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INTERNATIONAL 



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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW' YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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London, Thursday, September 15. 1994 



No. 34,694 


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Deep Split 
Remains in 
Talks With 
North Korea 


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US ‘ Off™* Dampens 
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££«*«*>< On Nuclear Question 

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By Janies Stemgold 

Wf Nrw Ylorfc Tunes Service 

TOKYO — The United Slates held pro- 
ductive talks with North Korea this week 
on two key issues, but America's chief- 
negotiator indicated here Wednesday that 
the remaining differences were so deep it 
was unlikely the two sides would open 
diplomatic relations or resolve questions 
.over North Korea's nuclear program soon. 

Robert L. Gallucci, who has been lead- 
ing the American team in the highly sensi- 
tive talks, said that two sets of working- 
level discussions this week in Pyongyang 
and Berlin had been useful and had helped 
the two aides to understand each others' 
positions. 

But be also used the occasions to rein in 
rising expectations. He emphasized that 
although the talks are moving forward, 
rapid breakthroughs that would end de- 
cades of hostility were distant possibilities. 

He characterized North Korea, formally 
known as the Democratic People’s Repub- 
lic of Korea, or the D.P.R.1C, as a serious 
potential military threat to the region and 
the United States because of its suspected 
nuclear weapons program 
“We would hope that in time we would 
get to a position where there is trust built 
up between the United States and the 
DJM&.K-," Mr. Gallucci said. “Right now 
there is a great deal of mistrust” 

Mr. Gallucci also said that even if the 
n i l war issue is eventually resolved, reje- 
ctions with North Korea might not improve 
T unless Pyongyang met American human- 
rights standards. 

He said that North Korea “will be no 
exception” to American human rights poli- 
cies. 

The two sets of talks this week were not 
negotiations, but technical discussions to 

E resent information on two areas. They 
ad been arranged after a framework for a 
broad agreement had been agreed upon 
earlier this month. The formal negotiations 
are scheduled to resume on Sept. 23 in 
Geneva. 

The talks earlier this week in Pyongyang 
covered the specific needs of each country 
on the possibility of establishing low-level 
diplomatic representation in each others' 
capitals. Any steps toward setting up these 
missions are contingent on a resolution of 
the nuclear problem. 

The t alks in Berlin covered several as- 
pects of the nuclear issue. These included 
who would provide the modem, light-wa- 
ter nuclear reactor for electricity genera- 
tion that Washington has agreed to ar- 
range if the North Koreans abandon their 
existing nuclear facilities. The existing fa- 
cilities generate large amounts of plutoni- 
um, the basic ingredient in nuclear bombs. 
The light- water reactor produces far less 
fissionable material. 

In addition, the Berlin talks took up the 
questions of how North Korea's power 
£ demand would be met in the time before 
™ the new reactor was constructed, and what 
will happen to 8,000 spent nuclear fuel 
rods currently in a cooling pond in North 
Korea. As much as 65 pounds (30 kilo- 
grams) of plutonium could be extracted 
from the rods if they are reprocessed, 
something the United States is trying to 

Sec KOREA, Page 7 



J-ikuc P-jriKi V'fncc r ».-i 

Newly recruited members of the Haitian militia in basic training on Wednesday in Port-au-Prince as U.S. planes dropped leaflets on the major cities. 

Protestant Frustration Spills Over in Ulster Fight 


By John Damton 

New York Times Service 

BELFAST — Gina. Johnny Adair’s 
partner, was rounding up “the beys.” 

There had been trouble at the Crumlin 
Road courthouse. 

A pitched battle had erupted inside the 
courthouse between Catholics and Protes- 
tants — or “taigs” and “prods,” as they are 
called in the Protestant ghetto around the 
Shanlrill Road — and the police had wad- 
ed in with truncheons, against the Protes- 
tants. 

So now Gina, with short, platinum-dyed 
hair and gold-loop earrings and a fearsome 
reputation among people who follow sec- 
tarian violence, was working the phones. 


Her summons was successful: A knot of 
men and boys began gathering behind the 
courthouse at 2 P.M. h grew to about 40 or 
50. Some of them earned pickax handles 
and cudgels and. in their pockets, masks to 
avoid identification. 

Soon the anger and frustration felt by 
the Protestants would erupt in a confron- 
tation with the police and army. Tuesday 
afternoon and part of the night, the men — 
some of them thought to belong to extrem- 
ist paramilitary organizations — engaged 
in hit-and-run forays, tossing rocks and 
Molotov cocktails, firing guns, dodging 

E lastic bullets fired by the police, and 
ijacking cars and vans and setting them 
on fire. 


It was the first serious outbreak of street 
trouble in Northern Ireland since the Irish 
Republican Army cease-fire was declared 
two weeks ago. And it was a clear sign — 
not that any was needed — that peace in 
Ulster will be difficult to come by without 
the inclusion of the Protestant loyalists, 
and especially of the tough young men who 
turn to violence in the name of the cause 
emblazoned on 30-foot murals aside brick 
buildings: no surrender, union with Brit- 
ain forever. 

What drew people to the courthouse 
Tuesday was a trial. A 23-year-old Catho- 
lic man from the Ardoyne area was up on a 
charge of attempted murder, for trying to 
kill Johnny Adair. People have been trying 


to do that for years. His two-story, red- 
brick attached house, not far from Snug- 
vOle Street, has the odd pockmark of a 
bullet and a front door with steel-plated 
backing. 

Under the nom de guerre of Mad Dog, 
Johnny Adair, 30. is the most feared loyal- 
ist gunman in West Belfast. A report last 
year cited police intelligence as saying that 
he had shot 12 Catholics in raids on bars 
and houses and had arranged the murders 
of at least eight others. He is now behind 
bars, awaiting trial on a charge of “direct- 
ing terrorism" under new anti-terrorist leg- 
islation. 

Back in March, before he was picked up. 

See BELFAST, Page 7 


Kiosk 


Hint at Inquiry 
Into Mitterrand 

PARIS (Reuters) — Justice Minis- 
ter Pierre Mehaignerie said Wednes- 
day that he would not oppose an in- 
quiry in Parliament of President 
Francois Mitterrand's concession that 
he had slowed legal proceedings 
against former Nazi collaborators. 

“With the support of ihe prime 
minister and the government, the mat- 
ter will not be blocked here.” Mr. 
Mfehaigncric told Europe 1 radio. 

Mr. Mitterrand, in a lengthy televi- 
sion interview on Monday, acknowl- 
edged having slowed down some legal 
proceedings against unnamed former 
collaborators, saying he believed he 
had a duty to reconcile Lhe French 
people and end a “permanent civil 
war* over the World War II years. 


Book Review 


Page 8. 


Population ‘Control’ Is Out, Options Are In 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Times Service 

Despite the lingering discord at the end 
of the International Conference on Popu- 
lation and Development in Cairo, most 
experts agree that the meeting and the 
societal changes its debates reflected have 
altered many of the premises for dealing 
with the crisis of loo many people on earth. 

The phrase “population control” is gone 
from the official vocabulary, and with it 
several decades of policies that relied on 
targets or quotas, goals that often went 
unmet because women in poor countries 


had little say in their own family planning. 

At their most extreme, some policies 
were, and occasionally still are, life-threat- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

ening or coercive, such as the sterilization 
and abortion programs ol india and Chi- 
na. 

In its final plan of action, adopted Tues- 
day by more than 150 nations, the confer- 
ence accepted that many women and men. 
if given adequate information, general 
health care and access to a wide choice of 


contraceptive methods, will very often 
make having fewer children a priority. 

In much of South .Asia, high fertility 
rates often reflect the kind of contracep- 
tion available. In Pakistan, mass distribu- 
tion of condoms failed to reduce the num- 
ber of births, in large part because women 
in traditional Islamic families had no pow- 
er to make men use them. 

In neighboring India, with the largest 
numerical population growth of any na- 
tion, illiterate village women in Rajasthan, 
a slate with high fertility rates, said they 

See CAIRO, Page 7 


HI 1 *''!' 


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5 «■ I* 


Baseball’s Team Owners 
Call Off the 1994 Season 








The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The major league base- 
ball season ended Wednesday with a fax 
instead of a fastball. 

The extraordinary reason, already shut 
down by a monthlong players’ strike, was 
canceled by the owners. 

The cancellation means that for the first 
time since 1904, there will be no World 
Series. And for the first time since profes- 
sional baseball leagues began in 1871, a 
major league season was played with no 
conclusion. 

The decision, taken on a vote by 26 of 
the 28 t eams, came on the 34th day of the 
players' strike in a conference call among 
the owners led by the acting commissioner. 
Bud Selig. 

“There cannot be any joy on any side,” 
Mr. Selig, the owner of the Milwaukee 
Brewers, said in Milwaukee. 

Gone are the exciting pennant races, 
expanded playoffs and the World Senes, 
as well as the hopes of fans who thought 
players and owners would resolve tb<ar 
dispute in time to restart the season. 

The end, though expected, was no less 


stunning when it was officially declared 
via fax machine. 

“This is a sad day,” Mr. Selig’s state- 
ment said. “Nobody wanted this to hap- 
pen, but the continuing player strike leaves 
us no choice but to take this action.” 

“We have reached the point where it is 
no longer practical to complete the re- 
mainder of the season or to preserve the 
integrity of postseason play,” he said. 

Baltimore and Cincinnati did not sign 
the resolution to cancel the season. Mr. 
Selig said Peter Angelos, the owner of the 
Orioles, while agreeing in principle, want- 
ed changes in the wording of the docu- 
ment. Marge Schott, who owns the Reds, 
refused to go along, saying that perhaps 
minor league players riiould be used, ac- 
cording to Mr. Selig. 

“Will the Yankees win or won’t they? 
Will the Mets be able to come back?” 
asked Governor Mario M. Cuomo of New 
York, a former Pittsburgh Pirates farm- 
team player. 

“Will Thomas be able to set a record?" 

See SEASON, Page 18 



v '; ! ' : 


Jaupjchnc *izi. The ViuKlJied Pr&i 

FERRY TRAGEDY — A frogman, left, gesturing to co-workers who were looking for debris from a damaged gang- 
way on a Belgian ferry. Six people died when the gangway collapsed Wednesday in Ramsgate, England. Page 2. 


Ex- Con Woos Back 



n 3 s Voters 


Newsstand Prices 


Bahrain ...0.S00 Dm Matte.--™ 

tvotus r. Pl.oo Nigeria .70.00 Naira 

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Finland. — 11 F-M. A00 Rja[s 

Gibraltar......jEO-85 Rep Ireland | r £ i.oo 

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M 1 * 


WecLctaM 


Trib Index 


Down ^ 
0.34% M 
116.18 


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DM 


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Pound 


1.566 


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Yen 


99.20 


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FF 


5.2735 


5.2775 


By Marc Fisher 

Washing!#* Post Service 

WASHINGTON — It was the other 
Washington’s night out, a spectacularly 
improbable evening, a jolting blow against 
the powers that be. Marion Bany’s people 
wore work shirts that said Concord Mov- 
ers and PMI Parking. They were the poor 
and the homeless, the old women of the 
church, and the dapper young men of Lhe 
Black Muslims. 

When Mr. Bany pulled ahead on Tues- 
day night, his faithful erupted in joy. While 
the Washington that had long been dis- 
counted in primary' elections danced the 
electric slide, the lawyers and the business- 


men could only stand in the back of the 
room, watching. 

Mr. Barry won the District of Colum- 
bia's Democratic mayoral primary exactly 
as he had planned: He gained tremendous 
support in the poor and working-class 
neighborhoods where he had directed a 
massive voter-registration drive. And he 
grabbed a substantial portion of black 
middle-class voters across the city. 

When the votes were counted, the for- 
mer three-term mayor had won six of the 
city's eight wards, trouncing the incum- 
bent, Sharon Pratt Kelly, as well as a four- 
time unsuccessful mayoral candidate, John 
Rav. Mr. Barry beat Mr. Ray by a margin 


of 47 percent to 37 percent. Mrs. Kelly, the 
first black woman mayor of a major Amer- 
ican city, ran a poor third with 13 percent 
of the vote. Mr. Barry’s primary victory 
virtually assures that he will be elected 
mayor again come November. 

For Mr. Bany’s ardent supporters, the 
vote seemed to be a chance to reward a 
politician whose career has been stitched 
deeply into their lives, or who has best 
understood, and articulated, their hopes 
and their troubles. 

For Mr. Barry, it was redemption, a 
remarkable comeback from his downfall 
four years ago when federal agents and 

See MAYOR, Page 3 


Clinton Says 
Haiti’s Chiefs 
Still Have 
Time to Flee 

He Votes Force if Needed 
To Correct Rampant 
Human-Rights Abuses 

Cr^ileJ f>y OurSuff From Dupoiiha 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clin- 
ton accused Haiti’s military rulers 
Wednesday of rampant human-rights 
abuses and pledged to depose them by 
force if necessary, but he said they still had 
a chance to leave voluntarily. 

“We have literally exhausted every 
available alternative, and the time has 
come for those people to get out." Mr. 
Clinton said in an interview with wire 
service reporters. “They can still leave. 
They do not have to push this to a confron- 
tation.” 

The president, speaking in the Oval Of- 
fice, showed the reporters a set of gory 
photographs to back up his claim that the 
Haitian government was “plainly the most 
brutal, the most violent regime anywhere 
in our hemisphere." The color photo- 
graphs showed bloody corpses, people Mr. 
Clinton said had been killed by the Haitian 
military. 

Gesturing angrily to the photographs. 
Mr. Clinton said toppling the Haitian 
leaders was a vital interest because pre- 
serving democracy in America's backyard 
was essential to U.S. economic and nation- 
al security. 

“Democracy is not a done deal all over 
this hemisphere,” he said. “And if this is 
allowed to stand, then democracy else- 
where will be more fragile. The time is at 
hand, they have to leave and they're going 
to leave one way or the other.” 

Mr. Clinton plans to address the nation 
Thursday night in a speech that aides grim- 
ly described as “cocking the gun" aimed by 
the United Stales at Haiti’s military. 

The timing of the address and White 
House efforts to push off until next week 
any debate in Congress fueled speculation 
that the military action could occur as 
early as next week. On Wednesday. Senate 
Democratic leaders blocked a Republican 
effort to force a vote on any U.S.-led 
invasion. (Page 6) 

The address will be Mr. Clinton’s first 
full attempt to offer the public a rationale 
and explanation of the status of the efforts 
to eject Haiti's military leaders and restore 
the deposed president, Jean- Bertrand 
Aristide. 

White House officials described it as a 
turning point as well as evidence that he 
had no intention of turning back. 

There was no sign, however, that the 
military leaders who overthrew Father 
Aristide in 1991 were succumbing to the 
pressure or leaving. 

Mr. Clinton's speech will have to per- 
suade Americans that the United States 
has a serious national interest in what 
happens in Haiti. Polls show that the pub- 
lic overwhelmingly opposes an invasion. 

Defense Secretary William J. Perry in- 
sisted Wednesday that no concrete dead- 
line had been set yet for Lieutenant Gener- 

See HAITI, Page 7 

Island’s Army: 
Short Hours , 
Good Rum and 
Obsolete Arms 

By Rick Bragg 

New York Times Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE Haiti — The su- 
preme commander of the Haitian military 
often comes to work at noon and leaves at 
2 P.M. 

The Haitian Navy has immaculate uni- 
forms but only one ship with working 
engines. Several others float. 

The air force has two prop planes; one 
of them can lake off. It has several old 
helicopters, in pieces, but a newer helicop- 
ter is rumored to be working. 

The army has six or seven artillery 
pieces, almost all rusted hulks fired for 
ceremonies. It has six armored personnel 
carriers rigged with light machine guns, 
but only a few are running. 

It has 7,000 soldiers in uniform, a bot- 
tomless supply of 150-proof nun, and a 
force of voodoo priests poised to turn their 
powers on any American invaders. 

As Haiti readies itself for a possible 
American invasion, it does so without any 
recent experience in war and without the 
modern-day means to cany it out. In re- 
cent history, Haiti’s military has waged 
war only on the country’s own defenseless 
people, controlling them with terror and 
violence. 

Few people here, not even Foreign Min- 
ister Charles David, one of the most hard- 
line leaders in the military government, 
expect Haitian soldiers to hold out long if 
the United States orders in combat troops. 

Mr. David and other government offi- 
cials portray Washington as victimizing a 
weak nation and preparing to shoot down 
valiant young men who are defending their 
homeland. 

Leaders of the Haitian pro-democracy 
movement and people on the street say 
with contempt and conviction that the 
Haitian soldiers will not fight at all but 

See ARMY, Page 7 


• i 

s. 














Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER IS, 1994 



Craxi in Exile : The Riddle of Blame 


By Alas Cowell 

Ar’w York Tima Service 

HAMMAMET, Tunisia ■ — For a man 
who was once the master of a consider- 
able universe. Bettino Craxi has some- 
what shrunken vistas these days. 

The former prime minister, the subject 


of a score of inquiries in Italy s corrup- 


tion scandals, now lives in self-exile in a 
sun-splashed villa in this Tunisian resort, 
refusing to return home, where he faces 
confiscation of his passport and a prison 
term for financial irregularities. 

His health, he says, is not what it was 
when he ran Italy from 1983 to 1987 and 
presided over a Socialist Party that then 
crumbled in disgrace as magistrates un- 
covered a bewildering record of corrup- 
tion at its highest level With his left foot 
bandaged to cover a wound that will not 
heal and with specialists treating him for 
diabetes and a weak heart, Mr. Craxi, 60. 
rarely leaves the plot of olive groves, 
palms and bougainvilleas that surround 
the villa. 

Even the “power suits" that once 
adorned his ample frame have given way 
to less imposing garb: a gray singlet, 
khaki shorts ana one dusty loafer on his 
good foot. And all this in the space of 
two years since he laid plans to run for 
another term. 

Yet if Mr. Craxi has come to symbol- 
ize everything that went rotten with Ita- 
ly’s political elite, he stands, loo, as a 
defiant emblem of a riddle: Were indi- 
viduals like him to blame for the huge 
scandal that brought low thousands of 
politicians and business executives, or 
was the virus of graft endemic to a politi- 
cal system of which he was merely a 
product? 

In his time, he said in an interview, 
there was “not a single party that did not 
present false accounts to Parliament ev- 
ery year” to cover up illicit financing. 
And, he said, referring to the executives 
who paid the bribes. “All the major 
groups, in one form or another, were 


involved.' 


Did that include the Fininvesi corpo- 
ration of Silvio Berlusconi, Mr. Craxi’s 
personal friend, who rose to power as 
prime minister after elections m March 
buried the old guard? 

“Every major group," Mr. Craxi re- 
plied. 

Judicial inquiries have already impli- 
cated Mr. Berlusconi's brother Paolo and 
senior Fininvest executives. 

The relationship between Mr. Berlus- 
coni and Mr. Craxi, who is godfather to 
one of Mr. Berlusconi’s children, puzzles 
many Italians. It was Mr. Craxi, for 
instance, who ensured passage of legisla- 
tion enabling Mr. Berlusconi to form 
Italy’s biggest private television empire, 
which is the core of his wealth. 

So are they still in touch? Mr. Craxi 
implied that they were. 

“Silvio Berlusconi is advising me to get 
better and be calm," he raid. “I'm advis- 
ing him to really promote the birth of a 
Second Republic." But he wondered out 
loud about his friend's ability to master a 
political system “which has always been 
sick with instability." 

“Perhaps I should be advising him to 
get better and be calm." he said with a 
smile. 

Mr. Craxi said he divides politicians 
who survived the scandal into “liars and 
what I call extraterrestrials." He adds, 
“The extraterrestrials are the ones who 
pretend they were on another planet for 
the last 20 years." 

The interview was the fust face-to-face 
conversation with a journalist since Mr. 
Craxi fled Italy in May. Since then, a 
judge has ordered that his passport be 
taken away, and in July a court sen- 
tenced him to eight and a half years in 
prison for fraudulent bankruptcy in the 
convoluted dealings of Banco Ambro- 
se ano, which was associated with the 
Vatican and collapsed under huge debts. 

In addition, Mr. Craxi is one among 
thousands of politicians and business 
executives implicated in the bribery 
scandals that have swept the nation. 

Such was the public revulsion that Mr. 


Craxi and dozens of others who had 
shared the vast patronage were swept 
from office. He resigned as head of the 
Socialists in Februaiy 1993. 

His onetime allies in government the 
Christian Democrat', have renamed 
themselves the Popular Party. 

To hear Mr. Craxi tell it now, though. 
Italy's housecleaning is far from com- 
plete. The magistrates themselves, be 
said, have not acknowledged their acqui- 
escence in the system that prevailed for 
decades. 

And most of all, he said, there has 
been a cover-up of what he described as 
huge financing of the former Italian 
Communist Party. 

By comparison to all this, he said, he 
has been victimized and wishes to set 
matters straight. A book, “The Craxi 
Case," is to be published this month and 
wiD provide him an opportunity to tell 
what he knows, he said. 

“I do not want to end my life under the 
stain of infamy,” he said. “1 have never 
lied." 

His principal defense is that the sys- 
tem was universal. 

Laws on political contributions, he 
said, were so restrictive that companies 
preferred to make undeclared donations 
to party newspapers, salaries and cam- 
paign costs in a land that “has an elec- 
tion every year. 

Hie biggest party machine of all. he 
said, was the Communist Party. Its mon- 
ey, he said, repeating charges that the 
former Communists have denied, came 
from East Bloc “solidarity]’ funds. KGB 
slush funds and commissions on trade 
between Italy and the Soviet bloc. 

It is by no means clear that Mr. Craxi’s 
arguments will help him escape a life 
where television and newspapers are his 
main contact with his country.) 

“I will return to Italy when I can do so 
in complete freedom," he said. 

But does he not fear that, living in 
isolation, he will be forgotten? “Don’t 
worry about the Craxi case,” he replied, 
“I'll look after that myself." 


Clemency Shows 
Anti-Islamist Effort 
Collapsing in Algeria 


WORLD BRIEFS 


American Remains Found Off Russia 


MOSCOW (AP) — Investigators scarching ^rtmote Pacific , Lilj! 


By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

Ne w York Tuna Service 
PARIS — The Algerian gov- 
ernment’s decision to free five 
leaders of the Islamic Salvation 
Front represents an admission 
by the military-civilian junta 
that it has failed in its 30- 
month-long quest to e limina te 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


Islamists from Algerian politics 
and eradicate armed Islamic 


Accident 
Kills 6 on 
U.K. Ferry 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

RAMSGATE, England — A 
walkway to a Belgian ferry col- 
lapsed Wednesday, killing six 
people and injuring seven as 
passengers catapulted 40. feet 
onto a pontoon below. 

Two Belgians and a Briton 
were among those killed. The 
nationalities of the others were 
not immediately released. 
i Five we re Wiled instantly; a 
sixth cued Tater'in hospital. ' 

A spokesman in nearby Can- 
lerbuiy said the injured were all 


young people, between 20 and 
35, and 


, and of various nationalities, 
including Japanese, Austrian, 
American and British. 

The covered walkway 
snapped as the last of about 400 
passengers were boarding the 
28,833-ton ferry, Prins Filip, for 
an overnight crossing to the 
Belgian port of Ostend. 

The 90-foot (27-meter), 
Swedish-built walkway was in- 


stalled eight months ago at the 
h Channel 


English Channel port of Rams- 
gate, the port authority said. 

“One of the connecting ends 
closer to the shore than the ship 
slipped and it dropped just like 
an arm dropping.” said Robert 
Faulty, chief inspector of the 
Kent County police. 

Some victims were crushed 
by the falling walkway and then 
by other passengers crashing on 
top of them. (AP, Reuters) 



groups. 

President Liamine Zeroual 
said in a statement that be or- 
dered the two most senior lead- 
ers of the Muslim fundamental- 
ist party, Abbassi Madam and 
AH Belhadj, freed from prison 
late Tuesday so they could 
“give their support to the objec- 
tive of stopping the violence.” 

The government invited the 
two to help negotiate an end to 
the conflict between secularists 
and fundamentalists that has 
taken the lives of more than 
10,000 persons. 

In the past year, armed fun- 
damentalist groups have 
brought government authority 
to a near halt throughout Alge- 
ria. burning, destroying and 
shutting down hundreds of 
schools, factories, forests, plan- 
tations and government offices. 

The military installed Mr. 
Zeroual last year largely as a 
figurehead, but he has moved 
since to form a group within the 
government advocating a mea- 
sure of power-sharing with Is- 
lamist opposition forces to stem 

Rabih Kebir, a senior figure 
in the Islamic Salvation Front 
living in exile in Germany, de- 
scribed the release of Mr. Ma- 
dam and Mr. Belhadj, who were 
placed under house arrest but 
allowed visitors, as a positive 
but “insufficient" step Wednes- 
day. 


with the fundamentalists means 
that events are approaching a 
point where a hard-hoe, vehe- 
mently anti-French Islamist 
current in Algeria is emerging. 

The Front and other Islamist 
political currents, including 
moderate ones, are united in the 
view that secularist influences 
in Algeria, most particularly 
France's substantial political, 
economic and educational in- 
fluence, must be obliterated. 

Such a development can only 
increase the already evident 
success of Algerian fundamen- 
talists in setting up cells among 
the North African Arab expa- 
triate community in France. 

In the past few weeks, 
France’s interior minister. 
Charles Pasqua has led a highly 
visible campaign against funda- 
mentalist Muslim militant 
groups in the country, initiating 


security operations to contain 
sad of 


island off Russia’s eastern coast found the remains of a US. 
serviceman shot down 42 years ago during the Cold War, the U^; 
Embassy said Wednesday. . . , j . 

A golden class ring was handed to investigators in December by 
a former Soviet sailor who related finding the body of an Ameri- 
can Air Force pilot more than 40 years ago. 

The embassy said it believed the remains were of a crew 
member of an RB-29 reconnaissance aircraft shot down by Soviet 
fighters in October 1952. 

“Available evidence indicates the remains may be those of 
Papain John Robertson Dunham." the embassy said m a state- 
ment. It said the remains would be taken to the U.S. Army’s 
Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii for analysis and 
positive identification. 

Investigators Stymied in USAir Crash 

CORAOPOLIS, Pennsylvania (AP) — New evidence in the 
crash last week of USAir Flight 427 near Pittsburgh has virtually 
ruled out the thrust reverser theory. And it appears that an engine 
did not break loose, either. 

“You go up blind alleys, but you have to go up them to see that 
they were blind alleys,” said Tom-Haueter, chief investigator for 
the National Transportation Safety Board. “We are still looking at 
every posable avenue.” , .. .. 

One theory still under consideration is that the spoilers ■ — wing 
flaps used to slow a plane in flight or after landing — worked 
unevenly. But no evidence has been found to indicate that the 
spoilers on this Boeing 737-300 were malfunctioning. 


'4T 


the spread of fundamentalist 
activities on French soQ ema- 
nating from Algeria. 

Twenty activists accused of 
channeling money to the Islam- 
ists in Algeria have bcem de- 
ported. Others accused of send- 
ing weapons and organizing 
terror cells are under arrest 

The most significant ques- 
tion, however, remains how se- 
rious are the divisions within 
the Islamic movement itself. In 
the past year, the Algerian fun- 
damentalist movement has 


Fighting in Afghanis tan Surges AueW* 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reuters) — Fierce fighting erupted 
between rival Afghan groups around Kabul on Wednesday, kill- 


lng many people, the government-controlled Kabul Radio said. 
TThe : ’ ' ’ ' J 


i radio, monitored in Pakistan, gave no details of casualties 

in clashes between forces loyal to President Burhanuddin Rab- 
bani and those of Prime Minister Gulbuddin Hekmatyar in the 
western suburbs of the city. 

An opposition alliance led by Mr. Hekmatyar said in a state- 
ment received in Islamabad that its fighters had advanced to 
within 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) of the strategic Salang tunnel, 100 
kilometers north of Kabul. No independent account of the fight- 
ing was available. 


Islamic movement which has Hong Kong Rejects Beijing Charges 


divided into various 
fighting each other. 


camps HONG KONG (AP) — The Hong Kong government on. 

n, i ... .■ iVnV .L.. 


Wednesday rejected Chinese accusations that it rewarded one of 
* tjrs leading ‘ " v " 51 '“ 


Echoing demands by the Is- 
t, he 


Jamie Salvation Front, he urged 
the release of hundreds of im- 
prisoned Islamist activists. 

More important, the Front 
has insisted on the participation 
in any talks of the armed Islam- 
ist factions, particularly the 
Armed Islamic Group, which a 
few months ago began a wave 
of killings of foreigners that has 
claimed 59 lives among expatri- 
ates living in Algeria. 

In a statement faxed to news 
agencies Wednesday, another 
wing of the Front welcomed the 
release, saying, however, that it 
will work for “a return of stabil- 


Yugoslavia 

Approves 

Monitors 


the colony’s leading trading groups with lucrative bu ildin g con- 
tracts in return for political favors. 

China asserted that the government gave Jardine Matheson, 


one of Hong Kong's oldest and best-known companies, a major 

" billion) container 


stake in a 12 billion Hong Kong dollar (S1.55 
te rminal because the company backed electoral changes devised 
by Governor Chris Patten against China’s wishes. The attack was 
carried by the Hong Kong China News Agency, which is funded 
by China and is widely seen here as its mouthpiece. 

Mr. Patten warned C hina that mixing politics with economics 
could undermine investor confidence in Hong Kong. 


ity to our country and giving 
iple 


Walw Fkm'The Assncratal Pna* 


Engineers inspecting what remained of the Korean Air jetliner's nose cone Wednesday. 


Storm Rips Nose Off 747 Over Italy 


the Algerian people a basis for 
building a civilized state based 
on the principles of Islam.” 

Algerian and French officials 
said it was far from clear that 
either Mr. Madani, 63, or Mr. 
Belhadj, 29, was in a position to 
command the loyalty of youn- 
ger Islamists who have taken 
charge of the aimed revolt. 

And, they said, there are sig- 
nificant differences among the 
Algerian Army top command 
as to how far a dialogue with 
Islamists can go. Several senior 
generals are known to advocate 
continued war. A previous fig- 
urehead president, Mohammed 
Boudiaf, installed two years ago 


The Associated Press 

ZURICH — Hail heavily 
damaged a Korean Air jetliner 
on a flight from Rome on 
Wednesday, but the aircraft 


was able to land safely and on 
time, airport officials said. 
There were no reports of inju- 
ries to the 108 passengers' 
aboard or to the crew. 




HOTEL DU RHONE 



Geneva s 


first business address in 


the finest location. 


^Thfffeading- Hotels of thcFWbrid- 


TEL. (41 22) 731 98 31 



The Swiss Leading Hotels 


FAX (41 22) 732 45 58 


The nose cone that holds the 
radar equipment of the Boeing 
747 was torn off, the connec- 
tions of the wings to ihe fuse-' 
Lage were ripped open, and the 
air intakes of the- engines were 
heavily damaged, according to 
a statement from the airport 
The windshield on the cock- 


by the junta, was assassinated 
when he stray 


gitwas pitted, and the fuselage 


spayed toward recon- 
ciliation with the fundamental- 
ists. 

“One must be very prudent 
since it is not a secret for any- 
one that the Islamic movement 
and without any doubt the gov- 
ernment are divide!" Alain 
Jupp6, the French foreign min- 
ister, said about 'he moves. 

As the home of a substantial 


numerous dents, it said. 

Flight 916 ran into a heavy minority of Algerians and otb- 
storm over the Po River about a ers of North African descent 
half hour after takeoff from France greeted the develop- 
Rome on Wednesday morning, ment with palpable apprefaen- 
ihe statement said. The plane sion. There is significant con- 
landed on schedule. cem here that the start of talks 


Compiled br Our Staff From Dispatches 

BELGRADE — The Yugo- 
slav government approved on 
Wednesday the deployment of 
international observers along 
its border with Bosnia to ensure 
that Serbia was complying with 
a blockade against renegade 
Serbs in Bosnia. 

In a statement carried by the 
Tanjug news agency, the gov- 
ernment said it welcomed a de- 
cision by “friendly" nations to 
send unarmed “members of na- 
tional humanitarian organiza- 
tions” to the border. 

Earlier Wednesday in Gene- 
va, an international mediator. 
Lord Owen, announced that an 
initial team of civilian Nordic 
observers would head for Serbia 
on Thursday, followed by a sec- 
ond contingent Friday. 

Serbia has agreed to the pres- 
ence of unarmed monitors on 
its borders in hopes of gaining 
an end to United Nations-man- 
dated sanctions that have crip- 
pled its economy for the past 28 
months. 

Official Serbian media re- 
ported earlier Wednesday that 
an easing of the economic em- 
bargo was imminent because 
President Slobodan Milosevic 
had met international demands 
that he end Belgrade's support 
for Bosnian Serbs. 

Belgrade announced a total 
blockade against the Bosnian 
Serbs after they rejected the lat- 
est international plan to end the 
two-and-a-half-year Bosnian 
conflict 

Muslim and Serb news orga- 
nizations in Bosnia reported 
continued fighting in the north- 
western Muslim enclave of Bi- 
hac and Serbian-held territory 
in the north. 

UN peacekeepers said gov- 
ernment forces in Bihac had re- 
taken territory from attacking 
Serbian forces. (AFP, Reuters) 


Polls Bolster Balladur and Delors 


PARIS (Reuters) — Polls boosted Prime Minister Edouard 
Balladur on Wednesday in the campaign for the 1995 French 
presidential election, but one showed that Jacques Delors, outgo 
mg president of the European Commission, would be a strou 
challenger. 

A survey in the dally newspaper Lc Parisian showed that 53 
percent of French voters would have confidence in Mr. Balladur, a 
Gaullist, just ahead of Mr. Delors at 52 percent Neither has 
declared his candidacy. 

A poll in the magazine Paris Match showed that Mr. Balladur 
was the politician who inspired the most trust in France, well 
ahead of Mr. Delors, who was finance minister in a former 
Socialist government 


WE33R 


Ei»*Shrinkro# 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Yanic Button’ for Avis Cars in Miami 


ORLANDO, Florida (AFP) — A panic button hooked up 
through satellites to an emergency police number is bang in- 
stalled on some rental autos to help give tourists an increased 
sense of security. 

Avis said it would install the guidance and security system 
initially an large luxury cars in the Miami area, where foreign 
tourists in rental cars have been victims of several highly publi- 
cized attacks. 

The panic button will relay a distress call to a command center, 
which in turn will notify the police. The system also would allow a 
satellite to detect the exact location of the car through the Global 
Positioning System technology used by boats and planes. It will 
give motorists directions to businesses, restaurants and tourist 
attractions on a video screen. 


^Defend That* fwe 


Soldiers Confess Murder on Cyprus 


Reuters 


LARNACA, Cyprus — The Cypriot police 

i British soldiers 


said Wednesday that two of three British i 
arrested in connection with the disappearance of 
a Danish woman tour guide had confessed to her 
murder. 

Tourist resorts were placed out of bounds for 
the 4,000 British troops on the island as police 
searched for Lhe body of Louise Jensen, 23. 


She was abducted on Tuesday morning, but by 
Wednesday there was still no trace of her. Police 
said charges would not be made until the body 
was found. • 

They said the three soldiers were arrested after 
Miss Jensen’s 21 -year-old Cypriot boyfriend, 
Mihailis Vassiliades, reported that three men in a 
Mini- Moke had overtaken the motorcycle on 
which she was riding and knocked the bike over. 


Air France Pilots Set a 2-Day Strike ^ 

PARIS (AFP) — The two pilots' unions of Air France voted 
Wednesday to strike Friday and Saturday after a dispute over 
productivity payments. Flights originating abroad will not be 
affected, they said. Negotiations broke down Monday. 

Air France, struggling to restructure, is to cut 5,000 jobs over 
three years and is trying to achieve a 30 percent increase in 
productivity by pilots and cabin staff over two years. 

An outbreak of botufism near I -aim Baikal, Russia, has left two 
people dead and three others hospitalized, the Itar-Tass news 
agency reported. (AP) 

Italy stepped up health and i mmi gr a tion controls in Bari in 
response to a cholera outbreak in Albania. A dozen Albanians 
who slipped into the port city were deported. (AP) 

Lightning struck and killed a woman in northeast Spain and two 
men died in storm-related traffic accidents as high winds, and 
heavy rains lashed the region, the police said. (Reuters) 

Scantfinavian Airlines System technicians resumed work 
Wednesday, ending a four-day wildcat strike that grounded most 
domestic flights out of Copenhagen, the carrier said. (AP) 
Private cars wffl be banned from central Athens on Thursday to 
combat a cloud of smog blanketing the city. (Reuters) 

Unpaid workers shut down afl six of Cameroon's airports, 
leaving some aircraft grounded on runways and hundreds of 
passengers stranded. (AP) 

British Midland and Alitafia airlines agreed to add 50 flights a 
day and streamline service for passengers trav elin g to or from 
Italy and points in Scotland, Ireland and England. (AFP) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 


Pose 3 


AMERICAS/ 


lit 


ior Defeats 
>us Right in 
sota Primary 


cm Dispatches In another Rhode Island con- 
— Gover- test, state Representative Pat' 
! Minnesota nek J. Kennedy, the son of Sen- 
11 enge from al or Edward M. Kennedy, 
rvative, in a Democrat of Massachusetts, 
.1 highlight- was easily nominated for the 
ous conser- House. 

lican Parw. On Tuesday, nine states 
x G.Sund- picked the lineups for eight 
s crushed m elections for governor, eight 
•y® a Senate races and 73 House 
: Island. seats. The winners' attention 
ist contest will imm e dia tely turn to the 
i sign of the general election, which is only 
■, within the eight weeks away. 

Mr. Qrnst | n N{JW York, Governor 
wsement at Mario M. Cuomo, a Democrat, 
l mis sum- WQn renomination for a fourth 
™ s \ff 1 § r y term and will /ace a IittJe- 
suppoit for Republican state sena- 

abortion ^ George E. Pataki. 

?f the party , „ 

In a House primary with his- 
(f .i A Hltt „ tori cal overtones, Rjepresenta- 
’then/wirh tive Charles B. Rangel, Demo 
•din J Mr crat of New York, defeated the 

ters mclud- New York Cit ^ mem ' 

bomerva- ber Adam Clayton Powell 4th, 

who want- 5011 ^ namesa ^ e of the 
5 _ t _ ” congressman who was defeated 

by Mr. Rangel 24 yeais ago. 

victory to Another winner was William 
E. Brock 3d, a former senator 
incumbent from Tennessee and also former 
id won the Republican national chairman, 
who captured the Republican 
also picked senatorial primary in Mary- 
Grams, a land. He edged Ruthann Aron, 
mer televi- a developer. Mr. Brock, who 
a Wynift a now lives in Annapolis, will 
democratic take on the Democratic incum- 
or the seat bent, Paul S. Sarbanes. 


lican Party, 
ce G. Surtd- 
5 crushed in 
ition for a 
: Island 
ist contest 
t sign of the 
; within the 
Mr. Quisi 
arsement at 
a this sum- 
rteis, angry 
support for 
abortion 
of the party 

•ed a bitter 
then, with 
iding Mr. 
ters indud- 
conserva- 
who wani- 
t into state 
□pared Mr. 
victory to 


ad won the 



A Premier Who Would Be President 




Tom Hanvm. The A»oculr4 Pieu 

The Parti Qu6b6cois leader, Jacques Parizeau, delivering 
his victory speech after being elected premier of Quebec. 


By Gyde H. Farnsworth 

Sew York Times Service 

QUEBEC — The new premier of Que- 
bec. who someday wants to be the first 
president of a Quebec republic, seems 
more like an aloof Victorian gentleman 
than the committed driving separatist he 
has been for three decades. 

Jacques Parizeau, 64, speaks impeccable 
English with an upper-class British accent, 
sprinkling his speech with expressions of 
yesteryear like “by Jove" and "humbug." 

His harrumphs and guffaws, which 
might seem more at home over Scotch 
whisky in a London club, have become 
trademarks in the rough and tumble of 
Quebec politics. 

Only after giving himself up to image- 
builders in the seven-week election cam- 
paign just ended did be discard his three- 
piece pinstripe for sports jackets and learn 
to trim his often ponderous, professorial 
speeches into sound bites. 

Mr. Parizeau’s handlers even got him to 
appear at the Montreal studios of Musique 
Plus, a popular rock-video television net- 
work, where he disclosed that as a Boy 
Scout his nickname was belette vibranie, or 
“eager weasel." 

If this reserved man unstiffened to get 
closer to the average Quebecker, it was for 
a cause from which he has never wavered. 

In the 1 960s, as one of the young techno- 
crats behind the so-called Quiet Revolu- 
tion, which increased the economic power 
of Quebec’s French speakers, he came to 
believe that federalism did not work for 
Quebec. 


The great epiphany, says his friend and 
adviser Yves Martin, came during a three- 
day train ride in 1967 between Montreal 
and Banff, where as a senior Quebec civil 
servant he was to speak on federalism. 

“He entered the train a federalist.’’ Mr. 
Martin said, “but as he put his thoughts on 
paper, he came inescapably to the conclu- 
sion that Canada could not function with 
Quebec inside and that neither could Que- 
bec function inside Canada.” 

To him, there was a built-in contradic- 
tion: The rest of Canada needed a strong 
central government for the equitable dis- 
tribution of social benefits. Quebec had to 
have a weak central government to allow 
its distinct society, given new definition bv 
the Quiet Revolution, to flourish. 

The country to Mr. Parizeau is a half- 
tom sheet of paper. “Why not tear it apart 
completely?” he asks. 

It is an intellectual argument, based 
largely on economics, befitting a man with 
a doctorate from the London School of 
Economics and a love of rational dis- 
course. Unlike many nationalists, who 
point to years of humiliation of French- 
speakers by English-speaking Canadians, 
he bears no animus. 

Indeed, be angered some nationalists a 
couple of years back with a blunt exhorta- 
tion to Quebeckers to learn English. “In 
our day and time, a small people like us 
must speak English," he said. 

In Monday's vote, the Parti Quebecois 
won a solid majority in the Quebec Na- 
tional Assembly but fell short of 50 per- 
cent of the popular vote. This means that 
Mr. Parizeau faces an uphill fight to win 


the referendum on sovereignty he has 
promised within 10 months. 

The Parti Quebecois gathered 77 of 125 
seats in the legislature, and the Liberals 47. 

In the popular vote, the parties were 
much closer. The Parti Quebecois took 
44.7 percent, the Liberals 44.3 percent and 
Action Democratique 6.5 percent. Thir- 
teen other parties ran candidates. 

His father taught history at the Univer- 
sity of Montreal’s school of business and 
founded an insurance company. The com- 
pany, Sod arc an. now run by Mr. Pari- 
zeau’s younger brother, has about 1,400 
employees. 

After his degree, Mr. Parizeau went to 
Paris and later to London for graduate 
work. In 1955, he followed his father’s 
footsteps on the business school’s faculty. 

“1 was bom to be a teacher, and f'U die a 
teacher,” he has said. 

In 1976. when the first Parti Quebecois 
government was elected under Rent 
Levesque, he became finance minister. 

He resigned in 1984 to protest Mr. 
Levesque's willingness to work inside the 
Canadian federation. His government had 
been shaken by the rejection of separatism 
by 60 percent of the voters in a 19S0 
referendum. 

As finance minister. Mr. Parizeau 
moved to put the levers of economic power 
in the hands of French speakers. 

Not all his initiatives were successful. In 
1979 he introduced the Quebec Stock Sav- 
ings Plan, allowing taxpayers to deduct 
from incomes the purchase of new shares 
in Quebec companies. Many of the compa- 
nies went bankrupt. 


also picked 
Grams, a 
mer televi- 
n Wynia.a 
Democratic 
or the seat 
dt David F. 
ublican. 
Mr. Sund- 
n by past 
smarts and 
■J1 to state 
k, who got 
if the vote. 
; a Novem- 
l a former 
Lincoln Al- 


Colleagues Cite CIA Misogyny in Spy’s Fall 


developer. Mr. Brock, wno gy jjjn Weiner 

>w lives in Annapolis, will York Tima semce 

ke on the Demwffatic incum- WASHINGTON — By all 
nt, Paul S. Sarbanes. accounts, Janine Brookner was 

In Arizona, Governor J. Fife a terrific spy. 

Symington 2d trounced a Phoe- In the Philippines in the 
nix lawyer, Barbara Barrett, for 1970s, she infiltrated the Cqm- 
the Republican nomination, munist Party. “An almost im- 


cy*s barons said in their 1991 or momentum/’ said Glen I'm astounded at the allegations 
evaluation of her job perfor- Holden, who was U.S. ambas- against her. Tliat is not the 
mance. “Top notch." sador to Jamaica from Novem- wo man I knew," 

Today the 53-year-old Ms. ber 1989 to March 1993. “I was Ms. Brookner’s federal suit, 
Brookner sits in a windowless proud of her, and I think our Jane Doe Thompson v. Wool- 
cubicle at the agency's head- country should be proud of sey, was filed in July, 
quarters, her career in mins. her.” * Separately, more than 100 

What happened to Ms. Mr. Holden said he could not other female spies are set to file 


I’m astounded at the allegations 
against her. That is not the 

wo man I knew." 

Ms. Brookner's federal suit. 


then settled back to see who his possible task,” said her boss, 
opponent would be. His 1990 “But not for Janine." 


rival, Terry Goddard, a former 
Phoenix mayor, lost in a tight 


Later, in Venezuela, she re- 
cruited a Soviet-bloc agent. 


race to Eddie Basha, chairman And as the Central Intelligence 
of the statewide supermarket Agency’s station chief in Jamai- 


chain that bears his name. 

