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INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Dafly Newspaper 


Paris, Wedaesday, April 2, 1997 





Anger as Orphans Go 

Germany Returns Children to Saraj 


.f 'I 


By Alan Cowell ■ 

Nr» York Tunes Service 


. j BONN — Hugging stuffed anhnwic 
pillows for comfort, a group 
ot 30 Bosnian orphans was sent back 
° om e Tuesday, five years after the chil- 
men were plucked from Sarajevo’s 
ae B e i^ t l er from snipers who shot 
and killed two infants fleeing with 
■them. 

crWhile the special flight from Berlin 
Schoenefeld airport was not a formal 
expul sion, the children’s departure 
sarred anger and sadness among Ger- 
mans who had tended them in three 
orphanages. 

It also played into a building dispute 
here among politicians over the 
avow ed intention of immigration au- 
thorities to forcibly deport tens of thou- 
sands of Bosnian Muslim refugees 
whose homes now lie in Bosnian Serb- 
controlled territories. 

The children’s odyssey from war to 
peace and back to a broken, divided 
land has been dogged at each step with 
contentiousness. Now aged between 5 
and 12, the children arrived in Sarajevo 


evo 


an Tuesday afternoon and were re- 
turned to the city’s Ljubica Ivezic 
orphanage, which they had left in Au- 
gust 1992. 

The two state legislators from Sax- 
ony- Anhalt in the former East Ger- 
many who organized the resrae in 1992 
were accused of publicity-seeking, 
recklessness and irresponsibility, and 
those who arranged their return Tues- 
day were assailed by one of die same 
legislators as heartless: ' 

“This is a scandal,” said Kaisten 
Knolle, a member of the state leg- 
islature in Saxony- Anhalt said. “They 
should have sent die adults home first, - 
not the children.” Workers from die 
German orphanages where the children 
grew up brushed away tears as they 
delivered their charges to the airport. 

State officials insisted, however, that 
the children’s guardians in Sarajevo 
bad repeatedly pressed for the children 
to return home. A previous attempt to 
repatriate them in October was halted 
at short notice because Bosnia seemed 
to German officials to have few fa- 

See ORPHANS, Page 8 



{toad LmaaThe Auorwn] Pres, 

Children who were evacuated from Bosnia in 1992 arriving at Sarajevo’s airport Tuesday. The 30 orphans, 
who range in age from 5 to 12, had stayed in the German state of Saxony- An halt for nearly five years. 




.* 


Zaire Rebel 
Draws Veil 
On His Past 

Ex-Marxist Says Little 
Of Plans for Nation 

By James C. McKinley Jr. 

New York Timer Service 

KISANGANI, Zaire — Laurent Kab- 
ila raised his hands above his bead in a 
gesture of victory and surveyed , the 
crowd of 5,000 people -who had 
crammed into a stadium to hear hfru 
speak, most of them for die first time. 

He knew what they wanted Jo hear, 
and he delivered it. Before the two-hour 
address was finished; he had not only 
promised freedom arid democracy, but 
had also decreed that the price of fabric, 
electricity, water and beer would be cut 
in half. . ' 

“I want you to be totally free,” he 
said in Swahili at an emotional climax in 
the address, delivered a week after cap- 
turing Kisangani. Zaire’s third-Iargest 
city, in mid-March. “I don't want you to 
be a slave to anyone.” The crowd erup- 
ted in cheering and song. 

Since emerging from obscurity six 
mouths ago to bead a rebellion that has 
seized a sixth of this vast country, Mr. 
Kabila has proven himself an adept pop- 



Tokyo Rescue of 2 Banks 
Clouds System’s Future 

Classic Government Intervention Underlines 
Problems in Modernizing Financial Markets 


By Sheryl WuDunn 

New York. Tunes Scnirr 


■ju/Tbc Asfibcstfai Proa 


Mr. Kabila, who emerged from obscurity six months ago to head the 
rebellion against Marshal Mobutu, Is vague about his plans for Zaire. 


olist, a men who can tap the widespread 
anger in Zaire with its failed economy 
and its corrupt dictator, President 
MobumSese Seko. 

. But if Mr. Kabila has a knack for 
giving voice to the discontent of the 
average Zairian,he isfarmore coy about 
his own past and plans for the country. 
When be is asked about himself or his 
family, Mr. Kabila — a stout man with 
an easy, laugh — invariably changes the 
subject with a deep chuckle and a wave 
of the hand. Though he may well be- 
come the next president of Africa’s 
third-Iargest nation, be says he is not 
what is important in this conflict 
Mr. Kabila, who is 58, has a history of 
leading rebellions that is almost as old 


as independent Zaire. But he is shy to 
speak of his life as a leftist militant — in 
the 1970s his followers went as far as 
kidnapping American students to fi- 
nance his armed struggle. And he is 
especially touchy about the days when 
be fought side by side with Che Guevara 
and created a socialist ministate for his 
rebel followers in eastern Zaire. 

Although he says he has abandoned 
Marxism and now favors multiparty de- 
mocracy, his recent actions hint oth- 
erwise. He has banned political activity 
in rebel territory for the duration of the 
war and made it clear he will not share 
power with any of Zaire’s political 

See KABILA, Page 8 


TOKYO — In a move that vividly 
alters the financial landscape in Japan, 
the government announced plans Tues- 
day to, in effect, rescue two of the 
nation's 20 largest banks and have them 
withdraw from the international arena. 

The bailout of one bank, Nippon 
Credit Bank, and the rescue merger of 
another, Hokkaido Takushoku Bank, 
also underscore the difficulties that Ja- 
pan is facing in modernizing its finan- 
cial markets. The latest upheavals raise 
new questions about how long it will 
take for the government to shed its bu- 
reaucratic-leu banking system for a 
more market-driven one. 

While the banks are not household 
names outside Japan, they are huge by 
any standard. Nippon Credit has assets 
of 15.9 trillion yen ($129 billion), while 
Hokkaido Takushoku has 1 0.1 trillion 
yen in assets, for a combined total of 
$211 billion. (Citibank, for comparison, 
has $256 billion in assets.) Both banks 
are crippled by piles of bad loans, and so 
the plans announced Tuesday were not 
surprising. But they reflected the Fi- 
nance Ministry's much-criticized tra- 


ditional approach to dealing with trou- 
bled banks. 

“How they are dealing with the prob- 
lem is the worry,” said Alicia Ogawa. a 
banking analyst at Salomon Brothers 
Asia Ltd. “There are a lot of other 
models they could have followed. I 
think it’s a sign that they don’t have 
anything else up their sleeve.” 

As Japan inches toward its goal of 
remaking its markets to be as modem as 
those in New York and London by the 
end of the century, it is test cases like 
Nippon Credit and Hokkaido Tak- 
ushoku that illuminate how difficult the 
journey will be and how tricky it will be 
for the Finance Ministry to strike a 
balance between stability and progress. 
The Finance Ministry appears deter- 


DlgC 

could provoke a sudden credit shortage 
and set off a chain reaction in the fi- 
nancial system. Tuesday, it kept its 
promise that it would not allow any of 
the nation's largest banks to fail. It also 
said it never considered the option of an 
orderly bank closing. 

But it also compelled some of Japan's 
strongest banks to put up money and 

See BANKS, Page 4 


Markets Fall 
Worldwide, 
Alarmed by 
Wall Street 

Fear of Contagion 
Sets Off Heavy Losses 
In Europe and Asia 

By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — World stock markets 
racked up some of their worst losses in 
months Tuesday, shedding billions of 
dollars in share value, as equities 
plummeted in response to two days of 
heavy losses on Wall Street. 

The lock-step drops have once again 
battered the notion that major moves in 
the stock market should reflect eco- 
nomic conditions in individual coun- 
tries — the so-called fundamentals — 
and raised fresh fears about another 
prolonged bout of follow-ihe-leader, 
namely the U.S. market, as it enters a 
new and turbulent phase. 

“The economic fundamentals and SO 
pence will not buy you a bus ticket right 
now,” said Jan Loeys, bond strategist at 
JJP. Morgan. 

Share prices fell sharply in Frankfurt. 
Paris. Zurich. Hong Kong. Australia 
and other trading centers around the 
globe. 

In Germany, where the markets had 
been closed for four days for Easter, the 
DAX index quickly made up for lost 
time, making one of its biggest one-day 
plunges. It closed with a loss of 3.88 
percent Tuesday, at 3.295.93. 

That was slightly less than the 4.3 
percent plunge of the Dow Jones in- 
dustrial average on the two previous 
trading days — its worst two-day 
stumble since 1 990. 

The average fell further on Tuesday, 
although by a relatively mild margin, 
and was quoted with a drop of 21.91 
points at 6,561.57 in late trading. 

What worried investors in Europe 
and Asia was the idea that America's 
rising interest rates could prove con- 
tagious. 

That could finally bring down the 
curtain on more than two years during 
which monetary policies in many in- 
dustrialized countries were set with the 
goal of engineering growth. In the wake 
of the rate increase, many economists 
fear a more normal but far less nurturing 
interest-rate era for corporations. 

American investors had been reacting 
to a string of disappointing corporate 
profits reports and the prospect of more 
downgrades to come as both U.S. in- 
terest rates and the dollar edge higher. 

“The perception in global bond mar- 
kets is that the best is over,’ ' said Holger 

See MARKETS, Page 8 


Gingrich Now Less Bold 
On Defending Taiwan 


Cmpdrtt br Our Staff Fran DUfxsdta 

TAIPEI — Toning down his remark 
tiat the United States would defend 
aiwan if China attacked it, the speaker 
if the U.S. House, Newt Gingrich, said 
'uesday that Washington would stick to 
ts “one-China” policy. 

Mr. Gingrich's backpedaling followed 
riticism from China and an attempt by 
he Clinton administration to distance 
[self from his remarks, which were made 
i unday in Beijing. Mr. Gingrich arrived 
n Taiwan for a three-hour visit Tuesday 
iter a two-day trip to Tokyo. 

“We don’t need any foreigner maki- 
ng indiscreet remarks,” the Chinese 
: oreign Ministry’s spokesman s aid in 
earning Tuesday against U.S. interrer- 
nce in the Taiwan question. 

n i OiinM 



oicuuifur u**" f ~ 

en able to extract certain gains from 

“Basiafly, the Chinese Communists 
; trying to compete wife Taiwan m 
lining support from both fee House 
d Senate,’ ^said Chang 
ssor of political science at National 

liwan University. . 

“It was already a small victory for tne 
unland to have Gingrich come for a 

“Ws^^statemwiK were meant 
r Americans back home rather than 

[■.cross-strait governments. 


Mr. Gingrich told Wang Daohan. the 
last of four Chinese officials he met 
during the weekend and an adviser Co 
President Jiang Zemin, that the United 
States was committed to defending 
Taiwan if China attacked the island, 
which Beijing regards as an integral part 
of China. 

But noting that Chinese leaden had 
told him they would not resort to mil- 
itary force easily, Mr. Gingrich said 
Tuesday in Tokyo: “So, we wouldn’t 
have to defend.”. 

“Last year, we moved aircraft car- 
riers to Taiwan, but I think it was not 
sent in a provocative way,” he said at a 
meeting of the National Press Club of 
Japan 

Washington sent two aircraft c ar rier s 
to the region when -Beijing mounted 
whar it acknowledged were intimidat- 
ing war games in waters near Taiwan 
during the island's presidential election 
in Mach 1996. 

Mr. Gingrich also said, however, that 
Washington abided by the 1972 Shang- 

See GINGRICH, Page 8 



Em Draper, TI k Anxutnl Pie. 

WE ARE THE CHAMPIONS — An Arizona forward, Bennett Davison, 


AGENDA 

U.S. to Start Barring 
Imports of EU Meat 

The United States will start to block 
imports of meat from the European 
Union, after an EU deadline passed for 
agreement on meat-trade inspection 
standards, the U.S. secretary of agri- 
culture, ban Glickman. said Tuesday. 

An adviser to Mr. Glickman said 
that about $300 million in EU meat 
products, mostly hams from Denmark, 
would be affected and that the Union 
was expected to retaliate by blocking 
U.S. egg, dairy and poultry products 
worth about $200 million. 

Gerry Kiely. agriculture spokesman 
for the European Commission, said he 
did not know how the commission 
would respond to the U.S. move. Talks 
between die two sides on inspection 
standards have been going on for more 
than 10 years. Page 1 1. 


I The Dollar [ 

NwVort 

Tuesday 0 3 P.tA. 

previous dose 

DM 

1.6645 

1.6759 

Pound 

1.6546 

1.638 

Yen 

121.535 

123.765 

FF 

5.606 

5.639 

\ EpjiT? The Dow 1 

mm 

Tuesday 3 PM. 

jmovIixk dose 

-21.91 

6561.57 

6583.48 

S&P 500 1 

change 

Tuesday O 3 P.M. 

previous dose 

-2.33 

754.79 

757.12 


Wildcats for the NCAA national championship in Indianapolis. Page 18. 

Books 

Page 4. 

RAGE TWO 

ASIA/PACIFIC Page 4. 


Pages 6-7. 

TV Soaps: Ireland's Own Drama 

Pakistani President's Powers Curbed 

Sports 

Pages 18-19. 

THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

EUROPE Pages. 

International Classified Page IS A 17. 

Bomb Trial Jury Selection Difficult 

hah Presses Ahead on Albania forte 

H The IHT on-line 

http://vAvw.iht.com J 


2 Bomb Attacks 
In the Gaza Strip 

Two Palestinians blew themselves 
up on Tuesday outside Jewish settle- 
ments in the Gaza Strip, and two Pal- 
estinians were killed by troops in the 
West Bank, the Israeli Army said. 

Only the bombers were killed in the 
Gaza attacks, one of which appeared 
timed to coincide with normal travel 
rimes for buses taking the children of 
Jewish settlers to school. 

President Bill Clinton, meanwhile, 
said that Israel and the Palestinians had 
to restore an environment of security 
and confidence to revive the peace 
process and that he had “some ideas” 
on how to do this. Page 8. 


In Comet, Astronomers Find a Mine of Clues to the Origin of Life 


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f Coast. 1250CfA ^OOODMi 


By William J". Broad 

New York Tones Service 





NEW YORK — A trillion or so comets axe 
thought to lurk beyond the planets on the dark 
fringes of the solar system. But over recorded time, 
a few comm have left this deep freeze and sped 
into the inner solar system, at times lifting Earth’s 
skies. 

And never before have modem astronomers 
witnessed anything quite so spectacular as Hale- 
Bopp. which made its closest approach to the sun 
on Tuesday. 

The comet’s icy core . is estimated at 25 miles (40 
kilometers) wide, more than 10 times the size of the 
average comet and. big enough- to . swallow many 
Manhattan s. Its great size makes it unusually bright 
and easy to study: Since it was first discovered 20 


months ago beyond the orbit of Jupiter, astro- 
homers have scrutinized it unceasingly as the sun 
wanned its outer layers, causing the gargantuan ice 
ball to shed many ions of clues every second about 
the nature of its chemical makeup. 

Now, tire first comprehensive findings are in and 
give support to a remarkable theory. It suggests 
that cometaiy ices bear the chemical precursors of 
life and that comets fell on the aboriginal Earth in 
vast numbers and sowed these precursors of what 
eventually became the planet’s riot of biological 
diversity. The same mechanism is thought to be at 
work throughout the cosmos, sowing the seeds of 
life on untold worlds. 

This view is now getting major support as tele- 
scopes around the globe find Hale-Bop p spewing 
not just tons of water but methanol, formaldehyde, 
carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen 


sulfide and many compounds rich in carbon — in 
other words, the basic ingredients thought to be 
necessary for the origin of life. 

“This is the ironclad link to the new paradigm, ’’ 
Dale Cruikshank, an astronomer at the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Ames 
Research Center in California, said in an interview. 
“We've never had such a panorama of important 
molecules." 

Mr. Cruikshank is the first author in a series of 
eight articles on fee Hale-Bopp findings in fee 
current issue of the journal Science. The new 
discoveries are seen as a milestone in the de- 
veloping field of bioastronomy, which looks to the 
heavens for the chemical forerunners of life. 

As fee comet hurtles through space at more than 
27 miles a second, scientists say its return trip to the 
outer limits of the solar system will probably 


produce even more insights into its nature, as well 
as striking nighttime shows in the Northern Hemi- 
sphere throughout April and early May. 

"It’s not over yet," said Brian Marsden of the 
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in 
Cambridge. Massachusetts, who helps track 
comets and other heavenly bodies for the In- 
ternational Astronomical Union. “It’s going to be 
improving its visibility in fee evening sky.” 

Such a comet appears “once eveTy 200 years or 
so,” Mr. Marsden added. “What makes it great is 
itspersistence.” 

Harold Weaver, an astrophysicist at Johns Hop- 
kins University and lead author on one of the Science 
papers, said Hale-Bopp might actually outperform 
itself while heading back toward its icy abode. 

See COMET, Page 8 


* 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY APRIL 2, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Troublesome Topics / A Catholic Society Opens Up 


Irish Soap Operas Reflect Social Change 


D UBLIN — Ireland's best-known married 
couple. Biddy and Miley Byrne, disagree 
about religion. Miley, the husband, a de- 
vout Roman Catholic, says prayer and 
divine intervention saved their critically ill daugh- 
ter. Biddy, who rarely goes to church and scoffs at 
religion, says the credit should go to the doctor. 

The parish priest in their rural town of Glenroe. 
Father Tim Devereaux, says that nobody is listening 
to his pastoral advice. So he retires early from the 
church and goes on a round-the-world cruise with 
Shirley Manning, a widow of Protestant and Jewish 
ancestry. 

Stephen Brennan, a pensioner, is mugged by a 
gang of female thugs from Dublin. In a Dublin 
suburb. Liam Casey, a tall, handsome wheeler- 
dealer. seduces a young man and is seen preparing 
to kiss him on die mouth. Not far away, Nicola 
Brennan, abandoned by her husband, is seriously 
considering an illegal abortion. Lorraine Molloy 
becomes addicted to amphetamines while cram- 
ming for school exams, ana Tony Kelly is stabbed to 
death in the street by a man to whom he owes 
money. 

They are television characters in Ireland's enor- 
mously popular soap operas “Glenroe” and “Fair 
City.” 

Twenty years ago. or even 10. this relatively 
conservative, overwhelmingly Catholic country 
would never have stood for such things on gov- 
ernment-supervised national television. But in re- 
cent years, the two 30-minute soaps, both jostling 
for top ratings in prime time, have taken up topics 
that were once rarely discussed: rising crime, drugs, 
unwed motherhood, rape, homosexuality and the 
declining authority of the Catholic Church. 

They have even dealt with what President Mary' 
Robinson and other top officials call Irish racism: 
the widespread bias against the tens of thousands of 
Irish families once called tinkers, now euphemist- 
ically called travelers. These nomadic trailer-dwell- 
ers have been widely reviled and discriminated 
against in seeking places to live, schooling for their 
children. even a place at the barm many pubs. 


By James F. Clarity 

Afeve York Times Service 


**K>*SS3 

■ amMit-ttP * r * 



Miley and Biddy Byrne, television characters in Irelands popular soap opera 
“Glenroe,* which tackles issues once rarely discussed: drugs, unwed motherhood, 
rape, homosexuality and the declining authority of the Catholic Church, 


W HILE Ireland is in the midst of an 
economic upsurge, the soaps are de- 
picting not only prosperity but also 
troubling. even dismal, aspects of Irish 
life. In particular, they focus on the problems of 
young adults in a country that has one of the worst 
rates of long-term unemployment in the European 
Union. Secondary schools here annually produce 
about 40,000 job seekers; the economy creates 
10.000 jobs a year. 

“The soaps reflect the liberalization of Irish 
society in the last 10 years,” said Hugh Linehan. 
who covers television and movies for The Irish 
Times. “Also, the soaps are the only indigenous 
drama on Irish television, so they are forced to carry 
an awful lot of stuff — but not too much. A soap can 
collapse from too much weight-” 

Cliona Woodbyme and her husband. John, a car 
electrician, regularly watch “Glenroe" with their 
three teenage children on Sunday evenings. “I think 
they have come a long way.” Mrs. Woodbyme said. 
“They’re dealing with more serious issues and less 
trivia, with something more relevant to our lives.” 

She said the episodes about how much money 
should be spent on a girl’s First Communion dress 
— a very heated issue here — had stimulated a 
general family discussion of religion, adding that 
she shared Biddy's religious skepticism. 

Niall Mathews, director of entertainment pro- 
grams for national television, said: “We don’t hang 
out a banner saying we are dealing with rape and 


murder as issues. One of our characters gets raped 
and the story is how it affects her. her family ana the 


and the story is how it affects her. her family and the 
community. We are not doing issue-driven pro- 
grams. We use issues to illuminate the characters 
more than to illuminate the issues.” 

But the producers of “Fair City’ ’ and “Glenroe” 
acknowledge that their high ratings, averaging 
800.000 viewers, about one-quarter of the pop- 


upcoming episodes Liam will also become a laun- 
derer of organized-crime money. 

“There will be violence and unpleasant char- 
acters.” Mr. Lynch said of these epiWes. 


uJation, derive increasingly from the troublesome 
aspects of life in Ireland. John Lynch, executive 
producer of “Fair City,” said that when the show 
started in 1989. there was conflict about what they 
were doing even among the actors. 

“Now,” he said, “we’ve turned a comer. Even 
people in polite society admit they watch ’Fair City. ' 


T OMMY McArdle, producer of ‘ ‘Glenroe,” 
which is in its 14th season, said he was 
worried that the problems of Biddy and 
Miley Byrne, who have been the center of 
the program since it started, might have become too 
familiar. 

So Mr. McArdle introduced the travelers issue, 
which is frequently in the news as residents try to 
have trailer park sites eliminated by the courts on 
various legal technicalities. In recent episodes, Mi- 


Unfoitunaiely, it’s becoming respectable to watch.” 

But certain subjects are still delicate, Mr. Lynch 
said, adding that there were no plans to deal with 
AIDS, even though it is as big a problem in Ireland 
as in the rest of Europe. Nor is the program likely to 
touch the reports of political corruption. 

"Politics doesn’t sell,” he said. 

He added that although he received mail from 
“eccentric clergymen” about some programs, he 
had had no direct pressure from the church hier- 
archy — not even on subjects like abortion and 
homosexual relationships, which were decrimin- 
alized only five years ago. 

He said homosexuals wen? “delighted” with die 
treatment of the subject on the program, although 
Liam is now being depicted as a bisexual who tries 
to swindle businesswomen by seducing them. In 


ley and Biddy tried to evict a family of travelers who 
Darked their trailer on the edee of the farm. 


parked their trailer on the edge of the farm. 

The episodes depict the attitudes of some Irish 


people that travelers are stupid, dirty and dishonest. 
For instance, two pet rabbits disappear, and neigh- 


Fcrr instance, two pet rabbits disappear, and neigh- 
bors suspect that the travelers have eaten them in a 
stew. The issues are not neatly resolved. Mrs. 
Woodbyme says she and her family are still won- 
dering whai happened to the rabbits. An extramar- 
ital affair between a traveler and an upper-middle- 
class local woman was even more provocative. Mr. 
McArdle said. 

“We have to reflect the changes in Irish society. ” 
he said. ’ ’In Ireland today, one person in a couple is 
always more religious than the other. So. soon, there 
will be another row between Biddy and the new 
town priest ‘ 


Only Orthodoxy Is Judaism, Rabbi Group Declares 


By Laurie Goods tern 

Washington Post Service 


NEW YORK — A group of Amer- 
ican Orthodox rabbis has touched off a 


dispute among Jews by announcing that 
Reform and Conservative Judaism, and 
every stream of Judaism other than Or- 
thodoxy, are “not Judaism at all. but 
another religion.'' 

One after another, in long beards and 
black hats or yarmulkes, they stepped to 
the microphone at a hotel news con- 
ference Monday to condemn the more 
modem Jewish movements to which 
more than 90 percent of American Jews 
belong. 

“We call upon all Jews to discon- 
tinue to pray any time in a Conservative 
or Reform temple and instead pray in an 
Orthodox synagogue,” said Rabbi Her- 
sh Ginsberg of Brooklyn, acting chair- 
man of the Union of Orthodox. Rabbis of 


the United States and Canada. 

The group behind the statement has 
been dismissed even by other Orthodox 
leaders as a once well-respected board 
now dominated by a small, rigorously 
traditionalist and confrontational core. 
The union’s declaration has provoked 
protests not only from Reform and Con- 
servative leaders, but also from the na- 
tion’s two largest Orthodox groups. 

Nevertheless, the affair is one more 
indication of the deepening fissures 
among the 5.8 million American Jews, a 
community that once suppressed its dif- 
ferences to stand united in the face of 
what it perceived as common threats. 

The dispute is mirrored in Israel, 
where a tiny minority of Reform and 
Conservative Jews are challenging the 
Orthodox rabbinate’s legal and reli- 
gious monopoly. So sensitive is the situ- 
ation that Prune Minister Benjamin Net- 
anyahu. a secular Jew who has sided 


with the Orthodox to preserve his gov- 
erning coalition, refused to be photo- 
graphed with Reform and Conservative 
leaders on a recent visit to New York. 

The reverberations have also been 
felt in Europe, where England’s chief 
rabbi recently refused to attend the fu- 
neral of a respected Reform rabbi for 
fear of conferring legitimacy on what he 
called a “false grouping” 

“As much as we differ theologically, 
we have always kept it within the family, 
and that is where it belongs.” said Rabbi 
Rafael Grossman, president of the 1.000- 
raember Rabbinical Council of America, 
one of the two Orthodox groups that 
denounced the union’s statement. He 
called the announcement “a hurtful 
statement of no benefit to anyone.” 

The Union of Orthodox Rabbis (also 
known as Agudaih Harabonim). still 
conducts its meetings in Yiddish. It is 
vehement!}- opposed to homosexuality. 


abortion and religious pluralism. 
The union claims 582 member 


“status quo” in which people converted 
in Israel to Judaism would be officially 
recognized as Jews only if the conver- 
sion was performed by an Orthodox 
rabbi. Reuters reported from Jerusalem. 

Government officials said Israel 
would continue to accept as valid con- 
versions done outside its borders by 
rabbis in the Reform and Conservative 
movements. 


U-Boats Off 
To America 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


.'II 


:IU»" a 




Artificial Chromosome 
Comes to Life in a Lab 

Advance Could Cure Hereditary Diseases 


*r*8rt 


^ . randomness that confounds results. 

By Rick Weiss Also, viruses are sometimes rejected by 

Washington Post Sen-ice the immune system. 

WASHINGTON Scientists in Moreover, a virus may insert its ex- 

Ohio have created the first artificial perimental genes ww a 
human chromosomes, an achievement creoles p-obfems. dtsmrfrng 

that may someday allow doctors to alter part of a chroroos^ewtosejob isto £ 
people’s genetic inheritance or cure dis- prevent cancer. Artificial rfromosonKS . 
eases by dipping genetic “cassettes” would eliminate thatnsk 
directly into peopled cells. new gene could reside on igovmcfrro- 

Thf- artificial chromosomes, made in raosome instead of being jammed mto 


WASHINGTON — Scientists in 
Ohio have created the first artificial 


eases by slipping genetic “cassettes 
directly into people* s cells. 

The artificial chromosomes, made in 
(he laboratory from a blend of natural 
and synthetic human DNA, are mini- 
ature versions of human chromosomes 
— the corkscrew-shaped structures in- 
side cells that carry all the genes re- 
quired for life. 

Scientists said die long-sought ad- 
vance marks the first time anyone has 
created an artificial human chromosome 
that can replicate the way natural chro- 
mosomes do every time a cell divides. 

In theory, the chromosomes could be 
designed to ferry curative genes into 


an existing one. . 

The Ohio team used synthetic DNA 


The union claims 582 members, but 
several Orthodox rabbis said the num- 
ber was far fewer. The group says its 
declaration has the force of halacfia, the 
code of traditional law followed by Or- 
thodox Jews. But experts say the group 
has authority only over its members. 

■ “Status Quo’ in Israel 

The Israeli Parliament on Tuesday 
approved preliminary legislation that 
would enshrine in law a Tong-standiog 


designed to terry curanve genes into 
people suffering from inherited diseases 
such as cystic fibrosis, or even to 
provide genetic enhancements such as 
added protection against cancer. 

More immediately, the chromosomes 
will serve as miniature “laboratory 
benches,” helping scientists leam bow 
genes are regulated inside cells — a 
central question in biology. 

Some experts predicted the success 
would also escalate concerns about sci- 
entists' increasing ability to manipulate 
genes, which reached new heights in 
February with die cloning of an adult 
sheep. 

Artificial chromosomes will not di- 
rectly ease die cloning of animals or 
people, medical ethi cists and others 
said, but they represent a new power 
over basic biological and reproductive 
processes. 

So far, the research team at Case 
Western Reserve University in Clev- 
eland has created only a handful of very 
s mall artificial chromosomes inside lab- 
oratory-raised h uman ceils, said John 
Harrington, the geneticist who led the 
work along with Huntington Willard. 

The group hopes to inject some of the 
manufactured chromosomes into anim- 
als within six months, a necessary step 
before considering clinical trials in 
people, said Mr. Harrington, who is also 
vice president of Cleveland-based Ath- 
ersys Inc., a biotechnology company that 
owns the rights to the new technology. 

“We think this may allow us to treat 
patients at a very young age. maybe 
shortly after birth, so the treatment can 
be delivered to a few cells and then 
spread as the cells divide and the child 
grows,” Mr. Harrington said. 

Within a year, he said, he hopes to 
have created a modular system of pre- 
fabricated chromosome parts, each 
bearing different key genes, which 
could be pulled off a laboratory shelf, 
combined and inserted into a person’s 
cells. 

“It clearly is novel and represents a 
new approach that seems to work,’ ’ said 
Amo Motulsky . a professor of medicine 
and genetics at the University of Wash- 
ington in Seattle who co-wrote a 1995 
federal report that called for the de- 
velopment of better gene therapy tech- 
niques. “You can't go to the lab to- 
morrow and start using it for gene 
therapy. But it's coming along.” 

Human cells have 46 chromosomes, 
each of which is a long twisted strand of 
genetic material, or DNA, made of mil- 
lions of chemical subunits. Some 
stretches of DNA work as a unit, called 
a gene, and the particular order of chem- 
ical subunits within that stretch con- 
stitutes a coded set of instructions, 
telling the cell what to do, such as 
“make insulin.” 

Chromosomes are extremely convo- 
luted and complex structures, yet every 
time a cell divides they manage to un- 
tangle their genetic threads and duplic- 
ate themselves so each resulting cell can 
end up with a full complement of 
genes. 

Currently, the preferred method for 
getting new genes into human cells is to 
load them into a virus that naturally 
inserts the genes into a cell's chromo- 
somes. But with that method there is no 
predicting which chromosome will get 
die extra gene — an unfortunate bit of 


made by a machine that strings together 
the chemical subunits of DNA, called 
nucleotides, which can be purchased 
from chemical suppliers. They designed 
this synthetic portion to mimic a spe- 
cialized part of a chromosome, called 
the centromere, which is involved in 
chromosome replication. 

They also included bits and pieces of 
natural DNA from human chromosomes. 
because they did not know what other 
DNA sequences might be necessary to 
matfp. a functioning chromosome. 

The team injected the pieces of DNA 
into cells growing in laboratory dishes. ( . 
where the pieces self-assembled into 
chromosomes, probably with the help of 
enzymes naturally present in cite cells. 
The researchers then let the cells divide 
normally. In one experiment that lasted 
six months, genes on an artificial chro- 
mosome were still present and func- 
tioning in daughter cells after the parent 
cell had divided about 240 times, ac- 
cording to a report describing the work 
in tiie April issue of the scientific jour- 
nal Nature Genetics. 

Not everyone agrees about the value 
of the work. 

“It’s absolutely fascinating and it's 
beautiful work that will lead to all kinds 
of advances, but it’s not going to lead to 
new therapies in humans,” said W.jA 
French Anderson, of the University of” 
Southern California, who performed the 
world's first gene therapy experiment at 
the National Institutes of Health in 
1990. The chromosomes were too big to 
be made cheaply and would have trou- 
ble passing safety muster with the Food 
and Drug Administration, Mr. Ander- 
son said 


Sudan Rebels 


Four Districts: 


Reuters 

NAIROBI — John Garang, the Su- 
danese rebel leader, said Tuesday that 
his guerrillas had seized four districts in 
northeastern Sudan in an offensive 
aimed at cutting Khartoum's main link 
with the outside world. 

He said a coalition of rebels had “lib- 
erated” die districts of Karora, Itairba, . 
Agiti and Agigi last week and over the • 
weekend and were advancing toward 
the town of Tokar. 

Mr. Garang, tire leader of the Sudan 
People’s Liberation Army and military 
commander of the National Democratic 
Alliance, said alliance forces were des- 
troying Khartoum's “military and se- 
curity machine” in the northeast. 

hi Khartoum, AJ Nasr, the army jour- 
nal, said Tuesday that independent mi- 
litias had killed 70 guerrillas and cap- 
tured 18 in an attack on the rebels near 
Akobo on title Ethiopian border in the 
south on Monday. 

The rebels say the offensive is aimed 
at cutting the road between Khartoum 
and Port Sudan on the Red Sea. Tokar is 
150 kilometers (90 miles) southeast of 
Port Sudan 

Sudanese officials said Monday that 
government forces were fighting Er- 
itrean and Ethiopian troops who had^pj} 
taken control of border areas in Red Sea ' 
state in the northeast. 

The Sudan People's liberation Army 
has been fighting since 1983 for greater 
autonomy or independence for the 
Christian and anionst south from the 
Muslim and Arabized north. . 


WEATHER 


The Associated Press 

ECKERNFOERDE, 
Germany — Anyone 
spotting a German U-boat 
off the U.S. East Coast 
this summer can relax: 
It’s a training exercise. 

Two 206A submarines 
left here Tuesday. They 
are to rake part in multi- 
national maneuvers and 
make port calls In San 
Juan: Alexandria. Vir- 
ginia; Groton. Connecti- 
cut. and New York City. 


Paris Flights Grounded 


PARIS ( AP) — A strike by ground crews 
forced Air France Europe to cancel many of 
its flights Tuesday out of Orly airport here, the 
domestic airline said. 

The strike, against job cuts caused by the 
merging of Air France and its domestic wing. 
.Air France Europe, came the same day the 
European Union deregulated its skies to spur 


European union deregulated its sues to spur 
competition. Though some shuttle flights be- 


The four main truckers’ unions called the 
stoppage just four months after a strike and 
road blockades by drivers paralyzed road 
traffic across the country. 

The government's agreement in November 
to back the truckers’ demands for retirement 
at 55 instead of 60 brought an end to the initial 
strike. But talks broke down when the parties 
failed to meet a March 31 deadline to put the 
agreement into effect. 


Europe 


□non. lnougn sonic snuiue ingius uc- TJl TT J C jj 

Paris and the cities of Nice, Toulouse / Of JT 1(10 S LiTlaer OCTUtlTiy 
arseiile were to take off, most of Air 1 ** 


tween Pam and the cities of Nice, loulouse 
and Marseille were to take off. most of Air 
France Europe's Orly schedule though 1 P.M. 
was canceled, an airline spokesman said. 

The airline’s flights to and from the other 
main Paris airport. Roissy-Charles de Gaulle, 
were not affected, the spokesman said. 


French Truckers to Strike 


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PARIS (Reuters') — French truck drivers’ 
unions Tuesday called a fresh strike for May 5 
after failing to agree with management over 
retirement at age 55, union leaders said. 


DALLAS ( AP> — Operators ol Boeing 767 
jetliners will be ordered to inspect the takeoff 
and landing flaps on about 200 of the airplanes 
because a piece of a flap fell off last week, a 
newspaper reported Tuesday. 

The Federal Aviation Administration was 
to send out the orderTuesday as an emergency 
airworthiness directive that will require the 
inspections within 1 5 days. The Dallas Morn- 
ing News said. The notice comes five days 
after a 2 1 -foot ( 6.4-merer> section of a flap fed 
from a Delta Airlines jet that was about to land 
at the Dallas airport. No one was injured. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


Oklahoma City Blast Trial Op ens 

Anud Tight Security, Court Begins Arduous Selection Process 


ByLois Romano 
and Tom Kenworthy 

Washington Post Smirr 


rtaS E 2^ E ^~ J Amid “rtnwnfinarily 
JJff* secunty and a huge news media 

prcsCTce, the tnalof Timothy McVeirfi, 
die Oklahoma City bombing suspect, 
has opened with aggressive questioning 
j I^ospecove jurors that quickly un- 
jjeaBD ^feed teqdty of selecting an 

,. *■ * *> after a bomb 
shear^ off the front of the Alfred P. 
Miurah Federal Budding, killing 168 
people. Judge RichardMatsch of U.S. 
distnet court, federal prosecutors and 
lawyers for Mr. McVeigh began the te- 
dious process of selecting 12 jurors and 
six auernates. Only six potential jurors 
were questioned Monday, anrf several of 
mem already appeared to pose problems 

for one side or the other in a case that has 
drawn enormous pretrial publicity. 

[The trial moved into its second day 
Tuesday, with one prospective juror say- 
ing she had already made up her mind 
about Mr. McVeigh’s guilt and another 
saying he should “pay for his crime” if 
he is co nvict ed. The Associated Press 
imported from Denver. So far, seven pros- 
pects have been interviewed.] 

Judge Matsch last year ordered the 
case moved here, saying that the de- 
fendants — Mr. McVeigh and Teny 
Nichols, who will be tried later — could 
not get a get fair trial in Oklahoma 
because they had been “demonized.” 
Ironically, the first of 350 prospective 
jurors questioned Monday was a white 
nun in his 40s who was working in 
Tulsa the day of the blast and who, as a 
former engineer, was intimately famil- 
iar with the type of explosive the gov- 


ernment alleges was used in the Anil 
19, 1995, bombing. 

Under questioning from attorneys, 
the potential juror, identified only as 
No. 853, said be watched the “wall-to- 
wall, ceiling to floor” news reports of 
die bombing, and had visited the site of 
the blast. “It was very moving and very 
sad,” said the man, now a self-em- 
ployed investment adviser in Denver. 

I think I cried a little.” 



me courtroom Monday morning in his 
usual jovial fashion, dressed in a blue 
Shirt and khaki pants and w ith hie hair 
freshly sheared in a military-style buzz 
cut He smiled often, talked to his law- 
yers and paid dose attention to the ques- 
tioning, at tunes passing notes to his 
legal ream, Mr. McVeigh's parents, 
who divorced when he was a child, sat 
together in the front row, the first tirng 
either of them has attended a court pro- 
ceeding since their only son was ar- 
rested on the day of the bombing. 

Concrete barricades and steel barr iers 
have been erected around the court- 
house, where Mr. McVeigh is being held 
in a basement cell. The street is lined 
with police cars, and dozens of local and 
federal police officers are patrolling the 
streets. More than 2,000 journalists from 
around the world have been given cre- 
dentials to cover the trial, but few mem- 
bers of the public showed up Monday. 

A closed-circuit camera has been 
placed in the newly renovated second- 
floor courtroom so survivors and rela- 
tives of victims can watch in Oklahoma 
CSty. This is apparently the first time a 
video camera has been allowed in a 
federal trial. Judge Matsch has prohib- 
ited any taping of the transmission, and 


Monday he expressed concern that 
someone might pirate die signal. If that 
happened. Judge Matsch said he would 
immediately interrupt the transmission. 

Mr. McVeigh's lawyer, Stephen 
Jones, who sought to have the case 
dismissed two weeks ago because of 
pretrial publicity, quizzed jury pool 
members relentlessly on how their 
views about the bombing have been 
shaped by what they have read or seen 
on television. All the potential jurors 
indicated a high level of awareness 
about the events from media reports. 

Prosecutors emphasized two areas in 
their early questioning: whether poten- 
tial juzois could impose the death penalty 
in the case, and then attitudes toward the 
federal government, specifically during 
such events as the standoff against the 
Branch Da vidian compound near Waco, 
Texas, and an earlier me involving a 
white supremacist, Randy Weaver, and 
Ms family at Ruby Ridge. Idaho. 

The government contends that Mr. 
Me Veigh, fueled by a seething haired and 
mistrust of the government, blew up the 
Federal Building to avenge the 1993 gov- 
ernment assault on the Branch Davidians. 
Prosecutors are particularly concerned 
about potential jurors who mig ht share 
Mr. McVeigh's hostility toward the gov- 
ernment, people close to the case said. 

Over the past month, both sides and 
the judge have whittled the jury pool 
down to under 400. During closed ses- 
sions, they will reduce the pool further to 
64 jurors who agree to consider the death 
penalty as punishment; the defense arvi 
prosecution each may dismiss 20 of 
them for any reason. After the 12 jurors 
are picked, six alternates will be chosen 
with the defense and prosecution given 
three more peremptory challenges. 


Cult Legacy: a 223 -Page Screenplay 


By B. Drummond Ayres Jr. 

' Nm York Tones Service 

PARADISE VALLEY, Arizona — 
As they did wherever and whenever 
they camped or paused on their long, 
peripatetic westward journey toward 
mass suicide in Southern California, 
members of the Heaven’s Gate cult 
found work in Arizona as nerdy com- 
puter p rogramm ers, polite-to-a-fault of- 
fice clerks and tireless dawn-to-dusk 
day laborers. 

But it turns out that they also busied 
themselves in other ways during a 10- 
month stay in 1995 and 1996 in a boose 
in this well-off Phoenix suburb. 

They were writing a screenplay about 
their lives and times. 

Hie script runs 223 pages, said a 
Phoenix movie; produceivAlex Papas, 
who worked with the cult members in- 
volved in the writing and now believes 
he has a box-office winner. 

“It’s a script that needs a lot of mas- 
saging because it's very raw material,” 
Mr. Papas said. “But it’s a Hollywood 
natural at this point if there ever was 
one.” 

Mr. Papas came in contact with the 
group when be rented members a house 


here. Upon learning that he was in the 
film business, they quickly cranked out 
a script, apparen t l y hopeful that any 
resulting movie could be used as a re- 
cruiting device. 

'White confident that an unrefined tale 
told by amateur screenwriters might be 
turned into a money-maker, Mr. Papas 
said the script provided few answers to 

mass suid^^Rancbo Santa Fe: ^ 

How did 39 people come to believe 
that by killing themselves they could 
find a better existence on the far side of 
a passing comet? 

Why did they choose while still on 
Earth to live a nomadic, monastic ex- 
istence, sometimes in the woods, some- 
times behind barricades and, at the end, 
in palatial mansions? 

“Much as. I wish I (fid know, I don’t 
know those answers because it*s a 
manuscript with a lot of holes.” Mr. 
Papas said. “But you could say it's their 
manifesto, nevertheless. They seemed 
to view it more as a possible recruiting 
device and a way to set the record 
straight than as an ego trip or movie- 
house entertainment or anything like 
that” 

The script is tided “Beyond Human. ” 


Mr. Papas said he bad secured an option 
on it, lxit he would not disclose the 

financial a rr a n gements. He declined to 
make a copy of the script public, but as he 
told it, the cult members “threw in a lot 
about UFO's and space aliens and earth- 
lings evolving from their ‘containers* to 
a ‘higher level.’ ” He added, “The ba- 
sics are all there, except it never really 
lays out the ultimate stuff, the suicide.” 

Mr. Papas said the original manuscript 
was the work of three or four cult mem- 
bers. He got the sense that revisions were 
being reviewed by die cult’s leader, Mar- 
shall Herff Applewhite. 

“I felt he was back there pulling 
strings,” Mr. Papas said 

A week or so before the mass suicide, 
(me of the writers, Richard Ford, known 
to fellow cult members as Rio D’An- 
gelo, moved to Los Angeles. No sooner 
had be settled in, near Beverly Hills, than 
a videotape filled with farewell mes- 
sages arrived from the group. He hurried 
back to Rancho Santa Fe, discovered the 
39 bodies and notified the police. 

“Since be didn't make the ‘trip’ with 
the rest and is the only known survivor, 
we hope to be able to work with him to 
finish the script,” Mr. Papas said. 
“He’s obviously a terrific resource.” 


Smokers 
Targeted 
By Race 


The Associated Press 

»HOENDC, Arizona — The to- 
co industry targeted consumers 
age, race and gender while 
iwmg of the “severe toxicity” 
nicotine, according to internal 
icrs from toe Liggett Group, a 
/spaper reported Tuesday, 
lie Arizona Republic said it had 
ained the confidential docu- 
its from the Arizona attorney 
eraL, Grant Woods, who played 
ajor role in lawsuits brought by 
zona and 21 other states that 
ilted recently in a settlement 
[i Liggett. 

lie Republic said the docu- 
ats also showed that the industry 
manipulated nicotine levels in 
ire ties and that at one point, 
gett, which makes Lark and 
jsterfield cigarettes, considered 
ig synthetic ingredients to ra- 
ise the impact of cigarettes on 
>kers “without the severe tox- 
f of nicotine itself.” 
lie newspaper said the reMarda 
ers from the 1960s and 1970s 
i showed how manufacturers 
>red their marketing cam- 

f^port prepared by the con- 
ing ram Arthur D. Little Inc. 
aibed potential smokers aged 
o 21 as being in “the formative 
rs” when “smoking starts and 
id preferences are developed, 

ta^tioiTcrf the Arthur little 
wt said. “Spanish and Ne ; 

... L. n n milu 



e for bargains,” the paper 
Sun the same report, issued 
1963, the consultants said 
here must be a racial slantin 
rfeeting efforts” directed to- 
- -whereas m 


equirement,” according to 

mblic. . . 

documents were released as 
■ a settlement, announced 
20 between Uggettandtoe 

^Thousan^otoerdx- 

have been placcdundws^l 
ire judges determine whetb- 

[eaie them to the stares. 


