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INTERNATIONAL 



®ribunl 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 
R Paris, Wednesday, April 16, 1997 


No. 35.497 


Russians Rediscover 
Scapegoat: The Jews 

Unpopular Politicians of Any Stripe 
Are Tagged Jewish by Popular Mind 



By Ales sandra Stanley 

A/gw York Times Service ' 

MOSCOW — At a recent rally 
near Rea Square to protest the Rus- 
sian government's delays in paying 
salaries and pensions, peopled rage 
quickly focused on a different cul- 
prit. 

‘‘Why are there no Russians in 
government?" Zinaida Piskunova 
screeched. "Why, why, why are there 
only Jews?" 

She is 46. a rosy-cheeked collec- 
tive farm worker from the city of 
Yaroslavl who wore a flowered ker- 
chief and a sandwich board that read, 
"Down With the Government, Zion- 
ist Know-It-Alls!" 

The people around her backed her 

Up l. 

"It’s true,” one man paid . "First 
Livshits and Yavlinsky, then 
Berezovsky and now Nemtsov. And 
Chubais, he’s probably a Jew, too." 

He was listing some of the most 
prominent Russian politicians asso- 
ciated with economic reform, even 
though not all are Jewish and not ail 
support the policies of President Boris 
Yeltsin’s government. 

But the presence of more Jews in 
high places than any time under the 
czars or since the Revolution of 1917 
is something that some Russians are 
depicting as sinister. 

Frustrated with the wrenching eco- 
nomic and social upheaval that fol- 
lowed the collapse of co mmunism, 
and the Soviet union, in 1991, and 
spurred on by po liticians willing, to 
tap their resentments, many people 
are retaining to a traditional scape- 
goat: Jews. 

"It is no longer shameful to be 
Jewish in Russia,’*; said Tankred 1 
GolenpoJsky, the editor of the In- 
ternational Jewish Newspaper, pub- 
lished here. “And so there is a reflex 


reaction against that revivaL" . 

Mr. GoTenpcdsky, who also leads 
the Anti-Defamation Committee of 
the Russian Jewish Congress, which 
was founded last year, added: 
"Nobody is hiding the fact they are 
Jewish anymore, ami that plays on the 
nerves of many people, particularly 
during this economic crisis. People 
want a scapegoat" 

Overt anti-Semitism is mostly at 
the fringes of society, and it has been 
flourishing there ever since die mid- 
1980s, when President Mikhail 
Gorbachev’s progr am of glasnost un- 
leashed all kinds of grass-roots chau- 
vinism, from the Siberian writers and 
RussophiJc revivalists to its more vir- 
ulent form in the pages ofPamyatand 
other extreme nationalist newspa- 
pers.- 

The Arm-Defamation Committee 
classifies about 200 newspapers in 
Russia as openly anti-Semitic, but 
most are cheap newsletters with a 
small readership. Bigotry is most, 
splashily displayed in the pages of die 
nationalist and pro-Commtmist news- 
paper Zavtra or in the poWic rantings 
of Vladimir Zhirinovsky, the extreme 
nationalist- politician, ainrf other pur- 
veyors of a Jewish conspiracy theory. 

There are isolated cases of van- 
dalism and violence: A bomb went off 
in one of Moscow’s main synagogues 
last year. And there are occasional 
reposts of Jewish _graves being de- 
secrated' in the provinces. But gen- 
erally, there is scant evidence that 
militant anti-Semites are. acting. on 
their viler prejudices. 

- The paradox of anti-Semitism in 
Russia today is that in most ways, life 
for Jews has never been better. 

The state-sponsored discrimina- 
tion of fee Soviet era has been ab- 
olished, opening doors to the highest 

See JEWS, Page 6 


’s Fans 


From Mailer to Dinkins to Cuomo, Memories 
Of First Black to Play in Majors 50 Years Ago 


By Bruce Weber 

• , New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — For Norman Mailer, 
Jackie Robinson was a hero of literary 
proportions. 

"He became a heroic figure because 
he was a protagonist,’' said Mr. Mailer, 
who recalled mat he was living in the 
borough of Brooklyn, putting the fin- 
ishing touches on his first novel, "The 
Naked and the Dead," when Robinson 
joined the Brooklyn Dodgers. “And not 
only that, everyone knew he was a prot- 
agonist." 

