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INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspap er 

Opponents 
Of Abortion 

f Force Shift 



Facing U.S. Boycott, 
Drugmaker Returns 
PiU Rights to Creator 

By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Concerned that 
■its image might be tarnished by high- 

» profile pressure from American anti- 
abortion groups, the Gennan pbarma- 
' -ceutical company that makes the RU- 
486 abortion pill said Tuesday it was 
transferring its patent rights to a creator 
of the drug. 

Hoechst of Germany said that its 
wholly owned French subsidiary, Rous- 
sel Uclaf, had signed an agreement to 
transfer rights to the drug without re- 
muneration to a new French company, 
■Exelgyn, being formed by Edouard Sak- 
iz, 7 1 . who was chief executive of Rous- 
sel Uclaf until 1993. 

Roussel Uclaf said it could find no 
buyer for the drug, which is now legally 
available in France, Sweden and Bn- 
- tain. 

V U.S. anti-abortion groups reacted to 
-.the decision by noting that Hoechst's 
retreat would not necessarily limitavail- 
. ability of the drug. 

Hoechst, the fourth-largest drug man- 
ufacturer in the world, said there would 
be no interruption in availability of the 
drag in the three countries where it is 
marketed. Plans by a nonprofit group, 
the Population Council, to produce it in 
die United States by late tins year were 
unaffected by the announcement Tues- 
day. 

Hoechst acknowledged that the heat 
pf the debate overRU-486 in the .United 
States was an important factor in its 
decision. The decision came a. week 
after anti-abortioo groups in the United 
States started a major campaign against 
a new antihistamine, Allcgra, oc fex- _ 
ofenadine y wh> a h. ' H oechst is-cocmring . 
on for substantial profits.- : . 

“We didn’t want to take the ride of 
boycotts, especially, in the US'.,*’ said 
. Catherine Euvrard, a company spokes- . 
woman in Paris. She called the drug a. 
“hdt potato" and added, **This product 
can ho longer be part of the strategy of 
an international company.” 

The move will have greater symbolic 
than economic impact on the company. 
Profits from the drag’s sales were $3.44 • 
I million last year, an almost negligible 
portion of the company's $7.5 billion in 
revenue. But Hoechst spent millions of _ 
dollars to develop the drag. 

Dr. Sakiz told tire French newspaper 
Le Monde: “It's clear that in accepting. 
I'm going to become an easy target It’s 
true there’s a risk that some 


might consider me Satan. But I 
believe we cannot abandon such an im- 
portant molecular product that has so 
much promise.” 

Proponents have vawiied RU-486 as 
a way to make abortion more readily 
available to women, particularly those 
who live far from clinics and nu“*“ 
otherwise be unable to obtain iL 

See PILL, Page 3 


Paris, Wednesday, April 9, 1997 



No. 35.491 


* s' \lT- : r 



K] 3 Arabs Are Killed 
In Hebron Unrest 

Politics Bind Escalation 


RfiU HilrmulRaam 


Palestinians, including a policeman, center right, rushing to help a youth who was shot in the head with a 
rubber ballet during dashes in Hebron on Tuesday. 'Witnesses said the youth later succumbed to bis wounds. 


Prodi Loses Support for Albania Force 

Berlusconi Throws Italian Coalition Into Crisis by Withholding Vote 


By Celestine Bohlen 

New York Times Service 


ROME — The center-left govern- 
ment of Prime Minister Romano Prodi 
was thrown into crisis Tuesday as it 
scrambled to avert a humiliating par- 
liamentary defeat of its plan to lead a 
6,000-sddier multinational force into 
Albania. 

' Already embarrassed by the noisy 
defection of its allies in Italy's hard- 
left Communist party, Mr. Prodi ’s co- 
alition,' known as tire Olive Tree, was 
further shaken by an announcement by 
Silvio Berlusconi, leader of the center- 
right opposition, tbmfttoowooJd vote 


against a government motion author- 
izing deployment of the Italian-led se- 
curity force in Albania. 

The Senate, where the Olive Tree 
coaltion commands a majority, ap- 
proved the deployment Tuesday. But 
that still left Mr. Prodi with the pros- 
pect of a crumbling majority in the 
Chamber of Deputies, which is to cast 
a vote Wednesday that could be crit- 
ical for both the Albanian mission and 
his own political future. 

The government is seeking autho- 
rization fora deployment for as long as 
six months of 2.500 Italian soldiers, 
the largest contingent of a force drawn 
from eight European nations that is 


due to go into Albania this month. 

Parliamentarians also were discuss- 
ing another morion authorizing the Al- 
banian mission, this one sponsored by 
Mr. Berlusconi's faction, which some 
said could become a compromise face- 
saving measure for the government. 
But while it might protect Italy's na- 
tional dignity, it would underscore Mr. 
Prodi 's growing political weakness, 
and surely open the way to a test of his 
strength in Parliament later. 

“Given that the majority doesn't 
exist any more, they would easily 
swing their votes behind our motion. 

See ITALY, Page 6 


Unruly Albania Awaits Peace Force 


By Daniel Williams 

Washington Post Service 


VLORE, Albania — ■ The tumul- 
tuous popular revolt here, fed by the 
rage of thousands of investors bilked 
out of their savings, has settled into an 
uneasy stalemate that leaves this little 
corner of the Balkans almost lawless. 

The deadlock revolves around cit- 
izens resentful of tire hollow invest- 
ment’ schemes, autocratic rulers un- 
willing to cede power, opposition 
parties too disorganized to mount a 
credible challenge to the government, 
armed factions that answer to no one 
and criminals who took advantage of 
the chaos to get guns and expand their 
smuggling operations. 

As a result, roads and towns 
throughout the country are in the 
hands of an unknown number of mi- 
litias, ad hoc police forces and gangs. 
Rifles and pistols, looted by the thou- 
sands from military stores as the crisis 


erupted last month, have ended up in 
feehands of almost everybody. 

This state of near anarchy provides 
a tense backdrop for tire arrival, sched- 
uled next week, of an international 
peace force. The UN-approved de- 
ployment. requested by Albania and 
led by Italy, is supposed to calm the 
country enough to ease deliveries of 
flour and medicine. 

The United States is taking no part 
in tire force despite U.S. concern that 
the chaos, and weaponry, might spread 
to other parts of the Balkans. 

For Italy, the quandary is how to 
restore peace to Albania so its refugees 
do not flood Italian shores. The gov- 
ernment of Prime Minister Romano 
Prodi is struggling to obtain a par- 
liamentary majority for Italy's first 
role as head of a multinational in- 
tervention force. 

VIore, a port on the Adriatic Sea 1 12 
kilometers (70 miles) southwest of Tir- 
ana, the capital, has been the most un- 


ruly and militant of tire many towns in 
revolt A tour of tire town gave an idea 
of what the peacekeepers are up against 
and of the range of Albania's torment 

At one end of the seafront drive, a 
funeral procession wound onto the 
narrow roadway. Women wailed and 
men marched stoically, carrying aloft 
the body of a man shot dead the night 
before by a drunken security guard. 
Just down the road toward town, a 
fender-bender appeared to be on the 
verge of becoming a shootout as one 
driver waved a pistol and kicked an- 
other driver to the ground. 

At the abandoned docks, a weeping 
widow tossed a bouquet of flowers 
into the sea as she mourned her hus- 
band. He drowned last month when an 
Italian naval vessel capsized a small 
Albanian ship full of refugees fleeing 
the anarchy. Offshore, burly men 
raced on pontoon rafts toward an old 

See ALBANIA, Page 6 


Netanyahu 
And Clinton 


By Steven Erlanger 

\r+- Kiri Times Sen-ire 

WASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton said Tuesday that there was “a 
fairly decent chance'* of renewing 
peace negotiations in the Middle East. 
But his words hardly sounded ringing in 
the midst of the latest crisis and to- 
gether with a U.S. decision not to reach 
for any dramatic, interventionist stroke, 
they reflect a wariness about Prime Min- 
ister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel. 

If foreign policy is domestic politics 
by other means, both Mr. Clinton and 
Mr. Netanyahu played careful hands in 
their meeting Monday, choosing to 
avoid confrontation in public and post- 
pone any important decisions. Mr. Clin- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

ton is well aware that the crisis of con- 
fidence in the Middle East is both deep 
and serious, and that a long breakdown 
in negotiations between Israelis and 
Palestinians is likely to lead to more 
violence, which will only reflect badly 
on him and his administration. 

Mr. Clinton and his foreign policy 
team are attracted in principle by Mr. 
Netanyahu's idea of accelerated talks 
over the next six months to try to resolve 
the “final status" issues of Jerusalem, 
tire nature of the Palestinian Authority 
and its boundaries. 

But the Americans say they need to 
be convinced — in deeds, and not just 
wonts — that Mr. Netanyahu is sincere 
about his intentions before Mr. Clinton 
can commit himself and American cred- 
ibility to such a bold and risky stroke. 

Just as important, senior U.S. offi- 
cials say, the Palestinians need to be 
convinced that they will not lose any- 
thing by trying and that Mr. Netanyahu 
is not simply working to destroy the 
more-gradual Oslo peace process while 
trying to wriggle out of serious political 
difficulties at home. 

But Mr. Clinton is also aware that 
American presidents who care about 
their opinion polls do not pick fights 

See MIDEAST, Page 6 


In Violence 
Is Forecast 


By Joel Greenberg 

,V«*w Wirt Times Sen-in- 

HEBRON. Israeli -Occupied West 
Bank — A Jewish settler shot and kilted 
an Arab who he said attacked him and a 
companion Tuesday, igniting street 
battles between rock-throwing youths 
and Israeli soldiers in which two more 
Palestinians died and about 100 were 
wounded. 

ft was one of the deadliest days in 
three weeks of violence in the West 
Bank, Gaza Strip and Israel that were set 
off by construction work on a Jewish 
neighborhood in historically Arab East 
Jerusalem. 

The worsening unrest developed as 
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu 
returned from a trip to Washington that 
had raised hopes of reviving faltering 
peace efforts and it underscored the 
perils of further political stalemate be- 
tween Israel and the Palestinians. 

With no public evidence of tangibte 
progress emerging from Mr. Netan- 
yahu’s meeting Monday with President 
Bill Clinton, there was heightened con- 
cern among both Israelis and Palestini- 
ans that the bloodshed Tuesday could 
trigger even deadlier conflict 

“This will cause an escalation in the 
situation.” warned Colonel Jibril Ra- 
joub. the head of the Palestinian Pre- 
ventive Security Service in the West 
Bank, who arrived in Hebron after the 
settler shooting. 

Tie Palestinian leader. Yasser Arafat 
was reported to be considering sending 
his deputy. Mahmoud Abbas, to Wash- 
ington to discuss the results of Mr. Net- 
anyahu’s talks with Mr. Clinton, but 
there seemed to be little goodwill on the 
Palestinian side after the latest violence. 

"This is an immediate result of the 
policies of Mr. Netanyahu," said Mar- 
wan Kanafani, an aide to Mr. Arafat “I 


blood on his hanc 
Mr. Rajoub added: “What happened 
today is a crime that happened with 
Israeli encouragement and clear Amer- 
ican cover.” Faisal Husseini, the most 

See ISRAEL, Page 6 


Dollar Soars to 4- Year High Against Yen 

The dollar hovered close to a four- 
and-a-haif year high against the yen 
Tuesday, supported by signs that of- 
ficials from the United States and Japan 
would not step in to stop the rally. 

Tsutomu Makino, vice minister at the 
Ministry of International Trade and In- 
dustry, said a weak yen would do more 
good than harm to the Japanese econ- 
omy, which is struggling to emerge 
from a five-year slump. 

On the U.S. side, Robert Rubin, the 
Treasury secretary, has said little about 
the dollar’s sharp gains in the course of 
this week. Page 12. 


| The Dollar 1 

Now Ywfc 

Tunwoy tt 4 P M. 

piavtous da** 

DM 

1.7155 

1.7125 

Pound 

1.626 

1.6343 

Yen 

126.335 

125.58 

FF 

5.7625 

5.761 


The Dow 




Tuesday dose 

previous doee 

*5325 

6609.16 

6555.91 

| S&P 500 

dianga 

Tuesday 9 * P.M. 

previous dose 

+3.93 

766.07 

762.14 


Worldwide Rules 
Set for Banking 

Central banks and regulators from 
around the world, including China and 
Russia, agreed for the first time Tues- 
day on a comprehensive set of rules to 
police banking operations worldwide. 

The set of 25 core principles, an- 
nounced by the Bank for International 
Settlements, based in Switzerland, is 
intended to forestall a variety , of fi- 
nancial shocks. Page 11. 


AGENDA 

MQE TWO 

New Theory on Sinking of Titanic 

THE AMERICAS Pafl»3. 

Americans Doubt Campaign Reform 

ASIA/PACIFIC Pi0» 4. 

Cohen Tells Gh to Be Ambassadors 

EUROPE PafleS. 

Salonika Bern Into Its Jewish Past 

HfTERNATlONAL PageS. 

Zaire Rebels Aim for Kinshasa 


Space Shuttle Lands 
After Failed Mission 

CAPE CANAVERAL. Florida 
(AP) — The space shuttle Columbia 
and a disappointed crew returned to 
Earth on Tuesday, ending a science 
mission that had been cut from 16 days 
to four because of a dangerously de- 
fective generator. The commander, 
James Hal sell Jr., had to land the 
shuttle with one-third less power than 
usual because of the faulty generator. 


Grain Deal for Starving North Korea 


Ciunpdrd b} Our SuffFmm Dapahlitt 

North Korea acknowledged Tuesday 
for the first time that children had died 
of malnutrition in the country, a day 
after a U.S. food conglomerate said it 
had sealed a breakthrough grain deal 
with the North. 

U.S. officials said It was the first 
direct sale of U.S.-grown wheat to 
North Korea since the end of the 1950- 
53 Korean War, when Washington im- 
posed a ban on trade with Pyongyang. 

The developments came on the heels 
of a U.S. congressman’s report that 
people in the North Korean countryside 


were “rapidly descending into the hell 
of a severe famine.” 

North Korean Health Ministry of- 
ficials said thai nearly one child in seven 
was suffering as a consequence of dire 
food shortages and that 1 34 children had 
died of malnutrition across the country, 
according to a Unicef spokesman, Hans 
Olsen. There was no indication how 
recently the children had died. 

The Health Ministry officials also 
said that 15 3 percent of North Korean 
children were suffering directly from 
malnutrition, according to Mr. Olsen, 
who added that it was “the first time 


such statistics have been shared with the 
international community.” 

The figures were released a day after 
the United Nations appealed for $126 
million to help North Korea, where two 
years of floods have set off severe food 
shortages. 

In a barter deal, the U.S. grains giant 
Cargill Inc. announced Monday that it 
had reached a hard-fought agreement 
with Pyongyang to sell North Korea an 
undisclosed amount of U.S. wheat. 

The company did not disclose the 

See KOREA, Page 6 


Books Page 10. 

Crossword Page 3. 


Opinion 

Sports Pages 18-19. 

totemaVonal Classified Page*. 


tewsstand PrIc«L 

10.00 FF Morocco — — 16 Dh 

.1250 FF Qatar 1050 Elate 

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„5E550 Said Arabia. -10.00 R 
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UAE 10.00 Mb 

.LL 3,000 U.S. (EurJ.—SI-# 3 



In Indonesia, Spark of Intolerance Lights Fires of Ethnic Rioting 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Senice 

RENGASDENGKLOK, Indonesia 

It was just before 3 A_M_ and the 

Muslim feast-day drumming bad been 
going on for almost an hour. Lin Kim 
Cuang* the Chinese merchant who lived 
next door, was furious, the 17-year-old 
drummer recalls. 

‘ ‘You stupiddogl You crazy pig! ” he 
shouted af the drummer, Hendra Knmia. 
“You don’t respect me.” 

Mr. Kuraia shouted back. Somebody 
threw a stone, and more stones followed. 
People began to gather in the small alley 
beh£d the marketplace in this town 50 
iflometers (30 miJes) east of Jakarta, 

As the sky grew light, residents here 
recalled recently, the crowd swelled 
with youngmen who hurried in from the 
surrounding fields and villages. Soon a 
mob was surging through fee narrow 
. streets with clubs and stones. 


By the end of the day, two Buddhist 
temples and a swath of Chinese-owned 
homes and shops had been vandalized, 
and four Christian churches and a Chris- 
tian elementary school had been 
smashed or gutted by fire. 

The convulsion of violence on Jan. 30 
in this town, where Muslims, Christians, 
and ethnic Chinese had lived quietly side 
by side for years, was one of the latest in 
a wildfire of riots that have spread across 
Indonesia in fee last several months. 

The violence, which has flared in 
Java and West Kalimantan since a major 
riot in Jakarta in July, has set Indonesia 
on edge before parliamentary elections 
in May. 

There is a current of electricity run- 
ning through, this overcrowded country 
of 200 million people as society is trans- 
formed by a growing economy and as its 
longtime leader, President Suharto, 
grows older without making provision 
for a peaceful transition of power. 



Sea Myta/ne He* tot Tuut* 

Hendra Kuroia, whose drum-beating on a Muslim feast day led to the 
rioting against minorities in Rengasdengklok, Indonesia, in January. 


Mr. Suharto, 75, has not stated his 
intentions, but he is widely expected to 
stay on for another term. Although the 
governing party's victory in fee elections 
here is not in doubt, the elections have 
become fee focus for an array of griev- 
ances bom of wrenching social changes. 

Rising living standards have been ac- 
companied by a deepening gap between 
rich and poor, widespread official cor- 
ruption. peremptory land seizures, and a 
disruption of traditional rural society, 
but not by an increased responsiveness 
by fee government, fee courts, and the 
police to people’s needs. 

Each riot has had its own specific 
flashpoint: • — an unpopular courtroom 
verdirt, a report of police brutality, a pay 
dispute. But each ended in fee same way. 
wife a destructive rampage feat fee army 
and the police were unable to control. 

Hundreds of people have died in 

See RIOTS, Page 6 









PAGE TWO 


Anatomy of a Disaster / An 85-Year Mystery 

Titanic Divers Find Hole 
In the Big- Gash Theory 


New Insight Into a Great Wreck 


By William J. Broad 

New York Times Service 


NOVA 

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ASmtStiOemm 


N EW YORK — Hundreds of books 
have been written about the Titanic 
and why the opulent liner sank in 
1912 on her inaugural voyage, tak- 
ing about 1,500 lives in the worst maritime 
disaster of the day. Everyone agrees that an 
iceberg was the proximate cause. But the 
nature of the damage that led to the appalling 
toss of life has stirred debate for 85 years, the 
issue sustained by a nightmarish sense of dis- 
belief. 

How could a ship so costly and so well 
constructed — the biggest 
and supposedly safest ves- 
sel then afloat, one hailed as 
unsinkable — turn out to be 
so extraordinarily other- 
wise? 

A persisrent theory is that 
the iceberg tore open a 300- 
foot (90-meter) gash in the 
side of the 900-foot-long 
luxury liner. But the ship 
was lost off Newfoundland 
in waters about two and a 
half miles deep, and no au- 
thor or naval detective was 
able to resolve the mystery. 

Even after the lin.‘r was 
found in 1985. expeditions 
tended to focus on the sheer 
spectacle of the ghost ship rather than the 
nature of the damage inflicted by the iceberg, 
partly because the bow was mired in mud, 
hiding the damage. 

Now. an international team ofsciendsLs and 
engineers that repeatedly dove to the remains 
of the Titanic last August is unveiling a sur- 
prise answer. 

Probing through the mud with sound waves, 
the team found the damage to be astonishingly 
smal I — a series of six thm openings across the 
starboard hull. Hie total area of the damage 
appears to be about 12 to 13 square feet (just 
over one square meter). 

What doomed the ship was the unlucky 
placement of the six slashes across six wa- 
tertight holds, the experts say. A different 
pattern of damage might have avoided the 
disaster that started late on April 14, 1912. a 
quiet Sunday evening notable for its clear sky. 
chilly air and calm sea. 

“Titanic was a victim that night," William 
Garzke Jr., a naval architect who aided the 



‘/reck ot 
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analysis, said last week in an interview. 
“Everything that could go wrong, did.” 
Working with computer simulations of the 
disaster and metallurgic analysis of retrieved 
fragments of Titanic steel, the team also ad- 
dressed how the ship flooded, broke in two and 
plunged to the bottom. Finally, the team in- 
vestigated the likely fate of the rusting hulk in 
the decades ahead, examining the onslaught of 
metal -loving microbes. 

The group of experts was assembled by the 
Discovery Channel, which visited the wreck 
during the monthlong expedition last August. 
The result is a two-hour television special 
called “Titanic: Anatomy of a Disaster." 

Mr. Garzke. a member of 
the Marine Forensics Panel 
of the Society of Naval Ar- 
chitects and Marine Engi- 
neers, a Jersey City, New 
Jersey, group that advised 
the Discovery Channel on 
the investigation, was one 
of the main experts. 

Another was David Liv- 
ingstone, an official of Har- 
land & Wolff in Belfast, the 
builder of the Titanic. It was 
the first time anyone from 
the company had descended 
to the broken hulk. 

“The stem is a terrible 
mess,” Mr. Livingstone said 
over an undersea micro- 
phone while exploring the wreck. But the bow, 
he added, “is still a very beautiful structure.” 
The opening of the Titanic to forensic anal- 
ysis is part of a global trend in which the end of 
the Cold War is accelerating deep-sea ex- 
ploration as former military personnel and 
technologies enter the civil sector and start to 
engage in commerce. In this case, the French 
government's submersible Nautile carried the 
investigators down to examine the ship's re- 
mains. 

When the Titanic headed out across the At- 
lantic on April 11, 1912, it had every luxury: a 
gymnasium, cafds, squash courts, a swimming 
pool Turkish baths, a barber shop and three 
libraries. The first-class lounge was styled after 
the palace at Versailles. The menu in die first- 
class dining saloon that fateful night included 
roast duckling, foie gras and Waldorf pudding. 

After hitting the iceberg, the ship went down 
in a little more than two and a half hours, and 
the 7 00 survivors gave conflicting accounts of 
what happened. Based on eyewitness reports. 


VYT 


Many Titanic researchers tong 
befievedthata big gash tom 
by an iceberg was responstote 
for floocfing six of the “watartighi 
compartments and sending the 

ship to the bottom. Such a gash 

[5 shown in the sketch at left, 

made by the team that found 

the wreck in 1985. Now, 

however, new sonar images 

of the hull, which is hidden In 

mud up to 55 feet deep (17 metere). 

indicate that six narrow team let In 

high-pressure seawater, sinking 

ttie ship in a little more than two hours. 




it was generally believed that hull 
extended from the first through the sixth of 1 
ship's 16 watertight compartments. 

The Titanic was designed to survive the 
flooding of three and possibly four compart- 
ments, depending on which ones filled up. 

At the British inquiry in 1912, Edward 
Wilding, one of Harland & Wolffs naval 
architects, proposed that the uneven flooding 
in the six compartments meant each had 
suffered unique, uncontinuous damage. Mr. 
Wilding also proposed that the actual cuts 
might & relatively small. 


H 

gash. 


IS testimony was widely ignored. 
Nearly everyone believed mat die 
only thing that could undo a ship so 
big and well constructed was a huge 


That idea held sway even after the ship's 
discovery. A Russian expedition to die sunken 
liner in 1991 studied the ship's hull plate, 
finding it quite brittle. Joseph Maclnnis, author 
of “Titanic in a New Light," wrote that re- 
peated strikes to brittle plates perhaps caused 
them “to disintegrate, one after the other — in 
effect opening up the side of the ship. ’ * 
While leaving many puzzles, the dives to the 


Titanic's resting place from 1985 to 1995 
documented that the bow and stem had come to 
rest nearly a half mile apart 
The dives to the wreckage last August were 
done by the French state oceanographic group, 
Ifremer, for Institut Francais de Recherche 
pour L 'Exploitation de la Mer. The French 
institute in 1985 worked with an American 
team from the Woods Hole Oceanographic 
Institution on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, that 
originally found me lost liner. 


major aim of the recent expedition was to 
use sound waves to image the Titanic's hidden 
bow. The wreckage, which slammed into the 
bottom at high speed in 1912, is today said to 
be buried in up to 55 feet of mud. 

Working from the French submersible, Paul 
Matthias, president of Polaris Imaging Inc. in 
Nairagansen, Rhode Island, imaged the 
sunken liner with an acoustic device known as 
a sub-bottom profiler, working in much the 
same way that a doctor examines a pregnant 
woman with ultrasound. 

• ‘There's no gash," he said in an interview. 
“What we’re seeing is a series of deformations 
in the starboard side that start and stop along 
the hulL They're about 10 feet above the 
bottom of the ship." 


* “They appear to follow the hull plate,” Mr. 
Matthias added, suggesting that iron rivets, 
along plate seams probably popped open to 
create splits no wider than a person’s hand. 

T HE longest gap, 36 feet from end to 
end, extends between boiler rooms 
No. 5 and No. 6, just crossing die 
watertight bulkhead. 

The gaps' are small- But in 1912, just after 
die collision, they would have averaged about 
20 feet below the waterline, where high pres- 
sures forced seawater through them like jets 
from firemen's hoses, filling the ship’s interior 
with about 39,000 tons of water just before the 
sinking. 

Mr. Garzke, a senior naval architect at Gibbs 
& Cox, Inc., said the pattern of damage would , 
have been very different if the ship had been 
moving slower than its estimated speed of 22 
knots, a very fast clip. 

If going half as fasti the force of the ice- 
berg’s impact and the extent of its damage 
across the hull plates would have both been 
much less, Mr. Garzke said, adding that fewer 
compartments would have probably flooded. 

“The ship,” he said, “might have just sur- 
vived." 


Whose State Is It? Asks Arab Seeking Office in Israel 


TRAVEL UPDATE 



Azmi Bishara, who says he will 
run for prime minister of Israel. 


By Hope Keller 

International Herald Tribune 

While attention is again riveted 
on Israel’s rock-strewn occupied 
territories, a more subtle struggle 
has been launched inside the state's 
pre-1967 borders. 

Azmi Bishara. doctor of philo- 
sophy. Knesset member, Arab Stu- 
dent Union founder and pro- 
vocateur. has become the first Arab 
to announce he will run for prime 
minister of Israel, in the elections in 
2000. In so doing he aims to force a 
debate about Israel's definition of 
itself as both a Jewish state and a 
democracy for all its citizens, 18 
percent of whom are Arab. 

While all Israelis have Israeli cit- 
izenship. they are classified by na- 
tionality as Jews or Arabs on their 
identity cards. Arabs lag behind 
Jews in income and educational 
achievement and Arab municipal- 
ities receive far less government 
money than Jewish areas, though 
Arabs’ social and material condi- 
tions have improved considerably in 
recent years. 

“Israel today exists to serve the 
Jews, not its citizens," Mr. Bishara, 
40. said in a. recent interview at his 
home outside Jerusalem, where he 
was recovering from a kidney trans- 
plant last month. “We should not 
accept for granted that Israel is the 
state of the Jews; Israel is the state of 
the Israelis. Without a separation of 
religion and state. Israel is not really 
a democracy." 


He admits the obvious: “This is 
hard for Zionists to accept" 

Changes in Israeli voting laws 
make his candidacy possible. Until 
die elections last year, prime min- 
isterial candidates had to be the bead 
of a major voting bloc, but Israelis 
now elect die prime minister direct- 
ly, voting separately for Parliament 

Mr. Bishara, one of 1 1 Arabs in 
the 120-member Israeli Parliament 
or Knesset, has no illusions about 
actually becoming prime minister. 
His goal, besides raising a debate 
about Israel's identity, is to force a 
runoff between Labor and Likud — 
the outcome if both parties get less 
than 50 percent — and then demand 
concessions from Labor, which in 
the past has relied on die Arab vote 
to win. 

His announcement in February 
prompted an uproar — not so much 
because an Arab planned to run for 
prime minister, but because a right- 
ist Knesset member immediately 
proposed a law banning Arabs from 
seeking the post. The measure was 
defeated 

“Israel doesn’t want to legalize 
its racism," said Mr. Bishara, a 
philosophy professor at Bir Zeit 
university who says he keeps two 
photographs in his Knesset office: 
one of Abdel Gamal Nasser, the 
former Egyptian leader, and one of 
Mordechai Vanunu, the Israeli con- 
victed in 1986 of having revealed 
the details of the nation's nuclear 
pro| 

Likud expressed amaze- 


ment at my growing rudeness,’’ he 
said, “but their attitude was. ‘Let 
him run.’ " He smiles. “I still think 
that hypocrisy is better than ra- 
cism.” 

His challenge is also making it 
difficult for moderates and liberals, 
who, on a practical level, fear a 
siphoning-off of votes for Labor. _ 

“Mr. Bishara has to make bis 
own calculations and think whether 
he will help the peace camp by run- 
ning," said Yoram Don, the Labor 
Party spokesman. “If Mr. Bishara 
gets even 5.000 or 10.000 votes, it 
can make the difference between 
Labor’s winning and losing." 

When be narrowly lost the elec- 
tion to Benjamin Netanyahu last 
year, Shimon Peres, the Labor can- 
didate. received 90 percent of the 
Arab vote. 

Many also see Mr. Bishara’ s abil- 
ity to run for high office as con- 
firmation that Arabs are equal cit- 
izens in Israel — and thus don’t need 
to go to such lengths as running for 
prime minister to prove iL 

“His move indicates a process 
that’s been accelerating in recent 
years — the ‘Israelization,’ or politi- 
cization. of Israel’s Arabs,’' said 
Elie Rekhess. a professor at the Day- 
an Center fra- Middle East Studies at 
Tel Aviv University. "This is an- 
other landmark in the growing in- 
volvement of Israeli Arabs in Israeli 
government." 

But be said Mr. Bishara’s decision 
was also seen by many, both Jews 
and Arabs, as a provocation that 


could backfire, causing increased 
Jewish alienation from the Arabs. 

* ‘People says there’ll be a price,’ ' 
Mr. Rekhess said. “They feel that 
what you can allow yourself as an 
intellectual lecturer at Bir Zeit and 
what you can allow yourself as a 
member of the Knesset are not the 
same thing." 

Other Israeli commentators wel- 
comed Mr. Bishara 's challenge, 
saying that while the issues he raised 
were painful, the debate could ul- 
timately be beneficial for all. 

“He puts us to die test," said 
Akiva Eldar, a political columnist 
for the Israeli newspaper Ha’aretz. 
“He puts a mirror right into our 
faces, exposing the double mes- 
sages we send ourselves." 

One of those double messages is 
enshrined in Israel's Basic Law on 
the Dignity and Freedom of Man, 
said Yaron Ezrahi, a professor of 
political science at the Hebrew Uni- 
versity of Jerusalem and the author 
recently of “Rubber Bullets; Power 
and Conscience in Modem Israeli 
Society." 

The few’s purpose is to “defend 
the dignity and freedom of man in 
order to anchor in a constitutional 
few the values of the State of Israel as 
a Jewish and a democratic state. " 

* ‘There’s a great tension between 
those two commitments, Jewish and 
democratic," Mr. Ezrahi said. 
“Azmi is putting the issue of equal- 
ity to the test of the political process. 
This is what makes him so impor- 
tant." 


Denmark -Sweden Bridge Is Started 

COPENHAGEN (AP) — The first concrete element of a 
bridge across the Ores and Strait between Denmark and 
Sweden has been put in place. " ' ' [ 

A 20,000-metnc-ton (22,000-ton) caisson for one of the 
two high bridge pylons was transported by tugboats and 
placed 4.7 kilometers (3 miles) off Mahno. Sweden. , 

The other caisson is expected to be put in place next 
week. - I 

The S3.1 billion Oresund link, scheduled to open early nexfa 
century, will consist of a 7. 8-kilometer bridge from Mahnotq* 
a 4-ktiometer-Iong artificial island in the strait 
From there, a 3-5-ktiometer tunnel will run to Copen-J 
hagen. 

U.S.-Singapore ‘Open Skies 9 Accord 

SINGAPORE (AP) — The United States and Si 
signed an "open skies" agreement Tuesday that 
strictions on airlines flying between the two countries. ! 

The agreement allows market forces, rather than gov-j 
emments, to determine air fares, flight frequencies and routed 
said the U.S. ambassador to Singapore, Timothy Chorba. -■ 

It replaces a more restrictive arrangement signed in 1978.) 
Airlines of the two countries operate about 90 passenger 
and cargo trips between Singapore and the United States each 
week. ... 

Washington expects to sign similar agreements with 

Brunei Malaysia, New Zealand, South Korea and Taiwan 
soon, said Mark Gerchick, a U.S. Department of Tians j 
porta tion official. • 

Scores of hotels and restaurants could be forced to 
because of a strike by truck drivers in India that has gone on 
more than a week, officials in Bombay said. (AFP) 

An Indian luxury train aimed at foreign tourists will stall 
running on a new Une in the west of the country in October 
1998, United News of India reported. The train, called tfe 
Palace on Wheels, will cover the 650 kilometers between 
Bombay and Goa in six hours. . (AFP) 


gtoLeiial 


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toy From 
Mitics 


Henry Hyde, Key OSS Figure, Dies 


By Wolfgang Saxon 

Nr* York Times Senice 

NEW YORK — Henry 
Baldwin Hyde, 82, a New 
York lawyer and onetime 
spymaster who helped pave 
the way for the Allied land- 
ings in France, died here Sat- 
urday after a long illness. 

Mr. Hyde was a crucial fig- 
ure in the team assembled by 
Major General Will jam (Wild 
Bill) Donovan, architect of 
the Office of Strategic Ser- 
vices and “father" of the 


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Central Intelligence Agency. 
Mr. Hyde was his chief of 
intelligence in France and 
later in Switzerland, and was 
the spymaster of Operation 
Penny Farthing. 

Mr. Hyde was bom in Paris 
to a socialite couple whose 
circle of friends included 
composers and spies and in- 
spired his penchant for art and 
intrigue. He was also the 
grandson and namesake of 
the founder and first president 
of the Equitable Life Insur- 
ance Co. He was educated at 
Trinity College In Cambridge 
and the University of Bonn, 
and earned his law degree at 
Harvard. He set up practice in 
New York, where Allen 
Dulles found him for the OSS 
in 1942. 

He was heading the French 


desk of the OSS in Algiers 
when he was picked to en- 
gineer Penny Farthing. His 
job was to recruit, brief and 
equip agents, select drop 
poinis and coordinate secret 
radio links with OSS oper- 
atives in France. 

He hired agents and, after 
training them, smuggled them 
into France. The network pro- 
duced accurate information 
on German troop movements 
and helped the high command 
plan and execute the landings 
in Normandy and the south of 
France. 

After V-E Day, he replaced 
Mr. Dulles as the OSS chief in 
Switzerland He returned to 
international few in New 
York in 1947, more recently 
as a partner in Wormser. 
Kiely, Galef & Jacobs. 



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Businessman 
Shoots Tire 
In Airline Spat 

CcrrtpHtd by Oar Sb& From Diyvojies 

PHNOM PENH — A 
pro min ent Cam bodian 
businessman shot at a tire 
of a parked airliner at the 
Phnom Ptenh airport 
Tuesday after a dispute 
over schedules and lost 
luggage. 

No one was hurt, but a 
front wheel of the Royal 
Air Cambodge Boeing 
737-400, on which the 
businessman. Teng 
Boonma, had been a pas- 
senger on a flight from 
Hong Kong, was dam- 
aged, officials said. 

Mr. Teng Boonma, 
president of the Cambod- 
ian Chamber of Com- 
merce, was unrepentant, 
saying the airline had a 
miserable service record. 
He said darkness had pre- 
vented him from shoot- 
ing out all of tile aircraft’s 
tires. (AFP. Reuters) 


WEATHER 


Europe 



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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by AocuWsather. Asia 



North America Europe 

Unseasonably chUy across A strong storm «rtH cross 
the northern tier ol the Scandinavia Thursday then 
United Stales from the move Into the Baltics Fri- 
northem Hocklss to the day. Unsettled weather is 
Northeast. A storm ovsr expected In Berlin and 
the Rockies Thursday win Warsaw through Friday, 
affect the Plains and Mid- Meinty dry and mild over 
weal Friday Into Saturday western Europe, mdutflng 
wMh rain In the south and Parts. London and A/nstar- 
snow. Ice and rain across dam. though sKgtttty coaler 
the north. air may arrive Saturday. 


Mainly dry and turning 
nMsr m Beijing. Seoul wffl 
be chilly through Friday, 
then wtf turn mfaer Satur- 

day^urrtng cMBer across 
much ol Japan, including 
Tokyo. wUi showers pomL 
ble Friday. Warm and 
humid in Hong Kong and 
Singapore with a thunder- 
shower poseibis each day. 


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PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 




esfor Campaign Reform 

nWill Deliver on Promises, Poll Says 


By Francis X- Clines 

New York Times Servir* 


. a significant 

piflJc^ofQieAmOTcanpecnjlebeHew 
dot fundamental changesW^S^ 

Congressare sincerely committed to 
cha ngi ng it, according to die latest New 
(floik Times/CBS News Poll. 

■ 7^° PT Bsident is nevertheless main- 
taining ms strong personal standing with 
Jbe public, the poll found, fespite 
months of sometimes withering accu- 
sations of improper campaign fundrais- 
ing tactics. 

' fit- contrast, Vice President A1 Gore 
pas su ffere d a sizable loss of approval as 
the controversy over campaign fmanr*^ 
has grown. ' 

i Almost 9 of 10 people surveyed see 
}be need for fundamental change in 
fund-raising procedures, or even an 
bverhanL Bat only 3 in 10 say they 
believe that the president really wants 
change, despite ms announced commit- 
ment to iL The resolve of Congress is 
subject to even greater doubt, wnh only 
£3 percent of the public convinced that 
the lawmakers, for all their th TV want to 
^ Change die current laws. 

"t While Mr. Clinton's commitment to 
Change is ‘ 



ag remains strong as 
gears up for hearings into his 1996 re- 
election practices. The telephone poll 
registered a 56 percent job approval rat- 
ing for the president, largely because of 


■ v \ 

his handling of the economy. That is 
only seven points below his personal 
high, registered by CBS News after his 
second inauguration. 

The campaign financing issue gained 


Aid to Legal Immigrants Is in Dispute 


By Robert Pear 

New York Times Service 


1 WASHINGTON — Republicans 
Tiave announced that they are drafting 
legislation to provide as much as 52 
billion in aid to states with huge numbers 
of legal immigrants who win lose ben- 
efits under the new welfare law, but 
Clinton administration officials said 
Jhey opposed the plan because it would 
result in disparate policies in different 
states. 

! Instead, the admins tration officials 
say they want full restoration of dis- 
ability benefits for most legal immi- 
grants, including children and elderly 
people who have not became citizens. 

Republicans in Congress want to 
provide states with lump sums of money , 
OrblockgrantS, tO help tegal immigr ants 
House Republicans, led by Represen- 
tative Clay Shaw Jr. of Honda, areccm- 
sidering a maximum of $2 billion in aid 
pver die next two or three years. 


By contrast, President Bill Clinton 
would permanently restore disability 
benefits and Medicaid for many legal 
immigrants, at a cost of $15 billion over 
sixyears. 

The dispute continues ai 
debate that has raged since Repnl 
took control of Congress in 1995 on 
whether statesorthe federal government 
cair better design social welfare pro- 
grams. 

Donna Shalala, the Health and Human 
Services secretary, said the administra- 
tion opposed block grants because they 
woulabe “ unfair and unworkable." She 
said the administration believed that die 
federal government should set uniform 
national standards for providing disab- 
ility benefits to legal immigrants. 

■ “We believe that an elderly disabled 
immigrant — a 75 -year-old disabled 
woman — . in New Hampshire ought to 
.be treated the same as a woman of the 
same B g " in California or Ohio,’ ’ Ms. 
Shalala said. “Their eligibility shouldbe 


Away From 
Politics . . 

• Congress Is preparing to pass le- 

gislation that would strengthen a law 
prohibiting Int ernal Revenue Service 
employees from snooping into tax- 
payer records. Bills in the U.S. House 
ana Senate would provide for prison 
time ami fines for illegal browsing 
through IRS files. (AP) 

• Nearly one person in 10 living in 

the United States was bom some- 
where else. There were 24,557,000 
people in the United Slates last year 
who were bom in another country, 9 3 
percent of the population, according to 
the Census Bureau. That is up sharply 
from 4.8 percent in 1970 and the 
highest since the 1930 census counted 
11.6 percent of foreign-bom resi- 
dents. (AP) 

• A teenager ItiDed by the police as 
be carried a machete on a street in 


northern Manhattan early Sunday was 
shot in the back, according to an 
autopsy. Police Commissioner 
Howard Safir said as a growing dis- 
pute swirled around the case. (NYT) 

•Federal prosecutors in New York 
■charged 55 defendants with partic- 
ipating in conspiracies to traffic in 
cocaine and launder money for a 
Colombian drug group. (Reuters) 

• The United States and Canada 

have initialed an agreement to reduce 
pollution in die Great Lakes by 2006, 
the Environmental Protection Agency 
announced. (AFP) 

• The New York teenager who was 

beaten by a gang of young men in 
Manhattan during the St Patrick’s 
Day parade last month has died. The 
teenager, Michael Sarti, an 1 8-year - 
oldwgh school senior, was him in a 
streetlight between Bronx and Brook- 
lyn youths that erupted on March 17, 
as the parade made its way up Fifth 
Avenue. (NYT) 


Pope Appoints Prelate 
For Chicago Diocese 

The Associated Press 

CHICAGO — The Vatican on Tues- 
day picked Archbishop Francis George 
of Portland, Oregon, to bead the arch- 
diocese of Chicago, the nation's second- 


Archbishop George, a 60-year-old 
Chicago native who overcame child- 
hood polio, succeeds Cardinal Joseph 
Bemardin, who died of cancer in 
November. 