Clinton Seeking Inquiry 
Into Liquor Commercials 


By John M. Broder 

New Tort Times Service 


WASHINGTON — President Bin 
Clinto n asked the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission cm Tuesday to ex- 
amine whether liquor advertising on 
television should be banned or sharply 
restricted. 

The president expressed concern 
about toe distilled spirits industry’s de- 


cision last year to uft a voluntary, de- 
cades-old policy against advertising on 
television. 

Mr. Clinton, who ran for re-election 
last year on several issues intended to 

r sai to families with children, asked 
commission to explore whether li- 
quor advertisements — combined wife 
the heavy volume of beer commercials 
already on toe air — will induce more 
young people to experiment with drink- 

mg. 

The communications commission 
chairman, Reed Hundt, who has ob- 
jected to distillers’ plans to advertise on 
television and radio, called Mr. din- 
ton's plan “terrific” and said he hoped 
to begin investigating toe effects of al- 
cohol advertising. 

“It's exactly what I think we should 
do and, with presidential backing, we 
can get it done,” Mr. Hundt said in an 
interview. 

The commission, an independent 
agency, is not required to act on a pres- 
idential request Mr. Him dt has said be 
supports toe inquiry as a first step to- 
ward the possible issuance of an a^ncy 

rule that would link restrictions on li- 
quor advertising to the granting of 
broadcast licenses . . . ■ 

But the proposed examination faces 
resistance from toe liquor industry, 
some members of Congress and from 
two members of the commission, who 
have openly questioned whether toe 


agency has any jurisdiction over ad- 
vertising content 

Mr. Hundt and several advocacy 
groups, now joined by Mr. Clinton, ar- 
gue that the commission has the power to 
insure that broadcasters serve toe public 
interest by restricting harmful messages 
on television, including lurid program- 
ming and advertisements for alcohol and 
tobacco. 

Critics say that the commission lacks 
authority to censor advertising and that 
it is unfair to let beer and wine compa- 
nies buy hundreds of millions of dollars 
of television advertising while banning 
the makers of Scotch and gin from the 
airwaves. 

Fred Meister, president of toe Dis- 
tilled Spirits Council of the United 
States, said toe liquor industry had 
broadcast only a few advertisements 
since it lifted its self-imposed ban last 
year. 

The big networks, fearing a public 
outcry, have not accepted any liquor 
advertisements. 

“During die Clinton administration, 
there have been billions of dollars in 
alcohol advertising, and only a small 
fraction of that has been from toe dis- 
tilled spirits companies in the last sev- 
. era! months,” Mr. Meister said 

“ff you’re concerned about the im- 
pact of alcohol advertising, you should 
look at beer, which is toe do minan t and 
overwhelming player in TV advert- 
ising,” he said. 

The president last year equated the 
effects of liquor advertising with those 
. of tobacco advertising, saying that they 
seduced young people to try products 
that were unsuitable or illegal for chil- 
dren. 

He Mu proposed banning cigarette 
advertising directed at children, and he 
is seeking to limit similar advertising for 
liquor. 


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OUT LIKE A LION — A magnolia tree in Philadelphia may have been 
in bloom but winter returned to the East Coast as a late snowstorm hit. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Away From Politics 

• The new U.S. immigration law took 

effect Tuesday after a federal judge 
blocked it but was quickly overruled by 
an appeals court. (AP) 

• Incidents of violence at abortion 

clinics dropped to 455 last year from 
2,929 in 1993, the year before Con- 
gress passed the Federal Access to 
Clinics Act, according to the National 
Abortion Federation. (WP) 

• Nearly two-thirds of the drivers in- 

volved in crashes examined in a recent 
study suffered some kind of injury re- 
lated to air bags, including 18 who 
received bone fractures, according to 
toe University of Michigan’s Trans- 
portation Research Institute. But most 
of the injuries were minor compared 
with the damage that could have oc- 
curred without air bags. (WP) 

•In the fall of yet another barrier 
limiting toe role of women in toe mil- 
itary, e nlis ted women for toe first time 
have shot live ammunition from heavy 
weapons in die Marine Corps combat 
training that follows boot camp. The 
women also threw live hand grenades 
in the exercise. (NYT) 


Labor Presses for Tax Changes 

WASHINGTON — Organized labor was set to begin 
broadcasting radio and television ads Tuesday in 19 con- 
gressional districts to build political pressure to end certain 
corporate tax breaks and increase spending on rebuilding 
U.S. public schools. 

The goal of die campaign is to persuade voters to pressure 
Congress to end two specific tax provisions that U.S. cor- 
porations use to reduce their tax liability for income earned 
in other countries, and to use the additional revenue for 
school construction. 

Labor officials argue that toe tax laws now reward U.S. 
corporations for investing money overseas rather than cre- 
ating more jobs at home. 

Under current law, U.S. corporations can subtract from 
their U.S. tax liability any taxes paid to a foreign government 
on their foreign income. By changing the credit to a de- 
duction, as has been proposed in Congress, the AFL-CIO 
es timates toe Treasury would receive an additional $14 
billion in revenue. (WP) 

Holocaust Survivors Sue Insurers 


bought the policies died during the war. many in con- 
centration camps. After toe war, toe companies refused to 
make payments on the policies, which toe suit says are each 
worth at least $75 BOO. 

One Italian company, Assicurazioni Generali, said that 
many policies were bought through the company’s affiliates 
in Central and Eastern Europe, which were taken over by 
Communist governments after the war. (NYT) 


For the Record 


The UJ5. Census Bureau may shorten its short ques- 
tionnaire for the 2000 census. Seven subjects, the fewest 
since 1820, were proposed for toe short form: name, age. 
sex, relationship to others in the household, race, whether 
one is of Hispanic origin and whether the respondent rents 
or owns a home. (NYT) 

The government corporation that insures the pen- 
sions of 41 million Americans announced that its largest 
insurance fund had posted the first surplus since the agency 
was created in 1974. Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. stud 
that ai toe end of 1996. its single-employer pension in- 
surance fund had a surplus of $869 million. (NYT) 


NEW YORK — Nine Holocaust survivors have sued g-. ,jr 

seven European insurance companies in Federal District IJUOte / UnQUOte 
Court in Manhattan, claiming that the companies have x * 

cheated them by refusing to honor policies purchased by 
their relatives before World War n. 

The suit, filed Monday, says toe companies used the 
policies’ funds for the Nazi war effort, to enrich individual 
Nazis, or to help postwar governments. 

The survivors’ families had bought life, property, and 
disability insurance in the 1920s and '30s. All those who 


President Bill Clinton, using the Social Security agency’s 
fortunes to promote his record on pension protection and 
call on Congress to revive legislation that would require 
more thorough audits of pension funds: “Our people de- 
serve to know that if they work hard throughout their lives, 
the money they worked for and that they saved is not being 
squandered or left unprotected.” (NYT) 


This announcement appears as a maner of record only. 


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Stretch 


Pakistan Ends Resident’s Power to Oust Government 


BRIEFLY 


By Kenneth J. Cooper 

Washington Post Service 


NEW DELHI — Pakistan's Parliament 
repealed a constitutional provision Tues- 
day that successive presidents used twice in 
the last decade to remove Benazir Bhutto as 
prime minister and to oust the current prime 
minis ter, Mian Nawaz Sharif. 

Mr. Sharif relied on his two-thirds' ma- 
jority. the largest in Pakistan’s history, to 
push legislation througl^Pariiament in one 


day to revoke what Miss Bhutto and other 
critics had denounced as undemocratic 
powers. The unusual authority was granted 
to Pakistan's indirectly elected president in 
1985 during the reign of Mohammed Zia 


ul-Haq, the nation's last mili tary dictator. 

S uppor t e rs described the repeal of those 
powers as strengthening the prime min- 
ister’s office and eliminating a major 
source of political instability that has pre- 
vented any of Pakistan's elected prune 
ministers from completing a five-year 
term. 

Such presidential powers were last used 
in November to dismiss Miss Bhutto, who 
was also removed in 1990. Mr. Sharif was 
ousted in 1993 before the country's high 
court briefly restored him to office. 

“This is a great day for parliamentary 
democracy,” Mr. Sharif said after both 
houses of Parliament approved the changes 
without any votes against repeal. 


Mandalay Unrest 
Reported to Cause 
Curbing of Monks 


Agence Franre-Pressc 

RANGOON — Burmese authorities disrobed 
1 50 monks and detained 10 members of Daw Aung 
San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy 
after co mmunal unrest in Mandalay, a resident of 
the city said T uesday . 

Buddhist monks in the central Burmese city have 
vandalized 12 mosques and other Muslim prop- 
erties since sectarian unrest broke out there m the 
middle of March, the resident said during a visit to 




Shireen Mazari, editor of the weekly 
Pulse newspaper, said: “I think it’s very 
significant for the first time in the post-Zia 
period we are going to move to a true 
parliamentary democracy. 

"I think die power tussle between the 
president and prune minister will be put to 
rest,” Mr. Mazari said. 

For half its 50 years as an independent 
nation, Pakistan has been ruled by military 
governments. During periods of democrat- 
ic rule, power has been shared tenuously 
among the prime minister, president ana 
army chief of staff. 

Mr. Sharif told The Associated Press thar 
President Farooq Leghari had “most 
democratically ana graciously agreed with 


• • i ■ " si/ 


the proposed amendments 1 ’ that reduce his 
power. 

The constitutional changes also increase 
a prime minister’s power in the appoint- 
ment of the army chief and commanders of 
other military services. 

Mr. Mazari said that the army’s power 
would also be curbed because a new na- 
tional security council of military and ci- 
vilian officials would now be advising a 
ceremonial president * ‘who is not going to 
have any real power.” 

A Pakistani president can still dismiss 
national and provincial governments, but 
only with the agreement of the prime min- 
ister in the case of Parliament or the chief 
minister of the affected province. 


National League of Democracy members 
who were detained included nine organizers and 
Htin Gyaw, who was elected a representative from 
Mandalay in nationwide elections that swept the 
party in 1990 into a Parliament that was never 
convened by the military government. 

Burmese and party officials could not imme- 
diately be reached for confirmation of the report 

A dusk-to-d&wn curfew remained in effect in 
Mandalay, where the attacks on Muslim property 
began more than two weeks ago after an alleged 
sexual assault on a Buddhist girl. 

The junta has blamed unnamed political agit- 
ators who it says are seeking to destabilize the 
country and sabotage its likely entry into the As- 
sociation of South East Asian Nations later tins 
year. 

Analysts and opposition sources in and outside the 
country have said that the attacks may be an ex- 
pression by monks of discontent with military rule. 

Before the outbreak of sectarian unrest, Burmese 
authorities were reported to have quashed attempts 
by younger monks in Mandalay to arrange demon- 
strations protesting tire death of 16 of their number 
in prison ramps. 

The military has also been accused of damaging 
die statue of Buddha at tire city's Payagyi Pagoda, 
searching for a legendary ruby that is said to bring 
victory in war to its possessor. 



Sberwra CrtsnVn* Amodued Pi™ 

INDIA’S TRUCKERS STRIKE — A laborer wheeling a cart past idled trucks in Bombay on Tuesday, 
the second day of an indefinite national strike to protesta new 5 percent service tax on transporting goods. 

Starving , North Koreans Eating Tree Bark 


QmtfdedbjOtrStffFmmDaptadiB 

TOKYO — North Korean food short- 
ages have become so bad that rations to 
the military have been cut for the first 
time and people were eating tree bark, 
the head of the UN World Food Program 
said Tuesday. 

Catherine Bertini, executive director 
of the United Nations program, warned 
that the situation was so dxre that North 
Korea could run out of food within the 
next three months. 

"Millions of people are going to 


starve to death this summer if the in- 
ternational community does not get a lot 
of food to North Korea soon,” she said. 

Although the military, which numbers 
1 . 1 million, was better fed than ordinary 
citizens in North Korea. Ms. Bertini 
said, she noted die first signs that the 
food crisis was hitting even the armed 
forces. 

"The government gives more food 
per person per day to the military than to 
die general population,” said Ms. 
Bertini, who visited North Korea last 


Sihanouk Son Calls for Referendum on the Monarchy 


C.impiaJ by (.fcr Stuff Fran Dupatcha 

PHNOM PENH — A Cambodian co- 
prime minister. Prince Norodom Ranariddh, 
called Tuesday fora referendum on whether 
to keep the country’s monarchy. 

Prince Ranariddh, son of King Norodom 
Sihanouk, said be bad no immediate designs 
on the throne but that the Cambodian people 
should decide the issue. 

The monarchy question has driven a 
wedge in Prince Ranariddh 's coalition gov- 
ernment with die other co-prime minister, 
Hun Sen, who has sought to curb the mon- 


archy's political influence. Hun Sen said in 
mid-March that be would cancel general 
elections expected in November 1 998 if die 
highly popular king abdicated to take part in 
politics. 

The prince’s comments followed a gren- 
ade attack Sunday that killed at least 16 
people. Doctors said several of the nearly 
120 people who were wounded were close 
to death. 

In the well-coordinated attack early 
Sunday, what appeared to be several as- 
sailants threw either three or four hand gren- 


ades into a small rally of about 200 people 
outside the National Assembly building in 
central Phnom Penh. 

The carnage heightened fears that the 
country's fragile democracy was degener- 
ating into feuds and violence and that the 
new elections would be difficult and 
bloody. 

The apparent target of Sunday’s attack. 
Sam Raiiisy, a leading opposition figure, has 
blamed Hun Sen for the attack. Hun Sen has 
blamed Sam Rainsy for organizing a rally 
that ended in bloodshed. (Reuters, NYT) 


month. "But even rations to the militaiy 
have been cut recently.” 

Floods in 1995 and 1996 ruined rice 
fields, washed away roads and left a 
half-million North Koreans homeless, 
according to relief organizations. 

Ms. Bertini, a former U.S. assistant 
secretary of agriculture, said North 
Korea was giving each citizen 100 grams 
l3 .5 ounces) of noea day. This is half die 
amount people received last year, and 
one-quarter of what they were given 
before the floods. 

Ms. Bertini said that fewer children 
were attending school because of a lack 
of food, and that she saw children show- 
ing signs of advanced malnutrition. 

“The situation is very dire and it’s 
going to get worse," she said "It is so 
bad that people are resorting to eating 
bark from trees, and as a result they are 
having a lot of intestinal problems be- 
cause it’s not easy to digest." 

On Tuesday, the Sou* Korean Red 
Cross announced a new aid package that 
includes $1.1 million in food relief to 
North Korea. 

Seoul on Monday lifted a ban on rice 
donations by civic and business groups, 
which have been barred from sending 
staple foods to the North. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


Bangladesh Leader 
Offers Rivals Talks 

DHAKA, Bangladesh — Prime 
Minister Hasina Wared has offered 
direct on all national issues 
with the main opposition leader in a 
bid to stave off any fresh anti-gov- 
ernment action. 

* ‘We are always ready to run the 
country through national consensus 
as we want to bring about well- 
being of the people” through 
"united and integrated efforts,’ ’ she 
was quoted as telling editors of na- 
tional dailies. 

Sheikh Hasina added m her talk 
Monday that open discussion could 
be held live on television or in any 
other form of dialogue chosen by 
her rival, Khaleda Zia. head of the 
Bangladesh Nationalist Party. 

Begum Zia’s party did not reject 
the offer outright, but said die right 
atmosphere had to be created fust. 

Begum Zia was prime minister 
for five years until she resigned in 
March 1996, prompting general 
elections. (AFP) 

Taiwan Holds Test 
Of New U.S. Missile 

TAIPEI — Taiwan said it has 
successfully tested a new U.S.- 
roade anti-aircraft missile that will 
strengthen its defenses against 
Chinese attack. 

Two Hawk mid-range ground-to- 
air-missiles fired from Taiwan's 
northwest coast Tuesday hit their 
targets and were recovered from the 
ocean, the military said. 

The missiles are the third gen- 
eration of the 30-year-old Hawk 
system, the militaiy spokesman’s 
office said, adding it was the first 
time the system has been test-fired 
outside the United Stales. (AP) 

Beijing to Discuss 
Dispute With Hanoi 

BEIJING — China is preparing 
for expert-level talks with Vietnam 
and expects the negotiations to re- 
solve a dispute with Hanoi over 
drilling by a Chinese oil rig in the 
South China Sea, Shen Guo fang, a 
Foreign Ministry spokesman, said 
Tuesday. 

Talks on the basis of "equality 
and friendship” could resolve such, 
problems, he said. 

Vietnam has said it hoped to hold 
talks with China as early as this week 
on competing claims to an offshore 
area where China's Kan Tan III oil . 
rig has been drilling, but this is the 
first Chinese confirmation that such ‘ 
talks were on track. (Reuters) 

VOICES From Asia 

Chu Hailan, the wife of Liu Ni- 
anchun. a labor activist, referring to 
the Chinese government White Pa- 
per that found '‘remarkable achieve- 
ments" last year in judicial guar- 
antees of Chinese citizens’ rights: "I 
don't know what this 'h uman rights’ 
my country is talking about is. I 
don’t know if this human rights in- 
cludes people like my husband. My 
husband’s health is getting worse 
and worse in jail.” (AFP) 


BOOKS 


BANKS: Tokyo Goes to Rescue 


UTOPIA PARKWAY: 
The Life and Work of 
Joseph Cornell 

By Deborah Solomon, 
illustrated. 426 pages. $30. 
Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 

Reviewed by 
Michiko Kakutani 

W ITH his famous shadow 
boxes, Joseph Cornell 
took the flotsam of daily life 
— cheap wine glasses, 
broken dolls, tiny medicine 
bottles, rusting thimbles, old 
cork stoppers and paper 
cutouts — and invested them 
with the luminous perman- 
ence of art. 

In works like “Penny Ar- 
cade Portrait of Lauren Bac- 
all,” “Medici Princess," 
“Roses des Vents " and ’ ’The 
Hotel Eden," the real is trans- 
formed into the surreal, the 
mundane into the magical: 
movie stars and paper parrots 
become iconic deities in Cor- 
nell’s intimate world; chil- 
dren’s toys, talismans of a re- 
membered past- As Deborah 
Solomon writes in her sym- 
pathetic new biography of 
Cornell, he “foand the sub- 
lime at the five-and-dime." 


At first glance, Cornell’s 
hermetic life would hardly 
seem to provide much fodder 
for a full-fledged biography. 
The artist, after alL spent al- 
most his entire adult life liv- 
ing with his mother and in- 
valid brother in a modest 
hoase on Utopia Parkway in 
Queens; there were no love 
affairs in Cornell’s life, no 
lasting artistic collabora- 
tions. 

“Cornell didn't drink," 
Solomon writes, “never 
learned to drive, and, to his 
regret, died a virgin.’’ After 
Cornell left his job at a textile 
.studio in Manhattan, he spent 
most of his days bickering 
with his mother, feeding the 
birds in the backyard and 
waiting for the mailman. 

What Solomon — the an 
critic for The Wall Street 
Journal and the author of 
“Jackson Pollock: A Biog- 
raphy" — has done in this 
elegant volume, however, is 
to make Cornell’s inner life 
ly real, enabling us to 
stand both the autobi- 
ographical impulses inform- 
ing his work and his imagin- 
ative transactions. 

Solomon does not dwell az 
length on the dysfunctional 


Living in the U.S.? 

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aspects of Cornell's life — his 
obsessive and highly defer- 
ential relationship with bis 
mother, his voyeuristic fas- 
cination with young women, 
his love of objects over 
people — but instead uses his 
fears and frustrations to il- 
luminate the painful sources 
of his art 

As for Solomon's appraisal 
of Cornell’s work, she not 
only debunks the early view 
of the artist as a witty mini- 
aturist who created glittering 
toys for grown-ups, but also 
contests the still popular view 
of him as a belated French 
Symbolist, a fellow traveler 
of the European Surrealists. 

She does not deny his Sym- 
bolist-Surrealist roots, but ar- 
gues for a broader view, a 
view that also recognizes his 
affinities with 19ib -century 
American realists and the Ab- 
stract Expressionists of the 
1950s. She suggests that Cor- 
nell bad a formative impact 
on later artists like Robert 
Rausche n berg and that in 
mixing the high and low, the 
classical and the kitsch, be 
anticipated the innovations of 
Pop Art and post-Modenusm 
as welL 

Though some of So- 
lomon’s arguments verge on 
hyperbole — she writes, for 
instance, that Cornell “can 
fairly be described as the most 
undervalued of valued Amer- 
ican artists" — her obvious 
passion for the artist's work 
helps her to explicate the 
mysteries of his elliptical art 
for die lay reader. 

Unhappy as a child, Cor- 
nell worshipped Houdini, that 
master of illusion and escape, 
and be would later roman- 
ticize the idea of childhood as 
a shining realm of innocence 
and purity. As a grown-up, 
Solomon says, he remained 
fearful of adult sexuality and 
developed a fascination with 
young women and girls, from 
long-dead ballerinas like 
Fanny Cerrito to contempor- 


aries like Susan Son tag, Patty 
Duke and Joan Collins. 

It is Solomon's contention 
that Cornell "was the most 
autobiographical of artists, 
obsessively relating his life 
story — or lack of one — in 
his work," and in the course 
of this volume, she tries to 
decode many of his best- 
known works. 

She notes that many of his 
earliest constructions — pill- 
box assemblages and di- 
oramas placed under glass 
bells — "suggest something 
sickly, airless and confined: 


the life of an invalid ” 
Solomon reads Cornell's 


ap B i 
family 


Set,” as a kind of family por- 
trait, with the four Cornell 
children symbolized by four 
cylinder-shaped blocks, and 
their mother by a wine glass 
containing an egg. In later 
works, she suggests, the pro- 
liferation of empty goblets 
and broken pipes hints at 
sexual impotence and unre- 
quited longing. 


Michiko Kakutani is on the 
staff of The New York Times. 


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Coo (ioued from Page 1 

bear part of die burden, a hall- 
mark of the traditional con- 
voy financial system. 

Both banks will eliminate 
jobs, dispose of all overseas 
operations and shut some 
branches at home, but they 
will also get assistance from 
stronger banks. 

The benchmark Nikkei in- 
dex fell 1 34 points Tuesday to 
close at 17,869, partly in re- 
action to the fall in stocks in 
New York, but Japanese bank 
shares led the decline. Nippon 
Credit shed 1 9 yen to 261 year. 
Hokkaido Takushoku shares 
were not traded. 

Nippon Credit revealed 
Tuesday just bow near insolv- 
ency it was. It said it had 1 .260 
trillion yen in bad loans, or 8 
percent of total assets. After 
writing off 460 billion yen in 
bad loans, its loss for (he 1996 
fiscal year ending Monday is 
285 billion yen. This loss 
erodes its capital base by 
three-quarters, to 100 billion 
yen, or 2 percent of assets. 

Under international stan- 
dards set forth by the Bank of 
International Settlements, 
banks should have an ad- 
equacy ratio of 8 percent. But 
Nippon Credit wul pull out of 
international banking, so that 
it will not have to adhere to 
those standards. 

[Officials said die hwnir 
would close and liquidate 
overseas branches in London, 
New York. Los An igeies, 
Singapore and Hong Kong, 
and representative offices m 
Rankfurt, Paris, Beijing, 
Seoul, Jakarta, S hanghai and 
Bangkok, Agence France- 
Presse reported.] 

Hiroshi Kubota, Nippon 
Credit's president, tried to 
present the pullout in a dif- 
ferent light. 

“We are pulling out of our 
overseas business, and (his is 
regrettable, but it is a good 
opportunity to break away 
from the mentality that we are 




6 


flit" 

i - i 

V‘ ' ‘ 
■i:i 


all in the same boat," he said 
at a press conference Tuesday. 
Moreover, he said that in the 
future, a merger or even a stra- 
tegic alliance with a foreign 
partner could be an option. 

. "I see. for example, be- 
coming an affiliate of a for- 
eign financial institution as a 
conceivable option," he said. 
"I think we could have a 
blue-eyed president at our i 
bank, for example/’ 

Japanese press reports 
have mentioned J. P. Morgan 
as a possible foreign partner. 
A spokeswoman at the com- 
pany denied that Nippon 
Credit has asked her company 
to take over any business op- 
erations, but she would not 
comment on the possibility of 
an alliance or tie. ' 

For the moment, the plan 
for Nippon Credit calls for 
insurance companies to con- 
vert a total of 15Q billion yen 
in subordinated loans to the 
bank into ordinary &ares and 
preferred stock, 

Nippon Credit will then re- 
ceive a capital injection from 
hanks and fro m public funds. | 
About 70 billion yen will come 
from other banks' and share- 
holding institutions and 80 bil- 
lion yen frcmrtbe Bank of Ja- 
pan, an infusion that amounts 
to using public funds. 

Still, Nippon Credit has 
many hurdles ahead. The re- 
structuring plan includes liq- 
uidating us three affiliates, 
which have just over 1 trillion 
yen in loan losses and were a 
significant cause of the 
bank's downfall. 

Nippon Credit will also 
pare 20 percent of its work- 
force, e liminate dividends, 
shave salaries — the bank’s 
president, . Hiroshi Kubota, 
said he would give up all his 
pay — and shrink a third of its 
domestic branches. . 

Hokkaido .Takushoku will 
merge with Hokkaido Bank, a 
regional institution in 
many ways was its main com- 
petitor. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2. 1997 


EUROPE 


Italy Firm on Leading Troops to Albania to Assist Relief Effort 


Can f^^<^Su^t^De^ach r , 

ROME — Italy said Tuesday that it 

ahead with P la5to tad all 

international security force to Albania de 
SJF domestic *£££*$& 

wsr. ™ 

said^h?foi IiniSler B '“ amin o Andrea tta 
«uaine force, expected to number about 

bSbyApril^ 5011 ***» in AI- 

“Wben you are . good members of a 
community 5?ou have to make haste and do 
¥ JJ ,Ur dniy* he said, adding that he saw 

factors* 5011 1 ° hesitate '' because of Sfflud 

Ketiso insisted that the Italian Navy 
would contoiue interdiction patrols in the 
where Albanian authorities say at 
least 83 refugees drowned Friday when 
their boat sank after a collision with an 
Italian corvette. 


“The Adriatic- patrols continue,''. Mr. 
Andrea tta said after he addressed a joint 
session of the .Senate defense and foreign 
affairs commissions on the disaster. 

Italy began the parols last month after 
some 13,000 Albanians fled to Italian 
shores in an uncontrolled exodus from 
their country's armed upheaval. 

■ Italy denied Tuesday that its navy had 
rammed the refugee ship. Mr. Andreatta 
told Parliament that he had invited Al- 
banian Navy experts to join investigations 
into the disaster and promised a full and 
open inquiry. 

Calls from some government supporters 
for a halt to the naval patrols and for Italy to 
keep its troops out of Albania grew after 
the disaster and reported Albanian threats 
to the safety of Italian forces. 

Fausto Bertinotti, a leftist leader whose 
Refounded Communist Party ensures die 
government its majority in the lower 


house, said he was against sending a se- 
curity force. 

It would only aggravate the situation in 
Albania and expose the mission “to all 
sons of dangers.” Mr. Berfinotri said. 

The Greens, who are part of Prime Min- 
ister Romano Prodi’s center-left coalition, 
also expressed misgivings. 

The proposed multinational force, 
which has received approval from the UN 
Security Council and the Albanian Par- 
liament, will require a vote of support from 
both houses of die Italian Parliament. The 
votes are expected this week. 

The force is designed to secure the ports 
of Durres and Vlore and Tirana airport for 
a planned European humanitarian relief 
mission to Albania following the impov- 
erished state's slide into anarchy. 

Mr. Prodi and other ministers planned ro 
appear before Parliament on Wednesday to 
answer questions about the mission. Also 


Wednesday, European military officials 
planned to meet in Rome to discuss which 
countries will take part, how many troops 
will go. iheir destinations and exact man- 
date. 

Italy has said it will send 2.000 soldiers. 
Spain is willing to contribute up to 500 
men. said an embassy spokesman. Arturo 
Claver. Prime Minister Necraettin 
Erbakan said that Turkey would send 500 
soldiers and, in Paris, the Defense Ministry 
announced Tuesday that France would 
send 1.000. 

Greece, Romania and Austria also are 
expected to take part 

The Nordic countries, however, an- 
nounced that they would not contribute 
troops. 

At a weekly informal meeting, in Green- 
land. the region's defense ministers de- 
cided that it would be impossible io or- 
ganize a battalion on such short notice, said 


Derailment 
Fatal to 18 

Train Going Too Fast , 
' Spanish Official Says 

The Associated Press 

HUARTE ARAQUIL, Spain — A 
train that derailed in northern Spain, 
killing 18 Spaniards and inju ring 
dozens, was traveling at more than four 
rimes the regulation speed, die state 
railroad chairman said Tuesday. 

The train, carrying 248 people re- 
turning from Easter vacation, was trav- 
eling at 137 kilometers (82 miles) an 
hour when the accident occurred 
Monday night, said the railroad official, 
Miguel Corsini. 

l It was the first of two t rain accidents 
l in Spain in less than 24 hours. On Tues- 
day morning, a train traveling from Bar- 
celona to Malaga derailed outside Mad- 
rid, killing a French woman and a 
railroad employee and injuring 16 
people. 

The earlier accident, in northern 
Spain, occurred as the train switched 
tracks to let another train pass. At that 
moment its speed should not have been 
above 30 kilometers an hour, Mr. 
Corsini told national radio. 

"It was going fast, very fast, and then 
just tipped over and matte a loud 
screeching sound." said 14-year-old 
Jose Antonio Ibero. who was riding by 
on his bicycle when the accident oc- 
curred outside Huarte Araquil, a farm- 
ing village of 1.000. 


the Danish defense spokesman. Major Nils 
Greier. ( Reuters . AP. AFP) 

■ Many Stomachs Growling 

A UN mission said Tuesday that 400.000 
people were threatened by hunger in Al- 
bania and that it would push ahead to dis- 
tribute aid before the arrival of the security 
force, Reuters reported from Tirana. 

“The country does not presently face an 
immediate large-scale humanitarian 
crisis." said Paul Hebert, an American 
from the UN Department of Humanitarian 
Affairs and the head of the mission. But he 
added: “Immediate humanitarian needs 
do exist.” 

He said that 140,000 of the pooresr fam- 
ilies, or about 400,000 people in Albania's 
overall population of 3.4 million, had been 
deprived of minimal welfare benefits by 
the colJ3pse of central government con- 
trol. 


BRIEFLY 



J. L. Pmo/Agme* France -Pres se 

Railroad cars lying overturned east of Madrid on Tuesday after a derailment of the Barcelona-Malaga train 
Teft two persons dead and more than a dozen injured. It was the second fatal train wreck in Spain In 24 hours. 


Tbeengine and three cars tipped over. 
A fourth car derailed but remained up- 
right. - 

The train began its journey in Bar- 
celona - and was headed for Iran in the 
Basque region when it derailed outside 
Huarte Araquil, about 300 kilometers 
mirth of Madrid. 

The track switch normally takes place 
at a station farther north but alternative 
plans were arranged after that station 


was damaged by fire, said a railway 
spokesman. Javier Sevillana. The police 
said die station had been damaged by 
supporters of die Basque separatist 
group ETA. 

Dozens of townspeople joined in the 
rescue operations by distributing 
blankets, water and other supplies. As 
rescue workers labored through the 
night, the most seriously injured pas- 
sengers were flown by helicopter to 


hospitals in nearby Pamplona. 

Of the 90 people injured. 40 were still 
in hospitals by midday Tuesday, the 
railroad spokesman said 
The dead ranged in age from 13 to 64 
and were all Spaniards. 

It was the highest casualty toll in a 
train accident in Spain since Sept. 24, 
1980, when 26 people were killed and 
40 injured as a train collided with a 
bus. 


Russian Farm Reform’s Fruit: a Rural Underclass 


By Vanora Bennett 

Los Angeles Times ' 


SYRK3NO. Russia — The only crop 
in the fields is abandoned tractors rust- 
ing in the snow. The workers, have not- 
pet been paid the pittance they earned 
last November. Whole villages have 


’ l 

emptied, rotted away or burned 
Whichever way he turns, “Uncle. 
Kolya” Suslov can see only five or six 
sagging log homesteads, huddled among 
birch trees, where local people from his 
former collective farm are still strag- 
gling to force a living from the soiL 
“Almost everything that we used to 
have on the farm has been wiped from 
the face of the Earth,” Mr. Suslov says. 
"And what can we do? Nothing.” 

The misery of the vast Volga farm, 
about 160 kilometers (100 miles) north 
of Moscow, is the bitter fruit of post- 
Soviet agricultural reform begun five 
years ago by President Boris Yeltsin. 

To his bewilderment, Mr. Suslov 
finds himself caught up in a giant social 
experiment. More than half a century 
after he grew up amid die cruelties of 
j Soviet farm collectivization and the 
hunger and suffering of World War H, 
the weathered 68-year-old is now living 
through “forced decollectivization.” 

Agricultural reform’s most visible re- 
sult has been to create a new underclass 
of rural poor, tied to the land because 
they have no money to leave, with little 
more hope of freedom or well-being than 
their serf ancestors had a century ago. 

“Now we have private property and 
democracy, but they haven t brought us 
anything except pain and poverty,’ said 
Nikolai Zhadkin, a Volga farm director. 

In one way. the “new serfs” of Russia 
are even worse off than their forebears. 


Bomb Topples 
Czar Nicholas 

Reuters 

MOSCOW — A bomb oblit- 
erated the only monument in Mos- 
cow to Russia's last czar, Nicholas 
11, on Tuesday. . . 

"A preliminary investigation 
has proved that the explosion was 
earned out in a very professional 
wav." a spokesman for the Mos- 
cow office of the Federal Security 
Service said. "Practically nothing 
is left from the monument. 

The 10 -meter bronze statue was 
erected last year at a remote sue in 
northeast Moscow, People who 
live nearby said they beard a loud 
explosion ai about 6:30 AM. ™ 
Tuesday. A spokesman for die All- 
Russia Monarchist Center said the 
act could be related ro a visii to 
Moscow by Grand DitfhessLe- 
onida Georgiyevna, a descendant 
of the royal family- _ — : 


slaves who were tied to their master's 
lauds by feixfal laws that, until 1861, 
deprived them of ritizenship. 

Under the czars, the countryside 
* the point where 


overcrowding was considered a problem. 
When the serfs suffered, they suffered in 
die company of families and friends. 

But the survivors of this century's 
experimentation are watching the slow 
death of their agricultural system in 
increasing isolation. Anyone with the 
wit, the courage or the cash to escape 
fled to town long ago. 

“There’s no one left to do the work." 
Mr. Suslov said. “Everyone’s scattered. 
All theold folk havedied, and city people 
have bought up half their homes as hol- 
iday cottages, and the rest of the houses 
have burned down. Even my children 
and grandchildren have aD ran off." 

There has been no official census since 
Soviet days, but a United Nations report 
published in 1994, titled “World urb- 
anization Prospects," showed the Rus- 
sian Federation’s rural population drop- 
ping 1.5 million between 1985 and 1990, 
then shrmknre an additional 3.5 million 
— from 38o milli on to 35 million — 
between the 1991 Soviet collapse and the 
report’s projected figure for 1995. 

The original idea behind the 1992 
farm reform by Mr. Yeltsin’s govern- 
ment was to kill off the pernicious So- 
viet state fanning bureaucracy, which 
was strangling free enterprise in the 
countryside. Peasants would be given 
the chance to buy land and become 
private farmers. 

Those who stayed on the giant col- 
lective and state farms of old times would 
see than transformed into modem free- 
market enterprises in which they would 
all have a share but that would henceforth 


be known as joint-stock companies. 

But the reform was so badly thought- 
out that it never brought the hoped-for 
flowering of new rural initiatives. 

Loans were hard to come by, farm 
equipment and fertilizer even more so. 
Because the law still made it impossible 
for private farmers to sell any land they 
took on if they ran into financial trouble, 
hardly anyone wanted to take the risk of 
buying — about 95 percent of farmland 
in Russia is nor in private hands. 

Land privatization, a fashionable top- 
ic in the early post-Soviet years, has 
been eclipsed by more pressing prob- 
lems. Mr. Yeltsin did not even mention 
it in his annua! state of the nation ad- 
dress March 6. 

Harvests shrink and shrink. Russia's 
1996 grain harvest was 76 million tons, 
just a touch above 1995's 69 million — 
the worst harvest in three decades. In 
1994. Russia produced 89 million tons, 
while back in the Soviet days of 1990, 
its output was 128 million. Imports of 
wheat, rye and flour grow every year. 

The renamed state farms are in dire 
straits. They no longer receive fat So- 
viet-style state subsidies, equipment or 
salaries. Thrown back on their own re- 
sources, they now pay their workers out 
of die money they earn from selling 
their produce to factories. 

But the factories are caught in a vi- 
cious nationwide cycle of debt, and few 
of them have the cash to pay farms for 
their grain, meat and milk. 

The Volga farm got its last tractor six 
years ago. It has been unable to afford 
new equipment since. 

Now its two main clients — milk- 
products factories in nearby Kimry — 
are feeling the pinch of Russia’s debt 
crisis. One factory owes the farm 


$50,000 for milk supplied this year. The 
other simply swaps the farm's milk for 
factory cheese. 

Mr." Zhadkin says the farm survives 
only because of the vacationers from 
Moscow who have bought up many of 
the picturesque old log houses as sum- 
mer cottages, employing residents to do 
repairs or build saunas. “In the summer, 
the outsiders swell our local economy 
by at least a third," he said. “There are 
more of them here in the summer than 
there are residents." 

All but 150 of the Volga farm’s 500 
regular inhabitants are pensioners, with 
only their memories of a better past to 
sustain them. 

“Even during the war, things were 
better," Mr. Suslov said. “We didn’t 
have any machines, and we were poor, 
and we worked like dogs, but we'd have 
a sing-song and a bottle or two — or three 
— of vodka as we worked. And there 
were plenty of people to work with." 

When their $20-a-raontfa pensions 
stopped coming last year — another 
symptom of Russia’s debt crisis — Mr. 
Suslov and his wife bought a cow, a piglet 
and some chickens. Together with the 
vegetables the Suslovs grow, the animals 
provide enough food for them to survive. 
“The only thing we buy now is bread. We 
fend for ourselves." Mr. Suslov said 
gendy. “What else can we do about not 
getting our pensions? Scream? 

“The oruy thing people care about 
nowadays is profit, profit, profit,” he 
added. “We used to keep rams here, but 
they say that's not profitable now. They 
don't sow crops anymore, because 
that’s not profitable either. Nothing 
seems to be profitable. Even living's not 
profitable anymore, and there’s nothing 
left for us to do but lie down and die.” 


Yeltsin Sets Union Debate 

• MOSCOW — Facing an outcry over plans 
to rapidly integrate Russia and Belarus, the 
Kremlin announced Tuesday that it would 
endorse only a shorter version of a union treaty 
due to be signed Wednesday. 

President" Boris Yeltsin and President Al- 
exander Lukashenko will sign the document in 
the Kremlin, said Mr. Yeltsin's spokesman. 
Sergei Yasuzhembsky. But a more detailed 
version will only be initialed. 

The full treaty will be put to public debate 
and ratification in a month's time, he said. 
However, there will be no referendum, despite 
Mr. Yeltsin's call for one in January, Interfax 
quoted Mr. Yastrzhembsky as saying. 

The Kremlin appeared to be playing for 
time in the face of opposition from liberal 
politicians and some government officials, 
who said leaked copies of the foil treaty 
showed it would take integration too far, too 
fast, and threaten economic reforms. (AFP) 

Serbs Attack Croat Rally 

ZAGREB. Croatia — UN authorities in 
Croatia’s lasr Serbian enclave said Tuesday that 
security for elections there would be increased 
after Serbs pelted candidates of President 
FranjoTudjman’s party with eggs and bricks. 

The April 13 vote in Eastern Slavonia will 
set in motion the return of the enclave to 
central government rule by July, six years after 
a Serbian minority waged war against Croa- 
tian independence. 

The attack Monday by about 300 Serbs on 
candidates of Mr. Tudjman's HDZ parry un- 
derlined ethnic animosities, but the UN Tran- 
sitional Authority said only an extremist 
fringe had been involved. It rescued the Croa- 
tian candidates and removed them from the 
enclave in armored vehicles. (Reuters) 

Blair Afraid, Major Says 

LONDON — Prime Minister John Major 
said Tuesday he remained ready to hold a 
television election debate with die Labour 
opposition chief, Tony Blair, whom he ac- 
cused of being “chicken" in backing away 
from the challenge. 

“We the Conservative Part}' have accepted 
the terms of the broadcasters' proposals as 
they stand even though they are not perfect 
from our point of view.” Mr. Major said. 

Labour said last week that it regarded ne- 
gotiations on the format of a debate before the 
May 1 elections as at an end. It accused the 
Conservatives of being inflexible. (Reuters) 

UN Adds Bosnia Police 

UNITED NATIONS. New York — The 
UN Security Council has authorized an ad- 
ditional 186 UN police officers and 1 1 civilian 
monitors for Bosnia and agreed to consider 
strengthening their mandate to investigate 
crimes and other abuses. 

The decision Monday to add to die 1,721- 
member international police force came after 
the peace coordinator, Carl Bildr. asked for 
more officers to be posted in the contested 
northern city of Brcko. The deadline to decide 
on jurisdiction over Brcko is March 15. 1998. 
The city, the border with Croatia, currently is 
part of the Serbia half of Bosnia. ( Reuters ) 

Germans Protest Killings 

KREFELD, Germany — About 1.000 
mourners marched through this city to the site 
of an arson attack that left a Turkish woman 
and two of her teenage children dead. The 
police said Tuesday they had found no ev- 
idence that the blaze was set as a political or 
anti-foreigner act. bui thar the investigation 
was continuing in all directions. 

A 41-year-old woman and her 19-year-old 
daughter died eariy Monday when they 
jumped from a third-floor window. The wom- 
an's 1 7-year-old son was found dead inside the 
apartment. (AP) 


U.S. Farm Workers’ Wages Keep Falling 


New fork Times Sen-ice 

SALINAS. California — Despite 
decades of efforts to improve their 
lot, the wages of America’s more 
rhnn 2 million farm laborers have 
failed to keep up with inflation for 20 
years, making it difficult for many of 
them to afford adequate housing and 
other necessities. 

Agricultural economists and some 
industrv surveys have found thai 
farm workers’ wages, after discount- 
ing for rising prices, have fallen 20 
percent or more over the past two 
decades; a U.S. Department of Ag- 
riculture study , found a 7 percent 
decline, to an average of $6.17 an 
hour, over that period. 

Here in Salinas, a lush farm center 
near California’s central coast, the 
piece rate for picking broccoli re- 
mains 20 percent below levels of a 
decade ago. even before considering 
inflation. In nearby Watsonville, the 
average wage for strawberry workers - 
has dropped from $6 55 an hour m 
1985 to $6.25 today — that, too. 


without taking inflation into ac- 
count 

“In terms of constant dollars, 
there’s been a significant decline in 
wages, we think by over 25 percent 
over the last 20 years," Dot Vil- 
larejo. executive director of the Cali- 
fornia Institute for Rural Studies, 
said. “You have a situation where 
there is a substantial surplus of work- 
ers, almost all of them immigrants, 
and labor unions have lost their im- 
portance in terms of helping to main- 


tain wage levels for farm workers.” 

Making the economic squeeze 
worse, many farm laborers now work 
fewer hours a year, mainly because 
farmers can choose from a large pool 
of immigrant workers, most of them 
Mexican, to get their harvesting done 
more quickly. As 3 result, many farm 
workers, whose jobs often involve 
bending over for hours at a time 
under a searing sun, complain that 
their earnings have slid to $8,000 a 
year from $9,000 a few years ago. 


Chechens Demand Ransom for Journalists 


The Associtned Press 
MOSCOW — Chechen field com- 
manders refused Tuesday to free five 
journalists, telling a Russian nego- 
tiator that a ransom must be paid for 
their release. 

According to the Interfax news 
agency, the negotiator, Magomed 
l alboyev, head of the security coun- 
cil in die -neighboring republic of 


Dagestan, said the kidnappers in- 
sisted on $3 million in ransom. 

Mr. Talboyev said the command- 
ers assured him that the journalists 
— four Russians and one Italian — 
were being held in good conditions. 
All were seized in Grozny, 
Chechnya's capital. The Russians 
were taken on March 4 and the Itali- 
an on Feb. 23. 



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PAGE 6 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1997 

EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Jtcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


Sribunc 


rvBLisHtst wmi ni£ .vn wn> tijj f.< ».w the wuaacw post 


Danger in the Mideast 


The Israelis and Palestinians are on 
the verge of a diplomatic breakdown. 
Quite soon there could be no “"peace 
process." Benjamin Netanyahu ap- 
pears to believe that Israel has a feas- 
ible substitute for peace in the coun- 
try's military power, its fitness for the 
global economy and its capacity' to 
reap American sympathy as a victim of 
terrorism. Reeling from weakness. 
Yasser Arafat seems unable to produce 
either a halt to the suicide bombers and 
the stones or what Palestinians would 
regard as progress toward statehood. 
For the Israelis security, for the Pal- 
estinians statehood — these are the 
goals in the peace process, but it is not 
advancing them. 