Frfty years ago Tuesday, on April 15, 
1947, Robinson, fee first black man to 
play in the major leagues in the 20th 
century, sauntered onto the Ebbets Reid 
infield for his first game as a Brooklyn 
Dodger. In doing so, be left an indelible 
mark on a generation. 

- For Ira Glasser, fee executive director 
of the American Civil liberties Union, 
Jackie Robinson, with his reckless atb- 


The Associated Press 

JERUSALEM — After a three- 
month investigation, the police have 
recommended that Prime Minister Ben- 
jamin Netanyahu's top aide, the justice 
minister and a political ally be mdicted 
in an influence-trading scandal, Israeli 

television repeated Tuesday. 

The police said that they would not 
make their recommendations public and 
that it was up to the state prosecutor to 
decide whether to act on tbem. 

There was no recommendation con- 
cerning Mr. Netanyahu, who was ques- 
tioned by the police and initially warned 
that he could face charges in fee rase. 

Even if indictments are handed down, 
the Netanyahu government is not ex- 

‘ Newsstand Prices 

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Cameroon ..1.600 CFA R&nion 12.50 FF 

i Egypt -£E 550 Sautfi AraMa-ldOO R. 

France 10-00 FF 8***! 1,100 CFA 

Gabon 7 TOO CFA ppsFTAS 

Italy - TunSa - 1.250 Bn 

SSS^SSS u£T— *■»; 

Lebanon LL1000 



pected to fell over allegations feat senior 
officials conspired to appoint a political 
crony as attorney generaL 

The investigation centered on alle- 
gations feat Mr. Netanyahu’s appoint- 
ment of an attorney general was pari of a 

deal to win favorable treatment for Ax- 
ieh Deri, who faced trial on corruption 
charges. 

According to Israel TV, investigators 
have now recommended bribery charges 
against Mr. Deri, fee leader of the rig- 
orously Orthodox Sbas Party, which is a 
member of the governing coalition. 

Israel TV first reported the case in 
January, saying feat Mr. Deri threatened 
to withdraw bis party’s support in a 
dose cabinet vote on Israel’s withdraw- 
al from the West Bank town of Hebron 
unless Roni Bar-On was appointed at- 
torney generaL 

Justice Minister Tsachi Hanegbi did 
appoint Mr. Bar-On, but he resigned a 
day later after a controversy arose over 
his qualifications. 

On Tuesday, Mr. Hanegbi sat in his 
office while the state prosecutor, Edna 
ArbeL a few offices away, reviewed a 
police recommendation to charge her 
boss wife fraud and breach of trust. She 
is expected to decide in the next few 
days. 

Television’s Channel 2 said that 
Avigdor Lieberman. Mr. Netanyahu’s 

See ISRAEL, Page 6 


3§sl !|f . 



Doito Knasofic/ReiMn 

SARAJEVO PARADE — A Bosnian girl leaning against her father’s wheelchair on Tuesday as he and 
other war wounded watched a military parade in Kosevo stadium in the Bosnian capital. A total of 2300 
soldiers from afl five corps of the Bosnian Army marched to celebrate the army’s fifth anniversary. 

Belgian Panel Faults Police in Murders 


By Tom Bueride 

huemaiiotuil Herald Tribu te 

BRUSSELS — A parliamentary com- 
mittee investigating a pedophile scandal 
said Tuesday that five young girls might 
be alive today if not for gross blunders 
and rivalries on the part of fee police and 
magistrates investigating fee known 
child rapists charged in fee killings. 

The committee was scathing in its 
criticisms and recommended the dis- 
missal of fee chief Brussels prosecutor, 
along wife dozens of other judicial and 
police changes. 

But it left open the question that 
everyone here has been asking since the 


bodies of the first victims were dis- 
covered last August: Did fee alleged 
killers benefit from official incompe- 
tence or were they protected by people 
in high places? 

The committee will pursue feat ques- 
tion for six more months, and its mem- 
bers did not conceal their strong sus- 
picions. The report said the committee 
"finds it difficult not to conclude" that 
the three men charged in the deaths 
"and their accomplices may have been 
protected." 

The report drew an immediate call for 
punishment for officials found respon- 
sible from Jean-Denis Lejeune. His 8- 
y ear-old daughter, Julie, and her girl- 


friend died of starvation after being 
sexually abused and locked in a dun- 
geon beneath the home of Marc 
Dutroux, the chief suspect in four of the 
deaths. 

