures that Mr. Gore will 
achieve one of the top goals laid out in 
his "reinventing government" report, 
which was issued a year ago this month. 

The administration, in keeping with 
an earlier Gore theme, also is pushing 
agencies to measure program perfor- 
mance, getting the government focused 
on results so that taxpayers can see what 


they get for their money. Mr. Gore, 
meanwhile, has spent this year advocat- 
ing what his report called "a new cus- 
tomer service contract with the Ameri- 
can people, a new guarantee of effective, 
efficient and responsive government." 

r UP) 

Z Ambassadors Mominaied 

Mr. Clinton has nominated Charles E. 
Redman to be the ambassador to Ger- 
many. 

Mr. Redman, 50. who joined the for- 
eign service in 1974. is currently a special 
envoy to the former Yugoslav ia. 

Mr. Clinton also named Marc Gross- 
man. a special assistant to Secretary of 
State Warren M. Christopher, as ambas- 
sador to Turkey. (AP> 

Quotc/Unquote 

Bob Dole, campaigning in Virginia 
with the Republican candidate for the 
Senate, Oliver L. North, whom he had 
previously faulted: "Haven't you ever 
changed your mind? You have to be 
flexible sometimes. I think he's going to 
do a great job." ~ ( U P) 






■ H !*• 


1m W* 


• Catalina Vasquez Villal- 
pando, whose signature as UJS. 
treasurer once appeared on ev- 
ery dollar bill, was sentenced to 
four mouths in prison for tax 
evasion. 

• A 10th day has been added to 
the Discovery space flight to 
learn about the damaging ef- 
fects erf space-shuttle exhaust 
The six astronauts dimmed the 
lights and even used flashlights 
to conserve power for the extra 
day. 

• ABC News reported that the 
Federal Aviation Administra- 
tion and Boring both knew that 
thrust reversers on the 737 — 
the model of the USAir plane 
that crashed near Pittsburgh — 
could make them unsafe. 

• The National Institute on 
Drug Abuse said that more 
than 5 percent of the 4 million 
American women who had ba- , 
bies in 1992 used Illegal drugs 
while pregnant, and 20 percent I 


smoked cigarettes or drank al- 
cohoL 

• The United States has a high- 
er rate of incarceration than 
any country in the world except 
Russia, according to a study re- 
leased Monday by the Sentenc- 
ing Project. Tbe study found 
thine are 1.3 million inmates in 
American prisons, and the in- 
carceration rate has reached a 
high of 519 per 100,000 popula- 
tion, up 22 percent since 1989. 

• The Swiss government called 
off its investigation of the con- 
victed U.S. spy Aldrich Ames 
and said it was unfreezing his 
bank accounts. It noted that 
Mr. Ames said he would coop- 
erate with U.S. authorities 
abCHlt the aCCOUnt AP. Reuters 



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Thursday 

HEALTH/SCIENCE 

With a wide range of topics from tech- 
nology to space exploration, from 
recent medical discoveries to how the 
human brain functions, this in-depth 
feature brings up-to-date information 
on scientific and physical develop- 
ments in the intriguing worlds of 
health and science. 

Every Thursday in the International 
Herald Tribune. 


'lit IV DVTERWTIOm A* H 

lleral a^S^ CLnbunc 

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Health Care Wrangle Leaves America Sour 


By Robin Toner 

Ne H’ York Tima Senvcv 

NEW YORK —Most Amer- 
icans still say they want a major 
change in their health care sys- 
tem. but the long struggle on 
the issue has left them in a sour 
and skeptical mood with a di- 
minished view of ma ny of the 
major players, according to the 
latest New York Tunes/ CBS 
News Poll. 

The new survey found the 
public casting blame all around 
for the difficulties in passing 
major health care legislation. 
Fifty-eight percent said they 
blamed both Congress and 
President Bid Clinton equally. 
Two-thirds said Republicans 
opposed Mr. Clinton's health 
plan for political gain, not be- 
cause of honest disagreements. 

Only 40 percent said they ap- 
proved of Mr. Clinton’s han- 
dling of the health care issue, 
down 12 percentage points 
from his rating after he formal- 
ly unveiled his plan iast Sep- 
tember. And the unfavorable 
ratings of Senator Bob Dole, 
the Republican leader who has 
been one of the most persistent 
critics of the Democrats' ap- 
proach, rose 10 percentage 
points during the same time 
frame, to a level last recorded 
by this poll in his unsuccessful 
19S8 campaign for the Republi- 
can presidential nomination. 

Hillary Rodham Clinton, j 
who headed the health care task i 
force, took her share of the heal j 
in what has become a fiercely | 
partisan debate. A sear ago, j 
when she was carrying the plan j 
to Congress in the first heady : 
days of the drive to overhaul the I 
nation's health care system, . 
twice as many Americans j 
viewed the first lady favorably 
as unfavorably. Now the bal- 
ance is almost' even: 33 percent 
see her positively. 28 percent 
negatively. 

Ilie poll was conducted by j 

t hone last Thursday through 
unday. just before’ Congress ! 
returned to Washington. j 

Congress has resumed work 
and Democratic leaders still ex- ! 
press hope that a modest bill I 
can be passed before the dec- I 
tions. Senator George J. Mitch- 
ell of Maine, the majority lead- 
er. said he would meet later this 
week with Senator John H. 
Chafee, the Rhode Island Re- 
publican who leads the self- 
styled mainstream coalition, to 
see if they could still work out a 
bipartisan deal. 


The poll suggests a majority 
still hope that something can be 
passed this year. 

It also suggests that attitudes 
on health care are just part of a 
dangerous electoral landscape 
for incumbents this fall. The 


restructure the health care sys- 
tem. Seventy-three percent said 
they still thought there was a 
“crisis" in health care today, 
down from the 90 percent who 
felt that way in the spring of 
1993 but holding stable now for 


Attitudes on health care are just part oi a 
dangerous electoral landscape for 
incumbents this fall. 


approval rating for Congress re- 
mains low at 25 percent, and 
"gridlock" was the explanation 
most frequently offered for that 
disapproval 

Fifty-two percent said less 
had been accomplished in this 
two-year session of Congress 
than usual in a typical session, a 
judgment that would be disput- 
ed by many political analysts. 
And 78 percent said that most 
members of Congress do not 
deserve re-election and that 
other people deserve a chance. 

On the health issue, the sur- 
vey shows 2 public clinging to a 
few broad fundamentals while 
reflecting the doubts raised by 
1 8 months of fighting and mil- 
lions of dollars of advertising. 

Seventy- six percent said they 
still considered it “very impor- 
tant" that every American re- 
ceives coverage in any plan to 


months. And 68 percent said 
that if Congress did not pass a 
health care bill in the next year 
they would be disappointed. 

The survey presented respon- 
dents with the choice that faces 
lawmakers themselves: “Which 
would be the better way for 
Congress to work on health care 
reform: try to pass at least some 
minor changes this year and 
continue io work on major 
health care reform legislation 
next year, or wait until next 
year and try to do a comprehen- 
sive job of reforming health 
care all at once?" 

Fifty-seven percent said Con- 
gress should try for minor 
changes this year, the position 
held by many'Democratic strat- 
egists who fear that adjourning 
without any action on health 
will feed the voters' disgust with 
congressional gridlock. 


The public remains divided 
on the very issue that dead- 
locked Congress: 47 percent 
said employers should be re- 
quired to pay most of the cost of 
their workers' insurance, while 
41 percent said it was enough 
that employers be required to 
make insurance available for 
their workers to buy. 

There were other signs of am- 
bivalence and doubt, too. In 
what many analysts consider 
the most politically potent fear, 
more than half of the respon- 
dents said they worn' that “ir. 
order to provide health care for 
everyone, the quality of your 
own health care will be dimin- 
ished." 

So far, the public is spreading 
the blame for the difficulties in 
passing a major health care law. 
When presented with five possi- 
ble reasons to explain the stale- 
mate, the respondents pointed 
most frequently to special inter- 
ests and lobbyists, and to the 
level of government involve- 
ment in the president's original 
plan. 

Despite ail the emphasis on 
health care this year, the issue 
did not rank at the top when 
voters were asked what they 
thought was the most important 
problem facing the country to- 
day. Crime was first, cited by 26 
percent, compared to health 
care at 15 percent. 


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1994 


OPINION 


Jteralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



eribunc 


PUBI.ISHEU WITH 11 IK M-.W 1 C)RK TIMKh AND THE WAMHNr.'TON POST 


Haiti and U.S. War Powers 


To invade Haiti without prior congres- 
sional approval would short-circuit the 
U.S. Constitution. It would also leave the 
president with sole political responsibil- 
ity if the operation turns sour. Yet that is 
just what the Clinton administration now 
’suggests it might do. Neither of the situa- 
tions usually dted as justifying indepen- 
dent action by the commander-in-chief 
— military crisis or unexpected threat to 
rational security — exists in this case. To 
for contrary, congressional deliberation 
■5 both practical and desirable, and there 
'.}> plenty of time for it 
’ The constitution vests the power to 
declare war in Congress while giving the 
president command of the aimed forces. 
Those overlapping responsibilities have 
fueled generations of controversy. Be- 
yond indulging a natural tendency to 
press against a vaguely defined constitu- 
tional boundary, recent presidents have 
r voiced practical arguments for bypass- 
ing Congress, like the need for speedy 
response or tactical surprise. Under the 
threat of a missile-launched nuclear Ar- 
mageddon on 20 minutes' warning, the 
idea of protracted congressional deliber- 
ation could be made to look like an ab- 
surd 18th-century anachronism. 

“ Cold War presidents also argued that 
military actions taken under the authority 
of treaty commitments or United Nations 
resolutions are not really wars, but “police 
actions” or “troop redeployments," and 
thereby exempt from constitutional re- 
quirements. For years the U.S. Congress 
was happy to avoid responsibility'. But 
presidential excesses in Vietnam drove 
Congress to re claim some of its authority 
in the War Powers Resolution of 1973. 
This required presidents to get timely con- 
gressional approval whenever they placed 
UJS. troops at risk. Since then, presidents 


have disputed the resolution's authority 
but sometimes fulfilled its provisions. 

In 1991, Democrats in both houses 
insisted dial President George Bush get 
prior congressional approval for Opera- 
tion Desert Storm. Now, misplaced fealty 
drives many of those same Democrats to 
relieve President Bfll Clinton of the same 
responsibility. That is poor governance 
and poor partisanship too. Democrats 
would do better to protect Mr. Clinton 
from enmeshing himself in a military 
action where most Americans see no 
compelling national interests at stake and 
in which the first casualties are likely to 
bring bitter recrimination. 

President Jean-Bertrand Aristide still 
represents Haiti’s legitimate government. 
But sending the U.S. Marines to restore 
him to power makes no sense even if, as 
some military experts predict, that turns 
out to be an afternoon's work. A century 
of Latin interventions should have taught 
Washington that it cannot enforce de- 
mocracy at gunpoint. Haitians elected 
Father Aristide and still support him, but 
even his legitimacy may not survive bang 
install ed by foreign troops. 

It is frustrating to watch Haiti's generals 
sneer at sanctions, play games with the 
United Nations and systematically shoot 
down democratic leaders in cold blood. 
Their conduct warrants international os- 
tracism and economic sanctions until they 
yield power, then generous and muscular 
support for the elected government that 
replaces them. But the conditions that 
warrant an American invasion — condi- 
tions that include broad public support 
and congressional agreement — are not in 
place at this time. Mr. Clinton should not 
abuse his powers and risk damage to his 
presidency by plunging ahead. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Bringing Taiwan Back In 


After much study and painstaking re- 
study, the Clinton administration has 
Sightly adjusted the terms of American 
relations with Taiwan. But only very 
slightly. The United States declares that 
u i r firmly committed to a one- China 
poii::., , with all the diplomatic peculiari- 
ties that it creates. Traditionally the 
Communist reg ime in Beijing and the 
anti-Communist re gime on Taiwan have 
both asserted that there is only one Chi- 
na, and it indudes both the mainlan d and 
the island. Consequently, other countries 
have had to choose between them. 

; When the United States recognized the 
Beijing government 15 years ago. it de- 
recognized Taiwan. That is why Taiwan 
has no official embassy in Washington 
(although a very competent unofficial one) 
and why Taiwan's president is not allowed 
to viat the United States. That is also why 
Taiwan has no seat in the United Nations 
or most other international organizations. 

But relations between the two Chinas 
are changing fast Far from the bristling 
hostility of past decades, there are strong 
and growing commercial ties between the 
two, with heavy Taiwanese investment in 
a mainland economy that is far from Com- 
munist. The two governments have been 
negotiating directly and productively on 
a range of issues —fishing rights, repatria- 
tion of hijackers, air transportation. 


Taiwan is turning itself into a genuine 
democracy. Ruled by martial law for near- 
ly 40 years, it now has an elected legisla- 
ture and in 1996 will hold, for the first 
time, a presidential election. As it becomes 
more democratic, the support for the old 
claims to represent all China is declining. 
A substantial opposition now talks about 
declaring the island an independent re- 
public of Taiwan. But that brings an angry 
growl from Beijing, which, in accord with 
the one-China claim, considers the idea to 
be secessionist and ille gal. 

The two governments are going to have 
to work that one out between themselves. 
The Clinton administration is right in say- 
ing that the United States must not let 
itself be pushed into the position of trying 
to adjudicate it But the United States has 
a great interest in its peaceful resolution 
and in the continuing prosperity of both 
the mainland and the island. 

Meanwhile, nonrecognition imposes 
real costs on Taiwan. Under its newly 
revised polity, the United States says that 
it is prepared to support Taiwan's mem- 
bership at least in the international organi- 
zations, like those concerned with trade, in 
which a seat does not necessarily imply 
statehood. There are a lot of those organi- 
zations, and it is time to begin bringing 
Taiwan back into them. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Not for Hun or Anyone Else 


Gil Garcetti, the Los Angeles district 
attorney, made the right decision Friday 
when hie announced that prosecutors will 
not seek the death penalty in the case of 
O. J. Simpson. Opponents of capital pun- 
ishment — and we indude ourselves 
among them — would have come to the 
same conclusion easily based on a moral 
abhorrence of the penalty and a belief that 
no crime, no matter how horrendous, gives 
the state the retaliatory power to IdlL 

But Mr. Garcetti had a more difficult 
task not only because he, like most prose- 
cutors, believes the death penalty is some- 
times warranted, but because he faced 
pressure from diametrically opposed 
groups in a politically charged situation. 

Some African-American groups, wary 
of the racial aspects of the penalty, urged 
that it be avoided, while some women's 
groups, concerned about spouse abuse 
cases, favored it Mr. Garcetti listened to 
both arguments but said that he drew his 
answer from the law and the written 
guidelines used by his office in every case. 

How does that work? A team of eight 
lawyers in the district attorney’s office 
reviews every case that, under state law, 
might merit the death penalty. Since Mr. 
Garcetti has held that office, more than 
300 cases have been examined; in 16 
percent of them capital punishment was 
recomrnended. The standard is supposed 
to b*' -nether the evidence in the case is 
“of such convincing force" that a judge or 
jury would have to find that the aggravat- 
ing circumstances of the case outweighed 


the mitigating ones. Mr. Garcetti's office 
did not reveal the specifics of this weigh- 
ing process. Who knows what consider- 
ations really went into it? 

Lawyers familiar with the system said 
the absence of prior felony convictions in 
Mr. Simpson’s case and the fact that 
domestic violence cases rarely produce 
death sentences could have bom impor- 
tant factors. But it seems to us that such a 
ruling could have gone either way. 

This case, in truth, provides powerful 
evidence that the death penalty can never 
be administered in an absolutely fair way. 
The criteria used may be arbitrary, for 
example. Why should domestic murders 
be treated with more sympathy than kill- 
ings involving strangers? Why should 
prosecutors be allowed such wide discre- 
tion that the guidelines can be ignored, as 
they apparentiy were in the case of the two 
Meaendez brothers, who were young, free 
of felony records and charged with domes- 
tic murder? And can juries be counted 
upon to be as objective in the case of a 
nationally known personality whose image 
had been very positive as they would be 
when die defendant is obscure, unglamor- 
ous and poor, as most of them are? 

Life in prison without possibility of 
parole is a terrible punishment Singling 
out some offenders for the death penalty 
will always be an arbitrary exercise, inev- 
itably unfair and thus unjust In spite of 
its perceived popularity, it has no place in 
America’s criminal justice system. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



International Herald Tribune 

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Bosnia: Culture Offers the Seeds of Survival 


W ASHINGTON — Bosnia has become 
like the man who sits outside the clinic 
for reconstructive surgery in Sarajevo on 
sunny days, the man without a face. A bomb 
has destroyed his chin, cheeks, nose and 
mouth. He is carnage with eyes. 

People walk by and look away. They 
cannot bear for an instant to let their eyes 
meet his face. 

Bosnia is full of faces. Not just of men 
like that one, but of widows carrying water 
pails, of young children who do not recog- 

WUh each painting, each play, 
ice challenge violence with 
tolerance, fascism with art, 

nize something as simple as an egg, of 
computer engineers who have become bird 
hunters, trapping crows for a bit of meat, 
of filmmakers willing to clean streets in 
return for a few moments of peace. 

In their eyes, in their emaciated bodies 
and artificial limbs, in their struggle to get 
up, go out and live each day, Bosnia exists. 
It is a population and a plaos. 

But how to save this place? Bosnians in 
Sarajevo have wrestled with this question 
even as they have learned to pick their way 
along the streets, to step over bodies blown 
apart by shells, to endure fires, the cold, 
hunger, filth and the shattering of almost 
every window in Sarajevo. 

They have repeatedly asked themselves 
how, even as they have learned to live on 
drips of water, bursts of electricity, and 
fragile supply lines. 

The answer lies not just in the struggle 


By Lyric Wall work Winik 
and Dzenita Mehic 

they wage with meager guns and shells, with 
the barest of defenses. 

For two years the Bosnians have waited 
for the one-sided arms embargo to be lifted, 
but it has not been. They have waited for the 
Americans to come, but they do not. 

For Bosnians, the answer lies not simply in 
military survival or outside salvation, impor- 
tant as these are, but in cultural survival. 

This is a battle waged with words, images 
and expressions. It is a struggle by artists, 
writers, f ilmm akers and journalists — 
the famous and the ordinary — to create a 
cultural record, especially in Sarajevo. 

Cultural survival is based on the premise 
that, in Bosnia, many people do not base 
their identity on religion or nationality that 
would divide as well as define. In this multi- 
cultural nation, they continue to cling to the 
idea that they are simply Bosnians, a people 
with a past and with a future. 

Denied every military weapon by the Unit- 
ed Nations, Bosnians turn to culture as the 
last weapons to preserve themselves and 
their nation. It is an act of defiance in the 
face of unbridled destruction. 

Cultural survival began during the 
height of the war. Without paints, without 
canvas, as many as five art galleries opened 
in Sarajevo. Artists worked with whatever 
they could find — bricks, broken glass, 
burnt automobiles. Movies played at a cin- 
ema, where the only entrance was hidden 
in a backyard. The city’s theater remained 
open, run by an actor who lost both legs 
in a sh elling . 

Fashion shows premiered, with designs 


stitched horn used UN plastic tarpaulins. 

Newspapers were printed irregularly in 
basements and sold tty the reporters on the 
streets. Five radio stations broadcast across 
the city, powered by batteries. 

These moments of culture are small but 
necessary triumphs in the face of interna- 
tional waffling and wanton ruin. They are 
the seeds of survival. 

With each painting, each play, each con- 
cert, Bosnians challenge violence with toler- 
ance, fascism with art and ideas, destruction 
with creation, death with humor. 

This summer, during the promise of the 
cease-fire, Sarajevo even held a cultural fes- 
tival called Baby Universe. 

And all this has meaning. When the 
shilling picks up, sounding the threat of 
another Serbian offensive (as it did last 
week in an apparent effort to keo> the 
Pope away), the Bosnian people will con- 
tinue to fight to save their nation with art, 
music, ideas and words. 

Cultural survival has become the message 
that no artificial lines drawn on maps by 
guerrilla armies or indifferent diplomats can 
repeal the spirit of Bosnia or undo the 
nation and its people. 

It is perhaps t he only hope of a people 
and a place struggling to survive in plain 
view of a passive America and its allies. 

It is also a warning against any plan 
imposed by the outside world that would 
sacrifice, rather than preserve, the Bosnian 
nation and the Bosnian ideaL 


Lyric Wallwork Wmik is a -writer; Dzenita 
Mehic is a journalist with Radio 99 m Saraje- 
vo and currently a fellow at the National 
Forum Foundation. They contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


The Folly of Uniting Europe While Slicing It in Two 


A EG IN A Greece — If you 
.want to muse about the fu- 
ture of Europe, a good place to do 
it is under the columns of the 
hilltop temple of Aphaia, on this 
Greek island of Aegina. To the 
north, visible across the water on 
a dear day, is the Acropolis of 
Athens. To the south is Epidan- 
rus, ancient shrine of medicine 
and the theater. To the west lie 
Corinth and Thebes, great p ow er s 
four centuries before Christ 
Like today’s Europeans, the 
dassical Greeks knew what it 
means to belong to the same part 
of the map. They were all Hel- 
lenes, all part of Hellas. Unlike 
some of today’s Europeans, they 
did not draw' the conclusion that 
they ought therefore to become a 
single state. At the time when 
classical Greece was raising its 
light to the world. Athens was 
Athens, Sparta was Sparta, and 
so on. They came together for 
shared purposes — to fend off the 
Persians, for instance. But they 
kept their independence from 
each other because they were dif- 
ferent places, each with its own 
ideas and its own separate flavor. 

It is worth remembering this as 
the advocates of European union 
propose the latest variation of 
their plan to hammer different Eu- 
ropeans into a single political enti- 
ty. The new project — the cre- 
ation of Prime Minister Edouard 
Balladur of France and some of 
the top people in Germany's gov- 
erning Christian Democratic 
Union — is unlikely to succeed, 
because it faces exactly the same 
difficulty as all the other projects 
for European unification. 

As things stand, the countries 
that belong to the European 
Union decide some relatively mi- 
nor matters by a system of major- 
ity voting but any really big deci- 


By Brian Beedham 


son — on foreign policy, defense, 
the economy — requires the ccm- 
sent of everybody. This works 
quite wdl, since those who lose die 
argument on the fairly small ma- 
jority-vote issues suffer no funda- 
mental damagf! (though even here 
a fair amount of evasion and rule- 
breaking goes on). But it does not 
satisfy the unifiers of Europe; pre- 
cisely because it leaves the big 


or 20 members. Of the countries 
next in line for joining. Sweden 
and Norway are both anxious to 
preserve their own special flavor, 
so they will tiy to hold on to the 
unanimi ty principle on the big 
issues. Some of the East Europe- 
ans, especially Poland, feel the 
same. And if it comes to look as if 
Germany could organize an over- 
riding majority out of the influ- 


It would take four members of an EU core group to 
counterbalance the strength of the fifth — Germany . 


things to unanimity, and the unifi- 
ers are wefl aware that there will 
seldom be unanimity on the big 
things: there is generally a veto 
ready to be used. 

This is why they have proposed 
the extension of majority voting 
to a wider range of subjects, in- 
cluding some of the big issues — 
and presumably, in the end, to 
everything that shapes the lives of 
Europeans. They are right to say 
that, without this, the present Eu- 
ropean Union is not really a 
union at alL They would like to 
“deepen” it into the real thing. 

But this has run into the obvi- 
ous objection. The trouble with 
the veto, say the unifiers, is that 
people tike to use iL We should 
therefore agree to abolish iL Even 
in the present European Union of 
12 members it will be impossible 
to bring off this non sequitur. The 
British want to hang on to the 
right to say no. So do the Danes. 
There are others who privately 
agree, even if the magic of the 
word “union” makes them hesi- 
to say so out loud. 

It wifl get even harder to abol- 
ish the veto if the EU grows to 16 


Tendtothe Wounds and Look Ahead 


W ASHINGTON — Having 
done little to resolve the 
America's multiple economic 
problems, George Bush be- 
queathed to Bill Oiatoa the 
complex assignment of restoring 
some sense of fiscal balance by 
reducing the federal budget defi- 
cit. This required Mr. Clinton to 
opt for substantial increases in 
taxes across the board. 

America's international eco- 
nomic policy has been wound- 
ed, too. Dunng the late 1980s, 
the Bush administration offi- 
cials James Baker and Richard 
Darman had carefully crafted a 
system of international cooper- 
ation, but it fell on bard times. 
Europe and the United States 
indulged their special interests 
by allowing a trade war over 
agricultural products to delay 
the creation of broader new 
rules and coverage under the 
General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade. The United States 
and Japan continued to scrap 
over trade imbalances that per- 
sisted despite a series Of agree- 
ments aimed at managing cur- 
rency fluctuations, and Third 
World nations continued to stag- 
ger under the burden of their 
international debt until deflation 
during the Bush presidency 
forced interest rates lower. 

In “the good old days,” the 
Federal Reserve Board could 
jump start the economy with 
lower interest rates. Now it is 
not so simple: Not only are con- 
sumers and businesspeople not 
anxious to take on new debt, 
they worry about the country’s 
ana their own long-term future. 
Thus, from June 1989 through 
October 1993, the Federal Re- 
serve Board took 24 easing steps 
that helped corporations and in- 
dividuals reduce the interest 


By Hobart Bowen 

This is the second of two articles. 

rate burden. But the old econo- 
my-stimulating ma gic seemed 
to have lost its potency. 

As 1994 got under way, a 
modest business recovery was 
taking place, sufficient to trig- 
ger a reversal of the Fed’s easy- 
money policy. Clearly, the 
economy was creating more 
jobs — notably in the services 
sector — more quickly than the 
most optimistic Clinton aides 
had hoped, with a minimum 
impact on inflation. Respond- 
ing to a higher yen that raised 
Japanese car prices and to the 
unproved quality of American 
cars, Americans turned in- 
creasingly to Detroit’s offer- 
ings. For at least a short hori- 
zon, the American economy 
under Bill Clinton was enjoy- 
ing a comfort level that politi- 
cians in Europe and Japan 
could only envy. 

Yet, the United States faces 
severe, longer-term problems. 
The president and Congress, 
though committed to a steady 
reduction of the fiscal deficit, 
must improve the skills of the 
labor force. That will require 
greater spending by business 
and government 

Will the economy be able to 
generate the high-quality jobs 
needed in the coming age? 

A notable phenomenon of 
the late 1980s and early 1990s 
was the “downsizing" of large 
corporations. Companies 
closed plants and eliminated 
jobs while carrying on produc- 
tion at roughly the same pace. 

In business terms, it made 
sense; from the worker's stand- 
point, it represented a sea 


change from the days when 
even a high school graduate 
could expect stable employ- 
ment that would help him or 
her fulfill the American dream 
of raising a family, owning a 
car and eventually a home. 

That dream will not return in 
the short run. and perhaps not 
for years to come. The deficit 
remains a constant Of all the 
self-inflicted wounds of the past 
three decades, none has been 
more harmful than the public 
debt saddled on (be American 
people by the eight years of Rea- 
ganomics, accompanied by a de- 
cline in real wages. 

The right policy prescription is 
to focus on investment, not just 
on controlling the budget deficit 
America needs a fiscal thrust: 
the expenditure of more money 
in the public sector. That would 
include rehabilitating the urban 
educational system and increas- 
ing teachers' pay, reviving reve- 
nue sharing to ease the burdens 
on state and local governments, 
and transferring large amounts 
of money from defense to civil- 
ian programs, notably for roads, 
bridges and highways. 

For the next decade or two, 
Americans wQl face a regimen of 
constrained national budgets. 
But the next decade or two is not 
forever. The United States re- 
mains the strongest economic 
power, even if it is more depen- 
dent on global well-being than 
ever before. It cannot operate, as 
Ronald Reagan in his first tom 
supposed, with “benign neglect" 
of the impact of U.S. policies on 
other nations’ prosperity. Ameri- 
ca’s goal should be to share pow- 
er with a stronger Japan and 
Germany, instead of concluding 
that the three must collide. 

The Washington Past. 


ence it wields in Northern and 
Eastern Europe, the South Euro- 
peans will be increasingly reluc- 
tant to find themselves caught in 
a dcfca cable minority. 

Enter the unifiers’ latest sug- 
gestion. If some Europeans do 
not like where lull union might 
take them, at least let the true 
believers get on with it The next 
steps toward a federal Europe, 
say Mr. Balladur and Wolfgang 
SchSuble, the CDU parliamenta- 
ry leader, can be taken by an 
inner group of five countries — 
Germany. France, Belgium, the 
Netherlands and Luxembourg. 

Do not believe it It is not just 
that the idea infuriates Italy, the 
excluded member of the original 
European Six; or that the rest of 
the present EU dislikes the 
thought of being formally relegat- 
ed to a sort of second divirion; or 
that there is something funny 
about saying you want to unite 
Europe while in fact slicing the 
current union in two. The real 
implausibtiity of this scheme lies 
within its chosen five countries. 

In one of them, the Nether- 
lands, recent opinion polls have 


shown a degree of hostility to the 
concept of a federal Europe that 
would make it very hard for a 
Dutch government to sign up to 
the Baliadur-Schauble plan. More 
important, it is highly unlikely that 
France, whatever Mr. Bahadur 
now says, would agree to tie itself 
so tightly to Germany with no- 
body else except the three little 
Benelux countries in the package. 

Since Germany’s reumfic. Ion 
the French-German balance c. 
power the French once stubbornly 
believed in has vanished forever. 
Germany is now far stronger than 
France in money, in the influence 
money can buy, and in the military 
power Germany will be able to 
deploy around the world by the 
end of die century. Tied one-to- 
one to such a Germany, the 
French will do what the Germans 
want, not the other way around. 

This is why, in any tightly 
bound Europe, France needs 
Britain and Italy and Spain 
alongside it to help counterbal- 
ance that German strength. It is 
why five into one will not go. 
Nobody likes swallowing an un- 
pleasant truth, but this is the 
truth now in France's throaL 

Ah, say the Eurounifiers, it may 
look tike this when you are sitting 
among the pines by a hilltop tem- 
ple on a Greek island; but would 
not classical Greece have been an 
even better place if it had unified 
itself, and should Europe not seize 
the chance that Greece missed? 

The honest answer is no. 
A unified ancient Greece might 
indeed have been spared those 
bloody wars between its city- 
states. But Europe no longer faces 
that particular danger. The Ger- 
mans and French and British have 
learned the lesson of the 20th cen- 
tury. They are not going to fight 
each other again, whatever their 
formal constitutional relationship. 
And, for the rest, the Greek exam- 
ple does not point Europe down 
the road to political unification. 

The glory that was Greece, in 
the 5th and 4th centuries B.G, 
required no all-Greek Parliament 
sitting in Thebes, no commission 
with an office in Corinth, no pan- 
HeUenic army commanded (one 
fears) from Sparta. The great new 
light of philosophy and culture 
and politics that burst upon the 
world in those centuries was at 
least in part a product of Greece’s 
very diversity and variety. When 
Greece was eventually made into a 
single state — by that cold outsid- 
er, Philip of Macedon — the light 
never shone so brightly w ytin 

Even now, though, there is a 
certain clarity in the Greek sky 
that aids those peering into 
the future. Perhaps the theoreti- 
cians of European unity should 
come and lean against the col- 
umns of Aphaia. 

International Herald Tribune. 


portunity and obligation to ex- 
plain to Americans why he may 
take them to war, any day now. 
That weakens a substantial case 
for the invasion of an execution 
ground created in America’s back- 
yard not by a government but by 
gpnmen sent by generals to mur- 
der adults and ebudren. Mr. Clin- 
ton leaves explaining to subordi- 
nates. But on the verge of wax, to 
delay further his duty to talk for 
hims elf, fully and candidly, does 
disservice to the men and women 
who will be sent into action, to 
Haitians and to his own case. 

But about Cuba it is too late to 
change the reality that the United 
States demanded that Fidel Castro 
resume blocking the in taxational- 
ly “guaranteed” right of Cubans to 
leave. The administration did so 
almost frantically, in view of the 
whole world, ignoring America’s 
history of supporting that right. 

On Dec. 10, 1948, the Imited 
Nations passed the Universal 
Declaration of Human Rights, 
with no dissenting votes but with 
the Soviet Union, its Eastern Eu- 
ropean captive nations and South 
Africa abs taining . Article 13 was 
one that U.S, adminis trations 

liked to quote in the decades that 
followed. They said violations of 
that article by the . Soviet bloc 
were international crimes. This is 
the heart of Article 13: 

“Everyone has the right to leave 
any country, including his own, 
and to return to his country." 

During the years that Fldd Cas- 
tro imprisoned Cubans for trying 
to exercise that right, the United 
States gave refuge to those who did 
get out. But this summer Mr. Cas- 
tro decided to apply a little pres- 
sure to see if this American presi- 
dent would put his convictions 
where his embargo was. So he told 
Cubans brave enough to sail to- 
ward freedom: Go ahead, see what 
the United States will do for you. 

The Clinton administration 
took one good look and surren- 
dered. It surrendered decades of 
American commitment to the 
right of free exit — in the UN 
declaration and other interna- 
tional covenants the United 
States had signed. Washington 
looked at the drenched people in 
those rafts and saw other faces: 
Floridians who might vote Re- 
publican if rafters were allowed 
to land and kiss American solL 

No country has to accept all 
refugees. But no decent country 
can overlook the human obliga- 
tions imposed by proximity, and 
by adherence to aQ those inter- 
national declarations. When 
co m m un ism collapsed, Europe- 
an nations took in people com- 
ing through the Berlin Wall. Pa- 
kistan took millions of Afghans 
fleeing war. Zaire took Rwan- 
dans, vast crowds of them. 

Washington deserted the right 
of free exit because the Cubans 
were politically inconvenient. 

Fidd Castro wfll be filling up 
empty cells with Cubans who 
still try to escape his rotting 
Co mm u n ist dictatorship. We 
can expect the United States to 
reward him later; watch. . . 

And America will morally be 
among his wardens, on patrol in 
his prison corridors, whoever 
thought it would happen? And 
whoever thought that America 
would call this deed a victory? 

The New York Times. 


m OUR PAGES: 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Invasion of China? 

SHANGHAI — Chinese authori- 
ties admit that there are grave 
reasons to believe the Japanese 
actually contemplate the invasion 
of China. [The Herald says in an 

editorial:] “The Chinese and Jap- 
raese can scarcely fed surprised 
that Europe should cease to take 
any interest in their warfare. In. 
these days no one cares for any- 
thing that is not quickly decided. 
Had the siege of Troy taken 
place m the year 1894, no one 
would have felt the slightest in- 
terest m the fate of Helen at the 
end of the first five weeks." 

1919: Unrest in Ireland 

LONDON — Ireland is in a f er- 
ment unequalled in intensity 
smee the Easter rebellion of three 
Jg“ following last night's 
l bept 12] proclamation prohibit- 
ing the Sum Fein organization. 


The police and militar y through- 
out Ireland swooped down on the 
Sinn Feiners’ nests, arresting 
leaders and seizing arms, ammu - 
niti on and literature. The Dublin 
Government win not now proceed 
with any plans for ihe provision of 
self -government in Ireland, and its 
energies wffl be directed instead to 
a rigorous suppression of the pre- 
sent criminal outbreak. Tbe estab- 
lishment erf martial law is not a 
remote possibility. 

1944: AOfes Rule Skies 

SUPREME HEADQUAR- 
TER5,ALLIED EXPEDITION- 
ARY FORCE — (From our New 
York edition;] The Allies appar- 
ently have won their first lag vic- 
tory in the battle for Germany. 
Luftwaffe opposition to the mas- 
sive softening-op by Allied air 
power has dwindled tonight 
[Sept. 13 ] and the AngloAmeri- 
cans rule western German sLfe* 




Shamefully 

Helping 
The Jailer 

By A. M. Rosenthal 

N EW YORK — The results to 
date of Clintonian policy in 
the Caribbean: 

First, in Cuba, the United States 
has achieved a new status: Ftdd 
Castro's partner in violation of in- 
ternational codes on h uman rights. 

At least three international dec- 
larations and covenants proclaim 
the ri ght of all people to leave and 
return to their country at will. But 
in Cuba it has been a serious 
crime. Thousands have been im- 
prisoned for it, 3 to 15 years. 

For 30 years, the United States 
cited Fidd Castro's breaking of 
international free-exit pacts as a 
major reason for ostracizing him. 
Now Washington tells us it is a 
victory that the United Stateslias 
persuaded hfm to hurry up and 
break than again by patrolling the 
beaches against Cubans stunning- p 
Iy brave enough to set out in one of 
♦hose heartbreaking little rafts; 
Second, on Haiti, Bill Clinton is 



* 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 14. 1994 



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OPINION 




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The Bible Says Nothing 
About Balanced Budgets 


By Herbert Stein 


W ASHINGTON - The other 
day I was surfing through the 
channels when I heard a spokesman 
for the Christian Coalition explaining 
his organization’s platform. I was 
surprised to hear that one of the 
planks was balancing the b udge t 
I sun not an expert on Christian 
doctrine — or on Jewish doctrine 
either, for that matter — but I have 
paid a lot of attention to arguments 
about balancing the budget. With 
one exception, I don't think- J have 
ever heard it suggested that balancing 
the budget was a Christian precepL 
The one exception was a remark by 
Walter Heller, chairman of the Coun- 
cil of Economic Advisers when John 
Kennedy was president He said, dis- 
missivelv, that balancing the budget 
was part of “the Puritan ethic.” 

But Mr. HeQer. although a smart 
fellow, was not an authority on 
Christianity. I have consulted a con- 
cordance on the Bible. Apparently 
the word “budget” does not appear in 
either the Old or the New Testament. 
Hie word “balance” . does appear 
about eight times, but never in con- 
nection with fiscal policy. 

Perhaps I am bong too literal. 
There may be a more general princi- 
ple from. which an injunction to bal- 
ance the budget can be derived Prob- 
ably the main moral or ethical issue 
has to do with equity between the 
present generation and Future ones. 
Running a deficit can be regarded as 
a way in which the present generation 
puts a burden on the future. 

What is the proper moral judg- 
ment of that? The Fifth Command- 
ment says, “Honor thy father and thy 
mother.” It does not say, “Thou shall 
honor thy children and grandchil- 
dren.” Thus one might say that the 
commandment not only sanctions 
but may even require running a bud- 
get deficit as a way for younger gen- 
erations to sacrifice for older ones. 

The Old and New Testaments 
both call on us to love our neighbors 
as ourselves. If “neighbor” can be 
interpreted temporally as well as spa- 
tially, we can say that the generations 
to come are our neighbors and we are 
instructed to show as much concern 
for future generations as for our own. 
One implication ought be that we 
should so behave that future genera- 
tions will have as high per capita 
incomes as we do. This may tell us 
something about budget policy, but it 
does not tell us to balance the budget 
From 1973 lo 1993, when the bud- 
get was never in balance and deficits 
averaged 3.6 percent of gross domes- 
tic product,, real per capita gross do- 
mestic product rose at an annual rate 




of 1J percent That is enough to 
double per capita income in 50 years. 

In the high deficit years that be- 
gan with the Reagan administration, 
from 1981 to 1993, when deficits 
averaged 4.3 percent of the gross 
domestic product, real per capita 
incomes rose 1 J percent a year. 

But our concern for the future 
will not be. or should not be. mea- 
sured by real per capita gross do- 
mestic product alone. Our legacy 
will be something more serious 
than that. If we can leave our chil- 
dren a country free of the danger of 
war, with safe streets, reduced ra- 
cial hostility, fewer miserable ur- 
ban ghettos and an elevated cul- 
ture, we will not have to apologize 
for leaving a larger federal deficit 

Recently I beard some scientists 
discussing the research they were 
doing in the field of genetics. They 
were talking of the probability that 
as a result of their work the risk of 
breast cancer would be greatly re- 
duced within 15 or 20 years. 

It seems to me that the willingness 
of our generation to invest in that 
research shows much love for the 
next generation. The scientists were 
at the National Institutes of Health. 
Their work was financed by the gov- 
ernment — that is, financed in part 
by the deficit. 

I am not arguing here against a 
policy of balancing the budget, for 
which there is something to be said. 
Nor am I arguing against the right of 
the Christian Coalition to support 
a balanced budget. But I do thank 
there is an obligation not to mislead 
the public about the basis for one’s 
support of any policy. The Christian 
Coalition would tie truer to its 
nam e, in my opinion, if it did not 
rive the impression that its support 
for balancing the budget was de- 
rived from Christian doctrine. 

“Render to Caesar the things 
that are Caesar’s, and to God the 
things that are God’s.” it is said. 
I believe that federal budget policy 
falls in Caesar’s domain. 

It is also said that “Thou shall not 
take the name of the Lord thy God 
in vain.” I believe that means that 
one should not invoke the authority 
of God for propositions, however 
worthy on other grounds, for which 
God has given no sanction. 

The writer, a senior fellow at 
the American Enterprise Institute, 
was chairman of the president's 
Council of Economic Advisers under 
Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. He 
contributed this comment to The 
New York Times. 



By JAVAD la Tmo^Bicaton (Tctano). CAW Syndicate. 


The Birth Outside the Window 


ForJrhnJ.. Phillips 

P ARIS — NVhen a Welsh friend 
asked why the French ute radish- 
es for breakfast. I replied that they 
didn’L They ate croissants. 1 said 
Sometimes they didn't eat anything 
but drank glasses of beer or red wine 
for breakfast. No mailer what the 
individual preference. I explained 

ME4NWHILE 

with some authority, the French 
breakfast never included radishes. 

If the French did not eat radishes 
for breakfast, my friend persisted, 
why was there a variety of radish 
known as “French breakfast"? 

As in “English breakfast tea?” 
I asked. He said yes. exactly, and 
I scoffed. 

A few months later I received in 
the mail a small packet of seeds for 
a variety of radish known as French 
breakfast. With the packet came a 
letter from my friend inviting me to 
plant the seeds and. when they had 
produced radishes, to sit myself 
down for a traditional French 
breakfast. 

That is how 1 became involved 
with the pigeons. 

First 1 bought a plastic window 
box, about three feet long and nine 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Strengthening an Alliance 

Regarding "The Case for Giv- 
ing NA TO an American Secretary- 
General ” (Opinion, Aug. 19) by Da- 
vid M. Law: 

2 agree that choosing an American 
as secretary-general of NATO would 
be the best way to strengthen Euro- 
pean- American relations at this spe- 
cial moment. An American secretary- 
general could make it dear to the 
world that the ties between the Old 
and the New World will not become 
weaker in the beginning of this new 
era of international relations. Gose 
cooperation between Europe and 
America must remain the mainstay 
of international security. 

Apart from the advantages men- 
tioned from such an appointment 
and the naming of a European as 
supreme commander, 1 see an addi- 
tional one: A European commander 
could pave the way for French mili- 
tary reintegration and thus for a com- 
mon European security policy on the 
basis of full NATO enlargement by 
East European countries. America 
might accept their membership if 
military responsibility in Europe lies 
more or less on European shoulders. 

KARL-HEINZ hornhues. 

Bonn. 


have been lost by France as Tar as 
influence on NATO is concerned. 

GEORGES GRIMAL. 
Boulogne-sur-Seine, France. 


In response to the report " France 
to Resume Seal at NATO Military 
Talks " (Sept. 3) by Joseph Fitchetl : 

At last! This is a story that goes 
back to 1940, when President Roose- < _ 

veil recognized Marshal P6tain as the Perspectives on Haiti 
legitimate French head of state. After r 
this, the divide between Roosevelt 
and de Gaulle became wider and 
wider. De Gaulle was kept aside dur- 
ing the preparations for landings in 
North Africa, Italy and France. Such 
humiliations were not forgotten. 

Fortunately, de Gaulle was not 
part of the French government when 
the Atlantic alliance was formed, so 
ail went smoothly. General Eisen- 
hower offered France an essential 
role in setting up the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization and SHAPE of- 
fices in Paris. But after de Gaulle A Shift Well Under Way 
returned to power in 1958 he lost no J 

time in dismantling French participa- 
tion. He was not willing to be in the 
“American camp.” 

Being in a position to appreciate 
the damage caused to France and 
NATO, I found myself constrained 
to leave my position as a general in 
the French Air Force (with regret). 