The American government fell short 
in its recent effort to revive the stalled 
negotiations by the familiar spark of an 
appeal to talk by diplomat Dennis Ross. 
But that does not mean that the United 
States has no further relevance. It is 
time to consider moving from the em- 
phasis on process to becoming a more 
active de finer and interpreter of the 
broad terms that the two Mideast sides 
have already agreed to pursue. Bill 
Clinton has shrunk from this more ac- 
tive strategy. But his earlier course has 


lost pulse. If he is not to engage more 
div ir 


deeply in the Mideast, he must lower 
die whole American regional profile — 
an invitation to major eruptions. 


Such a decision requires, of course, 
close attention to both Middle East 
parties. Toward the Palestinians it 
means demanding that Mr. Arafat 
abandon altogether his equivocation 
toward terrorism. He can no longer 
plead even implicitly that Israeli pro- 
vocations justify a violent response. 
Nothing explains that away in a ne- 
gotiation aimed at building peace be- 
tween neighbors. Other, political 
levers remain available, including, if it 
is deemed productive — and we doubt 
chat it would be — a rollback of ex- 
isting Arab ties with Israel. 

A decision to engage more actively 
could produce friction with Israel and 
with those of Israel's American sup- 
porters who have a different view of 
how the United States should dis- 
charge its profound moral obligations 
to the Jewish state. But that is an ar- 
gument not for tiptoeing past the issue 
and avoiding political risks but for 
proceeding with firmness and care. 
American obligations run not to a par- 
ticular Israeli government's policy of 
annexation or to a specific Israeli tactic 
of preemption but to the country's en- 
during security. In the dangerous cir- 
cumstances now settling upon the re- 
gion, this is where the focus of 
American thinking about Israel and the 
Palestinians must turn. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Garbled China Policy 


It would be understandable if the 
Chinese leadership were confused 
about America's China policy after the 
recent visits by Vice President A1 Gore 
and House Speaker Newt Gingrich. 
Mr. Gore arrived with a conciliatory 
message about improving relations 
and seemed hobbled by the White 
House fund-raising mess. Mr. Gin- 
grich delivered a forceful statement of 
concern about China's human rights 
abuses and suppression of dissert, and 
even threw in a gratuitous commitment 
to defend Taiwan militarily if it was 
attacked by China. 

Mr. Gingrich is entitled to his views, 
and his comments about China's re- 
cord were refreshingly candid com- 
pared with the oblique criticism 
favored these days by the Clinton ad- 
ministration. But he was presumptuous 


to speak for the United States, par- 
ticularly 


Jarly on the sensitive issue of 
Taiwan. It is not for congressional 
leaders to set the terms of American 
foreign policy or to make blanket com- 
mitments about the use of force. 

That said, Mr. Gingrich's comments 
on the Chinese political scene were in 
some ways more honest than Mr. 
Gore's anemic formulations. The Clin- 
ton emphasis on engagement and trade 
has severely undercut American sup- 
port for human rights and democracy 
m China. Mr. Gore seemed to go out of 
his way last week to praise "a sig- 
nificant advance in the process of de- 
mocracy" in China that few others 
have been able to detect. He also ap- 
peared to downplay American con- 
cerns over China's heavy-handed ap- 
proach to Hong Kong, which will 
revert to Chinese control on July I. 

In contrast, Mr. Gingrich chose 
Hong Kong as his platform to warn 
Chinese leaders. that attempts to con- 
fine freedom to economic issues while 


refusing to allow it in politics would 
surely fail. He referred explicitly to 
"the lack of basic freedom — speech, 
religion, assembly, the press” in China 
today. The speaker maintained this 
same blunt tone in his talks with 
Chinese leaders. It would not be a bad 
idea if administration officials adopted 
the same straight-speaking approach. 

The administration, like its prede- 
cessors. has wisely left the Chinese to 
think hard about how America would 
react to an invasion of Taiwan by the 
mainland. Washington and Beijing 
have long understood that good re- 
lations depend on China's dealing 
peacefully with Taiwan. Beijing is not 
likely to mistake a lack of specificity 
for softness, particularly after the dis- 
patch of two American aircraft carrier 
groups to waters off Taiwan during last 
year's Chinese missile tests. 

Thar Mr. Gore and Mr. Gingrich 
offered such divergent messages may 
well be explained by the political pre- 
dicament each man faces in Wash- 
ington. Mr. Gore, eager to protect his 
presidential aspirations in 2000, was 
cautious to a fault while in China, so 
anxious to appear evenhanded that he 
ended up looking ineffectual. Mr. Gin- 
grich. battered by his ethics case and 
virtually invisible in Washington in 
recent weeks, returned to center stage 
in China carrying the banner for a more 
assertive China policy. 

Some China specialists have en- 
couraged the Clinton administration to 
keep the Chinese offbalance by mixing 
conciliation and confrontation. That 
may work in theory, but after the Gore 
and Gingrich visits the idea looks un- 
tenable. The only impression that the 
Chinese got was that the United States 
does not have a coherent China policy, 
or even a clear chain of command. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Jackie Robinson + 50 


The American baseball season that 
began this Tuesday is the 50th since 
Jackie Robinson broke the game’s col- 
or line, ft is not entirely an uplifting 
tale, and it is far from over. Mr. Robin- 
son, carefully chosen and counseled by 
Brooklyn Dodgers President Branch 
Rickey to become the first black player 
in the major leagues, restrained himself 
ail season in the face of vicious racial 
hectoring from fans and other ball- 
players, and played well enough that he 
was named rookie of the year. The 
following season he was voted most 
valuable player in the National League. 
Yet ir was 10 years more before the 
Philadelphia Phillies hired a black 
player, 12 for the Boston Red Sox. 


Today, black players are a huge part 
of the game, the talents on which fran- 


chises are built. Yet the management 
and ownership ranks remain over- 
whelmingly white. Baseball, a thriving 
presence among black Americans dur- 
ing the segregation era. when Negro 


League teams drew huge crowds, has 
lost much of its appeal to black kids 
: played th 


who would have played the game in 


generations past, and to black fans. 
Whether baseball turns this situation 
around depends on a great deal more 
than the commemorative patches that 
players are wearing this season. 

In the meantime, it is a good thing to 
honor the courage of Jackie Robinson 
(who died 25 years ago at the age of 
53). to reflect on the cruelty of the race 
prejudice he faced and to recall con- 
spicuous acts of decency. Without this 
anniversary observance, many might 
never have’ heard the story of how Pee 
Wee Reese, a southern boy just back 
from the war. stopped a petition drive 
against Mr. Robinson in the Dodgers' 
clubhouse by refusing to sign, or how 
one day when the curses and insults 
were particularly awful. Mr. Reese 
(now 78 and fully recovering, we hope, 
from lung cancer surgery) called time- 
out. trotted over from shortstop and 
just stood there with his hand on Mr. 
Robinson's shoulder for a long mo- 
ment. looking steadily into the crowd. 
Never a slugger, he hit rite equivalent 
of five home runs that day. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


“T* IV rvTERMprw 11.55* 

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America and France Can Help Zaire Togethe 


W ASHINGTON — As with any 
crisis, the civil war in Zaire 
points to both danger and opportunity. 
With nine neighbors, Zaire is the con- 
tinent's third-largest state — four times 
the sire of France. What happens can 
make or break sub-Saharan Africa. 

If the country remains a vast zone of 
economic decay and political failure, it 
limits and threatens a whole region. A 
Zaire on the road to reconstruction and 
development could open the way to a 
regional renaissance. There is no more 
important challenge in Africa. 

If this were not Africa. Americans 
might be having a serious strategic de- 
bate. But Zaire epitomizes a region that 
Americans treat as a strategic backwa- 
ter. As African states have increasingly 
differentiated themselves into winners 
and losers, economically and politically, 
Zaire has hetpoi to anchor the losing 
team (along with comparably vast and 
ill-governed Sudan and Nigeria). 

Mobutu Sese Seko and his Ngbandi 
clan may have cornered the market for 
parasitic Meritocracy and sheer bad 
governance. But they have no mono- 
poly on African corruption, brutality or 
economic shortsightedness. 

In fact, it took foreign intervention, 
and the spillover effects of the 
Rwandan genocide of 1994, to spark 
the current rebellion in Zaire. 

Historically, foreign intervention 
(French, Belgian. American. Moroccan) 
has primarily favored the Zairian gov- 
ernment Now the pattern is reversed 
Those neighbors of Zaire that felt the 
sting of Marshal Mobutu's meddling 
have turned the tables by backing the 
Tutsi-dominated rebel alliance lea by 
Lament Kabila. For Uganda, Rwanda 
and Angola, it Is payback time. 

But if the Zairian parties to the con- 
flict fragment and continue fighting, 
the country’s neighbors could become 
mired in the chaos, adding weight to 
Africa's losing team. 

On the other band, a negotiated tran- 
sition to a stable post-Mobutu Zaire 
could bring a powerful boost to the 
entire region. Failure to capture this 


By Chester A. Crocker 


potential would be a real lost oppor- 
tunity not only for Africa but for the 
rest of the world as well. 

Here is why. 

Zaire is the bridge between the 1 1 
nations of southern Africa with real 
potential for development and the rest 
of Africa, including pockets of pro- 
gress in East Africa. Zaire's enormous 
hydropower capacity could meet the 
electricity needs of much of Central 
and southern Africa. The copper belt, 
which- Zaire shares with Zambia, could 
catapult the African copper mining in- 
dustry to world-class status. 

Marshal Mobutu’s recent return to 
the spotlight in Kinshasa does not mean 
that a political comeback is in the works 


Today, Zairians don't 


appear to want 
theii 


>ir big country to 
be broken up. 


or that we have to choose between him 
and Mr. Kabila. Marshal Mobutu, who 
has dominated and misruled Zaire 
since 1965, has been disengaging from 
real authority for years and may soon 
be history. IBs “regime’' is less a gov- 
ernment than a collection of security 
services loosely linked to an ineffectual 
cabinet and an unpaid civilian bureau- 
cracy sharing the capital with nearly 
800 fractious parliamentarians and 
members of the elite political class. 

But before we celebrate Mobutu 
Sese Seko's political demise, we 
should look at the larger picture. This is 
not about Marshal Mobutu, who, as a 
Cold War partner of the West, was at 
best a truculent and difficult client It is 
about how and when he goes, what and 
who fills the vacuum and whether the 
Zairian military and political establish- 
ment breaks apart sowing seeds of 


future turmoil not only in Zaire but 
throughout die region. 

It is by no means certain that the 
political status quo will fall like one 
ripe fruit into the hands of the rebel 
alliance. Nor is it guaranteed that die 
alliance will hold together as it po- 
sitions itself to take over the country. 

Then there is the question of whether 
Zaire remains intact. For more than 
three decades. Marshal Mobutu sound- 
ed this very theme to extract support 
from abroad, and we largely accepted 
his warnings. Given die Cold War com- 
petition and die secessionist challenges 
to the unity of the former Belgian 
Congo in the early post-independence 
years, this was understandable. 

But now chat Marshal Mobutu is 
gravely ill, the threats to national unity 
and territorial integrity are barely vis- 
ible. Interestingly, none of the major 
figures in Zaire call for secession- One 
legacy of the Mobutu regime may be a 
surprising level of national conscious- 
ness among Zairians. 

Some argue that Zaire is ungovern- 
ably large. But Zairians do not appear 
to want their country dismantled. Be- 
sides, where would the new bou n da ri es 
be drawn? Who would decide ibis? 

In any case, Africa does not need 
more mini-states. It most certainly does 
not need outside encouragement for 
e thnic opportunists and tribal militias. 
Warlordism, not self-determination or 
liberty, would be the result. A divided 
Zaire invites neighbors to asserr and 


protea their interests. Already, forces 
from A 


Angola, Rwanda, Uganda and 
Burundi are operating on Zairian soil. 

The United States must choose a 
strategy for dealing with the conflict in 
Zaire , a challenge that it has so far 
studiously avoided. 

American statements, signals, ac- 
tions and inactions have left important 
partners, such as France, South Africa 
and Ethiopia, mystified if not wary. Are 


not, what are we doing to stop it? Are 
there circumstances in whit* we would 
support a multilateral humanitarian mis- 
sioaTas Canadian, French and Untied 
Nations officials have proposed? 

W ashin gton has consulted with 
European and African allies- ft has 
supported the UN wish list for Zaire, 
which includes a cease-fire, troop with- 
drawals and elections. It has made 
preparations for a military evacuation 
of Americans from Zaire. This ls the 
foreign policy equivalent of sending in 
the director of Federal Emergency 
Management Agency. 

0 f waiting for events to take 
their course, we should decide to pre- 
vent Zaire from being tom to pieces— 
and make thai goal a high priority- This 
means exerting the political ww to 
create and sustain a united front of 
Zairians, other Africans and Western 
allies committed to a negotiated tran- 
sition from chaos to a stable post- 
Mobutu era. The full weight of Amer- 
ican influence should be directed at 
anyone who stands in the way. 

Because precious few players in the 
region have real clout, die closest pos- 
sible coordination with the Europeans 
— and especially France, the other 
major power in Central Africa — will 
be criticaL There are policymakers in 
both Paris and Washington who con- 
tinue to view each other’s approaches 
to Africa with distaste and suspicion. 
This has only aggravated the divisions 
among some 20 African countries over 
the conflicts in Zaire and Sudan. 

Squabbling between France and the 
United States over influence and 
prestige, as well as over strategic dif- 
ferences, is an unacceptable luxury in 
today’s Africa. Working together 
would help unite the Zairians, and Af- 
ricans in gen end. This is what lead- 
ership and leverage are all abouL 


we, as tine French-speaking rumor mill 
>ortme Mr. 


has it, tacitly supporting Mr. Kabila or 
his backers? Do we, as some seem to 
believe, want Zaire dismembered? If 


The writer, a professor of diplomacy 
at Georgetown University, was assist- 
ant secretary of state for African affairs 
in the Reagan administration. He con- 
tributed this to The New York Times. 


Russia and NATO: A Case for Binding Security Guarantees 


M OSCOW — The reaction 
of some Westerners to the 
results of the Helsinki summit 
reminds one of something the 
Russians are often accused of 
by the West — old thinking. It's 
once again “us versus them.' ’ 
Are we seeing the return of 
the famous Cold War zero-sum 
game in which a victory for one 
side was regarded as automatic 
defeat for the other? 

Ir is as if the last eight to 10 
years of new relations were sud- 
denly forgotten just because 
Russia dared not to accept a 
controversial Western move 
that goes against Russia’s na- 
tional interests. 

Such triumphalism implies 
ihar in Western eyes Russia is 
still more of an adversary than a 
partner. What it tells Russians is 
that NATO enlargement is not 
mainly about democracy, sta- 


By Alexei K, Pushkov 


bility and prosperity, but is a 
political and strategic i 


political and strategic operation 
aimed at consolidating the 
West's victory in the Cold War. 
Such a lesson does not bring 
Russia closer to the West. 

Besides expanding NATO, 
die Western alliance also seeks 
to integrate Russia in the new 
European political and security 
system. In fact, without such an 
integration NATO would not 
reach its strategic goal of ut- 
most importance. The enlarge- 
ment of the alliance would not 


compensate for new tensions or 
even animosity, should Russia 
be left on the outskirts of Eu- 
rope as an unhappy, defeated 
and insecure nuclear power. 

For all its importance. East- 
ern Europe will never be a glob- 
al player politically, militarily or 
economically. For all Russia’s 
present weakness, it will remain 
such, a player. Unlike Eastern 
Europe, it has the resources to 
become a major economic 
factor in the 21st century. 

Leading figures in America 
and Europe have warned of the 
risk of a major crisis with Rus- 
sia because of an ill-conceived 
and sbortsighred NATO expan- 
sion strategy, and have called 
for minimizing the harm it 
would inevitably do to relations 
between Russia and the West 

To minimize this harm, Rus- 
sia should be made part of the 
European game, not left out of ft. 
When some Western observers 
praise Bill Clinton for "giving 
tittle or nothing away" to Boris 
Yeltsin in Helsinki, they miss 
the poinL A wise strategy would 
give Russia the guarantees ft 
seeks in order to reach a viable 
compromise among NATO, 
Eastern Europe and Russia. 

Even if one takes the view 
that in Helsinki Mr. Cl inton 
won a tactical victory, the ques- 


tion remains whether without 


giving anything of importance 
tia the West can win the 


to Russia 
strategic battle for Russia’s fu- 
ture political orientation. 

As in any Western country, 
the Russian president has to sell 
whatever agreement he reaches 
abroad to the Russian public 
and the political establishmenL 
Today Russia has freely elected 
democratic institutions, and Mr. 
Yeltsin has ro take account of 
them. An agreement with 
NATO, to be meaningful, 
should be accepted by the Fed- 
eral Assembly and the bulk of 
the Russian political class. 

It is easy to predict what will 
happen if Mr. Yeltsin signs a 
Russia-NATO document void 
of contractual obligations. 

The Stare Duma, facing die 
prospect of a foreign military 
alliance approaching Russian 
borders, would not ratify the 


START-2 treaty, thus seriously 

‘ ‘ " T-3. 


hurting prospects for START- 
Tbe Russian military would 
have to plan not on the basis of 
NATO intentions but in terms of 
the enhanced military, intelli- 
gence and logistical capabilities 
of the other side. 


spresent 

disadvai 


ventional military disadvantage 
would incline it rely more heav- 
ily on nuclear weapons in plan- 


ning its defenses — just as 
NATO did in similar circum- 
stances in the late 1950s. All of 
this would trigger a chain re- 
action betweenRussia and the 
West fatally damaging die trust 
established in the 1990s. 

Most probably. Russia’s next 
presidential election would be 
conducted to (he tune of anti- 
NATO and anti-Western slo- 
gans put forward by main- 
stream politicians. 

What . Russia wants from 
NATO is not veto power over 
its decisions. It asks for min- 
imization of the military aspects 
erf the enlargement — which 
seems fair enough, if Western 
pledges that enlargement is not 
directed against Russia are to be. 
taken seriously. 

Russia needs a real voice on 
ma^or issues of European se- 
curity and a meaningful role in 
NATO peace-making opera- 
tions. It wants the West to un- 
derstand the implications that 
admission of Baltic stares into 
NATO would have for Euro- 
pean security. Finally, it insists 
on a binding agreement, not just 
a charter or declaration, as it 
has rich experience of verbal 
assurances aiming from West- 
ern leaders in the early 1990s 
that NATO would not be ex- 
panded eastward. 

That is what Russia wants — 
not more, but not less. 


The writer is foreign affairs 
director at Russian Public Tele- 
vision and a member of the board 
of the Russian Council on For- 
eign and Defense Policies. He 
contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


Singapore and Malaysia: Neighbors in a Changing Equation 




Intei- 


nel 


■ •*/ 

4 V 


By pledging in Helsinki not 
to deploy nuclear weapons and 
foreign troops on the territories 
of the future new member states, 
Mr. Clinton took important 
steps in the right direction. 
Now, as negotiations progress, 
these pledges should be codified 
and turned into obligations. 

. Promises to consult with Rus- 
sia, ro take its security needs into 
account and to give it a real 
voice in matters of European 
security should find their place 
in the future document not just 
as statements but as guarantees. 

ft might seem that this would 
restrict the freedom of maneu- 
ver of America audits allies vis- 
a-vis Moscow. But is that too 
high a price for having the nu- 
clear power that the West has 
been confronting for half a cen- 
tury at its side, rattier than turn- 
ing into a loose camion? 

In the long term, a structured 
European space giving no rea- 
sons to worry about its stability 
is in everybody ’s interest This is 
why the West needs a binding, 
clear-cut Russia-NATO docu- 
ment as much as Russia does. 




TfrfS 


nth' *u 


■ -V d.iid .1 


- 


K uala lumfur — The 

recent souring of relations 
between Malaysia and Singa- 
pore after remarks by Lee Kuan 
Yew about the neighboring 
Malaysian stare of Jobor is a 
storm in a teacup that will have 
few practical consequences. 
However, the rumpus high- 
lights underlying changes in the 
relationship. 

The spat has been surprising. 
Neither side is unaware of the 
other’s sensitivities. 

Malaysia has had serious dip- 
lomatic rows with Britain and 
Australia over unguarded re- 
marks by press and politicians. 
Singapore has a record of libel 
suits by its leadens against polit- 
ical opponents and bristles a: any 
perceived foreign interference in 
its domestic affairs. But hitherto 
the two have gone out of their 
way to avoid open disputes. 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin 
Mohamad recently remarked: 
“There are many problems. 
Only the government knows ... 
But we don't tell it to the people 
because we want to maintain 
good ties with Singapore." 

The current dispute cannot 
be attributed to domestic pol- 
itics in either country. Pnme 
Minister Goh Chok Tong's po- 
sition was strengthened by the 
recent Singapore elections. Mr. 
Mahathir's dominance of his 
party was reaffirmed last year. 

So one must look for deeper 
trends that turned a few unwise 
words into a significant issue. 

• Malaysia, with its 19 mil- 
lion people, has come out from 
under the shadow of die 3-tnil- 
lion-strong city-state, ft has 
made particularly dramatic pro- 
gress in the past decade. Itseco- 


By Philip Bowring 


nomic growth now exceeds 
Singapore’s and with its faster 
growing work force is likely to 
continue to do so. ft is even now 
bidding to compete with Singa- 
pore as an information techno- 
logy center. 

Mr. Mahathir has placed it on 
the world map through a com- 
bination of globe-trotting, con- 
troversial speeches and spec- 
tacular projects such as the 
world’s tallest building. 

Increased self-confidence 
has made Malaysians less will- 
ing to turn the other cheek to 
perceived Singaporean arrog- 
ance and condescension seen 
not merely in Mr. Lee's re- 
marks, for which he apologized, 
but also in subsequent ones of 
other Singaporeans. 

• Primarily as a result of pri- 
vatization. a new Malay com- 
mercial class has emerged in 
Malaysia, supplanting ethnic 
Chinese groups as the leading 
players in the private sector. 
This government-backed pro- 
cess has undoubtedly contrib- 
uted to ethnic harmony within 
Malaysia. But it has heightened 
differences with Singapore, 
which regards itself as more 
meritocratic, multiethnic and 
uncomipi. 

However, from the Malay- 
sian side of the causeway which 
joins them, predominantly Chi- 
nese Singapore is viewed as be- 
ing less open about issues of 
ethnicity and less tolerant of 
social pluralism. The hand of 
the stare is also viewed as mak- 
ing it less friendly to the local 
private sector than is Malaysia. 

ft is not a coincidence that the 


current spat began with the 
flight of a Singaporean oppo- 
sition politician, Tang Liang 
Hong, to Jobor. Malaysian lib- 
eralism and democracy may not 
conform to all Western ideas of 
fair play, but Malaysians of all 
ethnic backgrounds take pride 
in the fact that this is an open 
society with lively politics. 

Malays in particular are also 
proud that the nation is probably 
the most successful predomin- 
antly Muslim state in the world. 
Proponents of modernist, toler- 
ant Islam in Malaysia (as in In- 
donesia) can be critical of West- 
ern values, but that does not 
mean that they identify with the 
neo-Confucian ideas propag- 
ated by Singapore. Some, too, 
are disturbed by the allegedly 
•‘triuraphalist’’ attitudes of 
Chinese business groups whose 
international ethnic links have 
been lauded in the West. 

There are a few parallels be- 
tween this episode and one two 
years ago between Singapore 
and another Malay neighbor, 
the Philippines. Singapore's 
execution of a Filipina maid 
brought all kin ds of altitudinal 
as well as ethnic differences to 
the surface, pitting reason 
against emotion. 

• Singapore's younger gen- 
eration, beaded by Prime Min- 
ister Goh Chok Tong, may well 
be more sensitive to Malaysia 
than the older one. There are 
plenty of opportunities for con- 
tact with their Malaysian coun- 
terparts. and more interests to 
unite than divide. However, 
when measured against the 
likes of Mr. Mahathir and Pres- 


ident Suharto, Mr. Goh lacks 
regional and international 
stature, and could have a prob- 
lem acquiring it so long as Lee 
Kuan Yew remains the nation’s 
dominant figure. 

Mr. Goh s position is likely 
to be enhanced by this dispute, 
but for die future bis "kinder, 
gentler' ’ Singapore may have to 
deal with a Malay world that is 
becoming more assertive. 

None of this should be taken 
to mean that the cooperative 
political relationships which 


have underpinned ASEAN’s 
economic success are under 
threat However, the spar has 
come at a time when the region’s 
key country, Indonesia, is show- 
ing internal tensions reflecting 
worries about succession. 

The cross-causeway tiff is a 
timely reminder that constant, 
careful management of ethnic 
and other relationships is as im- 
portant as ever in ensuring that 
national rivalries are creative 
and not destructive. 

International Herald Tribune. 


# 


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IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Greek Blockade 


WASHINGTON —The British 
Ambassador has informed the 
State Department of the pur- 
pose of the six signatory Powers 
to the Berlin Treaty to blockade 
Greet* during April. 

ROME — In consequence of 
the decision, ft will be necessary 
to reinforce die intern ational 
fleet, and some days must elapse 
before warships Can be made 
available for dial purpose, ft is 
stated that at present only the 
Piraeus will be blockaded, but 
that if Greece proves obdurate 
further measures will be adopt- 
ed against her. 


pire immediately after the 
Armistice. Karl became heir to 
the throne and succeeded his 
great-uncle on November 21, 
1916. Karl took an active in- 
terest in public affairs. He made 
several attempts to save his tot- 
tering empire by ending a war 
of which he saw the issue only 
too clearly. 


VT; 
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1947: Gandhi’s Dream 


j v.; 


1922: Emperor Dead 


FUNCHAL (Madeira) — Ex- 
Emperor Karl died at 12:20 
p-m, to-day [April 1]. Karl of 
Habsbuig was the last Emperor 
of Austria and King of Hungary 
previous to the break-upof the 
former Austro-Hungarian Em- 


NEW DELHI — Mahatma 
Gandhi declared today [April 1]: 
"1 would not like to live in this 
world if it was not to be one 
world, and certainly X would like 
to see that dream realized in my 
lifetime.’’ The seventy-seven- 
year-old mahatma, speaking at 
the second plenarysession of the 
Inter-Asian Relations Confer- 
ence. also said he believed in die 
theory of one worid: "If you go 
out with die fixed determmation 
to see that dream through your 
eye, in your generation, you will 
see that dream realized.’’ . 


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EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1997 


PAGE 7 


OPINION/LETTERS 


The Internet and International Politics 


W ? S iF GT0 ^- La st : December, 

with hLv^ year ’° d armed 

. software accomplished what 
™ of soldiers legions of diplomats, 
seores of journalists and hundreds of 

hian^nrtwu^ 1 ^ noti.He gave the Ser- 
pro^emocracy movement its first 

against * e regime 
of Slobodan Milosevic and broke Mr 

Milosevic s control of Seibia's domestic 

news media. 

»«T?ims2? iplC T^ lepl,one cwwection 
■ J® internet, Urazen Pamic and his 

i “““?** * Radio B92, one of Bel- 
S 1 ”: s jew independent media outlets, 
quietly demonstrated bow new technol- 
ogies have changed international pol- 
itics: Anyone with a computer, modem 
and street smarts can alter deadly do- 
mestic political dynamics by exploiting 
the global character of the Internet. The 
story unfolded quietly and was lanzelv 
unnoticed by Western media. 

TTh: Serbian government, in response 
to B92 s news coverage of opposition 
protests, began to jam its radio signals. 
Regular listeners, in an effort to hear the 
latest news over the j amming began 
making crude signal amplifiers using 
long wires and hangers to improve their 
reception. B92's broadcast staff also re- 
sponded with a cat-and-mouse infor- 
mation strategy. 

According to a story filed on Nov. 28 

v by CNN, the radio regularly tricked the 
? jammers, announcing their street report- 
ers but continuing to play music. “A 
couple of seconds after the announce- 
ment, the jammers knock the radio sta- 
tion off the air. It’s back a couple of 
minutes later after the jammers hear the 
music and think they’ve made a mistake. 
Then once back on the air, the radio tries 
hurriedly to can y unannounced news 


By Bob Schmitt 

and live, reports before being switched 
off again.” 

Meanwhile, Mr. Panne and the In- 
ternet department of Radio B92 has been 
testing a computer program called 
fcfialAudio, which enables sound to be 
carried over the Internet. As Mr. Pantic 
learned, the process of using RealAudio 

When Serbia jammed 
Radio B92, the news got 
out anyway, via modem. 

is relatively simple:. A microphone is 
plugged into a computer thar then saves 
tire sound in a format that can be trans- 
mitted over low-speed Internet connec- 
tions. The ability to transmit good sound 
over slow lines was vital to Mr. Pantic 
because B92’s Internet service provider, 
XS4ALL, was located in Amsterdam. 
By using regular long-distance phone 
lines to connect to the Internet, the only 
.way Serbian authorities could have pre- 
vented B92’s Internet broadcasts would 
have been to shut down the Serbian 
telephone system. 

In November, at the first sign of jam- 
ming, Mr. Pantic began encoding B92 
news bulletins into RealAudio format 
and sending B92’s radio programs via 
the Internet to die radio's home page, 
located on XS4ALL’s computers in Am- 
sterdam. As die protests mounted in the 
streets of Belgrade. Mr. Pantic managed 
to secure a raster Internet connection. 
Hearing of B92’s efforts. RealAudio’s 
manufacturer, the U.S.-based Progress- 
ive Networks, donated more powerful 


server software, allowing 500 Internet 
users to simultaneously hear live B92 
broadcasts. Jamming increased, and on 
Dec. 3 the Serbian government shut off 
B92’s transmitter altogether. 

■ Thanks to Mr. Pantic’s foresight in 
employing the Internet link, turning off 
die transmitter didn't shut down the ra- 
dio station. Mr. Pantic continued to send 
RealAudio broadcasts to the Amster- 
dam-based server, making B92 radio 
programs available via the Internet to 
anyone in the world (including Serbia). 

Shortly thereafter. Radio Free 
Europe/Radio Liberty’s director. Kevin 
Klose (now director designate for In- 
ternational Broadcasting for USIA). ac- 
quired tapes of Radio B92 programs and 
began to use RFE/RL transmitters to 
broadcast the stories back into Serbia. 
For the first time since the annulment of 
the elections. Serbs could follow what 
was happening in the streets of Bel- 
grade. 

On Dec. 6, when it became apparent to 
Serbian authorities that blocking access 
to one medium of transmission could not 
prevent information from flowing 
through others. B92’s transmitter was 
switched back on. 

B92’s victory strengthened the op- 
position’s resolve and attracted support 
from unlikely sources — including 
the army and the clergy — to join in 
protest against an increasingly strident 
government. The result has been the 
reinstatement of the original election 
results for the 18 municipalities and 
improved prospects for a more demo- 
cratic Serbia. 


The writer, information-systems man- 
ager at the US. Institute of Peace, con- 
tributed this comment to The Washing- 
ton Post. 


Cybercultists Couldn’t Hack Life 


B OSTON — The “experts" are Bv Ellen Goo dma n 

parading across my television 
screen again. A full entourage of au- 
thors and researchers and professors that outstrip those of us who barely 
are there, following the psychic bread navigate the Internet. But believed 
crumbs, the clues that led 39 people there was a spaceship in Hale-Bopp's 
from their separate lives to their Ran- tail. 

cho Santa Fe. California, deaths. Millenniaiism and megabytes? The 

We are far now along the familiar World Wide Web and unidentified fly- 
media route. Last week's tragedy be- ing objects? It doesn't compute, many 
comes this week's analysis and then — ■■ ■ 

as surely as black humor survives hor- MEANWHILE 

ror — next week 's entry in some David * 

Letterraan television routine. say. as if computing were the ultimate 

Surfing across the channels now. I proof of rationality, 
can put together a collage of such ex- It doesn’t compute, they say. to find 
pens trying to explain why some three 39 bodies — pockets filled with quar- 
dozen souls would willingly, maybe ters and $5 bills, videotape filled with 
even eagerly, leave their “contain- excited talk of spacecraft — in a lush 
ere." home crammed with desktop lermin- 

There is a hapless pursuit of any als. Compared to this, the Jonestown 
common thread that brought a former jungle made perverse horror-tale 
massage therapist, choir leader, postal sense. 

worker to the conclusion that if they Maybe indeed "cybercult" should 
packed their flight bags and drank their be an oxymoron. Bui today, it stands as 
potions, they would be lifted to "the one more word of proof about how fast 
kingdom level above human.” and far technology can streak ahead of 

But this time the incomprehensible understanding, 
event has a new name. Someone labels At times like this we are reminded of 
Heaven's Gaie an Internet cult, a vast disconnect between the new 
Someone else calls it a cyberculL tools we create and the old mind- sets 
What jars the minds of many people they may serve. It's as vast as Heaven *s 
is that the folks in Heaven's Gate were Gate's home page that used electronic 
technologically sophisticated. And yet talent to post die tacky tabloid portraits 
stunningly gullible. They worked skill- of an alien creature. As vast as the 
fully in a field thai we associate with megabyte transmission of a message, 
computer science. And yet believed in and the gibberish of the message 
science fiction. * itself. 

Calling themselves Higher Source, The Internet is the latest, but hardly 
they made home pages by day. the only, example of this gap between 

And read ancient portents from the hi tech and lo us. After all. we are the 
comets in the night sky. They had skills people who made television and show 


sitcoms on it. We split the atom and 
made a bomb with it. We built cars that 
can go beyond 120 miles an hour for 
people who cannot control the wheel 
over 80. And in Hollywood, the most 
advanced technology is used to blow 
up a miniature While House or imitate 
a volcano. 

To see how much faster technology 
can move than the human mind, all I 
need to do is look at the cursor on my 
screen blinking impatiently for the next 
sentence to form. To see the gap be- 
nveen skill and understanding, you can 
talk about life with the 13 year old 
installing vour Windows 95. 

So. too’ the remarkable new turf of 
the Internet can. as well, be just another 
place to show people having sex with 
each other. 

Cutting-edge software can be used 
by people recruiting others to an anti- 
scientific creationism. It can hook up 
Marshall Applewhite to a young moth- 
er surfing the new way for an age-old 
way out. 

What strikes me about the Heaven's 
Gate members is not that they were so 
advanced but so far behind, not thar 
they were part of the great new world of 
computers but that they were lost in the 
world of people. Cut off from family 
and reason, the authors of these home 
pages had already left their earthly 
home. 

With all due respect to those who 
dub this a cybercult, the connecting 
thread isn't in the tools these people 
used, but in those they lacked. In the 
end. cyberspace was easy. Life was 
too bard. 

The Boston Globe. 



a, McDONAUI m Pimm, El timhki fTcguriffrfpe. fUnitim.). CjT SyatftcP 


Narco-Fishing 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Korean Peninsula Aid Guidelines 


Regarding “ Korean Penin- 
sula: Pragmatic Multilater- 
alism Is Working ” (Opinion. 
March 26) by Stephen W. Bos- 
worth: 

While I agree with Mr. Bos- 
wonb that the Korean Pen- 
insula Energy Deve lopment 
Or ganizatio n, or KEDO, plays 
a role in stabilizing the pen- 
insula, I feel he describes the 
situation in too positive a 
manner. It is understandable 
that, as executive director of 
KFDO he should promote the 
work of that org ani z a t i on, bat 
still, in some argu ments , he 
goes too far. 

For instance, he mentions 
j that North Korea has com- 
plied with its nuclear com- 
mitments under the “Agreed 
Framework.” To some ex- 
tent, yes. But as far as re- 
vealing the history of its nu- 
clear pr ogr a m is concerned. 
North Korea has been adam- 
ant in its refusal to cooperate. 

Mr. Bosworth also men- 
tions that in a few years the 
International Atomic Energy 
Agency will conduct a special 
inspection to clarify what 

North Korea has done with its 

spent reactor fuel from die 
past. But to conduct arty such 
inspection, all relevant Infor- 
mation must be preserved 
starting now - — and that is not 
happening because of North 

Korea’s noncooperahon. 

CHANHOHA. 

Vienna. 

Regarding “^orth and 
South Korea Discuss Talks to 
End War" (March 6): 

It is not true that the Korean 
talks last month were ‘ the 
first time in 25 years that foe 
two Kerens have sat in the 
same room to talk, 

Between 1990 and 1992. 

the two Koreas satin foe same 

room frequently. Several 
rounds of talks were beitkin 
Seoul and Pyongyang. The 
Koreas even signed me 


Regarding “New US. 
Guidelines far Providing Hu- 
manitarian - Aid” (Opinion. 
March 13) by J. Brian Atwood 
and Leonard Rogers: 

The clarity with which Mr. 
Atwood and Mr. Rogers of 
USAID have set out their 
guiding precepts for human- 
itarian relief, and the way 
these are to be linked with 
foreign policy, should be wel- 
comed by international relief 
agencies. Humanitarians 
have recently been blamed for 
political failures that are not 
of their making. 

Like any guidelines, 
however, these need to be in- 
terpreted in particular cases 
such as those of Liberia. Af- 
ghanistan and Zaire. The pre- 
cepts should not be immu- 
table principles. A balance 
remains to be struck between, 
on erne hand, the level of hu- 
man need and, on foe other, 
factors that might justify die 
withholding of aid. 

ft is precisely in si tua ti ons - 
where, for example, there is a 
“subjugation or die recipi- 
ents” and a threat to the se- 
curity of aid workers that need 

is greatest. No set of precepts 
will give either voluntary or 
governmental aid providers a 
precise map through this mor- 
ally complex terrain. We hope, 
therefore, thar USAID and the 
Stale Department wifi remain 
flexible m their approach to 
complex emergencies. 

Further, while the article 
speaks of linking; humanitari- 
an policy to the foreign policy 
of foe United States,- the au- 
thors will be aware that no 
single donor or diplomatic 
force can succeed alone m 
complex emergencies. Inter- 
national consensus is vital 
This is properly expressed 
through die United Nations 
and should be based securely 
on the Geneva Conventions 
and other instruments. Ifoere- 
fore hope we can look for- 
ward to the United States 
playing a foil and construc- 
tive rote within foe commu- 
nity of nations on these is- 
sues. . 

DAVID BRYER- 
Oxford, England. 

. The writer is the director cf 
Oxfam UK and Ireland. 



chaqm * and Cooperation _ 111 
December 1991 - fe provisions 
were never inrple^^v^ 
thereafter the North Korean 
nuclear issue soured relations. 
But -tibe agreement exists. 
aid an foster-cartek - 

Shipley, England. 



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INTERNATIONAL 


2 Palestinian Bombers Kill Only Themselves in Gaza Strip 


Jewish Children Apparently a Target ; 
Israeli Troops Slay 2 Arabs in West Bank 



Uim^d J«ddllih.'Ki-ni-ff 

An Israeli police photographer examining remains of a Palestinian suicide bomber Tuesday near Netzarim. 

COMET: Astronomers Find a Mine of Clues to the Origin of Life 

Continued from Page 1 


CJtnptM l* iV StjfFrm Pvpatrhn 

NETZARIM, Gaza Strip — Two Pal- 
estinians blew themselves up outside 
Jewish settlements in the Gaza Strip on 
Tuesday, the Israeli Army said, and two 
Palestinians were shot and killed by Is- 
raeli troops in the West Bank. 

The violence came at a time of dead- 
lock in Israeli -Palestinian peace talks, 
and led to new accusations from both 
sides. At least one atiack appeared timed 
to coincide with normal travel dmes for 
buses takin g the children of Jewish set- 
tlers to school. 

Israel held Yasser Arafat, the Pal- 
estinian leader, responsible for the in- 
cidents. saying he had sanctioned attacks 
by Islamic militants as a means of ex- 
tracting Israeli concessions. 

“We believe it is not merely a co- 
incidence that ever since Chairman Ara- 
fat gave the green light to terrorist or- 
ganizations to return to terrorist 
activities, there have been four or five 
attempts, one of them unfortunately 
deadly, to kill Israelis/’ said David Bar- 
II an. a senior adviser ro the Israeli prime 
minister. Benjamin Netanyahu. 

Mr. .Arafat dismissed the accusations 
and said Israel's prolonged closure of the 
Palestinian areas had created the climate 
for the militants. “The closure is the best 
platform for fanaticism and crime." he 
said. “To any pressure, there is reaction. 
We are all doing our best, by all our 
capability, to control the situation." 

The first explosion went off just before 


Netanyahu Proposes 
A Unity Coalition 

Agence France-Presst 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu said Tuesday 
that he was considering a national 
unity government with the oppo- 
sition Labor Party in preparation for 
final status talks with the Pales- 
tinians. 

* 4 We want to look into, of course, 
creating the widest possible plat- 
form for the final status negotiations 
with the Palestinians/* Mr. Net- 
anyahu. leader of the Likud Party, 
said on Israeli Army radio. 

“The question is whether a na- 
tional unity government would pro- 
duce this or prevent it," Mr. Net- 
anyahu added. “Would there be one 
national unity government or two 
governments?" 

The radio said Mr. Netanyahu's 
chief of staff. Avigdor Lieberman. 
was holding intense talks with 
Labor officials to discuss the pos- 
sibility of forming a coalition. 

A government of the Likud bloc 
and Labor parties would comprise 
66 seats in the 120-member Par- 
liament, the Knesset, the same num- 
ber as the current coalition. But it 
would comprise only the Likud bloc 
and Labor instead of the sometimes 
fragmented current government that 
includes the Likud and five rightist 
and religious parties. 

The Labor Party’s leader, Shi- 
mon Peres, has actively promoted a 
national unity government but other 
Labor officials are reluctant. 


7 A.M. one mile from the Jewish set- 
tlement of Netzarim. a tiny enclave south 
of Gaza City. A school bus preparing to 
leave Netzarim had been running behind 
schedule and was not near the bomb site. 
Only the bomber was killed, 

“There was a huge blast." said 
Shlomo Kostiner, a resident of Netzar- 
im. “Luckily, the bus was still in the 
settlement for technical reasons and a 
terrible disaster was prevented." 

The second blast also went off about 7 
A.M. just south of the Kfar Darom set- 
tlement. in the middle of the Gaza 
Strip. 

Palestinian policemen said it was not 
a suicide bombing and asserted that Is- 
raeli troops had thrown explosives at a 
passing taxi and a donkey can. killing 
one Palestinian and wounding five oth- 
ers. 

But reporters at the scene saw signs of 
an explosion: blast marks on the pave- 
ment and a dismembered body. Hospital 
officials said the five wounded were hurt 
by shrapnel, not bullets. 

The Israeli armed forces chief of staff. 
Lieutenant General Amnon Shahak, said 
both blasts were set off by suicide 
bombers. He said both assailants wore 
Palestinian police uniforms and were 
Islamic militants belonging either to the 
Hamas or Islamic Jihad groups. 

A caller to Israel Radio took respon- 
sibility in the name of the Muslim mil- 
itant group Hamas, but Hamas political 
leaders denied involvement 

Also Tuesday, some 1.000 Palestin- 
ians marched from the West Bank town 
of Nablus to an Israeli Army checkpoint 
north of the city. The crowd began hurl- 
ing stones, and Israeli troops initially 
fired tear gas and rubber bullets, then 
live rounds. 

One protester. Haitham Mansour. a 
plainclothes Palestinian policeman, was 
killed by a shot to the head. He had been 
sent to the scene of the clashes to try and 
subdue the protesters, according to a 
colleague. 

President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt 
said Mr. Netanyahu's decision to begin 
construction of a new Jewish neigh- 
borhood in East Jerusalem was to blame 
for a new round of violence. 

He said, however, that he had acted to 
tone down an Arab League statement on 
Monday recommending that Arab na- 
tions freeze relations with Israel and 
reactivate the Arab economic boycott of 
products from Israel. 

“Do you think we are happy about 
what is happening?" Mr. Mubarak told 
the Israeli daily Maariv. “Believe me, 
we are very sad." 

In Washington, President Bill Ginton 
said Tuesday that Israel and the Pal- 
estinians had to restore an environment 
of security and confidence to revive the 
peace process and that he had “some 
ideas" on how to do this. 

“This is a difficult time in the peace 
process, and we have a lot to talk about." 
Mr. Ginton said at the start of a White 
House meeting with King Hussein of 
Jordan. 

“What I think we have to do is restore 
the environment of security and of con- 
fidence so we can go forward with the 
negotiating process, and we’ve got some 
ideas about it. but I want to talk to the 
king about iL" Mr. Clinton said. 

(AP. LAT. Reuters l 


' ‘The nucleus sometimes stores heat 
and might remain at elevated temper- 
atures for longer ouLbound than in- 
bound/' he said in an interview. 

Some telescopes had to stop tracking 
Hale-Bopp as it approached the sun or be 
damaged by bright sunlight. This is par- 
ticularly true for the Hubble Space Tele- 
scope, orbiting Earth. 

Later, as the comet races toward the 
dim hinterlands, astronomers will re- 
double their efforts to gather clues to 


Hale-Bopp’s chemical and physical 
makeup in hope of strengthening the 
uncanny link between comets and the 
first stirrings of life on Earth. 

Such thinking is a radical departure 
from the traditional view developed over 
the decades by scientists, mainly geo- 
logists and geophysicists. 

