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INTERNATIONAL 




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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Yeltsin Asserts Primacy 
Of Russia’s Infl uence 
Over Ex- Soviet States 


By John M. Goshko 

WcuningfiM fair Service 

UNITED NATIONS. New York — 
President Boris N. Yeltsin of Russia told 
the United Nations on Monday that 
Russia's priority interests now resided in 
the independent states of the former So- 
viet Union, and he served notice that 
Moscow had the chief responsibility for 
ensuring peace and stability among its 
neighbors. 

Mr. Yeltsin, who joined President Bill 
Clinton in addressing the opening of the 
UN General Assembly, said his coun- 
try's economic and foreign policy priori- 
ties “lie in the countries of the Common- 
wealth of Independent States.” as the 
group of stales that made up the former 
Soviet Union is now known. 

“Russia’s ties with them are closer 
than traditional neighborhood rela- 
tions,” he said. “Rather this is a blood 
relationship." 

Mr. Yeltsin is to begin a two-day 
meeting with Mr. Clinton in Washington 
on Tuesday. In particular, he said, he 
wants to ducuss with Mr. Clinton ways 
to speed up negotiations on concluding 
the comprehensive nuclear test ban trea- 
ty so that it can be signed next year on 
the 50th anniversary of the United Na- 
tions. 

He said he also intended to raise such 
collateral issues as further limits on the 
American and Russian nuclear arsenals, 
further nonproliferation measures and 
destruction of existing weapons of mass 


destruction and guarantees to nonnucle- 
ar states that will make them feel safe 
from the need to develop iheii own nu- 
clear capabilities. 

In his address to the General Assem- 
bly. Mr. Yeltsin echoed a theme that has 
been sounded with increasing frequency 
by Russian leaders during recent 
months. 

It has stirred concern in the West 
about whether militant nationalistic ten- 
dencies are reasserting themselves in 
Russia and spurring Moscow to feel that 
it can act as arbiter of what happens in 
Central Asia and other regions along its 
borders. 

Some diplomats and domestic critics 
of Mr. Clinton's policies even feel that 
American courting of Russian support in 
the UN Security Council for U.S. mili- 
tary intervention in Haiti was a mistake 
because it rerived the concept of spheres 
of influence. 

According to this argument, Russia 
can argue that if the United States can 
take such actions in the Caribbean. Rus- 
sia has a similar right to interfere in the 
smaller and weaker countries of its 
neighborhood. Some U.S. officials said 
they are interested in seeing how strongly 
Mr. Yeltsin asserts this position in his 
talks with Mr. Clinton this week. 

Mr. Yeltsin left no doubt that Russia 
considered conflicts among the com- 
monwealth states “a threat to the securi- 

See UN, Page 6 


^ U.S. Tightens Grip in Haiti; 
’Clinton Removes Sanctions 


By Douglas Farah 

Washington Post Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE Haiti — Cheered 
on by thousands of wildly celebrating Hai- 
tians. U.S. troops on Monday took over 
the nation’s most notorious police head- 
quarters, a center fatuous for repression 
and torture and a stark symbol of the 
military brutality of recent years. 

The move, along with the occupation of 
several other important police headquar- 
ters around the capital and the spreading 
of American troops to outlying areas from 
Port-uu-Prinoe and Cap-Haliien in the 
north, seemed to indicate the United 
States was consolidating its hold and in- 
creasingly relegating the Haitian Army 
and police to insignificance. 

At the United Nations in New York, 
meanwhile. President Bill Clinton an- 
nounced the immediate lifting on Monday 
of most U.S. economic sanctions against 
Haiti, a move that will permit the eventual 
resumption of commercial air travel and 
allow- Haitians to carry out financial trans- 
actions in the United States. 

[The United Slates also indicated Mon- 
day that its Marines bad shot first in a gun 
battle in Cap-Hai'tien that killed 10 Hai- 
% tians but strongly rqected charges by Hai- 
ti's army chief. Lieutenant General Raoul 


Cedras. that it had used excessive force or 
committed an atrocity, Reuters reported. 

[“It is clear that our Marines acted in 
self-defense.” Colonel Barry Willey said. 
According to U.S. military accounts, the 
gunfight broke out when an angry Haitian 
military policeman outside the police 
headquarters gestured with his Uzi after a 
crowd of demonstrators taunted men in- 
side the building. The Marines shot and 
killed him and exchanged gunfire with 
people in the crowd and inside the police 
headquarters. 

{Military officials said it was impossible 
to tell how many shots were fired by the 
Haitians or how many of the victims were 
military policemen, it was also unclear 
whether all of the dead men were armed. 

[A Haitian military official also said 
Monday that armed supporters of the de- 
posed president, the Reverend Jean- Ber- 
trand .Aristide, had taken over the north- 
ern town of Le Borgne.] 

Initially the United Stales said it would 
cooperate with the Haitian military in car- 
rying out its security tasks. But actions on 
the ground gave a different impression. 

“Every day it is dear the initial agree- 
ment was only to allow the army to save 
face,” a Haitian analyst said. “The reality 
is that the Americans are in control, and 

See HAITI, Page 6 


Paris, Tuesday, September 27, 1994 





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A resident of Sursu putting otj a mask Monday to protect against the airborne bacterium that causes pneumonic plague. 

In City of Plague, Exodus and Paralysis 


By John Ward Anderson 

I LaiAf « An Service 

SURAT. India — Many of the sireet> of 
this disease-stricken city in western India 
were nearly deserted Monday as fear of the 
highly contagious and deadly pneumonic 
plague kept residents locked in their 
homes. 

Shops and stalls were shuttered, schools 
and theaters were closed, and most govern- 
ment services were shut because of worker 
absenteeism. Telephone service was dis- 
rupted; thousands of people were thrown 
out of work by factory closures, and medi- 
cal services were strained by the flight of 
numerous private physicians who closed 
their clinics rather than stay to treat plague 
victims. 

The mass exodus of as many as one- 
fourth of Surat’s 2.2 million residents con- 


tinued to spread the fear throughout India 
that migrant workers returning to their 
ancestral homes could spread the disease 
across the country. The concern was 
heightened by reports that as many as 100 
patients with the disease had fled from 
Surat’s main hospital, apparently to join 
families leaving the city. 

Although a few unconfirmed plague- 
related deaths were reported in Bombay 
and New Delhi, the death rate appeared to 
be tapering off in Surat, an industrial town 
known for diamond-cutting and textiles in 
the coastal state of Gujurat. 

[In trying to prevent an outbreak of the 
plague in Bombay, India's business capi- 
tal, city officials have sought vaccines from 
Israel to fight the disease and poison gas 
from South .Africa to wipe out Bombay’s 
rodent population, Reuters reported. 


[“Israel has been identified as the place 
where ami-plague vaccines could be made 
at the shortest possible time,” said a Bom- 
bay Municipal Corp. official Sudha Bhave. 
He also said that a leading diamond com- 
pany in South Africa had been asked for 
an emergency supply of cyano gas that 
could eliminate rats.] 

Estimates of the number of people who 
have died since the first plague case was 
reported in Surat on Sept. 20 range from 
about 50 to as many as SO. with most 
officials favoring the lower figure. Hospi- 
tal officials in Surat reported a total of 333 
patients with the disease in hospitals, in- 
cluding 60 new patients admitted Monday. 

Indian health authorities sent 10 million 
antibiotic capsules to Bombay on Monday 
for distribution in Gujurat and neighbor- 

See INDIA, Page 6 


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U.S. Seeking 
Compromise 
Over China’s 
Missile Sales 

Washington Would End 
9 93 Sanctions Imposed 
For Deal With Pakistan 

By Patrick E. Tyler 

AVh York Tima Service 

BEIJING — China and the United 
States are making “a serious push" to re- 
solve their dispute over the Chines sale of 
ballistic missile technology to Pakistan, a 
Western diplomat said Monday. 

China’s deputy foreign minister. Liu 
Huaqiu, and the U.S. ambassador. J. Sta- 
pleton Roy, are both going to Washington 
this week to take pan in an intense round 
of negotiations at the State Department 
aimed at breaking the 13-month deadlock 
over China's missile technology sales and 
the American trade sanctions that fol- 
lowed. 

These preliminary negotiations will Lhen 
set the stage for meetings next week be- 
tween Foreign Minister Qian Qichen and 
President Bill Clinton. Mr. Qian will also 
meet with Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher. 

The importance of these negotiations is 
that they represent a determined effort by 
both sides to achieve a visible diplomatic 
advance before Mr. Clinton meets Presi- 
dent Jiang Zemin at the informal leader- 
ship meeting of Asian Pacific nations to be 
held in Jakarta in November. 

They also represent the first high-level 
diplomatic engagement since Mr. Clin- 
ton's politically risky decision in May to 
break the link between human rights and 
trade relations with China. 

That decision has yielded few of the 
hoped-for results. Human rights condi- 
tions have deteriorated, and the Clinton 
administration has little to show for con- 
ceding China's point that Lrade and human 
rights policies should not be mixed. 

Since Mr. Clinton's decision. China has 
shifted its disaffection to other topics, 
complaining that Washington should also 
drop economic sanctions imposed five 
years ago after China's military crackdown 
on pro-democracy students. Those sanc- 
tions still ban some high-technology sales 
to China as well as transfers of military 
technology. 

In August 1993, the United Slates im- 
posed further economic sanctions on Chi- 
na after concluding that the Chinese had 
secretly shipped components of the M-I I 
missile to Pakistan. The M-l 1 is a modem, 
solid-fuel, surface-to-surface missile that is 
accurate and mobile. It is capable of carry- 
ing nuclear warheads. 

If a compromise emerges, it will proba- 
bly allow Mr. Clinton to remove the 1993 
missile-related sanctions while at the same 
time receiving China's pledge to adhere to 
the Missile Technology Control Regime in 
the future. 

The missile regime requires its member 
states and other nations with ballistic mis- 
sile capabilities to restrict exports of mis- 
siles capable of delivering a 1.000-pound 
(450-kilogram) warhead 185 miles (300 ki- 
lometers) or more. The founding members 
of the 1987 agreement were the Western 
industrial nations plus Japan: China and 
the Soviet Union were excluded. Member- 
ship has expanded to 25 nations. 


J 


German Markets, 
But Not Kohl, 
Sense a Setback 

By Brandon Mitchener 

Inter national Hc'ttld Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Financial markets 
winced Monday at the results of regional 
elections in Bavaria, worried that a similar 
outcome in national voting in October 
could topple Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s 
coalition. 

The Deutsche mark weakened against 
most major currencies, and blue-chip 
stocks fell an average 2 percent. 

Although Mr. Kohl’s popularity has 
been rising in the polls, and Bavarian vot- 
ers are noi necessarily representative of the 
nationwide electorate, markets treated 
losses by Mr. Kohl’s two coalition partners 
ami a gain by the opposition Social Demo- 
cratic Party as heralds of change. 

“These two elements of the Bavarian 
elections compounded a general sense of 
uncertainty that had already been present 
in the markets,” said Joseph ftendergast, a 
foreign exchange analyst at Basque Pan- 
bus in London. 

"Although the federal elections are like- 
ly to be an anti-climax from a market 
perspective," he said, *Td continue to ex- 
1 pect a certain amount of trepidation ahead 

See GERMANS, Page 6 

Newsstand Prices 

Andorra 9.00 FF Luxembourg 40 L. Fr 

Antilles 11.20 FF Morocco 12 Dh 

' Cameroon. ,i.«0CFA Qatar 8.00 Rials 

: Egypt ...... E-P. 5000 Reunion.. -.11. 20 FF 

France 9.00 FF Saudi Arabia ..9,00 R. 

Gabon 960 CF A Senegal 960 C FA j 

Greece ,300 Dr. Spain zoaPTAS 

. i?oiv 2, 400 Line Tunisia .... 1.000 Din 

tvorv Coast .1.1 MCFA Turkey ..T.L. 35.000 

1 Jordan 1JP U.A.E. .....8.50 Dirh 

Lebanon ...USs 1.50 U.S. Mil. (Eur.lsl.10 t 


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LIFE DURING WARTIME — A woman washing clothes in Sarajevo on 
Monday. The United States indicates it might lift the weapons embargo on 
Bosnians next month but delay implementation until next year. Page 5. 

Health Care Effort Is Dead for ’94 


WASHINGTON (Reuters) — The 
Senate majority leader, George J. Mitch- 
ell of Maine, abandoned efforts on Mon- 
day to pass a health care reform bill this 
year, sounding the death knell for Presi- 
dent Bill Gin ton's top domestic priority. 

At a press conference. Mr. Mitchell 
said he had concluded it was impossible 
to pass even a scaled-back health care 
reform bill before Congress adjourns for 
the year next month so members can 
campaign for the Nov. 8 congressional 
elections. 

The House of Representatives aban- 
doned its efforts weeks ago. 


Dow Jones 


up 
17.49 
3849 2-s 


Down 

0.38% 

115.05 


The Dollar 

Mpww Yort- 

DM 

Pound 

Yen 

FF 

Book Revie*- 
Chess 


1.5536 
1.572 
95-75 
5 3055 


grgy.em 

1 5488 
1.577 

9? ea 

52935 

Page 9. 
Page 9. 


U.S. Colleges Don’t Make Grade in Japan 


By Andrew Pollack 

,Vf»' York Times Service 

KORJYAMA, Japan — Texas A&M 
Universiry is one of the largest institutions 
of higher education in the United States 
and prides itself on the academic programs 
there. But that did not impress people four 
years ago when Lbe college opened a cam- 
pus in this city north of Tokyo and tried to 
attract Japanese students. 

People think of the college only as a 
place to learn English, said Takeshi Wa- 
tanabe, a student, as he stood in the yard of 
the nearly deserted campus shortly before 
it was shut down in August “They don’t 
look at it as a university." 

Texas A&M is only the most recent 
American college to fail in Japan. In the 
late 1980s, American colleges flocked to 
start programs in Japan, mainly to funnel 
students to their American campuses, but 
also to provide a place for Americans to 
study in Japan. By 1991. Japan had more 
than 20 American extension campuses. 


But at least nine programs have been 
terminated, the victims of Japan's reces- 
sion and recruiting difficulties. Many of 
the remaining programs are suffering from 
a shortage of students. 

The closings could widen what both 
countries agree is a serious imbalance be- 
tween the more than 40,000 Japanese stu- 
dents studying in the United States and the 
estimated 1,800 American students in Ja- 
pan. 

The small number of American students 
reflects the country’s high cost of living, 
the language barrier and a lack of pro- 
grams for American students, experts say. 

The Texas A&M campus grew out of 
meetings in 1986 between American and 
Japanese politicians who felt that having 
American colleges in Japan would pro- 
mote mutual understanding. 

Instead, it became the focus of a dispute 
between the college and its host city and 
another symbol of friction between the two 
economic superpowers. 


Koriyama, a city of 320,000, wanted the 
campus to help keep young people from 
fleeing to the big cities. With the mayor's 
support, the city assembly pledged about 
$25 million in 1989 to back the effort and 
to help build a permanent campus. 

The college opened in 1990 in a tempo- 
rary campus consisting of four prefabricat- 
ed buddings surrounding an asphalt lot 
that doubled as a parking area and a bas- 
ketball court. 

The college offered fresh man -level 
courses taught in English as well as inten- 
sive English lessons. After two years, stu- 
dents would transfer to the main campus 
in College Station, Texas. 

But the campus had fewer than 100 
students its first year and never attracted 
the 300 new students a vear needed to 
break even. 

The city decided that it would be fool- 
hardy to build a new campus. B.A. Stout. 

See JAPAN, Page 6 


*OJ . 9 Trial: A Candid Look at America 


By Henry .Allen 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — We had already 
had a full plate of myth-tinged mayhem 
in the last year — Lorena Bobbitt’s trial 
for maiming her husband, Tonya Har- 
ding’s plotting to maim Nancy Kerrigan 
and steal the Olympic figure skating 
gold. 

Then the police charged O.J. Simpson 
with murdering his former wife Nicole 
and her friend Ronald Goldman on June 
12. Nicole’s head was almost tom off. 
Ronald’s body was covered with stab 
wounds. 

It had all the blithe grisliness of a fairy 
tale or a Greek myth. But now, on televi- 
sion, in supermarket tabloids, in water 


cooler jokes, it has become the moral 
equivalent of a comic-book battle of su- 
perheroes — The American Dream takes 
on The Beast Within! 

Why are we so obsessed wi,h it? 

Theoretically, it’s People v. O J. Simp- 
son, which began Monday in a Los An- 
geles courtroom. Bui in the national psy- 
che, the courtroom of his murder trial 
will be an arena where Hero takes on 
Tragedy, Pride meets Race and Fame 
meets Fate. It’s a hell of a fight card. 

OJ. is the biggest American celebrity 
ever charged with murder. He has been a 
Hall of Fame running back, broadcaster 
and movie star. But more than fame is 
fueling the obsession. You watch him for 
hours the way a cat winches a goldfish. 1 1 


goes beyond star quality, and as anyone 
in the media will testify,' the ruckus is far 
beyond anything the "media could raise 
all by itself. It’s unexplainable. It’s as if 
he were a Kennedy. 

He sits in the courtroom like an Easier 
Island statue — monolithic and mute. 
You wonder if he knows something vou 
don’t, as if he were carrying a football 
and you were a tackier and he was about 
to blow past you. When he sits, he 
slouches a little. When he walks, he 
moves with a blithe impassivity, like a 
combination of a god and a game show 
hosL You watch him for guilt, sorrow, 
hope. You see nothing. The only change 

See TRIAL, Page 3 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1994 


Election in Moscow: A Little Strange but Very Normal 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Steven Erlanger 

Me* York Timet Service 

vnr TISHCHI, Russia — This is a 
measure of politics in the new Russia. 

W|U ** a ®P«ial election here 
"today to replace a member of Parlia- 
tnent gunned down outside his apart- 
ment house in late April, in a killing 
thought to be mob-related. 

One of the 12 candidates is Kon- 
siantm Borova, the founder of the 
first commercial exchange in the Sovi- 
et Union, whose posters show him in 
audience with the patriarch of the Rus- 
sian Orthodox Church, Alexei II. Mr. 
Borovoi says he narrowly escaped as- 
sassination twice in a year. 

There is a nationalist candidate. An- 
™ Sddnikov, whose posters show 
him with the grieving mothers of sol- 
diers killed in Afghanistan. Another 
candidate, Leonid Barashkov, a busi- 
nessman, boasts of financing a soccer 
team and creating a new bus route, 
then offers three "Barashkov family 
recipes" using mushrooms. 


And then, there’s the requisite qua- 
si-fascist. Alexander Fyodorov of the 
Russian National Unity party, whose 
symbol is an elongated white swastika 
on a black field. Mr. Fyodorov calls 
for Russian purity and the fight 
against crime, in that order. 

But the Favorite in the race is Sergei 
Mavrodi, the mysterious boss of the 
MMM financial pyramid, who was re- 
leased from jail to run and who can 
stay out of jail by winning the seat. 

Given the stakes for his future. Mr- 
Mavrodi is pulling out all the stops in 
this suburban electoral district just 
north of Moscow: making big prom- 
ises that remind everyone of his MMM 
advertisements, buying lots of air time 
and newspaper space, sponsoring con- 
certs, posting placards and distribut- 
ing leaflets. 

But Mr. Mavrodi has not set foot in 
the district, said the deputy chairman 
of the local election committee, Vya- 
cheslav M. Zhigulin. Mr. Mavrodi's 
spokesman, Sergei Taranov. said Tues- 


day night that personal appearances 
were “ineffective." that Mr. Mavrodi 
was visible on television, and that he 
did not want to "push it" with the 
courts by leaving Moscow. 

Avoiding prison, "of course, is one 
key aim," Mr. Taranov said. "But the 
main aim is to use the immunity to 
protect the interests of MMM share- 
holders through politics." 

Mr. Zhigulin said he thought Mr. 
Mavrodi had a good chance. “After 
all,” he said, “36,000 MMM share- 
holders live in My Tishchi alone.” The 
same number live in nearby Khimki 
another of the five towns in a district 
of some 2.5 million people and 500.000 
voters. 

“The shareholders are probably 
enough to win." Mr. Zhigulin said 
Some shareholders are angry with the 
MMM collapse, which took most of 
their investments. But the fund itself 
never really died, and many believed 
Mr. Mavrodi. who portrayed the col- 
lapse as the act of a willful government 


that feared his power and wanted to 
cut him down. 

MM M’s advertisements became 
famous, featuring a shambling Rus- 
sian ne’er-do-well who rinds all the 
choice sweets of tife — tropical vaca- 
tions, an apartment in Paris —through 
his investments in MMM. 

“Mavrodi’s campaign is exactly the 
same,” said Anna Sikder, a 23-year-old 
shopping is the local supermarket. 
“Mavrodi promises to turn My Tishchi 
into a little Switzerland" 

He has some way to go. Only 56 
percent of the families in the district 
have telephones. In Khimki cuts in 
military spending have crippled three 
big factories that once employed near- 
ly 50,000 people and controlled 70 
percent of the town's housing stock. 

Mr. Mavrodi not only promises vot- 
ers that he will spend $10 million on 
improving the district, but that every 
household mil get a telephone. Mr. 
Borovoi promises that his “business 


contacts” will bring $1 5 million to the Bosnian Serbs Fire On UN Tanks 


Alexander Shelepin, 
Ex-KGB Chief, Dies 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Alexander N. 
Shelepin, 76, the head of the 
KGB during Nikita S. Khru- 
shchev’s rule who was once con- 
sidered a contender for the 
leadership of the Soviet Union, 
died Monday. 

The Itar-Tass press agency 
repotted his death but did not 
give the cause or say where be 
had died. 


All but One Freed 
In Hijacking in 
Southern Russia 

Reuters 

MAKHACHKALA, Russia 
— Two crew members were 
freed from a hijacked plane in 
southern Russia late Wednes- 
day. leaving only the captain 
agd the hijacker on board, said 
the commercial radio station 
Ekbo Moskvy. 

“The terrorist is demanding 
another 52 million,'* Ekbo 
Moskvy said. The hijacker, be- 
lieved to be acting alone, has 
already received $23 million 
ransom in exchange for releas- 
ing 23 hostages since dawn. 

Prisoners released earlier said 
the huaefcer was carrying only a 
pared, which he said contained 
explosives, and was behaving 
without undue aggression. In- 
terfax news agency said. 

Commandos have surround- 
ed the plane and emergency ser- 
vices took up positions nearby. 
The plane has been refueled, 
but its possible destination was 
not dear. Russia has asked Iran 
to let it land there. 

The hijacking started late 
Tuesday when a passenger or- 
dered the plane bound for the 
southern dty of Rostov to re- 
turn to Makhachkala. 


Mr. Shelepin followed a clas- 
sic career path for Soviet lead- 
ers, joining the Co mm unist Par- 
ty in 1940 after graduating from 
the Moscow Institute of Histo- 
ry, Philosophy and Literature. 

He became a propagandist 
for the Komsomol, (he Soviet 
youth organization, and headed 
it from 1952 to 1958. Mr. Shele- 
pin was KGB chief from 1958 
to 1961 and, in 1964. was ap- 
pointed to the Communist Par- 
ty Presidium and was widely 
viewed as a potential Soviet 
leader. 

But, as Itar-Tass reported, 
Leonid I. Brezhnev, a senior of- 
ficial under Mr. Khrushchev 
and his successor as Soviet lead- 
er, "saw Shdepin as a serious 
rival, and removed him from 
the political scene." 

Myron S. Malkin, Physicist 
Who Graded Space Shuttle 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — 
Myron S. Malkin, 70, a physi- 
cist who was the first director of 
the space shuttle program and a 
former Defense Department of- 
ficial, died Monday of heart 
failure at a hospital in Bethes- 
da, Maryland. 

From 1973 to 1980, Mr. Mal- 
kin led the effort to bring to- 
gether aB the components that 
became the space shuttle, which 
remains the principal U.S. 
space launching vehicle. 
Robert Lansing, 66 , TV Star 
Of Series ‘12 O’Oock High’ 

NEW YORK (NYT)— Rob- 
ert Lansing. 66, an actor whose 
nigged good looks and deep 
voice served him well on stage, 
as well as in films and televi- 
sion, died Sunday of cancer at 
Calgary Hospice here. 

Mr. Lansing starred in the 
television series “12 O’Qock 
High" and in Broadway plays 
including “The Great God 
Brown,” “Suddenly Last Sum- 
mer” and “The Utile Foxes." 



Yegor V. Babichev, a physician, law- 
yer and deputy mayor of Khimki does 
not try to hide his disgust Khimki is 
one of the few towns where the entire 
leadership changed after the failed 
coup of August 1991, and the adminis- 
tration, at least is rife with libera] 
democrats. 

“But there is a counterreformatioa 
going on now,” he said. “There's al- 
ways the personalization of politics 
here." 

As for real local issues. like the three 
big factories in trouble, Mr. Babichev 
said, “I'm not even sure the candidates 
are aware of them.” 

“All our elections are a little strange 
these days," he said. “Mavrodi is al- 
ready at the stage where be has to enter 
the political establishment. It’s also 
some protection for him, it's true. I 
hope Mavrodi and his type won't come 
to power. But they're getting closer, 
maybe." 


EU Leader 
Puts Off 


PAPERS, PLEASE — Alerted that rival gangs planned a “duel,” Moscow police 
stepped in. A detective checked the drivers’ license of an armed suspect at a restaurant 

Germans Cite Fewer Neo-Nazi Attacks in 1994 


The A Bonn ted Press 

BONN — Neo-Nazis have tried to kill six 
people in separate attacks in the First eight 
months of this year, the parliamentary press 
office said Wednesday. 

No fatalities have been reported this year. At 
least 30 people were reported killed in the first 
three years of neo-Nazi violence. 

Law authorities have been battling rightist 
extremists for four years, and attacks — mostly 


ist foreigners — have fallen from a peak of 
t seven a day in 1992 to about four a day this 


That is apparently because Germany’s legal 
system, sometimes accused of being too lenient 
with the far right, has started getting tough. 
Courts have begun giving longer sentences. 

Most of the victims have been foreigners, but 
elderly and handicapped people have also been 
targeted. 


Leaving 


PARIS — The president of 
the European Commission, Jac- 
ques Delors, said Wednesday 
he would remain in his post in 
Brussels at least until Jan. 25 
because of a delay in approving 
a new commission. 

Mr. Ddors, widely expected 
to be the Socialist candidate in 
the French presidential elec- 
tions in the spring, was sup- 
posed to vacate his position on 
Jan. 6 but agreed to stay on 
until Jan. 25. He said the length 
of his stay beyond Jan. 2S 
would depend on when the Eu- 
ropean Parliament endorsed 
the new commission. 

Mr. Delors has said he will 
not announce whether he is a 
candidate for the French presi- 
dency until he ends his Brussels 
term. 

Political analysts said the de- 
lay would strengthen Mr. De- 
lors’s position, since it would 
enable him to remain above the 
fray while the rival contenders 
for the conservative nomination 
go at one another. 

The 12-nation European 
Union has chosen Prime Minis- 
ter Jacques Santer of Luxem- 
bourg to replace Mr. Delors, 
but Parliament wants to defer 
approving his full team of com- 
missioners until after four new 
member slates join the EU and 
can vote. The four, Austria, 
Finland, Sweden and Norway, 
are scheduled to join in Janu- 
ary. 

Opinion polls show Mr. Dep- 
lore has almost drawn even with 
Prime Minister Edouard Baha- 
dur and has overtaken the 
Gauilist pany leader, Jacques 
Chirac, the two leading conser- 
vative contenders, by keeping 
out of politics. 


SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Hcrzegovma (Reuters) — UN «Mta c™ 
under fire from Bosnian Serb forces on Wednesday, but the. 
United Nations decided against ordering an air strike m responsw ■ 
a UN spokesman said , „ 

The Danish Leopard tanks returned Tire from a Bosman hero 
tank and recoilless gun near the northern town of Gradacac Derore 
withdrawing, A UN military spokesman, Colonel Tun bpicm; 
said: “We believe one Leopard was hit but there are no reports 
casualties." J . 

The United Nations set in motion the procedure for a na ro 
air strike before deciding such a response was not wangled- _n 
explaining why an air strike was not ordered. Colonel Spicer sam 
that “in fact the best tank-killing weapon is another tank, in tnc 
end air was not needed." J 

Migration Accord at Risk, Cuba Says j 

HAVANA (AFP) —The decision of a U.S. judge to temporary 
fly halt the repatriation of Cuban refugees from Guantanamo 
threatens the implementation of a migration accord between the 
United States and Cuba, the National Assembly president, Ricar- 
do Alarc6n, said. _ . 1 

“This is a serious and negative development," said Mr. Alarcon* 
who is representing Cuba in talks with the U.S. government on 
carrying out a ScpL 9 agreement that ended an exodus of Cuban 
boat people to the United States. > 

U.S. District Court Judge Clyde Atkins issued a temporary 
rest raining order Tuesday in Miami, one minute before a LLS: 
military plane with 23 Cubans on board was to take off lor 
Havana from the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, on Cuba’s 
southeast tip. About 32.000 Cuban refugees who were refused^’ 
entry to the United States after being picked up at sea are bem^ ■ 
held at Guantanamo and in Panama. 

Russian Team Flies to Site of Oil Spill: 

MOSCOW (Reuters) — Russian officials flew to the northern 
region of Komi on Wednesday to investigate an oil spill that U.S; 
officials say could have a disastrous impact on the fragile Arctic . 
environment. 

But local officials tried to play down the significance of the 
spill, the result of pipeline leaks and the breakage of a dam 
containing the leaked oil “There are all these fairy stories about a 
leak of 200,000 tons of oil," said Nikolai Batin, head of the 
regional environment committee. “It is stupid. The most plausible 


it was estimated to be more than 2 million barrels by U.S. experts 
at the site. 

FortheRecord 

Three blacks were Jailed for 18 years each on Wednesday by a 
South African judge for the murder of Amy Biehi, an American 
exchange student. "Taking all mitigating and aggravating circum- 
stances into account, the court comes to the finding that the death 
sentence is not the only appropriate sentence," said Judge Gerald 
Friedman. Mzflcbona Nofemela, Vusumzi Niamo and Mongezi 
Manqina had pleaded not guilty. (Reuters) 

TRAVEL UPDATE 


Chunnel Train’s Debut Facing Strike 

PARIS (Reuters) — Eurostar, the high-speed train designed for, ' , 
the Channel Tunned, faced a new challenge Wednesday when ir v 
French union threatened to strike on Nov. 14. the scheduled 
commercial launching date of the high-technology rail link. . 

A union statement said the management of the French rail 
operator SNCF had ignored its claims about the safely of Euros- 
tar engineps and trains and the pay for staff specifically working 
on the train. 

The Association of European Airlines said its members will 
likely report their biggest increase in traffic in 15 years in 1994. 


traffic should rise by about 13 percent. (Knight-Ridder) 

A fire destroyed the steel-and-copper cupola of the German 
Church in central Berlin. The church, in the city's historic district 
in former East Berlin, was undergoing renovation. (AP) 

ltafian pilots have agreed to call off a series of strikes over the 
next month. Pilots for the state-run carrier Alitalia and the 
commuter subsidiary ATI made the announcement following a 
meeting with Transportation Minister Ptiblio Fieri (AP) 

Cathay Pacific Airways wfll introduce two additional flights 
between Hong Kong and Hanoi and one between Hong Kong and 
Ho Chi Mirth City, with Vietnam Airlines, starting Sunday. (AFP) 


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Kohl, With Tiny Majority , Is in for Tough Bargaining 



By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Past Service 

BERLIN — German politics, for 12 years a 
predictable and orderly affair, suddenly got very 
messy this week. 

Bickering within the ruling coalition, elbowing 
for government posts and a constitutional chal- 
lenge have underscored the fragility of Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl’s 10-vote majority in the 672- 
seat Parliament which is set to convene next 
month. 

The victory of Mr. Kohl and his Christian 
Democratic party in the Oct. 16 elections has 
been quickly overshadowed by the obstacles 
looming before bis badly weakened coalition, 
that was whittled down from a 134-seat majority. 

As coalition leaders began meeting Monday 
night for three weeks of hard bargaining over the 
new government’s goals and cabinet appoint- 
ments, it became apparent that even Mr. Kohl — 
a three-term chancellor with a reputation as a 
master politician and eternal optimist — has his 
work cut out if his tenure is not to end in a lame- 
duck whimper. 

Although often arcane and parochial. German 
parliamentary politics will not only determine 
Mr. Kohl's success in pressing his foreign agenda 
for tighter European unity and a broader Ger- 
man role in international affairs, but it will also 
be critical in such urgent domestic issues as 
economic competitiveness and immigration 
policy. 

Foremost among coalition woes is the sad 
shape of Mr. Kohl's junior partner, the liberal 
Free Democrats. 


Having survived a near-death experience — 
the Free Democrats were humiliated in nine 
consecutive state elections before surpassing the 
5 percent minimum needed to remain in the 
federal assembly by less than 2 percentage points 
— party faithful promptly fell to squabbling 
among themselves. 

The party leader, Klaus Kinkel, who also is 
foreign minister, this week repelled a challenge 
from former economics minister Jurgen MdUe- 

The chancellor’s objective: 

Not to end his tenure in a lame- 
dock whimper. 

raann. his political rival, who accused Mr. Kinkel 
of leading the Free Democrats “into the abyss." 

Mr. Mollemann resigned his party post Mon- 
day, leaving the field to Mr. Kinkel. 

But discontent bubbles just beneath the sur- 
face. The Free Democrats arc at odds over how 
best to bait the free fall in their popularity among 
the German electorate. 

The party is short on glamour and its tradi- 
tional core agenda — Tree-market economics, 
government deregulation and a commitment to 
civil rights — has largely been co-opted by the 
major parties. 

Some liberal leaders insist that in negotiating 
with Mr. Kohl, who needs the Free Democrats’ 
47 votes to maintain the status quo in Bonn, the 
party should play hardball in an effort to sharp- 
en its identity. 


Among ideas bandied about: cutting corpo- 
rate taxes, insisting on the right to dual citizen- 
ship for foreign residents, slashing red tape, and 
— in an effort to resuscitate Free Democratic 
strength in Eastern Germany — declaring the 
East to be a “low-tax zone." 

“We are a dinosaurs' club," a liberal from the 
East lamented during the campaign. "We're dy- 
ing OUL” 

But the Free Democrats hardly resemble a 
hardball team. 

The party's boss in the state of Rhineland- 
Palatinate said publicly that the party is so weak 
it must show “restraint” 

As to suggestions that some liberal malcon- 
tents might rebel against Mr. Kohl when the 
Bundestag, the lower house of parliament votes 
for chancellor in mid-November, the pany stal- 
wart Otto Lambsdorff, a former economics min- 
ister. warned, “Whoever does that knows per- 
fectly well that he will have given the party a 
death blow." 

Poised to profit from Free Democratic weak- 
ness are the Christian Social Union, the Bavarian 
sister party of Mr. Kohl's Christian Democrats. 

After grabbing more votes than tbe liberals in 
elections, the conservative party is feeling its 
oats. 

Erwin Huber, the party’s general secretary, 
warned the Free Democrats this week not to 

S ress for foreigners’ rights, while asserting that 
is party “will be pushing harder for effective 
crime-prevention laws with no messing around." 

Difficulties will likely develop when it comes 
to handing out cabinet ministries. The Free 


Democrats now hold five of 29 posts; having 
advocated a smaller cabinet, they may find them- 
selves victim of tbeir own policy suggestion. 

Discontent has also roiled the normally placid 
Christian Democrats. A Kohl plan to save nearly^ 
S3 billion a year by curbing unemployment bene- 
fits was challenged last week by the pro-labor 
wing of his party, which called for tax breaks for 
the poor. 

At the same time the chancellor is under pres- 
sure from the Bundesbank, or central bank, to 
cut the burgeoning federal deficit and from Ger- 
many’s employers’ federation to cut expensive 
social welfare benefits. 

Such countervailing pressures are symptomat- 
ic of the delicacy with which Mr. Kohl wfl] have 
to navigate on many issues. 

Further complicating the post-election ma- 
neuvering is a legal challenge by the constitution- 
al expert Hans Meyer, who contends that a quirk 
in German election law illegally boosted Mr. 
Kohl's majority from 2 to 10. 

The chancellor got tbe extra cushion through 
an electoral wrinkle that permits creation of 
additional seats under certain conditions; the 
issue may be headed to the country’s constitu- 
tional court. 

All of which brings good cheer to the opposi- 
tion Social Democrats and their leader, Rudolf 
Sc harping. 

Mr. Kohl "will have to fight incessantly for a 
majority in the Bundestag," predicted Rudolf 
Dressier, the Social Democrats* deputy parlia- 
mentary leader. 

“1 cannot see this coalition doing that, and 
therefore I don’t think it will last 12 months" 



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* POLITICAL NOTES + 


f Stumping, Clinton Pushes in AII the Stops 

'ORK. ^ -"-Campaigning for candidates when you are 
Ji-popular president is the science of embracing 
while remaining at arm's length, of giving your 



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NEW YORK — Campaigning for candidates when you are 
a less-than-p''*'"* 1 '*” — J — * 

somexme white lcmajnmg at arm s lengtn, of giving vour 
blessing to a man or woman who may not wish to look* like 
your ally. It is being radioactive without giving everyone e lse 
on the dais a lethal dose of political roentgens. 

Over the weekend. President Bill Clinton went to four cities 
m three days and gave eight speeches on behalf of Democratic 
candidates. If he did not win the Nobel prize, at least give the 
man a PhD. 

. ** no simple way to measure Mr. Clinton's standing 

in Chicago, Minneapolis and Kansas City, Missouri, the three 
Midwestern cities he visited over the weekend. Bui the cus- 
tomary gauges suggest that he is no more popular there than 
in the nation as a whole, where polls show that about 6 people 
m 10 disapprove of his performance. 

For example, the president was greeted by sparse crowds at 
airports and along tne routes to his appearances. More telling, 
perhaps, was the turnout at the four Democratic fund-raising 
events that were the overarching purpose of his trip. 

He coDected $1.1 million at his three Midwestern stops, 
including just $350,000 in Chicago, where a presidential 
appearance IS months ago raised $1 million 
Despite the relative indifference to the president in most 
places, the national Democrats who arranged the fund-raising 
_ events and the candidates who will receive the money say that 
Ik be is in great demand as a campaigner. 

Ann Wyrua, the Democratic candidate for the Minnesota 
Senate seat being vacated by Dave Durenberger, a Republi- 
can, said she was ^ust delighted” when Mr. Clinton agreed to 
come to town. “Here in Minnesota,” she said. “I detect a huge 
reservoir of goodwill for President Clinton. They believe he is 
truly trying to solve the problems of the average American.” 