Cardinal Bemardin was a liberal- 
minded mediator who sought to repair 
divisions between traditionalists and 
progressives with a more conciliatory 
approach than some supported. Arch- 
bishop George is more conservative. 

Cardinal Bemardin’s biographer, Eu- 
gene Kennedy, said the appointment 
“gives Chicago a pastor and gives the 
Pope a man after his own heart at the 
same time.” 

The diocese of Chicago has 2.3 mil- 
lion Roman Catholics. 


> 


CROSSWORD 


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CNew York Timea/Edited by Witt Short*. 


Solution to Pmzle of April 8 


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POLITICAL NOTES 


momentum after the president's re-elec- 
tion with a steady stream of disclosures 
about the wide net that had been cast by 
the Clint on-Gore team to reach affluent 
donors to the Democratic Party. 

Asked about Mr. Clinton's campaign 
fund-raising practices, 44 percent of re- 
spondents said he had acme nothing 
wrong, while 20 percent judged his 
activities unethical and 12 percent il- 
legal. Despite his general approval rat- 
ing, two of five Americans said they 
thought the president had made or 
changed policy decisions as a direct re- 
sult of money be raised for the party 
from major donors. 

As a “top priority” solution on the 
campaign-financing issue, the public fa- 
vors effective campaign disclosure (54 
percent) more strongly than limiting 
either campaign spending (23 percent) 
ex’ special-interest contributions (28 per- 
cent). On specific proposals for chan- 
ging the system, more than three of five 
favor significant free television time for 


favor cutting, to $1,000 from $5,000, the 
maximum that a political action com- 
mittee can spend on a single candidate. 

“The special-interest groups spend 
millions to get their point across, and 
people like me aren’t heard at all,” said 
Pam Elliott, a 42-year-old living cm dis- 
ability payments in Dyersburg, Tenness- 
ee. “Money talks.” 

The latest Times/CBS poll is based on 
telephone interviews conducted April 2- 
5 with 1347 adults throughout the 
United Stales. 


determined through national policy, not 
left to the discretion of the states.” 

Republicans on Capitol Hill said that 
they were surprised by the administra- 
tion’s position and that it could backfire. 
The president and the immigrants risked 
ending up with nothing if they insisted 
cm getting far more than Congress was 
wilting to provide to legal immigrants, 
the Republicans said. 

Mr. Shaw, the chairman of the Ways 
and Means subcommittee on human re- 
sources, said he recently had a sobering 
conversation with the chairman of the 
House Appropriations Committee, Rep- 
resentative Robert Livingston of Louisi- 
ana, who said it would be difficultto find 
even $2 billion to assist states with ben- 
efits for many legal immigrants. 

As for the $15 billion sought by Mr. 
Clinton, Mr. Shaw said: “That’s just out 
of sight, fr ain’t going to happen. TTiere’s 
no way Congress is going to be able to 
find that kind of money. There’s no 
sense even thinking about it” 



f.rfll ff*>T4rx/f?e 

Mr. Gingrich al the GOP AC meeting in Washington, where he questioned the AFL-CIO's political activity . 


Gingrich Fires Bock at Labor 

WASHINGTON — The House speaker. New! Gingrich, 
has challenged labor leaders to make the two years until the 
1998 congressional elections a referendum on the role of 
organized labor in America. 

‘ ‘More debates with people like John Sweeney are good for 
America,' ’ Mr. Gingrich. Republican of Georgia, told a group 
of laxjge donors at a dinner of GOPAC, the political action 
committee he once headed 

Mr. Sweeney is the president of the AFL-CIO, the largest 
American labor organization. 

“Let’s make sure people know who’s trying to rig the 
game and who’s trying to tell a one-sided story and let the 
American people decide,” Mr. Gingrich said. 

Mr. Gingrich was reacting to S700.000 in television and 
radio commercials the AFL-CIO ran last week against 12 
House Republicans and 7 conservative and moderate House 
Democrats — most of them first- and second-term law- 
makers who narrowly won election in 1996. The ads 
accused the lawmakers of favoring corporate interests over 
working families. 

Last year, organized labor spent tens of millions of 
dollars in an unsuccessful effort to give the Democrats a 
majority in the House of Representatives. The House Re- 
publican campaign committee did not begin spending 
money to respond to labor attacks until the closing weeks of 
the campaign. 

Now, Mr. Gingrich said, “we should raise the resources 
and we should say to John Sweeney. ’Let’s go ahead and 
have a two-year debate about die role of unions in this 
nation.’ ” 

Noting that 42 percent of union members are government 
workers. Mr. Gingrich said labor leaders and Democrats 
wanted to add to the bureaucracy, which would protect and 
create more government workers' jobs. (WP) 

Gore Cites Gains in Courtesy 

BETHESDA, Maryland — No deed is too small to earn 
someone a pat on the back from Vice President Al Gore 
when it comes to improving government. Decisions to 


recycle Marine uniforms, mount a safety campaign for New 
Jersey highway workers and even put a number on a federal 
building so people can find it are being praised by Mr. Gore 
as signs ‘ ‘the era of better government has begun.” 

Mr. Gore gave a pep talk to more than 600 federal workers 
and private-sector managers at a meeting to discuss ways to 
make government more efficienL Claiming early success in 
the drive to answer phones faster, cut red tape and be polite, 
he said the effort to treat people like customers “will amaze 
the bench-warmers' ' who doubt it can be done. 

Most federal agencies set standards for customer service 
under the National Performance Review started early in the 
first Clinton-Gore administration. By their own first ac- 
counting, they have made inroads in achieving public 
satisfaction. According to a survey by 150 agencies, pre- 
viewed by Mr. Gore, the U.S. Customs Service has been 
answering all calls within a minute, almost all callers to the 
Social Security Administration are getting through in five 
minutes, and the mail is moving faster. 

“We've sure come a long way from the days when we 
weren’t even sure who our customers were," Mr. Gore 
said. 

Bureaucratic efficiency is one of Mr. Gore’s less glam- 
orous specialities as he tries to make his own mark before an 
expected presidential run in 2000. 

The conference celebrated modest triumphs of common 
sense. 

The Forest Service won applause for putting a number on 
its building and having satisfactory hours of operation and 
information services. 

At the Patent and Trademark Office, the survey found 
’ ‘the public was treated courteously 80.8 percent of the time 
and directed promptly to the proper office or person 60.4 
percent of the time,” still leaving plenty of people treated 
nidely or inefficiently. (AP) 


Quote /Unquote 


Senator John McCain, Republican of Arizona, criticizing 
the government’s move to give the nation’s broadcasters 
new television channels worth billions of dollars for digital 
TV: “This gift takes federal largesse to a breathtaking new 
level.” (AP) 


NYU to Refund $15.5 Million to U.S. 


New York Times Senice 

NEW YORK — Federal prosecutors 
said that New York University Medical 
Center intentionally and routinely over- 
charged the federal government for re- 
search costs, and announced they bad 
reached a $155 million settlement. 

Federal officials concluded that the 
medical center had tried to increase its 
share of federal money over a decade by 


providing a “false, inaccurate and in- 
complete picture" of what it cost in 
overhead to conduct research projects. 

For example, the medical center is 
said to have given the government waste 
disposal bills already paid by other 
sources and to have inflated housekeep- 
ing bills, and counted as overhead costs 
for research such items as food for the 
medical school commencement dinner 


and expenses from the public affairs 
department. 

The medical center agreed Monday to 
pay Si 55 million, by far the largest 
amount in any case involving research 
overhead at a university, but asserted 
that it had done nothing wrong. The 
largest previous settlement for overstat- 
ing research overhead was against Har- 
vard for $4.6 million in 1983. 


PILL: Hoechst Drops R U-486 


Continued from Page 1 

detractors say the procedure 
is not as safe, simple or cer- 
tain as proponents say. 

Hoechst has done little to 
market the abortion drug in 
recent years. But Ms. Euvrard 
said that Hoechst hoped that 
Dr. Sakiz would be “more 
proactive" in promoting iL 

She said that during a tran- 
sition period, Hoechst would 
continue manufacturing the 
drug, while “doing every- 
thing it can” to help Dr. Sakiz 
set up his company, including 
providing stock of the drug's 
active ingredient. 

Dr. Sakiz will have the 
rights to drug distribution in 
every country but the United 
States, but Ms. Euvrard said 
the standards Hoechst has ap- 
plied for selling RU-486 
would continue to apply: 
Abortion must be legal in the 
target country; there must be a 
formal request from the coun- 
try’s government; there must 
be “a certain degree of con- 
sensus on abortion” in the 
country; high-quality medical 
centers must be available to 
ensure proper foUow-np for 
women using the drug; dis- 
tribution channels must be se- 
cure, to ensure that no black 
market in the drug emerges; 
and the drug prostaglandin, 
which is used in the proce- 
dure, must be available. 

One of the anti-abortion 
groups calling for the boycott 
of Hoechst’s allergy drug, the 
Family Research Council, 
took out a full-page in USA 
Today against Allegra. A 
spokeswoman, Kristi Ham- 
rick, said of Tuesday’s an- 
nouncement, “We’re cer- 
tainly going to have to 
evaluate this change.” 

She said her group would 
continue to campaign against 
RU-486. 


The Planned Parenthood 
Federation of America, a 
group that advocates birth 
control and provides abortion 
services, denied that 
Hoechst’s transfer of RU-486 
could be viewed as a moral 
victory for abortion foes. 

“The fact is," said Mar- 
garet Conway, a Planned Par- 
enthood vice president, “the 
opponents of medical abor- 
tion are the same extremists 
who want to outlaw all abor- 
tions, and that's simply not 
going to happen." 

The Population Council, 
which hopes to begin produ- 
cing RU-4S6 in the United 
States by the end of the year, 
was measured in its own re- 
action to Tuesday’s news. 

A spokeswoman, Sandra 
Waldman, said that Hoechst ’s 
shifting of patent rights out- 
side foe United States was not 
unlike the process in 1994 by 
which U.S. rights were gran- 
ted to the Population Council. 

Roussel gave up trying to 
sell RU-486, or Mifepristone, 
in foe United States because 
of opposition from abortion 
protesters. 

The council is now in the 
process of providing informa- 
tion on labeling and manu- 
facture to the U.S. Food and 
Drug Administration. Final 
approval is expected to be 
granted later this year. 

The council has found a 
manufacturer for the drag, but 
foe debate in foe United States 
is so sensitive that it refuses to 
name, or even characterize, 
the company. Hie U.S, market 
for the pill has been estimated 
at $100 milli on annually. 

RU-486 works by blocking 
the action of progesterone, a 
natural hormone essential for 
maintaining pregnancy. The 
drug must be riven within 
three weeks after the first 
missed menstrual cycle. 




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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Q ct' A /Martin Lee 


China ‘Reneging 9 on Hong Kong Pledge 


In the British crown colony's waning 
days. Martin Lee. chairman of Hong Kong's 
Democratic Party and a member of the 
Legislative Council, remains an outspoken 
activist, who militates for democratic rights 
in what will become a “special admin- 
istrative region ” of China after June 30. 
While in Geneva for the current session of 
the UN Human Rights Commission. Mr. Lee 
spoke with Robert Kroon of the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 

Q. In the Human Rights Commission. 
China is bitterly contesting a draft reso- 
lution condemning human-nghts violations 
in the Chinese People’s Republic. What 
does that portend for the future of demo- 
cratic rights in Hong Kong after the Chinese 
takeover? 

A. Democracy is on the move in the 
world, but in the case of Hong Kong it is 
moving in the opposite direction, m the 
Joint Declaration with Britain. China prom- 
ised we would be masters in our own house 
under the ’’one country, two systems" for- 
mula. But that was before Tiananmen. 

Since then. Beijing’s hands-off policy 
has changed into a hands-on policy. De- 
mocracy implies an independent legis- 


lature. an independent executive and an 
independent judiciary, but after the han- 
dover there'll be none of that. China wants 
full control of Hong Kong. It already 
controls the executive, and after June 30 
the legislature will soon follow suit, with 
our judges compelled to enforce Chinese- 
promulgated laws. 

A free press, the rule of law. right of 
assembly, free education and political 
demonstrations will disappear. 

At the time, the world applauded the Joint 
Declaration and the promise of no change 
for a 50-year period. Now that Beijing is 
reneging on its commitment, there is silence 
all around, because everybody is starry- 
eyed about that potential Chinese market of 
1.2 billion customers. But you don’t protect 
freedoms by kowtowing. 

• 

Q. What about United States policy in 
this respect? 

A. At the moment the U.S. does not have 
a China policy. The American adminis- 
tration does not even respect its own laws. In 
1992 the Congress unanimously adopted the 
Hong Kong Policy Act, stipulating separate 
treatment for our territory, including demo- 
cratic lights and an elected legislature. It 


was one of the last laws signed by George 
Bush before be left office. If you adopt a 
policy, you should stick to it. 

• 

Q. To what extent will the end of the 
Deng Xiaoping era affect the future of Hong 
Kong? 

A. That depends on how China’s new 
leaders feel about their own position in the 
national power structure. If they feel secure, 
they may allow more freedom. At the mo- 
ment I think they feel insecure, and that 
makes me pessimistic about the future of 
Hong Kong — at least in the short term. In 
the long term, they won’t be able to block 
the march of democracy. But right now, 
there's a feeling of helplessness among die 
Hong Kong people. The exodus is still going 
on. at least for those who can afford to 
leave. 

• 

Q. China is known to deal harshly with 
dissidents. Doesn’t that make you a marked 
man? 

A. Could be. This will probably be my 
last visit to the Human Rights Commission 
in Geneva. But Martin Lee mil stick to his 
convictions and won’t turn his back on the 
people of Hong Kong. 



Burma Says Mail Bomb Came From Japan 


ill ii In TTh i imihOTi B ui i 

A member of the Assembly of the Poor shouting in displeasure at 
Thai government officials during a blockade in Bangkok on Tuesday. 

Rubin Meets Leader 


GjrxpiM fri Ovr Staff From Ddpachri 

RANGOON — Authorities said Tuesday 
thar an explosion that killed a daughter of 
the military government’s second secre- 
tary, Lieutenant General Tin Oo, had been 
caused by a parcel bomb airmailed from 
Japan. 

"There are reasons to believe that the 
bomb plot was masterminded by some anti- 
Myanmar government groups within Ja- 
pan." an information sheet issued by a 
military intelligence body said. Myanmar is 
the government’s name for Burma. 

There are several Burmese exile groups 
in Japan and other Asian countries, such as 
Thailand and India. Exile groups in Thai- 
land have been blamed for previous bomb 
attacks in Burma, but all demed involve- 
ment in the explosion Sunday! 


A source close to General Tin Oo’s fam- 
ily said the explosive had been planted in a 
parcel with Japanese stamps on it that his 
daughter. Cho Lei Oo. 34. had been en- 
couraged to open after a phone call. 

Security checks were increased in Ran- 
goon. although troop presence on the streets 
was already heavy. 

State-run media carried only a short re- 
port on the attack, broadcast on radio and 
television late Monday and carried in all 
newspapers Tuesday, with an obituary of 
the general’s daughter. 

Analysts said Tuesday thar the attack 
added a different element of violence to an 
already tense political situation. 

"This is a new. most unwelcome de- 
velopment in Burma’s political culture," a 
diplomat based in Rangoon said. 


"They do a lot of nasty things to each 
other, but parcel bombs are a whole dif- 
ferent issue. This is not something tra- 
ditionally pan of the political culture 
here.” (AFP. Reuters) 

■ Appeal for Intervention 


Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the pro-de- 
mocracy Burmese opposition leader, ap- 
pealed in a smuggled videotape for in- 


Cohen Tells U.S, Servicemen 
In Japan to ‘Be Ambassadors’ 


The Associated Press 

YOKOTA AIR BASE. Japan — Mind- 
ful of the strains on the U.S.-Japan mil- 
itary alliance. Defense Secretary William 
Cohen pointedly reminded American 
troops Tuesday to avoid the “one bad 
deed" that can spoil relations. 

"Everything you do reflects upon our 
country, wherever you are deployed,” 
Mr. Cohen said during breakfast with 
troops at this U.S. air base near Tokyo. 

"You're not only soldiers, sailors, air- 
men and Marines, you also are ambas- 
sadors." Mr. Cohen said. "You do 100 
good deeds and you will get credit for it. 
On the other hand, all you have to have is 
one bad deed and that makes the headline 
news and changes people's percep- 
tions." 

The military alliance has been under 


particular strain since a September 1995 
rape of a 12-year-old Okinawan girl by 
three U.S. servicemen. The public outcry 
prompted calls for reductions in the U.S. 
military presence in Japan of 47,000 
troops. The United States has 100.000 
troops in Asia overall. 

■ China Assails U.S. Deployment 

China attacked Washington’s contin- 
ued deployment of troops in Asia, saying 
Tuesday that regional problems should be 
solved by Asian countries, Agence 
France-Presse reported from Beijing. 

"The Chinese government has always 
been opposed to stationing troops 
abroad,” a Foreign Ministiy spokesman 
said. “We believe the problems of Asia 
must be resolved by the countries which 
are part of the region." 


ternarional intervention to protect her 
followers from the government. The As- 
sociated Press reported from Bangkok. 

The tape, viewed in Bangkok, was to be 
played before the UN Human Rights Com- 
mission in Geneva. 

The Burmese government has denied a 
UN human-rights investigator entry into the 
country and. because Daw Aung San Suu 
Kyi has been under virtual house arrest in 
Rangoon since November, messages from 
her are rare. 

She said in the tape that her party’s rights 
were of paramount importance because the 
government already had crushed all other 
democratic political parties operating na- 
tionally in Burma. 

Since May 1996, the government has 
launched a series of crackdowns on Daw 
Aung San Suu Kyi’s party, arresting hun- 
dreds and sentencing many to long prison 
terms. 

Several party members have been forced 
to resign, she said. 

She said the actions a gains t her party 
showed "how far the authorities are pre- 
pared to go to prevent democracy from 
taking root in Burma." 


False Alarm Traps 281 on Jet 

Agence France-Presse 

AUCKLAND, New Zealand — Armed 
FBI agents swooped in on an Air New 
Zealand flight at Los Angeles after the pilot 
wrongly activated a hijack alert just before 
landing, press reports said here Tuesday. 

They ran to the jet as it stopped and kept 
the 281 passengers aboard for 45 minutes. 


Rubin Meets Leader 
Of Vietnamese Party 

HO CHI MINH CITY— The U.S. 
secretary of the Treasury, Robert Ru- 
bin, met Tuesday with the Vietnamese 
Communist Party chief. Do Muoi. for 
talks that Mr. Rubin described as 
"very focused on the economic de- 
velopment in Vietnam." 

Mr. Muoi "stressed the 4.000-year 
history of the country and the fact that 
much of it has been a troubled history 
and a proud history," Mr. Rubin said 
after foe 55-minute meeting. "What 
he would really like to see now is for 
Vietnam to grow economically.” 

He added that foe meeting was sim- 
ilar to one Monday with Prime Min- 
ister Vo Van Kiet in Hanoi, where 
they discussed moving ahead on full 
economic normalization and imped- 
iments faced by American businesses 
in Vietnam. 

Mr. Muoi told him he "hoped we 
could move on foe various aspects of 
economic normalization at a good 
pace," Mr. Rubin said. But the Vi- 
etnamese leader also said, "He un- 
derstood that each of these things in- 
volves complications. ’ ’ (AFP ) 

Thai Offices Blocked 

BANGKOK — Several thousand 
demonstrators blockaded Prime 'Min- 
ister Chaovalit Yongchaiyut and his 
Thai government ministers inside 
their offices for more than two hours 
Tuesday to protest a lack of action on 
social issues. 

About 3.000 to 4,000 people moved 
on the gates of Government House 
after foe Thai cabinet declined to dis- 
cuss their demands, a spokesman for 
foe Assembly of foe Poor said. 

"The Assembly of foe Poor was 
informed by foe government that the 
cases raised by foe poor were not 
ready to be sent to the cabinet as they 
needed more time for consideration,’ ’ 


The group is the main organizer of a 
protest in which about 10,000 people 
camped out around Government 
House since Jan. 25 have demanded 
action on social and developmental 
issues. (AFP) 

7 Die in Hong Kong 

HONG KONG — Residents squat- 
ted on window ledges and clung to 
drainpipes to escape a fire that killed 
at least seven people, including two 
babies, in a residential building in 
Hong Kong on Tuesday. 

The fire broke out at lunchtime on 
foe sixth floor of a 20-story building in 
the Kowloon district and spread to a 
lower flow. Fire fighters took four 
hours to quell the blaze. - 

A government spokeswoman said 
at least 28 persons were injured. The 
cause of the fire was not immediately 
known. (Reuters) 

For the Record 

A bus plunged into a 45-meter 
gorge in northern India on Tuesday, 
killing at least 38 people and injuring 
20. police officials said. The accident 
occurred at Dhaimadi. 82 kilometers 
(51 miles) northeast of Jammu, foe 
winter capital of Jammu and Kashmir 
state. (Reuters) 

The food situation in Peshawar, 
Pakistan, eased Tuesday as authorities 
rushed emergency supplies of flour to 
stores and dealers following public 
unrest marked by mob attacks. Of- 
ficials said more flour was on the 
way. (AFP) 

Papua New Guinea prosecutors 
have dropped illegal firearm charges 
against Tim Spicer, a retired British 
colonel who led 70 African mercen- 
aries into foe South Pacific nation, a 
prosecution official said. (Reuters) 


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PAGE 5 





ESTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1997 


EUROPE 


6 Unbearable Silence 9 About Jewish Past 


n 


By Celestine Bohlen 

New York lines Service 


'"fa 


'.'ft 



s ALONDCA, Greece — It has been 
more than 50 years since Nazi occuSere 
wipeout all traces of this port enrich 
•Jewish past AU but one of its 36 syn- 
agogues were destroyed, and all but a few 
thousand of a prewar population of 56,000 
Jews were killed m Nazi death camps. 

Tie war aided, and the survives re- 
turned —only to find that all traces of their 

' r\ at SU 5 C 5?£’ had so * n *how vanished. As 
■=% ¥ atBabi-Yar, the notonousNazi mass grave 
f » UJnune where Soviet authorities for 
decades refused to acknowledge that most 
of ■the victims were Jews, Salonika has 
. been slow to recognize that its large and 
vflaant Jewish community was singled out 
! for annihilation. 

• “There was such an unbearable silence 
about the Jews of Salonika,” said Andreas 
, Sefiha; 69, the president of the city's Jew- 
ish community. As a boy of 1 3. he managed 
to escape the occupied city in 1943 before 


the trains stalled leaving for Auschwitz. 

“It was sometimes as if we had never 
existed,” he said. “For my generation, it 
was like a second death.” 

As. Salonika celebrates its turn this year 
as the European Union's cultural capital, . 
fee city, the second-largest in Greece, is at 
last coming to terms with its history. Its 
first monument to the victims of the Holo- 
canst is to be erected soon in - a central 
square, and two new museums dedicated 
t o Jewi sh life and culture over the last five 
centuries are to open this Spring- 

Doing right by Salonika's past was 
"one of the most difficult tasks” that 
Panos Theodoridis, a writer and archi- 
tectural restorer, said he confronted when 
he became die fourth artistic director of the 
organization in charge of events for the 
cultural-capital role. 

‘‘People here tend to forget that this city 
was multinational rig ht from the begin- 
ning, ”he said. “Now it is tune to pay 
homage to all those who formed the dry’s 
character.” 


Mr. Sefiha, who took a leave from his 
family’s machine-building business to de- 
vote his energies to a Jewish communin' 
(hat now numbers a mere 1 ,150, considers 
the establishment of the museums and the 
monument a belated act of justice. 

“I think after we have the monument, 
more people will be interested to know the 
history ox this town- — why it is necessary 
to have a monument at alL” he said. 

To me discomfort of local Greek na- 
tionalists, it is a history that was largely 
Jewish during the 500 years of Ottoman 
Turkish occupation, with strong influences 
of Armenians and the Turks themselves. 

The first great wave of Sephardic Jews 
came to Salonika in the late 15th century, 
expelled during tbe Inquisition in Spain 
and Portugal In rime, tbe community grew 
with the arrivals of Ashkenazi Jews from 
Eastern Europe, until, by the late 19th 
century. Jews made up two-thirds of the 
dry’s population. Business was conducted 
either in French or L a ding, the Judeo- 
Hispanic language spoken by the Seph- 


ardim, and shops and offices dosed on 
Saturday for the Jewish Sabbath. 

AH evidence of this past is virtually 
gone now, and not only because of the 
Nazis. There were fires and earthquakes, 
but also a local strain of Greek nationalism, 
fueled by the arrival in 1923 of about 
160,000 ethnic Greeks transferred from 
the Turkish mainland. Not only has 
Salonika never commemorated its Holo- 
caust victims, but its children also find 
scam reference to the city's multicultural 
post in their school textbooks. 

“Nothing appears in the books — no 
mention ai all." Mr. Sefiha said. “Bur I am 
sure one day people will write again tbe 
story of this town in a more objective 
way.” 

The Jewish contribution to the city's 
past is nor the only historical memory to 
have fallen victim to a collective amnesia. 
In local guidebooks and in literature prin- 
ted for this year's international cultural 
events, the five centuries of Ottoman rule 
axe referred to euphemistically as the 


“post-Byzantine” period, a reflection of 
the strong anti-Turkish sentiment that is 
part of Greek consciousness. 

This was not always so. In the 1930s, in 
a gesture of good wtifio the modem secular 
Turkish state founded by Mustafa Kemal 
Ataturk, the Salonika dry council offered 
him as a gift the house where he had been 
bom — amodest, pleasant building with a 
garden, which has survived as one of the 
few- examples of Turkish middle-class life 
in a dry that was once the second largest in 
the Ottoman Empire. 

The house, now attached to the heavily 
guarded Turkish consulate, is now not only 
forgotten, but deliberately ignored by the 
local authorities, who never include ir in 
any list of local historical attractions. 

Few Greeks are aware that Ataturk was 
bom in Salonika or that this was where the 
Young Turks began the revolution that 
eventually brought down the Ottoman Em- 
pire. The street along the side of the bouse, 
which was once called Ataturk Street, was 
renamed long ago. 



es Trial 


For 2 Top Turks 

Pair Linked to Death Squads 


By Stephen Kinzer 

. ItffH* York Times Service 

ISTANBUL — A parlia- 
mentary commission investi- 
gating charges that the Turk- 
ish government sponsored 
death squads and allowed 
gunmen to smuggle drugs and 
commit other crimes has re- 
commended that two rncin- 
. bers of Parliament be stripped 
* r of their immunity and 
brought to trial 

The report said both men 
may have been leadens of a 
shadowy gang used by the 
government in recent years to 
assassinate perceived en- 
emies of die state. 

One of them, Sedat Bucak. 
is chief of a pro-government 
Kurdish militia dud has been 
helping tbe army fight Kur- 
dish rebels. The other, 
Mehmet Agar, was interior 
minister until shortly after the 
November car crash that 
brought the scandal to light. 

In the crash, a senior police 
official and a convicted 
heroin smuggler were both 
killed: Mr. Bucak, who was 
riding with them, was seri- 
ously injured. Pistols, silen- 
cers and other weapons were 
found in the wrecked car's 
trunk. 

The new report said some 
of tbe weapons have been 
traced back to police agen- 
cies. It concluded that the 
men in the car were on their 
way to cany out “an illegal 
3 mission.” 

Prosecutors in Istanbul 
have been trying to bring Mr. 
Bucak and Mr. Agar to trial 
for two months, but say ef- 
forts to remove their im- 
munity have been hindered by 
senior government officials. 
•-/Mr, Bucak has denied any 
wrongdoing- Mr- Agar has as- 
serted: ‘ ‘Those who wort for 
the state have secrets they 
carry to their graves.” Berth 
men are members of the True 
Path Party and have main- 
tained close ties to its leader, 
Foreign Minister Tansu 
Ciller. Mrs. Ciller was prime 
minister from 1993 to 1996, 
when many "mystery 
killings” took place. 

, At a news' conference Fri- 
day at which the commission 
report was made public, the 
commission chairman, 
Mehmet Elkatmis. said Mrs. 
Ciller had to bear some re- 
sponsibility for the crimes. 

"There is dirty money, 
-smu gg ling, terror, and an in- 
ternational dimension,” Mr. 
Elkatmis said. “People men- 
tioned in security reports as 
having links to the mafia have 
been promoted to the most 
important positions. These 
people have even become 
'ministers.” 


In presenting _ the report, 
Mr. Elkatmis said his com- 
mission, which deliberated 
for more than four months, 
had been denied access to 
many government documents 
on the ground that they in- 
cluded state secrets or “com- 
mercial secrets.” 

“We could not prepare the 
report as we wished, because 
our authority was restricted,” 
Mr. Elkatmis said. 

Opposition members of the 
investigating commission re- 
fused to take part in its final 
meetings to protest what they 
said were gaping failures in 
its agenda. They were espe- " 
dally angered that the com- 
mission voted not to summon 
Mrs. Ciller or her husband. 
Ozer Oiler. Mrs. Ciller has 
denied any wrongdoing. /- 

five of the rttng commis- 
sion members were from Mrs . 
Ciller's party and its coalition 
partner, the Welfare Party, 
beaded by. Prime Minister 
Necmemn Erbakan. 

The investigation ground 
man effective halt last month 
after the panel summoned the 
commander of the powerful 
rural police force known as 
the Gendarmerie. Tbe com- 
mander, General Teoman So- 
man, refused to appear* His 
refusal was .taken as a sign 
that tiie military did not want' 
Ihe possible involvement of 
top officers in the scandal to 
be inves t igated. 

A former interior minister, 
Mehmet Saglam, told the 
commission that the National 
Security Council, which is 
made up of. top military and 
civilian leaders, had approved 
the use of extralegal mea- 
sures. “I took initiatives un- 
der decisions made by the 
council” Mr. Saglam said. 

The repeat said that the use 

of gunmen to cany out 
killing s on behalf of the gov- 
ernment began after, the 1980 
military coup, and that Kur- 
dish nationalists were among 
the victims. It said the gun- 
men used their official con- 
nections to cover drug smug- 
gling, money laundering and 
the killing of business rivals. . 

Accoramg to the report, the 
convicted smuggler killed in 
the November car crash, Ab- 
dullah Cam held" 13 pass- 
ports in various names, all 
issued on orders from senior 
government officials. War- 
rants for his arrest had been 
issued by Interpol and by the 
Turkish police, which suspec- 
ted him of carrying out a 1 978 
triUmg of seven leftist stu- 
dents in Ankara. 

The report also said that vil- 
lage guards, who are used by 
tbe military as an auxiliary to 
help fight Kurdish rebels, have 
been involved in crimes. 



UHTimu/lpw FmwftNx 

Charles Sobhraj, wbo served 20 years in Indian jails, as be boarded a plane In New Delhi. 

Paris Charges Deported ‘Serpent’ 


Agence France-Prvsse 

PARIS — Charles Sobhraj-, aFreoch citizen who 
spent 20 years in Indian jails, was charged with 
poisoning Tuesday but was not detai n ed, h is lawyer 
said. 

The charges that he tried to poison a French 
citizen in India were brought tile same day that Mr. 
Sobhraj, 52. arrived in France after being deported 
from New Delhi. 

The police arrested him as soon as he arrived 
aboard an Air France flight and took him to police 
headquarters in Nanterre to question him in con- 
nection with the 10-year-old poisoning complaint, 
judicial sources said. 

Mr. Sobhraj, who has been linked to several 


unsolved murders in India in the 1970s and is 
-known as the ‘Serpent,’ was fined in India for the 
poisoning case. His alleged victim recovered, but 
lodged a complaint with French authorities. 

Mr. Sobhraj was not immediately allowed to 
meet his lawyer, Jacques Verges, who defended the 
Nazi war criminal Klaus Barbie and the inter- 
national terrorist Carlos. Mr. Verges called his 
client’s arrest “dangerous and arbitrary.” 

Mr. Sobhraj was released from jail in New Delhi 
in February after being convicted for manslaughter 
and for drugging and robbing tourists in 1976. He 
was ordered deported to France, but officials blocked 
his deportation while they checked if Mr. Sobhraj, 
who was born in Saigon, was a French citizen. 


BRIEFLY 


EU Parliament 
Calls for a Ban 
On Altered Corn 


OvrSuffFnmQspxches 

STRASBOURG — The European Parliament 
on Tuesday overwhelmingly voted to recommend 
an end to die sale of genetically altered com in the 
15-nation European Union. 

By a vote of 407 in favor, 2 against, and 29 
abstentions, the Parliament called on the European 
Commission, the EU's executive body, to suspend 
an authorization for imports of the grain, which 
was granted last December to the Swiss company 
Ciba-Geigy. 

Resolutions by the Parliament are not binding on 
the commission. 

Fanners, environmentalists and consumer 
groups have protested the imports, which largely 
come from the United States, contending that the 
corn has not been adequately tested for safety. 

The Parliament's call for ending the corn sales 
comes as U.S. and EU officials prepare to meet in 
Washington next week to discuss EU regulations 
for genetically altered food products. 

The Parliament’s Green group welcomed Tues- 
day's vote, saying that the commission had acted 
against the wishes of member states by allowing 
die sale of the corn. 

The resolution also calls on the commission to 
re-examine the safety of genetically altered food 
products. Austria and Luxembourg already have 
banned the com imports, saying the herbicides and 
antibiotic-resistant chemicals used to produce it 
have not been sufficiently tested. 

France banned the cultivation of genetically 
modified com last February, but is allowing it to be 
imported with special labeling. 

During a debate Monday. European parliamen- 
tarians accused the commission of making the 
same mistakes with genetically modified organ- 
isms as it had with * ‘mad cow' ’ disease, putting the 
interests of industry ahead of food safety and 
environmental protection. 

Consumer concern in Europe about food safety 
has grown since last year's outbreak of mad cow 
disease, afaiai brain-wasting condition in cattle, and 
its perceived mishandling by Britain and the com- 
mission. <AP. Reuters} 


Cyprus Cabinet Reshuffle 

NICOSIA — The Cyprus cabinet resigned 
Tuesday to enable a government reshuffle 10 
months before the latest possible date for pres- 
idential elections. 

The new composition of the center-right gov- 
ernment will be announced later, said a gov- 
ernment spokesman, Yiannakis Cassoulides. 

He described the reshuffle as an act of “re- 
newal” and did not link it to any need by the 
government to spruce up its image to bolster 
President Glavcos Klerides’s chances for re -elec- 
tion next year, if he decides to run again. 

“It is a political deed,” Mr. Cassoulides said 
“Governments are reshuffled to provide a breath 
of fresh air, a new image." 

It is the first cabinet shake-up since Mr. 
KJerides, founder of the rightist Democratic Rally 
party, was elected president for a five-year term in 
February 1993. 

Mr. Klerides’s Greek Cypriot administration is 
recognized as the only legitimate government in 
Cyprus, which has been divided since Turkey 
invaded the north of the island in 1974. (Reuters) 

Tax Reform Talks in Bonn 

BONN — Leaders of the governing center- 


right coalition and of the Social Democrat op- 
position are to hold new negotiations on tax 
reform in Bonn next Tuesday, tbe Social Demo- 
cratic Party said Tuesday. 

The talks will be held in Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl’s offices. 

A first meeting of fee two sides aimed at 
agreeing on tax cuts took place Feb. 24, but the 
talks were broken off after a second meeting, 
March 7. (AFP) 

Vote on EU Righ ts Record 

BRUSSELS — The European Parliament nar- 
rowly approved a report Tuesday criticizing fee 
European Union’s human rights record, wife fee 
legislature's leftist and rightist parties squaring 
off over individual liberties. 

Parliament approved fee document presented 
by its Committee on Civil Liberties and Internal 
Affairs by a vote of 174 to' 166, with 66 ab- 
stentions. 

The report offered a broad range of issues to be 
included under the umbrella of human rights — 
opposition to euthanasia, the right to a clean 
environment, and fee need to safeguarding per- 
sonal information on fee Internet. 

Among tbe alleged human rights deficiencies 
cited are the use of euthanasia in fee Netherlands, 
fee export of arms by Germany to Turkey, and the 


imprisonment by Greece of conscientious ob- 
jectors to military service. (API 

IRA Claims Aintree Scare 

DUBLIN — The Irish Republican Army 
claimed responsibility T iiesday for fee false bomb 
warnings that disrupted fee Grand National 
steeplechase last weekend. 

The IRA was widely assumed to lie responsible 
for the two coded telephone warnings that led 
police to evacuate 70.000 racing fans from fee 
Aintree racecourse, near Liverpool, half an hour 
before fee start of fee race Saturday. 

Tbe race was rescheduled and run amid tight 
security Monday. 

The IRA's claim was made in a telephone call 
to RTE, Ireland's state broadcasting service. The 
caller used a recognized code word RTE said. 

While the IRA usually admits responsibility for 
attacks, it is unusual for it to admit responsibility 
for a hoax. 

Police investigating fee bomb warnings said 
Tuesday they were examining a telephone booth 
outside a restaurant in Liverpool feat might have 
been used for the hoax warning. 

Meanwhile, a 14-year-old boy was charged 
with placing a fake explosive device in a park in 
Liverpool minutes after fee conclusion of the 
rescheduled race. (AP) 



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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, "WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Rebel Sets Next Goal: 
Capture of Kinshasa 

Kabila Rules Out Any Role for Mobutu; 
Government Radio Says No. 2 City Is Lost 


By Howard W. French 

New York Times Service 

KINSHASA, Zaire — Addressing a 
jubilant crowd in the diamond-mining 
capital of central Zaire, the leader of this 
country’s rebellion ruled out Tuesday a 
power-sharing agreement with the gov- 
ernment and promised to quickly train 
his guns on the capital, Kinshasa. 

Speaking before a crowd of tens of 
thousands at the site of his movement's 
latest major victory, Mbuji-Mayi, die 
rebel leader, Laurent Kabila, ruled out 
any future role for the country's long- 
time dictator, Mobutu Sese Seko, and 
urged another of his prime rivals for 
power, the newly named prime minister, 
to “to leave the Mobutu camp." 

Confident after having seized the cen- 
ter of Zaire's lucrative diamond industry 
last weekend, and encircling Lubum- 
bashi, the capital of the country’s south- 
ern copper belt, Mr. Kabila vowed to 
speed up his bid for power. 

“Our next objective is the capital. 
Kinshasa," Mr. Kabila told the rally in 
Mbuji-Mayi. “All of the evil in this 
country is decided in Kinshasa." Mr. 
Kabila heads the Alliance of Democratic 
Forces for the Liberation of the Congo 
(Zaire). 

With an estimated $20 million in of- 
ficial monthly receipts for diamonds and 
with far more money believed to be 
made through the black market trade, 
Mbuji-Mayi is Zaire's richest source of 
hard currency and represents a huge 
economic boost for the rebellion. 

For the second consecutive day, Kin- 
shasa, was the scene of rowdy street 
protests by supporters of Prime Minister 
Etienne Tshisekedi. who attacked the 
homes and vehicles of members of Par- 
liament who have begun efforts to unseat 
him less than a week after he was chosen 
as prime minister. 

At least one member of Parliament 
was beaten by a street mob, and a former 
minister of Marshal Mobutu's was 
dragged from his car, robbed and beaten 
near Parliament after be was mistaken 
for a legislator. 

Mr. Tshisekedi, a longtime political 
opponent of Marshal Mobutu, was re- 
turned to tire office of prime minister for 
the third time last week in an effort by 
both political supporters and enemies of 
Mr. Mobutu to blunt the rebel advance 
by handing the government to a popular 
politician. 

Mr. Tshisekedi quickly enraged the 
political class here, however, by dis- 
solving Parliament in a decree of du- 


bious legality and naming a government 
that excluded Marshal Mobutu's allies. 

Supporters of Mr. Tshisekedi s have 
vowed to mount a huge demonstration 
here Wednesday in which they say they 
will seat the prime minister’s govem- 
menL 

Mr. Kabila’s threat to take the capital 
came as his troops closed in on Lub- 
umbashi, 1,500 kilometers to the south- 
east. where units of Marshal Mobutu's 
Presidential Guard were reported to be 
offering sporadic resistance. 

While officers of the Presidential 
Guard claimed to have prevailed in sev- 
eral skirmishes with the rebels. Western 
diplomats gave them Little chance of 
holding oul And in an unusual an- 
nouncement, state radio in Kinshasa said 
that Lubumbashi, the second-largest 
city, would fall in “a matter of hours." 

Throughout Zaire's six-month civil 
war, government troops have typically 
fled at the approach of Mr. Kabila’s 
forces, pillaging each city as they flee. 