In the old picture. Earth was thought 
to have coalesced out of primordial dust 
as a bare sphere with no atmosphere, 
basically a rocky desert. The gases and 
water vapors and carbonaceous brews 
that formed the atmosphere and filled 


the seas were seen as having come from 
within Earth in an early period of intense 
volcanism. Lightning storms then stirred 
the primordial soup and created carbon- 
rich molecules that organized them- 
selves into self-replicating units, or 
erode forms of life. 

Not so. says a newer theory, which 
astronomers, astrophysicists and plan- 
etary scientists tend to advance. 

More than 4 billion years ago in its 
early days. Earth was hot enough to 
expel into space most of the water and 
lighter materials and chemicals, this the- 
ory holds. So the planet remained a 
barren rock. 

For the makings of life, the new the- 
ory looks especially to the dark clouds 
that loom against the stars. These dark 
interstellar clouds turn out to be 
peppered with grains of matter about the 
size of talcum particles that are virtual 
factories for the production of complex 
chemicals. 

In theory, such complex interstellar 
dusts become the raw material for new 
generations of stars, perhaps accompan- 
ied by planets as well as trillions of icy 
comets. 

A list of chemicals sighted by study- 
ing Hale-Bopp shows that comets are 
heavenly vans carrying tons of carbon- 
rich materials from interstellar space to 
addresses throughout the solar system. 

* ‘Thirty years ago we thought you had 
to have lightning storms." said Michael- 
Mumma. a longtime comet expert at 
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center 
in Maryland. "Now it's recognized that 
the materials are delivered automatic- 
ally/’ 

4 ‘That doesn't mean you get life out of 
that” Mr. Mumma added. “But it 
means you deliver large amounts of 
simple chemicals, and maybe some 
complex ones, that can lead to life di- 
rectly." 


ORPHANS: Back to Bosnia After 5 Years 


Continued from Page 1 

cilities to receive them. The children's 
1992 rescue from the Ljubica Ivezic 
orphanage became a grisly emblem of 
Bosnia's peculiar brand of hatred. First, 
the bus supposedly carrying them to 
safety came under sniper attack in the 
street Sarajevans called “sniper's al- 
ley,” and two children — a 14-month- 
old boy and a mentally handicapped girl 
of almost three years — were killed. 

Then the bus was halted in the Serb- 
controlled suburb of Ilidza, and nine 
children with Serb-sounding names 
were taken off it and forced to stay in 
Sarajevo. United Nations officials called 
their rescue a "suicidal mission." 

Their departure Tuesday focused new 
attention on Germany's dilemma in 
dealing with many more Bosnian 
refugees here. 

Since 1992. Germany has received 
almost one half of the 700.000 Bosnians 
who fled to European countries as war 
and ethnic cleansing washed over their 
land. Few have shown any great interest 
in returning to a country' where many of 


their former homes lie in Serb-con- 
trolled territory and where postwar re- 
construction is slow. 

At the same time, though. German 
immigration officials do not want the 
Bosnians to fuse into German society as 
an immigrant wave and. at a time of 
increasing pressure to reduce social 
spending, want to reduce the estimated 
S3 billion annual upkeep costs for Bos- 
nian refugees. 

"We were humane when we accepted 
them," Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel 
said Monday. “We will also be humane 
in their repatriation. We are dealing with 
people, some of whom have been Jiving 
among us for many years. They cannot 
just be sent back overnight because of a 
mechanical process." 

Under plans worked out by state im- 
migration officials and the Interior Min- 
istry in Bonn, the Bosnian refugees are 
to be sent home in two waves — first 
unmarried people and couples, then 
families. 

More than 60.000 refugees are cur- 
rently threatened with deportation un- 
less they leave voluntarily. 


briefly 


Algerian Army Kills 
20 Muslim Militants 

ALGIERS — The Algerian 
Army killed several Islamic mil- 
itants. after encircling the cave 
where they were hiding, at the end 
of a three-day sweep that left 20 
militants dead, witnesses said Tues- 
day. , . . 

Security forces on foot and in 
helicopters attacked the cave 
Monday in the forests of Sidi AJi 
Bounab. a mountainous region 60 
kilometers east of Algiers, wit- 
nesses said on condition of anonym- 
ity- 

There was no immediate con- 
firmation of the operation from the 
government. 

The witnesses said the cave w as 
beine used as a stronghold by the 
Islamic Salvation Army, one of sev- 
eral Algerian militant groups whose 
five-vear insurgency has left more 
than 60.000 people dead. (APi 

4 Injured in Attack 
On Pro-Israel Militia 

MARJAYOUN. Lebanon — An 
Israeli-backed militiaman was 
killed and four were wounded Tues- 
day in a guerrilla rocket attack in 
southern Lebanon. pro-Israeli se- 
curity sources said. 

They said a rocket hit a South 
Lebanon Army patrol on its way to 
the outpost of Deir Haifa in jthe 
western sector of Israel's southern 
Lebanon occupation zone. 

In Beirut, the pro-Iranian 
Hezbollah claimed responsibility 
for the attack. f Reutasi 

rola and Rebels 
To Form Government 

UNITED NATIONS. New Ycrk 
— Angolan officials and the forrrer 
ITNITA rebels have agreed to foim 
their long-delayed government ?f 
national reconciliation on April II. 
Secretary -General Kofi Annan tod 
the UN Security Council. 

The 15-member council also ex- 
tended the mandate of the Unitd 
Nations peacekeeping force in An- 
gola for two weeks until April 16. au 
recommended by Mr. Annan. Tht 
brief extension is to pressure the 
former rebel leader. Jonas Savimbi: 
to meet the April 1 1 dare. 

The U.S. ambassador. Bill 
Richardson, welcomed Mr. An-; 
nan’s efforts on behalf of peace in 
Angola. tAPi 

U.S. Military Plane 
Crashes in Honduras 

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — 
Three Americans were killed Tues- 
day when a U.S. military’ cargo 
plane with 10 people aboard 
crashed upon landing at the airport 
here and burst into flames, the U.S. 
Embassy said. 

The U.S. Embassy spokesman in 
Honduras, Marti Steli, said the Her- 
cules C-130 plane had come from 
Panama and missed the runway on 
landing, plowing into a street where 
it burst into flames. ( Reuters ) 



GINGRICH: 

Less Bold on Taiwan 


Continued from Page 1 

hai declaration, which recognized 
China's claim over Taiwan. 

“Taiwan is a question of great con- 
cern/' he said, adding. “We favor one- 
China policy with voluntary discus- 
sions/’ 

The Chinese Foreign Ministry 
spokesman. Shen Guofang, said, “The 
controversy between China and the 
United States on the Taiwan issue re- 
volves around one point, which is U.S. 
interference." 

Mr. Shen reiterated hopes for peaceful 
reunification with Taiwan, but warned: 
“If the question of independence arises 
on the island or a foreign force interferes 
in Taiwan issues, we will be forced to 
adopt other necessary measures." 

He also attacked Washington for its 
continued arms sales to Taiwan. “These 
give clear support and encouragement to 
separatist forces on the island and retard 
the process of peaceful reunification." 
he said. 

The Taiwan military spokesman. Kung 
Fan-ting, declined Tuesday to comment 
on a report by the state-run Central News 
Agency thai Washington had agreed to 
sell Taiwan 54 Harpoon missiles and 21 
Super Cobra attack helicopters, while 
turning down a request for submarines. 

The While House, seeking to defuse 
Mr. Gingrich's comments, played down 
his comments, saying they did not rep- 
resent the views of the U.S. government. 

Asked whether the Gingrich remark 
bothered President Bill Clinton, the 
White House press secretary, Michael 
McCurry, at first said that Mr. Gingrich 
"spoke for himself” in China and was 
welcome to do so. 

Later, Mr. McCuny added that Mr. 
Gingrich's remarks were a "shorthand 
version" of an American policy that is 
more complex than Mr. Gingrich’s com- 
ments suggest. 

As House speaker, with no direct re- 
sponsibility for foreign policy. Mr. Gin- 
grich has more leeway to speak his mind 
on the world stage than do adminis- 
tration officials. 

During his own visit to China last 
week. Vice President A! Gore was more 
circumspect, slicking to standard themes 
and avoiding public comments on whut 
the United States would do if China used 
force to reunite Taiwan with the main- 
land. {AFP. AP. Reuters) 



Dealers on the floor of the London futures 
exchange watching share prices fall Tuesday. 


MARKETS: A Sharp Drop Around the World in Reaction to Will Street Woes 


Continued from Page 1 

Schmeiding. senior bond strategist at Merrill Lynch 
in Frankfurt, noting that bond prices have now been 
sinking for six weeks as interest rates have inched 
upwards. 

In Europe, the new and more sour mood hit 
hardest in places like Germany, and in Stockholm 
where the OMX index dropped 4.5 percent, to 
2.827.01. In Amsterdam, the stock index dropped 
4.37 percent, to 708.60. 

"What is killing German shares today is Wail 
Srreet and. 1 must say. the fact that our markets were 
overheated to begin’with." said Roderick Hinkel. a 
German strategist with Banque Paribas. 

In fact. Europe's biggest losers Tuesday were 
precisely those countries that had posted its biggest 
gains this year — the likes of Germany, Switzer- 
land and Sweden, markets where percentage gains 
since the beginning of the year extended well into 
the teens. 

In contrast. Europe's largest stock market. Bri- 
tain. fell a relatively modest 1.5 percent Tuesday, to 
4.248. 10. paring its rise for the year to date to 3.15 
percent. 

With the rout hitting hardest at markets many 


viewed as too pricey in any case, many analysts 
expressed a lack of both surprise and concern. “To 
me this is no catastrophe," said Hans Kaufman, 
chief of equity research at Bank Julius Baer in 
Zurich. 

He noted that Swiss stocks had rallied by more 
than 17 percent this year and that Tuesday’s 3JS 
percent retreat, to 2,856.23, merely takes the index 
back to where it had stood a month earlier. 

More worrisome is a bond market already de- 
scribed by some analysts as having entered a bear 
phase of falling prices and rising interest rates, a 
phase that could threaten Europe's still fragile 
recovery. 

Unfortunately, Lhe roots of that bear market ran 
deeper than last week’s move by the Federal Re- 
serve Board, a decision largely blamed for touching 
off the slide in stocks that started on Wall Street and 
has now convulsed markets around the world. 

In contrast, the change in the bond market dates 
to mid-February. Since then, the yield on the 10- 
year German bund, for instance, has soared 0.6 
percent, touching 6 percent for the first time in 
months on Tuesday. While that increase is roughly 
the same as in the U.S. market, where, once again, 
the move started, the rationale is different. 


In America, after six years of economic growth, 
supplies of everything from idle manufacturing 
plants to workers to staff them are short enough to 
have sparked inflation fears. 

In America, the consensus is that the Fed will 
raise interest rates at least another half-percentage 
point this year, and could act as early as May 20th. 
when it holds its next meeting. 

For the major economies of continental Europe, 
few analysts expect to see interest rates going up 
any time soon. In Italy, they may actually rail in the 
face of a steep slide in manufacturing. 

In Germany, though, there is at least a growing . 
sense thar rates have hit bottom, that the economy jif 
will pick up this year, and that the Bundesbank may 
even push the cost of borrowing higher in the late 
autumn. 

Analysts in Hong Kong noted that the market's 
biggest one-day fall in share values in more than 
three years drove home the message that Wall 
Street apparently carried more weight than the 
upcoming transfer to Chinese rale as a market 
mover. 

Hong Kong's Hang Seng index fell 3.6 percent 
on Tuesday, the largest drop in terms of index 
points since Jan. 12, 1994. 


KABILA: Leader of Zaire Rebels Draws a Veil Over His Past and Keeps the Country Guessing About Its Future 


Continued from Page 1 

parties in a transition government. 

When asked how he made this ideo- 
logical journey away from Marxism, his 
normally genial countenance flashed 
with anger and his charm evaporated. 

“Should 1 answer to the propaganda 
that made my people slaves in this coun- 
try?" he snapped. “Is that the cause of 
the poverty in this country? That Mr. 
Kabila has been an extreme leftist? So 
that makes his people suffer from this 
poverty? Is that the cause of the bank- 
ruptcy of the regime? 1 don't think so." 

So far Mr. Kabila has largely defined 
himself by what he is against: his long- 
time rival. Marshal Mobutu, and his 
brand of autocracy. But even his claim to 
oppose Marshal Mobutu's nepotism and 
favoritism has been called into question 
since he placed his 25-year-old son in 
charge of military operations in the north 
and appointed a" cousin as his foreign 
minister. 

"I think he's a bit of a mystery man 
for all of us." said one diplomat, speak- 
ing on condition of anonymity. “There 
is even some anxiety among his sup- 
posed backers about what kind of person 
he will be in the long run." 


In interviews and news conferences. 
Mr. Kabila regularly refers to Marshal 
Mobutu s ruling parly as ' 'political mer- 
cenaries" who he says sold out the in- 
terests of the people to foreign cap- 
italists. 

■ 'The country was not ruled by natives 
who deserved it." he said in his Kisan- 
gani speech. "It was ruled by political 
mercenaries. They wanted foreign coun- 
tries to come and lake our riches. 

"The mercenaries here didn't want us 
to develop." he went on. 4 ‘They wanted 
to take our resources. I don't want to 
name people who were used by white 
people to steal your riches, but it is 
enough to give the name of Mobutu." 

Mr. Kabila is fond of saying that Mar- 
shal Mobutu would never have remained 
in power for more than 30 years had it 
not been for mercenaries and military 
support from the United States and ocher 
Western democracies, the same nations 
he claims he is now courting as a demo- 
crat. He also expresses a profound dis- 
dain for opposition politicians w’ho have 
cooperated with Marshal Mobutu's gov- 
ernment or have opposed the president in 
nonviolent ways. 

Indeed, diplomats, associates, and ex- 
perts on African history painted a por- 


trait of a man who has been a committed 
revolutionary for most of his life. 

Bom in southern Zaire on a branch of 
the Congo River in Shaba province, a 
member of the Luba tribe. Mr. Kabila 
studied political philosophy at a uni- 
versity in France, became an admirer of 
Marx and returned to Zaire to enter 
politics just as the country gained in- 
dependence from Belgium. 

He became a member of the North 
Katanga Assembly, supporting Zaire's 
first prime minister, Patrice Lumumba, a 
Marxist with strong Maoist leanings. 

When Mr. Lumumba was killed in 
1961 in a coup engineered by Marshal 
Mobutu and supported by the CIA, the 
Lumumbists fled into the bush and start- 
ed organizing an insurrection, gaining 
support From Russia and China. In 1964. 
the Lumumbists launched three insur- 
rections and for a few months set up a 
separate stale with its capital in Kisan- 
gani. 

Mr. Kabila and another leftist leader. 
Gaston SoumialoL were in charge of the 
rebellion in the Ruzizi lowlands around 
Uvira. the same place Mr. Kabila began 
the current rebellion 30 years later. 

With Marshal Mobutu in charge of the 

army, the government eventually 


crashed the rebellions with help of white 
mercenaries, Belgian paratroopers and 
American military aircraft. 

Mr. Kabila kept fighting around Uvira 
until late 1965. It was during this time 
that Che Guevara, the Argentine rev- 
olutionary. came to help Mr. Kabila. Mr. 
Guevara soon became disillusioned, ac- 
cusing Mr. Kabila of spending too Utile 
time with his troops, and abandoned the 
effort after a few months. 

Two years later. Mr. Kabila and 26 
other leftists founded a new rebel group, 
the People's Revolutionary Party. Mr. 
Kabila's rebels, who included exiled 
Rwandan Tutsi and a few Cuban troops, 
held out against government forces For 
nearly two decades. In the 1970s, they 
set up a mini state in the mountain^. 

On May 19. 1 975, Mr. Kabila's rebels 
kidnapped three American students and 
a Dutch researcher, taking them at gun- 
point from the Gombe Stream Research 
Center in Tanzania, where Jane Goodall, 
the primaioIogisL had begun her famed 
study of chimpanzees. The kidnappers 
demanded $500,000 and a shipment of 
arms as ransom. Paid an undisclosed 
amount, the rebels released the hostages 
unharmed after 67 days in captivity. 

"Our understanding was that Kabila 


was the mastermind, as far as we knew/' 
David Hamburg, the president of the 
Carnegie Carp, and a former Stanford 
professor who negotiated the students ft 
release. 

r In those days, Mr. Hamburg said, Mr. 
Kabila's followers espoused a socialist 
philosophy, but appeared at heart to be 
African nationalists, wbose main goal 
was ousting Marshal Mobutu and rid- 
ding the country of foreign influences. 

Marshal Mobutu's troops forced Mr. 
Kabila's group to flee to Tanzania two 
years later, but the rebels continued to 
mount guerrilla attacks in eastern Zaire 
over the next 10 years. 

During his life as an exile, Mr. Kabila 
traveled extensively in East Africa, for- 
ging strong ties with Yoweri Museveni, 
whose rebels seized power in Uganda in 
1985. and with Paul Kagame, who led 
the Tutsi rebel army that" took power in 
Rwanda in 1994. 

After 1988, Mr. Kabila dropped from 
public view. Some associates thought he 
was dead, but he re-emerged from ob- r 
scurity last October at the head of the 
current rebellion, with support from Mr. 
Museveni and Mr. Kagame, both of 
whom were having problems with rebel 
groups based in Zaire. 






S%'’ 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 


‘Parsifal’: Music Up Front 

Paris Production Is a Lyrical Deligh t 




■ Members of the Dorozovsky folk ensemble rehearsing at the Folk Art Center in Moscow. 

U-i 

Folk Songs From Russia’s Heart 


1 ‘ - ’ • V'» 


• • Pa 


By Alessandra Stanley 

New York Times Service 


M OSCOW — Four young 
women in bright, intricate ly 
woven orange folk cos- 
tumes sway and smile and 
gaily stamp their boots. “You man of 
Kanurovo. they sing sweetly. “You 
lie cm top of the warm stove all day and 
never do a lick of work.” 

Tie four women busily berating Rus- 
sian manhood are the M akasha folk 
groip from Brian sk in central Russia, 
andUKamarinskaya" is a famous old 
Rusuan folk song. They are among six 
Russian folk groups from all over Rus- 
sia that convened in Moscow on 
Motday to rehearse before their tour of 
the United States opens on Thursday at 
theBrooklyn Academy of Music. 

Host of the performers are amateurs, 
facory workers, and teachers who sing 
in village choirs in their spare time. 
Tfcey are preserving long-forgotten lo- 
ca ballads and raw ceremonial folk 
daces they learned from their parents 
ad grandparents. 

“My mother used to smg these songs, 
ad 1 just love singing them,' ’ said lima 
Ayoshina. 79, a retired farm and fac- 
tcy worker who is a member of the ail- 
fcnale Dorozovsky Folk Ensemble, a 
\ilage in the Briansk region. In making 
hr costume, she even wove die cloth on 
hr loom ax home. When music from a 
carby rehearsal room drifted toward 
hr, she began wiggling her shoulders. 

I can’t sit still once the music starts," 
tie said. “‘My bones start moving.” 

In Soviet tiroes, the only kind of 


Russian folk music and dance approved 
for exposure abroad was air-brushed 
and slightly kitsch. If the best was rep- 
resented by Igor Moiseyev's profes- 
sional folk dance group, much of it was 
bland and homogenized, about as au- 
thentic as the Russian Tea Room in 
Manhattan. “In the old days, if we 
wanted to send a group overseas, a 
special commission would inspect the 
program, and say, "Ibis no, take this 
oat, you can't sing this,’ *’ said Elvira 
Kunina, director of the Folk Art Center 
of the Ministry of Culture in Moscow. 
“We were supposed to represent Rus- 
sia. They wanted to iron out all the 
differences and make everything look 
the same, down to the tunics." 

In September, the impresario David 
Eden, who sponsored a tour of Russian 
folk dancers and musicians in 1991, 
returned to Russia to recruit authentic 
folk choirs from remote areas. The per- 
formers are not paid, but each is to 
receive a per diem payment of $40. 

The youngest member of the Doro- 
zovsky Folk Ensemble is 57, and all of 
diem have the weather-beaten frees and 
sturdy build of traditional Russian grand- 
mothers. Wearing beaded headdresses 
and hand-woven traditional dresses, they 
sine ami stomp and yip old village songs 


T HE Makasha folk group is also 
from Briansk. but it is made up 
of young musicologists. “In 
the Soviet palaces of culture, 
there were huge choirs and dance 
companies and die performances were 
very stylized, ir was pretty, but not very 
authentic.” said Irina Magolinova, 24. 
who teaches music in a kindergarten. “1 
didn't see the real thing until I went to 
music school.” 

Voloitsa, an ensemble from Rostov- 
on-Don that performs stirring Cossack 
songs and vivid martial dances (includ- 
ing sword-tossing), is led by Alexander 
Venglevsky, 40. a slender man who 
looks strikingly like Czar Nicholas n. 
Venglevsky, a musicologist who is not 
Cossack by birth, is a passionate convert 
to its culture. “The Cossack spirit never 
died: it was hidden within the people in 
villages,” he said stoutly. ‘ ‘People have 
this image of Russians who drink all day 
and do nothing. I want people to see 
Cossacks as they really are." 


with unnerving gusto. They bring with 
them not only long-forgotten melodies 
and intricate folk dances, but also the 
history of rural Russia. 

Alyoshina dropped oat of school 
when she was nine to work on a col- 
lective farm, wielding a scythe to har- 
vest grain. “My husband was killed in 
the war, and I lad to support five chil- 


Notorious B.I.G.’s Final Rap 


By Jon Paroles 

Vrw for* Times Service 

N EW YORK — Christopher 
Wallace, the Notorious 
B.I.G.. thought he had all the 
time in the world. His second 
album. “Life After Death' ’ (Bad Boy/ 
Arista), flaunts affluence with a leis- 
urely swagger, all midtempo grooves 
and calmly arrogant raps. 

Calling himself “richer than rich," 
the rapper from Brooklyn boasts about 
his condo, his platinum watch, his fre- 
quent-flier miles and his women, in a 
voice as husky as his 280-pound frame. 

At the same time, he insists that he has 
to watch his back and defend himself, 
guns blazing, against jealous rivals and 
predators. But he doesn't sound wor- 


ried, and his guest rappers insist he’ll be 
on top for years to come. 

The Notorious BIG. didn 'i have that 
kind of time, of course. He was killed on 
March 9 in a drive-by shooting, dead at 
24. Hip-bop observers have speculated, 
in one of many theories, that it was a 
gang-related murder growing out of a 
lethal animosity between Death Row 
Records in Los Angeles (the label of 
Tupac Shakur, who was shot dead last 
September) and Bad Boy Records in 
New York. 

With its prescient title, “Life After 
Death" is bound to be scrutinized for 
clues, though the raps themselves are 
circumspect “Notorious Thugs" men- 
tions a “so-called beef with you-know- 
who," while “Long Kiss Goodnight" 
is a death threat addressed to an un- 


CROSSWORD 


named rapper. But “Life After Death" 
wasn’t supposed to be a last testament or 
Exhibit A. It was gangsta rap business as 
usual: posturing and raw thrills in ac- 
cepted commercial form. 

The album claims underground cre- 
dentials while aiming for pop ears, bor- 
rowing recognizable chunks of old 
songs (from Screamin' Jay Hawkins, 
Diana Ross and the Commodores) and 
using smooth voices for sing-along 
choruses. Even a refrain like “time for 
you to die" arrives as a pop hook. 

As a rapper, B.I.G. rarely made great 
claims to originality. 

Instead, he was a consolidator, 
pulling together borrowed gambits in 
approachable form. With raps full of 
comic details, he was the thug next door, 
not a supervillain. 


ACROSS 
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54 Imperial decree 

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55 Hatha 

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©A ! eu York Times/Edited by Will Sharia. 


Solution to Ppzzle of April 1 


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By David Stevens 

Intermixing! H erat J Tribune 

P ARIS — The musical values 
are up front in the Paris Op- 
era's new production of 
Richard Wagner's “Parsi- 
fal.” beginning in the orchestra pit 
where Armin Jordan's direction — 
flowing, lyrical, unhurried but never 
dragging — sets die pace and tone for 
the whole performance. 

And the voices are there. Thomas 
Moser, the Vienna-based American 
tenor, has made his way gradually 
from Mozart to Wagner without los- 
ing the seemingly effortless lyricism 
that he unites here with dramatic 
strength in his first stage performance 
of the title role. 

Kathryn Harries is the splendid 
Kundry, more convincing in her se- 


ductive duties of the second act than in 
the abjectness of the first and third. 
Wolfgang Schoene is powerful in the 
torment of the wounded Amfortas. As 
Gumemanz. which can easily be the 
most boring role in all opera, Jan- 
Hendrik Rootering rolls out waves of 
glorious bass singing. Kristinn Sig- 
mundson is the dramatically potent 
embodiment of a fallen angel as 
Klingsor. while Gwynne Howell as 
Titurel is pure luxury cameo casting. 

The staging by Graham Vick and 
the sets and costumes of Paul Brown 
were effective without being eccent- 
ric. favoring a theatrical view of Wag- 
ner's final work without falling into 
the ever- threatening pseudo-religious 
attitude. The basic white set looks as if 
it were designed as an acoustic shell, 
not a bad idea in the tricky acoustics of 
the Bastille Opera. A gnarled tree. 


w ith or without blossoms according to 
the needs of the moment, is another 
constant. The magic spell of Good 
Friday is unconvincingly represented 
bv a few sparsely arranged flowers 
popping out of the stage floor. 

Mosf of the color was concentrated 
in the costumes, with the flower maid- 
ens of the second act outfitted as a 
particularly kitschy gaggle of cocktail 
lounge hostesses. Sundry's slinky 
maroon number being obviously the 
most fetching of the lot. 

The theater’s revelling platforms 
were put to effective use. both as a 
housing for the circular table of ibe 
knights of the grail and as a way of 
removing inconvenient recumbant 
bodies. 

But the real value of this production 
is that it does not get in the way of a 
team of superior musicians at work. 


An Upbeat "Flying Dutchman 


dren by working in a factory," Alyosh- 
ina said. “It was hard work, but I still 
went to choir practice. I would die if I 
couldn't dance." 

Alyoshina also brought with her 
some of the village tribalism that lingers 
in the provinces far from Moscow. 
"Don't trust anything Larissa tells 
you," she whispered, a reference to one 
of the other women in the group. “We 
brought ber in a few years ago because 
she can sing, but she can't dance at all." 
She nodded knowingly. “She’s not 
really from Dorozovsky, she comes 
from another village nearby." 


By Paul Moor 

International Herald Tribune 


B ERLIN — That reprobate 
genius Richard Wagner bad 
a thing about redemption; As 
a theme it crops up recur- 
rently in his operas, strengthening the 
contention that at least unconsciously 
he did feel guilt about such pecca- 
dilloes as making off with the wives of 
even close friends and patrons. 

Goetz Friedrich, one of today's 
leading operatic stage directors (and 
since 1981 director of the Deutsche 
Qper Berlin), has long had a thing 
about “The Flying Dutchman,” Wag" 
tier's first major opera: Although he 
has repeatedly staged all the others, he 
has only now staged his first "Dutch- 
man." He says only now has he found 
a solution to the problem he saw posed 
by Wagner’s contention that only 
Senta's suicide can redeem the Dutch- 
man from his doom to sail the world's 
oceans in seven-year stretches until 


Judgment Day. 
Friedrich doe* 


Friedrich does not have a reputation 
for doing violence to librettists' and 
composers' intentions, but here he 
takes more liberties than usual. Wagner 


said Serna * ’casts herself into the sea.” 
Here the opera has an almost happy- 
ending: on the foundation of Senta’s 
unconditional love, she and the Dutch- 
man somehow redeem at least that fac- 
tion of suffering humankind consigned 
to the seas of all the world. 

This motive appears already during 
the overture — which Friedrich, as 
usual, uses dramatically for scene- 
setting pantomime. Upstage, under 
lowering night skies over the most 
believable of stage seas t Gottfried 
Pilz). a silhouetted ship crosses the 
stage with EXODUS 1947 in dim 
lights across its side. 

Before the overture ends, we see a 
drifting sort of listing raft that re- 
volves" to reveal human flotsam re- 
miniscent of Vietnamese “boat 
people." In Friedrich's conception of 
today's world, far more than one lone 
Flying Dutchman desperately needs 
redemption. 

As usual, several peripheral Fried- 
rich innovations seem startlingly apt 
Act 2 opens not with a roomful of 
spinning wheels but with the women 
working together feeding individual 
strands into an apparatus cleverly in- 
corporating them into mariners’ rope. 


Act 3 opens not with a troop of seago- 
ing Boy Scouts but with a crew of 
rough Norwegian sailors just back in 
port, lustily boozing and carousing. 

Some aspects of this supernatural 
yam still force the spectator to sus- 
pend belief. The obsession of Senta's 
mooning over the portrait of the mys- 
terious unknown stranger twho ma- 
terializes as the Dutchman) indicates 
she may well have become psychotic 
— as indeed, come to dunk of it, 
perhaps she has. 

Wolfgang Brendel powerfully and 
convincingly sang and portrayed the 
Dutchman. Sabine Hass took over 
Senta's role when Julia Varady can- 
celed shortly before the premiere, and, 
especially under the circumstances, 
distinguishes herself. Two Finns — 
Marti Saiminen as a colossal Dal and 
and Jorma Silvasti as a lyrical Erik — 
received ovations. Renee Morioc as 
Mary and Uwe Peper as the steersman 
effectively completed the casL 

Isabel hies Glathar's costumes, es- 
pecially the Dutchman's, contributed 
importantly. Karl Hamper's chorus, 
as usual, sang superbly. The orchestra 
and Rafael Fruehbeck de Burgos did 
not have one of their better nights. 


LONDON THEATER 


Ian Holm’s Incomparable Lear 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — In a lifetime of 
theatergoing I must have seen 
upward of 50 King Lears: some 
more majestic than that of Ian 
Holm at the National, some still more 
mesmeric and some perhaps more 
hauntingly destroyed by their own 
weakness or even their own strength; 
but never have I seen one more moving 
or accessible. 

Richard Eyre’s valedictory Shake- 
speare is on die Cottesloe stage, down 
the center of which he and his designer 
have run a racetrack land of ramp 
thereby ensuring that we watch “King 
Lear" as we might the Derby, won- 
dering which if any of the characters are 
going to make it to the finish alive. In the 
event ir is old Kent (David Burke, one of 
a trio of great supporting performances 
with Michael Bryant's yokel Fool and 
Tim West’s commanding Gloucester), 
who in the final heartbreak of his “I 
have a journey, sir, shortly to go: My 
master calls me. — I must not say no" 
gets past the post dragging a cart on 
which are not only the bodies of all three 
daughters but also Lear himself. Father 
Courage could not have done it better or 
more tragically. 

This is often a Lear of surprises: Not 
entirely specific in date, it gives us for 
instance a Regan (Amanda Redman) 
who starts out as a high-society hostess, 
forever encouraging Lear's faintly dis- 
turbing paternal passion for her. only to 


disintegrate into illness and death in a 
journey that seems to minor dial of her 
father from the safety of indoors. Then 
again, Anne-Marie Duff’s Cordelia at 
times appears no less manipulative, the 
baby daughter accustomed to being 
spoiled and only too late aware that she, 
too. has a journey shortly ro go. Bryant 's 
Fool, as old and as weary as his royal 
master, sets up a useful mirror in which 
Lear can see himself as well as his 
imminent downfall, while in Paul Rhys 
and F inbar Lynch we have, for the first 
time in my recollection, an Edgar and an 
Edmund who could in real life be bas- 
tard half-brothers, so alike are they in 
looks and bearing. 

But time and again of course this is 
Holm's Lear, and we are unlikely to 
leave this century with a better a little, 
angry, bearded gremlin he seems to defy 
all the preconceptions about the king as 
he pads about the stage, mannered and 
mad and majestic by turn, but always 
letting us into the inner workings of his 
increasing self-destruction. 


A S we lose Eyre from the Na- 
tional, we welcome his pre- 
decessor Peter Hall to the Old 
Vic with what must be the 
most ambitious project even thar stage 
has seen since the National itself 
crossed the river almost a quarter of a 
century ago — 10 shows in repertoire by 
midsummer. Sunday opening and, as a 
foretaste of the sheer range of work to be 
seen there, a triumphant revival of the 
Victorian but ever -topical “Waste” 


countered by the first-ever London pro- 
duction of" David Rabe's “Huriy 
Burly" fully a dozen years after it took 
off-Broadway by storm. 

The time-lag has not been altogether 
kind to it: In the interim David Mamet 
(notably in the 1988 “Speed the Plow") 
has revisited these Hollywood lulls with 
more manic intensity, and Rabe’s ac- 
count of the old “me generation” mis- 
fits rumbling from fringe show business 
through cocaine to destruction mode 
seems now curiously dated as well as 
way past its seli-by date. True, no di- 
rector would have an easy time living up 
to the first New York production, by 
Mike Nichols, which starred Harvey 
Keitel. William Hun. Christopher 
Walken and Sigourney Weaver, most of 
whom won Tony nominations. 

Bui despite a strong Old Vic cast 
(Rupert Graves. Andy Serids, Stephen 
Dillane and Elizabeth McGovern for 
director Wilson Milam) the play does 
now seem to creak a bit. and it is "harder 
than ever before to care for these self- 
obsessed losers and dreamers. One 
aches for Clifford Odets, who in the '40s 
gave us the seamier side of Hollywood, 
but with characters we could even in all 
their larger-than-life awfulness actually 
care about. Rabe. by contrast, is so eager 
to alienate that we end up unable to care 
about any of his people and only thank- 
ful they never eoL around to starring in 
the movies we'would then have had to 
watch. There is a time-clock on plays 
like this, and it should perhaps have 
been observed. 


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PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1997 


Tuesday's 3 P.SI, 

The Asaocabd Press. 


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page II 



Plash! 

TKeifeean 


*sh! UPI Lives 

rtse and fall and rs-emergence of the United Press fntematforaJ news service. 


EW.Scdpps, 

wes&baron 


1907 

United . 

• Press is 

. founded by 

• E.W. ■ 
Scdppsas 
aprtvatsty 
Owned 
news 
service to 
compete 


merges with 


and UPI founder with The 

Associated 


Randolph 

Hearers 

International 

News 

Service and 

tenanted 

United 


International 


tee 

The Scripps 
tamfly sate the 
service totwo 
Tennessee 
businessmen, 
Douglas Ruha : 
and WUIiam 
GaissJer, for 
$1 and agrees 
to-corrtrfoute 
S5mifflonfor 
the transition 


1985 

UPI files for 
bankruptcy. 


Ruhe and Gefester 

seflUPItoa 

Mexican 

businessman, Marto 
Va z quez Rana, and 
a Houston raai 
estate davetoper. 
Joe Russo, for 541 
million. 


Sources: 77» Associated Press; UPf brochure fcrflo 75ft a/wwwsaiy in J882 


1988 

Vazquez Rana 
sells UPI to 
Wotechnotogy. 

last 

Infotachnotogy Has 
for bankruptcy. 

199Z 

Middle East Broad- 
casting Center of 
London purchases 
UPI for53.S5 
mIBon. 



Howard Dteus, 
general manager 
lor news at UPI 


New UPI Bets on Bite-Sized News 


By Iver Peterson 

New York Tones Service 


W ASHINGTON — Since 
1986, United Press Inter- 
national has been through 
three owners, .two h ank- 
ruptcies and one court-ordered liquid- 
ation. Not surprisingly, the company's 
latest owners nave been looking for a 
better brand of journalism. 

Starting with a reorganization in 
September, they hope they can find it 
by satisfying the American appetite 
for bite-sized bits of news. . 

Unable to .compete with The As- 
sociated Press or Reuters PLC, UPI is 
strengthening its radio-broadcast arm 
while developing aland of niche jour- 
nalism, selling fragments of news to 
customers ranging from a San Fran- 
cisco paging service that puts head- 
lines on pager screens to a Kentucky 
enterprise that wants to flash headlines 
in bare and reGgioas broadcasters who 
have begun adding news broadcasts as 
a way of holding their audiences. 

“Tbere are a tot of people out there 
who are trying to figure out which lanes 
of tiie ‘infobahn’ they want to be in, 
and we are making a living by provid- 
ing them with information in arty form 
they can use iL” Howard Dicus, UPTs 
general manager for news, said. 

“This is a place that has come so 
close to dying mar we have really had to 
straggle to find new markets, and now 
that we are making enough money to at 
least males ft worth saving the place, we 
will keep trying even harder. ; 

UPI is soQ for from profitable — 
Mr. Dicus said it would take $2nnDion 
more a month in revenue to put it 
“well into the black” — ami its man- 
agement only recently completed the 
latest of many cost-cutting programs. 
It has replaced most of its top news and 
business executives and closed afi its . 
European bureaus except the one in 
London, where Middle Hast Broad- 
casting Center Ltd- tire news service's 
owner, has its headquarters. 


Middle East Broadcasting, which 
acquir ed UPI in 1992, is owned by a 
group of Saudi investors, including a 
brother-in-law of King Pahd. 

Most of its U.S. news bureaus also 
have been closed, and national cov- 
erage is directed from news desks in 
New Ymk, Chicago, Los Angeles, 
Dallas. Miami and Washington. UPI 
relies heavily on freelancers in places 
where it no longer has bureaus. 

When it last changedhands in 1992, 
UPI had about 450 full-time staff 
members and 2,000 part-time employ- 
ees. Now, ft is now down to about 300 
staff members and 800 part-timers, 
Thomas Johnson, its director of mar- 
keting and sales, said. 

The news service has about 1,000 
broadcast clients and 1,000 newspaper 
andWorid WzdeWeb clients, Mr. John- 
son said; he declined to be more spe- 
cific. “Talk to me in about six months, 
and maybe FH tell you then,” he said. 

MEDIA MARKETS 

UPI sells its news articles to die 
Yahoo search engine on the World 
Wide Web and to Clarinet Commu- 
nications Corp., which maintains a 
news site on the Web. What is certain, 
howevex, is that tine are for fewer of 
the daily American newspapers that 
once were its bread-and-butter cli en ts. 

Asked bow many papers still carried 
the news service, Mr. Dicus said “a 
handful” and “ more than none.” 
Most of the service ’s print clients are in 
Aria flood in Latin America, be said. 

The UPI Radio Network has 120 

nfFTKatw; wyomitc fnr ahnnt half nf 

the news service’s income, Mr. Dicus 
said, with sales toretigioos broadcasters 
bring particularly strong. The Armed 
Races Radio Network and Bloomberg 
News Radio are also clients, he said. 

Nkbe users Of UPI’s headline ser- 
vice, called the Short Service, mean- 
while, include several telephone news 
services, which display news summar- 
ies an pagers. 


UPI also has adopted a writing style 
that is devoid of flourish or. interpret- 
ation and limits its articles to 350 words, 
half the length of a typical Associated 
Press or Reuters article. It calls its new 
approach “focus style,” and it has its 
roots both m UPTs history as a service 
for radio broadcasters and in Mr. Di- 
cos’s search fora way to report the news 
that is fast, and cheap. 

“We decided that the most a radio 
station would buy was one screenful, 
about 250 words, and that is a lot less 
than tiie traditional flat wire,” Mr. 
Dicus said, using a traditional term for 
a standard text wire. 

“We also noticed that a lot of papers 
were putting out USA Today-style 
news summaries of one or two lines 
each, running do wn one column of foe 
page,” Mr. Dicus said. “It all seemed 
to be leading us in the direction of 
keeping a flat news wire but making 
the pieces shorter so yon could read it 
over the air, wh2e keeping the visual 
conventions of the traditional wire.” 

UPI has also developed what it calls 
its Short Service, which sells “spot- 
lights.” two-sentence news summar- 
ies for clients wanting only the briefest 
summaries for broadcast or display by 
radio, beepers or the Internet. 

Inventing an electronic information 
service is a daunting task, as Mr. Dicus 
acknowledged, and profits from In- 
ternet-based information services, an- 
other part of UPI’s strategy, have so 
farproved illusory. 

The changes have upset some tra- 
ditional print reporters, who resent the 
length limits and foe ascendancy of the 
broadcast atm, as embodied in foe pro- 
motion of Mr. Dicus, a lifelong broad- 
caster, to the top editorial position. 

Still, many reporters said they were 
simply glad that the company was still 
around. “I started with UPI in. 1943,” 
said Helen Thomas. UPTs ''White 
House bureau chief. “I would go to 
work at 5:30 in the morning to write 
those three-line stories for radio, so this 
new approach is not so hard for me.” 


U.S. to Block Imports of EU Meat 

Deadline Passes With No Accord on Inspection Standards 


CMpi/dt? On Safffum Duperies 

WASHINGTON — U.S. and Euro- 
pean Union negotiators have failed to 
agree on common meat-trade inspection 
standards, and the United States will 
bean blocking meat imports from the 
Eu, Agriculture Secretary Dan G lick- 
man said Tuesday. 

Paul Drazek, Mr. Giickman's trade 
adviser, said the action would affect 
$300 million in EU meat products, 
mostly hams from Denmark. 

“It will certainly disrupt trade in the 
short term,” Mr. Drazek said. 

But about $li billion in beef, peak 
and poultry exports are at stake for both 
sides in the dispute. 

Denmark exports about 50,000 tons 
of pork products to the United States 
annually, according to the Danish Meat 
and Bacon Council. 

Mr. Drazek said the European Union 
would probably retaliate by blocking 
U.S. egg, dairy and poultry products 
worth about $100 milli on. 

The talks, under way for more than 10 
years, foiled to meet an April l deadline 
the Union had sei for each side to accept 
foe other’s inspection standards. 

Geny Kiely. agriculture spokesman 
for die European Commission, said thar a 


ion of U.S. slaughterhouses 


by EU officials had found a “difference 
of philosophy,” since EU controls arc 
effected at each stage of the processing 
line, while UJS. controls are carried out 
only at foe end of processing. The EU 
delegation had suggested unsuccessfully 
a temporary solution that would have 
enabled U.S. producers to meet EU stan- 
dards within three to six months. 

Since the mid-1980s, the European 
Union has barred more than 400 U.S. 
facilities from shipping beef and pork to 
Europe because of the lack of agreement 
on “equivalent” inspection standards. 

The United States, which has con- 
tinued exports to specific countries un- 
der a separate agreement, wrote EU 
officials in January threatening to block 
meat shipments from Europe if the 
deadline passed without an agreement 
on standards. 

“Because foe EU has imposed an 
April I deadline. U.S. exports of certain 
products will be adversely affected,” 
Mr. Glickman said In addition, he said 
any opportunity to expand U.S. red meat 
exports to take advantage of market 
access commitments made by the EU 
during world trade talks “has for the 
time being been lost.” 


Talks will continue in foe coming 
months, he said. 

Mr. Kiely called the U.S. move “pro- 
tectionist," and said it did not help the 
prospects for an agreement 

He said he did not know bow foe EU 
Commission, foe Union’s executive 
body, would respond to the U.S. decision. 
The U.S. Department of Agriculture no- 
tified EU leaders in January that ft may 
decide to inspect each European pro- 
cessing plant that wants to send meat to 
foe United States, a time-consuming step 
that would effectively block imports. 

Mr. Drazek said Tuesday that the 
United States would start inspections ou 
a “plant-by-plant basis.” The inspec- 
tions will involve more than 100 meat 
processing plants in Europe. 

An EU negotiator, Lars Christian 
Hoelgaard, has said sticking points in the 
latest round of talks, which took place last 
week, were over “harmonized import 
requirements in foe poultry sector.” 

The head of the U.S. Senate sub- 
committee for international trade, 
Charles Grassley. had pressed foe U.S. 
trade representative, Charlene Barsbef- 
sky, to prepare retaliatory measures, 
contending that foe Union was being 
discriminatory. ( Bloomberg , AFP) 


Wall Street Wilts in Shadow of the Fed 


CtmtOitlbrOgrS^fFnmDapaKha 

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks exten- 
ded their losses in late trading Tuesday 
amid growing concern that the Federal 
Reserve would raise rates for a second 
time this year when it met next month. 

Oil and computer shares paced the 
riep.linp- “I’m selling stocks,” said 
Larry Babin, a fund manager at Society 
Asset Management ‘ ‘Interest rates are 
going up.” 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
was quoted in late trading with a loss of 
2I.9f points at 6,561.57. The industrials 
were led lower by Chevron, Exxon and 
Hewlett-Packard. The Standard & 
Poor's 500 index was down 233 points 
at 754.79, while the Nasdaq composite 
index was off 8.60 at 1.213.10. 

With the Dow industrials losing about 
S percent in the past five trading days, 
however, fund managers said many 
stock prices inrKratftri bargains. 

‘Tnere’s no sign of a recession,” 


said Charles Henderson, chief invest- 
ment officer of Chicago Trust Co. ‘ ‘Just 

Ier^snapshot 

die opposite — foe Fed is worried foe 
economy is growing too much. I expect 
stocks to be up about 7 percent by foe 
end of the year.” 

The National Association of Purchas- 
ing Management's index of manufac- 
turing conditions rose to 55.0 last 
month, higher than the 53.4 reading pre- 
dicted by some economists. 

At the same time, the association’s 
closely watched price index, considered 
by some an indication of the inflation 
rate, fell to 50.9 in March from 55.1 in 
February. 

Separately, foe Commerce Depart- 
ment said U.S. construction spending 
rose 2.3 percent in Febniaiy. Analysis 
had expected a 0.7 percent increase. 

Bond yields rose as high as 7.12 


Global Private Banting 


percent after foe reports but then re- 
treated and were quoted in late trading at 
7.08 percent, on from 7.09 percent 
Monday. 