In a Chicago speech the president named the three Senate 
candidates for whom he was stumping exactly once. 

And he was careful to note that his endorsement did not 
imply that a candidate would be loyal to him. 

Here was Mr. Clinton in Minnesota; “I came here to ask 
you to help Ann Wyma — not because, as she said, she would 
agree with me cm every issue, but because she would bring 
common sense." 

Such little dodges are part of what makes campaigning such 
a deft and sometimes wondrous craft. (NYT) 

Homosexual Groups Back Senator Robb 

RICHMOND, Virginia — Homosexual political activists 
across the country are working to re-elect Senator Charles S. 
Robb, a Democrat whom they regard as a leader with the 
courage to condemn discrimination against them despite the 
obvious political risks. 

The Human Rights Campaign Fund, a national gay politi- 
cal action group based in Washington, has made Mr. Robb's 
campaign against the Republican nominee, Oliver L. North, 
one of its top priorities. 

“The radical right views Chuck Robb's convictions on 
lesbian and gay equality as a weakness, and will attempt to 
use this against him to defeat him,” the fund’s executive 
■director, Tim McFeeley, wrote members. “We need to prove 
that Chuck Robb can beat the radical right this year in 
iVirginia.” fAP) 

Quote/ Unquote • 

Kathleen Hah Jamieson, dean of the Ann en berg School for 
Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, critiquing 
a broadcast advertisement in which Tom Ridge, the Republi- 
can candidate for governor of Pennsylvania, is seen with his 
children: “It's one of those required chch6s. You have to 
establish that he does have a family and that he is comfortable 
with them — and that the dog doesn’t bite him.” (NYT) 


Fired Over Race, Teacher Puts Focus on Reverse Bias 


By Malcolm Gladwell 

Washington Post Sen-ice 

PISCATAWAY, New Jersey — 
Sharon Taxman and Debra W illiams 
were hired to teach in the business 
department of the high school here on 
the same day 14 years ago. 

Over the years, they both received 
strong evaluations, volunteered out- 
side the classroom and were granted 
tenure at the same time — to the point 
where there was nothing at all separat- 
ing the women's professional qualifi- 
cations. 

But in 1989, when the school board 
in this large, central New Jersey town- 
ship decided to lay off one member of 
the high school business staff, it did 
not hesitate. It dismissed Sharon Tax- 
man because she was white, and kept 
Debra Williams because she was 
black. 

What has brought the case national 
attention is that the Piscataway school 
board chose Ms. Williams over Ms. 
Taxman not to reverse any past pat- 
tern of discriminatory hiring, or even 
because blacks were underrepresented 


on the staff of the Piscataway High 
School. 

Rather it dismissed Ms. Taxman be- 
cause beard members fell a racially 
diverse leaching staff was a better- 
teaching staff. 

For those looking to clarify the of- 
ten murky legal status of affirmative 
action, this has proven an irresistible 
set of circumstances that raises one of 
the principal unresolved issues sur- 
rounding affirmative action as clearly 
as if it were dreamed up for a law 
school’s civil rights class; Is it right for 
an employer to discriminate in favor of 
minorities, even if that employer has 
not previously discriminated against 
them? 

At the time, the Piscataway school 
board had no inkling that what it was 
doing would turn into a national test 
case over the limits of affirmative ac- 
tion. And when Ms. Taxman sued in 
protest, her only interest was in recov- 
ering the two years of salary she lost 
after she was dismissed. 

In fact, she has scrupulously de- 
clined dozens of interview requests. 


unwilling to become the latest cause 
cclfcbre m the fight against so-called 
reverse discrimination. 

But that is precisely what the 47- 
year-old mother of two has now be- 
come, as Taxman v. Piscataway heads 
for a federal appeals court. 

The Justice Department, which un- 
der President George Bush had backed 
Ms. Taxman since tne beginning of her 
fight, took the unusual step two weeks 
ago of switching sides and taking up 
the defense of Piscataway. 

The move signaled a commitment 
on the part of the Clinton administra- 
tion to expand the scope of affirmative 
action programs. 

As for the Piscataway school board, 
it has twice refused to settle the case 
out of court, despite legal costs that 
now outstrip the damages sought by 
Ms. Taxman. 

“This was an issue that we felt very 
strongly about,” said Anne Thomas, a 
board member. 

“It was a moral issue as well as an 
educational one. We were offered a 


settlement, but that’s not the point. It’s 
a matter of principle.” 

Sharon Taxman was dismissed un- 
der an affirmative action program put 
in place by Piscataway m die mid- 
1970s. She won a $ 144.000 judgment in 
a federal court in Newark earlier this 
year that is now under appeal. 

The case hinges on the legality of the 
guidelines issued by Piscataway, which 
include, in addition to a general com- 
mitment to hiring more women and 
minorities, the following: “In all cases, 
the most qualified candidate will be 
recommended for appointment. How- 
ever, when candidates appear to be of 
equal qualification, candidates meet- 
ing the criteria of the Affirmative Ac- 
tion program will be recommended.” 

There is no question that had Ms. 
Taxman been more qualified or had 
more seniority than Ms. W illiams , she 
would have kept her job. And had Ms. 
Williams been white, the board would 
have decided whom to dismiss by flip- 
ping a coin. 

But there are two things that set 
Piscataway apart. 


The first is that no one has ever 
claimed that the Piscataway school 
district discriminaied against blacks in 
hiring or promoting teachers. 

These are the conditions under 
which the Supreme Court has consis- 
tently ruled (hat reverse discrimination 
is justifiable. 

Board members chose to keep Ms. 
Williams because she was the only 
black person in the nine-member busi- 
ness department, and they felt that 
providing a diverse group of teachers 
was an important pan of providing a 
good education. 

This is a justification for affirmative 
action on which, legal experts say, the 
Supreme Court has never explicitly 
ruled. 

The second aspect peculiar to the 
Piscataway case is that the board used 
its affirmative action program not in 
hiring but in firing. 

In previous cases, the Supreme 
Court has drawn a dear distinction 
between these two practices. 


Mrs. Cedras Reviled 
For Disdain of Poor 


By Rick Bragg 

jVfK York Times Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti 
— The wife of Lieutenant Gen- 
eral Raoul C6dras was given 
much credit by Jimmy Carter in 
the accord he reached here last 
week, but people who know her 
and the Cedi as family have ex- 
pressed doubts about the for- 
mer president’s portrayal of her 
as willing to die m the face of an 
invasion and of her crucial role 
in the negotiations. 

In interviews with more than 
a half-dozen women of all class- 
es in the last week, all spoke 
about General C6dras's wife. 
Yannick, on the condition that 
their names not be used, fearing 
retribution!. 

“She is a strong woman, but 
she does not make the decisions 
in the f amil y — he does,” a 
member of Haiti’s aristocracy 
said. 

Another well-to-do acquaint- 
ance of the Cedras family as- 
serted that the talk of Mrs. Ce- 
dras’s role in the high-level 
negotiations was a farce that 
only American news organiza- 
tions could create. 


The women who were inter- 
viewed said that in holding up 
Mrs. Cedras as a model of Hai- 
tian womanhood, Mr. Carter 
had insulted women of all class- 
es here. 

“Mrs. Cedras was impressive, 
powerful and forceful,” he said. 
“And attractive. She was dim 
and very attractive." 

He said also she told him that 
“we decided we were ready to 
die” after hearing that her fam- 
ily had been designated targets 
by the U.S. military. 

The women said the general's 
wife, an elegant woman of 38 
who dresses in the latest fash- 
ions. wears dazzling but tasteful 
jewelry and never has a hair out 
of place, is a viciously anti-poor 
elitist who has never said a kind 
word or showed any concern 
for anyone below her class. 

Mrs. Cedras, for example, 
has talked openly about her dis- 
gust for the followers of the 
Reverend Jean-Bertrand Aris- 
tide, the populist president who 
was deposed and sent into exile 
by her husband in September 
1991. 



Joint Rjcun/Agciw Fiance-Prcuc 

Yannick Cedras leaving a Port-au-Prince church with her son, Christian, and bodyguards. 


Away 


From Politics 

• Philip Morris has threat- 
ened to pull its headquar- 
ters out of New York if the 
city approves pending leg- 
islation that would outlaw 
smoking in nearly all res- 
taurants and public places. 

• The Reverend Jesse L. 
Jackson is threatening to 
boycott the four major tele- 
vision networks unless they 
put more minorities in visi- 
ble and powerful positions. 

• Drug Enforcement Ad- 
ministration officials have 
ended an investigation into 
the ways the Cali cartel, the 
Colombian-based organi- 
zation, moves cocaine from 
Colombia through Mexico 
to the United States. The 
investigation has resulted 
in the arrest of 166 alleged 
members of the distribu- 
tion network and the sei- 
zure of more than six tons 
of cocaine and $13 million 
in U.S. currency, drug 
agency officials said. 

• New York Gty police are 
investigating an Austrian 
visitor’s charge that she was 
raped in Central Park by a 
man who confronted her, 
put a sheet on the ground 
and assaulted her. 

NYT. AP. LAT 


X ‘ .* . ' 

\ . 


TRIAL: The Celebrated Simpson Murder Case Is Putting a Mirror Up to Society , Giving Americans a Candid Look at Themselves 


I TSuihmtl I M 


>’ \ 4* 


<i: i" * 


Ifauitr* IJtVH'tf 


ri-i. 

ii 




Continued from Page 1 

in O J. in the long weeks in 
court is the way his face seems 
to be getting even more beauti- 
ful and classically heroic. 

He is a sure-fire topic of last 
resort, like movies. 

“I thought he was guilty,” 
says your hostess. “I still do. 
When ] heard about the suicide 
note I figured it was the best 
way out But then I heard he’d 
escaped and next thing I was 
standing in front of the TV 
shouting ‘Run, OJ., run.’ Why 
do I feel that way T 
“This is not about race,” a 
guest says in the manner of 
white people everywhere when 
^they got the news. They said it 
as if they were proud of them- 
selves, and they were. 

White people liked O J. They 
liked liking him, too. Liking 
him proved they were not rac- 
ists. OJ. redeemed them. 

Whites never felt that OJ. 
hated them. For decades, pic- 
tures showed him wide-eyed 
; „ and a little open-mouthed, like 
* -"I A, . j j } a kid glancing up from a birth- 

* II ** . day cake. He was race-neutral, 

,. , like Cohn Powell or Nat King 

Cole. 

“People have told me Tin col- 
orless,” be has been quoted as 
saying in one of the two quickie 
biographies published since 
, . .. June. “Everyone likes me.” 

“I really enjoy being liked,” 
he said once. “I loved it when 
kids stopped me for auto- 
graphs, I loved it when people 
recognized me on the street.’ 

In a country where celebrity 
is akin to sainthood, OJ. has 
been famous for a long time. 
Then... 

cP' “Show me a hero and I wm 
write you a fragedy ” F. Scon 
, Fitzgerald said. 

■ “Looking nothing like the 
buoyant, charismatic sports 
hero who once earned a nation's 
ddulation, a weary, stone-faced 
* • OJ. Simpson yesterday pleaded 

CN-- not guilty "said the New York 

Daily News, adding the sinister 


i- 

¥* L • 

; • 
M 

; J-‘- ! 

a# 


fact that “his droopy eyes dart- 
ed side-to-side.'’ 

At that arraignment, he had a 
sluggish arrogance, like a moni- 
tor lizard on a too-cool day. At 
47, this was a whole new OJ. 
that contradicted the old one, 
but O J. operated with a lot of 
contradictions: street kid and 
country clubber, husband and 
wife-beater, white man's black. 


While people 
liked O J. They 
liked liking him, 
too. Liking him 
proved Ihey were 
not racists. 0. J. 
redeemed them. 


black man’s white. Rose Bowl 
r unning back, comedy klutz in 
the “Naked Gun” movies. 

“In Greek literature, heroes 
have a doubleness,” says Caro- 
line Dexter, classics professor 
in die George Washington Uni- 
versity honors program. 
“They’re insiders and they’re 
outsiders. The hero does great 
deals. He’s recognized. But die 
true hero story always ends with 
a mistake, and the hero dies in 
obscurity. The pattern is, we 
have to sacrifice our heroes as 
scapegoats, like Jesus.” 

And in a country where we 
twist our tongues around “in- 
terracial relationship" because 
there aren't any good ordinary 
words for it — miscegenation, 
race mixing, intermarriage, 
mongrehzation — we're a long 
.way from erasing the taboos 
against racial doubleness. For 
some people, the grass isn't just 
greener on the other side of the 
racial fence, it’s forbidden fruit 

On one side, we see Nicole 
with her blondness, the massive 
Vi kin g jaw, the tennis-WASP- 
Califomia-Aryan tribute to 
both beauty and a philosophic 
ideal. On the other side, he is an 


exotic fantasy: naive, passion- 
ate, the gorgeous and conquer- 
ing warrior hauling the princess 
up on his stallion. 

In Ebony, Nikki Giovanni 
wrote: “The Los Angeles Police 
Department and the prosecu- 
tors hate him because he is suc- 
cessful, good looking, was mar- 
ried to a white woman and had 
battered her." 

OJ. offers opportunities to 
pundits, ax-grinders and psy- 
cho-theorists nationwide. 

In the New York Review of 
Books. John Gregory Dunne 
lakes the opportunity to write; 

“Is there anyone out there 
who has not heard the fact, the 
factoids, the allegations, the 
half-truths, the untruths, the 
leaks, the smears, heard the E- 
mail jokes (hundreds of them, 
thousands, tasteless, it is always 
agreed, in all mitigating sancti- 
mony, even as they are passed 
on: ‘Did you hear that OJ.'s 
signed a new contract with 
Hertz . . . he's going to be mak- 
ing license plates for them' and 
‘Rodney King told O J., “Good 
thing you didn't get out of the 
car. Juice . . ” ’), heard the the- 
ories ripping along the commu- 
nications highway, crisscross- 
ing the Internet, hundreds of 
them, too, thousands ... the 
bloody butcher murders of Ni- 
cole and Ron (who in death 
achieved what OJ. earned in 
life, the true fame of not need- 
ing a last name for identifica- 
tion) a nirvana for conspiracy 
theor ists, halcyon days, not 
since JFK and the grassy knoll, 
the three tramps, the single bul- 
let, Zapruder frames 200 to 
224.” 

And that’s just a part of the 

first sentence. 

Like so many mythic hap- 
penings — the disappearance of 
Amelia Earhart, the sinking of 
the Titanic — this one provokes 
wild rumors: A drug deal gone 
wrong. A mob hit A second 
knife. A second murderer. O J. 
covering up for his grown son. 
A setup by a crazed racist cop. 


Jealousy over a love affair be- 
tween Nicole and Ronald Gold- 
man, the waiter who brought 
her the lost sunglasses. Or no, 
Goldman was gay. Was OJ.’s 
father gay? Jennifer Peace, an 
edgy but robust woman de- 
scribed as a former porn star, 
told police that A1 Cowlings, 
OJ.’s best friend (and driver in 
the freeway chase) told her that 
OJ. had told him that he, OJ., 
had done the killings. And what 


about rumors of a bite mark on 
Nicole’s back? Or was it a heel 
mark? Conspiracy theories, 
psychoanalytic theories. He did 
it because he loved her too 
much. Martyrdom to addiction, 
adultery, fame, a ghetto child- 
hood. Details seemed to deserve 
quote marks around them, as if 
they existed in a different di- 
mension: “the envelope.” “the 
glove.” 

Feminists keep trying to 


work the spouse abuse angle, 
particularly since the broad- 
casts of the 91 1 tape erf a terri- 
fied Nicole, but it’s hard to 
think of near-decapitation as 
"spouse abuse” in the same 
league, say, as a bruise from a 
thrown ashtray. 

Meanwhile, sitting in the sky 
boxes, running the concessions, 
sel lin g hot dogs to the crowd, 
are the lawyers, politicians, rac- 
ism-mongers white and blade. 


opportunists of every variety. 
The rest of us watch while the 
wrestlers sweat and thunder. 
We watch thanks to the biggest 
casher-in of all, the huge, dish- 
linked, lap-topped, ad- 
powered, fame-fueled, dead- 
line-tooled media luring us so 
far into the myths, the dream, 
the beastliness, the spectacle, 
that we hardly notice the fact 
that we've become the spectacle 
ourselves. 


EDUCATION DIRECTORY 



NEW FALL 
COLLECTION 

ESQ\m 

In Paris 

Also, Sales 
on Summer Collection 

Marie-Maitine 

8, rue de Sevres, 

Paris 6th 



>» ■. , 

s! N*'. 

_• - Ag.ll: stumsxxsiaastn 


Arduous Task of Selecting Jury Begins 


New YorilTunet Serttee 


new torn turn ■**•"-* 

LOS ANGELES — Tbc laborious process 
of finding 12 citizens who can tty OJ. Simp- 
son imp artially, despite the torrent of fact, 
rumor and falsehood with which they have all 
; been inundated over the last three months. 

i began Monday as the first group of prospec- 

’ live jurors marched into the courtroom of 
Judge Lance A Iio. , „ ... 

On Monday afternoon, 14 weeks after Ni- 
cole Brown Simpson and a friend, a waiter 
named Ronald Goldman, were hacked to 
, 5 fft th and Mr. Simpson charged with the 


killings. Judge Ito and the lawyers began 
reviewing the first few baicfaes of jury candi- 
dates. culled from lists of drivers and regis- 
tered voters in Los Angeles County. 

Of utmost concern at this stage were not 
attitudes toward guilt or innocence, but 
whether jurors could serve — possibly seques- 
tcjol — - for what could be a six-month trial. 

Those not excluded for reasons of hardship 
will fill out 80-page questionnaires, prepared 
by Judge Ito. They will then be questioned for 
bias, primarily by the judge. 


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j ±r ' — — — . — ■ s p, 

'international institute -1 

j OF PARIS 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
JLN INTERN ATIONAL HOTEL 

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Tel. (1) 45 26 59 28 - Fax (1) 45 26 59 29 
INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE M AXIM'S OF PARIS 
L 52. rue St Lazare -75009 PARIS - FRANCE , 




SWITZERLAND 








Page 4 


ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1994 



SELECTED IN UNIQUE 


•S3 




THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE FOR PRESTIGIOUS HOUSES, CARS, YACHTS, CRUISING, AIRCRAFT, ARTS AND UNIQUE PEOPLE^ 



FRANCE view oh the gou course— 

Set as approrinuitly I kca of land at Saint Van La 
Bntcdic. 2D Eon nwaf Puis, dir hay windows of die 
snmpums rilla w.rrWi one of the mm preirigicw 
5 Dt)\cruncv in the Park ares. BuDioofteefltrcr. in 400 
M). m include usi reception rnns nidi lurpbaa, 1 
Jimng nun. 0 bedrooms, cuff iceomnadarians aid i 
oroges. % 

Fqcn Boutogne ■ RANGE. 

TeL [33} 146 04 50 89 fax, [33] 1 46 04 10 23 



RIVIERA - CAP FERRAT 

In 3 BeUe-fpoqnMtyk riBa. j cumptnous. 300 sq. m. 
ajunmem opens onto a stunning "00 sq. m. gardes. 
Vlopnfonn view over dir Bay of Vfflcfnndic. A 80 sq- 
m (King opens onto terrace. a dining room, and 2 
bedrooms. Separate aparnneni. 2 ceflais, 2 partings. 

JOHN TAYLOR ■ Monien Bora 
A*. Abort lor, 06290 a Jwn Cop feral • RANGE 
TeL[33) 93 76 02 98- fox. (33) 93 76 13 09 


CANNES 

Tbc pesrige of an ateprimal residence nidi the mm 
bonrihil view in die world ■ a perfect aJlancc of gemne- 
rrr and light, dad in trauparenoe and white, opening 
mu die sea. Each apaitmem a 77 La Croisette a fieri an 
enviable panoramic new om die Bay of Cannes, from 
tbe lerea [duds to tbc Esterd 
COGHXM 

77, la CreisolM, 06400 Camus - FRANCE 
ToL (33} 93 94 37 77 - Fax. (33) 93 94 35 30 


PAWS . _ 

Sedsacd mznpoo restored in me angnul ayfe, wafa put* 
ndled nails. Venalfc parquet floors, firepluzt, modem 
comfort. Panoramic view over die Bail dc Boulogne and 
the Erfiel Town, 8HJ0 sq. ft. filing space, ground floor 1 4 
lenli * bannent. 6 bedrooms, bathrooms, trances, gar- 
den, interior courtyard, life, parting. 

BUMK TKKWDON MMOW 
81 me de Aww 75009 Mi ■ RANGE 
M. (33) 144 91 9) 15 -Fox. [33] 149 93 01 63 




PARIS 

!»T8BlfeA8] 

Near ihe MnenrGankro. in die molt eatfasire area of 
the I6dt anondiHCffient, this hearmtnl hgtd with in 
anrique fepale oficn 2 superb new apanmemi 1230 and 

260 sq. m.) complete with large reception moos, renace 
jud balconies. Basemen (icrice and 


COGBMM -44 na Jao|uM bert 75835 taw Cato 17 
«NCt Td. (33) 1 41 03 30 39 or 1 44 34 69 39 


to (33) 141 95 32 80. J 


PARIS 

TK> wmptinui vJ original 2 SO square-more aparr- 
moor. uwde a tounboiM located in a prime urea, 
offers nccpnonal spacious roocu T»o reception 
room dining room - } bedrooms. 1 parkrop. 200 hjiu- 
le-metre terrace. 

FcaoNauKy- FRANCE 

U. (33) 1 47 45 22 60 - fax. (33) 1 46 41 02 07 


RIVIERA 

ManeUcm pnpoiT limaad on mp of a hill mofooting 
Vdkfandte and Nice. Enrinfc renovated with baonwn 
oiateriaL view oo the tea. lndodc, magnificent Ttcepdoo 
rooms with marble Hoots, a beMufuTiO sq. m. master 
bedroom with 2 baths. Folly modermred eat-in Idrchen 
overflowing-pool system, tennis court, purdne s boose. 

JOHN TAYLOR - Moran Boren 
Av. Abertlo> 06290 51 Jean Cap Fesnit- FRANCE 
TcU33[ 93 38 00 66 - Fax. (33} 93 76 13 09 


RIVIERA -W0UGINS 

An exceptional quality of life may be (bund in die i»R 
of dm preserved estate, with way hmuy provided: 
high qu4it) seenrhy ijitems, a large range of services. A 
large aekedon of 2-ro 4-room apatuu t uis and battles 
(45 to IDO nr} is imhhle. 


1900 Cbawi da Grand Vrikn 06250 Msnpn • FSMCL 
M. (33) 92 92 62 22- to (XQ 92 92 9712- 
Kre From W. (33} 93 42 39 55 - tab [33) 93 N <3 TL 




RIVIERA 

Comucud m rife aiu vrithh beat, the pvtuioqai vntc 
-Link Alitra-. Li Sirens vdla rrunn afi die charoi gl Ac 
kemin- ot die cronut. OirrlmLing dir tea. Li fiirmr 
bn panoramic i*uv oict Cap Fenai and the port of 
Buuheu. Inside in raumc gate- Iks j Urge garden aith a 
ranmum; pooL nremne lauitv and trophal vajfuuna 
BrarooitdlMta alaaBoufingrin** 

5 bis A*. Princesse Alice MC 9SQ00 Monaco. 
Tri. (33|93 25 50 25- Fox. (33} 93 50 95 81 



RIVIERA - BEAU VALL0N 

Selected iiOO square- metre am on a sumptuous and 
protected estate faring the sea are available - an ideal 
spot for buddrog a dream home. 


Cogednn Scdw office : T«L (33) 94 43 8S 94. Mo - 
FMMCfeTeL [33| 93 A3 55 S3 - tax. (33) 93 10 13 II. 


LOIRE VALLEY ESTATE -FRANCE 

I9di fwiini j' dmcui* vuii 2 <waH ftocvud, Vo? 
and romantic scaring. grear jear-roemd firing. Mast 
home 45flna : Bring ana offers high quality imcnidei 
Many atdmd&fs. Set on 5 acres, 3 sc. psdt. and 2 ac. 
AOCTnuaine vineyard. Magnificent terrace with 
btnh-in Cafifitrman spa. 

far note Mnrmatietn Cdl fct RAN0E 
TiL (33) 54 32 06 53 -fat (33) 54 32 00 93 


CHALET AT CHAMONIX 

Snared in Qanunic France, this has never 
been lived in ditee its rentmtnL 700 of firing area, 
conistmg of 2 separate aparoneno, with own entrance. 
5 bedrooms, 4 Mbs, huge firing ic fining room for the 
1st one. 3 bedrooms & baths, Inrmg & diningroom, hu 
die 2nd one. Heated swimming pool, satno. praldng. 

flaMwBumnLm i a oaiiM-ta. m (4jaMM 
or UMt» Ms ■ RUHOi Id. <33| 1 42 30 II 00 
- Fax. PI) I 42310073 



SWITZERLAND 

Fabulous 19th century pcesograat property. ]i mimuB 
from Geneva. Snpnh views overlooking Lake Geneva 
rod the famous Mom-Blue 6 T bedrooms. Fnchawing 
Stephen in c ay room. Imposing Hbiaiy. Ourdoor 
swimming pool, pool home whh sauna and a summer 
veranda. Must be seen. Price: Sfr. S.SOOjMfl. 

CroatTvo Madtdins Group SwiuRnolEsWw. 
TeL (41} 21 962 8000 - Fox. (41} 21 962 8019. 


SWITZERLAND 

Charming iWs-cenrury estate. Et a pu s i tefy tenonted 
Swiss style Eutnbottse which exudes chancier and charm. 
T /8 bedroonB. bnotroSce. fireplaces, aparuaenl on 2nd 
flooc Otmt-iard with stables, barn and fountain. ID mm. 
from GennaTaratnaffS-OOTnr. Price: Sfr 6.500.000. 

Citathro A tohrf ng Group Swiss Red Estate. 
TeL (41) 21 962 WOft fax. (41) 21 962 8019. 






PALAam MARRAKECH 

Situated n nbc histone bean of Mvnkccb* dhc Mofizd. 
tha tamrtlf remnd pabee hat s 1000 m2 firing ana an 
2kid*uKMhg4 Fakutiandfintes-achofDaehu 
a bedroom, a dressing room, a bath, a firing room. 2 
paroov. Large firing area for die taicahen. Heated swim- 
ming pooL pnwri and omna Parking for 6 can. 

GmM h FUNO: M. |31) 1 43 M II M - hue. 1 43 IB 64 14 
arUNQUIfaii'IMNt£M.p3| I 433011 00- 
Fn.pqi42340072 



PARIS .1 

l thtktiUiKiwKMML- Ptro-m VnA.ivaroag^ 
jdj„ almfc m<ftnd ik.Wi"* law"- 
raw ama- Ik. «wpiMui .uvit.*nt,m kt-vrt -^it 
Vhu nl ik iluimn^ iKt-hiud knivatd 
Strut «.h ihw.ii J- the air ho \.wk R"_v lL»vksrC| 
a priori Ht< and utifepa. LMkqd.-, '^*4^-tev- 

coesttM _ . 

44. rw Jmmh Nrort. 7SM3 Nm«*w » • Mgn 
TR.I33JU10S 3030 RX. |33l J4103 33»~ 


PARIS FACING NOTRE-DAME - 

1 hrec new Invenunv tpximrarv uuimuwii ibv watqM 
view oi Vont I Lme. the qttik ul ihe Vwt JttJ »# 
wtperb iht)4n ua the tap Ihw of » tnjpBtx>»»i.»iP* <A 
all Paris Their nueptwn am ■Jppruv 'Out : upniv 
onto a hcamifd rotundi pjiu*. whi*h pt.wiA.-. j qam. 
voum level Parling Ewrliiwt inJoJoL 
COGECHM 44 fu* Joequm fcwt. 73833 NjWpLj 1 
FUNttW-rtt) M10SM30«I4434»» 
to. (33) Ml OS WOO. 




THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOUSE 
FOR SALE IN GREECE 

Thtv [0 bedroom uD with brthromns rat >uiiri kw* n 
vet in Landscaped gardens with over 4.0UV dnnrathc 
ml fhtii bearing nets. Price on leqtwt. 

HeSeroc Propwrtiw A hrwUrotrt farriees Ud 
Solomow 18, lyfcsnM, 14123 Athm, Gram*. 
ToL (360) 1 2845060 ■ Fox. (90) l 2845060 



GREECE 

‘FuSnag rtc ahM aJi Hottli. hofidoy homcv offices fir 
rimktpmeoL islaods. town homes- iodusttid buAbng? 
Coopcramro powbk «h other agents, hillwivirecvn- 
ic agency providing advice, recommending kronen rod 
Cmfing hoimcl CD tperifkarion, 

HeVeak Properties 8 brwsiHienf5orriwUid 

Satonau 18, Lykovristd, 14123 AHrons, Grow. 
TeL (360) 1 284J0M • fax. (30J 1 28450M. 



A CHATEAU IN FRANCE 

The most handful chateau in Provcncr, Brochare pa 
Kqstn Vkhs by appoituraem oak. ReF 4^01.04 SR. 
Openir^ hoar! from Monday m Fndav 9 am - 12 am- 
2 pm - “pm Karanby and Sunday by appoint mem 

LUNMOMUBt Faum-SAVOfHWtMIZ 
Z iw tal Dw V 1 ST ■ 13 M Ail m FMWM ■ wAw l-mm 
r4.pxci»n47-FK.[H«»no 



ENGUND 

KnuingUHi Green hmenahbhd itself ar one of Loodoo'i 
premier dndmma n pared bjr the strong am of sde 
over the past ISmoida. Ramming BUM DO* auntir of 
a xdeaiu* of 4 ind 6 bedroom heroes, fo addition, the 
dwefopen, Tayhtr^ Voodcow Ptoprny Company Limiod, 
have commenced work so the wand phase and is soc- 
cradulrgcnraauiig pre-vakv an I-jbedapatmenis. 

Alenqum pleas* cootod Ae SoksOflitB 
on |44] 71 938 3350 


PALACE IN TANGER 

MarveOass and mrique palace in the bean of die 
Kasbah. 15 rooms approx, bated on different levels, 
with terraces and inside path*. Roof-top swimming 
pooL faring the bay. Pabee for safe whh its aqiuitt 
Oriental and Gunoe f ut u kmc - 

CoarodiaTfngir, Morocffl. Td & Fate. f212)993SS56 
or UNIQUE, From. 

Td (33) 1 42 30 81 00- fax (33) 1 42 24 00 72 



LONDON 

A dooble-fronced house spproachd through ekanmiejy 
tsanoled wnro^K iron goes rod set hadt fisffi dns ia»- 
ved trod by aver 100 feet. 4 receptioo roans. 1 bedroom 
sahes, mnty. Staff fix with ncepriro room, bedsoom and 
bnhroom. Iw A njwl gndeus and ww »> F reehold. 
HAMPIDN5 

Conrom Jto (foUmy BKUND. U (44) 071 794 1222 
or Bdmf Toybr BfCUND. W. (44) 071 493 1222. 


ENGLAND 

Kensingroa Green has esaUekcd hseff as one ofLottdon's 
pratnerdevekproanas evidence by the strong race of sale 
gw ike past 18 swath*. Ramming bbc oar* omnik of 
a sdecnoo of 4 and 6 bedroom krona. In addhforo die 
devriopas. Taylor^ TToodrow Property Company Limited, 
ban coma Mc td woeh do the second phase mid is sne- 
craduDygoteraring pre-safes ou f -3 bed ^unnenB. 

AS BropBin plwse ntariha Salas Office 
on (44) 71 938 3350 



PORTUGAL 

R«nfnl restored convened farmhouse on 2.5 acres of 
(and in a udnded rural setting. US5 1.000, 000 

nQUIO NRJBBSCH 
SodraMi d* MraSofoo WAorio. ISA. 
Apertado 2192 qorto do logo, (135 Aland, Pnrtegal 
TA [3511 N 399055 - to (351) M 399057. 



COUNTRY MANOR 

Tim dtroe-stmey Ctmnnr French Manor h over 10JM0 
sq.fi. It indadB 6 bedrooms. 7-bath world daw home 
towers high on a bltrif above a dtampitutship gedf tour- 
te in Sprmgfidd. MassMtii redden ml uo. Hrepbues, 
2-noiey Great Hall Offered at 2,560.000 USS. 
Extensive fiinnshingi indnded 

HOmuNMBMIUlClIHLRttlrt 
OcfciTX: (H2M4W 1730 - W avUvroa PQ(1) M OM 3033 
■Mdr n>cMH i»M HH-MkNhitoapimaH tw 



PC;..uGAL 

Qmoa da t ago. Unique lakeside vifla with 5 bedrooms 
and atrium. PomsMta for private jetty. Both 1989. 
USS97MW. 

KKARDMOWSOI 
SMMnd* d» (Mndbfw IwWah, IM. 
Apovtwde 3193, tpdBta da logo, 3135 AknenaL Fortagid 
W. (351) 39 399055- to (3SI| 19 399057. 


MEGEVE - FRENCH ALPS 

Recently btdk 470 m2 chalet, ferity the Moor Blanc 
s paci o mfirin g-toDn*. 5 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, gmw- 
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Od In fan*, town. Til : (33) 1 4072 69 IS 



MISSOURI -USA 

This prominent cm amoms 373 am and 4 homes, 
4.920 sqfi-srie bant has veto many fughdoBtn paid at 
anenm tales. The Shaman mid txnwonhy 1R245 tq. 
ft romtapanry risowpba in teaksntod reaches unify 4 
wueyi with gfoss windowa dhn provide a pmocunkriew, 
HOmUN MBMAnONALREHTT 
London, UK : (44) 11 905 2010 
ni ili i s r .mn)aujwnw-th»praiwkcan)newsmi 



GUY C0UACH 1 1.50 

far safe by owner 1989. Yolw> diesel engines 2x306 cv, 
VHF, Loras C atumnan pfiac, 70fl000EFHTnegp- 
risbje. 


Forfuladn 


> swim Mot Mpbtat Mir. 


HtANO. Tri, (33) 1 423011 00 



LUXURY CHARTER 

Jka 

— ar- 'r—* 

Mediterranean season. 42 metre uotunadhi anrentfy 
arnsing the Medhettanao- Madera, fast - 26 knots. 
Comfortable acansuwdarioa for 12 guests in 6 doable 

— — ■ . • 


emote staterooms. 8 aew. 


Di MuitvuB Franet 

Tel. (33) 93 65 63 56 - to (33) 93 65 07 


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YACHTING 

SYNDICATION 


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hill equip, run w»xti owner saseroea, 3 ±tc goes 
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t bay 



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TdifrUatind III. 43oa aiaailnunB mmryaehi. 5 eshiat, 
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ASTON MARTIN 

Aston Martin DB6 MHI Yntage. 1970. Midnight 
bine vriih dads Hue hide. Correafynoinaiiied hy A- AL 
Service Dealer and recognised Masqne spedafio- A 
mpeth, me Vantage. £42*500. 

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TtL («4) 071 58 1 COM -to (44) 071 581 9676 


D.S. MARITIME 

Yachting syndication. Management. Tomorrow's way 
of yadtt ownership. The logic of sharing the nse anJ 
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DJ. Mattne France 

TeL (33) 93 65 63 56 ■ Fox. (33) 93 65 07 78 


SEPTEMBER BLUE 

139,5 \42,5m) Launched by Van las to DcVoqgcdesi- 
gn, stcef and al unto. Dim Starfoy tu. Snp Accoma- for 
12 in b ensuhe die caUsi and conf accom. for 10 atw. 
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Worldwide cental agent. Kcfi LM523. 

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UK. Iri (44) 0273 571 722 -Fox. (44)0273571720 or 
fame* TaL P3] 93 34 01 OOto (33) 93 34 20 40 


38M DIASNIP. 1987 

By Hetsen Hofiand. IShsmaL sp.2xli70HPDemz 
3J3Q0 nla m gf. MiUm deign, Aidme im. Own 
mre: on main deck. M width VIT staa-eoan^ 3 puKcrin 
w. bath, ensure on Isw dec L Stp. dforng room, gym, 
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dan, ABS posaSde. Vesy Cnfc nsed. Serumfe for rafo. 

U/R55FN YACHTS Spain. 

Td (34)71 700445 -feat. 04) 71 700551 



BLUE SHADOW C FOR CHARTER 

A tacray 165 ft 150m) mmorwhi with apaoou enrer- 
tainmg/recremiomri areas ana acoommodaoaa for 12 
pusa send hy a pro fi arntwal crew of 12. The ideal 
mefac for stnnmen along the French and Italian 
Rivwas, with wattes bared in the Caribbean. USS 
85,000 per week + ramring expenses. 

Omtar Ycohts Lid, fandon. 


J0NGERT 20S 

Sailing yacht, hoik in 1989. Tastefid krrerior deauarioo 
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benfu and jdjoatng hathreunu. 

Ctownr UL (4t| wS^uTtom 421 6733 !» 
USA TaL(l) 305 522 4«ir - to (11 3U SU 1161 



131' MOTOR YACHT 

■ 

Far sale by tender. Lamsehrd 1992. Tiamactan Mg- 

r ./ 

Comforable accomaodatmi for 14 press md 8 aew. 

For aure derails, please contact ow office 



DS Markfim LTD. UK - 
ToL (44} (0) 703 456 905 - 
fax. (44(0) 703 454 031 



ANTHEA PJL 

FOR SALE. (ATMmL 1991 Grosraatd » 

Hotttad m the highest sradxnL nothing has been spa- 
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MoatolfL {33)93 50 23M -Fw.p3) 9315 15 89 
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LUCKY DREAM, fossau, 

Akt ivadaMe for duner,U5$ 39.100 per week for np 

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dc asking USS 1.5 M. far foil mfentarioi phase fox 
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TeL (33) 93 34 92 45 > to (33) 03 34 84 2$ 



SA0NE, SEINE, RHONE, RHINE, DANUBE. 