Perhaps to assure a measure of dignity 
in peace talks held in recent days in 
South Africa, the government sent loy- 
alist units of the Presidential Guard, a 
heavily armed and relatively well- 
trained force that is drawn almost ex- 
clusively from Marshal Mobutu's north- 
ern Ngbandi tribe, to mount a symbolic 
defense of Lubumbashi. 

“They will put up a show, perhaps, 
but the city is basically undefendable at 
this point," a military expert said. 

Although its mineral production has 
declined to a small fraction of capacity 
because of years of mismanagement and 
neglect, the copperbelt around Lubum- 
bashi boasts 10 percent of the world's 
known reserves of copper and 80 percent 
of cobalt deposits. 

Coming fast on the heels of Kisangani 
and Mbuji-Mayi. Lubumbashi ’s fall 
would mean that Kinshasa would be the 
only remaining major city in govern- 
ment control. Mr. Kabila now claims 
that his fighters have advanced deep into 
two of the remaining four provinces that 
have escaped their control, including 
Mr. Mobutu’s fief of Equateur. 

The peace talks in South Africa were 
adjourned indefinitely Tuesday, without 
agreement on a cease-fire, ostensibly to 
allow each side to consult with its lead- 
ers. While diplomats reported construct- 
ive discussions on questions like future 
elections in the country, the talks are 
fundamentally stalled over the rebels* 
insistence that Marshal Mobutu, who 
has ruled Zaire for 31 years, imme- 
diately step down. 



BRIEFLY 


Colin nr flu&afRniU’iy 

Diamond sellers in rebel-held Kisangani waiting Tuesday to enter the town’s only operating diamond concession. 

UN Warns of Delay for Zaire Airlift 


Reuters 

KISANGANI. Zaire — The UN 
refugee agency said Tuesday that prep- 
arations to fly 100,000 Rwandan Hutu 
refugees home from eastern Zaire could 
take as long as 10 days. 

Paul Stromberg, a spokesman for the 
UN High Commissioner for Refugees, 
said the first to be flown out would be 
children, followed by adults healthy 
enough to travel. 

“It's still going to take a week or 10 
days before the start of the airlift." Mr. 
Stromberg said. “In the meantime we 


will care for the refugees." He added 
that fuel shortages in Kisangani and in 
the border city of Goma were slowing 
the operation. 

“.The planes will require fuel and the 
whole logistical operation to be in place 
before the airlift starts," he said. 

“We need planes,” the spokesman 
added, “a way to add to the transport 
across the river to bring the refugees up 
to Kisangani and that simply more 
trucks, as the train is irregular at best" 

On Saturday, after 48 hours of high- 
level international pressure, the United 


Nations extracted an agreement from the 
Zairean rebel leader, Laurent Kabila, to 
allow the refugees to fly home via Kisan- 
gani 

Mr. Stromberg said he was still waiting 
to bear whether Rwanda’s government 
would allow die planes to land. He said 
the first flights might be to Goma or to 
Bukavu, a Zairian town to the south. 

Many of the Hutu refugees, who end- 
ed up south of Kisangani after six months 
of fleeing the Tutsi-dominated rebels, 
are from southwestern Rwanda near 
Bukavu. They left Rwanda in 1994. 


U.S. Alleges Plot to Attack Gulf Troops 


ALBANIA: Waiting for the Peace Force 


Continued from Page I 

fishing boat being refitted for another 
refugee run. About 13,000 Albanians 
already have fled to Italy. 

In a nearby schoolhouse, a meeting of 
the self-nominated National Salvation 
Committee drew up its latest demands 
that the government compensate in- 
vestors for their lost savings. Suddenly, a 
troop of “police auxiliaries" burst into 
the room. They wore camouflage uni- 
forms and carried AK-47 Kalashnikov 
assault rifles but had no official insignia 
□or any inclination to say for whom they 
worked. 

“We heard there was someone from 
government TV here,” the leader said 
unapologetically as he eyed an Italian 
television crew. "Fortunately for you, 
you’re not them." 

Inside the buraed-out city hall at the 
end of the coastal road. Finance Minister 
Arben Malaj met with local leaders to 
convince them that the government is on 
its way to working out a refund for the 
investors. Outside the meeting, an irate 
Albanian screamed a phrase that seems 
to be universally known here in Italian: 
“Up yours! Up yours!” 

How long this nervous state can last 
without exploding is anyone's guess. 
Last month, mobs looted not only mil- 
itary warehouses throughout the country 
but also businesses and granaries. The 
outburst followed the collapse of the 
extremely high-risk pyramid investment 
schemes. 

Although the revolt is fractured and 
without clear leadership, a common de- 
mand is tiie resignation of President Sali 
Berisha. He is blamed by many for tol- 
erating the operation of unsound invest- 


ment companies and widely resented for 
overseeing abuses of civil rights over the 
past year. 

With Mr. Berisha’s Democratic Party 
and the opposition Socialists jockeying 
for tactical advantage, the chances of a 
quick political solution appear slim. Mr. 
Berisha is hunkered down in the capital. 
Tirana, where he issues commumqu& 
blaming the crisis on Socialist politi- 
cians whom be considers to be unre- 
formed Communists trying to ride unrest 
to power. 

Mr. Berisha dominates the remnants 
of the national police force, which are 
concentrated in Tirana and some towns 
in northern Albania. He holds the reins 
of the secret police, which, although 
officially disbanded, continues to op- 
erate, according to Western diplomats. 

Mr. Berisha also controls state tele- 
vision, which presents the calm face of a 
propped-up government No independent 
newspapers are permitted to publish, only 
the mouthpieces of political parties. 

New parliamentary elections are 
scheduled for the end of June, and op- 
position leaders hope the results will 
weaken Mr. Berisha and perhaps lead to 
his ouster. But fraud has maned the past 
two elections in Albania, and with the 
country unsettled, a clean vote may not 
be possible. 

Last month, Mr. Berisha appointed a 
national reconciliation cabinet, under 
Prime Minister Bashkim Fino, a Social- 
ist But Mr. Berisha seems not to trust his 
own creation. Last week, after new min- 
isters met with rebels in Vlore, he issued 
a statement asking whether they were 
siding with the “legitimate govern- 
ment" or with “Communist rebels that 
want to overthrow the government.’’ 


By Elaine Sciolino 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
United States has uncovered 
the outlines of a terrorist plan 
by dissidents in Bahrain to 
attack American troops sta- 
tioned in the country and has 
put its forces there on alert, 
government officials report 

The U.S. Navy has limited 
the movements of all forces 
stationed in Bahrain and has 
canceled shore leave for 
American sailors in the Guff, 
the officials said. 

The decision puts the 1 ,000 
military personnel stationed 
in Bahrain on ahigher state of 
alert and bans the 12,000 
American sailors in the Gulf 


from visiting the country, the 
officials said. 

At least one plan by mem- 
bers of Bamain’s Shiite 
Hezbollah, or Party of Gad, to 
attack U.S. military personnel 
has been detected in the last 
few days, they said. Hezbollah 
is opposed to the Sunni-led 
government and the perma- 
nent U.S. military presence. 

Although the United States 
has not uncovered a plot with 
a date and- location, a 
Pentagon official described 
the plan as “serious.” 

The navy has maintained 
military arrangements with 
Bahrain for nearly half a cen- 
tury, and the United States 
Fifth Fleet’s administrative 
headquarters — with about 


1,000 personnel — is situated 
on a 20-acre (8-hectare) site 
outside the capital, Manama. 

Until further notice, dubs, 
bars and restaurants on the 
island nation will be off-limits 
to all U.S. military personneL 
The n°yy's decision, which 
took effect over the weekend, 
also prompted a security alert 
Monday on the U.S. Em- 
bassy's citizens’ hot line re- 
commending that all Amer- 
icans avoid certain public 
places in Bahrain. 

For more than three years, 
Bahrain has been racked by 
unrest sparked by the coun- 
try's Shiite Muslim majority, 
which demanded the restor- 
ation of Parliament. 

But the dissidents have nev- 


er attacked Americans, and no 
demonstrations have been dir- 
ected against the U-S- base. 

Since the bombing of an 
U.S. military installation near 
Dfaahran in Saudi Arabia in 
June that killed 19 Americ- 
ans, the navy has stepped op 
security at the B ahrain base, 
including stationing Marine 
guards there for the first time 
and expanding the perimeter 
of the complex. 

One reason for the current 
concern is the annual Muslim 
pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia, 
which begins Tuesday and 
will bring 2 million Muslims 
to the kingdom. That will al- 
low potential terrorists more 
opportunity to enter Bahrain 
via nearby Saudi Arabia. 


New Massacre of 13 
Reported in Algeria 

ALGIERS — Muslim militants 
raided a village in western Algeria, 
slitting the throats of 13 people, 
including an elderly man and three 
children, the victims’ relatives said 
Tuesday. . . 

The slayings were the latest m a 
surge of massacres as the govern- 
ment prepares for June paiihmicn- 
taiy elections amid a five-year-old 
Islamist insurgency. 

The militants descended on Mer- 
chiche, near Tie race n. overnight 
Sunday, demanding food, clothes, 
money and volunteers, foe relatives 
speaking on condition of an- 
onymity. When villagers refused to 
cooperate, the militants killed 13 
people. (AP) 

U.S. Judge Rejects 
Hamas Chief 9 s Bid 

NEW YORK — A federal judge 
has dismissed a request by the 
Hamas leader Mousa Abu Marzook 
to be released from jail or depor- 
ted. 

Judge Denise Cote said Monday 
she has no jurisdiction over the case 
because Israel withdrew its request 
to extradite the leader of the polit- 
ical wing of the terrorist group. Mr. 
Abu Marzook, who has been jailed 
since July 1995, is now being held 
on an Immigration and Naturaliz- 
ation Service order. 

Mr. Abu Marzook’s lawyer, Mi- 
chael Kennedy, said the immigra- 
tion service is holding his client 
until a deportation bearing. He said 
Mr. Abu Marzook is willing to leave 
but the government will not let him 
unless be admits he is a ter ro ri st 
“We’re saying he's being illegally 
detained by the U.S. government' ’ 
Mr. Kennedy said. My client is. 
consenting to expulsion." (AP) 

Brazil Establishes . 
Rights Whtchdog ■ 

BRASILIA — Brazil has set up a 
watchdog body to oversee human 
rights following public outrage over 
police brutality. News of foe new 
group came hours before Globo 
Television broadcast mere video- 
tape showing the police beating a 
group of men with belts and a large 
piece of wood. - 

Officials said President Fernando 
Hemique Cardoso had signed a de- 
cree establishing the National Hu- 
man Rig]its Secretariat and had also 
approved a bill, recently passed by 
Congress, that makes torture a 
crime for the first time. 

The videotape footage last week 
showed Sao Paulo military police 
beating civilians, extorting money 
and allegedly killing a man. Ten 
officers have been arrested and 
charged. ( Reuters ) 


9 


M ID EAST: Politics Bind Clinton and Netanyahu in Discussions 


ITALY: Albania Fight Threatens Prodi 


Continued from Page 1 

which clearly says ‘Yes’ to the mis- 
sion,” said Gianfranco Fini, leader of 
the hard-right National Alliance, and an 
ally of Mr. Berlusconi. 

The political crisis has been slowly 
building ever since Fausto Bertinotti. the 
leader of the Refounded Communist 
Party, declared categorically that his 
party would not support sending Italian 
troops to Albania. 

The Communists have argued that the 
multinational force would shore up sup- 
port for Albania's rightist President Sali 
Berisha, whose increasingly authoritari- 
an rule has come under strong criticism 
here. 

In fact, it was the suggestion by a 
leading Foreign Ministry official Tues- 
day that Italy was no longer willing to 
back Mr. Berisha. that caused the rightist 
opposition to back off its earlier pledge 
to support the government's deployment 
proposal. 

The remarks by Deputy Foreign Min- 
ister Piero Fassino drew a strong rebuke 
from Tirana, which characterized them 


as unacceptable interference in Al- 
bania’s internal affairs. Mr. Berlusconi 
said Mr. Fassino 's public shift away 
from Mr. Berisha could put Italian 
troops in danger. 

“Things like this expose our boys to 
greater risks.” Mr. Berlusconi said. 

The exchange of political charges and 
countercharges has erupted at a delicate 
moment for Italy, as commentators and 
politicians argue over whether this coun- 
try has the political stamina and courage 
to take command of a multinational 
force. From the start of the crisis in 
Albania. Italy has taken the lead in press- 
ing its European partners to keep the 
Balkan country from spinning out of 
control. 

Prompted by an exodus of 13,000 
Albanians across foe Adriatic Sea in 
rickety boats toward Italian shores and 
alarmed by the drowning of several 
dozen people in a vessel that sank over 
the Easter weekend, Italy has seen the 
restoration of order in Albania as a vital 
national interest, one that, until Tuesday, 
enjoyed support from a broad political 
spectrum. 


Continued from Page 1 

with Israeli prime ministers without very 
good reason and that the Democratic 
Party, despite the fund-raising scandal, 
has a significant debt that conservative 
American Jews are being relied on to 
help retire. 

Washington is not now prepared to 
spend foe domestic political capital re- 
quired to try to impose a Mideast solu- 
tion on a conservative Likud govern- 
ment that has legitimate concerns about 
a renewal of Palestinian terrorism at 
home. 

So Mr. Clinton made it clear to Mr. 
Netanyahu in their talks — which were 
intensive and serious, officials say, but 
not antagonistic — that bold efforts at 
fundamental dialogue made no sense at a 
moment when the Israelis and Palestini- 
ans did not even trust each other enough 
to talk about minor issues. 

The most important goal now, U.S. 
officials say, is to get Mr. Netanyahu and 
Yasser Arafat, the Palestinian leader, to 
trust each other enough to talk at all. 

So the Americans will talk to 
Palestinian officials this week and then 
the Israelis again and then send Mr. 
Clinton’s special Middle East envoy, 
Dennis Ross, back to the region next 
week. U.S. officials say. 

To get these talks going, Mr. Clinton 
will press Mr. Arafat to repeat and dis- 
play the absolute commitment to fight 
terrorism that Mr. Netanyahu demands 
to rebuild Israeli confidence. 

But in return, Mr. Netanyahu should 
move very quickly “to show Palestini- 
ans foe benefits of peace and to prove the 
seriousness of his intentions,” an Amer- 
ican official said. 

U.S. ideas and “very strong sugges- 
tions” include rapid Israeli construction 
of Arab housing in East Jerusalem, a 
quiet Israeli agreement not to create urn- 
lateral ‘ ‘facts on foe ground” in disputed 
areas while peace talks are under way 
and an Israeli offer to negotiate with the 
Palestinians, ahead of time, the size of 
foe next Israeli troop redeployment from 
the West Bank, required in September, 
rather than deciding it unilaterally. 

■Hie Americans also pressed Mr. Net- 
anyahu to move quickly to settle and 
implement the list of issues in foe second 
protocol signed at the Hebron agreement 
in January, including opening foe Gaza 
airport, making available port facilities 
for the faster transit of goods and ser- 
vices in and out of the Palestinian Au- 
thority, providing safe passage for 
Palestinians between Gaza and foe West 
Bank, and allowing more Palestinians to 
travel in and out of Israel to work. 

Mr. Netanyahu also promised, as the 
Americans insisted, that should accel- 
erated final-status talks lake place, they 


will not supersede the previous Oslo 
agreements and guarantees. 

This was one of the Palestinians* ma- 
jor concerns. 

Privately, U.S. officials say Mr. Net- 
anyahu got the message. 

But his own domestic political situ- 
ation requires the kind of belligerence 
and even defensiveness he displayed in 
his public appearances, blasting the 
Palestinians as violators of their prom- 


ises, criticizing the U.S. press for its 
alleged bias against Israel and claiming 
that by supporting foe Oslo agreements, 
he faced severe criticism at home. 

Mr. Netanyahu does face such crit- 
icism, but largely for his reactiveness 
and lack of clear direction, which is why 
be is pushing foe idea of a six-month 
negotiation and the formation of a unity 
government, together with the Labor 
Party, to broaden his effective mandate. 


RIOTS: 

Ethnic Intolerance 

Continued from Page 1 


those outbreaks, though none were re- 
ported dead in Rengasdengklok. 

The violence has been aimed mostly, 
at two. minority groups in this over- 
whelmingly Muslim and ethnic Malay 
nation: Christians and Chinese. 

The Chinese minority, about2 percent; 
of the population, controls as much as. 
four-fifths of the private economy and 

ISRAEL: 3 Palestinians Killed in Hebron and periodic violence here in the worid’s- 

largest Muslim country. Christianity is; 
when at least one of them opened fire, - - - 


Continued from Page 1 

senior Palestinian official in Jerusalem, 
asked whether Mr. Netanyahu had given 
a “green light’ ’ to settler violence, echo- 
ing the Israeli prime minister’s charge 
that Mr. Arafat had given a go-ahead for 
terrorism against Israel. 

The shooting in Hebron was the 
second by a settler in as many days. 

On Monday, a settler shot and se- 
riously wounded a Palestinian in the 
West Bank village of Kharabata, re- 
portedly after the settler’s car was 
stoned. 

The settlers involved in the incident 
Tuesday were students at the Shavei 
Hevron Yeshiva, a religious seminary 
where about 200 pupils study in a heav- 
ily guarded compound near other Jewish 
enclaves in the heart of Hebron. 

Two students, who carried Uzi sub- 
machine guns issued by the army for 
their protection, were walking on a road 
leading to the Tomb of the Patriarchs 


killing foe Palestinian. They told police 
investigators that they acted in self-de- 
fense after the Palestinian sprayed them 
with a chemical substance. 

“The investigation shows that they 
were indeed attacked,” said General 
Yossi Satbon, foe chief of the Israeli 
police in the West Bank. 

‘’The findings and bum marks on 
their faces indicate that indeed someone 
sprayed them with tear gas or another 
substance whose nature we stiff don’t 
know. We’re still cbeckmgwhefoer the 
shooting was justified.” The students 
were held for questioning by the police. 

But Palestinians who said they wit- 
nessed the incident asserted that the 
shooting was unprovoked. 

OmarZarou, who said be had watched 
from his store, reported that one of the 
settlers first bumped into the Palestinian 
and the second opened fire, shooting the 
man again after he had fallen to the 


also viewed as a symbol of wealth in 
parts of Indonesia. 

“Amok is a Malay word,” said a 
political scientist, Dewi Fortnna Anwar, 
in describing her compatriots’ predilec-^ 
tion for outbursts of violence. w 

Bat nobody here in this town of 36,000 
seemed to be able to explain how a quar- 
rel between neighbors amid explode so 
suddenly into widespread destruction. 

“People were saying a Muslim prayer 
bouse had been attacked with stones or 
tom down,” said the public school prin- 
cipal, Weskomi. who like many Indone- 
sians uses only one name. “The emo- 
tions of young people were aroused. 
They felt they Had to taka action." 

Mr. Cuang, the merchant, andhis fam- 
ily fled, and soon their home was a ruin. 

‘Tve lived here for 35 years, and we 
always felt secure,” saidRoriaMulyani, 
another Chinese merchant. “The 
Muslim people here have always been 
good. Now we stay very quiet We don’t 
say anything at alL" 


HUNGER:^ North Korean Famine Intensifies, Grain Deal Sealed 


* 


Continued from Page 1 

financial terms for the sale. The United 
States has a trade embargo against the 
Communist nation, but allows the sale of 
humanitarian items on a case-by-case 
basis. 

In Seoul, traders close to the deal said 
Tuesday that North Korea had agreed to 
barter about 4,000 metric tons of zinc for 
about 20,000 tons of wheat. Traders 
valued the wheat shipment at about $4 
million, roughly equal to the value of the 
zinc. 

Representative Tony Hall, Democrat 
of Onto, speaking in Tokyo aftera three- 
day visit to North Korea, said that “ev- 
idence of slow starvation on a massive 
scale was plain wherever we made an 
effort to look.” 

Mr. Hall added that conditions had 
deteriorated significantly since he made 
a similar visit last August. 

The congressman said be was allowed 


u n li m ited access to villages north of the 
capital where few outsiders are ever 
permitted. He said he met an elderly 
woman making soup fr om year-old cab- 
bage leaves; visited an unheated hospital 
with no medicine; and saw "shockingly 
underweight” children, many of whom 
were orphaned when their mothers died 
from malnutrition. 

His bleak assessment mirrors those of 
the relatively small number of others 
who have been allowed to visiL 

On Tuesday, a UN World Food Pro- 
gram official in Geneva, Christiane 
Berthiaume, said. “The World Food 
Program has reached the conclusion t-hnt 
famine is virtually inevitable in North 
Korea in foe next few months.” 

Some observers of North Korea have 
suggested tharfood aid is die smartest 
course to follow because starvation could 
lead to instabOity, which could increase 
the chances of some desperate militar y 
action. Others argue riuw a popular up- 


rising is unlikely because iff die cult-Iifc& 
following President Kim Jong II has in-, 1 
herited from his late father, Kun II Seng.. 

The grain deal was struck in Berjmg’ 
last Saturday, traders g»iH ■ 

A Cargill spok e s w o m an, Lori John-’ 
son, said die company was operating) 
under a license it received from the U.S- 
Trcastny Department in December. ; 

Cargill's license constitutes an ex-t 
ception to the strict U.S. embargo onj 
North Korea. The last time WashingtotL 
made such an exception was in March 1 
J®*t year, when U.S. officials eased! 

trading with the enemy*! laws to allow 
private citizens to send money for food,; 
clothing, and medicine to NorfoKorea. t 
The chairman of foeTJ-S. Joint Griefs; , - 
of Staff, General J ohn ShaKkashvih, met f* 
ms South Korean counterpart,. YooD’ 
Yong Nani, on Tuesday to discuss the. 
threat from North Korea as ft grapples; 
with its food crisis a. Seoul milit ary of-! 


fidalsaid. 


(APP,Rauers,WP) 






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PAGE 8 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Jtcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PllLISHEU v> mi THE NEW YORK TIMES VND THE KASHIKCim' EOST 


Keep Helping Haiti 


i THE WASHINGTON *OST Israel: A Choice Between Duress and Respect 


Two and a half years after American 
troops intervened to end a murderous 
dictatorship in Haiti, that country faces 
daunting troubles. Its ministries are 
inept, its Parliament paralyzed and its 
police quick on the trigger. Yet these 

S oblems represent progress of a son. 

airi has gone from a government ded- 
icated to brutality and corruption to 
one of inexperience and incompetence. 
That is a sign that the United States and 
the international community can best 
help by staying involved. 

President Rene PnSval is not a 
seasoned leader, but he has tried to be a 
responsible one. He has pushed 
through a fractious Parliament a des- 
perately needed program to sell in- 
efficient public enterprises and mod- 
ernize Haiti’s economy. The reforms 
would not only qualify Haiti for in- 
ternational funds that have been held 
back, they would also begin to lift the 
economy and help Haiti ’s poor. 

The reforms have been blocked 
largely by Mr. Preval’s political ment- 
or, the only man in Haiti with a real 
political base, former President Jean- 
Bertrand Aristide. Mr. Aristide in the 
past has spoken for Haiti's people, but 
his role now is negative. His supporters 
have brought parliamentary action to a 
standstill. Ironically, he is joined in his 
opposition to economic reform by some 
members of Haiti's elite, who have 
grown rich from the monopolies they 
hold in the protected economy. But Mr. 
Aristide's opposition also shows that 
Haiti is in no danger of becoming a one- 
party dictatorship. A political split over 
economic policy is an appropriate dis- 
agreement in a democracy. 

The abuses by the new National Po- 


lice are extremely serious. In die 21 
months since the United States estab- 
lished the force, police have killed 
about 50 Haitians. The police must be 
held accountable for these crimes. The 
government is beginning to do that- The 
police's inspector general is investi- 
gating the killings. Most of those ac- 
cused have been fired, and some are in 
jail. This is one reason that the murders 
do not justify a cutoff of U.S. aid and 
Tr ainin g- The violence has not been the 
result of a deliberate policy, as were the 
thousand murders each year committed 
by the most recent dictatorship. 

The police need more training, re- 
sources and leadership. A related prob- 
lem is Haiti's virtually nonexistent 
justice system. The Clinton adminis- 
tration considers the building of a 
justice system a top priority. But reform 
efforts have been hun by an overly 
centralized program that slights the 
realities of Haiti's largely rural courts. 

For a few more months. Haiti could 
use the security and scrutiny provided 
by the 1300 international "troops re- 
maining in the country. Some are due 
to leave in July, but Canada, which has 
750 troops there, has said it will try to 
stay until the end of the year. The other 
troops should stay, too. 

If Haiti is to be able to feed itself and 
break the habits that come from cen- 
turies of occupation, dictatorship and 
mismanagement, it will likely need 
economic and technical help for years. 


It deserves such help. Haiti still faces 
serious problems, but thanks to the 
United States and other countries it is 
now a democracy with a government 
committed to solving them. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Syria Caught in the Act 


This is as close as anyone is likely to 
get to catching Syria, an old player, in 
the act of being a party to terrorism. 

The Saudis had asked Syria to ap- 
prehend a Saudi who was living in 
Syrian-controlled Lebanon and was 
suspected of involvement in a bombing 
in Saudi Arabia that killed five Amer- 
icans and two others. So reported 
Thomas Lippman and David Ottaway 
of The Washington Post {IHT, April 7). 
The Syrians, however, weighing their 
ties with Saudi .Arabia, put a higher 
value on Hezbollah for its straggle 
against Israel in southern Lebanon, and 
declined to tempt a military confron- 
tation over the suspect, Ahmed 
Ibrahim Mughassil. 

Subsequently, a truck bomb in the 
Saudi city of Dhahran killed 19 more 
Americans. The suspected master- 
mind: Ahmed Ibrahim Mughassil. now 
believed to be in Iran. He is from 
Hezbollah, a radical Islamic group 
supported by Iran as well as Syria. 

Syrian officials provided partial 
confirmation of this account, die Post 
reporters wrote, because the account 
shows that Damascus bad no role in 


plotting or carrying out the second 
bombing. But. of course, if this account 
holds up, then Syria is admitting that 
by stepping back and allowing events 
to unfold without check, it enabled a 
deadly act of terrorism to occur. 

The Saudi dissidents who are held 
accountable for the two bombings may 
have done the deed. The governments 
of Syria and. it seems. Iran could have 
prevented it and chose not to; chose in 
fact to help make it happen. Those 
American military men are no less 
dead by either path. 

Syria and Iran are already both on 
the U.S government’s annually re- 
viewed list of nations that sponsor in- 
ternational terrorism. At a certain 
point, new crimes of this sort or new 
reports of these crimes become so fa- 
miliar as to be greeted by a shrug, not 
by shock and outrage. But although 
they may be repeared, they are not 
'•routine.'’ They are violations of the 
norms of expected individual and state 
behavior, and civilized people every- 
where have a common interest in not 
blurring the difference. 

—THE WASHINGTON POET. 


A Dawdling Congress 


It is far too early to call this a do- 
nothing Congress, but it certainly has 
been a done-nothing one so far. The 
members come back this week from 
their Easier recess with the year a 
fourth over and little to show for it. As 
ever, the main item is the budget, 
which encompasses much more than 
just the budget. It requires members of 
Congress to make health care, edu- 
cation, tax and all kinds of other policy 
as they work their way toward the 
fiscal result they seek. 

The Republicans have a pretty clear 
idea of the direction in which they want 
to go in all these areas, but can't decide 
how hard to push. In the last Congress, 
when they pushed too hard for spend- 
ing, tax and regulatory cuts, it cost 
them. Do they risk paying such a polit- 
ical price again, or do they water their 
agenda? Congress, having received the 
president’s budget, is supposed to 
adopt the brood outline of an altern- 
ative by spring so that the committees 
have time to fill in the details by fall, 
when the new fiscal year begins. 

The Republicans have yet to agree 
on even such basic aspects of an al- 
ternative as whether to include the tax 
cuts they seek, and how large to make 
them. Some members want to balance 
the budget first, then take up tax cuts 
separately, lest they be accused again 
of cutting social programs that benefit 
the needy to finance tax cuts that would 
mainly benefit the better-off. 

Not a great deal is happening outside 


the framework of the budget, either. 
Campaign finance is of course an issue, 
but most of the effort thus far has gone 
into finding ways not to legislate even 
while sounding suitably indignant 
about the runaway fund-raising prac- 
tices in last year's campaign. 

A higher education bill will be de- 
bated. but it is expected to be mainly a 
reauthorization with little change of 
the existing forms of aid- The action in 
higher education will be in connection 
with the budget, where the president 
has proposed tax cuts that would con- 
stitute a major new form of aid. 

There also may be a housing bill, and 
there will be discussion, but probably 
not much more than that, of utility 
deregulation. As to environmental le- 
gislation, the agenda is anybody’s 
guess. Neither the administration nor 
the Republicans have made up their 
minds yet which proposals, if any. to 
press, whether on endangered species, 
forest management, clean air. clean wa- 
ter. Superfimd or any of the rest Mostly 
at this point, they're milling around. 

They may yet get un tracked, cut a 
budget deal that does more than tem- 
porize and make much other progress. 
It is always risky to predict how a 
Congress will behave — and it is also 
the case that a Congress can only be 
judged over the full two years of its 
life. It often takes that long to do the 
important work. But the first three 
months have been pretty barren. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Heralb^Sribunc 

rnunn him m ton rm» rm 

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91 W. Intervatuma! HmdJ Tribune. All rigka ttsmtd. ISSN ■ 0294-SO52. 


B OSTON — Underlying all the 
years of conflict between Israelis 
and Palestinians, there has been a fun- 
damental choice for the two peoples. 
One side could try to dominate or de- 
stroy the other, or they could live side by 
side with a degree of mutual respect 
For the Palestinians, the first course 
meant rejection of die very idea of the 
Jewish state, opposing its superior 
force by terrorism. The second was the 
path of compromise, agreeing to live in 
peace in a mini-state alongside Israel. 

For Israel, the first choice meant 
permanent control of all occupied ter- 
ritory and suppression of its Palestinian 
inhabitants. The second meant accept- 
ance of Palestinian aspirations for a 
homeland, negotiating about its nature 
and territory. 

At Oslo, both sides chose the second 
course, the path of peace. Now that 
choice is in doubt- The events of recent 
weeks — nnitarer ai, h umiliating actions 
by the Israeli government, Palestinian 

K 3 test and terro rism in response — 
ve the menacing ring of atavism. 
Benjamin Netanyahu blames it all on 
Yasser Arafat, who he says gave a 
“green light” to terrorists. Diplomats 


By Anthony Lewis 


on the scene disagree. I do not know 
exactly what Mr. Arafat did, but I do 
know this. If Yasser Arafat had been on 
Elba, Palestinians would have felt the 
same anger ax Mr. Netanyahu's policy. 

When Mr. Netanyahu announced 
that Israel's promised next withdrawal 
would be from only 2 percent of the 
West Bank, and decided suddenly to 
start building homes for 30.000 Jews 
in East Jerusalem, the Palestinian re- 
action was predictable. Indeed, Israeli 
security officials predicted it — vi- 
olence if the Jerusalem project went 
ahead. President Hosni Mubarak of 
Egypt said foe same thing. 

The Palestinians’ reaction was pre- 
dictable for a simple reason. They saw 
Mr. Netanyahu's actions, taken without 
consulting or even informing Mr. Ara- 
fat. as a rejection of Oslo. They thought 
he had chosen the first course: dom- 
ination instead of mutual respect They 
saw his aim as permanent Israeli oc- 
cupation of most of foe West Bank, with 
just some islands of Palestinian control. 

“For 13 months there was no vi- 


olence because there was hope.” said 
Saeb Arakat, a senior Palestinian ne- 
gotiator much respected by his Israeli 
counterparts.' “Netanyahu succeeded 
in taking that hope away.” 

Some Israelis, and some Amen can 
supporters of Israel, seem to find it 
hard to nnHarsfand why Palestinians 
should be discontented- For example, 
they say, Jerusalem under Israeli gov- 
ernance is a united city in which 
Palestinians are fairly treated. 

But anyone who has visited Jeru- 
salem with eyes open knows that in 
reality it is not a united city. There is a 
Palestinian sector where few Israelis 
ever go, a sector poor and starved of 
public support. 

Bernard Wasserstcin, president of 
the Oxford Center for Hebrew and Jew- 
ish Studies, summed it up recently in 
The Times Literary Supplement in 
London: In foe 1992 municipal budget, 
the last under Mayor Teddy Kollek, 

in^Jewish areas. S150 in Palestinian. A 
third of Palestinians live three to a 
room, while just 2-5 percent of Jews do. 
A 1995 municipal report said that the 
East Jerusalem sewage system was half 


the requited si 2 ® 11181 stfooolsand 

streets and lights were inadequate. . 

i .ik e anyone else. Palestinians feel 
resentment when forced to live as a 
second-class group, unable to control 
their own lives. If Mr. A rafat acqui- 
esced in a permanent stains of that kind, 
he would not remain their l e ader. 

Violence hurts the Palestinian cause, 
but it cannot be stopped at the diktat of 
Mr. Arafat- In the long run only peace 
— a peace of hope — can do m at. 

Israel’s rapprochement with the rest 
of the Arab world also depends on 
peace with the Palestinians. Mr. Net- 
anyahu should not have been surprised 
when an Arab conference last week 
for suspension of foe ties bong 
formed with Israel. 

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict will 
end only when both parties can live in 
respect and security. That means Israel 
accepting a disarmed Palestinian state 
in the West Bank and Gaza, with a 
political place in a still single Jeru- 
salem. I am an optimist, and I think that 

li^wSlbe lost before Mr. Netanyahu 
or a successor chooses peace. 

The New York Tones. 


Sudan: An Expanding Civil War With an Iran Connection 


L ONDON — Sudan, Af- 
rica's largest country, has 
had three coups d'dtat and a 
civil war that been going on and 
off since the 1950s. Despite its 
size, its strategic location be- 
tween Central Africa and foe 
Red Sea, its control of much of 
the waters of the Nile and its 
huge natural resources, includ- 
ing oiL it has attracted little in- 
ternational attention. 

The civil war, pitting the rul- 
ing Muslim Arabs in foe north 
against foe largely Christian 
and animist black Africans in 
the south, did not seem a threat 
to foe region. The war. which 
has taken a million lives and 
produced at least 3.5 million 
refugees, was largely regarded 
as a domestic problem. 

That is no longer the case. 
Since December the war in the 
south has been extended to foe 
eastern provinces, where an op- 
position army, attacking from 
bases in Ethiopia and Eritrea, 


By Amir Taheri 


has captured several towns and 
is threatening to cut off the 
country's sole access to the sea 
at Port Sudan- A new offensive 
is expected by another rebel 
army attacking from Uganda. 

The Khartoum regime, an al- 
liance of Muslim fundamental- 
ists and military officers, has 
threatened to extend foe war to 
Ethiopia, Eritrea and Uganda. 

Egypt has wanted that it may 
become involved. What worries 
Egypt is foe prospect of Iranian 
military intervention in support 
of the Khartoum fundamental- 
ists. An air bridge has operated 
recently between Tehran and 
Khartoum, with I ranian cargo 
planes ferrying in food, medi- 
cine and, according to Western 
and Arab sources, large quan- 
tities of weapons. 

In recent years Sudan has 
been the centerpiece of Iranian 
strategy in the Red Sea region 


and black Africa. It has hosted 
the Iranian president on two 
state occasions. More than 100 
ministerial and other senior Ir- 
anian political and military mis- 
sions have gone to Khartoum 
since 1992. The two countries 
have signed more than 30 
agreements ranging from agro- 
business joint ventures to train- 
ing for Sudanese army and in- 
telligence officers in Iran. 

According to Tehran sources, 
at least 400 members of foe Ir- 
anian Revolutionary Guard are 
present in Sudan, allegedly en- 
gaged in training militants fro m 
a dozen African countries. Un- 
der a recent agreement. Iran is to 
dispatch thousands of “con- 
struction mujahidin.” a para- 
military organization, to Sudan 
to help build logistical infra- 
structure. Port Sudan provides 
the Iranian navy, and its three 
new Russian-built attack sub- 


marines, with its only mooring 
facilities outside Iran. Tehran 
has extended aid worth $180 
million to Sudan, chiefly in 
weapons and cut-price oiL 

Sudan is the only Muslim 
country to have followed Iran's 
example by establishing a rad- 
ical f undamentali st regime. 
Khartoum’s chief theoretician, 
Hassan Turabi, has emerged as 
foe principal advocate of Ira- 
nian views in Africa. 

As a man who helped recruit 
fighters for the war to Afghan- 
istan in the 1980s, Mr. Turabi 
Has man y contacts with radical 
groups from Pakistan to Algeria 
and from the Gulf to Bosnia. 
Arab analysts warn that he 
mi ght nnlea&h his “A fghan " 

friends against pro-' Western re- 
gimes in foe region. 

The struggle between radical 
Islam and foe ruling elites in foe 
Muslim world led to the Iran- 
Iraq war in tire 1980s. It could 
now cause a war in Sudan in 


which Iran and Egypt would be 
fighting on opposite sides, and 
with Israel, Saudi Arabia and 
Libya also becoming involved. 

Washington has a perplexing 
policy vis-k-vis Khaaoom. Su- 
dan figures on the State Depart- 
ment's list of “states sponsoring 
international terrorism,” yet the 
Clinton admimstrafion encour- 
ages American companies to in- 
vest in oil projects mere. 

Tough measures are needed 
to force Khartoum to negotiate 
with foe united oppo siti on, an 
alliance of democrats, moderate - 
Islamists and black Christians f 
backed by former army officers, 
tribal leaders and trade union- 
ists. Elections supervised by foe 
United Nations could save Su- 
dan from greater tragedy and 
Africa from a lengthy war. 

The writer, an Iranian jour- 
nalist and author abroad, con- 
tributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


Cambodia: Sham Power- Sharing Undoes the Good Work 


W ASHINGTON — Esca- 
lating political violence 
bas put Camtodia’s remarkable 
experiment in democracy in 
grave jeopardy. 

In Phnom Penh on Easter 
Sunday, a hand grenade attack 
on a peaceful political rally 
killed 19 persons and wounded 
more than 100. including a lead- 
ing opposition figure, Sam 
Rarnsy. It was the bloodiest in a 
series of violent incidents in re- 
cent months that reflect the 
breakdown of Cambodia’s fra- 
gile ruling coalition. 

If this escalation of violence 
goes unchecked, it will endanger 
prospects for meaningful nation- 
al elections scheduled for late 
next year. It could reverse much 
socioeconomic and political 
progress that the international 
community has spent more than 
$2 billion promoting. 

hi 1975, society was reduced 
to ashes by foe genoctdal Khmer 
Rouge. A pawn on the Cold War 
chessboard, Cambodia was dev- 
astated by a civil war that lasted 


By Frederick Z. Brown and David G. Timberman 


until a UN-brokered peace 
agreement was signed in Paris in 
1991. UN-supervised elections 
were held in 1993, after which a 
“power-sharing" arrangement 
was established between a mon- 
archist coalition under “first" 
Prime Minister Prince Norodom 
Ranariddh and foe Cambodian 
People's Party, descendant of 
foe former ruling Communist 
Party, under “second” Prime 
Minister Hun Sen. 

The monarchists had won the 
1993 elections, but the People’s 
Party, which had foe guns and 
control of foe bureaucracy, re- 
fused to surrender power. 

Since the formation of this 
rivalrous coalition, a relatively 
sound economic policy frame- 
work and a liberal investment 
code have been put in place. 
The outline of a civil society — 
including political parties, an 
outspoken press and lively non- 
governmental organizations — 
is beginning to take shape. And 


there has been a sharp redaction 
in the military strength of the 
murderous Khmer Rouge. 

These are laudable achieve- 
ments for a traumatized, im- 
poverished society with no pre- 
vious experience in democracy 
or free market economics. 

But power-sharing has been 
an unwieldy expedient. Now. 
with foe 1998 elections in view, 
cooperation between foe two 
prime ministers has all but 
ceased, and the shotgun mar- 
riage has begun to disintegrate. 
Many observers believe that 
Hun Sen and his party are de- 
termined to assume sole power 
one way or another. 

The army, its generals loyal 
to one party or foe other, is split 
The National Assembly, race 
considered the linchpin of Cam- 
bodian democracy, is virtually 
powerless. 

Violations of human and 
civil rights are increasingly pre- 
valent. Cambodians and foreign 


donors alike complain of 
rampant corruption. With the 
upswing in political violence 
and the prospect of suppression 
of opposition political activity, 
the flows of international aid 
and commercial investment 
will decline. 

Preservation of nascent de- 
mocracy is essential to foe wel- 
fare of Cambodia's 10 million 
people. It is also important to 
the members of the Association 
of South East Asian Nations, 
which Cambodia hopes to join 
in July. Indonesia played a lead- 
ing role in brokering the Paris 
agreements. Thailand and Vi- 
etnam will be directly affected 
if neighboring Cambodia again 
sinks mto chaos. 

The credibility of foe inter- 
national community is at stake. 
The United Stales, Japan and 
the United Nations like to point 
to foe 1991 Paris ajpeemnus, 
the UN-administered elections 
and subsequent developments 


Albania: This Military Force Can’t Do the Job 


in Cambodia as a post-CoId 
War success story and a model 
for inTwruirionfll cooperation. 

