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Ik •* 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s DatOy 


Paris, Saturday-Sunday, April 5-6, 1997 




By Charles Tiueheait 

, WaafttHg^g Post Service 

PARIS — Forget Paris. Las Ve^ is 
atmt to offeryiMiamiJcj^'iinich better 
version: One whhmit Frendi p^le.' 
jDne widiom dog pcxip on the sidewalks. 
Qne where die mexius aiie in and 

the waiters say, “HB, Ttn Dwayne.** and 
retura 'pn»n{Xly with yotir fo<^ 

. It*s .called Paris X.as V^as, and its 
most strildng symbol will be an '‘Eiffel 
Tower” SO stones hi^ ab^ half the 
stature of the dung,- with a amiming 

vricw of greater Las Veg^acity of light 

^in its own lighL 

. Onhs24acxes(10hectafes)alsowill' 
be a toy Arc de l^omphe and ^prox- 
imadons of die Paris opera house, the 
Seine river and its bridges, the De Sl 
L ouis, the me de ia Paix, the Mont- 
parnasse ^uarte, a Metro stadoo (where 
a monorail wall stc^), and many other 
sights seen by American tourists who 
today have to make the mme conpli- 
cated trip to Paris. Brance. 

Paris Las Vegas^is a S750 mtiKnn 
project by Hotels Cotp., with a 
3,000-room hotel, nine restaurants anH 
an 8S,000^oaie-foot (7,650-sqnare- 
meter) casino. Construct io n will begin 
4fu5 month cm a patch of sand on the 
.^Golden hfile* ’ of^ Las Vegas Sttm, 
and convenient to ancient Rome, 
Egypt of the Phaiacdis, a^ King Ar- 
thur’s Pn glanrt 

The city the' new iroject seeks to 
evoke is, loosely ^peaking, the Paris of 
the last turn of the cen&iry, and h win be 
open , for business just in time fer the 
next tme. 

Arthur Goldberg, die.fffesideiit of 

• Hilton's gaming c^jenidons, was in Par- 
is widi a retinue of corporate people to 
unveil the project They were received 
at Cio^ HaU- ^ Mayor Jean Tjberi. 

Mr. Tiberi viewed the arcUtectural 
renderings and pronoimced hiniBftlf 
“irapie^^ by the ^gandsm of this 
proje^” as well as ”1^ Us quadty and 
Its chic,” 

Ftench disdain for American excess' 
- sec<wBM .' 0 ha*g-b<KAi suspende d i n -fee— 
face of this bomage in Nevada. Ctae 

• Hilton official said, “We haven't en- 
countered it at all." 

Mr. Goldberg told Mayw Ilbair “1 
visited here numerous times and tried m 
think up something that the petmle of 
the United States would enjt^ is they 
would never come to Paris." 

Mr. Tiberi, for his part, said he hoped 
Paris Las Vegas would teo^ its visitors 
^tf> see the original in “all its 
grandeur." 

I^ris Las Vegas may draw still more 
people to Las Vegas, which counts 
about 35 million visitors a year, ateut 
three times as many as come to Paris, 
France, diese days. 

When Goldberg told Mr. ‘Hberi 
that one leg of the mim-Bfiel Tower 
planted in me new casino would house 
“the cage where we ke^ our mcme}[," 
Mr. Tiberi quipped that it would te nice 
if Paris could have a share of iL The 

See VEGAS, Page 5 


F^nch Court Rebuffs Renault on Closing Plant in Belgium 

A Belgian pc^ceman brandishing his riot stick and shield during a dash with 900 Renault workers in Brussels 
on Friday. The woikers were protesting the closing of their plant In Paris, meanwhile, a court ruled that Renault 
must restart talks with unions about closing the plant and cutting 3, 1 (X) jobs. Page 9. 


A Big Problem Kohl Can’t Sit Out 

Re-election Decision Raises the Stakes Over Restructuring 


By John Schmid 

ItoentaSotiai HeraMTritidie ' 


FRANKFURT ■ — ■ One of the 
harshest and moscrecurrmg cridcisms of 
Chancellor Hehnut K^’s 15-yev ten- 
ure is diat be tends toward ''aussitzen” 
literally to “rit put" his m^lems by 
whhdiawing^d putting on decisioiis. 

With, his announcement this week 
chatheis seekmg re-Olectidi. a full year 
and « hdf befcm die vote, Mr. Kdbl 
- b ewe d -to pracolire w i di ia ow n « 
cTcasingly imi^ent ranks to advance a 
raft c& ecootomic and social restructur- 
ing pn^rams' thaX are as unpopular as 


di^ are urgent Those initiatives, many 
of diem floundering, stood their best 
chance, Mr. Kdil’s allies urged, only if 
be bundled them in a single campaign 
platform and carried diem fbrw^ by 
hitching them to his own political fate. 

In that sense, Mr. Kohl's decision to 
run again has as much to do with restor- 

~ NEWS ANALYSIS 

ing CDoridence in die embattled agenda 
for his foudi terin as it does with win- 
ning a fifth one. 

much of this year, Mr. Kohl's 
coalmon supporters complained that 


dieir buriy leader was failing to show 
leadership by failing to articulate his 
political ambitions. This renewed fears 
that Mr. Kohl had resorted to ducking 
issues, ju^ as criticism of the government 
wsK fk^shing, public discontent was on 
the rise and unemployment hit a recosd 
4.7 milUon, the highest since Hitler began 
his rise to power in the Depression. 

Selling a new and untested European 
currency to the stubbornly Euro-wary 
Germans stands as the most obvious 
program that cannot advance' without 
die activism of Kohl, on ardent 

See KOHL, Page 5 


Drop in U,S, Joblessness Rattles Markets 


1 The Dollar I 

NMrVbifc 

fttavcapM 

prawtoutetoH 

OM 

1.6841 

1.67 

Pound 

1.8345 ' 

T.6448 

Yw 

124.315 

122.615 

FF 

&671 

&5245 



Afda/GioM 

piMtaUiGtoM 

+7.18 • 

6484.58 

6477.35 

S&P 500 1 

ehsnga 

FiWKy 9 3 P.I4.' 

pnwIeuidaM 

+2A8 

753.00 

750.32 


'The U.S. unemployment rate fell to 
S.2 percent in March firom 53 percent 
in February, the Labor Department 
said Friday, alamung financial mar- 
kets worried about ini^aa. 

The decline in unemployment was 
the lowest seasmially adjusted rate in 
rive months, the department said, as 
moderate job growth was increased by 
g?w« in Se co m puter industry and ar 
retail and financial businesses. 

The gain last month of 175.000 new 
jobs ' was accompanied by an accel- 
eration in labor costs and record fac- 
tory overtime pay, suggesting that the 


inflation rate could be on the rise. 

While the March employment gain 
fell short of forecasts, workers’ av- 
enge hourly earnings rose 0.4 percent 
last month — or 5 cents. That puts 
wage growth up 4 per^t for the past 
12 months, above the inflation rate. 

Factory overtime also rose to a re- 
cord 4.9 hours per worker per week. 

‘ 'It’s not a riightening report, but it’s 
not a relaxing cxie,'' an analyst said. 

Wall Street to^ the report as an- 
other sign that Federal Reserve Board 
policymakers will have to raise in- 
terest races again. I^ge 9. 



‘Camp David’ Talks 


U»S, Unsure 
How to Deal 
With Israel 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Fost Stnice 

WASHINGTON — The breakdown 
of Middle East peace negotiations is 
forcing the Clinton administration to 
confnmt two crucial areas of disagree- 
ment between the United States and 
Israel that the two countries have mostly 
papered over for 30 years: Jewish set- 
tlements in the occupied territories and 
the status of Jerusalem. 

As long as there was no prospect of 
peace between Israel and die Priestin- 
ians. it was possible to finesse ih^ 
issues with verbal formulas that punted 
them into the future. 

But now the Clinton administration is 
in a diplomatic pickle because long- 
standing U.S.-Israeli differences may 
have to be addressed directly once and 
for all, a process that could expose the 
adminisoration to considerable political 


NEWSAJV.UYSIS 

risk. The issue has been forced by Is- 
rael's dedsion to proceed with a hous- 
ing project for Jews in the mostly Arab 
eastern part of Jerusalem, a d^sion 
denounced by the Arabs as a violation of 
an Israeli-Palestiitian peace agreement 
to which the United States is a sig- 
natory. 

To Israel, the area known as Har 
Homa, where construction of 6.SOO 
housing units for Jews has commenced, 
is just a neighborhood in a city that is 
and wrill remain under Israeli sover- 
eignty. To Che F^escinians and other 
Arabs, the project is a unilateral attempt 
by Israel to s^e with bulldozers and 
cranes issues that Israel committed itself 
in the 1993 Oslo peace agreement to 
settle through "finai status" negoti- 
ations. 

-- If the Clinton adminisliaiion appears 
to be in a quandary over how to re- 
concile the seemingly irreconcilable, 
that is because it is, according to senior 
administratimi orilcials, Arab diplomats 
and independent analysts. 

The a^inisuation is investing lai^e 
amounts of high-level time in searching 
for some way to hurdle this obstacle, 
including President Bill Clinton's meet- 
ing Tu^day with King Hussein of 
Jordan and a scheduled meeting 
Monday with Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu of Israel. 

The peace process is in ' 'dire straits," 
the State Department spokesman, Nich- 
olas Bums, said this past week. “Ob- 
viously. what wre have in mind is using 
the influence of the United States and 
the leadership of the president and the 
secretary of state" to “help the Israelis 
and Palestinians overcome tiieir difiler- 
ences. But I can't speculate on bow 
we’re going to do thaL" 

“Har Homa represents two ‘final 

See POLICY, Page 5 


PLO Balks 
At Push for 
Quick Fix 

CiunpUrJni /to- 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu offered Friday lo 
meet American wd Palestinian leaders 
for three-way Camp David-st^'ie talks if 
necessary to forge a final peace deal. 

But even as the prime minister spoke. 
Israeli troops in Hebron baaled 400 
Palestinian stone-throwers on the 16th 
consecutive day of West Bank rage over 
a Jevnsh settlement in Arab ^st Je- 
rasalem. A Hebron hospital treated 16 
Arabs for wounds from rubber bulleu. 
Violence alsoempted in Bethlehem and 
East Jerusalem. 

“As soon as violence against us stops, 
we can clear up all ouisuinding ques- 
tions in six months." ^ir. Netanyahu 
said in the interview on the German 
ARD television station trom Israel be- 
fore a meeting with President Bill Clin- 
ton at the While House on Monday. 

“If we don't manage that within that 
time, then Arafat. President Ginton and 
I can uy to settle the Israeli-Paiesiinian 
dilute in a sort of Camp David sum- 
miL" he said, referring to the Pales- 
tinian leader, Yasser Arafat. 

Thirteen ^ys of intensive U.S.-ls- 
raeli-Egyptian talks ar the U.S. pres- 
idential retreat in Camp David near 
Washington in 1978 paved the way for 
Israel’s 1979 peace treaty with Egypt, 
its first with an Arab state. 

Washington, the main sponsor of in- 
terim peace deals signed by Israel and 
the Palestinians since 1993. has de- 
scribed as premature reports in the U.S. 
and Israeli news media of a possible 
Camp Davfd meeting to clinch an Is- 
raeli-^alestine Liberation Oiganization 
deal. 

Palestinians balked at Mr. Netan- 
yahu's revived offer to skip over an 
existing deal on phased Israeli West 
Bank troop pullbacks and instead race to 
complete ^for-broke “final status" 
peace talks within half a year. 

“This is a black joke." smd Hassan 
Asfour, a Palestinian negotiator. 

Under the existing de^, Israel is due 
to withdraw from West Bank rural areas 
in three pha.ses by mid- 1 998 and to seal 
a final peace deal with the PLO by May 
1999. The PLO wants to receive more 
territory before closing a final accord. 

Palestinians have not ruled oura Camp 
David-style meeting but doubt Wash- 
ington's ability to be an honest broker 
after it twice vetoed United Nations Se- 
curity Council resoIuticMis to censure Is- 
rael over the Jerusalem settlement. 

Mr. Arafat said the main goal of any 
U.S. initiative would have to be to stop 
settlement construction. 

‘ T am not against it,' ’ Mr. Arafat said 
when asked whether he was ready to 
meet with Mr. Netanyahu to try lo over- 
come the crisis. 

But. he said, the problem was how to 
“prevent the breaching of the peace 

See ISRAEL, Page 5 


Constitution Controversy Hits Manila 

Aquino Breaks Silence to FigldMove to Lift Presidential Term Limit 


By Setfa Mydaos 

New York Tunes Service 


AAKUA — It was enot^ to 
azon Aquino back into the' politic 
la. Her one unquestioned achieve- 
it.as president — the re-establish- 
it of democracy in die PWlippiDes — 
ned to her to be nnder tbreaL 
1 am ready to march when the tune 
tes," she said recently, reviving the 
on of the “people power” uprising 
helped her drive Ferdinand Marcos 
0 power 1 1 years ago. 

In. Aquino's return to the spotlight 

response to a growing movement to 

ind the so-called Aquino Consdtu- 
of 1 987 that limits a president to one 

year term. The proposed dhangfi. 
ng all term limits, would allow hCT 
lessor. Fidel Ramos, to run again 
Eyear. . , j. 

hose backing the cbMge, 
ly business executives, SM 
los as the indispensable archit^of 
:ounny *s economic revival, with no 
rly qualified successw on the ho- 


Mewsstand Pric» 
a laOOFF Morocco 16 » 

5 f2.50FF Qatar ...laoo Rials 

oon_1.600CFA Riuniro .....—12.60 FF 

.££6.50 Saudi Aisbia».10.00R. 

I 10-00 ^ Sawgai i.iQOCFA 

1100 CFA 225PTAS 



)n LL aOOO U-S- <Sut.).m..$1-20 




rizoh. Under his leadeishm, the Phil- 
jppiiies, with its rieewbeenog democ- 
racy wide-open press, has begun to 
challenge l!te Southeast Asian mo^l of 
growth through ti^t government con- 
nol. 

“You have proven that democracy 
and development in tins part of the woild 
can go hand in hand,*' Preadent Bill 
nfnmn told Mr. Ramos in November 
when he jc^ned leadm. from around the 
reman at an eoDUKmic xneetixtg in tiie 
Fhilq^ines. Opponents of .tiie consti- 
tutional change see an echo of 1972, 
when Mr. Maicos, also bailed' from 
seeking a new term, held on to power by 
mar tial ]aw and j^tffiged 
country into a ruinous period bfiepHes- 
sipn, corruption and economic collapse. 

“What we have to giM against is 
the divinveness that ^ come about 
when people start fooling around vnth 
the constitution," Aquino said in a 

rare poIilKad statenaeat 


Since ending her own six-year term in 
1992, Mrs. Aquino has mc^y slij^ied 
back into the comfortable obscurity she 
enjoyed before challenging Mr. M^os, 
living quietly on bCT &imy estate and 
beadmg a foundation that is still seeking 
a focus for its activities. 

Mr. Ramos himself, now 69, has been 
coy about his intentions, repeatedly 
denying that he wants to stay in power 
but allowing his supporters to woik fora 
coastitutional change. 

The Philippines* Suprrae Court re- 
cently invalidated a petition drive that 
could have fenced a constitutional con- 
.vention and that claimed to have 
■gathered 5 million sign^ures suppWT- 
ing a chan^. Mr. Ramos was one of the 
to say tile court's ruling could be 
appealed — while again asserting that 
be had no plans to run. 

Mir. Ramos’s achievements as pres- 

See MANILA, IHige 4 





AGENDA 


France Blocks British Bid for Thomson 


Invoking national security, Paris 
barred a Friday for France's lead- 
ing defense-electronics manufacturer, 
state-owned Thomson-CSF, from Bri- 
tain '$ General Electric Co. 

Thomson will now be sold by the 
government to one of two competing 
French comranies, Alcatel Alsthom or 
Lagardere Group, and the resulting 
firm will be Europe’s larg^ man- 
ufacturer of defense electronics. 

Grc complained about the French 
action, charging that state restrictions 
were blocking European integration of 
defense industries, rage 9. 


IkL 

ZAIRE TALKS NEAR » Mar- 
shal Mobutu, after talks Friday 
with his new prime minister on 
the eve of peace talks. Page 2. 


Books 

Page 6. 



Opinion 

Pages. 

Sports 

Pages 18-19. 

internations/ CiassffiM 

Page 13. 

1 The IHT on-line http; 

//m'Av.ihLcom | 


THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

.4n Act of Compassion Gone /ftriy 

ASUURACIFIC Page 4. 

Chino.* Rig Stays in Disputed Area 

ART Pages. 

A GHmpse at the First Palazzo 

U.S. Clocks Changing 

Most of the United States and 
Canada move from standaid time to 
daylight time this weekend, joining 
West European nations, which 
changed their clocks a week ago. 
Americans and Canadians will move 
their clocks ahead one hour at 2 A.M. 
in each time zMie. There will be no 
time change in Arizona, Hawaii, the 
part of Indiana in the eastern time 
zone. Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin 
Islands and American Samoa. 


Bad News for Sports- Car Salesmen: The Midlife Crisis Is a Myth 


By Megan Rosenfeld 

Poft Service 


WASHINGTON — Another cherished concept 
of the modem age — the midlife crisis — may soon 
be rotii^ from the clich£ wardrobe, stashed away 
in the bottom drawer with the Communist Menace 

and Girls Can't Throw. 

Increasing but still incomplete research is show- 
ing that the whole thing is pretty much a myth. 

No one is going so ftr as to call « a conspiracy 
between sports car manufacturers and unemployed 
social scientists, but according to recem and soon- 
to-be-published studies, the entire-concept of a 
midlife brake-screeching, earth-shaking, hair-dye- 


in^ bimbo-loving, job-ditching, ab-toning.Tahiti- 
gomg trauma is a bunch of hooey — scientifically 
^leaking, that is. 

“Not more than 1 out of lOpeqple are re^rting 
an experience in midlife called a crisis," said 
Gilbert Brim, dir^tor of the MacArthur Foun- 
dation Research Network on Successful Midlife 
Development. “Nearly everyone goes throu^ 
changes. But most move through it successfully 
and come mt with somewhat different aspira- 
tions." 

Mr. Brim, 71, is heading a nine-year. $20 mil- 
Uem multidisciplinary project that began in 1 989 to 
study thousanos of people between the ages of 30 
and 70. 


The idea was that there are reams of data about 
adolescents and seniors but not too much about the 
largest midsection of life. Certain best-selling pop- 
ular studies cast life as a series of pr^ctable 
events (marriage, job. children, retirement and so 
on) that tend to pi^uce an “is that all feere is?" 
kind of cataclysm ar about 50. when runs 
off with his secret^, or, in a more recent twist. 
Mom decides she is a lej^an and leaves to raise 
goats on a commone. 

In fact, research is showing, middle age is the 
most fl»ibfe, happiest and mostpro^tive time of 
life. Scientists are actually conftmiing diat we not 
only leant things as we get older, we solve some of 
our problems and unddxtand more about life. 


“Part of our agenda is to replace some of the 
mythology with b^er ideas of wbai really happens 
so organizations and individuals can make their 
decisions on a more sensible basis." said Mr. 
Brim, who runs the program from Vero Beach. 
Honda. 

The physicians, psychologists, sociologists, an- 
thropologists and biologists involved in the project 
meet three times a year, and the rest of the time 
communicate electronically. 

They have a Web site {hcro;//midmac.med.har- 
vard.edu) and have publishen three books and 200 
papers. 

See MYTH, Page 5 








Uncertain Mission 
For Albania Force 

EjfortSeen as a Test for Europe 


By Jane Perlez 

yort Times Service 


VIENNA — The multina- 
tional force that is to try to re- 
store order to Albania will not be 
jc^xmsiUe fiardiaannzng oftim- 
ary civilians or c riminals who 
acqui^ weapons during re- 
cent insurrection, the coordin- 
ator of the European effort said 

But exactly how the S.OOO- 
member force, led by Italy and 
including troops Cram seven 
other countries, would operate 
in teiritOTy wfa^ armed gang- 
sters rule is not clear. 

It has not even been decided, 
for example, whether tiie troops 
would be pennitt^ to return 
fire if fund upon, said Rram 
Vranitzky, the former Austrian 
chancellor who is coordinating 
the military and civilian efforts 
under the auspices of the Or- 
ganization for Security and Co- 
operation in Europe. 

[The Italian Foreign Ministry 
said Friday that the Italian-led 
multinational security force 
was ejpectdd to begin deploy- 
ment in Albania in the we^ 
beginning A^ 14, Reuters re- 
ported frra Rome. 

[The ministry named the date 
in a statement regarding the out- 
come of a fust meeting b Rome 
of senior diplomats fiom eight 
countries that have eitfaCT 
pledged troops to the force or 
said they were cmisiderii^ tak- 


ing part The face's arrival had 
originally been planned for next 
Saturday.] 

The effort to send forces to ' 
Albania, where tiie central gov- 
ernment has no control outside 
the capital and where much of 
the country has dissolved into 
anned fiefdoms, is seen as a 
critical test of bow the Euro- 
pean security organization 
manages a volatile crisis on its 
doorstro. 

Mr. vranitzky, who until his 
lesi^iation tfar^ montibs ago 
ran a quiet, neutral nadtm, said 
of Albania during a news con- 
ference ‘ 'This is a strange coun- 
tiy." 

He added: “You are deal^ 
with a situation unlike anydung 
in Central Europe. You can’t go 
to a central oraoe and ask, how 
much wheat flour do you 
have." 

Security conditions are so 
bad, be said, that the multina- 
tional force would start mod- 
estly from a “few {wims where 
security can be adieved in re- 
latively short time." 

The rules of engagement un- 
der which the foreign troops 
would operate are a sensitive 
question. Mr. Vranitzky said 
the force would not arrive with 
a “belligerent intent" but was 
coming to safeguard aid eflbrts 
and build a secure environ- 
ment 

But many Albanians xemem- 



uioti 

Bombs Tied to U.K. Vote 




Take an Economic Toll 


By Bany James 

/MpnttfiOHa/ TKbum 


ciw, to Northampton. About 2 0 
at OT I 


A British election canq>aign has 
again broufifit Nortbero Lreland inior 
to me mamland With a botnb 
scare officials said, appeared to be 
t nfumrfed to maximum damage to 
the ecooonw. 

Frime Minister JoZm Major blamed 

the Irish Ri^Hiblican Army for the bomb 

th reats mat forced the closiDg of kxrg 
i;e ctiO"« of the nation’s busiest hi^- 
ways for more 24 hours. The IRA 


has' a lorn record of attacking trans- 
tion uoks. 


Italian marines In the multinational force boarding ship after a trainir^ eserdse Friday. 


ber that Italy, which is to coo- 
tribute half the force, occupied 
their country during both world 
wars. 

In a further sign of the un- 
certainty in which the multina- 
tioial force will be rotating. 
Hungary decided Wednesday 
to reject an invitation from Italy 
to participate. Prime Minister 
Gyula Horn said there were in- 
sufficient guarantees for the 
safe^ of Hungarian troc^. 

WariiingtoD is watcfamg Al- 


bania closely and has pushed 
ibr At Organization ftx Secu- 
rity and Cooperatioi in Eun^, 
nuher than the European Unimi. 
to coordinam the effort. St^ 
DqMutzneot officials said 
Thursday. The United States is 
a memba of the securi^ or- 
ganization. 

The United States will 
contribute any troops to the tnii- 
itaty mission bid plans to send 
specialists to Albania to help 
organize paiiiamentaiy elec- 


tions scheduled for the end of 
June, the officials said. 

In unusually «Jmng lan- 
guage. the State Department 
has said for several weeks that 
for the of Albania. 

President Sali Bezisha should 
step down. Aimou^ Albania is 
a small, impovezisbed country 
of 3.2 miTnon people, Wb^- 


poitation 

PolicemeD reopened tiie Ml noiili- 
soum expressway Friday and allowed 

traffic to resume on the parallel M5 and 

M6 eiqire&sways after a stoppa^ tiiat 
the Transport Assocranon es- 
timated cost mdustry £3.5 million 

($5.74 million). 

^licemen destroyed one exfdosive 
device to an overhead section 

of highway and removed anotiier. 

Police officials said the devices could 
have r**>**v* serious and loss of 

life bad tfa^ ei^oded. Hie bomb on the 
Ml was placed against a pillar close to 
an intersection used by up to 1^,000 
vefairies evmy wMikdsy arid ^ site of a 
new raiiTTui/i link to tiie CoDtinenL 
The search fa the bombs Thursday 
began after a coded wamiiig to tiie po- 
lice. As bomb eiqietts began a seardi of 

bridges, ramps and overhead sections. 


an estim 


lanms 

nawpA 


quarter of 
diverted oi 


a million 
onto smaller 


tngtOQ has been coneemed 
that instabUity there could fo- 
ment renewed unrest elsewhere 
in the Balkans. 


vdiicles were - 

roads, creating traffic jams tiiat trailed 
for hnnmeds of miles. 

The bombs were planted in the 
of Britain’s imhMtnai belt, stretching 
from Bimringham. the naticm's second- 


cbe couDny’s exports aw 
uuui the area, and many fectwes thtt 
denend on ju*-in-time deirvenes wer^ 
disrupted. A week ago. the CRA caused 
havoc on the railroeds by pl a nt i ng tw^ 

bombs on the track near Manchester^ 
warning tiiat bombs bad been piace^ 

Ite p"«m station in the city of X3oi^ 

caster. . . 

The terrorist group, whose poht^ 
wing, Sinn Fein, has been exclucM 
from peace mlks in the province, seeks^ 
to end British rule in Ulster. 

The IRA pkmred several MnaUbombj 
in London in the days leading to the last 
eeneial election, in 1992. Then, aflertfae 
^^ectitm of a Conservative govet^- 
fr dct^Hted two hutt bombs m 
using dozens of mlograms of 
plastic expl^ves that intelligence e^ 
pelts said came from Libya. 

The IRA frequently, uses actual or 
hoax bomb scares to disrupt traffic ^ 
tigth mif hitting the headlines in 
matnianri Biitazo. The asswlt on ^ 
nation's tiansportatiai system, creatirm 
chara for mimnns of peos^ appeared 
aimed at grabbing attention in the cam- 
paign leamng up to tfac 1 general 
election. 

In Belfast. Sinn Fan. has be|:un .a 
campaig n to reuapuite tiie seat m the 
House of Commmis tiiat had been held 
by Gerry Adams, the leader of ting/ 
group. Mr. Adams lost tiie scat in 199^> 
to a moderate doctor, Joe Hendnxi, who 
has been a vehement oi^xment of >q- 
(dence in the province. 

A qKdcesman for tbe Labour Party, 
witiictii is expected to win the genera) 
electiw, said that a. Labour government 
would oppose violence and leixotiszp 
“tooth- 







In Zaire, France Sees the Hand of Washington 


BRIEFLY 


By Howard W. Freocfa 

Ne^' York Times Service 


one senior American diplomat 
called “ lialliicinatinng •• fiut 


ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — 
Nearly a century ago. when a 
British flotilla stoned down 
the Nile from Khartoum, tbe 
suiroun^g of a remote French 
outpost forced Paris to lower its 
flag there and forever abandon 
its colcMiial designs on eastern 
Africa. 

Tbe French have never for- 
gotten tbe bitter 1899 bumili' 
ation. known as tbe Fashoda 
Incident, after tbe surrendered 
Sudanese garxisoo town. And 
today, with English-speaking 
countries of East Africa sup- 
porting an advancing rebelUcn 
m Zaue, many in France are 
warning of a sUar debacle for 
Fiance s position in Africa. 

Throu^out Zaire's six- 
month-old civil war, Paris has 
been haunted by histCHrilcal set- 
backs dating to Fashoda. But in 
place of die "treacherous 
band" of the British that Paris 
once denounced, many in 
France have come to see the 
turmoil in cencral AMca as a 
reckless. American-led drive to 
rearrange the political mm of 
tbe regioa at the eniense of tra- 
dition^ly strong French influ- 
ence there. 

In recent weeks, virtually 
every major F^di newspaper 
has published articles speculat- 
ing on American sui^ioTt for the 
Zairian rebels via Rwanda and 
Uganda, from supposed Amer- 
ican combat advisers killed in 
action to weqron suites and 
logistic^ help. 

Washingtim has steadily 
denied tfa^ assertions, which 


for many in France, each new 
loss by me Zairian govenuiieot 


to the rebels led by Laurent 
Kabila is seen as a setback for 
France and the French language 
at the hands of Anglo-Saxons. 

“Somewhere in the moun- 
tains of Kivu a new Yalta is 
being sketched," wrote a 
columnist in the Paris weekly 
Jeune A^ue, who added that 
fromnow on “itis Amexicathat 
has the «dnd in its sails" in 
Africa. 

The irony of assertions like 
tbese, many American experts 
on Affican affairs say. is th^ the 
Zaire crisis has cast light on the 
Africa policy of the United 
Stales, showing it to be in coo- 
sideiable disarray, with Wash- 
ington far from enable of 
thiniring io grand desi^ou. 

France's anxiety, and in- 
creasing suspicion of Washing- 


ton. is in part by the fact 
that Rwanda’s former Hum-led 
government, a close ally of Par- 
is, was overtiirown io 1994 by a 
Tbtsi-led rebel force tiiat in- 
vaded from Uganda, which is 
F.fi fflish - spftgtrin£, 

By virtue of their years of 
exile in Uganda, Rwanda's new 
leaders t 3 rpically speak English 
more readily ti^ French. 

Zaire, a former Bel^an pos- 
sesrimi, was never a French 
colony. But to frilly understand 
French passions on tiie country, 
one must recall that with 46 
million inhabitants, Zaire is tbe 
world's seco^-lar^t French- 
speaking country, after France 
itself. And on or close to Zaire's 
flanks lie a semering of former 
Fnench colonies t&t remain 
heavily dependent on F^aris. 

Tbe defeat of Rwatula’s Hutu 
govemmem was the first time 
that a Foencfa-backed legime in 
Africa bad been militaroy de- 


feated by an African in»ir- 
geacy. And French commen- 
tators have warned that the 
triumph of tbe 7flirian rebels 
would send powerful si^i^ to 
all of France's African clients 
that the Irmg era of Paris's su- 
premacy on the continent is 
over. 

Meam^ule, France's stead- 
fast support of the unpopular 
longtime dictator. Marshal 
Mobutu Sese Seko, has earned 
tiie aiunny tiie growii^ hostility 
of ordinary Zairians, as well as 
of tbe oouniry's two leading 
political figures after Marshal 
Mobutu himself: Mr. Kabila arxl 
[be newly named prime min- 
ister, Etienne Tshisekedi, the 
longtime (^^positicx] leader. 

Moreover, in addition to fa- 
cing the sternest ch^rilenge to his 
36-year rule in Mr. Kabila's xe- 
belUou, Marshal Mobutu, 66, is 
believed to be dying of prostate 
cancer. 


“Paris has been stron^y 
idemified with supportmg 
Mobi^** said Jean-Jrancois 
Ploquln, diiecta of tiie Cfenter 
for bifonnaiion on Zaire, a 
private research group in Lyon. 
“Watdui^ the evohrtitn of 
things in Zaire,” he said, there 
is “a lot of nervousness. “ 

American analysts of African 
affairs say tha» fer from delib- 
erately taking advantage of 
France's difficulties in central 
Africa, Washington's policy to- 
ward the re^on has bem 
ha{^iazard and uninspired. 

“I wish I ccnild 9 VB Credit to 
tbe U.S. government for the 
broad vision and poli^ of doing 
something like tiiis. but 1 
can’t,” said Hetman Cftiien, 
who was assistant seoetaxy of 
state for African affoits dining 
tbe Bush administnliQQ. “It’s 


day-to-day poliCT. One ptob- 
le buikis np. arid tbe 


Talks Are Set as Rebels Take Town 


Roam 

JOHANNESBURG — South Africa an- 
nounced Friday dial peace talks would go ahead 
in Pretoria on Saturday between representatives 
of tbe Zairian government and rebels who have 
overrun the east of tbe counoty. 

The talks had ^ipeared in doubt following 
political confusion m Zaire's c^tal, Kinshasa, 
and reports of continued advances by the rebels in 
the mining re^ons of central Zaire. 

The South African Foreign Affairs Ministry 
said that talks would start Saturday at the gov- 
ernment’s main headquarters, the Union Sid- 
ings, in Pretoria. Tbe aimouncement coincided 
with reports that tbe rebel forces of Lmtent 
Kabila, who is demancting tiiat F’resident Mobutu 
Sese S^o step down, had eoieied the diamond 


nuning caplml of Mbuji-Mayi on f^day after 
government troops fled. 

“We understand rebel forces have entered tbe 
to^“ said a mining source who had been in 
radio comaa with Mbuji-Mayi. “It is in tbe 
process of changiag hands." 

He said most Zmeian troops who had been in 
the town amieaied to have fled westward in stolen 
vehicles after looting shops and tbe premises of 
diamond traders. 

in Kinshasa, allies of Marshal Molxitu began 
moves F^day to remove Prime Minister Etieime 
Tkhisekedi for exciudingtiiem from power in his 
first act since taldng omce this wrek. Marshal 
Mobutu refused to be drawn into tite political 
crisis stirred by Mr. Triiisekedi, saying Friday 
chat it was not the busioess of the hem of state. 


lematatimel 
Frsticfx. witii fiheir paranoia, see 
a graod desigiL” 

In F^aris, many have seen Mr. 
Kabila as the latest in a series of 
soldjer^statesmen — former 
rebel leaders who have taken 
ovex in counlzies from Uganda 
and Rwanda, to E^opia and 
Eritrea — who are now closely 
allied with WashingtoQ. 

“Ihe soldier princes have in- 
deed rqilaced the so-'Cafled eo- 
ligfatened despots of tiie past," 
said Peter Rosenblnm, ao exp^ 
CD Zaire who beads tte Human 
Rights Program of Harvard Law 
Seb^ “Tliqr are liberaL with a 
capital and Washmgtm has 
bm quick to give its de- 
mands for demooacy in tbe in- 
terest of tbe new scanty in tbe 
regioa tfa^ tfiey seem to o£^. ” 


Energy Minister 
Quits in Russia 


Germany was not doing enou^ to., 
protect immigrants, (Reuters) • 


MOSCOW — Rusaa's fuel and 
energy minister, Pyotr Rodimov, 
resigned Friday, leavii^ a pcA that 
oversaw struggling domestic oil 
companies and seve^ stalled billion- 
doUar projects. 

A s^kesman for the Fuel and En- 
ergy Ministry. Sergei Slesaryev, 
would not comment on tbe reasons for 
Mr. Rodionov’s decision to go. 

No replacement has been an- 
nounced; Idr. Slesaryev said the gov- 
cannient press service would lele^ a 
statement soon. The Itar-Tass news 
agency said Mr. Rjodiooov would re- 
turn to tbe private sector but did not 
say which company he would 
join. (Reusers) 


Moscow Asks End <, 
Of Chechen MRssion - 


Turkey Asserts Faith 
In German Justice 


ISTANBUL— Turkey said Friday 
that it tad frutfa in Gern^ justice in 
dealing with arson attacks against 
Turks, but expressed concern that re- 
cent fires in Turkish homes in the 
Netherlands and Germany might 
spawn racist attacks. 

“We have confidence in tiae Ger- 
man police,” the Ttnkisb FeseigD 
Ministry underseoetaiy, Onnr Oy- 
meo. told foreign rqxsters. “Webave 
nothing to compl^ of in Gennan 
justice so far.” 

German police said earlier tb^ had 
detairied tbe frtiier aTuridsh family 
on suspidoD that he started a fire 
Sunday in the town of Kiefeld in 
wfaidi fars wife and two dhOdren 
(bed. 

On Thursday, the German govern- 
ment summoned Tokey’s ambassa- 
dor to protest Ankara’s criticism tiiat 


MOSCOW — Rusria said Fiv^ 
that it no iooger wanted tiie mission . 
semt to Pherfm ya by the Or gRTiiTalio a 
for Security and Cix^itoatioD in 
Europe to mrriiate between Moscow 
and ^ rebel F^on. 

The organization said Thursday-^ 
that it had appointed a Danish dip- ;^[ 
lomat, Rudolf Thorning-^etersen, to * 
lake over its miasioa in Chechnya ‘ 
fimn Hm Gnhfimann, who help^ ' 
broker a dMi to 21 mnnths of ‘ 
fi ghting berween Rnssian troops and ' 
separatists 

The Russian Foreign Bdmisixy said 
Friday that “the need for metfiation 
by the OSCE reprKemative has failen ' 
aw^. since there is of course a direct ^ 
dialogue between the central author- 
ities and the new leadership of- 
CbBdmya.” (Reuters) 


Hmdak in Slovakia 
Wreck Jews ’ Graves 


4 , ■ 


BRATISLAVA — Vandals desec-, 
rated a Jewish cemetery in Nove«*^ 
Zan^, in soiidiem Slovaltia, over-,] 
tiuniQg and rfains^ng ntose than 160'>, 
lomb^mies. the indqieodent daily 
Sme reporte d Riday. 

One of the tomb^ooes was smeaiedT 
with a Nazi swastika, the p^ier said. It 
said tiie Hamagg ^^as estimated at 7 
mrae tiian 1.2 milli on kouny- 
($38JX)0). 

The pepex said tbe incident.-, 
happened some time last week. 

Neither the local police oos the 
Jewish comnuuifty was immediately ‘ 
available for commenL (Reuters)-^ 


kidel.ult >tn 


RELIGIOUS SERVICES 


AMSIEKDAM 

CROSSROADS lUrrERNATIONAL 
CHURCH Intefdenofiiinalional & 
Euengelcei Sundw Senice 10n0 am a 
11:30 a.mJ Kids Welcome. De 
C ua ui Urtiul 3, S. Amnoalnm Into. OZO- 
641 881Zcr(BI>645ie53. 

PRANCE/IOULOUSi 


SWnZBlLANO 

BASEL CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
ErtJhh-Sp ooM ngnon-denomlnallonat. 
TeL 441 61 302 1674, Sundays 10:30 
MDere Smse 1% CH4056 BassL 

ZUUCH-SWnZERlAND 


HOPE UfTERUAVQNAL CHURCH 
(E w ngatcaO. 4, bd. da nxac, Oolorrfer. 
Sunday service. 6:30 p.m.Te1.: 
0562741156. 


ENGUSH-WEAIQNG CATHOUC 
MISSION; St Anton ChuiOi, 
MnervaetraBs 63 Suiday Mass: 8:30 
am a 11:30 am Senices held In Ihe 
oypl of SI Arfen Chuch. 


BRUSSBS/WAIBOOO 
ALLSAMTS' CHURCH, 1slSun.g& 
11:15 am Wy EuchM wdi CMcban^ 
Chapel tt 11;1& Matter SuidayK 11:15 
am Ndy Euchartst and Swilay 
563 ChaussSe de Louvain. Wialn, 
Beltium. TeL 3S2 384-356a 

WIESBADEN 


PRAGUE 


La FELUawSMP, Virahradsla » 68. 
Pn^ a Sui 1 1 na TeL' (02) 31 1 7874. 


WATERLOO 


WATERLOO BAPTIST FELLOWO UT 
Swv 1900 ai iPvtodlBh Ctwch, aaoee 
tram MadDansUs. Teu [OQ ^ 1 565. 


FRENCH RfVKRA/COIE D’AZUR 


THE fflSGOPALOlURCHES 
OF EUROPE (Ai^Bgoi) 


THE CHURCH OF ST. AUGUSTINE 
OF CANTERBURY. Sun. 10 a.m. 
Pamly Eucharist FtariMjrtar Stasee 3, 
Wiesbaden, Germany. Tel.: 
48611305474. 


ZURICH - SWITZBBAND 


L8.C of Zurich, GheirtmsaS}, 8603 
ROechRon, WoraNp Senrices Suiday 
mominoB 1030.TeLT48100ia 


NICE: Holy Trinity (AngBcan), 11 me 
BiAa. Sui 1 1 : VBICE: SI Hu^ 22. av. 
MsiBiance, 8 am 74:33049387 1361 


PARIS Old SUBURBS 


EUROPEAN 

BAPnSreONVENnON 


ASSOC OF NTL 
CHURCHES 


MONIECARLO 


MONACO CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHP 
Worship Senrice, Sundays: 1 1 a.m. 
9, rue Louis Notary, Monte Cario. 
TeL 37762165647. 


THE AieaCAN CATHB3RAL OP THE 
HOLYTRNTY.Swvg&ll am. 1045 
a.m. Sunday School for chUdran and 
Nursery care. Third Sunday 5 p.m. 
Evensong. 23, avenue George V, 
Paris 75008. Tel.: 3M1 53 23 64 00. 
Mean Geoge V or ASra Meneau. 


BBIUN 


FLORONE 


PARIS ond SUBURBS 


EMMANUB. BAPTfiT CHURCH - An 
ewangMcel efudt H tie western steuts, 
aU are wetoome. 9.‘4S F?(st Servtoe 
concunent with Suiday School, 11:00 
Second Senrice wth Gfridreife Chuch. 
French Service 630 p.m. 56, me dee 
Bons-Raisins, 92500 RueWulalmtesoa 
RxMb. carol 4751 2963L 


ST. JAMESr CHURCK Sul 9 am Hto I 
& 11 am Rte n. Via Bemaido nmai a 
50123, ftaenca, liaiy. TeL 39652944 17. 



3ura S 

:). Sunday, BUe study 10.45, 
Service 12.00 noon. Charles 
pesiv. TeL Q30-774-467Q. 


BBRUN 

AIKRCAN CHURCH M BERUN, COr. 
d Ctw Mss & RMbiv St.. SjS. 930 
am, Woi^ n am TeL 03M13EC2:. 

FRANKFURT 


BREMEN 


Hohenlohest. Hermarfv6os»Sir. 
Sun, ITriX Pastor tetadionee 
04791-12677. 


TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH, 
^atelli1gEnJBB54.SUl■W0ld»11am 
TeL 06Ste63iaB6 or 512SS2. 


FRANKFURT 


HOPE INTERNATIONAL CHURCH 
Hotel Orton te Pana a D afa ns n , 8 bd.de 
Nedy. Waters Suidws 930 am Rev. 
Douglas Miller, Pastor. Tel.: 
01 43 33 04 06. Matfo 1 tola Ddense 


CHURCH OF CHRIST THE KING 
(Episcopal/Angliean) Sun. Holy 
Camrmaion9& 11 am Sirxtay School 
and Nussry 10*45 am C ebeei an Rte 
a 22 50323 RanMut Gennany. U1, 2. 
3 Mte^Mlee. Tte: 4M9 55 01 84. 


BUCHAREST 

LB.Ch SiradB Pope Ruau 22. S.'QO pm. 
Contect ftstor M« Kemper. Tte. 312 ^ 

BUDAPEST 


GENEVA 

EV. LUTHERAN CHURCH 20 rue 
VMaine. Suday^vnotto 930. in Gennan 
1 130 in Eni9Bti.Tet (D^ 3105039. 

JERUSALEM 


I.B.C., meets at Morics Zsigmond 
GhnsatuixToidivesz ul 48-54, Sul 


LUneWN CHURCH d tn Redeenw. 
pd CI^Muristen FU. Bigfdi woidto Suv 


10ai.Td.2S03632. 

BUUSARIA 


9 am Al OS wdenma Id: (OQ 6281-049. 

PARIS 


GENEVA 


BMANUB. CHURCH, let & 3id SUL 
1 0 am. EuchaiM; axl & 4ti Sul Morrtv 
Piayw. 3 ns ds MortioiK 1201 Genava. 
SHteiend. TeL 41^ 732 60 7a 


LB.Cs Wbrid Trade Center. 3a Drahan 
Tzanicov Blvd. WoreMp IIHX). James 
Dde.Pador.Td: 669 eea 


AMERICAN CHURCH IN PARS. 
Worship lltX) am. 65. Qual efOrsay. 
Paris 7. Bus 63 at door, Metro Atma- 
Maneau or InweHes. 


RANKFURT 

INTERNATIONAL CHRISTIAN FEL- 
LOWSMP, Ev.^eaecMche Gemeinds. 


ViaiNA 


SAINT JOSEPH'S CHURCH (Roman 
CaHoi4 MASS »l ENGUSH Sd 630 pJiu 
Sun. 94a 1 1:00 am., l£ia ft30 pm. 
50, avenue Hoche, Paris 8th. Td.: 
01 42 27 28 sa UeOQC Qariee de Gaie • Eato. 


TOKYO 


MUNKH 

THE CHURCH OF THE ASCaOION, 
Sun. 1 1-/4S a.m. Holy Eucharlei and 
&eiday Schod. Nuseiy Care pRM^ 
Seybdh sba see 4. 8lS45 Muich (Har- 
tachmg). Genneny. T^ 4669 64 81 8S 

ROME 


VTENNA COMMUNITY CHURCH, 
Suiday weidiip In ErigMi 1130 AM., 
SuKtay school, nursery, intemadoneL efl 
denamnaeons w ra a mo . Daa ri Muas aB 
ia Vienna 1. 


ST. PAUL MTBWAT10NAL UJIHERAN 
CHURCH, re» fidabasM Sto. TeL 3281- 
374a WoBSto Senice: 930 am. SuKteya 

TMCra UNR3N CHURCH, rear OnoiBSaito 
Sdney So. TIL 34000047. MbshpSBnijes 
Sunday - e30at130artuSSdB45am 


ST. PAUL'S Wim-TTEWALIS, Sin 
830 am Holy Eudeid Hte I; 1 030 am 
Choral Eucharist Rite II: 10:30 a.m. 
Chuch Sdwol tar cNdan a Nuaety cats 
prawidst 1 pm Sptenh Euchaiiei Via 
Napef sa 00184 Roma ~nL 396485 
3339 or 3616474 3Sea 


Mleuey. CaSRae 0617362728 
BETHM. I.BX:. Am Daetisberg 92 
(EngBM. WbiaM Sul 1130 am. and 
6nO^ TeL 089649559: 

HOLLAND 

TRNTY ITTaVIATIONAL invites you to 
a Chrid centered teOowdAL Servtaea: 
930 and 1030 am Bto enea wp la an 54. 
Wa8Baeera7DS17-6Q24 nutsaiy prw. 

NICE-FRANa 


ZURICH 


INTERNATIONAL PROTESTANT 
CHURCH Eridlsh upoaWna. worship 
senrice. Sunday School a NurBery, 
Suv^ 1l30ajiL.Schdsgengease2& 
TeL (01 1 2625525 


SYNAGOGUES 


LBZL 13 rue Vernier. EngE^ aenm 
Smdwevenral^ 
TdJ^9S032t69a 


KEHILAT GESHER • the Freneh- 
Anglephona Jewish Congiegatioa • 
Jdn UB tor 5e second Seder d Passoier. 
April 22nd, Paris l6ifL Reeervaltons. 
queatana. TaL 013921 J7. 19. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


RunwaTS Blocked at Paris Airport Pilots Union at American Satisfied}^. 


PARIS (AP) — Air Ranee Europe gronnd crews blodced 
runways at Oity AiipQct on Friday to prote st {banned job and 
salary cots. Several Air Ranee Eisope flt^us were delayed A 
com^y spokesman said planes were ordered not to land 
beca^ of safety coDcerns. 

IfoioQs of {tilots and fli^ engiiieers at Air Ubearte/TAT 
filed notice of a 48-boar smka starting Wednesday at noon. 


ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Tlltnnig CAP}— Leadras of t^^ 
American Airlines pilots unioD recommended Friday tiiat 
members approve a tentative contract with tbe counuy’s 
largest dpmiratic aidine. In a 12-to-6 vote, tiie Allied Rkite 
Association executive board s aid the plan now would te 
presented to American's 9300 inlots for a vote in the next fegr 
weda, said Jim Sovich,preridait of tile umoQ. 


WEATHER 


StetepB 


Forecast for Sund^ through TUaadty, as provided by AccuWaeiher. Asia 





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1 8totm and Ho cold 


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front m Iriggor ohewero 
vid B ovaro SMidomlotTO 


lAnm 

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nww 

25!* 

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1«S7 IIC 80 
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SMI D 

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ISW 1057P 

ia«« O 00 PD 

400 104 U> 
7fU 402« 
2MB 1102 0 

10 * -anfe 

two 40Ooa 
M7.1Vl3pe 
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■101 -anoe 
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104 4ri0e 
10«.fOri6P 

1000 O02pe 
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1KB 7»M« 

1001 aoem 

DM .ncope 
aoB-nnaoi 
OMO lOiP 


oeraao tfie Amorioan Mto- 
nool Suvtey. O hoow to ond 
Uiundoroterms wni move 
into trio Em Cobbi eilies 


Sunday night and early 
Monday. C( 3 du air tat 


Mdriday and TVaaday. 
MaHWdkytathaWofl. 


Europe 

Dry and mild eenditiana 
acreaa moot of waaMm 
Europe. Hichiding London 
and Parte Srndoy through 
TVeaday. Eaaiom Eurrn 
oM be cMy and unaadted 
frith aema rain and «rat 
enow. Turning drier and 
mUar BBtoae ScandbMrta. 
Maybe a oh aoar In Roma 
Sunday, than mainly dry 
and aaaianabla. 


[Ran 

A^ 

Japan, Including Tokyo, 
will be aaaaenabla, but 
damp «Mi aoma rate aa a 
woak storm paasaa by. 
Chaneo of a ahowor Sui- 
day bi BoMig. than hin*« 
eodar. Warm and hamU to 
Hong Kong and Singapora 
wWi a ahowar or Suindai^ 
shuaar poaafato each day. 
Maybe a Miowar Monday 
biSeouLSianeealar. 


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1702 7f«4o ia04 12010. 
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MWdlaEast 


3804 IBM 0 2BS2 1702 0C 
1407 BM8e 1407 6M3c 

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1407 30780 I2S3 104C 
3103 7»4i 3103 8M3l 

3103 t?0>0O’ 90a3 130100 


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1407 311301 
a&at 1300 po 


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au7§ 180301 84/7S 13030 > 
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XNTERNATIOBIAL mRAZJ> TRIBUNE, Sum^RDAY-SUNDAi; APRIL 5^ 1997 


J . I. r- 

IV 


ByJohn-F.Hanis 

-and Susan Scfaimiit' — 

— WahiBgtoiifQig^pnw 

— The two senior While 
aides who tned a> line up hicndzve em- 

K£3SSS»te“‘' 

Ofjhe independent coDnsel m die 
Whitewate investigation. Kenneth Star, late 

wa s nneoded to buy his silence in the 

The White Ho^ admowled^ this past 
w^ that two of Mr. Claaon’s closest 


’Help to Hubbell as Act of ‘Compassion’ 


made calls to business contacts in 1994. en« 
cooraging tiiem to hire Mr. Hiti»b^ In Mar^ of 
thatyear^Mr.Hobbdlannoanced Ms resignation 
as assodMe attorney generaL Nine mmitbs later, 
he pleaded gniliy to UUg nearly $500,000 
fiom his clMits and former partneis at Uttie 
Rodc*s Rom Law Him. ICDaiy Rodham CtintoD 
is a fixmer Rose parMer. 

The aides were Ihomas (M^) McLaity, 
then the Whhe Roiim chief of staff and now a 
preadentiBlcoaiisd(xr,andEEdEiiie Bowles, tiwo 

bead of the Small BaamaB; Arfm?n?at r Brinn anri 

now Mr. Clinton's chitf of staff. 

hfr. Qhitm^ speaking briefly widi zeptxtep 
.before a meeting witii. Prime Ivfiiiister Antonio 
Omenes of FtsttiMl^ said he saw tinthii^ im- 

2 m v^Mr.'bowlesandMr. McLaity did. 
weie people Mu> were geotdncly con- 
ifaat mere was a man -vmo was out of 
woki who bad four dnldren,*' Mr. Ctii^ 
said. 

' “And as I nndexstaiid it, they were hying to 


he^ him for no other reason than just out of 
human compassioQ.” 

Repeating an assertioa offered this past week 
by other House ofScials, Mr. CIMtoo said 
hfr. Bowles and Mr. McLarty had no way of 
knowing how serious the allegations were 
against Mr. HiibbdL 

After his iKignuioa from the Justice De- 
mutment, Mr. agreed to cooperate with 

wfaitewaier prasecutmis. But {uosecutths later 
were foistnted with what they called bis lack of 
candor, and refused to. recommend lenimicy in 
sentencing. He ultimately served IS months in 
prison. 

in an interview with the CBS News program 
“60 NGmites.’* Mr. HnUieli said that be met 
with tite CSmtoQs die Capqi David presidential 
reheat his zerigDation and lied to Apm 
about the aOe^tions imainst him. *T didn't tell 
them the truth.” Mr. lubbell said, according to 
CBS, which released pans of the Hubbell in- 
terview in advance of ^ riiow's airing. “1 told 


tbem 1 hadn't done iL 1 was in deniaL” 

Among the funds Mr. Hubbell received fol- 
lowing his lesignmion was a $100,000 payment 
from a subsidi^ of the lodmiesia-basM U{^ 
Gtoi^ in June 1S194. 

■ Sau^g^iug DotMff Was laired by Diiuier 

Jotge Cabrera, a drug smuggler who has 
emerged as one of the most notonoos s u pporters 
of Hrttident Clinton *s le-elecdon campai^ was 
asked for a campai^ contribution in the imikely 
locale of a hc^l in Havana by a promineot 
Democratic fund-raiser, congresrionM investi- 
gaiQTs have learned, Don Van Nazta Jr. of The 
New York Times reported htun Miami. 

The investigaiQis said the fond-iaiser, whom 
they identiried as Vivian Manned, a Cuban- 
American businesswoman from ^ami, told Mr. 
CaMeia at a meetii^ at the Cc^cabtma Hotel in 
Havana that in exd^ge for a coatribution he 
would be invited to a fond-rairing dinner in 
hcHior (tf Vice Hesidenc AJ Gore in an exclusive 


Regulators 
Clear Path for 
Ej-aofHDTV 


" fffti'yort Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
Federal' CmnsKmicatioDs 
Commissioii has formally be- 
gun the transitiim to di^lal, 
i^BighnieifitiitioD television ~ 
dianMOver that wfl], in 
thne, affect virtually every 
American household. 

Ending more ihm a year of 
bitter debate, the mmi^i^nyi . 
voted TMifsday to lend each 
df Airaca’s neariy 1,600 
televisioD stations a 
channel to broadcast (figjtal 

ygrions of the prftg rflrnmtng 

foatnowanpeargontynneon- 
wntiooal cnann^. 

Ultimately, the inhoduc- 
tiem of digital televMioD win 
render obsolete all 240 mil- 
lion television sets now in use 
across the coa^, rince m- 
jjer the commission's osder 
foe tdenriiQD sigoMs tii^ 
now receive win no longer be 
broadcast after 2006. That 
means every consumer win 
most likely have to biQr a di- 
ghal set Jfy then in oraer to 
continue waidring lelevisioiL 
' Tlie first sets frem.televj- 
sion manofoctarers be 
-large-sareen home-theate 
imodeb tiiat cost at least 
•$2,000. Many will be ^mme 
;expeo&ive that. But mao- 
•ufiemren say that prices wiH 
fiiii iiqndly as tn««g pnxMc- 
■tiaabe^nB. 


G^hardtHUs the TrofZ 

CONCORD, New Hainpriiiie — Five 
' months afterDemoaats fiun to retake the 
House of Rqae seD l a tives, th^ leader is 
back on the. road recruiting cantfidates and 
xmsingmOD^forthenextelectjon,m 1988. 
fo' lise JMDC^_ Representative Richard 
Gqihaia^_ of Missoiiri, is reacqnaintmg 
hnnself <dd alH^ courting new friends 

and ^viitg pan^ activists an eady qppor- 
tnmty to equate him as a possiUe suc- 
cesscff' te JYeriddrt Bin Clintoo. 

I^ week, hfr. Gqtordt's canefidafe re- 
er nit m enf tour stopp^ in Iowa and New 
Hampshire. IBs appearance in boih states, 
wM^ are to be host of the first and second 

• w eridenlial • n ommatwig inteoa.- 

ned qieculation dKMit his fbture. 

Thi^ who know hnn well be has hot 

made a dedsian about rumiiDg m 2000. But 
he has^ not been. s^ about distaDdoghim- 
setf from tfier^tw» su1f¥wwi<etrarinn. ^ft hag 
(ptefdbned foe Medicare jeoposal in the 
presideiifs budget submiteiou. criticized 
tbe dedsioa m certify hfedco as an ally in 
tite against dru^ warned aigamst ap- 
pomting a commisrioi to adjust the con- 
sumer price index and sigualeddifEerences 
ove^ mqpandmg foeNAFTA free-trade zone 
tbiodadeChOk (WP) 

Special Spender, Too 

WASHING'fON — Independent coun- 
sels jnvesdgathig Itesidbit Cfoittn.. die 
fist lady and otto adimn£uiaticn officials 
ham spent neariy $36 inillioa ffl nw years, 
lo^fog foedr most mqxauiya sis-inonfo 
period yet by smmding more A«n $10 mil- 
lion from foroii^ SqMend^ 
acconfingtofoemostieceiitfigifrncmn- 
pfled by the General Accounting Ofifice. 

Its rqpoxt provides forfoer evidence that 


foe WMtewater irdepadent counsel, Ken- 
neth Starr, is carvh^ out a pl^ in qiecial- 


six montiis ended Sept 30, 1996, be q>eat 
$5,049,625, brining fab total to 
$2^98,708. Hb investigation began in 
August 1994, but b ^rproaching tire cost of 
a loDger-runnmg inqv^ of favoritism in 
the De pa r tiueu t of Housing and Urban De- 
velopment Department diztmg the Reagan 
aHmlnigrrariftn , fWPj 

Nunn Tackles a TcAoo 

WASHINGTON — Social Security must 
be part of the talks on balanciiig tire budgd 
if Congress and tire White House axe serious 
about finfong a sohitiem to the nation’s 
fiscal nis, former Senator Sam Nunn says. 

Mr. Ntoi, a Geogia X)exziocfat, has just 
been named as co-diairman of dte Concord 
Coalition, a grass-roots effort to press for a 
balanced budget. He suggested that Mr. 
CUntOD isvhecougressioQal leaders to join 
him in a televised ejqdanation of how ba^- 
' boom geoemion retiiemenb will wreck the 
federal bodg^ unless entitlement progr am s 
so^ as So^ Security and Medicare are 
refbrmed now. (AP) 

Quote/Vnquote 

Prerident Clmton recaUmg die little 
things he misses about Commence Sec- 
retary Rm Brown, who foed a year ago in a 
pil^ crash in Croatia: “It's apdagtime, 
and I can't go play golf with Ron Brown. 
We wiUiieversbom baskets again ... He's 
not here malting frm of me because I had 
tiite stimid accident with OQT leg, and I mbs 
tiuit ... But 1 can we should be heaitaied 

the missang , bckuise the pet^le we lost 
esuiefoed oar lives vi^ foeir gifts of 
love.'' (AP) 


Stiicide^CMt^airsm 


' By WiUiain Clafooine 
; Tlbstmgum Past Service . 

: LOS ANGELES — After 
■an mexplicablc — for Hol- 
lywood — delay of a wedc, 
•the sure-to-be-hicrative mar- 
of ^ maM suicides of 
'>39 UFO cnltisb in Rancho 
'Santa Fe has finally kicked 
iinto hi^gear. 

• The made-fop-televisiaQ 
imovie deal was disclosed 
-'nzmsday. 

! The sale of foe Heaven's 
•Gate cubists' bdourinA in* 
‘dufong tile bunk o^ on i 
iwMch many of rfaeir boefies 
;were fouBri, won't be fer be- ; 
•hind, either. 

; The office of the ^Dk^ 
'.Conn^' public admmistrator 
’said it would bold a public 
’ yncrig n, probaMy next 
tpooth, u> sell the beds and 
‘p riM-r hftnngmg s found in flie 

manaintn tO help defray tite 
jBOSt of investigating the mass 

gq ridd f* handling the me- 
dia onslaught that frtilowed. 

- Y 2.Qck Matzoritis. 34, owner 
of a Beveriy Hills software 
'firm and the empiofyer of 
•Richard IM. whom police 
‘are diaracterizmg as die onfy 
•Setive member m die Heav- 
en's Gate afo to survive, said 


‘xmnit in. an 


ay.JEC signer for Mr. Matzoritis 's In- 
tele- tiaAct Entertamment Gioiq>. 


vbida“m 0 vieofdieweek'*to receivied a Federal Express 
beriiedaseaifyasdibfeD.' packa^Mardi2Scoiitaimng 
. MriFbfd,43,ajaewfyhired two videotapes and a letter 
Worid Wide Web page de- oatixmng the 39 members* 


plans tecoamnt mass suicide, 
to. Frad, 43, whose cult 
name was Rio D'Angelo and 
who spent dnee years witii the 
Heaven’s Gate db- 

coveted foe bodies. 


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During five years of coptMly, former 
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Laini CllUianmw 4mdMcd hoi 

FoBcemeD io Settle confronting the sword-wieldiog man before subduing him. 


Away From Politics 

• A fcMiner oiental patient wielding a 

samurai-style swcml held the ^lice in Setetle 
at bay for 1 1 hours before mficers knocked 
him down with fire hoses and subdued him on 
a busy street (AP) 

• Two brothers on Cape Cod, Massaefan- 
setts, have been fined $43 million for more 
foan 300 violaticms of fetoal fisheries law, the 
largest such fiand case in U3. hbtoiy. (AP) 

•A cocaine haul valued at $23 miffioo was 
found in a lo^ of b ananas at a track in- 
spection nearEveigreen, Alabama. (Reuters) 


a A bill to allow women to breast-feed in 
rablic won overwhelming ^tproval in Cali- 1 
fbmia amid signs diat the measure could soon 
become law. (LAT) \ 

•The number of bank nfoberies last year , 
rose by nearly 10 pereent, at a time when most 
violexit crime across the country is declining, 
according to FBI statistics. (WP) '' 

a The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor at die i 
Rcteceton Plasma Physics Lrixxatory in New 
Jersey is bem| shut down because of a cut in j 
federal finamemg after 15 years of operation, 
during which its coomres^ hydrogen fuel , 
lead^ a temperature 30 times hotter than foe 
core of die sun, (NYT) 


enclave near Miami. Oo his remm to the United 
■States several days after t^igt n >^!^np , in Novem- 
ber 1995, to. Caiffoa wrote acheck for $20,000 
to the D^ocntic National Committee from an 
account that includ^ the {voends Grom smug- 
gling cocaine from Colombia to the United 
said the investigators, who spoke on 
condition of anonymUy. 

Whhin two weeks of the craitributioa. to. 
Caivm met Mr. Gore at the dinner in bfiatoL 

Ten days later, to. Cabrera attended a Christmas 

reception at the White House hosted by Jfillary 
Ro^am Clinton. 

At the events, Mr. G(H8 and Mrs. Clintcm 
pc^ed for photographs with Mr. Cabrera, who 
has two raooy coovictimis dating from the 
198(^ and is now in prisem in Miami on a drug- 
smuggling ctMiviction. 

White House and the Democratic Na- 
tional Comminee said the party returned the 
$20,000 from to. Cabrera after deciding it was 
an improper donaiimi. 


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On ff^dnesday. May 2S, 1997, 
as die SOdi anmversa:ry of The Marshall Plan approaches, 
the International Herald Trdsune will pubUsh a Special Report on 

The Marshall Plan 
and its Legacy 

Among the distinguished contributors wiR be: 

■ Stephen E Ambrose, presidential historian and beshsetlirn author, will provide a look 
bow of the plan - Hs birfh and the motives, vision and politics fhof drove one of fhe 
centur/s boldest moves. 

■ Joseph Joffe, fhe widely respected fbreign editor and columnist of the Suddeutsche 
Zeifung, will look back of fhe Flan's impod on a defixried Germany, how if may have 
helped shape the posf-^war personality of its people and the nation itsdf, what endures 
today, and whiher the same concasls that made such movements necessary SO years 
ago can work today in the east and elsewhere. 

■ MUiiel Craaer, French sociologist and author, who studied of Harvard cs a young 
man under A/karshall Plan funding, will bring alive both fhe rsafrfy of the immediate 
poshwar years in France and central Europe as the continent struggled for momentum 
and the perspective of Europe 50 years later. 

■ U.S. SecTBhiry of Stole Madeleine Albright- will write about what she sees as fhe 
Marshall Han's relewonce today, as governments seek a new departure for posFcold 
war Europe. 

■ Art Budiwold, humorist and columnist, who chronicled the high-jinks and low^jinks of 
postwar Paris for the International Herald Tribune for so many years, will remind us of 
what it was like there in the late 1 9d0s end early 1 950s when Americans resumed 
thdr love affoir with France and poured dollars, movies and lots of other things into 
the continent. 

■ Flora Lewis, the distinguished columnist of The New York Times, will reflect upon the 
truly re^utionory asp^ of the Plan, which was not really the ability to finance it but 
rather the imposition of cooperation, fhe forcing of a new way of w^'ng together 
upon countries and madeets. 

■ Iaa Rirhaii the IKTs veteran Dolitical corresDondent. will take us fhrouah the colorful 


covert action to penetrate French Communist trade unions. 

■ Barry Jdmes, another venerable IHT correspondent, will remind us of the diffonent 
ways that European countries - especially France, Holy and the UK - responded to the 
and to each criher, how that era provided a glimpse of attitudes that still prevail 
today, and how one European in porticubr, Jean AAonnet, sought to turn these 
disparate efforts and attitudes into lasting political achievements and European 
institutions. 

fbr more irforrnation about advertising in this Specud Report, please contact BiU Mahder in 
Bxris at (B3-1) 41 43 93 78 or Jax (33-1) 41 43 92 13 or ernail: supplements(^htcom. 






THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 









PAGE 4 


BRIEFLY 


U.S. Defense Ouef Heads to Asia 


WASHINGTON — Defense Secretary William Cohen 
will be heading to Ja|»n and South Korea to assure two 
key allies of American commitment to Asia amid con- 
cerns over North Korea and restiveness in Japan over the 
U.S. military presence. 

After flying to Tokyo on Sunday. Mr. Cohen is to meet 
with top Japanese officials, including Prime Minister 
Ryutaro Hashimoto and members of ParliamenL They 
will review progress in the reduced role of U.S. forces in 
Okinawa, where 27.000 troops are based. 

Mr. Cohen departs Wednesday for Seoul, where he will 
hold talks with top Korean leaders about developments in 
North Korea, where worsening food shortages have raised 
question about the future of the Stalinist regime. (AFP) 


Inmates Seise Colombia Prison 


BOGOTA — Former rebels and common criminals 
who seized control of a northern prison, killing four 
guards and taking a dozen people hostage, on Friday 
demanded bulletproof vests, a cellular telephone, para- 
chutes and helicopters to take them to freedom. 

Their leader, who calls himself Commandante Oscar, 
also said he wanted asylum in Cuba. At least 10 inmates 
seized control of the prison in the city of Valledupar on 
Thursday night, overpowering guards and grabbing 
weapons. (AP) 


Talks on North Korea Reactors 


SEOUL — American. Japanese and South Korean 
officials will visit North Korea next week to jump-start 
talks on providing the Communist stale with two safer 
nuclear reactors. South Korea said Friday. 

The group of 54 officials plans to examine the reactor 
site in Sinpo. on the east coast of North Korea. It will join 
a 29-member international technical team that has l^n 
working since last month on a geological survey of the 
site. The S5 billion reactors were promised in a U.S.- 
brokered deal in 1994 that has frozen North Korea’s 
nuclear program. (AP) 


Peru Repeak Pro-Rapist Law 


LIMA — The Peruvian Congress, heeding calls by 
feminists worldwide, has voted overwhelmingly to repeal 
a law dating from 1 924 that allows rapists to go firee if they 
many their victims. 

The bill, strongly supported by women’s groups, 
passed by a vote of 86 to 1 . though most of the opponents 
of the bill left bef^ the vote. 

The long-awaited vote will abolish a law that allows a 
rapist to escafte all criminal prosecution if he persuades his 
victim to many him. The law also allows all perpetrators 
of a gang rape to go free if only one of them marries the 
victim. Women’s groups say scores of Peruvian men take 
advantage of the law every year to escape prosecution for 
rape, particularly in poor and rural areas. (Rcurers) 


For the Record 


India warned truck drivers Friday to call off a crip- 
pling four-day strike or face arrest, officials said. (AFP) 


More than 2,000 children suffered food pmsoning in 
eastern China alter school officials allegedly ^owed them 
to test a new soy milk drink for the manufacturers, a report 
by the Hong Kong daily Siitg Tao said Friday. lAFPj 


The Japanese government submitted to Parliament 
on Friday legislation to boost the maximum joU term to 10 
years from 1 8 months for those trying to smuggle workers 
mto the country. (Reuters) 


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INTERNATIONAL mgRALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 5-6, 1997 


.• . T fS»K . v;f J? - 

** .va:. . . . s 


• ty ^ 






• r ■ 

• ™ 'X u. ' 




■ tL- • 

o' '•ft, • 

. Vk. 4 







Beijing Moves 
To Ease Tension 
In Hong Kong 










OneMArONr Sterrrrm 

HONG KONG — China 


Special Administrative Re- 


China says will enshrine guests. ( 

Hong Kong’s civil rights and ^ , 

autonomy from July L the (jiififi UeTllBS 
troubleshooters painted a 

tableau of a benevolent sov- y-v • y « • r /V 
ereign who would never fjll £\Xff JuBJl 
med^ in Hone Kong’s life. ^ 


^ Britain. meanwhile, 

sign^ that it had agreed with 

China on the outlines of a guest 

list for the joint celebranim of 
the handover to China. .A Brit- 
ish official said the two 
would invite about jJZOO^ 
ouests. (AFP,Reurers)9 


sddle in Hong Kong’s life. C7 

Disputed Area 

j ACC.:... M. 


DctW Loh/RoBn 


NOT CRICKET — Demonstrators s^ainst the presence of an Israeli cricket team in Kuala Lumpur coming 
under water-cannon attack by the police Friday. The protesters were from the Malaysian Islamic Party. 


director of die Hong Kcmg 
and Macau Affairs Office, 
smighi to lay to rest the wot- 
ries cd people from Hong 
Kong li^g abroad. He an- 
nounced a grace period for 
them to return to die territory 
if they want to keep perma- 
nent residency rights. 


Agenct France-Preae 

BEIJING — China denied 
Friday that an offshore oil rig 
drilling in waters claimed by 
Vietnam had been moved out 
of die area before a meeting 


Russia Wheels and Deals Gulf Arms 


A^ f^^i^^756,000 of between Beijing Hanoi 
Hong W’s 6.4 n^on « 


By John Lancaster 

Mbs/nvAM Past Senice 


ABU DHABI — Shoroin^ 
for a new sutxnarine? Heb- 
copters or armored vehicles? 
How about a truck-mounted 
anti-tank missile with ’‘semi- 
automatic laser-beam guid- 
ance system and diemal- 


unapin| sight for night op- one of the bi 


of we^xTiis, an effort that de- 
fense analysts say is motivated 
in pan by irritation with the 
United States over its un- 
wavering support of Israel. 

At tK mtereational De- 
fense Exhibition and Confer- 
ence, a major anns show that 
ended in Abu Dhabi on March 
2(). the Russian pavilion was 


people have foreign atizen- 
ship. The bulk iuve made 

Canada, Australia, Britain or . — - , on 

the United States tiieir adopt- China National Onshore Oil 
ed home. If tiiey are abroad Corp. official dfrrotly m- 
for long after July 1, they volved with die drilling proj- 
mieht lose their permanent ecu - 

Hong Kong residency. Reports eaibw Fnd^ said 

Mr. Wang said that China China had withdrawn tM ng 
IS nfenared to irive them a die contested area in the 


eration 7 


featuring 


it attractions, 
exhibits by 


Has Russia got a deal for more than 80 Russian aims 


you! manufact 

Stnig^ing to turn losses at Glossj 
home into opportimities and EngL 
d>road, arms manufacturers of such 
from Russia and other former Smerch 
Soviet republics are setting rocketsy: 
their sights on the wealthy machine 
Arab oil monarchies of the defense r 
Gulf. In doing so, they are Evens 
posing a new challenge to bnpressei 
U.S. defense contractors, learning 
already struggling to main- effective] 


manufacturers. 

Glossy brochures in Arabic 
and English touted the virtues 
of such products as the 
Smerch multiple-launch 
rocket system. Klin 9mm sub- 
machine gun and S-300V air- 
defense missile system. 

Even some Americans were 
implied. "The Russians are 
learning how to market very 
effectively.” said Keith Mor- 


took delivery of its diird Rus- ment as technologically die United States dieir adopt- 
sian-built submarine. inferior, Russian manu^tur- ed borne. If diey are abn^ 

"People in this region are ers are beginnizig to make in- for long after July 1. they 
interest^ in our sutoar- rrads with U.S. allies. might lose their permanent 

ines,” said Yuri Kormilitsin, Kuwait, for example, re- Hong Kong residency, 
chief designer of the Rubin cently bou^t Russian in- Mr. Wang said diu China 
Central Itesign Bureau fm- fantry ^hting vehicles.' And was ptepa^ to give them a 
Marine Engineering in Sl die Unitra Arab Emirates are grace f^od, but that the 
Petersburg. "That’s why we considering a Russian pro- length of time would be set 1^ 
are here." posal for an air-defense sys- tte Special Administrative 

Mr. Kormilitsin, whose tern to protect cities. Region, as the teiritmy will 

company built the Kiio-ciass RaymeosuraakeroftbePa- be known un^Oimesesov- 
diesel-electric subs used by triot, is competing for the ereignty. 
die Iranian Navy, said tiiat same contract. "It’s very old Tteie were also soothing 
three Arab countries — technology,” Stefriien Stan- words from the People's Lil^ 


"The Kantan 3 oil ri| is 
carrying out normal activities 
in Chinese waters,” said a 

• . 'AT • I ri.i '' 




1. 


which he would not name — vick, man^r of Raydieon’s 
and Israel have expressed in- missile division, said of the 


terest in buying Russian sub- 
marines. 

Although U.S. arms man- 
ufacturers generally dispar- 
age Russian military equip- 


lengtfa of time would be set 1^ 
tte Special Administrative 
Region, as the teiritmy will 
be known under CTimese sov- 
ereignty. 

There were also soothing 
words from the People's Lil^ 
eration Army. 

The political commissar of 


Russian system. the future Hong Roiu gar- 

But he added: "Their risen, Majex- Gaieral Kong 


prices are very flexible. I 
think the competition is se- 
rious.” 


Sren, stressed that die tioo{)s 
would be "mtunly respoisi- 
ble for die defend” of the 


South China Sea. 

Oiina and Viemam will 
meet in Beijing on Wednes- 
day to discuss the dispute, 
wfai^ flared on March 7 
when the Chinese oil rig 
moved into die contested 
area, prompting Vietnam to 
demand diat Quna move it. 

In Hanoi, the head of the^, 
Vietnamese negodatifig'^ 
team, Nguyen Ba Son, sud 
Friday teat he had not re- 
ceived any notification of the 
rig’s remoiral. 


tain teeir d^^wce of tee doff, a spokesman for Lock- MANILA: Battle Lines Forming Cher Limit on President’s Term 

_l_l I w 


world's richest arms bazaar. 

Low prices and increas- 
ingly sophisticated Western- 
style marketing methods have 


heed Martin Corp., the de- 
fense and aerospace giant 
As in tee case of U.S. de- 
fense contractors. Russia's 


Continued from Page 1 


begun to pay dividends for sales efforts are driven by the 
Russian arms dealers. need to And new markets for 

Like teeir European com- weapons that its own military 


petitors, the Russian compa- no longer needs. To the Con- 
nies also have beneHted from a stemation of the United 


desire by Arab countries in the 
Gulf to diversify their source 


Wenaweek 


fense contractors. Russia's idem have amazed many of his coim- 
sales efforts are driven by the trymen. A West Point graduate who was 
need to And new markets for a dutiful official in bote the Marcos and 
weapons that its own military Aquino administFations. he had been 
no lon^ needs. To the con- seen many people as colorless and 
stemation of the United indecisive. 

States, one of Russia’s best But as president he has moved mete- 
clients is Iran, which recently odicaJly to tame teecoundy’s problems, 
neutralizing long-standing armed chal- 
lenges from Osmmunist guerrillas. 
Muslim separatists and right-wing mil- 
itery officers and setting the economy 
on an increasingly sound footing. Mr. 
Ramos has opei^ tee econom)r to for- 
eign competition, ended most of its crip- 

pling monopolies and deregulated key 

L’ sectors including power, telecommuni- 

V V cations, banking, insurance, shipping 


and oil. Over the past flve years, the 
Philippine economy has moved from 
the negative growte rate he inherited to 
an expansion of more than 7 percent a 
year that is creating 14 million jobs 
annually. 


Mr. Ramos is still struggling with 
hat his aides say is tee fmm and most 


what his aides say is tee Anal and most 
difficult item on his agenda: tax reform 
in a nation where the rich and well- 
connected have traditionally bought 
teeir way out of paying taxes. 

In December, major aid donors in- 
cluding the Worid Bank offered lavish 
praise of the country's progress. 

Periiaps it is a measure of tee coun- 
try’s continuing self-doubt that many 
people here fear the nation could slip 
back from these achievements under a 
different leader. But political analysts 


are aghast at tee prospect teat Mr. 
Runos would be succeeded by his vice 
president, Jose]^ Estrada, a swashbuck- 
ling. hard-drtiddng ftmner movie actor 
who has little fenowle^ of or interest in 
economic issues but is popular with the 
voters. 

It is not at all certain, however, teat 
Mr. Ramos would seek another term 
even if he could. No less than Mrs. 
Vy^utno, he has been a defender of the 
country's democracy, turning back half 
a dozen coup attempts when he was her 
minister of defense but declining to 
seize power for himself. 

Just as likely, some analysts say. be is 
keeping the county guessu^ so he can 
keep his political ^uence until closer 
to tee end of his term and perfa^ be 
able to designate his successor hirnself. 


FOR TWO 

IN Spain 


GETTING ON IN YEARS, By Rich Norris 


Look for the 

IHT/Turespana Competition 
in the IHT 

on April 7, 16, 23 and 30. 




1 HE WOHUrS D 41 LY NEWSPAPER 


ACROSS 
1 Brawl 
7 Presence 

15 Brothers' titles 

19 Place 

20 Qearedout.ina 
way 

21 Maner 

22 Reckless arrival? 

24 — Arenas, 
poRin934)own 

25 Tropical cuckoo 

26 Cat 

27 Knockonthe 

28 FonnerHei 
conduaer Bruno 

29 Prefbc with fuel 

30 Smalltown, 
U.SX, family, in 


45 Actress Peeples 
etal. 


46 ‘Hardy Boys' 
chatBCter 


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Will Kane, in a 
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54 “No food or 
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once 

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80 Anatofflica] 
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talem scarcity? 

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ancient Egyptian 
rulers 

11 Transfix 

12 AdorVincent of 
“Alive" 

IS Writer Wolitzer 

14 -FaUestn 
Slai^ author 

15 Questionable 
ancesiiy? 

16 1961 Bobby Vee 
hit 

17 Coow before 

18 ^ed 

21 Onedotnga 
balandngjob 

23 Trick 

28 Stimulate 

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filmmaking? 

32 Brat’slook 

34 AUieist'B E-mail, 
maybe? 

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“Thelina& 
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Duchamp 
sulfjea 

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news aid) 


43 Austrian 
composer Berg 

44 Tumult 
46 Some 

apartments 
49 “—dear..." 

59 PbUle refusal 
51 They exist from 

hand-to-moath 

53 Be e thov e n’s 
*~— So lCT i uis " 

54 Nolongerdirt 

55 River at Avignon 

57 Humble 

58 S ch oolbag hern 

60 Vacuum 
malfonaion 
result? 

61 Least equivocal 

63 Prehistoric 
medical supply? 
K Was shown 
67 Revivalgear 

71 Words of 
understanding 

74 American 
reooriMiolder 
Steve Soon, e.g. 

75 Quattrasand 


York Times/E^ted by WUl Shoriz, 
78 Don's worid 95 Margin 


79 Mentifying 
equipment 


97 Barsdection 


81 J»1 indi 

82 Arrive^ 
officially 

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suburb— 
Bumle 

85 Trace 

86 ttmayinvoWe 
finger-pointing 

89 Ancient Greek 
eobi 


sometimes 


- . ledcpioiieer 
192 Jaazstyle 
196 — Magnoa 


167 Paitofa 
' woriuHit 


108 Court teure; 
Al^. 


93 Where the 
Bio-Blo flows 


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lestimoi^ 

77 OetsonwoofTee. 

perhaps 


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UtVtf.v, 


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— — ~ 

ir/; 












iJSJiat«AiiUi^ALJHI^4LI>TKlgUAE,SATLTtDAY-SLT\DA^^^ I 

For Many Americans, Existence of UFOs Is an Article of Faith 



hieroglyphs. *nie wreckage was taken to the 
nearty.Rostr " *■ '' 


fi 


't 


pfiipj 


^ “o* harboring an n^W i base 
andfe^haiboring the 
jwia^ofonjdentifiedflyiagobjecis^ ■ 

i«5 2f!l ® spokesman said, the mil- 

gave up the seardi for aliens 18 years ago 
bMauM It was considered a waste of laxpayS’ 

■ T^ronspim 

ica ^ hteaUy swaan on the internet mtgtff 
pomt wt that 18 yem is about as long as kS? 
bem^ With pointy beads and wraparound 

the iTuddle of ni^ and forcing theso to *«»fe 
uitergalaciic breedfing program. 
Ine laA that most of these 'abductions- ta lg 
plare m the Un^ States, said Philip J. Hass, a 
longdtne skeptic, is an indication mtber than 
are tastier, or *‘we have more' 

kooks. 

. began 5Dyeara ago diis summer when. 

a Kraneth Arnold, reported s ighting a 
fon^on of sUvery disks above MountRimier 
gn Jime .1947. Newqiqjets coined the ex- 
pres^n flying sancers,” and within a few 
months accounts of more sightings grsTtfyj oonr- 
mg m by the hundreds. . . 

♦ weeks after Mr. Arnold haii his vision, a 
rancher in Nw Mexico found some imiisn^ 
^w®ckage — bits and pieces of a tfwn, lightweight 
silvery material with patterns that resembled 


neaiby. Roswell Air Rase, udim a spokesman 
announced tbat the Army Air Corps had re- 
covered a “fl^g disk.” 

' AMiough the statement was quickly reiracted. 
the lore about aliens spread uncheck^ amid the 
sccxeey suiroundiog America’s nuclear weapons 
devekmoKnt, and now seems as deeply im- 
plantea in the human consciousness as earlier 
myths about fairies, witches or demcms. 

Ufcdogy, said Mr. Klass in an interview, “is a 
modem substitute for religion.” hideed,the Cali- 
foniia i^tists who cmmnit^ suicide to join a 
spaceriiip they believed to be traveling m the 
wake of the Hale-Bo;^ comet borrowed a 
concern believed by mOIions of American born- 
again Protestants — that at the end of the world. 
& chosen few will be “isqjtured” into heaven 
while the rest stay below to fight it out at the 
Battle of Annageodon. 

Many UFO lxi& are convinced diat the gov- 
omnent has recovered alien bodies and an intact 
flyiiig saucer. Some say they know for sure that 
ahw have a base in soutbem Nevada known as 
Artt S 1 m more timply as Dreamland, and others 
l^eye just as firnily that the government has 
signed a Ire^ with the gray intruders — their 
technology in exchange for the right to abduct 
Americans for use in medical experiments and a 
breeding |Hogram.. That's not all. Among ufo- 
logists, ahens are widely held responsible for the 
deaths of cattle, whose remains, always “sur- 
gically dissected,” are left to baffle small-town 
sheriffs. 

A few true believers, who call themselves 
“starseed,' * are fiimly convinced that th^ them- 
selves Al^ aliens, but hardened consi»racy ite- 




fomia cultists. a Defense Department spokes- 
man, Ken Bacon, stated, “We cannot substan- 
tiate the existence of UFOs, and we are not 
harboring remains of UFOs.” 

.Mr. Bacon said that between 1 947 and 1 969. 
a.s pan of “Project Blue Book.” the air force 
investigated 12.618 sightings and found no 
evidence that any were exirateiresirial 
vehicles. 

What the Pentagon spokesman did not and 
could not explain is why so many Americans 
and a growing number of people around the 
world telieve that they have been abducted by 
aliens. The m>’ihology about alien kidnapping 
began to accrue in die 1960s with the pub- 
lication of John G. Fuller's book. “The In- 


terrupted Journey.'* which told how a couple. 
Barney and Betty Hill, were abducted on a 


AneTekptnu' 

A photo of a '^flying saucer” taken in 1951. 
The photographer. Guy Marquaud, said he 
took the picture near Riverside, California. 


orists dismiss them as government plants to dis- 
credit the UFO movement. 

The U.S. Ah’ Force and the General Account- 
ing Office have both issued lengthy reports say- 
ing the wreckage found in 1947 came from a 
bi^oon used to track evidence of Soviet nuclear 
explosions. 

As alien speculation mounted with the arrival 
of the Hale-Bopp comet and the suicide of Cali- 


ionely road, taken to a space craft and sub- 
jected to medical experiments. 

In the 1980s. a New Yo^ artist called Budd 
Hopkins uncovered hundreds of similar stories 
by hypnotizing subjects, writing about their ex- 
periences in two books. “Missing Time." and 
‘'Intruders.” He sent many of the subjects to a 
Harvard psychiairisi. John' .Mack, whose views, 
which he wrote about in a 1994 best-seller called 
“AbducUon,” isesseniially that if people believe 
they have brnn taken by aliens it must be true. 
Earlier. Whitley Sirieber. a science-Hction 
writer, told about his personal abduction ex- 
perience in a best-seller called ‘'Communion." 

But like tales of childhood sexual abuse, all of 
these accounts have emerged under hypnosis 
with, critics say. a lot of suggestion from the 
iherwisis. 

‘ ‘There is zero hard evidence of anv son.” said 


a Harvard colleague of Dr. Mack, the physicist 
I^ul Horowitz. “There are only anecooies, ex- 
periences earnestly believed but not buttressed 
b\' any son of real evidence.” 

Roben Baker, emeritus professor of psychol- 
ogy at the University of Kentucky, said that the 
abduciion.s were real enough to those who .say 
they experience them. “During the middle ages, 
they were called incubus and succubus attacks.” 
he said. “The modern equivalent of the demOT.v 
is the aliens. These are what we call waking 
dreams.” 

David Hufford. professor of humaniries at 
Penn State medical school, said the cau.se is sleep 
paralysis. ‘ 'Most people,' ‘ he said. ‘ ‘will tell you. 
‘I woke up. I couldn't move. There was 
something frightening in the room with me. It 
wanted ID do me harm.' 

“One person might say. ‘So I think it was an 
alien. ‘ Someone else might think it was an abom- 
inabJe sriowman. That is a maner of inference 
from their culture." 

Bill Ellis, a folk)ori.st at Penn State, said he 
believed that all people have the same kind of 
dreams, but the way they express them conforms 
10 their culture. “An ancient Greek might have 
seen it as going up with the Gods.” he said. “In 
20ih century America, it is seen as being ab- 
ducted by aliens." 

In telling their stories. Mr. Ellis said, “ab- 
ductees” resort to the images supplied by Hol- 
ly'wood and particularly by television. P^udo- 
documentary programs like the “X-Files,“ in 
which a couple of FBI agents investigate alien 
happening as routinely as though they were 
ordinary homicides, blur the line between fact 
and fiction. 


VI 


Aggressive U.S. Arms Sales to Allies in the Gulf Begin to Raise Questions 


By John Lancaster 

Wtshingnm Posi Service 


iAi! 


T 

< ' . Ill 


ABU DHABI — In December 1995, 
Pierident Bill Clinton telephoned 
Sheikh 2^ayed ibn Sultan an Nahayan, 
^rident of the proqrerous.Unit^ Arab 
emirates, with an unusual personal ^)- 
peal; Buy American, 

] According to U.S. government and 
indiptry sources, Mr. Clinton uged 
Sheikh Zayed to as many as 80 IM6 

..strike planes from LocUi^ Mar^ 
,«CoTp., ihedefense giant that is compet- 
ing with European manufaemrers for the 
$6 billion deal. 

Mr, Clinton's ugressive salesman- 
ship shows his w illingnesg to use arms 
exports as an instrument of foreign 
■policy and to shore tip defense indus- 
tries, many of which are based in elect- 
oral ly important parts of the country and 
wboK ordera. have tailed off sbaiply 
since tiie end of tiie Cold War. 

But the cemtinued flow of U.S. 
.weapons to the Gulf nations — which 
are among the worid's biggest costenn- 
ers for hiih'fechDology anns — is rais- 
jng questions in the Gulf states and else- 
where about the long-term wisdom 
ihepoliCT. 

Tne Gulf nations already have huge 
'stocks of weapons, spend enramotis por- 
tions of their budg^ pn 
show signs of difficult' hi atffioibingand 
using wmat they have bought These are 
growing douns, monNiver, about 
whether the lightly populated Gidf coon- 
tries would ever be able to defend them- 


selves effectively against such larger 
potential foes as Iran and Iraq — or, ror 
that matter, whether Aey w<mld ever 
need to, given the large U.S. military 
presence in the regjon. 

.After (he 1991 Golf War, “everyone 
was expecting tiiat we would have p^ce 
and thm would be some anan^mem 
under which the Gulf countries could 
reduce their arms expenditure” said 
Abdnl Razak Fares, an associate pro- 
fessor of economics at United Arab 
EnixraiiBS University who has made ex- 
tensive studies -of mifitaiy spending in 
the Gulf. “But now it seems they are 
letuming to an aims race. Ibere is a 


general feeling that military expendit- 
ures are too high.” 

The United States is the worid's 
largest aims exporter, and the six nations 
of the Gulf Cooperatiwi Council — 
Saudi Arabia, KuwaiL Qatar. Bahrain, 
die United Arab Emirates and Oman 
include some of its best customers. 

Since 1990, when Iraq invaded 
Kuwtit, the Gulf states have signed con- 
tracts for $36 billion in American arms, 
or 32 percent of the $1 10.8 billion of 
total U.S. arms exports over the same 
period, according to an analysis of De- 
fense Department figures by the Arms 
Control Association in Washington. 


Having gorged on U.S. arms in the 
first half of this decade, the Gulf coun- 
tries have begun to reduce sudi pur- 
chases, from a postwar peak of S14.7 
billion in 1993 to S1.7 billion last year. 
U.S. defense firms also face growing 
competition from Europe and Russia, 
which is shifting its marketing efforts 
from Iran to wealthier clients on the 
Arab side of the Gulf. 

But U.S. aims sales remain a linchpin 
of the dual-containment policy that 
emerged after coalition forces drove 
Iraqi troops from Kuwait in February 
1991. The policy seeks to deter future 
threats from Iran or Iraq by beefing up 


TJ.S, Sets Stage for Fighter- Jet Sales to Chile 


WASHINGTON — r Easing its restrictions on sales of 
advanced wetroons to Latin /^erica, the United States has 
authorize 'U.S. plane makers to market fighter aircraft in 
Chile, Penti^cai officials said. 

Al^u^ Ftesideot Bill QinUMi would have to approve any 
sale of je^roChite, it madslhefiisttime since t^^ 1970s that 
Washin^on has allowed U3. companies to even enter the 
conqietition fbrthe sale of Ugh-tech weapons to Latin Amer- 
ica.' . ' ' 

. No decisibii has been m«le on whedier to permit the. sale. 

.^ut.ihe decision marks a sig-. 
iiffic»iustepmth^(tiri^on. v 
Under me. .dedsimi, U.S. manufacturers are authorized to 
fhscnsspric^ and classified lecbiuca) data witii ChUe. 

Chile, wl^ wants to but . 16 to 18 jets, is looking at the 
French Mirage 2000-5 and the Swedish Jas 39 Gripen, but also 


has expressed interest in the F-I6C and F16-D, which are 
made 1^ the Maryland-I^ed Lockheed-Martin Corp. 

Ending the ban is opposed by some in the State Department 
and (he Natimiai Security Council who fear it will stimulate a 
regnal arms race. 

The Pentagon has pushed such sales on the ground that the 
Latin America countries now are democracies and that they 
have a ri^i to upgrade dieir air defenses. 

An administrabon official said Chile had set a March 31 
deadline for submitting offers and that it would not be fair to 
deny companies the chance to bid when arms policy for the 
re^n miehi. change.. ^ 

^e (Tmlean AirForee, which wants to buy 16 to 18 jets, 
was expected to make a decision by tiie end of the year. 

The possible sale of the F-16s is strongly opposed 1^ 
Argentina, the newspaper El Mercurio reportra in Santiago. 

(AFP. Peuters) 


the “forward presence” of U.S. forces 
in the Gulf and strengthening its allies. 

To that end, the United States has 
sought permission from Gulf countries 
to stockpile military equipment for use 
by U.S. ferces in fufrire crises: deployed 
roughly 20.000 U.S. military peironnel 
in the region, most of them on ships or 
aircraft earners; sought to enhance mil- 
it^ cooperation among the Gulf coun- 
tries. and heavily promoted ajm.s sales. 

American officials contend that U.S. 
arms are preferable to the alternatives 
because they are compatible with equip- 
ment used by American troops who in- 
variably would do the major woric in any 
conflict with Iran or Ir^. Such pur- 
chases, they add, also would help the 
Gulf countries fend off an attack during 
the weeks it would take for U.S. forces to 
arrive in the region in strength. 

“This is a very important strategic 
relationship with the Pirates,” a senior 
White House official said in reference to 
Mr. Clinton's call to Sheikh Zayed. 

“It ts an advantage to both of us to 
have the same aircraft for purposes of 
interoperability, training and for military 
exercises; and it's especially important 
during times of conflict to have the same 
air frames to avoid confusion among our 
airforces.” 

Strategic considerations aside. Mr. 
Clinton is the first U.S. president to order 
that proposed sales be evaluated in terms 


of “the impact on U.S. industry and the 
defense industrial base, whether the sale 


is approved or not.” as he said in a 
Febniary 1995 directive on arms-tians- 


fer policy. Pentagon officials uaveled to 
Abu Dhabi last month to promote U.S. 
products at the Inremationai Defense Ex- 
hibition and Conference, a major arms 
show featuring daily tank demonstra- 
tions and elaborate displays of high-tech 
weaponry from more than SO countries. 

Two U.S. soldiers in fatigues manned 
a red. white and blue Defense Depart- 
ment booth while Gilbert Decker, the 
army's assistant secreta^ for research, 
development and acquisition, roamed 
the U.S. pavilion in a show of support for 
Textron, General Dynamics and other 
major U.S. defense contractors. The 
U.S. Navy arranged for a destroyer, the 
Hamilton, to ma^ a port call while the 
arms buyers were in town. 