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Waro uriwt ♦ trodwro, mM [8«U 
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M00NMAIDEN II FOR CHARTER 

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AZIMUT 78' ULTRA 

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Henj fang U (S2) 355 8377 la (353) >73 4014 




INEKE IV moo 1 (39.62*), 1990 

FOB SALE AND CHARTER. Impresste ocean gang 
xlirmimum motor yacht with rich and comfortable 
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toa 14.(33)1 42 61 66 77 -to (33) 142 97 *3 SI 

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for 6 guests in 3 dotdde cahiw and 4 in 
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MATANTHAR 38 metre ■ 124 fact 


This Fcadship is offered for tale and a also amibUc fat 
dbaner 

tor (nscR 1 ! Yacht Mcffotnf 

TA (33) 93 34 44 55 - to (33) 93 34 92 74 


ft 

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tor tnuVi Yacht Hohroiroi 
&L (S3) 93 34 44 55 - to |33) 93 34 92 74 


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^ I Sit 


VNiQUf 


. KSTERNATIOWAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEM BER 27 , 1994 

Strict Bosnia Arms Zones ITT TTT" I Bra 2 


Page 5 


By Ruth Marcus 

H'asAfngfwj Pmi Service 

i UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — President Bill Clinton 
Jt called Monday for more vigor- 
' 7 ous enforcement of the “exclu- 
sion zones" in Bosnia in which 
heavy weapons are prohibited 
But witha deadline looming 


an Muslims, a move that is un- 
popular with U.S. allies in Bos- 
nia. 

As a consequence, U.S. offi- 
cials are exploring the possibili- 
ty of moving to lift the embargo 
but delaying carrying out that 
step untO next year. 

Mr. Clinton, who discussed 


would consider moving unilai- The Bosnian Serbian military 
crally to lift die embargo if the commander has threatened UN 
United Nations did not go peacekeepers, convoys have 


aJOn §- been blocked and peacekeepers' 

U.S. allies in the effort to movements have been restrici- 
bring peace to Bosnia have been 

unwilling to lift the embargo. The United Nations lodged a 
Britain and France do not sup- strong protest with Bosnian 
port the idea because they fear Serbian leaders following a 


., w 


}y ~ 




for the United States to fiilfiU the embargo Sunday Iritfathe fear !![, bian Ieaders I 011 ™ 8 * a 

its pledge to push for lifting the Bosnian pitridenSialzetb^ ***** of ^ P 1580 * ™ Ua l war ? m S Sunday that 

anas embargo against the Bos- gpvfc, no ri^tranSihe f ' Safetyof planes , .““"f 

nian Muslims, the Clinton ad- Smiuous issued Sarajevo anpon 1 could no long- 

ministration has created a pos- Monday. Serbs, is also unwillmg to take er be guaranteed, 

sible escape hatch: moving to A senior administration offi- ^ step ’ ^ a “? on has bce P- m °stly 

end the embargo next month dal said Mr. Clinton and Mr A senior offidal said it was closed since the air strike 
but delaying implementation Izetbegovic had the “ not at ^ dear ” 11131 a dela >’ in Thursday, which was in retalia- 

until next year. “modalities" of liftin'* the em- 1116 embargo would re- lion for attacks on UN peace- 


thestep. 

A senior offidal said it was 
“not at all dear” that a delay in 


U1V OIUV1J UdUlg LliV 

Sarajevo airport could no long- 
er be guaranteed. 

The airport has been mostly 
closed since the air strike 
Thursday, which was in retalia- 
tion for attacks on UN peace- 


~ c — . . 



m ne- 


wt U;i 


i- 


until next year. “modalities" of liftin'* the em- ^^8 tbe embargo would re- lion for attacks on UN peace- 

The Bosnian Serbs have been bargo but refused to toy wheth- *0**® the allies' concerns. keepers, 

increasingly violating the exclu- er the United States would sup- With all land routes to Sara- 

zon® 5 ^ or weeks, port delaying the ■ Serbs Threaten Flights i ev ° ^ the aiipon is vital to 

with httle response from UN unplementation until after the Stepping up the DreSure on ensure supplies of food and oth- 
, . . . difficult winter months. Saraj?vo’s oniV outa F dTS the "“d- K™ Janowski. a spokesr 

in recent wttks, the sttua- Another senior offidal said Bosnian Serbs are warnina that 11X313 ^ or the UN aid agency, 

uon around Sarajevo has deteri- there was concern among the they can no loneer ffuaramp* 83111 “ty had about a iwo- 

orated substantially, "Mr. Clin- Bosnian Muslims themselves the safety of flights lothe Bos- w e^ supply lefL 

ton said, and Sarajevo once about the threat of a “very nian capital. The Associated As if to underscore their 

again faces the prospect of quick response” from their Bos- Press reported. threat to aircraft, Serbian forces 

strangulation. A new resolve by man Serbian opponents if the . on Sunday took two TQmm 

the United Nations to enforce embargo were lifted. . They also pulled several anti- a ‘ hou] . 

its resolutions is now necessary Mr. Clinton has long wanted f Lrc ™ ft , ga ? s ou J.f f slora S e der-launched surface-to-air 
tosayeSarajevo.” to lift the aims embargo but has f? *2?^*^* 3 _ .^rvaSLi C t^ missile out of a UN -monitored 


ton said, “and Sarajevo once about the threat of a “very 
again faces the prospect of quick response” from their Bos- 
strangulalion. A new resolve by nian Serbian opponents if the 
the United Nations to enforce embargo were luted. 


its resolutions is now necessary 
to save Sarajevo.” 


Mr. Clinton has long wanted 
to lift the arms embargo but has 


With the Bosnian Serbs balk- been unable to persuade U.S. 
mg at accepting a peace plan allies to go along, 
that would strip them of some The Bosnian Sobs’ reluc- 
of their territorial gains, Mr. tance to accept a division of the 


nian capital. The .Associated 
Press reported. 

They also pulled several anti- 
aircraft guns out of LIN storage 
to conduct a “training exer- 
cise,” Lieutenant Colonel Tim 


»im 


^ . 

t J r.iw .-i • } r 
**• ■*; ;;; 


lOWUMi 


•••Wfc. e. 

'*-*• •; v 


- ta». 


:oi»i ms: 


IlliRi 

TING 

ATION 


*nu ,i 


KtK*S 


Clinton has set an Oct. 15 dead- country, which would strip 
line by which they must accept them of about one-third of their 
thfi map, gains, and Congress’s threat to 

If they do not, he has prom- take action to lift the embargo 
ised to try to lift the prohibition pressed Mr. Clinton to set the 
on providing arms to the Bosni- Ocl IS deadline. He said he 

A City With a Past 
Hopes for a Future 

By Jonathan C. Randal 

Washington Part Service 

DUBROVNIK, Croatia — At first casual glance on a fine 
September day after the season’s first heavy rains, Dubrovnik, the 
poet Byron's “pearl of the Adriatic," looks like its old picture 
postcard image. I 

During the day, fishing vessels and sailboats bob along the I 
shimmering water just the way they should. After dark, young 
people eye each other as they parade up and down Dubrovnik’s 
main thoroughfare, the Stradun. 

Close your eyes and dream: Dubrovnik is again not just a 
resort, but the quick-witted Republic of Ragusa which, from 1358 
until Napoleon snuffed it out in 1808, was the center of the 
insurance trade, a thriving meeting place between the Ottoman 
Turks and the Western world of the Habsburgs, a favorite haunt 
. of spies and adventurers. 

* But all is not well today. 

The idyllic September scenes, like so many others in Dubrov- 
nik's long tradition as a survivor against the odds, are part theater, 
with these attractive extras unconsciously bolstering the city's 
flagging spirits. 

The problem here is the absence of the Americans, the Ger- 
mans, toe Italians, the French, the British and the other foreign 
viators who kept this walled medieval fortress town coining 
money as a tourist attraction. 

Asking local tourist officials about the city’s finances is a 
delicate matter, one likely to bring a storm of incomplete statistics 
and optimistic anecdotes. 

The cause of this skittishness is the war following Croatia’s 
secession from Yugoslavia, which visited Dubrovnik memorably 
in 1991 and fketingjy thereafter, but Ungers on sufficiently nearby 
to discourage all but the most faithful of its well-heeled foreign 
devotees. 

In the fall of 1991, the Serbian and Montenegrin pounding by 
land, air and sea of this port of little strategic value stirred the 
world's conscience. 

All of Dubrovnik’s old town had been listed as a historical 
monument by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and 
Cultural Organization. French and Italian cabinet ministers and 
assorted European intellectuals and artists rushed here to show 
their solidarity for it, as if Venice, Paris or the Vatican had come 
under bombardment. 

In fact, Dubrovnik was built to withstand just such sieges and 
did so again. The bombardment of the city killed about 200 
soldiers and civilians, a small fraction of the numbers slaughtered 
regularly in neighboring Bosnia when the war spread there a half- 
year later. 

At the Hold Argentina, Niksa Banicevic of the Dubrovnik 
Hotel Association is in his element, joyfully volunteering that for 
the first time in three years American tourists are on their way, 
thanks to a San Francisco Lravel agency. Is it a straw in the wind? 

Why insult the future by expressing’ such doubts, he intimates, 
since Dubrovnik has come a long way since its own dark days, 
even if there is an even longer road back to its prewar prosperity. 

To be sure, a fast hydrofoil link to Bari in southern Italy delivers 
tourists twice a week during the season, as do overnight ferries 
from Split and Rijeka, to the north along Croatia’s Adriatic coast. 

Dubrovnik’s airport is still avoided by the dozens of foreign 
airlines that once used it, because artillery shells occasionally land 
nearby, but it remains open as a matter of principle, offering a 
daily flight to Croatia's capital, Zagreb. 

Still, Dubrovnik soldiers on in its fashion. Boosters are proud of 
the recently completed summer festival — the 45th in an uninter- 
rupted series — although they are quick to acknowledge that they 
no longer can afford the foreign stars who helped keep Dubrovnik 
among Europe’s top-drawer resorts. 

Unsightly concrete now fills in the holes left by mortar shells 
that scar its elegant, stone-covered streets. And despite generous 
private and public donations from foreign friends, six burned-out 
palaces remain boarded up, and the Franciscan monastery is still 
without a roof for lack of funds. 

But Dubrovnik has old and powerful Friends. Ivana Burdjelez, 
director of the city’s international university center, tirelessly calls 
on a network of foreign devotees to carry her city's message 
abroad and troll for money and support. 


’ * and conducted a training exer- 

Relations between the Serbs else" wiih them, a UN officials 
and the UN peacekeeping force said. 


have deteriorated sharply since 
a UN-requested air stnke by 
the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization on a Serbian' tank 
Thursday. 


At another weapons collec- 
tion rite west of the city, the 
Serbs conducted a s imil ar exer- 
cise with an 88mm anti-aircraft 
gun, he said. 


Rabin Lets 
Builders on 
West Bank 

Reuters 

JERUSALEM — Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin, 
who curbed Israeli con- 
struction in the occupied 
territories two years ago, 
has approved new housing 
for a Jewish settlement just 
inside the West Bank, offi- 
cials said Monday. 

The move, which drew 
immediate condemnation 
from the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization, ap- 
peared to be designed to 
tighten Israel’s hold on a 
section of the West Bank 
directly across the border 
from where the Jewish state 
is the narrowest — only 1 1 
kilometers (7 miles) wide. 

“It is on the ‘seam,’ ” 
said a Rabin spokesman, 
Oded Ben-Ami, when 
asked about a report in the 
Ha’axetz newspaper that 
Mr. Rabin had given per- 
mission for new housing in 
the Alfei Menasfae settle- 
ment. three kilometers in- 
side the West Bank. 

He said the term “seam” 
was a reference to areas just 
“100 meters or so” across 
the pre-1967 war border j 
with the West Bank. I 


Brazil Leans Toward Cardoso 

Ex-Finance Chief Is Poised for Presidency 


By Gabriel Escobar 

Wtuhmgiai post Senice 

SAO PAULO — With the success of an eco- 
nomic plan he designed fueling his campaign, 
• Fernando Henrique Cardoso seems poised to 
become the next president of Brazil. 

Although the main opposition in the Oct. 3 
elation insists that the country is in for a sur- 
prise, pollsters and political observers say Mr. 
Cardoso’s center-right coalition has an insur- 
mountable lead over his chief rival, the Socialist 
candidate Luiz In&cio da Silva. 

Should Mr. Cardoso get more votes than his 
opponents' combined total, as some analysts 
predict, he will win the election outright and 
avoid a Nov. 15 runoff. 

if the analysts are correct, the former finance 
minister will assume office Jan, 1 with an unusu- 
ally strong mandate for a Brazilian leader, a 
factor recognized even by detractors who grudg- 
ingly credit him with orchestrating a newfound 

stability. 

Under his administration. Brazil would open 
its markets, the last major country in Latin 
America to do so. 

Mr. Cardoso’s stabilization plan has reduced 
the monthly inflation rate since July from about 
50 percent to less than 6 peicenC and he has 
outlined a broader economic program that was 
designed to be put in place within the first six 
months. 

Aides say its immediate goals are to sell more 
state companies, revise the tax and electoral 
systems and begin the daunting task of improv- 
ing health and education for Brazil’s long-ne- 
glected poor. 

The challenges facing about 150 million Bra- 
zilians are enormous, and no one is predicting a 
quick fix. Mr. da Silva, a former auto worker. 


maintains that the stabilization plan was de- 
signed to win Mr. Cardoso the presidency and 
that he is sure to suffer the fate of its 
predecessors. 

These objections aside, the election of only ihe 
second president to be chosen by popular vote in 
34 years is seen by many as seminal for the 
country. 

“Now is the moment of iruih for Brazil, time 
to push through fundamental changes in she 
economic and political structure so they can have 
an impact for the next 2U years." said Pablo 
Renato Sousa, an economist who is national 
coordinator of Mr. Cardoso'* government pn-*- 
gram. “We will be aiming so that in 20 years we 
will have a modern economy — competitive, 
integrated and based on a high-tech industry.” 

Opponents say the inclusion o; conservatives 
in Mr. Cardoso’s coalition will impede any sig- 
nificant social change. Bui Mr. Cardoso i> widely 
expected to count on early broad- based support 

so long as the stabilization plan remains strong. 

Brazil's belated turn to market-oriented eco- 
nomics comes at a time when the poor in other 
countries that have gone through similar changes 
— in particular Argentina and Mexico — are 
claiming they have been left ous of the formula. 
With Mr. da Silva and others using this as an 
example of the troubles the poor would face 
under Mr. Cardoso, there is pressure to address 
glaring inequities. 

How, or even if. any such changes will affect 
Brazil's poor in the short term has been a crux of 
the campaign. Although Brazil is rich in re- 
sources, its poor are among the poorest in the 
world. About 12.3 million people cam less than 
the S71-a-month minimum wage, and more than 
5 million work without cash wages. 


TWO GIANTS 



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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 199*1 




U.S. Troops to Block 9 Anti-Aristide Lawmakers 


By Larry Rohter 

New York Timm Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — In an action in- 
tended to make it easier for Haiti's exiled president 
to control legislation that would grant amnesty to 
General Raoul C£dras and other military leaders, 
the U.S. Embassy here announced Monday that 
American troops had been been ordered to prevent a 

C p of illegally elected, pro-military legislators 
i taking part in the deliberations. 

Haiti’s National Assembly is scheduled to begin a 
special session Wednesday to consider an amnesty 
bill for the military, a step required under the accord 
that former President Jimmy Carter negotiated with 
General Cedras on Sept. IS. But one-third of the 
Haitian Senate and a smaller part of the C ham ber of 
Deputies consists of pro- military legislators who 
want an amnesty much broader than the one favored 
by supporters of the exiled president, the Reverend 
Jean-Bertrand Aristide. 

“The illegal parliamentarians will not be permit- 
ted into the session," an embassy spokesman, Stan- 
ley Schrager, said Monday. ‘The U.S. security 
forces will prevent them from entering.” 


The American derision affects nine members of 
the Haitian Senate voted into office on Jan. 18, 1993, 
in balloting denounced as fraudulent by the United 
States and human rights groups. 

Baning the nine from the special session will give 
a majority to forces sympathetic to Father Aristide 
and aQow a pro-Aristide legislator. Senator Firmin 
Jean-Louis, to preside over the Parliament for the 
first time in more than 18 months. 

The Foreign Ministry of Haiti's current military 
government immediately denounced the action, say- 
ing it was a breach of the Carter agreement. In a 
communique, ministry officials said any deploy- 
ment of U.S. troops at the National Assembly would 
constitute “intolerable interference" in Haiti’s inter- 
nal affairs. 

American officials have said that they are eager to 
see an amnesty bill approved by the Haitian Parlia- 
ment as soon as possible to speed up Father Aristi- 
de's return to the office be lost in a military coup 
three years ago. 

The Carter agreement provides that “certain mili- 
tary officers” wil step down, “when a general amnes- 


ty will be voted into law by the Haitian Parliament, 
or October 15, 1994. whichever is sooner." 

Since the Carter agreement was announced, how- 
ever, Father Aristide hims elf has carefully side- 
stepped all questions about whether he personally 
supports a broad amnesty. 

“In time, the Parliament will make a pronounce- 
ment,” he said in an interview with Canadian televi- 
sion. 

But many of Father Aristide’s supporters in Haiti 
have made it clear tha i they bitterly oppose any kind 
of broad amnesty. They argue that while it may be 
permissible to pardon the military for its role’ the 
coup, soldiers, officers and civilian gunmen should 
be held accountable for the thousands of killing s* 
rapes and acts of torture they have committed since 
then. 

"Justice has not been pronounced in these cases,** 
said Necker Dessables, executive secretary of the 
National Justice and Peace Commission, the h uman 
rights arm of the Roman Catholic Church. “Amnes- 
ty means pardon, but you bave to know who is being 
pardoned and why.” 


HAITI; As Crowd Cheers, U.S. Takes Over Infamous Police Headquarters INDIA; 

Plague Panic 


Continued from Page 1 

are increasingly making it clear that it will 
be a cooperative effort only so long as the 
Haitian military does exactly as it is told.” 

As the presence of U.S. troops helped 
lift the curtain of repression that has cov- 
ered Haiti since the military overthrew 
Father Aristide three years ago, the first 
group of Haitian refugees returned volun- 
tarily Monday from Guantanamo Naval 
Base in Cuba. 

About 15,000 US. troops began arriving 
in Haiti last week to ensure that the junta 
leaders step down by Oct. 15. and to create 
a secure environment for Father Aristide's 
return. 

In an effort to limit violence between 
Haitians or acts against U.S. troops. Colo- 
nel Willey said, U.S. troops would begin a 
monthlong program Tuesday of buying 


back weapons. He said the army would 
pay $50 for handguns, S 100 for semi-auto- 
matic weapons, $200 for automatic weap- 
ons, and $300 for heavy weapons, rocket 
launchers or explosives. 

Just how discredited and reviled the mil- 
itary is here, and how much many Haitians 
are relishing their new-found freedom to 
express themselves when in the presence of 
U.S. troops, was evident Monday. 

A crowd of several thousand massed in 
front of the police headquarters known as 
the Cafeteria, the most famous center for 
torture and disappearances in the capital, 
when U.S. soldiers showed up to take con- 
trol of the installation. 

■ Some Sanctions Remain 

Ruth Marcus of The Washington Post 
reported from the United Nations: 

Mr. Clinton, who made the announce- 


ment of the lifting of U.S. sanctions in a 
speech to the General Assembly, left in 
place sanctions that froze the assets of 
Haitian military leaders and their support- 
ers and restricted their travel to the United 
States. 

The move came in advance of the re- 
moval of broader economic sanctions im- 
posed by the United Nations itself. Under 
the terms of the UN resolutions imposing 
those sanctions, they are to remain in place 
until the return of Father Aristide. 

Calling the Haiti mission a “prime ex- 
ample” of the United Nation’s role in the 
post-Cold War world, Mr. Clinton said the 
United States in Haiti had demonstrated 
that it would lead a multinational force 
when its “interests are plain, when the 
cause is right, when the mission is achiev- 
able, and the nations of the world stand 
with us." 


UN: Yeltsin Asserts Russians Primacy Over States of Former Soviet Union 


Continued from Page 1 
ty of our state.” He added, “The 
main peace-keeping burden in 
the territory of the former Sovi- 
et Union lies upon the Russian 
federation.” 

He also obliquely but unmis- 
takably repeated a warning 
made last week by Yevgeni M. 
Primakov, director of the Rus- 
sia's foreign intelligence service. 
Mr. Primakov said that efforts 
by the West to stand in the way 
of reintegration with the former 
republics are “dangerous and 
should be reconsidered.” 

“Attempts by others to use 
the tensions between the com- 
monwealth states for one's own 


advantages are extremely short- 
sighted,” Mr. Yeltsin said. 

Despite complaints by many 
of the other republics about 
Russian interference that some- 
times has involved outright mil- 
itary intervention. Mr. Yeltsin 
insisted that Russia’s efforts 
have been a force for peace. 

“A solid truce has been es- 
tablished in Moldova,” be said. 
“The peace process in Georgia 
is developing: die hope of stop- 
ping bloodshed in Nagorno- 
Karabakh is emerging, and the 
first agreements on Tajikistan 
bave been reached.” 

Mr. Yeltsin also said that 
Russia's interest in its neigh- 


bors was not limited to trying to 
sort out the tensions between 
different ethnic factions that 
have plunged some of these 
states into bloody civil war. He 
also asserted a right to protect 
the interests of “ mill i nns of 
Russians in the newly indepen- 
dent states who looked on these 
places as home and who now 
live there as guests — and not 
always welcome guests." 

“We can't stay indifferent to 
the fate of our countrymen,” be 
said. “I do not mean special 
rights or privileges. But the peo- 
ple of Russia will not under- 
stand if I don't say now: The 
independent states have to 


prove through their actions that 
guaranteeing the human rights 
of national minorities is indeed 
the cornerstone of their foreign 
policy.” 

Despite the bluntness of 
some of his language. Mr. Yelt- 
sin insisted that he was speak- 
ing as the leader of a country 
that has “removed the legacy of 
totalitarianism and the Cold 
War,” that is embarked firmly 
on the road to democracy and 
free-market economics and that 
wants “a serious and fruitful 
dialogue leading to establish- 
ment of strategic partnership 
between Russia and the United 
States.” 


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Gntmned from Page 1 
mg states, where plague alerts 
have been issued by medical of- 
ficials and pharmacies have 
been emptied of antibiotics by 
anxious residents. 

Many people who ventured 
onto the streets of Surat on 
Monday covered their faces 
with surgical masks, handker- 
chiefs and, for women, folds of 
their saris. Here at the center of 
the plague outbreak the initial 
panic has subsided. People in- 
stead greeted their predicamenL 
with fatalism. 

“I have faith in God not to 
affect me with the disease.” said 
Damji Bhai. 50, explaining why 
he was not wearing a mask. 

Residents complained that 
unusually hard monsoon rains 
and the almost nonexistent re- 
sponse by the government af- 
terward were to blame for the 
outbreak of the pneumonic 
plague, the more contagious 
cousin of bubonic plague. 

Bubonic plague is spread by 
insects, tike fleas, which bite an 
infected rodent then bite a hu- 
man. Pneumonic plague begins 
the same way. but in certain 
cases the infection enters a hu- 
man’s bloodstream and moves 
to the lungs. The airborne bac- 
teria are then spread from one 
human to another through 
coughing and sneeziDg. 

Surat has a long record of 
poor hygiene. It is often re- 
fereed to as India's dirtiest city 
by its own residents. 

As the world's largest dia- 
mond-cutting center and a ma- 
jor textile city renowned for 
silk, gold and silver brocade, 
thousands of migrant workers 
have flocked to the city in re- 
cent decades. 

The city channels raw sewage 
through storm drains to open- 
air “soak pits." On Monday, 
workers were wading in some of 
the pits, sprinkling handfuls of 
DDT across the surface. 

The city generates about 
1,000 tons of garbage a day, but 
only half of it is collected. 

The poor sanitary conditions 
have bred a huge rat popula- 
tion, but local officials said 
there has never been a program 
to combat the scourge because 
the animal is often worshiped as 
the companion of Ganesh, the 
popular Hindu elephant-head- 
ed god. 

■ Nations’ Protective Steps 

Many nations took steps 
Monday to guard against the 
entry of plague from India. 
Reuters reported. 

Hong Kong, Pakistan, South 
Korea, Thailand and the Unit- 



Micfcod lAten/RcuOk' 

Mr. Kohl appeared unconcerned Monday over negative results in Bavarian elections. 

GERMANS: Markets Sense Setback in Bavaria Vote 


Continued from Page 1 
of the event” Most analysts, in 
fact, continue to give Mr. 
Kohl’s coalition the edge in the 
elections. 

“We don’t see a big need to 
change our bottom-tine view 
that Mr. Kohl will make it” 
said Bernard GodemcnL, an an- 
alyst at Nomura Research Insti- 
tute in Paris. 

Barbara Boettcher, an ana- 
lyst at Deutsche Bank Re- 
search, gives the current Bonn 
coalition of Christian Union 
parties and Free Democrats a 
55 percent chance of being re- 
elected. 

“The SPD claim that Ger- 
mans want a change isn't re- 
flected in the polls." she said of 
the Soda! Democrats. 

Mr. Kohl and Klaus Kinkel. 
who is the German foreign min- 
ister and leader of the Liberals, 
said the Bavarian elections were 
irrelevant 

“1 don't have a funny feeling 
at all" Mr. Kohl said. 

The Christian Sorial Union, 
the Bavarian sister parly of Mr. 
Kohl's Christian Democrats, 
dropped 2.1 percent Sunday 
from its previous performance 
but maintained a majority in 
the state with 52.8 percent of 
the vote. 

The Free Democrats, who 
share power with the Christian 
Union parties in Bonn and have 
played a kingmaker role in na- 


tional politics for 25 years, 
failed to clear a 5 percent hurdle 
and will lose their seats in the 
Bavarian Parliament. They 
polled just 2.8 percent, less than 
the far-right Republicans, who 
polled 3.9 percent. 

It was the Free Democrats’ 
sixth straight loss in regional 
elections. They also lost their 
seats in the European Parlia- 
ment in a national vote in June. 

The Soda! Democratic Party, 
which hopes to topple Mr. Kohl 
on Ocl 16, gained 4.1 percent 
to daim 30.1 percent of the 
vote, and Rudolf Scharping, the 
party’s candidate for chancel- 
lor. declared that the party was 
on a rebound. 

Some political analysts ex- 
pect the former Communists, 
the Party of Democratic Sodal- 
ism, to win more than 25 seats 
in the lower house of the Ger- 
man Parliament, the Bundes- 
tag, thus depriving the current 
coalition of a majority and 
shifting the political balance in 
favor of a grand coalition of the 
two biggest parties. 

A strong showing by the for- 
mer Communists would also al- 
low the creation of a “red- 
Green” government of Sodal 
Democrats and Greens that de- 
pended on the silent support of 
the Party of Democratic Sorial- 
ism. 

Despite the market reactions 


Monday, the prevailing market markets. 


opinion is that a grand coali- 
tion, whether headed by the 
Christian Democrats or the So- 
cial Democrats, poses little 
threat to stable government and 
a continuation of fiscal and eco- 
nomic reform, though a change 
of government might slow the 
process down. 

“There's no doubt the mar- 
kets showed some knee^erk re- 
action,” said Mr. Prehdergast 
of Banque Paribas. “Anything 
could happen, but given the 
most likely outcomes, there’s 
nothing to suggest the German 
elections would turn the under- 
lying strong trend in favor of a 
stronger D-Mark.” 

A red-Green coalition, how- 
ever, would be expected to have 
a negative effect on markets. 
“This would lead to an outflow 
of funds, with foreign investors 
leaving the market,” Gerhard 
Grebe, an economist at Bank 
Julius Bftr. told Reuters. 

Thomas Mayer of Goldman 
Sachs agreed that markets 
would react badly to a swing to 
the left, expecting less of a com- 
mitment to fiscal consolidation, 
lower share prices, higher inter- 
est rates and possibly unwel- 
come changes in the taxation of 
interest income. 

Other economists were less 
pessimistic, arguing that as 
chancellor, Mr. Scharping 
would be eager not to unsettle 


JAPAN: U.S. Colleges in Trouble CIA Sees A-Arms 

In Iran’s Future 


Gonthned from Page 1 
the director of the program in 
Koriyama, said the city’s reneg- 
ing on the permanent campus 
was the “fatal blow.” 

College officials also say the 
campus nad a poor reputation. 


“Texas A&M was not under- 

cd Arab Emirates alt said they 
would examine travelers from 


India to see if they were stricken 


said Demar Taylor, assistant di- 
rector for externa] affairs at die 


AUWIH M/OVWU UIV1 nWV«U4t<AVU _ U T. m f m . . 

by the sickness. Five other Gulf 2TS. IL^ 1<X J ked a i by 
Arab states — Saudi. Arabia, mosl clUz ® ls 85 a P 1 ** 


Oman, Kuwait, Bahrain and 
Qatar — were considering simi- 
lar measures. 

U.S. health officials said they 
would monitor airports for 
plague cases. Malaysia and 
Germany advised their citizens 


students who couldn't make it 
elsewhere would come to 
school.” 

American colleges in Japan 
say such reputation problems 
result from unfair trade prac- 
tices. Japan's Ministiy of Edu- 


to postpone travel plans to af- cation refuses to accredit the 
fected areas. Hong Kong said it American branch campuses, so 
might isolate passengers with man y Japanese students shun 
plague symptoms for a number them, and their Amen can stu- 
of days. dents cannot get student visas. 

Immigrations authorities at Last year, in response to 
Bangkok airport said they were pressure from Washington, Ja- 
visually checking all passengers pan agreed to give such stu- 
for symptoms. dents cultural visas, with some 


of the privileges of student vi- 
sas. 

Officials of American col- 
leges here concede that they do 
not meet all the requirements 
for accreditation. 

Offering an American-stylc 
education is their main selling 
point, they say. 

Russian Border Guards 
Kill 22 Tajik Rebels 

Reuters 

DUSHANBE, Tajikistan — 
Russian guards patrolling Ta- 
jikistan’s uneasy frontier with 
Afghanistan killed 22 Tajik re- 
bels who tried to enter the for- 
mer Soviet republic over a two- 
day period, a border guard 
spokesman said Monday. 

He said the rebels had 
stepped up cross-border attacks 
after representatives of Tajiki- 
stan's former Communist gov- 
ernment and the opposition 
signed a temporary cease-fire 
on Sept. 12. 



£ 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The 
Central Intelligence Agency be- 
lieves that Iran will be able to 
build its own nuclear weapons 
in 8 to 10 years and that it is 
focusing on Russia as a poten- 
tial source of key materials and 
direction. 

R- James Woolsey, the direc- 
tor of central intelligence, said 
that in addition to an aggressive 
effort to strengthen its conven- 
tional defenses, Iran had put a 
high priority on acquiring nu- 
clear weapons. He was speaking 
Friday to a conference 
sored by the Was! 
tute for Near East Policy. 

“Iran has been particularly 
active in trying to purchase nu- 
clear materials or technology 
clandestinely from Russian 
sources,” Mr. Woolsey said. He 
added that Iran was also trying ” 
to buy fully fabricated nuclear 
weapons as a shortcut to be- 
coming a nuclear power. 





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Rage 8 


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1994 


OPINION 


Hctalb 


BTORIN'ATIONAL 



Eribnnc 


Published Wilh The Mew York Tiroes and The Washington Fwt 


Toward Deeper Nuclear Cuts 


President B31 Clinton and President 
Boris Yeltsin of Russia can spur efforts to 
curb the spread of nuclear arms when 
they meet in Washington. 

They can do so only if they recognize 
that the fewer warheads they have, the 
better the chances of keeping them out of 
the hands of other countries. But a just- 
completed Pentagon Teview of America's 
nuclear posture could get in the way 
of deeper cats. 

The two leaders need to arrange for 
closer monitoring of Russia's vast stocks 
of nuclear material — to keep any of 
it from slipping onto the black market. 
In view of alarming reports of attempted 
smuggling, the material needs to be col- 
lected at a few well-guarded storage sites 
while the Russians determine how best 
to dispose of it. 

Unfortunately, Russia’s nuclear custo- 
dians are resisting any sharing of custody 
or help from the outside. Mr. Clinton 
needs to persuade Mr. Yeltsin to break 
down their resistance. 

The two leaders also need to advance 
the larger goal of stigmatizing and reduc- 
ing nud ear arms. They can expedite glob- 
al bans on nuclear tests and on produc- 
tion of fissile material, commit them- 
selves to negotiate deeper nuclear aims 
cuts and reduce the role of these arms. 

The Pentagon's posture review, by con- 
tinuing to embrace an outmoded Cold 
War strategy, mil impede any significant 
reduction in nuclear roles. The review 
does recommend removal of nuclear 
arms from all U.S. surface ships and a 
modest cut in bombers. That is not 
enough. The review also lowers U.S. war- 
head requirements, making talks on fur- 
ther cuts possible. But the administration 
says it will not pursue such talks until 
Russia implements the latest strategic 
arms reduction accord. 

Administration officials argue, short- 


sightedly, that proposing new talks would 
only invite the Russians to reopen that 
accord instead of ratifying iL On the 
contrary, deeper cuts would redress im- 
balances in the agreement, making Rus- 
sian ratification of that agreement easier. 
Cuts would also leave fewer warheads to 
secure against smuggling or misuse. 

Mr. Chilton and Mr. Yeltsin need to 
pursue further cuts to improve the political 
atmosphere for achieving two of their aims 
— securing unlimited extension of the 
1968 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty at 
□ext year’s review conference and advanc- 
ing multilateral efforts to curb trade in 
bomb-making material and technology. 

In the 1968 treaty, states without nu- 
clear arms agreed to forgo developing 
them and to accept international inspec- 
tion of their peaceful nuclear programs. 
In return, the nuclear-armed states 
pledged to negotiate in good faith on 
effective measures to end the nuclear 
arms race and disarm. 

The United States and Russia have 
halted midear testing but have yet to 
conclude a formal ban. Even after the 
latest round of cuts is implemented, they 
will still have more warheads than they 
did a quart er-cen tiny ago. 

The non-nuclear states, led by Mexi- 
co, are trying to get the nuclear powers 
to keep their end of the bargain. They 
are threatening to hold up unlimited 
extension of the Nonproliferation Trea- 
ty. That would be self-defeating since 
the treaty keeps their neighbors from 
acquiring these aims. 

But they may have the votes to block 
extension. They also have a reason for 
encouraging nuclear powers to do more to 
disarm: diminishing the status of nu clea r 
arms removes an incentive for others to 
acquire them. Mr. Clinton and Mr. Yeltsin 
cannot afford to miss this point. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Europe’s Changing Union 


While the European Union is re- 
quired by solemn treaty to become much 
more tightly integrated over the coining 
years, that may or may not actually 
happen. A profound political struggle 
over the future of the Union is now 
under way among the 12 countries that 
belong to it, and its essential purpose is 
— once again — an open question. The 
issues aren't new, but now the prosperous 
democracies of Western Europe have 
large responsibilities for dealing with the 
poor and unstable countries to their east. 

The Union is expanding. Next year 
Austria, Sweden. Finland and Norway 
will probably join. But, much more diffi- 
cult, the Union must respond to the ur- 
gent appeals from Poland, the Czech Re- 
public, Slovakia and Hungary to be 
allowed to come in. Until now the Euro- 
pean Union has been a relatively homo- 
geneous family of the rich. To bring in the 
eastern countries will inevitably change 
the whole nature of the association. 

Germany’s governing Christian Demo- 
cratic Party proposed several weeks ago 
to organize the Union around a nucleus 
consisting of five — France, Germany 
and the Benelux three — moving toward 
increasingly close integration, with the 
other members following more slowly, de- 
pending cm their wishes or circumstances. 
Prime Minister Edouard Balladur of 


France replied with another variation on 
that theme. There was an immediate pro- 
test from Britain, where Prime Minister 
John Major countered with the concept of 
flexible cooperation — in effect, a kind of 
smorgasbord at which each country 
could choose for itself the areas in which 
it was prepared to integrate. 

These difference are fundamental On 
one side are the countries — with Ger- 
many and France at the top of the list — 
that see the European Union above all 
as a political instrument to ensure that 
there will be no more war and no more 
division on their continent On the other 
side are those, led by Britain, that be- 
lieve the sovereign nation-state is the 
natural and proper unit of political life, 
and that the Union ought to be limited 
to a useful commercial relationship. 

The integrationist side of the argu- 
ment has suffered severely from the 
Union’s inability to pull together a joint 
European policy capable of ending the 
savage war in the former Yugoslavia. 
But the integrationists still seem to have 
the initiative, and they have now re- 
opened the constitutional debate on the 
next Europe. The decisions on the four 
eastern countries, and whether and how 
to bring them into the Union, will estab- 
lish its character for decades to come. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Hear Out Tehran’s Foes 


In dealing with a dictatorship, it is 
simple prudence to listen to its critics. 
This has not been UJ5. policy in dealing 
wilh Iran’s clerical tyranny. The State 
Department has shunned all contact with 
a key opposition group, the Mujahidin 
Khalq, which also happens to be the 
group most loudly denounced by Iran. 
Bothered by this boycott. Congress last 
year instructed the administration to pre- 
pare an objective written report on all the 
Iranian opposition groups. 

Yet the State Department still refuses 
any contact with the Mujahidin Khalq. a 
stance protested recently by a flock of U.S. 
senators and nearly a hundred representa- 
tives. Indeed, it is hard to see how any 
study can be complete as long as the State 
Department studiously ignores one impor- 
tant component of the Iranian, opposition. 

More specifically, the State Depart- 
ment should at least give the group a 
chance to answer the charges that have 
made it so controversial and, apparently, 
so unpopular among makers of U.S. for- 
eign policy. Among these charges are 
that, in years past the group was respon- 
sible for killing Americans, and that to- 
day it obtains help and protection from 
Saddam Hussein’s dictatorship in Iraq. 

Some facts are not in dispute. The 
Mujahidin Khalq was part of the radical 
coalition that ousted the shah of Iran in 
1979; only later did these generally secu- 
lar revolutionaries break with the ayatol- 
lahs. It is also a fact that this group has 


resorted to armed rebellion; its insur- 
gents have struck across frontiers from 
bases in northern Iraq. But its ubiquitous 
representatives claim their movement is 
democratic, that it long ago shed its anti- 
Americanism and that it has helped to 
galvanize a global campaign against hu- 
man rights offenses within Iran. 

One can doubt any or all of these 
claims and still be troubled by the State 
Department's closed ears. It is especially 
distasteful that this boycott is treated as a 
victory by Iranian mullahs, who urge other 
states to have no contacts with Mujahidin 
Khalq “terrorists.” This cranes with spe- 
cial impudence from clergymen who clam- 
or for the death of the novelist Salman 
Rushdie, who are plausibly linked with the 
murder of Iranian dissidents in France, 
Switzerland, Turkey and elsewhere, and 
whose agents are believed to have assailed 
Mr. Rushdie’s translators and publishes 
in Japan. Italy and Norway. 

