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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




The Worlds Daily Newspaper 


R 


Paris, Friday, April 4, 1997 


No. 35.487 


l A Simple Test for Heart Disease 

;! inflammation, Not Cholesterol, May Be Underlying Cause 


By Rick Weiss 

Washington Post Service 

WASffiNGTON - A simple blood 
test can help identify healthy people 
who are most likely to have a heart 

attack or a stroke years before the usual 

warning signs appear, new research 
suggests, lending support to a radical 
new theory about the underlying 
of these leading killers. 

The findings indicate that hardened 
or narrowed arteries, which typically 
lead to heart attacks or strokes, are 
caused by inflammations in blood-ves- 
sel walls — the same kind erf reaction 
that triggers redness and swelling when 
a cut gets infected. 

Researchers warned that it was too 
soon to recommend the widespread use 
of die test, which looks for a substance 
called C-xeactive protein, a general in- 
dicator of infl amma tion. 

But its ability to identify as much as 
eight years in advance those most likely 
to get a heart attack or stroke supports 
the unorthodox notion that inflamma- 
tion is an even more fundamental ranse 
of hardening of the arteries than high 
cholesterol or blood pressure. 


If that is true, specialists said, then 
pharmaceutical companies developing 
drugs to prevent bean attacks and 
strokes might concentrate less on cho- 
lesterol-lowering and blood-pressure 
drugs and focus more on compounds 
that block inflammation. 

The new study offers surprising ev- 
idence that aspirin’s usefulness in pre- 
ven ting h eart attacks and strokes results 
not from the drug’s ability to prevent 
blood clots, as scientists have presumed, 
but from its ability to reduce inflam- 
mation. 

“It’s really a major shift in the way 
we think about heart attacks and 
strokes,” said R. Wayne Alexander, 
chief of cardiology at Emory University 
o> Atlanta. “What's really important 
about this is that it may provide a way to 
detect this disease process not just by 
looking for clogged vessels, which all of 
cardiac diagnosis until now has been 
based on.” 

By die time cardiologists find badly 
blocked vessels, they generally must 
resort to bypass operations or an- 

g ' oplasty, in which they clear the vessel. 

either case, the vessels often become 
blocked again before long. 


“This says something important 
about the biology of heart disease.' ‘ said 
Paul M Ridker, who led the study with 
Charles H. Hennekens at the Brigham 
and Women's Hospital in Boston. 1 ‘The 
inflammation is there way before the 
atherosclerosis and seems to be in- 
volved in the progression of the dis- 
ease.” 

The standard view on heart attacks 
and strokes is that high levels of cho- 
lesterol and fat in the blood, and high 
blood pressure, can cause fany deposits 
to line blood vessel walls — a condition 
called atherosclerosis. Eventually, a 
blood clot becomes lodged in that nar- 
rowed vessel, cutting off the supply of 
oxygen to the heart or brain. 

While not disputing that high cho- 
lesterol and the other standard risk 
factors add to the risk of heart attacks and 
strokes, the new findings suggest that the 
fundamental problem is inflammation, 
caused by overactive immune- system 
cells lodged in blood-vessel walls. 

The new view is thai many heart 
attacks are caused by bits of scar tissue 
that have broken away from an inflamed 



Kohl to Run 
For 5th Term 
As Chancellor 


Turning 67, He Calls It 
His Duty to Stay On 


By William Drozd iak 

Washington Post Srnhre 


See HEART, Page 12 


Arad WiegnmsvVclAEn 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl, who will seek a fifth term 
because: ‘1 believe I have an obligation to do this.' 


A Bold Peace 
Gains Favor 
In Mideast 


Quick Final Settlement 
Would Bypass Oslo Plan 


By Serge Schmemann 

New York Tima Service 


JERUSALEM — In the search for ways 
to salvage the foundering Israeli-Phiesthnan 


peace, one idea gaming ground is the dip- 
lomatic equivalent of radical surcerv — 


lotnatic equivalent of radical surgery — 
bypassing the badly damaged “Oslo pro- 
cess” of gradual steps, and plunrine boldly 


cess” of gradual steps and plunging boldly 
to a quick final settlement; ■■■•• 

The approach has obvious weaknesses. 
For one thmg. Yasser Arafat dismissed it as - 
a gimmick when Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu most recently proposed the idea 
last month; for another, it is difficnlt to 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


imagine that an agreement that requires, 
fundamental concessions on both sides 
could be reached quickly when mutual trust 
has almost totally wasted away. 

Yet. it is that loss of trust that has led not 
only Mr. Netanyahu, but also President Bill 
Clinton and King Hussein of Jordan to 
consider going for broke. 

The architects of the Oslo process 
worked from the premise that both sides had 
the same end in view and that the best way of 
getting there was via a staged, multilayered 
negotiating process. That approach was in- 
tended to ensure that if one track got stalled, 
progress could be made on another. 

It also gradually prepared the people on 
both sides for the major compromises that 
would be required when talks reached the 



Fund-Raising 
Was Overseen 
By Clinton 

Documents Show He Knew 
Campaign-Money Details 


By Alison Mitchell 

New Kiv£ Times Service 




m • k 

Jnap SilWlte toc c a ri hw 

Palestinian children hurrying into their home on Thursday before the start of 
an evening curfew imposed in the Jelazoun refugee camp in the West Bank. 


hypersensitive “final status” issues of Je- 
rusalem, refugees and the like. 

But in die 10 months since the Israelis 
elected a government with a fundamental 
distaste for the Oslo process, each step, 
intended to foster confidence, has done the 
exact opposite, feeding conflict and anger. 

Last month, Mr. Arafat's fury over the 
size of the proposed Israeli withdrawal from 


occupied territories and Israel’s decision to 
build a new housing project in East Je- 
rusalem led him to freeze negotiations, re- 
sulting in two weeks of constant clashes and 
three suicide bombings. 

What little trust the Arabs had for Mr. 
Netanyahu has turned to open hostility. 


WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton 
and Vice President A i Gore received a con- 
stant stream of memorandums providing 
them the most minute details of the Demo- 
cratic Party's fund raising in 1996. including 
monthly dollar tallies and projected sums to 
be raised at scores of events. White House 
coffees among them, according to documents 
released by the White House on Wednesday. 

The documents added to a growing body of 
evidence that undercuts the president's ef- 
forts to draw a distinction between his activ- 
ities on behalf of his own campaign and of the 
Democratic Party. 

The papers, from the files of Harold Ickes, 
die former While House deputy chief of staff, 
which were turned over to Congress several 
weeks ago, show that the president closely 
coordinated the fund-raising program of the 
Democratic National Committee. 

The documents describe an even broader 
range of activities and involvement by the 
president and vice president than documents 
obtained last month by The New York Times, 
which described the fund-raising goals set by 
the White House for the now well-known 
coffee sessions with major contributors. 

The party's fund raising is now under 
investigation by the Justice Department and 
congressional committees. 

Among the documents released on Wed- 


B ERL IN — Chancellor Helmut Kohl celebrated his 67th 
birthday on Thursday by announcing that he would run for an 
unprecedented fifth term in elections scheduled next year. 

Defying opinion polls showing that a majority of Germans 
want him to retire from politics. Mr. Kohl said in a television 
interview that he felt a personal duty after 15 years at the helm 
to remain there while his country was facing challenges at 
home and abroad. 

Speaking at the end of his annual Easter vacation in the 
Austrian mountain re son of Bad Hofgastein. south of 
Salzburg, Mr. Kohl said he relished the opportunity to help 
execute such historic decisions as NATO's eastward ex- 
pansion and the launch of a single European currency. 

“I have thought about this very carefully here, the path I 
have taken in these years and the burdens and the chal- 
lenges,” Mr. Kohl said. “I will run again because I believe 1 
have an obligation to do this in the current situation.” 

Mr. Kohl's declaration, some 18 months ahead of the 
election, appeared designed to quell speculation about his 
intentions within his fractious center-right coalition, led by 
his Christian Democrats, and to exert pressure on the op- 
position Social Democrats to choose their candidate. 

Even though close friends said they never doubted he 
would run in 1998. Mr. Kohl resisted their appeals to declare 
his candidacy and said in a recent interview dial he would nor 
announce his plans until later this year. 

But he indicated that he was finally convinced by their 
arguments that an early declaration would be therapeutic for 
his governing alliance and would help focus its attention and 
energies on the country's pressing agenda of social and 
economic reforms. 

“I will run again if my party and political friends want 
that," Mr. Kohl said. “This is not an individual decision 
made at the top of Mount Olympus.” 

The chancellor also has powerful personal moti vations for 
staying in power. 


Having secured a place in history as the architect of 
German reunification. Mr. Kohl says his ultimate ambition is 
to anchor his country in the vanguard of a united Europe. He 
often quotes his mentor, Konrad Adenauer, Germany’s first 
chancellor after World War EL in describing German and 
European unity as “two sides of the same coin.” 

At recent meetings with other European leaders, Mr. Kohl 
has emphasized the urgency of moving toward a single 
currency and other integrationist goals by warning that his 


successors in Germany are likely to be much more sensitive to 
national interests and less beholden to the ideals of European 


national interests and less beholden to the ideals of European 
unity. 

European leaders are supposed to determine by next April 
which countries will join the first wave in launching a single 
currency by 1999. But with Germany and others saddled with 
high joblessness and huge welfare payments that have bloated 
their deficits, some leaders are now calling for a one-year 
delay in the calendar. 

In the television interview Thursday. Mr. Kohl acknow- 
ledged that ir would be “extremely difficult" to meet the 
criteria and the timetable for a single currency, given weak 
economic conditions in Europe. But he said he was de- 
termined to push ahead and achieve those goals because 
abandoning them could be ruinous for Europe. 

Besides the elusive quest for European unity, Mr. Kohl will 
have to steer Germany through some of its biggest challenges 
in the postwar era as he prepares for a fifth term in office. 
Unemployment has reached 4.7 million, the highest level in 
Germany since 1933, the year that Hitler came to power. 

German workers, who enjoy some of the highest wages and 
shortest working hours in the world, have threatened strikes in 


See ISRAEL, Page 7 


See FUNDS, Page 12 


See KOHL. Page 12 


Worry Rising on Mekong 

As China and Laos Move to Harness River, 
Concern Mounts in Countries Downstream 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 


RHONE FALLS, Laos — For much 
of its meandering course from the 
Tibetan plateau in China to the delta in 
southern Vietnam where it spills into the 
sea, the Mekong River is wide and pla- 
cid. . 

But at the Rhone Fills in southern 
Laos, and at some other places along its 
4200-kilometer (2, 600-mile) length, 
especially in China, the river shows its 
awesome power — - and its potential for 
generating electricity. 

At the Kbone Falls, the Mekong 
. plunges over jagged rock ledges in a 
C. ; maelstrom of white water. Even now, 
‘ with the water level near its lowest point 
at the end of the animal dfyseaa^me 
falls are an impressive sighL Alter 
heavy rain, they are awesome. 

The potential of the Mekong — - the 
world’s 10tb-largest river, in volume. 


and the 12th -longest — has long fas- 
cinated explorers, merchants and de- 
velopers. 

In colonizing Vietnam. Cambodia 
and Laos in the 19th century, France 
hoped the Mekong would provide a 
navigable route to China ana its mar- 
kets. The Khorte Falls and nearby rapids 
proved to be an insurmountable barrier 
to large vessels. 

Today, governments of the six coun- 
tries through or between which the 
Mekong flows — China, Burma, Laos, 
Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam — 
want to build a series of dams on the 
river and its tributaries for flood control, 
irrigation and the driving of turbines to 
generate electricity for the region’s rap- 
ftfty industrializing and urbanizing 
economies. 

Some officials have called the greater 



Tale of 2 Mayors 
Who Shun Politics 
For Pragmatism 





By Dan Balz 

Washington Port Service 


hie 1 *: 


dt-'M 






See MEKONG, Page 12 


;***’* =- " 

Rhone Falls in southern Laos, where the Mekong River shows its power and its potential. 


NEW YORK — Their personalities are as dif- 
ferent as the cities they lead. Mayor Richard Ri- 
ordan of Los Angeles is relaxed, shy, sometimes 
inarticulate and uncomfortable with controversy. 
Mayor Rudolph Giuliani of New York is, well, not. 
He is direct, intense and always spoiling for a 
figbL 

“If the mayor of New York is laid back,” he 
said, “the mayor of New York gets run over." 

For all their differences, Mr. Riordan and Mr. 
Giuliani remain allies in an experiment in urban 
politics. Four years ago. vorers of the nation's two 
largest — and historically Democratic — cities 
turned over the keys to city hall to this pair of 
Republican mayors. Exuberant Republican offi- 
cials hailed the victories as a sign that the era of 
Democratic liberalism dial had guided the cities for 
a generation had run its course. 


AGENDA 


Today a more complex picture has emerged. Mr. 
Giuliani and Mr. Riordan have brought change and 
improvement ro their cities, notably so in some 
areas. The crime rate has fallen sharply in both New 
York (by 38 percent) and Los Angeles (by 25 
percent). The welfare rolls in New York have 
declined by 240,000 and the city bureaucracy is 
smaller by 21 ,000 workers. The Los Angeles econ- 
omy has rebounded, along with that of the state. 




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German Stocks Continue to Plunge 



in the German market 
continued to outpace those of other 
exchanges Thursday, as stocks fell 
across most of Europe for the third 

day. ^ 

The German perfannance — de- 
spite two hopeful economic indic- 
ators that wens made public 
Thursday — reflected the view that 
Europe’s biggest economy has the 
most to lose from a weakening dol- 
lar and the prospect of a delay in 


European monetary union. The an- 
nouncement that Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl would seeks fifth term 
did not much help die market, de- 
spite expectations that die move bol- 
sters chances for economic restruc- 
turing and the investment climate. 

The 30-share DAX blue chip in- 
dex never fully recovered from a 
rapid selloff at die opening bell and 
dropped 2.6 percent, or 85.92 points, 
to end at 3215.99 points. Page 1 3. 


PACE TWO 

This Man Would Be Serbia's King 


The Dollar 


New York Thursday Q 3 Pit previous does 


THE AMERICAS 

Ecuadorans Way of Government 


Books - - rages. 

Crossword Page 4. 

Opinion -- , mmmm pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 28-21. 

International CtassHfed Page S. 


[The IHT on-line http://vAvw.iht.com 


DM 

1.6678 

1.8778 

Pound 

1.B46 

1.643 

Yen 

122.585 

123.37 

FF 

5.616 

5.648 

Lem. 

The Dow 

1 

mm 

Thursday doan 

previous doss 

-70.62 

6446.39 

6517.01 

| S&P 500 | 

tfange 

Thusday 0 3 PJU. 

previous dose 

-2.48 

746.54 

749.02 


"Their leadership has changed the way a city is 
governed,” said the former federal bousing sec- 
retary, Henry Cisneros. “In the old days, a mayor 
bad to speak to the symbols of the minority com- 
munity and all the symbolic urban issues. These 
fellows have addressed issues like crime and jobs 
and business in such common-sense ways that dv 
critique for them not doing all the knee-jerk things 
evaporates.” 

Mr. Riordan is heavily favored to win a second 


See MAYORS, Page 12 


I 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


New Life As a Monarch? / Crown Prince Alexander Waits 


— 1 ^ t 

Should He Win, Kabila ^ 


.tjptt* 


The Man Who Would Be Serbia ’s King Will Have Adversaries 

m n 1* V C yi/i/no I?/I 


L ONDON — At first blush. His Royal High- 
ness Crown Prince Alexander of 
Yugoslavia could pass easily for one of 
Washington's moderate Republican con- 
gressmen. Chunky, polished and gleaming with 
good health at 5 1 . he is a former army ski champion 
with three handsome sons, a second wife, firm 
handshake, white teeth. Hermes tie. dark blue 
double-breasted suit, black tussled wingtip loafers 
and occasional flights of rhetorical passion. 

But then there is his plummy mid-Atlantic ac- 
cent. the portrait of his father. King Peter Q. in 
epaulets and full military regalia on the wall behind 
his desk, the swanky office address in London's 
Mayfair district and a gold Audemars Piguet watch, 
a gift from a Greek shipping tycoon — the sort of 
accessories that might raise an eyebrow or two on 
Capitol Hill. 

All doubts dissolve: You are in the presence of 
royalty. 

London, of course, is littered with washed-up 
European royals — exiled princes, forgotten counts, 
playboy dukes. What sets Prince Alexander apart is 
that after a lifetime spent in Britain and America as 
an army officer, businessman and commoner, he 
may stand a chance of going “home" to Yugoslavia 
as king, and soon. 

Opposition leaders in Belgrade, who have shaken 
the regime of Serbia's president. Slobodan Mi- 
losevic, with street demonstrations all winter, sug- 
gest they may restore Prince Alexander and the prc- 
World War II monarchy if they manage to take 
power in elections later this year. Last month, after 
they forced Mr. Milosevic to give up control of city 
councils in 14 of Serbia’s (and therefore 
Yugoslavia's) largest towns, the three main op- 
position leaders, made a beeline to London, where 
they met with the crown prince and plotted 
strategy. 

Prince Alexander himself, a prosperous inter- 
national business consultant who has made his 
money in banking, shipping, insurance and finance, 
is more than willing to entertain the idea of starting 
a new life as a monarch. In fact, he lives for it 
Since the fall of communism in Eastern Europe, 
Prince Alexander has devoted much of his time to 
preparing for his eventual re rum as king. He's 
brushed up his rusty schoolboy Serbo-Croatian, 
opened his own home page on the World Wide 
Web. met a steady stream of movers and shakers in 
the Serbian opposition and in Washington and 
Western Europe and made three triumphant trips to 
Yugoslavia. 

“My life started changing after the collapse of 
the Evil Empire," he said in an interview. * ‘I kind of 
got caught up with this whole crazy business." 

He sees nis potential role as a constitutional ! 
monarch in the style of his distant cousin. King Juan , 
Carlos of Spain, who shepherded his country back 
into the fold of European democracies after decades 
of Franco's dictatorship. Prince Alexander, whose 
great-grandfather King Peter L a benevolent dic- 
tator, consolidated Serbia’s Karadjordjevic family 
dynasty, aspires to be a symbol of hope, healing and 
democracy for a country devastated by die effects of 
nearby war. 

“We need someone who can represent, a neutral 
meeting point, continuity and unity — not the ruler 
but tiie symbol" of nationhood, he said. “I’ve had 
the pleasure of living my life in democracies. And 


By Lee Hocks tader 

Washington Past Service 



.. . . ' ■*;' 


r .■ 



Crown Prince Alexander of Yugoslavia* shown 
speaking in Belgrade in 1992 , has spent his life in 
Britain and A merica. He could go “home" as king. 


I'd be very sad if people in Yugoslavia lost the 
opportunity for a change and continued on for a few 
more decades of madness and new weapons." 

In contrast to many of his Serbian countrymen, he 
has taken a generally moderate, non-nationalist and 


Alexander's return seriously. Yet de- 
* spite Prince Alexander's ancestry 
and birthright, his tie to Yugoslavia 
has always been tenuous. 

He was bom in 1945, in Suite 212 
of Claridge's, heir to the Yugoslav 
throne as the first son of King Peter 
n. But there was a catch: The heir had 
to be bom on Yugoslav soil. And 
Prince Alexander’s family, flushed 
out by Nazi bombs and barred by die 
Communists from returning home 
after Belgrade's liberation, was liv- 
ing in exile in London. 

Not to worry, said the British gov- 
ernment. For the occasion of the 
birth, the Home Office declared the 
family's suite in Claridge's to be 
sovereign Yugoslav territory. 

Still, Yugoslavia seemed a world 
away during Prince Alexander’s 
boyhood and adolescence. The Com- 
munist dictator Tito, who had ab- 
olished the monarchy in 1945, re- 
mained in power and, after breaking 
with Moscow in 1948, was building a 
socialist state independent of the So- 
viet Bloc and supported by the 
West 

After his father died in the United 
States in 1970, Prince Alexander de- 
cided not to take the title of king. 
However, he never renounced his 
right to die throne. 

He was educated in England, 
Switzerland and the United States, 
graduated from the Royal Military 
Academy at Sandhurst, England's 
West Point, and was commissioned a 
British army tank officer in 1966. 
ijt-e'vw/H-ai'i. He spent seven years in the army, 
serving in the Middle East, Italy and 
West Germany, before quitting to go 
men into business, many and start a fam- 

• |-/v ■ ily. Living for 12 years in foe United 

u Uje in states, including Washington, he 

1 as king. tried his hand as an advertising ex- 

ecutive and insurance broker, gaining 

experience and connections he says 
would benefit Yugoslavia should he return as king. 


Nation’s Political Opposition Seeks Role 


By Lynne Duke 

Washington Past Service 


KINSHASA, Zaire — After over- 
running much of eastern Zaire in the 
face of scant resistance on the battle- 
field, tiie rebel leader Laurent Kabila 
faces a new challenge from established 
politicians over who can claim the 
mant le of opposition to President 
Mobutu Sese Seko. 

In less Hum six months, armed rebels 
led by Mr. Kabila have seized more than 
a quarter of 7*mm territory and earned 
broad popular support in their quest to 
oust Marshal Mobutu. But opposition 
figures who have been fighting Marshal 
Mobutu politically for years are grow- 
ing suspicious of Mr. Kabila’s motives 
and may yet stand in his way. Die 


removed from power by Marshal 
Mobutu in 1991. Some of those same- 
people view Mr. Kabila as a liberator 
whose battlefield victories could bring, 
democratic reforms and free elections. 

In captured eastern towns where Mr.. 
Kabila’s Alliance of Democratic Forces _ 
for the Liberation of the Congo (Zaire> 4 ' 
has set up local administrations, many 
of those who have come forward 
participate are Tshisekedi supporters. 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


And here in Zaire’s capital, a poll of 
1,000 residents conducted in early 
March found that 5 1 percent of respond^ 
had a good opinion of Mr. Kabila.-", 
"ft really means we want same. 


opposition politicians' leader, Etienne 
Tshisekedi. was approved Wednesday 


change." said Francesa Bomboko 
Bombelenga of the independent BERCI 
public-opinion research institute, which, 
conducted the poll. 

The difference between the two men*, 
however, is that Mr. Kabila, who for 
decades has been involved in armed, 
anti-Mobutu uprisings, has never been: 
lining to Marshal Mobutu and even say£ 
he has never met the man. * 

Mr. Tshisekedi, chough widely ac-> 
knowledged as the leading figure in the 
political opposition, is seen by some as 
having at least some connection to Mar- ' 
shal Mobutu because he served in his 
government twice. 

Both terms ended with Marshal. 
Mobutu dis missing Mr. Tshisekedi. The 
men are considered bitter enemies. 

Mr. Kabila’s rebel movement is try- 
ing to do what years of opposition pol- 
itics have not achieved. But the in- 
fighting among the array of anti- 
Mobutu forces is rooted, in part, in a fear 
of how Mr. Kabila and his armed force 
would govern the nation if their struggle 
is successful, analysts say. 


as the country's new prime minister. 
With Marshal Mobutu ’s army relief 


With Marshal Mobutu ’s army retreat- 
ing in Mr. Kabila's path and Zairians 
rallying to his cause, the rebel leader has 
faced few setbacks so far. B ut if he does, 
a Zairian businessman said, “it will be 
from the Tshisekedi people.’’ 

This battle over which anti-Mobutu 
faction should hold primacy threatens to 
split opposition forces badly enough to 
allow Marshal Mobutu to hold onto 
power, even as declining health and the 
rebel offensive make it appear that his 
days in power are numbered. 

In broad terms, Mr. Kabila and Mr. 
Tshisekedi share the same goal: the 
ouster of the man who has ruled Zaire 
with an iron fist for 31 years. 

Likewise, both men appear to enjoy 
overlapping support. 

Mr. Tshisekedi has served as prime 
minis ter twice before, and his support- 
ers continued to view him as the le- 
gitimate prime minister after he was 


even pro- Western line. Although an ethnic Serb, he 
suggests he supported the NATO bombing of Bos- 


suggests he supported the NATO bombing of Bos- 
nian Serb military positions in 1995 as a necessary 
evil that brought the war in Bosnia to a speedier end. 
These days he favors the arrest of all indicted war 
criminals, including Serbs, and opposes taking re- 
venge against the Communists who took power at 
the end of Worid War n. 

At the same time, he seizes every opportunity to 
denounce Mr. Milosevic, pouring scorn on him as 
an enemy of democracy bent on “bringing the 
whole country down." And he has urged unity on 
the various parties in the opposition, which he 
considers "the best hope for democracy." 

“Milosevic must go," he said. “He’s incapable 
of understanding democracy, compromise and tol- 
erance. He has fired up religion and nationalism in 
the worst possible way. ” Mr. Milosevic, in turn, has 
signaled he is starting to take the threat of Prince 


I N THE meantime he leads an odd triple life in 
London. Fust, there is his regular job as an 
international business consultant, a career foal 
has afforded him a very affluent lifestyle. 
Although be has no bodyguards, his life is not 
anonymous. As godson to Queen Elizabeth and a 
great-great grandson of Queen Victoria, he is a 
regular at Buckingham Palace social events, a 
friend of Prince Charles and a cousin to half foe 


Rebels Spurn Offer of 6 Seats 
In Cabinet Unveiled in Zaire 


royalty in Europe. 
But most of hi 


But most of his time in recent years has been 
devoted to Yugoslav affairs, of which he is a serious 
student- On his visits to Yugoslavia, he was greeted 
by thousands of cheering supporters. He visited 
hospitals, toured the countryside, gave small 
speeches in Serbo-Croatian and absorbed foe hu- 
man toll of the deeply destructive Balkan war. 

"It’s quite tragic,’ ’ he said. "No jobs. 60 percent 
unemployment, foreign reserves at $40 million, $16 
billion in debts. Factories are idle. . . schools are out, 
universities are out It’s a monumental disaster. . . 
The country needs some psychic healing." 


Eugenie M. Anderson, First U.S. Woman Envoy, Dies 


By David Binder 

New York Times Service 


WASHINGTON — Eugenie M. An- 
derson, 87. who in 1 949 became the first 
woman appointed a U.S. ambassador, 
has died at her home in Red Wing. 
Minnesota. 

Mrs. Anderson, who died Monday, 
had been active in foe Democratic Party 
on the stare and national levels when she 
was appointed ambassador to Denmark 
by President Harry Truman. 

Her interest in international affairs 
bad been stirred by a trip to Europe in 
1937, where in Germany she first saw a 
“totalitarian state in action," as she 
recalled. 

She joined the Democratic Party in 
part to oppose Republican isolationists 
in her election district and worked with 
Hubert Humphrey to eliminate a Com- 
munist faction within the Minnesota 
party. That effort culminated in the 
Democratic-Farm Labor Party fusion in 
the state in 1944. 

She participated in the establishment 
of Americans for Democratic Action. 


1948 and an appointment as a national 
committee woman. She campaigned that 
year for Mr. Truman's re-election. 

“She was a prime force in moving 
along a good Democratic Party." said a 
former Minnesota governor, Orville 
Freeman. 

After her service in Denmark. Pres- 
ident John Kennedy appointed her in 
1962 to head the U.S. legation in Bul- 
garia. then a militant Communist ally of 
the Soviet Union. 

President Lyndon Johnson appointed 
Mrs. Anderson to represent foe United 
States on foe UN Trusteeship Council, 
and a year later she served on foe UN 
Committee for Decolonization. 


campaigns of, among others, Ronald 
Reagan and Mr. Buckley’s brother 
James, a Conservative Party candidate 
who was elected senator from New 
York in 1970. While Mr. Reagan was 
president, Mr. Liebman held posts in 
federal agencies. 

In 1990, when he was director of 


Young Communist League in his youth. 


special projects at the Federal Trade 
Commission, he announced his homo- 


Marvin Liebman, 73; Promoted 
Conservatism and Gay Rights 

New York Times Service 

Marvin Liebman. 73. a conservative 
foe of communism who became active 
in promoting gay rights, died Sunday at 
George Washington Medical Center in 
Washington. 

The cause was heart failure, said Wil- 


formed by foe party’s liberal wing in 
1947. This took her as a delegate to foe 


liam Buckley Jr., foe editor at large of 
foe conservative journal National Re- 


1947. This took her as a delegate to foe 
Democratic National Convention in 


foe conservative journal National Re- 
view and a close friend. 

Mr. Liebman helped in foe political 


Commission, he announced his homo- 
sexuality in a letter to Mr. Buckley, in 
the letter, which was published in Na- 
tional Review. Mr. Liebman contended 
foar “political gay bashing, racism and 
anti-Semitism’ had survived “even in 
this golden period of conservatism's 
great triumphs." 

Later, he said he had made foe dis- 
closure with foe hope of countering 
what he called foe homophobia in con- 
servative politics. He also said he felt no 
bitterness toward Mr. Buckley, al- 
though they disagreed on the normality 
and morality of homosexuality. 

In an article Mr. Liebman wrote in 
1 992. he said: “To be gay. conservative 
and Republican is not a contradiction. 
I’m proud to be all three." 

In a 1992 autobiography, “ Coming 
Out Conservative." Mr. Liebman re- 
counted that be had belonged to foe 


Arthur Cunningham, 68, 
American Composer-Pianist 

New York Times Service 

Arthur Cunningham. 68 , a composer, 
pianist and conductor who combined 
classical forms and instrumentation 
with elements of rock and jazz, died 
Monday at his home in Nyack, New 
York. 

John Ellis, a former student of Mr. 
Cunningham's, said foe cause was pro- 
state cancer. 


Mr. Cunningham's eclecticism yiel- 
ded a rich, varied repertory that included 
a rock opera, “His Natural Grace” 
(1969): “Night Song" (1973), a theater 
work with a text in Swahili and the 
South Carolinian Gull ah dialect; and 
“Engrams" (1969), a solo piano work 
in which jazz and Serialism mingled. 
His best-known orchestral work, “Con- 
cen tries" ( 1968), was performed by Zu- 
bin Mehta and the New York Philhar- 
monic in a revised version in 1989. 

His “Lullabye for a Jazz Baby” was 
in foe repertory of the Alvin Ailey 
Dance Company in the early 1980s ana 
was regularly performed on orchestral 
pops programs. 


Crmptkdtn Our Staff From DapOKha 

KINSHASA Zaire — Zaire’s new 
prime minister, Etienne Tshisekedi, un- 
veiled a cabinet Thursday with no as- 
sociates of President Mobutu Sese Seko 
and six ministries reserved for rebels 
controlling a quarter of the country. 

But a rebel official said the insurgents 
would not join Mr. Tshisekedi’s gov- 
ernment. 

Ashe boarded a plane in foe Zairian • 
city of Gama for talks in South Africa, 
Raphael Nghenda. foe rebel information 
commissioner, was asked whether the 
insurgents would accept foe posts re- 
served for the rebels. He said, '‘No." 

“Why would we enter a Mobutu gov- 
ernment?" he asked. "We want 
Mobutu out. Tshisekedi and his gov- 
ernment are part of Mobutu’s admin- 
istration.” 

In what local analysts described as a 
new front against foe ailing Marshal 
Mobutu, Mr. Tshisekedi also dissolved 
Parliament, which is dominated by 
Mobutu supporters. 

Its legislative role would revert to foe 
sovereign national conference that 
launched Zaire's democratic transition 
seven years ago and, in theory, stripped 
Marshal Mobutu of most powers. 

“Tshisekedi has opened a second 
front against Mobutu," said a local 
commentator, referring to advances by 
Laurent Kabila’s rebels who have put 
Marshal Mobutu’s army on the run in 
eastern Zaire. 

“I don’t think Mobutu will accept 
this," the analyst said. 

“He has no power to dissolve Par- 
liament," said Banza Mukalayi, vice 


has seized a quarter of Zaire and is 
targeting foe main minin g centers. 

“Kabila has contributed to foe return 
of legality," Mr. Tshisekedi said. “He 
merits foe acclaim of our people." 

But he said the civil war now had to 


stop. “I don't see the war continuing,” 
he said. “Too much Zairian blood has 


been shed. I will see my brother Kabila 
and discuss." . 

A Zairian.. government negotiator. 
Honoxe Ngbanda, representing Marshal 
Mobutu, arrived in Johannesburg on 
Diursday. • 

A delegation representing Mr. Kabila 
was expected Thursday. Die first meet- 
ing between foe two sides was sched- 
uled for the weekend. (Reuters, AFP ) 


Hashimoto Gains 
Key Support for 
Gls on Okinawa 


Agence France-Presse 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Ryu- 
taro Hashimoto won crucial sup- 
port Thursday from the main op- 
position party for his drive to allow 
U.S. forces to stay on Okinawa de- 
spite objections from landowners. 

But allegations that a U.S. Navy 


e officer sexually assaulted a 
lese woman near Tokyo 


lament, said banza Mukaiayi, vice 
^resident of Marshal Mobutu's Popular 


Revolutionary Movement. “It is mad- 
ness. " 

Mr. Tshisekedi, who announced de- 
tails of his 26-member government at a 
news conference, said he was reserving 
for the rebel alliance foe portfolios of 
foreign affairs, defense, budget, plan- 


ning, foreign made and agriculture. 
He showered praise on Mr. Kai 


He showered praise on Mr. Kabila, 
whose Alliance of Democratic Forces 
for the Liberation of foe Congo (Zaire) 


Japanese woman near Tokyo 
threatened to fuel renewed public 
resentment over the U.S. military 
presence. The petty officer was 
taken into custody by American 
military authorities Wednesday. 

Ichiro Ozawa, head of the New 
Frontier Party, pledged help in 
passing a bill that would allow the 
U.S. military to keep operating 12 
Okinawa facilities. They are on 
land owned by about 3,000 people 
who have refused to renew leases 
that expire on May 14. 


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HflgSP Fa*or send detailed lesume for 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Britain Relaxes Rules for Casinos 


Pacific Western University 

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LONDON (Reuters) — Britain's casino operators sighed 
with relief Thursday when the government allowed them to 
admit new members more quicldy and keep bars open later. 

Casinos had argued that rules had to be relaxed to allow them 
to cope with increased competition from overseas gambling 
centers and the success of Britain's National Lottery. 

The changes cut the time a gambler has to wait between 
applying to join a casino and gaming at its tables to 24 hours 
from 48. 


Face-Lift 
At Times 
Square 


WEATHER 


Europe 


Forecast far Saturday through Monday, as provided by AccuWeetfier. Asia 


High Low* Mgh LowW 

C» OF OF OF 

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777 Breaks Distance-Speed Records 


SEATTLE (AFP) — A new Boeing 777 jetliner on Wed- 
nesday broke a second world record for commercial aircraft in 
two days when it completed an around-the-worid flight in 42 
hours. 


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The aircraft, a 777-2 OOlGW. set a nonstop distance marie of 
19,920 kilometers (12,450 miles) Tuesday, flying northeast 


from Seattle to Kuala Lumpur. 

It then refueled and flew on to Seattle. All told, foe jet 
circled the globe in 42 hours, six hours less than the record, by 
flying an average 885 kilometers (553 miles) per hour. 


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NEW YORK (NYT) — Hoping to foil counterfeiters. 
American Express introduced redesigned traveler’s checks 
Wednesday foal it said were safer and easier for merchants to 
verily. The new checks, in denominations of $50, S100, $500 
and $1,000, are on sale in foe United States and will be 


and $ 1.000, are on sale in foe United States and will be 
available in other countries in September. 


The .Associated Press 

NEW YORK —Times 
Square's metamorphosis 
from a crime-infested 
area io a family-oriented 
vacation spot took a giant 
leap forward with Dis- 
ney’s $36 million renov- 
ation of the historic New 
Amsterdam Theater. 

"What we are celeb- 
rating today has got to be 
the most startling turn- 
around of any urban area 
in America to this cen- 
tury." Governor George 
Patald said Wednesday. 

Michael Eisner, Dis- 
ney's chairman, called 
the theater's reopening 
on 42d Street foe culmin- 
ation of a dream, “an ex- 
pression of how great the 
city of New York is." 


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North America 

A powerful storm wff lash 
the Plains Saturday than 
ttw Great Lakas and MW- 
west Sunday, with rain, toe. 
enow and severe thunder- 
storms. Rain wrti Bits sb- 
(am wffi reach 9 m East late 


Europe 

Wot weather la on lap lor 
Amsterdam. Berlin ana 
Warsaw Saturday. South- 
east Europe wiH be cool 
end damp through the 
weekend, while much al 


Mild across Japan with 
scattered showers anger- 
ing through the weekend; 
drying out Monday. MaMy 


ilNnEaki 


Sunday and Sunday night. 
Mfid In the East Into Mon- 
day. while the nsfion'a mid- 
section wW turn colder by 
Monday. 


wes te rn Europe. Including 
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will stay d>y and mild, 
entity and at ttmss stormy 
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dry and mild In Bering and 
Seoul, though It may show- 
er In Seoul Monday. Very 
warn and humid In Hong 
Kong and Singapore wttti a 
thundershower possible 
each day. 


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PAGE 3 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


NEW YORK 


... "‘C- 


‘■c 



\lw 


) >eati 

Zaire 




ppor: 


n 


hi*- 


ample enough: Caroi^Far Sf nw c J iain was 


, -**"**"6 a Ul 

send the letter to 10 friends, 
did i ” dDt PCTmission ’” **»• Fadras said. ‘ l I just 


y Did she ever. Mrs. Faricas’s chain loner so far has 

teas- ^. $25i ' oo ° *5 

EBabeftT^ortodS 
diflXtorMike Nichols Qx>th sent $10), and embanassed 

0 °Indeed. second," said Kicbard Kearns, me senior vice pre 

wife of Robin idenf *®* difef of development at Columbia-Pres- 

of the byterian Medical Center; 

Quarantine sbecteseived ." SIoan-Kettering officials said that they had been 

tie nress mid speafc to inundated so far with 14,539 checks from the chain 

thatoffiedals said 5 !SSSh? &****■ t * am lettCT letter- In December and January, the checks arrived at 
and unbecoming «»f»dered tasteless a rate of 200 a week, and 50 to 100 a week continue to 

although it i« lciJ l ^... S n^ I ^^ CtIe ^ lg i S re P} ltal ^ on — arrive. Hospital officials said each contributor receives 

^s^ssfisssii^ssssi 5 ? ? - ■* 

by faemsmunon,’' said Avice Meehan, the hosoiial’s 
spokeswoman. “I think chain letters in general raise 
questions on die pari of the U.S. Postal Service.” 

' Chain letters are illegal if they promise financial 
wckpots. require a fee and rely on an “element of 
chance, like a prize drawing for 
John B rugger, a spokesman for the 


ital Queasy 

' And now, Ms. Meehan was asked, the hospital can’t 
turn off a chain letter? 

“Bingo,” she said. 

Recipients of the letters got a stack of photocopied 
lists showing who had sent the letter to whom, and 
could trace, if they took the lime, how the letter had 
jumped from one circle — say, actors and actresses — 
to others, like writers, lawyers, real estate executives 
and government officials. 

Elizabeth Taylor sent her letter to, among others, 
Roddy McDowall, Carrie Fisher and the celebrity 
photographer Firooz Zahedi. who sent it to Gregory 
Pfeck. who sent to Lauren Bacall, who sent it to Mr. 
Nichols, who sent it to his friend Cynthia O’Neal, the 
widow of the actor Patrick O’Neal and the president of 
Friends Indeed, an organization for people with life- 
threatening illnesses. 

Ms. O’Neal sent h to Peter Wooster, an interior 
designer, who sent it to Jane-Howard Hammerstein. a 
screenwriter, who it sent to the author Betty Rollin, who 
sent it to the writer Delia Ephron, who sent it to Susan 
Thomases, a friend of Hillary Rodham Clinton's. 

Like many recipients, Mr. Wooster said be found 
chain letters an annoyance, but he said that the cause 
seemed like a good one and that the SI 0 contribution 
. r . . was painless. Besides, he loved the sociological as- 

Officials said the chain letter was confusing and pects of it. “ I thought it was a riot." ’ he said. “Although 
inconsistent with the hospital’s own direct-mail cam- I couldn’t fa, 
paign, which solicits contributions as small as $25 from ~ ‘ 

people all over the country. The officials would not say 
bow much direct mail brings in for SIoan-Kettering, 


POLITICAL NOT 


Service. Mrs. Farkas's letter did none of these. 

Btit ah official of the Better Business Bureau of 
Metropolitan New York frowned on the idea. 

“In terms of a business practice, they're not con- 
sidered ethical,” said die official, Cheryl Bell. “This 
could damage the reputation of the charity because 
most chain letters are scams.” 

Never mind that this chain letter has made its way 
through overlapping elites in New York and Los 
Angeles, and has arrived in the mail of Gregory Peck, 
Laura' Bacall, the television journalist Katie Comic and 
the designer Isaac. Mizrahi Neither Paul Marks, Sloan- 
Kettsring’s president, nor Mortimer Chute, a senior vice 
president who is m charge of fund-raising, would com- 
ment on Mrs. Farkas’s efforts. Skan-Kettering’s com- 
petitors, however, were quick to emhrace her. 

“I’d want her on my development committee in a 
second,” said Richard Kearns, the senior vice 


but they acknowledged that it was an important part of 
the $75 million that the hospital raised last year. So far, 
an official said, the letter has nor hurt that effort. 


figure out how it got to Elizabeth Taylor.” 
Remarkably few people who sent on the letter 
feared it might be a fraud, perhaps because of the 
celebrities involved. 

“I just believed it was legitimate,” said Mr. Zahedi, 
who got the letter from Ms. Taylor. * ‘ She’s a friend of 
mine. I wouldn't question ha - on it.” 


Suicide Cult 
Found Time 
In Last Days 
For Fun, Too 


By Tony Perry 

Los Angeles Times Service 

RANCHO SANTA FE, Califor- 
nia — Even as they preparedto '. 
commit suicide, members of the- 
Heaven’s Gate cult enjoyed some 
earthly pleasures: gamblingin Las 


Children Inoculated in Strawberry Scare 


and taking a bus trip through scenic 
parts of northern California and 
southern Oregon. • 

In Las Vegas, the cultists visited 
the Stratosphere Hotel amnmrmnf 
park in late February and played the 
slot machines. Dedicated penny- 
pinchers, cult members ate at hotel 
buffets rather than restaurants. 


to the gambling mecca not by die 
lure of easy money onroller-caaster 
thrills but by a public-meeting to 
discuss Area 51, thar jpart of the 
Nevada desert thought by believers 
■ in unidentified flying objects to be 
the place where the UJS. Air Farce 
has kept an alien spacecraft under 
ms ton 


y 


decades. 

ley was an ob- 
session, One cultist found $20 is 
Las Vegas and dutifully tamed it 
over to die communal treasury.-. 

The final entry in the meticu- 
lously kept financial ledger .of 
Heaven’s Gate was from Much 21, 
five days before die bodies of 39 
cult members were found. The 
entry indicated that two cultists had 
found 6 cents. 

Although celibate and tee- 
totalers, the cultists satisfied their 
cravings for candy, maple syrup, 
cookies, sugar-rich soda pop and 
pizza. When investigators found 
the corpses at die mansion here, 
they also found seven quarts of ice 
cream in the refrigerator. 

- The ledger and other documents 
belonging to die cult indicate that 
even after the group made the de- 
cision to commit mass suicide, 
members still attended to small 
household chores: paying rent, 
paying a S2J0 library fine and buy- 
mggroceries. 

Even die farewell tapes that mem- 
bers made March 1 9 did not seem to 

disrupt the group's mania for clean- 
liness, orderliness and financial tidi- 
ness. After making the tapes, the 

groin) enjoyed a trip to a pizza parka - 
— tab: $41727 — and attended the 
movie “Secrets and Lies,” where 

drank $75 worth of soda, 
final days of Heaven's Gate 
to have been a combination 


■ uiyviv 

_ thereto 


\je ran uuuiig^ 

The entire cult membership went to 
* Las Vegas. In March they visited 
the Wild Animal Park. 

Later, several went to Mexico, 
probably to Tijuana. Also at about 
that time, cultists saw a homeless 
person and gave him $2. 

Four culnsts went on a bus mp 
through Santa Rosa and Sacra- 
natittoT California, and Gdd 
Beach, Oregon, before returning 
through Santa Clanta, nonh of Lot 
A ngeles, where *ey stopped to eat 
ST Burger King- The bus dnver 

was given a tip — $10. 

Judging from truckloads of 
belongmES seized by ^ county of- 
ficialsfufo In Heaven s 
oriterJy and stmetured (tore « £ 
master list for bancuts) but not 
" severe or without fan. 



• RkWi^dnn/Tbr.VwKM 

A man picking strawberries from a field in Simi Valley, California. 


Ceeedrd in Ok Staff From Dafkachri 

WASHINGTON — Thousands of 
American schoolchildren exposed to 
tainted strawberries were given hep- 
atitis inoculations Thursday as federal 
officials tried to determine now the ber- 
ries were infected and sought to stave 
off panic. 

U.S. officials said that 153 children 
and teachers in several Michigan 
schools were diagnosed with the dis- 
ease, while students and school staff in a 
half-dozen other states may have been 
exposed to frozen strawberries carrying 
the virus. 

A fruit processing company, An- 
drews & Williamson, based m San 
Diego, California, had presented the 
tainted Mexican strawberries as U.S. 
fruit in order to qualify for the school 
lunch program. Fred Williamson, the 
company president, was forced to resign 
following the disclosure. 

About 9,000 schoolchildren in Cali- 
fornia and 2,000 in Georgia were to 
receive inoculations of immune 
globulin. The medicine is not a vaccine, 
but contains antibodies to help prevent 
the illness. 

Hepatitis A has flu-like symptoms 
and is rarely fatal. Common m devel- 
oping countries, it is spread by poor 
personal hygiene or by contamination 
by sewage. 

Mexican agriculture officials said it 
was likely that the berries were con- 
taminated “during processing and pack- 
ing rather than dining cultivation.” 

(Rentiers. AP) 


Republican Attack 
Appeals to Donors 

WASHINGTON — In a highly 
successful direct-mail letter that plays 
on old fears about Communist in- 
fluence. a Republican Party commit- 
tee is breaking fund-raising records by 
exploiting tire Democrats' troubles 
over campaign financing. 

The letter — by the National Re- 
publican Senatorial Committee, die 
main fund-raising body for Senate Re- 
publicans — says the White House 
was “sold for ILLEGAL FOREIGN 
CASH” including money from ‘ ’Bled 
China, which still considers itself a 
Communist country!" 

The letter accuses President Bill 
Clin i on's fund-raising committee of 
accepting illegal donations from a 
“Communist regime.” It was signed 
by Senator Mitch McConnell, Repub- 
lican of Kentucky, who is the chair- 
man of the senatorial committee, and 
was mailed to 240,000 potential 
donors. The letter was also printed in 
five conservative magazines. 

In the first two days after its mail- 
ing, the letter brought in money or 
letters of support from more than 
22,000 people. More than 120,000 
people responded last week, 20 per- 
cent more than any week in the fast 
campaign. Michael Russell, a spokes- 
man for the National Republican Sen- 
atorial Committee, said that so far this 
year the committee had broken fund- 
raising records, generating about $4 
million, had reduced a post-election 
debt of S7 million to $5 million and 
has around S2 million in cash. 

Michael Tucker, a spokesman for 
the Democratic Senatorial Campaign 
Committee, said the controversy over 
the fund-raising tactics of the Demo- 
crats had not slowed donations. The 


The regulator, Eugene A. Ludwig, 
comptroller of the currency, said he 
was assigning a subordinate the job of 
deciding on two applications that 
could allow NationsBank Corp, of 
Charlotte, North Carolina, the coun- 
try’s founb-largest bank, to enter the 
business of real -estate development 
and leasing. 

Last May. Mr. Ludwig attended a 
coffee at the White House that was 
sponsored by the Democratic Nation- 
al Committee and attended by 
bankers, including the chief executive 
of NationsBank. Hugh L. McCotl Jr. 

Republicans in Congress said Mr. 
Ludwig's attendance at the White 
House meeting gave the appearance 
of political influence on the regulatory 
system. His agency, an arm of the 
Treasury Department, regulates 2,800 
nationally chartered banks. 

Mr. Ludwig has acknowledged his 
attendance was ‘‘inappropriate.’' (AP) 

Anti-Tobacco Push 

NEW YORK — In a drive to re- 
verse a surge in teen-age smoking, 
anti-tobacco forces are pushing for a 
combination of state and federal tax 
increases that could raise the cost of a 
pack of cigarettes by more than $1. 

Buoyed by public revulsion ai dis- 
closures that tobacco companies have 
been aiming at teenagers for years 
with sophisticated advertising and 
marketing techniques, advocates are 
lobbying for tax increases in 19 states 
and hope to have campaigns going in 
all 50 by next year. 

Congress is considering a bill in- 
troduced last month by Senators Orrin 
Hatch, Republican of Utah, and Ed- 
ward Kennedy, Democrat of Mas- 
sachusetts, to nearly triple the federal 
excise tax on cigarettes, to 67 cents a 
pack from 24 cents. (NYT) 


said. 


(NYT) 


committee raised $2.9 million in the /rr 

first two months of 1997, fa: (JuOte/ UnqUOie 

Gary LaPaille. chairman of the 
Democratic Party in Illinois and head 
of the Association of State Demo- 
cratic Chairs, on investigations into 
the Democrats' fund-raising: “It does 


Regulator Recusal 

WASHINGTON — A regulator 
who attended a fund-raising coffee 
reception last year at the White House 
withdrew Thursday from reviewing 
an important case involving a bank 
represented at the gathering. 


no good to sit and cry that the sky is 
falling and hang your head low. Our 
job is to keep morale up and get our 
coffers filled." (AP) 


Away From 
Politics 

• The judge in the Oklahoma City 
bombing case denied a request from 
news organizations that he stop hold- 
ing closed conferences to decide 
which jurors to dismiss. 


• A request by Theodore Kaczyn- 

ski’s lawyers to peruse files from the 
entire 17-year Unabomber investiga- 
tion has been rejected by a judge in 
Sacramento, California. (API 

• Fishermen are being told to cur- 


tail their catch of sharks along the 
south Atlantic Coast and in the Gulf of 
Mexico because of conservationists’ 
concern that some species may be 
endangered. (AP) 

• A federal judge has dismissed a 
lawsuit which accused Detroit news- 
papers of violating antitrust laws by 
( Reuters i publishing combined weekday edi- 
. tions for the first nine weeks ot a 19- 
month strike against the papers. (AP) 


• Two days after attempting sui- 
cide, 39-year-old David Lee Herman, 
who killed a woman while robbing a 
nightclub, was put to death by lethal 
injection in Huntsville, Texas. (AP) 


Ecuadorans Grow Restless With Interim Government 


By Diana 1 Jean Scheme 

. New York Tunes Service 

QUITO, Ecuador — Nearly two 
months after Ecuadorans ousted their 
president over bis severe economic 
measures and bis administration's at- 
mosphere: of unbridled corruption, the 
government that replaced him appears 
paralyzed. 

] ari d ri g a popular .mandate for much 
other than a rejection of the former 
admimstration’s policy, the interim 
president, Fabian Alarcon, has not put 
together an econcnruc blueprint far the 
future; instead, he has merely slowed 
the unpopular program of tne farmer 
president, Abdala Bucaram. 

The Congress has essentially taken 
over die executive branch. Mr. Alarcon 
is the former president of Congress, and 
the new ministers of public works, pet- 
roleum and energy crane from Congress 
as well. ■ 

While many Ecuadorans say they are 
relieved to havepeace after the scandals 
and rougfahouse 1 tactics of Mr. Bu- 
caram’s six months in power, critics 


little more than maneuvering to extent 
his term past 1998. 

They say the takeover of fee pres- 
idency by the Congress, where 82 seats 
are divided among 16 parties, has 
merely extended to the executive branch 
die legislative body’s own fragment- 
ation and weakness. 

* ‘The politicians hijacked the popular 
movement and channeled our straggle 
to their 'own ends,” said Fausto Dutan, 
president of foe United Wwkers’ From, 
the labor organization that stood at the 
forefront of the February demonstra- 
tions to oust Mr. Bucaram. “When the 
people went out to the streets, it was to 
improve their situation, not to continue 
in the same boat” • 

With ales of Mr. Bncaram’s excesses 
still surfacing daily, the Congress, having 
presented itself as a crusading agent of 
foe popular wilL is findmgitself inaeas- 
' in ----- - 1 - 


Sorae 30 members, including Mr. 
Alarcon and the current president of 
Congress, Heinz Moeller, have been ac- 
cused of accepting checks from Mr. Bu- 
caram to turn overto their constituencies. 
The voters banned such types of pay- 
ments in a referendum two years ago. 

Even in cases where the money was 
simply passed on for local use without 
any of it going into the congressman's 
pocket, the legislators violated the law 
by accepting the money. That has put 
Congress in an awkward position to 
pursue wrongdoing by the previous ad- 
ministration, and it has left Congress 
unable to seize a lever for establishing 
moral, if not legal, legitimacy. 

After initially agreeing to an inter- 
view, Mr. Alarcon referred questions to 
Arturo Gaigotena, the presidential min- 
ister. Mr. Gargotena contended that the 
government had no need to establish its 
legitimacy. 

“I don’t think that anything can be 
more democratic than that the Congress 
used the powers granted it under the 
constitution” to respond to the popular 
discontent, be said. 

Walter Spinier, an economic analyst 
who writes a weekly newsletter in the 
city of Guayaquil, said the paralysis 
under the new president was inevitable. 
“His mandate was not to do anything,” 

Mr. Spurur said. 

A congressional resolution gave the 
new president his orders, Mr. Spurier 
said. Under that resolution, “You have 
to be a populist, freeze the foreign debt, 
lower prices,’ ‘ he said. “Now, Alarcon 
has to avoid measures that would lead 
Congress to cut his term short” 

Mr. Alarcon is trying to narrow a 
record budget deficit of $13 billion, or 
6-6 percent of the gross national 
product. to23 percent by reducing pub- 
lic spending, cleaning up the customs 
system, increasing tariffs and raising 
petroleum prices for distributors, but 
n<rt consumers. 

But in a detailed analysis^Mr. Spurier 
concluded that the president would 
probably not be able to accomplish all 


that, and that if he does, it will only be 
because the deficit figures were over- 
stated io begin with. 

In 1995, a border conflict with Peru 
sapped the country’s resources. Then a 
corruption scandal involving Vice Pres- 
ident Alberto Dabik, who fled to Costa 
Rica, weakened the government so 
much that Ecuadorans wondered wheth- 
er it could hold out until last summer’s 
elections. 

The flamboyant administration of 
Mr. Bucaram. and the patch ed -toge ther 
interim administration of Mr. Alarcon, 
have now tried Ecuadorans further, and 


ale are asking when they will 
have leaders with ihe confidence and 
legitimacy to govern. 

Although Mr. Alarcon says he will 
step down in favor of a popularly elect- 
ed president in 1998, when the interim 
presidency is set to end. some analysts 
say he is maneuvering behind the scenes 
to stay in office through 2000, when Mr. 
Bucaram 's term would have expired. 

“The only direction we have is a 
political class that fights over power,” 
said Juan Jose Illingworth, a congress- 
man who opposed the process that in- 
stalled Mr. Alarcon. 


Some unions and a number of econ- 
omists say die president should take his 
cue from the streets, where the masses 
rejected the hard-line economic changes 
that Mr. Bucaram had earned to an 
extreme. He had proceeded with strip- 
ping away price supports on basic ser- 
vices, privatizing state assets, trimming 
the government work force and dis- 
mantling labor protection laws. 