“The fact is, unless we have 100 
percent agreement by all the industri- 
alized nations, if we don't deal, someone 
else will, and it might not be in as con- 
trolled a manner,” Mr. Decker said in an 
interview. “1 think we promote stability 
by assisting them with their defense.” 

Government officials here and else- 
where generally seem to agree. 

‘‘If we cannot defend our country for 
a week, then we do not deserve to exist.” 
said Jamal Suweidy, director of the 
Emirates Center foi Strategic Studies in 
Abu Dhabi, which is back^ by the gov- 
ernment and an adviser to the military 
chief of staff. 

“If you want to wait for 500,000 
troops to come in. that vrill t^e a lot of 
time. You have to be able to defend 
yourself in order to wait for help from 
your allies.” 


POLICY: 17.5. Confronts Disfigreements 


•>. • 


Continued from Page 1 





status' issues that are b^g forced onto 
the agenda that are exftiosive,'* said Ed- 
ward Djeiejian, former U.S. a m bassador 
to Israel and Syria. He said it nu^ be 
possible to develop “creative id^ on 
Jeru^em that could s^sfy both sides,' ' 
leven though the issue has defied xes- 
ohition for three de^es, but added tizat 
jtiiey probably cannot be puraued while 
Har Hpma construction continues. 

' A senior And) diplomat said a dm i n - 
jstration officials told him it would be 

‘ unrealistic ” to expect Israel to st^ the 

fonstnictioD project. He called tiiis po- 
sition ‘'ridiculous,” but Mr. Clinton and- 
Other U.S. officials tove ma^ it cl^ 
that they have no inters^ in puttipg 
pressure on Israel unless they get an 
■unequivocal commitment from the Pal- 
^tinians to prevent tenorism. 

. According to King Hussein, that is an 
.liunrealisdc U.S. demand bec^ at a 
■rima when the frustrated Palestiniaosaie 
leaping few of the economic benefits 
Itiiey were promised when they made 
•peace, an ijaeli action such as die sttet 
lof construction is “the straw that broke 
'the camel's back.” . . t i. 

; In King Hussein’s view, whicb be 
expressed in a mucfriwblicized letter to 
'Mr Netanyahu last month, Israel's ac- 
Itioiis make tenorism more likely, not 

" TTie seeds ofthe problem were planted 

in the 1967 Middle East War, when 

Israel routed Ai^ 

East Jerusalem and the West Bai^ from 
Jordan. Beginning that ye^ vnA United 
Nations Security Council Resolution 

242, diplomatshave found waystqavt^ 

deciding the fundamental question of 


'who ovms tiiat land.' The famous UN 
fesohxtirai citiled.on the Arate to make 
peace vrith Israel m exchange for Israel’s 
withdrawal, “fr o m tenitones occupied 
. in tiie recent conflict '*•— but did not say 
“all territories.” 

. hi a rimilar sidest^f lsraeli and Pal- 
estinian negotiators at Oslo agreed to 
defer the s^emenis and Jeruralem is- 
sues to “final status" negotiations, be- 
cause th^ were too hard to resolve. 

' Israel has Iraig asserted its rights to 
bi^ Jev^ s^emehts in the West 
Bank, while tiie United States, wluch has 
extenshte economic and political ties to 
countries, mamtained tiiat the set- 
tlements werean obstacle to a frill peace 
between Israel and tiie Arabs. Israel an- 
nexed the eastern poitirai of Jerusalem 
claimed soverdg n ty forever over 
the entire dty, while the United States 
insist dim the dty*s future be decided 
by negotiations and refused to move its 
emba^ ttiere from Tel Aviv. 

Tte dorisfa Labor government headed 
by Yiizh^ Ral^ and Shimon Peres 
accepted language in the Oslo agree- 
meot saying tiiat “permanent status ne- 
gotiations will commence as .soon as 
posable.” It continued: “It is under- 
stood that tiie negotiations shall cover 
remaining issues, indudiiig: Jerusalem, 
refugees, and settlements.” 

To ^ Patestmians, Chat put Jerusalem 
in play. Tbeir position, shared even by 



KOHL: 

Not Sitting It Out 

Continued from Page 1 


\ftid taad.'\p-nrT>i 9 ra.-ISw 

A Palestinian boy equipped with a gas mask aiming a slingshot at Israeli troops in Bethlehem on Friday. 


ISRAEL: Netanyahu Sees Possibility of^Camp David^-Style Talks 

Continued fVom P^e 1 


m play, ineir posmon, soareo even oy 
surii Arab friends of Isi^l as lUng Hus- 
sein, is (hat East Jemsatem is occupied 
territory and Har Homa is an illegal 
settlement Mr. Clinton has criticized 
Israel for commoiciDg woric on the proj- 
ect, but the United States veio^ two 
Security Counril resolutions calling on 
Israel to halt woik. 


e^ierialiy the con- 
ition of land, the Juda- 
izang of Jerusalem and many 
odier issues.” 

The chief Palestinian ne- 
gotiator, Saeb Erekat, said 
^estinians were considering 
sen^g peace envoys to the 
United States, but added, 
“Althou^ we want to pre- 


serve the pe^ process, I am 
not very optimistic." 

Former Prime Minister 
Shimon Peres, narrowly de- 
feat^ in elections by Mr. 
Netanyahu last May, voiced 
similar skepticism. 

“In the campaign before 
the elections. W. Netanyahu 
and others accused me of go- 
ing too fast,” Mr. Peres told 
Israeli Army radio. Suddenly, 


he added, they have “started 
discussing a swift pace.” 
"The problem in my view 
isn't the pace," Mr. Peres 
said. “The problem in my 
view is where do they want lo 


go? If they’re 


re going 

‘no’ to the Pal^tinians on 


to say 


everything, why hurry? We'JI 
reach a confrxmtation.” 

Israel demands that Mr. 
Arafat crack down on terror- 


ism as a condition for restart- 
ing talks. In the weekly cab- 
inet meeting Friday, the bead 
of the Shin Bet securiw ser- 
vice. Ami Ayalon, told min- 
isters that while Mr. Arafat 
was encoura^g stone- 
throwing protests, he was 
making an effort to {wvent 
terror attacks by Islamic mil- 
itants, Israeli television re- 
ported. fPeu/prs, AP) 


VEGAS: Gambling on a. Lovable Paris 

Continued from Pagel 


MYTH: Midlife Crisis Is Relegated to the Trash Heap of History 


in 


f 


Americans chuckled 
amusement. 

Paris Las Vegas will 
pay no rovalties to 
of Paris, ^cording to 
fell Lueiy, presidOTi of 
Bally's Las ^ Vegas 
tBal ly 's, which onginated 

ihejHojccLisnqwpartrf 

the Hilton empue)- ^pe- 


riatigK and lawyers in the 
United -States and Ranee 
advised the devel<^)ers 
that tiie Paris symbols that 

Hilton plaas to approm- 
ate are in the pubuc do- 
main, Mr. Lueiy said. 

But there are consola- 
tions. Mr. Luc^ said tto 
the intent was to offer “a 


dise” as well as a number 
of French restaurants. He 
that Hilton represeih 
tatives would be negoti- 
ating witii 'small French 
wineries to seO their 'vin- 
tages in Las Vegas, and 
that be envisio^ dis- 


continued from Page 1 


ajoriw of Bench shops 
with wench merchan- 


xna 


-1 

m 

1 

r * 


.* ■ .’ f 

' Tn nilR READERS IN BELGIUM 
HcniIl>;»Sribune 

t 



rashion and savoir faire. 
Air France and Bendh 
tourism offices may also 
have a presence at Paris 
Las Vegas. 

Asked if the more than 
3,000 en^ilpyees of Paris 
ijg Vegas will spe^ 
French, Mr. Luerj' said 
that tii^ will not, 1^ that 
knowled^ of Bench' 
“sure would help you 
get in the door as an em- 
ployee.” 


Another finding is that 
menopause seems to be a 
fsdriy recenfly invented crisis. 
Most women barely notice 
it 

' The problem witii thinking 
of evei^ing that happens to 
a person as a crisis is that it 
“tends to em^iasize the 
straggle rather man the fril- 
fillment,” write a Cornell 
University professor, Elaine 
Wethington. and two other 
authors in a paper that will be 
published this summer in a 
book called “Stress and Ad- 
versity Acro&s the Life 
Course.” 

Also, they write, ”self-re- 
poiTed psychological distress 
IS, on average, the ' lowest 


among middle-aged men and 
women, compa^ to other 
ftgft groups.” In lay terms, 
calling something a midlife 
crisis IS just a big excuse for 
buying that hangglider, or a 
way to explain why your hus- 
band has decided to sail to 
Turkey on a 40-foot yawl and 
you have embarked on a new 
career as a ballet dancer. 

"There is no evidence that 
events occur linked to ch^ 
nological age,'' Mr. Brim 
said. “Anything can happen 
to anybody at any age.” 

And what Ms. Weihington 
refers to as the “su- 
bindiistiy" of counselors and 
therapists devoted to helping 
us through our expected mid- 
life crises may be in ft>r some 
tough sledding. 


Another researcher. Ron- 
ald Kessler of Harvard Uni- 
versity said he had asked 
people in their sixties and sev- 
enties if thev ever had a crisis, 
“and got reiadvely low levels 
of response.” 

OF^, he said, when re- 
spondents did report a crisis, 
“it would be something like 
th^ bad cancer — but re- 
latively few woke up and 
said. ‘I luve to buy a sports 
car.’ ” 

Under these new myth- 
busting guidelines. Pat Boone 
is not having a crisis by cut- 
ting a heavy-metal album and 
wearing a studded dog collar 
and leather vest, even though 
he happens to be 62 and 
known for stmgs like “April 
Love." 


He’s just growing and ad- 
justing Us aspirations to com- 
plement his skills. 

Grorge Bush is not para- 
chuting out of an airplane be- 
caure he’s having a crisis — 
he simply wants to have fun. 

There are not crises, they 
are only events, in the new 
thinking.. 

Ms. Wethington and others 
would like to reulace the term 
midlife crisis with a new one: 
tuniing point. 

It can be positive or neg- 
ative. and si^iify * ‘a period or 
point in time in which a person 
has undergMie a major irans- 
fonnalion in views about the 
seif, commitments to impor- 
tant relationships, or involve- 
ment in significant life roles, ” 
such as job or marriage. 


European integrationisL But it is hardly 
the only one. To reach the deficit bench- 
marks to qualify for the single-currency, 
Mr. Kohl’s government must resort to 
another round of unwelcome reductiwis 
in welfare entitlements — astep that 
faces a phalanx of opposition from 
churches, unions, sociri workers and 
opposition politicians. 

The main remedy to unemployment, a 
tax reform meant to lower taxes and 
promote growth, is stalled amid legis- 
lative gridlock with the opposition So- 
cial Democrats, who vow to veto key 
aspects of the plan and water it down. 

Just as pressing, Mr. Kohl vows cuts 
in the state-frinded retirement system at a 
time when Germans have taken to the 
streets nearly each week to protest eco- 
nomic change. And he still faces the 
unfinished business of German unifi- 
cation. with polls and other indicators 
registering widening social splits be- 
tween East and West Germany. 

“The fate of the CDU as government 
party and of the coalition depends upon 
Kohl’s readiness to be candidate.” the 
daily Franldurter AUgemeine Zeitung 
commented this week. 

Mr. Kohl's canqsaign announcement 
also served a political purpose. By an- 
nouncing early, he put piessure on the 
Social Democrats to dioose their can- 
didate — a move Mr. Kohl evidently 
hopes will highli^t internal power 
strugi^ and ideological splits among the 
opposition. 

The chairman of the Social Democratic 
P^, Oskar Laforttaine. has to cmtoid 
with tfie Lower Saxmy premier. Gerhard 
Schroeder — a more d^hing, pro-busi- 
ness politician. The two men luve sht^Iy 
diverging views on the most sensitive 
issues, Lafontaine is an old-s^le 
defender of European entitlements, will- 
ing to crusade for tax increases to pre- 
serve the social system, and he actively 
courts the party apparatus. Mr. Schroeder 
is openly skepderi of European integra- 
tion and consider^ more capable of bat- 
ing Mr. Kohl than is Mr. Lafontaine. 

Forced to chose early, the Social 
Democrats could annoint Mr. Lafon- 
taine. because Mr. Schroeder will be 
busy preparing for a state election next 
year. In popularity polls. Mr. Kohl leads 
Mr. Lafontaine. 

The strategy, however, could backfire 
for Mr. Kohl. If the Social Democrats 
stay cool and wait until after Mr, 
Schroeder faces the voters in his state 
next March, Mr. Kohl will be deprived 
of an opponenL letting others snipe at 
him while he hits at air. 

‘ ‘We are not going to let them make us 
nervous,” said the SPD party manager, 
Franz Muentefering. 


4. V 
.w 


1 



PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD IRIBIJIVE, SATURDAY-^UIVDsAy^ APlUL 5-6, 1997 


Creating Angry Art Amid Plenty 


By Alan Riding 

Se\f yiorJt Tmts 5irn7iv 


L ondon— T he cul- 
tural buzz lighting up 
London these days 
comes with unlikely 
thanks to Margaret Thatcher. 
The fron Lady had no dme for 
arty types, whom she pre- 
sumed to be leasts bent on 
living off government subsi- 
dies. She frowned on official 
promotion of culture. And 
aAer she resigned in 1990. 
government spendif^ on the 
arts continued to shrink under 
her successor. John Major. 

Yet as 18 years of Con- 
servative rule draw to a likely 
close in the May 1 gener^ 
elecdoQ. British movies, 
theater, visual arts, hishion 
and pop music are livelier 
now than at any time since the 
1960s. And, strangely. That- 
cher deserves much credit By 
imposing a Darwinian order 
on the arts, she forced cre- 
ative talents to learn to stand 
on their own. And p^ 
moting economic policies 
that widened the gap between 
rich and poor, she gave visual 
artists, moviemakers and 
playwrights something to 
protest about. 

Most of those who have 
taken up this challenge are 
themselves very much chil- 
dren of the Tory years: Bom 
in the late 1960s and 1970s, 
they can remember no prime 
ministers other than Thatcher 
and Major. Yet what they 
have to say is anything but a 
paean to Thatcherism. Their 
message is angry, rebellious 
and, in the end. idealistic. 

“Mrs. Thatcher forced 
artists to say that there are 
more iroponant things than 
money, marketing and man- 
agement.' ' said Richard Eyre, 
the departing director of the 
Royal National Theatre. 
“Who are the dissidents? 
People who say dtere are oth- 
er values, values that you can- 
not live without, feelings that 
are not accounted for a 
reductive view of society, 
bte. Thatcher said there is no 
such thing as society. The 
artist asserts there is." 


“What's truly subversive 
about it is that one million 
pills of Ecstasy are taken 
every weekend." 

Young artists evoke a far 
bleaker Britain. Over the past 
18 years, the closing of coal 
mines, shipyards and other 
labor-intensive industries has 
spawned a new underclass 
t^ lives on the periphery of 
the job and consumer maket 
and smolders with resent- 
meoL Even the middle classes 
lament a society that has lost 
its moral compass and can no 
longer count on once-revered 
institutions, from royalty to 
tire National Health Service. 

Yet the clash of old and new 
has produced the raw energy 
that is feeding the cutrent cul- 
tural lenaissance. In the 1960s. 
college-educated artists ^ke 
for the workirra classes. 
Today, many oi the new 
voices come from bumble 
roots and speak with the dis- 
tinctive accents of the Lorxlon 
East End. northern England. 


able recognition, thanks in 
part to Ae Saatchi Gallery 
(Where Charles Saatchi has 
built up Britain's most im- 
portant collection of contem- 
porary an) and the Tate Gal- 
lery’s armual Turner Prize for 
under-30 artists. 

Many new faces are also 
represented by gaUeries now, 
notably Jay Jopling's White 
Cube and Nicholas Logsdail 's 
Lisson Gallery. Their rosters 
include Hirst, Steve Mc- 
Queen. Marc Quinn, Sam 
Tayior-Wood, Chris Ofili, 
Bona Rae. Angus Fairhurst, 
C^ry Hume. Georgina Starr. 
Douglas Gordon. Gillian War- 
ing and Rachel Whiteread. 

“It's hard to give them a 
collective identity," Jopling 
said. “Their woik relates to an 
urban lifestyle, but it is sQrl- 
istically eclectic. It's no 
longer about painting and 
sculpture. There are lots of 
lustrations, video woric. a 
blurring of lines between 
advertising and communica- 


Wfaen “Trainspotting’' 
came our last year, the British 
movie indusiiy was in fact 
already stirring after the fal- 
low l^Os falbeit still laggmg 
behind Ireland’s flourishing 
movie business). Chaimel 4 
Films, originally founded to 
produce movies for televi- 
sion, such as Srephen Frears's 
“My Beautifiil Laundrette,’* 
had b^iun makiitg feature 
films. It proved c^uite daring, 
co-financing Ned Jordan's 
“Crying Gmne," which bad 
trouble finding backers. 

In 1994, it was rewarded 
wit!) its first inieoiational hit 
in Mike Newell’s “Four Wed- 
dings and a Funeral.” V^th 
“Shallow Grave,” a clever 
film noir. Channel 4 collab- 
orated with the enterprising 
trio made up of die director 
Daimy Boyle, the producer 
Andrew h^Donald and the 
screenwriter John Hodge. 

After “Shallow Grave." 
the thm again joined forces 
with Channel 4 for “Train- 


In Britain, the images may be bleak but there^s a 
cultural renaissance in the visual arts, moviemaking 
and theater, fed, strange to say, by conservative rule. 


B ut if British society 
still exists, it is also 
Cast changing. In me 
seaise. die m^ei has 
triumphed. With die British 
economy now grovdng. there 
is money to be spent on 
clothes, restaurants, night- 
clubs, pop concerts and drugs. 
Ihe new mania for fim. fui, 
fim has in turn fed the hype that 
London is swins^ a^in. Yet 
this world of ^tz is enjoyed 
by relatively few people. 


“1 have coined the phrase 
*t^c hedonism' fbrTliatch- 
erism.” said Robert Hewis- 
on. a British cultural historian 
and author of ' 'Future Tense: 
A New An for the Nineties.” 


Scotland, Ireland and Wales. 

‘ '‘Iliatcherism required that 
if anydung was to be dtme. you 
had to do it yourself.” Hewis- 
on said. “As official culture 
coU^is^ artists learned to 
survive in the cracks. Tbey had 
a complete lack of faith in 
institutions. Instep they 
adopted business values and 
learned to sell themselves." 

Tte first to do so were visu- 
al artists, notably an students 
from Goldsmiths' College, 
led by Damien Hirst, who in 
1988 organized their own 
show called “Freeze." In- 
stead of waiting for collect- 
ors, galleries or museums to 
recognize them, they elbowed 
their way into public aware- 
ness, often being outlandisbly 
provocative in order to be no- 
ticed (wimess Hirst's dissec- 
ted animals preserved in for- 
maldehyde). And tiiey began 
setting up independent artist- 
led spaces in abandoned 
warehouses and factories in 
the East End of London, Glas- 
gow. Manchester. Belfast and 
other cities. 

“The Idea was, if the sys- 
tem can't accommodate you, 
you create your own system, 
you take matters into your 
own hands,” said Julia 
Peyton-Jones. the director of 
the Seipentine Gallery in 
London, which concentrates 
on contempora^ art “Once 
you've done this, eveiytiiing 
IS freed up. And if one it, 

oih^ follow.” 

Almost a decade after 
“Freeze.” a score of young 
visual artists enjoy coosider- 



Tlw SwMon iitvcr-gih S^bbaih Lamp. J. Rlaonin. Fuenh. 
mid |Kihc«niury. iRo^enbctg nn. 2l57i. Sfi cm (3j l/2in.i high. 
Etlimate: S I5P.<XI0.2 jn.ODO i £00,000-1 SO.nOOi 

IMPORTANT JUDAICA 
THURSDAY 2A APRIL 1997 .AT S.OOPM 
FRID.AY 25 APRIL 1997 AT 11.00AM 

IMPRESSIONIST. MODERN 
AND ISRAELI ART 

SATURDAY 26 APRIL 1997 AT S.50P.M 


Reuven RpWn i IS93- lOTJ.. r uji/. Bouquet, painted in 1923. 
vigned. oil canvas, .si.3 h> vticm i.32 b> >nn i. 
Eslimalc Sl'Ni.Oini.l SO.raHi lihU niiii.ciii,ririn> 


SOTHEBY^ 


PREVIEW .ANDS.\LES ATTHETEL.\V[V HILTON HOTEL 
PREVIEW FROM FRID.AV IN .APRIL IW.AT ll.OO.AM 

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dons. You feel a sense of crisis 
in the materials used. For ex- 
ample. Marc Quinn made a 
sculptim of his head. 'Self,' 
with his own frozen blood." 

“There's a feeling of iso- 
lation. loneliness, a yeamii^ 
for human communication in 
a lot of tody's ait.' ' said Lucy 
Sicks, who helped organize 
Alt '97. this >'ear’s iJondon 
contemporary ait fair. “Art- 
ists seem to feel trapped in 
their environment and they 
look for an instant fix. Among 
the younger artists, you feel a 
strange sense of powerless- 
ness combined witii enor- 
mous energy.” 

Part of their frustration 
may well stem from the fact 
that Britain's prestigious art 
spools continue to ^rroduce 
droves of aspiring artists, yet 
the market for their work re- 
mains tiny. They can organize 
shows, tiiey may even be 
written about, but over the 
past 30 years. Logsdail said, 
w percent of the best British 
art has been sold abroad. 

Peyton-Jones said such 
sentiments translate into art 
scarred by anger, bleakness 
and rawness. “When 1 ask 
them why art isn't refiecting 
the beauty of life,” she said, 
“I am told, because life is not 
Uketiuu.” 

That certainly is the view of 
many new British movie- 
makers for whom the bucolic 
England of Jane Austen and 
Mmhmt-Ivory holds no in- 
terest Rather it is ''Trainspot- 
ting” — Irvine Welsh's book 
and the hit movie by the same 
name — that has cometosym- 
bolize the new wave. Fast 
moving, f^y and violent, it 
tracks the antics of a eroup of 
heroin addicts from Eonbuigh 
j whose half-4ieaned attempts to 
I rejoin society invariably faiL 

Is this the real Britain? Per- 
haps not, but it is certainly one 
Britain. While many older 
Britons were shocked by 
what they saw, the m^rs of 
the film were themselves sur- 
prised that such a nihUlstic 
vision of society could have 
wide au^nce appeal — and 
not only in Britain (the S3 
milli on movie has already 
^ssed more than S70 mil- 
lion worldwide). 


spotting.” Since then. Chan- 
nel 4 hu backed Mike Her- 
man’s “Brassed Off," while 
MacDonald and Boyle pro- 
duced Kevin AUen's “Twin 
Town” for Polygram Filmed 
EntenainmenL 

“1 think what's different is 
that the old gu^ never cared 
about die audience.” Mac- 
Donald explained. “They 
would make films for SS-year- 
olds. We make films for the 
younger. 16 to 2S. crowd that 
goes to the cinema. These 
films don't need good reviews 
in The Observo*. They have 
their audience, tiiey are rough 
at the edges and specific. 
I'm always surprised when 
tiiey do well outside Britaia” 

Just as surprising is that 
they also do well in London, 
because they tell stories from 
distant outreaches of the king- 
dom; “Shallow' Grave” and 
“Trainspotting” were shot in 
Scothuid, ‘'T^^ Town” in 
Wales and “Brassed Off” in 
northern England. 

“Twin Town,” which cel- 
ebrates the anarchic and 
deeply antisocial beha^'ior of 
two violent, foul-mouthed 
brothers, play^ by the real- 
life broth^ Rhys Ifans and 
Uyr Evans (Evans is tiie 
Anglicized version of Ifans) 
has already been tagged a 
Welsh “Trainspotting.” It is 
also funny, scattering such 
national symbols as rugby, 
sheep and male choirs into a 
story about class warfare ^ 
miscarriage of justice. It will 
be released in the United 
States on May 9. 

' "The film could have been 
set in any provincial town in 
Britain,” said Allen, 35, who 
lives in Swansea, where the 
film was shot ' 'The twins are 
representatives of a youth 
culture that is celebrating its 
total confusion. Everyone is 
celebrating tiieir dysfiinction- 
al status." 

In contrast, “Brassed Off,” 
which opens in the United 
States on Maiy 23, hides its 
political punch in a sentiment- 
al story about tnriiig to save a 
Yoikshire colliery's brass 
band during a wave of coal pit 
dosings ordered by the cm- 
servative government. Star- 
ring Ewan McGregor, who 


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also appeared in “Shallow 
Grave'' and “Train^iotting,” 
the movie presents itself as a 
coQiedy. but anger bursts 
throu gh when the mine is shut 
and the band’s fate is sealed. 

Cheered by the prosper of 
a movie industry tiiat otings 
in profits and czeaies jobsT^ 
government has allowed rev- 
enues from die National Lot- 
tery to be used as seed money 
for new low-budget pr^nc- 
tions. Even more daringly, it 
has decided to pump $240 
million of lottery pronts into 
the creation of four fledgii^ 
snidios. For the first time in 
decades, British movie- 
makers are feeling optimistic. 
Indeed, there is a risk diat too 
many British films will be 
made. 

While the movie industry 
has welcomed the lottery 
money, ^ reactioa of oth^ 
sectors of the arts has been 
mixed. Legislation setting up 
the lotted three years ago as- 
signed 25 percent of profits to 
capital ej^enditure on “good 
causes,” including culture. 
As a result, the likes of the 
R^al Opera House, the Tate 
G^ery. the Roy^ Court 
Theatre and the British Mu- 
seum have now embayed mi 
expensive modernizations 
and expansions. 

But b^use gewemment 
subsidies for running many 
institutions are frozen or 
shriiildng, there is a fear that 
there may be no artists to per- 
form in the glittering new 
theaters. Alr^y, regional 
theaters have abandoned their 
role as proving grounds for 
new talent; some have closed 
while others put on easy 
crowd-pleasers to insure fim 
houses. 


Y et for all that, Brit- 
ish tiieater has 
found ways of sur- 
viving. In London, 
while commercial fare fills 
the West End, piti> theaters 
like the Gate and the Bush and 
experimental theaters like the 
Almeida, Donmar Ware- 
house and Royal Court offer 
more daring wmk to smaller 
audiences. 

Similaily, there is a place 
for young directors in the 
small Cottesloe Theatre at the 
National Theatre, in the Pit at 
the Barbican and in the Rr^al 
Shakespeare Company's Ot- 
her Place at Stratf^-on- 
Avobl 

Most remarkable, how- 
ever, has been the explosion 
in new plays, many of them 
by Y^ung men and wmnen 
writing about the “down- 
siairs'^of British socieQr. An- 
nually. 800 are sent to the 
Naticmal Theatre, 1,000 to die 
Bush and some 2,000 to the 
Royal CourL Most do not get 
produced, but all are read ^ 
around 30 new plays are 
staged each year. 

' 'We get a hu^ number of 
plays aMtit coirapsmg soci- 
ety,” said Jack Bradl^, tiie 
literary manager at die Na- 
tional Theaftw. “Perhaps 
that's why people choose to 
write plays in this country. 
Because they’re opposed to 
the status quo. But ^ {days 
are not p^tical as sudi. 
There's an ideolomcal vacu- 
um, indeed a disbelief in a 
larger society.'’ 

Today, Britain is bursting 
witii new talents anxious to 
disrujM die feel-gpod mood of 
“swinging” I^ndon. The 
next few years will determine 
which ones will be re- 
membered. 



Frescoes in the House of Augustus in Rome. i.rvttlill 

First Palazzo in History in 

f k 

Rare Glimpse Into Life of Augustus 


By Roderick Conway Morris 

/n/mutiiwul Herald Tritoir 


R ome — T he Palatine (fin is even 
now one of the city’s most de- 
lectable spots, and it is not sur- 
imsing t^ some of ancient 
Rome’s leacUng citizens, including Cicero 
and Antony, bcanes on it Octavian. 
later to be Augustus. Rome’s first emperor. 


House of Augustus, which was fortunate m a 
way since, tiiou^ tiiis led to the destruction 
(rf parts it, others were buried and left 
undistuifaed for nearly 2,000 years.” 
Augustus’ vaulted study turns out to be 
only a few yards square, but decorated with 
some of the most exquisite and ddicaiely 
frescoes that have survived from 
tte ancient wt^d. They were almost cer- 
tainly die work of a Ptolemaic painter wtm 
came to Rome from Esvpt after Octavian’s 


was bom here, and when he rose to power came to Rome from after Octavian s 
he made a more extensive residrace on its defeat of ^tony and Cleopatra, 
slopes, founding, in at least, the first A passiongte reader, with an extensive 
“palace” in history, since “palazzo” and library in other rooms in tiie hou^ Augustus 
“palace” derive from the name Palatine, also wrote a number of works, including an. 


slopes, founding, in name at least, the first 
“patece” in history, since “pala^” and 
“pstiace” derive fr^ the name Palatine. 

Subsequent em pero rs’ palaces were su- 
perimpose on the bill, with the result that 
tiie exact location of Augustus’ original cme 
was not rediscovered until 
relatively recently and has 
been systematicaUy excav- 


aotobienrapby (now lost). Hts study would 
srin mafe the perfect plata to retire aid write 
and, as lacopi commeoied, “Of course, tiiis 
has been a veiy eiteiting ar- 
A • . R ch^logical mscovery, but 


atedbnly over the past few 
years — a process that has 
unearthed two remarkable 
frescoed reception rooms ^ 
and Augustus^ studioh, or r 
private st^y, to which he 
used to go to seek solitude 
and to write. 

Since excavations are 
still under way, tiiis area of 
the Forum is closed to vis- 
itors, but as part of the an- 
nual Cultt^ Heritage 
Week, when all Italian state 
museums and sites are open 
fireeofctuag;e, the House of Detail of afresco. 
Augustus along witii a 


it’s just as impoctantperiiaps 
for what it tells us about the 
man and his tastes.” 

If the House of Augustus 
was the mother of palaces, 
the Ai^nan Way, die regina 
viarum (queen of ro^), 
was certamly the first ai^ 
most celebrated of the great 
networic that eventually ran 
ihe length and breadth of 
the Begun in 312 

B.C, it was extended to 
Biin^ ^ 190 B.C. and 
munortatized in verse in 
qiiiricy by the Au- 

gustan poet Horace, who 
made the whole journey 


number of other monaments not normally from die capital to tire Adriatic coast, 
accessible to the public can be visited. {Cxd- Ibe .^ipian Way origjnally began at the 

tural Herit^e 'week tuns from April 14 to footof die Palatine, and there were plans as 
23.Details^openingcanbeobtamedfrom eariy as 1887 to include it in a {notected 


local soprintendenza and tourist infmna- archaeological paric, which would have em- 
tion ofiG^.) braced a uim area fi:^ die F<»om and 

Au^tus began ids career as a staunch ColiseumtotheCaracallaBatiisandtbecity 
republican, and even after he effisetively walls. Rome’s Archaeological Superin- 
adiieved absolute authority, iteinodeledl^ tendency is sill, more than a century later, 
Ufesiyle on that of an unostentatious public tiyii^fomakBtiiispaikaieali^.aiidmdeed 
magistTate, advocating moderation and die to continue diis protected area for die first 
virtues of the Rome of old. He built a miles of die toad beycaid the walls, and in 
nificent Tenqile of Apollo m the Palaime, furdier sections of the road (much (tfwiiich 
but his own quarters next doOT, found below is in an excellent state of preservation) all 
theremamsmtfaetcmple’splintii,mmoutto dmig the route to Brined, 
have been fairly mod^ in keqjing with the 

he strove to project. OW wortiiwfaile this project 

public romnsm the residence so far would be is shown by “Tte Ap- 

opened im have some intiigiiiiig frescoes, ■ ■ Way: On the Ridns of An- 

with finuy painted aichitKtural and per- A rifnt h^gnificence,” at Palazzo 
qi^ve \uew$ evidently modeled on the- Ru^oli (until June 29), which has a 
atricalsceneiy, as are the masks tiiat amiear. sampling of die rich ar^eological finds 
The rustic scenic centetpi^ in the Room that nave been uneardied hy die roadside 
of the Masks figures a oizaire, futuristic, and demonstrates tiiat tiie developments 
caiiistm|-like object with tapeimg ends, tiiat grew up along dze way through the 
which is believed to be an arcane rep- centuries — from miperial and pa- 

resentation of Augustus’ protecting deity, gan cemeteries to Christian basilicas and 
Apollo, other examj^ of which have bera catacombs — mad*- it much more than Just a 
found in Nortii Africa. tiunou^ifere. Since eariy Mai^ tiie ininql 

But the pitee de rfeistance is the em- 15-idlometer (9-mile) stretch of the road 
peror’s stu^ on die floor above. Irene lac- hasbeendosedfocrsfficeveiy Sunday, and 
<^1, who has been leacting tiie excavations, tiie success of this experiment with the 
said, “The Eomeror Domitian built his public wiU, it is hoped, ^ve new impetus to 
palace inore or less directiy on top of the mepeananeocaichaeologicaip^ 


H OW wortiiwfaile this project 
would be is shown by “Tte Ap- 
Way: On the Ruins of An- 
cient htegnificence,” at Palazzo 
Ru^oli (until June 29), which has a 
sampling of the rich ar^teolo^cal finds 
that nave been uneartiied ty tiie roadside 
and demonstrates that the developments 
ibat grew up along the way thnni^ tte 


'hif-a'M, 


BOOKS 


BECAUSE THEY 
WANTED TO: Stories 
By Mary Gaitskill 254 pp. 

$22. Simon & Schuster. 

Reviewed by Carolyn See 

I KNOW that Mary (laitskill 
isn'tfm- everyone, that she’s 
gotarepuiation as a rowdy and 
a reprobate whose ideas about 
sex are — to say the least — 
startlingly innovative. Never- 
theless, I found this coUecticsi 
of short dories to be affec- 
tionate, diarming. thought^ 
and (one of Gaitskill’s favrxite 
words here) tender. The au- 
thor's intentitxi would seem to 
be to go beyond the wmld of 
giris with shaved heads, tat- 
toos and flesh-cutting devices, 
and women who identify 
themselves as “femme top” 
or “butch bouom” «4im 
they’re getting to know each 
other at cocktai] pemes. 

The first sio^. “Tiny, 
Smiling Daddy,’ ’ is told from 
the point of view of a father, 
agmg and glum, who learns 
from one of his buddies that 


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his dangle has wriom a “ let- 
ter” to him in die pages of Self 
magazine. nravy fixe- 
bodmg, he goes out to buy the 
peiiomcal, his mind of 
dark dioughts. Doesn’t she 
know how mudi his privacy 
means to him? Inde^ she 
mentions, in earnest, self-help 
luose, that she’s a iKUan aim 
that, siiice be’U never under- 
stand that, jtiie’s hpd Co learn 
how to parent herself. We find 
out in flashbacks about die 
blows and insnlte he’s rained 
down on her in die past, buL 
mrae sadly and inevitably, we 
also Iram that he’s had a babit 
of turning “die edge of cxie 
nostril over with his diumb and 
nervmtsly aroldng his nose 
hairs with one finger.” 'The 
poor man is repellent beyond 
words, a model for why girls 
might mm away from men. 

Many of & females in 
these streies nm away, from 
home at the age of 16. There’s 
oten no reason given, merely 
tiiat life at home is intolerable. 
Homeless and pei^ess, 
meeting murderous tnaninM 
in pubuc parks — all tiiat is 
much better tiian what these 
heroines have left beUnd. 

But if anytiung, die men in 
Gaitskill’s wwld are nune 
victimized by the quotidian 
flow of events tiian the wom- 
en. The eiqiectations put upon 
them, die enormous amounts 
of flatieiy and adulation 


they’re force-fed as children 
and youths would make freaks 
of anjmne; tiie boys can’t he4> 
it, GtetskiU might say. 

In “Orchid,” a tebian so- 
cial worker named Margot 
lives alone, trying CO ricte out a 
hrerioen heart. She woo^ hard 
and eats healthy hrane-cooked 
meals, impersonating a gocxl 
and normal h uman teing. By 
chance, runs into I^trick, 

an old friend frtm coQege. 
Patrick used to be hanri-^nf ufi 
and chymiftg, magica l and 
enchanting. Now he's a fatu- 
ous nitwit, and tiiat’s on a 
good day. After weeks of tiy- 
va^ to togediOT an adult 

frieadship witii him, Margot 
drinks wztii exa^peratuxi, 
“How had her Ughtiiearted, 
lovely beta noire become this 
silly man?” Butin flashbacks, 

we see that he’s been told so 
o^y times that he’s God's 
gift to women that he really 
^ begun to beUeve it. 

On the other hand, men cai^ 
be toroired and haunted by the 

sexually extravagant Gai>»iriii 
women. In “The Dentist,” a 


fear.” be cries out: “Why are 
you always saying tit^ 
itomeTwbatdo 


a Wisdom tooth out and riltrmg 
that trying operation becomes 
obsessed wttii her dentist, a 

nice, pleasam, reasonably het- 
erosexual guy. She peppers 
him with small talk about mo- 
lestation, mastuibatimi, body 
inocing aid what have you 
until, almost witii 


you want? why are you ali 
w^ talldng about sex?” 

These poor men don’t get 
h, Gaitskill seems to be say-^ 
ing. Either they’re cruel or 
repellent or silly or hope- 
lessly out of it, or they don’t 
laugh at ifae ri^t jokes# 
Wim’s a girl to Sex witii 
men doesn’t woric, and with 
women it’s h am pered 1^ role-' 
pitting. there be life b^, 
yond black leather and bodyA 
piercing, rolo-pU^g aim 
'mechanical” sex? 

In a four-part novella, 

' 'The Wrong Thing,” tiie au- 
cto follows the fbrames of a 
nice bisexual lady just on the. 
edge of getting too old for the 
standard nm of . GaitsI^' 
sherinnjgans. She haings out in 
a nice lire, partying, diinlang. 
writing, flirting, romanced by 
a vacuous young man and air 
mterestii^ young woman. 
The h^erosexual paradigm of 
domesticity is out of the que^ 
tion for biW. (That way lie 
craniy husl^cte who pat.the 
hair in tb^ noses.) But what- 
is possible? How does one' 
find love and costeohneot?' 
Gaitskill’s answer, tfaongh 
tentative, is affectionate, -j 
ebanning, tender: 

Carolyn See wrote this fim 
The WoMingum Post. ^ 













>> w , . ' li*mUuUK>lyVAOA.Ne»YH.N.Y. 

One of Jasper Johns s "'Flag" paintings, done in J954-55. 


'A Very Odd 
On Show in 


By David Galloway 

I OLOGNE — Comddeoce or 
hot, this dty*s parallel retro- 


eritica] reflections rtmr oehber show 
would have prompiied oa iis own. Ac 
first glaoM, the two paintecs seem to 
tome not just from different geoeratioDs 
but firoffl different worids. 
and ascetic, Jdms has been known to 
brood over a sing^ woric for years, 
while the hip-ho{^rin^ Haring could 
dash off a vast compositioD in a matter 
ef hours. 

I The artist as recluave genius and as 
^V^Niblic perfonner are two of tiie po- 
lanties tiiese shows iiiwninaf# yet the 
two figures also have something in com- 
mmi. Steeped in art history, both Johns 
and Haring quote frc»n their fovorite 
wtxks, somemnes with the help of a 
collide. 

> Such allusiODS are also an aspect of 
auiobiogr^diy, which may f^ure di- 
rectly in tile c^jce of mMifs, But whm 
Haring made eiqdich use of his en- 
thusiasms and eiqierienoes, including 
hu homosexualfty, Jdins fnsquendy ei^ 
codes the allusions. Witiiout foooootes, 
viewers are unlikely to recognize, the 
gridded pattern tm-acaivas as die floOT- 
plan of Im grandfadier’s house. 

; The introvert and the extrovert also 
share the desire to eaqdore new me- 
diums. Although the Haring j e h oroe c t-. 
tve at the Cologne KimsAaHe docu-' 
mems only his printed woric^ &e^Z04 
examples on view use VBtnaUy. every 
known technique, from siflcscrra and 
Iid)ogra{rfiy tinou^ drypoinc, etcb^,' 
engraving, emboss^ and photopoiu- 
ing. Correspondingly one. e n co mu era 
images that range fiom the ubiqoitous 
'‘R^ant Baby” to the tonnemed snr- . 
realist visions Haring ctmoeived to B.- . 
histrate William S. Bunou^'s epo- 
•^alyptic tale erf “Hie Valley.” 

. • P^ted works by Jtdms take iqi two 
galleries at the Museum Didwig, ^ 
true appeal of tins retrospective is hi 
seeing the artist's painteny evolution, 
documented in 200 canvases dating 
from 1954 to 1994. Hie eariy ”Flag'^ 
paintings, which once scandalized tra- 


ditionalists, have long since acquired an 
dd-masterly ama. According u> their 
creator, a dream about die American 
flag inqined the first of tfa^ wenks. 
The **fonDd'* composition, saij^ied of 
patr»Misz&, pathos and peispeciive, 
jnovided a frnmal pictorial structure for 
the intricate ^rnnal qiproach Jtdms 
was diea developing. Tafgets, m^ and 
numbers woulrf serve a ggriiar func- 
tion. 

Johns sought, in his own words, “to 
paint things peofde knew but didn't 
know,” in order toprovoke "a shifting 
focus erf the eye.*^ Unlike snto con- 
temporaries as Andy Warhol, Roy Licfa- 
ttostein or James Roseumst; he never 
celebrated tiie trivial, mtitin his re- 
latively restiictied sp ec tr um of imt^es, 
tiiere are no movie stars, ocmuc-boedc 
heroes or consumer icons, beymid a 
tongue-in-cheek pair of beer cans: Fur- 
tbmnexe, at a time when Fr^ pioneers 
were experimenting witii tiie flat, an- 
rniymbus awfiwMt madepossiUe by tiie 
niew acrylic paints, lo^ was wafting 
in tile anrifnt aod complex medium erf 
encaustic. 


O NE chaKacCBOstic of tiiis hoc- 
wax pioce» is diat evi^ 
its dis- 

tioct ptol^ and the entire 
canvas seems to acqitire a voluptuous 
“skiiL” Notiung c^d be mareremote 
fnm die calculated au o uyinity <rf War- 
heti and 'Ctoapany. Jrtiins's rigid dis- 
tinction between his '' serious ’ 'pamting 
and his 4^y. highly snccesafu] com- 
mercial *woikr^as'a£o f<m ro War- 
hol. asit.waa to the Pop Shop proprietor 

' RtinisseemsbiznrethattheMuseum 

m*vSe fiSS^POp /S^Nbt just in 
tiieme and technique but also in com- 
position, the wodcs foljkiwing the flags 
and targ^ would increasin^y reveal a 
baroque {ticmrial imagmation. Ihere is 
also a growing tendency to caimibaKze 
motifs from eariier works, so that a 
sin^ canvas can become a nuni-ret- 
lo^iectivein its ownri^iL 

. David GalUnvay is an art critic and 
five-lanc€ curator based in Wuppertal, 
Germany, 


How Deep Will the Excavations Go? 

Museum- Quality Chinese Art Is Main Presence at Asian Fair 

iMematiciui HeraidTiibuae would Stand oul anyuhere among ves- 

N EW YORK — As the Asian sels of that period and category. 

Fair closed its doors at the Yet, for magnifieeDce in archaic 
Annoiy, few seemed to give fanxites, it was Gisele Ones of Brussels 
much thought to the unique who won hands down. A pair of 


iMematiciui Herald Tribuae 

N ew YORK — As the Asian 
Fair closed its doors at the 
Armory, few seemed to give 
much tiiou^t to the unique 
set of circumstances that made its huge 
successpossible. While Chinese an was 
the mtended foens, its presence was 
overwhelining. If a show ever made the 
point that h U the oiily major art in ^ 
world that remains available at super- 
lative Tnuscutn level, this was it. 

One reason for this abimriance of 
artistic treasures for sale leaped to tiie 
eye. Excavated objects were to be seen 

SOURENMEIJKIAN 

aU over the fair, and what objects! De- 
spite the officii bmi on tiie expat of 
works of art of more tiian 50 years of 
ag^ tire loot of the buried hentage of 
China is clearly not over yet 
Ctanting ib^ h is dif&ult to say for 
sure whether a given piece came to li^ 
one, two or five years ago, the im- 
portance of some of the scuptures and 


bronzes makes it unlikely that those 
owning them have held mem for any 
lengtii of time. 

Tbe most extraordinasy discoveiy at 
the fair was perhaps a group of me 
lacquer meces made in tiie fijitii orfourih 
ceniuiy B.C.. displayed by Roben EUs- 
wortii of New York. These were part of 
a group of 19 items too bulky m be 
shown together. An openwork screen 
whh connonted birds amid fomalized 
motifs anda stand no biggv than astool, 
but monumental wim its monsters 
raised on their hind legs, would loom 
large in any maja world museum. 

Equally admirable in its own righU st 
ifaird-centuiy B.C bottle w^ its swirl- 
ing linear decoration cut through the 
gold foil soldered to the surface 




J 










would stand out anyuliere among ves- 
sels of that period and categi^. 

Yet, for magnifieeDce in archaic 
faitxites, it was C^le Ones of Brussels 
who woo hands down. A pair of squat 
jars rising fnxn a square r^)reseated 

all by t^nnselves a hMieito iml^wn 
schorl of metalwork, prob^y of tite 
fifth or fourth century B.C. And while a 
large circular basiru SS.5 centimeters (23 
isefaes) across inchiding the projecting 
hancte, may be of a well-known type, 
tiie sheer beauty of its abscraa pen^ 
cast in low relief as well as the condition 
make h one (rf tbe top-rankiDg pieces at 
that period anywhere in the wo^ 

For the fiik tima perhaps, the dis- 
coveries in the field of figural an at die 
fair and, more importantly, in a string of 
selling shows put up by dealers across 
town, maicbed m im p ortan ce those re- 
garding archaic vessels. On Croes’s 
stand, an earthenware danr^ pawned in 
whhe.red,pinkandbla^overanivoty- 
ooJoti^ shp from the Weston Han period 
(206 B.C. — AJ>. 9) displayed a sculp- 
tural masteiy in the face surpassing tiw 
of most Western Han an l^wn so far. 

The school was &st revealt^ to the 
West ar Eskenazi in London in 1 995, and 
Eskeoazi it was that led -ig^n, this time, 
for Render and surprise. On the 
oeznires that tiie dealer had rented at 28 
cast 78th Street for a solo show, two 
large-aze figures of attendants from tiiai 
same school of eartiienware sculpture 
had a hyimodc effect With their hands 
joined, concealed in dieir ample sleeves, 
and their ^es seemingly staring at sane 
fllummating revelation, they ra& among 
tiie early masterpiece s of Chroese fig- 
uration m the round. More astonishing 
tfaou^ were three figures from tiie same 
wodahop, seated on their heels, bands 
raised in sane ritual gesture reminiscent 
of the Middle EastOT prayer posnire, 
tiieirlm patted as if, 
TTvWfi, to chant sa- 
cred texts. Their xm- 
j»ct was instanL All 
the figures but one 
sold on the opening 
night on Ma^ 19, 
dim days before the 
fair started. 