Iu foe short term, the United 
States and others should en- 
courage a reduction of violence 
and urge foe govemmenL- in 
particular Hun .Sen and his 
party, to honor foe commitment 
to peaceful, multiparty political 
competition. 

That is difficult, given Cam- 
bodia’s traditions of absolutist 
leadership and zero-sum pol- M 
itics, but the last five years have 
shown that these damaging tra- 
ditions can be moderated. 

The factions should renew 
their commitment to foe spirit 
of the Paris agreements. The 
agreements were first and fore- 
most a practical diplomatic so- 
lution, but they included am- 
bitious goals for human rights 
and democracy in Cambodia. 

The international community 
must speak out against violence 
and act in concert to defend the 
principles of human rights, de- 
mocracy and pluralism. That 
means ensuring that the elec- 
tions take place as . scheduled, 
and providing foe necessary as- 
sistance for a level playing field 
for the period leading to them. 


B RUSSELS — The inter- 
national force raised on 
Italy's initiative for Albania is 
due to get there next week. Al- 
though its purpose is limited to 
protecting and supervising dis- 
tribution of humanitarian aid, it 
is a risky undertaking that could 
do more harm than good. 

Italy's move is understand- 
able. In addition to genuine con- 
cern for human suffering, there 
is the refugee problem — 
13,000 have already arrived. 
Italy is providing about half the 
5,000 troops, and seven other 
countries have promised to par- 
ticipate. United Nations Secre- 
tary-General Kofi Annan has 
welcomed foe move. 

Some other members of 
NATO (including foe United 
States) and of the Western 
European Union have cautiously 
offered different forms of sup- 
port. The organizations them- 
selves. NATO and the WEU. 
have let Italy know that they 
would prefer not to be asked. 

The initiative puts not only 
Italy's reputation but also foe 
West’s vision of a democratic 
Europe at risk. The danger 
arises from foe ever present 
hope, behind the declared lim- 
ited purpose, that the force can 
restore order in the country. 

Thar wish is based on a fun- 
damental misunderstanding of 
foe purpose of military forces 
and foe methods by which they 
achieve their aims. 

Regular forces are trained 
and equipped to win conflicts 
against a recognizable enemy. 

Their objective is clear and they 
can exert maximum force to 
achieve it. 


By Frederick Bonnart 


They can also be employed 
for peacekeeping, but, as these 
situations vary from case to 
case and often are confused, the 
missions and rules of engage- 
ment have to be sharply defined 
and well publicized. Tasks like 
“maintaining order” or “dis- 
arming populations” are not 
clear missions. 

Faced with hard decisions 
about foe need to stem slides 
into instability and to assist ci- 
vilians caught up in internal 
conflicts, politicians habitually 
turn to foe armed forces without 
appreciating their limitations. 

Vet foe logic is simple: The 
power of military forces lies in 
their ability to destroy and kill. 

They can either do so or 


they must be prepared to cany 
out their threat If, when chal- 
lenged, they do not their cred- 
ibility vanishes. 

Numerous recent examples 
exist from Africa to Bosnia, 
where respect was gained only 
when foe British-French force 
had used its heavy weapons and 
NATO had promised to con- 
tinue to do so. 

The troops were then able to 
maintain clear lines of separa- 
tion and enforce procedures for 
restricting the mutual threat be- 
cause those measures had been 
previously agreed upon by foe 
waning parties, and central and 
local administrations had been 
set up to adhere to them. 

In Albania, not only does foe 
central government have no 
control over foe country, but 
warring parties as such do not 


exist Armed gangs are at large, 
but the extent of their control of 
localities is unknown. 

Many in the population pos- 
sess persona] weapons, and in 
foe absence of law enforcement 
organizations they may well re- 
quire them for their personal 
protection. They can be expec- 
ted to surrender them only once 
institutions exist to ensure their 
safety and foe maintenance of 
law and order. 

To establish such law and or- 
der is not die declared task of (he 
allied force. A broken Albania 
cannot be made whole simply 
by die arrival of foreign troops. 
rviminal gangs and individual 
looters may be temporarily im- 
pressed, but without an indig- 

* i 


of a central administration they 
cannot be subdued. 

Effective government may 
emerge from elections promised 
for June. But the present force 
has neither the mandate nor foe 
strengt h to ensure that these 
elections are held, held fairly 
and accepted by the population. 
For that, cotraderably larger 
forces would be required. 

In foe absence of & credible 
government, a colonial- type ad- 
ministration would have to be 
se f uptorun foe country until its 
own institutions were ripe to 
take over foe reins. Even if this 
were acceptable to foe inter- 
national community, it would 
undoubtedly run into popular 
opposition, and violence would 
result Casualties would occur - 
on all sides. 

No international organiza- 


tion is likely to be ready to 
devote foe necessary resources 
for such a mission, nor risk in- 
curring foe opprobrium for fail- 
ure. Italy will therefore have to 
be prepared to accept it, and 
remove its force if it is unable to 
carry out its task. 

That would plunge Albania 
into further havoc, and weaken 
foe credibility of the civilized 
community in its effort to spread 
democracy and tolerance. 

International Herald Tribune. 


In dealing with afl foe Cam-^ 
bodian political parties, the in-' 
teroational community should 
be clear abont the costs of foil- 
ing to hold credible open elec- 
tions or to honor foe outcome. 

Mr. Brawn is associate direc- 
tor of the Southeast Asian Stud- 
ies program at the PaulH.Nitze 
School af Advanced Internation- 
al Studies. Mr. Timberman is a 
consultant to the Asia Society. 
They contributed this comment 
to The Washington Post. ■ 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1897* German Protest ta ^ e notice. Intte very curious 

WASHINGTON ti.~_ ■- diary °f Fanngtorvtne .eight*: ^ 

WAitiKNO lurs There is eenth century artist, it is noted v 

da £p r commercial that one Bacon, amemberof foe 


States and Germany. The Ger- 
man Imperial . Government 
makes a strong protest against 
the Dingiey Tariff BilL This 
protest is especially significant 
in view of foe commercial fric- 
tion already existing between foe 
United States and Germany 
caused by foe restrictions cm 
American meat products 
by G erm a n y ana the recent ac- 
tion by the United States im- 
posing tonnage and pant duties 
on German ships entering our 
ports. The Dingiey tariff imposes 
increased duties cm German 
products especially in textile fab- 
rics, gloves, wines and sugar. 

1922: Ice-Cream Cure 

PARIS — Europeans who ri- 
dicule that great American 
dainty, ice-cream, will please 


ice-cream, saying he knew a • 
lady who had been cured of a 
complaint of. the stomach . by 
it-” Don’t let us htiar any more 
now about the gastronomic 
habits of the Americans being 
inimical to health. 

1947: Hemiy Ford Dies 

DETROIT — Henry Ford, 
founder, of foe greatest personal 
industrial empire in foe world,. 
died of a cerebral hemo rrhag e 
last night [April -8} ar his home at 
near-by Dearborn: He was 
eighty -three years old- Mr. Ford, 
foe son of an Irish inmrigfa nt, 
built foe Ford Motor Company ' g 
into a billion -dollar entw priiie . * 
His death came in atoom lighted 
only by candles and kerosene 
lamps and heated only by' a. 
wood-bunting fireplace. 


i 


PAGE 9 



OPINION/LETTERS 






\ : ■'»*■ 


Would Help Greenspan 


don WHS 


®y James K. Glassman 

31111 their businesses — through 

r- ... j 086 rafiatiorL lower taxes, less regulation, a 

small er slice of the economy for 


PCtkn 


t 


&owth doesn’t cause inflation. 

Wen, you get the idea — oven 

though* apparently, the Federal 
Reserve Board doesn’t It's no 
pleasure to second-guess Alan 
Greenspan, whose masterful di- 
rection of the Fed has helpedgjve 
Americans the most stable prices 
in more than a quarter-century. 


the government. It’s called boost- 
ing supply. What's remarkable is 
how reafiemly and productively 
the private sector is already doing 
this in the face of the obstacles 
Washington places in its path. 

To show, how a supply-side 
revolution looks. I’d like to send 
Alan Greenspan go Silicon Valley 


tut* **ju u~ Z rwui vjrecnspan to aincon vauey 

m^i^ y n5 a l emadea V i 8 ® ^ honoSoon— along with 
mtsralce m raising short-tetm m- the' entire Congress and Si the 


terep rates to stop inflation from 
rearing an ugly head which, cur- 
rently, is nowhere in sight. 

The truth is there’s no direct, 
causal link between growth and 
inflation. Over thepast 125 years, 
the economist Milton Friedman 


administration officials who 
aren’t answering subpoenas. I just 
came back from this strip of land 
between San Francisco and San 
Jose, between ocean and bay — 
home of Hewlett-Packard, Intel, 

Cisco Systems, Oracle and 6,000 

' 



. “ . - — — ■ V-UDVVf kJ¥Mrjll> J V/IatlC dllU 

pomtsout, Amenca has had high other high-tech companies. 
erowth dimno “timw nf i. - , . .. - 


growth during “times of mfld 
deflation (1879-96), mild infla- 
tion (1896-1914 and 1947-69), 
substantial inflation (the two war 
periods) and relatively stable 
prices (the 1920s).” 

Jack Kemp put it well in The 
Wall Street Journal: “Inflation is 
caused by too many dollars chas- 
ing too few goods, not by too 
many people working.” To have 
both high employment and low 
inflation, the trick is to control 
the supply of dollars (which the 
Fed has done) and to main* sure 
there aren’t too few goods. 

The way to do that is to en- 
courage production — to mrieash 
the creative power of Americans 


In a' special section in its 
March 29 issue, The Economist 
says this fertile crescent is “ proof 
of capitalism’s continuing vital- 
ity,” contributing $65 billion to 
tije nation’s GDP — and a great 
deal more in spillover and spin- 
offs. Average pay in Silicon Val- 
ley is 55 percent higher t ha n in 
the rest of the country. 

And bow appropriate in this 
land of imagination and op timi s m 
to nm into my favorite optimist of 
aB: Larry Kudlow, a former 
budgiet official who's now chief 
economist for American Skandia, 
a tag insurance firm As usual, 
he’s lighting up the room. “Al- 
most everybody is too pessimis- 


tic,” he said at a conference ar 
Palo A1 h>. “Either the budget def- 
icits are too high or exchange rates 
are too high, or too low. Now 
they’re saying too many people 
are working, too many jobs! This 
thinking has to be stopped.” 

Mr. Kudlow points out that, 
other than a blip in 1990-91, the 
U.S. economy has been growing 
strongly for 15 straight years, 
perking along at a growth rate of 
close to 3 percent 

Mr. Kudlow credits Ronald 
Reagan's tax cuts and his pres- 
sure for government spending re- 
straint with starting a new * Tong 
wave'* of prosperity. Since 1982, 
die United States has created 26 
million net new jobs and in- 


creased GDP (in real terms) by 
more than 50 percent. The Dow 
was 800 at the start of this boom, 
and, says Mr. Kudlow, “not a 
living soul would have believed 
that it would be 6,500 in 1997.” 

■ True. Nor would a living soul 
have believed that high tech 
would account for 40 percent of 
the annual increase in GDP: or 
that an upstart called Intel, run by 
a Hungarian immigrant, would be 
on the brink of passing General 
Electric as the most profitable 
company in America: or that 
more than a quarter of the pop- 
ulation would be using something 
called the Internet, or that Silicon 
Valley (and its outposts in Wash- 
ingum state and Oregon) would 


be more vital to the economy than 
Detroit or New York. 

Also, in this high-tech world 
Washington is more and more 
irrelevant. Indeed Mr. Green- 
span's warnings about “irration- 
al exuberance” in the stock mar- 
ket and the Fed’s raising of 
interest rates last month sound 
almost like a plaintive cry from 
someone being ignored: “Hey. 
remember me?” 

Ditto. Congress and the pres- 
ident. What they should do is get 
out of the way of this magnificent 
engine of progress — stop grous- 
ing and legislating and let a free 
economy enrich the lives of all 
Americans. 

Washington Post Writers Croup. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 




Nike in Vietnam 


d 


Regarding "Making Billions on 
the Backs of Hungry Women ” 
(Opinion, April 1) by Bob Her- 
bert: 

The article about Nike's work- 
ers in Vietnam, while dramatic, is 
misleading. 

I just returned from a delicious, 
filling lunch of chicken, water- 
; cress and rite at a i^6 in a district 
that is among Vietnam’s most ex- 
pensive. The cost: $0-55, cheaper 
than the writer’s $0.70 for “a few 
mouthfuls of a vegetable and 
maybe some tofu.” Here in Ho 
Chi Minh City, many Vietnamese 


families of four eat at home for 
about $1 per meal. • • 

- Further, if the women making 
Nike sneakers ate paid $1.60 a 
day, that's somewhat higher than 
Vietnam’s average per-capita 
earnings of less than $1 per day. 

The real-worid truth is that 
if workers were not paid so little 
in Vietnam,- Nike would still be 
making hs sneakers in higher- 
wage countries like Thailand or 
South- Kored and the-warkers in 
Vietnam would hot have their 
jobs at alL 

Workers’ wages are only part 
of the equation. In Vietnam, die 
to business risks, corruption and 


government interference, execu- 
tives consider the cost of doing 
business too high. As a result, 
there are still relatively few fac- 
tories, and poverty and unemploy- 
ment are widespread. 

According to government es- 
timates, milli ons five on less than 
$15 per month. Vietnam’s work- 
ers compete fiercely for the jobs 
that are available. 

Nike and other companies that 
seek low-wage workers are ac- 
tually beneficial to countries like 
Vietnam and Burma. As repre- 
hensible as Nike sounds from Mr. 
Herbert’s description, without 
these companies the stomachs of 


the poor would be even more 
empty. 

Neither paying a starvation 
wage nor mistreating workers is 
justifiable. But it is naive to sug- 
gest that corporations engage in 
such charity as paying higber- 
than-market wages. Shareholders 
who invest in Nike to pay for 
retirement or their children’s 
education would quickly invest 
elsewhere. 

The plight of Vietnam’s poor 
will improve only when the 
country has developed enough 
so that workers can walk away 
from jobs where they are abused 
or underpaid. This will lake 


time and better management by 
the government 

DAVID CASE 
Ho Chi Minh City. 

Mr. Herbert should be com- 
mended for reminding us. with his 
nightmare story, that our “free 
world” mul tinatio nals run a close 
second to the former Soviet Union 
in creating systems based on slave 
labor. What Nike has brought 
forth in Vietnam is a new gulag 
archipelago. 

Are we returning to a new form 
of Blake’s “dark Satanic mills ”? 

MARGARET SZMURAK. 

Momreux. Switzerland. 


Reports of Print’s Death 
Are Greatly Exaggerated 


By E.J. Dionne Jr. 


W ASHINGTON — The 
grade school I attended 
taught kids well but didn’t have a 
lot of money. So its library in- 
cluded some very old books. It 
couldn't afford to replace them or 
throw' them out. 

My favorites among the yel- 
lowing volumes were the old Tom 
Swift stories, written in the early 
years of the centuiy. wherein 

ME4JN1THILE 

Tom discovered inventions new- 
fangled for his time but already 
pan of my life as a kid growing 
up in the early 1960s. 

In one tale, written a( the end of 
die ’20s. Tom happens upon the 
discovery of television (or. as it 
was called then, “talking pic- 
tures”). The action revolves 
around evil movie moguls who 
want to suppress television be- 
cause it will rob them of much 
profit, on the theory that people 
will stop going to films. 

It turned out. of course, that 
television did not kill the movie 
industry. On the contrary, it's big- 
ger than ever. That story keeps 
coming to mind amid predictions 
that the information superhigh- 
way will be the death of news- 
papers. books and all those won- 
derful printed things that you can 
hold with your hands. My hunch is 
that the predictions are wrong. 

To begin with, the Web is a lot 
less mystifying than the talk around 
it makes it seem. People in the 
know speak as if using it requires 
highly complex skills that make 
them masters of the universe. The 
inventors of this technology were 
surely geniuses, but we schleps 
who use it don't have to know very 
much. The Web’s power comes 
from the fact that it is easy'. 

It is also fun, and plays to our 
particular interests. I make regular 
visits to sites — including those 
constructed by newspapers — that 
offer large gobs of political news. 
I also like baseball sites that offer 
the scores early. 

For work, the Web's various 
“search engines” allow access to 
information sources (libraries, 
company and university home 
pages, for example) that I would 
not know about absent this great 
invention. 

And, as Tom Rosenstiel. direc- 
tor of the Project for Excellence in 
Journalism, has pointed out. the 


Web has allowed a rebirth of the 
“pamphleteering tradition" that 
goes back to the origins of the 
republic. You don’t need to own an 
expensive priming press or a tele- 
vision station to get your message 
out Sure, a lot of wacky conspir- 
acy theories go out on the Web. But 
that’s the price of free (and in- 
creasingly less expensive) speech. 

Note" that in my case, at leasL I 
use the Web to supplement, rather 
than replace, sources of informa- 
tion and entertainment. The Web 
is no substitute for reading books, 
newspapers or magazines. And it 
is surely no substitute for watching 
or listening to a baseball game. 

So. far from encouraging me to 
switch from one source of infor- 
mation to another, the Web has 
made me hunger for more of all of 
it. To return to Tom Swift's case: 
Movies and television, for better 
or worse, have prospered together 
rather nicely, as will old and new 
sources of information, 

Mr. Rosenstiel. who studies 
these matters, has a similar view. 
“The technology is no longer an 
enemy of print "but its ally.” he 
says, allowing people in the news 
business to reach more, and dif- 
ferent. types of readers. ' “The soul 
of your operation is not your print- 
ing press but your newsroom.” 
Finding and disseminating infor- 
mation is more important than the 
means you use to present it. 

None of this addresses the 
changes that technological leaps 
may make in the Web and thereby 
render my speculations obsolete. 
Nor does it get to the commercial 
questions raised by the technology. 
Newspapers, for example, live on 
advertising. Will the Web reduce 
the power of newspaper ads? 

But I suspect newspapers will 
eventually figure out how to make 
the Web pay. And the idea that 
information breeds a desire for 
more information works even in 
the case of advertising: Many 
print and television ads urge you 
to go straight to some Web site to 
learn more about the product or 
cause being advertised. 

Maybe this whole argument re- 
flects the silly optimism of a lover 
of the printed word about to be run 
over by large technological forces. 
But history suggests human be- 
ings can keep more than one idea, 
and more than one technology, in 
their heads at the same time. 

Washington Post Writers Croup. 



March 1997 


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international herald tribune, 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1997 
PAGE 10 


stage/entertainment 





The Road Back to Katmandu 



By Mike Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune — 

B OSTON — While Sharad Gurung was learning 
Western music at the Berklee College of a 

carpet of dish antennas has spread over me rooftops 

of Katmandu. ..... 

Tourists in five-star hotels have replaced the hippies m their 
crash pads who “discovered” his native Nepal m the late 
’60s vulgar "Bombay Mix” music blares from ghetto- 
blasters. And kids wearing baseball caps backwards and IceT 
T-shirts can be seen drinking Pepsis by the side of a road in the 
middle of nowhere. 

After what he's learned during six years in Boston. Gurung 
would like to change all tbaL 
Well, not exactly, m goals are 
more realistic, more modest — 
and. he thinks, within his 
province. Still, it's a big gig. 

When he returns home at 
the end of the year, he wants 
“to Inaugurate a conservat- 
ory for formal musical edu- 
cation emphasizing the use of 
Western musical techniques 
in contemporary Nepalese 
music.” He wants to start an 
orchestra: “I'm looking for a 
new balance. Progress means 
intellectual and artistic en- 
richment as well as materi- 
alistic achievement.” 

As a teenager, Gurung was a 
member of The Brotherhood, 
the first Nepalese band signed 
to a contract to work a big 

tourist hotel In Katmandu. Sharad Gurung: “ Our tra i 
Their repertoire, which in- 
cluded standards like "Autumn Leaves. ' ' was largely picked up 
from the Voice of America. He had ‘ ‘absolutely no iaea' ' why 
he moved his fingers the way he did across the keyboard. And 
there was nobody in die country who could tell him. 

When they heard a tape of Segovia playing Bach for the first 
time, the three Gurung brothers wondered how one guitarist 
could play all those lines. "Polyphony is not natural to Nepalese 
music.” says Shared, the youngest brother. “We don’t have 
harmony. Or rattier, we do. but harmony usually means violins 
going up and down the wrong chord changes. We accept this in 
Nepal 1 really don't know why.” 

with a diploma in guitar from the San Francisco Con- 
servatory'- his eldest brother became the first Nepalese with a 
college degree in music — he has opened a classical guitar 
society. His middle brother graduated from Berklee before 
Shared. 

Retired now. their father is a “well-known composer, 
singer and teacher” who was a pioneer in what are called 
“modem Nepalese songs.” 

Sharad, who is 32. has not visited home once during his six 
years in Boston. Although his family is not poor, the night for 
him and his wife is wa y too expensive. And although his father 
* ‘holds a respectable place' ' in the society, it's a poor country: 
“There are not more than 20 pianos in Nepal. There is only one 
university, one radio station and no music conservatory.” 

The modest four-track cassette tape recorder his eldest 
brother brought back from San Francisco was state-of-the-art 
hardware in Nepal. “We were amazed.” says Sharad. “We 
could record and record until we got it right. It was amiracle.” 
(He elected to take a course in recording engineering.) 


Sharad Gurung: “ Our tradition is presen'ed orally. 


Gurung "s eyes shine when he speaks of his homeland. 
Abashed by its material prinutiveness, he is at the same time 
proud of its culture ana beauty. He has a combination of 
intelligence and naivete, of energy and reflection, and a 
mixture of humor and the philosophic that one thinks of as 
particularly Eastern. 

Now there are more four-track cassette recorders in the 
country. You can buy cassettes by Nepalese singers now. 
Nepalese popular music includes both Indian modes and 
Western scales. Although musicians play traditional instru- 
ments like the banshure (a transverse flute) and the maria) (a 
kind of maraca). there are also acoustic guitars. 

Gurung flashes a disarmingly direct self-deprecating smile 
before admitting: “Bui mostly there are Cassios every- 
where.” Cassios are cheap 
elementary electronic key- 
boards often used as chil- 
dren's toys in die West. He 
keeps on smiling until he is 
sure you get the implications 
of that, and then he shrugs: 
“Mozart is not generally 
known in Nepal.” 

“Except for some Indian, 
classical pieces, we do not 
have purely instrumental mu- 
sic. Our music is vocal, it uses 
many microtones, and it is 
full of embellishment. We 
have no notation, our tradi- 
tion is preserved orally.” 
“The complex social struc- 
ture of our country,” he con- 
tinues, “is greatly influenced 
by Hinduism, from which 
comes the caste system that 
lit ion is presen’ed orally ." discriminates between people 

according to their occupatioas. 
The musician caste, known as Damain, is one of the lowest My 
family caste is Gurung; socially, we are considered higher than 
the Damain. Most educated Nepalese might not believe in the 
caste system, but the mass population does." 

He was "lucky enough” to have attended a school run by 
American Jesuit priests. He bad no piano to practice on until a 
friendly official of die USIA let him use the one in his office 
during lunch breaks. Gunmg sent a tape of his music along with 
an eloquent * ‘personal statement” to the president of Berklee. 
He received a scholarship: 

“The psychedelic rock die flower people brought with diem 
gave most Nqpatese a narrow understanding of Western music as 
just loud noise accompanied by drugs and long hair. People did not 
realize that in America rock and jazz are taught in universities.” 

When he first arrived, ‘ ‘all of those fast and inventive jazz 
piano players blew my mind," he says. “I was breathless, in 
shock, when I heard diem. ‘So this is jazz?! ' I said to myself.” 
In order to learn about the lives of historic jazzmen, he read 
every issue of Down Beat since the '70s. 

His first years in Boston were ‘ ‘thirsty years. 1 ' He could not 
get enough. He carried 16 or 17 credits (a lot) and he took a 
double-major, piano and composition. It came easier later, but 
at first it was like ' ‘I was confined between four walls, with no 
way to break through them. I had to learn the grammar of the 
music until it became a part of my own language.” 

He can hardly wait to sit down and talk to his father: “I’ve 
been absorbing all I can. I want to share whai I have learned 
with my fellow Nepalese musicians. T have put together lots of 
leaching cassettes. And I've attached hard covers to better 
preserve all my notebooks." 


i WVr. 




■ 1 „in«t a 
# 1U ,. 

; iin<r V» 

? r"r r 

if**- - 


From left, Patrick O’ Kane, Danny Webb and Dena Davis in Ben Elton’s “ Popcorn " at the Apollo. 


’Rewrtegtna 


A Wilde Summer: Dueling Vans 9 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — “I congratulate 
you on your performance, 
which suggests yon still think 
more highly of my play than I 
do." Oscar Wilde, of course, acknowl- 
edging the cheers of his first-night audi- 
ence when “Lady Windermere’s 
Fan” first opened at the St. James's in 
February 1892. 

This was the “woman with a past” 
drawing-room drama that effectively 
brought die London stage into the 
present century. But it is most famous 
now for the cigarette holder and the 
green carnation with which Wilde first 
took to the stage that opening night, and 
any director reviving it has perhaps to 
ask, a century later, what still matters 
about the notorious but ultimately lov- 
ing Mrs. Eriynne and her innocent, but 
ultimately unforgiving, daughter. Lady 
Windermere. 

The heart of the play is still beating 
loudly enough to give us two rival 
“Lady Windermere” productions this 
summer. With one still to come at 
Chichester, the other has made die jour- 
ney south from Manchester. Braham 
Murray's staging was conceived for the 
Royal Exchange in the round and, de- 
spite some handsome new sets and cos- 
tumes, is still looking a little lost behind 
the proscenium arch. 

Mercifully though. Murray does not 
here feel die need for a “concept”; he lets 


the play alone, allowing Gabrielle Drake 
to straw us the virtues of staying well 
outside polite society. Rebecca Johnson 
points up nicely the unloving chilliness of 
her untoo wing daughter, and Rosalind 
Knight cascades from a great height as 
the cranky old dowager who is deafly the 
first shadowing of Lady Bracknell. 

At the Apollo. Ben Sum's “Pop- 
corn” is far and away the best new. 
comedy in town, as well as the moM 
thoughtful Topically enough, it is set 
over an Oscar weekend in Hollywood, 
where a Tarantino-type director has just 

LONDON THEATER 

received his first statuette for a film of 
unremitting bloodshed and sexual vi- 
olence. He makes the ritual Academy 
Award speech of stunning inanity and 
incomnrehensibiliiy (“You are the 
wind beneath my wings and I flap for 
you”) and returns home with a nubile 
bimbo-actress, model, whatever, only to 
find that his house has been invaded by 
a couple of down-market Bonnie and 
Clyde killers who proudly tell him that 
their multiple murders have been a kind 
of tribute to the violence he has shown 
them on screen. And what's more, they 
now intend to practice that violence on 
him and his nearest and even sometimes 
dearest. 

The stage is thus set for a moral 
debate that would not have disgraced 
many mare serious dramatists than 
Elton; and it is greatly to his credit that 


“Popcorn” remains as fresh, and 
crackly as its tide, never sinking into the 
portentous pseudo-philosophic chat 

show it could so easily have become. 
The great American quest, lira play cells 
us, is notf or truth , beany or freedom but 
essentially just someone to b lani o .an d 
by the end all the survivors have man- 
aged to find suitable scapegoats for their 
own appalling behavior. 
t "T-rr.^ q mor alist carefully dis- 
guising nii.,.Z^~ M --«»TO cjgntextam er. 
After a couple of disap^^^^eaB^ 
stage scripts he has come into bis own 
with a tough, socially conscious study 
of selfishness. The laughter quickly 
turns rancid as you reahze just what 
these people are up to, high I 11 Hol- 
lywood bills; nodung less than the de- 
struction of an entire moral code in the 
quest for instant social and sexual grat- 
ification. 

In its own contemporary way, “Pop- 
corn” is as much of a problemplay as 
any ever devised by Wilde or Shaw; it 
essentially whether an artist can be 
blamed for the reaction of an audience 
or their later behavior, and though the 
final scene (with all American nands 
pressed on their remote controls, about 
to vote on matters of life or death by a 
simple channel-surfing switch) may 
seem a little desperate in its plotting 
contrivance, Danny Webb at thenead of 

wonderfully the’ double stvuiartis by 
which a movie culture lives and, often 
violently, dies. 


--- 


Not Quite the Homer You Learned: Botho Strauss Takes Odysseus Home 


By Paul Moor 

International Herald Tribune 


position of Germany's lead- 
ing playwright Of “Ithaka." 


B erlin — since 
Heiner Muller’s 
death late in 1995. 
Botho Strauss has 
had no serious rival for die 


which has opened in a stylish 
production at the Deutsches 
Theater, be says: “This is a 
transmutation from reading 
into drama. Nothing more 
than if one raised one’s bead 



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from Homer's book and saw 
on a stage before one the long 
finale of Tthaka* [the Ionian 
island Odysseus called home] 
as one imagines it." 

Reversion to the Greek 
classics, especially in the 
former East Berlin, evokes 
such problematical East Ger- 
man playwrights as Peter 
Hacks, who used to work 
around political repression 
and censorship by dodging 
contemporary material ana 
adapting a number of clas- 
sical myths to his own per- 
sonal dramatic and political 
purpose. 

In Botho Strauss' case, one 


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frailty, illness and senility. 

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cannot help wondering about 
his motivation. "Deviations, 
peripheral thoughts and as- 
sociations that accompany 
the reading thus become in- 
tegral parts of the dramat- 
urgy,” he says. “In order to 
remain mobile, the dialogue 
sacrifices the verse and the 
rhapsodic tone." 

The language Strauss uses 
does eschew rhyme and con- 
sistent poetic meter, but it 
also has unostentatious 
stateliness, sometimes even 
elegance — hardly congruous 
with either the barbarous, 
murderous mores common- 
place in Odysseus' time or 


the humanities at Columbia 
University and an articulate 
feminist, she is the author of 
eight books of scholarship, 
including the classic “Writ- 
ing a Woman’s Life.” She 
also has written a series of 
detective novels under the 
pseudonym of Amanda 
Cross. 

Now into her 70s, Heflbmn 
in “The Last Gift of Time” 
reflects on and shares with her 
readers the many joys and 
surprisingly few limitations 
of life beyond 60. Indeed, she 
considers her 60s the happiest 
decade of her life. 

And, as she explains, “I 
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with the dominant ironic in- 
flection Thomas Langhoff 
has infused into his deft di- 
rection. lending a character- 
istically Berliner overlay of 
sardonic wit to Strauss' dia- 
logue. 

Twenty years earlier, Odys- 
seus (aJca. Ulysses) has left 
Penelope to go tomcatting 
after Helen and get embroiled 
in (he wars her fhee launched. 
Profoundly depressed, 
Penelope has sought solace in 
gluttony: during this produc- 
tion's first part, Dagmar Man- 
zel appears as a wild-haired 
fury repulsively padded along 
the tines of the Miehelin tire 


man, favoring the audience 
with die most gigantic behind 
ever seen on any stage. Her 
unloveliness fails to daunt the 
11 predatory suitors gathered 
to take over, lock, stock and 
barrel, everything Odysseus 
has seemingly abandoned 
forever. 

War-weary Odysseus (Die- 
ter Mann) returns to Ithaka as 
an apparent beggar. Egged on 
by Zeus's insatiably blood- 
thirsty daughter Pallas Athene 
(Ulrike Krumbiegel), se- 
conded by his son Tele- 
machus, Odysseus hideously 
slaughters not only the suitors, 
in an unnervingly san guinary 


BOOKS 


rowed time. ’ Each day one can 
say to oneself: I can always 
die; do I choose death or life? I 
daily choose life the more ear- 
nestly because it is a choice.” 
She thinks the major danger in 
one's 60s is to be “trapped in 
one's body and one's habits, 
not to recognize those sup- 
posedly sedate years as the 
time to discover new choices 
and to act upon them.” 

So far so good. But her 
choices do not seem to this 
reader particularly imaginat- 
ive or bold. She hates to travel 
and, seeking solitude, she 
buys a second house in the 
country, leaving the first one 
for the use of her husband, her 
children and grandchildren. 
The first night aldne in the 
new house, the doorbell rings 
and to her relief and delight, it 
is her husband, “I thought 
maybe I should keep you 
company, just for the first 
night.” And be remained ever 
after, both to share and re- 
spect her occasional need for 
solitude. 

Would she have made such 
a choice as a widow? No. For 
as she observes, “Solitude, 


late in life, is the temptation of 
the happily paired; to be alone 
if one has not been doomed to 
al oneness is a temptation so 
beguiling that it carries with it 
the guilt of adultery, and the 
promise of consummation.” 

Heilbrun, fleeing the ar- 
cane world of academia, 
made waves when she a- 
bruptly resigned after 30 
years at Columbia. She refers 
to the “poisonous atmo- 
sphere” at Columbia espe- 
cially toward feminists. 

With the freedom to 
choose what to do next, she 
warns those with too much, 
time and “no world' ’ to find a 
world. The work involved 
should be concentrated, even 
difficult, but with measurable 
progress. 

Nonetheless, she regrets 
that she spent the first five 
years' of her 60s writing a bi- 
ography of Gloria Steinem — 
a woman she still very much 
admires. Why then the regret? 
“In all the other undertakings 
of my 60s, whether a house, a 
dog or the contemplation of 
rtearti, I emerged somehow 
changed, refigured with my 


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massacre, but also the serving 
maids they have cavorted with, 
whose corpses get hung up by 
their fret. 

For Strauss’ raw material, 
he has gone not directly back 
to Homer but to two distin- 
guished German scholars; 

However, the great trans- 
ferences from Johann Hein- 
rich Voss and Anton Weiher 
remain present at least in the 
reminiscent echo; May it suf- 
fice to transport the auditor 
into the world's childhood 
just as before" — question- 
able cricket, perhaps, from 
the perspective of scholar- 
ship. 


life altered to extend the range 
of possible reactions and ex- 
periences, however subtle or 
internal . . . [yet] after the 
book's completion, it was as 
though the whole experience 
had disappeared forever.” 
Provocative and wise 
though she is, her writing is 
sometimes convoluted and I 
would have enjoyed more of 
her wry humor. Certainly 
growing old could be heavy 
going without a sense of hu- 
mor and an eye for the ri- 


Aside from one of the suit- 
ors — crudely homophobic in 
directing and acting if per- 
haps not in writing — Lang- 
hoffs staging, emerges tri- 
umphant, despite a playing 
time of three and three- 
quarter hours. 

So does tiie brilliantly in- 
novative set designed by 
Kari-Emst Herrmann, whose 
seemingly inexhaustible ima- 
gination converts set chang- 
ing into theatrical spectacle 
all its own. 

Andrea Schmidt-Futterer's 
costumes complete a rarely 
brilliant evening in Berlin's 
great theatrical tradition. 


diculous. However, she does “ - 
convey her own senseof joy in ^ •• 
her60s.“ffonedffltoesfarjoy,. 3 
one always supposes it is far ^ . 
the last time. Yet this suppos- 2 • 
ition provides the rarest and .7 ’ 
most exquisite flavor to one's 
later years. The piercing sense 
of ‘last time’ adds intensity 
white the possibility of ‘again' u 
is never quite effaced.” . : 

Selwa Roosevelt, former * • 
US. chief of protocol, wrote 
this for The Washington Post. *»- 


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^ * — — 

| Dollar Soars 

! Against a 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1997 


PAGE 11 



en 

^Central Banks Appear 
Set to Stay on Sidelines 


U is 


-C>M 


.'C ■ 


■ YORK — The dollar hovered 
just below a four-and-a-hatf year high 
against the yen Tuesday, supported by 
signs that officials from the United 
States and Japan would not step in to 
stop the rally. • H 

Tsutomu Makino, deputy minister at 
the Ministry of International Trade and 
Industry, said: a weak yen would do 
more good than harm to the Japanese 
economy, which is struggling to emerge 
from a five-year slump. 

The official's comment “suggests the 
Japanese are comfortable with the dol- 
- A _ - .far/ John Nelson, manager of currency 
- "-U.- 1 leading at ABN-AMRO Bank, said. 

f On the U.S. side. Robot Rubin, the 
.. i Treasury secretary who has been an 
outspoken critic of Jean's widening 
trade surplus with the United States, has 
said little about the dollar’s gaim this 
week. During a trade visit to Vietnam on 
Monday, Mr. Rubin merely restated the 
U.S. position that a strong dollar was in 
America's interest 
“Removing that piece of the political 
lzzle takes a lot of pressure off the 
jllar, ” Mr . Nelson said. “The U.S. 
administration is not troubled by die 
dollar at these levels or higher.” 

The dollar rose to 126335 yen in 4 
PM. trading from 125380 yen Monday, 
Just below its fmir-and-a-half-year high 
: w 126350 reached in Tokyo t rading 

It also edged up to 1.7155 Deutsche 
/■I marks from 1.7125 DM, to 5.7725 
French francs from 5.7610 francs and to 
1.4743 Swiss francs from 1.4696 francs. 
... The pound slipped to $1.6265 from 
$1.6778. 

Favorable U.S. interest rates and 
.V signs that a single European currency 
' ;; will be launched on time, if on a weak 
-Z. note, also lifted the dollar, analysts 
..7: said. 

71 “There's a strong view that the euro 

; ; wiQ be a weak currency, at least at die 
beaming, ” said Chris Iggo, an econ- 
omist at BZW, a division of Barclays 

— See DOLLAR, Page 12 . ' 


,-r -.S' 

• 1’ ; 

- ■ -C J ^ 



Not as APP^Kng Anymore 

m . onth| y paw circulation for 
these men's magazines. 

6 million 



not available 

1983-19 QS 96 3 ®3JW5««» 

74 ™ T* ■"£ w « sa w » w W 


Video and the Jffeb vs. Larry Flynt 


By Constance L. Hays 

■ New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — The movie 
appeared in theaters as “The 
Fteople vs. Larry Hynt” But 
as Mr. Flynt himself has ob- 
served, it might have been called “$60 
Million Worth of Free Advertising.” 
These days, Mr. Flynt’s empire can 
use any free help it gets. He has been 
placing increasing emphasis cm what is 
euphemistically called the “men’s 
sophisticates” magazine category 
when renting a raunchy video can be 
cheaper than the $5.99 cover price of 
Hustler and when sexually explicit 
cable-television channels and Web 
sites are competing for his target audi- 
ence. As a result, Mr. Flynt’s operation 
seems to be falling behind in die 
swiftly evolving X-rated market. 

The current Hollywood limelight 
aside, Larry Flynt Publishing Inc., 
solely owned by its namesake, is so 
secretive that financial information on 
the company is as wispy as the clothing 
on a centerfold model But there are 
signs of trouble. 

Witiiin the past 18 months, the com- 
pany has sola or closed a handful of 


magarinfifi created for a more main- 
stream market, such as Super Cycle and 
Maternity Fashions. The new focus: a 
group of 20 tides that — with a few 
relatively staid exceptions such as PC 
Laptop and the music-oriented Rap 
Pages — is skewed toward sexually 
explicit publications such as Leg World 
arm Busty. Retrenching to this hard- 

MEPIA MARKETS ~ 

core core is a risky strategy when large 
chunks of the readership are finding 
die same photography and mindset 
through other media — often for less. 

Circulation is down, especially dam- 
aging for a company that relics heavily 
on single-copy sales, rather than sub- 
scription or advertising sales, for its 
estimated $100 million in annua] rev- 
enue. Its fla gship publication. Hustler, 
sold 2 million copies a month in 1976. 

But these days, Hustler's press run is 
less than a million copies, and on av- 
erage more than half are returned un- 
sold, according to die 1996 statement 
of ownership on file at die U.S. Postal 
Service branch in Long Beach, Cali- 
fornia, where the company is required 
to submit audited figures to receive 


second-class postage privileges. 

The skin-magazine business in gen- 
eral is “not asnugely profitable as it 
was before," said Reed Phillips, a 
principal in DeSilva & Phillips, a New 
York investment bank that advises me- 
dia companies. “The comer video 
store has made a big difference for 
these magazines.” 

Playboy and Penthouse also have 
seen their circulations plummet in re- 

cenr years. 

“The readers are aging with die 
owners,” said Martin S. Walker, chair- 
man of Walker Communications, a 
longtime adviser to media companies. 

By all accounts, Mr. Flynt, who de- 
clined to be interviewed for this article, 
runs an autocracy that allows him to 
make business decisions virtually un- 
challenged. It is not known exactly 
why he has not followed in the foot- 
steps of Play boy and Penthouse, which, 
feeing similar pressures, have inched 
toward a certain self-defined degree of 
respectability and branched out 
Fifty-eight percent of Playboy En- 
terprises Inc.’s estimated $7.6 million 
profit for the financial year dial will end 


See HUSTLER, Page 15 


Banking Rules for All 

Accord Sets Global Guidelines 


By Alan Friedman 

Inlematiunal Hrrjkt Tribune 


PARIS — Hoping to forestall any 
future Mexico-style crises and other fi- 
nancial shocks, central hanks and reg- 
ulators from around the world, includ- 
ing China and Russia, agreed Tuesday 
for the first time on a comprehensive set 
of rules to police banking operations 
worldwide. 