(WP, NYT, AP) 


ca from 1989 to 1991, she again 
won praise. “Superb." the ageu- 


POLITICAL NOTES: 


rinking Health Bill 

•N — Democratic House 
s halfheartedly insisted af-. 
President Bill Clinton that 
le to pass a mpdest health 

t Leader George J. Mitchell, 
dne, said there was “very 
or a small bill that would 
: subsidies for children and 

r members meeting for the 
ir Labor Day recess did not 
th care. Members said the. 
lead for this session. 


: end Their Turf 

•N — A single Texas trial 
i 5580,000 to candidates for 
ng the past four years — 
a group of 1,550 trial law- 
ished SI 7.3 million on can- 
ties. according to an ergani- 
br major changes in the 
■m. 

Tort Reform Association, in 
ednesday, said that plain- 
in Alabama, California and 
lassive amounts of money” 
ttle before state legislatures 


and courts to prevent limits on punitive dam- 
ages and other changes in trial procedures. 

"These lawyers have an extraordinary 
amount of political power as measured by 
-their contributions." said the associations. - 
president, Sherman Joyce, adding that he 
found the numbers startling. 

In Texas, the top 15 trial lawyer donors, 
their families and their law firms gave more 
than S3.4 million to stale candidates between 
January 1990 and last June, the period cov- 
ered by the study, which was conducted by 
State Affairs Co., a political consulting firm 
in Northern Virginia. Using similar criteria. 
ATRA said that in California, the top 15 
donors gave more than S9S9.0QU; in Ala- 
bama, the figure was S2.2 million. 

While trial lawyers have been known for 
heavy contributions in national elections, the 
study appears to be the first to focus on their 
role in the states. ( It ’P) 

Quote/Unquote 

Ross Perot, in Atlanta as part of a 10-city 
U.S. political tour, urging supporters to ask 
members of Congress to curb the power of the 
president to order military action: "We have 
in the White House a man who was unwilling 
to risk his life in the Vietnam War. The 
president must now look in the mirror and 
ask himself. ‘Would I. personally, be willing 
to die in Haiti?' ” i Reuters) 


quarters, her career in mins. her." 

What happened to Ms. Mr. Holden said he could not 
Brookner, one of the CIA’s first understand why the CIA’s in- 
female station chiefs? The agen- specter general never spoke to 
cy says she suddenly became a him while investigating Ms. 
drunken sexual temptress in Ja- Brookner. 
maica. But six fellow spies say One longtime clandestine of- 
hers is a case study tn male fleer, who did not want to be 
chauvinism at the CIA. identified, said: “I’ve known 

For her part, Ms. Brookner her personally, professionally 
contends in a scathing lawsuit and socially for 26 years. She 
that she has been punished for has no problem with substance 
challenging the agency’s “per- abuse or any kind. She is a very 
vasive atmosphere of machismo conservative person socially, 
and sexual discrimination” by She is the ultimate professional, 
filing a bias complaint and uy- She is and was one of the best 
ing to discipline a violent subor- case officers I’ve ever known.” 


dinate. 

Ms. Brookner’s fortunes be- 
gan to decline soon after she 
was offered the job of station 
chief in Prague m April 1991, 
while still based in Jamaica. 


George Kaiaris, who was Ms. 
Brookner's station chief in the 
Philippines and later the CIA’s 
chief of counterintelligence, 
calls ber “truly outstanding.” 
“She had a drive, persistence 


The offer was withdrawn a few and sensibility not normally 


months later because, the suit 
says, her deputy-tobe refused 


found in male officers," Mr. 
Kaiaris, now retired, said in an 


to work for a woman. Her col- interview. “She made me 
leagues suspect that she com- change ray mind about the po- 
mitted “career suicide,” as one tential that women had as espi- 
of them put it. when she filed an onage officers. She worked in a 


internal complaint about the af- 
fair in 1992. 

Then, after she reported that 
ber deputy station chief in Ja- 
maica was brutally beating his 
wife, he turned the tables, call- 
ing her a hard-drinking hussy, 
the suit says. To the disbelief of 
many of Ms. Brookner’s col- 
leagues, the agency’s inspector 
general and top managers be- 
lieved him, and that ended her 
climb through the CIA's ranks. 

“I’m surprised these allega- 
tions could gain any credibility 


macho society, and she succeed- 


Separately. more than 100 
other female spies are set to file 
a class-action suit charging 
rampant sex discrimination at 
the CIA; settlement talks with 
those women continue. The 
agency says it is doing its best to 
promote women and minorities 
at every level, and the director 
of central intelligence, R. James 
Woolsey, has offered them an 
olive branch, declaring publicly 
that the nation’s spies canno't 
“function as a fraternity, much 
less a white male one.”’ 

Ms. Brookner spent much of 
the 1980s based in New York, 
spying on the UN missions of 
the Soviet Union, other East 
European nations, Cuba and 
Libya. In 1984, her suit says, the 
CIA ignored her warning that a 
colleague on temporary assign- 
ment at the United Nations was 
breaking the rules, taking his 
foreign girlfriend to a secret 
CIA safe house on Manhattan's 
Upper East Side and blabbing 
about clandestine operations. 
The man in question was Al- 
drich Hazen Ames, the CIA of- 


ed at getting after some of the ficial who began spying for the 
most difficult targets we had. Soviet Union in 1985. 


INSEAD 


Barry Makes a Comeback in Washington 


>agel 

-St into a 
oom and 
; crack co- 

nrgiveness 
Mr. Barry, 
estled to a 
ne posses- 
i jail term, 
r him said 
ran better 
dminis tra- 
four years 

■ther,” said 

owner of 

They said 
id he done 
w to noth- 
ple. That’s 
id and no- 

a concert 
with the 
iat Marion 
£ to every 
o lost hope 


jirias 

the families 
dad and the 
huhayher, 
u Hamad, 
id, Qa’wur, 
juii, Sifry, 
of Beirut, 
Jyadh’ and 
sadness 

Saud Jirias 
til, 1991 in 
ed by her 
lets I Usiha, 
L Suad was 
• and Habib 


in our society that if you get 
knocked down in America, if 
you dean yourself up and be a 
man, you can do it” 

“This is a remarkable situa- 
tion,” said Chris N geo bo, an 
observer from South Africa 
who attended the Barry party as 
part of a U.S. Information 
Agency program. “In my coun- 
try, people would be skeptical 
of someone coining back from 
committing a crime like this.” 

Without an uptown crowd, 
Mr. Barry achieved a powerful 
grass-roots success. The only 
elected official in view at the 
party was R. David Hall, the 
school board member now run- 
ning as an independent for an 
at-large council seat. 

“Barry is a superb poiiti- 
dan," said Mr. - Hall, hastening 
to add thaL he was stopping at 
Mr. Ray’s party as well. "Barry 
knows you can’t leave a city 
split like this. Now the question 
will be whether Congress can 
accept the will of the majority 
of District voters. We’ll see if 
this is real self-determination." 

The party was a thank-you 
gift to hundreds of campaign 
workers who mounted one of 
the most extraordinary get-out- 
the-vote efforts in local political 


Your Studio or 
Apartment in Paris 


history. The dty seemed chock- 
ablock with Barry vans and 
buses. 

A large group of homeless 
men stood in line at the party, 
waiting for their turn at tables 
piled high with fried chicken 
and cold cuts. “We need some 
kind of hope for housing in this 
dty.” said Brian Dargan, 37. 
who lives at Lhe Olive Branch 
shelter and asserted that Mr. 
Barry had saved the homeless 
shelter for the Community for 
Creative Non-Violence. "We 
will be rewarded for this work 
in another lifetime." 



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Page 4 


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 


opinion 


Jteraih 


INTERNATIONAL 



Eribunc. 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Clinton Can’t Go It Alone 


President BUI Clinton insists he will 
not ask Congress for authorization to 
invade Haiti. The shortcut spares him the 
possibility of repudiation for a venture 
that appears more dubious and unpopu- 
lar by the day. But it cheats on the separa- 
tion of powers as defined in the constitu- 
tion. It threatens to undercut not just the 
quick operation planned against the 
thugs in Port-au-Prince but the pro- 
longed occupation meant to follow. And 
it promises to bring a political disaster 
upon the administration for misreading 
the popular mood on the process as well 
as the substance of its policy. 

Administration spokesmen trot out 
justifications of presidential prerogative. 
The constitutional scholars shred these 
claims The basic point of law remains 
that the Founding Fathers plainly meant 
the legislature to have a meaningful say in 
military action beyond the immediately 
defensive. A succession of wary presi- 
dents has resisted imposition of rigid con- 
sultation under the Vietnam -era War 
Powers Resolution, and there is reason 
for this. But a succession of wise presi- 
dents has understood the advantage to 
the country — and to presidents — of 
voluntarily bringing Congress in on dedt 
sions entailing a recourse to force and an 
exposure of Americans to battlefield peril 
In this instanc e, the adminis tration con- 
veys the impression that it has adequately 
"consulted" Congress and informed the 
public. Our impression is that the presen- 
tation has been piecemeal No single clear 
and comprehensive conception of policy 
exists of the sort you would expect in a 
formal presidential presentation. The ad- 
ministration heads toward an early seif- 
imposed deadline in a public fog. 
it seems to believe that its request for an 


enabli 

Conn 


request! 

resolution in the UN Security 
moots the obligation or reason to 


seek the political company of Congress, let 
alone the consent of a properly informed 
public. Imprudently, especially for a com- 
mander in chief short on military creden- 
tials or standing, it counts on the public to 
rally around if bullets begin to fly and the 
usual accidents of war occur. 

The right precedent lies in President 
George Bush’s request of Congress to au- 
thorize force, by a majority vote in both 
houses, in the Gulf in 1991. The issue was 
difficult and hot, and Mr. Bush — having 
resisted but been pushed into seeking that 
authority — took a real chance. It paid off 
in the impetus the vote gave his policy and 
standing and in the cover it offered if the 
operation had failed. Had Congress re- 
buffed him — and Mr. Clinton cannot 
ignore this possibility — he could have laid 
off responsibility for the consequences. 
With a Democrat in the White House, 
Republicans are notably more eager, and 
Democrats less, to bring the legislature 
into the act But the principle of shared 
accountability remains the same, and the 
concept of a commander in chiefs needing 
to be able to respond to military danger 
too speedily to countenance the delay has 
no relevance whatever in this instance. 

The national security/national interest 
case for the evidently planned action 
seems to us to hover somewhere between 
exceedingly thin and preposterous. If there 
is a better case than that, the administra- 
tion should be willing to make it to the 
public and to Congress. It should be will- 
ing to seek consensus and consent for 
spending the money and taking the 
chances with American lives, no matter 
how pitiable the Haitians' military re- 
sources or how good the odds of succeed- 
ing may seem to the p lann ers. A govern- 
ment that calls op reserves for military 
action has an obligation to do these things. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A Major Stride in Cairo 


The acrimonious debate ova- abortion 
at the world population conference in 
Cairo has obscured the truly radical ele- 
ment in the document approved by dele- 
gates at the final session Tuesday: the 
notion that e nhancin g the educational, 
political and economic opportunities for 
women is perhaps the surest way to curb 
further population growth. 

Previous conferences in this once-a-de- 
cade event have favored other solutions, 
such as economic growth ("development is 
the best contraceptive") or the provirion 
of family planning services. Each ap- 
proach can claim successes, and the 
world has made great progress in reduc- 
ing the rate of growth in recent decades. 
But the absolute number of births contin- 
ues to rise and major problems remain in 
many impoverished countries. 

The great contribution of the Cairo 
declaration is to add another weapon to 
the arsenal: the empowerment of women. 
This emphasis was largely at the behest of 
women’s groups, giving the document an 
odd flavor of feminist rhetoric. But surely 
it is intuitively right to assume that wom- 
en, as bearers of the world’s children, are 
in the best position to slow birth rates 
and that, if given greater opportunities, 
they will forgo continuous childbearing. 

Beyond intuition, there is empirical ev- 
idence. The state of Kerala in populous 
India, though very poor, has reduced its 


fertility rate to replacement levels, thanks 
in large part to high levels of female 
literacy and education and growing eco- 
nomic opportunities for women. 

The conference did nothing to eluci- 
dale the long-running debate between 
pessimists who fear population growth 
will outrun food and natural resources 
and optimists who believe the world can 
support much larger numbers. But one 
does not have to be a Malthusian catas- 
trophist to believe that, in many poor 
nations, economic and social problems 
could be more readily mastered if popu- 
lation growth were curbed. 

In most minds, the Cairo conference 
will be remembered for the battle over 
abortion and sexual issues, pitting the 
Vatican and many Islamic countries 
against the United States and other secu- 
lar governments. But its true importance 
will lie in whether it persuades govern- 
ments and private groups to adopt pro- 
grams to control growth rates. 

The Clinton administration did a mas- 
terful job in defusing the Vatican’s diplo- 
matic attack and committing U.S. money 
and influence to the international effort 
In contrast to the sorry performance of 
the Reagan administration, which virtu- 
ally withdrew from the global effort a 
decade ago, the Americans this time took 
a forceful and farsighted leadership role. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Crashing Into a Noble Idea 


The woebegone citizen Frank Eugene 
Corder hit something bigger and more 
fragile than the White House with Ids 
stolen Cessna. He crashed into and dam- 
aged U.S. faith in the protective capabili- 
ties of technology and security forces. 

Radar and heat-seeking missiles are 
useful tools. The Secret Service has its 
strengths, most of which derive from the 
selfless bravery of members who really 
are willing to die in the line of duty. But 
no technical wizardry and courage can 
forever disguise one of the grimmest facts 
of modem history. Even the most ad- 
vanced society is never far above what 
William Butler Yeats called the “bestial 
floor" of human disorder, and the nets 
constructed above that floor are weaker 
than most dare to imagine. 

Perhaps the military triumphs of the 
early 20th century gave Americans an 
exaggerated confidence in protective ma- 
chines and bureaucracies. Even in Wash- 
ington, where fallibility is ever on parade, 
officials and journalists share that faith. 
In the early 1 980s, a high fence was erect- 
ed between the Treasury building and the 
White House, and behind that fence a 
mighty excavation went on for months. 
The grapevine buzzed with talk that some 
advanced and highly competent security 
work was being installed to protect the 
Executive Mansion from terrorist tricks. 

Newspapers and broadcasters, out of a 
sense of responsibility, have never report- 


ed in much detail about what is lodged in 
the bunkers and on the rooftops around 
Pennsylvania Avenue. There was a wide- 
spread impression — a faith, if you will — 
that these locations housed devices of 
great potency for diverting or exploding 
incoming threats from land or air. 

Mr. Carder's mad glide rent a hole in 
that faith. The White House may well be 
protected by radars capable of detecting 
an intruder violating its airspace and by 
artillery and missiles capable of downing 
aircraft But response time is limited and 
firing off weapons in Washington's crowd- 
ed streets or air corridors is risky. 

What is supposed to protect the White 
House is, of course, a notion much more 
valuable and, if it can be sustained, much 
more powerful than weaponry and sharp- 
shooters. It is the idea that Americans 
want and deserve to be governed by a 
person living in a house on a street dose 
to comings and goings of dozens. The 
value of that idea is apparent to anyone 
who has experienced the vast isolation 
and remoteness of executive or imperial 
residences in other great capitals. 

Mr. Corder wanted his moment of no- 
toriety. But if he succeeds in turning 
Washington into a bunkered city, be 
must go down on a list of archcriminals 
who with bullets and now with an air- 

E lane have assaulted a noble idea about 
ow presidents ought to live. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



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A President 
In Search of 
Credibility 

By Jim Hoagland 

W ASHINGTON — President 
Bill Clinton has one good 
reason not to put his intention to 
invade Haiti to a vote in Congress: 
He might well lose. Odds, not con- 
stitutional principle, guide this 
pragmatic politician as he slides 
inexorably mto an invasion deci- 
sion he should delay indefinitely. 

It is not only the weakness of 
the president's case for an invasion 
that makes him bypass Congress. 
It is also the political and intellec- 
tual weakness of the Democratic 
leaders of the House and Senate, 
who want to duck a potentially 
controversial decision on war-, 
making before midterm elections. 

Mr. Clinton had already 
learned to his regret that Tom 
Foley and George Mitchell can- 
not deliver their legislative bod- 
ies. Haiti is a case where they do 
not even want to try. The House 
speaker and the Senate majority- 
leader meekly abandoned over 
the weekend the constitutional' 
powers they defiantly asserted for 
Congress when George Bush pre- 
pared Operation Desert Storm. 
On television they said Mr. Clin- 
ton does not have to seek their 
votes for Haiti. 

Their logic seems to be that 
Democratic presidents can make 
small wars without congressional 
authority while Republican presi- 
dents must seek approval for larg- 
er wars. That is the deconstruc- 
tionist subtext they propose for 
the constitution's award of war- 
making powers to Congress. 

The double irony of thdr posi- 
tions seems to have escaped Mr. 
Foley and Mr. Mitchell: The dem- 
ocratic right of the voters of Haiti 
to have the Reverend Jean-Ber- 
trand Aristide as their president 
must be preserved, with UJL com- 
bat forces if necessary. But the 
right of US. voters to pass on that 
proposition through their elected 
representatives in Congress is ne- 
gotiable, if not negligible- 
Second irony: The congressio- 
nal Democrats have just added 
retroactively to the luster of the 
Bush presidency. Mr. Bush’s deci- 
sion to seek a congressional vote 
— against his aides’ strong advice 
— stands in statesmanlike con- 


AIL RIGHT! NON/ 
tmi pom 
MAP£ 



win dml 
UAMNP. 


trast to the Qin ton- Fol ey-Mi tch- 
ell cop-out on Haiti. 

Mr. Bush could afford to risk 
the vote because he knew that he 
would order Desert Storm to pro- 
ceed even if he lost in Congress, 
as long as the margin was dose. 
He never explicitly said that to his 
closest aides, but several have 
told me they understood he 
would do exactly that But Mr. 
Bush won the vote and did not 
face that dilemma. 

Mr. Clinton, on the other hand, 
is waging a psychological war 
against the illegal Haitian junta. A 
loss in Congress would be fatal to 
Ms effort to terrorize the terrorists 
into leaving peacefully. Mr. Clin- 
ton's tactics of h uffing and p uffin g 
the junta into exile rule out risk- 
taking on Capitol Hifl. 

There is no doubt, however, 
about the outcome of the inva- 
sion itself. The American military 
will make quick work of Haiti’s 
ragtag army. The US. military 
(irony of ironies) will temporarily 
boost Mr. Clinton’s stock with 


the electorate. That is not why the 
president will order the invasion; 
out it is not an outcome that the 
White House ignores, either. 

The president’s aides have be- 
come rather candid about why he 
will invade Haiti, yet deal on ref- 
ugees with Fidel Castro. (Cuba’s 
hell is apparently more tolerable 
than Haiti’s helL) The national 
security adviser, Anthony Lake; 
speaking at the Council on For- 
eign Relations this week, listed 
among the reasons for invasion 
the need to defend American 
credibility in foreign affairs. 

That is another way of saying 
that this conflict is more about 
the Clinton presidency than it is 
about Haiti. It is more about our 
politics than theirs, winch we un- 
derstand imperfectly. That is a 
good reason for not going to war 
now, as well as for not going to 
Capitol Hill for approval 

The main reason for the inva- 
sion of Haiti will be to reinstall 
democracy, in the person of Fa- 
ther Aristide. But Mr. Lake’s re- 


THE ^DOMESTIC TOi-iCV 
FRESUOfiNT SETTLES IM 
AFTER A MICE UK GUUAI70N 


cent speech and the administra- 
tion’s other public statements do 
not contain a convincing analysis 
of the nature of Haitian politics 
and of the democracy that is 
about to be restored by American 
military muscle. It is not clear 
that such an analysis has been 
done wi thin the UJ5. government 

Father Aristide, termed a Hai- 
tian Robespierre by his followers, 
suggests hims elf that he is more 
about revolution — by all neces- 
sary means — than about parlia- 
mentary democracy. By the na- 
ture of things, if not by his own 
nature, Father Aristide will 
quickly turn and bite the hand 
that reinstalls him when he needs 
to mobilize the masses. 

Mr. Lake argues that the presi- 
dent’s credibility cannot afford an- 
other more delay on Haiti. That is 
a damning statement about the 
conduct of foreign policy thus far 
in this administration- Haiti is a 
place where presidential credibil- 
ity can only be lost, not regained. 

The Washington Post 


Beware the Chinese-Owned Suitcases Leaving Town 


TT ONOLULU — After touring 
Xi China in late August with 24 
i^nerican corporate chief execu- 
tives. Commerce Secretary Ronald 
Brown expressed glee over deals 
signed under ins auspices and the 
money to be made in the Middle 
Kingdom. But those who think 
this is a forerunner of a lucrative 
new wave of U.S. investment in 
China should think again. 

This latest bout of Snophoria 
tramples economic horse sense 
and repeats a miscalculation 
American businesses have been 
making for 200 years. Since the 
days of the clipper ships, China’s 
huge population and economic 
backwardness have led to repeated 
predictions of vast wealth to be 
harvested by foreigners, but com- 
mercial successes have been rare. 
American executives gawk at Chi- 
na and imagine a market of 12 
billion consumers. 

The mistake is to confuse need 
with d eman d Demand implies an 
ability to pay. Chinese people 
know they will have to struggle 
just to feed, clothe and offer even a 
minimal education to the majority 
of those imaginar y consumers. 

Even if that massive market did 
begin to materialize, the absence 
of an impartial legal system would 
remain an insurmountable barrier 
to long-term economic success. 


By Todd Carrel and Richard Hornik 


““ — ..ui * 1 1 

r,|! 

To Prosper, 
Burma Must 
Open Doors 

By Clare Hollingwoith 

L ondon — a strange but 
/nonetheless close military 
and economic alliance has devel- 
oped between China and thcuali- 
taiy of Burma. White this' new 
and unexpected relationship has 
alarmed India, the countries of 
Southeast Asia have paid but Ht- 
.tle attention to the fighter air- 
craft, high-speed assault vessels, 

TnigwleSj armored cars, trucks and 
enormous quantities of small 
arms that Beijing has handed over 
to the Burmese defense forces. . 

Lieutenant General Xhin 
Nyunt, known as “the first among 
equals" in the State Law and Or- 
der Restoration Council, has 
opened up the country to China. 

Beijing now enjoys important 
commercial facilities in Burma as 
well as vital naval ones in the Bay 
of Bengal. Currently, Oftpettafe 
Khin Nyunt is in Chi na , visiting 
military bases following a meeting 

with Prime Minister Li Peag. 

The change in relations was ini- \ 
dated by Beijing four years ago, 
when the Chinese Communist Par- 
ty abruptly terminated moral and 
financial support- for thcXT BUT- 

mese “comrades,** who were in 
open opposition to the junta. The 
Chinese Army then ceased to give 
assistanc e and limited supplies of 
small arms to the anti-junta ethnic 
rebels operating near the two 
countries’ joint 1,300-nrite border. 

These friendly gestures toward 
Rangoon were followed by the. 
opening of the border to extensive 
barter trade. The empty shelves of 
the state shops in Mandalay and 
Rangoon, woe suddenly filled with 
Chinese-manufactured consumer 
goods. A new air of prosperity 
developed in urban districts as ^ 
younger members of the junta be- 
gan to open the country to foreign 
investment and tourists after three 
decades of isolation. 

At the same time, about 3,000 
Chinese Army engineers and 
technicians moved in to supervise 
the reconstruction of three main 
roads from the Chinese border to 
Rang oon and the coast, as well as 
the railroad line. Other Chinese.* ; 
specialists began repairing and?' “ 
enlarging three naval bases to 
provide facilities for visiting Chi- 
nese destroyers and submarines. 

Chinese cadres claim the moves 
are designed to facilitate the ship- 
ment of consumer goods produced 
in western China to Pakistan and 


trary figure of about 10 percent —the Middle East — via Burma in 


Although the country’s rubber- 
stamp National People’s Congress 
chums out new laws like sausages, 
enforcement is arbitrary. Foreign- 
ers inevitably become ensnaded in 
intrigue and graft 
An Australian businessman, 
James Peng, was deported to Chi- 
na from Macao last October and 
held nine months before being 
charged with corruption. His ap- 
parent crime: winning a civil 
court case against the Shenzhen 
special economic zone. Although 
even China’s biased legal system 
found in favor of Mr. Peng, he is 
still in jail and likely to stay there 
until he pays a large ransom. 

Mr. Peng at least has some 
of buying justice. Arbitrary 
"e by officials deprives ordinary 
Chinese citizens of the opportuni- 
ty to apply their talents. 

About 375 million peasants are 
iunemployed or underemployed. A 
third of them descend on urban 
areas each year seeking jobs. Gov- 
ernment-owned enterprises in Chi- 
na’s cities have 30 million redun- 
dant employees. Ten million 
young people enter the labor force 
every year. Americans tend to see 
this as a gigantic reservoir of cheap 
labor. Yet the Chinese government 
knows that serious peasant and 


worker unrest could explode at 
any time. The response has been to 
flood the economy with credit. 

Instead of shutting down bank- 
rupt enterprises, the government 
keeps them afloat with billians of 
dollars in loans that will never be 
repaid. This keeps credit from 
flowing to the more productive 
private and cooperative sector 
and to foreign joint ventures. 
Worse still, pumping out money 
for unproductive ventures fuels 
inflation, officially estimated at 
24 percent in July. 

Even if some officials under- 
stand that inflation can be con- 
trolled only by slowing the supply 
of money and credit, China's el- 
derly leaders do not have the polit- 
ical nerve to stick to an austerity 
plan. Slashing spending is too dan- 
gerous. It would increase unem- 
ployment — and decrease the op- 
portunities for friends and 
relatives of the ruling ehte to make 
moneythrough speculation, insid- 
er t rading and influence peddling. 

The elite’s view of economics 
does not include concepts like 
risk and reward. Mq'or foreign 
contractors anxious to help 
build China’s infrastructure will 
find that Chinese leaders think 
profits should not exceed an arbi- 


Congress Has a Trade Deal to Ratify 


By Lloyd Bentsen 

The writer is secretary of the U.S. Treasury. 

W ASHINGTON — For sev- mean that every 
. en years, two Republican 
administrations and this Demo- 
cratic administration have 
worked on behalf of American 
business to fashion a new global 
trade agreement that opens mar- 
kets and lowers barriers to U.S. 
products. We have achieved that. 

Increasing the opportunities 
for U.S. businesses to sell thdr 
products and services abroad is 
not a partisan issue, and it 
should not become one. Creating 
quality jobs for Americans who 
want to improve their standard 
of living is not a partisan issue, 
and it should not become one. 

These are economic issues. 

Now, as we seek to ratify the 
Uruguay Round and put it to 
work for Americans, some sug- 
gest waiting. Some suggest that 
in seven years of work we haven’t 
thought this through, that we’re 
giving up more than we’re get- 
ting. That’s just not the case. 

Now is tiie time to exercise 
leadership. There is a price to be 
paid — by Americans and by the 
U.S. economy — for waiting. 

The Uruguay Round, because 
it increases business activity, 
raises money that holds down 
the deficit by 360 billion over the 
next 10 years. Delaying the trea- 
ty reduces the impact of deficit 
cuts. Waiting six months would 


ry year for the next 

10 years there will be 25,000 few- 
er jobs than if it is enacted now. 
A delay of six months would 
mean lost production of $70 bil- 
lion over the next decade. 

We have estimated tha t this 
agreement will increase Ameri- 
ca’s income by $1,700 per fam- 
ily per year. Delay literally robs 
Americans of money from their 
pockets. They win never recoup 
what is lost m that six months 
because the long-term potential 
of the agreement will not be as 
great. We project that the aver- 
age U.S. family will lose $110 a 
year in income over the next de- 
cade if we delay implementation. 

And, because this agreement 
effectively amounts to a global 
tax cut of $750 billion, delaying 
the start of the Uruguay Round 
would reduce the size of that tax 
cut by $90 billion. 

The final details of the Uru- 
guay Round have been known 
for nearly a year. This adminis- 
tration has consulted closely 
with Congress on its provisions. 
Thirteen congressional commit- 
tees and subcommittees have 
held 22 public hearings on the 
agreement, and there have been 
dozens of executive sessions, 
briefings and caucus meetings 
to discuss the agreement. 

The a dminis tration has pro- 


posed a package of revenue 
changes to make up for the tariff 
income the government will lose. 
That was done to keep the bud- 
get process intact, even though 
the accord will bring in far mare 
revenue than it will cost. 

Sixty yeara ago, when trade 
talks began, our average tariff on 
imported goods was 60 percent 
Now we are on the verge of 
bringing the average tariff in in- 
dustrial countries down to 4 per- 
cent. That is a remarkable ac- 
complishment. It will mean 
500,000 new jobs for Americans, 
and $ 1 50 bflhon per year in addi- 
tional economic activity. 

It will also provide new pro- 
tections for intellectual proper- 
ty, which are important sinnw 
America loses billions of dollars 
a year to copyright violations. 
And it contains an effective tool 
for resolving trade disputes. The 
leverage the United States gains 
puls it in a far stronger position 
to enforce fair trade rotes. 

Americans deserve to have 
the Uruguay Round’s benefits 
as soon as possible. They don’t 
want delay. They don’t want 
more of the same from Wash- 
ington — gridlock that gets us 
nowhere. Going slow only 
keeps the United States off the 
road to growth. 

Congress can demonstrate 
leadership by promptly adopt- 
ing the Uruguay Round. 

The Washington Post 


Even when profits axe not lim- 
ited in the original contract. 
Western investors with successful 
operations often find that their 
local partner will impose new tax- 
es, fees and expenses as soon as 
monqy starts to roll in. 

Taiwanese investors have been 
among the most successful groups 
on the mainland, but fewer than 
half their ventures are tinning a 
profit This year new Taiwanese 
investment has plunged. 

American investors should at 
least pose a simple question before 
taking the plunge: If China is such 
a great investment why are its 
best-connected and richest citizens' 
rushing to get their money out? 

In May, a Chinese central bank 
official said his country suffered a 
net capital outflow to the United 
Stales in 1993. For the last two 
years the Hong Kong stock and 
property markets have been 
boosted by an influx of hot mon- 
ey from the mainland. A former 
Chinese banking official esti- 
mates capital flight of $10 billion 
to $15 billion a year. 

Hie money trails lead to the 
leaders, and to their families and 
cronies. They have been moving 
money to places where it will be 
secure from the vicissitudes and 
risks they see so clearly for their 
country. They will succeed in get- 
ting their money out while many 
foreign investors will faff. 

These days China’s ruling Com- 
munist elite have two economic 
laws. Foreigners are welcome to 
bring in their money. And most 
money that goes out will leave 
inside Chinese-owned suitcases. 

Todd Carrel and Richard Hor- 
nik, former Beijing bureau chiefs 
on leave from ABC News and Tone 
magazine, respectively, are jour- 
nalists in residence at the East- 
West Center, a research institute. 
They contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


order to avoid the expensive and 
lengthy journey via Shang hai and 
the Straits of Malacca. But it is no 
secret that the Chinese Navy has 
been permitted to set up listening 
posts on two uninhabited islands 
m the Bay of Bengal 

The Chinese are hoping to flex 
their military muscles in the Indi- 
an Ocean in order to demonstrate 
that they are gradually deploying 
“a blue water navy” as proposed 
by the late Zhou EnlaL This will, 
they calculate, provide them with 
extra clout to assert sovereignty 
over the Spratly Islands. 

Meanwhile, the Nobel Peace 
laureate Daw Aung San Suu Kyi 
remains under house arrest despite 
the overwhelming victory of her 
National League for Democracy 
in free and fair elections in 1990. 
The U.S. government has refused 
to appoint an ambassador to Bur- 
ma for the past three years to stress 
its disapproval of the junta. That ^ 
example has, unfortunately, not 
been followed by the British and 
other European governments. 

The Burmese lack the skflR and 
equipment to efficiently produce 
the minerals in which their country 
is rich. Furthermore, basic infra- 
structure installed by the British 
before World War n is crumbling 
and inadequate. While China can 
help expand the telephone service 
and modernize hnwiy, Burma is in 
urgent need of technical assistance 
and finance from the United 
States, Europe or Japan. The junta 
members realize they cann ot a g ain 
dose the door to foreigners, even 
though they bring with them 
about democracy. 

It is important that the United 
States and the United Nations in- 
crease pressure on the junta. There 
is still deep discontent in many 
rural areas and a dearth of foreign 
currency. The Burmese cannot 
without foreign help — 
that China cannot provide. 
International Herald Tribune. 




& 


Willy; d t 

ftork st * 
iidaon: 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS ACO 

1894: An Offstage Bout England’s desire to make the 

kttt\i 7 vrto ir . ° worid safe for democracy, The 

Ntw YORK. Miss de Dio, a British cannot suppress the whole 

2“?!! ¥ 8fir ’ Irish people, and Ireland will nev- 

njssea at Roster and Bial s last er nd(nnwi«iB» aiim onfhnritv ** 
mfiht {Sept. 13]. The Audience 


was astonished to find that the 

hissing came from a box occupied 

solely by Mr. Oscar Hammer- 
stein, one of the proprietors. One 
of the lady’s admirers, a wealthy 
wine merchant, made the box hot 
Words lead to fisticuffs and the 
two men adjourned to the lobby 
where Mr. Hammersrein soundly 
thrashed his opponent 

1919s Irish Resistance 

PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island 
De Valera has msd* a state- 
mrar today [SepL 13]: “The war 
front has been transferred to Ire- 
land. The suppression by armed 
forces of the congress of freely- 
dected representatives of the 

Irisii people is a. comnwnuuy on 


er acknowledge alien authority* 

1944: Assanlt on Aachen 

SUPREME HEADQUAR- 
TERS, Allied Expeditionary 
Force — [From our New York 
edition:] The American 1st Anny 
opened a full-scale assault today 
I Sept- 14] cm the Siegfried line 
citadel of A achen, driving to with- 
in a mile of the dty, and poured 
tanks across the German frontier 
at a number of points in a general 
advance extending southward 
more than ninety nodes. Field des- 
patches described German opposi- 
tion as surprisingly lig ht m the 
Aachen area, with some forts in 
the Siegfried line not even 
manne d, but the thin Nad forces 
opposing the invasion northwest 
or Trier fought like fanatics. 




H'n- 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRI BUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 

©PINION 


Page 5 


Why Can’t Politicians Call 
A Trace Over the Family? 

By E. J. Dionne Jr. 

W ASHINGTON — Why, you gave his new version of the old speech 
might reasonably ask, were two and got a respectful hearing, 
politicians — President Clinton and These explanations are true as far 

former Vice President Dan Quayie — as they go. But they don’t get at just 
lecturing the nation last week on the why it is that out-of-wedlock births 
horrors of out-of-wedlock births? have become a pobucal issue, where 
Isn’t it the job of preachers and Mr. Clinton and Mr. Quayie agree, 
priests and rabbis and parents to say. and where both are right, is on the 
as Mr. Clinton did, that “you proposition that many social prob- 
shouldn’t have a baby before you’re leros — especially street crime and 
ready and you shouldn't have a baby falling educational performance ~— 
when you're not married"? Do we are caused in significant part by the 
need Mr. Quayie to tell us that “it’s decline in the proportion of children 
imoortant for fathers to be involved born to famines in which a father 


important for fathers to be involved 
in raising their children”? 

There are plenty of cynical expla- 
nations. for why both men did the 
“family values” number last week. 
Mr. Clinton, it is said, is desperate 
for some new issues and wants to 
sound like a “New Democrat” again 
by focusing on those tried-and-true 
values of community, opportunity 
and responsibility. The best speech 
of his term so far was his address to 
a group of black ministers in Metn- 
. phis last year in which he also 
'preached on these themes. What 
better way to get out of a deep hole 
than by trying Memphis II? 

As for Kir. Quayie. he wants to be 
president and sees the religious right 
as a prime constituency, especially 
since former Education Secretary 
William Bennett, a favorite of reli- 
gious conservatives, has derided not 
to run in 1996. Mr. Quayie caused 
a huge ruckus in 1992 when he went 
after the television character Murphy 
Brawn for having a baby out of wed- 
lock. In the process, he endeared him- 
self to many a conservative. 

Mr. Quayie, who is by no means as 
dumb as so many say he is, knew 
perfectly well that Murphy Brown II 
would gel lots of attention. So he 


A Survivor’s View 

Regarding ", Japan Marks Day of 
Defeat by Facing Up to the Truth" 
(Aug. 15) and “ Manila Women Pro- 
test Japan Visit" (Aug. 23): 

As a survivor of three years in 
a Japanese prison camp in the Phil- 
ippines during World War II, I 
question Japan's sincerity in facing 
* up to its responsibility for the war 
\ by such expedients as presentations 
in recently built war museums, 
apologies for war crimes in Asia 
and proposals to fund vocational 
training for women, in lieu of direct 
compensation for the victims. 

Such gestures are no more than 


and mother are present and have 
made more than a passing commit- 
ment to each other. 

Raising children is an immensely 
time-consuming endeavor. Single 
parents have a tougher time of it 
than married parents do in large 
part because one person has exactly 
half the potential time available that 
two people do. And what happens to 
a child’s sense of self-worth if the 
father simply disappears? 

Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, 
to his enduring credit, tried to make ‘ 
these basic prints almost 30 years 
ago. He argued that the rise in the 
number of children being raised wi th- 
out fathers would have a devastating 
social impact. He was pilloried by 
many, mostly liberals, who said he 
was “blaming the victims” of pover- 
ty. In Tact, he was trying to figure out 
what could be done to stop the 
spread of poverty and reduce its toll. 

Now. most liberals are willing to 
accept the senator's point. Mr. Clin- 
ton's embrace of the cause of restor- 
ing the family — he did so long 
before he ran for president — is 
a sign that this is one issue where left 
and right. Republican and Demo- 
crat, might come together. 


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By speaking out for the family, 
liberals are underscoring the view 
that social problems cannot be 
solved by government action alone. 
That, in turn, leads to a redefinition 
of the government’s role. In many 
instances, it is not to establish huge 
programs to deal with every aspect 
of a problem but to create condi- 
tions in which families and neigh- 
borhoods are in a stronger position 
to solve problems themselves. 

Dan Quayie takes some satisfac- 
tion in the altered debate, and it is 
true that much of what he said in the 
Murphy Brown speech made sense. 
But before Mr. Quayie is canonized, 
it is worth recalling the political 
point of that speech. 

Far from searching for a consen- 
sus on family issues, many Repub- 
licans used talk about “family val- 
ues” as a battering ram to cast 
Democrats as the advocates of 






alien ideas, presumably because 
they thought it was wrong to dis- 
criminate against homosexuals and 
were somehow enmeshed in that 
horrid “counterculture” of the 
1960s. Mr. Quayie couldn’t resist 
another shot at the counterculture 
in his speech last week, asserting 
that “the elite in particular did not 
want to admit what was going 
wrong in America.” 

Well, O.K.: The folks who vi- 
ciously assailed Mr. Moynihan 
were, indeed, wrong, and some lib- 
erals — though Fewer and fewer — 
have been reluctant to accept that 
private behavior, especially when it 
involves children, does have social 
consequences. But the Republi- 
cans' values talk failed in 1992 be- 
cause on these issues, most people 
don't like bashing or “culture 
wars” or the pretense that one po- 
litical party has a monopoly on 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


grandstanding to promote Japan's 
attempts to become a permanent 
member of the United Nations Se- 
curity Council and conclude better 
trade agreements with its former en- 
emies. Japan should dean up its 
human rights record by putting its 


money where its mouth is and pay- 
ing long overdue reparations to the 
victims of Japanese war crimes and 
their survivors. 

The Japanese assert that the al- 
lied governments absolved Japan 
of the obligation to pay reparations 
in the 1952 San Francisco peace 
treaty. The absolution was instigat- 
ed by the United States, which 
wanted to use Japan as a staging 


area for U.S. and UN troops in the 
Korean War. But under the princi- 
ple of Jus cogens, incorporated in 
international law, it is illegal for 
a government to sign or give away 
the rights of its citizens; therefore 
the exemption on reparations 
granted Japan cannot be sustained. 

BETTY BLUE BYRON. 

Paris. 

When the Bomb Was Used 

In response to “ The Revisionists 
Err : The Bomb Was to Save Lives ” 
( Opinion. Aug 26): by Chalmers M. 
Roberts: 

Most of the people denying 


a “revisionist” viewpoint about the 
dropping of atomic bombs on Hi- 
roshima and Nagasaki point out 
that many more people would have 
lost their lives in an invasion of 
Japan and insist that racism was 
not inherent in the decision. But 
they are missing the point. 

The real question is: Was it neces- 
sary to invade at all? By August 
1945 the Japanese Navy was almost 
nonexistent, lack of fuel had made 
their air force ineffective and food 
stocks were di minishin g. A naval 
blockade by the Allies could have 
starved the Japanese into submis- 
sion without dropping the bomb or 
invading. 


A Battle Over a Bus Seat 
And the Right to Be Rude 


familial virtue. Mr. Quayie insists 
that his point was not to -attack 
single mothers, only to emphasize 
the importance of fathers. But he 
got into trouble because many out- 
side the “elites” didn't read bis 
statement that way. 

So let’s have a truce. Credit both 
Mr. Quayie and Mr. Clinton for 
being right about the intact family. 
Acknowledge that neither Mr. 
Quayie nor Mr. Clinton nor anyone 
else has come up with a magic cure 
for family dissolution. Go to work 
to figure out those limited things 
government can do to strengthen 
the family. Admit that both eco- 
nomic circumstances and the moral 
climate affect the well-being of 
children. And stop pretending that 
our political opponents are sinners, 
knaves or freaks. On these issues, 
we ail see through a glass darkly. 

The Washington Post. 


Many of the American top brass 
were convinced of this point. But 
Russia (as Mr. Roberts so rightly 
asserts) “wanted a piece of the Japa- 
nese empire and a say in Japan’s 
future.” And a naval blockade 
would have taken time. 

The true revisionist viewpoint is 
that President Harry Truman de- 
cided to drop the bomb so as to end 
tbe war quickly before Stalin could 
add Manchuria to his conquests. 
And Japanese deaths be damned! 
The “morality” of using Japanese 
deaths to stop Russian expansion- 
ism is the real question. 

KEN COWAN. 

Paris. 


Bv William 

•f 

W ASHINGTON — Rosa Parks 
refused to give up her bus seat 
to a white man and made history. 
Sima Rabinovicz refused to give up 
her seat to a white man and succeed- 
ed only in making a lot of people 
angry and confused. Including me. 

The defiance of Mis. Parks, in 
1955. proved an eloquent and galva- 
nizing declaration that second-class 
citizenship would no longer be ac- 
cepted by African-Americans. Die 

MEANWHILE 

bus boycott it ignited was the launch- 
ing pad for a then-obscure Baptist 
ouruster named Martin L u t h er King 
Jr. And it brought her such lasting 
fame and respect that America is 
outraged that a young burglar could 
break into her home, terrorize, rob 
and actually strike this “mother of 
the civil rights movement" 

Here is the story of Ms. Rabino- 
vicz's more recent defiance: 

A bus line called Monsey Trails 
operates between Manhattan and 
New Square, a tiny community near 
Spring Valley, New York. The bus 
company is owned by Hasidic Jews, 
though it is licensed as public trans- 
port. And because New Square is 
populated almost entirely by Hasidic 
Jews, nearly all of the riders on Mon- 
sey Trails are Hasidic Jews. 

The religious custom among the 
Hasidim is that a man does not touch 
a woman other than his wife and that 
men separate themselves — even vi- 
sually — from women during prayer. 

In furtherance of that custom. 
Monsey Trails installed a curtain 
down the center of the bus, with 
Hasidic men on one side and women 
(and non- Hasidic men) on the other. 
One day at prayer time several 
months ago. Ms. Rabinovicz. a regu- 
lar on the route, refused to change 
seats — even for the duration of the 
prayers. Die men finally got off and 
held their prayers on (he roadside. 
Ms. Rabinovicz has charged the bus 
company with sex discrimination. 

Here is the confusion: Was she a 
victim of discrimination? Or was she, 
by reason of her refusal to accommo- 
date the religious requirements of her 
fellow passengers, the offender? The 
two lawyers involved with tbe case 
find the answer easy, even though 
they come down on opposite sides. 

Norman Siegel of the New York 
Civil Liberties Union sees the inci- 
dent as an obvious case of unlawful 
discrimination based on sex. “We 
want to prohibit the practice of seat 
selection based on gender.” 

But wasn’t it the passengers, not 


Raspberry’ 

the bus company, who asked Ms. 
Rabinovicz to move temporarily to 
a different seat? No mailer, says 
Mr. Siege). Clearly the company 
condoned the practice, not merely 
by allowing it but by accommodat- 
ing it — by putting up the curtain. 
Nor was the triggering incident the 
first offense, he says. “On several 
occasions the men have demanded, 
rudely and threateningly, that she 
move to the other side of the bus. 
once threatening that they would 
‘stone you till you bleed.’ ” 

Mr. Siegel compares the Monsey 
Trails practice to that for which 
Rosa Paries became a national hero- 
ine for resisting. 