Speaking in Chicago last month to the 
annual convention of B'nai B nth. Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton called the Iranian regime 
“the world’s leading sponsor of state-spon- 
sored terrorism.” So long as Tehran con- 
tinues to export death squads, and exhorts 
its followers to kill a foreigner for writing a 
book, it cannot in decency ask Washing- 
ton to avoid contacts with “terrorists.” 
Iran’s record needs to be taken into ac- 
count if the administration is to be objec- 
tive in judging the Iranian opposition. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



International Herald Tribune 

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The Move Into Suffering Haiti Is Worth the Gamble 


B ALTIMORE — Observers on all 
sides still recoil from the idea that a 
partnership between Bill Clinton and 
Jean-Bertrand Aristide can or should 
succeed. This is hardly surprising. 

Many Americans, after all instinctivo- 
ly shrink from military intervention any- 
where, while just as many have grown 
contemptuous of government’s ability to 
manage even small tasks at home; A 
miracle from Washington? In Haiti? 

Maybe. BUI Clinton did not risk his 
presidency without anguish and delibera- 
tion, any more than President Jean-Ber- 
trand Aristide easily agreed to have his 
country invaded. 

By last spring, as it became dear that 
draconian economic sanctions would 
fail the Clinton administration took the 
first step: concentrating on Haiti 
Hard examination produced commit- 
ment with the exiled Haitian government 
to specific steps aimed toward a medium- 
range goal based on a series of judg- 
ments about political reality. 

The goal is to create conditions favor- 
able to constitutional democracy in Hai- 
ti, without die long-term presence of for- 
eign troops. We must stay focused on 
that goal So far, the mission confirms the 
assessment that well-trained troops can 
make this a police operation rather than 
a war. The safe landing of U.S. troops is 
far more important than charges of war- 
mongering or waffling. 

All tire furor over the agreement be- 
tween the former president (Jimmy Car- 
ter) and the phony president (the Haitian 
figurehead Emile* Jonassaint) is a small 
price to pay for the steady accumulation 
of unopposed military strength behind 
the Ointon-Aristide plan. 

Tactical concessions to the Haitian 
strongman. General Raoul Cfcdras, are 
being recovered by the continued appli- 
cation of measures already planned. 

The quiet disarming of the Haitian 
Army’s few large guns, for instance, is 


By Taylor Branch 

more important than anything Mr. Car- 
ter may have said to General Cedras. 

With war fears calmed, American view- 
ers learned for themselves another premise 
of the commitment to Haiti: that Haitian 
security forces, supported by thugs, are 
not capable of permitting free assembly or 
free speech, even for Parliament. To se- 
cure these essential conditions Tor consti- 
tutional democracy, they can and must be 
disarmed, controlled, replaced. 

The conflict over amnesty begins an- 
other test Predictions that General Ce- 
dras and his top commanders will leave 

With help from Washington 
and the world community 9 a 
democratic mircude is possible. 

Haiti rest on the judgment that they will 
demand amnesty for murder and other 
gutter crimes as well os political ones. 

Because the Americans and the Aris- 
tide government axe jointly Tesolved to 
oppose an overly broad amnesty, they see 
General Cedras eventually accepting the 
protection of exile. 

More than likely, the delicate balance 
between justice and reconciliation will 
require international mediation. 

The Aristide government and the Clin- 
ton adminis tration are exploring the cre- 
ation of a UN “truth commission” to 
gather facts about human rights crimes. 

Until the restored Haitian government 
establishes courts and security forces, it 
will be too weak to try such cases — or 
may choose not to. for reasons of nation- 
al stability — and a truth commission 
could serve as a buffer of justice in the 
interim. Father Aristide could point to 
the tribunal as a source of hope for Hai- 


tian victims, underscoring his pleas 
against violent retribution. 

Both Father Aristide and the U.S. gov- 
ernment expect that the shocking record 
will help neutralize the worst offenders 
not already in exile. Thus they hope to 
meet another goal of democracy: a re- 
formed, reduced security force under 
civilian control. 

When the multinational peacekeepers 
arrive and sanctions arc lifted, a. backlog 
of aid and trade will work to lift Haiti 
from destitution toward a free economy. 

Another underappreciated reality is 
that UN relief agencies, the World Bank 
and other staid promoters of free- market 
development stand b ehin d Father Aristide 
find not the generals. His economists 
speak the language of capitalism, whereas 
the Haitian economy has been modeled on 
the rackets of the sheriff of Nottingham. 

Despots have limited big industry in 
Haiti to franchised monopolies, with mar- 
ket enterprise stamped out everywhere 
from farm produce to the concrete busi- 
ness. As a result, the average Haitian earns 
less than a dollar a day, and spends nearly 
20 cents of it just to buy water. Father 
Aristide’s stated goal is to raise Haiti from 
destitution to dignified poverty. Because 
of Haiti's small scale and abysmally low 
starting point, the U-S.-Haman strategy is 
that the most basic gains in literacy, jobs, 
health and market reform will stabilize, 
not threaten, a new political order. 

For all its audacity, the Clinton-Aris- 
tide partnership is a limited one. The 
theory is that the United States can lead 
an international police action to remove 
a stubborn, despotic clique that has hi- 
jacked Haiti’s first democratic election. 

Where others see Haiti as a protracted 
dvil war, the Clinton adminis tration 
agrees with Aristide supporters that peo- 
ple with guns have oppressed people 
armed only with votes. If that proves 
wrong, and the struggle degenerates into 
dvil war, much of the gamble will be lost 


and foreign troops should leave; An flfe 
American garrison would squash the very 
democracy Washh^ioa seeks la foster. 

With protection from 

peacekeepers, Haitians must determine 
whether democracy takes root. 

Father Aristide understands that the 
U.S. commitment runs more to the new 
Haitian Constitution and the faitb of his 
voters than to the success of his regime. 

He has freely pledged to work toward 
next year’s elections as a noncandidate. 
to fulfill his term, surrender office to 
a duly elected successor and retire 
peacefully. Until then, be knows that it 
will require all bis statesmanship to re- 
strain his followers and preach peace 
toward his enemies. 

For the United States, it mil require 
just as much discipline to give up control 
in Haiti. Power does not easily step back. 
But that was the test of wisdom going in. 

It is just possible that the combined 
will of Haiti, the United States and the 
world community can begin a democrat- 
ic miracle in hemisphere to -stand 
alongside the recent wonders in Europe 
and South Africa. 

No country needs a birth of freedom 
more than Haiti, and unexpected success 
there might scrape off a few barnacles of 
Ameri can cynicism, too. 

Even if Haitian democracy stumbles, 
however, the Ointon-Aristide gamble 
will prove worthwhile if it meets the 
standard of principle and reality, pru- 
dence and vision. 

A historic gamble in Haiti humbles our 
preference for drama in great worid capi- 
tals, but it could be the stuff of leadership 
and high patriotism. 

Mr. Brandi is author of “Parting the 
Waters: America in the King Years, 1954- 
63”: he has discussed Haiti with Presidents 
Clinton and Aristide over the past two 
years. This comment was contributed to 
The New York Times. 


Back Russian Reform and Its Sensible Advocates, Not a Weak Yeltsin 


W ASHINGTON — It is a 
useful coincidence that Bo- 
ris Yeltsin’s visit to the United 
States falls almost exactly on the 
anniversary of his invasion of the 
Russian Parliament. The Clinton 
administration took the lead 
among Western governments last 
year in supporting the Russian 
president's claims that Parlia- 
ment was “Co mmunist -do minat - 
ed" and “anti-reform." It encour- 
aged his military action. 

A year later the futility of Mr. 
Yeltsin's move is dear. His aim of 
replacing the old Parliament with 
one that would be more subservi- 
ent has not been achieved. When 
Russians went to the polls, they 
signaled their disapproval of Mr. 
Yeltsin’s behavior by electing 
more deputies who opposed him 
than the previous Parliament had. 
Among them was the horrendous 
Vladimir Zhirinovsky. Russia’s 
Choice, the only party to unequiv- 
ocally support the president, won 
14 percent of the vote. 

One of the new Parliament's 
first acts was to pass an amnesty to 
free two of Mr. Yeltsin’s bugbears 
from jail: Alexander Rutskol the 
former vice president, and Ruslan 
Khasbulatov, the framer speaker. 
There were no public demonstra- 
tions against the move. 

It is true that the elections also 
resulted in the adoption of a new 
constitution that was designed to 
weaken Parliament and give the 
president extra power. But the 
margin was narrow, and official 
figures on the vote seem dubious. 

Regardless, the new constitu- 
tion means little. The use of force 
at the Russian White House last 


By Jonathan Steele 


Before the October “events,” 
the country bad a relatively strong 
president and a relatively strong 
Parliament. Now. it has* a weak 
president and a weak Parliament. 

The only positive results of the 
elections and the charged atmo- 
sphere Mr. Yeltsin’s actions cre- 
ated were that they forced the 
government’s long-standing splits 
on economic policy into the open 
and strengthened the band of the 
pragmatists under Prime Minister 
Viktor Chernomyrdin. 

During the camp ai g n , Russian 
minis ters popped up in three po- 
litical parties, while Mr. Cherno- 
myrdin conspicuously supported 
none of them. The confusion 
highlighted a paradox: While Mr. 
Yeltsin had claimed that he was 
being obstructed by the old Par- 


liament, the battles inside his §qy- 
emment were equally fierce. The 
issue was not anti-market or pro- 
market, but what route toward 
the market to take. 

The siege of Parliament and the 
elections put pragmatists on top. 
To his credit Mr. Yeltsin has ac- 
cepted the situation. Except for 
Russia’s Choice, every party pro- 
posed a “socially oriented” market 
economy, meaning two things: a 
more gradual transition than the 
one introduced by the previous 
economic overlord, Yegor Gaidar, 
and a strong continuing role for 
government investment 

Russia, they note, still has no 
private businessmen waling to in- 
vest more than token amounts 
long-term. Small-scale investors 
are out, since inflation has wiped 


out everyone’s savings- Foreign in- 
vestors are reluctant. This leaves 
Russian state investment os the 
only viable option for a long time 
to crane. Those who campaign for 
sharp cuts in die Russian budget 
are therefore calling for Russia’s 
deindustrialization. 

Mr. Chernomyrdin represents 
the cautious reformers, who want 
to keep Russia’s industries in 
business while modernizing and 
preparing them for international 
competition. He recognizes that 
in many areas, such as military 
technology and heavy engineer- 
ing, Russia is a market rival of the 
West and cannot be a partner. 
While Mr. Yeltsin's poor health 
pushes him increasingly into a 
figurehead role, Mr. Chernomyr- 
din is working relatively harmoni- 
ously with the parliamentar y ma- 
jority on a joint agenda. 


With Mr. Yeltsin’s visit to the 
United States, the Clinton admin- 
istration has a new chance to show 
that it supports a process in Russia 
rather than a personality. 

By all means, be pofite to Mr. 
Ydtsin. But don’t pander to his 
ego or imply that Parliament is 
not a crucial part of any “new 
Russia.” And if the West, wants t# 
forestall any chance of humiliat- 
ed nationalism arising in Russia, 
then lei it encourage the com- 
mon-sense moderation of Mr. 
Chernomyrdin and the parlia- 
mentary majority who do not 
want to destroy Russian industry 
in order to save it 



The writer itft Moscow" this 
spring after six years as bureau 
chief far the Guardian of London. 
He contributed this comment to 
The Washington Post. 


Isn’t It Clear? Talk Won’t Move the Bosnian Serbs 


^SPEN, 



public cynicism 
the political elite. It set back the 
creation of a law-based state and 
made it easier for the crimfnal ma- 
fias to take deeper root 


Colorado — On 
March 20, the UN com- 
mander in Bosnia, Lieutenant 
General Michael Rose, organized 
a soccer match in Sarajevo to 
show how effectively an ultima- 
tum to the Bosnian Serbs had 
Stopped their shelling and snip- 
ing. A crowd watched safely in a 
shell-pocked stadium. 

“This is an irreversible pro- 
cess,” Sir Michael said. “The peo- 
ple of Bosnia have had enough of 
this senseless killing and destruc- 
tion of their beautiful country.” 

Over the last two months the 
Bosnian Serbs have made a 
mockery of Sir Michael and his 
words. They have: 

• Resumed intermittent snip- 
ing and shelling into Sarajevo. 

• Cosed the city’s one road to 
the outside world. 


By Anthony Lewis 


• Fired at relief planes as they 
land at Sarajevo Airport, forcing 
suspensions of relief flights. 

• Cut off the supply of electric- 
ity, gas and water to Sarajevo. 

• Resumed “ethnic cleansing” 

of people] mostlywomen and chil- 
dren, from tbeir homes in northern 
Bosnia because they are Muslims. 

The renewed assaults on Sara- 
jevo are bad enough. The scenes 
of “ethnic cleansing” are sicken- 
ing. Red Cross officials say wom- 
en have been beaten and abused, 
then forced to walk across no- 
man’s lands. Men have been tak- 
en away to unknown places, 
probably prison camps. 

The United Nations, NATO 
and the United States are all com- 


Don’t Target the New Man at NATO 


B russels— NATO’ s fi 

ministers, in New York lor 
opening of the UN General As- 
sembly, have finalized their selec- 
tion of the alliance’s next secre- 
tary-general The appointment of 
Belgium’s foreign minister, Willy 
Claes, is likely to be seriously criti- 
cized, particularly in some Ameri- 
can political circles; including sec- 
tions of the administration. 

Such criticism is, however, mis- 
directed. It is harmful because, in 
NATO’s precarious state, agree- 
ment on the individual should 
have, and be seen to have, the 
wholehearted approval of all 
member countries. It is also un- 
necessary because it is caused by 
a profound misunderstanding of 
the selection process and the 
competence of the post 
For this eighth appointment, 
an unusually large number of 
names and nationalities had 
been under consideration; previ- 
ously, selection was made 
smoothly between one or two 
possible candidates. Instead, in- 
dividuals and countries appeared 
to have been battling for the post 
while, in reality, no personal or 
national candidatures existed. 

The selection process has 
its Special ways. 

Nationality comes into play 
only negatively, in that a Greek or 
Turkish candidate is excluded due 
to national antagonism between 
those countries, or an Icelandic or 
Luxembourg candidate because of 
the lade or small size of the mili- 
tary forces of those countries. 

Up to now, no American could 
be considered, since the Supreme 


TCfsforeigi By Frederick Bonnart 


Allied Commander Europe has 
always been an American gener- 
al This was essential: The critical 
nuclear deterrent was almost 
completely U.S.-owned and its 
release would have needed an ex- 
ecutive order by the U.S. presi- 
dent to a U.S. commander. 

Given the irrelevance of nucle- 
ar weapons in solving today’s cri- 
ses, the replacement of an Ameri- 
can commander by a European 
one would now be technically fea- 
sible. But such a move would 
have been a mistake at this time, 
even if balanced by the selection 
of an American as secretary-gen- 
eral, because it would further en- 
danger the size of the U.S. mili- 
tary commitment to Europe and 
thus reduce the visible strength of 
the trans-Atlantic link. 

France’s attitude toward 
NATO is undergoing consider- 
able change. Still it remains out- 
side the mili tary structure and a 
Frenchman could not be consid- 
ered for the secretary-general's 
job at this stage. The possibility 
will not be excluded later, how- 
ever. Similar considerations 
would apply to a Spaniard. As a 
result, a candidate can emerge 
from only a few nations. 

Consideration of the individual 
is similarly restricted. In this re- 
spect, NATO differs from such 
organizations as the European 
Union and the United Nations. 
NATO is an international organi- 
zation in which every member 
country has an equal voice and no 


decision can be taken without 
unanimous agreement. 

So the secretary-general has no 
power. He does control the small 
international staff. But even there 
be is constricted by political con- 
siderations. He chairs the North 
Atlantic Council whether it meets 
at ambassadorial level or at that 
of ministers or heads of govern- 
ment He may, of course, express 
his opinion to them individually 
or collectively, but he has no vote 
and no voice in the final decision. 
Outside the organization, he may 
express only what is accepted pol- 
icy by them alL 

Nonetheless, several secretaries- 
general, including the late 
Manfred W5mer most recently, 
have been able to help shape poli- 
cy by persuason. tenacity and 
tact. In general however, member 
governments seem to prefer a loyal 
and efficient administrator to a 
charismatic pobtirian for the post 

It is in vain, therefore, to Took 
for powerful leadership from the 
incumbent. Leadership most 
come from the member nation s 
Until the end of the Cold War, 
this was exercised mostly by the 
United States. Its present attenu- 
ation has left a void that no mem- 
ber state has been able or willing 
to fill It is this topic, rather than 
the selection of the organization's 
secretary-general that should be 
addressed by the critics. 

The writer is editor of NATO’s 
Sixteen Nations, an independait 
mUimy journal published in Brus- 
sels. He contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


mitted to limiting the war in Bos- 
nia and its inhumanities — com- 
mitments they have promised to 
uphold by force if necessary. So 
what have they done about the 
recent savageries? Nothing. 

The other day NATO planes 
attacked one unmanned Bosnian 
Serbian tank near Sarajevo. The 
attack was made not because of 
the Serbs' many assaults on the 
city, but because they had fired at 
French peacekeepers. 

In fact, NATO had repeatedly 
called for the bombing of Serbian 
heavy weapons brazenly intro- 
duced into me zone around Saraje- 
vo from which heavy weapons are 
supposed to be excluded. Sir Mi- 
chael rejected the requests, saying 
they would worsen matters. 

A week ago Sir Michael threat- 
ened to call in air strikes on Bosni- 
an government forces after they 
fired. That is, he threatened to 
bomb the victims of genocadal ag- 
gression when they had the nerve 
to fire at the aggressors. 

How did a respected soldier 
tike General Rose come to speak 
and act so pathetically? He has 
failed at executing a policy de- 
signed for failure. 

The West, following its own 
principles, should have come to 
the defense of Croatia and Bosnia 
when Serbs attacked them. 

Instead Britain and France 
sent contingents to a UN force 
that sees no difference between 


aggressors and victims. And the 
United States, under two admin- 
istrations, has tried diplomacy 
without the only thing that would 
move the Bosnian Serbs: the real 
use of air power. That means at- 
tacks on serious military targets 
and headquarters, not pinprick 
raids on a single abandoned tank. 

President Bill Clinton, under a 
mandate from Congress, may ask 
the United Nations Security 
Council by Oct. 15 to lift the arms 
embargo on the Bosnian govern- 
ment; if so, the council will sa>^ 
no, and the United States is un- 
likely to act unilaterally before 
next spring at the earliest. 

What the Security Council has 
voted to ease are sanctions on 
rump Yugoslavia, because Presi- 
dent Slobodan Milosevic of Ser* 
bia promises to stop war supplies 
going to the Bosnian Serbs. To 
monitor that promise there are 
to be 135 international observers 
— 45 in each of three daily shif ts 
— watching a 480-kilometer 
(300-mile) border. 

And so we head for another 
Bal kan winter, with more Bosni- 
ans dying — and more disgrace 
for the rest of us. 

Anthony Lake, the notional se- 
curity adviser to Mr. Clinton, 
wrote the other day in The New 
York Times (IHT, SepL 24): “The 
Sarajevo ultimatum succeeded be-! 
cause the threat of NATO air pow- 
er was judged real” Please, Mr. . 
Lake, be serious. 

The New York Times. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1894: Papal Conflict 


PARIS — There is a curious dip- 
lomatic conflict in perspective; 
though not in the immediate fu- 
ture, since it can only begin at the 
next Conclave, that is to say, on 
the death of the Pope. Formerly 
Austria, Fiance and Spain had 
the right to oppose their veto to 
the election of the Pope. They have 
never exercised this right, but it 
still exists, and Count Kainoky has 
declared that, theoretically, he re- 
serves the right of exercising it 
should the necessity arise. There- 
the legists of the Holy See 
that the right has become 
obsolete, that ii. answers to a state 
of things which no longer exists, 
and that it is an anachr onis m 

1919: Invasion Expected 

HAVRE — Passengers from 
America who arrived by the 
French liner France 


the reports which have already 
reach«» France that the tourist 
invasion will begin very soon y nd 
that accommodation is reserved 
by every boat well into next year, 
a few cabins being held on each 
steamer for emergency voyagers. 

1944: Soviet Advance 

LONDON — [From our New 
York edition:] Yielding more 
than 500 towns and villages to the 
R u ss i a n s , the mauled divisions of 
the German Northern Armv 
Corps fell back on Riga last night 
for what may be their last standin 
the Baltic states. A brief Soviet 
communique reported that Red 
Army forces took more than 200 
communities in their drive to 
clear the scattered and disorga- 
nized enemy from the west coast 
of Estonia, southwest of Tallinn, 
and thrust on down to within for- 
ty-five Btiks northeast of Riga, 
t hkmg 300 places in Latvia. 


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THE TRIB INDEX: 115 

interpattonal HeraJd Tribune World Stock Index ©. composeTof 
280 intemaa°TOlj y irweslable slocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1 . 1992 = 100 
120 _ 



Approx waghUng; 32% 
Close; 129.15 Prev.: 129.60 
150 




Approx, weighing: 37% 
Ctosa: 11437 Prw.: 11535 



A M J 
££ WorM Index 

The Index Backs U.S. rioter values of stocks frt Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
Argentina. Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brad, Canada, Ctuto, Denmark, Finland, 
Rama. Gerraany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico. Natharianda, Naw Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Swmfen, S witzer lan d and Venezuela. For Tokyo. Saw York and 
London, me Max b convoked of ma 20 Up Issues m terms of market capdaSzBdon. 
otherwise the ten too stocks ere tracked. 


1 industrial Soctoi's £ 


■on. far. % 

daw dan dnngt 


lion. 

don 

Awl 

door 

« 

dmg» 

Energy 

1ft. 69 112.16 -0.42 

Capital Goods 

116.96 

11729 

-028 

Utilities 

129.45 131 JO -1.41 

Raw Materials 

134.22 

13423 

-0.45 

Finance 

115.11 115.48 -0.32 

Consumer Goods 

103.00 

103.17 

-0.16 

Services 

120.38 12055 -0.47 

IfisceBaneous 

133.38 

134.18 

-0.15 

For more information about the Index, a booklet i$ available free ot charge- 
Write to Trg] Index, 181 Avenue Charles de GauBe, 92521 NeuSy Codex, France. 


O International Herafd Trfcune 


Xerox Tries to Duplicate Success 

Copying Giant to Redefine Its Image in ComputerAge 


By Sandra Sugawara 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Remember the 
mimeograph machine? Executives at Xe- 
rox Corp. do, and they want to ensure 
that history does not repeat itself. 

The mimeograph machine was a vital 
piece of equipment in many offices. 
Then along came the Xerox plain-paper 
copier, a far better technology. The mim- 
eograph disappeared, along with the ma- 
chines that produced wet and sme lly 
copies on oily, coated paper. 

Xerox recognizes that its copiers, once 
the pnde of every well-run office, may 
now be headed for tough times as well. 
With many documents being stored elec- 
tronically in computers, matin g a copy 
increasingly means hitting a printout 
button, instead of stro llin g over to the 
copier to “Xerox" it 
Paul Allaire, the chairman of Xerox, 
says there will always be a need for 
copiers. But he conceded that in most 
companies, electronic files will overtake 
file cabinets bulging with paper. So Mr. 
Allaire is overseeing a massive effort to 
transform Xerox into a company that 
can prospa- in the 21st century. 

In recent months, those efforts have 
included introduction of a glitzy new digi- 
tal printing system that Xerox said was 
aimed at an emerging $93 billion “print- 
mg-OP-demand" market, adoption of a 
new logo with a digitized X, and an adver- 
tising campaign that could total $8 million 
this fall to herald the “new Xerox." 
Xerox already can point to some early 


successes. Its new digital printers have 
won raves from consultants. Joel Weck- 
sdl, vice president of Gartner Group, a 
Stamford, California, research firm, called 
Xerox's digital primers “ intellectually 
compelling” and “thrilling compared to 
everything else that's out there." Digital 
products already account for about 20 

Xerox recognizes that 
its copiers, once the pride 
of every well-run office, 
may now be headed for 
tough times as well. 

percent of Xerox revenue, which totaled 
$17 billion in 1993. 

But for Xerox, the hard work of rein- 
venting the company lies ahead. Its digi- 
tal-printing products face formidable 
competitors, such as International Busi- 
ness Machines Corp.. Eastman Kodak 
Co. and Hewlett-Packard Co. As it 
pushes into the digital world, Xerox will 
face the industry giant Microsoft Corp. 
and a host of smaller software compa- 
nies. 

Xerox hopes it will have an advantage 
in this competition because of its brand 
name, its reputation for quality and ser- 
vice, and its decision to make its prod- 
ucts compatible with major office equip- 
ment and software. But it enters this 
battle preoccupied by an internal strug- 


gle for the soul of Xerox, analysis and 
industry executives said. 

The main battle is between the so- 
called “toner heads" — as those who 
came from the copier side of Xerox are 
known — and the company’s computer 
nerds, over how aggressively Xerox 
should plunge into the document man- 
agement software business. Even within 
each group, there are struggles between 
competing interests as the company 
searches for a new center of gravity. 

Few companies are as well-situated to 
try to reinvent themselves as Xerox. It is, 
after all, the company that proved it was 
possible to win back market share from 
Japanese competitors by improving 
quality and cutting costs. 

But the track record of established 
companies such as Xerox in trying to 
develop substantial business in other ar- 
eas is ^generally rotten," said Tom Pe- 
ters, a business consultant. 

Mr. Peters points to Xerox’s history. 
He said that over the past two decades. 
Xerox has done it all: made major acqui- 
sitions to diversify, poured money into a 
wide range of research, hired top-notch 
executives and talked about new visions 
for the company, but “it is still basically 
a copier company." he said. 

Some analysts contend the big copier 
business has been like a giant ball and 
chain around Xerox’s neck, keeping it 
from jumping on new technologies. A 
classic example was its failure to capital- 

See COPY, Page 15 


Rising Sales Lead Peugeot To Profit 


Cen?ifei by Ov Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — PSA Peugeot Ci- 
troen SA said Monday it swung 
back to profit in the first half of 
the year because of improved 
productivity and better sales of 
new models in key markets. 

The French company, the 
No. 2 European carmaker, re- 
ported a first-half net profit of 
688 million French francs 1$130 
million), compared with a loss 
of 1.12 billion francs a year ear- 
lier. The profit was in line with 
analysts’ expectations and was 
aided by strong sales of the 


midsized, year-old, Peugeot 306 
and Citro&n Xantia models. 

The company in July report- 
ed a IS percent rise in first-half 
sales, to 83.8 billion francs. 

The company linked its in- 
crease in sales to two new vehi- 
cle lines — the launches of the 
Peugeot Boxer and CitroSn 
Jumper, which extended the 
group’s range of commercial ve- 
hicles, while the Peugeot 806 
and Citroen Evasion gives it a 
presence in the growing multi- 
purpose vehicle market, it said. 

Much of the sales increase was 
also due to govern mem incen- 
tives in France and Spain for 


consumers to trade in cars 10 
years old or more for a new car. 
First-half car sales in France and 
Spain rose 15 percent and 19 
percent, respectively. 

Thanks to strict cost controls, 
which included a reduced work 
force and lower stocks, Peugeot 
Citroen posted an operating 
profit of 2.45 billion francs 
against a loss of 125 billion 
francs in the first-half of 1993. 

“The first-half results are for 
us a source of real satisfaction." 
said the Yann Deiabri&re, the 
chief financial officer. 

Mr. DeJabrifcre said the com- 
pany would maintain its im- 


provement during the second 
half, but warned that the Euro- 
pean car market may be slowing. 

“We expect a 'slight slow- 
down in the second half." Mr. 
Delabri&re said. 

The company predictedEuro- 
pean car sales would rise about 
4 percent this year from a year 
ago. although sales during the 
first eight months of the year 
are up 6 percent. Even with a 4 
percent improvement, that 
would still imply a drop of 11 
percent from 1992, Mr. Dela- 
brifere said, given the 15 percent 
drop in the market last year. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Reckitt to Pay 
$1.55 Billion 

For Kodak Unit 


CcmpiM by Our Staff From Douches 

NEW YORK — Eastman 
Kodak Co., which has been 
purging its nonphotographic 
businesses, agreed Monday to 
sell its household products unit 
to Reckitt Sc Colman PLC for 
$1.55 billion. 

The subsidiary, pan of Ko- 
dak’s L & F Products unit, in- 
cludes such f amili ar brands as 
Lysol cleaner. Mop and Glo 
floor polish. Resolve carpet 
cleaner and Wet Ones moist 
towelettes. 

The purchase, which is condi- 
tional, will be financed by a 
combination of bank borrow- 
ings and a £400 million ($253 
million) three-stage disposals 
program that involves Rec kill's 
selling Colman’s mustard and 
other British food brands. 

Reckitt, itself a major house- 
hold products company in the 
United States and Britain, pro- 
duces Easy Off oven cleaner, 
French’s mustard, W oolite 
clothes detergent and Air Wick 
air fresheners. 

Some analysts said they 
would downgrade their fore- 
casts for Reckin’s earnings next 
year as a result of the purchase, 
but others said they saw no rea- 
son to do so, as the company 
said it expects no negative earn- 
ings effect in 1995. 

Some said Reckitt might face 
regulatory problems, particu- 
larly with regard to a possible 
monopolistic position in the 
VS. carpet-products market. 

The sale is part of a reorgani- 
zation Kodak announced In 
May, when it put its health care 
and consumer products busi- 
nesses up for sale. Those units 
were acquired in the 1980s in an 
ill-fated attempt at diversifica- 
tion that has left the company 
plagued with debt and several 
years of weak profits. 

As a result, Kodak is refocus- 
ing on its main businesses of 
photography and electronic im- 
aging. 

“This transaction takes us 


much closer to our strategic 
goal of total dedication and re- 
source commitment to our core 
imaging businesses," said Ko- 
dak's chairman, George M.C. 
Fisher. 

Reckitt closed at 5S7 pence 
Monday on the London ex- 
change. down 40 pence, while 
Kodak closed unchanged, at 
$52,625, in New York. 

(AP. AFX. AFP) 


Stock Markets 
In Europe Sag 
On Rate Fears 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — European 
stock and bond markets suf- 
fered losses on Monday on 
fears interest rates would rise. 

Although many analysis 
think the Federal Reserve 
Board's Open Market Commit- 
tee, which meets Tuesday, will 
leave U.S. rates unchanged, lin- 
gering doubts kept many inves- 
tors on the sidelines. 

The Financial Timcs-Stock 
Exchange 100-share index 
closed nearly I percent lower, at 
2,999.8 points, compared with 
3,0282 on Friday. Comments by 
Kenneth Clarke, the chancellor 
of the Exchequer, that he could 
not rule out an increase in Brit- 
ish rates added pressure to the 
British market. 

The Paris Bourse suffered an 
even bigger loss on the first day 
of the October trading account, 
on ideas that rising American 
rales could drive French long- 
term interest rates higher. 

The CAC-40 index closed 
down 1.3 percent from Friday. 

Germany’s DAX lost nearly 
1 percent at 2,068.67 on uncer- 
tainties about the outcome of 
the federal elections Oct. 16. 
(AFP. Reuters , Knight- Ridder) 




Thinking Ahead / Commentary 

Germany Wants a Core Hard to Crack 


By Reginald Dale 

Imcmanonal Herald Tribune 

N EW YORK — Political lead- 
ers in France and Germany 
are being disingenuous in re- 
pudiating a “hard core” Eu- 
rope in order to still the protests of their 
partners. It is what Germany wants and 
zt is not going to go away. 

The notion, floated in Bonn and Paris 
this month, is that a limited group of 
European Union countries should ad- 
vance faster than others to economic and 
monetary union. 

Economists, less tactful than politi- 
cians, are much readier to acknowledge 
the 4iard core” already exists and may 
actually be a good thing. In its hardest 
form, the core is composed of the dose- 
knit economies of Germany, France and 
the Benelux countries, whose monetary 
policies are all run by the Bundesbank. 

That realistic assessment came 
through loud and dear at a meeting in 
New York last week of the Reinventing 
Bret ton Woods Committee, an interna- 
tional group campaigning for stable ex- 
change rates. 

Those at the meeting were unanimous 
about two things: that Europe would 
have to move at different speeds to eco- 
nomic and monetary union or risk never 
getting there; and that pressure for mon- 
etary integration is again rising. 

Now that the European Monetary Sys- 
tem has ridden out the currency crises of 
1992 and 1993 — albeit by loosening the 
bonds among exchange rates — and eco- 
nomic recovery is under way, “the drive to 


European monetary union is regaining 
momentum," as a conference paper put iL 

In the words of David Roche, President 
of Independent Strategy Ltd. of London: 
“The entire political elite, not only in 
France and Germany, but in the Benelux 
states, Iberia, Ireland and elsewhere still 
regards EMU as a necessary step." 

That is not always well appreciated in 
the En glish -speaking world, where infor- 
mation about EMU is often filtered 


Many people inside 
the hard core do not 
actually want die 
laggards to join. 


through a prism of Anglo-Saxon cyni- 
cism. But it should be obvious that mone- 
tary union is not going to happen soon, if 
at afl, if it has to wait until all 12 current 
EU members are ready. While most 
North European economies are converg- 
ing, the Southern economies are still way 
out of line, and Britain and Denmark may 
opt out altogether. 

Again more honestly than the politi- 
cians, economists at the conference point- 
ed out that many people inside the hard 
core do not actually want the laggards to 
join them — despite the politicians' pro- 
tests that no one is being excluded. 

As Jfcrgen von Hagen of University of 
Mannheim reported, “A core group of 


central banks — Belgium. Germany. Lux- 
embourg, the Netherlands and, since the 
mid-1980s, France — have built reputa- 
tions as central banks committed to price 
stability.” They will be reluciant to “give 
up their brand names" and consort closely 
with “low-reputation central banks.” 

Germany’s immediate interest is in a 
limited union of disciplined, low-infla- 
tion countries, which would not place 
too big a strain on EU resources. 
Bundesbank officials, in fact, see the 
potential new EU members — Austria 
and the Nordic countries — as more 
desirable partners than the existing Med- 
iterranean members Italy, Spain, Portu- 
gal and Greece. 

The point was well illustrated in a re- 
port by Jorge Braga de Macedo of Lis- 
bon’s Universidade Nova, which suggest- 
ed that Austria, Norway and Finland 
could join the bard core relatively quickly. 

As well as being richer, potential Nor- 
way and Finland are also much closer to 
meeting the ElTs official criteria for eco- 
nomic and monetary union than the 
Mediterranean members. In the North, 
only Sweden is badly out of kilter. 

A hard core would also be easier to sell 
to the German public than a broader 
union. “A limited union would allay 
popular fears that EMU means some- 
thing akin to abolishing the mighty 
Deutsche mark and adopting esperanto 
money," Mr. Roche said. 

Whatever the politicians may say, it is 
pointless trying to pretend thai’monetary 
union will come on anything other than 
German terms. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 



* 



Cross Rstss SaP L 26 

I C DM. PJF. Urn on CJF. 4F. Y«o Cl Peseta 



i 

f 

DM. 

FJ=. 

Urn D. FI 

ts. 

S-F. 

Ytn CS 

Peseta 

Afntftfltoni 

mi 

2X2 

M2 

04278 

UJO“ 

5M‘ 

US 

174B* ure 

MB* 

Bfiiudi 

ham 

runs 

MB 

ADI 

SDtfr* Mm3 

— 

5U2JS 

UB1 217* 

2*67- 

FfWURlft 

lisa 

tun 


62KI 

UNI* UfB 

<6612* 

UE73 

l-SMi* USB 

1205* 

\ fa} 

U75 


ww 

urn 

1ULV IMS* 

jam 

HO* 

TBS 11213 

2(101 

Motrtd 

QUO 

atom 

tun 

24229 

«M* 

mo 

NOT 

wo** nan 

— 

Milan 

lAiia 2A61X tM* 

2UU 

— *» 

4Uii 12 IAS 

1SJ2J U442J 

12,05 

Haw ybpIi W 


U»o 

IJ3M 

um Mum ufl 

1154 

12871 

9075 UBS 

1=073 

PnfU 

JJ175 

tea 

urn 

— 

ant?* ion? 

UlMl 

4.T2S3 

SAW- l?SS 

4U6S* 

TaItvd 

nx 

B4.V 

a» 

ac 

Q£H Silt 

10633 

7610 

— 7171 

0JN6 

iwyu 

fardflta 

UAH 

lit* 

uor 

use 

BOB* IOTSI 

own- 

1M1 

U*»* 

1AB* 

a wa mirw 

Zartdi 

UBS 

IBB 

use 

u# 

am- M* 

om m 

— 

UBS2- MSB 

0JN4* 

1 ECO 

UK 

0.7*39 

MW 

IMZ 

imn iisw 

3PJ94 

urn 

CUBS 13SM 

151562 

istm 


&n* 

am 

HA 

zaw isst 

4um 

13673 

MUR 15761 

UU67 


i son am 

ttBftaa to amstertom, Unto Wrt oMZortcti ***** in etnar content Toronto 


t.. /.iv iw dollar: 


Units of m; NA.s net ooeted; HA.; not 


avoUoele. 


Othsr DoRaur VaJiws 


Cumncr 

Arant.*** WW 


Austral. I 1 JH5 
Amir.wML WWI 
Snuff retd MA 
CMMM«uan MM 
CcriftMrtiM mo 
DanMifcrwN 41015 
C*va4BMnd UK 
Fla matte 410 


C u r ren cy Pwr% 

G ree k diac 23670 
HOMKBMI 772# 
Huno. torM W.W 
MltnraKt SU33 
lUanatfi 21 AOS 
trtsti t 0MU 

Israeli suit- 1032 
K i w WA Wf WW4 
NMmr-ttHS. MAC 


Currency Pars 
Mil MM U82 
UZeataBtfS 1-4*22 
Ngrvr.KTM* AJD*5 
PMCmh 2160 
PtHtan doty 23136. 
Port, (scuds IXM 
Ran. ruMe 2301 M 
Saudi rival 37SW 
Slnf.1 1.4833 


Currency Per* 
S-Afr.rood 054 
S, Her. won BOOM 
SM&lOTM 2X671 
Tehran* SO 
YUalboM 34.96 
Turkish lira M07S. 
UAEcHrnam 1*727 
Venez. MUv. 191 JU 


ran) Rates 


mntaM 


Currency 

Canadian riellar 


Mn «Wor 
1JAJ1 IJOI UCM 
JM5 VJt WS* 


UN* MW 1-5729 
155*1 IJSM MOT 

BMC 1-2*1 1J0N 12*07 

, rMG ten* (Amsterdam,, tndosrm *** £££ 

Aaron France mam iPorW: Book at Tekre (Tokyo! . Korol Bon* at anode 
at; l som OOwrdato Awn Reuters and AP 


Eurocurrency Deposits sept 26 



Dollar 

D-Mark 

Swiss 

Franc 

Sterling 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

ECU 

1 montft 

4 *w5 *s 

4 'V.J'V, 


5V.-Sfc 

5^5:. 

i'w-Vhi 


3 months 

5VVSV. 