With higher rates possible, investors 
are exacting severe punishment on 
companies that fall short of expecta- 
tions. Informix tumbled after foe data- 
base management software company 
said it expected a first-quarter loss. 

Fore Systems fell after foe maker of 
networking products said it expected to 
report disappointing earnings for its cur- 
rent quarter. 

Meanwhile, foe fund-tracking firm 
Momingstar Inc. said foe average mu- 
tual fund investing in U.S. stocks had its 
worst performance in more than two 
years during the first quarter, and funds 
specializing in high-technology compa- 
nies were particularly weak, losing an 
average of more than 6 percent 

See STOCKS, Page 12 


Bre-X Trades Again, for a Few Minutes 


Compiled by OwS*#Ftt*oDbparka . 

TORONTO — Trading in shares of 
Bre-X Minerals Ltd. resumed Itesday 
despite company pleas for dealings to 
remain halted until farther tests coaid 
resolve a f uror over claims of a hag e 
gold discovery in Indonesia. 


t ha n an hour because the volume of 
orders caused the Toronto Stock Ex- 
change’s computer trading system to 
fail. More than 7.7 million Bre-X shares 
changed hands between 1030 A-M., 
when trading resumed, and 1033 A-M. 
The- shares rose 135 Can a dian dollars 
(98 U.S. cents) to 3.85 dollars before 
trading was halted for the day. 

The value of Bre-X stock plunged by 
more than 80 percent — a loss of more 
than $2 billion — Thursday after foe 
company said reports of its gold dis- 
covery may have been exaggerated be- 
cause of inaccurate tests. 

The sell-off came after Bre-X’s de- 
velopment partner, Freeport McMoRan 
Ccmper & Gold Inc. of New Orleans, 
announced that its independent initial 
analyses of samples from the site had 
shown insignificant amounts oi goia. 

Trading in Bre-X shares was mitiaDy 
halted Monday, and Bre-X asfa dfoatfoe 
suspension be extended until Freeport 
McMoRan finished its tests and an m- 


That could take four weeks cxr more 


Also Monday, two class-action law- 
suits were filed in foe United States cm 
behalf of Bre-X investors, alleging that 
executives of the small Calgary-based 
company bad sold some of their shares at 
a huge profit before serious questions 
were, raised abbot what had been trum- 
peted in some quarters as possibly the 
biggest gold find of foe century. 

The news agency Canadian Press said 
one suit had bom filed in federal court in 
New Yack alleging that Bre-X had sold 
shares before damaging news emerged 
about its Busangproject and that material 
misstatements had been made about the 
project. The law firm of Mil berg Weiss 
Benftad Hynes & Lerach said the suit, 
filed in Manhattan, sought class-action 
gtntng cm behalf of all investors who held 
Bre-X stock between Aug. 13, 1996, and 
Wednesday of last week. A Houston- 
based law. firm, Baker & Botes, said a 
group also had filed a suit in Texas. 

David Walsh, president of Bre-X. has 
said he stands by the company’s c l a ims 
and threatened to sue its critics. 

Bre-X’s estimates that foe Busang 
rite on foe island of Borneo contains at 
least 71 million ounces of gold m ade the 
company a favorite with Canadian and 
U.S. investors. Shares purchased for a 
few cents in 1993 were worth more than 
$200 by last September. 

Ind onesia has asked a team of spe- 
cialists to examine foe gold deposits. 


Mr. Walsh, his wife and other Bre-X 
executives reported their sales of Bre-X 
stock to authorities, and they have denied 
violating any securities regulations. 

Canadian Press quoted foe New York 
complaint as alleging that insiders at 
Bre-X in selling more than 22 million 
dollars of Bre-X stock on the open mar- 
ket, had benefited from a “belated dis- 
closure” of information in die Freeport 
McMoRan study. It said the suit bad 
been filed on behalf of a U.S. investor 
who bought 4,000 Bre-X shares in Feb- 
ruary and early March. 

In Houston, Baker & Botts said the 
Texas suit had been filed on behalf of 
shareholders who had been injured in 
buying or selling foe stock over foe past 
three years. “Beginning in 1994,” the 
plaintiffs alleged in the suit, “defendants 
convinced the world that Bre-X owned 
90 percent of a massive gold deposit, 
perhaps foe largest ever discovered, lo- 
cated in foe Busang area of East Ka- 
limantan, Indonesia. This was false.” 

The suit named Bre-X and Mr. Walsh 
among, foe defendants. Bre-X execu- 
tives suggested foal foe difficulties of 
testing the coarse type of gold it found in 
Indonesia might have caused some con- 
fusion. The company and some inde- 
pendent geolojpsts also said different 
methods of calculating reserves might 
produce different results. 

(AP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


April t 

Cross Rates u e 

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Stiorflfc Atvfes. 


At 


REPUBLIC, MANAGING 


YOUR ASSETS IS A DIALOGUE, 
NOT A MONOLOGUE. 


of RofiaUu 

Sotiofial H omh of Sow Vwl 
CSmooci S.A. m Genoro 


In fact, we consider asset management 
a team effort, with you as the hev member of 
that team. Your particular financial needs, your 
objectives, help us determine the winning strategy. 
Our fundamental goal: to protect your capital 
as we safeguard its purchasing power. 

It is a simple principle upon which we base 

. m Gniira 

our brand of financial conservatism: private 
banking built upon rigor, discipline and prudence. This 
sophisticated conservatism, vigorously pursued, has created 
a global private bank of exceptional stability, capable 
of weathering the roughest storms. 

Indeed, Republic's capitalization ratio, 
on a risk adjusted basis, is iuv times as great 
as that required hy the world's international 
banking regulators. 

To our way of thinking, it is security as 
well as return that we must ensure each day. 

And in the process, to provide a unique quality 

S'.rU IfejJqmorfet* of 

of service, understanding and discretion. 


Ip Republic National Bank of New York’ 

Strength. Security. Service. 

A Safra B«nL ' New Virfc ' Geneva * London ■ Beijing ' Beirut * Beverly Hills ' Bueno: Airve • Cayman Islands " Copenhagen ' Gibraltar 
Guem#e* ’ Hnnfi Ki'n^ lafearta Lo» Anselm * Lugano * Luxembourg * Manila * .Mexico City ‘ Miami “ Miijii * Munte Carlo " Montevideo 
Muntxeal ' Merer* * Ni**au " Pari? ■ Fertli * Punta del Erie * Rio je Isneiru * Santiago ■ Singapore * SyJnry ’ Taipei " Tofcyu ' Toronto ‘ Zurie 


CH rr wU K Xj»J&*L i'« '-A. K 




Investor’s America 


The Dow 


30-Year. T-Bortci Yield 



Hoiiar in Deutsche marks B Dollar in Yen 



- 

□ 

1996 

EKdiango 

NYSE . 

J F m’ A 
1997 

index . 

TheOow 

110 

1996 

' .Tuesday 
, 0LSD PM 

8607^7 

*v£l . 

J F 

Prey. 

Close 

6583.48 

M A 
1997 

% 

Change 

+0.36 

NYSE * 

S&P 500 ' 

■ 757*2 

767.12 

■ +0.09 

NYSE". 

■S&P 100 

7»7 £S 

737.20 

+0.06 

NYSE 

Composite - 

398.15 

39B.56 

+0.15 

OJS. .. 

Nasdaq Composite t211J2. 

1221.70 

-0.81 

AMEX 

Wfartot VaftJG ■'. 

.9BSM 

568.71 

-0.60 

Toronto ■ 

TSE mete* 

583*40 

5831.75 

-Q.84 

saofinito 

Bore^aa ■ . ; 

9125.00 

9044.35 

+0.90 

MaxiCO City 

Bofea 

■ 3857.76 

3842.94 

-3.78 

| Buenos Aires Metvat - 

711.18 

739.15 

-3.78 

Santiago 

IPSA General 

5278.00 

527821 


Caracas 

Capital Genera} 

NJL 

6325.17 

- 

Source; Bloomberg, Reuters 


Inimuliniul HcraU Tnhuic 

Very briefly: 


Dow Chemicals Sues G£ on Secrets 

MIDLAND. Michigan (Bloomberg) — Dow Chemical Co. 
said it had filed suit against General Electric Co. charging GE 
with stealing trade secrets from Dow's automotive and en- 
gineering plastics business. 

Dow said the suit claimed GE “systematically and ag- 
gressively targeted, recruited and hired Dow employees privy 
to Dow trade secrets 1 ' and placed them in similar GE jobs. 

World Bank Approves Shake-Up 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The World Bank board unan- 
imously approved a $400 million reorganization plan Monday 
designed to shake up the bank's bureaucracy and make it more 
effective in fighting poverty around the world. 

• The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. reprimanded Lippo 
Bank, a Los Angeles institution, for “unsafe and unsound 
banking practices." Under the terms of the ‘ 'cease and desist' ' 
order, the bank neither admitted nor denied the allegations. 

• Brooke Group Ltd. said its Liggett Group cigarette unit, 
maker of Eve and Chesterfield cigarettes, may not generate 
sufficient cash to meet its debt payments, raising doubt about 
its future. 

• NBC has acquired a 25 percent stake in Madison Square 
Garden and its two sports teams, the New York Knicks and 
Rangers. 

• Globalstar Canada, a partnership of Loral Space and 
Communications Ltd.. AirTouch Communications Inc., 
and Canadian Satellite Communications Inc. received a 
license to offer wireless telephone and fax services across 
Canada. 

• Westwood One Inc. is to distribute to radio stations the 

programming produced by Westinghouse Electric Corp.'s 
CBS Radio Network unit. ur. Bloomberg. .\ p 


Cry Victory in Court Ruling 


Broadcasters 


By Mark Landler 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — It had been billed as an epic 
battle between the American broadcast and 
cable industries, so when the Supreme Court 
ruled that cable operators must continue to carry 
broadcast stations on their systems, broad- 
casters gloated while their cable counterparts 
scrambled to rationalize a defeat. 

But the ruling handed down Monday was 
neither as big a victory nor as crushing a setback 
as the years of legal skirmishing would suggest 

Cable executives originally pushed for the 
"must carry” rules to be scrapped, arguing that 
in a world of proliferating television outlets, it 
was unconstitutional for the government to 
require that cable companies give broadcasters 
space on their systems. 

Still, even if the rules had been overturned, 
several cable executives said it would have 
made little difference in the lineup of channels 
now available to cable subscribers. Cable ex- 
ecutives. who widely expected the rules to be 
dropped, had planned to throw only a handful of 
broadcast stations off their systems in favor of 
new cable networks. 

"While we’re disappointed, we’ve been liv- 
ing under these rules since 1 992," said Michael 
L liftman, a spokesman for Tune Warner Cable, 
"so basically this means that nothing is going to 
change." 


Even broadcast stations with small audiences 
inspire enough loyalty that it would be difficult 
for Tune Warner to arbitrarily remove them 
from its system, one Time Warner executive, 
who asked not to be identified, said. WLIW, a 
New York station, for example, has a tiny but 
intensely loyal audience for its news and public 
affairs programming about Long Island. 

In fact, tne court's ruling could have a bigger 
effect on cable programmers that are struggling 
to gain distribution on crowded cable systems. 

An even larger question is the potential effect 
on satellite broadcasters such as Rupert Mur- 
doch. Mr. Murdoch's News Corp. is spending 


NEWS ANALYSIS 

several billion doQars to build a U.S. direct- 
broadcast satellite service that plans to offer 
local broadcast stations in addition to a broad 
lineup of cable channels. 

The service, to be called Sky like his satellite 
services in other parts of the world, would use a 
network of seven satellites to beam about half a 
dozen of the roost popular broadcast stations to 
subscribers in each market 

That combination of hundreds of cable chan- 
nels plus local broadcast stations would make 
Mr. Murdoch's venture the first genuine al- 
ternative to American cable television in its 
three-decade history, and it has stirred con- 
siderable alarm among cable executives. 


If Mr. Murdoch were forced to carry ail 1 .544 
of the country’s broadcast stations, however. 
anal ysts said that would far outstrip the trans- 
mission capacity of his satellites, and Sky would 
have to radically scale back the number of 
markets in which it offered local programming. 

"No matter how you slice it. this is not good 
news for Murdoch," Kick Wes term an, an ana- 
lyst at UBS* Securities, said of the high court's 
ruling. 

Executives at News Corp. did not return 
phone calls seeking comment. 

At the moment, the ‘ 'must carry" rules do not 
apply to satellite services. But Mr. Murdoch will 
have to persuade Congress to grant licenses to 
his venture to retransmit local broadcast stations, 
and lobbyists for the cable and broadcasting 
industries said Monday that they would push for 
these rules to be extended to his venture. 

"To the extent that Murdoch hopes to cany 
local stations, we would hope that he would 
make arrangements to carry all local stations," 
said Eddie Fritts, the president of the National 
Association of Broadcasters, which led the 
battle to uphold the "must carry” rules. 

As for broadcasters, the ruling mainly helps 
small independent stations, which were vul- 
nerable to being removed from cable systems. 

Bud Pax son, a broadcaster who is assembling 
a chain of nearly 50 small stations, said the rules 
would enable him to reach 40 million house- 
holds through cable distribution. 


Equifax to Buy KroII, the Corporate Gumshoe 


C.mprini hr Oir Suff Fan Drspasthrj 

ATLANTA — Equifax Inc. said 
Tuesday that its Insurance Infor- 
mation Services Group had agreed 
to buy the private investigation firm 
KroU Associates Inc. for an undis- 
closed sum. bolstering its corporate 
risk-management services. 

Equifax said Insurance Informa- 
tion Services would complete the 
rchase of KroU, which is closely 
id. after the insurance unit is spun 
off to shareholders later this year. 


The new company will be called 
ChoicePoinL 

Shares of Equifax, which is based 
in Atlanta, dropped $1,375 in late 
trading Tuesday, to $27. 125. 

KroU. a New York-based corpo- 
rate gumshoe firm founded in 1972 
by the former New York state pros- 
ecutor Jules KroU, would provide 
Equifax's unit with consulting ex- 
pertise and contacts to expand over- 
seas. Equifax said. 

In December, Equifax said it 


would split by the summer into two 
companies and spin off its insurance 
services unit to its shareholders be- 
cause its two businesses had grown 
too far apart. 

The insurance-service business 
had $559 millio n in annual revenue 
and more than 4.500 employees. 

KroU, which employs 300 people 
in 22 offices worldwide, provides 
detective work to corporate clients, 
helping companies, for example, do 
background searches on potential 


acquisition targets or executives. ' 
People familiar with the deal say 
that die longtime KroU president, 
Robert McGuire, a former New 
York City police commissioner, 
will retire from KroU as the deal is 
completed. 

Whether there wiU be other de- 
fections is uncertain — London 
newspapers were buzzing last 
month about a possible rebellion in 
the London office of KroU. 

(Bloomberg. NYT1 


Stock-Market Losses Weigh on the Dollar 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar sUd against other 
major currencies Tuesday amid concern that the 
recent losses on U.S. stock markets may mark the 
start of a move out of U.S. assets that could 
generate sales of dollars. 

The yen was particularly strong against the 
dollar and other currencies amid speculation that 
the Bank of Japan’s tankan survey of business 
sentiment, to be published Wednesday, would 
indicate Japanese growth was gathering mo- 
mentum more quickly than expected. 


Expectations that the U.S. Federal Reserve 
Boaro will foUow up the interest-rate rise it 
announced last week with further increases in the 
next few months have driven the Dow Jones 
industrial average sharply lower this week. Re- 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


cent U.S. economic data have added to expec- 
tations that the Fed will have to raise rates further 
to try to keep inflation in check. 

"The stock-market moves are weighing on the 


dollar for the time being, even though higher rates 
should theoretically be good for the dollar,’' said 
Klaus K usher, a currency analyst at Dresdner 
Kleinwort Benson Research in Frankfurt. 

The dollar feU to 121.535 yen in late trading 
from 123.670 yen Monday and to 1.6645 
Deutsche marks from 1.6763 DM. 

Against other major currencies, the dollar 
slipped to 5.6060 French francs from 5.6390 
francs and to 1.4400 Swiss francs from 1.4490 
francs. The pound was stronger at $1 .6645, com- 
pared with $ 1 .6405. 


r 


STOCKS: 

Wall Street Slumps ? 

Continued from Page 11 






w 


Some financial advisers have be- 
gun telling investors to dig in and 
expect the rough time to continue 
for several months. 

* • We're getting more defensi ve, 
said Louis Stanasolovich. president 
of Legend Financial Advisors of 
Pittsburgh. "We certainly are not 
telling people to sell their entire 
portfolio, but we are advising them 
to look to put new cash to work in 
different areas, m ak i ng sure their 
portfolio is diversified away from 
the S&P 500." * 

So far. mutual-fund investors 
have stayed the course, slowing 
their pace of new mutual -fund pur- 
chases since the beginning of the 
year but not yet pulling money out 
on a broad scale. Some sectors of the 
fund industry, however, have 
already started to suffer redemp- 
tions — technology funds and. more 
recently, the most aggressive types 
of general equity funds — raising 
once again the question of how in- 
vestors will react to a broader, or 
extended, market downturn. 

Thus far in 1997, the best-per- 
forming mutual funds have been 
those that cast their nets overseas. 
According to Morningstar. funds 
specializing in Latin America have- 
gained about 16 percent on average 
since Jan. I, while more general^ 
emerging market funds gained'* 
about 9 percent. The fund that in- 
vests in Russian heavy industry. 
Lexington Troika Dialog Russia, 
gained 46 percent in the first quarter, 
making it one of the period’s best 
performers. Among funds that in- 
vest in a broad array of U.S. stocks, 
those following a “value ’ ’ style per- 
formed better than those investing in 
“growth" stocks, and large-capit- 
alization funds did better than their 
brethren that invest in companies 
with smaller market values. 

Large -capitalization value funds, 
which buy shares of big companies 
that are trading at relatively low 
price/eamings ratios, and large-cap^ 
funds that buy a blend of value and 
growth stocks outpaced the field. 


i 

■e 




To Our Readers 

Because of the seven-hour time 
difference between New York and 
Paris through April 5. die U.S. stock 
tables, the U.S. futures and some 
other items in this edition reflect 
early prices. 

This change is necessary to meet 
distribution requirements. We will 
revert to our usual coverage 
Monday, after daylight time begins 
in the United Stales and Canada. 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 




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WO 


Dow Jones 

Open HW 

Indus 856131 6671.6S 65Z1.16 0607.27 

Trans 23Sl« 236186 ZMM 236186 

Ul* 21 7.7? 218.78 2178* 217.83 

Comp 2055.45 2060.1* 2044.93 2084.70 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


V Standard & Poors 


Industrials 

Trnnsp. 

Ul HI lies 
Finance 
SP50Q 
SP 100 

NYSE 

CaniMHAl 

IndUiTikPs 

Trnnsp. 

UtfflT 

Finance 

Nasdoq 

Campodte 

Inrtuvrtate 

Banks 

insurance 

Finance 

Tramp. 

AMEX 


Piwtous 

mjO Lae One 
W.A1 888-14 889 M 
556.18 54X89 544-27 
191.08 188.71 189.32 
88-03 8484 8498 

77X88 756.13 757.12 
754.24 736j45 73730 


HIpJi law 1P.M. 
400J3 H6J5 39755 
50503 499.07 10074 
1 5 6.3 3 357 56 

37.21 25432 25S-M 

364M 35045 362-75 


MM Law JPM. 
1220.40 120876 121091 
101143 10014] 100739 
127X21 1361.93 1368.93 
1425.97 141 A15 141837 
166X67 165250 145851 
85134 1054 849.10 


HIM* LOW 3PM. 
54871 54479 56516 



Nasdaq 


4 Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds- 
10 Utilities 
10 Industrials 


■ 1 J 0 

■114 

-004 

173 

- 2 m 


C»«. 

■1079 

■1061 

■877 

-6.73 

-138 

■X67 


TDtoy 


II 

Dsoo 
AsoBnd 
BieX/Angn 

Intel 

Mlaosns 

CmcCa 

Oracles 

VTaddCms 

Reglnds 

5unM<s 

DeOCpIs 


VM. Hlga 
216554 m 
217855 11 
107710 49*9 
10334] AIM 
99041 

94506 1J«, 
91044 nvi 
71114 26*1 
65375 38*9 

asm io 

38305 47*4 


Lew 3PM 
10 121 
8*4 I 0 *n 
46*9 47*9 
39V> 40*9 

I3nSi3?S 
89*4 911 
25*9 361 
36*4 36*9 
71 <9 TP* 
31*4 31*9 
2M 27V| 
66*9 66*9 
8 BAH 
45 46*9 


AMEX 


102.01 102512 

9877 987-3 

10574 105319 



teak 

wo* 

Ur* 

*PN 

a*. 

5PDR 

21714 


75ft, 

75ft 

♦ft 

V1«S 

9724 

33ft 

Sft 

32’y 

-re 

TWA 

4565 

7 

Oft 

6ft 


PoonC 

3342 

lift 

10ft 

10ft 


Nebors 

3579 

19ft 

iere 

lBft 

-hi 

NTH Cora 

3541 

4ft 

4*e 

4ft 

+*b 

EIPOCE 

3108 

6 

5*6 

5ft 

•re 

IraQ 

3043 

w 

»ft 

99* 

-re 

EcteBoy 

2400 

8ft 

**a 

6ft 


Ber^GcAJ 

2439 


ift. 

6ft 

•*» 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 


Aavancea 
Dcatned 
UiKfnngad 
TtfdlSMies 
Hetl HWlS 
Mevr Lows 


AMEX 

Advmced 
DMineiJ 
Ungrqnqed 
rowtssues 
New HigtB 
New LOWS 


Haoa 

Fm. 

Nasdaq 


Mvaa 

Pun 

1004 

S52 

Advantea 


1308 

1397 

1257 

21X 

DecSraO 


aii 

2803 

614 

661 

UiKticngeC 


2319 

1555 

3185 

3343 

TobddMes 


5758 

5755 

10 

77 

Mere Higls 


.2 

« 

55 

103 

New Lon 


34) 

300 

172 

267 

Pre*. 

159 

426 

Market Sales 

NYSE 

near 

NO 

43X44 


Pin. 

cons. 

66028 

157 

172 

Arne, 

14.1B 


•tkvc 

596 

A 

7 57 
| j 

Nasdaq 

4BS48 


5B3M 

13 

37 

inmlWanx 





Dividends 

Company Per Amt Rec Pay 

IRREGULAR 

Bca BHbnO V ADR b 5223 4-9 4-31 


Brandywine Realty 
Pnid EautyFd 
Sanyo Elect ADR 
Tele Danrnarti A/S 


_ JS 4-15 4-30 

- .116 4-4 4-9 

b JH8 4-3 

b 1724 5-1 5*12 


STOCK SPLIT 

ASM UtnograptiyNy 2 tar 1 spur. 

Suffolk Bncp 2 for 1 spB. 

STOCK 

Community Ctrl Bk - 10% 4-15 4-30 

JeffBonksinc _ 5?, 4-22 5-13 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Forte Software 1 for 10 reverse spfft. 

INITIAL 

laferppaf Inert - 0373 4-7 4-T5 

AAliler. Herman n . .0725 5-31 7-15 


Company 


AmerFndGp 
Amenm Inttcp 
CNB Bncshrs 
Eagle Bncstus 
Emerging MBs 
rtcor SmteHatb 


F efc or S 
Ghxler Bncp 
GOri Ptnrs Inca 
Green Street Fnd 
Hancock PatGIDie 
Hancock Pat Sd 
Harvest HameFnd 
LiqiA-BoxCp 
NeWTark TsEx 
PBgrtn AmPrtmRt 
Ouaker SMteCp 
westCoastBcs 
Winnebago Indus 


Per Amt Rec Pay 
REGULAR 

Q 75 4-15 4-25 
0 -32 4-24 5-20 

0 32 4-11 4-30 

Q .15 4-7 4-21 
M .1325 4-15 4-30 
a 30 4-15 4-30 
Q .16 4-10 4-23 
M .1187 4-15 4-30 
Q .IB 4-11 4-23 
M JW75 4-4 4-30 
M .1031 4-4 4-30 

O .10 4-15 4-30 
Q .13 4-10 4.15 
M 3)53 4-15 5-1 

iUl .0695 4-10 4-22 
a .10 S-15 6-15 
Q .06 4-7 4-30 

_ .10 6-6 7-7 


April 1,1997 

High Low Latest a*s» Opfeit 


Grains 

CORN (C80T) 

S3M bu mMmum- canti par butoM 


May 97 

320 

313ft 

313 

+3 

Jul 97 

320ft 

111ft 

314 

+3+4 

SOT V 

30016 

296 

296ft 

+ lft 


298 

291 Vi 

291ft 

♦ ft 

Titer 96 

301ft 

2M 

295ft 

—ft 


- 21 * 

-44a 

-*9 

-99 

.♦** 

-1A9. 

-Va 


-18a 

May 97 

24X3 

2400 

2416 

+036 

37373 

-*» 

Jul 77 

24.97 

2466 

249 

+BJ0 

30,223 

-3V« 

-1*« 

Auu 97 

25.15 

2402 

2477 

+029 

um 

Sep 97 

2475 

2495 

2406 

+025 

3468 

-1ft 

0077 

2429 

2496 

2497 

+036 

3418 

-re 

Dec 77 

2450 

2X20 

25. W 

+0.16 

11400 


Est sates NA 

Atart sides 

17»59 



o-onmiob b ep i lulieu l e e ra Ka rat pm 
sbarWA ORr g-poyoMt la CflBOdkar foMttf 
awMRtblp g-gnartarty; nmoHamaal 


Stock Tables Explained 


Sales figures are unatfldaL Yearly nfotts and lows reflect the previous 52 weeks plus the 
st trading day. Where a spRt or stockdlvldsnd amounting la 25 
percent or more has been pam the years flight -lew r an ge a nd dividend are s h own farthe new 


cunenl week, but nol the latest bad 


stacks only, unless otherwise noted, rates of divide nds ere annual disbursements based an 
the latest dedanitfan. 


i f: 


a - dividend also extra is), 
b - annual rate of dividend plus stock di- 
vidend. 

c - liquidating dividend. 

ee- PE exceeds 99. 

dd- called. 

d- new ready law. 

dd - lass In the lasti 2 months. 

e - -dividend declared or add In pieced Eng 12 

months. 

7 - annual rnbv increased on last decla- 
ration. 

dividend In Conadian funds, subject » 
5% nan- residence fax. 

|. dividend declared alter spflt-up or stack 
dividend. 

■ - dMdend paid tins year, omBtetl deferred, or 
no aefion taken al btestahtdend meeting, 
k - dividend dedared w paid Ifds yeoc an 
aoeum uUtve Issue wtih dhtdends in areas, 
m - annual rate, r educed on Iasi dedara- 
tton. 

n- new issue In me past S2 weeks. The high- 
low range begins with ftw start of trading, 
ad - non day deflwry. 


p- Initial dividend, anmral rale unknown. 

P/E - price-eamings ratio. 

q-ctosed-end mutual hind. 

r- dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 

months, plus stock dividend. 

s - stack split. DMdend begins with dale of 

soflt 

sis -sales. 

t - dividend paid In stock in preceding 12 
months, estimated ash value on c* -di- 
vidend or ex -distribution date, 
u- new yearly high. 

v- trading hatted. 

vi- iti bankruptcy or le ce fversh l p or being 
reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act or 
secuttties assumed by sbdi companies, 
wd - when dlstifouted. 

wf - when issued/ 
ww-wrtn w ar ra n ts. 

x -eMflvidend orex-rtglfe. 

stftc • ex-dbtitbutlon. 

xw- without wdtroidx 

y- w-dividpnd and sales M ML 

yld-ywo. 

z- sales In ML 


H005-UXM (CMBU 
40000 In.- cam par lb. 

Apr 97 7180 7X20 7X50 — *147 

Jun9/ B1J5 axe 8070 —1.17 

JtH 97 81 JO 8X40 8885 —I* AC 

Aug 97 7X75 77 JS 77.95 — IL75 

0«J97 71J90 71 JS 71JJ +X10 

Dec 97 siM an ♦xib 

Est.sctes 1326 Mon's. sobs ue 
Mon’s open M 3X587 up Jgl 


PORK BELLES 
4049MBrL- can 

May 97 8X00 
MV 7X92 
Aus97 7640 
F*b 9* 7100 
Mar 08 7180 
May 98 

EsL sates NA. 
Mon's open bn 


ICMER) 

perl*. 

78-30 8X07 *2JH 

77 JO JBLS7 *-122 

7500 7i»7 + 1.32 

7X70 71.12 tflJS 

7i.oo run +u» 

7100 .680 

Mon’s, sales X75n 
1324 oft 3347 


6,175 

1X769 

3J9* 

1689 

X236 

1^97 


4.133 

2.169 

535 

95 


Food 

COCOA (NOE) 

10 metric lam- Sow Ion 
May 97 1515 I4« 1512 

J*497 1541 1471 1560 +58 

5ep9T 1558 1407 1® +|f 

Dec 97 1576 1514 1578 ,54 

Marta 1600 1590 1660 *48 

Est.sotes 8J24 Mon’s. mes tw 
AAon sooenif* 191 JO off 732 

COFFtEC CNC5E] 
VtoBL-CMIPtrb 
MOV 97 19580 18150 I9U0 *115 

JI897 17675 16X25 17X15 +100 

Sep 97 16380 15780 tSJO +280 

OOC 97 14780 M280 147JS *l.n 

Est.sotes 11825 Mon's. soles 4.521 
Mon’ 4 open rt 37435 off 895 

SUGAR-WORLD 71 INCSE) 

112800 IKS.' cents por B. 

MOT 97 11.01 1XJB 1180 +021 

AK77 1X73 IX5B 1X72 +X14 

0097 1X50 HUB 1X56 *087 

Mar 90 1X56 1X48 1X55 +006 

EsL sales 17/86 Man'xsaies *466 
Mon'sapenM 1*0455 UO 763 


29869 

23857 

11.983 

9J94 

19817 


T7J86 

&6B3 

6887 

3J66 


5X478 
35.971 
a <m 

KM 


HU* 

Lav 

Latest 

Chge 

O0W 

ORANGE JUKE (NCTH) 



15400 lbs.- carts peril. 




MOV 97 7X75 

75® 

7X15 

-030 

TWW 

Jul 97 7075 

7740 

7X30 

+005 

7.117 

SOT 97 1140 

IU5 

BOBO 


X157 

NOT 97 6450 

B3JD 

BUD 

-005 

1,7*2 

Est. sales NA 

Aten's, sates 

X513 


Aten's open W 

27487 

up 21 1 




Est. scries HA Man's, s ties uon 
Aten's open inr 37X946 up 163* 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOTl 
I DO tons- dortan per ton 

May 97 29100 29080 29220 +920 4X031 

Jul 97 38920 28720 2B9,« +920 HAW 

Aug 97 27X30 27680 277A +BJ0 8424 

Sep?7 25980 25480 25X00 *780 X199 

Oct 97 23X00 22X00 229 JO *dJ0 4852 

Dec 97 22380 21980 22X50 +3-30 9 JU 

Est.sotes NA Man’s. sales >7,763 
Mon'sapenM 107,197 up 1198 

SOYBEAN CXLKKTT} 

4X000 Us- cents pot lb 


Man's open ire 97802 up M65 

SOYBEANS (CBOTl 

UNO bu minimum- cents Par Duenel 

MOT 97 OBSU 876 875ft +19*1 73885 

Jul 57 BR 867 87SH +20h 373V 

Aug97 BMft 857 855ft +21 VI 8,757 

Sep 97 779 757 762ft +|ft 5J27 

Nov 97 713 6939. 695 *2 3X129 

ES- sates NA Man's, sates 5X8» 

Alton's open M 18EL44V UP 2945 

WHEAT (CBfm 

moo bura M mum- ows per branei 
Mov 97 407 397 393ft -3ft 2X883 

AX 97 404ft 3W 390ft -3ft 42825 

5ep97 405 395ft 393ft — 1 X713 

Dec 97 4U 413ft 403 -3 X573 

Est. sales NA Man's, sates 70.537 
Mon's open M B4A05 up 1614 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMBU 
40800 lbs.- cents per I*. 

Apr 97 6X72 6787 6880 —022 2X180 

-km 97 6585 *170 6482 -085 3X611 

Auo97 &J85 6160 6385 2X785 

Oct 97 47 JO 67 A 6782 +085 1X034 

Dec 97 6987 6X45 69 7^57 

Feb 98 7X55 7X37 7X42 —112 4262 

Est.sotes 14468 Alton's. sates 1X426 
AAm'saaenirt 10X815 up 75 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMHU 

MJXXJBj*.- am per b. 

Apr 97 69 JO 6885 69.10 —087 X554 

Mot 97 49 JO 6985 69.42 -X42 X3M 

Aug 97 7115 7287 7282 — X65 5811 

Sea 97 71£9 7115 7117 -060 1J89 

Od97 74.15 TIB 7125 —X70 2,191 

Nov 97 7585 7X35 7X25 —0J7 1JH9 

ES. sales Alan's, sates 3877 
AAan'sapenktt 21874 off 324 


Metals 

GOLDWaVUO 

MO hr at- daoora per «rav 01. 

Apr 97 351 JB 34980 35160 + 060 2822 

MOT 97 35380 +X70 2 

JUP97 35660 35120 35670 +X70 6X071 

Aug 97 35680 3S5J?i 35780 *170 11199 

Oct 97 35X90 35X40 31080 +A7B X4S7 

DOC 97 36180 36X90 36190 +0J0 21,731 

Feb 98 365J1 +X6 0 X265 

Apr 98 368.48 +0LS0 3858 

Est. safes NA. AAai's. sates 3X499 

Aten's open W 151,569 off 4770 

M GRADE COPPER (HCKDO 
KUMOtes-censperli. 

Apr 97 11480 111 JO 11285 — 1J0 1850 

May 97 11280 11X20 11185 -US 21534 

Jun 97 109 JO 1D9J0 11X05 -0J5 5JSS 

Jul 97 HBJ0 H7JD WAS -080 9841 

Aug 97 J0XS0 10X50 WJS -080 74Q 

Sep 97 W60D 10X20 18X15 -468 1955 

Oct 97 X&1S — X35 638 

Nov 97 10620 -460 757 

Dec 97 M2LB0 14260 10025 -860 X678 

Estsdes NA Men's. scles 1875 
Moo's DoenW 5X205 off 136 

SILVER 0VCM7Q 

1808 trav Ob- cents per troy to. 

Apr 97 49X20 -780 4 

Mov97 50X50 49680 50X50 -780 5U00 

.Am 97 mu 13X00 501® +37158 

Jul 97 512.50 50280 50580 -780 19,777 

Sep 97 51XTO 50980 51050 -780 3 WB8 

Dec 97 52X5D 51380 51X10 -)X 5822 

Jan 98 52180 -780 U 

MtrW 5J3JO 533J0 52X20 -760 5866 

EsL sides NA Alton's, sates 27,750 
Alton's open tot 9TJ24 up 7101 

PLATMUM (NMER] 

PtwOTMeiw trayae. 

Apr 97 17X00 364-50 371 JO *290 1,791 

MOT 97 3BX5D 

Jul 97 37490 37280 37X20 +190 12J66 

Oct 97 37X50 37680 37X70 +480 2,136 

Jan 98 379.50 377 J9 36X90 +480 1,147 

EsLsctet NA AAai's. sales 9855 
Man's open int 17,106 off 1791 


LONDON METALS (LME) 
Ddam per mettle ton 


Prevtaw 


AtuntaomOOgb Grade) 

Spat 160380 160480 1606ft 1607ft 
Reward 1637.00 163880 1639ft 164080 

sc 

Lead 

Spot 69580 69780 

FwWfll 


CHfab Grade) 

240X00 24S.00 242780 
235680 235780 2366ft 2367>6 


Nidnl 

Soat 761580 762580 
Forward 773080 773580 
He 

Spat 583080 584080 
Forward 586080 586680 
Zinc (Special High Grade} 
Spat 1278V, 1279ft 
Forward 129780 129880 


69780 

68780 


69880 

68880 


761080 762080 
772080 772X80 


586080 587000 
587580 588080 


126580 126680 
1284ft 1205ft 


High Low Close Chge Opfrrt 

Financial 

UST.HLLSCCMSU 

St mBBon- DR eF 100 net 

Jun 97 MJ7 94.55 9410 +084 X944 

SW 97 9425 9424 9X27 +484 2JB2 

Dec 97 9418 80 

Est. soles NA Atan's.sdes 1B4 

Atari's open for MM up 23 

5 TR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

S10XSM Prfn- phi x Mats of loe pa 
Jun 97 104-33 104-14 144-27 + 08 227,118 

Sen 97 104-03 3 

Dec 97 103-54 5 

EsL sales NA Man's.saies 4X873 
Mon's open in* 223196 OB 3425 

n YR. TREASURY (CBOTl 

SHOLOOO Brtn- Ph 6. XfaWSoMOO pa 

Jun 97 105-26 WS-09 16S-23 *07 314,113 

Sep97 705-06 105-06 106-07 *06 1X161 

Dec 97 104-21 50 

EsL sates NA Alton's, sates 71336 

Mon'saponlnt 331,916 up 6592 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 
ie pa-4 Ha.n»-BB e, PMs or laopcii 
Jun 97 1Q7-ZJ 106-25 107-16 *09 €9323 

Sto 97 107-48 146-13 107-42 * 09 32820 

Dec 97 104-26 106-40 106-16 +03 XS21 

AAV 98 146-05 116-05 106-45 * 02 1849 

Ed. sales NA TAon's. sates 22X997 
Stem's open ini «4J13 off 367 

LONG GILT CUFFE) 

1 - 0-20 17H.122 
SepW 708-49 MHO I4M0 —US 4 


HfgO Low Latest Chge Opfnt 

10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS UftATIF) 

FEsnuna-pboiiaopct 

Jua 97 127J4 12784 127.44 — 0JD 15X778 

S«i 97 12640 12X70 12X82 — X82 4,111 

Dec 97 9X72 9X72 9X54 -X8Z 0 

EsL vahmw: 117831 . Open UL- 15X189 op 4807. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND CLiFTO 
nL200nanon-ptso1100pct _ 

Jn«7 12453 12170 1289 — 18410X05 
Sep97 12380 12380 12384 — T84 3878 
E«. soles; 4X29& Piev. sales; 46872 
10X513 off un 
EURODOLLARS (ONER) 
ll mUnt-ctoaf MOpa. 

Apr 97 9X19 9X17 9X19 +081 41833 

May 97 9X18 9X00 9X10 +XS1 21.156 

Jun 97 9X03 9X00 9X02 +082 509,250 

Sep 97 9372 9163 9171 +083 37X706 

Dec 97 9144 9135 9X42 +XC3 268,926 

AAOT9B 9131 93J3 9130 +003 200897 

Jun 98 9SSM 9111 93.16 +482 16X689 

Sep 98 9112 9383 9110 +082 130802 

Dec 96 9383 92J6 9381 +082 110809 

Mar 99 9382 9193 9100 +082 8X513 

Jun 99 9199 9253 9259 +081 7X311 

SOT 99 9255 9250 9255 +084 61899 

Est. sates NA Man's, sales 34B89B 
Mart's open int 2 891 883 off 13462 
BRITISH POUND (CMBU 

ffl-tiim pound*. Sp * 1 round 

Jun 97 18530 1.6352 18524 31156 

Sen 97 18470 ljuaa 18S» 8W 

Dec 97 18138 93 

Estsdes NA AAO P'S. sates 1X2B4 
Mon’s open int 3X459 up 1997 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CNO0 
NtiMIOOdolkn. spar Cdn.dk- 
Jun 97 7261 - JZM JZO 70456 

Sot 97 J2M J265 7275 X«1 

Dec 97 7314 7302 7322 1.115 

Mtr98 7374 696 

EsL saes NA MorYx sides 7.934 

Man’s Open hit 7X7B9 UP 730 

GERMAN MARK {CMER] 

12S800 rrevko. t PW movie 
Jun 97 MVU 5998 8039 60,999 

Sep 97 JSU7 8049 8081 ZS« 

Dec 97 8125 ilS 8125 m 

Mar 98 8129 27 

Est. sates NA MorYs-sates 3U92 
Mart’s open kit 63766 up 297 

JAPANSEYEN(CMER) 
mm Btl a n vwuS per 100 yen 
Jun 97 8315 5151 833 70803 

Sep 97 8415 8281 8438 918 

Dec 97 8480 8433 8550 300 

Est sales NA MwTtydos 0554 
Mat's open hit 71801 off 1856 

5WB5 FRANC fCMSU 
125800 h eaiBekBE 
Jim 97 7034 8953 8999 39865 

Sot 97 7064 704B 709 1121 

D0C 97 7144 7144 7144 423 

EsLsateS NA AAai's. sides 18812 
Mat's open ht 42816 up 777 _ 

3-MONTH 5TERLINC QJFPE] 

isiiuno-ptsonosjd 

JuOT7 9131 9330—088120440 

SepW 9381 9257 9259 — 085 8 43SS 

DvdJ 9278 9273 9274 - 087 631931 

BAfflW 9288 9282 9284 - 007 4X242 

Jl»OT8 «83 9239 9280 -B87 3X440 

S4P9B 9234 9230 9230 —088 ZM73 

DssSS 9225 9131 9222 —DM 3SJ3I 

Mag? 92.19 9213 9216 —007 11878 

JimTO 9213 9289 9210 — 006 9885 

SOTW 9287 9285 9285 — 087 B.024 

Decro 9284 9282 9282 —087 5323 

Marf» 9158 9156 9157 - 087 1882 

oates: 4&44X Prev. sales: 22^78 
Prev.apanhN; 429,160 op 1806 


IFTB 


D0C97 

Mor98 


Dw5B 

MarW 

JuS9 

SotTO 

D0C99 

fttaflO 


Estscdes 4346V. Piev.satap.xuia 
Pnv.opmtaL: 178,122 Ot X504 


aCNMAN GOVniNMENT BUND CUPFE) 

»-*+ -08734X091 
SOT97 N.T. N.T. «M1 — HLS7 0 
Est sates: 139854. PreiLsates: 97866 
Piw.amnhiL: 249,114 op 1866 


8-MOKTH BIIROAAARK < 

DMi nnop ■ pti of loopa 

9675 9675 9X7S Undk 7,970 
9X74 9X73 9X74 UdUl 1419 
9X75 9X71 9X74 + 081 222J72 

9X67 9X62 9X65 UKfL 18X174 

its S^zgaiSSS 

9X60 9X55 9U6 —OH 70fl« 

9482 947S 9*76 — 08B §317 

9458 9451 9450 - 0.10 2X377 

9436 9427 UM -OIO X688 

W K- iSJ 

at: K: gSzKi ^ 

Eotsotete I5L204 nev.sotat: 14X841 
Piev.opea kfc 18SU4 off 2JIJ3 
3-MOKTH Pi BOR 0KATTP} 

FF3OTBon-ptsaMMpo 

■tea 97 9X63 9XU 9X61 -081 5M7B 

VXKJ 9X49 9X51 —1181 4X871 

9X39 9X35 9X37 —083 3U03 

9X21 9XZT 9X23 -083 24994 

9X07 9X84 9X85 — 083 19,380 

9588 9585 9586 -085 1X720 

9586 9582 9584 —085 12419 

*539 9586 9537 -XU 12343 

95.15 9X1D 9X12 — XK XJra- 

94» 9486 9*87 -B89 4722 

lot: w N.T. N.T. 9485 —087 £725 

Mar 00 N.T. H.T. 9442 -084 30 

Est vaume: 4X48X Open InL: 24L7I5 *05727. 