A major impediment on growth is 
that 45 percent of this small country’s 
$4 billion annual budget goes for debt 
service on foreign and domestic bor- 
rowings. 


Tennessee Agrees: Blacks Can Vote 


The Associated Press 

NASHVILLE, Tennessee — Tennessee 
has ratified the 15th Amendment. 127 years 
after it was added to the U.S. Constitution. 

The 1 5th Amendment guarantees that no 
one can be denied the right to vote on grounds 
of “race, color or previous condition of ser- 
vitude." 

The state’s House of Representatives and 
Senate have voted unanimously for a res- 
olution that ceremoniously ratified what has 
been the law of the land since 1 870. With their 
action, Tennessee became the last state to 
ratify the amendment. 


“It’s embarrassing," state Senator Steve 
Cohen said, “that the state hasn't done it 
already. Let’s get on with it.” 

The 15th Amendment was submitted to 
the states for ratification after it was ap- 

? roved by the 40th U.S. Congress on Feb. 
6, 1869. 

Three-quarters of the 37 states in existence 
at the rime approved it. The bill was ratified 
on March 30, 1870. 

Many other states ratified the amendment 
late, including Delaware in 1901, Oregon in 
1959, California in 1962, Maryland in 1973 
and Kentucky in 1976. 


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AMERICA ONE" 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1997 


PAGE 4 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


For Japanese Men, Schoolgirls Provide Ultimate Erotic Lure 


Objects of Middle-Aged Lust Get Younger; 
‘Only Maniacs Like Girls Below 3d Grade’ 


By Nicholas D. KsistoF 

IVw York Times Sm-Le 

TOKYO — With a shy, quivering 
glance that she had practiced a thousand 
times, eyes slightly downcast but lu- 
minous with innocence and apprehen- 
sion. Kaori sat at her desk in her prim 
school uniform, framed by a black- 
board. waiting fora "teacher'* to walk 
into the classroom and rip her clothes 
off. 

It looks like a real classroom, and 
baby -faced Kaori looks just like a real 
Japanese schoolgirl. But it is all make- 
believe. for here in Japan the best way 
for a prostitute to recruit clients is to put 
on a school uniform and adopt the naive 
anxiety of a frightened schoolgirl. 

“Japanese men tend to be obsessed 
by schoolgirls," said Kaori, who would 
not give her last name but cheerfully 
conceded she is really 26. "The men 
who come here are looking for sub- 
missive schoolgirls." 

This is an “image club," one of 
several hundred in Tokyo where Jap- 
anese men pay about SI 50 an hour to 
live out their fantasies about school- 
girls. In this club, customers can choose 
from 1 1 rooms, including classrooms, a 
school gym changing room, and a 
couple of imitation railroad coaches, 
where, to the recorded roar of a com- 
muter train, men can molest strap- 
hangers in school uniforms. 

Behind the image clubs is a disturb- 
ing national obsession with schoolgirls 
as sexual objects. Far more than in most 
other countries, men in Japan seem to 
find schoolgirls sexually alluring — 
and, by all accounts, the target age is 
getting steadily younger. 

The sexuality of schoolgirls has be- 
come an issue in Japan over the last year 
or so because a growing number of real 
schoolgirls are turning to prostitution to 
raise pocket money. 

But most of the disapproval has been 
directed at the girls rather than at their 
middle-aged customers, and. in any 
case, it is legal in Tokyo for men to have 


sex with children over the age of 12. 

[That may change, however. An ad- 
visory panel of the Tokyo Metropolitan 
District recommended Thursday that 
the capital bring its laws in line with 
most local governments in Japan by 
prohibiting adults from engaging in 
“obscene" acts with children under 18, 
Reuters reported. The proposed bill 
would punish those who make pay- 
ments in cash or gifts in exchange for 
sex.] 

Many Japanese, particularly women, 
say they are deeply troubled by this 
obsession with schoolgirls. Yet by in- 
ternational standards, there is remark- 
ably little domestic outrage in Japan at 
what people here call Loli-con, or the 
Lolita Complex, after Vladimir Nabo- 
kov's novel about a middle-aged man's 
obsession with a young girl. 

What is the appeal of very young 
girls? 

“Lots of Japanese men feel very 
threatened by adult women," said 
Masao Miyamoto, a male psychiatrist 
and the author of a best-selling analysis 
of Japanese society. “But a 15-year-old 
girl would not be threatening. It's not so 
much sexual as psychological." 

Dr. Miyamoto and others say that the 
discomfort that many men have with 
women their own age is in part a con- 
sequence of the growing sophistication 
of Japanese women. While most men 
slave over their jobs and take almost no 
vacation, a growing number of young 
women find that they have the time to 
travel abroad, read books, go to con- 
certs, or take evening classes. 

A result is that while several decades 
ago most middle-aged men still felt 
more worldly than the women they en- 
countered, now the opposite is often 
true. So to seek comfort and relaxation, 
the analysts say, the men turn to the only 
females over whom they can still plau- 
sibly feel some edge — schoolgirls. 

"In associating with young girls, 
men want to behave in an overbearing 
way." said Rika Kayama, a female psy- 
chiatrist and social commentator. 



\Mwla I >. kiMmv ■»«. Vui Tlnw 

Suzu, left, and Kaori, dressed as schoolgirls, awaiting customers in a “classroom” at a Tokyo “image club.” 


“They want to position themselves as 
superior to the girls.” 

Several decades ago. sexual fantasies 
centered on ‘ ‘office ladies' ' in their 20s. 
Then the focus became college women, 
and, a few years ago. it shifted to high- 
school girls. 

Now the focus is on junior-high 
school girls. 

“The age at which the girls seem 
interesting is clearly dropping." said 
Hiroyuki Fukuda, a 30-year-old man 
who edits a magazine called Anatomical 
illustrations of Junior High School 
Girls. 


4 * But it's only die maniacs who go foT 
girls below the third grade." 

To be sure. Japan is without doubt a 
safer place for children than America. 
Groping of teenage girls on crowded 
subways is common in Japan, with 69 
percent of high-school girls saying in 
a recent poll that they had been abused 
in that way, but most other crimes are 
much rarer in Japan than in other 
industrialized countries. While there 
is doubt about the reporting, only 
about one-30th as many rapes are re- 
ported per capita in Japan as in Am- 
erica. 


Most of the attention in the Japanese 
press lately has focused on schoolgirl 
prostitution. A survey last year in-Tokyo 
round that more than 25 percent of ju- 
nior-high girls had called “telephone 
clubs” — pornographic services that 
pay girls to have erotic conversations 
with men. 

Nearly 4 percent of all junior-high 
girls said that they had accepted money 
in exchange for “dates" with men. 

“I thmk it's OJC as long as they pay 
me," said Yuki Shinohara, 16, who said 
she had dated men for money, but had 
not slept with them. 


China Moves ; 
To Forestall 
Rights Critics 
At UN Forum 

CVnfafinf to Oht Stog Fi.mO.yxfa hrt 

BEIJING — Seeking to stop other 
countries from condemning its human 
rights record before a UN commission u 
in Geneva. China warned Thursday that *. 
their relations with Beijing might suffer 
if it is publicly criticized. 

The Foreign Ministry s pokes man: 
Shen Guofang. held out the prospect of 
dialogues on human rights with coun- 
tries that do not attack China before the 
UN Human Rights Commission. 

If * ‘there is no confrontation, then 
China can begin dialogues on human 
rights with every country," Mr. Shen' 
said. “But if there is confrontation, then 
I’m afraid that there will be no basis for 
dialogue.” 

He commented as Western countries’ 
appeared to be abandoning their resolve 
to condemn Beijing for human rights 
violations. 

France, after talking with Germany, 
Italy and Spain, said last week that it 
would not back a negative resolution, 
Japan also appeared to be wavering. • {• 

Ambassador Bill Richardson of the; 
United States told the commission Tues-i 
day that Washington still wanted a con-! 
demnatory resolution, although it P*®-; 
(erred that the Europeans take the lead. ! 

To protest France's move, diplomats- 
at the commission session in Geneva' 
said Thursday, the Netherlands will not- 
sponsor resolutions against any other; 
country. 

The Netherlands, as current holder of 
die rotating EU presidency, was to have, 
proposed motions condemning Burma,; 
Iran, Iraq, Zaire and possibly Indonesia- 
on behalf of the EU. ; 

European attempts to condemn China, 
in this UN forum have failed every yearly 
since 1990, when international outraged 
was still fresh from the Chinese mil- 
itary ’s deadly assault on prcwlemocracy; 
demonstrators in central Beijing in June< 
1989. (AP, AFP)[ 


BRIEFLY 


Coalition Backs Deve Go wda 

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister H. D. Deve Gowda won 
support from his United Front coalition Thursday, a move 
indicating that members would rather lose a no-confidence 
vote and face new elections than dump him as leader. 

His coalition refused Congress (I) Party demands that he 
be replaced in order to rescue his government in the 
Parliament vote next week. India's newspiqiers reported 
Thursday. 

Parliament will convene April 1 1 for a confidence vote 
on Mr. Deve Gowda. (AP) 

Sri Lankans Unite in Peace Bid 

COLOMBO — - Sri Lanka’s ru ling People's Alliance and 
the main opposition United National Party have agreed to 
work together to try to end the long war against Tamil 
rebels, the government said Thursday. 

Foreign Minister Lakshman Kadirgamar said the two 
parties were aiming at a ‘ 'common approach ’ * to resolve the 
conflict. They also agreed that the party in opposition would 
not undermine any discussions or decisions between the 
ruling party and any other group, including the Tamil 
rebels, aimed at ending the ethnic war. (Reuters) 

Mercenary Spoils in New Guinea 

PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea — The mer- 
cenary company hired to crush a separatist uprising in 
Papua New Guinea had sought a stake in the country’s 
lucrative copper mine in exchange for fighting the rebels, an 
investigator said Thursday. 

The question of whether the British mercenary firm 
Sandline International had sought to own pan of the mine is 
an important issue for a judicial inquiry into the hiring of the 
mercenaries to crush the rebellion or. the island of Bou- 
gainville. 

The $36 million mercenary contract outraged the coun- 
try's military, which said it was underpaid and poorly 
equipped Brigadier General Jerry Singirok said the gov- 


ernment was corrupt and asserted that Prime Minister Julius 
Chan was trading away national assets to foreign mer- 
cenaries. (AP) 

Pakistani Shoot-Out Claims 3 

PESHAWAR, Pakistan — A gunfight outside a crowded 
polling center left three people dead Thursday and critically 
wounded a candidate in the parliamentary elections, au- 
thorities said 

Qamar Abbas, the candidate for Benazir Bhutto's 
Pakistan People's Party, was wounded in the shoot-out in a 
narrow street in Peshawar, a city near Afghanistan. 

Shabir Bilour, the son of the rival Awami National Party 
candidate Gbutam Bilour, was killed, along with a police 
officer and an Awami party supporter. (AP) 

For the Record 

Vietnam and China will bold expert-level talks on their 
dispute over sovereignly of a potentially gas-rich South 
China Sea area in Beijing next Wednesday, a Foreign 
Ministry spokesman in Hanoi said on Thursday. (Reuters) 

The Indian government Thursday asked the army to 
help move goods after more than 2 million truckers kept 
their vehicles off the roads for the third day. (Reuters) 

One of Cambodia's leaders, Hun Sen. warned Thursday 
of a “confrontation" if opponents keep accusing his party 
of being involved in a grenade attack that killed 1 6 people at 
a political rally. (AP) 

VOICES From Asia 

Kosei Oyadoraari, mayor of the Okinawan capital, 
Naha, on Prime Minister Ryu taro Hashimoto’s asking 
Parliament on Thursday to extend leases on land for U.S. 
military bases on Okinawa: “To ask Okinawa to peacefully 
coexist with the U.S. bases after its society has been 
undermined by that very presence is too cruel.” ( Reuters ) 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1 Academic 
division 

10 Chubby 
15 Unruly 
1C Harder to find 


17 Temporary 
winter havens 
is Silver Springs 
neighbor 

19 Having feelings 
30 Hotter 
21 Business 
owner's concern 


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Esl 1911. Paris 

“Sank Roo Doe Noo‘ 


A Space for Thought. 


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"Elijah, "e.g. 

33 Guthrie and 
others 
S3 Backfire 

3« 'South Pacific" 

lass 

as Discloses 

asRuboui 

37 Part ol Pedro's 
diet 

39 Martinique 

empteron902 

40 How some 
"Melrose Place' 
stories proceed 

41 German 
sausages 

42 Where to buy a 
suit 

44 Writer Barthetme 
4? Giant star in 
Scorpius 

53 "There was 

woman . . . " 

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4 Puts Wades to 
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s Wipes oui 
■ Shelled 

7 Butchers' 
measures 


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9 Postal rtes. 

10 Bafytwo 

11 Twisthand 

12 River at Orsk 

13 Cartoonist 

I ilTtlnK 

14 Implore 

20 They can be 
grand 

22 Cheers 

23 Cleaving tools 

24 Shellbacks 

25 Running wild 

20 Ada of "Bleak 
House* 

zr Bombshells 

to Certain stocks 
ao Estuary feature 

21 Gives the 
double O 

aa One two of 
twosand-wo 


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31 Mrs. Marcos at 
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45 Central pant 
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getupr 

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54 1 994-95 name m 
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Hong Kong’s History: An Open Book ; 


By Edward A. Gargan 

New York Times Service 

HONG KONG — Change, historic 
and ordinary, awaits Hong Kong as 
Chinese rule approaches. Colonial priv- 
ilege, attitudes and instincts are giving 
way to China's desires’ and demands. 

The vocabulary and world view of 
colonialism are fading — from Hong 
Kong’s classrooms, even from the 
sporting ground. 

Sun Yat-sen, the first Chinese rev- 
olutionary of the century, never, ever, 
cooperated with warlords, it appears. 

Badgers and foxes, the fauna of the 
British shires, are pass£. Pandas and 
golden monkeys are to be preferred. 

No one is to refer to the governor any 
more: he's being replaced by a chief 
executive. 

And forget the backstroke. After July 
1. the day China retakes Hong Kong 
from Britain, the territory’s swimmers 
will be doing the yeung wing — the 
“face-up swim.” 

Hong Kong's schools are preparing 
for the new order adopting mainland 
expressions, revising school textbooks, 
focusing more on things Chinese. 

For several years, Hong Kong’s edu- 
cational bureaucracy has been working 
on revisions of textbooks for the ter- 
ritory’s 932,165 students. And it all 
would have happened largely out of 
public view if China’s foreign minister 
had not staked out his own views last 
week on what children here should be 
taught. 

4 ‘The contents of some textbooks cur- 
rently used in Hong Kong do not accord 
with history or reality, are not suited to 
the changes after 1997. contradict the 
spirit of ‘one country two systems’ and 
the Basic Law, and must be revised," 
the foreign minister, Qian Qichen. told 


Chinese legislators, referring to die 
shorthand for Hong Kong's autonomy 
and the miniconstitution for the ter- 
ritory. 

Mr. Qian, who has overseen the cre- 
ation of the new government for Hong 
Kong that will begin work on July 1. 
offered no details on offending texts or 
passages. And there were no sugges- 
tions that Hong Kong embrace the 
sharply skewed versions of history and 
politics promulgated by texts used in 
mainland Chinese schools. 

But his comments made people jit- 
tery, because no one knows just how the 
new Chinese administrators will treat 
the teaching of history. For now, at least, 
many people were pretty sure they knew 
what Mr. Qian was talking about. 

No one knows just how 
the new Chinese 
administrators will treat 
the teaching of history. 


“One of the textbooks used here ex- 
plains the reason why Hong Kong was 
ceded to the British 150 years ago was 
because of a clash of Eastern and West- 
ern cultures, or because the British 
wished to do business and the Qing 
dynasty did not," said Tsang Yok Sing, 
the principal of a local left-leaning high 
school and leader of a pro-Beijing polit- 
ical party. “No opium sales were men- 
tioned in that textbook.” 

And while Hong Kong schools will 
still be permitted to choose whatever 
texts they wish, and though most textual 
changes are relatively minor, some 
people here expressed alarm ai the for- 
eign minister’s statement. 

“What we think is that Hong Kong is a 


free society,” said Cheung Man Kwong. 
the chairman of die union representing; 
Hang Kong's 63,000 teachers and a! 
member of the territory’s legislature.' 
‘'Every publisher has the right to publish' 
what he wants. There will be different' 
views of history- If you are a teacher, you' 
are free to chose what text you want" - 

Hong Kong textbook publishers seem 
flustered by the political skirmishing. 

“Why are the foreign {Hess making 
such a fuss about this?" asked Richard 
Bernard at Oxford University Press. 
“Textbooks are subject to revision 
every year. These are minor technical 
changes related to the handover." 

Hong Kong's schools are not how 
required to use any particular textbook. 

Publishers compete to sell their books . 
to schools, which may pick from a list 
recommended by the Education Depart- 
ment or may ignore the list 

Still, at some publishers, political 
concerns are creeping in. 

At one small publishing house, Kwan 
Cheuk-fung, 23, worried over his edit- 
ing of a junior-high-school history text. 
Toe author had described Sun Yat-sen’s 
early 20th-century organizing and had 
strayed, perhaps unwittingly, into a 
minefield. 

Sun, the author wrote, “cooperated" 
with China’s warlords while trying to 
unite the country. 

“The author used the wrong word- 
ing," said Mr. Kwan, whose pencil 
solved the problem. “We must be con- 
cerned with this political point 

“We must find some suitable word. 
Sun Yat-sen was the father of the coun- 
try, but if we say he joined up with the 
warlords, then this will affect the imag^ 
of him. In our Chinese history, the war- 
lords are bad guys.” 

So out went “cooperated" and in 
went "obtained help from." 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1997 


PAGE 5 


M 


EUROPE 


s 



*C 

<F 


hk 


Mr 


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i Bo 


Labour’s ‘Radical Center’ Ideas 

Blair Promisesto Not Raise Taxes and to Fight Unemployment 


C«WhtowSitfFnm,DBpadia 

LONDON — Tony Blair, unveiling 
Ok opposition Labour Party’s man£ 
festo for the May i election, made. 10 
promises Thursday in a 4 'c ontr act with 
the people” to govern Britain from the 
political center. 

A day after the governing Conser- 
vatives presented their policy blueprint, 
Mr. Blair promised ro-not raise income, 
sax rates, to guarantee low inflation to 
get thousands of young people back to 
work and to show leadership in 
Europe. 

But Mr. Blair, fighting to win power 
for. his party after 18 years in the polit- 
ical wilderness, said there were no quick 
fixes. 

“There are no magic wands or instant 

g >lutions. he said. 4 4 What we do say is: 

ritaio deserves better, and Britain can 
be better." 

. At 43, the Labour leader who has 
drastically overhauled his party since be 
took power three years ago is bidding to 
become the youngest British p rimp- min - ' 
liter this century. 

His 10-point manifesto c ontained 
little that was new. although the pack- 
aging was polished, and Mr. Blair’s dis- 


cussion of the unions that created and 
long controlled his party had a sharp new 
edge. Toward them, he vowed to show 
“an absolute, implacable toughness.” 

Ax a news conference, Mr. Blair nev- 
ertheless gave some credit to the Con- 
servatives, saying he was not dismissing 
all the changes they made since they 
took power in 1979. 

“There are some things the Con- 
servatives got right,” he said. “There 
are some things they got badly wrong: a 
divided society, an education system 
that , is failing oar children,, oyer-cen- 
tralizati.au of government, failure in 
Europe. These ate the things that new 
Labour can put right.” . 

The Labour manifesto included keep- 
ing virtually all the Conservatives' 

tough curbs an labor unions; no increase 
in personal income taxes for five years; 
ana no taking back by the state of the big 
enterprises sold off — including, most 
recently, the national railroad. 

On a European single currency, Mr. 
Blair confirmed that the it would be pin 
to the British public in a referendum, but 
that the government would keep its op- 
tions open. 

. Mr. Blair, whose party led the Con- 


servatives by 27 points in a poll pub- 
lished Thursday in The Times, said the 
manifesto was not a pale copy of that of 
the governing party. 

“I defy anyone to deny this is a 
radical program," he said. “But it is in 
the radical center of politics, modem, 
forward-looking, utterly in tune with the 
times and instin cts of today's Britain.” 

Deputy Prime Minister Michael 
Heselnne immediately called the La- 
bour manifesto a “ surrender” to the 
trade unions, while the leader of the 
liberal Democrats, Paddy Ashdown, 
described Labour’s pledges as “all 
warm words and woolly phrases.” 

Prime Minister John Major, on a cam- 
paign tour in the north of F 
GTa t - 


sailed Labour's plans to give more 



2 Bombs Found 
On English Road 

ComftHat tr* Our Suff Fran Dupotcha 

LONDON — Policemen acting 
on telephone warnings found two ' 
bombs Thursday beneath an elev- 
ated section of a major highway in 
central England, in what was be- 
lieved to be a coordinated campaign 
by the Irish Republican Army. 

' A spokesman for West Midlands 
police said the first device was 
found attached to one of the posts 
that support the M-6 expressway at a 
junction at Bescot. 105 miles (170 
ilometers) northwest of London. 
They called h a viable bomb. 

A search was made after a series 
of bomb alerts that Prime Minister 
John Major immediately attributed 
to the IRA. 

Traffic backed up for miles when 
police closed the M-6 expressway 
while they carried but two con- 
trolled explosions on the device. 
The second bomb, which was found 
at the same junction, failed to gooff, 
although its detonator exploded, the 
police said. Hve hundred people 
were evacuated in the Bescot area. 

. (AP. AFP) 


i- is 


■ England, as- 

r's pi 

i oniy to Scotland and Wales. 

Mr. Major’s campaign seeks to argue 
that the Conservatives have transformed 
Britain economically, and that Labour's 
moderation is cosmetic. 

“In six weeks they’ll sell out to 
Europe,” Mr. Major said, "in three 
months they'll raise billions of pounds 
in tax, and in 12 months they'll have 
handed power back to the unions.” 

(Reuters. AFP. APi 


BRIEFLY 



Eurotunnel 
Announces 
Measures to 
Bolster Safety 


to 


Ned MoaM/Tbr Aswca*d Pros 

Paddy Ashdown, the leader of the Liberal Democrats, assailing the 
Labour Party's manifesto at a news conference Thursday in London. 


Insurers Assess Holocaust Suit 

LONDON — European insurers are combing through 
old records to assess the likely impact of a U.S. lawsuit 
alleging they cheated Holocaust victims out of billions of 
dollars during the Nazi era. 

The insurers say they have no idea yet whether they will 
have to pay out and if so. how much it will cost them. 

“We take this complex issue extremely seriously and 
will be busy looking at it but in terms of the actual content, 
it is very difficult to say anything yet," said a spokes m a n 
for Allianz, the largest German insurer. 

Seven insurance companies are mentioned in the U.S. 
lawsuit filed Monday. 

The Holocaust survivors' families had bought life in- 
surance before the war. After the war, the companies 
refused to make payments on die policies, which the suit 
says are each worth at least $75,000. (Reuters) 


ways to trim the executive European Commission and 
extend the scope of qualified majority voting. (Reuters) 

Walesa Weighs Forming a Party 

GDANSK, Poland ■— Lech Walesa, the former Polish 
president and first leader of the Solidarity union, said 
Thursday he would form a new party to challenge the 
former Communists if they won the parliamentary elections 

tins year. . 

Mr. Walesa, who has kept a low profile since his narrow 
defeat by Aleksander Kwasniewski in presidential polls in 
late 1995, said he wanted to give the fragile Solidarity-led 
rightist coalition time to consolidate. 

He said that if the coalition wins, he would limit ms 
political role to an advising one. But if die former Com- 
munists win, he added, “then I will have to unleash a 
lightning force that will shatter the Commies.’ ’ (Reuters) 


EU to Try to Speed Reform Talks Paris Quashes Election Rumors 


THE HAGUE — European Union foreign ministers will 
gather in the Netherlands on Sunday in a bid to step up the 
- pace of wide-ranging reform talks before a summit meeting 
in Amsterdam in mid- June. 

A Dutch Foreign Ministry spokesman said the talks 
would continue along a twm track, with national rep- 
resentatives preparing the groundwork and ministers keep- 
ing d» process on schedule. t 

Ministers will be asked to focus cm reviewing the Union s 
institutions. To streamline policymaking, they will look at 


PARIS — French officials dismissed press reports 
Thursday that President Jacques Chirac might dissolve 
Parliament and call an early general election this year. 

Reports in die newspapers Liberation and Le Monde 
quoted unnamed cabinet minis ters and aides to Prime 
Minis ter Alain Juppe as saying the chances of winning an 
election might be better this June than next March, when the 
vote is due. But one government official said: “There is no 
factual basis for such rumors. It’s just quiet-season spec- 
ulation.” (Reuters) 


Chemical Taints 
Alsatian Wine 

Agence France-Presse 

STRASBOURG — About 
200.000 bottles of wine from the 
eastern French region of Alsace 
have been contaminated with small 
amounts of cooling fluid, the Ag- 
riculture Ministry said Thursday. 

The Edelzwicker wine, sold in 
France, Germany and the Nether- 
lands. was. the ministry said, “ac- 
cidentally” tainted with the chem- 
ical in doses that are “not a danger 
to health.” 

The minis try said that the levels 
of the chemical were less than 100 
millig rams per liter, but more than 
the officially accepted level of 30 
milligrams per liter. A person 
would have to consume 1 ,000 times 
that amount for the chemical to be 
fatal, the ministry statement said. 

The wines’ producers said the 
contaminated bottles would be with- 
drawn from the market, and asked 
that consumers finding bottles of 
Edelzwicker with die labels P. Mei- 
erheim, Alsace Wiflin. Wolfberger, 
Reflets, CVE and F6842Q return 
them to die seller. 


Ca>^ed by ftr Sxfifrcn 

COQUELLES, France — Hi 
resume full service through the 
Tunnel by mid-June, Eurotunnel on 
Thursday announced tougher inspec- 
tions, anti-smoke masks for passengers 
and other measures following a truck 
fire in November. ^ _ 

Eurotunnel also admitted on Thursday 
rhat it took too long to get people off the 
blaring train in November but insisted 
that the fire was not its fault 

“Our service was safe in that we got 
everybody out of that train without se- 
rious injury in an extremely serious 
fire,” the Eurotunnel co-chairman. 

Robert Malpas, said at a news con- 
ference at the French end of the tumreL 
* ‘it took too long. They were in that club 
car too long.” . 

Thirty-four people were sbgbily in- 
jured in the Nov. IS blaze, in which a 
train carrying a truck in flames tried to 
drive out of the tunnel quickly but broke 
down before it could. The injuries oc- 
curred when smoke from the burning 
truck filled the tunnel and seeped into 
the club car, where the truck drivers and 
other passengers were traveling. 

Train engineers were formerly in- 
structed to try to (hive out of the tunnel if 
possible, bur that practice appeared to fan 
the flames during the November blaze. 

“The most important policy change 
is that it will no longer be drive- 
through,” Mr. Malpas said. The in- 
struction will be to "stop immediately 
and evacuate” from the central service 
tunnel. 

Eurotunnel stopped short on Thursday 
of ordering new, fully enclosed truck- 
carrying freight cars, a 1 billion-franc 
($178 million) option originally rejected 
as unnecessary and too costly. 

Already, repairs and modifications 
since the Nov. 18 fire are to cost up to 
200 milli on francs. New staff plus train- 
ing are to cost 15 million francs an- 
nually, officials said. 

The cause of the blaze remains under 
investigation. 

Eurotunnel said it expected to com- 
plete repairs by mid-May to reopen the 
damaged section of the tunnel, and re- 
sume truck freight train service before 
mid-June. 

The fire did not seem to scare off 
passengers on the Eurostar trains. Euro- 
tunnel reported more than a half-million 
passengers — 500,899 — in March, 
compared with more than 389,000 the 
same month last year. (AP. Reuters) 


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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1997 



INTERNATIONAL 


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*33 (0)4 S3 16 17 81 


COTE D'AZUR - VMandte sur Her. 

Magnflceffl 3 rooms, retrace sunny, sea 
vcw. Rctasread/Si Jean rdnefl decore- 
tan. FF2J5M. 7* *33(0rt 93 80 60 10 


HOMES EARCH LONDON Let us 
search tor you. we find homes / Rats 
to buy and rent and provide corporate 
relocation services For iidundueto 
and companies Tel *44 171 838 
1066 Fax * 44 171 S38 1077 
hoq/iVww.homesearchcc.iJiritxn 


GOLDEN IRIANOE - SAHT GERKAH 
DES PRES LOFT - PtED-A-TERRE, 


ASSH, HEART OF MEDEVAL TOWN, 
magnificent apartment in 18th century 
mansion. Courtyard, garden, terrace. 
Panoramic war. 300 sq.m., 2-car ga- 
rage. Teh 39 2 68003107. 


2 rooms in stunning 17th cant town- 
fuse. 24 m SECURITY /CARETAKER, 
super heated POOL gym. sane.. 4m 
ceings. redone. ARMOHED door, ar- 
tsns. torrros. equpped *MIE£* fcflchen, 
martrte balhroora. wardrobes, dry cafcr 
room. FF2.IM ♦ pariung. TeMax owner 
+33(0)145491960 or rent FF15,00Q/mc. 


Greece 


CAP MARTIN NEAR K0NAC0 

Large 1 bedroom apertmera 
plus 40 sqm gaiden terrace wth an 
eseptonal vow. overtoekrg toe sea & 
the l^rts d Monte Carlo. Ths unrt 
is abated in a small actuate btocfc 
feahitog privacy, secutey & a roof 


NEAR MCE. daC^rttui 2-room ^ranment. 
toA-up garage. 5 minxes hum sea and 
commernal centers. FF800.000 T«t *39 
229522264 


GREECE, toniy vias & sea front ^Hrf- 
meras tar sate. Hellene Realty. Tel: 
+3310)450477198 Fax (DHS04Z7HZ4 


VBiEZIA LAGUNA GBIDECCA • 196 
sqm apartnal on 4th (bar writ) pent- 
house. 1 kving. 3 bedrooms. 3 bath- 
rooms raid 1 btahen. Often are request- 
ed Tet +39 2 29522264 


Germany 


VBNCE • Apartment on GRAM) CANAL 
between Aecademe Bridge & Patao 
Grassi - 145 sq m. - Some restoration 


necessary USS600.000. Reply: Box 
0256. IHT. 92521 Nedy Cedex. France. 


PAWS - ilE ST LOUS 
95 sqm. apartment, 3 taje rooms 
(poesM y of 5 rooTTB). cafag by 
modem ertisL groin] ftoor, cebn. 

3 teepiaces. USS 380,000. 

Tel *sapn 43 25 « n(office), (Q1 46 
81 02 79 Fax (8)1 <3 25 93 B6. 


tap pool, amxi wifli a magnrticsrd view 
Pnca FF23I wan garage & store room 


Pnca FFZ2M with g: 
Phone N. Efiet *33 


i store room. 
S3 28 57 26. 


UMOUE PENTHOUSE, *ecSy overlook- 
ing the Me. 755 sqm inctodng superf) 
terrace, central air coreitiorang. prwate 
elevator, hi select tegn class buMng. 
USS 32 rnfcn Fax 202 39 39 362. 


French Riviera 


BAY OF CANNES Pan la Gatare, 
in prorate property of 25 ha on sea from 
duplex 140 sqm. terraces with nothing 
opposite, pan o ram ic vrow of 180 degree. 
2 pools, tennis, private port. Restaurants, 
cleaning and housekeeping assured by 
At. Tet *33(0)2 43 47 IB 45 


CANNES 

CAUF0RNE 

Townhoure, 6 bedroom. 6 batonrans. 
2 fiving roans, i (tong room, terrace, 
saknnmg pooL Vow on sea. air 
cunrSSonng. garage, maxfs room. 

5 mins Port unto. Urgent 
tsambert Tafc +33 [0)6 09 54 11 70. 
Fax: *33 (0)4 93 69 84 89. 


250 YEAR OLD FAMLY RESIDENCE 
M THE MDOLE OF G8HIAIIY. NEAR 
FRANKRRT AIRPORT, FOR SALE 
As pan of an aid castle, the resdence 
was rebjl m 1996 wrtft afl cantors and 
space for your entire famrty, tnends and 
business partnero Assistance with al au- 
thonhes 8 govemmera perms avatebfe. 

Ra mue ntomaaon and pree: 

D. Opel Posttach 1313. GS572 Dez. 

Gerirary or tax 004364321984310 


Monaco 


EXCEPTIONAL - PARS 


New Zealand 


PLACE V9D0IE 


MONTE CARLO 

Seashore n the prestgous Residence 
IE 21 \ an exceptxmaf apanmem. 
S3 stpn fivrg area + 185 stpn Braces, 
mod’s ft aomn a fa aoiL Pool cabana. 

5 parting spaces. Please cat 


PAR K TAGENCE 


HOTEL SITE FOR SALE m Queentawn, 
New Zealand for boutique hoteWuxury 
n>. Ideal serviced site only 5 nans, to 
town. Super lake and mouitain views. 
Design and zorin apparels in fond. JV 
devdapment conaderert CcrXact owner- 
Hypemo Corp. Ltd., Queenstown. NZ 
Tei- 164-3) 442-5340 Fax (68-3) 
442-5417 Emat pnserty§hyperxicarn 
URL Iflitf ‘www.hypefnciro.nz 


AboU 200 aun. "nobte’ loor (1st). 
5 FrenOr winoows gfvtog onto Pteoe. 


Pterick RANDf +33 


I onto Pkce. 
45 55 22 (XL 


Great Britain 


TR0CADER0 8 ROOMS 

dass te*&ng, 50i ftoor 
320 sqjn. Luge reception. 4 bedroom. 

3 mats’ rooms, view, greenery. 
FERRE BA2M Tal *33(11)1 47 04 75 75 


GAMES CALFOfllffi, panoranK vew. 
big terrace, garden, pool. Funshed du- 
plex. 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, garage. Tel 
oww +33 (0)147201817 r (0)680841969 


HOMESEARCH LONDON LTD Let us 
search tor you. We find homes f flats 
to buy and rent For individuals and 
companies + Fufl Corporate Relocation 
Servrcas. 7 dayM-we#. Tel. *44 171 
838 1066 Fax + 44 171 838 107? 
Wp.'twwwhomeseaich caiA-hom 


Le Park Palace 
25 avenue de la Costa 
MC 98000 Hook C«te 
Tat (377) 93 25 15 00 
Pane (377) 93 25 35 33 
wwwjrvuntecatoJnerteader/parti agance 


Paris and Suburbs 


7th - FACING INVAUDES DOME, 
240 sqm., superb reception. 34 bed- 
rooms. tegh eatings. ST. GERMAN DES 
PRES. [jerMterre. 65 sqm. opfln vew. 
DOURDW Tet *33 (0)1 46 24 93 33. 


EXOBSITE- HE SANT LONS 
17bi certify butilng, vise on Seine, 
exbemety eteganL 140 sqm, 2 bed- 
rooms, 2 bate. Ugh ceings. USS18U. 
Tel +33 (0)143294507 / $680454091 


BAHAMAS 


Quiet and security. 

True pieces of paradise belong to a blessed few. One such rare 
Eden awaits 147 mfes southeast of Nassau. Accessible by sea 
from one dock or via its own airstrps; the 700 acre private was 
once a cotton plantation. Its fertility remains evident in the mature 
soporflla, mango and many fruit trees that grow everywhere. 
Coconut palms fine six pristine beaches. Fauna thrives her too. 
sixty sheep and goats, twelve donkeys etc. Plenty of fresh water, 
eighty foot elevations. Cay’s main house boats, six bedrooms 
and six bath’s + one big master suite with jaccuzi. The house is 
accompanied by a swimming pool, one pool house, one makfs 
and caretaker's house, and a twenty-two-foot Boston Whaler. 
Balconies wrap around the residence, and a crow’s nest poises 
atop it From these advantage points views of the ciystal sea 
stretc h to the horizon. Paradise of the boneftsh and crawfish an 
unusual opportunity for an individual or syndicate. 


m 








Maule - Yvelines 

35 mins to Rxris vn AI4 

SOPOB UUffiE FAMILY HOQSE 

6 beds, main ensuite. separate far 
& independent rames room, 
swwrmitig pod & tennis court 

Fr 4.9 MilDon 

Ttt Owner: ♦ 33 fOJ * V3 77 16 3J 
Foe +33(01493770315 


NORTH CHAKNTE 
Oesp in rural France, but only 2 1(2 
heurs from Pais on the TGY. STOsattai 
Manor House fully renovated by an 
American to (aghesl comfort standout s, 
Stamfinc on a fd lop n 10 ha. Howeied 
pari. Spectaortar views. Guest house 
also tolly renovated. Total 7 bedims, 
3 receptions FF3.500.000. Additional 
lata available nctodng inrtfte cadent 
TeL owner *33 (0)5 45 31 84 74 


96, AOVBtS SUR OSE histoncal vtiage 
(VAN GOGH). Restored 18th century 
stone house, 120 sq.m., living. (Mng, 
3 bedrooms, 1 btfvoom. 2 wsdroams + 
430 sqm. garden. S275.000.Tefc +33 
10)134480214. Fax: *33 {Q54S332237. 


NEAR Sa(d)b AnttooBe, Meet Cranes. 
Rare opportunity-. Estate wfih atrthentic 
iSh coteiy ofive oi ml + dependent 
mas + separate ap ert mera. toeteig SO 


BETWEEN ST TROPEZ 8 RanotueBe, 
sttavSd vfla, 310 sqm. (possfbte 450 
sqm.) Bn pool Panoomfc sea view, 4 
ha teraLPnce S1-5M. Tet Phl^ Guy. 
Peris +33(0)143069479. office 
(0)145487286. 9 Tropez (0)49454SQ2 


sq.m, hno space. 9.000 sqm. text 
Posstote bimng extensm Sbean bank. 
Pool PooHiouse. ScW (teectiy by owner 
50% under value tar itewte i ca eons. 
FF4.300J30a Tet +33 (0)4 93 77 36 57. 


| For documentation and pictures fax to the owner: { 
% WORLD CREATIONS Belgium Fax: (322) 223 03 50 ' 

NMSWKM-il torn** 


35 km Pans, near Ucnifrai L'Amaury 


GERMANY 


INTBUtATIOtiAL 


Established in 1992, 14 rooms. 27 
beds, on a 5.000 sqjn. plot of land 
on die edge of town, situated in a 
nature reserve in Mecklenburg- 
Westem Pomerania near the 
hi^way B 96 between Grrifiswald 
and Stnlsund. South of Rugen. 


Next HARRODS, London 

Small fcvd-siiting. entrance hall, 
shower. Poncr. 

Av ailohlc 01 .US. 1 9*>7 

tmtoadelKntaBJX,Satimbai 

Furnished studio Hat. Porter 
Available Gl.OS.ldy 7 
CeO *41 22 i4b J r St wraiipnawg 


LARGE CHARMING ESTATE 

on 17.000 sqm. tondscaped pari 
boedemg lie woods Mam house 
♦ friachertrod guesl codage. 

Bah tsirety renorated vmh penod 
beams S ffing. Abut 500 sqm hng 
space with al trodten contorts + care- 
takas' qieitss. grestause & egraje 
Easy access to Pars by car. RcR tram 
to La Defense or SNCF to Uorfluarras* 
Contact o arar 

Td +33 (0)1 40883617. Fax 4088329. 


FRQKH SIDE OF GBCVA 
10 mint. GENEVA I UN OrganUtoni 
IFERKY/VOITAIRE Franca) in a toxu- 
ncus guarded residence, swrointed by 
green parts and terns courts. 

LARGE 205 SQJL APARTMENT 
55 sqm. iwraras. High ctass, 5 bed- 
rooms. two bathrooms. 1 water's WC. 
Magnrficeni view of Jura & Alps mom- 
last. Underground garage FF1500.00Q 
Tel: +41-22-73L46J8 (evetag) 
E+tati: QrodttMICaCH 


LE CASTELLET hfistarical medtevd vt- 
boa 12 ta sea, surrwxted by vtoyrods. 
75 sqm. house. 2 bedroom*, 2 Whs, 
period condtan. Td *33 01)140169100 


Normandy, for sale by owner, 4krn 
Deeuvfe, 2 Boars, home 400 M2* refer 
with detached guesl house aid garage 
on one hectare of land, ccmpfetoh 
fenced Perfect conffion, 1^0,000 FF. 
Cortaa Jaxpln, La Cour fkjmsnde, 
14800 Bwitevtie STouques. 


SMALL RENAISSANCE CHATEAU - 
300 sqm + 3£ na. rewinds, 2 hours 
sort of Parte RR27U. More (totals Tet 
+33 (0)2 4874 5774, Fax (0)2 4874 6916 


Hans Alfred Temer, LuisemCr. 9 
D -30159 Hannover - Germany 
T.b +49-51 1-363931 
fox: +49-51 1-323398 


MONTE CARLO 


IS UN & 15 KB WEST OF PARS by 
roe AJ4. 20 tun SI Laore staoon Very 
beflinM 1958 MODERNIST trouse 270 
sqm. bmg space on 2,000 spm garden 
m private domain luxurious Rtings. 60 
sqm fivrg, large treptacs bay wrdem 
laerng South, terraces. 4 bedrooms 2 
baths. 2 showers. Otto Room with fl- 
own S sauna. Outdoor healed swurt- 


mng poof. Pms» quay on Saw. Water 
skivig, Qotf. Outer. Greenerv. Quahty 
fitKtyte. Nesr shops. USS7DO.OOO. Tel 
NY 212 219 9565 Fax NY 212 965 1348 
Tefc Pans 01 39 75 61 62 


BRITTANY, SUITABLE for Amencaw 
European.' Ac an businessman, domg 
business in Fiance, Europe or the mta. 
what would be better tran u set up in a 
race 40 acre estate with 19tn centuy 
castle. 600 sqm. fiving span. 2.000 
sqm. mdusmaf buri&rgs, buftSng peitil 
tor 6^)00 sqm. re more? Varan ret sale. 
Castle may be sold wdh antique funi- 
tirre. Near highway. 4 hours drive hum 
Pare. 2 hours by TGV nan. 1 hour by 
plane Brochure on requeS Fax +33 
[012 96749190 Tet +33 (0)2 96749154. 


PBUGORD - SHALL FAMLY CASTLE. 
15tei / 17lh centuy, toty restored, easy 
ma m taianc e . ttSTORICAL PLACE, pro- 
tected 8*8. pod, guest cottage. Agance 
KLARER Tet +33 (0)5 53 55 09 21 
Fare +33 (0)5 S 62 06 49. 


ST JEM CAP FERRAT - Ravishing pro- 
vencal vfe, 3 bedrooms, study, 3 rates, 
1,600 sqm garden. Bargain price. Tel 
+33 0)609534854 or +3Z7 (0)607332505 


CAP FERRAT WATERFRONT. UNIQUE 


4-bedroom nfia. Private beach, jetty, 
guest house. $W 1990 now SI BML Teh 


guest house. S3M 1990 now SI BML Tel 
♦377 607935198. Fax *377 93S071B7. 


MBCRBES LUBERON 
irajue beaten hfstnal ste. 200 sqm 
Landscaped garden. Pod Sold by owner 
Docurnsfiamt Fax *33(0)4 42 26 32 14 


HOUSE M UMOUSM, 2 bedrooms, 
kitchen, (fining room, WC, attic, 
near take. FF 80,000. Tet owner 
33(0)140363152 / (0)146663149 


SPAIN 


Opportunity eo purchase 
impounded land in Siam (bank owned) 
FLATSr COTTAGES, LOCALS, 
INDUSTRIAL HALLS, BUILDINGS, ne. 
For more infonnuon conaa: Karen, 


Td: (+34-J) B4J 7K3 F*t (+J4-J) M5 4570 
(Cd between 7pjn.-10pjn. kxal tune, 

“ efah. German S French spoken! 


MONACO- FOR SAU 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 

Penthouse., luxury standard with 
full mew of harbor. 5 min. from 
Hotel de Paris. 3 bedrooms. 
2 bathrooms, sep. Powder Room, 
f Kitchen, big fivineroom with 
i terrace and sep. roof -terrace with 

| 1 ff 9.8 miiL 

1 Comocc +-HI - 7/ 223 5256. 


Magnificent RENOVATED FARIKW5E 
r ISO acres ash wsruerfui vew-, ct the 
Pyrenees, 5 Be* asua. Svwt teeners 


2 large receptions, games room, pool 6 
states 6 ear x 3flm franing arem 


states 6 dan x 33m tranng arena. 
Injures to Tet +33 (0)4 68 69 93 70. 

ftc +33 (0J4 58 89 90 71 
MBfi 100705Z7WeConpuSerr&ow. 


REIMS-EPERNAY-CKALONS Tnangfe. 
Luxurious property buffl m 1993. 
set si 11,2 acres panilie prasxt border- 
fig take IsprmWer systens). 3,500 sqA 
fivng spars: 3 receptan rooms. 5 doute 
Deraorens. 3 badnoms. 2 ensute 1 wah 
taairn. Indoor pod. sauna, shower, 
double garage, woe cedar. Luxury 
Sitings. Selfing pnea FF5M or rwares 
offer Tet Owns- -33 W 26 $6 56 78, 


WNOUNDY, tnne? SE1IS rerwated 
manor muse. 300 sqjn. living space. 
6 bedrooms + guest horse. 3 bedrooms. 
Several outbidding^. stables_ Treed 
4B la. land, pond FF2BM. Tet Pans 
*33 (0)147321321. Fare (0)147140567. 


NEAR BAHBEON, fee house on park + 


3-room BsL big pool FF3M. Tet *33 
(R60SB54821 Tate +32 2-7327065 


SOUTH of FRANCE. PAYS VAROIS 
1 hr Sam Tropw, 2 to Monte Carta 
Fid charm of Provence. Via on Made. 
Exhaonfinarv «w, 330 sqm, 6 Its tank 
pod. housekeeco'B tadoing. said ready 
to move In SIM. Fax +33KB142223734 


OWN® SH±S HOUSE in south at 
Fiance, near Laras, TOO sqm, redone. 
FF45OB00. Tet +3381)4 68456 CE 


10% fCT PROFIT - Rare Townhouae. 
850 sqm m Orleans. Zertrfi Promotion 
Tei +3*0)238420202. Fax (0)238628634 


AJX EN PROVENCE - CBJTHl oU ofy. 
Poet's duplex, tage tenaca. eoepdonaf 
Mw& leeptace. lemvaied, lumkhetL 
FF1.000.000 T* +33 10)4 42 23 52 32. 
Far *33 (0)4 « 23 29 07. 


PBUGORD, LOVELY STOW HOUSE fir 
12th cert, vffHB. Beams, .fireplaces, 
vim. F375.00Q. Tet +33(0)1 43253687 


araGUIOY, RE5T0RS) FARMHQUX 





. '**■ i$k. 


BEIRUT — A Beirut investigative judge issued an 
indictment Thursday charging five Japanese Red Army 
guerrillas with offenses carrying up to 10 years in prison, 
judicial sources said. 

In his indictment, issued after nearly one month of in- 
terrogations. Judge Saeed Mirza said the charges included 
"'passport forgery, illegal entry to Lebanon, and official 
stamps forgery,” the sources said. According to Lebanon's 
judicial system, a three-member judicial board needs to 
approve the indictment before the suspects are sent to court. 

Kazua Tohira. Haruo Wako. Mariko Yamamoto, Masao 
Adachi and Kozo Okamoto were arrested Feb. IS in Beirut, 
and Lebanon announced that it would try them in Leb- 
anon. (Reuters) 


\UoMubuontaten 


ESPRIT DE CORPS — Peruvian policemen sharing 
a joke Thursday outside the Japanese ambassador's 
residence in Lima where rebels still hold 72 hostages. 


had been developed by Russian military research labo- 
ratories. The publication said the three nerve agents could be 
made without using any of the precursor chemicals banned 
under the 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention. (Reuters) 


Nicaragua to Investigate Fraud 


LONDON — Russia has developed a new variant of the 
anthrax toxin that is totally resistant to antibiotics and which 
could cause a catastrophe if it fell into the wrong hands, the 
foreword to the 1997-98 Jane’s Land Based Air Defense 
publication said Thursday. 

Jane's said the toxin, along with three new nerve agents. 


MANAGUA — Nicaragua’s president, Arnoldo Ale- 
man, has ordered prosecutors and accountants to investigate 
possible massive fraud during the former government's 
privatization program, a government official said Wed- 
nesday. 

The loss to the government “could reach more than SI 
billion.” said Rosendo Diaz, president of the National 
Corporations of the Public Sector, which oversees state-run 
companies. Mr. Diaz released a report Wednesday indicating 
there was “proof of evident fraud" of as much as SI 00 
million in the sale of seven sugar refineries alone. (AP) 


PASSY-KEMNBJY, owner sells apart- 


ment, Imh dan brtfing. 100 sqxn. 
brtony. 48i fax. Mng. 2 bedroortB, 2 
betas. 3 WCs, equipped titaheq cbOht. 
gym. pod. snadt bar & caterer in com- 
jia. FF 2JNL RossUy toga paring. 
Tet +33 (0)1 46 51 83 01 


MALIBU, CALIFORNIA Architectural 
nBstoqfieGe! Ocean me*. 3 beorooms. 
fflura. gantena. S1BM. T31 0457-3681. 


PARIS 16A, 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms 
an suite, huge entrance and reception 
era. large ttctei with pany, dose to 
Seme, metro 8 shops. To mdude 3 
rooms an the top floor. FF 5 MMans. 
Tet 44 (0)175 388 8785. 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


French Riviera 


FACING EIFFEL TOWER 

Rare 1 reftad double tense. 
LBI+33(0)142896243tene (0)147206405 


5W FRANCE, renmeted mansion, steep 
20. 10 baths. Huge pari A pool near 
madavel rasfle. beaches, Span Ava8- 
ata now tor privatB/grcup rant. Reason- 
ate, broker OK. Fax 305B3B-93B7. mat 
POBok 403487. HaniH. 33140. 


Holland 


AVENUE MQNTAiGJE (8fb) 
apretaentc 38 aqn. to 320 sqm. 
Tet RONTQX +33 (0)1 47 » 27 17 


P\H 

Vi llm 


7» RUE DE BABYL0NE. perfect conri- 
tton. troastiiB lading, targe storio (pcs- 
stay 2 rooms! 40 sqm, 4tti floor, I! 
kritaen. beta, fireplace, chuting. calm. 
Price FIjWOM. Owner *33(0)146478286 


REHTHOUSE INTERNATIONAL 
No 1 1n Hdend 

tor (sari) tumtsted house^fas. 
Tet 31404448751 Fax: 31-2W465909 
NTawn 1021. 1063 Am AffStentam 


iffijit-v s 


NEAR OPERA, 48 sqm., exoepGonaly 
daman, vWfie beam A stones. Price 
FF1.45M. Tet +33 « 85 59 04 


Paris Area Furnished 


PARK 3rd, stnfio lor sale. 40 sqjn., 
2nd ftoor, visible beams. Price: 
F 754000, Tet +33 p)1 48 15 40 80 


.\^c Ofy. 


ST. GERMMN DES PRES, top ROOT 
apartmenl In 18th century house. 3/4 
rooms, calm. vtaw.Td +33 (0)143293757 



Seychelles 


RARE SEYCHBJLES - 5 acre beach- 


kfeat accammcxteScrr stated bedrooma 
CteBy and sarvfce assued 
READY TO MOVE W 
Tel +33(0)143129604 Fax (0)143129808 


front property, new house, forest 
USS304004 not SatatBro 248- 234 344 


EXTTB4H.Y BEAURFUL iMUtefam 
ESTATE 1.4 mflon sqjn. One bow 
from Madrid, kfcel far taring and recre- 
atat S 714B04 E-m* mamofa m B 
radeata.es 


CAPITALE * PARTNERS 

la LJfAirnl m hAi winAnmdn 

Hantpcxao quom apareneras, 
al sizes. Peris end attautas, 

Te( +33^1-48148211. Rb#-4772WS 
WetetoyaubesB 




Sts.*- 





MALLORCA. PRESTIGE PROPERTY. 
Luxury via, 7000 sq.m, pkri & 1200 
sqjn. of Dwifl space. Price to dtecuss. 
Tel: +34-06437663 Fax +34-71-713454 


BTH-LUXURY DUPLEX, off Avenue 
Montaigne. New, twniOid^ famished 
taring room, dining area. 1 bedroom, 
1 1/2 maitde bans, modem custom 
kBchen, Bnenskfishes, manflen. 3 
norths to 1 yr. USA Tet 212-755BB5& 


FOR SALE IN HADRfl). 72 sqm. 
luxury 2-bedroom flat. Pis 32,000,0 
Cortaa TeVFtax +34-5Z-77 S3 82 


94, ST. NAUR, netfRER A. Besutfa 
120 sqjn. fumnhad home, 3 beds, 2 
baths. FabUous ganten, dots river, 
shops, English smote to 10 y ess. 
FF12500 note. Tat: +33 (Q142831644. 




Switzerland 


LACfflfiA&ALPS 


HISTORICAL ARTIST STTBKL Excb^ 
falai 80 sqm, gantan, cakn, Ight, cha* 
acler, anririteduraf dBS^yfV Ufa tacMpped, 
•fit ln» & daatn. posstawbr poteg. 
FFliOOffmo. Tettex +33(0)14ffi30430 


^ H., 


rsautaorizBd 
sinew 1975 


Attache poperies, overiooking wews 

1 to 5 beriwn s . from SFr 200,000. 
REVAC 

52, Hortbifftant 04-1211 Gam 2 
Tet 4122734 15 46 te 734 12 20 


16th, TROCADBtO tonte 40 sqm stodto 
go garden. ptane/TV. FR.000 2 weeks. 
FFSJOO mo. Tet +33(0)148860334 am 


LE MARAIS center, beauBM 68 sqjn. ^ 
lei funfehed wNi batanam. F7BU net -y 
Fiee now. Tet +33 01 42 77 59 95. 


USA Residential 


TROCADBW, 70 sqm. luxurious Rat 
Ftenowted, F1 1000 1 wnaS stixfio, balco- 
ny. FSOOOl Owner +33 W 1 45021064 



Paris Area Unfurnished 


IfiAlfl ■ FLORIDA 

ran waterfront property a? ten Max! 
(7 B00 sqfi. on 100 x 300 lafc 

- 9 bedrooms, 7 beds, spedecter 
Hofiywood penthouse on top floor with 
pirate te rrace : 

- 2 separate gust houses, pool, 
oral pwda dock 

- (Stared ofanUad at SI .791000 
Tet +33 [0)1 47 2fl 04 94 
Far +33 \0)1 47 2Q 94 95 


PARIS 16th, mr Hatetio de la Rado. 
rentals teft securtV poxtou spaces. 
FRMO l month. Tet 33 (0)1 4524 2586. 


Switzerland 


GQEVA, LUXURY F1H9NSHED apart- 
nwte From skxfios to 4 bertaxmo. TeL 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1997 


PAGE 7 




"lH 

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INTERNATIONAL 


ISRAEL: 

Bold Peace Weighed 

^beprojxKeswjiiije^^^^ 

sugiciw) and probably violence. 

