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INTERNATIONAL 



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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 



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Paris, Friday, September 16, 1994 


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No. 34,695 


‘Leave Now,’ Clinton 
Warns Haiti Leaders, 
‘Or We’ll Force You’ 

Td Rather Die, Reserve Call-Up 
Cedras Affirms Is Authorized 


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US. Navy and Army personnel waiting on the deck of the aircraft carrier Eisenhower at Norfolk Naval Base In Virginia as they prepared to departfor Haiti. 


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40 Years Later , Russia Recalls ‘Barbaric’ A- Test 


PM 


By Fred Hiatt 

Washington Pan Service 

TOTSK, Russia — Forty years ago 
this week, a Soviet warplane bombed tms 
area in the southern Urals with an atom- 
ic weapon more powerful than the one 
that h»d flattened Hiro shima 

Nikolai Levon ov, who had been evac- 
uated from his fanning village a few 
miles from the center of the target zone, 
returned the next day to find his house 
flattened and his tomatoes turned from 
green to red. Mr. Levonov, now 68, set 
about rebuilding his house. He also ate 
the tomatoes. 

The nuclear explosion of Sept. 14, 
1934, was intended to test whether sol- 
diers could fight in conditions of nuclear 
war, a Russian Army colonel, Alexander 


Vasiakin, 39, explained during a recent 
tour of the site. About 44,000 Soviet 
troops were deployed in 225 kilometers 
(140 miles) of trenches that had been dug 
for the test Within minutes of the 9:33 
AM. explosion, they were ordered into 
the atomic inferno. 

After the test. Colonel Vari aldn re- 
counted, the soldiers were told to wash, 
but there was not enough water to go 
around. They were also encouraged to 
destroy their clothing, but many refused 
to give up the leather belts they had been 
given for the occasion. Many may have 
died as a result, he said. 

The Soviet leadership — including 
Marshal Georgi K. Zhukov, who 
watched from an observation tower to 
the south with defense ministers from 


China, Poland and Yugoslavia — con- 
cluded that soldiers could, in fact, fight 
through a nuclear battle. 

“They had a list of 100 cities which the 
Americans were preparing to hit with 
three bombs each,” Colonel Vasiakin 
said. “Naturally, we were preparing for 
this.*’ 

Early in the atomic era and at the 
height of the Cold War, both the United 
States and the Soviet Union put service- 
men and civilians in nuclear harm's way. 
and both governments were reluctant to 
acknowledge the consequences or com- 
pensate the victims afterward. In Russia, 
totalitarian secrecy and people's fear of 
speaking out kept the Totsk test entirely 
hidden until just a few years ago. 

Last week. Defense Minister Pave! S. 


Grachev, visiting the Totsk testing range 
to inspect the first U.S.-Russian joint 
exercises here, condemned the test as 
“barbaric” and “monstrous.” But even 
so, a 74-year-old survivor, who has suf- 
fered from skin cancer and other diseases 
she attributes to the blast, refused to give 
her name. 

“1 had to swear an oath that I would 
never discuss it, for the rest of my life ” 
she said. 

Because the Soviets apparently con- 
ducted no comprehensive medical stud- 
ies, it is impossible to say how many 
soldiers and civilians died because of 
exposure to radioactivity. Regional offi- 
cials recently reported that the incidence 

See TEST, Page 4 


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Settler Arrests Raise Specter of Jewish Terrorist Network 


By Clyde Haberman 

Near York Tines Service 

KIRYAT ARBA, Israeli-Occupied 
West Bank — Although they are skimpy 
with details, the Israeli authorities suggest 
that a terrorist network of rabidly anti- 
Arab Jews has sprouted, with roots in this 
militant settlement on the outskirts of He- 
bron. 

Eight or nine men have been arrested in 
recent days, including two young army 
officers, and government officials say that 
some were caught “at the last minute" as 
they were about to go out and kill Palestin- 
ians. 

In Kiiyat Arba, home to most of the 


, residents wave off the allegations 
asdess, calling them part of a cam- 
paign by the Labor-led government to de- 
legitimize all settlers in the West Bank and 
Giza Strip and to depict them as wild-eyed 
radicals out to block peace with the Arabs. 

If anything, they say, the real victims are 
the arrested men. Some, they insist, were 
hooded, beaten and otherwise tortured in 
rat-infested cells by security agents, 
charges found to be baseless by a special 
investigator from the attorney general’s 
office. 

Whatever the suspects’ physical condi- 
tion, there is no question that they are not 
being allowed to see their lawyers. 


It is a familiar practice in Israel, de- 
fended by the security service known as 
Shin Bet as essential to keeping sensitive 
investigations from being compromised. 
But it has produced charges from both 
settler leaders and Israeli civil-rights 
groups — not usually political bedfellows 
— that the government is trampling dan- 
gerously on human rights. 

The case has touched several basic issues 
for Israelis, especially for settlers in the 
territories who feel alienated from a cen- 
tral government denounced by the more 
militant among them as a bigger enemy 
than the Arabs. 

Allegations of Shin Bet torture are hard- 


ly new, having filled countless human 
rights reports, here and abroad. What is 
new is that some of the same political 
figures who used to dismiss Lbose charges 
when the supposed victims were Palestin- 
ians are protesting now that the targets are 
fellow Israelis. 

The arrests also raise questions about 
the possible rise of a new “Jewish under- 
ground,” armed radicals intent on killing 
Arabs as a counterpoint to Palestinian 
extremists who have murdered Jews in 
growing numbers despite the peace agree- 
ment signed a year ago by Israel and the 

See ISRAEL, Page 4 


Conpiled by Our Staff From Daptudtes 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Raid's 
military rulers stood their ground on 
Thursday and refused to yield power de- 
spite President Bill Clinton's warning of an 
impending invasion and the appearance of 
a U.S. fleet offshore. 

“I would rather die, and if 1 die in the 
next few hours or next few days, that 
would be better than leaving my country in 
dishonor and leaving my children with a 
dishonorable name,” said Lieutenant Gen- 
eral Raoul C6dia$, the Haitian military 
leader. 

But President Clinton has said that 
United States has a moral obligation to 
intervene to halt human rights abuses in 
Haiti, which he said had become a killing 
field under the Cedras government. 

Two more U.S. warships steamed into 
Port-au-Prince harbor on Thursday. The 
capital was calm despite a report by the 
president of the Haitian Senate, Bernard 
Sandaricq, of “panic on the streets.” 

People went about their affairs, al- 
though some gathered at the dock to gaze 
at the U.S. warships off the coosl 

The Pentagon activated 1.600 reservists. 
Defense Secretary William J. Perry said 
those called up mcluded military police 
and medical personnel. 

“I hope the invasion will not be neces- 
sary,” Mr. Perry said. “I hope that simply 
the preparations for the invasion will focus 
the attention, will focus the thinking of the 
military regime there on what the clear 
altema'tives are." 

A total of 5,800 U.S. Army and Marine 
troops were deployed aboard ships off the 
Haitian coast on Thursday or were due to 
arrive by Sunday. At least 1 8 U.S. warships 
were on station or en route and another 14 
cargo ships were bring loaded with t ank*; 
and other military equipment at U.S. 
ports. 

General C6dras predicted that a civil 
war would follow any invasion. 

In a CBS News interview, he said that he 
believed the ousted president, the Rever- 
end Jean-Bertrand Aristide, was anti- 
American and a demagogue and that Pres- 
ident Clinton had bom misinformed. 

“I'm not interested in any buyout,” 
General C6dras said. “I'm not interested in 
any comfortable life in exile. I am very 
interested in the future of Haiti, the future 
of democratic institutions in Haiti." 

The New York Times, quoting senior 
U.S. officials, said Mr. Clinton had autho- 
rized efforts to persuade General C6dras 
and two other leaders of the September 
1991 coup to step down by offering them a 
“golden” exile. 

“Whatever happens to me,” General C£- 
dras said, “if there’s a U.S. invasion, 
there's going to be a long, extended civil 
war and bloodbath.” 

Mr. Sansaricq, a friend of the govem- 

See HAITI, Page 4 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — In a final warning 
before an American military invasion. 
President Bill Clinton bluntly told Haiti’s 
military leaders Thursday night: “Your 
time i5 up. Leave now or we will force you 
from power." 

Building his case for an invasion against 
a chorus of opposition, Mr. Clinton issued 
his warning in a speech prepared for deliv- 
ery from the Oval Office. 

In Washington and in the Caribbean, 
every sign pointed to an imminent inva- 
sion’ Twenty American warships ominous- 
ly shadowed Haiti's coast, and two troop- 
laden aircraft carriers were on the way. 
expected to be on station by the weekend 

Mr. Clinton signed an executive order 
authorizing the callup of 1,600 reservists to 
support the 20,000-person invasion force. 

In his remarks — excerpts of which were 
released in advance — Mr. Clinton sought 
to explain why American lives should be 
risked to restore the deposed Haitian presi- 
dent, the Reverend Jean-Bertrand Aris- 
tide, after three years in exile. Mr. Clinton 
said there were widespread human rights 
abuses under the military regime, threaten- 
ing to provoke another outpouring of refu- 
gees. 

He said Father Aristide had pledged to 
step down when his term expires in Febru- 
ary 19%. 

Douglas Jehl of The New York Times 
reported earlier from Washington: 

Aides to Mr. Clinton said he recognized 
that his address Thursday night might not 
change many minds about an invasion 
that, according to polls, two-thirds of the 
American public regards as unwise. 

But he has decided that his 20-month 
standoff with Haiti's junta must not con- 
tinue, they said. He hoped the majesty of 
his office would persuade the junta that he 
means what he says and would persuade 
Congress not to stand in the way. 

The administration apparently failed to 
anticipate the degree to which the liberal 
Democrats who were the most vocal pro- 
ponents of an invasion would remain at 
odds with mainstream Democrats as well 
as Republicans. And officials said they 
had underestimated the opposition from 
groups like the American Legion. 

“Could more have been done to condi- 
tion the public?" a senior administration 
official asked. “Yes, but we were also 
heavily involved in health care and crime 
and Cuba and a lot of other issues. Now we 
have a clear field of vision." 

Mr. Clinton’s aides remain skeptical 
that anything short of force can push the 
Haitian leaders from power, But as the 
White House stepped up the tempo of its 
warnings, saying the time for the junta was 

See CLINTON, Page 4 


Influx of Chinese Workers 
Heightens Tension in Tibet 


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By Lena H. Sun 

Washington Pan Service 

LHASA, Tibet — Tibet's largest cov- 
ered mark et is crammed with a. wealth of 
v£* goods imimagiwaMe a decade ago. There 
.< >' are pigs’ feet, frozen ducks and fresh vege- 
tables galore: piles of sleek eggplant, 
,- gleaming nhfli peppers and thick bunches 
of Chinese string oeans. 

As shoppers make their purchases, one 
thing is st riking . All of the vendors are 
ethnic Chinese. The only Tibetan among 
them is an old woman, bent double, stuff- 
ing discarded turnip peelings into a hemp 
bag to feed her cows. 

For Tibetans in this Himalayan region, 
the peddng order at the market is the 
result of an economic invasion by Chinese 
entrepreneurs. But while their presence has 
iL boosted commerce, it has soured race rela- 
tions. 

_ The resentment and bitterness sparked 
by the arrival or the Chinese traders repre- 
sent a rise in the ethnic tensions that have 
>* troubled Tibet since its annexation by Chi- 
, ' 1 • na 44 years ago. . ; 

- ff Oiinese authorities are perceived as 
not taking this seriously, they could be in 
for some serious trouble,” a Western ana- 
' lyst said. “People could start to do some 
nasty things.” , . . 

• The foot soldiers of the invasion are 
- >’ restaurateurs from Sichuan, cabinetmak- 
’ • ers from Zfaqiang, even pickled-cabbage 
vendors from distant Liaoning. 

... Tibetans say the latest arrivals are tak- 


ing the best jobs and forcing unemployed 
youth to turn to crime. The animosity by 
the Tibetans, in turn, is making longtime 
Chinese residents feel more bitter and frus- 
trated. 

Unlike the newcomers, many of these 
settled Chinese residents never wanted to 
be in Tibet The Chinese government 
forced them, decades ago, to work in the 
government and serve in the army in order 
to consolidate Beijing's rule. 

The friction is driving the two groups 
further apart at a time when cooperation 
between than is critical if Tibet, for centu- 
ries ruled by a theocracy of Buddhist no- 
bles and monks, does not want to fall even 
more behind the rest of China, officials 
say. 

“Relations in general are tense ri^ht now 
because of job resentment,” said one 
young Tibetan intellectual. “Just look any- 
where on the street. The Chinese take all 
the construction jobs. All the shoemakers 
you see on the sidewalk are from Zhe- 
jiang,” a province on China's eastern 
coast. 

Some Chinese say Tibetans have reacted 
by becoming prouder, more sensitive and 
fiercer about their traditions. And that has 
them scared. 

A Chinese bureaucrat who has worked 
here for nearly 20 years and has many 
Tibetan friends said he was glad there were 
so many Chinese soldiers around. “The 

See TIBET, Page 5 


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Newsstand Prices 


Andorra. — 9.00 FF 

Antilles 11-20 FF 

Cameroon. .1 .400 CFA 

Egypt E.P.5000 

France 9.00 FF 

Gat>on,„....9«0CFA- 

Greece 300 Dr. 

Italy JW00 Lire 

Ivory Coast . 1.120 CFA 

Jordan JD 

Lebanon ...USS1.50 


Luxembourg 60 L Fr 

Morocco 12 Dh 

Qatar 8.00 Rials 

RfeunSon.. f .11^0FF 
Saudi Arabia.. 9.00 R. 
Senegal .....960 CFA 

Spain .200 PTAS 

Tunisia ....1.000 Din 
Turkey ..T.L. 35.000 

U.A.E. 830 Dirh 

U.S. Mil. (EUT.) S1.10 




On Monday 


The IHTs restaurant critic. 
r ^ Patricia Weils, resumes her 
search far the world’s 10 best restaurants. 
After visiting Hoag Kong, Tttkyo. the United 
States. France, the Benelux countries. Spain. 
Britain and Switzerland, she reports on 
Germany's top restaurants, and also on 
more casual dining establishments. 


Kiosk 


Last U.S. Envoys 
Leave Mogadishu 

MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP) — 
Fearful of deteriorating security and per- 
sistent clan fighting, the last U.S. diplo- 
mats in So mali a lowered the Hag at their 
compound on Thursday and began leav- 
ing the country. 

Marine guards turned over security to 
United Nations troops and left Thursday 
morning for Mombasa. Kenya, said a 
U.S. diplomat. All the U.S. diplomats at 
the liaison office in Mogadishu, includ- 
ing the ambassador, Daniel Simpson, 
were to arrive in Nairobi by the end of 
the day, said a U.5. diplomat in Nairobi. 

Washington announced last month 
that it would withdraw the last 80 U.S. 
diplomats and Marines in Somalia by 
Sept. 15 because of security concerns and 
the failure of Somali clan leaders to make 
progress toward peace. 

Gtnml Nows 

UN peacekeepers retimed fire as fight- 
ing escalated in Bosnia. Page 2. 

An Ohio lawyer wants wants to change 
his TV image for politics. Page 3. 

Lofsuro 

Trekking the MacLehose Trail high 
above Hong Kong. Page 8. 


Book Review Page 8. 

Bridge Page 8. 

Crossword Page 19. 


Up 

58.55 

3953.88 


The Dollar 

NenrofK. 


Thura. cta6* 


Trib Index 


Up 
0.30% 

11 6.53 

- ....... 'i; 

vnvfous dora 


DU 


1.5493 


1.5417 


Pound 


1.562 


1.566 


Yen 


99.45 


99 20 


FF 


5.2915 


5.2735 



Manin Kccar'Agefk.* Fr*mvPro*c 

AN ANNIVERSARY — The British veterans John Hayward, left, and Jack 
Hobbs walkuig in a cemetery near Arnhem, the Netherlands, Thursday. 
Ninety World War n veterans are to parachute into the town this weekend. 


Europe Faults 
Indecisiveness 
On Invasion 

By William Drozdiak 

Washington Pan Santee 

PARIS — President Bill Clinton's han- 
dling of the Haiti crisis has come to be 
perceived by the European allies and oth- 
ers as further proof of chronic indecisive- 
ness, a malady that continues to under- 
mine faith in his leadership. 

The persistent efforts to coax, cajole and 
intimidate Haiti’s military rulers into leav- 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


ing the country ahead of an American-led 
invasion have been depicted by the Clin- 
ton administration as a display of patience 
and self-restraint. 

But in inany European capitals, the 
hand-wringing ahead of the most widely 
advertised intervention in American histo- 
ry — ■ one that has received nearly unani- 
mous blessing from the United Nations — 
has confirmed suspicions about growing 
U.$. discomfort about dispatching its sol- 
diers into battle in the post-Cold War era. 

_ European diplomats and military spe- 
cialists say American fears about suffering 
casualties in such a lopsided military 
match reflect the Democratic administra- 
tion’s deep ambivalence about using force. 
As seen in the crises over Bosnia, So malia 
and Rwanda, the all-volunteer army that 
performed so effectively in the Gulf War 
has consistently been withheld from com- 
bat. 

The success of the Gulf War, these offi- 
cials say, may have set a standard that has 
left American politicians almost paralyzed 
by anxiety about the electoral fallout from 
casualties. 

General Philippe MoriUon, the French 
general who headed UN forces in the for- 
mer Yugoslavia, believes this syndrome 
may erode American will to intervene 
abroad in the future since its political and 
military leaders may refuse to engage in 

See EUROPE, Page 4 









Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1994 


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Kohl Sees Bosnian Serbs Dismiss Peace Plan Deadline 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Recovery 
In East 


But Opposition 
Disputes View 


opinion polls, but doubts about 
the performance of his liberal 


the performance of his liberal 
Free Democratic coalition part- 
ners mean he cannot be sure of 
retaining a working majority. 

Two leading members of the 
Social Democrats' shadow cabi- 
net, Gerhard SchrOdcr and 
Wolfgang Thierse, said eco- 
nomic growth in the East 
looked strong only because it 
had started from an absolute 


low point when industry virtu- 
ally collapsed after unification. 


In other developments: 

• The former German chan- 
cellor Helmut Schmidt, at the 
last campaign rally of his long 
political career, urged voters to 


support Mr. Scharping a gains t 

“There always has to be an 
end,*’ Mr. Schmidt said 
Wednesday night at a rally in 
his home town of Hamburg 
when he announced his deci- 
sion. He said he would be 76 
just before Christmas and that 
it was time to bow out 

Mr. Schmidt became chan- 
cellor in 1974. He governed un- 
til 1982. 


• The Social Democrats said 
Thursday that the general elec- 
tion was now a completely open 
race after two state votes con- 
firmed die decline of the Free 
Democrats. 

Their campaign manager, 
GOntcr Verheugen, said that 
the Free Democrats might not 
win any seats in the October 
election. 

Fifty-seven percent of voters 
told pollsters they wanted a 
change in Bonn, be said, while 
the large number of those unde- 
cided — 30 percent of the elec- 
torate — meant the Social 
Democrats had a good chance 
to win over floating voters. 


ConpUed by Our Staff From Dbpatdta 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia- Heizego vin a — 
Bosnian Serbs, emboldened by a rift 
among major powers, said Thursday 
they would defy a U.S. deadline for 
acceptance of a peace plan despite a 
threat to arm their Muslim foes. 

Momcilo Krajisnik, a hard-line mem- 
ber of the Bosnian Serbian leadership. 


said the plan proposed by major powers 
would be ignored until it was redrafted 
to take account of their objections. 

The United States has said it will push 
to lift the United Nations embargo on 
the Muslim-led Bosnian government if 
the the plan is not aocepted by Oct. IS. 

The rejection by the Bosnian Serbs of 
the proposal, which would require them 
to relinquish some of the territory they 
have conquered to a federation of Mus- 
lims and Croats, has left them isolated 
and under a military blockade by their 
former Yugoslav allies. 


Reuters 

BONN — Chancellor Hel- 
mut Kohl claimed credit on 
Thursday for economic recov- 
ery in Eastern Germany, which 
he said had turned the former 
Communist region into the fast- 
est growing area in Europe. 

But the opposition Social 
Democrats, who hope to defeat 
Mr. Kohl in an election on Oct. 
16. accused him of “resounding 
complacency** and said the re- 
alities in the East were mass 
unemployment and industrial 
decline. 

Speaking at a meeting with 
business leaders and unions on 
the East German economy. Mr. 
Kohl said that between unifica- 
tion in October 1990 and the 
end of 1994, Western Germany 
would have pumped nearly 500 
billion marks ($325 billion) into 
the region. 

Real economic growth in the 
east was nearly 9 percent in the 
first half of this year. 

“East Germany is at present 
the strongest growth region in 
Europe,” Mr. Kohl said. “We 
have achieved a lot since Octo- 
ber 1990. although much re- 
mains to be done." 

The chancellor, who was ridi- 
culed by the opposition for pre- 
dicting in the 1990 election that 
Eastern Germany would soon 
be a “flourishing landscape," 
used the same phrase again. 

“People in astern Germany 
fed more dearly every day that 
unification has been a success 
economically and socially," he 
said. “The flourishing land- 
scape is emerging." 

Mr. Kohl, leader of the 
Christian Democrats, is well 
ahead of Rudolf Scharping, the 
Social Democratic leader, in 


But they are keenly aware of divisions 
over the aims embargo between the U.S. 
government and its main allies. 

“Wc will not give up our demand for 
the correction of the map. because it 
divides the Bosnian Serbian republic 
into three parts and gives 20 town&eigbt 
mines ana all rivers to the enemy," Mr. 
Krajisnik told a Yugoslav radio station. 

The major powers’ “contact group," 
made up of the United States, Russia, 
Britain, France and Germany, wants to 
divide Bosnia equally. 

In Sarajevo, UN peacekeepers report- 
ed Thursday heavy fighting between 
Serb rebels and the Bosnian Army in 
central Bosnia and in the northwest 
Muslim enclave of Bthac. 

Bosnian Serbian sources in Pale, out- 
side Sarajevo, said that the government 
forces had gained ground in recent fight- 
ing around die central town of Konjic 


and had captured the village of Bijela, 
south of the town. 

The United States says that lifting the 
arms embargo on the Muslims would 
redress the military imbalance that has 
favored Serbs. But Russia. Britain and 
France say it would provoke renewed 
war and have said they would withdraw 
their forces from the Um'ted Nations 
Protection Force in Bosnia. 

There has been no clear sign from the 
contact group about where it will head 
once the Oct 15 deadline runs out. 
Hopes are pinned on the possibility that 
Belgrade's military blockade of the Bos- 
nian Serbs might temper their defiance. 

President Slobodan Milosevic of Ser- 
bia halted shipments of fuel and materi- 
el last month after denouncing Bosnian 
Serbian leaders as war criminals. 


the independently minded politicians 
and that he would never risk leaving the 
Bosnian Serbs in the lurch militarily. 


But diplomats in Belgrade stressed 
that Mr. Milosevic’s quarrel was with 


Major powers have offered to ease 
sanctions on rump Yugoslavia in return 
for allow ing monitoring of the blockade 
against Bosnian Sorbs. 

Bo Pellnas, the Swedish head of an 
international mission to monitor the 
Y ugoslav- Bosnian border and ensure 
that the blockade is being enforced, met 
Yugoslav officials on Thursday to work 
out details of the operation. 

Mr. Peflnas will have only 135 civilian 
volunteers working under the supervi- 
sion of Yugoslav authorities. 

British UN soldiers have fought two 
fierce firefights in the besieged eastern 
Gorazde enclave in two days after com- 
ing under attack, UN spokesmen said 
Thursday. (Reuters, AP) 


African Peacekeeping Troops Figh 
Takeover by Insurgents in Liberia 

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MONROVIA. Liberia (AP) - Tanks .and gmb fflm oPThe 
African intervention force pounded Liberia s preadeahmaan- 
sion Thursday in an attempt to dislodge plotters who claimed to 

have taken over the oountry. ' ‘ . , 

The eight-nation force tried for hours to negotiate with the 

interval tion force, said 50 to 60 of the *tackert had surrendered 
earlier Thursday and indicated that up to 150 renamed m the 

mansion. .. . . . . • • . . 

The fighting came three days after Liberia's three mam waning 
facdonsagned a UN-approved peace agreement. The accord 
caused an uproar because it provided for the warlords to replace ^ 
civilian-dominated interim government. 


Head of French Media Firm Is Held 



Fear of Cuts 
Starts Rush 


Of Retirees 


PARIS (Reuters) — A French judge issued an arres t wanta nt on 
Thursday for the rhairman of a state media holding company m 
the latest probe into suspected political conupdon. 

Jean-Louis Dutaret, a lawyer and dose aide to fenner commu- 
nications minister Alain Cangnon, has been heldTor questioning 
with his sister in Paris. A Lyon judge, Phil4™ Courroyc^ued 
arrest warrants as a prelude to plaang both of them ja goggKaal 
investigation, justice sources said. Mr. Dutaret heads SOraRAD. 
The sources said be was suspected of acting as an mtermediary 


HWW 




inYPUkfluui^ j ujuvw — 

The sources said be was suspected of acting as anmtennediary 
with two major public works ooups that bailed out heavily 
indebted campaign newspapers after Mr. Cangnon, a member oM 


with two major puouc wens* ****** 

indebted campaign newspapers after Mr. Cangnon, a member oSw 
the Gaullist Rally for the Republic party, won the 1989 mayoral 
election in Grenoble. 


t T- | election m Grenoble. 

•Ill Itftly Crimean Prime Minister Steps Down 


Roam 

ROME — Italian workers are 
rushing in record numbers to 
take early retirement in a stam- 
pede triggered by fears of sharp 
cuts in pension benefits as part 
of a cost-saving 1995 budget. 


State pension bodies have re- 
ceived 460,000 retirement re- 
quests so far this year, nearly 
double the number m the whole 
of 1993. 


Woffproj Rnoy/Rrmcn 

SMOKE-FILLED POLITICS — Three foreign ministers — from left, Andrzej Oiecbowski of Poland, Alain jupp6 
of France and Klaus Kmkel of Germany — lifting glasses of so-called smoked beer, with a taste described as 
“smoked ham,” Thursday in Bamberg, Germany. The trio met to tfiscuss Poland’s finks with the European Umoa. 


EUROPEAN 

TOPICS 


countries as Rwanda and the former Yu- 
goslavia. 


allowed on death certificates in many 
other countries. 


Requests, from both the pub- 
lic and private sectors, salaried 
employees and the self-em- 
ployed, averaged some 60,000 
in July alone, according to offi- 
cial figures Thursday. 

The leading state pension or- 
ganization, strapped for cash, 
said it had received an average 
of 42,000 requests a month this 
year, against some 23,500 a 
month last year. 


SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine (Reuters) — The prime mjntoter of 
Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula tendered bis resignation Thursday, 
saying he was unable to work amid the region's constitutional 

crisis. . . | 

Yevgeny Saburov told reporters during a session of the local 
Par liament that he had offered his resignation to President Yun 

M toa < speecb to the chamber, Mr. Saburov only hinted broadly 
that he intended to step down, saying he could not J*see any 
possibility of working further in a constructive way if mis situa- 
tion continues.” The Parliament passed a law last week that 
curtailed Mr. Meshkov’s powers, and the president responded by 
suspending the body. 


Former Greek Leader to Stand Trial 


ATHENS (Reuters) —The Greek Parliament yoted Thursday 
to send to trial the former conservative prime minister Constan- 
tine Miisotakis for allegedly taking a bnbe in the sale of a state 
cement company. „ . . 

The 300-seat Parliament, where the ruling Socialists have a 

comfortable 170-member majority, voted to prosecute Mr. Mitso- — 

takis on four separate charges of breach of faith, morally mstigat- n yyiUt m 

ing a c rime, taking bribes and violating his duties as. a cabinet IP**” 

member. 


Swiss Voters Tackle Question: 
Is Racist Speed) Protected? 


ally collapsed after unification. 

In reality. East German in- 
dustrial .production is still 
about a third below the levels 
seen in 1989-90 in the final days 
of co mmunism. 

“What we are hearing from 
the chancellery today is re- 
sounding complacency," the 
two men said in a joint state- 
ment 


What limits should a civilized nation 

S lace on the right of free expression? 
hould even inflammatory racist com- 
ments be treated as protected speech? 
Swiss voters win have to deckle on these 
delicate questions in a referendum next 
week. 


Support is widespread among the 
country's legislators for changing the pe- 


nal code to ban speech that “incites ra- 
cial hatred or detracts from human dig- 
nity." Federal authorities insist that tins 
would not affect people's right to speak 
freely in private but is intended only to 
ensure public safety. Swiss officials also 
want to ratify the International Conven- 
tion on the Elimination of All Forms of 
Racial Discrimination. 

The proposed law, reports the Journal 
de Genfeve, targets comments such as the 


Around Europe 

An odd problem has faced Ewope’s 
largest solar-energy plant outside Tole- 
do, Spain, since it opened early this sum- 
mer: too much sun. Temperatures in the 
barren plains of central Spain, where the 
sun shines 3,000 hours a year, have 
readied 50 degrees (122 Fahrenheit) in 
recent weeks, damaging some of the sen- 
sitive solar pands. 

Another problem has come from the 
south. Storm clouds blowing in from 
Africa have deposited a fine yellow film 
of Saharan sand on the 7,836 silicon 
panels, reducing their effectiveness. 

Nonetheless, technicians at the plant 
are mostly satisfied, reports the German 
weekly Focus. The plant, buQt at a cost 
of Slo million, with Spanish, German 
and European Union financing, is ex- 
pected to meet its target for the year of 
1 j million kilowatt hours of electricity 
production — enough for a village of 
2,000 inhabitants. 


What to do when you’ve had a few too 
many dinks and don’t want to call a cab 
because then you'll have to go back for 
your car the next morning? Michael Rex- 
roth, 24, spent an evening weighing that 
question over a few beers in a Frankfurt 
tavern not long ago- His answer: “Let 
someone else drive you home in your 
car." To turn his brainstorm into reality, 
Mr. Rexroth. a former professional soc- 
cer player, bought a small fleet of Italian 
fold-up mini-motorcycles. When some- 
one calls his company. City Flea, from a 
bar, an employee rides to meet the caller, 
folds up the cycle and puts it in the 
trunk, then drives ihe customer home. 
City Flea is getting 10 to 15 calls a nighL 
Mr. Rexroth already plans to expand to 
other German dries. 


Prime Minister Silvio Berlus- 
coni’s conservative govern- 
ment, which has pledged to re- 
duce a $1.15 trillion state debt 
TTKwintain, has pinpointed the 
generous and much-abused 
pension system as the main 
threat to the country’s depleted 
coffers. Italians are allowed to 
retire on up to 80 percent of 
their final salary under one of 
the world’s most generous sys- 
tems. 


Saudi Dissidents Warn oi New Threat 


LONDON (Reuters) — A Saudi opposition group said Thurs- 
day that a previously unknown group in Saudi Arabia had issued 
warning of bomb attacks and kidnappings of Westerners anxL 


Saudi royalty if an imprisoned cleric is not released. 

The London-based Committee for the Defense of Legitimate 
Rights produced what it said was a statement issued in the Saudi 
capital of Riyadh by a group calling itself the Battalions of Faith. 

“The Battalions of Faith demand the release of our Sheikh 
Salman ibn Fahd al Audah and give the Saudi authorities only five 
days," the statement said in Arabic. “If they do not respond, then 
we will blow up Western interests such as embassies, banks, shops 
and companies and kidnap American and European cit iz e ns ." ’ 


call by one doctor for the tattooing of all 
people who are seropositive or the asser- 


people who are seropositive or the asser- 
tion that the Holocaust was a fiction. 

The SepL 25 referendum has encoun- 
tered some opposition. Extremists of the 
right — those most likely to be affected 
— have sharply attacked the proposal. 
Liberals fear infringements on people's 
right to expression. They also note that 
signatories to the UN's convention on 
the elimination of racism include such 


One of the more popular nutritional 
theories of recent times — that a French 
diet, red wine included, could reduce the 
risk of heart disease — came in for heavy 
criticism at an international cardiology 
congress this week in Berlin. A 21 -nation 
World Health Organization study found 
a problem in French reporting of heart- 
disease deaths. A cardiovascular expert, 
Hugh Tunstall-Pedoe. of Dundee. Scot- 
land, told the congress that many deaths 
by heart attack are classified in France 
simply as “sudden death," a category not 


In England, debate persists over a local 
vicar’s refusal to allow families to have 
informal inscriptions such as “Dad," 
“Mum" or “Ginger" placed on head- 
stones in the church cemetery. Some say 
a family should have the right to show its 
respect any way it wants; others favor 
traditional dignity. One writer to The 
Times summed it up this way: “The key 
issue in the case of the vicar of Freckle- 
ton is surely not of free speech but of 
taste. If I wished my grave to be illumi- 
nated by pink neon squirrels which 
would softly sing The Party’s Over* in 
close harmony each time a mourner ap- 
proached, should 1 be legally restrained 
on the grounds that my plans were naff?" 
Good question. Pink is a bit garish. 


The leading state pension or- 
ganization said the rise in appli- 
cations was in line with esti- 
mates after a government block 
on early retirement requests in 
1993. Labor Minister Clemente 
Mastella called media specula- 
tion of a flight from the work- 
place “alarmist comments." 

He noted that monthly re- 
quests averaged 40.000 in 1992. 


a jnquotft 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Air France Pilots Put Strike on Hold 


The government, which must 
present its 1995 budget to Par- 
liament before the end of this 
month, plans deficit cuts of at 
least 45 trillion lire ($29 bil- 
lion), including some 8 trillion 
lire from pensions. 


Brian Knowlton 


Italy has some 20 million 
pensioners, slightly more than 
one in three of the total popula- 
tion, with more than a third of 
the state's total annual expendi- 
tures used to cover the cost 
Payouts far exceed contribu- 
tions. 


Ulster Unionist Urges Slow Peace Efforts 


Chechen Leader 


PARIS (Reuters) — Air France said Thursday that a planned 
strike by its pilots on Friday and Saturday had been postponed *■ ■■■■ 

and that all flights would operate as nonnaL The company made » 
the announcement after discussions with union representatives.! X.. _ 

A statement by the pilot unions said they and the management « p n tii s 
had agreed to enter into immediate discussions on the contested 
company proposals. The unions had called for the strike action 
over plans by Air France to reduce the flight premiums in this - '• ’ c 
pilots’ pay packages. J • 

AD private cars wifl be banned from the center of Athens for £ 
second day on Friday, the Greek Environment Ministry an- 
nounced Thursday after temperatures hit a high of 37 degrees fT 1 ' 
centigrade (98 Fahrenheit) and pushed air pollution to danger >7 
levels. (APi >V..- ’ 

Italian bank workers wifi go on a nationwide strike on Friday tq 
protest delays in renewing contracts, unions said Thursday. The - 
one-day action will be accompanied by demonstrations in major - 

cities with the main protest expected in Milan. (Reuters ) [a '*' ctm* 

Mayor Rndotph W. Giuliani announced that New Yoik Gty an<j ^ 
the Circle Line were offering rewards totaling $21,000 for inter j • . ' 

motion leading to the arrest and conviction oi the person respond 1 ^ 
ble for the shooting of a German tourist aboard a Circle Line / : 
cruise boat on Monday. (NY1) : r ~ - .. 


i ■ . 


Reuters 

BELFAST — Protestant ex- 
tremist attacks against targets 
in Ireland are likely to continue 
unless the Irish government 
slows down its peace efforts, a 
politician with connections to 
one of the outlawed groups said 
Thursday. 

David Ervine, spokesman for 
the tiny Progressive Unionist 
Party, said the extremists want- 


ed peace, eventually, but were 
frightened by the pace of 
change since the Irish Republi- 
can Army announced a cease- 
fire two weeks ago. 

“The name of the game, I 
think, is to slow down, take 
stock." Mr. Ervine said, adding 
that Ireland could play a role 
once the Protestant community 
in British-ruled Northern Ire- 
land got used to the idea. 


Unionists and loyalists, who 
both want Northern Ireland to 
stay British, fear that the IRA 
and its political wing, Sinn 
Fein, are using the cease-fire 
merely as a tactic. 

Unionists were infuriated 
when Prime Minister Albert 
Reynolds of Ireland met the 


Sinn Fein leader, Gerry Adams, 
just a few days after the cease- 


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just a few days after the cease- 
fire, fearing that Ireland was 
seeking a major role in the prov- 
ince’s affairs. 

Mr. Ervine said Protestant 
extremist groups were desper- 
ate to make the British and Irish 
governments pay attention to 
these fears and were copying 
IRA tactics to do so. 

The British government, 
meanwhile, said Thursday that 
it needed more time to decide if 


the IRA cease-fire was for real 
a stance labeled “bizarre" by 
Mr. Adams. 

Northern Ireland’s secretary. 
Sir Patrick Mayhew, briefed the 
British cabinet on develop- 
ments in the province, includ- 
ing Protestant street violence 
and uncertainty about the 
truce. 

Afterwards, the London gov- 
ernment reiterated that it want- 
ed more proof that the cease- 
fire was permanent. 


Signs Martial Law 


MOSCOW — The Chechen 
leader, Dzhokar Dudayev, 
signed a decree on Thursday 
imposing martial Jaw in his 
breakaway republic of Chech- 
nya, Interfax news agency said. 


U.S. Man Must Pay $653,000 K 
In Killing of Japan Student 




The Associated Press 


It was not clear to what ex- 
tent Mr. Dudayev, facing rebel- 
lion from several armed groups 
inside his tiny territory, would 
be able to enforce the ruling. 


Hong Kong Tope 6 Million 

Reuters 


HONG KONG —The popu- 
lation of Hong Kong surpassed 
6 million people at the end of 
June, the government said. 


Itar-Tass said the Russian 
Army would hold maneuvers in 
the north Caucasus near Chech- 
nya’s borders next week. The 
exercises will be led by the com- 
mander in chief of land forces. 
Colonel -General Vla dimir Se- 
myonov, an unusually high- 
ranking selection. 


BATON ROUGE, Louisiana — A judge ordered a home- 
owner to pay $653,000 to the parents of a Japanese exchange 1 ’ , ■’ 
student who was shot to death in 1992 when he went to the ! ;. / v - 
wrong house while looking for a Halloween party. , ' 

State District Judge Bill Brown rejected Rodney Peairs's 1 r.,, 

contention that he thought 16-year-old Yoshihiro Hatton i J ■ . 
was a crazed attacker. « 


"There is no justification that the killing was necessary to * 
save himself or his family." Judge Brown said. *• 

Mr. Peairs did not use the "extraordinary care" required 1 
irnder law for using a gun, and neither Mr. Hatton nor his 
host family bears any blame, the judge said. • 

Mr. Peairs was acquitted of manslaughter last year in the 1 
slaying, which reinforced the United States' image in Japan . 
as a country of gunslingers. * 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE., FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 16, 1994 


Page 3 



THEAMERICAS/ 


Ar POLITICAL NOTES* 


Wilder Quits tfio Senate Race In Virginia 


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RICHMOND, Virginia — Former Governor L. Douglas 
Wilder ha^ abandoned his independent run for the Senate 
after two polls showed him far behind his fellow Democrat 
and longtime rival. Senator Charles S. Robb. 

Mr. Wilder’s withdrawal reduced the chance that a split 
among Democrats would hand the seat to Oliver L. North, a 
conservative Republican. Marshall Coleman, an indepen- 
dent is the third remaining candidate in a hard-fought race 
that is crucial to Republican efforts to win control of the 
Senate in the Nov. 8 election. 

“I have seen that the two-party system in Virginia is strong 
and thai the difficulty in financing independent candidacies is 
real.’ Mr. Wilder said in a statement. 

"I have said that I was in this campaign for one reason only, 
and thaewas to win.’.’ the statement continued. “Though I 
don't attach great significance to polls, they are influential, 
and the influence on financing capabilities is great Mainly for 
that reason^! don’t feel; that I could raise sufficient funds for 
any winning effort to take place. 

. “I am a rfcalist,” he 


when to fold them." 


said. “I know when to hold them and 

’API 


Grousing at White House Staff Overhaul 

WASHINGTON — As the White House chief of staff, 
.Leon E. Panetta. approaches his final recommendations on a 
long-delayed staff reorganization, aides have begun to recog- 
nize a potentially serious political problem — too many white 
guys. 

Mr. Panetta has been working for nearly three months on 
plans to revamp President Bill Clinton's sometimes chaotic 
staff. The length of the process has hurt staff morale and led 
-to considerable bitterness on. the pan of those whose Futures 
have been left twisting in the wind. 

“It's just unfair to people,’’ an aide said. “It looks bad for 
Leon and for the president” 

Mr. Panetta has made some changes already, placing three 
longtime aides, including a woman, in mid-level White House 
posts. ’ 

Those expected to leave include a majority of the top- 
ranking women on Mr. Clinton's immediate staff, people who 
are largely unknown to the public except as anonymous 
“senior White House officials'’ but who are key to the internal 
workings of the White House. 

Some high-ranking men are likely to be leaving as well. 
John Podesta, staff secretary, for example, has planned to 
depart at the end of the year. Nonetheless, women on Mr. 

' Clinton's staff have long complained tbout what one high- 
ranking female aide called an ’inclusion problem" — a sense 
that while women hold many posts, the key players at the 
White House are all men except for Hillary Rodham Clinton 
and her chief of staff, Maggie Williams. ( LA T I 


Republicans Run With a New Ad Strategy 

Republican strategists are considering a novel way to lie 
Democratic members of Congress to Mr. Clinton by depict- 
ing them jogging with the chief executive. Walter Jones Jr., the 
Republican challenger to Representative H. Martin Lancas- 
ter, Democrat of North Carolina, is using a television ad 
showing a somewhat breathless Mr. Lancaster on a jog with 
Mr. Clinton. 

Other Republican candidates, especially in the South, may 
use similar commercials against other Democratic jogging 
partners. Representative Bill Paxon, Republican of New York 
and the chairman of the National Republican Congressional 
Committee, says that, in the South, B.C. does not stand for 
Bill Clinton but for “ball and chain.'’ (LAT) 

Quotu/Unquote 

Haley Barbour on, the Republican National Committee 
chairman, an his party's chances in the November elections: 
“I am very bullish. We have not only had a strong wind at our 
backs for more than a year, but in the last few weeks that wind 
has actually picked up.” ' (NYT) 


TV Ads Haunt Ohio Lawyer 

He Needs Image Transplant for Senate Race 


m.: 


By R.W. Apple Jr. 

New York Tima Service 

CHARDON. Ohio — Televi- 
sion spots are the miracle drugs 
of modem politics. They can 
make weak candidates strong 
and put hope into hopeless 
causes. But a television spot, as 
Joel Hyatt has discovered, can 
also be a sword with two edges. 

With an expenditure of tens 
of millions of advertising dol- 
lars over the last decade, he 
built a national chain of store- 
front law offices, and in the 
process made himself well- 
enough known to win the Dem- 
ocratic nomination for an open 
Senate seat in Ohio. 

But the ads also firmly im- 
planted in the minds of voters a 
picture of a smooth-talking law- 
yer, an image that many find 
unsuitable for the job he is seek- 
ing. 

Ask voters to describe his Re- 
publican rival. Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor Michael DeWine, and 
they say “lieutenant governor" 
or “politician" or at worst “pe- 
rennial candidate.” 

But ask them about Mr. Hy- 
att and they almost all say “law- 
yer.” Many add some deroga- 
tory comment about the 
profession. Some refer to him as 
an ambulance chaser. 

Partly as a result of this im- 
age problem. Mr. Hyatt has 
fallen far behind Mr. DeWine 
in opinion polls published in 
recent days. He and his strate- 
gists think he can catch up, but 
few Ohio analysts give him veiy 
much chance. 

That is bad news for the 
Democrats, who are struggling 
to limit their losses in this fall’s 
contest for control of the Sen- 
ate. 

This year, as in most years. 
Ohio is one of the pivots upon 
which the election mil probably 
turn. If the Republicans win 
here, their chances of gaining a 
net of seven Senate seats, which 
they need to take control, will 
rise sharply. 

A number of elements be- 
yond his control have handi- 
capped Mr. Hyatt’s effort. Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton is unpopular 
here, although he helped Mr. 
Hyatt raise more than 5300,000 
at a dinner earlier this year. 

Governor George Voinovich, 
a Republican seeking re-elec- 
tion against a token opponent, 
is extremely popular. 
"Tben-lbereris the old Ohio 
political tradition that a candi- 
date for major statewide office 
has to lose at least once before 
he or she can win. 

That was true of senators like 


Robert Taft, John Glenn and 
Howard M. Metzenbaum and 
governors like James Rhodes 
and John Gilligan. Mr. DeWine 
lost to Mr. Glenn two years ago. 
This is Mr. Hyau's first uy for 
public office. 

In addition, Mr, Hyau had to 
fight hard in the primary to de- 
feat Mary Boyle, a Cuyahoga 
County commissioner, and he 
dismissed most of his campaign 
staff immediately afterwards. 

Among those he let go was 
Mandy Gnmwald, one of Mr. 
Clinton's advisers in the 1992 
campaign and since. While his 
new team was still getting orga- 

Some voters refer 
to Riot as 
an ambulance 
chaser. 

nized, Mr. DeWine mounted a 
television campaign in the 
Geveland area, Mr. Hyau's 
base, and made significant in- 
roads. 

A recent poll has Mr. 
DeWine 11 percentage points 
ahead, and another new one 
puts the mar gin at 18 points. 

In this state, where politics 
tend to be cyclical, “it’s starting 
to look like* an elephant stam- 
pede,” says Mike Curtin, a Co- 
lumbus Dispatch reporter. 

Gerald Austin, a political 
consultant who was one of Ms. 
Boyle’s strategists, said that Mr. 
Hyatt “has wasted the three 
months since the primary" and 
“hasn't developed the credibil- 
ity to make his attacks on 
DeWine stick the way -Glenn 
did.” 

Professor Alfred Tuchfarber 
of the University of Cincinnati 
said Mr. DeWine could still 
lose, “but he'd have to put his 
fool in his mouth and twist it." 

Mark Mellman, the Demo- 
crat’s new pollster, nonetheless 
promises a fast finish. 

He said the Hyatt campaign 
would shift the focus of the con- 
test from Mr. Hyatt's personal- 
ity to Mr. DeWine’s voting rec- 
ord, emphasizing the 
Republican’s support of the 
North American Free Trade 
Agreement, unpopular among 
trade unionists, and his opposi- 
tion during his years in Con- 
gress to the Clean Air Act. to 
civil rights bills and to increases 
in the minimum wage. 

“People know Joel," said Mr. 
Mellman, who worked for Mr. 
Glenn two years ago. “People 
don’t know DeWine. He may 


usl M iv 

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Away 


From Polities 


• The $2.7 million jury 
award to a woman burned 
by a cup of coffee at a Mc- 
Donald's restaurant has 
been reduced to $480,000. 
“We sriQ feel the damages 
are excessive and inappro- 
priate,” said a McDonald’s 
spok esman. The fast-food 
chain will appeal again. 

• New York’s crime rate 
has fallen to its lowest level 
in 15 years, with an average 
of five murders a day. But 
poverty is on the rise with 
one in seven on the dole. 

• Discovery’s cloud-map- 
ping laser scanned the eye 
of a typhoon from above 
the Pacific to give atmo- 
spheric scientists a detailed 
profile. 

• A Thai Airlines Boeing 
747-300 with 390 people 

aboard ‘Mew at least swo.of 

its 18 tires taking off from 
Los Angeles International 
Airport but returned to 
land safely. - 

• Santa Rosa Community 
College in California 
agreed to pay two female 
students $15,000 e a c h be- 
cause of derogatory sexual 
remarks made about them 
on a men -only computer 

bulletin board. The college 
did away with the message 
network soon after the 
women complained. 

• Four of Cleveland’s 19 
parking-enforcement offi- 
cers were dismissed for 
voiding their own tickets. 
Mayor Michael White said. 

AFP. Renters, AP 


yYefiiilin;’ r 


Air Traffic Controllers Deny Blame 

White House Protection Not Their Job at Night, Union Says 


By Don Phillips 
and Pierre Thomas 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
union representing air traffic 
controllers has declared that it 
is not their responsibility to 
monitor radar continuously 
during early morning hours and 
that controllers on duty at Na- 
tional Airport when a small 

& crashed on the White 
lawn were “conducting 
their duties as required.” 

Obviously angry that con- 
trollers appeared to be getting 
the blame for failure to detect 
the plane, the National Air 
Traffic Controllers Association 
said the two controllers were 
performing required adminis- 
trative duties and had no reason 
to look at radar screens, 

The union strongly suggested 
that air surveillance and notifi- 
cation to White House security 


was routinely limited, at least in 
the early morning hours. 

“Controllers on the midnight 
shift are required to monitor the 
radar only when aircraft are 
scheduled to enter their air- 
space,” its Wednesday state- 
ment said. “Neither the tower 
controller nor the radar con- 
troller was working any aircraft 
movements at the time of the 
incident. In accordance with 
their responsibilities, they were 
conducting standard adminis- 
trative duties in preparation for 
the heavy morning traffic 
flow." 

A joint news release from the 
Federal Aviation Administra- 
tion and the Secret Service 
made it clear that the adminis- 
tration plays a role in providing 
the Secret Service with vital air 
space information. The release 
also noted that the two organi- 
zations have “heightened secu- 


rity procedures" pending a 
comprehensive review of the 
current system. 

Privately, controllers and em- 
ployees of the a dmini stration 
and the Transportation Depart- 
ment expressed frustration with 
the Secret Service’s handling of 
the incident, including what 
they called a gag order that has 
prevented the administration 
from making any comment. 

Some in the administration 
and the controllers’ union said 
that the Secret Service was more 
interested in controlling its im- 
age than in an orderly flow of 
information. 

The joint news release said it 
was “inappropriate” at present 
to discuss the relationship be- 
tween the administration and 
the Secret Service. “To do so 
may compromise the Secret 
Service’s ability to perform its 
essential security role," it said. 


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be ahead at the moment, but 
he’s a bleeder, he loses votes in 
the stretch, and believe me, we 
know how to make him bleed." 

Last weekend, in appear- 
ances in Geveland and at a la- 
bor picnic near this bucolic vil- 
lage, Mr. Hyatt was already 
busy trying to redefine images. 

The 'son of immi grants who 
ran a small umbrella shop, Mr. 
Hyatt is nevertheless inevitably 
described as “the multimillion- 
aire son-in-law” of Mr. Metzen- 
baum, who is retiring. 