Yet even these 
p^e ^ comparison 
with the en^ rev- 
elation of me month, 
which appesred on 
March 28 in the 
window of the E&J 
Bankel Galleiy on 
Madison Avenue. 
The roaring chimera 
of the seventh cen- 
tury, 1(X) centi- 
meters high, is not 
just the largest 
wooden anmial 
carving from Tang 
China discovered so 
for. The medium has 
allowed tile sculptor 
to give it a liiheness 


Detail of Tang period wood chimera, seventh century. 


and an expiessive- 
oess in the rendition 
of unleashed fury 
tiiat is breathtaking. 

After illicit dig- 
ging, the secoM 
rac^ that unloaded 
BdtiAMW on the staricec many 
enturv. rarities is the Cul- 






Earthenware attendants from the Western Han period, 206 B.C. ‘AD. 9. 


tural Revolution. Without the tornado 
that wrecked patrician houses and 
temple halls by the thousands, Ming and 
early Qing fomiture of the splendor seen 
of late ini^ West would probably never 
have been let loose. On the stand pul up 
by Grace Wu Brace of Hong Kong a late 
1 fith-cenony raised platform with open- 
work caof^y made to serve as seating 
furniture in tiie ^ytime and as a bed at 
night outshone any offered so far. A 
rep^ pattern ba^ on the swastika 
motif that appeara on the low sides is 
replicated on a bigger scale in the can- 
o{^, making the bed a gem of Chinese 
design at its most ethereal. 


A THIRD factor accounting for 
the cunem availability of 
Chinese an of a hi^ or^r is 
the changing taste in the West 
after four centuries of steady Chinese art 
iuq»rts. Those who owned works of art 
as a picturesque addition to their decor 
are losing interest in exotica. The same 
works looked at differently find a new 
life. The two blue and white dishes with 
radiating pattenis of the Kangxi period, 
Iar|^ than any known, whito Michael 
Pa&fcy of tiie Santos Gallery, London, 
exhibited, will probably end up in a 
museum. They reached Europe a long 
time ago. So did the pair of tobacco- 
brown lacquer palace toairs with open- 
woik scroll bac^ exhibited by Michael 
Gillingham and Roger Keverne. also of 
London. The 1 Stb-centuiy seats used to 
grace an old English collection. Their 
oeaiest rarity, a 60-centimeier bronze 
fij^mserfa seared Xwanyin cast in 1572, 
unique for its date within the short 


Longxing reign (1567-1572). gave an 
Oriental whiff to the garden of a Boston 
house only a short whtie ago. Now. rare 
Buddhist statues are no longer thought 
of as pn^ for outdoor decoration. 

Even furaiture made for the European 
market is seen in a new light A bureau 
covered with Canton plaques painted in 
light, delicate hues took center stage on 
the stand of S. Marchant &. Son of 
London. A garden scene with Chinese 
literati points to the early years of the 
(^anlong reign (1736-1795). Ii stood. 
John M^hant says, in a Shropshire 
country bouse where it was “repured to 
have bi^ since new.” 

The oltimaie discovery among works 
reflecting Che impact of Europe was a set 
of four cloisomi6 enamel figures of Old 
Testament prophets holdbg tablets with 
Biblical quotations in Chinese. Khalil 
Rizk of New Yak dared the figures to 
the ‘ ‘CJing Dynas^. 18th/l9ih cennny .' ' 
But foe sculptural handling, purely 
European, wlucb is based on Roman 
models, allows greater precision. It sug- 
gests the time when Giuseppe CastigU- 
one and other Jesuits were active at the 
court of (^ianloag. The quote from Isaiah 
inscribed on one tablet, "Behold a virgin 
shall conceive, and bear a son. and shstil 
call his name hnmanuel," would sup- 
port the connection. 

Was this set made for a Chinese Chris- 
tian? Or was it ordered, if not even made 
in part, by a European Jesuit? James 
Wart, tte Chinese department curator at 
the Metropolitan Museum, may know 
the answer. In any case, be bad no doubt 
that these are museum pieces. Wan 
bought them there and then. 


A Watteau 
Discovered 
in Chicago 

C hicago — The 

An Institute of Chi- 
cago bas found a 
major work by an 
18ih-century French master 
in its collection. - 
The painting. "Fere Qiam- 
peire,’^ has been authen^ 
aied as the work <rf- Antoine 
Watteau. It was mven to the 
museum in 1954 and attrib- 
uted to an anonymous 
tower of Jean Batiste Pater. 
Pater was a pupil trf Wanean. 

Two years ago, reseatchos 

to investigate the work, 
which was badly clouded 
with varnish. The institote 
^d a scientific examination 
and X-ray analysis had 

proven it 10 beaWa«eau.0M 
that, because of the scarcity OT 

his work, foe museum would 
be unable to afford today. 
Scholars from other insti- 


!HiTiXini¥wm‘L' 


al Gallery of An m Wasb- 
ingion and liie National 
Galleiry in London, have ex- 
amined foe painting ai^ back 
foe attribution, alfoou^ some 

suggest that Waneai^ 

Have ^owed his 
to finish some of the figures, 
Purtber substantiation ot 
foe Waneau attribunon 
from Piene Rosenbw^di^- 
lor of foe Louvre m Pans, ma 
1773 auction catalofiiwn^ 
in the Bibliofoeque Njtitmale 

in Paris, Rosen^ 

reference to a woA^w 

10 Watteau that 

lainly can be ident^ as foe 

Alt Institute’s pamnns, ®e , 
museum said. ,««4nr 

i . This is foe fcond^^ 
discoveiy in the 
coUectiSi in 

The fitsl was that ofad^Mg 

by foe Renatwance 
l^phael. (Reutars.AFF) 


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SATUIU>4Y-SUM>AX, APm5-6, 1997 

EOnmiALS/OPINION 


HcralK 


INTERNATIONAL 



j^rtbune 


niBUSHED wm THE NEW HWK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON rOST 


Quid Pro Quo 


AU tbe parties to the Middle East 
negodadon see a looming crisis, and 
laael ’s iHime minister, Brajamin Net- 
aayabu, is due in Washington with a 
rescue plan. He would park the broken- 
off talks on the Oslo accord for a Pal- 
esdnian-Israeli interim settlement and 
open crash ralks on the big permaoent- 
settlement issues — Jerusalem, Jewish 
settlements, Arab refugees, borders, 
security. Mr. Netanyahu hopes for an 
accord in six months, perhaps with 
American help at a C^p David-like 
pressure-cool^ finale. 

Strange things happen in the 
Mideast, and so you cannot say this 
idea could never work. But very 
strange and unlikely things would have 
to happen for the Netanyahu plan to 
produce a txeakthroug^. We don't 
think there is any new magic in the 
step-by-step process that he would at 
leak temporarily abandoo, and there 
has been plenty of frustradon and dis- 
appointment in iL But we also think 
there is a huge and even determinadve 
shortage of tbe trust needed to make 
either iaciemental or compnehensive 
talks prove useful. Day One would 
bring the statement of starting, max- 
imal bargaiaing positions. Day Two? 
And if tbe new talks fail? Go back to 
Oslo? 

Yasser Arafat has slyly altered 
Oslo's terms in some respects and has 
failed to keep the Palestmiaas' anti- 
terrorism end of the bargain. But Israel, 
too, has played a big part in under- 
mining the Ctelo pr^ss. and it now. to 
save bargaining chips, wants to put off 
tbe "led^loyments'* devised at Oslo 
and to move to a new venue. Israel also. 


by adding a Jerusalem housing project 
that Labor governments had avoided as 
inflammalorjr, has luiilaieraliy mooted 
later negotiation on Jerusalem, and has 
otherwise doled out territory so scuty 
and genymandered as to mrxk the idra 
of aieanble Palestinian state. 

Ask why tbe cunent negotiations are 
flagging . The Palestinians are failing to 
provide the IsraeUs with adequate se- 
curiQ'' This is a fact and a very con- 
sequnitial one. It has understandably 
made some Israelis doubt that a sale 
peace is attainable, while others use the 
Israeli occupation and Palestinian equi- 
vocation to press claims, by construc- 
tion ami by confiscation, to extensive 
teiritoiy claimed by Palestinians, too. 
P^es rinians step Up the inexcusable vi- 
olence, and more Israelis conclude that 
territory is better than a dubious peace. 

This seems like an unbreakable 
cycle, but the familiar internationally 
^iproved formula of land for peace 
suggests at least the possibility of a 
way ouL Peace requu^ greatly im- 
proved security for krael — tiiere is no 
doubt about that, and it is not and 
should not be negotiable. Land means 
political e:q)ression fm* the Palestin- 
ians. These things are a^evable if the 
United States will mess the Palestin- 
ians hard to stop playing games with 
teiTorists and pi^ the Israelis hard to 
stop conducting a unil^ral annexa- 
tionist policy. Palestinian responsibil- 
ity on peace would make Isml readier 
for compromise. Israeli easing up on 
land would undercut the tenorism. 
This is what Mr. Netanyahu needs to 
hear from Mr. Clintcm. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Latin Militaries 


As Defense Secretary William Co- 
hen continues his p redecessors' efforts 
to ad^)t tile Pentagon to a post-Cold 
War woiid, he must ps^y special ac- 
tenticMi to modemiang ^ relations with 
Latin American militaries. Few aspects 
of defense policy were more poisonous 
titan the Pentagon’s suf^^ Ah' abusive 
and anti-democratic T-aftn officers. 

During the first Clinton administra- 
tion, offxnals at Defense made a start in 
abandoning this Cold War policy. But 
tii^have a long way to go. 

The Peofegon has shif^ its focus to 
the promotim of democracy and ci- 
vilian control of militaries. Vestiges of 
the Cold War remain, however. Tbe 
most notorious is the School of tbe 
/Goxnicas, now in Fort Benning, Geor- 
gia. For decades. U.S. officers tituned 
Latin American solttiers at the school 
to Sj^t Marxist guerrilla movements 
and built ties that ensured Latin mil- 
itaries would be dominated ^ friends 
of the United States. At times, die 
trainers used Tnannals advocating 
blackmail, tcature and the arrest of 
anti-Ameiican politidans. 

The school is no longer teadiing tor- 
ture, and its courses now emphasize not 


counterinsurgency but tank rqiafr. But 
the Pentagon has not rqiudiat^ its old 
practices as dioioug^ as h should. The 
school should be clo^ and its Int- 
imate training functimis transfeoed to 
Latin America. The school continues 
the Cold War policy, now conqil^y 
unjustified, of making mili taiy relatioos 
the central point of contact benreen U.S. 
and Latin govennneots. This focus is 
still a threat to frag^e civilian control of 
Latin militaries zad encourages abuses. 

Secretary Cohen also n^ds to en- 
sure that American military officers 
based in Ltuin America do not un- 
dermine tbe Pentagon's new pro-de- 
mocracy policies. During the Cold 
War, many of them idmtified too 
strongly with their Larin counterparts 
and winked at abuses. Some still do, 
especially in infotmal socializing. The 
Clinton administration should also 
stop pushing Latin militaries to take 
over the drug war and spend their na- 
tions' scarce resources on higji-tecfa 
American we^x^. 

Instead, Washington should be help- 
ing civilians shrink tiieir militaries and 
urging soldiers to accept the cuts. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Assault on Inunigrants 


Most of the recent criticism of 
America's iramigratim policy has fo- 
cused oa the new welfere reform law's 
roean-qririted limits mi public assist- 
ance for legal immignints. But tiie 
broad immigration bill that took effect 
t^ past week may turn out to be a 
grayer tfaieaL Tbe law strips even legal 
residents of the ri^t to go to court to 
c hallen ge decisions on deportation by 
the Immigration and Natnralization 
Service. It also attempts to remove 
most judicial checks on tbe INS, an 
agency wife a record of mismanage- 
ment, disorimination and brutality. 

The law, passed last fall, was an 
attempt to ke^ inmugrants from using 
lengthy court procedures to prolong 
feeir stay. It alM sought to shield the 
INS from legal challeoges to its prac- 
tices. Immigr^mi lawyers are already 
suing to block parts of the law from 
taking effect, and more suits are likely. 

The law is so confusing and con- 
tradictory feat fee Clinton adminis- 
tration's decisicKis about how to en- 
force it assume special importance. So 
far. administration policjmiakers and 
Justice Department lawyers have 
largely pus^ for fee harshest p(^ 
sible interpretation, perhaps to avoid 
being seen as pro-immigrant. 

One of the law’s most pernicious 
aspects is its attempt to ban certain 
class-action injunctions. Those would 
keep fee INS tom violating the law in 
its deportations of people seeking to 
enter the United States and certain 
groups of recently arrived illegal im- 


migrants. Only individual lawsuits are 
now allowed. This removes what has 
been the most important safeguard 
against discrimination and abuse. Such 
an injunction, for exaz^le, stopped the 
INS tom denying Haitian boat people 
tile ability to seek political asylum. 

In some cases, the law seeks to block 
infeviduals tom going to court to chal- 
lenge their deportations. Immigration 
officers can pick up people on the 
street and deuim and deport them with- 
out a bearing if fe^ cannot prove they 
entered on a visa or have been in the 
country for two years. Legal lesideots 
can be deported they have been con- 
victed 01 a crime or two offenses of 
moral tmpitude, which could inclnde 
jumping a subway turnstile. Most of 
tiiese cases turn on decisions INS 
examiners that cannot be argued before 
acoint. . 

Perha^ die law’s worst flaw is tiiat 
its denim of access to fee courts will 
make it much har^ for those freeing 
political persecution to win asylum. 

Peiha^ this law will be overturned 
by fee courts. In tbe interim, the ad- 
ministration should ^ly it wife com- 
passion and flexibility. 

law won political 
attacking an unpopular group, 
historic^y. is how more widespread 
deprivations of rights have started. The 
law is not just an assault on vulnetable 
people who deserve protection from 
abuM, but a threat to tbe liberties of all 
Americans. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


HtctalbS^rlbunc. 


E^ABUSHED 1887 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co^hanHen 

KATHARINE P. DARROW, C/uirmm 

RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher & Chief Executive 
MICHAEL GBTLER, Executive Editor 

• WALTER WELLS, Managing Editor • PAUL HORVTTZ. Deputy Managing EtStor 
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m REN£ BONDY, Deputy PubHsher 

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Life Support Urgently Needed for the Mideast 


J ERUSALEM — Tbe Middle East 
peace process is in deep trouble. It is 
not in temporaiy recess; it is in re- 
giessioiL 

What is the reasem? Is it the “greeu 
light" allegedly given by Yasser 
Arafat to tecrorists to resume boriness 
— fee story flashed around the worid by 
Prime Mister Beojamm Netanyahu? 
Or is it perhaps the * "red light" Stepping 
implementation of the Oslo peace ac- 
coj^ Mr. Netanyahu’s decisioi to cre- 
ate new fait accomplis in Jerusalem? 

Mr. Arafat’s record arouses the sus- 
picion, whenever te n or strikes IsiaeL 
that he has unleashed it, if n<K directly 
then at least by acquiescence. But the 
actions Mr. Aiafat undertook against 
militant Palestinian organizations after 
last year's suicide bombings cast doubt 
on the prime minister’s charge. 

Be that as it may, the success of the 
fi^t against Palestinian tenorism de- 
pends to a large degree — as expe- 
rience has shown — tmtiiecooper^oo 
of both sides. Ihis requires a basis of 
trust and discretion. 

Mr. Netanyahu, feou^ he professes 
adherence to the Oslo agreement, has 
never concealed his conteinpt for it 
This formed a c e n terpiece or his elec- 


By Gideon Rafael 


tion propaganda. "Tbe Oslo acctxd," 
be noclaimed, "sticks like a knife in 
die bade of Israel" because it seeks fee 
settiemeot of tbe Israeli-Palestintan 
cooflict by fee partition of fee cmiimy. 

Such an approach is fiercely rejected 
by feose, bxiB Mr. Netanyahu, who 
believe in Israel’s divine rij^ to rule 
the land from tiie sea to fee Jordan 
River. Such people fenm the core of 
Mr. Netanyahu 's coaliCioD and limit his 
freedom of movemenL 

In attempting to free himself fro m 
tbe fetters of tbe Oslo agreement. 
Netanyahu has built up a fomiidable 
arsenal of political tactical wetqKXis, 


"green li^" charge when Arab vi- 
olence ensu^ 

Now I^. Netanyahn proposes to 
speed tm final status negotiatioas, fin- 
ishing mem in six months. 

His aides also hastened to add feat all 

fee Pdestinians coold expect in the 
final settlement was about ^ percent 
of die West Bank, and not contiguous 
areas fear could comixise a sovereim 
state but areas interspersed wife IsraeH- 
controUed setdements. Jerusalem’s 
{xesent status would be uncontested, 
ch^ added. 

Since Mr. Netanyahu cannot expect 
die PaJestiniaiis to accept such a solu- 
tion, it is ofafvious his plw for speeded- 
np negotiations is just a ploy to reduce 
intematitMial pressure on him and to 


alternately procrastinating, prevaricat- place responsibility for Oslo’s demise 


ing and taking unilateral arrinns fear 
humiliate the ofeersLfe and fan feafiny 
of the Palestinian pet^Ie. 

One of Mr. Netanyahu’s principal 
aims is to saddle Mr. Andiat and the 
Palestinian Authotiw wife die 
siinlity for die colhq^ of the 
peace laoc^. Criticized worldwide 
for ixooeeding wife the Har Homa 
Jewish htmsing project in East Jeru- 
salem, Mr. Netany^iu turned on the 


squarely on the shoulders of the Pal- 
estinians. 

Unless urgent, radical change oc- 
curs, fee peace process win wifeer 
away and laoleoce will reign. The Pal- 
estinians will coifenue to suffer fee 
hardships of occupation; fee Arab 
world will seethe wife unrest; fee re- 
gion’s econmnic growth will wane; die 
position and infkietice of the United 
States in tbe Middle East will be se- 


riously harmed, and laael wffl dv^ m 
sDlendid isolation, depnved of the 
Sospects of peace and security. Pro- 
tect^by American benevolence and 
vetoes, feou^, it will be in command 
of Har Home. 

Again it has become mamfea that, as 

in all previous Arab-Israeli crises, fee 
of fee conflict is too heavy a 
load to be lifted by <»ly the parties 
(Erectly involved. Too muefe is at stake 
in fee present crisis to let it be treated 
wife benign neglect . - - 

Tranqimizets dispensed by fee 
American diplomat D entns Ross — — 
which in any case none of the excited 
is wiliing to take — will not 
the tempest The rescue of the 
process demands tbe urgent dis- 
patch of life-support equipment under 
of President Bill dinton. 

Ar^Israeli peace will never be 

achieved bomb and bombast nor by 

stealth and arrogance. Its building 
blocks are trust and compromise. 

77 ie writer is a former t^recum-gen- 
eral of the Israeli Foreign Af/«siry and 
a former ambassador to the United 
Nations. He contributed this comment 
to the International Herald Tribune. 


5 

^ Bid 








•A 

The Political Lessons of the Gingrich and Gore Visits to China 


W ASHINGTON — Newt 
Gingrich has come close 
to pulling off a neat political 
gf ratflpftm Agf has feuS far 
elude3 Bill Qinton and A1 
Goie. Unders&md bow and why, 
and you understand much abom 
fee problons of perc q ition and 
pofonnance that plague the 
Clinten White House. 

Tbe scandal -damaged House 
speaker has used a forN^i 
policy trip to refurbish his im- 
age, efaan^ fee subject and di- 
rect attentiem away from his 
own problems, at least tempex'- 
aril^. In China, Mr. Gingrich’s 
straightforward deliveiy of his 
dist^te for dictatoisbip won 
him favorable attaition in tiie 
U.S. ptess and tte gmdging ac- 
ice by his Chinese hosts 


By Jim Hoagland 


of his to differ wife them. 

Mr. Gingifoh gain^ 
f(x what be did and said in I 
and Taiwan. It may well not 
save him from the suxm that b 
breaking on Capitol HDl about 
tbe speaW's refusal, or perhaps 
his inability, feus fv to pay a 
$300,000 penalty inqiosed on 
him 1^ fee House. But hb Arian 
interiude won Mr. Gingrich pre- 
cious time and sympathy. 


Resident Clinton 
ably counted on hb Helsinki 
summit meeiii^ vnfe Borb 
Yeltsin — wtuch went well 
from a dqilomatic point of view 
— to work similar woodeis for 
him. But tbe drip-drip-drip dis- 
closures of the now merging 
1^6 canqiaign finance scimdu 
and tte Webb Hubbell afEair 
lesumed atoost immediately on 
Mr. Clinton's retum, wife new 
vigor. 

Mr. Qinton's connections to 
the Indonesia-based Riady fam- 
ily quickly rqilaced summit 
success on {>age (xie. Investi- 
gators are tr^Hng to detennine if 
fee Riady-cratrolled l^ipo 
Groiq) saved as a source bofe 
of questionable campaign con- 
fribroons and of a suspect 
$100,000 payment to Mr. Hub- 
bell after he resigned from gov- 
ernment in disgrace in 1994. 

Poor A1 Gore: He went to 

China last mnnrh shOTtly after it 
became known that tte FBI has 
been looking into possible U- 
li^al contnbutions the 
Cmnese government to U.S. 
political canqiaigns. The dis- 


closures turned a difficult mis- 
rion into a political (tebacle, 
whose true dimenrions have 
only become clear with Mr. 
Gingrich’s fluid hawiting of hb 
China trip fee following wedt. 

An unfair conqMiisoD? After 
all, as vice prerident, Mr. Gore 
b shackled wife cany^g out 
Rresident Clinton’s policy, 
whatever hb own views may 
be. He has to tread more care- 
fully in addressing frxdgn gov- 
ennnents because of the respon- 
sibilities of power. He still 
freezes in public in tiiese shn- 
atiOQs. And so (xi. 

Hie alibb and justifications 
about Mr. Gtxe’s perforaianoe 

migg Aa fimHarn gntal pnint; Mr_ 

Gingrich went to Quna as a 
politidan, in the best sense of 
that word. Mr. Gore went there 
as a fexei^ policy exp^ and 
manag er intent oo shovring hb 
sophbticatitm and skiUs. That b 
why Mr. Gingrich came out 
way ahead, getting fee press and 
fee public to briefly on 
hb strengths rather than hb 
weaknesses. 

The WasfaingUm Post report- 


ed that to prepare fex- fee trip the 
vicepresi^t"arrangedtutoii- 
abon Chinesehistoiy, vdiichbe 
recited along tbe way,’* and 
called former {xesidents, sec- 
retaries of state and a sitting 
Supreme Court justice. 

Mr. CKngridi wcxked bard at 
not seeing tbe problem of China 
from fee eroerts’ perspective. 
He ejqxessed to hb Chinese in- 
terlocutors fee simide. clear 
idea feat Americans "are 
defined by freedom." He 
warned: "We will defend 
Taiwan. Period." 

Call that approach simpUstic 
if you like, but 1 think Mr. C^- 
gridi ^ot much closer to what 
Americans expect from politi- 
cians than did Mr. Gore in 
rhinaj or fean Mr. Clinton does 
when he goes on and on to feow 
how many of tiie details of 
NATO expansion or dobal 
trade indices he can absorb. 

Americans eimect tiieir 
politicians not to beoxne in- 
stant totoerts on Chinese or Al- 
banian nisfaxy. Americans ex- 
p^ tiieir politicians to die 
big things rigju — {xindples, 
tbe drift of history, the con- 
temporary mood and fee en- 


during values of the American ,i> 
DatioQ. 

In tiieir eaiDestnes ai^ ^ . 
eagerness to impress wife their ,. 
unquestioned intellectual abil- ^ . 
ities, Mr. Clinton and Mr. Gore 
frequently imprison tiieniselves 
in a pseudo-^qiertise that does ,, ; 
not ^jea clear values. 

What better place to start to 
cfaarige that than Indonesia? Mr. 
Clinton should eageriy join die ^ 
efforts of Portu^'s able prime 
minister, Antonio Gutenes, to ^ ' 
pressure Jakarta into ixnproving 'A : 
fee human rights ancf living ^ ' 
conditions of the peopfo of East 
Timor. 

Mr. Clinton heard an ap^ieal 
frtxn Mr. Guterres for such sup- , 
port in a White House meeting^.. . 
on Thursday. . 

Mr. Clintixi showed in 1996 
that he.b a virtuoso of political . 
tradecraft. But the tricks of die 
trade can only carry him so .• 
for. 

He still has to demonstrate an 
autiientic coaum&nenc to clear, 
uns^ected values and ideas the 
Am^can people honor. Mr. " . 
Clinton can be^ now, and be . 
should be^ in Indonesia. ~ 

The Washington Post. 


It’s Not So Simple to Make Rules About Humanitarian Aid " ohowic sceni~" 

''fctlie D 


W ASHINGTON In a re- 
cent two-part article. J. 
Brian Atwood aro Leonard Ro- 
gers of the U.S. Agency for 
uiteroational Developnent out- 
line a policy that would effec- 
tively have die United States 
turn its back on the chaos of the 
post-Cold War era, sacrificing 
innocent lives and wasting re- 
sources by postponing action on 
complex poiiticalfeumamtaiian 
problems. 

liie "precepts" for human- 
itarian tud put forward by Mr. 
Atwood and Mr. Rogers (Opin- 
ion. March 12 and 13} lo^ fine 
in theory, but they do not meet 
the practical test of today's 
world. In fact, tiiere are few, if 
any, international emet;pencies 
that would meet their cnteiia. 

Take precept 1, whidi says 
aid should be delivered only 
when the lives of aid woikeis 
are not threatened. On the sur- 
face tiib seems logical and laud- 


By Lionel A. Rosmblatt 


able, but tom Bosma to Zaire 
and Chechnya to Rwanda, such 
a stricture would role out 
humanitarian assistance to mil- 
lions of civilian victims, be- 
cause the most acute human- 
itarian needs are ofl^ in zones 
of confUcL Sinnlariy, pieoeftts 
2-4, caUing fix enhanced assess- 
ment, nuxiitixing and controb 
against coerdon, are also often 
impossible in zones of conflicL 

Implementation of tbe an- 
tiuxs* objectives would require 
a groui^ frnce to protect hu- 
manitaiian woricers, monitor 
the aid and ensure it b not di- 
verted or used to enhance the 
power of "bad" elements. 

Refugees International has 
long called for an intecmtional 
iqM leactim foice to be at the 
rrody for such mbrions and, 
moreover, to prevrot emergen- 
cies from ej^loding. Such a 


foroe need not enqiloy American 
soldiers, but it would never get 
off fee ground without American 
leacksr£ap. Pronqit use of such a 
frxce woidd malto it less likely 
tiiat the U.S. militaiy would 
wind up becomii^ unilaterally 
en g^gftd- Unfortunately, tbe id"** 
of stxfe a force has received litde 
consideratiaa from the United 
States or other nations. 


tions to humanitarian problems. 

ft b true that humanitarian aid 

alone cannot adequately resolve 
a c risis. All it can do b keep 
people alive imtil more funda- 
mei^ steps can be taken. For 
)le, when those lesp^ 
le fix’ tiie Rwandan genocide 
were not removed from the gen- 
eral refugee popolation. — 
which tii^ intimidated and 
controlled — further utstabOiCy 
wasjxedictable. 


Whming: Jobs Threaten America 


N ew YORK — God help 
us Americans, there’s a 
chance the unemploymeDt 
rate will ultimately ^ below 
5 percenL Can you imagine 
worse news? 

You can almost hear fee 
knees of financial analysts 
knocking as you read that the 
Federal Reserve will probably 
have to raise interest rates ag^ 
next monfe if tilb rampaging 
monsterofanecwiomydo^^ 
hurry up and slow do^ 

It's as if tbe nation were 
faced wife the threat of a cure 
for cancer. Be on the alert; 
ftosperity for tiie jobless b just 
around the comer. We have no 
choice but to confront it, turn it 
around and (fease it outetf the 
neigbbodiood altog^her. In 
short we have to get the un- 
employment rate 
7fiflgrinn is the 
No one has seen it in several 
years, but the mere feought 
that at any moment it might 
sfxing back to life — the fi- 
nancial markets’ very own 
Iredcly Krueger — b enou^ 
to ke^ the well-heeled on 
constant edge. 

Whatever motives are driv- 
ing Alan Greenspan, the efaair- 
man of the Federal Reserve 
Boaid, tbe result b a brutal 
Catch-22 f(x tbe natiob’s 
woiking classes. The route to a 
future frx most men 
[wttnen — raises fix those 


By Bob Heriiot 


already working, and increased 
eoqiloyinait oi^xxtunities to 
th(^ who want to work — b 
ecGoomic growtii. There b a 
consensus on the left and fee 
ri^ tiiat growfe b tiie answer 
to the persistent and potentially 
dangerous problem of eco- 
nomic mwmiatity. The tOp 20 
percent of Americans get 
nearly half of all tiie incane. 

Fifty percent nfAmariran fiftyt- 

flies ^ve less titan a tfaous^ 
dollars in financial assets. 

For a majority of Ameri- 
cans to do better, an expand- 
ing economy b essentiaL And 
yet, whenever there b evi- 
dence of anytiiing beyixid an 
anemic rate of grow^ to 
- iii^ b to s^ m and rnfe- 
head it on. The effect b 
to slam to workplace door on 
millions of men and women in 
to bottom half, and espe- 
cially to bottom fifth of the 
socioecMioinic scale. 

For those who tiiink to so- 
called experts are doing any- 
thing other than flailing about 
in a tiieoretical tiridoBt, con- 
sider th^ record. These nat- 
tering nabobs of NAIRU (to 
aciODtm for to Nonaccelei^ 
ating Inflatimi Rate of Unem- 
ployment) have for to long^ 
time been trying lo piiqioint 
to lowest level of uoienqiloy- 


policy b to s^ 
; bogeyman, lessly head it on. 


ment to economy can sustain 
without tiiggei^ an accel- 
eration of inflation. 

In other words, without 
raising Reddy from to dead. 

Fix a while it was feought 

Aat fee nfReial imemplfyrnent 

ratehadtoremainaboretipCT- 
ceoc to keq) inflation stilL But 
die joUess rate came down, 
txoke to 6 peroent barrier and 
nothing baraened. Tbe tfaeoiy 
had to be adjnsted. Poli^ 5^ 
percent was to magic figure. 
Wrong. Uneoqdoyment fell 
thmuf^ riiat barrier without a 
peep fr om inflarinn Well, 
maybe 5S, <x 53 or S3. 

Tbme b still oo evidence of 
acceleratiog inflation. But 
tiiere b ple^ of evidence that 
an awful lot of Americans are 
in need of jobs and can’t get 
tiiem. 

And already tiiere is evi- 
dence that to working poor 
are being forced inm a croel 
head-to-head conqietitiai 
wife welfare rec i pient s for 
precious low-w^ jobs. 
Eventually more fa*" 4 mil- 
lion welfare recipients be 
sent into to job mari^ 

. The policymakers are mas- 
ters of obsemity (xi fee crucial 
issue ofenqdoymenL For those 
at to bottom who are des- 
perate for work, an honest loc^ 
at current economic policies b 

a gliiwpgg intn fee alqrsS. 

TTie New York Times. 


But there was a choice, put 
directly to to United States and 
other nations. Ihen-UN Secre- 
tary-General Boutros Boutros 
Ghali asked for an infemational 
force to weed out to intim- 
idators from the refugee pop- 
ulation, bat to idea got no si^ 
port from to United States aj^ 
oflier Security Council mem- 
bers. 

Rather crwi f mnring thC 

problem as to UN recommen- 
ded, lifr. Atwood and Mr. Ro- 
gets ttoear to argue in retro- 
spect ti^ it would have 
better to simidy starve out those 
in to refugee camps — more 
than half TO plfppn and ehn<b yn. 

It b inSiuctive to famlc one 
step furtiiCT bai^ to to 1994 
geQodde in Rwanda, in whidi 
at least 5(X),000 mostly Tutsi 
Rwandans were killed and 2 
million mostly Hutu refugees 
were generated. Many believe 
that had fee interoatiODai com- 
munity sent a small nqiid re- 
qxmse force as to gooodde 
erupted, to kilims ^ve 
bem ste^qied and to ensuing 
lemixial instability prevailed. 

Tto unsurnising lesstxi of 
Bosnia and Rwan^-Zaire b 

that him uii i it ai ian actioo w i th - 

out political^ooilitaiy action 
does not resolve root causes. It 
has therefore become fashion- 
ahle to aigue feat fauinanitarian 
interventions should be curbed; 
to Atwood-Rogers approach b 
one sudi fonnulation. 

X agree wife the antiiois tiiat a 


frilnxe m adciress root causes b 
a nu^ feiUog in qiaeot hu- 
manitarian policy, but to an- 
swer should not be to sinqriy let 
innocent people starve. Instod. 
what b needed b to American - . ^ — . 
political wiU to lotd to inter- C f ■ . 
national community in fashion- 
ing diplomatic and security^ _ 
strategies to deal wife urgent* 
problems or. better yet. prev ^- 1 ' 

mg them instead of sweeping • 
them under fee mg. » 

Ultimately, whra to suffer- .> 
ing becomes too distxessiog to 
ignore on CNN, to United.' 

States often does get involved, ' 'r'i! '. 
but only after lives and re- , 
sources have been tragically i . 
and needlessly wasted. T/ ^ ' a 

At a time vtfeen to new sec- " : 

retary of state b encouraging a „ 
more vigorous U.S. invdve- 
ment in intemarift nal affair s, fee ~'j 
Atwood-Rogers precepts offer ] 
a puzzling prescr ip tion fix’ in- , > 
action by to wcxlirs lemamizig v,'. .. 
superpower. Not only b tins ^ 
wrong morally, but it abo al- A 
lows to proliferatiai of threats^, ' 

to international stabil^, 
thereby ultimately damaging 
essential U.S. mtamata and in- ' 
creasing to likelihood that 
American troops wifi liave Co go 
into combat. 


'0 


4 iT. r> ' ■ 
■ • 

The writer is president cf'’l ' 


Refugees international, an in- 
dependent humanitarian ad- 
vocacy organization. He con- ^ 
tributed this comment to the 
International Hax^TrUntne. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1897: Pope’s Qoilt brougjto to light Chief among 

T>/\\eo /V. A.- ^ ^ ^ that wife to -J|. , 

every ^ vogiraforup-to^cacqphoii- T- 
mnOn^M is the powerj^ch ies of Afro-American origia, -j ■ ■■; . 

H*® exaa^ m to en- more than half to j .- 

OrewoiM mqBteirftol^of niw employed m "-dancings*' ^ . 

to in pmtted Italy to take offe. a City Councillor, basis c - 

brought foxwaid a fx^wsal 
that no more 10 per ' r - ^ 

cent of foreign petformers be 
permitted in any . * eriabUsb- 
ments o wning a .coocesdrai 
from to City of Pans. ,5 





from tiie Piqie <xi tiie 
condition "to do it qiacuy. 
One cannot refrain frmn recall- 
ing tiia on tirat tha 

witty Rus IX remaiked: "Poor 
Ni^leon, when his nam^i 
whidi he believes immoitaL 
has been forgotten by faistoiy, 
there still be. here or some- 

where in to world, an old man 
clothed in ^feite who will be 
to Vicar of QnisL’ ’ 

1922: Foreign Music 

PAIUS — Cmisrauentiiponto 

decisfoo of to Faris restaura- 
teurs and cafe proprietors to dis- 
miss their (xchestras as a protest 

agamst increased taxa&m, a 
number of problems are being 




1947: Press Card Takeat ^ 

ISTANBUL — Nedim Ve^ -I 
Okin, doector of to Tormsfa ^ 
Press Bureau, said last night 
[April 4] thaf he i*ait withdrawn ,a 
to press card of Aslan Hum- 


--I,,, 

iV'Jt 


by Mr. Hombaiad coil ^ . 
oeming regouitioiis for fbreiffi ^ 1 ^ 
^^orrespoixleiitS''W2ii^ 'v 

was "full of maocurades." 




'•♦at 


V* w *•- 






France Bars 
U.K. Bid for 
Thomson 

^EC Offer h Rejected 
On Security Grounds 

By Joseph Rtcbett 

littanaiomt HeraUTribiau 


PARIS — ^Involdiffinadonal security* 

^ British takeover bid 
I ftiday for the country's leading de- 
I fensereteciroiucs manufacturer, state- 
I owned Thomson-CSF. 

I TTuMxison will now be sold by the 
I gove rnment to one of two cnmp*»t m g 
nench^ comramies, and the lesolting 
nrm mil be Europe's largest manufac- 
turer in this cruda] armaments sector. 

) Th® British smtor. Genaal Qectiic 
I immecfiately com plaipg^ ahmit thf 
j Prench at^cm, charg in g tfmr govem- 
j^iDCTt restrictions were Uocking mjirope- 
I r wide integratkai of defense industries. 

I D^ie the rebuff, GEC said Riday 

{ that it was already ini^ved in talks wifa 

I the two Rench bidders selected to vie 
I for control of Thomson — Alcatel Al- 
I sthom SA and Lagardm SCA — about 
j future arrangements widi the new com- 
: pany. which will be the Etnt^wan leader 
j in the sector. 

I France's dedrion seemed bound to 
j trig^ accusations of iaotectionism,es- 
I pecially as frendi oCBcials had indicated 
j that fneign bids wxild be weJcone. 
j If the bid had been allo\^ to pro- 
I ceed, GEC would also have obtamed 
acces to Thmnson's accounts, a wind- 

suse- 


■^il in future competition. 

But the British candidacy was dis- 
allowed by fae Rench finance Min- 
istry, whii^ said that it would be con- 
trary to “essential interests ^ natimtal 
securi^'' to allow the government's 58 
per^t share of 'Dunnson to ^1 inte 
foreign hands. 

The sale of Tbomson has rmeacedly 
caused problems for Prime Minister 
Alain Juppe. An eariieragreenientto sell 
Thomson had to be carded last year 
because pan of tiie sale involved the 
acquisition of Thomson Multimeda, an 
unprofitable teliwigion inatnifactOTtr, by 
Soiutb Korea’s Daewoo Hectrcxiics Co. 

Amid intense public c^ipositiaa. Paris 
retreated — and stui^ Sraul into angry 
charges of protecdonism. With no other 

See THOMSON, Page 10 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 

SATDR 0 . 4 Y-SIJNIM^ 


PAGE 9 



Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin chatting Friday in Tokyo with Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto. 

Rubin Calms Japan Trade Tensions 


By Velisarios 

iBtenatjcnetHenddT r^uM 

TOKYO — The likelihood of a 
trade spat bet w ee n Toicyo and Wash- 
ingtim tiiis year ai^jeaied to dw ninifih 
Fnch^ when Treasury Secretary 
Robert Rubio indicated that the Clin- 
ton adminfetration could live with a 
small rise in Japan's trade sur;dos with 
the United States. 

Alfbough Nfr. RuUn warned Prime 
Minister Ryutaro Hashunoto not to 
rely on exports to Japan's 

faltering economic recovery, he gave 
no- initiotti^ tn tiiar the- Japanese trade 
surplus, had reached levels unaccept- 
able to the United States. 

Mr. Rubin also rejected suggestions 
that boosting the v^fne of tire yen was 
the best way to cut Japan's o^e sur- 
plus. 

“It is critical that Japan’s current 
account sunlus not rise again to a level 
that is deuimeDtal to global gtowtiu" 
he gain after meeting Iw. Hashimoto. 
Otiierwise,ftcoitidcaasett^e friction 
and protecticxiisi smtiments 

among Sap^a trading partners, Mr. 
Rultin said^ 

Analysts and currency traders took 
his comments to mean tiiatfornow at 
least Japan's-lrade surplus was not a 


ma^ irritant for the United States, 
which is enjoying steady growtii and 

ghrintrin g unempln yment. 

Official statistics released last week 
showed that Japan’s trade surplus in 
February rose for the first time since 
November 1994; it rose 6.5 percent to 
686.72 billion yen ($5.6 bill^). With 
the United States it grew for ^ fifth 
montii in a row, rising 12J percent to 
407 J5 billion yeiL 

While most analysts expea Japan's 
surplus to continue to edge higho' for 
the rest of the y^. few expea it to 
climb as high as h did two years ago, 
when Tolo'o and Washington clasbra 
over Japanese exports of cars and car 

p^. 

“Rubin seemed to say that he could 
cope witii a small rise in Juan's trade 
surplus," said Mamoru 'Vamazaki, a 
senior economist at Paribas Capital 
Markets in Tokyo. *‘Aiid since the 
U.S. economy is strong and a luge rise 
in Japan's trade surplus is unlikely, it 
appe^ there isn't going to be much 
trade friction betv^n Washington 
and Tol^o this ym.'* 

Mr. lamazaki, a former economist 
at the Ministry of Intemationa] Trade 
and Industry, expects J^^}an’s trade 
surplus to re^ 8J2 triltioo yen in 
19^. up fatxn 7.4 trillion yen in 1996 


but well below the 10.4 trillion yen it 
reached in 1995. His forecast is in line 
with those of many other private econ- 
omists. 

Mr. Rubin, in Tokyo for one day 
mor to meetings with Asia-Pacific 
nnesce ministers in the ^lilippines, 
rejected suggestions that boosimg the 
v^ue of the yen was the best way to cut 
Japan's trade surplus. A strengtirening 
yen undennines tire competitiveness 
of Japanese eiqiorts. He told American 
business executives here that to cut its 
surplus Japan needed to promote 
strong domestic demand and dis- 
mantle harriers to imports and busi- 
ness activity. 

“We don't believe in anybody us- 
ing thdr currency for trade policies, us 
or anybody else," Mr. Rubin said. 
Those comments sent the dollar as 
2d^ as 123.23 yen, up from 122A3 
yen in New York on Ibursday after 
traders decided he would not actively 
push for a stronger yen. 

Mr. Rul^ has consistently main- 
tained that a strong dollar is in Amer- 
ica’s interests because it keeps down 
U.S inflation and interest rates, al- 
though he has toned down his en- 
thusiasm to recent weeks in an ap- 
pall effcot to ]»event the dollar from 
risirtg further. 


U.S. Joblessness Drops, 
Stirring Inflation Fears 

Labor Costs and Overtime Are Rising 


W.aSHDMGTON — The unemploy- 
ment rate fell for the second consecutive 
month, to 5.2 percent in March ftom 5.3 
percent in Febmary, the Labor Depart- 
ment said Friday, touching off nervous 
gyrations in financial maricets worried 
about inflation. 

The decline in unemployment result- 
ed in the lowest seasonally adjusted rate 
in five months, the department said, as 
moderate job growth was increased 
gains in the computer industry and at 
retail and financi^ businesses. 

But last month’s gain of 175,000 new 
jobs — down from a revised increase of 
293.000 in February — was accompan- 
ied by an acceleration in labor costs and 
record faaory* overtime pay, suggesting 
the inflation rate could be on the rise. 

While March's employment gain fell 
short of analysts' forecasts of an in- 
crease of 2(^,000, wcffkers' average 
hourly earnings rose 0.4 percent last 
month — or 5 cents — after a revised 
0.4 percent gain in February. That put 
wage growth up 4 percent for the past 12 
months, above the inflation rate. 

Factory overtime also rose to a record 
4.9 hours per worker per week from 4.7 
hours in February. 

Wall Street took the report as another 
sign that Federal Reserve Board poli- 
cymakers will have to raise interest rates 
again. The yield on the benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond climbed to 7.13 
percent in late trading Friday from 7.07 
percent on Thursday. 

The Dow Jones iiidustrial average fell 
more than 70 points in early trading but 
then made a strong recovery in late 
trading, gaining rrearly 40 points. The 
Dow h^ posi^ a loss of 400 points in 
the previous five sessions. 

"it's not a frightening report, but it's 
not a relaxing one." said Rotert De- 
derick, an economist with Northern 
Trust Co. in Chicago. ‘Tt keeps us on 
guard very much. Tte odds are pointing 
to the Fed listening In May." 

David J(»es, chief economist at Au- 
brey G. Lanston & Co. in New York, 
sai^ “The numbers that the Fed pays 
auention to were all on the strong side." 

The White House welcomed the news 
as a si|n of "a healthy economy." 

President Bill Oinion said. "I now 
think we have persuaded most econ- 
omists that we can actually have 5 per- 


cent or lower unemployment in this 
country without having innation if we 
do it with discipline." 

TTic Federal Reser\’e Board — con- 
cerned that tight labor markets and 
rising wages will translate into accel- 
erating inflation — nudged short-term 
interest rates up by a quarter of a per- 
centage point March 25 to dampen 
growm and squelch inflation. 

March's job growth was led by ser- 
vice industries. Temporary-help firms 
a^d 25.000 employees: computer 

See ECONOMY, Page 10 


Unions Win 
Renault Suit 

PARIS — Renault SA must re- 
start talks with unions about closing 
a plant in Belgium and cutting 
3,100 jobs, a mnch court ruled 
Friday. 

The decision came a day after a 
court in Brussels ruled that Renault 
had breached Belgium's worker- 
consultation rules when it an- 
nounced in February that it planned 
to close the plant in Vilvoorde on 
July 31. But legal analysts said 
neither ruling would stop Renault 
from closing the plant eventually 
and underta^g other cost-cutting 
measures in its drive to erase a 1996 
loss of 5.2 billion French francs 
($924 million), its first in a decade. 

The carmaker said it would ap- 
peal the French ruling. The court's 
decision, which included ordering 
Renault to pay 15.(XX) francs to the 
employees' factory committee, 
compels the French carmaker to 
comply even if it appeals. 

It must not close the i>lant until it 
has fulfilled its obligation to con- 
sult with the unions, the French 
court said. 

Renault said it thought it had 
fiiUy complied with Belgian law in 
announcing the closure but would 

See RENAULT, Page 11 


ECONOMIC SCENE 


Selling the Dootjsunb and Seeing the Forest 




By EriklpSCT 

liaemaional Herald Tnbuae 


L ondon — Rve jreais ago,, 
when environmaitatists began 
asking a leading British groceiy 
and d^it-yotirself chaiD whedi- 
er its wood-based .products had ccKoe 
from property managed forests, they got 

no answer, and fw good reason: No ooe 
at Sainsbu^ "PUZ bad any idea. 

* The firn thing we had to do was to 
figure out how many of tiiete titings we 
smd." said Willi^ Martin, Sains- 
bury’s senior *erh"i«>i manager. 

After weeks of wcxk, Sainsbory came 
up with the answer — from domjambS' 
to diapers, the company sold 13,000 
fr)iest-based products, “when I found 

out it was that many, I went weak in the 

knees," said WtlUam Martin, Sains- 
buiy's senior technical m a n ager- 
Today, Mr. Martin can attest not only 
the quantity botto the eDviromnenlal 
quality of many of those products as 
wen — right down to what part of afar- 
off Finnish forest the pine for a given 
door came from. 

With that knowledge has come 

power the powa to ferret oat which 

cfwTtnanies are usxng woods Sainsbi^ 
says the y shouldn't and to pressure the 
miscreants to clean up their acts or find 
themselves a new customesr. ^ 

That radical change in Samsbuiy s 
awareness and activism mimws a mov^ 
ment across a broad swath of Btiosh 


letaiiera. Seven yoara ago, envutAtmen- 
tal gro^ tiirew in their lots with their 
erstwhiM enenues — retmlera and fur- 
niture 'makera who rank as the biggest 
.bnyers of trojacal hardwoods and other 
products — forming the fiist na- 
tional buyers gtocp and a model of 
business^vironmaital group cooper- 
ation tiiat hu now been c<med in the 
Netiteriands. Austria and Belgium. 