To question the de Gaulle policy 
has been taboo in France. But it is as 
nonsensical as UJS. isolationism of 
many years ago. More than 30 years 


Regarding "Quayle Sees Politics 
at Play Over Haiti ” (Political Notes, 
Sept. 9): 

Dan Quayle says that President 
Bill Clinton is thinking of invading 
Haiti for political gain. If thousands 
of Haitian refugees were sheltered in 
die former vice president's home 
state of Indiana he might have a 
belter understanding of the situation. 

MARC D. EMORY. 

Dusseldorf. 


Regarding “ Plenty of Time Going 
Unused" (Meanwhile, Aug. 30): 

Time is a precious resource and an 
important dement of the quality of 
life. The writer's comments on* the 
use of night time are banal and retro- 
grade. If he went outside at 3 A.M. 
instead of sitting home with his com- 
puter, he would be well aware of 
today's world of night work. 

MONIOL'E MAYNE. 

Paris. 


Bv Samuel Abt 


inches deep, and planted the radish 
seeds on a small ledge outside the 
living room, following the instruc- 
tions and pouring the seeds liberally 
in row's so many inches apart, cover- 
ing them with dirt and watering 
them often. When green tops 
sprouted 1 thinned the crop, dis- 
carding every third plant. Months 
went by in a rustic way and the 
green tops grew thick. 

When the instructions said it was 
time to harvest the radishes, 1 did. 
Although the tops were lush, the rad- 
ishes themselves were small. Tuiy, 
actually, each about as big as a tack. 
The entire harvest could not have 
made a single course at breakfast. 

So I quit the radish business, leav- 
ing the window box out there. We 
fanners call it letting the earth lie 
fallow for a season. 

Then the pigeons moved in, set- 
tling in the window box and fouling 
the ledge. If I made a loud noise — 
shouted or clapped my bands in- 
side the room — the pigeons flew 
off for a while but quickly returned. 
After a while they became so dis- 
dainful that even noise would not 
scare them off; I had to open the 
window to chase them. 

Last spring I was away for a few 
weeks and, when I returned, a pi- 
geon was sitting in the box. When I 
shouted, it continued to sit When I 
opened the window, the pigeon 
turned its head, looked at me and, 
reluctantly, it seemed, flew off. 
There in die box were two eggs, 
more gray than white, each about 
half the size of a chicken’s egg. 
When I closed the window, the pi- 
geon returned and sat on the eggs. 
We farmers call it brooding, I think . 

(Notes on pigeon hatching: Same 
bird continues to sit on eggs for more 
than a week. Sometimes relieved by 
another pigeon, rarely for long. Un- 
certain whether second bird is male, 
father to eggs. Uncertain also where 
first bird goes when it flies off but 
presume to feed. Whatever, pigeons 
sit on eggs around the clock, leaving 
them only when I open window to 
water flowers.) 

Nearly two weeks later one egg 
cracked and disgorged a pigeon. It 
was small, about the size of on in- 
fant’s fool, and wet. The second egg 
cracked a few days later and this 
pigeon was even smaller than the 
first. (Why had I assumed that the 
longer the term in the egg, the bigger 
the bird?) Both shells disappeared, 
whether eaten, buried or carried 
away. This is not a comprehensive 
report on the life cycle of pigeons 
because, between my job and out- 
side interests, I had little time to 
watch that cycle. 


Little imeiesi also. Not much ac- 
tually happens on a minute- to-min- 
ute Basis in the pigeon-raising line 
— the same is true with radishes 
and probably most crops — and we 
settled into a relationship of mutu- 
al neglect, the pigeons living on 
their side of the window. 1 on mine. 

Plus the splendors of nature are 
less splendid when they include a 
constant fouling of the radish box, 
the ledge and even the flower pots. 
In short, my main crop seemed to 
have become guano. It was not 
pretty. 

Another week or so and ihe chicks 
(you could look ii up) began to be 
fed. Leaving them untended, the 
main pigeon flew off for long peri- 
ods and, when it returned, leaked 
some sort of drool from its beak into 
theirs while the chicks peeped loud- 
ly. They grew bigger and their feath- 
ers took on a recognizable pigeon 
shape and color. 

Soon the bigger or ihem was out 
of the box and stumbling around the 
ledge. In another few days, it was 
fluttering its wings in practice. .And 
then one morning n was gone, off 
into the world. The big pigeon, the 
mother, left a few days later. 

By then the smaller bird had 
managed to climb out of the box 
too. It settled in a corner of the 
ledge and gazed out at the sky. the 
flag snapping in the breeze, the 
clouds, the sun, the moon, the stars. 

Occasionally it siood at the edge 
and looked down five stories. 
It did not flutter its wings in prac- 
tice. Still so small, this one was 
staying put. 

For how long? The bird was not 
being fed and it was out in the 
weather, away from the security of 
the box. Presumably it was subject 
to animal drives: Pigeons fly. no: 
linger, lo their way, pigeons even 
soar. This one continued only to 
regard the skies. 

Then, one afternoon, as the sun 
moved away from the iedge, the pi- 
geon’s time arrived. It was quite a 
fair size by now and its wings arched 
high. Once, twice it pumped those 
wings. Then, with a great clattering, 
the pigeon li ted off, lofted, hung 
there in the sky for an instant and 
flapped away, flown. 

Life, Johnny, life. As long as there 
is memory, life. 

International Herald Tribune. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters t» the 
Editor “ and contain the writer's si- 
gnature, name and full address. Let ■ 
ters should be brief and ore subject 
to editing. IFc cannot be responsible 
for the return of unsolicited mu- 
nuscripis. 


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JPage.6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1994 


** 


Japan Gives Hazy Commitment 
In Seeking Security Council Seat 


By T. R. Reid 

Washington Past Senior 

*• TOKYO — Does Japan want 
a seat on the United Nations 
Security Council? The govern- 
ment addressed that question 
head-on Tuesday and came up 
with a classic Japanese-style an- 
swer: yes and no. 

- With the UN secretary-gen- 
eral, Butros Butros GhaJi, 
strongly urging Japan to seek a 
seat on the Security Council, 
jop officials of Prime Minister 
Tomiichi Murayama's govern- 
ment struggled Tuesday to 
work out a position that could 
win support from all the ele- 
ments of the country's shaky 
liberal-conservative coalition 
government. 

Id the end, the government 
agreed. As Foreign Minister 
yohei Kono said, to “express 
the will that Japan wants to 
fulfill the responsibilities of a 
member of the Security Coun- 
cil.” 

: But if that wording sounds 
like a “yes,” Mr. Kono went on 
to place so many conditions on 
Japan's position that the final 
Stance might just be taken as a 
"no." 

j The result seemed to leave 
Mr, Butros Ghali thoroughly 


mystified.. Asked what Lhe Japa- 
nese leadership had told him 
about the UN bid, the secre- 
taiy-general replied, “I have to 
ask somebody that question 
myself.” 

Japan’s inability to produce a 
clear answer reflects both the 
nation's ancient cultural tradi- 
tions and its modern history. 

As a cultural matter, the Jap- 
anese tend to consider it rude to 
come right out and ask for 
something directly. 

This reticence is amplified in 
this case because of Japan's bit- 
ter memories of its disastrous 
military history adventure in 
World War H. 

Almost nobody in Japan 
wants to see the country in- 
volved in overseas military op- 
erations. And there has been 
reluctance for Japan to play a 
leadership role in the UN be- 
cause it might require a mili- 
tary contribution. Another rea- 
son for the government’s fuzzy 
reply is that the government it- 
self is unable to agree on a clear 
position. 

The current coalition links 
traditionally liberal and conser- 
vative parties, and the resulting 
policy split is evident on many 
issues. 

Mr. Murayama, the Socialist 


Party leader and prime minis- 
ter, has repeatedly expressed his 
reluctance about a Security 
Council seat. But his foreign 
minister. Mr. Kono, comes 
from a conservative party and 
seems much readier to accept 
increased responsibility. 

Since coming to power, two 
months ago, the more conserva- 
tive dements in Mr. Muraya- 
ma’s coalition have been nudg- 
ing the government toward 
changing that position. 

But Mr. Kono had difficulty 
Tuesday trying to clarify what 
the government bad agreed to. 

He said, “Japan wants to ful- 
fill the responsibilities''’ of Secu- 
rity Council membership. But 
he added that Japan would 
meet these responsibilities 
“within the limits of our consti- 
tution.” 

“We will not use levels of 
force that are prohibited by our 
constitution,” Mr. Kono said. 
But he declined to say whether 
the prohibition would interfere 
with Security Council obliga- 
tions. 

Mr. Kono also said Security 
Council membership could 
only come if Japanese public 
opinion supported it. Most re- 
cent polls snow the people bad- 
ly split on the issue. 



Saced Khan/AgcDcr Francc-PitM 

PAKISTAN CAMPAIGN — The opposition leader Nawaz Sharif, at left in railcar, 
being showered with petals during a stop in Rawalpindi, near Islamabad, on Tuesday. 


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Ex- Admiral Returns 
To a Tragic Scene 

He Sees Effects of Defoliant 



By Tim Larimer 

Washington Bast Service ' 

HANOI — The two sisters, 8 
and 10 years old but barely 
three feet tall, smiled shyly on 
their contorted legs, bent out of 
shape since birth. 

“It’s tragic," said Elmo Zum- 
walt Jr, a retired admiral The 
girls, according to the director 
of a clinic here, are the children 
of a North Vietnamese soldier 
who was exposed to Agent Or- 
ange in South Vietnamese jun- 
gles. 

It was Admiral Zumwalt, 
now 73, who as commander of 
U.S. naval forces in Southeast 
Asia from 1968 to 1970 ordered 
the chemical defoliant sprayed 
over the South Vietnamese 
countryside to deprive Commu- 
nist troops of cover. 

[A report in the United States 
saying dioxin is more likely to 
cause cancer than was previous- 
ly thought should lead to more 
compensation for veterans ex- 
posed to Agent Orange defoli- 
ant in the Vietnam War, Admi- 
ral Zumwalt was quoted by 
Reuters as saying Tuesday in 
Vietnam. 

[He added that the report was 
"ample evidence to add signifi- 
cant other diseases for compen- 
sation.” 

[Admiral Zumwalt said he 
would ask President Bill Clin- 
ton and congressional commit- 
tees to provide extra funds for 
research on the effects of 
dioxin. The report, by the Envi- 
ronmental Protection Agency, 
issued in Washington, on Tues- 
day, was a major support for 
the veterans' cause, he added.1 

Admiral Zumwalt. the high-' 
est-rankmg U.S. veteran to re- 
turn to Vietnam since the war, 
is on a weeklong trip that is 
intended both to address one of 
the most bitter legacies of the 
war and in memory of his elder 
son, Elmo Zumwalt 3d, whose 
fatal cancer may have been 
caused by Agent Orange. 

On Monday, he toured 
Thanh Xuan village, a rehabili- 
tation center for retarded and 
deformed children. Of the 70 
children housed there, 49 have 
fathers who fought in southern 
Vietnam, according to Nguyen 
My Hien, the school's director. 

About 20 million gallons (75 
million liters; of herbicide were 
sprayed on South Vietnam dur- 


ing the war, laying bare an esti- 
mated 10 percent of the coun- 
try. More titan half of the 
herbicide used was Agent Or- 
ange. 

Arnold Schecter, a physician 
and Agent Orange expert trav- 
eling with Admiral Zumwalt. 
said there was still no scientific 
proof that the herbicide causes 
birth defects. 

But Admiral Zumwalt ’s elder 
son, Brno, was a patrol boat 
commander in 1969 and 1970 in 
the Mekong Delta, where Agent 
Orange was used to clear dense 
vegetation that masked Viet 
Cong troops. 

Six years ago, Elmo Zumwalt 
died of a form of cancer that 
has been linked to Agent Or- 
ange; his own son, now 17, suf- 
fers from learning disabilities. 

“f absolutely believe, there's * 
no doubt in my mind, that El- 
mo's cancer had to be the result 
of exposure to Agent Orange,” 
A dmir al Zumwalt said. 

Still, Admiral Zumwalt de- 
fends his military decision to 
use the herbicide and says he 
would do the same thing today. 

"It’s the kind of tragic deci- 
sion (hat has to be made in 
warfare,” he said. “We desper- 
ately needed something to re- 
duce the casualties. We used 
Agent Orange to save lives." 

He said he did not know at 
the time that the defoliant was a 
carcinogen. But even if he had, 
he added, "Under the same cir- 
cumstances, with no other alter- 
natives, yes, I would do . the 
same.” 

Since his retirement, he has 
made redressing the human 
damage inflicted by Agent Or- 
ange his personal mission. He 
camp ai g ns for compensation 
for war veterans suffering from 
exposure to the chemical, and 
he is in Vietnam to urge the 
government to cooperate in re- 
search on the herbicide's health 
impact here. 

Admiral Zumwalt's return to 
Vietnam also has included 
meetings with old adversaries. % 
as part of an attempt, he said, 

"to bind the old wounds.” 

’ He had wanted to visit Viet- 
nam earlier but said the State 
Department urged him to wait 
until a U.S. ban on trade with 
Hanoi was lifted; Mr. Clinton 
ended the embargo in Febru- 
ary. • , 


North Korea Opens Pair 
Of Nuclear Sites to UN 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

VIENNA — North Korea al- 
lowed United Nations nuclear 
inspectors into two atomic sites 
previously off-limits to the In- 
ternational Atomic Energy 
Agency, and the experts report- 
ed no unusual activity, an agen- 
cy spokesman said Tuesday. 

The agency inspectors, work- 
ing at North Korea's main nu- 
clear complex at Yongbyon, 
were allowed access over the 
weekend to a fuel-fabrication 
plant and a fresh-fuel storage 
building, said the agency 
spokesman, David Kyd. 

“Our inspectors phoned to 
say they had been permitted to 
go in over the weekend,” he 
said, "and they said there was 
nothing unusual going on. It is a 
modest step in the right direc- 
tion. 

"But of course we're still far 
short of being able to resume 
our normal inspection activities 
— let alone be able to say that 
the North Koreans are living up 
to their obligations under the 
safeguards agreement and. the 
NPT,” he said. The NPT is the 
Nuclear Nonproliferation Trea- 
ty- 

The Yongbyon facilities are 
two of seven nuclear sites de- 
clared by North Korea. The 
UN agency is still seeking to 
inspect two undeclared sites at 


Yongbyon. They are suspected 
to be nuclear waste dumps, but 
Pyongyang says the buildings 
are conventional installations. 

The easing of restrictions on 
the- inspectors was seen as a 
spinoff from talks in Berlin and 
Pyongyang between North Ko- 
rea and the United States. 

The UN agency director-gen- 
eral, Hans Blix. told his board 
of governors at their meeting 
Monday that North Korea indi- 
cated last week it was ready to 
give inspectors slightly more ac- 
cess to its atomic sites. 

He also said that UN inspec- f 
tors had reported that North 
Korea apparently did not pro- 
duce weapons-grade plutonium 
from February 1993 to March 
1994, the period in which it had 
been blocking inspections of its 
nuclear program. • 

The report cast doubt on 
speculation that North Korea 
was producing plutonium, a key 
ingredient in nuclear weapons, 
while keeping inspectors at bay. 

Talks between U.S. and 
North Korean officials in Ber- 
lin -are focused on how to re- 
place North Korea's graphite- 
moderated. nuclear reactors 
with. light-water plants, which 
produce less of the plutonium 
that can be used to make nucle- 
ar weapons. 

{Reuters, AP) § 


Nigerian’s Trial Is Delayed, 
Lawyers Raise Health Issue 


Agence France- Prease 

ABUJA, Nigeria — The op- 
position leader Moshood K.O. 
Abiola appeared in court Tues- 
day to face treason charges, but 
the trial was adjourned to Sept. 
21 soon after the session start- 
ed. 

Chief Abiola, whose health is 
reported to have declined 
sharply in recent weeks, looked 
unwell and remained seated 
throughout the hearing. 

The presiding judge, Chris 
Senlon® ordered that the Mus- 
lim businessman be allowed to 
meet with his attorneys and 
family members for four hours, 
three times a week, until the 
trial is resumed. 

But defense lawyers also 
raised concerns about their cli- 
ent's health and said he needed 
to be transferred to a hospital 
for tests. 

The Nigerian Medical Asso- 
ciation, which had sent doctors 
to examine Chief Abiola, said 


last week that his health had 
deteriorated sharply and that he 
was suffering from very high 
blood pressure and compressed 
lumbar vertebrae. 

Chief Abiola was arrested on 
June 23, 12 days after he de- 
clared himself head of state fol- 
lowing presidential elections a 
year, earlier that he -.-as pre- 
sumed to have won. 

DemoCTacy activists, mean- \ 
while, said they welcomed the 
dismissal Monday of the justice 
minister, Olu Onagoniwa, who 
'had * publicly dissociated him- 
self from draconian de c rees is- 
sues by by Nigeria’s military 
leaders to crack down on oppo- 
nents,., the judiciary and the 
press. 

Mr. Onagoruwa was previ- 
ously an outspoken critic of 
mihtaiy rule and close to Chief 
Abiola. He joined the junta 
against the advice of colleagues 
in the democracy movement 





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Frederick Weisman, 
Philanthropist and 
Art Collector, Dies 


lW«" 


Nn York Times Senice 

Frederick R. Weisman, 82, a 
businessman, philanthropist 
and avid collector of contempo 
raiy art, died Sunday at his 
home in Los Angeles after a 
long struggle with pancreatic 
cancer. 

Mr. W Gasman's gifts included 
the SS million in initial funding 
for the American Center in Par- 
is, which recently opened. He 
also gave $3.5 million to the 
University of Minnesota for the 
Frederick R. Weisman Art Mu- 
seum. 

Mr. Weisman was bom to 
Russian, immigrants in Minne- 
apolis and by the time he was 3 1 
he was president of Hunt 
Foods, He founded a savings 
and loan association, bought a 
racetrack and developed a line 
of drugstore products. In 1970, 
he establish®! a Toyota auto 
distributorship. 

In 1938, he married Marcia 
Simon, sister of the billionaire 
Norton Simon. The Weismans 
began collecting art in the late 
1940s, starting with the works 
of American and European art- 
ists, including Willem de Koo- 
ning, Alberto Giacometti and 
Mark Rothko. They were di- 
vorced in 1981 and split the 
collection. 

Amy Oampitt, 74, a poet who 
did not publish her Erst major 
collection until she was 63, died 
Saturday of cancer in Lenox, 
Massachusetts. 

Tom Ewefl, 85, the comedy 
actor who won a Tony for his 
role in Broadway’s “The Seven 
Year Itch” and stood next to 
Marilyn Monroe when a blast 
of air blew her skirt up in the 
famous scene from the 1955 
movie, died Monday in Los An- 
geles. He served in the navy in 
World War II. 


Sara Taylor, 99, the mother 
of actress Elizabeth Taylor, 
died Sunday in Palm Springs. 
California. 

Boris Yegorov, 57, one of the 
First Soviet cosmonauts, died of 
a heart attack in his Moscow 
apartment. 

Yossef Harmdin. 71, the Shin 
Bet security service boss from 
1964 to 1974 and again from 
1986 to 1988, died Monday in 
Jerusalem. 

Wiffiam J. Obanhein, 69, the 
former police chief whose arrest 
of a teenage Arlo Guthrie 
brought him fame as Officer 
Obie in “Alice’s Restaurant,” 
died Sunday of heart disease at 
Stockbridge, Massachusetts. 

Dennis Morgan, 85, a popu- 
lar Hollywood leading man of 
the 1940s and 1950s, died 
Wednesday in Fresno, Califor- 
nia. of heart disease. 

Nikos Hadpkmakos- Ghikas, 
88, one of Greece’s most promi- 
nent modem painters, died Sat- 
urday in Athens. He had bom 
in ill health. 

Terence Young, 79, who di- 
rected three of the James Bond 
movies starring Sean Connery 
in the 1960s, died Wednesday 
of a heart attack in Cannes. 


Russian Ambassad or 
To Madrid Is Named 

The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — President Bo- 
ris N. Yeltsin on Tuesday ap- 
pointed the veteran diplomat 
Viktor Komplektov as Russia's 


* * «■ * vikoui vu a uwauay ap - 

pointed the veteran diplomat 
Viktor Komplektov as Russia's 
new ambassador to Spain. 

Mr. Komplektov, 62, former- 
ly served as the Russian ambas- 
sador to the United States. 


BOOKS 


JEAN RENOIR: 
Projections of Paradise 

By Ronald Bergan. 378 pages. 
$23.95. The Overlook Press. 

Reviewed by Caiyn James 

I N an uncharacteristically 
griping mood, Jean Renoir 
wrote to his friend the screen- 
writer Dudley Nichols. “I 
would rather sell peanuts in 
Mexico than make Elms at 
Fox,” When the great French 
director arrived in Hollywood 
at the start of World War H, he 
was not prepared for the way 
studios would cramp his bril- 
liant, graceful style. 

Yet Renoir did more than 
survive in Hollywood. He 
adopted the whole country, if 
not its methods of filmmaking, 
and died at home in Beverly 
Hills in 1979. at the age of 84. 

The paradox of the auteur in 
Hollywood is just a piece of 
Renoir's huge, eventful life. He 
was bom 100 years ago. on 
Sept. 15, 1894, and his career 
spans the history of movie- 
making itself. His work ranged 
from alent films to Technicolor 
classics (Anna Magnani m “The 
Golden Coach") to television. 

He was the son of the Impres- 
sionist painter Pierre-Auguste 
Renoir. As a young man in 
World War I, Jean Renoir was 
shot in the leg; the wound left 
him with a limp and recurrent 
infections for the rest of his life. 

His wartime experience also 
reEned his sense of the absurd 
but necessary social contracts 
we live by. That vision led to 
"Grand Illusion” and “The 
Rules of the Game,” the last 
film he made before another 
war drove him from France. 

Ronald Bergan’s account of 
Renoir’s early days in Holly- 
wood is one of the rare high 
points in his biography, “Jean 
Renoir: Projections erf - Para- 
dis®” This is a shallow, pedestri- 
an work, but one that accidental- 


ly helps solve a puzzle: Among 
the dozens of books and articles 
written about Renoir, why is 
there no first-rate biography? 

A large part of the answer is 
that Renoir, quite deliciously, 
brought this on himself. When 
he became too old, too physi- 
cally weak to make movies, he 
wrote books. "Renoir, My Fa- 
ther,” published in 1962, is a 
big, loving biography based on 
conversations between the 
. painter and his son. His aulobi- 
ography, “My Life and My 
R lnis” (1974). is filled with 
scenes of an enchanted child- 
hood and shrewd observations 
about movies. Both works are 
as vivid as any Renoir film. 

Renoir’s masterpiece, the 
1939 film “The Rules of the 
Game,” was inspired by forces 
as different as 1 Sth-century farce 
and the impending war, and it 
remains one of the greatest tragi- 
comedies ever filmed. During a 
country weekend, a marquis, an 
aviator, servants and other as- 
sorted lovers play by and violate 
the unwritten rules of romance. 
As Renoir said, “Beneath its 
seemingly innocuous appear- 
ance the story attacks the very 
structure of our society." 

His films sneak up and bite 
the viewer, yet Renoir’s subtle 
personality has yet to nip at 
biographers like Bergan (author 
erf “The United Artists Story” 
and other film books). 

Francois Truffaut, who was 
powerfully influenced by Re- 
noir, best described what it is 
like to watch “The Rules of the 
Game.” He wrote, “For an in- 
stant we think to ourselves. Til 
come back tomorrow and see if 
it all turns out the same way.’ ” 

Only a great sophisticate 
could have inspired such a pure 
and innocent response, con- 
founding art and life. Renoir, 
the grand illusionist, is still 
evading biographers. 

Caryn James is on the staff of 
The New York Times. 


BEST SELLERS 


TheNewYwfcTliKS 

This list is based on repotu From more ihm 
Z000 bookstores ihmiglKmi the United Stans. 
Weeks oo list are s« necessarily consecutive. 


FICTION 


L*n Weeks 
Wk Botar 


1 DEBT OF HONOR, by Tom ^ 

CUacy 1 - 

2 THE CELEST1NE PROPHE- 
CY. by James Redfield 2 28 

3 THE GIFT, by Danktk Sled 2 7 

4 THE CHAMBER, by John 

Grisham 4 14 

5 THE BRIDGES OF MADI- 

SON COUNTY, by Robert 
James Waller — 6 109 

6 POLITICALLY CORRECT 

BEDTIME STORIES, by 
James Ron Garner 5 *- 

7 UNTIL YOU. by Judith 

McN audit ? 4 

8 A SON OF THE CIRCUS, by 

John Irvins - - 10 2 

9 DISNEY'S THE LION 

KING, adapted by Don Fer- 
guson - - * 6 

10 THE AUENIST. by Caleb 

Carr • 9 z “ 

11 THE HIDDEN CITY, by Da- 

vid Edding* — — 1 ' 3 

12 EVERYTHING TO GAIN. 

by Barbara Taylor Bradford .13 « 

13 DIXIE CITY JAM. by Jamo 

Lee Burke , 3 

14 THE CROSSING, by C nnnac 

McCarthy - '* 12 

15 MUTANT MESSAGE 

DOWN UNDER, hv Marin 
Morgan * 


NONFICTION 

1 EMBRACED BY THE 

LIGHT, by Betty J- Eadie with 
Curtis Taylor I 70 

2 THE KENNEDY WOMEN. 

bv Laurence Learner — 2 4 

3 Midnight in the gar- 
den OF GOOD AND EVIL, 

by John Bcrcndt 4 27 

4 THE BOOK OF VIRTUES, 

bv William J. Bennett 6 38 

5 OCTOBER 1964. by David 

Halbentam 5 4 

6 COUPLEHOOD, by Paul 

Reiser ... I 

7 MOTHERLESS DAUGH- 
TERS. by Hope Eddman — 8 7 

8 THE AGENDA, by Bob 

Woodward ..... 7 12 

9 THE TRIBE OF TIGER, by 

Elisabeth Marshall Thomas -.3 5 

1ft THE CATCHER WAS A 

SPY. by Nicholas DawidoIT >10 5 

11 MOON SHOT, by Alan Shep- 

ard and Deke Shylon with Jay 
Barbiceand Howard Benedict 0 9 

12 LIFE OF THE PARTY, by 

Christopher Ogden 12 13 

13 FEAR OF FIFTY, by Erica 

Jone — — 13 4 

14 SOUL MATES, by Thomas 

Moore - — 15 34 

15 GAL: A Tiw Life, by Ruthie 

Bolton .. - 14 6 

AD wo; HOW-TO 
AND MBCQXANROUS 

1 MEN ARE FROM MARS. 

WOMEN ARE FROM VE- 
NUS. by John firav . 2 b 7 

2 IN THE KITCHEN WITH 

ROSIE, by Roue Dales I 19 

3 MAGIC EYE II, by N. E 

Thing Entwwtse. 3 

4 SMART EXERCISE, by Co 

wen Bailey 4 33 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1994 


German Politician Tackles Mostar Ills 


Page 7 


By Jonathan C. Randal 

Washington Post Service 

MOSTAR. Bosnia-Herze- 
govina — A burly, bustling 
German who recently retired 
from politics at home is fighi- 
ing the battle of his life to 
reunite the battered and still 
divided city of Mostar. 

Hans Koschnick, 65, left 
behind a distinguished record 
as mayor of Bremen and 
memb^ of the German Par- 
liament's foreign relations 
committee. He was named ad- 
ministrator of this once pros- 
perous regional capital last 
spring on behalf of the Euro- 
pean Union. 

Mostar straddles the route 
between Sarajevo and Cro- 
atia’s Adriatic coast. Before 
the Bosnian war began in 
1992, it had a population of 
126,000 — about a third Mus- 
lim. a third Croat and a fifth 
Serb. 

The city was seized by Ser- 
bian forces at the stan of the 
fighting, then captured by 
Croats allied with the Mus- 
lim-led government in Saraje- 
vo. In April 1993. when the 
Muslims and Croats began 
their own yearlong battle for 
control of central Bosnia. 
Mostar became the scene of 
one of the war's most savage 
battles. 


If visitors suggest that Mr. 
Koschnick has embarked on 
an impossible mission, he 
reaches for his favorite book, 
“Bremen Kaput.” It traces his 
northern German port city’s 
flirtation with the Nazis in the 
1930s, its destruction in 


A banner on a main street 

E reclaims “Welcome to Croat 
losiar.” underlining a deter- 
mination to hold on to the 
larger, western portion of the 
city that Croatian hard-liners 
consider tbeif unofficial, if di- 
vided, capital. 


If visitors suggest that Hans Koschnick 
has embarked on an impossible mission, 
he reaches for his favorite book, 
'Bremen Kaput’ 


World War II and its postwar 
prosperity. 

That is his way of saying 
that Mostar, once an alumi- 
num and aircraft-manufactur- 
ing center, also can rise from 
its ashes. 

To succeed. Mr. Koschnick 
must get the intensely wary 
Roman Catholic Croats and 
the Muslims to work together. 

So far the results scarcely 
seem encouraging. Radical 
Bosnian Croats from the 
hardscrabble country around 
Mostar pay only lip service to 
the federation with the Mus- 
lims, refusing to keep prom- 
ises to dismember their self- 
styled Croat Republic of 
Herceg-Bosna. 


Last week, the president of 
Bosnia- Herzegovina, Alija 
Izetbegovic, warned, “The sit- 
uation cannot go on like this.” 
He accused his predominantly 
Muslim government’s Cro- 
atian partners of grabbing all 
the federation's customs re- 
ceipts, preventing Muslim ref- 
ugees from returning to their 
homes or even from traveling 
through Croatian-controlled 
territory. 

The Croats, in turn, com- 
plain that (he federation’s 
Foreign Ministry has only 
four Croatian officials and the 
Defense Ministry one. 

Shortly after midnight Sun- 
day, a grenade was fired into 
Mr. Koschnick's second-floor 


room at the hotel used as a 
base by Mostar s EU adminis- 
trators. The EU team's police 
chief said it came from Cro- 
atian-controlled western Mos- 
ul 

Some critics feel the federa- 
tion was compromised when 
the Clinton administration 
lost interest in its handiwork, 
failing to station an official 
here to lend support to the 
European initiative. Mr. 
Koschnick has pleaded for a 
bigger U.S. presence to main- 
tain pressure on Mr. Izetbego- 
vic and the Croatian presi- 
dent, Franjo Tudjman, to 
stabilize the federation. 

Mr. Koschnick rails against 
the EU bureaucracy in Brus- 
sels as reluctant to send mon- 
ey and incapable even of 
agreement on the uniforms or 
cars his police force should 
receive. 

Without adequate police, 
seemingly tolerated Croatian 
gangs will continue to make a 
mockery of efforts to re-estab- 
lish law and order in western 
Mostar, Mr. Koschnick said. 

The lawlessness prevents 
tens of thousands of Muslims 
driven out of western Mostar 
from returning. Croatian pro- 
fessional people have joined 
the exodus of Muslim profes- 
sionals. 


Envoys Set Details 
On Bosnia Monitors 

Unit to Verify Aid Shutdown 






The .Associated Press 

GENEVA ■ — Envoys of the 
United States and major Euro- 
pean powers agreed Tuesday on 
specifics of international plans 
to verify the shutdown by Ser- 
bia and Montenegro of supplies 
to Bosnian Serbs, a key media- 
tor said. 

“We've got the details clari- 
fied about the mission,” the Eu- 
ropean Union envoy. Lord 
Owen, said. 

He declined to elaborate un- 
til he holds a news conference 
on Wednesday. 

Lord Owen, co-chairman of 
the International Conference 
on Former Yugoslavia, said the 
envoys of the five-nation con- 
tact group held a series of meet- 
ings into Tuesday evening. 

Included in the talks was Bo 
Pellnas. a Swedish official with 
the conference who will bead a 
mission of civilians to check 
that only humanitarian aid is 
crossing the border to Bosnian 
Serbs. Also participating were 
representatives of Britain, 
France, Germany and Russia. 

An official close to the talks 
who asked not to be identified 


f •••• - '2 


said the discussion centered on 
“nuts-and-bolts" issues that 
would meet with the approval 
of the Serbian president, Slobo- 
dan Milosevic. 

Lord Owen, who with UN 
envoy ThorvaJd Stolienberg 
heads the conference on former 
Yugoslavia, has said at least 1 35 
monitors will be needed. So far, 
Denmark, Finland. Norway 
and Sweden have offered to 
provide 60. 

Mr. Milosevic said last 
month that he was stopping ex- 
ports of everything but food 
and medicine to the Bosnian 
Serbs. 

In Zagreb, Croatian and Bos- 
nian leaders tried Tuesday to 
breathe life into a feeble federa- 
tion of Bosnian Croats and 
Muslims, a U.S. creation that 
threatens to unravel and leave 
the two groups again at war. 

-As the meeting convened in 
the Croatian capital, fighting 
raged to the south in Bosnia. An 
unconfirmed report said Gener- 
al Ratko Mladic, the Bosnian 
Serb commander- in -chief, was 
wounded in the fighting, but 
gave no details. 


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„ -Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1994 



3R 




„,,<v v-T'.‘ v a 








U.S. Seeks to Rally 
Support on Haiti by 


• • 


By Fiainp. Sdolino icg an invasion would they be 
ivm >ar* 7ima Sem« detained and turned over to the 

WASHINGTON — Snug- new government of Hain. 
gling to win congressional and That means that .if ueathi< 
public support for an invasion nntGencral Raoul Cedras^wno 
‘ " litL the Chi ' " ’ 


of Haiti, the Clinton adminis- 
tration has offered assurances 
that American soldiers will do 
little more than restore Haiti’s 
exiled president to power and 
has also issued a gnm new lit- 
any of human-rights abuses by 
the ruling junta. 

Senior nfffrjais said the mili- 


tary force will restore the demo- broad public or congressional 
cratically elected president, the support for an invasion of Hai- 


Pintos b> Adalberto Rotjor'Agovc Fr a nc r -Pi enc 

A rafter carrying tus inner tube along tbe beach in Cojimar, Cuba, while another man slept near 
Guanabo. Bad weather and the Cuban authorities discouraged people from beatfing out to sea. 


30 , 000 Refugees Later, the Cuban Exodus Grinds to a Halt 


Reverend Jean-Bertrand Aria- ti. Administration officials 'are 
tide, »n^ help remain in hopeful that by defining limited 
office until his mandate runs goals and an exit strategy for 
out at the end of 1995. But the Haiti they can deflect criticism 
missi on does not aim to rebuild of the prospective invasion, 
the country or ensure that Fa- The a d nrini . s tration also is 
ther Aristide and his new gov- trying to persuade the Congress 
eminent will succeed, they said, and the nation that the ruling 
“The criteria would be the military regime is so repressive 


By Tod Robberson 

War king ton Post Service 

HAVANA — Beaches were empty 
on Tuesday as Cuba’s monthlong ex- 
periment with unrestricted migration 
by raft ended, and those who chose 
to stay resigned themselves to an un- 
certain future under President Fidel 
Castro’s Communist rule. 

The rafts were gone at some of the 
most popular launching points along 
a 50-kilometer (30-mile) stretch of 


coast near Havana as the police be- 
gan enforcing a U.S. -Cuban accord 
to halt ail seaborne departures of 


migrants. 

Cuba called a halt to the exodus 


after reaching an immigration accord 
cm Friday with the United States 
under winch Washington agreed to 
increase to a minimum of 20,000 the 
number of visas it grants each year to 
Cubans. 

With the rafting spectacle no long- 


er providing an entertaining diver- 
sion, Havana residents returned to 
the arduous task of daily survival — 
a task that served as perhaps the 
primary stimulus for about 30,000 
Cubans to flee for the United States. 

Barbara, a housewife, made her 
twice-weekly trip to the state-run H 
Mayabeque supermarket in down- 
town Havana to buy a one-liter ra- 
tion of fresh milk for her infant 
daughter. Like diabetics and ulcer 


patients. Barbara is among the few 
allowed legally to purchase fresh 
milk. Most Cubans receive a rationed 
bag of powdered milk when it is 
available. 

Because fresh milk is so difficult to 
rind, Barbara said she resold it on the 
street for a 500 percent profit, then 
used the extra money to buy other 
ftwntial items for her family. 

Some Cubans, like a man who is a 
kidney dialysis specialist at a Havana 


hospital, have coordinated networks 
to pool information on potential 
sources of income. If he runs across a 
tourist looking for a good restaurant, 
the man refers him to a former hotel 
chef who runs a “clandestine restau- 
rant” in her house. The chef buys 
ingredients for her meals from clan- 
destine meat, poultry and seafood 
vendors who smuggle their goods 
through the streets in car trunks and 
unrefrigerated trucks. 


removal of the illegal govern- 
ment, the restoration of civil 
law, and giving the Haitian peo- 
ple an opportunity to have the 
kind of freely elected govern- 
ment that they chose in 1990,” 
Secretary of State Warren M. 


and the situation so untenable 
for Haiti’s 6 million people that 
an invasion is warranted. To 
that end, the State Department 
has prepared a new human- 
rights report describing the vio- 
lence under the current military 


Christopher said Monday, junta as even worse than “dur- 
“That’s the fundamental issue.” mg the notorious regime of 
But Mr. Christopher made it Tapa Doc* Duvalier ” 


But Mr. Christopher made it 
dear that it was not the respon- 
sibility of the United States to 
rebuild the country’s failed in- 
stitutions or hunt down the 
three militaiy leaders who run 
the country and who oppose 
Father Aristide's return. 


RWANDA: Rain Is the Latest Hardship for Refugees HAITI: Reservists Could Participate in an Invasion 


■ Panetta’s Rallying Cry 
The White House chid of 
staff, Leon E. Panetta, predict- 
ed Tuesday that Americans 
would rally behind Mr. Clinton 
should the United States invade 
Haiti, despite a poll that sug- 


rauia Amuuc»iaum. Haiti, despite a poll that sug- 

“The aim of the United gests otherwise, Reuters report- 
Srates,” he said, “is not to be ed from Washington, 
involved in nation-building, but “I always believe that the 


Co ntinu ed from Page 1 

superior to the Hu tus. We will 
go back home with our own 
army for our own protection.” 

- Former government fighters 
in the camps terrorize refugees 
who want to return. Relief 
workers said that last month, 
several people who wanted to 
return were stoned to death. 
Even the topic is taboo. 

. Mugunga, about 15 kilome- 
ters (10 miles) east of Goma, is 


agencies re m a in in tbe Goma da^hi^ between Zairian sol- 
area. Every day, 50 water tank- diers and civilians as welL 


ers make as many as five trips 
along the 15 kilometers from 
Goma to Kibumba — the camp 
with the most dire water prob- 


Relief officials say the former 
Hutu government hopes to keep 
the refugees in Zaire in an effort 
to persuade Kigali to compro- 


ffmtfnnpd from Page 1 Washington. It involved going 
, . , , , , through a day-by-day scenario 

resulting flights of refugees, and D f derailed actions that would 


to curb “gross abuses of human be taken leading up to and fol- 

“ e ? a ? d - . . lowing military intervention. 

The administration is consid- , w 


involved in nation-building, but “I always believe that the 
resolution authorizing “all nec- to give the people of Haiti an American people unify behind 
essary means” to overthrow opportunity to build their insti- the president when he has to 
Haiti's military dictatorship tutions, to reclaim their coun- take that action,” Mr. Panetta 


Haiti's military dictatorship 


r*ii< for two separate phases of try, and have that opportunity 
military invasion: an initial with respect to the building of 


Iems — lu g g in g more t ha n 4 mise. In Goma and Bukavu, 
mill ion liters (1 million gallons) Zairian provincial governors 


ering several options for acti- 


Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher announced that 17 


take that action,” Mr. Panetta 
said on an ABC news program. 

“The American people al- 
ways rally to their president 


of purified water. 

Digging latrines is a priority. 


unofficially support the former 
militaiy. relief officials here 


vating military reserves for Hai- ££3+ fcd*Eg£adand 
2? M2 “2°.£ West European nations, 


but the bard volcanic rock say. In southeastern Zaire, UN 
makes it difficult and the rain officials say they believe troops 
makes it worse. In the Katale loyal to Rwanda's ousted Hutu 


not yet been presented with 

them, a senior offidAl said. Use iSoSw 

of reservists would likely be fu-thS? ft i s . 


group that would enter Haiti, *hdr own institutions.” ways rally to their president 

either by force or with the pas- As for the ruling mOitaiy That’s part of the great strength 
sive acquiescence of Haiti’s mil- triumverate, called upon to re- of this country,” he said, re- 
itary. to secure control of the linquish power and flee the spending to results of an ABC 
country; tbe invasion troops country, Mr. Christopher said News poll that showed 73 per- 
would be succeeded by a peace- that only if “we find them there, cent of Americans oppose a 


loyal to Rwanda's ousted Hum 


one of the roughest camps, camp, there are 500 latrines for government are preparing to go 


About 300,000 Rwandans live 
Sandwiched together under a 
sea of blue plastic tarpaulins. 
About 20,000 are former Rwan- 
ftan soldiers and militia mem- 
bers ineligible for food aid, al- 
though the refugees feed them. 


300,000 people when 20,000 are 
needed, said Mark Richardson, 
spokesman for CARE Interna- 
tional. 

As anti-Americanism has 
flared in the camps, security has 
tightened for Western relief 


!■ The camps, more like make- workers. They follow strict se- 
■ghift cities with peddlers, road- curity guidelines, leaving the 

^ ■ Jl_ I < C D A A n^.4 


fide vendors and even restau- camps no later than 5 P.M. and 
rants, are still chaotic. Refugees rarely driving alone. 


back to war. 

Juvenal Musubiranya, a derk 
at a brewery in Gisenyi, Rwan- 
da. and a leader in the Kibumba 
camp, said the refugees were an- 
gry because many Western na- 
tions had recognized tbe new, 
Tutsi-led government in Kigali 

“All foreigners are on the side 
of the enemy,” Mr. Musubir- 
anya said as a crowd cheered. 
“We lost the war because of the 


necessary because restructuring 
of the aimed forces has caused 
reservist functions in such areas 


police personnel to help a U.S.- 
led invasion force. 

Mr. Christopher’s announce- 


keeping force under UN super- we encounter them there” dor- 
vision. 


spondmg to results of an ABC 
News poll that showed 73 per- 
cent of Americans oppose a 
Haiti invasion. 


IWWITUtlUUVUVlUUigUWU OlVOO m . -i_ « . 

as logistics and support to be mmt of contributions of troops 
integrated closdy with the op- byoflteroountnes was intended 
^ - - * - ^ to show that Mr. Clinton s de- 


erations of active-duty units. 


“In some cases, the active- termination to rertore democra- 
duty soldier cannot do his job to , Haitl has broad mterna - 
without the reservist,” the offi- bonal ^PP 011 - 


Congressional Republicans __ _____ _ 

!&&E£ ,“£££& ** RATES: Europe Put in Tough Spot 

leaders of* “ Fto «*“ ^ 1 FT”* the former 


rial said. Pentagon sources said 
Mr. Clinton might ask reserv- 


The identities of most of tbe 
17 nations that pledged to help 


ists to volunteer, rather than were already known. They are 


leaders of the [wo horn- Corfuoed front Page 1 above 2 perettit utetaw 

jzs&sssszszs 

Leader Robert H. Michel of II- willing to risk slowing growth cmn ^ 


fere now taking stock of their A couple of weeks ago, a Ca- “We lost the war because of the 
•futures, said Yvan Sturm, the nadian television crew was am- Americans. It is mostly the 
field officer in charge of repatri- bushed at gunpoint near Katale Americans we hate. They bring 
a lion for the UN High Com- and robbed. On Saturday, vio- aid to Rwanda when they know 
-missioner for Refugees here. lence broke out at the Kibumba it is needed here so they can 


-missioner for Refugees here. 


Seventy registered relief camp, and there were reports of 


aid to Rwanda when they know 
it is needed here so they can 
force us back. It is a trap.” 


formally call them to duty. 

The roles played by reservists 
and other elements of a project- 
ed 20,000-member invasion 
force were pan of an “inter- 
agency walk-through” of plan- 
ning for the invasion and its 
aftermath conducted Sundav in 


Antigua and Barbuda, Argenti- 
na, tbe Bahamas, Bangladesh, 


Leader Robert H. Michel of Il- 
linois and House Minority 
Whip Newt Gingrich of Geor- 


rates if this will contain future 


Barbados, Belize. Belgium, Bo- gia — called for Congress to 
livia, Britain. Dominica, Guy- “have an immediate opportuni- 


pnee pressure. - 
If interest rate decisions were 


ana, Israel Jamaica, the 


ty to debate and vote on a reso- 


er lands, P anam a, St. Vincent, lution authorizing the employ- 


based solely on the perfor- 
mance of the real economy, log- 
ic would require central bank- 


and Trinidad and Tobago. 