A ranking official in ihe Hy- 
att campaign conceded that Mr. 
Metzenbaum was purposely be- 
ing kepi in the background in 
an effort to dampen Republi- 
can charges that he was trying 
to create a senatorial dynasty. 
He has been an active fund- 
raiser, appearing last month, 
for example, at a Hollywood 


reccgnon. 


Hyau pictures himself as 
an entrepreneur — not a lawyer 
— and emphasizes his lack of 
government experience. 

Mr. DeWine likes to wear 
plaid work shirts to emphasize 
his country origins, but Mr. Hy- 
att misses few opportunities to 
describe Mr. De Wine’s family, 
which has a flourishing seed 
business, as wealthy. 

As for the unfavorable im- 
pressions that may linger from 
his ads, Mr. Hyau said his firm 
has represented 600,000 people 
in Ohio — "mostly to their 
great satisfaction.'’ 



• > A*/.' 

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SAVED FROM THE SEA — An elderly Cuban woman being rescued by the U.S. 
Coast Guard, which said the number of Cubans picked up had dropped significantly. 


Washington Ex-Mayor Seeks Respect 


By Yolanda Woodlee 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — After a decisive victory’ in 
the Democratic mayoral primary, Marion Barry 
has emerged with words for white voters who did 
not support him. with plans to balance the Dis- 
trict or Columbia's budget and with confidence 
that he will defeai his opponents in November's 
general election. 

At a news conference, Mr. Barry was asked 
what he would say to the large number of white 
residents who did not vote for him in the primary 
and what be would say to Congress. 

His message was blunt, and he demanded that 
the voters accord him some respect. 

“Get over whatever personal hang-ups you 
got,” Mr. Barry said. “Get over it. I’m the best 
person for Washington. I know best how to 
protect their investments, their homes, their busi- 
nesses. I know best how to balance this budget. I 


know best how to save our city from financial 
collapse. I know best how to get us moving. 1 
know best how to get our government to be 
responsive. 

“So to those white people who have whatever 
hang-ups they have, get over it." 

Mr. Barry, mayor for 12 years and now a 
District of Columbia Council member, defeated 
Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly and an at-large coun- 
cil member, John Ray, in the primary election on 
Tuesday. 

Mi. Barry said he would like to meet with Mrs. 
Kelly’s financial team. “First of all, we’re going 
to balance this budget. We know how to reduce 
the budget by $140 million. We're very surgical 
about it." 

By Oct. 1, he said, he will probably have 
introduced an emergency budget act to guaran- 
tee that the city does not have “a runaway 
government” until January. 



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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1994 


U.S. Questions Rights Record of Aristide Aide 


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By John M. GoshJko 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Haiti’s deposed 
president, the Reverend Jean-Bertrand 
Aristide, sent a former Port-au-Prince 
police chief to GuantAnamo Bay, Cuba, 
to recruit refugees as future security per- 
sonnel even though the U.S. government 
had raised questions about his human 
rights record, according to U.S. officials. 

The remit incident was described by 
U.S. officials and aides of Father Aris- 
tide after an account of it was disclosed 
in a leak from Capitol HQL 

Colonel Pierre Cherubin was police 
chief of the Hai tian capital when Father 
Aristide was president U.S. officials ac- 
knowledged that they had heard allega- 
tions that he had been involved in drug 
trafficking and the killing of five young 
people whose bodies were found in a 
vacant lot 

When Father Aristide decided to send 
Colonel Cherubin to the U.S. Naval 
Base at GuantAnamo Bay to recruit Hai- 
tians there, the United States raised the 
question of his human rights record. 

Both U.S. officials and aides to Fa- 
ther Aristide said the former president 


had replied that he had looked into the 
accusations against the colonel and had 
concluded that they were without merit. 

“Mr. Aristide is the president, and it 
would be inappropriate for us to suggest 
we might disapprove of people in his 
government,” a U.S. official said. 

He and other officials said William H. 
Gray 3d, President Bill Clinton's special 
adviser for Haiti, had made no attempt 
to veto Father Aristide’s choice of Colo- 
nel Cherubin. The colonel currently is in 
Guantanamo assisting the recruiting ef- 
fort 

The incident illustrates that Father 
Aristide, a populist leader deposed by a 
mili tary coup m 1991, remains a subject 
of controversy even as the U.S. contin- 
ues plans for an invasion to restore him 
to power. 

Father Aristide and the administra- 
tion are now engaged in confidential 
discussions about a broad range of is- 
sues touching on Haiti's future after an 
invasion: building a police force to 
maintain order, getting adequate food 
supplies and paying off the nation's 
debts. 

But concern on Capitol Hill about 


Father Aristide, whose foes describe 
him as an anti-American demagogue, 
remains one of the principal sources of 
opposition to any invasion. 

Precisely when Father Aristide would 
go back wul depend on bow long it takes 
U.S. forces to secure control. 

An account of the administration’s 
discussions with Father Aristide about 
Colonel Cherubin was included in a 
document, described as an internal Pen- 
tagon memo, that circulated in Wash- 
ington on Tuesday. 

It charged that the Clinton adminis- 
tration and Father Aristide were quar- 


consisted, as one official said, "almost 
exclusively of calming talk of peace and 
reconciliation among all Haitians,” 
Representative David E. Skaggs. 
Democrat of Colorado, expressed con- 
cern about Father Aristide in a leuer to 
Mr. Clinton. 


reling bitterly about how to bring de- 
mocracy to Haiti. 


U.S. officials said the alleged docu- 
ment exaggerated the degree of conflict 
between Mr. Gray and Father Aristide 
over Colonel Cherubin, and they said 
they could find no evidence that the 
memo bad originated in the Defense 
Department 

Both sides said that Father Aristide 
bad been broadcasting regularly to Haiti 
on U-S.-providcd faculties, that his re- 
marks had been monitored closely by 
the administration and that they had 


“We know that Mr. Aristide was inef- 
fective in governing Haiti and in con- 
trolling the military when he was presi- 
dent,” Mr. Skaggs wrote. “Wbat if he 
again loses support? Would (he United 
States now have to guarantee the success 
of his government?” 

During his three years of Washington 
exile. Father Aristide proved to be a 
tough client because he feared that the 
United States wanted to force him to 
share power with his domestic oppo- 
nents. 



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That began to change last May after 
Mr. Clinton named Mr. Gray his special 
adviser, U.S. officials said. 

“BUI Gray's singular contribution is 
that he established a climate of mutual 
harmony and trust between us and Aris- 
tide,” said a senior administration offi- 
cial. 


t 


DNA 'Match’ 


HAITI; Military Rulers Stay Defiant as U.S. Warships Arrive Off Coast 



links Simpson 
To Murder Site 


Los Angela Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — Fi- 
nal DNA' lists in the O.J. 
Simpson murder case point 
to him as the source of at 
least some of the blood 
drops found near the bod- 
ies of Nicole Brown Simp- 
son and Ronald L. Gold- 
man, according to sources 
dose to the case. 

Tests still are bong con- 
ducted by two laboratories, 
and some of the results so 
far are inconclusive. 

But a batch of final re- 
sults forwarded to defense 
lawyers and prosecutors 
this week point to a 
"match” between Mr. 
Simpson's blood and that 
of at least two of the drops 
found in a line leading 
away from the bodies, 
sources said. 

Tests for the so-called ge- 
netic fingerprint could be 
the most damaging physi- 
cal evidence to date against 
the former football great, 
who has pleaded not guilty 
to the double murder of his 
former wife and her friend. 

Sources also disclosed 
Wednesday that a hair 
found on Mr. Goldman is 
being analyzed to deter- 
mine whether it matches 
Mr. Simpson's hair. 


Continued from Page 1 
mem, also predicted that the 
army would try to mount a 
guerrilla war instead of con- 
fronting U.S. troops head on. 

“Everyone right now has 
some kind of fear, they don’t 
know what is coming,” he said 
in an interview Thursday with a 
U.S. television network. 

The United States is threat- 
ening to invade to restore Fa- 
ther Aristide, who was demo- 
cratically elected. A crippling 


trade blockade and intensifying 
psychological warfare have 
failed to dislodge the military. 

“The government will contin- 
ue to fulfill its mission and wiQ 
not fail to fuDy pursue the de- 
fense of the republic,” Presi- 
dent Emile Jonassaint, who was 


elections less than two months 


installed by the army, said at a 
news conference Wednesday 


news conference Wednesday 
night. 

He added that the invasion 
threat was politically motivat- 
ed, with U.S. congressional 


away. 

“The approaching enslave- 
ment of our people has been 
calmly announced,” Mr. Jonas- 
saint said. He noted that “the 
immense majority of the Ameri- 
can people have not been con- 
vinced” of the need to invade. 

The Ministry of the Interior 
and Defense imposed a 7 P.M.- 
7 A.M. ban on traffic on inter- 
city highways and on the depar- 
ture of boats and planes during 


EUROPE: Clinton Is Perceived Abroad as Indecisive 


C on tinued from Page 1 
anything but what he calls 
“zero-dead wars.” 

With only six weeks to go 
before congressional midterm 
elections, the loathsome pros- 
pect of body bags returning 
home from an adventure that 
polls indicated a majority of 
American voters find unneces- 
sary has deepened the adminis- 
tration’s quandary about using 
force. 

With many Democratic con- 
gressmen already running 
scared, there is alarm that an 


grip on power because it has 
accentuated his image of exer- 
cising such weak influence over 
Congress. 

“Clinton’s misfortune is that 
the whole world believes it 
knows his indecisrveness, in- 
cluding die Haitian generals," 
said Germany's conservative 
daily, Franf inter AQgemeine 
Zeitung, in an editorial. “Clin- 
ton's long hesitation has grown 
into a crisis of credibility for 
American foreign policy.*' 


invasion that goes wrong could 
ruin their chances of bolding 
onto their jobs. 

While the president may have 
felt he needed time to convince 
the Americari'public and Con- 
gress about the reasons for 
aimed intervention, the long 
delay has raised questions 
throughout Europe about his 


In contrast to previous 
American incursions into Ca- 
ribbean countries, there has 
been little if any outcry in Eu- 
rope about heavy-handed 
American imperialism. All of 
the European allies have en- 
dorsed the use of force to get rid 
of Haiti’s military rulers, as has 
much of the rest of the world. 
Only China and Libya have 


publicly upbraided the United 
States. 

Some 19 countries, mainly 
from Central America, have 
now agreed to participate in the 
American-led invasion, which is 
designed to oust the military 
rulers who seized power three 
yearn ago.’ 

Britain is sending a frigate 
and a refueling ship now on 
station in the West Indies to 
support the American military 
effort. 

France said it would partici- 
pate in the second phase, the 
establishment of security on the 
island, by sending about 100 
policemen. 

Belgium and Denmark also 
plan to contribute to an inter- 
national peacekeeping force 
that would oner Haiti after the 
junta and the ragtag army are 
swept away by foe American- 
led intervention force. 



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those hours. It said the curfew 
was taken “to counter acts of 
foreign aggression-” 

Militiam en beat up people 
who tried to pick up leaflets 
dropped by U.S. aircraft early 
Wednesday. The leaflets an- 
nounced Father Aristide’s re- 
turn. 

Michel Fran 9 ois, the capital's 
police chief, was heard on the 
police radio band ordering sol- 
diers to shoot at foe aircraft as 
they flew over at 2:45 A.M^ 
according to one resident. 

Two Army Blackhawk heli- 
copters flew over the capital lat- 
er Wednesday. 

Apparently anticipating an 
invasion, middle- and upper- 
class Haitians stocked up on 
goods, emptying shelves at 
many food stores and super- 
markets in Port-au-Prince. 

At his news conference, Mr. 
Jonassaint said legislative elec- 
tions would be held as planned 
in December and that presiden- 
tial elections would be held 
soon after. 

After delivering his remarks 
in French, Mr. Jonassaint spoke 
in Creole, the language of most 
Haitians. 

“We have harmed no one, 
threatened neither the peace of 
America nor of foe world." he 
said. “Haiti doesn't have foe 
atom bomb. They could destroy 
us in a couple of minutes.” 

( AP, Reuters) 





yW<; - ‘ 






m . :: ' 





A 1 IMd/Aanw Ram ft, m 

President Clin ton pointing to photos of what he said were atrocities in Haiti. 


CLINTON: A Speech Aimed at Congress and Public 


U.S. Patrol Boat Runs 
Into Sandbar Off Haiti 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — A U.S. 
fast patrol boat, part of foe U.S. 
force assembled for a possible 
invasion of Haiti, has run 
aground in the bay off the capi- 
tal, Port-au-Prince, defense of- 
ficials said Thursday. 

They said foe Monsoon, one 
of two small fast patrol boats 
that have been used to intercept 
craft violating a trade embargo 
on foe miliiaiy-ruled state, got 
stuck on a sandbar on Thursday 
but was likely to float free when 
the tide rises. 


Gntfmued from Page 1 
running “very, very short,” the 
president and his aides were 
trying harder than ever before 
to find a resonant argument 
that an invasion was just and 
proper. 

“It is not time for a divisive 
debate about this,” said Dee 
Dee Myers, the White House 
press secretary, on Wednesday. 
“It is time to present a unified 
front” 

[“I assure you that every ave- 
nue has been exhausted.” Ma- 
deleine K. Albright U-S. am- 
bassador foe United Nations, 
said Thursday, according to 
The Associated Press. 


[Asked about indications in 
ublic opinion surveys that a 


public opinion surveys that a 
majority of the American pub- 
lic is against an invasion. Mrs. 
Albright said: “It may not be 
popular. The president has said 
that but he is foe leader. He is 
foe commander in chief, and he 
believes that this is the right 
thing to do/*] 

In a preview of his Oval Of- 
fice address, Mr. Clinton told a 


group of news agency repo, lets 
that, if left lmcoirectcd, Haiti's 
slide back to dictatorship would 
bode ill for fledgling democra- 
cies elsewhere in foe Western 
Hemisphere. He portrayed Hair 
ti as a kilting field in which foe 
United States has a moral obli- 
gation to halt human rights 
abuses. 

And having threatened since 
May to stage an invasion unless 
Haiti’s military leaders stepped 
down on their own, the presi- 
dent warned that the credibility 
not just of his administration 
but also of foe United States 
would be at stake unless he 
made good on his threats. 

Saying he had already shown 
“extremely good faith and for- 
bearance,” he added, "The 
United States must not be in a 


Since Mr. Clinton first ^ 
threatened to use force to oust 
Haiti’s junta, his aides have said ~ : 
he recognized that he was on a 
path in which he would see no & 
option but to go forward with r 
an invasion if economic sane- .T 
lions alone did not work. 'J. 

Administration officials said 'Z. 

any effort to persuade Congress ' ; 
and foe public that a relatively 
insignificant country like Haiti [ 
was worth American Wood and 
dollars was bound to be an up- ” ■ 

hill struggle. 

“Inevitably, there was going 
to be a large controversy about 
sending troops to a place that 
most American people regard 
as peripheral to our interests,” a 
senior official said. 


position to walk away from a 
situation tike this.” 


“I know it is unpopular,” Mr. 
Clinton said of a possible inva- 
sion. “I know foe timing is un- 
popular. I know the whole thine 


popular. I know the whole thing 
is unpopular. But I believe it is 
foe nght thing.” 


jettiner Stowaway Is Killed 

The Associated Press 

SUVA, Fiji — Lack of oxy- 
gen and internal bleeding 
caused foe death of a stowaway 
whose body was found jammed 
in the whed well of a Polyne- 
sian Airlines jetliner. 


Ti 

For 


TEST: Fallout for Human Subjects 


Cotrfnoed from Page 1 
of tumors and congenital disor- 
ders had risen fivefold in the 
past 40 years. They attributed 
foe problems not only to foe 
nuclear test but also to chemi- 
> cal- weapons testing that pollut- 
, ed the groundwater in the 1920s 
and 1930s. 

What is dear, from inter- 
views with survivors still in the 
area, is that civilians were pro- 
tected only haphazardly and 
soldiers not at alL Some people 
were evacuated, others were 
not. Some said they were ad- 
vised to leave but did not both- 
er. Others said they left despite 
being told they could S3fely stay 
as long as they lay on foe 
ground and did not look up. 

Lyubov Ivanova, 70, said she 
was evacuated from a village 
near the center of the target 
area that had been wiped out 
and bad never been rebuilt. But 
“like idiots,” she said, she and 
her neighbors returned two 
days later to see what had hap- 
pened to their houses, and when 
grass began growing again from 
foe scorched earth, they drove 
their animals there to graze. 

“No one told us not to.” she 
said. “And after all, we have to 
live.” 

“Now,” she added, “my son 
and daughter are both sick, and 
many of my friends have died.” 

On the day of the test, sol- 
diers brought livestock to the 
target center, along with all 
kinds of military equipment 
and radiation instruments. A 


mushroom cloud. It detonated 
with a force equivalent to 
20,000 tons of TNT, compared 
with 12^00 for the Hiroshima 
bomb. Villagers miles away re- 


Swedish Tycoon Apologizes 
For Comment on THackies’ 


ported a deafening explosion, 
followed by fires and violent 


followed by fires and violent 
shock waves rumpling the 
earth, shattering windows and 
collapsing houses. 

In accordance with the plans 
for the military exercise, 20 
minutes after foe detonation, 
scores of warplanes were sent 
toward foe center of the target 
area to bomb whatever “ene- 
my” might have survived. As 
the mushroom cloud drifted 


STOCKHOLM — The Swedish business tycoon -Peter 
Wallenberg apologized Thursday for having used the .tens 
“blacldes” to describe South African blacks dur in g a televi- 
sion interview. 


east, about 170 pilots found 
themselves flying through it. 

Within another 20 minutes, 
foe infantry was sent out of the 
trenches and toward foe center. 
Many soldiers received a “sec- 
ond shock,” Colonel Vasiakin 
said, when they saw what had 
happened to foe livestock. 

^We already had many man- 
uals written on foe tactical use 
of nuclear weapons, but we 
wanted to see what would hap- 
pen in real life — foe morale 
and psychological response of 
foe soldiers, and so forth,” he 
explained. “We knew already 
this would be foe only such test, 
and we wanted to make it a 


way in which my words were interpreted and sincerely apolo- 
gize to anyone offended.” 

The comments by Sweden’s most powerful industrialist had 
prompted liberals to call for a boycott of a bank of whidlhe is 
vice chairman. Two television personalities urged* Swedish 
youth to boycott S-E-Banken. “I don’t want to havf^ny 
money in a bank that is dominated by a person wifot'sucfr 
racist views,” said Cissi El win, one of foe two. 

Mr. Wallenberg, in an hourkmg television program 
this week, was asked why he had objected to Sweden’s^® 
cnndsm of foe apartheid system in South Africa, abofisaSI 
last year. >&;=-• 

In his answer Mr. Wallenberg said that “there are 
well-educated blaclrics” in South Africa, adding that blm 
did not have foe competence to run foe country wifooutiSin; 

from the white min ority 


ISRAEL: ^Underground’ Rumors 


high-quality experience.’ 

Today, a small monument 
stands near foe target center, 
honoring foe soldiers who “de- 
fied danger and fulfilled their 
military duty in the name of the 
defensive might of our home- 
land.” Background radiation 
levels remain slightly higher 
than in surrounding territory. 
Colonel Vasiakin said, and foe 
trees have never grown back. 


bomber dropped foe device 
from about 10 kilometers up. 


from about 10 kilometers up. 

The bomb exploded at an al- 
titude of about 380 meters 
(1,200 feet), forming a huge 


Continued from Page 1 
Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion. An Israeli monitoring 
group called Peace Watch re- 
corded 65 Israeli deaths from 
such attacks in the last 12 
months, compared with 49 in 
foe previous year. By the same 
token, Palestinian deaths at the 
hands of Israeli civilians took a 
huge leap during the same re- 
porting periods, from 0 to 38, a 


receiving end is an Arab who 
converted a few years ago from 
Islam to Judaism, chan ged his 
name from Mahmoud Jabari to 
Yaacov Ben David and moved 
from Hebron to Kiiyat Arba. 

Because the police are pro- 
viding almost no details, it is 


impossible to say if the “tinder- 
ground” is real or merely a 


figure that indudes the 29 peo- 
ple kffled by Baruch Goldstein 


of Kiiyat Arba in a massacre 
last February in Hebron. 

The phrase “Jewish under- 
pound has dominated Israeli 
headlines, evoking memories of 
a network that carried out 
deadly bombings and other at- 
tacks on West Bank Arabs in 
foe early 1980s. 

A central figure is Lieutenant 
Oren Edn, 23, one of two young 
officers from Kiryat Arba im. 
plicated in foe case and accused 
of passing along army weapons 
to others in foe settlement 
Among those said to be on foe 


For investment 
information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the IHT 


Paris Bombing by Goraeans 

Agattx FraacePrase 

PARIS — A bomb exploded 
early Thursday in a city educa- 
tion office in northeastern Par- 
is, causing severe damage to foe 
building and in the immediate 
neighborhood. A Corsican na- 
tionalist group claimed respon- 
sibility. 


ground” is real or merely a 
cattfoy expression, as some" Is- 
raeli commentators who spe- 
cialize in security issues have 
written. It is also unclear if foe 
arrested men are accused only 


of plotting future attacks or are 
implicated in past killing s of 
Arabs. in particular several that 
took place around Hebron, a 
hotbed of nationalism for Israe- 
lis and Pales tinians alike. 


In Kiryat Arba, residents cite 
foe paucity of public informa- 
tion as proof that the govern- 
ment of Prime Minister Yitzhak' 
Rabin is creating smokescreens 
to discredit them aR Suspicion 
fills the air, with some accusing 
others of being Shin Bet spies. 


1 


*'n 

-4fe 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1994 


Page 5 


** 



Ex-Rightist Leader 

in Japan 



- ( . . The Associated Prw 

* . ^OKYO—fThe former lcad- 
; erot an ultrarightist group has 
•‘beat shot death here, the 
;po)ice said Thursday. 

The- police found Hiroyuki 
.T foak a. 42, mefonnerleader of 
;-t&Kodo R^igo group, lying in 
■ aresidential parking lot after he 
;had been shot in the left side of 
"the chest, a police official said. 
■Mr. Tanaka; died shortly after 
. the police aiifivcd at the scene. 

. . Also a member of a gangster 
' group related to a major crime 
^syndicate, Snmiyoshi-kai, Mr. 
•Tanaka recently stopped his ac- 
' tivities with tie rightist group. 

. Residents! living near the 
■scoie, about 400 meters from 
Mr. Tanaka's home, told the 
■police that they had heard sev- 
ieral shots and then saw two 

-men fleeing pn a mntnrcvcle. 


said the official, who requested 
anonymity. 

The police would not specu- 
late on whether the men were 
members of the rightist group 
that Mr. Tanaka had lot or 
gangsters. 

Last year, the rightist politi- 
cal group conducted a series of 
attacks on the residences of 
magazine editors who had run 
stories criticizing Empress Mi- 
cfaiko. 

Because Japan’s wartime mil- 
itarism centered around the Im- 
perial family, rightists are 
among the royals strongest 
supporters. 

Mr. Tanaka was arrested ear- 
lier this year For carrying 
banned weapons and received a 
suspended sentence of three 
years in jail. 


North Korea Demands 
4 Several Billion Dollars ? 



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« ■" By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Pm Service 

- BERLIN — North Korea ex- 
pects “several billion dollars” in 
compensation fees as well as 
international financing of a new 
reactor program in exchange 
for overhauling its nuclear tech-, 
oology program, a senior North 
Korean negotiator sard. 

The comments followed sev- 
eral days of technical discus- 
sion s in Berlin between U.S. 
and North Korean delega t ions 
over Washington’s insistence 
that Pyongyang abandon its 
graphite reactors — the pluto- 
nium by-products of which 
could be used to make nuclear 
weapons — in favor of safer 
light-water reactors. 

‘ Kim Jong U, the leader of the 
North Korean delegation, said 
his nation wanted two types, of 
lion if it acceded to 
Washington's demands : funds 
to buy the foreign-designed 
light-water reactors and reim- 
bursement “for electric losses 
and investment” following 30 
years of North Korean nuclear 
research. 

Mr. Kim estimated the latter 
compensation would come to 
“several billion U.S. dollars.” 
No agreement on costs emerged 
from the meetings, he said at a 
news conference, and the issue 
will be pursued when higher- 
ranking officials meet in Gene- 
va on Sept. 23. 


U.S. delegates refused to take 
reporters’ questions during the 
discussions, which began Satur- 
day. 

But news reports in Japan 
indicated that the United States 
had proposed that an interna- 
tional consortium contribute $4 
billion over the next decade to 
finance construction of the 
light-water reactors. 

After months of bellicose 
threats, the United States and 
North Korea have sheathed 
their rhetoric and begun dis- 
cussing Washington's proposal 
to replace the graphite reactors 
with a light-water variant. 
Pyongyang^ apparent accep- 
tance of this idea in principle 
has given rise to hopes that a 
major crisis will be averted. 

In Bolin on Thursday, Mr. 
Kim repeated Pyongyang’s re- 
jection of a light-water model 
made by arch-rival South Ko- 
rea on grounds that those reac- 
tors are not sufficiently ad- 
vanced. The United States and 
its allies have decided that 
Seoul should be the main sup- 

K lier of reactor technology, but 
forth Korea has expressed a 
p re f erence for Russian or Ger- 
man reactors. 

North Korea has the right to 
select which light-water reac- 
tors it receives, Mr. Kim said. 
“Whether South Korea is to fi- 
nance the project or not, we are 
not concerned,” he said. 



Romcn Rwcn' Rouen 


DIVIDED DRIVERS — A truck driver threatening to throw a rock at another driver 
who had not joined a strike Thursday in Manila. Hundreds of motorists are striking to 
protest government orders to keep them out of the capital’s traffic dogged streets. 


Hurd Is Upbeat as He Arrives in Hong Kong 


Agena France- Presse 

HONG KONG — Foreign 
Secretary Douglas Hurd of 
Britain on Thursday empha- 
sized the “shared interest’’ that 
Britain and China had in ensur- 
ing a smooth transfer of power 
for Hong Kong in 1997. 

But the minister, who arrived 
Thursday for a two-dav stay to 
be briefed on Hong Kong' is- 
sues, conceded that the two 


sides still had a lot of work to 
get through. 

Mr. Hurd was to meet the 
governor, Chris Patten, mem- 
bers of the Hong Kong Execu- 
tive Council and legislators. He 
was also to see business leaders. 
Mr. Hurd said he wanted to be 
briefed before a meeting with 
Foreign Minister Qian Qichen 
of China during the UN Gener- 
al Assembly meeting in New 
York at the end of the month. 


“I’ve always bad good talks 
with him." he said in words 
measured to shore up confi- 
dence in Hong Kong in the 
tense run-up to its return to 
Chinese sovereignty in 1997. 

But he cautioned that "a big 
volume of work” remained to 
be done in the Joint Liaison 
Group, where British and Chi- 
nese representatives are dis- 
cussing transition problems. 


Militants Behead 13 Algerians 

Civilians Kidnapped in 2 Separate Attacks 


Reuters 

TUNIS — Muslim militants have decapitated 
13 Algerian civilians this week. 12 of them 
rounded up in a night raid on a village, the 
independent Algerian newspaper El Watan said 
Thursday. 

The daily, usually well-informed on security 
issues, said another civilian, a 20-year-old wom- 
an, was beheaded after being kidnapped from 
her home in Medea, south of Algiers. “Her head- 
less body was found a few hundred meters from 
her house,” the newspaper said. 

It said about a dozen Islamists armed with 
knives and rifles kidnapped 12 inhabitants of 
Sidi Bakhti village in Tiaret district, about 220 
kilometers (140 miles) southwest of Algiers dur- 
ing Tuesday night. 

“The 1 2 were savagely mutilated, then decapi- 
tated." e Watan said, adding “The 12 bodies, 
drained of their blood, were found the morning 
after by security forces." 

Three people in Algeria's eastern Oum El 
Bouaghi area had also been “mutilated and had 
their throats slit,” the paper added, without giv- 
ing any source for its report. 

El Watan commented: “At the moment when 


the state presidency has announced the release of 
leaders of the banned Islamic Salvation From 
peaceful citizens have been beheaded by a group 
of terrorists." 

Algeria has been shaken by violence blamed 
by officials on Muslim fundamentalists since the 
Islamic Salvation Front was thwarted of victory 
in a general election in which it had taken a huge 
lead nearly three years ago. 

The authorities scrapped the poll in January 
1992. In the violence since then, more than 
10,000 people have been killed. 

Earlier this week, in a bid to halt the blood- 
shed. President Li amine Zeroual announced that 
three senior men of the Salvation Front had been 
freed from jail and the banned party's president, 
Abbassi Madam, and his deputy, Alt Belhadj, 
had been transferred from prison to house arresL 

In a statement on Thursday, a former prime 
minister, Redha Malck, said concessions to fun- 
damentalists risked aggravating the situation. 

"So far measures of appeasement have only 
benefited terrorism, and dialogue has only in- 
creased pressure on the government by parties 
taking part in it," he said. 


TIBET: Invasion of Chinese Workers Raises Tensions 


Ctatumed from Page J 

Tibetans might kill us all if 
things get worse," he said, refer- 
ring to clashes in the late 1960s 
during the Cultural Revolution, 
when Tibetans killed some Chi- 
nese settlers. 

Accurate figures for the eth- 
nic breakdown of Tibet's popu- 
lation are difficult to obtain and 
are disputed by Chinese offi- 
cials and the Tibetan exfle com- 
munity. Many Western analysts 
say the exile community’s fig- 
ures are highly exaggerated. 

Tibet, with a population of 
2.2 million, has an estimated 

66.000 ethnic Chinese with per- 
manent residence status, ac- 
cording to Chinese officials. 

Not included are another 

40.000 Chinese entrepreneurs 
who are part of an unofficial 
“floating population’* and 
40,000 to 65,000 soldiers and 
paramilitary police, putting the 
total Chinese population in Ti- 
bet at no more than 8 percent. 

It is the recent influx of entre- 
preneurs that has triggered old 
animosities. The newcomers 
have come to seek their for- 
tunes. Loosened controls over 
where Chinese can live and 
work have allowed laborers to 
flood the Lhasa area in the past 
few years. They often can earn 
double what they make at 
home, where there is more com- 
petition for jobs. 

In Lhasa, about 50 percent of 
the population of 150.000 is 
now Chinese, longtime resi- 


dents and Western analysts say. 
Ignorant of Tibetan Suddhist 
customs and habits, these new- 
comers often unwittingly of- 
fend the devoutly religious Ti- 
betans. as well as longtime 
Chinese residents. 

They often do not observe 
the practice of walking clock- 
wise around temples and mon- 
asteries. And. to the horror of 
Tibetans, who believe dogs are 
the last reincarnation before re- 
birth as humans, some Chinese 
have caught and eaten a few of 
the mongrels that roam Lhasa’s 
streets. 

Chinese officials concede 
that more ethnic Chinese have 
come to Tibet in recent years. 
But they say they have been 
drawn by economic opportuni- 
ty. not as pan of a plan to 
displace the Tibetans, as the Ti- 
betan exile community claims. 

To be sure, many Tibetans 
admire the Chinese for their en- 
terprise, while blaming their 
disadvantage on their cultural 
and historical differences. 

Tibetans give freely to beg- 
gars and donate huge sums to 
temples in hopes of finding sal- 
vation in the next life. Tibetans 
don’t save or invest their money 
and don’t like to take risks, said 
a Tibetan government worker. 

Two years ago. Chinese offi- 
cials tried a grassroots cam- 
paign to teach the fundamen- 
tals of a market economy. 

“They would say to these no- 
mads, “If you’ve got eight yaks, 
what’s the next best thing?,’ " a 


Western analyst recounted, 
“The nomads would say, “Nine 
yaks.* The Chinese would say, 
"No, sell a yak, then you get 
money. With money, you can 
build a house.' ” 

Bui to the average nomad, 
living 14,500 feet above sea lev- 
el without running water or 
electricity in a climate where 
winter lasts nine months, the 
feeling was, “What's the 
point?" the analyst said. 


Body of Guide 
Found in Cyprus 

The AsSitemteJ Press 

NICOSIA — The body of a 
Danish tour guide, allegedly 
kidnapped and murdered by 
three British soldiers, was 
found Thursday in a shallow 
grave, the coroner here said 

“This is definitely the body 
of the missing Damsh woman 
Louise Jensen,” he said at the 
burial spot, on the outskirts of 
the east coast town of Para- 
limnL 

The 23-year-old woman had 
been missing since early Tues- 
day, when she was allegedly 
kidnapped by three British sol- 
diers while riding a motorcycle 
with a friend in the tourist re- 
sort of Ayia Napa, eight kilo- 
meters (five miles) south of Par- 
alimni. The soldiers were 
arrested Tuesday. 


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JPage6 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1994 


OPINION 


Jteralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunr. 


PUBLISH EV with THE NEW YTJRJC 77ME5 AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


A Victory for Stability 


The narrowness of the popular vote that 
has restored the separatist party to power 
in Quebec is heartening news for North 
America. Splitting Canada in two would 
be wrong, but the vote count suggests that 
Quebeckers are not ready to do it For the 
United Stales, and for continental stabil- 
ity, it is a reassuring indication that our 
northern neighbor — closest ally, biggest 
trading partner and best friend — will 
continue to be all of those things . 

The victory of the separatist Parti Qufc- 
bfccois was expected. The party will have a 
solid majority in the provincial Parlia- 
ment. biit pre-election polls predicted it 
would be significantly larger. Moreover, 
-the separatists’ failure to win SO percent of 
the po pular vote, and their slim margin 
over the Libera! candidates — less than 
one-half of 1 percent — say voters are less 
than enthusiastic about their new govern- 
ment’s aim to create a sovereign nation. 
Indeed, the liberals' defeat had more to 
Ido with high unemployment and low re- 
gard for the party after nine years in office. 

. The United States has political, eco- 
nomic and neighborly interests in keeping 
Canada whole, as well as a desire to avoid 
the chaotic unknown. As a global super- 
power, America wants stability on its bor- 
ders, not neighbors engaged in a divorce. 

■ Considering also that the United 
States and Canada are each other’s and 
.the world’s largest trading partners, the 
value and reliability of this relationship is 
. far preferable to the barriers likely to rise 
in the wake of a split. Finally, long-term 
friendship says that if the great majority 
of Canadians prefer unity, which they do. 


the United States should support them. 

Canada has been through several Que- 
bec crises; this one may not be the last 
Jacques Parizeau, the Parti Qu&bfeois 
leader, promises a referendum on sover- 
eignty next year. But even if the majority 
vote to stay in Canada, the cultural split 
between English Canada and the French 
in Quebec will not fade away. It is part of 
Canada — a humane, multicultural soci- 
ety, albeit sometimes quarrelsome. 

Meanwhile, one way or another, Mr. 
Parizeau promises to stir up (rouble with 
the federal government in Ottawa. On 
matters where provincial cooperation is 
called for, such as social reforms, he says 
Quebec will refuse to participate. On lo- 
cal matters, he has ideas for public pro- 
jects to cut unemployment and prove that 
his government is better than Ottawa’s. 

On sovereignty, the party has laid out 
three steps: an immediate parliamentary 
resolution saying Quebec should split, 
even before a referendum to determine 
the popular will; preparation of a new 
constitution, a huge task itself, and nego- 
tiations with Ottawa on arrangements for 
separation, which Ottawa would surely 
rqect before a referendum and would 
fight if the referendum carried. 

AD three steps looked less certain the 
morning after the election, but this battle 
is far from over. In power, the Parti 
Qu£b 6 cois may yet convince the majority 
of Quebeckers they would be better off as 
a nation apart That would be unfortu- 
nate for ail concerned, including their 
neighbor to the south. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Government’s New Look 


A large part of the political debate in 
America revolves around what govern- 
ment should do. Too little of it concerns 
how government should do what it does. 
'Many Americans who support the idea of 
the government undertaking worthy pro- 

ijecause they are sel^^OTb^^^Sey’re 
bamboozled by special interests, but be- 
cause they question a program’s design 
, and wonder if it will do all its sponsors 
I claim. These concerns about government’s 
performance, in turn, are not the result of 
blind cynicism but of legitimate questions 
raised by past actions and failures. 
r That is why the quiet work of Vice 
I President A1 Gore’s reinventing govern- 
ment project has been genuinely impor- 
| taut Mr. Gore's mandate from die presi- 
>dent has been to re-examine and reform 
| many of the routine acts government un- 
■dertakes, from the way it buys things to 
[the way it hires people to die way it 
.responds to citizen inquiries. The high- 
profile aspect of Mr. Gore’s effort in- 
volves reducing the size of the govern- 
ment's payroll — and that, quite 
.surprisingly, has actually happened. As 
reported in The Post, 78,000 federal 
-workers have departed since Bill Clinton 
took office, and the government will shed 
60,000 more over the next year. 

But the lasting impact erf Mr. Gore's 
efforts may be more pronounced in less 
showy areas. The administration has 
junked the 10,000-page Federal Person- 
nel Manual and abolished the notorious 


Standard Form 171, which may have 
been the world’s most ungainly job appli- 
cation form. The Department of Housing 
and Urban Development dosed its 10 
regional offices in April on the theory 
that they amounted to an unnecessary 
layer of bureaucracy. Congress is on the 
verge of passing a bill to overhaul the 
government’s cumbersome procurement 
system. And the Gore initiative has en- 
couraged federal workers around the na- 
tion to come up with their own proposals 
to simplify procedures and reorganize 
functions in ways that would save money. 

None of this is Utopia, and there are 
still many questions about where this 
project will lead. There are concerns 
about whether the reductions in the work 
force will take place where they should. 
There is still much to be done to get the 
balance right between Congress’s prerog- 
atives to oversee programs and Mr. 
Gore’s sensible desire to avoid congres- 
sional micromanagement. Some of the 
project's initiatives — for example, to 
restructure the country's air traffic con- 
trol system — ran into bride walls. 

But on balance, Mr. Gore and Ms lieu- 
tenants have been giving incrementalism 
— the effort to bring about gradual but 
sustainable reforms — a good name. An 
administration that has had problems with 
grand plans should consider whether the 
consciously experimental approach of the 
rein venting government project might of- 
fer dues on how to progress in other areas. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Two Wars, One Budget 


It did not take long for the Pentagon's 
“bottom-up review’' to bottom out. That 
review, undertaken last year, adopted the 
premise that the United States should pre- 
pare to wage two regional wars simulta- 
neously. The force levels needed to satisfy 
that requirement were certain to put up- 
ward pressure on the defense budget, cur- 
rently $263 billion, for years to come. 

Now the Pentagon concedes that there 
is a mismatch between those force require- 
ments and the means to pay for them. The 
budgetary shortage, by the Pentagon's cal- 
culations, will exceed $40 billion over the 
next five years. Taking a grimmer view of 
the requirements for a two-war strategy, 
the Government Accounting Office puts 
tire gap dose to $150 billion. 

To close the gap. Deputy Defense Secre- 
tary John Deutch has asked the armed 
services to consider deferring or canceling 
purchases of new weapons. The Pentagon 
will have to do that and more if it is to 
avoid putting the squeeze an readiness. 

Mr. Deutch has identified many of the 
weapons that the United States could 
safely do without: the army's Comanche 
helicopter and Advanced Field ArtiQeiy 
System, the air force's F-22 stealth fighter 
lane and air-launched Tri-Service 
landoff Attack Missile, and the Marine 
Corps' V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft. He 
also wants to slow purchases of the navy* s 
new attack submarine and Arleigh 
Burke-class destroyers. 

Delaying these programs would not 
diminish America's defenses or dull its 
technological edge. It already has an am- 


ple arsenal erf weapons that can outper- 
form any in the rest of the world. But 
postponing procurements will not suffice 
to close the budget gap. The Pentagon 
will also have to re-examine the overall 
size of its forces — 13 divisions of ground 
troops and 26 air wings on active duty — 
and look for places to reduce redundan- 
cy. A recent Congressional Budget Office 
study identifies several places to do just 
that. One is to cut contingency forces for 
rapid deployment overseas. The Marine 
Corps has three divisions of such troops. 
The army has four more: one airborne, 
one air assault and two tight infantry 
divisions. It has little use for the light 
infantry. Moreover, it has not conducted 
a parachute assault using an entire divi- 
sion since World War II; it could rely an 
special forces for that missi on. Eliminat- 
ing three divirions would save $14.5 bil- 
lion over the next five years. 

The Marine task forces have their own 
F/A-18 planes fra: air support. They have 
no need for the navy to augment them. 
Cutting the navy’s complement of F/A- 
18’s would save 51 billion. The air force 
and the navy have more than enough 
bombers and fighter-bombers deployed 
around the world to make at least 2 of 12 
carrier battle groups unnecessary. Emu - 
gating them would save $ 6.8 billion over 
five years. Postponing unnecessary pro- 
curements and rearranging outmoded 
roles and missions would assure the Penta- 
gon of the forces it needs without sacrific- 
ing readiness or increasing its budget. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



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The Case for Invasion Does Not Hold Up 


L OS ANGELES — It is disconcerting to 
/ watch the Clinton administration ready 
American forces for the upcoming invasion 
of Haiti under the pretext that they are re- 
storing democracy in the person of the Rever- 
end Jean-Bertrand Aristide. This is a man 
who hims elf undermined the always shaky 
rule of law in Haiti, shut down its Parliament 
and organized a private gang of enforcers — 
an the model of Jean-Qaude Duvalier’s Ton- 
tons Macoutes — inciting violence. 

It is Hiqrmi to hear the administration call 
this planned military operation a “police ac- 
tion” rather than a war, thereby seeking to 
evade the constitutional requirement for the 
consent of Congress, and pretend that the 
authorization of the UN Security Council is 
enough to spend half a billion dollars and risk 
U.S. lives — as if President BUI CEnton were 
no longer responsible to the people. 

It is cynical for a government endlessly 
searching fra negotiated peace in Bosnia- 
Herzegovina to speak of having exhausted all 
alternatives but war in Haiti, when we know 
that the U.S. government has discouraged 
efforts of Venezuela and “the five” Latin 
governments to resume talks. Haiti’s military 
government has repeatedly indicated that it is 
ready and willing to join in new negotiations. 

It is especially objectionable to hear offi- 
cials and partisans of the Clmt/m adminis- 
tration cite the U.S. military action in Gre- 
nada as a precedent fra the Clinton team’s 
expected decision to invade Haiti. In fact, a 
comparison between the situations in Gre- 
nada, in October 1983, and Haiti, Septem- 
ber 1994, demonstrates what land of prob- 
lems actually engage American interests and 
justify the use of force. 

First, Haiti poses no urgent threat to the 
life and limbs of Americans, but Grenada’s 
viol ait rulers constituted a dear and present 
danger in a situation of extreme violence. On 


By Jeane Kirkpatrick 

Ocl 19, 1983, Grenada's Marxist prime min- 
ister, Maurice Bishop, and five members of 
his cabinet were shot in cold blood by Mr. 
Bishop’s Cuban-trained deputy, Bernard 
Coard. A round-the-clock, shoot-on-sight 
curfew was then imposed by Mr. Coard and 
his associates. The airport was dosed, trap- 
ping some 1,000 American citizens, including 
several hundred American medical students, 
who were held under guard, incommunicado. 
Their lives were judged to be in real danger. 

Second, Haiti has no strategic importance 
to the United States, but the United States 
and others in the region had a serious strate- 
gic interest in Grenada. Even before U.S. 
forces landed, it was dear that Grenada had 
been transformed into a base for the projec- 
tion, of Soviet and Cuban ntilitaiy power in 
the Caribbean. The largest airstrip in the 
Weston Hemisphere was nearing comple- 
tion under Cuban auspices. The flow of 
military traffic to and from Grenada was 
ranging widespread anxiety among Grena- 
da's island neighbors. Their fears were am- 
ply confirmed by the discovery of 800 
aimed Cuban troops and six warehouses 
filled with advanced Russian weapons: hun- 
dreds of crates of heavy artillery, anti-tank 
and anti-aircraft weapons, grenade launch- 
ers. crates of AK-47s and so forth. 

Previously secret treaties between Grenada 
and the Soviet Union, Grenada and Cuba, 
and Grenada and North Korea further illu- 
minated plans for making Grenada a major 
base for guerrilla operations in the Caribbean 
basin. So dearly there was a strategic interesL 

Third, Haiti poses no threat to peace and 
security of the region, but with good reason, 
America and most Caribbean nations per- 
ceived Grenada as a threat. The weapons 


ample c 
Thai 


caches and docum ents found there offered 
le confirmation for these concerns, 
is why prime ministers of the Carib- 
bean states — Edward Seago of J a m ai c a, 
Tran Adams of Barbados, Eugenia Charles of 
Dominica — appealed to the United States 
and the United Nations for help. With data- 
rich presentations, they described the desta- 
bilizing effects on the region of the exte n si o n 
of Soviet-Cuban power to Grenada. 

Fourth, surprise is not a necessary element 
of the Clinton plan for deposing the govern- 
ment of Haiti, but secrecy and dispatch were 
needed to save American students from the 
violent men who had seized power in Grena- 
da. The Reagan administration, therefore, 
did not consult with the U.S. Congress and 
did not have its consent Moreover, since 
these events occurred at the height of the 
Cold War, when the Soviet Union would veto 
any act against a communist state, there was 
no question of seeking UN authorization. 

Though warmly applauded by a large 
majority of the American public, the Rea- 
gan administration was vociferously de- 
nounced in the United Nations by the Sovi- 
et and nonaligned blocs and by liberal 
Democrats in the Congress. One group of 
congressmen was especially bitter. The 
Black Caucus, which .today urges action in 
Haiti, strenuously denounced the liberation 
of Grenada — even after the American 
students had kissed the ground and shared 
their terror on national television. 

I have heard that top officials of the din- 
ton administration expect that once the mili- 
tary lands in Haiti, the American public will 
ratty round and the action will prove a source 
of new political support for the president 
That could be, but don’t count on it The 
American people have an uncanny sense fra 
what is ana is not a vital national interest 
© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


Mitterrand Fails the Unforgiving Test of History 


P ARIS — In the end, it is a 
question of character. Dur- 
ing nearly a half-century, Fran- 
901 s Mitterrand has constructed 
a political career founded on 
personal ambition and dominat- 
ed by his sense of rivalry with 
Charles de Gaulle. 

Mr. Mitterrand is nearing the 
end of his second seven-year term 
as president of the Fifth Repub- 
lic, which de Gaulle founded. De 
Gaulle never completed one full 
term, resigning his office in 1969 
as old age closed on him. and in 
the aftermath of the popular up- 
heaval of May 1968. 

Mr. Mitterrand now is old, too. 
Old and very ill, from prostate 
cancer. He said last week of his 
illness, “I think that it will be 
obliging enough to allow me to 
finish my mandate" — which 
ends next spring. He said that to 
die was less a concern to him than 
no longer to live, as he has books 
he wants to write. “But a book 
takes time, and I no longer have 
much of that” 

He is old, ill, and now be sees 
that his effort to control how his- 
tory will regard him has failed. 
He recently allowed himself to be 
interviewed for a book on his 
youth and the war years. This has 
just come out. Last week he gave 
two long newspaper interviews 
dealing with the same subjects. 
On Monday he was interviewed 
for an hour and a half an televi- 
sion. The result has been an 
abrupt disintegration of his repu- 
tation, and of the authority of his 
presidency as well 
He has tried to explain his 


By William Pfaff 


connection to the wartime Vichy 
government, his right-wing asso- 
ciations as a young man, and his 
lasting relationship with Rene 
Bousquet, head of the Vichy po- 
lice, accused of crimes against 
humanity in 1983, held to be re- 

? >onsible for the dispatch of 
ranch and foreign Jews to Nazi 
death camps. 

The president’s response to the 
television questioning was defi- 
ant, and seemingly calm, al- 
though his hands constantly 
twisted. Yet, as the evening went 
on, what bqgan as an interview 
became an interrogation, and Mr. 
Mitterrand's answers became a 
plea for sympathy: that he be 
judged with consideration for his 
family and upbringing, the con- 
text of the times, his constant 
commitment, he said, to social 
justice. He insisted that he was at 
peace with himself, and that he 
hoped to be regarded as having 
done more in his life that was 
positive than was negative. 

It was moving in a way, but in 
the end there seemed more to be 
pitied than to be admired. Every- 
one had known that Mr. Mitter- 
rand was compromised by having 
served Marshal Pfctain until 1942. 
Later he was part of the Resis- 
tance. But his conversion turns 
out to have come only in 1943, 
when the tide of the war had 
changed, and his conduct in the 
Resistance served to launch Ms 
postwar political career. 

His comments on Vichy were 
equivocal. He claims to have 


known nothing of Vichy’s anti- 
semi tic legislation and deporta- 
tions of Jews. Vichy’s first anti- 
semi tic law, which excluded Jews 
from the public service — of 
which he was a part — was 
passed in October 1940. 

On Thursday, Le Monde pub- 
lished a devastating analysis of 
the political thought of the young 
Mitterrand, as he expressed it in 
Vichy publications during 1942- 
1943, by (be historian Claire An- 
drieu. She concludes that while 
the documentation is incomplete, 
she is, as a historian, compelled to 
draw the provisional conclusion 
that on the basis of his own 



An Ignorant Jury Can’t Serve Justice 


By Newton N. Minow and Fred H. Cate 


E vanston, Illinois — 

Juay selection in the O. J. 
Simpson trial promises to be 
another quixotic search for ju- 
rors who know nothing about 
one of the nation’s most cele- 
brated criminal cases. Judge 
Lance Ito of Los Angeles Supe- 
rior Court has predicted that 
he will need to question at least 
1,000 potential jurors to find 
12 who know sufficiently little 
to be qualified to serve. 

The Sixth Amendment of the 
U.S. Constitution guarantees 
every person accused of a crime 
the right to a trial “by an impar- 
tial jury of the state and district 
wherein the crime shall have 
been committed.” The standard 
for selecting jurors is impartial- 
ity, not ignorance. 

Yet attorneys in newsworthy 
trials often daim that pretrial 
publicity wfll interfere with a 
fair triaL As media coverage of 
such trials has increased, so 
the frequency- and intensity of 
these claims. As a result, more 
and more courts spend days, 
even weeks, in the search of ju- 
rors who know nothing about 
some of the most widely cov- 
ered events of the decade; Me 
bombing of the World Trade 

Center, the beating of Rodney 
King, the grounding of the Ex- 
xon Valdez oil tanker. 