• fi^T '. Ne ? nyahu, s solution, which he 
floated when be took office andtheu 

• revived during the latest crisis, is tempt- 

±e pubUc ^du^SS 
; |g of agreement — as accomplSied 

.** by Air. Netanyahu, the 

, idea would be to gather Israeli and Pal- 
estinian, negotiators and American me- 
maiors m some isolated location with . 
orders to negotiate until done. That is 
: much the way that waning factions from 
the former Yugoslavia were tucked 
away m Dayton, Ohio, and that Israelis 
and Egyptians were corralled in Camp 
David, Maryland, by former President 
Junmy Carter. 

And if the negotiations fail, Mr. Net- 

• anyahu added, the Oslo process can al- 
ways be resumed, since in any case it 

• requires no further action until another 
. mcremental Israeli withdrawal from the 

• West Bank is due in six months. 

The prime minister has rendered the 
. idea more tempting by giving ample 
; signs that be is not averse to forming a 
"‘nati onal unity” government with Shi- 
mon Panes, the leader of the opposition 

• Labor Party and the premier architect of 
•' - the Oslo accords. 

Mr. Peres has made it abundantly 
; dear that he is eager to re-enter gov- 
ernment and to nurse the peace hack to 
life. He has held meetings on the pos- 

• sibility with his followers, with Mr. Net- 
anyahu and with President Ezer Weiz- 

man 

Mr. Netanyahu has found advantage 
in fostering the idea of a national unity 
1 government, both because it has kept the 
Labor opposition conveniently quiet and 
; because the public demonstration that be 

• has an option has helped keep right-wing - 
coalition partners in line. 

It is known, however, that he would 
prefer to avoid bringing die Labor Party 
1 into the government since that would 
dilute his power and he would have to 
negotiate every aspect of the peace effort 
with Mr. Peres first 
In any case, forming such a govera- 
■ meat has an inherent deadline. 

Labor Party elections are due in June, 
when Ehud Barak, a popular farmer gen- 
eral, is certain to replace Mr. Peres, and 
Mr. Netanyahu would not bring his fu- 
ture challenger into his government 
However tempted Mr. Clinton may be 
by the idea of intense final-status talks, 
there are many obstacles to overcome 
just to get Mr. Arafat and Mr. Netanyahu 
talking, since both have set conditions 
on any resumption of contacts. 

The Palestinian leader is feeling be- 



Israel Drops Its Request 
1 To U.S. for Extradition of 
Leading Hamas Figure 


Mcn a hfm KtHiru, 4gaur fnU' r,=- * 

Palestinian and Israeli children sharing a rudimentary playground next to a tent camp that was established to 
protest the beginning of construction of a Jewish neighborhood, Har Homa, in East Jerusalem last month. 


trayed not only by Mr. Netanyahu but that the administration has qualified its 
also by Mr. Clinton, over U.S. vetoes of criticism of Palestinian violence. Ac- 
United Nations resolutions that criti- cording to Israeli accounts, the prime 


cized the Israeli housing development in 
East Jerusalem. 

In order to resume talks, he would be 
likely to require a series of measures, 
such as the opening of an airport and a 
seaport in Gaza and a safe-passage route 
between Gaza and the West Bank, which 
have been repeatedly promised him. 

And if Mr. Arafat were to agree to 
enter intensive final-status talks, which 


minister's trip to the United States next 
Monday has two goals — to meet with 
Mr. Clinton and to press die pro-Israeli 
lobby to urge Mr. Clinton to get tougher 
with Mr. Arafat. 


violence is one of the few cards in his 
hand. 

The real question is Mr. Netanyahu, 
whose election 10 months ago dramat- 
ically changed the equation in the 
Middle East, whose actions have pre- 
cipitated one crisis after another and who 
has now circulated the striking proposal 


Yet the president has made it clear to advance the entire problem to a swift 
what sort of peace he advocates and what conclusion. 


role he is prepared to play, and Secretary 
of State Madeleine Albright is certain to 
follow in the path of all her modem 


is farfrom certain, he would probably do predecessors and to dedicate consider- 
so only if Mr. Netanyahu agreed at least able time to the problem. 


to a freeze on settlement construction 
and on the confiscation of land in the 
West Bank. 

Air. Netanyahu, who has made much 
of the charge dial Mr. Arafat gave a 
green light to terrorist attacks and that 
the Palestinians have deliberately used 
disorder as a pressure tactic, will de- 
mand that the United States wring tan- 
gible evidence from Air. Arafat that he is 
bringing security to Israel. 

And if Mr. Clinton did get both sides 
to some secluded negotiating table, it 
would require extraordinary statesman- 
ship to envision a settlement that both 
sides would accept as fair and to sell it to 
them in six months or even a year. 

The challenge would be daunting 
even if all sides were in basic agreement 
on the goaL But of the many variables 
Afr. Clinto n must weigh, probably die 
biggest is Mr. Netanyahu. 

The administration's relations with 
him have been strained. 

The WMte House made no secret of its 
preference for Mr. Peres in the elections 
last year and of its dismay at Mr. Net- 
anyahu’s recent actions. 

Mr. Netanyahu, on his side, is miffed 


For his part, Mr. Arafat has been wavers from the true nationalist path and 
consistent in his declared goal of a Pal- Palestinians who harbor unrealistic ex- 
estuian state with part of Jerusalem as pectations. 

its capital. He insists that he has nonetheless 

And whether the Palestinian leader demonstrated his good faith by with- 
actually gave a green light to terrorism or drawing Israeli troops from Hebron and 
not, it is no secret that the threat of by releasing woman prisoners. 


In conversations and interviews. Mr. 
Netanyahu insists that he is ready and 
willing to conclude a peace, but that he is 
trapped between a right-wing cabinet 
that threatens to bring him down if he 
wavers from the true nationalist path and 
Palestinians who harbor unrealistic ex- 
pectations. 

He insists that he has nonetheless 


By Barton GeJlman 

P/nt Smite 

JERUSALEM — The Israeli govern- 
ment gave up its bid Thursday for ex- 
tradition of a Hamas leader from the 
United States, ironically citing the same 
concerns over ■‘security and the pre- 
vention of terrori st attacks' ' that inspired 
the initial request nearly two years ago. 

The Israelis' loss of enthusiasm for 
bringing the Hamas leader. Mousa Abu 
Marzook, to trial reflects the double- 
edged results of previous efforts, legal 
and operational, to strike blows at top 
echelons of the Islamic Resistance 
Movement. 

Assassination of the Hamas bomb- 
builder Yehiya Ayash by a booby-trapped 
cellular telephone in January 1996 reaped 
the deadliest sequence of terror attacks in 
Israel's history — four suicide bombings 
in eight days, killing 59 people. Expul- 
sion of Hamas activists to Lebanon in 
1992 drew international opprobrium and 
helped the Palestinian Islamic movement 
forge valuable links with the Iranian- 
sponsored Lebanese Hezbollah. 

In today's deteriorating political con- 
text. with Israeli -Palestinian talks un- 
raveling and daily clashes suggesting a 
return to something like the uprising of 
1 9S7-93. army and secret sendee chiefs 
warned Prime Minister Benjamin Net- 
anyahu that Mr. Abu Marzook's arrival 
could trigger a major escalation of polit- 
ical violence. 

Israel's hand was forced by an Amer- 
ican legal deadline. Mr. Abu Marzook. 
held by U.S. authorities since his arrest 
ai New York's Kennedy Airport in July 
1995. set a 60-day clock in motion by 


U.S. May Lack Enough Evidence to Try Saudi 


By Elaine Sciolino 

New fort Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Despite the 
FBI’s initial optimism that a Saudi 
arrested in Canada could provide a 
breakthrough in the investigation of the 
bombing last year that frilled 19 Amer- 
icans in Saudi Arabia, the adminis- 
tration is now uncertain whether he can 
provide enough evidence to make it 
worthwhile to bring him to the United 
States, senior officials said. 

The administration also does not ap- 


ican court that the 28-year-old Saudi A federal judge in Ottawa is to begin 
man, Haiti Abdel Rahim Sayegh. played open hearings on the case April 28. 
a role in the attack, the officials added. In recent days, officials in the White 
The uncertainty is complicating the House, State Department, Pentagon 
American legal strategy about whether and Justice Department have ex- 
to allow the Canadian government to pressed concern that much of the ev- 
deport him to the United States, either idence against Mr. Sayegh appears to 


as a material witness or a suspect in the 
bombing. 

The Canadian government has re- 
buffed a request by the FBI to interview 
Mr. Sayegh. Canadian officials said. 

Canada will make a decision only 
after it completes the legal process to 


pear to have enough evidence, at least decide whether Mr. Sayegh should be 
for the moment, to prove in an Amer- deported as a threat to national security. 


rest on intelligence information and 
summaries of confessions of suspects 
in jail in Saudi Arabia that may not be 
substantial enough to make 3 case 
against him, or may not be admissible 
as evidence in an American court 
Air. Sayegh has denied any role in 
the bombing, saying he was in Syria at 
the time of the attack. 


abandoning his objection to extradition 
in early January. Mr. Netanyahu and the 
Clinton administration raced the dead- 
line to find a face-saving retreat but 
requests to expel Mr. Abu Alarzook to 
Jordan. Egypt and the United Arab 
Emirates were apparently turned down. 

[Attorney General Janet Reno said on 
Thursday that Mr. Abu Marzook would, 
remain in U.S. custody, even though 
Israel has dropped its request for his 
extradition. Reuters reported from 
Washington. 

[” He will remain in custody .pursuant 
to a detainer which has been filed” by 
the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization 
Service, she said. “This will essentially 
place Marzook in the position he was in 
before the Israeli government filed its 
extradition request.” 

[In New York. Mr. Abu Marzook said 
Thursday that he expected to be sent to 
Jordan. Reuters reported. “My under- 
standing is that everything is done," he 
said in an interview in the prison where 
he has been held without charge or trial 
since July 1995. “I think they are going 
to do something before Monday.”J 

Mr. Abu Marzook, 46. has acknow- 
ledged he is political leader of Hamas 
but compares himself to Sinn Fein’s 
Gerry Adams, arguing that he has no 
connection to the military wing that 
killed scores of people in a four-year 
spate of suicide bombings in Israel. 

Pan of Israel's reluctance to try him, 
when push came to shove, was fear that it 
could not establish its charges to the 
contrary. 

“On the one hand, you're absolutely 
certain that he is behind these evil acts, 
and on the other hand, you're not sure 
you have the evidence to prove it," said a 
senior official close to Mr. Netanyahu. 

Most accused terrorists in Israel are 
tried in secret military proceedings, under 
laws dating from the British mandate that 
do not require the government to provide 
defendants with the witnesses or evi- 
dence against diem. 

Many others are held without charge 
in renewable six -month periods of “ad- 
ministrative detention." 

A Hamas spokesman reached in Am- 
man and Gaza City on Thursday con- 
gratulated Israel on its choice and con- 
tinued to imply that the contrary result 
would have resulted in further blood- 
shed 

“Actually, this is a wise decision." 
said the Gaza spokesman, Mahmoud Zo- 
har. “because if they brought him here, 
they were going to face a lot of trouble 
and they were going to gain nothing." 


PATRICIA YVfilJS 

At Home in Provence 

Recipes Inspired by Her Farmhouse in France 


>■. V. . - ‘ --.*5 " vv ' 

•v jy ■ 








Hardback. 384 pages. 75 foaKolcs-pbowgraphs- 


For the past thirteen years. 
Patricia Wells has been carrying on a 
love affair not with an Individual, but 
with a region of France, a centuries-old 
stone farmhouse, and a cuisine. Now, 
in a cookbook that captures the soul or 
modern regional French cooking, the 
award-winning loumalisl and author 
invites readers to share the passion, 
the joy. and. best of all. the cooking of 
her adopted home. 

Provence is uniquely blessed with 
natural beauty as well as some of the 
world's most appealing foods and liveli- 
est wines. Patriciais culinary skills have 
transformed the signature ingredients 
of this quintessential French country- 
side into recipes so satisfying and 
exciting they will instantly become part 
of your daily repertoire. 

Here are 1 75 recipes from 
Patricia's farmhouse kitchen. As you 
read and cook from this book, gener- 
ously illustrated with the captivating 
color pictures of famed photographer 
Robert Freson, you will feel as if you 
have actually joined Patricia Wells m 
her beloved stone farm bouse, and her 
passion for the foods, flavors, and peo- 
ple or Provence will become yours. 

Patricia Wells has lived in France 
since 1980. where she is the restaurant 
critic for (he International Herald 
Tribune. She Is the author of five best- 
selling books: The Rood Lover's Guide 
to Parts, Hie Food Lover's Guide to 
France. Bistro Cooking. Simply French. 
and Patricia Wells’ Trattoria. 


nTEHAHimi. 


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PAGE 8 


FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Bmlb 



PUBLISHED WITH THE MEW tDU TIMES AMO THE WASHINGTON POST 


Ask Netanyahu Why He Humiliates Partners 


-.jit- Nat: 


Watching ‘New Labour 9 


Britain's election campaign offi- 
cially began last month, but in a larger 
sense both parties have been preparing 


for this showdown since the day Tony 
Blair took command of the Labour 


Blair took command of the Labour 
Party in May 1994. Befitting the cent- 
rist views of both Mr. Blair and Prime 
Minister John Major, the contest has 
shunned ideology. Indeed, Labour and 
the Conservatives now have nearly 
identical positions on a. wide range of 
issues. Still, a victory for Labour on 
May 1 would have significant domes- 
tic and international consequences. 

The Conservatives appear caught in 
a paradox. They have so transformed 
the terms of political debate that La- 
bour now competes with them on pro- 


posals for privatization, welfare re- 
form and tougher law enforcement 


form and tougher law enforcement 
But British voters see Mr. Major as an 
ineffective leader and his party as hav- 
ing gone stale in power. 

Mr. Blair, meanwhile, has worked 
bard ar preparing a distrusted and de- 
moralized party for a return to power 
after 18 years in opposition. He has 
recast the old blue-collar, socialist La- 
bour Party as something he calls New 
Labour, centrist and un threatening; he 
has asserted authority over the party’s 
trade union base and renewed Labour's 
appeal for the younger, white-collar 
voters who deserted it in the Thatcher 


income tax rates for five years. 

Still. Britons worry that Mr. Blair is 
disturbingly vague when forced to 
move from glib slogans to actual 
policy prescriptions. The one area 
where Labour is thought likely to bring 
in significantly different policies is 
parliamentary and electoral reform. 
Mr. Blair talks about creating separate 
Scottish and Welsh Assemblies, re- 
ducing the powers of the House of 
Lords and considering some form of 
proportional representation. 

Labour’s greater internal coherence 
over the issue of Europe could allow 
Britain to play a more effective role in 
Continental affairs, which Washington 
would welcome. A comfortable ma- 


jority for either party would also prob- 
ably help revive the now-stalled North- 
ern Ireland peace talks. 

For many Americans, die most in- 
teresting aspect of this campaign will be 
the chance it offers to find out whether 
Mr. Blair’s “New Labour" rhetoric is 
simply clever packaging or represents a 
serious new approach to center-left gov- 
ernance in an age of global markets. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Patch Up Albania 


Albania is a disintegrating country 
that desperately needs to be put back 
together. Bad luck and bad leadership, 
especially Resident Sali Berisha’s, have 
brought die former maverick Stalinist 
outpost to die brink of self-destruction. 
To their distaste and evident reluctance, 
Albania's European neighbors (it has no 
friends to speak of) are struggling to end 
die refugee exodus, repair the political 
damage and contain any overflow of 
Albanian political unrest 

Italy, across the narrow Adriatic 
Sea. is the most immediately exposed. 
In a tra gic ni ghttime accident an Itali- 
an warship on a mission to hale Al- 
banian “boat people" struck and sank 
an overloaded refugee ship. For the 
resulting loss of life, recriminations are 
being exchanged. But Italy re mains the 
logical and right leader of a multina- 
tional force that the United Nations 
approved and that the Europeans are 
now planning in order to protect dis- 
tribution of h umani tarian aid. 

That is step one of an international 
rescue effort whose next step is to have 
the Organization for Security and Co- 
operation in Europe organize an all- 
party crisis government and early elec- 
tions. Later would come an attempt to 
draw the international banks into 
works of reconstruction. 


The first task, relief, is difficult for a 
reason that no one anticipated just a 
month or two ago. The Berisha gov- 
ernment, to save itself from popular 
outrage over the pyramid scheme dis- 
aster. in effect gave away the order- 
keeping powers of the state to local 
officials and bandits. Hence Albania 
faces not only a north-south split but 
die dispersal of arms and authority to 
local warlords. 

The theory is thar relief is the right 
project on which to restore a national 
structure to the country. But the prac- 
tice is going to be dicey. Italy, France 
and other likely providers of peace- 
keepers (the United States is indis- 
posed) accept a responsibility to re- 
store stability. They are ill-prepared 
politically to pay hard casualty costs. 

It is a blessing that few expected that 
overseas Albanians living in Serbia’s 
Kosovo province and in Macedonia 
have been as relatively orderly as they 
have been. The nightmare that many 
fear is to have Albanian unrest spin on 
into the period when the West is 
mulling the specific terms on which it 


vill withdraw peacekeepers from B os- 
tia. To head off twin Balkan fires — 


there lies the urgency of patching Al- 
bania back together again. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Unrepentant Bomber 


Brian Desmond Pearson is a lucky 
man. An immigration judge in New 
York rejected a government effort to 
deport him and found that the Irish 
Republican Army bombings for which 
he had served 12 years in prison were 
not deportable offenses but political 
ones. If the ruling stands, Mr. Pearson 
will be able to remain in the United 
States with his American -bora wife 
and daughter. He and his supporters 
have used this occasion to boost the 
IRA and to argue that none of its crim- 
inal members now in the United States 
deserve to be deported, either. 

Special circumstances in the Pear- 
son case won him community support 
and the intervention of political lead- 
ers, including Representatives Ben- 
jamin GQman and Peter King. The 
offenses were indeed bombings, but 
because the bombers gave consider- 
able advance warning, no one was in- 
jured. The targeted buildings were 
used by police and military, not ci- 
vilians. Mr. Pearson served a long sen- 
tence and has had no run-ins with the 
law since coming to America a month 
after he was released. He has an Amer- 
ican family and a good job as a car- 
penter. His neighbors ' testimony about 
his character and reputation was im- 
pressive. The Immigration and Nat- 
uralization Service concedes that he is 
no threat to U.S. national security. 

But brushing off bombings as polit- 
ical acts creates a dangerous precedent. 
Moreover, in The New Yak Times Mr. 
Pearson defended his crimes provoc- 
atively. “Young people in Northern 
Ireland,” he said, “are faced with the 
same decision I made. You can do 
nothing, in which case I think you 
should hang your head in shame, or you 


can do something and lose your life or 
spend a long time in jaiL" Thar is 
exactly wrong. In Northern Ireland an 
alternative — peacemaking — has been 
supported by a vast majority for a long 
time. It is arduous, frustrating work. 


constantly disrupted by those who think 
like Mr. Pearson, break truces and at- 
tempt to undermine the brave people 
from Belfast. Dublin and London who 
have chosen negotiation over bombs. 

Talks on die future of Northern Ire- 
land have been suspended until after the 
British elections next month. They will 
be resumed with less hope than when 
they began a few years ago. because die 
IRA and its followers — a minority — 
have returned to violence. If Mr. Pear- 
son has learned anything during his 
peaceful and prosperous time in Amer- 
ica, he should have noted the contrast 
between societies where reconciliation 
is a paramount goal and those where 
bombers are seen as heroes. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Failure in Cambodia 


A key vanity of the new colonialism 
si that outside powers might simply 


[is] that outside powers might simply 
decree democracy. We were dubious 
about the 1991 Paris peace accords, a 
skepticism heightened by the sub- 
sequent failure of UN forces to dis- 
charge the task of disarming the Khmer 
Rouge. That failure of will doomed the 
country to a government carved up 
between the two contending powers. 

— Far Eastern Economic Review' 
(Hong Kong). 


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W ASHINGTON — No one should 
question Benjamin Netanyahu’s 


years. Most recently he has defused the 
issue that probably cost Labour the last 
election — the fear that it would un- 
dermine prosperity with tax-and-spend 


YV question Benjamin Netanyahu’s 
courage. While in die military, be 
shown! beyond a doubt that he is a very 
brave man. But his political daring is a 
different matter, and here there is cause 
for doubt. Mr. Netanyahu, it seems, 


By Richard Cohen 


the West Bank to the WeaSnim entity 


policies. Labour now pledges to freeze 
income tax rates for five years. 


leap into the unknown (the ramifica- 
tions of a Palestinian state) but of risk- 
ing the ire of right-wing politicians. 
This seems to be the reason why Mr. 
Netanyahu zigs and zags from one 
policy to another, embracing the aims 
of the Oslo accords one moment arid 
then, when his right flank seems rest- 
ive. showing the Palestinians that they 
are not. as they might think and every- 
one proclaims, his partner. When push 
comes to shove. Israel does what it 
damned well warns. 

But when it cones to wrecking the 
peace process, Mr. Netanyahu has had 
help. Yasser Arafat has his own right 
wing to worry about, and so. to show that 
he is not a sap of the Israelis, he has done 
tilings like release terrorists from jaiL 
Almost instantly — maybe totally un- 
related — a suicide bomber killed three 
Israelis in a Tel Aviv cafe. This is not 
only an unspeakable act but it allowed 


Mr. Netanyahu to talk about the so- 
called “greed light" given to terrorists- 
It is true, as Mr. Netanyahu noted at 
the time, that these suicide bombers 
have struck when the peace process 
was progressing. That happened last 
March and April, a wave of suicide 
bombings that killed 59 people. This 
time, though, the bombing didfollow a 
grievous wounding to the peace pro- 
cess — the Israeli decision to build a 
Jewish settlement in the East Jerusalem 


Now, a construction project is not a 
terrorist incident and should not be 
compared to one. And it is true, of 
course, that Israel had the legal right to 
press ahead wife the construction of 
homes for 30.000 Jews. But the timing 
was appalling, and incendiary. It sent a 
message to tire Palestinians that their 
protests did not matter, that Israel could 
change the status quo as it pleased. 

This tendency to bully has been 
characteristic of the Netanyahu gov- 
ernmenL Despite warnings, it precip- 
itously opened a tunnel in Jerusalem's 
Old City last September, and a small 
battle ensued. It ceded only 2 percent of 


Opinion polls indicate a seething 
Palestinian population — and. it must 
be added, growing support for terror- 
ism. This is understandable. 

Mr. Netanyahu has shown a tend- 
ency to tub the noses of the Palestinians 
in their inability to control their own 
destiny. He has done this, supposedly, 
to appease the more hard-line members 
of his coalition made uneasy after Is- 
rael pulled out of Hebron. He had to 


show diem he’s tough. 

But now it is Bill Clinton's turn. Mr. 
Netanyahu is coming to Washington 
and he ought to hear a frank expression 
of presidential disapproval, which is 
the sentiment du jour within the ad- 
ministration. Up to now. though, the 
Clinton White House has been oh-so- 
solicitous of Mr. Netanyahu; and. as is 
both customary and right, it vetoed die 
usual anti-Israel UN resolutions. 

The United Nations is no place for 
the United States to show its displeas- 
ure with Israel. But the White House is 
a different story, a more friendly venue 
and the perfect place for Mr. Clinton to 


American Jewish community. _ 

The peace that Yitzhak Rabin lit- 
erally (bed for is now in maximum 
peril. The Arab states are once again 
talking economic boycott, and Egypt s 
Hosni Mubarak is so antagonistic to- 
ward Israel that he countenances anti- 
Semitic stereotypes in his press. Only 
King Hussein of Jordan persists m 
keeping his eye on the prize of peace. 

In early March, King Hussein wrote 
to Mr. Netanyahu. He accused the Israeli 
of wiring actions that “seem bent on 
destroying all I believe in.” and asked 
him a question: “Why the apparent con- 
tinued deliberate humiliation of your so- 
called Palestinian partners?” 

Mr. Clinton ought to ask the same 
question. My guess is that the answer 
has to do with domestic Israeli politics 
— the need to placate those who don’t 
want the peace process to succeed. Mr. 
Netanyahu, it seems, would rather risk 
losing the peace than his grip on power. 
That 1$ a failure of leadership and, it has 
to be said, of nerve. 

The Washington Post. 


NATO: Slow Down and Be Sure the Alliance Remains Strong * 


B russels — “T he parties 
may. by unanimous agree- 
ment, invite any other European 
state in a position to further the 
principles of this Treaty and to 
contribute to the security of the 
North Atlantic area to accede to 
this Treaty." 

So says Article 10 of the North 


By Frederick Bonnart 


European countries is the 
wrong method. 

The Western democracies 
did indeed have to welcome 
them into their fold. But for the 
security aspect the Partnership 
for Peace program with NATO 
was the ideal answer. With its 
individual agreements enabling 


Atlantic Treaty signed in Wash- was the ideal answer. With its 
ington on April 4, 1949. There is individual agreements enabling 
no obligation fa the alliance to partners to choose the degree of 
accept new members — “may” involvement, it provideaa per- 
is not “will” And the two qual- feet means of bringing in ad- 


ifi cations, if rigidly applied, 
would exclude all present can- 
didates for membership. 

The concept of enlargement 
arose out of two other consid- 
erations: a perceived need to 
demonstrate a purpose for the 
alliance after the collapse of the 
direct threat; and an urge to sat- 
isfy the security requirements 
of the former Soviet-dominated 
countries and to help their in- 
tegration into Western Europe. 

Both these aims are impor- 
tant and need to be achieved. 
But extending NATO member- 
ship to the Central and East 


involvement, it provided a per- 
fect means of bringing in ad- 
herents at a pace and depth of 
involvement of their choice. 


An implicit security goaran- 
e is contained in a clause that 


tee is contained in a clause that 
gives them the right of consulta- 
tion with NATO when they con- 
sider themselves threatened. 

The idea of accepting all of 
Central and Eastern Europe as 
members of NATO should nev- 
er have been considered. For, 
once begun, such enlargement 
cannot be halted. 

Unless it is held in check, 
enlargement would perman- 
ently impair relations with Rus- 
sia, whose population would 


feel and remember the humi- 
liation. It would create a class 
division in Europe between 
countries now admitted and 
those put off; if they feel 
humbled and excluded, their 
democratic renewal may be at 
risk. Above all, it would divide, 
emasculate and finally destroy 
the alliance. 

The Helsinki summit is in- 
terpreted as overcoming Rus- 
sian opposition and, hence, giv- 
ing me green light to 
enlargement Pressure, largely 
from the United States, is 
already building up for accel- 
erating and widening it 

Madeleine Albright, on her 
recent visit to NATO, took for 
granted the conclusion of ne- 
gotiations with first entrants by 
the end of this year, and initial 
accessions by 1999. Congres- 
sional advocates want to push 
through a binding timetable for 
die next wave. The “open 
door” is the second item for 
NATO's July summit agenda. 


NATO is committed to open 
such negotiations with “one or 
more” applicant countries, and 
cannot now backtrack. Prom- 
ises made to Poland, Hungary 
and the Czech Republic by al- 
lied leaders, although not bind- 
ing on the alliance, have been so 
often repeated and believed that 
failure to go through would be a 
fatal blow to its credibility. 

But Romania and Slovenia 
have also found support among 
allies for their appeals for ad- 
mission in the first wave, while 
the three Baltic countries 
protest at their possible exclu- 
sion. Slovakia. Bulgaria. Al- 
bania and Macedonia all con- 
sider themselves qualified and 
do not wish to be left out 

In Brussels, work is proceed- 
ing on defining eligibility cri- 
teria. These can be adjusted to 
suit preselected applicants; 
powerful lobbies in Brussels 
and in member countries are 
actively trying to shape them to 
ensure their own admission. 
Differences among allies are 
already appearing; they will be- 


Free Trade: Keep die Faith and Beat Gephardt 


N EW YORK — I can't be- 
lieve I’m writing this sen- 


n lieve I’m writing this sen- 
tence, but it’s true: The race for 
the Democratic presidential 
nomination for the year 2000 is 
already having a profound, and 
unhealthy, affect on Clinton 
foreign policy. 

One of the biggest foreign 
policy questions before the 
Clinton administration in its 
second term is: Do we want to 
keep expanding the North 
American Free Trade Agree- 
ment throughout South Amer- 
ica, and sign more free trade 
agreements with other countries 
around the world? 

You would think that this 
was a no-brainer. President Bill 
Clinton hailed NAFTA as one 
of the great achievements of his 
first term, and Vice President A1 
Gore led the Summit of the 
Americas in Miami in 1994, 
which proclaimed free trade 
throughout the hemisphere as 
its goaL But since then NAFTA 
and “free trade” have become 
almosr dirty words for the Clin- 
tonites, thanks to some foul 
political winds that have 
swirled together recently. 

Fust, the anti-globalization 
movement, led by Pal Buch- 
anan. is still with us, arguing 
that free trade and global in- 
tegration cause stagnating 
wages. (Wrong. What primarily 
hurts lower-skilled workers is 
rapidly advancing technology 
that replaces them with ma- 
chines. computers and voice 
mail, not free trade). 

Combined with this is a 
growing sense that Mexico has 
become a drug- infested, finan- 
cially strapped state and that 
somehow NAFTA is to blame. 
And combined with tins is a 
sense that China, with its human 
rights abuses, low wages and 
closed markets, is the new 
archenemy of American labor 
and should be punished. 

All this has put advocates of 
free trade on die defensive. 
Now add the politics. Repre- 
sentative Richard Gephardt has 
emerged as the leading chal- 
lenger to Mr. Gore in 2000. Mr. 
Gephardt, long a critic of NAF- 
TA, smells the new public 
mood. He is positioning himself 
to take advantage of it and to 
saddle Mr. Gore with the free 
trade argumenL 

Mr. Gephardt has not come 
out explicitly against more free 
trade accords, but on Feb. 26 he 
circulated a 12-page letter to his 
Democratic congressional col- 
leagues that att ac he s so many 
labor, environment and human 
rights conditions to any new free 
trade agreements as to make 
them virtually impossible. 

Noting in his letter that 
“many Americans see them- 


selves as victims, rather than be- 
neficiaries, of recent trade agree- 
ments," be urged that Congress 
go slow in granting the president 
any new “fast track” authority 
to negotiate more trade agree- 
ments. That is a pretty good 
strategy for tying up the anti- 
NAFTA labor vote and AFL- 
QO endorsement for 2000. 

Said C. Fred Bergsten, head 
of tbe Institute for International 
Economics: “Gephardt is play- 
ing to the losers from global- 
ization. He isn’t playing to all 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

rather than be- those Americans working in ex- 


not to mention me millions who 
benefit from low-priced imports 
of shoes, clothing and other at- 
tractive products. Clinton must 
confront this issue directly.” 

For now, though, the Clin- 
tonites, who are rightly focused 
on getting the budget passed, 
have been reluctant to take on 
this extra battle. The adminis- 
tration has stopped talking about 
extending NAFTA to Chile. So 
Chile is signing its own free 


A Rough Ride for Gore 


By David S. Broder 


W ASHINGTON — For A1 
Gore, 1997 is proving to 


YV Gore, 1997 is proving to 
be far too close for comfort to 
election year 2000. 

In the best circumstances, the 
transition from sitting No. 2 to 
candidate for No. 1 is one of the 
most dicey in politics. It re- 
quires shedding the subservi- 
ence dial popular psychology 
requires of the deputy and 
gradual unveiling of the qual- 
ities of vision, assertiveness and 
independence that Americans 
crave in their presidents. 

Richard Nixon and Hubert 
Humphrey, two of the most 
skillful politicians of the last 
generation, failed the test when 
they tried it in 1960 and 1968 
respectively. George Bush 
barely managed it in 1988, even 
though Ronald Reagan was 
much more committed to hav- 
ing his vice president succeed 
him than was Dwight Eisen- 
hower or Lyndon Johnson. 

No vice president since Mr. 
Nixon has been subjected to the 
intense scrutiny that Mr. Gore 
has faced in recent months. 

In the final term of the re- 
tiring president, when political 
custom allows and requires the 
vice president to become bis 
own man, he has to measure the 
impact of everything he does 
and says, not only on himself 
but on the current president and 
his policies. 

That is what Mr. Gore is 
painfully learning from the bur- 
geoning campaign finance 
scandals and from his just con- 
cluded venture into high-level 


diplomacy in China. To the dis- 
may of me vice president and 


may or me vice president and 
his staff and friends, he looks 
very much like the fall guy in 
both these politically embar- 
rassing areas. 

Mr. Nixon was condemned 
by Democrats in a nonstop cres- 
cendo from 1952 through 1960 
for the tactics he used as the 


hard-edged partisan campaign- 
er for his venerated and po- 
litically untouchable boss. Gen- 
eral Eisenhower. Mr. Gore now 
is being pilloried for the eager- 
ness with which he took on the 
role of 1 ‘solicitor-in-chieF ’ in 
the Democratic money sweep. 

From a laughingstock in die 
Los Angeles Buddhist temple 
caper to the heavy-handed guy 
putting the arm on contributors 
from ms White House office, he 
has become — far more than 
Bill Clinton — the personific- 
ation of this latest scandal. 

His legalistic news confer- 
ence effort to defend himself 
only added to his problems. 

But where Mr. Nixon was 
able to recoup ground by his 
overseas travel and his ventures 
into diplomacy, Mr. Gore has 
seen his ill-timed trip to China 
become an additional source of 
doubt about his readiness for 
presidential-level politics. 
Every broadcast and every 
news story underlined the “di- 
lemma” he freed in courting 
the Chinese while they were 
under suspicion of having 
fonneled money into the Clin- 
ton -Gore re-election campaign. 

In all these matters, what is 
rarely noted is that Mr. Gore is 
not operating as a free agent but 
is stul very much constrained 
by the constitutional and polit- 
ical responsibility of being Mr. 
Clinton s No. 2. 

For example, he cannot point 
out publicly that it was Bill 
Clinton and his longtime polit- 
ical consultant,. Dick Morris, 
who ordered up the early 
massive television advertising 
campaign which required the 
kina ofhigh -pressure, be nd-the- 

rules fund-raising for which Mr. 
Gore is now being pilloried. 

Mr. Gore is learning the game 
earlier than most of his prede- 
cessors, and enjoying it less. 

The Washington Post. 


trade accords with Canada. 
Europe and Mexico and leaving 
the United States behind. 

But the battle is coming. 
Congress has to decide this year 
whether to give Clinton fast 
track authority, and that is going 
to really turn into a national 
debate on how people feel about 
globalization. Mr. Clinton and 
Mr. Gore should come our 
swinging, not ducking. 

At a time when America is 
the job-creating envy of Europe 
and Japan, and U.S. companies 
dominate their European and 
Japanese competitors in virtu- 
ally every postmdustrial busi- 
ness, from software to package 
delivery, the United States has 
everything to gain from more 
free trade agreements. 

The U.S. market is already the 
most open, so Americans only 
gain from getting more access to 
others’. And there is no reason 
why we can’t accompany more 
free trade accords with reason- 
able programs to assist and re- 
train the minority of lower- 
skilled U.S. workers who mig ht 
lose jobs in the transition. 

Mr. Gore’s defeat of Ross 
Perot in die NAFTA debate was 
politically his finest hour. He 
and Mr. Clinton could demolish 


come more acute as the July 
s ummi t approaches. 

The worst can still be 
avoided. The enlargement pro- 
cess is begun; it is important 
that it be properly channeled. 

Russian concerns should be 
met by complete transparency. 
While new members will 
clearly have the same rights and 
obligations as present ones, 
common infrastructure projects 
are a NATO decision. NATO 
cannot and should not commit 
itself forever to deployment in- 
hibitions, but it can and should 
publicly present the extended 
infrastructure plans for the next 
five to 10 years. 

These should be limited to 
extending communications fa- 
cilities and harmonizing pass- 
ive air defense systems (radar 
stations, control centers). No 
plans should exist for extending 
road, rail and pipeline systems 
eastward. 

An enhanced Partnership for 
Peace process should satisfy the 
needs, if not the aspirations, of 
other prospective candidates. 
The whole gamut of military 
cooperation is available and be- 
ing practiced; common action in 
Bosnia of the. 16 NATO mem- 
bers with 19 partners is proof of 
theprogram s effectiveness. 

The initial consultation pro- 
cess has been considerably 
widened, so dial partners can 
participate in allied planning, 
including establishing common 
force goals. 

For new members, the qual- 
ifications in the Washington 
treaty should be fully applied by 
limiting the first entrants to eco- 
nomically advanced countries. 
Initially, only one — say, the 
Czech Republic — should be 
admitted, with a definite further 
timetable for Hungary and Po- 
land. Har monizati on of military 
procedures, equipment and or- 
ganizations should be open to 
partners on the same basis as 
new members. 

As for the justification for 
NATO’s further existence in 
die absence of a tangible threat, 
a simple answer exists. Nation- 
al armed forces acting in an 
alliance are vastly stronger than 
alone. It would be madness to 
abandon or impair a proven sys- 
tem of military integration, cre- 
ated and refined over half a cen- 
tury, which, has produced a 
unique international instrument - 
as Europe’s security anchor. 

International Herald Tribune. 


Mr. Gephardt on this issue if 
they really engaged it. Without 


they really engaged it. Without 
their leadership, though, die 
country that led the world to 
liberalization and market access 


agreements is going to end up 
leading die world in retreat, and 


leading die world in retreat, am 
we will all be poorer. 

The New York Tunes. 


Letters intended' for publi- 
cation should be addressed 
“ Letters to the Editor " and 
contain the writer's signature, 
name and full address. Letters 
should be brief and are subject 
to editing. We cannot be re- 
sponsible for the return cf un- 
solicited manuscripts. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1897: Painters’ Battle of the principal cities of tin 


PARIS — “There is every rea- 
son to believe that this year's 
Salons will contain some work 
of exceptional interest. The 
battle between the acad emi c 
school and the impressionist 
school is so keen that the paint- 
ers of both will produce their 
best work,” said M. Henri 
Roch efort who will write for die 
HERALD his appreciations of 
the Salons. “Personally,” M. 
Rochefort went on, “my mind 
is not yet absolutely made up 
regarding the artistic value of 
die new school; but I recognise, 
in certain landscape painters 
who at first seemed to me to be 
pure faruaisistes, qualities of 
light and composition.’' 


of the principal cities of the 
world. The exhibit consists of a 
huge canvas, 402 feet long by A 
48 feet, upon which are grouped T " 
life-size portraits of more 
than 6,000 of the military, naval 
and diplomatic leaders of the 
Allied countries as well as the 
portraits of various national 
heroes from the ranks. 


c 


1947: Russian Brides 


1922: War Panor ama 


PARIS — The war exhibit 
known as the Pandfeon de la 
Guerre is to be moved bodily 
from Paris to be taken on a tour 


LONDON — The Russian re- 
fusal to permit fifteen Soviet 
wives of British ex-service men 
to leave Russia and join their 
husbands in Britain drew hot 
criticism in die House of Com- 
mons. and members were told 
that die Foreign Secretary had 
taken the * ’gravest view’ * of the 
incident A Conservative MP 
said: “This harsh treatment of 
British ex-service men makes 
a complete mockery of die 
treaty with Russia and the 
friendship of the British people 
toward that country.!’ . 


Oil 

r 





PAGE 9 


OPINION/LETTERS 


v' 


Does the Nation- State Have a Future? 


S alzburg — is the nation-state* at 

*** end of its 

r;“” h “ -P^fire™ 

paia^ that has been fee site of the 
Sl ^l Senunar for 50 years. 

. advanced or un- 

m * 1 °P®^ Western or Eastern nations, 
?? agreed we’ll still need 

nanon-states to give people identity 

safety nets, 

protect the environment and guarantee 
internal security. 

. B “ r ^ or 0 peek into the deep uncer- 
Iaj t ntie ^- ^ 21st century and the 
astounding array of forces now under- 
numng the nation-states, this conference 
was a remarkable tour de force. 

Leading the parade of transformative 
change are globalization and its accom- 
plices. The computer and telecomm u- 
ra ?, on ? J revolutions enable instant 
worldwide communications to create new 
relationships, new economics, whether 
^ vli governments like them or not. . 

Multinational corporations now as- 
semble goods from plants across. the 
globe and have moved heavily into ser- 
vices, too — law. accounting, adver- 
tising, computer consultation — as if the 
world were borderless. 

Financial markets are also globalized. 
Where nation-states once sought to set 
exchange rates, private traders now con- 
trol currency flows — at a scarcely be- 
lievable level of $1.3 trillion a day. 

Tbe nation-states fatefully shranV- 
their own power by creating supema- 


By Neal R« Peirce 

tional institutions such as the United 
Nations, World Trade Organization and 
Worid Bank. Each creates its own cadres 
of- civil servants unaccountable to any 
single state. 

Now comes a rise of influential, glob- 
.ally active nongovernmental organiza- 
tions . — the NGOs — ranging from 
Greenpeace to Amnesty Internationa] to 
a nimal rights groups. They got official 
UN recognition at die Rio Earth Summit 
in 1992; now they’re negotiating to get a 
voice in official UN deliberations. Yet 
the NGOs, like the multinationals, are 
mostly based in Europe and North 
America, feeding off cutting-edge tech- 
nology, setting new global standards 
without much accountability to anyone. 

Globalization is creating immense 
wealth. Yet countries unwilling or un- 
equipped to become technologically 
connected — many in Africa today, for 

example — * ‘ marginal iTairi nn, ' ’ an- 

other word for isolation and poverty. 

At tbe Salzburg sessions there was 
real unease about jpobalization — a fear 
that the world order now emerging 
would be too cruel, too amoral, too ex- 
clusive in its power-wielding. 

. Anil S aldanha . a corporate executive 
from India, gave voice to these con- 
cerns. 

“Man is not well,” Mr. Saldanha 
said. “He is going through a process of 
insularity — insecurity, fright, fear. He 
doesn’t know whar’s thrust on him, yet 
he must cope. So we need to look in- 
ward, to express our individuality, spir- 
ituality. If we do not puta human race on 
globalization, bring humanity to the 


forefront, we may not have far to go.” 

A global market does not create a 
global community, another speaker 
commented. 

Yet die conference made it clear that 
tbe erosion of the nation-state is not only 
coming from above, it's creeping up 
from below. 

One force is die rise of subnational 
regions impatiem with the bureaucracy 
and unresponsiveness of large national 
governments. Nimble city-states — the 
“Asian tigers” of Hong Kong, Taiwan 
and Singapore, for example — have 
been recent 1 models of success. In 
1970, four U.S. states had trade offices 
abroad. Now virtually all do and all 
have official standing in tbe World 
Trade Organization. 

Ethnic, racial and religious groups 
grasping for power are perhaps an even 
greater pressure from below. The end of 
the Cold War untapped myriad ethnic 
nationalistic tensions. 

Indeed, we may end up with more 
nation-states. The United Nations had 
166 member “states" in 1991. It now 
has 185, and it could one day end up with 
400 or more, just because of ethnic di- 
visions. But bow many will be viable 
nations? And whai does the developed 
world do about the collapse of countries 
worlds removed from its sleek glob- 
alization? 

New hybrid structures — African. 
Asian or »-atin Ameri can emulations of 
the European Union, for example — 
may be needed. 

Perhaps we’ll see forms of commu- 
nity as unknown now as the nation-state 
was when it burst on the scene in the 
16th century. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Filling the Hole Where God Whs 


L OS ANGELES — So I’m not Jew- 
ish after all. The conclusion isn’t 
mine, doesn't arise from personal soul- 
searching and will undoubtedly sur- 
prise my parents in Florida. 

My excommunication comes from 
the 600-member Union of Orthodox 
Rabbis of the United States and 
Canada, which has made obedience to 
the Torah's 613 commandments the 
litmus test of Judaism. 

To be sure, the rabbis are a very' 
small group. But they have hit upon a 
real vulnerability — and not just among 
Jews. A loi of people cobble together 
their own concept of a Supreme Being, 
a fragile, ad hoc faith that gets them 
through die postmodern night. 

How authentic is their idea of re- 
ligion? How real is their God? Fun- 
damentalists are satisfied with their 
answers. Are the rest of us? 

It is considered a blessing to observe 
the Torah's commandments. 

Some of them, like the Ten Com- 
mandments. make sense to me as moral 
rules. But others seem optional. The 
rules of keeping kosher, for example, 
helped Jews preserve their identity for 
millennia. But when my parents took us 
to Ming's on Lyons Avenue in Newark, 
New Jersey, on Sunday nights, they saw 
no risk of assimilation, or divine re- 
tribution, in ordering lobster 
Cantonese, and I think they were rigbL 
Some of the commandments, such 
as not mixing linen and wool, strike me 
as deal-breakers, If you observe them 
as God's inviolable law. I stand in awe 
of your faith. Nothing 1 say to you will 


By Marty Kaplan 


justify my sacrilege. So our only hope 
is pluralism, the big tent of tolerance. 

But the rabbis want to throw my kind 
out of the tent. Until now, if your 
mother was Jewish, you were Jewish. 

MEANWHILE 

From here on, say the rabbis, it's not 
just genes. 

The protest they've aroused sug- 
gests that Jews really do value di- 
versity. But those rabbis have a philo- 
sophical ace up their sleeve. 

Why should 1 be able to pick and 
choose among the 613 command- 
ments? If I'm free to eat shellfish, why 
isn't another man free to murder? 

The answer modem people give is 
based on reason. We do what makes 
sense. We abide by the categorical 
imperative, the do-unto-others at the 
crux of aJJ communities. We observe 
the rales we wouldn't mind seeing uni- 
versalized. But Reason isn't God. 

Fundamentalists have God: we've 
got Kant, and maybe some kind of 
personal Supreme Being. Fundamen- 
talists live by the literal word of the 
Bible; we live by its poetry. They are 
commanded: we are merely moved. 

Upward of 90 percent of all Amer- 
icans say they believe in God. But 1 bet 
a lot more than one of 10 also believe 
that science has got it basically right. 
Religion may offer a source of nos- 
talgia. a sense of community, a con- 


soling mythology, but without faith, 
without the experience of God. it is no 
protection from the crisis of spirit at the 
century's end. 

This is the sadness at the heart of our 
secular lives. No one wants to live in a 
pointless, chaotic cosmos, but thai is 
the one that science has given us, and 
that our culture has largely cham- 
pioned. We may yearn for the divine, 
but our feet are stuck in the moral 
relativism (or even nihilism) that such 
a culture breeds. 

The postmodern Dadaism that’s hip 
today is the best we can do; 
everything's a joke. But inside it feels 
awful. The things you want a God for 
— an afterlife, a comfort, a commander 
— seem unavailable. 

The baby boomers wrestling with 
their interfaith marriages, their chil- 
dren’s questions about the Creator, 
their friends' cancers, their own mor- 
tality — where are the troubled 
wiseacres turning now? 

Too stable to be seduced by cults, 
too secular to be bom again, too pained 
to ignore our unease, we have become a 
generation of seekers, searching for 
something transcendent to fill the hole 
where God was. 

The rabbis may have found a tender 
spot in all people, of all faiths, whose 
idea of God has an asterisk after it. 

The writer, a former speechwriter 
for Wee President Walter Mondale, is a 
screenwriter and movie producer. He 
contributed this comment to The New 
York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


On Russia and NATO 

Regarding ** Look Again: 
Russian Weakness. Chinese 
Strength" (Opinion, March 
31) by Farced Zakaria : 

I take issue with Mr. Za- 
karia and contend that fee 
Clinton administration has 
got its foreign policy prior- 
ities right, both in fee prom- 
inence given to relations wife 
Russia and more recently in 
its forceful decision to ex- 
pand NATO membership to 
the east. . . 

That fee Soviet regime lost 
the Cold War is patently ob- 
vious. That Russia has ceased 
to be a superpower is not 

Yes. Russia's conventional 
forces are in disarray. But feat 


Letters intended for pub- 
lication should be addressed 
Letters to the . Editor “ and 
contain the writer’s signature: 
name and full ad dress. Letters 
should be brief and are sub- 
ject to editing. We cannot be 
responsible far the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts . 


is not fee whole story. Rus- 
sian military industry is 
down, but it is not oul Rus- 
sian arms manufacturers are 
moving aggressively into the 
international arena wife 
world-class systems. More to 
the point. Russia’s nuclear ar- 
senal and ICBMs potentially 
threaten the . continental 
United States in a unique 
manner. Happily, • any 
Chinese threat is to Amer- 
ica’s interests, not its exis- 
tence. Hus alone makes it 
foolish to downplay the im- 
portance of stable relations 
wife Russia. 

The shoring up of security 
arrangements m . Central 
Europe through NATO ex- 
pansion is tnirmg place 
against a background of polit- 
ical ami economic instability 
in Russia, and fee real fear of 
what - would happen if fee 
economy-tumed-sOra- ^orithe ; ‘ 
current president died or left 
office prematurely and an ex- 
tremist came to power. At a 
bare minimum, we are talking 
about an insurance policy for 
fee Continent : 


The forging of a European 
consensus behind this policy 
of expansion speaks volumes 
for its compelling logic, given 
fee fractious nature of Euro- 
pean diplomacy. Western 
solidarity explains Boris 
Yeltsin’s acquiescence at 
Helsinki, just as such soli- 
darity over Pershings re- 
solved fee SS-20 issue in 
the decade past. 

Assumption of long-term 
Russian weakness due to fee 
decline in fee official econ- 
omy over fee last five years is 
a risky proposition. We 
know feat a very substantial 
portion of the national 
product of the Soviet Union 
was wasted because of fee 
hopeless inefficiency of the 
system. We also know that 
fee official statistics on GNP 
today fail to capture a vety 
lame amount ^f ..economic 
activity. T believe -it is -pre^ 
mature to write off fee Rus- 
sian economy. 

I applaud the priority fee 
Clinton administration gives 
the present and real challenge 
coining from Russia over 


some hypothetical future 
threats coming from China. 

GILBERT DOCTOR OW. 

Brussels. 

Regarding “Sorry. You’re 
Still Wrong on NATO Expan- 
sion" (Opinion. March 25) by 
Thomas L. Friedman: 

Mr. Friedman is right to 
insist that NATO does not 
need to expand to include 
former Co mmunis t coun- 
tries. 

As an American of Hun- 
garian origin who visits East- 
ern Europe frequently. I can 
testify that joining fee North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization 
is not among the hottest de- 
sires of citizens living some 
thousand miles east of fee At- 
lantic coast. Opposition lead- 
ers in Hungary, for example, 
are demanding a referendum 
on fee issue, 

■ Presidem Bflt Clinton and 
other NATO expansionists 
would be well advised to fol- 
low suit: We in fee West 
should also be asked through 
a referendum whether we 
want tQ pay billions of tax 


BOOKS 


' A FACE AT THE WINDOW 

By Dennis McFarland. 309 pages. $25. 
Broadway Books. 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani 

T HE ingredients of Dennis McFar- 
land's new novel, “A Face at fee 
Window.” will immediately bring to 
mind Henry James: an American abroad 
in London, encounters wife ghostly alter 
egos that remind the hero of his past and 
the paths he didn’t take, and lots of 
ruminations about missed connections 
and fee failure to engage. 

But while “A Face at fee Window” 
appears to borrow themes and a good bit 
of its plot from wests like “The Sense of 
fee Past," “The Turn of fee Screw” and 
“The Jolly Corner,” it utterly lacks 
James's masterly control of narrative 
and his graceful manipulation of mood. 
\T' What has gone wrong here? Well, to 
begin wife. McFarland has given us a 
hero — his narrator, Cookson Selway — 

who is supposed to be haunted by his past, 

yet McFarland has neglected to make that 
ppcf tangible to the reader. “A Face at tbe 
Window” remains sullenly spick in 
Cookson’s solipsistic, haflucinatton- 
prone mind Indeed, concrete allusions to 
Cookson' s past are confined to perfimc; 
[Qiy recitations feat read like one of those 
canned summaries you see in fee alumni 
notes section of a college magazine. 

"I got the hell out of fee South as soon 
as I could (the summer after high school 


graduation),” Cookson recalls cm page 4 
of the np vel, “moved to Venice, Calif., 
dropped out, turned on. tuned out; 
moved to Manhattan, sold cocaine for a 
living, made a lot of money, opened a 
restaurant (honoring fee theory feat we 
somehow live into our names. I sup- 
pose); got married (Ellen, a mystery 
writer), became a father (Jordan, a girl, 
called Jordie); checked myself into fee 
detox unit at St Vincent's (shortly after 
Jordie ’s first birthday), got clean and 
sober, opened two more restaurants, 
made a shocking amount of money, sold 
everything, got fee hell out of New York; 
moved to Cambridge. Mass., bought a 
200-year-old house on a full-acre lot, got 
a dog (Spencer, a Dalmatian) and retired 
at fee age of 39 to manage my con- 
siderable (socially and environmentally 
responsible) investments.” 

What happens is this: after putting 
their daughter in boarding school. Cook- 
son and tus wife take off for London for a 
month. They book a suite of rooms at a 
«ma11 hotel called fee Willerton, which 


accident (or murder) back in the 1930s. 

Bizarre- things start happening to Cook- 
son fee minute he arrives at fee hotel, and 
swiftly begin to accelerate. He hears a 
piano feat no one else can hear. He feels a 
ghostly presence in fee room watching 
hrm mak?» love to his wife. And he starts 
conversing wife three spirits or. ghosts. 

Cookson becomes so obsessed wife 
these ghosts feat he withdraws into a 


private, secretive worid of his own. He 
begins sleeping all day, lies to his wife 
and petulantly refuses to see a doctor. 

Eventually, his wife moves out, and 
he begins an odd, vaguely paternalistic 
relationship wife Pascal, fee hotel porter 
— a relationship feat will have violent 
repercussions by fee end of fee book. 

As a narrator. Cookson is not a terribly 
engaging fellow: he’s self-absorbed to 
the point of monotony, weirdly oblivious 
to fee physical and emotional world 
around him. “It’s my personal theory 
feat most men spend- most of their lives 
pretending to be someone they are not," 
he says in a fairly typical rumination, 
“because they’ve beat made to feel feat 
there's something intrinsically debasing 
about being who they truly are.” 

Of course, some of this is intentional 
on McFarland’s part: he needs to make 
Cookson seem like a selfish jerk so that 
his encounter wife the ghosts — remin- 
iscent of Scrooge's encounter with the 
ghosts in “A Christinas Carol" — can 
goad him mtn reassessment of his life. 

By fee end of the book, fee reader is so 
tired of Cookson's self-pitying self-in- 
ventories, so weary of his efforts to deter- 
mine whether the ghosts are projections of 
his unconscious or real emanations from 
fee sprit worid. that one doesn’t really 
care what effect they have on his search 
for self-knowledge and redemption. 

Michiko Kakutani is on the staff ofThe 
New York Times. 


dollars toward the expansion 
of NATO, and whether we 
aspire to involvement in 
peace-keeping adventures 
wi thin our own expanded 
ranks. 

R. LESLIE ILES. 

Munich. 

Regarding “ NATO’s Fu- 
ture" (Letters. April I): 

One of your letter writers 
seems to have mixed up fee 
United Nations and NATO. 
NATO was never involved in 
Somalia, but fee UN was. 
peter b. martin. 

Montcuq, France. 

Religion in America 

Regarding “ See What You 
Get When You Suppress Tra- 
ditional Religion?" (Opin- 
ion. March 31 1 by David Gel- 
efhter: \ . 