The UN Security Council 


ment of U.S. armed forces in 
Haiti.” 


The British move, however, is 
already remfoituig.'the percep- 
tion in financial markets that it 
is now only a matter of time 
before continental Europe fol- 
lows suiL In addition, unlike 


ers in Germany and France — the interest rate increases last 
countries where economic re- month in Italy and Sweden, 



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Continued final Page 1 

to coincide with tbe flotation, 
which is to take place before the 
end of the year. He did not say 
how many shares would be put 
on the market or at what price. 
This has to be established by a 
commission on privatization. 

“This opening of the capital 
will allow French people and 
Renault employees to be share- 
holders in the company,” Mr. 
Afohandtxy said. 

Renault’s plant at Boulogne- 
BiDancourt, west of Paris, used 
to be known as “the worker’s 
fortress.” It was a focal point of 
the 1968 workers’ and students’ 


capital and invested heavily in 
robot technology. 

By involving workers in qual- 
ity control and micromanage- 
ment, the company has defused 


coveiy is lagging Britain by 
about a year — to wait until the 
second half of next year before 
changing course. This Is be- 
cause traditional yardsticks for 
measuring the danger of fresh 
inflation, be they estimated 
1994 economic growth or the 
capacity utilized by big indus- 
try, are unlikely to look even 


where domestic factors also 
were the main impetus, the Brit- 
ish rate rise has had a relatively 


small impact on European 
bond markets. 


Christopher Potts, an econo- 
mist at Banque Indosuez in Par- 
is, said this means the expecta- 
tion for continental interest 


much of die former unjoa mili- 


potentially worrisome for an- ta * cs rising again over the next 


tancy. It has a successful range 
of products from the bubble- 
shaped Twingo utility to the 
luxury Safrane sedan and the 
Espace van. The Superrinq, a 
derivation of the small R5 se- 
dan first introduced 23 years 
a|o, still is a good seller, along 
with its modem cousin, the 
Clio. 

Renault's main problem, as 
Mr. Balladur suggested in an 


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revolt. A former president of interview Sunday, is its lack of 
the company, Georges Besse. f 0 international partner in fac- 
v/ds murdered by Direct Action rapidly changing global 


Economists agree that tbe 
rate rise in Britain — which has 
a current inflation rate of 23 
percent and a solid but by no 
means roaring recovery under 
way is aimed at stopping 
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General Labor Confederation, poured huge amounts of aid covery has not yet been 
The Boulogne- Billancourt into Renault — including near- matched by a substantial return 
plant now stands mostly empty, ly 31 billion francs in cash and in cons umer confidence, indus- 
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has moved its operations to ui- than 100,000 jobs and make the rates in Germany and France 
tramodera factories outside the company profitable. which are expected to be just 


Continued fron Page 1 


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In addition to the daily sports pages, Monday Sports is 
expanded to include full weekend results of interna- 
tional sporting events. On these pages, you’ll find the 
outcomes of tennis, soccer, football, baseball, crick- 
et, basketball, rugby, golf and many other sports. 

Every Monday in the International Herald Tribune. 


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INTERNATIONAL 



rihune. 


meet Quebec’s demands to be 
treated as a “distinct society," 
and will most likely be less will- 
ing to buy Canadian unity with 
expensive public-works pro- 1 
jects or other benefits to Quo- 
I bee. 

Preston Manning, head of 
the western-based, conservative 
Reform Party, has long saved 
as a spokesman for that senti- 
ment. But on Monday night, he 
said of the Parti Qu6b6cois vic- 
tory, “I think it’s important for 
the federal government to re- 
member there are nin e other 
provinces." 

The powerful premiers of 
Canada’s majority- English 
provinces will be key figures as 
Quebec moves toward a refer- 
endum next year. 

Their rask now wifl be to con- 
trol anti-Quebec sentiments in 
their own provinces while per-, 
suading Ottawa not to give too 
much away to Quebec. 

On Tuesday, the premiers, 
who held a nine-way conference 
call Tuesday morning, were 
counseling peace. 

“I flunk we should take a 
Valium and stay calm,” said 
Premia- Frank McKenna, of 
New Brunswick, 


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niBUSUED WITH THE FKW YORK TIMES A rib the WASHINGTON PUST 


“We have to be cool and cok 
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da,” Mid Premier Bob Rae of 
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most populous province and a 
fluent French speaker, Mr. Rae 
is likely to play a key negotiat- 
ing role in the coating months. 


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ing an invaaon would they be 
detained and turned over to the 
new government of Haiti. 

That means that if Ueuteu- 


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leads the mihtaiy junta; Colo- 
nel Michel Joseph Francois, the 
police commander; and Gener- 
al PhiSppe Biamby, the army 
chief of staff, go mto hiding, 
U.S. troops mil not ' pursue 
than. 

The administration is keenly 
aware that it does not enjoy 


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STAGE /ENTERTAINMENT 


International Herald Tribune 
Wednesday > September 14^ 19%$ 


‘Dreyfus — J’ Accuse’: Dance Drama Links Affair to Present 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribans 


B ONN — WMe most of Europe's 
t hea ters are stBL 'wanning up for 
the new season, the munkapal op- 
era here is off and running with 
recent productions — an ambitious new 
dance drama based on the Dreyfus affair 
and a revival of an exotic operatic hit from 
the end of last season fay the 19th-century 
Brazilian composer Antonio Cad os Gomes. 

“Dreyfus — «P Accuse" is the choreo- 
graphed companion piece to the opera on 
the same subject that had its world pre- 
miere in May in Bedm. George R. Whyte, 
the librettist of the opera and primt- mover 
of numerous Dreyfus cen tennial projects, 
also did the scenario for the da nced ver- 
sion. Valery Panov, the Bonn theater’s 
d a nce director, did die choreography and 
made the effective selection from the com- 


positions of Alfred Schnittke that provide 
the musical basis for the spectacle. 

Panov is in more ways than one a natu- 
ral for the subject He is a proven glutton 
for large-scale projects, as his ballets based 
on the likes of Dostoyevsky’s “The Idiot" 
and Tolstoy’s “War and Peace" attest His 
own horrendous experience more than 20 
years ago when his plea, as a Jew, to 
emigrate from the Soviet Union ended Ms 
career at the Kirov Ballet and almost end- 
ed his dandng career altogether, suggests 
affinities with the Dreyfus material. 

A similar case could be made for 
Schnittke, whose music was long semi- 
buried by Soviet cultural repression. The 
dance score, chosen from about 15 differ- 
ent pieces, is by turns apocalyptic, an- 
guished, consoling and sentimental, and 
provides the single most satisfying dement 
of the wocL It is interspersed with other 
music related in various ways to the Drey- 
fus affair — such as cabaret music for a 


Moulin Rouge scene and parodies of na- 
tional anthems with an anti-Semitic twist. 

Choreographically, "Dreyfus" is less 
convincing. An overlong first act intro- 
duces a long rosier of characters and bogs 
down in anecdote and repetitious dance 
ideas, although it ends spectacularly in a 
grotesque military march that follows 
Dreyfus’s degradation. The power of 
dance to voice inarticulate feelings fares 
better in the second act, ranging from a 
lament for Dreyfus and those dose to him, 
to a leap into the present (disco music), a 
reminder of Hannah Arendt's dictum of 

the Dreyfus case being a dress rehearsal for 
the future. 

Josef Svoboda’s set was dramatically 
dominated by a large panel simultaneous- 
ly a projecting screen for cartoons and 
other period visual elements, and an ad- 
justable reflecting surface that gave the 
public an overhead view of the stage as 
well as a frontal one. 


Galina Panova was moving as Dreyfus's 
wife, Lurie, while the focus on male role 
was fragmented among the victim Dreyfus 
(Yevgeni Mamrenko), his devoted older 
brother Mathieu (Igor Mikhailov) and 
Colonel Picquart (Vadim Bondar), per- 
haps the most “heroic" as a dispassionate 
seeker of the truth 

“D Guarany" passes for being the Bra- 
zilian national opera, and its overture still 
ranks as a kind of unofficial national 
anthem, but the operatic reality is some- 
thing else. As a promising young compos- 
er, Gomes (1836-96) went to Milan to 
study with a stipend from Emperor Pedro 
n, and although he eventually returned to 
Brazil the bulk of his career was spent in 
Italy as a thoroughly successful opera 
composer roughly in the orbit of middle- 
period Verdi. 

“II Guarany" was produced at La Scala 
in 1870, an enormous success repeated in 
Rio de Janeiro a few months later. Al- 


though a rarity, it has never totally been 
out of the repertory, especially in Rio, and 
many famous tenors of the last century 
have had a go at the principal role. One 
was Mario del Monaco, who sang it in 
1949-50, and apparently passed on an in- 
terest in it to his son, Cnan-Carlo del Mo- 
naco, now the in ten dan t and opera direc- 
tor in Bonn. So in June, Boon put on what 
is probably its German premiere, with Pld- 
rido Domingo on hand to assure a success- 
ful launching, and as stage director Werner 
Herzpg, whose interest in South American 
operatic oddities was notable in his film 
“Fitzcairaldo." 

The subject of the opera is Brazilian, 
based on a novel by Jos6 de Alencar, “O 
Gua ran i." about the 16th-century clash 
between colonizing Portuguese and natives 
(the Guarani being a tribe centered in 
Paraguay and adjacent Brazil). Some his- 
torians refer to Amazonian Indian themes 
in the music, but to the unassisted ear the 


score is pure Italian, perfectly identifiable 
as an opera that appeared one year before 
Verdi's "Aida" and five years after Meyer- 
beer’s “L’Africaine." 

What it shares with these two works is 
its exoticism and a central love affair that 
seems doomed by cultural conflict. But 
here the hero, Peiy, is the noble savage, 
and his beloved is Cecilia, the daughter of 
a wealthy Portuguese settler. After many 
vicissitudes there is a happy ending of 
sorts, with the destruction of almost every- 
body but the happy couple, who go into 
the sunset and a multicultural future. 

Herzog, and his designer, Maurizio 
Bai6, played up the dense jungle exotica, 
while leaving the singers pretty much to 
their own devices and slighting the work's 
important dance element. John Neschling 
conducted the Bonn troupe in a worthy 
account of toe music, led by Hasmik Pa- 
pi an as Cecilia and Amoruo Lotti as Pery. 


Ton Koopman, in Step With Bach 


By Robert L. Kroon 

Special to the Herald Tribune 


B USSUM, Netherlands — Even 
the prolific Johann Sebastian 
Bach might have shaken Ms be- 
wigged head in wonderment at 
the ebullience of his Dutch devotee Ton 
Koopman. This 49-year-old Baroque 
scholar, conductor, organist and harpsi- 
chordist is emerging as one of the world’s 
most dynamic inte rpret ers of Bach’s cre- 
ations. 

Koopman’ s Amsterdam Baroque Or- 
chestra, a ensemble of young European 
and American musicians, is fflTing concert 
halls around the world, as unusual feat 
considering the intimacy of chamber mu- 
sic. To a large extent this success can be 
attributed to the Koopman credo of “au- 
thenticity" including the use of period 
instruments. 

"Those are the seniorities Bach himself 
wanted,” he insists. “Before you can do 
justice to Ms astonishing masterworks, yon 
have to penetrate Bach’s world. He ren- 
dered his compositions on the organ and 
the harpsichord. I don’t want be a musical 
gendarme, but I think Bach should not be 
played on a piano any more than on a 
synthesizer or barrel organ." 

Koopman’s recording of the monumen- 
tal SL Matthew Passion for Time-Wamer’s 
Erato label last year has sold almost 
100,000 and risen to an astounding 36th 
place in the Dutch top-100 Mt parade this 
year, and Koopman’s SL John Passion, 
with Ms orchestra and chorus and Dutch, 
French and German soloists, is not far 

b ehind 

Emboldened by this response to what 
many considaL a taxing kind of fastening 
pleasure^ Koopmah has set himself the 


considerable challenge of putting all of 
Bach’s organ music and bis 200-plus reli- 
gious and secular cantatas on CD. Thai 
covers about 75 percent of the composer’s 
total output Koopman is aiming to pull it 
off within 10 years, working on the project 
with toe Harvard Baroque scholar Chris- 


toph Wolff. 
Between 


i a guest-conductor stint in Syd- 
ney and an organ recital in Hamburg, toe 
jet-lagged musician recently found time 
for what he calls a “refueling stop” at 
home in Bussum, a leafy Amsterdam sub- 
urb. The white stucco villa he shares with 
wife, Tim Matood. a concert harpsichord- 
ist, and three daughters, is toe Koopmans’ 
home, office and private museum, contain- 
ing a private collection of antique instru- 
ments, scores and countless awards. 

The former garage is now toe office of 
Ms Amsterdam Baroque enterprise, where 
half a dozen employees keep tabs on re- 
cording dates and other bookings. 

T HE days that Koopman trekked 
through Europe as a cash- 
strapped student in tattered jeans 
to attend a Nikolaus Harnon- 
court concert are long past A spry, restless 
figure with twinkling eyes and a neatly 
tnmmed, graying beard, Koopman talks in 
a rapid staccato about Ms early Baroque 
passions and future projects. 

Bom into a middle-class Catholic family 
in Zwolle, in toe eastern Netherlands, he 
caught toe Baroque bug before he could 
read or write. “My father was a part-time 
jazz band drummer, and since kids rarely 
agree with the musical tastes of their par- 
ents. I opted for classical music from toe 
age of 6,” says Koopman. 

He sang in a boys choir when he was 7, 
mastered the harpsichord in his early 


teens, played the local church organ from 
age 12 and enrolled at toe Amsterdam 
Conservatory after grammar school to 
study organ and harpsichord under Gus- 
tav Leonhard L 

In 1965, at 21 , Koopman formed a quar- 
tet, followed four years later by bis first 
period-instrument ensemble, Musica Anti- 
que His climb to fame began when he 
founded toe Amsterdam Baroque Orches- 
tra in 1979 after his marriage. His wife was 
a former pupil and now produces most of 
his recordings. 

The daunting Bach project will cost 
about $10 milli on and require 74 CDs. 
“Harnoncourt and Leonhard t put all of 
Bach's church cantatas on Tdefunken." 
says Koopman, "but not the secular ones. 
That took 25 years and you cannot sustain 
toe original enthus iasm over such a long 
period. Harnoncourt is a man of extremes 
and he drifted into a more operatic envi- 
ronment in later years. That’s why I want 
to do it in a shorter time span. Every 
recording will be preceded by a live con- 
ceit, in the Amsterdam Concertgebouw 
and three other Dutch concert halls, in 
Italy and in France." 

Koopman says that will keep his Am- 
sterdam Baroque aggregation busy five 
months a year well into toe next century, 
“but such a schedule never deterred Bach, 
it doesn’t deter Erato and it won’t deter 
me.” 

It will leave him ample time, he says, for 
guest conducting, organ and haxpsi'chord 
recitals, and for his recent appointment as 
conductor of toe Netherlands Radio 
Chamber Orchestra. 

“Plus regular trips to Verona, where we 
have a second house," says Koopman. 
‘Tini and I consider Italy as our second 
homeland anyway. The Italian audience is 
the best in toe world.” 


A 6 Devil’s Disciple’ in High Style 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribute 


L ondon — “ n» dctsts Dfad- 
ple” (National) is Shaw at his 
lightest and most effervescent 
The wonder is that it has not yet 
become a musical Set stylistically some- 
where between “The Beggar’s Opera” 
and “A Tale of Two Gties," it’s toe one 
about the renegade Dick Dudgeon de- 
ciding to do a far, far better thing and die 
in the place of Ms local priest, until a 
last-minute dash to toe scaffold by toe 
priest makes both deaths unnecessary. 

The problem now, brilliantly over- 
come by Christopher Morahan in toe 
best “Disciple” I have ever seen, is how 
to get us through two rather cursory acts 
of exposition before we reach the sub- 
lime last-act double of Burgoyne and 
Swindon. Once there, toe play soars into 
one of the funniest of all Shavian de- 

^^Dairid Massey as to© exhausted, etio- 
lated general and Jeremy Sindon as Ms 
ga rgflntiiftn T growling major take this last 
act of an otherwise fragile fable about 
toe true nature of heroism and romp 
home as toe best double-act in town, 
leaving the drama's notional stars, Rich- 
ard Bonneville as toe disciple and Paul 
Jesson as Ms alter-ego pastor, somewhat 
wounded as well as winded. 

Ostensibly a one-joke play about role- 
reversal "The Devffs Disciple" emerges 
from Morahan’s joyous staging as a more 
complex piece about toe wil lingn ess to 
die, and although 1 have reservations 
about John Gunter’s set, wirich seems, 
unusually for Mm, to highlight rather 
than overcome the problems of the open 


Ofavier stage for proscenium drama, in 
every other respect this is a vintage and 
classic production of which toe National 
can be more than proud. 

John Osborne sometimes threatens toe 
formation of a playwrights’ mafia, one of 
which would roam the streets at night, 
fuBy armed, picking off critics who had 
in some way displeased them. I find 
myself more and more inclined to form 

LONDON THEATER 

an organization on behalf of deceased 
playwrights, to dispose of young direc- 
tors in a huny who have decided to make 
reputations at toe expense and is often 
blatant disregard of those they have been 
hired to stage. 

We have a likely target in Sean Matoi- 
as, a talented director oddly obsessed 
with dirty lanndry, much of which was 
strewn around toe stage of his recent 
“Les Parents Tembles” at toe National 
and a gpod deal more of which can now 
be found littering "Design for Living” at 
the Do n mar Warehouse. Whether some- 
tome very nasty once happened to Mr. 
Mathias in a launderette is unclear. 
What I do know is that a classic No61 
Coward comedy is about a great deal 
more than can be encompassed within 
this obsessively sexual but oddly limited 
reading of toe play. 

There is nothing very new in toe sug- 
gestion that this is a highly sex^charged 
piece. 1 have not seen a production since 
about 1960 that has not made it abun- 
dantly dear that Otto and Leo are as 
passionately in love with each other as 
they are with Gilda. But “Design for 
Living” is about much more than assort- 


ed rolls in toe bisexual hay. Like “Hay 
Fever" and “Private Lives" and “Fallen 
Angels" and “Blithe Spirit, ’ it’s about 
people who find it impossible to live 
apart and still more impossible to live 
together, and fake “Present Laughter” it’s 
about toe self-absorption and self-obses- 
aon of toe artist in crisis. 

Written by Coward for himself and 
toe L unts, tins is also a play about three 
huge stars. Here we get it played for a 
star director by three adequately talent- 
ed but not hugdy experienced stage art- 
ists who fatally lack toe charisma to 
make us care. They also, and equally 
fatally, fail to progress with toe play, so 
that Leo’s sudden success as a dramatist 
or Otto’s as a painter or Gilda’s as an 
interior decorator is virtually unre- 
marked in the playing. 

Mathias’s vision of them as three 
naughty children is all we are ever al- 
lowed. and it grows progressively tire- 
some. What is lacking is precisely what 
made Coward a greater playwright than 
Cocteau, toe sense of a real outside world 
against wMch art and artists had to be 
judged and compared and contrasted. 

The result is all Mgh-camp chic, but no 
real substance. Instead of a play about 
toe price of success and toe cost of fame, 
we get an uneasily anglicized “Jules et 
Jim,” in which Give Owen, Paul Rhys 
and Rachel Weisz posture about. Cer- 
tainly there is an element of that postur- 
ing in “Design for Living," but in mak- 
ing it toe central idea of a narrow 
“concept," the production has willfully 
discarded a lot of what toe script was 
originally about We are left with a stag- 
ing that is precious without being very 
valuable. 




Muvo Bwurrfc 

Facing a decade of Bach: Ton Koopman and members of his ensemble in the Amsterdam Concertgebouw. '■ 

‘Quiz Show’: The Writer Answers 


By Bernard Weinraub 

Sew York Times Service 

L OS ANGELES — 
Paul Attanasio was 
bora in 1959, toe same 
year toe quiz show 
scandal on television stunned 
and outraged toe nation. But 
Attanasio, who wrote toe script 
for toe film “Quiz Show,” 
speaks of the scandal as if it 
happened hours ago. 

“Films only work if they’re 
about us today," said Auana- 
sio, a Harvard-trained lawyer 
and former film critic for The 
Washington Post. “And I 
thought where we all are today 
is toe product of this national 
loss of innocence, which began 
with the quiz show scandals and 
continued on to Vietnam. Wa- 
tergate, Oliver North, even O. J. 
Simpson.” 

Directed by Robert Red- 
ford. the film opens Wednes- 
day in the United States with 
powerful advance reviews but 
uncertain commercial pros- 
pects. “There’s no violence, no 


sex. no love story, no car 
chases.” said Attanasio, who 
has rapidly emerged as one of 
the more formidable screen- 
writers in Hollywood. “The 
characters in it are flawed, and 
all toe stuff in it is really sub- 
tle. And subtlety has gone out 
of toe culture.” 

The scandal broke when a 
former contestant accused toe 
show’s most popular guesL 
Charles Van Doren, of knowing 
toe answers to questions before- 
hand and participating in a 
fraud. 

Attanasio seems a bit more 
self-possessed, confident and 
candid than most successful 
writers. “I’ve had a charmed 
life” he admitted. “I’m in a 
very privileged position ." 

His next film. “Disclosure," 
based on toe Michael Crichton 
best-seller about sexual harass- 
ment, has been completed with 
a cast that includes Michael 
Douglas and Demi Moore. The 
film was directed by Barry Le- 
vinson, whose company was 
one of toe producers of “Quiz 
Show.” 


Atianasio's first screenplay 
was about the Mafia. “It was "a 
terrible screenplay, but it had 
very good dialogue,” he said. 
“On toe basis of that I got an 
agent and an assignment to do a 
screenplay at Paramount about 
the CIA. After that I was off to 
toe races." 

That screenplay went unpro- 
duced, but a third one, “Donnie 
Brasco,” about a real-life agent 
for toe FBI who had infiltrated 
toe Mafia, caught Levinson's 
attention. With Levinson, At- 
tanasio created an acclaimed 
NBC television series, “Homi- 
cide: Life on toe Streets." 

For “Quiz Show,” Attanasio 
watched television clips of 
“Twenty-One," read newspaper 
and ma gazin e accounts, and 
spent time talking to Richard 
N. Goodwin, whose 1988 book, 
“Remembering America: A 
Voice From toe ’60s,” served as 
the basis for toe film. Every 
studio in town except Walt Dis- 
ney rqected it as too commer- 
cially risky. 

“You just have to see toe 
movies today to know why they 


turned this one down," he saitL 
“Tbey’d rather make ‘Speed.’ ” 

Attanasio said his sometimes 
scathing film reviews had not 
entirely caught up with him. 
But then there was toe case of 
Tom Hanks. 

“Hanks had some project, 
and he told a friend of mine, 
who was sitting on toe beach 
with him, that be was looking 
for a writer,” Attanasio recalled 
with a smile. “My friend said. 
“You should hire Paul Atiana- 
sio.’ ” 

“Hanks said toe name was 
very familiar," said Attanasio. 
“My friend said that I did a lot 
of work for Bany Levinson and 
I used to be a critic." 

“That’s it!" shouted Hanks, 
toe screenwriter said. 

Attanasio said, “Hanks then 
proceeded to repeat my review, 
word for word, of ‘Nothing in 
Common,’ which I had com- 
pletely forgotten.” 

But Hanks had obviously not 
forgotten the unkind 1986 re- 
view. Attanasio did not get toe 
job. 


POUR LE PIANO 

SAISON 1994-1995 

20 H 30 

VICTORIA HALL. GENEVE 
9 RECITALS DE PIANO 


UNO' 0 MSVCVfCl li'CClCRC'E :«.1 
RACH If ClA-1: « -1 MP'Vf .t'.’tfi •. 1/ 


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JEAN -FRANCO IS HEISSER 

i - *BDI 3 • •AiH 'ir.J iWj 

FRANC.-RENE DUCHABLE 

JE-JD! I6.f E'.TiES 1 

RAFAEL OROZCO 

> maw, lys>,. 

MIKHAIL PLETNEV 

MFE-ceroi ?v maw. iwj 

GYORGY SEBOK 

• \1>CeCl'l 2<i A.'UIL iWt, 

NELSON GOERNER 

t.'lfOl :•> MAi I'M 1 .'. 

KRYSTIAN ZIMERMAN 


LOCATION HOUR lOUM IFS RFCliALS Dr LA SAi'.ON 
All GRAND PASSAGL TFl 0?? 310 91 9.W T 8HLCIU 


Dining £ .iL.V Out 

| AMSTERDAM 

PARIS 6th 

Wan 

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Holed u 6e baa Mai nAuaw h France 
by fiie leedlna Rutda* {air condtapad], 14, 

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Near Imafidei Terming. 

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PARIS 2nd 


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decor. ExceUanf «Hn« & mineral water,. 
32. rue 5t Mat TeL: |1 1 42 96 45 04 

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International Herald Tribune, Wednesday, September 14, 1994 


Page 11 


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THE TRIB INDEX: 116.58ft 

Internationa Herald Tribune World Slock Index ©, composed of 
280 interna tronaWy cnvestable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1 , 1992 = 100 
120 ' 




W*»v, . 



1994 

Asw/Pacifie jv. 


Eurow? 


ApfTOK. wegWing: 32% 

Ctose: 129.65 Prevj 12&20 

BEP8 

Approx, weighting: 37% 

CHse: 1 17.66 Pibvj 117.67 

ifiHs 


110 "&B& S S 


s mrnmm 


A W' fjk vl .« '• «■• .. . v „• ■ 




1994 


1994 

■ . _ 

North Amorica 


Latin America 


: : . ;/•; 

Approx, weighting: 26% 
Close: 96.11 Prev^ 95.47 

4CA 


Approx, weighing: 5% 

Close: 147.76 Ptbvj 14825 

11 





$£j WoridlndB* 

7he viator backs U.S. doBar values at slocks to Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bafghun, Brazil. Canada, Chita, Danmark, Finland, 
Franca, Germany, Kong Kong, Italy, llaxlco. Netherlands, Near Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Vanamala. For Tokyo, New York and 
London, the Index h composed ot the 20 tap Issues In terms ol market capkaBzation. 
otherwise the tan top slocks are tracked. 


’■% , •••; 

| industrial Sectors ; ; ; { 

rf‘ : ' 

V 

Tun. 

Pm. 

% 


Tub. 

Pm. 

% 

H' ■ ; 

dost 

Etesa 

dwnga 



etase 

change 

i* 1 ’ . 

i \ ' 

♦ Energy 

115.69 

116-04 

-0.13 

Capital Goods 

1 18-33 

117£0 

+0.62 

•i 

lABUes 

131.22 

131.13 

+0^7 

Raw Materials 

13828 

138.63 

-036 

• j . . 

Rnanca 

115.67 

114.87 

■I0J7 

Consumer Goods 

104.00 

10186 

*0.13 

* ■■ 

Services 

12252 

121JS 

+0S7 

kfiscafioHous 

136-93 

138.52 

+0J0 


For mom information about the Index, a booklet is avaBaUe freed charge. 

Write to Tnb Index. 181 Avenue Charles da GauBe, 32521 NeuSy Cedar, Fiance. 

Q International Herald Tribune 


Chairman 
Quits At 
Goldman 

Friedman Leaves 
As Profit Slumps 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Stephen 
Friedman, chairman of Gold- 
man, Sachs & Co. since 1990, 
announced Tuesday he was re- 
signing and would' be replaced 
by Jon Corzine, co-head of the 
firm's fixed-income division. 

Mr. Friedman, 56, who helped 
manage the biggest expansion in 
the securities firm’s 125-year his- 
tory, said in a letter to its em- 
ployees that the job was taxing 
and that he wanted to “pass the 
baton to younger successors.” 

But he ’also referred to Gold- 
man's “disappointing profits'* 
in 1994, which he described as 
“a frustrating year for all of us.” 

Goldman said Mr. Friedman 
would resign when the firm’s fi- 
nancial year ends in November. 

After posting record profit of 
52. 3 billion last year, before 
partners' taxes, Goldman earned 
abouL $446 million in the first six 
months of its fiscal year. 

Goldman, one of the last ma- 
jor privately held investment 
firms, does not publicly report 
earnings but has suffered along 
with other big Wall Street houses 
from the slump in financial mar- 
kets that began early this year. 

“While almost ail of our busi- 
nesses have done well this year, 
the firm’s profits have been dis- 
appointing, particularly as a re- 
sult of trading results in some of 
the businesses which performed 
extraordinarily well in the last 
few years,” Mr. Friedman said. 

As part of the management 
succession, Hank Paulson. 48, 
co-head of the firm’s invest- 
ment banking division, will be- 
come vice chairman and chief 
operating officer. 

Mr. Friedman became co- 
chairman of Goldman Sachs 
with Robert Rubin in 1990. Mr. 
Rubin left the firm to join the 
government as chairman of the 
National Economic Council 

(AP, Bloomberg) 


Cooking Up Competition P ros p ec ts 

Mexico Tries Its Hand at Freer Market For Full Tr£I(l6 


Pact, Japan Says 


By Anthony DePalma 

New York Tuna Service 

MEXICO CITY — In a slender 20-story 
tower at the center of this city, a team of 
young bureaucrats is attempting to create 
what untD recently was as unlikely to be 
found in Mexico as chili peppers that don't 
burn — a competitive economy. 

The 140 economists, investigators and staff 
form the backbone of the Federal Competi- 
tion Commission, which in its first year of 
operation has managed to anger, obstruct and 
scold some of Mexico’s biggest companies. 

The commission has fined brokerage 
houses for bid-rigging in connection with the 
sale of Treasury notes. It has made the oil 
monopoly Pemex loosen its grip on the num- 
ber of gas stations it supplies. It has even put 
an ena to price-fixing by comer laundries. 

American companies doing business in 
Mexico, or pla nnin g to enter the Mexican 
market, stand to benefit from the commis- 
sion’s actions. By policing competition, the 
regulators can make the market freer and 
more open, essentially more like markets in 
the United States. 

But some analysts here doubt the serious- 
ness of trying to legislate competition in a 
country that still tolerates monopolies in oil. 
electricity and railroads. 

“The commission represents both a serious 
attempt to encourage competition and basic 
window-dressing; for this administration." 
said Roberto Salinas- Le6n, executive director 
of the Center for Free Enterprise Research, a 
nonprofit institute in Mexico City. 

Legislating freer competition is considered 


a natural complement to existing trade agree- 
ments, which have toughened up an economy 
that traditionally sheltered businesses from 
competition and let some become huge, inef- 
ficient monopolies. 

The General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade, which covers world trade, and more 
recently the North American Free Trade 
Agreement by Mexico, Canada and the Unit- 
ed States have opened an estimated 55 per- 

r Mexico is a country where 
for 50 years competition, 
monopoly and antitrust 
were just not household 
words.’ 

Santiago Levy, president of the 
Federal Competition Commission 

cent of the economy to a flood of internation- 
al competition over the past decade. 

Using wide-ranging powers granted by the 
new law, Santiago Levy, the president of the 
commission, is expected to see that Mexico 
operates as a free and open market. 

“Mexico is a country where for 50 years 
competition, monopoly and antitrust 'were 
just not household words,” said Mr. Levy. 
“When the commission started, people only- 
bad rough notions of what competition really 
meant. Some came in and complained be- 
cause a competitor was lowering prices. That 
says a lot about the competitive culture here.” 


U.S. Retail Prices Ease Fears 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — U.S. 
consumer prices rose a moderate 
03 percent in August as falling 
dothing prices helped offset big 
increases in food and energy, the 
Labor Department said Tues- 
day. bringing some relief to dol- 
lar and stock investors. 

Energy prices were up 1.4 
percent as gasoline prices rose 
3.7 percent, their biggest jump 
since October 1993. 

Food costs rose 0.3 percent, 
but most of that increase re- 
flected a second consecutive 
monthly surge in coffee prices. 

Excluding the food and ener- 


gy sectors, prices were up 0.3 
percent, the same as the overall 
figure. Clothing prices were 
down 1 percent, after falling 0.4 
percent in July. 

Private economists said the 
modest advance in the consum- 
er price index, which was iden- 
tical to the July and June in- 
creases, showed inflation was 
still subdued at the retail level. 

Separately, the Commerce 
Department reported that 
America’s trade deficit jumped 
in the second quarter to its high- 
est level in more than six years. 

The $37 billion defidt in the 
current account — the broadest 


measure of international trans- 
actions, covering trade, services 
and investment flows — repre- 
sented a 15 percent widening 
from the first-quarter defidt of 
$32.3 billion. 

Wall Street rallied on the 
consumer price report, with the 
Dow Jones industrial average 
climbing nearly 30 points in the 
first hour of trading but giving 
up some of its gains later. The 
dollar was mostly higher in 
London trading. 

“U.S. economic activity is 
currently slowing to a pace 

See PRICES, Page 12 


By Steven BruII 

Imemcnonal Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Hardening its 
stance in trade talks with Wash- 
ington, Japan said Tuesday that 
“there are no prospects” for 
agreement on all aspa'ts of the 
countries’ dispute by the dead- 
line at month's end. 

In an apparent attempt lo 
force Washington to retreat 
from its insistence on a results- 
oriented trade strategy, Japa- 
nese offidals publicly empha- 
sized that the United States had 
agreed to settle for a partial 
accord if a full agreement could 
not be reached by Sept. 30. 

Trade Minister Ryutaro Ha- 
shimoto, who partidpated in 
trade talks in the United States 
last week, said the two countries 
had a mutual understanding 
that they should reach anv 
agreements they could before 
Sept. 30, the date Washington 
has given Tokyo as a deadline 
to make progress or risk being 
named an unfair trade partner 
and facing trade sanctions. 

Currently, “there are no 
prospects” for a full accord on 
all issues, said Mr. Hashimoto. 

It was the first time the Japa- 
nese side had said so loudly and 
publicly that the United States 
had backed down from its insis- 
tence on a full accord. 

Previously, Trade Representa- 
tive Mickey Kantor of the Unit- 
ed States demanded complete 
agreement in three sectors being 
discussed — cars and car parts, 
insurance, and government pro- 
curement of telecommunica- 
tions and medical equipment. 

“Both sides recognized that it 
is important to conclude the 
framework talks if possible," 
said a Japanese government offi- 
cial who requested anonymity. 

The comment, combined with 
a restatement of Japan's unwill- 
ingness to bend to Washington’s 
demands for “objective indica- 
tors” to measure unproved mar- 
ket access, appeared designed to 


pressure the United States to 
conclude a deal that would avoid 
exacerbating the kind of trade 
tensions that would put upward 
pressure on the yen. The curren- 
cy has jumped 1 3 percent against 
the dollar so far this year. 

“There is a misperception in 
the United States that the Japa- 
nese will compromise at the last 
moment.” the official said. 
"This perception is incorrect.” 

The official said the insur- 
anccsector, in which the United 
States had not made demands 
for objective indicators, was 
likely to be the firsL sector in 
which an agreement is reached. 

The greatest difficulty is ex- 
pected in the sector of autos 
and auto parts, an area that 
accounts for more than half of 
Japan's S60 billion trade sur- 
plus with Washington. 

The two countries have “virtu- 
ally agreed” on simplified regis- 
tration, standardization and cer- 
tification procedures, the official 
said. But Tokyo remains op- 
posed to Washington’s demands 
that Japan endorse “voluntary” 
plans for its companies to raise 
purchases of foreign car parts 
and increase the number of deal- 
ers handling foreign cars. 

■ Test-Track' Is Derailed 

President Bill Clinton's re- 
quest for authority to negotiate 
trade agreements’ on a “fast- 
track” basis has been blocked 
for this year. Peter Be hr of The 
Washington Post reported from 
Washington. 

Representative Robert Ma- 
tsui. Democrat of California, 
the acting chairman of the 
House Ways and Means trade 
subcommittee and a supporter 
of Mr. Clin ton, said he expected 
the White House to drop its 
request this week for fast-track 
consideration this year. 

Under fast-track rules. Con- 
gress can approve or reject trade 
accords negotiated by the presi- 
dent but cannot amend them. 




Marie Claire Visits the U.S. 


By Daniel Tilles 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — A new French authority on 
fashion has landed on American 
shores. Marie Claire, the American 
edition, recently hit newsstands 
throughout the United States. The two part- 
ners in this joint venture — Marie Claire Al- 
bum, the French publisher, and Hearst Corp. 
of the United States — have been quick to call 
the debut an overwhehmng success. 

The partners said the introductory issue, 
which appeared on August 16, had sold out in 
New Yonc and other cities around the country. 

American Marie Claire, which cost $30 
i mil li on to get off the ground, faces the daunt- 
ing challenge of succeeding in a market that is 
already crowded. 

About 20 magazines are chasing the same 
readership which has largely “leveled off,” ac- 
cording to Lanny Baker, a financial analyst 
who covers the media for Salomon Brothers 
Int in New Yarik. Competition for advertisers 
is fierce in an economy which some say still has 
not truly recovered from the recession. 

Charles Townsend, publisher of Glamour 
magazine said the ad market, for women’s 
magazines was “fairly static with some con- 
traction.” 

Sr?!!, with the model Claudia Scbiffer on 
the cover, 157 pages erf editorial and 131 
pages of advertising, the debut issue of Amer- 
ican Marie Claire has stepped out in style. 

Laurence Humbert, international develop- 
ment director for Marie Claire in Paris said 
the first issue was “51 ad pages over target.” 

Though ad pages have slid for the second 
issue slated to appear October 18th, Ms, 


Hembert claimed it was still more than 1U 
pages above the 80-page objective. 

Furthermore, Tom Wolf, vice president 
and general manager for magazine develop- 
ment at Hearst, said Marie Claire would in- 
crease its print run for the second edition to 
750,000 from a 700,000-copy debut. 

The chances of Marie Claire achieving suc- 
cess on par with Glamour. Mademoiselle, Self 
or Vogue, depend on who is talking. 

One rival welcomed the competition. Cath- 
erine VUcardi Johnston, publisher of Mira- 
bella said, “The market can absolutely sup- 
port another entry if it’s done well.” 

Others were not so confident. “There are 
already 20 titles out there,” Mr. Baker of 
Salomon Brothers noted. “It’s not like 
launching a magazine for home computing 
where there are five competitors. I wouldn't 
want to do it.” 

Mr. Townsend of Glamour magazine ac- 
knowledged that Marie Claire could possess 
an immediate advantage due to its low adver- 
tising rates. 

While its rivals such as Glamour and Vogue 
offer guaranteed circulation up to three times 
higher than Marie Claire's, they charge up to 
five times more for a full-page color advertise- 
ment. 

Mr. Townsend gave the first U.S. edition of 
Marie Claire mixed reviews, but he said it 
would be foolish to ignore Marie Claire’s 
potential impact. "1 have an appropriate con- 
cern for the ability of the marketplace to 
absorb another magazine in the category I 
compete in,” he said. 

Marie Claire has made some concessions to 

See MAGAZINE, Page 13 


Fox Signs 
U.S. Hockey 
To TV Deal 

Confided by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Fox Broad- 
casting Co., a unit of News 
Coip. has struck a five-year 
television rights deal with' the 
National Hockey League, the 
NHL said Tuesday. 

The five-year agreement, 
which starts in January, gives 
Fox exclusive rights for over- 
the-air broadcast of certain 
games, including the 1995 Stan- 
ley Cup Finals. 

ESPN and a related channel, 
ESPN 2, will continue to tele- 
vise about 100 games a year for \ 
five years. Fewer games will be , 
blacked out in local markets un- 
der the revised accord. The 
ESPN channels are units of 
Capital Cities/ ABC Inc. 

The future of this year's NHL 
season is uncertain because of a 
wage dispute that caused the 
owners to threaten to lock out 
the players on Sunday. 

When asked if he expected the 
lockout to occur, Gary Bettman, 
commissioner of the NHL, said. 
“I expect to make a deal” 

In December, Fox signed a 
51.58 billion, four-year deal for 
rights to broadcast National 
Football League games begin- 
ning this season. Those rights 
had long been held by CBS Inc. 

( Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Ratos 

t C DM 
Amsterdam L73E UM LUIS 

BnMStfc JL775 4US &3 

Frankfort Uffl MU 

London tat ISOS 

Madrid mm sun bm 

MHan MMJB WSW 10U» 

Hew York (b) liMo L5«B 

Parti SMS uu UB7 

Tokyo W.TC W59 

Toronto LH» MW UH 

Zarten IMS UH U» 

i ecu um utu une 

I SDR WB WW 23W 

Ctostnot bn Amsterdam, London, 
rates at) run. 

S i To buy one pound: b: To buy 

nIMib 


Sept. 13 

PJ. Lira DJFI R^. S.F. Y«1 Cl Peseta 

UBI 0.1 H»» SMS* L3U3 IUL* 125 U52S* 

UU UBS* IU*S 3LHS UK 21505 M.7W 

ton bum* «JfT7 tm m Lins lsst* i.nw iaw* 

131 asm 27120 41044 UUt 15451 11147 2043 

n» 4.177 * 74BJ4 4JW 9MM 12M23* MU 

2JU1 >0427 *20 mf.lt JSM 1.1SS30 B2I 

12775 1 55450 U3tt J1J3 1*5 5MI US* 1MJ5 

U37I* IBB 9.1653 41022 SJJ1J ■ IAW 4131* 

an um 57 js ii 2 jj 77.u — nn 

02541 BUM* UM MHi* UH17 IJ5B* — - IDS* 

|Hf tKD* 13494 41531* 1X31* BJSS1 15057* 

45J30 1.KLM 2U7 JM0C7 L974 12Zfli TSM0? 

73373 UK2S 2JJS1 4U1H IM0 1«JC l.im U7JO 

New Yet* and Zurich, fixings tn otner canters: Toronto 

one dollar: •: Un>H of WO; M.O.: net wored: «A: not 


eurocurrency Deposits 


f deposits 

Swiss 

D-Moi k Franc 

Sterling 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

Sept. 13 

ECU 

«b-5 

3 

5 - v5 v. 

54k-ffrii 

5 


4 VrS n. 

4-4 IB. 

5 V5 

5V5-541I 

2W»-2ta 

5 *,5 r >. 

5 V^-5 K 

<M'. 

6 MrAU 

S'krS'* 

2 *,? 

6'.Y-6U 

SWN 

4 '«-4 ■> 

A 4,7 

6 *vb 

25*-2>4 

W4+ Ti 


1 raw 5 VtS *i. 5 *W5 H 4 '•■>4 ^ 6 6 *Vd »» VA-Z 

Sources; Routers, Uaydt Bank. 

fbbrstapcncaoie to Interbank deposits of SI mttnon minimum (oremlvalmtl. 


sfvoUabtc. 

Other Dottor 

Cummer Pert 
ArMnLpesa MW* 
AMtrnLt I-M2S 
Avftr.KML WUB2 
BrazHrenl Ml 

CMMwnmn mzm 

Cxrcb ksnmc 2U1 
DwUMkrMe tOOH 

EnnM-DMOd 1WH 

Fin, uiurimn 4M2 


Values 

Currwer Mf 1 

Greek drac- ***** 
KOM Karat 7.7345 
Kune, torts! 107J6 
imSen rupee 31 JS 
IMtorupMi 2176JM 

■mac omu 

imwaiMk. urn 
Kuwaiti Mw turn 
Moiay.rlo*. S SO 


Currency 
MBX.PMO 
H-zeetoadt 
Morw. krone 
PMLfkno 
POltHi doty 
Port. Manta 
Ruinrutte ; 
Sand rival 
sira.s 


Currency Perl 
5. Afr.rond 35545 
5.K0T.WM MOJO 
Swed.krsaa ism 
Taiwan I 3431 

TMtWM 25.95 

Turk! lit lira 33KU. 
UAEdlrtnm 147 V 
Venez. Dalhr. 19200 


Forward Rates 

jm y <Mor THtoY Currency 39-dav 4»4av MHlay 

DeulMMraani 15*24 15*24 1 SOi JM*K | 7* n 

SwtHfnMK iaw 1-2M4 uaw 

j™. IHG Bonk (Amsterdam!: trrdosuet Bunk (Bruaatsl: Banco Qwunerctoto ttottano 
IMlkml/hoonce Franc* Prom tParts), Btmk at Tokyo (Tokyo): Revet Bank at Canada 
t Toronto}; IMF t SDR). Ottwr data tmm Reuters and AP. 