These courts engage in ex- 
cruciating questioning of po- 
tential jurors in an attempt to 
weed out those who know too 
much. Potential jurors in the 
rape trial of Mike Tyson had to 
answer 78 written questions, 
including whether they had 
ever belonged to the National 
Organization for Women, gone 
to a boxing match, played com- 
petitive sports, studied psychi- 
atry, psychology or sociology, 
and how often they attended 
religious services. 

In the case of two men ac- 


cused of beating the truck driv- 
er Reginald Denny during the 
Los Angeles riots, potential ju- 
rors faced 45 pages containing 
1 16 questions. 

Such questioning increases 
the costs and delays of criminal 
trials , and disserves the inter- 
ests of justice. 

Impartiality is guaranteed 
not by the search for people 
who are uninformed, but by the 
commitment of those selected 
fra jury service to do justice. 

Judges already instruct jurors 
to consider only what they have 
heard in the courtroom and what 
the judge has accepted into the 
record. In almost every case, this 
means jurors are told to disre- 
gard something they have seen or 
heard in the courtroom. And we 
trust them to do so. 

More important, we trust the 

in the final verdict 

In the past, black Americans 
and women were often excluded 
from juries, until the UJS. Su- 
preme Court recognized that a 
jury of rally one race or one 
gender is not representative of 
tne community. A jury from 
which citizens who seek to be 
weO-informed have been sys- 
tematically excluded is equally 
unrepresentative. 

The Sixth Amendment guar- 
antees a defendant’s right to tri- 
al by impartial jury, not impar- 
tial jurors. Perhaps the nation's 
founders recognized that impar- 
tial people — in the sense of 
people without bias, opinion or 
prejudice — do not exist. Rath- 
er than base the protection of 
fundamental judicial rights on 
an unrealistic and unobtainable 
concept, the Sixth Amendment 
depends instead on the rough- 
and-tumble interaction of 12 
members of the community. 

Farh of those 12 citizens 
brings his or her own experi- 


experience 

Extensa 


ences and knowledge into the 
jury box. The verdict is not 
merely the sum of 12 indepen- 
dent votes; rather, it is the prod- 
uct of deliberation, of the inter- 
action among the 12 sets of 
riences and knowledge, 
ive questioning and 
challenges pose a more serious 
threat to the fundamental fair- 
ness of the verdict than expo- 
sure to any media coverage. If 
the membership of the panel is 
skewed by the selection pro- 
cess, then the fundamental 
guarantee of fairness — the di- 
versity and breadth of experi- 
ences and views — is likely to 
be compromised. 

Moreover, the skills of dis- 
cernment that most citizens ex- 
ercise and refine daily in evalu- 
ating the barrage of news, 
advertisement and rhetoric pre- 
sented by the media may help 
jurors be both impartial and ca- 
pable. The jury that excludes 
the informed majority of citi- 
zens can be neither. 

Mark Twain’s warning in 
1871, describing a jury trial in 
Virginia City, Nevada, is even 
more applicable today: 

“A minister, intelligent, es- 
teemed and greatly respected: 
a merchant of high character 
and known probity; a mining 
superintendent of intelligence 
and unblemished reputations 
. . . were all questioned in the 
same way and all set aside. 
Each said the public talk and 
the newspaper reports had not 
biased Ms mind. ... But of 
course such men could not be 
trusted with the case. Ignora- 
muses alone could mete out un- 
sullied justice.” 


writings, Mr. Mitterrand was un- 
til April 1943 “among the most 
intransigent of Pfetainistes.” 

Mr. Mitterrand undoubtedly 
did no worse during the war years 
than many others, and a great 
deal better than most. But Ms 
subsequent career as defender erf 
republican values and human 
rights against the forces of reac- 
tion fits uneasily with what now 
has been confirmed. The picture 
of opportunism and political cyn- 
icism that emerges goes much be- 
yond the reputation Mr. Mitter- 
rand has always enjoyed as “the 
Florentine,’' the consummate cal- 
culator. His Socialist followers, 
certainly, are now demoralized. 

He always considered de 
Gaulle his challenge. He says that 
he dashed with de Gaulle at their 
first meeting, in Algiere in 1943. 
He opposed de Gaulle in the 
postwar political struggle, and 
made a successful career in the 
changing coalitions of the Fourth 
Republic, He was a minister in 
governments waging the Indo- 
china and Algerian wars, and ran 
against de Gaulle in the presiden- 
tial election of 1965. He con- 
demned de Gaulle’s Fifth Repub- 
lic as “a permanent coup d’fciat” 

His election to the presidency 
of that republic in 1981, and re- 
election in 1988, seemed a victory 
over his old enemy. 

But in the end it has proven a 
defeat History will certainly ac- 
knowledge the great accomplish- 
ment of Mr. Mitterrand, which 
has been to modernize the French 
left and turn it into a mainstream 
force in French political life. But 
he has left the Socialist party dir 
vided, and discredited by a series 
of financial scandals reaching 
into the presidential palace itself. 

History will deal more harshly 
with the man himself, who made 
use of the old parties and forces 
of the left to advance himself, and 
then cast them aside. He made 
equally cynical use of the light, 
lending indirect support to the 
ex t rem ist National Front in order 
to weaken the mainstream right 

De Gaulle escaped partisan 
definition; saying that he served a 
“certain idea of France”: that “it 
must aim high and hold itself 
straight, on pain of mortal dan- 
ger." KBs acknowledged oppor- 
tunism was in that cause. He was 
a man of principle, who drew oth- 
ers to principled action. 

The liberal journalist Jean 
Darn'd has said that by his war- 
time leadership, “De Gaulle al- 
lowed me to remain myself.” Mr. 
Mitterrand's loyal followers to- 
day fed themselves diminished 
by their political commitment. 
That contrast tells it all. 

International Herald Tribune. 

© Las Angeles Times Syndicate. 


A Sufferer’s 
Fatal Stab 
At the Top 

By Joel AchenbadU 

W ASHINGTON — Every- 
one’S initial reaction to 

Monday’s plane crash at the White 

House was consternation that So- 
cret Service agents posted at the 
mansion didn’t shoot down the 
plane with one of- the shoukkr- 
Iaimched Stinger i n is sfl e s they are 
rumored to have, or with some 
kind of previously undisclosed fu- 
turistic surface-to-air paralysis 
beam, or at the very least with one 
of those Uri submachine guns they 
keep folded inside their wallets. 

(Sashing an airplane into the 
White House is so obvious a stunt 
that one naturally assumes that 
appropriate de f e ns es have been 
deployed. Surely the government 
has a procedure for this sort of 
thing. Yet a Secret Service 
spokesman said the agents on 
hand only had “enough time to 
run for cover.” ’ 

Was this evidence of a dreaded 
Breakdown in the System? 

Soon after the crash there-ma- 
terialized on television various in- 
dividuals who called themselves 
security consultants. Thes e ex - 
perts explained that a guard firing 
a Stinger missile might destroy a 
harmless off-course plane loaded 
with Girl Scouts, or the rocket 
might mfos and instead bring 
down a commercial airiiner.flying 
into National Airport. 

Tim fact is that the best restraint 
against attacks on government 
leaders or institutions is simply 
our own ovBity. Americans have 
to understand that there is ho pro- 
cedural guarantee against calami* 
ty . Our best hope is decency. 

In a democracy, leaders are al- 
ways vulnerable. The White House 
is not exactly a fortress. It doesn’t 
help matters that Clinton is devil- 
may-care about Ms security. 

Just about the only president 
who is completely safe from barm 
these days is Ulysses S. Grant 
This is as it must be. We don’t 
entomb living presidents. 

Anyone who thinks Monday’s 
plane crash reveals some glitch in 
presidential security is bring un- 
realistic. Hie real ditch in the 
system was Frank Carder. Even 
deviant behavior has certain 
norms, and he violated them. 

Investigators aren’t sure what 
Mr. Carder was up to. At first this 
looked like a wacky assassination 
attempt, then like a suicide, but 
it’s possible Mr. Center simply 
had a couple of beers and tried to 
pull off a publicity stunt 
Mr. Corder’s nutty demise 
doesn’t mean he was a nut He 
wasn’t a man divorced from reali- 
ty. He wasn’t a frustrated revolu- 
tionary. He was a loser, but that’s 
not the same thing as a loon. He 
had an idea what he was doing, 
but he apparently botched it, just 
as he probably botched a lot of 
other tilings in his life. 

If s a tragedy for a man to die 
that way at the age of 38; if s also 
pathetic, bokey, cheap. 

It’s amarmg tO think that pot 

that long ago human brings man- 
aged to live their entire lives with- 
out presuming to inflict them- 
selves on everyone dse. They fell 
in love, had kids, triumphed, suf- 
fered, agonized, struggled, and 
they did it all privately. To make 
a spectacle of oneself was the 
height of foolishness. Fame was 
tolerated, but only in thefamous. 

Somewhere along the line we 
became so mediarobsessed, so ce- 
lebrity-crazed, that we forgot that 
there is honor in being nobody. 
There is grace is obscurity. 

There is nothing scarier than a 
mediocre man with a mission. Al- 
most every assassin in the nation’s 
history — and anyone who nearly 
rams the president's bedroom can 
be lumped into that company — 
has been a pathetic mess. 

Now comes Mr. Corder, with 
Ms fatal stab at social dmlmg in 
the American cetebritocracyTMr. 
Cottier's Mother says he “always 
wanted to be on top.” He was at a 
dicey age f or men, 38, when future 
mocks the ambitions of youth. Mr. 
Corder’s father had recently died; 
he had just split 19 with Ms wife; 
he was living in a car. 

Frank suffered. Frank 
dreamed. But Frank should have 
spared us. May he rest in peace, 
and may we all, sooner rather 
than later, forget his n»m». - 
77»e Washington Past. 








IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 



Mr. Minow is director of the 
Annenbag Washington Program 
in Communications Polity Stud- 
ies of Northwestern University. 
Mr. Cate is a senior fellow there. 
They contributed this comment to 
The Washington Post. 


1894: Anarchist Plot? 

BERLIN — During the visit of 
the Emperor to Marienburg a 
number of Anarchic placards 
were discovered posted up in var- 
ious parts of the town. As a result 
of toe inquiry made into the af- 
fair, all the soldiers in the 15th 
Army Corps of the namw of 
Kowalski have been arrested. For- 
ty men have been sent to themiK- 
tary prison under a strong escort. 

1919: Journalists Tried 

BRUSSELS — On charges of 
having, in time of war, aided the 
progress of the enemy armies and 
attempting to corrupt the loyalty 
of Belgian troops and citizens, 
sixteen journalistic hirelings of 
the Germans during the occupa- 
tion are about to be tried. It has 
been shown during the prelimi- 
nary investigation that two news- 
papers “Le Bruxellois" and “La 


Belgique” were deliberately used 
to deceive and demoralize the 
population by presenting the 
events of the warm a guise favor- 
able to the enemy and prejudicial 
to the Allies. All the regular Bel- 
gian newspapers had chosen to 
suspend publication rather foan 
appear under boche censorship. 

1944s Acroes Germany 

WITH AMERICAN AD- 
VANCE FORCES — [From our 
New York edition:] Riding 
through German towns mid vil- 
lages burned out by our long- 
range artillery, the American 
troops are receiving a quiet recep- 
tion. The German civilians do not 
dare be hostile, for that would 
subject them to the rules of war. 
On the other hand l they do not 
dare be cordial lest the Gestapo 
punish them. For -the most part 
the Germans jnst sta nd stare 
as our troops go by. 





/**?*¥**?&* ESS5? 5? 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1994 


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The Clock 
Is Ticking 
On Bosnia 

By William Safire 

Tt/ASHINGTON — After the 
VY president has addressed the 
nation about his need to make good 
on his stream of threats to the Hai- 
tian junta; after partisans in Con- 
gress do their mutual somersaults 
on the War Powers Act; after we 
hail a victory over a pipsqueak 
principality in a war of nerves or 
forces — then a real foreign policy 
crisis will have to be faced/ 

. The Bosnian dock now stands at 
otic month to midnight. Being put 
to the test is the credibility of 
NATO and die strength of the' new 
relationship T. between the United 
States and Russia. 

Much good diplomatic ■work has 
been done. The united States bro- 
kered the renewal of the alliance 
between Bosnia's Muslims and 
Croats to strike a balance of power 
and a division of territory wnb the 
Bosnian Serbs. After a shaky start, 
the marriage is solidifying, which 
shores up the victims of Serbian 
aggression. Meanwhile, the eco- 
nomic squeeze put on Belgrade has 
had the desired effect of splitting 
the Serbs. Belgrade is now willin g 
to accept mom tors to watch Serbia 
cut off aid to its rogue compatriots 
in Bosnia, in return for a UN lifting 
of sanctions against Serbia. That 
isolates the local aggressors. 

The only trouble: It’s not work- 
ing. The Bosnian Serbs refuse to 
accept the peace deal that the Unit- 
ed Nations persuaded their victims 
to swallow. They snipe at civilians, 
murder UN soldiers and threaten 
to shoot down the Pope's plane if 
he visits besieged Sarajevo. Thor 
goal* is never to compromise but to 
conquer and |U cleanse." 

Thus has the world learned that 
the way to make peace with the 
Bosnian Serbs is to put guns to 
their heads. But the United Na- 
tions has embargoed the sale of 
guns to Bosnians. That leaves the 
well-armed aggressors with the 
firepower advantage. President Bill 
Clinton has been unable to per- 
suade the British and French, who 
have peacekeeping troops in Bos- 
nia, to lift the embargo and even up 
the power balance. They prefer to 
dither than to hunker down or get 
out; in effect, they are ‘^protecting” 
the Muslims out of their country, 

Mr. Clin ton's impotence with 
American allies led the U.S. Senate 
to prepose — and the president to 
embrace in an Aug. 10 letter to Sam 
Nunn — an ultimatum with a dead- 
line. *Tf the Bosnian Serbs have not 
accepted the contact group's pro- 





A Hero of Entebbe, Welcome This Time 


Lm Angela Tina Snulu ir 


posal of July 6, 1994 ... by October 
1 5, 1 994,” reads the Senate's amend- 
ment to the defense appropriation 
bill, not yet voted on by the House, 
“the President . . . should formally 
introduce and support a resolution 
in the UN Security Council ... to 
terminate the international arms 
embargo.” If that proposal is ve- 
toed, says the Senate, the president 
should submit a plan to lift the em- 
bargo unilaterally; Mr. Clinton's 
letter would not go beyond pledging 
to seek a vote on “multilateral termi- 
nation” of the embargo. 

The clock has been ticking. On 
Sept. 28, Boris Yeltsin arrives for 
his fifth Clinton summit. That 
meeting’s success depends on Mr. 
Clinton’s ability to persuade the 
Russian president to support the 


U.S. resolution to arm the Bosnian 
defenders. The two have worked 
well together before; Mr. Clinton 
helped Mr. Yeltsin make a deal 
with Ukraine to give up its nukes. 
3nd the Russian kept his word to 
pull troops out of the Baltics. Mos- 
cow has been helpful with Bel- 
grade; now comes the crunch. 

A New York Tunes editorial 
(“Bosnia and the Embargoes, ” IHT, 
Sept. 13) suggests linking the lifting 
of economic sanctions on Belgrade 
to the lifting of the aims embargo on 
Bosnia. Good idea; that would en- 
able the Russians to go along, and 
put the issue to Britain’s John Major 
and France’s Edouard Bahadur: 
Who wants to veto the U.S. resolu- 
tion? Such a veto would split the 
Atlantic alliance, invite a radical 


drawdown of U.S. troops in Europe 
and undermine what would be left 
of NATO after its failure in Bosnia. 

That would be an isolationist's 
dream, brought about by the intran- 
sigence of the Bosnian Serbs com- 
pounded by the shortsightedness of 
Mr. Major and Mr. Bahadur. But 
the British and French are not so 
foolish: they’ll vote with the United 
States and withdraw their peace- 
keepers, selling the Bosnians their 
on-site equipment. 

If Mr. Clinton is steadfast, reject- 
ing the defeatist counsel of General 
Shilly-shally and the CIA, he can 
bring along the allies and level the 
field of tire in Bosnia. Success would 
be remembered Jong after the brou- 
haha in Haiti is forgotten. 

The New York Times. 


E NTEBBE Uganda — There are 
two airports at Entebbe: a large, 
modem one where a steadily growing 
number of flights from Europe and 
Asia prove Uganda’s reputation as an 
island of peace and progress in an 
Africa, and the old airport a few 
hundred meters away with its bullet- 
ridden shell of a terminal budding 
serving as a monument to the coun- 
try’s past horrors. 

It was to the old airport that Serin 
Herschu came on a recent Septem- 
ber morning, rolling his wheelchair 
across the tarmac where be bad ar- 
rived 18 years ago. 

On the morning of July 4. 1976. 
Lieutenant Herschu and the group 
of Israeli commandos he belonged 
to came sweeping in from Lake 
Victoria in three Hercules aircraft. 
They appeared out of the blue a few 
hours before a deadline that five 
Palestinian and two German hi- 
jackers had set for killing their 103 
hostages. A week earlier, the hi- 
jackers had forced an Air France 
flight en route from Tel Aviv to 
Paris to fly to Entebbe. As the week 
passed, they had released most of 
those aboard, but threatened to kill 
the remaining Jewish and Israeli 
passengers and the crew if Israel 
and four other countries did not 
release S3 Palestinian prisoners. 

Lieutenant Herschu’s task was to 
secure the main terminal building. 
As he stormed up the stairs to the 
roof, he faced an Ugandan soldier 
who fired a shot before he was killed 
by the Israeli commandos. That shot 
hit Mr. Herschu in the mouth and 
shattered bis spinal cord. A few 
hours later, he underwent surgery bv 
Israeli doctors in Kenya. 

“We had expected much higher 
numbers of casualties, and had 
flown in a large medical facility, 
which was waiting in Nairobi,” Mr. 
Herschu said. 


By Jon Liden 

All seven hijackers were killed in 
the 35-minute operation, together 
with 20 Ugandan soldiers, three hos- 
tages and the commander of the 
Israeli troops. Lieutenant Colonel 
Jonathan Nethanyahu. One passen- 
ger who had freed by the hijackers 
and hospitalized in Kampala for 
medical treatment. Dora Bloch, was 
later killed by Idi Amin ’s thugs. 

The day of the raid was the last 
day of Sorin Herschu’s three-year 
military service. It had started with 

MEANWHILE 

the 1973 Arab-Isradi war, and the 
Entebbe drama had come as he was 
preparing for his end-of-duty cele- 
brations and a civilian life. 

Mr. Herschu woke up from the 
anaesthesia to find himself para- 
lyzed from the neck down. He was 
confined to a bed. and later, thanks 
to a year of rehabilitation and a lot 
of willpower, to a wheelchair. 

“I have wanted to come back for 
many years,” said Mr. Herschu. 
watching a cultural show in the 
garden of a Kampala hotel, visibly 
tired after a week of many impres- 
sions and strong emotions. 

For a long time, returning to En- 
tebbe was not possible. Uganda con- 
tinued to suffer from terror and war 
for another 10 years after the Enteb- 
be raid. Idi .Amin was overthrown 
by a Tanzanian invasion in 1979, 
and after a year of instability. Mil- 
ton Obote, a former Ugandan ruler, 
look power and started a second 
terror regime. Before Yoweri Muse- 
veni drove him from power in 1986. 
close to 1 million Ugandans had lost 
their lives. Uganda was devastated. 

Idi Amin had taken the raid on 
Entebbe as a personal insult, and 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A Writer in Prison 

Wole Soyinka (“A Brutal Feudal 
Minority May Be Destroying Nige- 
ria ,” Opinion, Aug. 23) refers to the 
imprisonment and ill health of the 
writer Ken Saro-Wiwa. Mr. Saro- 
Wiwa is well known in Nigeria for 
his television plays, which he 
adapted for schools. An amusing 
satirist whose subject matter con- 
cerns the linguistic, social, moral 
and political chaos of postcolonial 
Africa, he has been outspoken 
about Nigerian corruption and the 
lack of respect for human rights 
and democracy. Something must be 
done to save his life. 

BRUCE KING. 

Paris. 


White House Defense 

In response to the report “How Did 
Pilot Breach the White House's Secu- 
rity?” (SepL 13): 

I would imagin e that the Secret 
Service has found a weak point in 
While House security after that air- 
borne intrusion. Imagine if it had 
been a determined terrorist The 
White House is as vulnerable as a 
ship dead in the water. I would think 
that the same systems used to protect 
navy ships would be appropriate in 
the White House case: a low-level air 
defense system directed by an auto- 
matic tire-control system consisting 
of a tracking radar, TV and infrared 
camera with a laser rangefinder. 

This system could incorporate a 


cannon using fragmentation ammu- 
nition that would not carry farther 
than a set engagement zone; one 
could even incorporate a Gre-and- 
forget short-range missile system. Ex- 
isting examples of this type of de- 
fense system provide all-weather, 
day-and-night automatic detection, 
tracking and engagement — all with- 
in six seconds, plenty of time to safe- 
guard the White House. 

PETER B. MARTIN. 

Valprionde, France. 

Artworks Far From Home 

Jules Dassin’s call for the return of 
the Elgin Marbles to Greece (Letters, 
Aug. 31) illustrates a growing muse- 
um problem as well as a festering sore 


point within Greece: when or if an 
item in a public museum should be 
returned to its country of origin. If an 
item has been stolen, it should be 
returned. If an item has been legiti- 
mately acquired from the (then) rul- 
ing government of a country and is 
exhibited publicly, it should stay 
where it is. Otherwise, every time 
governments changed, museums ev- 
erywhere would be in jeopardy. 

However this issue is resolved for 
ordinary artifacts, the Elgin Marbles 
are very, very special. They represent 
the remains'of the underpinning of 
Western heritage and belong to all erf 
us. They are tastefully exhibited, 
alone in a large room in the British 
Museum. More importantly, the 
Marbles remain largely unblemished 


while similar items in Athens have 
been greatly damaged by the corro- 
sive atmosphere. Is it better to right 
a possible wrong at the risk of losing 
these classical artifacts forever or to 
keep them where they are for all 
people to enjoy for years to come? 

GERALD C. HARDY. 

Manchester, Connecticut. 

I would give priority among the 
works of world patrimony for Paolo 
Veronese’s “The Marriage at Cana” 
to be returned to the San Giorgio 
Mqggjore convent in Venice, where it 
had a meaning, rather than its artifi- 
cial hanging in the Louvre “at the 
same level” as in the convent. 

W. A B. M1AILHE. 

Capdepera. Majorca. 


most Ugandans were angered by the 
killing of Ugandan soldiers. For 
more than a decade, relations be- 
tween Uganda and Israel were frosty. 
President Museveni, however, has re- 
built his country through a policy of 
reconciliation — a policy he has also 
directed at Uganda's former enemies. 
So when the two countries normal- 
ized relations some weeks ago. Sorin 
Herschu knew it was time to go. The 
mayor of Entebbe extended an imi- 
tation to Mr. Herschu, and an Israeli 
newspaper paid for the trip. 

Mr. Herschu is a hero in Israel, 
a symbol of the country’s readiness 
and ability to defend its Jewish citi- 
zens and not let itself be black- 
mailed by terrorists. 

Does he regret that he volun- 
teered for the raid? 

“I regret that 1 got wounded.” he 
said, closing a painful subject. In- 
stead. he talked about being a veteran 
in Israel. “The situation for veterans 
is probably the best in the world,” he 
said. “You cannot compare it to any 
other country." 

Mr. Herschu has become a celebri- 
ty in Uganda as well. Seeing his visit 
as one more step toward burying a 
traumatic past, Ugandans welcomed 
him enthusiastically. His arrival was 
front-page news; the week he spent 
here was filled with receptions, din- 
ners and sightseeing in the company 
of his hosts. They hope that the bul- 
let-ridden airport will become an at- 
traction for Israeli tourists. 

After years of quiet decay, the old 
airport is again abuzz with activity. 
U.S. military planes of the same kind 
that brought Mr. Herschu to Entebbe 
IS years ago are ferrying emergency 
aid to the victims of the Rwandan 
war. Yet. surrounded by journalists, 
his Ugandan hosts and American 
military* personnel who wanted their 
photos taken with him. Mr. Herschu 
was veiy much on his own. 

“For me, there are only personal 
reasons for being here.” be said. “I 
came with the journalists because 
I knew that would make it easier to 
get access to the old airport and see 
the place where I was shot. If any- 
thing good can come out of this for 
Uganda or Israel, that is fine. But 
I came for myself to see this place 
once again. It is a place where ray 
life was completely changed.” 

Mr. Liden is a writer based in 
Hong Kong. He contributed this to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed " Letters to the 
Editor” and contain the i enters si- 
gnature. name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject 
to editing We cannot be responsible 
for the return of unsolicited ma- 
nuscripts. 


The IHT/JAL Competition 

rw//9</-6yf //r/W-j fr 

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Over the next two weeks, a series of JAL statements will 
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YOUR RESPONSES TO; 


Ql. From which European cities does IAL fly non- ; 
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A 

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Q2. How often does JAL fly direct from Europe 
to Osaka? 


Q3. How many onward destinations in Japan and 
Asia does JAL offer from Osaka? 


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COMPANY. 
ADDRESS. 


POST CODE. 
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Send coupon ro: IHT/IAL Competition. International Herald 
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j International Herald Tribune 
i Friday j, September 16, 1994 


s & j? 



Hiking the Heights Above Hong Kong (in 10 Easy Stages) 


By Marty Carlock 

H ONG KONG — Within view 
of Hong Kong’s six million in- 
habitants. just north of its 
jammed harbor and apartment 
towers, are thousands of unpeopled acres, 
miles of walking paths and several rural 
Chinese villages, almost abandoned. 

Through this mountainous terrain the 
MacLehose Trail runs for 60 miles (100 
kilometers), climbing and descending so 
often that its vertical change is calculated 
at 30,000 feet (9,000 meters), more than 
the height of Mount Everest. 

Trekking the MacLehose can take from 
13 hours to seven or eight hiking days. The 
trail is segmented into 10 sections, all very 
different, varying from 3 to 10 miles. 

The eastern two stages skirt the sea. The 
third stage of the trail crosses a wide 
peninsula; the fourth mounts the shoulder 
of Ma On Shan, Horse Saddle Mountain. 
From stage five, a short side trail climbs 
the promontory of Lion Rock, hard under 
the flight path of Kaitak Airport. The next 
section traverses territory where British 
defenders fought the invading Japanese in 
1941, and lost Farther along, hikers have 
to contend with troops of aggressive wild 
monkeys who expect to be fed. 

Although the western terminus of the 


fill 




Ms On 
Shan 


NEW TERRITORIES 




y * ' Sal HtonjC 






Tbe Nn Yodt Tima 


pathway overlooks high-rise towers, the op- 
posite end is remote and unspoiled. Linking 
thing dynasty stone steps, grass-cutters' 
routes and intervfllage paths, passing old 
Chinese tombs and stands of bamboo, tra- 
versing hill, beach and seaside villages, the 
pathway has sensational views of islands, 
mountains, skyscrapers and sea. 

The MacLehose Trail and Sai Kung 
Country Park, a preserve of about 18,500 
acres (7,400 hectares), are in the New 
Territories; park and trail both are the 
legacy of a former governor. Sir Murray 


MacLehose. While serving in the colony in 
the 1950s, be and his wife discovered rural 
areas little changed from ancient China. 
Returning later as governor. Lord MacLe- 
hose found the countryside nearly desert- 
ed, its paths overgrown and its fields un- 
worked. He encouraged creation of 
territorial parks in these empty areas. The 
trail named for him was opened in 1979. 

My host, Mark, and I walked the two 
eastern sections of the trail on an earlier 
visit. When I returned to Hong Kong last 
winter, I wanted to climb Ma On Shan, the 
most distinctive summit seen from Hong 
Kong. He invited a few friends to join us. 
Our multinational group of eight met in 
the parking lot at Sai Kung at 10 on a cool 
December morning. 

There’s no parking at trailheads, so 
walks in Sai Kung Park begin with a taxi 
ride of 15 to 25 minutes, depending on 
where the walker wants to begin. The fare 
may range from $7 to S15. 

At 22 degrees north latitude, the colony 
can have beautiful weather, sunny and 
close to hoL At other times, like the day 
we scheduled Ma On Shan, a chilly gloom 
sets in and distant vistas fade into humid 
haze. Although we had hopes tbe morning 
cloud cover would bum off, the cool air 
was ideal for climbing. 

And cHm h we did. The third stage takes 


off vertically, up a path littered with 
bumt-ocher rocks. Early European voyag- 
ers described these open, scantily vegetat- 
ed hills as desolate Close at hand a recent 
fire had cleaned off the grasses. In com- 
pensation we had views in all directions: 
of hills, bays and reservoirs, of the second- 
stage trad snaking around the ridge to the 
east, of our own path winding toward the 
fang of Ma On Sian. 

On the horizon as we reached the top of 
Ngau Yee Sbek Shan (Cow Ear Mountain) 
was High Island Reservoir, one of a num- 
ber of reservoirs within the confines of the 
colony whose supply is insufficient for tbe 
bursting city. Most of its water comes from 
China; Hong Kong is as vulnerable as an 
ancient fortress without a well. 

The two stages I had already hiked were 
not at ad like this one. Circling High Island 
Reservoir on shale ledges, they offer the 
hiker views of the island-pocked South Chi- 
na Sea. Up conical hflls and down to beach- 
es, the path of stages one and two bisects 
scattered villages, dimme r getaways for a 
populace fleeing high-rise flats for the com- 
parative luxury of one-room shacks near 
the sea. In Sai Wan and Ham Tin, the route 
mns smarlc thro ugh shops, where we 
bought bottled water and soft drinks. Later 
the path gives way to asphalt and even, for 
a while, street lamps, a paseo for city- 
dressed strollers who seemed to come from 


nowhere. In contrast, the stage-three trail event. Organized asa 
traverses a vast, empty bowL ous chanties. as 

Ascending a second ridge, we left the traverse the manage- They 

scorched turf behind. Odd boulders, in close to nonstop can ihey 

profile high on tbe hillsides, were our must enter astern* tat tteevrat 

fandmarfcfor a time: then we descended is not a «tay ; AHfoor must cmeru* 
into a grove of bamboos, rhododendron mileage, and ^ 

and scrubby live oaks. Trailsidc shrubs clocked by the slowest m ■ r ^ 
displayed blossoms I guessed might be jf s taken for granted the race wighe 
native stewartia — our Norwegian-Chi- py the Queen’s Gurkha soldiers, Wfio 

nese companion remarked (accurately) str jde the distance in about 13 hours. A 
that they looked like fried eggs. of relatively healthy like 

We eased downward through a forest of Mark’s, crosses the finish linem 27 boUrt. 
30-foot bamboo, down wide stone steps About half drop out. 
and past a few open^aced tombs marked TreJddne & McLdiose in a day is not 
by stone tablets. Ipraled over the ■ ceramic J ™**' it * easv doses is 
jars just made, thinking pcAaps thqr were thatoncewdVe . 

offerings. Later, reading about t he trail, I Maon Shan, TU have walked the 

leamedthe jugs contain ancestral bones. ^ path, tfs true that 

A HEAD of us, the cloud cover modern Hong 
had descended and snagged on “fly f 

the shark tooth of Ma On Shan, highest 1 peak,. Tai _. Mo Shamhas 

Our s ummi t climb promised been spoiled for^ the luto by^ 
zero visibility. Though we had hiked for installations on the summit, for sample, 
only three hours or so and were ready for But however much me present (^y in- 
more, the group voted to save the peak for crudes, the trail keeps dipping mtooid , 
another day and adjourn for lunch to a Sai China. There are disused tea plantations 
Kung pizza parlor. to see, low-lying forests to explore and 

Over lunch, Mark reminisced about his wild monkeys to feed, 
experience the previous month as a panic- — — - - 

ipani in tbeTraflwalker. Each fall the 100- Marty Carlock wrote this for The New 

kilometer path is the rite of this marathon York Times. 


nV . 


A! 


Tuning In on a Shortwave World 


/// M 9 r I E f I / 9 / 


By Fred Powledge 

Y OU’RE halfway around the 
world. You don’t speak their 
language, and they don't speak 
yours. You’re an American news 
junkie, and you feel deprived. How do you 
get the latest on health reform? On your 
favorite sports team? On Whitewater, 
Rwanda, Eastern Europe, and the presi- 
dent’s taste in underclothes? 

Your, best friend may be a compact 
piece of electronic equipment not much 
bigger than a paperback book: a short- 
wave radio. I recently returned to the 
United States from a six-week trip that 
took me to Taiwan, the Philippines, Indo- 
nesia, India and Britain. I stayed in touch 
with the world I left behind with my tiny 
radio. Luggage space was precious, but 
there was room for the radio. In addition 
to bringing me news, it woke me up, lulled 
me to sleep, and helped me understand tbe 
surrounding countryside. 

In some of the places I stayed, the hotel 
television set provided around-the-clock 
news from one or another satellite net- 
work. But my little shortwave told me 
about Whitewater, Tonya Harding and 
the British Conservatives' latest embar- 
rassment even while 1 was in the departure 
lounge at the Jakarta airport, when I was 
early for an appointment in Taiwan, and 
once when 1 was riding in a rickshaw 
(OJC, I was showing off, but it was time 
for the BBC news). 

All over the world, there are radio sta- 
tions that operate in the shortwave por- 
tion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Or- 
dinary AM-FM sets can’t catch their 
signals, but shortwave radios pull in 
broadcasts from great distances, hence the 
move in recent years to replace the term 
“shortwave" with “world band radio.” 

Many countries broadcast by shortwave 
to the rest of the world in En glish. Some of 
these international stations are little more 
than propaganda mills (Radio Moscow 
was a hoot in the old days), but others do 
quite credible jobs. Which stations you 
can get, and when you can get them, 
depends largely on how they aim their 
signals. Some broadcast in Eng lish only 
part of the day; most point their transmit- 
ters toward specific parts of the world. 
Generally, it’s easiest to receive shortwave 
during local nighttime hours. 

Shortwave is not a device for hearing 
“breaking news as it happens." This oc- 






2s».^ 

Nicnlac Aadn/UTT 


curs about as often as truly fbsthand ac- 
counts on local televirion. Once, in 1982, 1 
flipped on Radio Moscow and heard fune- 
real music, a sign that someone important 
had died (it was Leonid Brezhnev). You 
do, however, gel competent reports on 
important events, along with news and 
features about sports, the arts, science, 
agriculture, education, politics, crime, hu- 
mankind’s inhumani ty to itself, and be- 
cause shortwave listeners are almost by 
definition fans of shortwave, information 
about antennas, reception, and the like. 

It’s never been easier to enjoy short- 
wave listening without having to be a 
nerd. There is a large range of radios and 
prices, along with highly useful informa- 
tion on how to choose among them and 
get the most out of them. The best single 
U. S. source is the annual “Passport to 
World Band Radio.” less than $20, pub- 
lished by International Broadcasting Ser- 
vices Ltd, Box 300, Penn’s Park, Pennsyl- 
vania 18943, tel: (215) 794-3396. 
“Passport" reviews radios of all sizes and 
prices and tells you which frequencies to 
listen to at what times of day. 

There’s a lot of junk out there, but there 
are quite a few models that won’t let you 
down. My favorite; and the one that so 
satisfied my recent information craving, is 
the Sony ICFSW1. In addition to short- 
wave, the tiny set brings in FM (in stereo) 
and AM, has a dock, turns itself on when 
you tell it to, and has a sleep timer. If you 
forget your list of frequencies, it will scan 
the spectrum and find stations for you. 
and it will remember your 10 favorite 
frequencies. 

If you’re planning a heavy-duty trip, 
practice at home until you get a feel for 
frequencies, station personalities, and 


times. If a station particularly interests 
you. you can ask for a detailed program 
schedule. Some schedules are free; the 
BBC charges tbe equivalent of $40 a year 
for a slick monthly magazine, BBC World- 
wide Magazine, available from BBC 
World Service, Bush House, The Strand, 
Loudon WGZ. 

Thanks to my little shortwave, I felt 
much less isolated on my trip, even in 
places like central Java, where I had the 
feeling (and some evidence) that I was the 
only anglophone. My favorite stations and 
programs turned out to be those I listen to 
most at home: “Monitor Radio," the in- 
ternational product of the Christian Sci- 
ence Monitor, and the BBC. The BBCs 
24-hour World Service is awe inspiring. 
For sheer attention to news, there's noth- 
ing on the air that beats “Newshour” and 
the 30-minute “Newsdesk." 


T HEN there’s Radio Canada In- 
ternational, with “The World at 
Six," which puts even “All 
Things Considered” to shame. 
Radio Netherlands, Germany’s Deutsche 
Welle, and Radio Australia (really audible 
only in the Pacific and Asia) are good. 
When I was traveling, I got a better expla- 
nation of the Whitewater press frenzy 
from Radio Australia than anyone else. 

The Voice of America seemed awkward 
and unhelpful, and I stopped trying to 
tune it in. VOA recently came under new 
management and some change has been 
noticeable. Even if you’re not terminally 
addicted to news, there’s good reason to 
cany a small shortwave on foreign travel 
Because most sets come with FM and 
local AM bands, you can sample the local 
culture. I heard game! an music in Jogja- 
karta, the si tar in Madras, Tagalog rock in 
Luzon, and a variety of domestic BBC 
stations in England. 

In Taiwan, I discovered an English-lan- 
guage FM station that was the image of an 
American broadcaster, right down to un- 
memorable music, motor-mouthed disk 
jockeys, superficial newscasts, passable 
weather reports, and the latest word on that 
traffic jam an Taiwan’s lone, and often 
supersaturated, freeway. The station is said 
to be a great favorite of Americans on the 
island. It was almost like being back home. 

Fred Powledge is a free-lance writer. His 
most recent book is “ Free at Last? The Civil 
Rights Movement and the People Who 
Made II" 



Christopher MacDonald, left, and John Turturro re-create “Twenty-One” in “ Quiz Show.' 


Barry Weidw/HoBywood Pfcnux* 


Quiz Show 

Directed by Robert Bedford. 
U.S. 

The brilliantly unsettling 
prologue to “Quiz Show” is 
a seduction scene in an auto- 
mobile showroom, with a 
shiny new Chrysler working 
its wiles upon a wary young 
man. The car promises late 
1950s-style perfection, but 
its allure is undercut by an 
air of sleek unreality and a 
hint of danger. “Hey,” says 
the customer, aptly antici- 
pating what will follow. “I 
thought it used to be the 
man drove the car. Now the 
car drives the man.” Con- 
fronted by that Chrysler as a 
symbol of false values and 
misplaced optimism, the au- 
dience faces the most salient 
aspect of the American 
dream: that we had to wake 
up. “Quiz Show," a su- 
premely elegant and 
thoughtful parable about 
that awakening, transcends 
its narrow time frame and 
resonates with a piercing 
disillus ionment that dates 
back to tbe events described 
here, and has not gone away. 
As directed with quietly daz- 
zling acuity by Robert Red- 
ford, “Quiz Slow” offers a 
portrait of slipping stan- 


dards, delicate lies and a 
sensation-loving public that 
may genuinely prefer such 
falsehoods to the truth. The 
nominal focus of “Quiz 
Show” is the patrician, eru- 
dite Charles Van Doren 
(Ralph Fiennes), whose 
siring of canned victories on 
“Twenty-One" once riveted 
the nation. He is seen in 
pointed contrast to the other 
main characters: Herbert 
Stempel (John Turturro), 
the contestant whom be un- 
seats; Richard Goodwin 
(Rob Morrow), who investi- 
gates tbe quiz show scandal 
for Congress, and Mark Van 
Doren (Paul Scofield), the 
literary lion whose reputa- 
tion casts a long shadow 
over his son. Seldom has a 
movie about dissolving mo- 
rality been more dear. 

(Janet Maslin, NYT) 

Fresh 

Directed by Boa: Yakut. 
U.S 

In addition to being the 
most commercially viable 
film to come out of this 
year’s New Directois-New 
Films series, Boaz Yakin’s 
“Fresh” is likely to be the 
most controversial. “Fresh” 
is the story of the tide char- 
acter, an impassive black 12- 


year-old. Fresh (Sean Nel- 
son) has two important men 
in his life. One is Esteban 
(Gianeaiio Esposito), the se- 
ductive drug dealer who em- 
ploys him as a courier with- 
out realizing that Fresh is 
actually quite an indepen- 
dent-minded little entrepre- 
neur. The other is Sam 
(Samuel L. Jackson), Fresh’s 
father, an indigent chess 
whiz who does what he can 
to discipline his son. He 
can’t do much. This isn’t the 
usual preteen innocent, nor 
even the standard bad seed. 
This is a seemingly decent 
kid who can sit there eating a 
candy bar while other peo- 
ple die. “Fresh” features del- 
icate and sympathetic work 
from both Esposito and 
Jackson, whose fine charac- 
terizations say a lot about 
the originality of this film ’s 
vision. (Janet Maslin, NYT) 

Las SOtttCM du Mate 

Directed by Maufida TlatlL 
Tunisia-France. 

Alia (Head Sabri) has been 
raised in the servant quar- 
ters of the Bey's palace 
where her mother (Am el 
Hedluli) tended to the per- 
sonal pleasures of Sid’ Ali 
(Kamel Fazaa). The up- 


stairs-downstairs life of 
women and a ruling class in 
decline is the subject of this 

fida^TTath. The Palace she 
shows is, in fact, not silent 
but alive with gossip and 
perfidy, crumbling under 
the weight of hierarchies, 
jealousies and secrets: The 
servants are restless; the : 
masters uneasy; indepen- 
dence is in the air. Alia 
learns music by watdnng 
her half aster — a legitimate 
danghter of princes —-play 
on her lute. Lofti (Sami 
Bouajfla), a militant nation- 
alist in hiding, helps her 
break away to a new life. 
Sabri, 15 years old, plays 
Alia as a young girl, moving 
beautifully from languid tor- 
por to revolt Hath, a film 
editor, has structured a se- 
ries of melancholy flash- 
backs showing Alia as a dis- 
enchanted adult (Ghalia 
Lacroix) who revisits her 
childhood. But there is a hid- 
den structure, another way 
of telling tire story and a 
more dynamic movie in the 
foundations of the palace, 
built around music as for- 
bidden sensuality and ex- 
pression as transgression. 

(Joan Dupont, IHT) 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


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HOLIDAYS 
& TRAVEL 

appears 
everv Friday 


THE KENNEDY WOMEN: 
Tire Saga of an American 

Famil y 

By Laurence Learner. 933 pages. 
527.50. ViUard. 

Reviewed by 
Constance Casey 

I BEGAN by putting yellow 
Post-Its on the top of pages 
to mark fo«an<^ of cruelty de- 
scribed by the author in “The 
Kennedy 'Women,” 100 years of 
the matriarchs, wives and sis- 
ters of the political dynasty. Be- 
fore long there were so many 
Post-Its that, if the yellow paper 
had been stiffer, riffling them 
would have made the sound of 
shuffling a full deck. 

Learner's sympathetic book 
(his previous celebrity biogra- 
phies include “King of the 
Night: The Life of Johnny Car- 
son”) is touted as “triumphs 
and the tragedies.” But once 
you exclude the vicarious 
achievement of having a male 
relative amass a fortune or win 
an election, there’s not much 
real triumph. Even before the 
famous tragedies, the Kennedy 
women suffered from small but 
debilitating cruelties — affec- 
tion withheld and insult given. 

As I/amer paints the family 
portrait, the obvious villain is 
Joseph Kennedy Sr., whose cal- 
lousness toward the women in 
his family ranges from bizarre 
to unforgivable. As a 20th anni- 
versary gift, he gave his wife, 
Rose, ft trip to Europe and then 
sent her off alone. When his 
oldest* daughter, Rosemary, 
who had probably suffered 
brain damage at birth and was 
stow to learn and erratic in her 
behavior, matured into a very 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• John Gray, chairman and 
chief executive officer of Hong- 
kong & Shanghai Banking 
Carp., is rereading “The Ginger 
Tree ” by Oswald Wynd. 

“A poignant story, set in the 
first half of this century, of a 
Scotswoman’s struggle to come 
to terms with traditional Asian 
social values and to bridge the 
East-West cultural divide.” 

(Kevin Murphy, IHT) 



pretty woman, the elder Kenne- 
dy arranged for her to have a 
lobotomy. To be kind, he was 
probably fearful for her (she 
had begun to wander off alone), 
but he was also terrified that 
what was known at the time as 
“feeblemindedness” and 
thought to run in families 
would be exposed. Rosemary is 
still alive, age 76, at a Wisconsin 
institution where she has lived 
since 1 949, in the infantile state 
to which the operation reduced 
her. 

Joe Sr. is a far more sympa- 
thetic person in relation tonis 
easy-to-love daughter, Kath- 
leen. It was he who backed the 
rebellious Kathleen when she 
married a Protestant English- 
man. “You are still and always 
will be tops with me," he cabled 
her as his wife Rose feverishly 
sought to have the marriage an- 
nulled. Learner sees Rose as a 
“relentlessly positive little girl” 
(she is relentlessly holding on to 
life at age 104), a severe mother 
and a chilly wife. In his charac- 
teristically feminist way, be 
pins much of the blame for 
Rose’s stiffness on her father. 


John Fitzgerald, mayor of Bos- 
ton in Rose’s teenage years, de- 
nied 18-year-old Rose her 
greatest wish — to go to Welles- 
ley College — because he feared 
offending Catholic clergy and 
voters. If the mayor’s daughter 
strayed, other young Catholic 
women might succumb to the 
allure of the comparatively god- 
less Wellesley campus. Learner 
believes Rose would have been 
a softer person if she had es- 
caped tbe nuns. 

Rose’s older daughters. 
Kathleen, who died in an air- 
plane crash, and Eunice, and 
her daughter-in-law Jacqueline 
are Learner's heroines. 

Kathleen is the Kennedy 
woman he likes; Eunice he 
gnxdg^ngly admires. He calls 
her “scrawny ” “skinny,” “sick- 
ly," “unkempt," but be also 
says she’s the smartest Kennedy 
daughter and the only one with 
a sense of herself as a person 
with a role in the world outside 
the family. Eunice did social 
work in a West Virginia prison 
and a Chicago settlement house 
before she married Sargent 
Shriver. 


Learner, whose book was 
pushed into print ahead of 
schedule when Jacqueline Ken- 
nedy Onassis died, concludes 
with the accepted view that she 
eventually found her bearings 
through pride in her children 
and work as an editor. 

The other sisters, Pat and 
Jean, a pair in being lanky, pret- 
ty, shy and younger, and sisters- 
in-law Ethel and Joan are by 
comparison lost in the shuffle. 
Learner's Ethel is “puckish,” 
“prankish," "graceless.” Joan’s 
story is a strong argument for 
early divorce, and a cautionary 
tale about the way public life 
distorts private life. 

Learn er’s talent is for enthu- 
siastic amassing rather than se- 
rious delving. He has found 
neighbors ana school friends no 
one ever talked to before and a 
trove of Kathleen's letters, 
some interesting, some not. 
When at a loss to explain a 
relationship, he defaults repeat- 
edly to the word “matrix.” Why 
tell the story again if we can’t 
understand more? The new de- 
tails can only reassure us in the 
old conviction that the rich are 
not really happy. 

Learner’s final heroines, 
briefly sketched, are Caroline 
Kennedy Schlossberg and 
Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, 
who have earned law degrees 
and apparently stable mar- 
riages. They seem to be unwill- 
ing to put up with the acts of 
cruelty, small and large, that 
their grandmother, aunts and 
mothers accepted as unremark- 
able. 


Constance Casey is on the 
staff of The Washington Post 


■ An animal rights group has agreed to change the slogans on 
an anti-fur ad campaign featuring River Phoenix and Kurt 
Cobain after their families objected. The proposed ads fea- 
tured photos of Phoenix, who died of a chug overdose last- 
year, and Cobain, who shot himself to death earlier this year, • 
with the headlines: “I Wouldn’t Be Caught Dead in Fur,” and 
“You Need Fur Like You Need a Hole in Your Head ” 


By Alan Truscott 

S TUDY the North-South 
hands and select a contract^ 
Four spades and five clubs are 
obvious possibilities and suc- 
ceed, but neither is safe. Three 
no-trump is best although even 
that might fail after a heart 
lead. 

South chose two dubs, strong 
and artificial, and her partner 
showed his spades and followed 
with Blackwood rather impetu- 
ously. 

It is not normally ri ght to put 
on the brakes when Blackwood 
shows that only one ace is miss- 
ing, but it was right in this case. 
Five spades would have made, 
very luckily, after any lead. A 
heart lead seems damaging, for 
West can win the queen with 
the ace and return the suit. 

In the circumstances it is 
hard to blame South for retreat- 
ing to six dubs, but it worked 
out badly. After an unlikely 
spade lead South would surely 
have gone down to defeat by 
taking a trump finesse, unrf 
would then have found that a 
bizarre finesse of the spade jack 

or a bizarre play of the dub ace 
would have succeeded. 

1 The heart ace was the only 
disastrous lead for the 


Even then West could test the 
declarer by shifting to a spade, 
and South should work out that, 
West is eager to permit a dub : 
finesse. 

The declarer's choice was a 
diamond, and South won and 
ran all her trumps. This offered 
a chance, for West might have 
thought it desirable to save 
spades. But he oorrectly saves 
hearts* defeating the slam since 
South was surely due to succeed 
unless she was void in spades. 


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International Herald Tribune 
Friday , September 7(5 , 1994 
Page 9 


Belgian’s Daily Bread 
Is Rising in the World 

• By BarbaiaRosen 


B russels —T he setting is eaiTn, 

clean, natural. Well-dressed 
women in pairs and businessmen 
alone lunch family-style around a 
giant pine table, peeking at their neigh- 
bors as they reach across for the sugar 
bowL At 2:30 P.M., the line to buy bread 
stretches out the door. 

Alain Coumont opened his first Le Pain 
Quotidlen bakery in 1990. This week, the 
14th Belgian franchise opened. If all goes 
well, at least-two will open in Paris by the 
end of the yJjar. Within three years. Cou- 
mont predicts, people will break his daily 
bread m Los Angeles, London and Milan 
Each store . offers the same ‘streamlined 
menu built around an old-fashioned sour- 
dough bread — simple food in simple 
surroundings. But behind the wholesome 
chic, the jambon de Bayonne sandwiches 
served on earthenware breadboards and 
the bowls of te vred chocolai chaud, there is 
a carefully controlled image. Trained as a 
chef, Coumont knows when he's onto 
something. At 33, he is ready to trade in 
his Alfa Romeo Spider on a Mercedes. 