MAOKTH EUROUIA CUFFS 
m. ) ndteen -paa lODpd 
Ju*l97 926B 9259 9287 —085 109.42 1 
SHOT 928B 9250 9250 — SS 6TTO- 

0ec37 9387 9257 S3J4 -XW 37» 

AAaTO 9387 9278 93JR -Xu n m 

JOlH <380 9273 9254 -114 

SepW 9275 9286 9287 —XT *1^ 

D*C» 9284 9284 9282 -OJA 253 

MOW 987B 9270 9276 -OIB 276 

EsL sales; HW.P1W, sales 3X934 
Picv.Gpeam--2Sam ap 24712 - 


Moral 


oZV, 

I 


High Low Latest aioe opim 


Industrials 


COTTONKNCTN) 
SOUHtn.- cants Peru. 
MOVV7 7185 7185 

JK97 7388 72.90 

0097 7580 7480 

Dec 97 75M 75.15 

AAra98 7X40 7680 

MOTW 7780 7780 


HEATWGML NMER} 
4Z800a*L rents po-pa 
Mot 97 5475 5425 

Jim 97 546B 
Jot*? 5585 
AOg97 &J5 
SOT 97 5670 

0*397 5770 
NOT 97 

Dec 97 5880 
Jan 98 SB85 
Fflb 98 5X70 


5625 

5X85 


71 JO 

+035 

34474 

7US 

+028 

17.153 

7475 

—045 

1.999 

7X60 

+045 

2IJ97 

7X40 


1112 

7743 


545 

sates 

17,751 


Ul 619 


SL9S 

—047 

39439 

5400 

-037 

10416 

54S 

-017 

1X356 

2835 

-042 

8478 

5X00 

+04J 

5400 

5X75 

+048 

X312 

S7JB 

+0.1B 

4438 

SL10 

+033 

9J19 

SUD 

+031 

5J49 

5030 

+031 

2494 


Man's open irti 11380 off 9345 
UGKTSW^T CRUDE (NMER] 
1800 hbL- dofin BirblSL 


MOT 97 

2045 

2025 

2039 

—0.12 

90430 

Jun 97 

2062 

2036 

2032 

-0.10 

61.906 

Jul 97 

2036 

2038 

2033 

—045 

3149/ 

Aw 97 

2049 

2033 

2030 

—044 

22472 

SOT 97 

2044 

2032 

2035 

+043 

1X154 

Od97 

2038 

2034 

2036 

+ 046 

1X926 

Nw 97 

J039 

2039 

2039 

+0.11 

12368 

Dec 97 

2039 

2037 

2028 

+042 

2X677 

Jon 98 

2031 

2039 

2039 

+043 

13438 

Feb SB 



2034 


7404 

Mar 

2033 

snftt 

2033 

+047 

\JikL 


BL8060S NA MoYs. soles SS.775 
Man's opBTlrt 39X551 off 1838 

NATURAL GAS ONER) 

10800 mm Uhl's, s pot ran Mu 
MOT 97 1850 1895 1896 

■Am 97 1.990 1850 1855 

Jul 97 1.995 1865 1870 

AubTO 2805 18BB 1890 

Sep 97 2810 1890 2 800 

0*297 2840 spsy vine 

NwW 2180 11SS 2170 

DecW 2810 2295 2305 

Jan 98 2850 » r Tw 23® 

Feb 98 2270 2365 2270 

MO-91 2153 2145 2150 

E&saies NA Man's. sUss 1X073 
Man's open W 153847 off 39879 

UNLEAD87GAS0LME (NMBQ 
OJnOocU, cents per pal 

May 97 4575 63.M £275 -047 42828 

Jimro 63LE; 4240 -082 21J19 

87197 6240 6200 6180 -ai2 10,219 

6+^B 6180 6085 +0.13 5822 

S&W 5980 59 JO 5980 +OZ3 2463 

CW97 58.10 SOW 37.90 -HUB 1^73 

Est.saos NA Mart, sates 33420 
AAaYsopenM 57J97 off 1059 

GASOIL OPE) 

UA doOars per nrelrtc ton - lots of 100 tons 
Anl97 16780 16X25 16X50—185 22,161 
Afay97 16885 16675 16780 — 180 12852 
- Jun 97 17030 16985 16980—1.75 11808 
Jul 97 172J5 17180 1T1J5— 185 4^45 
Aug 97 17400 17200 173J5 — 180 2,256 
jit 97 175J5 175J5 175L75 — 0J5 1J2? 
0*797 N.T. N.T.17780— C.50 1,702 

NOT 97 N.T. N.T. 17BJS— 0J5 042 

Decro 17985 179 JO 179J5— OJO x*47 
Jon 99 N.T. N.T. 18OJ5-0J0 1J18 
1 ^ w EsL sates: 9J48. Open ltd j 65J59 ofl 

BREWTOILaPE) 

UAdasaa per barrel* lots alLOOObcHitals 
May 97 }937 1981 19.11+087 5&48S# 

■JuneW 1989 19.15 1983+085 398S3 

July 97 19X0 19.19 19JB +019 16839 

Aug 97 1989 1985 1981 +0.1S Mis 

SOT 97 19 JO 1988 1981+0.15 XX57 

OS97 1989 1980 1981 +ai3 5.280 

N«97 1988 1988 1989 +0.13 4877 

Dac» 1985 1985 1987 + 0.12 4994 

, Qtealee:38LSOO. Opal lot: 1&452 up 

4fOUY __ 

Stock Indiums 
»PCQMP.Bmex (o*03 

SUxbidax 

8mro IS 2 * 75X50 76070 +2JB I7SJ9S 

SepW 77585 76480 76250 +1J5 4810 

DacW 70000 773J0 77119 -185 2826 

Mar TOJS 41 

gsjate* NA Mart sates 9X020 
Aten's anon m 182672 off 444 

StoJRteS? - 

JunOT 400X9 42*50 +*’*'*" —4X0 59.938 
W ILT ILT 42900 —4X0 . 

fslsoles: 12092. PiMcdep 12159 
Prey, awn ht X2433 sc 1827 

aCOTIMATlH ~~ — ' 

Apr 9^:£8n P 2B5J 25770—810) 2X438 

SOTW “ nS-M-SS w 

tree W N.T. H.T. 25770 — B20D (D 

2 N.T. N.T. 26028—8180 78W 

Sep 9B N.T. NT. 25750- 8180 1810 

Est wdUDe: 21X14 0pwitsL:6S2SI off 14499. , 



Commodity Indexes 


Moodirt 


pj.Fwutei 

CRB 


187160 

1,98280 

.15085 

-24587 


PftvfoK 

1,57480 

1,967.10 

158.13 

345.17 


I 


t. 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1997 


PAGE 13 


EUROPE 


iSuez Board 
roves 
er With 
onnaise 





ViHt/fl 


ft * bet } 
men 


-- Compagnie de Suez SA 
*&*£$*. * returned to profit in 
- and that its board had unanimously 

• approved a planned, merger with Lv- 

^ onnaise d<M Eaox, a water company. 

\f -. Su ^ a Prench-BeIgian industrial and 
.. nnmcial holding company, posted a net 
of .f43- million French francs 
. ($149.4 million). In 1995, unprofitable 
real^stare investments and the diffi- 
. ; culties of its Basque Indosucz unit Jed to 
. a net loss of 3.96 billion francs. 

■Die profit had been expected. Suez 
raid m January that its 1996 earnings 
would be in the range of 800 mfljion 
francs. Societe Generale de Belgique SA, 
its Belgian unit, contributed 1.13 billion 

• francs to the balance sheet Suez said. 

Suez also said it would pay an ex- 
ceptional dividend resulting from the sale 
, last year of Banque Iodosuez, its flagship 
investment bank, for 11 3 billion francs. 

It did not specify the size of the 
dividend. 

Shareholders have been demanding an 
exceptional dividend ahead of the mer- 
V !. ger with Lyonnaise, which analy sts say 
• “ will dilute earnings per share in the short 
term. Suez shares closed Tuesday at 
285,90 francs, down 5.00. 

Jean -Louis Beffa, c hairman of the 
: glassmaker Compagnie -de Saint- 
Gobain SA, which owns just over 6 
percent of Suez, said his company h«ut 
' been joined by Banque Nationafe de 
Paris and the insurer Axa-UAP, which 
' also own stakes in Suez, in seeking a 
payout equal to about 10 percent of 
Suez's financial assets to protect the 
value of their shares. BNP and Axa had 
no immediate comment 

Jerome Lab in, a banking analyst with 
Jean-Pi erre Filiation in Paris, said the 
demands for a special dividend were 
v unjustified. 

4 ‘Frankly, I don’t see why sharehold- 
ers should be compensated,'*’ he 
"Because they suffered losses? Be- 
cause the shares fell? That’s the every- 
day lot of a shareholder." 

Suez canceled a news conference on 
its earnings scheduled for Wednesday, 
saying it was not yetready to comment 
on its merger with Lyonnaise. The 
boards of the two companies are to meet 
April 1 1 to discuss the planned merger, 
which would create ah industrial power- 
house with a market value of about 80 
billion francs. {Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Russia’s Airlines Edge Closer to Respect 


• The Associated Press he added: “Once you fly within with former into woods shortly aftertakeoff from the south- 

MOSCOW — After decades of isolation, Soviet Union, they're not even close to in- em Russian city of Stavropol on March 18. 
Russia's airlines — long the butt of inter- ternational standards.” The increase in air fatalities is usuallv at- 

tributed more to poor maintenance than to 


national travelers’ jokes — are i 
- way into die world aviation marke t, 
ride has been a bumpy one. 

mbs, Ri 


their 
sot the 


But, in 


i practice. 

Aeroflots.Infact,diereseemtobecloseto400 badly made equipment, but Russian airlines 
of them. When the Soviet Union collapsed, so are increasingly turning to higher-priced West- 
didthe official Soviet airline, then the world's em manufacturers to fill their new orders. As a 


there are more than two 


In recent months, Russia’s two biggest air- w tj U1WU lwn viuwa> rfc3 

lines, AeroflotandTransaero,havesigneddeals largest. It was split into hundreds of smaller result, Russian manufacturers are struggling, 
to buy Boeing Co. and Airbus ' * - 

Industrie jets, a move that oat- 


_ air- 

craft industry. 

Aeroflot has also signed a 
deal whh Continental Airlines 
Inc. to offer joint service be- . 
tween New York and Moscow. 

On international routes, both 
Aeroflot andTransaero are said 
to be moving toward the stan- 
dards of big American and 
European airlines. 

- It may be some time, 
however, before the interna- 
tional jet set begins to wax lyr- 
ical about the joys of air travel 
between, say, Novosibirsk and 
Vladivostok. 

On domestic routes and on flights between 
the former Soviet republics, the prospects for 
comfortable and safe air travel remain dim. 
Since the breakup of the Soviet Union, airline 
fatalities have risen sharply, and service — 
never a big selling point — may have actually 
gotten worse. 

"It’s almost like there are two separate 
Aeroflots,” said Geoff Collins, a Dallas- 
based spokesman for the International Airline 
Passengers Association, referring to foe dif- 
ference between the airline's international and 
domestic operations. .. 

Aeroflot’s agreement with Continental may 
make it safe getting to Moscow, 1 ’ he said, but 



& **i-nrv'l jaMKl 


For Aeroflot passengers at Moscow airport, delays are standard. 

airlines across the former Soviet Union. 

Some of these "babyflots,” serving such 
far-flung places as Azerbaijan and Kazakstan, 
have become notorious for lax safety, main- 
tenance and service standards. 

Standards are now set and enforced by civil 
aviation authorities in each of fobs independent 
post-Soviet states. These authorities are 
linked by foe Interstate Aviation Committee, a 
principally advisory agency that investigates 
all air crashes in foe former Soviet Union but 
has little authority to enforce its standards. 

The most recent disaster was foe crash of an 
Antonov-24 airliner operated by Stavropol 
Airlines, one of the Aeroflot spinoffs. All 50 
people aboard died when foe plane plunged 


In October. Aviator Co.. 
which makes Tupolev planes, 
announced it was laying off 
2,000 workers because orders 
had dried up. The announce- 
ment came shortly after Aer- 
oflot announced that it would 
buy 10 Boeing 737-400 passen- 
ger jets because they were better 
made than Russian planes. 

"Our aircraft producers 
mustn't feel discouraged by the 
deal, but rather assess it as a 
stimulus to improve their 
products,” Aeroflot's director. 
Yevgeni Shaposhnikov, said at 
foe time, in a statement that was 
perceived as profoundly dis- 
couraging by Russian aircraft producers. 

When President Boris Yeltsin flew to foe 
summit meeting in Helsinki last month, it was 
in a brand new presidential plane — a Rus- 
sian-made Ilyushin 96-300. The choice of foe 
plane might have been an important statement 
of confidence in Russian manufacturing, but 
Mr. Yeltsin had foe plane furnished in 
Switzerland. 

Mr. Yeltsin has called for improvements in 
aviation. But he also raised some eyebrows 
recently when he appointed his son-in-law. 
Valeri Okulov, acting director of Aeroflot. 
Mr. Okulov, for his part, held a news con- 
ference to promise no major changes, at least 
for foe time being, in foe state airline. 


Investor's Europe 


Rankftirt 

DAX 


jswj — 


London 

FTSE100 


, Parts 

Index : CAC40 
2850- 



'N DJ F 
1696 


FMA ^ITOT' F M A; 

1696 1997 


Exchange 

index 

Tuesday 

pose 

PlBV. % 

Close Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

70840 

.740.99 • 

-4^7. 

Brussels 

BEL-20 

2.104 

2.146 37 

-156 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

3,295.93 

3,429.05 

-3.88 

; Copenhagen Stock Market 

525.71 

535.31 

-T-79 

Helsinki 

HEX General 

2,784.45 

zeab^3 

-2J32 

Osip 

OBX 

57397 ■ 

591.66 

-2.99 

London 

FTSE100’. 

4^48.10 

4,312.90- 

-150 

tfacirtd 

StotS&cchahge 

465.14 

47aos 

*1,67 

UHbr 

M1BTEL 

11^40 J00 12024 

-3.19 

Pars 

CAC40 . . . 

2£ft.S2 

2.K6.68 

*2.82 

StocKholm 

SX 16 

2^27.01 

2,960^6 

-4.50 

Vienna 

ATX 

1,185.49 

1^15^4 

-2.61 

Zurich 

SPI 

2J&623 

2^46-25 

-3.06 

Source: Telekurs 


InifiTiiuional HcrJJ Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Czech Telephone Company to Cut 10,000 Jobs 


Bloomberg News 

PRAGUE — SPT Telecom AS, foe Czech 
Republic’s main telephone company, said Tues- 
day it would cot 10,000 jobs, more than one- 
fond of its weak force, in foe next three years 
after posting a loss fek 1996. 

The company, which is managed b y its 
minority owners, a joint venture of Royal PTT 
Nederland NV and Swiss Telecom, reported a 
consolidated uct loss for last year of483 million 
koruny ($16.6 million), based on international 
accounting standards, after a profit of 4.8 bil- 
Iion karuny foe previous year. 

The loss stemmed in part frombigher labor 
costs and a one-time “impairment and restruc- 
turing charge” of 8.76 billion koruny. The 
charge covered changes in d e preciation account- 
ing as wen as die planned staff reduction, which 


executives said would allow the company to face 
increased competition in the next century. 

Revenue, however, rose to 32.48 billion 
koruny from 26.42 billion koruny foe year be- 
fore and is expected to rise about 20 percent this 
year, executives said. 

The company plans to lay off as many as 
6,000 workers, mostly in 1998 and 1999, and to 
make the rest of die cuts by attrition. It has 
26,800 employees, so the cuts theoretically af- 
fect 37 percent of them. The job reductions will 
be across foe board, said Urs Kamber, foe chief 
financial officer, although the focus will be on 
installation and maintenance workers respon- 
sible for foe outdated analog network that foe 
company is replacing with a digital system. 

‘ ‘The market will take it quite favorably foal 
they are getting rid of 10,000 people over three 


years,” Guy Creasy, an analyst at IB Austria 
Securities in Prague, said. SPT. which is 51 
percent owned by foe Czech government, is 
hurrying to install hundreds of thousands of 
lines in a country that is accustomed to a years- 
long waiting list for telephone service. 

■ Bohemia Funds Firm Is Reined In 

The Ministry of Finance has appointed an 
outside administrator to run Invesricni 
Spolecnost Bohemia AS. an investment com- 
pany. the daily Hospodarske Nov in y reported, 
citing foe Czech news agency CTK, according 
to a Bloomberg News dispatch. 

The Bohemia region is suspected of having 
broken the law on investment companies and 
funds by acting in a way foal jeopardized foe 
interests of shareholders, foe paper said. 


• GKN PLC of Britain said Giaf Industries SA of France had 
joined its bid to build S6 billion of armored troop carriers for 
Germany. France and Britain. GKN and its partners are 
bidding ’ against Vickers PLC of Britain and Thyssen 
Henschelfof Germany for the contract. 

• A ms trad PLC's shares soared 11 percent, to 221.5 pence 
(S3.61 >. after the British consumer-electronics maker said it 
would sell its mobile-telephone unit Dancall Telecom AS to 
Robert Bosch GmbH of Germany for £92 million. 

• Spain's unemployment rate averaged 21.9 percent over 
November, December and January, the national statistics in- 
stitute said. The institute's survey is one of two unemployment 
measurements in Spain; the other, by the National Employ- 
ment Institute, shows a substantially lower rate. 

• Kuwait has about SI 2 billion of state assets that are can- 
didates for privatization, a local newspaper said. 

• France’s new-car sales fell 21 percent in March, to 151 J86 
units. First-quarter sales dropped 26.5 percent, to 407.018 
units, as a sales-incentive program ended. AFP. AP. Bloomberg 


Lindt Profit Rises 10% 

Bloomberg News 

KILCHBERG. Switzerland — Lindt & Spruengli AG, the 
biggest independent Swiss chocolate maker, said its 1996 net 
profit rose 1 0 percent as it released new products and benefited 
from cosi savings from reorganization. 

Profit rose to 46.8 million Swiss francs ($32.2 million) as 
lower sales in Switzerland and Germany, two main markets, 
were more than offset by higher revenue from other countries, 
including France and Italy, foe company said. 

Sales rose 6 percent, to 973 million francs. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


/ 7;J 


ft 

.71' 


Tuesday, April 1 

Prices In local currencies. 
TeMurs 

High Urn CMm Pm*. 


Amsterdam 


AfiXMacTBUft 

PnriMKMUf 


* 


ABM-AMRO 
Aegoo 
..AhOta 
AkoKBM 
Boon Cd- 
.Mf HtouCKi 

CSMcm 

OonfteMPet 

D5M 

EtaMer 

ForttaAmw. 

GttWa 

G-BRKcra 

mSEEST 1 ' 

HBMMB • 
HOOOOWIISCW 
HwiDouckra 
ING Group 
KLM 
KNPBT 
. KPN 

BSP** 

OceGfinlCTi 
PUSH Elec 

{$353 



124J0 
12BJ0 
12660 
26030 
8360 
34J0 
105 
35170 
163 
29 J8 
69-50 
99 
6030 
150 
31 7 JO 
BMC 
14SJ0 
7030 
5530 
39 JD 
6030 
46.10 
28760 
236 
83J0 
9530 
159 
156 
50.90 
16030 
108 
330. SO 
35230 
B730 

38.40 

21930 


121 

121.90 

121 

255.60 

77 

2L70 

mio 

347 
170 

28J0 

63 

5520 

5830 

150.10 

307 

Bfi.60 

145 

65 

53/JB 

3030 

6530 

45.10 
269 
230 

8130 
8850 
150 
15430 
5830 
199 JO 
107 JO 
327 

348 
8130 

■W.M 

211 


i 


Bangkok 

Ate Into 5*C M2 
Bangkok BKF 256 
KiungThalBk 3430 
.PTTExptar 338 
StamCemenfF 673 
SIOBrCanBkF 148 
Teinromuia 4435 

IMCaem 168 


SETl 


210 220 
250 252 

34 34K 
326 332 

660 664 

144 146 

43 4325 


164 

162 


170 

165 



Brussels 


v- 


■ Brow 

cmiiyt ' 

DftNtoUon 

Eieetiutal 

EKOraim 

RMS AG 

Gewwi 

GBL 

Gen Basque 

KflHMfea* 

PetWHno 

Pmerflo 

Rowtefteigs 

SocGenMg 

Mvcy 

Br - 


Copentiagen 

BGBsfik «6 

ssss $ 


Dm 

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Frankfurt 


am a ISIS 

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801 SS nva 
« » ® 
329 w _ 

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1199 1210 «0jj 
176 1MJ0 1B9JD 
3240 3290 3445 
1280 13® 1^ 

M30 « « 

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t % ,| 
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USS 0 *8530 712 


Goto 


TZL90 129 
12420 132.10 
12530 13Q20 
25850 26920 
82 8630 
3680 3&60 
10230 10620 
351 JO 36028 
1B2 18840 
29/B 3030 
6870 7810 
5850 41 

5930 6U0 
155 159 JO 
315 327J0 
8960 9180 
14630:U2J0 
7810 7330 
55 56 

3840 3930 
67 6930 
46 47 JO 
OS 390 
234 242J0 
8840 8730 
95 MJ0 
158 161 

154.70 1S9J® 
3850 4030 
159 JO 364JD 
10730 10820 
32930 34060 
34050 36840 
B5J0 8880 
37 JO 3860 
217 22530 


Henkel i 
HEW . 
HocMof 
HoechU 


Htg8 ‘ Low CtaM 
DeidacMMi MAS 87J0 8845 
DNtTaMoB 3630 3625 3855 
DnsricwrBaok 5930 5730 59J0 
Renata 357 345 347 

FmmtaMari 15630 15230 15630 

Fried. Krupo- - 317 310 317 

T14 11030 114 

iZmt 14530 14330 14430 
89 8720 B87D 
500 SCO 800 
7020 4930 6960 
6525 6330 64.10 
570 561 568 

1135' IIS. T133 
2110 2220 2235 
471 442 44530 

§3ffi 625 626 

MllfSuai-wWlB 37 3630 - 3630 
«EJTO 164 160 14330 

MUKBRMAR 4300 4200 4300 

43650 425 433 

1250 i» mo 
7160 7870 7125 
273 247 30 270 

16330 160J0 163 

227 223 22620 

8620 8532 -MBS 
12* 1^ 
820 811 . 828 
Tbrnen 36530 34130 30 

Vtoa 90 8863 8BJB0 

503498 OT 
775 76S 770 

900 887 808 


Loffhaan 

MAN 


RWE 

SAPpW 


Pit*. 

9890 
3830 
5930 
360 
159.90 
325 
11430 
145 JO 
92 

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70140 

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57330 

1175 

24.15 

.479 

638 

3760 

171 

4348 

44925 

1230 

7465 


Somancnr 

Sasoi 

SBtC 

Tiger Qab 


High 

LOW 

due 

Pm. 


High 

Low 

oon 

Pree. 


137 J0 136JD 

137 

1*0 

vendreMLxuts 

583 

490 

5J1 

5.10 


5* 

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SA 

5460 

Vodofone 

Z79 

288 

X76 

7J9 

Paris 

M 1C 

45 

’ 44 

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WWtb.-sad 

782 

UJ 

788 

7JT\ 

181 

178 

T78 

181 

wuknnsHdB* 

125 

3.15 

119 

130 


7735 

7660 

7650 

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Wobetay 

487 

AJS 

4J9 

492 

Accor 






232 

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287 

265 

AGF 





Zeneca 

1760 

17.18 

1788 

1783 

AtaUaukte 


High Um Oose Pm. 


High Lew one Pw. T he Trib Index 


Pncea as of ZOO PM New York time. 


CAG48; 2511-92 
Prwtauc 265461 


Kuala Lumpur c gwanm iig?? 

niihHOi 1203.10 


AMMBHdgs 
Genikn 
AW BenMng 
MolinflSMpF 
PeSiamsG® 


PbMCB K 

Rmoho 

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Shra Darby 

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3060 

1980 

1980 

2040 

1670 

1630 

1680 

1680 

2776 

2735 

2775 

2825 

680 

6.10 

420 

4.15 

9.10 

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9 

9.15 

16 

1560 

1580 

1570 

496 

480 

484 

488 

420 

408 

414 

470 

1080 

1060 

10JO 

lajo 

2280 

22 

■nm 

22 

9J5 

B.9S 

8.95 

9.05 

1970 

19 

19 

1930 

1220 

lUffl 

1180 

12.10 

2180 

21 JO 

2180 

2180 

1280 

1230 

1270 

1260 


Springer (A»0 
Suedrodcer 


VEW 

vSEwagan 


16830 

229 

37850 

9445 

503 

788 

922 


69874 

70543 

222 

252 

3575 

340 

676 

152 

4435 

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169 

168 


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FftSOA 

HuMnmaMl . 

K ffflfto 

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Merita A 
MabaB 
MdU-ScriaB 

NaktoA 

Orfan-YMynon 

OotakuropuA 

UPMgffMWHi 


HEX O—nri tail rr 276465 
Pmtauc 285033 


42 4130 

■ 3 

7240 6930 
T6J0 TS.W 

36 ' 35 

191 184 

9030 8880 
10630 .'ISM 
8630 86 


42 42J0- 
239 243 

5330 5160 
71 7230 
M 17 
28440 292 

3540 36 

127 129 

290 29830 
191 195 

9030. 93 

106 10930 
8820 09 


London 

Abbey Matt 
AttriDwnecq 
AnpOaiWatar 
Aigaa ‘ 

Aorta Gmua 

AOMcBrFbads 

BAA 

Bodays 

Ban 

BAT hid 

Book Scotland 

SB» aide 

BOC Group 

Booh 

BPBInd 

BritAeroap 

Brff Abvrays 

S «i 


745 

437 

638 

6J0 

1.10 

548 

5.14 

1035 

8.12 

5.19 

121 

462 

949 

A76 

333 

1165 

636 

162 

545 

767 

631 

161 


US 

4.1 6 
938 
6.75 
135 


267 


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PKVMMBS3M69 

885 92AS TOJO 
939 95330 938.75 
359 30075 36050 
83 8735 B4J0 
34535 363 35825 

7X 24835 241 

24S 21335 S&35 
257.25 26Z50 27235 
19 1935 
336 35635 340 


Hong Kong 

H5S 

Cathey Podflc 1130 

§ rssss its 

Hang Lung Dew 1330 
Hang5cnaBk 78 
HendHaonlm 
HmdeoanLiS 
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BEL^tadR^Htf 
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13250 13050 13850 13600 
5710 58» 5W 

7600 7350 7420 77f 

SS 3240 34® 

13850 14W0 

1H0 1 850 1880 1920 
7BJ0 77B0 7m 
3490 3310 3490 3470 

eggo 5310 5900 5150 

** S5S 

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isSo 13050 13175 135P 
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4815 4930 4880 
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93000 89800 90200 92950 


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MriMnaPW 
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Wtedoch TWO 


HKQfCJrtc 

HKTetocanun 

HgewsOHdgs 

HSBCHdai 

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HangSugriimif 

pS S B iMRn 

765 775 '830 

25.40 2565 2630 
T135 1160 1160 
6330 6375 68.25 
MHO 2«S 2160 
33.10 3340 3430 
3AJ0 3760 3830 
3270 33 3530 

940 935 965 

law 1365 1465 
76 80 

7J5 B 

61 6425 

MW 74JS5 1435 
7330 26J5 2735 
1270 1260 1330 
3J8 4.1 B 

175 17930 
_ 5625 sasa 
•ytvt 2230 
1830 1830 7930 
mm 1735 1730 
38.90 40 4230 

295 3 3.10 

SJffl 5.90 6 

77 7835 8235 
AM 435 S05 

730 760 8 

US 640 MS 

58 6030 41 

2830 28 M> 2965 
WO 1 SJ5 1A95 


76 

735 

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■l93l 
17230 
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5W8 5W 9900 

IBIS 1775 1»0 1825 
1350 1325 1350 1375 

10675 1M0 10£5 
3JD0 3273 3300 34M 

5200 5150 3200 BOO 
6425 6350 6400 6400 
11250 10800 10675 1T2» 
57m 3635 SOS 5975 
305 3S50 3CT 


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^ Johannesburg MJggggS 

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2630 26.10 ,2630 26» 
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71 W W 7130. 


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Cobh WhdBG 5.04 
Cadbury Schw 540 
CarttejQonw) 5.17 
Cataml Union 669 

Sffif ts 

Dixons 533 

Etednxnmponenb 335 
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645 

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GefflAcddont BJ7 
GEC 336 

GKN 1031 

GtamWBOeaow 11.17 
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Grand Met 4J5 

GRE 179 

GrcenaBsGp 540 

135™“ . 'MB 

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Thames Wcfler '640 
31 Group 565 

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Unmer . 16.15 
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UtdNOW* "7J7 

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FME 180:424110 
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633 636 439 

650 669 6.77 

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436 438 4.46 

268 243 267 

10 10J5 10.18 

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475 430 434 

537 535 540 

5.10 5.16 532 

640 666 6.72 

638 644 657 

363 156 161 

5.17 530 539 

184 188 40! 

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630 642 640 

162 1J3 168 

7J60 8JH 830 
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iTD 605 £93 
1062 1061 1806 
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Botaakdex: 465.14 


Pretriow: 47386 

Acertmw 

196S0 

19390 

19*50 

19950 

ACE5A 

.1620 

1575 

1605 

1630 

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5240 

5100 

5210 

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BBV 

<080 

8500 

5990 

8310 

6020 

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6160 

8580 


1105 

1080 

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SanfcWer 

19000 

18800 

18910 

19150 

Ben Centro HUp 

2730 

3620 

3695 

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Bee Exterior 

3000 

27/S 

2BMI 

2/80 


25350 

24900 

25000 

25*70 


9670 

9450 

9500 

9750 

CEPSA 

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*105 

4165 

4100 

Continents 

2500 

2*20 

2*70 

2515 

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7160 

9050 

7000 

9910 

7100 

9040 

7300 

9130 

FECSA 

1170 

1140 

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GaBtteSunU 

30480 

29800 

30250 

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1545 

1510 

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HQK 

2505 

2550 

2650 


5850 

5770 

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SmOtanaElae 

1205 

1250 

1285 

MS 


7030 

60/0 

7030 


3385 


333S 

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178 

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12 

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123 

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670 

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9160 

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BetaatadBE 369282 


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4475 

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3185 

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11170 

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Bcsceremnd 

3335 

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BIC 
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Gen. Eaux 
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Lafarge 
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004 775 

20000 19660 
069 855 

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Electrolux B 
Ericsson B 
HennuB 
Incentive A 
Investor B 
MaDoB 
Ntodbankan 
PhwWUpiatm 
SondvBtB 


*70 
256J0 
1000 
492 
342 
229 
253 
279 JD 


*57 459 
20 25330 
972 996 
488 490 
330 339 
220 227 
245 252 
773 275J0 


195 19Q50 191 JO 


480 

266 

1009 

510 

354 

234 

240 

290 

200 


717 

7Q2 

710 

7*5 

Sarnia B 

1B360 

175 

183 

189 

844 

B30 

834 

855 

SCAB 

1<2 

I5H 

160 

16960 

249 

23/ 

247 JO 250.10 

S-E Sunken A 

80 

//JO 

78 

8360 

1073 

1033 

1037 

1106 

Stemfla Fora 

229 

219 

22030 

23/60 

3448 

3360 

3367 

3*91 

SkanskaS 

334 

320 

333 

3« 

26280 255.10 

26260 26390 

SKJFB 

19* 

18/ 

189 

190 

264.90 261.10 

26260 269 JO 

Spartinrrtwi A 

139 

125 

13560 

140 

65B 

642 

647 

667 

StadshypotekA 

190 

190 

190 

190 

844 

825 

830 

WO 

SloraA 

1036O 

100 

10260 

107 

584 

561 

561 

<07 

Sw Handles A 

225 

216 

222 

2J0 


1240 1250 

875 Ml 
557 543 

894 067 

10.10 953 

465 £40 

75* 739 


1240 

863 

557 

874 

1005 

AJO 

750 


B 

Paribas A 
Pernod Wcorri 

Peugeot at 

PtnouH-PrlW 

Proraodes 

Renault 

Rend 

Rft-PauteneA 

Small 

Schneider 

SEB 

SG5 Thomson 
Ste Generate 
5odmm 
51Gct«Jn 
Suez 

Srnthetobo 
Thomson CSF 
Total B 
Usinor 
Video 


410 397 JO 39EL50 
050 831 B45 

382^0 375 

1005 m 

1938 1900 

1351 1331 

56B 551 

336J0 32460 
30640 37 AJO 
30B.4J 302 

650 607 

2354 2290 

1890 1840 

14060 13570 
1740 1680 

18760 180 

539 521 

312J0 305 

1040 1005 

383J0 3 7660 
646 620 

2885 2812 

834 B05 

287 JO 28170 
549 561 

186 182.60 
477 467 JO 
9fl 8825 
377 341 


1205 
892 
577 
BBS 
10 
£60 
7*5 
418 
877 
38160 389 JO 
980 1015 

1900 1968 

1336 1366 

554 575 

336 33460 
376J0 391.70 
305 31570 
618 641 

2314 2420 

1857 1905 
13660 14270 
1715 1780 

JS740 1P03D 
531 550 

31160 322 

1025 1040 

379 395 

640 658 

2838 2900 

BIO 852 
285-90 290,90 
566 576 

184.90 190 

475 486.90 
90 92 

370 37B70 


Vonro B 


197 JO 191 JO 19460 202 


BradeseaPht 
Brahma Pfd 
CendgPfd 
CESPPM 
Copel 
Eletrabras 
ItaubmcaPM 
UgM Senridos 

P^^sPfd 

PauBsto Lin 

SfdNochmal 

Souza Cruz 

TetebtnsPM 

Tetanig 

Teien 

TefcapPW 

Unflxmco 

UsUninaPfd 

CVRD Pfd 


0J0 
700.01 
43.90 
53J® 
15*5 
434 JO 
S5O00 
44779 
31552 
3 ID-00 
147.00 
3770 
9 JO 
110J0 
1464)0 
145J0 
271410 
3930 
130 
2430 


835 055 

695J0 700J1 
4368 4360 
52-00 52J0 
15^0 1540 
mm *34.00 
53SJ0 542J0 

444.00 4*560 
31510 31560 
207 JO 288.08 
146J0146760 

36*0 3730 
47000 9 JO 
10870 109.90 
142M 1*150 

141.00 1*460 

344.00 27015JI 
39.40 39 JO 

1.18 1.19 

23J0 2430 


Seoul 

Doeom 

Daewoo Huovy 
HywKWEng. 
KtaAtofara 
Kona El Pwr 
Korea EzdiBk 
Korea Mob Td 
LG Seat Icon 

Pahang iron Si 
Sanuuia Dtalay 
5aiKwig_EiK 
ShlnhanBank 


Cea^este tades 6WJ9 
Piw liiw; 67734 

107000 100000 101000 103000 
4640 4*50 *500 450 
18800 17800 17900 1B5S0 
I5SWJ 1S5K U£-m 15500 
26900 25B00 26000 2MO0 
5790 5410 5650 5650 

534000 490000 *91000 485000 
27400 267DC 26700 26800 
465D0 *6500 *6500 *3100 
*2200 4000 412® 394X 
61200 59100 60000 59900 
10900 10200 10500 10700 


Singapore ***,%£%& 


Aila Poe Brew 

CtmbosPac 

OtyDeriB 

Cyde Carnage 

DcteFonolm* 

DBStorotari 

DBS Late 

Frettr&Narm 

HKLand* 

Jani MaBwn ■ 
JgrdSIrn goK * 


Oslo 


KeppelBank 

KapodFet 

KegpdLmd 

OCScfcretai 
OS Union BcT 
Partway Hdos 
Smbamng 
SlngAHorelgn 
51 no Lend 
SingPmsF 
Sing Tech ino 
Skip Telecomm 
Tat Lee Bank 
UtainduflM 

UtdtKeaBk.F 
Wing Tai Haas 

ttatfj. antes. 



735 

7.10 

730 

935 

935 

930 

13 

1160 

1190 

14.90 

1428 

1470 

0J9 

0J5 

0J7 

1730 

lt70 

172) 

ASA 

490 

490 


11J0 

1230 

1H1 

231 

127 

5.90 

685 

190 

150 

1*4 

3J6 

935 

9 

935 

192 

338 

188 

AM 

436 

4*8 

AM 

442 

4S8 

17.40 

17.10 

17.10 

10.10 

M0 

9,95 

565 

5J0 

5J5 

4SS 

1 80 

490 

IliO 

11JD 

11J0 

7 JO 

73S 

730 

27 

U 

24.90 

US 

3J4 

uo 

3 

7SS 

298 

1*2 

331 

140 

1.18 

1.13 

1.14 

IS 

1440 

14<0 

4JQ 

4.14 

436 


Stockholm 


SX16EBdacUZUl 
Prevtous; 2W0J4 

110 105 110 114 

820 830 852 

IBB 300 300 

335 34*50 36460 

183 185 190 


W 
351 

187 

315 W 306 32530 


Sfio Paulo 


8JS 
69060 
4360 
S2J0 
16.00 
438J0 
54BJ0 
447.99 
fin no 
21060 
146.90 
37.99 
BJ5 
10960 
14050 
14630 
269.00 
4020 
1.19 
2110 


Sydney 


All Ordtaarles; 235230 
Prevtous: 242230 

Amcor 

8.12 

8 

8.11 

030 

AICBklng 

7.98 

7J2 

7J6 

BJH 

BHP 

1664 

1445 

1662 

17 

Boral 

163 

155 

360 

4/9 

SramWeslncL 

2065 

2035 

2038 

20.97 

CBA 

1250 

12J0 

12^9 

1175 

GCAmata 

11.95 

1165 

1132 

1113 

Cotes Myer 

5.95 

5.78 

535 

6 

Comalcn 

640 


630 

663 

CRA 

1BJ7 

1830 

1832 

10J6 

CSR 

473 

467 

470 

4B8 

FosteraBrew 

260 

265 

159 

264 

Goodman Rd 

163 

166 

161 

US 

ICI AusmAi 

1139 

11.19 

1130 

11.49 


3IJ7 

21.15 

21.19 

2166 

MJMHdps 
NatAust Bank 

167 

163 

1^4 

1.71 

15.89 

1564 

1571 

16.15 

Wat Mutual Hdg 

1J9 

134 

UK 

1.9* 


5L79 

565 

573 

3.95 

PoofiC Dunlap 

336 

335 

136 

142 

Pioneer Inti 

*37 

419 

419 

4.T9 

Pub Brooders! 

6J4 

6. 60 

6.60 

633 

St George Bank 

743 

730 

/33 

761 

WMC 

7.99 

7J5 

7J6 

BJ6 

westpac BUng 
WoottedePet 

7.18 

938 

7J6 

9J5 

7.11 

9.12 

7^0 

939 

Woohrorths 

335 

330 

332 

361 

Taipei 

Stack Market Mac 81 4341 
Previous: 800430 

Cathay Life Ins 

167 

16* 

165 


Chang Hm Bk 
CNooTunaBL 

173 

76 

170 

75 

170 

76 

170 

75 


115 

112 

115 

112 


26.90 

2660 

2660 

26J0 


173 

171 

171 

171 



6860 

tM 

<9.50 


12960 

127 JO 

128 

120 

I ml Comm Bk 

7* 

73 

/* 

n 

‘•ian Yo Ptanta 

63 

62 

<760 

67 

Shin Kong LHe 
TchfonSeni 

100 

72 

99 

7060 

100 

72 

9860 

7060 

Tatung 

l/td Micro Elec 

57 JO 
5560 

5* 

5360 

4/ 

5560 

5* 

54 

Uta World Chin 

70 

6860 

70 

6060 


Tokyo 

Alliwntoio 
All Nippon Air 


Nlldtel 225; 17869 J9 
Preriousi 18003*0 


AsohlL 
AsohIChefli 
Asa hi doss 
Bk Tokyo MItsu 
Bh Yokohama 
Bridpereane 
Canon 
OiubuElec 
ChuankuElec 
Dal Nipp Prim 
Data! 

DaWCWKong 
Dal «ro Bonk 
□raw House 
DahnSee 
DDI 
Den» 

End Japan Ry 

Etanl 

Farwc 

Fu8 Bank 

FuNPtiohi 

Fu(teu 

HOCtSfunl Bk 

KitaeM 

Honda Motor 

IBJ 

im 

Itochu 

no-Yfikado 

6AL 

Japan Tobacco 
Jusco 
Kalmn 
Konsal Elec 
Kao 

KflMsaldHvy 

Kawa Steel 

Kink! Nipp Rr 

Kirin Brewery 

KoMSted 

Komobu 

Kubota 

Kyocera 

Kyushu Elec 

LTCfl 

Manibenl 

Wqrul 

Marwi Comm 
MoKa Etaclnd 

Mitou Elec WV 

MBsuWshi 

MBpAtahlQi 

MfeaUsMEI 

MOsubbMEsf 

MtaubteWHuy 

MBwijlshiMM 

Mitsubishi Tr 

Mitsui 


90S 

956 

966 

980 

761 

750 

752 

ns 

3460 

3440 

3*50 

3400 

74S 

711 

7*3 

778 

644 

612 

626 

644 

1090 

1080 

1090 

mo 

1910 

IWO 

WIO 

two 

567 

551 

557 

570 

2310 

715)0 

2310 

7*70 

2690 

2600 

26TO 

2650 

2090 

2030 

2090 

7010 

SOM 

7U3U 

2050 

2050 

2050 

2020 

2050 

2070 

679 

fi74 

674 

681 

7.110 

1250 

1310 

>310 

458 

4*9 

454 

465 

UK) 

1*00 

1*21) 

1440 

WO 

B// 

881 

893 

7960a 

7770a 

7950o 

781 0a 

2*2(1 

2360 

sm 

24.81 

SI 70e 

mia 

51J0D 

5050a 

7110 

2070 

HB0 

2170 

.mo 

m\ 

3870 

3800 

1*10 

1350 

1400 

1430 

*080 

4Q0U 

4050 

W7D 

1260 

1240 

1260 

IMA 

1109 

1070 

1090 

HOD 

lino 

1070 

non 

non 

3670 

3590 

3670 

3690 

11*0 

1210 

1230 

1260 

*30 

*11 

*30 

*25 

MU 

58/ 

599 

<06 

5401) 

5340 

WHO 

5800 

501 

490 

*9S 

506 

R760a 

8170a 

8260 a 

men 

3370 

3280 

3370 

3*00 

572 

565 

568 

576 

2180 

SIS!) 

21/0 

2170 

I34U 

1320 

1340 

1350 

4/9 

4/U 

*75 

«l 

350 

336 

3» 

360 

m 

m 

737 

737 

1010 

992 

inon 

1020 

773 

218 

272 

rw 

880 

an 

872 

m 

530 

511 

SK 

515 

7010 

674a 

Ami 

7m 

2150 

419 


2150 

*01 

3160 

*70 

477 

460 

470 

*80 

I/8S 

I/Ml 

1700 

1790 

sm 

TWO 

T9® 

.9Bfln 

1920 

1890 

1920 

1910 

1150 

mo 

113(1 

llm 

mo 

370 


1110 

367 

1100 

375 

691 

681 

<87 

<95 

1320 

!250 

1330 

1320 

615 

m 

Rift 


917 

w 

916 

917 

1210 

11M 

1210 

1330 

908 

899 

902 

906 


Jan. 1. 1933= 100. 

lave* 

Change 

% change 

year to date 
% ch&ng* 

Worid Index 

147.27 

-1.78 

-1.19 

+11.68 

Regional Indaxaa 

Asia/Padtic 

107.42 

-0.50 

-0.46 

-19.99 

Europe 

159.37 

-3.29 

-2.02 

+14.51 

N. America 

166.47 

-1.22 

-0.73 

+29.77 

S. America 

134.78 

-0.65 

-0.48 

+51.37 

Industrial Maxes 
Capital goods 

170.25 

-2.38 

-1.38 

+28.12 

Consumer goods 

160.06 

-0.98 

-0.59 

+20.27 

Energy 

179.15 

-2.59 

-1.43 

+32.10 

Finance 

108.21 

-1.75 

-1.59 

-14.95 

Miscellaneous 

151.56 

-3.39 

-2.19 

+11.60 

Raw Materials 

177.30 

-3.53 

-1.95 

+25.04 

Service 

138.72 

-1.75 

-1.25 

+15.60 

Utilities 

131.13 

-020 

-0.15 

+3.14 


The International Herald Tribune Worid Slack tnctex C tracks the U S ctoBar values of 
280 mtemaaonalty mvastabh stocks from 25 countries. For more Momarico. a tree 
booklet Is available by writing to The Trtb Index. 781 Avenue Charles de GriuBe, 

92521 NewBy Codex. France Compiled by Bloomberg News. 


High Law Oose 


Mitsui Fudosn 
Mitsui Trust 
MuratnMtg 
NEC 
NBuin 
NikhaSec 
Nintendo 
Nipp Ezniess 
Nippon on 
Nippon steel 
Nissan Mow 
NKK 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 

NTT Daa 
Ofi Paper 
Osaka Gas 
Rltofi 
Rohm 
Sokura Bk 
Sonkyo 
Sanwa Bank 
Sanyo Elec 
Secure 
5eEbu Rurv 
SeUsul Otere 
Sekteri House 
Seven- Eleven 
Sharp 

Shikoku El Pwr 

Shimizu 

Snhvebu Cn 

snbeido 

5hizuDka Bk 

Softbank 

Sony 

Sumitomo 
Sum Homo Bk 
SvmltChem 
Sumitomo Elec 
SumllMeW 
SumB Trust 
Ttrisho Ptrarm 
Tatedo Chem 
TDK 

Tahoku El Pw 
Tokal Bank 
Tokto Marine 
Tokyo El Prn 
Tokyo Electron 
Tokyo Gus 
Tokyo Corp- 
Tonen 

Tcppan Print 

Tnruylnd 

Toshiba 

Tostem 

Trro Trust 

Tsyoa Molar 

Yamonoucni 

or* lOOr't l-a 1200 


1250 1230 

705 678 

4390 4390 

1420 13« 
1650 1570 
705 604 

9060 8760 

825 804 

503 490 

346 336 

729 720 

260 2S3 

1400 1350 

8550a 6360a 
3410b 3260b 
622 605 

294 7 86 

1410 1380 

9030 9030 

603 667 

3380 3300 

1340 1290 

*58 445 

6980 6850 

5430 5150 

1198 1150 

1220 1169 
7500 mo 
1480 1450 

1980 1950 

652 641 

2340 2300 

1590 1550 

1090 10W 

7850 7690 

8690 B5SS 
865 845 

1460 1400 

494 *70 

1700 1673 


282 

997 


274 

959 


2940 2870 
5570 2530 
8630 8410 
3010 1980 
945 916 
1370 1230 
2280 2230 
4200 4050 


304 

597 


2 W 

575 


1160 1130 

1*60 1400 


720 

677 


698 

670 


2790 
830 800 
3150 3090 
2550 2570 


1740 

705 

43W 

1420 

1650 

701 

?M0 

B25 

503 

348 

729 

257 

1400 

BS50a 

3370b 

622 

290 

1*10 

9030 

683 

3300 

1320 

*58 

4900 

5430 

1190 

1220 

7500 

1480 

1980 

645 

2330 

1590 

1080 

7780 

8601 

664 

1450 

49* 

1700 

282 

99* 

2920 

2570 

8630 

1990 

920 

1260 

226D 

*170 

301 

597 

1140 

1450 

720 

67* 

2830 

m 

31*0 

2520 


Prev. 