Key Money Rates 

United Slates Close 

Discount rate 400 

Prime rate 714 

Federal fends 456 

J-rnwitti CDs AM 

Comm, paper in dan 5.15 

34Maffi Treasury DID 4e0 

kvear Treasury UU 534 

2. rear Treasury note 431 

5-year Treasury note 7.03 

TdMur Treasury note 704 

H-year Treasury note 7-41 

to-vear Treasury bood 7i8 

Merrill Lynch Xtatoy Ready asset 197 
J«wu 

Discount rate I** 

Cafl money 2.13 

1 -monte Merton* 2'h 

J-muntti Merton* 2 >- 

t-monm Interbank Zfe 

to-year aovernmeat bond 455 


Britain 

Bonk base rate 
Call money 
Mnontb Interbank 
Smooth Interbank 
4*nontk Interbank 
lOnrar out 
France 

intervention rate 
Call moan 
Vmooth Interbank 
3-manlli Interbank 
<■ month Interbank 
IS-yearOAT 


5*. 5'* 

*le 5ta 
5V5 5*t 

Jki 5*1 

4 S 6 V 4 
BJQ 909 

500 500 

5 v. 5 k, 

5 6 * 5 k* 

Sta 51ft 
5». in. 
907 107 


Lombard rate 
Call money 
l-rrann intertank 
S-maotti interbank 

4-ojontti Interbank 

10-year Bund 


400 400 

105 105 

500 500 

500 500 

115 115 

1M 7SA 


Sources: Reuters. Btoomoerg, Merrill 
Lynch, Bank of Tokyo. Commerzbank, 
Grwtmvatt Moataou, Credit Lyonnah. 

Gold 

A-M. PM. Cft-m 
Zurich 39100 39055 — 020 

London 39045 339 a0 — 1 jo 

NOW York 39450 39440 —050 

US. dallora par ounce. London official fix- 
ings: Zurich and New York opening and eta* 
tnoorkm; New York conten (December.) 
Source; Reuters. 


Our Philosophy of Banking 
Goes Back 4,000 Years. 



established nearly four mil- 
lennia ago. 

We believe in the primacy 
of personal relationships, the 
importance of trust and the 
protection of depositors' 
funds. This emphasis has 
made us one of the world’s 
leading private banks. 

As a subsidiary of Saffa 
Republic Holdings S.A. and 
an affiliate of Republic New 
York Corporation, we’re part 
of a global group with more 

REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


A SAFRA BrMMK 

TIMELESS VALUES. TRADITIONAL STRENGTH. 

HEAD OFFICE: GENEVA U04 • E. PLACE DU LAC ■ TEL. i022l 70S 55 55 • FOREX: 1 OZZ 1 705 55 50 AND SEN EVA 1201-2. RUE DR. ALFBED-VINCENT (CORNER 
OUAI DU MONT-BLANCi BRANCHES: LUGANO 6901 - t, VIA CANOVA * TEL. 10911 23 B5 32 • ZURICH OT39 ■ STOCKERSTRA5SE 37 • TEL. (01 1 268 18 IB • 
GUERNSEY • RUE DU PRE ■ ST PETER PORT • TEL. i4Bll 711 761 AFFILIATE REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK IN NEW YORK OTHER LOCATIONS 
GIBRALTAR - GUERNSEY • LONDON - LUXEMBOURG • MILAN • MONTE CARLO ' PARIS ' BEVEHUf HILLS • CAYMAN ISLANDS ■ LOS ANGELES * MEXICO CITY ■ MIAMI ■ 
MONTREAL • NASSAU • NEW YORK • BUENOS AIRES • CARACAS - MONTEVIDEO • PUNTA DEL ESTE ■ RIO DE JANEIRO • SANTIAGO ■ BEIRUT ■ BEIJING - HONG KONG • 

JAKARTA - SINGAPORE - TAIPEI - TOKYO 


I t was the ancient traders 
who first established 
many ot today's banking 
practices. They accepted 
funds tor safekeeping. 
Bartered goods tor services. 
And extended credit, it was 
a husiness based on trust, 
and a handshake contract 
was binding. 

The world has changed 
immeasurably since then, 
but Republic National Bank 
still holds to the principles 


than US$5 billion in capital 
and more than US$50 billion 
in assets. These assets con- 
tinue to grow substantially, 
a testament to the group’s 
strong balance sheet, risk- 
averse orientation and 
century-old heritage. 

Though cuneiform tablets 
have given way to modem 
computers, the timeless 
qualities of safety, sen-ice and 
personal integrity will always 
be at the heart of our bank. 







Page 12 

MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1994 


U.S./AT THE 


Price Data Calm 
Fears of Inflation 


IVhAiMCotodPrm 


Dow Jones Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Daily closes of the : 

Dow Jonee industrial average. 


Open Mon Low La*t Oib. 


Metals 


inch n 3878-51 3B92A4 386CL34 3a» Ji - H-g 
Tram 1 577 J3 1581W 1572X* 157169 -0X3 
um 178.63 179.28 177.ra 178X2 — 0.07 
Comp 131Z97 1317X3 1M7X7 1311.73 -3X1 


Cine 

BM Ask 


ALUMINUM CHhrti Grade] 
DoRora par metric ton 
Soot 136U0 136100 

Forwent 15B8JOO 1589.00 

COPPER CATHODES (HlgD 
Delian nor metric ten 
Spat 2SSU0 25D400 

Forward 2S18JOO 2519X0 

LEAD 

DoHm par metric too 
SOOI 616X0 617X0 

Forward 62LH 627 JO 

NICKEL 

Dettori per metric ton 
Spot 6445X0 647100 

Forward 636100 637000 

TIN 

Dollar, per metric to w 
Spot 5280X0 529000 

Forward 536000 537000 

ZINC fSPKtoi Hton Grade) 
Dollar* per matrlc too 
SMI 982m 98X00 

Forward loauo 100000 


Previous 
Bid Ask 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks 
climbed as technology issues 
surged and as concern about in- 
flation eased when the govern* 
meat said consumer prices in 
August rose less than expected. 

The Dow Jones industrials 
average ended 19.52 points 


U.S. Stocks 


higher, at 3,879.86. Almost 11 
stocks advanced for every 10 
that fell on the New York Stock 
Exchange, where volume was 
295 million shares. 

The government said con- 
sumer prices rose a moderate 
03 percent in August, in line 
with expectations. Analysts 
said the data would calm Wall 
Street's inflation jitters, follow- 
ing a worrisome report Friday 
on producer prices that caused 
a steep, two-day sell-off in stock 
and bond markets. 

In reaction to the inflation 
report, yields on the Treasury’s 
ben chmar k 30-year bond fell to 
7.68 percent from 7.71 percent 
on Monday and the bond was 
priced at 97 28/32. 

Cyclical shares also got a 
boost from the data, with Inter- 
national Paper, ending up \Vs, 
at 74%. 


Pitney Bowes dosed down ! A, 
at 37, on news it is seeking buy- 
ers for two units accounting for 
about 15 percent of its annual 
business as it focuses on its of- 
fice-equipment operation. 

Computer, semiconductor 
and software stocks were 
among those posting the largest 
gains amid stronger-than-ex- 
pected orders for computer 
chips last month and optimism 
about sales of mainframe com- 
puters by IBM. 

IBM rose 1%, to 69W. New 
mainframe computers intro- 
duced Monday give IBM “reve- 
nue growth potential,'’ Merrill 
Lynch & Co. said Tuesday. 

Sun Microsystems ended up 
1 3/16, at 28. 

Hanson shares remained the 
most active on the NYSE as it 
awaits news on the dividend. 

Western Co. of North Ameri- 
ca rose 414, to 16%, after oQ 
drilling services company BJ 
Services offered to buy compet- 
itor Western. 

Microsoft ended up 1 7/16, 
at 57 9/16 after the company 
said its new operating system 
software Windows NT 3.5 
should be available within three 
weeks. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 



Standard A Poor’s indexes 


Htoft low Close Cb'se 
93X08 55008 55X03 + 1-93 
378.12 375X0 37X70 +050 
151X9 150X8 1SCU1 + 0X4 
MJJ «5X0 45X8 
468.76 466X1 46751 + 1X0 
436X1 432X4 434X3 + 1.99 


AM J 3 A S 


NYSE Indexes 


Higti 

Low 

Lost 

Ota. 

Composite 

induartob 

Tronso. 

Utmry 

Finance 

258.44 

322X8 

243X1 

203.47 

2I40» 

257X2 
321 M 
241X9 
202X1 
213X7 

257.84 
323 M 
242X6 
202.78 
21174 

-0.52 

• nil 

• 1X7 
■0.14 

— 0J» 


199X0 15000 158X0 1S7J3 -350 

158.75 137 JO 137.7$ 157JS —150 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 156.00 -100 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 153X0 — 1JS 

15550 153.75 154X0 1A+M — 150 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 155X0 -150 


American Express to Buy Its Shares jjj{ 
NEW YORK (Reuters) — American Express C<xsaid TJjSday P 
< i l... ... on miiiirm common shares as part of a 


Vd A 


NEW YORK (Reuters) — American Express Gxsaid Tuesday P « j| 

it would repurchase up to 20 million common shares as part of a lljlflt* 
nllUro reKthe number of outstanding common shares, and 


1568X0 1569X0 
159150 199250 
Grade] 


Eft. volume: 16X47 . Open Hit. 90X17 


249750 349050 
2514X0 2515X0 


611X0 612X0 

sn 423,00 


6365X0 637000 


6480.00 6485X0 
5575X0 5580X0 


5315X0 5325X0 
5390X0 5400X0 


BRENT CRUDE OIL {IPE) 

U5. dollar* p«r borr*+tots of LOW barrel* 
00 14,18 15X3 15X5 15X5 —0X7 

NOV 16X8 16X4 16X6 1UH —0X7 

Dec 1654 16X3 1629 1629 - 0X7 

JOT 1451 16X4 1641 1641 —0X4 

Fcfi 1665 16X5 16X5 16X5 —0X3 

Mar 1668 1645 1645 1645 —AM 

AOT 1663 1645 16.43 1645 —0.10 

Mot N.T. N.T. N.T. >647 - WO 

JIM N.T. N.T. N.T. 1649 —W0 

JtV N.T. N.T. N.T. 1651 —0.10 

A 08 N.T. N.T. N.T. 1653 —WO 

So? N.T. N.T. N.T. 1655 —WO 


on AugSt 31 and about 3 ndUUrnc 

reflecting employee stock cations likely to be exercised. 

GM Promotes European Executives 

DETROIT (NVT)— Toaddppwti^to ^ thenewnrS 


EM. vo hunt: 59,485 . Ooen in. ltfX03 


47250 97350 
995X0 99600 


Financial 


Stock Indexes 

Hlfltl LOW CIOM Change 


executives to senior posts in its intemaopnal noWML ■ 
Mr. Hughes, 45, will remain m Zurich as MiteMI 
Motors Europe and as an executive vice president of GM, Peter ft. 
. . , _ .... m meaitive vice president of 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Low Lost Ota. 


NYSE Most Actives 


Comaaslta 

Industrials 

Banks 

Insurance 

FI none* 

Transp. 


76558 76264 764.95 - 4.94 
23Xa 77284 773.78 -457 
780.94 778.68 779X3 —8X8 
939.17 934.73 936.71 *051 
95607 954.76 95751 -8.B3 
729.51 726.03 77603 *1X9 


Henson 

RJRNob 

Borden 

WaiMort 

Faros 

Dresv 

EMC* 

TMMex 

IBM 

WCNA 

MfcrTCS 


VOL Hioti Low 
18% 16% 
64* 64a 

131* 13V* 

26 15 V* 

294* 28V* 

204* 20'/. 

IBM 18 
631* 424* 

69V* 68V* 
17V. 16V* 

404* 39V* 
104* 10’* 

311* 304* 

99 964* 

44 Vi 434* 


AMEX Stock Index 


Moll Low Last Chg. 
456 88 454.95 456X1 -1.75 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
10 Utilities 
10 Industrials 


Close Cb'se 

97X0 +606 

93.40 — 0X5 

101X1 +0.18 


NASDAQ Most Actives NYSE Diary 


PRICES: Inflation Pressure Eases 


Continued from Page 11 

which should be consistent with 
a fairly stable inflation rate," 
said Bruce Steinberg, director 
of economic analysis for Merrill 
Lynch & Co. in New York. 

Through the first eight 
months of this year, consumer- 
price inflation has run at an an- 
nual rate of 2.9 percent, little 
changed from I993*s 2.7 percent 
“Inflation at the consumer 
level remains moderate,” said 


Marilyn Sc ha] a, an econo- 
mist at Donaldson, Lufkin and 
Jenrette in New York, said 
Tuesday’s inflation report 
would take the pressure off the 
Federal Reserve Board to raise 
interest rates at its Sept. 27 
meeting. But she said a rate in- 
crease could still come in No- 
vember. (AP, AFP) 


TetCinA 
Cisco s 
Informix 
irtei 
DSC 1 
SunMic 

Methcnx 

MiCsflS 

IrtfgOv 

VLSI 

Adobe Sy 

HeortTc 

AST 

MCI 

Quantum 


vaL (Cali 
44319 22*i 
372B9 25*i 
31210 21V* 
29600 £54* 
28391 30 
26199 28 U 
25584 17V* 
25581 57** 
74707 234* 
20375 124* 
19262 337u 
16532 24V* 
16192 144* 
19931 24 
15387 164* 


Law Last 

214* 22% 

2SV* 25V* 
20T* 20% 

591* 65*4 
28'.* 29®»m 
261* 78 

1CV1 1714 
56V* 57V r. 

239* 22Vu 
12 12V* 

31 329* 

21V* 24Vi, 
1346 139* 

Z3Vi 23V« 
16 164* 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total is&ues 
New High* 
New Lows 


1132 735 

1001 1404 

735 757 

2B68 2896 

42 32 

65 71 


AMEX Diary 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issue* 
New Highs 

New Low* 


300 342 

256 312 

251 251 

807 885 

16 4 

23 12 


VkJCB 

Naborj 

EchoBay 

IvoxCd 

TooSroe 

SPDB 

XCLLId 

Hf-tgMd 

Amdhl 

B atonic 


VoL Htot* Law Last CDs. 

11521 35V, 34 35 -IV* 

6968 6 'h 6% 64* 


NASDAQ Diary 


5501 13V* 124* 13 

4067 20 Mi IV** 20 Vi 


3927 7 6V* 64* »'A 

3892 47V* 46W„ 47 *V«i 

3773 H. IVh IVu _ 

3707 2246 22 224* * Ml 

3705 10 9V* 10 —V* 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
MewHfcrtu 
New Low* 


Forafgn Exchange 


Cynthia Latta, an economist at 
DRI-McGraw Hill in Lexing- 
ton, Massachusetts. “These 
numbers are consistent with our 
expectations that inflation is 


going to be faster in the second 
half of the year, but nothing 


naif of the year, but nothing 

alarmin g,*' 

Wall Street slumped Friday 
after the government reported 
that wholesale prices had 
surged 0.6 percent in August, 
their biggest rise in four years. 

But the consumer price index 
is considered a broader gauge of 
inflation because it covers ser- 
vices, which are not included in 
the wholesale price report. 


■ Dollar Edges Higher 
The dollar finished little 
changed Tuesday against most 
major currencies in New York, 
.with relief about inflation offset 
by lack of progress at trade talks 
between the United States and 
Japan, news agencies reported. 

The dollar finished U.S. trad- 
ing at 1.5433 Deutsche marks, 
up from 1.5414 DM Monday, 
but at 98.84 yen, down from 
99.15 yen. The dollar slipped to 
12855 Swiss francs from 1.2867 
and to 52775 French francs 
from 52845. The pound weak- 
ened to SI 5624 from $1.5705. 

Strength in Treasury bond 
prices kept the dollar under- 
pinned, but investors did not 
have enough confidence In the 
currency to buy into a rally, 
analysts said. 

(Bloomberg Knight-Ridder) 


Spot Commodities 


Hton Lew Clcue Chuno* 

3-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 

1306080 -pt* of 100 Pd 

500 94.15 94.10 94.14 +0X7 

one 9138 93-?; 93X7 +0X7 

MOT *240 9250 9259 + 0X9 

Jon 92X7 91.97 92X6 +611 

Sap 91X3 9154 91X3 +0.11 

DM 91X2 91X1 91X0 +0.12 

Mor 91X1 90.94 91X1 +0X9 

JOT 90X2 9074 9082 + 0B7 

SW 90X8 9057 90X8 + 8X7 

DM 9049 90X7 V3M + 0X4 

MOT 90X0 9056 90X3 +0X5 

Jun 9032 90X8 90X2 +0X1 

Est velum*: 83X50. Open Irtf.: 535,944. 

3* MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

II Rilfflon-ptsof lOOptf 
Sap 94X2 94.92 94.93 +DX1 

Ok 94X4 9424 9*27 +0X3 

Mor 93X7 93X7 93.90 + 0X2 

JOO N.T. N.T. 93X5 +0X3 

SOT N.T. N.T. 9325 +0X4 

Est. volume: 194 Osen Inf.: 6X68. 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS tLIFFE) 

DM1 mlinoo-Ptsot wojxa 
Sap 9499 9457 9499 +0X1 

Dm 9482 9476 94X1 +0X2 

Mar 9445 9458 94X3 +601 

Jun 94X7 9359 9406 +0X2 

5*P 9077 93X9 9356 +0X2 

DM 93X7 93X0 9347 +0X3 

Mar 93X7 93.19 9126 +QXI 

Jun 93X6 9256 93X5 +OXS 

Sep 9178 9177 92X5 + 0X5 

DM 92X5 9255 92X5 + 0X6 

Mar N.T. N.T. 92X7 +0X6 

Jun 9133 9226 92J5 +0X5 

E8t. volume: 78X76. Open Inf.: 786507. 
3-MONTH PI BOR (MATIF1 
PF3 million - on of WO pd 
Sep 9438 9436 *438 + 0X2 

DM 93X4 93X7 9353 + 0X6 

Mar 93X9 93X2 93X8 +QJ35 

Jun 93.14 93X7 93.12 + 0X3 

S*P 92X5 9279 92X2 Unch. 

Dec 92X0 9254 9257 —0X1 

Mor 92.42 «3fi 92X0 —0X1 

Jun 9223 92.17 9221 —OX) 

Eat. volume: OjTV.Oeenlni.: 202X01 
LONG GILT fLIFFE) 

■50X00 - pt* A toads of 108 pet 
Sep 100-24 10M0 100-24 + 0-05 

Dac 100X7 99X9 IB0X3 +0-04 

Mar N.T. N.T. 99-15 +0X4 

Est. volume: 75X35. Open tat: 119.128. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 258X00 - Pt* Of 1W pd 
OK K2S 8857 8920 +IL2D 

Mar 8755 8750 BOAS +8.15 

Est. volume: 134139. Open InL: 144317. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FF508X00 - Pts of 100 pet 
Sep 11220 11172 112.16 + 0X2 

Dec 11122 T 1076 11135 Unch- 

Mor 11054 1103) 11052 —0X2 

Jun 109X0 10*56 109.90 —0.14 

EsI. volume: 259X24 Open Inf.: 160249. 


Hlah Low Close Change 
FTSE ISC (LIFFE) 

OS per Idmx point 

Sep 3120X 3075X 31140 +40 

Dec 31XL0 3092X 3T29X +40 

N& 3131X 3131 X 31 5U» +2X 

Eli. volume: 33X50. Open Int.: 62504 
CAC 40 (MATIF) 

££” Perl W H r942X0 1980« +4« 

s* ^ is, 

DM 1995X0 197400 »«X0 +6X0 

(««r N.T. N.T. M37-M +J« 

JOT N.T. N.T. 2030X0 +6X0 

Est. volume: 29X38. Open Int.: 61X47. 
Sources .- M atlf. _ A ssociated Pm s* 
London mn Ftnanckd Futuna Etcname, 
Inn Petrottvm Exchange. I 


IHOIOF5 Europe auu as au r , . • 

Hanenberger, 52, was promoted to executive wepresdeni of 
design, product and manufacturing engmeenng for GMs interna- 
tional operations, while Manfred Wolf, 56, was named vice ' 
president of vehicle platform development. 

P GM announced the moves late Monday. The idea is to save on 
development costs and time and to cut duplication. TYadmonalty, , •; 
GNfs Europein, Asian, South Ameacan and North Ampcan , 
operations worked autonomously. Ford Motor Co. recently an- 
nounced a worldwide shake-up to accomplish the same thmg. 


Bass Sws Crowne Will Stand Alone 

. /m, t m Jer KkI mcMmized hr 


DMdMids 


Per Amt 
IRREGULAR 


BuU&Bear SpEoFO 
COrporot* HlYM 
Corporate HlYtai i 
M etropolitan Rrty 
Nuveen Prmlncu 4 
Pltorlm RMdonal 
worldwide Dollar 
gcof aolns cflstrlbutlon. 


HJ Heinz Q M 

Mercantile Bahj O 20 

Merrv Land O 25 


LONDON (AP) — Holiday Inn is the best iWKwnized brod 
name in the global hotel business, but Bass PLC, its British 
owners, said Tuesday they would scrap the name from upscale 
Crowne Plaza holds in the Americas. . "« ; 

Tim Clarke, president for Holiday Inn Worldwide operauon^fe - 
Europe, the Middle East and Africa said “We have a speaficn^. - 
for segmentation of our brands.” Holiday Inn said the Crowne 
Plaza name was already well known among upmarket business 
travelers, conference organizers and travel agents. ■■■ 

The company said it would also establish two new types of • 
hotels in the Americas: Holiday Inn Select hotels, targeted toward - . - 
business travelers, and Holiday Inn Hotel and Suites, which wm \ 
have large suites designed for people who make extended stays. . 


CORRECTION 


S Bo may mil Mun d X5 

S Barney Inti d X5 

d-ravtoed record data. 


Aon Muni Fund 
Bedford Prop 
Cdn Pacific 
Cardinal Health 
Consolld Nat Goa 
EKOlorcMna 
Essex County 


Fst Svos Bit Moors 
Fine Flnonctal 


Market Sales 


NYSE 

Amu 

NoidQq 

tn mltltom. 


Commodity Today 

'Aluminum, lb 871 

Cooper electrolytic, lb 123 

Iron FOB. ion ziaxa 

Load, lb (L40 

Silver, troy ox 145 

Stool Iscrop), tan liai7 

Tin. lb HA 

3 no lb 0485 


Industrials 


Hton Low Lost seme arae 
GA50ILIIPE) 

i U 5. dollar* per metric ton-hits of Ida tons 
Oct 15275 158X0 150X0 15025 — 300 

Nov 15550 15275 153X0 153X0 - 3X0 

DM 15775 155X0 15525 15525 —3X0 

JOT 15925 156.75 15725 15725 —250 


Flag Financial 
Fortls Secur 
Gexfynomlcs Coro 
Graphic Indus 
Hyperion 1997 
Hyperion 1999 
Hyperion 2005 
Inli Flavs&Fraos 
K -Swiss Inc 
Kelttilev Instrum 
Merrtrusf FedlSvo 
Omnicom Gro 
PrapectSt HI Inc 
S alem Corp 
S du boai d Carp 
SBamev HllncOoo 
5 Barney HlincOop 
SBamev HllncOoo 
SBamev HlincOop 
SBamey inti 
Tour Muni CA HU 
Tour Muni NY Hid 
Tootsie Roll 


M X609 9-19 9-29 
Q X9 10-14 1020 
g .08 9-27 10-28 
Q .03 10-1 10-15 
Q 485 10-14 11-15 
. .85 1-2-1 12-8 

Q 20 9-19 10-1 
_ .10 9K® 10-15 

Q .075 90 10-1 
M X75 9-26 10-14 
O .07 9-22 104 
<3 XI 75 9-22 106 
M X5 9-19 9-29 


M X5 9-19 9-29 
M X625 9-19 9-29 


7? 9-27 10-10 
X2 9-30 10-14 
XS 9-21 9-30 
.10 10-3 10-10 
XI 9-26 10-7 


BJ Services Offers to Buy Western 

HOUSTON (Combined Dispatches) — BJ Services Co. said ■ ' 

Tuesday it offered to acquire Weston Co. of North America in a 
cash and stock transaction valued at $450 milli on. 

BJ Services offered to pay $18.50 for each of the 1&2 minion : = ■ ■ 

outstanding shares of Western Co., and assume about S 1 14 
million of the company’s debt. A previous offer whidi d id not 
include the assumption of debt was rejected by Western’s board. — • • | * « * 

Both companies specialize in services for the drilling and con- i / 1 i ’ J‘- 1 * ** 

Stxucti on of oil ana gas wells. (Bloomberg Knight-Ridder) Jt.V* 

For the Record 


M JOS 9-23 9-30 
O .10 10-3 10-17 


25 9-20 9-30 


M XV£ 9-22 9-29 
M X96 10-18 10-25 
M X96 11-15 11-22 
M X96 12-M 12-27 
M XS 11-15 11-22 
M JEM 9-19 9-29 
M X661 9-19 9-29 
O .11 9-27 10-12 


u-annool; p-pcryable In Canadtaa fond*; m- 
meatMy; otavltrln v-Mml-aimual 


Monsanto Co.’s chairman. Richard Mahoney, said he would . 
retire in March. The company’s board plans to name Robot - : r 
Shapiro, 56, the current president, to succeed him. ( Bloomberg) , 
Eckerd Cora, said it would sell its Insta-Care Pharmacy Services . • 
subsidiary to Pharmacy Corp. of America for $11 2 million in cash. 
Eckerd said it expected to use the proceeds from the sale to 
redeem debt (Knigfu-Ridder) : j 

AJL Bek) Corp. said it would acquire the assets of KLRO-TV in • 
Seattle for $160 million. (Knight-Ridder) . 


Lower Provisions Help Mediobanca Net 


Dieter’s Home Searched 


AFP-Exte! News 


Forte Named to Savoy Post 


Compiled hy Our Staff From Dispatches 

MILAN — Mediobanca SpA said Tuesday 
its parent-company net profit for the 1994 
financial year rose S percent to 215.9 billion 
lire (S 1 38 million), as it slashed its provision for 
problem loans. 


The Italian merchant bank took provisions 
and writedowns totaling 143J billion lire, 
down from 275.2 billion lire in the previous 
year. Consolidated net profit stood at 301 
billion lire, Mediobanca said, without provid- 


ing a year-earlier comparison, ft said it would 
propose an unchanged dividend of 200 lire 
per ordinary share. 

As of June 30, total funding amounted to 
22.1 trillion lire, an increase of 8.3 percent 
while total loans and advances rose 12.7 per- 
cent to 17.3 trillion lire. 

Securities and equity investments increased 


DUSSELDORF — Stale 
prosecutors searched homes of 
Werner Dieter, the former 
chairman of Mannesmann AG, 
a company spokesman said 
Tuesday. 


16.1 percent to 2.7 trillion lire, and liquid 
assets increased 7.8 percent to 6.4 trillion lire. 


A Dusseldorf court spokes- 
man said premises in DCssel- 


assets increased 7.8 percent to 6.4 trillion Ore. 

(AFX. Bloomberg) 


dorf, the Saarland towns of 
Sulzbach and Dudweiler, and 
the Bavarian town of Lohr had 
been searched. 


Bloomberg Businas News 

LONDON — Rocco 
Forte, a hotelier who has 
been trying for 13 years to 
gain control of the Savoy 
group of hotels, was named 
Tuesday to- a three-man 
committee that will ran the 
luxury hotel company. 


chairman of the private 
bank Coutts & Co., as chair- 
man, succeeding Sir Antho- 
ny Tuke, who will retire at 
the end of the year. 


Savoy Group PLC ap- 
pointed Sir Ewen Fergusson, 


Mr. Forte an&Jqto. §ia- 
dSr, who represents several 
trusts that control a major 
stake in Savoy Group, will 
join Mr. Fergusson on the 
chairman’s committee. 


NYSE 


.1 v • I 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 

































** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1994 


Page 13 


EUROPE 


Germany Expects 
Will Act Alone on 

WMl^ftai djj.? . *4;hrA WURZBURG, Germany — “ lhe Geld 10 lease 

The minister of posts and tele- 
■i. * communications, Wolfgang 

^ BOtsch, said Tuesday that Euro- 

Union countries were un- 


Phone Monopolies 

aasss 

fftl to pear 

\s , .i!“ v '*■■? f«r^ endi 

Irv.L ... ■’• T, u „K_c 


!< 

»i *!».? • 

■ Wirt, 

Ifmain 
m^-u iUT , w> 
Ptotnoift! 

Hufaviut 
Maid i el 

drv, hv . 

**** U w T . 

&w and t.« . ... V J : v 
t SrtUth a v "* 
MkHttiv 

ttdkt-up 


"fc, 


to reach agreement on 
ending state telephone monop- 
olies soon, making a unilateral 
c?: ! move by Bonn probable. 


*»»■ i.wM; J Vr 



. W .Ml . . 


wne Vt ill ; 


tofiAiy l-v: , , 

» ‘"v- rvM 


**l huMiscv. 
toy vti«ui t j 
tto Antes*., 
toritaihit,* | r . 
and 
brands 
wll kiumu 
iWtucr 

tatuld _ 

baJidav Inn 
Mhtas Inn 
d 


MtxLtx | r .. y *'la 

tO 1 : 


After a meeting with the 
EUs industry commissioner, 
Martin Bangemann, and repre- 
sentatives of Finland, Norway, 
Sweden and Austria — which 
are due to become EU members 
in January — plus France and 
rv%i ' Greece, Mr. Bfctsch said be saw 
lias. little chance of the EU reaching 

m,.. r , r-ri agreement at a council meeting 
*r> scheduled for November. 

If there is no agreement, he 
said, Germany will “consider 
.TiV whether it win have to decide 


lines from the monopolies. 

Reflecting a change in Ger- 
man policy, Mr. BOtsch said this 
week, that during Germany's 
presidency of the EU, which 
runs to the rad of this year, he 
would seek an agreement among 
members to allow new telecom- 
munications companies to own 
and operate their networks. 

German companies welcomed 
the change but said it should go 
into effect as early as 1996. 

Mr. Bangemann raged EU 
countries to move more 



|* }*i 


Infill lot; ri.'V ".'. , ^c Iar lCt fi 
for j?e, r ; L . U u';; 

nAt BB^u’ 

fers to Bm % 


tions companies. 

Xj He was speaking at a news 
conference after the meeting, 
which was called to discuss the 
r ‘ impact of the new members on 
^ \y , . C$lQ» EU telecommunications policy. 

iw^Spii? " Basic telephone service in 

w r I *- ni * - f * -• ^,’r most European countries is 

^ ... . scheduled to be opened to com- 

*»• -»> -.'.'.t, petition in 1998. But no date 

VCMtrru t .> .. . J*- v: has been set to end state mo- 

nopolies on telecommunica- 
tions networks, which force new 


at valued ;l! *4>,. 

y ... !: uU5 

ifofcm t ,. 
t debt, a po.-'is*' 


to introduce competition or rii. 
falling further behind the United 
States and Japan in developing 
“information superhighways.” 

“Countries that hesitate will 
be creating their own disadvan- 
tages by denying the advan- 
tages of more advanced tech- 
nology,” he said. 

Finland and Sweden have tak- 
en steps to open tip their domes- 
tic telecommunications markets, 
and Austria is planning to open 
its mobile-phone industry to 
competition next year. 

“We see liberalization in the 
interest of consumers, produc- 
ers and operators, and we are 
pleased with free competition,” 
said Ole Norrback, Finnish 
minister for transport and com- 
munications. 


Emerging Market News 

Upstart Financial Service Rules in Moscow 


Bloomberg Business Ne*s 

MOSCOW — Two-and-a-half years after 
starting with S100 and a typewriter borrowed 
from friends. Sergei Skaterschikov has be- 
come the dominant source for information on 
Russia's new financial markets. 

Skate-Press Consulting Agency has grown 
from a 22-year-old entrepreneur working 
alone in his apartment to a dozen employees 
in a large, buzzing office at one of Moscow’s 
most prestigious business addresses. 

It has become the company investors and 

Others turn to for the lowdown on Russia's 
chaotic, aU-but-unregulaied securities market. 
Just Tuesday, for example, Moscow Tunes, the 
city’s largest English-language newspaper, be- 
gan publishing what it says is the biggest share 
index in Russia — provided by Skate-Press. 

“Skate-Press is perhaps the main informa- 
tion agency in the securities market,” said 
Andrei Terebenin, a senior partner in Dun & 
Bradstreel CIS, the U.S. company's Moscow 
unit. “They provide important information 
for malting' investment decisions.” 

In a country where people still wait years 
for phones, Skate-Press has five lines and a 
half-dozen computer networks to gather and 
disseminate more market and company infor- 
mation than any competitor. It also offers 
advice to more than 300 clients. 

Despite his company’s command of the 
market, Mr. Skaterschikov said he was aware 
that increasing investor interest in Russia is 
attracting Western challengers and that he 
must continually improve if he is to survive. 

“They can easily grab all our pluses” Mr. 
Skaterschikov said of Dun & Bradstreet 
Corp., Moody's Investors Service Inc. and 
other Western financial-information agen- 
cies. “It’s very hard for us to grab theirs: 
world clients and a famous reputation.” 

But for now, Skate-Press is Russia's only 
daily source of a wide range of market infor- 


mation, from simple share trading in St. Pe- 
tersburg to company research in Petropav- 
lovsk to changes in interbank lending rates. 

Skate-Press information is used by all of 
Russia’s business newspapers, which gives the 
company exposure and credibility. But its real 
profit comes from Western organizations un- 
familiar with Russia's financial markets. 

This includes the International Monetary 
Fund and the World Bank, the U-S. State 


'Skate-Press is perhaps the 
mam information agency in 
the securities market’ 

Andrei Terebenin of Dun & 

Bradstreet. 


Department, Deloitte & Touche, C.S. First 
Boston and J. P. Morgan & Co. 

Quickness is Mr. Skaierschikov’s specialty. 
When the old Soviet government fell in 1991 
and took its command-style economy with it, 
he was a stockbroker with six months experi- 
ence and a problem: no independent market 
information. 

“It all came from banks or other parties that 
may or may not have had a position one way or 
another on the product being sold.” be said. 

Mr. Skaterschikov quit his job and tried to 
fill the gap. He found a fascimile center will- 
ing to send and receive faxes for him and 
began pumping old contacts for information 
that went out on a daily two-page fax, mainly 
to newspapers and television stations. 

Within a month, business increased to the 
point where he was visiting the fax center twice 
a day, and profits were high enough to let the 
living-room analyst buy his first fax machine. 


Fison Net 
Dampens 
Outlook 


Compiled to Our Staff From Dupadio 

LONDON — Fisons PLC 
said Tuesday that its first-half 
profits plunged, reflecting 
problems at its scientific instru- 
ments operations. 

Pretax profit at the British 
pharmaceuticals company in the 
six months to June 30 fell to 
£30.4 million ($47.7 million) 
from £41_5 milli on in the like 
period last year. The dividend 
was halved to 1.7 pence per 
share from 33 pence. Fisons’ 
first-half sales fell to £640.3 mil- 
lion from £651.4 million. 

Fisons blamed the decline on 
rising losses in its instrument 
division, which makes up about 
19 percent of sales. 

Fisons, which underwent re- 
structuring at the end of last 
year that wiped out 1993 prof- 
its, also warned that profitabili- 

S was unlikely to improve in 
e second half. 

“The trading environment is 
expected to remain challenging 
on all fronts, and it is unlikely 
that, for the group as a whole, 
any marked improvement in 
profitability levels can occur 
during the re main der of this 
year,” the chairman, Patrick 
Egan, said. 

“The results were dearly very 
disappointing, although the co- 
mpany appears to have taken a 
realistic approach to prospects 
f or the future.” said Paul Kri- 
kler, a Goldman, Sachs & Co. 
analyst. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


II Investor’s Europe 1 

Frankfurt 

DAX 


London 

FTSE 100 index 

Paris 

CAC 40 














22E/M - 


3300 

3200 • 


m jj* 

SlWJH-r 

Ar 


r - 

wn. A- 


2000 - - VI- , 

% 

am- Y 

— . 

m «?V 

f 

1900 -- vy 


Ma-uj 

1894 

J AS 

®AMJ 

1994 

J _ A“ £ 

* a m y 

1994 

j A S 

Exchange 

Index 


Tuesday 

Close 

Prev. 

Close 

S 

Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX 


412.S9 

411.81 

+0.21 

Brussels 

Slock Index 

7^64.15 

7.509.59 

>0.61 

Frankfurt 

DAX 


2,136.09 

2,154.61 

-0.B6 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 


80a47 

614.64 

-0.76 

Helsinki 

HEX 


133438 

1.943.83 

-0.46 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2,427.30 

2,425.90 

+0.06 

London 

FTSE 100 

3,121.40 

3,128.80 

■0.24 

Madrid 

General Index 

294.72 

298.85 

-1.38 

Milan 

MIBTEL 

10429 

10401 

+0.27 

Paris 

CAC 40 

A ,969.36 

1,966 79 

+0.13 

Stockholm 

Atfaersvaerlden 

1,853.05 

1.852.90 

+0.01 

Vienna 

Stock Index 

455.16 

457.21 

■0 45 

Zurich 

SBS 


941.63 

938 20 

+0.37 

Sources : Reuters. AFP 



Inirmjii.^ijl HrrjlJ Tnhi:;r 

Very briefly 






v ’ MAGAZINE: Marie Claire and Hearst Tackle the American Market Moody’s Warns on German Funds 


Costumed from Page 11 Men: Does he have date or male other 51 percent is held by Eve- were down about 10 percent 

nartirtllir tartar rtf A m a . J nAtM«!i>10 n n tv . n • - . .1 : - 


Mil. Kich.ud .. _ 1 

ttpAnv’' bv.r.i j» ,,!* the particular tastes of Ameri- potential?” are classic woman’s iyne P^uvost-Berry, "chief exec- from the previous year, 
ftftttitfrit. • :u\\ ’V’tJ "**?:!- c** 1 women. magazine fare, though a story on utive of the company, and her 

'•* V " M s. Hcmb ert said the Ameri- WW .,^^2 

the 

* »“““ “* * *“*vv, uwuugu ui t nouuai acknowledged a press magnate who started 


ipT./ Vm-V" . “ can. e^tron was “a bit more & Warriors” ala? appeared in ry ^^7^T^^panv from 

tifui \ i! r v :: ^n pracGcal in the United States the premier issue. her grandfather, JeaA Prouvost. 

'h‘ * ! MT C; ,’ than in France,” although the Ms. Hembert acknowledged a press masmate who started 


LUV M1UV1UU UlUSIVUMd 111 UK XOiUindVUL ..L' Lj.L 

»*Hilildiqh:!. largely identical to that in Euro- American edition, especially A successful foray into the fh«?nln io<r» 

[ pean editions: educated women when contrasted with its British American market would further 

" between the ages of 25 and 45. counterpart. “In the U.K., it’s the comeback of Groupe Marie This view was seconded by 

• Indeed, the table of contents more news, more provocative,” Claire, which has been hurl re- Marc Loneux, an analyst with 

k for the fashion and beauty de- she said. cently by the recession and a Bacot Allain in Paris, who said 

rwj W* n . Apartments m the debut Ameri- Mr. Wolf of Hearst estimated 1993 law regulating how adver- ad pages for the French edition 

yUr If/ / 1 (/I ifflrTcan Mane Claire offers titles it would take from three to five tiring is bought and sold in of Marie Claire in the first sev- 
, such as “Makeup Miracles — years brfore Marie Claire start- France. cn months of 1994 had risen 20 

Ms. Hembert said “the group percent over the same period 
very profitable,” but she ac- last year. He noted, however. 

that part of this growth was due 
to the disappearance of former 
percent tbat revenues of 750 million rival, Marie France, which fold- 
Features such as “Reading of Groupe Marie Claire. The French francs ($142 million) ed in 1993. 


Bloomberg Business Sews 

FRANKFURT — German 
money-market funds could be 
riskier than others because of a 
dearth of short-term govern- 
ment paper, Moody’s Investors 
Service me. said Tuesday. 

The Bundesbank recently said 
it would siop issuing zero-cou- 
pon paper, known as Bulls, to 


avoid encouraging short-term fi- 
nancing of the budget deficit 
“Because of the lack of Bulis 
and the relatively low use of 
government billsi money-mar- 
ket funds will be forced' to in- 
vest more money in co mm ercial 
paper or floating-rate notes.” 
Moody’ s said. “Tbat may lower 
the credit quality of the funds.” 


• West European new car registrations rose 4.7 percent in August, 
to 1.08 million vehicles, the European carmakers association 
ACEA said. But registrations in Germany, the largest car market 
in Europe, fell 4.1 percent. 

• Alusuisse-Lonza Holding AG, the Swiss aluminum, chemicals 
and packaging company, said it named Dominique Damon as 
chief operating officer and indicated she could become chief 
executive by the start of 1997. 

• Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co. earned £126.4 
million (SI 98 million), down from £291.6 million in the 1993 half, 
but the comparison was skewed by a one-time gain of £211.5 
million in the 1993 period. 

• Queens Moat Houses PLC posted a pretax loss of £59 million in 
the first half, dragged down by a £19.3 million loss on foreign 
currency dealings; the result compares with a £37.8 million loss in 
the 1993 first half. 

• Kingfisher PLCs pretax profit rose to £88.1 million in the first 
half, up 7 percent from the 1993 first half, as earnings increases at 
its B&Q and Superdrug businesses offset losses at Wool worths 
and Comet. 

•Turkey, seeking to become a financial hub for the Middle East, is 
planning a new exchange in Istanbul where foreign brokers could 
trade international slocks. 

Bloomberg, Reuters. .4 FT. ,-i F . V 


Ki-.k a * . ; you hate or “Directions — ad- Group Marie Claire wili no is very profitable,” but she ac- la 
its.:;,. ’•»{. ,v.yi'\. >t i vice on what to wear, how to doubt be hoping for the shorter knowledged that 1993 had been ti 
i:\ ! ::L. u.^.| wear it and what’s worth buy- payback period. a “very difficult year.” She said tc 

thr » \.. . ing- w L’Ortal SA holds 49 percent that revenues of 750 milli on ri 


Vtfi* 

Ki-.K 


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ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF MAURITANIA 

Honor-Fratemity-Justice 

MINISTRY OF FISHERIES 
AND MARITIME ECONOMY 

PUBLIC OFFER 

1. Object: 

The Ministry of Fisheries and Maritime Economy is 
offering quantities of pelagic fisheries through free 
licenses for one year renewable. 

2. Participation: 

This oiler is made wilhin the context of the 
reorganization of the Fisheries activities, and is open to 
all investors without distinction of nationality who can 
meet this offer's requirements. Bidders may bib for a 
general license of a license for a particular species. In 
tho last case, bidders should demonstrate that the 
vessels and the Fischrng techniques they will be using, 
will mainly serve to catch the specified species. 

3. Withdrawal of the bid's documents: 

The bid’s documents may be withdrawn from the 
Ministry of Fisheries and Maritime Economy (Industrial 
Fisheries Department) or from Mauritanian Diplomatic 
and Consular Representations Abroad starting 
September 5 1994 upon payment of Mauritanian 
Ouguiya (UM) 25,00 or USD 200.00 to the Treasury of 
the Islamic Republic of Mauritania. 

4. Closing date: 

The bid closing date is October 15. 1994 at 3:00 PM 
(Universal Time). For any further information, please 
contact the Industrial Fisheries Department. BP 137; 
Telephone number Fax (222-2) 531-46 Nouakchott, 
Mauritanie. 


FIDELITY DISCOVERY FUND 

Societe d’lnvestissement a Capital Variable 
Kansallis House - Place de CEtoile 
B.P.2174 L- 102! Luxembourg 
R.C. No B 22250 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

At the Annual General Meeting held on August 25. 1994. it 
was decided to pay a dividend of USD 0.05 (5 cents) per 
share on or after September 22. 1994 to shareholders of 
record on September 1. 1994 and to holders of bearer shares 
upon presentation of Coupon no 10. 