“The product we make — everything is 
very simple,” Coumont says. “We don’t 
want to give a luxurious imagp to what we 
do.” Luminous or not, his image sells. He 
projects that sales will jump almost 25 
percent, to 280 milli on Belgian francs 
($8.8 minion), in 1995, more than 10 times 
what he sold in 1991. 

“Fm not doing it for money,” he insists. 
“In fact, I think it’s really fan.” However, 
he’s not losing any money either. “One of 
the biggest problems this year will be how 
not to pay tax,” he says. 

In 1990, when Coumont co-owned the 
Caf6 duD6me brasserie, he couldn't find 
the bread he wanted. He decided to bake it 
himself, but found it was not cost-effec- 
tive. So he opened a bakery on the trendy 
Rue Antoine Dansaert. (“The rents were 
very low,” he says.) To meet the overhead, 
he added sandwiches and coffee. He had 
no plans to go further, but the bakery 
business took off. In about a year be had 
left the brasserie behind. 

Now, says Coumont, “every day I have 


5 to 10 people calling to open a franchise.” 
And that's just in Belgium. But Coumont 
knows his success lies in staying artisanal, 
not going industrial. 

“There is one thing important with 
bread," he explains. “It can be a very good 
business — when it is family-run." 

“We’d rather keep it on nearly a family 
scale in each country. In every country 
where we go, we are going to do u step-by- 
step." 

Each step will be carefully prescribed. 
Each bakery will supply a handful of Pain 
Quotidien stores in its area, be it Beverly 
Hills or the 8th Arrondissement in Paris. 
Pastries alone may be allowed to vary a 
bit. 

Centrally supplied specialty groceries. 
snrih as Tunisian olive oil, Italian wines or 
Belgian chocolates, will all eventually car- 
ry thePain Quotidien name, already regis- 
tered in seven countries. 

By the end of the year, Coumont ex- 
pects to have completed his “bibteT dic- 
tating everything from recipes to walls 
(antiqued stucco) to dishes (with logo)- No 
synthetic materials, no frivolous furniture. 

“Everything will be set up, like McDon- 
ald’s,” he says. “There is no decoration. I 
would say it’s like a monastery.” 

Coumont has partners in his Belgian 
business, but Le Pain Quotidien Interna- 
tional belongs wholly to Coumont and his 
family. 

I N each new country, a subsidiary 
will hold the master franchise. The 
pioneer franchisee gets exclusive 
rights to his region (in the United 
States, it’s by stale), as well as 49 percent 
of the national franchise company. The 
other 51 percent, and with it product and 
image control, stays with Coumont. who 
insists his schooling taught him only to 
spread icing, not risks. 

Still, for a couple of years he was per- 
sonal chef to Robert M. Fomon. then 
chairman of E.F. Hutton, at Fomon’s 
homes in New York and Palm Beach. 

“The only thing I had to do was to re3d 
business magazines to learn English." 
Coumont says. “I was cooking something 
like eight hours a week and reading the 
magazines of my boss." 



The banker found Coumont a good risk 
as well as a good cook- “I lent him some 
money to open his first restaurant and 
within his first year he had paid it all 
back." Fomon says. 

Coumont believes Le Pain Quoudien 
will find different niches in different 
places. In Belgium, yuppies breakfasting 
on croissants a la Le’ndtre fuel the restau- 
rant side. For Lhe bread. Coumont says, 
“everybody buys it.” He turned down a 
chance, however, to sell it in a major 
supermarket chain. 

Coumont knows that in Paris, his spe- 
cialty will compete againsL the sourdough 
bread of Poilane. But he is not easily 
daunted After all, he has worked in the 
kitchens of Robucbon and Guerard. 

Still, he says, “It will be fun to open in 
LA. or in Paris, especially a Belgian guy, 
you know, starting a bread business in 
France.” 

Barbara Rosen is a free-lance journalist 
living in Brussels. 


The Ins and Outs of Gulf Airports 


By Roger Collis 

International Herald Tnbmc 


T raveling wisely and well 

around the Gulf — whether 
you’re living there or passing 
through — requires both ad- 
vance planning and an opportunistic eye 
for discount fares and short-term promo- 
tions. The trick is to know which kind of 
tickets to buy with which airline and the 
best place to buy them. 

Published fares in the Gulf are about 20 
percent higher than in North America, 
Europe or Asia, so it makes sense for 
frequent travelers to buy a one-way ticker 
to say, London or New York, and a series 
of round- trips back from there. Consoli- 
dator tickets also are sometimes more ex- 
pensive in the Gulf, but they may carry 
fewer conditions: pay full fare and you’re 
likely to get an upgrade. Creative’ “fare 
construction" can save you up to 40 per- 
cent by tacking on a few extra destina- 
tions, possibly on your way around the 
world, or combining separate round-trips 
on the same ticket. 

The quality of travel in Bahrain, the 
United Arab 'Emirates, Qatar. Oman. Ku- 
wait and Saudi Arabia has improved dra- 
matically in the last 12 months. Open skies 
over Dubai, the end of Gulf Air’s monop- 
oly in Bahrain. UAE, Qatar and Oman 
(the four Gulf stales that jointly own the 
carrier) and the emergence of serious tour- 
ism have led to more competitive services. 
.Air traffic in the Gulf is growing at around 
twice the worldwide rate of 3 to 4 percent 
a year. 

Emirates, owned by the government of 
Dubai, which flies to 34 destinations with- 
in the Middle East, Europe, the Indian 
subcontinent and Asia, increased its ca- 
pacity by 50 percent last year with a new 
fleet of Airbus 310s and 330s. It will be 
one of the first customers for the Boeing 
777 in March 1996. Emirates and Gulf Air 
compete fiercely from Dubai and Bahrain, 
their respective hubs. Oman Air, based in 
Muscat, has a growing network of regional 
and international services, and Qatar .Air- 
ways. a new carrier that started services in 
June, flies Airbus 310s three times a week 
to London. It also flies to Amman, Cairo. 
Abu Dhabi. Khartoum, and Colombo. By 
the end of 1994, Qatar expects to serve 
Munich, Vienna. Beirut and Athens, and 
it has further plans to add Bangkok. Mel- 


bourne and Sydney. Kuwait Airways is 
investing SI billion on 15 new Airbuses 
and Borings, for delivery in 1995. 

“You can now drive fairly easily to a 
good airport wherever you are,” said Si- 
mon Evans, a fonner* British diplomat 
based in Abu Dhabi. “There used to be 
very little inter-Gulf traffic, except for 
Gulf Air. But nowadays with British Air- 
ways and Emirates putting on smaller 
aircraft, and Qatar Airways starting up, 
you can now drive out to an airport fairly 
close by and fly out direct.” 

Bahrain and Dubai are streamlined su- 
perhubs. You can often get from the plane 
to your city-center hotel in less than 30 
minutes. 

A decade ago, Bahrain and Dubai were 
best known as midnight fuel stops be- 
tween Europe and .Asia! Paradoxically, the 

Fit Fftfittf Trart/tr 

introduction of the ultra-long-range 747- 
400s stimulated their development as ma- 
jor hubs in their own right, with the 
growth of regional and long-haul services. 
Many British Airways and Cathay Pacific 
flights stop in Bahrain or Dubai en route 
to Hong Kong and points in Australasia. 

The United Arab Emirates has six inter- 
national airports: Dubai, Abu Dhabi. 
Sharjah, Fujaira, Ras al Khaima and AJ 
Ain — a S182 million airport slap in the 
middle of die desert only 100 miles (160 
kilometers) from Abu Dhabi along a six- 
lane highway, which opened for business 
in March. So far, it can handle only one 
flight at a time. 

People living in the Gulf have great 
opportunities to exploit round-the-world 
(RTW) tickets. If you’re based in Bahrain, 
for example, you could buy a Cathay/ Un- 
ited Airlines RTW for around $3,700 
(business class) or S2.400 (economy) that 
gives you dozens of options. You’ could 
fly, for example, Bahrain-Hong Kong-To- 
kyo-Honolulu-Los Angeles-New York- 
London-Bahrain. You can buy such a 
ticket in Bahrain. London, or. anywhere 
along the route — price varying with cur- 
rency rates. But if. for example, you were 
to start your RTW journey in Hong Kong, 
you could first buy a round-trip ticket to 
Hong Kong, commence your RTW. and 
arrive back in Bahrain. You would then 
have 12 months in which to use the re- 
maining Bahrain-Hong Kong coupon: re- 


turning to Bahrain on the return half of 
your original round-trip ticket. 

Trailfinders in London could construct 
you a discounted RTW fare for around 
£1.000 ($1,550) in economy. One option 
would be to fly London to Dubai and on 
to Australia with Royal Brunei Airways, 
and then back to London, either with Air 
New Zealand, which would give you a 
stop in Los Angeles, or United Airlines, 
which would take you straight out of Aus- 
tralia into Los Angeles or New York to 
London. 

Travel derisions are a trade-off between 
cost, convenience and comfort. The fast- 
est and most comfortable way to travel in 
and out Of the Gulf is nonstop into Dubai 
with Emirates or Gulf Air to Bahrain or 
Abu Dhabi. Saudi Arabian Airlines flies 
nonstop between Riyadh and Delhi, 
D hak a, Frankfurt, Geneva, London, New 
York, Paris, and a score of regional desti- 
nations, and between Jidda and Bangkok. 
Bombay, Geneva, Jakarta. London, Ma- 
nila. New York and Rome. 

Fly full-fare first- or business-class be- 
tween Dubai and London Heathrow or 
Galwick with Emirates and you get a 
chauffeur-driven car wiLhin a 50-raiie ra- 
dius of Lhe airport at each end. You also 
get a free economy ticket for use any time. 

Many of the best consolidator deals 
depend on flying with a non-Gulf airline 
via its main hub. The cheapest deals are 
with Cyprus Airways via Lamaca; Aero- 
flot via Moscow to Bahrain or Dubai; 
Royal Jordanian via Amman; Middle 
East Airlines via Beirut: Egypt Air via 
Cairo to Bahrain or Dubai; or carriers 
such as Air Lanka and Royal^ Brunei en 
route to Colombo and Hong Kong. 

Published fares are likely to cost more if 
you buy them in the Gulf. Bui you can 
often buy discount fares (cither through 
consolidators or direct with the airline) 
with fewer conditions — such as being 
able to change flights without penalty. 

Qatar Airways may be the brightest star 
in the Gulf for budget travelers. Qatar is 
targeting the expatriate community with 
quality low-cost services to Europe and 
Asia. The airline's consolidator. Check-In 
Travel in London, has an offer that’s hard 
to beat: a full economy round-trip fare 
from London to Dubai (via Doha) for 
£350, compared with the published price 
of £1,345, and Dubai-London return for 
£478. 


I E E IEEE f l I E E 


AUSTRALIA 


Sydney 

Powerhouse Museum, tel: (2) 217- 
0111, open daily. To Oct 23: "Chris- 
tian Dior The Magic of Fashion." 
More than GO gowns chronicle the 
rise of Christian Dior from the launch 
D(tts "new took!' in I947^and docu- 
ment his influence on Australian 
lashtoh during tt>e 1940s and 1950s. 


AUSTRIA 


Salzburg . . 

Landestheater, tet: (6621 67-1 S-1 2. 
"Armlnlo," an opera Dy Franz Biber, 
Sept. 17. 20 and 21. 'The Rake's 
Progress'* (Stravinsky) , SepL 25. 27 
and 29. 

Vtesw 

Kunstforum Bank Austria, tel: (1} 
532-06-44, Open daily. TO Nov. 27: 
"Herbert Boeckl. 1894-1966.” A ret- 
rospective Of the woric of the Austrian 

artist Seventy paintings and 60 wa- 
tercokxs and drawings document his 
artistic career from the. Austrian Ex- 
pressionist group with Kokoschka. 
Gerstl and KoJtg to Abstract work in 
the 1950s. 

KunstHausWien, tel: (1 ) 712-0495, 
open daily. To Jan. 29: "Mappleth- 
orpe: Bne Retrospektive." A selec- 
tion of more than 200 known and 
unknown works by the controversial 
American photographer. The exhibi- 
tion will travel to Australia. 


BELGIUM 


jget 

Deningemuseum, tel: (50) 34- 
■59, open daily. Continuing/To 
v. 1 5: “Hans Memtlng: Five Centu- 
i of Reality and Fiction." 30 works 
MemHng and paintings, drawings 
j sculptures by hfs contemporar- 
in Bruges. 

rcst centrum Oud Sint-Jan, tel: 
)) 33-56-66, open dally. Contin- 
g/To Oct. 2-. "Modigliani: De 
anbaring." More than 400 draw- 
s by Italian artist Amedeo Moctt- 
inLfrom 1906 -to. .1 924--The -draw- 
s were purchased and collected 
Paul Alexandre who became the 
liter's closest friend and onfy pa- 
i upon his arrival in Paris In 1906. 
en! 

sewn voor Schone Kunsten. tel: 

I 222-1703, closed Mondays. To 
/. 27: 1 'Meesterwerken van de Go- 
ne Beetdhouwkunst." An over- 
h of the origins and development 
he Late Gothic style in sculpture, 
i wood, stone, metal and Ivory 
ilplures come from lhe I5th-cen- 
i Burgundian Netherlands that in- 
jed present-day Benelux coun- 
s. Northern France and German 
ji&r Rhine. 


BRITAIN 


\Jational Portrait Gallery. 
02-2266. open dally. Con- 
o Nov; 6: "Visions of the 
Empire." Orientalist works 
romantic creations by 
rno, hke Delacroix, imag- 
Easi a& a place ot deca- 

nsuatity and mystery, and 
stic paintings by painters 
Roberts and William Hol- 

ademy of Arts, tel: (711 
open daity. To Dec. ’^. 
r of Venice: An In the 18th 
A survey ot the art ft Venice 
h century, including i dty- 
Canstetto, Guard and Bal- 
re paintings by Tlepoto. 
renitienMe by Pietro Longhi 
scenes by Piranesi. 


ine Arts, tec (514) 
ad Mondays. To Nov. 
ay: A Retrospective," 
inttngs of landscapes, 
jres spanning the pen- 
o 1992. The paintings 
sguised portraits and 
as well as texts by 
5 Barthes and Demda, 



ITALY 


Florence 

Istituto degli Innocenti, tel. (55) 
247-7952. open daily. To Nov. 3- 
"Picasso: Ceramiche, Incisioni. IIJus- 
trazioni, Arazzi." Works from the vari- 
ous penods in Picasso's life. Fea- 
tures his illustrations of literary 
works, a series of female portraits 
and a selection of ceramics. Also 
features large lapestnes inspired by 
his work. 


JAPAN 


‘Self Portrait 1985 ” by Robert Mapplethorpe at the KunstHausWien in Vienna. 


Quebec 

MusOe du Quebec, tel: (418) 643- 
21-50. To Jan. 8: "Alexander Cai- 
der." 55 works by Cakfer from the 
Whitney Museum of American Art in 
New York, Including stabiles, sculp- 
tures, works on paper and jewelry. 
Toronto 

Art Gallery of Ontario, tel: (416) 
977-0414, closed Tuesdays. Sept. i7 
to Dec. 3t: “From Cezanne to Ma- 
tisse: Great French Paintings from 
The Barnes Foundation." Includes 
80 Impressionist Post-Impressionist 
and Modernist paintings from the col- 
lection of Dr.. Albert -C. Barnes in 
Philadelphia. The coflection which in- 
cludes works by Renoir. Matisse, Ce- 
zanne, Picasso, Manet and Modigliani, 
among others, is permitted a one-time 
worldwide tour to raise funds for reno- 
vations of the Foundation building. 

CZECH REPUBLIC 

Prague 

Prague's Castle, tel: (2) 33-37-33- 
68. open daily. To Oct. 30: "Affons 
Mucha" Posters, previously unpub- 
lished drawings and photographs, as 
wed as some of his stutfo equipment. 

DENMARK 

Copenhagen 

Nation aimuseet, tel: 33-13-44-11. 
closed Mondays- To Jan. 8: "Mac- 
edonia: The Northern Greeks and the 
Era of Alexander lhe Great." 400 ob- 
jects from excavations fn Macedonia, 
with items dating from the bronze age 
to the time of the Romans. Features 
bronze and silver vessels, gold jewel- 
ry end terra-cotta figurines, 

FRANCE 

joumfies du Patrimoine 94. Sept. 
17 and IB: More than 1 0.000 monu- 
ments and sites are open to the pub- 
lic throughout the country, in Paris, 
the Bysee Palace, the Banquo de 
France, the Hotel Matignon (resi- 
dence of the French Prime Minister) 
and the Russian Embassy, among 
others, will open thor doors. Long 
waiting lines should be expected at 
the main places of interest. 


tave CaiHebotte. 1848-1694." A ret- 
rospective of 69 paintings and 28 
drawings by the lesser-known 
French Impressionist painter. Caille- 
botte organized and financed exhibi- 
tions of Impressionist paintings and 
left hss own collection to the French 
state. 

Musde des Arts Ddcoratifs, tel: 44- 
55-57-50, closed Mondays and 
Tuesdays. To Nov. 20: "Parures: Bl- 

e ux Etnnfques des Collections du 
usde Barbier-Mueiler.” On loan 
from the Geneva museum, a collec- 
tion of ethnic jewelry from Africa, 
Asia and the South Pacific. 

Musde du Louvre, tel: 40-20-51-51. 
dosed Tuesdays. Continulng/To 
SepL 26: "La Reforme des Trots Car- 
raci: Le Dessln a Bologne, 15BO- 
1620.” 

Versailles 

Trianon Palace, tel: 30-84-38-00. 
open daily. To SepL 26: “Diana 
Guest Sculptures.” More than 40 
bronze and marble sculptures of ani- 
mals by the British sculptor. 


OERWANY 

Berlin 

Berlinische Galerie. tel: (2) 54-86- 
108, closed Mondays. Continu- 
ing/To Oct. 12: “Der Deutsche 
Spiesser Argert Sch: Retrospektive 
Raoul Hausmann 1886-1971.” 250 
works by lhe Austrian- born artist 
( 1 886-1 971 ), a representative figure 
ot Berlin Dadaism around 1918. 
Brocke-Museum, tel: (30) 031- 
8029. dosed Tuesdays. To Nov. 27: 
"Dor Frohe Kandinsky." More than 
100 paintings, drawings and prims 
dating back to the years 1900 to 
1910. before the beginning of Kan- 
dinsky's abstract work. 

Bonn 

Kunst- und Austellungshalle der 
Bundesrepublik Deutschland, tel: 
(228) 9171-200, closed Mondays. 
To Jan. 15: "Eva Aeppli. ” 30 installa- 
tions, sculptures and paintings by the 
Swtss artist. Her work is character- 
ized by her obsessions with mysti- 
cism, astrology and death. 

Cologne 

Josef-Haubrich-Kunsthalle, tel: 
221-2335, open daily. To Od. 


Leipzig 

Museum der bildenden Konste. tel: 
(341) 31-31-02. closed Mondays. 
To Nov. 5: “Lucas Cranach Bn 
Maler-Untemehmer a us Fran ken " 
More than 200 Items, including 54 
works by the 16th-century German 
painter and engraver. Features reli- 
gious paintings, portraits and animal 
studies. 

ISRAEL ~ 

Jerusalem 

The Israel Museum, tel: (2j 708- 
ail, open daily. To Nov. 15: 
"Against Hitler! Photomontages t-v 
John Heartfield. 1930-1938." Ann- 
Nazi satirical photomontages created 
between 1930 and 1938 by the Ger- 
man artist who fought agsinsl Na- 
zism. capitalism and war. 


Nara 

Nara Sogo Museum ot Art, tel: 
(742) 36-3 141. closed Tuesdays. To 
Sept. 25: "Articles from the Silk 
Road." 200 objects from the private 
collection of a leading Japanese re- 
searcher dating from me period be- 
fore Christ to the Middle Ages. 
Tokyo 

Hara Museum of Contemporary 
Art tel: (3) 3445-0651. open daily 
To Nov. 3: "Yasumasa Morimura: 
Rembrandt Room." Morimura uses 
photography to superimpose himself 
into masterworks ot Eastern and 
Western art. He creations have in- 
cluded him as Manet's "Flute Play- 
er." and as Pre-Raphaelite maidens. 
The exhibition features 26 works 
based on portraits by Rembrandt. 
Suntory Museum ot Art tel: 1 3 ) 
3470-1073, closed Mondays. To 
Oct. 16: "Goddesses in Japan." Fo- 
cusing on the representation of god- 
desses in the Buddhist and Shintoist 
arts, this show presents various tech- 
niques ot ancient Japanese art. 

NETHERLANDS ~~ 

Leiden 

Stedelijk Museum de Lakenhaf, tel: 
( 71 ) 16-53-60. closed Mondays. To 
Oct. 24: "Vivienne Westwood." 20 
designs by British fashion designer 
Vivienne Westwood. At the same 
time, the Stelimg Gallery presents 
Westwood's accessories 


RUSSIA 


MOSCOW 

Pushkin State Museum of Fine 
Arts, tel: (095) 203-69-74. To Oci. 
16: "Anatoly Zverev, 1931-1986." 


L’Me-wr-lfl-Sorgue 1221) 

Hotel de Campradon, tel: 90-38-1 7- 30 ; Richard Avedon: Fashion 
4L closed Mondays Continu- work." 350 photographs by U.S. 
Ino/ToOct. 80: "Des Sards de I'Es- fashion and art photographer Richard 

— — - — Avedon. 

Frankfurt 

Schlm Kunsthalte, tel: (69) 299- 


'Des Bords de I'Es- 
eaut aux Rives de la Sorgue: Lea 
Modemes du Realisme a TExpres- 
sfomsme 18B0-1940.” Works by 
Flemish painters, ranging from Real- 
ism to Symbolism, Fauvtsm and Ab- 
stractionism, 
part* 

Grand Palais, tel: 44-13-171-17, 
closed Tuesdays. To Jan. 9; "Gus- 


iays. 

" Expression fstteche alder." About 
50 masterpieces of German Expres- 
sionism, inducting works by Beck- 
mann, Kandinsky, Klrchner. Macke 
and Marc. 


CONCERTS 


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Features 65 gouaches and 100 draw- 
ings by the Russian Expressionist 
painter. 

SINGAPORE 

National Museum, tef: 165 ) 332- 
3656. closed Mondays. To Nov 13: 
"AiamKara: 5000 Years of India." 
This exhibition, which covers lhe pe- 
riod 3000 B. C. 10 1900 A. D.. in- 
cludes stone, bronze and terra-cotta 
images of deities, paintings of court 
life, everyday life and nature, jewelry 
and other examples of decorative an 
on loan from the National Museum. 
New Delhi, Singapore institutions and 
private collectors. 

SPAIN 

Madrid 

FundaciO La Caixa. let: ( n 43-54- 
833. closed Mondays. To Nov. 13: 
"Kandinsky /Mondrian: Dos Ca- 
minos haoa la Abstraction." Docu- 
ments the parallels and differences 
between the two painters in their ear- 
ly phases. Both started as figurative 
painters although Kandinsky later de- 
veloped an abstract style wniie Mon- 
drian adopted a geometric idiom. The 
exhibition will travel to Barcelona. 

SWITZERLAND 

Basel 

Kunst museum, tel: (61) 271-D445. 
dosed Mondays. To Nov. 27; "Fer- 
nand Lager 1911-1924: Le Rythme 
de Ja Vie Modeme. " Presents the first 
artistic phase ot the French artist and 
includes monumental paintings, ab- 
stract paintings, gouache drawings 
as well as still lifes and interiors- 
Lugano 

Museo Canto nale d'Arte, tel: (91) 
22-93-56. closed Mondays. To Nov. 
6: "Jean-BapUste Camille Corot: Un 
Sentlmento Particolare del Paesag- 
gio." Focuses on the relationship be- 
tween the French painter and nature 
and countryside. 

Zurich 

Kunsthaus, tel: H) 251-6765. 


closed Mondays. To Nov. 6: "Daria 
Global.'' Features 400 documents 
and 200 works by Duchamp, Man 
Ray. Hausmann. Picabia, Max Ernst 
and Arp, among others. 

UNITED STATES 
Atlanta 

High Museum of Art, tel: (404) 898- 
9284. closed Mondays. To Nov. 27; 
"Willem de Kooning." 50 paintings, 
drawings and sculptures from 1939 
to 1 985. Includes "Queen of Hearts," 
a portrait anticipating de Kooning's 
mature figurative style; "Zurich." one 
ot the abstract paintings of the late 
1940s and paintings and drawings 
from the "Women" series of the 
1950s. 

New York 

Cooper-Hewitt. National Design 
Museum, let: (21 2) 860-6894, 
closed Mondays. To Feb. 19: "The 
Structure of Style; Modernism in 
Dutch Applied Arts 1880-1930." 75 
examples of modernist ceramics, 
glass, metalwork, furniture, graphics, 
textiles, wallpaper, jewelry and light- 
ing. The exhibition examines the 
works of leading designers, archi- 
tects and artisans, and the diversity ot 
design sources ranging from nature 
to pure geometry. 

Guggenheim Museum SoHo. tel: 
(212) 423-3840, closed Tuesdays. 
To Jan. 8: "Japanese Art After 1945: 
Scream Against the Sky." 200 paint- 
ings. sculptures, photographs, video 
films and installations by 70 repre- 
sentatives of Japanese postwar and 
contemporary art. including such 

S ps as Gutai, Hi Red Center. An- 
Buloh and Mono-ha. The exhi- 
bition will travel to San Francisco. 


Metropolitan Museum of Art, tel. 
(212) 570-3951. closed Mondays. 
To Nov. 27. "Madame Gres." Astudy 
ot the work of the Parisian fashion 
designer, who. together with Coco 
Chanel, and Madeleine Vtonnei al- 
tered fashion in the 1920s and 
1930s. 

Museo del Barrio, lei: (2121 831- 
7272, open Wednesdays through 
Sundays. To Oct. 30: "Recovering. 
Popular Culture." The exhibition in-, 
terweaves the histones, traditions 
and customs of Latinos, with reli- 
gion. food, music and clothing as 
emblems of nationality reinterpreted . 
by each artist. 

Museum for African Art, lei: (212) 
966-1313. closed Mondays. To Jan.- 
8: "Luba Memory in the Making; Cre- . 
atmg History Through Art." Luba an' 
of zaire from the 9th to the 19th. 
centuries juxtaposed with the writ- 
ings of missionanes. anthropologists 
and other visitors. 

Whitney Museum ot American Art, 
tel: (212) 570-3652. closed Mon-, 
days and Tuesdays. To Oct. 9: "Jo- 
seph Stella." A retrospective ol the 
work of the Italian- Amencan artist, 
whose modernist depictions ot New 
York are symbols of the American 
machine age From 1922 to hss death. 
In 1946, Stella created metaphoric 
Landscapes, ponraits and religious 
images. 

Washington 

National Museum of Women In the 
Arts, tel: (202) 783-5000, open dai- 
ly. To Oct. 13: "Picture When Women 
Do: A Photographic Portrait of Wom- 
en's Lives Across America." An exhi- 
bition of photographs taken by Amer- 
ican women in ail walks of life. 


r i t f / j f / 0 i j 


On Sept. 18: "Beauty and the Bank- 
note: Images of Women on Paper 
Money." British Museum, London. 
On Sept. 18: "Malfiguren." Museum 
Modemer Kunst Vienna 


On Sept. 18: "Odilon Redon: Prince 
of Dreams." Art institute, Chicago. 
On Sept. 19: "Tapissenes du Portu- 
gal." Musee des Arts Decoratifs. 
Bordeaux. 


Rate the world's best restaurants 
with Patricia Wells. 

The IHT's restaurant critic has set out 
on a rare and ambitious gastronomic journey, a 
search for the 10 best restaurants in the world 

She will be rating, in month-to-month 
articles, die top restaurants from region to 
region, and comparing them to one another. 

Whether it's the best in dim sum, 
delicious but secret sushi bars or the finest of 
French tables, she will guide readers with 
articles about inexpensive restaurants as well 
as the grand ones in the world's major cities. 

She will also share her tips on how to select 

quality restaurants in unfamiliar territory. 

Don't miss this series . 

COMING SEPTEMBER 19th 

GERMANY 



Pamela Wells is the author of The Food 
Lover's Guide to Paris, now in its 
third edition. 


s 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1904 


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A0 1.9 22 2443 21% 20% 21% +14 

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1.72 3 A 9 170 40M 40 40% +% 

- 14 419 9% 9% 9% —V, 


AMEX 

Thursday’s dosing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not refiec 
Mate trades etaawhere. Via The Associated Press 


12 . . 

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THE TRIB INDEX: 116.53ft 

Irtemational Herald Tribune Worid Stock index ©. composed of 
280 internationally investable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 c loo 
120 


JK’ 




i *'£ x ■* 

A M j j a s 
1994 


150 


130 


| North America 


Latin America 

—j 

Approx. enfgMng: 26% 

Close: 97.62 Pm.: 9R3« 

m 

Approx. Wighfing: 5% 

Close: 147.71 Pthvj 14937 

l lsV: R 



; fi'-.- 

RRSI REI 

m 





M 


77m Mex tracks US. Mar vb/uos of slocks ft- Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
Aigontfna, AuutraBa, Auutrfo, Belgium. BrazS, Canada, Chita. Denmark, Rntond, 
Franca. Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Nuthoriande, New Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore. Spain, Sweden. Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. Now York and 
London, the Index is co m posed o! the 20 top Issues in terms of market capdabs&on. 
otherwise the ten top stocks an tracked. 


I JTvdustrial Sectors 




1 


Tbo. Pwr. \ 

dam don eftanga 


Tin. 

Pm. 

dOM 


Energy 

115^9 115a +0.37 

Capital Goods 

118.32 

11B.42 

+0.76 

Utilities 

130.03 13069 -0.43 

Raw Materials 

135^4 

136.06 

-0.16 

finance 

1T5J0 115.43 *0.06 

Consumer Goods 

104.35 

10354 

+0.78 

Services 

12227 122.05 +0.1 B 

HueHanoous 

135.49 

135.14 

+026 

For more information about the Index, a booklet is aia2abfe free of charge. 

Write lo Tri b Index, 181 Avenue Charles de GauBe. 82521 NeuSy Codex, Franca. 


Apple-IBM Alliance Runs Off Track 

Challenge to the Intel-Microsoft Industry Standard Fades 


By John Markoff 

New York Times Sendee 

SAN FRANCISCO — It 
was to be the alliance of for- 
mer enemies, teaming up to 
conquer common foes. 

At least that was the strate- 
gy three summers ago. when 
IBM and Apple Computer 
stunned the industry by an- 
nouncing a joint plan to at- 
tack the d omina tion of the 
personal computer industry 
by machines based on chips 
from Intel Corp. and software 
from Microsoft Corp. 

Apple Computer Inc. and 
International Business Ma- 
chines Corp. called their 
planned weapon the Power 
PC. and to make sure they had 
sufficient firepower, they re- 
cruited the big chip maker 
Motorola Inc. to thar team. 

But recently, the IBM-Ap- 
ple alliance has shown signs of 
running off track. 

Although Apple has been 
selling a line of Power PC 
computers since March and 
BBM is expected to introduce 
its own version of a Power PC 
machine next month, the com- 
panies have wandered from 
their common mission: mak- 
ing Power PC a unified tech- 
nology “platform” that would 
run both Apple and IBM soft- 
ware interchangeably. 

Executives at both compa- 
nies declined to speak on the 


record about the troubled alli- 
ance. But they have confirmed 
privately in recent weeks that 
it may be years — if ever — 
before IBM and Apple fulfill 
their promise of giving com- 
puter users, and the computer 
industry itself, a true alterna- 
tive to the Intel-Microsoft 
standard that accounts for 85 
percent of personal computers 
now in use. 

Analysts see an opportunity 
squandered. 


“This was the last hope to 
stop the Intel-Microsoft car- 
tel, and it's not going to hap- 
pen,” said George Colony, 
president of Forrester Re- 
search, a computer industry 
consulting firm in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. 

To be sure, the Power PC 
chips made by Motorola and 
IBM are finding a market not 
only in Apple and IBM ma- 
chines, but also in other r 
of consumer electronics. 


Attiring at Inters Goliath 

WliSe fcanew Power PC chip, based on RISC technology. 
pfoyW^ffBater'processfrs power' than infefs current fine.of 
computer cHps, it te not expected to pose a serious challenge 
to imef s hegemony over tfe© desktop computer chip market 

70'mB6on chips 


•C6rrjp^ere.itiog interchips ■ 
60 ~ M.MriuxoEa S80QQ serfescfiips “ 
(used in older Macintoshes} 

50 ^JH'RtSC drips ' 

• J. ^nchKfes.'POwBfK^ 

40; — r - — - — 


30. 

20 



•88 *8& ’BO *91 ’92 *93 '94 '95 *96 '97 


85.5% | 
*ol the j 
overall i 
market j 


14.5% 
of the 
overall 
market, 
two- ‘ 
thirds l 
maybe I 
Power j 
PC chips 


prelected 

Sources: hnemsUofiaf Pare Corporation, Daiaquesi 


Tfie New York Times 


video-game system maker 
3 DO Co., for example, recent- 
ly said it would base its next 

f eneration of systems on the 
ower PC. 

Apple, meanwhile, says it is 
still on pace to reach its goal 
of selling I million Power PC 
Macintosh computers by the 
end of the year. IBM has' high 
hopes for the Power PC-based 
computers that may roll out as 
soon as October. 

But at least initially, these 
Apple and IBM machines w-ill 
use different software. And 
Taligem, the IBM-Apple joint 
venture created to develop a 
common software operating 
system, has yet to finish the 
software tools that third-party 
software developers will need 
to create the applications — 
word processors, spreadsheets 
and the like — without which 
an operating system is useless. 

So far apart are the two 
companies. In fact, that Apple 
has not yet disclosed whether 
it will include IBM among the 
computer makers it allows to 
license Apple’s new System 
7.5 operating system for the 
Power PC. 

Apple is drawing mounting 
industry criticism that it is 
bungling its System 7.5 licens- 
ing strategy by imposing such 
restrictions as allowing only 

See ALLIANCE. Page 13 


Mirror Plans 

Cable Venture 
With U.S. Firms 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dnspatcha 

LONDON — Mirror Group 
PLC. one of Britain's largest 
newspaper publishers, said 
Thursday it would team up with 
five American telecommunica- 
tions companies to bunch a ca- 
ble-television channel focusing 
on live events. 

The joint venture is to offer a 
channel called “Live TV," ini- 
tially to around 500,000 homes 
now served by cable systems 
run by the U.S. companies. 
Their systems account for 
about 60 percent of the British 
cable market. The date for 
starting the service has not yet 
been set. 

Mirror’s American counter- 
part, called CPP-1. is a partner- 
ship of the regional telephone 
companies Nynex Corp., South- 
western Bell Corp. and U S West 
Inc. and the cable system opera- 
tors Tde-Communications Inc. 
and Comcast Corp. 

Neither Mirror Group, which 
will be the majority partner, nor 
the U.S. companies would spec- 
ify the size of their planned 
stakes or investments. A 
spokesman for Mirror Group 
railed start-up costs “minimal. 

The programming initially 
will focus on events such a’s 


sports matches and concerts. It 
is to be made available to all the 
companies' cable subscribers at 
no additional cost for an initial 
run of 10 years. 

Adam Singer, chairman of 
CPP-1. said: “To grow, U.K. 
cable must be more than im- 
ported TV and recycled shows, 
ll must have fresh British pro- 
gramming, with fresh altitudes 
from new producers." 

“These arrangements mark 
the beginning of our strategic 
move into television, by joint 
venturing with other leading 
players in the media industry," 
said David Montgomery. Mir 
ror Group chief executive. 

As U.S. telecommunications 
companies dig up the streets of 
Britain to lay cables, they hav 
come under fire from Britisl 
Telecommunications PLC tb 
phone company that is barred 
from competing with them on 
the multimedia front because it 
is not allowed to deliver televi- 
sion over its own network. 

British Telecom has accuser 
the U.S. companies of using 
Britain as a testing ground for 
multimedia systems that could 
be expanded to bigger markets. 

(AP, Bloomberg } 


U.S. -British Phone Deal Paves Way for Lower Rates 


O Imemalonal Herald Tribune 


By Tom Buerkle 

!ni emotional Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The United States and 
Britain are preparing a dramatic opening 
of telephone services between the two 
countries that is expected to unleash 
fierce price-cutting throughout Europe 
on trails- Allan tic phone calls, govern- 
ment and industry sources said Thursday. 

It will be the biggest realignment to 
date in the pricing of international calls. 

Regulators plan to authorize new com- 
petitors to lease telephone lines between 
the two countries from existing operators. 


led by AT&T Corp. and British Telecom- 
munications PLC, and offer to carry calls 
for a wide range of customers at steep 
discounts. Current restrictions on leased 


US. companies rash to make deals to pro- 
vied nationwide cefiidar service. Page 14. 

lines make them available only to very- 
large corporate customers and offer mod- 
est cost savings. 

“The theory is that this will open up 
the market to resellers who can serve ail 


segments of the market,” said Diane 
Cornell, chief of the international policy- 
division at the Federal Communications 
Commission in Washington. “It will cer- 
tainly put pressure on rates." 

Since the 1930s, when the telephone 
was a luxury and international lines 
were scarce, charges for cross-border 
calls have been set at artificially high 
levels by a cartel-like arrangement of 
national telephone operators. 

The new price cuts, which analysis 
and industry officials estimate could 


reach as much as 50 percent, at first will 
be offered to major corporations, but 
eventually the competition is expected 
lo lead to substantially lower prices for 
individual consumers as well. 

Although the opening technically will 
be limited to traffic between the United 
States and Britain, operators are likely 
to try to route calls from Continental 
Europe to the United Slates via London 
to take advantage of lovver rates, said 
Viesturs Vucins. president of Unisource. 

See PHONES, Page 12 


at*: 4 " 


•wiv*- 


WALL STREET WATCH 


Exxon Spill Still Soils Stock 


By Agis Salpukas 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK. — As jurors deliberate 
on whether Exxon Carp, should 
pay punitive damages for the Ex- 
xon Valdez oil spill in 1989, should 
investors worry? Wall Street analysts are di- 
vided on the answer. 

Some recommend avoiding the stock until 
the damages are awarded. Others advise wait- 
ing even longer, until the appeals process is 
finished and it becomes dear exactly how 
much. Exxon’s final bill w£D be. 

Some analysts said Exxon stockholders 
should hold onto their shares, while others 
even, suggested buying now, since the stock 
was about 1 2 percent below this year’s high of 
$67,125. Those advocating a buy said there 
was a good chance the jury’s award will be 
moderate, paving the way for a quick rise in 
the stock price. 

In addition, they said Exxon's 
outlook was improving because some of 
company’s businesses, including its huge Eu- 
ropean operations, are on the rebound. 

The jury, meeting in U.S. District Court in 
Anchorage, is expected to reach a decision 
soon. Even if the jury awards the full $15 
h itKo n that the plaintiffs* lawyers are seeking, 
analysts said Exxon has the financial strength 
to suffer only limited damage. 

“Exxon has deep pockets,” Francis P. 
Knuettd, with Prudential Securities, said, 
ing that the company was sure to appeal, 
which would buy time. There also is a good 
chance it could negotiate the amount down. 
Exxon has put together a legal tram that was 
able to convince the jury on Aug. 12 to award 
(wmmmiinl fishermen $286.8 million in dam- 


ages for the 1989 spilL far less than the $895 
mini on that was sought- 

Frederick Leuffer, an oil analyst for Bear, 
Stearns & Co., calculated that if Exxon bor- 
rowed to pay a $15 billion award, its interest 
cost would reduce earnings per share by 
about 55 cents a year. He said he expected 
Exxon to earn about $3.35 per share this year 
and $4 JO next year, compared with $4.21 a 
share in 1993 on net income of $5.28 billion. 

“It’s certainly not life threatening, but the 
dividend growth rate could fall below that of 
its competitors,” he said. 

Mr. Leuffer, who advised investors to avoid 
the stock as the trial neared, said Exxon could 
manage to pay an award on the high end 
without a major impact on its long-term earn- 
ings potential. He said he was sure, however, 
that there would be an impact on the stock. 

“If the juiy can come bade with $5 billion,” 
he said, “the stock will still get hit. Who needs 
the headache ?" 

He said he favored avoiding the stock until 
it became dear how much Exxon would have 
to pay, which could mean waiting out a long 
appeal process. Only then will it be clear 
whether Exxon can keep paying its high divi- 
dend, which now equals about 5 percent of 
the stock price. 

But Mr. Knuettel said that if investors 
shunned Exxon now, they could miss a nice 
rally. 

Exxon stock dropped about $8, to $59 a 
share in the weeks before the jury found that 
Exxon’s “recklessness” had caused the 
grounding of the Exxon Valdez. 

Exxon’s stock rose 50 cents to $59.25 in 
trading on Thursday. 



Compiled by Our Staff From Lkspairhcl 

NEW YORK — Signs that 
U.S. inflation has not acceler- 
ated enough to prompt the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board lo raise in- 
terest rates kindled a rally on 
Wall Street on Thursday. 

A monthly survey by the 
Federal Reserve Bank of Phila- 
delphia reinforced the percep- 
tion by showing manufacturers 
in that region paid reduced 
prices for raw materials in Sep- 
tember even as manufacturing 
continued to expand. 

“The sentiment now is that 
the Federal Reserve really 
won’t raise rales until at least 
after the November elections.” 


said Peter DaPuzzo. senior 
manag ing director at Cantor 
Fitzgerald & Co. 

High rates raise borrowing 
costs and hamper profit 
growth; they also make stocks 
less attractive relative to fixed- 
income investments. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage finished up 58.55 points, 
at 3.953.88. while advancing is- 
sues outnumbered declining 
ones by a 2-to-l ratio on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

Computer-guided buy-orders 
flooded the market in the last 
ten minutes of trading, adding 
21 points to the Dow average, 
said Greg Schoenleber, an ana- 


lyst at Birinyi Associates Inc., a 
company that tracks computer- 
driven trades. 

“The lone of the market has 
changed from one of higher 
rates and a big downdraft in 
stock prices to the possibility of 
a little uptick in rates and good 
earnings,'' said Ronald Doran, 
head of institutional equity- 
trading at C.L. King & Asso- 
ciates Inc. “Cash is starting to 
flow into equity mutual funds 
again and is being put back to 
work.” 

The tame inflation signals 
shown in the Philadelphia data 
also spurred a rally in Treasury 
bond prices, easing the threat of 


inflation eroding the value of 
fixed-income securities. 

The price of the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond finished 
up 14/32 poini at 9S 13/32. 
while the yield dropped to 7.63 
percent from 7.67 percent 
Wednesday. 

“Investors issued a sigh of 
relief on the numbers.” said 
Hugh Johnson, chief invest- 
ment officer at First Albany. 

Hanson PLCs American” de- 
positary receipts were the mosL 
actively traded issue on the 
New York Stock Exchange, ris- 
ing Vs to ISTfc. Hanson has fre- 
quently topped the most-actives 

See STOCKS, Page 12 


Lufthansa 
Sets Radical 
Overhaul 


Reuters 

FRANKFURT — The 
German airline, Lufthansa, 
which this week set terms 
for its privatization, an- 
nounced Thursday a radi- 
cal restructuring aimed at 
securing its future in the 
fiercely contested world of 
private carriers. 

Lufthansa's supervisory 
board gave the green light 
to the airline's freight, tech- 
nical and systems divisions 
operating as legally sepa- 
rate units beginning Jan. I . 

The reorganization is the 
culmination of several 
years of cost-cutting and 
streamlining to rid the 
state-owned airline of bu- 
reaucratic practices and 
prepare for a challenge to 
its main rival, British Air- 
ways. 

“This is a historic situa- 
tion.” the board's chair- 
man, Wolfgang Roller, 
said. “The crane has finally 
been set free.” he added, 
referring to Lufthansa's 
corporate logo of a crane in 
flight. 


Weatherstone to Retire 
As Head of J.P. Morgan 


Bloomberg Business News 

NEW YORK — Dennis 
Weatherstone, the English trad- 
er who helped make JJ*. Mor- 
gan & Co. more like a Wall 
Street firm than a bank, said 
Thursday be would retire as 
chairman and chief executive 
officer at the end of the year. 

* The board chose Douglas A. 
Warner 3d, 48, the company's 
president since 1990, to succeed 
Mr. Weatherstone on Jan. I. 
Mr. Weatherstone will be 64 
when he retires. 


t! 


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um 


DM. 

V.TTM 

s as? 


lYart.a« 


I 

L73JS 

JUBJ 

uet 

i vo» 7MB 

ram mm am 
w an m5mo xpmt 
Ufla Uttl 
42* HUB 


FJF. 

tens 

urn 


Lira 

uir 

UB14' 

WOl* 


Oft 


turn 

MOT 
2710 

ion im* nw 
au — will 
iro» 


B f. 
IMS' 


03X 


SJr. 

1J51 

TOO 

tap 

mm 


Yen 

im m 

tfSSM 

UM' 

Tits 


Sept 15 

w PsMfn 
UMS UH* 
7 1 g ) KKO* 

i.ui7 law 

inn OLE 


jgjg rjt ** 


uts 

USB 

UH 

US 

MU1 


sans win 

USH 


um k*b* mm* *t u — 

4ta UZUO ?U*1 MOM 1U1I 

sun UM BX5 US2 1205 

tuti U 2 U sna» ims tia 1 


1 month 

3 months 

4 months 
liwr 


Donor 

<*4-4% 

4'Kr5V. 

S*r4S 

5%-6 


r Deposits 

Swiss 

D-Mark Franc 

Starling 

French 

Frrrnc 

von 

Sept. 15 

ECU 

498-5 

Vk-Ws 


5»v5 S 

2 V2 ' . 

5*8-5^ 

4 *r5 V. 

3% -4 

fn. m> 

5V9-5M 

2U.-240 

5 *+• 

5VW»4 

4*w-J*. 


S9>4A. 

T+Tri 

6 > w« ». 

54MW 

4H-flA 

7 Vm-7 9. 

6 -m 

2%-2%. 

0 r -«r7 


21154 

urn 

un 

MSS 


0X747 

asm 

uts 

2*9 


0MS 

tun 

7JW 


UB2* 

1M01 

22Q57 


CbMtf 

un 

IMS 

2MB 

2£B4 


Sources: Revtaf&UoytbBonk. 

Rotes oppHcbUs to interba nk deposits at St million mMmum (or equivalent). 


Although Mr. Warner has 
spent most of his career as a 
corporate banker, rather than a 
trader like Mr. Weatherstone, 
J. P. Morgan executives said he 
would not slow the bank's focus 
on new securities businesses. 

Mr. Weatherstone described 
Mr. Warner as a “strong leader 
who knows what it takes to ex- 
cel in global finance and meet 
the changing need of clients 
around the world.” 

The bulk of Morgan’s reve- 
nue now comes from businesses 
the bank was not even involved 
in six years ago. In 1989. the 
bank’s new headquarters, a 47- 
floor neo-Gothic tower on Wall 
Street, had one trading floor for 
its bond and currency opera- 
tions. Now it has four floors 
devoted to trading everything 
from complex derivatives con- 
tracts to Latin .American equi- 
ties. 


Blanc pain 


Mir 

*mu « 

31X221 

45171 


rasa 


UV 

U747 


US' 

1JW* 

GUM 

HA 


vm 

MTtt 

15M 


1*4 • 

i«r 

157*9 


Key Money Rates 


Cantata pots 
arm*, peso 
MMI 1-W3 
Anlr.KhE ion 
Knoll real Ml 
CMMtayuro X5234 
Czeco Koruna 7JJU 
Danish Krow 0. 1(09 

EoyptMvnd 10383 

Pin. nwmiM 


atoms* m Amsreraam. London. New nor* and Zurkb. Uxktss In other t*t**rt; Toronto 

'Trob^m sound; b: To buy one dollar; -• Volts of MB; HA: not sooted.- NA.: not 
available. ' 

Other DoHar Values 

Curacy W* 

Qmvdrac. 33X50 
HasKml 7T2« 

HUM. Mint 107-71 
HxBob nw* 31X5 
Indaruvk* 217WW 
imti . 
laraeUHKh. IBS 
KNoHiMr 03001 
Mato*. rta«- USE 


United States 
DHcotmtrme 
Prime rate 


Close Prev. 

4JM 4JH 


N. Zealand! 

Nonc.kroM 
PM. peso 
Mtthzlatv 
Portasatfo 
Rvu.ni Ml 

Saudi rtyaJ 
5k*. S 


PatS 

34053 

14511 

47845 

2540 

MMX 

1S7J3 

2301-00 

3J504 

1487 


Cu rren c y Peri 
S. Air. rood 355 
S.K6T.UAM 79940 
Sw s d .hr o no 74054 
Totaoat 2621 
Thai baht 25.95 
Tarfckunra IBM. 
UAEcOrtam 34727 
VenotMIv. 19540 


7* 

4 

444 

5.15 

43» 

531 

634 

6.94 

Ut 

733 

74J 


Currency 
Canadian daltor 
Jaw anese yen 


Jfrday 
i wn 
9940 


40-day 90-day 
13536 13542 
9843 9841 


Forward Rates 

Correacv JKtor 40doy f*day 

14*31 14*23 I44U 
nSoMumk 14£. ««. -»! 

Swlufrwtt ' 138** 13837 13848 . 

caress- IMG Bodt (Amsterdam); tndosuee Bank /Brussels); Banco CommercM* twiano 

Sub£;a£m ***** '***>•■ Bonk 01 ToKro <Toicn>{ Ron * Bmk 91 

(Toronto): IMF (SDR). Other data from Reuters and AP. 


J-amntb CDs 

Comm, paper 188 days 

*aratsi Treason tin 
l-rear Treasury Mil 
Oyear Treasury aotc 

5- rear Treasury note 
7-rear Treasury bo re 
It-year Treasury note 
l»-year Treasury bond 
Merrill Lynch 30-day Ready asset 199 
japan 

EHKauBtrate 1*i 

Coil money Cisd. 

Milan tti interbank — — 

MMRtb feKefbanfe — 

6- me«tfi interbank 
lfrvear Government bond 
Orman, 

Lombard rate 
COII money 
l-meem interbank S.00 

3-meMti interbank S.I0 

6-monlh Interbank S'* 

10 -year Bond 743 


7*. 

49k 

444 

515 

458 

534 

629 

741 

7.04 

740 

747 

198 

1* 

225 

2VS 

2U 


Book base rote 

5* 

5V. 

Call money 

51b 

5 

1-month Interbank 

5 h. 

5!. 