4V5 

3 M 4 


SVs-5* 


534-571 

tmoatto 

5*^-5% 

5V8-5V. 


6*«V“ 

5^5'. 

2 >-2 •- 

6 L -r*> 

lyeur 

6 SvA K 

5*>-5 '*■ 


7 »«■? 

6 *«-6 

2 *.-2 -- 

4 -‘-4 


Sources; Reuters. Lloyds Ben*. 

Rems apfRKOOfe to kt t oCbank deooslts of St million minimum lor eoulvoienn. 


Key Honey Ratos 


United States 

Close 

Pr*v. 

OUcoOTt rate 

4JH 

400 

Prime rate 

7Vi 

7V. 

Federal hmds 

4% 

4% 

j-noatb CDs 

455 

455 

Comm, paper 111 day* 

557 

537 

3-meatb Treasury blit 

476 

477 

t-raar Treasury Ml 

557 

536 

3-rear Treasury note 

<Ufl 

648 

5-year Treason 1 note 

7.T9 

7.1» 

7-jreor Treasury note 

752 

752 

W-year Treasury aole 

756 

755 

30-rear Treasury Hand 

7£D 

77? 

Merrill Lynch BO-dmr Ready asset LOT 

406 

Japan 



Discount rate 

l*i 

l*i 

Calf nancy 

2.13 

111 

1 -maara InterOank 

:■* 

2»- 

J-araatb Interbank 

2U 

2M 

6-moatb tnttrbnk 

2* 

2*. 

10-year Oeieremem Bend 

4 53 

456 

Germany 



Umtortrpit 

6 JO 

400 

Call manor 

460 

4*0 

l-moran oiterbaek 

un 

5JBS 

iHaeath intartKB* 

5.10 

5J0 

tmontn laterboak 

530 

5J0 

ltorear Buad 

7AS 

757 


Britain 



Book base rate 

54i 

5% 

Call owner 

A'k 

LOO 

t-menti) Intcrtnoe 

S*v 

5H 

3-awfft Interbank 

5*. 

S 

6-mentb Interbank 

6* 

6 •« 

to-mrom 

a.97 

901 

France 



lotervefi Hon rate 

530 

100 

Call money 

5*. 

5<* 

1-moott Interbank. 

5‘. 

5‘. 

3-moiiHi interbank 

5^ 

5-. 

Fmentli Interbank 

54. 

5’. 

14-War OAT 

tu 

6.1? 


Sources: Routers. Bloomhera. Merrill 
Lynch, Bank ot Tokyo. Camtnertoank. 
Greenaw// Mentaou. Credit Lronra! s. 



AJIA 

PM. 

Chtae 

Zorich 

39SA5 

39575 

050 

LsMon 

»J0 

39SJ0 

+ aio 

New York 

too JX 

39730 

— 130 


US. dollars oer ounce. London official Ua- 

inesiZuriai and new Yar* aoeninoona das- 
Ins prices: Hew York Cemex IDecemoer.l 
Source ■■ Reuters. 


Leaks Dilute Shares of Channel Tunnel 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New York Times Service 

LONDON — The Channel Tunnel is 
leaking, and as usual it is the investors in 
the project who are getting soaked. 

Shares in Eurotunnel, the company that 
operates the 50-kilometer (31-mile) under- 
sea link between Britain and France, 
plunged Monday after weekend news re- 
ports that water was seeping into the tun- 
nel and not draining properly. After failing 
nearly 10 percent early in the day. Euro- 
tunnel units — representing one share in 
each of the French and British divisions of 
the company — partially recovered but 
still closed in London at a record low of 
250 pence, down 1 9 peace, or 7 percent, for 
the day. 

Eurotunnel, which is planning to begin 
regular passenger services in November 
and is already Tunning a freight service, 
said the water problem was extremely mi- 
nor and would not create operating or 
safety problems. The amount of water in 


the tunnel, Eurotunnel said, was along of 
lines of “puddles, not floods.” 

The tunnel is bored through rock hund- 
reds of feet below the seabed, and any water 
coming in from the outside comes from 
naturally occurring deposits in the rock, the 
company said, not the English Channel 
above iL The tunnel is designed to allow a 
certain amount of seepage to keep outside 
pressure from building up, the company 
said, and some of the water may also nave 
come from the coding system, from rainwa- 
ter running off trains passing through the 
tunnel or from rJranmg operations. 

But even if concern about the leakages 
was largely a product of the British press’s 
penchant for seizing on the project's evety 
problem, it quickly became a new public 
relations nightmare for the company, which 
has seen the project through a long series of 
delays, cost overruns and refinancings. 

For investors, it was just the latest bit of 
bad news for a stock that has taken a 
pounding through much of its eight-year 
history, particularly over the last year. The 


shares, which trade in London and Paris, 
sold for 300 pence per unit in London at the 
initial public offering in 1986. and traded 
close to 1,000 pence three years later. 

The units traded as high as 654 pence 
earlier this year in London but have slid 
precipitously. Monday’s closing price was 
lower than the 265 pence at which addi- 
tional units were sold to investors in a $ 1 2. 
billion rights offering in July. 

Eurotunnel has been losing credibility 
with investors for some time. 

The project’s final cost of around $15 
billion was twice the original budget. Prom- 
ises that the company would pay a dividend 
by next year have given way to projections 
that dividends would commence in 2004. 
The traffic and fare assumptions that un- 
derlie the company’s forecast of reaching 
profitability in 2002 are viewed with skepti- 
cism among many analysis. 

Freight service — special trains designed 
to cany trucks — has been r unnin g through 
the tunnel for several months. 


A New Push 
In U.S.- Japan 
Trade Talks 


LVMH 

MOfT HENNESSY . LOUIS VUITTON 

REPORTS 36 % INCREASE IN NET INCOME 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Tunes Service 

TOKYO — With a deadline 
looming Friday in trade talks 
with the United States, Japan’s 
trade minister will leave for 
Washington on Tuesday in a 
last-ditch effort to avert sanc- 
tions from being invoked 
against his counuy. 

Ryu taro Hasbimoto, minister 
of international trade and indus- 
try, is expected to meet Mickey 
Kantor, the U.S. trade represen- 
tative, and probably Commerce 
Secretary Ronald H. Brown, of- 
ficials here said. Mr. Hasbimoto 
and Mr. Kantor spoke by tele- 
phone in the morning. 

Mr. Hashimoto’s ministry is 
in charge of talks on automo- 
biles and glass, two of the four 
sectors now being negotiated, 
under the so-called framework I 
agreement signed in July 1993. 

Officials in both nations say 
that agreements in those two sec- 
tors, especially automobiles, 
were unlikely by Friday because 
the two sides are so far apart It 
seems likely therefore that Mr. 
Hashimoto’s visit is aimed not at 
reaching an agreement but per- 
haps at moving close enough to 
persuade Washington not to im- 
pose sanctions in those areas. 

If there is no agreement on 
Japan's government procure- 
ment of telecommunications 
and medical equipment, U.S. 
sanctions will almost certainly 
be applied. 


In ihe first six months of 1994. the LVMH Group recorded net sales of FF 12 billion, an increase of 19.0 *7 
over the comparable 1993 period. 

Group income from operations, amounting to FF 2,645 million, rose by 30.5 reflecting the increase in 
sales, improved profitability in all the Group's segments of activities and favorable exchange rates, notably 
of the Japanese yen. 

Net income, totaling FF 4.751 million, includes ihe capilai gain recorded on the occasion of Guinness's 
acquisition of a 34 *5- interest in Moet Hennessy. 

Excluding unusual items, net income rose by 36 ** to FF 1,27 1 million in the firsi half of ihe year. 

Sales and income from operations broke down as follows ; 


In FF millions 

1993 

Sales 

1994 1 

Income from operations 

1993 1994 

• Champagne and Wines 

1,802 

1,920 

86 

118 

• Cognac and Spirits I 

2,554 

2.854 

781 

912 

• Luggage and Leather Goods 

2.434 

3,188 

968 

1,395 

• Perfumes and Beauty Products 

2.858 

3.0B8 

326 

352 

on a comparable structural basis 

2.444 

2,922 

275 

327 

• Other activities 

* including holding company expenses 

387 

951 

'(134) 

*(132) 

LVMH 

10,035 

12,001 

2,027 

2,645 


In the Champagne and Wines segment, ihe recovery in income from operations stems from the rise in 
sales and ihe initial impact of lower grape price* and production costs. 

In Cognac and Spirits, a rebound in Japanese sales following price adjustments implemented in March, 
as well as lower eaux-de-vic prices, are the main reasons behind the improvement in income from 
operations. 

In luggage and Leather Goods , the strung rise in sales - particularly of "Cmr Epi“ and Taiga'' - and tight 
control over operating expenses resulted in a 44 ■> increase in income from operations. 

In the Perfumes and Beauty Products segment, the increase in sales - 20 r .i on a comparable structural 
basis -'reflets successful recent product launches, bolstered by significant advertising and promotional 
efforts. 

Guinness's contribution to LVMH's net income rose by lOCf. primarily reflecting its improved results. 

LVMH, THE WORLD'S LEADING LUXURY PRODUCTS GROUP 



Page 14 


DTTERNATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1994 


MARKET DIARY 


Blue Chips Rise 
Despite Rate Fear 


Bloomberg Businas flews 

NEW YORK — Blue-chip 
U.S. slocks edged higher Mon- 
day as optimism grew that the 
Federal Reserve Board’s policy- 
setting panel would opt notto 
raise interest rates on Tuesday. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage rose 17.49 points to close, 
at 3,849.24. The rise snapped a 

U.S. Stocks 

slide last week when the index 
fell 104.97 points, or 2.61 per- 
cent, its biggest weekly loss 
since June, which occurred 
largely due to speculation that 
the Fed might raise rates. 

Many analysis do not expect 
the Fed to raise rates until after 
the Nov. 8 congressional elec- 
tions. “Waiting less than two 
weeks makes available to the 


Sept 

info 


October information on em- 
ployment and inflation, which 
will be extremely important in 
gauging the economy's direc- 
tion,’' said Raymond Urban, a 
strategist for Duff & Phelps. 

Although the Dow was up, 
four stocks fell for every three 
that rose on the New’ York 
Stock Exchange. Trading was 


moderate, with about 270.82 
millio n shares changing hands 
on the Big Board, down from 
297.58 shares on Friday. 

Semiconductor stocks paced 
drop after CS Fust Boston 
Coip. cut its investment ratings 
of Texas Instruments and Mi- 
cron Technology amid concern 
that increased Asian produc- 
tion of memory chips noil swell 
global supply and hurt pricing 
for some of the companies' 
products. 

Micron Technology, the most 
active U.S. stock, tumbled 2ft 
to 36. Texas Instruments, the 
sixth most active, fell 3% to 
68‘A, and Intel eased % to 62%. 

Mercantile Stores Co. 
plunged 16 1/S to 39 after talks 
with a potential acquirer broke 
off. Shares of May Department 
Stores, the rumored buyer, rose 
Vito 39. 

Arbor National Holdings 
tumbled 4% to 15% in the wake 
of an acquisition offer from 
BankAm erica Corp. that valued 
the mortgage company at about 
SI 18 milli on. An Arbor spokes- 
man said the purchase price was 
below the prior trading price 
because the shares “got traded 
up based on takeover rumors." 


Mark Trips on Election, 
Yen on Trade Hopes 


NEW YORK — The dollar 
rose against the yen and the 
Deutsche mark on Monday. It 
gained against the Japanese 
currency as traders bet positive 
news would come out of this 
week’s trade talks between the 
United States and Japan, while 
the marie was undermined by 
election jitters in Germany. 

Hopes for a last-minute solu- 
tion to the trade impasse 
prompted traders to sell yen 
they had bought in recent 
weeks. “People find it hard to 

Foreign Exchange 

believe the UJS. and Japan 
won't iron something out on 
trade and present some sort of 
conciliatory agreement,” Henry 
Wilkes of Bank Julius Baer said. 

The dollar rose to 98.75 yen 
from 97.83 yen on Friday. 

Germany is to hold a federal 
election on Oct 16 and uncer- 
tainty over whether Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl's coalition will re- 
main in power has prompted in- 
vestors to sell marks. 

The results of an election in 
Bavaria on Sunday raised con- 
cerns about the fate of Mr. 


Kohl's coalition. “The spark be- 
hind the dollar's rise came Erst 
from the Bavarian result,” said 
Tim Fox of Credit Suisse. 

The dollar rose to 1.5536 DM 
from 1.5488 DM on Friday. 

Against other currencies, it 
rose to 1 .2871 Swiss francs from 
1.2865 francs and to 53085 
French francs from 5.2935 
francs. The pound fell to 
$1.5720 from $1.5770. 

Analysts said the dollar was 
also nudged higher as traders 
guarded against the possibility 
of a rise in U.S. interest rates 
after a meeting Tuesday of the 
policy-setting Open Market 
Committee of the Federal Re- 
serve Board. 

Opinions were split on 
whether the Fed committee 
would announce a rate rise after 
Thesda/s meeting. 

Increased U.S. rates would 
make dollar deposits relatively 
more attractive and would typi- 
cally boost the currency. But 
those benefits have been over- 
shadowed this year by concern 
that foreign investors would 
dump U.S. stocks and bonds 
when rates go up. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Via AtHMrtad Praii 


Sep*. 26 


The Dow 


Da3y dcK5in0s <rfirie 
Dow Jones industrial average 


Dow Jones Averages 


Own Hhih Low Lott On. 

I nOUS 3833.09 384991 3836.34 384*40 - 17.83 
Trans 150133 15060# 1491.36 M9&03 — 1 38 
Util 17138 17737 176.44 1/7.10 -0JD 
Como 1383 J* 1384.72 1379 S3 12845* -3.11 



! Standard & Poor’s Indexes 


I 

! industrials 
I Tran so. 
Utilities 

Finance 
SP 500 
5P TOO 


HMi Low a 050 CTr os 
MS4B 54341 $4540 + 148 
34075 35747 35841 —046 
150.91 14946 15045 + 054 
<340 4336 4346 — 047 
46087 45*31 46X82 + 1.15 
42837 425.90 427.92 +137 


NYSE Indexes 


JU A-'M- J : J A S | 

smu,, , v.:; ' ! - 


NYSE Most Actives 



VaL Hgh 

Low 

Last 

Chg. 

Giaxa 

65963 18 

17*4 

17W 


AAierTcs 

53782 37V, 

35'to 

36 

— 3~ 

FordMs 

43011 27 

HVk 

26U 

-to 

Tex Inst 

36790 69'x 

6Ste 

£8 


GnMalr 

33794 47M 

*6'/. 

*w 

* to 

TelMex 

30353 66V, 

64te 

65Vk 

— 'U 

Oirvslr 

27864 46 

43W 

431k 


Merdc 

25278 35Ml 

34te 

349k 

.14 

Nottatv 

23816 28 

27Vi 

27% 

* to 

ABarck 

23068 26to 

26 H 

26V. 

—to 

PhllMr 

19579 SOVk 

58Vi 

S9te 

+ ito 

AT&T 

19360 Site 

53te 

54>A 

*te 

WolMart 

18715 33te 

23te 

23H 


attcorp 

10099 429k 

4ite 

42V4 

—5 

ISM 

17184 69 to 

67te 

69Vk 



NASDAQ Most Actives 



VOL 

High 

Law 

Lost 

OlS. 

CstHIth 

41401 

33 

31 Vi 

33 

+ te 

MCI 

33982 24V, 

23te 

349k 

*94 

Intel 

30919 

63to 

63 V. 

62to 

—4k 

N&dal cm 

27745 22 V. 

20to 

209k 

— ite 

IritgOv 

23432 7Stu 

TOV. 

3194 

* to 

Lotus 

23385 

37 V, 

aste 

369k 

*94 

Oracle 5 

22497 43V 

42 

42W 

— 16 

EawCnfi 

19630 

30 

29to 

29 V, 

*49k 

Pyxis s 

19261 

24to 

2194 

2* to 

* te 

Informix 

19001 

26te 

2594 

25te 

—9k 

Micsfls 

18637 

54 

SSto 

55V, 

—to 

Cisco % 

17738 

24 Vk 

23 fk 

2414 

—Ik 

GaVTOOa 

17681 

20 

189k 

19Vu 

*•'/* 

BedBath 

17354 

23tt 

2216 

23to 

—V. 

ArbrNII 

16880 

16 

15<A 

iste 

— 4to 


AMEX Most Actives 



VaL 

Moh 

Law 

Lass 

eng. 

Echo Bov 

9562 

I3tk 

1394 

1394 

—to 

vioca 

BO*6 

3694 

34 V, 

36*4 

* to 

RovrtOB 

7173 

Ato 

ito 

4«ll 


X CL Ltd 

4981 

IVu 

1 

1V H 

—>te 

IvoxCP 

3694 

1994 

19te 

19Vj 

—to 

Vkxjn rt 

3367 

494, 

4to 

«Vu 

—to, 

CtzFsl 

31(9 

94k 

9 to 

9to 


viocrtwl 

3085 

Ite 

Ito 

1<V„ 


Hsflorurt 

2865 2i Vu 

2V U 

Ite 


Atari 

3617 

54k 

5to 

594 

+ '4 


Maricet Sates 


Commodity 

Aluminum, lb 

Today 

0719 

Prev. 

073 


Today 

Prev. 

Copper electrolytic, lb 

109 

21800 

06 

21100 



cans. 

Lead, lb 

000 

000 

NYSE 

27083 

36893 

Silver, troy oz 

507 

508 


187B 

2X99 

Steel (scrap), ton 




2301 

32103 

Tin. lb 

3Jt f J 

<10 

InmdtMs. 



Zln&tb 


00986 


HSati Low Lon On. 

Composite 25439 25356 25*39 -058 

Industrials 319.00 31744 31*40 • 0*8 

Tronsp. 232.04 230.10 23X76 -0 69 

Utility 30304 20117 imiw -ujo 

Finance 204.97 MU? 20647 —0.17 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Com bos rte 
industrials 
Berta 
insurance 

Finance 

Tronic. 


HtoH Law Las Cbg. 

756.16 75386 75149 —397 
76532 76130 76312 — 3TB 
7737B 76841 76841 — 80 
*38.90 92635 928.10 —0.08 
93745 93440 934.00 —AJ7 
715.96 70843 71043 


AMEX Stock Index 


Mali Law Lost aid. 
455 48 45376 45338 —145 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bands 
10 Utilities 
10 Industrials 


Close 

97.12 

9246 

101.79 


arwe 
— 0.10 
Unch. 
— 030 


NYSE Diary 



Ctase 

Prw. 

Advanced 



Declined 



Unchanged 

731 

72* 




NewHign* 

34 


New Lews 

137 

1 50 

AMEX Diary 


Ckae 

Prev. 

Advanced 

240 

242 

Declined 

321 

335 

Unchanged 

227 

257 

Trtai Issues 

788 

834 

New Highs 

6 

19 

Now Lows 

30 

26 


NASDAQ Diary 


AdvOTced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Hiatts 
New Lows 


1406 

1738 

1934 

5078 

85 

74 


154* 

1571 

1954 

5074 

96 

77 


Spot Commodities 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 

8 J?** At* BW Ask 

ALUMINUM (High Grade) 
Mionoemjmctoo^^ 1MUQ 

Forward 1607.00 140X00 T63L00 163300 

COPPER CATHODES tMWl Grad*] 

Dalian per metric ton 

Soot 255300 255400 255350 235630 

Forward 256130 256100 257OJ00 257130 

I CA D 

Dollars per metric loti 
Sat 61830 0)930 62030 42230 

Forward 63300 63300 63300 637.00 

NICKEL , 

Dollars aer metric tan 

Soot 642300 643030 644300 645300 

Forward 652300 653000 654500 655000 

TJN 

Dollars per metric ton 
St 537700 538200 540500 54)500 

Forward $45300 546000 548500 549000 

ZINC (Special Hhtn Grade) 

Dollars par metric ton 

Snot 102130 102230 102230 102350 

Forward 10443D 104500 10430a 04600 


9300 

*813 

*819 

Unch. 

9829 

9222 

9828 

— O01 

9104 

9106 

9102 

+ 001 

9101 

91.12 

91.19 

+ 003 

7008 

9001 

9087 

+ 002 

9007 

9004 

9006 

+ 003 

9054 

9051 

7053 

+ 002 

1-iM, 

9001 

*003 

Unch. 

9037 

9033 

m33 

— 001 

7030 

9027 

7028 

+ 001 

7021 

9020 

7020 

Unch. 

9020 

90.19 

?C20 

Unch. 


Financial 

Hist Low am Change 
MAONTH STERLING (UFFE) 

im m- oft of loo per 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
sep 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
sw 
Dec 
Hot 
Jon 

**Est- volume f42498. open Int.: 48041. 
1MONTH EURODOLLARS tUFFE) 

SI million - Ptx of 190 »ct 
Dec 94.10 94.10 94.11 +001 

Mar 9374 9373 9375 +003 

Jen 9137 9337 9339 +002 

Sep 9307 9307 9310 + 002 

EsJ- volume: 63 Open ini.: 3034. 

3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

DM1 mimcn- ptsof 10a pet 
Doc 9474 9470 9871 —002 

Mar 9433 9428 9402 Until 

Jim 9394 9390 9192 — 002 

5#P 9159 9355 9356 —003 

Dec 9129 9124 9307 —001 

Mar 9306 9103 9305 Unch. 

Jun 9205 9203 9204 Until 

Sen 9267 9265 9267 Unch. 

Dec 9252 9252 9252 Unch. 

JBD 9224 9224 9225 + 001 

Sep 9213 9210 9211 +003 

Est. volume: 53333 Open InL: 691 21 B. 


3-MONTH PI BOR (MATIF) 
FF5 mnitofl . pta of 100 pd 




INCREASED 



Dec 

9408 

9405 

9407 

+ 001 

Blount me A 

a 

.1425 

12-15 

1-2 

Mar 

7358 

9355 

9358 

+ 002 

Blount incB 

0 

.13 

12-15 

1-2 

Jon 

9320 

9815 

9819 

+003 

Keystone Amwrld B Q 

.IS 

9-23 

10-6 

Sep 

9208 

9884 

9207 

+ 003 


INITIAL 




Dec 

9263 

9158 

9200 

+ 8W 





Mar 

9838 

9131 

9226 

+ 002 

Pulaski Bank 


.IS 

10-3 

10-17 

Jan 

Sen 

98)9 

9207 

9816 

9203 

9817 

9204 

+004 
+ 004 

Trigen Energy 

- 

03S 

9-30 

1D-T7 

Est volume: 21004. Open int: 168528 


OMITTED 





LONG GILT t LI FFE) 

CBiOM - Pfs & 32ads of TOO pet 
Sep UXMW 99-24 49-30 — 043 

Dec 99-12 90-26 9W4 — (HM 

Mar N.T. N.T. 98-16 —004 

Est- volume: 26,94a Open Ini.: 109*48. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFC3 
DM 23X000- ptl Of 100 PCI 
Dec 89.14 8873 8892 — 005 

Mar 8834 sun 8826 — 0.10 

Est. volume: 67,942 Open InU 149015. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FFSUaOOO-ptscf 100 Pd 
Dec 11004 10700 17072 —006 

Mar 110-18 10004 109.98 —006 

Jim 10940 109.40 10928 —0.6* 

Sep N.T. N.T. N.T. Unch. 

Est- volume: 72881. Ooan Int.: 133830. 


Industrials 


HU Low Lost Settle Owe 
GASOIL (IPE) 

UJL dollars per metric tnMots of loo tans 
Oct 15275 15325 15150 15140 +025 

Nov 15575 15400 15450 15450 +025 

Dec 15825 156.75 15725 15775 +100 

Jan 15975 15150 15*25 15725 +100 

Ffib 16000 16000 16000 16000 +100 


HU Law Last Settle ai'ae 

Mar 1(00$ t$875 16000 UIUH +100 

Apr N.T. N.T. N.T. 15875 +150 

Mar 15825 15825 15825 157.50 +150 

Jane 15725 15625 15700 15700 +175 

J8lT N.T. N.T. N.T. 15875 +175 

Est. volume: 13205 . Open im. 107.142 

■RENT CRUDE OIL (IPE) 

ILS. dollars par OamMati of )AN Barrels 
Oct 1679 1640 1651 1651 —0.15 

Nor 1(08 1622 1602 1602 —811 

Dec 1893 1(00 1(05 1608 - 0.17 

Jan 1890 1865 1866 1606 —0.10 

Feb 1(07 i860 1600 1605 - 0.14 

Mar 1608 1866 1866 1606 —814 

APT 1874 1874 1674 1868 —814 

M Or N.T. N.T. N.T, 1670 —814 

JIM N.T. N.T. N.T. 1872 — 8M 

Jtr N.T. N.T. N.T. 1674 —814 

Add N.T. N.T. N.T. 1876 -814 

Sep N.T. N.T. N.T. 1878 —814 

Est. volume: 28187 . Open bit. 144221 

Htrti Low Last settle arat 


Stock Indexes 

HMi Urn Close Change 
FTSB IN (UFFE) 

■IS per index palm 

Dec 30320 29870 30090 -340 

MOT 30385 30190 30332 — 34J 

Est. volume: 17404 Open Int: 53208 
CAC 40 (MATIF) 

FF2M per inritut paint 

Sep 193700 1894 DO 189600 -4300 

Oct 194600 190320 1TO5JW -4200 

Nov 193850 192200 191320 -4120 

Dec 196*20 193000 192150 -4200 

Mar 196450 195X00 195000 -4300 

E it volume: 37208 Open bit.: 63728 
Sources: Motif, Associated Press, 
London inn Financial Futuna Exchange. 
Inn Potrofovm ex O tanee. 


Dtvl (tends 


Company Per Atnt Rec Par 

IRREGULAR 

Kyocera Carp c 2073 9-29 

Leeds Fed Svas _ JI75 10-5 10-19 

Sasol Ltd ADR C .1353 830 11-12 

Shanghai Petro c 4654 IM 10-20 

o-approx amount per ADR. 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Bortson Electron 1 for 6 reverse spilt 
STOCK SPLIT 

Am Mnamnt Svslatns 3 for 2 split 
La Quinta Inns 3 far 2 split 


Jacksonville Svas 



a 

05 

10-5 

10-19 


Q 

00 

10-11 

11-1 

BakerJ 

Q 

ms 

10-18 

10-* 

BancFIref Q» 

a 

M 

10-3 

10-14 


0 




Buti&Besnr GHcFd 

M 

as 

9-26 

9-30 







Q 


10-3 

10-14 

Comwest Explar 


06 

9-29 

10-1 


O 

.43 

11-18 

12-2 


G 

22 

11-18 

17-9 

KtolnwrtBnAus Inco 

M 

06 

10-6 

10-17 

Lowes Cos 

O 

0*5 

VO-17 

uxn 

Morgan Group 

a 

02 

10-3 


Nah Data 

a 

.11 

11-15 

11-30 


0 

04 

10-3 

VM7 


a 

05 

10-20 

11-10 

PocTelesIs 

O 

.543 

10-5 

11-1 

Patriot Sol Dlv 

M 

.1031 

10-6 

10-20 

RCMSIrat Gib 

M 

074 

10-12 

10-26 

Second BncpOH 

a 

74 

10-15 

10-31 

Shawm ut Natl 

a 

.30 

105 

10-15 

Stratton Monthly 

M 

.16 

9-30 

10-11 


0 

27S 

10-3 

11-1 

T cnibman Centers 

0 

.2? 

UM 

10-30 

Titan Wheel 

Q 

015 

7-30 

10-14 


iKmn uo l: g-pavaMe In Canadian funds; m- 
moatMv; e waluli; sumleuml 



U.S./ATTHI 


Coca-Cola Plans Russia Investment 

ATLANTA (AF) - Co=a^ Ca ^ 


n /'Vw-o.fnla c?o and two iOMSrtt&tii 

bo » ^« 1 * 10 !"S£d£ RUS5i# “ Ikn ’ 

■he next R|iW 


atoif M^illion^e 

facility and$40 million to develop soft dnnk openuwns a 

uihem and eastern Russ*- r Group ^ efES, ptasfcr 

The bottling companies, the Levenus yroup 1 “TT 

vest a total of $30 minion in Russia during the next time y^s. 

_ _ _ r. T • .. A __ 1 


McDonnell Douglas Puts an Outsider in Charge 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ST. LOUIS — For the first time in the 
history of McDonnell Douglas Corp.. nei- 
ther a McDonnell nor a Douglas is at the 
helm. 

The defense-aerospace giant announced 
Monday that Harry C. Stoneripher, chair- 
man of Sundscrand Corp.. has taken over 
as president and chief executive officer.* 

He takes over the CEO spot from John 
F. McDonnell who will remain as chair- 
man, focusing on long-term strategies. 

Mr. Stoneripher, 58, had been with 


Sundstrand, an Illinois-based maker of 
aerospace and industrial components, 
since 1987, becoming chairman and CEO 
in 1991. Previously, he worked at General 
Electric Co. for 26 years. 

Mr. McDonnell, 56, is the son of the 
founder of McDonnell Aircraft Co„ James 
McDonnell. During the son's tenure, the 
nation's No. 1 defense contractor fought 
with the Pentagon over a $1.6 billion cost 
overrun and delays in the C-17 military 
transport program. It also saw its share of 
the world market for commercial jetliners. 


which it once led, fall to a distant third 
place. 

The company laid off tens of thousands 
of employees as the Cold War ended and 
recession dried up demand for its passen- 
ger jets. An attempt to raise capital by 
selling off a piece of the commercial jet 
business to a Taiwanese start-up failed. 

Mr.- Stoneripher said he would concen- 
trate initially on the C-17 and the commer- 
cial aircraft business. 

(AP. Bloomberg. Knight- Bidder) 


invest 

NBC Suitors utuu W — o TLJJTr-S 

NEW YORK (NYT) — The taftsbetween the Generari^fa ^ 
Co. and Walt Disney Co. about Drsney 
NBC have cooled, according to people with knowledge: of|thc| 

di Thf S SSbling block seemed to be * 

NBC — the network, the seven locai idevijon :■ 

interests in cable television. General Bect fJ? “j® 
derided that it would prefer to continue owning a m^only.or^ 
NBC, making only 49 percent available to suitors, - * 

ITT Corp. s negotiations about NBCs future ak® 
appear to b? going smoothly. An executive close 
the company had lost interest in buying NBC, but a company v 
spokesman would not comment. * 

Barnett to Acquire EquiCredit - 

JACKSONVILLE, Florida (Bloomberg) — Barnett Buries Jra f . 
said Monday it signed a definitive agreement to acquire Ecjpusfr- 
dit Corp., a consumer finance company, for $332 mffliou nrosh, ^ 
or $32 a share. • M 

EquiCredit, operates 89 offices in 29 U^. states. The company,® 
originated $602 minion in loans in 1993 and has the right to g 
service $1.5 billion in loans, . * • :S : 

In February, Barnett agreed to buy Loan America Financial > 
Corp. for about $62 milli on in cash. Loan Ammca buys.HH58%^a; 

and h a F the right to service about $4 billion in mortgage ^ 
loans. Barnett services about $13 billion in loans a year. 

SEC Report on Fund Manager Abuse ! 

WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — The Securities and Exchange 
Co mmissi on said Monday it would release a report on Tuesday 
ou tlining abuses by fund managers who put their personal invest 1 
meats ahead of those of their shareholders- ^ 

People familiar with the study said it would find that some • 

manage rs do indeed trade actively for their own aocounts-befoft * 
they make trades in the same securities for the funds they managfc 
Arthur Levitt, chairman, of the SEC, said in a recent speech that 
the pr ac tice, known as front-running was “very Car from being. & 
standard practice,” ~ * 

Industry officials said the report would probably add to recom: 
men clarions made by the Investment Company Institute Iasi May 
that said fund companies should adopt a senes of steps to linut- 
trading by fund managers for their own accounts. 

For the Record 

BankAmerica Corp. said would acquire Arbor National Hofcd 1 V5 
ings Inc., a mortgage company, in a stock swap valued at. about 
$1 18 millioiL Under the agreement, each share of Arbor National w 
will be exchanged for $16JS-worth of BankAmerica stock. . •* 

( Bloomberg) 

The National Association of Realtors said that sales of Existing “ 
homes fell 1.8 percent in August. (AP) 


W— kind Box Offfc# ~ ** • ' ~ 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — “Timecop” dominated the U. S. b«6i office 
with a gross of $8.2 million over the weekend- Following, are the 
Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday ticket sales and estimated 
sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


tixt* 



t.TimecBF" 

Z Terminal Vriodfv- 
8 TofTral Gump’ 
4~0ulzSlMMr 

8 ~CI«ar and Present Danair* 1 

8 "Natural Bam Killers' 

7.-TDeMask- 
8 "Carrl no, Carrtna" 

9. "Milk Money" 

18 "The Next Karate Khr 


( Universal) 

(Hollywood Ptcturai 
(Paramount) 

rMrttaMotfncfurasr J 

(Paamooatl J , ■ 
(Warner Brattons) 

(New Une Cinema) 
(Now Lfrie CiNNiw) 
( P aramount) 
(CotomOta) 


58! million 
552 million 
CMailtUon 

.~aMuuon.. 

MTSjmUlkxt 
S17 mUHon 
SlAmHHon 
*14 minion 
Vwluta 
*14 million 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Ayenco Franc* Prat* Sept. 26 
doMPrev. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACF HoUflna 
Action 
Ahold 
Akzo Nobel 
AMEV 

Bots-Wessonen 
CSM 
DSM 
.Elsevier 
'Fokkor 
Gbt-Brocodes 
HBG 
H ejnek en 
Hoaoovefn 
Humor Douglas 
IHC Cakmd 
Inter Mueller 
flirt Nedertand 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 
Nedikml 
OceGrlnten 
Pnkhoed 
PMIlDS 
Potvarom 
Robeco 
RoUamco 
Rollnco 

nonHitD 

Royal Dutch 
Stark 
Unilever 
van Ommeren 
VNU 


57 5838 
37 JO 3720 
10100 10120 
49 497B 
20430 20860 

7850 7230 

3320 3320 
66 6720 
15130 15170 
1(3 16120 
1520 1500 
4410 4400 
29450 297 

23830 23800 
7810 7840 

76 77 

43 « 

92.40 9250 
7400 7570 
4700 4700 
51.10 5890 
5200 S3 
5148 3S28 

7030 7000 

4570 *8.10 
54 55.10 
7520 7810 
114.10 11420 
5100 51.10 

117.90 11720 

B2.40 0200 

18860 10810 
4440 4520 
19450 19890 
4860 4870 

19140 19440 


woiters/Kluwer 11720 118 


Brussels 


AG Fin 

Almanll 

Arbea 

Barca 

BBL 

Bekaert 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

Cockertli 

Cobepa 

Cal nnn 

Delhafze 

Eiedrabel 

Electrafina 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevaert 

Gfaverbel 

immobei 

Kr*dlettxmk 

Masane 

Petroflna 

Powtrfln 

Recncei 

Reyale Beige 

Soc Gen Banque 


2575 25 <0 

7430 7670 

4500 4&M 
2538- K60 
*040 4100 
33950 24200 

12100 HITS 

2490 7500 

1950 1945 

200 200 
5420 5440 
7430 7470 
1256 JZ7C 
5900 5380 
2925 3000 
1370 1382 
4015 4020 
902® 9150 
4430 4525 

2S®» 2980 

6250 <240 

1440 1440 

9940 9970 
2780 2000 
490 490 

4600 4000 
7890 8030 


Soc Gen Brtgfque 2200 2215 

Sothia 13425 13625 

SoJvaV 14150 143CU 

-Teesenderto 10100 10200 
Tractwei 9440 9420 

UCB 34000 3(300 

Union Minlere 27M 2700 

W OOOOS LitS NA 70*0 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

AJcetel SEL 

Allhnu HoM 

Altana 

Aiko 

BASF 

Bav*r 

Bay. Hypo bank 

Bov Verclnabk 
BBC 

BHK Bonk 
BMW 

Commerzbank 

ConNnantai 

Daimler Ben: 

Deaussa 

Dt Baocock 

oeviisciie Bank 

Douglas 

□mdner Bank 

FeiamueMe 

F Kruop Hoescti 

Haraener 

Henkel 

HochtW 

Haechst 

Halzmam 

Horten 

fWKA 

Kail Sal: 

Korstodt 

Kaufhof 

KHD 

KloecknerWerke 

Unde 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Mannesmann 

MelalkKKll 

Muench Rueck 

Porsche 

Prewssag 

PWA 

PWE 


1580016100 
Ml 300 
3M3 2359 
(25 638 
852 860 

30700 311.10 
353.70 355 

38* 395 

432431J0 
703 703 
380 3B4 

70178350 
31231550 


. 

Cknp Prev. 

Rhetametan 

30130X51 


940 741 


65165951 


27429X51 


32031551 



VEW 

346 HE 


49150 491 

Volkswagen 

4565045801 

Wet la 

1(00 1021 

DAX Index:? 

SX67 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yhtymo 10S 106 

Enso-GutzoH 4500 4550 

Huhtamofcf 143 145 

5-O.P. io#« in.-® 

Kymmene 138 137 

Metro 135 150 

S2S. 550 545 

Potihria 65 62 

Repala 103 101 

Stockmann 244 2«0 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 3300 3300 

Camay PocHIc IZfiO 1 2M 

Cheung Kang 3860 3860 

China Light Pwr s$,m 39SO 
Dairy Farm inn 1005 1050 
Hang Lung Dev 1450 1420 

Hang Seng Bank 54 JO 5450 
Henderson Land 4820 47.90 
HKAJr Eng. 1170 3500 
HK ChinaGtn 1405 14.45 
HK Electric 24JS 2815 
HK Land 1900 19.T5 

HK Realty Trim 2810 2005 
HSBC Holdings 8850 8725 
HKShangHm 1100 1155 
HK Telecomm 1505 1555 
HKFerry 11J5 1100 

Hutch WMampoa 3750 37 JO 
Hyson Dev 23 23 

Janflne Math. 6525 *4 94 
Jardlne Sir Hid 3120 3uo 
Kowloon Motor 75-70 1505 
Mandarin Orient 905 1835 

Miramar Hotel 19.10 I9J0 

New World Dev 27 242a 
5HK Proos 5825 57JS 

Sfetux 320 121 

Swire Poc A 6175 62 

TulOieung Pros ll.to ILto 


7VE 

wnartHoW 

Wheetock Co 
Wing On Co Inti 
Wlnsor ind. 