Officials said that by working closely 
with central banks from China. Russia 
India and a handful of fast -growing 
emerging economies in Asia, Eastern 
Europe and Latin America, the indus- 
trialized West is seeking both to rec- 
ognize the shift in gravity in the world 
economy and to help foster a safer glob- 
al financial system in the next century. 

The set of 25 core principles on bank- 
ing supervision was announced by the 
Bank for International Settlements, the 
institution in Switzerland that is the lead- 
ing forum for monetary cooperation for 
the advanced democracies of the West. 

The agreement sets out a range of 
bank supervision guidelines that were 
describee! by officials as a distillation of 
the best practices of the leading central 
banks and other regulators of the United 
States, Europe and Japan. 

Among them are rules concerning 
minimum capital requirements, the 
need for adequate internal controls, the 
monitoring of corporate lending prac- 
tices, the evaluation of country risk in 
international lending, the need for ex- 
ternal auditors and mil disclosure prac- 
tices. 

Tommaso Padoa-Schioppa, a senior 
Bank of Italy official who led the com- 
mittee that wrote the rales, said in an 
interview Tuesday that one of the more 
striking elements of the agreement was 
that it is comprehensive. 

“From time to time we have put out 
rules concerning one particular aspect 
of banking supervision.” be said, “but 
this package covers all aspects, from 
birth to death, meaning the entire life 
cycle of a banking institution.” 

The agreement also marks the first 
concrete initiative to involve new 
emerging economies since the Bank for 
International Settlements — formerly 
an inner sanctum for some of the 
world's richest nations — opened its 
doors last year to new members. 

Mr. Padoa-Schioppa said the 
guidelines would be discussed by Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton and other leaders of 


the Group of Seven industrialized na- 
tions at their annual economic summir 
meeting, in Denver this summer. The 
idea is to then seek formal endorsement 
by governments of the guidelines before 
September. 

Mr. Padoa-Schioppoa said that the 
International Monetary Fund had 
agreed to help monitor enforcement of 
the rales. 

“This is the first time that a complete 
set of rales applicable by all countries 
and to all banks has been agreed." Mr. 
Padoa-Schioppa said, “and with the ac- 
tive participation of a large group of 
nonindustrial i zed countries, emerging 
economies, and new financial centers 
from all continents.” 

Mr. Padoa-Schioppa said the rules 
had been prepared in cooperation with 
Brazil, Chile. China, the Czech Repub- 
lic, Hong Kong. Hungary. India, In- 
donesia. Korea.~Malaysia, Mexico, Po- 
land. Russia. Singapore and Thailand. 

“In de facto terms." he said, “the 
countries mentioned have very actively 
participated in the preparation, they 
have seen all the drafts, they have dis- 
cussed every aspect and they fully agree 
with the contents.” 

Asked how countries could be made 
to comply with the new rales. Mr. 
Padoa-Schioppa stressed that the agree- 
ment was not in the form of a legally 
binding treaty, but that banking super- 
visors had in the past agreed on such 
accords and generally complied with 
them. 

“A mixture of market forces, peer 
pressure, the need for respectability and 
credibility on the part of national au- 
thorities and banking systems should 
help to enforce this agreement," he 
said. 

The guidelines also include a rec- 
ommendation that centra] banks should 
be independent “We are suggesting,” 
Mr. Padoa-Schioppa said, “that de- 
cisions concerning banking supervision 
should be taken without any political 
consideration and without deferring to 
any special interests, either in the public 
or private sectors.” 

Commenting on plans to cooperate 
with the International Monetary Fund. 
Mr. Padoa-Schioppa said that as the 
guidelines were written over the past 
nine months, the idea that emerged was 
“that bank supervisors agree on die 
rales and the IMF will help in mon- 
itoring, surveillance and implementa- 
tion. 


l Y I?': I* i . * » — c .<•* ’ " 


How the Dead Help Some Make a Living 


JBy Marc Fisher 

Washington Post Service 


Vh? 


WASHINGTON — Dard Ross's cli- 
^ cuts spare her the headaches that afflict 
. a modern-day sports agent Her clients 
: ^rill never force her into damage control- 
'Y %y spitting on an umpire or belting a 
sportswriter. 

Her clients will never solly a whole- 
,-j. some image by dyeing their hair green 
or baring their private parts. 

Of this Ms. Ross can be certain, be- 
X cause her clients are safely and 
manently ensconced in the sport 
>; firmament. Her clients are dead. 

The client list at CMG Worldwide, 
where Ms. Ross is president, includes 
Jackie Robinson. Ty Cob b. Babe Ruth, 
Vince Lombardi, Joe Louis, Jesse 
Owens and Secretariat, among about 
200 sports stars and celebrities. 

If you’re looking for a posthumous 
endorsement from the likes of Amelia 
Baxhart, Humphrey Bogart, Marlene Di- 
etrich. Malcolm X or Oscar Wilde, it 
might, be prudent to call Ms. Ross before 
appropriating the celebrity’s image. 

CMG has cornered the market cm 
&ad athletes, signing the fennhes or 
States of more than 50 legendary fig- 
ures, from Cy Young to Casey Stengel 
and on to Thurman Munson. _ • 

“That’s our niche,” Ms. Ross said. 
"You ean count on our clients.” 

For a cut of the receipts ranging from 
40 percent to 60 percent. CM G can 
sharply increase a family ’s income from 
their ancestor's name mid image Until 
they signed with the agency a decade 
ago. Babe Ruth’s survivors, fa r , eXr - 
ample, saw perhaps $100 a year from 
sales of the Sultan of Swat’s name. Now 


they get annual checks in six figures, 
Ms. Ross said. 

: Computer-photo technology has 
made it possible to bring stars back from 
the beyond, inserting their faces and 
voices into TV commercials, pitching 
beer, cars, even items that hadn’t been 
invented in their day. 

“Far and away, the players from an- 
other era sell better than the current 


Among the busier 
posthumous packaging 
deals is that of the great 
Negro League pitcher, 
Satchel Paige. 

ones, the Griffeys and the Bonds,” said 
Frank Walsh, chief executive of Au- 
thentic Images, a San Diego-based com- 
pany that makes gold trading cards of 
sports and entertainment figures. 

“They look better from many years 
away, even The Babe Ruths of the world, 
whose behavior we now know all 
about." 

.For CMG, it's a $10 millian-a-year 
business, and the agency has shown it 
wiH use copyright and intellectual-prop- 
erty laws to protect its clients. A few 
years ago, CMG took on the filmmaker 
Spike Lee over the use of the “X” from 
Malcolm JTs name, eventually making 
reit afn that the slain black leader's wid- 
ow. Betty Shabazz, won rights to the T- 
shirts, hats and other spin-offs from Mr. 
Lee’s biographical movie. 

While advertisers and merchandisers 
are not exactly beating down the door to 


license the images of Casey Stengel or 
Oscar Wilde, some dead celebrities re- 
main in high demand. Vince Lombardi 
has 11 licensing deals, including one 
with Hallmark Cards to use his image on 
greeting cards, one with a company that 


coach on prepaid phone cards and 
tiie usual array of poster, lithograph and 
movie contracts. 

Among the busier posthumous pack- 
aging deals is that of the great Negro 
League baseball pitcher. Satchel Paige. 
Twenty-nine companies have signed to 
offer Paige products or to use his image 
in ads. There are Paige plates, orna- 
ments, figurines, boxer shorts, calendars, 
playing cards and board games. Compa- 
nies that make beer, computer programs 
and cereal have contracted to use Mr. 
Paige's picture to spur their sales. 

Mark Roesler, the founder of CMG, 
got into the dead-celebrity business by 
marrying the daughter of the publisher 
of the Saturday Evening Post Mr. 
Roesler was assigned the task of pro- 
tecting copyrights on the more than 300 
covers that Norman Rockwell had 
painted for the magazine. 

That work led to his first real client, 
when the survivors of Elvis Presley 
hired Mr. Roesler to handle licensing for 
the late singer. 

“In the majority of cases, it’s a family 
member whom we represent,' ’ Ms. Ross 
said. “But it can be whoever handles die 
estate. For Shoeless Joe Jackson, it's the 
American Heart Association.” CMG 
has some living clients too, including 
the forma- Yankees great Whitey Ford, 
the former Chicago Cubs pitcher Fer- 
guson Jenkins and the football legends 
Johnny Unites and YA Tittle. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


April a Ubld-Ubor Rates 


AprilS 


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INARY SERVICE MEETS 


CLIENT NEEDS. EXCEPTIONAL 


SERVICE ANTICIPATES THEM. 



//mifiurim of Republic 
S'atiaual Bank of S' nr York 
iStnwJ AH. in 


At RepuLli c we take service very seriously. 
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the way in advance. 

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VorlJ HraJ.juarlrrr of 
Republic S'olional Rant oj 
Seng Virfc in New York. 



Republic National Bank of New York" 

Strength. Security. Service. 

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e tu-putli; N'aHmal Rjnt rj \fvTnrt, 199 b 











PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


The Dow 



6300 


— 6.35 - 



Staples Inc. to Fight U.S. on Merger 


: — /‘ ,f 

Technology 

n . _ n . I .. ^ 


By John M. Broder 

JVw York Times Service 


1.60 > 


120 - - 


nJL lift . 

NDJFMA ,IU ND 


J F M A 
1997 


NYSE The Dow • 

NYSE S&P50G . 

NYSE S&PIOO . . 

NYSE ■ Composite ~ ■ 

US: Nasdaq Composite 

ME* ~ MartcetVafaje /. 
Toronto TEE ind ex : ‘ 1 ' 
saoPauto • Bowaspa . • 
Hbtoo City Btriat . \ 

Buenos Afres Matval ■ - 
Santiago IPSA Gdnora! 
Caracas Cap*# General 
Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


&4PM' 

6609.16 

766-8T 


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762.12 +QJS2 1 


40229 

1257.41 

561.41 
5814.40 
973221 
377228 
71522 
535426 
6202.30 


741.50 +0.62 

400.68 +0.40 


1251.34 +0.49 j 

579.53 -3.13 


5837.40 -029 

9836.52 -1.06 


WASHINGTON — Staples Inc. and Office 
Depot Inc., asserting that federal antitrust of- 
ficials do not understand the office supply 
business, have vowed to “vigorously contest" 
the Federal Trade Commission's decision to 
challenge their proposed $4 billion merger. 

Thomas Sternberg, the Staples chief exec- 
utive, said that the FTC's conclusion that the 
merger would result in higher prices and de- 
creased competition was based on a small 
sample of product prices and a flawed theory of 
the office products market. 

“We believe an unbiased court of law will 
understand the merits of our case," Mr. Stern- 
berg said. 

The commission voted, 4 to l, on Friday to 
go to federal court this week to block the 
proposed combination, which would have cre- 
ated a office supply giant with more than 1 ,000 


stores and S10 billion in annual sales. . 

Agency officials said that they planned to 
file a motion seeking an order temporarily 
restraining die merger in a federal court in 
Washington later this week. 

Both sides' positions appeared to be harden- 
ing after the vote Friday, william Baer, chief of 
the commission's antitrust bureau, said that 
there did not appear to be any way to structure 
the merger to ease the commission’s concern 


that the deal was anti-competitive. 

Mr. Sternberg, who called the panel’s de- 
cision “bizarre* and “absurd," indicated that 


lei’s de- 


the companies would pursue the merger re- 
gardless of cost. He said Monday that the 
companies would seek an expedited hearing in 
federal court to resolve the matter before the 
merger agreement expires May 31. 

The federal trade agency's complaint is 
based in large part on pricing studies and 
econometric models that officials say demon- 
strate that Staples. Office Depot and the only 


other company in the superstore business. Of- 
ficemax Inc., compete only against each other, 
and not against other suppliers of office 
goods. 

Commission officials have argued that elim- 
inating one of the three competitors will violate 
federal antitrust laws and will inevitably lead to 
higher prices. 

But Mr. Sternberg contended that the com- 
bined company would control less than 6 per- 
cent of a highly competitive and fragmented 
$185 billion office supply industry. He said that 
the merger, if it was allowed to proceed, would 
not end price competition for office products 
because they would continue to be sold by such 
giant retailers as Wal-Mart, warehouse clubs 
and several large nationwide catalogue deal- 
ers. 

* ‘Staples and Office Depot are committed to 


Beats Rates 

As Motivator 5 lull* ?? 

Of Market ^ : 3 


our mission of bringing even lower prices to 
our customers" after the merzer. Mr. Sternberg 


our customers" after the merger, Mr. Sternberg 
said. 


3787.94 -0.41 

720.71 -0.68 


535296 +094 : 

6170.19 +0.52: 


[lUcmalMul HeralJ Tribune 


U.S. Trade Delegation Strives for New Look 


Very briefly: 


By Paul Blustein 

Washington Post Senice 


Wholesale Sales Surged in February 


WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — U.S. wholesale sales rose 
in February at the fastest rate in almost three years, suggesting 
growth may accelerate in the months ahead as companies 
place new orders to ra Lin tain inventories, according to gov- 
ernment figures released Tuesday. 

A 2.1 percent increase in February in wholesale sales, up 
from a 0.8 percent rise a month earlier, was the largest since 
August 1994. the Commerce Department said. 


Polo Ralph Lauren to Go Public 


NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Polo Ralph Lauren Corp.,the 
apparel and fragrance company with one of the world's best- 
known brand names, plans to raise as much as $600 million 
through an initial public offering. 

The New York-based company filed with the Securities and 
Exchange Commission to sell an undetermined number of 
Class A common shares. The Lauren family will maintain 
control of the company through its ownership of Class B 
shares, which receive 10 votes each. 

Polo Ralph Lauren plans to use the proceeds from the stock 
sale to pay debt and a special dividend. 


WASHINGTON — Commerce 
Secretary William Daley has said be 
will lead a trade mission to South 
.America next month, his first since 
he took over the department, and 
vowed to eliminate perceptions of 
political favoritism in choosing the 
participants. 

The mission, which is scheduled 
to go to Brazil, Argentina and Chile 
from May 1 1 to May 1 9. will include 
about 12 yet-to-be-chosen U.S. busi- 
ness executives for each of the three 
countries, Mr. Daley said Monday. 

The move marks an important 
step in Mr. Daley's efforts to dispel 
die cloud created by allegations that 
previous trade missions included a 


disproportionate number of big 
Democratic donors. Those allega- 
tions have featured prominenily in 
the controversy over the fund-rais- 
ing practices of President Bill Clin- 
ton's administration. 

The Commerce Department's 
ability to aggressively support the 
interests of U.S. multinational 
companies abroad has been severely 


hampered by the issue. In response, 
Mr. Daley imposed a 30-day 


moratorium on departmental trade 
missions when he took office in Feb- 
ruary. At the end of toe period, he 
issued guidelines aimed at ensuring 
that partisan considerations would be 
eliminated from the process of choos- 
ing participants in toe trade trips. 
Now, be said in an interview, the time 
has come for the department to re- 


sume its advocacy role for U.S. busi- 
nesses, especially because top offi- 
cials from countries such as France, 
Germany, Japan and Canada have 
been bringing groups of executives 
from their countries on visits to rap- 
idly growing emerging markets. 

“People will continue to raise 
questions about trade missions." he 
said. “We can't do anything about 
that. The fact is, we’ve got to get 
back in the business of being around 
the world just as our competitors are 
doing." 

In accordance with the new 
guidelines, be said, the selection pro- 
cess will be “overseen and decided 
by a majority of career people" from 
toe department, rather than by polit- 
ical appointees. The Commerce De- 
partment's press release issued 


Monday stated: * ‘An applicant's par- 
tisan political activities (including 
political contributions) are irrelevant 
to the selection process.” . 

' The choice of Latin America re- 
flects the Clinton administration's 
desire to create a hemispheric free- 
trade zone by 2005, starting with the 
incorporation of Chile into the North 
American Free Trade Agree men t. 

At present, this plan for a free- 
trade initiati ve in the Western Hemi- 
sphere is beset by political troubles, 
however, including resistance in 


C^rrJAlhtOurSsiffrnmtDaitMrtus 

NEW YORK — Stocks rose 
Tuesday as strength in technology 
and banking issues offset a drop in 
Treasury bond prices. * 

The Dow Jones industrial aver-^ 
age closed up 55.25 points at 
6.609.16. and the broader Standard • 
& Poor's 500-share index rose 3.94 
points, to 766.07. 

Better-than -expected - earnings 
from Advanced Micro Devices and 
Motorola helped technology issues 
advance. 

“You are starting to see tech- 
nology companies report some 
goodearnings." Paul Meeks, di- 
rector of research at Jurika & 
Voyles. said. “PfcopJe remember ' 
how exciting stocks were and are 
getting warm and fuzzy about them 
again." 

AMD said earnings were led by 
sales of its flash memory chips, 
which are used in portable com- 
puters, and sales of its K5 pm- : 
cessor, which competes with a $ ■ 


UA STOCKS 


Congress to legislation needed to 
negotiate trade deals. 


negotiate trade deals. 

“The fact that my fust mission as 
commerce secretary will be to Latin 
America reflects toe importance of 
this region to our economic future," 
Mr. Daley said. 


model from Intel. AMD closed up 
V4 at 43V4. 

But while profit also was strong 
at Motorola, the company said or- 
ders were less than expected in the. 
first quarter, indicating sales 
growth may not pick up until the 
second half of 1997. Motorola fell 
1% to 59%. 

Banking stocks rose after Stan- 
dard & Poor's said credit-card 


losses rose less quickly in February 
than in January. Citicorp rose 214. to 
1 1416, and First Chicago advanced* 
% to 54%. * 




DOLLAR: Central Banks Appear Ready to Stand Aside as U.S. Currency Soars 


Continued from Page II 


• Bausch & Lomb Inc. said it had agreed to make and sell 


prescription sunglasses under the Ray-Ban brand name with 
France's Essilor International SA. a leading maker of nre- 


France's Essilor International SA. a leading maker of pre- 
scription lenses. 

• U.S. companies cut jobs in March at toe fastest pace in 15 
months, said Challenger, Gray & Christmas Inc., an out- 
placement company. A total of 50.182 workers lost their jobs 
in March, up 33.9 percent from a year earlier. 

• Chrysler Corp. has abandoned plans to build a $ 1 92 million 

auto-assembly plant in Vietnam because the number of auto- 
makers licensed to build plants has increased, eroding hopes 
of near-term profit. Bhwnberg 


Bank. The stabilization of stock and 
bond markets after last week’s vol- 
atile price swings also contributed to 
toe dollar's advance, Steve Galla- 
gher, an economist at Societe Gen- 
erate, said. 

“It's not brain surgery," Thomas 
Arnold, chief currency trader at Dai- 
Ichi Kangyo Bank in New York, said. 
“With the large difference between 
interest rates in toe U.S. and Japan, if 
you’re an investor, the first thing 
you’re going to do is buy dollars." 


The Federal Reserve Board is ex- 
pected by many to raise U.S. interest 
rates again when its policy-making 
council meets May 20. Rates in Ger- 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


many and Japan, meanwhile, show 
□o signs of rising, and some analysts 
are even beginning to expect Ger- 
man rates to be cut soon. 

Bonn is struggling to trim its 
budget deficit to 3 percent of gross 
domestic product by 1999 to qualify 
for the European Union’s planned 


single currency. “Germany wants to 
meet the budget criteria and will 
want to stimulate domestic growth," 
Domenick Press, chief currency 
trader at Dresdner Bank. said. Given 
that, Germany may be “inclined to 
lower' ’ interest rates," be said. 

Eisuke Sakakibara. head of the 
Finance Ministry's international fi- 
nance bureau, said the central bank 
would act if the currency market 
“deviates from fundamentals," 
Nikkei English News reported. 

Kabun Mutoh, director-general of 
Japan's Management and Coordin- 


ation Agency, said toe central bank 
should consider raising interest 
rates. But both of toe comments were 
eclipsed by those of Mr. Makino. 

The dollar also was able to shrug 
off comments from Richard Med- 
ley, a prominent U.S. investment 
adviser, who said a move above 
126 JO yen would put the dollar in a 
“danger zone." He also called 130 
yen a “critical political and psy- 
chological limit’ ’ and suggested that 
the risk of U.S. intervention grew 
with every yen toe dollar rose. 

(Bloomberg. Bridge News r AFP) 


Those sectors offset a drop in 
Treasury bond prices, which were 
hit by a Labor Department econ- 
omist’s forecast of a temporary rise 
in inflation. That fueled speculation 
that the Federal Reserve Board 
would raise interest rates again 
soon. 

The price of the benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond fell 12/32 point, 
to 94 5/32, taking the yield up to 
7.10 percent from 7.08 percent 
Monday. 

Viking Office Products, the most 


actively traded U.S. stock, fell 5Vl 
to 14Vs after toe company said die 


rising dollar would result in lower- 
than-expected earnings for its third 
quarter. (Bloomberg. AP) 


3RL[>> TIM k V* \i;kr 


tadafc & 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday's 4 P.M. Close 

TTw top 300 most octive dunes, 
up to the dosing on Wall Sheet. 
The Assocasd Press. 


Ssta MW LB» Latest On* 


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April 8, 1997 


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Uffllties 186.90 186.15 186.17 18542 

Finance 8674 8548 8627 8775 

5P500 76682 757.90 762.13 76607 

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SOYBEAN I8EJU. (CBOn 
IDO Ions- doom per ran 

May 97 28770 3CJ0 2070 —660 4X476 

Jill 97 28SJQ 27970 28070 — 6S 3U21 

AuaTT 27400 Z7U0 ZTOJO -2.JB 9797 

Sen 97 25600 25200 252J0 -240 6340 

Od97 23000 22870 22870 -050 6156 

Dec 77 222W 220.70 22270 -070 I2J92 

Est. sales NA Mon's, sites 22449 
Mon's open W 110.722 up 142 


SOLD (NCMXJ 
100 tnmrn- daBan per Huy n 
Apr 97 349 JO 34230 34870 *030 
MW 97 SmM +4M 

Am 97 35230 35050 35170 +210 
Aug 97 35460 35150 35370 +210 
Oct 97 35740 9660 35660 +210 
Dec 97 36040 35940 35940 
FCb98 36270 

Apr 98 35470 

Ed. sales 17400 Mon'6 softs 22017 
Mon's open Id 147494 off 2703 


17ft 39ft 
36ft 26V. 

23 2*M 
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9W» 9 n V 


SOYBEAN tXL KBOn 
60*xn B»- cents par ft 

May 97 2418 2379 MJ» -216 34001 

W97 2499 3432 2435 -023 3X655 

Aug 97 2476 3455 3455 -420 7432 

Sop 97 2486 2467 3467 -418 4889 

0097 3495 3475 2475 -2» 4969 

Dec 97 2520 2498 3498 -222 14318 

Est. sates NA Mon's sites 12557 
Mon's OPWlift 102223 up 187 


W GRADE COPPER tNCMX) 


Apr 97 10250 10750 10845 
May 97 10670 10475 U690 


56143 55950 561X1 


Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bomts 
10 UlflWes 
10 indintiWs 


101-83 10153 

9856 9233 

105.10 10473 


176*6 76*f» 15%>7iPfE 
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Sj» tu minimum- own mr bumei 

May 97 864ft 8*6 849ft -13Vi 6630 

JlA97 868ft 852 853ft -14 72375 

Aug 97 850 837ft 838ft -10V 12891 

Sep 97 761 750 751 —8 4502 

Now 97 705ft 08 698ft -6ft 37.882 

Est. safes NA Mot's, sates 71^75 

Mon's open Ir# 19544* off 120 


All 97 18473 10150 104*5 

Aug 97 10420 10150 10420 
Sep 97 HtU5 wi aa laxas 
Oct 97 102J0 10140 MBJB 
Nov 97 WL9D 10130 1013B 
Dec 97 W1JZ5 10225 10175 
Est.sites 7joo Man’s, sites 
Mon's open H 5277* up 0 


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Trading Activity 


Unchanged 
Total HSuas 
Haw Highs 

t*ew LOWS 


p™. Nasdaq 
'am 

Cl IIHUI iSAVcfc 

44 NewHkJtU 
NhiIaq 


WHEAT (C30T) 

6000 taw mWimm- cents par biaM 
Kay 97 388 381 382 +1V5 22625 

JU1 97 30ft 381 386 +» 44867 

Sep 97 393 385ft 389ft +3ft 2185 

Dec 97 401ft 195ft 398ft 43ft 2973 

EsLsctes NA Mon's. soles 21.186 
Men’s open W 82.156 off 998 


SB-VEH (HOAX) 

5400 buy cu.- cants per may is. 

Apr 97 47A4D —070 2 

MO997 4CJ0 47570 478.00 -MO SSJX 

JUT 97 438150 — U» 6 

Jul 97 487.50 48070 452.90 -170 2470 

Sep 77 490JD 48670 487.70 —1.00 1872 

Dec 97 fiBJO 49100 495.10 —170 2458 

Juo98 49250 497 JO 497 JD -170 16 

Mo-98 50150 — IjDQ 230 

Est.sdes 12000 Men's, soles 11,930 
Mon’s open irt 99448 up 1323 


High Loir Latest age OpM 

10-YEA* FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT! F) 
FFSOCWMO-BtSoflOOpd 
Jun 97 12256 T28.18 12230 40.10160841 
Sep 97 17AM 12260 12676 +0.10 41731 
Dec 97 9250 9250 9640 +210 0 

EsL wlunw: 153556 . Open tat: 165572 off 
2122 . 

ITALIAN GOVEmMEirr BOND OJFTO 
m.200 ntBoo . pH of 100 pd 
Jao97 12755 12450 12774—046102178 

Sep97 1Z77S 12775 1277* —046 3.179 

EsL Softs! 71779. Pjbl soles; 72702 
Pier.opaitaL: T125S7 up tm 
EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

SI m0«an-P«5o*lB0pcC 

PtrJI M.19 94.77 94.T7 32964 

MOV 97 94J1 9479 9210 -071 22.157 

Jun 97 9471 MJS S4JB -071 92757 

Sen 77 9173 9270 9373 392J14 

Dec 97. 9244 9140 93X2 —071 281796 

Mar 98 9351 9376 9376 -071204® 

Jun 90 020 9375 9377 -071 172172 

Sep 98 9112 TUB 9379 -001132608 

Dec 98 9103 9197 9279 -402 112457 

Mm 99 9UB 9277 9279 -871 0280 

Jun 99 9279 91M 9175 -®72 7650 

Sep 99 9276 9291 9192 -472 60J74 

Dec 99 9270 9185 9Ut -072 52374 

Est softs NA Men's, sotss Z321X 
Man's onmlnr Z439.1V off 2780 
BOTCH POUND [CMER) 

AZ40D pounds. S per mod 
Jun 97 1-6272 17180 15254 32108 

Sep 97 15230 15190 15Z10 834 

Dec 97 15208 101 

EsL softs NA Mon's, sites 9517 
Mat's open 1m 37543 up 226 

CJIMADIAH DOLLAR (OAER) 

Hiun eum s <w dm. dr 
Jun 97 .7346 7234 7238 74504 

Sep 97 7280 J268 7275 4735 

D8C97 7315 7382 73TO 1,135 

MOT98 7336 772 

EsLsofcs NA Mai's. softs 2183 
Mon'smnH B1J78 off 129 


FSati Low Latest Cbge OpM 


Sep98 9340 9135 9337 —LOB 4018 

■tXSS 9130 9134 9330 — (LIB 4W 

MOI99 9123 9114 9U1 — 0J2 626 

Estate* 6M5L Pnr.sdiK 33972 
Prty.OpMH_- Z6&439 op 1217 


Industrials 


Q0TT0H2(NCnO 

SUMBOb-cwPiivIk.'. J ' 

May 97 7291 7198 7125 -454 31413 ^ 

Jd97 7457 7161 7338 -05Z 79523^ ~ 

Od97 7540 7U0 7125 -030 1.931 ■. „ 

Dec 97 7645 7650 7637- — 4U5 22531 ■ \ 

ftorX 77..® 77.15 7135 -flJ i 2425 ? 

May 98 71® 77.90 TUB -0J0 564 r. 

EsL softs NA Man's, softs 10413 ZJ, 

Mar'sopenW 72981 up 376 2 


HEATB4GOO. QfMBQ 


■BESS «NUta 

New Laws 

Market Sales 


1604 2329 

1708 1478 

m 3s 

41 56 

145 143 


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tn minions. 


44941 54755 
1L74 2352 
480.10 56&27 


CATTLE (CMBU 
*0400 B».- certs oor la. 

Apr 97 6747 6657 67.17 +L20 16512 

Jun 97 6350 63J» 6332 +007 35524 

Aug 97 63J5 63J15 6352 +0JD 24560 

0097 6755 6755 0.70 +055 15JMI 

DOC 97 050 040 0JO +022 7554 

Feff98 m70 71L3S 7B4B +0JQ UH 

Estsdes 1&432 Mon's, softs 23539 
Man's open H 103588 all 19*3 


PLATWUM MMER3 
sfmau-deiasMrnriE. 

Apr 97 36550 36450 34530 +050 70 

May 97 3885B 

Jun 97 1487 JO 

Ju197 37150 36850 3050 +050 13486 

Od 97 37250 371 JB 37LP 2519 

Jan 98 37450 37450 37450 +050 1,152 

EsI.SCteS NA Mon's.sctes 2.990 

Man's open irt 16548 us 27* 


Close 

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J 


IRREGULAR 

Aegon NV ADR _ 5518 5-T5 6-6 

Astra AB ADS .5215 4-24 5-12 

New Iberia - -OB 4-18 4-30 

Todlran Ltd - 54 6-4 6-19 


2V +* 

n*a -V* 

nv »v 

IV Jft 

IV 
T2V 

TV 4fa 

Is »fa 

3Bl -V 

**fa »Vfa 

lOfa +V 

17V tV 

II +V 

31 +V 

3W. -fa 

18 *Kt 

38V *« 

11W -fa 

5fa V 


REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
computer MMptaee l (or 6 reverse spUL 


INCREASED 

0 5125 4-30 5-15 


Alamo Grain 
Food Lion A, 
Food Lion B, 
Hotteraslneo 
HDftntxanit Ind 
Independence 5q 
UncNUCvSecur 
Unctminai 
Nations Gu 2003 
Nations Gv 2004 
Orford indust 


REGULAR 

a .10 4-14 4-30 
O 5337 4-21 5-5 

Q JJ332 4-21 5-5 

M JS95 4-IB 4-30 
Q .165 4-25 5-30 
q M .115 4-22 400 

r Q 54 4-IB 4-30 

Q 26 4-18 4-30 
M 5514 4-18 4-29 
M 5538 4-18 4-29 
C -20 5-15 5-31 


FEEDS CATTLE (CMBt) 
saewta- cents pwta. 

AW 97 7055 7040 7077 +8.15 

MOV 97 050 69.55 6957 -007 

Aug 97 7320 7175 73.10 

Sep 97 7145 7357 7132 +055 

00 97 7355 7370 7X92 +110 

Nov 97 7575 75J0 755S 

Est sites 3JB3 Mon's, sdes 2,170 
ManV Open M 20J81 up 75 


1547ft 1548ft 1S050 1551.00 
15B250 158350 158550 158&00 
Othodes (HU Grate} 

233650 20950 232750 232450 
229350 229450 228350 228450 


Spot 648ft 649ft 64850 64950 

Forward 650ft 651ft 64950 65000 


Spot 719550 722550 717550 71 „ ^ 

Forward 731050 731550 729050 729550 «« 


HOG&Ltaa(CMBU 

*0500 Bs.- calls pw-Il 

Apr 97 7X25 7220 7142 -057 


Spat £1050 572050 569050 569S50 
Fawmd 574550 575050 573050 573150 
Zinc CSpccM Higta Grade} 

Sped 123250 723350 1227ft 1228ft 
nnwrd 1256ft 12S7K 125350 125450 


INITIAL 

_ JO 4-8 


p-aanuobbHBpnw lw uOeowHiBtper 
skwe/ADR; g-poyatrte te CaHoBai ffuete; 
m-nmalU|f q-tmartertp s-seaMnoul 


Stock Tables Explained 


l!fa HV 
Ufa UV 
II 20V 

IV lfa 
Ufa 10V 

Vs V 
tfa 6U 
14V Ufa 
llfa II 
4fa 

V 4fa 
17fa I7fa 
UV 16V 

V fa 
•fa 4V 
£• ifa 
.ifa IV 


in 

IM .U 
Bfa -fa 
IV -'.fa 
10V 


Sales figures are unoffldaL Yearly Idghs and kavs reflect the previous 52 weeks plus the 
current week, but not Ihelatesr trading day- Wtierea spilt or slack dMdend amounting to 25 
percent or mare has boen paid. Itieyeara htgh-tmv rangeand dMdend ore shown torttw new 
stoe ks only. Unless otherwise noted, rates of dividends ore annual disbursements based on 
the latest dedaiottan. 

a -dMdend also extra (s). p - tnlTlal dividend, annual rate unknown, 

b - annual rate at dMdend pi as stock dt- P/E - price-earnings ratio. 


Jun 97 

"l-S 

.«L57 

80.97 

-137 

14610 

JUl 97 

81-W 

8MD 

8045 

—047 

4166 

AW)97 

7RS5 

7X20 

7BL35 

-0 45 

X542 

Oct 97 

7X0 

7X55 

7247 

-ua 

2420 

Dec 97 

71 JB 

70LS5 

7042 

- 12 a 

1423 

ENOrtes 9438 Morts. sates 

lob 

Morts Bpennt 

3X152 

W 54 



PORK BBXIES (CMBU 







May 97 

79.92 

78-55 

79 JB 

+LB 

3461 

Jul 97 

7170 

77.45 

7865 

+0J5 

248! 


7130 

7X50 

7190 

4-157 

564 

Feb 98 

7 m 

7142 

7142 

-112 

iaz 

Mr 98 



7140 

-120 

8 

May 98 



7400 

+7 JO 

2 


GERMAN MARK (CMER] 

T2S500 morHi, Spar mark 
Jun 97 .5879 5848 5963 76529 

Sep 97 5914 _5897 MW 7. <717 

Dec 97 J941 JSffl JMJ 3W 

Mar 98 JKKH 27 

Eft.sitn NA ManV. Sites 0564 

Mon'S open W 79580 op 13897 

JAPANESE YEN (CMBt) 

ILSmBSon m 1 pa 180 yen 

£53 -SS S9° ra«4 

San 97 -B1M 5098 5115 1.189 

Dec 97 5264 5244 52(4 SO 

Est sates NA Mai's, sales 30514 
MarTS open kd 76520 up 5574 

SWISS FRANC (CMBt) 

133500 firm, taw Irene 
Jun 97 5866 5816 5839 41511 

Sep 97 5928 502 5908 7593 

Dec 97 5985 5988 5980 m 

EsL softs NA Mon's. Sites 23591 
Mon's open lit 4L38S up 1450 

3-MfWTH 5TEKUHC (UFFE) 
{soa^n-ptsoriDopd 

SBS SP 41 8® 126+48S 

W »» +-WH mn 

SS 23:88! 

„ H H H 


May 97 5X65 5255 5255 -027 3M35 

Ail 97 5110 5X30 51® -0.18 23J76 

Jul97 . SX25 5X75 SX75 -0J3 18JK 

An 97 5X85 5358 5145 —003 W.TS4 

Sep 97 5455 5628 5LS +027 6998 

0097 M SSJS M +0JF 7215 

Nov 97 54X 5580 3598 +057 LZU 

Dec 97 5L90 5650 5655 +OJ? K&I08 

Jain 5755 5655 5755 +0.17 6J12 

Feb 98 5720 SL90 5695 +022 X9TI 

Est soles NA ManV-EOtet vjn 
MoiTl apenkt 137JJ1 up 4682 

uenT street aiunEcweo ' 

J JUBbtaL- doUars HrtBL 
Mayor 1920 1928 1930 + 007 82224 

Ajflff 1937 1929. I MI +081 67/25 

JulW 1957 1*^03 T9M +003 3S857 

AligW 19J 19/4 1950 +009 3WZ3 

to97 1952 1953 1751 -kOA 16JB22. 

OtfW 1952 1955 1955 +4UB 15^78 

MovW 1952 W54 1955 +056-0531 

D8C97 1956 1951 1952 " +W 29 JM 

-ton 98- W5B 1958 1958- HU3S.14.tS7 

ROW 1950 1950 1950 +055 7573 

Mar 98 1956 3558 

f*r98 1959 19.39 19J +052 3505 

May 90 1958 4205 

E^soles NA Mafesaies -92J79 
Men's open irt *113*5 up 7573 U 


' cs-r.-i 


•a 

*■■■■ - 


3S =i| 


NATURAL GAS QWBO . ' 
lUWmnibtu'c.spammMu 


May 97 1575 1.92D 

JBI97- 2JU8 iSS 1.990 


SB9 •- 

S' 

Sir > 


M97 Uff 2308 ZOOS 
AOOW 2JMS 2JB5 2515 
sep w vm vm 7m 

009/ im. ten. .wm . 
NnrW 2500 IBS 118S 
Dec97 2391 2320 2325 
Jai9B 1305 2310 2J70 
ft* 98- ISM 2JSQ 2200 - 
MorWJ US 1183 2J83 
B^Jdes NA Men's, sites W #4 
Mar's open W U9JS up MU 


UNLEADS) GASOLME MMBO 

+M«»oot WHS pa- act 
May 97 61A 6050 6B55 +023 49.M8 

Atiff 6125 60.10 . 4030.. +039 27577 

JB97 9 HAS 3955 +031 10136 

AOOW HJS 5850.. SLES. +034 5,13* 

S«»97 5720 5758- 57JQ +049 XB0 

0097 5JL5I . - 1556 

e&satet -NA Mon'victts- 26320 
Mar's open im 96599 up. Wf 
GASOIL OPE) 

UA doctors per metrteteo- hteof lOOtaw 


& Kl > Y * . - 


''►'ifa.. 


S3 ss S3 ;ss 


Apt 97 16350 16125 162J5 -430 15545 
May 97 16425 T62/25 16430 —530 16560 

JlHl 97 16630 164JU 16525 —630 93» 
jul 97 167501662516730-630 5W6‘ 

Aug 97 16935 16830 169*1® -5^ 3^0 
SfW97 17135 17030 17025 -625. 15Mj. 
6597 17X75 1712513350 — 55U » 
Nw 97 17435 17425 17175— iK. _87Br 
Dec 97 17530 17430 17450—575 7, IBS' 
Jan 98 17475 17475 17530 S2S 1254 


High Low dose Chge OpM 


Hnandal 


92-13 92.12 92.18 +D36 
92.10 9237 92.13 *036 

Eri. softs: 80382. Pnv.adeK 8&9ST 
Pnv. open teL 462302 up 9®?' 


UST.BRJLS [OBQ 

fl mBtan- pt* o* IM net 

Jun 97 9443 9*59 9450 -031 6399 

S«P 97 9422 9429 9429 X2» 

Dec 97 9140 0*7 

Est.sdes NA Man's. sates as 

Marts openirt 1031? up 187 


Eta. softs 2314 Man's, soles 170 
Alton's open W 6323 is 2*0 


5 YIL TREASURY (CBOT) 

S100300 win- ota &«*0tsaf 100 Pd 
Jun 97 104-35 104-17 W-33 —07 22S33S 

Sep 97 W-14 6M 

Dec 97 104-01 10 

Estsdes NA Man's. sdes 25343 
Morts open Irt 226531 off 75 


UV -V 
llfa 

*fa» -v» 
V -v« 


iita im 

RV Ufa 

3% I?5 

^ '5 

4. 

llfa 12H 
5 411 

iev 

im 13V 
II9W IIN 

nv nv 

S 12V» 

isv 


vldend. g-dosod-tend mutual fund. axOMNCSE) 

c-SqukJodng dividend. r-dMdenddodtaretl or paid hi preceding 13 lonairfctara-tBw-twi 

cc - PE exceeds 99. aronttib plus stock dMdend. May 97 1403 1377 1408 +7 I 

dd- coded. s-stoekspffL DMdend betfnswllli dale of Jul 97 1444 M18 14*0 ♦< I 

d- new yearly law. spHt uS !? 

dd- loss In the last 12 months. sts-satas. IS S Jy 

e- dividend declared or paid br preceding 12 t - dMdend paid In stadc In preceding 12 Est sales 15770 Marts, sales 3R67B 

months. months, estimated cosh value on w-dl- Mai's wen tot 98423 off 6938 


1 8 YH. TREASURY (tSOT) 


May 97 

1403 

1377 

1408 

+3 

21,348 

Jul 97 

1444 

U18 

14*0 

+4 

2SJD0 

S«P97 

1464 

144] 

1464 

+9 

12.no 

Dee 97 

1*5 

1466 

1485 

+3 

1X124 

Mar 98 

1505 

1488 

1505 

*7 

19,178 


JTO97 105-30 U5-I7 135-Zt —05 32X656 

Sep 97 TOS-11 HH3 105-05 -87 15732 

Dec 97 105-00 0 

EsL softs NA Mai's. softs Ofll 

Mu'S OMCM 337783 off 3140 


J^7 9677 967* 967* -032 23X463 

j*P97 9671 9667 9668 —031 T&ssis 

DerP7 9654 9650 Ks — Qjn 2 16664 

ftE2? J 6 - 54 9675 —an 157Jffi 

^S, &S 9614 9616 - 071 13i<a 

SES 5 SS SS SS= 5 S 

Jun99 95.16 96U 95A5 — aSl 

5ep99 9439 94M 94JB UqdL 

DW99 9-4.43 94J9 9460 UndL 

MmW 9*J7 9634 9635 iff* 

Joan NT. NT. 9614 Un£ UD 

5^00 NT. NT! 9394 KS WM 

NT NT H22- 1J<S 

**■07 NT. NT. 9358 UndL 307 

EB- mtei; 114397. Pm. softs: 161,186 

Pm. open [ntr USLO0 up M814 


Est soles: 19J7B. : ' Open lnLB&6SS off 


BRENT OIL GPE3 ' 

U A doffurs per bone! - tad of U8J0 barrels 
MayW 1BJJ9 17J0 1759 +4X12 44216 
JUIK97 1428 1836 MM +0.13 5M< 
Jn*y97 i&4o 1020 mat +aio 21756 

Aug97 1X49 14JT 1435 +6.10 10216 
^5” 14S0 IBM 1857 +037 7J£ 

Ort97 1853 1041 W39 +036 4429 

J(WW 1855 ML45 1840 +03* *90 
D"g7 1840 1044 -1940 +033 . T.9S5 
Jan98 1856 1047 1039 .UneN . 4862 


sales: 40983-. Open tefcl 70296 UP 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 


lift 

S -V 
W* -H 
im t+fa 
im 

17V 

121ft -ft 
ISfa +ft 


months. raontrau estimated aish value on m-dl- 

f ■ annual rate, Increased on last tierto- vldend or ex-dbtrlbutfon dare, 
ration. 0- new yearly high, 

g - dhrfdend In Canadon funds, subied to v- trading halted. 