QjHIMlh i--f— , |»nrA 
WlWu Him fcrvuW 

5% 

5% 

6-nMnth Interbank 

V* 

6'i 

16-rear dll 

LBl 

Ul 

Franca 



Intervention rate 

540 

540 

Can money 

5‘, 

5*. 

l.inontfa interbank 

5V, 

5*. 

3-moath Interbank 

51b 

515 

4- month Interbank 

5% 

5 S 

10-vcarOAT 

837 

M8 


Sources: Reuters. Bipamoera, Merrill 
Lynch . Bonk of Tokyo. Commerzbank. 
Graemvell Menton. Credit L rennets. 

Gold 



216 

iSi 

Zurich 

AJU. 

3&SS 

PJA. 

38800 

Ch-se 

-L50 

A SC 

6.00 
e Ac 

London 

New York 

38740 

39140 

BMP 

391.90 

— IX 
-140 


S4S 

545 

520 

7S9 


US. donors per ounce. London official tU- 
Ings: Zurich and New York opening and clos- 
ing or Ices; Hew York Comer t December. 1 
Soi-ree; Reuters 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INGERSOLL-RAND COMPANY 

(CDRa) 

The undersigned announces flip! ns 
front 22 September 1994 at Kns- 
Associatie N.V_ Spui«(raaf 172, 
Amsterdam, rfiv. rpn. no. B7 of Ihe 
(JDK’s Ingi-rsnll-Kand Cnmp.int. 
each repr. 5 shores, bill be payable 
»ilh Dll*. U7 neL Idh. nrf rrr. 
date IL08.94; gross S p.sli.) 

oflrr deduriion nf |5kfc DSA-lax — 
S 0,1 :i8 = Dfle. (U3 per Cflii Dir. 
cps. belonging In nun 'residents nf 
7 lie Netherlands will he paid after 
deduction of un additional lal'o 
USA-lax (= li.I.IH = Dfis. 02S wHb 

Dlls. I Jl f neL 

AMSTERDAM DKPOSITARV 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam. ScpK-niheT 9, IW|. 



r.suibill»n 


Since 1735 there has 

NEVER BEEN A QUARTZ BlANCPAIN WATCH. 
AND THERE NEVER WILL BE. 

Arfan 

buiD.. lli.L-.il *1,1^11. -L* \>.n il -L- L( LdW* l-jit. 

hmL->*nliL-- I'^nuiL- TAW Pjii-.TA i I r -IT f.l i* T4 

yi. ijuK.ir^ Ai-Hi«k,.' ”Aii\ J'jn«. Ul 1 1 1 J« TJ ii| v, 
rt'ai I kinal N.tniUnunik- r,Lllfti.tl-l»nn.H 

























Trade-Talk Hop es 
Give Dollar a Lift 


Compiled by Our S:qff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
rose Thursday on anticipation 
of 2 rale, cut in Gtfuuiny after 
the mid-October presidential 
election and hope for a U.S.- 
Japan trade agreement. 

A regional Federal Reserve 
Board report hinting that U.S. 


5.2735 francs and to 1-2860 
Swiss francs from 1.28)2 
francs. The pound weakened to 
SI. 5620 from $1.5660. 


The report from the Federal 
Reserve Bank of Philadelphia 
lifted Treasury bond, which are 
seen as a barometer of foreign 
interest in doUar-denominated 


Foreign Exchange 


inflation was only advancing at 
a moderate pace also shored up 
the American currency. 

Trading was quiet, with 
many foreign-exchange desks 
thinly staffed because of the 
Yom Kippur Jewish holiday 
and a national holiday in Japan. 

Talk that Lhe president of the 
Swiss National Bank saw room 
for one more small interest rate 
cut in Germany helped the dol- 
lar against the' Deutsche mark, 
even though the Bundesbank 
Council kept German interest 
rates unchanged at its meeting 
Thursday. 

The dollar finished at 1.5493 
DM, up from 1.5417 DM 
Wednesday, and at 99.45 yen, 
up from 99.20 yen. It rose to 
5.2915 French francs from 


“The Philly Fed index 
showed growth with moderate 
inflation, which is construc- 
tive,” said John Nelson, direc- 
tor of global foreign exchange 
at Barclays Bank PLC in Lon- 
don. “The dollar looks buoyant 

right now.” 

The dollar was helped against 
the yen on sentiment that the 
United States and Japan would 
resolve their trade differences 
before a Sept. 30 deadline for 
U.S. sanctions to kick in. 

But concern about America's 
seemingly immin ent invasion of 
Haiti could hurt the dollar in 
coming weeks, traders and ana- 
lysts said. On Thursday, Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton approved call- 
ing up as many as 1.600 mi litary 
reservists for duty in an inva- 
sion of Haiti. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters ) 



Open HMi low Lou On. 


Metals 


India 3890W 39JM8 389*33 395328 -5BJS 
Trans iuoJ9 158*39 157*70 1574.45 — 1 w 
Ulil 177 A3 179.74 177.10 179.74 -2A> 

Comp 131*21 1 327.59 131*65 1327.59 - 12.24 


Sta ndar d & Poor’s Indexes 


HW» Low Close CllVe 


I ndustri als 
Tnrrep. 
Utilities 
FI nonce 
SP 50a 
5P 100 


54033 55139 540.83 +744 
37113 37425 37625 +0X1 
15124 151.06 15124 +115 
4SJ15 4541 <5JH +041 
474J1 46179 47441 +401 
44103 435-52 442X13 +&J1 


NYSE Indexes 


High Lew Lad Cbg. 


Cemaodte 

InduMriall 

Tramp. 

Ulifilv 

Finance 


261.42 75047 241.42 -2.94 
327.18 323.16 327.IS -402 
24370 242.03 34101 -070 
306.06 30141 206.06 - 746 
315-55 31190 2I5.5S -1.48 


Cine 

Bid ASP 
ALUMINUM (Nfab Grade) 

Dollars per nwtrfc tori 

Spot 1S52JJ0 S5100 

Forward 1576.00 1577X10 

COPPER CATHODES (HWl 
Denars per metric too 
Spot 2471X10 247100 

Fenton) 2407.00 248&00 

LEAD 

Dalian per metric tod 
Soot 679X30 62700 

Forward 631X10 63100 

NICKEL 

Doom per metric toe 
Spat 6350X10 634000 

Forward 6450XM 6460XW 

TIN 

Dolton per metric ten 
Spot 524000 5250X10 

Forward 5215.00 533000 

ZINC (SpecM Htoti oraeai 
Delian per metric too 
Spot 992X10 99100 

Forward 1014X» 1014J0 


Previous 
Bid ASK 


1557-50 155BJ0 
15S2J0 158100 
Grade) 


Feb 1S5J5 IS5JD0 155X3 75125 —100 

Mar 155.75 13475 15525 15525 -125 

Apr 15400 154 XX) 154.00 15tW -12S 

MOT NX N.T. N.T. N.T. —1J» 

J0M 15100 15200 15200 15200 -1O0 

July N.T. N.T. N.T. N.T. • 

Est. volume: 11591 . Open tot. 102461 


2497X10 249BX8) 
251200 251300 . 


BRENT CRUDE OIL UFB) 

US. (Saltan Hr Darrel -tots of lJM barren 


A15O0 61600 
627 JO 62800 


654500 6555.00 
664500 665000 ; 


530000 530500 I 
537500 53*000 ! 


Oct 

t iS> 

I SJ5 

1562 

1563 


Nov 

1565 

1565 

1568 

1566 

— *05 


16XM 

1566 

15.90 

15.90 

—aw 


1*12 

16X10 

1*03 

1*03 

— niw 

F«b 

16.17 

1*06 

1*06 

16X10 

— 009 

Mar 

1*2) 

16X0 

1*20 

1*11 

-009 

Apr 

1*25 

1*20 

1*20 

1*20 

— 009 

May 

N.T. 

n,t 

N.T. 

1*23 

— 009 


N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1*26 

-009 

xty 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1*29 

-009 

Aug 

N.T, 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1*32 

— 0.09 

Sea 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1*35 

—009 

Est. volume: 3*674 . 

Open ini. 17*096 


98X50 98450 
100600 100700 


Stock Indexes 


WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — Pnces lor 
finished goods fell this month while 
delphia area continued to expand. 
released Thursday by the Federal R< ^ e . 

The Philadelphia fed's September pnee SdStotf 

fell to 40.4 from 48.4 in August, while its pnees receive index tor* 
manufactured goods fell to 15.0 from 24-5. Economists said the 
report was Hkely to relieve fears of inflation. . J 

Separately, the Commerce Department said bua«J 
tones piled up for the fourth month in a row mJjdy* 
percent as sales tapered off. Though the -"“Sr^S-TiISL^SS 
Ss the smallest gain since a 02 percent dtcimtm 
analysts said it suggested businesses may 
consumer demand for goods. Compared with the levd in JuQf. 
1993, inventories rose 3.9 percent. - { • • 


9 


f 


IK* 


Financial 


NASDAQ Indexes 


High Low Lot On. 


High Low Cton Chang* 
8-MONTH STERLING (LIFFE) 
tSWUM-ptsOf IMPCt 

Sop 9418 9413 9417 + 0j84 


Htoh Low Cl 0*9 dmn 
FTSE IN (LIFFE) 

05 per Index point 

Sep 312X0 30740 31140 +5X0 

Ok 3131-0 30810 112X1 +51J 

Mar N.T. N.T. 3151X) +52J 

CSt. volume: 20690 Open tat.: *0.917. 


ITT Plans Sell-Off to Invest in Media T; 


NYSE Most Acttvi 


Composite 

Lnctustrlals 

Banks 

insurance 

Finance 

Tranjp. 


777.39 769 JO 777.59 -B.98 
784.03 778.01 78403 -476 
787.07 78X74 787 03 -4X19 
«*7? 940.00 W*72 -4.7? 
96527 96X29 96437 -428 
73450 733.15 73X67 -1.10 


Hanson 

ITT Cp 

walMorl 

Barden 

TelMOX 

Fords 

CompUSA 

Shows 

Compaq s 

AT&T 

CocaCl 

SaroLee 

Merck 

IBM 

PtlilMT 


VoL «9h 

!?_ 

Low 

1&V 

Last 

10% 

am. 

*% 

34706 25V, 

75% 

25% 

— % 


13**. 

T3% 

- % 

74925 64«S 

63U 

64% 

*i% 

25738 29 'A 

2ffW 

28% 

_ IA 

24449 13% 

12V* 

1S% 



13% 

14% 

— % 

21461 37% 

35% 

37% 

* i% 

20863 5<V« 

54% 

54% 



47 V* 



19794 239* 

72 

23 Lt 

• i% 

19621 34V* 

33% 

34% 

♦ V, 

18953 70'*. 

69% 

69% 

- 

18753 40 li 

59% 

60% 



AMEX Stock Index 


Mali Law Law 

459.74 45728 499.73 

Oto- 

-740 


94.1B 

9*13 

9*17 

+ 004 

9X20 

9122 

9327 

+ 004 

9288 

92J9 

9283 

Unch. 

91.94 

9162 

91M 

—003 

9160 

9183 

9186 

— DXB 

91.16 

91XJ7 

91.12 

— 003 

9088 

9080 

9084 

Uncn. 

9063 

9062 

9067 

— *01 

9056 

7084 

9054 

+ 003 

9082 

90J8 

9044 

+ 004 

9033 

9027 

90X3 

+<m 

9023 

9017 

9023 

+ 005 


CAC 46 1 MAT! FI 

Sp** Pe '' 1990.00 1956X10 1987XJ0 + 29X10 

Od 1996J0 1967X10 19945) +2950 

Nov NT. N.T. N.T. UncJv 

DK 201400 1989X10 3016X10 + 29X10 

Mor 2025-50 2033-50 2043J5 +39.00 

Jim 201X00 301X00 2037X10 +29-00 

Est. volume: 17858. Oaen lot.: 62860 | 


NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — ITTCorp. plans to raiscabou^” 

billion to finan ce media anaentertaimnent acquisitions by seuug ( 
businesses in commercial finance, commercial installment lending^ 
1 ; - in ihn mmnfl nv Mid Thursday. i 


pusincsacs in iajuuiiuvku uuuu**, — : ., __ , 

and reinsurance, a person dose to the company said Thursday. -» 
The finance and insurance units being sold generated 


Dow Jo nos Bond Averages 


Est. volume: nm Ooen I nl.: 537281. 
4-MONTH EURODOLLARS (L1FFE1 
SI roflftai - pts of IHPCt 
An 94« 9495 9496 + 0XB 

& 943S 9428 94J0 +0* 

N.T. N.T. *195 +0.0* 

Jon N.T. N.T. 9160 + OLD* 

Sap N.T. N.T. 91X1 +am 

Est. volume: 251. Open Int.: 4995. 


Sources: Mailt, Associated Press. 
London inn Financial Futures Exchange, 
inti Petrotevm Exctxmae. 


Dividends 


20 Bands 
10 Utilities 
10 industrials 


dose Chfe 

*7.57 +112 

9121 +110 

101.94 +114 


3-MONTH EURO MARKS (LIFFEJ 
DM1 ratmon- on of in per 
Sep *4M 9452 9494 +101 

Dec 9475 9468 9474 +104 

Mar 9435 9427 9434 +105 

S 919S 9157 9194 +OD3 

9166 9158 9166 +103 

Dee 9U9 9130 9139 + 004 

Mar 9119 93.10 9178 +103 

S 9X55 9X87 9X94 +103 

9X75 9X47 9X76 + IUN 

Dec 9X56 9X50 9X56 +103 

Mar 9136 9X34 9X39 +103 

JiM 9125 9X24 9227 + 0X13 

Est. volume: 101901 Open Int.: 797.814 
3-MONTH PI BOR UMATtP) 
FFStnBfiap-Msof Hnpc* 

Sep 9438 94X6 9437 UlKh. 

Dec 9194 9189 9193 + 0X12 

Mnr 9147 9141 9146 +101 

Jun 9110 9304 9309 Unch. 

Sep 9183 9177 9252 —101 

Dec 9158 9X51 9X56 —CUM 

Mar 9139 92X4 92X7 —0XO 

Jan 9X22 9X14 9X17 —003 

Est. volume: 40,631 Open ini.: 199,193. 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) 

BM0O- Pts& SnMMIN PCt 
Sep 100-479 99-22 100-11 +0-26 

Dec 99-23 98-27 99-21 +0-28 

Mar N.T. N.T. 9F01 + 0-28 

Est volume; 64424 Open Ini.: I2L084 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 250000 - Pts of 1M PCt 
Dec WJ5 88X3 89X2 +048 

Mar 8114 88.14 8853 +169 

Est. volume: 94647. Open Int.: 144183 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT IF) 
FF50OM0-pfS of IMPCt 




NASDAQ Most Actives NYSE Diary 


STOCKS# Inflation Data Helps 


Continued from Page 11 


list recently on dividend related 
trading. 

ITT fell 1% to 79ft after a 
Goldman, Sachs analyst cut his 
investment opinion of the 
stocks The conglomerate plans 
to raise about S4 billion to fi- 


U.S. Stocks 


nance media and entertainment 
acquisitions by selling its com- 
mercial finance, commercial in- 
stallment lending and a reinsur- 
ance business. 

Telfefonos de Mexico’s Amer- 
ican depositary receipts rose 1 ft 
to 64ft. helped by a 2.4 percent 
rally in Mexico’s Bo Isa stock 
index. 

Food stocks were strong, 
with Borden rising ft to 13ft, 
Sara Lee up I ft to 23ft and 
Coca Cola adding 1ft to 48ft. 

Compaq Computer rose 1ft 
to 33ft a day after announcing a 
new line of personal computers. 

Among over-the-counter is- 
sues, Structured Dynamics Re- 
search fell 2ft to 4ft. The maker 
of mechanical-design automa- 
tion software said it uncovered 
bogus sales in its Asian opera- 
tions that would result in a third- 


quarter loss and restatement of , 
results for the past two years. 

Parametric Technology, 
which competes with Structural 
Dynamics, rallied 3 13/16 to 
31ft. The software company's 
1995 earnings estimates were 
raised to S1.4S a share from 
SI. 43. 

Taco Cabana fell 2ft to 8ft 
after reporting lower third- 
quarter profit than analysts ex- 
pected. 

Tektronix climbed 4ft to 38ft 
after the electronic and com- 
puter graphics company said 
first-quarter earnings were 
higher than analysts had ex- 
pected. 

Crown Cork & Seal rose 2ft 
to 38ft after it said it would take 
a charge of $68 million against 
third-quarter earnings to close 
10 North American metal- 
packaging plants and reorga- 
nize three others. 

Alpha Industries rose ft to 


Struct) 

Osaos 

TocoOAjs 

MetttcfiA 

VLSI 

IrUel 

PormTch 

SunMic 

TelCmA 

MCI 

MiCSttS 

Cemocor 

AppIoC 

3Com s 
IrtfoDv 


Vo L High 
109205 4?, 
43560 27W 
35844 9 
35555 IBV5 
33646 1 2V, 
30505 67 
29090 32 
27161 2816 
26787 23 
76616 25 
24970 58 VI 
23368 17Vi 
23068 36h 
20582 347k 
18034 2346 


Low Lost 
3H 49, 
25Vi* 27 
8 8h 

18 1BV„ 
17M 12V m 

65V. 67 

2716 31 Vj 

2769 2SH 

22 2 Tfx 

231* 25 

531% 58U 

16 I7U 

3S>* 36 

32V. 341* 

2216 23>* 


Advanced 

Declined 


Total iuue» 

1 New Hlatai 

New lows 


1529 1188 

626 1058 

708 6 99 

2863 7865 

66 31 

40 86 


AMEX Diary 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 
Declined 
Uredwaad 
I Totci Issues 
New Highs 
UewLmK 


arcaPn 

5POR 

lidarDto 

Htrken 

GayiCn 

BchoBav 

GravLne 

VicicB 

VtocwtC 

Amcti* 


VOL Moll 
2291 D 13 V. 
6923 47X7,, 
6544 3tt 

6900 3H 
5767 81* 
5414 I2U 
5214 4'i u 
<260 359, 
3812 31* 
3031 9M 


Low Lari 

12V, 13V, 

47 i Vh <7»/w 
3'a »■. 

2 21 * 

TV. B’A 
124* 121* 

3 V. 4V„ 

35 35H 

9V. U 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advmced 
Declined 
U m ho n ged 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


Per Amt 
IRREGULAR 

_ X5 
_ .1549 
INCREASED 


9-27 10-11 
9-30 1031 


Cedar Fair LP Q 5623 

Fri Essex BCD Q .08 

Tucker Pptys Q J8 

tod Ass*! MomlCp Q S6 


10-7 11-15 
9-30 W-13 
9-X 10-15 
9-30 10-14 


The finance and insurance units being sold g encr atea^ aoouv 
S271 million in operating income last year on revenue of SI-4R 
bill ion. They had total assets of SI 1.62 billion. Hr plans to keep" 

its ITT Hartford insurance unit, the person said- ' 

ITT, in partnership with Cablevision Systems Corp- e . l f r ? < v 
the media and entertainment business in late August with its^_ 
S1.075 billion purchase of New York’s Madison Square <5araeft 
from Viacom Inc. The Garden includes the nation's largest 
regional cable television sports network, a 20.060-seat arena, a 
performance theater and the New York Knickerbockers and New 
York Rangers sports teams. The company also 'is reportedly^ 
bidding to acquire General Electric Co.'s NBC television network^ 


Wiley IJI&SOtaAJ) _ .155 

wnev IJlMonsBn _ .1375 

ChJcoOQ Mllwauk qx X4 

c-revlsed payable data. 


iw io-n . 
10-4 10-12 
9-15 12-14 


ADVO Inc 
Air PidtsACheni 
A/rlease Lid 
Allied HI liter Prd 
Amweri Insur Otp 
B lrmkistiom lllll 
CelaneM Canada 
ClreuH aty sirs 
Commun Svsfems 
Cohen SStrs Rtvine 
CoheniSfrs RfyStis 
CorntnoDel LPMIPS 
Curtiss Wrtom 
Fla Pub Util 
FhikeCnrp 
Generol HeCp 
GUM Hllnc Dir 
Holllnsor Inc 
Kenan Transport 

LTCPPty* 

UDerty TrmTrW 

MocNeol-Scftwndir 

McArthur GlenRtv 


Measure* Corp 
JMaraaiUP adlpfi 


Sea 

11X28 

11122 

11222 

+ 028 

Dec 

11120 

3109* 

11124 

+ 028 

Mar 

11044 

11036 

IIOS4 

+ 026 

Job 

10972 

10922 

10920 

+ 024 




Spot Commodities 


Est. volume: 191899. Open int.: 170451. 


Market Solos 


NYSE 
Amex 
Nasdaq 
In millions. 


Commodity Today 

Aluminum, lb 07M 

Copper e lec tr ol yti c, lb 1X4 

iron FOB. tan 213JH 

Lead, lb 0.30 

Silver, troy w 5M 

Steel l scrap), ton 110.17 

Tlalb 15*92 

Zinc, lb 04882 


Industrials 


Htoh Low Leri Settle arve 
GASOIL (IPE) 

U S. doflors por metric ton-lots of IOC loos 
OCt 14175 147.00 14775 14775 -IX# 

Nov 1517S 13000 13X50 15050 -175 

Dec 15375 15X75 15275 15100 —1-50 

Job 15525 15425 15475 1547S — ITS 


Nicer Inc 
Nucor Carp 
Okk> Ges& Elec 
aw Second Ba» 

Paine Web prmHIIc 
PenelecCne MIPS A 
Pennsvi REIT 
Perkins Fam Rest 
Rock Flnl 
StooerCo 
Strotton SriCpYM 
2D02 TrgTrm 
Thor inttos 
T rimes Corp 
Utd Stationers 
Walden ResldPotvs 


REGULAR 

O XJ25 10-3 10-14 
Q 245 10-3 11-14 

O M 9X0 11-15, 
Q M 9-X 10-14 
a X* 9-30 10-14 
Q .12 9-26 9X0 
g .13 9-26 10-3 1 
Q JI2S M0 10-14 
Q M 9-23 1M, 
Q .17 10-7 10-21 ! 
O AO 9-19 9-20, 
UPS M 25 9-29 MO 
Q 25 10-17 10-31 ! 
Q 29 9-23 10-1 I 
Q .14 10-28 11-18 1 
Q At 9-23 9-30, 
M .115 9-23 9-30 I 
g .15 11-25 12-10 
Q JM25 MO riMS| 
a 27 9-30 10-15 1 
M XM8 J-23 1W| 

G .16 11-18 12-7 I 
Q J4 10-10 U-20 
Q .11 9-2B 10-12 
O 125 9-26 9-30 
Q J15 9-30 11-1 
0 .045 9-30 11-11 | 

a MS 10-7 10-28 
G 28 9-23 10-1 
_ .11 9-23 *38 

>SA M .1822 9-2 9-30 

Q .47 10-31 11-15 
O J2S HO IMS 
O X! t-D 10-3 
Q XH 9-30 10-15 
a .12 9-14 9-22 
M XJ7B1 9-23 104 
Q JO 9-23 10-3 
Q XH 10-14 11-14 
a .10 9-30 10-14 
Q ,425 10-14 12-2 


Lear Seating Buys Fiat’s Seat Maker * 

SOUTHFIELD, Michigan (Reuters) — Lear Seating Corp. said 
Thursday it agreed to buy an automotive seating supplier from 
Fiat SpA for about $160 million, significantly expanding its 
European presence. 

As part of the acquisition of SEW SpA, Learisaid it would entej » 
into a supply agreement with Fiat for the newly acquired unit ter 
provide nearly all of Fiat’s European auto seats. I + 

SEPI had sales of about 553 billion lire ($354 million) last yea?- 
and has about 1,800 employees. Lear, with sales of nearly $2 bUlioq, 
last year, has about 19,500 workers in 60 facilities worldwide. ^ 


*r 

.,[<»/.< *“• 

Jifivit' 


FCC Considers Blocking QVC Sale 


o-annoal,' g- uu y c Mc to Caoadton funds; m- 1 
monthly; q-auarterty; s-s«mKumual 


NEW YORK (NYT) — The Federal Trade Commission is 
considering blocking the sale of QVC In&, the cable home, 
shopping company, to Comcast Corp. and Tele-Communications 
Inc., according to a person close to the discussions. i 1 

The FTC is said to be worried about the concentration of poweb 
in the cable home shopping industry that Tde-Communications- 
would hold after such a deal. Tde-Communications, the largest’ 
U.S. cable operator, already owns 80 percent of Home Shopping) 
Network Inc. and would own 43 percent of QVC after the deaL-’ 
The source said Wednesday the agency seemed to be signaling, 
that it bad reservations about the deal and was not just asking for 
mere formalities. If so. its requests for additional data could delay, 
the deal for months and perhaps cause it to be abandoned. 


PHONES: Price of Trans-Atlantic Calls Seen Falling 


Aipna industries rose rt u 
6ft after the electronics compa- 
ny said year-to-date orders hac 


ny said year-to-date orders bad 
surpassed expectations, princi- 
pally on the strength of wireless 
communications activity.. 

A buy recommendation from 
Dean Witter Reynolds helped 
Automatic Data Processing 
stock rise 1ft to 56ft. 

(Bloomberg. AP) 


Continued from Page U 

a consortium of the Dutch. 
Swedish and Swiss phone com- 
panies. 

The Federal Communica- 
tions Commission also “hopes 
and expects" that by stimulat- 
ing traffic on the U.S.-Britain 
route, the world's third-busiest. 
the opening will bring indirect 
pressure for lower rates else- 
where, Ms. Cornell said. 

‘This is going to bring about 


a fundamental change” in the 
economics of the industry, said 
Dominic Fry. communications 
director at AT&Ts British divi- 
sion. It will allow customers to 
benefit from the huge increases 
in international calling capacity 
brought by fiber-optic links and 
turn international traffic from a 
highly regulated cash cow to a 
commodity business, he said. 

Underlining the scope for 
price cuts. Mr. Fry said the ac- 


tual cost of a leased line would 
be about 1 1 cents a minute. By 
contrast, the cheapest agreed 
rate between trans-Atlantic op- 
erators now is 23 cents a minute 
between AT&T and Britain’s 
Mercury Communications. The 
final cost to customers after do- 
mestic connection charges and 
profit margins is much higher 
— AT&T says it averages 67 
cents a minute for all calls leav- 
ing the United States. 


UoycTs Has Plan on Debts 

Reuters 

LONDON — The 300-year- 
old Lloyd's of London insur- 
ance market announced a new 
strategy Thursday for collecting 
debts from its individual back- 
ers. known as “names.” Lloyd’s 
chief executive officer, Peter 
Middleton said Lloyd's would 
try to reach agreement, with 
names through dialogue and 
would come to a settlement 
with those names whose liabli- 
ties exceeded their asseLs. 


For the Record 




Health Systems International Inc. said it planned to acquire 
M.D. Enterprises of Connecticut Inc^ a physician-owned health 
maintenance organization, for $101 million in stock. (Bloombertf 
Raytbeou Co. said it would combining two divirions to form. 
Raytheon Aircraft Co„ a consolidation that will cost 940 workers 
their jobs. The company is merging Beech Aircraft Corp- and 
Raytheon Corporate Jets. The new company will have annual sales 
of $1.7 billion. (Bloomberg^ 

Profit Market Research sent mystery shoppers to 50 major LLS. 
financial institutions to ask for advice on how to invest $35,000. The 
survey gave high marks for disclosure and customer service to Ban# 
of America, while ranking Great Western and Wdis Fargo among' 
the worst performers. fL47> 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Seomi Season 
High Low 


Open Utah Low dose Cbg OpJnt 


Season Season 
Htoh Law 


Open Htoh Low dose ps OoJnL 


Agencr francs Piewe Sepf. 15 

CtonPrev. I 


Via AaoPoM PraM 


Seaton Semen 
High Low 


Open High Low Owe Chg Oo.wi 


1 156 11. 16 Mar 94 _ 1141 

11JS 11.78XUI96 n.70 11.70 11 JO 11.70 

EsL sales 71.447 Wed’s. StoeS 15.757 
WM’s aoen int 144,530 up 4972 
COCOA (NCSE) ip mc»« ions- sperm 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACF Holding 
Aegon 
Ahold 
Atoo Nobel 
A6HEV 

Buis-Wcssanrn 

CSM 


Elsevier 

GhsJ-Broeodes 

KBG 

Hemekon 

Hoooovens 

Hunter Douglas 

IHCColand 

Inter Mueller 

Inn Nederland 

KLM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

Neditovd 

Oee Gr Inten 

Pokhoed 

Philips 

Polygram 

Raoeco 

Rodamco 

Rollnco 

Rorento 

Poval Dutch 

Stork 

Unilever 

vanOmmeren 

VNU 

WoltervMuwer 


Rhetometall 

Severing 

siemens 47 

Thvuen 

VOrta 

Veto 53) 

VEW 

VkH 

Volkswagen 

WWta 1 

PAX.tode x2.jny 


29629820 
91893A50 
47170 681 

29729870 
302 305 
S37A0S3SJ0 
355 357 
50750420 
465471 70 
1040 1037 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yhlyma 107 lOo 
EnSO-GutZdl 45.90 4570 


Huhtomakl 

(COP. 

Kvmmene 

Melra 

Nokia 

PohlOtO 

ReooJa 

Stockmann 


155 157 

ia.40 1070 

135 135 

195 157 

*2 5 

104 103 

235 230 


HEX Genera) index : 1897+0 
Provloa* : 190042 


KSM9PW 


Brussels 


AG Fin 

Aimanil 

Arced 

Barca 

BBL 

Bekoerl 

C8R 

CMB 

CNP 

Coekerin 

Osbepa 

Colruyl 

Del ha lie 

ElearaCd 

Elect rolina 

gib 

GBL 

Gevoert 


ImmoCel 

Krodletconk 

Mown* 

Pelroflno 


Rechcel 
Rovale Beige 
Soc Gen Bonaue 
SocGenBetotoue 

Sal l no 

SlSSSderk, 


UCB 

Unlvi Mlnlen 
woeomuis 


! Hong Kong 

3420 

sst 

4030 
1X45 
14X50 
55 
4740 
3540 
15 
2525 
2095 
2X80 
90 
1IX» 
15.75 
1240 
37.70 
aim 
7475 
3370 
1670 
1140 
20 
27 JO 
5875 
375 
6375 
11 
47J 

17^ 

11 JO 

1175 
986244 


GEC 

GoiT ACC 

Glaxo 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guiimess 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hlltedown 

HSBC HWBS 

ICI 

Inchcape 
Ktootlsher 
Lads rake 

Land Sec 

Laoorte 

Losmo 

Logo) Gen Grp 

LtoYdsBcnk 

(Maria Sp 

MEPC 

Nan Power 

NatWori 

NtftWst Water 

Pearson 

PAD 

Pllklnaton 

PowerGen 

Prudential 

RcnkOrg 

Reck in Col 

Red land 

Reed Inti 

Reuters 

RMCGrouo 

Rolls Raven 

NottHnn (unit) 

Royal Scot 

RTZ 

SalnsburY 
Scot Newcos 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shall 

SleOe 

SmntiNeghew 
SmntiKllne B 
Smith tWH) 
Sun Alliance 
Tate & Lvle 
Tesco 
Thom EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
Ufa Biscuits 
Vodafone 
War LoanSig 
Wellcome 
Whlibreod 
Williams Haas 
Willis Canton 
FT 30 Index : t 


Cambtor 
Dominion Text A 
DanohueA 
FCA inn 
MacMillan SI 
Natl Bk Canada 
Power Carp. 
ProvSgo 

OueoecTel 
Ouebecor A 
Ouebecor B 
Teleulobr 
Video Iron 


Industrials Index 
Pnnatis : 193174 


18W. 1714 
BVB 81* 
lSHi 15 
4.10 A10 
2014 20 

908 id 

19** 20V* 
5V* 514 
191* 19% 

ir*. i9% 

18V4 1914 
18M 179* 
73% 13% 
: i9ss.ee 


Stockholm 


AGA 
AseaA 
Astro A 
Alios Cooco 
Eledmhix B 
Ericsson 
Essetle-A 
Handetsbanken 
inveslarB 


67 67J0 
SB3 575 
1S5 184 

98 98 
381 381 
408 402 

93 94J0 

99 9650 
175 175 


Norsk Hydra 25JJ0 257 
Procardia AF 137 136 


Accor 
AlrLIqukle 
Alcatel Atethcm 
Axa 

Banco I re (Cte) 

B1C 

BNP 

Bouvwos 

Domme 

Carrefour 

CC.F. 

Cerus 
Qtargeurs 
Clments Franc 
Cimi MM 
EN-Aaulta'ne 


Sandvlk B 

SCA-A 

S-EBanken 

SkaneRaF 

Skanska 

SKF 

Stara 

TreNebargBF 
Volvo BF 


118 117 
120 120 
4770 47 

122 119 

151 148 

133 132 

441 438 

TOO 100 
141 142 




' Euro Disney 
Gen. Eaux 
Havas 
1 metal 

Lafarge Coppee 
Legrand 
i Lyon. Eaux 


Oreaf (L'l 
L.VJVAK 
Moira-i lachette 
Mlchelln a 
Moulinex 
Paribas 
Pechlney Inti 
Pernod- Rlcord 
Peuowt 
pmaulf Print 
RodlotcOmlque 
Rh -Poulenc A 
RoH. SI. LOUIS 
Sanofl 

Soinl Gabaln 

5.EJL 

Sto Genera I e 
Suer 

Thomson -C5F 

Total 

UJLP. 

Volea 



242640 
Fn; 311270 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BMP 
Bora l 

Bouoairwllte 
Coles Myor 
Cornel co 
CRA 
C5R 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Field 
ICI Australia 
AVigellon 
MIM 

Not Aust Bank 
News Corp 
Nine Network 
N Broken Hill 
Poc Dunlop 
Pkxreer Irtfl 
Nmndy P ose i don 
OCT Resowces 
Santos 
TNT 

western Mining 

Westoac Banking 
Woodslde 


Sydney 

9.12 9.11 I 
199 345 1 
2028 20.18 
375 374 
yflle 1.14 1.12 

tor 4 jji exn! 

I9J0 19AB 
449 454 
3 raw 1.13 1.13 

1 Field 133 134 

ralto 10-42 1058 
i 1.90 1.92 

290 296 
Bank HUD 10JIB 

rp 460 858 

work 435 436 

I Hill IBS 391 

lap 415 412 

Inn 3X37 ill 


Com Inca 
Canwesi ExpI 
CSAMgtA 
Dotasco 
Dvtox a 
E cho Bov Minos 
Equity Silver A 
Fed IrvdA 
Fielctiw Chan A 
FPI 
Gentra 
Gull Cda Res 
Hm inM 
Hetnlodd Mines 
Hoi I toper 

HoSon? Bay Co 

Imoseo 

into 

IPL Energy 
Jannock 
Laban (Xohn) 
LotHaw Cas 
Mackenzie 
Maona Inti A 
Maple Leaf Fds 
Maritime 
Mark Res 
MefsonA 
Noma Ind A 
Noranda inc 
Naranda Forest 
Horcen Energy 
Ntftem Telecom 


Grains 


WHEAT ICBQT) UHk, nvabiwa-annK-kiWi 


XEJ’. 107 SepM 176 
109 Dec 94 1»1 
4XKV, 127 IWr95 1*7 


189V, 291 -aas’-? MM& 


190V* ll61*Mov95 182 1 8Tu 174 7394 

141 HI A4*S ID, 1S3 M 149V.-033J. 1570 

143% 134 Sep »5 354^ 151 IB IS -dOlV* 19 

172V, 155 Dec 9S 145 145V, 1*3 162 — QXD'k 43 

EsLsakn NA. Wwj-fc. saws^ J 342 

wetfsopenirt 7290e aft 604 

WHEAT flCBQT) wturmnwn-aHmwiwiici 

189 102 V, Sep *4 183 183 177V, 3.77*.-a06* 407 

4XO 112'vDecW 194 194 188 1884-0X17 24155 

4XML> 375 Mor9S 198 l*8Vi 19T<, 19310-00414 10.991 

392 12)*, Mar 95 399% 183 399% 180'4-OiBta 803 

144 114% Jut 95 154 157 152 154 -0X131* 1334 

159 129 Sep 95 335 — 0XVJ 15 

las 140+ Dec 9 5 1*1 -004 l 

Es/. sa«-i KLL WMltole 1835 

waTsoperint 39393 up 327 

CORN ICBOT) 5804 du mMnwn- Mora nr Mora 

195 V, IW Sea 94 270 Vi 270*6 114% H7’/.-O04 1*47 

177 217 Dec M 271 271 218 XI8U-O04 134.1*5 

182% 136 Aflcr95 130V. IX V. VTPn IMVi-OXOV. 3C325 

2JS 15S2'.HMcv9S 134^4 136V. 134% 2J4*.-0X13% 11494 

185% 236% XU 95 1415, 241*6 2Jff% 139*6— 0X0% 1 1379 

ZJVVt 2JP Sec 95 147*<1 U2L 141 L 14714— OJB’V 921 

263 275%Dec95 7M 144L 144% 244*4-079% 4.437 

102% 267 Jul 94 15* -003 52 

Est. sates NA Wed's, sates 18,967 

Wed-sooenW 208.580 up 743 


ion Sea 94 1310 I3W 1310 1300 

1041 Dec « 1344 1355 1331 1350 

1077 Mar 95 1394 1400 1380 13*7 

1 078 MCv 95 1419 1424 1414 1472 

1225Ju!95 1450 

1 417 Sep 95 W7D 

UKOecIi 1494 

13S0MQT94 1520 

1225 MOV 94 1540 1540 1540 1541 


Esi. sates 1701 wed’s, sues 5,143 


wed's open ini 71931 ofl 265 
ORANGE JUCE (NCTN) liOOO ov.- cmnmvlD. 
134XB 83.10SCP94 85XM *575 85XM B4JX 

114.00 1 5.00 Nov 94 88X30 B8.45 87.10 87.15 

IJ2JX S9JBJCTI9J 77JX *270 907J 9075 

12475 91II6Mar9S »iS0 «&05 94.75 9475 

11475 97 XW May 95 9870 96.70 9&O0 9175 

119X10 10033 XU 95 10075 

11340 109X10 Nov 95 10L50 

Jon 96 105J0 

11150 lOUDSepf* 10175 

Est. sales NA wad's, soles 1^40 
Wed’S open int 21141 up 448 


—1140 4 

-050 12031 
-ax idifl 
— 0J0 3740 
—060 857 

— 075 496 
—1.00 311 

— ixn 

-075 20 


1.5764 1^440 Sep 94 15480 1.1480 1J420 1-5438 

1.5760 1A500Dec94 1J6X 17444 1J544 17612 

1J720 1A440MO-95 1-5590 17600 17580 1-557B 

1-5420 17148JUnf3 I7S1B. 

Esr. sows 7494 Wed’s, sales 1&5B7 
Wed’s open Irt 50713 *161 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMBU teerdk- 1 HHouA 
07740 07068 Sep 96 87380 07372 07375 07391 

0.7670 07038 DecM 07311 07398 07367 07385 

07405 07020 Mar 95 07375 DJOT 07358- 0737* 

0.7522 04990 Jun 95 07357 07357 073S5 07345 

073*5 0-6965 Sep » • . 8047 

0721 0 0-704} Dec 95 • • 07327 

Eg. sales UJ25 wed’s. sates UAH 
Wed’s open W 51704 UP 263 
GERMAN MARK (CMERJ I per max- 1 eomeouasU 
06595 05400 Sep 94 84504 06504 06451 06444 

06404 IBWDSCM 06485 06485 06*50 06466 

06595 0JiI0NI(r9S 06472 04472 06458 06472 

06S9S 0J5WJU19S 06468 06448 06*68 06479 

(I An* 06347Sep9S i*nf 

Ea.scte 37619 Wed'S- sales 47.W 


—14 200.' 

-20 f] 


I k 


14 Ml „ 

—3 97)0 
-3 40TCO 
. — 3 LOtt- 
—4 44Q 

=i % 


—19 44711 
—30 4168? 
—19 1721 
—20 667 

—21 _ 10 


NYSE 


Metals 


W GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 25x«0 

121.40 7A90Sep*4 120 JO 120 JO I19JH 

117.00 7 575 Dec 94 11130 11SJ5 11470 

114J0 7iJ0Jan95 

11575 73X30 Fed 95 . „ . 

11SJD 7100 MW « 11406 114.15 113X10 

11*® 74J5May95 111® 113X10 111* 

11300 78X0 JU 96 111.40 111.90 111* 

11X30 79.105W95 MOJO 110.90 110.20 

117.85 75700095 Mi.® 11570 115* 

11780 77.75 Ntw 95 ML40 11640 11640 

11575 88-00 Dec 95 10880 109.10 10860 

104.00 84.50 Jan 94 

(0070 6170 Mar H (08-50 UKJ0 (BUB 

114-40 91 .10 Apr 94 

106-50 10670 May 96 

11375 10*10 Jun 94 

JUl 94 

112.05 112X30 A*S 94 

Est. soles 9700 Wed’s, soles 8675 

Wed’s open 55.983 up 7e0 

SILVER (ND4XI SWewK-cWlKwa 


Nova Corp 
Oshawa Group A 


SOTBEA74S (CBOT) Loan Purrem mum- oofloraowDuPwi 
7 X»% 5609, Sep 94 5.73% 574 SM'n 564 — 0-1 1 Vj *274 

777% 571 NOV94 561 564 564 567^-0.11'/, 77628 

7XM 560 Jcel95 573 574'/> 565% SMK-0.11 1*340 

7XB 569 (Wx-95 563 SJQ'5 574 . 5.75^—0.115* *107 

7.05% 575>|M0V95 591VS 5.91% 5B3V, 58T*4-ai<»» 4.9S7 

7XJ4W 57BSJUI9S 5«6 594% 568% 568^-aiOW *«c 

*12 579 Aug 95 593 59J 5901* i9OV._0J38^ M 

*15 577 Sep 95 591 -a.0794 91 

*JD'.* 578V, Nov 95 *0116 *014 SM 597Vi-0.06W X5C7 

*71 *20 JU94 *17 —0X15 1 

Est. sales NA wed’s.saies 1522* 

Wed's (wen int ig jlx, of f ZH 

S0Y6EANMEAL (CBOT) loom*- down etnsn 

210X10 1*9.90 Sep 94 170.00 170XX) 16860 1 6970 -1* 3.942 

207-50 147.1 nod 94 14*80 16*80 14520 14550 —170 1*361 

209* 167.00 Dec 94 14450 16*30 14550 14*80 —150 37*1 

707 JO 148.10 Jan 95 16*00 16850 16780 1080 -150 8.940 


!S S 


Pagurian A 
Placer Dame 
Paco Petroleum 
pwaCotp 
R oyrock 
Renaissance Eny 
Rogers Comm B 
Rothmans 
Royal Bank Cda 
Sceptre Res 
Scott’s Hasp 
Seagram Co 
Sears Canada 
Stall Canada A 
siwmtt 


-180 *470 
-180 39640 
—095 557 

-090 424 

— 030 3 .787 
-075 1.120 
—065 994 

-065 

-loa 1.719 
-180 4M 
— 0.45 894 
-045 

-065 150 

— 080 487 

-065 

-060 

-065 

—065 


Wed'S open mr 1X2598 im 420 i 

XAPAN^ZYEN (CW3 Q %tm yen- l eolniWMnmAMWn _ 

0-flI040ffl.008?4I5ep 94 OjBllHMOJJIOOSCOJnOQMlJ) 0041 —24 34521 
081M«0809^^94 0810l510810im0101200810127 
081 054008094»QMtr 95 081 020008W200S.OV01 930810200 —27 2,1 JT 

a8T0d71X3JJ0f774Jui?5(UIfO30aJX7rajja38rC!2W38r0737 —29 449 

0810773101020050.95 0810349 —31 O' 

D*c 95 0X110451 ’ . * 

Est sates 16.715 wed's.stoes 32.944 ■ *. 

Wed'SDcenW 72646 UP 2*40 ' to*- 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) cnrOmc- 1 noMeauUstaJDWl 
07842 06400 Sep 94 *7780 07*08 07770 07792 —13 23.1V 

07844 0.6085 Dec 94 07824 07827 077*5 07813 —13 317(5 ■ 

07185 *7483 Mw 95 07840 07840 07821 *7838 —13 2*4 

07901 07446 Am 95 *7063 ' —13 29 

Est. sods KA Wed'S. sale* 3165a 
Wed’sopeolnf 5*679 UP 49* 


•• "K 1 
‘ * », 


193 SS2 
2us ua 1 
BJ3 *30 , 
N A *34 I 
NA *5* 


5Ht Srstemhse m 


WJO 171.00 Mar 95 ITITO 171 JO 17*20 (7*40 -ixn 1789 

20780 173X10 May 95 17330 17360 17280 177.10 —0.90 5818 

20*00 J7A0DJW9S 173JO IJJL5D 17X30 174X0 -*90 3,742 


Spot Aerospace 10% 


Talisman Env 31V1 


MSBTM-* 5 




Madrid 


Johannesburg 


BBV 3225 3095 

Bco Central HIsp. 2830 2740 
Banco Santander 5230 SI80 


Sao Paulo 


AECI 
A (tech 
Anolo Amer 




Anglo Amer 

DOTK/WJ 

Bhrvoor 

BuHels 

Do Boors 

DriofonteJn 

Goncor 

DFSA 

Karmenv 

Hietwew Steel 

Kloof 

NodbankGm 
Randfentoto 
Rusatat 
SA Brows 
SI Helen* 


Bonesto 

CEPSA 

Dragadta 

Endesa 

Ercros 

Iberdrola 

Repsol 

Toboooloro 

Tofofonlco 


1020 1010 
3233 3140 
2045 1995 
5540 S410 
1*1 173 

S3* 82S 

4030 «B0 


Banco do Brasil 2070 21.10 


3120 3120 

Tofofonlco 17*5 1775 

msszs bf- - -:" 


BOMSIXI 

Bradostxi 

Brahma 

Comto 

EWtrobrus 

Itaubanco 

LtoM 


Prtfgbraa 
Souza Croz 
Toktbrea 
Tdoso 
Usiminas 


iQ.10 iaoo 

7.95 *20 
249 253 

92 94 

37481 388 

2*5274.99 

319 335 

1370 1420 
1497917*50 
7000 7150 
4980 9 

443 455 

184 161 



To Our Readers 

The Tokyo stock 
market was dosed I 
today for a Holi- 
day. 


TeekS 25* 

Thomson Corp 1*>+ 

ToroomBonk 2 ov 

Torstar B 25% 

Transolto Corn ]4Za 

TransCda PIP* 17% 

Triton Finn A 380 

Trimoc 7S*i 


Unicorp Energy 164 




18260 1768CAuoM 17*50 17*50 17*20 17570 -180 294 

18270 17520 Sep 95 17*50 17*50 17100 175.10 -0.10 372 

OJ 75 17670 -1J0 I 

18280 18280 Dec ?5 17880 17840 17*50 17*50 —270 2 

Est. soles NA WWf5L sates *859 
wed'ioeennl 83603 up 2277 

SOYBEAN on. (CBOT) UAtota-aDemralDOKH. 

3*34 2260 Sep 9* 2L7Q £*70 2*25 2*44 -034 *554 

2964 22.10 Od 94 2*27 2*29 2570 2*91 -7168 178*6 

2*47 22 OD DOC 94 2560 2582 2S.0B 2574 — (LTD 41 J96 

3*55 2265Jai95 25J5 25 J 5 24.90 24.99 —064 6652 

29JO 32-+JMar« 2S7Q 2*20 1*60 2460 -067 7.7W 

28JJS 2393 May 95 2*90 2*90 2*37 2*39 -0J9 *930 

2185 2380 Jy 1 95 2*60 2*40 2470 2*20 -063 2.534 

2770 22.95 Aug 95 2*45 7*45 3*20 24.30 -0J0 S06 

2*75 22.95 Sep 95 2*05 -0.15 ( 04 

23.10 5-1000 95 2395 -0 10 1 

2375 2280 Dec 75 2190 *015 3 

Est. totes NA Wed’S, tales 8,741 

WnTtOPamm 83714 oil X77 


6158 4938 Sep 94 539.0 5398 537J 

5498 51160a 94 5388 5388 53*0 

Nov 94 

5978 3300 Dec 94 5X38 5478 5418 

5448 401.0 Jon 95 

40*0 41*5 Mar 95 5518 5548 55*0 

40*5 4118 May f 5 

6108 43>8Jul95 

5848 5326 Sep 95 J748 57*0 57*0 

U*8 5398 Dec 95 5808 5816 0*0 

*12.0 5710 Jon 96 

*1*0 5548 Mar 96 

5878 5878 Mar 9* 

Jut 96 

ES. sates 12800 wed’s, sates. 8899 
wed’5 Open int 10*144 up 290 


-58 540 

-57 

-57 

—57 82833 
—57 

—57 9.113 


Industrials 

OTTONJ (NCTN) 

JUJ 7260 72.47 7160 

7775 9988 Dec 94 7165 71 JO 7*75 

3-15 4260 Mar 95 72.75 7275 7780 

7*65 6*03 May 95 7183 7183 7370 

7*75 49J0AI « 7*» 7*30 7190 

7*70 66800095 7*50 7*50 7060 

7280 6*25 Dec 95 7080 70.15 I860 

Es* sates MA. wed's, sales 5824 
Wgd'sopwjfetf 83878 UP 932 


-88 4 2.9* 

-*47 1107 
-080 3JQ 
— *25 *» 

— WO 1JO 


HEATING O*. fNMBD' 

r ”“ 4*9009794 4 


-57 MIO 
— S7 
-57 
-57 

—S3 14 

—57 1704 


Toronto 


AblllW Fries 
Aonlco Eagle 
Air Canada 


1*% 1PW 
17% 17H 

_ I i 


Alberta Energy 219k 21U 


AmerBorrick 

ace 


3j% *r*i 

46% 46 


ValeRloDocs 1498? 1S260 K sertta Ss? iJ£ 


BC Gas 
BC Telecomm 
Bramatoo 
Brunswick 
CAE 


M>. 14» 

10% 10% 
rv» 7% 

& 


CISC 326fc 32% 

QBl Pod fto Ltd 24% Zfr* 
Conodl an Tire A 11% 1144 

Cara ^ 

CCL. Ind B 10 10 

CLnestex 465 4% 


Zurich 

Adta Inti B 232 239 

Alinuisw B now 575 675 
BBC Brain Bov 8 1190 1172 
SjMGetoyB 782 773 

CS Holdings B 5*5 5*4 

EteWraw B 351 333 

frictar B 1570 1400 

hrtsnflscaunt B 22M 2290 
J"WK> U B „ 90S 908 

kand ie Gyr R 750 740 
MeavanglckB 406 406 
Nestle R 1214 1220 

aertfk. Byefirte R 137 137 

Pareesa Hid B 1550 1575 
Rocne Hdg PC 4040 6140 
Salra Republic 107 104 

Sanaa B 4B7 492 

gflser PC 932 930 

fw<*iiian« b 1940 im 
5wtssBne Corps 377 378 

Swfae Refraur R S2* 527 


Livestock 


750 740 

406 406 

1216 1220 


69.42 -&40 J16U 

4*47 — 083 19.903 

4760 — *40 1275? 