Judging from the righteous-; 
blathering of Mr. Gelemter. 
the ayatollahs of the Moral 
Majority, having largely 
completed fee subversion of a 
major political party, are now 
making inroads in fee ivy- 
covered bastions of American 
higher education. 

This is more than unset- 
tling for those of us who be- 
lieve there is too much rather 
than too little religious mys- 
ticism in public life in Amer- 
ica today. 

By accident of history, fee 
United States has a Jitdeo- 
Chrisrian majority. But by 
virtue of their citizenship. 
Americans who subscribe to 


other belief systems — such 
as Buddhism. Islam and, yes. 
atheism — also have rights to 
believe and expound their 
particular variety of absolute 
truth. 

As minorities, moreover, 
they have a right to be de- 
fended against fee tyranny of 
the majority. This is a fun- 
damental American right. 
Deny it and you deny fee core 
values of a nation that counts 
among its founders many 
who fled such tyranny in their 
countries of origin. 


Clearly then, the only way 
to fully respect minority 
rights is to avoid all expres- 
sion of religious belief in pub- 
lic places. 

Mr. Gelemter claims, in 
conclusion, that “fee stronger 
among us remain Christians 
and Jews in fee old sense.” 
Perhaps fee truly strong are 
those capable of accepting fee 
world as it is: a chaotic place 
where many questions may 
not be answerable. Perhaps 
the truly strong are those cap- 
able of living moral and eth- 


ical lives without taking 
refuge in any particular for- 
mulation. be it traditional or 
otherwise, of divine or ab- 
solute truth. 

Perhaps the truly strong 
among us recognize feat es- 
tablished religions, as they 
compete to establish partic- 
ular versions of absolute 
truth, are more fee cause than 
the solution of violence and 
fee loss of moral compass in 
the world today. 

STANLEY GUCK. 

Boulogne, France. 



When Alan Greenspan sat down at the piano , all 
irrational exuberance ceased. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


T HE first thing most play- 
ers learn about bidding is 
that they should open one no- 
trump wife a balanced hand 
and 16 to IS points. Later they 
may switch to 15-17, or even 
12-14, 14-16 or some other 
range. But fee hand is always 
balanced. 

There is, however, one 
iconoclast who believes that 
one no-trump should be a 
strong, forcing bid with a 
hand that may not be bal- 
anced. His name is George 
Rosenkranz, and those who 
are willing to experiment 
should buy his latest book. It 
is “Godfrey’s Bridge Chal- 
lenge," written wife Philip 
Alder, and it is available for 


$11.95 including mailing 
from The Bridge Worid, 39 
West 94fe Street. New York, 
New York 10025. 

Refinements in slam bid- 
ding and suggestions in the 
areas of Stayman. transfer 
bids and major-suit raises add 
up to a package which is guar- 
anteed by fee authors to im- 
prove anyone’s bidding. 

The diagramed deal is an 
example of fee Dynamic No- 
Trump. which shows 19-20 
points when balanced or 18- 
21 when unbalanced. The 
feree-club response, a rare 
one, showed five controls, 
counting the ace as two and a 
king as one. The outcome, 
after an overbid by North at 
her second turn, was a rea- 
sonable six-spade contract 

At first sight it appears, in 


view of fee duplication of dis- 
tribution, that six no-tramp 
would be as good, needing 
two out of three finesses to 
succeed. But in spades, as 
Godfrey demonstrates. 
South's chances are better. 

South has to win fee open- 
ing club lead in his hand and. 
postponing trump plays, take 
an immediate heart finesse. If 
this loses he will need win- 
ning finesses in spades and 
eventually diamonds. But 
when the heart finesse wins, 
as it does, he should repeat fee 
finesse to make sure that East 
is not holding up. 

Then he should play tbe 
spade ace, spurning that fin- 
esse, and cash his remaining 
winners in club and hearts. 
Finally a spade is led. and one 
defender. West as it happens. 


NORTH 
♦ J9854 
O A 7 fi 
O A 10 3 
«K2 


WEST 

* K3 
9K954 
<-QS5 

* J 10 9 7 


EAST 

♦ 2 

0 8?2 

*9874 

*86943 


SOUTH (D) 

♦ A Q 10 7 6 
OQJ10 

* K J 2 
*AQ 

North and South were vulnerable. 
The bidding: 

South West North East 

1 N.T. Pass 3* Pass 

3 * Pass 4 N.T. Pass 

5 * Pass 6 * Pass 

Pass 


West led the club jack. 

will be forced to lead a helpful 
diamond or concede a ruff 
and sluff. 




4 




residing 


outside Canada can 

to vote. 



For more information, please call Elections Canada at 
1-613-993-2975, or toll-free from Canada and the United 
States at 1 - 800 -IN FO-VOTE (1-800-463-6868) 


Elections 

Canada 


TTY/TDD: 1-800-361-8935 toll-free from Canada and the United States 
Internet: http^/www.eiections.ca 
E-mail: eleccan@magi.com 



Elections 

Canada 






■ 4 .. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRIDA11 .APRIL 4. 1997 



eisa/u? 


/ 



. i ■ , 

< ,• i 


= u 4 i » Y 


Zanzibar: 
Of Cloves 



Magic Carpet 
To the Horizon 


By Paula Budlong Cronin 


M OST of the three- and four- 
story whitewashed buildings 
of Stone Town were built of 
pink coral ine. which is plentiful, and 
date back centuries to when Omanis 
and Indians based on Zanzibar dom- 
inated the African East Coast trade. The 
coded insignia on walls and underfoot 
map underground freshwater and elec- 
trical systems installed by British en- 
gineers who operated here a century 
ago under their country's de facto pro- 
tectorate. Indeed, the House of Won- 
ders. a ceremonial palace the engineers 
built in 1 883, is so called because it was 
the firsr building in sub-Saharan Africa 
to have electric light. 

Much of what we saw mirrored 
what my husband and I. with our two 
young sons, had seen 22 years before 
at Bagamayo. a crumbling fishing vil- 
lage 50 kilometers across the strait on 
the Tanzanian mainland. 

In the heyday of Zanzibar's slave 
markets. Bagamayo was the end point 
of trails of suffering and death that 
extended hundreds of kilometers into 
the African continent- Then and now, 
Bagamayo and Stone Town share a 
heritage of wooden doorways ornately 
carved with Muslim, Hindu and ancient 
Egyptian symbols and quotations (the 
carving was local, the teak imported*, 
and breath-stopping slave quarters. 

But Stone Town survived the last 
century much better than Bagamayo. 
by replacing its trade in slaves with 
rubber and ivory, then moving on to 
such commodities as cloves and other 
spices, reef fish, coconut products and 
fanned seaweed. Today that trade also 
includes antiques and curios for the 
few European and Asian tourists who 
have begun trickling in. 


Through the Centuries 


A walk around Stone Town is a walk 
through time. The Anglican Cathedral, 
a stone pile much more English than 
African, was built a hundred years ago 
on the site of the former slave market. 
The entrance to the slave quarters is 
nearby, a narrow stairway down to two 
small, windowless underground rooms, 
where men and women were crowded 
together, sometimes for days, waiting 
their rum ai the auction block above. 

Livingstone House, a whitewashed 


Z ANZIBAR. Tanzania — Asa 
child. I flew my magic carpel 
to all sorts of strange places 1 
couldn't imagine reaching 
any other way — Katmandu, Beijing. 
Egypt, the Taj Mahal. Rhodes, even 
Zanzibar. Then one day in the early 
1970s. when 2 was stanng out ai the 
Indian Ocean from a lookout on Dar es 
Salaam harbor, a local standing next to 
me volunteered. "Just over the horizon 
is Zanzibar, madam. But you don't 
want ro go there. It is very dirty." 

Suddenly I knew that all those 
strange, unreachable places were 
reachable. By now I’ve been to most of 
them, some more than once, but it 
wasn't until last fall that I made it to 
Zanzibar. It is as strange as my child- 
self expected it to be (and not par- 
ticularly dirty). 

Zanzibar is a small archipelago in 
the Indian Ocean 40 kilometers off the 
coast of Tanzania. The population still 
includes descendants of .Africans. 
Omani Arabs and Indians who sailed 
die monsoons there on dhows in the 
first millennium, as well as descen- 
dants of Africans emancipated from 
the notorious slave markets that made 
Omani sultans rich. The luxuriant 
clove plantations the Omanis set up 
with slave labor are thriving. 

Out on the coral reefs, men still stalk 
fish with spears when the tide is low. 
and spear diem from outriggers when 
the tide is high. The white sand 
beaches are largely unsullied by the 
merchants of tourism and still undis- 
covered by shell collectors. 

And Stone Town. Zanzibar's old 
quarter and the staging area for the 
African explorers 'Richard Burton. 
John Speke and David Livingstone 
(Henry Morton Stanley, too. of 
course I. remains a maze of bazaars, 
mosques, arches, colonnades and bal- 
conied dwellings where you can easily 
get lost just two steps from your hotel 
on streets as narrow as sidewalks. 



Una tea, Hndilv- often 


At the sultan's palace: the interior of a mosque: on the beach, and a 
child playing with a hoop in the winding streets of the old town. 


coraline block house built about I860 
on the waterfront for the reigning sul- 
tan. was the jumping-off spot for mis- 
sionaries and explorers bound for 
Bagamayo and the .African continent 
David Livingstone was the most fa- 
mous of these (Burton. Speke and 
Stanley stayed as well), as is noted on 
a wordy plaque on a wall outside. 

The Palace Museum, a few steps 
further along the embankment, was the 
official residence of the sultan of Zan- 
zibar. and was opened to the public 
only two years ago. Its cavernous- 
rooms ore full of old tables and chairs 
and beds, period costumes, family pho- 
tographs and personal items, including 
a working water closet. The last sultan 
of Zanzibar was overthrown in a vi- 
olent revolution in 1964. 

But our favorite time warp was 
Emerson's House, our small hotel. 
Bought by an American several years 
ago. it has been restored to resemble the 
posh Omani-Indian home it once was. 
Our quarters, up a steep, dark stairway, 
included a high room full of antiques, 
two wide canopied beds, carved ma- 
hogany armoires and tables and chairs, 
richly wm en carpets and. a: Lhe top of a 
long interior stairway that rendered our 
suite a duplex, all the necessary bath- 
room fixtures installed along a hall- 
way. the sink and shower areas drain- 
ing into a single hole in the floor. 

We had arranged to spend the 
second half of our stay at a beach 
house on the East Coast 40 kilometers 
across the island. Zanzibar roads are 
works in progress, so the drive past 
plantations, a forest populated by colo- 


bus monkeys, and villages of thatch- 
and-mud huts and large families, twice 
interrupted by police'checks. 

On this stretch of the coast the 
beach, north and south as far as one can 
see. is a working beach. From dawn 
until late in the afternoon, when out- 
rigger sailing canoes float in with the 
tide, the beach and tidal flat stretching 
out to the reef are busy. Spear fish- 
ermen come and go on bicycles, wom- 
en process coconut husks in ihe muck 
or walk alone with awesome loads on 
their heads, livestock graze, men with 
axes shape giant tree trunks into the 
hulls of outriggers, and children gather 
seaweed or die for sea worms. 


TAKEN BY SURPRISE We slept well in 
our modest room at the six-room Sun- 
rise Hotel-Restaurant iit was so 
crowded with tw in beds, and a couple 
of chairs and tables that there wasn’t 
space to do much else i and began each 
day with a long walk on ihe beach, 
returning with so many large, imaci 
shells that we began putting back 
nearly as many as w e picked up. 

Never mind that our shell book at 
home described the fruits of our 
shelling us "common" or "abund- 
ant" in the Indian and Pacific oceans. 
Finding t'ne Pacific bubbles. Hian's 
sun' clams. Indian chunks. serpent's- 
head cowries and Scorpio conchs took 
us by surprise — as did most of what 
we found on Zanzibar. 


Paula Budlong Cronin, who travels 
to Asia and Africa frequently, wrote 
this for The .Yen York Times. 


■7 

Mayhem Galore in New Orleans 

In ihe City of Voodoo Legends, Mysteries Abound 


By Marilyn Stasio 

Sew York Times Sen-ice 



EW ORLEANS — This is 
no place to read a book. Vain 
as a cat about its airs and 
graces, the city gets miffed if 
you dare to tear your eyes away, even 
for one quiet hour, from its ravishing 
features. I abandoned countless books 
in New Orleans, lured away by the 
dance music outside my window, before 
I finally got the message of this self- 
regarding city: "If you must read, you 
must read of me.” 

Luckily for those of us who can't live 
in a world without stories. New’ Orleans 
loves a mystery and admires a winy 
murder. 

Death is such a friend to this city that 
it has its own chaprer (covering such 
topics as "dancing, "dress code” and 
“elegy") in "New Orleans Un- 


masqued." a grab bag of "lovingly 
zatne 


wicked little tales" gathered by S. Fre- 
derick Starr and illustrated with Frank- 
lin Adams's whimsical drawings 
(Dedaux, 1985). 


was playing. According to Tallant. 
"that St. Joseph's Night in New Orleans 
seems to have been the loudest and most 
hilarious of any on record." 

The atrocities of the Axeman can still 
stir a frisson among local residents. Some 
keep alive the memory of this madman 
by impersonating him at Mardi Gras or 
by whooping it up on Sl Joseph's Night. 
Julie Smith put the most novel spin yet on 
die legend, in "The Axeman's Jazz” 
(Ivy Books, 1992). by letting the re- 
incarnated killer prey upon habitues of 
1 2-step recovery programs — nowadays , 
a more papulous victim pool in New 
Orleans than Italian grocers. 

Authors are also keen on recycling the 
voodoo legends that residents of this su- 
perstitious city love to frighten them- 
selves with. The funky New Orleans His- 
toric Voodoo Museum, on Dumaine 
Street in the French Quarter, stocks quan- 
tities of fanciful tales about Marie 
Laveau, the legendary Voodoo Queen 


who presided over the snake-charmin® 

'losegraf- 


THE MURDERED MADAM "Ready to 
Hang," by Robert Tallant, was my 
choice of reading matter on a recent trip 
to New Orleans for a wedding. While 
the other guests were sipping cham- 
pagne in the conservatory. I was in the 
garden, thumbing through the chapter 
on Kate Townsend, the madam of a 
notorious brothel on Basin Street. 
Murdered in 1883 by her fancy man. the 
hugely obese victim was found 
sprawled across her four-poster bed. 
clad only in a blood-soaked chemise. 
Above the body, suspended from the 
bed canopy, hung “a basket of fresh-cut 
flowers — roses as red as the gore 
beneath them and w’hite bridal 
wreath." 

Tallant also offers a chilling account 
of the infamous Axeman, a serial killer 
who in 191 1 found his special calling in 
the wholesale slaughter of Italian gro- 
cers and their wives. The random at- 
tacks continued in 1918 and 1919, by 
which time the Axeman (or opportun- 
istic imitators) had the city temmzed. In 
a most bizarre twist, the Times-Picay- 
une printed a letter signed by ‘‘The 
.Axeman" in which he threatened to 
strike again on March 19. traditionally 
observed as St. Joseph’s Night — but 
promised to bypass any residence in 
which a live jazz band (“ In full swing’ *) 


dances on Congo Square and whose l 
fin-scored mausoleum is the big traffic- 
stopper in Sl Louis Cemetery No.l . Once 
you have admired the live snakes, look 
among the bauened. paperbacks for a copy 
of "Voodoo in New Orleans,” a lurid but 
uncommonly well-written account of the 


House on Chartres Street) and the se- 
ductive ghost provides an apt metaphor 
for the hold that New Orleans exerts on 
writers — including visiting firemen. 
Whenever out-of-stare detectives come 
to town, they either head for the nearest 
restaurant, tike Linda Barnes s Boston . ■_ 
gumshoe in "Cities of the Dead" (Dell. 
1997), or party down at Mardi Gras, like „ 
the Atlanta reporter who visits in Sarah 
Shankman's "Now Let's Talk of 
Graves" (Pocket Books. 1991). 

Local crime writers, whose world 
view of politics stops at Baton Rouge, 
stick to local crime. Ralph (Rat) Trapp, 
a homicide detective in a streetwise 
series by John William and Joyce H. 
Carrington, chases 
drug dealers in the 
city's housing proj- 
ects. Industrial skul- 
duggery in one of tbe 
new medical research 
laboratories was un- 
covered by Tubby 
Dubonnet, the chub- 
by charmer in Tony Dunbar's witty 
mysteries. 


■y. f. 


•j ^ 1 ' 



origins and practice of voodoo by the 
tTallani 


redoubtable Tallant (Pelican, 1983). 

Copies of "Papa La-Bas, ‘ ’ published 
by Carroll & Graf in 1989. are harder to 
come by. Try the Maple Street Book- 
shop (Uptown by Tulane) for this mys- 
tery by John Dickson Carr, master of the 
locked -room puzzle. Thick with atmo- 
sphere and steeped in the arcane lore of 
the black arts, the novel was based on 
the crimes of Delphine Lalaurie, a sad- 
istic aristocrat who was run out of town 
in 1834 for whipping her slaves, whom 
she kept in chains in the attic. 


A LTHOUGH an angry mob set 
fire to the house, it still stands at 
1 140 Royal Street, haunted, it is 
said, by the ghost of a slave who jumped 
from an attic window in despair. 

The beautiful Creole wraith who 
haunts the narrator of “Madeleine's 
Ghost," Robert Girardi's modem tale of 
romantic obsession (Dell. 1996), is so 
irresistible that she drags an enthralled 
young man all the way back from Brook- 
lyn, where he bad fled after a disastrous 
affair with one of her descendems. The 
story is a stunner (best read by penlight 
in a warm, dark bar like the Napoleon 


thb gaudy side Whenever local 
writers work the gaudy side of town 
they don't look at it the way visitors do. 

* *The majority of Vieux Carre residents. 
James Lee Burke says in "The Neon 
Rain” (Pocket Books. 1992). "were 
transvestites, junkies, winos, prosti- 
tutes, hustlers of every stripe, ana burnt 
out aci dheads and street people.” 
Burke's hero, a Cajun cop named Dave 
Robicheaux. doesn’t even live in New 
Orleans. A stem moralist who broods 
over the corruption of modem civili- 
zation, Robicheaux has found his refuge 
in the swamps of Bayou Teche, a lush 
world "where it was "never a treason to 
go with the cycle of things and let the 
season have its way." As writers like s 
Dick Lochte ("Blue Bayou”) and 
Robert Crais ("Voodoo River”; find 
their way to Cajun country’, Dave is no 
longer alone out there in the mist. 

Sooner or later, like the young man in 
"Madeleine's Ghost," everyone comes 
back to New Orleans, if only to test the 
memory of their senses. As one of Tony 
Dunbar's mobsters puts in "I have always . 
looked forward to ray visits to New Or- - 
leans. It’s die sense you get of unreality." _ 




Marilyn Stasio writes the Crime • 
column for The New York Times Book . 
Review. 


DINING 


[■>■ 


Updating the Grand Traditions 


By Patricia Wells 

Imenunonal Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — Anyone looking for a 
road map to some of the most 
up-to-date French food would 
do well to bring a generous 
appetite and a sackful of money ro two 
of the city’s grand hotel dining rooms. 
Both the Crillon and the Bristol boast 
talented and ambitious new chefs, an- 
other sign that the tide has changed from 
chef-owned grand restaurants to those 
managed by major corporations. 

One of the best new tastes in town 
comes from the kitchen of Dominique 
Boucheu whose substantial track record 
includes stints in the 1970s as assistant to 
the chef Joel Robuchon and in the 1980s 
as chef at the then Micbelin three-star 
Tour d‘ Argent and the then two-star 
Jamin. He went on to capture two stars at 
his own Moulin de Marcouze in lhe 
Charente. Bouchet is calm, forceful and 
direcL characteristics chat should do him 
well at the giant Crillon. 

The spring menu offers something for 
everyone, and the level of profession- 
alism in the vast Crillon kitchens trans- 
lates evenly and solidly to the glorious 
ocher-marbled dining room of Lea Am- 
bassadeurs. Bouchet's penchant for 
straightforward combinations sublimely 
prepared do make a statement The 
trendy chicken of the day, Gauloise 
Blanche from France’s southwest, is 
served with flavorful flat parsley tucked 
beneath the skin and with tiny, woodsy 
giro lie mushrooms. Tender, succulent 
lobster is flanked by firm green asparagus 
and delicate, buttery fava beans. The 
entire eye of the lamb loin is seared to 
perfection and teamed up, ever so hon- 
estly, with flawlessly aimed artichokes. 

Desserts include an ultra-rich 
Robuchon-style chocolate tart served 
with vanilla ice cream flavored with a 
touch of maple syrup and a sprinkling of 
sweet caramelized walnuts. 



Del Burgo prepared the finest bowl of 
risotto I've ever sampled from a French 


chefs hands, a creamy, voluptuous 

nth fu 


mound of ai deote rice lined with tirst- 
of-season morel mushrooms, all circled 
by a rich sauce, flawed by overreducrion 
and an excess of salt. 

But his most brilliant dish of the even- 
ing came in an unexpected combination • 
of langous tines, truffles and sweet, fresh " 
pears. Langoustines and black truffles • 
are a surprisingly wonderful duo. for the 
iodine of the langoustines seems to in- - 
tensify the flavor of the truffle, yet the 
pears here were a startling addition. The . 
shellfish were quickly seared in their 
shells, coated faintly with a creamy sauce 
laced with minced truffles, and cubes of 
pear were sprinkled over it alL Rather 
than disappearing into the background as 
one would think, the sweetness of the 
fruit came to the forefront, uniting the 
flavors of all three. Alas, the thin rounds 
of fresh black truffles shaved over the 
entire dish arrived mercilessly dry — 
negating any value they might have ad- 
ded to tbe dish. 

A platter of roast pigeon paired with 
epeautre. the newly popular poor man 's 
wheat of Provence, was too heavy, too 
rich, too salty and too old-fashioned to 
be at borne on an otherwise up-to-the- 
minute menu. 





. V’-- 


c , 


•t 



Nila be AicJu/HT 


Spirit of Adventure 


The service is less professional and 
the setting less august, but the food at Le 
Bristol deserves a ay’. Die new chef at 
this traditional patio restaurant is 


Michel del Burgo. most recently chef at 
La Barbacane in Carcassonne, where he 
earned two Michelin stars. His cuisine 
— with a strong bias toward Medi- 
terranean favorites — is more audacious 
and adventuresome than Bouchet's but 
is flawed by technical lapses. 

A typical evening's starter might in- 
clude a miniature filet of rouget on a fine 
and flavorful bed of sliced artichokes, 
fennel and onions, all ropped with a 
moist and delicate shaving of parmi- 
giano reggiano cheese. The saltiness of 
the cheese played off against the iodine- 
rich flavor of the fish, coating one’s 
mouth with the most pleasant sensation. 


ESSERTS need help. A pleas- 
ant combination of a thin square 
of shortbread coated with a but- - 
tering of fresh sheep's milk cheese and 
topped with fresh raspberries seemed to «• 
have been prepared hours in advance, ' 
making for a soggy mess on the plate. 
The evening was saved by a bite-size 
mango tart, a perfectly puckery end to ' 
an evening of discovery. 

Les Ambassadeurs. Hotel de Crillon. 

10 Place de la Concorde, Paris 8; tel: - 
01 -44-71-16-16. Open daily. All major 
credit cards. 340- and 620-franc ($60 - 
and $11 0) menus. A la carte. 500 to 800 . 
francs, including service but not wine. 

Le Bristol. Hotel Bristol, 112 Rue du ■'* 
Faubourg Saint Honore, Paris 8; tel: 
01-53-43 -43-00. Open daily. All major ■. 
credit cards. 360-franc mem. A la carte. 
S00 to 800 francs, including service but 
not wine. 


\\ ’ 

J- . 





British Airways 


Imp • ! nM-t, ill-' r ' • 'ilM 


The worlds favourite airline, 







PAGE 11 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. APRIL 4, 1997 


LEISURE 


*ICO»D1NO$ 


ea^. 1 Charlie Parker in 38 Tracks 


H 


' )f, Uh 


If! 



Cf 


i* >n? 


_ * HAkid 

< v>ii ec ri ftn C ^^ ls ^8 a Cflrear-sp annmn 

^asssssSS 

wy<rfltey?MteSd^S fSgJy 

you think that it doesn Klfn 1, 
much sense , 0 lisu^nyto^eSf' 

• Meredith MONK -<Lr 

c2!P^ : Influenced by the likes 
of the composers Henrv tTT 


Jaime.” -She describes her duets with 
Katie Geis singer as 11 ‘so intertwined that 
you can hardly tefi that two different 
peojrfe are ringing." She “sorts from 
z ®o” with each song and it’s “like 

flying blind." 

• «uok szabo .‘“Die Sorcerer" 
(Ijupdse!): Szabo left his native Bud- 
apest in 1956 after the Soviet invasion. 
He settled in the U.S. as a political 
refugee (this was recorded in 1967). He 
combined blues. Eastern and Gypsy 
roots into a style of jazz guitar that 
remains avant-garde today. He was re- 


cently cited by Wyclef Jean, one of a 
newer band of (rapping) refugees called 
The Fugees, as a major influence. 

• joe uvano "Celebrating Sin- 
atra" (Blue Note): Co mm ereiality 
through universality, without condes- 
cension or sentimentality. Like its in- 
spiration. Probably the tenor saxophone 
player of the day, Lovano toasts The 
Voice with the imaginative help of the 
arranger Manny .Albam. The spirit of 
Nelson Riddle hovers. 



A Hushed Hideaway 
For Garden Lovers 

Ninfa, Italy’s Legendary Oasis 


By William Weaver 



Mike Zwerin/IHT Parker and Miles Davis in 1948, ticket and 


INFA. Italy — It takes a mo- 
ment to absorb the silence of 
Ninfa. You park your car in a 
sunny olive grove, buy your 


step through a stile onto a path 
of fine gravel. Then, immediately, you 


MOVIE GUIDE 


GlMlALOOilS d'un crime 

Ruiz . France 

5-27**^.“ “» seuie’mort,” 

JjJ^^JpMasUoianm played a nan of 
many faces, adrift between multiple 

^I^. aD ^ lves - A y** 1 teter. RauIRmz, 
vmose films are made up of mazes and 
mnror games, is back with a movie 
(wnttCT with Pascal Bomtzer) for Cath- 
erine Deneuve, another film legend, 
playmga double role. She is Jeam^the 
auburn -haired psychoanalyst, protective 
or a murderous nephew — and indeed 

murdered by the boy — andSolangethe 
blonde lawyer, who defends him. Dead 
or alive, dressed to the teeth by Saint 
Laurent, she haunts every scene of this 




■■ • 


heavy-handed escapade/ lootring'as if 
i a bad Bunuel film. Ruiz, 


she’s landed in i 


intent on playing havoc with Freud, 
ana other fixtures of Parisian 



Lacan 

" “ — — * uauu» ui rvii i.mn 

haute cutpire, based hear role on the stray 
of Hamine Van Hug, a colleague of 
Freud’s, murdered by die nephew sb* 
was analyzing. Mefvil Poupaud plays 
the ambiguous nephew: Was he, in fact, 
the murderer? Do we care? The movie 
may be carefully plotted; it’s fiinwri any 
which way, and the game's the dung — 
skeletons m die cupboard, charad^c and 
word {days. Michel Piccoli is chief guru 
I of a sacrificial cult, and Andrzej Sew- 
J, eryn plays aJungian who takes literature 
w literally. Rogues, impostors and psy- 
1 cboanalysts all are agog at their own 
jokes in this erudite entertainment, for 
initiates only. (Joan Dupont , IHT) 


The Power Rangers. 


SamUnJnk 


The Godfather 

Directed by Francis Ford Coppola. 
US. 

"The Godfather," which has been re- 
released an its 25th anniversary, is a 
jewel that stiflglows across time — and 
in die darV. Gordon Willis’s cinema- 
tography, considered revolutionary at 
the time, plunged its characters into 
pools of semi-darkness. Studio exec- 
utives — always the last ones to get it 
— howled in the screening rooms. But 
in this saga of an Italian- American fam- 
ily’s bid for power, we were watching 


the American Dream operating in the 
darkest shadows. Luckily, America 
saw the light. The movie, released in 
March 1972 and directed by an un- 
known eccentric called Francis Ford 
Coppola, was a smash hit — the first 
film to top $100 rnillircn in its mi rial 
release. "The Godfather," which 
Mario Puzo and Coppola adapted from 
Puzo's novel, won three Academy 
Awards (for best picture, best actor and 
best screenplay adaptation). It lit a fire 
under the careers of A1 Patino, Robert 
Duvall, James Caan, Diane Keaton and 
Thlia Shire. It entered the pantheon of 
American cinema; and it has informed 
virtually every crime movie in the last 
quarter century, from “Scarface" to 
‘^Donnie Brasco." Coppola, then in his 
30s, reluctantly heeded the advice of 
his friend George Lucas to make this 
picture. To him, this was a commer- 
cially unpalatable project that had noth- 
ing to do with his personal ambition: to 
change foe way Hollywood made 
movies. How wrong he was. There are 
volumes that could be written — and 
have been — about the movie’s uni- 
formly powerful performances; its pre- 
cedent-setting editing by William 
Reynolds and Peter Zmner, Nino 
Rota's haunting score; and Dean Ta- 
voularis's evocative set design. But 


us — with almost Shakespearean grav- 
itas — foe errors of hasty vengeance 
and the wisdom of assured leadership. 
He gave us a great American picture, 
foil of incredible images and lasting 
moments. (Desson Howe, WP ) 


Turbo: 

A Power Rangers Movie 

Directed by David Winning and Shidd 
Levy. US' 

Parents will have to take their kids’ 
hands and be led through "Turbo: A 
Power Rangers Movie." a purgatory 
of low-budget interplanetary adven- 
ture, It’s easier for tots, at whose short 


attention spans and bright color con- 
bled tales are 


Coppola must get most of the credit. 
With Pro 


Puzo, he forged an epic tragedy 
about America, capitalism, family, 
greed, treachery and love. He showed 


sciousness these jumbl 
aimed, to figure out who’s new and 
who’s a repeater among the Red, 
Green, Blue, Pink and Yellow Power 
Rangers, foe bad guys, the wizards, 
and all their cosmic cohorts. Most 
young folk already know everything 
from the long-running daytime TV 
series that spawned this epic and, in 
1995, "Mighty Morphia Power 
Rangers: The Movie." It's doubtful, 
however, whether kids can clear up 
why, though the Rangers are a fairly 
diverse cross section of American eth- 
nicity, only foe Anglo-ish ones have 
many lines or heroics to perform. Or 
why foe comic relief, a couple of doo- 
fuses named Bulk and Skull (Paul 
Schrier and Jason Narvy), is supposed 
to be funny. f Jane Horwirz . WP) 


are in the legendary garden, immersed in 
nature, surrounded by the mystery of 
centuries-old ruins. Though Rome is only 
an hour's easy drive to the north, Ninfa 
seems a remote, happily isolated world. 

The soft-voiced young guide speaks 
up only to give essential information, 
identifying a tree, explaining the original 
meaning of a decayed wad. a surviving 
Gothic fragment covered with a climbing 
rose or a rare clematis or plain old ivy. If 
you are a dawdler, you can lag behind and 
proceed at your own, uninformed pace. 

But foe silence, you gradually realize, 
is a surface. Beneath it, like the ground 
bass in a baroque sonata, foe ostinato of 
running water fills the groves and foe 
meadows. And an oriole — happy in its 
protected security — may ornament the 
steady murmur with a brief, inspired 
cadenza. 


ARTS GUIDE 


BELGIUM 




by 20th-centuiy Belgian and Dutch 
painters. 


Brussels 

Musee tfArt Ancten, tet (2) 508- 
3211, dosed Mondays. Continu- 
ing/ To July 27: "Paid Delvaux, 
1897-1994." Paintings and works 
on paper by the Belgian painter. 


BRITAIN 


EdMBWMIH ■ , - . 

National Gallery of Scotland, fak . 
(31 ) 332-2286, open daSy.To June 
8: "Cassiano dal Pozzo’s Paper 
Museum: Drawings from the Royal 
Collection.” Drawings and water- 
colors assembled in Roma by the 
colector and connoisseur Cassi- 
ano del Pozzo in the first half of the 
17th century. Unable to buy an- 
tiquities an a large scale, he in- 
structed artists to make drawings 
of surviving Roman remains, fcn- 
rAduding household objects, 
manuscripts and works of art. 


Berlin 

ARM Nattonalgalerfe, tef: (30) 
31 0-00132, dosed Sundays- Con- 
ttnulngfTo May 11: “Adolph Men- 
zel. 1815-1905: Between Roman- 
ticism and Impressionism.” More 
than 120 paintings, drawings, pas- 
tels and wate motors by the Ger- 
man artist 

Bodemumuqti * tet £30) -203- 
55506, dosed Mondays, lb May 
25: “Henan ' der Meerre: Meister 
der Kunst — Das HoBantfische 
Seebfld bn 17. JahThundert.” A col- 
lection ot 110 paintings from more 
than 40 Dutch artists that give an 
overview of the seafaring world. 
Features works by Hendrick 
Vroom, Wiliam van do Vtfde and . 
Cornelius van Wfaringen. The ex- 
hibition also documents the expan- 
sion of maritime trade and Hb in- 
fluence on 17th-century Dutch 
culture. 


JAPAN 


1912.” 60 paintings, sculptures 
and drawfrigs created during the 
years of friendship between Picas- 
so and the French painter. 


Tokyo 

Tofcu Museum of Art, tel: (03) 
5391-3220, dosed Wednesdays. 
To Aprfl 13: “Wisdom and Com- 
passion: The Sacred Art of Ttoet" 
From Sl Petersburg, London and 
Loa Angeles, a selection oJTlbetan 
religious - items created between 
the 10th and 19th centuries.' 


Madrid 

Funrfaao Juan March, tet (93) 
435-42-40, open dally. Corrtinu- 
Ingflb Jure 8: “Max Beckmann: 
Retrospective." 35 paintings by 
the German painter (1884-1 950). 


SWITZERLAND 


ETHCRLANBS 


lantnu 

Hlstodsch Museum, tel: (20) 
5231-822, open dally. Conti nu- 
IngflFb Aprfl 13: “Peter the Great 
and Holland.” 250 objects from the 
czar's Chamber of the Arts. 


RornamiAM 

Kunsthal, tel: (10) 440-0301. 
Continuingnb June8: The Early 


Geneva 

Le Petit Palais, tel: (22) 346-14- 
33, open dally. Continuing/ 1b 
June 15: “Le Douanler Rousseau 
et Lbs Peintres Nails Francais." 
Examines the Naive movement 
and features 60 paintings by 
French primitive painters, includ- 
ing Rousseau, Bombois, Bau- 
chantand Desnos. 


UNITED STATES 


London 

Royal Academy of Arts, tet (171) 
494-5615, open daily. Continu- 
ing/ To June B: “The Berlin of 
George Grosz: Drawings, Water- 
colours and Prints, 1912-1930." A 
satirist and soda! commentator, 
Grosz (1893-1859) captured Ber- 
Bnboth In its seductive and repuls- 
ive face. 

Tate Gallary, tel: (171) 887-8732, 
open dally. To June 8: “Hogarth The 
Painter A Getebratlon of the "ter- 
centenary of his Birth.” Whfle Wil- 
liam Hogarth (1697-1764), the first 
native-born British painter of influ- 
ence, remains famous for his en- 
gravings, this exhibition highlights 
his achievements as a painter. 


FRANCK 



Chicago 

The Art Institute, tel: (312) 443- 
3600, open dally. To June 22; 
"Charles Rennie Mackintosh." Ex- 
plores the output of the Scottish 
architect and designer (1868- 
1928) with more than 200 archi- 
tectural drawings, room settings, 
furniture, decorative arts, arctirteo- 
turai models and watercoiofs. pro- 
duced while he was living in 
France. The exhflxtionwifl travel to 
Los Angeles. 


Paris 

r grand Palate, tel: 01-44-13-17- 
T7. dosed Tuesdays. Continuing/ 
To July 14: “Paris/Bnjxefles - 
Bruxeifes/Paris." A confrontation 
between Belgian and French art in 
the second half of the 19th cen- 
tury. 

Institut du Monde Arab®, tab 01- 
40-51-36-38, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing^) Aug. 31: “Soutterc 
Royaumes sur le NH-Anex^or- 
ation of archaeological finds from 

Musee tTOrsay, tet 01-40-49^6- 
14, dosed Mondays- Continuing/ 
To Ju!u 14: “Emile Verhaeren: Un 
Musee Imaginaire.” Doc ^E 

the role of the Be*gn«t erffic 

(1855-1916) In the defense a# tne 
Belgian and French avant-garde at 
the end of the 19to __ 

Pavilion ties ArtSj -42-83- 
SSldt^ed Mondays- Continu- 
ing June 18: “Le 

JtL-AmOur." 150 pajnjngsjjcu^ 
■lures, objects, 

and photographs creagdjromfoe 

1920s to the ‘60s ^ 

S^S^PicabiaandP^^ 
wefl as 100 books, dlustrations. 


Charles Rennie Mackintosh's work, on view in Chicago. 


New York 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, td: 
(212) 570-3791, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/ To April 27: "Giam- 
battista Tiepolo." 80 paintings and 
33 etchings. 


COLOGNE 

Museum Ludwig, teh (221) 221- 
2379, dosed Mondays. To June 1 : 
“Jasper Johns: fletrospektiva." 
About 200 paintings, cotiages, 
drawings, watercotore and scufc- 
tures created over a period of more 

than 40 years. Johns came to fame 

as a result of his paintings of U.S. 
flags which were instrumental in 
launchingihe Pop Art movement in 
the mid-1960s. 


Mondrian.” The exhibition, review- 
ing Mondrian's earty work up to 
1920, features 150 paintings, 
drawings and watercdcre During 
thte period, Mondrian (1872-1944) 
experienced with flowers, wind- 
mills, trees, church steeples and 
dune landscapes. The selection 
depicts hte artistic progression to- 
ward abstrad compositions fa ho- 
rizontals and verticals. 


Washmqtom 

National Gallery of Art tet (202) 
737-4215, open daBy. To July 27: 
“Picasso: The Earty Years, 1892- 
1906.” A collection of more than 
150 paintings, drawings, pastels, 
prints and sculpture created by Pi- 
casso between the age of 11 and 
25, Inducting his famous Blue and 
Rose periods, prior to the advent cf 
Cubism. The exhibition will travel 
to Boston. 



reflections The park occupies 20 
acres (8 hectares), of which 16 are open 
to foe public. The river Ninfa winds 
through the properly, like a life-giving 
vein, past the ruins of medieval 
churches, patches of city walls and 
sumps of towers. Flowering trees are 
reflected there in spring and summer, 
while in autumn the many varieties of 
maple enact foe drama of their colored 
foliage. Although the Caetani family, in 
creating foe gardens, studied and 
achieved this variety, these brilliant ef- 
fects, all has foe appearance of total 
informality. There are no divirions; 
Ninfa is a place for wandering. 

This is not my first visit, but it is the 
first in about 40 years. So as I stroll 
toward foe purling river. I experience 
not only this magic present but also foe 
spell of foe past 

In foe Middle Ages, this was a large, 
busy town in an unhappy location, in foe 
unhealthy marshes south of Rome, and in 
hotly, frequently disputed territory cm a 
main road between Rome and Naples. 
Like foe town of Nonna atop foe stem, 
sheer mountain that glowers over Ninfa. 
and like foe nearby castle of Sermoneta 
that crowns the next high mountain to the 
south, Ninfa was the fief of a succession 
of feudal families — foe Counts of 
Tuscolo. foe Frangipane, foe Ceccato, foe 
Annibaldi — until, in 1297, the Caetani 
pope Boniface VH bought the area for 
2 00,000 gold florins. At foe start of the 
1 6th century the truculent Cesare Borgia, 
instigated by his father. Pope Alexander 
VL seized foe fief and for a brief period 
his sister, the unsavory Lucrezia, was 
installed as chatelaine. Finally, Pope Ju- 
lius n. foe mettlesome patron of 
Michelangelo, Raphael and Bramante. 
restored the property to foe Caetanis. 

But whai the Caetanis really owned 
was a virtually abandoned, crumbling 
cluster of buildings in the midst of a 
noisome swamp. Malaria had long been 
a constant of foe Pontine area, and be- 
cause of its ravages Ninfa remained for 
centuries all but uninhabited, invaded 
by the murky water. 


younger Caetani brother, Roffredo ; in- 
herited foe property, he — and especially 
his American wife. Marguerite, later 
abetted by her daughter and son-in-law 
— expanded and enriched foe garden. 

In foe late 1940s, when postwar Ro- 
man intellectual and artistic life was 
thriving and attracting foreign writers 
and painters. Princess Caetani founded 
foe international literary magazine Bot- 
leghe Oscure, and Ninfa became a kind of 
prize awarded to special visitors io Rome 
and to cherished old Italian friends. 

And this is where I came in. A gradu- 
ate student freshly arrived in Rome, 1 
was introduced to foe Principessa, who 
promptly pressed me into service as a 
willing, unpaid proofreader for Bot- 
teghe Oscure. The magazine was pub- 
lished in several languages, and English 
contributors included Dylan Thomas, 
Auden, Edwin Muir. Randall Jarrell. 
Theodore Roethke, and eventually me. 

One day, Lady Mallet, wife of foe 
British ambassador, and L armed with 
walking sticks, climbed foe mountain to 
Norma, foe medieval town perched on 
the stark cliff that shuts off Ninfa to foe 
east. That cliff, as much apart of Ninfa as 
foe crystal river and foe flowering groves, 
some 20 years ago risked being defaced, 
as the whole Ninfa park was menaced by 
a proposed industrial development on the 
slope. The water from Ninfa ’s lake would 
have gone to serve the purposes of com- 
mercial development, and foe very life of 
the plants was in danger. Fortunately a 
battle — led by foe present director, 
Laura Marcbeui — thwarted foe plan. 

“For years," Marchetti said, in ex- 
plaining this groundswell of solidarity, 
"we have had a school program. School 
classes are brought here, but not until 
they have first been briefed, in the 
classroom." The children don't come 
just to look at foe flowers; they are 


encouraged to understand the impor 

it les 


ranee of nature conservation, a fust les- 
son in ecological responsibility. 
Today's school population represents 
the second or thud generation of ben- 
eficiaries from this program; so — after 
genuine alarm — foe foundation and the 
appreciates of this oasis can breathe 
more freely. And, of course, the ap- 
preciates include the animal popula- 
tion, the orioles and nightingales, foe 
herons and kingfishers, the ducks and 
porcupines and owls. 


Drainage Decree 


Finally, at foe end of the 19th century, 
the Italian government decreed that foe 
landowners had to drain the marshes and 
construct canals. The Caetani family bad 
already begun the process, and in 1920 
Gelasio Caetani, diplomat and engineer, 
set about bringing Ninfa back to life, 
encouraged by his English- born mother, 
the Duchess Ada Wubrahaxn Caetani. 
Inside the remains of foe ancient town 
hall, the Caetanis created a summer 
home, and initiated the laborious process 
of rescuing foe ruins from foe all-in- 
vasive brambles and scrub. Duke Gela- 
sio and his mother also began planting 
the garden, encouraging not only local 
trees, like ilex and eucalyptus and 


K EEPING up a garden is a com- 
plex. never-ending task, but the 
atmosphere of Ninfa, belying 
foe immense backstage commitment, 
still suggests serenity and cultivated 
leisure. Distant views are as fascinating 
as close-up inspection, and even foe 
most vulnerable, and hence most pro- 
tected parts of foe garden, where visitors 
have to be excluded (the villa, where the 
Caetanis' English heirs vacation, and 
foe lake), are nevertheless visible and 
enjoyable. At every turn of every path, 
there is likely to be a surprise: a flour- 
ishing stand of bamboo, worthy (and 
reminiscent) of a Kyoto temple, the 
exotic Brazilian plant Gunnera 
manicata, immediately identifiable by 
its immense leaves, or — among foe 
ruined, partly frescoed walls of what 
was once a church — an invasion of, 
yes, weeds, but the cheeky, lovely 
Queen Anne's lace and ragged Robin 
are, after all, at home here and insouci- 
antiy hold their own against foe ped- 
igreed imported residents. 

Whether or not I really climbed up to 
Norma nearly half a century ago, on my 
recent visit! was in no condition to repeal 
foe exploiL Instead, with a friend, I drove 
up to another Caetani village, Sermoneta, 
seat of foe great castle where the Borgias, 
among others, held sway. Driving up, 
you can see Ninfa from above, foe con- 
fines of the oasis clear, a massive patch of 
deqp green, shaggy with trees and cur- 
licued with streams and canals, then, 
beyond it, the squared-off, regimented, 
fertile fields, some also green, others 
brown as the season requires, while long, 
leafy rows of fruit trees march into foe 
pearly haze toward the sea. 


Watercolor design for Glasgow 
buildings by Mackintosh. 


cypress, but also giving foe garden a 
!t with hoi 


slightly British cast with hollyhocks and 
peonies, lavender and buddleia. When a 


William Weaver, who divides his rime 
between Italy and Bard College, wrote 
this for The New York Times. 


CLOSING SOON 


ITALT 


BOUMMA 

Galleria cf Arte Modeme, tet (51) 
502-859, dosed Mondays. Con- 
tinuing/ To May 4: “Materiali 

defT Arte; Ricerca e Speri- 
mentazione In HaHa dagfl annl 
Sessantu ad OggL” Trends in use 
of nonfratfflional media In Itaflan 
art, between the 1 960s and today. 


Lisbon 

Centro Cultural do Belem, fab (1) 
301-9606, open daily. To April 29: 
“For Heinar Muller.” Documents 
the relationship between the worics 
ot the poet and those at contem- 
porary artists such as Gfltes Afl- 
taud, Christian Bottanski, Rebecca 
Horn and Jarmls Kouneffis, among 
others. 


SPAIN 


Venice 

Palazzo Grassl, tel: (41) 522- 
1375, open da/fy. Continuing/ Tb 
juW 13: “Arte del ’900: La Plttura 
Ramminga e Olandese." Works 



Barcelona 

Muaeu PieasBo, tel: (3) 319^310, 
dosed Mondays. Continuing/ To 
June 28: "Andre Derain, 1904- 


April 8; ‘The Color of Sculpture." 
Henry Moore Institute, Leeds. 
Aprfl 6: Tous tes Savolrs du 
Monde." EMbltothaque Nationale 
de France, Paris. 

Aprfl 6: “Art ollhe Persian Courts." 
Smithsonian Institution, Wash- 
ington. 

April 6: “Braque: The Late Works." 
Royal Academy of Arts, Lon- 
don. 

Aprfl 6: “Splendors of Imperial 
China: ^ Treasures from the National 
Palace Museum, Taipei." National 

Gallery of Art, Washington. 

Aprfl 7:“Facs a fitetoire.” Centre 
Georges Pompidou, parte. 




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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


A Familiar Tale of Bosnian Horror, but Serbs Are Accusers, Not Accused 


* 


By Marlise Simons 

A/tn- York Times Serxice 


THE HAGUE — Once again, the 
courtroom of the war-crimes tribunal 
here echoes with accounts of cruelty and 
murder, the ghastly but now familiar 
tales of Bosnia's war. 

But in this case, it is not Serbs who are 
on trial. 

The three Bosnian Muslims and one 
Croat are charged with 14 murders and 
numerous incidents of torture and abuse 
committed against Serbs at a prison 
camp in 1992. 

The Bosnian Serbs are blamed for 
almost all the horrors of the war, and 
they in turn accuse the tribunal of polit- 
ical prejudice. But cotut officials have 
insisted that the United Nations tribunal 


suspects regardless of their politics or 
ethnic origin. 

At the same time, the latest trial is also 
a reminder of how little the tribunal has 
achieved since its creation in 1 993. It has 


only seven defendants in its custody, 
four of whom are now in court. Of the 74 


is evenhanded and not driven by politics. 
Cases like this one. tribunal officials say. 


Cases like this one. tribunal officials say. 
show that the court will try war-crimes 


four of whom are now in court. Of the 74 
people indicted for war crimes, 67 re- 
main at large, even though in many cases 
their whereabouts are known. 

The four men now on trial are charged 
with terrorizing hundreds of men and 
women who spent time at a prison camp 
controlled by Bosnian Muslims between 
May and December of 1992. The camp, 
at Celebici in the mountains about 48 
kilometers (30 miles) southwest of Sa- 
rajevo, used to be a military storage site. 

Prosecutors said that some 500 people 
passed through the camp during those 
months, most of them Serbs from vil- 
lages around Konjic. Some had helped 
defend their villages when Muslim 


forces attacked, but others had noL The 
indictment said that many of the camp's 
inmates suffered hunger, beatings, tor- 
ture and rape. 

The camp conditions described in the 
court sound familiar. They mirror the 
stories that have been told and retold by 
survivors of dozens of Serbian-run 
camps where Bosnian Muslims were 
held and persecuted. 

But Celebici was run by Muslims and 
the victims were Serbs. Two of the men 
charged in the Celebici case are the 
highest -ranking defendants so far to 
stand trial in The Hague. 

Zejnil Delalic, 48, and Zdravko Mu- 
cic, 41, are charged with overall respon- 
sibility for the atrocities linked to the 
camp, Mr. Delalic as regional command- 
er of the Bosnian Muslim forces and Mr. 
Mucic as the camp commander. 

Hazim Delic. 32, deputy commander 
of the camp, is individually charged with 


four murders and torture, including the 
rapes of two women. Esad Landzo. 24. a 
camp guard, is accused in Eve deaths, 
and of torture and cruelty. Their crimes, 
as listed by the prosecutor, included 
beating elderly men to death with 
wooden planks, baseball bats and 
shovels. The prosecutor said the two 
charged with torture also used pliers, 
acid, electric shocks and hot pincers to 
torment their prisoners. 

In the courtroom, the four defendants 
appeared to follow the proceedings, con- 
ducted in English, via earphones provid- 
ing them with translations. At times they 
took notes: often they looked bored or 
dozed. Each defendant has two lawyers 
paid for by the court 

The defease lawyers have requested 
that their clients be tried separately, in 
part because they fear that the suspects 
may testify against each other, as they 
already have in pretrial statements. 


But the court has ruled that the four 
were closely linked through file chain of 
command and that separate trials would 
mean duplicating much work and re- 
calling the same witnesses many times. 

Among the first witnesses to appear 
was Mirico Babic, 63, a Serb. He pulled 
up his trouser leg to show his scars. He 
said Mr. Landzo had poured gasoline on 
his legs and set fire to them. “I saw the 
flames; it was very painful.” he told the 
court. • 

Another witness, Branco Goto vac, 66. 
also a Serb, said Mr. Landzo had beaten 
him so hard rbar he swallowed his tongue 
and nearly suffocated until a fellow pris- 
oner. a nurse, rescued him. 

“I had to' put my hands behind my 
head and then he kicked me in the 
testicles,” Mr. Gotovac said. “During 
all this, my tongue went inside my 
throat. I was urinating blood.” 

Mr. Gotovac, who has had lasting 


injuries and is a frail and sick man. was 
questioned by Mr. Landzo s lawyer in 
such a strident way that die presiding 
judge. Adolphus Karibi-Whyte. from 

Nigeria, intervened. 

He said to the lawyer. Cyntlua White 
McMurrey. an American: “I left you at 
large when some of the thing s you said 
have been complete rubbish. If y o“ con- 
tinue being irresponsible. I think I w dl 
have to take a different attitude/ ■ 

In the courtroom. Grozdana Cecez. 
47, a Serb, came face to face w ith the 
man who she said bad raped her at the . 
camp. Speaking of Mr. Delic. she saufr r 
“I thought he was going to beat me. 
Then he started to rape me. I will never 
be the woman that I was." 

On another night, four men raped her . 
she said. Mr. Delic did not look at his 
accuser. While she described the eveni 
in detail, he chewed gum and kept his 
hand over his face. 




lllt^ al 


f •'* 


Home of U.S. Envoy f 
Draws Fire in Tirana i 


Caif*lfdhrOwSuffFn*iDupGHm 

TIRANA. Albania — Gunmen fired at the U.S. am- 
bassador's residence in Tirana, hitting three cars, and an 
armed gang forced its way into the Greek Consulate in 
southern Albania to demand visas Thursday, the police said. 

Lawlessness that has swept the Balkan country for three 
months showed no sign of abating despite the impending 
deployment of a 5.000-member Italian-led multinational 
security force. 

No one was hurt in the shooting at the U.S. residential 
compound, where Ambassador Marisa Lino lives, the police 
said. The police raided homes near the compound, seizing a 
quantity of weapons and arresting several people. Most 
foreign diplomats were flown out of Albania last month. 

In rebel-held Gjirokaster, 30 kilometers (20 miles) from 
the Greek border, gunmen with Kalashnikov assault rifles 
and hand grenadesforced their way into the Greek Consulate 
and demanded that 100 passports be stamped with visas. 
People waiting in line alerted Gjirokaster' s rebel-run coun- 
cil A rebel unit was sent to the consulate and persuaded the 
gunmen to leave without a fight, and without the visas. 

In Athens, meanwhile, a European envoy said Thursday 
that it was “too optimistic” to nope for the dispatch of a 
military mission next week. “We were striving, actually had 
set the date for April 12,” said the envoy. Franz Vranitzky. 

“Five days plus or minus is not a great catastrophe." he 
added. (Reuters, AP) 



MAYORS: Pragmatism, Over Politics 


Continued from Page I 


/ / 5* t 4 , .. ; 


\ ■■ 


/)£ I?-''' * 

$ ‘V f - 

>■ : 



An American guarding the U.S. Embassy on Thursday, a kilometer from the shooting site. 


term in the contest next week against a 
Democratic state senator, Tom Hayden, 
a lifelong liberal activist. Mr. Giuliani's 
re-election test comes in November, with 
four Democrats running for the right to 
challenge him. But as the campaign be- 
gins, he stands on solid ground. 

Yet neither Mr. Giuliani nor Mr. Ri- 
ordan has delivered a conservative rev- 
olution to their cities. Fred Siegel, author 
of a forthcoming book examining the 
two cities, argues that Mr. Giuliani and 
Mr. Riordan represent “a major cor- 
rection, rather than a full turn” in the 
governance of the big cities. 

“It’s not terribly Republican,” Mr. 
Siegel said. “It amounts to arejection of 
die excesses of the past, rather than 
going fully in anew direction.” 

In truth, Mr. Giuliani and Mr. Riordan 
represent part of a broader, bipartisan 
change in city governance, where liberal 
ideology has given way to pragmatism 
and results- oriented management. In 
that sense, they share much in common 
with such Democrats as Richard Daley 
of Chicago or Edward Ren dell of Phil- 
adelphia. 

As Republicans, Mr. Riordan and Mr. 
Giuliani enjoy greater freedom than their 


Beijing Criticizes Gingrich for ‘Improper’ Statements on Taiwan 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

Aiinr York Times Sen-ice 


BEIJING — China admonished the United 
States to speak with one voice on foreign policy 
Thursday and criticized Newt Gingrich, the House 
speaker, for making "improper” statements on 
America’s commitment to defend Taiwan from any 
military attack by the mainland. 

The criticism was made by the Foreign Ministry 
spokesman, Shen Guofang, who earlier this week 
had expressed basic satisfaction with remarks made 
by Mr. Gingrich during a three -day visit to China. 