Kevin Hasson, who represents 
the bus company, compares it to an 
airline passenger's request that you 
switch seats so he can sit with bis 
wife. ‘Tve never been on a plane 
where anyone refused to make the 
switch,” he says. “Everybody does 
it. It’s just good manners. But ask 
someone to please move so you can 
pray, and everything changes. It’s 
symptomatic of how religion is dis- 
respected these days.” 

Mr. Hasson, who heads the 
Washington-based Becket Fund, a 
law practice devoted to the defense 
of religious liberty, thinks the bus 
company was entirely reasonable 
in its attempt to accommodate the 
overwhelming majority of its pas- 
sengers. “We’re not talking about 
a good side of the bus and a bad 
side of the bus; we’re not talking 
about somebody being made to 
stand so someone else can sit down. 
They asked her to change seats for 
10 minutes so they could pray. 

“Even Rosa Parks was quoted as 
saying she would have relinquished 
her seat to someone who needed it 
to pray. Her intuition that this was 
not invidious discrimination is ex- 
actly righL” 

And so it seems to me. Fm not 
proposing that the government get 
involved in seal assignment, or that 
individuals voluntarily submit to 
discrimination — or to the rudeness 
that Ms. Rabinovicz alleges and that 
the bus company deities. 

It does stake me. though, that our 
single-minded insistence on “rights,” 
our finely honed ability to find of- 
fense where none is intended, is en- 
dangering the graciousness, the ordi- 
nary civility, that makes it possible 
for societies to function. And it sad- 
dens me that a refusal to suffer what 
seems to me a trivial inconvenience 
for someone rise’s nontrivial purpose 
should wind up in litigation. 

Washington Post Writers Croup. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

ERICSSON $ 


Growing demand for complete 
network solutions is reshaping 
the telecoms supply industry 

Meeting market needs with turnkey network engineering 


ADVERTISEMENT 

ERICSSON 0 


Against a changing commerciai and 
regulatory background, the business of 
supplying telecommunications equip- 
ment is undergoing a major shift 

Established public network operators 
are seeking to cut overheads by con- 
centrating on their core business: supplying 
telecoms services. Other activities - 
including the design and construction of 
networks - are being divested, or 
outsourced. 

One consequence of this is that 
operators are trimming their supplier lists. 
Instead of having hundreds of suppliers of 
individual network building blocks, they are 
now preferring to form new-styte 
partnerships with a handful of companies 
that can offer a complete portfolio of 
competences. 

New public network operators have an 
even more urgent need for turnkey 
solutions. They have to build networks from 
scratch, to start revenue flows quickly, in 
this situation, there is neither the time nor 
the desire to buikl up in-house engineering 
resources and expertise. 

The same trend is also visible In large 
organisations with private networks. They, 
too, are focusing on their core activities, and 
realising that building and operating a 
private network is not something they need 
to do themselves. 

That’s why suppliers like Ericsson now 
increasingly focus on presenting integrated, 
turnkey network solutions, 
v At a functional level, such an approach 
means that the network is delivered as a 
total package, ready to enter service. At an 
operational level, the supplier can take lull 
responsibility for all processes, including 
design, procurement installation, training 
and even running the network for the 
customer. 

For decades, Ericsson has been 
undertaking large-scale turnkey projects, 
particularly in the Middle East, South-East 
Asia and Latin America. 

And as the trend towards turnkey 
network engineering gathers pace, in both 


public and private network sectors 
worldwide. Ericsson is well placed to take 
advantage of the new opportunities. 

Ericsson has a complete range of 
products and systems covering all the key 
areas of telecoms network technology such 
as switching, transmission, network 
management, and radio communications. 

There is a large human resource of 
telecoms project managers with experience 
of turnkey network engineering. 

And helping draw together all this 
knowhow are sophisticated computer- 
based tools developed by the company to 
streamline all the processes in designing, 
planning and implementing complex 
networks. 

It adds up to a thoroughly-proven, 
turnkey engineering capability that Ericsson 
offers for public and private network 
projects on any scale, anywhere in the 
world. 



The Engineering Support System (ESS) 
is a powerful computer tool developed 
by Ericsson for ail stages of network 
engineering r from initial planning 
through to implementation, document- 
ation and forecasting. 


Sweden’s first ‘information 
superhighway’ to use Ericsson switches 


Telia, the Swedish tdecornmunications net- 
work operator, has announced plans to 
create Sweden's first information super- 
highway' in Helsingborg in southern 
Sweden. 

When it enters commercial operation in 
1995 it will provide city-wide data 


networking for private companies and the 
dty administration. 

The network infrastructure will be 
based on nine Ericsson ATM multimedia 
switches, capable of handling voce, data 
and video communications. The test net- 
work will be operational this year. 


Orders increase 
for eleventh 
successive quarter 

The financial report for the first six 
months of 1994 shows Ericsson's order 
bookings up by 19% at SEK 40,342 m, 
net sales up by 33% at SEK 36,51 4 m, 
and pre-tax income up by 78% at 
SEK 2.290 m. 

“This is the eleventh consecutive 
quarter in which order bookings have 
risen,” said Ericsson CEO Lars 
RamqvisL 

. Order bookings in the second 
quarter were boosted by large orders, 
mainly from China, Sweden, the USA 
and Italy. The increase in net sales, to 
which afl business areas contributed, 
was very strong, particularly in Japan, 
the USA, Sweden, Australia and China 

Ericsson’s largest market is the 
USA, accounting for 11 % of total net 
sales, followed by Sweden, Italy, Great 
Britain and China. 

Radio communications activities 
including mobile telephony have grown 
so strongly that they account for half of 
Ericsson’s order bookings and nearly 
half of consolidated net sales. For 
mobile telephony, sales increased by 
80% 

'Our successes are based on goal- 
oriented, Jong-term investments within 
the most expansive areas of telecom- 
munications,' said Mr RamqvisL The 
first six months have been very 
favourable, and I anticipate a continued 
Improvement in earnings during the 
remainder of the yeac” 


How to bring ATM 
broadband services 
to network customers 
more flexibly 

The broadband public telecom networks of 
the future will be based on ATM 
(Asynchronous Transfer Mode) switching 
technology, capable of handling voice, 
video and data services at bandwidths up 
to 155 Mbit/s. 

But many users may require band- 
widths far lower than this figure. 

So Ericsson has developed an ATM 
service access unit that allows the 
155 Mbit/s public network bandwidth to be 
split down to meet the needs of individual 
users. It brings bandwidth on demand to 
individual user premises. 

Existing PBX systems and data 
networks can be connected to the public 
ATM network via the new access unit, 
without the need for any special modi- 
fication. ft supports services such as ATM. 
frame relay and circuit emulation (PBX). 


Volvo chooses Freeset for in-plant 
communications mobility 


Another boost far Ericsson's Freeset 
business cordless telephone 
system has come with a decision . 
by Volvo to install the system in I 
Sweden, initially at the car plant in ] 
Gothenburg. 1 

Some 25% of their 12,000 J 
extensions are scheduled to ^ 
become cordless with 
Freeset by 1995. 

various sys- 

and we found 


US operation wins big 
Taiwan order 

Ericsson GE Mobile Communications Inc, 
together with Ericsson Taiwan, has won 
what is regarded as the largest order ever 
plaoed tor a digital trunked radio system. 

Under the terms of the US$ 110m order 
from the Taiwan National Police Admin- 
istration. Ericsson will supply a fully digital 
EDACS system on a turnkey basis. It will 
provide island-wide coverage, with encryp- 
tion and telephone interconnect 

When completed In three years time, 
the system will have over 40,000 radios, 
supported by eight multi-site subsystems 
and over 80 repeater sites. 


BT and MCI choose 
Ericsson ‘virtual 
network’ knowhow 

Concert, tee BT and MCI joint venture 
company, has chosen Ericsson’s AXE 
equipment for the Concert Virtual 
Network Service (Concert VNS). New 
AXE International exchanges will serve 
as Service Switching Points In London, 
New York, Frankfurt and Sydney. 

Concert VNS is a global service 
being marketed in theAmericas by MCI 
and else whereby BT. Users get an 
International telecommunications serv- 
ice that works as a private network, but 
is created within the public network 
infrastructure - hence tee term Virtual 
private network’. It avoids the fixed 
costs and operational requirements of 
a privately-owned network. 

In collaboration with Concert, BT 
and MCI, Ericsson has developed an 
interface between AXE and the 
Northern Telecom DMS-250 network 
switching equipment that is used in tee 
MCI intelligent virtual network. 


Freeset the most suitable solution 
for tee present needs of Volvo Car 
and Volvo Truck Corporation,” 
explained Rolf Agren. Techno- 
. logy and Production Manager 
at Volvo Data AB. 

The Ericsson Freeset 
system chosen by Volvo is 
Hr a multi-cell, multi-user 
H business cordless tele- 
phone system conforming 
to the DECT standard. 
SP&l It will be supplied 
ISiaBk. by Telia, Ericsson's 
?y|||j^ Freeset distributor in 
nllBY Sweden. 


Coca-Cola 
takes to the air 
with Mobitex 

Coca-Cola drinkers in Norway are unlikely 
to find their nearest vending machine 
‘so Id out of their favourite drink from now 
on, thanks to Ericsson mobile data 
technology. 

Vending machines operated by 
Ringnes Coca-Cola Kafd-Drikk A/S (jointly 
owned by the Norwegian Ringnes brewery 
group and The Coca-Cola Company) are 
to be linked to tee company’s headquarters 
via the Mobitex mobile data network in 
Norway. 

Information gathered daily from tee 
vending machines will allow servicing and 
restocking schedules to be planned on the 
basis of detailed, factual information on 
each Individual machine. 

The company will know, for example, 
exactly when a vending machine needs 
restocking, and also the mix of drinks 
that best fits customer demand at that 
machine. 

Data on cash levels in every machine 
will be transmitted, so tee company knows 
exactly when cash boxes need emptying, 
or the change replenishing, giving full 
control of money and merchandise. 

This automated approach will also 
greatly reduce tee paperwork associated 
with servicing and restocking work. 

Special software and hardware for this 
innovative Mobitex application has been 
developed by Norwegian company Mobile 
Business Systems A/S. 

A trial involving 80 vending machines 
started in September this year. Ultimately, 
It is expected that the approach will be 
applied to all 3.000-4,000 vending mach- 
ines operated by Ringnes Coca-Cola KaJd- 
Drikk/VS. 


World roundup 

China: Ericsson has recently won orders 
worth over US$ 600 m from China. They 
indudW the.. first digital/analogue AMPS 
mobile phone system in China, for the' 
Nanjing region, and expansion- of the 
existing mobile phone network In Beijing to 
nearly 100,000 subscribers. AXE 
switching equipment worth US$ 180 m is 
to be supplied to Uaonjng and -Jiangsu 
Provinces as part of frame agreements 
signed in 1992. ‘ 

A new USS 400 m frame agreement 
with the Guangdong Province covers AXE 
exchanges arid transport network 
equipment to be supplied oyer, a three-. . 
year periodstarftog in 1996. Afeo Included 
is ATM technology for future Tnfbnnatiqn 
superhighways’. . ,• .. 

Croatia: Ericsson Cables is to supply a 
100 km submarine 'optical fibre 
cable to. HPT, tee -Croatian post and 
tetecommumcations, to complete a link 
from Rijeka through ZSdarto Spft. , . 

Greece: A SEK 678 m order from GTE, the 
Greek telecommunications network 
operator, w» take total AXE ftrws installed 
to 1,250,000. 

Lebanon: A 36-monte tomtey project teto | 
expand the Lebanese public telephone 
network. The USS 147 m contract will. I 
restore existing AXE exchanges With j 
55,000 lines, and install 1707000 new 


Malaysia: Ericsson radio technology wiH 
hefo speed up the provision of telephone 
services nationwide to . Malaysia. By toe. 
beginning of ; 1995; an extra 40,000 
subscribers wRf be connected to- the 
nWMorkWaEricssor^RASTOOOI^acfioto 
theLoc^Loop’syatera.underaS^e^ 
m contract between Telekom. Malaysia 
BffxiPeniAa Ericsson StfoBhd.. ? ' 

Ufc Fotawfag .toe co n m w tM ^ibXKk-Of ^ 
thA Mercury OhS&bnaF oefsbnatcom- 


teunteafiorts network 'stfryCe^Erfcssj^; 
' ha9 won ecKpamnSckrT octfeWs; -wc»ritti r 

£140 m. - ir . •, , ? 

- ■ ■ tl- 


USA: Businesses'^ using ■ 

centre* ee price "yHtt' : he^abie..'to :uae. 
Ericsson Freeset.confcess telephones, 
foBowwg »i ^reer%%agned l^aWeert < 

: the two ttotr^tara^ 
make and- reoj^^tetephtw 




Tefefbnaktfeboteget Lit Ericsson, 

S-1 26 25, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Ericsscrfs 70,000 employees are active tnirvro 
than too countries. Tlmr combined axpuloncein 
switching, ratio anti neovoridng makes Ericsson 
a worki loader in tetecommvnications. 


w 


J 





Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER IS, 1994 


** 


Politician Is Reborn in Japan 

Sullied Takeshita Rises From Political Ashes 


New York Tima Service 

TOKYO — After a year of 
political upheaval in Japan, one 
of the few things that had 
seemed certain was that when 
the corrupt old order fell, so 
had Us power brokers, and that 
a new set of personalities had 
stepped forward to dean up the 
system. 

It is a thought that Noboru 
Takeshita likes — the new No- 
boru Takeshita. 

The improbable has become 
the norm here these days, with 
the government a self-styled re- 
form coalition of the Liberal 
Democrats. Japan's most con- 
servative and discredited party, 
and the Social Democratic Par- 
ty- 

Ttae Socialists, accused of 
cynically putting power ahead 
of principle, have since aban- 
doned most of their leftist poli- 
cies, putting themselves suspi- 
ciously close to the conservative 
mainstream. 

But none of these shifts have 
been more startling than the 


quiet return of Mr. Takeshita, 
the onetime kingmaker who, 
more than anyone, ignited the 
scandals that set the old politi- 
cal system ablaze and put Japan 
on its strange new trajectory. 


In a rare interview, the re- 
made Mr. Takeshita saw things 
differently. Only someone who 


Patrick O’Neal, 66, Dies; 
Actor and Restaurateur 


By Eric Pace 

■VfH York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Patrick 
O’Neal. 66. an actor who ap- 
peared on stage, on television 
and in more than a dozen films, 
died Friday of respirator*’ fail- 
ure in Manhattan. 

He had tubnculosis and can- 
cer. said his wife. Cynthia. 

At his death, Mr. O'Neal was 
a co-owner, with his wife and 
his brother, Michael, of O'- 
Neal’s. a restaurant in Manhat- 
tan. which was named the 
Ginger Man until 1993. The 
restaurant prospered, drawing 
patrons from the Lincoln Cen- . 
ter area and farther afield. Mr. 
O’Neal and his brother were 
also co-owners of the Land- 
mark Tavern in Manhattan. 


also acted in many television 
shows and series,' from the 
1950s through the 1980s. 


In 1963, Mr. O'Neal played 
the lead role in "The Ginger 
Man," a play by J.P. Donleavy 
based on his novel of the same 
title. 

Among Mr. O'Neal's .films 
were “A Fine Madness" (1966), 
‘The Kremlin Letter" (1970), 
“In Harm’s Wav” (1965), 
“King Rat" (1965), "The Wav 
We Were" (1973) and ’‘The 
Stepford Wives" (1975). He 


Stuart Abramowitz, 42. a 
New York City subway conduc- 
tor who was shot in the neck 
and paralyzed when he tried to 
protect a" passenger from her. 
gun-toting ex-boyfriend, Thurs-’ 
day in Copiague, New York. ■ 

Melvin Greenberg, 65, who 
built Greenberg Traurig Hoff- 
man Lipoff Rosen & Quentel 
into one of the most powerful 
law firms in Lhe United States, 
Monday of pancreatic cancer in 
Miami. 

Moses Sbefesnyak, 85, a re- 
searcher prominent in the study 
of Parkinson’s disease, Sunday 
in Solvang. California. He ap- 
parently had been bludgeoned. 

John Bradshaw Holt. 84. a 
career diplomat who was the 
deputy chief of the U JS. Embas- 
sy in Vientiane, Laos, during 
civil strife there in 1960, Friday 
of cancer in Brunswick, Maine. 

Langbourne Meade Williams 
Jr.. 91 , the retired chairman of a 
company now known as Free- 
port-McMoRan Inc, Thursday 
in Rapidan, Viigima. 


knew the old system so well, he 
suggested, had the credentials' 
to really push change forward. 


There is little doubt that Mr. 
Takeshita. who is no longer a 
member of a party and whose 
name can barely be uttered in 
public because of its scandalous 
taint, is back. 


T am not confident enough 
to say such a thing myself," he 
said In his unusual indirect 
manner. “But if you take a look 
objectively, some very good so- 
cial critics might agree that that 
assessment is correct." 


It has been reported that Mr. 
Takeshita, who once hand- 
picked prime ministers, is being 
asked for advice by the current 
prime minister — an old friend. 
Tomiichi Mu ray am a of the So- 
cialists — and other top offi- 
cials, who now troop to his of- 
fice regularly. 


Some commentators have 
criticized Mr. Takeshita's new 
influence as a sign that the push 
for fundamental reform is dead. 


Mr. Takeshita spent decades 
as a fixer in the Liberal Demo- 
cratic Party, then effectively be- 
came the most powerful politi- 
cian in the land when he seized 
control of Lhe party's largest 
faction in Lhe mid-1980s. He 
became prime minis ter in 1988; 
but his reign was brief. 

Even though be never faced 
charges, Mr. Takeshita was 
forced to resign in April 1989, 
when he and much of his cabi- 
net were implicated in a shares- 
for-favors scandal It was later 
disclosed that his lieutenants 
had sought the aid of a power- 
ful gangster in his drive to be- 
come prime minister. 


Nevertheless, Mr. Takeshita 
provided one of the backdoor 
channels that brought the So- 
cialists and his old party togeth- 
er. In the interview, the politi- 
cian who was all but invisible 
after his ignominious fall five 
years ago, put the case in what 
was, by his own standards, 
straightforward terms. 

He insisted that he did not 
play any “decisive role" in cre- 
ating the coalition. "Probably." 
he added, “I played the role of a 
mood maker." 


But Mr. Takeshita spoke with 
the assurance of an insider in 
explaining the new govern- 
ment’s direction. 


“There will be continuity’ in 
foreign policy." he said. “Do- 
mestic policy will move toward 
reform. There will be a greater 
degree of openness. But we 
shouldn't be too much con- 
cerned about the word deregu- 
lation. It has become a kind of 
buzzword, very fashionable. We 
want to look at specific issues 
and examine them closely." 


Japan will initiate a major 
change in its defense policies, 
he said, reducing budgets while 
shifting away from land forces 
toward sea and air power. De- 
spite talk to the contrary, Japan 
mil “live up to the commit- 
ments I made" and make all the 
required payments in support 
of the American military bases 
in Japan, Mr. Takeshita said. 

—JAMES STERNGOLD 



Todd Smlini The AtOCUUrd Pits 


U.S. soldiers relaxing atop their vehicles while awaiting deployment from a port near Fort Bragg, North Carolina. 


U.S. Battle Plan: Use Carriers for Troops 


By Michael R. Gordon 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Military officials 
say the current battle plan for an invasion 
of Haiti calls for sending U.S. Army and 
Marine forces from ships and other vessels 
offshore into Port-au-Prince, Cap Haitien 
and other places as quickly as possible to 
seize key installations and crush any resis- 
tance. 

Their goal would also be to protect 
American citizens and help maintain order 
during the eariy hours and days of the 
invasion, aimed at ousting Haiti's leaders 
and restoring its elected president, the 
Reverend Jean-Bertrand Aristide, to pow- 
er. 

“The idea is simultaneous entry in mul- 
tiple places and to avoid disruption by a 
massive presence," said a senior adminis- 
tration official. 

The aircraft carrier America, which 


would serve as a launching pad for special- 
operations forces, left Tuesday for die Ca- 
ribbean. It will be joined by the aircraft 
carrier Eisenhower, which sailed Wednes- 
day carrying troops and about 50 helicop- 
ters from the Army’s 10th Mountain Divi- 
sion. 

Military officials said their plan was to 
use an overwhelmingly U.S. force of about 
20,000 at first, then deploy a s mall multi- 
national contingent and finally turn tbe 
operation over to a 6,000-member UN 
peacekeeping force. 

The peacekeeping force, which would be 
half American and under U.S. command, 
would be withdrawn completely by Febru- 
ary 1996, they said. 

It would be the first time that aircraft 
carriers had been stripped of their war- 
planes and filled with army troops and 
special-operations forces. 

The tactical innovation of using the air- 


craft carriers for troops was promoted by 
Admiral Paul David Miller, head of the 
Atlantic Command, which has overseen 
pl anning of the invasion. 

The use of the carriers “will give you 
flexible entry points so that all the troops 
do not have to go to Port-au-Prince.” a 
senior administration official said. 

The carriers will join two Marine am- 
phibious ships, carrying 1.800 Marines, 
which are already deployed off Haiti. 

Paratroopers from the 82d Airborne Di- 
vision would also assault the island. The 
rest of the American force would be airlift- 
ed. Their equipment would arrive by ship. 

The invasion is expected to he com- 
manded by Lieutenant General Henry H. 
Shelton, the commander of the Army’s 
XVIII Airborne Corps. Vice Admiral Jay 
L. Johnson, the commander of the 2d 
Fleet, is expected to be the deputy com- 
mander. 


In Reverse Flow, Americans to Go to Cuba 


By Robin Wright 

Las Angela Times Service 

WASHINGTON — As dis- 
affected Cubans switch their at- 
tention from rafts to visas in 
their attempts to leave for the 
United States, the Clinton ad- 
ministration is deliberating new 
policies to undermine President 
Fidel Castro. 

To heighten the pressure, the 
administration is seeking to in- 
crease contacts and exchanges 
with Cuba, primarily by making 
it easier for Americans to travel 
there for educational cultural 


humanitarian or religious pur- 
poses, according to senior U.S. 
officials. 

The proposal could end up 
doing to Mr. Castro what be 
tried to do to the United States 
— unleash a wave of civilians to 
influence public opinion and 
force policy choices. 

Groups of reporters might 
visit Cuban journalists to dis- 
cuss freedom of the press, for 
example, while religious organi- 
zations might visit their coun- 
terparts, and other nongovern- 
mental charities could travel to 


provide humanitarian goods or 
services. 

The proposal seeks to use a 
section of the 1992 Cuban De- 
mocracy Act that imposes an 
economic embargo on Cuba but 
also encourages humanitarian 
assistance and exchange of in- 
formation and ideas. 

Americans traveling to Cuba 
must get a license from the 
Treasury Department or face a 
penalty of up to $50,000. 

“There are a lot of people 
who want to go to Cuba, people 
who want to engage in humani- 


tarian exchanges." a senior offi- 
cial said. 

Defining who and what mis- 
sions qualify is at the top of a 
list of options to encourage 
stronger American contacts and 
exchanges with Cubans. Since 
the act was passed, Washington 
has licensed $50 milli on worth 
of humanitarian goods provid- 
ed by American groups directly 
to Cubans, according to the 
State Department. 

Also under consideration is 
allowing a Cuban press office to 
open in New York. . 


Democrats 

t 

Dodge Vote 
On Haiti 


Invasion 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupotcha 

WASHINGTON — Senate 
Democratic leaders blocked & 
Republican effort Wednesday 
to force an immediate vote on a 
U.S. invasion of Haiti, saving 
President Bill Clinton from a 
public rebuke. 

The Senate Democratic 
Leader, George J. Mitchell of 
Maine, instead scheduled a vote 
next week that would be limited 
to a proposal already approved 
by the Senate June 29, saying 
Congress should vote on the in- 
vasion. 

Senator John S. McCain 3d, 
Republican of Arizona, had 
sought an immediate Senate 
vote on a nonbinding “sense of 
tbe Senate" resolution opposing 
the invasion. 

“They’re doing everything 
they can to avoid a congressio- 
nal vote,” he said, “ because^ 
they do not want a vote they 
know they will lose.” 

He had told tbe Senate earli- 
er: “I intend to force a vote on 
this issue before this weekend 
because that's the time of this 
invasion as we all know, per- 
haps the most publicized inva- 
sion in the history of warfare." 

Senator William S. Cohen, 
Republican of Maine, said Mr. 
Clinton should get approval of 
Congress before any invasion 
because “if things go awry, I 
think it could inflict moral 
damage to his presidency." 

Senator John Glenn, Demo- 
crat of Ohio, said there was no 


— * 
j 


emergency. 

“It has to pass the Dover 
test'’ Mr. Glenn said, referring 
to the military air base in Dela- 
ware where die bodies of slain 
servicemen are returned. 
“When the Hag-draped coffins 
come bade, wlU the American 
people support it?” 

Invasion opposition has also 
mounted in the House of Rep- 
resentatives, where the No. 3 
Democrat, William B. Richard- 
son, of New Mexico, said he 
had serious reservations about 
an invasion. He called on Mr. 
Clinton to slow the march to-^ 
ward military action. T 

The Senate Minority Leader, 
Bob Dole, of Kansas, said: 
“The invasion is going to hap- 
pen. We’re going to support the 
troops if there’s an invasion. 
But we certainly don't support 
the policy.’’ (Reuters, AP) 


-t 



MITSUBISHI 


Whenever you want to do 


My mother wanted me to have piano lessons. 


something, somebody expects 


iOBAl KAU 

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something else. 


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for that little voice inside 


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utility vehicles like our highly 


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My /i v/(/:wams me to stay at home. 




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Radar Saw 
Ul *Rgi t j Cessna, but 
lllv asi 0)1 >No Alarm 
Was Raised 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER IS, 1994 


Page 7 


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BELFAST: Protestant Frustration Erupts in First Battle Since Cease-Fire KOREA: HAITI: Clinton Tells Junta to Flee 


wi 


By Pierre Thomas 
and Ruben Castaneda 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
skeleton crew on duty in Na- 
tional Airport’s control tower 
was probably not watching ra- 
dar screens that showed a small 
plane flying above downtown 
Washington before smu.nhiTig 
into the White House, a govern- 
ment source said. 

A tape from National’s radar 
system, recorded at the time, 
clearly indicates the plane's 
path before the crash that killed 
the student pilot, Frank Eugene 
Corder, early Monday. But, the 
source said, apparently no one 
was watching the radar. 

The radar is not monitored 
closely by Federal Aviation Ad- 
ministration controllers around 
$.2 A.M-, when the crash oc- 
1 curred. 

The investigation, ordered by 
Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bent- 
sen, indicates that the Secret 
Service received no warning 
from aviation officials that the 
single-engine Cessna was bead- 
ed toward the White House. 

While the White House sup- 
posedly is one of the country’s 
most secure buildings, the dis- 
closure that it apparently is not 
undo- effective radar surveil- 
lance late at night raises ques- 
tions about its vulnerability. 

Congressional leaders 
briefed by administration offi- 
cials on the details of die crash 
said they wanted more answers. 

“Why wouldn't the FAA 
have seen this plane and noti- 
fied the Secret Service?” Dennis 
DeConcmi asked. The Arizona 
Democrat, who heads a Senate 
subcommittee that oversees the 
Secret Service; said he might f 
hold hearings to get an answer. 

The investigation so far sug- 
gests that Mr. Corder acted 
alone and was probably suicid- 
al, a source said. P reliminar y 
toxicology results show that 
Mr. Coraer, who had a history 
of alcohol and drug abuse, had 
k a blood-alcohol content of 
P 0.045 percent, slightly in excess 
of the aviation standard of 0.04. 
Traces of cocaine also were 
found in his blood. 

If the radar had been moni- 
tored, an air-traffic controller 
would have tried to warn the 
pilot that he was flying into 
prohibited airspace. 


Continued from Page 1 

someone took potshots at Johnny’s car on 
Berlin Street off the ShankilL Three people 
looking at a lineup picked out a young man 
named Stephen Larkin and so, Tuesday 
morning, Mr. Larkin was in the dock in- 
side the cream-colored building with a 
confectioner’s pink trim that sits inside the 
Protestant area. 

About 40 republicans turned up to sup- 
port him. An equal number of loyalists 
came. A dash was inevitable. What set it 
off was unclear — the Protestants c laim a 
Catholic made a triumphant reference to 
the IRA S han kill bombing last year, which 
killed 1 1 people — and in any case the 
cause seemed quickly forgotten. 

Sitting near a gigantic aquarium filled 
with tropical fish and with Mr. Adair's 2- 
y ear-old daughter, Cloe, playing at her 
feet, Gina — last name unknown — field- 
ed a phone call. “Do you know what the 
hell's going on?” she whooped. 

“It's Johnny,” she announced to those in 
the room. 

Somehow the man whose photo was 
propped on top of the TV, a husky, short- 
haired man with two gold earrings, looking 
something like a blond Bruce Willis, was 
calling out of his maximum security ceil in 
the Maze prison. She passed the phone 
ova- to a reporter for an impromptu inter- 
view. 

Mr. Adair said that the charges against 


him were “trash” and that the case against 
him might never even get to court. He 
pronounced himself skeptical about the 
authenticity of the IRA cease-fire, but at 
another point he added, “I believe in a 
couple of months the loyalists will declare 
a cease-fire, and then the charges against 
me will be dropped.” 

Gina, putting away Coe’s pacifier and 
putting ou a tight jacket, made another 
call. Then she left for the courthouse, 
where by now a line of women was block- 
ing Crumlin Road, holding a unionist ban- 
ner and shouting abuse at camouflaged 
British soldiers a foot away. 

The young men, putting their masks on, 
said they, too, were suspicious of the cease- 
fire. But mostly they were angry that the 
republicans seemed to be getting the better 
end of things. 

“They get their prisoners sent over and 
we get police ” said & masted young man. 
raising a club in anger to emphasize his 
point He was referring to some transfers 
of IRA prisoners from jails in England to 
jails in Northern Ireland. 

Suddenly, trouble started. A white van 
pulled by, was steeped, turned over and 
set a b laze. The police and soldiers in ar- 
mored vehicles moved nearby. Plastic bul- 
lets were shoL For the next two hours, and 
again later at night roving bands moved 
through the Sh ankill area, taking ou the 


police from a distance. At one point five 
bullets were shot from a handgun, but no 
one was arrested. 

Anyone with any contacts at all in the 
tough Protestant neighborhoods that 
spawn the paramilitary groups, a sprawl of 
1950s row houses and newer brick “es- 
tates.” readily admits that people are con- 
fused and anxious about the events of the 
past two weeks. 

“In one word, fearful," said David Er- 
vin e, a man often said by newspapers to be 
“in contact” with members of the Ulster 
Volunteer Force, one of two main terrorist 
groups and the one that claimed responsi- 
bility for placing a bomb, which failed to 
fully explode, on a train to Dublin on 
Monday. 

Much of the concern comes from the 
sense many people have that the IRA 
cease-fire seemed to come out of the blue 
— though in fact it had been secretly 
debated for months, if not years — and 
that therefore there must have been a se- 
cret deal between the Catholic terrorists 
and the British government. 

“In a zero-sum society, perception is 
all,” said Mr. Ervin e, sitting behind multi- 
locked doors at the Sh ankill Historical 
Society. “And the perception is that the 
IRA has not achieved enough to make 
them embark on this road. So people con- 
clude there's a secret deal.” 


CAIRO: Premises Have Been Changed in Crusade for Population Control 


' Continued from Page I 

knew all about family planning but had 
only one contraceptive choice: steriliza- 
tion. They avoided it because they feared 
serious infection or even death from un- 
safe Operations carried out in unsani tary 
settings. 

In other In dian states, notably Kerala 
and Tamil Nadu, fertility rates are lower in 
areas where choices are greater, women are 
better educated and health care is more 
readily available to alL 

In Indonesia, enthusiasm for family 
p lanning grew and fertility rates declined 
when the government began to promote 
wider choices of methods, said Haryono 
Siryono, the state minister for population, 
in an interview in Cairo. Local women 
were brought into clinics as counselors, 
which inspired confidence, he said. 

If the donors who contribute the bulk of 
aid in family pl anning follow through on 
the conference’s recommendations. 
“Women will really be collaborators,” said 
Ellen Chester, a director of the Interna- 
tional Women’s Health Coalition, a New 
York-based organization that assists wom- 
en’s health groups in poor countries. 

“Money will be spent in tremendously 
different ways than it has been spent in the 
past," she said. “What is key now is how 
this plays out. We have to take this lan- 
guage and impose it on foreign-assistance 
acts." 

Officials of several donor governments 
and international organizations said in 
Cairo that aid could be directed to family 
planning and health programs in which 


women take part in decision making. Do- 
nors are also expected to expand relation- 
ships with nongovernmental organizations 
that work directly with women at the vil- 
lage level. 

In Washington, the Congressional Cau- 
cus for Women's Issues plans to introduce 
provisions in foreign aid bills that would 
require the Agency for International De- 
velopment to ensure that women’s groups 
participate in any programs supported by 
the United States. 

Among the societal changes influencing 
the tone of the Cairo conference were an 
expansion of the middle class and a rise in 
the number of women in the paid labor 
force in many developing nations, Ms. 
Chesler said. 

Those trends, along with a growing pro- 
pensity in Roman Catholic and Muslim 
countries to disregard religious rules pro- 
hibiting or curtailing contraception, con- 
tributed to the increasing demands for 
f amil y planning as a personal right. 

Not all women's groups in the develop- 
ing world are pleased with the Cairo plan. 
Some are concerned that calls for action on 
population growth will translate into new 
conditions attached to aid for poor coun- 
tries. 

Some say that the burden of limiting 
population still falls on the poor, while the 
richer industrialized nations are a greater 
danger to the earth and its environment 
because of their disproportionate con- 
sumption of natural resources and contri- 
bution to pollution. 


Ms. Chesler said that such criticism of- 
ten grows from a perception that policy 
changes involving women are the work of 
Western fe minis ts. Yet many of the wom- 
en who spoke out in Cairo on reproductive 
rights were from developing nations. 

Allan Rosenfield, dean of the School of 
Public Health at Columbia University, 
who has been involved in family planning 
debates and policy-making for several de- 
cades, described the conference plan of 
action as “the most comprehensive docu- 
ment to come out of this kind of meeting.” 

He welcomed the Vatican's conciliatory, 
if still dissenting, comments. 

If bringing women to the center of fam- 
ily planning was the major change in the 
deliberations of the conference, the third 
one on population to be held by the U ni ted 
Nations since 1974, the diminution of reli- 
gious authority in debates on abortion and 
sex was an equally strong theme. 

To a large extent, theology and ideology 
were relegated to the periphery, leaving the 
Vatican, conservative Islamic scholars and 
some outspoken Third World political crit- 
ics of industrial nations in a minority. 

Delegations from several developing na- 
tions representing a range of beliefs and 
political philosophies welcomed what 
Egypt's foreign minister, Amr Moussa. 
characterized as a final consensus: 

“This conference was a meeting of all 
cultures and civilizations,” he told the final 
session, “and it has succeeded in adopting 
a text which was composed by a blend of j 
religions, values and traditions.” I 


Deep Differences 

Continued from Page 1 

stop. The discussions only em- 
phasized how far apart the two 
sides remain on these nuclear 
problems, Mr. Gallucd indicat- 
ed. The United States has in- 
sisted that the spent fuel rods 
must be removed from North 
Korea entirely, but so far the 
North has only agreed to forgo 
extracting the plutonium in 
them and to place them indefi- 
nitely in a safer Form of storage, 
called dry storage. This remains 
unsatisfactory to Washington, 
Mr. Gallucci said. 

He also disclosed thaL the 
North Koreans bad asked that 
the new nuclear plant be fi- 
nanced with a no-imcTcst. long- 
term loan that would be paid 
back not with cash, but with 
goods of some kind, perhaps 
electricity produced by the 
plant itself. He characterized 
this as impractical. 

“They have not taken into 
account fundamental economic 
or financial realities in their po- 
sition,'* be said. 

■ Hidden Plutonium? 

North Korea appears to have 
halted reprocessing nuclear fuel 
by 1992, but the International 
Atomic Energy Agency sus- 
pects plutonium is still' being 
hidden from inspectors, Reu- 
ters reported Wednesday from 
Vienna, quoting agency offi- 
cials. 

The UN agency is for now 
rductam to do or say anything 
that might disturb the delicaie 
negotiations, but officials said 
the plutonium issue will have to 
be tackled at some stage in the 
future. 

“What did they do before in- 
spections began?” an agency of- 
ficial asked. “How much pluto- 
nium had they squirreled away? 
How much raw material for 
making plutonium did they still 
have on hand when our inspec- 
tions began?" 

He added, “We don’t have 
answers to these questions, and 
we will unfortunately have to 
raise them at some point.” 

Bombing by Basque Group 

Reutm 

BILBAO, Spain — A large 
bomb destroyed a bank in Gue- 
ctao in the Basque province of 
Vizcaya early Wednesday, but 
□o one was injured. An anony- 
mous phone caller said the 
Basque separatist group ETA 
had planted the bomb. 

5ee our 

Arts and Antiques 

every Saturday 


Coo timivd from Page 1 
al Raoul Cedras and the other 
junta leaders to step aside. 

Asked by reporters when a 
growing fleet of U.S. warships 
and troops would be in place 
off Haiti, Mr. Perry replied: 
“The answer to the question is 
very soon. That’s as precise as I 
can be on that.” He added: 
“That’s not to suggest there 
might not be some change in the 
future.” 

In Haiti itself, U.S. military 
jets roared over three cities 
Wednesday, dropping millions 
of leaflets to encourage the re- 
turn of Father .Aristide. 

Hours after the predawn 
flights, the United States 
moved a warship into Port-au- 
Prince Bay and dispatched a 
helicopter to buzz the capital’s 
coast. “The sound of invasion is 
already in our ears,” said a Hai- 
tian nationalist politician, Vla- 
dimir Jeanty. 

In Port-au-Prince, the leaflet!, 
fluttered to earth, where they 
lay for a few hours before the 
authorities hosed them into the 
gutters. Pro-army militiamen 
roughed up people living to 
pick up the leaflets in the Del- 
mas section of the capital, the 
local radio reported. 

Father Aristide, a Roman 
Catholic priest, was elected 
with 67 percent of the vote in a 
1990 election and is still popu- 
lar with a large percentage of 
Haiti's 7 million inhabitants. 

Except for routine training of 
militias near the army head- 


quarters. where several hundred 
volunteers have been receiving 
rudimentary instruction in how 
to march and handle guns, there 
was no sign of increased mili- 
tary preparedness in Port-au- 
Prince. 

“I just cannot believe those 
guys," said one businessman 
who deals with the army. 

“An invasion is probably 
four or five days away, and 
those guys are just sitting there, 
doing nothing. They are not 
preparing any defensive strate- 
gy. They seem like they are just 
going to sit there and' watch it 
happen." 

The U.S. deputy secretary of 
state. Strobe Talbott, said a 
multinational force was going 
to take control of the island 
even if its military leaders went 
into exile. 

In an interview on CNN, he 
said the expectation was that 
this force could establish civic 
order in Haiti within "a couple 
of months.” 

The U.S.-led international 
force, which is massing and has 
commitments of at least 2.000 
troops from 20 countries in ad- 
dition to the United States, 
“will be going in in any event" 
Mr. Talbott said. 

“In the case that we hope will 
occur — and that is that belat- 
edly the three principal dicta- 
tors get the message and leave 
— it will still be necessary for 
an international force to be de- 
ployed,” he said. 

(Reuters. AP. ll'Pl 


ARMY: Good Rum and Bad Arms 


Continued from Page 1 

rather will shuck their uniforms 
and hide. 

“They will toss their rifles in 
the street.” said one man, a 
longtime supporter of Haiti's 
deposed and exiled president, 
the Reverend Jean-Bcrtrand 
Aristide. 

“They are not afraid of wom- 
en and children. They will shoot 
a man who is bound up like a 
pig, but they will not stand and 
fight They dance and sing now 
and talk big. but when they 
hear. ‘Boom! Boom!’” — he 
wiggled two fingers to simulate 
someone running away. 

In September 1993, a large 
ship was spotted on the horizon 
north of Jeremie. on the north 
coast of Haiti's southern penin- 
sula. Word spread through the 
city that it was a warship, com- 
ing to kin the soldiers and rein- 
state Father Aristide, said a hu- 


man-rights worker who was in 
Jeremie at the time. 

The soldiers in the city aban- 
doned their uniforms arid fled. 

It turned out to be a mer- 
chant vessel. 

The soldiers collected their 
uniforms and returned to their 
posts to protect Haiti’s coast- 
line. 

But in the event of an inva- 
sion, U.S. officials do not count 
on a quick retreat and mass 
surrender, said Stanley 
Schrager. the U.S. Embassy 
spokesman. 

He believes some of Haiti's 
soldiers will fight, as will the 
civilian gunmen loyal to the 
military government. 

Mr. Schrager and other U.S. 
officials hope the Haitian Army 
will tum on its generals. He said 
that any invasion plans would 
provide for keeping the army 
intact after the invasion, to re- 
build the countiy. 


ROUMANIA IS CRYING 

1 amr\ behind loctr .5 be-re- - 


On\ 


y you Ocx n in e- 1 p wia. 


GLOBAL EMERGING MARKETS '94 


M Mi S3 

[ini jit fiwm 


The Mining Investment Summit 

THE BREWERY, CITY OF LONDON, OCTOBER 3—4, 1994 

October 3rd Emerging Markets Through North American Gold 

n Richard M. Pomboy, Portfolio Manager, Pomboy Asset Manag e ment , Inc. 

Program Bow Emerging Markets Are Changing the World 
Highlights David D. Hale, Chief Economist, Kemper F i n a nci a l Companies 


New Mining Investment in Zimbabwe 
Dr. EJ-M- Zvobgo, Mines Minister, Zimbabwe 
Tanzania: Prospective Area o/JE. Africa 
Ll Co. Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete, Minister of 
Water, Energy & Mines, Tanzania 
Experience in Emerging Markets 

Geoffrey Loudin, Chairman, CEO, Niugini Mining 
Platinum Mining in Zimbabwe 

Peter M. Vaaderspuy, Chairman, Delta Gold N.L. 


The Potential in African Countries 
Mike Kurtanjek, Credit Lyonnais Securities Ltd. 
The Changing Investment Environment 
Philip S. Martin, Partner & Mining Analyst, 
Gordon Capital Corp. 

Trends in Emerging Markets 
Michael Simon, CPM Group Ltd. 

Rapidly Changing Mining Markets 
David Williamson, David Williamson Assoc. 



* -rr;r r . 


This 3 years old boy 
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His crib is his prison 
in the «home» where 
he is interned. 

He is just like other 
little children/, 
except that he 
doesn't matter to 
anyone. i 

He is unloved. 


Jf 


[Keynote Heman Alberto Bfichi Buc, Former Minister of Finance, Chile; 

Speaker President, The Institute of Freedom & Development 

Development of Natural Resources in the Andean Countries 

Jaime Villalobos Sanjines, National Secretary of Mining in the Republic of Bolivia 
Roque Benavides, President, National Society of Mining and Petroleum (Peru) 

Charles Bruce, Executive Vice President, Mintec (S A.) 

Investment in Latin America presented by Yorkton Securities 

Ian Lament, Economist; James Crombie, Mining Analyst; David Shaw, Corporate Finance 

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Numbers of children interned iirCeausescu's monstrous «home» network are on the rise. And once these children ore in the system, 
there is no woy out. Adoption ond foster families are exceptional These innocent victims lead o life of sadness, longing ond despair. 

We guarantee that your gift will be put to good use. 

SERA* is committed to saving os many of these children as possible. It is currently recruiting teams of doctors and teachers on- 
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Your generosity will help them. Please dont' delay. 

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Page8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 


HEALTH /SCIENCE 


Gene Therapy Urged 
For De Facto Bypass 


By Gina Kolata 

Nc* York Tunes Service 




EW YORK — An advisory com- 
mittee at the National Institutes 
of Health has unanimously rec- 
ommended approval of a pro- 
posal in which gene therapy is to he used 
for the first time to treat cardiovascular 
disease. 

The idea is to add genes near a clogged 
artery in the leg to get new blood vessels 
to grow around a blockage. One research- 
er compared the procedure to a bypass 
without the surgeon. 

The 15-member advisory panel, the Re- 
combinant DNA Advisory Committee, 
whose approval is required for all propos- 
als involving gene therapy, gave permis- 
sion Tuesday at a meeting in Bethesda, 
Maryland, for 12 patients to be treated. 

Toe Food and Drug Administration 
must also give its consent before the study 
can begin, but the FDA says it has never 
rejected a study approved by the commit- 
tee. 

The study brings the beginning of a 
new era in the treatment of cardiovascu- 
lar disease, said Dr. Judith Swain, a pro- 
fessor of medicine and genetics at the 
University of Pennsylvania and director 
of cardiovascular medicine there. 

“With our standard techniques — with 
bypass surgery and angioplasty — we've 

g ine about as far as we're going to go,” 
r. Swain said. 

But gene therapy, she said, offers the 
hope not only of treatments for blocked 
arteries that resist available therapies but 
also of better therapies for conditions 
that currently lend themselves to treat- 
ment. 


Generating new blood vessels to go 
around a blockage, she said, is “almost 
like a coronary bypass without the cardi- 
ac surgeon.” 

Dr. Claude Lenfant, director of the 
National Heart, Lung and Blood Insti- 
tute, cautioned that although this is “a 
very exciting field that is full of promises, 
it is still in an experimental phase.'* 

It may take years before the promises 
are fulfilled. “We need to be as careful 
and cautious about what we say as we are 
enthusiastic about the process,” he said. 