Paying Agent: KREDIETBANK SA LUXEMBOURGEOISE 
43, Boulevard Roval 
L-2449 LUXEMBOURG 


Fidelity 



Investments' 


UNITED STATES BANKRUPTCY COURT 
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK 




In re 

R. H. Macy & Co., Inc.. : 

etal., " 

DvbUiOv 


Chapter l| 
liBKHT'lBRL) 
(Jointly UitiinJMaol) 


NOTICE OF HEARING TO I A) CONSIDER APPROVAL OF 
JOINT DISCLOSURE STATEMENT. I B) ESTABLISH PROCEDURES 
FOR SOLICITATION AND TABULATION OF VOTES TO ACCEPT 
OK REJECT THE JOINT PLAN OF REORGANIZATION. |Cl 
SCHEDUI.E HEARING ON CONFIRMATION OF THE JOINT 
PLAN OF REORGANIZATION AND APPROVE NOTICE .AND 
PUBLICATION PROCEDURES RELATING THERETO. I D) 
.APPROVE EMPLOYMENT OF A SOLICITATION AGENT .AND A 
TABULATION AGENT. AND (E) EXTENDING THE EXCLUSIVE 
PERIOD 1 1NPER SECTION 1 1 21 tc) OF THE B.ANKRI tPTO CODE 

TIMI.I.rRMMTHRS, INIIKN11 IRE TRUSTEES, EQUITY SECURITY IIOl.llERS 
ANII PARTIES IN INTEREST: 

Nonet IS II V.KEIIY Cl V V!N ih Ji >». U.Ma,>NC,.„tm. .«"Ma.C-“v J na 

■.vruin „r ns ilmvl .ilk I iridiiiii vitoiJionc* uiilliimch. ihv -UehiirO. jihJ >v«knjw-d 
IVpuniiK.nl Sitiftts. In,- 1-lxnV-r.ilcO." jrkl Kifithcr wilh ItK- LV-Mikn. ilur Pbii Pnip.>noni."i. 
<.-u-pr.i|ktnctiK nicJ lliL-irininl I1an.il KciKrjm/uinKi Uikk-r ChJpier 1 1 .-I Un- Ujxikiupi.'vC.iJi' 
(ovilv -jnic hus h»vn. and nun k lunlvr. jinciuk-Jo: nk^lili.-U. llk.'"J>niU ll4n"i uiul ,*n Al^uj 
. 11. lilcJ i Ik- jiikiiiIci] Jmni Han jnd I hr rcblnl Jimiii QiH-liKurr Sijinnmi purMunn in 
<*x linn I ll' nl i hr HjnkmpUA 1 ‘ikU- las ihc ujiiu- nu\ tv lioii^iliuT aniL'ixti.-d m nkxInicU. ihu- 
“Jmm DiMfliKiir,- SiJiinivnri. 

NOTICE IS EUKTHKR «tl YEN Itui a h.-unn- illv IKIiimiii: Suu-nviu Hi-unnp ” i uu ill 
Ivhcld in R'vmCi?'nl I hr Mmu-dSiulo. Bunlrupl,y Cnun. AlrvanJrr I UniilliuiCu-4i.ni Hiw. 
Onr Ei'^linj: Orccn. Kr» "i nrk. Nl-h "i .»V ji tlllXl a m ,in Suplcnrtvr 2'i. 1«-M. ,ir j% 
Ihctv.-Jl I lt 4.-. LimrtM-l lan (v Iwjr J. ■ «i Ifw PUli Pninmvnis’jiunl nhlinn. Jaii-J Auui'l •>!. I'fU. 
In ,-.h)mJlt Ij| jppfnvjl ill ihr Jmnl OiMThisuii- Sljtirnirni anJ jii> ii>\unu:nls pn>pi*uii in Iv 
iransiiiuu J Inpciltcr llu.iv*> ilh mhnUK-iv nl cUunivanJc^uii) muTV'iv purMuru in-wUnn 1 12? 
■»f ihr Bjniniplc* CihIc. ihi appim me ihr |'n-,i.iluiu% Ini viili.iijimn jrxi IjNjIjihhi nl i><r- In 
jcaTI nr iy|cv’i ihr Jnini Plan. irKliulinj- ■ i • ihc pp-jkiml miIk'iIjiumi |Ui)ui|!r' in tv ili'inhilnl 
h> ihr Plan PhipufK'Mv mi ihr inm» >il Mhu. uni ihr pmrrjutr- l.v v,.ir uhulaimn ji»J «u i 
llir nvonJ Jaxr lot \nlinf . ir i ■-dv.-dulini! a hranni: In iiimuk-r r.-nrinriuiiiin nl Jv Jnini Plan i Uir 
"Cnnlirmajinn Hrarini! ‘I anJ apprinihr Ihr fnrm anJ nuiuiL-r nl nnlirr rrlairU ihrrdu. i Ji 
appni\iiiK il»c employmriu v*f a Milu’iiaiiim jjErni aiul a uhulaiinfi asrni. and ti'i r\ien4in-.> ihr 
rtrliiM\r pc rind under xvliiui I ITI irl nl ihr Banl.nip(i> Cndr Ihriw-h ihr riirwlu«mn lUihr 
C.-rfimuUn-n Hrannq ia> ihr -amr nia\ he jJk'uuk-J from nmr in nniri. 

NOTICE IS FVRTtlEK GIVEN lhal nhjmtoiN. if any. in ihr approval ol‘ ihr Jnini 
Duahkonr Sialrmeni khutl br in wniiup.anJ i a i -hall si air ihr name an J aJdnaks ol Ihr ■•hjrriin.T 
|uny and the luiun: »f Ihr v I ami ur imriw ni \urh panj . i hi shall -uiru iihpaniL ulariiv ihr ba>i's 
and nature nl any nbjmwn «r pmpnsnl mnditiralnm and irl Iv filed. l--vihrr unfa pronl nf 
uimre. Uiih the Cv'un i*nh a nm in Chamber.' and wnnl -u lhat ihry are hicivrd bv ihc 
Cano, the panics lislrd on ilv Evnibil “I” allavlird herein and the Oflkr n| ihr United Stairs 
Tru aee. SO Broad Siren. New "l nri. New 1 nrk HKH.U nn lairr than fliJii p ni Eosiem Time nn 
ScpJcmtvr 22. 

NOTICF. IS EY'RTIIER GIVEN lhal III puraiam in Rule ."I'l’iJ ' »■! ihr K-Jrnal Kulr» of 
Banknipruy Prrvcshne. mpicsls lor □ cups' ol Ihr Jimu Divclouire Suirmriu. and iltr Jmnl Plan 
annevrd i herein i excluding: certain exhibits m ihc Jmnl Plain. h\ panic-, in imlitsi must Iv made 
by iclephnniiic Mr. Ron AvallnncorMr. WaJi er Cummings ji ThcCmpnralc PnnlinrC- 'mfijnj . 
Inc.. al (ROtll JMK-2b7” or 1 2 i ?l < i2H-.Sw.1iX and < ii i a mpy nl ihc Juini Dia-I.Mire SuiiemciH and 
Joira plan annexed ihrimn. are nn file uilh ihr Ollier of Ihr Clerk nl ihr Cnun. United Stales 
Bantnipky Cnun. Soul hem Dlitki ol New York. Alexander Hamil|.«i Cuvmm Hnits-. One 
Bowling Green. New York. N.-V, Ynik and may hr examined by any pans in imerej-1 during 
normal business hours. 

NOTICE IS FY'RTHER GINEN lhal ibis Nnlut is i»ii a -a'Auiuimn nl j,rcpxanrcs o, 
reyeci ions of ihr Jnini Plan. Acvvnijnrrs may mu be vilieued unless and umil i he proposed Jnim 
Dr-eU-sure Siaiemem is apnn-.ed puisuanl li* an orJrr of ihr Corn. 

NOTICE IS FL'RTHtR CntN lhal ihr Disrlnvure Siairineni Hearing mai he cnniinurd 
Irtim lime in lime udhnul tunher ne-iwr In un> pans m inirtesi mhei than die au'winnes-meni .-.t 
ihr adjouined dam si al the Disclosure Siairmmi Hi-anrg nr any continued Iieannr. 

BY ORl>KK OF THE UNITED STATES 
BANKRUPTCY COURT FOR THE 
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW \ORK 
JONES. DAY. RE \>1S A POGUE 
Vnornev* Tor FrdrrMrd 
DeparUnem blares, luc. 

North Pwinl 
Ml Lakeside Avenue 
Cleveland. Ohio 4-1 114 
David G. Hciman. Esq. |DH 91111 
Richard M. Cirri. Es.,. |RC «Ob2| 

Cu- Counsel lo Fldrlicy Management 


Dated: New York. New York 
August 31, 1994 

WEIL, GOTSHAL & MANGEj 
AQomcys for Debtors in Possession 

767 Fifth Al four 

New York. New York 10153 
(2I2i 3104(000 

Harvey R. Miller. Esq. [HM 607SJ 
Richard P. Krasnn*. E«a. |RK 5707] 
Judy C-Z. Uu. E«q. ]JL 6449] 


Service List 





muaunni nir -mu i«u mas w mt viomim ran 


LIVING IN THE US.? 
Now Printed in 
New York 
For Same Day 

DELIVERY IN KEY CITIES 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1 - 800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-752-3890) 


Debtors 
Herbert IVL HcHmon 
Group Senior Vice President ■ 

Geo end Counsel 

R. H. MAO’ & CO, INC. 

Legal Department 
ISlUcst 34lir Street 
New York, New York I OOO I 

Counsel to the Debtors 
Harvey K. Miller 
Richard P, Krastw* 

Jud y GZ. Liu 

WEh, GOTSHAL A MANGES 

767 Fifth Avenue 

New York. New York 10153-0101 

Ftikraiwl Pmntwgi.S-iwy5.Jnc.- 

Denms J. Broderick 
Senior Vice PnaMcuL General Counsel 
and Seen la rv 

FEDERATED DEPARTMENT STORES. INC. 
7 West Seventh Street 
Cincinnati. Ohio 4f202 

CwHBdlp.EcdnaKiI 
David G. Hcimtu 
Rkhard NL Cirri 

JONES. DAY, REAVIS & POGUE 
North Point 
901 Lakpdde Avenue 
Cleveland, Ohio 44114 

Counsel lo The Prudential 

instiiaret Cwnpa«p of. Anwrioi 

Chaim J. Kortftftnp 

WACHTELL. LIPTON. ROSEN & KATZ 

51 West 52nd Street 

New York. New York 10019 

Counsel to the Working 
Capital Ban k Group 
Joel B, /.netbv-I 
Beniamin D. Fedor 
O'MELVEKY A MYERS 
153 East 53rd Street 
52nd Moor 

New York. New York 10023 

Q— «UtlR -*9 ,St«»rc Bonk faro 
Michael J. Cniracs 
Arthur Strinbere 

KAYE. SCHOLER. FI ERMAS, HAY.S 
& HANDLER 
425 Park Avenue 
New Ynrk. Sew York 10022 
Counsel to th e CRFt Bank fiom 
R. Paul W icket 
Poudn P. Bartncr 
SHEARMAN & STERLING 
599 levlanoD Avenue 
New York. New 3 nrk 10022 


Daniel ILGnklt-a 
Lea C. Beckerttum 
STKOOCK & STKOOCK & LX VAN 
Seven Hanover Square 
Nrw York. New \ork 10004 

Hermun L. Gian 
Lee R. BucdunuIT 

STLTXLAN.TREtbTER & GLkTT 
3099 Wit-hire Boulevard. Suite 900 
1.0* Anp-lrs California TOUlO 

CgUBri tnSwhs Bank I'm - pornlhin 

Donald S. Bernstein 

Karen F. Wsuitr 

DAVIS POLK & WARD WELL 

450 Lexington Avenue 

New York. New V nrk 10017 

Connsri to the Uaveeurud 
Creditor-* Commi liw 
Scon L. Haran 
Enid N. Smart 

OTTERBOURG. STEINDLER. 

HOUSTON & ROSEN, PA'- 
230 Park Avenue 
New 7oriL New York 10lo« 

Counsel to the Bondholder." 

Csramirir* 

Koben M Miller 
Bari J. Maues 

UERLACK. LSRAEISX LIBERMAN 

120 West 45th Street 

New York. New Ynrk 10030 

Attorneys J-ior Ch emic al Bank 

Richard S. Todor 

7.A1.MN. RODIN & GOODMAN 

750 Third Avenue 

New A ork. New York 10022 

AUMmaClnnALE.. CapitlH t:m-n . 
Herbert Altnkri 

FRIED. FRANK. HARRIS. SHKIVER 
& JACOBS 
One New Yurk Plaza 
New York. New V urk 10004 

UflkmfiheJL^If d- States Tntxtee 

Arthur J. <>oiuales 

US. TRUSTEE. SJI.V.Y. 

so Broad Strrei 

New York. New York I0OU4 


I 





















Page 14 


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1 'VuRotortc 
5% 3WRcyatOg 

2 WRvmoc 


- 19 


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% 9% - 

^ y£ -B 

2*5 295 —15 
2 74 2% - 

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3 BEK 

% tm.+’Vu 
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% % -■ 


4*6 


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4U, PW, SOI Ind 
26% 12WSPI Pt, 


1. i.-Vb 


217411 . 

7 lWSagoCwt 
18*4 5 Sanaarns 
1% WSrtwGnf 


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409423W5ott>EC 2J3 8X - 

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6j 1 

gXfTTdfg^nlS 1 \i Z vi 

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1494 10 SDoo p(C 
"iSnFrnns 


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.£ Tfc! 

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205 168 SdCP 1X0 
15% JO 

l% ’VuSemPkwt 
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26 
141 
3 
9 
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IX 15 152 


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16% iwlhiiCms 
8% SWShwdGp 
4% 2W5hOPcg 
8% 4 SsnlTech 
775 5*4 S 



» 5075 +W 

85% 85 85*5 -% 

92 91% 91% _ 

3774 36% 36% +% 

40 40 40 -% 

18 17% 18 

4% 4% 4% 

11% ll'A 11% 

U% 12% 12% +W 
lowdiow 10% — % 

r-w-^s 

r* ?* s ta :# 

3775 36*5 36% — % 

l’A l'A 176 - 

574 3*4 1 *% 

1494 14% 14% — % 

180 in in +2 


11% 1U£ 11% _ 


5% 

1 % 1 * 
2% 

8*4 


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11% 9*4SmtBln AO a 5X _ 1« 

15*4 13*5 SmrarnAA X5d 6X - 3 

is liw^drtc 1x6 a3 Z 1 
1996 14 SffiJPfE 1.19 SJ - 5 

21 21WSCi£pfP 1X4 8.1 - 69 

23% 12WSOUCOS XI t 5.1 21 119 
7W 4*4SwnLffe — — 1450 

1995 1495 SsnOg Pi 1JS 10J - 74 

676 3(iSoartch _ 7 137 

7% 3’i.SpcOm _ _ 18 

’2w J^ISdVrt - I ^ 

I 3892 

1074 57) Storm* 25 15 15 S 

34 3496 Stepan XO ZJ 21 7 

21*4 14 StteHan - 16 24 

7% 6%StflC0P J5el1.1 _ 18 

1394 9*4StWlHitn - - IS 

7% 5 SJvGpA 
5% 495 StorPr 


i|_« 

2*d2§ SS^js 

m 2^5 aS Z 
10'A 10 10'A -74 

14% 14% 14% +% 
6% 6% 6*5 -74 

12% 12% 12% -% 
14% MW M% 


23% 22% 22^5 +5 


liw 2 smxtier 
17*5 SWHvtoVld 
1 TVs 2'Vu Sukis 
12% VWSwnlTx 
SW 2WSundV 
4*5 lWSunNur 
17% VWSunctvsn 
13 awSunstUr 


16W 11% SuprSrg 
‘ Suprmbid 


7 dWSuprre 
2*5 VuSupinun 
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6 4 TSF 

25’A 3*5 T5X Cp 
11W 7V5TobPrd JO 
15% 12 Tasty J2 

5W I'/iTsam 
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12*5 SWTeiasPw 
177613 TBtTTR -18 

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1'Vu %Term 

7*u 3WTexBiim 
16W TWTexAAer 

19 ll*6Thermd s 
S% 13%ThrnCrd A 
16% l2WTbmfnb 


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1X0 20J 10 9 

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X4 BJ _ 78 

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_ 17 1348 

- 21 32 

32 23 II d 

- 9 42 

- - 10 

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- 3 112 

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X 23 It 14 

17 20 69 

- 21 65 

27 17 X 

- 33 85 

.10 J 73 237 

J6 X 64 994 

AOa 43-141 

_ _ 25 

_ _ 309 

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I 55 37 

-378 93 

- 44 52 


18% 17% .. . ._ 

5% 574 5*5 *76 

17% 17 17% — % 

S t 5% 5% ♦% 
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2% 2% 2% -% 
5% 5 5 — % 

47*5 44'Vw 47 -Yu 
7% 7% 7% _ 

32 31% a -74 

14W 14 14W — % 

7*5 695 6% - 

11% IT 11% *% 
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11% 17% 11% — % 
14% 13% 14 — % 

6 5% 5% _ 

Vu Vu Vu — % 
4% 4W 476 - 

7% 7% 7*4 — % 

5% 5% 5% - 

2SV6 24 25% *1 

B% B*4 8*4 
14 13% 13% -% 

3% 3% 3% - 

4295 41*4 41% — % 
10 9% 9% _ 

14% MW 14% _ 

45% 4SW 45% +95 
14% 13% UVS — % 
<Vu 94 % - Vu 

41 V u 4*4 4% —Yu 
14% 14% 14% — V6 
14% 14*6 14% - 

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31% 31% 

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13A 6.9 10 


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15% 1 


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4%J*Vi«VefW - 

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60W219s\flacB 

XD4 awvnac B Wl - 

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4% 2WViOC WTE 
14% 7 Vlratek 


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15V. 11 WVoyAZ 


X91 

X4b X 




IkiBt ag i 

1575 10)5 VoyMAOn J2 6 A 


61 

J7 6A 

X3a 7.0 


375 3 

!1 19W 1* 

3 4% 4% 

Z *8 » » 

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iT ,8 d 17% 17CJ Z- 

_ 16 10*4 1M5 10% —V. 

Z 39 11% n 11 -% 

Z 2*1 nw nwnw^w 
Z n 12W 19% i?j^Z4k 

Z 36 11% 11% 

- 101 lOYsdlBW 

Z 4 11W 11% 

'17 6 6% AH 

Z 1715 S*S M* 

-llOl 3SV» 34 

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- 3353 1'Vu 4Vu 

„ 2375 975 d 3% 

- 920 IW 1’W. 

- 1236 3** 3% 

_ 376 12W 12% 

B K35 8% BW 

- 113 *6 'W« 

- 94 127S ni 
Z 82 12*5 1274 

3 12 12 

- 41 13Wd 1376 

- 96 11% 11*6 

- 10 11 10% 


W-X-Y-Z 


23*4 1795 WRIT 32 

itt •“ 

3 WsWeMm 
5% 2%WelGrd 

iftSSi .« 

2% IVWKflRO 
21*4 TVuWIWiTc 
3% VuWiiiSRs 
15% 3‘i Wir#iei»T JO 
74% CTVi WisPpf ASO 
32 JOWWomvi XO 

as 


5J 22 249 18 
1.9 7 2 4Vu 

91 2418 1295 
_ 14 2'Vu 

Z - 19 3W 

_ _ 12 Yu 

X 47 5 120 

- 10 56 VW 

SX 13 711 19% 


374 TVS +% 

listin'* — % 
«W 9% -%■ 

. « 

- 14 52 IW 

IX 40 301 U 1 6*6 
7J - ZlO 67% 

IX 13 1M 31W 

- — 3773 1% 

- - 280 5 



17*5 1794 — ** 


z m *<vu 

31% 31% - 

Sa-« 


Soles floum are unamdoL Yearly htete cmd knw 
the RPtyloia SZ weeks ptoThicurrgrt vyeefc 6ut 
day. Whore 0 SPOT or stock dhrklenfl 


tteme ny. wnare a split or stock dWMMrtamoid 
pveent or more has Men pofcUhe reart h WHMr i 
dMdend are shoirn lor the new Mock anty.untew 


notecL rates of drvfdmds ore annual dtsbur 
tbs latent d e cla r a tio n , 
a— dividend ateaextradl. 
h— mnuaJ rate of dhrtdend ptua slock tfvWend 
c — lluuktotlng dtyWend. 

CM — CTO^. ^ 

■— dividN^mdared or paid fn proeetf no 12 months, 
i —dividend bi Canadian fundAMSfotf » 19% 


1Z 


1— dividend declared after nhM<por gtocli dhrMead. 


I —dividend paM this year, omtl 
k— dividend ardarca or pom r 



, deferrea or no action 


mis year, an oocumgiattve 
The hWHow ranee bentoe 


wfth dividends la « _ 

n— now issue in the nasi S2i 
edth the sfarl of tradlna. 
nd — next day delivery. 

?— i oivSend^SSS or paid M precscflne 12 montns. Ph» J 

» ■- irtmiienii 

stock arvio tn o. 

s— stock sint. Dividend basin with dal* of split. ^ . - _ 

* e 4l\I)K\l * 

u — newyeorTyhioh. V? ^ ■ 

v — trorflno hrtlwT . .• • f. £. 

vl— In bankrupecy or reoslverahto or being reeraanlnd un— * 
der the Bankruptcy Ad, or socurWes oesumed bvsucft coot- 4 


wd— when dWrtboted. 


nw— with earanta. 


x — axHitv mend or eierlahia. 
— ex-dkli (button. 


salts- 

xw— wtttMul warrants, 
v—ex-cpvtdaid and sates In fun. 



ytd—yjckL 


IntulL 


NASDAQ 


Tuoidiy'i 4 p.m. 

This list compiled by the AP, consists of the 1.000 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value. II is 
updated twice a year. 


ItAtonUi 
High Low Stock 


Si 


Dh, Y« PE IRK «gn LowLuresiaro- 



- M 

Z iT 

A 13 


438 13% 
tO I9W 


- 29 


23% 1 _ 

32 19V.AK Steel 
29'. 15'. APS Hid 

SPiTS? 

39% 14'.,AbbevH 
31 J, « 17' sAcdawi 


88 lew 

641 19% 
57 I3». 

46 33 

.. 31 9143 43'.. 

- - 14 | IV. 

3X 17 2564 18% 

._ - 941 30 
M 351 

- - 1 


13*5 I3*i — v. 
I9W 19*. * W 

16 16*i * 

IB*) 189. — W 
13 13*5 - W 

32”, 32% — % 


42W 42*# — W 

11*5 — W 


_ T IT 

z is H 

30 r?ro igj 


*Cf r i 

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MW 6'S 

Vi 13’iAOOPtCS 




AaacLb X8 


essft »v h 

34*, 16' .AdteSv 
12’: 4’ ,AduPro 
IT, 4’, AdvTiSS 


19*. 

-.9 9 34% 

... 31 2121 10".. 
5.9 R 1152 B'u 

z '. 6 ^I S % 

A 19 40 37’5 

.6 2919263 33% 

- -IBS R 


IDs , 

17'.) 18 • *) 

29% 30'.. -W 

■ 

i-AW-ll 

18”» IBW— ’u 
24% 24*i ♦ ’ . 
9*5 9’# -Vi 
715 BW -V. 
19 19*. — "U 

137. 13*. •% 
36V. 37'# .% 
31 »%*!’. 

5% S’Vu-'Vu 
i*s «*. — ■# 


38”; 25 AdvamBs 
16% 10 Aonicoo 
16’* B'iAgourn 
14', I'.ArMem 
63W45'iAkre 


XO 


J6 


J4 


.08 


28' , IB’ 

19'. 11 W Aldilai 
28*. 21 Alex Hid 
21' , 67, Alla 5P 
3*s TVuAnASem 
12'. 7*iAlionPh 
19W 7WAmScmi 
32’. 227, Alliefl&p 
a'slSVsAldHlda 
24'-. l Atonal 
35W T'.AtonoBro 
39'., 21 Vs Altera 
34<iiowAimn 
92 47>iAmerOn 
30’-, io*s ABnkr 
19'„ 13W AClajVay .16 
33 10’’: ACoUOKI J4 

74% IS'", AmFroht 
34’ , JS'.AGreel 
24'., 5*5 AH It IKS 6 
27'..15'iAMS 
17’., 6’sAAMdE 
72 lJ'.AmMOSoi 
30'-, 14' iAPsitCvS 
39W22' lAmSuor 
27 12’,AmTcto 
17' . ID’.# AT ravel 
16*) 7' .AmrrCoJ 
26'. 19’ . AmfCd 
5. ' , 34* .Amgen 
is 5 Amnon 
33'. B'.AmtcnCn 
16'i 1 1 W AnchBCP 
D'.jio’iAnenGm 
49 19', Andrews 
21 '..13 AixJro* 

M' , 18’ , Artec 
38* 1 22 AppleC 
18”, II AMSOUS 
25 . 1 1 Artftee s 
25 13’iADdDafl 
33 14 Aminov* 

54’ , 78' . ApIdMJ 5 
21 16 ArOorDrg 

15 lZWATborHI 
19 l?WArcnCm 
35’. Z6’ .AISOGO 
33' < iS'-.-Araoiv 
15>. 9", AflrBOU 
22>, 16’ . Armor 
22'* IE Arnolds 
24' .- r Artsit 
13'.. 7>)Ashwmi 
46 74 AsPCITl 

34' ) 22 AvdCmA 
33’. Il’.AsdCmB 
Will Altec _ 
34>,27’,AsonoF 
3S'.2T«AhSeAir 
30*5 11 Almcll 
26',15’iAuBon 
9* i. 4'sAuro5v 
12 TiAiAor. 

66 37 AufOdh 

34’ . 23’.Aul0lnd 
29V. I J 1 « AutCTOI 5 
IS’.IB AiridTch 


JD 

X 

1# 

S?B 

»W 

31*4 

32 

2A 

8 

16 

192 

30% 

JO'. 

XV, 

.108 

X 

57 

070 

13V) 

13 

13'k 



— 

137 

ra% 

I?'--. 

19% 





1247 

2!« 

JJi 

2ft 

IJ48 

2X 



32B 

61V) 

401. 

61 V) 




3557 

14 

13 

14 

XO 

lie 

13 

149 

U’i 

25% 

25% 


■■■ 

22 

3845 

raw 

raw 

12V, 

X8 

3X 

17 

403 

25% 

25V. 

25'-# 


32I940u2l'*u 

- 14 SIS 2W 

537 9% 

25 21 45 u 21 

2.1 7 52 M*> 

- B 423 77'.. 
._ .- 299 IV. 

- ... 125 13 
_ 2114223 30W 
_ 13 140 16 

.Ole - 98 2441 76>. 
.72 11 9 126 23*5 

X S3 103 19 
1.6 If 394 15 

- 31 67 24'.5 

1.9 16 5122 30*. 

_ 13 B47 8*, 

70 341 24 

- 13 261 9*. 

- I 16*) 

... a 14769 19 

... 49 30V, 

- ... 37 MV, 

... 12 1728 16”. 

35 #'•» 

IX 21 247 54 

... 19 8273 53W 
.. 17 171 7% 

X 11 1586 10W 

- 10 2312 167. 

- 17 91 18 

- 31 1084 47% 

- 10 17 !•% 

- - I22B 36 
1.3 a 9343 36'', 

.1 41 900 17 

J 37 1847 19'.. 
150 >8*. 

- a im 17*. 
7714606 50'.i 

1.2 23 179 TO’ . 

- 23 779 21 W 
95 IBW 

S9S SOW 
477 18' . 
663 13% 
12 21 
24 70% 


1.16 


.04 


XO 


J2 


.48 


3.9 9 

.. 99 
.3 71 
10 19 

7.0 18 

-. 13 5204 17 

_ 21 3298 9’s 

... 27 1133 40 
_ 1250 27 2SW 

-.1780 406 2S J * 
.. Tl 91 13% 
... -. 1625 37’ s 
U 16 9098 24'/, 
... 28 10213 29V. 

- 25 2287 17W 

- . 9797 7’u 

- IS 231 5*. 

X 34x1090 61 

_ 17 BOO 76 

- 41 3435 70'S 

- 20 2312 34*. 


20*-, 21 *i - W 

ft 

19*7 20 -I 

a a 
lew m. #iw 

1*1. IVr, — 

12 12 — 
aw a*. -*. 
15 v, ISW - 
74V, 74'.J— 1*s 
73’., 23% * % 
!8W IV »V# 
14':. 14% * W 
24 24’.) - *, 

M’S 29*. -W, 
B’ . BW • «u 
23% 23*. ... 

a>.) 8% — W 
16*) 16% 
ia law +i 

aw 79* r. — 

14 1J - '.* 
16'. 16'.. — W 
iw aw —v. 
23*u 23'.. — Vu 
52'.. 53V) * 

7 7 

9% 10'.. — 
15% 16 

17*: 18 - *5 

46 46% ... 

15*. 16 — W 

35% 35'.s — *. 
35W35'k',t •'/!, 

16'.’i 16' s • '■. 
18”, 10% — 
18V. IB”. — 
m. i7v, •*. 
JO'-j 43% - W 

19V, w . . i., 

20W JO' ) - *) 
IT, 17*, _*. 
a*, a*. — *. 
17», 17'S ... 

13”, 13' ■ — 


21 21 


I9* u 30*) - 9. 
11*5 11*u -Vu 
9*5 ?' * •’% 
38 73 - W 

75 25 — •) 

25 75*. _ 

13W 13’. 

31*. 31% — *i 
24’/, 24V,-1W 
28 >5 a -'* 

15’i 16 —I 
6*5 6*» — W 

5W S'. 

60 600 • W 
2S'.‘i 26 • V; 

I9W 19% -% 
33*, 33 W — 


34 2B*1iBB&r 1.16 
3S’s B*. BHC Fn s .08 
24’ i 16 BIS VS 

71 40’iBMCSfl 
30’: 1TWBMCWT5 
26*. IS BW1P 40 

a-', eWBabaoo 
221. IS). Baker j .06 

74 tO’sBatvGm 
13 1 . 29’s BanPgnc 1.00 
74% 5*' j BcOneotC3JO 
6£'.74*.BncGdliC JOr 
26”. IBWBancwc 
?1 ’ ) 1 71) Bk South S2 
38W 31 ’.) Banta 32 

26' i HWBonynSv 
if la.Berehs XO 

if- . io BoretRc 
7 7%BdlTeCll 
45 , ..43 l , BavBks 1X0 
35*: 71 BcaBam 
ZB’iZS'iBclIBcas JO 
15', 7 Bo 1 1 M/C 
49”, IB'.E.'IISpt 
-*>. 3". E^nlOC 
47W32 Berkley 44 

21 B'aBCHUO 
77* , 1 3 BesiPwr 
13% V'.BjCBS .16 

53‘.i27'..BiDgen 
13' . SHBiomet 
6's 2 BloTcG 

nw flWBIcVB.S 

35 26' jBooiBh s U6 

73W17’.HobE«n 39 

a IB' ;Bk*.VjII 

27 17' .-Boomtwn 

IB”. B’ /Bound 
25' : l6'(Bo5iCn 5 
14', 8'iBaslTc 
14' ■ 7'jB0,EnB 
IS'. 7 W Britov 
52', II BrdbdTc 
59',3l’:Braas< 

21% V'.BraOour 

16W lO' lBrTom 
IDs 6's Brunos .26 
27', ISWButtete 
10*. IT /Build! 


i? 9 bo a.# aw a*. — 


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2J 199 
_. 30 
J 12 


2.0 10 
6.7 _ 
1.0 - 
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IX 15 
.. 120 
.5 71 

_ 4? 


3 :. 1 53 

1.0 17 
... 18 
-. 16 


1.2 17 
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... 80 
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460 77'. 
6416 44W 
180 IBW 
1 144 IB ' : 
254 12 
95 21 
3B! 13% 

34 33*) 
33 6! % 
1193 31% 
693 26V., 
3001 19 
1279 33 V, 
1313 17 
487 16 
3073vl9% 
993 3*'i» 

2147 Jflt) 
7»7 78"u 
93u» 
568 I3W 
2222 20*4 
063 7% 


ID 


3701 36% 
745 I?*. 
732 14 
912 13 
5902 S3'-. 
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4.1 10 
1.4 U 
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204 
2.9 19 
- 23 


3801 2% 

62 MW 
2488 33* < 
723 21 Vi 
686 27% 
1069 17*4 
7839 13 W 
2167 21 'm 

14W 12*. 
797 9 

333 13'/, 
1577 IB*i 
1947 55% 
763 14V. 
339 121k 
4256 9*. 

2641 17% 
119 17*5 


21% — % 
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18 18' a • 1 a 

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IT, 11% , 

20*. 21 
12% 13% _ 

a% 33*. • w 
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30% 31 - *5 

25W 95% _. 

IBW IB • V, 
33 13% - 

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58 50% -is 

76*. 26)5—1'% 

ana -w 

12W 13W -W 
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61. 7 -!■„ 

36% 36% — % 
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I3’i 13'/, —V. 
1 1 % 17 - % 

5T'i 52*. — W 
10W II*. • W 
2*’i 2'-) 

II*: II*, . % 
33”. 33*. — /„ 

row 21 • ”, 

26*. 76-”.— I 
16”, 17’.* ■ ’•) 

1 1 % 12% — 'i. 

20 V, 21V, 

12% 12W W 
BW 0% - 

12*5 13 — % 

17% 10V, • W 
54 54% ■ % 

1T4 13% — W 
IDS 12% -% 
8% 9 • % 

IT”. 17% — ■*/ 
17*. 17*. — 


UMontn 
HSeh Low Stock 


9s 


16 V, 10 CA1 Wre 
SW21'sCTEC 
10% 4'ICAQ 
M*, JSWCodCyS 

Ift $538" 

90WS9*,Conom 
MiiCorouslr 
15' 


Dr. YM PE 100s H^n Lm.LrteaOi’oe 
Z _. 4182 12% 


.. _ 494 26% 
_ 18 739 10 1 ’, 
1.17 e AO ... I» 29 

- - 8,4 15 


z a ^ 


Jle 


■## nB 40» U 


21*, 10*iCnrsPir 
i3i# ncuuvsi 

21% 'sweasMogiC 
2b /'.CastlEs 
19% 0 CathStr 
24*4 9 CaloCp 

1 1 17 CHodon 

JV, lSWCekmial 
36*,17%CellPro 
20*) 9' .Cell star 
54' , 40' , CtHCmA 
31 W IB*’,CelCmPR 
24*. xWCeilrTcs 
24*. 14 CenfCel 
43 10 Cewgrm 
15% niCeniacar 
34’:25*.CRdB-. 
19*, 8 Cochin 


.16 


a 78/ 

s 

-. Z fti 2?- 

i 'i 6 ® 15*. 

Z 17 338 

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19 3678 22% 
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40 14 II 71 3S’) 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TTUBUIVIU WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1994 


•* 

Life 


ING Worhs Alchemy on East-Bloc Debt 




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* HANOI — Internationale Nederian- 
den Groep NV has put together a com- 
plex swap deal that allowed a Vietnam- 
ese slate company to retire some of its 
debt to a Russian lender in a way that 
was profitable to both parties, an ING 
executive said Tuesday. 

The deal was based on the plunging 
value of Russian debts and required par- 
ticipation by players in four countries. 

The Vietnamese borrower, Saigon 
Leather, ended up repurchasing $ 5.4 mil- 
lion of its debt to the International In- 
vestment Bank of Russia. 

ING, a specialist in secondary markets 
for East European and Third World debt 
. learned last year that International Invest- 


ment Bank, a Comecon development 
bank, was willing to accept less than face 
value on loans it had made to Vietnam. 

At the time, Vietnamese debt was 
trading at about 30jpercent of face value, 
but when the United States eased its 
opposition on commerce with the coun- 
try in July 1993, the price began to rise. 
In February, when the U.S. trade embar- 
go was lifted, Vietnamese debt got an- 
other boost, rising to about 70 percent of 
face value in secondary markets. 

Russian debt has fallen, however, as 
the country’s economy unravels, and In- 
ternational Investment Bank paper was 
trading at considerably below 70 per- 
cent, the ING executive said “That al- 


lowed us to propose to the Russians a 
deal: For each $1 milli on of Saigon 
Leather loans which you give us, we give 
you SI milli on of your own debt which 
you then don't have to repay." 

This structure was advantageous to 
the Russian bank because it could de- 
crease its liabilities by their face value. 

Saigon Leather, however, did not have 
the money to buy up the bank's debt. It 
asked ING to provide the financing, but 
the Dutch firm would have been required 
to set aside money to account for the risk 
of exposure to risky-country debt. So it 
brought in the National Bank of Kuwait, 
which does not face such accounting re- 
quirements, to finance the buyback. 


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Toyota to Expand 
Output in America 
By 50% in 2 Years 


The Anedaied Press 

TOKYO — Toyota Motor 
Corp. said Tuesday it would in- 
crease production in North 
America by nearly 50 percent 
over the next two years, partly 
to combat high costs caused by 
the strong yen. 

Toyota, Japan's largest auto- 
maker, said it planned to make 
790,000 vehicles in North 
America in 1996, compared 
with 533,000 in 1993. That 
means that more than 60 per- 
cent of the cars it expects to sell 
in the United States in 1996 will 
be North American-made, 
compared with 46 percent last 
year, Toyota said. 

Employment at Toyota’s 
plant in Georgetown, Ken- 
tucky, is expected to rise as a 
result, to about 6,000 in 1996 
from 4,885 at the end of 1993, a 
Toyota spokesman, Brendan 
Hagerty, said. 

But he said Toyota did not 
plan any layoffs in Japan as a 
result of the move. 

The yen’s rapid rise, which 
makes Japanese wages and 
prices for materials higher in 
dollar terms, means that some 


Companies Say Malaysia 
Clears Navy Yard Purchase 


Bloomberg Business Ness's 

KUALA LUMPUR — A 
consortium of Malaysian com- 
panies has received government 
consent to take over the Lumut 
Naval Dockyard, an executive 
of one of the companies said. 
The purchase price was report- 
ed to be around 5 billion ringgit 
(S2 billion). 

The two leading companies 
in the consortium are Sedap 
Food & Confectionery Bhd., 
which would take a majority 
stake in the venture and shift its 
food business to another com- 
pany, and the tin-plate maker 
Perusahaan Sadur Tim ah Ma- 
laysia Bhd., or Perstima. 

“The privatization exercise 
has been awarded,” said Ng See 
Yen. Perstima’s corporate sec- 
retary. “We received a letter of 
intent from the government on 
Saturday.” 


Mr. Ng would not say how 
much the consortium would 
pay, but analysts and newspa- 
per reports have speculated that 
the price would be around 5 
billion ringgit. 

Mr. Ng also refused to com- 
ment on how the companies 
would raise the money to buy 
the dockyard, which is in Perak 
state on Malaysia's west coast. 

Perstima’s largest sharehold- 
er is the timber company Ke- 
lanatnas Industries Bhd. 

Analysts said the privatiza- 
tion may include some kind of 
real estate development as well. 

“A price of five billion must 
surely include something else 
besides a naval dockyard.” said 
Les NicboQs, head of research 
at PB Securities. "Ports are not 
necessarily the most profitable 
privatizations around. There 
may be development potential 
around there.” 


Page 15 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


Japanese models now are priced 
several thousand dollars higher 
in North America than compa- 
rable American-made cars. 

On Monday, the first Avalon, 
a large sedan designed for the 
U.S. market, rolled off tbe as- 
sembly line at the Kentucky 
plant. All Avalons, which re- 
place the Cressida model, now 
are to be built in Kentucky, 
Toyota said. 

Toyota said it also planned to 
shift production in 1995 of all 
pickup trucks sold in the Unit- 
ed States from Japan to New- 
United Motor Manufacturing 
Inc., the Toyota-General Mo- 
tors joint-venture plant in Fre- 
mont, California. 

■ Hino Raises Its Forecast 

Hino Motors Co. doubled its 
pretax profit forecast for the 
year ending in March, to 9 bil- 
lion yen (S90 million) from 4.5 
billion yen, citing stronger-than- 
expected demand for big trucks, 
Agence France- Presse reported. 

Hino. Japan's biggest truck- 
maker and an affiliate of 
Toyota, also raised its sales pro- 
jection, to 615 billion yen from 
540 billion ven. 


| Investor's Asia 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

Totcyo 

Nikkei 225 

JiBCv — — • 

2400 • - • 

2I ® /lyu 

230K^/ i 

'm - A 

:/V- 

2100 J . 

,w3 A M J J A S 

1994 

2000 A M J J A S 
1994 

1S0K A M J J A S 
1994 


Exchange Index 

Hong Kong Hang Seng 

Singapore Straits Times 

Sydney All Ordinaries 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 


Tuesday Prev 

Close Close 

9,937.01 9.890 37 

2L299.6S 2.280 39"" 

2,04X60 ~ 2,032195"" 

20.046.11 191917228 

1.169.11 VtisTosT 


Bangkok 

Seoul 

Taipei 

Manila 


SET 

Composite Stock 

Weighted Price 
___ 


1,507.73 

"995438 

6,955.02 

2,95324 


1.490.41 
"99570 - 
lf96?43~ 
"£1)1 9. ?T 


Change 
+0 47 
+0.85 j 
*053 
' +0.65" 
+0.01 
+1.16 
""-003" 
”*-0.18 
+ 1.16 


Jakarta 

Stock Index 

515.70 

521 24 

-1.06 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2,093.B0 

2.111.09 

-D.82 

Bombay 

National Index 

2,175.53 

2.172.80 

+0.13 




lrilrniJ,..r>J ]L 

•laid furi'jip' 

Very briefly: 


• Long-Term Credit Bank of Japan Ltd. and Nippon Credit Bank 
Ltd. said they would raise their prime lending rates to 4.9 percent 
from 4.7 percent, a day after Industrial Bank of Japan Ltd. said it 
would raise its long-term prime rate to 4.9 percent. 

• Malaysia's finance ministry ordered gaming operators in Sabah 
to cut their number of outlets in half. Analysts said the company 
most heavily affected would be Olympia Industries Bhd. 

• Taiwan gave McDonald's Corp. permission to increase its local 
subsidiary's capital to 880 million Taiwan dotlars iS34 million) 
from 100 million dollars; the fast-food concern plans to have 4u0 
restaurants in Taiwan by 2000. compared with 77 now. 

• Australia’s maritime workers’ union agreed to cod a five-day 
pen strike, but the shipping industry estimated it would take li) 
days to clear the backlog of delayed cargo. 

• Indonesia's project to build a coal-fired power plant in East Java 
won preliminary agreement for loans totaling $2 billion from eight 
international banks, executives of PT Paiton Energy said. 

• Hong Kong's Securities and Futures Commission named Antho- 
ny Neoh chairman, effective Feb. 1, succeeding Robert Notlle. 

Rt-ju-n. AFP. AFX 


Supermarkets Lift Coles Net 

Compiled fa Our Staff Fnm Dispaiches the latest vear increased 5 


MELBOURNE — Coles 
Myer Ltd., Australia's largest 
retailer, said profit in the year 
ended July 31 rose 3 percent, 
more than expected, on in- 
creased earnings from its super- 
markets and discount stores. 

Coles said net profit rose to 
424.4 million Australian dollars 
(S3 14.8 million) from 41 1.8 mil- 
lion dollars a year ago. Sales in 


the latest year increased 5 per- 
cent. to 15.9 billion dollars. 

The result was higher than an- 
alysts* forecasts, and the compa- 
ny's shares closed at 4.03 dollars, 
up from 3.95 on Monday. 

Separately, Commonwealth 
Bank of Australia, said its an- 
nual profit grew 54 percent, to 
682. 1 million dollars, in the year 
ended June 30 on a reduction in 
charges for bad and doubtful 
debts and cost cutting. 