15 % non-residence ftre, vl - m bankruptcy ar reertversNp or befng 

I -dMdend declared otter spBI-up or stock reorganized under tbe Bankruptcy Act or 
dividend. securities assumed bysucti eatnpo nte g. 

I -dMdend paid Bts yeas onOtad. deterred or wd- when distributed, 
no oaton token al kseskSvidend meeftig. wl-wften teu«v 

R - Iffvtdend dedaed or paid Ws year, an ww- won warrants. 
acsumutaArebsuew0i(Mdon(blnaneaa. x-ex-dMdend ore*- rights. 

■ - annual rate, reduced an last dedara- xtas-ct-dwnbutton. 

Aon. *w*wnftout warrants, 

n- new issue In the post 52 wee+a- The h+gh- y-ex-dMdend and series PifuR 
tow fnrwe begins wSflttwstorf of trortng. ytd-yteW. 

bO- nod day drttvwY- z- sates In Ml. 


COHFEEC (NCSE) 
37jnM.-an>iwti. 

May 77 UUB 17630 T7S75 -065 
Jul 97 16650 162JD 16458 -055 
Sep 97 15X25 1523a 15275 —025 
Dee 97 14230 14030 UOJO -140 
Est. softs 5750 Men's, soles 644* 
MWsOpenW 3X628 Off 2311 


Jun 97 W7-M 107-06 107-14 — 06 430435 

Sep 97 107-09 106-31 106-30 —08 3450 

Dee 97 106-27 106-15 106-20 —05 5440 

Mir 90 106-77 106-17 106-17 +02 1450 

esf. rates NA Man. softs 237574 
MrtStaeiU 4725*3 off 5003 


3+A OtfTH P1BQR (MAT1F1 
FF5 m«Jnii-pts o* 100 pcf 

Jte 97 Kffl 9658 9640 +030 4939a 
Dec 97 9651 9647 9648 Join "'£2 
S*1T 9653 lam 


Stock IndaxM 
»ooiib*.mdbx<ci«8 




SUGAR-WORLD n (NCSC3 
11 9JM0 ■*-- cwfa* Bw ft. 

May 97 1130 1130 113* +03* 1 

Jut 97 HU4 RU3 KUO +001 

Oct 97 1043 1DJ9 HU! +032 

Mats HU3 KLS9 1061 +031 

Est sates 21,723 Morts-sates KU83 
Starts open M 151524 off 1420 


LONG G1IT (UPPE) 

... 

Jua?7 lOW* 10fa.35 10943 +0-01 101590 
SftW 10«a_ 1 OS-27 1 06-30 + 0-0* 
Saks 44901 . Piw.satex 5U23 
Prk. open bit: 1825*0 up 9357 



76340- 7 ax +048 DftV 

rES 2H2 77541 +03G ;*tM 

fccW 78258 7KJ9 78X50 — UH 3387 

gr * 79235 ' « 

Est-rafts NA Mm’s. sifts 70J64 

Mart open hit 18627S up 1508 
™«IOO 


"’■‘‘MV 


an 24»s 


Mor 00 9*47 9447 9447 +£53 
9t2 g t "t" 1 * 4 * 00 . open lot; a«bl : 35 up 


BERMAN GOVCKNMENT BUND OJPFB] 

DM2Sa0»-Bft0fll»pa 

Jue97 TOM M0JD 10032 —036260347 


S«p97 9956 99.12 9M3 -033 5087 

eSsoMC 189407 Pnv. tolls; 308348 
PWMWSnhfc 26X314 off 60 


SP 

DK97 «3 SS «4W 

Jam §sl *L49 —ala SSj 

■»» 935S 9439 934* -(Lip fgg 


innv 


CACBiaAATIFJ 

pfrlndDriirtnl ■ ■ - a? - 

m 

Jon W S4M 2S37J^354&0— W»«WJ 


,§ li-. . "C 

& & ■- 


is S 2537*1735410- IM& 
S«1 97 2561 J> 255 ! JS 25® J — LW- 17®. 
9 T NT. NT. 2577 J—U» •_ 


II ■V 1 - r LI. bihu.-iw ■_ j 
Mar » NT. Nt.3«7UI— 

Sap 98 NT, JCT.2S803— ViO 

E«t wtane «40t Opffn litiOiflTWif- 


s 6i ^-1 ' f 

»>. •: to;. 


,*ii 

’V **• to. 




’i. ^ '*• r . 4 

*1 _•••• •_ 

■*«» ;■ : ... v , 




PAGE 13 



n 

; - c, i 
• . ' 




• -i' r,< 


t,_- c- 

.-i 

‘ / ZZm 


7 ‘"V:| 1 

; ~ i 

-i ; i 



EUROPE 


tion 


fforl: 


On Jobless 

Unemployment Falls 
As Budding Resumes 

■ Cmpitrdtn OmrSkgFjem Oty^ p, 

7 jrc^MERG - Unemploy- 

* March for AefiStoem 

“ a year, the government said Ihesdav 
- al&ough analysts warned that the 
, stilHRgh jobless rate would continue 
* 5 «ratrate Bonn’s efforts to slash its 

deficit m time to launch Europe's 


# 


* 5° Unemployed 

-.waters feU by 194,702 last broft 
as warmer weather prompted con- 

- sanction companies tn Easton Ger- 

■ «any to rehire staff, the Labor Of- 
fice reported. After adjusting for 
seasonal factors, the number erf job- 
less workers was down 15,000. 

_ German central bank figures, also 
. issned Tuesday, put the seasonally 
adjusted jobless rate at 11.2 percent 
of the work force, down from 113 
percent in February. Unadjusted 
data from the Labor Office put the 
rate at 11.7 percent, down from 123 
the previous month. 

. Despite die fell, the Labor Office 
said there was little sign that the 
economy was creating new jobs. 

> - With 43 million Germans still 
out of work and no relief in sight for 
. the labor market this year, the fed- 
eral government’s goal of cutting fts 
budget deficit to 3 percent of gross 

- domestic product is becoming in- 
. creasingly distant 

“It’s going to be very, very ti ght 
fa the government,” Eberhard 
. Schcdz, an economist at Bayerische 

■ Vereinsbank AG in Munich, said. 

( Bloomberg , Reuters) 


Moscow Faces Another Budget Battle 

Tax Shortfall Could Trigger a New Debate With Parliament Soon on Cuts 


Cd^&dfyOm-SBfFnmDcpa&a 

MOSCOW — — Slumping tax revenue may 
force the government to slash spending across 
the board this year to keep its reformeSorts on 
track, openmg the door to anew dispute with the 
conservative lower house of Parliament. 

Hie 1997 budget, approved this year only 
after prolonged negotiation and debate, says the 
government must ask Parliament to approve 
new, lower spending proposals if revenue is 
more than 10 percent below planned levels. 

Now, with Russia’s tax-collection diffi- 
culties continuing, government ministers say 
lower spending is the only way to resolve tire 
problems, and plans fa sp endin g cuts might 
have to be presented as early as this month. 

1 Tax collection is lower, not oily c o mpar ed 
Co the budget but also compared to last yea r,” 
said Yevsei Gurvich, an economist with, the 
Finance Ministry. The revenue shortfall so far 
this year has been estimated at $8.8 billion. 

Pl ans far lower spending wilLreopen the bitter 
arguments of the hurt budget round, when depu- 


ties in the lower boose of Parliament assailed the 
government fa making unrealistic plans and 
demanded cash fa companies and individuals 
who ted lost out when reforms got under way. 

’The Finance Ministry has to adopt a plan, 
and tire Duma has to accept or reject it/ * said 
Roland Nash, chief economist at Renaissance 
l, a research firm. “It means a whole new 
Iget round — a smaller one, but a sew round 
nonetheless.” 

Analysts said reduced spending and a more 
realistic budget could help Russia out of its 
lengthy economic slump, provided the new 
government team held to its ambitious plans to 
restructure tire economy. 

‘ ‘If they can manage to hang things together 
tiiis year and keep inflation under control, one 
would expect the economy to start to pick up 
this year,” Vladimir Konovalov, an economist 
fa tire Wald Bank, said. (Reuters. AP) 

■ Germany Backs Russian G-7 Role 

President Roman Herzog of Genu any ex- 


pressed support fa a larger Russian role in the 
Group of Seven, despite Japan's reservations 
about the idea. Agence France-Presse reported 
from Tokyo. 

Mr. Herzog said Moscow was “still a world 
power’ ’ after the end of the Cold War despite its 
economic difficulties. 

Japanese leaders have opposed an increased 
role fa Russia, saying Moscow was not yet 
entitled to discuss international monetary 1 and 
economic problems with the Group of S»even. 
which is made up of Britain, Canada. France. 
Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States. 
But the group's scheduled meeting in June in 
Denver will be called the Summit of Eight. 

Apart from economic issues. Japan has cited 
Tokyo’s long-standing territorial dispute with 
Moscow over the Kurile Islands, which Russia 
seized from Japan at the end of World War II. 

Still, Japan is close to an agreement to lend 
Russia S500 million for a range of projects. 
Kensaku Kumabe, the head of mission of the 
Japanese Export-Import Bank. said. 



I Investor’s Europe I, 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

London Parte 

FTSE 100 index CAC40 


3500 

4650 

2850 


3400 

Al 4500 

2700 

JVl 

3200 A 

f 1 4250 

A 250 J 

rV ^ 

m u/ 

4200 > 

' * 2400 f 


m 

4050 t\r 

mAy 


DJ FMA.®®»I DJ 
1996 1997 1996 

F M A Z,ffl N D J 
1997 1996 

F M A 
1997 

Exchange 

Index 

Tuesday 

Ck>9e 

Pmv. 

Qose 

% 

dwige 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

TZtJft 

787 & 

Unctr. 

Brussels 

BEL-20 

2,114.43 

8,115.85 

.-0.07 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

3^29.76 

3,312.88 

*051 

Copenhagen 

Stock Market 

S27.14 

52054 

41.19 

Hetemki 

HEX General 

zjmao 

2,821.86 

+0^1 

Oslo 

oax 

589,76 

580.08 

*0.12 

London 

FTSE 100 

4^289^0 

4^71.60 

-OJ06 

Madrid 

Stock Exchange 

477 JS • 

4734» 

+0.84 

Milan 

MBTEL 

11920 

11,931.00 -0.09 j 

Paris 

CAC40 

2^7SD0 

2.577.78 

+0.05 

Stockholm 

SX 16 

2^56.47 

2^75X17 

<0.65 

Vienna 

ATX 

1,186,13 

1.17K29 

+0£7 

Zurich 

SPt 

9.jpaao$ 

2,903.15 

•0.14 


Source: Talekurs 


I ammonal Herald Tribune 


Paris Moves to Extend Business Hours for Banks 


Very briefly: 


Reuters 

PARIS The French govern- 
ment will revise a 60-year-old decree 
to allow banks to open six days a 
week instead of five, tire labor min- 
ister, Jacques Barrot, said Tuesday. 

Mr. Barrot said banks and muons 
bad failed to reach an agreement at 
theproposals to change the banking 
regulations and that the gov ernment 
had unilaterally decided to repeal 
tiie 1937 decree and to allow bank 
branches to stay open from Monday 
to Saturday. 

Unions called a one-day strike for 


Biday, saying that the government 
was preparing to change hawiriTig 
regulations without sufficient nego- 
tiation. Mr. Barrot said he would 
propose a new decree that also 
would allow banks to open from 
730 AM. to 830 Pjif, ending the 
current eight-hour limit. 

“The 1937 decree belongs to an 
era, that of 1937,” Mr. Barrot said. 
“People need to be able to go to die 
bank on Saturday.” 

Mr. Barrot said the decree re- 
quires banks to convene a meeting 
with an employees council xf 


changes in opening hours had not 
won workers’ approval. 

Mr. Barrot said that the Bench 
commercial banking association 
had agreed that the new decree 
would be put in to practice gradually 
and that the association believed 
greater flexibility could preserve 
about 9,000 jobs. 

■ Suez-Lyonnaise Deal Friday 

The chairman of Lyonnaise des 
Eanx SA a French utilities group, 
said Tuesday be hoped a merger with 
Compagnie de Suez SA. a conglom- 


erate, would be approved Friday, 
creating a global player with Suez's 
chairman. Gerard Mestrallet. as 
chief executive. Reuters reported. 

Lyonnaise* s chairman, Jerome 
Monod, rebutted speculation that 
the merged company — already ap- 
proved in principle — would be run 
by a single executive board headed 
by himself. 

Mr. Monod made the comments in 
an interview published in Le Figaro 
newspaper, in which he also said he 
wanted the new company to be 
called Suez-Lyonnaise des Eaux. 


•¥ 


Switzerland’s unemployment 
, rate unexpectedly fell to 53 percent 
. last month from arecord 5.7 pacent 
in February, but economists said the 
. country’s economy was not likely to 
show strong growth this year, 
, Bloomberg Business News reported 
from Zorich. 

There were 202307 people re- 
. gistered as unemployed at the end of 
_ March, the government said, down 
from 206391 in February, but “it’s 
. too early to be talking about a turo- 
ing point,* * Thomas Heller, an econ- 
- oznist at Credit Suisse, said. 


Volvo Denies Plans to Buy Mack Trucks From Renault 


Om^atdiyOw&eeFnmU^aut 

STOCKHOLM— Volvo AB and 
Renault denied Tuesday that the 
Swedish automaker was consider- 
ing buying the U3. truckmaker 
Mack Trucks Inc. from Renault. 

_ Volvo said, however, that it was 
holding talks with Mitsubishi Mo- 
tors Corp. about working together, 
r. The Swedish daily Svenska 
Dagbladet reported that Volvo was 
interested in acquiring Mack Trucks 


from the French automaker to 
doubl e its market share in the United 
States to 19 percent. 

. The move also would give the 
Swedish company access to Mack’s 
distribution network in the United 
States, the papa said, quoting 
unidentified sources. 

. ’ But a Volvo spokesman said, 
“We have no concrete plans with 
any other heavy-truck maker than 
Mitsubishi of Japan.” 


mg any 


leave the truck m- 


For its part, Renault denied bav- 
oy plan to 
dustry. The company referred to a 
statement made Mach 20 by its 
chairman. Louis Schweitzer, that its 
truck unit, Renault VI, “is part of 
our historic operations, and we an- 
ticipate that it will continue as such 
in the future.” 

Renault VI had a loss of 791 
million French francs ($138 mil- 
lion) in 1996. Mack posted an op- 


erating profit of $29 million last 
year on sales of $2.14 billion. 

Volvo previously said it expected 
its North American truck division to 
break even this year. 

Volvo and Renault called off a 
planned merger in 1994 but con- 
tinue to cooperate on purchases of 
parts and in other areas. Renault 
owns 7.7 percent of Volvo, and 
Volvo owns 11.4 percent of 
Renault (Bloomberg, AFP ) 


• Lasmo PLC's shares surged 5 percent to close at 234 pence 
($3.81) after the oil-exploration company said it had tapped a 
“substantial” natural-gas discovery in Pakistan. 

• Poland said that as many as 100.000 people working fa 
coal-mining companies would Jose their jobs by 2000 as it 
reported that Polish mines lost 1.6 billion zloty ($519.5 
million) last year. 

• Mickey Kantor, the former U.S. commerce secretary, sug- 
gested that the United States, the European Union and the 
countries of the Middle East create an organization similar in 
scope to the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum. 

• South African Airways* formal complaint against a link 
between British Airways PLC and the South African carrier 
Comair was overruled. 

• Spain's trade ■ inions agreed in principle to a relaxation of 
labor laws as part of a government plan to cut unemployment. 

• Television par Satellite, a French satellite-television broad- 
caster, denied a report that the Belgian businessman A ben Frere 
was considering selling his 28 percent stake in the company. 

• Shigeru Myojin, the head of proprietary trading and risk- 
management at Salomon Brothers Inc. in London, had income 
of $3 1 million last year. The Times of London reported. 

• AO Lukoil Holding, a Russian oil company, plans to raise 
43 trillion rubles ($7843 million) by selling debt and global 
depositary receipts. 

• OM V AG, Austria’s oil and gas producer and its largest 
company, said its 1996 net profit rose 14 percent, to 1.98 
billion schillings ($163.1 million), as it gained market share 
and streamlined its corporate structure. 

•Jefferson Smurfit Group PLC's 1996 pretax profit fell to 
201 million Irish punts ($312.6 million) from 420 million 
punts in 1993. in line with expectations, because of a slump in 
global paper prices and overcapacity in the industry. 

Bloomberg. Reuters, AFP 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Ttoesday, April 8 ‘ 

Prices In local amandas. • 
TMsurs 

High Low Clot* Pot. 


Amsterdam 

RCMMK7Z7JV 


□eut Tristan 


run- vua was ku» 

37.55 37.15 37.55 37.63 
39JD SBJB SBJD SUB 

. ■ 352 - 1147 30 «8 

FnmnteMod 1522a ie.70 14970 152J0 



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137® 

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SBIC 

18*50 

184 18*25 1 6*25 

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78® 

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High Lot Ctae Pot. 


HOT Uri Oose Pot. 


High LOT C3 os* Pot. 


Vodnfene 


VWtansKdgs 
Wo May 
WPP GRHip 


525 

5.13 

5.15 

285 

278 

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775 

7X7 

773 

320 

115 

118 

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252 

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144 

1772 

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ABH-AMRO 


Mod Natal 
Boon Co. 


CSM 

Dart 

DSM 


Pa! 


Forts Anew 

G-Bracoo 

nampqi 

lloaomii&cu 

Ham Dougin 

INQGreop 

KLM 

KNPBT 

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two 


126.10 

127.70 

130.90 

266*0 

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36.10 
109 
349 
187 

31.10 

71 

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6120 

160 

9Z50 

15150 

74 

5680 

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4030 

28650 

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16110 
10050 
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124 
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3490 

105 

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1B3JD 

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6930 

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157 JO 
319 
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7250 
5610 
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28350 
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15950 
15028 
59 JO 
162J0 
10038 
324 
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12490 12530 
127 12750 
13058 129 JO 
267 JD 267 JO 
9050 0050 
3610 35.10 
10050 10600 
347*8 349.40 
18650 W4 
3000 3070 
70,10 7050 
5970 5950 
6130 40.10 
15950 158.40 
320.10 321-90 
9050 91.10 
15020 VC 
7130 7140 
5630 5640 
3990 39-70 
6820 6870 
4760 4620 
28350 2*4 

23790 23800 
8630 8770 
95 97 JD 
16070 160 

15620 15630 
5970 5950 
16220 16630 
10630 10790 
326 32630. 
34870 34790 
8890 8990 
39.40 3920 
23090 23150 


Fftsd. Krepa 

310 306 

- 309 

304 

Gotta 

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113 11*® 

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143 142 142® 141® 

Hartripto 

BB®“ 80 

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492 «2 

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4725 4*90 

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530 521® 

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433 

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TI12 

1110 

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22*0 21® 

22 ® 

2270 

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Maanamann 

*50 450® 
638® 832 

458 *53® 
4149 420 


MaMtowtahalt3650 3610 J63B 3678 
Mrim . _ 15650 15758 T» 158 

MoodllhNCkft 4157 4135 4145 4157 

Pltnsog 43650 432 436 435 

WtataEfara 1340 1225 1240 1225 

ftWE . 6850 6820 6640 6835 

SAP pM 289 281 28790 27950 

16640 16650 168 16650 

234 231 23350 23250 

1793 8722 8755 8755 
r(An0 1280 1280 aoo cum 
S30 825 829 845 

357 35450 35660 354 

91.10 89 JO 9030 89*0 
500 499 499 500 

74550 74250 74550 M1JS 
923 919 92170 91150 


Helsinki 


Kuala Lumpur 

AMMBKdgs 19 

Gening 1550 

MotSmtag 2725 

Malta Strip F NX 

PriranasGa 995 

1550 
190 
350 
1040 
2240 
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1958 
1220 
2050 
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PubflcBk 


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15.10 

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113*23 

1890 I860 
15.10 15.10 
2725 3650 
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995 190 

1660 15.18 
090 458 

390 372 

1020 10 
2250 7240 
668 045 

1950 1000 
12 1140 
2040 1990 
1220 12 


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London 

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Aa^n timer 


FT-S* 180:426928 
PltaSOK 427171 


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452 

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600 

1.13 

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750 770 
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630 633 

668 673 

198 1.12 

528 529 


741 

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Art* Into Sue 
Bangkok BkF 
KranalMBk 
PTTBijitor _ 
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cITetocomosla 
TW Abamys 
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238 234 224 

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3775 38 38J5 

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4525 4650 45 

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166 I6A 166 



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SJS 

409 

409 

307 

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1000 

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022 

8.13 

813 

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BAT Ind 

526 

517 

522 

5.17 

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123 

118 

122 

122 

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9*7 

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627 

678 

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BPBtod 

133 

227 

130 

129 

BriAemsa 

13*2 

1140 

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CttoO-YWyata 

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UPMKymroene 


Market Qosed 

The Bombay Stock market 
was closed Tuesday faa hol- 
iday. 


Brussels 




Bores 2 
BBL 

aa* 


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, GenBanque 


, SocGen 




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13400 

5950 

7710 

3395 

14275 

1770 

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257® 

5120 

13875 

12500 

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13775 13875 
12300 12475 
119M 1W5 
4830 4900 
8800 8830 
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20475 am§ 
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89000 88750 


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166 

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1975 

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29 29 

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305 387 

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438 

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978 

174 

093 

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353 

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275 

1522 

476 

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Madrid 


Baton todtac 477*2 


Pretoria. 4743S 

AOTtaOK 

23606 

20310 

20*00 

205*0 

ACESA 

1470 

14* 

1655 

1655 

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54* 

5370 

5410 

5390 


41® 

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8580 

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11® 

1084 

1090 

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192® 

190® 

193® 

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38* 

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38* 

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2758 

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24090 

24790 

25970 

25U80 

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98® 

y/10 

9/90 

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4230 

41® 

42® 

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2555 

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31730 

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1205 

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1775 

1725 

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PSE index: 2909® 


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24 

2*75 

2*75 

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25® 

2475 

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121 

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2878 

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11750 

11425 

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3425 

3310 

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400 


4300 

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1199 

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215® 

20850 

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2410 

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5710 

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20L9O 

197.® 

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858 

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242® 

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310® 

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1924 

1R79 


144® 

13/® 

141.® 

1® 

Rexel 

1475 

1561 

1470 

1639 

Rh-PoulencA 

18270 

178J0 

18220 

179® 


Kl 

524 

536 

537 

Sctetalder 

KJ 

31170 

314 

313 

SEB 

1010 

991 

1®4 

1005 



*13 

*20 419-90 

SteGenereie 


439 

644 

645 


2810 

2/92 

29® 

2/99 

StGabrio 


7Ul 

788 

B02 


284JD 

282 

282 283® 

SYrthetabo 
Thomson CSF 

4® 

191.® 

577 613 

187® 189® 

997 

189® 

TotalB 

472 

464® 

467 471® 


9000 

89® 

90® 

90 

Vrieo 

348® 

35*50 

342 

3(4 


EkcMuiB 

Ericsson B 

HsmsB 

incenttreA 

ImestorB 

MoOoB 


PhoraVUrtohn 
SwWvRB 
Sarnia B 
SCAB 

S^BanlunA 
StinDa Fore 
StaretaB 
SKFB 

Spornan ta i A 
SnashypatekA 
Skua A 
SvHsvllesA 
VofrtB 


480 466 

250 2S2 

1015 1001 
506 498 

355 34650 
fl l 22350 
253 244 


282 
199 
186® 
1(5.50 
81 JO 
271 JO 


275 

195 

ID 

163 

B0 

218 


333 327 JO 
19*50 190-50 
136 133 

190 190 

104 9950 
227 223 

193 190® 


4(9 SO 469 SO 
25*50 254 

1003 995 

502 505 

347 3« 

225 227 

24550 2ST 
Z75 294 

1® 1® 
1B3 18350 
16450 165 

0050 81 

221 219 

32950 320 

191 19150 
13150 135 

190 190 

101® 102-50 
22350 225 

191® 193 


Sao Paulo 


BrwJescoPH 
BralwoPW 
Cemlg PM 
rasp pm 


tlou banco Ptd 
UgM Senktos 

pffisPM 

rtfHDtMU 5 rTU 

Paoteta Llt 

SMtactanol 

SaaoCnn 

Tetebraspto 

Tetordg 

Teter] 

TetepPM 

Unftcncs 

Uita*w*P« 

CVRD PM 


9® 8® 
7D5JB 70600 
49® 47® 
6000 56® 
17® 16.49 
490® <73® 
SS10I wn wn 

4a4nn m2 ® 

349® 360® 
212 ® 208® 
164® 162® 
3870 3S® 
8 ® 872 

121 ® 121 ® 
168® 163® 
176® 171® 
315® 30101 
29® 38® 
1.19 1.16 

25 M 2*70 


697 695 

701® 707® 
4610 4620 
5690 59® 
1649 16® 
47B® 473® 
SS3JJ1 SS5® 
443® 4SQ® 
361® 375® 
Z1150 209® 
162® 16*51 
38® 3670 
680 6® 
121® 123® 
164® 168® 
172JD 177® 
305® 310® 
3600 39.49 
1.17 1.19 

SSjOO 2*85 


Sydney 

AlOrttacaiBK 234800 
Pretoria: 2166® 


8.14 

8.10 

8.10 

815 

ANZ BUng 

8.11 

8 

8 

807 

BHP 

1609 

1675 

1475 

1608 

Barel 

162 

109 

34.1 

159 


20® 

2026 

70.54 

2020 

C8A 

1279 

1202 

12® 

1253 


1408 

11P0 

7*05 

7*73 


502 

506 

5.90 

80/ 


6® 

6® 

4® 

6® 

CRA 

1805 

18® 

1805 

las 

CSR 

4® 

*56 

*67 

*65 


2® 

2-55 

2J/ 

207 

Goodman FW 

1® 

144 

1® 

1® 


11® 

11.10 

1124 

11.10 

Lend Lease 

21® 

21® 

21J4 

21® 

MIM HOT 
Nat AusrBank 

1® 

1577 

1® 

15® 

1® 

15J2 

10/ 

1504 

Nat Mutual 
Hdg 

104 

1® 

1® 

104 

506 

501 

504 

5® 


118 

110 

118 

119 

Pioneer WI 

*10 

*05 

409 

*04 

Pub Broadest 

6® 

6® 

601 

652 

SI George Bank 

7® 

761 

/0U 

7® 

WMC 

7® 

7® 

761 

7® 

Westaac BktoB 

6® 

6® 

60/ 

682 

vtooaddePto 

92T 

9.18 

9.19 

9.18 

WoolwertlB 

3® 

3*8 

3® 

148 

Taipei 

Stock Mretat tadOT 848063 
Pretoees: 8517J0 

Camay Lite Ins 

167 

1(3 

163 

166 

OttngHwaBk 

ChtooTunoBk 

175 

78® 

173 

76 

174 

76 

173 

79 

China Devriprot 126® 

1® 

122 

124® 

OUnoSteri 

30® 

29 

29® 

3820 


176 

m 

174 

175 


70 

47® 

6 150 

W 

Hue Nan Bk 

13150 131® 

132 

131® 

Ml Comm Bk 

71® 

77 

77® 

76® 

NanYoPtasaa 

64 

42 

62® 

63 

SMnKomUto 

1® 

81 

1® 100® 
76 79 

101 

78 


9 

55® 

55® 

57® 

CffS Micro Elee 

65® 

47® 

6550 

41® 

UTdWartdChfn 

74® 

72® 

13 

73 


The Trib Index 


PrleeB as of 3M PM. Now York dm. 


Jan. 7. 1992- 100. 

Level 

Ctrenga 

% change 

jmr to dole 
% change 
+15.04 

World Index 
Regional krtnaos 

151.70 

+1.15 

+0.76 

Asta/Padbe 

110.77 

-0.19 

-0.17 

-17.50 

Europe 

160.79 

+2-28 

+1.43 

+15.53 

N. America 

175-96 

+1.42 

+0.81 

+37.17 

S. America 
IndiretrW Indnxcn 

138.61 

-0.90 

-0.65 

+55.67 

Capital goods 

175.76 

+2.94 

+1.70 

+32.27 

Consumer goods 

170.28 

+1.06 

+0.63 

+23.33 

Energy 

183.06 

+2.94 

+1.63 

+34.96 

Finance 

112.93 

+0.31 

+0.28 

—11.24 

Miscellaneous 

156.63 

+1.06 

+0.88 

+15.33 

Raw Materials 

182.19 

+1-28 

+0.71 

+28.48 

Sank* 

142.74 

+0-81 

+0.57 

+1&95 

IMrtras 

132.97 

-0.42 

-0.31 

+4.50 


7T>8 InomaOonal Hendd Tribune Works Stock Index O OTefcs Oto U.S. Ootw vakjes at 
200 mramaOoneiy kwostaole s»ro*g from 25 co unb tos. For mora I nformation, a bve 
booklet to avanaae by anting Id 77ie Trib Max. 101 Avenue Charles de OauMe, 
02S27NeuBy Codex. Franco OompSod by Bloomberg Nows. 



Utah 

Lot 

OOH 

Pot. 


HlBh 

Lot 

dam 

Pot. 

Mitsui Frilosn 

1320 

1290 

1310 

1310 

Metoarwt 

11 * 

11*5 

11 ® 

11 * 

MteriTrua 

618 

5B4 

413 

598 

Mocie 

27V5 

26.95 

J7>* 

27® 

MorataMfg 

47® 

4660 

47® 

4720 

Newbridge Net 

41® 

40® 

41® 

41.15 

NEC 

1520 

14® 

1520 

14® 

Koronda inc 

2865 

28 

28 

28* 

NBuui 

1880 

1750 

1840 

17® 

Natron Enemy 

30U 

29>4 

2916 

29® 

KBkoSec 

420 

566 

601 

616 

Nriem Teteam 

9270 

90* 

91*5 

92® 

Nintendo 

91® 

90® 

91® 

39® 

Now 

11 ® 

1105 

11.10 

11 ® 


861 

BO 

855 

BSD 

Onex 

2375 

2205 

2205 

23* 

Nippon 08 

499 

490 

497 

492 

Panedn Pettai 

56 

56 

56 

55® 

NZppan Steel 

346 

Oil 

K? 

359 

PetmUa 

19* 

19*5 

19 V) 

19*5 

Nissan Motor 

795 

770 

786 

767 

Placer Dan* 

ynx 

2 *® 

24® 

2*90 

NKK 

248 

240 

265 

262 

Poco Petal 

13*5 

I3>* 

13® 

1325 

Nocture see 

1250 

11 ® 

1240 

1260 

Potto Sori 

10 « 

103 

104 

103.® 


Seoul 


CanpariM todec (M57 


OaeanOHaavy 
Kyuttool Eng. 
KtaMrims 
Koteo El Pwr 
Koto Em* Bk 
Korea Mot) Tel 
LG Sam ton 
PohaaglianSI 

Samsung Dktoy 

sornnui uara 


1070® 

4W0 

19000 

IS® 

269® 

60® 

4700® 

ss 

433® 

450® 

um 


103000 
6660 
190® 
154® 
2 66® 


380® 

523® 

* 10 ® 

630® 

106® 


1040® 1025® 
47W 48 tO 
190® 1P5M 
15500 156® 
269® 267® 
584£ 60® 

4570® 4640® 
797® 290® 
540® 538® 
424® 430® 
6Q00 63800 
107® 110® 


Singapore 


Oslo 

AtPfA 

Broun Of A 
□nSnriBk 

DennorsteBi 
Htera 
Hofsto® A 
KnerwAso 
NockHjidiD 
' Hooke Stag A 
NtcmsdA 
undo AHA 
PeBnGeoSvc 
i Paris A 


OSXtadBs507( 
Prestos 58922 


AstaPKBlOT 

CaretaPDC 

OTyDevI* 

Cyde Contoge 

Oaky Fonnfi* 

DBSfareifln 

DBS Land 

Fnser&Neose 

HKLOM* 

jadMaaiesn* 

JanSStroSW 

Keppal 

KeotaBank 

Keppemo 

KappriLond 

OCSCRnta 

DSUntaiBkF 

PoriowfHSgs 

Stabawong 

Slog Ak foreign 

sins Land 

ShioPiezF 

SJngTcriilrel 


TnuKHiOff 

StarinndAss 


185 

14UB 

2*78 

27® 

127 

4J0 

340 

331 

223 

703 

543 

~ao 

112J0 

129 

415 

4676 


179 182J0 
143 MS 
24® 2420 
27® 27® 

A 

32 S | 

MUD >07 

538 541 

27B 279 

11030 HI 

128 Si 

4® 415 

4620 4620 


1® 

144 

2430 

Z770 

135 

4*50 

341 

328 

SO 

10650 

538 

28230 

11230 

10 

390 

4670 


TO Lee Bart 

UMimfU5kW 

UMOSenOkF 

MngTWHd® 

-.InUlMBt. 


775 

9J0 

1*50 

1SJ0 

073 

N.T. 

575 

mo 

133 

s.n 

370 
9® 
338 
4 M 
*5 6 
ISM) 
M-T. 
605 
725 
12 ® 
7J5 
ftr. 

184 

102 

3*6 

1.14 

0® 

*42 


720 

945 

1160 

IS® 

071 

N.T. 

525 

1130 

228 

5® 

160 

925 

192 

*54 

430 

mo 

N.T. 

4 

690 

1133 

720 

ItT. 

178 

271 

1*2 

1.14 

0® 

*34 


725 7 JO 

9*5 9® 

1*10 1370 
IS® 1 530 
071 073 

N.T. 1610 
525 5.15 
11® 11® 
229 131 

545 Sj6B 
364 338 

925 9® 
194 1® 
*42 *52 

*54 4® 

7640 7820 
N.T. 10® 
605 4 

7.15 690. 

11 ® 11 ® 
7J0 725 

N.T. 27 

184 374 

239 232 

144 142 

1.15 1.1* 
<UB 1570 
*4? *34 


Tokyo 

Ataomola 
Aff Nippon Air 
Arawa* 

AsoN Barit 
AsrtOwm 
Aariti Glare 
BATakjoAVtsa 

BkV&tahan 

BrtOgesnne 

Conor 

□tabuEtoc 

OtugakuSec 

wwSppiw 

Dol-KMKang 
DataaBank 
Drina House 
DafcKtS® 

DW 

Denso 

EostJapwRy 

Brel 

Fan® 

IBank 
I Photo 


Stockholm 

AGAB 
ABBA 


SX 14 hritK 2854*7 
Piw too t! 287151 

107 104 1® 107 

01 85 855 653 

201 199 2® 20030 

Asha A 3S9 35030 35030 358 

AttsCoaco A 187® 184 10 18650 

318 3® 39630 314 


HoctlQtaBk 

i rii _-h7 

Han® Mow 
IBJ 

W 

Itocho 

Ita-Yatada 

JAL 

Japan TfltXKXO 

Jvsco 

Kcdn 

KansriElK 

Kao 

KaMBOtlHsy 

Kom Steel 

KbUNIppRy 

KWiBrewetr 

Kobe Sled 

Kanatsu 

KutaD 

Ksocere 

Knjsba Elec 

LTCB 

Mareheal 

Mari 

MoBuCorem 

Matsu Elec Ind 

MriuBKWK 

Mnsuotoa 

MDBMSMOI 

MtariHsHEI 

MfesbbUEri 

MtarisNHvy 

MtaaMaiAM 

MBniHridTV 

Mitsui 



HBrtei225t 19Q21J0 


PretoMK 1771567 

9® 

950 

9® 

953 

7® 

721 

726 

736 

300 

34® 

3410 

3410 

739 

703 

720 

726 

660 

641 

658 

649 

10® 

1070 

1060 

1070 

7910 

1810 

19® 

1890 

531 

Hi 

430 

434 

75® 

M?n 

MM 

7490 

2940 

2830 

2930 

2820 

2040 

2020 

20® 

20*0 

2020 

20® 

M10 

2020 

7140 

71® 

2140 

21® 

552 

535 

562 

554 

12® 

1210 

1260 

1260 

3SB 

343 

354 

349 

14® 

1390 

14X 

1390 

774 

/3U 

/44 

7® 

8310a 

R7.Ca 

8200a 

K2IU0 

26® 

2480 

2590 

23® 

Ml® 

TOJtB 

4360a 

440(10 

77V 

71® 

2240 

20/0 

4150 

401(1 

41® 

3990 

1350 

12® 

1330 

1360 

4330 

4291) 

4310 

4280 

13® 

12® 

1290 

7Z70 

11® 

1110 

1110 

11® 

1140 

1110 

1140 

inn 

3920 

3870 

38® 

3840 

12® 

11® 

1170 

1200 

444 

41/ 

444 

*16 

54? 

Wi 

MB 

957 

4800 

an 

47® 

5600 

460 

451 

*91 

4ft? 

nftta 

7820a 

UMOo 

371 Da 

3690 

34® 

36® 

3590 

515 

4/V 

« 

42? 

2IX 

21® 

2110 

21)0 

1330 

13® 

13X 

1310 

497 

an 


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364 

35 f 

363 

3 60 

73S 

7K 

729 

737 

10® 

957 

985 

973 

221 

21/ 

220 

221 

884 

053 

MU 

SA 

530 

504 

937 

506 

75® 

7060 

iS! 

2030 

7470 

2850 

7360 

2090 

341 

315 

333 

353 

VI 

461 

466 

467 

1780 

l/« 

1770 

1750 

33® 

3llfl 

31® 

3140 

1990 

1940 

1986 

1940 

12® 

11® 

11® 

11® 

10® 

ion 

I0KI 

10® 

375 

J64 

368 

366 

/m 

689 

693 

60S 

1410 

817 

m 

14® 

8)2 

1370 

n? 

914 

906 

010 

91? 

1140 

11190 

UM 

1150 

92/ 

914 

917 

?25 


NTT 
NTT Data 
Of Paper 
OsotaGas 
Rtah 
Rafon 
SokumBL 

Santoro 

ScnwnBonk 
Sanyo Elec 
Seaom 
SetouRwy 
SekhriOwn 
Sektsul House 
Seven-Eleven 
Sham 

SMtattiEJ Purr 

Shtata 

ShtorisuCh 

ShheWo 

SWzuoknBk 

Sontwrt 

Sony 

Samflonio 
SwnBoreo&k 
SumkOnn 
SumtanaEtoc 
Sumn Metal 
Sim* Tins 
Tobho Phann 
TakadaOitn 
TDK 

TohoJai E) Pwr 
Trial Bart 
TaUaMartno 
Tokyo B Pwr 
Tokyo Becnwi 
Tokyo Gas 
Tokyu Corp. 