The therapy was proposed by Dr. Jef- 
frey Isner. a cardiologist; Dr. Kenneth 
Walsh, a molecular biologist, and Dr. 


James Symcs, a surgeon, all of St. Eliza- 
beth’s Medical Center in Boston and the 
Tufts University School of Medicine. 

Dr. Isner said the proposal was to treat 
people who have a blockage in one of two 
major arteries that supply blood to the 
leg. 

He estimated that in the United States 
30,000 to 40,000 people a year have leg- 
artery atherosclerosis so severe that they 
have excruciating pain even when at rest 
or have sores that cannot heal because so 
little blood is getting past the blockage. 

Those people must have bypass surgery 
or balloon angioplasty — in which a bal- 
loon is threaded into the artery on a 
catheter and then inflated to widen the 
constricted area — or must have the leg 
amputated. 


T HE idea behind the gene therapy 
is to mimi c what naturally occurs 
in some people when their arteries 
are blocked. These people form 
10 to 50 extra blood vessels, called collat- 
eral vessels, that wind their way past the 
blockage and provide a new pathway for 
blood to get through. 

The collateral vessels “are son of like a 
heat-seeking missile,'' as they migrate to 
and around the blockage. Dr. Isner said. 
“When you think about it, it’s pretty 
amazing.” 

Many people, however, do not form 
collateral vessels, or do not form enough. 
“Everybody has made the observation 
that some people are collateral-formers 
and others are not,” Dr. Isner said. 

But molecular biologists have identi- 
fied the substance that signals collaterals 
to form. The substance, a protein called 
vascular endothelial growth factor, or 
vegf, is secreted by cells lining an anery. 

Dr. Isner and his colleagues propose to 
provide a gene for vegf molecules that 
will allow formation of collateral vessels 
in patients who do not make them on 
their own. 

The researchers will coat a tiny angio- 
plasty balloon with a polymer that is 
impregnated with vegf genes. Then they 
will inflate the balloon in a region of the 
artery adjacent to the blockage. 

The genes should be taken up by the 
cells of the artery wall, and those cells 
should chum out vegf proteins for Lhe 
next couple of weeks. The hope is that 
vegf proteins, in turn, will coax new blood 
vessels to grow around the blockage. 



The New York Times 


To be eligible for the study, patients 
must have leg pain so severe that they 
have been taking narcotics for a month, 
with no improvement in their condition, 
or must have a leg ulcer that has persisted 
for a month despite treatment 

They must also be inappropriate candi- 
dates for bypass surgery or balloon angio- 
plasty. either because of the location of 
the blockage or because of their general 
medical condition. 

Conventional medicine will have noth- 
ing to offer these people except an ampu- 
tation, Dr. Isner said. 

If the experiment works, the research- 
ers expect to see increased blood flow to 
the leg. And the patients should have 
fewer symptoms: Their sores sbould heal, 
or they should have less pain — or no 
pain at all — in the leg. 


There are risks to the treatment, how- 
ever. 

“In a patient with marginal circulation 
to begin with, there is some risk in putting 
a catheter in among the few arteries that 
are working,’' Dr. Isner said. 

A piece of plaque could break off and 
travel through the bloodstream, causing a 
heart attack or a stroke. Or the treatment 
could damage the fragile artery to such an 
extent that the patient's leg would have to 
be amputated anyway. 

But Dr. Isner said the risk of serious 
complications was less than 10 percent. 

And if the treatment works. Dr. Isner 
said, it will open new doors. The next 
logical step, he said, would be to use the 
same method to open blocked arteries 
leading to the heart. 

“It could be a totally new way of treat- 
ing patients,” he said. 


Human Growth Hormone Drug Flunks Test 


By Rick Weiss 

Washington Past Service 


W ASHINGTON —Parents who 
had hoped to add inches to 
their short but healthy chil- 
dren by giving them shots of a 
controversial hormone drug may them- 
selves end up shortchanged, a new study 
suggests. In the first test of what happens 
when short healthy children are given hu- 
man growth hormone until the end of 
puberty, researchers have found that the 
drug has little or no effect on final height 
This is the latest setback for the hor- 
mone's U.S. makers — Genentech and Eli 
Lilly — which have tried to expand its 
lucrative market Last month, a federal 
grand jury indicted a Genentech vice presi- 
dent and three officials from Genentcch’s 
growth-hormone distributor on charges in- 
volving illegal kickbacks on hormone sales. 

Since then, both firms have come under 


investigation by Congress and the Food 
and Drug Administration amid allegations 
they have overpromoted the drug. Both 
companies have denied any wrongdoing. 

The report is based on a small number of 
children, and scientists caution that the 
results must be confirmed by huger stud- 
ies. But the study calls into question the 
practice among some pediatric endocrinol- 
ogists of prescribing the hormone to short 
children without a dear diagnosis of 
growth-hormone deficiency. 

“Many of us have been saying for a long 
time we should not be practicing cosmetic 
endocrinology," said Alan D. Rogol, a 
pediatric endocrinologist at the University 
of Virginia. “These are the data that tell 
you why.” 

The drug in question is a genetically 
engineered version of human growth hor- 
mone, normally produced by the pituitary 
gland. It is approved by the FDA for 
children whose bodies make insufficient 


quantities of the hormone — a syndrome 
that can leave them four feet tall as adults. 

About 7,000 children in the United 
States are known to suffer from growth- 
hormone deficiency. Yet an estimated 
20,000 to 25,000 American children take 
the drug. That disparity has led some crit- 
ics to call for tighter controls on its sale. 
The thrice-weekly injections cost SI 5,000 
to $20,000 or more per year. 

In children whose pituitaries fail to 
make the hormone, treatment with the 
drug over a 5-to- 10-year period can in- 
crease adult height by six inches or more, 
depending on the child's genetic potential. 
Preliminary studies suggest it may also 
help some children whose failure to grow is 
due to other problems, such as Turner's 
syndrome, a kidney disorder. 

The new study, which appears in the 
August issue of the Journal of Pediatrics, 
suggests the hormone drug may not in- 
crease a normal child’s bright Research- 
ers gave growth hormone to 10 boys and 5 


girls, ranging in age from 7 to 13. The 
children won shorter than 98 percent of 
their peers, and X-rays of their hand bones 
indicated their growth was la gging more 
than two years behind normal — but each 
had normal growth-hormone levels. Injec- 
tions of growth hormone were given four 
to seven times a week until each child 
stopped growing; depending on the age 
when they started, children were on the 
drug for 4 to 10 years. 

“The kids got to their adult height soon- 
er," Dr. Rogol said, “but they didn’t get 
taller." 

More studies are under way. Officials 
for the drug makers pointed out that pre- 
liminary data from one study, involving 
120 children, shows some evidence that 
growth hormone may add inches to normal 
short children. But that study is not yet 
complete, and results are unpublished. The 
biggest trial, now under way at the Nation- 
al Institutes of Health, will not be com- 
plete for several more years. 


Study Raises Doubts 
On Prostate Screening 


International Herakt Tribune 

P ARIS — Screening for prostate 
cancer only marginally extends 
life expectancy while potentially 
hurting quality of life and costing 
billions of dollars, according to a study 
published Wednesday in the Journal of the 
American Medical Association. 

It questioned the cost of mass screen in g, 
saying that a blood test or rectal exam of a 
50-year-old man would increase his life by 
a statistical average of only 0.6 days. 

A week away from a nationwide cam- 
paign in the United States of free, or low- 
cost prostate examinations, the study said 
there was no reason to recommend ann u al 
scr eening of healthy men over 50. 

This contradicted advice given by the 
American Cancer Society, which recom- 
mends regular screening with a blood test 
or rectal examination. The American Uro- 
logical Association said that, as with breast 
cancer, it is important to detect prostate 
cancer early. It is the second most preva- 
lent cancer in males in the United States 
after skin cancer. 

The vice president of detection and 
treatment of the American Cancer Society, 
Dr. Hugh Shingleton, called the study 
“simplistic," and said that the society was 
nnt changing its recommendation for men 
over 50 to undergo annual screening. 

Another expert, Dr. Patrick Walsh of 
the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 
said the study was both “terrible” and 
badly timed. “Let’s face it, next week is. 
prostate cancer awareness week,” he said. 

The AMA said the juxtaposition of 
dates was a coincidence. 

Dr. Walsh said the study was flawed 
because it assumed that screening would 
be carried out only once instead of regular- 


ly A single test is likely to detectadv&uced 
cancer of a type that rarely responds to 
treatment Repeat screening would be 
more likely to pick up cancers at an earlier 
stage, doctors said. 

Murray Krahn, the chief author of the 
study, said that aggressive treatment of me 
disease, including surgical removal of the 
nrostaie, can cause incontinence and m- 
notency, and lead to a worse quality of -hfe 
£nd possibly reduced life expectancy.^ 

He said doctors, by nature, are uuwfeig 
to consider “watchful waiting" of the dis- 
ease, which in many men rema ins slow- 
er owing and poses no immediate threat. 

“Screening is going to expose men to a 
therapeutic cascaded said Dr. Krahn, of 
lhe University of Toronto medical center. 
“If you are labeled with cancer, the 
chances are you are going to get treated for 
cancer." 

The study was carried out using a statis- 
tical model, and did not take into account 
cases where early and aggressive treatment 
might be beneficial. It is likely to parallel . 
the debate over screening for breast cancer ^ 
of women under 50. - , 9 

In both cases, the question is whether 
the benefits to some individuals outwe igh 
the costs to society of large-scale screening. 

In the United States a blood test for 
tale specific antigen, or PSA, costs " 

As a result of campaigning by the Amcr- 
ican Cancer Society and the Urological 
Association, the PSA test has become 
widely used. The number of men treated 
for the prostate cancer has increased corre- 
spondingly, but until now there has been 
no global study on the effectiveness of 


Breast - Cancer Gene Found 


The Associated Press 

W ASHINGTON — Three 
teams of U.S. researchers 
have won the worldwide race 
to isolate the gene that 
causes the inherited form of breast can- 
cer, the journal Science reported 
Wednesday. 

The gene, called BRCA 1, is believed to 
cause 5 percent of breast cancer cases. 
The gene was isolated by researchers 
from the National Institutes of Health, 
Myriad Genetics Corp. and the Univer- 
sity of Utah. 

Isolation of the gene will enable scien- 
tists to develop a test to identify women 
who carry BRCA1, giving them an op- 1 
portunity to identify breast cancer or to 
make the more difficult decision of hav- 
ing a mastectomy to forestall the disease. 

Some researchers believe such a test 
could be developed within two years. 
Scientists have known for years that 


the BRCA1 gene exists, and more than a 
dozen research facilities around the 
world have been working to pinpoint it. . 

Scie nc e announced that the work by 
Dr. Douglas F. Easton of Myriad Genet- 
ics, Dr. Mark Skolnick of the University 
of Utah and Dr. Roger Wiseman of the 
National Institute of Environmental 
Health Sciences had passed peer review 
and would be printed in its Oct. 7 issue. 

But the journal was releasing copies of 
the work Wednesday. 

About 182.000 women are diagnosed 
with breast cancer in the United States 
each year, and 46.800 die, according to 
the American Cancer Society. ■ 
Experts have said women with the al- 
tered gene have about a 60 percent chance- 
of developing breast cancer before age 50 
and an 85 percent chance by age 65. 

. The researchers couldn’t immediately 
be reached for comment NEH refused to 
discuss the findings. 


t 


Genetic Miscoding May Cause Dwarfism 


Reuters 

ONDON — A single “spelling” 
mistake in an individual’s genetic 
code is the cause of the most com- 
mon form of dwarfism, according 
to an article in the science journal Nature. 

Researchers at the Institut Necker at the 
HGpital des Enfants Malades in Paris re- 
pented they had studied 23 cases of achon- 
droplasia. People with this form of dwarf- 
ism have unusually slum limbs and an 
enlarged head. 


All 23 had the same, single error in a 
gene, probably resulting in less efficient 
instructions to bone-forming cells to di- 
vide, the researchers said. 

Fewer bone cells lead to shorter bones. 
But this deficiency only affects “long” 
bones, so that some parts of the body are 
dwarfed while others are normal length, 
the article said. 

' Achondroplasia affects one in 15,000 
Hve births. Children bom with the condi- 
tion are often conceived by older parents. 



BOOKS 


By Alan Truscott 

T HE fifth edition of the Offi- 
cial Encyclopedia of 
Bridge, a complete reference 
guide to every aspect of the 
game, is now available. Ten 
years have elapsed since the 
previous edition, and the tech- 
nical material has been updated 
and expanded under the editor- 
ship of Henry Francis. 

The diagramed deal has been 
added as an example of a “five 
or seven" situation, although 
this one is really “four or sev- 
en." In the 1986 Vanderbilt 
Knockout Team Champion- 
ship, the North-South cards 
were held by Edgar Kaplan and 
Norman Kay. Kaplan as North 
doubled the opening one-dia- 
mond bid, and followed with 
five no-trump, the grand slam 
force. He knew that his partner 
could not bid seven spades, 
which would have needed two 
of the top three trump honors, 
but nevertheless the convention 
was helpful. 

The partnership was using a 
scheme of responses in which 
six spades showed one of the 
top three trump honors togeth- 
er with extra trump length. Ka- 
plan therefore knew that his 


partner held at least five spades 
headed by the queen, so he bid 
seven spades. He knew that a 
dub finesse was likely to be 
required, and that rated to win 
in view of West’s opening bid. 
More important, if the club fi- 
nesse was due to fail, a heart 
lead would defeat six spades, 
and even five spades. 

In the replay, North-South 
were content to play six spades, 
and since the club finesse suc- 
ceeded, Kaplan’s team gained 
11 imps. 

NORTH 

* A K 10 A 

V A93 

O — 

* A Q J 10 8 4 

WEST CD) EAST 

*8 *62 

OQ32 OKJ76 

OAQ87652 OKJ943 
*K9 *75 

SOUTH 

* Q JS753 

O 10 8 4 

0 ia 

*632 

Neither side was vulnerable. The 


ft 


bidding: 

Wes 

North 

East 

South 

1 o 

DM. 

J 

1 * 


5N.T. 

Pass 

6 A 

Pass 

7 4 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 

West led lhe heart two. 



B RAINMAKERS: How Sci- 
entists Are Moving Beyond 
Computers to Create a Ri- 
val to the U nman B rain 
By David Freedman 214 pages. 
S22. Simon & Schuster. 

Reviewed by 
John Markoff 

R ECENTLY when Dante 1L 
the 1, 700-pound robot built 
engineers at Carnegie Mellon 
University, missteppea, tumbled 
and couldn’t right itself while 
returning from exploring the 
crater or an Alaskan volcano, it 
provided a fitting metaphor for 
both the progress and the limits 
of the three-decade-old science 
of artificial intelligence. 

Indeed, since its inception in 
the late 1950s, the field has ac- 
tually made remarkable pro- 
gress. There are now machines 
that see; expert systems that ad- 
rise us on lough derisions, and 
it is posable to pick up a tele- 
phone and chat with a comput- 
er that is standing in for a long- 
distance operator. 

Bui while progress has been 
made in mimicking h uman sen- 
sory and reasoning skills, scien- 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Eduardo Giannetti da Fon- 
seca, economics professor at 
Sflo Paulo University, is reading 
“Raizes do BrasiT’ (Roots of 
Brazil), by Sergio Buarque de 
H oil an da. 

“The basic argument is that 
the central feature of the Brazil- 
ian character is the predomi- 
nance of the emotional compo- 
nent in human relations.” 

(Steven BruU, IHT) 



tists’ perception of the size of 
the job has grown dramatically 
larger even as computers have 
gained remarkable new powers 
of performance. 

In “Brainmakers: How Sci- 
entists Are Moving Beyond 
Computers to Create a Rival to 
the Human Brain,” a Boston- 
based science writer, David 
Freedman, sets out to survey 
the current state of the an of 
artificial intelligence. 

His premise is that the origi- 
nal artificial intelligence re- 
searchers, traditionalists as he 
refers to them, failed because 
their attempts to codify a logic 


representing human thought 
proved bankrupt. Elaborate 
models written in computer 
languages such as Lisp and Pro- 
log were incapable of emulating 
the simplest human behavior. 

Freedman then charts the 
outlines of a new movement 
that has emerged to carry the 
search for artificial intelligence 
forward by drawing on the bio- 
logical underpinnings of h uman 
intelligence. 

Scientists are now at work in 
what is called artificial life re- 
search, tinkering with electronic 
dreuits that mimic biological 
neural networks, with software 


programs known as genetic al- 
gorithms that improve them- 
selves through simulated evolu- 
tion, with chemical brews that 
attempt to synthesize life itself, 
and with weird amalgams com- 
posed of biological cells grown 
on semiconductors. 

The new studies have already 
yielded a great deal of useful 
technology: neural circuits en- 
hance virion systems as well as 
speech and handwriting recog- 
nition; genetic algorithms cre- 
ate programs that are more effi- 
cient than the finest human- 
designed programs. 

It is a seductive idea: A new 
artificial intelligence revolution 
can be achieved by copying the 
simplest biological processes 
and enhancing those processes 
with immensely powerful super- 
computers and arrays of neural 
circuits made in the laboratory. 

Freedman takes us from the 
heartland of the traditionalists 
at the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology to the home of a 
researcher- turned- ven lure-cap- 
italist in the hills above Silicon 
Valley in California to the Uni- 
versity of Tsukuba in Japan, 
and in the process shows us a 


scientific world that still lacks a 
useful road map. 

Indeed, even while Freedman 
draws disparaging portraits of 
such pioneers in artificial intel- 
ligence as Marvin Minsky and 
Seymour Papert, computer sci- 
entists at MIT and John Mc- 
Carthy of Stanford (who is de- 
scribed as looking and acting 
like a homeless person), his 
more affectionate portraits of 
the younger artificial life wiz- 
ards contain enough ominous 
signs to warn the reader that 
this new generation is no closer 
to the holy grail of a self-con- 
scious machine. 

At one point an optimistic 
neural network researcher is 
quoted as saying: “We're now 
about 25 years away from a 
silicon brain. ” 


Those words strike a particu- 
larly eerie note because 25 years 
is about the same time span- that 
the traditionalists originally 
thought would be necessary to 
create a thinking machine. 

But the real problem with 
“Brainmakers” is that Freed- 
man’s study lacks both journal- 
istic depth and passion. And it 
would apocar that revolution- 


ary breakthroughs are not yet 
on the horizon. 

Freedman has provided a 
quick travelogue that offers a 
glimpse of the work of some 
leading researchers in artificial 
intelligence. Ultimately, howev- 
er, the reader is left wondering 
why he made the journey. : 

John Markoff is on the staff of 
The New York Times. : 


Real Estate Marketplace 

Every Friday 
Contact Fred Ronan 
Tel.: (33 1146 37 93 91 
Fax: (33 1 ) 46 37 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office or representative 



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aoo-rni.i 



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Jmaa Include me nationwide prices up to 
JhO dosing on Wall Street and do not reflec 
date trades elsewhere. Via Tfte Associated Press 



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as a serious 

business school, 

we encourage you to 

read the fine 

print 

We're proud of it IMD's fine print lists the 116 leading companies who take an active part in the 
institute - our Partners and Business Associates. The osmosis that results from this unique partnership 
between industry and IMD puts us at the forefront of international executive development. 
Collaboration with some of the most successful companies in the world ensures that IMD's programs 
and research are solidly grounded in today’s market while preparing executives for the future. 


PARTNER COMPANIES 

Andersen Consulting 
Asea Brown Boveri 
Astra AB 
AT&T 

Bank Leu Ltd 
Baxter International Inc 
British Gas Pic 

British Petroleum Company Rc 

British Telecommunications Pic 
Caterpillar Inc 
Ciba-Geigv Ltd 
Citicorp 
Credit Suisse 

□eloitte Touche Tohmatsu International 
Dentsu lx 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Du Pant de Nemours International SA 

Exxon Corporation 

Hoffmarm-La Roche Ltd 

HolderbankAG 

IBM Europe 

LEGO Group 

Mini! International 

National Westminster Bank Pic 

Nestle SA 

Philips International BV 
Sony Europe 
Sulzer Brothers Lid 
Swissair Ltd 
Swiss Bank Corporation 
Swiss Volks tank 
Tetra Laval Group 
Union Bank of Switzerland 


BUSINESS ASSOCIATES 

Acer Inc 

Alcan Aluminium Ltd 
Barlow Rand Lid 
N.V. Bekaert SA 
BICCPlc 
BobstSA 

Boehringer Mannheim International 

Booz Allen & Hamilton Inc 

Brrtish Steel Pic 

The Buhler Group 

CAPSA 

CeatLtd 

Compagnie de St. Gobain 
Daimler-Benz AG 
Dow Europe 
DSM NV 

Egon Zehnder Int'l Management Cons. 
EnsthGutzeit Oy 

Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson 

Ernst & Young 

Eskom 

FiatSpA 

Firmemch SA 

Gemini Consulting 

Geneial Molars Corporation 


BUSINESS ASSOCIATES 

Gist-Brocades 
Grace Europe Inc 
Heineken NV 
Hewlett-Packard SA 
HiltiAG 

The Hinduja Group of Companies 
Hoogovens Graep BV 
Huhtam&u Oy 
ICI Pic 

Incentive AB 
Iskra-Holding. D 0. 

KNPBTNV 

tone Oy 

Kvaemer AS 

Lafarge Copp*5e 

Mecrastor Corporation 

Metallgeselischaft AG 

NCC - Nordic Construction Company AB 

Nokia Corporation 

Nordic Competence Circles 

Nordvest Forum A/S 

Norsk Hydro as 

Northumbrian Water Group 

Norwegian Institute of lnt‘1 Trade 

Orkla as 


II you want to find out more about what a business school 
working in partnership with industry can Dfler you, please call 
J1 21/61303 M or fax J1 21/61307 15 to request our introductory package. 


BUSINESS ASSOCIATES 

Parker Hannifin Corporation 

Philip Morris 

Price Waterhouse 

Prombudbank 

Proudfoot Pic 

Publicitas Holding SA 

Rabobank Nederland 

Raychem Corporation 

flierer Holding AG 

Rothmans Int'l Tobacco IUK) Ltd 

Saga Petroleum A/S 

Saudi Basic Industries Corp. (SABICI 

Scandinavian Airlines System ISAS) 

Shell int'l Petroleum Company Ltd 

Singapore Airlines Limned 

Skandia 

Skandinaviska Enskilda Sankan 

ABSKF 

Statoil 

The St Paul Companies 
Swedish Trade Council 
Telecom Eireann 

Televerket - The Norwegian Telecom 
Telia AB 

Thames Water Pic 
Total 

Transnet Ltd 
Valmei Corporation 
Vattenfall 
Volkswagen AG 
AB Volvo 

Williamson Magor & Co. Ltd 
Zurich Insurance Company 








• *9ITXFIL.9D 


IMD -IMTE RVATIONAL rMSTITUTE FOR MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT 
Chcmin de Bellerive 23, P.O. Box 9 IS.. CH-I00I LAUSANNE. Switzerland 


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7—10)89 In lull. 




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US ConmodRy eaBhnflM 


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INDEXIA II Plus 


Technical Analysis Software 

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** 


NASDAQ 

Wednesday's 4 pan. 

This Hat compiled by the AP, consists of the 1,000 
most traded securities In terms of dofier value. His 
updated twice a year. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 


Page 11 


nMarth 

Htf* Law Slew 


Pitf YM PE llte Higi Low Lines or ae 


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73%15*AE5CflS 
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28ft IBftAtotmk 
19W. 11* Akfila s 
78ft 23 AJftxBM 


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3ft lWtaAHA5em 
12* 7ftABanPn 

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32ft 22ft ARMfGa 

22 ft 13ft ABdHJdfl 
24ft 1 Atonal 
35ft TftAioncHta 
39ft 31 ft Altera 
34ft lOftAHnm 

93 47ftAmerOn in 
30ft 70*ABnkr J1 

19ft 13ft AOaSVov .16 
33 lOftAQWoM J4 
24W 15ft Am Front 
34ft 25ft AGreet 
34ft SftAHIthcsS 
27ft 15ft AMS 
17ft OftAMedE 

23 12ftAmMb&at 
30ft ldftAPwrCtfs 
39ft 22V>AmSupr 
27 12'AAmTeie 
17ft 10ft ATftwel 

16* 7ftAmBiCa5 

36ft 19ft Amfed 
57ft 34ft Amaen 
IS S Amrton 
33ft SftAmfChCP 
16ft lift AnChBtp 
19ft lOftAndiGfn 
49 17ft Andrews 
21 W13 - Andros 
38 ft 18% Artec 
38ft 22 AppJeC 
18ft II ApiSaus 
25ft 11 ArtoOoOS 
25 13ftApd3atl 
33 14 Apdlnnvs 

54 * 28* AptoMtS 
31 16 ArborDra 

25 12ftArt»rHI 
19 13ftATC*lCm 
35* 76*ATOQGp 


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- - 637 g2Dft 19ft 20ft ♦ 1 

„ - 11 98 16ft U 16ft _ 

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- - fS» I3» 13ft 13ft _ 

M 17 “ IP 17ft W + * 

- — 269 30ft 29ft 29ft —ft 

— T4 207 2flVi aft aft _ 

- 2 13 13 13 

- VI 6135 14ft 13ftlJVu .ft, 

- 33 368 17ft 17ft 17ft —ft 

- J5 7470 19 lBVl 18ft —ft 

- 10 484 25 24ft 24ft tft 

„ -T 3; 10ft 9ft 9ft —ft 

-48 54 9 aft 8 oft ♦ ft 

_ 16 7770 19ft 18ft 18ft —ft 
-j - 38 14ft 13ft 13ft _ 

AT9 61 34ft 36ft 36ft — ft 
A a 3643 33ft 32ft 32ft —ft 

- — 2745 6ft 5ft 6 *Vi» 

_ _ 1717 7 6ft 6ft _ 

■A 14 427 32ft 31ft 33 

A 16 638 30% 30 30ft _ 

J 57 8SS 13ft 13 13 —ft 

TO 12ft 12ft 12% _ 

1 _% - 773 7% 2ft 2ft —ft 

U4« ze _ 69 61ft 60* 61ft _ 

- - 1649 14 T4ft IS + 1 

U 14 130 26 25ft 26 tft 

- 22 1947 13ft 12ft 13ft _ 

3J 17 752 25* JSV* 2SV) x»4 

- 31 1463 21 ft 20ft 20ft —ft 

- 14 789 2ft TV„ 2ft — V„ 

_ _ 297 9ft 8ft BUft +vK 

- M 844 20 Vj 19ft 19ft —ft 

2.1 7 2 29ft 29ft 29ft +ft 

- 8 422 17% 17 17% +ft 

- - 1288 1ft lift lift _ 

- _ 60 12% lift 111! —ft 

_ 21 19870 sn, 78* 38%.— IVu 
_ 14 2439 17ft 15% 17w * 1% 

99 1453 74 74% 75 t% 

3.1 9 34 23ft 23ft 23ft _ 

J S3 276 19 IflftlfPVu —1ft 

lj 30 239 15 14% IS* + ’“ 

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1.9 16 7354 30% 39ft 29% _ 

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- 21 7S8 25 24 25 + 1 ft 

- 14 723 9ft Bft 9 *ft 

- - 987 16ft 16’ A 16ft —ft 

- 2814313 19 17ft 18% —'A 

- - 55 29ft 29% 29% — Ift 

- - 81 15ft 15 15ft* 1ft 

- 12 403 16ft 16ft 16ft * % 

- _ 388 9ft — - 

til 22 254 23ft 

- 2017641 54ft 

- 18 299 7ft 

A 11 584 10ft 

- 11 929 16% 

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46 34 AspcfTl 

34ft 22 AsdCmA 
33ft21ftA8dCmB 
20ft 11 Asrec 
34ft 27ft AsKMlaF 
38ft 21 ft AltSeAJr 
30ft 11 Aimels 
26ft lSftAuBan 
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16 16% 4% 

17% 18 — 

_ 46ft 47% 41 

9 153 16V& 15ft 15ft —ft 

- - 1200 36ft 35 36ft +1 

\A 22 8831 35ft 35 35ft— >«ft 

.1 42 907 17ft 16% 17% *ft 

J 36 1B06 18ft 18W 18% —ft 

._ _ 584 18ft 18ft 18ft 4ft 

_ 28 300 17ft 17V, 17ft * ft 

- 2210984 49% 48% 48ft —ft 

1 J 21 18 20ft 19% 19% —ft 

_ 23 5 20% 20% 20% 4ft 

_ _ 117 18 ITVu 17% _ 

34 9 413 30% 29ft 30ft * % 

-.100 33B3 18% 17ft 18 -ft 
J 21 199 13ft 13% 13ft * ft 
34 19 116 21% 21 21% *% 

10 18 208 20ft 19>%, 20ft _ 
_ 13 6053 lift 11% lift *%, 
_ 21 890 9ft 9ft 9ft _ 
_ 36 432 39ft 38% 38% — % 
-1275 58 25% 25ft 25% *% 

Z iT 308 14% 13ft U% —ft 

- - 1308 32 31% 31ft —ft 

1J 16 3234 25% 24ft 25 4% 

- M 4928 29ft 78ft 29ft 4 ft 

„ 25 1772 16ft d 15 15% — % 

- -.16457 6ft 6ft ttV* *%, 

- 15 1810 5ft SVa 5ft * ft 

A 24 1260 60ft 59ft 60ft —ft 
_ 17 915 » 25% 25% — % 

_ 40 J13S 19% 18ft 19ft — % 

- 29 4069 35 32ft 35 +1% 


9 18 DF&R 

7ft 2HDNAPI 
36% 17% DSC S 
29ft 16% DSG tot 

34% 1 2V, DSP Gp 

31 5ft Demon* 

23ft 14ft Danko 5 

17 12 Data) 

27’k 22% DouFhn 
27 14%DovdSnA 
22'A 9ftOayftun 
33%23%DeVrv 
24ft HWDecKOut 

18 TftDrtKSIto 
36 24ftDhlbGn 
36% ISftDdlCptr 

UftDafa-ina 

47 31 ’APontwtv 
13 7%Desldna 
77% 71 DkAPoc 
32% 13V.D03r«ll 

24ft li'ADloi inn 

20 7ftDoflLnk 

30 BWDIOMic 
37% 30 Dtonex 
30% 12%DtscZono 
27ft I7ft DkGrds 
36%ll%Dartfc«ftr 
32%)7%Davatm 
15% aWDresB 

31 ft 21 ft DreverG 
46ft l4%DUTOOrtl 
30 14ft Durban 3 
28ft 15ft DvtetiC 

28%i4ftEans 

34ft BftEWIPI 

34ft 8%EoSHrd 
39*25% EatoVan 
48ft Oft&teAJt 
11 6V>Eaahead 
i7 sweSci 
46% 19Vi Etetrob 
42 ISftEieArt 
25 13ft EF1 
16% 11 ErranttBd 
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17% Bft EnatHm 
28% 10 Erwirotst 
73 13ftEnvovCr> 
24* lSftEqiMCrdr 
14% lOftEqlvWvi 
60* 35ft ErftTel 
18% IlftEvnSut 
22% Bft&tobvte 
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17% ll%E2CDrp 
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21ft 11% FTP Sit 
15% 7ftF=as)On 
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30 lTWFstAJert 

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31ft 23%FComC s 1J0 
27 20%FtFMIs 54 
l»ft MftFfFnCP 

31 * 23 ft F rHcw 

20ft 6%FtPcNlw 
20% ]3ftFstPalm 
32ft23*FSecCa 
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23ft 18 Rstrv 
23 17 Flair 

20ft 9*Focmex 

7% SftFdLiaB 
7% SftFdLioA 
38V, 30* For Am 
5% 3%ForesJO 
34% lOWFossS 
25 3 40 Safi 

14% 7*FramTc 
32% 19 FrsrtCnc 
35% 25* Fritz 
42* 31 ft FulrHB 
a* 12ftFtmen 
16 SHFotorm 5 


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- - 1462 7*« 2ft 2ft — V« 

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J5e .9 14 12 27 26 % 26% — % 

__ 179 23ft 22* a —ft 
_ 23 2756 13 lift 12ft — % 

- 2310395 19* 17* 17%— lft 

_ 16 183 15ft 15 15% *% 

.92 X4 12 365 27 26*27 t% 

„ 38 289 20 19 20 *2 

— IB 394 21 19% 19*— 1 % 

_ IB 41 27 26 U —ft 

- 16 41 17* 16ft loft — % 

_ 9 1784 gz* 7ft 8ft rft 

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„ - _ 16 24 23* 23* .. 

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-. 14 1383 IS* 14* 15% ♦% 

- - 897 15* 13% 14ftvl 

- 34 318 15% IS 15% - 

- 16 16 35% 34* 35* —ft 

^ -. as 4S44 19ft 19* 19% — * 

JO A 24 2231 25% 24 V, 24% — % 

_ 14 304 24ft 24* 24% —ft 

- _ 491 21* 20* 20ft —ft 

.. II 453 10% 95» 10 +% 

2* 1X1 29 237 25% 25* 25* _ 

- M *96 34</ u 33*33Vi, — lft, 

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- 10 8577 ?ft d8 '-Mi-— W, 
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40 U 12 10 33* 32% 32% 

- SI 485 19 18 18ft —ft 

-239 675 7 6ft 6ft + ft 

- 13 2814 15ft 14% IS* *ft 

- 16 998 45% 44* 44%+}* 

- 1811977 18* 17* 164, — V U 

- IV 953 24 22* 23* +* 

- _ 19 14% 14% M% „ 

20 1893 u 17* 16ft 17ft + 1 

.16 1.6 8 36 10ft 10* 10* — * 

- 17 76 15* 14* 14ft —ft 

- 41 M13 20ft 20 20* —ft 

„ - 10 1742 341+ 22 23 V, * 1 ft 

JBBe 7J _ 561 12* lift lift _ 
Me 1.1 70 3848 545, 53ft 53ft + ft 

- 88 991 12ft 17* 12ft —ft 

- 17 835 18ft 18% 18% —ft, 

„ - -. 56 33% 32ft 32ft — W 

.10 A 73 79 Tift 21 21* — % 

- 45 120 33 30* 31V, — * 

- 18 587 12ft 17% 12* _ 

- 17 5941 29* 28* 29* + 1 

- 31 257 71* 21* 21* — * 

- _ 499 S 4ft 5 t % 

04 J S3 %|7 4Qft 36ft 40* +* 

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24 15 1221 52* 51% 51ft —ft 

- _ 114 9* 9* 9V U tV u 

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- - 29 26* 25% 26* -ft 

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- 238 25* 24* 24* _ 

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1.18 4.1 12 164 29 28 V, 2S% «% 

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- - 335 19% 19% 19* -Vj 

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26 3039 22ft 21* 22ft +1 
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_ _ _ 225 11 10ft UKA, — Vi, 

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319 1A 192 1202 6 5% 5ft — 

1.08 3^ 12 31 31ft 31% 31% —ft 

- _ H31 VJu 3* 3>u +V„ 

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9 856 7* 6% 6ft - ft 

_ .. 3920 14% 131%, 14% ♦* 

_ 30 752 21* 20* 20% -ft 

- 24 123 34% 33* 33ft — * 

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35% BftBHCFns M 
24% 16 BISYS 
71 40% BMC Sft 

30% 12% BMC Wt 6 
26% 15 BW1P A0 

29ft SWBotxne 
22% 15% Baker J M 

34 lOWBdvGm 
33%29%BanPonc 1.00 
74ft 57% BcOne ptCT.50 


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26*18%BancMC 
21* 12*BkSautti 
38% 31% Bantu 
26% 12ft BanvnSv 

19 12ftBorefts 
19ft 10 BaretRs 

7 TftBaTTecJl 
65* 43V, BavBkl 
35% 23 BedBato 
29 22%BetffiCDt 
15* 7 BeOMiC 
49% IBUBettSot 
7ft 3%BentOG 
47% 32 Bartow 

26 8%Bartua 
27% 13 BOTlPvw 
13ft 9ft Bis B S 
Sav 2 27*B(aaan 
13* 8%Bto«net 

6% 2 BfoTcG 
13% OftBIckBXS 

35 26%BaalBn 1 
23VjJ 7ft BobEvn 
29 IBftBooUUfll 

27 12 % BoofTitwn 
IB* BWBorlod 
25% 14% BoitOl S 
14* 6%BOStTc 
14% 7%Bo*En B 
ISft 7’ABrBoV 
52*11 BnSxfTc 
S9*31%BracSI 
21ft 9ftBroGaur 
16% lOWBrTam 

lift 4 ft Brunos 
27%15%BufMs 
IB* IlftBuOdT 
16% 10 CAlWru 
33% 2I*CTEC 
10% 4ft CAa 
32W25ftCadtrvS 
11% SVjCaere 
17% BftCataan* 
73% VftCalWO 
31* 16%CaWlC 
33* 20*CWIneA 
«a% »%Canoni 

20 l4%Cixaustr 

21 15’AQXMfHz 

VTA SWuCardttw 
21% lOftCarsFlr 
13% fftCOKV*! 
25 9* 

36 1. 

21% 

25 7ft Cast£c 
19ft 8 CattiSfr 
24ft 9 .CataCp 
21 12 Celadon 

34* lSWCeteMrtH 


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_ 19 4045 45* 43% 45**1 

_ 12 2587 18ft 18 18* —ft 

12 203 167 18% 17ft 18* +% 

_ 31 44 11% II* lift +ft 

J 12 1081 21 Vi, TO* 21% * % 

„ _ 273 13%, 13 13Via - V, 

ID 10 240 33* 33% 33% —ft 

SJ - 326 61% 60ft 61 +ft 

3 _ 1119 31ft 30ft 31ft +ft 

_ 18 10G8U26W 26 ~ 

23 11 

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J 21 1900 16 
_ 43 2553 u 20 

- _ 155 3ft 

3.1 13 987 SB* 58 SB* +% 

- 39 2531 26ft 26* 26* + ft 

1X1 17 1247 u 79V, 28% 27 

- 19 1051 14% “ 

_ 16 >451 71 
_• - 1329 7ft . 

U 17 3080 36% 36* 36* _ 
_ 19 239 12 }1% lift — % 


756 If* I Bft »* +% 

|4D 33ft 33 33ft +ft 

•" 16% 16ft - 

15% 15ft— Via 
19% 19ft +ft 

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54% 40* CdCmA 
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24* 4% centres 
34*14 CetdCW 
43 10 Centonn 

15* 7ftCantocpr 
3**2SftCRcBk 

19% 8 ceonto 

49% 23% Corner 
36* IBftCwvaoer 
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25 17*ChtOnFs 
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24ft 13% 

19 8 CWCOSS 

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21% 6%Otmmds 
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61% 50 QnnFIn 
34% 25 Onfos 
15 gftOroon 
44ft 34ft Orrul 
40*I8ftascas 

25 HftCUmoom 

21*13 aubox 
42 25 CsfHtth 

55 25 Cobra 

41 % 24 CocaBtl 
24% 16 Coftexto 
28 11 Coonecs 

14* 7ftCoano3fl 
15ft u Cahemt 
31*17 Comma 
25ft 17%CDK&<3> 

34% 17. . Cctnalf 

28* i4%comcsts 

26 MftCmcsas 
25ft lSftCammrjet 

33 27*ACmcBA50 AS 
27% l7%CmcFdl 

26% 13%Comi«5y 
26ft 20ft CompBne .92 
18% 7*QYtpr»l_ 

7* 2ftCmocm 

34 11'ACmpOala 
12ft SftCpiNwk 
48* 21 Camiwwr 
16% 8. Comyars 

9ft 2%CedCwn 
29* 17ftCon^F5 
15% 5 OanCH WI 

23ft 13 canna 

22ft 14%COorsB 
S>*21%CoptevPn 
lift 3ft Copy W 
18 9 Car Titer 

23* UViCorOtfiF 
57*30 Corals 

25 MVSCoretCPS 

26 rtftConmao 
17ft 6%Carx30> 

37ft 9ft con CP 
26ft ?5* Cynips 

29*21*CrtoBrl 
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28 ID CrwtSvS 
33% 20 gf- 
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39* 30*CuBr 

38 12*Cus«h 

27 IS CvoneD 
12ft SftCvonus 
44* 18% Cvn* Cp 

35*I4ftCyt* 

8* 3%CvtRx 


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- 82 7250 53% 51* 53% +1% 
_ 1910355 lift 10ft lift +* 

- - 2884 Hi 2% 2% —ft 

_ 15 72 lift TJ% 11% _ 

4X1 11 3958 33* 32% 33ft + % 

1A 18 225 21ft 21 21% * * 

_ 34 51 Z7% 26ft 27ft +% 

-571 506 17* 16% 17ft. _ 
_ _ 4726 12% 12*12*.+ % 
_ 93 1983 21% 20ft 21% +* 
_ 32 1976 12* 17ft 12% +ft 
_ « 693 9 Bft 8ft —ft 

- 32 S63 13ft 12ft 13ft + ft 

- _ 1688 19* 18* 18ft +% 

- 60 2^9 56* 54 56* -lft 

- _ 292 13ft 12ft 13ft t% 
- 198 281 12* lift 11% —ft 

26 28 1913790 9% 1% •* +VS 

- 24 2341 18% 17%l*Vu + l%, 

- 19 67 12ft 12ft 12ft tft 

_ _ 883 13 12* 12% — * 

- _ 39 «% 25* 25* — * 

,.1,8 435 2 ^ T 

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- 21 1049 25 24% 25 ♦% 

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_ _ _ 6ft 4ft, —Via 

_ - 986 21ft 20ft 21 +* 

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_ 7 2234 13% 12*12’%, —ft, 

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- 11 4041 8% 8 8 — % 

- 3 500 17* 16% 16% — % 

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204 23% 23 . 50% 


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_ _ 19 12 II* 12 +ft 

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1A 25 330 23ft 23* 23ft ♦% 

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U 9 1542 D’,4 22% 23 — % 

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_ 14 914 9ft 9 9% +* 

_ 35 1701 53% 51 y. 53 +1 

- 27 722 4ft 4% 4ft +» 
Z 112 6174 67ft 66% tJ —ft 
Z 68 1756 12* Uftl2Via+'%, 

- _ 1660 26% 25% 26 *% 

2j4 16 17H 54 S3* 54 +* 

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„ 3J 20 » 29 28% 28% — % 

Jle 1.4 — 102 22% 22% 22% — % 

- 26 1662 19ft 19 19% ♦% 

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30% 31*— I* 


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J - 1022 16% 16% 16% — Vm 
2 Z 5548 16ft 16 16ft —ft 
_ Z 2165 25ft 24 25% + 1% 

2.1 12 335033* 33ft 33 + * 

l-«:S 

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- 111 141 11% 10% 11% — 

~ 11 307 4% 3% 3Wn — »>l 

0 9 82 12 11% 11% —ft 

- - 1470 8% 7ft BW +% 

1 36 3315 43% 12% 43S* +1%, 

- 17 613 10% 10% 10% +ft 

- ss a a* 

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- 14 442 21* Tift 71ft - 

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_ - 1321 16% M 16ft - 

_ _ 665 17ft 16ft 17 ♦% 

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- 33 132S 27ft 26% 27% -% 
_ 1110712 15* 13* 14*+or u 

- 35 2231 39% 38ft 36% 1 1ft 

_ 135 1079 8 % 7% 0% +% 

_ _ 321 6ft S* 6ft * ft 

- - 416 7% 6% 7% +% 

_ 29 1439 32 Tift 32 -% 

_ 3118699 a% 571/5 57* +%, 
_ _ 732 15ft 14% 15ft +* 

_ 14 115 26* 26ft 26* +* 

_ 29 9343U39* 36* 2e% — * 

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J5 2J 15 408 24* 24ft 24% —ft 

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_. 22 178 19* 18* 19% x ft 

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J2 IJ 10 90 28ft 37% 2flft _ 

_ 16 200 18ft 17ft 17ft — * 

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35ft 20 Prlmaar 
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36* 14* Promt 
60ft 27 ProSoR 
29*11 ft ProtDu 
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64% 29 ft 0 VC 
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33 1J0 13 132 30* 30 % 30% +* 

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2A _ 2600 14ft 13% 14 +H 

-.15 28 8* 8ft 8* +* 

_ 16 81 40V, 39% 40ft +ft 

.. _ 171 26 25V, 26 — % 

- 39 1631 7% tft 7* x* 

_ 293 268 14ft 14% 14* +W 
_ 15 979 7% 7* 7% _ 

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_ 23 2264 21V: 27% 28 — * 

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_ 32 13 19% 13% 18% -»W 

26 1358 19% 19* 19* — * 

- — 276 8* 8* 8* +ft 

146 1 185 8* 8% 5* —Vr 

A 35 31 35ft 35 35% +% 

4A ifl 52 18* 10ft lift — % 

- - 1635 15ft 14ft 14% —ft 

_ 38 37’2ul9ft 17* 19ft + 11* 

- - 7159 24* 24 20 . 