6*75 —037 *466 
4*00 —075 1,945 

65.85 —AOS 932 
6470 -0.10 94 


6S7 492 

7B25 7850 
932 930 


mr*l 

TIB —070 1.572 
7140 — *42 i4M 

7367 -*W 2JC 

7365 — *25 793 

7285 — 075 347 

7270 —0.17 260 

7175 -*17 IW 

7280 —6.12 6 


Swissair R 
UBS B 

Winterthur B 

Zurich Ass B 


SBC todex; 

Previous :■ 


849 844 
1208 1212 
470 475 

1268 7283 


for 

investment 

information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the IHT 



435.40 36*000094 409XO 41160 40760 

43560 37480 Jun 95 41280 41*00 4I0J0 

43980 390 OQ Aar 95 41760 41760 41660 

43500 41960JUI9S 

4)1.50 42280 Ori 95 42580 42580 42580 

E9. totes NA wed’s, sates *373 
wed's open >nr M.7B3 up 2 
GOLD INCMTO WirsrK-aAncvhve 
417X10 34*MOO«4 38*00 3070 30760 

Now 94 

42*50 143xnc«c94 39180 39*40 39*60 

411.00 3S360Feb95 39*20 395.3 39470 

41780 36*50 APT9S 393JX) 37*00 397UO 

42*50 36170 Jun 95 «2.00 40X10 401.00 

41X50 38QJQAug95 

39080 390 80 5eo 95 

41130 40180 Oct95 

-0980 40060 Dec 9J (1280 4I2J0 41280 

<2460 41U0F«b96 

0*00 41*30 Apt 94 42*40 42*40 42*40 

430X10 (1380 Jun 96 41*50 42*50_ 42*50 

Est. sates 15.000 Wed’s, sales '7J47 
Wed'SOpenilT 150739 off 8884 


-220 13826 
—2A0 *161 
—163 3.103 
— 260 4*4 

—260 229 


—180 0.087 
— IXB 

— 1X10 90835 
— 180 13832 
-180 4818 
—180 10628 
- 1.10 

-0.90 2 

— l.ia 

—1.10 5840 
—170 1.900 

—170 3877 


Financial 


4*nOb94 4770 4785 4*65 

6*00 Nov 94 4*30 4*50 4785 

4*50 Dec 94 4960 <975 49.10 

C75J«n95 5060 5085 5*10 

47.95 Feb 95 5*95 51.15 5*70 
4780Ma-»5 JUS 5*90 *B 
4*05 Xtor 95 5*25 50 JO 5075 

£80/Vtoy95 4970 ’ 4980 4970 

SS %% S5S 
SSS $8 %£%%%% 
KSS% a,s a,s 

5380 Dec 95 
9070 JQn 96 
5970 F« 96 
J*W 5*P0Mu-« 

Est. sates ha wed's, sales 43740 
Wed’s op en Int 171,135 up 1077 
i-JGNTSWECT CRUDE (NMSt) l8Wk(*-i 
2*73 1*650(394 1428 1685 l*a 

2*49 7*ENdv 94 t *94 17^ 625 

1*93 Dec 94 17.13 1774 1704 

15. 15 Jon 95 1771 1740 

1*28 Feb 95 1784 1787 1770 

582 Mar 95 1789 1761 1785 

565XW9S 1760 1765 760 

ISMMoySS 1780 17^ 1764 

1523 Jun H 176# 1765 1768 

1*05 All 95 1765 l/S 1745 

naseS? '™ nja 

ItjInSi” 

W» 

i 

1723 Jui 94 

■ u< 1*39Ses9« 

Est. sues KA Wed's, utes lojrr; 

SSWS aSSSi a*-. 


4A3r3S6tb 


=Si?S» 

^5 




*023 3J9f 
*023 189 
+ *2* *34* 
■>028 *43? 
♦028 182? 
*828 

+078 u 
HUS . 17* 
♦*38 2A0 
♦078 V 
9*28 r \ 
♦ 028 + 


-005 8264) 
-0036788* 


SHU 0 *! 4 *970 44.9Q SS 


COFFEE C INC5E) J7J99 fts-ram b»> 

W*M 6*50 SOP 94 20525 WJO 2 


6*50 sea 91 20525 WJO 30*00 
77.IODec9i 2U.C0 21*25 28*00 
7LO0MW9S 71580 717.10 21380 
B3J0Mavf5 217X30 218X10 21**1 
454)0 -till 95 21760 21*00 71*00 
185J05ep7J 
8170 Dec 


BpVsalK 4.577 Wed’s, salts 9601 


—065 98 

— *30 23230 
—380 7778 
-380 38176 
—388 403 

-380 375 

-J80 »J9 


wed's open IH 3561? Dt, 41 ® 

SUOAP -WORLD 11 (NOE UJXWPS-eenni 

riJ8 4J»0cfW IUS IL» 

1261 927I&95 126» }M* 288 


1*57 uoy 95 1*51 1260 1781 

lOBJsfiS 1*30 1384 1273 

10.000 95 fit* 1*72 1216 

mJMbrtt M.T2 11.75 11.72 


» *67 31.859 

■ *03 876*4 
• *ffl 13.15) 
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Page 13 



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••■• 


Compiled bp Our Staff Rom Dispatch^ 

■VEVEY, Switzoland — Nes- 
U6 SA said Thursday that im- 
proved maigjns hdpedit post a 
1.7 percent rise in first-half net 
profit, -to 127 billion Swiss 
francs ($990 milli on), despite 
the strength of the Swiss franc. 

The food and beverages con- 
cern said first-half operating 
profit rose 5 percent, to 2.83 
billion Swiss francs, with “sig- 
nificantly” improved operating 
margins in Europe, North 
America and Larin America. It 
forecast stronger profit growth 
in the second half and a slight 
rise in full-year sales. 

A strong point was Nestle’s 
rise in profit margin to 10 3 per- 
cent from 9.8 percent “when 
other food companies are expe- 


Foreign Units Aid 
United Biscuits 

Bloomberg Business News 

LONDON — United Biscuits 
(Holdings) PLC said Thursday 
its pretax profit rose 12 percent, 
to £80.1 million (S126 million), 
in the first half , boosted by rising 
earnings at its Keebkx subsid- 
iary in America and other over- 
seas operations. 

The cookie and snack food 
maker said total sales fell 3 per- 
cent, to £1.79 billion, but sales 
at continuing operations in- 
creased by 1 percent 
- If Last year’s one-rime gam 
from the sale of a unit were in- 
cluded in the c om parison. Unit- 
ed Biscuits pretax profit would 
have fallen 403 percent Ana- 
lysts said the company’s stock 
fell 2 pence to 319 pence because 
investor’s were surprised by its 
decision to keep its dividend lev- 
el at 5.5 pence per share. 


riencing downward margin 
pressure,” Sylvain Massot, an 
analyst at Morgan Stanley & 
Co. in London, said. 

Other analysts were also im- 
pressed by the rise, saying it 
reflected Nestles corporate re- 
structuring, strong growth in 
Asia, price increases and a good 
performance from high- mar gin 
products such as its Nescafe 
brand of instant coffee. 

Nestlfc said the strength of 
the Swiss currency cut operat- 
ing profit by 338 million francs 
after currency translations, 
compared with 108 million 
francs a year earlier. 

The company said in July 
that sales in the first half were 
down 0.7 percent to 27.35 bil- 
lion Swiss francs, largely be- 
cause of the rise in the currency. 

“Nestte is the first company 
that can stand up and dearly 
say we’re seeing an improve- 
ment in Europe,” Wilhelm 
Blaeuer, an analyst at Union 
Bank of Switzerland, said. 

Many analysts forecast 
strong growth for the full year, 
saying Nestfe should benefit 
from a surge in drinks sales dur- 
ing this year’s hot summer in 
Europe and North America and 
coffee prices caused by 
3 age in South America. 

Nestfe said sales volume im- 
proved in North and South 
America and expanded vigor- 
ously in Asia. Volume was fiat 
in Europe, but that represented 
an improvement from the previ- 
ous year’s slight dedme. 

In 1993, Nestfe had consoli- 
dated net profit of 189 billion 
Swiss francs on sales of 57.49 
billion francs. 

Expenditure for acquisitions 
and participations amounted to 
928 million francs in the first 

(Bloomberg, Reuters! 


End of Road for Italy’s SME 

Rinascente and Benetton to Make Bids 


Bloomberg Bun ness Sews 

MILAN — Rinascente SpA and Benetton 
SpA said Thursday they were leading groups 
that would make competing offers to buy the 
remnants of a once- large, govermnent^con* 
trolled food company. 

The two companies will submit bids by 
Thursday night for the Autogrill highway 
restaurant company and the GS supermarket 
chain, which are the last units to be sold of the 
State-owned SME Meridionale SpA. 

Together, they are estimated to be sold for 
about 2 trillion lire ($127 billion). 

Rinascente, a leading department store 
chain controlled by the Agnelli family, said it 
was teaming up with Banca Coinmerdaje 
I Laban a SpA and the private chocolate maker 
Ferrero to bid for the SME operations. 

The other group consists of the clothing 
maker Benetton, the supermarket chain PAM 
and the Swiss hotel company Movenpick. 

A Benetton spokeswoman, Laura Pollini. 
said that if its group were successful, Benet- 
ton would keep Autogrill’s 200 highway res- 
taurants, while PAM would take GS. 

PAM, whose initials stand for “more for 
less” in Italian, is a private Venice-based 
supermarket chain. 

A spokesman at Rinasceme confirmed the 
group’s bid, but could not give details about 
the price. 1FIL SpA. an Agnelli family hold- 


ing company, is providing what the spokes- 
man called “external support" for the bid. 

Final binding offers for what’s left of SME 
were due Thursday evening The Italian state 
holding company Istituio per la Ricostru- 
zione Indus triale, or IR], which owns 68 per- 
cent of SME, will review the offers with its 
financial adviser Wasserstein Perella & Co. 
and make a decision in the next few weeks. 

IR1 has already sold off SME’s frozen 
foods, edible oils and canned vegetable units, 
receiving about 1 trillion lire from the sales. 

The sale of the remaining operations will 
complete the Italian government’s withdraw- 
al from the food industry. The breakup and 
sale of SME has dragged on for two years 
because of political opposition and constant- 
ly changing plans by the government 

SME’s share price has climbed about 5 
percent since eany September, whereas the 
wider market has dropped about 3.5 percenL 
Analysts said the sale price for SME is much 
higher than its current share price. 

Nomura Research and BNL Eurosec uri- 
ties-Crfedit Lyonnais have estimated SME’s 
market value at 2.1 to 23 trillion lire, which 
works out to 4,850 lire a share. 

Its shares traded Thursday at 3.7S0 lire, 
valuing the entire company at about 1.7 tril- 
lion lire. 


Schneider Accused of Tax Evasion 


Bloomberg Business News 

FRANKFURT — German 
prosecutors on Thursday added 
tax evasion to their list of 
charges against the fugitive real 
estate developer JOrgen 
Schneider, who brought about 
the collapse of one of Germa- 
ny's biggest property empires. 

The Frankfurt public prose- 
cutor’s office said it was levying 
the new charge against Mr. 
Schneider, adding to the exist- 
ing counts of credit fraud, doc- 
ument falsification and remov- 
ing money from his companies 
while knowing they were about 
to go bankrupt. 


Mr. Schneider’s disappear- 
ance in April led to the collapse 
of his company. Dr. Jfirgen 
Schneider AG, under 5 billion 
Deutsche marks ($3 billion) of 
bank debts. 

Mr. Schneider resorted to 
criminal activities to cover up 
losses at his business, amount- 
ing to “several hundreds of mil- 
lion Deutsche marks” every 
year since 1992, Hildegard 
Becker-Touissaint, a prosecu- 
tor, said Thursday. 

The prosecutors office said 
Mr. Schneider paid employees 
“several milli on marks,” without 
paying tax on dial money. 


■ 'Warrant Issued in France 

A judge issued an arrest war- 
rant Thursday for the chairman 
of Soctete Fmanri&re de Radio- 
diffusion SA, the latest in a 
probe into suspected corrup- 
tion in France, Reuters report- 
ed from Paris. 

Jean-Louis Du tare t, a lawyer 
and close aide to the former 
communications minister Alain 
Carignon, has been held for 
questioning with his sister for 
the past two days in Paris. The 
warrant allows a judge in Lyon 
to place both of them under 
judicial investigation, justice 
sources said. 


Economy 
Gives Lift 
ToGobain 


Bloomberg Business News 

PARIS — Saint-Gobain SA 
said Thursday its first-half net 
profit almost tripled, to 126 
billion French francs (S239 mil- 
lion) from 452 million francs a 
year earlier, largely because of a 
nascent recovery in Europe and 
the company’s restructuring 
measures. 

The maker of building mate- 
rials and glass for the automo- 
tive and construction industries 
increased its operating profit 50 
percent, to 3.50 billion francs. 
The figure represented 92 per- 
cent of sales, up from 6.6 per- 
cent a year earlier. 

First-half sales rose 6 per- 
cent, to 38.04 billion francs 
from 35.74 billion francs, and 
net debt fell to 1020 billion 
francs from 18.07 billion francs 
as of June 30, 1993. 

The recovery in sales volume 
was strong in America showed 
some improvement in Europe, 
the company said 

Separately, Chargeurs SA, a 
French textile and communica- 
tions company, said it swung to 
a first-half net profit of 213 mil- 
lion francs from a first-half loss 
of 209 rrrilh on francs in 1993. 

■ Indosoez Posts Profit Rise 

Banque Indosuez, a subsid- 
iary of Compagnie de Suez SA, 
reported a 24 percent rise in 
first-half net profit and said it 
had cut provisions for problem 
loans by 50 percent. 

The banking company said 
profit was 412 million francs, 
compared with a restated 332 
million francs ayear earlier. 

Its chairman, Gerard Worms, 
in a radio interview’ from China 
called the result “satisfactory 
but insufficient” He added, 
“We have more ambitious ob- 
jectives for 1995 and 1996 than 
these kind of figures.” 

Banque Indosuez reduced its 
bad-debt provisions to 632 mil- 
lion francs from 131 billion 
francs it set aside a year earlier. 


I Investor’s Europe li 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

23TO 

22 B#n 

London 

FTSE 100 Index 

- - 3400 

M IL A 

Paris 

CAC40 

2300- 

2200 sa 

2100 H V • 

At 

m — |)f 

1994 

Exchange 

Amsterdam 

_ . bm \fL 

2900 • Y 

J A S ®'AHJ 
1994 

Index 

AEX 

r-- 

J A 5 

Thursday 

Close 

411.61 

2D0G ft 
1900 - -ft/ 

®a-m7 

1994 

Prew. 

Close 

410.56 

J A S 

*0 

Change 

+0.26 

Brussels 

Stock Index 

7,375.55 

7,416.03 

-0.55 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,113.98 

2.12412 

-0.48 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

803.07 

809.21 

-0.76 

Helsinki 

HEX 

1,897.43 

1.900.62 

-0.17 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2,426,90 

2.398.10 

+ 1.20 

London 

FTSE "l 00 

3,112.70 

3.079 80 

+1.07 

Madrid 

General Index 

300^8 

296.89 

+0.70 

Milan 

MIBTEL 

10651 

10436 

+1.57 

Paris 

CAC40 

1,977.30 

1.952.94 

4 1 25 

Stockholm 

Affaersvaeriden 

1.865.08 

1.855.6 6 

40.51 

Vienna 

Stock Index 

453.05 

454.35 

-0 29 

Zurich 

SBS 

932.83 

935.55 

•0.29 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


lni.-rnj]:i'nji lixjlJ Ir.'.in; 

Very briefly: 


• Zeneca Group PLC said Sydney Lipworth, now deputy chairman 
of National Westminster Bank, would succeed Denys Henderson 
as chairman of the company after its annual meeting on May 12. 

• Minorca SA said low metals prices offset a 13 percent increase in 
sales to force down pretax profit 9 percent in the year to June, to 

5308.8 million. 

• Royal Dutch/Sbell Group raised the interim dividend on its 
British shares by 9.8 percent and on its Dutch shares b\ 2.7 
percent 

• Medeva PLC and SmhhKEne Beecham PLC said they had 
reached several agreements aimed at expanding their companies’ 
franchises in the worldwide vaccines market. 

• Cartiere Burgo SpA, Italy's biggest paper producer, said it 
decided to exercise its option to acquire an operation in Belgium 
from Investud SA for 20 billion lire (SI 3 million). 

• Courtaulds Textiles PLC said its pretax profit fell nearly 3 
percent in the first half, to £10. 1 million (SI 6 million), because of a 
loss by its recently acquired hosiery businesses. 

• British retail sales fell 0.3 percent in August from July but rose 

2.8 percent from August 1993. the government said. 

• MetallgeseQschaft AG said it would sell its 47 percent stake in 

Kolbenscfamidl AG to institutional investors and said T&N PLC 
had options to acquire a stake of up to 52.5 percent in Kolbensch- 
midL AFX, Reuters 




i 


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UH<- 

«M ■ 


ALLIANCE: IBM- Apple Venture’s Challenge to the Intel-Microsoft Standard Hits the Skids 



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a> ft*** 1 • ' 




Continued from Page 11 

home-country use by compa- 
nies like Acer Inc. of Taiwan 
and Toshiba Corp. of Japan. 
Sensitive to its critics, Apple 
has scheduled a “clarification” 
briefing on Monday. 

. For its part, IBM appears to 
be placing new emphasis on its 
OS/2 operating system. OS/2, 
aro und for years, has never had 
a; big following. But IBM has 
spent considerable time and 
poney improving it lately, and 
next month the company plans 
to introduce an entirely new 
version that has drawn praise , 
from the industry experts who 
have tested it. 

At a recent computer confer- 


ence, Lee Rdswig, president of 
the IBM personal software 
products division, said the com- 
pany would spend as much as 
$500 million to market and ad- 
vertise the new OS/2. 

The initial versions of the 
new OS/2 will work only with 
personal computers using Intel 
chips. But within a year, IBM 
expects to have a Power PC 
version of OS/2 ready. Until 
then, unless IBM obtains a li- 
cense for Apple’s System 73 
software, IBM’s Power PC ma- 
chines will run on the Microsoft 
Windows NT operating system 
or on IBM's version of the in- 
dustry-standard Unix software 
used primarily by engineers, ac- 


ademics and computer scien- 
tists. 

It would seem, as a result, 
that not only have IBM and 
Apple slopped cooperating on 
Power PC development — they 
may eventually find themselves 
in direct competition, with in- 
compatible versions of Power 
PC hardware and software. 

The Apple-IBM alliance is 
“brain dead,” in the view of 
Stewart Alsop, editor of Info- 
world, a personal computer in- 
dustry news weekly. “There are 
billions of dollars sitting out 
there, as well as control of a 
huge industry, and they're giv- 
ing it away” to Intel and Micro- 
soft, be said. 


Mr. Alsop wrote an 
Infoworld editorial last week 
urging IBM to delay introduc- 
tion of its Power PC computers, 
contending that there would be 
so little distinctive software 
available for the machines that 
no one would buy them. 

Many industry experts see 
the combination of Apple's 
software wizardry and IBM's 
hardware-making prowess as 
an unbeatable combination. 

The idea emerged from the 
success IBM was having in ear- 
ly 1991 with its new RS-6000 
work station, a sophisticated 
computer for engineers and 
other “power users” that was 
based on a type of chip archi- 


tecture known as RISC — for 
reduced instruction set comput- 
ing. One of IBM’s designers of 
the RS-6000. Phil Hester, con- 
vinced Jack Kuehler, who was 
then IBM’s president and vice 
chairman, that RISC chips 
could find success in other 
types of computers. 

JnteL, then and now, has 
avoided RISC technology in fa- 
vor of a more conventional ap- 
proach to chipmaking. 


See our 

Business Message Center 
evety Wednesday 


Oslo Oil Plan Disappoints 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

OSLO — Norway, Europe’s top oil producer, proposed 
changes on Thursday aimed at stimulating exploration of the 
country’s continental shelf, but oil companies were disap- 
pointed in the amount of incentive the government offered. 

Industry and Energy Minister Jens Stoltenberg did not 
announce any new tax reductions. 

A spokesman for Conoco Inc., a subsidiary of Du Pont Co., 
said “We are operating in all comers of the world, and could 
get much more lucrative deals in other parts of the world.” 

The Labor government proposed to scrap the so-called 
sliding scale on undiscovered resources in certain areas in- 
cluding the continental shelf. The sliding scale, which allows 
the state to increase its stake in profitable fields. wiU not be 
dropped in several other areas, Mr. Stoltenberg said. 

A spokesman for Norsk Hydro A/S said the company had 
hoped the government “would use this opportunity to scrap 
the sliding scale completely.” (AFP, Reuters) 


NordLB Has Part 
Of Berlin Bank 

Bloomberg Business News 

BERLIN — Bankgesellschaft 
Berlin AG said Thursday it had 
formed a “strategic alliance" 
with Norddeutsche Landesbonk 
Girozentrale that calls for 
NordLB to lake a 10 percent 
stake in the Berlin bank. 

Martin Rassfeld, spokesman 
for Bankgesellschaft Berlin, 
said the price of the deal had 
not been determined, but would 
be from 800 million to 1 billion 
Deutsche marks ($520 million 
to $650 million). 

The Berlin bank's shares trad- 
ed at 386 DM Thursday, down 
330 DM, which would value the 
company at 8.04 billion marks. 


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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1994 


Dance of the Cellular Elephants: Grab a Partner! 


By Edmund L. Andrews 

.Vw York Times Service 


WASHINGTON — Cellular 
telephones may be getting small- 
er and lighter, but me industry is 
on the way to being dominated 
by a handful of huge companies. 

With AT&T Corp. expected 
to complete its S12.6 billion 
purchase of McCaw Cellular 
Communications Inc. any day 
now. the regional Bell compa- 
nies are rushing to form cellular 
telephone partnerships that can 
match AT&T in reach and mar- 
keting clout. 

In what one executive called 
the “dance of elephants.” virtu- 
ally every big participant is 
talking to everyone else. Many 
telecommunications executives 
are convinced that they must be 
part of a nationwide network 
with a national brand name. 

Executives at Bell Atlantic 


Corp., which already agreed to 
pool its cellular properties with 
Nynex Corp.. confirmed Wed- 


Nynex Corp.. confirmed Wed- 
nesday they were discussing a 


possible deal with Sprint Corp., 
the third-largest U.S. k>ng-dis- 


the third-largest U.S. long-dis- 
tance carrier and a big cellular 
company in its own righL 

But Bell Atlantic is also talk- 
ing with several other Bell com- 
panies, notably Pacific Telesis 
Group in San Francisco and 
Ameritech Corp. in Chicago. 

“The Bell companies* cellular 
units are feeling the impending 
competitive threat from McCaw. 
and they are equally frustrated 
at their own lack of scale and 
lack of brand-name recogni- 
tion.” said Daniel P. Rein gold, a 


telecommunications analyst at 
Merrill Lynch & Co. 

For customers, the consoli- 
dations are likely to mean fewer 
so-called roaming charges for 
people who travel to distant cit- 
ies and faster introduction of 
new features like messaging or 
paging functions. 

Adding to the pressure to 
strike deals is an impending 
deadline at the Federal Com- 
munications Commission. By 
early November, companies 
that intend to participate in the 
coming auctions for a new gen- 
eration of wireless personal 
communication services must 
let the FCC know in which cit- 
ies they intend to bid for li- 
censes. 

Because the FCC is restrict- 
ing local cellular companies to 
bidding only on certain types of 
the personal-communication- 
service licenses in each market, 
big communications companies 
such as the Bells need to decide 
soon what services they intend 
to provide in any given market. 

Thus the urge to merge, or at 
least to form loose cellular alli- 
ances — quickly. 

Air Touch Communications, 
the cellular company that was 
spun off from Pacific Telesis 
Group earlier this year and 
which recently teamed up with 
the regional Beil in Denver, U S 
West Inc., is still looking for 
other partners. Air Touch, like 
many of the companies that are 
seeking alliances, would not 
comment on its efforts. 

Meanwhile, many Wall 
Street analysts have predicted 


Cellular Phone Partnerships 


How the operators would rank after link-ups 

Ranked by potential customers in markets where each 
operator holds a majority interest m licenses, as of Dec. 31. 
For example, if an operator controls 60 percent of an 
area's Hcerises, its potential customers in the area equal 
60 percent of the population. 

Bel! Allan tic/Nynex/Sprint 


Cellular subscribers 
The industry adds more than 
17,000 subscribers daily and now 
has almost 20 miHion. 

20 milSon 


AT&T/McCaw 


Air Touch/U S West 


Bell South 



GTE 


Source? CefMar TeteGommunfcations industry Association 


'84 '86 *88 ’90 


’92 June 

•94 


Tht- V:* York Times 


that Southwestern Bell Corp.. 
currently the nation’s sixth- 
largest cellular operator, would 
cement an alliance with AT&T 
soon after the deal with McCaw 
closes. 

Southwestern Bell's proper- 
ties include cellular systems in 
Boston and Washington, which 
would mesh well with proper- 
ties that AT&T will soon con- 
trol in New York. 

The intentions of BellSouth 
Corp. remain unclear. The com- 
pany. which is based in Atlanta 
and serves much of the South- 
east, held discussions about a 
personal-communication-ser- 
vice partnership with Bell At- 
lantic more than a year ago. 
Although those talks came to 
nothing, a BellSouth alliance 
with Bdl Atlantic and Nynex 
Coip. would create a network 
sp anning the East Coast. 


Also surveying the cellular 
landscape are cable- television 
companies, which are eager to 
use their networks as an means 
for linking cellular telephones. 
Companies such as Time 
Warner Inc, Comcast Corp. 
and Cablevision Systems Corp. 
own cable networks in metro- 
politan markets but are looking 
for capita] and expertise in the 
cellular business. 

Rightly or wrongly, most cel- 
lular companies are convinced 
that they have to be big if they 
are to successfully reach the 
mass consumer market. 

AT&T has one of the best 
brand identities in the country, 
and it already advertises on a 
nationwide scale. It can also use 
its own huge database to identi- 
fy the most desirable customers. 
Its long-distance business al- 
ready knows the biggest users 


of long-distance service, and its 
callin g card operations can re- 
veal the most frequent travelers. 

In general, a national cellular 
company is in a much better 
position than a local company 
to offer free or low-cost roam- 


ing services that allow people to 
use their cellular telephones 


use their cellular telephones 
wherever they travel. 

Industry executives also be- 
lieve that brand-name identifi- 
cation will be steadily more im- 
portant as competition 
intensifies in the cellular busi- 
ness. The coming auctions will 
make room on the airwaves for 
at least three full -fledged rivals 
to today’s cellular companies. 

“There’s going to be a flood 
of spectrum od the market," 
said Blake Bath, an analyst at 
Sanford Bernstein & Co. “Any- 
one who wants to provide wire- 
less service will be able to do it. 


Customers are going to migrate 
to something they know.” 

Many cellular executives feel 
the only truly valuable national 
brand names in telecommuni- 
cations are those of the long- 
distance carriers. Because 
AT&T is aligned with McCaw, 
and generally at odds with the 
Bell companies on many issues, 
Sprint and MCI Communica- 
tions Corp. may be the most 
desirable franchises in the in- 
dustry for cellular companies 
seeking a national partner. 

MO may be particularly ap- 
proachable, because ii has no 
cellular operations yet. The 
company suddenly finds itself 
without acellular strategy, after 
recently calling off its plans to 
team up with Nextel Communi- 
cations, which is building a na- 
tionwide wireless network by 
upgrading radio services for 
taxi and truck fleets. 

Still, new cellular deals may 
prove difficult to strike, as the 
players wrestle over the com- 
parative value of their business- 
es and control. AT&T’s deal 
with McCaw almost collapsed 
amid disagreements about the 
use of the AT&T name. The 
disagreements were resolved 
because AT&T ultimately de- 
cided to acquire all of McCaw. 

The Bell companies have 
been at odds with each other on 
issues of valuation and control 
of their cellular properties. Bell 
Atlantic executives rebuffed a 
proposal last week from Ameri- 
tech. arguing that Ameritech 
was placing too high a value on 
its wireless operations. 


m 

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HAUTE 5AV0E - EYJAN - GENEVA. 
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rid, golf, terns, sa&ig. TO BUY YOUR 
PERMANENT OR HOLIDAY HOVE, 


PERMANENT OR HOLIDAY HOVE. 
FIAT, VILLA. CHALET: phone Fire 
“ 50 71 49 19. 



3 JOHN I. 
TAYLOR 


GERMANY 


SOTHEBTS 

(NTEXKAHON.U. REALTY 


FOR SALE: red estato m Germaiy 
d Frandt-lmmbaurg border, 


2 taddm uL partly furnished on re- 
quest. an 13 acres of laid, beautiful, 
detached n n Me village, autobahn 


WE ALWAYS LOVE YOU— 

NOT ONLY FOR A SONGf 
Da you know a place where there we 


Tho GEMS of A* ABEND* 0V2SE4 

CAP FERRAT 


Slumng WATSFRONT Property 
vdh pnvwe hwbou and bod house. 
500 iqjn. house m perfect eondtion. 
Indoor pool Beautiful newt o*«r 
VSefhmche Bay. RAKE OPPOKTUMTY 


rtrfw 13 mfa. One bunng tutobfe 
fer tawL affiees, me ro fexturer . wwe- 
hause. ekfer c are home, dub etc. 2nd 
unit is a 2-fcmly home vdh heatable 
pool on large k*Hirh garden + frees. 
fora DM. 750,000 mduing Ue- 
cNenstem AG (Corp) owrtmg the estate. 

Address enquiries to: Fam AG. 

PO Box 224. 0+8056 Zurich 
Fox +41.1471 JUJB 


ween fields as tar as the eye can see? 
Where the w b fresh and dean) 
Where the ocean crashes onto some 
shores and the gulf streuui caresses 
df ml Where you con wdk for nrtes 
on naiurd sand* beaches and not meet 
anodier person Where yon con efimb 
mountains, play go8. honende, swmv, 
go deep lea fishing & nver ftjfimg, or 
enter ui btsh pub and bsmn to the* 
sereimewd songs and shake hands Bee 
lanq led fnereE. sounds fee paadbef 
Wd drnosi, bur its better known as 


Cdk Monica Bwco 93 38 00 66 
w Fora 93 39 13 65 


16th AVB4UE FOCH 

Luxurious and sunny pied- 
6-terre. lop Boar, panuunc 
vttws, perfect condtwa. 
Td (I) 4329.45.07. 













Pans 146478135 


GREAT BRITAIN 


Coutty Danegd on the Emerald ble of 
Irdana. We can offer td types of 


UNESCO 

4th flow. 153 sclhl, 5 roam. 3 baths, 
2 moids" roans. Td (1) 44 71 87 82 


CHALET 

SWITZERLAND 7 WAULS between 
Crara Mortana & Zermatt, l^OOm dti- 
tude, 130 sgjn, 2 bd trooms, 3 bed- 
room. garage, beauhfui 50 bn view, 
port cnbgue furniture, 3F 520 L00 Tek 
Germany + 49-202-7Q744. Fax723744. 






; ; v ‘ ^ it ‘ ij B .‘i C.‘ 7 1 4* . |J 


USA COMMERCIAL & 
INDUSTRIAL 


NYC/Three bnooh Certer 



ST. Kins, 


WEST INDIES 

20 or 140 acre site with beach fr ont. 
World dro hotel & condos weft ctuna 
fcerae & tax abatement Mostly Beach 
Front. Broker commisaon guaranteed. 
Priced from 523 mdion to 56 nxlfron. 

TeL NYC USA I 

(212) 888-7555 

1212) 371-9133 


FRENCH RIVIERA 



FRENCH RMEBA 

ST JEAN CAP IB0UT 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


Unque and rare opportunrty. 
toatfed n □ sms, dduve 


SUMPTUOUS 18 Wit, PROPKTY 
m Charenfe Aten Dote between Le Hout 
Mfedoc and Hie de Re. 1km port. I tau 


Budeouit arport Residence hnmhed 
with ' obiets dut" & authenne furnftire. 


with ' obiets dot ' & authentic finnAire. 
Situated et 3 ha grounds with pool. 
outewTcfrngs and an old «re uAcr. 
Pnce FFBM. IMMCeiLlS CHAVANT-C 
Fa J >63583737 Tel 3343583*97 


condamnun 

APARTMENT -VUA. DUPLEX, 
luge twig roan, 3 bedrooms. 3 baths 
large double garage. Private gen den 
gving (freer access to dtepboL 
Easy access to the beach. 

Ref Y.'A 1855 



LONDON EATON SQUARE 3 room 
Ik* tar sale with <4 contents ■ access 
tents court. Fax owner 44 71 259562b 


MYKONOS 

Busses Enterprise sells or rents 3 
tints n fee best place in Myk o no s 
tar beem reasons. 

I. Fufty eqvpped workshop tar 
ccrfcene end befcery 170 sqm, 

+ 80 sqm. sales counter tar fee above 


Irtutd. We can otter aft types of 
property aid land at tha meet beautiful 
port of Ihe world, h eland c o member 
oftheEU^buthasnailosiiii trarfftom 
and vataet Contact us today far d 
det u fe on the service we offer, and 
rerramber, once you <nr*od us. you 
contod fnends in DoregoL 
GuU Real Esne 3 Investment Lid., 
Chinch Si Howe, lenetkerety, Co. 

DonegoL Ireland. Fax 353 74 25551 


(92). PANORAMIC VIEW 

FffliliY f M. BARRBt 5th floor 


teRUY f M. BARRBt 5th floor 

80sqiti,2 rooms, balcony- 1-4471 3782 



PRIME SELECTION 

Mogvficent homes now avoBoble an 
'fth Hoar. Offers 114 mottle baths, 
^aue kildiens and tuxurious hetfeh spa 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


CARIBBEAN 




i poaL Startm a S275.000. 

KA®? MAN50UK 
212-727-61 341 Res. 212-861-2270 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


DOUGLAS BUMAN 



TONES (17th) 

120 nit - e x t epti nnd 
lOOtOOftTel (1)42-^-46.46 


FRENCH RIVIERA 


MONACO 


NYC/ Pork Ave, 72 St 7 Root 

BBT PENTHOUSE W NY 


NYC/60's East Condo 1 A3 Bedrooms 


products, m the sume ptace 
there a a restaurant 560 sqm 
L 9iop wife al taabtes tar fast 


1st floor and » sq-m. 2nd Hoot. 

3. 270 sqjn. trading des^ned tar 
commeroo l me. 60 metres hoot fee sea 
Mat beautify penorqnuc 
mew of the sunset. 
Information: Mrs Meads 
Tel 30-289-22402. 9mit ta 5pm. 


PUNOPAUTY OF MONACO 

Cocnraerad premses in the centre of 
ManteCbrio. 100 scyn. porkng spoce 
included. Very imerrtmg appuhmrt- 

PARK + AGENCE 


7 * rue de VHteua 
2/3 room aputment to renovate. 
Tel Owner |1) 47.03.91.09. 


HOLLAND 


19. ffd du Gtafrai tederc 
06310 BEAUUEU 

Td (33) 93 DIW H Fa. (23) 93 01 11 96 


UMOUE {YIP} reskfadiof V1UA on 
3300 tqjn u FStareuin/ Netherlands 
30 mn from Amsterdom Gty/ 
Schiptrt residertrt area/ a ufeiuau 
nature reserve. Brochure coB +31 
251 B 52548 u far 51837 
EURORNANCE. 


CREIE-BOUNDA 

Houses fer sale with wonderf u l views of 
the harbour. ftTOO sqm abo 
avabUe for dewdopmer rt H e fai ac 
Properties and I n v es went Services. 
Tet/fms 301-2845060, TeL 301-3254140. 
We have (TCpenns «M ewer Greece. 


MONTE CARLO 


tBROKAUBfGwn tTOr}, fiwxoa 
studs 42 sfitx emrafr refurbshed. 


storage room and double poking spaa 
pUjfhduiw, 4gert 



tor O* I m woiio 


luxury flats in very best location, 
connected with 3-Star-Hctel. 

■ A roams, lad sqm , living/dining 

roam, fireplace, 3 bedrooms. 
2 bathrooms, kitchen 

■ 2 rooms, 82 sq.m.. Iwing/dming 
room, fireplace. 1 bedroom, 
1 baihtoom. bKheo 

oat furnished, long lets 

Facsimile: +41 82-2 15 22 


Chamonix - Flame 

Charming -i-ljud chaleLv 
Sv'undinavian deigned 
,tnd huflt. Ltcaicd next to 
guff course and modem 
.ski-station. 

Direct access Geneva. 
Call Caihy on (33)50 908293 
nr Fax (33)50 90 86 79 



AAGEDI 


7/9. Bdda‘*ou * MC9BOOO Monaco. 
To/ 33-92 16 59 T Fax 3393 50 19 42 


CARRE DXX - FACING THE CASINO 
Very resdentrt buMno. 
"Appartemerl de Ma*e'. 271 sqm. 


Double hm. 4 bedrauns. 
senna room, pufang. P onorqnn c new. 
For mere ctetoife 


BREMOND-DOTTA 

Tel 33-93 25 50 25 Fox 33-93 50 95 81 


PANAMA 




\i-%l Sprriul I leading 

Real Estate In and 
Around Paris 

— on SeplfmlMT 23 — 


f nr ia/uM'lflu”- rnJlWrt t>iur InnJ 
UIJ. reprewBHifirr nr in I'nrii: 

TrLt IU7M - tau WS.9W0 


REAL ESTATE GUZMAN 


MARBEUA PROPERTY EXCHANGE 
luxury viHa in goad residertfial am, 
ipecfaniW sm vfew, J420 sq.m7630 sa.m 


(Mrti 40 ntm] 8500 satn. properly & 
LAICES1CC LUXURY VTUA 
(333 sqjn. rtfe arnwrefing wruidah 
ond targe coveted pcoo. Mater bed- 
room wife M bofe, shower, [mate 
terrace. 3 double bedrooms w«h bath, 
smgfe bedroom with rtower. Living- 
tiacg aid implex a. fJcher. canteen, 
gomes' own. knindry room, mne oekr. 

Ire IteotfeMy ittowwned tandscoped 


PARIS 4k SUBURBS 


AVE VICTOR HUGO 

DmCTOTnO.MOsgjri.dud.*. 

beautiful layout, spaoous teceplai 


double draw, 4 bedrooms, nod's 
roam. Needs some work. FFB mfen. 



HT FOR A KING 

Gkmuows penthouse n prene Iccnfcon 
with enormous wrap planted terrace. 
Fabulous master rente wife his/her 
baths. 2 oditiond bedrooms or 1 + 


GREAT LOCATION/ VIEWS 

Luxury building, prime location. 
Bat investment. Mint apartments. 
Below rwrtet, 

MMIE BIANCO 212-091 -7001 



GREAT BRITAIN 


fcrary. Double ta ng roo m wtfe wood- 
bumg fireplac e , fennel (fnirfl room 
wife xltybe. Deluxe eaten kitchen, 
vnher/dryw, at candtionea Mint 
oureknaa Foreryi & oorporat e buyers 
weknme. Co-exdustve. 

RSECCA STBfCfOSI 
212891 -7060/hx. 212-6288057 


DOUGLAS BUMAN 


TUXBSO PARK, NEW YOK 


Gctfed private rtage, Onfy 40 mlea NY 
GtyOfon 3 Urt/ wooded hfc and 
European jiitnnoe. Let us show you 
we eken d cottages m $4004, range or 
Oateaux el 5)3-35 nx&ion mec, 
mostly bu* '866-1940. 

TPA FEALTY 

TeL91 4^51 -«800 Fax.91«51 5752 


DOUGLAS BUMAN 


L a ju aHe btgfeh manor house si tuated 
on a fartl in dmcnong grtrt 
carntrerety near the sea. nvopeem 
detab copture a tavurf-century 
Hegatce perfea fer groom* entertan- 
mg. DehncM stone ores state sotonun 
entry, two Story erfngs. soanng stone 
Fireplace, sumptuous master suie and 
three bedrooms dl add to the unque- 
ness of rt» spsod residence. 
tJewfir pnow. $849,000. 



LUXEWOURG,: 



UTfRE fab (?/ 45.4444.45. 


OK5POK9 

loss biASnft 

iMCfOCTl 

^.in* 




EESSIS 

T ff.lJJjll l I II’ 


whmm 


Country Living 





6 Corbet Drive _ fM3| 655.4741 
hi usa: Boo-^44-oeai 



FLATOTH. 

EIFFEL TOWER OR 
BCPO PORTE DEVB5AIUS 

From snrioi to five ■roo m de luxe. 
Daly, weekly or monthly. 

Free shuttle service to 


w Jersey 15 Min. to NYC 

Conte Dfreffly to Die GALAXY 




Eurotfaney-Lond 

Teh 133-11 4 75 62 20 


| 45 79 73 30 


^Vr/.. yyrri 


7DOO BhcL E Gutterfeero/Lower Mol 
Tenm. hi & Ousdoor roots. Oub 


Terns, hi & Outdoor Pools. Oub 
1-2 & 3 Bedrooms & Penthouses 
SfrlTALS $12005400 

SALS $90^00- $565^X0 

COfiFORATEREjOCATlGN 






* ,.o . 


[nra jr ■ : . ■ j i> m j ■■■ 


Riverfront 

v • • - r.toiitv 



201-661-6777 

OPEN 7 DAYS FAX: 201-&14677 


a 


room. Needs some work. FFBmSen. 
Tel (1)47 04 41 32 or <«, 51 43 DS 


3^£tan. S<IUna b ° aT 


fry ether European property in c good 
uilion, os pari payment lor mis villa vduea 
at US 1,100.000. 


tome, dock. SF 3 J itnlion. 

Coreact Trt/Fm ( + 41) 37 41 12 22 


EXCEPTIONAL 


□ LAKE GENEVAS 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 


Norwich. ComeOKut 

CONDO STEALS 


25 years experience. 

We oner c^tartmim. vSes, 
ond mv at t in i.i ii opport u nities. 

CoS KOSTINA SZEKEIY. 

ToL. 34-52-81 J3 1.02 Fa* 34-52-81.77^8 


W^PlAORiANCOiS IS 

TOP Float BALCONY 


TOP FLOCK BALCONY 
349 sqjn, freestone, fegh dais 
read's stutfia TeL (I) 4471 87 8? 


AVENUE MONTAIGNE - Euqtori 
pmkt-tene, oppaste Hate! ftea. 8fe 
ficor on gerdea fireplace, 24 hour 
coretolei. Gorage possible. I nt er gyro 
pace. TeL (t| 4770 56 06 [marniinsl 


5«rt to ferartterjotr*a*re< 

MiwSira&iTcHAUK 

ta MONJHEJX , VaiARS, CSTA AD. 

IB DIABIHSTS, «Bpa 
CRANS-MONTANA, elt. 1 to 5 bed- 
reotm, SFr. 200,000 to 3 J rate. 
RWACSA 

52, Mo rt bfl tait, CH-121 !G«Jva2 
Tre 41 22-73415 40. Fax 734 12 20 


$8SK- $100K U.S. 

Fabutaus on*/twu bedrooms/ bafes 
fumahed on I8hofe golf course, 4 
terns carets, 3 outdoor peak, world 
dass spa. gourmet restaurant, m 
cfwrnvng New England setting near 


NYC. For more inta, ad or fa* me) 
JOAN WB.T2 212-8917095 
FAX; 212891 7239 


DOUGLAS HUMAN 









I ~n:i 


Rttal Estata 

ewy firictayi: ' V.i 

t ^ •c’.. viji* 



















































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1994 


Page 15 



Jain) 



ASIA/PACIFIC 


-Fi’j .iu.* .. 

-* TT 

= «b! \ !,v 

V 

■air sh... 

amf j, 

*iH v 




•Vv 


BP Group Finds 
Big Gas Field 
Off Vietnam 








l u:: V. /' 



fir 

a;'*- 


“'■wWlrit 


TO Son a classified# 

< NQ?r>- cjtjtrj 


Reuters 

• HANOI — British Petroleum 
Co. announced a big natural-gas 
^discovery off Vietnam on Thurs- 
day that is likdy to launch a 
major industry for the country. 

; It was the first big natural- 
.gas discovery announced by 
'foreign companies exploring 
!for ml and gas off Vie tnam 
; “The gas discoveries could be 
.expected to play a ley role in 
Supplying Vietnam’s emerging 
'domestic gas market," the com- 
pany said in a statement issued 
4 n Hanoi on behalf of its part- 
nership with Indian and Nor- 
wegian companies. 

■ They would work closely 
With Vietnamese authorities, 
■jibe statement said, “to ensure 
hprimum use of this resource 
and to try to achieve an early 
commercial development.” 

! BP said it had found “en- 
couraging discoveries of gas” in 
'the Nam Con Son Basin south- 
east of Ho Chi Minh City, with 
recoverable reserves from two 
adjacent fields estimated at 2 
trillion cubic feet (57 billion cu- 
bic meters) of gas. 

Michael Yeldham, BFs chief 
executive in Vietnam, said the 
oil equivalent would be 350 mil- 
tion barrels, in the same range 
as Vietnam’s offshore Dai 
Hung (Big Bear) oil field, where 
the operator, BHP Petroleum of 
Australia, expects to start 
punning crude next month. 

“In world terms, it’s not enor- 
mous,” Mr. Yeldham said. “But 
it’s an interesting volume.” He 
said Vietnam still had to decide 
how the gas would be used. 

The reserves were enough to 
generate electricity for Ho Chi 
Minh City, the country’s biggest 
city with 4 million people, for 25 


years. Or it could be used to 
make fertilizer or for other in- 
dustrial uses. Vietnamese offi- 
cials have also talked of the pos- 
sibility of exporting gas by pipe 
to Thailand or in liquid form to 
Japan and other Asian markets. 
BP and its partners, Statoil of 

Norway and Oil & Natural Gas 
Carp, of India, hoped to get 
government approval to start a 
detailed feasibility study by the 
end of the year, he said. The 
study would take another year. 

u BP, with 30 percent, is the 
. operator for the partnership in 
Vietnam’s Block Six. The Indi- 
an partner has 55 p erce n t and 
Statoil holds IS percent. Petro- 
Vietnam, the state o3 company, 
has an option to acquire 5 per- 
cent equity from BP and Statoil. 

“The gas reservoirs are highly 
productive, achieving flow rates 
m excess of 80 million cubic feet 
per day during testing opera- 
tions,” the statement said. 

“The partnership is confident 
that the recently completed ap- 
praisal d rilling program has 
successfully identified poten- 
tially commodal quantities of 
gas,” it said. 

It said developing the gas was 
expected to require the laying of 
a submarine pipeline 400 kilo- 
meters (250 miles) from the 
fields to the coast. 

Mr. Yeldham said the devel- 
opment cost would be $1 bu- 
tton, and the cost of facilities, 
for instance, a big power plant, 
could also SI billion. 

The BP wells West Orchid 
and Red Orchid make up Viet- 
nam’s first field for gas alone. 
But a consortium of British Gas 
PLC, TransCanada Pipelines. 
Mitsui & Co., and PetroViet- 
nam, will probably be Viet- 
nam’s first producers. 


Broad Horizons for TV Technology 

in Japan 



By Andrew Pollack 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — With its high- 
definition televisions getting a 
disappointing response from 
consumers, Japan has begun 
moving toward a different 
system, one designed to make 
home viewing like going to the 
movies. 

Japanese consumers have 
been flocking in recent 
months to buy television sets 
with extra-wide screens, her- 
alding what could be a perma- 
nent shift in the shape of tele- 
vision pictures here and 
eventually worldwide. 

Sales of wide-screen televi- 
sions in Japan are expected to 
soar to between 1 million and 
1.5 million this year from 
300,000 last year and 44,000 
in 1992, the first year of sale. 

This would mean that wide- 
screen units would account 
for about one of every eight 
television sets bought' in Ja- 
pan this year. 

The sales could receive an 
even bigger lift next year, when 
Japanese television stations be- 
gin broadcasting for a wide 
format Sales of the new sets 
also are under way in the Unit- 
ed States, Europe and Asia. 

The broadcasts planned by 
Japanese stations next year, 
known as EDTV-2, or en- 
hanced-definition television, 
will provide better-quality 
pictures than conventional 
television, although not as 
good as high-definition televi- 
sion. 

High-definition television 
offers a wider picture than ex- 
isting sets and an image that is 
sharper. But the popularity of 
wide-screen television sug- 
gests that consumers might be 
satisfied with the wider pic- 
ture alone and unwilling to 
pay for higher resolution. 

EDTV-2 is compatible with 
the existing television system. 


but wide-screen television sets 
now sold in Japan need a de- 
coder to receive the higher 
picture quality. 

Enhanced -definition televi- 
sion, originally seen as an in- 
termediate step toward high- 
definition television, is also 
being developed in Europe. 
American engineers, mean- 
while, are going directly to dig- 
ital high-definition television. 

In the wide format, the 
shape of the television screen 
matches that of movie frames, 
so that films can be shown 
without clipping off the edges, 
as happens on conventional 
television screens. Proponents 
say the wider picture fills the 
field of vision more complete- 
ly, giving the viewer more of a 
feeling of being at the scene. 

“It’s more natural” for hu- 
man eyes to view a wide scene, 
said Tadao Kubodera, general 
manager of the Japan televi- 
sion department at Sony Corp. 

Sony, which has introduced 


a video camera in the wide 
format, is also promoting 
wide-screen television for vid- 
eo ga m es. Tire wide screens 
stretch the video ima ge so the 
game characters cover more 
ground and seem to move 
more quickly across the screen. 

The ratio of the width to the 
length of the wide screens is 
16 to 9, which makes them a 
third wider than the 4-to-3 as- 
pect ratio of conventional 
television sets. 

The new sets are best when 
used with wide-formal broad- 
casts or videocassettes. They 
handle conventional broad- 
casts or tapes by stretching 
the picture across the screen, 
distorting it a bit. 