( Bloomberg, Reurcrsi 





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Page 16 




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0 Far East USD A (Dlv) t 1MU1 

' 0 Far East USD B( Cap) _5 a»l! 

d Japan JPT A iDIv) -Y lj&ffi 

a JopcJn JPY B (Cop) .V 1W8.9B41 

a Pors« FRF B (Cop) F f Ufcwm 

0 Latin America USD A (Div)J 27.1123 


a Latin America USD BlCaojS „ 

d North America USD A IDfvW U&M 
d North America USD B 

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It Alia USD A IDIv) 3 100607 

d Asia USD B (Cop) * IftMW 

d Work! USD AID W)_ — S 103003 

a worm U5D B (Cap) J 103003 

BUCHANAN FUND LIMITED 
e% Bank at Bermuda Ltd: (809) 275-JOCO 

/ GiuDai Hedae USD S 1132 

r Olocai Hedae GBP- t 1*83 

r GBOalCHF SF 1447 

I European & Atlantic * 1144 

t Padilc * M.10 

l Emerging Markets * 2583 

CAIS5E CENT RALE DES BANOUES POP. 

d Frucllfux - ODL Fsw A FF B42SS9 

d Fracing* ■ 00*. Eure B. — Ecu 14 *ijn 
.• vFroclilux- Actions FsesC-FF 8714.73 

d FrecHliM • Act WTO Euro D .Ecu 1C7J1 
0 Frectlliu - Court Tern* E_FF 849X34 

d FructHux’O Work. F DM W4.ll 

CALLANDER 

ht Callander Enter. Growth S 13936 

w Col lander F-A33<rt__— S 155.94 

> i* Callander F-Ausirtan... . AS 125487 


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CAMPBELL (BERMUDA) LTD 
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CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL GROUP 






a Cl Canadian Growth Fd™CS 6 A3 

d Cl North American Ft) CS BJ4 

d Cl Pacific Fund— CS 116* 

a ci Global Fund. cs mxa 

d Cl Enter# Markets Fd CS ia/x 

a Cl Eurooean Fund CS £90 

0 Canada Guar. Mortgage Pd cs 1433 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

w Capital inn Fund S 13968 

w Cacllai Holla SA s 44/9 

CDC INTERNATIONAL 

w CEP Court Term* FF 177MU0 

w GF I Lotto Terme. FF 151728840 

CHEMICAL IRELAND FP ADM LTD 
3S3-IMU433 

nr Korea 2tSl Century In vL_S 974 

w The Yellow Sea invt Co 1 10.19 

CINDAM BRAZIL FUND 
a cindam Enultr Fund. . 1 174/214 

0 Clncam Balanced Fund S 1177424 

CITIBANK (LUXEMBOURG) SJL 
FOB im UnsRIDouro Tel.47/»71 
d Cl IlnvtSI Global Bond S <772 

d ntinvea fgp usd s 1231.95 

tf CUInvest FGP ECU ECU 124381 

0 CJI invest Selector s 1 501 .18 

d at (currencies USD s 14497* 

0 anairrendesDEM DM iuoj 

0 CMcurrenctes GBP L 164/0 

0 ClncurrenelesYen. v 12*3460 

d ClTInort NA Equity. - S 238.13 

0 OMport Cant. Euro Equity -Ecu 18021 

d Cltlport UK EaullY t 13133 

d Cltlport French Equity FF 139437 

d Cltlnart German Eatrirv DM 936* 

d Cltlport Janan Equity Y 477400 

d Cltlport IAPEC ■ . S 23788 


d arrport Eamec — 

d Citioan NAiBond. 


d Cltlnort Euro Band. 







d Manaaed Currency Fund . 
d India Focus Fund 















MJ- 




tad 



CITIBANK (PARIS1 SJL 12/09/94 

d ail 96 Cap Gld J 

a ati gw Astai Mkts Fd s 

CFTTTRUST 

w US t Equities I 

■v US S Money Market _^_S 

nr US I Bonds S 

mCHtpertarmano* Ptfl 3 A S 

nr The Good Earth Fund S 

CONGEST 03-1) 44 71 7S 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1994 


ADVERTISEMENT Sept 13, 1394 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

OuoUDons supplied by funds Ksled, and transmitted by MICE OPAL PARIS [Tel. 33-1 40 SB 09 09), 

Net neat value quotations are simpfled by the Funds listed with the e*cep:km of some quotes baud an bum prices. 

71m nwglnal oymbala bdkota frequency of quotations supplied: fd) • daffy: («f) • weeWr. W - bimortM*! If) tortnighay (every two weeks); (r| - regularly; (I) • twice weakly, (ml ■ pwidMy. 


6 HtohbrWct CfflH la! Corn S 1220728 

i mover tot* Perfarmanee Fd_s 202080 

raPodflc RIM Op Fd S „ 10tO7E 

BBC FUND MANAGERS (Jenerl LTD 
10 Seale Si, Si Holier ; 0534-3633? 

EBC TRADED CURRENCY FUND LTD 

a capital s 2iB8i 

a income— t _ 15285 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 
0 Long Teem s 31 391* 

d Lena Term- DMK DM 195.4372 

ERMITAGE LUX 1352-407338) 
w Ermltoao inter Rate strai_J3M 10.13 
n ErmHage Seta Fund— — — S 6J60 

w Ermliaae Aslan Heaue PdJ *.*4 

w Ermliaae Euro Hedge Fd —DM 1036 

iv Ermliaae Crasbv Asia Fd_3 2BJE 

m Ermitaae Amer Hda Fd s 13) 

iv Ermltaae Enter Mkts Fd S 1467 

EUROPAFUND3 UMITED 
0 American Efwlty Fund— .t 2*7-95 

d American Option Fund— — * 1B0.14 

w Aslan EauttyFd s iJsiS 

wEunienai Eoulty Fd— — #_ 128.94 


EVEREST CAPITAL (8091 252 2208 

m Everest Capita inti Ltd % 13577 

FIDELITY INTO. INV. SERVICES I Lax) 

d Dtacavery Fund 1 — - — 5 3080 

d Far East Fund S 8561 

ef FlU Amer. Assets 1 Sffli^i 

0 Fid. Amer. Values IV— . — _S 11057300 

d Frontier Fund s J7J7 

d Glooal Ind Fimd S I9J6 

0 G«bal Selection Fund S 2331 

0 New Eureae Fund S 14 JS 

d Orient Fund S 136.92 

0 Special Growth Fund 1 *ZJ2 

d World Fond S 119.92 

FINMANAGEMENT 5A-Utgano(41 jl/239312) 

w Delta Premium Coro— s 121280 

FDKUS BANK AS. 472 428 5K 
wS cmN onos mn Growth Fd -8 1.02 

FORE KHI « COLON I AL E MERG MKTS LT D 
Tel : London 071 428 123* 

0 Argentinian invest Co SKavS 27J8 

0 Brazilian Invest Co Sicov—S 4137 

w Colombian Invest Co Slcav js MJfl 

0 Glbl Em Mkh Inv CO 5lcavS 11-75 

d Indian Invest Co Slcav— S 1266 

0 Latin Amer Eetra Yield Fd 8 9.9146 

0 Latin America income Co-S 9jn 

d Latin Amertem invest Ca— 8 12 A® 

0 Mexican Invest Co Slcav S 45.19 

wPerwImi Invest CaSknv—S 1410 

FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID) 

PJ3. Box 2001, Hanl Hon. Bermuda 


m FMG Global 131 July) 

at FMG N. Amer. (31 July) . 


mFMGQ (31 JU 


m FMG Find (31 July) S 

FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA) LTD 

w Concents Forex Fund % 

GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 

w Gala Hedae II 5 

w Gala Hedge III S 

w Gala Swiss Franc Fd sf 

■r GAIA Fx S 

in Gala Guaranteed Cl. I S 

m Gala Guaranteed CL u 5 


OARTMORE IHDOSUKZ FUNDS 12/89/M 


Tel: (352)46 54 24470 
Fax : (352) 44 54 23 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 

0 DEM Bend DM532 DM 686 

0 Dfverband Dls266 SF Z00 

d Dollar Bond D4S224 S 144 

d EuropeanBd DUi.iS Ecu 126 

0 French Franc_0(s 983 FF 1222 

d Global Bona DIsZlB S 2/S 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 

0 ASEAN S 9/4 

0 Asia Pad He 5 5J0 

0 Continental Europe ECU 1/5 

0 Devntoolna Mortals —5 4/5 

0 France FF 10,73 

d Germany- DM 587 

d Irdemaflonal S 265 

0 Japan Y 2nu» 

0 North America I 267 

0 Switzer land 3F 383 

0 United KJnodom i 137 

RESERVE FUNDS 

«wn ritoSTiu DM 4386 

o Dollar Pb Zilft . s 1IM 

d French Franc— FF 12.99 

d Yen Reserve Y 2886 

GEPIKOR FUNDS 

Londan:7l-499 41 71 jleneva:4l-22 73555 30 

wScotttsti World Fund S 4793715 

w State 5t. American _J 34887 

OCNESEE FUND Ud 

w (A) Genesee Eagle S 15240 

w IB) Genesee Short S 67/4 

wCGeoesee Opportunity _S 17195 

wjF) Genesee Nan-Eaulty 5 139.98 

GEO LOGOS 

w M Stratait Bend B Ecu 105487 

w II Padlto BOMB SF 1264.90 



GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 
OFFSHORE FUNDS 
It Altai SLDougkH.1 of Man 44-624-&26037 

wGAMerlm 5 

ir GAM Arbitrage S 


r GAM ASEAN 

w GAM Australia— 

w gam Boston 

w gam Combined 

w GAM Cross- Market. 

w GAM European 

tv GAM France— 
w GAM Franova! 


iv GAM GAMCO— _____ 

tv GAM Hlpll Yield S 

■V GAM East A5Ja__— S 

W CAM liwm - - - e 

m GAM Money Mkts US8 S 


0 DoSlertfM 

0 Do Swiss Franc- SF 

0 DoDeutscbsmark DM 

d DO Yen Y 

w GAM A1 located Mltt-Fd % 

w GAM Etnarg Mkts MtH- Fd J 


w GAM E merp Mkts MttFFd-S 

w£am Mltl-Euraae USs s 

IV GAM Mltl-Eurooe DM DM 

n> GAM MltLGIobal USS S 

IV GAM Mltl-US — — S 

ir GAM Trading DM. JDM 

w gam Trading uss s 

w GAM Overseas— — _S 


, GAM Pacific. 

«v GAM Relative value— l 

w GAM Selection 3 

iv gam Stnoapore/Matoysia-S 
ivGAMSF special Bend — - SF 
iv GAM Ty eta . — .. . - .-3 
W GAM UA ■ .5 

■v GAMut Investments - ■ a 

W GAM Value S 

nr GAM Whitethorn. s 

w GAM Worldwide S 

nr GAM Bond U 55 Ord — .. 6 
nr gam Bond USS Special — * 

w GAM Band SF,. SF 

nr GAM Bond Yen_ Y 

nr GAM Band DM OM 

nr GAM Bond c £ 


w GAM (Special Band, 
w GAM Universal USS- 


ivGSAM Composite— 
w Global StrahSc A __ 

wGtooal strategic B 

w European Strategic A- 
w European Strategic fl- 
ip Trading Strategic A — 

w Trading Strategic B 

iv 6 merit Mkts Strategic I 


ht Emery Mkts Strotsgic a — s 
SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 41-' 
MuhieCoet u lrassB 173.CH B034Zuri 


0 GAM CHI Europe. 
0 GAM CHI MonSaL 
0 GAM CHlPaciflC- 


SEC REGISTERED FUND! 
135 East 57Th SfntaJiY 1002 


INDS 41-1-423 
8D34Zurleh 

ztIf 


r Gam Europe „ 

W GAM Global S 136.02 

nrGAM intemaitonal — . ■ ■ 5 I94J9 

w gam North America s .9084 

iv GAM Patifle Basin 5 195354 

IRISH REGISTERED UCITS 

4546 Lower Mount SLDUblh) 1353-1-676060 

nrGAM EuraaAcc DM 13222 

w GAM Orient ACC— -DM 162.11 

H>GAM Tokyo ACC DM 171 02 

w GAM Total Bond DM ACC—DM HM/6 

ip GAM Universal DM Acc dm 174J1 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda: (809) 2954000 Fax; (8091 2954110 
JWH GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 


w (A) Original Investmeirt — 5 9190 

nr JO Ftoanctai & Metal* 1 145J7 

Hr (O) G local Dhrenffleft—S 11338 

nr IF G7 Currency S *1.98 

iv (H) Yen Flmmdai 5 157 J8 

w (Jj DlvereHM Risk Adi S 11838 

w(K) inti Currency A Bond -5 119/s 

w (L) Glooal Financial S 9086 

Hr JWH WORLDWIDE FUND 6 1783 

GLOBAL FUTURES A OPTIONS SICAV 
mFFM mi Bd Pragr-CHF □ -SF t00.9* 
GOLDMAN SACHS 

wGS Adi Rate Mart. Foil s 9J2 

mGS Global Currency 1 12*2.98 

w GS World Bona Fund 1 10.09 

iv GS World income Fund — J 937 

GS EQUITY FUNDS SICAV 

wGS Euro Small Cop Part — DM 9864 


iv GS Global Equity 

nrGSU 5 Cop Growth Port — 5 tfta 

nrG5U5 Small Cap Port I 1030 

nrGSAsla Porttollo S I1J7 

FUND MANAGEMENT 

Fund- Ecu 115599 

CAPITAL 1NTL GROUP 

n Cooitat Ewltv S 0.97*7 

w Granite Capllnl Morteaan— 1 0.7373 

w Granite Global Debt. Ltd S 09440 

(ELAND) LTD 





r GTTechnatogvFundB5h_j 63.1? 

OT MANAGEMENT PLC (6*71 71845*7) 

0 G.T. Bialech/Hcgllh Fund-5 20 « 

0 aT. Deuncniand Fund s Il6t 

a G.T. E un»e Fund 5 S3 ?2 

w G.T. Gtobai Vital Co Fa —5 2174 

0 G.T. invesiirent Fund 5 2>jt 

nr G.T. Korea Fund 5 4/* 

wG T Newly Ind Counir Fd-S JtSI 

wGT US Small Companies -5 7*. >4 

GUERNSEY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

t GCM Global SeL Ea 5 lll.l* 

GUINNESS FLIGHT FD MNGRS (Oner) Lid 

GUINNESS FLIGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 


Bermuda : 1 809)2*5 4BQ0, Lu»- 1 352I4IM 64 61 
Estimated Frlcei 

mHerrrvK European Fund Ecu 340 

m Hermes North American Fdl 290 

m Hermes Aston Fund 5 282 

m Hermes EmergMkti Fund.* 122 

m Hermes Strategies Fund S 678 

m Hermes Neutral Fund S 1 14 

m Hermes Clc&ol Fund s 64? 

m Hermes Bond Fund—— .Ecu 1242 

niHerme* Starling Fd t loe 

m Hermes Gold Fund s its 


INCOME PARTNER5 (ASIA) LIMITED 


wASIm Fired income Fd— — 3 
INTER INVEST (BERMUDA) LTD 
C/o Bank of Bermuda, TeJ : 80* 295 *000 
m Hedge Hag & Conserve Fd_5 
INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
2. Bd RovnL L-2449 Luxembourg 
w Eimme Sud E B". 

INVE5C42 INTL LTD, ROB 271, Jersey 
Tel: 44 534 731 14 

d Maximum Income Fund— c ( 

0 Sterling Mnga PHI— __r 3 

0 Pioneer Markels i t 

0 Global Bond— — 5 

d OAawn Global Strategy 5 11 

d Asia Sauer Growth 5 71 

0 Nippon Warrant Fund— 3 1 

d Asia Tiger warrant s S 

0 Eurowon Warrarrf Fund S 2 

d Gld N.W. W4 S 4 

PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 

d American Growm —8 e 

0 American Enlerorise S 5 

d Asia Tiger Growth a 12 

d Dollar Reserve—— — 5 5 

0 European Growth 5 5 

0 Europe**! Enterprise % I 


a Giaoci Emerging Markets-! 

0 Global Growth 5 

a Nippon Enter orl 


0 Nippon Gro» 

0 UK Growth l 58700 . 

0 Sterling Reserve— — f 
0 North American Wwrrnni-J L4S0D 

0 Greater China Opcs > 88100 

tTALFORTUNE INTL. FUNDS 

wClasiA lAggr.OrawitillaDS 799*5.00 

•r Class B (Global Eoulty) 5 12J0 

w Gass C (Global Bond) 5 1125 

iv Class D I Ecu Bondi Ecu 1082 

JAHDINE FLEMING , GPO Bex 11*48 Hg Kg 

d JF ASEAN Trust I 6133 

d JF Far East WndTr S 2235 

d JF Global Conv. Tr— 5 1434 

0 JF Kang Kong Trad 5 1989 

d JF Japan Sm. Co Tr.— .Y <9740.00 

d JF Japan Trust Y I2iiloo 

0 JFMotOYSiq Trust S 3106 

0 JF Poclllc Inc Tr s 12.78 

a JF Thaltona Tru*l 1 4331 


JOHN GOVETT MANT (I.OJH.1 LTD 
Tel: 44624- 62 94 20 


Tel: 44624- 62 9*,: 

iv Gavett Man. Futures 

w Goven Man. Put. USI_ 
iir Govetl 5 Gear. Curr .. . 
irGovefl 5 GIN Bal. Hdoc 
JUUUS BAER GROUP 
d Hi— mom 


0 Conbar 

d Eauibaer America. 
0 Eaulbcer Europe,. 
0 SFR. BAER 


d Slock bar 

0 Swtsaoar 


0 Lioulbaer 

0 Europe Bond Fund. 
0 Dollar Bend Fund - 
0 Auslro Bond Fund- 
0 Swiss Bend Fund— 
0 DM Bend Fund 


0 Convert Band Fund— 
0 Global Bond Fund — 

0 Euro Slock Fund 

0 US Slock Fund— 

0 Pacific Stock Fund.. 
0 Swhs Stack Fund — 


S Special Swiss Slock. 

Japan Stock Fund — 
d German Shx* Fund. 
a Korean Stock Fund- 

0 Swiss Franc Caih 

0 PM Cash Fund 

0 ECU Cosh Fund 

d Starling Cash Fund.. 


d Starling Cash Fund.. 
d Dollar Cash Fund— 


d French Franc Cash- FF It LUO 

KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC.. 
m Key Asia H0tolng5:_j— J 102»4 

m Key Global Hedae — s 2543* 

mKev Hedge Fund Inc 5 15039 

Kl PACIFIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC. _ 


mKI Asia Pacific Fd Lid__S 
KIDDER, PEABODY 
b C he s a peake Fund Ltd —5 


b Inn Guaranteed Fund— 1 

b Stonenenoe Ltd S 

LEHMAN BROTHERS 09/81/91 
d Asian Dragon Port NV A _ S 
d Asian Dragon Pari NV B — 5 
d Global Advisors ii nv a — i 


d Asian Dragon Purl NV B — 5 
d Global Advisors II nv a — i 

0 Global Advisors 11 NV B S 

0 Global Advliors Pori NV Ajb 
a Global Advisors Pari NV Ojt 

d Lehman Cur aov. A/B S 

0 Premier Futures Adv A/B-S 


LIPPO INVESTMENTS 
24/F LIpod Tower Centre. 89 Queenswav.HK 
Tel 18521 8*7 5088 Fax 1852) 596 0388 

ir Java Fund — 5 9.77 

iv Asian Fixed Inc Fd 3 8 9? 

•v I DR Mane/ Market Fd S 1181 

iv U3D Money Market Fd —3 1034 

n Inaoncuan Growth Fd jS 2J.J0 

■v Asian Growth Fund. 5 11)44 

w Asian Warrant hund_ J £80 

LLOYD GEORGE MNGMT (152) MS *433 

w Antenna Fund 5 1884 

w LG Aslan Smaller CesFd_S 19.7888 

w LG India Fund Ltd S 

IV LG Japan Fd S 103S 

LLOYD5 BANK INTL (BAHAMA5) Ltd 
w LtovdJ Americas Porttaio-S 9J2 


w LG Aslan Smaller Cos Fa —5 
w LG India Fund Ltd S 


LOMBARD. ODIER ft CIE - CROUP 
OBLIFLEX LTD (Cl) 


OhLIFLEX LTD (Cl) 

0 Multicurrency 

0 Dollar Medium Term— 

d Dollar Lang Term 

0 Japanese Yen— » 

0 Pound Sterling 

d Deutsche Marx 

0 Dutch Florin — 

0 HY Euro Currencies — 

d Swiss Franc- — _ 

d US Dollar Short Term- 


d HY Euro Curr Dlvid Pay — Ecu 10/9 

d Swiss Multicurrency SF l*j* 

d European Currency Ecu 21/7 

0 Belgian Franc — BF 132/3 

0 Convertible S 15.11 

d French Franc — — ..FF IS392 

0 Swiss Mum-Dividend— sf 931 

d Swiss Frsxrc Short-Term — SF 10785 

d Canadian Dollar a 1AJ7 

d Dutch Florin MuM „FI 14/0 

d Swiss Franc DMd Pay— SF HUS 

a CAD Mulllcur. Dlv a 1 1.77 

d Meaiitmmean Curr 5F HUM 

d Convertibles SF 9J6 

d Deutschmark Short Term — DM 1080 

MALABAR CAP MGMT (Bermuda) LTD 

m Malabar Int i Fund S 19.47 

MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 

mMlnl Limited -Ordinary s 4085 

mMlnr Limited -income S 1280 

mMInrGtd Ltd- Soec issue —* 26 02 

mMlnl Gld Ltd -Nov 2002 S 2184 

mMIntGtd Ltd -Dec 1994 5 17J1 

mMIntGtdLta- Aug 1995 5 H5t 

mMlnt Sp Res Ltd IBHFI s 9737 

m Mint Gld Currendn— 3 6.72 

mMInt Gia Currencies 2001— J e.«* 

mMbll G GL Fin 200J S *33 

m Mini Plus Gld 7003 S 939 

mAthena Gld Futures s t2J3 

m Athena Gld Currencies 5 936 

m Athena Gld Rnandois Cap 3 1069 

mAthena Gtd Ftnancfais incJ lail 

oiAHLCaniiol MkU Fa S 13.17 

/IJAHL ComihDdirv Fund S IOJ2 

fllAHL Currency Fund— 5 761 

mAHL Real Time Trad Fd — s e.7a 

mAHL Gtd Real Time Trd — 5 8.99 

mAHL Gtd Cop Mark LM s 986 

mAHL Gld Commodities LW J 734 

mMap Guaranteed 1994 Ltd-J 087 

mMap Leveraged Recov. ud3 1129 

mMAP Guaranteed 28M S 9.98 

m MAP Gld 2001 S 10 45 


MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
73 From St Hamilton Bermuda (00913*2 TVf) 

■v Maritime Mll-Seciar I Ltd _S 100389 
w Maritime GU Bela Series _5 S313V 

■v Maritime GlOi Delta Series S 78*84 

MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MGT 

EMERGING ASIAN STRATEGIES FUND 

mCtes A S 11881 

d Gob B S 117.97 

PACIFIC CONV STRATEGIES FD LTD 

rn Class b * 9598 

0 Class B ■■ — ■ - — 5 9983 

MCKINLEY _CA PI TAL PARTNERS, LTD 

mThe Corsair Fund Ltd 5 77 70 

mTiwOauiUieuFdUd 3 111.70 

MEE5PIER50N 

Raxin 55. lOITKk. Amsierdam (2D-S21TMte) 


w Asia Poe. Growth Fd N.V..8 

w Aslan Capital Holdings s 

w A skm Selection Fd N.v F! 

w DP Amer. Growth Fa n.v. j 

w EMS Ottsnore Fd n.v n 

w Europe Growth Fund N.V. _FI 

w Japan Diversities Fund 5 

»v Leveraged Cap Hold I 



Francs' CS- Canadian DoCars; gM - toutscfie Marks; ECU - 


norin: 

d. n prefcadHras; vfins irachange:**- Anwtsrdam exchange; 

id price; y. price cacuiatKl 2 bays prwr to publication: z; btd pnee. 


I MERRILL LYNCH 

a Debar Assets Porttollo S 

a Prime Rate Pcrirdio S 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TERM 
WORLD INCOME °OPT FOLIO 

a Class a s 

d Class e s 

MERRILL LYNCH 
GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SERIES 
AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
it Calemry a -AS 


d Cctejorv I 
CANADIAN DOLLAR POPTFOLJO 

I d Co Jewry A CS 14.12 

! e Ccteocrv B CS 13.76 

! CORPORATE hiGH INCOME PTFL 

CCIoSiA-l S 9.12 

a CICjj A -7 5 966 

I a Class a-i — s 9.13 

0 ClciS B-: S 73 

DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 
d Oalegorv 6 DM 1102 

d Category B DM 1264 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO tDMI 

dCIOUA.l . 5 1153 

d Class A -2 i 15.01 

dClaisB-l S :j33 

0Cta»E-2 S I486 

EUROPEAN BONO PORTFOLIO (USSI 


a Managed Currency— — — i 3877 

0 GlSOfll Band — ) 

d Glcoci High inrwne Band— 5 21.H 

d Gill &( Bor.d ; 19.22 

d Euro High Inc Band ( 70 38 

d Global Equity i 95.3 

d Amertran Slue Chip s 2e.u 

d Jcoan end Pccllic 5 1 35.75 

0 UK C :&85 

0 Eurooean 5 i!38? 

GUINNESS FLIGHT INTX ACCUM FD 

a Deutschemark Money DM 90312 

a US Cc icr Mangy 5 3ft?7* 

d US Lre In' High Yd Band S 24H 

0 Int i EJClKed Grttl 5 3*33 

HASENBICHLER A55ET MANGT GeunUi. 

w Haw nbtanier Com AG. 5 43s3J21 

w Ha _ nb.cN vf Cam Inc 5 ) 13/8 

w H- T.biJiIir Dlv S I3ul4 

IVAFFT i 747680 

HDF FINANCE.Telt33-lH07i6J5LPOX 40764455 
■r Mordinvest Europe— F F 1 3833 

w Manauivest Croli3once FF 1389-39 

w Mona in vest Odp mtto FF !2su0 

wMondlnvest Emerg Growth. FF 13588C 

iv Mondinves) Futures F F 1 21 W« 

HEPTAGON FUND NV (9fff-«155»l 
t Hep logon QLB Fung..... 5 90.J3 


dOOUA-l DM 3.91 

JCIauAt— ,_DV 964 

0 Crass B- 1 5 B.*l 

0 Class 82 3 9 J* 

POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 

d Category A ... i 15J< 

a Culecary B ■: i«*3 

US DOLLAR PiJRTFULIO 

a Category A S 1336 

d Category fi S 1X17 

YEN PORTFOLIO 

d Cctocary A Y 1285 

0 Cctegarv 9 . . .. Y f2J2 

MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 

d Z\-.T. A 5 2280 

0 Class B S 21.0 

US FEDERAL SECURITIES PTFL 

d Class A S 936 

0 Class 3 S *JS 

MERRILL LYNCH 

EQUITY / CONVERTIBLE SERIES 

BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 

0 Class. A s 1547 

0 Class B 3 1477 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

0 Class A S 14J7 

d CJCI53 8 S 1X73 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL (USS) 

0 Class A S 1037 

0 Class B 1 10/3 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

0 CUBS A _ — — , . . 3 1032 

0CJOiSB S 1081 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

d Class A S 1468 

d Class B 8 1433 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

0 class a s leoa 

0 Class 6 5 1767 

PACIFIC EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A 5 963 

0 CklSS B 8 963 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 

0 CK1S5 A S 1265 

d Class B 5 1162 

DRAGON PORTFOLIO 

dOtrnA S 1763 

d Class B 5 1763 

MERRILL LYNCH EMEROING MARKETS 

0 Class A 8 1114 

0 Class B S 12.13 

MERRILL LYNCH INC I PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A S 835 

0 Class B S 835 

d Class C S 035 

. MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

d Mexican lac SPIfl Cl A S 963 

d Mexican Inc I Ptfl DB S 963 

d Mexican Inc Peso Ptfl cl A3 0.92 

0 Mexican lac Peso Ptfl CJB3 882 

MOMENTUM AS5ET MANAGEMENT 
ir Momentum N needier Perf-S 9169 

m Momentum Ratntxnv Fd S 11464 

mMomenwrn PjR R.U 3 8272 

m Momentum Stockmastnr 5 15135 

MORVAL VONWILLER ASSET MGT Ca 

w Wilier Japan Y 2iBi0 

W Wilier South East Asm . 5 1X42 

tvWNIer Telecom 8 1020 

wWlllertumEWiileruondCaDS 15/6 

■v WUlertunds-Wuierbmd Eur Ecu 1264 

ir WlllerfundS-Wtllerca Eur— Ecu 1X84 

w Wlilertanos-Wlitareq Italy -Lit 124S6JU 

iv WlHerfunas-Wlllerea NA— J 1165 

MULTIMANAGER N.V. 

mWerld Band Fund Ecu 1267 

m European Eauines Ecu 14/1 

mjopanese Ecu I lies Y 881 

m Emerging Markots s 2)30 

mCavi Enhancement J 984 

S 964 

—I 1264 

! CAPITAL MGT 

S 14762 

— 5 13082 


w NA Flexible Growth Fd S 14762 

wNA Hedge Fund 5 13082 

NOMURA INTL. (HONG KONG) LTD 

d Nomura Jakarta Fund S 11.19 

NOR IT CURRENCY FUND 

mNCFUSD S 81731 

mNCFDEM OM 871.13 

mNCFCHF SF 934.79 

mNCF FRF FF 44*110 

mNCF JPY V 83*9580 

mNCF BEF BF 2*7*100 

ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
21 Gresvenor StJLdn WIX * F E^-71-499 2998 


d Odev European. 


wOdev European S 131: 

w Oder Eurap Growth Inc DM 141, 

w Odev EurOP Growth Acc -DM 142 

wOaev Eura Grin Sler Inc— i 5ft 

nr Odev Eure Grin Star Acc. _f 59. 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL. INC 
Williams House. Hamilton HMII. Bermuda 
Tel: 809 292-1016 Fax: 809 29S-230S 

nr Finsbury Group-. 5 221. 

iv Olympia SecurileSF SF 144: 

iv Olymnia Stars Emerg Mkts I 981. 

w wmcn. Eastern Draean„i 17. 

nr Winch. Frontier 5 2*7: 

w Winch Fut. Olympia Slar S 1*1: 

w Winch. Gi Sec Inc pi f Ai— 3 9. 

w Winch. W Sec Inc PI iC > — l «j 


.. .... Giqbal Healthcare— Ecu 
iv Winch Mdg mn Madisan-^cu 
nr Winch. H dg inn Ser D_ — Ecu 

w Winch. H dv inti Ser F Ecu 

w winch. HUtw Oly Star Hedges 
nr Winch Reser. Mu ill. Gv Bd j 
iv Winchester Thailand -5 


OPPENHEIMER ft CO. INC Fdl 

a Arbitrage internahenal J 

b Emerg Mkts IMT II S 

b inn Hari too Fund 11 S 10IJ 

OPTIGEST LUXEMBOURG 
b OpttoestGloi Fd-Flxed inc-DM 1576 
b Ootigest Gibl Fa- Gen Sub FDM 1820: 
OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 
73 Front SI. Harm tton, Bermuda 809295-0*58 
■v Dpi taio Emerotd Fd Lta — s to: 


wOolbma 
w Optima 

w Optima 


Imp Emera 
hna Fund- 
Mia Future 


uresFund S 

ool Fund S 

leuta Fd Ltd — S 


ORBITEX GROUP OP FUNDS 

d Orbital AHo Pec Fd 3 

0 Or bile* Growth Fd 3 

0 Orbital Health ft Emrlr Fd-S 
0 Orbih-v Janan Small Cap FdS 
d O'hitre natural Res Fd— cs 
FACTUAL 

d Elernlh Fund Ltd S 

a immllv Fund Ltd S 

I C Novariur Fund- S 

0 Star High Yield Fd Ltd 5 

PARIBAS-GROUP 

w Luiar .5 

d Pa rvest USA B S 

d Purvey Jaxjn B — V 

d Forms! Asia Padf B— _i 

0 Parvnt Europe B Ecu 

d Porrest Holland B FI 

d Parvest France 8 -FF 

d Porvest Gcrnuxiv B — DM 

0 Parvesl Obll-Dottar B S 

0 Parvest Obll-DK. B DM 

0 Parvesl ObiFYen B v 

0 Pa rvest Obi i-Gu Wen B fi 

0 PorvesioblF Franc B FF 

0 Pqryesf ODII-Ster B C 

a Parvest Obtt-Ecu B Ecu 

d Parvest ODtl-Bef ux B — — LF 

d Parvest S-T Dollar B s 

0 Parvest s-T Europe B Ecu 

0 Parvest S-T DEM B DM 

d Parvest S-T FRF B _ — . — FF 
0 Parvest 5-T Bel Plus B- — BF 

d Parvest Globa! B LF 

0 Parvest ml Band B S 

0 Parvest Obit-Lira B — ,LR 

d Parvesl Ini EauHles B . 9 

ti Parvesr UK B E 

0 Parvest USD Plus B S 

0 ParvKIS-TCHFB SF 

0 Parvest Obll-Canada B CS 

0 Parvesl ObU-DKK B DKK 


PERMAL GROUP 

f Drokkar Grown N.V i 

I Emerging Mkh Hldgj S 

/ EuroMIr (Ecu) Ltd .Ecu 

1 FX, Financials ft Futures— S 

I investment Hldsrs N.V J 

1 Media & Communicntiura — 1 

1 NoscatLtd S 

PICTET ft CIE -GROUP 

d Amerosec ■ — — 6 

W P.C-F UK Val (U«l. c 

iv PCF Germavol (Lux) DM 

nrP.CF Naramval (Lux) 5 

iv PD.F Valioer ILux i — Ptas 

w P.CJ Uolllalta (Lux) Lit 

w P-C.F VaifnmcB ILuxi- .FF 

w P.U.F. Valband SFR l Lux) JF 
nrPJJ.F.Vataona USD lLux)-S 
nr P31.F. Votaond Ecu (Lux) -Ecu 
w P.U.F. Valband FRF (Linl-PF 
w P.U.F. Vanwid GBP (Lux)^ 
w P.U.F. VOIbuKl DEM I Lux I DM 
nr P.U.F. US S Bd Ptfl t Luxj_l 

w P.U.F. Model Fd Ecu 

w P.U.F. Plcllte SF 


wP.U.T. Emerg Mkts(Lux)— S 
n P.U.T. Eur. Opoon (Lux) E t 


r. P.U.T. Eur. OuDori (Lux) Ecu 149. 

O P.U.T. Gtobal Value ( Lux) -Ecu 14ft 

w P.U.T. Euraval (Luxl Ecu 22X 

0 Pictet Valsutese CCH) sf M9. 

m Inti Small Cop (IOM) S 504. 

PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 
c/a PJCL Box 1100. Grand Cayman 
Fox: (») 9490993 

m Premier US Eauhv Fund— JS 1234. 

m Premier 1 nil Ea Fund — J 1304. 

m Premier Sovereign Bd Fd— S 791 

m Premier Global Bd Fd 5 14*7: 

m Premier Tata Return Fd -3 979' 

PRIVATE ASSET MGT GAM FUND INC 
Guernsey:Tei:i004448ll 723432 Fax: 723*83 


w Private Assei Myt CAM FdS 
PUTNAM 

ti Emerging Him Sc Trust S 

w Patnem Em. Info. Sc. TriKtS 
0 Putnam Gleb. Utah Growths 
0 PutaamHIgh Inc GNMA Fd* 

0 Putnam mrl Fund 3 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 
nr Aslan Development. .-..9 
nr Emerging Growth Fd N.V— 5 
tr Quantum Fund N-V.._. —5 

w Quantum Industrial 6 


w Gwantum Rwlit Tririt— 5 J34J7 

w Quantum uK Fealty Fund-I 11063 

w Oumar Ini l Fund N.V S 10.9) 

vyOuoraFimdN.V. — — i 14X43 

REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 

w New Korea Growth Fd * 

1* Nova Lai Poclllc inv Co — s 
iv Pacific ArWIrggo Ca . 
m R.l Country Wrm Fd 

d Pegcnt Gibl Am Grth Fd S 

9 RegcnfGIbl Eur* Grth Fd-S 
d Regent Gibl inti Grthfd — S 
d Regent Gibl jop Grth Fd— 6 
0 Regent GW Pout Basin — S 

d Regem Gibl Reserve s 

d Resent Gibl Resources. s 

d Regenl Gibl Tiger _S 

d Regenl Gibl UK Grth Fd— I 
w Regem Mogtu/ Fd Ltd 
mRcgen* Pacific Hda Fd, 
w Regent Sn Lanka Fd 
w Undervalued Assets Ser i— J 
REPUBLIC FUNDS 
w Reaubllc CAM 

w Republic GAM America 5 

IV Rep GAM Em Mtrtj Gtabal JS 
w Ren GAM Em Mkts lot AmS 
w Reoublic GAM Europe CHFSF 
Republic GAM Europe U5SJS 
Republic GAM GrwtnCHF-SF 

w Republic GAM Growth C t 

n> Republic GAM Grawtli USS S 
iv ReputH ic GAM Depart unity S 
iv Republic GAM Padilc. 
w Republic Groev Dal me 
w Republic Gnsey Eur rnc 
w Republic Lot Am Alloc- 
1* Republic Lot Am Argent. J 
■y Republic Lot Am Brazil— S 
iv Republic Ud Am Mexico — S 
■y Republic. Lot Am Venri — s 
nr Pep Solomon Strategies— S 


FOB 97X3000 AZ Potteream.131110 2241224 

0 rg America Fund f 1 140.H) 

0 RG Europe Fund. Fl 130.K) 

0 RG Padilc Fund FI 14460 

0 RG Dlv, rente Fund FI 5130 

0 RG Money Plus F Fl FI 115J0 

More Rabeca see Amsterdam Stocks 
ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
IN-HOUSE FUNDS 
iv Aston Capital Hatatnos Fa_s 
w Dai wo LCF Rothschild Bd-5 

ivDatwa LCF Roltoch Eq S 

nr Farce Cash Tradition CHF-SI 

w Lrlcom ..5 

iv Leveraged Cap Ho tatags —S 

w OWFVoior 

tr Prl Challenge Swiss Fd 

b Prleqixty FtS-E-rope Eo 

t Priequlty Fo-rtelvella 6F 

b PrtaQUUY Ffl-Ui (In Am 6 

b Prioond Fund Ecu Eci 

b Prt&and Fund USD 
b Pribond Fd HY Emer Mkti 
w Selective Invest SA 
O Source— — 
w us Bona Phis 
wvarlapl 



5VEN5KA HANDELSBANKCN SA. 

144 1 BO Oe W Petr u 559. L-2330 UrxemOOBI 

b SHB Bond Fund —5 

w Svencka SeL Fa Amer Sh — * 
w Svensko Set. rd Germany— S 
i» Svetuka Set. Fd Inti Ba 566 
w bvenjka Set. Fd Inti Sb 

w Svrnstca Set. Fd jaoon 

wSvenska Sel. Fd Mlll-Mkt _ Sek 
w Svenua Set. Fd Nardta. — -5 
iv 5vernkd 5ei. Fd PacH sn _S 

w Svemha Sel. Fd Swtd Bor Sek 

SWISS BANK CORP. 
d SBC 100 index Fund 
d SBC Eauily Ptfl-Ausfrona-AS 

d SBC EauKy Plfl-Cancda CS 

d SBC Eoulty Ptfl-Eutwe Ecu 

0 SBC Ed PHFNettMtlands— Fl 

dSBCGovIBdBl S 

0 SBC Bond Ptft-Ausir s A — AS 
d SBC Bond PHFAusfT S B — AS 

d SBC Band PilhCanft A Cs 

d SBC Bond Pttl-CaftS B CS 

0 SBC Band ptfl -DM A— DM 

0 SBC Band Pfft-DM B OM 

0 SBC Band Ptfl -Dutch G. A_F1 
0 SBC Band PHI-Outdl G. B— Fl 
0 SBC Band Ptfl-Ecu A 
0 SBC Bond Ptfl-ECU B 
d SBC Band Plfl-FF A 
d SBC Band PtfFFF B 

a SBC Band Plfl-Ptm A/B Ptas 

d SBC Band PtU-Stori tag A _E 
ti 5BC Band Ptfl-Starlbig B — C 

0 SBC Band PartfaHa-5F A SF 

0 SBC Bond ParttoHo4F B SF 

0 SBC Band PHMJS5A 
0 SBC Band Prim 55 B 
d SBC Bond Ptfl- Yen A 
0 SBC Bond Pffl-YenB 
d SBC MMF - AS- 
0 SBC MMF - BFR 
0 SBC MMF -Cant 
d SBC DM Short-Term A 
rf SBC DM Short-Term B 
0 SBC MMF- Dutch G. 
d SBC MMF -Ecu 
d SBC MMF -Esc 
d SBC MMF -FF 
d SBC MMF-LII. 

0 SBC MMF- Ptas 
d SBC MMF - Schilling 
a SBC MMF - SH " 

0 SBC MMF - SF 
d SBC MMF -US- Dollar 
0 SBC MMF-USS/ll 
a SBC MMF - Yen — 

d SBC GlW-PTfl SF Grth SF 

0 SBC GIM-Ptfl ECU Orta— Ecu 
0 SBC GIW -Ptfl USD Grth 
0 SBC Gtbl-Ptfl SF YU A 
0 SBC Glbt-PKl SF YtO B 

0 5BC GHjf-Ptfl Ecu YkJA 

0 SBC GUM-Ptf I Eai Yld B Ecu 

0 SBC GlbFPTII USD YM A 
0 SBC GIM-Ptfl USD YM B 
d SBC GIM-PTfl SF Inc A 
0 SBCGttt-PfflSF incB 

0 SBC GIM-Ptfl Ecu Inc A Ecu 

0 SBC GlW-PTfl Ecu Inc B Ecu 

d SBC Gibl- Ptfl USD Inc A S 

0 SBC GIM-Ptfl USD Inc B _* 

0 SBC GIM Ptll-DM Growth —DM 

0 SBC Gibl PHVDM Ykt B DM 

0 SBC GOjI Ptfl-DM IncB DM 

d SBC GW- Ptfl DM Bal A/B-DM 
0 SBC Gtaf-Plfl Ecu Bal A/B-Ecu 
0 SBC GW -PHI SFR Bal A/B JF 
0 SBC GttJt-Pttl USS Bal A/B-S 


0 UBS Port inv FF Cao G 
d Yen-lnvesl — — 

,d UBS MMInvest-USS 

’d UBS MM invest-c Sf 

0 UBS MM Invest-Ecu Ecu 

0 UBS MM Invest-Yen Y 

0 ubs mm invesr-ur ut 

d UBS MM Illvesf-SFR A SF 

0 UBS MM invesf-SFR T. 

0 UBS HUH invest- FF_ 

d UBS MM litvest-HFL 

0UBS MMIaveai-CarvS cs 

0 UBS MM Invest-BFR BF 

0 UBS Short Term Inv-DM— DM 
0 UBS Band Inv-Ecu A 
0 UBS Bond invEcu T 

d UBS Band InWFR 

0 UBS Band mv-DM DM 

0 UBS Bond Inv- US 

d UBS Band Inv-FF 

d UBS Band mv-Cdn* 

0. UBS Bond Inv-Ut Ul 

d UBS BJ-USS Extra Yield S 

0 UBS EP I erTT> hw-SFRWJSF 

0 UBS Fix Term Inv-DMM DM 

0 UBS Fix Term Inv-Ecu 96— Ecu 

0 UBS Fix Term Inv-FF 94 FF 

0 UBS Ea Inv-Eurone a dm 

0 UBS Ea Inv- Europe T dm 

0 UB5 Ea Inv-SCQP USA S 

0 UBS Port t Fbr Inc (SFR)— SF 
? UBS Port I Fix lac (DM) —DA 
0 UBS Port l Fix inc iEcu)_Ecu 
d UBS Part! FUlneiJSii-i 

0 UBS Port I Fix Inc (Ut) Lit 

0 UBS Port I Fix Inc (FF) FF 

d UBS Cap tnv-90/w USS S 

d UBS Can tmiWO/IO Germ— DM 
WORLD FOLIO MUTUAL FUNDS 

0 S Daily income 

0 DM Dally Inca me 
d S Bond income 
d Non - s Bona? 

0 Global Bonds. 

0 Global Balanced 
0 Global Equities. 

0 US Conservative Eoultlei-f 
0 US Agresshn Equities 
0 European EaufTtn 
0 Padilc Equities-. 

0 Natural Resources 


0 SBC E merstato Markers— s 
d SBC Small 4 MM Caps Sw_SF 
0 SBC ovn Floor CHF 95 
0 AmertcoValor 
0 Ana I a Volar 

0 AstaPortfoti 

0 Crxrreri Band Selection 

0 D-Mark Bond Seleqlon.. DM 

0 Dollar Bom Selection 
0 Ecu Bend Selection— 
d Florin Band Selection 
d FronceVotor — 

0 Germantatfalor 
0 GoWPartfolta— 


OtherFund 

w Adtaroteano* 5lcav 
wAcfimnnCB Skav 
iv Adlluhiras Lfd_ 
wAcHgesttanShav 
wAchvasI Inn Slcav 
hr AOOkHde 

w Adelaide. 

m Advanced Latin Fd Lid 

m Advanced Pacific Shat 

iwAdymredSfrategleiLW-J 

wAlG Taiwai Fund t 

w Alexandra Gibl Invest Fd U 
ntAixm Invesimenl —5 


w Awiki Infernolional Fund_S 
w Arbi fin investment 

w Argus Fund BaWKed 

0 Asks Oeeanki Fund 

w ASS IGtabalJ AG. DM 

/nAtaoctoted Investor* Inc— S 
w Athena Fund Ltd. 