_ 23 1037 7ft A* 7* eft 
-. _ 1266 35ft 34ft 34% — * 
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.9 70 4379 «5% 44* 45 + ft 

- 18 1881 7%, 6*1. 7V„ +ft 

23 12 1519 38* 38% 38* +ft 

_ _ 1180 19* 18% 19W +* 

_ 26 221 7 6* 41«— % 

.. _ 1374 21% 21 21% +* 

2018539 15* 15* 15* — Vu 
24 4190 44% 47V. 42* — 1* 

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- 21 Isa 20Vi 19ft 20 —ft 

1A 14 551 20ft 20 20ft _ 

_ 17 5179 14* 14 14% _ 

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4.6 13 729 32ft 31ft 31* +% 

3.4 10 326 34 Vi 34 34 _ 

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... 14 19 14% 14 14% t V. 

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_ 59 1197 72% 71* 72% 6* 

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_ 28 1206 !5ft 14* 15 ♦% 

_ 26 400 74% 73ft 74% - ft 

_ 26 384 72 70* 71% _ 

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_ _ 118 15% 15 15 — V* 

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- 2B 1236 31ft 30 30* _ 

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•TTit- t K international +4 

— licralo^^^enbunc— 


1 Tts£ mcnw ydo& oo rm 1 


LIVING IN THE US.? 
Now Printed in 
New York 
For Same Day 
Delivery in Key Cities 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1-800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-732-3890) 


On October 4lh, the IHT will publish a Special Report on 

Global Banking 
& Finance 

Among the topics to be covered are: 
l The value of the dollar. ■ The outlook for Japanese 


The booming market for 
derivatives. 

The European Monetary 
Institute. 


banking. 

Investment prospects in 
Latin American, Asian and 
other emerging markets. 


This uippiemem canadts kh/i the inicnu&ytal \ fc/vtan’ Fund Wxid Sark 
meetings in Madrid, at nlvet) 2.000 etfrj «?;« t ms fie tf S!n0‘Jed 
Fer further Jifcwawa pfejsc conljcr ftU f.bftdiv in Paris 
at {33-1) 46 3 7 93 76. tic (33-1) 46 37 SO 44. 

—J » 4L LM19MTH1MI • | 

Hcralb.^&.enbunc 


Extraordinary General Meeting: 

participate in the 
Group’s worldwide expansion! 


L'OREAL, world leader in 
the cosmetics industry with 
managed cosmetics sales of 
FF 43.5 billion in 1993 and net 
consolidated profit of FF 2.585 
million, before capital gains and losses and after 
minority interests, is offering Us shareholders the 



opportunity to take part in a 
new stage in its expansion. 

If they suppon the transforma- 
tion of agents in the United 
— j States. Canada. Switzerland and 
the majority of Spanish agents into Group subsidia- 
ries. the Group will grow further internationally. 


Extraordinary General Meeting 
Thursday, 22 September 1994 at 11 a.m. 
at the Group's head office, 41 rue Martre, Clichy, Hauts de Seine, France. 

To vote and/Qrjo atiendJhe Meeting 

Holders of bearer shares should advise their bank, stockbroker or other approved intermediary of their intention 10 vote and'nr 
10 attend the meeting before Friday 16 September. 

- Those attending the meeting should ask their bank, stockbroker or other approved intermediary for iheir admittance card 
which must be shown on the day of the Meeting. 

- Those who cannot attend the Meeting can exercise their votinc; rights hy appointing a proxy or casting a 
postal vote. Details are available at your bank, stockbroker or other approved intf.rm km \ry. Postal votes 
must be received by Monday 19 September at the latest. 

Main points of the agenda 

- Report of the Board of Directors and ihe Appraisal Auditors 

- Approval of the capital contribution by GESPARAL, (he valuation of (he acquired shares and the related payment 

- Acknowledgement of the L'OREAL rights issue related to the capital contribution 

- Corresponding amendment of the articles of association 

In a press release dated 13 June 1994. L'OREAL announced ihe financial terms and conditions for the project of capital 
contribution or acquisition of shares in COSMATR. Inc. USA. COSMAIR Canada Inc.. LORSA-FAGEL (Switzerland) and 
PROCASA (Spain). 

The company invites its shareholders to approve the transfer by GESPARAL to L'OREAL of COSMAIR. Inc. USA 
shares, representing 51.16% of its capital 3nd of COSMAIR CANADA Inc., representing 29.R3 'v- of its capital. These 
capital contributions will be paid for by the allotment of new L'OREAL shares to GESPARAL. 

This capital contribution would increase GESPARAL's interest in L’OREAL from 5 1 .04 10 53.65*?. 

Fairness opinion 

At the request of L'OREAL, CREDIT COMMERCIAL DE FRANCE expressed an opinion on the fairness of the proposed transac- 
tions to the shareholders of L'OREAL. This opinion addressed the conformity of the proposed transactions with the relevant standard 
criteria, the fair treatment of L’OREAL’s shareholders from a financial standpoint and the protection of their financial interests. 
CREDIT COMMERCIAL DE FRANCE reported lhaL in its opinion, the proposed transactions protect the financial interests 
of all L’OREAL *s shareholders, the payment in shares or in cash for the assets previously held by certain Group shareholders 
cannot be construed as enabling them to benefit from preferential treatment compared 10 the minority shareholders of 
L’OREAL and the financial terms agreed between the parties reflect the economic and financial ratios generally applied for 
transactions of this type carried out between unrelated parties. 

CREDIT COMMERCIAL DE FRANCE'S opinion does noi and should not be construed as representing a recommendation to 
the Board of Directors or the shareholders, who are responsible for their own decision and choice. 

Based on its analyses. CREDIT COMMERCIAL DE FRANCE considers that the proposed transactions comply with the 
criteria defined above. 

Copies of its report are available to shareholders, on requesL at the Company's head office. 


• The |wp.irjiary documents lor this Et i m, * dinsy General Mis-nne van be ■•blHined 
from banks. -1 act: brokers, financial msinuiiims nr hy hthiiiu in 
L'OREAL. Business Infomuiion and Investor Relations Dcpjruncm ■ -JI. rue Mann: • •>- 1 IT Clichy - Frame - Fjv 


i*3) 1 J7ShSn(12 


L'OREAL 



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British Airway s 

The worlds favourite airline 















Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 


NYSE 


W«rfMsday*s Closing 

Tables indude the nationwide prices up to 
toe closing on wadi Street and do not reflect 
isle trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 



12 Mona as 

Mofl LOW &XX ON YM PE 1008 


W> USwLWegQfOe 



ir Moron 
HW LOW swat 


Qnr Yld PE IBM HM Low Loin OTgn 




INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


^ ^Q MANA GEft p 

YjtfRENGTNEElj 


FORUM 


SEVENTH YEAR - BRUSSELS 



15 & 16 DECEMBER 1994 


IMTEHNXnOftAL 




with EMDS and media partners in ten countries invite 

EUROPE’S TOP 400 YOUNG EXECUTIVES 


to attend a two-day meeting with central recruiters from : 


• ABB • AGIP ■ AIR UOUIDE- AMS MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS • ANDERSEN CONSULTING • ARTHUR D. LITTLE • AT&T - BARCLAYS BANK • 

> BAT • BERTELSMANN • BNP • BOOZ-ALLEN & HAMILTON * BOSSARD CONSULTANTS • BP OIL • CARNAUDMETAUBOX • COMMERZBANK ■ 

• CPC EUROPE CONSUMER FOODS • DEUTSCHE BANK • DRESDNER BANK • EDF^GDF * EUROPAY • GOLDMAN SACHS • 

• HEWLETT-PACKARD • KERRY GROUP • MCWNSEY & COMPANY • PREUSSAG • RWE • SHELL • SOG&TE G&JERALE • 

• SWISS BANK CORPORATION • VOLKSWAGEN • WEST LB • 


Applications are welcome from professionals of all disciplines and 1995 graduates able to demonstrate the following 
- outstanding intellectual and Interpersonal skills - ability to operate in at feast two languages - international mobility • 
- a maximum of five years' professional experience - availability for employment in 1995 - 


To receive an application form and supplementary in f orm a tion, please send our Brussels office a postcard, to arrive 
no later than 1 October 1994, stating clearly your name, address and date of birth. 


EMDS International, P.O. Box 2, beetles 2, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium 


COMMERZBANK 


sabena 


o 


official carrier 


E URES 



MKEneryht 

RWE 

•noRBUtav , RtaMOBcnu 

Bhochtbp 

gjlAHMEYEB 

1 -waw Mti* 

RWK Etnsorgung 




MDS 


■ AS natkmaUntBa welcome, European & non-European aHw 


Exp nttv- oi Irw-Ttmtpjl K<-murm r» 

■tj A* i - io«rx FMvewnruli - 


OFFICE 

ADMINISTRATOR 


Major hi-tech U.S. company 
soon to be based in 
Rotterdam, the Netherlands, 
is seeking an Office 
Administrator to help tun and 
grow the office. 

This individual will be res- 
ponsible for travel arrange- 
ments, banking coordina- 
tion, telephone answering/ 
routing, appointment schedu- 
ling, and other critical office 
coordination chides. 

Excellent English written and 
verbal skills a must, as well 
as traditional office skills, to 
include PC usage and databa- 
se familiarity. Salary com- 
mensurate with experience. 

Send your resume, 
references, and salary 
history immediately to. 

BOX D-419 

International Herald Tribune 
850 Third Avenue, 8th Floor 
k New Yerit, NY 10022 > 


if 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL S.A. 


■s 




We are one of the world's largest investment management organizations. Due to the 
rapid growth of our European operations, we have an opening in Geneva for a newly 
created position of 

FUND ACCOUNTING MANAGER. 

The position will be directly involved with the management and supervision of our 
European Fund and Client Accounting Departments. The position also offers an 
opportunity for interaction and involvement with the organization's investment, 
accounting and operations departments worldwide. 

The successful candidate must have an accounting qualification, a university degree in 
b usiness management or be a chartered accountant In addition to having significant 
experience within the securities industry and with the management of a department, 
the following personal qualities are essential to succeed in this position: high level of 
initiative, ability to focus on objectives, good communication skills and team spirit 
Fluency in both English and Ftenlch are also required. 

A very competitive base salary, as well as an exceptionally attractive bonus and 
benefit program are offered. 

Kindly forward in confidence your hand-written 
application and curriculum vitae to: 

Capital International S JL 
Director Administration 
1 1, rue de Chantepoulet - 1201 GENEVE 


J 




Chief Operating Officer 



Branded Foods Marketing 

Our diem, a well established and privately-owned 


company, is a major force in the highly competitive 
iuai Arabt 


Jeddah 

cUS$ 250,000 
(tax free) package 


Saudi Arabian food and drink sector, with a number 
of leading brands. Whilst consolidating its dominant 
position within the Kingdom, the company is 
actively planning to extend its product portfolio and 
expand the scope of its activities throughout 
the Gulf. 

As part of this process the company is undertaking a 
restructuring of its organisation, which has led to 
the creation of this new past of Chief Operating 
Officer. 

Reporting to the CEO via an advisory committee, of 
which you will be an ex-officio member, you will 
provide the strong leadership and control vital to the 
successful day-to-day operation of toe company. 
You will also be responsible for toe achievement of 
ambitious profit and growth targets, and will make a 
key contribution to the company's strategic 
development and performance which will eouip it to 
meet tne challenges of the late 1 990s and beyond. 
To assist you in these tasks, you will have the 
support of a multi-national team of top professional 
managers. 

A graduate, probably in your forties, you must 
currently have profit and loss responsibility for a 



substantial business with annual turnover well In 
excess of $100 million, operating in the branded 
consumer goods sector. Your broadly based career 
in senior management should have an international 
dimension - ideally with exposure to the Far or 
Middle East markets - and will include experience of 
branded foods marketing, as well as the 
management of growth-induced organisational 
change. 

Entrepreneurial flair should be combined with 
exceptionally strong strategic, marketing, financial 
and leadership skills. A capable communicator, you 
will possess keen intellectual and commercial 
abilities together with considerable personal 
presence. Of prime importance are tact and 
sensitivity to the culture of the company, allied to a 
firm, assertive business approach. 

Salary is negotiable to attract the high calibre 
individual demanded for this appointment. The 
executive package indudes performance-related 
bonus, car, quality accommodation, first-class air 
fares for the employee and family and school fees. 
Please write - in confidence - with full career and 
salary details to Chassan Yazigi, R ek 1364/4, 
MSL International Li mi ted. 32 Aybrook Street, 
London W1 M 3JL. 


,ir 
r .«■ 


». *- 

0 ' " 


EXECUTIVE RECRUtTMENT CONSULTANTS 


LONDON BIRMINGHAM GLASGOW LEEDS MANCHESTER 

071 487 S000 021 454 8864 041 248 7700 0532 454757 061 834 2425 


IERNATIONA 

dance Tii 


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

Panos London 



Panos is an independent information organisation which 
works to stimulate debate on sustainable development 
issues. It has a unique international reputation for the 
qualify of its information outputs, and for its capacity 
building work in developing countries. We believe that ideas 
are more important than money in achieving durable 
change. 

The challenges facing the new Executive Director of Panos 
London are to provide overall strategic direction to keep us 
at the forefront of the development debates, to develop 
further our thematic and regional programmes, and to 
maintain and increase the international impact of Panos' 
information. 


You will need to have strong vision, be a good 
communicator — with the ability to represent Panos in the 
media and at the highest levels of international debate — 
have a deep knowledge of development and a good 
understanding of the media. 

Salary: £35,000 Closing Date: 7 October 1994 

Panos London is one of three Panos offices — the others 
are in Washington and Paris. The London office has a staff 
of 30 and an annual turnover of just under £2 million. 

For Application details, please contact: The Personnel 
Office, Panos London, 9 White Lion Street. London, 

N1 9D. Tel No 071 278 1111 


Panos seeks to be an Equal Opportunities Employer 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTI VES AVAI LABLE 

GERMAN, 54, fart Engfeh. tafan, 
Fr each, Gannon. 2D ym of oversea 
experience, East/Wesf Africa end 5 
yews SJL Asa, d with ny o c inti ov3 
oipDBcnrifl firm, presently inu n u fl ing 
firm in a Wetf Afnasi country, ederv 
iiv» ex poience in bams devsoproenf, 

BE 


fuccyniiihofi and ihopo^vM, 
®rTspa*ir?j fwsriai swiosJ. 


Abo rtensted in ihott term cunuto cy 
r eas ons in the Wd of bume dwet- 
opmenf an d/or rt u Mthntert « srtl « 

project nrijiniHm. 


Cot bn earftxSed m Europe, or 
ato n S£ Aria at From ewfy 0 
fpty Bax 

UiT, 92521 Nouiy 


Anfebie Hwe uf n s. Reply Ba 

Cedex, Frenoe. 


3710. 


CALIFORNIA CPA 

Experienced m Prong global growth 
through contracts, negotiations, 
end/ff resolving deputes. Ahrayi 
avrfobk cross wfwd 4 lowL 
Tat 707-874.2563 ISA 


HfGH EXECUTIVE BUSSES CoroUt- 
anf mb ne«r dnlengsr'hgh puhfc 
rofatja m based m Brack, tree to 


hovel, top sties & irarWiog,_20^w 


rtl cx ppq icc , brepe, Mme • 

Eat (projects, operowns expo«fl Ft*r» 
Engbh, Frereh, Dutch, abo free kwc*. 
Fto Braefc 32-W40L0&58 


BENCH, MJLA. 20 yean' experience 
ri swear rangemert pcstiors a the 
Mdde fat, crape and the UJL, 
biSngud French/EngUv fluent Russian 


8 Fcri teefa cheftri^ng pcaiSom 
top atm mulfra rt ion ol company, 
flense fax Paris ( 33 - 1 ] 64224951 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


wn cua CTODIMIY 


We we an rtl RE5S & ADVEKTBNG 
AGB-tCY miwg sdes c o c tJ nBtes. 
tderty you ore; 

• Between 24 ond 30 yews old. 

■ EsoRwt opMorantk. 

* c — ■ — * — 1 J r..rj. Cmjv4« 

CaCCWQSH UJ Ull tfii Cm L F IU W I, nen aj i 

Wtd hnowtedge of Spwrti. 

• Dynamic txfrtMtl, confidert, opti- 
en0< independent, seH-motwrtd 
• frepnred jotrortMQ months o yew 
wifi readeocy and extended stays in 
dffcrent tBUtrin 
A No exp eri e n c e in sales netegory. 


The jab ertcris ccrtods on the fegheri 
level ci o»w fo world and e rewd- 
mg salary. 

[f you the* you hora the dive end we 


rt you the* you Dm me One an a* 
embtoous enough to h*e tfte ehalenge. 
we wodd Ba you to send us your Of 


. ... ._i you to semi us your i _ 

regether with a recent photograph 
promptly to 


c/oNOA 

91, RUE DU WJ 5T HONCRE 
75008 HUBS 


ADMINISTRATIVE SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 


SECRETAIRE DE DIRECTION 

BIUNGUE ANGLAIS NEUILLY-SUR-SEINE 
pour le President d’un cabinet de conseil 
international : 35 ans environ, BTS Secretariat 
de Direction, st6no anglais et frangais, 
parfaitement bilingue anglais, capacites 
redactionnelles dans les deux langues (suivi 
des relations a I'inter national). 

Adresser lettre manuscrite, C.V., photo 
et pretentions a Box D434, IHT 
92521 Neuilly Cedex , France . 


% 


- T . 


r'-. 


AOVanSMQ SAIES EXECUTIVE 5al 
print (pose for mtemaionol fashion 
trade pubfica&xi Awourts h Europe, 
U5, Aria Seme travel necenwy- 
resume with sakry/conminon 


retirements to; Pubfahw, Suite 500, 
6 West 32nd St, New YorV. NY 


v aid a. 

IOOQ1. fae U\2l 6&rB9 USA 


HRHNB COOIDMATOB m your 
epurtty ta repr et ert wi ve liar ex- 
, fauna « PO 


™tB» tows compwiy. Bssuna to I 
Bar TaiS Btfa, idcrio 83715 USA 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
WANTED 


SM0S UJ, OTIZEN, hxheior, 
German born, hetf^ewrih, a re ek ing a 

Can rrioato. Own aw, p os ri ow u to 
Pteugear thw. 060 eneder 
prwoTfropic werk and/or 
help to haod«CQpt»i 
^ Vidwy Bort bojed. 
.WrfloteLt.Oppemh, 

fag— * pgfTriai 


YOUNG AAUHCAN WOMAN, 
deeply raonoSed with world cuthxe, 
wshoi to esoond her horizons. Bode- 
ground m celebrity toiert coordneenn. 


P«*Se7nwfc» retohont, wrifina. Seefa 
press/K 


now choilenge as prew/iooal/ 

penond setronxy/ipa fa pps n n for 

pmwtert rtenrtmnd busnefi/aA- 
taxd/iplomrtc IwxJer/orgtxiaotioo. 

rasourcefd, 


ft jgrtVknn raktortan. Reply: 


fttort ffl En^, and French, 


torie Jrtin „ 

grape wtd twww. Phne write to 
gw 3 gW.UtT, FneWidrtr . 1 $ 
_M023 fitritfirt/Maet. Germaiv 

IH^NArtONAUST SEEKS n 

_VW celoetrt^rT ^eWIS^^g 


" WUW 3UAL WH. UDY web Ht 
pwtom vnlti trocErn w tourism an- 
pwyin hance/HoSmd. Has wwWn 
WSywnfceate anytime. Fm 


BBJVfcf 


SOUTH OF RMNCE 

toed French FA, 


"■’iwr if 

Td 031 9lSljfSt 


«5 sg"^ 


jw. iwm, cpw- 

*tfa wst/fuMme portoa 


wets 


MS 


WWfc yar HUBII MAWAIdK 

S yearn at Own, seeks to represent 

SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVA1LAMR 


Cirtrd&ropean VP cf wi Americwi 
totooi company sub artxdous 


■M.. 


PA/ SECRET ART 

fer dralenwng Paris bawd poridon. 
Engfedi nxmr tongue, fhwrt French 
•"tod. G ood presenWbon. Three 
mmimuni twl i Mfl 


■* wperience required. 

Aged 25-30 yean. Pleate forward 
CV end photo to: 


V .. 


MISS FUJI 

S3/3T AVXMC DE NBJ01Y 
73116 PASS 


^CwidWales should hove e x eelert 
WP sk* fWcxiwh 
Perxwwywxfbel 

..fgrtfan bMdeip Sw 1st 



SECRETARY REQURH) 

, PACT TIMS 

CY. to: ACTIVE MBMATKMU ^ 
3 n« EugmManuel 751 16 Pw» Ptanae 


WMIHAMUSCAN STtXX tedtonj" 

SSAVVaaF 1 

r v wnw* rwraif. : 
tongue Ftode 

SECRETARIES AVAn^mJT 

M "*W UVB. SKIMP"" 


K 


i. 


aperima, wd 


exceleN 


gert MW4 of fwperw- 
P to. w wy to howl for EEe* 


-^Td Q3-11 UlrFssSI. 

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International Herald Tribune, Thursday, September 15, 1994 


Page 13 



THE TRIB INDEX: 1 1 6.1 _ _ 

International l Herald Tribune Worid Stock Index ©, composed of 
280 nterattonaHy mvestable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 = 100 
120 — ; 




World Index 

9/1 4/94 close: 115.11 
Previous: 116.58 


Officer 


S 


•a n». i» ..... 
VJIltV ,;ir. 

*Jr» A'..' : 

K.C- . . 
b *'Vt •* 
*9*0*1. fi 
jjuiu’r; <|. 

* 

U A . .. .;• 

•1 .Vti-'l* • 

*nr •.••:>. ■ 

ftH.fr .-. . - 
W* -»lV 

A* 

ithf >■*■ • 
e «•■ 

»' • - • 
a« *'•■■ •■ • 

"■ • 

■<**■ ... 

* l:,= 


»i L - 


s 

1994 


ftsia/Paciiffc 


Approx. weighting: 32% 
Oosa: 12B.® Prev.: 129.65 


Europe 


Appro*. waghang: 37% 
Close: 11659 Pravi 117.66 


,— >u 'St’-’v * V**v- . 

fast. Laa ag '■■» £a ^ -,m- . . % .■ 


"A M J J 

A S 
1994 

A M J J 

A S 
1994 

( North America 


Latin America 


Approx, weighting: 26% 
Oosa: 9604 Prw_- 96.1 1 

0 

H3 

Approx. Mtyfling: 5% 
Close: 149X7 Prevj 147.76 




Sfc Worid Index 


The ndex tracks U.S. dollar values of stocks n Tokyo, New York, London, and 
AraenUne, Australia. Austria, Mpum, BrszH, Canada Chflo, Dan marie, Finland. 
Franco. Gerawny, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Natnarionds, New Zealand. Norway, 
Singapore. Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. Now York and 
London, the Max is composed ol the 20 top issues in terms of market capaatizabon. 
otherwise tfia ten top stocks am tracked. 


1 Industrial Sectors J 


tod. 

Pll*. % 


tod. 

Pra*. 

% 


don 

dosa ctenge 


dOM 

dosa 

dungl 

Energy 

115.26 

115.39 -0.54 

CopBal Goods 

118.42 

11823 

40.08 

Utilities 

13059 

13122 -0.48 

Raw Uaterfals 

13686 

13628 

-0.16 

Hnanca 

115.43 

11587 -088 

Consumer Goods 

103.54 

104.00 

-0.44 

Services 

122JJ5 

12222 -0.14 

lEscefiaieous 

135.14 

136.93 

-121 

Fw more information about the Index, a booklet is avaSaUe free ol charge. 


Write to Trib Index, W1 Avenue Charles de Gauffle. 92521 NeuByCedex, France 


.■ O International Herald Tribunp 


Forte Gets 
Majority 
Stake in 
Meridien 


Cvnpded bv Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Fone' PLC 
said Wednesday it bought a 
57.3 percent stake in the luxury 
hotel chain Socdete des Hotel's 
Meridien from Air France and 
that it would pursue an even 
larger stake. 

The amount paid was not dis- 
closed, but Forte said it valued 
the entire Meridien concern at 
1.9 billion French francs (S360 
miilionV Fone France said it 
was prepared to buy even more 
Mtndien equity. 

For Forte, Britain's biggest 
hotelier, it was the second coup 
in as many days. On Tuesday, it 
won a decisive say in the run- 
ning of the luxury Savoy Hotel 
group in London. 

Forte plans to combine the 
58 hotels under the Meridien 
name with several of its own 
luxury establi shm ents to create 
a chain of 50,000 rooms. 

Air France had intended to 
sell Meridien to Forte in April, 
but the decision was delayed 
when the French government, 
the airline's principal share- 
holder, bowed to pressure from 
Aocor SA. a rival hotel chain and 
bidder, and ordered indepen- 
dent analyses of the two offers. 

Accor had insisted that its 
lesser bid that valued Meridien 
at 1.6 billion francs included 
longer-term marketing benefits 
that Forte couldn't provide. 

But the argument did not ap- 
pear to sway Air France, which 
wanted to raise as much cash as 
possible. Tile M&idien sale 
comes amid Air France's three- 
year restructuring effort to cut 
costs and increase productivity. 

Air France, which posted an 
8.5 billion franc loss in 1993. 
has received approval with con- 
ditions from the European 
Commission for a 20 billion 
franc capital injection from the 
French government. 

( Bloomberg, AP. Reuters) 


Japan Slows Discounting 

Tokyo Court Upholds Cosmetics Firm 


By Andrew Pollack 

iYe*v York Tuna Service 

TOKYO — The spread of discounting in 
Japan hit a roadblock Wednesday when the 
Tokyo High Court reversed a lower court 
ruling and upheld the right of Shiseido, the 
cosmetics giant, to stop supplying its prod- 
ucts to a retailer who had sold them below list 
price. 

The ruling goes against the recent trend in 
which entrepreneurs have been circumvent- 
ing Japan's rigid and inefficient distribution 
system to dramatically lower sky-high prices 
of everything from soft drinks to airline tick- 
ets. 

The court ruling could give some ammuni- 
tion to other manufacturers aiming to control 
the way their retailers sell products. But de- 
spite Wednesday’s r ulin g, it seems the mo- 
mentum toward discounting in Japan is un- 
stoppable. 

The Shiseido case has drawn international 
attention as a test case of how much Japan 
would change. Ken Fujisawa, who owns a 
small store in Tokyo, had defied Shiseido by 
selling cosmetics by mail order, often at a 20 
percent discount 

Shisddo’s Tokyo sales subsidiary cut Mr. 
Fujisawa off. Shiseido requires its products to 
be sold face to face, with a sales clerk explain- 
ing the proper use to the customer. While 
Shiseido m aintains the system is needed to 
avoid allergic reactions and dissatisfied cus- 
tomers, analysts suggest it is a way of main- 
taining suggested retail prices. 

In September 1993, the Tokyo District 
Court stunned the cosmetics giant by ruling 
that Shiseido could not cut off Mr. Fujisawa. 
But on an appeal by Shiseido. the Tokyo High 
Court ruled Wednesday that the company’s 
policies did not violate antitrust laws. 


"We cannot conclude that the company 
was using the face-to-face sales as a way of 
controlling prices," Judge Kin i chi Takahashi 
said. 

Mr. Fujisawa said he would appeal to the 
Supreme Court. 

Shiseido said it was not trying to dictate 
prices, only the level of customer service. It 

Despite the ruling, the 
momentum for price-cutting 
still seems unstoppable. 

said it had cut Mr. Fujisawa off for violating 
his contract. 

Shiseido is not completely out of the 
woods, however. It is still being investigated 
by the Fair Trade Commission, which en- 
forces the antitrust laws. Last year, the agency 
raided Shiseido's offices after another retailer 
complained that it. too, had been cut off for 
offering deep discounts. Thai retailer. Kawa- 
chiya Ltd., said it sold its products in its 
stores, not through mail order. 

Prices in Japan have long been far higher 
than in other countries, for cosmetics and 
many other goods. Among the reasons for this 
is that sales often go through small retailers 
who dare not anger the manufacturer by sell- 
ing below list price. In addition, products 
ofien pass through a multilevel distribution 
system, with the product being marked up at 
each stage. 

Japanese consumers put up with the high 
prices and even seemed to prefer them if it 
meant getting high-quality products or ser- 
vice. But in the last two years, discounting has 
become widespread. 


Narrowing Gap 
Fails to Help 
Japan on Trade 


By Steven Brull 

International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Japan's trade 
surplus with the world contract- 
ed at the fastest rate in nearly 
four years in August, but the 
gap with the United States wid- 
ened, the government reported 
Wednesday, less than three 
weeks from a trade deadline 
with Washington. 

With the high yen boosting 
imports, Japan's trade surplus 
narrowed to S6.08 billion in Au- 
gust, 18.8 percent below the fig- 
ure a year earlier and the small- 
est since January 1993. But its 
trade imbalance with the Unit- 
ed States expanded 2 percent, 
to S3.49 billion, the fifth con- 
secutive monthly rise, the Fi- 
nance Ministry said Wednes- 
day. 

Economists said the speed of 
the contraction in the overall 
surplus reflected temporary 
factors, such as unusually hot 
weather in August, and large 
individual items such as aircraft 
purchases. 

Thus, they say. although the 
surplus has peaked and begun a 
long-term decline because of 
the high yen and structural 
changes. August’s high rate of 


Foreign Chips 
Gain in Japan 

Reuien 

WASHINGTON — For- 
eign manufacturers held a 

record 21.9 percent of Ja- 
pan's computer-chip market 
in the second quarter after 
taking a 20.7 percent share 
in the first three months of 
the year, the office of U.S. 
Trade Representative Mick- 
ey Kan tor said Wednesday. 

It was the third straight 
quarter the foreign shore of 
Japan’s semiconductor mar- 
ket exceeded 20 percent, the 
target set by a 1991 U.S.- 
Japan trade accord. 

In 1993. foreign compa- 
nies accounted for 1^.4 per- 
cent of the $25 billion Japa- 
nese market for microchips. 


contraction will not be sus- 
tained. 

Moreover, the still-growing 
trade gap with the United States 
underscores the structural mis- 
match between the two nations 

See TRADE, Page 14 


2 Emerge as Top Candidates at OECD 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The field of candi- 
dates to lead the OECD effec- 
tively narrowed from four to 
two Wednesday as ambassa- 
dors from the 25 member coun- 
tries met to try to choose a new 
secretary-general, diplomats 
said. 

But the meeting stalled after 
it became clear that support 
was almost equally divided be- 
tween Donald Johnston, a Ca- 





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INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


Balance Tips to Trading at Goldman 


By Leslie Wayne 

New York Tima Service 

N EW YORK — The selection 
of Jon S. Corzine, a hard- 
nosed trader, to replace Ste- 
phen Friedman at the top po- 
sition at Goldman, Sachs & Co. is a sign 
that the firm is returning to its trading 
heritage, a tradition forged decades ago 
by a- legendary trader, Gus Levy. 

It is also a sign of the crucial impor- 
tance of global securities trading to a 
firm that has recendy prided itself on its 
inves tment-baolrin g prowess. 

“Given where the firm is today, espe- 
cially after the last year, Goldman is 
more of a hedge-fund trading mecha- 
nism than an investment bank," said a 
former Goldman partner who insisted on 
anonymity. “So you need a trader in 
charge who knows fixed-income and 
who knows derivatives.” 

Mr. Corzine, 47, who will become se- 
nior partner and chairman of the man- 
agement committee, knows trading. A 
former college basketball star and Ma- 
rine, he has been co-head of the firm's 
fixed-income securities division since 
1988 and has been instrumental in Gold- 
man’s expansion into Asia. During this 
period, his specialty has produced the 
firm’s greatest profits and, this year, 
some devastating losses. 

Largely as a result of trading losses, 
Goldman’s profit in the first six months ■ 
of its financial year fell more than. 60 
percent, to between $400 million and 
§430 mini on. This contrasts with the 
pretax profit of $23 billion in 1993 that 


made Goldman one of the world's most 
profitable companies. 

"The trading side is where the biggest 
risk is,” another former Goldman part- 
ner, who insisted on anonymity, said. "It 
gives you the biggest chance to lose your 
shirt or make a bundle. And Goldman 


Ton need a trader in 
charge who knows fixed- 
income and who knows 
derivatives. ? 

A former Goldman, Sachs & Co. 
partner 

needed someone dose to the top of the 
firm that understands that" 

By contrast Mr. Friedman had come 
up through the investment banking 
ranks as a specialist in mergers. With the 
departure in early 1993 of Robert E. 
Rubin, the co-chairman who was a trad- 
ing expert to join President Bill Clin- 
ton’s administration, the firm was left 
without a trader in Lhe chairman’s office. 

People at the firm said Mr. Friedman 
was feeling increasing stress from han- 
dling a job alone that had been handled 
by two men — especially when trading, 
an area of the business that was not Mr. 
Friedman’s strong suit was increasingly 
causing problems. 

With a balance sheet of SI 10 billion, 
and more than $5 billion of partners' 


capital including a $500 milli on passive 
investment made by Sumitomo Bank of 
Japan in 1986, Goldman has been facing 
some heavy losses this year as interest 
rales have climbed. 

The company was profitable in the 
First six months, but the picture behind 
the numbers was grim. Revenue from 
trading was down more than $] billion 
from a year earlier. 

The announcement Tuesday broke 
with Goldman's tradition of having an 
investment banker and a trader as co- 
heads of the firm. 

When Mr. Friedman and Mr. Rubin 
were named co-chairmen, they succeed- 
ed John L. Weinberg, an investment 
banker, and John C. whitehead, a trader 
who later left to join the government. 
Mr. Weinberg and Mr. Whitehead were 
co-heads of Goldman until 1985, when 
Mr. Weinberg became the solo chair- 
man. 

In this case. Mr. Corzine will have the 
top spot and there will be do co-chair- 
man. Heniy M. Paulson Jr., 48, one of 
three men who headed the investment 
banking activities, will become vice 
chairman and chief operating officer. 

Mr. Paulson made his reputation at 
Goldman as head of investment banking 
in the Midwest. 

People at Goldman say he lacks Mr. 
Comae's skills at dealing with people, 
and he has a reputation of being tough 
on junior associates. Mr. Corzine is 
known for having an “open door" office 
policy and frequently highlights the 
thoughts of junior associates at meetings. 


nadian politician, and Jean- 
Gaude Paye, the incumbent 

Since June, when the choice 
was supposed to have been 
made, members of the Organi- 
zation for Economic Coopera- 
tion and Development have 
failed repeatedly to agree on the 
choice of a new leader to revi- 
talize the much-criticized Paris- 
based think tank. The OECD 
provides economic research and 
policy proposals to the world's 
leading industrial democracies. 

The British candidate, Nigel 
Lawson, a former chancellor of 
the Exchequer, lost support as 
European Union members ral- 
lied to Mr. Paye, a former 


French Foreign Ministry official 
who has already served two five- 
year terms as head of the OECD. 

Britain made clear during 
Wednesday’s meeting that it 
would not stand in the way of a 
consensus forming in favor of 
either Mr. Johnston or Mr. 
Paye, although it said Mr. Law- 
son remained officially a candi- 
date. But Mr. Lawson’s only 
hope now would seem to be as a 
compromise choice in case of a 
continued split between the two 
front-runners. 

Diplomats emerging from 
the OECD meeting also said the 
candidacy of Lorenz Scbo- 
raerus, a top German trade ne- 


gotiator, had effectively been 
cast aside. 

Of the 25 countries represent- 
ed at the meeting, only wo were 
said to remain undecided 
Wednesday. Ambassadors at the 
meeting agreed to seek further 
instructions from their govern- 
ments and reconvene Tuesday. 

Complicating matters, the 
United States, which has 
thrown its weight behind Mr. 
Johnston, has explicitly op- 
posed even a temporary exten- 
sion of Mr. Paye’s mandate. 

“The situation is totally 
stalled,” one diplomat involved 
in the negotiations said. “I don’t 
see any way out right now.” 


China Inflation 
Surges in Cities 

Reuters 

BEIJING — China said 
Wednesday that urban in- 
flation continued to defy a 
15-month government cool- 
ing program and rose to the 
highest level in more than 
five years. 

Figures from the State 
Statistical Bureau, pub- 
lished in the China Busi- 
ness Times, showed August 
consumer retail prices in 
China’s 35 major cities rose 
27.1 percent from a year 
earlier, following an annual 
rise of 24.2 percent in July. 


“ ;.,tu . 
»* V ‘T* -* 




I* 1 '"' ' „ 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Isn't it our role to encourage any wealthy person to become 
even wealthier ? 




■ r.«e . 


> 


. «. At* -■ • 


Cross Rat** 

S C DM. 

M nurt nra 1W U06 1.1115 

Bnmb H37 #1 3 3B3SS 

Frankfurt LSW MlU — 

Laotian to) L StfS MW 

taw Jans uni 
. M|i«" Ufl* ujss 

New York n) HUB VWJ 

Parte uas &26 ME7 

Tokyo SiS isut WB 

Toronto UK2 HI* &D72 

zona LOTS UK UW 

lieu 130 UW Ltw 

ism anu mu 

Oostnss In Ait&antom. London, 
rates at lain. 

a: To bur one pound; b: To buy 

OVO/W W* 


Sept. 14 

ff. Lira DJFI fcF. SJP. Yen « Pweta 

02277 BJIM* — H«* 130 IJm* 13 135" 

UGB 11241 * I13S2S — 24MS tUJU ZLO 24755- 

128 0SMS* QJPU 41574 * 1308 LS408* 1.1*15 lXBt* 
U07 UOS 17123 *17F 1025 15517 1135 2BU0 

20*5 HU* 74HH 4X377 WA55 V3J»* W* 7 

21495 MUD KJOt 1JW.15 U&5 14*40 1120* 

UTS U47JB L73 3173 12112 fUO MSB noil 

U27* 1051* UMl 41t1» SLMH* UR* 4117* 

1122 1ST SSI 1111 75* 71W 07715 

B2S43 UW* 07417 MM* U81 13M1 * UBS* 

UCf tor 7* 07*12 4095* 1294** U*7 lJOti* 

4508 IMS zm 1*m 1JK7 12242* 1403 159JU9 

72377 L295J8 nji *0205 UBOo U4IK MB W.W 

New York and Zurich, linings In other centers; Toronto 

ana dollar! *: Units of 100; MO..- not auateo: MA: nor 


Eurocurrency Deposits 

Swiss 

Dollar D-Mark Franc 

Sterling 

French 

Franc 

Yon 

Sept. 14 

ECU 

1 month 

4 4 V-4 ■> , 

4V5 

3 ^3 


5 Sr5 

246-2-* 

5&6-TU 

3 months 

4 *hr5 V. 

4 >Kr5 ^ 

3 9. 

5 ■V5 t « 

5ft-5% 


5-^-5^ 

6 months 

5 *v5 V* 

5 W-5»w 

4 '-4-446 

6'4-db. 

5 >v,S R . 

3=*-2'.S 

A i* 

l vtor 

5A4 

3*r4:i. 

4W * i 

7V6-7 1 * 

iM'. 

2^-rVi 

6*u n6^te 


Sources: Reuters, Uovtts Bank. 

Rates opullaVe la uitorbcnk deposits of SI million mlnhntim i or aaul volenti. 






-c •• - 

_ ' ' . • • 

- J 

Oj '•* r- . J1 ^ 

-...MV V • • • 


OtfwrDoOar 

Crn-mor *■«■* 
AraenLUtto aw 
AaatraLI US14 
Anstr.KML IMS 

BraUnol Ml 

CMWMVMm 15234 

Cradikanm 27-80 
D«**i kram MBS 
egvpLpOiMf MSB 
FU. markka 4«19 


Values 

Cummer Par* 
QdMfcdrac 23416 
mm Hanot 7JM7 
Huno-torhtf 1B7B 
intikmrawe 3US 
Mo-rwH 9176*4 
Irish* 1U*79 

teraeMsbek. U32 
Kuwaiti Onar MODI 
MoKnr.rtM. 121 


Corraner 
Max. peso 
N. Zealand! 
Norm, krona 
pmlmu 

PetMtzMv 
Port wendo 
Rote. HUM 
SawU rival 
S1M.S 


Perl 

3409 

14014 

*702 

22967. 

15470 

HSMO 

3J504 

1,483 


Currency Per* 

S. Afr.raid 35*85 
S.XOT.MM 7WJ0 
SwetiLKiwa 7X75 
Taiwan S 2o30 

TtNtibam 25.95 
Turttift) lira 33950. 
UAEtiimsm 10727 
venatwiv. imoo 


30-tiaV MFdoy 90-tior 
U520 10524 10530 

70.40 78.15 77.73 


Forward Bates 

runner Sfrtiny mdmr *Mtoy Currency 

pCad Stern* TJ043 15*33 15*33 CawKScm Ootior 

OwiteCMinerk 15377 . IS3S7 U377 J0*wae«n 

iZarrLc 1JW7 12M7 L2B58 

CMinvs- INC Bonk (Amsterdam); tndawet Bank (Brussels >; Banco CommercMe Hofrono 
(Mitao); A 3 en^ France Presso fPorHl; Bank of Tokvo t Tonal, fhnat Bank of Canada 
t Toronto >; IMFISDR). Other cans from Reuters and AP. 


Kay Honey Rates 

United Statea Close Prev. 

mount ran 4 jD0 4X0 

Prime rate t* Vt, 

Fetienrl fond* < *. 454 

J-month CW am AM 

Comm, paper inton 5.15 115 

3-month Traoorr Mil 458 tea 

1-veor Tranwry t>ui 53* 5Jo 

3- yeor Treasury note 431 

5- year Treasury note 7X1 7X3 

7-ywr Treaw i-y note 7X4 7Xo 

IB-ytar Treatwry non 740 741 

SO^rear Troasory bond 747 7XB 

Morrill Lynch M-dar RndraMl 3.98 3.97 

Jcpob 

DlKOValrMe lt» 144 

Call money 2J5 113 

l^nOrtttl interbank 2 Vj 2V: 

J-rtionth htterHiK Yu 2 ,f - 

4- raonHi interwuik Tte 25s 

IB-ywr Government bond 4X4 455 

CornmBV 

LomDord rate 6X0 6X0 

CoH money 5.05 5X5 

1-month intcraon* 5X0 5X0 

3 month Interbank 5X5 5X0 

6- month Interbank 5X0 5.15 

10-yror Burnt 7J9 TM 


Britain 

Bonk boaa rate 
Call money 
l-month Interbank 
Mnaiitit Interbank 
6-mootti (ntwtxmk 
10-vear Gift 
Franca 

intervention rate 
Coll money 

1 - month interbank 

2- mostti Interbank 
frmontti t nm rtx mk 
10-rear oat 


51- 

5 

5 % 
5K, 

BX1 

5X0 
5V 
5 '« 
SW 
5 1 *. 
8X8 


4% 

5ft 

591, 
6 V. 
8X3 

5X0 

5-4. 

5t. 

5ft 

5i. 

8X7 


Sources: Reuters. Bloamoers. Merrill 
Lynch, Bank of Tokvo, Commerzbank. 
GreenvteU Montagu, Credit Lyonnais. 

Gold 

AM. PM. CITtiC 
Zurich 39060 390X0 — OXS 

London 37000 390X0 + 0.70 

New York 39*a0 37170 - 1X0 

US. dollars pot ounce. London ottldal (lx- 

Inasf Zurich and New York optmmo and ck» 
Inn prices; New York Comae (December.) 
Source: Reuters. 



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Page 14 

MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER IS, 1994 


Mild Inflation Signs 
Spur Stock Gains 


NEW YORK — The stock 
market advanced on Wednes- 
day, helped by fiim bond prices 
and a new batch of U.S. eco- 
nomic data hinting at only 
moderate infla tion. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage finished up 15.47 points, 
at 3,895.33, while gaming issues 
outnumbered losing ones by a 
narrow margin on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

The price of the benc hmar k 
30-year Treasury bond edged 

UA Stock* ~ 

up 2/32, to 97 31/32, while the 
yield slipped to 7.67 percent 
from 7.68 percent. 

While retail sales rose in Au- 
gust, which could signal infla- 
tion, the increase was less than 
analysts expected. A Federal Re- 
serve Board report also suggest- 
ed moderate inflation, which 
kept a floor under Wall Street 

“Inflation is coming down- 
stream, but it is traveling slow- 
ly,” said Rao Cb alasam, chief 
strategist at Kemper Securities 
Group in Chicago. 

Hanson PLCs American de- 
positary receipts were the most 


U.S. Chip Data Help 
Dollar Gain on Yen 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
strengthened against the yen 
Wednesday but was little 
changed against other major 
currencies as U.S. economic 
data failed to shed light on the 
inflation outlook. 

The dollar rose to 99.20 yen 
from 98.S4 yen Tuesday and 

Forlgn Exchange 

slipped to 1.5417 Deutsche 
marks from 1.5433. it slipped to 
5.2735 French francs from 
5.2775 francs and to 1.2812 
Swiss francs from 1.2855 
francs. The pound edged up to 
SI. 5 660 from $1.5640. 

The government said retail 
sales rose in August, but less 
than analysts expected, while a 
Federal Reserve Board report 
on regional economic condi- 
tions suggested moderate eco- 
nomic growth accompanied by 
mild inflationary pressures. 

Treasury bond prices held 
firm after the data were re- 
leased, which kept the dollar 
underpinned, traders said. 

“It was good news for the 
dollar that bonds stayed steady 


in the face of strong retail 
sales,” said Lisa Flnstrom, cur- 
rency analyst at Smith Barney. 

The dollar has tracked the 
performance of bonds for much 
of this year as traders looked for 
dues about whether foreign in- 
vestors were buying U.S. assets. 
Few analysts said they expected 
the dollar to strengthen unless 
there was strong demand for 
American stocks and bonds. 