Tanen 

TappanPrtnt 
Twin Ind 
Tsritaa 
Tastun 
Toyo Trust 
Toyota Maw 
Yamanww 

a:* 7 ® ft* MW 


8720a 

351® 3370b 351® 


588 

5® 

587 

610 

289 

m 

289 

283 

1510 

14® 

1510 


9840 

9720 

9840 

9550 

656 

603 

648 

650 

3550 

34® 

35® 

34® 

1310 

12 ® 

17® 

1310 

453 

443 

452 

455 

7160 

7060 

7140 

7040 

5710 

56® 

56® 

5710 

1150 

11 ® 

1140 

1140 

1170 

11 ® 

1150 

1170 

7750 

7610 

7750 

7650 

1500 

1470 

15® 

1470 

I960 

19® 

1950 

I960 

579 

50 

562 

588 

nun 

2470 

2550 

2460 

1610 

1590 

15® 

16® 

10 ® 

1040 

1070 

1060 

7740 

76® 

76® 

7700 

9120 

89® 

9120 

89® 

868 

865 

868 

868 

1350 

12 ® 

1320 

1360 

500 

476 

499 

479 

1730 

16® 

17® 

16® 

298 

■ 1 

295 

299 

926 

Kff 

913 

966 

3170 

3110 

3170 

31® 

2790 

2750 

27® 

27* 

9230 

90® 

91® 

®00 

2000 

1950 

1770 

1978 

930 

891 

926 

935 

1230 

11 ® 

1220 

1220 

22 ® 

2170 

2170 

22 ® 

4778 

45® 

4778 

46® 

2 ® 

288 

2 ® 

288 

609 

579 

604 

585 

11 ® 

1120 

1160 

1140 

1550 

15® 

1540 

15® 

726 

706 

724 

704 

710 

695 

707 

695 

26® 

26® 

26® 

2668 

750 

729 

735 

7® 

3470 

3380 

34® 

3280 

2S60 

2520 

2560 

2540 


3390b RJoAJaom 


SeogramCb 

SheflCdaA 

Stone Corsold 

Suncar 

ToitsmonEny 

Ted. B 

Tefetfobe 

Telus 

Thomson 

TorOomBank 

Timsata 

TnersCdaPlpe 

TimortRnl 

TrtBcHohn 

TVXGotd 

weacoasEny 

Weston 


«>« 
33® 
24.05 
52® 
52® 
20 
99® 
4615 
29 
39 JO 
20® 
27W 
34 Vi 
1610 
2*90 
41® 
39® 
935 
2*15 
(6*5 


39® 39® 4LA5 
32H 3255 33 

24 24 2*05 

51® 51SS 52 45 
52® 52* 52.95 

19V 19® 19® 
59.15 59® 59® 
39® 39.15 40.15 
28*0 28® 28® 
39® 39® 37to 
SOVi TSfn 20® 
2695 37.10 37® 
3605 36® 36® 
15® 15.90 1610 
24*0 2*85 2*45 
41*0 41® 41® 
39® 31® 3)30 
9® 941 9® 

23*0 24.10 2X95 
67M 67M 60U 


Vienna 

Boenier^Jdarti 8® 
OnStanriPM 457® 
EA^tonerafl 3309 
EVN 1670 

Roahoten Wien 533 
OMV 1341 

DestBetoti m 
VA5tnW 469® 

VATedi 1 70650 
Wlenerterg Bau 21® 


ATX Mae 118613 
PravtoWE 117B29 

BIS® 815® 813 

451 457 454® 

3160 31® 3170 

1459 74481447® 

522 523 529 

1309 1320 1338 

83650 8<2® 839® 
445 447® 461 

16541701.10 1651 

2131 2174 21® 


Toronto tse iiasm*; saiui 

PtMooe SS40JB 


Wellington 

AirNZBMB 
Briefly Inn 
Outer Holt art 
FWaiOlBMg 
FtoKhOiEnr 
FHdiOiFarS 
nrid9 Oi Paper 
Lton Nathan 
Telecom NZ 
Wlsan Horton 


NZSE-aelndce 222*42 
Preto ria. 2221.01 


197 

1 « 

306 

1 M 

129 

128 

128 

128 

309 

306 

309 

307 

422 

*19 

*22 

*24 

305 

302 

303 

306 

106 

103 

106 

102 

206 

203 

204 

203 

2 .« 

328 

3*0 

338 

*60 

60S 

6-55 

6-56 

HT. 

NX 

N.T. 

1100 


AWWPiH? 
AHwta Energy 
Alcan Alum 
Anderson Expl 
BKMortmal 
Bk Nora Sofia 
BankXGoM 
BCE 

B CTdtcwnw 

Btactan Phuiu 

BambariaB 

BrnscanA 

BimWnmoto 

Cameo 

OBC 

Cdn Natl Itol 

can Not Ra 

CdnOcddPet 

CdnPadnc 

Camtacs 

Doteo 

Dantar 

Donohoe A 

DoPMCdoA 

Edper Group 

E write* Mng 

FabtaRni 

Fakartataga 

FWOiertjwiA 

Franco Newoo 

GafiCdaftes 

bnpertriOl 

toco 

IPL Energy 
LakDn B 
Laewen Group 
MaanUBIdT 
Magna ir® A 


19.95 

28® 

4110 

1550 

itA5 

5270 

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tm 

29V4 
3414 
2605 
31® 
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51 J5 
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49® 
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25.15 
33 
35 

2*40 

10.15 
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3114 
2225 

41 

29974 

27® 

21.90 

67* 

10 

6270 

43® 

3975 

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19 

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19* 
3670 
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1570 
49.10 
5175 
3270 
53 
2&90 
341* 
95 rK 
3085 
2*5 
SOSO 
31V. 
49.15 
IH5 
25 
4*65 
34V 
2100 
10 
2414 
31 
22U 
40tt 
298 
27® 
21V) 
47® 
9® 
61® 
4205 
39® 
1615 
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69Vj 


19® 19.95 
28.10 2&® 
4*40 4*90 
15® 1190 
0J5 0® 
5110 51* 
32D 9275 
43K 6145 

28.90 29® 
3414 3*30 

2195 24 

30.90 31® 
273 2J2 

51 5U5 
31® 31V 

49® 0® 
31® 32*4 

3190 3190 
3*90 35 

w bc 2 A A0 
1005 HUB 
Wi 2*70 
31 3111 

22* 2275 
4695 4645 
299 299® 
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PAGE U 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. APRIL 9. 1997 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close 

Notfomrkle prices nd reflecfmg tote trades eisewtiere. 

The Associated Press. 


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ASIA/PACIFIC 


$ 


Fear of Loan Defaults 

a Stocks 



Bloomberg fa us • 

MANILA — The stock ex- 
change s main index tumbled "> 7 
percent Tuesday, its biggest oi- 
day decline in more than five 
■ months, amid concent that swine 
loan defaults could hurt banks. 

"The concerns about die banks 
have to do with their exposure to the 
property sector and consumer fi- 
nancing,’’ Rolando Valenzuela, se- 
nior vice president at Philippine TA 
Securities Inc., said 
The Philippine Stock Exchange’s 
composite index, a basket of30 


275 ' *** Iowest since Dec. 20, 
1*95- Far East Bank & Trust Co. fell 
2.83 to 93 after paying a 20 percent 
stock dividend. 

Bank of the Philippine Islands 
slid 4 to 157. Bankart! Inc., die only 
credit-card company listed on the 
exchange, fell 0.90 to 6.20. 

Property developers ; also fell 
anud concern the industry could 
face financial problems similar to 
those in Thailand, where overbuild- 
ing. high interest rates and die slow- 


est economic growth in a decade 
23^^i Br0 - Mcgzwarid Hold- 

tS^SSJBgSXA* 

. B ye afiy^we yegoiamaikctqf 6 JO, its lowest level since Dec. 19 
gunslingers who have ran out of — - * 

bul lets,’ ’ Miguel Ongpin, an analyst 
at SJ Roxas & Co., said. 

“It is my own frank op inion this 
is no time to be a contrarian. We 
haven’t seen the bottom of the mar- 
ket yet,” 

Metropolitan Bank & Trust Co., 
the country’s largest bank in terms 


C 5 


of assets, paced the decline. The 
stock, which accounts for 8.5 
cent of the benchmark 
dropped 40 pesos to a 16-week low 
of 600 ($22.76). 

Last week, the Philippine central 
bank issued a report saying that de- 
faults on car loans and overdue cred- 
it-card accounts had ballooned, 
fueling concern about the financial 
health of banks. 

“The recent meltdown with the 
banks has to do with the higher-risk 
consumer-loans sector,” Mr Valen- 
zuela said. “Metrobank is really 
more exposed to the retail sector.” 

Other banks followed Metrobank 
down. Philippine National Bank lost 


1995. Its housing unit. Em pire 
Land Holdings Inc., fell 0.90 to a 
record low of 5.80. 

Other large -capitalization stocks 
also fell as foreign investors 
tri mmed their holdings of Phili ppine 
. siocks, traders said. 

• Last week, Andrew Tan, chair- 
man of Megaworld, attempted to 
quell speculation that his companies 
were in financial trouble because of 
mounting debt! 

“The comments by Andrew Tan 
wore not sufficient,’ ’ John Man gun, 
director of portfolio strategy at Con- 
nell Securities Inc„ said. Megaworld 
“is going to run into a cash-flow 
problem in the future,” he said. 

Wilson Sy, chairman of the stock 
exchange, criticized “rumors and 
innuendoes” surrounding Mega- 
' world. He saida “wave of malicious 
rumors” could ffamag re rhg p m ppj l y 
industry and the “positive gains tbie 
country has achieved in creating a 
favorable business climate for sus- 
tained investment.” 


Bond Issue: Thailand’s Test 


Bhonberg Neva 

~ HONG KONG — Thailand’s sale of government 
bonds this week will serve as a referendum on how 
die country is weathering a financial crisis that sent 
stocks there into a railspin and profeiced the slowest 
Thai economic growth in a decade. 

The government is marketing $500 million in 10- 



analyst 

Still, the feet that Thailand can sell debt at all is a 
testament to bond investors’ search for higher yields. 

Two mouths ago. die Ministry of Finance expected 
to pay 60 basis points, or six-tenths of a percentage 
point, more than the yield on UJ. Treasury issues for 
its “Yankee” bonds, which are sold to U.S. in- 
vestors. Now, that spread may be as much as 85 basis 
points, analysts and investors said. 

In February, Thailand's biggest investment bank, 
finance One rLC, was forced into a merger to shore 
up its finances. Ai about the same time. Standard & 
Prior’s Corp. and Moody's Investors Service Inc. 
lowered their credit ratings on Thai banks, and 
Moody ’5 said it might downgrade the government’s 
debt as well. Then last week, the Federal Reserve 
Board nudged U.S. interest rates a quarter-point 
higher and set off concern that rates in many other 
countries would rise, which depressed bond prices. 

Optimists point to steps that die Thai government 
has taken — such as forcing troubled financial 


companies to merge and establishing a fund to bail 
out property companies — as signs thk Bangkok will 
be able to limit the damage to die economy. 

Standard & Poor's said Tuesday that its rating on 
Thailand’s sovereign debt would be “unscathed” by 
a meltdown of Thai finance companies. It cited the 
government's ample supply of resources to offset 
potential losses. 

“The fundamental credit strengths and weak- 
nesses of Thailand haven’t changed," Cem Karacad- 
ag, S&P's director in New York. said. 

Still, some investors say they expect Thailand's 
economic situation to deteriorate for about six more 
months. Thai could push Thai bond yields — and 
borrowing costs — still hi|her. 

"The bad news is not hilly absorbed yet" said 
Edmund Yuen, a Hong Kong-based investment ad- 
viser at Republic National Bank, which manages 
more than S300 million of Asian bonds. 

This week's Yankee bond sale is not being watched 
only by bond investors, however. In the past few 
weeks, other lenders have decided to delay new loans 
to Thai companies pending the outcome of the sale. 

“The real concern for me is that many companies 
will not be able to access ibe capita] markers. * * Denis 
Giranlt, director at BZW Asia Ltd., said. 

Although Thailand's best credit risks should still 
be able to raise funds, albeit at a higher cost, some 
bankers say many Thai companies could have dif- 
ficulties borrowing internationally. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

14000- ----- 
12500 
\m 

1300' 

12000 
IIKOt 


Singapore 

Straits Times 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 



n □ j 

1996 


F M A 
1997 


Exchange 
Hong Kong 

tmtex 

Hang Seng 

Tuesday Prev. %; 

Ctosa Close Change 

12,38857 12287.84 +050 

Singapore 

• Straits Times 

■ 2.104,71 

2,088-U 

+0.79 

Sydney 

ASOrcfinariee 

2^68.90 

2.366.00 

+0.12 

Tokyo 

MAka'225 . 

16,021.70 

17,715.67 +T.73j 

Ktrate UBnpurCkxeposte 

1.16&2S 

1,134^3 

.+2.47 

Bangkok 

SET 

715JS6 

714.09 

+0.18 

Seoul 

Conposite Index 

G94S7 

69450 

+0.01 

Te*el 

Slock Market JfKlex 8/W0S3 

6517.70 

-057 

UanBa 

PS6 

2,909.30 

25 S 0.66 

-2.7S 

Jakarta 

Composite Index 

83822 

636.64 

+055 

Watitngton 

WZSE-40 

2,2248? 

2521.01 

+0.16 

Bombay 

Senative Intiex 

Closed 

3520^9 

- 

Source; Tetekurs 

Inumitu'iiul HcrjU Tnbonr 

Very briefly: 


World Bank to Sell Its First Won Bonds 


Bloomberg Nr* s 

HONG KONG — The World 
Bank will sell its first bonds de- 
nominated in South Korean won 
this month to help the country build 
a Western-style debt market, offi- 
cials say. 

Along with a similar sale planned 
by the European Bank for Recon- 
struction and Development, the 
five-year bonds will give South 
Korean corporate borrowers a mod- 


el for pricing and marketing their 
own debt. At present, many borrow 
for no more than three years. 

“ft’s to develop the Korean long- 
term bond market,” Woo Tin Kim. 
head of the market-opening desk at 
Daewoo Securities, said. Daewoo is 
helping to arrange the sale with KDB 
Securities of Korea. The sales will 
offer South Koreans a rare chance to 
buy international bonds denomin- 
ated in their own currency. Overseas 


buyers currently demand yields of 
about 9 percent for investing in won. 
because the investment implies a bet 
that the currency’s yearlong slide 
agains t the dollar will soon end. 

Both sales will help expand South 
Korea's bond market. By using the 
World Bank and the European de- 
velopment bank as benchmarks, 
companies may be able to price their 
own bonds more easily and lock in 
money for longer periods. 


<; HUSTLER: New Media Are Hurting Traditional ‘Skin’ Magazines 


Continued from Page 11 

profit for the financial year 
that will end in June, for ex- 
ample, will come from its 
cable and video businesses 
and just 18 percent from Play- 
boy magazine. 

Mr. flynt has chosen to 
stay focused on print and on 
making Hustler “the most 
outrageous magazine out 
there,” in the words of Hus- 
tler’s executive editor. Allan 
MacDonell, to whom Mr. 
Flynt referred all questions. 

Nor is there a clear explan- 
ation for the saleTaie last year 
of one of Mr. Flynt’s chief 
assets, Flynt Distribution Co., 
which handled newsstand 
placement not only for Flynt 
publications but also for oth- 
ers, including newsstand cop- 
ies of The New York Review 
of Books. 

Anthony DiBisceglie, di- 
rector of client services far 
Curtis Circulation, which 
c. bought Flynt Distribution. 
t said interest stemming from 
the current movie, which 
chronicles Mr. Flynt’s legal 
battles in setting up his 
magazine, had lifted sales of 
Hustler, but he would not 
provide specific numbers. 

But Mr. Phillips said that 
increase might prove to be 
only a temporary publicity- 
related surge. 

Mass approbation has never 
been a priority, however, for 
Mr. Flynt, who owned a chain 
of strip bare before starting 
Hustler in 1974. Circulation 
quickly soared, but so did pub- 
lic hostility. While he was on 
trial on obscenity charges in 
Lawreoceville, Georgia, in 


1978, a sniper shot him in the page ad, while magazines 
back outside the courthouse, with circulation comparable 
But despite — or perhaps be- to Hustler's average $43,805. 
cause of — the notoriety, . according to fee Publishers 
Flynt Publishing has per- Marmati on Bureau. 


formed well enough over fee 
years to gain respect from 
some quarters. 

. Mr. MacDonell would not 
c omme nt on what fee eaiii- 
are on Flynt Publishing’s 
million in revenue, oth- 
er than to say “we’ve got a 
pretty good ratio there.” 

But John Harrington, who 
publishes a newsletter fear 
tracks newsstand sales, said 
profits were probably- veiy 
.good. “They’re not paying a 
great deal in editorial or other 
marketing costs,” be said. 
“There are a bunch of spe- 
cials feat . they sell, recycling 
that same editorial roateziaL” 
••• There are no outride es- 
timates of Hustler’s circula- 
tion or advertising pages. But 
“we do pretty well wife ads,”, 
Mr. MacDonell said. - 
The ads Hustler does sell 
are cheap, comparatively 
lie prices peak at 
.OOO fbr a four-color, full- 


Althongh still not involved 
in video and cable television, 
Mr. Flynt’s company is be- 
coming active on fee World 
Wide Web. Mr. MacDonell 
said, where it already has on- 
line versions of Hustler and 
three of its other magazines. 

The on-line Hustler 
(wwwJrustier.com) closely re- 
sembles fee magazine in terms 
of tone and content, namely 
the editorial preoccupation 
with female anatomy. 


New technology notwith- 
standing. it is not easy to 
gauge fee future of Larry 
Flynt Publishing. Unlike 
Hugh Heftier, for example, 
who propelled his daughter. 
Christie, through tire ranks to 
chairman and chief executive 
at Playboy, Mr. Flynt, who is 
54 and uses a wheelchair as a 
result of fee 1978 shooting, 
does not appear to have cul- 
tivated a pub lishin g heir 
among his five children from 
three marriages, although 
two.LanyJr. and Theresa, are 
currently working there, nor 
has he designated a successor 
outside fee famil y. 


Insider Suspected at Suzutan 

Bloomberg •Vfus 

TOKYO — Financial regulators asked prosecutors to 
charge Katsura Suzui. the former chairman of Suzutan 
Co.. Japan’s largest maker of women's clothes, wife 
insider trading, a government spokesman said Tuesday. 

The Securities and Exchange Surveillance Commis- 
sion filed a complaint wife fee Nagoya prosecutor’s 
office charging that Mr. Suzui and two others had sold 
Suzutan shares before the company disclosed a sub- 
sidiary’s losses. 

A spokesman for fee commission said Mr. Suzui sold 1 
milli on Suzutan shares a few months before fee company 
announced the unit’s loss. 

The company's announcement of the loss, in October 
1994. sent Suzutan shares tumbling to about 600 yen 
($4.81). By selling before the announcement. Mr. Suzui 
got about 1200 yen each for his shares, fee spokesman 
said. Suzutan closed Tuesday at 192 yen, unchanged. 


• Malaysia's central bank unveiled a series of exemptions 
from its new lending curbs, helping to quell investor concern 
that the restrictions will squeeze bank earnings. 

• Taiwan’s trade surged in March, suggesting fee economy 
might weather an outbreak of hoof-and-mouth disease feat 
crippled its pork industry: imports rose 25 percent from a year 
earlier, to a record S 1 0. 1 1 billion, and exports rose 1 8 percent, 
to S10.67 billion. 

• LG Semicon Co. and Hyundai Electronics Co., two of 
South Korea’s major chip producers, said they would increase 
production of high-powered 64-megabir dynamic random 
access memory chips to try to lift their flagging profits. 

• South Korean prosecutors will question Lee Suk Chae, a 
former adviser to fee president, in a loans-for-kiekbacks 
scandal involving the failed Hanbo Group, state radio said. 

• Japan's gross national product got a boost of 7.28 trillion 
yen i $58.36 billion), or 1.55 percent from deregulation of 
telecommunications, oil. electricity and other industries in fee 
early 1 990s. the Economic Planning Agency estimated 

• South Korea's leading carmakers announced record pro- 

duction of 271,801 vehicles in March, up S.6 percent from a 
year ago, in spite of a sluggish home market and high 
Stockpiles. Bloomberg. AFP. Bridge Nm s 


Australia Sees Bank-Merger Easing 

Bloomberg A'wj 

CANBERRA — A review of Australia's financial system 
to be made public Wednesday probably will ease restrictions 
on bank mergers, although it is not expected to lead to a large 
number of takeovers among major banks, analysts and in- 
vestors said Tuesday. 

The so-called Wallis report, fee first major review of fee 
financial system in 18 years, was commissioned by fee 
government. It is expected to recommend dropping what is 
known as fee “six pillars' ’ policy, which bans mergers among 
the country's four major banks and wife its two biggest life 
insurers, AMP Society and National Mutual Holdings Ltd. 


INCORPORATE 


ana 

IN THE 

Protect Ybur Pwonal AsMte 

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Corporate Agents, Inc. 

Fax; {302)938-7078 
Conpu6an«: OO INC 
Mp^wwteorpoaiejoni 




CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL FUND ■ 
Sodttf rfliwwfiswmartd O^VonobU 
LunMnbourg, 5, bcutevord da b Fob® 

R.C. Unantbouig B No 8-833 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

farina Aaant : CHASE MANHATTAN BANK (LUXEMBOURG) SA 

5, rue Hosit* 

U 2338 UJKEMBOORG 

FuAwxw, 

bate# of the rfwahoWer eoncamad. 


NAMPOWER 

HtV Interconnection between Namibia aid South Africa 
Pre-qualification of Tenderers 
for 400kV Transmission Lines 
empower wish to Invite Interested parties 

y as tumkoy contractora fw tira abovo pro^ Invtrfv 

« TZOKn. of sins*, cko* «W 

sing guyed chalnette type towers and incorporating 

iffbreOPGW. 

, order to pre-quality tenderers will have to demon- 
Irate: 

n Their experience of similar projects 
1 1 ) Their capability of personnel and equipment to 
undertake the work 

110 Their sound financial status 
re-qualification documents can be obtained from 
lay 1997 by fax request to 

am Power ++264 61 2052354 for attention Of Mr KM 
^'"-*‘ Krehm8dbvi8noOT 
ft 30 May 1897. "'*** 



ASIAN CAPITAL HOLDINGS FUND 

' 20. Boclmzd Emmanuel Semis, L-2535 Luxerobouig 
R.G Luxembourg B 43 100 


NOTICE TO THE SHAREHOLDERS 


Notice » hereby given that an Anim a l G ener al M e eting of the 
Sh arrh oM«* of ASLAN CAPITAL HOLDINGS FUND will be 
held at ’ the registered office of the Company on 
28 April 1997 at 3J0 pm. 

AGENDA 

1. Approval of die report of the Board of Directors and the 
report of the Auditor; 

2. Approval of the financial stat emen ts for die year ending 
on 31 December 1996; 

3 . Retirement of die outgoing Director and the Auditor from 
their duties for the year ending on 31 December 1996; 

4. AppomHMnrof the Directors and the Auditor of die Fund: 

. Re-election of die Directors; 

• Re-election of die Audi tor . 

5. Any ocher business. 

Resolutions of the shareholders will be passed by a simple majority 
of those present and voting and each share is entitled to one vote. 

A shareholder may art at any meeting by prosy. 

On behalf of die Company, 

BANQUE DE GESnON EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD 

LUXEMBOURG 
- Soa£4Anaayme- 
2tVBoateyttd KnmwTin d Serves 
L-2S35 LUXEMBOURG 


LEICOMFUND 

20, Boukmid Emmanuel Serais, L-2535 Luxemb our g 
S.C LuxembourgB_21 454 


AVIS AUX ACTIONNAIRES 


Kfexseurete* s c c oanaar s torn conroques par le prewar avia a 

L'ASSEMBUfiE G&N&RALB ORDINAIRE 
DESACnONNAIKES 

qia k an ii&gc social a Luxembouig le 28 aval 1997 % 15h30. avre 

Fordre du jour urintnr ; 

ORDR8 DU JOUR 

L Compte Rendu d’actmte do Cowed d‘ Administration pour I'excrcice 
se rerrainanr le 31 decembxe 1996 ; 

Z RappoedaRe<tipar ^nticpri 9 fs po«gt*c»acogicae a n«ntKlgj; dacembndPgg; 
3 Aoopaon des comptes de reaatke tc mmi o a nt le 31 decetnbre 1996 ; 

4. AfiKMxw du rtsohar de I'excrcice se terminant le 31 decembtc 1996 ; 

5. Ratification de la c ooptation de LA COMPAGNIE FINANCJERE 
EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD BANQUE, reprcteniee par Monsieur 
Roger CUK1ERMAN, ra tens placement de Monsieur Donat 
BRANGER et de Monsieur Samuel PINTO cn remplacemem de 
Monsieur Obrier MAUML'S ; 

6. Dednwge aus Adnanntrateun et au Rerheur dTnnepnses pour 
J’ecacice ac tenaiunr le 31 dccemfere 1996 ; 

7. Nommanoa des organs* sotiaot : 

Nocmnaisofl des A d min? wt aanrs ; ; 

, NcmiristiDn du Rfvisew d’Emreprises ; 

8. Divers. 

Les a cnwiroiira sons in&nnds pu'auam tporum n'est re^» pow eene 
asgemUec et que les rifriritins tom prises a la majotixe ample da actions 
presenter ou represents. 

Qnque action a un droit de ibre. 

Tout aettonnaue pent voter par mandaoire. A cette fin, des procurations 
sont disponiWes au siege social er seront envoyees aus actiocnnres sur 
demande.- 

Afin d'etre salable, les procurations dument signets par les actionnaites 
devTont ecre envoy ee* an siege- social afin d’etre Wfues le jour precWant 
] ’ll sem bice & 1? heuxes u plus Bxd. 

Les profnenoes d'acnoas au portent; dehiant p artroptt a cette assembles, 
devrow deporer Ions actions onq jours cwrnbla mat Tassembire au siege 
social de I* soeieiti. 

Les actionnaire* desireur d'obrenir le Rapport Annuel Audi re peurem 
s'ldiHin au siege social dc la wtim, 

Pour la societe, 

BANQUE DC (SSHGN EEAiQND DE RQOtSCHlLD LUXEMBOURG 
- SodesS Anonyme - 
20, boidererd Enanatnrel Serais ■ 

Ln2S35 LUXEMBOURG 





iK7 


MNSTEmo DC B4ERQIA 
Y UNAS 


PETHOECUADOR 

ES’DItt IKMtL 
PETBOLEOS OEL ECUADOR 


REPUBLIC OF ECUADOR 

MINISTRY OF ENERGY AND MINES 

EMPRESA ESTATAL PETROLEOS DEL ECUADOR 
PETROECUADOR 

SUSPENSION OF INTERNATIONAL TENDER 


Within the process of the “ Special Tender Ol-SOCO-CEL-97 for the Contracting 
of Transportation Service for Crude Oil, using the Privately Owned Centro - Oriente 
Pipeline System, (SOCO)”, the Special Bidding Committee, CEL, in application 
of its authority, stipulated in Art. 1 1 , numeral 10, of its bylaws for the Contracting 
of Transportation Service for Crude Oil through Privately Owned Pipelines, with 
Resolution Nbr. 497 - CEL - 97 of March 20, 1997, decided to suspend the above 
mentioned bidding process, on the grounds of its inconvenience to the national 
interest . 


Quito, March 24, 1997 


Eng. Raul Baca C. 

Minister of Energy and Mines 
Chairman of the Special Bidding Committee 


Dr. Rafael Almeida M. 

Executive President of Petroecuador 
Secretary of fee CEL 



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CmmvD130829S66 Hoag fimrBW967209 /re/wrf 1896569294 few/ 1771000102 
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Ualied Kingdom 08009668Z2 United Snug 180099457B7 US-Totl Volet ♦714-370-8020 l S- 7p// for +7 1 4 -376-80 25 


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PAGE 18 


rvffitttiWML 


Sports 


■A v 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1997- 


World Roundup 



B«tt7 VipHoam 

Todd Woodbridge pausing 
while playing Shuzo Matsuoka. 

Rain Halts Chang 

tennis Rain midway through 
the first set Tuesday halted Michael 
Chang's first round match in the 
Salem Open in Hong Kong. The top 
seed was leading a Hong Kong wild 
card, Melvin Tong, 3-0 when die 
match was stopped. Chang's broth- 
er, Carl Chang, finished his match, 
losing 6-0, 6-4 Brian MacPhie. 

No. 3 seed Todd Woodbridge, a 
doubles specialist, beat Shuzo Mat- 
suoka of Japan 6-1, 6-4. Wood- 
bridge had been playing doubles for 
more than two weeks. He and his 
partner Mark Woodforde helped 
Australia beat the Czech Republic 
in the Davis Cup last week, and the 
week before they won the Lipton 
doubles title in Florida, 

* ‘The hardest thing for me was to 

adjust to singles after two and a half 
weeks of doubles." Woodbridge 
said. "It's not often that I go 
through such a long period without 
playing singles.” (AP) 

Attendance Rises 

baseball Attendance was up 
1 0. 1 percent for the first week of the 
Major League season. The 76 
games during the first week of the 
season drew 2.258,009, an average 
of 29.71 1. Through 76 games last 
year, baseball drew an average of 
26,98 1. The average fell 20 percent 
after the baseball strike, from 
31,612 in 1994 to 25,260 in 1995. 

* Cleveland expects a S37.5 mil- 

lion economic windfall from the 
All-Star game July 8 at Jacobs 
Field, Mayor Michael White es- 
timated Monday. He said the game 
and related activities would draw 
more than 100,000 people over a 
five-day period. (AP) 

Ambrose Reaches 1,000 

cricket West Indies fast bowl- 
er Curtly Ambrose scored his 
1,000th test run as West Indies 
moved from its overnight first in- 
nings score of 252 runs for seven 
wickets to 333 all out just before 
lunch on the fifth and final day of 
the fourth cricket test against India 
on Tuesday in Antigua. 

Ambrose, a 33-year old Antiguan, 
became only the third West Indian to 
achieve the double of 100 wickets 
and 1.000 runs. The other two were 
Sir Garfield Sobers and West Indies 
coach Malcolm Marshall. (AFP) 


Brewers Beat Texas 
But Almost Forfeit 

A Hailstorm of Giveaway Balls 



The Associated Press 

It was just above freezing, the fourth - 
coldest game in Milwaukee Brewers 
history, and the winds were whistling. 
Pipes were frozen, the soda machines 
were down, and an entire section in the 
lower seats was drenched when a water 
main broke. 

"At least the skies are clear," Brew- 
ers manager Phil Garner said before the 
Brewers' game against Texas on 
Monday. 

They didn’t stay that way for long. 

Unruly fans showered the field with 
souvenir baseballs, disrupting play three 


times, pushing the Brewers precariously 
close to the first forfeit in the club's 28- 
year history and prompting Bud Selig, 
baseball's acting commissioner and the 
owner of the Brewers, to issue a dir- 
ective: Take away the giveaways! 

"The teams were told not to give out 
the balls before the games," Phyllis 
Merhige. an American League spokes- 
woman, said after the Brewers' 5-3 vic- 
tory. 

A hardware-store chain sponsored 
the promotion during home openers at 
19 of 28 major-league parks. Seven 
teams were supposed to hand out balls 
later this week — S l Louis on Tuesday, 
followed by Boston, Cleveland, Phil- 
adelphia, Pittsburgh and the New York 
Yankees on Friday and the New York 
Mets on Saturday. 

“It was frustrating, but to the fans' 
defense, I don't think they understood 
the seriousness of it," said Brewers 
catcher Mike Matheny, who called a 
masterful game and hit a grand slam. 

“I don't think they understood that 
we were bordering on a forfeit." Ma- 
theny said, "and it was just a domino 
effect, something that started and we 
had a hard time getting it to stop." 

Texas manager Johnny Oates played 
the game undo 1 protest. He pulled his 
players off the field twice in me second 
inning, with the delays lasting 14 and 16 
minutes. The game also was delayed for 
a few minutes at the start. 

"I wasn't just concerned about the 
players," Oates said. "I was concerned 
about the kids in the lower deck. I didn't 
want anybody to get hurt." 

Although there were no reports of 
injuries, there were 1 12 citations issued 
by the Milwaukee County Sheriff s De- 
partment. including 14 for throwing 
baseballs onto the field — an offense 
canying a S105 fine. 

The shenanigans finally stopped after 
Gamer and crew chief Jim McKean 
used the public address system to urge 
the rowdies in the crowd of 42,893 to 
settle down. 

Milwaukee right-hander Cal Hdred, 
who was nearly plunked twice, said the 
players were actually more concerned 
tor the fans’ safety than their own. 

“The worst thing we saw is dial 
people were throwing them out of the 
upper deck and not getting them onto 
the field," he said. 

"There's a lot of open space on the 
field, but people were getting hit in the 
back of the head. That's just not right 
People expect to come out to the ball 
game ana not have balls thrown at 
diem." 

The start of the game was delayed 
several minutes when dozens of fans 
pelted the field with the baseballs they 
had been given as they entered the sta- 
dium, site of several ugly incidents be- 
tween fans and players in recent years. 


The final delay came moments after 
Matheny 's grand slam gave Milwaukee 
a 4-1 lead in the second inning. He 
connected off Ken Hill (1-1) with one 
out. 

Oates instructed his team to take 
refuge in the dugout for a second time 
when two baseballs nearly hit left field- 
er Rusty Greer. 

Tlffatm 10, Twins 4 The Tigers ended a 
string of 17 straight home losses with 
victory over Minnesota. 

“Today was a fun day/ ’ Detroit man- 
ager Buddy Bell said, ‘ ‘a great day/' 

Brian Johnson hit a three-run homer 
as the Tigers won at home for the first 
time since last Aug. 30. 

Justin Thompson (1-0) became the 
first Detroit starting pitcher to win since 
that Aug. 30 game, despite giving up 
four runs, eight hits ana four walks in 
6% innings. 

Athletics 6, Rad Ssx 2 In Oakland. 
Mark McGwire and Jason Giambi each 
hit two-run homers, and A's pitchers 
recorded 12 strikeouts. 

Richie Lewis got the win in relief, and 
Billy Taylor earned his fourth save. 

Indians 8, Marftiera3 In Seattle, Sandy 
Alomar and Manny Ramirez homered 
for Cleveland, and Charles Nagy beat 
the Mariners for the fifth straight time. 

Nagy allowed one run and eight hits 
in 6% innings. 

The Indians scored four runs in the 
second off Scott Sanders (0-2). Alomar 
homered in a fourth straight game for 
die first time in his career, and Ramirez 
broke an 0- for- 11 slump with his first 
homer this year. 

Yanksss a, Angsts 8 In Anaheim, 
Derek Jeter continued to impress from 
the leadoff spot with three hits and two 
runs scored. He has 13 hits in 18 at-bats 
after an 0-for-8 start. 



Ottin Vtfnczfrba AModatrd fVw» 

Roberto Alomar of the Orioles swinging against Kansas City. 


For Alomar, 
Season Starts 
With Boos 


The Associated Press 

KANSAS CITY — Roberto Alomar 
was booed by Kansas City fans each 

Htwi» he came to the plate, but turned m a 
fine performance in his first game since 
he finished his five-game su spensi on for 

spitting in the face of umpire John 
F&schoeck. • 

Alomar was soft-spoken with report- 
ers and fen s alike after he arrived at 
Kauffman Stadium for Baltimore's 
game with the Royals, who won, 6-5, in 
the bottom of the ninth. 

“I just want to go out there and play 
the game of baseball/’ Alomar said 
after getting two hits. “The fans are 
entitled to their own opinion and that’s 
all I can say about it- 

After Brady Anderson doubled to 
lead off the game, Alomar dropped a 
perfect sacrifice bunt to move mm to 
third. A sacrifice fly by Rafael Palmeiro 
t hen produced the Orioles 1 first run. 

Alomar, plagued by a badly sprained. 
apVIft that was heavily taped, made a 
diving stop in the second inning on a 
grounder that skipped off the edge of the 
m field grass. He left for apineb-ranner 
after singling to start the eighth. 

“The Tn»Tn thing for me was it was 
good to be out there," he said. “It was a 
good day for me.” Hie was allowed to 
complete the 1996 season and play in 
postseason games, then sat out bis sus- 
pension at the start of this season. 

Alomar was booed in the pregame 
introductions of the team and in each of 
his four plate appearances. He got mild - 
cheers for his one defensive play, but 
there were more cheers when he struck 
out in the second inning. ' 

When will the booing stop? 

“I just don’t know/’ said Alomar, 
who signed about 25 autographs as fans 
gathered b ehind the Orioles dugout be- 
fore the team took baaing practice. “I 
wish I knew." 




Butler Helps Dodgers Outlast Mets in a Marathon 


The Associated Press 

Brett Butler wasn’t even at Dodger 
Stadium at the start of the game with the 
Mets, but he scored the winning run. 

Butler missed a start for the first time 
tins season Monday night because of 
soreness in his jaw. 

In the 15th inning he scored from 
second base on Tom Prince's infield 
single to give Los Angeles a 3-2 victory 
over New York. 

The five-hour marathon finished 
Tuesday morning at six minutes past 
midnight. Butler entered the game in the 
ninth inning as a defensive replace- 
ment. 

“He has a swollen lymph node be- 
hind the left side of the jaw," said the 
team doctor, Michael Me II man, during 
an impromptu news conference in the 
third inning. “He has been placed on 
antibiotics, and his progress will be fol- 
lowed.” 

Buder, 39, missed most of last season 
after tonsil cancer was diagnosed in 
May and he underwent surgery and ra- 
diation treatments. He had played every 
inning of his team's first six games. He 
was in uniform in the dugout by the 
fourth inning. 

Todd Zeile walked to start the 15th 
inning against Joe Crawford, who was 
making bis big-league debut, and Butler 
then grounded into a force play. 

Butler stole second while Greg 
Gagne was striking out, and Prince then 
hit a roller to first baseman John Olerud, 
whose throw to Crawford was too late to 


get Prince for the third out. 

Butler, meanwhile, never slowed as 
he rounded third and slid home without 
a throw. 

He also walked twice and sacrificed 
before the 15th. 

As for his jaw, he said: “I had the 
doctor tell me, ‘Hey, it's 'not what 

If L Rounbor 

you’re thinking. Everything’s fine. 
About four or five days ago, it started 
bothering me. I decided today to get it 
checked out.’’ 

Butler described his pain as a doll 
ache on the left side of his jaw. He was 
examined by Dr. John Rehm, an ear, 
nose and throat specialist, who pre- 
scribed antibiotics. 

"Brett's past history is what mag- 
nifies this event,” Dr. Mellmaa said. 
“Having said that, we don't have any 
reason to believe there’s a recurrence of 


his cancer. Nothing's been defined 
here.” 

Bill Russell, the Dodgers’ manager, 
said: "Brett's fine, as you saw. He got 
on base, did what we needed. Heck, he 
got four at-bats." 

By the game 'send, neither team had a 
position player left, and the only non- 
starting pitcher left for either team was 
the Dodgeis* Todd WanelL 

Pedro Astacio (1-0), normally a 
starter, pitched three shutout innings for 
the win. Crawford was recalled from the 
minor leagues Monday when the Mets 
placed pitcher Pete Hamisch on the 15- 
day disabled list 

"I fly in and get an ‘L/ ” Crawford 
said. “I felt good once I got my jitters 
out of tiie way.” 

Padm 3, PtratM 2 Chris Gomez's 
run-scoring single with two outs in the 
10th inning gave host San Diego the 
victory after blowing two chances to 
win it in the ninth. 


With one out in the 10th, Matt Ruebel 
walked Greg Vaughn, who took second 
on Wally Joyner’s single. Gomez then 
bounced his. game-winning single 
through the hole mto left 
oianta 4, PhHBtc 3 In San Francisco, 
Shawn Estes came off the disabled list to 
win bis season debut allowing two runs 
-m 5^ innings. Estes. who missed his first 
start and much of spring training with 
biceps tendinitis, kept the Phillies hitless 
until pinch hitter Kevin Sefcik singled 
with two outs in the fifth inning. 

RoefclM 13, Rada 2 Jeff Reed and 
Vinny Castilla hit three-run homers, and 
Bill Swift pitched six strong innings for 
the Rockies' fifth straight victory. 

The Rockies drew 48,014 for their 
home opener, extending their consec- 
utive sellout streak to 133 games, a 
major league record. The crowd got 
what it wanted — Colorado scored five 
times in the first inning and led 10-0 by 
the fourth. 


, KC'.JBcavu 


Jackie Robinson Wasn’t the Very First 

Fleet Walker, a Black Catcher, Played in the Major Leagues in 1884 


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By Ira Bexkow 

♦ New York Times Service 

He was a handsome man, tall and 
slender. He was the son of a physician, 
attended Oberiin College and the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, and studied math- 
ematics, Greek, rhetoric, mechanics, 
natural philosophy, French, civil engi- 
neering, zoology, astronomy, German, 
botany, logic and Latin. He was also an 
athlete, ana excelled at baseball. 

He was Moses Fleetwood Walker, 
and he was a catcher. In 1884 he became 
the first and the last African-American 
to play in the major leagues until Jackie 
Robinson broke the color barrier 63 
years later. His brother Welday, an out- 
fielder, also played six mid-season 
games on the same team that year. 

Baseball is celebrating the 50th an- 
niversary of Robinson's arrival with the 
Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. A commem- 
orative stamp has been issued Universit- 
ies are holding symposiums about the 
sociological impact of a ballplayer. Every 
major-league player is wearing a patch in 
honor of Robinson. But little is known, or 
remembered, about Fleet Walker. 

On finishing college in 1 883, Walker 
joined the Toledo Blue Stockings, then 
in die International League. The next 
year, Toledo moved up to the American 
Association, and Walker went along. 
The American Association was con- 


sidered on par with the National League, 
but less prestigious. 