On Monday, the 
ccpoept will score its 
Uggest conquest to date, 
the launching of a 
U.S. buyers group. A Ger- 
man briers group is ex- 
pected to ftmow in die 
next fflcodi. Others in 
coontri^ frmn Canada to 
Japan are under discus-, 
sion. After - years of 
sporadic consumer boy- 
cotts and public prote^ 
that have had liak iastiofi impact, the 
buyers groups have, in effect, ccngpor- 
atized the struggle, and diere are enorts 
to extend die model to other issues such 
as fitiieiies protection. 

“The secret of its success is that 
everybody wins," said AJan Kni^t, 
environinratal controller for B&Q, Bri- 
tain's largest do-it-youcself chain and 
the buym group's first corpo- 

rate member. 

Rh- retailers, and for the forestry 
companies who go along with the al- 
liance, it oCto the increasingly im- 




poitant blessing of environmentalists 
that they are doing all th^ catL More 
and m(xe,diatbie^Lng takes the form of 
products emblazoned with die tiee-and- 
check-mark seal of ^iproval of the in- 
dependent Forest Sieward^p Council. 

"The seal is a tnistw^xtiiy way of 
saying to the market drat we are prac- 
ticing responsible forestry,** said Rag- 
nar rabeig, chief forester frx Sweden's 
Store Forest AB. "Hope- 
fuDy, that will xnalre 
people want to use wood 
over competing products 
like plastic.’* 
Ntmetheless, wfaat 
some are braod^g an no- 
acoqnable graying of die 
green movement gen- 
erated harsh orticism on 
both sides. 

"We were accused of 
sleepy with the en- 
emy," said Justin Stead, dte naoam of 
the Biitisfa buyers groim original^ put 
togedier by die Worldwide Fund for 
Nature. Today, that buyers ^oup has 77 
conqianies, including Britain's laigest 
gtoc^, <^it-yoursw and drugstore 
chains — companies that account for 
more than 1 $ pero^ of all die freest 
products ooDsomed in Briiraii. 

Togedier they demand of their sup- 
pers not just prrenises of higher stan- 
dards of management, but peri- 
odic 'iiidepreident venfication diat they 
aie'livmg up to those pledges. 


hi one of the clearest signs that pres- 
7 sure is bearing fruit, one of Eure’s 
biggest timber exporters. Sweden, will 
retolish on April 14 stria draft rules for 
forest management — a first nro to- 
ward having Swedish forests certified as 
acceptably managed under the rules of 
the inde^ndenr Forest Stewardship 
Council. 

As consumer awareness of the FSC 
latel grows and as demand for goods 
bearing it expands, problems have tegtm 
to emerge. In the whole world there now 
are only 3 millirei hectares (7.2 million 
mes) of certified forests — less than 
some individual forestry companies 
control themselves. By 1999. however, 
10 million hwtares of freest land should 
be certified. 

It is up to the two-year-old Forest 
. Stewardship Council to keep that total 
exjrandiQg oy helping to sa national 
stsLodards on just who can cut down 
whax kind of trees, where, and bow. It is 
a process fright with controversy. 

"Forestry always featured lots of 
warrii^ camps," said Timothy Synnoit, 
dirrotor of Oaxaca, Mexico-lrased FSC. 

He notes, for instance, the move in 
Europe and America to bar the use of 
wood fr om so-called old-growth or vir- 
gin forests. In Europe those forests typ- 
^Uy accoimt for less than 5 percent of 
the total. In many pam of the world 
though, where forestry is relatively new. 
"pnKtically all of cte forests are old 
growtii." TO said. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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U.S. Car Sales 

Hit 8-Year High 

New York Tunes Service 

DETROIT — Despite a decline u 
Ford MoiorCo.. U.S. car and truck sales 
in March were the st ro ngest in at least 
eight yeara, getting the spring selling 
season off to a robust start. 

Ford, the last of the Big Three Aracr- 
ican auto makers to report, said 
Thursday that its sales fell 22 percent in 
March from a year earlier. But over all. 
cars and trucks were whisked out of 
dealerships in March at the brisk, sea- 
sonally adjusted annual rale of 15.8 
million vemcles. Automalters sold 1.4 
million vehicles last mtmtb, up 1.5 per- 
cent from the corresponding period a 
year ago, when sales were also strong. 

The robust results signal that the econ- 
omy is still going sirot^ despite the 
Rderal Reseive Board’s interest-rate in- 
crease last week, analysts said. 

"These are terrific numbers," said 
Dav^ Bradley, on analyst at J. P. Moqgan 
Securities Inc. "There's an underlying. 


Wider Wallenberg Sphere? 

Shake-Up at Investor Signals Move to Expand 


By Erik Ipsen 

Imemalional Herald Tribune 

LONDON — With the appointment 
of Percy Barnevik to head Investor, the 
sprawling industrial holding company, 
ite Wallenberg family of Sweden has 
once again signaled its desire to push its 
tentacles into internationaJ markets. 

On Thursday, the family pMUriareh. 
Peter Wallenberg, who is retiring, said 
that he had chosen his successor as 
chairman largely because of Mr. 
Baroevik's international credentials. 

Analysis, on the other band, ex- 
pressed skepticism Friday as to how 
much of a change now lies ahead for the 
80-year-old group, which controls the 
overwhelming bulk of Sweden's blue 
chips, including coinp^es like the mo- 
bile-phone m&er Ericsson AB, the 
household-appliance maker Electrolux 
AB and the drug- 
maker Astra AB. 

With an over- 
whelmingly Swedish 
portfolio of stocks. In- 
vestor AB has seen its 
net asset value soar 
from 9 billion kronor 
(51.2 billioolto 79 bil- 
lion over the past de- 
cade alone. 

"The- question is, 
can they do as well in 
an international envir- 
onment," said a 
Stockholm analyst. 

Within Swed^ In- 
vestor picks the chair- 
men and chief executives of its compa- 
nies and even helps them chart their 
strategies. It also encourages those ex- 
ecutives to look beyond their own firms 
to the interests of the group as a whole 
— to the so-called W^lenberg sphere. 
Typically, they will sit on each other's 
boards and even exchange jobs on oc- 
casion. 

As the chaiiman of ABB Asea Brown 
Boveri Lid. and of the WaUenberg-con- 
trolled construction company Skanska 
AB. and now as the fature bead of 
Investor, Mr. Bamevik himself is the 
classic produa of one of the industrial 
world's most unique dynasties. 

“Percy Bamem 1^ always been 
strongly related to the Wallenbergs," 
said Hakan Blmndahl. an analyst at 
SBC-Watbuig in Stockholm. “He 
trusts them and they trust him." 

At ABB. Mr. Bamevik demonstrated 
a strong streak of independence. He 
turned around the troubled Swe^sh en- 
gineering firm of Asea, and then merg^ 
It with the s^ggling Swiss firm of 
Brown Boveri in the late eighties. H- 
nally, he molded the lot into an in- 
ternational powerhouse. His sharehold- 
ers had ample reason to be gr^Ail, 
much less to let him get on with it 

At Investor, Mr. Bamevik’s leash is 
expected to be far shorter. 


"As its chairman, he will not be able 
to do whatever he likes." said Johan 
Sirondberg. an analyst ai Deutsche 
Morgan Grenfell in Stockholm. After 
ail. Investor is no mere outpost of the 
Wallenberg empire — it is its control 
room. 

The Wallenberg family controls 41 
percent of Investor. 

Having served on Investor's board 
for seven years already. Mr. Bamevik 
has had plenty of time to familiarize 
himself with how ihe Wallenbergs like 
it run. 

Typically, that management style has 
included a man named Wallenlrarg as 
either chairman or chief executive, or 
both. Already there is considerable 
speculation that the absence of Wal- 
lenbergs will prove brief. 

Claes DahJback. Investor's present 
chief executive, is expected to leave 
next year to cement 
the Wallenberp* 
control of Skand- 
inaviska Enskilda 
Banken AB. 

Sweden's third- 
largest bank. Mr. 
Dahl back will be- 
come chairman of tiie 
bank, and the nom- 
inal boss of its young 
new chief executive, 
Jacob Wallenberg. 

Thai would then 
allow 41-year-old 
Marcus Wallenberg. 
Jacob's cousin and 
Peter Wallenberg's 
son, to take over back at Investor. 

Analysts also say the move might 
well allow Mr. Bamevik more latitude 
to exert his wiJl over a relatively in- 
experienced new chief executive even 
while he retains his post as chairman of 
ABB. 

"Marcus does not have much of a 
reputation," said an analyst, who fol- 
lows Investor. “He turned up a couple 
of years ago when the family put him on 
the boards of Ericsson. Saab and some 
Others." 

For Mr. Bamevik. the most famous 
Swedish industrialist since Ivor 
Krueger, the erstwhile "match king," 
tiie problem is that, like it or not, there is 
little choice but to take Investor beyond 
Sweden. 

"The problem is that they are now 
too big ror Sweden," an aiialyst said. 
"They already control so many of our 
big companies that expansion here b 
almost impossible." 

With 10 billion kronor of cash in the 
till and a team of 40 analysts in Stock- 
holm. London, New Yoik and Hong 
Kong scouring the landscape for 
companies to spend it on, mal^g the 
ini'estments will be easy. 

Fitting them into the cross-fertilizing 
Wallenb^ sphere will be another ma- 
ter entirely. 



IHT 





PAGE 10 


30-Year T-Bond VIeld 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAy, APRIL 5-6, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 

Toll-Free^ Bill Shocks AOL Customers 


ECONOMY: ; 

Stirring Vp Fenrt P- 

ContinaedfromPage9 1 

anddataprocessingadded 15.000;retml ^ ,|j| | 

stor^ 43,000, and banks and secunnes < 

finns.17.000. , , 

Manufacturing eaq>l<^wient rose ‘ 

16,000, with stxengdi at Imnlw nulls ‘ ' , > ; , , •, 

aiHJ Industrial inachinctyfactcmesinore . , 

than offsetting a decline in app^*: “ 

Construction employment, which had 
shotupby l08,0£»inFebn2aiybecs^ - 
of unseasonably mild weather, tell 
27.000 in March. 

■ Stocks Head to Recovery 

U.S. stocks pared the week's losses as ' 

gwins in Intel, Cisco Systems and other • • 

cornputer-reiamd shoes offset concOT ' * 
rha> rising wages wall squeeze profits . 
and drive boTFownng costs higher. ‘ 

“The technology stocks had an early • - 
conecdon, and now they’re having an • 

eariy rally,” said Philip &hetiewi, a-f 
money iwanagw widi Loomis & Sayl^. 

Hie Iriggest percentage gains came in 

3 P.M. SNAPSHOT ^ 

the Nasdaq cmnposite index, which rose 

20.75 i^34Jl in late trading. 

But ±e Ckiw Jones industrial average *3 
was up 37.77 points to 6,515.12, after i 
closing 39.66 points lower Thursday. 

Anmysts are becoming increaringly . • 

(^itimisiic about the proqiects of com- ''' 
puter-related companies. " ' 

Nficfaael Giunpoit, Lehman Brothm 
analyst, said the recent slide by chip^> 
stocks **does not prroerly reflect 
increasingly positive fund^entals.” 

Intel climbed 3% to 144H, and Cisco < 
suig^ 3^ to 51VL ' 

Business Madiines de- 
clined % to 130W after it was down- ,, 
graded by Menill Lynch on expecta- ^ t‘ 1 1 f | • i ! r> 
dons that the computer company's » |■\t * ‘ 

earning s will be disai^jointing. 

Checlqxiint Systems fell 2^ to 10 and ' 

Ultrak declined 4 to 11 after the compa- 

nies tenninated their merger a^eemenL 
Checkpoint said late Thuisday die inain * .. . 

reason for calling off the <ted was a * 
peroeiv^ conflict wife Ultrak's large ' 
distributiott/dealernetwoik. ' 

Aittocam fell 2 to 8)4 after fee auto- 
parts nuker pr o fi t Ah’ fee first ** j 
quarter of 1997 w^d be below ex- ~ 
pectations. (AF, Bloomberg) 





D J F M A ■ N D J F M A 

1996 1997 1996 1997 

•• Pte*. ■ ■ 

, s- *hr -<- V V. , ..i.- v. ;• -.aaae^ •». Che^ 

■ tfe.Dow'';. .-tifM 


MW' ^ * composa^ 


Iev,s. Sowes^''' ' 




' ' ' 

Inmaimial HoaM TMune 


By Seth Schiesel 

A^fif fork Timer Smice 

NEW YORK — After months of frus- 
trating busy signak, Susan Atokicz, a pho- 
togr^her in fee Bronx, thought she had 
solved her problems connecting to America 
Online Inc. in February when her teen-age son 
said that schoolmates had told him ^raut a 
toll-free number feat gave users quick access 
to the on-line service. 

Using the “800” number, she believed, 
would give her fee best of all possible worlds: 
America Online service for a flat rate of 
S19.95 a month — and freedom from busy 
siaoals. 

But last Saturday. Ms. Maridcz received a 
bill from America Online for S541.65 for 
service in February. Hundreds of other sub- 
scribers also have complained about unex- 
pected charges. 

Those who seek information about the toll- 


free service from the compaw are informed 
that tihere will be a surchar^. That charge, the 
company tells those who read through several 
computerscreensofirifonnatioD.is lOcentsa 
minute, or $6 an hour. 

But subscribers who have been passli^the 
numbers to one another verbally, in offices 

Ammca Online said H had 
received 600 complaints a 
month since last autumn. 


and schoolyards and even tfarou^ America 
Online’s chat rooms do not necessarily know 
dbout fee charge. 

* ‘We are extremely concerned,' * said Marc 
Carey, a spokesman for Dennis Vacco, New 
York staters attorney general, “and ww have 
ongoing discussions mfe AOL about this.” 


America O nline, which is based in Dulles. 
Virginia, says it has about 8 million sub- 
scribers. Asl^ about fee problem tiiis week, 
fee company said it had received about 600 
complaints a month since last autumn. 

A^ysts estimated that the company op- 
erated atout 300,000 phone lines. America 
Online would not say how many of feose lines 
were connected to the system through the toll- 
free numbers. 

This is not the first time that state attorneys 
general have investiga^ America Online. In 
Janoaiy fee company reached a settlement 
with attorneys general from 36 states who bad 
tiireatened to sue the company for deceptive 
business practices, coaqrlaining feat custoin- 
eis were not getting die “unlisted access” 
they had paid for. 

In the settlement, America Online agreed 
to mflice refunds and offer free access to users 
who had been unable to gain access to fee 
system in December and January. 


Dollar Rises With Outlook for Interest Rates 


Sou/ee: Bloomberg, fieuters 

Very briefly: 


Republic to Buy Artz Automotive 

FORT LAUDERDALE. Florida (Bloomberg) — Republic 
Industries Inc. agreed Fri^y to buy Artz Automotive Group 
of Cleveland for S1S.7 millioa in stock, adding to Chairman 
Wayne Huizenga's chain of car dealers. The group had 
revenue of $50 iifelion in 1996. 

Since December, Republic has agreed to buy 1 8 auto-dealer 
groups with more than S4 J bUlion in combined revenue. 

Shares of Republic rose 37.5 cents to $25,625 in late New 
Yoik trading. But fee stock has fallen from $35 a share since 
Monday, when Toyota Motor Corp. moved to block the 
company from buying any more of its U.S. dealerships, ablow 
to Mr. Huizenga's plan to build a retail chain of new-car 
dealerships. 

Apple Goes Windows-Compatible 

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Florida (Combing Dispatches) 
— Apple Computer Inc. said Friday it had introduced two 
compilers that had compatibility wife the Windows software 
standaid developed by I^crosoft Corp. 

Hie computers, fee Power Macintosh 7300/180 and the 
Power Macintesh 4400/200, will be aimed at business and 
education customers, the company said. 

Lidustiy analysts said the new machines could give a lift to 
Apple, w^h is stru ggling against persistent losses, slunqiing 
sates questions about its future. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 

• Julian Robertson Jr„ one of the higbest-profile hedge-fund 
managers in the United States, is smog McGraw-Hill Cos. for 
$1 bUiion over an allegedly defamatory profile in Busi- 
nessWeek magazioe. 

•Circuit City Stores Inc. said its fourth-quarter earnings fell 
17 percent, to S68.3 millii^ because of weakening electronics 
sales and tough competition. Bloomberg 

AMEX 


CenpSerf Okr Sk^FiON MjaAct 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose agai^ 
other major cunencies Friday on speculation 
that U.S. interest rates were headed higher. 

The govemment's jobs report sbowra work- 
ers’ average hourly earnings rose a stronger- 
tban-expected 0.4 percent in March, indicating 
the economy continued to grow rapidly enou^ 
for die Federal Reserve to raise interest rates 
again to stave off inflation. 

Henry Willmore, senior economist at 
Barclays Bank, said, “Hie wage numbers keep 
intact the key fact that rates in fee U.S. are 
rising, and they’re not going anywhere in J^»n 
in Germany.” 

Meanwt^, Alice Rivlin, Federal Reserve 
vice chairman, said the dollar had “moved up a 


lot.” which had he4>ed to curb U.S. inflatioo. 
She feat feneign confidence had been 

helping to bolster the dollar. 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

The dollar was at 1 2A3 15 yen in late trading, 
iq7frcm 122,585 yen fee day before, it was alro 
at 1 .684 1 Deutsete marks, im from 1 .6678 DM, 
and rose to 1.4423 Swiss francs from 1.4330 
francs and to 5.67 10 Rrench francs from 5.6160 
francs. The pound was at $1.6345, down fro m 
$1.6460. 

The dollar rose against tire after U.S. 
Treasury Secretary Robert Rul^ said Wash- 
ington did not favor cunency-value adjust- 
ments to cut Japan’s trade surplus wife fee 


United States. “The dollar's set to go h^iv,” 
said Masahiio Yamaguchi, manager for foreign 
exchange at Tokai Bank Lzd. “The market i^ 
cleared reasons to strengthen die yen.” 

A stnMiger dollar can increase Japan's trade 
surplus by maifing Japanese exports more com- 
petitive in the United States. 

One analyst said the market's interortfatioD 
of Mr. Ruth’s meeting with Priine Minister 
Ryutm Hashimoto was that the United States 
was giving Jqnn a breatiiing qiace ou the trade 
issue that need traders to target dollar levels of 
125 yen and beyond. 

Robert Sinebe of Prudential Investments 
said: ‘’There’s some ocmfhszon over what 

the administration wants, but Rubin cleared 
that up.” (Bridge News, Bloomberg) 


THOMSON: Paris Cites Natiorial Security in Rejecting Bidby Britain’s GEC 


Continued from 9 

takers for Thomson Multimedia, the govern- 
ment had to abandon its hopes of a packa^ deal 
covering both parts of Thomson and chose in- 
stead to proceed wife fee privatization of its 
so^t-after defense business, Thomson -CSF. 

Imday’s episode could cause wider embar- 
rassment for Paris because Gemum defense 
contractors have begun criticizing Paris fix' 
dragging its feet on planned cross-border mer- 
gers involving missUes and satellites. 

White President Jacques Chirac has said that 
natimial-defense contractors need to be restruc- 
tured cm a EoFopewide basis, French officials 
have made it plain that France intends to merge 
its own companies in each sector into strong 
players and would only feen begin looking 
around for European partners. 

French officios have consistently described 
Thomson’s privatization as fee first step toward 


forging a European giant in defense electron- 
ics. With annual defense sales runni^ between 
$4- billion and $5 billion, Thomson is tiie main 
Europe rival to GEC, which is rou^y die 
same size. But oitiy if fee new ^ench company 
and GEC team up can Europe hope to have a 
defense-electronics manufacturer ca^le of 
comMting over the long run with U.S. rivals. 
Raytheon and Hu^^, which are both bigger 
thM any European riv^ are set to merg& 

Hte need for faster European integratimi to 
meet U.S. competition was the thiust of an 
unusual public protest Lord nior, the chair- 

man of GEC, who exposed “regret” at tiie 
Fnmch govenunent decision. “The cunent 
fragmec^ structure of the European defense 
electronics industry will not long sustain a 
strrag competitive position in world markets in 
fee next century,” he said. 

In pushing its way into the competition fbr 
Thomson, fee British company was clearly hop- 


ing to show that European industrialists want to 
move faster in restcuctuimg die defense busi- 
ness tiian politidans seem willing to accept 

But it was undeflr whether the British com- 
pany had acfeally ejected to win ootri^it con- 
trol of a leading nendi defmse contractor 
Britain ruled out foreign owiusrsh^ for British 
Aerospace «4ieo it was inyatized m the 1980s. 

But the Froidi authorities, in calling for bids 
last mtxitfa for ’Ihomson, ruled out any American 
offers — a posititm feat implied that th^ would 
accept offera frtm European c o iT ip a n ies. 

French industrialists maintained that it 
would be politicly impossible for the gov- 
ernment to sell to rorei^ owners a higb-tech 
leader such as Tbomsem's defense wing, but 
both Alcatel and Lagardere carefully reznmned 
neutral over die issue of G^’s potential ac- 
quisition of Thomson because both cleariy 
wanted to preserve fee prospects of future 
partnership with the British company. 


To Our Readers 

Because of fee seven-hour time 
difietenoe between New York and 
Paris this week, die UdS. stock tdiles, 
tiie U.S. funixes and some other items 
in this ed^ion reflect eariy prices. 
This dumge is necessary to meet 
distribution reqitirements. 

We will revert to our usual cov- 
erage next we^ when Dayli^ Sav- 
ingTime begins in the United States 
and Canada. 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


O'Ttu K y, \ r- 




Friday’s 3 P.Hi 

The lop 300 most octtve shores. 
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Dow Jones 

0|M H%h IMt t!M GhO. 

indut 64UU ^*J6 &404B4 4516.S -41.17 

Tram 3V4a niui 2mi3 sshS *o6J« 

un 2USS 3I&74 21X44 71432 -2Sl 
CMnp 201933 2053.V1 3018.04 20SU3 ,1030 

Standard & Poors 

p i iH uiii iwm 

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IndwMalS BBIL51 B7125 B794n S8&«1 

Transit S4tt.10 S40.4B S4ZS0 S40J6 

UMHIOS iaa.64 186.41 187.53 186418 

nmmeo 85J9 8177 85.11 BSill 

SP500 75104 744.40 7503S 75100 

SPlOO 729.49 722J6 738.76 73401 


Hlgk IM 3VJM. 

y»4r mxr ikm 


Nasdaq 


Ik Nasdaq 

Mm 


Mm Mr 3PJ4 Wp. 
123034 1211.73 123034 ,1640 
101179 9f7.ll 101179 ,^1196 
I3M73 13006 1340J3 -083 

1404.97 136040 I401JI9 -9J6 

1M&24 M36II M41li *03 
Sijaj 04072 857317 *T<3 


Hm Uk WJN. Ck» 

S57J2 gam £148 -4.0 


« Dow Jones Bond 


30Beiidf 

loumms 

lOindifstiMi 


Trading ActMty 


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22474 75%t 74k% -%i 

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4598 6% 66% 67% 

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Nasdaq 

Unetnmd 

TOMISSVB 

NmHghi 

Nmiam 

AAorkeft Sales 


NYSE 

Amn 

Nosdoq 

AimBBpns. 


DMdends 

Cenwcwr Por Ant Rac Pay 

IRREGULAR 

Oct-Vondererln b 1.092 4-T5 — 

TemNiIre .. J9S 4-18 4-30 

STOCK 

Dynomko Resdi .. 10% 4-i4 4-28 

STOCK SPLIT 
nowv bidust 3 tor 2 ipnt. 


HuglMsSueply O .11 s-2 5-16 

InSuOitolBnv 0 -12 4-23 5-7 


INITIAL 

Romrindutfn ...1075 4-18 5-2 

OmesbEiierBy _ A6 400 5-15 


AmensiAptln* M A62S 400 64 

Amor1B1&Mtg M JM5 440 5-27 

AfflorfstPorMS^ M A883 440 6-2 

BoToHJdADR bA668 44 S-12 

CoBedlwBia 0 os 4-16 440 

ElecbDfilcDaSi Q .15 5-1S 6-10 

Rukecin 0 .16 445 5-16 

MoatedibK Q 05 4-18 S-12 

NIPSCOInduot 0 AS 4-30 5-20 

PNCBonkCfllp Q 07 4-14 444 

PHntoHPlWO a 015 6-6 647 

SunCo Q 45 5-9 MO 

TbeknyShlp Q 415 4-11 440 

WolsalK O 435 4-15 440 

WBtHmmOB, o .08 411 54 

woodBanenp Q .10 4-ii 429 

fr«anualt b-oppraAnoie onouRt per 
sbarWADRi B-PWoMe % CmoBoH toete 
■n-Meltaly; q-qoalHln S4BB-mHMl 


1735 1776 

1579 2» 

205 ^ 

5749 5% 

a 32 

221 271 


467.16 57841 

1847 2442 

54640 58IL49 


Por Ant Rk Poy 


4% 

36k *% 

11% «M 
2% -4k 

ISk -M 

ISl L" 

39% -1% 

20k -Ilk 


II6k 17% 
17% 17 

P, i 


fk 0% 

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13k, 13% 
Ml, Uk 
116% 11% 
11% KM 
M% M»k 
k V, 


IM -M 
1% -Ik 
9k »% 

m 

lllk 

13% *% 

1A -Ik 
119, Ml 
11% -% 
im 

% -k. 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sotoo Sguns <n uneOdOL Yfeoriy MS>H otto lows leBod the pmtaus 52 weeks ptoo Ob onent 
worn but MlOMUesnRxSng day. whenasp8torstod(dMdendaniocirftigiD2SpiKBOannoie 
haibeeRPBMnoieDiohtoM0iv(angeonOAitomOaoslMMR8rfieiiew6ndBorilr-Uritae 
oOwnite nM ram of iMdBKto oe annual mbunofiKfils based on the Wool dedonNoB. 

0 - dMdand also exho (s). b • annual rate of dividend plus stodv dividend, c - HqutoBlIng 
dividend, cc- PE CMceeds 99jdd -cpBed. d - new yeofly tokw. dd - loss in the tost 12 months, 
e • cHvMend ctodored or pold In p raceMip 12 ornilhs. f - annual Rile, hi e raose d on tasl 
dedoraiton. 9 - dividend In Canadian fiind% subied lo 15% non-nsWencB taib I • dividend 
dedoied oiler ipB-up orstodc dividend. l-dMdend paid tlds year. omHtocLdetanML or no 
odton taken at tatest dividend meeting, h - dividend declared or poM iMs year, on 
oownuiallve hsue iftm dMdands In oneon. n - annual mlA ledocod on lost deetoraSen. 
n • new issue In the pest 52 weeks. The Mph-iew range be^ns wWi the Stott of trading, 
od-nat dor deffvsfy.p-MitoldhFMeml, annuel niewikiiewn.R/E-pdee4amliigsfeltaL 
q - dosed-end mutuol fund, r - dividend dsdorad or paM In pieeedhig 1 2 monffiSi phis stodi 
dividend, s - SMde spm. Dividend begins wRh doto of spRL m - soles, t - dMdand paid to 
stock In precee Sn g 12 months. esHiiwtodaBli value on cs-dMdend or eit-dl sl rlbuilcn date, 
e-n o w ye i^hlgh.v«tieangholted.vl-tobonknip6cy or lecelvwaMperbe l n y ieotq on md 
under the BaikfvpNy Act Of secuiHles assumed by sudiconip on l es .sra-kffaenastf lb tiied. 
kri • when Issued/ ww - urttn woiranls. X • ee-dMdend or es-ilglils. Mb • es-dbtributtan. 
xw - vraimut weimnts. y- n-OMdend end sdes to fulL yid • yield. X - soles In ML 


For investment information 

Read THC MONSY RBOST every Saturday in the UfT. 


April 4y 1997 

High LOW Lotosl Oige Opint 


CORNKSOT) 

UIB bu nWWnwn- OMs Mr DuOHi 
Mov97 380% 293% 2N% -6% 04,171 

Jjlf7 301% 225% 2N% -5% 11U3I 

Sw)97 3» 2M% 385% -3% 1f,4U 

O0C 97 25SM 28t« 2DM ~Vi 94422 

MrlB 289 386% 187% -2% 9410 

ESLsms HA. Ihu's.stleB 97,053 
'niU^apwiM 3B.120 OR 4806 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 
in HM- doim owWn 
Ntov97 29140 2BIJD 28140 -1040 45441 
JUI97 M50 27850 27850 -1050 3IA4 
Aua97 277J0 21840 26U0 -8J0 9442 
S0Pf7 2SUI 25I5D 2S23B -640 6405 
0097 222LOO 22SL58 22650 -UD AUB 
D0C97 22100 21950 23UD -140 11.942 

EsLsom HA Thu^sem 21 , m 
T lw'sflpcnlnl 112,665 up 669 

SOYBEAN OR. (CBOn 
405W mrUi pw b 

Ntoy*7 2459 2143 2357 -A17 36,111 

JK97 3457 2340 3149 -CIS 32483 

Auaf7 3153 2450 3145 -AI7 7441 

Sgp97 3473 243 21SS -0.16 4471 

M97 3455 3140 8165 ^10 S4U 

Oteir 2558 319 3(51 -0.12 IXMO 

EsLsris KA Thu^soleo 1240 
Tlsrsopnim 100581 up 1024 

SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

S5n Du nSnVnwrb mUs Mr bmhd 
MOV97 871% 841 841 -38 71473 

Jul97 B7% 847 147 -38 61321 

AU0 97 156 027 127% -29 10.123 

Sgp97 765 70 743 -22% 44M 

MOV 97 702 6R 684 -9% 38,974 

&.sOes HA Ttor^Hdes 6UM 
Thu'sopwM 196415 w 1W 

mSAT (CBOn 

SAOObm i ww i iuiif c raw s mt duuiwi 
M ey97 371 3U 371% -3% XVT 

Jul97 373 367 371% -3% 45,831 

S4P97 376 371 375 -2 7582 

DOC97 385% 381% 383% -3% 7568 

ed.sms HA Tim^odn 25,908 
Ttoj'soPViW 86440 elt 1700 


Livestock 

CATTLE K34ER) 

40500 lbs.- ewe s M Tb. 

APT97 6755 6757 6752 -Q5S 3D.BS 

Jun97 6125 8355 6105 -832 31906 

Aup97 6112 6345 6187 —027 23420 

Od97 6852 6756 6742 -057 H8M 

Oec97 BJB 6958 8955 -8.10 7412 

Pgb98 7055 7050 70.B -055 1485 

esLstoes IMI Uw^som i9506 
TtU*SflP«iM 106574 off 430 

PBOERCATTlf (CMBRI 

S85WlDk,-mwsPW-b. 

Apr 97 7888 78.15 7DJ0 +050 2470 

M0»97 7855 6955 7850 +8JB 6534 

Aao97 7355 7325 73J0. +042. LUI 

SmW 7100 7370 7355 +045 15B 

Od97 7140 7105 71B +022 2459 

Nov97 7555 7555 7550 +040 1517 

ESI. sates 3587 Thu's, sdes 3471 
Thu^apniit 2D.M5 off 4 

HOCSHoim (CNIHO 
4on ib%- cwm per b. 

APT97 TIN 7350 7352 -035 1985 

Jun97 0250 0150 8142 -040 11596 

Jul97 8150 0050 8147 -075 35N 

AUB97 7940 7158 7945 +055 2.592 

OdVr 7345 7235 7345 -045 2568 

Dec97 71.10 7020 7155 -^45 14H 

EAstoes 11.972 Tl8rs.nm 1D5M 
UkTsopenW 30471 tm 335 

PORKBELUBSVMHU 
40500 bs^ cram e« b. 

Moy97 7945 7742 7950 -047 35<6 

JW97 7855 7758 7055 -055 2,141 

AuefT 7650 75.10 7105 -077 SB 

FobN 7148 Wl 

uvn TijB 8 

MorN 6158 .^58 2 

Etf.sdm 2453 Tl^oms 2575 . 
Thu^openint 6.B8 oA 34 


Food 

COCOA OCSE} 

10 maMe tarn - 1 par tan 
Mov97 1505 1478 1473 —19 30454 

JW97 Isa 1501 1SD4 -30 25481 

Sm«7 1553 1821 1SS -38 11559 

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INTERNATIONAL HKRAJ.P TRIBUNE, SATLIUDAY-SUNDA^'. APRIL 5-6, 1997 


PAGEU 


EUROPE 




Tip. 


^4-1 

•v^ 


j^Lockheed 

AndBAe 

Team Up 

FirmsBidtoBmld 

j! Armored Vehicles 





I ^l^onAergNews 

j, LONDON — Biidsh 

tad teamed qd 
wi* Lockheed Martin S 

UnitedSta^tobidforaK bUli<a 
r- ,. contnec to build ^next’generaiuxi 

armor^ recoonaissance vehicle 
'^1 century, an Ulus- 

MDpnofthegrowingttaas-Atlantic 

cooperauofl in the inteimtiiona] de< 
fense mdusby. 

The partno^ also could help 
Lockheed s aoempt to win Biiti* 
Aero^ace to its side in the com- 

iwirinnn untk « 


EU Ministers Hope to Bolster Euro 


Retaen 

AMSTERDAM ~ European Union fina^ 
tauistecs leaded Hiday ta a two-day meeth^ 
m the Nednlands atn^ch hoped to regain 

the moznanum firam doubters of their sii^e- 
CUrrency plan 

After an outlaeak of specuhuiasi about a 
delay in the jdanned 1999 starting date for 
economic Staid moneu^ unicm, the 15 ministers 

NEWSANALYSIS 

were heartened by the atmouncement Thursday 
diax ChanoellcNr Hehnnt R<^ of Gemiany, the 
key figure in the pu^ for a single currency, will 
nm for a fifth term in office next year. 

Mr. Kohl^s decisis gave a shot in die atm to 
backers of monetary uiuon, who Senear to have 
been ovmhadowed in recent we^ by those 
who doubt tbe project start on 

German paiticipadoa in die first wave of 


tnooet^ unioD is seen as critical to its success. 
But with Germany's unemployment rate at a 
64-year hi^ and Boon risking wwker unrest in 
a determined bid to cut spending to meet mon- 
etaiy-unioo criteria, ma^ have begun to ex- 
press doubts about die project's timetable. 

Analysts, however, said markets were taking 
a more upbeat view of the currency project's 
chances ahead of thie meeting in the coastal 
town of Nooidvdjk. 

'‘There are a couple ofthingsgoingonintbe 
background which are helping to ^ore up con- 
fidence/' Andrew Sevan, a senior bond econ- 
omist at Goldman, Sadis & Co. in London, said. 
One factor, be said, was the renewed sense of 
commitment shown by Mr. Kohl's announce- 
ment; the other was a recent set of unexpectedly 
strong economic data in Germany. 

The counny needs an economic pickup to 
bring down its d^cU as a percentage of gross 
donttstic product — oue of the key criteria for 


£U nations seeking to qualify for monetary 
union. The finance ministers will trv- Sat- 
urday to set a date next year for choosing the first 
countries to join the smgle currency, with late 
April appea^g to be the most likely choice. 

Thai tuning would allow France to get its 
parliamentary election finLshed first and would 
provide time to consider reports from the Euro- 
pean Commissiem and the Emopean Morietaiy 
Instinite, due in February, on the degree of 
economic convergence within the 15-naricm 
bloc, based on economic data for 1997. 

The commissioner for Europe^ monetary 
affairs, Yves Thibaultde Silguy. reiterated in an 
imerview Friday with a French new^per that 
the Maastricht treaty on European union did not 
allow for any delay in launching the single 
currency. Ministers in Noordwijk also will re- 
view progress on some lechmeal aspects of 
monetary union, m^y how to pve legal 
standing to the EU’s stability and growih pact 


, r ^ ui UlC UOm- 

U.S. Concern Takes Aim at Deutsche Telekom 

craft British Aerospace and Lock- 
he^ . Martin, along with Vickeis 
PLC. General Efynamics Corp. and 
odier partners, plan to compete with 


a groTO of companies led'by GTOt 
PLC, General Electric Co. of Britain 
^ynd some U.S. companies m mairfng 
: /^vehicles for the U.S. and British 
armies. 

T3ie wanning bidder for the oon- 
; tract involving die armored recon- 
naissance vehicle, to be called the 

IVacer, could be selected British 

and U.S. defense officials in 2001 . 


AgmeeFrmee^resse 

BONN — USA Global Link Ihc. 
issued a challmige to Deutsche 
Teldcreh AG on mday by saying in 
a newsp^ier mat it intmided to cut 
tdephooe prices in Germany by as 
much as SOpBceaatbyroutiDg eaiig 
dBOogh file mtemeL 
TheU.S. company, based in Fair- 
field, Iowa, win invest $100 tnillinn ' 
along wifir an unidentified Gerznaa 
partner to install 66 td^ione ex- 
changes in the next few months. 


ChristopberHartoett, the bead of the 
contpany, said In a letter to die Hao- 
delsblatt newspaper. 

■ These swit^boards would enable 
calls from subscribers to be carried 
via the Internet instead of through 
the netwodc -operated by Deuteche 
TelOkom, he said. 

Mr. Hartnett noted that there was 
no charge for tiie use of tiie Internet, 
. and he promised rates diat would be 
“betw^ 20 and 80 percent che 
er than the tariffs now cl 


Deutsche Telekom, depending on 
tiie distance." Ke predicted that his 
cmnpany would win away "a 
qua^ of Deutsche Telekom's 
business in tel^tme services" in 
the next two ye^." 

Deutsche TdduMn idd Handels- 
blatt that the Inteniet was not suiteble 
for canying heavy telephcme tr^c. 
A i^ifesman for the telecmumu- 
nicadons concern, Stephan Altiioff. 
said tiie Intetnet was already sat- 
urated with traffic and could not ofier 




-Hf 




RENAULT: A Frendi Court Rules Ageanst the Automaker 

Continued from Page 9 

now take up the consultation pro- 
cedures deemed necessary by die 
.Belgian court 

V It said “these procedural ele- 
ments" did not alter the fact that it 
needed (oxlose che p lant eco- 
nrenic reasons. 

Renault's cfaainnaii, T 
Schweitzer, reiterated Friday his re- 
solve CO press ahead witii 1^ plan. 

' 'The ruling doesn’t ctumge the eco^ 
nomic reality" of the shSdown, he 
said. “Given the Beldan rul^ 1 
don't think that the dbetskm wffi 
have an impact on the ft«tg ^ tiie 
plant’sclosi^" - 

Workers went on strike in Renault 
plants throu^iout Eisope on Friday 
to support unions* attenqits to le- 


. verse Renanlf s decUdon. Ignoring 
the Belgian court ruling would have 
eiqjosea Reriault to a fine, Ohvier 
Debrw, a Bel^an labor lawyer, 
said. The Belgian government said 
last month that the penalty would 
' \ be. no greater titan 20 mil- 
i Belgian fra^ ($575,000). 
Tlennot CSrumbach, a lawyer for 
the unions, said tiie talte would cen- 
ter on issues of organiring and shar- 
ing wQsk at die plant in hqie of 
saving jobs. Sitnilv measures were 
rejected by Renault ^er it mdered 
'tile plant dosed.. 

Sales of Renault's vehicles in 
Belgium phimnieted 43 percent in 
Mardi after fee decision the com- 
pany to dosetfae plant 
IGoiel' Schn}ixiodc, spokesman 
for Renault Belgique Luxembourg 


SA, attributed the sales decline to 
deliveiy problems caused by 
Renanh wcmcers* ‘occupation of tire 
\filvoorde plant’s parking area since 
Feb. 28. (^P, Bloombergi Reuters) 

■ Citron to Cut 800 Jobs 

Another Ecench antomaker, the 
.Gtroen diviaon of PSA Peu^t- 
Chroeo SA, wall cut 800 of ite 
28A00 jobs this year. The Asso- 
ciated Fi^ repoztM. 

Cicroeo said most of tiie cuts 
would be made in its technical sup- 
port staff and that almost all the 
msmi^ed employees would receive 
early-^etirement benefits or part- 
time work. 

The company added that it would 
review its layon plan with etnplpyee 
representatives April 15. 


Worker Unrest Spreads in France 


Reuters 

PARIS — Labor unrest rippled 
across France on Biday as bank 
employees joined airline person- 
nel, junior hosfntal doctors and 
car workers in protests against 
state and private seemr refemns. 

The doctors stormed out of 
talks with Social Affairs Minister 
Jacques Barrot, saying die 
eminent was refosing to offer 
raoposals to meet their demands 
tot sermpine fines on doctors as 
part of o^tn spending curbs. 

In the fourth we^ of their 
strike, they asked Prime Minister 
Alain Juppe to intervene in the 
amfiict, now affecting 24 cd 
I^'ance's 26 Teaching hospitals. 

Mr. Juppe called on tiie doctors 


to reopen tiie talks, saying the 
goveniinent's proiwsals were 
worthy of consideradon. 

Fac^ with a series of protests, 
tile conservative government has 
vowed to push on with reforms it 
says are nee^ to keep France 
competitive and help it qualify for 
European monetaiy union in 
1999. Workers in tiie troubled 
baiddng sector struck on Friday 
against government plans to 
change a 1937 law regulating 
work schedules. 

The change would allow banks 
to stay open on Saturdays and 
permit shift work. Unions say 
they are not t^iposed in principle 
but object to the government’s 
lack of negotiation on tiie issue. 




Frankfrirt 

DAX 

LcMUton Paris 

FTSE 100 Index • CAC 40 


36D0 

«30 

2850 


3400 

fi 

27C0 

fj\i ■ 

320G 

JV^ 4350 

/y 2550 ; 

nr « 

3G00 

. 4200 / 

r » 2400 / 



4050 

2250 At 


2BMn DJ 

1996 

F M A N D J 

1997 1996 

F M A D J 

1997 1996 

F M A 
1997 

Exdian^ 

Index 

BUay 

Close 

Prev. . . 
Ct^ 

% 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

706.43 

702.11 

•-143.90 

Bnmsflls 

8EL-20 

2^08067 

2,079.26 

■10.07 

FranHurt 

■ DAX 

3,244S3 

3215,24 


CopBititagen StodcMuket 

52IL94 

520.45 

+0.09 

Helaitiiei 

HEX Genera 

2,734.35 

2,738.93 

-0.17 

Onto 

■ oex 

S72.14 

57&31 

rO.20 

London 

FTSE 100 

4^JB0 

4.214.60 

tO,S2 

Madrid 

Slock Exchange 

466.1Z 

481jB7 

+0,36 

USm 

MISTEL 

11683 

11608 

+0.54 

Patla 

CAC40 

2^7.97 

2,51432 

•HJ.14 

Stoddi^ 

SX16 

2,800.06 

2,80831 

-0.29 

Vtofina 

ATX 

1,167.80 

1,16838 

-&08 

Ztotch 

SPi 

2,836.53 

233832 

4009 


Source: Tetekurs 


(nMiulimjl HcRild Tnfwar 


a hi^ quality of conununicatioa. 

The newspapCT noted that several 
German industrial concerns, such as 
Mannesmann AG, VlAG AG. 
VEBA AC and RWE AC. planned 
to make large investments in con- 
ventional idephooe technology to 
compete wdth Deutsche Telekom 
once the Gennan market was opened 
fully to competition in 1998. 

USA Global Link's plan could 
rob them of this opponunity, the 
newspaper said. 


Very briefly: 


• France's trade surplus unexpectedly widened in Janua^. to 
1 1.7 billion francs (S2.0S billzon) from a revised 8J3 billion 
francs in December, as imports fell more than exports. Exports 
fell 2.7 percoit, to 125.1 billion francs from a revised 128.6 
billion francs, but imports were down 5.6 percent, to 1 13.4 
billion francs from 120.1 billion francs, 

• Clariant AG's second-half earnings jumped 46 percent as 
cost cutting rook hold and the Swiss franc fell, bringing the 
company's full-year profit rise to 26 percent. The Swiss 
specialty-chemicals cmnpany said second-half net profit was 
73 million Swiss francs (SSI million), compared with SO 
million francs a year eariier; fiill-year earnings rose to 133 
million francs from 106 million francs. 

• RWE Ene^e AG bought an 11.7 percent stake in tiie 
Prague gp utiliQ' Prazska nyiiarenska, the RWE AG unit's 
first foreign nat^-gas holding. 

• Tele Danmark AS. Denmark's majority state-owned lele- 
fdione company, made a binding bid for 25 percent plus one 
share of Mobukom Austria AG. a subsidiary of Post & 
Telekom Austria, the state-owned post and telephone com- 
pany. It did not disclose the price. 

• Sweden's unemployment rate fell to 8.0 percent in March 
from 8.4 percrat tiie month before, the Swedish Labor De- 
partment said in a preliminaiy estimate. 

• Greece is to sell a 10.7 pCTcent stake in Hellenic Tele- 
conununications Organizatioo SA, die national telephone 
company, in June. 

• Dahnler-Benz AG's Mercedes-Benz unit is recalling 
68,700 of its S-Oass luxury sedans because of a possible 
defea in the brake system. The recall will cost the carmaker 
about 7 miUion Deutsche marics (S4 million), a Mercedes 
spokesman said. 

•Spain plans to sell its remaining 10 percent stake in tiie oil 
and gas company Repsol. Bioomherp 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Low Odu Prt*. 


SA 


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Pilces In kKol cuneodes. . 
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High Lota Ouse 

Prev. 

AssiDaoKin 

Htph 

301 

LOta 

190 

Oase 

19ft 

Prev. 







Paris 


CAC48e25)7J7 

Prntaufc25l4J2 

A9D A 

AliuCbiKaA 

Autoliv 

35050 34450 
182 I79JD 
30S 29* 

347 
179 JO 
300 

34750 

17950 

300 


800 

787 

798 

798 

EtocbotiHB 

46S 

458 

464 

457 

AGP 

200JD 191» 

199.80 

3» 

ErtcssuiB 

75750 

346 24150 

2SQ50 

ARLtatade 

839 

827 

83) 

833 

HcmiKB 

985 

973 

977 

971 

AkaldAlsih 

653 

642 

647 

6«S 

IncenBveA 

507 

490 

son 

«650 

Ani-UAP 

365 36030 

31140 

364 

inveslorB 

34150 

336 

339 

33350 

Boncelm 

716 

Tin 

712 

702 

WoOoB 

226 

771 

227 

32350 

BIC 

B40 

1173 

IW 

825 

HoRlbanfeen 

250 

740 

74A 

242 

BMP 

2X 

335 

339 

334 

PhufliVUiiiimn 

277 27050 

77? 

27S 


10)5 

m 

lOU 

1009 

SoruMiB 

192 

18150 

W 

18950 


3409 

mi 

053 

3378 

ScottsB 

182 

ISO 

IX 

180 

Culm 

246 23160 

342 

247 JO 

SCAB 

159 1SU0 

1CT 

IX 

CCF 

2050 auSD 

741 

3S 

^BaokenA 

8UD 

79 JO 

80 

7950 


665 

151 

AM 

653 

SkaiuBaRHS 

2M 

213 

213 

at 


819 

80S 

BOB 

80S 

SkunsInB 

325 31950 

327 

V15D 


570 

551 

556 

565 

SKFB 

189 

185 

1811 

1M50 


1253 

J7W 

J7W 

1253 


134 13U0 

13250 

134 


•68 

M7 

ass 

854 


190 

190 

190 

190 

EILAqulliibie 

540 

570 

575 

533 

smoA 

100 

98 

9isn 

99 

EfhimitaBS 

918 

HM 

910 

eso 

SvHontaeaA 

22$ 22DJQ 

ni 

23150 

Eundhnav 

10 

950 

9J5 

10 

Votaae 

m 18150 

188 

188 


GeaEow 

Hna 

IimM 

Lofoige 

Learaod 

Wnol 

LVMH 

LyeaEaux 

MIMiB 

PoifeasA . 