Yoichi Morishita, president 
of Matsushita Electric Indus- 
trial Co_ predicted that wide- 
screen television sets would 
eventually become common- 
place in homes. 

Executives of Sanyo Elec- 
tric Co. forecast that wide- 


f . Robomom 9 to Set Limits 

Reuters 

SINGAPORE — Children and other would-be television 
junkies may now have to reckon with “Robomom," an dec- 
ironic gadget that controls the amount of time the family 
tdevision set can operate. 

The device, which is to be launched in Singapore on 
Sunday, also is being considered for eventual export to 
Malaysia, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and the United States, 
Steven Chan, managing director of Informatics En gin eering 
Pte., said Thursday. He said the product, a small black box to 
be priced at 129 Singapore dollars ($87), could be pro- 
grammed to turn off the tdevision after a certain number of 
hours operation per day or per week. 

He also said the microprocessor-driven “electronic teiesit- 
ter" had several other features that were being patented. He 
did not daborate on those. 

Mr. Chan, who said he had tested the product with his three 
children aged 4 to 1 1, said Robomom was not a replacement 
for parental responsibility but “a form of dectronic agree- 
ment between the parent and child.” 

He said the device was “tamper-proof” and could only be 
bypassed or changed by a master key. 


screen sets would be in 1 5 per- 
cent of Japanese homes by the 
end of this year and SO per- 
cent by 2000. 

Prices for the sets in Japan 
range from about S600 for a 
small model to 54,000 for a 
large, deluxe modd; high-deG- 
nition sets, on the other hand, 
still cost more than 56,000. 
With an adapter, wide-screen 
sets can reedve high-definition 
broadcasts, but with only nor- 
mal resolution. 

The boom in wide-screen 
sales has cheered Japan’s con- 
sumer electronics companies, 
which have been suffering 
from an economic slump, ma- 
turing markets and a dearth of 
popular new products. 

Mr. Morishita and other ex- 
ecutives, however, said wide- 
screen television would not be 
the kind of blockbuster item 
that could rescue the industry 
by itself. 

It is an improvement on ex- 
isting television sets, but not a 
new product as the videocas- 
sette recorder was. Still, wide- 
screen television is one of sev- 
eral potentially profitable new' 
products, along with the mini- 
disk audio system and the car 
navigation system. 

Its spreading popularity, 
however, could be anoLher 
nail in the coffin of Japan's 
high-definition television, 
which has failed to catch on 
because of high prices and a 
Shortage of progr ammin g. 



cause it uses an analog trans- 
mission system instead of the 
computer-like digital technol- 
ogy being developed in the 
United States. 

Last year, only 10,000 
HDTV sets were sold in Ja- 
pan. compared with 8 million 
or more conventional sets. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

11000 - - - 
10300 


Singapore 

Straits Times 

JSO - 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 

223GC 


-rV ZM 

8 KB 2100 / 15000 ' 


J JAS 2533 A M J 

JAS ^ A M J 

JAS 

1994 

1994 


1994 


Exchange 

Index 

Thursday 

Prev. 

°0 


Close 

Close 

Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

9,862.64 

9.846.40 

+0.16 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2^8084 

2.29831 

-0.76 

Sydney 

All Ordinaries 

2,050.80 

2,050.50 

+0.01 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

Closed 

19,919.38 

- 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1,176.06 

1.173 34 

♦0.19 

Bangkok 

SET 

1,53444 

t .536.14 

-0.14 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

988.75 

999.26 

-1.06 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

6,989.97 

7,025 18 

-0.50 

Manila 

PSE 

2,954.46 

2.953.37 

"Vosr 

Jakarta 

Stock Index 

522.03 

520.31 

Tq.33 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2,09320 

2,116.04 

-1.08 

Bombay 

National index 

2,176.43 

2.169.24 

“+0.33 


Sources Reuters. AFP 


Imcnuii.-Lil lici.ii*! T n. -.m; 


Very briefly: 


• Philippine Long Distance Telephone Co. said it would withdraw 
from a consortium seeking to launch the Philippines’ first satellite 
to set up a separate satellite-launching group: International Com- 
munications Corp. also is leaving the Agila consortium. 

• Sung Hung Kai & Co. said first-half net profit rose 12 percent 
from a year earlier, to 187.3 million Hong Kong dollars (S24 
million).' The brokerage concern left its dividend unchanged at 10 
cents a share. 

• Southeast Asian economic ministers will meet in Thailand next 
week to discuss setting up a free-trade zone in 10 years, instead of 
the original timetable of 15 years, beginning last year. 

• India dropped most of its requirements for foreign companies to 
get government consent to make pharmaceutical goods and ended 
price controls on about half the 142 drugs affected by those rules. 

• The Pfufippines' Securities and Exchange Commission said it 
was preparing a case against Interport Resources Corp. that could 
result in the first insider-trading conviction in its 58-year history. 

• Australian banks have about 50 billion Australian dollars (S3 7 
billion) at risk in derivatives contracts, the Reserve Bank said, of 
which about 4 percent is in highly speculative investments. 

• NEC Corp. adopted Philips Electronics NV’s new standard for 

smooth digital transmission or spoken words. Philips announced 
in Amsterdam. The company said the Japanese concern would 
become the first company to make microchips under the new 
software standard. AFP, AP. BUmbcrp Reuters 


Jpairy Farm to Leave Hong Kong Bourse 


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■ is: l »* 







Compiled ip Our Staff From Diipatcha 

■ HONG KONG —Dairy Farm Interna- 
tional Ltd, the retailing subsidiary of Jar- 
dine Matheson Holdings Ltd, said Thurs- 
day it would delist its common shares from 
the Hong Kong Stock Exchange effective 
March 31. 

| The company said its principal listing 
would continue to be in London and it 
would also trade in Luxembourg, Singa- 
pore and Aust ralia. 

The move had been expected because 
the two m»rn Jar dine companies, Jardine 
Matheson and Jardine Strategic Holdings 
Ltd, announced in March they would de- 
list effective Dec 31. 

‘ Jardine Matheson moved its legal domi- 
cile from Hong Kong to Bermuda in 1984, 
and it has since listed itself and its subsid- 
iaries on other stock exchanges. 

’ Consequently, its Dairy Farm subsid- 
iary became subject to Bermuda's takeover 


code in July. Because of this. Dairy Farm 
asked the Hong Kong Securities and Fu- 
tures Commission for an exemption from 
the Hong Kong code, which was denied 
and prompted the move to delist. 

Dairy Farm also said Thursday that a 
one-time gain helped its first-half net prof- 
it jump 53 percent, to S10L6 million. The 
fit included a gain of 541.8 million 
i the sale of a Hang Kong factory site. 

The company’s revenue was $2.6 billion, 
up from $2.4 bmion in the first half of 1993. 

“Dairy Farm has experienced more se- 
vere competition in some of its major mar- 
kets but continued to make progress with 
its international development,” Simon 
Keswick, the company chairman, said. 

Dairy Farm owns Wellcome supermar- 
kets and 7-Heven convenience stores in 
Hong Kong. It also has retailing operations 
in China, Sin g ap ore, Taiwan, Britain. Aus- 


tralia, New Zealand and Spain. The compa- 
ny said it expected its operating profit for 
1994 to remain close to the 1993 leveL 

Dairy Farm’s delisting is part of Jar- 
dine’s attempt to reduce its risk exposure 
before Hong Kong returns to Chinese rule 
on July 1, 1997. 

Jardine has had a rocky relationship 
with China since the early 19th century, 
when its founders were involved in the 
opium trade. The relations soured further 
over the company’s attempts to distance 
itself from Hong Kong before the colony’s 
handover to China. 

Bdjing this week accused the Hang Kong 
government of awarding a major port con- 
tract to a consortium involving Jardine be- 
cause it said Jardine supported Governor 
Chris Patten's democratic reforms. 

(Knighi-Ridder, AFX) 


* ilV * 




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£ — 


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.0? 


Khashoggi in Thai Market 

Agenee France-Prase 

BANGKOK — The arms dealer Adnan Khashoggi is negotiat- 
ing to buy major stakes in three Thai companies, an official of the 
Thai stock market said Thursday. 

The official identified the companies as Semiconductor Ven- 
tures International, Jalaprathan Cement Co. and Morakot Indus- 
try, a maker of palm o»L 

The official said Semiconductor Ventures shareholders had 
signed a preliminary agreement to sell a 40 percent stake to Mr. 
Khashoggi for about $25 million, which he said was about $7 
milli on, or 39 percent, more than the market value of the stake. 

The Saudi-bora Mr. Khashoggi also was said to be seeking a 25 
percent stake in the cement company. The projected price was not 
The official said the market value of the stake would be 
about $62 million. 

In addition, Mr. Khashoggi may buy a 47 percent stake in 
Morakot, valued at about $45 million on the open market 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16. 1994 


1 owns I " 

'gSJ? ! ADVERTISEMENT 

Si INTERNATIONAL FUNDS SepM5 ’ 19M 

‘JB5 ^ 

™ - —■»* « SS**, ,£$1. ^S , — * m . 


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mOvBrloor Perlorm&iee Fd_» 2038.18 

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tf C5 Money Market Fd S , . .5 
tf CS Money Market Fd Yen— Y 

d CS Money Market Fd C L 

tf CredbSmlH4UdCap5wttzlSF 

tf CS Eq Fd Emerg MWs s 

rf CS Eq Fd Lot Americo__s 

d CSEqFd Small Q» Ear DM 

tf CS EqFtf SmoflCcB>Ger_i3M 

tfCSEqFd Small Coo Jap Y 

tf CSEq Fd Small Coo USA—S 

tf Credit ScrisM Fds Inft SF 

ff g Euro Blue CMOS A DM 

ff g Euro Blue avps B DM 

ff CS France Fund A FF 

tf CS France Fun) B FF 

tf CS Germany Fund A DM 

tf CS Germany Fuad B DM 

tf CS Gold Mine* A 
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. CS Italy Fund A Ut 

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CS Japan Megatrend SF R_s F 
CS Japan Megatrend Yen _Y 

S Nether lend* Fd A FL 

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14*5.18 RESERVE FUNDS 

ff DEM DbSJDi DM 6388 

ff Dodur Dls2.ni S 2.18* 

tf French Franc FF 12.99 

d Yen Reserve r 1884 

GEFINOR FUNDS 

Mian LoMon:71-4994171JJenevn:41-22735 5S 30 

w State SI. American — __s 348.97 

GENESEE FUND Lid 

nr Al Genesee Eogte in42 

w B) Genesee Short S 6748 

w Cl Genesee Ooeortuniry _3 17135 

w F) Gnesee Non- Equity — S 139JB 

GEO LOGOS 

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GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 
OFFSHORE FUNDS 
11 Athol SLDougfas.1 of Man 4447*4^037 

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W GAM Austral to S 22575 

W GAM Boston 5 30078 

iv GAM Combined DM 12335 

w GAM Cross-Market S 1 1235 

w GAM European S 9538 

, w GAM France FF T 78237 

» GAM Francrvol SF 24448 

ir GAM GAM CO 3 27664 

w GAM High Yield s 158.16 

wGAMEastAs)8__— 3 76883 

w GAM Japan 5 B8975 

iv GAM Money Mkts USS S 10038 

tf Do Storting t 10096 

tf Do Swiss Franc SF UH79 

tf Do Devtscftemurk DM 100JB 

ff Do Yen 1 1 003400 

iv GAM Allocated MIM-Fd 5 16235 

w GAM Emerg Mkts Mttl-Fd _S 

hr GAM Ml H- Europe U5S S 

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cs Bond Fd Lire A/B Ut 

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CS CtgHtal DM 2800 DM 

CS Capital Eco 2000 ECU 

CS Capital FF 3000 FF 

CS Capital SFR 20X1 SF 

CS Ecu Band a Ecu 

CS Ecu Band B Ecu 

cs Europe Band A DM 

cs Europe Bead B -DM 

§ Fixed) DM n 1/9# DM 

CS Flced I Ecu 03/4% 1/96. Ecu 

S FlxBdl SF 7Tb 1/96 SF 

FF Bond A. FF 

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CS Guinea Band A Fl 

CS Gulden Bend B Fl 

cs Prime Bond A SF 

CS Prime Bond B SF 

f Short-T, Bond DMA DM 

SbartT. Bands B S 

CS Swt*s Franc Bond A— SF 
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USA/S&P SB S 1894 

IndextsJomxi/NTkkei Y 1777JU 

ladexta G Bret/FTSE e I la, 

France/CAC 40 FF 14187 

C.T FF 1T734 

d Court Terme USD s 1700 

ff Court Terme DEM DM 3932 

tf Court Terme JPY Y 2DU13 

rf Court Termo GBP ! 1333 

rf Court Terme FRF FF 13943 

ff Court Termo ESP Pto 300621 

ff Court Terme ECU — Ecu 2003 

ff Adions inn Dbenlfiees ff 12445 

rf Actions NonMmertcolfKa-S 2279 

d Actions Jruwnoisei Y 183531 

d Actions Anpi oiee a c lisa 

rf Artlons AJiemondes DM taM 

d Acttom Francoises FF 14144 

ff Adkins Em & Pori Pta 347539 

ff Acttom ttoUcmes Lit 3274146 

ff Action Bmsln Poctflque—S 1972 

ff OUto inn Diverxiftecs FF 11658 

rf OOltg Nord-AmertcclTies S 1847 

ff Oblto Jooon ol s m Y 237130 

rf Dblio Anotoises C 1132 

ff OMIg Allemondn DM 38J9 

rf ObUg Francoises FF 14439 

rf ObDg Em & Port Pta 2607 SI 

a Obits Convert, intern. FF W3.I2 

tf Court Terme Ecu— —Ecu 2238 

ff Court Terms usd s 1751 

ff Court Terme FRF FF 14354 

“ COMMERCIAL DE FRANCE 

ElyseesMenetatra FF 913497? 

Sum AcHcmh USD B -5 111731 

J RSI TOR FUND 

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HENT5CH GROUP 
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DH Major Mortata Fund — SF 9951JB 

DH Mandarin Pontnlto SF 1032730 

Samurai Portfolio SF 3050 

ISCOUNT BANK GROUP 

Muftteorr. Bond SF 134LS7 

Dotvot Bond S i)37o2 

Eorovo) Equity — Ecu 13*32 

N. America Equity — S 15003a 

Pacific Eoully 1 1 WAQ 

Mull irwrrancy Bond FF 4tS3 

Muft f currency Band -DM 93178 

T INVESTMENT FFM „„ 

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{•-IFSC-DuDdnl 
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■V GAM T racing DM DM 12352 

w GAM Trading uss s I7036 

w GAM Oversees S 15435 

w GAM Podflc— S 99175 

hr GAM Retatlvr Value 5 10812 

Hr GAM Sefectkxi ^__S *3438 

nr GAM Stagapore/Malovsto-S 78754 

nr GAM 5 F Special Bond SF 13029 

w GAM Tvchr S 36271 

w GAM U5 J 21064 

wGAMul Investments S 85759 

wGAM Value S 130*5 

tr GAM Whitethorn S 19032 

w GAM Worldwide—— _S 67638 

W GAM Band USS On) 4 1*471 

w GAM Bond l)SS5peaai— 3 1*1.10 

w GAM Bond SF SF 1D026 

wGAMBond Ye n Y I4640XM 

Hr GAM Bond i . ..f 15651 

w GAM CSpectof Bond t 14402 

w GAM Universal USS S 14850 

wOSAM Uxnpcstlr S 33873 

w Globa I Strategic A S 10129 

wGlotol Strategic 8 S 10090 

ht European Strategic A __ s 10052 

h> European Strategic B S 10021 

w Trodrtg Slraieolc A— S 10520 

w Trading Strategic B t 101.14 

w Emerg Mkn Strategic A S 11252 

w cinera Mkts Strategic B— 5 11100 

SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 41- 1-422 2626 
MotiieboeftstnnsE rn.cH aniZurich 

ff GAM (CHI Europe SF 94.18 

tf GAM (CHI Mondlol SF 16141 

ff GAM (CHI PodffC SF 39179 

SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 

135 East 57th Street JJY nmsma-Om 

w GAM Europe 5 92JM 

wGAMGlobol S 137.14 

ir GAM internal tonal % 19477 

w gam Korin America 8 9139 

iv GAM PDClflc Basin 5 1*621 

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65-66 Lower Mount SUDutribi 2353-1-67 60« 

w GAM Eureca Acc DM 13051 

w GAM Orient Acc DM 1 62.11 

• GAM Tokyo ACC— DM 17103 

W GAM Total Bond DM ACC—DM 10448 

w GAM Universal DM Acc DM T7471 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda :I«9I 295-4000 Fax: 1809) 2956180 
JWH GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 

w (A Original Investment S 93.90 

w (C Financial & Metah 5 14537 

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1 iv IF G7 Currency S 91.98 

w (H Yen Financial S 15738 

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w JWH WORLDWIDE FUNDS 1753 

GLOBAL FUTURES 5 OPTIONS 5ICAV 
m FFM Int Bd Prosr-CHf O-SF 100.9* 
GOLDMAN SACHS 

ivGS Adi Rato Mart Fd It — 5 972 


w Jcaon Dhienffitd F-wrf e i*^ 

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MERRILL LYNCH 

ff Dollar AaeR Part folio i JJM 

rf Prime Rot* ParrMia 1 1050 

MERRIU. LYNCH SHORT-TERM 

WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

ff El"” * « JJ9 

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GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SERIES 
AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
B O ttegorv A. AS 1778 

rfCaleporvB AS 1740 

CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

tf Caregorv A - n U2J 

tf Category B a 1386 

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ff CJ033 A-l - « 9.11 

ff Clou A-2 S 955 

tf OSS B-l « fll 

tf Class M % 910 

DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 

a coreooryA dm 1197 

d Catesary B DM 1252 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (DM) 

tfCfossA-l — J 11J8 

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a ass 3- 1 i 1358 

a Ctes B-2 s 14.9! 

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ff CtOSSA-2— DM M) 

rf any*. B.1 . e LU 

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POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 

rf Category a c 1577 

d Category r )5j6 

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tf Calegary 6. j 1356 

ff Category H « 1117 

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rf CotegoryA- Y 12M 

tf Colegorv B v 1254 

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tfCtassA S 2101 

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ffCtoMA S 93* 

tf Class B S 973 

MERRILL LYNCH 

EQUITY / CONVERTIBLE SERIES 

BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 

tfClasiA, i 1552 

tickers B .1 ujn 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

dads A S U.ll 

tf ChM B * 1352 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL (USS) 

tf Cion A l 1053 

rf rm«n • 10,4* 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

rf CH"* - * 1056 

rf Class B < 975 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

ff Class A < 1455 

rf r.ldft ft l 14J0 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

* M.M 

rf Cli«B t 1734 

PACIFIC EOUITY PORTFOLIO 

ff Doss A S 94* 

tf Class B * 943 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 

d firmi 3 1235 

rf ri"« n e 11J2 

DRAGON PORTFOLIO 

rf CtoJS A S 1741 

ff CJau B — * 1751 

MERRILL LYNCH EMERGING MARKETS 

rf a ass A s 12.17 

tfCkeaB « 1116 

MERRILL LYNCH INC S PORTFOLIO 

rfCImA c 467 

rf Class B I 057 

d OassC 5 847 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 
d Mexican IncSPtfl Cl A S 944 

rf Mexican Inc S Phi Cl B s ej* 

rf Mexican incPeso Ptfi Cl aj S72 

tf Max Icon me Pew PNI Cl B 4 1.92 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
w Momentum Novell tor Perl-S 91 jfi 

m Momentum Rc Inbow Fd S 11546 

m Mo men tun RxR R.U S 7923 

m Momentum Stock mosrer s 1S9.92 

MORVAL VONW1LLER ASSET MGT Co 

nr wilier joeon y 21840 

w Wilier South Eos Asia— s 1042 

w Wilier Telecom S 1040 

w WlllerfuntfvWlrtorbcmd Caps 1556 

>r Wlllerlunos-WIDeroond EurEcu 1234 

w WUlerfunds-Wlllereq Eur_Eai 1141 

w wmerfunds-willerta Uatv _ut 1265640 

wWIHertiinds-WUtoreoNA— 5 iijs 

MULTIMANAGER K.V. 

m War Id Bond Fund .Ecu 1247 

m European Eauilles Ecu 1441 

m Jaaanese Eaoliles Y 68i 

m Emerging Markets 5 21 JO 

mCash Enhancement S 941 

m Arbitrage S 944 


m War Id Bond Fvni, ^eu 1247 

m European Eauilles Ecu 1441 

m Japanese Eaoliles Y B8i 

m Emerging Markets s 2140 

mCash Enhancement S 941 

m Arbitrage S 944 

mHftrfpw- * 125* 

NICHOLAS-APF LEGATE CAPITAL MGT 

W NA Flex We Growth Fd S 14752 

w NA Hedge Fund S 13002 

NOMURA INTL. <KONG KONG] LTD 

tf Nomura Jakarta Fund S IU» 

NDRIT CURRENCY FUND 

fflNCF USD S 81751 

mNCF DEM DM 871.13 

mNCF CHF SF 93479 

mNCFFRF FF 44*110 

mNCF JPY Y 8269SOO 

mNCF BEF- BF 2679340 

ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
21 Gnsvenor SI.Ldn W1X 9FE44-71-499 2998 


iv GS World Band Fund S 

w CIS World Income Fund S 

GS EOUITY FUNDS SICAV 
iv GS Euro Small Cop Port _DM 

iv GS Global Equity S 

IV GS US Cap Growth Port S 

nr GS US Small Cap Port— _S 

nr GS Asia Portfolio S 

GOTTEX FUND MANAGEMENT 
l v G. Swao FltkJ Ecu 


rf Dollar Long Term $ 1944 

tf Japanese Yen Y *94750 

rf Pound Starling C 7446 

ff Deutsche Mark DM 1742 

S Dulch Ftortn Fl lUO 

HY Euro Currencies Ecu 1537 

tf Swiss Franc SF ti?* 

d US Donor snort Term 5 T2J9 

tf HY Euro Curr Dtvid Pov Ecu llLE 

d Swiss Multicurrency SF 1636 

rf European Currency Ecu 2144 

tf Beigton Franc 0F 13172 

tf Convertible^— _S 1557 

ff French Franc f f 1517* 

a Swiss Muttt-Dtvidend SF 951 

ff Swiss Franc Short-Term SF 10770 

tf Canadian Dollar cs 1358 

d Dutch Florta Multi Fl 1446 

tf Swiss Frene Dtvtd Pav sf 1043 

rf CAD Mutttcur. Div— CS 1157 

rf MnfltorroneonClirr SF lOxff 

ff Convertibles SF 953 

rf Deutschmork Short Tenti-DM 10J0 

MALABAR CAP XAGMT (Bermuda) LTD 

mMoloOor inti Fund i 1947 

MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 

mMInt Limited -OrflinarY s 4041 

ra Mint Utntted - Income— I 1240 

ffl SMMGtd Ltd- spec liaue_5 26X1? 

mNUnl GK) Ltd - Nov 2002 S 3146 

ffl Mint GM Ltd -Dec 1*94 S 1731 

mMntGtd Ltd -Aw 1995—3 1451 

mAMnt Sc Res Ltd (BNP) J 9737 

mMInt Gld Currencies— _s 672 

mMInt GM Currencies 2001— s 4.«6 

fflMInlGGL Fin 2083 S 633 

rn 6*1*11 Plus Gtd 2003 s 9J9 

mAtheno Gtd Furures S 1238 

m Athena Gtd Currenctov S 934 

m Athene GW Flnonaots Coo J 1049 

m Alftena Gld Rnandols lnc_S mil 

nr ahl Capital Mkts ra s mi? 

mAHLCommodlTY Fijivj s 10J? 

mAHL Currency Fund— s 741 

mAHL Real Time Trad Fd S 876 

m AHL Gld Reel TimeTrd S 85* 

mAHL Gtd Cim Mark Ltd_5 94ft 

mAHL GM Commodities LW5 944 

mA*op Guaranteed 1996 Ltd_S 847 

mMap Leveraoeo Recov. LHJ 1139 

m MAP Guaranteed 2000 S *.«6 

raMAP Gtrf 2CC! S KUS 

MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
73 Front St Hamilton Bermuda 1809)292 «7B9 

w Maritime Mlt-Sedor I LM _S 100348 

wMartUme CRH Beta Series-8 83137 

w Maritime Gibl Delta Series 5 78656 

MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MGT 
EMERGING ASIAN STRATEGIES FUND 

mCkm A S 11883 I 

ff Class B S 11623 

PACIFIC CONV STRATEGIES FD LTD 

m Class A s 9941 

0 Cuss B 1 9943 

MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS. LTD 

ffl The Coodr Fund Ltd s 7770 

m The Dounflea Fd Lid 1 111.70 

MEE5PIERS0N 

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hr Alio Poc Growth Ffl N.V. _S 4087 

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xrDP Amer. Growth Ffl NV.J 3553 

nr EMS Offshore Fd N.V — Fl 10066 

hr Europe Growth Fund N.V. _fi 6480 


GRANITE CAPITAL INTL GROUP 
w Granite Capital Eouttv 5 


k Granite Coolnl .... 

w Granite Global Debt. Ltd— * 
GT ASSET MANAGEMENT (If 
Tel: (44) 71 -710 *6 £7 

tf GT Asean Fd A Shares S 

tf GT asean Fd B Stares S 

ffGT Asia Fund A Shares * 

tf GT Asia Fund B Stares 1 

ff GT Aslan Small Como A Shi 
ff GT Aslan Small Comp BSh5 
ff GT Australia Fd A Snares-5 
tf GT Australia Fd B Sham S 

rf GTAustr. Small Co A Si s 

tf GTAustr.SmonCOBSti 5 

tf GT Berry Japan Fd A Sh_S 

ff GT Berrv jaacm Fa B Sh S 

rf GT Bond Ffl A Shares s 

ff GT Band Fd B Shares 1 

tf GTBto S.Ap Sciences A SftJ 
tf GT Bto & Ad Sciences B Sh_* 
d GT Dot tar Ford A Sh— _5 

tf GT Duller Funa B Sh 5 

tf GT Emerging Mkts A Sh— S 

ff GT Emerging Mkts B Sh S 

tf GTEijiMHSmollCaAShJ 
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i» GT Elvo Smart Co Ffl B ShJ 
tf GT Hang Kcms Fd a Shares! 
rf GT Hong cons Fd B Shares! 
tf GT Honshu Pathfinder 4 ShJ 
d GT Honshu Pathfinder B 5h* 
wGT JopOTC Stocks Fd A ShS 
wGT JaoOTC Mods Fd B Shi 
w GT Jap Small Ca Fd A sh—s 

w GT Jaa Small Co Fp B Sh^j 

n GT Latin Amer too A 5 

w GT Latin AmericD B_ > 

d GT Strategic Bd Fd A Sh S 

tf GT SlralcBtc Bd Fd B 5ft _J 
ff GT Telecomm, Fd A Shares 5 


_S 0.9819 

-3 0JE70 

J 0XU4S 

(IRELAND) LTD 


wOdev European I 133 

•vOdey Eutop Growth inc— JJM T*C 

iv Ddey Eutop Growth Acc DM l« 

■vOdevEuroGrthSler Inc 1 53 

wOdey Euro GrthSler Acc _t St 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL. INC 
Williams House. Hamilton HMll, Bermuda 
Tel: 809 292-1018 Fax : 909 295-230$ 

w Finsbury Grouc s 221 

wOtympta Securlto SF -SF 16] 

w Olympia Stars Emerg Mkts I 9V7 

IV wtnen. Exctorn Dragon s 17 

w Winch. Frontier S 267 

w Winch. F m. Ofympia 51ar S 1*2 

w Winch. Gl Sec Inc PI (A) S 9 

w Winch. Gl Sec Inc PI (C) S 9 

m Winch. Global Healtncare^Ecu 1042 

w Winch. Hide inn Modlson_Eai isi* 

w Winch. HWb Inn SerD Ecu 1785 

ivWbKh.HUs InnSer F Ecu 1772 

to winch. Hldg Oty Star Hedge* 1034 
w Which. Reser. MullL Gv Bd_J 17 

w Winchester Thai tana s 33 

OPPENHEIMER 8 CO. INC Fds 

b ArtJltrage International i 101 

B Emerg Mkls inti II S 106 

b inn Horizon Fima ll I 101 

OPTIBEST LUXEMBOURG 
b Oatlgest Glbl Fd-FU«d lncJ3M 1573 

6 Oprtoat GBH Fd-G«l SuD FJJM 1B2X 
OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 
73 Front SI. HomlrtonJJermudo 809 29546SB 

wOuflma Emerald FdUd I m 

w Optima Fund—— j 17. 

w Optima Futures Fund 5 16 

w Optima Gtobal Fund J 14. 

w Optimo Pertauia Ffl Ltd * 9. 

tv Ontlma Short Fund 6 6. 

n> The Platinum Fd Ltd S 10. 

ORBITEX GROUP OF FUNDS 

tf Orbit** Asia Poc Fd >5 570 

tf Orb! ter Growth Fd 5 758 

ff Ortiltex Health & Emir Fd_S ST7 

tf Orfallex Japan Small CtatFdS 445 

tf OrbUex Natural Res Fd CS 1457 

FACTUAL 

rf Eternity Fund Ltd 5 40557 

ff Infinity Fund Ltd— s 62047, 

rf HovastarFimd. — — i 11349 

0 Star High Yield Fd Ltd S 14745 

P ARIBAS-GWOUP 

tf Porvest USA B S 23J 

rf Porves) Jason B Y 

0 Porves* Asia Pad! B S 

d Porvesf Europe B Ecu 

tf Parvesi Holland B Fl 

ff Porvest France B FF 

rf Porvest Germaiy B DM 

ff Parvesi Obll-Ooltar B s 

tf Porvest OWKJM B DM 

ff Porvest OblFYen B Y 

rf Porvest Obll-Gutden B Fl 

ff Porvest Obit- Franc B FF 

tf Porvest OWFSter B c 

tf Parvest CBHl-Ecu B Ecu 

rf Porvest ObM-Betox B LF 

tf Parvesi S-T Oobor B S 

rf Porvest S-T Europe B Ecu 

ff Parvest S-T DEM B DM 

ff Porvest 5-T FRF B FF 

ff Parvesi S-T Bef Plus B BF 

ff Parvesi Gtobal B LF 

rf Porvest Int Hand B _ % 

d Parvesi OblJ-Ura B Lit 5122984 

tf Parvesi Ini Equine* B S 

ff Porvesf UK B c 

tf Porvest USD Plus 8 % 

rf Parvesi S-T CHF B — _SF 

rf Porvest OMLCanodo B Cl 

tf Parvest Oblt-DKK B DKK 

PERMAL GROUP 

t Drc&knr Growth N.V. S 28035 

1 Emerging MJcts Hides 3 9167 

r EuroMIr (Ecu) LM ECU 1 6674 

t Fx. Financials & Futures _5 9684 

f Investment FtktoS N.V___S 13104 

t Metfla & Communications _S 10064 

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PICTET A CtE -GROUP 

ff Amwnmr t 54J 

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» P.CJ Germaval (Lux) DM *54 

w P.C.F Noromval iLux) s 2*4 

wP.CF VfHIber (Lux) Plos 917*4 

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w P.C.F vallrance (Luxl— FF 12244 

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w PXJ.F. Vafecnd Ecu ( Lux 1 -Ecu 177. V 

m P.U.F. Vaibond FRF (Lux) JF 9275 

w P.U.F. Vaibond GBP (Lux) J 9iS 

w P.U.F. Vaibond DEM ILl*v) DM 2844 

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ir P.U.F. Model Fd Ecu 1T75 

tr P.U.F. Platte SF *80Xk 

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0 E-SM* Vohto I Lux I -Ecu MBAi 

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PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 
yd P-tLB wJWO. G rand Cayman 
Fax: (B09J 949-0993 

rtlPremfcf US Eouily Fund_S 123641 

m Premier inti Ea Fmf i 130671 

m Premier Sovereign BdFd_6 77iM 

at Premier Glotal Bd Fd s 14673 

nPiwi* Total Return Fd 5 97951 

PRIVATE ASSET MGT GAM FUND INC 
Guernsey ,TeJ:(004* 481 ) 72343T Fox: 723488 
^hmhjARtofMOfGAMFd* 1004* 

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QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 

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w Emerging Growth Fd N»V_J in.ll 


w Quantum FundN-v 5 169264* 

w Quantum Industrial _s iocJi 

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REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 

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tf Bond Sweden Inc Sek 1047 

tf Bond DEM Acc DM ITS 

d Bond DEM inc DM 0.93 

d Bond Dollar US A*c S 139 

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d Curr. US Dollar S I3B 

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rf BTW Cat B S 4233 

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nr SF Bands E GJS—t 1145 

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mSR European — - 4 10247 

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146 Bd de to Petntsse. L-2330 Luxembourg 

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Arts and Antiques 

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• Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1994 



SPORTS 


i ~ i 


e : : - * * 1 

V - *0 ' 

* :£• * «s- 


Storms, on 2 Fronts, 
Strike British Masters 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WOBURN, England — The first round of the British Masters 
became a wash-out Thursday when, after 24 hours of heavy rain 
that was continuing, play was called off at noon. 

The toumamem’s director, Mike Stewart, said that, conditions 
allowing, the first round will be played Friday, the second round 
Saturday and the final 36 holes cr amm ed into Sunday. The 
forecast for Friday was for rain at times, some of it heavy, while 
the outlook for the weekend was for showers becoming isolated. 

During the wait for clearer skies, the En glish Ryder Cup player 
Mark James took Nick Faldo to task over his compatriot's 
criticism of the European Tour. 

James accused the game’s superstars of being “dominated by 
money to a ridiculous degree” after reading Faldo's comments 
that the European tour had not made as much progress as the 
American circuit in the past 10 years. And. said Faldo, he was 
thinking of rejoining the U.S. tour next season. 

James, 40, a member of the European tour's tournament com- 
mittee. said: *Tve been talking to other players and they cannot 
believe the comments that Nick has made. I think Nick most have 
been playing a different tour to the rest of us. Our money has gone 
up in leaps and bounds and facilities have improved enormously, 
whereas 1 thought things had stagnated in America.'* 

The Masters is Faldo's eighth European event of a season now 
33 weeks old. Said James: “It's difficult for him to get an overall 
view playing the number of tournaments he has " (AP, AFP) 






That Still Counts 


A pence Franco Pi cut 

A member of the greens* staff at the Duke's course at Woburn, England, trying to get the water off the first hole. 


More Than One European Soccer Champion Has a Bumpy Ride Thursday Results 


Compiled by Ota Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — IFK Gothenburg's 
players finally made it home Thursday, 
several hours late and two goals short 
after their 4-2 defeat to Manchester 
United in a European Champions' 
League match the previous night. 

The pilot of the team's charter plane, 
with 39 people on board, turned back to 
the Manchester airport after noticing 
unusual vibrations and called for emer- 
gency assistance to land, the SAS airline 
said. 

“Because of stabilizer problems the 
captain took extra safety precautions,” 
SAS said in a statement. The team spent 
the night in Manchester before retum- 
inghome on Thursday. 

Elsewhere on the opening night of 
play in the revamped, 16-team Champi- 


ons League, defending champion AC 
Milan also had a bumpy ride as it was 
shut out, 2-0, by Ajax in Amsterdam. 

Overwhelmingly die best club in Eu- 
last season, MDan opened its title 
tense without nine players because of 
suspensions and injuries, and never test- 
ed Ajax goalkeeper Edwin van der Sar. 

“Beginning like this at borne to AC 
Milan gives us a great feeling of self- 
belief,” Ajax captain Danny Bund said. 

Second-half goals by Ronald de Boer 
and Jari litmanen on the wet Olympic 
Stadium turf sank the Italians, whose 
absentees for the Group D match in- 
cluded Demeirio Albertmi, Marco Van 
B as ten, Alessandro Costacurta and 
Marcel Desailly. 

Nearly 100,000 fans turned out at 
Republican Stadium in Kiev to watch 


the Uk rainian champions rally from a 2- 
0 deficit to beat Spartak Moscow, 3-2, in 
a match between bitter rivals from the 
former Soviet Union. 

Substitute Sergei Rebrov scored the 
winner with four minutes to play after 
two goals from teammate Viktor Leon- 
enko. 

Organizers said they received some 1 
million requests for tickets for the 
Group B game; the first in Kiev since 
Ukraine gained independence three 
years ago. 

In Manchester, Ryan Giggs scored 
two opportunistic goals as United held 
off Gothenburg in Group A. 

The victory also provided some redemp- 
tion for die two-time defending English 
champions, eliminated by Galatasaray be- 
fore the league stage last year. United 


received a bye into the league this season. 

Barcelona, losing finalist to AC Milan 
last season, opened its Group A cam- 
paign with a 2-1 home victory over Ga- 
latasaray as Guillermo Amor scored the 
winner in the 50th minute. 

In Paris, George Weah and Daniel 
Bravo scored as St. Germain beat Bay- 
ern Munich, 2-0, in Group B. 

The other three Champions League 
matches ended in scoreless draws. 

In Vienna, SV Casino Salzburg strug- 
gled through a miserable first half be- 
fore finally applying the pressure to 
Greek champion AEK Athens in a 
Group D match. 

There were also no goals in both 
Group C matches: Anderlecht vs. 
Steaua Bucharest in Brussels and Haj- 
duk Split vs. Benfica Lisbon in Split. 


CUP WINNERS' CUP 
First Round, First Ln 
CSKA Moscow l FerCBcransi I 
Scorers; Moscow- Sergei Monchovr 
tSOtn), Oleg Sergveev (73d). r e/enevaroj — 
Kenneth Qirbttansen (5Wh>. 

Croatia Zoorelb 3 Antm 1 
Scorer*: Croatia— Jasko Jalldc [2nd). 
Zvonlmir Soldo (40th). lour Pomfc Msitii. 
A uxe rre Barnar d Diomede 121st) 

Gloria Bishito Z Real Saraoo MO 1 
Savw*: Glorio— Marius Roduto (4W»),MJ- 
hal lunge. ISIsll.S ai ug onp-Juan Ewiolder. 
45Wt minute 

K Ptrto B, Panathinolkot 2 
Savers: NHtos nIopK* (7DHU. Alexia Atox- 
oudls 183(d) 

Zbaletrts VlMm U Foreseen! Rotterdam 1 
Scorers: Zhalglrls— Andriuo TtresUnas 
(87ih). Fayenoortf— Henryk Larsson (9th). 
Omenta Nicosia l. Arsenal 3 
Scorers; Oniunhi Qiitoi Motaf.loi (72 tk 1). 
Ar s enal P out Marion 137th, 78th), ion 
Wright 150(h). 
ftesOdas Z HJK Helsinki 0 
Scorars: Oktay (28th I, Ertugrut (36th, pen- 
alty! 

Broalk Mori bar 1, Austria Vienna t 

Bran Dc — Prmenik 23d. Vienna— 
<46thl. 


The Associated Press 

There were no proper good- 
byes this season. 

The cancellation of the rest of 
the season was the antithesis of 
the way baseball is supposed to 
end. Just last year, for instance, 
the World Scries ended with a 
game-winning home run by Joe 
Carter of the Toronto Blue Jays. 

Nothing like that will happen 
this October. 

If you wanted to see Tony 
Gwynn hit .400, you'll have to 
wait 

Don Mattingly in a playoff 
game? Not this year anyway. 

Roger Mans’s home run re- 
cord? It's safe. 

The list goes on and on: 
would’ve beens and could’ve 
beens that ought've been but 
won’t be. 

“Tragic is what it is,” said the 
P hillies ' pitcher. Cun Schilling. 
“Baseball, as 1 knew it growing 
up, is gone.” 

For the record, though, there 
wifl be such postseason awards 
as those for most valuable play- 
er and die Cy Young Award. 
Ballots go out this weekend and 
the announcements will come 
in mid-October. 

And like it or not, the Texas 
Rangers, Chicago White Sox, 
New York Yankees, Montreal 
Expos, Cincinnati Reds and 
Los Angeles Dodgers can call 
themselves division champions, 
if they want to. 

“I think there would be some 
skeptics if we did, for sure,” 
said Marty Conway, the Rang- 
ers* head of marketing. 

There also are batting cham- 
pions (Tony Gwynn, .394 and 
Paul O’Neill, 359), home run 
champions (Matt Williams, 43, 
and Ken Griffey Jr., 40) and 




SCOREBOARD 


Japanese Leagues 


Control Lou h do 



W 

L 

T 

PCI 

OB 

Yomluri 

64 

55 

0 

M 

— 

Hlreablma 

63 

57 

0 

J25 

ito 

Hanttiln 

60 

57 

6 

JO* 

4 

Cnunlctu 

57 

St 

0 

J00 

AV3 

Yokohama 

55 

62 

D 

A T9 

5 

Yaxulf 

53 69 0 

ThundaTs ResuHi 

A61 

9 


Hiroshima Z Chunkhl l 
Yokohama 7, Hanstiln 3 
Yomluri w* Yakut!. owJ- rain 

PacHIc League 



W l 

T 

Pet. 

GB 

5*1 bu 

67 46 

0 

SB3 

— 

Orix 

64 51 

2 

J57 

3 

KlntotW 

42 53 

2 

317 

5 

Daltl 

62 55 

1 

-530 

6 

lotto 

48 65 

1 

.<25 

18 

Nippon Ham 

41 72 

4 

363 

25 

Tbandan RwilK 




Orix 5. NIoMti Ham 4 
DaM 1 Kintetsu 3 
Setou v*. Lotto, ppd* rain 


L| 

NHL Preseason 


Tuesday's dames 
W ash ington B. Ottovra 6 
Philadelphia & Quebec 4 
St. Louts 7. Tampa Bay ) 
Dallas 4. Anaheim 3 

Wednesday* Oaraes 
Philadelphia 1 Boston 2 


Hartford 3. Buffalo 0 

N. Y. Ranger* 7. Pittsburgh 4 

Anaheim % San Jose 1, 


BASK BALL 
American Leasee 

TEXAS— Fired Tom Grieve, general man. 
ager, end reassigned him as an assistant to 
dub president Tom Schlatter. Named Sandy 
Joiraen.dlrectorofplaverparsofinellntertm 
general manager. 

National League 

COLORADO— Announced It will move Its 
Northwest Leogue affiliation from Bona, ore. 
la Portland, Ore. and signed 2-Y*ar working 
agreement with Portland, Ore. 

SAN DIEGO— Signed 2-rear working 
agreement with Idaho Palls of the Pioneer 
League. 

BASKETBALL 

Motional Baik uH wU Association 

ATLANTA-- Ag r eed la terms with Craig 
Ehla. guard, an 2-vear contract. 

HOUSTON Signed Larry Robinson, 
guard. and Tim Breaux, forward, to multi- 
year contracts. 

SEATTLE— Nmned Dwane Casey, assis- 
tant coach, and Ride Sund as a consultant to 
the president and general manager. 

FOOTBALL 

Nat iona l Football League 

KANSAS C I TV— Signed Matt Gay. eafety.to 
2-year c on l ra d. Placed Tim Watson, free 
safety, on Inturad reserve. 

L A. RAIDERS— Placed Napoleon McCol- 
lum, running back, on lntured reserve. Signed 
Jarred Bunch, fullback. 

MIAMI— Signed Jesse Solomon, lineback- 
er. 

N. Y. GIANTS— Signed Lean Brown, run- 
ning back, to the practice squad. 


Royals Fire McRae, 
Gooden Fails Tests 

The Associated Press 

KANSAS CITY, Missouri — 
Hal McRae was fired Thursday 
as manager of the Kansas City 
Royals. 

General Manager Herk Rob- 
inson said McRae and all his 
coaches had been let go because 
the team would have a lot of 
young players next year and 
change was needed. 

Robinson said he did not 
have a successor in mind . 

• Pitcher Dwight Gooden, 
suspended for cocaine use, has 
tested positive for drug use 
more than once since his release 
from a rehabilitation center, the 
New York Mets confirmed. 

The Mefs said they had been 
advised by league officials that 
Gooden “has committed addi- 
tional violations of both his af- 
tercare program and the com- 
missioner's office drug policy.” 

Gooden was suspended for 
60 days on June 28 when he 
tested positive for cocaine use. 


The 1994 Major League Season’s Final Standings and Leaders 


AMERICAN HAGUE 


THE BATTING AND PITCHING 


East Division 



LEADERS 


W 

L 

PeL 

GB 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Now York 

70 

43 

■617 


BATTING— C (4*111. N*w York. J57; 

Baltimore 

63 

47 

363 

6» 

B*ir* a*vttana JS7: Thomas. Chicago. 

Taranto 

55 

60 

.478 

16 

353; Lotton, C tamtam! JOT; Boggs, Nm 

Boston 

54 

61 

■470 

17 

York, 342; Mofltor, Taraita, 341: 

DatraM 

53 

62 

Ml 

U 

wriark. Taxa* 329. 






RUNS— Thomas, QUcaua 106; Lofton, 


wtnrnii Divmoa 



Ctowtana 105; Grtttov Jr, Saattto, 94, 

Chlcogo 

67 

46 

373 

— 

PtaniP* Oat roll, 91 ; Balto. Clavttand, 70; 

CtovttaM 

66 

47 

384 

1 

Canseco, Texas. SO; Mol Nor. Toronto. 

Kansas City 

64 

51 

357 

4 

16. 

Minnnata 

53 

60. 

M9 

14 

RBI — Puckett. Minnesota 112; Carter. 

MIlnaukM- 

‘ 53 

62 : 

:-A6t 

r 15 

Tarwita 102; Thomas, CMcago, 101; 






BaD* CtovataKl 101; Franco, ODcogo, 


ND»T UITtSWU 



78; Sierra, Oakland, 92; Griffey Jr. Seat- 

Ttxa* 

52 

62 

.456 



11* 90; Canseco. Texa* 70; Flakier, De- 

Oakland 

51 

63 

347 

1 

tract, 9G 

Saattto 

47 

63 

A38 

2 

HITS— Lofton. Cleveland. 160; MoUtor, 

CaDfomla 

47 

68 

•40V 

51ft 

Toronto. IK; Belle. Cleveland, 147; 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 


Montreal 
Atlanta 
New York 
Philadelphia 
Florida 


W L Pet GB 

74 40 JUS — 

6t 46 396 6 

55 58 AST IBM 

54 41 -47Q 20% 

51 64 ,443 ZJVft 


Ceotrol Division 


Cincinnati 
Houston 
Pittsburgh 
St Louis 
CMcago 


66 48 377 - 

6* 4* 374 Vi 

53 61 -465 13 

53 41 MS 13 

47 64 .424 16V* 


West Dfyrtton 


Los Angeles 
SanFrandKD 
Cotoroda 
SantMcaa 


SB 56 -509 — 

55 60 A7Z 3Vft 

53 64 <453 61ft 

47 73 M2 13V* 


Thomas. Chicago, 141: Ortffev Jr. Seat- 
tle, M0; C Risken, Baltimore. H); Knob- 
touch, Minnesota 137; Boorga, Cleve- 
land. 137; Palmeiro. Baltimore, 137; 
Puckett, Minnesota, 137. 

DOUBLES— Knob! ouch. Minnesota 
45; Belle, Cleveland. 35; Thomas. Chica- 
go. 34; Fryman, Detroit. 34; Lofton. 
Cleveland, 32; Boerea Cleveland, 32; 
Po bnel ra Baltimore, 22; Puckett Minne- 
sota 31 

TRIPLES — LJalmnxv Chicago. 14; 
Coleman. Kansas Qtv. l2i Lofton Cleve- 
land 7; AOtax, Mlhsoutaa, 7; McRae, 
Kansas City, 6; Potonto. New York. 6. 
twibe, Toronto. 6. 

HOME RUNS— Grlflev Jr, Seattle, 40; 
Thomas. Oucaga 30; Belle, Cleveland 
36; Canseco. Texas, 31; FMder, Detroit, 
30; Carter. Toronto. 27; MVaughn, Bov 
ton, 26; CDovfs, California 26. 

STOLEN bases— L ofton Cleveland 


60; Coteman Kansas atv, 50; Nixon 
Batten 42: KnaMaucfe Minnesota 35; 
ByAndereon, Baltimore. 31; A£ol* Min- 
nesota 2»; McRae. Kansas atv. 30. 

PITCHING III Decisions)— Bore, Chi- 
cago. 12-Z JH7, 121; Key, Now York, 17-4, 
2ia 127; NkOartu Ctovelwd. 11-1 JB6. 
322; Mussina Baltimore, J42. 106; 
Cm Kansas City, 14-5. J61 224; 
ALParet Now York, 7-4. Ml 4.10; RJcfirv 
son Seattle. 1H M*. Ill 
STRIKEOUTS— RJofmton Seattle, 

204; demons. Boston, 160; Flntov, Cali- 
fornia 140; Hantaan, Toronto. 147; Ap- 
pier. Konsos City, 145; Cone, Kansas city, 
IB; Bern Oikaaa 127; JMcDewelL Chi- 
cago, 127. 

SAVES— LaSmlttv Baltimore, 33; 
M ontgomery, Kansas City, 27; Aguilera, 
Minnesota 23; Ecktrttev. Oakland 17; 
Ayala, Seattle, 18; Hall. Toronto, 17; Fel- 
lers. Milwaukee. 17; Russell Cleveland 
17. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
BATTING— TGwynn, San Dteoo. 394; 
Bagwell Houston. 347; Alau. Montreal. 
327; Morris, CJnelnnall. 315; Mitchell. 
Cincinnati 326; Jefferies, st Louis. 325; 
L Walker, Montreal 322. 

RUNS— BogwelL Ho us ton IM; Gris- 
som. Montreal 96; Lankford St. Louis, 
57; Bands, San Frond sea 17; Bigg la 
Houston, Mi Alau Montreal 01; 
McGrtfl Atlanta H. 

RBI B oows l l Houston, 114; Ma wil- 
liams. San Frondsca 74; Bichette, Colo- 
rado, 95; McGrtff, Atlanta 74; Piazza 
Los Angeles, 92; L Walker, Montreal, 86; 
Galarraga Cotorodo, 85. 

HITS— T-Gwyna San Dlega 165; Baa- 
well Houston, M7; Blcfwfta Colorado, 
147; Morris Cincinnati 146; Canine, 
Florida 144; Alau, Montreal 143; B to- 
ol o, Houston. 137. 