In “Only the Ball was White," a 
history of the black men in baseball 
before Jackie Robinson, Robert Peterson 
writes: "Walker’s reception in the big 
leagues was mixed If me other players 
resented his presence, they gave no out- 
ward indication of it, and spectators, on 
the whole, seemed favorably inclined 
toward him except in the league’s two 
distinctly southern cities.'’ 

Those cities were Louisville and 
Richmond In Louisville, the Toledo 
Blade reported. Walker was “hissed 
and insulted because of his color." In 
Richmond, Toledo's manager, Charlie 
Morton, received a letter threatening to 
"mob” the “Negro catcher" if “he 
comes on the ground in a suit" 

Walker did not play that day. He had 
suffered a rib injury from a foul tip — 
chest protectors for catchers had not yet 
been introduced 

He was released from the team in 
September, having played in 42 games 
for Toledo and batted .263. He was 
considered an adequate backstop, his 
.888 fielding average being 26th in the 
league for catchers. 

The Toledo team, suffering financial 
problems, disbanded after that season, 
and no major-league team picked up 
either brother. (Welday had batted .182) 
For the next few years, a handful erf 


black playets — including Fleet Walker 
— played in the minor leagues. That 
ended on July 19, 1887, in Newark, New 
Jersey. Adrian (Cap) Anson, first-base- 
man and manager of the Chicago White 
Stockings, said his team would notplay 
an exhibition game against the minor- 
league Newark team if Newark, as an- 
nounced, sent their ace pitcher, George 
Stovey, a black man, to the mound. 

It is a part of baseball folklore that - 
Anson said, “Get that nigger off the 
field.” Newark acquiesced. Stovey did 
not play. Jim Crow did, and would for 
years to come. 

Some major-league teams tried to cir- 
cumvent the color barrier. In 1901, John 
McGraw, manager of the Baltimore 
Orioles of the American League, sought 
to sign a light-skinned black second- 
baseman named Charlie Grant, and 
called him “Charlie Tokohama, a full- 
blooded Cherokee.” But McGraw ’s 
ruse was exposed by Charles Cbmistaty, 
owner of the White Sox. •' 

Meanwhile, Fleet Walker had re- 
turned home to Steubenville, Ohio. At 
one point, as a newspaper editor, he 
urged the emigration of all black people 
to Africa. Only 1 ‘failure and disappoint- 
ment’’ were m store for “the colored 
man in America," he wrote. 

Moses Fleetwood Walker died in 
1924, aged 67, never having left Amer- 
ica’s shores. 


v? \ 




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Iverson Scores 44, but 76ers Can’t Beat Bulls 


The Associated Press Chicago WOO its 31 St COn- 

Despite Allen Iverson's ca- secutivenome game with 30 
reer-high 44 points, tire Bulls points contributed by Michael 
beat the Philadelphia 76ers Jordan, while Scome Pippen 
128-102 Monday night to 

clinch home court advantage NBA Roundup 

throughout the playoffs. 

Chicago (66-10) can march added 28 points. Ron Harper 
last season’s record 72-win had a season-high 22 for tire 
total by winning its remaining Bulls, who are 38-1 at the 


six regular-season games. 

“We'd like to win 70; 
we’d like to win 72/’ said 
Phil Jackson, the Bulls coach. 
“But from now on, it has no 
relevant factor." 


United Center. Chicago can 


beating injury-riddled San 
Antonio Spurs. 

Karl Malone scored 26 
points for the Jazz, who can 
clinch the best record in the 
Western Conference by beat- 
ing the Los Angeles taken; 
on Wednesday. 

“They’re a very good bas- 
ketball team, and they 
out and beat us exactly the 


Honwta 110,Cav«8ar*108 

Glen Rice scared 42 paints - 
and Charlotte overcame a 19- 
point deficit in Cleveland. - 
Hurt 94, Ptetona 88 P.J. 
Brown had 2Ipomt5 and 13 
rebounds and Tim Hardaway 
just missed a triple-double as 
Miami won in Detroit. 

Bwm 110, Hu jm ala 104 
Isaiah Rider scored 28 points 
as Portland won in Denver. ' 


The Jazz 

won their 13th straight game. 


M ML-— T. 


v 

% ' •> 


N 

if, *j . 


\ 






■* . •//’■’•is* 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, "WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1997 


PAGE 19 


SPORTS 


Cup Play Under the Cloud of Terrorism 


■ International Herald Tribune 


European Soccer /KoiHuanis 


soccers spring,' are as close 
now as flowers to blossom* But as fee 
semifinal first legs attract ever widen- 
ing television attention, so fee dangers 
az the playing grounds deepens. 

Manchester United’s reawakening 
in fee UEFA Champions' League has 
already brought fee sound ofguufire. 
In Vienna last autumn, two United 
fans were shot by an Austrian after a 
nightclub argument; in Oporto, Por- 
tugal, last month, scores of 
Manchester followers were scattered, 
and same wounded, by fee indiscrim- 
inate firing of plastic pellet ballets by 
riot police. 

Nqw, as 3,000 Manchester United 
fens bead for Dortmund, Germany, 
where their team plays Wednesday, 
there is a new and sinister threat The 
Irish Republican Army, stepping up a 
campaign of terror before Britain’s 
May 1 general election, has aban- 
doned its former tacit agreement 
sports are counterproductive targets 
for its weapons. 

Sport, transmitted into hundreds of 
millions of homes across 150 or more 
nations, offers an irresistible platform 
to those who call themselves an army, 
but work behind masks of anonymity . 
I have seen ' IRA men and Northern 
Ireland loyalist paramilitaries stand 
side by side at youth league matches 
in fee magnificent Cambane league 
near Newiy, on the Irish border. 

Their sons were in the same colors, 
chasing fee shared honor of a cup 
somewhat less illustrious than fee 
European Cup, but no less desired by 
fee youth of Ireland’s troubled border 
regions, where 93 teams entered fee 
competition and never a question was 
asked about religious or political af- 
filiations. That innocence may still 


E xist. But there is no way feat 
Donmund’s police dare assume feat 
fee match Wednesday between Bor* 
ussia Dortmund and Man ch es t er 
United will not he targeted by ter- 
rorists. .Stop me here: Tell me you are 


bomb threat came half an hour before 
the 150th Grand National 
: It is a race that draws a worldwide 
TV audience. Just as fee Olympics do, 
just as Wednesdays soccer matches 
are sc heduled to. The British turned 
their Grand National into a cause 
cdfebre, and 20,000 of ns exercised our 


the notion that alTfiat counts is for the 

best team to won. 

I share your wish. I would love to 
c oncentra te on fee relative merits of 
Dortmund’s Andreas MoDer and 
Manchester United’s flowering 
youth, David Beckham. It woold be ■ 
marvelous to confine sports page 
comment to the question of whether 
Roy Kerne, Manchester United’s su- 
perbly gifted but volatile southern Ir- 
ish m i dfi elder, can impose his skill 
rather than his temper on Dortmund’s 
fine playing field. I would prefer to 
assess the impact of Matthias Sam- 
mer’s one-match ban on Borussia’s 
chances. Sammer, red of hair and 
smooth of movement in turning de- 
fense to attack, is to my eye the out- 
standing performer in European soc- 
cer over the past 12 months. 

Indeed, Sammer’s transition from 
East to West German soccer is a state- 
ment in itself on the futility of di- 
viding up nations by politically de- 
signed walls and do gmas, Dortmund 
will miss him in the crowded West- 
afallen StaxHon, especally because Ju- 
lio Cesar, the Brazilian center back 
and, Jurgen Kohler are both suffering 
injuries and may be absent. 

Even as I write, such considera- 
tions pale in significance. I am one of 
fee 70,000 racegoers who had to be 
evacuated from' fee Aintree track in 
Liverpool last Saturday when an IRA 


returning to Aintree on Monday. 

The race was won in a canter by a 
New Zealand-bred horse wife an Irish 
name. Lord Gyllene. Its jockey is a 
slip of an Irish lad from Downpatrick, 
Tony Dobbin, who had the courage to 
distance himself publicly from the 
bombers and admit his deep sense of 
shame in coming from Northern Ire- 
land. He simply rode for his chance of 
a lifetime, and rode home in front of 
20,000 people who did not give a 
damn where he was bom and bred. 


W E SHARED the sporting 
spirit. The IRA, simply by 
making two coded phone 
calls and this time not even bothering 
to plant one of their heinous devices, 
gave no thought to the fact that Eng- 
lish and Irish bloodstock, human and 
equine, is mixed and is especially 
bonded in horse racing. 

Why, then, would its bombers, or 
bomb .hoaxers, hesitate because 
Manchester United has a huge Irish 
following? Why would the fact that 
Keane, and also Dennis Irwin, 
United’s raim defender, both hail 
from Cork, in the south of the divided 
island of Ireland. 

The IRA has grown increasingly 
desperate to use anyone and anything 
as its victims. Its leaders claimed re- 
sponsibility last week for planting a 
Semtex bomb beneath an expressway 




bridge en route to the Grand National, 
and then followed up wife a hollow 
but “effective” couple of cheap calls 
to disrupt the sporting event and hijack 
the 400 million TV audience switched 
cm for Saturday’s steeplechase. 

Now, Germany’s police and its 
people have to be vigilant- Sport 
unites our lives and offers us op- 
portunity to bury our cultural, polit- 
ical, and nationalistic differences. 

Sport is precious, and I for one 
would look down the barrel of ter- 
rorist threat to defend it In fee turmoil 
of the postponed, but defiant Grand 
National, CNN pronounced that a 
couple of phone calls was now all it 
takes to destroy a world event. 

No. Disrupt, but never destroy. We 
are more resilient than thai because, if 
we want fun and meaning and dis- 
traction from Page One horrors, we 
have to stage the big events. 

In that spirit, I suggest Dortmund, a 
squad containing a dozen European 
Cup goal scorers this season, might 
overcome injury problems and gain a 
significant fust leg lead over 
Manchester United on Wednesday. 

The other semifinal, in Amster- 
dam's new sports Arena, is harder to 
call. Juventus. the reigning European 
champion, is in fantastic form, having 
beaten AC Milan, 6-1. on Sunday. 

Ajax, after a depressed season, is 
getting back its injured but cannot 
recall players who left for greater 
profits. 

Nevertheless, Ajax knows it is now 
or never again fear the present squad, 
whose coach, Louis van Gaal, is also 
about to depart. The first leg could be 
very close, the second leg in two 
weeks time almost a cup final in its 
own right 

Just so long as it is peaceful. 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London. 


ss.: 



. r - ' jflp 




- >■ 



3.i nU.I-li fWnlT 

The Flyers’ Eric Lindros flattening the Rangers' Bill Berg as Ulf Samuelson moved in. 

Lindros Cools as Rangers Win, 3-2 


The .Associated Press 

Eric Lindros watched from the penalty box 
as fee New York Rangers scored twice to beat 
his Philadelphia Byers. If the Rangers have 
their way, he'll be a spectator for their next 
meeting, too. 

Lindros was targeted by the Rangers’ check- 

til H L Roundup 

era. In the second period. Jeff Beukeboom. 
Karpovtsev and Churl a delivered punishing 
checks to the Flyers' captain. He responded in 
kind, getting a double-minor penalty for high- 
sticking Shane Ctaurla. As he sat in the penalty 
box, Alexander Karpovtsev and Brian Leetch 
scored to give New York a 3-2 victory 
Monday. 

Churla thought Lindros should have been 
ejected. “My nose is on the side of my face. 


What else do you need?' ' he asked. 

Lindros had two more high-sticking pen- 
alties in the third and, at the buzzer, cross- 
checked Ulf Samuels son in the face. The 
Rangers say he should be suspended for 
Thursday’s remarch in Philadelphia. 

Whalers 4 , Sabres 2 Geoff Sanderson scored 
twice to lead fee Whalers over Buffalo and 
strengthen their grip on the final Eastern Con- 
ference playoff spoL 

Canadian* 2 , island ars i Benoit Brunet ri- 
cocheted a backhand shot off an opposing 
defenseman wife 3:10 to go, giving fee Ca- 
ff adiens a victory over visiting New York. 

Stars 2 , Coyotes 2 In Phoenix, Andy Moog. 
recovered from a back injury and a sprained 
ankle, stopped 25 shots for Dallas. 

Canucks 3, Sharks 2 Vancouver kept alive 
its slim play off hopes when Sergei Nemchinov 
scored off fee post in fee third period. 


Scoreboard 


Major League Stammnos 


EAsrnvmoM 



W 

L 

PCL 

GB 

Boltbnore 

4 

2 

j 6 a 



Boston 

3 

3 

300 

1 

New York 

3 

3 

300 

1 

Detroit 

3 

4 

j09 

1* 

Toronto 

2 

3 

JOO 

1W 


CENTBAL DIVISION 



Ometond 

4 

2 

667 

_ 

MBwoukoe 

3 

2 

-600 

vt 

Mtonesoto 

4 

3 

371 

% 

Kansas Oty 

3 

3 

300 

1 

Chicago 

2 

3 

300 

1W 


WEBTDMMON 



Oakland 

4 

2 

Ml 

— 

Tans 

2 

3 

M0 

116 

Anahetan 

2 

4- 

333 

3 

Seattle 

2 

4 

333 

2 

HltWIULIHMI - - 



EAST DIVISION 




w 

L 

Ptt, 

GB 

Florida 

5 

J 

333 

-A. 

Aflanta 

f '4 

2 

Mt 

I ■" * 

Montreal 

3 

3 

300 

2 

Now YOrk 

2 

5 

386 . 

. 37t 

Philadelphia 

2 

5- 

316 

3Vt 

CEWTlULDIVtSION 



Houston 

5 

1 

333 

— 

OncJonatl 

3 

4 

329 

216 

PDWburgli 

2 

4 

333 

3 

CMargo 

0 


300 

5 

SL Louis 

0 

6 

300 

5 


WE9TMVWOH 



Catorada 

5 

2 

J14 

— 

Los Angeles 

5 

2 

J14 

— ■ 

San Diego 

S 

2 ' 

714 

— 

SanFnmdsco 4 

2 

367 

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MtaMMtfl 100 SOI 200-6 9 3 

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BaflUMIW 100 002 011—6 10 o 

Kansas aty 100 002 82V-6 12 2 

Key. Mitts cn, Benitez (8] and HcSes 
Appier, Jocome (8). (91. WnOtor Off and 

5pehr. Fasono C73- W-WdOw, 1-1. 
L— Bentaz. 0-1. HRs— Bafflmom Andaman 


Cl). Kansas Ctty, PwjuettoO). Ktog Cl). . 
Texas 101 001 000-1 7 1 

MJftmaso MO 070 MM 7 O 

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Mercedes (6), Wldanan CEO, Janes (91 and 
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Milwaukee, Matheny m. 

BoslM 100 Oil 000-2 S 0 

Oaffaad 000 M 2D— < 0 1 

Gordon: Mahomes OB), Eshelman ffi) and 
Hasetawro Prieto, R. Leeds {7J, Groom 48), 
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Su Randan 310 m 00s-4 5 0 

Madam Hsrtfcom 09, Btaztar £72, 
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Beck O). W-Eatw, 1-0. Lr-Modura. (ML 
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380 

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Minnesota 

37 

38 

393 

21 

Dallas 

22 

53 

393 

36 

Denver 

20 

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367 

38 

Sat Antonio 

19 

56 

353 

39 

Vancouvar 

12 

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R-Seattte 

52 

24 

684 

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x-LA. Lakers 

51 

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380 

16 

x- Portland 

45 

32 

384 

716 

Phoenix 

36 

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.480 

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34 

41 

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1716 

Sacramento 

30 

45 

.400 

21W 

Golden State 

28 

47 

373 

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(V-ctaeheddhrUionime) 


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x-New Jersey 
x-PNknMpNa 
x-Rorlda 


ATLANTIC MVaiON 
W L T PIS 
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33 28 19 85 


x-N.Y. Rangers 37 33 10 


W L T Per GB 

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53 

22 

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347 

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320 

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New Jersey 

23 

51 

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MONDAY'S HSULTS 

Charietts ' 18 24 25 31 12-110 
□evetaad 32 23 18 27 7—1 65 

Cte race 11-21 15-1642, Pteree 5-1356 15? 
a Ferry MO 3-4 23. MBs 7-10 66 22. 
Brandon 0-154-421, patapenko 8-11 4420. 
R r h si m d s— m ntfnttn 42 (Getpsr, Rase 7), 
□ewiond 36 (West®. AHMs-OmMie 25 
(Bodies 8), Owetand 26 (Sura 8). 

Miami n II U B-H 

Detroit 21 24 15 20- 80 

M: Brawn 8-1355 21,Moumfcig 4-11 13-16 
21; D: Thorpe 11-10 1-1 23, HOI 5-15 11 -18 21. 
Rebounds— Miami 51 (BrownTH, Debt* 41 
(Tharps 14). AsUBs-Mtaod 17 (Hontaway 
V), DeboB 16 (HU 7). 

PNMMphla 1* 35 23 25-182 

Oricage 20 29 38 41—128 

P; leerson 1602 5044 Weatherspoon 8-18 

3- 419:0 Jordan 15-251-230, Pfppen 1V24 3- 

3 28. Rebaewb— Phttadeiphla 43 

(Weatherspoon 121, Chicago 73 (Longiey 11). 
Assists— PhttadeWda 17 (Iverson 8L 
Chicago 36 (Hurper 71. 

Porttand 32 26 32 20-110 

Denver 30 23 21 22— 1M 

P: RJder 12-172-2 28, CJbiblnson 9-17 2-2 
23: D: Hammonds 10-19 9-14 29, D.ERb 5-13 

4- 418. Reboeeds— Portland 60 (Dudey 133# 
Denver 42 (Johnson 151. Assists— ^ Portland 
21 (Anderson 9), Denver 23 (tXEIBs 6). 

Saa Aetonto 16 24 29 24- 93 

Ittdi 31 30 24 31—116 

5JL Alexander 7-13 56 26 FMek 4-7 7-11 

1& WBtotns 5-13 5-7 1 5j U: Motane 9-15 0-10 
26 Homocek 7-9 54 19, Stockton 6-7 56 19. 
Betaends— San Antcnto 45 (Heck 10), Utah 
56 (Osteriog 9). Amlsls-San Antonio 19 
(WIDfims 6). Utoh 26 (Stockton 8). 


Tampa Bay 
Washington 
N.Y. Islanders 


X- Buffalo 

x- Pittsburgh 

Montreal 

Hartford 

Ottawa 

Boston 


1 30 39 9 69 

1 30 40 9 69 

ers 28 39 12 68 

NorrmcAST divibion 
N IT tt 
» 28 12 90 

h 37 33 8 82 

30 35 14 74 

31 37 11 73 

28 36 15 71 

25 44 9 59 


x-Cotorarto 

x-Anahefen 

x-Edmonton 

Vancouver 

CakW 

Los Angelas 

Son Jose 


CENTRAL UVKtQN 

« l r n sf si 

Z-DaHas 47 24 8 1(0 246 189 

x- Detroit 37 24 17 91 244 186 

x- Phoenix 37 36 7 81 230 235 

St- Louts 33 35 11 77 227 237 

Chicago 32 34 1 3 77 211 204 

Taranto 29 42 8 66 223 264 

PAcmcwvistQN 

W L T Pts GF GA 
z-Cotorarto 48 22 9 105 272 196 

x-Anahehn 34 33 13 81 237 229 

x-Eckntmton 36 35 8 80 243 233 

Vancouver 33 40 7 73 246 265 

Calgary 32 38 9 73 208 225 

Las Angelas 26 42 11 63 205 2*1 

Son Jose 26 45 8 60 203 269 

(z-cflndwd dMsIon fltte) 
Cx-cUncned playoff berth! 

MONDAY'S UMTS 

Buffalo 2 0 0-2 

Hartford a 1 3—1 

FbsT Parted: S-Sotan 23 (Hotdngei) Z B> 
SmehBk 11 (Sotav ZUtnOO Second Period: 
H-tCPrimeau 26 (Emerson, Burke} ThW 
Ported : H-CMasson 8 (Emerson, Primenaul 
(pp).S, H-Sandereon 34 (Oaseb. CMassonl 
(PP>- 6 H -Sanderson 35 (Cosseb. Dlneen) 
Shots oa goal: B- 13-7-4-24. H- 13-17- 
11-41. Codes B-Hasek. H-Burkc. 

N.Y. Menders 0 • V- 1 

Maedneal 1 • 1-2 


First Period: M-Matoknov 4 (Buie KMvu) 
(pp). Second Period: None Third Period: 
New Yarfc Berfual 10 fBomger. vaske} x 
M-Brunet 10 (Maiaknav, Ructosky) Shots oa 
goal: New York 7-10-9-2*. M- 11^-15-35. 
Genies: New York, Solo. M-Thtoault. 
PhOadelphla 2 0 0-2 

N.Y. Rangers 0 3 0-3 

Rnt Period: P-Fallaan 11 IBrtnff Amour) 
i p- Undros 31 tLeOalr. Ktatl) Second 
Period: New York, Udster 3 (Coumafl, 
Karpovtsev] a. New York, Karpovtsev 9 
(leetdi, Gretzky! (pp). 5. New York. Leech 
30 (Gretzky. Graves} (pp). Third Period: 
None. Shots m goal: P-96-14— 29. New York 
6-15-6—27. Games: P-HextaU. New York. 
UcMer. 

Dmas 110 0-2 

Phoenix 110 0-2 

Fbst Period: D-Letntnen 15 (Modana 
Zubov) 2, Phoenix. Roenlck 27 (Drake, 
Mummtnen) (pp). Secant Period: Phoenix. 
Drake 15 (Rormlng, Roenlck) 4, D- 
Nleuwendyk 3D (Langenbrurmer, GOchrisD 
Third Period: None. Overtime: None. Shots 
oa goat: D- 10-8-9-3—30. Phoenix 1266- 

I— 27. Goalies: D-Moog. Phoenix. 

KAablbutln. 

VOncormer 1 0 2—3 

Saa Jose 1 1 0—2 

Hrst Period.- SJ.-Grmoto 24 (Peltonsn. 
GfflJ z V-Noonon 12 (SDIInger, Lumme) 
Secsad Period: S-I.-Peltonen 1 (Turcorie. 
Bodgert (pp>- Third Period: V-Nadund 19 
(Bohonas. Ridley) 5. V-Nemchlnov 8 
(Brashear, WaBrert Shots on goal: V- 4-9- 

I I- 34. S J.-86-10-26. Gomes: V-MCLeon. 
SJL-Hradey. 


BMUSH PUJRin UASDX 

Leeds 0, BlcckhumO 

mum wM: AAancnester United *3; Aise- 
not 60. Liverpool &a Newcastle 53, Anon vnia 
SX- Chelsea 49, Sheffield Vtodnesday 49; 
Wimbledon 46; Tottenham 42. Leeds 42; Le- 
icester 39; Derby 38,- Blackburn 37; Everian 
3A- Sunderianrt34; West Ham 3X Caveinry3X- 
Mlddtosbrouah 32; Nottingham Forest 31; 
5outnompton 30. 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Real Madrid d Compostela 0 
aTANMNOBiRetd Madrid 73; Baraelana 66; 


Real Bells m,- Deporilw Conma 6X Attettca 
Madrid 55; AttileDc BBbao 48, vafladoUd 4fc 
Rea) Socledod 47; Tenerife 44 - VMenda 43; 
Racing 5amander 42' Cotta Vigo 39; Oviedo 
38; Compostela 37; Spoiling GO on 35. Ex- 
tTemadura 35; Espanyal 34; Zaragoza 33. 
Raya Valleca no 33: Hercules 28. Lag rones 28f 
Sevilla 26. 


FOUnTHTXST 

WEST 1HXCS VS. INDIA 
MONDAY, IN ST JOHN'S. ANTI QUA 

West Indies tamings: 252-7 

FIFTH OH BAT lUTlRHATIONAL 
AUSTRALIA VS. SOUTH AFRICA 
TUESDAY, M JOHANN ESBURa 
Australia tamings: 25&-7 (SOoireisl 
SHARJAH CSP 
ZIMBABWE VS SRI LANKA 
TUESDAY, IN SHARJAH. UAE 
Zimbabwe innings: 203 (495 oven) 

Sri Lanka tamings: 153 (46.) oven) 

ICC TMPHY SEMIFINAL 
BANOLADeSH VB. SCOTLAND 
TUESDAY. IN KUALA LUMPUR 
Bangladesh Innings: 243-7 ISO oven) 
Match Interrupted due to rain. 


MAJOR LEAOUE BASEBALL 
AMERICAN LEAOUE 

Baltimore— Activated OF Petolnawlglla 
from 15-day disabled Hst. Sent OF Tony 
Tarasco to Rochester, /(_ 

Kansas cmr— Put INF Jose Ottoman and 
C Mike Mactartane on 15-day disabled Bsc 
Bought contract of Shane Hatter from Om- 
aha AA. Called up C Sal Fasana tram Om- 
aha. 

Seattle —Agreed to terms with C Oar 
Wilson on 5-neor centred extension riuouph 
1999. 

tampa Bay —Signed 55 Chris Martin and 
assigned him to team minor-league extend- 
ed spring training program. 

NATIONAL LEAOUE 

cinncinati -Claimed P.HP Scott Service 
oH worrers (ram Oakland Athlerics. Optioned 
OF OzzJe Timmons to Indianapolis. AA. 

Houston -Put 3B Sean Berry on 15-day 


iflMbied list. Recoiled INF Russ Johnson 
from New Orleans. AA. 

n.y. METi-Put LHP York® Perez an 15- 
day disabled Bst. Bought contract of LHP 
Brian Bohanon tram Norfolk. IL 
UN FRAtrasco — Activated INF Desl WB- 
son tram disabled llsi and optioned him to 
Phoenix. PCL 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 

Denver —Signed G Jimmy King. 

Philadelphia —Put G Ludous Hants on 
in|ured llsi. Signed G Frankie KJngtoKHtay 
contra a 

phoenix -Signed C Mike Brown tar re- 
molnder of season. 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAOUE 

CINCINNATI —Signed QB Boomer Estosan 
to 2 -year comma. 

Dallas— S igned S Brock Marlon. 

KANSAS —Signed WR Reggie Jones. DT 
Outs MaumalangQ and TE Billy Khayat. 

new ENOLAND —Re-signed LB Todd 
Coin ns. 

new Orleans —Named Jack Del Rio as- 
sistant strength coach. 

PHILADELPHIA -Signed WR Nate Single- 
ton and RB Corey Crown. 

Pittsburgh -Traded DL Brentsan Buck- 
ner to Kansas aty Chiefs for 1997 seventh- 
round draf) choice. 

sam diego— S igned FB Robert Chancey to 
three-year contract. 

Washington— S igned CBCris Dbhmanto 
4year contract and 5 Jesse Campbell ta 3-year 
contract. 

HOOCEV 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAOUE 

Colorado —Returned G Jen-Frnncois 
Lnbbeto Heishey. AHL 

LOS angeles — PecaBed C Jason Morgan 
tram Mississippi. East Coast Hockey 
League. 

new jersey -L oaned G Frederic Henry to 
Albany. AHL 

PHOENIX -Recalled D Deron Quint from 
5pringfletaL AHL 

Pittsburgh— A nnounced retirement of C 
Mario Lemlrux. effective at end of season. 

couxoe 

COLORADO— Announced G Chauncey 
Billups will forgo Anal two years of eilglbltty 
and enter the NBA draff. 

west viRMNU—Announced F Gordon 
Malone wilt forego his final season of eL 
tglbWiy to enter the NBA Draff. 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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PACE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1997 


OBSERVER 


Back to the Bookcase 


The Far Side of Pianist Mitsuko Uchida 



By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Reading 
matter 

“Inside U.S.A.” by John 
Gunther is an absolutely ter- 
rific book. Example from 
Gunther's minute-by-minute 
diary of a day with New York 
City Mayor Fiorello La 
Guardi a; “ 10.55 A.M. The 
mayor said, ‘This Ls a lull. I 
had planned to open a tunnel. ' 
So I had a chance to ask some 
questions. But not many. Lull 
lasted until 10.58.” 

It took Gunther more than 
900 pages to create this por- 
trait of America in the late 
1940s. Published in 1947. it 
returns from oblivion in a new 
50th anniversary edition. 
Gunther was a superb reporter 
with no axes to grind, and his 
book is a tribute to the ancient 
virtues of objective reporting. 
As the jacket blurb says, you 
“may be astonished”' to see 
how the country has changed 


One respect in which 1947 
America excelled the 1997 
model was that it did not pro- 
duce books like “Microsoft 
Word: Users Guide.” This is 
the worst computer manual 
ever written. I embarked at 
page 1 determined to master 
the technique of writing 
“Now is the time for all good 
men to come to the et cetera” 
on my screen. 

By page 4. 1 was lost in a 
bog of incomprehensible in- 
structions for using some- 
thing called “toolbars.” 

For relief 1 turned to Anne 
Bronte and “The Tenant of 
Wildfell Hall.” What a relief. 
Since the reader is always 50 
pages ahead of the author in 
this Victorian potboiler it is 
possible to nap for an hour 
and not miss a thing. 

When not dozing, one 
yearns to cry. * ‘Get on with it. 


Anne. We ail knew Arthur 
was a bounder even before 
noble, love-besotted, silly, 
unobservant Helen married 
him 80 pages ago.” 

Sister Charlotte Bronte's 
masterpiece, “Jane Eyre.” is 
the father and mother of the 
Gothic romance, unsurpassed 
to this day even by Georgette 
Heyer. Sister Emily’s “\Vuth- 
ering Heights” is nearly as 
good 

Here's a new book to look 
forward to: Roy Jenkins' bi- 
ography of Gladstone. It is 
63 1 pages long. Though I put 
it aside at page 28. 1 intend to 
read the next 603 before the 
next- few years are oul 

Why? Not because every- 
one should know plenty about 
Gladstone, but because the 
writing is so good. 

I put him aside now only 
because of a commitment to 
Francis Parfeman's “France 
and England in North Amer- 
ica.” which runs to some 
2.900 pages in the Library of 
America editions. Columnists 
ought to know that primitive 
history of the continent before 
they presume to dilate on the 
present state of the world 

You. however, may not be 
a column isl If not. here's a 
swell read: John Dos Passos’ 
“U.S.A.,” also in a Library 
of America edition. It re- 
minds you of an age when we 
bad an authentic radical tra- 
dition instead of today's 
milksoppy “liberalism.” 

Its thumbnail sketches 
(“Tin Lizzie," “The Un- 
known Soldier.'* e.g.) are 
American writing at its best. 
And speaking of best, here is 
Sherwood Anderson's 
“Winesburg. Ohio.” pub- 
lished in 1919. Does anybody 
still read it? This copy came 
from a used-book sale. A 
treasure for only 50 cents. 

Yes. Virginia, if the Inter- 
net fails, life can still go on. 

New York Times Sen-ice 


By Dinitia Smith 

New York Timej Serin 

N EW YORK — “I have not a clue 
about late Beethoven!” the pi- 
anist Mitsuko Uchida said with a little 
giggle. “But then, who has got a 
clue?” 

The remark seemed disingenuous, 
coming from one of the world's fore- 
most concert pi anis ts. But then, this is 
a virtuoso with a sense of humor who 
reads “Calvin and Hobbes” and 
“The Far Side" when she is not 
studying Goethe or Heine in prep- 
aration for playing Schubert. 

Uchida was in New York preparing 
for a series of recitals in New York 
and Boston. 

Her twice-annual New York ap- 
pearances have become hot tickets, 
almost like rock concerts for the in- 
telligentsia, attended by celebrities 
(often stylishly in black) including 
her friends Susan Sontag and Annie 
Leibovitz. 

They are drawn to Uchida 's play- 
ing, of course. The notes ripple across 
the piano like drops of water on crys- 
tal. Her interpretations are etched, 
delicate, seeming to envelope the 
audience in a diaphanous cloud. Uch 
But the concerts are also a visual 
spectacle. Uchida. usually dressed in a flow- 
ing top and skirt, sweeps her arms dra- 
matically across the keyboard. She trembles 



:W« KraMdVThc V" York TkmCT 

Uchida's listeners come for more than the music; her concerts are also a visual spectacle. 


series of sonatas in London. With Schubert, 
the Beethoven sonatas, Berg. Webern and 


wanted to play Beethoven,' ' she said simply. 
“Beethoven is the most intense composer that 


with feeling, her face suffused with a kind of States in 1995. Uchida has mastered works 
rapturous sorrow, a face compared to that of that require intense physical stamina and 
a figure by the 19th-century artist Hokusai, intellectual power ana that have mostly at- 


“She dazzles her listeners,” the critic Allan 
Kozinn wrote in The New York Times, 
praising her “speed, precision and power.” 
Uchida t alks about music with passion and 
intensity. This month, she releases her first 
recording of Schubert, the composer, she said, 
whose work best reflects her own inner life. 
“Schubert has this incredible loneliness." 
she said. “Schubert had plenty of hopeless- 
ness, yet he can bring out happiness.” 

It took Uchida years, she said, to decide 
where to record the Schubert and even what 
piano to use. She finally recorded his Im- 
promptus (Op. 90. D899, and Op. 142. 
D935) last September at the Musikverein in 
Vienna on her own 1962 Steinway. 

In recent years Uchida has extended her 
repertory far beyond the Mozart that made 
her famous in 1982, when she performed a 


Schoenberg, which she played in the United - ever lived. It's frightening. But if I don't feel 
States in 1995. Uchida has mastered works a struggle with Beethoven. I don't like it** ■ 
that require intense physical stamina and Uchida was bom in Japan in 1948, die 
intellectual power ana that have mostly at- daughter ofFujio Uchida, aJapanese diplomat 
tracted male virtuosos. who had been stationed in the Japanese Em- 

“ Beethoven, Schubert, Schoenberg, Berg bassy in Berlin during Worid War IL At the 


tracted male virtuosos. u 

* ' Beethoven, Schubert, Schoenberg, Berg b 
imply a type of pianist who is intellectual.” e 
said Jeffrey Tate, who conducted the En glish ft 
Chamber Orchestra when Uchida recorded e. 
Mozart's concertos. “That's not always as- tl 
so dated with female soloists. Mitsuko was h 
doomed to play this! ’ ' Ja 

Uchida's recital series this spiring is a daring sa 
mix: the intense romanticism of Sch umann 
(“Davidsbundlerranze”). the bravura of aj 
Beethoven (Sonata in C minor. Op. 1 11), the T 
pristine intellectuality of Berg ( Sonata. Op. I ). * * 
All in the same concert, she was asked? “Bern 
and Schumann are actually very close to each st 


| mm frustrated- His technique was very 

. V limited.” „ .... 

Yet when she was 16 and her father 

was sent back to Berlin, she chose to 
stay in Vienna, living by herself in a 
youth hostel so she could continue 
studying with Hauser. She was 20 

when she won first prize in the Beeth- 
oven Competition in Vienna, and the 
next year she was second artfac Chop- 
in Competition in Warsaw. 

At 22, Uchida left Vienna for Lon- 
don- “If you arc a musician, unless 
you can kick it off, you will be stuck 
in Vienna forever.** she said. And she 
never wanted to live in Japan because 
“Japan has nothing to do with West- 
ern music.” 

In 1982. Uchida made her repu- 
tation when she played all 17 Mozart 
sonatas cm successive Tuesdays at 
Wigraore Hall in London. Rarely are 
the sonatas played in a cycle, and 
Londoners flocked to the event. Then, 
from the fall of 1985 to the summer of 
1986, she played 21 of the concertos. 

. Her latest recording, of the Beeth- 
oven Piano Concertos No. 3 and No. 
4, was with the Royal Concertee- 

bouw Orchestra, conducted fry Kurt 

Sander Ling. “It was very selfish.” 
>. she said of the Beethoven recording. 

She wanted to record with Sanderiing 
while there was still time, she said. 

“He is 85 this year. I wanted to see what 
happens between the two of us.” 

She has also been stubborn in her affection 
for the Second Viennese School (Schoen- 
berg, Berg and Webern) and for modem 
composers. Last year she played Sir Harrison 
Birtwistle’s piano concerto “Antiphonies,” 


end of the war, he was arrested and interned with the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orches - 


for three months in the United Stales. She was tra and Pierre Boulez in the U. S. premiere, 
exposed to Western music through her fa- “I was never sure if we were together by 
tber’s European records. He also insisted that mistake or apart by mistake,” she said with a 
his children learn an instrument. “But in. laugh. “Excuse me! It became a big 


Japan, you don't show you love music,” she mess. ' ' 
said. “It’s a sort of duty.” When Uchida is not traveling, she lives on 

When Uchida was 12, her father was Portobello Road in London, in a house next 
listed Japan’s ambassador to Austria, door to that of her companion of nearly 20 
move was a tremendous culture shock,, years, Robert Cooper, a British diplomat 
enormously difficult time,” she said. stationed in Bonn. 

Imost immediately, she immersed her- She has never married, and her career 
in the piano. She began studying with the “would not have been possible if I had had a 
wned teacher Richard Hauser at the Vi- child,” she said. “I would have made life 


other.” she said. “Schumann is whatever renowned teacher Richard Hauser at the Vi- 


German Romanticism is. And Berg has the 
romantic spirit in the 20th century. 

As for the Beethoven, his last sonata, “I 


“an enormously difficult time,” she said. 

Almost immediately, she immersed her- 
self in the piano. She began studying with the 


enna Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. It hell for a child. And I would have been 


was never an easy relationship, she said 
“He was a very intelligent musician — and 


frustrated because I would not have bad time 
for my music.” 


PEOPLE 


F IFTY students have signed up for 
the latest pop culture course at the 
University of Amsterdam: a 40-hour 
class on Madonna. “As a media phe- 
nomenon. she’s really intriguing,” Mo- 
nique Tolk. a student, told De Telegraaf 
newspaper. The for-credit course ex- 
amines Madonna's lyrics and voice, and 
ventures into her film work as well as 
her persona as a sex symbol, her re- 
ligious beliefs and most of all. her me- 
dia presence. Students say it’s 
Madonna's media savvy — not her mu- 
sic — that has drawn them to the class. 
Tolk. who's doing her doctorate on the 
singer, said she prefers Sting. 


The Chinese filmmaker Chen Kaige 
has a surprise choice for the lead role in 
his next film — fellow director Zhang 
Yimou. Chen, who won international 
acclaim for “Yellow Earth” and 
“Farewell My Concubine.” said he 
hoped to work out a deal by next week to 
snare Zhang' for “Assassins.” “It’s a 
little risky.” Chen said. “He’s been a 
director for years, but he hasn't played 


any pan recently. I just think he has a 
great face.” Zhang has directed inter- 
national hits such as “Red Sorghum.” 
“Raise the Red Lantern,” “The Story 
of Qiu Ju" and “To Live.” 


Christopher Reeve has completed 
his directorial debut, a film that will be 
shown on the HBO television network. 
Reeve, who was paralyzed from the 
neck down in a riding accident two years 
ago. directed Glenn Close, Whoopi 
Goldberg and Bridget Fonda in “In 
the Gloaming,’ ’ about ayoung man who 
returns home to die and revives the love 
and connections in his family. The actor, 
who still breathes with a respirator, dir- 
ected using a video monitor and a two- 
way microphone. “Of course, I talked 
very privately a lot of the time, but I 
could communicate with the set at all 
times and they with me,” Reeve said. 


Elizabeth Taylor is free to marry 
again. She's officially divorced from 
Larry Fortensky. husband No. 7 (No. 


8, if you count Richard Burton twice). 
The actress’s lawyer described die set- 
tlement as amicable and refused to re- 
veal financial details, but she said re- 
ports that Fortensky was getting SI .5 
million were "too high.” They were 
married Oct. 6, 1991, in a ceremony at 
Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch. 
Taylor filed for divorce in February 
1996, citing irreconcilable differences. 


Sylvester Stallone and his compan- 
ion, the model Jennifer Flavin, plan to 
many within the next several months, 
according to Stallone’s publicist They 
have a 7-month-old daughter, Sophia 
Rose, who underwent surgery in Nov- 
ember to dose a hole in her heart. 


A judge issued an arrest warrant for 
the father of die “Horae Alone” star, 
Macaulay Culkin.forfatiing to show up 
in court to answer assault charges stem- 
ming from a brawl with a photographer 
last month. Christopher (Kit) Culkin is 
accused of punching a news photograph- 


er who tried to take his picture on March 
4 outside bis New York City apartment 
building. Andy Uzde, the New York 
Post photographer who filed the police 
report, claimed Calkin grabbed him 
around the neck and punched him in the 
face, leaving him with blurred vision in 
one eye. Last week. Patricia Brentrup, 
Macaulay's mother, won custody of die 
actor and five of his siblings as well as 
control of his S17 million fortune. 


The Everglades crusader Marjory 
Stoneman Douglas correctly predicted 
that she’d live to be 1 07. Now her aim is 
1 15. Douglas rested through much of 
her 107th birthday, as friends gathered 
at a groundbreaking ceremony for an 
environmental-education center next to 
the small cottage where she’s Uved 
since 1926. It was the second birthday 
celebration in two days and a little too 
much activity for her, a longtime friend, 
Elisabeth Lilly, said. Douglas's 1947 
book. “The Eveiglades: River of 
Grass,” sounded die alarm about the 
perils of the ecosystem. 



AGENDA 


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Christopher Reeve with his wife and daughter at the premiere of his film. 


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