China's decision to criticize die congressional 
leader came after he led a delegation to Taiwan on 
Wednesday and met with President Lee Teng-hui. 

China considers Taiwan a renegade province and 


is committed to a program of reunification that is to 
follow the return of Hong Kong to Chinese sov- 
ereignty in July and of Macau in 1 999. China has 
refused to renounce the use of force in seeking 
reunification, largely out of concern that this would 
only encourage pro-independence forces on 
Taiwan to declare a permanent separate status for 
the island of 2 1 million. 

While in Taipei, Mr. Gingrich publicly elaborated 
on a pledge he first made in Shanghai last weekend. 
Speaking at the American Institute in Taiwan, 
Washington's “unofficial” embassy there. Mr. 


Gingrich said, “It is important to be explicit with 
both the People’s Republic of China and Taiwan that 


both the People's Republic of China and Taiwan that 
should Beijing seek to reunify Taiwan with die 
mainland by force or intimidation, the United States 
will use all means necessary to prevent it. 


“The use of force or engaging in provocative 
actions by either side is unacceptable.” he con- 
tinued. and he called on both sides to resume their 
political dialogue and increased social, trade and 
investment ties as “the best available mechanism 
for achieving a- long-term, peaceful, resolution of 
the differences." 

Though Mr. Gingrich's message to Taiwan's 
leaders was balanced and restated a co mmitm ent to 
the one -China policy adopted by six consecutive 
administrations. Beijing % s negative reaction 
Thursday appeared related to the official nature of 
the speaker's visit to the island and his tribute to 
Taiwan’s “impressive democracy" and its “re- 
spect for human rights and the rule of law.” 


If nothing else, the visit highlighted the contrasts 
between the societies that have faced each other in 


a stare of suspended warfare across the Taiwan 
Strait since 1949. Taiwan, beginning in the late 
1980s, embraced freedom and democratic devel- 
opment. The Communist Party leadership on the 
mainland has repeatedly crushed pro-democracy 
movements, while arguing in the .United Nations 
that Asians have a different standard for human 
rights and that Chinese culture is not suited to 
Western-style democracy. 

In any case, while Communist Party officials 
treated every aspect of Mr. Gingrich's visit gingerly 
and searched for the most positive interpretations of 
his remarks, the comments Thursday by Mr. Shen 
seemed to drop all pretense of politeness. 

“We do not hope to see different branches of the 
American government carry out different foreign 
policies,” Mr. Shen said. 


MEKONG: Worry Rising Along With Plans to Harness River 


CHINA 


KOHL: 


Continued from Page 1 


Mekong region a new frontier for eco- 
nomic growth in East Asia. Including 
China’s remote but resource-rich Yun- 
nan Province, the area has a population 
of 230 million. 

In Laos, Thailand and Burma, the 
Mekong is called Mae Nam Khong, or 
Mother of Waters. It is a rarity among 
major rivers because it bas no large 
factories on its banks, except a few in 
Yunnan, and no big cities, but for one or 
two in southern Vietnam. So the 
Mekong remains relatively unpolluted, 
supporting a population of millions of 
fanners and fishermen. 

However, the impact of development 
is already being felt in ways that could 
lead to serious clashes of national in- 
terest over water management 

The first dam on the Mekong, the Man- 
wan Dam in Yunnan, began generating 
electricity in 1 993 and will produce 1 500 
megawatts of power once all its turbines 
are installed. Another 1 500-megawatt 
hydro plant further downstream, at 
Dachaoshan, is under construction. 

Five more large dams are planned in 
Yunnan for the Mekong and another 
nine for its tributaries. Together they 
would have an output of 20,000 mega- 
watts, more than will be produced by the 
much-publicized Three Gorges Dam on 
the Yangtze River in central China. 

Despite China's assurances that the 
dams are for power, not irrigation, and 
will help regulate the Mekong's flow, 
officials in downstream countries are con- 
cerned that the giant reservoirs will hold 
back water in the diy season. Scientists 
say that the average water level of the 
river in its middle and lower reaches has 
cbupped in recent years as Thailand and 
other countries bordering the Mekong tap 
it more heavily for irrigation. 

Vietnam is worried that intrusion of 
salt water from the sea — already a 
serious problem in the low-lying Mekong 
Delta, where the bulk of the country’s rice 
is grown — will spread infertility further 
inland as China keeps more of the river's 
headwaters in its Yunnan reservoirs. 

Cambodia is concerned that silling of 
its great fisheries lake, the Tonle Sap. 
which is connected to the Mekong, will 
worsen if the river's level drops further. 

“It is not easy to develop the foil 
potential benefits of the water resources 
while making sure that the ecological 
balances are preserved over the long 
term/’ said Yasunobu Matoba. chief ex- 
ecutive officer of the Mekong River 
Commission Secretariat in Bangkok. The 
commission was formed by Cambodia. 
Laos. Thailand and Vietnam to coordin- 


ate development in the Mekong basin. 
China has refused to join, seeing its work 
as an intrusion on national sovereignty. 

More generally, some scientists, en- 
vironmental groups and nongovern- 
mental organizations warn that building 
dams will contribute to the elimination 
of migratory fish species and rare an- 
imals and displace many thousands of 
villagers. They also contend that de- 
forestation along the river has the po- 
tential for ruining power-generation 
possibilities if the waters fill with silt 
washed down from denuded hillsides. 

“Exploiting the Mekong to obtain the 
maximum amount of hydropower in the 
shortest amount of time will not con- 
tribute to sustainable economic devel- 
opment.” said Tyson Roberts, who is 
based in Bangkok as an affiliate re- 
searcher for the Smithsonian Tropical 
Research Institute of the United Stales. 
After a 1996 study, the Asian Devel- 
opment Bank cautioned that of 54 dams 
planned for the Mekong and its trib- 
utaries. only eight had been the subject of 
an environmental impact assessment 

The lion’s share of the hydropower 
projects are in Laos, where the gov- 
ernment has signed contracts for 23 ven- 
tures with foreign companies — most to 
be built at the developers' expense, op- 


oe bum at me developers expense, op- 
erated by them for periods of up to 25 
years, and then handed over to the gov- 


ernment at no cost. 

Several of the projects are under con- 


struction, and Laotian officials foresee a 
total of 50 or 60 eventually, with most of 
the electricity being exported by trans- 
mission lines to Thailand and Vietnam, 
both of which are short of power. 

The bank estimates that Laos has a 
hydropower potential of more than 
18,000 megawatts, of which about one 
percent has been developed. 

Proponents of plans to develop a net- 
work of dams in Laos say they will help 
preserve watersheds and forests, encour- 
age tourism, raise the living standards of 
local communities and provide year- 
round supplies of water, most of which 
will eventually enter the Mekong, guar- 
anteeing the flow levels needed by fish- 
ing and fanning communities down- 
stream. 

"We are convinced that hydropower 
is inexorably linked with environmental 
protection and enhancement, the devel- 
opment of rural areas and the alleviation 
or poverty, ’’said Khammone Phonekeo, 
Laotian deputy minister of industry and 
handicrafts. 

But the country’s largest dam project 
so far — a 681 -megawatt plant being 
built by group of Asian and Western 
companies on the Nam Thuen River in 
central Laos — is being delayed, partly 
because the World Bank, sensitive to 
criticism from environmental and so- 
cial-action groups, has not yet agreed to 
provide partial loan guarantees for the 
project . 


• Mekong River 


*5.Manwan Dam 


Seeking a 5th Term 


Continued from Page I 


LUTZ? 


Hanot 


0 Km 300 
^ .CHINA. 


Vientiane 


mesa 


THAILAND 


CAMBODIA 




:/&LT 






several key sectors if their benefits are 
cutback. 

Last month, Mr. Kohl was forced to 
offer further state subsidies to defuse 
angry protests by coal miners and con- 
struction workers. 

But economists warn that such con- 
cessions will only worsen state deficits 
and Germany's competitive position in 
the global economy. 

Even though Mr. Kohl's popularity 
has slumped in recent months, his de- 
cision to ran again was cheered by Chris- 
tian Democrat supporters, who still be- 
lieve he represents their best chance to 
retain power. 

“This is a good decision for Ger- 
many,” said Wolfgang Schauble, the 
party’s parliamentary leader and a man 
often mentioned as a Kohl successor. 

The decision is expected to force the 
Social Democrats to reach an early de- 
cision about their own candidate. 

The party leader, Oskar Lafontaine, is 
eager to avenge a 1990 defeat but polls 
show that Mr. Kohl would beat him 
again. 

His rival, Gerhard Schroder, the state 
premier of Lower Saxony, runs ahead of 
Mr. Kohl in voter surveys but is not 
popular with rank-and-file Social 


HEART: Study Points to a New Suspect FUNDS: Clinton Coordinated Program 


Continued from Page I 


vessel wall and become lodged there, 
rather than by blood clots getting 
snagged in narrowed vessels. 

The study was not designed to tell 
what is stimulating the immune system 
cells, and the cause may be different in 
different people. Laboratory studies 
have suggested that the crashing of blood 
against vessel walls can cause sufficient 
damage in some people to attract white 
blood cells and trigger inflammation. 
Other research has suggested that per- 
sistent blood-borne infections by mi- 
crobes such as chlamydia or “Helico- 
bacter pylori." the bacteria that causes 
ulcers, or viruses such as cytomegalovir- 
us can cause vessel inflammation. In that 
case, antibiotics or antiviral drugs may 
help prevent heart attacks and strokes. 

The new study, which appeared in 
Thursday's issue of the New England 
Journal of Medicine, presents two lines 
of evidence that inflammation is an im- 


portant early factor in vessel disease. 

First, the researchers measured C-re- 
active protein levels in 1,086 healthy 
men and tracked their health for more 
than eight years. All had levels con- 
sidered normal. But those with the 
highest normal levels were nearly three 
times as likely to have a heart attack by 
the end of the study, and twice as likely 
to have a stroke, compared with those 
who had the lowest levels. 

Second, the researchers asked half the 
participants to take a 325-milligram as- 
pirin tablet every other day for the full 
length of the study, to confirm previous 
hints that aspirin can prevent heart at- 
tacks and strokes. 

Aspirin reduced the risk of a heart 
attack by 56 percent in men with high 
levels of C-reactive protein but not at all 
in those who scored low on the inflam- 
mation test. Thai suggests aspirin's abil- 
ity to prevent heart attacks comes from 
its anti-inflammatory pr oper ti es rather 
than its anti-clotting properties. 


Continued from Page l 


nesday were three memos, sent to both 
Mr. Clinton and Mr. Gore, showing that 
an appearance by the vice president at an 
event set for last April 29 in Los Angeles 
was projected to raise 5250,000. 

When it was first disclosed last foil 
that Mr. Gore attended a fund-raising 
luncheon that day at a Buddhist temple in 
the Los Angeles area, he said he had 
thought it was a “community event” and 
not a fund-raiser. Later, he said he had 
known he was addressing a group that 
made contributions to the Democratic 
Party but had not known that the lunch- 
eon itself was intended to raise money. 

Joe Lockhart, a spokesman for the 
vice president, said mi Wednesday that 
at one point the Democratic National 
Committee had planned for April 29 a 
“different and separate fund-raiser" 
from the temple event bur that * 'at some 
point in the process” this other event 
was dropped. 


'“As we said before,” Mr. Lockhart 
said of the luncheon at die temple, “the 
vice president didn't believe this was a 
fund-raiser but knew it was a finance- 
related event and in retrospect that it was 
a mistake to attend.” 

The memos show that the president 


himself occasionally checked off mat , 
ters of interest or offered suggestions. 

In late 1996, for example, he advised 
that the party's direct-mall solicitations 
should explain the problem that die 
Democrats were having raising dona- 
tions because of the legal limits on con- 
tributions dial could be spenr directly on 
individual candi d ates. “I think we can do 
better w/mail if we have the right mes- 
sage.” Mr. Clinton wrote, adding that 
this included “the federal $ prob.” On 
another document, in October 1996. 
which projected the debt that the Demo^ 
crahc committee was likely to face after 
the election and recommended rfmr the 


committee budget $1 million for poten- 
tial fines. Mr. Clinton wrote, “U gh. ** 


Democratic colleagues to challenge 
business as usual because they owe less 
to the web of liberal interests thai have 
controlled city governments for decades. 
That may be one reason, said George 
Kelling, an urban crime spec iali st, that 
Mr. Giuliani has achieved such stunning 
success in reducing the crime rate. 

Mr. Kelling is a co-author of “Fixing 
Broken Windows,” which argues that 
by ignoring smaller irritants like subway 
graffiti or broken windows in housing 
projects, city officials invite more se- 
rious crime. He said that for too long, 
liberals saw disorderly behavior in cities 
as a sign of cultural pluralism, adding 
rh»t Democratic politicians resisted 
strong action because they feared the 
reactions of their liberal constituencies. 
But Mayor Giuliani, Mr. Kelling said, 
can “tweak his nose” at the groups and 
“he doesn't lose anything.” 

Far from losing support, both mayors 
have expanded their middie-class base 
by bringing more order and stability t&. , 
their cities. - j 

Both have sought to make the cities ! 
more attractive to business by cutting ! 
some taxes and paring away regulatory 
cobwebs chat have hindered job creation. 
Mr. Riordan claims greater progress 
here, although critics say much of the , 
credit goes to die overall improvements 
in the California economy. 

In New York, results have fallen short 


lh 


of expectations. The unemployment rale 
stands at 10 percent and the city's rate of 
job creation ranks 15th among die 20 
largest metropolitan areas. 

Nor has either Republican mayojr 
challenged the power of the municipal 
unions in the way that many conser- 
vatives say is necessary to reduce 
bloated urban bureaucracies and assure 
long-term fiscal stability. Mr. Giuliani 
■ battled die police unions over consol- 
idation, and both mayors, have wrested 
some financial concessions from organ- 
ized labor. But they have moved more 
slowly to shift services to private con- 
tractors because of union resistance. 

As Republican outsiders, both mayors 
have had trouble building political co- 
alitions. 

Before politics, Mr. Giuliani made his 
mark sending mobsters to prison as a 
high-profile prosecutor, and he still craves^# 
the limelight. He is a strong leader with' 
vast powers, but his contentious person- 
ality has hindered him at times as mayor. 
His approval rating is high, but most New 
Yorkers do not find him very likable. 

Before Mr. Riordan won election in : 
1993, he had made afoitune as a behind- ; 
the-scenes businessman and deal-maker, 
and he still avoids the spotlight. He is ' 
well liked personally and uses a network < 
of business connections to circumvenr i 
die government bureaucracy. But he has- ! 
been hampered by difficult relations' - 
with die city council and an exodus of 1 
top managers from city departments. ■ ' 

On issues (ike abortion, gun control! ! 
and gay rights, die Republican mayors 
are closer to the Democrats than to their; 
own party. Mr. Giuliani has championed! 
immi gration rights, in contrast with the 1 ! 
leadership of his party. Mr. Riordan was! i 
largely silent during the fierce debatei ; 
over California’s anti -immig ration Pro*’ i 
position 187 that was approved in 1994.- ; 

In 1994, Mr. Riordan endorsed the; ! 
Democratic senator Dianne Feinsteiri : 
and last year opposed Proposition 209,; I 
which was against affirmative action. ! I 

Mr. Giuliani defended President Bill' I 
Clinton when Republicans threatened to! ; 
scuttle his crime bill in 1994. That same* > 
year he backed the Democratic governor! 
at the time, Mario Cuomo, over a Re-! j 
publican, George Pafalri, in a political; ‘ 
gamble that went awry when Mr. Pataki! 
won. 

Although Mr. Giuliani has created, 
one of the biggest work-fare programs in 
the country for welfare recipients, he 
opposed the welfare bill signed by Mr. 
Clinton last year, arguing that it dumps’ 
die burden of revamping welfare on 
states and cities in the name of balancing 
die federal budget. If 

But while neither Mr. Riordan nor Mr.' 
Giuliani has governed as a partisan Re-, 
publican, both say tfaev are advancing. 


iking Ahead 

feign Briber* 








publican, both say they are advancing, 
important elements of the Republican' 
philosophy in office. “Law and order— • 
a safer America — and let’s reform the ; 
welfare system,” Mr. Giuliani says. . \ 
. They both succeeded black mayors at ; 
times- of racial tension in their cities.' 1 
Today tensions have eased, bur both cities ! 
rema in polarized, and mother mayor has, j 
strong standing in die black community.. . i 
The two mayors’ Democratic chat, 
lengers acknowledge that voters grew 
weary of their party’s approach to ruri.- 
ning the two largest U.S. dries, but they i. 
contend that neither Mr. Riordan nor M£- 
Giuliani represents a real answer to whaf 
ails big cities. • ' r 

Still, Ester Fuchs, who heads die Cen- 
ter for Urban Policy at Barnard College^ 
and Columbia University, said, "Wbarw 
Republican mayors have learned is dial’ 
it’s pretty damn 'hard to-be a mayor, arid- 
they’re a mayor first arid a Republican 
second.” 




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The perfect tool 10 snatch vour business needs 


FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1997 


PAGE 13 


Court Finds 
Renault’s 
Plan Illegal 

Belgian Panel Cites 

Lodi of Consultation 

c "9*W6j OurSu&Fmm Disptmbei 

. BRUSSELS — Renault SA’s de~ 
cisim to dose its plant in Vavoonle. 
Belgium, is illegal because tbe anto- 
maker faded to consult its workers, a 
-Belgian court ruled Thursday. 

The Brussels labor court said Renault 
bad breached worker consultation rules, 
and it called on management to restart 
negotiations with unions to find means 
to avoid or reduce job cuts. 

The tribunal does not have the power 
to force Renault to reverse its decision 
to close the plant, but Its ruling left the 
company open to a possible fine or 
higher charges for laying off workers 
Renault can appeal the ruling. 

*1- A spokesman for Renault said the 
rating would nor affect the decision to 
close tbe plant and that Renault would 
proceed with its plan. 

Renault announced in February feat it 

planned to close the factory at the end of 
July, eliminating 3,100 jobs. Workers 
were outraged, and labor unions took 
toe company to court for toiling to give 
them further warning before deciding to 
close a profitable factory. 

.’ Labor unions welcomed Thursday’s 
decision and said the ruling would set an 
important precedent for the way compa- 
nies could handle their employees. * ‘It is 
good news that the judicial power in 
Belgium is bringing Renault back into 
j£ine," said Denis de Meulemeester, a 
spokesman for tbe Be lgian metals un- 
ion. Management boards, he said, “are 
still autonomous, but they have to re- 
spect the rules on information.” 

Tbe Vilvoorde closure would also 
lead to the loss of about 1,000 jobs at 
companies that supply the plant 

A Paris court is set to rale separately 
Friday on whether tbe French auto- 
maker’s decision goes against French 
labor regulations. Renault unions have 
called for stoppages at all the com- 
pany’s European plants Friday. 

Renault executives were not avail- 
able for comment Tbe company’s 
shares closed in Paris at 129.70 francs 
($23). down 1.40. 

( Bloomberg , AFP, Reuters. AFX) . 


Growth of Fee Accounts 

' . Assets*? fee-based account? at some of the largest brokerage firms. 


f 

\ ;.,$tn±mon ■ 

% 1 

S2B4 billion I 





^ Hnpm UwW/IV Virk Tiori 

David Beyer, like other retail brokers, has become more of a financial adviser, earning money from fees. 

Brokers Turning to Managed Money 


By Peter Trueil 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — David Beyer’s 
luck had run out The stockbroker's 
best client a 56-year-old heir to a 
. garment fortune who loved playing the 
market, died of a heart attack. 
Overnight, Mr. Beyer’s commissions 
at Paine Webber Inc. toe* a dive, 
jolting him into action. 

Deciding he could no longer afford 
to depend so heavily on one account or 
on something as as com- 

missions, Mr. Beyer began reaching 
out to more clients with a different 
approach: He would manage their as- 
sets for a fixed fee. Now, a decade later, 
as much as 60 percent of his income 
comes from flat-fee accounts, provid- 
ing him with a more stable cash flow 
that has steadily grown over the years. 

“I changed my business.” Mr. Bey- 
er, 44, recalled recently. . 

Mr. Beyer was early to make the 
switch, but these days he has a lot of 
company. 

A& brokerage firms struggle to win 
the business of a skepticaTnew gen- 
eration of investors, a growing number 
of brokers are shaking off old habits. 
They are earning less from selling 
stocks and more from manag ing 
money. They are making fewer cold 


calls and spending more time sitting 
down with clients to discuss long-term 
financial goals, to set income targets 
and then to allocate assets among a 
range of investments. 

tbe switch, which comes under 
pressure from regulators alarmed at 
tbe antics of “rogue” brokers who 
“churn” customer accounts to raise 
their commissions, could not be more 
radical in terms of the shift in brokers’ 
financial incentives. It puts the em- 
phasis on performance rather than on 
the . generation of commissions from 
transactions that may. or may not. be in 
die client’s best interest. 

Many big retail brokerage firms are 
counting on so-called managed ac- 
counts to secure their place in tbe 
investing future, which for Paine 
Webber. Merrill Lynch and others will 
largely revolve around managing 
chunks of toe growing mountain of 
assets that baby boomers are building 
for retirement. 

Managed accounts have been 
around for decades, but they were usu- 
ally reserved for tbe biggest clients, 
those with portfolios of SI milli on or 
more. As the savings of middle-class 
investors began to grow, however, 
many firms lowered tbe bar, offering 
financial management services for ac- 
counts of $100,000 or even less. 


The big firms are facing intense 
competition from discount brokers and 
mutual funds, a contest they join with a 
special problem: Many investors are 
leery of the army of commission 
brokers who serve as the firms’ foot 
soldiers, seeing them as pushy sales- 
men peddling whatever investments 
their employers tell them to. 

The fixed-fee account is meant to 
counteract that image while also 
providing a level of personal service 
that tbe less expensive competition 
cannot. 

“It gets the broker and the customer 
on toe same side of toe table.” said 
Raymond Mason, chairman of the Bal- 
timore-based Legg Mason brokerage 
firm and an early champion of man- 
aged accounts. 

The managed accounts have attrac- 
ted their share of critics, who question 
everything from toe size of the toes, 
which can be well over double the 
charges levied by many no-load mu- 
tual funds, to the qualifications of the 
brokers to serve as financial advisers. 
Some skeptics wonder just how im- 
partial the brokers and their money 
managers can be. 

Wm they pick investments tailored 
by the brokets’ firms rather than more 
appropriate assets sold by competit- 
ors? 


Germany Again Leads 
Europe’s Stock Losses 

Despite 2 Hopeful Reports, Index’s Fall 
Of 2.6% Exceeds Other Key Exchanges 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune 


FRANKFURT — As stocks fell 
across most of Europe for the third day 
Thursday, losses in the German market 
continual to outpace those on other ex- 
changes. reflecting toe view that 
Europe’s biggest economy has toe most 
to lose from a weakening dollar and the 
prospect of a delay in European mon- 
etary union. 

Germany's 30-share DAX blue chip 
index never fully recovered from a rapid 
sell off at tbe opening bell, despite two 
economic indicators that were made 
public Thursday and that pointed to 
sound economic growth. 

A 1.9 percent increase in German 
industrial output in February indicated 
that growth was under way. reinforcing 
expectations that interest rates are un- 
likely to fall any further, traders said. In 
another report Thursday, toe govern- 
ment said that manufacturing orders rose 
0.2 percent in February, enough to keep 
toe recovery 6n track, toe traders said. 

A meager boost was also all the mar- 
ket got from the announcement by 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl that he would 
seek re-election next year, despite ex- 
pectations that toe move bolsters pros- 
pects for economic restructuring and tbe 
investment climate. 

The DAX dropped 2.6 percent or 
85.92 points to end at 3215.99 points 
after it plunged at the opening to an 
intraday low of 3.19233. By contrast, 
France’s CAC 40-share index fell 03 
percent and London's FT-SE 1 00 shares 
lost 0.15 percent. 

Thursday's dealings continued a 
trend that began when global shares 
began their slide last week. In toe same 
period, toe DAX has shed 6 percent, 
compared with 53 parent for tbe Dow 
Jones industrial average. 4.8 percent in 
France. 1 .6 percent in London and 4.4 
percent in Amsterdam. 

Selling pressure spilled over into 
Europe this week after Wall Street came 
under pressure after an interest rate in- 
crease in the United Stales last week. By 
devaluing cyclical shares, investors are 
betting on even tighter monetary con- 


ditions in the United States, keeping 
pressure on stocks there and, by ex- 
tension, European shares. 

German securities were ripest for a 
correction after their rally outpaced 
their European counterparts over the 
last six months, said Christopher Potts, 
equities strategist in Paris at toe Ch- 
euvreux de Virieu investment house. 
The DAX hit an “ebullient” succession 
of record highs over the last six months, 
he said, as the dollar rallied and as 
prospects brightened that currency un- 
ion would begin on time. 

“When the factors that made Ger- 
many an overperformer went into re- 
verse. Germany became an underper- 
former.” Mr. Ports continued. "Ger- 
many has been one of the principal 
beneficiaries of a rise in the dollar.” 

With faltering consumer demand and 
little investment or hiring at home, the 
export-dependent German economy has 
become more vulnerable to exchange rate 
fluctuations than usual in the current re- 
covery. After perching steadily above 
1.70 Deutsche marks ai the start of 
March, toe dollar has drifted slowly 
downward over toe past month — it stood 
at 1 .6778 DM late Thursday — making 
German exports more expensive. 

Even more detrimental to Germany, 
the mark stands to gain further from a 
delay in monetary union, said Hans 
Bokermann. director at Marcard, Stein 
& Co., a private bank in Hamburg. 

With France and the Netherlands as 
its two largest single export markets and 
two expected to be in on the launch of 
the new currency, Germany would ben- 
efit handsomely from the disappearance 
of exchange rate fluctuations, Mr. 
Bokermann said. 

Foreign investors also began to re- 
assess their bullish stance on Germany 
as confidence faded on many of the 
government's economic initiatives, he 
continued. Tax reform appears to be 
stalled. Workers spent much of last 
month protesting in the streets against 
economic change. And the failure of 
Krapp Hoesch AG's unsolicited 
takeover bid of toe rival steelmaker 
Thyssen AG sent the message that Ger- 
many rejects U.S.-style takeovers. 


Ulihkftng Ahead /Commentary 


Foreign Bribery Should Be a Crime 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 


W! 


ASH3NGTON — An American canght brib- 
ing a foreign official for commercial gain will 
be fined or jailed for violating U.S. law. Euro- 
peans who bribe the same official may well 
qualify for a tax deduction. 

U.S. corporations are estimated to be losing contracts 
worth tens of billions of dollars because of corrupt practices 
- by their competitors. It is hardly surprising that Washington 
‘ is leading an aggressive campaign to crack down an in-, 
ternational bribery and corruption. . • 

What is surprising is that tbe cam- 


paign, dismissed as hopelessly naive Germany and France are 

holding out in die fight 

At next month’s ministerial meet- against corruption, 

ing of the Organization for Economic ° 1 

Cooperation and Development in Par- 


visas. The problem is big payments to induce an official to 
do something illegal — bribing a public employee to secure 
a contract is against toe law all over toe world. 

Last year, Germany and France subscribed to a non- 
binding OECD recommendation to end tax deductions for 
bribery abroad and agreed “in principle" to make it a 
criminal offense. The difficulty is persuading them to 
follow through. The two countries have not ended tbe tax 
deductibility, and they say they want to negotiate a binding 
international convention before criminalizing foreign 
bribery. Washington wants each OECD member simply to 
enact its own legislation next year. 

France and Germany argue that 
without a watertight legal convention, 
other countries will cheat. This ar- 
gument is “clearly a delaying tactic,” 
says Frank VogL vice c h a irm a n of 
Transparency International, an inde- 
pendent group that monitors business 
‘ >n. Negotiating an interna- 


corruption 

’ ^Washington hopes other industrial countries ’will com- tional convention could take years. 
rmt themselves to making foreign commeiraalbribery a But many Europeans also argue that U.S. military and 
as the Uni " ’ ’ * “ 6 J 


1 criminal offense. 


jnited States did in 1977. political power gives American businesses an unfair ad- 

Manv developing and ex-Commanist countries back toe vantage. Americans say their country ’s leading role just as 
3 - ■ •- -=-~ =-«! 9 t a disadvantage — for example, when 


often sets them at a 

Washington puts pressure on China to improve its record on 
human rights and weapons proliferation and European 
governments seek commercial favors by keeping quia. 

Tbe two issues are not comparable. A telephone call from 
President BiUCHnton is not the equivalent of a bribe — nor 
should it bean excuse for offering one. 

Tbe hope must be that European voters, increasingly 

__ disgusted by scandal and corruption in their own countries, 

; JiK^t^ffirienTbidders. diverts" funds that could have ' will press governments to act on an international level. The 

the ItlOSt cm onH Pnrrmm T Tninn nlsns tn rnminaliw lirflvw witliin PT1 


U.S. stand and are asking the major exporting nations to 
help them fight corruption. __ 

i Y 'Hie main holdouts are two close American allies, Ger- 

* many and France. These two countries do not dispute that 

’ bribery is bad. Many international corporations say cor- 
1 raption is toe main obstacle to business in places such as 
Russia, China and much of Southeast Asia. 

Bribery according to Alan P. Larson, a senior State 

Department offiaa],_dcoie; devstopjpg 


‘been spent on economic and social development, and 
corrupts fragile democratic institutions. 

’ VVashington is not too warned by toe anaft sums often 
needed to persuade bureaucrats to do the jobs they are 
supposed tobe doing anyway, such as issuing licenses or 


within the EU. 
it a criminal 
rials but not 


Tbat'wfll have the bizarre effect of 
offense fer a German, say, to bribe French 
Russian ones. Europeans, who pride themselves on their 
logic, must surely see toe absurdity of that 


Wallenberg to Step Down at Investor 


Cu^»inJ hy (Mr Stiff Fran Disptmrbn 

STOCKHOLM — Investor AB nom- 
inated Percy Baroevik, 56, chairman of 
toe Swedish- Swiss industrial giant 
ABB Asea Brown Boveri Ltd., on 
Thursday to succeed Peter Wallenberg 
as chairman of Sweden's largest in- 
vestment company. 

Mr. Wallenberg, 70, is planning to 
retire. Mr. Baroevik is also chairman of 
Sandvik AB, a Swedish industrial and 
household tool manufacturer, and will 
soon leave his position as chairman of 
the construction company Skanska AB. 

The Wallenberg family controls 41 
percent of Investor. Mr. Wallenberg in 
toe past year has stepped down from 
other board positions aid moved to pass 
leadership to his son Jacob and his neph- 
ew Marcus. Peter Wallenberg will retain 
the chairmanship of the Wallenberg 
Foundation. 

Last month, Jacob Wallenberg was 
named to succeed Bjoem Svedberg as 
chief executive of Skandinaviska En- 
skdJda Banker] AB, Sweden's third - 
:bank. 

igh Investor, Incentive AB and 


private foundations, toe Wallenberg fam- 
ily holds dominant or controlling stakes 
in the following Swedish companies: toe 
drugmaker Astra AB, toe mobile-phone 
maker Ericsson AB, toe household-ap- 
pliance maker Electrolux AB. the paper 
maker Store Kopparbergs Berglags AB, 
tbe bearings maker SKF AB, Saab Auto- 
mobile AB, the engineering company 
Allas Copco AB and S-E Banken. 

Any of those companies could be 
involved in Investor's plans to expand 
abroad. 

“I couldn't say whether it would be 
pharmaceuticals or telecommunica- 
tions,” Peter Wallenberg said. “I'm 
prepared to listen to any idea when it 
comes to this sort of thing.” He said toe 
push abroad had come because growth 
in Sweden was set to slow. 

“Corporate growth in Sweden will 
continue but possibly ai a slower rate 
because much of toe established in- 
dustry will be investing increasingly 
outside of Sweden," be said- 
investor’s B shares closed at 333.50 
kronor ($43.89), down 1 30. 

( Bloomberg . AFP) 



Percy Baroevik 


Rubin to Warn Japan on Trade Gap 

Hashimoto Will Try Hard to Reassure Visiting U.S. Treasury Chief 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Aprils UbkHJbor Rates 

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Soa us Sealm. 


By Velisarios Kattoulas 

International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Japanese officials, pres- 
sured by a faltering economy, soaring 
exports 3nd a weak yen, are expected to 
spend much of Friday trying to reassure 
U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin 
that Japan's trade surplus with the 
UnitedStates is not poised to balloon. 

Mr. Rubin, in nan, is expected to 
spend most of his one-day visit here 
telling Prime Minister Ryu taro Hashi- 
moto and other officials that Washing- 
ton cannot tolerate a surge in Japan s 
trade surplus with the United States. 

Statistics released last week showed 
that the weak yen helped Japan’s sur- 
plus with the United States grow for the 
fifth month in a row in February, it rose 
12 percent to 407 billion yen. Since 
October, when Japan’s surplus with the 
United States grew for the first time in 
two years, Mr. Rubin and other U.S. 
officials have repeatedly warned Japan 
tokeep its surplus in check and not to uy 
exporting its way out of recession. 

They have made “real progress" in 
cutting their trade surplus, “but toe is- 
sue is not to have it go back the other 
way,” Mr. Rubin said in Washington 
this week. 

Financial maricets are watching care- 
fully for signs that Mr. Rubin has aban- 
doned his support for a weak yen to take 
the steam out of Japanese exports and 
alleviate pressure at home. U.S. auto 
manufacturers have already complained 
that toe dollar’s rise against the yen has 


caused Japanese exports to soar. 

Mr. Rubin wanted Japan on Wed- 
nesday that a renewed rise in its trade 
surplus could cause friction with toe 
United States and toe rest of the world. 

1 ‘Our goal is clear — to foster growth 
in Asia, which will, in tum, promote 
global growth,” be told toe New York 
Stock Exchange Board of Directors. 
“The end result will be increased U.S. 
exports, more high-paying jobs and 
greaier prosperity.” 

For his part, Prime Minister Hashi- 
moto will insist that U.S. fears about 
Japan’s trade surplus are overdone, an 
official at toe Foreign Ministry said. Ja- 
pan’s economic recovery, recent changes 
in its economic structure and continuing 


A BCCJ Conviction 

The Associated Press 
LONDON — A P akistani ship- 
ping tycoon was convicted 
Thursday of tunneling $1.2 billion 
out of the Bank of Credit & Com- 
merce International in a fraudulent 
scheme that ultimately contributed 
to toe bank’s collapse in 1991. 

Abbas Gokal. 61, will face fines, 
confiscation of his assets, and up to 
17 years in prison when he is sen- 
tenced next month on two conspir- 
acy counts. Ten others were also 
accused, but many have avoided 
prosecution by staying in Pakistan. 


deregulation have made Japan less de- 
pendent on exports and win prevent its 
trade surplus from soaring again. 

If the recovery stalls, toe government 
will be in trouble: Interest rates are 
already at record lows and cannot easily 
be cut to bolster consumer spending and 
suck in more imports. Tokyo is also 
reluctant to lift government spending 
because the balance of Japan's long- 
term debts mushroomed as Japan tried to 
spend its way out of its last recession. 

According to Finance Ministry data , 
government debt will reach 521 trillion 
yen ($4.25 trillion) in toe current fiscal 
year, which ends in March 1998. That 
would surpass Japan’s estimated gross 
domestic product of 5 1 6 trillion yen. 

In any case, Japanese officials insist 
toe economy is strong enough to prevent 
a resurgence of the nation's trade sur- 
plus with the United States without 
more economic pump-priming. The 
Economic Planning Agency said last 
month that the economy grew by 3.6 
percent last year, its highest growth rate 
since 1991. 

In the current fiscal year, the gov- 
ernment expects growth of 1.9 percent 

“You should not pay too much at- 
tention to a very short-term trade sur- 
plus,” a Foreign Ministry official said 

Mr. Hashimoto said toe construction 
of scores of Japanese factories overseas, 
deregulation and record imports had 
changed the structure of toe economy. 

Top Japanese exporters continue to 

See RUBIN, Page 17 








THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 


f The; Dow 

1 1 

30-Year T-Sohcf Yieiri 

i ■ I 

t95 k #-/* 

6£5l jAJ S/ 

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120 - - 


N 0 J F M A 
1996 1997 



Exchange 

Index 

Thursday 

03.3OPM 

Prev. 

■ Close 
• 6537.01 

% 

NYSE 

The Dow 

6437^0 

-1 22. 

NYSE 

S&P50Q 

746.77 

750.11 

-0.45 

NYSE 

S&P100 

72/urr 

72846 

-0.63 

NYSE ■ 

Ccunposte 

■u 

3S5L37 

-a 60 

U.S. 

Nasiktq Conqx>Si» f2SB£3 

1201.00 

+0.44 

AMEX 

Market Vakie 

SSftfiS 

561.19 

-0.80 

Toronto 

TSE hWte* ' • 

5814^0 

SS49.14 

-059 

Sao Paulo 

Bovespa . 

9305.63 

929031 

+0.17 

Mexico City 

Sotsa ■ 

3744.82 

3716.18 

+0.77 

Buenos Aires Merval ' 

71B.G8. 

729.01 

-1.42 

Santiago 

. IPSASerwiaJ 

. 5350.86 

5318.51 

+0.60 

Caracas 

Capital General 

6152.11 

€253.59 

-1.62 

Source . Bloomberg. Reuters 


mem all. rad MeruM Tnhuru 

Very briefly: 


German Automakers Cruising in U.S. 


Bloomberg ben? 

FRANKFURT — U.S. sales of cars made by 
Bayerische Motoren Werke AG. Mercedes- 
Benz AG. Porsche AG and Volkswagen AG 
surged in the first quarter as Americans, feeling 
affluent, opted for high-priced German sedans 
and sports cars. 

Except for Volkswagen, all German car- 
makers reported double-digit U.S. sales growth, 
including a doubling of sales at Porsche, a 41 
percent surge at BMW. a 33.6 percent gain at 
Audi AG (a unit of Volkswagen; and a 25.6 
percent rise at Mercedes-Benz. Volkswagen’s 
U.S. sales were up 8.7 percent. 

Analysis said German carmakers were cap- 
italizing on a booming U.S. economy and con- 
sumer willingness to pay more than $40,000 for 
a deluxe vehicle. 

They said the German makers were out- 
performing European rivals such as Volvo AB 
and Saab Automobile AB as well as beating 
America's automakers in their own backyard. 

“Prestige and performance are the main 
factors." said Simon Miller, an auro analyst at 
Union Bank of Switzerland in London. German 
automakers, he said, "don't really have much 


competition," as much of American production 
is "pretty bland.” 

German automakers said the sales figures 
confirmed their strategy of focusing on the U.S. 
economic recovery to offset continued weak 
domestic and European sales growth. Christian 

‘German cars are a real status 
symbol in the United States/ 

Dau, a spokesman for Mercedes, said the 
growth highlighted a global trend favoring for- 
eign status cars. 

"German cars are a real status symbol in the 
United States, ' * Mr. Dau said. "A lot of it has to 
do with image. If I were in Hamburg, for 
example, I would buy a Jaguar as a status 
symbol.” 

While the Germans are pushing ahead, other 
European luxury carmakers are snuggling to 
lift sales in the United States. 

Saab, jointly owned by General Motors 
Corp. ana the Swedish investment company 
Investor AB, said Thursday that its U.S. sales 


rose only 0.5 percent in the first quarter, to 
5.623 cars. Its sales in March fell 18 percent. 

Saab attributed the drop in March to '‘tough 
competition and marketing campaigns.’ ’ 

Volvo said its sales in the United States fell 
slightly in the first quarter, to 24,247 cars from 
24.450. Its March U.S. sales fell 2 percent from 
a year earlier. 

Daimler-Benz AG's Mercedes unit said U.S. 
sales rose to a record 24,555 cars in the first 
quarter from 19,547 a year earlier, led by its 
luxury E-Class sedans. Mercedes expects to sell 
more than 1 00,000 cars in the United States this 
year, up from 90,800 in 1996. 

BMW of North America Inc. said first-quarter 
sales rose 37 percent to 29,136 cars, fueled in 
part by a 130 percent rise in sales in March of its 
73 sports car and flagship 5-Series sedans. 

It said March was its best month ever, as sales 
rose 41 percent to 1 1,578 care. The U.S. surge 
outpaced BMW's global sales, including those 
of its British Rover unit, which rose 8 percent. 

The success of German carmakers in the 
United States was further illustrated by Porsche, 
whose sales more than doubled in North Amer- 
ica in the first quarter, to 3,500 cars. 


U.S. Defers Fees on Some Wireless Licenses 


SEC Raises Disclosure Standards 

WASHINGTON — The Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission has raised the disclosure standards for many non-U.S. 
companies that have stock trading in the United States. 

Under a rule proposal approved Monday, the companies 
will have to register dieir stock with the SEC if they want its 
price to be quoted on an electronic bulletin board run by the 
National Association of Securities Dealers. 

Once registered, the companies will have to file annual 
reports with the SEC and provide financial statements that 
conform to U.S. accounting standards. The ruling could affecr 
about 200 companies, among them CS Holding, Nestle SA 
and Volkswagen AG. The American and New York stock 
exchanges had been lobbying the SEC to make the change. 

■ America Online Inc/s network service is considering 
selling shares to the public within a year, the unit's head said. 

• Ford Motor Co. said U.S. sales of autos and trucks fell 2.2 
percent in March from a year earlier, dragged down by car 
sales, which declined 9.9 percent. 

• MCI Communications Corp. said it would add 1.000 jobs 
in Atlanta within two years, and it named the city the 
headquarters for its North American business unit. 

• Tsingtao Brewery Co., China's biggest beer exporter, is 
considering setting up a brewery in Northern California, 
according to Willie Brown, mayor of San Francisco. 

• Toyota Motor Corp. has taken legal action to try to block 
Republic Industries from buying up its dealerships. 

• Walt Disney Co. said it had taken control of Starwave 
Corp„ a Web-site operator founded by Paul Allen, the co- 
founder of Microsoft Corp. Disney plans to team Starwave’s 
creative talent with its ABC News unit to launch an on-line 
news service to rival MSNBC, an NBC-Microsoft venture. 

Bloomberg. MYT. AP 


By Mark LancUer 

Neve York Timet Service 

WASHINGTON — The Federal Communi- 
cations Commission has announced that it will 
temporarily slop collecting payments on more 
than $10 billion worth of wireless communi- 
cations licenses sold at auction last year, raising 
doubts about the government's most favored new 
method for pouring money into the Treasury. 

The decision by the agency, which has cham- 
pioned the concept of selling tne public airwaves to 
the highest bidder, comes in the same week that 
one of last year's largest bidders filed for bank- 
ruptcy, and others are reportedly in danger of 
default. So now. even though Congress has already 


committed at least $1 billion ofthemoney.it is not 
clear whether the commission will ever collect the 
full $10.1 billion the government thought it had 
raised in this, the largest airwave auction yet. 

Though the agency, on paper at least, has raised 
nearly $23 billion since it began bolding auctions 
in 1 994, it now seems doubtful that future auctions 
will produce the huge windfall the government 
has been counting on to help balance the budget. 

"We have to be careful about assessing the 
revenue to be gained from auctions,” said Rep- 
resentative Thomas J. Bliley Jr., Republican of 
Virginia, chairman of the House Commerce 
Committee. "If not, it can become fool's gold in 
the hands of budgeteers.” 

On Monday, the commission announced that it 


would suspend the installment plan by which a 
group of communications companies were pay- 
ing die government for licenses auctioned last 
year for a new class of wireless telephone tech- 
nology known as Personal Communications Ser- 
vices, or PCS. The new PCS networks will offer 
conventional cellular service, plus advanced data 
features, through a single handheld phone. 

. One of the largest bidders, Pocket Commu- 
nications, filed for bankruptcy protection on Tues- 
day, and analysts said others looked unlikely to 
meet the next payment Pocket had said the fi- 
nancial reorganization was necessary even though 
it lined up more than $646 milli on in financing 
from suppliers such as Ericsson, Siemens 
Stromberg -Carlson and Northern Telecom Ltd. 


Signs of a German Recovery Hurt the Dollar 


OnpileJIn Our SuffFnm [tapasrhes 

NEW YORK — The dollar was lower in late 
trading Thursday after two German economic 
reports suggested that the Bundesbank would not 
cut interestrates soon. 

The dollar also was hurt by concern that U.S. 
stocks and bonds would extend their recent slides, 
prompting global investors to sell dollars. 

Germany's industrial production rose 1.9 per- 
cent in February, while manufacturing orders rose 
021 percent. The data led some analysts to believe 
that the Bundesbank would not need to cut rates to 
spureconomic growth. Lower rates hurt a currency 
by malting deposits and bonds denominated in it 


less attractive. "I dunk most people would agree 
that Bundesbank policy is on hold for die fore- 
seeable future," Pierce Acheson of NationsBank 
said in Chicago. 

The market is now focused on U.S. unem- 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


ployment data for March, winch are due to be 
released Friday. The dollar was quoted at 1.6678 
Deutsche marks in late trading, down from 
1.6778 DM the day before, and at 122.585 yen, 
compared with 123.370 yen. It also dropped to 
1.4330 Swiss francs from 1.4450 francs and to 


5.6160 French francs from 5.6480 francs. The 
pound rose to $1.6460 from $1.6430. 

Meanwhile, the governor of the Bank of Eng- 
land, Eddie George, warned against any "pre- 
mature monetary union” among countries not 
meeting the economic criteria set out in the 
Maastricht treaty , saying such a move "would put 
European prosperity at unnecessary risk.” At a 
bankers' meeting in Amsterdam, he said that if 
members of a fixture monetary union were not 
"genuinely and sustainably convergent” in eco- 
nomic terms, a union would needlessly endanger 
European prosperity. 

(Bloomberg, Market News. AFP) 


Stocks Fall 
On Outlook 
For Rates 
And Profits 

Blcunhcrf; Sens 

NEW YORK — Stocks fell 
Thursday amid concern that more 
central-bank rate increases were in 
store, which could dent corporate 

‘There's been a psychological i 
shift.” said James Weiss of State 
Street Research & Management. 
“Many managers figure they’d bet- 
ter book profits before the market 
goes down another 1,400 points.’ 

The Dow Jones Industrial Av- 
erage fell 70.62 points to 6.446.39 in 


3 RM. SNAPSHOT 

late trading after closing 94.04 
points lower Wednesday. 

Meanwhile the Nasdaq compos- 
ite index gained 5.15 points to 
1,206.15, as most technology 
shares in the index gained. Mi- 
crosoft rose 2 to 94, and Intel 
climbed l’/fe to 138V6. 

Stocks have been sliding since 
the Fed raised interest rates March 
25 for the first time since February , 
1995 in a strike against inflation. 

The market is awaiting the March 
unemployment Figures, which are 
to be released Friday. An unex- 
pectedly strong reading would 
make it more likely that the Fed 
would bump interest rates higher at 
a policy meeting next month. 

One indication of the status of the 
job market came when the Labor 
Department said the number of 
American workers filing first-time 
jobless claims rose by a smaller- 
than-expected 1 .000 to a seasonally 
adjusted 3 14,000 last week. 

U.S. bonds were unchanged as 
investors awaited Friday's jobs re- 
port. The price of the 30-year Treas- 5 
ury bond was unchanged at 94 15/ 
32 for a yield of 7 percent 

International Business Machines 
fell 3% to 130% on reports that 
analysts were cutting the com- 
pany’s profit estimates. IBM is 
scheduled to release first-quarter 
results April 23. Analysts are con- 
cerned that other companies' earn- 
ings will fall short as well. 

"I think earnings are going to 
grow half as much as last year.” 
Richard Eakle, an investment ad- 
viser, said. 

Apple Computer rose % to 18% 
after The New York Times repotted 
that the computer maker was seek- 
ing a friendly merger partner. 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursday’s 3 PJML 

The lop 300 most odtve stores. 
The Associated Press. 


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X0639 


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Tronsp. 549J8 54099 S4S31 54014 

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Finance 8434 84JU 8*30 84.92 

SP500 759.45 7<759 750.11 74454 

SP100 738.83 727315 729.49 724.93 


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224* 23 

M* Bfe 
Z7V9 271* 
18W 1BA 
3119 12*9 

BTO 

£* 


4 

*149 

♦U 

*<* 


*V* 

*9 

+249 

♦l 1 * 

+1IV9 

-I*. 

+19 

+19 

+V» 

-It* 

+49 

+249 


619 6V* -M 
.2 2 -V* 
+*» 4Vl 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 


Advance 
□earned 
unowned 
Tew iuu« 
Near High, 
New Lews 


AMEX 

Advanced 
Decline] 
Uncaanqec 
Tent bates 
iimHiatn 
New Lows 


807 

1481 

343 

113) 

14 

68 


155 

775 

169 

559 

4 

13 


Nasdaq 

Pnnc. 

Mo Advanced 

i«s D erated . 

Hi undmnged 

-Tt?5 Tend Issues 

23 New Highs 

94 New Lews 


Market Soles 


175 
348 
{?* Amex 
71 J Nasdaq 

2j tn mtffl 


NYSE 
Amex 
Icsdaq 
lamSBom. 


1*2 1438 

1994 2573 

7278 1746 

5754 5757 

26 27 

352 284 


402.90 566.44 

1473 26.98 

430 JB 583.25 


High Uw Latest Chfle Qphit 


Grains 

CORN toon 

SJW) bu n*i9num- cents per Hanoi 
May 97 3084* 302** 302 -619 139445 

JU1 97 310 30419 30219 -7Y< 111883 

Sw 97 29444 291W 20919 — 5Vt 19,102 

Dec 77 272 MB 287 -449 91390 

Morn 294 29219 28949 -644 9,201 

EsLstees NA Wed's, stees 74X71 
WetfsnwiM 306,126 up 4134 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CB0T) 

1 DO lm- dolors par ton 

Mov 77 597 J10 29080 29UOO -3.70 46*679 

AM 97 29X80 288.50 289110 -330 31,133 

AUB97 28140 27850 27320 -380 8.959 

Sot 77 26000.25730 259 JO +030 &.162 
0077 33DM 22170 229 JB -JL20 5M1 

Dec 77 22270 22380 22100 +030 11436 

Esr. safes NA WWTS, safes 23639 
Wed’s open Off 111.906 up 2627 

SOYBEAN OIL (C2HJT) 

43000 Ito- cmn par la 

May 97 2432 2X96 2430 -310 36.968 

All 97 2637 2436 2142 -310 32*28 

APB 77 2430 2435 2158 -311 7JPD 

Sep 97 2182 2165 2173 -309 1570 

0097 2190 2168 2170 -320 I860 

Dec 97 2S.H 2190 24JB -022 13312 

Est. safes NA Wed'S, sates 19,344 - 
WecrsacenM 99365 up 2799 


9342 


EsL sales HA. Wed's, sate 75J» 

Wed’s open irt 196381 up 2897 

mCAT(CBOT) 

UHKenMmm-OMiOWtwM 
Mo> 77 389 362Yr 374 —MW 26338 

JU97 3864* 379W 371 -15 46356 

5ep 77 M 3829* 377 -12U 7349 

Dec 77 398 39ZV* 384 — 12W 7,105 

Esl sales na Wed's, soles 25331 
WiHriOPaiM 17.940 up 4439 


IM 

3PM 


SOYBEANS ICBOT) 

SJJ00 Du nUntrum- emit* par OuM 

lira 


-u 

May 97 BS3n 

849 

872 

—lift 

H 


■'.iii 

All 97 892* 

8/i 

878 

— 9Vj 

SSj 

& 


AUB97 8671A 

ns 

BSB 

-7 

rv» 

i 

-Mi 

Sep 97 7fl 
Nov 97 70491 

m 

698 

76S 

Tony 

-av. 

+i« 


Dividends 

Company Per Amt Rec Pay Company 

IRREGULAR 

Blue Chip Value . 32 4-11 4-25 


Per Amt Rec Pay 


REGULAR 

BDak Strung Tim M J039 4-15 


STOCK 

Bk Santa Clara A _ 6% 0-2 9-16 

Valley NBBncp _ S'* 4-30 5-15 

INCREASED 

Echlin Inc O XB 4-14 4-1B 

GPU Inc O 30 4-25 5-28 

Valley Nil Bncp Q 375 4-30 5-15 

INITIAL 

Advance Find _ M 4-15 4-21 


Carolina I 
Coastal Fin 
FfeeprtMc CapGW 
LBylndsA, 
Menlar Inat Fd 
Oppenhelnir Mulll 
Dppenhelmr 
Peerless Mig 
Premier Bkshrs 
Templeton GA> 

WesttjqnKCDtp 

ZMHg Total Ret 
a-nanoal; b-app 


m 4-15 
q .ii 4-n 
_ 325 4-15 
Q JOB 6-10 
M J77 4-15 
M 374 4-11 
M AS* 4-11 
Q .125 5-16 
Q .14 4-15 
M .05 4-16 
0 J3T5 4-16 4-2S 
M J07 4-11 4-24 


4-30 

5-1 

4-25 

5-1 

7-1 

4-30 

4-25 

4- 25 

5- 30 
5-1 

4-30 


sBarWA DR; g-payafaie in Caaadlmi funds 
ai-BMntUK QHiwirtBrfys s^emMarewal 


Stuck Tobies Explained 

Sales figures are unofflcnL Yearly higlB rent tows reflect die previous 52 weeks plus Ihe ament 
wee*, burnoi the tatesflrofing day. Wherea spOtorstock dhridendamounfliiQloSS parent or mac 
has Seen paid the yeas higtvJaw range and cflvkfend are shown fcr me new tfoclcs only, u rfcss 
a llfenvt se noted, rales of dhridenrfa ree annuantsbursemerts bused an the toted dat tan ll u n. 
a - dtytofend also exrra (si. 6 - annual rata of dvidend plus stack dfvfdend. c~ Bqu (doling 
dluWenA. te - PE exceeds 09 jM - called, d - new yearly taw. dd - lass In the last 12 monflu. 
e - dividend declared or paid in preceding 12 months, f - annual rata Increased on lasf 
dedanillon. g - dhrtderej in Canadian funds, sublect to 1 5% non-residence tax. I -Addend 
declared after split-up or sue*, dividend. I- dividend paid ihls year, omitted, de ta il w i or no 
action taken at latest dividend meeting, k - dividend declared or paid this year, an 
accumulative issue with tflvldends in arrears, a - annual iota, reduced on lost dedamtfan. 
a - new Issue in the past 52 weeks. The high-low range begins with the start of trading, 
nd- next day deiivenr-P- initial (Dvtdend annual tote unknown, P/E - prtce-eamlngs ratta. 
a - closed -end mutual fond, r -dividend declared arpaid In precedlng12iiMnths, plus stack 
dividend, s - slock split. Dividend begins wtth dale at spBf. sis - sales. 1 - dWdend paid in 
slock in preceding 12 months, estimated cash value on a-dividend or a-dteMbuHan date, 
u - new yearly high. *- trading hat led. vl - in bankrvptcyer receivership or being nmganbad 
undtrr the Bankruptcy AcL or securities assumed by such companies, wd-when distributed, 
wt - when issued/ ww - with tvarrants. i - ex-dtafdend or ex-rights, jafls - e* -distribution, 
xw-wittwut warrants, y, ex-tSvidend ana sales In futLyM -yield, r- sales in fuft. 


For IIWESTMENT UV FOR MAHON 
Road THE MOSSY REPORT even Satinday in the IHT. 