Famed Riem 

Pematai 

PfMUfrPlM 

Pramadas 

RwmuII 

Rent 

RM>outencA 

SoneA 

tenaldar 

SEB 

SGSThemaan 

SKGenmle 

r iiihiii tw 

StCebBln 
Suez 


SyiimelabQ 

TtiansanC 


TehdB 

lU8w 

VMae 


eSF 


670 455 

766 746 

39790 38420 
834 8M 
377 36110 
990 967 

1067 1817 
1324 1298 

555 532 

32790 38040 
3I99D 360 

305 39410 
620 596 

2265 2230 

1099 1BS0 
13550 1X90 
1645 1600 
179 17X10 
SX 515 
31150 30298 
1019 967 

304 38110 
635 615 

2800 X4S 
803 785 

28S40 277 

S60 XI 
in IM.10 
465 457 

X9D V50 
364 353 


4«t 

7a 


490 

734 


3KU0 38790 
8 X 031 
370 37190 
984 967 

18X Tsa 
1303 1290 

533 543 

32X70 3X 
360 36430 
30150 28790 
601 5M 
2242 2224 

1064 1867 

13150 1X70 
1630 J65D 
ITS in 
530 SX 
30590 30590 
994 1012 

384 380 

619 614 

2776 27a 
790 781 

210 281 
XI 570 
18450 >a 
465 

X 80 
35650 35550 


Sao Paulo 


fPM 

OBpel. 

nwSraPCd 

Ugmsenleios 

HwnOi?* 

T%P« 

CVRO PM 


855 

78758 

4699 

XX 

1695 

451X 

55000 

45199 

33850 

2I1X 

154DQ 

XJO 

950 

12050 

16S5Q 

17100 

30100 

XX 

1J1 

2115 


170 

70100 

4SX 

54X 

1650 

JJ9IKf 

sax 

44100 

33050 

20100 

14199 

a.10 

8X 

117X 

19550 

19650 

29100 

SOX 

1.19 

34X 


Seoul 


Dooin 

HwndS&S?' 

KanoSMiBk 

Keie oMehT W 


OBXadKSTlM 

Pmtas 57X31 

173 172 172 17290 

M 141 MIX 14190 
2130 2370. 2410 X 
X.M XX 27X 27X 
179 >1490 1I7X 718 
X 43X 4X50 _44 
341 333 333 33150 

323 315 U7 318 

211 209 210 209 


Singapore 

AsiaPKBiow rx 
CaRhxPoe 9M 
OtaDovOS 1^ 

cydeCotitaoe lie 
MfvFnniini* 
OBSWrion IBjO 
DBSLflX ,105 
RoxfBKOOW 1X10 
HKLond' |79 
jgrdMothesn* ^ 
jortShniogfc' aa 
Kenoal 9,25 

kxpSbira ^ 

KeoodFeb 4J4 
!^Lond 4TO 
17X 
lOdO 
550 
7X 
VM 

ShoLand ' 2'^ 

SbUPlOMP V-S 
SinsTcdiliid ax 
SfenToleamiii 271 
TonjeSerti U4 
UMbldUSIlW 1.15 
iMOSeoB^ TSX 
wmgToiHdgs 4« 
•sUUSdeSms. 


OfUidMBkF 

PMl^HdBs 


795 

995 

1X20 

I&90 

178 

17X 

450 

11X 

2X 

5J9 

390 

110 

3X 

4X 

448 

17X 

1AX 

&70 

195 

1IX 

7X 

2400 

396 

251 

142 

1.14 

UX 

4X 


7JS 

9X 


90 99 

...... 520 Srt 

270 260 OT 279 


111 108 itt no 

IX IX IX 1U 

3tt 362 362 37X90 

4450 4550 X 4690 


Stockholm 


S7C16UdR2000X 


AGAB 

ABBA 


in loin IX IX 
oe 841 an <a 


Sydney 


A10idkartes;2369X 
Pnvioas: 236150 


130 
157 
1753 
X6I 
2112 
IZ41 
1431 
401 
435 
1177 
457 
254 
U7 
11X 
2i.ra 
IX 

NotAuSttek 15J2 

NidMiltMdHdg IX 

NaasCam 16B 

PoemcDunlop U1 

PknaerMl uo 

PobBnodcaai 4SS 

StGeemBonk TM 

WMC 7X 

WhstpocBkfeio i.93 

WaattMePH 121 

WeelaMrths 151 


AnCDT 

ANZWnp 

BHP 

BOIDl 

SnooUeslnd. 

CBA 

CAmoiB 

CeUsMyer 

CePHla 

CRA 

CSR 

FeMnBmr 
CeodmonFld 
KIABSDMa 
Land Lease 
MIMHdB 
kUStBOPk 


113 115 

7.x 102 

16X 1499 

xa XS9 

I9J5 TOMS 
1257 1290 
1273 1470 
186 197 
671 435 

1143 1177 
4X 464 
261 Z6S 
IX IX 
11X 11.10 
XX 21X 
IX IX 
11X 1162 
IX IX 
IM 179 
334 376 

410 410 

451 6X 
799 7X 
7X 7X 
4ra 483 
9.10 9.18 
3L46 399 


112 

7.W 

1484 

1X» 

I2X 

IW 

670 

1144 

442 

2X 

IX 

11X 

XJD 

IX 

1160 

IX 

177 

379 

416 

455 

797 

7X 

6X 

9X 

398 


IMR 954078 
930X19 

UO ISO 
7D7X 7B250 
45.90 4590 
9150 5450 
1630 1160 

fisnt 

S510Q 54B50 
45450 44100 
337X 32880 
20UD 204X 
1S65Q 1459 
XX XX 
16) 890 

119X 11110 
16050 151X 
17050 1X90 
30X00 28100 
XJSg 3100 
1.19 1.19 

7690 3450 


Tokyo 


CBomEeMasOxx 

Pietlsec 67074 

103000 iwoaotflomioim 

4860 4548 6800 XSO 
18300 17600 18100 17600 
15900 15500 15600 16000 
26900 3n« 36300 26500 
9960 5700 5920 5700 
480000 464000 464000 466000 
37800 26800 27700 27200 
927M SI2Q0 S2300 51000 
63SOO tiOOO 43000 42600 
62SH 61900 62DQ0 62000 
10600 IBSOS 10600 10700 


SWUTllUil 207570 
PmfDoe 307108 


7.10 

975 


TXtO 1X58 
1&4P ISJD 
178 
1110 
5 — 

1U0 11X 
278 136 


17^ 

496 


6 

198 

IIS 

U< 

49B 


las 
XS9 
9.10 
192 
4C 
690 464 
17.90 17JD 
1140 7178 
180 IX 
MS 7 
MX 1190 
7X 7X 
27 97X 
X68 398 

191 251 

ax 390 
1.15 US 
TITS 1150 
430 440 


INipponAIr 
Ainwr 
AsoMBoftt 
AsoMOwm 
AscMGiosa 
BkTetovMnsv 
Bk Yokohama 
Bridpmne 
Com 
CheiHiElec 
QHMidaiElac 
DaINMPlW 
Ootet 

MMiKong 

MwoBonk 

Mno House 

OoteaSec 

DIM 

Denso 

ggfJapaiRy 

Ehol 

POMC 

MBorii 

Pup Photo 

PullBU 

Hod4uriBk 

HBdcM 

Hondo MOV 

IBJ 

(HI 

itodiu 

no-YOkoda 

JAL 

XportTehaeeo 

Jibs 

Kiene 

KonalEiic 

Km 

KUNOsoklHw 

KaanSieet 

UM^Ry 

KMiBinan 

KoteStaEt 

KonoBu 

KWHla 

K|sms 

tbrushuEite 

LTCB 

«6onibenl 

66onii 

Mlotni Conan 
MolauEletlM 
Motto ElaeWk 


SI 


MBsalFodoai 

MttstfTwr 



NIOmI 225: 1786159 


PrealBuc 18IBJI 

9rt 

99 

960 

979 

757 

750 

7S3 

711 

3440 

3400 

3410 

3440 

765 

748 

74t 

7X 

6S3 

641 

641 

640 

1080 

ion 

ion 

III80 

I960 

1880 

1890 

19V 

562 

849 

555 

511 

3440 

9400 

3430 

3410 

TftW 

2770 

3790 

3820 

7M1 

7050 

TWO 

3100 

7050 

3030 

2040 

30M 

3130 

7080 

3100 

3100 

533 

523 

533 

633 

1370 

i?n 

1760 

1340 

430 

393 

403 

«7 

1440 

1440 

1440 

I4« 

Ml 

817 

820 

870 

ftSTOa 

871 Ita 

B330e 

aoooa 

2470 

2380 

2390 

7430 

5440a 

540QB 

SiiOa 

54NIB 

2MD 

3020 

am 

7030 

4170 

4010 

am 

4000 

lOT 

1170 

1390 

140 

mn 

4240 

4330 

oo 

12N 

1270 

1770 

13M 

1110 

1100 

1110 

1100 

1140 

1120 

1130 

11.V 

1710 

3640 

3680 

3660 

1260 

1710 

1240 

1760 

40 

X2 

« 

441 

Ml 

m 

SB7 

6IH 

5B2D 

5580 

5810 

5650 

478 

468 

470 

479 

AVOe 

03108 

tmoo 

87800 

1580 

3510 

m 

3510 

VO 

90 

fat 

575 

TIM 

7170 

2I« 

nao 

IM 

1310 

IZIO 

I3« 

«y 

491 

494 

4M 

3M 

358 

3M 

39 

734 

7M 

733 

734 

994 

876 

981 

994 

277 

222 

775 

778 

896 

864 

OT 

889 

SM 

$17 

521 

530 

TOO 



TStSD 

31M 

7110 

nv 

71V 

408 

185 

380 

410 

483 

X4 

479 

«I 

1M0 

1820 

lAM 

1IU0 

3200 

SISD 

3200 

nm 

I960 

1800 

1040 

10« 

1300 

1100 

1100 

11M 

1130 

iim 

1080 

1110 

381 

MB 

380 

171 

7S2 

6N 

m 

7B7 

lOT 

1340 

I'M!* 

1380 

822 

MI8 

818 

ftlH 

81ft 

808 

015 

917 

IflO 

11M 

11M 

17N 

934 

925 

922 

830 

1230 

1300 

ISO 

ran 

706 

6 M 

669 

707 



The Tiib Index 

PncesMsetZoaPMNamroitcim. 

Jlaa I, I8S?» ISO. 

Lewri 

Changu 

Mehmige 

yeutodntn 
ta> change 

+10.73 

World Index 

146.02 

-0.45 

-0.31 

Ragtocud Indnus 
Aeia/Paciac 

106.65 

-1.34 

-1J24 

-20.56 

Europe 

156.24 

-044 

-0J28 

+1Z26 

N. America 

165.57 

•046 

-0.28 

+29.07 

S.Amenca 

tncbutriaa induxae 

140.26 

+2.79 

+2.03 

+57.S2 

Caphal gcxjds 

17049 

-027 

-0.16 

+28.30 

Consumer gooeb 

164.55 

-039 

-0.36 

+19.16 

Energy 

172.29 

-2.14 

-1.23 

+27.04 

Finance 

106.94 

-0.85 

-0.79 

-16.95 

Msc^laneous 

149.25 

+0.03 

+0.02 

+9.90 

ftawMaterisUs 

177.37 

+0.46 

+0.27 

+25.06 

Serviee 

140.14 

+OK5 

+0.61 

+16.78 

umes 

130.31 

+0.60 

+046 

+2.48 

77ie MMnoMftal HenM TMmpo MUM suck IMK e rads tfw us. doSar nbtae of 

3eOMemnMnta9ir«>«ia6ttpieafocAsi!ramJ5cixatanas. ForntofeOitomaHon. eftM 
hoofttaf e Milahta by nvtang n TTio Trta tode*. IBT Avmut CMartas da 6«ulla, 

paS2i MeuWCedox. Frenoe. 


ConyilWliyBtoomseigMeM. | 


MUIOlO Mlp 

Nkon 

NOikeSec 

HbdHido 

MppEsPRs* 

NIppwiM 


Market Closed 

The Taiwan stock market 
was cios^ Friday for a hol- 
iday. 


iMoiar 

NKK 

NanwoSec 

tm 

NTT Data 

Of Paper 

OsakoGos 

Rtoad 

Rehn 

SokuioBK 

Sankyo 

SonwaBoiilc 

SaiynEiac 

Secern 

SdbuRm 

SeUsulOiem 

SaUsi6 House 

Seweo-Eleven 

Sham 

ShfeakuBIPwr 

SMmiBi 

StaOMBud) 

SiriseldB 

ShtBMko Bk 

Seffbonk 

SofiY 

Sumltanw 

SumltoffloBk 

SumaOKin 

SumMenn Elec 

SumltfMtal 

8umh Trust 

TaBtontafin 

TokedaCicm 

TDK 

TohokuEIParr 
TattarSanO 
TaUoMoitae 
Tokyo EtPHr 
TekpoERonn 
Tokyo Goa 
Tow Cap. 
Tgnen 

TOnMHPihir 

ToreyiM 

Tosinbo 

Itatam 

Toyo Trust 

To^MWor 

YOmonaucM 

exmtbtahoaa 


High 

Law 

Qoie 

Prev. 



LOW 

Oue 

Pmb 

X50 

4680 

X50 

4650 


37K 

VJO 

371* 

2755 

i-ao 

1450 

T4n 

1460 

NeHhrfdoeNef 

4140 

3190 

4B 

39J5 

1750 

1700 

1710 

1710 

2910 

29 

V 

7950 

684 

651 

655 

«91 

Norceii Eneigy 


29 

79K 

30 

9000 

8940 

WOO 

8810 


Ho 

■B'6 

8950 

8960 

865 

855 

860 

855 

Non 

■10 

1US 

11 JO 

111* 

500 

493 

493 

491 


231 

2350 

230 

7X85 

361 

356 

359 

3X 


56K 

56K 

S6K 

5190 

ni 

741 

745 

7S7 


19J0 

79.M 

>9.13 

?9)» 

365 

260 

765 

365 


2555 

25.15 

251* 

3130 

isn 

1320 

1330 

i3n 


13N 

1X90 

13J0 

ixn 

B60DO 

8490D 

85300 

86400 

Potash sodi> 

imio 10SJQ 

1QSJQ 

106K 

ssioh 

3370b 

33900 

3420b 


MJD 

a9.v 

V6S 

391* 

637 

605 

627 

420 


3330 

33 

3105 

TUO 

391 

284 

284 

296 

RoeenQintalB 

25 

24M 

24M 

3S 

1510 

1X0 

1480 

)4n 

SedSRMtCe 
SM^CdoA 
Slone Cansdd 


511+ 

T1.M 

s 

9380 

705 

9380 

679 

9280 

689 

9540 

705 

53W 

I9JD 

5X55 

1950 

1^^ 

19.90 

3430 

3330 

3430 

3410 


61.00 

61 U 

61K 

6155 

1330 

1310 

1330 

1330 

ToftsmonEnv 

39 JO 

39 

39Jn 

391t 

460 

452 

4X 

4X 

TediB 

2155 

2840 

7115 

» 

7030 

6940 

7000 

6950 

Tetaotobe 

401* 

40 

4ft 

•UO 

5680 

5560 

56W 

5620 

Telus 

3IJ5 

3065 

7055 

71.1S 

1300 

Iin 

Iin 

1200 


XJ5 

XJ5 

XJO 

7750 

1300 

nn 

1190 

1200 

ToiDara Bonk 

35J0 

3455 

3110 

3105 

7730 

7610 

7730 

7640 


1120 

1195 

1195 

16J0 

1X0 

i4n 

I4n 

1500 

TrnnaOaoPbta 

2455 

24.10 

24J0 

24J0 

3000 

I960 

7000 

1990 

TrlmeihFlnl 

4ita 

4150 

4150 

41V, 

XI 

613 

614 

634 

TitzecHoiui 

31 

301* 

30JS 

3190 

3440 

3410 

3440 

3X0 

TVXOoia 

lifts 

9.90 

9.95 

1105 

1630 

1600 

16?0 

1630 

westtoonEny 

U 

331* 

73K 

M.10 

1080 

ion 

ion 

1070 

Wastan 

MJO 

69M 

69K 

69U 


7H0 

0970 

894 

1480 

SOI 

1720 

297 

1010 

SIM 

2730 

9090 

3010 

9X 

1340 

2280 

4630 

399 

608 

1160 

USD 

724 

711 

3690 

825 

3180 

2550 


7610 7630 
1780 8040 
860 863 

1410 140 
490 491 

1600 1700 

392 397 

986 lOOO 
3060 31M 
2600 2720 
8890 8890 

3000 2010 
M3 944 
1220 1230 
3230 2260 
4520 4600 


393 

S93 


397 

593 


1140 1140 

1510 IfK 


713 

701 


715 

70S 


3640 3640 
791 800 

3ie 3160 
2530 2530 


7630 

8780 

895 

1460 

506 

1710 

391 

1010 

3060 

2720 

8800 

3000 

965 

1330 

2280 

4380 

301 

668 

1160 

I5» 

725 

699 

3690 

830 

3170 

2560 


‘SSEiias 

BoaMer-UOdeh 794 786 794 786 

Oedllai0PM 454J0 4SUD 451X 454 

EA-6etien6 XX X30 X45 X20 

EVN 1660 16461699X1655JD 

nnhafenWIan 53190 519 524 53X95 

OMV 1369X 1341 1345I3417D 

OeslEleklrtZ 040 836 839X 837 

VAStohl 459 44130 4S0 4M25 

VATech 1629X 1997 IMO 1635 

MetterOetpBov XX2IXX SUB X40 


Wellington losB xwtte gjM 

PtMBOS:222SJ1 


Toronto 

Abnu Price 

MbOftoEnCigy 

AtconAium 

AndmonEnl 

BkMenueal 

BkNowoSE^ 

BanlekCetd 

BCE 

BCTWeaBuim 

BtochamPtiarm 

BamberderB 

Bjdscma 

Bi»«Mln8iris 

Conea 

OBC 

CdnNallRflll 

CdnHotRfS 

CdnOtedPo) 

CdnPodHc 

combKo 

DohMo 

Oemtar 

DenaliveA 

DuPentCdoA 

Et^arfinup 

Bi n o We a Mag 

PoMnFM 

Fotewbddof 

PMdtarCliaBA 

FroneeNeuado 
GidfCdaRes 
imperial on 
Inca 

IPLSnem 
UMtowS 
Loewtai Croup 
JMocmlBbB 
ilnflA 


TSEIoBbsIlWs; 5701.76 
PreutaBsiSBKJS 

19JS 

I9.n 

19K 

19J5 

2155 

AIS 

7135 

7016 

45.V 

44V 

45 

4in 

16 

1565 

1.9* 

16 

49 . 1 s 

4140 

4155 

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51.15 

M45 

Sim 

X3D 

a 

3X40 

3250 

B.9S 

<XQ5 

631* 

6755 

6110 

MK 

mu 

TIM 

WU 

3X45 

3145 

1545 

7955 

717Q 

7535 

75M 

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.■n.M 

318S 

3MB 

3080 

X7B 

X1B 

334 

X43 

KW, 

5IK 

blJU 

SI5U 

31K 

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31110 

3130 

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4165 

4819 

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31.90 

319.5 

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7550 

7130 

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X.10 

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7450 

2450 

3450 

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2455 

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311 * 

311* 

311* 

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799 

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3716 

78JK 

7170 

31 <+ 

31.10 

7130 

7130 

6630 

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6XM 

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4635 

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4460 

39.95 

391* 

391* 

VR5 

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1130 

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1170 

4115 

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411* 

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1195 

1160 

1170 

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61W 

68H 

619P 

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1U5 

1155 

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MrNZeoldB 

4J4 

194 

44» 

191 

BilerlytiM 

130 

1.99 

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131 

Carter HoRord 

3011 

3<n 

306 

307 

FtthCheklq 

4JI 

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EGYPT 


LIBERAUZATION. DEREGUIATION. PRIVATIZATION. 

The Egyptian economic policies 
rely on increased investments and 
greater openness to the global 
economy. We are building tbe 
inatitotionfi- drawing the la%vs, 
training the people, and most of 
all* leading a government that will 
abide by it, and build on it. 

- PacsmEnr Mohamad Hqsni Mubarak 
XrnwiB tuUiati <u sW VoTid Ecorumw Fonim 
Dtnw - Ffbruaryt, 199T 

WONDER OF THE PAST 
YOUR INVESTMENT FOR 
THE FUTURE 

Fw Cuilbe es^Buies [^ese nalKti 
IWn ^ UwntitB DfpvtwaL lUBr 7 flf FsTBpi ABUn, 

Onkhf EUa StiM, Smpen, Cik*. Tel: SM^74*7SS4 Fb 2m74*7248. 





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FACE 13 



INTBRNAJEONAL HERAJ.D mBUNE, SAIURDAY-SCJNIIAS; APRIL 5-6, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


asf ^Nike Charges 
g ; Could Impede 

luvest^^ 
r1 La^etnam 


India Starts Clock on Foreign Airlines 



Bloomberg Sews 

ZT ®“Porate invest- 

fflm m Vietnam could be 

■ ta^actsvists (AargesthatVietaameM 
«ib^^ for Nike Lie. misneat 

^ American 

■ business group want g^ 

■ ^ City branch of the U.S. Chamber 

of Commerce, said the chaises ooold 
affis« a pemfing U.S. de^m qd 
«* emCTVietaam is in accord with labor 
Standards. If the Overseas Private hi- 

vesnnrat Corp., a U.S. govemmeot- 
nmdea agency scheduled to visit 
et^ n^ month, finds ate 

sun a t a n dard, it wiD not provide p<^- 

ical-riskinsunmce CM- arrange finanmng . 

for U.S. companies that wanttobo^ 

plants m Vietnam, Mr. Bmke said. 

Nfc. Burke, who is also a managtng 
partner in tbe Vietnam office of the 
Chic^o-lxtted law firm Bay^ r & Mo- 

Keo^ said it was &ir to assume ihitflbe 
diaiges agtUnst Hiloe, a nuker of piemi- 

mn adtl^ic footwear, would ^slow 
down &e iTOcess** ^ diiect investment 
by U.S. corporations in Vietnam. 

A spokesman for die invesnne&t 
agienc^ m Washingtan said: ‘‘Because of 
ibe gtu atio o with Nike, we*S have to 
monitor wmkets* rights more closety 
dier& We have to matgf. sme are 
meeting foe labor lights we require before 
OPIC can go in.” Nike has acknow- 
let^ged that conidilicnis at some of its 
tones in Vietnam (moated by snbcon- 
Bactors from South Korea and Taiwan 
violated its workplace standards. 


li tiW DBT.HT — 7 ^ goveRBnent mdeied 
fneiga sriines Biday to withdraw ihirir in> 
TOStments fiom Istfian domestic carxiexs vritbin 
sfatm omha. 

The setting ci die ax-mondi deadline fcd- 
' lowed tojproval by tbe m the 

wedc (tfan aviation policy gnning that 
fbrdgn airfines wouldnoi be aOowedto invest in 
d<Mne^ Indian carrieis, ahbo^b overseas in- 
vestcrs ontside die aviati(» sector could own as 
mnch as 40 pooeot statom dttoiesifo aniioes. 

CAL Itxahim, the aiidation minister ,- sai^ 


atr-branq^ sector, in whicib equly is bdd by 
foito|a airifomdiiectfy or iXKSz^y, will have 
to dismvest ndthtn six nxxidis* time.” 

The poliQr change comes Bs ablow to Jet Air, 
India’s lar^st pnvately nm carrier, in which 
Gulf Air and Kuwait Airtfoes eacdi hold 20 
percent stakes. 

loda^ spiaces said Mr. Jbiahim's an* 
noonconait would fantt Jet Air's pl«n« to un- 
port three wid^bodied passenger plaoM by 
July. Hm airline already bad government clear- 
ance and scone funds its overseas partners 

fin the |dan. Jet Air has a fleet of 12 new- 
ition Boeh^ Co. planes and operates 74 
i to 23 destinations daily. 


' D. Sudhakar Redtfy, duef of India’s Air Pas- 
sengers* Assodatioo. said tiie new poli^r was 
“loaded in favor of gpvemmeDt><)wned 
hnes.” 

He added, ’ Tt is neither attractive enou^ nor 
useful, but ai^ieaied to be t»ly in favor of foe 
ladianAiriines.” 

But India’s Air Tasd Operators' Association 
de^tded tbe new mles, sayn^ font foreign 
investment in domestic airiines is not generally 
permitted dsewhere exiher. 

Jet Air said it wcuJd not be affected by foe 
new policy, because the new rules allow 100 
pentom equity panidpaiion in (loDiestic 
^ bidiati nationals living abnxtd. 

“We will foUow foe govemmeat guidelines; 
foey wcMtid not affect our tmeration,” Shiva 
Nandan, gatcral maiager of Jet Air, said. 

The new guidelines also pin an end to a S70S 
million plan by Singapore Airlines and an In- 
dian company, the Tata budness group, to set 
up a new airline in India after more fom two 
years of wrangling. 

Nk. Ibrahim h^ aigued (hat investment by 
fordgn airlines in private Indian companies 
would lead to foe destruction of India Airiines, 
foe stato-run domestic earner, wttich is plagued 
by (fonmic labm' unrest and financial losses. 

But the mmister said 100 percent foreign 


equity stakes would be welcomed at India’s 
dnn^c airports. “The government has for- 
warded a proposal to this meet to foe cabineL’ ' 
Mr. Ibrahim sai(L 

To prevent “nonserious” jifoiyera from en- 
tering foe aviation sector, tbe minimum fleet 
size ^a “scheduled ^rator” has been raised 
freun three airenft to five, a rntn-e that analysts 
said would probably affect about seven private 
carriers here. 

Mr. Ibrahim said ail domestic airtine compa- 
nies wmxld have to ttoloy 10 perceat of 
capacity in ecoDomicaUy backward areas of foe 
country such as the northeast, Jammu md Kash- 
mir, Andaman and the Nicoto Islands. 

He also said Indian Airlines was expected to 
makeaprofit ofaround 526 million in the year 
en(^ m March 19^, after years of losses. 

Ar^d 20 pri^fe airiines were launched in 
India in direct competition wifo foe national 
carrier, Indian Airli^, after the government 
up the industty to the private sector in 

The Civil Aviation Ministty said Wednesday 
that foreign investors, including airline compa- 
nies, thaccmremly hold stakes in Indian airiines 
would have to conform to foe new rules. But it 
did not set a deadline for such action until 
I^day. (Reuters. AFXl 


investor’s Asia 


Hai^.Se^ 

14000 1- 

M- 
13GDS 




d^Tm' a . “W-N DTriTA: F 


1SS7. 


1996 


1997 

Flit^ 


1996 

■ftisv;- 


1997| 
•ft.' ' 




Stogiyore. . 


i^075,7S .2^08' -OAI 

Stydbey 

./aOKfinato . . 

ijSB&m ■ a,3»4iev 4038 


»iii4kei225'. ' " 

i7A6p^‘.'*a,isam ■■4i48' 

Kiiafai toa^.Comp^^ 

■■tVem 1,1S3SlVr^^ 

Bwgtiek- 

SET • 


seofti.. 

ONT^DStts index ' 

BSTAB- '.'.678.74.' 

Talpoi 

Sttoitaiketkxiex'IGlDsiBd ,'8^67.57 

- .. .. 

wran^* - 



.Jakarta 

OompOBBe Indeet 

-63SM3- ' ••'QL85 

Yumogton 

NZSE-40- 

g;2SM3 ' -0.02 

Boaeaiy 

Sens^ue.indtos 

gjsssar. .-ois 


Ban^ad^hOuagesBer^rineExeciitive 


Bloomberg Sews 
. DHAKA, Bangladtadi—] 
InvemiMots Holdings LhL saiiTFri- 
d^ that its managing director in 
Baqgladesh' was dotged with price 
manipolatioKi in couaec tio n wzfo a 
stock-maricet crash last year that 
bankrupted' hobdreds of small in* 
vestors, but said the efaar^ were un- 
justified; 

Rnna A lam, owner of SES Secu- 
rities — through whichPeregriDc (XXI- 
(fnets ite inyestawm-banking business 


in Bangladesh — was among 36 own- 
ers of local brokerages and executives 
at 1 S ofoer ccmip^es named in arrest 
wazraots. P we^yin e is tbe only foreign 
securities firm m Ban^adesh. 

Pe re g rin e, a Hong Kong-based tn- 
vesnneat hciuse. ewed the diaiges 
^[am “absolutely with- 
out justification” and accused the au- 
thorities in Bangladesh fix' having 
friled to control a maricet that quad- 
rupled in value before coUqtsing in 
December 1996. 


Very briefly: 



• Malaysian stocks plunged to their lowest level in a year as 
leoc&g Clubs 1^ the cent^ bank threatened to depress bank 
jxofits. The drt^ in banks, which account for 15 pereent of foe 

main index. “ 

IntiexdowD 
of 7.6 percent fix i 

• Japan's sales of imported vehicles jumped in March be- 
cause of strong demand ahead of an increase in the naticmal 
sa les tax. tire Jqnn Automobile Importers Association said. 
M<>5t (^the gains were regisuned by European producers, with 
U.S. carmakers posting a drop in sales. 

• Indoneda's financial maricets were rattled again by rumors 
about President Suharto’s health. Tbe government draied the 
{resident planr^ to visit Germany for a check-up. 


• Daiei Inc. 's shares tumbled to their lowest level in 26 years 
on concern that increased competition will hurt earnings. 
Shares in Japan's largest supermarket chain closed at 533 yen 
($435), down 100, a decline of 16 percent 

• Japan's Ministry of Agrrculture deci<ied not to nediree 
tariffs on imports of pork after reports that it would do so sent 
U.S. hog futures prices soaring. 

• Marubeni Corp. will book a loss of about 28 billion yen on 
its securities holdm^ for tire year that ended Monday because 
of sluggish stock pritres. 

• China's financial situation was stable in foe first two mtxiths 
of 1997, its central Irenk said The People's Bank of China stud 
inflation was moderate, wdfo the consumer price index up 5.9 
percent in January from a year earlier. Bloomberg, Reuters, aFP 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 




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SATURDAY-SUNDAX; 

APRIL 5-(v 1997 
PAGE 15 



What’s in a Number? Demographics Tell a Multifold Investing Tale 



Women at Work 4s 3 percentage of total employment 


Australia 

43.1% 

Indonesia 

38.8% 

PfMtugai 

44.2% 

Austria 

4E6 

Ireland 

37.7 

Spain 

35.3 

Belgium 

38.9 

Italy 

35.4 

S. Korea 

40.3 

Canada 

45.2 

Japan 

40.4 

Sweden 

48.3 

Denmark 

44.5 

Malaysia 

33.9 

Switzerland 

42.9 

Finland 

33.B 

Netherlands 

40.8 

Thailand 

45.9 

France 

43.8 

New Zealand 

44.1 

Turkey 

30.3 

(aermany 

41.9 

Norway 

45.8 

U.K. 

44.7 

Greece 

35.9 

PitiSpitines 

37.0 

U.S. 

46.1 


Women in the U.S. Labor Force 


Labof<4oic»partii:^^fyr women aged 76 
orofcfec 12-’mon^ movhg average 


60% 



SBiacarfcwwatoMft^twQiifc*- ti.Q ftiwMMi/Vtjhwr.ftitMefl. IHT 



liiiljfi— if1 !■ Iliniln Timii Till *11 wifiiit T«»n Jnlj CiMBc/La«AB|9ifa*'nM«B 

in tbe 15^90Sy bnt th^ differ widely over why participation in the workforce is fallii^ and what it means for the economy and investors. 


By Ann Biocklehnist 


E conomists WHO dabbfe in 

demognqjby . do not nsnallty 
quacid ovCT tbe basic statistics, 
but when it to 
die iinpoftance of various numbers, de- 
teratioing what is behind mui 
trapolating dse leperonssioos for-in- 
' vestors, differ widely. 

Consid e r, for estanqde, tfaear theories 
on why labor-force particqpaiimi by 
young women has reoe^ stalled or, in 
some cases, falkai, levetsntt aticsd that 
be^ at the end cd WoitidWar n. 
Richard Hoicoisai, econamist 


at the New York brokerage bouse Don- 
aldson, Lnfkin & Jeorette Securides 
Cocp., stdd many wmnen wanted **to 
lednce the stress generated by a wooking 
wodd that refers litde stqjpoct to fam- 
ilies** and had therefore taka advan- 

homewiihdien^dldre^^ 

As a result, they have mote time to 
Mr. Hokenson said, 
9 ntoNenis forbcaud- 
said rtiat time- 
[wraking mothers tended to buy 
nliar brand-name breakfast cereds. 
for exais;ile,becai]sed)ey could not risk 
pmchasing sranetfaing less esqpenstve. 



name 


yet unfamiliar, diat tfadr cfaildten mi^ 
tfaeit refuse to eat ZL But for one-income 
families on budgets, saving money 
is die pricai^, diey have the t»ne to 
letum te the siqietmaTket if the dieaper 
cereal proves to be a gustatory faHine. 

She^Cocmer , ^ief eccmomist at 
Nesbitt Bums Inc. in Toronto, mgges- 
ted another reason why women could 
afford to stay out of tbe worimlace. 

la a report. “Sex and die economy: 
The Next Reviriudon,’ * she noted that in 
Natih America there were more young 
men than wmnen in the maniage pool. 

This shift b^an in 19SS, wba the 
bulk of die b^-boom generation had 
passed dirou£^ their maniageaWe 20s. 


Q&A/Dtnrid Foot 


Statistics Are (Almost) Eyerything 


D avid foot, an eamonast 

and demographer, sc^s_ 
demograpfdcs apirm two- 
dtirdscf everything. 

In his recent book, ^Bocan Bust &, 
Echo: How to Profit fiom die Cormng 
Demographic Shifi,'] Mr. Foot pre~ 
dieted that ba^ boomers entering 
^ir prime saving years would cause 
Norm American stock meahets to 
boom for 20 years, while J^sanese 
markets would languish as the coun- 
try's aging ptpuladon pulls money out 
of equities. According to Mr. Foot, 
most real estate is no longer a good 
investment and interest rates are m- 
tikefy to rise signficantlyfor a number 

^^rl^oot, who teaches at the Uni- 
versity ofToronto, used Canadian data 
in A& studies. But he said didt his 
conclusions also tppUed to the United 
States, which experienced a similar 
baby boom, aidmigh it was slightly 
ear^r and smaller. 

He looks to Europe and Jtman to 
provide examples ^ how se- 
deties behave. Becausej^rtiUty rates 
dropped in Jtpan.in the late 1940s 
while Europe recorded oidy a smo/2 
postwar rise in birdi rates, the^ dih 
de^s are now older than diose in 
North America. 

Mr. Foot discussed a variety of top- 
ics with Am Brocklehurst. 

Stock markets. Most eqni^ mffic- 
atots are becoming inel^anL The 
boomers are going to put an ever- 

lamerpcfftionofthegre ti remieatMV- 
»«E« into stocks became, riv en the low 

returns available on real mtate and 
they have no acentaUe altern- 
ative. Because diey have litde time and 
want their moD^ profosaoiirily manr 
aged, they will focus thrir attention on 
Quality mutual foods. 

The stock maricets of die next de- 
cade are the housing maifc^ of die^ 

Americans are going to tore 
stock markets up around the wo^ 


offered by bank deposits periled die 
price of stocks to astronoimcal levels. 

At dutf time, Japan was a country 
writ more -savers than qieodas. The 
xeaaoo was demographic: Feardli^ in 
Canada declined in ^ late 1960s, but 
in Xapao, fertiliiy deeSped in the late 


Japanese stock prices cventaally 
came downi to eaini with a tfand as 
iMhed JapspsesB started to sell didr 
eq^holdmgs. Ibe Jtqpicse are now 
going to have to cash m an their in- 
vestmeim to pay for dwh rising health 
care costs. 

Real estate. Piop^ is riioat 
1 forpeople to live in and work in. 
is why leri estate is driven fEtr 
mace ^ demogriqphics than by eco- 
nonucs. Because most of die needs of 



■'W 

Tbe ecooomist JJavid Foot 

die boomers are fined, real estate is no 
inmgftr a gr owdi industiy. That means 


Country real estate win probably do 
relatively weD. We know t^ die over- 
45 age gnxQ? contains die largest 

know 

baby bomners are streaming into diat 
age groiq>. That is wl^ teisure and 
teCT^oiial ppperfy wfll be a strorig 
segDoeot of me real estate marioet for 
the rest of the decade. 

Interest rates. Just as the price of 
real estate went up because a huge 
xnzmber of peopte nvnted k at tbe sante 
time, so ddd die price of ma^. But by 
the inid-1990s, tbe baby-boom gen- 
eration has booj^ most of die bouses, 
^ipliances and cars it needs. As a 
r&t. the cton^ for money has 
flattened just as die real estate market 
hm flattoed, and interest rates have 

We in Nmdi America win be living 
in diis low- iitfei es t- rate wodd for 
many years to come. Bnt that does not 
mean that an fixed-income invest- 
meotsriionld be abandoned. In fact, in 
a pexiod of faDing interest rates, qo^- 
i^ long-term bonds ae an attractive 
investment that offers both safety and 
thepossibility of capital gains. 

Tedinolo^. In an amg sode^, 
die growdi of the wonabtee daw 
down. Meanwhile, because peo]^ are 
older, diey have more money to invest 
and tbe siqif^ of cqnial increases, 
herefoie becomes cheyer 
dieie is more incentive to use it to 
znveri in new techterir^ as an al- 
ternative to increasing^ eiqpensive 
labor. 

Ibis demogrsqdnc pheomnenoo 
was at the root of Japan's phenomenal 

♦ ra n a firantmrirffi jntn an sq- 

iwer. J^au, which had a Inrdi 


20 years of buying with no 

!!Sigrs£ 3iat 

wl^savers whoMiiWn^ 

estate and shunned tbe low retums 


than ID make it in die 1990s. 

If you are a booiner who thinks your 
house fa jpungto be your pension idati, 
thinlr again, u you*re a real estate 
investor, nnless yoQ pick yoor spois 
triUfantiy, yon are not bkay to make 
anymoD^. 

m the 1 990 s, diere wiU be tpnte a hit 
of iiMwket activity but not net new 
A»mand. Jt will be lenovatioos and 
hadmgqi. 


following its defeat in Wodd 
War n when North America was 
starting its baby boom, had no al- 
ternative but to be an eariy poriwar 
adnter of technolc^. 

In the autoOUriwe and rvmai m a r 
etectxooics industries h specialized in, 
Japan became the most effident pro- 
dneer in tbe worid over the 1.960s and 
1970s. 

From 1965 to 1985, we trailed such 
older countries as Japan and Germany 

ContiDued OD 17 


Trend-Spotting for a Great 30- Year Play 

T-lORlNVE^Sta^ 



oiwi5*^®* »**'»*■'**» aoc 

tves spotting which 
underinvested 
eloi^hauL 

s in many conntnes 
3 QB 2 telttS to 
y are ereattog new 
0 i tt^ fiiat are tin- 
ted dt*riiig tiie next 
ate analyst^ 

•seaxrii ana^ wim 

ittoed effect of 


“Inlhatieroect,it’saL ^ — 

be arid ‘'That will be aboot d» 
time tiiese boanesses wiB be switching 
aioinri foca taking znooey in to paying 
iiouL” .. 

He that peoaon providers 

around the world would enjoy the two- 
fedd bf™*^** of increased menne and 


r advances auu 
sions would my 

gn nflny profits wt 


T Jim Bie Steady riuftrf State welfae 
govices into the private sector to hrip 
— goveniniBiii-^aKting burdens, 
many long-tom investnxot changes 
wDl be created 1 ^ the need to solve 
ooviroomeotel problems such as pol- 
lution and declining energy xesouxoes, 
Mr. Hollins said. 

esnm^ he aaid, the technology 
n ef^fd mcMny rap e -^e e doDuitodie- 


sri fodi abeady cxitts and is used for 
mass tranrit openrioos in some coun- 
tries. Baying into Inotedmology compa- 
m'tt reroazddng ways of inqiroviqg 
gyo^seed ^elds wo«dd give investas 
access to tiiese changes, he said 
Brim TQfa,flqi <^niMn for difiBrit- 
irii Stockbroker Gt^ Mkkllti!^ 
tile gio«^ globalaitioa trend a bag 
bomess to create inverimat opportu- 
nities among out-sowemg specialists. 

“hi the same way tiiat coporaiions 
doD*t lannder tte ttrWels in their w^b- 
rorans,** be said “(heic are increas- 
areas (bey prefoto subconixact to 
speoahsts.’* ife said that businesses 
providing julininistration services 
woild fm from this change. 

-B 16 BY LARNER 


The ratio of young men to young 

^factmkfirst- 


_ wom- 
en rose shai^ due to tbe i 
time bridegrooms tend to many wonen 
their age or several years younger. 

Changes in tile ratios of mainageable 
men to women have an important effea 
OQ die economy because in societies 
where women are scarce, men are "in 
cotrqietitioD** for **die best wife pc^ 
sible** and “are willing to make a social 
anH fmanrifli commitment to remain 
widi her,*' wrote Ms. Cooper. 

She added that this should translate 
into lower £vorce rates, hi^ier birth 
rates and greata growtii m family 
households than in non-family house- 
bdds, aQ trends dm are visible today. 

But Doiald Straszheini, chief ecem- 
omist at Menill Lynch & Co. in New 
Yoric, has a {fifierent theory. He said that 
fhictuations m dte ratio of marriage-age 
womea to men are “trivial *' when com- 
pared to the overall a g ing of baby 
boocners, who were bom roughly 
tween 1946 and 1966. 

As to an exodus of wesnea from the 
job maik^ due to low mortgage rates, he 


said’ * T don't buy that at alL 1 tiunk people 
who have been in die labor force for a 
number of years find the money earned 
useful I suspea they also fi^ other 
fulfiUment in thrirprcni^onal life.” 

He noted that the partietpatioa of men 
and women in the U.S. labor 
force was now roughly equal, 
after adjusting for time off taken 
by women to raise children. 

Contr^ to Nb. Cooper.Mr. 
Stzasrizeim sees restaurants, 
particularly fast-food outlets, 
continuing stremg. frequented 
by time-pressed two-income 
families aM tbe many teenage children 
of the bal^ boomers. 

David Foot, a Univerrity ofToronto 
economist, piloted that many baby 
boomers would start to go out more 
**once the kids are old enou^ to stay 
home without a baby sictar." 

They will start patraaizini restaur- 
ants ai^ movie theaters agam, rather 
than ratting out to ;n 2 za and renting 
video cassettes, he writes in his book, 
“Boom Bust and Echo: How to Profit 



from the Coming Demographic Shift.’* 

Moreover, Mr. Foot said, such re- 
tailers as Wal-Mart, Price Oub and 
Home Depot, which “seemed invin- 
cible in the early part of tiie 90s, are 
headed for trouble water,*’ as baby 
boomera prove willing to pay 
for convenience and service. 

“An older, affluent con- 
sumer wants to shop at the 
oei^boibood bakery, butcher 
shop, or clodting boutique 
whm the staff knows her name, 
her likes, and disUkes,” he 
said. 

While Mr. Straszheim agreed that 
retailos offering attentive service 
would cone back in style, he predicted 
that the most successful modiants 
would be diose on tiie Imeroet, rocb as 
neighborhood grocers widi w^ page^ 
whose customos could order by e-mail 
eitii^ to pi^-up or delivery. 

He said he expected brand names to 
benefit because virtual shoi^iers woild 
be unlikely to opt to genoic jaoducts 
with which tiiey were onfamiliar. 


?rr‘ ‘.yc 





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I 30 dw of die start of your sabsoipfio n fiff a fi ifl refiiod. oepteiSM^ 





















































































































































JNTfiBNATlONAL HEEUIJ) TRIBUNE, SATURDi^^Ui^Y, APRIL 5^, 1997 


PAGE 17 






'Hg-Term Plans BRiif case 



Preparing Now to Meet Old-Age Needs Later 


ByBaiteaWall 


to sett 


y 


^ and infiaiaEs diCT hem 
* ^ «f ™tog care in 

ffinch as $50,000 m urtan areas. Res- 
ideins of a ty^cal Bntidi noisnig honie 
^ abom «8UW0 

^29p20) a year, while the cost ofpart- 

tmre care m die home averages £5 0^ 
A spokesman for the American As^ 
soraMoo rf Retired Pbreons, which is 

tes^m Washington, said that at least 

half of retirees older than 65 would 
spend rime in a nuEsmg home. The av- 

ew stay varies fixnn riuee to six years, 

aiffloutt rnanypeq^ 
much iOD|er. Itie iobbying 

Cooice n i ‘found tfwt one in 

tetir^ were bring cared fog in 
ii u nring homes on a seam^- 
manentbasis. 

With many peo^ now liv- 
ingt^intoriieir^,ritBpos- 
^UUty of needing some focm of 
professimial care in old 
cannot be ignored. ffycHi want 
m peserve some of the fomily 
asseto and have a s&y in the type and 
quality of care provided, the 
advice is to start planning early. 

. It is now possttde to Say p riv a t e in- 
soranoe to cover musing fao^ foes. Tbe 
drawbacks are riiai the peemfomf ca n be 
expensive and ^ msutance vriU (ttly be 

triggered if certain conditions are tn^r . 
Tbe internati<mal he nf fo mmiwr Private. 
Patients nan will pay out a set le^ of 
benefits to policidioJdeis triio cannot 
perform riiree out of six daily activities, 
such as bariiing. To qualify for a pay- 
ment of £1.000 per month, rile monthly 
ptemhim for a u-year-old man is £85. 
In the United Stales, the average cost of 
a good, loog-ttnn-care insimDce policy 
is about $2300 a year. 

A parinersfato rian is anoriieg fype of 
insurance tiiat wul pev for-instipmcoal 
care and hefo tndivimials protect their 
assets. now, dtoy are cnfy avrilatde 
in riie United States ««iri ju Gennanyi 
although they are expected to be io- 
troduced SOCHI m Britam and Innoe. 

Under these plans, tbe government 
vrin pay nursing bcxiie costs coce in- 
surance benefits have been exhansled- 
and poJicybolders have dtrined riieir 
resooices to apredeterndned levri. Plan 
provisioas aoccnliqg to where you 
Uve. In New xoik. for exanqile, a per- 
scMi who buys $50,000 worth of tor 
suzance for about Sl^iOO a year can 
protea $50,000 wortii of assets. WUi- 
out the coverage, 
would have to 1 
qualify for 

state health-care pr ogr a m. 


So for, only 11,000 polides have 
bepsold. 

**lbexiiainproId6misriittfoepteiiii- 
ums are still too high,** said Jotima 
WeineE, a. resesB^ associate with the 
Urban Priiqr Tmethiiti* jq WaArngmu. 
‘‘Even if you buy a long-^ierin cate 
poSky in middle-raB. when wmmnte 
shotud be mne affccdaUe, .mere is a 
. sCrai^ chance that tile time you need 
foe bttteto the priiey be wottidess. 

Bew ptdides on rite market have been 
aUe to keep pace witiLmflation. . 