The dollar was supported 
against the yen by rumors of 
central bank intervention and 
by a report showing the U.S. 
had increased its share of com- 
puter chip sales in Japan. 

Bui analysts said the dollar’s 
longer-term fate against the yen 
rests with the progress of trade 
talks between the United States 
and Japan. The United States 
has set a Sept. 30 deadline for 
solring the dispute before im- 
posing trade sanctions. 

“The big thing for the yen is 
the status of the negotiations,” 
said Craig Shoot of Bear Steams 
International. “The deadline is 
looming and the question is 
whether the two sides will make 
any headway.” (Bloomberg, 
Knight-Bidder, Reuters ) 


Via Awdoud Press 




actively traded issue on the New 
York Stock Exchange, slipping 
K to 18& Hie stock has been 
extremely active recently in divi- 
dend-related positioning. 

CompUSA* shares jumped 2% 
to 12 in active trading after the 
computer retailer disclosed that 
its officers and directors bought 
138,000 shares in August 

American Express gained 1V4 
to 31% after it said Tuesday it 
would buy bade as many as 20 
million of its shares, 3.9 percent 
of the shares outstanding. 

Walt Disney dropped 1% to 
41% after acknowledging it was 
negotiating to buy the NBC 
television network from Gener- 
al Electric, which rose to 50%. 

Quaker Oats rose % to 79% 
after announcing a two-for-one 
stock split and an increase in its 
quarterly dividend. 

In the over-the-counter mar- 
ket, Centocor rose 1 3/16 to 16 
after an analyst recommended 
the medical equipment maker, 
eating expectations that the com- 
pany would report higher earn- 
ings this year. 

* ( Bloomberg, AP) 




Pow Jones Averages 

Open Mali Low Lost On. 

Indu* 3877.17 3BW! 3S7380 389573 + 1587 
Trans 157L30 157875 157001 157129 +440 
util 17756 17042 176.97 177 JO —052 
Camp 131181 131577 130942 131533 +140 

Standard & Poor’s Indexes 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


‘ **■<!' k ’■ ■v- 

i 


Industrials 


KW Law Ouse arye 
5064 551.25 55379 + 1J6 
37457 37453 37S8S +0.15 
151.13 15109 151.13 +172 
4145 45,19 4584 +0.16 
46U6 44632 46*80 +179 
•0152 43140 43522 +0,9? 


nrr 


.NYSE Most Actives 


Hanson 

RJRNc* 

wawtart 

Am Exp 

Dert=d 

Portts 

GnMatr 

OutwUSA 

AT&T 

Boraen 

IBM 

SIXTY. 5 

Disney 

Citicorp 

EMC 6 


NYSE Indexes 


OomPWBe 

tadustr tate 

Tranw. 

UlfHV 

Rnanco 


Man Low 

25648 257.51 
32125 3Z1J7 
24147 241.55 
xnr> 
214417 2113) 


25848 +044 
32116 -062 
mji — aos 
2CH58 +072 
21107 -033 


Metals 

CfeM 

BM Aik 
ALUMINUM (HMi Grade} 

be tiara per metric _ 

soot *553 

Rtrword 151200 155106 

COPPER CATHODES (KM 
Milan per metric tan „ 
Scat 249750 249000 

Rx-nCrt 25000 2S1100 

Ml tan per metric tee 
Seat 61530 616JD 

Wward 42750 62000 

NICKEL 

Doners per metric ton 
Spot 4MSJ0 455SJM 

Forward 664000 669000 

TIN 

ponpi-w per nwertetoo 
Spot 530000 530 5 .0 0 

Forward £37100 R6000 

ZINC (Special HM Grade) 
Milan per metric Too 
Spot 9S3J9 98*50 

F ur w or d 180680 10074*3 


Previous 
BM Ask 


13644)0 156500 
158800 158900 
Grade) 

29300 250400 
251 BOO 231900 


HM Law Lott Seme OW 
Pe* 13630 13173 156J0 1S7J5 —000 

Mar 15700 15505 15700 15700 -075 

ACT UB2S 13300 15500 13500 —100 

May N.T. N.T. N.T. 13400 — IOO 

Jaae isioo 15100 ism isioo — 10S 

Mt N.T. N.T. H.T. 15400 —100 

EM. volume: 28200. Open tat 101464 


BRENT CRUDE OIL (IK) _ 

US. doitare Per karr i ta t» oMOee bcrreU 


61600 61700 
62600 62700 


646500 647100 
656SOO 637000 


52804)0 52IOOO 1 
«tqnn 537SOO 


9824)0 98100 
100500 180600 


oa 

1574 

1i38 

1982 

1582 — *43 

Hat 

15W 

1*66 

1571 

1571 -*34 

Doc 

16.15 

1587 

1574 

1i9S —034 

Jan 

1636 

1672 

1*08 

1*08 — *33 

F8R 

U81 

1*13 

1*15 

1*15 —030 

MOT 

ws 

1672 

1621 

1670 — 075 

Air 

1679 

1*29 

1029 

1674 — *16 

Mar 

1*21 

1623 

1*23 

1672 —US 

Joa 

N.T. 

H.T. 

N.T. 

1635 — *14 

JIT 

N.T. 

N.T. 

NT. 

1*38 — 013 

Adi 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1681 —on 

Sop 

H.T. 

M.T. 

N.T. 

1*44 —ui 


Financial 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Htak low oew comae 
3-MOWTK STERLING (UPPE) 

098060 - PTs Of M0 PCI 


GamenBe 

muustrtota 

Bonks 

insurance 

France 

Tramp. 


767.72 76340 
776J8 7717? 
784.74 78006 
942.15 93*47 
W0J2 9044 
731.99 TUSH 


76741 +1JB 
77606 -1J6 
78142 +112 
94044 +123 
93900 +106 
731.99 +4J3 


VOL Htati 

LOW 

Last 

at*. 

250413 189* 

1844 

1846 

—16 

5D159 6Vi 

n 

M 

t'A 

48313 26 

25’A 

2SV4 

—46 

42261 32 

3>m 

3196 

*116 

40967 26 

2546 

254, 

—’A 

35618 =9tt 

28H 

2SV, 

+ V6 

27366 50* 

4 <PH 

5014 

+ 96 

26498 12 

916 

12 

+ 2V, 

29977 S4V, 

5J1. 

54% 

+ 96 

25447 13!* 

13M 

13% 

+ V6 

24739 70'-. 

49 

699k 

-96 

23617 149. 

14% 

1416 

—16 

23226 42 U. 

41 

41J6 

— 116 

22888 44-ta 

4314 

44 

+ ta 

21524 I9V9 

18V5 

1916 

-96 


AMEX Stock Index 


sop 

94.16 

M.12 

MU 

■am 

dec 

9377 

9*21 

9173 

4.14 

mar 

92-58 

9*42 

9283 

■0.16 

lun 

9287 

9188 

9189 

-*17 

SOP 

9184 

9187 

9188 

•015 

dec 

91-30 

91.13 

91.15 

-015 

mar 

91 J» 

9086 

9*56 

■015 

lun 

9*75 

5*66 

9*66 

•014 

SOP 

9060 

9*50 

9*53 

-015 

doc 

9*44 

9043 

9*40 

-0-14 

mar 

9*34 

9*79 

9*29 

-*T4 

lun 

9*24 

9*18 

5*1 a 

-014 


lot. volwno: 6*851. Open Im. 171677 


Stock Indexes 

HHM Low Close Q iaap e 
FTSR 1M(UFFR1 
CS per Max pin 

sen 31380 30600 30640 -SCO 

OK 313 SO 30 WO 30715 -515 

rpor 31 K10 31100 3098J -575 

ess. volume: 32990 Open bit: *I7B3. 

CAC 40 (MAT1F) 


Utah Low Last Chu. 
45746 45649 45703 +033 


Dow Jones Bond A 


20 Bands 
10 Utilities 
W industrials 


ESI volume; 100500. open ML: 533444. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 
si mlillaa - pts omm pet 
(OP 9456 9454 9404 +601 

HOC 5*26 9426 9426 401 

mar N.T. N.T. 9309 -*01 

tun N.T. N.T. 9304 -OOl 

ses> N.T. N.T. 9123 4L02 

EsL volume: 431 Open tat.: 6886. 
3-MONTH BU ROMANICS I LIFFE) 

□Ml tnflOan - Pts o4 100 pd 


NASDAQ Most Actives NYSE Diary 



AdvtnOBfl 

Declined 

Undjonged 

TatcC rca*» 

New Highs 
New Lows 


1103 110 

1057 990 

703 729 

7863 286 9 

31 42 

86 66 


SOP 

9488 

9*93 

9*93 

dec 

9482 

9*88 

9*70 

mar 

9483 

9*28 

9*29 

lun 

94JJ5 

9390 

9X91 

SOP 

9174 

9163 

9363 

doc 

9385 

9X74 

9375 

mar 

9320 

9315 

9315 

lun 

93J34 

9272 

92.91 

top 

9280 

9275 

9272 

dec 

9280 

9284 

9253 

mar 

9280 

9276 

9276 

lun 

922 

9274 

9274 


SOP 197708 193700 79900 -2209 1 

oet 1901 08 196700 19*700 -2200 ! 

NOV N.T. N.T. N.T. UnctL 

DeC 200500 198600 198700 -2100 1 

Atar 7P 7 1 H I iimen 2 B\j_sd -ZL5C 
3m N.T. NX 200800 -2200 

Est. volumes 3*434. Open bit.: 60429. 

Sources: Mall/, Associated press, 
London tan Financial Futures Exchoaue, 
trdi Petroleum Exchange. 


Dtvtdomts 


Co m p on v Per Amt 

IRREGULAR 

Amcor Ltd C J320 

Bora! Ltd ADR C -5932 

FcJrtwven Infl c 80s 

NFCPLC C .1546 

o+wrax amount per ADR. 


AMEX Diary 


AMEX Most Actives 


VOL Ktati Lew Lost Cbu. 
GoyiCn 17946 7% 71* 76» + 1V6 

US Ale 6438 3n/j Wt, 3*6 +V» 

AASTMXn 6378 63 63 63 

IVOXCP 9972 21 TO'/l 20*4 -V4 

Vlocwtc 5966 2 VV» 2 -V» 

GoytCwi 5873 614 6 4Wi ♦ * 

Harden 5612 2*4 Ttu 246 »V, 

VkJCB 5475 35% 34*. 351* + V6 

TopSrce 5461 7 'A 676 7\6 +H 

viacwie 5022 314 3V. 3*4 *Vu 


Advanced 
Oedtaea 
Unchanged 
Toms issues 
NewHWu 
New LOWS 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advoncad 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


SU 300 
289 256 

225 2ST 
BOO 807 
23 16 

21 23 


1714 1827 

1474 1369 

1809 1085 

5077 5081 

139 111 

53 57 


Spot Commodi ti es 



Today 

Prey. 


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con* . 

NY5E 

29784 

36154 ! 

Amox 

2086 

d ; 

Nasdaa 

3*3^0 

28383 

In millions. 




Coai modify 
Aluminum, lb 
Copper eleetroiytfe. lb 
iron FOB, ton 
Lead, lb 
Silver, Irov az 
Steel Iicnplitai 
TTn.it> 

Zinc lb 


Bit. volume: ]67J87.0Pen InL: 789464 
3-MONTH PIBOR fMATIF) 

FFS RtBBea - pts of 100 pet 
Sep 9438 9437 9437 —Oil 

Dec 9194 9189 9X91 —0.02 

Mar 9148 9142 9145 — CLD3 

Job 9113 93J37 71 09 — OXD 

sec 9183 917B 9183 +101 

Dec 92 . 59 92S5 9280 +103 

, M or 9141 9137 9H0 Utich. 

I Jan 9222 9119 9120 —101 

Est. volume: 41.783. Open InU 199270. 
LONG GILT CUFFE) 

0X888 - Pts A 32B0 Of 100 pd 

COP 108-14 99-20 99-17 -1-07 

dee 100-04 90-20 9*25 -no 

‘"St. voJum#?»280. Open lnt.MU.527. ’ M ° 

^^M^taofWpcT 7 BUND tL,,=FE3 
dec 0M4 0858 8854 -036 

mar brjx sjss b7JU -036 

Est. volume: 14*500. Open Int: 143A2* 
TO- YE AR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATiF) 
F F50O0B0 - pts Of 1 0 PCt 
Bap 11136 11182 11154 —122 

Dec 11138 11084 11096 —024 

Mar 11082 11040 11128 —024 

Job UOjOO 11000 10984 —026 

Est. volume: 257834 Open mt: 161659. 


prey. Industrials 

• Htak LOW Lost settle CWw 

2T 048 SxMknpw- metric teapots of W8 tons 

11 ^ SS, ^1^^!^=^ 

nJL Dec 15450 15175 15450 15450 — 0J5 
0805 Jan 13*30 15450 15630 15680 — 075 


Ault Foods a .166 

Fst FlnBncjhr polk Q .15 

Fst Leespart Ben a .11 

Manna Inti a 87 

Stott FlnlSvs 0 .11 

REDUCED 

Keystone Am Tx Fr M 843 

INITIAL 

AmerPubfaftPAOiB - JOS 

First 5tattCon> n . .18 


9-26 10-28 
M-6 IMO 
HM 11-10 1 
11-17 Ml 


9- 30 10-14 
F30 10-15 

10- 1 10-15 
MO 10-15 
9-26 10-10 


11-1 11-13 
9-15 18-1 


Allen Grp Q 

Am Borrtck S 

Anchor Ftnci O 

A Arsenti na Q 

Astro-Med 0 

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DouBhftes Food Q 

OravanGrand Q 

Ecnrm Inc q 

FstMIctmun BkCp O 

GBC Bancorp Q 

GiiLRlty Q 

Gltocn CR Q 

Granite State 8k 
Hudson Foods A Q 

John Aldan Fin I Q 

Katy Indus Q 

Keystone AmGvSsc M 

Keystone CUst b 1 M 

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Keystone cust 31 Q 

LabattJohn a 

MoroonJP A Co G 

MaxhamBk 

Price T Rowe Q 

Punuer PabUsh Q 

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9- 26 10-10' 
11-30 12-13 

10- 21 10-31 
926 10-7 
922 10-4 

922 9-30 

92 9 M-7 

923 18-4 
10-7 10-18 

930 10-28 
9-30 10-15 

9- 30 10-14 

10- 7 10-28 
926 10-7 
928 10-12 
930 18-28 
930 10-20 
923 HM 
923 10-6 
923 HM 

9- 23 10-6 
930 10-13 

926 10-14 

927 930 
930 W-14 

10- 7 1V1 
930 10-14 
922 10-1 T 




U.S- /AT THE CLOSE 


Reports Indicate a Strong Economy 

WASHINGTON (Combined Dispatches) 

after remaining uuchangcd in July. The advance in retail sales, ui 
fine with analysts’ expectations, was spurred by a recovery in 
automobile sales and rising sales of other durable goods. 

The Federal Reserve Board said its survey of economic condi- 
tions found that prices for finished goods remained steady, raw 
material costs continued to rise, and wage pressures remained 
“modest” in a US. economy it said M continu«3 to mad 
throughout the summer.” ^ ■ XwjnwoafrJ 

Disney Talking to GE About NBC 

NEW YORK (Combined Dispatches) — Walt Disney Co. is 
discussing the possibility of buying NBC from General Electric 
Gl, a source fanrihar with the talks confirmed Wednesday- 

Several executives close to the negotiations told the New York 
Times on Tuesday that Michael D. Eisner, Disney s chair man , 
had been in discussions with GE to acquire NBC for as muchas&5 
billion. Disney is also believed to have held discussions with CBS. 

Disney is one of several companies who have reportedly been 
considering buying the network. (NYT, AP) 

Results Jump at Auto-Parts Maker 

MARKHAM. Ontario (Bloomberg) — Magna International 
Tiy said its fourth-quarter net income rose 65 percent on in- 
creased auto-parts sales in North America and revenue from new 
acquisitions in Europe. 

Net inrytrn^ jn the quarter ended July 31 rose to 65.2 milbon 
OinpHiRTi dollar s ($48 million), or 1.08 a share, from 39.6 millio n M 
dollars, or 79 cents a share, a year earlier. Sales jumped 60 percent, 
to 1.04 billion dollars. .. 

Magna maWm products for the Big Three North American 




ippjni parts and sunroofs. The rise in North American sales 
reflected a 10 percent increase in vehicle production in the Ui. 
and Canada, Magna said, adding that its overall sales advance 
reflected acquisitions in Europe, including the purchase of a 74 
percent stake in the Zipperle auto-parts company of Austria. It 
al s o has acquired 60 percent of KS Automobil-Sicherheitstechnik 
GmbH, a German airbag maker formerly controlled by Metdlge- 
sellschaft AG, and is planning to raise it stake to 75 percent. 

Senate Passes Interstate Bank Bill 

WASHINGTON (WP) —The Senate has passed legislation that 
would make it easier for banks to operate branches nationwide. 

The bill, which was passed Tuesday night, would allow banks to 
cross state borders either by opening branches or by acquiring 
other banks. The House passed identical legislation last month, 
and President Bfll Clinton has indicated he will sign the bffl. 

Interstate banking has long been a legislative priority for big U.S. 
banks, which contend tha t federal regulations prevent them from 
competing with credit-card companies, mortgage Arms and other 
financi al services providers that are free to operate nationwide. 

Wal-Mart to Expand Supercenters 

BENTONVILLE, Arkansas (Bloomberg) — Wal-Mart Stores 
(nc , continuing the rapid expansion of its Supercenter division, 
said Tuesday it would open 100 Supercenter stores in its financial 
year that starts next February. 


TRADE: Japanese Surplus Shrinks 9 hut Analysts Say Problems Unger AGF to Aid Spanish Unit 


Continued from Page 13 
that will prevent any significant 
improvement in the bilateral 
trade balance for some time. 

While U.S. exports across the 
P acific are growing, the impact 
on the trade imbalance is offset 
by much larger and still expand- 
ing trade flows from Japan. 

'The impact on the frame- 
work talks will be quite nega- 
tive,” said Mineko Sasaki- Smith, 
senior economist at Morgan 


Stanley & Co. in Tokyo. Tt al- 
most justifies America saying 
‘Don't worry about multflatera- 
Hsm; the problem is bilateral.’ ” 
The predicament is dear in 
the auto sector, the most con- 
tentious of three areas being 
discussed in the so-called 
framework talks between 
Washington and Tokyo, which 
have dragged on for 14 months, 
of telecommunications and 
medical equipment 


Although car imports into Ja- 
pan surged 70 percent in Au- 
gust, with most of the increase 
coming from the United States, 
the impact on the trade balance 
was overwhelmed by a 12.9 per- 
cent rise in Japanese car exports 
to the United States. 

■ No Comment on Report 
A spokesman for UB. Trade 
Representative Mickey Kantor 


declined to comment on a state- 
ment by a Japanese official that 
the United States was ready to 
settle for a partial trade accord 
with Japan, AFP-ExteL report- 
ed From Washington. 

A senior Japanese govern- 
ment official who asked not to 
be identified said Tuesday that 
Washington would settle for a 
partial accord if the two sides 
tailed to reach a full agreement 
before Sept. 30. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MADRID — Assurances 
G6nfarales de Fiance said 
Wednesday it would inject 73 
billion pesetas into its Span- 
ish unit AGF Union Fenix. 

The capital injection will 
be carried out in 1994 and 
1995, Pierre Pierart, the 
unit’s chairman, said at a 
hearing with a Spanish par- 
liamentary committee. 


AGF is’ also ready to buy 
La Union & El Fenix SA’s 
French activities if they can- 
not be sold to a third party, 
Mr. Pierart said. 

Meanwhile, the sale of 
AGF to the public will take 
place mice market condi- 
tions improve, Finance Min- 
ister Edmond Alphandfcry 

S3ld ' "(AFX, Bloomberg) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 


Page 15 


KLM Pays $180 Million 
To Raise Northwest Stake 


Cmptiedty Ojr Siafi Frm Dupauha 
AMSTERDAM — KLM 
Royal Dutch Airlines placed a 
5180 million bet on its partner- 
ship with Northwest Airlines 
Corp. on Wednesday by increas- 
ing us equity stake to 25 percent. 

KLM said it increased its 
stake, which had been 20 per- 
cent, by buying shares held by 
Foster's Brewing Group Ltd. It 
said the move underlined its 
'‘confidence in the global coop- 
eration with Northwest.” 

The deal gives KLM die max- 
imum stake foreign companies 
are allowed to hold in a U.S. 
airline. KLM said it would dip 
into its cash reserve of 3 billion 
guilders ($2 billion) to pay for 
the investment. 

Analysts said the short-term 
result of the deal will be a drag 
on KLM's earnings. Although 
the partnership looks more 
promising now than a year ago. 


when Northwest narrowly 
avoided bankruptcy by restruc- 
turing, the larger stake mil not 
improve KLM's bottom line, 
they said. 

“1 am a bit puzzled,” said 
Wiliemien JRijsdijk, an analyst 
with Bank van Meer James Cu- 
pel in Amsterdam. “Apparently 
it has a long-term strategic val- 
ue, but I am not sure about the 
short-term financial aspects/' 

Northwest returned to profit 
in the second quarter, with nel 
income of $713 million, com- 
pared with a loss of $13 62 mil- 
lion in the second quarter of 
1993. But KLM has been unable 
to record any profit from its alli- 
ance with Northwest because the 
U.S. company’s huge debt bur- 
den gave it negative shareholder 
capital of close to $1 billion. 

Analysts said it could be sev- 
eral years before Northwest's 
shareholder capital is positive, 


allowing it to help KLM's bot- 
tom line. 

KLM's shares first fell on the 
news but finished at 49.40 guil- 
ders, op from 49.30 on Tuesday. 

Just two years ago, KLM was 
forced to write off a $400 mil- 
lion investment in Northwest 
because of the U-S. airline’s 
heavy losses. KLM first invest- 
ed in Northwest in 1989; it 
made no further purchases until 
Wednesday. 

Foster’s also acquired its. 
Northwest stock in 1989 when 
its financing subsidiary. Elders 
Finance Ltd, was involved in a 
leveraged buyout of the airline. 
Foster’s originally held about 14 
percent of the carrier, but its 
stake has been diluted by corpo- 
rate restructurings at Northwest. 

Foster’s said it would use the 
proceeds from the sale to reduce 
debt. 

_ . (Bloomberg. Reuters) 


France Expected 
To Offer Only 23% 
Of Renault for Sale 


AFP-Exiel News 

PARIS — The French 
government cannot sell 
more than 25.6 percent of 
Renault SA in the compa- 
ny’s partial privatization if it 
wants to retain a 51 percent 
majority stake following the 
operation, analysts said 
Wednesday. 

The most likely outcome 
is that the government will 
initially offer about 23 per- 
cent of the carmaker for a 
total of just under 10 billion 
francs (Sl.S billion), taking 
account of the incentives 
that will accompany the sale. 


they added. 
In additi 



Prudential Puts EU Calls lor Policies 


Dividend Up 
As Profit Rises 

Compiled by Our Staff Frarn Dispatches 

LONDON — Prudential 
Cojp„ Britain's largest life 
insurer, said Wednesday 
that first-half pretax profit 
rose 16 percent, and the 
company raised its divi- 
dend 9 percent 

The profit of £280 milli on 
(S437 million), compared 
with £242 million a year ear- 
lier, exceeding most fore- 
casts. The company raised 
its first-half dividend to 4.9 
peace a share from 4.5. 

Prudential said, however, 
that the market for its main 
products in Britain would 
remain “subdued” for the 
rest of the year. 

The dividend rise was 
“way ahead of inflation,” 
Roman Cizdyn, an analyst 
at Smith New Court, said. 
"The stock yields 30 percent 
more than the market, and I 
think it's going to go high- 
er.’' Prudential shares ini- 
tially rallied but ended just I 
penny higher, er, at 315, in a 
weak London market. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


To Help Firms Compete 

Reuters 

BRUSSELS — The European Union must invest in training, 
promote industrial cooperation and modernize its civil services to 
help companies be competitive, the European Commission said 
Wednesday. 

It also should re-examine the way it authorizes subsidies and 
consider new instruments to promote open international trade, it 
said in a policy paper on industrial competitiveness. 

The paper, an update of a 1990 document, reflects the commis- 
sion’s philosophy that governments should create a healthy environ- 
ment for industry without intervening to promote specific sectors. 

It gave a generally upbeat assessment of the Eli's competitive 
position, saying its trade deficit with the United States fell by 90 
percent between 1991 and 1993 and that debt levels of European 
companies were on average less than those of their competitors. 

The ELFs unit salary costs also fell by 9.7 percent between 1980 
and 1993, more than in Japan or the United States, it said. 

However, it said industry was facing new challenges, such as 
vigorous international competition, high unemployment and the 
growth of new technologies. 

Industry also has been handicapped by an insufficient presence 
on growing world markets, slower growth in manufacturing pro- 
ductivity than in the United States and Japan, and an inadequate 
research effort. 

Martin Bangemann, the commissioner for industry, said Union 
policies must give high priority to "intangible investments" in 
areas such as training, and that tax incentives also should reflect 
that philosophy. 

Mr. Bangemann said the EU also should encourage companies 
to cooperate with partners in Eastern Europe, Latin America and 
Asia. 

He also said regulations should be streamlined for sectors that 
jfice lengthy licensing procedures. such as biotechnology. 


in addition Volvo AB, 
which has 20 percent in Re- 
nault, said it will offer an 8 
percent-to-12 percent stake 
in the French carmaker to 
the market alongside the pri- 
vatization operation. 

This calculation is based 
on a 423 billion franc valua- 
tion or Renault made by 
Volvo, which is in line with 
Industry Minister Gerard 
Longuet’s estimate on 
Wednesday that Renault is 
worth 40 billion francs to 44 
billion francs. 

A Volvo spokesman said 
Wednesday that h is compa- 
ny agreed on the 42.5 btibon 
francs figure with the 
French government for the 
purpose of pricing a 5 per- 
cent stake that Volvo wishes 
to sell back to Renault. 

Late Tuesday, the govern- 
ment said Renault's partial 
privatization would be ac- 
companied by a 2 billion 
franc capita] increase, which 
will not be underwritten by 
France. The government 
must therefore retain 53.4 
percent in Renault, which 
will be diluted to 5 1 percent 
by the capital increase, ana- 
lysts said. This compares 
with its current holding of 79 
percent. 

This figure does not lake 
account of the various incen- 
tives to shareholders that the 
government is planning, and 
will have to pay for. They 
are widely expected to in- 
clude issues of free shares to 
loyal shareholders and spe- 


cial concessions to Renault 
employees in the share offer. 

Analysts said the govern- 
ment will need to retain 
around 10 percent of the to- 
tal number of shares it hopes 
to transfer to the private sec- 


A larger sale 
would ran the 
risk of leaving 
France with less 
than 51 
percent. 


tor if, as is expected, it gives 
small shareholders one free 
share for each 10 held for 
more than 18 months. 

“The government will 
make less than 10 billion 
francs from this operation,” 
said an analyst at a French 
brokerage: 

Analysts reiterated tbeir 
expectations that Renault’s 
privatization will benefit 
from much investor interest, 
because of the cyclical nature 
of its business, its favorable 
results and the fact that auto 
stocks have returned to favor. 

■ Calvet Attacks Plan 

Jacques Calvet, chairman 
of PSA Peugeot Citrofen, 
asked the French govern- 
ment to cancel its planned 
Renault capital increase, 
Bloomberg reported in Par- 
is. 

“My surprise turns to stu- 
por when I hear the govern- 
ment saying Renault needs 
the aid," said Mr. Calvet. 
who has often attacked the 
state-owned rival’s privi- 
leged ties with the govern- 
ment. 

Mr. Calvet said the gov- 
ernment had given the once- 
ailing Renault 22.8 billion 
francs in direct aid and cred- 
it between 1982 and 1994, 
and 11.4 francs billion by 
way of a capital injection 
when Volvo swapped equity 
with Renault in 1990. 


Bundesbank 
Bate Cut 
Hostage to 
Bond Yields 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribute 

FRANKFURT — A rise in 
long-term German interest 
rates is restricting (he Bundes- 
bank's scope to reduce money- 
market rates, the Bundesbank’s 
vice president said as the cen- 
tral bank's policy-setting coun- 
cil prepared to meets on Thurs- 
day. 

The Bundesbank will find it 
difficult to justify a rate cut 
while long-term bond yields are 
above their historical averages, 
Bundesbank Vice President Jo- 
hann Wilhelm Gaddum said 
late Tuesday. 

The rate on 10-year German 
government bonds has risen to 
around 7.6 percent from around 
5.6 percent at the begi nning of 
the year, largely because the 
market doubts that Bonn can 
control government spending. 

Adjusted for an inflation rate 
of about 3 percent, 10-year Ger- 
man bonds currently yield 4.6 
percent, much higher than the 
average of 4 percent in recent 
years. 

Mr. Gaddum said long-term 
interest rates were “above tbeir 
historical average and bear no 
relation to fundamental eco- 
nomic data as we see them." 

“With money supply expand- 
ing at an annual rate of almost 
10 percent and a goal of 6 per- 
cent, 1 can't imagine that we 
could justify any action that 
might be understood as an eas- 
ing," he said. 

“That doesn’t rule out the 
possibility that the money sup- 
ply trend could give us that 
scope, but it's not a question of 
today or tomorrow,” he added. 

He said that recent interest 
rate rises in Britain, Sweden 
and Italy were no reason for 
Germany to abstain from re- 
ductions in short-term rates it 
may deem necessary. 

Economists interpreted the 
central banker's comments as 
meaning that the long, slow de- 
cline in official German interest 
rates would persist for one 
more cul 

Others said that interest in 
buying long-term German gov- 
ernment bonds would remain 
weaker than the govern me nis’s 
interest in selling them, mean- 
ing that long- Lean interest rates 
would remain at high-levels. 


Frankfurt 
DAX . 



noo— '■f/— 


London Paris 

FTSE 100 Index CAC 40 

340Q -- — — 2300 - - 

33® - ■ * - 23® «- 

»*:■ A 

3!®PVv— itP-4- ' ■ \ 

30® -W— m ^ 
29M • V «« 


MJ J A.S- r;-?® X M J 


Exchange 

Amsterdam 
Brussels ~~~ 
Frankfurt ■ 

Frankfurt 

Hetefnld ~ 

London 

London 

Madrid 

man 

Paris 

Stockholm 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Sources: Reuters. 


A EX 

Stock index 
DAX : “ 

FAZ 
HEX . 

Financial Times 30 
FT5E 100 » 
General Index 
MtEfTEL ■ 

CAC 40 
Aftaersvaeriden 
Stock Index 
S8S 
AFP 


J AS . 1800 A j'V'A S . 

1894 

Wednesday Prw. % 

Close- . Close Change 

41056 .412.69 -052 

7,416X0 7,464.15 ,-064 

2,124.12 2,136.09 -0.56 ! 

809.21 808.47 +009 

1,900-62 1,934.98 -1.76 

238-10 2,427.30 -150 

3,07950 3,121.40 -1.33 

298.89 294.72 4*1.41 

10486- 10429 +0,55 

1,95254 1,969.36 -0.83 

1JJS&86 1,853.05 +0.14- 

45435 455.16 ,-0.18 • 

93SJ5S. 941-63 ■ -0.65, 

lAcnumnul Herald Tribune 


Very brief ys 

• The Dutch consumer association said its tests found a new 
version of Unilever NVs Omo Power washing powder caused 
excessive damage to clothes, contradicting Unilever's test results. 

• Savoy Hotel PLC had first-half profit of £575,000 ($897,000). 
reversing a year-earlier loss, and said three trustees including John 
Sinclair, now a chairman's committee member, had resigned from 
trusts that control a significant amount of voting shares. 

• Invest Ibtrica’s chairman, James Sheehan, was arrested in 
connection with allegedly irregular stock-market dealings that led 
to losses of 4 billion to 6 billion pesetas ($31 million to S47 
million) for clients and financial companies, Spanish police said. 

• Branded Consumer Products AB's Procordia Food & Beverages 
unit said it would merge its convenience-foods unit and its fmits 
and berries division. 

• Lasmo PLC the British exploration and production company, 
posted a first-half net loss of £] 8 million ($28 million), citing low 
oil prices and the fight against Enterprise Oil's takeover bid. 

Return. Bloomberg, AFX 


EDF to Take Swedish Stake 


Bloomberg Burimss ffe w 

STOCKHOLM — Electricite 
de France SA said Wednesday 
it planned to buy a 5.6 percent 
stake in the Swedish energy and 
power-supply company Sydk- 
raft AB. 

The town council of Malmo 
said the French dectriciiy com- 
pany would buy the stake from 
three Swedish municipalities 
for 1.17 billion kronor ($156 
million). 

“It is a good thing for Sydk- 


ra ft that the municipal stake is 
reduced." Lennart Ericsson, an 
analyst at Svenska Handelsban- 
ken, said. “It is an advantage 
with less influence from politi- 
cians. The company becomes 
more commercial that way." 

Sydkrafl is controlled by 
Swedish municipalities, but its 
largest single shareholder is the 
German power company Preus- 
seoElektra AG, vduch bolds 
18.7 percent of the shares and 
21 percent of the voting rights. 


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Citing Speculation, 
Hanwa Says Loss 
To Triple for Year 


Bloomberg Business Sews 

TOKYO — Hanwa Co, said 
Wednesday its net loss would 
more than triple, to 175.S billion 
yen ($18 billion), in the year end- 
ing March 31, 1995, because of 
losses from “speculation" in cur- 
rency and securities markets. 

Yen Forces Nissan 
To Alter Strategy 

Bloomberg Business Sews 

DETROIT — To cope with 
the strong yen, Nissan Motor 
Co. will start exporting cars 
next year from its Mexican 
plant to Lhe U.S. market, a Nis- 
san executive said Wednesday. 

Earl Hesterberg. general 
manager of the Nissan division 
of Nissan Motor Corp. U.S.A. 
said the company planned to 
ship about 20,000 of its Sentra 
subcompact sedans from Mexi- 
co to the United States starting 
in the spring. 

He said the Mexican-made 
cars would be sold alongside 
about 175.000 Sentra cars made 
at the company's assembly 
plant in Smyrna, "Tennessee. 


“We apologize to all of our 
shareholders,'' Hanwa President 
Shuji Kita said. “We went a bit 
too far in our zaitech speculati- 
on. From now on, we will focus 
on our core business and no 
longer engage in such specula- 
tion.” 

Zaitech refers to the practice 
among Japanese companies of 
using speculative investments to 
try to multiply corporate profits. 

Most companies abandoned 
such activities after Japanese 
stock and real estate prices 
slumped in the late 1980s. But 
Hanwa, whose core business is 
steel trading, is still known as 
one of Japan's most aggressive 
players in the currency and se- 
curities markets. 

Mr. Kita disclosed Wednes- 
day that Hanwa and its U.S. 
subsidiary had losses of 384 bil- 
lion yen on currency speculation 
in the year ended March 31, 

1 994. The company’s net loss for 
the year was 49.37 billion yen. 

Yet Hanwa also said that be- 
cause of rising demand for steel 
it expects a current profit of 1 5 
billion yen in the year ending in 
March 1995. 


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Pilot Loss Hits Indian Air 

Competition Takes a Toll on Carrier 


Reuters 

NEW DELHI — Indian Airlines, India's 
biggest airline, is canceling flights because it 
does not have enough pilots. 

Last month, 24 pilots flying the state- 
owned and largely domestic carrier’s fleet of 
Boeing and Airbus planes resigned 

That was one of the biggest group resigna- 
tions in two years of intermittent personnel 
losses since private airlines began competing 
with Indian Airlines in 1 992. Of the 607 pilots 
chat used to fly the carrier’s fleet of 54 B-737s. 
A-320s and A-300s, 183 now have left, mostly 
for higher wages and better benefits. 

Indian Airlines, formerly a monopoly carrier 
known for poor customer relations and flight 
delays, faces stiff competition from more than 
a dozen small private airlines c laiming to offer 
better service and on-time nights. 

As a result, the airline has lost passengers 
and market share on major routes and run up 
losses totaling more than 6 billion rupees 
(S191 million). 

In the first four months of the year that 
began in April, private airlines doubled their 
market share on major domestic routes from 
year-earlier levels and carried more than 1.6 
milli on passengers. 

Indian Airlines, meanwhile, carried 2.9 mil- 
lion passengers, compared with 3.1 million, 
losing 8 percent of its market, the country's 
airport authority said. 

Last month, when the 24 pilots announced 
they were leaving. Indian Airlines cried foul 
and accused the private airlines of stealing its 
personnel, a charge they firmly denied. 

P. C. Sen, Indian Airlines' managing direc- 
tor. said the pilots bad been expected to give 


six months' notice but did noL “It’s tike 
jumping bail” he said. 

Indian Airlines is proposing changes in its 
wages and retirement system to try to keep the 
its remaining pilots. It also warns to ado in- 
structors to train junior pilots. 

But in any case, the airline's finances are 3 
mess. Although its revenue has increased in 
recent years, its losses continue to mount. In 
the current financial year, ending March 31. 

The former monopoly 
carrier now has to vie with 
more than a dozen small 
private airlines claiming to 
offer better service and on- 
time flights. 

1995, Indian Airlines hopes to hold its loss to 
1-2 billion rupees, compared with 2.94 billion 
rupees last year. 

■ Industry Sees 8% Growth This Year 
Indian industry is predicting 8 percent 
growth for itself this year, in what appears to 
be a payoff for government reforms aimed at 
revitalizing the private sector, Agence 
France-Presse reported. 

The Confederation of Indian Industry, 
which represents major businesses, said a “re- 
markable’' indur'rial rebound was under way 
in the country after a two-year recession. 

The group said industrial production in 
April, the first month of the current financial 
year, was up 8 percent from April 1993. 


Sumitomo 
Executive 
Is Killed 

Bloomberg Business News 

TOKYO — One of Sumi- 
tomo Bank's top executives, 
Kazufumi Hatanaka, was 
found dead in his Nagoya 
apartment Wednesday morn- 
ing. Police are treating the case 
as a possible homicide. 

Mr. Hatanaka, 54, suffered a 
shotgun wound to his head, Na- 
goya police officials said. The 
apparent murder was the latest 
in a series of threats and violent 
incidents directed at executives 
of Sumitomo and other Japa- 
nese financial institutions. 

Mr. Hatanaka was a director 
of the bank. Police officers said 
that the his death may have 
been related to the bank's busi- 
ness troubles, according to Jap- 
anese press reports. 

Police officials said they 
planned to tighten security for 
Sumitomo executives, but they 
would not comment on whether 
the murder was linked to Sutni 1 
tomo's trouble with bad real es- 
tate loans. . . 

Last year, Sumitomo Bank 
was the target of several threats 
and acts of violence from un- 
known parties, according to a 
bank spokesman. 

These included gun shots 
into a few branch buildings and 
hate letters to the bank's presi- 
dent . 



Hanoi Readies Building Plan 


Bloomberg Business News 

HANOI — Foreign builders 
are hoping a massive develop- 
ment plan for Hanoi to be un- 
veiled Thursday will provide a 
dear blueprint to development 
opportunities while preserving 
the city’s rich architectural 
character. 

“There have been several edi- 
tions of the master plan,” said 
Toby Anstruther. country repre- 
sentative for the real estate bro- 
ker Brooke Hillier Parker. “De- 
velopers are confused about 
which edition they should look 
to follow when planning pro- 
jects," said Mr. Anstruther. 

In addition to identifying 
sites for development, the plan 
aims to protect the character of 
Hanoi The dty, unlike other 
crowded Southeast Asian cities, 
is a throwback to another era 


complete with old French villas, 
wide boulevards and lakes. 

The chief architects office said 
the plan would define the size 
and shape of Hanoi, develop- 
ment of sAlreets. and strength ol 
development capital. It would 
also address transport, construc- 
tion and sewage issues. 

The city of 2 million will be 
split into zones, including a cen- 
tral area, residential and scenic 
spots. Industrial and commer- 
cial areas. The idea is to protect 
the city’s architectural heritage 
by limiting development in the 
inner city and forcing develop- 
ers into the suburbs. 

“It is a step in the right direc- 
tion,” said Richard Elliott. Ha- 
noi project manager for Hong- 
kong Land Holdings Ltd. “It 
will certainly make it easier for 
developers when it comes to se- 
lecting the right site,” he said. 


One of the biggest problems 
for foreign developers is reach- 
ing agreement with Vietnamese 
partners on whaL should be 
built on a given site. 

According to Mr. Anstruther, 
the real test will be whether Ha- 
noi's chief architect “sticks with 
the plan and on what basis he 
might deviate from it for any 
future project." 

Analysts said the plan would 
not affect any projects currently 
under construction. However, 
some developers may be forced 
to shelve projects that are not 
licensed and no longer conform 
with the plan. 

“It is unlikely to affect any 
development which already had 
its construction permits ” said 
Mr. Elliott of Hongkong Land. 
The Hong Kong-based proper- 
ty giant Is building a seven-sto- 
ry office tower in central Hanoi 


Korean Market 
Has Confidence 

Reuters 

SEOUL — Optimism 
that the economy is grow- 
ing rapidly and that the 
government will change 
rules limiting foreign own- 
ership of South Korean 
companies lifted the stock 
market Wednesday. 

The composite stock in- 
dex rose 3.98 points, to at 
999.36. South Korea's 
economy grew 8.5 percent 
in the fust half 1994, up 
sharply from a 4.4 percent 
rise a year ago. 

Analysts said the govern- 
ment might soon raise ceil- 
ings on foreign stock hold- 
ings in Korean companies. 
At present, Korean compa- 
nies must be at least 90 per- 
cent Korean-owned. 


Very briefly: 


• South China Morning Post (Holdings) Ltd_ publisher of Hong 
Kong’s largest-circulating English-language daily newspaper, 
earned 564. 1 mil li nn Hong Kong dollars ($77 million) m the year 
ended June 30, down nearly 4 percent from the previous year, 
which was inflated by a one-time gain for real estate sales. 

• Turner Broadcasting System Inc. will increase its visibility in 
Asia next month, when it starts marketing a combination of the 
TNT entertainment channel and Cartoon Network in TaMrao, 

■ STAR TV will start a movie channel catering to India, Pakistan, 
the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia on Oct. I. 

• rhma International Trust & Investment Corp. has purchased the 
exclusive worldwide rights to market the image of Marilyn Mon- 
roe. 

• Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. is considering buying an equity stake 
in Huaneng Power International a Chinese power company.; ■ 

• BT Barito Pacific limber's first-half net profit rose 26 percent 

to 103.23 billion rupiah ($47 million), helped by a 4 percent 
increase in sales., Bloomberg^AFP- 


Taiwan Eases Banking Rules 


-‘>* ; 


Agence France-Presse 

TAIPEI — Taiwan on 
Wednesday relaxed its rules on 
local-currency deposits by for- 
eigners in a bid to help its appli- 
cation to jo in the General Agree- 
ment on Tariffs and Trade. 

Under the new rules, visiting 
foreign nationals and overseas 
institutions not registered in 
Taiwan will be allowed to open 
Taiwan dollar bank accounts. 

Previously, only foreigners 
who had resident status and 
companies registered at the 


Ministry of Economics were 
able to make bank deposits in 
the local currency. 

The change was “among the 
financial liberalizations de- 
manded by GATT, of which 
Taipei hopes to become a mem- ,■ 
berby the end of this year,” said % 
Yu Teb-pd, an economist at 
Soochow University in Taipei 

Fears of too much foreign 
control over the local currency, 
especially by China, were the 
reason for the currency^dntrol 
measures, Mr. Yu saicL.. • .- ’ 


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15777 

314019 

105.1664 

1813 

4448 

944 

1866 

1953 

879 

1452 

24755 

17957 

T265S 

12896 


w European Equity Fd s 

EVEREST CAPITAL (109) 292 2M 

m Everest Candid Inti Ltd S 135J7 

FIDELITY INTL >NV. SERVICES (Lax) 
tf Diicuvery Fund, 
tf Far East Fuad. 


0 FB. Amcr. Ajjel* „ 


tf Global ind Fu 


2095 
mm 
SOflM 
1KS7X00 
37 Jl 
1944 
2351 
1478 
13773 
4371 

13117 

FINMAHAGEMENT SA-L«eaP0U151/Zlfm) 


tf Global Select i on Fund 5 

tf New Europe Fowl .9 

tf Orient Fund S 


iv Delta Premium Cam 


131200 


FOKU5 BANK AS. 472421 SSI 

iv Sca n foods Inti Growth Fd_s 

FOREIGN A COLONIAL EMERO MKTS LTD 
Tel : London iX 1234 
tf ArsentMan Invest Co Sk»vS 
tf Brazilian Invest Co 5kav_5 
iv Colombian Invest Co Sknv-S 
tf GUM Em Mid* lltv Co SI COW A 

tf moan invest Co Sleav i 

tf Latin Amer Extra YicMFds 
tf Latin America income Ca_5 
tf Latin American Invest Co_S 

tf Mexican invest Co Slaw 5 

ivPer u vkxi laved Co &cov s 

FUND MADKCTIMO GROUP IBID) 

PXL Bax TOOL HtrnlBon. Bermuda 
mFMGdohol (31 Jutvl. 