1280 

710 

44*0 

1400 

1620 

69* 

8850 

B24 

500 

340 

7*5 
260 
1370 
B710a 
3290b 
623 
299 
1*10 
9120 
693 
3410 
1330 
447 
6950 
5540 
1220 
1210 
7520 
1*70 
1980 
485 
2350 
1600 
1080 
7B50 
0650 
880 
1*70 
483 
1680 
280 
990 
2890 
2590 
8500 
2020 
M5 
1240 
2250 
41 W 

310 

582 

1180 

1*40 

719 

68* 

2040 

853 

3135 

2560 


Toronto 

AS MW Price 
Ataeno Energy 
Alcan Alum 
Andetsan Ezpl 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Now Scotia 
Bank* Gold 
BCE 

BCTetocnmm 
Btaetwm Phatm 
Bomba rrterB 
Boston A 
Bie-x Minerals 
Camera 
□BC 

CdnHoflRna 
CdnJjKte 
edit Dean pet 
CdnPodflc 
Comma 
Dofosco 
□rantat 
DonofwfiA 
Du Pam cm a 
E flper Group 
Eurotart Mog 
Foblttirinl 
Foicatridge 
FlWCfHfCnOll a 
Franco Newda 
Gulf Cria Res 
Imperial 00 
Im 

IPLEneray 
LaUkniB 
Loemn Group 
MoctniDBIdl 
Magna inn a 


TSE ladutrials: 5B75.*4 
Previous: 585032 


3030 
28lf 
47J5 
16J0 
49.70 
5135 
3135 
6*30 
30V: 
61 
25.90 
3135 
185 
5335 
32,45 
*9.10 
33.95 
26 
33ti 
37V; 
24.10 
10 u a 
23 ‘I 
32JO 
22.85 
*0ie 
300 
79>i 
21 '? 
619 
10!* 
6470 
451a 
4045 

19J5 

45 

19^5 

6VJ0 


19.70 
28 
*635 
16JS 
4860 
50Vr 
3265 
63Vs 
30* 
58'7 
25 
31 'i 
165 
5217 
3135 
48.90 
3260 
2i*0 
3110 
3Ti 
□.10 
10J5 
6160 
31.05 
22J5 
3935 
290 
29 

21.15 
6335 

10.15 
&4V. 

4480 

39M 

1BJ0 

43J0 

19J5 

6835 


20J5 19.95 
284 2B 1 ? 
*6j5 m 
16^ 1630 
49 48.95 
Sy. 5065 

32.90 32.70 
6170 6160 
30' J SOU 

6035 5917 

25.90 2105 

31 '.i 3V* 
185 ?** 

5 JW 5105 
31.05 3130 

49 49J5 
33ta 33'fl 
25.W 2ff.T 
3330 3385 

37jt5 374i 

24 23 

1020 1060 
ZUO 2140 
32L 

22 JO 22.95 
40V? 40 

299 299 

29 2B85 


21.15 

U>.< 

1020 


21ft 

64 

law 


6440 6430 
*535 *480 
40U 39.90 
19 18>* 
4195 *4’- 

1935 1935 
69 68J5 


Methane, 

Moore 

Newbridge Net 
N aranda Inc 
N often Energy 
Nttwm Tetacom 
Novo 
Onex 

Pancdn Petlm 
Petra Coo 
Placer Dome 
Poco Petlm 
PanshSaah 
RenalsRmce 
Rio rugom 
Rogers Conte! B 
Seagram Cc 
SrtenCdkiA 
Stone Canso Id 
Suncor 
Tonsman Eny 
TeckB 
Teiegtobe 
Telus 
Thomson 
TarDom Bank 
Transatta 
TransCdaPIpe 
Trimark FInl 
TrtzecHnnr 

TVXGOM 
WesKoasi Eny 
Weston 


High Law 

11.90 1160 
2785 27ft 

39.90 38ft 

31 3035 

3030 29J5 
9130 90 

11.40 1130 
24JO 2415 
56 JO 56ft 
2035 19.95 
25ft 24V: 
11» J2J0 
107 10400 
*lft 39.05 
33 ’i 33 

25*5 2560 
5330 5280 
5645 55 

20.10 20 

6180 61ft 
42ft 40ft 
30 JB 30ft 
40^0 40ft 
2135 21* 

27 J5 27.15 
35ft 34ft 
1&65 1630 
25*0 25 

41.15 40ft 
31 3070 
9.95 9.1V 

2435 2410 
70 68ft 


Oose Pm. 

11.90 1180 
27.80 2785 

39ft 39ft 
38.&S 3B-6 1 ; 

30.10 2985 
. 98J0 9030 

1130 11.15 
2420 24 ft 

56.70 56ft 

20ft 20.15 
2480 25 

72 85 1280 

10640 105.60 

40.90 3935 

3330 33 

2580 2580 

53 S3 
554, 5545 
2085 20 05 
6180 61 
41.85 41.10 

30.70 30ft 
40ft *0.10 

2130 21.41 
27.45 2735 
3495 34.90 
1680 1630 
2530 25.15 

41.10 40ft 
3085 30.95 

985 « JO 

2430 2435 
69ft 6Bli 


Vienna 

Boehtar-liddeh 
Ctwflfmtsr PM 
EA-GeneraD 
EVN 

Finahoten Wien 
OMV 

Oes* Etaktrtz 
VA Stahl 

vATedi 

Wlenerberg Bau 


457 J05 
3360 
1673 
529.90 
1370 
B4CL90 
476 
1729 
2181 


ATX index: 11EL49 
Prevtous: 121534 

781 792 816 

4*5.15 457.05 45635 
3105 3200 3290 

1650 1667 1704 

528 521 537 JO 

132* 13301 

ms M l 8*0 
47030 473X0 <8730 
16751681.15 1739 
21«0 2175 2222 


Wellington icsE-joitae twm 

3 Prrtfcos; 223874 


ArNZeaidB 

1H5 

105 

3J5 

1» 

Briefly >iw 

130 

139 

139 

13 

Carter HoAard 

104 

300 

107 

IK 

FletchCh BWg 

437 

4.1/ 

4.17 

*38 

FletdiChEny 

335 

■JJB) 

3J3 

188 

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available on Internet; http://www.iht.com/IHT/FUN/funds.htmI 


April 1, 1997 


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Quotations Mippl ted by liincl group* to (kBoreperf Pwrh* (W: 33-1 40 38 OB 00) 


service sponsored by 


For Information on haw to Hst ycur fund, fax Katy Hourf at (33-1) 41 4392l2or&fnaf :ft«te@thtfiOtn iy|A|A| A 
Ouotations lor your finds Enmall : Bounds© titccjin ■ V»-JIX1« 


n Asian Euudv Fd } lfi 99 

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PAGE 15 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Expand Sh 


aring 


[wo car models u 

Mazda spokesman said Tuesday * 

“ «•»“ <* ^y^dci. 

Fwd 

fnrhSh n r^ 0re w °uM save design Mid other costs 

81 m 0 " 8 * 1 *e .models cohered by the latest 
:fS S^jwB not go into production much before 
the end of the decade, analysts said. The development will be 
more « includes a car dial can be soldin markets 

anwnd the world or a sport utility vehicle, they said. 

A likely candidate for platform-sharing is Mazda’s Familia 
Mssenger car, called the 323 In the United States, which could 
shffle a platform with the Ford Escort, analysts said. 

Another candidate is Mazda's Capefla passenger car 

m *e United States. That crnddbecoupled 
wim Ford s Contour, sold in Europe as the Mondeo. 

MaZda had a net loss of 179 million yen ($1.5 million) in the 

fid Sent tA and fQ pQA. „ In.. 

[ Monday. 


If , ..vubw, ii^umuuujrcu^ 

hau-year that ended Sept. 30 and expects to post a loss of 4 
billion yen for the full year that ended Mo * 


NEC Facing Penalties in U.S. 

Initial Ruling Faults 2 Japanese Computer Makers 


By John Markoff 

Nftc Kart Jims Service 


. SAN FRANCISCO — If the U.S. Commerce Depart- 
ment this summer upholds its initial ruling made this week, 
itwotdd mean that NEC Corp. would face harsh penalties on 
the sale of any new supercomputers or the upgrades of 
machines it sells in the United States. 

The penalty for NEC could be 454 percent of the price of 
any system sold, and for Fujitsu 27 percent, if the initial 
finding is upheld. 

The Commerce Department issued a preliminary finding 
Monday that two Japanese computer makers. NEC and 
Fujitsu Ltd., were guilty of dumping by bidding below cost 
in an effort to sell a supercomputer to an Amen can weather 
research laboratory. 

The lab. the National Center for Atmospheric Research in 
Boulder, Colorado, had chosen a $35 million bid from NEC 
offering four 32-processor SX-4 supercomputers in May 
1996. But in July, Cray Research, which is now a subsidiary 
of Silicon Graphics Inc., filed an anti-dumping petition with 
the Commerce Department and die International Trade 
Commission, an independent federal agency. 

Cray officials acknowledged that the Commerce De- 
partment’s figures had been based on cost data the company 
supplied after NEC executives refused themselves to provide 
data for die inquiry, arguing that the Commerce Department 
had provided mem no chance of a fair hearing. 

“There is -a price to be paid,” said John Green wald, a 


lawyer representing Cray. “NEC refused to supply ihat 
information. I suspect it is because they examined their own 
data and didn't like the result" 

An official of NEC said, however, that the Commerce 
Department bad in effect blocked the company's bid in May 
1996, releasing a “predecisional dumping* analysis," a 
memo analyzing the bid, finding NEC guilty of dumping 
before the National Center for Atmospheric Research had 
announced its award. 

“We felt we had zero chance of getting a fair hearing." 
said Samuel W. Adams, vice presi&ot for sales and mar- 
keting at HNSX Supercomputers, the American subsidiary 

of NEC. 

In October, NEC filed a lawsuit in the Court of In- 
ternational Trade, a federal court dial deals with issues 
under American trade laws, seeking to prevent the Com- 
merce Department from investigating Cray's dumping 
compIainL 

Two weeks ago, the court rejected a request by NEC for 
a preliminary injunction that would have stopped the Com- 
merce Department from issuing its preliminary ruling. 

Computer industry analysts said NEC might have erred in 
not providing its cost data. Cray executives said they 
thought their rival had forfeited any chance of presenting 
that data to the Commerce Department in the future. 

"I didn't understand why NEC refused to release any 
numbers." said Howard Richmond of the Gartner Group, a 
market research firm in Stamford, Connecticut. “It tends to 
weaken their case." 


FMG MIR SICAV 

. - - Socrete d'lnvestissement '& Capital \bdabfc 
10A, Boulevard Royal, .Luxembourg . 
R.C. Luxembourg B 53.392 

NOTICE OF MEETING ' 

Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of 
Shareholders oi FMG MR SICAV will be held « che Registered 
' Office, 10A, Boulevard Royal, Luxembourg, 

on Tuesday 15th April, 1997 ct 11 ud, 

tor the purpose of considering the following agenda: 

M ana g e ment Report of the Directors for the year ended 
31st Decernbet: 2996. ... 

Report of the Statutory Auditor for the year ended 
31st December; 1996. 

Approval of the Annual Accounts for the year ended 
31st December; 1996 and appropriation of the warning* 
Discharge to the Directors in respect of the execution of their, 
mandates to 31st December; 1996. 

Ratification of the appointment of one Di recto r 
Election of the Directors for a new term of one year 
Election of the Statuary Auditor for a new term of one year 
S. lb transact any other business. 

The present notice and a form of pr ox y have been sent to all 
registered shareholders on record at March 24, 1997. 

In order to attend the Meeting, the owners of bearer shares are 
required to deposit their shares before April 7, 1997 At the 
■ Registered Office of the Company; 

BanqueRiribas Luxembourg 
10 A, Boulevard Royal 
Luxembourg 

The registered shareholders have to inform by mail Jletrei or proxy 
form) the Board of Directors of their mtenrion to assist at the 
meeting before April 7, 1997. 

By order of rhe Board of Director s 


Ji 


J 4. 

5. 

6 . 




2 Chaebol Agree to First Friendly Takeover 


Bloomberg News 

SEOUL — In tiie first friendly ac- 
quisition among South Korea's biggest 
conglomerates, Kmnho Group, the 
country's 1 2 ifr-Jargest industrial group, 
said Tuesday it would buy a controlling 
stake in Miwon Petrochemicals Co. to 
try to strengthen its chemical business. 

Ihe move reflects attempts by the 
conglomerates, known as chaebol, to 
sell their weaker businesses to stronger 
rivals and focus resources on their most 
profitable companies. Miwon Petro- 
chemicals had a loss of 586 million won 
($653,000) last year. The agreement, the 
first friendly takeover involving any of 
South Korea's 30 largest chaebol, may 
have been made easier because the top 


executives of the companies are related 
by marriage- Miwon Group is the coun- 
try ’s 29th-Iaigest chaebol. 

Korea Kumho Petrochemical Co., a 
unit of Kumho. agreed Monday to buy 
25.1 percent of Miwon Petrochemicals 
from Miwon Group for 25,880 won a 
share, or 47.2 billion won. Miwon Pet- 
rochemical's shares fell 6.2 percent, or 
540 won, to close Tuesday at 8, 100. South 
Korean companies in such transactions 
often pay a massive premium to take 
control of a listed company, in part be- 
cause buying the stock in the market could 
drive the shares up even more quickly. 

The chance of a hostile takeover of 
Miwon Petrochemicals would have in- 
creased Tuesday as the government in- 



Protect Your Personal Assets 

• tnanpoma In any suae. Inckrtng 
Delaware. Nevada & vtycwwifl 

• LLCTs (United Liattey Compares) 
■ in as tttte as *8 houre 

Corporate Agents, Inc. 

Fat (3021 998-7078 
ConpoSwvB.GOWC 
hgp^hinww JQ cpo ra lB co m 


Singapore Drops Mobile-Phone License Fees 


Reuters 

SINGAPORE — The government marked 
the deregulation of its cellular-phone and pa- 
ging markets Tuesday by scrapping license 
fees for mobile phones. 

Meanwhile, signs of a price war emerged as 
three companies entered the paging business. 

Communications Minister Mah Bow Tan 
said the government would remove license 
fees for all portable phones, saving users as 
much as 100 Singapore dollars ($69) a year. 
Total savings would amount to about 23 mil- 
lion dollars a year. 

As of Tuesday, the state-owned company 


Singapore Telecommunications Ltd., or 
SingTel, faces one competitor. MobileOne, in 
the mobile-phone market and three rival pa- 
ging services: Sun page; Hutchison Paging, a 
joint venture of the Hong Kong conglomerate 
Hutchison Whampoa Ltd,, Intraco Ltd. and 
Teledata, and MobileOne, a joint venture that 
includes Cable & Wireless PLC of Britain. 

S unpage’s rates start at 9.80 dollars a month, 
compared with 9.90 dollars for Hutchison Pa- 
ging and 15 dollars for Singapore Telecom- 
munications. S unpage said it was aiming to get 
one-third of the Singapore market, which it 
said could grow to l3 million pagers. 


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Foe 30M874151 Attn 1290 


MANAGSD FUTURES ACCOUNTS 
cdablB for quaOed kwaatore. 
FttcR.Uu3tM69-725rUSA 


Diamonds 


cash far gam African oJax* 
voiurne oriy. Free 954 <743866 USA 


COMMERCIAL & 
INVESTMENT PROPERTIES 


Offices tor Rent 


PARS OFRCE StB LEASE 900 stft, 
fa pmSgious bJSng tocatad near Re® 
Varicne on ran Ctegfane. toefag 8» 
kmmn S na ttl Host BeeuiuSy rmaraF 
Gd, q** & 3 raoree Baranca te 

’nudam tatoreom i tftmr. 14 'norths 
el BJOMwrfv Fax 433 {0)142803041 


Sales 


. RESTAURANT F0H SALE 

Stfetlr wnasuetod fa 1380. 
lO.mfaa from Ranch gcr stadun 
Borriaring #» Seine, pmtee stolen, 
taertr- 100 pestngpiacfls. 

75D *pn LMtfi Ste 
3 dnre raws, at conficning. 
RsstotoSSOttpaencbsu 
tonace tor adn restaunu. 

FF 18 Won tomovet. 

- Ctosed 2 (toys a wet 
FAX PUDS: 31 SO. 


PARIS 15ft. For sab fa jrtna location. 

. fanny boutique wfatte tor tel typw ol 
buBbtoss, m bea» op sealed. Guaran- 
teed pnnfiaL Seera pda FRLBU S 
twrthh tart F6JOOT* +33 BJ148 48 
BS SONIAS 46 13 67^0}146 Of 51 07. ' 


Page 17 
FOR MORE 
BUSINESS 
MESSAGES 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S! 

m 

I you enjoy reafrig Die IKT 
*tien ywi bmL why urt 
also get ft ai home7 
Someday defivery avaSahie 
n toy U.S. efies 

Catt (t) BOO 682 2884 

(In Km Ym^|!?JS2 3880) 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


Italy 


TUSCANY MILS, nett Anrm, doaB to 
Casokfao Forest Ne&ral Part, beatttU 
sweatee, asating trsUong and toraa- 
tock rittng. aww *efc tfredJy tearful 
lams ends 
Tat 00 39 551 


foils. Van conmnem press, 
i 2478473 9am - 5pm. 


Paris and Suburbs 


PAHlSSft- NOIRE DANE, 
PANORAMIC VIEW • DUPLEX. 4 rooms, 
top Boor, charm, sunny. 

PARIS «V PANORAMIC YteW ON 
S3t AND NOTRE DAME, DUPLEX, 
top km. about UO sqm, 
fa ttey baatte toasune Mctea 
PARIS 8ft - AVENUE MONTAIGlfe. 
DUPLEX , top H oo t, h a m odem bubftg, 
4fi rooms + ten ♦ g&raQB. 
N0TABE Tefc *33(0)1 44 77 37 83 


Switzerland 


□ 


LAKE GENEVA & ALPS 

Sato to torartwre autnoftaad 
our spedaflty sinca 1B7S 


Attadne prepertiaa. overiooten Was 
1 to 5 bedrooms, ten SR 200.000. 
REV AC 

52, Moaitbrttant CH-Y211 Gcnan 2 
Tel 4122-734 15 40 Fax 734 12 20 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


Paris Area Furnished 


16ft, 7R0CADER0 torejy 40 afa 1 stufo 
~i. FFLOOO 2 ■ 


on ganlen. plwafTV _ 

FF5JM0 mo. Tet *33(0114889334 am. 


8ft, RUE NOTRE DAME DES CHAMPS. 
Chanang room, no bain. USS250 per 
onnft. Tet *33 {0}1 43 25 78 33. 


AUTOMOBILE MARKET 


£*2** ' gTrhte.A 

AHtod E*ehar Strew 10 
CH-8027 2urtetl 
Far OttZOS 76 30 
Tai.- 01/2C2 76 10 
new tax-free um 
AU.LEAOMQ makes 
S ana day rootowaUon pcaaMM. 
ranvMbie, up to £ years 
Wi atse rogtaar cars waft 
temrired) torteqn ftaa-free) piatea. 


Auto Rentals 


RENT AUTO DERG1 FRANCE 
WEEKEND: FROO. 7 DAYS: F1500. 
TEL- PARS 48(0)1 43 6855 55. 


Autos Tax Free 


FRED OPSTT RACING WOflUJWEJE 
Nav U& note FraaShjppfagWoridaida 
~ ‘ I tot 


16V dc iwflorCI JB7 
SUZUKI VTTARA 2d0W 4*4 softop 
SredABS oiibaga cassahe pa S13.799 
^GrandOKnkodttiVebattw$33S49 
i in tor quotes on oftar wfifctos 
Bi-an-ann fwv2oi-3Z7B22 


25 YRSOCaWBE MOTORS 

aorttte sorty end ahWng of AUDI 
Ikreedes, BW. Porache. CM Germany 
♦4M11-434646 or tax 211-454 2120 


TRANSCO BELG3UU 

20 YEARS WE DBJVER 
CARS TO THE WORLD 

A! mates and models 
Eapotf Sates - HegistraDon 
Shtopeig - insurance 

Transco. 51 VossttchpetL 
2030 Armap, Betoten. 
Tet *32 3 5426240 
Fte *32 3 54258J7 


ATK WORLDWBS TAI FffiE CARk 
Enofl ♦ sfotofaQ * raystisjmi n new a 
SSI cars. ATK IW. Temnatte <0. 2230 
Brtesdiaat, Betorom. Phona *32 3 
64S5002. FM «2 3 64S7169. ATK, 
sirae 1958 


duto Shaping 


SAVE ON CAR SHIPPING. AHESCO, 
Krtobesb 2. Antwp Bettni ^To^om 
US, Africa Regu&r Ro*i salroa F* 





Ideal aeeommodaSon: saskrt battooms 
'and sttvceassind 
TO IIOVE M 
Tel -33(011 43128800. Fax (0)1 43128808 


AGENCE CHAMPS ELYSSS 


Furnished ^rarnnofa, 3 months or more 
or urturtthed, raadanw areas. 


Tel: +33 

Fee *33 


42 25 32 25 

45 63 37 09 


CAPITALE 1 PARTNERS 
Hagfapidced rjuaBy apattnefts. al 3 zhs 
P ans and suPurts. m help you oea I 
Tfll +33 (0)1-46148211. Fax(D)1-46148215 


Switzerland 


GENEVA, LUXURY FURNSHB) Ken- 
mens. From sWSos to 4 bedrooms. Tet 
+41 22 735 6320 Fa +41 22 7362671 


Employment 


General Positions Wanted 


0U5KES5JUK, SIXTY, unwerany de- 
gree, Emfisti. French. Arabs 
Ktokng for any iob miding 
Phone and tax *322376.15.16 


TO PLACE 
A\ AD 
W THIS 
SECTION 

Coll 

Kimberly 

Guerrand-Betrancourt 
in Paris 

+ 33 (0) 1 41 43 94 76 
+ 33 (0) 1 41 43 93 7U 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Song 


Singapore: 


TDkyo " '■ 
tmm2& 



Exrtw^B'. Index;' .. 
Hong Kong 


Prev. . . 
Gfosa :Cbahg^ 

12^74.13 12^32-^7 


Singapore : 

■Strafei Tuaes ' 

2,07467 2,07SJBO *D:O8 

Sydney. 

ASOs&reri© 

2^3823$. &422L30 , -2.89 

Tokyo 

N&&*225 • • ' 

17^S9^9 18^®4B +0.74 

Kte&UsmpurCompoBte . . 

. 1*87-77 .-.tybaitf. *4-27. 

SangJcok - 

SET - 

89474 - 70M3. - . “1.52 

Seotfl - . 

Composite tote* 

67JL09 ■ 677.34 /' /0*4 

Taipei 

StockMartefctodeK &?6£4! 90D4JSQ *1,99 

Kanfa. 

•PSE 

. 3,17*78 3,222,98 -1:59 

Jakarta 

Composite Index 

6S2L01 66&24 -1.64 

Wellington * 

NZSB40 • 

,ZZS7M .2336.74 -tJ3t 

Bombay 

5ansith»ted®c 

3,427.01 St&ois tt.97 

Source: Telekurs 


hncnuoona] Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


croduced regulations that make mergers 
and acquisitions, even hostile ones, easier. 
Investors no longer must inform the stock 
exchange when they buy more than 5 
percent of a company’s shares, and a 10 
percent limit on individual stock own- 
ership has been removed. 

■ Big Firms Continue to Grow 

South Korea's chaebol have 1 8 percent 
more subsidiaries in their empires than a 
year ago, Agence France-Presse reported. 
The number of companies affiliated with 
the top 30 conglomerates now stands at 
821, up from 669 last year, the Fair Trade 
Commission said. Assets of the family- 
controlled conglomerates, meanwhile, 
rose 21 percent, to 384.4 trillion won. 


• China set its income-tax rate for foreign banks doing local- 
currency business at 33 percent and reduced the income-tax 
rate for domestic banks, insurance firms and other financial 
institutions to 33 percent from 55 percent. 

• South Korea's customs-cleared trade deficit widened to 
SI .88 billion in March from a S446 million a year earlier and 
reached $7.43 billion for the first quarter, compared with S4.17 
billion. Semiconductor exports dropped 42.8 percent in March 
after a 42.4 percent rise a year earlier, and oil imports rose. 

• Hanbo Group’s founder. Chung Tae Soo, withdrew 24.5 
billion won ($27.3 million) from financial institutions last year, 
prosecutors were quoted by the Yonhap news agency as saying. 
The prosecutors said they wanted to ask Hanbo executives and 
accountants where the cash was now. 

• Malaysia's M3 money-supply measure rose 20.4 percent 
year-on-year in February, compared with 22.1 percent in 
January. The central bank. Bank Negara Malaysia, has ordered 
limits on bank lending for property and stock purchases. 

• India's main stock index rose nearly 2 percent, to 3.427.01 
points, recovering from an 8 percent drop Monday, amid 
optimism that Parliament would pass a pro-business budget 
before the government faced a vote of confidence. 

• Japanese auto sales soared 12.4 percent in March, to a 
record 830.864, as consumers bought ahead of a tax increase. 
For the year that ended Monday, sales rose 7.6 percent, to 5.56 
million, their third consecutive annual rise. 

• Vietnam's total trade increased 26 percent in the first 
quarter, as exports rose 33 percent, to $1.75 billion, and 
imports lose 20 percent, to $2.6 billion. AFP. Bloomberg. Reuters 


ALFRED BERG SICAV 

Societe d'lnvestissement h Capital Variable 
Registered Office: 

L-1140 Luxembourg, 26, route d'Arion 
R.C. Luxembourg B 26150 

Shareholders are invited to attend the 
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS 

which will be held at 26. route d'Arton, Luxembourg 
on April 18. 1997 at 10.00 a.m. with the following 
agenda; 

AGENDA: 

1 . Reports of the Board of Directors and Auditors. 

2. Approval of the financial statements as of 
December 31. 1996. 

3. Decision on allocation of net profits. 

4. Discharge of the Directors and of the Auditors in 
respect of the carrying out of their duties during 
the fiscal year ended December 31, 1996. 

5. Reelection of the Board Members. 

6. Election of a new Auditor. 

7. Miscellaneous business. 

NOTES: 

Holders of bearer shares may vote at the Meeting: 
in person by producing at the Meeting either 
share certificates or a certificate of deposit issued 
by their bank which will be issued to them 
against deposit of their share certificates, 
by proxy by completing the form of proxy which 
will be made available to them against deposit of 
share certificates aforesaid. 

Share certificates so deposited will be retained until 
the Meeting or any adjournment thereof has been 
concluded. 

The Board of Directors 


ALFRED BERG NORDEN 

Society d'lnvestissement a Capital Variable 
Registered Office: 

L-1140 Luxembourg, 26, route d'Arion 
R.C Luxembourg B 26149 

Shareholders are invited to attend the 
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS 
which will be held at 26, route d'Arion, Luxembourg 
on April 18, 1997 at 10.30 a.m. with the following 
agenda: 

AGENDA: 


Reports of the Board of Directors and Auditors. 
Approval of the financial statements as of 
December 31, 1996. 

Decision on allocation of net profits. 

Discharge of the Directors and of the Auditors in 
respect of the carrying out of their duties during 
the fiscal year ended December 31, 1996. 
Reelection of the Board Members. 

Election of a new Auditor. 

Miscellaneous business. 


NOTES: 

Holders of bearer shares may vote at the Meeting: 

• in person by producing at the Meeting either 
share certificates or a certificate of deposit issued 
by their bank which will be issued to them 
against deposit of their share certificates, 

■ by proxy by completing the form of proxy which 
will be made available to them against deposit of 
share certificates aforesaid. 

Share certificates so deposited will be retained until 
the Meeting or any adjournment thereof has been 
concluded. 

The Board of Directors 





PAGE 16 




































































































s'- 1 - - • 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1997 


PAGE 17 



BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 


Bao*dSI Jm T.£S^ raE , 

Pfe^crifcicTTWDMDBK 

TW; USA, 41-212^07-0^73 

FK USA +141M0T405a 

^a/Bt^mmacoHan. 


BUY1H6 BRAND NAMES and b tan ~ 
pnaiqs hr Wrd work] marine pJ 
tel Stock lot prices or*. Cash pm- 
warts and dscretm Tat Pane +33 Mi 
48 SB B& 8S. Fax: +33(0)1 46S9438CL 

7 DtGARETTES, America^ 

bland tobacco, lowest pncas. private 
- avaMle. FAX® 1 figg 


USED LEW SOI JEANS ■ Al ctias Jt 


FMWBS BRAND FOODS, health S 

baatay aes. IB ongoi Vrtume 

■ pwfaBMB Oftj. Far 954-474-386B USA 


LEVI 561*8. Used and New. uu 
tom tfte USA. Hones 
ft Fax 50M2W749 USA 


POWDERED HLK, Holland ongte, low 
pwa. wj™ puctase mfy. FAX USA- 
♦ 964 <74-3806. 


QUALITY USB) JEANS d tends mea 

woraan, an sues. Ain Levi 501V 
Fffl 508 584 W83 USA 


* 


FBQZBI OflCXEN, Wwfe Uk Pondgr. 
Uaigeme and oner commodities at 
good prices. Fa* USA 508 584 8483. 


Business Opportunities 


BAGELS 

For jus! one Hat fee-no percentages, you 
can be on yom way to mating bageft fa 
youiiiw store. To teem mom about Ms 
enftng opporkriy bom a company atfi 
a 10 -year uadi record of success-. 

! Fbk31 059-7484 US 


ANTIQUE HAND CHISELED PAVING 
STOICS. suitable lor homebuikfeng 
andtor fancy cmtnjcticfl, made of nld 
rwk. gramta gray color, sizes about 
17-19 cos x 15 one t 10-11 cms. A «3- 
rtdty: fat of 600,000 units at S850 each 
C+F. Orders and Momoticn lax no. 596 
(2) 96 21 29 In MortmUeo. Uruguay. 


ATHENS, KobmaU area, fannaus an- 
tiques shop tor tea as whole. $550,000 
or partly, icons, authentic ancient Greek 
Aver i gold Rams. Tat 4301-3020505, 
Ft* 3303372. 


2nd PASSPORTS / Driving licences / 
Degrees/Camouflaga Passports/Secret 
Bank Accounts. GM, P.O. Box 70302. 
Athens 16810. Greece. Fax 8962152, 
iOp^wiigtobte-nnnByjam 


FAMOUS DISCOTHEQUES OFFERED. 
2 new/farga succesahi Iranchee outlefa 
«i Sngapore and BaL Avatabte In April 
O oner miring Fan {BS) 834 0395 


AGENTS WANTED! To Sati US Corpo- 
rators 6 LLCs hum 5300 (al industw) 
Corporate Consulting Ltd. Telephone: 
302-52M600 « Fax: 302-52M005 USA 


CONROEKnAL SWISS ADDRESS 
1100 per year. Free idormaQon. Fax 
your address 33 ( 0)1 53 01 31 19. 


OffSHORE BANKS 
COMPARES & TRUSTS 
ASSET protection 


19 


TRAD&FNANCE 

ASTON CORPORATE 
TRUSTS. LTD 

Wad Mao 


Tel: 01624 626591 
Fas 01624 625126 

E Man No. aBton&antojBfawwt 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

WADY MADE COV, FULL ADMIN 
TRADE DOCUMENTS AND UC 
MMONG 4 ACCOUNTING 
CHNA BUSINESS SBWKES 


sawes £ company brochure 
NAGS LTD, Room HOG. AUon Baza 
2-6 Gnmie Road, 1ST. Kowloon, 
"* • e-rust i 

Fax 27224373 


DELAWARE JNCSj LLCs 

Deal died tetri Dataware moot save 
money on USA company tomiation. 
Delaware be. or LIC, S350 US5L FteL 
refiable, complete service in aS US 
totes. Free Irto. Call or fax: 
CrxpAmarica, he. 

30 Obi Rate* Lane, Dat H 
Dover. DE 19901 
TO 302-736-4300 
Fax 302-736-5623 
fattest htqxMMWjccrpamerfcaxom ' 


SELUNG COWRDUJHQ WISEST 
Lama Industrial constomeata 
xmmufm abmlnin/iln ant 
tv art dutoWte Irterested Fax 
Saa^e (1) (305) 374-1013 USA. 


TMqn Raitwm opponredfH 
■World Femdus 1 . H(pt pnflh & 
Grass Safas. Beverly Hfeks An 
CaSana. OueBtoa Buyers 
Wide.- 23679 Catabasas Rd, 

" " , CA 91302-1502 


1», 


STUEffBAKEffS FRANCHISES offered. 
Tlda taiga USA. Aurtrafa, Asa data d 
tffetarinetf ortfete offs® (randfce op- 
pomrtreG far PRC, KL Subbaya. Cebu. 
Bangkok. Fax (65) 736 8009 


Telecommunications 


mmtiK 

k,WA fltltV 


TtaOrigfate A Larged Dbcormt 

TetoDoraoHdcBdoni Company 

Teh ms&lttl 
Fax: 1-206^99.1981 

E maB. WoOktetoacfcawi 
wnrJaffitKfcconi 


FOR SALE 


US COMPANY 

WeB managed, SioM sales SifM cash 
flow In the fast growing school unflomi 
and booteore butenes. Purchase price 
SIOM tor equby plus the UMrptoi of 
wetting cspte debt (S1.7ML 
. Far nquvtos ta 001-617-6854049. 


FOR SALE 

5,000 price* Stew marfa 


For defalls FAX (4+41) $2 851 48 88 


INTERNATIONAL MARKETING: Pftft- 
pins. Poland. BrazL B*on (titer Com- 
pany expandm Leaders to late iraitat 
share. Top 50Q BWrage S75QJXOA/T. Fa 
USA Dr. tasty 301-460-5557. 


OFFSHORE COWAMES. For fhss bro- 
chure or adrae Tet London 44 1B1 741 
1224 Fax: 44 181 746 6558/6338 
MUffriettnmirir .-■•■■ 


SEEK PAR7MERIWVESTOR to startup 
an itofwfcnte tool eumpaw oqpnfe- 
ing fast date ten*. ftr dens lax Lur- 
aribourg +352 51 76 03 


NETWORKING AND 
COUMUNKATONS 

Dfecon source ta afl networking and 
tafacom products - modem servers, 
mum, torbfihal PCs, his, conran. 
power ptrtadton. etc. Facrternafl 
iwyiwrrerts te 

KTX Nrtmric Services, be. 

Ufa. of Heattwc km. (fomtori 1979) 
4645 PaddMBSZB CL Oriando FL 32B06 
Fax 407.296&33 Tat 407298.4333 
Emai: htxOhrxneuxxn 


Fro riwy-The New Buak ma Opportunfty 
tor fatocotnmunicallons company or start 
iqi bwestore in any couvy. 

FAXWAY: BY INTERNET 

The New Why of Sending Rn to Fta. 
We provide turvtey system, hardware & 
9dHre baa. Under a fcensad partner- 
ship - very high rnargha. Fax inquiries 
to BEST DATA UNE TREOW, 

Fax Parte 33 P)1 40 a 45 71 


Business Services 


ASSET PROTECTION 

Ottering a (irfaue range of services to 
ovwsws investors In Canadian private 
corporations, real estate and porttoSo 
investments. Our firm Bpecaltzes in 
provdfag management and stewardship 
overview funetbs atoned » the apedGc 
nquMmenta d oversees owners. 

For mom bdormetion, phase contact 
L Gnxweiri CAACA (UX) 

Rare Canarfa (416) 05WJ7B3 

E-Maft gnantedfalstarfa 


BUSINESS SERVICES In SOUTHERN 
SWITZERLAND. Effidem & experienced. 
ItaSan - Gaimn - Engbsh - Frencti Tet 
+41 51 £05.45. 26 Fax +4li055436. 


YOUR OFFICE IN LOHWN 
Bond Street - Mai, Phone, Fax, Telex 
TO 44 171 499 9192 Fax 171 489 7517 


LEGAL NOTICE 


*! 


1 


No. 96 Ch. 8589(RWS) 


ORDER PURSUANT 
TO 28 U^-C. § 1655 
DIRECTING ALL 
DEFENDANTS TO 
APPEAfl QB PU5AP 


UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
SOUTHERN KWrnCT OF NEW [ YORK 

MERRILL, LYNCH,* HERC^* FENNER - ” 

& SMITH INCORPORATED, . 

Plaintiff, X 

. -agafnet- ■ I 

BAW30 INTERNATIONAL SJL; SWISS IRflON SBWCES L.HL; ABB. COSW; GRAtt J 
AMGDOR; D. SALMOft WHOLESALERS' 1KTERNATW3NAL; ASAKO YOKOMURA, tehfa I 
SSSm.UMwSWtBC WTHINWIONAL TRUST, B 4C; ^FHgYYOKOMURA; | 

HOffiY ALUTOWI^J ROMEO IHLES; I® TRUSTS SOLER PROMOTION SA^- ANTOteE 

SwCTaHAiaiQJN: sa^ rwutj syluam gallea,- mckael lucas,- 1 

SS^DJLTWFBrTSm TUFFBW; PH4RETTE TUFFERY; BERNARD WWTH; 1 
MraU^DEffi^! LOWS DBJVUNEY; SA JCH MDUSTnE; JEANCLAUDE MOREL; . 
^^SAVTOANTcLAUDE DUDEFANft SARL AGRtLJX; IDCHB. D6SCAMPS; SCI f 
b b i c fli iff -te BACQUET) RENE LABOR DE; BJETTE VIO Li F; ALAIN VIOLLE; I 
DAMEL BINE; KEIL ENCONTRE. aflda t^JEAlLPAUL , 

JOHN DOES 1-3, ‘ 

Dnteftctent*. — 

order and the 

» U-S-C- S 1655. ^ ^ 

w dead faJ* 1 r ^L n 2^S® 1 S|S^S ) |ffid taSSSrSto to sa»*SgAifeIit BhdPtawwd by puUcahon d this 

523& i t5S^'5BSaEr^ffiteirS!^ # ^ 

001:9 ^ 3 th? SSSSmtSS kSw B to 9» Sflbertwg Afflttevlt dial appear or plead h Ws action no 

faterthan SS5WffS33ted*i Publtodlon Parted. 

jaanatum olHon.Baati.at 

UrtBd Statsa Dtebict Judge 


Dared: 1-15-C7 


UNITED STATES DtSTWCT COURT 


UEtj pB I LVNOH, PI ERCE , FEW®! 
& SMITH tWCORPORATH), 

BANCO WTEF84ATTONAL SA at aL 
CXenrrertaL 


PtafattW. 


No. 96 Cfe B589(RWS) 

! AFFBAV1T 

■ IN SUPPORT OF 

■ EX PARTE MOTION FOR 

! ofustufficrretG 
l Ail DEFENDANTS TO 
APPEAR OR PLEAD 



irantmiiHm. aw uminniu , u. , ™.™, 1TD08 

aumh requeae an order. pMwara as u AC. 
atef amrOTttw ord» Is effected (the vamhg 

^IS^iSiggisasmmaaassjt 

BBfeassaaa eSates ^a^ 

r, 1996 


‘~siArr Prilteotl RM**nte infWlM^ w CiirrVta 


o?£SS« h Evape. 

MfaS SS of Sushesa in Europe. 

Mob: Prtndpd Ftorttfanca fa FW«». 


UdccntKtone ollhelclowkiff illMaiireJepn- 
. isnrtj to Dbtein « “pyp* Pant, prance; 0 Micheal C. Sttertwgi Em, MpivBq. 

^sraaBasftBff Si «■ **•' « 

IriN—iM, 


COMPANY SET UP SUPPORT 
You wnto open a oosiSan in Seme- 
ny, Ireland tot France. Wtfl m up the 
corparo far you. inciting sfafL 
mar & Parmer, Fn 

IF* 


STAFF RECRUfTHENT 

SpectifaB far heaMoie. 

U leute in finpe. 

H S S GmbH, FiteWurt/Man, Gemery. 
TflM8P69534040 Fx+4Si?))3flSZ7848 


TRAVEL AGENT PHOTO LD. To 75% 
tteoari on Holds, CflrJtemalB. Tons 
end RestaiPtes. 5120 Rrti year. S50 ra- 
newBi yearly, kfflmaiond dmere lasrae, 
1 5 years, 5B5 Send 2 phetes win 
dte to GAUSTH Assoc. PQS 
farad. Tel: 
send cash 1 


vBfd 5 years, 
personal date 
5609 Herzfrya 46100 
+872-5M68B38. Do nrt j 


US COMPANY, pertamg to a Group 
e&teHshed 30 years ago, wi source af 
types of US nanufadraed goods and 
ntevfaktora modate commartoa 
Bresvil (USA), Inc. (Miami). Tet 
(305)374-2828, Fee (305)3744153. 
E-Mtit rioBWBOtfaneaneL 


YDtfR OFFICE M amt Sewed Of- 
fices, Mail. Phone 8 Fax. Oflshore Co. 
Formations. Prettmaus Address. TO 
4353 (1) 475 1891 St |1J 475 1889 


PROBLEM SOLVER avafete gtobaBy. 
30 years varied busmas experience, 
credala, deceive, discreet. Tel: 
+31 -20-6701 &46 Fax 31 20 6791371 


Security and Surveillance 


ALPHA BHAV0 ASSOCIATES 

Afahe Braro ofler a eomptete rtscretf S 
pmfessonel serwee fa enportee 
t axkwduai cfienls. To Ascuss your 
requirements cortae Jeremy Hgson orv 

+44 171 352 9309 


Tax Services 


UNITED STATES EXPATRIATES- Dfc- 
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4^ir Wlm u ,maD4z™.2.m^ i- 

In Battle of Wildcats, Underdog Finishes on Top 


PAGE 18 


Orioles Opener Canceled 


baseball The Baltimore Ori- 
oles postponed their opening day- 
game against the Kansas City Roy- 
als on Tuesday because of die 
weather. Temperatures were ex- 


pected to reach only the upper 40s 
Fahrenheit (8-9 degrees centi- 
grade J in the afternoon. Winds 
were gusting up to 50 miles per 
hour (80 kilometers per hour). The 
game was rescheduled for Wed- 
nesday at 3:05 P M. ( AP) 


Irabu Told to Say Sorry 


Pitcher Hideki Irabu's old team 
has told him to forget about coming 
back just long enough to gain free 


agent status so he can play in the 
United States. 


United States. 

Irabu can return only if he apo- 
logizes for saying his team treated 
him like a slave and signs letters 
saying he will not be playing in the 
U.S. Major Leagues, the Chiba 
Lone Marines said Tuesday. 

Irabu wants to play only for the 
New York Y ankees. but the Marines 
have sold his rights to die San Diego 
Padres. The Marines said they were 
replying to a lener from Irabu asking 
for confirmation that he would need 
to spend 48 days on Lotte's roster to 
qualify 1 for free agency. (API 


Saints Trade No. 2 Pick 


FOOTBALL A day after signing 
Redskins quarterback Heath Shuler 
to an offer sheet, the New Orleans 
Saints traded the No. 2 pick in the 
NFL draft to the Oakland Raiders 
for receiver Daryl Hobbs and three 
draft picks. The Raiders, who also 
received the 166th overall pick from 
the Saints, gave up the 10th, 39th 
and 107th selections. Hobbs had 44 
receptions last season for 423 yards 
and three touchdowns. 

The Saints and Shuler reached an 
agreement over the weekend, but 
compensation to Washington must 
be worked out. Shuler is a restricted 
free agent The Redskins reportedly 
are seeking a No. 2 pick. (AP) 


Fortson Turns Pro 


BASKETBALL Danny Fortson, a 
power forward at the University of 
Cincinnati, said Tuesday he would 
pass up bis final year of college 


eligibility to enter the NBA draft. 
In his three college seasons 


In his three college seasons, 
Fortson became the school's No. 2 
scorer, behind Oscar Robertson, and 
a dominant frontline player, but he 
scored only 16 points as Cincinnati, 
the preseason No. !, lost. 67-66. to 
Iowa State in the second round of 
(he NCAA tournament (AP) 


Hawaii Kicker Drowns 


Shannon Smith, a place kicker 
for the University of Hawaii, 
drowned on Kauai while trying to 
save his coach’s 6-year-old son. 

Smith, who would have been 21 
on Tuesday, and the family of head 
coach Fred vonAppen were swim- 
ming at Waipahee Slippery Slide 
when Smith and the boy, Cody, 
were sucked into a whirlpool. 

Smith saved the boy by pushing 
him toward vonAppen ana his wife. 
Smith was pulled under water and 
drowned, vonAppen said. 


Dubai Race Rescheduled 


HORSE racing The rain-delayed 
running of the Dubai World Cup 
horse race will take place at 15.35 
GMT Thursday, organizers said 
Tuesday. The $4 million race, the 
world's richest for thoroughbreds, 
was postponed Saturday. ( Reuters j 


■* 1 


i)V ( 


. Wit 


World Roundup 



Kentucky Loses on Free Throws in Overtime, 84-79 


By Malcolm Moran 

Mm- York Times Service 


Sue Ojawta/Reinm 

Arizona's Bennett Davison knocking over Anthony Epps of Kentucky on 
his drive to the basket during the championship game in Indianapolis. 