W ATO Nikkei Fund - 

w BoraoJ HfdwM Growth Fd J 
ir Beckman In! Cap Acc— S 
ivBEM Inremational Ltd. « 

0 BJkubervMorvol EEF 

W Brae inttmatlonal FF 

m OU Eu ro Leverage Fd L«-s 
mCaphal Assured imflo Pd— S 

tf SS.SwnwB index Fond. DM 

m Century Futures 


1438LM , 
1713J4 9 
.4M2JH » 
139 J) . 
20134 * 
10.9288 0 
148666 9 

1X13* 
Ml JO 9 

113* « 

89.11 ’ 
16*7231 * 
99781 i 

■ W3* 


for investment in fo r n icrtion * 
Read THE MONEY REPORT > 


aveiy Sahffdoy m 4ia IHT 


For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 3Sf - 


Investing in New 
Infrastructure for Europe 


SKAODEN 

ARPS 

SLATE 

MEAGHER & 
FLOM 


Berlin • November 3 & 4 


limlbSSribunc 


For further information on the 
conference, please contact: 



T»t| 


Brenda Erdmann Hagercy 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH, England 
Tel: (44 71) 836 4802 
Fax: (44 71) 836 0717 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1994 


Page 17 


BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 


JKUHBiUFJMraBP 

tttf tt» International 
H m U tdban* nm t A*. 
MtfnvamWfibrAwor 


rf IrmcmAm riniK 


i*Hi BBP »ar l» owpepar. 
frfo* mHwnHmmf. 
md thjt Ka li n nob 
p naptfafr mqeki u Mn 
■RfivnxmMrwM- 
Mrin« kdo tatry binding 


IMPORT/EXPORT 


SUGAR 

grade H A M refined 




■ SeaiDoafaly ocnsd. «vwri » -witj : 
- port. Foe OQtaI7*28A-50QT USA 

MWWC aGMETTB, Anerioan 
blend loboaD, fewest prim*. 

FAX USA: 


HISHOWWE 1«t Gold 

Eght VM^aht. made in USA, $13/51 
FSbutowloofc Grtacx LD1 PK 013 
398-0606 FAX: [2121 39MK6 U5A 
■ GOOD QUAUTY program dodinq 
- contoinen - Aottmo/Wfnler mix 
l«n*« & undo antt/iadah. S&5 
Idef-frodc Fra 44 71 331 


, w DID AMESfCAN 

IK KWANGE COMPANY 
*"*my fcr repraantativw to nfi in 
S« expatiate noricat in Euopa. We 
oner ax^petfiw He produCb, nahn) 
comrajssfons. vestmas and bonut 
pregram. Wo ofco offer orvmd 
eonemjr c a wd n i or attudiw ides. 
nMSfiMdraonEto; 

'*%&? awtr 

^OBBSSSS^Gonnaiy 

OrwU&wfo Code 8j 
Of fa* WWl-ftltt 


INVEST iotfit 

GENEVA 

fnlniefleiid 

^„CAR MUSEUM 

« me Geneva Airport, on an oreo of 
WJTOs^m, wc cm crecrtroan ex- 
hporpnory mueun fschxng 500 cars 
ofefi motet opening March 1995. The 
enpiu Stock of fire company is now 
robed. We ore tookmo wr invtt- 
toa For xtfonnolioit 

fax 141)2132050 59 


"MASWIZEB" - SUPER PRODUCT 
Tednoiopcd breofcdvoudi in fid 
oonervemoa and water freemen. 
Sam petrol in an and reduces : 
nanrfie exhousl eminiera- Abo softens 
water end desoote buidop m prp&. No 
cortng of ppes, no dwnae. used. 
Spaurwig raudentd to ntudriol 
xnarnB. Guoi trt eed ID vmi. PnMn ! 
ream. Rewdna. wtfafying and ! 
uxrofiw haima. European baributan 
apphr to: USA fan 71M4MM1 or 


* UKOtT- PRIVATE INVESTMENTS 

-JKOffBMmNCF- 

We have a large setedion of musd 

BuJiittl Holes ■ ■ Factories ■ Ftes 


AGENT Q REQUIRED m For East to 
HfpnBB dis trib yeun md owlets far 
indue food padvrt HoneyAranu far 
*wtia and catorie reduced usage, 
produced by leadng German Meoltr 
tore Cempaiy. Please contort; 

Arne Gerties, PBS HoWim Fax 44 
8X21 4564116 






5E 

WOmiWIDE cSkwi oomocSs required 
far financial asset trad i ng compcry. 
Please reply to Bar 351 f. IHt.63 I 
long Acre. London. WC2E 9JH i 


BUSINESS FOR SAl£ 

iK«i.Y waSS^Lohanr 
SOS A Red Cash Cow SSSI 
ramoBm GcMsmtert borne, very 
stobe CorUxun country. Fid bonbon, 
telephone. lateSto nrwee. feed tor 
me mart rtemationW nw ess or. 

P.a Box 2077 
St. Marten 
Netherlands, Antilles 
Fax: MM) 24034 





mmmmk 




MES Qoaaort, Now 
fiily. Hr. A der T«fc 

BUSI 

NESS 


VHY PR5TO0US P80PBITB. 
Looking fa.: NVESTOBS / PAfiTNBtS. 

Contact TARGETS 
Anerican A BrSrt Bummk Odb 
7 Place de la RMstmee 
14000 cam. Range 


TEXTBE MA0SNEKY 
Tampon ProducOai Madmery 

Caton 5wofa Forneng Machine 

Cotton Pad Madams 
K. FnafcrixHjjdwifl & Co AG 
0+6446 Wdnen b. Jooa 

*jud iAnl 

Tet (55) 26 31 4] TU S75349 FALUCH 
Telefax: 55 28 42 60 


BBNESE OBERLAND 

American tntri e fing fMepreaear scab 
ncriment opponunry/pasitnn in cen- 
tral Switzerland. Proven tucceaful 
background mtfl irdemciiond startup 
TOaspanieL. Hncaprial to mvesL 
feply Box 541D LH.T, 850 IW Ave, 
Bto H, NY, NY 10022 UAA. 


FOB SALE 

BEMAMIQ STOCKS 
Surplus production of d l&tdl oF 
corwreer goods. For offer contort: 

Euro Voian Lid. Sawaerfcnd 
Foe +41 5A 94 00 43 

CLASS A BANK in tax Free venue vmh 
pdtamikutrve services and estoUshcd 
tanbpg aid securities aomm US 
S50.0W. tetneJate trmfar. Col 
Canada (0041 942-6169 or Fax J50fl 
942-3179 or London 071 39* SITor 
FAX 071 231 972R 

united investment trust 

HCNG KONG) Authenticated Bank 
Drafts owjilable to provide Funds For 
borrow; who hove bad: oolatwa! 
a security. Plaza fax 852 537-5655 or 
write tft 7ih Floor, Bank of Amerw 
Tow, Central Ht»na Kcnq 


Tow, Central Hong Kong 

2ND CmZBtSHlP AVAILABLE 

through 100K legal namreAzatan. 
Gxi^we deivefY n 90 days. Invest- 
mens starts at $19300. FJ prasgetfan 
of your funds. No payment unless you 
reoave war documsnii. Swiss invest 
toefatk ++313M730416 
PARTNR SOUGHT BY OPTIONS 
Troder with average 563% oared 
per year tost 8 years. 5250,000 mar 
mua You control account/Fimds. 
I drecr aJ tradra. We share profits. 
Detab to prinapoB in eonfidenoe: Feet 

514-231-4239 iSC 

MB4S WMTER PARKA STOCKS We 
am oner immy ruining styles of mans 


SEUOUS MANAGRS. We ntqun 
Fundmg far loons far d Spanish 
tznpanies to bufid concbimxa or 
hoteb-BcpIy to fax +3+^285^74 

RUSHAN IMPORTS USTS 
Updated rw^Sed. Mae than 1000 
entries, fat booge Afaho ltd. Moscow 
7@a 221-1663, nX 5IP-3335. 

ONSHORE GOMPAME5: JPCR. 1/5 
Church Street, Dougfai, We qf Men, 
Teh 100*1 629529 fefo524| 629661 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


BALTIC STATES 

Weoresttag in the heart of the 
Bdfc waiSfa s; Rig a, Latri a 
tmd ore running the mast pooUar radio 
stofeyv We offer afi Mraceayoa 
wok. Faw I 712) 2B 90 78 


3 AVE - NEW YORK (FRH TUAlfl) 
*Mo7 Forwvirg»Fa x t »P hone Servxe* 
BS, 576 5 Ave #1103 NY NY 1M36 
Teh 212-221-5000, Fax: 212-221-5958 





200264, 

CONSULTANTS 
your psaea stuoy - we gwe it 

TT5 FINAL TOUCH - to make it viable, 
fra inquiry- + 49 30 8114492. 


OPPORTUNITIES 

ranch Commit, anted in 1986, 
ta«k£zing in Hanoi Resources 
fpraiapoSy head-hunfag) offers 
snare pafippation to: 


AVARJLB1E CAPITAL 

NHfcrt and Oient capital sources 
arofebie for mestmerts worfcfwti* « 
rad estate, baineo dartag* or defat 
awfdpiion. Lang »enm best rates, 
broker fees paid and protodod. 
far your proposal sumray tot 
Far East Imraxhn e n t Gram, kic. 

Attn: fiandd Depaimnl 
Froc (507) 63^0 S?(Fmm). 


DSAWARE INCi, LLCs 

Deaf direct with Defawora aged, save 



• — ',ri 


i t w ■ 

i ! t- ■ • ■ 

i ; «■•... 

* {».«—, 

t r- 

; 4 . - . i. 


Li ! v ■'*- s 

: !?r 


to penetrate the French market, 
and wahing to tr*e oefamtoga of: 

• a prime office location m cMral 
Paris 

• a pote*d denh portfolio of: 


tnepey on USA company fonnedon. 
DAnwrra Inc. or LLC, 5350 USD. Fart 
reGabfa comddB service in sS US 
stela. Free into. Cal ot fan 


- 2j00 eomp om et 

- 3wrnmiasxAties 


- 300 mmidpdttas / facd 
goyenxn e ntcl outhorihei 
• a gow imog e of profaniand 
- competence. 

IntensSed partes should address #wr 
(xopasoi ta hnevd 11 rue Tronchet, 
75008 Fans France 




OSTIOCH OWhKSWP (the other red 
meat + hide & feaherst. Lei in 
introduce you to the greener oan- 
kwestm en t of file VO's. 8bds are 
■cured and mmtged on a Texas 
rendv E xcrl mt returns expected CoS I 
817/5956909 USA (24 TSwlLetn* 
tdrphone <md fax KxribenL 


■grmi 

200 £24 HrsJ FAX 71 ^ 965340a Dorado, PWrmo. teu 5W-27-13ffl 


P.6- Bax 81 1-H 
Dmrar,DE 19903-0811 
Teh 302-736-5510 
Fcdc 302-736-5620 


faaura lor regular orod u dioa fee 

BSZ1 418 22WTdd852l 418 3661 

tMTEMtATfONAL COMPANY expand 
m in Europe mb loey-peoplD far 
mdependcMit adNdity related to pr» 
kxjnrti of new pwtods 1 Only senoas 
gc pfi cui to. Fbase col Mn E. Agusto 
133193 78 71 92 

SMALL NYSE MEMBER HEM SEEKS 
QUAURS) 5S3ES VB with retad or 
inrtitotiond production. Art- active 
coroeriMtion paincie. Reply in Full 
confidence Box 3705, IliT, 92521 
Neu*y Cedex, France. 


FOR SALE 
TYRES (ENEWED) 

AB toes, attraane priced 
For offer GntfattF a c-Mf 56940043 


mm 


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MINISTRY OF DOMESTIC AFFAIRS 
OF THE ARGENTINE REPUBLIC 

Financial improvement and Economic 
Development Program of the Argentine Provinces 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL BID 

PROVINCE OF MENDOZA 

MINISTRY OF CULTURE, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Provincial Executory Department 

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS AND SERVICES 

Provincial Department of Roach System 

■ ■ — i.... ... .. Wuitoi ExBCUtlon 

CONSTRUCTION OF AVENIDA COSTANERAJCOASTUNE AVENUE] 
(RP 1 J CALLE DORREGO JDORREGO ST] STRETCH UP TO JUNCTION 
• WITH THE RODRIGUEZ PENA TRACK JRP 4] AND WITH 
THE SOUTHERN ACCESS ROUTE (RN 401 


Opening of Tenders: October 31, 1994 at 11 cum. 

Af the Ministry ofPmk Woks and Services, 7 floor, main faviUSng, Cunfra Cfwc o, ftovinca of Mendoza. 

1. This province, ({rough a Suaogrian CovwxbY with In National Government, viS take tfw ban granted (hereto from Sk Banco 
Interomeriamo de uesafroUo • loon Covenant BID (ff®) N 1 6I9/OCAR to contribute to pay for ihe Provincial Financial 
hnprowemenb ana Economic Devebpmeifi Program. The province wfl utihze part of these funds to make poymenb in axardonce 
wffli lhal agreed open in ihe corikoa idmed to in rids Notice. 

2. Works wiTcoosid of fa camfruciion of the Avenida Costawa (Coosfcne Avenue} RP l]CateDonem{DorregaSl|stietehupto 
junction will die Rodriguez Petto kort [RP 4) and w#i Ihe sa/hern access route [RN 40), Buptrii lie aretnidion of confined 
lerrepteinj wilh wafls af reinforced concrete of approximately 400 mis. long, a two-way bridge of SO mb long, and the 
corresponding upgoing and downgoing ramps in wjwicfonwS i ihe aforementowd routes. 

3. The province irwros fiose com pomes of countries members of me BD ||DB) Pnteramerican Devetopmenl Bonk) interested in 
poritc^xiting to submit (heir tenders will the hMvenvebpe system (envelope l: Doannenb for PrequalSafiion. Evelope 2: Tender). 

4. Bidding Proposals may be inspected and purchased, and additional information obtained al die 'Provincial Department of Roads 
System, or Umcinas Sreer w/ no number, Parque Gened San Matin, Mendoia [5500], Telephone Number [5461) 230077, 


5. OSdaf Budget: S 7X*55^66. 

6. Execution Term; Uffojrfeeti] n 

7. The Cost of ihe Bid Doaimert 


8. Tenders wS be delivered d 
Government House, Man 8 
opening of Tenders. 


is i 2,000 which wS be paid in fufl efi lie moment af the puchase thereof. The Bid Document will 
G) lwo business days before <ie dote of file opereng of Tenpen. , , 

^ teceafion (rf ihe Mmisfry of Pubfc WoHs aid Services .of <» Province of Mendoza, or |<ie 7 Boor, 
<fcig, Banto Gvrco, Mendoza (5500), Argentine Republic unm me dote and lime stipulated for the 


1BBH0NE SAVINGS 
kfiernotiond caB back. Ffiflh volume 
cfcrtuUM. TRAN5COM ■ Ti 619/407- 
6640; Far. 619/407-6946 USA. 


BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 

r OFFSHORE 1 
COMPANIES 

BY LAWYERS 

IMMIGRATION 
& TRUST EXPERTS 


OFFSHORE TRUSTS. COMPANIES. 
BANK INTRODUCTIONS. NOMINEES 
& ADMINISTRATION BY UK LAWYEHS 
flSUWf UKORPOUami fBB EXEL 


■ IRISH naRBEH £165.00 

m ISLE OF MAN £195M 
m DELAWARE lu £495.00 


■ B.TX/PANAMA £265M 




LOUDON OFFICE 

sc:-=?;? ho"S£. «c; sro*.;* ? ra=E r 
•• -CHELSEa. LONDON SVWSIiJ •' 

- 44-71 352 2274 - 

^ 44-71 373 5638 J 


OFFSHORE 

MERCHA3NTBANK 

Offered for sale ind. licence 
or possibility of new start-ups. 

Law firm Dr. Bernal, Dr. Gdmez, 
Dr. Moreno & Partners 
Fax-n'+l 809 328 2935 


1994 

"“SS3E Sn ‘ 

If your book bwInck a ban. w wX 
aAdoraEsa (free ban with a Motor 
World Bcnk y«ronlc« naming the bark 
far filer authentication nrcl. 

AS offers heron are subpa to eoatracS 

FORWARD P9QJECT OUTLINE 
NOW TO 

INVESTMENT SUISSE SA 

Batataferaae 86, 

Zundi 8001 Swiaerlcnd. 


IMMBXATE 4 UNLIMITED •* 

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ALL busnen prorecbl 
MIN U5. 52 nJjno max. 

{TITJ 397-7490 (U.S. f AXJ 


FWBS AVAILABLE 

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ALL BLONE5 PROJECTS 
OR FOR 

LETT0S OF OHJfT 
BANK GUARANTY 
OTHHt ACCEPTABLE COLLATERAL 

Broker 'i camnssen guaranteed 

Muwtoun. 1 G» 

RNANOAL WSTTTUnON 
Branreh - B8X5UM 

Information by fax 32-2-534 02 77 
or 32-2-538 47 91 
TELEX- 20277 


INIBtNATIONAL LEASING 
iMMHMATEY AVAILABLE 

F08FNANONG 
af puJxae of heavy squqmnl, 
oireraft*. mer c h e rt ond ptoaun 
ihips. induarid real wrote. 

Broker i eonxix mun gwrorveed 

For ony mformatian 
Mnten MJJP.KJ, md Ok 
RNANOAL WSTTIUTiqN 
■iinufa. BELGIUM 

fa 32-2-534 02 77 & 32-2 539 47 91 
THBC 20277 


PROJECT FINANCE 
VB4TURE CAPITAL 

* MMmum USJ500.000 

* No Maximum 

* Term Loan 

* Equity Finance 

* Broken Protected 

Anglo American Group He 

Fox +44 924 201377 


CONFfllMABLE DRAFTS 
BACKED BY CASH ! 

* toned m Your fare 

* Confirmed by Moor Iwl Bart: 
to PriM AwricMty of Fvncb 

■ Backed by Private twflyi I 

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HJPSXNG PROBLEMS ? 

Venhre Ccptol - Equity Loans 
Red Eiare - fares 
Financing . Lang Term 
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BvAtAie aureantees to secure fundtag 
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Gonvriuisu earned orfy upon Funding. 
Breton ComtTuSnon Assured, 
fa (W-21 810-9284 
Tot (63-2) 8 1 0-257Q or 812-3429 


FB^ANCWG AVAILABLE 

WORLDWK 

AU COMMBOAL FBOJKI5 

NO FEB 

NATIONAL BUSINESS 
RB*OKT1NG BUREAU 

TeL 212702-1821 fa 212867-5127 


* KUU St ai± Caam rai. bo rk wd 

ccmpcrry nwxigDtiQns ErctipfittMxl 
cf defats, (cash end other bsses). m 
the entire world except Italy. 1st etas 
inrarmmnul ogency Fox- +39 <34 

550263 

DSCKETE PRIVATE BANKING, in- 
vfsmfju end fiCuexry sen.xes. For 
brochure. World Monetary Erxhanv. 
Box 533. Auckland. New 2 eatond. Tel- 
(6<251 957-777 fa (W?) 377-7726. 
CONRRMH) VENTURE CAPITAL 
Cash or eqjT>>tfie-'6 fcr irLemanonal . 
Bucrexs IWts. SI -SIM MS. USD 
TeJ 407-463- TO6 Fc. 407-4SS-2664 LC , 


Ef) PURCHAS E & SAL E 

v B/ of currenoes, Infomtatton 
M/ by fax 02-21 534 16 68 
V/ ftMgWTtfa 20277 

SERVICED OFFICES 


YOUR HEAD QUARTERS 
ADDRESS 
YOUR OFFICE 

ON M USSES MOST 
FKE5TTGKXIS AVEWJE 

WITH A FUU. 56TV7CE 

Phone, Fax, Telex, 

muftimgual secretory 

COMMKOAL ADDRESS 
OFFICES & MST1NG ROOMS 
RATALS 

hcu. tidf-day, (toy and week. 

INFORMATION fa 32-2-534 02 77 


FEW 

YOUR OFRCE IN PARIS 


VOICE 4 FAXBQX IN BIUSSB5 Orth. 
$33/moinh, tonfidentirffiy gvorotoed, 
available 24724 far round ** gk^te 
LA 32-2-223-y ig, fa 219-1047 

NEW YORK SERVICED OFFICES 
And Corporate Idenerv'M 5ervtee 
from SIQO/monh. REGENT Tel [31 ^ 
572-B3Q1 or Fat 712-572-8304 USA. 

YOUR ADDRESS near Chomps Bnea 
LSP. hfncB I95H 5/i»cTArtM 75CC8 

Ports, Tel <11 GSfitOt fa <56 ^35 

LONDON, WIMKXE ST. office CZCQ 
per watk. Mail, fax. phjita «. TeL 44 
71 t>37 4722 Fax 44 71 637 44j) 

LOFTON MARBLE ARCH Mrt F®<, 
FTtaxta, Telex, W#„ semc«l offices. 
Tel 71 723 3773 or fa 71 724 5766 

YOUR OfflOE IN LONDON 
Bend Street. See ii and vouH take <« 
Tri 44 71 499 9192 fa 71 499 7517 


LV-'l. 'll- ' 


per watk. Mail, fox. phene etc TeL 44 
71 637 4722 Fax 44 71 637 4429 



Master Franchises Available 



| Ziebart TidyCar is the recognized brand name for a suc- 
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P.O.Box 1290 ■ Troy, Ml 48007-1290 USA 
TEL- 1-810-588-4100 • FAX; 1-810-588-0718 


INTERNATIONAL 
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OPPORTUNITIES 



,ff>i ?rM*> 
;***-'" ' 


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8,500 Stores Open in 
18 Countries 

Master Franchises 
Available 


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Tel 1-206-284-8600 
Fax 1-206-282-6666 



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Franchise UPDATE has just what you need. 

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or order by VISA or MasterCard by faxing your 
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approval s^«afun? to: 408-997-9377 (USA) 


telecommunications 


WORLDWIDE CALL BACK SYSTEM 

rrc 

International Telephone Company 

IF YOU LIVE OR TRAVEL OVERSEAS YOU KNOW 
HOW EXPENSIVE TELEPHONE CALLS CAN BE PUT 
. EXTRA CASH BACK INTO YOUR POCKET WITH 

rres cost saving call back service 

ITC's call back system is the most complete, reliable and 
flexible telephone service available. 

• Large Savings over Direct Calls Through Foreign 
Telephone Companies 

• Overseas Callers Pay U.S. Rates 

• Access to Ail U.S. 800 Numbers 

• Requires Absolutely No Installation 

• Itemized Real Time Billing 

» No monthly minimum charge 

Call, write or fax us for more information on how to save up 
• to 65% of your international telephone- cosLs! 

DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED WORLDWIDE 

International Telephone Company 

290 Praii Street Meriden, CT 06450-2118 
1-800-638-5558 exi. 101 or 203-238-9794 Fax: 203-929-1906 
Call for joor qualification for free minutes! 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 

BANK PURCHASE ORDERS, KTTi or 
OmShood SWIFT i efaSt C-.-ntoo 
by Fox only Londoi 71 B3? iiflt. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


PROJECT FINANCE 
VENTURE CAPITAL 

A rafcblf fioni 
One mJ&on US Dodcn pha 
repa/men! (era Tleee to Ter vrers. 
TeL I NT. + 5995-G453 '43667 
fa INT + 5WS4344* 

(ST. MAARTEN] 


ESTABU5FS) WORLD CLASS itoonnq 

fos&y baled m Vermcrt leetmg 
partn er^) for plowed faneu etpan- 
wxi Tartiushc poXntal aid busier 
growth opportunity Near moor ski 
oreta. TeUJSA: 8jg-2tf-5ffi& 

GOLD & CURRENCIES 


f BUYING GOLD: 

nor refined, n powder, 
Ftamerts. fragroenK, e»c_ 
Al quantifies, make offers 

*V fax (33-? 554 11 53 
Begum. Telex: 20277 


perwrefirced tafepkotxi lereos 

YOUR A008E5S near OPERA 1st dens 
buutaa oddfen, fat pfiene number 

BURO CLUB HCANCfi MADCLBNE 
17 &d Madeline - Pars 9di 
Tet 33 1-« 51 W 80 Fax 33 1 -44 SI B0 81 


BRUSSELS 

Alpha + 

A taxm center wWi a 
canpMi taiga af wvlre 

Elegantly fureahed offices and 
neehag room fnuMngua! tatephore 
oicwenng service (tad secretarial, fax- 

A»enue Lauisr 207 Bn 10 
1050 Bnnseh. 

Tefc 32JL645.09.il 
fa 3 2. 2. 646.42. 66 


YOUR OFFICE IN PARIS 

a ready when yea need Ft, 
•van far a crwpto of boon. 

• Ful Functional ntooere offices 

and conference rooms to rare by Ihe 
hew, day, month, etc... 

■ Your ndfa o> permanent bow 

• prestige fflOjkn^ oddresi. AB services 

91, Fg St-Honore 75008 PARIS 

10 pi fi.71.363i. Fax 11) 4266.15^0 


COMMERCIAL 
& INVESTMENT 
PROPERTIES 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


PARS 716 - BAG. Chcrmmg 30 sqjn 
2-room office, beams, etooexx. arret, 

around fbor. FVaifale lew FjXU'aa. 
Tel- 1.45 *9 03 «. fa 105 44 8860 . 

SALES 


PRORTAB1E STEAXHOUSE/nX-teaX 

rataurarfi, first doss kxanco, Anneo 
tt&oa (40tou Grand FrAr feeroed 
bar, rcSMurm searmq 1(0 mnmum 
Resiaurarv bwldng, vda and grounds 
far ufie. Price FFo M Owner dnecl 
fa 031 5052 6018 Tel (331 SOS: 4813 

FRANCE. B£D ■ BREAKFAST: Gusnns 
6/ or Pleaswe. Spectacular anart ul- 
lage home, 6 bedrocna. 5 bathroom, 
terrace, vcw near Aaen Pravenre 
SIM Owner TeL (33) 42 K 87 1’ or 
fa a* -IIB B7 37 brochure 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 


Investment Opportunity in Munich 

Ideal location in ciry centre. 

Completely rented out, commercial tenants only Ishops/offices). 
3,200 sq.ra. Some renovation needed to be in mint condition. 

Far more m/arrruuum, frlease uriu to: 

Bax 3693. 1.H.T . . Friedrichstr. 15, D-6C323 Frankfurt, Germany. 


• Andros Island, Bahamas 

140,000 m 7 oceanfront 
For Sale 1.2 Hio $ 

•USA - Whitefish lake, 
Montana, ski mart area 
Is! Class Hotel/Resort 
Invest I0.S Hio $ 

• Florida Shopping Centers 

Manner Real Estate 
TeL- (49) 089 / 793 79 73 
Fax: (49) 089 / 793 84 91 


BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 


SCULPTURE WORLD™ 

Discover A Gold Mine in 
New Aery 

YouTransfoi 
Posters Into 
That Sells frt 
S100-S2,00< 

Great Profit < 

Return Potenl 
No Direct Sato 
Required 

AB EijulpmantfFuO Control 

Investment SI 5- 525,000 

71 6-691-1 750 

FAX: 716-691-1766 



U.S. MFC SEEKING 
MASTER DISTRIBUTION 

Do you have auto prts or FfeO equip dlst? 
H so, you owe it to your co & lie pubtic ta 
offer pard lech brsakthru MAGNE71ZER 
Fuel & Water Eneirtsers for fuel savings 
& pofcifcn control. Territories avail USA 
215-76M6C0 Fax 786-7320 


YOUR PARTNER IN ITALY (Florence) 

Are you planning to distribute your products or to estabflsh a subsidiary in Italy? 
We offer you partnership, co-operation or the distribution of your products. 
Correspondence in itaBan, Engtsh, French, German. Well estabtished Italian 
company. Furnished offlces/offtce services available. 

For further Information please co n tact; Box No. 3691 , D4T, 
Friedrichstr. 15, D-60323 Frankfurt, Germany, Fax: +49-69-727310 


•HOW TO LEGALLY* 
OBTAIN DUAL NATIONALITY 

Daowiir jeacsofdMl KMo&rt Mtonr ICO 
cowrie eunioed ito heaxnr a tL (PREVIOUS 
TAX PAYER). MlfcgjnyjiiBfuxc.pwawneas 
md luult Durov cr ibe ixsider fans ahow lax 
toms sad brai p becone j Iqal TAX EXE£. 

Far your FREE BROCHURE and PRI- 
VACY NEWS LETTER that wffl bdp 
ro»k» and kcuxi jobt atone? write to! 
Scape Inti Ltd. Bax 4.W7. ' 

Fortscide Home - ForeaLJe 

Rambiids Ctofic - Hiss ■ P09SEE - UX. 
Td.: + 44 705 63I7SI ■ Rw: + 44 70S 631322 


1 OFFSHORE WORLDWIDE 

Ready made companies (shells) 

• full management 

• address services 

F*n brvtberr 

INTERCOMPANY MANAGEMENT 

RO. Box 160, W3 Manren 

v nfeh .1 Uechrensrdn 

Far 41-75-373 -W63 
iL sm 1979 


Swiss Company for Sale 

Established In 1970 - Clean balance sheet 

Excellent opportunity for export-import, 
real estate, financial services. PR. 
advertising.. .and related businesses. 

Offices In prime location In Lausanne 

For further information please contact: 

Tel.: 41-21-312 35 12 - FAX: 41-21-320 23 70 


Win op to 10 Million DM 

by taking part nr a German Lottery 
for further delate pfease contact: 
German Lottary Marquardt 
POB 10 12 07 

D-63012 Offenbach Germany 
TeL + 49 6102 320986 
Fax: + 49 6102 39329 

only ualld wharg teqrt 


Business 

Message 

Ceivter 

Every Wednesday 

Contact Philip Oma 
Tel.: (33-1) 46 37 93 36 
Fax: (33-1) 46 37 93 70 
or your nearest LHT office 
or representative 


INVEST IN GERMANY NOW! 

■feiofe H'.is ism?" 


niriftni 


SERVICED OFFICES 


NEW YORK CITY 

BoflanBy Appointed QfBow 
for toe demaidtog Executive. . 
In lha heart or Manhattan 

Alliance 


PrafoxtoanoRyStcrted Fumtehscl 
* Equipped OMcm & Suites 

230 Park Avenue 

Premier USA acttBSS 

C13972-S7PQ fa C212) 808-3020 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


WE ARE READY FOR THE EEC 

As a renowned haulage contractor in Austria, we 
offer you the opportunity to build up or expand 
your business in Austria. 

Spacious warehouses, offices as well as a 
widespread distribution in Austria will support 
your project. 

For more information please contact- 
RWF Fri'meft H<?c/ipn/riLMfr Werbetjesellsliaft mi.H., VcldererWeg 16, 
A-61 12 WflUrns. T J. ; +43-5224-52785. 


SECURITIES WHOLESALER 
"BOILER ROOM EXPERTS” 

Vendors of shares and high yield 
debentures {Swiss Franc Denominates) 
in dynamic growth Company rctjuircs 
asaaance if maiteting ineif desirable 
instruments to (he European and Ui. 
investor markets at large. 
Introductions to brokers and/or 
assistance in establishment of own 
sales operations sought. 

Please contact 
Mr. Franks in Switzerland: 
Phone: ++41/25/543939 
Fax: ++41/25/343947. 


OFFSHORE BANKS 

• Merchont/oonunotoal bonk 

• Accept deposits 

• Clone A ficenco 

• No quafifkntkta roquiroreerta 

• No kscaar treaties 

• Total anonymity 

» Boarar shares O.K. 

• Nominee directors O.K. 

■ bnmettok: deinery 

- OSS 15,000 or £25,000 with o 
tan! cempany 

Caff or fax for free details I 

Ron Jensen 

London TeL T1 394 S157 Fu 71 231 9923 
Canada Tel. 304 948 3181 Fax M2 3179 


P0N0M0 

As one of the most experienced offshore 
jurisdictions. Panama continues to offer 
its traditional advantages for doing 
business ihnnieh Panamanian offshore 
companies. Oar experience and 
efficiency guarantee? Tut. reliable and 
accurate service. 

Write for a free brochure on the 
advantages of Panamanian companies, 
convenient ship registration and 
mmpjgny managemmL 

EVIT CORPORATION 
P.O. Box 7392 

Panama 5, Republic of Panama 
Telephone: f507l 6.V63O0 
Telex: 2708 PC 
Telefax 1507) 63-6392/64-8000 



OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
INSURANCE/REINSURANCE 
COMPANIES OFFSHORE BANKS 
ASSET/INCOME PROTECTION 
62 years established - providing 
professional sonnees irnomanonaBy 
tor an types of business 
ASTON CORPORATE 
TRUSTEES 
19 Peel Road. Douglas. 

Isle of Man. Ml 4LS 
Tef 0624 6*591 
Fa* 06W 625126 
or London Tet (71)222 8866 
Fax. (71)233 1519. 


]i;Ag[ 

Old German 

Royal House 

15 offering a financialhj sound 
personality the opportunity to 
okain a title of 
NOBILITY. 

Tel. +49-89-201 5142 
Fax +49-89-2013597 


SWITZERLAND 

PRIVATE SELLS 

23 TUI COMMOCUL COMPANY 

in the field of 

exdBstve Hair and Cosmetic Products. 
Wett-esmbUshed customer baste Complete 
WraSnttture Indoding large stooge 
opacity and show room * 2 subsidiaries. 
Modem equipment loyal and experienced 
ptwp of staff as wel as experienced 
management 

Price: SFr 2.400.000 - 
Contact 

Thtapex AccoohHbk- M r. K. Betscfuut ! 
UniermOll 7. CH-oJ02 ZUC 
Fax: +4 1-423 1.44.6Q. 


Tax-Free US. 


ILS. Attorneys! 

fummctn'GTc NmdJ our speculrr Semnr in 
dl te Sates ijuanmcr el ctitnpttr inoorotirt. 

flfttr U5. address with pbnrc X ta rarrice, 
office setTkes. U5 hank icrooms t'5 cuuns 
m v tflirants, cnmjAne foal acmes & 
isststince lodudinj; nrc nurkri entry h 
tanigntion. Ptewe requrst our fore bfodiure, 
mftUe m Eaptoh iirarmaa 

Dr. Jut. WQliam A. Wright 
Attorney at law 
U.5 Cutpontion Senices. inc 
34.V) BautKnal Drive. Suite »Ifl. 
SacramentP. Calif omb oss’t 
ms Fax (USA) 916/783-3005 eb 


YOUR BUSINESS 
IN EUROPE 

Establishing and Expanding 
by Professionals 
Zander Business Development 
Fax: (Germany) +49-21 1 -591240 


f A VERY SPECIAL OPPOKTUNIIY ^ 

We are a well cslabtiahcd U.K. Company with peat potential a deep caring for 
people and the environment and a strong desire for our business to beoro- 
actlw hi creating a belter world. r 

To enable us to capitalize on our success we now need a financial 
baicfortCHV Investor who shares the same values and sense of commitment to 
achieve a Company of lasting influence. 


Please untie to Bax No. 1355. The International ffm wM Ttfbitnp 
63. LengAcre. London WC2E SUE 









Page IS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14,1994 


SPORTS 


\«;U 


Maccabi Plays 
Bremen to Tie 


Compiled by Oie Staff From Dtepaidta 
Maccabi Tel Aviv and SV 
Werder Bremen played to a 
scoreless de Tuesday in Tel 
Aviv in their first-leg, first- 
round match of the European 


Cup Winners’ Cup tournament. 
The German league leaders. 


the German league leaders, 
struggling in the hot, humid 
Mediterranean afternoon, had 
goalkeeper Oliver Reck to 
thank for a series of outstand- 
ing saves in a lively first half. 

In one three-minute period. 
Reck parried powerful shots 
from Gad Bromer, Avi Nimni, 
and Victor Belkin. 

While centerback Michael 
Schulz had the best of Israeli 
striker Alon Mizrahi and 
Werder’s Wynton Rufer looked 
threatening in attack, the Ger- 
mans lost control of the mid- 
field to Maccabfs Russian im- 
ports Belkin and Yuli 
Choukanov. 

Neither side could maintain 
the pace throughout the second 
period, although Maccabi came 
dose twice in a late flourish. 

“We played better,” said 
Maccabi captain Nir Klinger, 
adding: “But I'm sure the Ger- 
mans will play differently in 
their home field” in next 
month’s second-leg match in 
Bremen. 

Some 10,000 fans attended at 
Ramai Gan stadium outside 
Tel Aviv. 

Belkin, Mizrahi and Noam 


breaking away for a late goal 
that could prove decisive. The 
French now need only to win by 
1-0 at home in the return match 
to qualify. 

Nicolas Ouedec gave Nantes 
a 28th minute lead, but the Rus- 
sians, making their European 
debut then scored three tunes 
and were denied a fourth. 

Vladimir Geraschenko and 
Sergey Nechai headed in from 
the comas as the Nantes de- 
fenders and goalkeeper David 
Marraud faded to cover. 

Then Ole^ Veremikov's 25- 
meter free-kick deflected off a 
defender and caught Marraud 
on the wrong foot. 

Veretnikov slammed a loose 
ball into the net for a fourth 
goat but Hungarian referee 
Sandor Vaxga ruled a foul had 
already been committed. 

• Jean-Pierre Papin made a 
sad return to the Parc des 
Princes when he failed a fitness 
test that ruled him out of Bay- 
ern Munich’s European Cup 
match Wednesday with Paris 
Sl Germain. 

The French striker, recover- 
ing from a knee operation, 
trained briefly with his German 
teammates at the Parc des 
Princes, where he has scored so 
many great goals for France, 
but left the find well before his 
colleagues. 

(AP. Reuters. AFP) 



Norman Hospitalized- 
For Intestinal Illness 


■ V- - 


Compiled by Oar Staff From DtSpOdta 

GAINSVILLE* Virginia — Greg Norman has a serious 
intestinal mn«ss tha t has forced him to withdraw from the 
President's Cup international matches this week, the interna- 
tional team’s captain, David Graham, said Tuesday. 

Graham said Norman was in Houston being treated for- a 
very, very serious hemorrhoid condition.” ' . 

Sources who asked not to be identified said Norman, 39, 
had a very serious case of hemorrhoids that became infected 
after they were treated surgically two weeks ago* 

Norman, the No. 2-ranked player in the world, has not 
played since the World Senes of Golf two weeks ago. 

A source dose to Norman said he underwent surgery 
shortly after the World Series and since bad lost 13 pounds 

(5.S kilograms). . . . 

Norman, who underwent the surgery near his home m 
Florida, entered the University of Texas Health Science 
Center in Houston on Monday night. 

“Mr. Norman has been experiencing persiste nt gas trointes- 
tinal symptoms with abdominal cr ampin g, intermittent wa- 




HataLuL Lcvoon ' Renters 


Maccabi goalkeeper Alexander Ouvarov was waiting when Bremen's Wynton Rufer headed the bail during their match. 


mail. . . . . 

“He has been advised that he cannot continue any physical 
activity for approximately three weeks,” the statement contin- 
ued. 

Graham said Norman would be replaced by fellow Austra- 
lian Bradley Hughes on the 12-man international team that 
will play a U.S.team in matches here this weekend. 

“This is a major disappointment and certainly a blow to the 
team," Graham said. 

Earlier in the day, organizers announced that Norman had 
withdrawn from next week's Lancome Cup event in France. 
Graham, who had been in frequent contact with Norman for 
the past several days, said the Australian was also withdraw- 
ing from at least two more tournaments in the coming weeks. 

“It is a great disappointment that I have to withdraw from 
the President’s Cup for medical reasons,” Norman said in a 
statement from the hospital in Houston. (Reuters, AP) 


irla-i 


Shoham received yellow cards. 

• I n one of the day’s earlier 
UEFA Cup matches, French 
league leader Nantes paid the 
price for some defensive lapses 
as it lost, 3-2, in the first round 
at Rotor Volgograd. 

Names could easily have lost 
by three goals, and Chadian 
striker Japhet NDoram made 
the Russians pay for their own 
lapse of concentration by 


In Amsterdam, European Stage Set for Drama 


TFT *77 T 


International Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — Ruud Gullit's return to play 
in Amsterdam is a real-life drama of the 


European Cup Scores 


UEFA CUP 
FInl Round. First Loo 
Admlra Wockor 4, Gomlk 2 
AnorttMds X AtNotlC Bilbao 0 
CSKA Sofia X Juvontus 2 
GKS Katowtco 1. Arts Salonika 0 
Apollon 1, FC 5tal 3 
FC T monte 1. Kbpoot Homed 4 
Boavlsta Z MvPa 1 
Rotor Voleoorod X NcnW 2 
Slovan Broiblovo 1. FC Cawthagm 0 
Trobzortsoor Z Dinamo Bucharest l 
Rapid Bwdiarost 2. FC Owterol 0 
Tmmo TMUI 1. FC Tirol 0 
Sorussta Dortmund 1. Motherwell 0 
Tekstlkhik Kamydilna 4. Bekescsdnl 1 
Dyna mo Minsk 0. Lazio Rome, 0 
Vitesse Arnhem L Parma 0 
AIK Mno a Slovto Prows 0 

CUP WINNERS' CUP 
First Round, Firs! Lee 
Mac c aM Tel Aviv 0. Werder Bremen 0 


International 

Recruitment 


in Amsterdam is a real-life drama of the 
kind that would get a playwright certified. 

To some, Gullit is the Judas of Dutch 
soccer, the star who walked out on his col- 
leagues and his nation in the final month of 
World Cup preparation. Without Gullit, the 
Netherlands lost to Brazil; with him, claim 
the critics, Holland would have beaten Brazil. 

I doubt that, but though the World Cup is 
history the rancor still festers. Moreover, 
Gullit, while on the attack for AC Milan 
in Wednesday _ ^ ^ — ^ ^ , 
evening’s Eu- Rob # 

rS Hughes fW 

match, will be 

directly opposed by Frank Rijkaard in the 
defense of Ajax Amsterdam. 

This is where the plot thickens, borders on 
the incredible. It is as if Gullit and Rijkaard, 
soul brothers, are suddenly set to a dual at 12 
paces — except that if they drift that far apart 
on the field, Rijkaard might let GulHt in to 
score. 

They are, when they want to be, extremely 
sensitive, highly articulate men. Gullit is ex- 


Every Thursday 
Contact 
Philip Oma 
Tel.: (331) 
46 3793 36 
Fax: (331) 
46 37 93 70 


pansive, Rijkaard often withdrawn, but the 
depths of feelings that each will carry into 
separate locker rooms on Wednesday might 
be beyond expression. 

It would take a mathematician of genius to 
work out the odds against two performers 
among the tens of millions who play soccer 


bang drawn together in this way. Gullit and 
Rijkaard were like two peas in apod, Amsier- 


or your nearest 
(HT office 


or representative 


Rijkaard were luce two peas in apod, Amsier- 
damers bora to Dutch mothers and Surinam- 
ese fathers in the same September 32 years 
ago. 

Each grew strong and tall, each to proudly 


display black roots through dread) ocked 
hairstyles. 

They had more than 60 appearances to- 
gether in the orange uniform of Netherlands 
soccer, and many more as youth and imder- 
21 team players. They blossomed together, 
became millionaires together, reaped the 
spoils of Italian riches in games around the 
globe for Milan. 