1JB 


2778 

4337 

1530 

1172 

1256 

99146 

»J1 

1249 

45.19 

14.10 


d atlpori MJESBana 

tf CJtlMTt Euro Bond 

d Mavsed Currency Fund 

d mala Focus Fund, 


m FMG N. Amer. pi Juhr). 

mFMG Europe 01 Julyl i 

m FMG EMC MKT (31 July) Jg 

mFMGQ 131 July) S 

mFMG Find (31 JuM I 

FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA! LTD 
w Concepts Fore* Fund—* 
GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 

iv Gate Hedae II i 

w Gal, Hetfoc I II 5 

w Goto Swiss Franc Fd SF 

iv GAIA Fx. 


tf BBL Invest America 

d BBL Invest Betotum 

d BBL Invest For East 

tf BBL Invest Aria - 
tf BBL invest Latin Amer . 
tf BBL Invest uie _. . 
a BBL Rema Fd I 


_BF 


LF 


tf BBL Patrimonial Bal. IF 

tf Rente Onh SMetJtumBEF BF 


d Renta Cash S Mwflum DEMDM 
tf Ben to Coen S-Modtom usd i 
tf BBL IL) irrv Goldmines— 5 
tf BBL (L) Invest Europe— JLF 

tf BBL (U Inv Euro-lmmo LF 

rf BBL (U iBWKtWnr M ........ i f 

tf BBL (FI Invest France FF 

d HBL (Fl Rerrtofund FRF^FF _ 
BANQUE.BE LGE ASSET MGMT FUND 

Shore Dbtrthutor GuwwMy 04B1 7266U 


42254 

1336750 

49551 

66175 

24488 

•Kmq ri 

1986980 

12055500 

519306 

302673 

14459 

1386600 

970900 

352500 

■ri, tc 
1466173 


Winn Equity Fond, 
wlnn Bond Fuod_ 


w DN lor Zone BdFd. 


Baiikinu 


w Asia Pocfflc Reoton Fd . 
w India Fund. 


r Sterling EauBvFd- 

t Stcrhna 




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w The Dragon Fund SI 
m Japan GM Fd A (31/08794). 
m Japan 6td Fd B 01/QB/94)_ 
■MW Cl A Untls 


1373 

1571 

1285 

1200 

1171 

1760 

1443 


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i Futures Fd CI A Units S 
I Futures Fd □ C UrftsJ 
m Maxima FuLFdSer.i CL AS 

iFuLFdSer. 1CLBS 

:e^sr:i&gs 

[S?:8SlSlgd 


CITIBANK PARS) SJL 12/19/94 

tf au 96 Cap GM 

d an Gki Asian Mela I 
CTTTTRUST 

wU51 Ewdttes 

w US S Money Market. 
wUSSSondS. 


m Gala Guaranteed Cl. iJ 

mCoto Guaraidced CL 
GARTMORE IMPOS UEZ FUNDS I3TO9/94 

Tel : (352) 4654 24 
I Fa*: 1357)465*23 J 

BOND PORTFOLIOS! 


1341 

1073 

1055 

1201 

974 

1080 

950 

13478 

1779 

5444 

12473 

B4J5 

8405 


manpertermanoe Ptfi 5A._ 

W The Good Earth Fund — . 

CONGEST 03-0 49 70 73 10 

1 CP-E. Lotus Fund 

wCompal Aski . . . 

wCamgest Europe— 


tf DEML. , „ .. 

tf Dtvertsond. DU 25* 

rf Dal tar Bond— D(s 134 S 

tf Eunmon Bd__Dfa US Ecu 

tf French Fnmr nts 993 FF 

tf GloCol Bond Dfc 219 S 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 
tf ASEAN. 


rf Asia Pocfflc- 


CONCEPT FUND] 

b WAM Global ■ 
ft WAMlidIBd 

CONCERTO uHi 

WNAV 26 August 19W S 

COWEN aSET MANAGEMENT 
Cowen Enterprise Fund N.V. 

wQ-lASul 


0 Continental Europe— 
tf Developing Markets - 
tf France 


-Ecu 


wCirasB5hs_ - ■ . . J 

CREDIS INVESTMENT FUNDS 

rf CSPortl me DM A DM 

tf CS Pontine DM B DM 

a CS Parti Inc (Ural A/B Lit 

tf CS Farit IncSFRA 5F 

tf 5 Parit Inc SFR B SF 

tf CS Portf Inc USsa s 


tfCS Farit lac USSB S 

tf CS Portf Bal DM DM 

tf CS Rortt Bal (Lire) A/B— HI 

tf 5 Perif Bal SFR SF 

tf CS Peri! Bal USS S 

tf CS POrtf Growth DM— DM 

tf CS Portf Gro (Lire) A/B Lit 

d CSPartfGrowthSFf. 
tf CS Portf Growth USS_ 


tf North America. 

tf Switzerland 

tf United Kingdom. 


RESERVE FUNDS 

tf ci.; 

tf Dollar DtsLHi. 

tf French Franc — — 


672 

259 

244 

1.24 

1273 

246 

946 

5.17 

145 

442 

HL73 

562 

252 

27880 

256 

359 

156 

6787 

2.181 

1259 

2805 


tf CS Money Market Fd BEF-BF 

tf CS Money Warier! Fd CS CS 

tf CS Money Market Fd dm— dm 

tf CS Money Market Fd FF FF 

tf C5 Money Market Fd Ecu-Ecu 
tf CS Money Market Fd hr_fi 

rf C5 Money Market Fd Lit ur 

tf CS Money Market Fd Pta-J*tas 
tf CS Money Market Fd SF — SF 

tf <3 Money Market FdS S 

I CS Money Market Fd Yen_Y 

I CS Money Market FUt c 

I Credb SmJI+MM Can SwitxlSF 


mmit 




12511 


tf Yen Reserve 

GEFINOR FUNDS 
Lsnden:71-«f9 41 7LGenevo:4V22 73S5S 30 

w Scottish World Fund. S 4795715 

; w State St. Ameriam S 34857 

GENESEE FUND Ltd 

w (A) Genesee Eagle s 15252 

r (Bl Geneseo Short S 6746 

./(CS Genesee Opportunity's 171.95 

w(F) GwjraBeNob-Equtty—J 13958 

wll Stratuht Band B Ecu 105677 

w II Pocfflc Bond B SF 1269.90 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 
OFFSHORE FUNDS 
11 Athol 5Utaegtaxl of Man 4463642037 
* GAMerlca ___ 

w GAM Arhttroge. 
w GAM ASEAN — 
wGAMAustrafkL. 

wGAM L._ 

w GAM Combined. 

w gam Cross-Market. 

w GAM E u ropean 

wGAM FnsKt 

wGAM Franc-voL 

WGAMGAMCO 

wGAM HM) Yield. 


wGAM East Asia. 

LM Japan 

\M Money Mkfs USS % 

i StgrUna. 

d Go Serin Franc. 
d Do Deulschcmark. 

w GAM AltocatedMm-Fd S 

I Emerg Mkts MIH-Fd J 

I iwm- Europe USS -7 

I Mlfl-Eurooe DM _DM 

i Mm-Giobai uss s 

IMItt-US. 

I Trading I 



1 5taoapere/Mafovdo _S 

1 SF Spedal Band 5F 

iTYehe — _s 

IU7. S 

1 liMWi m lt 1 

I Valor. 


w GAM Whitethorn 

IV GAM Worldwide — 

wGAM Band USS Ord 

w QAM Band USS Special . 

wGAM Band SF 

wGAM Bond Yeti 

wGAM 

w GAM Band I _ 

wGAM I Special Bond, 
w GAM Universal USS- 
I Composite 


I » M » • «i : 


:rs 


1 i: - 
tf. S'. 
II 1.1 • 


tf South East Asia — J 37774 

s: , ii&^Dr NaR5( ‘ REiAH0,LTD 

w WOrid Bond FFR FF 5389 

JkAR INQ I ITTL FD MMORS (IRELAND) LTD 


■iN SIB RECOGN IZED) 

wAutfralla j 

w Japan T*awiotooy 

tv yopan Fund l 

w Japan New Gerwratl oliJ 
W Moteiflta & iNNHi 


iv intematlanoJ Bond, 
w Europe Fund- 
wHongKang. 

wTrtetar Warrant- . 

w Global Emerging Mkts S 

w Latin America — — — J 

w Currency Fund S 

iv Currency Fund Managed -J 
IV Korea Fund 5 

isgstiamsas^ 

wBDD uss Cash Fund S 

w bdd Ecu Cash Fund- Ecu 

tv BDO Swto Franc Cusfl SF 

W BDO Ink Bond FareHJSS — S 
w BDD Int. Bond Fund-Eev —Ecu 
w BOO N American Equity FdS 
w BDD European Empty Fund Ecu 
m3 DO Asian Euuttv Fund — S 
m BDO US Small Cop Fund — S 

nt BDD Japan Fd — — — S 

in BDD Emerging Ml* Fd—J 
w Euroflnandere Fixed Inc — FF 
w Euraffn NtaBKvBd Fd_£F 
BEUNVCST MGMT (GSY) LTD 

w fleBn vesFBngtl $ 

w Beflnvest-Gfobol 1 

w Beflcivest-lsTOi — * 

w Bettnvtnt-Mumtond — — s 

wBeUiwest-Suoeilor. s 

BNP LUXEMBOURG 
INTER CASH 

Franc FRF FF 


2772 

6741 

27,15 

22.95 

LTLS9 

2659 

4564 

11979 

1754 

17.91 

11577 

3748 

1676 

16.99 

1665 

5171 

1034 

1.118 

540325 

618454 

309771 

51(031 

65037 

302777 

611802 

149871 

105X17 

man 

10SBJ33 

1048889 

905670 

141479 

95177 

70886 

94579 

969J9 


h« 


»< ^ 




f France Securile. Ff 

f Inter Cash DM—— DM 

f inter Cash E« Ecu 

/ (nl*r Cozn GBP 1 

I liner Cash USD- 1 

I Inter Cash Yen 


INTER MULTI INVESTMENT 
IV Priwjtwdlora Inti invest ^3 
■r Telecom Invest — . — . — S 
INTER OPTIMUM 

w inter Bond USO_ J 

w BEF/LUF HI 

lyMuHWHfisfsOM Dl 

w USO — . — * 

w FRF Ff 

w ECU. 


INTER STRATEGIE 

> Austr 


w Frost®'. 
w Eirooe rfu N ord. 
w Europe duCentn 
w Europe tfuf 
w Japan. 


.FF 



wSud- Esl AstaHwe 

HSUNrVERSALFUND JICAV 

tfEffUKC ECU A (Div) Ecu 

tf ECU B ICO) Ecu 

S Irteteec USD A IDtv) S 

a iSKeclW? B Iw, 1 

a UMtiaM USD A IDtv) 1 

a mSSond USD t icaa) * 

SKSSScGM^FMAfpivlFM 
a F U u ie ec Gteeoi FM B (CaplFM 


1500774 

17978,17 

277111 

1944J3 

149975 

125899 

165QZ7 

>2625.45 

103175 

141 L53 
10296770 
290120 
134X49 
1479802 
119970 

123199 
1 1229.09 

128M3 

216X11 

946J9 

116046 

I6>22i 

1BU1 

MM 

1J9JW5 

141.1975 

ry-xm 

214556 

15J05S 

194401 

2267M7 


- CradflSwbsFtteL-^— _ 

rf CS Band Fd LI re A/B Lit 

tf CS Bond Fd Pesetas Ara—Ptos 

a Cs Capital DM 1997 DM 

rf CS Cnnttal DM2000. 

tf CSQStal Ecu 2000. 

tf CS Capital FF 2000— 

tf CS capital SFR 2008. 

rf CS ECU Bond A_ 
rfCS Ecu Bond B. 
rf cs Euroaa Band A. 
tf CS Europa Band B_ 
rf CS Fixed I DM 8% 1/96- — DM 
a cs Fixed i Ecu B 3/4% i/96-Ecu 

rf CS FF Bond B FF 

tf CS Gulden Bond A Fl 

tf CS Gulden Band B F) 

ff CS Prime Band A SF 

tf cs Prime Bead B SF 

rf CS Short-T. Bond dm a — JJM 

tf CS Shari-T. Bond DM B DM 

rf CS Shark-T. Bend s A S 

tf CS snort-T. Bond S B_ 1 

a CS Swiss Franc Band A SF 

d a Swiss Franc Band B SF 

d CS Eurareal DM 

CREDIT AGRICOLE 

INDEXI5 

tf Index Is Japan /NiKKei -t 

tf Indcxtl G Br*t/FTSE <■ 

rf Indexb FranaiiCAC 48__FF 

tf indexb C.T FF 

MON AXIS 

tf Court Terme USD S 

tf COort Terme DEM DM 

tf Court Terme JPY Y 

rf Court Terme GBP 1 

rf Court Terme frf FF 

tf Court Terme ESP. 
tf Court Terme ECU. 

rf Adlans Inn ptversfflees — FF 
rf Actions NoriFAtiierioolnes-S 

rf Adlans JnuonabM Y 

rf Actions An oi o ii B ; r 

d Adlans Allemandes DM 

d Adlans Fi i» md ses 

tf Adlans Esp. 8 P« ' 

rf Adlans ifatlennes __ 

d Adlans Banin Padflmw—S 

a ante Inn DiversIfTew FF 

rf Oftlto Nont-Amerlealnes. 

S SBff" “ 

tf ObHaEaftEfott. 


134872 

133862 

151539 

9877 

169.H 

21X05 

33571 

10773 

107J7 

10581 

1001.12 


48250 
41277 
47S76 
231 JU 
30878 
12X35 
112X5 
9574 
178771 
24964 
21770 
I38D1 
77976 
90X15 
10077 
10892 
10077 
10085 
1003270 
16275 
18177 
12463 
12571 
17476 

12132 

14832 

15435 

99175 

10826 

63638 

78235 

13839 

36291 

21864 

857.19 

13865 

18930 

67638 

145.18 

1*174 

18803 

1443800 

11768 

15661 

14402 

14830 

33831 

10139 

1BB30 

10002 

10021 

10030 

101.14 

11879 

moo 


Stoftat strategic 

Kobai Strategic B S 

iv European Strategic A — S 

r European StndpglC B S 

* Trading StrotegtcA . . .7 

w Trading Strategic B S 

w Emerg Mkts Strategic A— S 
w Emerg Mkts 5tndeglc B — S 
SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 41-1-422 2626 
MubMxxtwtrasse 171CH BOMTuridi 
rf GAM (CHI Europe SF 9464 

S GAM (CHI Mandat SF 16146 

GAM (CHI Pacific SF 29130 

SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 

135 East 37th SfrtetNY 10822312788-4200 

wGAM Europe S 92.11 

wGAMGtabcd S 11574 

wGAM International S 19335 

wGAM North America s H02 

wGAM Pacific Bailn s ivsjo 

IRISH REGISTERED UCITS 

6S46 Lower Mnxit SLDuUIn 23SS-1-676060 

wGAM Europa A«X DM 13001 

wGAM Orient Ace DM 162.11 

W GAM Tokyo ACC DM 17803 

W GAM Total Bona DM A4X— DM 18446 

wGAMUntveraoiDMAtx — dm imti 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermudo:JB09) 29S-OOS Fmr.(8091 2956TB0 
OBAi. STRATEGIES LTD 


JWHGL< 

(Al Orialnd Ir y estme n t — s 

•~l Ftaandaf 4 Metets 5 

l Gtobof DhenMed S 

I G7 Currency j 


ULH7 

178597 

1132 

14167 

11773 


lYen FTnandaJ. — 

■Dtvers»ed RbkAdl — % 

IK) Inti Currency 8 Bond—S 

HLI Global Ffnanckd -S 

IwJWH WORLDWIDE FUND7 
GLOBAL FUTURES ft OPTIONS SICAV 


9X90 

14577 

11X58 

9138 

15738 

11838 

11944 

9886 

1773 


m FFM I id Bd Proor-CHF a JH= 
GOLDMAN SACHS , 
wGS Adi Rate Mart Fd II. 


-ECU 


tf Obi Is Convert intern.. 
tf Court Term* Ecu 

tf Court Tet 


C REDITCOftW^ClA L DE FJ«NCE^ 

g|5SffllSB=3 FF 

CURSITOR FUND 
tf Cunflar East Astao Ea— J 
tf cunitor GIM Bd Owart-jjJ 
tf Curatiar CW O wth iwb-Fd J 

DARIER HEMTSCH GROUP 
Tri 41-22 700 4837 

tf Henbcft Tr eoowyM — — 
tf DH Major Ma rktW Fu nO— SF 

tf DH Mandarin Portfolio 5F 

d Samurai PO/t toHn . . — 5F 


DISCOU NT BANK GROUP 

■MteyrtteteHrai 


wDoh®! Bgnd- 


_SF 


w Eurovtd Equity— J 
wN.AmertajEqixtY 
w Pocfflc Equity —I 
lw MMwiarreney Band. 

wMumairrency 


-Ecu 

J 


-FF 


DtT INVESTMENT FFM 

d Cencentra+ 

tf Infl Rentenfond+J 


DRE5DNEK INTL MCMT SERVICES 
La Teuehe House - IFSC-Mdin > 
DSB Tnontfon Lai Am Set Fd . 
tf Canqutetftdor Fund 7 



10894 

932 

1262.98 

1809 

937 

9830 

1X18 

1842 

1037 

1140 

115599 


03819 
87570 
y 8946S 

(IRELAND) LTD 

88.17 
8839 
2674 

2778 
1939 
19J9 
3439 
34J1 
2736 
yurt 

WM 
2477 
1819 
1827 
2809 
20.13 
3679 
3636 
•ni n 
2240 
1861 
1071 

4174 
*476 

7939 

nn iw 

1155 
1367 
1152 
1362 
1622 
1635 
2608 
2610 
868 
869 
IS39 


a GT Tsteavnm. Fd B Snorris 
r GT " - 


. Tedmotagy Fund A ShJ 5968 

r GT Technology Fund S 5n_s 6812 

BT MANAGEMENT PLC (44 71 7184567) 
tf G.T. BMeeh/Health Fund— I 2068 

tf g.T. geubdi^d Fuiio s 1361 

w gt! cm Smou Ca Fa s 3874 

tf G.T. Investment Fund S 2734 

w G.T. Korea Fund S 64t 

w G.T. Needy intf Counrr Fd— s 4271 

“ 2614 


w G.T. US Small Campon lee _7 
GUERNSEY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

f GCMGtobatSeLEq. S 111.19 

GUINNESS FLIGHT FBMNCRS (Gasnl Ltd 
GUINNESS FLIGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 


tf Managed Currency, 
tf GtatM Bana-^H 


tf Global High income Bond_S 
tf Gilt 6 [Bond. 


d EureHWi Inc Band, 
tf Global Eauttv. 


tf American Blue Chip .,.5 

tf Japan and Pacific J 

tf UK——. 1 

tr EurooMn. 


3878 
3X33 
21.16 
1824 
7828 
9SJ2 
revt 

136*9 
2685 

.. 12268 

GUINNESS FLIGHT INTL ACCUM FD 

tf Deutscheniarti Money DM 98122 

tf us Dollar Money I mass 

rf US Dollar high Yd Bond s 2451 

d Inn Balanced Griti j 363* 

HASENB1CHLER ASSET MANGT GeSjnML 
wHnserblctUerCwn AG S 636370 

w Hnsenblchter Phr . Ij law 

wAFFT S l47&ffi 

HOF FINANCE r Tel(33-lHg7464S4 > Flix 48766455 
wMondlnveafurapo— __ FF 126858 

wMandlitvesI Cratuonce FF 138939 

» fuandinvest opp mtles FF lzxji 

wMond Invest Emerg Growth, FF 13SB70 

w Mondlnvesi Futures— —FF 121889 

HEPTAGON FUND NV ISOT-4 15SS5) 

Heptagon QLB Food S 9887 

r MANAGEMENT LTD 

BeniWOoiinfJTK 4008 Lux: (152) AM 84 »1 


w jaoan Diveniitea Fund s 

ivLeveragea Can Kola S 

MERRILL LYNCH 

d Dollar Assets Portfolio S 

tf Prhno Role Portfolio s 

MERRILL LYNCH SHOPT-7ERM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

tfCknsA £ 

d Class B S 

MERRILL LYNCH 

GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SERIES 
AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
d Category A AS 


tf Cairaary B 


.AX 


CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
tf Category a cs 


tf Cs ternary I 
CORPORAT 


Estimated I 

mHarmti European Fund. 

m He rmes North American FdS 

m Hermes Aslan Fund 5 

m Hermes Emerg Mkts Fund_S 
m Hermes Sirateoles Fund— s 

in Hermes Neutral Fund S 

m Hermes Dlobol Fund s 

m Hermes Bond Fund. 


-Ecu 


34856 

29770 

38979 

129.72 

67971 

11473 

65636 

123637 

10891 

42639 


m Hermes Sterimo Fd 
m Hermes Cold Fund. 

INCOME PARTNERS (ASIA) LIMITED 
w Aslan Fixed Income rd—— 5 18552 

INTER INVEST (BERMUDA) LTD 
C/o Bank of Bermuda. Tel : BD9 295 4008 
m Hedae Hoo ft Conserve Fd-5 944 

INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
1 Bd Royal. L-3449 Luxembourg 

w Europe Sud E Ecu 9178 

INVE5CO INTX LTD, POB27L Jersey 
Tel: 44534 73114 

tf Maximum income Fund c 

rf Sterling Mnod PHI. 
tf Pioneer Markets, 
rf Global r ' 


tf OkaMi Global Strategy - 
tf Asia Super Growth 


ff Ntooon Wtamvil Fund— S 

tf Asia Tiger Worrant s 

tf European Wornnt Fund S 

a GW N.W. 19*4 s 

PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 
d American Growth , , s 

d AmerlCnn Enterprise S 

ff Asia Tiger Grown, 
d Dollar r 


tf Eurapean Growth 5 

tf European Entergrise—S 
tf Global Emerging Mark Mi _S 

rf Glabal Growlti S 

tf Nippon Enterprise— S 

tf Ntapon Growth S 

a UK Growth. 


89200 ■ 

2.1490 

67*90 

177900 

275670 

27500 

5.1500 

11*00 

97400 

61400 

9.03® 

IX04M 

53200 

5.4080 

67400 

10.1400 

57700 

87900 

tTWi 

53300 


rf Sterltna Reserve c 

tf North American warrant -J 4A5M 

tf Greater CninaOpos S 83900 

ITALFORTUNE INTI- FUNDS 
w Class A (Aggr. Growth ItaLII 7996570 

wCtms B (Glabat Equity) S 12J0 

w Class C (Global Bond) S 1135 

w Class D( Ecu Bond) Ecu 1882 

JARDIHE FLEMING . GPQ Box 11448 Hg Kg 

tf JF ASEAN Trust S 6138 

tf JF For East Wntf Tr S 2246 

rf JF Global Conv.Tr s M46 

rf JF Kang Kang Trust— — 5 1892 

rf JF Jam Sm. Ca Tr Y 4*18870 

tf JF Japan Trust Y 1196770 


a JF Malaysia Trust . 
tf JFPoriflcHie.Tr._ 


tf JF Thaltend Trust S 

^!S^T MT,l " JULTO 

wGovett Man. Fuhxes x 

w Govett Man, FutUSS 5 

w Govrtt S Gear. Curr, 


3085 

1X76 

4X68 


I w Govett S GIM BaL Hdoe- 
JULIUS BA ER GROUP 
rf Baertxxid-^re^^^re 
d Conbar-MHL— 
tf EauinoarAroerteaJ 
rf Equihaer Europe 3 



rf LlmHbnerJ 

tf Europe Bond Funa. 
tf Dollar Band Fund J 
tf Austro Band Fund! 



SS&S'fhakL. 




IET MANAGEMENT INC 

m Key Asia Hoktteon A 

rn Key Globed Hedae S 


IF 1C ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 


1175 

7.94 

1131 

107314 

till At 

173800 

247X62 

15807* 

1076.11 

236X24 

295555 

226570 

14130 

129.10 

125670 

11979 

11670 

9890 

86JO 

13X10 

13260 

14230 

16030 

14880 

963800 

10540 

9X41 

121570 

127170 

128270 

111*70 

185478 

112370 

10X96 

2S4J9 

15859 


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ft ill Fund Ltd. 


ft Inti Guaranteed Fund S 

ft umWww. lw _ » 

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tf Asian Dragon Part NV A S 

tf Asian Dragon Part NV B S 

tf Global Advisors II NV A S 

d Global Advtsora 1 1 NV B S 

d Glabal AdvUoro Pan NVAJ 
tf Glabal Advtsora Part NV B_5 

tf Lehman Cur Adv.A/B J 

tf Premier Futures Arfv A/B_S 
UPPO INVESTMCNTS 
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T et 18521 867 C8M Fax (8521 596 0380 

WJuvu Fund s 9J7 

wAsean Fixed Inc Pd » 897 

wIDR Money Marka Fd I 1181 

w USD Money Martel Fd— s 1056 

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w Aslan Growtn Funa s 1846 

w Aston Warrant Fund S 570 


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w LG Aslan Smaller Cos Fd_S 193*88 

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i Japan Fd I 1805 


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tf Dollar Long Term 

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d U5 Dollar Short Term 1 

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rf BetBkm Franc BF 


rf Converraue- 
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tf Swiss Franc Short-Term. 

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jn Malabar inti Fund S 1947 

MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 

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m Mint GM LM ■ Spec I sue _S 

n> Mint Gtd Ltd -Nov 2002 l 

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mAHL Gtd Real Time Tra 5 

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w Maritime Mlt-Sector I LM-S 100376 

w Morttlme GRil Bata Series— S B3137 

w Maritime G tal Delta 5crlcs3 78854 

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d Clara B S 11633 

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MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS, LTD 

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w Asian CrarttaJ Holdings 5 6378 

wAslori Selection Fd n.V— jl 10774 

w dp Amer. Growth Fd N .v. -S 3552 

w EMS Offshore Fd N.V Fl 10076 

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dCteSB-Z— 1 1491 


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MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
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m Momentum Rabttxjw Fd — S 115 86 

m Momentum RxR R.U 5 7937 

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w Wlllerfunds-Wlllerea NA S 

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m Wo rid Band Fund Ecu 


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NOMURA INTL. (HONG KONGI LTD 


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NORIT CURRENCY FUND 

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21 Grosvenor StidnWIX 9FE44-71-499 2998 


.'urop Growth Inc DM 

luroo Growth Acc — DM 
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OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL. INC 
Williams House. Hamilton HM1 1. Bermuda 
Tel: B0929J-101B Fa* : 809295-2305 

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tf Orbltex Nature/ Res Fa — CS 
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rf Nmrastor Fund J 

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rf Parves! Holland B Fl 

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tf Parvesf Obtl-Daliar B 5 

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rf Parvest o«l-Guiden B Fl 

tf Parvest Obil-Franc B FF 

tf Parvest OOti-Sler B t 

tf Porvesi Cibll- Era B Era 

0 Parvesf OMFBelux B LF 

rf Parvest 5-7 Dollar B- s 

tf Porvesi s-T Europe B— 

rf Parvest 5-T DEM B 

tf Parvest 5-T frfb 

d Parvest S-T Bef Plus B. 

rf Porvesi Global B 

tf Parvest Int Bond B 

tf Parvesf Obfl-Lirn 8 

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rf Parvest S-T CHF a 

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d Porvesi OBIFDKK B 

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rf Ptcfef Vffljulsse (CM J SF 65145 

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mPremierus Ecuitv Fund— 5 1S641 

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m Premier Sovereign Bd Fd_S 79146 

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m Premier Total Return Fd— S 979.9? 

PRIVATE ASSET MGT GAM FUND INC 
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PUTNAM 

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rf Putnam Inn Fund. __s 1S59 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 

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• Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15,1994 


SPORTS 



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. . . . • .ti • 




Once Simply Flotsam, the Coyote Returns to Race Anew 


n,r*h 


By Barbara Lloyd 

New York Times Service 

CHARLESTON. South Carolina 
— The racing yacht Coyote, left to 
drift in the Atlantic after it capsized 
and its skipper was lost at sea, will be 
sailing again this weekend in the 
BOC Challenge. 

In a bold move to see Mike Plant's 
lost vision realized, his fiancee at the 
time has retrieved the 60-foot (18- 
meter) boat, restored it to racing 
readiness and chartered it to David 
Scully, a solo sailor from Chicago 
who lives in France. 

The Coyote is scheduled to be one 
of 20 sailboats leaving here Saturday 
in the BOC Challenge, the single- 
handed yacht race around the world. 

Named after the BOC Group, the 
British gas products company that 


sponsors the competition, the nine- 
month race will take the fleet of 
sailors through 27,000 miles (43.400 
kilometers) of open ocean. There are 
three stopover ports. 

The new Coyote is a mightier ver- 
sion of the boat that capsized in 
October 1992. Outfitted with high- 
tech sails, the restored version has an 
87-foot mast that is 2 feet higher 
than before, thus providing more sail 
area and more speed than when 
Plant bad it. 

Beyond that, the yacht's new skip- 


per, schooled in the traditions of 
French offshore ratine, is lean. 


French offshore rating, is lean, 
smart and confident. 

Scully, 39, has lived in the sea- 
coast town of La Trinite, France, for 
the last five years. He has raced 
maxi-yachts around buoys, catama- 


rans around islands and trimarans 
across oceans. 

But he has never raced a thor- 
oughbred sloop around the world. 

“I think the BOC is the ul tima te 
tingle-handed race," he said recent- 
ly. “You don’t know if you will ever 
have the opportunity to do it But if 
you do, you have to go for it.” 

Still in search of a sponsor, Scully 
has tapped private funds to get start- 
ed. 

The quadrennial competition, 
which began in 1982, has tested the 
mettle of scores of yachtsmen before 
Scully. But none has set off on an 
emotional tidal wave as forceful as 
the one brought on by the Coyote. 

The boat was built for another 
race, the Vendee Globe Challenge, 
in 1992. 


On the way from New York to the 
starting line in France, the Coyote 
lost the 8000-pound (3,719-kilo- 
gram) bulb on its keel, an appendage 
that kept the boat upright when un- 
der way. 

A three- week, million-dollar 
search discovered the hull about 700 
miles southwest of Ireland. Plan), 
41, who lived in Jamestown, Rhode 
Island, was never found. 

His fiancde, Helen Davis, agreed 
to abandon the Coyote at sea when it 
was confirmed that Plant was not on 
board. But two months later, the 
Coyote was sighted floating near the 
Irish coast, prompting Davis to re- 
think her decision. 

She hired a tugboat and retrieved 
the yacht she had helped launch, 
then shipped the battered hull back 


to Rhode Island, where inquiries 
over the missing ballast bulb turned 
heartbreak into blame. 

Last year, Daws received an out- 
of-court settlement from the Coy- 
ote’s builder, Concordia Custom 
Yachts of South Dartmouth, Massa- 
chusetts. She took the money, an 
undisclosed sum, and used it to give 
the boat new life. 

“I didn’t want the boat to sit there, 
and I didn't want to put my life on 
hold.” Davis said. The $500,000 re- 
habilitation, pan of which was sub- 
sidized with the charter fee paid by 
ScuUy, took most of last roring. 

Even the new Coyote has had a 
scrape. 


During a 2,000-mile qualifying 
voyage last month, it collided at 


night with a fishing vessel about 175 


miles east of Nantucket Island. Coy- 
ote’s bowsprit was knocked off. The 
fishing boat had a small hole in its 
side. 

The Coast Guard said it has not 
yet ascertained blame. 

Mark Schrader, BOCs race direc- 
tor, said the rebuilt the Coyote had 
passed its safely check with flying 
colors. 

“The boat looks very well pre- 
pared.** he said. “Everything was in 
order, and there were no deficiencies 
or last-minute panic.” 

In this race, the top boats look 
equally matched, including the Coy- 
ote, Schrader said. 

“Of course, luck is always in- 
volved,” he added. “But this time, 
it's the skipper who will tell the sto- 
ry.” 


Norman Has it>r 
Just the Fh, f 

But Is Still Out 


A Comeback for Capriati 

Troubled Teenager to Play in Zurich and Germany 




if*. ’ .+■< y 


By Robin Finn 

New York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — Jennifer Ca- 
priati, the troubled t enni s phenom 
whose career began as a fairy tale at 
13 and derailed in despair at 17, 
plans to return to competition next 
month in Zurich at the European 
Indoors, a 5750,000 event played in 
the 4,000-seat Sallsporthalle. 

Capriati said she intended to im- 
plement the second phase in her 
comeback the following week in Fil- 
derstadt, Germany, at the Porsche 


Grand Prix. Depending on her spir- 
its and results, she will then deter- 
mine her future schedule. 

“It may seem like a sudden deci- 
sion to some people, but I've wanted 
to play again for some time, and Fve 
thought it out and I figure, why not, 
that mentally I*m ready to play,” 
Capriati said Tuesday from the 
home her family recently rented in 
Rancho Mirage, California. 

[Steffi Graf, meanwhile, has been 
told by a specialist to rest her injured 
back for three weeks, her father, Pe- 
ter, said Wednesday in Essen, Ger- 
many, Agence France-Presse report- 
ed. 

[Graf, after losing to Arantxa San- 
chez Vicario in the U.S. Open final 
on Saturday, had flown to Essen to 
consult the sports medetine special- 
ist Hartmut Krahl who examined 
her-Tuesday.] 

The request by Capriati, unranked 
and unseeded, for a wild card into 
both WTA events was readily ac- 
cepted by the organizers. 

“It’s going to be different this time 
around; I’m not going to put a lot of 
pressure on myself,” said Capriati, 
whose spectacular rise — from an 
unranked junior in 1989 to the youn- 
gest player ever to own a Top 10 
ranking, as a 14-year-old in 1990 — 
was accompanied by inevitable ex- 
pectations from her entourage, her 
sponsors and herself. 

“I just want to play again, have 
fun and see how it goes,” said Ca- 
priati, who seemed to have less and 
less fun the more successful she be- 


three months of the tour, but she has 
not played since her first-round de- 
feat in the U.S. Open just over a year 
ago. That loss had origins both phys- 
ical and mental: She traced it to a 
painful combination of bone chips 
in her right arm and the discourag- 
ing disappearance of her motivation. 

Moreover, the first-round loss rep- 
resented her poorest showing in four 
years of Grand Slam competition and 
was a harbinger of a nine-month slide 
during which she not only swore off 
t ennis but received a citation for 

S lifting at a suburban Florida 
in December. She moved into 
her own apartment and then moved 
home again to concentrate on com- 
pleting her senior year of high 
school. 

But shortly after turning 18 in 
March, Capriati left school, left 
home again and moved in with a 


nitely marketable. During her hiatus 
from t ennis , all of her sponsors ended 
t heir affiliation with her, and officials 
at Prince, her longtime racquet spon- 
sor, indicated that any future con- 
tracts with Capriati would likely spec- 
ify a code of acceptable behavior. 

In what was very much a move 
designed to allow the entire family to 
“start over,” according to Capriati's 
mother, Denise, the family left Jen- 
nifer’s training ground at the Saddle- 
brook Resort for Rancho Mirage, 
California, at the end of August. 

Since then, Capriati has resumed 


practicing at a local dub and her 
father, Stefano, with whom she had a 
tempestuous relationship while he 
was her coach, has reappeared at 
courtside as an adviser and procurer 
of hitting partners. Capriati said she 
was not interested in hiring a coach 
until she saw whether this comeback 
inspired her to compete again on a 
full-time basis. 


r I just want to play 
again, have fun and see 
how it goes.’ 

Jennifer Capriati 


Capriati described 1992 as “a 
waste” with the exception of the 





By Larry Donnan 

New York Times Service 

GAINESVILLE. Virguni — 
Greg Norman won’t be playing in 
the inaugural edition of the Presi- 
dents Cup, and there is cruel irony in 
t h at , - 

Norman, who is suffering from 
what his doctor said is “a bad case of 
what in layman’s terms you'd called 
prolonged flu,” is one of the major 
reasons this new competition came 
into being after an amazingly short 
gestat ion period of six months. 

So his withdrawal Tuesday came 
as an unhappy surprise. - 

But Dr. Richard Andrassy, the 
chief of surgery at Hermann Hospi- 
tal in Houston, who also happens to 
be Norman’s brother-in-law, cor- _ 
rected early reports that the player’s * - 
hospi talizatio n was related to hem- 
orrhoid surgery he underwent two 
weeks ago. 

“It’s cer tainl y not seriovs and 
nothing that wiu cause a prolonged 
problem,” Andrassy said. 

The concept for the Pres ide nts 
Cup, a match-play competition 
which begins here Friday at the 
Robert Trent Jones Golf Club, was 


Olympic gold medal she won at Bar- 
celona. Last year, she won her first 


female friend who attended college 
in Boca Raton, Florida. Her prob- 
lems culminated on May 16 with her 
arrest at a seedy motel in Coral Ga- 
bles, where she was charged with 
marijuana possession. Two other 
teenagers who had been at a party in 
her motel room were arrested on 
felony drug charges. 


celona. Last year, she won her first 
circuit stop, in Sydney in January. 
But she was hailed in the quarterfi- 
nals of the Australian and French 
Opens and Wimbledon, a mirror- 
image of her 1992 performance at 
those slams . Before the opening- 
round loss at the U.S. Open, Ca- 
priati had reached the final of the 
Canad i an Open, her best result since 
she earned her sixth career title at 
Sydney. 


IUdu Sqheti/Rcotcn 

Goran Ivanisevic beating Tomas CarboneD of Spain, 6-4, 6-2, on Wednesday in the Romanian Open. 


SEASON: Major League Owners Call It Quits for the Year 


Her arrest prompted Capriati to 
enter a substance-abuse clinic in Mi- 


She ended 1993 ranked No. 9 in 
the world despite missing the final 


ami, where she remained for 23 days 
before going home to Wesley Chapel. 
Florida. She then agreed to cooperate 
with a court-monitored drug counsel- 
ing program, allowing her to avoid a 
court appearance and have the 
charges against her dropped upon 
satisfactory completion of the course. 

While Capriati appeared to have 
solved her legal problems, she was 
treated with less sympathy by the 
various corporate sponsors who pro- 
vided her with a S5 million yearly 
portfolio when she was 14. happily 
ranked No. 8 in the world and infi- 


At the 1990 French Open. Ca- 
priati became, at 14. the youngest 
semifinahst in Grand Slam history, 
and in 1991 she was Wimbledon’s 
youngest semifinalisL But her prob- 
lems since ha halcyon debut are 
largely responsible for the recent 
Women’s Tennis Council decision to 
prohibit 14-year-olds from playing 
on the WTA Tour as of 1996. 


Continued from Page 1 
he continued. “Will Jimmy Key be 
the Cy Young winner? Every time 
you see him pitch you're thinking 
about it. and all of the sudden they 
say to you, ‘You’ll never know. Be- 
cause we ended it before the culmi- 
nation.' That’s a wicked thing to do. 


A really wicked thing* 
In the days and we 


dais and an earthquake could not. 

Players, meanwhile, said they 
were willing to continue contract 
talks and said an agreement by Sept. 
26 would have saved the postseason. 
But the issue of a salary cap, which 
owners say they need to control sala- 
ries that now average nearly $1.2 


According to Capriati’s agent at 
le International Management 


the International Management 
Group, Barbara Perry, the decision 
to return to the circuit next month 
came from the player herself. 

“It was her idea,” Perry said. “She 
wants to play again, and she seems 
to want to play soon.” 


In the days and weeks to come, 
fans will be left to wonder when 
baseball will return. When it does 
come back, there might even be an 
entirely new league. 

“Baseball games are won and lost 
because of errors — and this will go 
down as the biggest ‘E’ of all," said a 
former commissioner, Peter Ueber- 
roth, who negotiated an end to the 
1985 strike after two days. "The los- 
ers are the fans, and there is no 
winner. Nineteen ninety-four — the 
season that struck itself out.” 

In the end, it was a $2 billion 
battle between owners and players 
that did to baseball what wars, scan- 


million a player, remains the sticking 
point L. the negotiations. 


point u. the negotiations. 

“The union refused to bargain 
with us over costs and took a hard- 
line position that the clubs would 
fold as they had in past negotia- 
tions,” Mr. Selig said. “That was a 
terrible mistake, one for which all of 
us must pay." 

No negotiating sessions were 
scheduled between the union head, 
Donald Fehr, and the owners' repre- 
sentative, Richard Ravitch. The two 
sides have met only three times since 
the strike started, and not at all in 
the final five days. 

“What people will remember is 
that it ended in this fashion with Bod 


gnashing his teeth at a news confer- 
ence,” Mr. Fehr said. 

Mr. Ravitch said the goal was now 
to negotiate an agreement “without 
ha rming next year.” 

“I think and I hope thak^Don 
understands a union leader is sup- 
posed to talk about the wages of the 
people he represents,” Mr. Ravitch 
said. “They didn’t want to do that. 
Now they have to. Once you cross 
that threshold, hopefully we can 
work something out, whether it’s a 
cap or a tax or a widget.” 

Mr. Selig’s declaration follows 
more than 25 years of labor strife 
between the players and owners. In 
December 1975, players won the 
right to free agency and owners have 
never completely come to grips with 
it, leading to a series of strikes and 
lockouts — eight in a fl. 

“Maybe we’ve been headed for 
this for a long, long time,” Mr. Selig 
said. 


Robert Trent Jones Golf Club, was 

mtemationa^^rars such as Neuman 
and Nick Price to compete in the 
bi ennial Ryder Cup matches. 

The Ryder Cup matches, which 
have become successful and compel- 
ling theater in the last decade, put a 
team of golfers from the United 
States against a European team ev- 
ery other year, and are open only to 
players bom in either the United 
States or Europe. 

Norman, an Australian who is the 
No. 2 ranked player in the world, 
bad openly campaigned for a Ryder 
Cup-style event that would include 
international players. 

Hie prospect of Norman being 
paired with No. I -ranked Nick Price 
was one that thrilled both' ESPN, 
which w31 telecast eight and a half 
hours of play Friday, and CBS, 
which will broadcast the event live 
for three hours Saturday and four “ 
hours Sunday. But Bradley Hughes, 
who is replacing Norman? The thrill 
isn't gone, bat it might have been 
mitigated. 

The U.S. team of Corey Pavin, 
Tom I flimmi, Fred Couples, Davis 
Love in, Scott Hoch, Loren. Rob- 
erts, John Huston, Jeff Maggert. Jim 
G allag her Jr., Jay Haas, PhuMTckel- 
son and playing-captain Hale Irwin 
is strong, although it might have 
been stronger still if it intititied Tom 
Kite and Curtis Strange. 

The international team of Price, 
David Frost, Mark McNulty, Vijay 
Singh, Frank NobOo, Peter Senior, 
Steve EUdngton, Craig Pany, Tsu- 
kasa Wantanabe, Fulton Allem and 
now Hughes is solid, but Norman's 
absence could be felt 




How much it will matter will be 
determined this weekend. But Irwin 
might have summed up, in a half- 
jokmg fashion, the competitive spirit 
that sets all match-play events apart 

“AH of us were champing at the 
bit to get a shot at Greg,” he said. 
“We wanted to kick his butt this 
week.” 





























** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 


Page 19 




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By Richard Justice 

IPasAzagnm Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Three 
months after the Houston 
Rockets and New York Knicks 
played a championship series 
short on scoring and viewers 
but long on elbows and fouls, 
the National Basketball Associ- 
ation has moved to rescue 
Showtime before it comes to 
resemble professional wres- 
tling. 

The league’s competition 
committee voted Tuesday to 
recommend shortening the dis- 
tance of the 3-point shot and 
amend several other rules. The 
changes must be approved by a 
two-thirds vote when the NBA 
Board of Governors meets next 
month, but all indications are 
that they wiD be. 

‘-The proposed 3-poim line 
would be a uniform arc 22 feet 
(6.70 meters) from the basket 
Currently the dimensions are 22 
feet in the comers and 23 feet 9 
inches at the top of the key. 

Rod Thom, the NBA’s vice 
president of operations, stud 
that shortening the 3-point shot 
should force teams to play more 
perimeter defense and thus un- 
clog of the lane. Thom said the 
vote to shorten the line was not 
quite unanimous, but that there 
were few dissenters. 

“I think their basic premise 
was that we’ve had the line for a 
long time and it has served us 
well," he said of those against 
the change 

“Maybe it's a little too easy 
from 22 feet," he added, but “I 
think you are going to have to 
have people who can shoot 

“Onr shooting percentages 
have been going down and wub 
this shorter line you are going to 
see more taken and more made. 
In international basketball you 
have to guard the line and it can 
lessen the congestion in the 
lane." 

The committee also recom- 
mended that a shooter fouled 
on a 3-point shot be awarded 
three free throws instead of two, 
that the “clear path" foul rule 
include contact in the back- 
court, that hand checking be 
prohibited from the' end line in 
the backcourt to (he opposite 
foul line, and that illegal screens 
be called more closely. 


The committee also recom- 
mended more severe punish- 
ment for fighting, including a 
one-game suspension and maxi- 
mum $20,000 fine for any play- 
er leaving the bench during a 
fight and the gection of any 
player who commits two unnec- 
essary-contact fouls during a 
game. 

“There’s concern about low 
scoring and how it impacts the 
popularity of the game as op- 
posed to the Showtune style the 
Lakers played," said the Wash- 
ington Bullets' general manag- 
er, John Nash, 

“There’s going to be a great 
deal of focus on grabbing and 
holding. Hand-checking has 
been a violation and will be 
called more closely. We saw 
that in the summer league and it 
produced an inordinate number 
of free throws as a result of the 
referees taking a stronger posi- 
tion." 