INDIANAPOLIS — The Arizona 
Wildcats, supposedly too young, too in- 
experienced and too weak inside to be a 
legitimate contender, won their school's 
first national basketball championship. 

They overcame a breathless Kentucky 
comeback Monday night at the end of 
regulation time to secure an 84-79 over- 
time victory in the 59th National Col- 
legiate Athletic Association title game. 

They did it without making a field 
goal in overtime. Arizona scored on six 
of its eight overtime possessions, making 
10 of 14 free throws in die extra period. 

Miles Simon, the junior guard who 
scored 30 points and was voted most 
outstanding player, made four free 
throws in the final 41.7 seconds of over- 
time. 

The overtime was the sixth in the 
history of NCAA finals but the first 
since Michigan’s 80-79 victory over 
Setou Hall in 1989 and only the second 
since 1963. 

Arizona set a championship game re- 
cord by making 34 free throws on 41 
attempts. Simon, whose 14 free throws 
made were the second most in a cham- 
pionship game, attempted 17 — the same 
number as the whole Kentucky team. The 
discrepancy was due to Simon’s ability to 
drive through the Kentucky squad after 
Arizona successfully faced the challenge 
of Kentucky's pressure defease. 

Arizona (25-9) had the most losses in 
a season of any champion since the 1 988 
Kansas Jayhawks, who were 27-1 1. and 
became die fourth-lowest-rated team to 
win since the seeding format was cre- 
ated in 1979. Arizona, the No. 4- seeded 
team in the Southeast Regional, became 
the first team to beat three No. 1 -seeded 
teams. Arizona prevented Kentucky 
(35-5) from becoming the second team 
in 24 years to win consecutive titles and 
became the first Pacific- 10 team other 


rhan UCLA to win a title since the 
University of California in 1959. 

Arizona's response to Kentucky's 
press was centered around helping Mike 
Bibby, the freshman point guard, who 
scored 19 points and had four assists and 
eight turnovers. Kentucky created 21 
points as a result of 18 Arizona 
turnovers but could never sustain the 
kind of disruption needed to manufac- 
ture a lengthy run. 

Arizona's Wildcats felt they could 
beat the Kentucky pressure by (fribbling 
nearly to half-court before making 
passes. Thai gave Simon a chance to take 
advantage of Kentucky’s commitment 
to defending against the 3-point shot- 


NCAA Championship 


ARIZONA 

Mia 

Ftt 

FT 

O-T 

A 

PF 

Pts 

Dovbon 

27 

3-9 

3-3 

*■7 

0 

2 

9 

Dtdcenon 

24 

1-8 

2-2 

2-4 

0 

0 

5 

Broralett 

Z7 

1-3 

1-1 

3-6 

1 

5 

3 

Bibby 

38 

5-12 

6-6 

2-9 

4 

1 

19 

Simon 

40 

8-18 

14-17 

1-3 

1 

1 

30 

Terry 

33 

2-6 

2-2 

0-2 

5 

1 

B 

Edgorson 

15 

0-0 

2-2 

0-5 

0 

2 

2 

Harts 

19 

2-2 

4-8 

4-7 

1 

4 

8 

Totals 225 22-58 

34-41 

16-45 

12 

16 

84 



WN>fc*t (Hurts 6-11 (B8jby 7r& Terry 2-3, WOwreon 
1-3. Stmcn 0-2). Ttom RdxwmS*.- 2. Blestes ilwts: 2 
(BranMfZ). T um onm IB (Bibby a Simon l Dov|- 
sort z DkSwrson 2, Edveewfi Z Bramtett). Stash: 7 
(Bibby Z Tsrry 3, Bnrmletn. 

KENTUCKY Mta PS FT O-T A PC PB 
Mercer 41 5* 1-1 5-9 6 S 13 

Padgett » 5-14 *4 0-1 o 5 17 

Ma globe u 0-1 M 34 1 4 0 

Tumor 28 4-9 0-1 14 5 5 B 

Epps 38 4-13 0-0 0-5 4 0 11 

EAwmta 4 M 0-0 M) 0 0 0 

PridUdt 21 1.4 4-5 1-5 1 5 6 

Mohammed 35 6-11 0-6 7-11 0 3 13 

Mflls 21 5-9 04) 0-1 I 2 12 

MateOo itj-oo-oo-ooo a 

Taftrts 225 30-72 9-17 17-40 18 27 79 

3-Potat Cod* KWO .333 (Epps 3* POdgett 3-1 Z 
Maw 2-4 MlUs 2-d). Twin Rebmnh: a BtockW 
shata: 7 (Mohammed 3, Mask** 2. Tinner. Pridwttl- 

Tww>mrs:16(AV!^iPc«}gettlTDnier2,Pridiett 

Z Mohammed Z Ma0k*& Edwards). Stems:? (Pod- 
arftl Eros 2. Prtdcett Z Mercer. Turner, MBs). 
Altana 33 41 10—84 

Kentucky 32 42 5-77 

(AttaMtasoe; 47JHB} 




“They were coming out so hard," 
Simon said, “that the penetration was 
there all night." 

Four Kentucky players fouled out, 
including Ron Mercer, who was held to 
13 points on 5-of»9 shooting by a de- 
fensive effort led by Arizona's Michael 
Dickerson. Mercer’s shot total was his 
third lowest of the season. 

“Every time I curled around they 
had somebody waiting there for me," 
Mercer said. 

Wayne Turner, the Kentucky point 
guard who scored eight points, and Scott 


Who’s No. 1 Now? Unlikely Arizona 


By Michael Wiibon 

Washington Post Service 


INDIANAPOLIS — You have to go 
back to Villanova in 1985 to find 
something like this, an afterthought team 
getting mi a roll nobody could stop. 

ITsualiy, when coaches and players 
say. "Nobody thought we were any 


good" they’re posturing, creating an 
us-against-the-world attitude. Not this 


us-against-the-world attitude. Not this 
time. If anybody tells you he or she 
picked Arizona to win the NCAA cham- 
pionship. demand proof. 

Three times in this tournament the 


Arizona Wildcats played No. 1 seeds: 
Kansas. North Carolina. Kentucky. 
Three times Arizona won. 

On Monday, with essentially no front 
court. Arizona beat Kentucky's defend- 
ing champions, 84-79. in overtime. Jr's 
never been clearer that the importance of 
great guard play cannot be overstated 

With the Arizona starting front court 
accounting for a measly total of five field 
goals and one free throw, guards Miles 
Simon and Mike Bibby earned their team 
to the school's first basketball cham- 
pionship. Simon, not the premature NBA 
wannabe Ron Mercer, was the best play- 
er on the court He scored 30 points and 
helped freshman point guard Bibby with 
ball-handling duties against Kentucky's 
press. Simon was voted the MVP. 

"I think we went into the Final Four 
with an advantage: We didn't have a 
care in the world." Simon said. "We 
weren’r nervous our there." 

While Simon was calmly and assert- 
ively taking every lough shot while also 
defending Mercer quite a bit, the Ken- 



drama of the final moments of reg- 
ulation and the resulting overtime can 
allow us to forgive what was for the 
most part an artistic mess. 

All the missed lay-ups. air balls and 
goofy turnovers were washed away by 
those two sensational Kentucky 3-point- 
ers in the final desperate moments of a 
game that was ragged but intense and 


competitive enough to be coi 
The two coaches. Lure 


En: DrapafTbr Atiocblcd Pieu 

Coach Lute Olson of Arizona pa- 
cing the sidelines during the final. 


The two coaches. Lure Olson and 
Rick Pitino, both worked miracles to get 
teams with so many deficiencies to the 
NCAA championship game. Then 
again, with die college game almost 
devoid of experienced star players, the 
final reflected the entire season. 

Even in defeat, it was easy to make the 
case that Pitino did his finest work this 
season. Pitino has cried wolf so often — 
saying he has no talent — ihat it's easy to 
suggest his cupboard is always loaded. 
Usually it is. This year it wasn't. 

Likewise, this wasn't close to being 
one of Olson's most talented teams at 
Arizona. He does have three big-time 


to six min utes because of the effects of a 
stress fracture in his right ankle, the 
normally reliable Kentucky bench was 
tested as it rarely had been this season. 

And yet Kentucky had its chance. 
Mercer made the first of two Kentucky 
3-point shots in the final 5 1.1 seconds of 

time! His shot brought Kentucky within 
a point, at 72-71. 

Bennett Davison of Arizona scored 
inside with 18.6 seconds to go after 
Bibby's penetration, then Anthony 
Epps matte a 3-point shot with 12.1 
seconds to go. and Arizona was forced 
to play five more minutes. 

"The whole tiring we always talk 
about,” Arizona's coach. Lute Olson, 
said. “is. the toughest team, mentally 
and physically, is going to win this 
basketball game. They've gone through 
three No. 1 seeds, and in every one of 
those cases, that was the point: ‘Are we 
tough enough? Can we be the ones that 
run other people out of gas?’’ 

Davison, who scored nine points, 
made two free throws to give Arizona 


the lead 25 seconds into overtime. With 
Kentucky still within two points. Mercer 
appeared to grab an offensive rebound. 

But, Mercer said, “They kind of 
trapped upon the goal; they slapped it in 
and got the loose balL" ’ 

Jason Teny then was fouled at the 
other end after grabbing an offensive 
rebound and made one nee throw for a 
77-74 Arizona lead Terry was fouled 
again after amiss by Epps and made two 
more free throws for a five-point lead 
Kentucky never came closer than threi 
points after that. 

Mercer had averaged 17 points in Ken- 
tucky's five tournament victories, and his 
20 points in the 1996 championship- 
game victory over Syracuse, then a career 
high, became a decisive factor. 

On Monday night, with Dickerson 
leading Arizona’s defensive effort, 
Mercer was held to one 3-point basket in 
four attempts in the first half. 

Arizona's concentration on Mercer 
created other opportunities. Nazr Mo- 
hammed Kentucky’s 6-foot- 10-inch 
(2-meter) sophomore center, came off 
the bench to spark the Wildcats by scor- 
ing eight points. In the second half and 
overtime, Mohammed was limited to 
four points and four rebounds, and Ari- 
zona ootnebounded Kentucky, 28-18. 

“We -don’t -have- a. . first-place 
trophy,” Rick Pitino, the Kentucky 
coach, said, “but Fm just as proud of 
this team as Z was of last year's team. 
Maybe even mere.” . 

And Olson, who had been criticized 


after first-round losses by mare highly 
ranked Arizona teams, finally had the 


ranked Arizona teams, finally had the 
response he was looking for. In the over- 
time, Olson’s players were bent over, 
milling at their shots, gasping for breath. 
They were also answering the coach’t^ 


question: Were they tough enough? 
“I think they answered that for ev 


“I think they answered fhatforevery- 
one tonight," Olson said 


tucky All-American made just one bas- 
ket in the last 10 minutes ana didn't touch 


Arizona, tie does nave tnree mg-nme 
players in Bibby, Simon and Michael 
Dickerson, but Dickerson’s shooting 


ket in the last 10 minutes and didn't touch 
the ball in overtime before fouling out. 

Yes, Mercer's 3-pointer was the start 
of a stunningly dramatic final minute of 
regulation that got his team to overtime. 
But he simply wasn't up to taking over 
the game when it was necessary, either 
preferring or being forced to settle for 
outside jumpers instead of taking the 
ball to the basket as a player with his 
skills should. 

Fortunately for the participants, the 


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Dickerson, but Dickerson’s shooting 
touch so deserted him by Monday that he 
was scared to even look at the basket the 
final 15 minutes of the game. 

With so little of what coaches would 
call bona fide talent on the court, the 
play was as poor as the Final Four has 
seen in at least 20 years. 

Arizona had its worst shooting night 
in four years Saturday and still won a 
national semifinal against imperial 
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I've covered 14 Final Fours, and can 
say without hesitation this is the worst 
I've seen. By miles. Two of the three 
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But none of that demeans what Olson 
and his players accomplished, because 
without one senior on the court they beat 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY APRIL 2. 1997 


SPORTS 



PAGE 19 





es70 


By Rob Hughes 

International Herald Trihu** 


Croatia, Bosnia, Azerbaijan and 

Macedonia all have home World Qjpues 

Wednesday — reflecting Europe’s chan- 
ging map, and the importance of soccer 
as a palliative after the bloodshed. 

Puskas was known as the Galloping 
Major, though his rank and uniform 
were symbols only of the fact that the 
army took over his beloved Kispest club 
and named it Honved. His famuy name, 
too, is an abridgment: He was bom 
P®*®dc Porczeld, but German ancestry 
was nothing to shout about while na- 
tionalism swept Hungary in 1935. 

He also Had a nickname “Oca” de- 
noting his status as the smallest kid on 

the block. From age three he followed 

around the five year old nest door, Jo 2 sef 
Bozsik. Their fathers worked together in 
a ' slaughterhouse. They learned their 
tricks in street games with older boys. 

They were inseparable — Bozsik die 
thoughtful one, Puskas living off his 
quick wit. When Kispest recruited Boz- 
sik, at 12, as a junior, Puskas, 10, pre- 
tended he was also born in 1925, and 
said his name was Kovacs. 

“What about me?” he demanded. 
“Jozsef and I always play together on 
the pitch; we get a lot of goals.” 

The club, for which his fisher had 
playedand bad coached, could not have 
bear folded. Neither was it so foolish as 
to turn the mite away. Puskas and Boz- 
sik played together, in rime ran a hard- 
ware shop together, and grew into key 
men fix me Magyars who routed Bag- 
land, 6-3 at Wembley in 1953 and 7-1 m 
the Nep in 1954. 

Russian tanks separated them. Puskas 
went to Madrid, Bozsik inherited his 
Hungarian captaincy. Bozsik died of a 
heart attack (as had Puskas’s father) but 
Puskas felt unable to breakhis vow never 
to return, even for his friend’s burial 

Puskas played on for 23 years. He was 
aclnb player at 16. an international at 20. 
He forged an even more renowned part- 
nership at Real Madrid with the extraor- 
dmay Argentine Alfredo £ Stefano. 

Di Stefano was established in Madrid, 
unlike ly to share his halo with anyone. 
Puskas, who was almost 30 when he 
joined Madrid, pdsonified the Hungari- 
an diplomat. Accustomed to leading out 
his toons, he walked out last behind Di 
Stefano. Used to ouiscoring every man. 
bepaced his first season. On the final day, 
against Granada, Puskas had the goal at 
his mercy. He cradled the ball, waited. 


. — By accident, or by 

. design. Budapest will have internation al 

- i • soc *if r Nepstadian on Wednesday 

>-\ birthday of the city’s most 

•• j famoi^ footballing son, Ferenc Puskas. 
"•.V ^ beyday. Hungary could sum- 
v '•'uKSVand beat, any nation. Brazil, Ger- 
V many , Austria, Italy, and especially 

England. All fell to the MagicalMag- 
yars. -It is a sign of hard tunes that 


Wobld Soccir 


Hungary, playing in Puskas’s ample 
shadow, is reduced to a friendly against 
Australia on this auspicious dare. 

• Never mind, the ball is round. Puskas; 
bora on April 2, 1 927, is as besotted by it 

•now as he w as when the roar of the 
Kisjpest crowd, through his kitchen win- 
■ do w, . attracted him as a three-year-old 
and, though he lives in modem comfort 
in Buda, on the other side of the capital, 
the noise still arouses him 
. Indeed, Puskas thrives on acclama- 
; don- from the knowing looks of old men 
r ,‘ to the wonderment of infants, he basks in 
whaf a simple game has given him — 
. even if he despairs at the modern haste, 
negativity and commercialism. 

“Puskas on Puskas," an autobio- 
graphy (Robson Books, London) edited 
by as English soccer historian and a 
Hungarian translator, portrays a life of 
transitions caused try Hitler and Stalin. 
Pnskas is a survivor whose life has 


Jbeeh stmplified and amplified through 


soccer. He possessed the most powt 
and accurate left foot in the game — 
'with which he scored the majority of his 
83 goals in 84 matches for Hungary and 
his 35 goals in 39 European matches for 
. Real Madrid from 1961 to 1965. 

. His stomach was portly by the tim e he 
r r jfefected to Spain during the 1956 Bud- 
' apest uprising. It is bulbous now, “my 
companion " he calls it There are heavy 
spectacles, but still the swept-back. dark 
hair, still die irrepressible urchin wiles. 

..We can only guess how Puskas, on 
this' of all days, feels about men playing 
games while their kinfolk are under the 
gun, or their homelands striving to re- 
. build out of war. On his birthday. Al- 
bania tackles Germany in a World Cup 
qualifier being played in Granada. 
Spain, for obvious, deadly reasons. 



Penguins Beat 
Panthers: 

Cup Prelude? 


The Associate J Press 

The Pittsburgh Penguins and the Flor- 
ida Panthers might be seeing each other 
quite often in the next few weeks. 

Hie Penguins moved into a tie with 
the idle New York Rangers for the fifth 
seed in the Eastern Conference playoffs, 


NHL Roundup 


Tke AMocuSfd Pros 

Ferenc Puskas, right, with Anton Turek, Germany’s goalie, and Werner Leibrech. standing, watching a Puskas shot 
go into the German goal at the end of the 1954 World Cup final. The goal was not allowed, and Germany won. 3-2. 


and passed to Di Stefeno who became top 
scorer with 22, Puskas next with 21. 
“And I had a friend V" said Puskas. 

Handling di Stefano was probably 
child’s play after the years as * ‘smuggler 
in chief’ among Hungarian players who 
came home from games loaded with 
razor blades, or machine parts, for paying 
customers. He was twice called to face 
MDialy Fares, bead of the secret police, 
and twice charmed the cop with his 
tongue and his fame. 

Puskas stayed away to coach in such 
places as Athens, and finally resettled in 
Budapest Unconventional, indifferent to 
coaching strategies, he searched for 
“pure” talents among die Romanies, 
and he works as a catalyst for Hungary's 


perermia] search for lost sporting glory. 

l epitaph. “From the 


He writes his own epitaph. “From die 
moment as a tittle kid I heard the roar of 
the crowd from Kispest. stadium," he 
concludes. ‘ T suppose I was spoken for. 
In the end, God willing. I will be just an 
old man who loves football." 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times af London 


U.S. Soccer Season Off to a Slow Start 


New York Times Service 

Major League Soccer has opened 
its second season with lower atten- 
dance and goal scoring, but also with 
higher-quality play and hopeful signs 
for one of its most prominent but 
struggling teams, the New York/New 
Jersey Metros tars. 

Hus year, the MLS will have to 
survive on the caliber of its play, not 
the novelty of its existence. 

The league has added more week- 
end games in hopes of boosting at- 
tendance to an average of 20.000 per 
contest, but the first full weekend 
faced competition from the NCAA 
tournament and the Easter holiday. 

On Saturday, 53.147 showed up at 
the Rose Bowl to watch the defending 
champion, D.C. United, defeat rite 
Los Angeles Galaxy by 1-0 in a pen- 
alty-kick shoot-ouL 


However, the other four matches 
Saturday drew a combined 50,985. 
Counting the league opener a week 
ago, MLS attendance after six games 
this year was 35 percent lower than 
after six games 3 year ago. 

The crowd in Los Angeles pushed 
the average of the first six games 
above 20,000 — the league’s target 
— but only one other game drew 
more than 15,500. 

The MetroStars, who hope to sell 
12.000 season-tickets, have yet to 
play a home game in the nation's 
biggest market 

Sixteen goals were scored in die first 
six games last year, compared with 10 
this year. But league officials have said 
that they expect a drop in the average 
of 3.4 goals a game from last season as 
defenses employ better personnel and 
organization. 


beating the Panthers 4-3 Monday night 
in a potentially pivotal game. 

The No. 5 team plays No. 4 in the first 
round of the Stanley Cup playoffs, with 
the No. 4 team getting home-ice ad- 
vantage. Right now, Florida — which 
ousted Pittsbmgh in the seven-game con- 
ference finals last season — is No. 4. 

“I hope we play them again. It would 
be a great series,* Panthers coach Doug 
Mac Lean said. “It would be fun." 

It would also be competitive. Monday 
night, the Penguins surged to a three-goal 
lead before holding off the Panthers. 

“It seems like it’s the same every time. 
Those first 10 minutes are tough," said 
Scott Mellanby, a Florida forward. “It 
seems like we always get behind three 
goals, and it seems like we always come 
back." But this time, not all the way. 

Jaromir Jagr’s first goal since he re- 
injured his groin nearly six weeks ago 
put the Penguins ahead 3-0. but they 
would eventually need Mario 
Lemieux’s 610th career goal to win it. 

Lemieux’s goal at 18:30 of the third 
made it 4-2 and tied him with Bobby Hull 
for sixth place on the NHL career list. 

Hie Penguins have won two straight 
since Jagr’s return from a month's lay- 
off allowed coach Craig Patrick to re- 
unite Lemieux, Ron Francis and Jagr on 
the line, which has combined for 15 
points in the two games. 

Lemieux set up Jagr's 46th goal to put 
die Penguins up 3-0. then restored their 
two-goal lead with a power-play goal at 
18:30 of the second after the Panthers 
scored two goals. 

Stan 3, Oilers i Arturs Irbe made 17 
saves in a replacement role as Dallas 
extended its unbeaten streak to 10 by 
winning in Edmonton. 

The Stars swept the four-game season 
series between the teams and moved 
within three points of Colorado for the 
top spot in the Western Conference. 

The Oilers are tied with Anaheim for 
fourth in the West, but Edmonton has an 
edge with two more wins. 


1! 


Scoreboard 


HOCKEY 


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33 26 IS 
35 32 9 
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28 36 11 

29 38 8 


Pt* €F CA 
97 258 19* 
95 215 171 
84 287 187 
79 240 ZT2 
68 194 216 
67 219 222 
66 202 232 


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33 33 H 
32 36 8 
32 40 5 
26 41 10 
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101 259 187 
77 ,’337 229 
77 226 219 
72 203 215 
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» 34 14 
29 36 10 
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87 221 190 
79 264 257 
70 234 263 
68 20T 232 
67 208 221 
57 217 280 


CENTRAL aVMON 


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46 23 6 
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9B 234 177 
87 237 181 
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75 221 229 
74 204 196 
63 216 257 


» 2 

■ 2 2 0-4 
first Period; P-Mcrtm 4 (Hatcher, Hides) 
Z P-Beranek l (KoparaUfc, Nedred) 
Second Period: P-Jogr 46 {Lantern. Raids) 
4. F-MeDanby 27 (Svehfa, VanblesbroodO 
(ppj. 5, F-JowanaM 7 (Nenriravskft 
Washburn) L P->Jjenrieut47 (Fronds. Jogri 
tppJ. ThH Paris* rMed ana o yer 11 
(Wnrreoeri Stoat* on part F-M2-9— 29. P- 
16-10-6—32. Cooties F-VmhtesbraudL P- 
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Do Do* -0 1 *— 8 

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(Modona) 3, D-, Cortona ecu 5 CHorvey, 
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1, Ten Lehman 796390 points; 2. Work 
O'Meara 793.73*3, PM JWduison 65U9CS 
4> Stare Ames 579 JBfc 5, Scott Hadi 57428* 
6, Marie Breaks 549JS* 7, Oorts Low III 
540L008; 8. Tiger WbcdS 500000; 9. David 
ChiMri 39000* 10t Kenny Peny 371350; 11, 
Tommy Toltes 36428* 12, Port StonJtowsU 
36334* 13, Red Couples 3S8JM0: 14, 
Michael Bredtey 35730* 15. Jim Fuiyk 
347300. 


1, Coin Mantgomertte Scattand, 331364 
points Z Miguel Angel Marita, Spate, 
269335ft Thomas B(onv Denmark. 238357) 
A Omen dark. N. Ireland. 201379; & Con- 
stanttno Rocca, Italy, 20B32* & Paul Bread- 
hunt, England 176319; 7, Ian Woc sn cm. 
Milevl73362r& Jean Vkm de Veide, Rancb 
T7136« 9, Per-tllrtk Johansson, Sweden. 
16233® Id PeterMBcMI, England 1S8 l 97» 
1 1, Sam Torrence. Scattand 1 5031ft 12, LM 
Westwood Emdund 14&319; 131 Roger 
Chopman, England 121301; Id Padreig 
Hantagtaiv Ireland 12L60* Id Andrew 
Codaitr Scotland 11&XM7. 


ICC TROPHY MATCHES 
Ttaasday, feiKnaW Lompar 
West Africa ten tags: 247-6 (50 overs] 

Israel 57 {21.1 overs) 

West Afttao dec isiaet by 190 mk 
S cotland lrtnlngs:l 67-10 (40 overs) 
Denmcrt;122 (453 overs) 

Scotland «te». Denmark by 45 ran* 
Ireland tertngs: 91-3 (23 awn) 

Hoflmd innlngs:193-8 dosed 
hetand del. Mem. on comparaflve score rrte 
Hong Kong tenfaigs;74S (453 owns] 
Bangladesh tanlngEl48-3 (383 overs) 
Bangladesh del. Hang Kong by 7 wldrels 
Kenya lnmrtgs3C2-4 
Canada lrvdngrl436 (48 own) 

Knnya def. Canada by 159 nins 
United Arab Emirates teningKlBM 
United stotee fmtags:)55 (403 overs) 

Arab EmteriosdeL U5. by 34 nms. 


ZonigotD 33, Rayo Vbltocorw 31 Etaremedu. 
ra 32; Esparyoi 31; Logranes 2& Sevffla 25. 
Hereuies25. 

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— - -ASIAN ZONE. OIMHJP1 

Motaysta 1. Bangladesh 0 


TRANSITIONS 


Alletlco Madrid Z Sparring G*on 1 
■TAMDMOS: Real Madrid 72) Barcelona 61 
Real Bells 6* Deportlva Carwa 4* Arietta) 
Madrid 55i Real Sadedad 47, Athleric Bilbao 
47; VbUrefttfd 45; Tenerife 4« Valencia 43s 
Rndng Santander 41; Cefto Vigo 3d Com- 
portelo 3d Oviedo 35. Spoiling Gflon 35; 


MAJOR LEAQUE BASEBALL 
AMERICAN LEAOUE 

ANAHEIM -Put LHP Jim Abbott on 
wrtvere for purpose of ghrtng Mm Ms un- 
candmonal release- OpBoned LHP Darrell 
May and INF Chris Pritchett to Vancouver. 
PCL Assigned INF Fousta Cruz, INF Randy 
Ready and OF Mike Wolff to Vancouver. Put 
RHP Stew Onttveros on 60-day dteabled Bst 
Put LHP Chuck Ririey, INF Randy Velarde, C 
Chris Turner on 15-doy disabled Bst refreoc- 
1tvetaMardi27. 

■altuaobe — Put RHP Rocky Coppinger 
and OF Pete Inoortglta on lS^Joy disabled 
ftat Purchased contracts of RHP Scutl 
KamlenlacM, INF Jeff Rebaulet, OF Jerome 
Walton andC Lenny Websterfnm Rochester. 
IL. Assigned INF lOrty Gruber to Rochester. 
Sent C Tim Loner ouirigtB to Rochester. 

BOSTON —Bought contract of RHP Bret 
Sabertragen from Pawtucket, IL and pul him 
on 15*taY disable list. Pul RHP Robinson 
Cheat RHP Rich Garees and RHP Mart 
Brandenburg an 154ay disobled list. As- 


signed INF Mike Benjamin, INF Tony Ro- 
driguez, OF Jesus Tavarez, RHP Mike Blais, 
RHP Brett Cederbtodte Pawtucket. Optioned 
RHP Cartas Valdez to PawtauckeL Optioned 
INF Randy Brawn to Trenton, EL 

once oo —Bought contract af RHP Danny 
Dorwtn tram Nashville. AA. Put RHP Jason 
Bere and 3B Robin Ventura an 15-doy dis- 
abled Dst. Returned RHP Jayson Duracnerto 
Montreal Expos for S25JXXL 

CLCVELAND -Optioned LHP Brian Ander- 
son. RHP Danny Graves, C El nor Diaz. SS 
Damian Jackson and OF Trenldod Hubbard 
to Buffalo, AA. Assigned RHP Terry dark 
and 28 Casey Ckuidoefe to Buffalo. Assigned 
2B Robby Thompson to Akron. EL Put RHP 
Jose Mesa on restricted a a. Bought minor 
league contracts of OF Kevin MBcneH and C 
Pat Barden. 

Detroit —Bought contract of OF Vince 
Coleman from Toleda IL Designated RHP 
Ramon Ffermtn for assignment Announced 
INF Dove Ha|ek has cleared waivers and 
assigned him to Toledo. 

New to HKYANK ffES— Assigned RHP Dave 
Povka, LHP Dole Polley, INF Matt Howard 
and OF Scott Pom to minor-league comp. 

Oakland -Reassigned RHP Chris merit- 
ing, LKP Steve WofdecbowsU C Dora Voile 
and of Patrick Lennon to minor-league 
camp. Sent OF Jose Herrera outright to Ed- 
monton, PCL Purcnased contracts af RHP 
Richie Lewis, INF Dave Magadan and OF 
Damon Moshorefrem Ecknonton. 


Seattle— Optioned RHP Rafael Carmona 
to Tocsma, PCL Re-assigned RHP Dennis 
Martinez to Tacoma. Put LHP Jamie Moyer 
an 15-day disabled Hit. Bought contracts of 
RHP Joshs Manzanillo and 1B-3B MBce 
Blowers from Tacoma. 

texas —Bought contract at IF Domingo 
Gedenc from Oklahoma City, AA. Assigned 
RHP Cory BaDey to Oklahoma City. 

NATIONAL LEAOUE 

nl— Upheld six-game suspension of ST. 
Louis Cardinals RHP TJ. Mathews. 

CINCINNATI —Acquired OF Ozzle Timmons 
and RHP Jayson Peterson from Chicago 
Cubs far RHP Curt Lyons. 

HOUSTON —O aimed INF Tim Bogar off 
waivers from New York Mete. Sent INF Luis 
Lopez to New York Mets as consideration tor 
claim. 

new York mets— C laimed LHP Yotkls 
Perez off waivers from Atlanta Braves. Op- 
tioned RHP Juan Acevedo and LHP Joe 
Crawford to Norfolk. IL Assigned LHP Brian 
Bohanon to Norfolk. Returned LHP Jim 
Boron to San Diego Padres for S2&000. 
Bought amtraas of OF Andy Tombedln. 
RHP Ride Reed and OF Steve Betser from 
Norfolk. Put RHP Jason Isringhausea RHP 
Armando Reynoso, L HP BUI Putslpher. and 
RHP Pout Wrison on 15-day disabled Bst. 
retro-ocrive ® March 24. Transferred RHP 
Derek Wallace to 60-day dlsoblBd Bsl 

PfTTSBUROH— Put RHP Paul Wagner and 
LHP Jason 


Christiansen an tee 60-day dteabled Bst. 

SAN FRANCISCO cunts— Put INF Mark 
Lewis on 15-doy iflsabled list retro-active to 
March 28. Put RHP Dan Carlson on 15-day 
disabled Ost retro-odl veto March 27. Bought 
uonnods of RHP Rich Rodriguez and C Da- 
mon BenyhllL Recoiled INF Wilson Delgado. 
Assigned OF Kevin Roberson to minor league 
comp Released OF Darrin Jackson. 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 
Houston —Put F 5am Mack on injured tw. 
Activated C Charles Jones from Injured Bst. 

Philadelphia -Named Lora Price direc- 
tor of marketing and cammuntatfiofts. 


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
DETROIT —Signed OB Mott Blundta. Re- 
leased CB Richord Woodley. QB Mike Cawley 
and WR Mike Haecek. 

HOUSTON— Agreed to terms wtth OB Dave 
Krieg an 2 -year comrad. 

new England -Signed OT Zefrau 
Moss. 

new YORK JETS— Signed FB Lorenzo Neal 
OAKLAND RAIDERS— Traded WR Doryl 
Hobbs and their first, second onfl fourth- 
round picks In the 1997 draff to the New 
Orleans Saints for their fM and sixth-round 
picks In the 1997 draft. 

SAN meco— S igned WR Tony Mortal to 1- 
yeorcontmd. 


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PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1997 


OBSERVER 


Famously Said 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Things are 
said famously these days. 
Other things are said arguably. 
Mrs. M.N. of Merchantville. 
New Jersey, is tired of it and I 
don't blame her. 

The other day on television 
I heard a talking head talking 
about London. He said. "As 
Dr. Johnson famously said, a 
man who is tired of London is 
tired of life." 

How dumb can you get. eh. 
Mrs. M.N.? 

Dr. Samuel Johnson, the 
18th-centuiy word expert, 
constantly turned down pleas 
for him to say things famously. 
Even his great biographer. 
Boswell, could not break the 
Doctor's resolve to eschew 
saying tilings famously. 

"tfat out." said the Doc- 
tor. "That's the only way to 
say things." 

I well remember Dr. John- 
son waxing irate on this point. 
It was the night he came up 
with the storv about the wife 
who told her husband she was 
"surprised" to find him in 
bed with the maid, prompting 
the husband to reply: "No. 
my dear. I am surprised. You 
are astonished." 


The Doctor's amusing il- 
lustration of the difference be- 
tween the words “surprise" 
and “astonish" so impressed 
Boswell that he stopped the 
proceedings immediately. 
"That was a crackerjack. 
Doctor.” he said. "Would 
you be good enough to say it 
over again, but this time I'd 
Like you to say it famously." 

Dr. Johnson scolded him as 
an ignoramus. "I can say it 
loudly, gently, angrily, arrog- 
antly, humbly. distinctly, tim- 
idly. boldly or with an in- 
sufferably smug sneer, dear 
Boswell. But nobody, not 


even L can say it famously/' 

This recalls a similar verbal 
incident years ago in Rome. 
Julius Caesar had just said, 
“Veni. vidi, vici." and his 
wife said. ‘ ‘Those are arguably 
the most memorable words 
you'll ever say. Julius." 

"What do you mean, 'ar- 
guably'?" 

"You know, honey — just, 
like, ‘arguably’?" 

"What are you saying? 
Thai they're probably, pos- 
sibly or maybe my most mem- 
orable words? Or that you 
haven't paid enough attention 
to my other sayings to know 
what you're talking about?" 


Mrs. Caesar tried to quiet 
him. saying. "Oh. don’t be 
such a pedant. Julius." 

* ‘I can ’t believe it. ‘ ’ Caesar 
shouted. " Arguably 1 You 
want to argue about It? Let's 
argue about it" 

His wife turned away. 

"Sure." said Caesar. 
“ ‘Veni. vidi, vici’ is pretty 
good. Great for crossword 
puzzles, in fact, with all those 
vowels. But what about the 
time I crossed the Rubicon 
and said. ‘The die is cast'? 
You want to argue that that's 
not tops in the memorable- 
line department?" 

Mrs. Caesar said she was 
going to bed and read a good 
scroll, but her husband pur- 
sued ber to the foot of the 
stairs. “And what about. 'Et 
tu. Brute 1 ?" he shouted. “Is 
that arguably tops, too. for 
memorability?" 

“For heaven's sake, calm 
down." said Caesar's wife. 
"When I said ‘arguably.' I 
didn't mean a thing. 1 was just 
making some typical Amer- 
ican noises." And went to 
bed. 

“Things get dumber 
around here every day.” 
Caesar famously said. 

N'w York Times Service 


S izzling ! The Year of the Hong Kong Thriller 


"The Communists were coming ; they were 
almost here." — “The Last Six Million 
Seconds" by John Burdett 

“ The lowering of the British flag loomed 
somewhere in the recesses of the mind of 
most everyone who did business in the boil- 
ing capitalistic cauldron that was Hong 
Kong." — “Hong Kong. China'' by Ralph 
Amote 

"The Handover: They called it Chinese 
Take-away, and it n os now the old refrain 
— “Kowloon Tong" by Paul Theroux 

By Keith B. Richburg 

Wushuigton Post Senice 

H ONG KONG — The coming British 
retreat at midnight on June 30 and the 
reversion of Hong Kong to rule by the 
Chinese mainland has spawned a plethora of 
handover memorabilia — T-shirts, buttons, 
lapel pins with alternating Chinese and Brit- 
ish flags, even a new brand of mainland 
cigarettes, called, predictably. “1997." 

So it seems only logical that fiction writers 
and publishing houses are hurrying to cash in 
on the handover fever, rushing into print a 
dizzying array of new titles — action ad- 
ventures. detective yams, period pieces. 

"It began a few' years ago," said P.K. 
Leung, a poet and literature professor at 
Hong Kong University. “For the past de- 
cade. there's been this interest in die tran- 
sition . Now the media is focusing on Hong 
Kong." 

Some of the latest titles on the shelves 
include "The Last Six Million Seconds." by 
the lawyer and sometime author John Bur- 
den. which boasts on its jacket to be "a 
‘Gorky Park’ for the Pacific Rim" and "the 
ultimate Hong Kong 1997 novel.” 

“Thirty miles north, there lives 1.4 billion 
people whose collective attention was fo- 
cused on Hong Kong just two months before 
its reversion to rule by the People's Republic 
of China." Burden writes in his fast-paced 
thriller about a Eurasian detective named 
Chan who has just 6 million seconds to 
complete an investigation into a gory 
murder. “It was like living in a spiritual wind 
tunnel," he writes. "You could feel the 
pressure of uncontainable envy, loathing and 
longing pressing in from over the border.” 

Not to mention the pressure of fierce com- 
petition for handover novels, which are 
crowding each other out on bookstore 
shelves here. 

Also recently released is “Hong Kong, 







China," by the traveler and author Ralph 
Amote. making his hardcover debut. The 
book's jacket touts it as “a sizzling novel of 
love, greed and revenge, set against the 
Chinese takeover of Hong Kong in 1997!" 
The novel opens with Davy Wong, a Chinese 
pro-democracy dissident from Beijing’s 
Tiananmen Square protests, escaping over 
the border into Hong Kong, and includes 
such characters as the evil General Liu Wing 
of the People's Liberation Army. 

Liu Wing? 

“And who. pray tell, is that?" our hero, 
the wealthy industrialist Brandon Poole, 
asks Davy Wong. 

“He is in Hong Kong." a frightened 
Wong replies. “He has a specialty which he 
learned in Tibet. It is occupation, and the 
e limin ation of resistance." 

Other thrillers, released earlier, are find- 
ing more shelf space as the handover nears 


DnW Suter/IHT 

— books by veteran authors such as Peter 
Maas (“China White”), Colin Falconer 
(“Triad") and the earliest of all, Justin Scott 
(“Nine Dragons"). 

One of the best-known names in fiction 
trying to cash in on the Hong Kong handover 
fervor is the prolific travel writer and nov- 
elist Paul Theroux, author of such classics as 
“The Great Railway Bazaar" and "The 
Mosquito Coast." 

Theroux, a longtime traveler in Asia, has 
weighed in with “Kowloon Tong," about a 
couple of stereotypical British colonials: 
“Bunt" Mullard and his domineering moth- 
er Betty. Though longtime residents of Hong 
Kong, theirs is a quaint and quintessentially 
British world; Betty Milliard, for example, 
displays over her sideboard a portrait of 
Queen Elizabeth even larger than that of 
Betty's late husband. 

The Milliards, mother and son. are thor- 


oughly dislikable protagonists. They refer to 
mainland Chinese as "Chmky-Oimks. 

they hate Chinese food, they _ find the 
Cantonese language a grating, incompre- 
hensible clatter, and they stock their house 
with all British-made products, down to the 
English-made Roberts radio. To them, the 
handover is simply “Chinese Take-aw-ay. 

Theroux's addition to the great handover 
book stakes was recently ami roundly 
trashed in the colony’s venerable English- 
language daily newspaper, the South China 
Morning Post. A Post critic took issue with 
Theroux's stereotypes, a narrow view ot 
Hong Kong skewed mainly toward th ehoo k- 
er bare of Mong Kok, and for some errors of 
simple geography — like placing *e Mul- 
lards’ textile factory in Kowloon Tong, a 
neighborhood that long has been designated 
for residential use. . 

“Are the streets crawling with Chinese 
and' Filipino call girls?" asked reviewer 
Kevin Kwong. * ‘Why do such a disservice to 
the place that is my home? Simply to cash in 
on pre-handover world interest? Why bother 
writing a book that has nothing new or 
interesting to say, while there are hundreds 
more of these cheap thrillers about Hong 
Kong in airport book shops?’ ' 

For the record, -‘Kowloon Tong" is not 
the only quick-hit handover book to play- 
loose with the facts. For example, Amote. in 
his preface to "Hong Kong, China,” writes 
that after the colony’s reversion to Chinese 
rule in July, “There will be a British gov- 
ernor for another 50 years.” 

Really? Hong Kong’s China-appointed 
chief executive, Tung Chee-hwa. might be 
startled to discover a British governor 
hanging around after Jane 30. 

Still. Hong Kongers seem to be approach- 
ing their newfound fame with a kind of 
bemused detachment. Some say they do not 
read any books about Hong Kong by gweilo. 
or foreign, authors, because they are never 
very realistic. “I’m not interested." said 
Mandy Chow, an arts coordinator for the 
local Youth Aits Festival who went to col- 
lege in the United States. She thinks such 
books likely would be “very superficial." 
She added, “I would rather go see the 
Howard Stem movie.” 

Said P„K- Leung, “If you continue to 
repeat all these stereotypes, it’s as if you’re 
looking at Hong Kong, but you don't really 
see Hong Kong, the real Hong Kong." 

Just wait until die 6,000 foreign jour- 
nalists get here. 





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PEOPLE 



A PAPARAZZO says a few choice 
words from Princess Diana cost 
him his scoop. Brendan Beirne said he 
was taking pictures of Diana as she left a 
London gym when she yelled at him to 
hand over the film. Beirne refused. Then 
a “guy appeared and said, ‘Can I help 
you?' " Beirne said. “Di said, ‘Yes, I 
want his film,’ " Beirne told The Sun 
tabloid. “The guy said, ‘Give her the 
film,' and grabbed me in an arm lock. He 
twisted my wrist I was frightened he 
would break it I let the camera go and 
heard it being opened.” The passer-by. 
Kevin Duggan, 28. said he would have 
done the same thing for any woman: 
"It’s a question of manners. My mum 
brought me up to be a gentleman." A 
statement from the princess's office 
said: “Once again the Princess of Wales 
has been harassed by a photographer. 
Once again this itself has become the 
subject of inaccurate press comment" 


STAR STRUCK — Dennis Rodman, the basketball (and now movie) Pat Paulsen, 69. the former Smoth- 
star. arriving for the world premiere in Chicago of “Double Team,” in ers Brothers sidekick and perennial bu- 
which he stars with Jean-Claude Van Damme and Mickey Rourke. more us presidential candidate, has in- 


operable brain cancer, the Press 
Democrat of Santa Rosa. California, 
said. “Nothing is a given anytime,” 
Paulsen told the paper. “So we are hope- 
ful.” He became a household name in 
1968 when he announced on “The 
Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour” that 
he was running for president under the 
Straight Talkin' American Government 
party. By 1972, he was on the ballot for 
real. “I think I’d make a pretty good 
president, and they have a great pension 
plan,' ' Paulsen once said, adding, “I say 
the things that all politicians say. I just 
use shorter sentences." Among the slo- 
gans for his 1996 campaign: "United 
We Sit.” “You Get What You Vote 
For" and "Well, Whadaya Want Me to 
Do About It?” 


After sport shoes and cologne, bas- 
ketball superstar Michael Jordan has 
branched out into fashion, unveiling his 
own line of men’s underwear at his 
trendy restaurant in downtown Chicago. 
Jordan teamed up with Hanes, the No. 1 
brand of underwear in die United States, 


to launch a line of underwear styles, 
athletic designs and boxers. 


Diane Sawyer, 51, is staying put 
After flirting with the idea of switching 
networks, the “PrimeTime Live" host 
said she will stay at ABC. Her contract, 
which has two years remaining, had an 
escape clause that permitted her to en- 
tertain other offers. Her derision was 
being closely watched in the industry. 


Walter Cronkite is in a New York 
hospital for quadruple bypass surgery. 
The clogged artery showed up during a 
routine checkup, a spokeswoman said. 
Cronkite retired as anchor of foe CBS 
Evening News in 1981, after 20 years. 


What a literary find! It seems that two 
cleaners have unearthed a long-lost 
manuscript by late British author W. 
Somerset Maugham in the cellar of 
Singapore's colonial-era Raffles Hotel, 
where the writer often stayed. A report in 


the Straits Times said “The Sacred 
Flame" was written on faded bote! sta- 
tionery and wrapped between foe covers 
of an old Tiffin Room menu. It said foe 
manuscript included “poignant epis- 
odes” about Maugham’s “homosexu- 
ality and problems he had with his stam- 
mering. The newspaper’s story said the 
hotel had faxed copies of foe manuscript 
to Maugham experts 'in Britain who, 
thoroughly excited, were eager to head 
for Singapore to authenticate the orig- 
inal. When contacted, a spokeswoman 
for the hotel said foe newspaper report 
was an April Fool’s joke. 


Two hi story professors are to receive 
this year’s Bancroft Prize, awarded an- 
nually for notable books about Amer- 
ican history, biography, or diplomacy. 
The recipients are David Kyvig of the 
University of Akron, author of “Explicit/ 
and Authentic Acts: Amending foe U.S. 
Constitution, 1776-1995,” and James 
Patterson of Brown University, author 
of “Grand Expectations: foe United 
States, 1945-1974.”