DOUBLES— Bigg to. Houston, 44; 
L walker. Montreal 44; JMell Pitts- 
burgh, 35; T-Owynrv San Dtooc, 35; BA 
dwtta Cotoraaa 33; Bagwoll Houston. 
32; Alou, Montreal. 31 

TRIPLES— OXewfs. San Frondsca 
9i Butter, Lss Angeles. 9; Mondesi, Los 
Angeles. B; RJander* Qadivwtt, B; 
K Inaery, Cotoroda •; Clayton. San 
Frondsca 6; Coni no, Florida 6; Sata 
Chicago, H T.Femandez. Cincinnati 4. 

HOME NUNS— Ma. Will tom* San 
Frondsca 43; BcBwelL Houston. 37; 
Bonds, San TTOndsca 37; McGrtff, Ah 
kmta 36; Galarraga Colorado, ' 31; 
Mitchell anctonaH, 36; Sheffield Flori- 
da 27; Bichette. Cotoroda 27. 

STOLEN BASES— Btoato, Houston, 
37; DJanaer* ClndnnatL 38; Grissom, 
Montreal 36) Carr, Florida 32: DXevrf* 
San Frondsca 30; Bands, San Fronds- 
ca 27; DaSfttoU* las Angela* 27; But- 
ler. Los Anode* 27. 

PITCHING 02 Dedttoes)— Freamoa 
Cotoroda 104, 333. 230; Sabvhagoa 
Now York, l*d 378. 234; KJtlll Montre- 
al. 14d -742. 332; OJMaddwc. Atlanta 16- 
6. 327, U6; DnJodaoa PMIadoWHa 
14-6, 306. 336: Mardwr. Atlanta M A7Z 
335: PJMorfbMZ Montreal 11-5. MO. 
33L 

STRIKEOUTS— Bene* San Dbea 167; 
Rita, Cincinnati 171; GMaddux, Atlanta 
156; Saberttagen, New York, 143; 
PJJMarfbwz, Montreal 142; Gtavlna At- 
lanta 140; DnJadtson, PhUadotoMa 127. 

SAVES— Franca Now York. 36; Bock, 
San Frondsca 2B; DJone* Phttad ol 
Dttfa 27; Wettetond. Montreal 25; 
McMIchatt, Atlanta 21; Myers. Chicago, 
21; Hoflmai San DleOa 20. 


LAS VEGAS — ThaT& weco 
winners here, those who hadbet 
that Toronto would win moth- 
er World Series, or. that $as 
Diego actually ought win its di- 
vision. They will gel something 
they probably thought they’d 
never see: Thou moiiey back. 

The losers were those who 
had wagered on the Yaidcees at 
15- 1 to win the World Series, ©r 
the Oakland A’s, those once 
300-1 shots who. made an im- 
probable iaie bid to taknit aO. 

they, too, will get thar mon- 
ey back, a small consolation. 

“We would have lost $2 mil- 
lion if the A's had won the 
World Series,” sad the 
sports book director, / JSnxn, 
vaccaro. “If I had a tidtetLbn 
the Oakland A’s, Fd be scream- 
ing for them to keep pJajw|®r 


strikeout Ieadog^.(A]|dy : Benes, 
189, and Randy Johnson, 204). 

“You feel terrible: about 
Tony, losing his shot A .400,” 
said the Padres’ generafexanag- 
er, Randy Smith. “Irw 2 u|proba- 
biy one of the besi y g tas for 
baseball in a long 
August Now it u 
thing for the year. 1 

There were Lee Sn^&jg| 33 
saves, Jimmy Key’s ll&tecon^ 
Jeff Bagwell’s 1 16 ropfl^ted 
in, Grqg Maddux’s iJwcapfed- 
run average. 

None of it really rn&ttfes^feut 
all of it counts. ^ j. 
There were so manyj&amora- 
ble moments, totij From 
Gwynn’s game-ending slide 
into home plate at the^AH-Star 
game to the no-hitters pitched 
by Kent Mercker and, Scott 
Erickson, and Kenny ^Rogers’ 
perfect game- - •' 

“It was great to throw that 
game, but it’s foigotten, basi- 
cally ” Rogers said. “I really 
don’t have any joy from this 
year at alL” 

The great accomplishments 
and riveting subplots that made 
this such a great season are now 
mostly forgotten. ‘ 

No one will recall for long 
that Ray Lankford opened the 
season with a ■ home- run or 
Johnson threw the final pilch 
on Aug. 1 1, striking out JEmie 

Young; ! - 

Instead, the defining moment 
of the 1994 baseball season will 
be remembered as taking place 
in a VIP lounge at Milwaukee 
County Stadium, where Bud Sc^ 
Ug tola a hushed crowd and a 
national television audience 
what they expected to hear, but 
dreaded nonetheless: 

“We have readied the point 
where it is no longer practical to 
complete the remainder of the 
season or to preserve the integ- 
rity of postseason play.” 

Just like that. It wa 
good-bye. 


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Rood THE MONEY REPORT 
ovary Saturday in the IHT 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



PEANUTS 

( rerun, what's 
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CALVIN AND HOBBES 






THEN U)W ARE 
YOU SITTING 
LIKE THIS? 

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every mowing on the day of publication. 
Just call us toll free at 0130 84 85 85 




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1 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1994 


»tSe 


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SPORTS 


ill ( Pushball, the Game, Lives Even if a National Pastime Died Long Ago 

- _ I By Robert Lipsyie He mosi cnmnTmrih1(> nf rh(> 1 nm Baw « 1>« lhn» Th* mma ium animannaj .U~ 1 VW J! ..J . ■ , . ■ __ . 

Nrw York Times Service 


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N EW YORK — The National Pastime, which . - 

was buried Wednesday, died a long time ago. 83 P«venus nmung the Pastime. 

Baseball, which survived, will live forever. Quick quiz: Was it Tom Werner of the Padres or 

And somewhere between the myth of the Pastime *J arr >' Frazee of the Red Sox who sold Babe Ruth to 
and the glory of the g>mi» was the annual major “* Yankees so he could help finance “No. No, 
league season, which seems to have collapsed of Nanelte "? Which Chicago White Sox owner, Jerry 
exhaustion toward the tail end of a century-long ^ dns ^ )rf OT 


The most contemptible of the Lost Boys are those The gam * was encouraged, after the Civil War, as 
who cover players’ salaries as if they were batting a big, nonviolent spectator sport to contain and 
averages and those who of for up the current owners pacify the European immigrants (hot-stovers argued 
” then whether the game was better suited to the 

temperament of Goman or English stock); to es- 


cape women marching toward the vote, and to whip 
the white boys into shape for foreign wars and the 
Industrial Revolution. 


diverted America’s attention when the game was 
about to go down the drain? 

By 1974, when Hank Aaron, an even more talent- 
ed yet unanointed player, broke Ruth’s career record 
of 714 home runs, the Lost Boys spread the news 
that the heart of baseball was Joe DiMaggio's 56- 
game hitting streak. 


search for its souL 

Of the three, the major league season will be the 
easiest to forget and eventually to resurrect in some 
other form. It had become an increasingly sour malp 
soap opera, and it may just need a year or two of 
detoxification. It has to purge itself of the rage 
between the owners, who regard business as a com- 
petitive sport, and the players, who regard competi- 
tive sport as a business. 

And it needs a rest from the daily outbursts of the 
Lost Bays of Literature; those sportswriters who 
scan to hale the owners for being rich and the 
players for being young and large. 


Comiskey, drove his 
players to dump the 
1919 World Series? 
Baseball the game 


Vantage 

Point 



the best little symbols of what went wrong. They 
were created to sell cigarettes, and then were used to 
sell gum, and now they are a low-rent collectible. 

Players say the)- hate to sign cards for kids outside 
the ballpark because they never know if the tyke will 
put it under his pillow' or turn it over to his boss, the 
evil card-pusher waiting around the comer. Of 

ire run by the players themselves, but the mer- J^iSPSS fl S^2!i : i25S e t ra0 _5" cards for cash without ever kv^kine uo You wanted 


will be fine. Baseball has less to do than one might 

thinkwithtf- *— • " — * 

the family fi 
raurt 


think with the major league season. Baseball is about 
imil y farm, which few of i 


us grew up on, and it is 
about railroad trains keening in the night on the 
prairies, which few of us ever beard. 

Little boys are still playing the game, more little 
girls are playing, ana it is still die world's most 
interesting game, a dud, a chess match, a footrace, a 
gymnastics exhibition, that rare opportunity for 
individuals to be recognized within a group effort. 


were 

chants and their politicians soon took control for the 
“best interests.” 

Obviously, there would be a real conflict if the 
people who got to play the game actually got to 
make all the money, too. 

If it was the National Pastime, it passed away at 
least 20 years ago. in 1961, when Whitey Ford broke 
Babe Ruth’s World Series record for pitching 29 
consecutive scoreless innings and no one much no- 
ticed because they were so busy affixing an asterisk 
to Roger Maris's home-run record. 

How could Maris, a talented but unanointed 
player, supplant the Sultan of Swat, the man who 


ment and the National Football League — ap- 
peared, as did the killer word “relevancy “ and video 
games. 

There was only one tent large enough for all that, 
and so television became the National Pastime. It 
bound the nation, it passed time. 

Once television took hold, no single game or 
diversion — not popular music. Fashion, sex or 
disease — could fully engage or reveal us. Football 
and basketball were enhanced by television, while 
baseball, sprawling and complex,' was diminished. 

And so we are left with our baseball cards, those 
IOUs of the soul-searching major league seasons. 


cards for cash without ever looking up. You wanted 
a metaphor? 

Or hope and a hero? 

Look south to Birmingham and Michael Jordan. 
The minor leagues, where the stars of tomorrow 
shine tonight, have become whaL people think the 
major leagues once were, accessible, glad, welcom- 
ing places where families could ravel the threads of 
their lives in the sun. 

And Jordan, who should be too big. too hand- 
some, too rich, too talented to have summer dreams, 
turns out to be our surrogate. He’s willing to be 
challenged, to risk, even to fail, because, like his dad. 
he always wanted to play baseball. 




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Extra Innings of Strike 
Are Bound to Turn Ugly 


t m ^ Hill Wcod'Afcooc Franor-Prrac 

Ed Friedman of Chicago waiting at the ticket booth outside Wrigiey Field to be reimbursed for game tickets he had bought hot now will never use. 


The Losses 9 Big and Small 


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By Richard Justice 

Washington Post Service 

• WASHINGTON — Major-league baseball af- 
■fects so many people on so many different levels 
that it may be impossible to fully calculate the 
cost of a labor dispute that has wiped out the 
final 52 days and 669 games of the 1994 regular 
season, along with the playoffs and World Seines. 

But its impact was being felt in areas large and 
small even as the acting commissioner, Bud Sdig, 
announced there’d be no more games this year. 

Among them: 

• Major-league players will lose $230 minion 
in salaries — an average of almost $300,000 per 
player —while owners won’t collect around $600 
milli on in revenues. 

• Each major-league city will lose an average 
of $1.16 million for each canceled home game; 
according to a survey by the U.S. Conference of 
Mayors. In addition, approximately 1,200 full- 
time and part-time employees wifi lose their jobs 
at each ballpark. Local businesses are losing 
$640,736 per canceled game. 

• A broad range of television and radio pro- 
gramming will be affected, from the networks 
that were planning their World Series coverage 
to Atlanta superstation WTBS, which features 
Braves baseball about 180 nights a year. All of 
tire outlets have scrambled to fill the void. 

WTBS attempted to substitute the minor 
league Richmond Braves for the Atlanta Braves, 
but ratings were so low, the superstation has 
switched bade to a movie format. 

Furthermore, without a labor agreement, 
teams may have a difficult time signing players 
or selling tickets during the offseason, and every 
- team depends on those winter ticket sales for 
“revenue until the money from in-season commit- 
ments starts coming in. Each team will lose an 
estimated $5 milli on in national television reve- 
nues because the World Series won’t be played. 

Teams such as the Montreal Expos and Seattle 
Mariners, which already faced uncertain finan- 
cial futures, may not survive the strike — at least 
without new ownership or moving to new dries. 

(Jackie and Gene Autry have dedded to sefi 
the California Angels once the dispute is re- 


solved, and are asking $130 million, the Los 
Angeles Times reported. 

(“Gene loves baseball, but he’s 87, and it’s 
time for him to relinquish total control of the 
dub,” Jackie Autry said. However, only 23 per- 
cent of the dub wifi be sold while Gene Autry 
re mains alive, his wife said. 

(“I know I’ve said repeatedly that the dub is 
not for sale, but it’s come to a point where 
enough is enough,” Jackie Autry said. “You can 
only take so much money out of your own 
pocket”) 

And even though the players speak confident- 
ly of their solidarity, the union has no idea if it 
will be able to hold itself together if the dispute 
extends into a significant part of the 1995 season. 

And there’s the strange case of the New York 
Yankees’ left-hander Jim Abbott He was likely 
to be one of the most sought-after free agents this 
winter, but be now falls a few days short of being 
eligible for free agency. There’s dozens of other 
players who have clauses requiring their teams to 
pick up their 1995 options or let than become 
free agents within five days of the concilia on of 
the World Series. What World Series? 

However, the larger economic numbers, the 
stories of millions and billions, can obscure the 
strike's street-level impact. 

Several teams, such as the Los Angeles Dodg- 
ers, donate leftover concession food to kitchens 
for the homeless. Many players have charitable 
contributions tied to their playing performances. 

And in Loveland, Colorado, the varsity bas- 
ketball team may not get its new uniforms. 

Lovdand High School is one of hundreds of 
groups that runs concession stands in big-league 
ballparks to raise funds for field trips, equipment 
and other needs. 

“We run four concession stands and make 
about $1,000 per game,” said Gene Atone, Love- 
land High’s athletics director. “We’re going to 
Lose 24 home games, and that’s a significant part 
of our budget. We used it for the band, boys 
basketball, different groups. It was 40 percent of 
the boys’ basketball budget, and losing the funds 
is a pretty significant blow. We’re looking for 
other ways to raise funds.” 



a lmicu> 'Afcncc Fmw*nn 

Bud Selig: “It’s important to move ahead quickly.” 


CROSSWORD 


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19 Hemingway 

press 

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29 Bygone auto 

3 Pro 

21 Quarantine 

4 Cabinet dept 
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2 t Ship officers 

blossom 

24 CM oneself: Let. 

s He went to 

25 GOLDEN GALE 

camp in a 1987 

28 POTASSIUM 

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33 TIN SOURCE 

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34 HYDROGEN 

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book section 


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37 Lika Oscar 
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41 CARBON 
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42 SILVER DEBRIS 
4S NEON PORTAL 
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47 Recreational 
drives 

48 Grants 

53 Take measures 

54 Box boy 

57 Lets, in tennis 

58 Bug River locale 
60 Current 

instrument 
81 Soma new-car 
drivers 
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DRINKS 
63 ALUMINUM 
FISHING GEAR 


10 Rad 

11 Latin list 

extender 

12 Actress 

Kedrova 

13 Senator from 
Mississippi 

14 Backwater 

22 Bedroom 
community, for 
short 

23 Kerrigan and 
company 

25 Yoga position 

28 Take apart 

27 Stnve mightily, 
with “out" 

29 U.S. poet 
laureate — 
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30 Former Twin 
batting champ 

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48 Monticello site 

48 Comic 
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49 Esau's wHe 

50 Approach 
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82 Lfth. and LaL. 

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Solution to Puzzle of Sept. 15 


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|A[W L I N T|H|ElF|A|M] 
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Arts & Antiques 

Every Saturday 
Contact 
Fred Ron an 
Tel.: 

{33 1 ) 46 37 93 91 
Fax: 

(33 1)463793 70 
or your nearest 
IHT office 
or representative 


By Murray Chass 

;V» York Times Some e 

NEW YORK — In one sense, it was over, the 
major league baseball owners having called off 
the rest of the season, sweeping away 89 years of 
the World Series. But in doing so, they had also 
sent the game staggering into the great unknown. 

The players strike, the eighth work stoppage in 
23 seasons, will become the longest shutdown in 
baseball history, surpassing the 50-day strike in 
1981. It was in its 34th day Wednesday when the 
owners, led by Bud Selig. the acting commissioner, 
voted by 26 to 2 to cancel the rest of the regular- 
season schedule, the playoffs and the World Se- 
ries. The remaining 18 days of the season will 
automatically extend the stoppage to 52 days. 

The strike, however, is expected to endure well 
beyond that and very likely will get nastier be- 
fore it gets better. 

The e limina tion of the phyoffs, including a 
new round that for the first time included wild- 
card teams, and the World Series removes the 
urgency for the two sides to bargain. 

The off-season, starting early this year, does 
not guarantee that the two sides will* reach the 
new collective bar gaining agreement they must 
have before they begin the 1995 schedule. But 
there does figure to be a potentially lengthy 
schedule of legal skirmishes. 

“We can’t let a lot of time go by,” Mr. Selig 
said at his news conference in Milwaukee. “It’s 
important to move ahead as quickly as possible.” 

But the players and owners more likely will 
prepare for the next rounds of their labor strife 
instead of negotiating seriously. 

The next step for the owners, perhaps before 
OcL 15, when players can begin filing for free 
agency, could be a decision to declare an impasse 
in negotiations and unilaterally impose their sala- 
ry cap proposal. It was this issue on which the two 
rides could find no common ground, the owners 
seeking a ceding on payrolls and the union charg- 
ing that it would artificially deflate salaries. 

The players will begin preparing a series of 
charges to file with the National Labor Relations 
Board- They very likely will include the charge 
that this is an unfair labor practice strike. 

Mr. Selig became acting commissioner two 
years and one week ago, after the owners forced 
Fay Vincent to resign as commissioner. The 
owners were concerned that Mr. Vincent would 
be too concilia lory toward the players in labor 
negotiations and (fid not w’ant him to undermine 
their bargaining position. 

So the prevailing view is that the dispute will 
become nastier. 

The expected first step, the owners’ declara- 
tion of impasse and unilateral implementation of 
new terms and conditions, will not come without 
legal risk. The union will challenge the owners 
once they take those steps, and the owners must 
be ready to support the actions under labor law. 

The owners can impose only their last proposal 
or parts of it; they cannot implement what they 
have not proposed.* They have proposed giving the 
players SQ percent of their total revenue for salaries 
and other costs, with SI billion guaranteed as long 
as thdr revenue does not fall below this year’s 
projected prestrike level of $1.78 bfllion. 

They also proposed eliminating salary arbitration 
and reducing eligibility for free agency from six 
years to four years, though establishing the right-of- 
first-refusal for players who are free agents after 
their fourth or fifth year in the major leagues. 

The owners need a salary cap to trigger a 
revenue-sharing plan they adopted in January to 
help low-revenue clubs. 

To defend impasse-implementation, the own- 
ers will have to prove, among other things, that 
they made bargainable proposals under the law 
and that they engaged in good-frith bargaining 
from start to finish. 

The union, which proposed a tax on payrolls 
and revenues as a means of revenue sharing 
between high-revenue and low-revenue clubs, 
will contend that by stickijg to the proposal they 


made June 14 and never changing it, the owners 
did not bargain in good faith. 

The days could quickly add up during what 
always has been refen-ed to as the off-season, but 
the players and owners still could be immersed in 
this dispute whea the time comes for spring 
training and even next April 2, when the 1995 
season is scheduled to start. 

Now that they have no pan of the season or 
the postseason to try to salvage, what incentive 
do the two rides have to negotiate intensively? In 
the owners' view at least, they apparently do 
have a new- target date. 

Even before Mr. Sdig made his decision, but 
when owners knew it was inevitable, they turned 
to what they suggested was the next deadline for 
an agreement — Nov. I . That date has no legal or 
labor significance, but suddenly, in the last week, 
owners began mentioning it. 

**We have to look at a deadline Nov. 1,” Jerry 
McMorris of the Colorado Rockies said last 
weekend. “If we don’t get it resolved by then, 
boy. it could be a long hard process to get this 
thing put together.” 

John Harrington of the Boston Red Sox talked 
Tuesday of the importance of reaching an agree- 
ment by mid- to late October. Thomas Schieffer, 
president of the Texas Rangers, said he thought 
thaL “some time around the first of November” 
the clubs would have to announce a system for 
the 1995 season. 

The clubs are targeting Nov. 1 for two reasons: 
If they want to declare an impasse in negotia- 
tions and unilaterally implement their salary cap 
system, they would have to do it by then, and it is 
around that time they have to begin setting into 
motion plans for next season. 

They have to make up their roster; begin to 
negotiate with and sign players, especially free 
agents; sell season tickets and thus know which 
players they to promote to prospective buyers; 
sell advertising; negotiate, where necessary, new 
radio and local television contracts, and make 
plans and commitments for spring t rainin g. 

“How many people do you think will buy 
season tickets this off-season when they didn’t 
finish this season and don't know if there will be 
a season next season?” asked a lawyer involved 
in major league baseball. 

“I don't think many people will write out 
checks for season tickets. The clubs aren't going 
to have that money to put in the bank.” 

Players whose contracts or major league ser- 
vice status do not restrict them to their 1994 
teams will be anxious to know where the}' mi gh t 
be playing next season, if there is a next season. 
“They’ll have a long period without income fol- 
lowed by a period ot not knowing what to ex- 
pect,” one union official acknowledged. 

But once OcL 2, the final day of the scheduled 
season, arrives, players no longer will be losing 
their salaries, which* they have been losing collec- 
tively at the rate of $4.4 milli on a day. 

One player’s agent suggested that the clubs 
might tty to apply pressure by offering more 
lucrative contracts early in the off-season than 
they would offer later in exchange for a commit- 
ment from the player to report to spring training 
if the owners open camps. 

“It’s going to get really ugly,” Richard Moss, a 
veteran representative of players, said. 

The clubs have not planned so far ahead that 
they have decided whether or not they will open 
spring camps next February. If they have no 
agreement by then, though, they would be ex- 
pected to open their camps and see if any players 
walk in. They could then use those players plus 
minor league players to try to field teams. 

Management never has tried to use replace- 
ment players during a strike, as the National 
Football League did in 1987. but next season 
could be the first time. Mr. Harrington, who has 
become a spokesman for owners on several 
fronts, said the other day the possibility would at 
least have to be considered. 

“You wouldn’t call it major league baseball” 
the Red Sox official said, “but you’d call it 
professional baseball ” 


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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1904 


OBSERVER 


Back to the James Gang 


Revisiting the Bad Old Days of Hollywood 


PEOPLE 


By Russell Baker 


W ASHINGTON — Thanks 
to the baseball strike, Hen- 


ry James has ai last gained pur- 
chase on that part of mv con- 


chase on that part of my con- 
sciousness — I might almost call 
it my psyche — which has long 
enabled me to endure summer’s 
idler hours without suffering a 
sense of what I might once have 
thought of as emptiness. 

Exposure to the Jamesian 
sensibility now makes me wince 
at the realization that I was ever 
so indifferent to the nuances of 
daily life as to think myself ca- 
pable of experiencing a condi- 
tion so blatant as emptiness, 
even under a condition as trying 
as an absence of basebalL 

Prior to the vexing situation 
which resulted in baseball's re- 
moval from what a more blunt 
observer might call my psychic 
forefront, I had been conscious 
that a curious sense of vacuity 
had begun to shape my daily 
conduct, if not indeed my char- 
acter. 

You might have had difficulty 
choosing the precise word for 


fans a lot he is called a fannee.” 

"Do you think all this Henry 
James is good for you?” she 
asked- “You seemed healthier 
when it was baseball all the 
time.” 

□ 


By Bernard Wemraub 

York Tima Service 


L OS ANGELES — John Gregory 
Dunne was upset The novelist 


Physical hygiene was scarcely 
at the heart, nor even at the 
foundation, nor at the root, nor 
at the voy taproot itself, of the 
condition in which I found my- 
self as a result of the absence of 


what 1 am tempted to call pro- 
fessional major league baseball, 


fessional major league baseball, 
though a person who delights in 
cliches might prefer to call, er- 
roneously perhaps, but excus- 
ably so, the national pastime. 

What I had perceived, you 
see, was that Henry James was 
the perfect substitute for base- 
ball, or, more accurately per- 
haps, what Henry's brother 
William James might have 
called “the literary equivalent 
of baseball.” 


J-/ Dunne was upset The novelist 
and screenwriter, who lived in Los 
Angeles and worked in the movie 
business for 24 years, could not get a 
lunch reservation the other day at one 
of his favorite restaurants, the Ivy. 

So he called his agent, Jeff Berg, the 
chairman of International Creative 
Management, a top talent agency 
here. Dunne promptly got the best 
table in the house. 

“Hollywood!" he laughed after re- 
counting the story. He quickly or- 
dered a chicken tostada and glanced 
around the trendy restaurant. 

Hollywood is Dunne’s theme in his 
wickedly funny and sad novel. “Play- 
land.” It is his 10th book and fifth 
novel, following such bocks as “True 
Confessions,” and “Dutch Shea Jr.,” 
and the memoir “Harp,” as well as a 














narrator of Dunne’s last novel, 'The 
Red, White and Blue.” 

Wo rking like a detective, Broderick 
reconstructs the life of 41 Baby Blue 
Tyler, Hollywood’s No. 1 cinexnop- 
pet” after her volatile affair with a 
gangster named Jacob King (bom Ja- 
cobKinovsky), collisions with a movie 
mogul named J.F. French (previously 
Moses Frankel), an innocent flirtation 
with politics that puts her on the 
blacklist, and enough sex and booze to 
fill a couple of other novels. 

During has created a mosaic of old- 


B 


style Hollywood, before television, 
when stars and films seized the fanta- 
sies of the nation far more than today. 
IBs view of the old Hollywood is 
scathing, funny and, although Dunne 
doesn’t quite say so. almost reluctant- 
ly wistful. 

The main characters are an obvious 
combination of real people. Blue Ty- 
ler, Drone said, is a “monstrous ver- 
sion” of Shirley Temple, with de- 
ments of Elizabeth Taylor, Natalie 
Wood and others. 

“One thing I remember about Nat- 
alie was how astute she was about the 
business of Hollywood,” he said. “She 
understood money and investment, 
the way the French bourgeoisie does. 
And she was a fantastic gossip. She 
knew everything, where all the bodies 
were buried, and under how much 
dirt” 

In the novel, the moguls are a bit of 
Hany Cohn, Louis B. Mayer, Jack 
Warner and Samuel Goldwyn. The 




number of screenplays written with 
his wife, Joan Diction. 

- “Playland” focuses on the heyday 
of Hollywood, from the 1930s to the 
1950s, a lavish and treacherous world 
of spoiled stars, thugs, hacks, malevo- 
lent studio bosses and producers and 
agents almost entirely consumed with 
control and manipulation. 

Those wane the bad old days, 
Dunne said. 

“At birthday parties for kids, they 
had elephants and downs,” he said. 
“On Halloween they would ride up 
and down in limousines on the streets 
of Beverly Hills, and the chauffeur 
would stop and go oat and get the 
cand y, The most amazing things. 11 

Is it that much different today? Not 
really. Dunne recently heard a story 
about a Hollywood director on a Con- 
corde flight from Paris with his son. 
“Why are all these people on your 
plane?” the boy asked. 

A bear of a man, friendly, funny 
and a bit disheveled, Dunne, 61, 
shrugged off a question about the 
mixed reviews given to “Playland.” 

“I once figured out Joan and I have 
been reviewed 4,000 times between 
our movies and books,” he said. “Re- 
views don't bother me.” 

His research for “Playland” cen- 
tered on conversations with friends, 
who were often sons and daughters of 
the Hollywood elite 50 years ago. 

These friends included the late Jo- 
hanna Mankiewicz Davis. Brooke 
Hayward, Barbara Warner, George 
Stevens Jr„ Daniel Selznick and Jean 


This ortraftrdrngiy insight had 
come wdl after a July midnight, 


chose to think of as vacuity, 
though how others might have 
thought of it I cannot say. 


the pitching hour, in faraway 
Baltimore. My companion and I 


Calling it emptiness would 
have been misleading, for there 
was nothing in the least showy 
or even indelicate about it, as 
might have been intimated by 
the pompous reverberant over- 
ture and the coarsening ulti- 
mate sibilance one cannot avoid 
hearing in the utterance of a 
word luce emptiness. 

Yes, vacuity was what it was, 
though Fannie, whom I almost 
surely would have married if 
Henry James had created me, 
said she believed it was actually 
utter vacuity. 

“My dear Fannie,” I felt com- 
pelled to remonstrate, “there is 
absolutely nothing utter about 
me, not even the vacuity.” 

“Who’s this Fannie you're 
talking to yourself about?” 
asked my wife. 

“It's a baseball expression,’' I 
explained. “When a player 
strikes out, he is said to fan. If he 


Baltimore My companion and I 
had far more than four hours 
watched an encounter between 
»«ni< managed by Mr. Tony 
LaRnssa and Mr. Johnny Oates. 


As the affair advanced into 
its fifth hour Mr. LaRussa and 
Mr. Oates brought it to a nearly 
absolute halt by changing 
pitchers so frequently that it 
was dear they desired the g ama 
never to end. Neither my com- 
panion nor I wished to be the 
first to say, “Let us admit base- 
ball is tedious and go home.” 

That, however, was precisely 
how I fdt. My companion knew 
I felt it, and I knew he knew I 
fdt it. Mr. LaRussa also knew 
that I knew my companion 
knew; moreover, Mr. Oates 
knew that Mr. LaRussa knew, 
and what’s more Mr. LaRussa 
knew that Mr. Oates knew Mr. 
LaRussa knew that my com- 
panion knew Mr. Oates knew 
that . . . 




7 


m: A 




i sssa 




1957 Lennon Tape Gets 

£78,500 at an Auction 
A recording made by 16- 
year-old John Lennoa was sold 
at a Sotheby’s auction in Lon- 
don Thursday for £78.500 4 
($123,000) to EMI Records, ” 
which hopes to issue the record- 
ing. It was made July 6, 1957, at 
a church fete in Liverpool by 
Bob Mblyneax, who was at the 
auc tion. He used a red-to-rccl 
machine ’ to capture Lennon 
qfng in g EWs Presley’s “Baby, 
Lefsmy House 7 and the Brit- 
ish skiffl e song “Puttin’ on the 
Style." The same day. Lennon 
met chubby-faced, 15-year-old 
Pad McCartney, who was to 
join him as a Beatie. Bow*, lead 
singer of U2, paid £35,600TOf a i 

costume worn by QaiBcQiap- 

fin in "The Great Dicaa^’' 
and the London HardiStacK 
Cafe paid £18,400 tor atffwtft 
WBBams guitar and £5;7&.foF 
an Eton John oostunAv®^'' 

D mi 


.) • x "f 


■ -V. 


The Kyrgyz writer G 
A i tm ato v received the An 


state prize for European T&eiv- 
ture for “a lifetime's wqik in 

breaking down .baniers^Gd^ . 
toe Minister Rndotf SStoa ft 
said in Vienna. Born intora no- • 


madic family, Aitmatov Worked 
the folk tales of his Central 
Asian homdandjnto bisjbooks, 
written in botfr Kyrgyz and 
Russian/ He is widely Xead in 


Aim Levouoo for The New York Tis 


John Gregory Donne’s novel evokes a lavish and treacherous world. 


y ? |d 1 Vil ' 


Stem. Natalie Wood was also a friend 
of his, and he spent time over the years 
talking to Billy Wilder and Irving La- 
zar, the agent. 

Dunne also studied photography 


is now a photography editor at EUe 
magazine.) 


memoirs, including Jean Howard’s 
classic, “Hollywood.” as well as pri- 


dassic, “Hollywood.” as well as pri- 
vate photo albums. 


Writing “Playland” was delayed a 
ar because of serious health prob- 


New York Tima Service 


year because of serious health prob- 
lems — emergency heart surgery in 
March 1991 followed that summer by 
a life-threatening blood infection 
caused by a mosquito bite. “My 
daughter was in a play off-Broad- 
way,” he said. “I mean it was so off- 
B roadway, it was in Philadelphia. It 
was a hot, unair-conditioned theater, 
and I got bitten in the ankle.” 
(Dunne's daughter, Quintana Roo, 28, 


Exhaustion and depression took 
their toll after that. But then, structur- 
al problems of “Playland,” which had 
plagued him before his illness , were 
suddenly resolved one day. Dunne 
said he realized that each of the main 
characters viewed the events in the 
plot with totally different perspectives 
— and the book was written to reflect 
these blurred points of view. 


The events in “Playland” follow the 
path of Jade Broderick, a rich man's 
son and slumming screenwriter, who 
stumbles across a former child star 
nam ed Blue Tyler, who is now an 
alcoholic and living in a trailer park 
near Detroit Broderick was also the 


portraits in the book, a rabbi to the 
movie industry, is Edgar Magnin. 

Drone, the son of a Hartford sur- 
geon, was raised in relative privilege, 
attending Catholic schools and 
Princeton. He is the fifth of six chil- 
dren. Old friends call him “Greg,” the 
result of attending schools in Con- 
necticut where many boys were 
named John. 

“We grew up in a community where 
there was no real assimilation,” he 
said. “When Joan and I got married, 
we came back to Hartford. My mother 
had a party for us and we had 125 
people. There were 124 Catholics and 
Joan, who’s Episcopalian.” 


Sophia Loren,-6B nexf/week, 
says she ha& ■ never Vpjfd be- 
cause she is too young-l^Inside 
I'm Tm 

towTSarriere ddto Sery news- 
paper's Sette magarin*^: 


The Temptatkms endexTup 
on the Houywood Wilk « 
Fame, thanks to a chance en- 
counter 30 years agp vnth the 
founder of Motown R«grd£“l 
want to thank Beny Gwcfy for 
being at the right placfcat the 
right time: the men’s bathroom 
in Detroit,” founding member 
Otto Wffibms said as the group 
got its star on Hollywood Bou- 
levard. Williams and Mebtn 
Frankfin are the two remaining 
original Temptations. 


Althougn Catholicism plays a role 
in his novels, Dunne said he was not a 
practicing Catholic. “But on my 
deathbed, I hope there’s a priest near- 
by to hedge my bet,” he said, laughing. 





sS: 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


Europe 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


Mgvnm 

Mrettrdam 

Ament 

Un 


COPMIUMI 

CmMSd 

Du(*n 

ECrtuW 

FWane* 

FnnWun 


St Pvtmbuni 
Stocknc/m 

SCMtaurp 

Taojon 

Wanna 

Wanew 

Zuncn 


Today 

High Low W 
OF OF 
23 m IBM a 
IM1 13/55 r 
34/03 10*1 ■ 
33/91 22/FI ■ 
22/71 IS /SI pa 
28 /TB 13/35 pc 
18«0 11/32 Hi 
14/37 0/40 r 

22/71 12/SO pa 
10*1 12/93 I 
20/79 21/70 ■ 
10/90 3/37 I 

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10*0 11*2 r 
12/53 BMfl ah 
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32*0 20*0 a 
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22/71 10*4 pa 
15*0 7/44 ah 

!1WJ 12/03 pc 
17*2 11/52 ah 
23/77 14/57 a 
13/95 0/4O « 

10*4 12/93 ah 
14 *7 9/40 an 
21/70 17*2 pe 
14/57 BtfO ah 
15*9 9/40 t 

13/55 01*3 a 
21/70 12/53 pe 
20*0 11*2 I 
14/57 11/52 I 
11*2 7/44 r 

17*2 11/52 PC 
21/70 14*7 pc 
10*1 9/40 pc 

19*0 9/40 PC 

13*5 8/40 ah 



Today 

High Low W 
OP OF 


Banda* 
Bayng 
Hong Kong 
Mu*a 
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540li 

Shanghai 
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Taipw 
Tokyo 


SATURDAY 



SUNDAY 


AO ronaaata and da* provided 
by AccuWoodw, bWP 1994 


Europe and Middle East 


Europe and Middle East 


i Unaaaaafiatly 
Co* 


UnwMBonedy 

Hot 


North America 

Drier and cooler weather vril 
overspread the Midwest this 
weekend. Sunny, warm 
weather Is expected acres* 
the Plain* from the Dakotas 
northward Into Canada. 
Heavy rains will continue 
early In the weekend along 
the Quit Coast from New 
Orisons to Mobile, Alabama. 


Europe 


Chilly weather will eettla 
southward from Norway 
through tha AJpo to northern 
Italy this weekend. A aosMng 
rain wll occur from northern 
Poland through St Peters- 
burg. Cool weathar In Pads 
and London Saturday will 
give way to ourtiy, pleasant 
weather by Monday. 


Asia 

Much of central China, 
hdudkig Shanghai, wfl have 
dry. warm weather Saturday 
mtoeerty nan week. Bating 
wB Dim cooler Sunday kite 
Monday while pleasant 
weather develops over 
Seoul. Wet weather wll con- 
tinue throughout much of 
Japan, including Tokyo, 
through tha weekend. 


AVm 
Cap# Town 


20/79 29*5 a 27*0 19*0 pc 
21/70 12*3 a IBS* 7/44 pe 


aa /70 17*2 s 27*0 17/02 PC 
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20*2 23/73 I £0 *2 24/75 PC 
23/73 0/40 pc 24/75 11/52 pe 
20*2 19*0 a 29*4 ifl *4 a 


North America 


Middle East 


Latfn America 


Today Tomorrow 

High Low W Mgh Lew W 


Today Tomor r ow 

* Lew W High Low W 


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31/88 

24/73 


33/91 

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7<44 

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7/44 a 

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33/91 

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28/82 

IB/M 

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20/88 pc 

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31/88 

17/82 


33/91 

17/02 a 

Urn 

18/84 

18/81 

pc 18 M 

18/81 pc 

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38/82 

18 /B 4 


30 « 

IBM l 

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23/73 

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IBM 0 


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Dam* 
Honolulu 
Houaton 
Lea Angaiaa 
Mans 

Mnieapds 

Montreal 


10*0 0/40 c 10*1 9/40 pa 
20 /SS 11/82 s 21/70 0/40 a 


Lsgend: eeunw. pa-parly doudy. c-doudy. shshowere, Hhurdmmrms, r-ntn, ri-anow Ikartse. 
m-enow, Met. W-Wemhar. AM mu*, ton aoo rts and data provkfad by Accu-Waottier. Inc. 0 1994 


Toronto 

Wartvtoti 


13*5 5/41 

31*0 21/70 
24/75 1 0*4 
31*0 10*1 
24/75 0/40 

30*0 17*2 
31*0 23/73 
31*0 19*0 
34/93 19/00 
32*9 20/79 
19*0 11*2 
21/70 11*3 
31*0 24/75 
20*2 20*0 
39/102 23/73 
20/79 13/55 
25*2 12*3 
27*0 14*7 
31*0 20*0 


1 12/93 4/39 pc 

t 30*0 19*0 t 
pa 20*2 14*7 ! 
pc 25/77 12*3 pa 

■ 22/71 BMB po 

pc 20/79 11*2 *l 
pc 31/99 24/79 pc 
1 20*4 10*4 i 

■ 33*1 10*0 a 

■ 31*0 24/76 aft 

■ft 10*4 9/40 a 

PC 21/70 a/40 ah 
pc 32*9 25/77 pc 
I 31*0 19*9 t 

a at n 00 2*773 a 
a 24/75 13*5 pc 
a 25/77 12*3 pc 
■h 22/71 10*0 I 
a 32*0 21/70 t 


Location 

Weather 

High 

Low 

Water 

Wave 

Wind 

Location 

Weather 

High 

Low 

Wafer 

Wave 

Wind 




Tamp. 

Temp. 

Temp. 

Het^ita 

TTnrarait 

bpofO 



Tamp. 

T sr 

Tamp. 

■ ■*- 

1 IMJJIM 

Spaed 




or 

Of 

C If 

(MetraeJ 

Ikphl 



CJf 

Of 

(Metre*) 

(**) 


Cornea 

party sunny 

25177 

18/81 

23/73 

1-2 

NW 

2035 

Cannes 

sunny 

26/79 

15/59 

22/71 

1-2 

w 

18-35 

1 * 

Doauvfle 

clouds and sm 

16/81 

sue 

15/59 

2-4 

W 

40-70 

DesuvWa 

ourmy 

18/64 

10/50 

15/59 

1-2 

NE 

20-40 


Rimini 

clouds and sun 

27/80 

18/88 

25/77 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Rfmmi 

sunny 

28/82 

18/64 

24/75 

0-1 

NW 

B-1B 


Malaga 

aunty 

26/52 

18/84 

23/73 

0-1 

N 

8-18 

Malaga 

sunny 

29/84 

some 

24m 

0-1 

N 

10-20 

- 

Cagliari 

party sunny 

28/82 

22/71 

23/73 

0-1 

NW 

15-30 

Cogilal 

sunny 

29/84 

22/71 

24m 

0-1 

NW 

12-25 


Pare 

sunny 

clouds end sun 

24/75 

15/59 

20/68 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Fore 

partly sunny 

24/75 

16*1 

1M6 

0-1 

W 

12-22 


Piraeus 

30/96 

21/70 

23/73 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

Plraoua 

sumy 

31/88 

23^ 

24m 

0-1 

NW 

10-20 

V. “ 

Corfu 

clouds and aun 

3088 

21/70 

23/73 

0-1 

NW 

15-30 

Corfu 

sunny 

clouds and sun 

sane 

22/71 

24m 

0-1 

NW 

12-22 


Srt^aon 

showtre 

18/81 

8/48 

15/59 

2-4 

W 

40-70 

8ri0Von 

17/82 

9/48 

15/59 

1-2 

N 

15-30 

— 

OaJond 

ahowera 

15/59 

1050 

15/50 

2-4 

W 

40-80 

Octsnd 

clouds and sun 

18/81 

8/48 

14/57 

2-3 

N 

20-40 


Schsvsntagen 

shwers 

14/57 

iorao 

15159 

3-6 

NW 

40-80 


douds end sun 

15/58 

5/48 

14/57 

2-4 

H 

20-40 


Syti 

rain 

13/55 

9/48 

13/55 

3-9 

NW 

40-80 

Sy* 

ahowera 

16/81 

8/46 

13/55 

2-4 

N 

30-50 

; - 

Izmir 

showers 

ZB/82 

13/68 

24/75 

1-2 

W 

15-30 

temfr 

partly erniy 

28/84 

2068 

24m 

1-2 

NW 

18-35 


Tel Aviv 

clouds and aun 

29/84 

Z4/75 

28/82 

0-1 

w 

15-30 

Tel Aviv 

sunny 

30/88 

ssnr 

28/82 

0-1 

NW 

12-22 


Caribbean and West Atlantic 







Caribbean and Went Atlantic 








Barbados 

ahowera 

31/88 

24/75 

28/82 

1-2 

E 

25-50 

Barbados 

portly sumy 

32/89 

24/76 

28/82 

1-2 

SE 

20-40 


Kkwston 

St- Thom** 

party sunny 

32/89 

24/75 

27/80 

1-3 

SE 

2540 

Kingston 

31. Thomas 

Ihundaratorms 

31/88 

24m 

27/80 

2-3 

3£ 

30-50 


showers 

32/B9 

24/75 

28/82 

1-2 

SE 

2545 

Siundanuims 

32/89 

24/75 

28/B2 

1-2 

E 

20-40 


Hamilton 

party sunny 

31/88 

23/73 

27/80 

1-2 

NE 

20-35 

HamWoo 

party sunny 

32/89 

24/75 

28/82 

0-1 

SE 

15-30 

- ' 

Aala/PocMc 








Aala/Padflc 








1 • 

Penang 

party sunny 

31/88 

25/77 

28/84 

0-1 

SW 

10-20 

Penang 

thundsneoma 

32/89 

24/75 

28/84 

0-1 

SW 

1030 

, 

Phuket 

thundaratorma 

31/88 

26/77 

29/84 

0-1 

sw 

15-25 

Phuket 

clouds and sun 

32/89 

25/77 

29/84 

0-1 

SW 

15-30 

1 • ■ 

Ba9 

r* a hi . 

party sumy 

Mw nA^wSnrma 

32/89 

QA/Bd 

24/75 

2WB4 

qn/ao 

0-1 

SW 

Cc 

12-25 

4I.4A 

Bell 

Palwi 

pertly sunny 

31/88 

24m 

29/84 

0-1 

sw 

1530 


WVDU 

Palm Beach, Aua 

uiunovTaiarrni 

sunny 

•iumo 

24/75 

tttfo 

13/55 

•M/OQ 

19/66 

1 

1-2 

DC 

w 

15-30 

15-30 

UCDU 

Pefrn Beach, Aua. 

ahowera 
douds and aun 

31/88 

21/70 

23/73 

12/53 

30/86 

18/64 

0-1 

.1-2 

sw 

sw 

15-25 

20-40 


Bey of Island*. NZ 
Shlrahoma 

rain 

showers 

1B/B4 

27/BO 

10/50 

24/75 

18/81 

27/0} 

1-2 

1-2 

NW 

SE 

2040 

2040 

Boy of Wanda, NZ 
Shtrshama 

shower* 

ahowera 

17/82 

28/79 

9/48 

23/73 

15/59 

27/80 

27/80 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 

sw 

E 

20-40 

20*35 

20-40 

11 

HonoUu 

party sunny 

31/88 

24/75 

27/80 

1-2 

EKE 

2040 

Honolulu 

portly surety 

31/BB 

24m 

ENE 



4 . .. . 


AB2T Access Numbers. 

How to call around the world. 

1. Using the chan below, find the country you are railin g from. 

2. Dial die corresponding ADS’ Access Number. i -‘ 

3. An ABg English-speaking Operator or voice prompt will ask tor the phone number you wish m rail nr mnrwr y^i a — 

customer service representative. . : 

To recrive your fi^waOefcairi of Access NurrdTers, just dial the access nurrAier of 

the country you’re in andask for Customer Service 


*-t. . 


Iravcl in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


> . 


Australia 
China. PRO— 

Goam 

Hong Rong 

India* . 

Indonesia* 

Japan* 

Korea 

gjprcaAA 

Malaysia* 

New Zealand 


ASIA Italy* 172-1011 Brazil 

1-800-881-011 T.lechtcnsteip* 155-00-11 n.tu 

10811 IMm a nti* ~ 8* 196 Cotombta - 

018-872 Luxembourg ~ 0-800-0 1 U Costa RicsTa 

800-1111 Macedonia, F.YJL of 9»800-*288 Ecuador* 


000-117 Malta* 
001-801-10 Monaco* 


0800-890-110 El Salvador** 
394-0011 Guatemala - 


Salpanr 
Singapore 
Sri Lanka 

Taiwan- 

Thailand* 


0*010-4800111 6todco*AA . 9 
05017-1-288 Nicaragua (Managua) 
01-800- 4288 Panama. 

155 -5042 PenF 7 

00-420-00101 Serinanw 

900-99-00-11 Uruguay _ 
020-795-811 Ven ezuela *. 


coBimgcaat I Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
83 language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 ajn. knowing they’ll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with AIKE 1 

✓ ^ tf'uv 

• — -- To use these services, dial the AISET Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 

help you need. With these Access Numbers and your XR5T Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an AIKT Calling Card or you’d like more information on ARET global services, fust call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 


Armenia** 

Austria—* 

Belgium* 

Bulgaria 

CroaQar* 

CaccfaKrp 

Denmark* 

Rnland* 

France 

G erman y 

G r eece* 

Hungary* 

Iceland** 

Ireland 


0039-111 Netherlands- 06-022-91 11 

°°9-^ Nbrvray 800-19 0-11 Honduras** 

Pofand ‘*“ QA01048( Mim Mexico* 

80<H»H PortugaT 05017-1 -288 Nlcamg 

00^11 Hon»nia 01-800- fcZ88 Pamnui 

; 103-11 Rnstria-TMoscowj 155-5042 Par? 

2 35-2872 Slovakia 00-42tH>010l «wrr4n nv 

WO-OUl-m Spainw 900-99-00-11 Uruguay 

*3tM30 Sweden’ 020-795-411 Venezue 

0080-10288-0 Switzeriand* 155-00-11 

0019-991-1111 U-K. 0500-89-0011 Bohami 

Ukraine* 8*100-11 Berniud.- 

8*1*111 MIDDLE EAST British V. 

H Bai ^ 800-0 01 Cayman 

Q 800 * 100-30 c yP TUS ’ ~ 080-90010 Grenada 

00-1800-0010 Israel 177-100-2727 Haj? — 

99 ~ 38 ^ 011 Kuwail 800-288 Jamaica* 

°°' 4MM)0101 m«moo (Being) 426-801 >«h.Ai 

8001-0010 Qatar 080MU-7? SLKhrs.T 

9800-100-10 Saudi Arabia 1-800-10 ~ 

1 9a ~ 0011 Tarkg y 00-800-12 Z77 7 

013tMW10 ^ 800-121 

° aW ^ 11 AMERICAS Bi 

004-8004)1111 Argentina* 001-800- 200-1111 Kenya* 

"**? ! Bcli2e * 555 UbeSr 

1 •800-550-000 BoU\-b* 6800-1112 c^TT: 


OOOSOIO 

QQa-0312 

980-11-0010 

114 

119 

190 

I9Q 

165 

12^ 

95-800-462-4240 J 
0 * 174 .. 


hi r; 


«'!/ 


109 

191 

156 
00-0410 
. 804JIM2) 


15w ~ n CAMBBEAN 

MOWOll B a hamas 1-800-872-2881 

- 8*100-11 Bermuda* 1-800-8^2-2881 

^51 BridshVX 1-800-872-2881 

80O^X)i Cayman Islands 1-800-872-2S81 

_0S0-900lQ Grenada* 1-800-872^2881 

lT7- 10 0-2727 Haiti* 001-800-972^3 

800-288 Jamaica** 

Ncth.Antfl 001-800- 872^81 

jm-011-77 SL JOns, Nevis 1 -910^72-2881 


1-800- 10 J 

°° ■Vto-um i^pr (Cairo) 
500-131 Gabon* ~ 


«5 Liberia 

0^00-1112 Somfa AfrW 




iwi«r 


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MTVSADtttcr' J>'Plbl4v him jfl i/vivumV-. WrJ iNnc I n "" 1 8,1 aTra ' 

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-7uf4rp/Knvn.vUn'tk'piM,,/’ii4niiriVi,iK-iiiniri«dt4 h»K ■r!ir^rr »T7 yi^ > " n puHfc 1* 

**n44k-pbnne,mpd'i-iki«n0.4a>iii k ciltil tw. I)W ii |! w«uiu | « 1 

wiOIIWSJMIUWi' WBkPktUmjVajmHminifti 


3-800-3^2-2881 •_ v 

; 1-300-872-2881 

Is 1-300-872-2881 . 

1-80^872^2881 ; - v 

001-800^72-2883 

0- «XV877-^ffl • 
00 l- 80 CK 872 ^» 8 l f 

1- 800-872-2881 

AFRICA ~~ 

0 V 510-0200 

- 00^001 

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■ . , -oaoo-to - 

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