Livestock 



CATTLE (CMER) 




40A00 fas.- cento pjt a. 




Ad 97 6850 

67.95 

«Q7 

+0S 

22375 

Am 97 £190 

6*15 

6437 

+028 

JL304 

Aufl97 6**5 

6*00 

6*15 

+002 

72,936 

Od 97 sun 

67 63 

UM 

+0)7 

1*93/ 

D«C97 49.92 

49J7 

6975 

+0)5 

fja 

Feb 98 7080 

7060 

im 

+002 

*311 

E9. sales NA 

wetfs. sales 

1X982 


wed's open kit 

106r804 

0(1 228 


PBEDEH CATTLE (CMER) 



S0JU to!., cento pur to. 




7W97 7X30 

6975 

7020 

+0*7 

11,17 

May 97 7025 

69-60 

70.10 

+035 

U» 

Aub97 7X45 

7290 

7227 

+030 

LUff 

Sea 97 7087 

7X55 

7160 

+037 

1+593! 

00 97 7*2 

7190 

7*17 

+022 

5«n 

Now 97 7175 

TIM 

KJ0 

+025 

UK4 

EsLstees NA 


3,926 


Wed's open ml 

20.169 

OR 1177 


HOGS-Lean (CMBO 




4*floo Bbl- cents pot to. 




ABT97 7X97 

7105 

7297 

+XOT 

5A59 

Am 97 82J2 

BUS 

R237 

+2J00 

l*4M 

JU97 8X32 

81 JO 

8X12 

+1J0 

1206 

AU097 7975 

1X30 

7970 

+1J9S 

X488 

0097 7182 

7230 

7160 

+ 1J7 

2J58 

Dec 97 7180 

7050 

7130 

+1 JO 

1*4 

Est. stees NA 


X62S 


Wed's open W 

30606 

off 391 


PORK BELLIES ECMBU 



403)00 in. - ators cot to. 





7933 

80.17 

+1.87 

3J31 

AM97 8020 

78.75 

».» 

+132 

*106 

Aug 97 77 JO 

7625 

7*82 

•US 

St, 

Feh9B 7X98 

7X80 

7112 

+1.10 

101 

Mar 98 


7160 

♦aia 

8 

May 98 


75.00 


2 


Est. safes NA Wed’s, safes 2A38 
Wed’s apenM A472 on W 


Food 


COCOA (NC5E) 


May 97 

me 

1688 

1492 

-a 

HOB 

A4V7 

1513 

1522 

1534 

-13 

2*821 

Sen 97 

1555 

1545 

150 

— 13 

11,830 

Dec 97 

1.577 

1564 

1566 

-a 

9A5I 

MOT 98 

1589 

1589 

1587 

—13 

1*769 


Est. sates NA. Wed’s, sotes VbOi 
Wed’s open Ini 1DU61 up 911 

C0FFEECINCSE1 
3/psea tis- owfei per to. 

May 97 19030 177.00 177.00 -M.15 16J97 

M97 17X08 UlSB 16100 —1X25 f,W 

Sec 77 157 JO ISUC 16539 SJB &S3 

Dec 97 148.08 14155 141 AS -AM 3374 

Est. safes NA WetfS-MteS I4.H9 
Wed’s acenM 36314 qtt 493 

SUOAR-HORLD H (NCSEJ 
i lima to*.- eents per ta. 


no* 

10M 

11 JM 

+004 

6*495 

1078 

1072 

ion 

+005 

37J09 

MtO 

1036 

1X59 


20419 

1060 

1055 

1057 

♦ooi 

I5T5J 


Wat Low Latest owe OpM 

O62AN0E JUICE (NC1W 
iMdObs-oMtnrh 

May 97 7930 7890 77JJ0 -IB 12381 

JUI97 8128 7930 7925 -W5 7J74 

Sep 97 8X85 8125 8X00 -ftlB 4368 

Nov97 8680 8438 8420 +820 1200 

Esr.sdes na Wed's.ndes UOO 
Wed's open inf 1 off 27264 


Metals 


troyo* 

34738 36730 -128 

3504D 

35038 35033 -1J0 
35330 35220 -430 
35520 —120 
35820 mat —230 
35230 36030 -030 
Wife 

Wed's, sales 22,920 
151,920 oil 1» 


—435 
— 335 
— 3J5 
— Z3S 
— 235 
— 230 

—430 

MM 


1JH7 

2 

67364 

13301 

5321 

T1251 

5316 

1058 


3321 

3X596 

1387 

9.745 

740 

3398 

640 

757 

6361 


GOLD (HCMXI 
too (royal.- .. 

Apr 77 349.90 
May 97 
Jun97 35230 
AW97 35X00 
Oct 97 

Dec 97 36039 
Feb 98 36X10 
Aar 98 

Esl ides NA 
wed's op«i On 

H GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 

25300 Kb.- cants per to. _ 

Apr 97 11100 1083D 10BJD 

MOV 97 11130 10730 106.70 

JW197 73920 10630 10730 

Al 97 THUD 10530 70470 
Auo97 10450 

Sep 97 HJ5J0 18151 10X59 
Oct 97 1022S 

Nov 97 10(30 

Dec 97 10X30 10230 10025 
Est. sotes NA Wad's, safes 
Wed's open hf 53313 off 42 

SLVBtflVCMX} 

5300 (roy at- cents per troy az. 

Apr 97 48*80 4 

MOV 97 48930 47U8 46K57 -1730 56257 

Jun77 ffUO l 

AM 97 49150 4B0J0 47430 -1730 20,151 

Sep 97 49839 48630 d79 M -1830 X476 

Dec 97 50540 49X00 482J>ia -2230 5266 

Jan 98 SDUB -jaj m 

Mar 98 50830 50830 497 30 -1SJM X366 

Ed. sates NA west’s, sates 2X917 
West's ocerim 94214 up 290 

PLATMUM (NMBU 
SOtroyPt-dotonBcrlroyot ' 

Apr 97 36830 36X50 S5340 — 435 331 

Muy97 mss 

AM 97 37230 36A30 36830 -320 12374 

0097 37X50 37130 369 J8 -4J8 1186 

Jan 98 37730 J7XS0 37530 -090 U46 

Est soles NA WStfs. sales 2214 
Wed's open irt 16322 off 8M 

Close Previous 

LONDON METALS (LME3 
D cBora pw metric tan 

AkulMmi gl^Grade)^ 1JJM 1596W 

Forward 1611JJ0 1611C8 163000 163130 

f^ C ^^lt1So30 239230 
Forward 235730 235830 235530 235630 


68130 6S230 
67630 67730 


69830 69930 
68830 69030 


75*530 755530 
766030 766530 


gUd 

Nktel 

5paf 754030 754530 
F&ward 765030 765530 
Tin 

583030 5B3530 583530 584530 
585530 586030 586030 5865. 0 0 


128130 126230 
130X00 130430 


High Low Close Chge OpM 


Financial 
UST.HLL5 (CMSU 

Am 97 9S e, 9*» 3 ' 9*63 +033 6389 

Sep 97 9*31 9*29 9*39 +031 2372 

Dec 97 9448 M7 

EM. sates NA We<f*.safes 457 
wetrsaptnM 9301 up 246 

5 YR. TREASURY ICBOT) 

S 1 BMBD re in- an fe Stated IBOBO 
AP197 M4-34 104-26 104-35 + 35 221,170 

Sep 97 104-16 104-16 W-16 1 02 3 

Dec 97 10401 S 

Esl. sates NA WetTs-sMes CMV 
Wed’S OPfeiM 221,173 up 69 

H YR. TOEASURir ICBOT) 

srewtoa prfci- Bt% 8. SMB oft 00 pet 

Apt 97 105-27 105-21 105-28 +04 319325 

S«> 97 705-11 185-07 105-13 +04 15287 

Dec 97 104-29 50 

Est sates NA wad’s, sales 77314 

mrswiW 334363 UP 1363 

US TREASURY BONDS (CSOT) 
n ect-siaiJMt-orvS. Stadsat IQS pen 
Am 97 107-73 107-12 107-23 + 05 426,958 

Sep 97 107-05 106-30 107-00 ♦ 01 3X471 

Dec 97 106-24 106-22 106-28 + 05 5202 

Mar9B - 106-13 1250 

Esx sales NA waifsiates 257368 
wed's Open W 467248 Off 5606 
LONG GILT 


Mglt Low Latest Otga open 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 

FFsnum- pfc ofioo pci 

Jim 97 12736 12736 127.18—0221642*7 
Sap 9712534 12168 12526 -022 <552 
Dec 97 9524 9524 9528—022 e 
EsLwMnvl77J)03. Open bit: 169299 op 
609. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (LI FFE) 
7TL2B0 nKaa -ptsrfTOO pcf 
Jan97 12*64 13X98 12*62 +020 10*1 M 
S<p77 12*35 134 AS 13*47 +0.18 1138 

Esl stew 5X280 Prav.steex 4X908 
Pn.apaM.- 107352 off 7236 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

Si makm-ptsaeiOOpeL 
Apr 97 9*20 9*W 9*19 39272 

Mar 97 9*12 9*18 9*12 +031 21289 

Jon 97 9*06 9*33 9*05 +031 507323 

Sep 97 9173 9X70 9X73 +032 37X853 

Dec 97 9X45 9141 93A5 +032 270323 

Mar 91 93133 RUB 9133 +033201633 

Am 98 9322 9X18 9X21 +03217X309 

SOP 18 93.14 9XHI 9113 +1132 131,166 

Dec 98 9334 9X00 9334 +832 111,499 

Afar 99 9X04 9239 9334 +0.03 87340 

Am 99 9330 9237 9X00 +032 75,989 

Sw>99 9297 9294 9236 +031 68398 

EsLstees NA wed’s. sales 316317 
Wnfs open felt 2388356 UP 255 

BRrtEH POUIO (CMER) 

6XS00 PPUIMB, S per pauid 
Am 77 13450 13364 13444 36,153 

Stp97 13401 13150 13404 822 

Dec 97 13366 93 

Est. safes na Wed's. kMk 1954 
WetfsopenW 37368 up 227 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMBQ 
1003* dtetarb S Per Cdn. ter 
Am 97 3262 J2K 3222 7XS26 

5*97 3282 3153 3361 4J93 

Dec 77 3303 3287 3294 1.151 

Mar 99 3326 332* 3324 716 

EsLstees NA Wed v stem 9,192 
Wed's open W 77389 off 1990 

GERMAN MARK (CMBQ 
11X0* marks, s par mark 
Am 97 3036 J981 3028 61,568 

S«P 97 3069 3059 3064 2J2B 

Dec 97 3117 3117 3117 202 

Mir 90 3120 . 27 

EsLstees NA wed’s. stees 713*6 

Wed's open fed 6*225 off 1470 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

I U mBtan yen, t per MB yen 
Am 97 A2SD 3199 3342 68*7 

Sep 97 3357 334) 33S5 1314 

Dec 77 3426 391 

EsLstees NA WetTs-ttees MM* 

WtHTsepenint 69302 up 1232 

SWBS FRANC KMER) 

TfeSJOO tom. S IvOrnc 
Am 97 3063 ^66 3043 4X291 

Sep 97 3125 3092 3109 XH4 

Dec 77 3192 3192 3192 426 

EsLstees NA Wed's. stees H . W7 
Wed's open irt 4X951 off 3» 

XMONTH STERUNG OJFFE) 

£500000 - iM* or ioo ipa 

SlS SS-ffl'n* 

9X02 9X98 9ZS0 -04) tuu 

9234 9235 — 003 ffl.lM 

9X40 7X55 9X56 — 003 46,930 

9X44 9X41 9X4* — 0lD3 3XS3S 

9X35 92AX 9X32 — t ?m 2*542 

9X25 9253 9X24 -oS 

na n.17 9x» -003 ussi 

9X14 9X12 9X12 — OJQ £134 

raa nor 9x« -am Sow 

«34 nm 9XD4 Until. £433 

9200 n«8 9100 —001 

^Steee: M«EL ^ Pra*. sales 3*204 
Prev.epmlnL 44X714 up X365 


Jun97 

Sep97 

P«S7 


Am98 

DOC98 

tham 

Jua9f 

Sep99 

6599, 

NUn* 


3 as »:ss 

Occ97 9*49 9*S SS +OOZ 

Mortt 9621 mS 9600 iam 

Aran 9609 9605 9609 +007 

Sep98 9SM 9502 9506 +U 

NOB 9£59 93JH S3 +0O1 

4faP99 9532 9508 9sS UaQL 

Arn9? 9504 9501 9SJO -BM 

SflpM 9*76 MOB 9*74 —002 

DOTS’? MSS M46 SUT-W 

Mono 9*27 9*22 9*24 —003 

Am* NT. N.T. 9*03 —004 

SVM NT. NT SS -004 

DecOO NT. NT. nS —004 

MaiOl NT. nt! nM -004 

Est safes l6L5W. ff ^w. soles; 10X751 


10580 

1299 

22SMI 

18*063 

197J23 

J50500 

130.708 

100446 

SJg 

3*797 


i.ta 

7 


Pray, open feu L227J 


up 7033 


JlitlW 


^^enooate 

iom ioms iS-n 


17X442 


Estsatei NA Wed’xste* l*8C 
WcftOpenM 147T24 UP 1873 


SCB97 NT. NT. 106-03 — 04H 
E&sato*: 3*961 PfW.iafeE 4U02 
PR* open Inti 17X460 off ion 

human GovmNMCinr bund (uive) 

DM250O* - Mset I* pa 
iutm »3s 99 JM P9J4 — tttt25RM 

5*97 Tist 9*20 9*29 — *21 2044 

EsLstees 1 75347- Pre*. stdes 73*294 
Pm. open felt 260316 op 5JQS 


WjONTNPwoRijiumig 

FTSmOBon-ptsofloooa 

Jwn 97 960 9660 96-62 +nm> «5tu 

Sep 97 K33 9630 9652 +000 Sm 

Dec 97 9X39 9636 9X37 — 001 3*M 

Mar 98 9633 «3o 9632 +mo zijsS, 

Am 98 9606 9602 9604 +000 fern 

as is M 

nSS WM Sy? S' 01 '2377 

W tUo 95-32 9SJ14 0_fn 1 1 
JOB 99 9S.I0 |Sm- 0O1 '*2? 

Sep w 9*36 902 SS-0O4 

pec 99 902 9438 9*58 — (UM eS 
Mar 00 9*40 9*40 Em +SSS 

valam« 41,908. Open Inti 240X0 up 

MMNTKEUI 
IT*1 miSoB-a 

Am?T W.7T 9X74 9X91 *a.l*ii->nt 

S5 SI SS gj! :! §« 

Marti «21 93« S3 Mg 


vagb Lew Latest Chge Optot 

JunM 9X75 9199 9X15 + 0.13 1X678 

5*98 9105 9292 9X05 + ail 2771 

DK» 9X91 9X89 9X96 +0.11 3B3 

Ma99 9X87 9X79 9X92 +X12 409 

EsLmlnS&520. Prav.eateE 3*752 
Prev. open (r*: 2S7J32 Off 538 


Industrials 

COTTON I (NCTN) 
stum to*- cents pot to. _ 

May 97 7X50 7*95 7X55 +047 33,516 

AM97 74JDS 7157 74.10 +0JB 17,954 / 

OdT? 7525 75JDB 7549 +045 1,98* 

Doc 97 75.90 7167 74J30 +333 21436 

Mor 98 76.90 7175 76J9Q +005 2J15 

Mov 98 7730 566 

EsLstees NA Wsd’s.sofes lOkOOO 
Wed's open int 1 off 78132 

HBA1WCOL WMBO 
4X0* aaL cbih per oat 
May 97 53S7 5255 G49 +UB 

Am 97 5340 5X60 5130 + 077 

Jul77 SAB 53J0 5X55 +0J2 

Aug97 5*45 5340 4*25 +037 

Sep 97 5525 51S 5*95 +047 

Od97 5100 5540 5530 + 037 

NOV 97 5635 5625 5170 +077 

Dec97 5740 SL90 5730 +072 

Jtm 98 V30 5745 5778 +072 

Fed 90 5730 5730 S7.S +072 

EsLstees NA WKTLStees 33392 
Wed's open irt 125351 up 4836 


*8334 

21352 

77352 

9431 

1370 

7,131 

SJ77 

103*7 

5314 

2409 


LIGHT SWS=T CRUDE (NMER) 
1400 bbL+dbOrei pot bbL 


May 97 

1973 

19 JB 

1933 

+116 

81234 

Jurt 97 

1930 

W38 

•971 

+0.17 


Aj397 

1935 

1937 

1975 

+0L16 

3X586 

Aug 97 

1936 

1932 

1971 

+0.16 

23383 

Sep 97 

1933 

1935 

1930 

+015 

1*968 

Od97 

1936 

1970 

1933 

+X15 

U.U9 

Nov 97 

19.90 

1930 

1933 

+0.11 

12393 

Dec 97 

1933 

1975 

1937 

+0.15 

27322 

Jon 98 

19.9(1 

1979 

IV3B 

+0.15 

1*179 

FtetR 

1970 

1V32 

1937 

+X13 

7704 

Est. sales NA 

wed’s, stees 

13X734 


W«fs open irt 

39X052 

off 916 


NATURAL GAS (NMBQ 



lOrtOO (Twn Mu’S, S POT nvn bta 



May 97 

1 BM 

1355 

U85 


31755 

Jur97 

1350 

1.919 

1340 


1*218 

Jut 97 

1365 

1340 

13611 


13777 

Aug 97 

1385 

1360 

1385 


9317 

Sep 97 

xooo 

1375 

1.995 


1X061 

Oct 97 

XffH 

1015 

urn 


1X642 

Nov 97 

1170 

1159 

11/0 


5,970 

Dec 97 

1310 

X295 

73HI 


9,918 

Jon 90 

1350 

2340 

73» 


10351 

Feb 9* 

1380 

X278 

2.29i 


*431 

Mar 98 

1160 

1151 

Xi rt 


*361 


SL stees na Wtefs. stees 
Wed’s open mi 11L331 up 

M&EAOED GAS0UME OMMBQ 
42400 oat, eerts per ste 
May 97 6130 60.15 6130 +839 45.946 

Am 97 sasB 6030 -6IL« +834 2*3» 

AM 97 6041 SIM 6035 +034. HL749 

Auo97 5940 930 5940 +834 5J73 

Sep 97 5830 5735 5835 +079 2409 

Od 97 sub 5615 5140. +034 1425 

EsLstees NA Wild's. stees 29,190 
WWs open fed 9X320 up 4632 
GASOIL OPE) 

U A doom per metric ton - Ms of 100 Inti 
fW97 16X75 16X00 16X00 -330 19,904 
May97 16530 16X75 16X75 — X75 1X716 
JwtW 16730 16X50 16iK — X25 11,135 
AM 97 169.00 16730 16775 -330 A6W 
A»w97 17030 169^5 1«975 —175 X501 
SepW 17230 17X50 1717S -250 1329 
Od97 17*75 17A®1J 17X50 -125 1400 
Nmr97 17630 17530 17475 -125 852/- 

D« 97 17775 17630 17S75 -375 6,948* 
Jan 98 17&30 17730 17630 —aOO 1318“ 
Est. stees: 17,900. Opel !nL4*676 off 505 
BRENT OIL OPE) 

UA.doflore per barret -lots of 1300 botreis 
May 97 1X40 1837 18.18 -073 48713 

JWM»97 1X62 1875 1843 -075 4&4T5 

AMy97 1X73 1848 1X60 —073 1X513 

Aug97 7831 1X58 1872—078 8458 

SjgW 1839 1X67 1830-074 7317 

0097 1X88 1X74 1838 -0.19 6,146 

Nw97 1X90 1X80 1X90 -0.19 4393 

Dec97 1X90 1830 1X90 -07D . 7,111 

? ^EsUntec 4X125. Opel Inf- 7 5*937 up 


Stock hdwes 

SBJPOOMP. DOIEX (CMBQ 

SDOkMik 

Am 97 75630 74830 75*47 ' +110 17*230 
aeiw 7cun zsajo 76X79. +34* 4 sa 
Dec 97 77*00 76X00 76975 +235 3406 
Mot 98 . 77*33 86 

HLitees NA Wed's. eteM 9(311 
Wed'sopenM IB14Z2 UP 492 

- - - 

Jew 4 ^£o 42304) ■ 42373 — 1*0 61484 

Sep97 <265.0 asm an 3 —174 X49s 

EteLstew 73114. Pra+.mfes 1*87* 

Prw-QpentoL 6*379 . .up 2S1 . 
CMOptMATIF) 

FF *&£ 






. 251*3—71302*505 

. 97 251 <5 24893 2507 J— 7230 X714 
Am 97 34943 24634 M2' 4 “ 1 !'§S 1 2'2S 
S» 97 25003 24893 249231-1130 X372 
Dec 97 N.T. • N.T. 251X0- 11 JO 0 
Mar 98 25303 25304 2503- IT JO Z6M 
Sep 98 N.T. . NT. 251*3-1130 1^10 
Est vteuow:2fi,92Xflpen tab 6X394 up 

r63m 











oiL:..: ■ ■■ ■ • : 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FREDAS’, APRIL 4. 1997 


PAGE 15 


all 

: 


EUROPE 


2 French Utilities f ‘ 

See Strong ’97 Profit Yankee Pinstripes , Adidas Style 

® Deal With Baseball Club Signals Firm’s Global Ambitious 


— Generate des Eaux SA 

STv I ^ y,tretUn ? <l “proftin 

he:' des Eaux posted a 

49 percent increase in earnings for 
■ the year, and both French utilities 

- 5*?^ stron S profit for this year 
• amia an expansion into telecom- 
munications. 

4| 9?^ <*es Eaux said it bad 

.# !■» billion francs 

" tp 45 * 3 mdhon) on lower one-time 

charges and increased earnings from 

^r distnburion. It had a loss of 
3.09 billion francs in 1995. 

Its rival Lyonnaise des Eaux. 

earnings rose to 
. 1 °“J 10n francs, reflecting strung 
growth m water and waste-manage- 
ment activities and lower reaUestaie 


Russia Gets 
IMF Vote 

Catynkd H (MSugFtrth Dvparhn 

MOSCOW — Declaring that 
Russia’s leaders were “totally 
committed to the reform and 
stabilization effort,” Michel 
Camdessus, managing director 
of the International Monetary 
Fund, said Thursday he would 
recommend that the fund’s di- 
rectors free delayed payments 
from a $10.1 billion loan. 

“Russia is taking the nec- 
essary monetary and structural 
measures to get into a situation 
where growth is strong and 
where enterprises enjoy a 
framework for their activities 
favorable to the development of 
private business,” Mr. Cam- 
dessus said. 

An IMF team will come to 
Moscow this month to “final- 
ize" the details, Mr. Camdes- 
sus said. “After that 1. will 
transmit to the executive board 
a recommendation to be adopt- 
ed for consideration as soon as 
possible.” 

Mr. Camdessus is in Mos- 
cow in part to resolve an im- 
passe that has led the IMF to 
withhold the $340 million Janu- 
ary installment of die three-year 
loan. (AFP. Bloomberg) 


losses. Gcnerale des Eaux said its 
earnings would more than double 
this year, to about 5 b illio n francs, as 
it became one of France’s biggest 

media companies. 

“In 1997, we wifi fully benefit 
from efforts to reduce our debt and 
refocus our main activities,” the 
fbainnan, Jean-Marie Messier, said 
* We will be an the offensive.” 

Lyonnaise des Eaux’s shares rose 
4 francs, to close at 542. Generals 
des Eaux’s shares dosed at 734, 
unchanged 

Generate des Eaux operates . 
France's second-biggest mobile 
phone service, after France Tele- 
own, and controls Canal Plus SA, 
Europe's biggest pay-television op^ 
erator. as the main shareholder in the 
media company Havas SA. 

Lyonnaise is merging with the 
holding company Compagnie de 
. Suez SA in an operation that analysts 
say should help Lyonnaise fund its 
expaision into telecommunications 
and gain more water contracts in 
competition with Generate des Eaux. 
Lyonnaise des Eaux’s vice presi- 
dent, Guy de Panafieu, confirmed 
that the company was looking for a 
“partner in me telecommunications 
industry” to develop interactive ser- 
vices on its cable networks. He 
spoke of a possibility of “selective 
ventures” with Bouygues SA. 

( Bloomberg , AFP, Reuters ) 


Bloomberg News 

FRANKFURT — The newest 
addition to the New York Yankees 
isn’t on the team's roster. But 
when the Yankees takethe field for 
their first home game next Friday, 
it will be hard to miss. 

The name of Adidas AG, the 
German-based sporting-goods 
company, and its trademark triple 
stripes will appear on the Yankees' 
uniforms, on their shoes and on 
Yankee Stadium billboards as part 
of a 10-year sponsorship contract 
valued at an estimated $95 million. 
Adidas signed the contract with 
the Yankees — die defending 
World Series champions — last 
month to help raise the company's 
profile in the United States, which 
accounts for about half of the 
world’s sporting-goods market 
with annual sales of $42 billion. 

Adidas, best known outside the 
United States for its soccer shoes 
and clodiing, said the contract did 
not signal an intent to expand into 
baseball. Analysts, however, said h 
showed die company's determina- 
tion to raise its global brand profile 
and its willingness to play hardball 
with the market leader, Nike Inc. 

“Nike is really pushing and set- 
ting the trends, and you have to be 
as aggressive as they are,” said 
Suzanne Seibel, an analyst with 
Merrill Lynch & Co. “visibility 


has a direct impact on earnings in 
this industry, and Adidas' has 
chosen the right team to give them 
the exposure they need.” 

The company’s prospects for 
sales and earnings growth have 
already grabbed investors’ atten- 
tion. Adidas's net profit rose 28 

Adidas appears ready 
to play hardball with 
its rival Nike Inc. 


percent, to 314 million Deutsche 
marks (S187.7 million), in 1996. as 
sates surged 34.5 percent to 4.7 
billion DM. Double-digit sales and 
earnings growth is forecast for 
1997. Adidas's shares, meanwhile, 
have more than doubled in value 
from their initial public offering 
price of 68 DM in November 1 995. 
On Thursday, they closed at 179.80 
DM, down 3.20. as Frankfurt shares 
in general continued to tumble. 

The outlook for Adidas, based 
in Herzogenaurach, Germany, 
hasn't always been so rosy. The 
company grew out of one founded 
in the early 1920s by the brothers 
Adolph and Rudolf Dossier. After 
a family dispute in 1948. Rudolf 
founded Puma AG. Adolph cre- 
ated Adidas, and the two became 


rivals. The companies dominated 
the sports scene until the 1980s. 
when Nike and Reebok Interna- 
tiona] Ltd. introduced successful 
lines of fashion sneakers aimed at 
younger customers. 

In response. Adidas expanded 
its product range but was forced to 
slash prices and enter the discount 
market after the strategy tailed. By 
the late 1980s, the company had 
reduced its work force, closed do- 
mestic factories and returned to its 
core sneaker and sportswear busi- 
ness. As recently as 1992. Adidas 
had a net loss of 152 million DM. 

The rum around, analysts say. 
began with the arrival in 1993 of 
Robert Louis-Dreyfus. a former ex- 
ecutive at the advertising concern 
Saatchi & Saaichi Co., who took 
over the company with a 15 percent 
stake. Under his direction as chief 
executive. Adidas bolstered its ad- 
vertising to try to regain market 
share it lost in the 1980s. The com- 
pany's annual marketing budget 
has almost doubled since Mr. Drey- 
fus rook the helm, climbing to J2.3 
percent of net sales in 1996 from 
bA percent in 1992. 

“Dreyfus was the person to rec- 
ognize rhai marketing, even more 
than technology or manufacturing, 
drives the sporting-goods mar- 
ket,” Elaine Redler, an analyst at 
Credit Lvonnais Securities, said. 


Lagordere Bid Torpedoes Filipacchi Shares 


Bloomberg News 

PARIS — Shares of Filipacchi 
Medias plunged 14.7 percent 
Thursday after an offer by Lagardere 
Groupe to take control of the media 
company valued its shares at a sharp 
discount, to their market price. 

Lagardere's offer valued Fihpac- 
etti’s shares at 1,200 francs 
C$212.46) each, and the stock fell 
230 to dose at 1330. Lagardere 
shares fell 5.60, to 17230. 

Lagardere said the offer, to which 
Filipacchi’s controlling sharehold- 
ers had already agreed, would be 
submitted to shareholders of both 
companies for approval as soon as 
possible. Lagardere plans to merge 
Filipacchi with its Hachette media 
activities, forming the world’s 
biggest magazine publisher, with 


sales of more than 1 billion francs a 
year and titles including Elle, Paris 
March and Car & Driver. 

Lagardere plans to take control of 
the company in a complicated trans- 
action in which it would take a stake 
in the holding company that controls 
Filipacchi Media. 

Filipacchi Media would then ab- 
sorb the holding company and take 
100 percent control of Hachette, of 
which if already own 34 percenr. At 
the end of these transactions, 
Lagardere would hold a 66 percent 
stake in the new company, to will be 
called Hachette Filipacchi Medias. 

Lagardere’s 65 percent jump in 
net profit in 1996, to 1.04 billion 
francs, as orders soared in its tele- 
communications and military divi- 
sion. is helping fuel the company's 


expansion. Lagardere. which an- 
nounced the earnings Wednesday, 
also said it expected the profit 
growth to continue in 1997. 

In addition to bolstering its pub- 
lishing activities, Lagardere recon- 
firmed its desire to rake control of 
Tbomson-CSF. the defense-elec- 
tronics maker that the government 
has put up for sate. 

“The Filipacchi agreement makes 
industrial sense,” Jean -Michel 
Main gain, a fund manager at CDC- 
Gestion. said. “It's logical for 
Lagardere to try to create two distinct 
poles for its activities, especially giv- 
en its bid for Thomson-CSF.” 

Philippe Camus. Lagardere's 
chief financial officer, said. “We 
have finally decided to legally re- 
group companies that have already 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

3502 

3400 

3MC- 


London 
F75E 100 index 

4650 

4500 

4253 WV- 

420G -f ~ — — 

4G5C-k/^- 

3900 n'dTTma 


Paris . 
CACAO 

2850 

2700 

2550 

2400 

2250 AP 


Exchange index ' 


Amsterdam 

Brussels 

Frankfurt 

Copenhagen 

Hetslnki 

Oslo 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Paris 

Stockholm 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Source: Teiekurs 


AEX 

BEL-20 

DAX 

Stock Marked 
HEX General 
OSX 

FTSE1Q0 
Stock Exchange 
MIBTBL 
CAC4Q 
SX 16 

ATX 

SP1 


fTTa D J F M A 

1997 1996 1997 

Thursday Ptev. ' % 
Close. . Close Change 

mil. 708.55 ' -0.91 

2£7&2s 2,io&98 -rig 

8^15^4 3.301.9V -2.62 

520.45 529.27 -1.67 

2,738.93 2,744.74 -pST 
57&31 57339 • -Q.Qt 

431460 4336.60 -QJB& 
461,67 464X13 -o!si 

11609“ 11646“ -0.32 

2314-62 2.53028 -O.S2 
2,608.31 g.78a4g *0.71 
1.16&89 1,176.56 -0J8S 
2,833 JZ 2J351.59 4XS2 

Imenuuonal Herald Tribune 


been working very closely togeth- 
er.” He declined to estimate the total 
value of the series of transactions. 

■ Bertelsmann Revenue Rises 

Bertelsmann AG. Europe's largest 
publishing and entertainment com- 
pany, said sales in the first half of its 
current financial year rose 4.9 per- 
cent. to 1 1.4 billion Deutsche marks 
($6.79 billion), and it expects net 
profit few the full year to be better than 
last year's 905 million DM, 
Bloomberg News reported from 
Guetersloh. Germany. 

Bertelsmann said it expected full- 
year sales to reach 22.5 billion DM, 
compared with 21.5 billion DM in 
the previous year. It said earnings 
also improved in the latest six 
months but provided no figures. 


Very briefly: 

• British shops, stores and supermarkets posted higher sales 
in nearly all areas of retailing in March, according to the 
Confederation of British Industry. 

■ incentive AB, a Swedish holding company, reached an 
agreement to sell TA Hydronics to the British building- 
materials maker IMI PLC for 1.2 billion kronor ($157.9 
million). 

• Benetton Group SpA. an Italian clothing company, said its 
1996 net profit rose a betrer-ihan-expected 11-5 percent, to 
245.7 billion lire (SI 47.8 million), as the company suc- 
cessfully bet on an increase in the value of the lira. 

• LM Ericsson AB of Sweden and NTT DoCoMo of Japan 
will develop in Japan the first so-called third-generation 
network for cordless, high-speed multimedia services. 

• Mediaset SpA, an Italian media company, said net profit in 
1996 fell 2 percent, to 445.3 billion lire, as a higher tax rate 
wiped out lower financing charges and improved earnings 

from operations. Bloomberg. AFP. Reuters 


ING’s 1996 Profit Jumped 25% 

Bloomberg News 

AMSTERDAM — ING Groep NV said Thursday its 1 996 
net profit rose 25 percent, to 3.32 billion guilders (SI. 77 
billion), on steady growth in both banking and insurance. 

The financial-services company's earnings also got a lift 
from a bullish bond and stock market throughout last year. 

ING said at the end of last year it had 2.55 billion guilders 
in hidden reserves, of which 1.25 billion guilders would be 
added to assets and the rest set aside for contingencies. 

This is the first year that Dutch banking and finance 
companies have had to disclose their hidden reserves. TNG's 
shares closed at 69.30 guilders, down 1. in Amsterdam. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Thursday* April 3 

Prices In tacol currencies. 
Tetokunr 

High Low Close ' PTML 

Amsterdam Ajxfcac7w.ii 


ABN-AMRO 

Aegon 

AMU 
AkzoNoM 
Boon Co. 
Bo&Wesscvn 
CSAACW 

.. Dorttsdie Pet 
* DSM 
i Elsevier 
FonfcAmev 
Getranks 
& Brecon 


rioMoveracva 

HwrfOooito 

JUG Group 

KLM 

KHPBT 

KPN 

NedhMGff 

Ntfrida 

OceGrtwtn 

PWHpSBec 

Potantnn 

Ramrod Hdg 

Rnheco 

Rodainco 

Roreroo 
Royal Dutch 
Unilever eva 
Ante Inti 
VNU 

wataretacnu 

Bangkok 

AdvlntoSuc 
: BflWkokflkF 

KnmoTlnjl Bk 
PTTBflplor 
• Bom cement F 

*. StamCom BfcF 
' Te l e ow H ute 
( Thnl Airways 

TAc/ftjnnMF 

Ind Comm 


13070 122J0 
171 JO 122-90 
125JD m 

261.10 36050 
82-30 . lO 
33*0 3150 
TOL20 lOUO 
346J0 ‘349.20 
17060 181 A0 

».» 29JX 
6150 60.10 
57 JO 58X0 
5010 59J0 
15SJ0 . IS* 
314 31150 

a jo 

145 14150 
69.30 7030 
U 54J0 
3030 3140 
67-50 68 

4170 46 

27470 282J0 
231 JO 23560 

82.10 82.70 
9440 9120 

154 159-50 

IS 

15130 15160 
107 JO 107 JO 
32120 30180 
33960 344 

86 8630 
3& 37.50 
21130 217-40 


89 JO 

W5 

8895 

9092 

3550 

3X40 

3X70 

3X90 

5820 

S7JO 

57X0 

59 JO 

345 

340 

340 

351 

153 150X0 150X0 154.90 

312 

307 

387 

317J0 

111 

107 

108 

113 

142J0 

140 141 JO 

144 

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492 

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492 

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TjQtrDoK 


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LOW 

dose 

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7J7 

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178J5 177X0 

ITS 

179 

wystans Haas 

119 

114 

3.14 

77 

76 

77 

7X75 

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4JB 

4.13 

4J4 





WPP Group 

ZJ9 

2J4 

247 


High Low Close Prey. 


Bombay 

BaMAuto 

Hlncua Lever 
Hindus Porim 
Ind Dev Bk 
ITC 

MalKuwoorTai 
Reliance Ind 
StataSklndto 
steel Authority 
Tnln Eng Loco 

Brussels 

Airatq 

BmcQind 

BBL 

CBR 

Cahuyt 

CMftataUnt 

Etedtokti 
Etodroftao 
Forts AG 
Gwnrii 
GBL 

E GMScrepr 

Kredtabm* 

v 

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RoymeMge 
teGmBetg 
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UC& 


Frankfurt 

AMSB 

Adidas J® 

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Altona ££ 

I'JT SS 

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tawssu m 


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4150 6475 41jg 
122 12X75 128 

(4450 667-50 68751 


Pried. Kropp 
Get* 


HodtflBf 7150 6950 6958 

KoedM 64 62J0 6160 

UM . ’ 529 525 526 

Ltlde 1105 1080 7IOS 

uHtann 22J0 nj« 2220 
MAN 450 44150 44150 

ttmtesmon 61850 - 60S 61050 
MeMfarirlHr |>dl 3650 3650 31B0 
Metre . 161 la 161 

MunchHuecfcR 3950 4000 

Prtusmg 436 - rfffl 435J5 


1190 

RWE 6158 

SAPpM 269 

. 229 JO 

sZSZSatAm -ISM 
StafiKtar H9 

Tbyoen 35150 

% 


1175 117S 
6? JO 67 JO 
266 26130 
15750 M140 
226JB 227 

1X30 8550 
1235 123S 

r? 819 
347 351 

>9.10 89.25 
498 «e 
738 741 

861 87150 


SET tadne 70101 
PitataKsniM 

234 no 2U 230 

280 272 27B 276 

38J5 34 3650 3730 

338 ® ® 

492 672 676 680 

168 160 164 1£ 

4550 44.75 45 44.75 

4750 45J5 46 4125 

g % 1M % 
Smm p sssss 

M930 948 96530 OS 

1014 995100125 999^ 

38650 381 J5 3W 38150 
9350 9030 9150 92J5 
380J5 37X50 37B50 
264 25175 261 256-25 

26950 26150 26750 ^5-® 
27175 271 J5 274 27350 

37050 36350 36630 366^ 

Mia iarao i^ 

5830 5740 5820 5830 

7550 7400 7410 7470 

3410 3260 3275 3405 

m % ’fig 

SS 3« ^ Mg 

^ ^ » 

1»S l^W 

1M75 12025 12160 12300 

S ] js w 

S S MOO gg 

j^o awn 20400 

?S»D 14600 I46W 

gOiOO 88400 68400 B99O0 


Helsinki 

EMOA 
HuMomtfdl 
KMriro 
K«to 
Mata A 
Metro B 
Metro- Serb fl 
Naste 
NddnA 
Orion- YUrnue 
OiriDKmnpu A 
UPMKynreene 
Vntoot 


Hong Kong 

CnllxiyPodta W50 
CMMLHW 

anertrat 37J> 
DooHenuBk 3458 
RutPadBc 9J0 

Hang Luno D« 14^ 
HanqSengBk 80 
KaMfEontoy 
HmdeaonLd 
HK China G 

HKTBteamm 1^ 
HutcMOTWh 5tre 

assxd. q 

ITvErDey 40^ 

TMerAll PlBM 103 

5.90 


HEX Gnanri tatac2738JJ 
Ptevioeo 274174 


41 

39 

40X0 

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237 

335 

236 

240 

51 JO 

50-50 

5050 

51 JO 

71 

69X0 

69 JO 

69 

16 

15X0 

1X50 

1XSO 

286 

280 

780 

284 

35 

1. JO 

35 

34X0 

128 

172 

125 

126 

290 

2/6 

387 28X50 

199 

192 

195 

199 

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86 

88 

89X0 

107X0 

104 10X90 

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8X80 

8X30 

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Copenhagen 

3GBanl ^ jo ® M 

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FISIndB is 645 660 

KobLufltwvne ^ wo 656 

NWMortbkB 650 799 J7 810 

SophusBerB ^ MO 337 

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> sasss> » m 30 g 


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smoLjndai. 
sm China Post 
StarePpcAB 


Jakarta 

Astro w* 

BkKtundoi 

BkNBgnra 

GudoogCwn 

Indocraert 

Woftotf - 

5gmpan»NM 

SaaeoGrtdk 

TeMmonaM) 


Hem Stag: 120S5.17 

PrHtaB: 1Z136J2 

7 J0 755 7JD 
2550 2SJ0 2170 
11J5 11-40 1155 
6X75 6150 6425 
21 21J5 21.10 
33 3140 3150 
37.10 3750 3750 
3250 32J0 3180 
BJ5 9.15 855 

1190 1420 14 

77 79 77.75 

7AS 730 7J5 

60 61 6U5 

1420 1425 1420 
-*75 26J0 2180 
185 lias 1X85 
190 193 198 

175 17550 17750 
5125 54 5525 

2250 2X70 2XB0 
1115 I ISO 1855 
17.40 IB 1730 
3950 4020 40.18 
X95 X95 3 

5J5 550 XW 

7475 77 77 J5 

4 90 S 5 

735 735 730 

130 650 190 

S9J5 60 6030 
2BJ0- 2X75 M35 
1545 1SL7S 1545 


N.T. M.T. «. 5925 

1750 1700 1700 175) 

13M 1275 1300 1150 

10350 10150 10225 10450 

3300 3300 3300 3325 

5050 5090 SOSO 5100 

6t50 6325 6325 4450 

10625 1B525 1«K 1«W 

5725 5675 5725 5750 

375 ; 3475 3S2S SJ00 


Kuala Lumpur n moetam uMl 

Prom; 1181 J7 

AMMBHdgs ' 19 JO 1150 19 1180 

Gtrnang 1170 1X80 ISJO 1170 

Mol Banking 28 2725 2725 28 

MoUnSShlpF 125 110 120 625 

PebonuGas 9.10 9 9.05 9J5 

Pratal 1X50 15 1X10 1530 

PuriOCBk 476 438 08 478 

towns 406 3J4 186 406 

RsuriS World 1040 10.10 10.10 1040 

tohflWtnPM 2X50 2X10 22JO 2X50 

SJnwDortv WS 120 820 9 

Telekom AW 192D 1820 1B.N 19.10 

Tsoffifo 11.90 I) JO 11 M !)-» 

UM Engineers 2140 21 21.10 2140 

-YTL . 1X50 1220 1230 1X40 

London . f t-sei oo: 42144a 

Pr e v l i wi. 411 6 40 

Abbey Hen 747 725 728 7^ 

AffledDonwcq 477 445 447 45) 

Angltan Wirier 6J9 130 132 136 

Arena 6J2 171 176 X75 

Astro Group ijs 1J5 1X6 ixs 

Assoc Brftods X40 530 5J0 540 

BAA SM 493 4.97 5 

BotkJyn 1020 10X1 10.15 10X9 

Boas • 822 105 113 112 

BAT bid 528 486 5.14 513 

BtroKSaritand 3.19 112 116 116 

BtueQldB 4X9 4 406 404 

30C Group 947 927 942 932 

Boats 622 179 184 6J3 

BPB fcnd 333 328 330 3J2 

Brit Asms? . 1172 1338 1347 1342 

BritAfrwnys 649 635 636 141 

BG 1 JO 142 146 145 

BrffUnd S39 528 534 535 

BrffPMtra 773 JJB ASS i» 

BSkya 620 X99 6.11 6X5 

BrttStaei 141 139 140 140 

BrRTetocem 436 420 423 431 

X52 246 X58 

_____ 9.93 923 929 

Barton Gp 132 130 130 131 

QlbfeWWess 496 483 4J3 492 

Codbory 5dm 541 519 535 540 

Carlton Cbrain X22 508 XI 2 520 

ComiWUrtan 639 643 635 155 

Compass Gp 152 638 152 140 

CoudouldS 336 347 X48 331 

Dtocs 536 5^ 539 

0f^W POn * n8 1U5 1045 1U0 1140 

Erasin' Group 5X3 492 493 499 

ErterartaeM 638 114 118 638 

FomCotonM 132 130 130 142 

Gent Accident 114 7.95 8X6 8X3 

GEC 349 3JI 3J6 3LM 

GKH 949 923 975 9J9 

GkswWMIOOae 11X1 1QJ3 1187 1193 

C-nuwriaGp 9X8 199 9X3 9.05 

Grena Met 486 473 480 481 

GRE 174 249 X74 172 

GrearnasGp SJ6 330 X30 X34 

Gubmess 512 476 448 5 

GUS 150 139 639 145 

Hcys- 534. 530 X32 532 

HSBCHIdQS 1431 1170 1327 1182 

Id 7.10 6J6 195 193 

imp) Tobacco 415 407 4X7 411 

Wopf&bef 180 673 6J9 67B 

Udbrote 128 122 223 125 

Land Sec 749 1.18 743 7 46 

Lnsmo X3S 223 226 135 

Legal Ganl Grp XB7 X55 3J2 3J5 

UorisTSBGp 4.98 450 491 495 

LuaaVartW 124 188 141 122 

MataSpeneer 494 486 490 489 

ME PC 475 462 463 473 

MenwrAssri 1157 1125 1245 1241 


Rascals World 
RtrihraonsPM ' 
SJme Derby 
Telekom Mol 
Tstjoto 
UM& iglneeas 
-YTL 

London 

• 

Abbey Mori 
AJBedDoroocq 
Anglian water 
Area* 

Astro Group 
Assoc Brftods 


BAT tad 
Bor* See Hand 

Blue Ode 
boc Group 
Boots 
BPB tad 
BrttAeresp 
Brtt Alramys 

BrtrUnd 

BrttPedni 

BSkyB 

BrtStael 

BrilTtfscem 

BTH 

Burmaft Costal 
Barton Gp 
CbbfeWWess 
Codbofy Scttw 
Carton Oronn 
OomiN Union 


Madrid 


ACESA 

A goca B aroeion 
Areento rin 
BBV 
Banesa 
Boitader 
Bco Centre Hlsp 
Ben Exterior 
Bco Popular 
BcoSartonder 
CEPSA 

Ccrrtkisnte 
Cara Mapfre 
Endroa 
FECSA 
Gas Nnturo) 
IberzJrofa 
Prym 
touot 

SoriBtroa Elec 
Tabocolero 
TeWotdca 
Union Fenow 
VUenc Cement 


Manila 


Ayala Land 
BkPhRpId 
C1P Homes 
Manta BecA 
Men Bank 
Petroo 
PQ Bank 
PM Long DM 
SanMJgudB 
SM Prime Hdg 

Mexico 


Alfa A 
Banned B 
CenwCPO 


olio take 46147 
PlWtoOK 46403 


19690 19400 
1610 1560 

5320 5130 

6000 5920 

8350 8290 

1095 1075 

18900 18610 
3715 3650 
2810 27B5 

25240 25000 
9500 9360 

41 B0 41Q5 
3455 2420 
7000 6950 

9080 8950 

1180 1135 
30400 29700 
1530 1505 

2600 2530 

5870 5790 

1290 1270 

7130 7020 

3275 3540 

1155 nss 
I7B0 1720 


19600 19740 
1580 1580 
5180 5220 
5990 5990 
8710 8380 
10B0 1095 

18750 18700 
3680 3700 
2810 2775 

25000 25100 
9400 9520 
4120 4120 

2430 2435 

7000 6950 

9000 9050 

1150 1150 
30120 30090 
1525 1520 

2575 2560 

5820 5840 

1270 1290 

7070 7170 
3245 3290 

IMS 1145 
1760 1750 


OanlAcddant 

GEC 

GKH 

GtamWMIcaaK 
Granada Gp 
Grand AM 
GRE 

GrearnasGp 

Guinea 

GUS 

Hcys- 

HSBCHldgs 

K3 _ 

Irtgri Tobacco 


Johannesburg «*g}S!;j3. 


mwfa nnBdBta 

AtgioAjnOri 


jW nW 

& 

DeBetrt 

gSffiS 

Gencor 

tapcrWHjlg* 

W"W 

SnteW 

LfcertyH** 

asyst 

Wodcnr ^ 
RHhbranwGP 
Rjdtaiuo) 
BatPtottaum 


27X5 27 JO 
301 301 

26935 269 JO 
308JS 31050 
mJO 17450 
UJ0 1840 
’4775 47 JO 
26 26 
169 -160L2S 
40.10 40 

2850 27J5 
19X5 1JL95 
104 W 
S 
28 

— as 
59 5M 

. 322 323 

1222S 1 22 

1470 1475 
10175 102 

1035 IB 
84 0X25 
4650 4690 
' 5750 5675 
697S 70S 


Land Sec 
Lnsmo 

Legal Sard Grp 
Ltop&TSBGp 
LuaaVortty 
McaKs Spencer 
ME PC 

MsrcwyAaet 

NatandGM 

NaflPgpw 

NaWest 

Next 

OranjB 

p&o 

Pearson 

PCkfcgton 

PowerGen 

Premier Pome* 

PniflenlW 

RafitrotkPP 

Rm* Group 

toilticoftn 

tofiond 
Reed inti 
ReooUiD&kil 
Reuters Hdga 

Re m ui 

RAiC Group 
Rote Raya 
Rayol Bit Sari 
Rrarog 
ROWS Sun AH 


EmoModema 

GpoGanoAl 

GpoFBCDTTW 

GpoRnUTOursa 

KtnbCkrt Me* 

TetalsaCPO 

TetMctL 


ASemzoAalc 

BcdCmwt>i« 

BcoHdeutare 

BcatflRamo 

Benetton 

CFedtattodono 

ECson 

ENI 

Rot 

Genera* As* 

IMI 

INA 


2.16 

2X5 

2X0 

2X8 

5X1 

475 

4X5 

479 

6X8 

6X1 

6J5 

6X0 

6X5 

X98 

6X3 

6X1 

114 

108 

2X8 

109 

X29 

6 

X26 

622 

7 JS 

731 

7X7 

741 

1X4 

1.15 

121 

1.16 

XII 

5J3 

6X7 

5X2 

4X5 

450 

460 

464 

5X9 

5J0 

5X4 

5X5 

4X3 

4M 

432 

437 

4J4 

425 

435 

438 

0X6 

7J0 

7.90 

8X4 

3X3 

130 

3JB 

3X7 


Satutory 
Sdnode n . 
ScpfWwensOe 
Scd Power 
S eanfc or 
Severn Ttent 
aicBTwMpR 

5rem Nephew 
StnRhXItae 
Strftaslnd 
StheroElec 

Cfcj A yaPl i 

Staid Charier 
Tales Ljle 
Ttaca 

Thames Water 
31 Group 
Tl Group 
TanKns 
UnOwer 
UUAtamna 
UldNews 
UMUMtos 


TMW 11.02 

405 405 

X76 SJ9 
130 336 

947 946 
2J7 Z32 

X19 X22 

950 950 

438 435 

355 153 

334 136 

1170 1553 
645 6l76 

355 354 

XB4 191 
657 6X6 

1X46 1054 
9X3 10X3 
135 1.74 

847 BJB 
757 774 

. 752 7.92 

6 51 658 
830 839 

430 431 

346 148 

653 6JQ 
5X2 5X4 

5.45 X45 

279 246 
1540 1555 
-406 474 

733 141 

632 636 


Mrittoa 

Mertedlson 

ramff 

Puiuiulut 

PtaB 

RAS 

Rola Banco 
S POOH) ToOib 
SM 

Terecnmiwa 

TIM 


Montreal 

Bee Mob Cota 

CdortreA 

CdnUtflA 

CTFWSve 

Go Metre 

B-WaslLIfKa 

Investors Gtp 
LnblawCos 
Natl Bk Cauda 
PowrCorp 
Power Fm 
Quebecer B 
RogenCommB 
Royal BkCda 


DennrntaBk 
EAetn 
KafSlund A 
KMoetnerAsa 
Norsk Hydro 
NsrsiteSksgA 


PSE Woe 310177 
Prevtoos: 316331 

2550 2550 2650 
2750 2750 2750 
163 163 172 

11.75 1U5 1335 
121 122 122 
670 675 673 

10 ID 1025 
260 360 3B0 

1573 1580 1580 

90 90 9150 

750 740 790 


Bata tadne 274X01 
Prevfaot: 3716.18 

43X0 4350 4150 
17J0 17J0 T750 
2845 28.70 2X70 
1056 10.74 la70 
3930 3930 3950 
4X10 4X50 4X15 
1J0 1J1 1J3 

2750 28X5 2750 
32X5 32X5 3X10 
9930 10130 98.70 
1X40 1550 1534 


MI8 Ttanattcoc 11409X0 
PrertreR 11646X0 

1260 10030 11225 10920 
CB5 3235 awa 3285 
1265 4070 4145 4420 

190 1160 1189 1179 

KSO 20150 20350 20500 
385 2370 2370 2390 

1400 B245 6315 8305 

1140 7990 BOBO 8245 

1190 5135 5150 5230 
750 28750 29600 29200 
1565 14100 14550 14515 
an 2220 2280 2230 

375 521 D 5343 5320 

1695 6585 6650 6670 
1910 9625 9700 9995 

106 1096 1102 1110 

620 609 615 610 

USD 2265 2340 !2S5 
1600 3540 3545 .3630 

1675 14450 14560 14660 
750 14605 14750 14600 
080 10900 10915 10990 
320 72« 7300 7285 
n» 4130 4180 4160 

1700 4565 4660 4650 


taasMrfi tads 279*86 
PrevtoUK 2742J1 


41.10 41.10 
24.95 2430 

31 31 

3230 3X30 
17 16J0 
2216 22 

35.10 3470 
2430 2410 

1636 1610 
1465 14H 

m 28 

.2630 26.10 

6.10 2490 
7 JO 7 JO 


41.10 411* 
2430 3440 

31 311* 

3X30 3230 
16.90 1495 
23 22.15 
3470 35 

2430 2445 
16V 16* 
1455 14W 
2BJ5 27.90 
2420 25J0 

25.10 2SU 

7 JO 8 

54 5X90 


AHA 

PNUGeoSuc 
* — PeflmA 


TianOKsoaOT 
5lore h rang Asa 


OBXEodesc 57X31 
PjCTtam; 57X39 

167 17X50 772 

140 140J0 141 

2X80 24 2430 

2440 2730 27.10 
114 118 117 

4X90 44 4420 

330 335 JO 33430 
316 318 318 

205 209 305 

97 99 98 

515 517 51450 

273 279 277 

107 110 110 

123 126 127 

370 37X58 38050 
4420 4450 4750 


"Parts 


Accor 

AGP 

AkUQuIde 

Alcatel Atetti 

AKf-UAP 

Bcncalre 

SIC 

BNP 

Canal Plus 

Canrfajr 

Casino 

CCF 

Cardan 

Christian Dior 

CLF-Oola Fran 

Credit AgriaUt 

DQKW16 

EH- Aquitaine 

EridomoBS 

Eknadner 

Eurotunnel 

Gen. Eaux 

Havas 

Imam 

Lotage 

Leorand 

LOreet 

LVMH 

LyoaEoux 

MUJteOn B 

Partoqa A 

Pernod Wcrod 

Peoaoaa 

Plnouo-Prtnt 

Premoias 

RenouB 

RexH 

Rh-PouiencA 

Srmofl 

Srtnetaer 

SEB 

SGS Thomson 
Sie Generate 
Sodexho 
StGctaln 
Suez 

Srrttietotx) 
Thomson C5F 



CAC-4t2514J2 


Previous: 253028 

TVS 

780 

798 

787 

200.40 

197 

200 

199X0 

840 

829 

833 

833 

675 

643 

645 


365 361 JO 

364 

3600 

708 

682 

702 

687 

toy 

820 

825 

828 

238X0 

234 

234 237 JO 

1013 

992 

1003 

1010 

3395 

3310 

21/3 

3159 

253 

245J0 

247-40 

254 

259 JO 

252 

253 

260.10 

655 

625 

652 

625 

820 

8tt 

BK 

820 

578 

553 

5«5 

550 

1252 

1252 

1252 

1252 

864 

847 

854 

85J 

537 

521 

533 

532 

860 

845 

850 

853 

10 

9.90 

10 

9.94 

650 

635 

6-50 

oJ0 

747 

725 

734 

734 

393 

382 

387-50 

3K16U 

wo 

82V 

831 

BJV 

381 

36730 371 JO 

3/4 

970 

956 

967 

962 

1865 

1824 

1833 

1862 

1314 

1294 

1298 

1301 

551 

533 

542 

538 

325 

320 

320 329X0 

370 

361 JO 

36430 

365X0 


Electrolux B 

Ericsson B- 

HennesB 

Incentive A 

investor B 

MoDoB 

Motdborilron 

Pnarm/Uptohn 

SardvAB 

Scoria B 

SCAB 

S-E Bonken A 
Skanrio Fore 
SLanskn B 
SKFB 

SgartwikenA 
Statehypotek A 
S torn A 
Sv Handies A 
VohroB 


High Low Close Pm. 