Isiah Thomas, the former 
point guard of the Detroit Pis- 
tons who now is the head of 
basketball operations for the 
expansion Toronto Raptors, 
said: “The fans have spoken on 
those issues.” 



Ajax Beats AC Milan, 2-0, 
In Champion’s League 


Defending champ ion AC Mi- international showing in the 
Ian was beaten. 2-0. Wednesday first half, built up pressure after 
night by Dutch league eh am pi- the change of sides but failed to 
on Ajax in their European outplay the clever, technically 
Champions’ League Group D excellent Greek team, 
match in Amsterdam. Manchester United 4. !FK 

Second half goals by Ronald Goieborg 2: Ryan Giggs scored 


I j -p, r Juirvn - Kv*uu*i. 

Milan’s Ruud Gullit was booed in Amsterdam, while Ronald de Boer got a goal for Ajax. 


de Boer and Jari Liimanen sank 
the Italians, who never 
stretched Ajax goalkeeper Ed- 
win van der Sar. 

De Boer scored after 5 ! min- 
utes when Patrick KJuivert left 
Milan captain Franco Baresi 
stranded with a well-timed 
pass. 

Unmarked. De Boer gave 
Milan goalkeeper Sebastiano 
Rossi no chance with his right- 
foot shot. 

Litmanen fired a left- fool 
half volley into the roof of the 
net from a Marc Overmars 
cross from the left flank in ihe 
65 th minute. 

The Ajax crowd whistled AC 
Milan’s Dutch star Ruud Gullit 
every time he touched the ball. 

Salzburg 0, AEK 0: The other 
Group D match was played to a 
scoreless draw in Vienna al- 
though Salzburg, after its worst 


SCOREBOARD 


Japanese Leagues 


Central Leosae 



W 

L 

T 

Pet 

GB 

Yornfurl 

64 

55 

0 

J3i 

— 

Hiroshima 

62 

ST 

0 

.521 

2 

Harabin 

60 

M 

0 

.506 

3to 

Qwnlctil 

St 

58 

0 

.504 

4 

Yokohama 

54 

62 

0 

-466 

Bta 

Yakult 

53 

63 

0 

Ml 

9 


Yakut! 4. Yomturt 0 
Hiroshima 5. OwnkN 4 
HansMn 4 Yokohama 3 

Pod He League 

Selfau 
Orix 
Kintetsu 
Datel 
Latte 

Nippon Ham 

Wednesday's results 
Oris U. Nippon Ham 1 
DaM 5. Kintetsu 4 IS Innings 

ew 

w*/ 

European Cup Scores 


W 

L 

T 

Pet. 

GB 

67 

46 

0 

JB1 

— 

63 

5) 

2 

-553 

3Vt 

63 

52 

2 

-544 

4VJ 

61 

» 

1 

.526 

6to 

48 

65 

1 

X2S 

18 

41 

71 

4 

366 

>4V; 


Napoli 1. Skoatfl Riga • 

Scorer: Benito Cordon* i penalty 30tti.*nh). 
Uaflekt L Odense BK 1 
Scorers: LlnfleW— Mark Anderson Item). 
Odense BK— Michael Schionberg (44th I . 
Bayer Leverktnea S, PSV Eindhoven 4 
Scorers: Bayer Leverkusen— (111 Kirsten 
(5RL 14lh.4lst). Thomas Dooley (J4tm. Bema 
Schuster |73dl. PSV Eindhoven— Ponaldo 
Him. 45th. ersti, Luc nihs ibsud. 

Aarau 4 Maritime Funchal I 
Seraipg X Dynamo Moscow 4 
Scorers: Seralng — Wamberla Sousa Com- 
pos (471til.MarcSrtiaessens (75th). EamUson 
Paulo da Silva (Nttti). Dynamo Moscow Al- 
exander Smirnov 116th), Dmitri Chervcnev 
(SSIti 41st). I Dor Shnutenkov (penalty, 44lh). 
Co sms 4 Fenerhahce 0 
Scorers: Franck DurU (49th. penalty). 
Ad Iron Kaznlku (56th. 60th). OiristoPhe Hor- 
knrille (47th). 

Antwerp 0. Newcastle 5 
Scorers: Robert Lee l)st. 8th, 51st). Scoll 
Sellars (3910). Steve Watson (78th). 
Bordeaux X. Lilies from I 
Scorers: Bordeaux— Chris I ophe Duoarrv 
(4th). Ronnie Jahnsen (37th). Richard 
wmchee (64th). Uliestrom— Gaetan Huaro 
UBh). 


It's Passarella 
In Argentina 

The Associated Press 

BUENOS AIRES — 
Daniel Passarella. who 
played midfield for two 
World Cup winners, signed 
Tuesday as coach of Argen- 
tina's national soccer learn. 

His first match as coach 
will be a friendly against 
Chile on Nov. 16 or 23. 

Passarella's contract 
runs until the end of the 
qualifying round for the 
1998 World Cup in France. 
It has a clause extending it 
for another year if Argenti- 
na qualifies for the Cup. 


SIDELINES 


Taiwan Appears to Concede Defeat 

TAIPEI (AP) — Taiwan appeared Wednesday to be readying to 
concede defeat in its efforts to defy China and send its president 
to the opening ceremony of the Asian Games in Japan. 

If President Lee Teng-hui “can go. he will. But if he can’t go. so 
be it,” Tsiang Yien-tsi, Lee's secretary general, told reporters. 


For the Record 


Evander Hofyfidd, the former heavyweight champion who 
recently underwent another examination with a cardiologist in 
New York, was told his heart ailment, a non-comp] iant left 
ventricle, has not sufficiently healed to allow- him to resume 
boxing. The Atlanta Constitution reported. (AP) 

Ichiro Suzuki, a 20-year-old outfielder in his third year as a pro, 
set a Japanese record of 192 hits for a season as the Orix Bluewave 
whipped the Nippon Ham Fighters. 14-1, at the Tokyo Dome on 
Wednesday night. (AP) 


two opportunistic goals 3* 
United held off the stubborn 
Swedish champion for a Group 
A victory at Old Trafford. 

Giggs struck in the 33d min- 
ute after IFK had taken an ear- 
ly lead, then scored the gtv 

"" EUROPEAN SOCCER 

ahead goal in the toth. Both 
scores came after the ball had 
rebounded straight to the 
Welsh striker off a United shot. 

International goalkeeper 
Thomas Ravel li. one of six IFK 
players on Sweden’s World Cup 
squad, kepi his team in the 
game by saving a Giggs shot 
with his face and a Mark 
Hughes effort with his chest 
within the space of five seconds 
late in the half. 

Ravelli, however, was unable 
to stop a 30-meter drive by An- 
drei Kanchelskis three minutes 
after the interval, nor Lee 
Sharpe's insurance goal off a 
Kanchelskis cross in the 7t.it h 
minute. 

Barcelona 2. Gaiatasaray 1: 
Guillermo Amor scored in the 
50th minute in Barcelona to win 
the other Group A match. 

His shot from 20 meters went 
in behind goalie Gi Maras 
Steauche after being deflected 
slightly by a defender. 

Galaiasaray took a 1-0 lead 
when Kubilay Turkyilmaz 
scored in the 14th minute on a 
rocketing, left-footed shot from 
15 meters that beat Barcelona 
keeper Carlos Busquels. 

Galaiasaray, which dominat- 
ed play early in the match, 
seemed to lose its momentum 
when Barcelona lied in the 30th 
minute on a 25-meter free kick 


from Dutch international Ron- 
ald Koeman. 

Paris-St. Germain 2, Bayern 
Munich 0: George Weah and 
Daniel Bravo scored in the 
Group B match in Paris. 

Four minutes before inter- 
mission. Valdo’s comer kick 
found Brazilian compatriot Ri- 
cardo whose header hit the 
crossbar, bouncing directly to 
Weah just in front of the net. 

Weah was twice stopped by 
goalkeeper Oliver Kahn in ihc 
second half before PSG scored 
an insurance goal. 

On another comer by Valdo. 
the ball bounded out near the 
limit of the penalty area, from 
where Bravo sent a blistering 
shot past Kahn in the 83d min- 
ute. 

Dynamo Kiev 3. Spartak 
Moscow 2: In Kiev, substitute 
Sergei Rebrov snatched an 
S6th-minute winner in the other 
Group B match. 

Rebrov’s goal overcame a 2-0 
halftime deficit and sent 40.000 
fans home jubilant from the 
first game the two former Soviet 
league rivals have played in the 
Ukrainian capita! since the 
break up of the Soviet Union. 

Andericdit 0, Steau Bucha- 
rest 0; In a Group C match in 
Brussels, the Romanian team 
withstood relentless pressure to 
get its draw. 

Both teams hit the woodwork 
in a one-sided match in which 
Anderlecht was the only side 
seeking a victory. 

Hajduk Split 0. Bcnfica Lis- 
bon 0: The other Group C 
match, in Split, also ended 
without a goal. 

Bcnfica 's .Argentinian player. 
Claudio Caniggia. missed a 
dear scoring chance when he 
hit the crossbar from 5 meters 
out in the 84th minute. But that 
was just Benfica’s third shot on 
goal in the match. 


To our readers in Franca 

Its never been easier to subscribe 
and save with our new toll free 
service. 

Just call us today at 05-437-437 


UEFA CUP 
Tuesday** Results 
Hr st round. First Ha 
Akraaas 4 Kalsenlaaleni 4 
Scorers: MottNos Horn moon (33d), Dirk 
Anctera (43d). Staton Kwnfz (5ls». Pavel Kuko 

xi^-RMif Madrid irSaortiaa Ufibon a 
Scorer: Martin Vazwe2 (llttl). 
Ro se nb org L Demrttvo La Coruna D 
Scorer: Kart-Potter Loeken (Sid), 
otlrmptakos 1, MMrteWe 2 
Scorers: Olvmntakai lUu I vie l57lti).Mar- 
sellle— Jean-Marc Ferror t31st). Jean-Cltrts- 
toahe Morgue* (79m). 

BkKfcMm Rovers 4 TreUebons 1 
Scorer: Fredrik Sandell <7lsJl. 


BASEBALL 
American League 

MINNESOTA— Named Terry Ryan gener- 
al manager. Signed Tom Kettv. manager, to 
c o ntra c t extension thrown 1997 season. 

SEATTLE— Signed 2-vecr Plover develop- 
ment contract with Tocomo. Pacific Coast 

League. _ .... - 

National League 

CHICAGO— Announced on extension oi 
their player deveioomenl contract with Wil- 
liamsport. New Yorfc-Penn League through 
vear 2000. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 

SEATTLE— Signed Bill Cartwright, cemer. 
lo 3-year contract. 


FOOTBALL 

National Football League 
ARIZONA— Signed Wendolt Gaines, defen- 
sive lineman, to the practice sauad. 

MINNESOTA— Released Rav Rowe. Ham 
end. Signed Martin Harrison, linebacker. 

TAMPA BAY— Released Jerrv Ellison. run- 
ning bock, from the practice squad. Re-signed 
Vidal Mills, llnehocker. lo ihe ora cllcc sauoa. 

SAN DIEGO— Put Blaise Wimer, delensive 
tackle, and John Kidd, punter, on miuraa re- 

ierye._ Agreed la terms with John Parrella, 

defensive lineman. Srgned John Parrella. de- 
fensive tackle, ana Bryan Wagner, punier. 
HOCKEY 

National Hockey League 
CALGARY— Signed Joret Burgovne. poal- 
le- Assigned Frimk Accel, defenseman, to 
Dusseldari, Germany, and Jorgen Jonssan. 
right wtng, to Rogle. Sweden. Released Dusty 
I moo and Jett Calvert, goo lies 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


CROSSWORD 


T 01>A V$ 


w 


Ipfn-nrs 
on /'««.• 12 


ACROSS 

i Land tor 
development 


B Small narf 

io Observer 

(1992 mission) 


ts 


JAL 

offers 1 direct 
. a week to Os 
from Europe - 
more 

than any other carrier. 



3apaa Airlines 


14 Move like a 
chopper 
is Greek liqueur 
is Wanted G.l. 

17 Gay 

IB Comics canine 
i»— — fide (in bad 
tallh) 

20 Heirloom tool? 

23 Carte start 

24 Run an art show 

25 Red giant, e.g. 

aaTVs- 

Academic" 

31 N.L cap 
monogram 
32Sch(emieJ 
33 Knock for a loop 
35 Casino request 
39 President 
Lincoln’s toots? 

42 Hightail it 

43 Hummer's 
instrument 

44 Month in which 
O.O.E. wasbom 

4B Astronaut 
Grissom 

47 Cornell's Big 

48 Disturb, with 
■up’ 

48 Peloponnesian 
War participant 
92 Antipollution 

grp- 

94 Secret military 

toot? 

98 100 kurus 
so — du Lac. 

WlS. 

•i Puts out 
S3 in a frenzied 
fashion 

84 Former Hawaii 

Senator Hiram 


65 Annual visitor 

66 Kind of (oaf 

67 eyed 

68 Actress 
Georgia 

DOWN 

1 Word ignored in 
indexing 

2 Gossipy Barrett 

3 Admit 

4 Homeol the 
1962 Mets 

5 Park way 

6 Rub. as a 
grounder 

7 Wife of Boaz 

8 Conquer ee of 
1521 

eGoofbali 

10 Class to which 
an of us belong 

11 Look tor 

12 Esther of ‘Good 
Times* 

t3 Dispatch 

21 Attaches 

22 Joint: Prefix 

29 Drenches 

26 1 on the Mohs’ 
scale 

27 Way off 

29 Transported 

30 Until now 

33 Our longest 
bones 

34 Level 

36 Commandment 
starter 

37 Certain ramgear 

38 C.P.R. 
specialists 

40 1945 blast site 

41 Augured 

46 Doesn't tip 










TS- 









24 


29 

30 


57~ 


W 

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vr 

ti 










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© New York Times/ Edit ed 6v B "ill Shorts. 


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Ice- 


WE ALWAYS LOVE YOU... 

NOT ONLY FOR A SONGf 
Do you know a place where there are 
green fields as far a* ihe eye con see' 
Where the or s fresh and cleom 
Where the ocean crashes onto some 
shares and die guff strewn caresses 
others? Where you can waft (or rales 
on natural sandy beaches and nor meet 
■another person’ Where ytv can dimb 
mouniairs. plaf got. hwsende, iwim. 
go deep sea fishing ft rwer fohng. or 
enter an ktsh pub wtd hpen >o rhen 
semnentd songs e «J shake hands Lke 
long be fnends. sounds like poradse? 
Well abnasi. but us better known « 
County Donegd on the Emeudd Ue of 
iefand. We con offer rf types of 
property and tod ut rtht most beautiful 
port ol ihe world Wefcmd a a member 
of ihe EfJ. btf has nor lasnts tiodtions 
and values. Ccuvaci us roday for rf 
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remember, once you contact ui, you 
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Church 5' House. Leherlenny. Co 
Dcregrd, hefand Fa*: 353 74 25551 


SWITZERLAND 




LAKE GENEVA & 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 


Sole to haansa a u6mriin d 
oar ■ padiMy line m 1975 
ceUd KOP6nE5 A CHALETS 
in MONTREUX. VUARS. GSTAAD, 
LE5 DIABLBETS. VBtBIES, 
CRANS-MONTANA etc. I to 5 bed- 
rooms. SFr. 200.000 to 3J mio. 
REVACSJL 

52, MardbriDvil CH-12II Geneva 2 
Tel 4722-734 15 40. Fax 734 12 20 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS EYSHS 

CLARIDGE 

FOR 1 WS( OR MORE l-gh dau 
stuia 2 or Jronr.i apoimems. FULLY 
EQUIPPED. thWtwATE RE5ESYAT10N5 
To); (1)44 13 33 33 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL STATE 
AGENT M PARIS 
Tel: (1) 47.20.30.05 


AG0JCE CHAMPS EYSS 

ipeoatai rn formjhed apartments, 
rndenaal areas. 3 months and more. 

Teb 11) 42 25 32 25 

Fax (l) 45 63 37 09 

CAP1TA1E • PARTNBS 
ffondp<krd qudey apnmneria. 
al sues. Para and suburbs. 

Tel 1-4614 8211. Fax 1-4772 3096 

AMBHCAN LADY seeks sm^e tenon! 
for beouiifd fully equipped stwks. 35 
sqm + large bakony. TROCADSO 
purer, new bwldng, sepaiato Vifchen, 
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Tel 1-47 55 11 09 fear|, or eves) 

IU SAINT LOUIS 35 tq.m. studo + 
30 sa m mecanne. hreplaae. takhen. 
barh.F7.B00 Owner Tel 1-46339623 

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bedrooms, bathroom, batten. Free 
now. Tel 1-4325 7731 or 1 -4016 0172 

16ft. PASSY, 4 bed-ooms. double kv 
mg. 150 sam Sunny, quM. spaosus, 
6m Roar. 07.500. Tel M6 21 32 71. 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 

OIAJBDON UGACHt, dwrmng 3 
rooms, 57 ujm.. 3id how, on garden. 
eievaUx. at comforts. F5.65& net. 
Td III 45 24 43 14 

C80455Y. reudenhal. Amman School 
oi Para bus. Fust claw property, BO 
«JJn. F31.00Q. Ottmung house, 190 
sqm, FMjJOO Tel (1) eg 03 12 30. 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANCE 

FAMILY ACCOMODATION Urgently 
seeting house with mimmum of 5 
beftaams, large garden, cove, etc 
with dose proems io RER m die 
"banieu own' Fa* Pom (33- II 
40687891 

LEGAL SERVICES 

DIVORCE FINAL m 1 day. 

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8695 USA. 

LOW COST FLIGHTS 

WORLD AVIATION SCHHXAED 

FLIGHTS. 1st. business, economy at 
femes* fores, Tet IFT Para (114755)313 

RESTAURANTS & 
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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


Law-Abiding Citizens 


Dewey Redman: Survival by Saxophone 


PEOPLE 


W ASHINGTON — The 
phrase that I heard the 


YY phrase that I beard the 
most during the debate on the 
Senate crime bill was “law- 
abiding citizens,” as in, “Will 
you deprive law-abiding citi- 
zens of their right to bear arms 
under the Second Amend- 
ment?” or “The law-abiding cit- 
izens of my state will not stand 
by if you take 


M- 


t 


their semiauto- 
matic weapons 
away from 
them.” 

I can't speak 
for others, but 
I don't know 
any law-abid- 
ing citizens, ASL 
That doesn’t pl/]|§r 

mean they B nchwaW 
don't exist — 

it's just that I have never met 
them. 

Take Rubbishon. who owns a 
Rapid Dead] .45 semiautomatic 
pistol. He broke all the environ- 
mental laws when he construct- 
ed his house and boasts about 
cheating on his income tax. 

□ 

Charlie Tender is no better. 
He sports a sawed-off Jezebel 
Glockmeister and has an auto- 


graphed photo of Charlton 
Heston on his wall. Charlie 


Heston on his wall. Charlie 
would be a law-abiding citizen 
except that he refuses to sepa- 
rate his bottles from the rest of 
his garbage. 

Instead be pays the refuse 
people S20 so they will look the 
other way. He also owns a bot- 
tling factory that is one of the 
biggest polluters in America. 


Petty crime, you might say, 
but as Arnold Schwarzenegger 
said in “Les Misfcrablcs," “The 
law is the law.” 

Senators who believe that 
their constituents who keep 
firearms in their homes are pro- 
tecting their private property 
are living in a dream world. 

Most of the people killed at 
home are victims of a law-abid- 
ing loved one (or former loved 
one), who keeps a weapon in the 
house. 

Professor Joe Skalet, who has 
been unsuccessfully searching 
for a law-abiding citizen ever 
since he graduated from Stan- 
ford, told me: “If there are any 
law-abiding citizens who own 
guns, they are very careless 
about where they keep them. 
Some time ago a man in No 
Drink, Michigan, hid his semi- 
automatic under the floor, 
sealed it with cement and then 
put a refrigerator over iL 

“In just two days, his 8-year- 
old son found it by moving the 
refrigerator, borrowing a jack- 
hammer and digging up the 
floor. The boy took the gun to 
school and sprayed the entire 
fifth-grade gym class with gun- 
fire.” 

John Dillinger once said, 
'There is no way a law-abiding 
citizen can hide a gun from an 
8-year-old chfld." 


By Mike Zwerin 

Truanaaonal Herald Tribme 


P ARIS — People are always asking 
Dewey Redman: “What do you 


JT Dewey Redman: “What do you 
think about your son?” 

“What do I think about my son?" 


He has a veteran jazzman’s rasp. He 
shook his head: “I love my son. What 


shook his head: “I love my son. What 
kind of question is that?” 

Worse, be sometimes hears this: 
“Are you Joshua Redman's father? 
Didn’t you used to play the saxo- 
phone?” 

The senior Redman is one of the 
most accomplished if not most re- 
warded tenormen around. He is not 
exactly an overachiever. Recently, at 
63, he engaged his first agenL He grins 
and puts it this way: Tm too honest 
to tie; too lazy to work and too ner- 
vous to steaL That kind of limits my 
options.” 

Joshua is the torehbearer of the 
Young Lion generation doing the best 
it can to renew jazz. One of Joshua's 


albums is up for a Grammy this year. 
(Father and son have cut an album 


Ruling on TTiree Graces'* 

The Associated Press 

LEEDS, England — Reject- 
ing arguments by the J. Paul. 
Getty Museum in California, a 
judge has ruled that the govern- 
ment was entitled to give British 
museums more time to raise 
money to buy “The Three 
Graces” by Antonio Canova. 
The Getty Museum, which 
bought the statue for £7.6 mil- 
lion (S11.S million), said it 
would appeal wi thin a week. 


Professor Skald's studies in- 
dicate that law-abiding citizens 
go through as many red lights 
and exceed the speed limit twice 
as much as noorlow-abiding 
members of society. They also 
brag a great deal about break- 
ing the law, except, of course, 
where their guns are concerned. 

In many cases, although they 


will fight to the death to pre- 
serve the Second Amendment. 


serve the Second Amendment, 
which provides them with the 
right to bear arms, they keep 
asking for the Hist Amend- 
ment to be thrown out of court 
on a technicality. 

I mention all this only be- 
cause Tm sick and tired of sena- 
tors referring to their constitu- 
ents as Taw-abiding citizens" 
when they break more laws 
than the rest of us. 


together, “Choices.”) Joshua is in de- 
mand everywhere all the time and you 
never hear a bad word about him. 

“Does his success bother you?" It 
was not easy to ask. A longtime pro- 
fessional about whom it bas been said 
“he doesn't draw" would have to be at 
least sensitive about iL 

“Well, yes and no,” he replied. “It 
might bother me sometime, but it 
doesn’t worry me. Warner Bros, paid 
him a lot of money to sign and they’re 
really poshing him. Which is wonder- 
ful. He’s getting things I never got But 
wherever I play, musicians come 
down to listen to me. That's an honor. 
Musicians name tunes after me — 
'Dewey Circle,’ “Dewey Says,’ ‘Dewey 
Baby.' I have musicians’ honor. And I 
think I'll be successful when I die. 
Then they’ll say: ‘Hey, Dewey sure 
could play.’ ” 

This is a major figure with impres- 
sive credits such as Ornette Coleman. 
Keith Jarrett. Pat Melheny, Michael 
Brecker, Charlie Haden and the popu- 
lar cooperative group Old and New 
Dreams. His phrases are supple and 
incisive, he has his own sound and his 
lyricism prefects a hefty Texan gruff. 
Although extensively recorded in Eu- 
rope — ECM (Germany) and Black 
Saint (Italy) — he has not had a con- 
tract with a U-S. label He once 
worked the phone down the list of 
companies, got nowhere (“the secre- 
taries all knew my voice”) and then 



The next night he went to hear Col- 
trane, who was working in town at the 
Jazz Workshop. He noticed that Col- 
trane had long, beautiful fingers and 
Mien he introduced himself, he said: 
“Mr. Coltrane you have beautiful fin- 


gers." Then he thought, “Oh my God, 
I blew iL Mavbe he’ll take it the wrong 


I blew iL Maybe he’ll take it the wrong 
way." 

“Did you ever see Bird’s fingers?” 
Coltrane said. “They were short and 


stubby.’ 

Redman began: “Mr. Coltrane — " 

“Call me John." 

“Mr. John, can I come over to your 
hotel and talk about music?” 

Redman talked his head off. Col- 
trane, a quiet man, mostly listened. 
Redman asked him questions about 
reeds, fingering and what books he 
practiced from. He thought Trane 
must be getting all of his stuff out of 
books, when be asked about mouth- 
pieces, Trane pulled out a bag from 
under his bed. There must have been 
150 books in there. He dumped them 
on the bed. He liked none of them. It 
was obviously a big problem for him 
but he didn't talk about that either. As 


Redman was leaving, there was only 
one word of advice: “Practice.” 


Depp WiUHay$9 9 767 
For Ruined Hotel Room 

Johnny Depp agreed to pay 
$9,767 to a hotel after be de- 
stroyed his room there, the 
Manhattan district attorney's jg 
office said. The 31 -year-old ac- ■’ 
tcir was released alto waiting 
out the restitution agreement 
with the Mark Hotel EBetin Pe- t 

rez, a policewoman, who re- [ 
sponded to the early morning 5 
call by the hotel, said that as 
Depp was taken to the station 
house he said to another officer ‘ 

about Perez: “I don’t thmkshe 
tikes me. But if she saw meat a 
y paH I bci she would ask mifcfor 
an autograph.” “No, Johnny," 
Perez said she responded “I 
don’t think so.” -W 

□ ; 

In Washington for 
mi ere of his new film, JjQuiz 
Shaw ” Robert Redford told a 
full house at the National Press 
Club that the ratings-at-afreost 
mentality of the ’50s quigshow . 
scandal is not a thing Of the 
pasL It will be that way. Be' said, • 
“as long as we’re under fheiri- 


Redman: “I think 1T1 be successful when I die." 


decided not to record at all. What’s 
wrong with Europe? 

“I’m an American jazz musician.” 

Thanks to his new agenL he is busy 
now although he admits he might be 
getting Joshua's overflow. The story 
leading up to this more or less happy 
ending is a tale about how hard it can 


be to stay true to yourself and get 
beyond cliches, spilt milk and peanut 
butter sandwiches. 

In the late 1950s be was leaching 
fifth grade in a public school in Bas- 
trop, Texas, near Austin. His mother 
worked for the president of the Fort 
Worth Board of Education. He fig- 
ured he was virtually assured of a 
teaching job there. But he had been 
woodshedding and working with 
blues bands on weekends and be did 
not want to be 63 years old and say he 
never tried music. He would go to 
New York, it was a five-year plan. 

Resigning his teaching job. he 
bought a car and drove to Los Ange- 


les. The guys there were cliquish and 
would not even let him jam with them. 
So he drove to San Francisco where 
people were friendlier. It was a good 
place to be in the early 1960s. In his 
mind he was just passing through on 
Ins way to New York. 

Playing it by ear in more ways than 
one, he stayed seven years. He could 
not read music, did not understand 
harmony. An illiterate won’t make it 
in New York and he couldn't afford 
lessons, so he rented a piano and 
taught himself. He devised exercises 
and practiced live in Bop City, a small 
club that was open from 2 A.M. to 6 
A.M. 

One night, after a set, a friend told 
him that John Coltrane had been 
there: “He said you can really play ” 

Redman, who had not had much 
encouragement and absolutely no 
breaks, was astounded: “He' said 
that?!” 


“Practice?!” He knew that already. 
Redman bad hoped to get some se- 
crets. It bit him a couple of days later. 
He laughed in the street. What the 
master had meant was: “Nobody can 
teach you. You have to do it yourself.” 

Something else had been bothering 
him, though, and that night he tossed 
and turned. “What’s wrong?" his lady 
asked. 

“I can't sleep.” 

“Why?” 

“John Coltrane doesn't have an ego. 
All the other name musicians I know, 
they all have egos. Sometimes ego 
translates into confidence, but Mr. 
John has confidence but no ego. How 
come I have an ego and John Coltrane 
doesn’t?” Early in the morning, he 
resolved the problem by deciding to 
stop bra gging , stop telling people how 
“bad” he was. Let people tell mm that. 
Then he went to sleep. 

Finally in New York, one thing led 
to another, not much, not nearly 
enough, at least not until this year, the 
year of Joshua. But he never had to 
drive a taxicab, never waited tables, 
was never on welfare. He sighed as be 
said: “I survived playing jazz music in 
New York City for 26 years. That’s my 
greatest accomplishment. I would like 
that to be remembered." 


flneoce and in the grip~$f the 
merchant mentality that 1 cer- 


mor chan t mentality that 1 cer- 
tainty controls my business A 
and it is a business, it's fitit art” " 
□ ■ 


The Balzan Foundation of 
Zurich has given its 199^C|draes, 
worth 350,000 Swiss franfis each 
($270,000), to Norberto Bobhfo; 
a philoso pher and professtir at ‘ 
Turin University, for hiS pUbt 
carious on the law and science of 
government politics; Re»6 Coo- 
teaux, a professor at the univer- 
sity Pierre et Marie CuriemPar-, 
is, for his research on cell 
structures and their rdarion io 
the nervous tystem, and jointly 
to Fred Hope, of Cambridge 
University, and Martin 
Sc h waizscMd, of the Princeton 
University Observatory, for 
their work on a book, “Structure 
and Evolution of the Stars.” 




ll ears I 


Oprah Winfrey is parting 
ith $3 million to help poor 


with $3 million to help poor 
families get a roof of their own. 
She said the Jane Addams Hull 
House Association in Chicago 
will use her donation to move 
famities from subsidized hous- 
ing to independent living. 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


4 


Europe 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


AJjarv* 

Anrrorann 

Ankara 

Affions 

Brabn 

Belgrade 

Bmm 


Cworfiagen 

CctOCWSol 

Duran 

Eonowgti 


FwMuri 

Gemvn 

Hetw* 

WunCul 

Las Palmas 

LoMn 

London 

Maw 

Ulan 

Lfciieow 

Murwft 

Nee 

0!P 

Palma 

Pare, 

Pngue 

RfV<4MiV 

Rome 

Si Pfimhi] 

SlocWdm 

Swton 

Ttfvsi 

vww» 

Vends 

Wamow 

2urWi 


toft 
Mgh Low 
Of OF 

23/n 17«2 

iE«l 14.OT 
33<9I 1S/M 
33.91 22 'T I 
23.73 16*1 
2904 17.B2 
19166 9/M 

16-69 11162 
28/78 14 1ST 
1B/W U/55 
36.75 73*6 
13/55 JOS 
14/57 9/48 

22-71 11/52 
20*8 10/50 
14.67 SMS 
IB/61 12/53 
33*9 19*6 

28.52 21/70 
21/70 17*2 

15.53 11*52 

2S/77 13-55 
18*6 13/55 
22.71 15-59 
16*1 0/48 

21-70 1X55 
18*1 11-52 
23.73 17*3 
15.5R 9/48 
19.56 9/48 
12/53 5/41 

23 73 12.53 
1968 14.57 
16*1 12/53 
14-67 8/46 

16-51 13-55 
23/73 16/61 | 
25.77 1355 
26 79 11/52 | 
18*1 10.50 1 


T oday Tomorrow 

Mgh Low W High Low W 
OF OF C/F C/P 




Bsndek 
B*ng 
Hong Kong 
Manaa 
Mew De« 
Seed 

Singapore 

Trap# 

Tokyo 


SATURDAY 



SUNDAY 


M tmcMa and data prowftM 
byAnwWaati^.lnoB 1994 


Jetstream 


I Unaeasonafy 
Cow 


North America 

Warm weather in Ihe Mid- 
west Friday wtB be Mowed 
by Ihutderstorms and coaler 
weather over Hie weekend. 
Wa5hln£on. D.C.. to Boston 
anil bask in Sumner warmth 
this weekend. Showers end 
thunderstorms will be 
widespread along the Gulf 
Coast Friday kilo Ihe week- 
end. 


Europe 

Thunderstorms will bring 
scattered reins from Istanbul 
to Kiev Friday. Dry. cooler 
weather wffl Mow Ms week- 


Shanghel will be dry and 
pleasant this weekend. Bet- 


Alga* 
Cana Town 


and. The Alps wfl be windy 
and cold this weekend with 


and cold this weekend with 
snow over Ihe higher pass- 
es. Hamburg through Gene- 
va will have windy, cool 
weather this weekend with 
clouds giving way to sun. 


pleasant this weekend. Bat- 
ing wtt turn windy and cool- 
er with a few showers Fri- 
day. Japan will be humid 
with widespread rains this 
weekend. Parts of southern 
Japan will hava flooding 
rains and mudsMea. Manila 
and Hong Kong wifi be warm 
wsh showers at Manila. 


26/79 19/68 1 27*0 Zn/TO pc 
22/71 12/53 9 22/71 8/46 pc 

26/79 18/61 9 28/79 18*4 pc 
22-71 10/50 PC 22/71 11/52 pc 
28*2 24/73 l 29*4 24/75 ill 
23/73 9«8 PC 24/75 H/52 PC 

31*8 21/70 pc 31/88 19/85 1 


North America 


Middle East 


Latin America 


„ Toepy Tomorrow 

Hgh Low W Mgh Lew W 
OF C/F OF W 
32*9 25/77 S 33*1 24/75 * 


33/91 23/73 s 35*6 21/70 * 
31*6 18*4 « 35*5 18*4 a 


Oceania 


28*2 19*8 « 31*8 19*8 ■ 
39/10121/70 ■ 39/10219*6 ■ 


16-51 9MB sn 16*1 9/48 pc 

r0 E8 9MB 5 21. TO 12*3 pc 


38/10025/77 s 38/10024/75 S 


Today 
Mgh Low 
OF OF 
Buenos Ahes 17/62 EL48 
Caracas 26*2 20*8 
Urea 18*4 16*1 

UnfcoOty 24-75 13*5 

nodAtonafeo 30*6 20*8 
Smogs 23/73 7/44 


Legend: s-pitny, ps-parOy doudy. odoudy. ab-sbowera. i-mundoraorm s . rim 
sn-www. nee. W-Weadw AO maps, forecasts and data provided by Accu-’ 


W Mgh Low W 
OF OF 

1 pc 17/62 6*3 pc 
I pc 38*2 20*8 pe 
I pc 18/04 16*9 c 
i pc 24/75 13/55 I 
I PC 25/77 19*8 Sh 
l pc 20*8 9*8 pe 

.sl-raxw femes. 
■Weather, hie. © 1904 


And usage 
Aflana 
Borax 
Cracago 

Damns- 

DeMd 

HenWAj 

Mourann 

Los AcgMa 

Miami 

Mhnaspous 


Sh 13/55 4/39 * 
pc 31*8 21/70 PC 
S ZJ73 15*6 pc 
PC 27*0 13-55 I 
pc 21/70 B/4f. s 

pc 30*6 14.-57 J 
pe 31*8 25/77 pc 
pc 30*6 19*6 ( 

% 32/83 18*4 * 

I 31*8 24/75 Sh 
I 21/70 14*7 r 
pc 21/70 11/52 pc 
PC 32*9 26.77 pc 
pc 27*0 18*4 pc 
S 36/100 25/77 i 
9 25/77 14/57 s 
C 22/71 12/53 PC 
c 28/79 14/57 sh 
pc 31.88 20 *8 pc 


Europe end Middle East 







Location 

Weather 

High 

Low 

Water 

Wave 

Wind 



Temp. 

Temp. 

Temp. 

Heights 

Speed 



C/F 

OF 

OF 

(Metres) 

(kph) 

Cannes 

partly sunny 

25177 

16/61 

23/73 

1-2 

MW 

20-35 

Deauvile 

clouds and sun 

16/61 

9/46 

15/58 

2-1 

W 

40-70 

RmJrt 

douds and sun 

27/80 

19/68 

25/77 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Malaga 

simny 

28182 

18/64 

23/73 

0-1 

N 

8-16 

Cagkan 

partly sunny 

28182 

22/71 

23(73 

0-1 

NW 

15-30 

Faro 

sunny 

24/75 

15/59 

20/66 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Piraeus 

clouds and 9un 

30186 

21/70 

23m 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Corfu 

ckmdsand sun 

30/86 

21/70 

23(73 

0-1 

NW 

1530 

Brighton 

showers 

16/61 

8/46 

15/59 

2-3 

W 

40-70 

Ostend 

showers 

16/61 

12/53 

15/59 

1-3 

W 

30-60 

Scrievenlngan 

showers 

17/62 

12/53 

15/59 

1-3 

W 

30-60 

Sy» 

ran 

1066 

12/53 

14/57 

2-1 

W 

35-70 

Izmir 

showers 

28/82 

19/66 

24/75 

1-2 

W 

15-30 

Tel Avw 

sunny 

31/86 

25/77 

28/82 

0-1 

w 

10-20 

Caribbean and West Atlantic 







Bartwdos 

showers 

31.BB 

24/75 

2082 

1-2 

E 

25-50 

Kaigston 

thunderstorms 

31/88 

23/73 

27/80 

2-4 

SE 

40-70 

Sl Thomas 

showers 

32/83 

24/75 

28/82 

1-2 

SE 

25-45 

Hamilton 

party swrty 

35/M 

23/73 

27/80 

1-2 

NE 

20-35 

AslafPadflc 








Penang 

partly sunny 

ai.'ss 

25/77 

29/84 

0-1 

sw 

10-20 

Phuket 

thunderstorms 

31/88 

25/77 

29/Bd 

0-1 

sw 

15-25 

BaTi 

partly sunny 

32»i 

24/75 

Z3.H4 

0-1 

sw 

12-25 

Cebu 

thunderstorms 

30/86 

23/73 

30/86 

0-1 

SE 

15-30 

Palm Beach. Aus 

sunny 

24/75 

nw 

ia<66 

1-2 

w 

15-30 

Bay of Islands. NZ 

rain 

18/64 

10/50 

16/81 

1-2 

NW 

20-40 

Shirahama 

showere 

27/80 

24/75 

27/BO 

1-2 

SE 

20-40 

Honolulu 

partly simny 

31/88 

24/75 

27/80 

1-2 

ENE 

20-40 


Europe and Middle East 


Location 

Weather 

High 

Low 

Water 

Wave 

Wind 



Temp. 

Temp. 

Temp. 

Height! 

Speed 



C/F 

C/F 

CIF 

(Matrae) 

(kph) 

Cannes 

sunny 

28/79 

15/59 

22/71 

1-2 

W 

18-35 

Deauvile 

douds and sun 

17/62 

10/50 

15/59 

2-3 

W 

30-60 

Rimini 

sunny 

28/82 

18/64 

24/75 

0-1 

NW 

8-18 

Malaga 

stamy 

29/84 

20/88. 

24/75 

0-1 

N 

10-20 

Cagfcari 

sunny 

29/84 

22/71 

24/75 

0-1 

NW 

12-25 

Faro 

partly sunny 

24/75 

16/BI 

19/68 

0-1 

W 

12-22 

Piraeus 

sunny 

31/88 

23/73 

24/75 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Corfu 

Bunny 

30/B8 

22/71 

24/75 

0-1 

NW 

12-22 

Brighton 

clouds and sun 

17/82 

9/48 

15/59 

2-3 

NW 

40-60 

Ostend 

ctoudy 

17/82 

71/52 

14/57 

2-4 

W 

30-60 

Scheuaningon 

doudy 

17/62 

11/52 

14/57 

2-4 

sw 

30-60 

Syfl 

cloudy 

17/82 

9/48 

14/57 

2-4 

SW 

35-70 

tonir 

party sunny 

29/84 

20/68 

24/75 

1-2 

NW 

18-35 

Tel Aviv 

sully 

32/89 

25/77 

28/82 

0-1 

NE 

12-22 

Caribbean and West Atlantic 







Bartudos 

partly sunny 

32m 

24/75 

2B/B2 

1-2 

SE 

20-40 

Kingston 

thtfiderstomis 

30/86 

23/73 

27/80 

3-5 

SE 

50-80 

SLmomas 

thunderstorms 

32/89 

24/75 

28/82 

1-2 

E 

20-40 

Ha/nHon 

pan iy sunny 

32/89 

24/75 

28/82 

0-1 

SE 

15-30 

Asta/PacWc 








Penang 

thmderstwms 

32*9 

24/75 

29/84 

0-1 

SW 

10-20 

Phuket 

douds and aun 

32/89 

25/77 

29/B4 

0-1 

SW 

15-30 

Bali 

party simny 

31/88 

24(75 

29/84 

0-1 

sw 

15-30 

Cebu 

showers 

31/88 

23/73 

30/86 

0-1 

sw 

15-25 

Palm Beach. Aus. 

douds and sun 

21/70 

12/53 

18/64 

1-2 

sw 

20-40 

Bay of Islands. NZ 

showers 

17/62 

9/48 

1 5/59 

1-2 

sw 

20-40 

Shirahama 

showera 

28/79 

2 3/73 

27/80 

1-2 

E 

20-35 

Honolulu 

party sunny 

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Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


AJKT Access Numbers. 

How to call around the world. 

1 . U«ing the chjrt below, find the country you are calling from. 

2. nialibecr'm»ponding.4LlJ£r Access Number. 

3. An AB.T English-speaking Operator or voice pn.impt will ask for the phone number you wish to call or connect you to a 
cust.-imer service representative. 

To receive your free wallet card of ADETs Access Numbers, just dial theaccessnumberof 
the country you're in and ask for Customer Service, 


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j ftfWLS 1 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


Australia 
China. PRCw 

Guam 

Hoog Kong 

India* 

Indonesia# 

Japan - 

Korea 

Korea** 

Malaysia’ 

New Zealand 
Phllippines - 
Saipam’ 

Singapore 

Sn Lanka 

Taiwan' 

Thailand# 


1-800-881-011 Liechtenstein - 

10811 Lithuania# 


172-1011 BrezO 
155-00-11 Chile 
8*196 Colombia 


018-872 Luxembourg 0-8)0-0111 Costa Rica - * 

800-1111 Macedonia, F.YJL of 9^800-4288 Ecuador* 


000-117 Malta* 
001-801-10 Monaco* 


0800^90-110 El Salvador* 
19* -OOI I Guaietrala* 


EUROPE 


cetasgc arct j Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 

reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
83.L language, since it's translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 im. knowing they] 1 get the message in 

^ your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with XRSC 1 

. ■. To use these services, dial the ART Access Number of the country you’re in and you'll get all the 

help you need. With these Access Numbers and your AIST Calling Card, international calling lias never been easier. 

Tf you don't have an AIKT Calling Card or you’d like more information on AES T global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your righL 


83. L 


Armenia** 

Austria**** 

Belgium* 

Bulgaria 

Croatia*# 

Czech Rep 

Denmark* 

Finland* 

France 

Germany 

G r eece * 

Hungary* 

ledand'w 

Ireland 


0059- HI Netherlands* 06 

009-11 Norway 8 

11* Poland*#** 0*010 

800-0011 Portugal* 05 

000-Qll Romania 01 

105-11 Russia**(Mo6COw) 

235*2872 Slovakia 00- 

80Q-0111-H1 Spain# ftp 

130-430 Sweden* 02 

0080-10288-0 Switzerland* 

Oaio-991-1111 U.K. 050 

\ Ukraine* 

8*14111 MIDDLE EAST 


06-022-9111 Guyana*** 
800-190-11 Honduras** 


0*010-480-0111 Mexico*** 9 

05017-1-288 Nicaragua (Managua) 
01-8004288 Panama* 

155-5042 Pern* 

00420-00101 Suriname 

nrXMW./10-n Uruguay 

020-795^11 Venezuela** 


0008010 

004,-0312 

98011-0010 

124 

119 

1O0 

190 

165 

123 

95-800-462-4240 

|) 174 

109 

191 

156 

QU-0430 

80011-120 


8*14111 MIDDLE EAST Brttfahl 

022-903-011 Bahrain 800-001 Caymar 

( etn - ioo-io Cyprus* OBPOQOIO Grenad 

Oi> 1800-00 10 Israel 177-100-27Z7 Haiti* 

9P-3P0011 Ktm-ait 800- 288 Jamaica 

00***Pflfr»>i Lebanon (Beirut) 426-801 Neth. a 

^X* 1 - 00 ™ Qatar QKQ0-011-77 St Kitts; 

9800-100-10 Saudi Arabia 1-fiOO-IO 

- Wa-OOH Turkey ~ 00-800-12277 Egypt* 

0130-0010 UAE* ftXMzT Gabon" 

<*>*00-1311 AMERICAS ~~ gjjgbjj 

00*-800-011I1 Argentina# 001-800-200- 11 II Kenya* 

W-Q'ri Belize* 555 Ubertoi 


1554)0-11 CA RIBBEAN 

0500-89-0011 Bahamas 18 00872 -^ 1 

B*^°0-11 Bermuda* 1-800-872- 2381 

^ British VI. ! -800-872-2881 

BOO-QOl Cayman Islands 1-800-872-2881 

080-90010 Grenada* 1-800-872-2881 

177-100-2727 Haig* 0 01-800-972-2883 

800-288 Jamaica** O-SQ0-g72-2881 

426-801 Ncfli.AatiI 001-800*872-2881 

QHflfl’QU-T? St Kitts/Nevfci 1-800-872-2881 

AFRICA 

» 510-0200 

00*401 

ooni 

QHUQ-10 

797-797 
0-800-99-0123 


00-800-122 // Egypt* (Cairo) 
800-121 Gabon* 


Gambia* 


1110800 1-800-550-000 Bolivia* Q8W-U 12 South Africa 


AT&T 





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