Ben Fnmer, a spokesman for Age 

GonOeni, advised petqde to consider all 
riirir optioDS before bong paririoed into 
bnvioginsmauQft. Heiafflwtnighf matra 
more sense to pay forcate out (^savings 
xatber titan invest in an insurance poli^ 
that may never be te^nred or, worse, 
inay notp^ out becaose of xigorous and 
codfosiDg poli^ riders. 

*]T3ie average home owner who has 
for retirement will probahify 



A 



SChe mcaivIst^e penginn hwngB^ equi- 

valeat to about S900 per montii,'* Mr. 
Ronersaid. they were to add to this 
sum inleiest from saviiiss and 
tite xocooK accnied finxnlet^g 
out foie fopsnly home, it is likely 
that they wotuki be ri>fe to afford 
foe cctsts <if loDg-lenn care.** 
There are znany cre a tive 
fondSng spinri on* to rite Icms* 
term cate folemma. 

A grow of elderiy women 
Omcetn teoeni^ wifo 
idea of settzsg op a hooszog 00‘< 
operative. Th^ Mcfa agreed to con- 
tnbme £50 to £100 to a rend so that if 
one m ember of tiie co-op became ill 
some oi tiie money could be used to 
a cate-g^ver. 

Strang that could be finandrily 
dstgetons would be to give away mcoey 
to a trusted fijend or xriative and thus 
to be in need of state assistance. 
*SomepeDflODers be persuaded 
to gift tiiefoassets in Older to for 
state assistance,** srid Hona Price, (fi- 
lector of foe LcmdorMnsed finaricial 
advisory firm Hcma Price Assodaies. 
**Alrikon^ tecfardeally feariU^ tiiis tto- 
proach is fnn|^ wifo daogM. If w 

assess was related to an jpplicatioit for a 
mitring heme place di^ would prob- 
abfy deny aariataace. * * 

FmtiiannQre, tf you refy solely (» tile 
state for loug-tetm care financing; you 
wifi probably have Httle say in tiie type 
ofemaDom:^ 

Irivaie muring homes are in business 
to make money, said Sarah Green Bur- 
gm. audior cf “Nursing Homes, Getting 
^&iodCBze'niere.**ShesaidthatfoCTe- 
fore “pec^baveto.riiop around as riw 
qnahty'af cate varies eoamonsfy bt- 
tween mstitutions.** 

Forfimhera^cfnnatum: 

•SAWi araBN BOBOtR. Mte or ** 11111 ^ Ugao. 0» 

*« Gwd teltaB 1 an sn XR3 

•AMWCAN AasOOAZIW OP WntED rmsOMS: 1 

•A(SOaMCBUi:44 0111 ai9 woo 


TIW 0 U.S. Mutual Fkinds 

Open to Naw Investors 

- Two U.S. mutual funds with excel- 
lent long-term records have put out foe 
wdrome nut for sew iovestors, no 
doubt because the performances of both 
have been sQpping reoentiy. 

Rrst is foe B^yn Incase fund, 
whfoh closed to new investors in August 
1995. 

Berwyn rose 12A percent a year, on 
average, a iiiU percentage point more 
ihyn a& domestic hybrid fiiods, for t^ 
fiw etided Ma^ 22, acoori^ 

Moningstar InCn foe fosd^cadd^ 
in Chid^. But its three-year return is 
10.7 pcicait ayear, cornpaed whh 12.4 
petcritt for its group. 

Stem Roe Cmtal Oppentonides, 
which dosed in s^tembo', has also 
decided to take ziew zDvestors again. The 
fund gained more than 17 percent a year 
in the tiiree and five years ended Kmrch 
22, veisns 13 percent for its grotR>.nud- 


lut last year, the fbad lost oeariy 5 
percent, cmiqiaxed vrAi a 5.8 percent 
mcreaae for its group, Monungstar 
said. (NYT) 

Momingstar Creates 
InCeraetive Site on Web 

Mbmingi^ has qpened an interact- 
ive web site (wwwJDorningstarjiet) 
that covers more than 15,000 stocks and 
funds. Investors can create portfolios 
anrf fimmuiw fh#ww fhmtighft iit the day. 
The rite also ofiers commentary and 
research by die Momingstar jiet staff. 

(NyT) 

Money Report On-Line 

The Money R^ioct no w has an e-mail 
address. Readers are znvhed to send 
^lestkms and comments to 
moneyrqxgifaLcom. 


In a Dicey Market, You’re the Enemy 


I T TOOK AJST two brutal days of 
trading Iasi week for the Dow 
Jones industrial average to drop 
297 points. Compla^t in- 
vestors, who might hwe forgotten 
1987 and probably oe%'erwent through 
1973-74. got a rude awakening. 

No douM you were scared, ^id you 
will probably be scared again b the 
wttks ahead. This is a volatile, high- 
priced markeL h is for cool, patient 
investors only. The skittish and the 
greedy need not apply. 

It is a time to 

to^^*^mOTbCT JAMES tttASSMAM lifTlNVE^TING 
Benjamin Gnt- 


only once a week, or even once a 
month, to check your portfolio. But do 
not neglect the prices of pc^rial pur- 
chases. If the market is sliding, your 
reflexive riiought should be “buy/’ 
not “sell.” 

a Try to ban the word “market” 
from your investing vocabulary. Un- 
less you are buy mg an mdex fonfo you 
do not mvest b the maritet: you mvest 
b stocks of businesses. 

Ignore piedicDons about the econ- 
omy. A possible course for tbe year 


ham*s admoDition: **The mvestor's 
chief problem — and even his worst 
eztomy — Is likdy to be hbiself.” 

If you are smart you will recognize 
this human centoition and construct 
^ntr portfolio accot^^y. 

So. here ts some adv&, behavioral 
and financial, for a dicey market get- 
ting ever diciat 

• Hold onto good companies. If they 
were not good, you should not have 
bou^ tbra b ^ first palace, ff riiey 
are good, thetr prices vUU rise whh 
their profits — not smootiUy over the 
sbCHt term, but certainly over the long. 
Tbar is whri history shows: prices aim 
profits are mextric^ly 

The only reasons to sell right now 
are to correct mistakes or to reorder 
badly built portfolios. 

• as little attention as possible to 
the daily fluctuations of the you 
own. Tbis is import a nt even (b fact, 
espedaily) if foe mriket dro^ severely, 
^ort-terzn movements are aoeaningless 
to foe Ittog-ietm investor. They only 
make you more frightened, bereasbg 
tiie ehanewe that you win do SQsnethbg 

lid, such as sell a great company. 

It newspaper stock tables 


ahead goes like this: boonibg economy 


Ig^bke 
s Federal 


stupid, sue 
Consult 


causes Federal Reserve Boaid to boos 
bterest rates, thus cunbg off grmvth 
and peifaaps predpiating a tecesrioi. 
That scenario would be bad for stocks 
— but only m the short term. The 
market wotw soon stan lookmg for an 
itjtftim jQ the economy. stocks 
would rise. Long-term shareholders 
have tbe luxury of not needbg to worry 
about sudt cycles — except to realize 
foat they present buying oppominities. 

Warren Buffett, chmrman of 
Berkshire Hathaway Inc., put it best: 
“If we find a company we like, the 
level of tbe market uil) not really 
impact our decisions. We will decide 
company by comply. We spend es- 
sentially no time thinking abwt mac- 
roeconomic factors, b ofoer words, if 
somebody handed us a prediction 
the most revered mtelleciual on the 
subject, with figures for unemploy- 
ment or bterest rates, or whatever it 
might be for tbe next two years, we 
would not pay any attention to it.*' 

• If you recogj^ that ymi lack the 
discTpluie to be a long-term holder of 
5tocl& this could be a good time to 
diversify mto bonds. Interest rates may 


rise, but Treasury securities have be- 
come attractive. TTre five-jfcar note 
was yieldbg 6.7 percent last week, up 
from 5il percent b late November. 

• With new money you are seeking 
to mvest, think global. John Wri^t m 
David L. Babson & Co. b Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, recently told clients: 
“Even when an economy is stagnat- 
mg, as Japan’s and Europe's have been 

late, there are frequemly good in- 
vestment oppoituniti^ mvolving 
companies that are forgb^ ahead and 
creating above- 
average growth 

andeantings.” 

You can trade 
bdividuaJ foreign stocks on many do- 
mestic exchanges, but for most small 
mvestors, mutual funds may make 
more sense since foreign nnanciri 
statements can be confoibg and di- 
versificati(» is a must. 

• If you have new money to mvest, 
recognize that some of the world’s 
best companies are cheaper today than 
foey were two months ago. You may 
have shunned Johnson & Johnson Co. 
when it was peakbg at $63 on Feb. 18. 
but what ab(wt now at SS4? It's hardly 
cheap, tradmg at a ptice-to^amm^ 
ratio (based on 1 997 estimated profits) 
of 22. but foac’s less risky than 28. 

Intel Corp. is down 16 percent from 
its I%brumy hi^. For a company 
whose profits grew 44 percent last 
year, a P/E of 1 61s not bad. Even b'gh- 
flybg Microsoft Coip.. which com- 
bbes creativity, marketing smarts and 
an almost vicious competitive drive, is 
wMth a serious look for long-term 
mvestors. 

^^\2skingl^tn Post Service 
VANCUMtD GROUP, ibe pun BfrUad fniid iranip* n 
Vjdey FMgc, Pow>Kuia. b» joa ruWr*ad '‘BewMar- 
kcik A taacinol pa^mne oa maikM dawmiiM “ 
T«0tuin a espy or Ac ftce ciO loll iRt in ite linml 

Sbks. I KODMOTMTot 1610669 l06ll.ari^VtB^ud't 
weh uin at •wv.vaopnlxcn. 


With Tiinds of Funds/ One Pick for Twice the Price 


By Carole Gould 


I NVESTORS STRUGGLING to 
pidc from among die 8,000 stock 
atrwi hnfvi funds OD foe tnaricet can 
snnjdify the task by choosbg a 
“fund of mods.*' These bvestmenB 
own shares m ftth** * wmtiwil funds 
boast several advantages: sb3|tiiciiy, di- 
veisificaticm and access. Oriy one tiimg 
is geoesaQy rnissbg --- good lecmTis. 

“I dem't rule out the possiblify that 
actively manned funds of funds could 
a gr^ package,** said Don FfallUps, 
president at Mon^gstar bic., the fimd- 
traclcBrsbQticago. “Ijusthaven'tseen 
anyone do it ri^ y^' 

Tire ezoqi. stiD b ire biatu^. is pol^ 
for exiwrive growtii, as fniid cozixpanies 
reach out to oew mvestors and ofoers 
sedemg rinqile bvestment choioes. b 
foe last six rnoiifos. Fidelity Irivestiirencs 
and Scudder, Stevens & Oatk began 
seDbg packa^ of their own funds. 

alk tiioe were 53 funds of fimds 
m 1996, up from 32 ayear earlier and 1 8 


b 2990. accofdmg to Mombgstar. A 
decade ago. there were only seven. 

Rinds of funds, also known as mul- 
dfonds, are mtended to offer mvestors 
care-stop shopping %rii3e g^g them 
broad-fresed esqresure to a varieQr of mar- 
kets. Tbe vast majority mix U.S. stock 
azid boi)d fimds. alfoou^ five also dabble 
b overseas stocks. Several own shares b 
mtennediate-term bond fimds. and ooe 
ntixK various types of bond ftmds. 

Most are actively managed, wfaidi 
TTM-ans that they can buy shares of any 
mutual fimd. A handfuL mcludbg T. 
Rowe {^rice's Spectrum frmds. Vanguard 


Star and the Fldeby Freedom series, 
own shares only m the funds of their own 
company. Divosification is the chief ad- 
vantage: a sbgle fond of funds can own 
shai^ m a do^ other funds, bcludbg 
some foat othervrise are closed. 

But m general, a fimd of funds is a 
costly way to bnld a fond portfolio, 
bvestots pay the management costs of 
whoever is sponsoring ibe umbrella fund, 
but drey also pay aD the expenses of the 
underiybg fimds. That double layer of 
expen^ takes a big Inte out of returns. 

While the multifonds have not been 
widely tested m all types of market 


cycles, their remms have been disap- 
pobting so far. Of roultifunds that mix 
stocks and bonds, only 4 of the 14 wifo 
five-year records beat their peer groups, 
as ^fined by Monungstar. for foe pen- 
od ended m February. 

Vanguard Star is cxie of tbe few mul- 
tifrmds that have consistently beaten peer 
groups. For the five years ended m Feb- 
mary. it gained 13.1 percent a year, oo 
average, compared with 11 percent fre all 
doioM^ hytnd funds. For the one- and 
Ihree-year periods, it was ahead of foat 
group by three percentage points a year, 
rftr Nov York Times. 




Building Boon: Baby-Boom Retirees 


By Aline Sullivan 


ana- 


I NVESTMENTS THAT taxget 
agbg baby boomers seem almost a 
sutebk. at least to many buildmg 
and coQstnictioD compsmes. Tire 
yf w r a tip n coDstitatBS a market foat is 
hard to resist: fix tbe Ibrted Sttoes, ftir 
example, foe number of people age ^ 
and ^d er is pcogetxed tire Oigani- 
jytWt ficH Economic Coopeiatioo and 
Development to rise 21 percent b the 

next 10 years. Similar gabs are expected 
b most otiier developed conntritt^^^ 

jBeoesr still* this g eneration is ieririo| 
early «nd with money. Hie so-called 
empty-oestezs — couples or on^ 
whose duldren have grown iqi and len 
home — will aoxmot for almost one 
third of households by 20ia But m^ 
i- cti re B ff are reluctant to rattle around in 
what used to be a family hoore. 

Instead, tii^ are flodemg to vtot le- 

tbsmeot communities. wh«* 
to-date housing and recreational fix- 
ities. Hiese mini-cities have cverymg 
&om smermaikets to on-siiB mroicai 
clinics, aufiletooard is oassft iwidcots 

nip about on golf caris from flreir aqua 


Not suiprisinSy. ^ 

struction co m p ai zres are feDiug ow 
each ofoer for a dice of to 

particularly as demand for otherfonns of 


new housing tapers off on < 
of ziang bterest rates. But i 
lysts warn that only tire best-: 

^ estaMidred co n ipatiies vgiil be 
to devdOjp a substantial presence. 

“Clea^.tire demogrqfoics are m tire 
fisvor of to busbess, and tire c oi qpn- 
niea that do it wen should proroer,** smd 
Sterfoen Do^ an analyst at Goldman, 
b New YodL **But re- 
member that the fizst retire e b a irew 
commimify expects eveiy fadlify to be 
m place. That makes it a very capital- 
intensive buriness.” 

The gtanddaddy of tire buildets is Del 
Wdib Coro., based b tire zbuement 
mecca Ifooeaix. Aiizana. More tiian 
half its 100,000 so-caUed active-adult 
fMM u rnnnififtg ate b tiiB Company’s Sun 
CSties pntic^ Ifo icstructuting. b 

wtai^ tire conmany focused on its adult 

/»nmmiiniri«B ^ divestbg botds and 
casbos, is paybg c0. Last y it had 

recosd eamn^ of more than $1 Union. 

Dd Webb tscimeQtiydevelt^mig two 
Sun eSfy rjrtmmimitiflg b Azzzoaa, two 
b Cafironiia, two b Nevada and chic 
eadi b South Caolba and Texas. Flans 
to acquixe lanri nortiiwed of Chica g o 

could result m its first foray nocth. 

Movbg noifo may not be a bad idea. 
Accofdiire to Robert Stoidler, cfaaiiman 
of U.S. &me Corp. b Ikius^ tiie 
secood-lazpest . bauder of reciiement 
cnuniu&ities b Ameica and tire cbly 


mh tt one widely recommended by b- 
dnstxy analysts, 85 percent of retirees 
never leave ttidr hometowns, chooang 
to xemab near family and friends. 

U.S. Hcmie has long been established 
b colder legions, particularly b New 
Jersey, whm it to operated for 20 
years, and is currentiy eiroandbg b 
CUoi^o, C^o and Texas, ft also mao- 
ages more than 50 commuaities b Flor- 
ida and Arizona. Tte comply com- 
pleted l,620TetirerrreDt and active-adult 
homes lartyear, whidt accouuted for 
more fom $260 million b revenue, or 23 
t of tire coomasy's total sabs. Mr. 
expects mb prop ortion to rise 
to 33 percent by the ew of this decade. 

Oirade tire Ibhed States, tire busbess 
b just taldng off. Retiremeot cammu- 
ni to rqxes^ just a fraction of tire sales 
of tire big build^ white the mche pb^- 
ers are privai^ owned. Hiat scenario 
could change lariicany b the next de- 
cade, boweiw, as tire ocBwqu becomes 
entrntiched, bdu^ aiuilysts said. 

fiivestmg m buikfiqg companies foal 
are t argrtin g amg b^ boomers may 
not be a sure tmig, but it b well worfo 
considetfag. Acemfong to U.S. Hortre 
Cotp- ffgb^ people over 50 years old 
own 77 percent of die financial assets b 
tire Ifimed States.Their dbcietionaty 
xta b more foan 20 


per 


perce m 

age. 


tire national aver- 


Profiting From the Coming Shift 


Continued from I^ge 15 

new technologies. It was not 
Luddites, but because we 
^ajsc and had more 


oiiQspeqpio- 

fjjg car industry has not 
iBtaphic lessons from to 

■Teebcoccahad any^idea 

vfaeohecametqi^J" 
was lucky. Once tfaetods 
Hiy., you do not new s 
e than you need a five- 
liat means luxury sedms 
will be to bg 


ibobbo. 

V and service, not pnce» 
woids for an older pop* 

-rail analysis because w 
ores on a r^ular bas^ 
jQjjy of opportunity to 


decide wfoicii ones have what it takes m an 
agbg sodeiy. 

ManiifatoriQ^ lb btenational trade, 
counbdes have an advantage.- H^ 
know to maikeqilaces of younger countries 
becfflse th^ have already esqrericiiced to 
eaiwft demogriqifoics b thi^ own. domestic 
market 

IV i»« bad ptenfy of expexience sitolybg 
household- ftBnitogs to young Sweto as- 
senfolbg foefrfiirthmnesbeto ft strived b 
Norfo America to e^oft a huge new maricet 
of young baby boonrers. 

Ldsure. Qamblw, oot of to fasfesi- 
gcowing Iristo activities b Nath America, 
S a lelailvely easy indnstzy for to iiiyestor to 
follow. Senous and tecre^coal gambfeis 
tend to be people m dirir SOs and 60s \rix> 
have duer^onaty bcoore to afibd 
this pastime. 

Baby boomets aie about to start gobg to 
easinos, bit ihb do» not necessai^ mean 
tiiQr wifi be a good investmeoL-TVe could be 
flooding to mbket. 



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PAGE 18 


^ ItcralbS^ribunc 

Sports 


SATURDAY-SUNDAy, APRIL 5-6, 1997 


World Roundup 


French Test Positive 

SOCCER Bernard Lama, the 
French national goalkeeper, could 
face a two-month ban for smoking 
cannabis, his club, Paris St -Ger- 
main, said Friday. 

“The procedures were not fol- 
lowed,” said Lama, who has asked 
for a second test 

Lama failed a test before 
France's game against Sweden 
Wednesday and was replaced by 
Monaco’s Fabien Baithez, who 
failed a test in 199S and was sus- 
pended for two months. 

• David Garcion has been sus- 
pended for 1 8 months by the French 
soccer federation after testing po^ 
itive for steroids, club sources said 
Friday. It is the longest ban im- 
posed on a French player for dop- 
ing. Garcion. 23. who has been 
playing for Lille on loan from 
Nantes, has appealed and will be 
allowed to play pending the appeal. 

{AFP, Reuters) 

Sa Pinto Suspended 

SOCCER Ricardo Sa Pinto, who 
last week attacked Portugal coach 
Aitur Jorge, was suspend^ by the 
Portuguese league Friday, just days 
after he was barred interna- 
tionals. The league said Sa Hiuo 
would be barred while an inquiry 
took places into the incident. {AP) 

Mets Buy Japanese 

BARBBALi. The New York Mets 
acquired pitcher Takashi Kashi- 
wa^ from the Yomiuri Giants on 
Thursday for cash in the first trans- 
action between the Japanese team 
and a major league organism. 

Kashiwada, 25, participated in 
the Mets' spring training as pm of 
an educational exchange. He is ex- 
pected to join the Cl^ AAA af- 
filiate at Norfolk, Virgiiiia. 

• Pitcher Curt Schilling agreed 
to a S 15.45 million, three-year con- 
tract extension with the Phil- 
adelphia Phillies. In his seven-year 
career. Schilling is 53-52, with a 
3.46 earned run average. (AP) 

Women Target Olympics 

OLYMPICS A women's groi^ 
called on the International Olympic 
Committee on Friday to apply tiie 
same sanctions to countries that 
discriminate against women in 
sport as were imposed on apartheid 
South Africa. The Atlanta^ydney 
Plus Group is taking its cause to the 
United Nations Human Rights 
Commission, which is meeting in 
Geneva. The group says 25 coun- 
tries sent only male competitors to 
the 1996 Atlanta Olymjrics — 
down from 35 all-male teams in 
Barcelona four years earlier. Ten of 
those countries were African, 10 
Asian, tiiree were Caribbean and 
two in Oceania. (Reuters) 

Test Delayed by Rain 

CRICKET Heavy rain Friday 
washed out the opening two ses- 
sions of the fouith test between 
West Indies and India in St Johns. 
Antigua. {Reuters) 


Australia Takes Lead 
Over Woozy Czechs 

Sweden and South Africa Tied, 1-1 


O^Sl^FnmDbpeiehet 

Australia grabbed a 2-0 lead over die 
flu-hit Czech Republic in their Davis 
Cup quarterfinal in Adelaide on Fri- 
day. 

Australia's big servers Mark Phil- 
i^xiussis and Pa^ck Rafter proved tro 
power^ for Martin Damm am stand-in 
David Rikl in overcast breezy ctnidi- 
tions on the Memorial PUtk grass 
court. 

Rikl was pitched into his Davis Cup 
debut as a last-minute replacemem for 

Davis CdpTbnnis 

Jiri Novak, who went down with flu 
ovetni^L 

RaftCT put Australia ahead when he 
beat Damm, 6-1, 7-6 (9-7), 4-6, 6-4, in 
die flrst rubber. Philippoussis then beat 
Rikl. 6-1, 6-4, 2-6, fr4. 

Damm, die highest-ranked player in 
the Czech team, struggled against 
Rafter's accurate first serve and wasted 
a chance to make a break at 3-3 in the 
fourth set 

'Tt was a very, very critical point in 
the match.” Damm said. “It was un- 
fortunate I could not make those 
points.” 

Philippoussis used his rocket service 
to telling effect, hitting IS aces in the 
115 minute encounter widi the gritty 
left-handed Rikl. But the 20-yw-old 
Australian showed a lack of di^pline, 
dirowing away points going for winners 
and totaflng 12 double faults. 

The 25-year-old Czech broke the 
Australian in the third set with the help of 
a deligbtftilly lofted backhand return. 

Sweden 1, Senlh Alriee 1 In Vaxjo, 
Sweden, Thomas Enqvist be^ Gr^ 
Stafford in the first rubbW of its quanerfi- 
nal but Wayne Ferreira squared tte match 
with a victory over Jonas Bjorkman. 

Enqvist, ranked seventh in the world, 
beat the 69th-ranked Stafford, 7-5, 2-6, 
6-4, 6-1. 


‘ T was struggling in the second set.' ' 
Enqvist said. “But in the third and 
fourth sets I think 1 served much better 
than in the first two sets. I found my 
ifiythm agaiiL’' 

Ferreira beat Bjorkman, 3-6, 4-6, 6-2, 
6-7 (3-7^. 

Italy 1, Spain o Omar Camporese of 
Italy fou^t back from a two-set deficit 
to upset Carlos Moya, 6-7 (8-10), 6-7 
(4-7), 6-1, 6-3, 6-3 in the first rubber of 
Aeir World Group quarterfinal in 
Pesaro, Italy. 

Cainporese, 28, who nearly retired in 
1993 following a bad elbow injury, 
needed three hours and 41 minutes to 
win a tense match . 

Camporese, ranked No. 156 on the 
ATP computer, relied on good serves 
and powerful forehands to overcome 
Moya, ranked No. 8 in tiie worid. 

(jamporese lost the first two sets on 
tiebreakers, the first after wasting two 
setpoints. 

But Moya lost concentration in the 
third set (junpotese broke serve in the 
second and fourth games and took the 
set, 6-1. Camporese took command in 
the fourth set and broke Moya twice to 
level tiie match. 

In the decisive fifth set Camporese, 
supported by a nois;^ partisan crowd of 
5,000, made a decisive break in the 
second game with good returns and 
powerful forehands. He then held his 
serve to 6-3 for an unexpected victory. 

■ Coetzer Upsets Champion 

Martina Hingis, the new world No. 1, 
beat T^tiud Probst of Germaiw, 6-2, 6- 
0, Friday in the quarterfinals of Fam- 
ily Circle Magaaoe Cup on Hilton Head 
island, ^uth Carolina. Monica Seles, 
seeded fourth, also advanced, beating 
another German, Anke Huber. 6-3, 6-0 

On Thursday, Amanda Coetzer beat 
defending champion Arantxa Sanchez 
Vicario of Spain, 6-2, 5-7, 6-0, in the 
third round. (AP, AFP, Reuters) 



Thomas Enq vist stretching to hit a backhand against Grant Stafford. 


Bullets Shoot a Few Holes in Bulls’ Invincibility 


CiiB^/iledl^OtrSu^FnmDitpitKlrt 

The Chicago Bulls called it a wake- 
up call. They talked abcMit the need to 
“elevate our game” and “match their 
intensity.” They heaped praise on Rod 
Strickland and Gheorghe Muresan and 
the way tiie Washington Bullets were 
playing tiieir best when the games count 
the most. 

They all agreed that the Bullets had 
made an impressive and riirprisJng 
statement in defeating them, 110-102, 
Thursday at USAir Arena. 

“Give them credit,” Michael Jordan 
said. “They came in and played us 
strong. We really couldn't sttm Rod 
StricUand's penebation, and Muresan 
is a tough guy to move out of tiiere. He 
was able to get some rebounds and just 
put it back iiL When that h^ipens, you 
can't control the tempo.' ’ 

What tiie Bulls graciously didn’t 
point out is that they’re coasting into the 
playoffs, with Coach Phil Jackson at- 
tempting to cut his stars’ playing time. 



Michael Jordan watchii^ the Bul- 
lets cruise to victory over the Bulls. 

What the Bulls also didn’t point out is 
that they played the game wiih just one 
service^Ie Ug man — Luc Lmgley. 


The Bullets won because Muresan 
dominated inside with a season-high 24 
points and 13 rebounds and because the 
Bulls had no one capable of guaidmg 
Strickland, who had ^points, 14assists 
and 7 rebounds. The Bulls got 34 points 
from Jordan but lost the rebounding 
battle decisively. 

cfippen IIS, Magic 04 In Oriando. 
Danick Martin scored 31 points, 23 of 
them after halftime, and the Clippers 

came from behind to sruq) a four-game 
losing streak. 

The loss was the fourtii straight for 
Orlando, which faltered in the second 
half and saw its lead in the race for the 
seventh playoff position in tiie East 
shrink to two games over Cleveland. 

S Rpa fS en iea l 03, Budta 80 In Seattle, 
the Sonics opened a 20-point lead in the 
first quarter and weren’t seriously 
tiireatened the test of the way. 


G^ Payton scored 22 points, Sam 
Perkins 17 and Detief Sdhrempf 13 in 
his first start in more than a month.. 

HMrt 92, Pacers 78 Jamal Mashbum 
scored 23 points, inchiding-16 -siraig^' 
in the fourth quarter, as Miami won in 
Indian^lis and opened a tiuee-game 
lead in the Atlantic Division race. 

Alonzo Mouming scored 17 points 
and Voshon Lenard 15 as Miami swqjt 
the season series for the first time. 

Hornets 08, Nets 87 Matt (jdger had 
1 1 of his 18 poinis in tiie third quarter, 
when visiting Charlotte ontscored New 
Jersey by 26, and Glen Rice scored 1 7 of 
his 24 points in the second half as die 
understren^ Hornets ralliedfrom a 12- 
point deficit to win. 

W sf rior s 108, MOTwfrIrs 90. NBA 
commissioner David Stem scxhdiow 
felt tills game was wortii his.v^e, and 
he sat in tiie stands in San Jose and 
watched Latrell SpreweD score 2Spomts 
as Golden State sent Dallas to its season- 
high ninth strai^ loss. tiP) 


Upsets Decide 
EuroLeague’s 

Final Four 


By Ian Thomsen 

/jitf nwiMwa/ Hera ld Trib me 

Three winner-take-all games in ibd 
EutoLeague baskeftball quarterfinals 
pnxluMa tiiree upsets and a brouhaha 
over refereeing. 

None of the top seeds advance to tiie 

European Final Four, to begin in Rome 
on April 22, where the semifinals will 
mafffh Barcelona against the most un- 


likely ccouen^. ViUeurbaime of 
loanee, and tiie Greek champion 
Olympiakos of Ptiaeas will 
fMimp ija Ljubljana of Slovenia. The 
wirmeis will meet two days later for the 
championship. - 

Two of die survivors {xovided huge 
surprises Thursday, a ni^tt wfaen all of 
the favored hmne teams lost titeir de- 
cisive quarteifinais. 

The rmlians were especially annoyed^ 
because two of the losers were Mften 
and TeamSystem Bttiomia. Hiot losses 
ended the possibiliQr of an Italian team 
w inning the Europe eh am p i onsto 
for the first time sinoe die 1987 and 1988 
Milan teams in^itied by Bob McAdoo. 

Milan was smothered. 77-61, by vis- 
iting Ljubljana, a club of great oamdon 
and tirdess defense. Ljnbijaiia will be a 
good dark hoTSe to wiD tiie tide. The 
Sloveniatis’ deqi beoefa and endless de- 
fensive nessnre will provide a difficult 
test foe Olym^oakos, stiiich is probably 
the most talented team in the Final 
Four. 

Olyrunakos, which clinched its 
quartmmial eariier in die weidc agmns^ 
its crosstown rivaL PanatiunaDros or^ 
Athens, is piloted Da^ Rivers, tiie 
American point ^ard (fonneriy of 
Node Dame) who as a free agmt is 
eager to affira his value by vrinnk^ a 
ctiamiMonship. Rivers has been criti- 
dzed .in Greece for not being a team 
player, bat now- he can have die last 
wc^ His instiDcts to tate it to the hoop 
himself might pTove oucial against the 
deftnrive pressure. 

Bdiogaa fdl, $7-62, to Barcelona in a 
s^es ihar was virtually decided W a 
referee’s whistie two ni^ts earlier. Bo- 
logna believed Tbesday iti^ that h had 
woo die pl^ff on a last-second tinee- 
poinier Dan Gay. The referee ruled, 
however, that the riiot didn’t beat die 
buzzer. The Italian league prerident. 
Angelo Rovati, said his clubs and dieir 
fimswerebong^^takenforaiide.** ' 

Barcelona obiriously felt Iktie sym- 
pathy, stiH believing it was rc^tixed 
of last year’s Europ^ Champkniship 
by a refereeing decision to allow a 
game-winning block by Stojko 
Vrankovic of I^athinaikos in die last 
second of the final. Replays showod 
diat Vrankovic had prdnttiy been guili^ 
of goaltending. 

The biggest shock of all was sufiered 
in Istanbul by Efes POseri. whiefa was 
omwmked in the second half of its 62- 
57 loss to Villgnrhflnne. Mmy bdScved 
tiitt Efes Pilsen oronld win tiie tide ti^ 
year bdiind its Macedonian point guard, 
Peiar NaumoskL The opportunity will 
go instead to Villmzbann^ wliidi has 
overcome injuries to its two centers by 

exploiting tha paeging gatw. ai>y«ng 

the teams headed to tiiennal Ikiixr. 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Stawdiiiqs 

AMmCANllAOIII 

BASTOmSKM 



W 

L 

PCX 

GB 

Brrinmore 

2 

0 

1JKID 

— 

Boston 

1 

1 

ADO 

1 

New York 

1 

1 

ADD 

1 

ToieniB 

1 

1 

SCO 

1 

Dehoit 

0 

3 

jm 

2'A 


rmNmALDmsKM 


/Minnesato 

3 

0 

1JI00 

— 

Oilago 

1 

1 

Boe 

1>4 

devetand 

1 

1 

s» 

Ilk 

MBweukei 

0 

1 

MO 

2 

Kansas Oiy 

0 

2 

JOM 

2M 


WBSTHVKION 



Tssa 

1 

0 

1.000 

— 

Anetwlm 

1 

1 

500 

Vv 

OeklerMi 

? 

1 

BOO 


SeoNie 

1 

1 

ADO 

IV 

■•neiiALtiMn 



eASTonnsNiN 




w 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Heride 

3 

0 

IJM 

— 

Montreal 

3 

0 

1J)00 



Attonta 

1 

2 

J33 

3 

NewYOri: 

1 

2 

J33 

2 

PMIedelphlB 

1 

3 

J33 

2 

CEinRALDIVISiaN 



andnneB 

2 

1 

467 


Heuskn 

2 

1 

467 

— 

PKisfaufgh 

1 

1 

JOO 

Vi 

Chkego 

0 

3 

JNN 

2 

SLLouls 

8 

3 

MO 

2 


WESTDmSKm 



LaAngstas 

2 

1 

467 

— 

Sen Dim 

2 

1 

*67 

— 

Son Rondsa 1 

1 

*00 

M 

Crtoredo 

1 

2 

433 

1 


raSBSMT'l UNI sceus 


AMERICAN LEAOUE 

CIWEIaiBl V30 IM NO-4 « I 

OaMund in Ul Ola-S I 0 

Kenhiser. M. Jaefcsen (5), Plunk (7). 
Assennweher (B) and Beiden; WJldam, 
TdBlwder <5)< R. Lewis (8i. Toylor t9> and 
Gawnams. w— R. Lewis. 1 -a L~Plunk, 0- 
1. Sv— Taylor (I). HRs— Cleveland, Mttchell 
I2>. OaldOfid. McGwire (1), Genoa O), 
KoBsosCily IN 030 no— ) o i 

Bainmoie 2M eii 0 3 x— < » 1 

RosodCk J. Walker (7), J. Montgernery (0) 
and Sweeney. Speiir (8): KomleniedcL 
TUuaihewe (5), Rfiodes (7>. RoJMyen <9) 
and Holies, weoaer (9). W -Rnodes. 1-0. 
L— MonJoameo', 0-1. S My ers U), 
HRs— Kansas Oiy, J. Bed (1). BoMmoffc 
Pobnelradl. 

Detratt 032 IM 0N-« 14 2 

MhineMtn 072 NT OOl— 10 10 I 
Blair, P. Hemondai <2), J. Cummings 13], 
Sager (fiL M. Myers (7), Lira (8) and B. 
Johnsoa- Aldred. Rlldile M, Tramway (T), 
Guardado (91. NouHy (9) oW G. Myers, 
w— Riicnia 14X L— Blair. 0-1. S—Noiitty (I). 
HRs— Oeiroft T. Qoik (1). Mlnnesoto. 
MoOtor (IL Lawton (1). 

Bastoe 000 MO ODD— • S 0 

Anaheim 000 oh IIs— 2 7 0 

WabefleM Hammond (81. TrOeek (8) 
and Hasehnoa Hotwoerg (8){ Oldwon 
ond Pabiegob W— Dicksaiv 1-0. 
WDkeneM.0-1. 

NAHONAL LEAGUE 

Colorado ON ON ISO-7 8 0 

Ondnoli NO ON 001—1 6 I 


MLThoiiipsoa Reed (S), RufBn (9) and 
Monworhig; Sdiourek, Sullivan (4. Merdmr 
(4), BeRnda Ui, RemBngw (8) and Fonlyce. 
W— ML Tharniim 14L L— Setnurak, 0-1. 
HR-CotoiDda Walker (2). 

New York BN 228 000—4 8 8 

San Diego IN BN ON— 1 7 1 

Jones, Frana (9) ond Hundey: 
VkdeitBielD, Cunnone (6), Beigmai (8) and 
llem oo dez. W Jone» 1-0. L— VolenzuWa. 
0-1. HR— New YWK Glkey 0). 

SLLeirtl 282 ON HB-^ 7 2 

Meetreol 023 020 28)1-9 14 1 

ALBeneb Ludwldi (5), Poseos (6L 
Eckeisley (B) and SheoRen Pern, Veras (Q 
and PleMier. W— Perez, 1-0. L—ALBensb 0- 
I.' HRs— SL Louis. Ybung (1). Montreal, 
Andrews (IX Seoul OX While n>. 

Q tf cege 818 8N Nl-J 7 0 

FleittB SN ON 031-8 18 2 

CoMa BonenfleM (5}, Wendell (7), RdIos 

(8) and Sannls,’ fti ii ui ide i. Cook (7), Pewel 

(9) and Johnson. W— Femondeb 14. 

L-CostUlOk 0-1. HR-Rorldcb CoWne (1). 
AtlaNB ON ON 120-3 2 0 

HeuslDB ON ON 000-3 • 0 

Gkwlnb BieieekI (8), Wbhien (8) and 
Lopes, Peraz (8); Kle. Springer (9) and 
EioeblG Ausmis (9J. W— Glovinei 1-0. 
L— Kllb 0-1. HR— AnanM, McGriff (1). 
Phflnticrgllle ON IN 800—1 S 2 

lOtAagslH ON on 08>-2 7 1 

M.Letter. Ptontenbero (7). R. Harris (7) 
onri Parent; I.IMMes, IMnsky (OX Holl (BX 
Gulliile (B). TaWeneO (9) and Plena. W— I. 
Valdez, 1-a L— W. LeRer. 0-1.S— Td.Wonell 
(1). HR— LosAngele& Piazza (1). 

Ptttsbuigh ON Ml 800-5 10 0 
Sa Praoebco 310 2N 01»-7 9 0 
CNkft lAWntiQuse (4), Gnmger (S). 
WMns (6). Rincon (7) ind Xendolh 
O.Femands. OeLucki (6). Rodriguez (6). 
Tovom (71. Henry (BX Poole (9), Bede (9) 
and WBkbn. w— (X F emondez, 1-0. 
L— CookA 0.1. S— Beck (1). 

HRs— Phtsburgh, M. Johnson (2). Son 
FrondsCG Kerri Q). 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Standinos 



Anjumc DnraoN 



w 

L 

Pet 

GB 

s-Mioml 

55 

18 

J53 

— 

x-NewVOrfc 

52 

21 

.713 

3 

Oriondo 

40 

a 

A48 

15 

Weshinsien 

a 

a 

*21 

17 

New Jersey 

33 

so 

*15 

a 

Philodelplita 

21 

51 

*92 

avL 

Bcsien 

13 

61 

.176 

4216 


CENTRAL imnsKm 



v-QUoege 

63 

10 

*63 

_ 

«-Delrail 

51 

a 

*99 

13 

«-Atftmk 

50 

23 

*85 

13 

Qiaitene 

47 

26 

*44 

16 

Oevehind 

a 

a 

*a 

25 

imSora 

a 

a 

.479 

H 

MliwDulia 

V 

44 

*97 

34 

Torotse 

27 

47 

*65 

a'A 

WESIERH CeNPEBEIMS 



MOWOST IMVBKm 




w 

L 

pa 

68 

s-Utali 

55 

17 

*64 

_ 

s-Heuwen 

49 

M 

*71 

6M 

MlmeMta 

a 

37 

*93 

19h 

DeBa 

a 

51 

*01 

avs 

Denver 

a 

S3 

*74 

35V) 


SonAidonlo 

18 

54 

*50 

37 

Vancouver 

12 

63 

.ia 

44<6 

pAcncnviaoN 



s4eaMe 

51 

a 

*B9 

_ 

s-LA.Lolwrs 

a 

23 

*85 

16 

s-Peritond 

43 

31 

*81 

8 

Phoenbe 

34 

a 

*66 

1616 

LJLaipptrs 

32 

41 

*a 

18VI 

Sudumento 

29 

44 

*97 

21 Vv 

Golden Stole 

27 

46 

*78 

23V6 


y-dbidied dhMon IMe 
z-cindied playell berm 

miiBmiTiBBiniii 
aorletle 15 B4 34 1^ 93 

New Jersey N 19 lo 33-87 

C Rice 941 44 24, Pleieel-IS 3-3 19; N J.: 
GO 940 54 2L Ceesell 5-15 54 18. 
-»«««»*«— Charlene 40 (Dine 11X New 
Jeney SS (Messenbuiy lOX Assislo— 
Cluilalte 23 (Boguei 9), New Jeney 2 (CM 
CesseNd). 

CMcege 2 N i« 33-in 

wasM e g len 34 24 ia 04-llo 

C: Jordon 1 400 M 3< PIppen 9-1 d M 2di 
W: Strickland 10-15 6-7 34t Mureann IMd ^ 
4 24, ffatwiiililT riilniDn 37 Kafhy. Kukoc 
B). VtaslUnglon 57 (Muresan 13). 
Asil il B O ileaBOPOordondXWn sh lHBtoH 
27(SlricMand1i). 

LA-OIppen 2 2 32 33—113 

Oiteda 31 2 2 15-94 

LAjMOrtIn 10-146-731. IMuoM 5-11 54 
l5lO:HardawBy5-1l 17-192,AndeBoa8- 
19 (M 2. nWiisiH I nil Angeles N 
(Outlaw ICO. Orlando 45 (Hardowey 9). 
AssMs— Los Ang el a 26 (Dehere dX 
Orlando 14 (HardawoyS). 

MloW 2 24 14 25-91 

Indlaa 31 84 15 18-2 

M:Masflbum7-144423;Meumlng7-125- 
417)l:SmN7-l42-31LDJ}OVlsS-101-411. 
RehBimds MI«nl39{M09hbufn71, Indiana 
49 (a Davis 9). Asdsts-Mloml 2 
(Hardaway 11X Indiana 17 (JoeksanS). 
MBiraulM 12 n 13 84- N 

Scotne M 2 2 8C-10I 

M: Rohlnsan 7-1 7 04 1& Brawn 4-9 54 1 X 
Newman 3-13 64 13; S: Pnylon 11-1404 22. 
Peikhis 7-13 14 17. RNends— MOwouka 
51 (Baker a, SeolHa 49 (MdWnmi, Kemp 6). 
Assists— MMveukae 17 (Rebinseo 4. Seome 
N (McMIDan 7). 

ONa 2 2 19 35- M 

GoMnShrie 2 2 N 2— 1N 

D: Harper 8-14 24 IA Pedi 5-13 44 17. 
OonBOVle 6-13 34 171 GJ.: SpnwN 10-18 4- 
4 25 Pike S« 34 Id. BMiaedi DePeT 36 
(Gran 5X CoMm Stole 63 (SmBh 12X 
Asdsk— Oeias 2 (Hoipw 7), Golden stole 
24 (Price a. 


HOCKEY 


NHL SiANiMMas 


BBBIBMI tUmBBMWCM 

ATLANTIC nnnsiOM 

W L T PB «F GA 
»miaddpMa n 2 12 90 259 3N 

i-NewJersey « 21 13 97 26 12 

X-FlDfldB 2 2 15 M 3N IN 

»N,y. Rongen 2 2 10 88 246 217 

WBlrinom N 40 0 « 194 22 

N.Y.Islandef3 2 2 18 68 22 2S 

Tdnipa Bay 2 N 9 67 803 22 

NonrrcAsrBivMeN 



W 

L T 

Pts 

6F 

GA 

r^Bufleto 

a 

27 12 

a 

222 

193 

i^PIthburgb 

a 

a 8 

a 

269 

262 

Atanheol 

29 

34 14 

72 

2a 

264 

OltawD 

a 

34 15 

71 

214 

ai 

Herltard 

29 

37 11 

69 

207 

ai 

Brskn 

24 

44 9 

57 

221 

285 

WBBIBRH6 

am 

MM 

B 



CBrnUL DIVISION 




w 

L T 

PIS 

GP 

GA 

l-OMtas 

47 

a 6 

IN 

239 

181 

x-Delrall 

a 

24 17 

89 

240 

186 

Pheenh 

37 

3S 6 

N 

227 

ai 

SLLouls 

a 

34 11 

77 

227 

235 

CMcogo 

31 

34 13 

75 

209 

203 

Teranto 

29 

41 8 

66 

221 

2M 


FAOHCDIVBKm 




W 

L T 

PIS 

6F 

GA 

z-Celerado 

47 

21 9 

103 

264 

in 

Anobekn 

a a 13 

79 

234 

227 

Etanuntan 

a 

a 7 

79 

ai 

ai 

CMgary 

a 

a 8 

72 

204 

220 

Vbrkouvor 

32 

40 5 

69 

2a 

2SB 

LaAngda 

a 

a 10 

62 

202 

2a 

Son Jose 

25 

44 8 

a 

194 

2M 


tcPndied WvWen IRIe 
edliKtad plovoff berin 

nDMDAVB RISBUS 
HerNBrd 2 2 10-5 

P itttb ei iM i 1 2 2 0-5 

nrit Period: H-KNonen 11,. Z P-Jogr47. 
(pp). Z H-nng 2 (Coseeis) Second Period: 
P-Jetnsan 13 (VMk. KosporalBs} Z P- 
Beraneh 2 (OkzylO L HJOno N (HoOeri 7, 
H-Prtmeau 2 (Koponeo, Odoaon) (pp). 
Yhbd Porferi: P-Lnmleax48 Uogr. Otaussen) 
Z P-Frands N Uegr. LonMux) (pp). ia H- 
Primeou 34 (KhiB, LesdiyNiyn} Oveil iii e ; 
Monk Shots M goeh H- 5-14-144-38. P- ]^ 
16-104-44. Goala: H-Bwka P-WieogeL 
Was hin gton 0 0 0-0 

Ot a n u 1 2 1—4 

Rrsl Period: O-Dolgle 26. Second Perfedb 0- 
Oioake 18 (Pakk. Reddn) Z O-PWfdc 5 
(AlheasuiL Loukfcanen) Third Pwto d. O- 
YdsMn 34 (Aifredsson Dudresne) Shots on 
BOOb W- 5-104-21 . 0- 10-14-7-31. GoNiC 
W-Roirferd. O-Tugnult 
BesMn 1 2 1—4 

N.Y.RaD0Sfs 4 1 0-5 

Pint IM ried . N.Y.- Gieedqr 34 (BeukebaeiiL 
Leekh) Z N.Y.- Grova 2 (Messkr, 
Courmoa Z N.Y.- Beulmtaeem 3 (Messier, 
Graves) 4 N.Y.- Oliver Z & B4lumpei 19 
(Whsea Rey) Secood mtad: N.Y.r Mesrier 
36 7, B-WRson 4 (Stumpet Roy) 8, B-WBsen 
5 (Roy. SlwnpeO Ttahd Period: B4kiter 10 
(Chynowel h ) Shots m gal; B- 13-IM044 
New Ytok 15B447. rntSIrr B-COray. N.Y.- 
Rkhter. 

Toronto 1 I 0 0—3 

OffMI 0 12 0-2 

not Periods T-Kypiea 3 (Zeflkr. Conmey) 
Second Period: T-Yudihevidi 3 IWanhmr, 
SundtaO (pp). TIM Perioih D4banohon 47 
(McCorty. Yzermon) 4, D-Toylor 3 (Kedov) 
Orarttat: None. Shots m geoh T- 7-164- 
1-M.D- 7441-3-36 GeoBa: T-Petvm. O- 
Osgood. 