461 JO *5X50 457 456 

252 247 250-50 247 JO 

900 966 971 986 

495 486J0 4BXS0 490 
338 333 333J0 335 

227 JO 222 22X50 222 

244 237 242 244 

277 272 275 271 

191 JO 188 189 JO 190-50 
181 JO 179 JO 180 181 

157 153 157 156 

8OJ0 78-50 79 JO 7930 
22X50 218 221 221 

32SJ0 321 321-50 327 

189 JO 185 JO 1B9J0 106 

13450 130 134 13450 

190 190 190 190 

100 98 99 9850 

221 JO 215 220J0 218 

191 188 180 189J0 


3Q2J0 296 297 JO 298 

414 590 S9B 611 

2248 2220 2224 2263 

1885 1831 1847 1830 
131 124J0 129 JO 131.10 
1665 1618 1650 1679 

180 17X50 178 179.50 

52fi 520 526 52- 

319 JO 305 30X50 31 7 JO 
1030 1010 1012 1029 

386J0 376 380 382.10 

628 614 614 630 

2B40 Z766 2783 2836 

794 775 7B1 780 

2S7.70 Z74JC 237 2325 0 
577 567 570 573 

193 1B6J0 193 1BBJ0 

46X50 455 JO 46460 499 

89 88 B8 B9 JO 

366 350-50 35X60 364 


Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZBMng 

9HP 

Borel 

Brambles tad- 
CBA 

CCAmotll 
Cotas Myer 
Coma ico 
CRA 
CSR 

Touturs Bretv 
Goodman Fkl 
iCi Australia 
lendLecae 
IJUAA Htfra 
NatAustBcnk 
Nat Mutual Hdg 
News Care 
Podflc Duntop 
Pioneer inti 
PubBrooacasi 
Si George Bank 
WMC 

Westooc Bring 

WooasWePM 

W ochfor ws 


Sao Paulo Bo>re yoiBtae wi5g Taipef 


BredescoPM 

Brahma Pfa 

CemrqPtd 

CESPPM 

Cope! 

Etetrobras 

ItaubancoPfd 

Light 5enridos 

Ughlpar 

PetrobnaPfd 

PauOstaLuz 

StaNacJonaJ 

Sauza Duz 

TriebnsPfd 

Teterig 

Tried 
Triesppfd 
Lmflxfficn 
Usiminas Ptd 
CVRDPfd 


Dacam 

OaewM Heavy 
Hgrr^Eng. 

Korea El Pwr 
Korea BtchBk 
Korea Mob Tel 
LGSeraicofl 
Pahang Iron Si 
Samsung Dfsloy 

Samsung Elec 
ShkinanBar* 


n 4m gjo 
700X0 703X0 
4X00 4570 
52J0 54X0 
1540 15J0 
<3X00 444X0 
546.00 547X0 
oax J40X0 

312J0 31 7 JO 
204X0 207X0 
147X0 147.10 
37.10 37 JO 
IJ5 8J5 
11100114.990 
146X0 152X0 
I4aw 14X20 
280X0 793X0 
39 JO 39 JO 
170 1X7 

24X0 25X0 


CMtgasIte tadne 67BJ4 
pmfetfc 678X6 

1B3S00 100000 101000 101800 
46« 4410 4450 4540 

17900 17500 1 7600 17000 
16000 75700 16000 16000 
27400 26400 26500 26500 
6020 5500 5700 5590 

495000 461500 <66000 485000 
27700 77000 27200 27300 
53000 50200 51066 50200 
<3800 42200 42600 42600 
63200 61500 62000 61900 
I0W0 10400 70790 10400 


Singapore 


Asia Pbc Brew [|5 
Cera** Pnc 0 

OtyDwss Wo 
CydeCaniage 15 JO 
Dairy Form Irtt* 0.7B 
DBSfOl&n lM? 
OfiS Lana -5 

PreserAKeow .12 
HKLand* IW 
Janl Mathew 4 6 

Jari5troleglc* 152 
KfWel 935 

KegpolBdnfc 4 

KeporiFefc 4* 

BBS, ]i 

OS Union BkF I0J0 
PartnwyHdgs 5X0 
Sent torn itg ? 

Stag Air fotrigit 
Sing Land ?J5 
Sing Press F 2W0 
Sine Tout ind 3^ 
StaoTriecamre J-97 

Tat L«e Sank 142 

utd Indusnw 
UWOSeaBkF 1U0 
WingTalHdgs Art 
■.-in Upd ates 

Stockholm 

AGAB WUO 

ABBA VS 

AssiOe^w« ,, 

Astro A 

AttascopcnA 180^ 
Autolh 308 


7.10 7.10 

915 9.3S 
1X20 1150 
14J0 1X20 
0J7 0J7 

17J0 17J0 


5 

4.94 

4.M 

5 

12 

11 JO 

nxo 

12 

2J4 

2J7 

3-74 

2X1 

6 

5X6 

6 

5X5 

3X2 

3J8 

3XD 

150 

935 

9.10 

9.10 

9X0 

4 

1» 

a 90 

199 

4X8 

4XD 

458 

4X0 

4J7 

460 

4X4 

4X0 


16-30 1170 
5J0 SJS 
4.90 7 

It JO 11J8 
7 JO 730 
27 JO 27 JO 
SJS 3J8 
176 XB1 
3J0 

1.15 1.15 

15 1X50 
428 JJ0 


5X 16 letiea: 23C8J1 
Prevtaus: 27S8J2 

1 Q3J0 104 105 

825 838 029 

196 200 200 

330 34 7 JO 34X55 
178JO 1 79 JO 182 
298 300 300J0 


.Crihoy LHe Ins 
Chong H iwi Bk 
Qiiao T tmg Bk 
China Devetorm 
Chino Steel 
Fits Bank 
Formosc PtoSTic 
Huo Wan Bk 
tad comm Bk 
Non Yo Plastics 
Shin Kergufr 
Tafrron Semi 
Totunc 

■JM Were Elec 
Utfl World Chin 


Tokyo 

3 iwmato 
Nippon Air 
Amway 
Asahl oarik 
AsahlOiem 
Asa W Glass 
Bk Tokyo WJtsu 
Bk Yakcnama 
BrliSgeiors 
Canon 
Oiubu Elec 
enugoku Elec 
DamgpPiW 
Da lei 

puJ-lchl Kang 
Down Ban*. 
OaVro House 
□amaSec 
DD1 
Denso 

E«> Japan Ry 

Elsal 

Pane 

FuP3onk 

FuBPhoro 

FuRttU 

H«hilunlBk 

Hltedil 

Hondo Vxror 

IBJ 

IHI 

Itochu 

Rg-YOMOO 

JAL 

jgpon Tobacco 

JUSC3 

KcfTmc 

KansolElK 

Kao 

KawdMW Hwy 
Kama Steel 
KlnU Nipo Ry 
KtanBre-jety 
Kobe Steel 
Komatsu 
Kuboro 
Kyocera 
Kyushu Etac 
LTCB 
Maucert 
Mriri 

AUBuCocm 

Matsu Elec Ind 

Matsu Elec Wk 

MhsufiijtH 

Misurisnicn 

MOSUriSH El 

MltsubbHEsi 

Mitsubishi H»y 

MffsuhisWAtar 

WTsuftSWTr 

Mitsui 


A0 Ordinaries: 2361 X0 
Pmtous: 23SSJ0 
I 8.10 XI 2 XI 7 
l 7X5 7.97 7X9 

’ 16-57 16JM 1469 
1 3J3 3.58 3J9 

I 19 JO 19-90 19-88 
i 1X33 7 X50 1139 
I 12X6 12X0 11.95 
5X4 5.98 X95 

610 6X0 615 

18-35 18-44 18.48 

<54 462 ATP 

2J9 263 162 

162 164 1.63 

10.98 11X5 11.19 
21.14 2170 21.15 
1.63 1.63 166 

1X20 15-60 1X53 
IXi 1X6 1X7 

570 X77 X77 

1» 329 137 

jje Ain Ai5 
6J7 6J5 655 

7J8 7J7 761 

775 7X2 7XJ 

6.75 6X8 687 

9X4 9-20 9.75 


Stack Marta tadCK 8367X7 
Previous: 8203X9 

170 166 1»7 165 

175 171 174 170 

7&5D 76 78 75 

118 115 116J0 114 

29.10 28J0 28JO MJO 
177 172 175 1 71 

7OJ0 69 JO 69 JO 69 JO 
134 130 132J0 129 

75J0 73JD 74 73 

64 63 6350 63 

103-50 99 JO 10? 99 

74JD 70 73 70 

57 5650 54-50 56 

57 JO 5J 57 JO Ss 
72 69 JO 7050 69 JO 


KlktaZ25: 18129X1 
PrevtovstlBorxe 
9nS 979 969 

755 763 757 

3420 3440 3430 

750 757 750 

630 645 635 

1080 1090 I0<0 
1FV0 7930 1B«0 

550 563 558 

2360 2<10 2380 

1730 M20 27M 
2090 2100 2130 
2040 M50 2050 

2070 2100 2080 
633 633 670 

1320 1340 1340 

425 427 446 

1430 1440 1410 

m 070 867 

3064a B3»a 8050a 
2390 2430 2410 

5330a 54100 5310a 
2010 2020 2080 
3tM 4* JW 
1410 1420 1430 

4160 4230 4750 

1280 1280 1290 

1090 1100 1080 

1110 1130 1110 
3620 3660 3640 
1240 1260 1240 

434 441 428 

595 606 595 

5490 5650 5480 

477 479 490 

tttOo 8290a 8270 b 
3450 3510 3460 
560 575 567 

2160 2180 2180 
1320 1340 1338 
479 484 479 

355 3S5 362 

731 734 739 


7340 

71 7D 

7250 

2140 

2120 

2130 

412 

407 

410 

405 

478 

481 

1870 

1820 

1840 

3140 

3050 

3120 

1960 

1920 

1940 

1190 

1160 

1160 

1130 

1100 

1110 

375 

364 

371 

709 

695 

702 

1360 

1370 

1350 

82! 

808 

818 

922 

916 

917 


994 995 
226 228 
899 B75 
530 523 


The Trib Index Pncas asof2 -' 00 PM - Vo * omo 

Jan I. 7992- ton Lmrel Chang* % change year Update 

% chong* 

World Index 146.55 -0.18 -0.12 +11.13 

Regional W eses 

Asia/Padfic 106.03 +0.22 +0.20 -19.54 

Europe 156.88 -0.53 -0.34 +12.72 

N. America 166.06 -0.36 -0.22 +2S.45 

S. America 138.66 +0.67 +0.49 +55.73 

Industrial Index** 

Capital goods 170.81 +0.86 +0.51 +28.54 | 

Consumer goods 165.31 *0.1 3 +0-08 +19.73 

Energy 174.64 -2.15 -122 +26.77 

Finance 107.87 -0.03 -0.03 -1522 

Miscellaneous 149.53 -0.38 -0.25 +10.10 

Raw Materials 177.06 -024 -0.14 +24.87 

Service 139.55 +0.04 +0.03 +1629 

Utilities 130.55 +0.38 +OJ20 +2-68 

The fmamstonalMMid Tribune Mbrtt Stock MbxO tracks the U.S. doto values at 
280 tnswnaiionalty iyvoeMOta stocks tmm 25 axavnas. For mom information, a trve 
Ooofctet is avadabfetyivnteig to 77» Tnb tndax. tfl I Avenue Charles do QauBo. 

32521 Neutiy Cerise. Franca Compiled by Bloomberg Nows. 


High 

MIBulFuaosn 1250 

Mitsui Trusi 710 
MuretaMfg 
MEC 
Nikon 
NIUroSec 
Nlriendo 
Nlpp Express 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nissan Motor 
NICK 

NomuroSac 
NTT 67400 

NTTDSto 3+40b 


High Low Oom Preik 


1280 

1240 

1280 

1240 


1216 

11.90 

11.90 

710 

696 

707 

712 

Moore 

27X5 

271* 

27X5 

4650 

4590 

4650 

4680 

Newbridge Nor 

39XS 

38J5 

3V.4U 

14DU 

1440 

1460 

14« 


30** 

29X5 

79.90 

1740 

1690 

1710 

1690 

Horten Energy 

31 

301* 

3W» 

707 

682 

691 

70/ 


90X5 

KV 

89W 

9000 

B900 

BVW 

9000 

Novo 

11X5 

11.15 

11.15 

864 

850 

855 

846 


24X5 

23 

Ztuj 

503 

491 

491 

503 

Pantdn Petlm 

56 

5515 

55 Vr 

361 

356 

357 

363 


20X0 

19 JO 

19X0 

757 

747 

757 

745 

PtoeerDome 

2.5J5 

24.90 

25X0 

271 

264 

265 

26V 

PocoPetim 

1110 

12-90 

13 

1400 

1360 

1370 

1400 

Potash Sort 

06.10 

105X0 105.60 


6740a BtlDo B6 4to 8660a 
3+40b 3400b 34?0b 3410b 


Ofi Paper 

630 

611 

620 

624 

Osaka Gas 

299 

289 

296 

290 

Ricoh 

1480 

1420 

1470 

1430 

Rohm 

9550 

9500 

P5<0 

P550 

SakwoBk 

710 

694 

705 

704 

Swikyo 

3450 

3380 

3410 

3410 

Sarrwn Bonk 

1370 

1320 

1330 

1350 


Sanya Elec 
Secora 
5etauRwy 

Serisul Own — 

Seri&ul House 1210 

Seven-Eleven 
Share . . 

Shikoku El Pwr 2000 

Shimizu 629 

Shln-etSuOi 
Shlsetaa 
ShouokoSk 
SottOank 
Sony 

Swraltorao 
SumtaVTioBk 
SumilChem 
Sirmltomo Elec 1720 

Sumir Metal 

Smrif Trust 

TabhuPtronn 3120 

TakedoOwro 2730 

TDK B90IJ 

Tahnku El Pwr 204} 

Tokal Bank 

Toklo Marine iuo 

Tokyo ElPvrrr 2300 

Tokyo Election 4420 

Tokyo Gas 303 

TtrtyuCnip. 610 

Town 1170 

Tapaan Print 1120 

Tony Ind 730 

Toshiba 707 

T astern 2800 

Taya Trad 830 

Toyota Motor 3200 

Yvmonouchl 2570 

(E 1 HU’&'r uno 


1220 1210 
930 908 


Toronto 

AbWri Price 
Alberto Enetgy 
Alcan Atan 
Anacreon EqK 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Kpvn Scrilo 
BanickGold 
BCE 

BC Telecomm 

BtocnemPhrom 
Bombardier B 
BrasconA 
Bra-* Minerals 
Cameco 
CISC 

CdnNotiHftl 

Cdn Hai Res 

CdnOaMRei 

CdnPoaBc 

Carina 

Dolasa 

Domtar 

DonohueA 

Du PoroCdoA 

Edper Group 

EuroNevMna 

Feiifta Hnl 

Ftstan bridge 
Rdcher Ow» A 
Fttaieu Nevada 
GuHCda Res 
imperial Oil 
lies 

IPL Energy 
LoWtawB 
LaenenGreiro 
MactnS Bkfi 
Magna Irdi A 


TSE IndPSWriB 5826X7 
MNP 5849.14 

n* 19.70 19.70 20X5 
90 28 1; 28.60 28J0 

30 4X40 45X5 4614 

55 1X40 16.40 It5S 
IV 44» 48X5 48.95 
» 51 JO SUO SIJO 
SO 33J0 33J0 3160 
10 6255 43 ii 6135 

45 304 30J0 30W 

85 29J5 29J5 60 

B0 25J0 25"> 25-55 
K 30X5 30.90 30.95 
52 3X7 143 120 
"i 51 Vi 51 VS 52 V. 
!U 31.10 31.15 3U5 
Ivi 47k. 48'S 47ki 

15 32X0 32X5 3X20 
55 2X55 25a. 25.90 

10 32Aj 32.90 3255 
10 36V 34.90 37 

85 2A60 2460 24J0 
10 9.95 9.95 10 

W 23J0 2190 2165 
B 31ta 31*t 31*. 
10 21 21 Vi 2110 
K 40.15 40J5 40.40 
)1 WO 300 301 

W 2X30 2X35 28J0 
30 21.10 21 30 2110 
SO £ 630 65.90 6 5b 

10 lGlO 10.10 10J5 
V. 62 m 62-95 63U 

S5 441“ 44J5 45X5 
W 39X5 39X5 39X5 
10 IBta 18X0 181; 

ft 424. 4jUa 4110 
10 19 19 19J5 

» 48U 68.70 69 


Rwobsance 

RJoAlgom 

Rogers Cartel B 

SeooromCa 

5heiCdaA 

Slone Conoid 

Suncor 

TartsmanEnv 

TeckB 

Tetogbbe 

Telus 

Thomson 

TorOamBonk 

Trnnsnba 

TronsOJa Pipe 

Trtaiort Rnl 

TrtzecHatin 

TVXGrid 

WtacacsiEny 

Weston 


3190 33X5 
25M 25W 
52-20 51 JO 
5190 52 

2al0 19.95 
61J0 61J5 
4M* 391t 
29v. 2BV| 
40 JS 40-20 
21 J5 21 U 
27J5 26X0 
35W 3495 
16JS 1615 
2514 2690 
42 <1 JO 
31.10 3W4 

1010 9.95 

2420 24 

70 6916 


33V5 3317 

25W 25M 

51.90 5116 

52.05 5155 

19.95 20.10 
61 S 61.00 
3WT 47. M 
28ta 29.1 S 
40-20 40JS 

21 M 21X0 
27 J5 26X0 
35X5 3490 
16% 16% 
2695 2X1S 

41.95 41M, 

37.10 30.90 
10X5 10 

24J0 7610 

69*i 691k 


Vienna 

Boehler-Uddeh 790 

CfKtmma pm 454 

EA -Generali 3195 

EVN 1663 

Rugterten Wien 522J5 

OMV 134X70 

OtBt Elektrtj S3B 

VA Slohl 47D 

VATedi 1667 

Wtanerberg Bov 2140 


ATX Index: 1168X9 
PrtvtouK I176J6 

784 786 79Q 

449.05 454 452X5 

3060 3120 3200 

1645165X70 1667 

519J0 572.95 522JQ 
1305134X70 1322 

835_50 S37 838 

460 466 47+ 

1622 1635 1675 

2118 2140 2154 


Wellington «sE^ew«mxi 

Previous: 22162* 
Air N Zerid B 3.93 X90 193 189 

Brierty Irwt 1J2 1JQ 131 131 

Carter Holt ort 1XG 1W 3X7 3X6 

Fletch Ch Bldg 436 622 625 622 

Fletcti Ch Eny 3.98 3XS 3X8 3X5 

FlaaiQl Foret 1X5 1X2 1X1 1X1 

BeWiCti Paper 2X7 2X1 2x2 2x4 

Lion Nathan 1« M Ml U7 

TetemnNZ 657 OJB 656 6il 

Whoa Horton 1U0 1160 1160 1160 


Zurich 


ABB B 
Agecca B 
AlusulsseR 
Ares- SerenO B 
AMR 
Boer Hdg B 
Batata Hdg R 
BKVfetan 
QartantR 
CraSutaeGpR 
EtektrowattB 
Ems-Dieflile 
E5EC Hdg 
htaidereant B 
UeaiMsl LBB 
NesneP. 
Nevartb R 
DeriBraBvehR 
PmgeeaHidB 
PnanntfluiB 
RthefflomA 
PkeUPC „ 
Roche HUg PC 
S3CR 

saundwRC 
SG5B 
SMHB 
SrizerR 
Swta Reins R 
SwIssrirR 
UBS B 
WlnierthurR 
Zurich ABurR 


SPI Wen 283192 
Pterions: 2651 J? 

1661 1667 1681 
430 438 450 

1167 1167 117B 
1710 1750 1725 
B80 890 890 

1685 1690 1700 
2835 2880 2900 
617 820 825 

676 663 680 

15EJ0 15? JO 16125 
532 535 535 

5675 5730 5790 
3850 3890 4300 
1041 1053 1052 

472 472J0 474 

1622 1634 1636 
1705 1731 1736 
137 I39JD 138 
7435 1635 1650 
695 720 704 

1869 1802 1884 
214 215 217 

1170S 11750 11725 
290 293 297 

1700 1710 1700 
2890 2915 2910 
770 7B5 770 

«03 907 934 

1477 1484 1492 

1229 1230 1HB 

1230 1239 1245 

983 998 991 

433 434 437 


* 




PAGE 16 


Thursday’s 3 P.M. 

Tte Aasodased ftess. 


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I i WATCHED WITH MOUNTING DESPAIR 

as the magnificent Gieves & Hawkes tie slid like a sword into the Sauce 
Bearnaise Mr Carruthets, who had just returned to his seat, was unaware 
of the disaster. The waiter glided silently forward and announced his 
presence with a tiny ahem'. Perhaps, he suggested with the tact of Jeeves, 
| Mr Carruthers would be more comfortable if he took off his tie? The 
| gentleman duly obliged and the pride of SavjJe Row was silently borne 
i away to be subjected to the secret alchemies of the laundry manager. 
^ Less than an hour later U was returned to the bemused Mr Carruthers, 
J cleaned, pressed and just - ^^in time for coffee. So im- 
pressed was the hotel guest, in fact, that he 

delighted his table & Jf companions with a piece 

^ of uncharacteristic N ^llGAPO^ /^ jocularity. He would, he 
^ quipped, be returning the following week with a suit to 

^ be cleaned. The waiter merely observed that in that case he would ensure 
^ that an extra large dish of Sauce Bearnaise was on hand to receive it. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL A, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC " 


PAGE 17 


v es 

all 

^Cs 

r UUi 


finance Chief Urges 
Drastic Measures 


SEOUL — The new finance mm. 

^acknowledged TTansday ^ 
South Korea s economy was in «*_ 
rioos.. trouble, 

d^at, labor unrest, bankruptcies 
mi a political crisis. 

-In a blunt assessment of the eco- 
KfflMC «aloc*, Kang Kyong Shik 
sad drastic measures wenToeeded 
to solve deep-rooted problems. 
.There is do doubt the Korean 
in serious 

trouble, Mr, Kang said. 

pessimism was a 


Amatil Buys 
Soft-Drink 
Unit From 
San Miguel 


Blwmbers ,V«j 

MANILA — Coca-Cola Amatil 
Ltd. of Australia said Thursday it 
had acquired San Miguel Corp.’s 
soft-drink (mi: in a S2.7 billion stock 
swap that will create the largest 
Coke bottler outside the United 
Stales. 

San Miguel agreed to transfer 
Coca-Cola Bottlers Philippines Inc. 
to Coca-Cola Amatil in exchange 
for a 25 percent stake in of the 
Australian soft drink company. 

Under the agreement. Coca-Cola 
Amatil will issue 293 million or- 
dinary shares valued at 3.4 billion 
Australian dollars IS2.7 billion) to 


(tong Kong 

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$ook 


d. 2 percent. 

, Mr. Kang said strikes caused by a 
labm - bill that was pushed through 
Parliament in December as well as 
the collapse of Hanbo Steel & Gen- 
eral Construction Co. in January and 
• ■ ■jwpant political crisis had all 
'added more uncertainties rmA in- 
stabilities into the economy.” 

A key provision of the labor bill 
making worker layoffs easier has 
since been watered down. 

Mr. Kang was brought into the 
cabinet last month to try to steady 
floa^al^ markets rocked by South . 

Hanbo collapse, which uncovered a 
bribery scandal that has involved, 
several of President Kim Young 
Sam's closest aides and his s^n . 

. Since taking office, Mr. Kang has 
stressed fiscal belt-tightening to 
curb demand and bring down a bal- 
looning current-account deficit. 

This week, the Finance Ministr y 
announced plans to expand foreign 
investment in the bond and stock 
markets and a policy to increase 
overseas borrowing to attract for- 
eign capital and shore up the local 
currency, the won. (Reuters, AFP) 

■ Trugafity’ Drive Is Denied . 

Mr. Kang rejected U.S. charges 
that the government was sponsoimg 
a “frugality” campaign aimed at 
trimming imports of luxury goods. 
Renters reported. 

* ‘It is not true the government is 
leading such campaigns aimed at 
discouraging excessive consump- 
tion and imports,” the finance min- 
ister said. He criticized civic, and 


3 Thai Finance Firms to Merge 


CeapBedbpOw'SaffbvmPiaaadaa 

BANGKOK — Three finance 
companies said Thursday they 
would merge as part of a gov- 


Both the banking and finanflp 

sectors have been saddled with 
huge levels of bad debts by Thai- 
land’s property-market slump. 


enaaaat drive aimed at shoring up Government rales to increase cap- 
Thafland’s ailing financial sector, ital and reserves for doubtful loans 
The Bank of Thailand said led to a nm on financial companies 
CMIC Finance & Securities Co_, early last month. 

NavaKnance & Securities Co. and A merger “would be positive, 

Thaimex Finance & Securities Co. because men we could spin off the 
had agreed to mage, creating a combined securities businesses 
bank with assets of 140 billion teht and concentrate on what we do 
($5.4 billion). _ best,*' Pakpoom Valtisuta, asso- 

It added that die Finance Min- date managing director of 
istiy and the Bank of Thailand Thaimex, said, 
would support the merged com- But investors remained uncon- 
pany in case of a liquidity crunch, vinced, saying the true value of the 
The announcement came a day companies was masked by mount- 
after the governor of the Bank of ing bad loans to property de- 


Thafland, Remgchai Marakanonda, velopers. a slowing economy and 


announced new regulations cover- 
ing mergers in financial sectors. 


performing assets. 

lews of the merger failed to 


see prop up the market. Shares fell 1 .48 
tth percent on the exchange, with the 
ai- Stock Exchange of Thailand index 
ip. closing at 706.01 points, because 
ip- investors feared the new guidelines 
ons could mean that companies with- 
ies out enough net assets to comply 
may be put out of business. 

;e, Issarpbol Kansoro of Wall Street 

he Finance & Securities said some 
es ‘‘ailing'’ financial companies “fear 
do their situation may actually worsen 
io- if their net assets after losses are not 
of enough to actually carry on the 
business under new guide tines.” 
n- Under the latest government 

be plan for the financial sector, Mr. 
u- Remgchai said incentives would 
!e- be provided for finance companies 
ad that choose to merge, including al- 
lowing them to open new branches, 
to (AFP, Bloomberg, Reuters j 


by Coca-Cola Amatil in 1997. 

San Miguel will receive Si. 9 bil- 
lion of the stock, making it the 
second-largest Coca-Cola .Amatil 
shareholder, after Coca-Cola Co. 
The Atlanta-based company, which 
owns 30 percent of the Philippine 
bottling unit, will have its stake in 
Coca-Cola Amatil reduced to 33 
percent from 36 percent. 

San Miguel executives said Coca- 
Cola Amatil planned to seek new 
franchises in Asia. The Australian 
company has held discussions with 
Coca-Cola Co. about obtaining fran- 
chises in the western half of mdia. 

Shares of Coca-Cola Amatil rose 
85 cents in Sydney to close at 12.80 
dollars. San Miguel's Cass B 
shares, which foreigners can own, 
slumped 1 JO pesos <5.7 U.S. cents) 
In Manila, closing at 90. but analysts 
said the merger would help the Phil- 
ippine company as well. 

“It will mean better revenues for 
San Miguel, which is also expand- 
ing its beer operations abroad,” 


Very briefly; 

• Hyundai Motor Co. is cutting passenger-car production in 
South Korea to restructure its assembly lines to turn out more 
models for export, a spokesman said, citing an already sat- 
urated domestic car market Hyundai's domestic sales dropped 
26 percent in the first quarter, to 128.517 units. 

• Mazda Motor Corp.'s U.S. sales fell 23 percent in March 
from a year earlier, to 21,257; its first-quarter sales in America 
were down 21 percent at 49.975. 

• Sumitomo Bank Ltd. will report anet profit of 35 billion yen 
(S285-5 million) for the year that ended Monday, down from a 
forecast of 60 billion yen; it cited the falling value of its equity 
portfolio and !arger-than -expected write-offs of bad loans. 

• Sumitomo Corp. and other trading companies will buy more 
pork from U.S. producers to offset the loss of pork shipments 
from Taiwan. Japan banned pork imports from Taiwan last 
month because of an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease. 

•The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum will hold a 
finance ministers’ meeting in the Philippines this weekend to 
discuss common standards for the region's financial markets. 

• BASF AG plans to invest as much as 8 billion Deutsche 
marks ($4.78 billion) in Asia over the next five years. The 


Alexis Cube, an analyse at Angping chemical and drug company said it had already invested 3.5 

_ _ _ 4 . _ vr C* Ktllimi nK4 in tha raitinn D1 L.— ifn O 


& Associates Securities, said. 


billion DM in the region. 


Bloomberg. AFP. Reuters 


Tata’s Plans for an Air Venture in India Hit a Snag 


Westpac Bids for Melbourne Bank 


Bloomberg News The Indian cabinet late Tues- Ravi Du bey. a spokesman for 

BOMBAY — India's Tata day decided not to allow foreign Tara, said the decision “will 
group of companies said airlines to own, directly or in- send negative signals to in- 
Thursday it would consider directly, a stake in an Indian air- vestors abroad.” contradicting 
starting an airline on its own line company. Under Tata’s pro- promises by India to intema- 
after a government ruling foiled posal. Singapore Airlines and tional investors that it would 
its plans to run a domestic ser- Tata would have owned 40 per- welcome foreign investments in 
vice in a joint venture with cent each in the venture; the pub- areas involving sophisticated 
Singapore Airlines Ltd. lie would have owned the rest technology. 


Ctof*MtvOwS*gFnwvDapaa*a 

MELBOURNE — Westpac 
Braking Coro. said Thursday it was 
planning a 1 .44 billion dollar <$I . 1 3 


) takeover bid for Bank of penny, to 6.88. 


good for Bank of Melbourne share- 
holders, and Bank of Melbourne 
shares rose to close at 92S0 dollars, 
up 0.70 cents. Westpac shares rose a 


The takeover must also be ap- 
proved by the antitrust authority, the 


Australian Competition and Con- its plans to run a domestic ser- 


religrous^ grottps whose efforts Co endorsed M by ;.J3aak r of Melbourne's 
discourage lavish consumption and board, came- just days before the 
close the country’s widening trade scheduled publication of a report 


Melbourne Ltd. * ‘The starting gun doesn’t run un- 

Westpac’s offer,- which has been til the government announces its re- 
dorsed by J3ank : of Melbourne's sponse to the Wallis report,” Peter 
ard. came just days before the Costello, Australia's treasurer, said. 


close the country’s widening trade scheduled publication of a report 
deficit have been taken up by the that is expected to recommend a 
national media. . . relaxation of bank takeover laws. 

“Such campaigns will bring more The cash and stock offer values each 
losses than gains,” he said, adding Bank of Melbourne common share 
that tiie government was concert- at 9.75 dollars and each convertible 
hating its efforts on fighting waste preference share at 15.36 dollars. 


up 0.70 cents. Westpac shares rose a sumer Commission. vice in a joint venture with c 

penny, to 6.88. The commission's chairman. AJ- Singapore Airlines Lid. li 

“The starting gun doesn’t run un- lan Pels, said the takeover would be 
til the government announces its re- “carefully examined.” TAT f n P/icf T Ace 

sponse to the Wallis report,” Peter But analysts said the planned JcxLi 111 AT Uhl L/t/W 
Costello, Australia's treasurer, said, takeover appeared likely to win reg- 

“No analysts should think that this ulatory as well as shareholders ap- ffni* ygjru-y hilt lope 
has somehow beat the gun; it hasn’t, proval. * OF J & Ur UUl WU* 

The gun hasn’t sounded.” “1 think they would have both n . n /»• , 


after a government ruling foiled 


The Wallis inquiry, headed by done their homework beforehand. 
Stan Wallis, a prominent business- and I think it will be successful,” 
man, is the first major review of Hayden Asp in all, an analyst with 


i uiuiK mey wowu nave ouu ? n . n /»• 

done their homework beforehand. MXBtUTfl tO tlOTlt 
and I think it will be successful,” *7 


and cutting spending. 


Analysts said t he offer looked 


Australian finance-sector regula- 
tions since the early 1980s. 


itott* tt . it RUBIN: Warning Tokyo About Trade Deficit 

. i Continued from Pace 13 yen, which boosts the competitiveness c 


Reuters one. He ad< 

TOKYO -s- Matsushita sushita was 
Electric Industrial Co. is broadcasti ng 
stepping up efforts to tap each area of 
into tiie potentially Incra- market and tin 


one.” He added that Mat- 
sushita was seeking a 
broadcasti ng ' partner in 
each area of the European 
market and that BSkyB was 


tive digital broadcasting in- one candidate. 


dustry. joining rival Sony 
Corp.’s move to take stakes 
in European broadcasters. 

Matsushita said 

Thursday it was talking 
talks with European broad- 
rasring companies, includ- 
ing Bntish Sky Broadcast- 
ing Group PLC, set up by 
Rupert Murdoch’s News 


rived Sony . A spokesman later con- 
take stakes firmed that be was referring 
adcasters. to the possibility of taking 
said equity positions, 
as talking Matsushita, one of the 
«an broad- biggest electronic and me- 
ies, ntcJud- dia groups in the world. 
Broadcast- with brand names such as 
, set up by Panasonic, is mainly inter- 
ims News ested in getting its televi- 


Continued from Page 13 

build factories overseas to take advantage 
of cheap labor. By exporting many of the 
products they make at those plants to Japan 
and elsewhere, they both boost Japan's 
im pest s and cut exports. 

Imports to Japan have also boomed as 
Tokyo, under pressure from tiie United 
Stales and other trading partners, has taken 
down many trade barriers. Import growth 
is expected to continue as Japan pushes to 
cut the red tape that still constrains many 
pans of its economy. 


gala- Merrill Lynch Australia, said. Agence Fnmce-Pnsse 

(Bloomberg. Reuters) TOKYO — Japan Air Lines Ltd. 

said Thursday it would post a loss 
for ^ year just ended but expected 
ji . rw i j rj /• tobe profitable in tiie current year, 

V O About 1 raae TJet IClt which ends in March 1 998. 

' ^ The airline said it expected to post 

yen, which boosts the competitiveness of a parent-company pretax loss of 20 
exports and undermines imports, could billion yen ($163.1 million) for the 
send tiie trade surplus emphatically high- year that ended Monday. It earlier 
er. said it hoped to break even. 

“I appreciate the government’s situ- JAL did not say how much it 
ation but it needs more courage,” said expected to earn this year, but it 
Sachio Semmoto, a professor at Keio Uni- forecast a parent-company pretax 
versity in Tokyo. “Deregulation has to be profit of 30 trillion yen for the year 
accelerated. It has to be completed in a few ending in March 1 999. It also said it 
years. It involves great pain but without expected its revenue to reach 1.4 ' 
that land of surgery [his society will be in a trillion yen in the year ending in , 
disastrous situation in 10 years.” March 2002, compared with 1.12 

Mineko Sasaki-Smith, chief economist billion yen in the year just ended, j 
ar Credit Suisse First Bostoa Securities in As die airline disclosed an outline i 


A two-month 
trial subscription. 



March 2002, compared with 1.12 
billion yen in the year just ended. 
As die airline disclosed an outline 



Still, there are signs tiie government’s Tokyo, expects Japan to post a trade sur- of its current five-year plan, it said it 

i _ ■ « . * _ tTZ r a -7 4 i rxm * -a — - — i 1 


Cmp., about the possibility sion hardware into people’s 


of an investment. 


homes and sees an equity 


When asked whether stake as the best way to get 
Matsushita was bolding J^eragemttecximpetjbve 
such talks with BSkyB, market, analysts said. The 
SeinosukeKuraku, director broadcasting industry has 
in charge of the company’s become die hottesr sector 
European division, said, for consumer-electronics 
“We are talking to every- makers. 


Sal Oppenheim jr. & Cie 

Luxemburg SJL 

V»ynff«niBchurKiBn gem^i § 17 Ahs. 3 Nr. 2 und 3 AusUnveafanG 


outlook might be too optimistic. Some 
private Japanese economists predict eco- 
nomic growth of as littie as 1 percent in the 
current fiscal year, which ends in March 
1998. 

Economists have also warned that years 
from itscunent deregulation drive/^hey 


plus of around 7.4 trillion yen in 1997 
compared with a surplus of 6.7 trillion yen 
in 1996. 

Ironically, Mr. Rubin was instrumental 
in engineering the dollar's sharp rise from 
about 80 yen in April 1995, to more than 
120 yen now. 

Yet, it remains to be seen how big a rise in 


say tiie government is dragging its feet to Japan’s trade surplus be can tolerate before 
protect powerful vested interests, such as he decides something must be done to save 


banks rad state monopolies. 

Such foot-dragging, sluggish domestic 


U.S. manufacturing jobs, which are per- 
ceived to be under threat from Japanese 


economic growth and the weakness of tiie exports driven ostensibly by the weak yen. 


would make a thorough re-evaluation 
of corporate costs, reduce noncore 
business and introduce performance- 
based salaries for management. JAL 
said it would put more emphasis on 
Asia-Pacific destinations, adding 
routes to Hanoi and the Pacific island 
of Palau and expanding existing ser- 
vices to China and elsewhere. 

The airline said it would cut 400 
noncore jobs by March 1998. bring- 
ing its payroll down to 17,000, and 
another 400 jobs by March 2000. 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1997 


PAGE 19 



13* 


1 



3*eralb3$ribttne 

Sports 


PAGE 20 


World Roundup 


Singspiel on Song 


horse racing Singspiel. 
trained by Michael Stouie in Eng- 
land and ridden by the American 
Jerry Bailey, overtook Sipbon, the 
favorite, late in the race Thursday to 
win the $4 million Dubai World 
Cup by a length and a quarter for 
owner Sheikh Mohammed. 

Bailey, who won the inaugural 
race last year on Cigar, said: * ' After 
Cigar. I thought nothing could feel 
better, but this was just as good.” 

Japanese long-shot Hokuto Vega 
fell ai the final turn and had to be 
put down. 

Siphon 's stablemate Sandpit was 
third in the race, run on sand over 
2.000 meters (a mile and a quarter). 

( neuter si 


Albanians Seek Asylum 


soccer Eight young Albanian 
players and a coach sought political 
asylum Thursday in Spain, a Span- 
ish Interior Ministry spokeswoman 
said. 

The nine men, who were not iden- 
tified. turned up at the government's 
asylum office after arriving from the 
southern Spanish city of Granada, 
where the national team played two 
World Cup qualifying games. 

The spokeswoman would not say 
whether the players belonged to the 
first team or the under-21 squad. 
But since all the members of the 
senior squad already play for clubs 
outside Albania they would not 
need to seek asylum. (APl 



It’s 1, 2, 3 (Homers) 
For Yanks’ Martinez 


Seattle Fans Give Him Ovation 


CarpHed hi Ckr SztfFnwn Dapetrbcs 

SEATTLE — For one memorable 
and glorious night. Two Martinez did a 
splendid imitation of Ken Griffey Jr. 

Martinez blasted three massive home 
runs Wednesday in his first three at-bats 
against the Seattle Mariners, as the New 
York Yankees won, 16-2. 

Scon Sanders will remember his 
American League debut as the dreary 
night when Martinez treated him like a 
batting practice pitcher while knocking in 


Ted MAblu/Acncr Fanv-IW 

Baltimore's Cal Ripken hitting his first home run of the season. He also signed a two-year contract extension. 


Astros Thwart Maddux to Top Braves 


A Franchise Player 


BASEBALL For the first time, the 
salary of one player — Albert Belle 
— is more than the payroll of an 
entire team — the Pittsburgh Pir- 
ates. 

The average player salary rose 
1 7.6 percent this season to a record 
$1.38 million on opening day, ac- 
cording to a review of contracts by 
The Associated Press. 

Belle, the game's highest-paid 


player this season. He is making 
$10 million this season. $928,333 


$10 million this season. $928,333 
more than the whole Pirates payroll 
which totals $9,071,667. 

The New Yoric Yankees, the 
World Series champions, have the 
biggest payroll at $58.5 million, 
followed by Baltimore at $55.1 
million. 

The average salary this season 
Si 383.578, up from $1,176,967 at 
the start of 1 996 a rise of 29 percent 
from I995‘s average of $1,071,029. 
The total payroll tops $1 billion for 
the first time at S1.070 billion, up 
from S902 million last season.(AP) 


The AjscviufeJ Press 

Larry Dierker. who went from the 
Houston Astros' broadcast booth to 
their dugout. remains unbeaten as the 
club's manager. 

Houston beat the Atlanta Braves. 4-3, 
on Wednesday, and the Astros' second 
victory of 1997 was as unlikely as their 
firsL 

One night after beating the National 
League's *1996 Cy Young winner. John 
Smoltz, the Astros roughed up Greg 
Maddux for 10 hits in six innings. 

“They found holes.” Maddux said. 
"It's not like they were hitting a lot of 
line drives. Sometimes the ball just 
bounces that way." 

The ball is certainly bouncing the 
right way for Dierker. who spent 18 
years as a broadcaster before taking the 
Houston job. 

“You've got to be lucky to beat the 
Braves,” Dierker said. "They are so 
hard to play. The tighter the game, the 
harder, the better they play." 


who caught the ball then doubled up 
Blauser for the final oul 

Expos 4, Cardinals i The Expos are 
also perfect after two games. In 
Montreal. Jeff Juden allowed two hits in 
seven innings in his first start since 
1995. and Henry Rodriguez went 3-for- 
4 for the Expos. 

Chris Widger hit his second career 
home run for Montreal, which dropped 


NL Roundup 


the defending NL Central champions to 
0 - 2 . 

Sr. Louis, which got only two hits, has 
scored only two runs in its first two 
games — both on wild pitches. 

Lee Smith, baseball's leader in career 


saves, worked a perfect ninth for his first 

ov/> cinn> Iimi> IS Hruirimip-r rirtuM/>A 


Trailing. 4-2, the Braves pulled with- 
i a run in the ninth on Jeff Blauser's 


in a run in the ninth on Jeff Blauser’s 
run-scoring double off John Hudek. 
Blauser took third on Keith Lockhart's 
groundout, and Billy Wagner relieved 
to face Kenny Lofton. Lofton hit a line 
drive to the third baseman. Bill Spiers. 


save since June 28. Rodriguez doubled, 
tripled and homered. 

Rada s, Rockies 3 In Cincinnati, Deion 
Sanders had four hits and Reggie Sanders 
hit a three-run homer for Cincinnati. 

Sanders, continuing his impressive 
return to baseball after sticking strictly 
to football in 1996, went 4~for~5 with a 
run scored, a stolen base and a run batted 
in. He's 6-for-9 in two games, with three 
steals. Dave Burba allowed five hits in 
seven innings for the victory. 


Marlins 4, Cubs 3 Al Lei ter and three 
relievers combined on a five-hitter as 
Florida won in Miami. 

Leiter allowed four hits and two runs 
in five innings for his 50th career vic- 
tory. Robb Nen pitched a perfect ninth 
for his first save. 

Florida's Gary Sheffield, who signed 
a six-year. $61 million contract exten- 
sion Wednesday, doubled, walked 
twice and scored a run. 

Jeff Conine went 3-for-3 for the Mar- 
lins. 

Mark Grace drove in all three runs for 
the Cubs with a homer and a double. 

ppdras 6, AMs 5 Chris Gomez’s nm- 
scoring single with two outs in the 1 2th 
helped host San Diego complete a two- 
run rally. 

Ken Caminiti drew a leadoff walk off 
the losing pitcher, Ricardo Jordan, and 
moved up on Archi Cianfrocco’s pinch- 
hit single. Both runners advanced on a 
passed ball, and Caminiti scored the 
tying run on Wally Joyner’s sacrifice 

’ One out later, Gomez, singled to left 
field off reliever Toby Borland. 

John Olerud twice gave the Mets a 
lead they could not hold, hitting a two- 
run homer in the sixth inning and then a 
run-scoring single in the 12th. 


six runs, tying his career best After Mar- 
tinez’s thud homer, in the fifth, the polite 
30,951 fans gave one of their former 
heroes a rousing standing ovation. 

Manager Joe Torre shifted Martinez 
to the cleanup spot and lowered Cecil 
Beider to fifth in the order against the 
right-handed Sanders and looked like a 
genius. “I’m trying to break up the three 
left-handed hitters in a row so it’s not so 
easy for other teams to pitch a lefty 
against those three guys late in a game.' 1 
said Torre, referring to Martinez, Paul 
O'Neill and Darryl Strawberry. 

Sanders was not too crisp. He walked 
Wade Boggs and Bemie williams with 
one out in the first and paid handsomely 
for the eight balls when Martinez 
clubbed a 1-1 off-speed pitch deep into 
the seats in right center for a 3-0 cushion. 
It was the first homer of the year for the 
Yankees. But there was more to come. 

Sanders stumbled into the same trap 
by walking Williams to leadoff die third 
and Martinez made him rue his erratic 
pitching again by smoking a two-run 
shot over the right center field fence off 
a 2-0 fastbalL So Martinez matched 
Griffey’s opening-day feat. 

Two innings later, Martinez was the 
leadoff batter and he eliminated any 
suspense by lining Sanders's first fast- 
ball over die right-field fence fra: his 
third homer and a 6-2 lead. 

Red Sox 6, Angsts s The three Amer- 
ican League games in the Pacific time 
zone produced 45 runs Wednesday night 
Boston got four of them with two outs in 
the ninth inning to stun Anaheim. 


bad an pinch-hit infield single to third 
base, knocking home the winning run m 
the season opener for both teams. 

Indians a, AthMw»7 In Oakland. Dav- 
id Justice, making his American League 
debut just eight days after being traded 
from Atlanta, hit a tie-breaking two-nm 
homer in the top of the seventh to give 
Cleveland a season-opening win. 

“Good athletes have a wayof short- 
ening their adjustment period,’ said the 
Indians’ manager, Mike Hargrove. 
“David’s a good athlete.” 

justice also tripled and singled. Jim 
Thome and the newcomer Kevin 
Mitchell added solo homers for the re- 
tooled Indians, who have only 1 1 play- 
ers remaining from the team that won 
the 1995 AL pennant. 

Twins 7, Tigw* 6 Minnesota started 2- 

0 for die first time since 1987. Marty 
Cordova’s one-out single scored Pat 
Meares in the ninth to win the Twins' 
second game of the season. 

Rick Aguilera got the victory in Min- 
neapolis, despite giving up Matt Wal- 
beck’s game-tying homer for Detroit in 
the top of the ninth. 

The Twins’ relievers Gregg Olson 
and Greg Swindell combined to give up 
three runs in the top of the eighth inning 
as the Tigers took a 5-4 lead. Bat Dan 
Miceli, who gave up four runs in Tues- 
day's loss, came on to surrender Greg 
Colbrunn’s two-run. two-out homer in 
the bottom of the eighth. 

Ortotaa 4, Royals 2 Cal Ripken, play- 
ing third base in an opener for the first 
time since 1982, saved a run with a J 
sparkling play, doubled twice, homered 1 
and walked. Following the game at 
Camden Yards, Ripken signed a con- 
tract extension that will pay him $6.3 
million a season for 1 998 and 1999. The 
Orioles have the option to sign him for 
die same amount for the 2000 season. 


Jimmy Key pitched six strong innings 
ainst Kansas City in his Baltimore 


The Angels led 5-2 and had Troy 
Percival, their ace reliever, on the 
mound. He struck out the first two bat- 
ters, but then John Valentin doubled. 
Met Vaughn walked and Reggie Jef- 
ferson got an infield single to load the 
bases. Percival then walked Tim 
Naehring and Wil Cordero to make it 5- 
4, and hit Rudy Pemberton on the upper 
left arm, tying the game. 

Pep Harris relieved, and Troy O’Leary 


against Kansas City in his Baltimore 
debut Key allowed no earned runs, four 
hits and a walk to improve to 7-0 in eight 
career opening-day starts. 

Btu» Jays 6, Whit« Sox i Roger Clem- 
ens earned his first career victory with 
the Blue Jays; his other 192 came in 13 
years with Boston. He pitched a six- 
hitter, struck out nine and walked one in 
the league's first complete game this 
season. 


Benito Santiago put host Toronto 
ahead 3-1 in the fourth with bis first AL 
hit, a two-nm homer off Wilson Al- 
varez. Orlando Merced, another Blue 
Jays’ newcomer, broke open the game 
with a three -run double in the seventh. 

(NYT.AP) 


3 Years Later, Nomo Feels 


Just Like One of the Guys 


And One of the Top Pitchers, as Phillies Learn 


By Bob Nightengale 

ioi Angeles Times Service 


Once, he was considered little more 
than the foreigner in a Los Angeles 
Dodgers uniform who was responsible 
for the crowd of unwanted media per- 
sonnel in the team’s clubhouse. 

Now. three years later, Hideo Nomo 
not only has become one of the guys but 
is being relied upon to help lead the 
Dodgers to the World Series. 

Nomo. establishing himself as one of 
the most feared starting pitchers in base- 
ball. dominated the Philadelphia Phil- 
lies on Wednesday night, leading the 
Dodgers to a 5-1 victory at Dodger 
Stadium. 

Nomo yielded only four hits and 
struck out eight in seven innings en 
route to the Dodgers' first victory of the 
season — which also ended the team's 
eight-game losing streak daring to SepL 
25, 1996. 

”1 remember when the rap on Nomo 
was that the league would get to know 
him and he wouldn't be the same,” 
Dave Wallace, the Dodgers’ pitching 
coach, said. “Well, they’ve had plenty 
of time to know him now. and he keeps 
getting better.” 


Nomo. who still conducts his inter- 
views through a Japanese interpreter, 
attributes the primary difference in his 
ability simply to comfort 

He says he no longer feels as if he is 
solely responsible for the future of all 
Japanese pitchers in the U.S. major 
leagues. He no longer acts as a stranger 
in a foreign world. He even commu- 
nicates and goes out with his teammates 
on the road, just as if he were Sandy 
Koufax hanging out with Don Drys- 
daie. 

“I feel so much more comfortable, 
and there's so much less pressure com- 
pared to my first year.” said Nomo. who 
still lives in Japan in the off-season. 

“I'm just so much more relaxed. I 
understand my teammates much 
more.” 

Nomo. in fact speaks English to his 
teammates. He can go out on his own 
and have no problems. But when it 
comes to conversing with the media, he 
still is reluctant to speak without an 
interpreter. 

”1 pretty' much understand the con- 
versations.” Nomo said. 

”1 understand what they say. But I 
still don't have the confidence to do 
press conferences.” 



What’s the Japanese for ‘Play Ball’? 


V bk* Boco/Agcm haare-ftwse 

Nomo, who's shy about using his 
English with reporters, delivering 
a pitch during his 5-1 victory. 


Despite the language barrier. Nomo 
got his point across Wednesday night , 
and then he thanked teammate Raul 
Mondesi for providing plenty of sup- 
port. 

Mondesi ruined rookie pitcher Calvin 
Maduro’s Phillies debut by hitting a 
three-run home run off him in the first 
inning and then a two-out single in die 
fourth that helped to knock Maduro out 
of the game. Mondesi went three for 
four with four runs batted in. 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Japan opens its 1997 
professional baseball season Friday 
with a longer schedule than usual, two 
new domed stadiums and the biggest 
foreign star — Mike Greenwell — ab- 
sent with a back injury. 

GreenwelL an outfielder who batted 
.295 in 77 games for the Boston Red Sox 
last season, was signed for an estimated 
400 million yen ($33 million) to help 
the Hanshin Tigers, the 1996 basement 
dweller in the six-team Central League. 

The 34-year-old Greenwell arrival in 
Japan on Jan. 30. but returned to his 
home in Fort Myers, Florida, on Feb. 20 
for treatment of a back injury that he 
suffered in training here. 

His return date is not known yet, but 
Kazuyoshi Hotani, an official of the 
Tigers, says the club wants him back 
"as soon as possible.” 

Meanwhile, the nation's most popular 
team, the Yomiuri Giants, is expected to 
repeat as champion of the Central 
League, which starts play Friday. It 
would be the Giants’ 29th pennant 

The Giants lost last year s Japan ver- 
sion of the World Series to the Orix 
Bluewave. 

In the six-team Pacific League, which 
starts play Saturday, the Bluewave is 
seeking its third consecutive pennant 

Much of the team's punch has come 
from Ichiro Suzuki, the league’s leading 
hitter for three successive seasons, and 
from Troy Neel, the 1 996 home ran king, 
formerly with the Oakland Athletics. 


Suzuki, 24, batted 356 with 16 home 
runs and 84 runs batted in and Neel, 32, 
hit .274 with 32 home runs and 111 
RBIs last season. 

In both leagues, the season has been 
extended to 135 games from 130 in an 
effort to boost total attendance figures. 

The Central League wanted 140 
games, with more played at cities other 
than the teams’ home bases. The Pacific 
League wanted to add exhibition games 
between the two leagues. 

The Central League had 123 million 
spectators and the Pacific 8.9 mil lin n 
last season. 

Added attractions this season are two 
modem stadiums — the 40,600-seat 


The Giants have reinforced their team 
with an investment of more than 3 bil- 
lion yen, die newspaper Asahi Shimbun 


They are paying an estimated 360 
million yen to Kazuhiro Kiyohara, 30, a 
free agent who batted 257 with 31 borne 
runs and 84 RBIs last season for the 
Pacific League’s Seibu Lions. 

From the Marines, the Giants ac- 


quired Eric Hillman, 31, a former New 
York Mets hurier. who had a 14-9 re- 


iNagoya uome ior me i_entrai League s 
Chumchi Dragons, and the 48.000-seat 
Osaka Dome for the Pacific League’s 
Kintetsu Buffaloes. 

The Giants and the Pacific League's 
Nippon Ham Fighters use the 55,000- 
seat Tokyo Dome, while the Pacific 
League's Daiei Hawks are based at the 
48,000-seat Fukuoka Dome. 

Each of the 12 professional teams can 
have three non-Japanese on its roster. 