410 412 
32.10 3150 
17 1895 
11 JO 11 JO 

ia» 11.1s 

967709 


Johannesburg 


AECI 
Aitedi 
Anglo Amer 
Bartons 
Biyvuor 
Butte is 
De Beers 
Drtetanteln 

Gcncor 

GFSA 
Harmony 
High veld Steal 
Kloof 

N e tflwnk Gro 
Rond fon rein 

RUSPlat 
SA Brews 

St Helena 

Sasol 

Western Deep 


79 

121 

241 


60 

101 ... 
71 7350 


127 128 

42 40 

33 34 

75 73 

3150 31.75 
56 57 

121 125 

81 8250 
NA. 4950 
35 3475 
320 230 

j jonrpo stli tod ^ : 368M2 


London 







Abbev Nati 

884 

308 


479 

Allied Lyons 

870 

8/4 



Ar hi Wiggins 

204 

205 

6925070650 

Argyll. Group 

205 

86/ 

WR 

508 

Ass Brit Foods 

.1)5 

5.27 

39550 

398 

BAA 

4J6 

885 

302 

303 

BA* 

404 

867 

20850: 

3440 

Bank Scotland 

I0i 

80S 

332 

337 

Barclays 

555 

897 

577 583 JO 

Boss 

521 

502 


1M9 

161 

4.13 

8W 


BET 

104 

104 



Blue Circle 

876 

275 

21 s 

214 

BOC G«up 

896 

707 




830 

525 

14750 


Bowater 

402 

870 

(0750 

610 

BP 


897 

SM 

50* 

Brtt Airways 

870 

174 

129 JO 

129 

Brit Gas 

892 

899 

142 


Brit Steel 

103 

104 

90189850 

Bril Telecam 

167 

873 

188 

119 

BTH 

812 

114 

4085040858 | 

Cow# Wire 

4 

40/ 



856 

801 

13820 

149 

Ca radon 

875 

7.7/ 

2745 

2750 

Coats viretio 

1.97 

l.VS 

696 

705 

Comm Untan 

893 

8Ht 


457 

Courtaukts 

452 

4X2 



ECC Group 

854 

320 

462 

466 

Enterprise Oil 

301 

305 



CIom Prev. 

Eurotunnel 

252 

209 


1.19 

1.18 


818 

817 

GEC 

204 

20* 

Gm'IACC 

504 

557 

Glaxo 

SJ0 

573 

Grand Met 

4 

199 

GRE 

1J9 

1J9 

Guimess 

451 

450 

GUS 

556 

558 


831 

200 

Hillsdown 

1J5 

1J7 

HSBCHtdgs 

7.17 

720 

ICI 

X 19 

X24 

Inchcape 

408 

811 

Kingfisher 

882 

8181 

Lodbrake 

157 

100 

Land Sac 

813 

817 

Laparte 

7J0 

702 

Lasmo 

150 

152 


835 

845 

Llovds Bank 

5J4 

80S 

Marks So 

401 

807 

MEPC 

840 

844 

Hon Power 

847 

8V. 

NutWsst 

874 

876 

NthWst water 

SJ0 

525 


557 

520 

Pip . 

832 


Pllklngton 

104 

10* 

PowerGen 

5.12 

506 

Prudential 

897 

302 

RmkOra 

RecklttCrt 

804 

811 

557 

597 

Redtana 

811 

5.15 

Reed Inti 

705 

703 

Rioters 

8*6 

863 

RMC Group 



Rolls Rovco 

1J5 

1.76 

Rothmn (unit) 

811 

809 

Rcnrai Scot 

824 

803 

812 

B.9S8 

Salnsbury 

890 

397 


893 

496 

Scot Power 

878 

307 

Soars 

107 

107 

Savara Trent 

502 

SJ* 

Shell 

893 

745 

Slebe 

509 

S53 

Smith Neptew 

1.45 

186 

SmlthKUnc B 

822 

831 

Smith (WH) 

854 

858 

Sun AlUonce 

810 

301 

Tate 4 L vie 



Tesra 

Z2S 

202 

Thom EMI 

9.92 

*92 

Tomkins 

207 

816 


810 

2.13 


1093 


Utd Biscuits 

304 

1(K 

Vodotana 

194 


War Loan 3W 

4X13 

40.19 

Writeoff* 

X7S 

602 

wnilfiread 

305 

506 

WflltamsHdas 

125 

307 

wunscorroon 

109 

150 


Ckae Prev. 


Montreal 

AtcoLId I im 13V 

Bonk Montreal 2316 2XW 
bce Mobile Cam sow 38 


CdnTIreA 
CdnUtll A 
Cascades 
Crown* Inc 
CT Flirt See 
Gaz Metro 
Gt west UMca 
HewInrtBCP .... 

Hudson's Bav Co 27%k 2846 
Imasca Ltd 371* 37% 
Investors Gra Inc im 14Vi 
LabatT (John) ZHt 22U 
LoblawCoa 
Molson A 
Natl Bk Canada 

OilKJWO A 

Panedn Petrolm 42V. 42to 
Power Cara im 

Power FlnM 29 29 

Que&ecorB 1 714 1716 
Rogers Comm B 20% 20?s 
Royal Bk Cda 27?k 2794 

SS?SS‘2 ,0lnc -S£ ^ 

Southam Inc 164k IMh 

steioo a n m 

Triton FlnT A 305 170 


HU. 1151 
229k 231k 
8U. 816 

16to 16V6 
1714 18 

1216 12W 
2016 30W 
13V, 13% 


71% 2H6 
20V, 2016 
91k 91k 
1W6 1F54 


Paris 


Air Uqulde 
Alcatel Alstnom 
Axa 

Bancolre (Cle) 

BIC 

BNP 

Bouygues 

Danone 

Carrefour 

CCF. 

Cents 
Chargeun 
aments Franc 
aubMed 
Elf-Ami Ha Ine 
roDh 


602 620 
738 733 

55J ju 

21040 23500 
515 315 
1324 1330 
235J0 23950 
590 405 

709 710 

2112 2145 
2144021870 
10850 108 

1289 1318 
289 2B9 

45650 4S5 

389 39650 
800 850 
*9150 49550 
42050 435 

574 575 


Euro Disney 
Gen. Eoux 
Havas 

I metal . ... 

Latorge Canpee 427.10 432 

Ltgnmd 6630 6550 

Lyon. Earn m2.90 *9670 
Oreal (L) 1123 IMS 

L.VJWJ4 858 876 

Matra-Hachatte 1O6 1D9J20 
MtCfWftnB ,214 22120 
Moulton 122.40 m 

Parliras 32200 326 

Pertihiev Inti 147 14250 
Pernod- Ri card 301 309 

Peugeot 793 795 

Plnault Print 918 918 

Rartatectmtaue 513 518 

Rh-PouiencA 12300 12350 


I Madrid 


BBV 

3200 

3200 





5130 


Bo fiesta 

998 

laoo 

CEPSA 

3195 

3200 

Drogodos 

1935 

1965 

Endesa 

5460 

5530 




Iberdrola 

•33 

836 

Repsal 

J825 

3815 




Totefonica 

1730 

1750 

m ssrm 1 ***'™ 7 


Milan 

Atleonza 16650 16700 

Assttalla 13SM 13730 

Autostrode arfv 1825 1797 
Bca Agrtcoltura 2718 2880 
Beo Cummer Hal 3955 9965 
Bca Naz Lovora 13200 13000 
Bca Pap Novara 8250 8100 
Banaal Rama 
Bca Amurasiano 
BcoNapoH rbp 
Benotten 
C red I to I tat lana 
Enkhem Aug 
Ferfln 
lot w 

FlMAkAaroInd 
Flnmeccontca 
Fondlartaspa 
GenereUAsstc 
IFIL 


Ifalcemcntl 

Itnfoas 

Medtonanca 

tlnntnilbnn 

monicuiaun 

Olivetti 
Pirelli soa 
RAS 

Rlnascerte 


1810 1805 
4230 4180 
1349 1320 
21300 21480 
2195 2150 

3050 3050 

1(33 1630 
6685 6715 
10900 10950 
1(10 1(16 
11330 1W10 
39400 39400 
5900 5945 

11545 11575 

5455 5485 

13740 13740 

1390 1405 

2055 2880 
2605 2640 
24900 25080 
9300 9380 


Son Porto Torino 9270 9280 


SIP 
SME 
Sntobpd 
Stanaa 
Stet 

TeraAssK 

I I Will II A ■ 


4325 4238 
3925 3865 
2255 2240 
M000 32*00 
4620 4535 
26950 26900 
10754 



1396 1406 


957 961 


644 (M 

XE-B. 

530 SX 


•• M 


rj| 

ThomsnrvC5F 

-■A- 


32150 3B 

UAJ». 

13X2013601 

Valeo 

281 271 


190X72 

Previous : 192705 


Sao Paulo 


Cemlg 

EWrobras 

ussr* 


920 900 
8 020 
sso ta 
JO 8750 
373 387 

27527250 
320324.99 


Poronuponemo 1240 1206 

18516309 

SoLRaCna 7600 77(0 

Telebras 51 

Tetaso 470 505 

Usiminas ijj fS 

1 » RteD ~ *ns S7 


Slngapore 

Asia Poc Brew 1(58 1&20 

Cenbos lqs us 

atv Devetocmnt 7 JO 70S 
Cyde A Carriage 1140 13 

DBS 1050 1008 

DBS Land 406 450 

FELavIngston 6.15 6J0 
Fraser 8. Neave 165D 1600 
Gt Eastn Lite 7750 2720 
Hang Leang Fin 432 4J4 
inchcape 555 500 

Jurgng Siitoyard 13J0 1300 
Kov Hlan J Cocel 205 107 
Keppel HJD UJO 

Nalsteel 324 3J0 

Neptune Orient 2 24 224 
OCBC foreign UJO 1420 
Okeas union Bk 655 60S 
Olseas unton Ent sjs 80S 
Sembawcng UJO 1150 
SUne Singapore 1J7 UB 


Sing Aerospace 
Sing Airlines lorn 
Sing Bus 5 vc 
Sing Land 
StngPetfm 
5lna Pram torn 
Sing Shlpbtdg 
Sing Telecomm 
Straits Steam 
Straits Trading 
Tot Lee Bmk 
Utd industrial 
Utd CVsea 8k torn 
UMCseasLand 
«rrtjs . .. 
Previous : 


Close Prev. 

234 236 
1430 14.10 
9J5 9J5 
8J5 8JS 

207 248 
26 26 

202 205 
3J8 300 
404 404 
3J8 3^4 
438 434 
101 101 
1400 1400 

208 200 
229901 


Stockholm 


AGA 
AaeaA 
Astra A 
Atlas Copco 
Electrolux B 
Ericsson 
Esseite-A 
Handetsbanken 
Invesior B 
Norsk Hydro 
Procardia AF 
ScxxJvik B 
SCA-A 
5-E Banken 
SkoncflaP 
Skanska 
SKF 
Stora 

Tnrilebarg BF 
Volvo BF 


67 67 

562 564 

180 182 
97 9650 
362 363 

403 403 

9350 9350 
93 94 

167 168 

23950 239 

131 132 

113 115 

117 118 
4070 47 

127 125 

150 1S3 

130 131 

431 431 

101 TK 
133 137 


Sydney 

&95 (L7S 
350 350 
1902 19.74 
3J8 338 
105 1J» 
4JH 398 
5J6 5145 
1806 1100 
457 450 
1.11 1.11 
1J1 1J2 
1006 1050 
105 105 
284 293 
1030 1026 

... H30 S25 

Nine Network 4.10 A17 

N Broken Hill 208 204 

POC Dunlop 414 413 

Pioneer Inrt 3.19 215 

Nmndy Poseidon 2 55 152 

OCT Resources 107 108 

Santas 337 377 

TNT 2J7 2J2 

Western Minim 8.12 8.14 

Westpac Ban king 423 424 

WOodside 405 *05 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 
Bonn 

Bougainville 
CdlesMyer 
Carnal co 
CRA 
CSR 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Field 
ICI Australia 
Magellan 
MIM 

Nat Aint Bonk 


Tokyo 



429 426 

793 798 

T220 1220 
1510 1510 
1540 1540 
1730 1780 
1228 1230 
1810 1840 
1450 1440 
1450 1430 
4540 4500 
2158 2110 
2260 2208 
1060 1060 
964 967 
830 830 

1630 1(40 
5340 5340 
704 700 

748 731 
1010 1010 
2580 2580 


Full . . 

Full Photo 
FulttSU 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 
ito Yokoda 

Itochu 

Japan AJrHnes 
Katimo 
Kansal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 

Kyocera 

Matsu Elec lnds 1640 1660 
Matsu Elec WkJ 1050 1048 
Mitsubishi Bk 
Mitsubishi Kasd 
Mitsubishi Elec 

Mitsubishi Hev 

Mitsubishi Carp 1270 1240 
Mitsui and Co 843 845 
Mitsui Marine 
Mltwfcoshl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 1020 1030 

Nlkke Securities 1180 10*0 

Nippon Kogaku 935 931 

Nippon DO 
Nippon steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura See 

NTT 

Olympus Optical 1060 1060 

Pioneer 2670 2450 

Ricoh 944 942 

Sanyo Elec 572 572 

Sharp 1760 T7SB 

Shhnazu 720 720 

ShtaotsuCmm 20*0 2080 


1150 1158 
902 902 
715 713 

7100 7100 


2450 2450 
530 535 
702 694 
.762 .765 


775 769 
977 970 
1400 1480 
1170 1180 


707 7W 
388 391 
628 633 
799 798 
2100 2130 
B87DaB650a 


Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Suml Marine 
Sum noma Metal 
TaJsei Carp 
TakedaChem 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Toppan Printing 
Tarav Ind. 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
Vama toil Sec 
a: x m 

mcel 225: 19912 


CtoMPrev. 

5870 5840 
1(M» 1B50 
555 542 
913 90S 

344 346 

669 658 

1200 1210 
4290 4300 
557 556 

1200 1220 
2960 2950 
1420 1390 
759 756 

74* 751 

2040 2050 
748 746 


U.S. FUTURES 


Vie Auoctoted Pm 


Sept. 70 


Season Season 
ttgh Low 


Ocen Hqh Low Close Chfl OoJnl 


Grains 


Toronto 


AbTttbi Price 1915 19M 

Air Canada TV. TV* 

Alberta Enerav 2<Wi 20% 

Alcan Aluminum 35*k 35U 


Amer Barrtck 
Avenor 

Bk Now Scotia 
BCE 

■C Telecomm 
Bombardier B 
Bromaiea 
BrascanA 
Camera 
CISC 

Cdn Natural Res 
CdnOcdd Pet 
Cdn Pacific 
Cascades Paper 
Comlnca 
Consumers Gas 
Dafasca 
Demon Ind B 
Du Pont Cda A 
Echo Bav Minos 
Empire Co. a 
F alcon bridge 
Fletcher Chatl A 
Franca Nevada 
Guardian CopA 
Hemic Gold 
Horsham 
Imperial Oil 
Ineo 

IPL Energy 
Lac Minerals 
LoMfcnr A 
LakSawB 

Loensn Group 

London Insur Ga 27U 
Macmlll Bloedel 1916 
Magna Inti A 
Maole Leaf Fds 
Moore 

Newbridge Netw 
Noranda Inc 
Naranda Forest 
N or ran Energy 
Nttiern Teleram 
Nova 
Onex 

Petre Canada 


36 36 

24H 26Hi 
2516 25*fc 
48 4Vki 
IS* 2 5* 
21to 2116 
4.15 416 
2016 20to 
26 261k 
31W 31 to 
18to 18K 
294i 30 

229k 23 

m « k 
2(16 24to 
17 1616 
23H 231k 

J 3 13 

1816 181k 
18Vk 1BK 
134k 14 

21 2Tto 
191k 19U. 
87 87 

816 816 
151k 15*k 
21to 21 to 
«Vk 43H 
40*1 41to 

.J 9 W 

17Vk 17to 
10k. lOto 
nnn lovj 
321k 32V. 
23 

30 

4716 4716 
llto llto 
25 2416 
OV. 439k 
2714 271x 
12Vk 1216 
IBto IBVk 
47» 48Vk 
1314 14 

14ik 141k 
llto llto 
34to 34lk 
52to 5114 
5to 5to 
001 062 
ISVk 1314 


Placer Dame 
Potash Carp Sask 
Provtao 
PWA 

Quebecar Print 
Renaissance Eny 2sik 2Sto 

Rio Alcorn — 

Seagram Co 
Stone Consold 
Talisman Env 
Tefeglabe 
Tcta> 

1 numson 
Tor Dam Bank 
Transalta 
TronsCda Pipe 
Utd Dominion 
Utd Wcstburne 
Weatraost Env 


XonwCanodoB 

jsaw- 


.24 26 

411k 42 

19to 1916 
»*s 2*» 
171k 1716 
16to IMk 
1514 1516 
Wk 2016 
1416 14U 
17H 171k 
2Sto 2516 
IDto IDto 

2Hfc 211k 
3716 3TVk 
071k 46 


205 

L85Vi 

von 

20 ] 

203 

20214 


WHEAT ICBOT) UOIBiimlnkkn-MnflrrBietial 
lWli UP Dec 94 J.99W 1*9*6 194 3M* 48054 

4.05V. X27 Mar 95 U5Vi 406+ 4JJH, 4.0314—00010 19096 

im. 116V:Moy93 193 193 30711 3JW.i-a02to Z6BS 

1631. 3.11 Jul95 3.53V, 163V» 309 300 -0.03V. 4.556 

305 151 Vi Sep 95 304 304 163 163 -0.02 75 

3.75 155 C«9S ITS 175 37? W tODDV 81 

Esi. soles HOM Firs, sate 17003 
Frrsopen nt 75087 up 546 
WHEAT t ICBOT) loaaau n*vmum- 

403 Vj 3.IZVkDec*4 403 40314 488 403 ’X .0.0054 23077 

407 125 Mar 95 407 40714 403V 404 11,941 

3M 021 toMay 93 3.9416 054% 051 U3V,— 001=6 1057 

307 '6 114V, JU 95 306 Vi 307 30316 IM -001 i093 

309 3J9 Sep 95 3J0 077 306 307 -002 44 

705 0£0*-5Doc95 3J1W— OOl J 

ESI, sales . NA. FfTs. sales 6.779 
Fit’s Open W 40013 up 919 
COHN tatort LlPObumWinum-dglarsparliumi 
J-2, J-] Dec M 2.17 117V. 2.14'i 2.14** — 000 'A 134084 

202V 2JJVMar95 2061. ZZPi 226 226* 4IJ37 

132WMOY 95 134V. 204 V, 133 V, 234 16013 

134toJU9S 2MVi 2J9 238 2J8U I7J42 

703^ 142V. 14214 -0001* 1.114 

23511 Dec 95 206 206 20SH 146 —000'* 6,744 

20116 Mor 96 202 2021. 252 2J2'A-O.0UV. 11 

2059.06 » IffV. 708 V, 207V5 20815-08016 56 

I7JOO Frfs. sales 12026 

FiTs Open int 217,915 up 381 
SOYBEANS (CBOT) UW Du rnkwrurv CDkaripw&ullwt 
707*6 509»Ntw94 504 505 5015k 504V. *00016 78095 

704 5J» Jan 95 S04to 505 5011* 5041k 19071 

705 109 Mar 95 SJ4W 53414 SS7 JJ 4 I 4 — 0005* 11062 

7055k 5355* MovM iC SB ill 501*6—0001* 5,741 

706W 57|VkJU9S 588 588 9LB5 586W-0JM 1)028 

4.17 579 Aug 95 S07U 588 587 507W_aJlOto 266 

6.15 577 s«p 95 S£8V<1 508V5 58855 58859-0019, 96 

(SOVi 578V, NOV 9S 3.96 Vi 506H 574 5J6V,-O.OOVi 4,227 

471 8.12 JU96 4.14 6.14 6.12 6.12 -OCQ 3 

ESI. soles. 2IUJ00 Frfs. sales 18021 
Frl’SOpennt 131018 up 7p 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) Wm-oNniHign 
20700 164J0OC3 W 16530 I65J0 I 6+00 16400 -000 12025 

20900 165.10 DOC 94 16500 16160 THAO 16570 -000 44^3 

10700 16490 Jan 95 16730 16730 16470 16700 —070 10,518 

20700 17000 near 95 17UJ0 T710O 17070 17000 10060 

20700 1 7200 May 95 173.10 17300 17100 17370 *110 5788 

20600 17430 JU 95 T75J0 17600 17500 17670 * 080 3081 

18200 17570 Aug 95 17700 17700 17430 17600 * 000 591 

18270 175.00 Sep 95 177.00 17700 17470 17470 *000 493 

17670 1767000 95 17*00 179.00 17100 17900 --0JD 4 

18200 1 7430 Dec 95 18050 18000 18003 18070 .770 147 

EsLsdes 10000 FrriKta 14351 
Fri'sopeninl 89030 up 1641 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) tMHte-dUnnrlni6 
2934 22.1000 94 2505 2505 2536 2584 *036 16021 

2807 2200 Dec 94 3404 2S08 2472 2507 *000 37,9*1 

2455 M_6SJanM 2404 2400 2400 24.75 >0.10 8043 

2830 2293 Mar 95 3149 2445 24.15 UM *004 833! 

MJB 22.93 Mav 95 2415 24.15 23.90 2413 5J5B 

2705 23JBJ1H95 23JO 3.95 2301 2308 -005 3.773 

27 JO 22.95 Aug 95 2305 2205 2375 2305 5*4 

2475 2275 S«P 95 2300 2180 2173 2373 -O0S 192 

2UB 21100295 2163 IS 

2305 2200 Dec 95 2305 2170 2165 2370 418 

Est. SOWS 16000 Fri's. stuas 21.142 
FH'sopenfrt 8I0T oH 173 


Season Season 
toon Low 


Open togh Low Ckne Oig On. Ini 


11.67 <006 


Livestock 

CATTLE fCMER) 410DO Pc- an p*r H 


74.10 
7420 
7425 

75.10 
49 JO 

68.10 
6705 
Estsdes 


SI 35 


70.15 

6920 

67.90 

49.40 

6625 

(5.95 

6620 


6570 OU« 70,10 
6720 Dec 94 6920 
6725 Feb 95 6700 
4800 Av 95 6920 
6500 Jun 95 6605 
6500 Aug 95 45.90 
660500*5 6620 

10316 FrTs.srtes 1 1755 

Fri's oeen W7MB2,^B 419 

FEEDER CATrtJE 

7580 72,1SSap.. .... 

mnodbi 7ias 
72AINOV94 7422 
7275 Jen 95 7375 
71 00 Star 95 7100 
71 JO APT 95 7235 
njOAtav9S 7200 


4907 

6872 

6705 

619? 

6595 

«HW 

6(20 


_ (CmcA) gunm-awisi 
72.15 Sap 94 7305 7305 73.10 


Zurich 

Ado Inti B no vet 

Atosubra B new M5 68e 
BBC flrwn Bov B IKS lloa 
~ 758 

Fischer B 
Interdtocwnt B 
Jelmoll B 
LomBsGvr R 
Moevemlcfc e 

Nestle R i,v, laB 

Oerilk. Bvchrlo R 133 134 
Paraoso Hid b 154a isjn 
Bwhehdgpc wto ^ 
Sdlro Republic 1(7 106 
B 687 685 

— er B 8000 8025 

SulzerPc wo 

gurveinanraB 19» ws5 
Swiss Bnk Corps 3(7 372 
5wlB Rei nsur R to ^ 
Swriiaalr R B23 823 

UBSB HM im 

WrrtermurB ™ 'Jg 

Zurich As(B 12(1 1S0 


538 547 

.351 330 

1560 1630 

2200 2230 

3S m 

m ma 
398 400 
1191 1205 




71 00 Aug 95 7200 
1085 PH’S 


7180 
7625 
7X90 
7205 
723S 
7200 
7200 
1 JUS 


7280 

7100 

7320 

7220 

7195 

7105 

7175 


7000 

69.13 

6787 

a*J7 

662S 

65.95 

6620 


7X30 

7305 

7420 

7190 

7205 

72.15 

7105 

7200 


80.95 
8025 
7690 
7620 

7305 

EAttHS 1085 Fri’s. SOias 
Fri-sooenw ?JS5 OH 201 
mas (CMER) «MkL-eB>iHrn 
S9J5 36750d«4 3735 3775 3732 3705 

5000 37 00 Dec 94 3805 IMS 37.9J 3820 

5000 3873 Feb 9S 3700 3937 3800 3920 

4800 38J5APT95 30.15 3937 3907 3930 

0 JO 4175 Jun 95 4430 4400 4430 64.0 

4500 4375 Jut 95 4430 4435 *110 4435 

000 4X70 Aug 95 4305 4110 4305 4307 

40JD 39.7DOd95 40.15 40.15 4002 40.07 

4130 4100 D« *5 4102 4135 41JC 4105 

Ea soles 4J9* Fri's. total 4063 
Fri's Ouen Int »J03 cfl 3* 

PORK BELLIES (CMER1 4uaou.-emHr» 


38.45 Feb 95 3805 3905 3XS 3935 

3B5DMor*5 3800 3900 38J3 3*37 

3*05 MOV 95 6000 4040 4020 4020 

4160 Jut 95 «70 41.10 4045 41.10 

3905 AuO *5 OLIO 

Est. sola* U33 Fri's. SOW 2042 
BTsopenM 6*48 up 385 


4005 

6020 

61.15 

5100 

4400 


-022 35,158 
-020 21036 

nm nuj 

♦M2 »J94 
♦005 2057 
HUB 1064 
129 


-033 1202 
— 00! 2,938 
—O.I2 3074 
920 

-007 317 

—0.15 287 

—032 205 

12 


+ 0J8 B092 

*X33 13037 
♦023 4JI9 
-IUB 2,577 
841 
221 

—Mi 116 
-80S 84 

9 


*0J9 7094 
*057 (49 

+0JS m 
*040 199 

*035 47 


1188 11 70 Jut 96 

ESt.srtM 23074 Fri’s, SOUS 9075 
Fri's open im 152054 
COCOA (NCSE) Hmrtnc Km-iecr Km 

1580 1041 Dec 94 1372 1374 13«7 1349 —32 42J97 

1605 1 077 Mar *5 1418 1420 1398 1401 -25 1503* 

161? 1078 May 95 1450 1050 1437 1430 —25 5.167 

1(00 I 225JI4 95 1475 1475 1470 14(3 —25 

IH0 1447 Sep 95 107 1487 I486 14*0 -25 1095 

1413 1290 Dec 95 1517 1520 1510 1516 —25 

1676 1 350 MOT 96 1540 1540 1549 1549 —15 

1*43 1225 May 96 1971 1571 1571 1578 -35 287 

_ Jul** 1598 -29 11 

Est. sales 7.119 Fri's. sdes 140(0 
Fri's open M 75078 

ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) 1 USD to., art* Mr*. 

13400 6500 NOV 94 96.10 100.00 96.10 99J5 * 400 11085 

13200 0900 Jan 95 99.70 10300 992 0 10X75 >471 6007 

12023 930Q6Aar95 10X75 10600 10X75 105.95 *4J5 4055 

11435 9700 May 95 107 00 7 09 JO 107 JO 10905 +405 971 

119.00 1 0001 Jill 95 11100 11100 111J0 111.95 +435 <13 

. Sep 95 11480 11480 11400 11405 +435 20 

11300 10900 Nov 95 11605 +425 

11100 i05J0Jan«6 11605 *475 

Ell.sdes 40S8 Fri's.sales 1065 

Fm Open irn 34.133 Oft 76 


Season Season 
High Low 


Open hwi Law dost am Dotnl 


Metals 

WOTADECOPPER (NCMX) Uti-cwirh 
128J0 74*0S<s>94 12X30 12800 12780 17780 2J47 

11900 7575 Dec 94 11900 719.10 117.90 11100 -005 44306 

11800 76.90 Jan 95 I17JS — <L75 573 

TOM 7300 Feb 95 IISJO -OJ5 C9 

11700 7300 MOT 95 117.10 117.10 116.10 114.10 — 0J0 5309 

11X80 7405MOV 95 11500 11500 11530 11405 —080 1307 

11470 7XOOJ095 11X70 11400 11179 11300 — 0 j « lJas 

11X30 79.10 Sep 95 11330 11300 11230 11230 -030 70 

2200 7S30OCIH 121.90 12110 121.10 12135 2J92 

11800 77J5NPV9S 1T9.00 -OJS 898 

S-S'SL* n,J ® ,njD HU» -aJO 949 

10600 6830 Jan 96 110JD —000 59 

OJOMorM 11030 11X20 11030 1O9J0 -X65 ISO 

11630 91 .10 An- 96 11530 — OjSS 583 

1Q8-2J TOUOMayto 10930 10930 10930 1DOJO -005 42 

11480 1 0410 Jun 94 11470 11470 11430 114JS -035 967 

Julft 18030 —005 

11209 11100 Aub 96 11111 —030 

Est. sates 4308 Fri's. soles 16JB3 
Fri's open inr 61.132 up 732 
SJLVEB (NCMX) SU0rrorn.-cmtiwnvrDZ. 


1-22 10500 Dec *4 1 3790 13730 13674 1 3490 -48 32338 

!-E!2 ■*** tar ” 13710 13640 13442 -64 290 

13(60 13348 Am 95 130H —64 I 

BMt.NA. Fri's. soles 7J27 
Fri’saponM 32336 up 734 . 

CANADIAN DOLLAR 4CA* U mr*. I MMenuaniXOOai 
07670 (7D3SDec94 07440 03447 07410 07412 —34 4X780 

07(05 07020 Mar 95 0740) 074(3 07487 07400 —26 | JJ6 

07522 069*0 Jun 95 07399 S3) 

SSH SflSSSS 07344 -34 3« 

07400 07040 Dec 95 07367 —24 37 

*0ie» NA FrfS. Solus 1057 - 

Fri’s open M 

rommosmwvm 

6.5590 Dec 94 O04J8 00458 110471 0.609 —26 72,5(9 

O^IDMarrt 00430 00453 00430 X6U8 -27 4076 

OJWOJunM 0-6457 -26 476 

08347 StO 95 00448 —28 II 

S>-*,KA Frr*. mas 24346 
Fri’s open M 77.152 up 1798 

TCT (CMER) f wrw-l MtoetoMSUOMI 

O01D49SD0O9S25DK 94 00102910010302001018(0010118 —112 4(034 

O01tn75DjnO375O0SraSim(a67 -414. 452 
O01O775Q0IO2OOSM 95 0010463 —315 (J 

>J01Q66OO01«MMD+:9S B0lSS —116 5 

Bt.5BesjUFtfi.idH 15,207 
Fri's open HT 49,741 up 1353 
SWISS FRANC (CMER) i per lranc»l part aouatslAMOl 

£ 33 ?! K 25 a S 2 17770 07789 - u 

H‘59'? cr £ 17,21 11780 o-rna —12 <33 

07930. 074(6 Jun 9S 07848 —9 M 

U.saies NA. Pit's. soles 1X244 
FlTsQPenim 36013 up 330 


,t 

‘J .... 

s 


00595 

00595 

00525 


Industrials 

OiTTOH 1 (NCTNJ 9O0nns-cMieww. 


8905 (876 
6972 6775 

7X85 6*70 

n.90 7009 

7300 71J5 

7000 6970 

6900 68.10 


5(50 5(80 5(40 


(150 4910 Sea 94 

5490 511JOct94 

Nov 94 

5970 MOO Dec M 5670 573J 5670 

5710 4010 Jon 95 5 690 569.0 569.0 

40*0 4I6JMOT95 575.5 581 J 575-5 

6063 41X0MOV95 582J awn 563.5 

SS5 s "- n 5 "-° m -° 

SS! &&8S& 4,BJ s,, -° 

6180 55(0 Mar 94 6220 6220 (2X0 

5870 5870660 96 

„ M96 

fid. sales 12J»o Fri's. sales. 11745 
Fri'sopeninl 11X981 up 310 

BH-travoL 

MX0OOC194 42000 4ZL50 41700 41X30 —170 8021 
S' 50 ‘ 326J0 az3 - ao <2370 —130 12J3I 


500 -60 318 

5615 —60 

5647 -00 

5(77 —68 91 045 

M9.7 -60 46 

3757 —60 10J29 

« -60 4045 

MX5 -60 3702 

-48 1009 

^ zU 1242 

4160 —60 

«30 -60 

BU —60 


435001 

143530 

43900 

1435001 

43600 


SUjSn? «L58 42X50 42X50 ^00 -040 £49! 

5001 -360 


42200 Oct 95 

Ed. sain NA Fri's. 

Fri's open tnt 34.247 up 974 

41700 3440OMW 39570 39600 39400 »4J0 -170 5.150 

34100 Dec ^4 39&SD 4Q0.0Q 397,70 397 JO ZitolMQb 

sSjoaS?” SIS £S Sis il2 ] 7™ 

HgrtOBJO 41X00 40X8° 40870 -100,0^ 

+0 1 00 Od « 4IJJQ Z\m 1JB2 

«aa)DecM 43140 421.40 41*70 4W0O -100 

0170 -1J0 3046 


496 at 
141100 
41700 
42X51 
41X70 
39500 
41X30 
42900 
142470 
43070, 
43170 


41270 Feb 96 
41X30 Aar 94 
- ... 41300 Junto 

Eh. sates 30000 Fri's tom 37.157 
Frisoaeniru i76j*» on 2522 


*403 

9475 

9193 


Food 

COFFEBC (NCS6) J70W te-congra 

24S 77.10D*<94 22800 23175 22X30 22X40 -105 22062 

5m 7X90 Mar *5 23175 23470 22775 229.95 —300 B0B8 

24400 82JD MarfS 23200 23500 mm 23005 -105 X4H 

24570 850OJUI95 23400 234.00 23300 23175 -US 1062 

23800 18570 Sea 95 23450 23470 33410 2J175 -305 441 

2000 81 00 Dec *5 Z145I) 33450 23450 23275 -100 (22 

EttSotes NA Fri'xsrtes 9J37 

BtWwSSwiLD^f 3 (NCSE) ltua toj^awiojrlb 


1205 

1270 

1205 

1202 

1279 

1102 

1104 


4J90UW 1209 
9.17M0r*5 1203 
1007 Mar 95 1202 
1OJ7J0W J2J0 
1077 Od 91 0.11 
lO.nMarto 1100 
U.llMayH 


12.72 

1308 

1200 

1270 

1277 

1100 


1204 

12J» 

li» 

1277 

1208 

1100 


1208 

1200 

1KB 

1209 

1223 

1100 

1184 


’0.15 19,187 
+XI2 99,5(4 
rX13 1MI3 
>XU 10086 
*008 (0(1 
*004 
• 006 


Financial 

raw ^wjSSSS *"«■— risriwuea. 

*6-10 9475 Dec 94 9404 M05 *463 

SHE 52 MorW *427 9477 94JJ 

^ ‘ Ju 2*f «« 9192 

EH. sales NA Fns. icnu jjai 
Fri’s open Int 77.259 up 1551 
? P!? 17 HD6-oooprtv- r*i &4jnasnr iwdcj 

S£,»« S**"* awM “* "* ,w 

wsopenrt 190,931 uo 4463 

*mMOona-on.sumeimoa 

IH3? ISS'S S*e“i0l-24 101-31 101-21 101-23— 91 25X8*7 

1SS »J? ,00 - 19 ,DM3 M * 

|j££3^rw w, 
^amnnr“ 

13:15 Siw S£« w ‘’ 7 w - m ™ ZZ- 

imLM S^ 7 MorM 96-05 _ 

7»> gwn fm M5+061 up gn 

5flK ,C S®L B ®!25. (CBOT) SlODOirlncto+RXSPiesHMBa 

JSS.Q a n : s -s 

Fri's BpenlnT 


—001 16070 
B059 

+001 2J30 


ram 597i od 94 (9.10 

7775 5908 Dec 94 (900 

rail 4300 Mar 95 7000 

ra75 4400 May 95 7100 

7X« 69 JO Jut 95 7XD0 

7470 6600 Od 95 6970 

7200 6X23 Dec 95 6070 

Mcrto 

Est. sates <000 Fri's. safe 5054 
Fri'sopeninl 50057 od 552 
HBATlNCOtL (NMERJ 42000 M- caws par i 
5770 4490 OdW 4870 ”-20 47^ 

3BJ0 46.00 MW 94 49 JO 50.15 44J0 

5900 4X80 Dec 94 5000 SL» «70 

4275 4X25 Jon 95 5175 52.10 5D.7n 

*-75 ^.*5 Feb 95 92.19 5270 51 JO 

WTO 470OM<r95 5105 J2L30 5170 

S-JS O-MAPr’l 5100 5100 51.00 

5+30 470OMay95 5X10 3075 3X10 

S^^" 193 4?J0 *9-70 4V JO 

5010 5QJ0 49J3 

5540 42J0AUO95 

075 4805 Sep 95 

P 

P ^ 308 ^ 

3X90 

EH-aotes NA Fri's. sates 31946 

Fri's o pen kn 1 7X140 UP 993 

LJG+tT SWEET CRUDE (HMBU I0NMH. 