When one was injured, the other may not 
have shared the pain or been asked to give 
blood. But as friends, as comforters, as men 
who understood the private doubts and con- 
cerns of the sidelined athlete, they were closer 
than brothers. 

The parting came a year ago when Milan’s 
Dutch era was deemed to be over. Marco Van 
Basten, their colleague was and is hors de 
combat with ankle injuries, the result of years 
of abuse from opponents' boots and the 
dreaded injections of pain killing drugs, from 
which he may not recover. 

And when Silvio Berlusconi, the paymaster 
at Milan, was persuaded that Gullit would 
also never recapture his form after a horren- 
dous knee injury, Ruud was sold to Samp- 
doria. Rijkaard, polite in his wording but 
determined to go his own way before he too 
was a figure of rejection, decided to control 
his own destiny. 

He had all the money he needed. He was 
tired of the Italian life in which the hand that 
slaps the back one day inevitably holds a 
dagger. Berlusconi begged him to stay, Rij- 
kaard demured and set his own path toward 
retirement: a two-year deal with his Erst club, 
Ajax. 

His $1.1 million contract is by some way 
the most lucrative Ajax has ever granted a 
player, but with its phenomenal record of 
schooling apprentices for the open market, 
the Amsterdam academy (for it is more than 


a dub) reckoned Rijkaard was the perfect 
elder statesmen for its youth. 

Life in the relatively slow lane is suiting 
Rijkaard. He is adamant that this is his last 
season but, haying guided Ajax to the Dutch 
league championship, having agreed to sacri- 
fice his midfield yearnings for the defensive 
role coaches have long tried to pin on him, 
Rijkaard is in good shape. 

H E SCORED a spectacular goal in Ajax.’ s 
5-0 thrashing of Vitesse Arnhem last 
Saturday, scored a goal and secured the re- 
treat while Ron De Boer and the Nigerian 
Finidi George pulverized the opposition’s 
goal and Marc Overmars teased on the wings. 

So Ajax feels it is at the peak of early 
season readiness. It feels willing and able to 


take on the European champion Milan. 
Milan, by contrast, is suflerine. Even 


Milan, by contrast, is suffering. Even Van 
Basten aside, it has half its players under 
medical care. Forwards Marco Simone and 
Dejan Savicevic are unfit, midfielder Stefano 
Eranio is out, stopper Alessandro Costacurta 
has torn a muscle, and Paolo Maldini, the 
finest left back in die world, is also doubtful 
for the Amsterdam match. 

Much depends on Gullit After a season of 
personal triumph in Genoa with Sampdoria, 
he played hard to get but eventually could not 
resist Berlusconi’s call to kiss and make up in 
Milan. The way it is in Italy, the presidential 
whim (not to mention the prime ministerial 
persuasion and the Berlusconi purse) over- 
rides the designs of the coach. 

Fabio Capello had not only retained the 
Italian Serie A title with his own brand of 
pragmatic football, he had produced a 
breathtaking team performance to devour 
Barcelona in the European Cup final in Ath- 
ens this year. But whether he liked it or not, 
he was told Gullit was returning, so accom- 
modate him 


So far, so amicably good. Gullit’s physical 
soundness, and his restored appetite for ac- 
tion are currently the best friend a Milan 
coach has. Last Sunday, when the weakened 
Milan was held to a 1-1 draw in Cagliari, it 
was a goal from the Dutch master that saved 
his team’s point. 

He can soar close to the heights of bis 
youth, as he showed repeatedly on his person- 
al mission in the year with Sampdoria. He can 
sink toward self-doubt, and doubt his team- 
mates, to the degree that he abandoned the 
Dutch World Cup in a mood not even Gullit 
can fully explain. 

Rijkaard, if anyone, will be the closest to 
understanding. But rather than support his 
erstwhile pal, Rijkaaid’s purpose this evening 
will be to undermine him, to best him in the 
air and on the ground, to deny his every twist 
andturm 

Television will show their dual in close-up 
but, thank goodness, we Europeans are not 
yet into wiring opponents for sound. We can 
scan their faces, read into their clashes what- 
ever we will, judge them man for man ax the 
heart of a team game. 

There is a degree of privacy, of mystery 
without which the contest would be the poor- 
er. It is our prerogative to read into a band 
shake or a foul tackle what we will; it is theirs 
to draw the curtain on us, at least until the 
next time. 


Schumacher Denies Rift 


FRANKFURT (AP) — Miclus| Schu- 
macher, through a spokesman, denied reports 
Tuesday that the suspended Formula One 
leader intends to quit the Benetton team at 
the end at the season. 

Several Swiss and German publications 
reported that Schumacher’s lawyers had giv- 
en a letter to Benetton before the Italian. 
Grand Prix at Monza last weekend notifying! 
the Britain-based team that Schumacher in- 
tends to break his contract. 

A Benetton spokeswoman in London also 
denied the reports and said the team had not 
heard from Schumacher’s lawyers on the 
matter. 


Lee: Still Going to Games 

TAIPEI (AP) — President Lee Teng-hui. 
said Tuesday hie remains determined to at- 
tend next month’s Asian Games in Hiroshi- 
ma, despite the. illicit withdrawal of his 
invitation. 

“So far, the Olympic Council of Asia's 
invitation to President Lee remains un- 
changed; so does President Lee’s plan to 
attend the Games,” the presidential spokes- 
man Chang Ping-nan said. 


IEBOARO 


Rob Hugha hat the staff cf The Tima. 


For die Record 


To our roodo r i In Berlin 

You con now receive the IHT 
hand delivered to your home or office 
every morning on the doy of publication, 
just call us toll free at 0130 84 85 85 


Musasfahn&rn, the American ozeki (cham- 
pion) bidding for promotion to sunups high- 
est rank after winning the last tournament, 
was upset Tuesday on the third day of the 15- 
dayAutunm Grand Sumo tournament. (AP) 
The Hockey HaH of Fame said that, for the 
first time, no player had received enough 
votes for induction this year. (AP) 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1994 



B , SPORTS 

tinnl'rn''^ 804 Sides Awaitil, g 

"hty Baseball’s Closing Act 


Page 19 



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The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Officials on both sides of the 
major league baseball strike said Tuesday that it was 
inevitable that the season would be can ce l ed . 

. “We're either very dose to the end or within a day 

or two,” the acting commissioner, Bud Sdig, said 
Monday night when be was interviewed at halftime 
on ABC’s “Monday Night Football” 

Sehg said he had spoken with most of the clubs 
about a decision to cancel the rest of the season. And 
while the owners and striking players did plenty of 
talking Monday, none of it was to each other. 
Appearing on NBC-TVs “Today” program Tues- 
; day morning, the head of the union, Donald Fehr, 
. and Richard Ravitch, management’s chief negotia- 
tor, continued to each blame the other side for the 
failure to reach an agreement. 

**We have bees far more amenable to compromise 
. and what we have been told is the players will not 
agree to any constraint whatsoever on players’ com- 
; pensations,” Ravitch said. 

. There is see m i ng ly almost a rush, and in some 
(L cases a gleeful rush to put an end to it all and I 
* expect Bud to do that,” Fehr said. 


By George Vecsey 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — This is failure. This is sheer. 

flagrant, blatant failure. When the owners pull 
the plug on the major league baseball season, they 
will be confirming one of the great public miscalcu- 
lations ever committed in this pan of the world. 

They will be forever redefining a sport, a business, 
a way of life, a national pastime, as it used to be 

called, but can never 

be again. „ . 

They bought into a Vantage 
century of baseball the Point 

way nouveau-riche 

gangsters and junk-mail specialists buy into historic 
estates. Now they are preparing to cheapen that 
heritage by closing it down for this season, for the 
foreseeable future. They must live with the conse- 
quences, these Reinsdoffs and Seiigs. 

The owners soiled their own campground by call- 
ing for an artificial device called a salary cap. bv 
prodding the union to strike in August. The union is 
also at fault, for not finding a way, early in the game, 
of letting the owners know they were serious about 
not accepting this salary cap, for not coming up with 
some kind of alternative. But make no mistake, this 
disruption in baseball is the owners’ doing. 



There is no guarantee of a 1995 season, none at 
all. If the owners don’t trust each other now to 
distribute their huge profits more equitably, why 
should they trust each other next spring? They have 
gotten themselves into this bind by spending foolish- 
ly in the past two decades, and now they have asked 
their labor supply to solve their problem for them. 
Ugly days are ahead. 

There arc unpalatable scenarios of strike-breaking 
or rival leagues. I say neither will work. But first the 
public must say “Never again” to these owners. The 
only weapon the public has now is to cut off the dole. 

These owners have sponged off us because alleg- 
edly responsible adults (like me, maybe you) drooled 
at the very mention of Op ening Day ana Babe Ruth 
and bleachers and Henry Aaron and World Series. 
Those magic words don’t work anymore. 

Congress has other chores, of course, but some- 
where there must be time and energy to repeal the 
antitrust exemption the baseball owners have en- 
joyed. 

And while we’re at it, every municipality should 
re-examine its tax laws and public-events policies. 
New York City has been thinking of upgrading the 
roads and train stations and parking around Yankee 
Stadium for a man from Tampa named Sleinbren- 


ner. Instead, how about a health clinic and a gymna- 
sium and a soup kitchen on stricken 129th Street in 
Manhattan, the subject of a haunting series in The 
New York Times tins past week? How about taking 
police officers off traffic duty at ball games and 
putting them in neighborhoods, so fewer children 
will be killed by stray bullets? 

I T IS TIME to re-examine our attitude toward 
baseball Yes, I felt a wave of nostalgia toward 
basebalL Yes, I would have welcomed it back, but 
that was io avoid this gap in history w-e now face. In 
all our lifetime, there has always been a World 
Series. But if the owners can tinker with that, we 
must ask ourselves just what we want from baseball. 

Do we want a Scab League? Yes, the players will 
become desperate as they run out of money, as they 
run out of things to do. Real life is going to intrude 
itself on these relatively unformed, untrained, uned- 
ucated, sheltered, pampered, arro gan t, highly paid 
athletes soon enough. Some players will be desperate 
enough to scab for the baseball owners. But I submit 
that the union players — by turning down millions 
of dollars, by standing up to the take-it-or-Ieave-it 
tactics of the owners — nave earned the respect of 
organized labor. 1 do not see union workers letting 
the owners operate a Scab League next spring. 


What about a rival league? Puh-leeze. The Tunes 
did all of us a favor Sunday bv running a photo of 
Donald (Combs His Hair With Buttered Toast) 
Trump, the once and future bogeyman of all upstart 
leagues. Sure, Donald would love to dabble in a rival 
baseball league. Sure, Donald would love to have his 
name in the paper. What else does he have to do? 
But baseball fans won't have much to do with a W.S. 
Wolcott Medicine Show League. Come see Jo Jo the 
Dog- Faced Boy. Come see the Bearded Lady. Come 
see the New York Trumps. I don’t t hink so. 

No, the charm of baseball has always been its 
continuity. You take a friend from France or India 
to a ball game and you point out that people have 
been playing in the' same leagues, in many of the 
same cities, for a century. Your friend from overseas 
won’t understand the infield fly rule (heck. Mel 
Allen never could explain it, either) but your friend 
from overseas can respect tradition, can understand 
history. 

Now these owners are about to sever history. They 
axe about to make immense mischief. They must live 
with it. When they go out in public, these owners 
must brace themselves for the whispers or maybe 
even the audible heckling that will follow than: 
“The men who killed baseball” What a way to go 
down in hisioty. What a failure. 


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NBA’s Tour 
Of Far East 
Starts Monday 


NFL Scoring Soaring , 
New Rules May Help 


Cunningham, on 3 TD Passes, Gets Eagles by Bears 



wmhi'r Denies ft 

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The Associated Press 

BEIJING — The pros of the 
National Basketball Associa- 
tion are coming to the Chinese 
capital for an exhibition game 
next week before continuing on 
to South Korea and Japan. 

The Nike Hoop Heroes Tour 
. win bring the Charlotte Hor- 
nets’ star center Alonzo Mourn- 
ing to Beijing as well as Seoul 
and Yokohama, Japan. 

Mourning will be joined by 
Anfemee Hardaway of the Or- 
lando Magic, Jerome Kersey of 
the Portland Trail Blazers, Walt 
- Williams of the Sacramento 
' Kings and Lindsey Hunter of 
. the Detroit Pistons. 

The players are to arrive in 
• Beijing on Monday. The next 

' day they are to practice and 

»f\!L ‘ '"’i public appearances to 

n ya i :r - .... \ .. Wstramlate interest in basketball 
** * and teach skills to Chinese play- 
ers. 

They are to play on exhibi- 
tion game Sept. 21 against a 
team of Chinese Basketball As- 
sociation players before travel- 
ing to Seoul for clinics and an 
exhibition game on SepL 23. In 


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New York Times Serriee 
NEW YORK — In what may 
be a trend related to the rule 
changes, for the second week 
NFL point production was up 
over last season. 

In the 13 games played Sun- 
day, 537 points were scored, an 
average of 41 J a game. In the 
second week of last season. 14 
games produced 461 points, an 
average of 32.9. On opening 
weekend, the 28 teams scored 
652 points, an average of 46.6 a 
game, as compared with 587 
points (41.9 a game) in 1993. 

Are defenses this far behind 
the offenses? Or are offenses 
making better use of the new 
rules, particularly the one that 
allows offensive linemen to line 
up off the line of scrimmagefor 
better pass blocking, and the 
rule that forbids defensive backs 
to bump receivers five yards past 
the line of scrimmage? 

Six quarterbacks threw for at 
least 300 yards, including Drew 
Bledsoe of the Patriots, who has 
passed for 300 yards or more in 
nis last three regular-season 
games, the first time any Patriot 
quarterback has down that 
Unfortunately, it has come in 


Japan, they are to play an exhi- losing efforts. The last two 
bition game on SepL 25. weeks, the Patriots’ defease has 


been torched by 300-yard pass- 
ing games, by the Dolphins’ 
Dan Marino and the Bills’ Jim 
Kelly. 

Even more surprising than 
the offensive production is the 
group of teams that are off to 2- 
0 starts. The Giants, Jets, Seat- 
tle and San Diego all classify as 
surprises at this point of the 
season. 

Perhaps the biggest one is Se- 
attle, which whipped the Los 
Angeles Raiders, 38-9, on Sun- 
day. The Raiders (0-2) were 
considered a good bet to make 
the Super Bowl this year. 

This sets up some intriguing 
early matchups between unde- 
feated teams next week. The 
Jets play at Miami (2-0) for the 
best record in the American 
Football Conference East divi- 
sion and San Diego plays at 
Seattle in an AFC West game. 

• The 49ers’ offensive line 
wasn’t in the greatest shape 
heading into the game at Kan- 
sas City. Now, it is a shambles. 

Center Jesse Sapu’o went out 
with a pulled hamstring and 
guard Derrick Deese, a replace- 
ment for the already injured 
Ralph Tamm, was sidelined 
with a concussion, but returned. 



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K* Rerun! 

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Jlft * 
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Urn Han. 

_**■ i*;.*'- 
tafcn.fi 


SCOREBOARD 


James Joseph left Bears in his wake as the Eagles buret to a 30-0 lead, only to have the visitors score the next 22 points. 

NFL Players Getting Pay From ’ 87 Strike 


L*I»J 


NFL Standings 


AMERICAN CON PE REHCE 


Minnesota 

TanuwBov 


Atlanta 
LA Roma 
Son Francisco 
N«w Orleans 


1 1 
1 1 
west 
W L 
1 1 
1 1 
1 1 
0 2 


Miami 
N.Y- Jcto 
Buffalo 

Indlanopans 
Now Enstand 


Cleveland 

Pittsburgh 

Cincinnati 


Central 
W L T 

1 1 D 

1 1 0 

« 2 0 


Pts PF PA 
1JX» <3 49 
1-000 48 35 
JW 41 SI 
400 55 4S 
■000 70 77 

Pts PF PA 
400 38 37 
400 2ft 38 
.400 30 55 


r< 




■ 

'. Houston 

8 

2 

0 

JHO 

38 65 


Record 

PIS 



West 




1. Florida (27) 

Mfl 

1492 



W 

L 

T 

Pts 

PF PA 

2. Nebraska (221 

2-0-0 

1483 


Kansas City 

2 

0 

0 

MOO 

54 34 

3, Florida 3t_ (5] 

244 

U84 


* son Dieao 

2 

0 

0 

1JM0 

64 44 

4. Mien loan (2) 

344 

1470 


Z, Saattle 

2 

0 

a 

MOO 

66 16 

5. Miami (1) 

244 

MBS 


^ Etanver 

0 

2 

0 

JKO 

56 62 

6. Pann SI. (2) 

344 

var 


LA RaMers 

0 

3 

0 

jno 

S3 82 

7. Cotorado 

144 

1.116 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


& Notre Dame 

1-14 

IMS 




East 




9. Arizona (2) 

244 

um 



w 

L 

T 

Pts 

PF PA 

10. Wtsaxudn 

144 

M06 

0 

Dallas 

2 

0 

0 

1.000 

46 26 

11. Auburn 

244 

918 


' N.Y. Giants 

2 

0 

0 

UN 

48 40 

11 Alabama tl> 

244 

577 


* PhltodstaMa 

1 

1 

0 

JW 

S3 50 

13. UCLA 

344 

792 


[ Washtnoton 

1 

1 

D 

500 

« 52 

M. Texas AAM 

344 

TBS 

-(4 

Arlma 

0 

2 

0 

300 

39 34 

15. Tennessee 

1-14 

649 



Central 




16. North Carolina 

144 

587 



w 

L 

T 

Pts 

PF PA 

17. Texas 

244 

575 

- 

’ Chicaao 

1 

1 

0 

JOO 

43 39 

18. Vlralnla Tech 

244 

473 


□atratt 

1 

1 

8 

300 

34 38 

19. WasWngtoo 

1-14 

346 

• " *1 

Groan Bav 

1 

1 

0 

300 

30 34 

30. Southern Cal 

1-14 

335 


Mnmhiw'i Game 
PhllactelpnJa Jk Chicago 22 

The AP Top 25 

The Ton Twenty FTvt teams In The Associ- 
ated Press colira loelball poU, wild first- 
place votes la parentheses, records thrown 
Seat. IS, tehri points based on 25 points for e 
Brit ptaco vote throagb one petit fOr a 25H> 
place vote, nod ranking in the previous poll: 

Pv 
2 
l 
4 

4 

5 
8 
7 
3 
9 

HI 
12 
II 
13 
16 

19 
17 

20 
21 
25 


500 

20 19 

71. Okltdxxna 

1-14 

233 

15 

MO 

33 31 

22 Brtaham Young 

244 

197 




2X Ohio SL 

1-14 

ISO 

IB 

Pts 

PF PA 

24. Washington SL 

344 

130 


M0 

59 44 

25. N. Carolina St. 

244 

128 



M0 

27 43 

Others racsivtng voles: Kansas l(F. Kansas 

M0 

61 38 

State S3, Boston College 41 Bavtor 40. Illlnote 

M0 

41 *8 

32 Indiana 26, Georgia 2a Syracuse 16. Gem- 


gla Tech 12, Iowa II. San Dfeao State T1, vir- 
alnta II. Rutgers 8. West Vinrtnta 8, L5U 7. 
Utah 5. Stanford 4. damson X Pittsburoh 1, 
Western Mtchipan 1. 


ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Tottenham 1. Southampton 2 
Standi an: Newcastle 1 S points. Nottlnohom 
Forest 13, Blocntum 11. Liverpool 10, Man- 
chester United ML Leeds 10, Chelsea 9. Aston 
Villa 9, Tottenham 9, Manchester City 7, Nor- 
wich 6, Arsenal 5, Queens Park Rangers 5. 
Wimbledon 5, Southampton s, Sheffield 
Wednesday 4, letwich 4. Crystal Palace IWest 
Mam Z Coventry 2. Leicester 1. Ewcrfan t. 


rfa.-jrTr -T “T" 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK —The Nation- 
al Labor Relations Board has 
announced that NFL players 
will receive $30 million in back 
pay from the 1987 strike. 

The Players Association filed 
a complaint with the NLRB 
when striking players, who had 
agreed to return to their teams 
at the end of the walkout Ocl 


15. were not allowed to play in 
games on Oct. 18 and 19 be- 
cause they had not met an own- 
ers' imposed deadline to report. 

The NLRB ruled in 1992 that 
the owners’ acted illegally and 
awarded the players back pay. 

Joe Browne, the NFL vice 
president of communications, 
said the $30 million was set 
aside as part of the $200 million 


settlement of the Freeman 
McNeil lawsuit against the 
league in .1993 that paved the 
way for the collective bargain- 
ing agreement with the players. 

Gene Upshaw, the executive 
director of the Players Associa- 
tion. said NFL Commissioner 
Paul Tagliabue had recently 
agreed to pay the 1,300 players 
affected in the 1987 strike. 


The Associated Press 

PHILADELPHIA — For 
three periods, the Philadelphia 
Eagles were having a great time. 
So great that they nearly forgot 
to close out the Chicago Bears. 

Thanks to a vintage perfor- 
mance by Randall Cunningham, 
the Eagles won, 30-22 after tak- 
ing a 304) lead Monday night 
before they let the Bears storm 
back in the last 15 minutes. 

Cunningham threw three 
first-half touchdowns passes en 
route to his second 300-yard 
game. But instead of getting a 
well-earned rest in the fourth 
quarter, he had to come back 
with two key completions on 
the Eagles' final series to enable 
them to run out the clock. 

They finally ended a seven- 
game losing streak against the 
Bears. 

Cunningham threw for 250 
yards in the opening half, with 
two touchdown passes to Cal- 
vin Williams and one to Mau- 
rice Johnson. 

And he never cooled off. 
Cunningham finished 24-of-36 
for 311 yards in his 1 1th career 
300-yard passing effort He had 
344 yards in a loss to the New 
York Giants last week. 

“We really focused this 
week," he said. “We wanted to 
do the same thing last week, but 
we didn'L’’ 

Cunningham wasn’t the only 
star on a night when the Eagles 
did little wrong until the fourth 
quarter before a raucous crowd 
of 64,890 at Veterans Stadium. 
Williams had all six of his re- 
ceptions in the first half for 85 
yards, and Fred Barnett added 
eight catches for 102 yards. 

The defense shackled the Bears 
early, holding them to 70 yards 
and three first downs in the first 
30 minutes. By the time the Bears 
got their offense in gear, they had 
to fight back from a 30-0 deficit 
in the fourth quarter. 


Japanese Leagues 

Central League 

W L T PcL GB 

Yomiurt M 54 0 44 — 

Hiroshima 61 57 o 417 3 

Cnunlehl 59 57 0 409 4 

Hanstrin 59 58 0 504 iv, 

Yokohama 54 61 0 X70 BVj 

Yakut! 52 62 D AS# 10 

TutsdaYs Results 
ChunJcTtl 5, Hiroshima 3 
Yomlurl vs. Yakutt, ppCL rain 
Pacific League 
IN L T Pet GB 

Sefbu 17 a 0 483 — 

Klnletsu 62 51 2 449 4 

Orix 62 SI 2 449 4 

Pole! 60 55 1 422 7 

Lotts 48 65 1 425 18 

Nippon Ham 41 70 4 469 24 

Tuesday's Results 
No aames scheduled 


ONE DAY INTERNATIONAL 
Sri Lanka w Australia 
Tuesday, In Colombo 
Australia innings: 225-6 ISO overs) 

Sri Lanka innings. 1M-4 (34> overs) 
(Target reduced due to rain) 

Result: Srt Lanka whti bv o wickets. 

-L: i.L- i 4 l I'.V. JL vl’r SSL :Ll.. r&b ' 

BASEBALL 
American Lcoruc 

MILWAUKEE— Signed 2- year player de- 
velopment agreement with Helena a I me Pio- 
neer League. 

SEATTLE— Signed 4-year plover develop- 
ment agreement with Everett of the North- 
west League. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 

SEATTLE — Re-sinned Vincent Askew, 
guard, and Stave Save-ffler, forward. 


-V) 

• - ; A< 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Hunter's pray 
s Batter's woe 


to They're big for 
conceited folks 
14 General under 
Dwight 




JAL 


ts 


offers 7 direct fligh 
a week to Osaka 
from Europe - 
more 

than any other carrier. 



japan AlrttiMt 


is Resort lake 
16 Author Emile 
it Cabdrhrers do 
this 

20 Start for step or 
stop 

21 Fix, as in 
gambling 

22 Wild talk 

23 Uganda's Amin 

24 Show biz 
routine 

28 Rummy cry 
so Repetitious 

32 Simile center 
as ‘What Kind of 

Pool ’ 

Mils symbol is 
five rings 
32 Write 

40 Optometrists do 
this 

*4 Silent 

communication 

«s Tributes 
4fl Evperl 

47 Kind of room 

48 Animal stomach 
sa Stole 

S3 Battery's 
partner 

57 Show to a seat, 
informally 

sa What you pay at 
sates 

ao Way of Lao*tzu 
at World traveler 
otnoie 

B2 Up readers do 
this 

67 Conductor 
Klemperer 

88 Fnend Df 
Mercutio 


68 Cabin wood 
TO Un mixed, a> a 
miner 

71 Hanker 

72 Busy bodies 

DOWN 

1 "Get cracking!* 

2 Blake of 
'Gunsmoke* 

3 Succeed 

4 Before 

5 Having a stiff 
uppanip 

a Har-de-har-har 
7 TV band 

B Stock response 
9 Each 

10 Metrical Pound 

11 Flipping 

12 Nostalgic 

13 Enclosure with 
a MS 

18 '93, '94. etc. 

19 Aquatic zoo 
25 Pudding 

ingredient 

28 ‘OfThee ’ 

27 Big stickers 

29 Diamond digit 
31 Fine, to a pilot 
as Caust ic agent 
38 Letter sign-off 

37 Slippers lor the 
stubborn? 

38 1989 comedy 
• Devil’ 

40 Page (through) 

41 Kiss 

42 Vidor Heibert 
work 

43 Computer key 
abbr. 

49 Emphasizes, as 
an embarrass- 
ing error 




5 


w 




17 " 




ZO 




H - 




30 - 



1 



On October 24 th, the IHT will publish a Sponsored 
Section on 

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Shopping 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

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duty-free products are sold. 

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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1994 


OBSERVER 


The Humble Elitist 


By Russell Baker 

W ashington — These 

letters piled here de- 
nounce me as an elitist. My hu- 
mility makes them hard to an- 
swer. They are all written in — 
well, such an elitist tone. 

Annoyed by some half-baked 
opinion in this column, or irri- 
tated by some idle criticism of 
their favorite novelist or sitcom, 
their writers mount the high 
epistolary bench to condemn 
me as an elitist, hence unfi t to 
address the common man. 

I am much too humble to 
point out to these writers that 
passing brutal judgment on a 
fellow human, as they are do- 
ing, is one of the most elitist 
acts anyone can commit. 

Moreover, I am far too mod- 
est — speaking in all humility, 
mind you — to let them know 
my origins are those of the poor 
country lad who has grown up 
with mud between the toes. 

That’s why to this day I never 
write the briefest letter without 
the feel of mud between the toes 
lest I lose touch with those 
plain, unpolished roots. This is 
why a tub of mud sits under my 
desk at all times. My feet are in 
it at tlds very moment, and the 
feel of that mud restrains me 
from trying to be fancy, or elit- 
ist. 

□ 

This is why I permit the ab- 
surd metaphor “unpolished 
roots” to stand in the paragraph 
above, instead of substituting a 
literate expression. 

Only a hopeless elitist would 
make a fuss about whether 
roots come in two varieties — 
polished and unpolished. Bui of 
course, he would not. 

No elitist ever makes any- 
thing as plain as a fuss. He 
would raise the awkward ques- 
tion whether roots can be pol- 
ished, or deplore the tendency 
toward cliche disclosed by call- 
ing the roots unpolished — any- 
thing to avoid a simple fuss. 

Reader, I know all this be- 
cause once —let it be confessed 
— once I did indeed yearn to be 
an elitist 

This yearning began in my 


earliest mud-between-the-toes 
days, when I dreamed of being 
an didst pitcher of baseballs 
who might someday be as excel- 
lent as the great Carl Hubbell. 

Quickly I I earned that my ap- 
titude for baseball would never 
qualify me to be the ditest utili- 
ty infielder of Southwest Balti- 
more sandiot baseball, much 
less the peer of the magnificent 

Hubbell 

For a long time afterward I 
pursued the dream in other 
fields. In high school I yearned 
to match the academic record of 
Melvin Sachs, the elitest stu- 
dent in Lhe school’s history. 

O 

Yes, oh yes, I went on to 
college. Such was my hunger to 
be an elitist After acquiescing 
in the school’s request never to 
enroll in another science course, 
I was allowed to graduate with a 
gentleman’s C. 

So it went until, well on in 
life, I mentioned one day to a 
child these letters accusing me 
of being an elitist “And are 
you?" he asked. “The letters 
convince me I am," I said, full 
of pride. 

At this the child obviously 
wanted to roll on the floor in 
laughter, but fonunatdy didn’t 
since he was driving the car. 
Nor did he state what was obvi- 
ously on his min d; that I had 
not become the equal of CarJ 
Hubbell, or Melvin Sachs, or 
Humphrey Bogart, whom I had 
once yearned to match in what- 
ever it would take to make me 
interesting to Ingrid Bergman. 

Nor did he mention Einstein, 
Fermi, Szilard, Oppenheuner, 
Teller, all such elitists that I 
wasn’t even qualified to boo 
them, the way a real nonelitist 
who was nevertheless a fan 
could boo Hubbell or Bogart 
and feel superior to them by 
doing iL 

I wasn't an elitist; I was a 
consumer of elitists, one of 
what touring presidents like to 
call, with well-disguised con- 
tempt, “the real people.” That’s 
my reply to this pile of letters. 
I'm feeling the mud between my 
toes as it’s written. 

New York Tuna Service 


Celebrity Exile for Cuba’s Late-Blooming Dissident 


By Pamela Constable 

Washington fon Service 

W ASHINGTON — Less than two 
weeks after a tea-and-water pro- 
test fast that ended with a flight mto 
American exile, the Cuban writer 
Norberto Fuentes has already re- 
gained a comfortable paunch and is 
working hard at perfecting his new 
image as an intellectual defector from 
Fidel Castro’s fast-sinking revolution. 

Several days after his arrival here 
via Mexico City, the tweedy, 51 -year- 
old Fuentes is still having trouble 
with such unfamiliar technology as 
touch tones and voice mail He gig- 
gles at the soothing mechanical voice 
on the other end of his hotel phone. 

But his cracked pocket agenda is 
crammed with important names and 
numbers — Norman Mailer, William 
Kennedy, Gabriel Garda M&rquez 
— and his charming patter is sprin- 
kled with literary name-dropping: 
Sartre, Malraux, Hemingway. 

Fuentes, a journalist, is best 
known in the United States for his 
1984 book, “Hemingway in Cuba,” 
on the novelist’s life as a renegade 
sportsman in Cuba during the 1950s. 
In fact, he likes to compare himself to 
both Hemingway ana Solzhenitzyn. 
More neutral observers say a closer 
comparison would be to leading 
American war correspondents in 
Vietnam. 

Whatever his merits as a writer, 
Fuentes’s cause has been champi- 
oned by a remarkable collection of 
international literary figures. Cuba is 
in the news, and Fuentes is seen as 
the latest victim of intellectual re- 
pression under Castro. Thus, a late- 
blooming dissident from Cuban so- 
cialism is becoming a celebrity 
figure. 

In fact, much of Fuentes's career 
has been spent chronicling the ex- 
ploits of other adventurers — “men 
of action,” as he calls them. As a 
government-sponsored journalist, he 
covered the Cuban role m revolution- 
ary Nicaragua and die Cuban mili- 
tary mission against anti -Communist 
rebels in Angola in the 1980s. 

In return for such contributions, 
he was able to thrive for years in the 
precarious terrain of intellectual fife 
in Castro’s Cuba. While friends and 
colleagues fell by the wayside, disillu- 
sioned or deep-sixed by the regime, 
Fuentes bounced bade repeatedly, 
ostracized for one book — a 1960s 


essay on an anti-Castro peasant 
movement —but lionized for others, 
such as the Hemingway work. 

By the mid-1980s he had attained a 
rare place in Castro's inner circle, 
living in a government apartment 
and traveling in fast company that 
included General Arnaldo Ochoa 
Sdnchez, the dashing hero of the An- 
gola campai g n, and Antonio de la 
Guardia Font, a high-living spy and 
overseas wheeler-dealer for the re- 
gime. During one arms-puf chasing 
session in raris or Panama — he 
can’t remember which — de la Guar- 
dia manufactured a grand fiction on 
the spot, introducing Fuentes as “the 
legendary comandante Andres.” 

Then, in 1989, Fuentes's charmed 
life came crashing down. 

”1 learned some very disturbing 
information and I called Arnaldo to 
tell him,” Fuentes began. “I knew 
there were microphones in my house, 
so we went out walking. We joked a 
bit, and then I told him." The bad 
news was that high-level officials 
were accusing Ochoa of embezzling 
S200.000 in aid to Nicaragua's Sandi- 
nista regime. “His face turned white, 
and he told me he had to leave. Al- 
ways before he had embraced me 
good-bye, but this time he didn’t 
even look at me. He seemed very 
worried. I never saw him again." 

At dawn on July 13 of that year, 
Ochoa and de la Guardia were exe- 
cuted by a government firing squad, 
after being tried for drug trafficking 
and treason. Many people believe 
their real crime was becoming too 
powerful for Castro's comfort. The 
draconian punishment shook Cuba's 
establishment to the roots. Fuentes, 
as an intimate crony of the disgraced 
men, was swept from favor. 

“The fusilamiento [execution] 
showed Castro was willing to do any- 
thing necessary to stay in power," 
Fuentes says, launching into a litany 
of invective against Castro’s “abso- 
lute personal dictatorship" and 
“moral bankruptcy." 

Asked to explain his belated con- 
version, he is appropriately rueful 
and surprisingly blunt. “I lost my 
two best friends, and I discovered 
something that many Cubans had 
discovered 30 years before," he ac- 
knowledged “In my generation, we 
were all wrong. It was a painful les- 
son, but we have to realize that with 
all our energy and romanticism, we 
were contributing to a monstrosity." 



Mu] Lou Foy'Thc Washtagwn Post 

Norberto Fuentes, journalist and author, now in the United States. 


After the Ochoa affair, Fuentes's 
life changed drastically. He lost his 
apartment; he says he was followed 
by state security agents and could 
not publish any work for five years. 
Finally the chronicler of others’ ex- 
ploits decided to take action. 

Last October he tried to flee Cuba 
in a small me tivboat with his family, 
but was caught several miles offshore 
and sentenced to Villa Maris la, Cas- 
tro's political prison. Unlike most 
prisoners, Fuentes had outside 
sources working on his behalf; for- 
eign literary groups and Cuban exiles 
quickly mounted an appeal, and he 
was released after 20 days. 

The tension intensified this sum- 
mer, when he received a conference 
invitation from the PEN American 
Center in New York, but was not 


allowed to travel abroad. In protest, 
he decided to go on a hunger strike in 
early August, consuming only water, 
tea and vitamins. 

By this time, though, Cuba had 
erupted in the most serious political 
upheaval in decades. There were riots 
in the streets of Havana and make- 
shift rafts clogging the beaches of 
Cojimar. 

Fuentes, who had heard through 
Garda M&rquez that Castro was go- 
ing to “resolve my problem,” says he 
gradually became convinced the 
phrase bad a double, more sinister 
meaning. “My life was in danger,” he 
says flatly. “I had to get out.” 

On Aug 26, the 23d day of his fast, 
he received a call from Garcia Mir- 
quez. then visiting Havana, who 3aid 
he must prepare to leave immediately. 


Within hours, the Colombian Nobel 
laureate, a friend of President Carlos 
Rufinas de Gortari of Mexico, had 
arranged for a Mexican gwernment 
jet to whisk h»m to Cancun. From 
there Fuentes telephoned Kennedy. “I 
told him . . . I had won," he ays. his 
voice breaking for a moment. 

But the victory was partial: At the 
Havana airport, his passport had 
been scrawled with the phrase “In- 
definite Departure."Norberto Fueri- . 
tes could not go home again. 

Since his arrival in. the United 
States, die journalist who made a 25- 
year cares’ of swimming in Havana’^ 
mercurial waters has been deftly posi- 
tioning h frwsaif for a new role as liters 
ary exile. He spent a whirlwind three 
days in Washington, giving press in- 
terviews and meeting with State D©* 
partment officials before h eading for 
Miami , the nerve center of Cuba’s 
contentious exile community. 

Meanwhile; Fuentes has acquired 
a New York literary agent and hopes 
to publish a new book, tentatively 
titled “In the Wolfs Mouth.” It is 
not yet clear, however, how smooth 
his professional and political recep- 
tion will be. 

Privately, some exiles express 
skepticism about Fuentes’s belated 
defection, given his many years as a 
privileged professional under Castro. 
But in public, most prominent Cu- 
ban Americans seem glad to welcome 
him to the fold — in part because his 
message gives a timely boost to their 
cause. - - - 

“Many people might ask, why 
now?” said JosA Cardenas, a spokes- 
man for the Cuban-Amcrican Na- 
tional Foundation, the largest exile 
or ganizatio n. “But we’re not con- 
cerned about what his motives may 
have been. He is just another in a 
long line of people whose tolerance 
level with the Cuban regime sudden- 
ly reached its limi t. 

“Some left long ago, some stayed, 
but it's all one large tragedy." 

Fuentes remains unrepentant 
about his youthful romance with Cu- 
ban socialism. “I became a trinket 
for Fidel and Raul [Castro's brother], 
but I owe them nothing,” he said 
defiantly, noting that he turned 
down an offer to become head of the 
government-sponsored Cuban writ- 
ers’ union. “They gave me an apart- 
ment, and they took it away. But they 
didn't make me a writer; I made 
myself a writer.” 


, ¥" 


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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



Joatiaflm 

North America 

Warm weathsr wilt be the 
rule tram Kansas City and 
St. Louis to Philadelphia 
later this week. A tew heavy 
thunderstorms will occur 
from Chicago to DairoH and 
New York City toward the 
weekend. A tropical storm 
may form In the Gulf of Mexi- 
co later this week and move 
toward the Texas coast 


Europe 

Athens to Istanbul will nave 
dry. hot weather late this 
week. Cooling rains and 
thenderwia spread from Italy 
and Albania Thursday, then 
across Romania and Bulgar- 
ia Friday mto Saturday. Cool, 
damp weather will prevail 
from London and Peris 
through Frankfurt and Ham- 
burg. 


Heavy 

Snow 


Asia 

Shanghai will be dry and 
warm late this week while 
Belling turns cooler with a 
few showers. Seoul will be 
sunny with low hum Why end 
warm a fternoon. Heavy rains 
over Japan Thursday will 
gradually diminish by the 
weekend. Tropical Storm 
UJie wlH bring heavy rains to 
northern Vietnam. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Bevut 

Cairo 

Damaaaii 

JwuMtom 

Liner 

nyacr 


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Los Angelas 

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North America 



Andrew L/dUcnsieiu'Tbe AJv-caiiud Prwj 

Johnny Depp arrested in New York. 


T HE actor Johnny Depp was arrested 
Tuesday on a charge of criminal mis- 
chief after be smashed up furniture in his 
room at a New York hotel die police said. 
Depp was “possibly intoxicated,” and “was 
not surprised” by the officers’ arrival at the 
Mark Hotel shortly after 5 A. M., a police 
spokesman said. “There appeared to be a lot 
of glass shattered all over the room,” said 
Sergeant Robert Votonino, who estimated 
the damage at more than $2,000. Depp’s 
girlfriend, the mode] Kate Moss, was with 
him but was not arrested. 

□ 

The Fulbright Association will award 
the second annual J. William Fulbright 
Prize for International Understanding to 
former President Jimmy Carter. He will 
receive the $50,000 prize on Oct 1 , his 70th 
birthday, in Washington. . . . David 
Rockefeller has been named the recipient 
of the World Monuments Fund’s Hadrian 
Award. 

□ 

A Los Angeles court is likely to throw 
out a lawsuit by Elizabeth Taylor seeking 
to prevent NBC from making a television 
mini series about her life. The Superior 


Court said that any harm she suffers 
would be actionable, but that she was not 
entitled to a prior restraint. But Taylor’s 
lawyer will get one more chance to argue 
the case. 

□ 

A lawyer for Joan Kennedy maintains 
that the ex-wife Of Senator Edward Kenne- 
dy tried to negotiate the reopening of her 
divorce settlement privately for months 
before. Monroe Inker said Joan Kennedy 
initiated conversations in June with both 
her former husband and his lawyer, Pan) 
Kirk, before turning to Inker. Kirk told the 
Boston Globe last week that he knew noth- 
ing of her efforts. 

□ 

Francois Nourissier’s nightmare ended 
happily when a rabbit hunter found the 
manuscript of the French author's latest 
novel, stolen with his briefcase at Mar- 
seille's airport in July. Francois Gniraud. 
36, a Marseille port employee, bagged two 
rabbits and the battered attache case while 
hunting in scrubland northeast of the 
Mediterranean city. Nourissier said on the 
radio that he was deeply relieved that 19 
months’ work had not been in vain. 


* 


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COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

ASIA 

Australia 

1-800-881-011 

China, PRO** 

10811 

Guam 

018-872 

Hong Kong 

800-1111 

India, 

000-117 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Japan* 

0039-111 

Korea 

009*11 

Korea** 

ir 

Malaysia* 

800-0011 

New Zealand 

000-911 

Philippines* 

105-11 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

Singapore 

uoo-om-in 

Sri Lanka 

430-130 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

Thailand* 

0019-991-1111 

EUROPE 

Armenia"* 

8*14111 

Austria* - *'- 

022^903-011 

Belgium* 

0800-100-10 

Bulgaria 

00-18CCH3010 

Croatia** 

99-38-0011 

Czech Rep 

00-420-00101 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

France 

1?a-OOU 

Germany 

0130-0010 

Greece* 

00-800-1 3H 

Hungary* 

OOa-SOO-Oim 

Iceland** 

999-001 

Irdann 

1-800- 550-000 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


Italy 

172-1011 

Liechtenstein* 

155-00-11 

Lithuania* 

8*196 

Luxembourg 

0300-0111 

Macedonia, F.YJL of 

99-800-4288 

Malta* 

0800-890-110 

Monaco" 

19*-0011 

Netherlands* 

06-022-9111 

Norway 

800-190-11 

Poland* ~ 0*010-480-0111 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 


01-800-4288 

Russia**CMc>scow) 

155-5042 

Slovakia 

00-420-00101 

Spain* 

900-99-00-11 

Sweden* 

020-793-611 

Switzerland* 

155-00-11 

UK. 

0500-89*0011 

Ukraine" 

8*100-11 

MIDDLE EAST 

Bahrain 

800-001 

Cyprus* 

080-90010 

Israel 

177-100-2727 

Kuwait 

8)0-288 

Lebanon (Beirut) 

426-801 

Qatar 

0800-011 -Tr 

Saudi Arabia 

1-800-10 

Turkey* 

00-800-12277 

IU.E.* 

300-121 

AMERICAS 

Aqwvitu# 001-800-200-11 11 

Belize* 

555 

Bolivia* 

0-800-1112 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 
BracR 000*010 

Chile QOa-0312 

Colombia , 980-11-0010 

Costa Rid’* Hi 

Ecuador* H9 

El Saivadof jpO 

Guatemala" VS© 

165 

Honduras** 123 

MexlcoAAA 95-800-362-4240 

Nic a r a gu a (Managua) 174 

Panama* 109 

19) 

Suriname 156 

Uruguay 00-0410 

Venezuda** S0-Q1M2Q 

CARIBBEAN 

1-800-872-2881 

Bgrcuuda' I -800-872- 2881 

British VX 1-600-8-72-2881 

Cayman Islands 1-800-872-2881 

Grenada* 1-800-872-2881 

Haiti* ' 001-800-972-2883 

Jamaica** 0-800-872-2881 

NedLAntfl 001-800-872-2881 

St Kltts/Nevis 1-000-872-2881 

~ AFRICA 

Egypt* (Cairo) 5104*00 

fiabotr 00 * 4-001 

Gambia* Q0111 

Kuuya* 0900-10 

ttbed* 797-797 

South Africa. 0-800-99-0123 


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