W.Y.Iriondirv 2 0 3 0-4 

SLtMb 1 2 2 0-5 

RrsIPcrled; N.Y.- PaMy 46 (Green) Z SJ-^ 
Murphy 18 (TurgeoiL Motlean) Z N.V.- 
SmoOnsld N CPelMy. McCabe) (pp). Seeend 
Piriad: 6L.-Leodi 2 (Pdkrtn, Modnids} Z 
Sl--OMihm I (Mtirp(i6 TiiigeonJ (pp). 
THtri Perteri! Zi_-caurma0 17 (Ptengep 
Rm 7, S..L-D0IIIIIIB 2 (Pew8¥i a» 
Coottnao Z N.Y.. Green 2 (Andeiaon) 9, 
N.Y.- BerlidO (AndiBiOn) IA N.Yr PrifFy 


47, Owltare None. Sliets « geek NarYWk 
94-1M— 24. ZL- 10-1Z17-6-44. GoNes 
N.V.-Sala.SJ--Fiihr. 

Chkego l 1 8-2 

EdmenlBn 1 1 2—4 

Fmr Perfed: E-Smym 2 (Murray:, Wdghn 
(pp). z C-KrtvekiDsirr 13 (Amente) Second 
Period: C-Piebert 9 (Cummlnz Oiellos} 6 E- 
Merdimertl 3 (Kevolenke) TMrd Perlids 
Grier IS (CzetkowsM. Mlrenev) (pp). 6 E- 
Buchberger 8 (Wdierdse n ) (en). Shots a 
geefe C- 14.1*4-34. E- 5-9-9-25. rniArr 
C-HeeMt. Esieseph. 

PhotrUc 1 3 1^ 

La Ang ela 2 1 1^ 

Fhst Period: LA-R-VOpof 4 (Stevenz 
Loloyelle) Z LJLJAurray 13 (Shevofer, 
J.Vepet) Z P-TtadHik 48 (Jaimes 
NumnWren) (pp). Stand Period: P-Remdno 
1Z. & P-Gortiwr 2 CJenney^ Tkeehua 6 
LA.-Betg 1 (Fenuz OievalBi} (pp). 7, P- 
Numnrinen 2 (Jenne^ Garhwr) Thbd 
Perieft P-YkndHJk 49 (Roenk*. DMudd 
(enl.ZLJLGmylhZShols on fed: P-12-13- 
9-34. LA- 157-9-31. ffrmBrr P- 
KtaUbuOn. LA-5lerr. 


CRICKET 


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SR LANKA VS. rWOPWI 
nOOAV, M SHAAJAR UAE 
Sri Lenka Innings: 24ZB(»eveia) 
PoMshm innkigs: 22*9 (N ever*) 
Sri Lenka wen by 19 lura 


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Auddend 2Z Conlerauiy 2 

M CANeBIRA, AUSTRALIA 
AuanBon CBpowTemiBwSA ReeShiM2 



ssmiAu sseeiHMriB 
Boroetom Z La Polmas 0 
(Baraekm win 7-0 en oBgregaW 
iHHMaeiBcap 
lndaZUztackMnn2 


TENNIS 


Davis Cup 


WOBUOROUP 

(MIAfnERPUUaS 
BVABBLABK, AUSTHALU 
Pel Ralkb AusbnlkL del. MoiBn Demm, 
Oedi RepuhflQ 6-1, 74 (9-7). 4-6 M Mart: 
PhMppeiiesiz Ausboflo. det David RM 
QXdi RCPiMC, 4L44, 24. 64. 

Aushnta ieodi (tell RepohOc 3-A 
eeeoNDiwuND 
iMVAXiamresriN 

Thema engvN. S weden dot Gnid 
StoflORl Seiilh Aftka 74 24 6-4 5-1 . 
Swedm leads Soum Aftka 1 -0. 

6imGMFncANzoNe,sBceNPiio(nB 
AueMo lends Croeno2-A 


Slovakia leads Israel M. 

Belgium and DernnericBed 1-1. 
Zimbabwe kadi Great Brthdn 1-0. 

A8UUOCEANIA ZONE, fVMrr ROUND 
New Zoolond teods mdoneeta 24X 
Seum Korea leads CM»24X 


TRANSITIONS 


MNMU 

MAJOR LBABUB BASGBAU. 

AHKCAMLfARlE 

TEXAS -Pirn B vn oortt on 15doy dfo- 
obM 1st lebumJIve to Mordi 2. Bought 
canbDd ol OP MIN Shnms hem OHohonia 
OhL AA. Sent INP Dove SIvestrt eulrfgm to 
OMohoiMCny. 

NATIOIIAL LEAUW 

iLY. METS-Boogm cenbad el LHP 
IWoMhl Koshfvrada Bom me Tokyo VOmfciil 
Gienis of Jepoira Central League. 

PHUADEtPHU -Agreed to tenns wMi 
RHP Curt Sdi N ng en 3-yeer eentrect e» 
tenslen thraugh 20oa 

■ABOIMU 

RmONAL BAtoCEIBAU. ASneeunON 
EBAp-nred Orlande Magic G Brian Shew 
SZONtormoimigeBsGenogasluntohedi- 
Ing tan Oder Tueedey nlgld% gome. 

cmcAde'-4lgnedCBftanWBBaiiisilBrie- 
mdaderersansan. Pure BH wennlngtan on 
hdundasfc 

LOS AiHiBUiS AcBvnted F Robert Horry 
ftomlnleradllst 

POOtMMZ 

rUTtOrUU. FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
Atumu-SloiKd DE Mlduel Bankston to 
ene-yeGreenlRtd. 

ATiANTA A gre N k toms wdh OL Jeff 
PWiukM end CB Leruiy MeGta on one-y M r 
cordradz 

nu iTA LB S igned P Mac CeBnz 
QWCAdd- Ro s igned TE RyanWeMghtto 
enoyoercenlrad. 

aNONNATi-SIgned DE Remonde 
StoBtags to 8-yeor eemraa 
OREBN BAY-4lgned TE-C Horper Le fieL 
Signed SMBs Prior. 

INDIANAPOLIS Bgoed DE Al Pontenotto 
4-yeor cuntrad. 

JAdooNviLLE -4lNed WR woe Jeeto 
SML WR Curtis Moish, LB Bmnt Beya 6 
RkA TVtskl OT Chrb Omnmns and s Darren 
Studsat 

MINNSSOTA-Agreed to tomu with R6 
Leroy Heard m 2-year coitttndL R»«taoed 
OTSco trDBI and RB Jama Stewerttol-yeor 
oentmd* 

NEW EHSLAtn — R o leoBe d OG Bdr 
KroldL 

OAraANO -Slgnad OL Danny VBta. 
PHiLADELPtnA -Signed QS Rndney Poele 
toene-yeofcenli uu. 

FfmwncN— Re-Shpwd DE Kevin Heory. 
ST.Ljens— sipwd DLiy Portmt. 

SAN DiEse-SwMd WR Tony Martin to 1- 
yeaoenencL 

SAN nurtosGO -4lened PK Jen BWrer to 
Iwu yeui'uiiihuLL 

SSATT1.B— Traded 1997 Id^eund. 2nd- 
raund, 3d-raund end 4RH«und dmir pkhs to . 
the Adento Fefc ane tor 1997 let-round and 
3n9iDunddrsEpldC6 

HO CI CET . . 

mnOHALNOCNErLAABUE 
niiL SuRiendod Smi Jose F Andral 

Nonoytorttc gnma tar phyMcBl nbuM Of 


onctab durtop gome OR Mendi 26. 

EDMONTDii-RecDltod LW R^ inlranu^ 
vefram KemlleA AHI- Rehimed LW Santa 
MooratoKeRrilton. 

SAN JOSE necoBedGWadenWieflyBem 
Kentucky, AHL 

TuiPA HY -4lpwl G Dam Puppe ft 
llua-yeui uuiUulL 

VAEcewn -sent LW Lony Oemvflto to 
Syraeua.AHLJjoaMd DZenlHi KemotnlsM, 
D OW CObano ond LW Peler Sdruetar to 
SyimozAHL 

•ASHtNETOH-RMiatonedGMarcSeBger 
to Hampton RooN, ECHL 

COlUM 

NCAA G uaend e d IMarqualte merA bos- 

tolbal coadi AWe Deane hem ceocMia in 
ftsMwnd or nad yeoR tournoiiient tar his 

behavior durtog ftsLieund mokfiup wUi 
Pie» fcl a Hi. k 

aiiaiuuTi-Anneunced P Danny Prison 
wa glw up Ms ftrol year or oBglbny and 
enter ttie NBA draft. 

INDIA W A P OIB Nomed Todd Stnigeen 
metre boshelbdl andL 

iNDtAEA STATE-NenMd Roya Wblbmi 
menh boshslball eeadL 

Lso-Releaid 6 Tetrana anmens hem 
the bG8kelb o5 team m be eon minster to 
enethersetooL 

OHIO STATB-NoHiBd Jim OBiten mem 
heihetheB auUL 

TBMnE-Announeed CMmc Jedmen wM 
ghre im Ms ItoW yar a ellglbaiy end oiriM- 

NBAtauft. 

TENWE M CE - Nu i iieii Joiiy Gram mem 
beskabofl CBOdL 


QiiMBiuiiv8.ambabu(n;6ioup& Gabon 
vs. Monccer Group CONCACAP teHte, 

Cenede vs. B SMunder.. 

cytUHB. Beighnn— World Qqe Tour of 
nonderaCtame. 

ATHLETICZ Pish— PmhbltafB B lta l l U l 
MmattMiL 

RSdBYDiiioiL SydnmAusbuBa— Suptr 
1Z New SouHi Wkda vs. Nartbsm 
‘nansvaoL 

MONPJtt^ApilIL? jl.i 

TBiMK BrieiZPeitugal'— ATPT bud 
E starl opea thmgh A^ 1Z Hong Korn 
— ATP Tew Soteffl OpiiL RseoMi April 1 te 
New DeltaX InWa— ATPTewGeM Rohe 
Open, ttaaogh April iz AnwMe Nto4 
Horldo — WTA TeuD Bdusdi and Lamb 
Chompfenslihs. ttniitfi AprI .IX 

Tuasbiw, ApihlS 


sDceaiL vurteitssiiB— UBmoa, 
semHInriB M toh hdvJMBoa Ohriy) vs. 
AS Memcm Thn^ (SpobD Vi. sehoke (M 
(Sennony]; Brnrefti — Wtarid Cup 
quonytag, Asia, ilisr nun4 Giaap z ftsP 
taKBalmtebJaidahUiMAim- 
En*ata6VnugbAgrt14.Vbfto»Mtas— 
Cops Ltaertodorss,AstiDimd, Group 1> 
GwhoM {Poaguay} vs. Beterer (BoBvIa}; 
Gnep to Rseteg (AtgstriBto) vs. Emslee 
(Ecuodor); Group 3:Oeparllw (M 
Kotambla) vs. Nodo oe l (Uroguoy). 

CEteKET, .inhreiniibulhSoolhAlWee— 
mw ikiybihMiiuHuiiutSoBlIiAhtauvs. 
AusboBa. 


The Week Ahead 


SwnmpAY, Apim.5 


CMOCEr, Durban — Soutti Aftka vs. 
AwhoBz fturth one-day fntormitonab 
Vorfow Nee- ICC Trophy, itoough AptO 1Z 
TEENiz HBkn Homseuttiairellna- 
WTA Teub AmBy Otde Cup. ihrooBh April 
6r various dta — Oovfs Cup. second mutitt, 
United Stata vs. NeHiettoads AusbaRa vs. 
Csodi RepubBw Italy vs. sputa; seum Aftka 
vB. svredere Belgium vs. OeranoriB Brikto 
vs. Zimbabwe StavMde VA hreel: Auebto 
w.Oodta; Indonesia vs. New Zeolenm 
CMtie vs. soum Kerem Iran vs.lblwan; 
Lebanon vs. Thdtanm (tonoda vs. 
ItanaiMe am VA AigsiriBim Cetainbta vs. 
nrur Paraguay VA Uragiiay, 

COLA Now Ottaans—UA. PGA TtoK 
^apmPMcDMtnoir Oossto ihteugh Apts A 
tutoerumotL Brisbane— supw 13 
tournament Queeaiend VA OtaoA 
sooss, 

Vvtaw sBa - Wertd Cup QaaWying, 

AftkA seand mmA (Sraup L MgM VA 
Gubwai Groop Z Skm Leone VA GtaNL 
Smwpay,Apiul6 


soeaiL WOmbiORBigland— leosue 

... I Is l uil l ll 
VMsBa-wertdOipQuaftytog, 
Alta em tounZ Group 1. Ketiyo w 
BvrMPBflta Gi^ ZLIberiavA Egypt 
NaoMbta VA Ttmtam (Sreup z Conge VA 
South AflfOD Group 4 AngetaVATbga ' 


WBMiaaajiY,AP8ML9 

soocBLVbrieusaltoe— Bnpeon ^ 
Oremplene Cuyt semnnalB flist leg, A|BC 
(Nethertenda va Juva d u s Ohriy), Borussta 
Peritnwd (G en natTy) vAMmdresler 
UidtodfEngton^HoroeZhnbabwe- 
Wertd Cup QuuOiytBff AftkB. socend inonm 

Group Z Zdn VA ZeiidHA 

TMimapNiifiAwiiLlO 


seesR, VbitaueeBesi-^EumpeenCup 
Wlmss' Cup, leaiMMiA IBsT taA PC 
Barestana(SpMn)VAFtorwdb»(nBlyZ ' • 
PwiASt Getmota (Prancnl VA LfvorpMl 
(Bngl^. 

mKKer.CsmurtonPathSaomAftla— 
enedaytatamaflonak Bourn MIrkDVA 
AuMraao. 

terhia Lmden— OP^QiiLdtowtar 
quefllylng round of WMdGteupL . 

88UL A ugudA G eei ^ r-MdilbMotL 
UA. JWostari, flupugh ApM 13.. 

FamAT^APiMLlI 

soecBL various sBa Com 
l-teertodomA Ibto rounrk Group 1: Ctoto 
P9>tefl8(miaguDy)«ABama'(Ba0via}i' 

2: Item sondeid CteHeMM VA 
Emetac Ceitadet); Ota « Duaho 
<BraN) VA Sperma QNDl (PBU); Group s 
MMonariaCCelaitibBGvANadBaal 
(Untgony). 

(weE EZ C eerge i owi— GuyenevAlnJA 
1teaugbApiB14. 

eucoYmiioiL North Hartour,New 

&8tand— suporistaunaaerit WWknl u 

vANaM 


6 
















IHXERNAXIONAL herald tribune, SATURDAY-SUNDA]i!; APRIL 5-6, 1997 

SPORTS 


PAGE 19 



2 Teams Suspected of Dod^mg Payroll Tax 


■mm 

m 

i 






•1 




^^bsUngUHiFost Service 

■ BALTIMORE — Basebdl nffiniaie - 
say tbey sos^ that the BaMmoce 
Orioles and &e Florida Mariins dr- 

cmnveiited the foies of the newpayroD 

taxatiOD '^stcni ^™^T Kjhi g con- 
tract extensions for Cal Ripken and 
Gary SbefGeid on Wednoday. 

Because dM deals woe annoimced 
after April 1 , die teams win nothave to 


announced before April 1, ^ new 
average enmuil valnes c£ dtt playeis* 
contracts would have been taxed diis 
season. 

Baseball's leaders have no ]dans to 
invcsticate tematierbecanse they do 
not feu they would be al^ to prove 
aiw wronging, baseball sources 
said. 

‘Do I believe they had those duds 


man $15.1 nnllion, with a third-year 
team option that ccmid make the deal 
wordi $18.9 million. Also on Wed- 
nesday, the Mariins announced that 
ShefiSeld bad signed a six-year, $61- 
millicffl ejctenskm. 



deal was com|deted just before game 


pay any additioual money this year, befeire? Yes;'* a top baseball ofGdal ' time, tod assistant general manager 
Under the tax system, the five fatd.**Rmiw»iam7»M«Dtnnmveh Kevin Malmie denied that there was 


system, the five 
teams witii tiie Ug^t payrolls ate 
_ assessed a 35 percent poi^ on all 
mcmey dsvtXM to plaj^ conqKsi- 
' ' sation above $51 miiKnn. a ph^er*s 
salary is considered to be the avenge 
annual value of his contract, not^ 
. actual salary for the season. 

If the cmtract extensions bad lyg n 


said. * ‘But how am 1 going to prove it 
if the pliers, the ^ents and the teams 
an say othowise?” 

On Wednesday, fee Qiudes an- 
nodnced muaetfiately after a 4-2 sea- 
soQ-memng victory over tiie Kansas 
Gty Royals that Riplren bad amced ^ 
a two-year connact extensianferou^ 
1999 feat guarantees the third base- 


Kevin Malmie 
an ^reement before then. 

' wasn't even 100 percent sure 
when fee game staned," he said. “It 
^vas 95 percent People who think 
thrift was a deal before that dcm't 
know what they're taDdng about 
“I know fee timing is strange," he 
mntinnwt ‘^But tbsTs usuaily wbui 


things happen, ri^ before a dead- 
line." 

■ No Orioles^ Game in Cuba 

The U.S. Treasury Depanroem has 
denied a request by fee Onoles owner, 
Pete Angelos, to his team to Cuba 

next fall saymg it was inomsisient 
with U.S. policy toward the coui^. 

The St raul Saints, an unafOlia^ 
minor le^ue baseball team, were also 
denied permission lo visit Cuba, 
which h^ been under U.S. embargo 

since 1961. 

This was the second time that the 
Orioles have applied for permissioD 
to go to Cuba and play an exhibition 
game. 

The spplicatioD last year was also 
refused. 









* -• 


i 


Fernandez Enjoys 
His Homecoming 



The Rangers' Niklas Sundstromu left, fighting for the puck with Anson Carter. 


Dm AModrtid Ftas 

Ken Caminiti of the Padres waiting at third base for the ball and Bernard Gilkey. 

Molitor Slam Gives Twins a Sweep 


The Associated Press 

Paul Molitor, asked to ex- 
plain his third career grmid 
slam, kxdEed to the stars in- 
stead of himself. 

"h's not somediing feat I 
have done very fte^renily. 
Maybe it's fee comet. I don't 
know what to attributeit to,'!,, 
be said after Mhmesota heal 
Detroit, 10^ Thursday ni^ 
ghriDg fee Twns a seasoor 
opening feree-game swew. 

Demnt took a 3-0 lead in 
fee seccHid inning on a lu^ 
scoring angle Melvin 

Moves, a passed ball by Scott 

Aldred and a groundont by 
Brian Johnson. 

But Matt Lawton t^ it 
wife a thiee-nm homer in the. 
l>otton» of the inning oft W3- 
Ue Blair, and Molitor bit bis 
first gra^ slam since Jnty 5, 
1994. . . 

The seven-nm inning matt 

a winner of Todd Ritchie, 
u4io pitched his first game in 
fee majors. 


“Th^’Il remember him 
getting tiiat grand dam, and I 

jnVtnT-irtff i 1n a9 sifeim* ** RltCh* 


jesaid.*THketiiaL" 

W ith Hs parents watdnng 
fiom bdnnd honie plate, be 
replaced starter Scott Aldred 
to start fee fourth with Mm 

AL Kowwa up- 

nesote leading, 9-5. Bitdbie 
allowed a-sn^Je on Ins first 
jfech and a miirscoring 
doable on bis seccmd, but 
gave cnily more hit for 
the iieact three innings. 

. It was the 22d loss in fee 
last 24 games for the Hgias, 
^hrttng to the end of last sea- 
son,, a^ jntcih^ was the 
mam cntaiint agaiiL Detroit al- 
lowed ei^U walks and 19 
in 24VS mnings during the 

aMara 

ItfoGvrire .homeied and Ge- 
fonimo . Beiroa brote im 
<M^iH 4nning tie «dfe liis 


second homer in two days of 
tile young season. 

Beuoa harmed into the 
left-field bleachers off Brie 
Plonk with one out in die 
«»ighrti at Oakland. Ridtie 
Lewis pitebed fee dghfe for 
the victory, and Billy Taylor 
fisiriied for fee save. 

briolM a, Rovato 4 Rafael 
Pahneiro bit a game-tying 
iHXDer in the eighth for fee 
imbeaten Orioles and CSiris 
Holies hit a two-nm. two-out 
sin^ oft Jeff Mootgocnery, 
who blew a save for the eijpife 
time in his last 16 dbanoes. 

angate A Rad Sex O Rookie 
Jason IMdcson pitdied a five- 
hitter and Ga:^ Anderson 
drove in the go-ahead nm at 
Ankheim. 

'Didcsoii. who came to 
mrtng teaming horang to be 
feefflh starter in fee Angels* 
.rotation; hwranift the chib's 
No. 2 starter after a qning 
training injury to Chuck Fin- 
ley. 


The Assodaud Press 

Alex Fernandez caro 
ihmiifl h in his much-anticip- 
ated hmnetoum debut with a 
victoiy. 8-^ over the Chicago 
CnbsinMia^. 

rnniiig hit a fijst-in- 
ntng grand slam and Moises 
Alou drove in two runs 

Ml KOBMPUP 

to give the Florida Marlins a 
three-game sweep and 
Fernandez a night to remem- 
ber. 

‘T*ve pitdied in the play- 
offs, and I’ve pitched weU m 
the playoffs," he said. ‘*But 
this was wwngfeiag diffemiL 
There were a lot of pecmle 
who know me in the crowd. I 
could tell when they called 
my name out " 

The Miami native signed a 
$35 mini on, five-year con- 
tract in December after seven 
seasons wife the Chicago 
White Sox. He allowed one 
run in 6% innings before leav- 
ing to a standing ovation fiom 
tile crowd of 3^92, whidi 
incliided dozens of fiiends 
and relatives. 

‘‘It was an emotional feel- 
ing," he said. 

With Fernandez pitching. 
Mariins officials hoped for a 
sellout, but the crowd fell 
nearly 10.000 below cjq»- 
cUy. 

**Ican'twony about tiiat, 
Feroandez said. “Trying to 
get maifir-league hitters out is 
auNigh for me to do." 

Alou, who went 3-for-4, 
singled home Florida's first 
run in the first inmng follow- 
ing a piur of walks. Devon 
While reached first base on an 


ie,andConmefol- 
his third career 


infield 
lowed ... 

grand slam to make it 5-0. 
“Batting a home nm — 

tiioe's Dotiiing like it in base- 
ball,** Conine said. “There 
mi ght be notiimg like it in 
qKUts, especially when the 
bases are loaded." 

Expo* O, Cafdnala 4 In 
Montreal, Shane Andrews, 
Roodell White and David 
Segni homered as the Expos 
comideted tiieir first three- 


game sweep to open a sea- 
son. 

The Expos have won 1 1 of 
their last 15 games a^instSt 
Louis, the dftendingl^ Cen- 
tral chammon. 

Carlos Perez won his first 
start since Sept 22, 1995, al- 
lowing four runs and seven 
hhs in seven innings. He 
TniaceH all of last seasoD fol- 
lowing shoulder surgery. 

Brawaa 3, Aalfoa 2 In Hous- 
ton, Red McGriff ended 
Darryl Kfle's no-hit bid with a 
hmne run in tiie seventh, and 
the Braves rallied for tiieir 
first victory of 1997. 

McGriff’s shot to left made 
the som 2- 1 , and Jeff Blauser 
and Keith Lockhart hit sac- 
rifice flies in the eighth to put 
Atlanta ahead. 

Tom Glavine allowed six 
hits in seven innings for the 
victmy , fee Braves' first since 
diey to(& a 2^ lead in the 
Wttld Series against the New 
Yoiic Yankees. 

RoekiM 7, Reds 1 Laixy 
Walker ke)^ Colorado’s 
first victory this season by 
going 3-for-S wife two nm- 
acoring hits in a six-run fourth 

inning and a solo homer in the 
seventii. 

Mark Thompson, one of 
tiie Rockies’ numer^ pil- 
ing concerns in spring train- 
ing, scattered five hits in sev- 
en umings for the win. 

Hats 4, IteilMs 1 Bobl^ 
JcHoes pitdied eight strong in- 
nings, and John Franco 
worked the ninth as New 
Ycnt avmded a scasai-open- 
ing sweep in San Diego. 

Mets relievers blew laie- 
mntng leads in the first two 
games, but Jones limiied the 
Padres to six bits in ei^t in- 
nings. and Franco closed out 
the niwfe for his 324tii save. 

DodeM* 2 , PhillM 1 1n Los 
Angples, Kfike Piazza 
homeced ai^ Todd Hol- 
landswosth hit an nm-scoiing 
double in the sixfe mning to 
back Ismael Valdes. 

GisBto 7, Ptaatw 5 Jeff Kent 
matched a Career high 
five runs hatred in as San I^an- 
t i ite o withstood Mark John- 
son's first career grand slam. 


Rangers Stoop to 5-4 Victory 
Over Bruins in Game of Goofs 


s l)ar Si^Frrmi Djpji-*>rs 

The Boston Bruins are a bedrock franchise of 
the National Hockey League. Like the Rangers, 
they date to the Roaring '20s. For three de- 
cades. the Bruins have been one of the NHL’s 
better and most consistent teams, always mak- 
ing fee playoffs, somedmes contending long 
itim the tournament for the Stanley Cup and 
even winning it twice in fee early 1970s. 

But they have bottomed out this season ^ fee 
26th-best ream in a 26-team let^ue, the kind 

NHL Roundbp 


of club that, on good ni^ts. lulls opponents 
into playing down to their level. They ac- 
complished this Thursday night at Madison 
Square Garden when the Rangers beat them 

5-4. 

The result guaranteed two things: that fee 
Rangers would make fee playoffs, fee way 
they usually do. and feat the Bruins would 
mi« them for tte first time in 30 years. 

Neither *ft«m had much to be proud of in 
this miserable affair. The Rangers led by fom 
goals but allowed the Bruins to cut the deficit 
to one in the 52d min ute. Thai goal mi^t have 
been the highlight of the nighL 

It was scored by Anson Carter, one of 
sevCTal promising black rookies this season. 
He throuj^ fee entire Ranger team and 
beat goalie Mike Richter on the glove side 
wife a wrist shot. 

Coach Colin Campbell called it ‘ ‘a comedy 
of enois" and said of fee game in general: 
“We got sloroy and loose and disrespectful. 
It was an awj^ 35 minutes of hockey. I don’t 
blame the fans for showing tiieir disgust You 
could nm a coaching clinic fora couple weeks 
wife fee dips fiom that video." 

Richter, who heard a few hoots from tiie 
ftms. said: “We made it hard on ouraelves. It 
was definitely not a pretty game." 

Jeff Beukeboom. who scored one goal and 
on another, explained i^y the 
Rangers got giddy after the four-goal burst in 
the first period. “It's been a Icmg time since 
we had a 4-0 lead," he said. 

Those four were twice as many as they had 
scored in titeir previous three garnes. 

The first goal was typical of fee game's 
goofy quality. As Beukeboom shot fee puck 
from the blue line, he broke fee blade of hu 

stick, which sailed off high against the glass in 

the left-wing corner as the puck wobbled 


nerward. Goalie Jim Carey, out to block the 
shot, couldn’t scramble back in time, so 
Wayne Gretzky retrieved the loose puck and 
deposited it behind the line. 

Se wa tora 4, Capitals O Ron Tugnutt got hiS 
second straight shutout, blanking Wast^gmi 
and improving Ottawa's prospects for its first 
playoff berth. The Senators moved two points 
ahead of Hartford and three in front of fee 
Capitals and New York Islanders in fee race 
for the eighth spot in the Eastern Conference 
playoffs. 

Tugnutt stopped 21 shots against the m- 
jury-plagued C^itals. who went into the 
game without Peter Bondra, Joe Juneau, 
Michal Pivcxika and Chris Simon. By fee third 
period, tiiey also lost RickTocchet with aback 
strain and Kelly Miller wife a concussion. 

isinden 5, BIum 5 In St Louis, Ziggy 
Palffy capped a three-goal, tiiird-penod 
comeback when he stole the puck from Igor 
Kravchuk and scored on a br&tic-in. 

Palffy got his 46fe and 47fe goals and 
an assist for the Islanders, who trailed, 
5-2, after PavolDemitra got his second goal of 
the gam e — and the season. 

Travis Green and Todd Bertuza pulled 
New York whhin one. 

“It's a great feeling right now, with 
everything going ri^t tof us,*' Palffy said. 
“We believe in ourselves.’* 

Oilers 4, Biaefchawiu 2 Mike Grier and Ry- 
an ^yth scored power-play goals as host 
Edmonton vaulted mto a ae for fifth place in 
tiie West 

The victory was fee Oilers’ first on home 
ice over Chicago since 1992. 

Penguins 5» Whalen 5 Keith Primal! S 

second goal of the game tied it for visiting 
Hartford- . . 

The Penguins trailed after two penott, bte 
rebounded for a 5-4 lead on Mano Lemieux 8 
61 1th career goal and Rod Francis's 26th of 
fee season, a power-play goal. Lemieira's 
45tii goal moved t'ire past Bobby Hull into 
sixth place on the NHL career list 

Maple Leafs 2, Rad Wings 2 Brendan Sha- 
nahan and Tim Taylor scored tiiitd^riod 
goals, lifting Detroit to the tie in the Red Wings* 
fifth consecutive overtime game. The tie 
clinched the third spot for Detroit in the West 

Coyatas 5, Mnga 4 Keith Tkachuk fco^ 
twice and an assist as the visiting 

Coyotes took over fouitii place in the WesL 

' (NYT,AP) 









08 - vwir nearest BT office 

orrepresenttWe- 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUND.^, APRIL 5-6, 1997 


DAVE BARRY 


Income Tax Advice 


M iami — it's time for my annual 
tax-advice column, which always 
draws an enthusiastic response frorn 
grateful U.S. readers. 

“Dear Dave," goes a typical lener. 
“Last year, following your advice, 

I was able to receive a large tax refi^ 
simply by claiming a S43.000 business 
deduction for 'paste.' I am cunendy 
chained to a wall in a federal j»ison, 
but they tell me that, with good be- 
havior. in 23 years they'll remove the 
skull screws. Thanks a 
lot!” 

Yes. helping people Jhe IRS 
IS what this column is 
all abouL That's why want to r 

today I'm going to start anvthina 

by answermg a question umig 

chat taxpayers are con- hyphenat 

standy asking, namely: 

“When writing a letter 

to the IRS, shoiild I use hyphens?’’ 

Not if you can help iL I base diis 
advice on a Washington Post news item, 
sent in by alert reader Bob Pack, con- 
cerning an internal memo distributed ^ 
the IRS counsel's finance and manage- 
ment division. This memo, accor^g to 
the Post, stated that the deputy chief 
counsel. Marlene Gross, “doesnot want 
to receive any memorandums, letters, 
etc. with hyphenated words.” 'This was 
followed 6y a SECOND memo, vriiicfa 
stated that Gross "does not want hy- 
phenated words in letters, memos, un- 
less it is at the end of die sentence.” 

The Post item does not say why the 
deputy chief counsel feels so strongly 
about hyphens. But it's quite comnuKi 
for people to develop hostility towaid 
certain punctuadon nuiks. I myself fly 
into a homicidal ra^ when Z see busi- 
ness names featuring apostrojAes cxi 
either side of die letter "n,” such as 
“The Chew 'n' Swallow Cafe.” Many 
historians believe the 1970 U.S. invasion 
of Cambodia was a direct result of the 
fact that Richard Nixon received a memo 
containing a semicolon. The important 
thing for you the taxpayer, to remember 
is ttet if you write a letter to the IRS 
finance management division, and 
you MUST use a hyrrihen. you shcnld 
place it at the end of the sentence, as 


Kisses From Nantucket 

Reuters 

NANTUCKET ISLAND, Massachu- 
setts — Beachcombers picked through 
thousands of Hershey fosses. Tootsie 
Rolls and other candies that washed up 
on Nantucket Island after a container 
ship lost its cargo in heavy winds. 

Most of the cargo aroarendy sank and 
the ship continued to Baltimore, but the 
treats washed up on ^ Massachusetts 
island. "There's evety choice of candy 
you could ever imagine washing up in 
the surf.” said Police Chief Rudolph 
Norris. “It's pretty much a mess.” 


The IRS does not 
want to receive 
anything with 
hyphenated words. 


shown in these tw'o e.xampJe sentences 
provided by the American Association 
of Tax Accountants Wearing Suits: 

WRONG; “You fat-heads will never 
catch me!” 

RIGHT: “You will never catch me. 
fat-heads!” 

Speaking of rinance and manage- 
ment, I have here an Associated Press 
story, sent in by many alert readers, 
concerning a congressional audit of the 
IRS. The key fmding. according to the 
story, was that the IRS 
“cannot properly keep 
does not trillion 

, it collects each year.” 

eceive isn't th^ ironic, taxpay- 

wif-h ers?TbeIRS — the very 

same agency that ex- 
ed words. ^ maintain 

detail^ records of 

everyfting but your toe- 
nail clippings — can ' t keep track of $ 1 .4 
trillion! Although I’m sure there's a 
good reason fair this. They probably 
nave their hands full at the IRS, whm 
with this hyphen crisis. 

But enough about punctuation. Let’s 
answer some other common taxpayer 
questions, using the popular Q-and-A 
format: 

Q. Are you saying thaL as a taxpayer. 
I DON’T have to maintain detailed re- 
cords of ray toenail clippings? 

A. Not if they account for 4.7 Mrcent 
or less of your Adjusted Gross Bodily 
Debris, which you are of course re- 
quired to report quarterly on Form 
^38-YUK (not available) unless you 
are a single taxpayer Cling jointly or 
vice versa, whichever comes Ctsl 

Q. Are we EVER going to have a 
foleral tax system chat cellar people 
can understand? 

A Our top political leaders here all 
voiced strong support for this idea. 

Q. So you’re saying it will never 
happen? 

A. Right 

Q. 1 have been trying without success 
since 1962 to get tim>ugb on the IRS 
taxpayer Assistance Hoc Line. I un- 
derstand that the IRS now also has a 
help site on the Internet. 

A. That is correct. Now, in addition to 
failing to receive help by phone, tax- 
payers can fail to receive additional help 
by tt^giuisuccessfully to connect with 
tbt RS World Wide Web site at http;// 
www.bunchoCetters.gov. 

Q. When you write columns like this, 
don't you worry that the IRS is going to 
get ticked off and audit you with an 
electron microscope? 

A No. because the guys and gals at 
the IRS are a fun bunch, and they know 
I'm just kidding around. “Ha-ha,” is 
their reaction, i^ess they work in the 
finance and mai^ement division, 
wtere their reaction, if they know 
what’s good for them, is “Ha ha.” 

^1997 T7ie Miami Herald 

Dunibuted l>y Tribune Media Samlcei /nc. 


A ^Washington Novelist’ Dissects Capital 


InierTuitional Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Ward Just is one of 
America's best novelists, with a 
sur^ooted probity, wit. and sense of 
where the country has been and is. The 
New York 'Times once called him a 
contender for the title of "national 
novelist’ ' but be is less known than he 
should be. perh^s because he is not a 
writer who can be pigeonholed, which 
doesn't stop critics ^m trying. 

The usual epithet is “Waslwgton 
novelist” although he reckons that 
only four of his 11 novels have been 

MARYBLU>ffi 


fitf 


set there, including “Echo House.” 
which Houghton Mifflin is bringing 
out on May 1 . It is true that in such fine 
novels as “TTie American Ambas- 
sador” and “The Translator” the 
mi^ty and untrustworthy hand of 
Washington is felt although the books 
are not set in the United States, and in 
“In the City of Fear” he wrote about 
the Vietnam War throu^ the Wash- 
ington powers who were its architects. 

But Just's subject, if it can be defined, 
is politics, in the sense of its root. 
polls, encompassing not only the city 
but who is being administrated, why 
and how. 

“Political Washington is virtually 
the tiilid rail of American literamre.” 

Just said on a visit to Paris. ‘ ‘No one's 
ever touched it — not even Theodore 
Dreiser who understands the marriage Just: PoUti 
if you will between capitalism and 
politics better than any American novelist and set all 
his books in Philadelphia, Chicago and Lcxidon.” 
Henry' James spent a couple of seasons staying in 
Lafayette ^uare with Henry and Clover Adams and 
was sufficiently uninspirra (“Washington talks 
alxiut hei^lf and almost nothing else”) to write only 
one short story whose hero is a German diplomat. 

Before writing "Echo House” Just had been 
thinking of the Washington novel as a genie because 
the Oxford University'Press asked him to write a 
preface to the first one, Mark 'Twain’s “The Gilded 
Age” (1873), a satire followed soon after by the 
finest satire of all. “Democracy” by Henry Adams. 
There have been satires since, and tbnUers and 
historical novels and forgotten attempts like “Ad- 
vise and Consent” but Washington has never at- 
tracted die finest writing talents, says Just, because a 
knowledge of government is required, not the news- 
paper he^ilines, but how it fimctions, how deals are 
m^e and favors exchanged, what is given and what 
conceded, what terriuxy is gained and what is lost 

“The other, probably more impoitmt reason is 
char Washington, unlike London, unlilrg Paris or 
Rome or Ma£id, has no native intellectual class,' ’ he 
says. In a huge unwieldy country like the United 
States it was perhaps necessary to place the nation's 
capital in a faceless marshland but die result was an 
unreal self-centered city cut off from die rest of the 
country, except of course when its own interests were 
concemeil Even F. Scott Htzgerald noted that when 
Washington was chosen “the intellectual drifted to 
Che Mecropolis and our politics were childi^ ficom 
lack of his criticism.” 

The Echo House of Just's new novel is a fine 







Although Just does not 

Clinton adininistraiion in the book, m 
says it is clear that they don i losow die 
rules. • ‘No, they certainly don i. which 
ought to make them more attractive 

than di^ are.” . , 

Btan near Chicago m 1935. ^t 
says he first learned about power ^ 
his grandfather, a newsp^r pubhsh- 
er “In those days one ot the reas<^ 
you wanted to be a newspapCT pub- 
f:<^y Usher, particularly in a smaU tovi^ 

r A i was by God you can run things. And he 

* told me once, power accumulates m 

^1' direct relation to its nonuse. U s xnucm 

■<f j better to use power not so much di- 

rectly but as a direat. . , 

“I diink that's as succinct a defin- 

I ition of real power as any; I know 
among odier things it s 
'S' » ideally suited to Washington^ which 
j . ^ runs on inertia. This is a 

li presc ri ption for inertia. There s diis 
ff i CTormous boulder that eveiyoire has 

If ' > their shoulders againsL Meanwhile die 
V nranwiththispunitivepowerisstand- 
ing off to one side saying, ‘Push away 

hoys.’ ” , . 

Whm Just arrived in Washington in 
1961 to write for Newsweek, he duly 
read Lewis Deschler's 727-page “The 
Rules of die House of Representa- 
tives” and was utterly mystified fas' 
hie year and a half of coverixtg Con- 
gress aldiough be was noticed by the 

newspaper powers dim be and, for The 

Washington Post, became one-of the 

Just: Political Washiueton is “liie third rail of AmericaD literature.*’ great Vietnam conc^ndeDB, 

wounded by a grenade and (ttiis be 

ist and set all mansion, owned by the Behl (pronounced Bell) never mentions) refusing to be evacuated, until die 
d Lcxidon.” family since 1916 and so nam^ bemuse of tbe hurt youi^ Gb had been flown oim 

IS staying in rep^tion of rooms, each perfectly ^aie but di- Although mariced fora hi^porition at The Wash- 

r Adams and minishlng in size, an echo of die previous room. ington Post, Just decided to give it up to struggle in 
ingum taUci? Constance BehL wife of a senator, foresees a time Setioo. When he goes beck to WaHungttm, to. his 

towriteonly when Washington will rise from a didl Sondi^ amazementpeoplestillaskhimifbemissesitafier28 
village to an immense power “vdiete the big cats <Ud years and be senses that he is thought odd to have 
their buriness and dieu came home” and where her given it all up. “What this is about, I think, is dial 

dinner table, as carefully arrant as a military somehow your values ate a little askew because you 

1 f »-« I J !. I J u...* 



-- • % r 


iF'Ji 


dinner table, as carefully arran^ as a milit^ 
redoubt, but {aeitier of course, “a commercial 
euriioiiment where practical conversation could 
flourish." 

Constance's vision is fulfilled as her son Axel and 
his son Alec rise our centuiy ‘s e^ to great 

positioa, not as elected officials, but as the insiders 
who run the nation. The nation is of course of minor 
importance coropaied to Washing^ — there is a 
woodetfiil scene where Axel, listening to a debate in 
the House, hears tbe con^esstnen's regional accents 
with astonishmeat, as if they were taiiring SwahilL 
They may well be: It is only Washington that exists, 
and it is the fixers without portfolio, as Ju^ calls 
them, wfao-iun it 

The Behls are lifetime insiders. “To become an 
insider the first thing you have to do is be prepa:^ 
never to roeak your mind in straight declarative 
seutences.'^ Just says. 

In “Echo House'' Richard Nixon never makes it 
as an insider aldtough he has been in Washington 
since 1946. “Th^ definitely see him as an out- 
sider,” Just eiq>k^, “because if they see him as an 
iusidff wiutc diis say about thenudv^s?” 

Tbe rules are strict — loyalty (which leaves space 
for its obverse, betrayal), compromise, discretion. 


have rejected it, ^ou have decided that there is 
something more unpoitaht than reporting cm tte 
activities of those in power in Washingtem, 

Just ? pd bis wire, Sarah Catcfapole, live in 
Martha’s Vineyard. His novels, for all their bumc^ 
and sharp observatim, come, as Mark Twain said his 
own did, from die dark side of the moon. He saw the 
side at its brightest when he arrived in John F. 
Kenny’s Washington “at a very young age to be 
dtrust into this febr^ glamour. I'd never seen any- 
diing like it.” And nev^ will again? “Never wW 
again and if I did I sure wouldn’t react in the same, 
way." 

Today, Just says, die main nxUOT in Washingtou is 
revenge, its class system indecent “Yw ^most 
can't overemidiasize the isolation of Washington 
ffom the rest of the counoy. All this would be 
different if WariiingtoD Ited a class odier than a 
political class and ^ tiding black underclass that 
surrounds it It's n<tt acity like any other.” 

It, and the government, have inexoraUy become 
what Constance Behl foresaw. “We would like to 
live as we once lival but history wiUoc»permc it,” 
John F. Kennedy said. He was ^leaking in Fort 
Wordi. Texas, in November 1963. 










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PEOPLE 


'T'HE poet AUm Giiisberg, a patriarch 
X oftMiccmoclasiic Bear generation of 
writers who chafed against mainstream 
Ammca, will go on writing poetry in the 
fece of tenmnal liver cancer. The diag- 
nosis for tbe 70-year-old Ginsberg was 
made public ^ bis docttv and tty BiD 
Moi^^, a £ri^ and the poet's arch- 
ivisL “Ife’s wotidiig on a lot of poems, 
talking to old Moigan said 

“Ife’s in very good He wants to 
write poetty aod fini^ his life’s w^" 
Ginsb^ is being cared for at his New 
York apartzaeaL Ginsberg and Ae other 
Beat writers are credited with starting a 
genre of American prose and poetry in 
UK late 1940s that cdebiatedfi^wheel- 
ing bohemians ricepdc»l of moral coifes 
arid political power. Their movement 
gave rise to the hipm of the 1961^. Ih 
1936, Ginsberg pimliriied perim hb 
most famous poem, “Howl,” whimbe- 
gms; “I saw the minds of tzty gen- 
eration destroyed Ity madiess, starving 
hysterical nak^” ;fos latest ctdl^an, 
‘'jSelected Poems, 1947-1995,” was 
published Ity HaipeK^llins last year. 


They met as reporter and news source 
and now after a 12-year courtship, diey 
are headed to tbe altar. On Simday, the 
NBC rep o nei Andr^ Mitch^ will 
wed Alan GreenqMUi, chainnan of die 
Feder^ Reserve. It may not be Charles 
and Diana or even John Kennedy Jr. 
and Carolyn Bessette, but it will def- 
initely be ^ wedding of tiie season in 
Wasltington. It will be an afternoon 
wedding at the very exclusive Virginia 
countiy^de lim at £i^ Washington. 
Tbe guMt list — 75 fiioods and relatives 
— will include W ashing ton’s 
media and government elite. 

Invited are tbe Washington 
Post’s Katharine Grakuun, 

ABC’s Barbara Walters, a 
former Greenspan girlfiriej^ 
and Senator John Warner, 

Walters’s current escort 


A judge has given custody 
of the “Home Alone” star 
Maraulay Culkin and five of 
his six siblings to their moth- 
er, Patrida Brentrup, but 
suggested sizoi^y that their 
faSer be invoi^ in tiiexr 
showbiz careers. Christoph- 
er (Kit) CuDdn, tbe ml- 
dren’s father, cooiceded cus- 
tody to Bientrup as a beariite 
was to begb, saying he di(^ 
want “to put & family 
through any more prun.” 


An msurance conmaity 
dropped its coverage (tfjulie 
Andrews, claiming that die 
star of the musical “Victor/ 
Victoria” was not acctaaae 
about her medical history. The 
Wall Street Journal re p o rt e d . 
lYodooeis of die Brmdway 
diow purchased the policy in 
bforch 1995. They bdieved 
diat the $138,000 policy 




V2mc Boedf Rvkc*Picm6 

THE SAINT RETURNS Val Kilmer arriving, far the premiere in'. 
Beverly Hills of his movie **The Saint,” in whkii he plays Simon Templar.-^' 

would pay as much as S2 millirni fev • lion. The insurers aroaiendy diink f'ht 
m issed appc^aiioes by the actress, and Anebews did not provide zuforination on 
$8.5 miluon if sbe were forced to aban- respiratoiy and orthopedic ppnMama , die 
don the show altogether, the newqnmer newqi^ier said, 
said. Since die show c^iened in Oc^er . . 

1995, a gall Madder operation, a bad O 

larynx and a sore throat have caused Akm Ben-Gurion a grandson of 
Andrews, 61, to niissinare than 30 per- David Beo-Gurion, Israelf^ first ptinas 
fonnances, causing losses of $1.6 mil- minister, became manager of the- Wal- 

dinf-Astoda Hmelin Manhat- 
tan three w^ks ago, and smoe 
d^ he hag been disooveriog 

**This is a fasctna&^SoteL” 
he said. “Cte March T4, 1960, 
my grandfather' stayed in die 
Presidential Suite, and diis is 
where he had one' of the first 
official meetings, widt Chan- . 
ceDori&Mirad Adenauer and ^ 
uhere the relatibnship be- * 
tween Gamariy 'and, Israel 
came to fr uit ion ” - • 


fngmnr BeTgttiail'.Will IS' 
ceive a special awtttd at noct- 
montfa’s Canneif^F^vri 
in conqiezisation for his nevCT 
baviiK WOT the festival's tOT 
awanC the Swedish .daily Af- 
tonhladet iqiorted.an Vndayi 

U':. 

Spumed fwa. JOlh season - 
^ ABC, Roseanoe will star 
in a spinoff on anotiier .net-^ 
wodc, acconting to lhe New ' 
York Hm^ has with- 
drawn from negotiations for a 
new show, with Cars^ ' 
Warner Prodiic tio"^ / -wfalOT 
produces ‘’Roseretne/’ be* 
cause.it wtetmwfiZ^topar 
the aridng pace, naidexitinM 
executives told'te pi^. 



Alien Ginsberg, diagnosed with termini liver cancers