1*02 Nov 94 17J81J79 17J3 

MJ? 1473 Dec 94 1773 1810 1708 

1905 IllSJwitS 1105 1X14 1700 

^ i§its 8S- £1 ii 

j^^§5 jXM 1800 17.W 

gs US&ff SS SB BS 

9® 141jAuo»5 1X17 1X23 1X17 

1K7 K5oSg 1M0 ,W ,B ' , ° 

1J-0* 17.13 Nov *5 1X23 

2000 16^3 Dec 95 1X29 

21.15 1 70S Jan to 

1804 1809Fto*4 

3009 IT^Junto 

Bf— WTftx... _ 


MM . 753 

4777 — L04 27085 
4907 —105 100*9 

7077 —101 5031 
7105 — 0.92 8940 
(900 — X7S 465 
4X28 —007 1.734 

».M -OX 


39303d 

i84a 

833 

>36 

1H 

46 

23 


"■ * vpen an 18080 Ua 406 

Mmwtooteor IOOPCS 

IMS: ranooecu 9x100 0x120 mihb 94090 

JHS yirco SS 

J0.710 Jun 95 93J90 9UU fUU njm 

mmo 9 ii»&« S® S-iS 0 * u * a » 

9XS» 714,0 ,2 - 4 * *7010 920ID 

FOUND (CMER) t wnvid. I i>+n*un UOOI 


—10 530025 
401.444 
. 38X467 
• 10229049 
144,719 
1*022 
11X639 
10X739 


SSS?W. 4500*^4. 
42J7NOVM 4505 
oooDecto 5300 
5000 Jon 95 on 
51.10 Feb 9S- 5850 

5200 Mgr 95 5400 

5405 Apr 95 5707 
5X80 May 95 
5X30 Junto 
SSJ0JUI95 
5X00 Sen H 
52700095 
SX15NW93 
52.9IDecto 
5X90 An] 96 
BJ.50W NA PrrxuM 39073 
Fri's apenim 70359 up Hsi 


57.90 
55001 
(035 
5X40 
5X8S 
5520 
5800 
5700 
5700 
5X95 
5850 
15438 
1 5899 
5879 
5X25 



1 130 303388 
‘130 8JN 


Stock Indexes 

tCMER) swvtote, 

ss ssssftsks as as jsb 

25 «O0OStoto «U0 gj« .jS IM 

Es.Mies NA HTs. sates 64007 ,J0 1,7 

Fri ’s te ten Int 211024 ori w 

n .m- 

«U0 3flJS5ep9S 
Bi- sates wla W*. salts sj» 

Fits open m 8914 up 59 


23X85 

250.95 


► Q.7S 

• X7S 


195 

(3 


Moody's 
Reutm 
□J. Futures 
Com. Research 


Commodity Indexes 

Close 
IJUJO 
2,12MB 
1S6JQ 
23224 


Previous. 
1 JS 8 J 0 ' 
2.1K2B ■ 
U4.M 1 
232-77 ' 

/ 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1994 


pt**e*A\ ,. v ' - ‘ 

§<u*. A . " . . 


Societe Generale 




8te iSw . . 

M- Jl,,, 


Buys 20% Stake Rosr Oudookfor Ir ^nd 

? * Xl Ti -n o nv i 


ft' 


,ny iii. M 


In French Firm 


CwtwW 6j> Oar Am 

BRUSSELS — Sodete G6n- 

ferale de Belgique SA said it was 


The strong results helped 
make it posable for Soofelfe 
Gfenferale to purchase the stake 


Vl-mi ; . 

#* «r V 


investing 4.S billion Belgian in Coficem, which in turn has a 
francs (S14 L6 million) to lake a 333 percent stake in the French 
20 percent stake in Coficem, a company Sagem, or Society Ap- 
proach technology and tele- plications Generate d'Electzi- 
cQflununications company. dt6 et de Mfecanique. 


m* 

mm*-.-. 

nirt* i 

Wfcta : :t' . 

^Wn-U ! I I . 
ita* r , . 




Fund 


*3 ET vlW:--- 
s:..' 


Sodfetfe Gfenferale, the biggest 
company in Belgium, also said 
its net earnings m the first half 
. had risen 54 percent, to 6.73 
billion Belgian francs, largely 
due to sates of shares in other 
companies. One-time gainc at 
, the holding company totaled 
i lj|k 1.63 billion francs, up from 698 
. . - million francs a year ago. 

The sale of 18 percent of the 
metals company Union Mini fere 
S A, 44 percent of the construc- 
tion company CBR Cim enter - 
htiSA and 2.7 percent of Ge. de 
Suez have netted more than 30 
billion Belgian francs over the 
l - past 12 months, making Socifetfe 

■ Gfenferale (me of Europe's most 

■ casb-rich companies. 


s* **-' -i f. . 

ifev Si • 

Vi .. 

* r* .. 


Gerard Mestrallei. executive 
officer of Sodfetfe Generale, said 
Coficem and Sagem hold prop- 
erty rights in applied technol- 
ogies in telecommunications and 
electronics sectors with high 
growth potential. 

Sodete Gfenferale said that 
earnings for the full year of 
1994 were expected to be higher 
than the 8.68 billion francs 
earned last year. 

Sales in the first half totaled 
70.04 bQHon francs, down from 
9 1.87 billion francs the year ear- 
lier. The drop was mainly due 
to sales of subsidiaries. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg, AFP } 




France Fixes Lyonnais Deal 

Bloomberg Business News 

PARIS — Credit Lyonnais, the French bank that was forced to 
delay releasing financial results while it sought urgent state cash to 
cover unexpected bad loan provisions, has reached a financial 
accord with the government. 

First-half results, scheduled for release last Thursday but de- 
layed while emergency talks were held with the government on 
covering the bank’s losses, are to be announced Tuesday, the bank 
. said. 

Crfedil Lyonnais received 4.9 billion French francs (S925.7 
million) of emergency funding from the state just six months ago 
after it made French banking history by posting a 1993 loss of 6.9 
billion francs. That was combined with a decision to move 43 
billion francs in problem loans into a separate company. 

Crfedit Lyonnais and the French Finance Ministry refused on 
Monday to provide details of their talks. 

The bank, which is on the government’s list of companies to be 
sold to die public, has not denied press reports that put its first- 
half loss at more than 4 billion francs. 


Improved Economy a Boon for Market 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New York Times Serrice 

LONDON — For most people, Ireland 
holds many pleasures, from the lush green 
landscape to the bead on a fresh pint of 
Guinness stout. But for investors. Ireland has 
always been a bit of a wasteland. 

That may be changing. Ireland, once 
viewed as an economic disaster area, has 
remade itself in recent years into one of Eu- 
rope's most vibrant economies. 

While most of the rest of Europe lan- 
guished in recession last year and struggled to 
recover this year, Ireland’s gross domestic 
product grew 4 percent and is expected to 
grow nearly 6 percent this year. Next year’s 
growth could be even higher. More remark- 
ably. Ireland seems to have pulled off this feat 
while keeping inflation low and bringing a 
massive budget deficit under control. 

Additionally, wwhile direct economic ef- 
fects from the prospects of peace in Northern 
Ireland are far off, if they materialize at all, an 
end to the violence could spur foreign invest- 
ment or at least let tbe republic's underlying 
strengths show through to investors. 

“There’s a neat economic story in Ireland.*’ 
said Richard Davidson, a strategist at Morgan 
Stanley & Co. in London. “It's got one of the 
strongest growth rates in Europe. It’s got ex- 
tremely low inflation. It’s a country where debt 
levels are actually falling. So you’ve got a great 
economic background, and the market back- 
ground is one of undervaluation.” 

Ireland’s equity market is small by world 
standards, with a capitalization of about S15 
billion. But stock prices, in the view of many 
analysts, have not caught up with the coun- 
try’s new economic strength. In Dublin, the 
ISEQ Overall index stood at 1,835.83 Mon- 
day. up more than 8 percent from its low for 
the year, in July, of 1,694.14. The high for the 
year of 2,082.16 was reached in January. 

Mr. Davidson said the Irish market was 
trading at 10.3 times projected 1994 earnings 
and at 9.1 times projected 1995 earnings. The 
price- Lo-eantin gs ratio on the London ex- 
change, by contrast, is 14.9 times 1994 earn- 
ings and 12.9 times 1995 earnings, he said. 

’The Irish stock market is at one of the 
lowest multiples of any European market, and 
there’s reasonable earnings growth.” he said. 

“We expect that the market can rise by 15 
percent over the next 12 months," Mr. David- 
son said. “International investor interest in 
Ireland has increased dramatically over the 


last decade, but the market still remains 
slightly undervalued in our view, particularly 
in the bank sector.** 

Irish financial markets have always been 
seen by investors as taking their cues 'directly 
from the British markets. Bui now, with clear 
differences emerging between the British and 
Irish economies and the economic strategies 
of the two governments, that link may be 
breaking down. 

Most importantly, London has been decid- 
edly unenthusiastic about European Union 
plains For monetary union, and has all but 
ruled out moving toward a single currency. 

But Dublin has gone all out to meet the strict 
financial targets set by the EU as precursors for 
merging currencies and monetary policies, and 


There’s a great economic 
story in Ireland.’ 

Richard Davidson, a strategist at 
Morgan Stanley & Co. 


it has succeeded to a greater degree than most 
of its partners. It is close to tire targets for 
inflation, budget deficit and bond yidds, al- 
though it is still out of the required ranges for 
total debt and for currency stability. 

Ireland still has problems. Its unemploy- 
ment rate, at 15 percent, is chronically high, 
even by European standards. It is relatively 
poor, with output per capita running at 65.6 
percent of the EU average over the last four 
years, according to the London investment 
advisory firm Independent Strategy. 

Just last week, Irish Steel, once one of the 
nation’s top employers, gave up a long fight 
for survival, joining other Irish companies 
that have fallen to worldwide competition. 

But even with those problems, Ireland 
seems destined to take a more prominent 
position within Lhe European Union. 

“Ireland is a surprise,” said Bob McKee, an 
analyst at Independent Strategy. “Its finances 
are under control. Economic recovery is pick- 
ing up. It will probably make it to the Ger- 
manic core of a two-speed Europe.” 

Analysts said that many of Ireland's big- 
gest and best-known companies look like 
good investments now. 


2 Nordic 
Companies 
In Concert 
WithBT 


Bloomberg Business Non 

LONDON — Tele D anmar k 
A/S and Telecom Finland said 
Monday they would join an alli- 
ance originally formed by Brit- 
ish Telecommunications PLC 
and MCI Communications 
Coip. to provide global com- 
munications services to multi- 
national companies. 

Tele Danmark should help 
the BT-MCI alliance, which is 
called Concert, challenge some 
of the emerging global partner- 
ships, including Unisource and 
Eunetcom, on their home turf, 
analysts said. 

BT and Tele Danmark will 
develop products for Sweden, 
the companies said. The nation- 
al Sweetish, Swiss and Dutch 
telephone operators comprise 
Unisource. 

Norwegian Telecom has been 
selling services for the venture 
since ApriL 

Analysts said the fortified al- 
liance will probably take on 
northern Germany as well, cut- 
ting into Euneicom's territory. 
Eunetcom is a venture of 
France Telecom, Deutsche Te- 
lekom and Sprint Corp. 

AT&T Corp.. bas established 
WorldPartners, a loose collabo- 
ration of companies worldwide, 
to offer voice, data, and video 
services. 

■ Spain Sets Cellular Price 

Spain will charge a minimum 
50 billion pesetas ($390 million) 
for the license to operate a digi- 
tal mobile phone system to 
compete with state-supported 
phone monopoly Telefonica de 
Espana, Elena SaJgado, Secre- 
tary General of Telecommuni- 
cations, said. 

She added that the license, 
for which five groups of compa- 
nies are bidding, would be 
granted by the end of the year. 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

2300 



London 
FTSEIOO Index 

m : — — 

■'m—-. — r- 
3000— SJ—J 


Page 15 

EUROPE 


Paris 

CAC40 

2330 1 - 

22»-w — 

■ Jl , ~ 

m - -it Afl- 

18 ro 'A'jrf j'jTT 

1994 


Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Brus3eis 

Frankfurt 

Frankfurt 

Helsinki 

London 

London : ' ! 

Madrid 

Milan ‘ ; 

Paris 

Stockholm 
Vienna ■ 
Zurich 

Sources: Reuters, 


. index ■ Monday 

Close 

A£X': - 4QQ.47 

Stock index 7,212.41 

DAX . 2£68.S7 

FAZ ; * 784J6 

■ HEX ' ' 1,880-39 

Financial Tjmes 30 2,331.40 

FUSE 100 , 2.999.80 

General Indax 297.17 

MtBTEL ■ 10754 

CAC 40. 1302-72 

Afiaersvaertden 1,81033 

Stock Index 440.70 

S05 ' 921.59 

AFP 


*4 

Change 
403.61 -0.78 

7.255.14 -059 

2,089.12 -0.98 

790.32 -0.69 

1.864.14 +0.87 

2.347.60 -0.69 

3.028-20 -0.94 

297.98 4L27" 

10737 *0.16 

1,927.35 -1.28 

1,822.57 -0.67 

441.26 -0.13 

92874 ~ -0.77 

]nienuB>)iul HnU Tribune 


Very briefly; 

• Adam Opel AG, a unit of General Motors Corp., is being 
investigated by the state prosecutor of Darmstadt to determine 
whether five Opel workers accepted free construction work for 
themselves in return for awarding building orders for the company. 

• Germany posted a surplus of 1 billion Deutsche marks (S647 
million) in its balance of payments in July, according to provision- 
al figures, down from 4.4 billion DM in" June. 

• Newspaper Publishing PLC, publisher of tbe Independent, had a 
loss of £12.6 million ($20 million) in the first half of 1994 as a 
result of restructuring and a fierce price war. according to Edilor- 
iale La Repnbbfica SpA, its Italian shareholder. 

• CamaudMctalbox SA, the French packaging company, said it 
called off its agreement to merge its cosmetics packaging activities 
with those of Wheaton Inc. of the United States. 

• Spain's Treasury, reluctant to pay high interest rates on govern- 
ment bonds, turned to 34 commercial banks, led by Chemical 
Bank, for a line of credit totaling 6 billion European Currency- 
Units ($7 billion). 

• Olivetti SpA will offer Italians an interactive on-line computer 
information service in the middle of October and plans to launch a 
similar service in Britain later this year. 

• Energis Communications Ltd. said it would charge 10 percent to 

15 percent less than British Telecommunications PLC for most of 
its telephone services. Savings could be as high as 40 percent for 
some services, it said. Reusers. AFX. Bl-omben;. AFP 


Portable IBM Unit Would Hear and Obey COPY: Xerox Tries to Redefine Its Image to Fit in With the Computer Age 

V ^ ■ r n .1 : I J _ L : - . t I. — — — — ] — . ,1 — . I».. n u m,lr, il>«r i^hnnl.^au mmnali. 


By Mitchell Mania 

International Herald Tribute 

PARIS — IBM is developing a portable 
computing device — or persona] digital 
assistant — that can understand spoken 
commands, an executive said Monday. 

The device, which could compete with 
Apple Computer Inc.’s Newton, would be 
useful for such things as executing securities 
orders, dictating letters and assisting doc- 
tore. There are no voice-recognizing person- 
al digital assistants on the market now. 

International Business Machines Corp. 
has a prototype device based on its Power- 
PC processing drip, said Martin C. Qague, 
general manager of worldwide diem/ server 
computing. He said it recognized 80,000 
words with 96 percent accuracy. 

Personal digital assistants are band-held 
computers organize information, tak- 


ing the place of handwritten notes and often 
Uniting with computing networks. But the 
devices have so far failed to gain much of a 
market, despite high hopes by their makers. 
The Newton, for example, has not been 
widely accepted. In July, AT&T Corp. end- 
ed its backing of EO Inc., which closed after 
having sold fewer than 10.000 devices cost- 
ing from $1,500 to $3,000 each. Both devices 
were designed to recognize handwriting 

In 1993, according to the market-research 
company Dataquest Inc., 476.000 pen- 
based digital assistants were sold world- 
wide, and an additional I.I million devices 
that use keyboards were purchased. Prices 
for these units are typically less than $700. 

Apple’s former chairman, John Sculley, 
has estimated an a-nnunl world market for 
digital assistants of up to S3.5 trillion, and 
EO had predicted that 100 million person- 


al communicators would be sold by 2000. 

Mr. Clague said IBM counted on the 
voice-recognition aspect of its devices to ov- 
ercome the problems that others have expe- 
rienced with pen-based units. He refused to 
say when the product might come to mar- 
ket, but he did say IBM wanted to get its 
reliability past 99 percent, which would be 
needed for such applications as medicine. 

Jeffrey Goldberg a Dataquest analyst in 
Britain, was cautious about the marketabil- 
ity of such devices. “There is a real reason 
for doing that, and it is a good idea." he 
said. “You would have a hands-free PDA 
and that is something that is demanded by 
users in certain circumstances .” He added, 
however, that while the technology exists to 
create them, units would have to cost less 
than about £300 ($474), but he estimated it 
would now cost about £800 to make them. 


Continued from Page 13 

ize on the personal computer, 
even though much of the basic 
research was done at Xerox’s 
Palo Alto Research Center. 

Xerox said those missteps oc- 
curred. years ago. and that it has 
learned from them. These days 
Xerox is leaner and nimbler, 
said Peter van Cuyienburg. ex- 
ecutive vice president of opera- 
tions. 

Most important. Xerox exec- 
utives said that after some false 
starts, the company has found a 
strategy that makes .sense. 
“We’re really focused on being 
the document company." Mr. 
Allaire said. 

Documents, as Xerox defines 


them, include almost anything 
that conveys information: let- 
ters, memos, reports, invoices, 
charts, graphs, photos, financial 
records. 

For years. Xerox copiers 
were the best at handling all of 
those things on paper. Now, the 
digital revolution is putting 
those things into computers. 
That, in turn, is spawning a 
whole new industry that can 
help manage these byte-sized 
documents. 

Over the next few years, com- 
panies are expected to spend 
billions of dollars to buy prod- 
ucts that can create electronic 
documents, store them, find 
them, get them to the right peo- 
ple and keep them away from 


others. It is a market that touch- 
es on nearly every facet of the 
information-technology busi- 
ness and thus has many poten- 
tial entrants. 

Earlier this year. Xerox's 
marketing machine revved into 
full gear to try to propel the 
corporation to the front of the 
pack. In April. Xerox intro- 
duced its newest product-high- 
speed digital primers that could 
receive information over tele- 
phone lines from various points 
around the world, then assem- 
ble and prim it. 

Xerox also announced that 
50 companies, including AT&T 
Corp- Novell Inc. and Sun Mi- 
crosystems Inc„ had agreed to 


make their technology compati- 
ble with Xerox’s system. 

Four months later. Xerox un- 
veiled a new corporate logo: 
THE DOCUMENT COMPA- 
NY-Xerox. The company said 
the logo underscores “the new 
Xerox." 

These marketing moves have 
drawn attention to Xerox. Bui 
in a way. they have also made 
Xerox’s product offerings — 
mainly digital printers — seem 
cautious. 

Jeff Simig a spokesman, said 
Xerox had no intention of being 
just a primer company. "We've 
got nine divisions, all focusing 
on various pans [of docu- 
ments.] What you see with Xe- 
rox is a breadth of capability," 
he said. 


Han uowLaie'j'Oi 1 
















































































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1994 


Page 17 

ASIA/PACIFIC 





i ) 


■ A- 


h ■» 

? i 


* - 

■s 

■ / 


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:.j* 


South Korea 
Budgets 16% 
Spending Ri se 


SEOUL — The South Kore- 
an cabinet approved a state 
budget on Monday that will 
ruse government spending by 
Id percent and includes large 
increases in defense, public 
works and farm subsidies. 

A highlight of the 1 995 budget 


ffient, will be enormous next 
year," said Yum Young Mok of 
the Daewoo Research Institute. 

The draft budget does not 
foresee an income-tax rate in- 


crease. The government expects 
the increased spend- 


is a rise of nearly 40 percent in 
i subsidies to cushion farm- 


farm 

ers and fishermen against the 
opening of South Korea's mar- 
kets under the General Agree- 
ment on Tariffs and Trade. 

The 1995 budget will total 
50.14 trillion won ($62.5 bil- 
lion) compared with 43.25 tril- 
lion won for 1994, the Econom- 
ic Planning Board said. 

Is Defense spending, which ac- 
counts for almost a quarter of 
the total budget, is due to rise 
’ 9.9 percent, to 11.57 trillion 
won, reflecting South Korea's 
preoccupation with war threats 
from North Korea. 

“The economy is expected to 
grow by between 7 and 8 per- 
. cent in 1995," an official from 
the planning board said. “De- 
mand for budget spending will 
be much higher.” 

Spending on public works — 
roads, subways, dams, ports 
and a high-speed telecommuni- 
cations network — will rise 21 .9 
percent, to 6.77 trillion won. 

Private-sector economists 
said the budget rise appeared 
low in view of soaring demand 
for infrastructure investment 

“Pressure for more spending, 
including infrastructure invest- 


to finance 
ing from duties on consumer 
goods, restraints on wage in- 
creases, and improved tax col- 
lection. 

Officials said that after a se- 
ries of balanced or deficit bud- 
gets, the 1995 draft is the first 
with a surplus, estimated at 700 
billion won. 

“A surplus budget now will 
allow the government to adopt 
deficit budgets more easily in 
the future," a budget planner 
said, looking ahead to the possi- 
bility of Korean unification and 

its likely costs. (AP, Reuters) 

■ Stocks Hit Record High 

South Korean stocks closed 
at a record Monday, as a strong 
economic outlook encouraged 
investors to buy shares in medi- 
um-sized manufacturers, 
Bloomberg Business News re- 
ported. The composite index 
rose 7.71 points, to 1,045.12, 
while advancing issues outnum- 
bered declining ones by a 3- to- 1 
ratio. 

“With the economy growing 
at a healthy 8 percent, investors 
have shifted their attention 
from overvalued top- level man- 
ufacturers to undervalued sec- 
ond-tier manufacturers,” said 
Hwang Chang Joong, an ana- 
lyst with Lucky Securities Co. 


Ford Hits Curbs on Road to Japan 

Executive Says Dealers Form Invisible Trade Barrier 


By Paul Blustein 

Washington Past Service 

TOKYO — Konen Suzuki, president 
of Ford Motor Co. (Japan), ought to be 
crowing over his company's recent suc- 
cess at penetrating the Japanese market. 

Ford’s Japanese operation posted a 130 
percent sales increase for the first eight 
months of 1994, while sales declined in the 
overall Japanese auto market. 

Yet Mr. Suzuki sounds like an ag- 
grieved U.S. trade negotiator. “These 
numbers are still negligible,'’ he said of 
Ford's sales, which have accounted for 
about one-third of 1 percent of the total 
Japanese market in 1994. G ainin g access 
to Japan’s auto dealership system, he 
said, “takes 10 times more effort than it 
does in the United States." 

Mr. Suzuki’s success and frustration are 
a microcosm of the U-S.-Japanesefonflict 
over trade, which is reaching a critical 
stage as a SepL 30 deadline looms for 
President Bill Clinton to deride whether 
to impose sanctions against Japan for 
alleged “unfair” trading practices. 

Although companies such as Ford are 
on the upswing here, that does not mean 
trade tensions are about to evaporate. 


experience selling imports in the U.S. 
and Japanese markets. 

After receiving a degree in literature 
from Tokyo University, Mr. Suzuki. 56, 
worked for Toyota Motor Corp. for 30 
years. While working in Toyota’s U.S. 
operation in the 1970s, he was credited 
with popularizing the Corolla model. 

He stunned tradition-bound Toyota 
by joining Ford in 1991. Now he derides 
the Japanese industry for “doing the 


Although companies 
such as Ford are on the 
upswing here, that does 
not mean trade tensions 
are about to evaporate. 


Tokyo maintains its market is plainly 
becoming more receptive to foreign 


toreign 

goods, while Washington sees plenty of 
barriers left to knock down. 

Fords are hardly the only imported 
product faring well in recent months. 
Chrysler Corp.’s Japanese operation has 
also registered triple-digit sales gains this 
year. Despite the lingering recession, Ja- 
pan’s imports of manufactured goods 
rose 15.7 percent in the first half, spurred 
by a strong yen. 

But U.S. officials and business execu- 
tives rejected Japanese claims that such 
data negates much of Washington’s case 
against Tokyo. 

Few people enjoy such a unique per- 
spective on the debate as Mr. Suzuki a 
rare example of an auto executive with 


same things the Americans did with then 
tail fins” by producing over engineered, 
gimmick-laden cars. 

He is positioning Ford as by far the 
most aggressive importer among the U.S. 
Big Three, launching a splashy ad cam- 
paign this year and setting a goal of 
selling 100,000 cars annually by the end 
of the decade: roughly seven times the 
current level 

- To Japanese officials, the recent success 
of Ford and other U.S. automakers here 
proves that sales of U.S. cars will take off 
only after Detroit begins offering prod- 
ucts Japanese consumers want. 

“It’s an indication of the openness of 
the Japanese market, and also the impor- 
tance of the efforts made by U.S. auto- 
makers,” said Masakazn Toyoda. director 
of the Americas division of the Ministry 
of International Trade and Industry. 

Until 1993, Mr. Toyoda said, Chrysler 
did not sell vehicles with the steering 
wheel on the right side to conform with 


the Japanese practice of driving on the 
side of the road. Ford only began 


left sic 


doing so this year, with the U.S.-made 
Probe and the European-made Mon dec. 

In addition, Mr. Toyoda said, Chrys- 
ler and Ford have recently begun mar- 
keting less costly cars. 

Mr. Suzuki shares the view of the U.S. 
government: the Japanese auto market 
remains riddled with “invisible" barriers 
typical of Japan’s keiretsu, or corporate 
families. Although tariffs on imported 
cars are nonexistent and many regulations 
have been eased, he contends Ford’s abili- 
ty to sell cars is limited by the tight links 
dealers maintain with big automakers 
such as Toyota and Nissan Motor Co. 

These ties axe not legally binding — 
indeed, the Japanese auto industry has 
expressly stated that dealers can sell any 
cars they wish — but the dealers often 
feel beholden to the automakers because 
of financial and managerial help they 
have received over the years. 

There Is a ray of hope. This year, Mr. 
Suzuki persuaded some Nissan dealers to 
convert four of their outlets to Ford, and 
he expects to sign up a couple of Toyota 
dealers by year’s end. 

For the longer term, he is looking to 
expand Ford’s network from 290 outlets 
to as many as 1,000. He is counting on 
the fact that many Japanese dealers are 
losing money and need popular vehicles 
to be profitable once again 

Perhaps U.S. automakers should just 
let market forces naturally create dealer- 
ship opportunities as their products im- 
prove? That is what the Japanese side 
contends. The U.S. side, however, argues 
that Tokyo should set targets for increas- 
ing the number of dealers selling import- 
ed cars, using government prodding to 
loosen the bonds between manufacturers 
and dealers: a step the Japanese ada- 
mantly reject as “managed trade." 

“If there hadn't been any government 
pressure over the past year, we probably 
wouldn't have gotten any dealers," Mr. 
Suzuki said. 



Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

•' Singapore Tokyo 

.• rStraite Times Nikkei 225 







/lK^ ThT jy^ V • ■ /VAMrt 





I3WV 


,W A^J J A S 

1984' " 1884 

Exctia^e . . index 

Hongkong TtengSeng 

J* AS*. 

Monday 

Close 

9.67759 

Vtt A .M J J A S 
, ■ 1984 

Prev. % 

Close Change 

;9, 632.47- ^.47 


Straits Timas 

Z299^t 

2.302.05 

-0.10 

Sydney •' 

AB Ordinaries ... 

2,030 JM) 

2,037.70 

+6.11 

Tokyo 

Nikke)2Z5 

19314.36 Closed 


| Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1,157.48 

. 1,170-W 

-1.10 

Bangkok - 

SET 

1,495.72 

1.506.06 

*0.69 

Sepyl... 

Composite StcxA 

1JM5.12 

. 1,037.41 

+0,74 

Taipei- 

Woi^ited Price 

7.025.-7& 

6£22.02 

+1.50 

Maoilu ' 

-PSE 

234U0 

2.959^6 

-0^1 

Jakaria 

■Slock Index 

2iai9 

512.57 

-58.99 

-New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

ZJ07SM 

2,080.53 

-0^3 

.Bombay ' 

Natbnal index 

2,109^7 

2.12233 

4X60 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


Irucnubmil Herald TritmiK 


Very briefly: 


• Malaysia posted a trade deficit of $320 million in the first six 
months of this year, compared with a $1 billion surplus in the 
corresponding period last year, the statistics department said. 

• Nynex Corp, has acquired a 25 percent stake in Telecom 
Holdings Co., a Philippine telecommunications company, report- 
edly for $9.8 milli on, to take advantage of the deregulated tele- 
coms industry in the Philippines. 

• San Miguel Brewery HK Ltd, the 64 percent-owned Hong Kong 
unit of the Philippine food company, said it would pay stockhold- 
ers a special dividend of 3 Hong Kong dollars (39 cents) a share, 
lower than expected. The company posted a 95 percent increase in 
profit for the first eight months, to 33.9 million dollars, on rising 
sales in China. 


• Ajinomoto Ok, a Japanese food company that holds 19.8 percent 
of Orsan SA, a food-additive maker, expanded its stake in the 
French company's operations for 8 billion yen ($80 million). 

(AFP. Bloomberg) 


AMEX 


Monday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades ateewtwe. Via The Associated Press 


(Continued) 


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Reuters 

SYDNEY — Normandy Po- 
seidon Ltd, an Australian min- 
ing concern and Bureau de Re- 
cherches G6ologiques & 
Mini ires, a French state-owned 
company, announced Monday a 
joint venture grouping their in- 
ternational mining operations. 

The venture will have net as- 
sets of 450 million Australian 
dollars ($332 million), with a 
diversified portfolio of mining 
operations in Europe, Africa 
and South America and access 


to Bureau de Recherches' ex- 
tensive exploration portfolio. 

Bureau de Recherches will be 
split into two companies: La- 
Source Cie Min iire SAS. hold- 
ing industrial-minerals and base- 
metal assets, and Cie Mini&re 
International Or SA, or Mine Or 
SA, which will own gold assets. 

The venture brings together 
the experience of the French 
company, formed 35 years ago 
to bring' together all the French 
government’s mining assets, and 
the Normandy group, whose Po- 


seidon Cold Ltd. arm is Austra- 
lia’s largest gold producer. 


Analysts said the deal was a 
partial privatization of Bureau 
de Recherches. 


Normandy will pay 1 18 mil- 
lion doUars for a 60 percent 
stake in LaSource. while Bu- 
reau de Recherches will retain 
40 percent. Normandy's gold 
arm, PosGold, will spend 130 
million dollars for a 37 percent 
stake in Mine Or. LaSource will 
own 40 percent of Mine Or and 


Bureau de Recherches will have 
a 23 percent stake. 

Bureau de Recherches will 
also pay 104 million dollars for a 
9 percent stake in Normandy, 
wnich will issue it 47.2 million 
new shares. The issue will dilute 
the present 19.9 percent stake 
held by Minorco SA, the over- 
seas arm of Anglo-American 
Corp. of South Africa. 


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SPORTS 


CapriatVs Tale: The Wild Times and New Hopes of a TennisDropout * jUr 


By Robin Finn 

Nat York Time! Sernve 

RANCHO MIRAGE, California — The desen 
sun is on the rise and already packing a punch only a 
lizard could love, and it would be 99 degrees in the 
shade if there were any, so it's small wonder that the 
outdoor hard courts at the Mission Hills tennis 
complex are deserted, all except for one. 

On its simmering surface, a teenager with a rakish 
purple glaze in her ponytail and a hard-working wad 
of green gum in her mouth is whacking tennis balls 
across the net as fast as her male sparring partner 
can deliver them. 

The tear in her graffiti-print shorts is self-inflicted — 
tennis shorn as fashion victim — but the tears under 
her eyes are not tears of unhappiness from feeling 
victimized by everyone within staring distance. This is 
just plain sweat after a rigorous practice session. 

The teenager happens to be that infamous tennis 
and 12th-grade dropout. Jennifer Capriati, lately an 
alumnus of Florida's police blotter, the school of 
hard knocks and two strange stints in rehabilitative 
facilities, where addiction and psychosis were daily 
subjects on the blackboards. 

Six weeks ago, she and her family relocated to this 
recreational mecca in the California desert, prospect- 
ing for a new start after a bad time. Last week, 
Capriati broke her yearlong vow of silence regarding 
the public's need to know her private ups and downs. 

She waxed cautiously optimistic after a year of 
waning internally. The torment, as she refers to it. is 
over. She hasn’t solved her problems, but she has 
elected to survive them. 

“I was always expected to be at the top. and if I 
didn't win, to me that meant 1 was a loser," she said 
last week. "The way I felt about myself had to do 
with how 1 played, and if I played terrible I'd say, 
yes, I can handle it, but really I couldn't; l felt like 
no one liked me as a person. I felt like my parents 
and everybody else thought that tennis was the way 


to make it in life, they thought it was good, but I 
thought no one knew or wanted to know the person 
who was behind my tennis life." 

When Capriati couldn't make peace between the 
girl in the mirror and the player who had been 
assigned a starring role as “the next Chris Evert," 
she tried to rid herself of the latter identity. Being a 
teenager, it seemed logical to go to extremes to do it. 

U I was depressed and sad and lonely and guilty." 
she said of her dismay at being the player everybody 
knew but a person nobody understood. 


“I burned out — I'U say it,” Capriati announces 
with a grimace that shows she's aware of the chorus 
of “T told you so’s” the revelation will inspire in the 
armchair psychologists and cynics who have waited 
for her to take a fall ever since she turned pro — and 
multimillionaire — as a toothy, giggly 13-year-old. 

In 1993, less than four years after the Women’s 
Tennis Council bent its age eligibility rules to allow 


"Totally, mentally, I just lost it, and obviously it 
goes deeper than that one match. I really was not 
happy with myself, my tennis, my life, my parents, 
my coaches, my friends." 

“I spent a week in bed in darkness after that, just 
baring everything,” she added. “When I looked in my 
mirror, ] actually saw this distorted image: I was so 


ugly and so fat. I just wanted to lriU myself, really/ 

* lie self. She turned 


l I felt rd give up all the material dungs to be with 
uld ’ 


someone who would love me for me," said Capriati, 
who gave up her marketability and credibility in the 
course of the six-month walk on the wild side that 
landed her here on the rebound. 


Yes, the Betty Ford Clinic is just around the 
comer. But no, Car 


ipriati isn't going there for therapy 
after a year of entropy that began with a destabiliz- 
ing loss at the 1 993 U.S. Open and culminated in her 
arrest in May on a marijuana charge following her 
own version of the lost weekend. 

Instead, she’s back on the tennis court, the not-so- 
innocuous launching pad that made her a celebrity 
at 13, broke her at 17, but now seems an integral ally 
as she picks up the pieces of a life that ha<£ in her 
prematurely jaundiced vision, turned pointless, 
friendless and hopeless. 

“I was pretty close to being not in existence," said 
Capriati, speaking at length, albeit uneasily, about 
the most difficult year of her life. 

Tin not an addict to drugs, but you could say I'm 
an addict to my own pain. Or I was," she said. “I had 
this sarcasm about everything. My spirit was just, 
like, dark." 

Her opening-round loss to Leila Meskhi at last 
year’s U.S. Open pushed her over the edge of a 
precipice and into a self-destructive limbo. The self 
she wanted to destroy? J ennif er Capriati, tennis 
phenom and international celebrity. 


f I don’t regret anything that 
happened in my career, except 
that maybe 14 is too young to 
handle everything emotionally. 
But 1 know I don't want to leave 
tennis the way I did, crying and 
crawling away.’ 


this box-office smash early entry to their novelty- 
left it ana purposely left no 


starved circuit, Capriati le 
word when or if she would be back. 

Had a groin strain not intervened, Capriati would 
definitely be in Zurich next week at the European 
Indoor Championships. But to return to the circuit 
the same way she left it, in pain, seems unwise: 
Capriati hopes to play every aspect of the game more 
wisely her second time around. 

“I don’t regret anything that happened in my career, 
except that maybe 14 is too young to handle everything 
emotionally, ” she said. “But 1 know I don’t want to 
leave tennis the way I did, crying and crawling away." 

Capriati, who had residual nightmares after losing 
her 1991 Open semifinal to Monica Seles, cried 
incessantly after losing her 1993 first-rounder. 

“I started out O. fC, but at the end of the match I 
couldn’t wait to get off the court," she recalled. 


So she proceeded to kill her public ; 
her back on tennis and all it entailed. She withdrew 
from her family, first emotionally, then physically, 
and moved into her own apartment last November. 

Her anonymity was short-lived once she was cited 
for shoplifting on Dec. 10. 

Though a juvenile at the time, Capriati’s celebrity 
status seemed to outweigh her legal right to confidenti- 
ality; her case wound up being dismissed, but not 
before a worldwide blitz from the media, most of which 
presumed her guilty, sent her even deeper into her shell. 

“1 thought, ‘Am I that big that they have to make 
such a big deal out of this? 1 " she said. “And I see 
now that once you're considered a celebrity, you 
kind of have no rights to privacy 1 . After that 1 kind of 
forgot about everything and everyone except for my 
brother, all I cared about was having my music and 
partying with friends.” 

For several months, she refused to touch a racket, 
but last winter, even after the party circuit bad 
become her only circuit, she was bored and started 
bitting balls on the sly. 

But then came another setback. Her parents, 
worried about her mental state, plucked her from 
her apartment and signed her into the Manors, a 


like people were watching me at Saddlebrook, said 
Capriati whose paranoia was not u^wndM, More 
than once she was ambushed by tabloid photogra- 
phers hiding in the bushes and stalking her high 
school in surb urban Tampa. Florida. In Boca Raton* 
she moved in with friends who attended the local 
university, and her father found her a tutor for her 
schoolwork. 


wf° 


* 




Again, she started playing ten nis recreational!^ 
* • ■ she “loved it, loved the game. 


and remembered that i 


w ' 
■' .. . 


Capriati’s arrest occurred on^MayJ6 huide^a 


vupi kUU U — 

seedy Coral Gables motel room ----- 
bankrolling a party attended by an assortment of 
teenage revellers she later described as acquaint- 
ances, not real friends.” . . 

What they had in common was a complete fact or 
interest in Capriati, the tennis play*^1 her generosity 
with her car and wallet were enough to award her a 
hig h ranking in their pecking order. 

What the police, who made two felony arrests and 
released two others without charging them, found in 
Capriati’s backpack was just enough marijuana to 
charge her with mis ^ , ** T,ffar 'or possession and snap a 
mug shot that turned up on TV screens around the 
globe. Her sponsors dumped her, she went into a28- 
day treatment program at Mount Sinai Medical^, 
Center in Miami Beach. ■ 

Now, wild cards are available at whatever event 
she deems to enter. Her father. Stefano, is happily 
ensconced on the practice court. Tennis seems ready 
to welcome Capriati back, and she seems ready to 

n rafiirti nn cltohfJv HifffWfll tdltlS. 


m \\* 


*1 1 , 




private psychiatric facility in Tarpon Springs, Flori- 

in Fel 


da, for a two-week evaluation in February. Capriati 
emerged resentful, and when she turned 18 in 
March, she left her family's Saddlebrook home for 
Boca Raton, a move across Florida that initially 
received her parents’ blessing. 