Aside from Greenwell, newcomers 
include Leo Gomez, 30. formerly with 
the Baltimore Orioles and Chicago 
Cubs, and Mark Carreon, formerly with 
the San Francisco Giants and Cleveland 
Indians. Gomez signed with the 
Dragons for an estimated 110 million 
yen and Carreon with the Pacific 
League's Chiba Lotte Marines for an 
estimated 165 million yen. 


York Mets hurier, who had a 14-9 re- 
cord with a 2.40 earned run average last 
year. His salary, is estimated at 250 
million yen. 

Also joining the Giants is Luis San- 
tos, 31, a Dominican who. led the 
Taiwan League in hitting for three 
straight years. He batted 375 with 22 
home runs and 75 RBIs last year. His 
.estimated salary is 30 million yen. 

The Giants already had slugger 
Hideki Matsui. who hit 38 home runs v 

last season. 

Among their main rivals are the 
Hiroshima Toyo Carp, who finis hed 
third last season. 

Their lineup includes Luis Lopez, a 
former Cleveland Indians player, who 
hit 25 homers last year, Akira Etoh, who 
hit 32, and Tomonori Maeda, who had 
19. 

In the Pacific League, the Fighters, 
second last season, have acquired a vet- 
eran slugger, Hiromitsu Ochiai, 44, who 
won three triple crowns early in Ms 
career with the Marines: He played for 
the Giants last year. . : - 


Jazz Rout Kings to Extend Winning Streak to 10 Stars SiS,f m 


The Ass>.viiireJ Press 

The Utah Jazz stretched their 
league-leading winning streak to 10 
games with a victory over the Sac- 
ramento Kings. The Jazz had runs of 
17-2. 15-2 and 14-2 in the first half, 
led 67-28 al the half and went on to a 
118-87 rout. 

“You come into these games and 
you have to win them, so you go out 
there and play hard.” Jeff Homacek 
said. "The bad thing about it is you 
get up by so many at the half that it's 
almost a natural reaction to cruise." 

The Jazz have won 15 of 16 games 
overall and 32 of 35 home games. 
With four more victories. Utah can 
lock up the home-court advantage 
throughout the Western Conference 
playoffs. 

Karl Malone scored 23 points. Bry- 
on Russell added 19. Homacek had 1 1 


Malone, who also had nine re- 
bounds. was needed for only 28 
minutes — well under his 38-minute 
average. Russell, who hit three 3- 
poiniers. played only 24 minutes, 
eight less than usual. The Jazz got 45 
points from their reserves. 

Suns 109, Rockets as Even Charles 
Barkley’s return to Phoenix was not 
enough to slow down the Suns. 


NBA R< 


Barkley, a surprise starter and playing 


for the first time since suffering a hip 
iniurv March 1. grabbed 16 rebounds 


and Greg Ostertag scored 10 to go 
with 1 1 rebounds. John Stockton had 


with 1 1 rebounds. John Stockton had 
10 points and seven assists in 22 
minutes. 


injury March 1 . grabbed 1 6 rebounds 
for the Rockets, but missed 12 of 14 
shots from the field and finished with 
six points in 26 minutes. 

Kevin Johnson had 30 points and 
1 1 assists, Wesley Person scored 21 
points and HoL Rod Williams had 16 
points and a season-high 16 rebounds 
for the Suns, who have won 13 of 15 
games — including two each over 
Seattle 3nd Houston. 


Barkley didn't seem overly im- 
pressed by what he saw from Phoenix. 
"They have played terrific, but they 
are what they are — the No. 7 seed," 
he said. "If you ask me if I'm con- 
cerned about them beating us in a 
playoff, you know ihe answer to that 
question.” 

Lakwa 110, Nuggots 85 Eddie 

Jones scored 27 points and Nick Van 
Exel had 18 points and 12 assists as 
the Los Angeles Lakers, playing with- 
out three injured centers, bait visiting 
Denver to move into a first-place tie 
with Seattle in the Pacific Division. 

The Lakers, who have won five 
straight games and 10 of their last 13. 


played without Shaquille O'NeaL 
Elden Campbell and a rookie reserve. 


Elaen Campbell and a rookie reserve, 
Travis Knight. But Robert Horry re- 
turned to action, playing for the first 
time since injuring his left knee on 
Feb. 16. He had seven points and eight 
rebounds in 20 minutes. 

HorMtt 95, Hawks 84 In Charlotte, 
Glen Rice shook off the flu and scored 


38 points as Charlotte snapped At- 
lanta's seven-game winning streak. 

Rice led all players with 42 minutes 
and made 10 of 21 field-goal attempts 
and 1 6 of 1 8 foul shots. 

Piston* us. Spurs 92 In San Ant- 
onio. Grant Hill bad his ninth triple- 
double of the season with 31 points, 
1 1 rebounds and 10 assists, and Joe 
Duraars made a pair of crucial 3-poinr 
baskets as the Pistons pulled away in 
the fourth quarter. 

Cavaliers 96, Catties 87 Terrell 
Brandon scored 19 points as Clev- 
eland won in Boston and moved a 
half-game ahead of Washington in the 
race for the East's final playoff berth. 

Tiinfaarwolves 94^ Nats 88 In Min- 
neapolis. Stephen Marbury made a 
season-high six 3-pointers and scored 
21 for the Wolves. 

Raptors ii 2 , 76er» 90 In Phil- 
adelphia. Doug Christie had 29 points, 
seven assists, eight steals and a career- 
high 15 rebounds. Damon Stoudamne 
had 23 points and 15 assists. 


— . , period to pull the Islanders intoa 4-4 tie and 

The Dallas Stars won the Nanonal Hockey set the stage for Hogue’s heroics. 

*"■»“**• s, names 1 Peter Forsberg 
vjetory over the New York Islanders, then recorded his first three-goal game of the 
mmol us attention to overtaking Colorado season to lead Colorado wee the snuggling 
for the top spot m the Western Conference. Flames. It was Forsberg’s first game id 
The Avalanche leadby three points Calgary since suffering a thigh injury Dec. 

With six games left, we vegotColorado 14 in a collision with foe F!mes’d4nse- 
on our minds, said Benoit Hogue, whose man Todd SiimKnn 


man Todd Simpson. 

Senators s, sabm o In Buffalo, Shaun 
Van Allen and Bruce Gardiner scored the 


goal with 32 seconds left to *e third period 


, . . . . . . * ms nrst shutout in more than three years. 

Stars unbeaten in their last if garner?**We 

65 point; behind «, wtato,. , to Hartford. 

f? ^aod=rs 

^^^S5I aadfinaIEaSt - Montto/r* third viocay^n four 


era Conference playoff spot. 

Mike Modano’s breakaway 
seconds into the final period gave 


seconds into tne ruuu period gave Dallas a lev scorM * ' r. “ 

tXSJZ E&SX asKtfSMSftftS 


games. 

Sharks 5, Mighty Ducks 5 Marty McSor- 
ley scored a goal with 22 seconds left in 


nuuL me minors on oaturday, scored ins visitirur Anal,,:,, ' jc ,7 . T~ 
fet goal of .ho season at 13:36 of STthM Z^tod^™ “ oied four ^ ® ** 



,,h N 


FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1997 ij}fl 


lh Ann 


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SPORTS 



In South America 


When the Argentines won 
the fair-play trophy at last 
year's Olympic Gaines it 
seemed that the dark side of 
their game finally had been 
consigned to history. They had 
behaved impeccably on the 
field at the 1994 World Cup 
and again in Atlanta, when 
■ 'Jjthey were the runners-up. 

•’ But the fighting, play-act- 
ing and bickering that has 
long marred Argentine play 

Wo rid CbrSoccir 

resurfaced Wednesday as the 
two-time world champions 
lost, 2-1 , to Bolivia in a World 
Cup qualifier in La Paz. 

Argentina finished with 
nine men after Nelson Vivas 
and Gustavo Zapata were 
ejected in the second half by 
the Brazilian referee Sidrak 
Milton Dos Santos, who ad- 
ded' 17 minutes of injury time 
to account for several fights. 

Marco Antonio Sandy 
rave Bolivia the lead in the 
7th minute. Nestor Gorosito 
>■ tied it with a penalty in the 
33d- Fernando Ochoaizpur 
then scored three minutes into 
the second half. 

Play was held up for more 
than 10 minutes by one brawL 
One Argentine player was 
caught by television cameras 
spitting in the direction of 
Bolivian fans, while other Ar- 
gentina players tried desper- 


ately to get at die Bolivian 
team bench. 

On a day that FIFA, in- 
ternational soccer's govern^ 
ingT body, criticized players 
who try to deceive referees, 
Argentina showed that play-, 
acting was St® part its rep- 
ertoire. Sepp Blatter, the FlrA 
general secretary had said: 
“When a professional star 
takes a dive, mlTlirrn s of lesser 
players dive with him. ** ■ . . 

During the second half, 
television cameras caught a 
close-up of an argument be- 
tween a Bolivian substitute, 
Demetrio Angola, and Argen- 
tina's Zapata. Angola's finger 
made slight contact with Za- 
pata’s forehead. The Argen- 
tine immediately collapsed 
and lay on the field, clutching 
his face in apparent agony. 

Some of the Argentine 
tackling was gruesome. De- 
spite Argentina's comp laints 
over the choice of a Brazilian 
referee, the only criticism that 
could be leveled at the official 
was that he was too lenient. 

PiarasMy^CMombtai In a 
game in which two players 
were ejected, Paraguay took 
the lead in the South American 
qualifying standings with a 
home victory over Colombia. 

Derlis Soto scored the win- 
ning goal in the 87th minute. 
Just before the goal. Jose Qril- 
avert, Paraguay's goalie, and 
Faustino AspnHa, a Colom- 
bian striker, were ejected for a 



Lhq*n I .iudHvAhr VNvilliil 1W 

Nestor Gorosito celebrating after scoring for Argentina in La Paz with a penalty. 


fistfight after the referee 
awarded Colombia a penalty. 
As Onlavert was leaving the 
field, he was attacked by 
Colombia’s Victor Aristiza- 
baL The game was stopped for 
eight minutes. 

Pam 1 , Ecuador i Ecuador 
also had two players sent off 
the field in Lima tot rallied 
for a tie. Pern’s Roberto Pala- 
cios opened the scoring with a 
shot from 20 yards out in the 
58tb minute. Alex Aguinaga 
tied it on a penalty in die 
78th. 

Ecuador's forward Agusrin 
Delgado was ejected in the 
48th minute, and Luis Cap- 
urro was sent off in the 84th 
for hitting an opponent 


Albania 2, Germany 3 Al- 
bania had to surrender home 
advantage and play its Euro- 
pean qualifying Group Nine 
game in Granada, Spain, and 
lost after three late goals by 
Ulf Kirsten, a substitute. Al- 
lin Rrakilli failed in the 15th 
minute with the first of Al- 
bania’s three penalty kicks. 
But Bledar Kola scored with a 
penalty in the 62d minute. 
Kirsten came on and scored in 
the . 63d. 80th and 84th 
minutes before Kola conver- 
ted another penalty at the end 
of the game. 

IMtay 1, N et h er lands 0 

Hakan Sukiir gave Turkey a 
victory in Bursa over the vis- 
iting Dutch in Group Seven 


when he headed in a goal sev- 
en minutes into the second 
half. Clarence Seedorf sent a 
Dutch penalty kick over the 
crossbar with four minutes re- 
maining. 

Croatia 3, Slovonia 3 In 

Split, Primoz Gliha scored all 
three goals for visiting Slov- 
enia, which rallied from two 
goals down to tie with Croa- 
tia, a favorite in Group One . 

Croefa RapiAlir 1, Yugo- 
slavia 2 The Czechs, finalists 
in Euro 96. lost in Prague to 
Yugoslavia when Savo Mi- 
losevic scored the winner 
with 30 seconds left in the 
game. The Czechs are fourth 
in Group Six. II points be- 
hind Spain. {Reuters, AP) 


A Battle Over the Davis Cup 

Spaniards Want It, Americans Want It Changed 


By Christopher Clarey 

Intemaiioeal Herald Tribune 

SEVILLE, Spain — It has been nearly a 
century since a Harvard undergraduate and 
future American secretary of war named 
Dwight FiUey Davis donated a large sterling 
silver bowl to the peaceful cause of launching 
a trans-Atlantic tennis rivalry. 

At the stan in 1900. the Davis Cup was for 
bragging rights between the United Stales and 
Britain. It now involves 127 nations in five 
divisions in places as far-flung as Botswana. 
Oman, Cyprus and Australia. Ultraprofession- 
al ai the highest level, essentially amateur at the 
lowest, the Cup assumes different forms de- 
pending on the stakes. But what is striking on 
the eve of this weekend’s World Group 
quarterfinals is how differently it is treated by 
the leading tennis nations. 

In Spain, gleefully riding a wave of men's 
success, the Cup is a slurrunering objective: 
something it has never won. Meanwhile, in the 
United States, which has won the Cup 31 
tiroes, the event has become an awkward bur- 
den to die players rather than an inspiration. 

There are five Spaniards in the top 20 in the 
world rankings, more than any other nation. 
When Spain~opens play on a stick indoor 
surface against Italy on Friday in the Adriatic 
city of Pesaro, its top two players — Carlos 
Moya and Albert Costa — will be present and 
motivated. When the United States is host to 
the Netherlands on outdoor hardcourts in 
Newport Beach. California, its top two play- 
ers — Pete Sampras and Michael Chang — 
will be elsewhere, even though both grew up 
Californians and competed in the United 
States last week. 

The top Americans have made a habit of 
skipping the Davis Cup, citing scheduling dif- 
ficulties and. quite accurately, their fellow 
citizens' lack of interest .After Sampras won 
die 199S Davis Cup final almost single- 
handedly against the Russians in Moscow. 


overcoming cramps and a stow surface hardly 
conducive to his best tennis, he returned home 
expecting acclaim. But instead there was only a 
murmur of appreciation in a nation much more 
concerned with die upcoming NFL playoffs. 

Physically and emotionally spent by his late- 
season efforts. Sampras was bounced early 
from last year's Australian Open. He has not 
played Davis Cup since. He is hardly alone. 

Germany's biggest stars. Boris Becker and 
Michael Stich, skipped the first-round tie 
against Spain on clay in February despite their 
lucrative contracts with the German Tennis 
Federation. Richard Krajicek of the Nether- 
lands, the reigning Wimbledon champion, is 
skipping the tie with the Americans. More 
surprisingly, four of the top five Czechs are 
missing the quarterfinal on grass in Adelaide 
against the Australia, which is at full strength. 

~ The best Italians are also playing, as are the 
best Swedes and South Africans, who meet in 
the other quarterfinal in Vaxjo, Sweden. But 
the nagging, unsettling comments still come 
in from across the Atlantic. Sampras believes 
the Davis Cup should be played every two 
years. The International Tennis Federation, 
which runs Davis Cup and oversees the four 
Grand Slam events, is not biting. 

“It would never pass at the general meet- 
ing.” said Thomas Hallberg, the Davis Cup 
director. ‘ ‘Davis Cup means too much. It’s the 
major source of income for the majority of the 
nations and particularly the smaller nations. 
To just have the World Group every other 
year or every fourth year would ruin the whole 
promotion and relegation system. Davis Cup 
is an annual event for sure, and we currently 
have new. long-term sponsorship contracts 
that commit us contractually to that.” 

Sampras has said he might be available for 
the semifinals, which would be played at 
home, probably against Australia. If America 
won it could meet Spain in the final: the team 
that seems to want Davis’s silver bowl the least 
versus the team that seems to want it most 


Scoreboard 


Major Leaque Standi nos 


EASTDMSJOH 


3 



W 

L 

PcL 

GB 

Baltimore 

1 

0 

1-000 


Boston 

1 

0 

1.000 


New York 

1 

1 

SID 

vs 

Toronto 

1 

1 

300 

V, 

Detroit 

D 

2 

.000 

VA 


CENTRAL DIVRDOH 


Minnesota 

2 

e 

1300 


demand 

1 

0 

1-000 

w 

Chicago 

1 

1 

sx> 

1 

Kansas ary 

0 

i 

MO 

in 

Mgwatitoe 

0 

i 

JJOO 

11* 


wear division 



Toon 

1 

0 

LOOO 

— 

Seattle 

1 

1 

J00 

Vi 

Anaheim 

0 

1 

-000 

1 

Oakland 

0 

1 

jno 

1 

MOKHUU.I 

3JUMM 



EAST DIVISION 




w 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Montreal 

2 

0 

1.000 

— 

Florida 

2 

0 

MOO 

— 

Phfladelphla 

1 

1 

.500 

1 

Altorno 

0 

-1 

JMO 

= 2. 

New York 

0 

7 

Mr - 


CENTRAL DIVISION - 


□ndnnafl 

2 

0 

1-000 


Houston 

2 

0 

LOOO 


PltlslwiTO 

1 

0 

1.000 

Vi 

Chicago 

0 

2 

JMO 

2 . 

St. Louis 

0 

2 

-000 

2 


WEST DIVISION 



Sort Diego 

2 

0 

1.000 

— 

LosAngries 

1 

1 

-500 

1 

Son Francisco 0 

1 

jooo 

1% 

Coiarorto 

0 

2 

-000 

2 

WKWUSOAY-N UNI SCOMS 


AHERCAN LEAGUE 


KmasOty 

009 

002 1 

06 — I 

7 B 

IBdftaiere 

0B0 

201 1 

0*— 4 

IB 1 


(ffl, Pichardo (81 andSpeftr, MLSweeney (71; 

Key. was m, a»» to. sente m. 

RoMyw* (9) ond Hofles, Webwer W. 
VV— Key. 1-0. L— J. Walker, M. 
5v- RaJByera 0 1. H R— BqMtnw* C RWan 

in. 

Bit IBB 008 — 1 6 I 
Tomato BIB 2BB **-6 I I 

.Alvarez, BertOtfl (7). Sfmos (7). C. CastBo 
(8) and Katkovta Pena TO; Clemens and 
Saratoga. W-Oemens, 1-0. L-ANarez, 0-1. 
HR— Toronto, Santiago 0). 


Detroit 000 200 031—6 IB 1 

M tomato on ON 121-7 B 1 

Ju-Thompson, Lira TO. M. Myers (7). 
MKbB TO, CuronUngs (8), ToJones (0 and 
Wnflrecfc FJtoctriguaz, Oban (8). SMndeO 
(8). Nattily (8), Agutina (9) and gtetabodL 
W-nAgaBna 7-a. L-TUonn, 1-ft 
HRs — Detroit. Vftdbedc 0). Hlgghmi (1). 
Minnesota, Cofenmn 0)- 
dovetad NO 200 381-9 13 1 

OaUatd On 230 BIB-7 II 1 

Nagy, Kflne (d), Ptonk (7), Assemaeher 
(8). M. Jackson (03, Shiny (9) and S. Ataman 
Prieto, Wfmgur (5), Brewer (7), R. Lewk TO. 
Groom TO, Acre TO and Ga-WTOams. 
W— KBne, 1-0 L— WOngert 0-1. Sv-Sbuey 
TO. HRs— Cleveland, Thome 01. Juste (11. 
MUNI m. OafdDnd— Benaa (T). E- Ybung 
0). 

MO OBI 104-4 9 1 

101 002 1BB-5: 12-1 

. Gordon, Eshelnion Heray CO. 

Mahomet (8), Soawib TO and HasMmm 
Hoftebag (9); Langston. James (75# 

Me El toy (TV Perdvol TO, P. Hank TO and 
Leyitfe Fabregas TO. W-Mahomes. ML 
L — Perctaft 0-1. S*r-Stocumb ' 0). 
HRs— Boston, Nattering (1). Anaheim, 
Edmunds 0). 

New York 382 «11 027— H 14 0 

Seattle^ W. 

PsStte, Weathers cn.JA. RJmo TO and 
Posada; iSanttoOL HOTlodO (B. McCarty 
H), MaraanMo 00, Tome TO, B. Wats TO 
and D. WBson. W POT I U 1-a L-S. 
Sandras 0-1. HRs-New York, TJMitez 3 

- NATIONAL LEAGUE ■ 

St Loots . . IN OH oss-l 2 .0 

Moated 200 no Otx — 4 9 1 

Petaoraek, RaKaton TO, PNNr (8) and 
LampMn Judm, Daal (85, L Sinim (9) and 
Widget W— Jucton. 1-0. L— Prtkovsefc 0-1. 
Sv-U Smith OV HRs— Martreat H. 
Rodriguez Oh WWgar (TV 
Catorado BIO 011 000-3 0 1 

COdkatl 380 .110 Bftf-5 12 0 

Swift Homes -CO# Munoz » and 
Mammring; Bubo. Belinda (8). Romflnger 
TO# Show « and Toubansee. W— Burba. V 
0. "L—SvitfL 0-1.' Sv-Shaw ' 0). 
HRs— Cataradft Galarraga (1J# L Walter 0). 
Ctadnnaft ftSaraton 0). 

CMcngs NO 002 *10-3 5 8 

PtorMa 110 020 ON— 4 11 0 

Trocftset Adams 03# tend* TO, 
Patterson TO and Secvtrito AJjNet HeOng 
TO. Pawel TO. Ne* TO and C Johnson. 
W— A.Lo#er#l-O.L— T>ndB«tO-1.S*— Hon 
05- HR— Odoaga MajGroce (1). 


Attaeta ■ HI OBI N1— 8 0 0 

Houston ON ON OH-4 TO 1 

GJMaddux, Btotodd (TVOontt TO, Eaihrao 
(81 and EdiPonz, Lopez TO; Hampton. 
Motto TO, Hade* TO, B. Mwwr TO and 
Ausmus. W — Hampton, 1-0. L-G. Modduz. 
0-1. Sv— B. Whgner TO. 

PhaNHjNa ON 010 000-1 A 0 

LasAaosks - an loo Ote-5 a o 

' Madura, Ruffcom (5), B lazier (8) and 
Lleberthab Naan Guthrie TO. DreHort (81 
and Pfazm. W^-Horoa 1-a L— Madura. 0-1. 
Sv— DretforT 0). HRs — PhSadeipMa 

Uehottod Cl). Las Angeles. Mondesi 03- 
NawYMr IN 002 IN 001-5 5 2 
Sen Diego 000 2N 101 002-5 12 0 
ALOorfc McMkitoet TO, JaFnsnco TO. Y. 
Psrer 01). Jordan (11V Borland 023 ond 
Hundley; Ashby, Hitchcock TO. D. teas (9). 
H u ffma n (lOV Bochfier 01), Bergman (12). 
W— Bagman. 1-a L— Jordaa 0-1. 

HRs— New York Attorno HI Qlervd (15. San 

Dtoga Camfedn (IX 


HOCKEY 


NHL Standmos 


ATLANTIC DtVSKON 



W L T 

Pta 

GF 

GA 

x-PMadnlpfiia 

43 22 12 

98 

299 

200 

x-New Jersey 

42 21 13 

97 

216 

171 

N-Ftarlda 

33 27 18 

■4 

208 

190 

N.Y. Rangers 

35 32 10 

80 

24) 

213 

Wtashtngton 

30 39 8 

68 

194 

217 

ILY. Wonders 

. 28 3711 

a 

223 

227 

Tampa Bay 

29 38 9 

67 

203 

233 

NORTtEAST DCVtSTON 




W L T 

Pta 

GF 

GA 

x-ButWo 

38 2712 

88 

222 

193 

Pfftsborgh 

36 33 7 

79 

264 

257 

Montreal 

29 34 14 

72 

238 

264 

Ottawa 

27 34 15 

69 

210 

221 

1 luilfr lail 

nanKfu 

29 37 10 

68 

202 

236 

Barton 

24 43 9 

57 

217 

TO 

280 

CENTRAL OmiOM 

■ 



W L T 

Pta 

OF 

GA 

X-DlAS 

47 23 6 

100 

239 

181 

x-Deirotl 

36 24 16 

88 

238 

182 

Ptoenta 

36 38 6 

7B 

222 

227 

St Louis 

33 34 10 

76 

222 

230 

Chicago 

31 33 13 

75 

207 

199 

Taranto 

29 41 7 

6S 

219 

258 

moHCDmaoN 




W L T 

Pta 

GP 

GA 


x-Catarodo 47 21 9 103 264 IN 

Anaheim 33 33 13 79 234 227 

Edmonton 35 35 7 77 237 229 

Catgay 32 37 8 72 204 220 

Vancouver 32 40 5 69 238 258 

LOS Angeles 26 41 10 62 198 2S3 

Son Jose 25 44 8 58 194 260 

(x-d Inched trioyafl berth) 

irsMsain 


Moated 2 11—4 

Hartford 1 0 0-1 

tot Period: H-Prtmeau 2Z (sh). 2, M-, 
Quintal 7 (Thornton Stevenson) a M-RaceN 
34 (Koto) Second Period: M-Monson A 
Third Period: M-Motou 16 (Brunet Reodtf) 
Shots OQ gnt M- 9-13-10-32. H- 64-13-25. 
Codes M-TWbaulL H- Burke. 

1 o t -i 

8 0 0-0 

RrsI Period: O-tei Alton 11 (AKiedtssn) 
Second Peri o d: Nam: Thirt Period: O- 
Gartfltwria Shots aa goal: O- 16-13-7-36. B- 
5-7-3—15. Goodes: O-Tugnutl. B-Hasek. 

0 1 0-1 

2 0 1-3 
Rrrt Period: T<krt 28 (Sutton 

PodoOanJ Z T- Berezin 23 (Sunddi. XSmBti) 
Second Period: F-Lawry 12 CJavnnousfcl 
Wmienert t hi rd P eriod : T-Dcmi 10 (Botqm 
SuOwm) (pp). Shots m geafc F- 7-17-10—3* 
T- 13-7-8—28. GoaOes: F-fhzpatrfck- T- 
Porvtn. 

N.Y. tstedors 2 1 1-4 

DaBas 1 2 2-5 

Fhst Period: New YorK Snoansid 25 
(Reichei, Berardl. Z D-{jehtfne» 14 (Zubov. 
Adams) (pp). X New Yotfc Poffly 45 
(SflwffnsU. Rfllchei) Secon d Period: New 
Yort. Wood 6 (LapaMe. Berardl 5, D-Huonl 
10 (Breton, Sydor) £. D-Bassen 4 IRefet 
Harvey) TNrd Period: D-Modono 33 
(Huard). ft New York, McUwtdn 1 (Beard, 
Janssen) (pp). 9, D-Hogue 18 (VerbeeW 
5hotaangori:NcwVbric8>3-9— 20.0- 10-18- 
1^-45. GoNes: New York. Sato. D-lrhe. 
Coiorade 2 3 0-5 

Calgary 0 1 0-1 

Hrst Period: C-Fotsberg 24 (OttHnsN ft 
C-Cortwt 12 (So Be, Mfflert Second Period: C- 
Farsberg 25 (Soldo 4, tDeatotareh 33 
(Loaatx, Jones) 5, C-Mdnids 22 tsimpsm 
Thov) ft C-Forsbeg 26 (ttoaN tenensky) 
Th»d Period: None. Shots on goah C- 12-12- 
3 — 27- C- 12-4-0— 24. GoadeK C-BBlngton. C- 
Rotooa Wkftt Ratooon. 

A nrdrrh n 1 0 4 0-5 

Sat Jnso 2 12 0-6 

first Period: A-Koriya 41 (Rucehift 
Setanne). ft S J.-Fitesen 27 (Notan, GuoUal 


ft SJ.-Frtesen 20 (Gift Noion) second 
Perfo* S_l.-GooOa 12 (Fdeseis Natan] Thfnf 
Period: A-Kurri 1 S (Pork. Trebffl ft A-BeOows 
IS (Kwri. Park) 7. SJ.-Donovan 7 (Eney) ft 
A-Treb* 2 (Sekwne, Kariya) 9, A-Sekmne 48 
(Kartya Drury) tft SJ.-McSodey 4 (Rottfe 
Friesen) Ovarttoie None. Shota N gotd: A- 5- 
0-13-1-27. S_L- 12-7-9-3-31. GoaOes: A- 
Hebert. SJ.-Hrudey. 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Stan m nos 



w 

L 

Pci 

GB 

x-Mkrml 

54 

18 

J9D 

— 

x- New York 

52 

21 

.712 

2*6 

□Hondo 

40 

32 

.556 

14 

Washington 

37 

35 

-5)4 

17 

New Jersey 

23 

49 

J19 

31 

Ptritodelphlo 

21 

51 

291 

33 

Boston 

13 

61 

.176 

42 

CENTRAL DIVISION 



x-Chlcaga 

63 

9 

475 

— 

x-D«tralt 

51 

22 

499 

m 

x-Altatria 

50 

23 

.685 

13Ji 

Owrtotle 

46 

26 

439 

17 

Cleveland 

38 

35 

428 

25V, 

Indtana 

35 

37 

-486 

28 

Milwaukee 

29 

43 

M3 

34 

Toronto 

27 

47 

465 

37 

WZSTCU 

ICONFUMCE 


MDWEET DBRBRM 




W 

L 

Pel 

GB 

x-Utah 

55 

17 

-764 

— 

x- Houston 

49 

24 

47) 

6’A 

Mimesato 

36 

37 

493 

19!i 

Dallas 

22 

50 

406 

33 

Dower 

20 

53 

J74 

3SV4 

Son Antonio 

18 

54 

-250 

37 

Vancouver 

12 

63 

.160 

44-6 

PACIRC DIVISION 



»-S Battle 

50 

23 

485 

— 

x-LA. Lakers 

50 

23 

48S 

— 

x-Portkmd 

43 

31 

481 

7y> 

Phoenh 

34 

39 

A66 

16 

Ul Clippers 

31 

41 

431 

18-i 

Saaamento 

29 

44 

-397 

21 

Golden Shite 

26 

46 

461 

23V, 


(xrdlnclied playoff berth) 

WUMSMT'SKHIS 

Ctoteand 27 23 14 32- 96 

Boston 26 17 19 25- *7 

OMDis 8-14 5-6 24, HU 0-10 3-5 19, 


Bnmdon 5-17 84 19: B: W after 10-19 4-S 25, 
Cordon 7-1344 1& dNorinds CtoteondST 
(H8I 11). Boston 37 (Walker 7). 
Assists— Oevriand 19 (Sura 6). Boston 22 
(Wester 7). 

Torarto 26 20 26 40—112 

PHtodetaNa 23 22 24 20- IS 

T: Oirtsfle 12-24 2-2 29. StoudamRft23ft6 
Zfc P: Stackhouse 9-19 15-20 3ft Iverson 9-24 
34 22-ftCbowds Toronto 66 (CNtsfie 15), 
PttedehMo 44 CWHoms 10). 
Assists— Toronto 28 (Stourtomm- 1 S>. 
Phflodefphio 21 (Iverson 8). 

AtlaatO 26 19 15 34—04 

Charlotte 22 28 22 23-95 A: SmtthB- 
17 6-7 25. Laritner 8-1 3 7-10 2ft C: Rice 10- 
21 16-18 3ft Pierce 7-102-2 1ft 
Rebounds— ADanta 47 (Btoytock 11), 
Chariotto 42 (GefgerS). Asststa— Altarmr 15 
(Bkrytadt 7), Orarkme 24 (Bogues 9). 

New Jersey 26 22 19 23- 89 

Minnesota 27 22 26 19- 94 

NJj Gffl 10-18 34 2ft Jackson 8-21 33 225 
M: Gamm 1 1-18 24 24, GugnallD 8-1 744 21 . 
Mboonds— New Jersey 49 (Jackson 9). 
AWnnesoJa 42 (Gamert B). Asserts— New 
Jersey 19 (Cosset 6). Minnesota 27 
(GugfloHa, Marbury9). 

DetraB 20 27 22 30- 99 

SOI Antonia 23 23 22 24- 92 

D: HtH 1322 5-7 31. Thorpe 6-11 5-9 17: 
SJL: Herrera 10-163222. WWJns3l4 34 19. 
Rebounds— OeSraB 43 (HID ID. Sam Antonio 
52 (Perdue 16). Assist*— Detroit 19 (Hill 10). 
San Antonio 26 (Johnson 6). 

Sacroraeato IB 10 34 25—87 

Ufc* 36 31 21 20—110 

S:l9rivnond5-lI64l& WBtamson5-103- 
5 1ft U: Malone 8-16 7 -9 23, Rinsed 0-13 04) 
19. Reboun ds — ' S oaomento 39 (WBdamson 
7). Utah 62 (Ostertag 111. 
Asrists— Sacramento 16 (Richmond 5ft Utah 
32(Ebiey91. 

Houston S 19 23 29— 96 

Phoenix 30 24 21 34-109 

H: Ototuwon 15-24 34 3ft Drexler 8-17 3-5 
20: P: KJohnson 10-18 W 3ft WIBonts 6-10 
4-6 1ft Rebounds— Houston 58 (BorUey 16). 
Phoenix 44 (WOttams 161. Assists— Houston 
23 (D reader 9). Phoeidx 28 (K_k*nson 12). 

26 16 18 25— 85 
21 26 34 29—118 
D: McDyess9-t B 36 21, LEW* 7-24 1-7 17; 
UL: Jones 9-14 64 27. VOn Exel 7-162-2 1ft 
Rebounds— Denver 60 (Johnson 11), Los 
Angelas 55 CBtourrt 13). Assists— Denver 36 
(GohMmdl, Los Angeles 32 (Von Exel 12). 


TRANSITIONS 


WORLD CUP QUALIFY DM 

GROUP ONE 
Croatia ft Skwenio 3 

STANMNSSe Greece 1ft Denmark 7; Croa- 
tia ft- Bosnia ft Slovenia 1 

GROUP TWO 

Poland ft Italy 0 

STXNOOKUk Italy 1ft England 9; Poland < 
Georgia ft Mol dova 0 

GROUP FOUR 

Scotland 2. Austria 0 

STANDBtaseScottond K- Austria 7; Swe- 
den ft- Estonia ft Belarus ft- Latvia 1 
group sx 

Czech Rep 1. Yugoslavia 2 
STAMDUMWe Spain 1ft- Yugoslavia 1ft Slo- 
vakia 1ft Czech Republic A Faroe Islands ft 
Malta 0 

GROUP SEVEN 
Turkey 1. Netherlands 0 
stanmnoSt Netltertands tft Belgium ft 
Turkey 7. Wales 7; San Marino 0 
GROUP NWE 
Albania 2. Germany 3 

st M t B W C» Ukraine 1ft Portugal ft Ger- 
mary ft Northern Ireland ft Armenia 3: Al- 
bania 1 

SOUTH AMERICAN GROUP 
Paraguay Z Colombia 1 
Perul. Ecuador 1 
BaSvIa Z Argentina I 
Uruguay X Venezuela 1 
T— — tarff oro go ny 2ft Colombia 17; 
Bolivia- 1ft Ecuador lft Argentina 1ft 
Uruguay 11 Pmi lft QiBeft Veneaieta 1. 


SEMIBNAL, XO LEO 
Cetta Vigo 1. Real Beds 1. 

nrmNAnoMAL ram dues 
Switzerland 1, Latvia 0 
France 1. Sweden ft 


CRICKET 


3d OME DAY BRnMAnOMAL 

SOUTH me* VS. AUSTRALIA 
WEOTCSOAV. HI CAPE TOWN 
South Africa lm’tngs2*$-8 (SO oven) 
AustraBa Innings: 199 a* out (44J avers) 
South Africa del. Australia try 46 runs ana 
lead 7 match series 2-1. 


ZIMBABWE vs. SRI LANKA 
THURSDAY. IN SHARJAH. U«E 
Zimbabwe htMngs:187-« (So overs) 

Sri Lanka Irmtogs: 188-3 (454 men) 
Sri Lanka del. Zimbabwe by 7 wickets 


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 
AMSUCAH LEAGUE 

baltuure -Agreed to terms wHhlNFCal 
Ripken an two-year cont rac t erienslan 
through 1999. Bought c ontract of RHP Mott 
Ramagll from CatsMft NAL. 

KANSASOTY— Boa gMun d iu ris of 3B Scott 
Cooperand RHP Rondy Veres from Omaha. 
AA_ Optioned OF Jon NimnaDy to Omaha- Pul 
RHP Jamie Bluma OF Dtortes Davis. RHP 
Richord Hutaman and OF Roderick Myosin 
15-day disabled HsL 

MINNESOTA —Bought contracts of 1 B Greg 
Cotaruna RHP Gregg Otson ond LHP Greg 
5 winded from Soft Lake Ofy, PCX. PM OP 
Khtay Puckett on 60-day disabled list. Op- 
honed OF Bieitt Brade to Salt LakeOty. 

NEW YORK YANKEES— Put OF RubMI 
Rivera on to-day dtaabtad BsL 

OAKLAND —Bought contract of LHP BIDy 
Brewer from Edmonton, PCI- Designated 
RHP Sadi Sendee lor ossignmenL 

SEATTLE — Agreed to twins with INF Al- 
varo Espinoza on one-year contract. 

Texas —Waived INF Dave SDvesbL 
Bought contracts L HP Eric Gunderson and 
INF Domingo Gedena, Front Oklahoma aty, 
AA. Agreed to iBmtswHh RHP John Burkett 
on two-year corrtnx* extension itimah 1999 
and wtrh OF Rusty Greer on two-yearcomrod 
extenston through 200ft 

TORONTO —Bought cardiac} of INF-OF 
Juan Samuel from Syracuse, ll_ Put RHP 
WTOam Rtaiey an60-doy dlsotaled HsL 
NATIONAL LEAQUE 

Atlanta -Put OF Daniel Bouttsta, LHP 
Pedro Bortton ond RHP Brytra Hazrey on 1S- 
daydtaaHedBst. 

Cincinnati —PM OF Stephan GfcroHer 
and RHP Jose R8o on 60-day rflsobled BsL 
Optioned SS Pokey Reese to Indiana paOs. 
AA. Added OF OzzJe Timmons to 40-man 
raster: ReooBed RHP Scott Sutawn from Irv- 
dbnapoRe. AA. 

Florida — A<peed to terms with OF Gary 
Sheffield on six-year contract extension 
through 200 ft 

Houston —Optioned LHP Aivfh Norman 
and RHP Donne Won to New Orirans. AA. 

Montreal -BOU0* coronas a RHP Lee 
SattavRHPArthBnyTleBBntlNFAitdySksMewkz 
rmd INF Doug Stamgrfmmaawn IL Deskfided 
IB Ryrm McGube tarasdpenenL 

PHILADELPHIA- PM OF Lenny Dykstraan 
60 -day disabled 1st. 

st. UHiis — Bought oontrod of I N F Roberto 
Me{lo from LoutsvTOe. AA. 


DENNIS THE 3 MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



terroni* taw tour Jarttai, 

sra bow is wdi rwa b> hn» 

taewdniyandA 


RANOB : 




19 


YUN1F 


fe!Bl 

!i 

[ NARIFA 


till 

11 

BW 





BEETLE BAILEY 


NON SEQUITUR 


DOONESBURY FLASHBACKS 


COMfW?a?TD 
HO»i*,5UMk« 
CM&CAN BCTHli 


tam*e*Bpm*4«rar«*4w 

^edifiedMcstm 


rftettetee: A** 

( Am —i kwrmfl 

— ' SSfd ESsSSSSL BLONDIE 

wd-aoouwbm* 



:.XOU WILL PRIFT ALOWS 
MARVEUNS AT THE CITIES 
AMP SCENERY - ON THE 

coast; 




WHAT ARE YWJ OOtNG, EU /07 


trr.'fynHJii 


every Tuesday, 
atisp contact 
»rtBiJ*B((nino)iirt 

0} 1 41 43 94 76 

0 ) 1 41 4398 TO 

jirest IKT office 

resenlative. 


HE TOLD ME CNCS 
THAT I COULP H WE 
ANY CHANGE THAT 
BULLS OUT OF 

HIS POCKET 





SRB87 Mfy Iftfar/ 4M. to 

















PAGE 22 


OBSERVER 


A Word for Baseball 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK— The point 
of this exercise is to say a 
good word for baseball My 
family has begged me not to 
do it. and who can blame 
them? 

Saying a good word for 
anything or anybody now- 
adays can get you blackballed 
from the Sociely of News- 
paper Columnists, not to 
mention the Pantheon of 
Talk-Radio Blab be ry. 

It is heart-breaking to see 
the fear in the children's 
faces. Little Ken-Boy. our 
youngest, asked with tear- 
stained face: “Does this 
mean you will never be in- 
vited to a Gridiron dinner to 
bask in the company of politi- 
cians delivering hilarious 
speeches crafted by profes- 
sional joke writers?" 

My daughter Fiordiligi be- 
lieves I am in the grip of a 
“martyr complex." Ever 
since changing her name 
from Annie to Fiordiligi she 
has accused me of harboring 
sundry “complexes." which 
she believes result from being 
psychically imprisoned in an 
Anglo-Saxon name. 

“Change your name to Gi- 
an giacomo." she urged, 
"and this suicidal impulse to 
say a good word about some- 
thing wiil pass, and you will 
be able to eat lunch in the 
National Press Club again." 

(Editor's interruption : 

Where is this going? Lei's 
move ahead to the baseball 
motif.) 

"What's more, you're fed 
up with baseball," Fiordiligi 
sobbed. “That's why you 
didn't renew your season 
tickets to the Orioles games. 
You told me so yourself. ‘I've 
had it with those crummy, 
overpriced seats,' you said. 
You washed your hands of the 
Orioles.” 


(Editor's interruption : 
You're just kidding me. right? 
You're warming up for an- 
other heart-chilling piece on 
Whitewater, or Hillary, or 
Gore's stiff posture, or the 
Lincoln Bedroom, or Paula 
Jones, or liberals, or Gin- 
grich, or right-wingers, or 
greedy CEOs milking their 
companies for those astound- 
ing salaries, or Disney or 
cops or cars or movies, right ? 
Put plenty of bile into it.) 

No, my dear editor and my 
beloved Fiordiligi, no longer 
will I contribute to the na- 
tional well-poisoning. Some- 
one has to start braking this 
national free fall toward des- 
pair. Hereafter when the Clin- 
tons arc my subject, what will 
be celebrated will be Bill's 
devotion to his late mother 
and Hillary *s fine relationship 
with her splendid daughter. 

f Editor: OX., at least give 
me just a little malarkey, 
please, about baseball: 
greedy owners and players 
ruining the American pas- 
time. the usual hokum. ) 

So let this good word be said 
for baseball: When the great 
Pooch Puccinelli played for 
the Orioles his salary was S35. 
That was for the season. You 
could buy a fine seat behind 
first base, the better to study 
Pooch's moves at the initial 
sack, for 75 cents. I didn't have 
that kind of money the after- 
noon Pooch hit five home runs 
in one game, but hearing about 
it made my day. That's one of 
the wonders of baseball. It has 
the power to make your day 
when yoQ don't have 75 cents 
to spare. Recently I read that 
one of this year's Orioles may 
soon depart unless they pay 
him $7 million. 

Naturally, only corpora- 
tions can afford seats behind 
fust base. What a glorious 
game! Let’s watch it on TV. 

(Editor: See me at once.) 

/Vfu 1 York Times Senure 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1997 


France Displays Art ‘Unclaimed 9 Since Nazi Era 


By Alan Riding 

iW a- York Times Sen-ice 

P ARIS — Embarrassed by charges that it 
still holds many artworks seized by Nazi 
occupation forces and returned to France 
after World War IL the French government 
has identified 987 paintings, drawings and 
sculptures that have not been reclaimed by 
the families or estates of their original own- 
ers. many of them Jewish collectors. 

France has always strongly denied trying 
to conceal the provenance of these works, 
many of which are on display in the Louvre, 
the Orsay Museum and the Georges Pomp- 
idou Center. Its decision to organize a special 
exhibition of the works, at the three mu- 
seums and other sites, nonetheless reflects its 
failure to convince critics that it has done 
everything possible to find their owners. 

The government is eager not to be drawn 
into the heated debate about the fate of 
Jewish property seized by the Nazis across 
occupied Europe, notably gold said to be 


deposited in Switzerland. 
In January, French Prin 





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In January, French Prime Minister Alain 
Juppe formed a committee to identify and 
locate property stolen from Jews in France 
during the war and never returned. Under- 
lining the importance that the French gov- 
ernment is giving to defusing the issue. Cul- 
ture Minister Philippe Douste-Blazy on 
Wednesday presented the 71 paintings. 54 
drawings and five sculptures to be displayed 
at the Orsay Museum from April 8 to May 4. 
They include oils and drawings by Gauguin, 
Degas. Seurat. Renoir, Monet. Sisley, Piss- 
arro. Courbet and Cezanne, as well as sculp- 
tures by Maillol. 

“I hope to demonstrate that the reality is 
more complex than that suggested by the 
rumor that French museums have hidden 
away veritable masterpieces seized from 
Jewish families by the Nazis,” Douste-Blazy 
told reporters. "Among the works, there are 
few masterpieces, even though there are 
some. Further, the term seizure is often in- 
appropriate. since many of the works were 
sold on the open market at a good price." 

While inviting valid claims to art looted 
by the Nazis, the government seems to ex- 
pect that few claims will actually be made, 
disproving accusations that it has been neg- 
ligent in seeking out the works' original 
owners. Francoise Cachin. who heads the 
French national museums department, said 
that 18.000 “visits" to the Culture Min- 
istry's Internet site displaying 400 un- 





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Philippe Douste-Blazy, French minister of culture, with Courbet p aintin g. 

claimed works had resulted in no fresh at the Chateau of Versailles will display 10 
claims over the last four months. " works in the coming weeks. The Culture 

Still, in an announcement evidently timed Ministry has also encouraged provincial mu- 
to coincide with the exhibition, the French seums to identify 700 lesser works that were 
Foreign Ministry said that three works — a seized by Nazi forces and are now on loan. 
1921 “Woman's Head" by Picasso and oils The balance of unclaimed works are in stor- 
by Albert Gleizes and Tsugoubara Foujita — age. 

would shortly be returned to heirs of their During the war. most of France’s national 

original owners. collections escaped confiscation as the Nazis 

The three paintings are among 38 works, concentrated on die major Jewish collec- 
including oils by Matisse, Utrillo, Ernst and dons. They turned the Jeu de Paume on the 
Leger. and drawings by Picabia, Derain and Place de la Concorde in Paris into a huge 
Dufy, to be on show at the Pompidou Center depository where the Nazi leader Hermann 
from April 9 to 21. Goering frequently came to take his pick. 

The largest collection of unclaimed and other senior Nazi officials looked for 
works. 678. is to be found in the Louvre, works for a museum in Linz planned by 
which will present them to the public from Hitler. But Nazi officers also frequently 
April 9 to May 5. although only signaling looted art found in Jews' homes, 
them with colored cards and not bringing After the Allied victory, Germany re- 
them together in special galleries. The col- turned 61 ,257 works of art to France, 45,441 
lection includes paintings by Rubens, Rib- of which were recovered by their rightful 
era, Corot, GericaulL Delacroix, Rousseau owners by 1949. The government then sold 
and Watteau, drawings by Ingres and Durer, 13,800 minor works, holding onto 2,058 
and Greek. Etruscan and Roman antiquit- considered to have some artistic importance 
ies. or which are evident fakes. - 

The National Ceramic Museum at Sevres These were presented to the public in the 
will present 131 objects, while the museum Chateau of Compiegne from 1950 to 1954 


before being distributed to museums for dis- 

were reclaimed between 
1950 and 1996. the presumption being that 
the owners of most other works weneamong 
the 76.000 Jews deporred from France to 
Nazi camps. Only about 2.000 of them sur- 
vived the Holocaust. .... iiam 

The issue was not reopened imnl Not em- 
ber 1995, when an American journalist liv- 
ing in Paris. Hector Feliciano, published a 
book, “Le Musee Disparu,” in which he 
accused the government of making little 
effort to find their owners- 

Feliciano's book, to be published m the 
United States next month by Basic Books 
under the title “The Lost Museum," caused 
an. immediate stir in the French press. 

Tbe French museums department was 
soon on the defensive, with Cachin first 
asserting rfwr the disputed works were all 
labeled with the letters MNR. standing for 
M usees Nationaux Recuperation, and could 
easily be claimed. 

Last November, she presided over a 
stormy daylong symposium on the issue at 
the Louvre and opened the Web site with 
information in French on the works. (Its 
address is http://www.cul ture-fr. the infor- 
mation is under a section called “Docu- 
mentation — Catalogue des MNR-' * ) 

The opening of the special exhibitions in 
French museums this month, however, is 
easily the most important step in the^ gov- 
ernment’s move to appease its critics. * 'The 
only way of ending this embarrassment is to 
do a real ownership search," Feliciano said- 
“You can’t just have a passive search by 
displaying the works. You need an active 
search. I was able to trace some of the 
owners. Why can’t the government? At no 
moment in the past 50 years did it look 
properly for the owners or their heirs." 

Feliciano also echoed concern expressed 
by some experts that, having m a d e the ges- 
ture of displaying these works, the gov- 
ernment may argue that no more rightful 
c laiman ts exist and. consequently, propose 
legislation to give the nation formal own- 
ership over the works. “I would not like this 
to happen," the author said. * ‘but the tempta- 
tion exists." 

Asked about the future, the culture min- 
ister said that a committee had been formed 
to make recommendations. “1 hope there 
will be people who find works here to show 
that recovery is possible. Some think there 
will be few. 1 hope there will be many." 



r 

L 


■i Only 



Euln/Th, ,W«rd Rn. 

Emmanuelle Beart at a demonstration in August 


T HE fashion house Dior said 
Thursday that it was sticking 
with Emmanuelle Beart The daily 
Le Monde had reported that Dior had 
decided to let her advertising con- 
tract lapse after the actress was pho- 
tographed without makeup and with 
untidy hair during demonstrations on 
behalf of immigrants. Dior's couture 
chief. Francois Beaufume. said. 
“Asa citizen. Bean has her opinions, 
and we perfectly respect her freedom 
of expression. She has perfectly rep- 
resented the image of Dior high fash- 
ion and perfumes since 1995.” 
Beaufume would not say when 
Bean’s contract was due for renewal, 
adding. “When the time conies, we 
shall deal with the question." 


Joni Mitchell has found the 
daughter she put up for adoption 32 
years ago. * * Apparently her daughter 
was looking for her. too. so there's 
sort of a fairy-tale ending." 
Mitchell's father. Bill Anderson, 
said in an interview from his home in 


Saskatoon. Saskatchewan. Mitch- 
ell s only child was conceived while 
she was an an student living in Cal- 
gary. Alberta. Her parents weren't 
told about the pregnancy until ai 
least two years after the bizth. 
“We’re quite happy, and we’re 
looking forward to meeting her 
later." said Anderson, who learned 
about 10 days ago that his grand- 
daughter had been found. He would 
not give further details. "Joni is just 
gathering her thoughts to go public.’ ’ 
said Bob Merits of Reprise Records. 
Mitchell's record labeL He said she 
would make a statement later. 


Carl Wilson, the lead guitarist of 
the Beach Boys, is undergoing 
chemotherapy and radiation treat- 
ment after cancer was found in his 
brain and a lung. Doctors said they 
believed they had identified the can- 
cer early and could control it in order 
to provide a speedy recovery in time 
for the group's annual summer tour, 
the publicist Alyson Dutch said. 


PEOPLE 


ently they caught it and he 
able to tour by May." she 


The Writers Guild of America has 
quietly restored screenwriting credits 
to 24 films, including “The Robe," 
“Inherit the Wind" and “Bom 
Free," to 10 writers who wrote the 
films under pseudonyms because 
they were blacklisted during the Mc- 
Carthy era. The Guild had already 
announced credit changes for 10 
films, including “Roman Holiday" 
and "Lawrence of Arabia.” One 
blacklisted writer whose credits have 
been restored is Bernard Gordon. 
His “Hellcats of the Navy." a 1957 
comedy, is the only movie in which 
Ronald Reagan and Nancy Davis, 
who later became his wife, appeared 
together. Others who will now get 
credits are Hugo Butler, writer or co- 
writer of * The Adventures of Robin- 
son Crusoe." “Autumn Leaves" and 
* ‘The Young One' ’; Butler’s widow. 
Jean Rouvenal Butler, also for 


"Autumn Leaves”; Lester Cole, 
“Bom Free”; Nathan E. Douglas. 
“Inherit the Wind"; Albert Malta, 
co-writer of “The Robe”; AI and 
Helen Levitt, a busband-and-wife 
t*nm who wrote several films far the 
Walt Disney studio; Adrian Scott, 
“Conspiracy of Hearts.” and Julian 
Zimet, “Pancbo Villa” and “A 
Place for Lovers." 


Two Fox prime-time series, 
“The X-Files” and “The 
Simpsons." and six programs from 
WGBH-TV in Boston were among 
31 winners of the George Foster 
Peabody Awards. The awards, ad- 
ministered by the University of 
Georgia’s Henry W. Grady College 
of Journalism and Mass Commu- 
nications, honor broadcast and 
cable excellence. NBC was also rec- 
ognized, for “Law & Order,” and 
ABC, for “NYPD Blue." The 
sports journalist and filmmaker 
Bud Greenspan won a Peabody for 
his chronicling of die Olympic 


Games, and Radio Smithsonian 
won for “Black Radio: Telling It 
Like It Was,” a 13-pait documen- 
tary about radio’s crucial role in the 
evolution of American black com- 
munities. Tomer Network Enter- 
tainment and Steven Spielberg 
were recognized for a Holocaust 
documentary that included testimo- 
nials by survivors, personal pho- 
tographs and artifacts. 


A jury believed Ron Shelton’s 
claim that 20th Century Fox reneged 
on its promise to pay him half of the 
net profit for directing the 1992 
movie “White Men Can’t Jump" 
and awarded him 59.8 million in 
compensatory damages. Shelton’s 
lawyer said the movie made S50 j. 
million, but the studio claimed it lost 
$10 million. A Fox spokeswoman-,-, ;; 
said the studio would ask a judge td? ' 
set aside the verdict. Failing that, she ; ; 
said, the studio will appeal. Shelton 
also directed “Bull Durham.” "Tin 
Cup,” “Blaze.” and “Cobb." 






■sx&s 


Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 


makes calling home and to other countries really easv. 


calling from and you'd get the fastest, dearest connec- 


tions home. And be sure to charge your calls on your 


AT&T Calling Card. It’il help you avoid outrageous 


phone charges on you r hotel bill and save you up to 


60%? So when in Rome (or anywhere else for that 


matter), do as many business travelers do. Use AT&T. 


Please check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 


AT&T Access Nmnbgrs 


. 028 - 785-011 

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0688 - 89-0311 


Sweden 

Switzerland*... 
Unttnd nagdomA. 


Belgium* 0-810-100-10 

Czech Republic* ... ... 00-42-000-181 

France . 0-800-99-0011 

Germany 0130-8010 

Greece* 00-800-1311 

Ireland . 1-880-550-080 

Haly* 172-1811 

Netherlands* (J3CIHJ22-9111 

Russia •* (Moscow) > . 755-5842 Konya* ..- .... .MOO-10 

Spain. 800-99*08-11 Snath Africa - 0-80009-0123 

Can’i find the AT&T Access Number for the country you’re calling 6am? Jns ask any operator for 
AT&T Direct* Service, or rish our Web die an bttp^wwji t C OBl Aggveler 


Steps to follow for easy call lag worldwide: 

1. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country you 
are calling from. 

2. Dial the phone number you're calling. 

3 Dial die calling card number listed above your name. 


Egypt •( Cairo)*. 

Israel 

Seed! Arablao 


177 - 100-2727 


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