“1 was trying to gel better, get happier, but 1 felt 


ii a uisiuc lug, a uuvG mo urauG play and a talent 
to play, and I don’t want to waste my talent,” she 
said. “1 don’t care about being No. 1, but I'm ready 
and witling to give a battle, and that’s what sports is 
ah about Who cares about endorsements and all 
that stuff? Just give me a racket There’s no ending 
to my story yet" 


• '»* ’ 
i- 1 


SCOREBOARD 


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NgwEngJana 
NY. Jets 
Indianapolis 


Cleveland 

Pittsburgh 

Houston 

Cincinnati 


San Diego 
Kansas City 
Seattle 
LA Raiders 
Denver 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
Bait 

W L T 
3 I 0 
2 1 0 
2 2 0 
2 2 0 

1 3 0 

Central 

W L T 
3 1 0 

2 2 0 

I 3 0 
0 4 0 

west 

W L 


PH PF PA 
7S0 124 101 
Ml 54 45 
XO 123122 
500 69 72 

250 90 97 


PH PF PA 
230 *1 51 
J00 70 87 

iso a n 

.000 71 106 


PH PF PA 
UNO 114 71 
.750 04 60 
250 106 53 
250 95124 
300 72 110 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 



W 

L 

T 

PH PF FA 

N.Y. Giants 

3 

0 

0 

1-000 

79 63 

Dot kit 

2 

1 

0 

467 

63 to 

PNladolMila 

2 

1 

0 

M 7 

44 57 

Waoningtan 

1 

3 

0 

.250 

88 110 

Arizona 

0 3 

Central 

0 

jOOQ 

29 66 


W 

L 

T 

PH 

PF PA 

MUMHOta 

3 

1 

0 

J50 

100 68 

Chicago 

2 

2 

0 

JQO 

76 88 

Dafroir 

2 

2 

0 

-500 

71 78 

GreonBav 

2 

2 

0 

XO 

a 50 

Tempo Boy 

1 3 

lute ■§ 

0 

-250 

43 70 


w 

L 

T 

PH 

PF PA 

San Francisco 

3 

1 

0 

JS0 

119 70 

Atlanta 

2 

2 

0 

500 

96 *4 

la Rami 

2 

2 

0 

5M 

62 77 

ttawOrtaans 

1 

3 

0 

5250 

63 99 


1. Florida nil 
1 Nebraska 122) 

3. Florida St. (4) 

4. Penn SL 13) 

5. Colorado (I) 

6. Arizona (1) 

7. Michigan 

8. Notre Dame 

9. Auburn 
10 Texas A&M 

11. Alabama 

12. Washington 

13. Miami 

14. Virginia Tech 
T£ Wisconsin 

16. Texas 

17. Washington St. 

IB. North Carolina 

19. Southern Col 

20. Ohio St. 

21. Oklahoma 

22. N. Carolina SL 

23. Kansas St. 

24. Colorado SL 
21 Illinois 

Others receiving i 
39, Utah 34. Duke 26, Georgia 22. Syracuse 11 
Virginia 11 Mississippi stole 11 Baylor 7. 
South Carolina Z Stanford Z Texas Tech Z 
Western Michigan z Bawling Green 1, 
Brigham Young i, Indiana 1. 


RBCOTd 

PH 

Pv 

3*0 

1,509 

1 

4-0-0 

JX»3 

2 

4-0-0 

U96 

3 

44-0 

1369 

5 

344 

1334 

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300 

1,199 

8 

2-14 

1.145 

4 

3-1-0 

1383 

9 

444 

1308 

10 

344 

935 

12 

444 

906 

11 

2-14 

863 

17 

2-14 

791 

6 

444 

735 

14 

2-14 

674 

16 

340 

666 

15 

344 

515 

22 

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491 

13 

2-14 

462 

19 

3-14 

430 

20 

2-14 

341 

21 

340 

266 

24 

344 

175 

— 

440 

71 

— 

2-14 

44 

— 

»: Kansas 4L UCLA 


Mike Donald, 158300 
Russ Cochran. S4(uno 
John Huston, S32J75 
Tom Lehman. *32275 
Robert wrena. *33275 
Curt Byrum. S32J75 


70- 66-64-67 — 267 
67-66-7065— 26B 

71- 64-47-65— 2S9 
71-47-45-66-269 
63-7047-49—269 
69-6545-70—269 


Mark CaKavecchkL S23JI00 66494046-270 


DAVIS CUP PROMOTION PLAYOFFS 
Austria 1 Uruguay 2 
Diego Perez. Uruguav.def. Gilbert Schaller. 
Austria 5-7. 64. 7-5. 

suvenia & Guano 2 

Blaz Truce i. Slovenia deL Isaac Donkor. 
Ghana 5-7, 6-1 74 (841. 6-7 0-7). 84. 
NICHI RE I OPEN 
Hog lei Final 

Arantxa Sanchez vicar ki (1). Spain, dot. 
Amy Frazier (71. U.S. 6-1. 4-2. 

Doubles Float 

Arantxa Sandw vtoarfo. Spain, and Juflc 
Ha lard, France (1). def. Amy Frazier, ui. 
and Rika Hlrakl. Japan. 4-1. 04. 4-1. 


CFL Standings 


Winnipeg 

Baltimore 

Ottawa 

Taranto 

Hamilton 

Shreveport 


Eastern DIvtshM 
w L T 

8 4 0 

B 4 0 

4 8 0 

4 8 0 

3 9 0 

0 12 0 

Western Division 


ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Lazio Z Parma 3 

Standings: Roma 10 points. Parma 10, Ju- 
ventus ilk Sampdorla 7, Lazio 7. Inter 7. Fktr- 
•mina 7. Ml Ion 7, Bari 6.Cremanese6,Torb»6. 
Fooola£Cogliarl4,NaPOil4.Bresda2. Genoa 
Z Regglcna 0. Padova o. 


PP PA PH 
435 373 16 
370 312 16 
359 437 8 
331 416 0 
272 357 6 
198 449 0 




NHL Preseason 


Senders Gomes 
Atlanta 27, Washington 20 
Cleveland 21. Indianapolis 14 
L. A Rams 16. Kansas Cl tv 0 
Minnesota 38. Miami 35 
Green Bay 3a Tampa Bay 3 
Houston 20. Cincinnati 13 
Now England 23. Detroit 17 
Son Francisco 34. New Orleans 13 
San Diego 36. U A. Raiders 24 
Seattle 3fc Pittsburgh 13 
Chicago 19, N. Y. Jets 7 


Calgary 

Edmonton 

BrftGoiumMa 

Saskatchewan 

Sacramento 

Los Vegas 


470 237 20 
350 270 IB 
439 293 17 
337 324 14 
293 333 11 
353 374 10 


Smdan Games 
Baltimore 42, Ottawa 27 
Edmonton 2a Taranto 25 


Edmonton 4. Las Vegas (iHL) 4 
Montreal X Quebec 2 
Philadelphia X Washington 2 
Tampa Bay 7, Buffalo 3 
Defrofl 4, Toronto I 
Boston X Chicago X 
N. Y. Rangers X Los Angeles l 
N. Y. Islanders 4 Florida 2 
New Jersey X Hartford X 
Edmonton K Dallas 4. 

Pittsburgh X Aixmehn 2 
Detroit X Chicago 2 


The AP Top 25 


Hardees Classic 


The Top Twenty Fhm mms In The Associ- 
ated Frees college football poll, wtih first- 
place vetes In parentheses, recants through 
Seat. M, total points based an 33 points for a 
Bret Place vote mrwpfi one point for a 2Jffi 
Ptaoe vote, and ranking In the previous pen: 


Final leading seem and earnings Sunday 
el the 01 million Hardees Classic on hmUN- 
yard, par-70 Oafcwoad Country art coarse In 
Coal Valley HDneU: 

Mark McCumber, $18X000 6*474547—245 
Kenny Perry, S1DM00 67464548-266 
David FreiL *5X000 68474745-267 


FOOTBALL 

National Football League 
PHILADELPHIA— Stoned Tom McHota. 
oftemlvB lineman, to 1-vear contract 
HOCKEY 

Haltoaal Hockey League 
DALLAS A ssig n ed Zac Bam. tan wing; 
Math Lawrence, right whig; and Mike Tor- 
Cilia, geottender. fa Kalamazoo. IHL. 





Surprise Drug Tests 
For Chinese Runners 


Reuters 


BEUING — International athletics officials surprised Chi- 
na’s women runners with unannounced drug tests on Monday. 

Coach Ma Junren took the unexpected screening in stride,' 
saying during the procedure in a Beijing hotel room that his 
star runners’ performances were enhanced only by arduous 
training and a nutritious diet 
“The use of performance-enhancing drugs is immoral," Ma 
said. “Those who do so will be scrapped by sports history. 
Attaining improvement in athletics can only rely on science 
and technology and proper, goal-oriented training.” 

A showman who feeds turtles' blood to his runners and 
finances the team with a secret-formula sports elixir. >Ma 


asked the world champions Wang Junxiaand Qu Yunxi^lo 


Dmuinique FjgcWAgc 

A Hiroshima resident biking past a poster for the Asian Games, which begin Sunday. 


strip to their underwear to display the delicacy of tin 
— citing this as proof that neither was on steroids/ > 

Ma said Wang, world champion in the J Q.000. metexs^and 
Qu, world 3,000-meter champion, would travel to Japan next 
week for the Asian Games in Hiroshima, along with Zhang 
Linli, Zhang Lirong, Liu Ii and four other teammates. 

He said he knew of no plans byChim t<j, boycott the #pian 
Games in a dispute over Japan's granting of a visa tb.‘a.senior 
Taiwan political official . . 

Ma predicted that Wang would win die 10,000 meter&and 
Qu the 1,500 and 800 meters and that Chinese women would 
take gold and silver in most events. But he did not predict 
world-record times. - 

Ma's five stars were all tested on Monday with less than 
four hours’ notice, although China's State Sports Commission 
knew on Friday that some athletes would be tested. Alfnad 
run 24 kilometers at dawn and none had eaten before the test. 
• Goran Svcdsater, the International Amateur Athleticfed- 
eration official who collected their urine for analysis in Oslo, 
said the surprise check was part of a world crackdown 
involving random testing outride major meetings. 

“We started this program of off -competition testing in 1989 
and it's been accelerated in the last two years,” he said 
"We're testing only the best — the top world performers.” 

Svedsater said similar surprise tests on the runners trained 
by Ma and other top Chinese athletes in January and March 
found no doping violations. 


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CALVIN AND HOBBES 


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every Saturday 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1994 


Page 19 




SPORTS 




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Fixing Baseball: 

2 Macro Options 

Mess Is Bigger Than the Salary Cap 

By Peter Passeil 

tew Kwfc T?«ej Service 

N EW YORK — With baseball junkies suffering from 
Wortd Series withdrawal. Congress is in a mood to make 
the club owners share their pain. At the very least, there will 
be bl concerted effort in coming weeks to strip the owners of 
their antitrust protection, which in turn would eliminate their 
right to cap salaries without the players 1 consent. 

But some wonder whether it is time to think bigger — to 
reorganize major league baseball in a way that puts the fans' 
interests first. And economists are happy to rush in where 
tradi don-bound commentators fear to tread. 

Two approaches are especially provocative: 

PLAYING THE NCAA WAY: Major league baseball Is 
confined to 28 cities (when it is bong played at all). Why not 
38 or 48? Because the owners of the existing franchises make 
\ the decisions, and have every reason to believe that expansion 
9 does not pay: local revenues from increasing league size 
would not offset the dilution of national television n&hts. 

Indeed, the $90 million franchise fee charged to the latest 
applicants was explicitly intended to compensate for the bite 
into of broadcast revenues. 

That arrangement suits George Daly, dean of the Stem 
School of Business at New York University, who thinks the 
owners’ interest in keeping baseball small coincides with the 
public interest 

In an era of television, he suggests, fans can as easily grow 
attached to teams whose stadiums are 1,000 miles (1,600 
kilometers) away as those 100 miles away. 

“For all 1 know,” he said, “baseball is too big” in the s ease 
that fewer dubs playing with the best athletes could generate 
as much pleasure for the public. 

But that is not how Roger Noll, an economist at Stanford 
University and consultant to the players association, sees it 
The logic of free markets puts the burden on those who would 
restrict entry to as indostry. 

A ND IN Noll's view, the most practical way to let the 
market decide how marry teams play in the majors would 
be to break baseball into a half-dozen smaller (perhaps 
regional) leagues and let them negotiate playoffs for a nation- 
al title. 

Weakening the leagues would reduce the financial barriers 
to starting yet more leagues or reorganizing existing ones. 
Baseball, Noll hopes, would then evolve into a system similar 
to college basketball, with teams operating with lower costs in 
dozens of smaller markets. 

The catch, argues Gerald Scully, an economist at the 
University of Texas at Dallas, is that fans would trade 
“quality for quantity.” After all. he notes, “you can’t replicate 
500 Barry Bonds.” 

But he does concede the attraction of the Noll vision. 




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Baseball would, in a sense, return to its roots, with much 
lower salaries, more dependence on local fan loyalty and 
stranger intercity rivalries. 

And the likely dilution in the quality of play might para- 
doxically increase interest in the game. 

The best of college basketball and football are no less 
exciting than their pro counterparts, at least in part because 
ordinary mortals are occasionally inspired to play beyond 
their capacities. 

THE EUROPEAN OPTION: Remodeling the profession- 
al game after the NCAA may seem a bridge too far for 
traditionalists. But Philip K. Porter, an economist at the 
University of South Honda, offers an alternative that seems 
far less disruptive, though no less revolutionary in impact 

In Europe, be notes, professional soccer dubs compete in 
several divisions, much the way baseball is divided into the 
major and minor leagues. There is one gigantic difference, 
though: Whole teams, rather than players, switch leagues 
when they excel or fa£L Specifically, an A division team must 
trade (daces with the best of the B division when it finish es at 
the bottom of its division standings. 

Think of the implications: Fust and foremost, baseball- 
crazed dries would no longer be at the mercy of dub owners. 
If the professional team in, say, Tampa invested enough in 
players and management, it would probably get a crack at 
joining the big leagues. 

Only slightly less important, incompetent or cynical owners 
would no longer be secure. 

“Only the best-managed teams could stay at the top, 
Porter said. 

Major league baseball would thus become a truly national 
pjimgj one in which any city able to support the costs of a big 
league team would have a crack at iL By the same token, 
though, there would be no tendency to dilute player quality. 

And even the fans of teams that could not aspire to major 
league performance would be better off since they would 
catch the excitement of competition with other minor league 
dubs still an the way up. , . 

Is any of this possible? Not if Washington leaves it to 
professional baseball to dean up its own mess. But if the fans 
—and thus Congress — are angry enough, the legal leverage 
is there to reshape the game. 


For the Fallen World Champ , This Belt Is a Steal 


fniemanonoJ Herakf Tribune 

P ARIS — *Tm here to report a 
robbery." 

“Name please, last name first.” 
“Lewis. Lennox Lewis. Maybe 
you’ve heard of me.” 

“Can’t say that I have, Mr. Lewis. 
Occupation?" 

“I’m the heavyweight champion of 
the world.” 

"Been at this job how long?" 
"Actually, I stopped being heavy- 
weight 1_ 

champion 
of the world 

Sunday Thomsen 
morning 




around 2 o’clock. That's what I'm here 
about, to file a complaint I was totally 
robbed” 

** 'Unemployed' then.” 

“No, no, don’t put that Put: 'Rising 
challenger, down hut not out, back on 
his feet and the world better watch 
out/ " 

“‘Between jobs.’” 

“Sure, write that. While you’re aL it, 
write the name of the thief who robbed 
me. King. Don King. FL spell it for 
you: K-I-N. . ” 


“"Property first, Mr. Lewis. Please 
describe all items reported as missing." 

“Don King took my belt/' 

“One belt . . .” 

“Not one belt. I’m talking about the 
belt. He’s made a career out of stealing 
them," 

“You’d think he’d do better hot- 
wiring cars." 

“This isn’t a belt you wear to match 
your shoes and keep your pants up. 
Picture a belt as wide as a cummer- 
bund, loaded with all kinds of exotic- 
looking jewels. That’s the World Box- 
ing Council heavyweight 
championship belt You don’t wear 
this bdt — you own iL You nib it and 
it becomes Aladdin's lamp fox you. 1 
bet I’ve made something like $30 mil- 
lion off that bell. 1 fought my way up 
proper — J earned that belt, I owned 
that belt and I'm not about to let Don 
King off and steal iL" 

“So you insist on filing a report.” 

"Damn right” 

“When and how did you gun pos- 
session of said belt?^ 

“I found it in a trash bin.” 

“Just ru mmag ing, were we?*’ 

“No, we weren’t just rummaging. At 


the time I was the No. 1 challenger to 
Riddick Bowe. The WBC said he had 
to fight me but he was too scared. I 
guess, so he threw the WBC belt in the 
trash and I claimed it” 

“Must bring a tear to your eye.” 

“I was the first British' heavyweight 
champion of this century." 

“That's quite a feat for someone 
who doesn’t sound British.” 

“I was Canadian when 1 won the 
gold medal in the 1988 Olympics, and 
then I was training in the States a lot of 
the lime.” 

“I'm afraid I must ask to see your 
papers." 

“What are you on about? 1 was born 
in East London, spent my first 12 years 
there. I came back because Britain 
needed a champion. I’ve made a good 
name for myself here.” 

“Forgive me for having wasted the 
taxpayers' money on minor questions 
of immigration, while belts axe being 
stolen left and right” 

“Here’s how it was this weekend. I 
signed on for a nice hide fight against 
an American, to help build up my 
name over there and put me in position 
for the big payday when Mike Tyson 


gets out of jail. There wasn’t supposed 
to be any sort of threaL Just put in a 
short appearance for the British pub- 
lic, and at the same time start the light 
at 1 :30 AM. in London in order to dip 
our beaks with the American TV audi- 
ence. So who does Don King send over 
to fight me but some thug he’s worked 
up to a frenzy named Oliver McCall. 
What kind of respect is that to show to 
the heavyweight champion of the 
world? So 1 missed with a right, thug 
lands me a lucky punch on the jaw, I go 
down for a few seconds and when I’ve 
come back up Don King’s run off with 
my belL” 

“He is in possession of it now?” 

“He has access to it somewhere in 
America. He's wanted this bdt ever 
since Busier Douglas won it off of 
Tyson in a knockout four years ago. 
Within hours of that fight. King was 
working with the WBC to try to steal 
the title back from Douglas. He's a 
promoter, sure, but the whole world 
knows he has the WBC in his pocket. 
He couldn’t steal it from Buster but 
now he's stolen it from me. That was a 
WBC referee in the ring, but it might 
as well have been Don King himself. 


As soon as I went down in the second 
round, that was it — the fight was 
stopped and I wasn't going to get a 
champion’s opportunity to fight 
back.” 

“But you admitted to never haring 
beaten a champion yourself.” 

“Thai’s the beauty of boxing. There 
are no champions, not really, so long 
as Tyson's in jail. That belt was my 
franchise for when the big money 
came. Now King is going to hold a 
monopoly on Tyson’s first fight for the 
title. 1 know people are saying it’s my 
own fault, I had a lousy trainer, I never 
worked to improve my game. They 
don't understand the business I'm in. 
Now what do I do? My multi-fight TV 
deals are all shot to hell. I've got my 
biography in the bookstores without a 
world title to back it up.” 

“I can tell you it’s not worth filing a 
report in this case, but 1 can offer you 
two possibilities. You can retire with 
your winnings." 

“I’m only 29." 

“In that case, I suggest you take the 
advice of our prime minister: bade to 
basics. You can start by helping me 
with the trash." 


Chargers Edge Raiders, 26-24, Extending Record of Perfection 


The Associ a ted Press 

Four weeks into the NFL 
season, the San Diego Chargers 
are the league's biggest suxprise 
— and its best team. 

With a 26-24 victory over the 
Los Angeles Raiders on Sun- 
day. the Chargers are off to 
their best start since 1980, the 
year they finished 11-5 and 

NFL ROUNDUP 

went to the American Football 
Conference championship 
game. The only time San Diego 
has started better than 4-0 was 
way bade in 1961. when it won 
its first 11 games as part of the 
American Football League. 

But the Chargers aren't put- 
ting any pressure on them- 
selves. or looking to silence 
doubters. 

"In this league, 1 take it one 
day at a time,” said Coach Bob- 
by Ross. “That's all I can do 
and that’s all I will do.” 

The Chargers remained one 
of only two unbeaten teams — 
the other is the Giants (3-0) — 
partly through the determina- 
tion of the quarterback Stan 
Humphries. 

Even after throwing an inter- 
ception that the Raiders (1-3) 
returned for the lead and hurting 
his knee on the play, Humphries 
wasn’t done. Against the coach- 
es’ wishes, he limped back onto 
the field and led the Chargers on 
a 65-yard drive, capped by John 
Camel’s 33-yard field goal with 
two seconds lefL 

terwaixHhat his knee was sore. 

“I felt it pop, but I tried to 
walk it off ” he said. *T purpose- 
ly stayed away from the trainers 
to try and take care of it myself. 

1 gave up the TD to put them 
ahead, so there was no way 1 
was staying ouL” 

Bears 19, Jets 7: In East 
Rutherford, New Jersey, Lewis 
Tillman scored two touch- 
downs and gained 96 yards on 
32 carries for Chicago (2-2). 

Not even a team-record 90- 
yard run by Johnny Johnson 
could help the Jets (2-2), who 
lost two fumbles, missed two 
field goals and saw Quarter- 
back Boomer Esiason sidelined 
with a sprained ankle after be- 
ing sacked in the third quarter. 

49exs 24, Saints 13: In San 
Francisco, Deion Sanders made 
his first start for the 49ers (3-1) 



Juhn C. Mutungln/Agmar FranccKrc-w 

San Francisco's Delon Sanders lungjng for a pass Intended for Torrance Small of the Saints. Sanders, making Ms first 
start for the 49ers, missed the interception but returned another one 74 yards for a touchdown to secure a 24-0 victory. 


and returned an interception 74 
yards for a touchdown with 32 
seconds left to kill a potential 
winning drive by the Saints. 

Steve Young, playing behind 
an injuiy-derimaied offensive 
line, was sacked five times but 
managed two touchdown 
passes to Jerry Rice. 

New Orleans (1-3) led 13-10 
at halftime, turning a botched 
punt into a touchdown drive 
and a Young interception into a 
field goal. 

Seahawks 30, Steelers 13: In 
Seattle, Pittsburgh's Neil 
O’Donnell was intercepted four 
times, three times in the final 
quarto'. 

Chris Warren rushed for 126 
yards and a touchdown for Se- 
attle (3- IX outperforming Pitts- 
burgh's Barry Foster, who got 
96 yards on 21 carries. The 
Steelers (2-2) lost despite a 452- 
297 advantage in total yards. 

Oilers 20, Bengab 13: In 
Houston, Gary Biown scored 
two touchdowns for the Oilers 
(1-3). But the offense continued 
to struggle, even though Cody 
Carlson was back at quarter 


back after separating his shoul- 
der in the season opener. 

David Klingler was sacked 
seven times and threw three in- 
terceptions as the Bengals re- 
mained the NFL’s only winJess 
team. 

Patriots 23, Lions 17: In Pon- 
tiac, Michigan, Drew Bledsoe 
completed 21 of 33 passes for 
251 yards and one touchdown, 
and the Patriots (2-2) benefited 
from two late interceptions. 

Maurice Hurst picked off 
Scott Mitchell late in the third 


quarter, and Myron Guyton in- 
tercepted him again just before 
the two- minute warning. 

Barry Sanders ran for touch- 
downs of 35 and 39 yards for 
the Lions (2-2). 

In earlier games, reported 
Monday in some editions of the 
Herald Tribune: 

Rams 16. Chiefs 0: In Kansas 
City, Missouri, the Chiefs (3-1) 
were shut out at home Tor the 
first time since 1985, when the 
Rams blanked them. 

Never before in Joe Mon- 


tana’s 15-year career had his 
team been shut out, but Mon- 
tana had a touch of flu. He 
threw three interceptions and 
was 18-of-37 for 175 yards. 

Jerome Beilis had his third 
straight 100-yard game, getting 
132 yards on 35 carries for the 
Rams (2-2). 

Vikings 38, Dolphins 35: In 
Minneapolis, Minnesota blew a 
28-point lead, allowing Miami 
(3-1) to tie it before 'Warren 
Moon led a 70-yard scoring 
drive, capped by Scottie Gra- 


ham’s 3-yard run with 7:25 to 
play. 

Moon had his best game 
since joining the Vikings (3-1). 
He completed 26 of 37 passes 
for 326 yards, including three 
TD passes to Cris Carter. 

Browns 21, Colts 14: In Indi- 
anapolis, Vinny Testaverde, the 
lowest-rated quarterback in the 
AFC, threw for three touch- 
downs. including a 57-yarder to 
Eric Metcalf and a 65-yarder to 
Leroy Hoard. 

The Browns (3-1) led 14-7 at 
halftime after Metcalf s second 
TD reception, a 15-yarder. In- 
dianapolis (!-3) tied the game 
on a 13-yard TD catch by Roo- 
sevelt Potts in the third quarter, 
but the Browns needed only 
two plays for the go-ahead 
score early in the final period. 

Falcons 27, Redskins 20: In 
Washington, the Falcons capi- 
talized on two interceptions 
and a fumble by Quarterback 
John Friesz. to score 20 straight 
points in the second half. 

Rookie Heath Shuler led 
Washington (1-3) to a touch- 
down in the fourth quarter, but 
his last-ditch bomb was picked 
off with one second left and At- 
lanta (2-2) won for the first time 
in 1 1 attempts at RFK Stadium. 

Packets 30, Buccaneers 3: In 
Green Bay, Wisconsin, Brett 
Favre was 30 of 39 for 306 yards 
and three TDs and Chris Jacke 
kicked three field goals for 
Green Bay (2-2). The Bucs fell 
to 1-3. 

Michael Husted’s 24-yard 
field goal in the third quarter 
made it 16-3, but Favre threw 
TD passes of 20 yards to Ed 
West and 3 yards to Sterling 
Sharpe to finish the scoring. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS- - 

i "Amo. — — . * 
leva a lass' 
s Rowing craw 
io Nickname for 
Barbara 


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water 

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and Old Lace’ 

2 a Goes out. in a 
card game 

24 Millet sub(ect 
28 Ships’ cranes 
20 Pipe type 
ae Pisces’s 
follower 

so Use the 

Osterizer 

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24 Shaw classic 
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38 — my easel" 

30 Mongolia 

40 is the wonywart 

41 Olympics 
ceremony song 

42 Peruvian pack 
animals 

48 O.T. book 
4 « Scale's reading 
47 He-man's 
display 
si Sham 

52 Vincent Price 
classic 

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57 For fear chat 
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times 

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DOWN 

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2 lea cream treat 

3 Cruising 

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stories'’ 

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Fro me 


a Jeremy of stage 
and screen 

7 Pain In the joints 

a Altitudes: Abbr. 
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10 Market 

11 Decorate 

12 Hardly a show 
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13 Villain's look 
is Opposite of a 

puif 

22 Boss of bosses 
24 Adjective lor 
Alexander 

2SDrt8‘ 

counterparts, in 
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26 Neighborhood 

27 Pharmacist's 
container 

2a *God * 

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response) 

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»i The Bambino 

32 words of 

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33 Seed 

as Whispers 
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contest 

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41 Immigrant's 

giveaway 

42 Dire 

43 Rent 

as Tot) roads 
49 Artist's stand 
47 Conductor 

Fticeardo 
4a Take a swipe at 
4* Earn 

W Clumsy ones? 

53— -bran 



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© New York Times/ Edaed by Will Shorts. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1994 


Yeme’s Bleak but Uncanny Vision o 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

P ARIS — The year was 1863, and Jules 
Verne decided to take a break from writing 
popular adventure tales to try his hand at 
prophecy. 

He pared a century into the future and saw 
the streets of Paris jammed with automobiles. 
He also envisioned mass transit systems, the 
electric chair, even the fax machine. Yet his 
glimpse of the modem world was bleak and 
morose, depicting a society run by bureaucrats 
and philistines who trample classical culture in 
their frenzied pursuit erf money, technology 
and power. 

Verne’s publisher. Pierre-Jules Hetzd, took 

one look at “Paris in the 

20th Century” and ad- 
vised the 35-year-old au- 
thor to scrap iL “You 
took on an impossible 
rank, and you did not 
pull it off. Nobody will 
ever believe your proph- 
ecies.” 

Dutifully, Verne 

turned his attention 
back to concocting the fantastic adventures at 
which he excelled. He went on to write more 
than 60 novels, including such classics as 
“Around the World in 80 Days” and “20,000 
Leagues Under the Sea,” conjuring with his 
ferule imagination such marvels as moon trtvd 
and submarine explorations. But he never 
bothered to resurrect his futuristic novel about 
the heroic poet Michel, who becomes a home- 
less vagabond after a fruitless odyssey in search 
of an enlightened society. 

The unpublished novel was consigned to a 
one-ton safe by Verne’s son Michel and histo- 
rians assumed it was destroyed during World 
War II. When Verne’s great-grandson Jean put 
the family house in Toulon up for sale in 1 98 9, 
he did not know what to do with the heavy 
strongbox. “No one wanted iL Everyone 
thought it was empty and useless. It was locked 
and the key had bon lost,” be told the Paris 
daily Infomatin. 

Nonetheless, Jean Verne summoned a lock- 
smith who took nearly three hours to force 
open the safe. Inside, they discovered several 
letters, a notebook and a dusty manuscript 
bearing Verne’s neat penmanship and Hetzei’s 
damning comments on the margin. The text 
was quickly verified by Verne specialists; after 
a long bidding war, Hachette/Le Cherche Midi 
published the novel last week under Verne’s 
original title — 131 years after it was written. 
The mystery opus offers astonishing testimo- 


His society is run by 
bureaucrats who trample 
classical culture in their 
frenzied pursuit of money. 


ny to Verne’s uncanny prescience about the 
evolution of science and technology in the 
modern world. And while Verne’s portrait of 
Paris in 1963 may not have been entirely accu- 
rate; it was close enough to put the lie to his 
publisher's criticism. 

A quarter century before the advent of the 
automobile, Verne describes in detail how Paris 
became choked with traffic jams. “Of the innu- 
merable vehicles that wound their way along 
the boulevards, the vast number operated with- 
out horses. An invisible force with a gas- 
powered motor made them move. ft was simple 
and easy to handle. The driver, sitting on a seat, 
used a steering wheel and a pedal at his feet to 
change the speed of the vehicle instantly ” 
^ He wrote of an elevat- 
~ ed mass transit system 

powered by compressed 
air and ru nning auto- 
matically along tracks, 
similar to monorails now 
in service, that would 
ferry a thousand passen- 
gers every 10 minutes. 

He also mentions a 150- 

meter 1500-foot) light- 
house dominating the skyline of Paris, erected 
in the area where the Eiffel Tower was later 
builL 

Verne predicted, much to his own horror, the 
creation of the electric chair that subsequently 
was invented in the United States 25 years 
later. “What a sinister sight!” he wrote. “Sing- 
ing workers were already building the {execu- 
tioner's] platform. Michel wanted to avoid the 
site, but he bumped into an open crate. As he 
stood up, he saw an electric generator. And he 
understood. People were no longer bang be- 
headed. They were being electrocuted. It came 
closer to divine retribution.” 

He even imagined the fax and the telephone 
becoming everyday communication tools. 
“Photo-telegraphy allowed any writing, signa- 
ture or illustration to be sent far away, and any 
contract could be signed and exchanged” over 
a distance up to 19,000 kilometers (12.000 
miles). 

Despite such wondrous inventions, Verne’s 
hero Michel becomes dejected over a society in 
which much of the population is addicted to 
technology, heavily indebted to huge corpora- 
tions and no longer interested in the classical 
achievements_of the past. 

Michel wanders among bookstores looking 
in vain for the works of that “unknown” writer, 
Victor Hugo. He ultimately concludes that “the 
beautiful French language is lost” and, fore- 


Jules Vane’s long-lost prophetic novel has just been published. 


shadowing today’s cultural wars, he laments 
the fact that scientists and other professionals 
“have thrown themselves to the foreigner . . . 
and drawn their most unpleasant tales from 
English.” 

In the end, Michel and his fellow writers can 
no longer find work and wind up in a daily 
struggle just to feed and clothe themselves. It is 
a futuristic Orwellian nightmare that scholars 
say makes his missing novel all the more im- 


•£ -vf j&hv 

■ "r-iv:- 

pressivc: For not only did Verne predict 
feats of modern technology, but/ho-also dis- 
cerned some of the most frightening come* 
quences. 

“Verne saw the 20th century asi& ratESr 
pessimistic place,” says Piero Gotu&Jo BeJjit 
Riva, a specialist who runs a private -museum 
filled with Verne artifacts. “He simply figured 
that poetry and books would have a Jiara-tp&e 
coexisting with science and machines.”. £ 

s 


Page 20 


ART BUCHWALD 


Let’s Make a Deal 


Buchwald 


W ASHINGTON — The 
two questions that the 
American people have at this 
time are; “Does the United 
States have a foreign policy?" 
And if so, “What is itr 
The answer is, “Of course, we 
have a policy. How else could we 
have humiliated such major 
powers as Pan- 
ama, Somalia, 

Iraq and Hai- 
ti?” 

Ever since 
the Soviet 
Union went 
down the tube, 
the United 
States has 
turned its at- 
tention to oth- 
er totalitarian 
regimes around the world to 
dramatize the fact that we will 
not be pushed around — no 
matter what the cost. 

Our policy requires top plan- 
ning, careful examination of all 
our options and a former presi- 
dent of the United States to per- 
suade Third World despots that 
this country means business. 

□ 

This is how it goes. Every so 
often the United States decides 
to show everyone that it sup- 
ports democratic forms of gov- 
ernment even if they aren't ex- 
actly what we had in mind. 

Once every armored division, 
aircraft carrier and fighter is in 
place, the president goes on TV 
and tells the dictators that they 
are finished and we will no long- 
er allow them to make fools of 
us. 

The president dispatches an 
ex-President to make sure that 
the message is loud and clear. 

“General, I speak on behalf 
of the president of the United 
States. We want you to relin- 
quish power immediately and 
get out of the country so that 
your legally elected president 
can take over the palace.” 

“I can’t leave now. My wife is 
having a cocktail party for the 
first families of our nation.” 


“Why didn’t you say that in 
the fust place? How about you 
and the other two generals leav- 
ing next week?” 

“That’s impossible. We’re all 
scheduled to go oo the Today 
Show* next Thursday.” 

“Well how about some time 
this month?” 

“It would be very inconve- 
nient because we had plans to 
beat up all the opposition poli- 
ticians with baseball bats this 
month. Hunting them down is 
not going to be easy." 

O 

“General you have a lovely 
wife and she is very beautiful I 
personally lust in my heart for 
beautiful women. But this 
doesn’t mean that we can per- 
mit you to continue doing all 
the bad deeds you have been 
ooied for in the past. I must 
insist that you resign before 

Thank sgiving or at the latest 

Christmas.” 

“Does this mean that I have 
to give up my country chalet, 
my yacht and my private 
plane?” 

“We didn’t say that You can 
remain in the country and drive 
your Maserati around any place 
that you want to.” 

“I think that President Clin- 
ton owes an the military an 
apology. He has accused us of 
terrible human rights’ viola- 
tions. We have feelings, too.” 

“I’ll talk to him as soon as 1 
get a chance. I find you a very 
reasonable person, surrounded 
by some of the most attractive 
women I’ve seen in all my years 
of peace negotiating. I will re- 
turn to the United States and 
report that you are a man of 
honor and will keep your word 
and resign by the first of the 
year.” 

“Thank you, Mr. President 
If you’ll excuse me, I have some 
mopping up to do.” 

“Are you going to continue 
to mop up civilians?” 

“I have no choice since you 
promised me amnesty.” 


WEATHER 


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The Great Lakes in rough 
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weather late this week. 
Heavy rains vrtH move away 
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Wednesday. Sunny, warm 
weather uriD prevail hem Sat 
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London through Paris will 
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late this week. Southern 
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and cool Athens and Istan- 
bul will ba sunny and warm 
lata this week. The Alps w* 
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Asia 

Northeast China will have 
cool weather lata this weak, 
while Shanghai Is dry end 
seasonable. Hong Kong 
through Manila will have 
mainly dry. warm weather. 
Typhoon Orchid may bring 
kxaRy heavy rains to Japan 
later this week with gusty 
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4/39 


17*2 

8/46 s 

McvWrt 

20*8 

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eh 

17/62 

7/44 Vi 

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31*8 

2475 

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32/69 

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2170 

16*1 

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2170 

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fmotaw 

39/102 2473 

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2170 

14*7 


2373 

14*7 pc 

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2373 

12*53 

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2271 

13/55 pc 

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19/88 

9/48 

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17*2 

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24.75 

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14*7 pc 


A CTRESS Meryl Streep’s feet and 
hands have joined impressions of A! 
Jolson’s knee, Jimmy Durante's nose and 
Betty GraUe's leg in the courtyard of 
Mann’s Chinese Theater on Hollywood 
Boulevard. Those impressions aside, the 
Academy Award-winning actress says 
-what has really impressed hex children is 
her role as the voice of Bari’s new girl- 
friend in “The Simpsons.” “It’s given me 
more credibility in my home than anything 
I've ever done.” Streep said. 

□ 

Rumors that the Duchess of York is 
patching up her marriage to Prince Andrew 
were dismissed as “wishful thinking” by 
British tabloids on Monday. The Daily 
Express quoted a senior courtier as saying 
lawyers had drawn up a divorce blueprint 
under which “Fergie” would forfeit the 
title Her Royal Highness. The furor started 
when the duchess’s father. Major Ronald 
Ferguson, suggested in the Daily Mail that 
she might beheading for a reconciliation 
with Andrew. In excerpts from his autobi- 
ography, “The Galloping Major,” which 
he has sold to the Mail be suggested his 
daughter would love to return to Andrew, 
but feared the prince would not stand up 



Meryl Streep getting handprinted. 


for her against the “back-biting toadies” at 
the court of Queen Elizabeth H. . . . 
The queen’s youngest son. Prince Edward, 


documentary his production company. 
The Theatre Division, is developing on ih/ 
Commonwealth countries for Australia 
television. 

□ 

Supennodd Christie Brinkley says her 
divorce from BiHy Joel was a long time 
corning but if she had it to do all over 
again, she would many him “because I was 
following my heart,” she explained in TV 
Guide. 

□ 

It was a stroll down memory lane and 
across London’s Abbey Road pedestrian 
crossing for Beatles fans on Monday on 
the 25th anniv ersary of the band's “Abbev 
Road” album. Tbc studios where the af- 
bum was recorded mounted a commemo- 
rative exhibition to mark the record’s 
launch but not all the fans in attendance 
were pleased with the event. “I don’t agree 
with iL If s too commercial” said 45-year- 
old Alan Harrington. 

□ 

The Australian-born actress Nicole Kid- ; 
man (she's married to Tom Crmse) has 


interviewed President Nelson Mandela of been appointed UNICEF’s goodwill ama- 
South Africa in Johannesburg as part of a bassador in Australia. 


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