"What the commission has done is 
make public what we have been saying 
since the disappearance of our chil- 
dren," Mr. Lejeune said. “It’s clear 
there are people in fee police and justice 
departments who are not worthy of 
working there." 

The 310-page report compiled a lit- 
any of errors uncovered by six months 
of hearings involving more than 100 

See BELGIUM, Page 6 


% t ?■ 


Seoul’s ‘Language Cops’ 

An Official Backlash Against English Tutors 


letirism, his peculiar, pigeon-toed gait, 
was a moral example. 

“The way he tranced off third base 
became a metaphor for tire struggle 
against injustice, ’ Mr. Glasser said, re- 
membering that when he was growing 
up in Brooklyn, it was Robinson, not 
Carl Furillo or Pee Wee Reese, that he 
and all his friends would imitate in their 
sandlot ball games. 

‘ 'There was a defiance," Mr. Glasser 
said. "adaring,a persistence, a s tamin a. 
I don’t think this was conscious, but 
decades later it became apparent to me. 
In the 1960s, every adult my age who 
came to the ACLU was a Dodger fan 
and had the same feeling about Robin- 
son that I had. 

"Statistically, this was impossible, 
but it was then I realized that it Was fee 
Yanke e fans who grew up to believe in 
oil depletion allowances, and that it was 
Dodger fans who grew up to be civil 
rights activists." 

For David Dinkins, the former mayor 


g L-3- $•* c. t- 


mi 


A rendering of a new U.S. coin 
commemorating Jackie Robinson. 

of New York who was a student at 
Howard University in Washington in 
1 947. Robinson’s ascent to the Dodgers 
was a candle of hope. 

"It was really amazing to wake up one 
day and find Jackie Robinson playing in 
Brooklyn,” Mr. Dinkins said. "It was a 
really big deaL I went to Brooklyn Law 
School because I was a Dodger fan." 

For Mario Cuomo, tire former New 

See ROBINSON, Page 3 


By Mary Jordan 

Washington Poa Service 

SEOUL — Koh Hye Ryon spends 
hundreds of dollars a month sending her 
second-grader to private English les- 
sons because, she said, "the world is 
getting smaller and you need English to 
survive.” 

But if she continues to send him to a 
tutor next year, she could get arrested by 
the "language police" and face a year 
injaiL 

The South Korean government, in an 
effort to curb tire huge sums of money 
families spend on private lessons, has 
banned such tutoring in any subject 
offered during the regular school day, 
with the exception of an and music. 

“I am so angry about tins” said Mrs. 
Koh, who is caught up in this nation’s 
zealous drive to learn English, a move- 
ment that has spawned a multi billion- 
doll ar industry of language tapes, books, 
schools and tutoring. "It isn’t fair," 

Just about every major company offers 
its workers free English lessons. Amer- 


icans, many of them spouses of U.S. 
military officers, are stopped in grocery 
stores by strangers wbo ask, and some- 
times beg. them to teach English. 

On weekends, waves of South 
Korean elementary school children 
enter U.S. military bases for private 
language lessons. Just about any Amer- 
ican wife a college degree can earn more 
than $100 an hour explaining that two 
plus two equals four, but too plus too 
does not. 

The number of foreigners teaching 
English legally here has almost doubled 
since 1995, to 7,000. The number of 
people who are teaching English ille- 
gally is exploding, and they are earning 
suitcases of cash doing it. 

The English language craze — pro- 
pelled partly by President Kim Young 
Sam’s making “globalization" the 
catchword of ms administration — has 
even touched off a snit between Amer- 
ican and British diplomats, wife the 
British complaining that the Americans 

See ENGLISH, Page 6 


U.S. Raises 

Korean Aid 
Amid Fears 
Of Famine 

Washington Denies 
Using Bait to Get 
Pyongyang to Talks 

By Brian Knowlton 

InternJliorul Herald Trthu/W 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States, in a move wife humanitarian and 
diplomatic reverberations, said Tuesday 
that it would provide S15 million in new 
food aid to North Korea, a donation 50 
percent larger than its last commitment. 

But a spokesman denied flatly that 
the aid was intended to secure Pyongy- 
ang's agreement to take part in peace 
talks wife U.S., South Korean and 
Chinese officials. 

The aid announcement came a day 
before Pyongyang is to inform the 
United States, at a meeting in New 
York, whether it will join the four-party 
negotiations. A South Korean official 
will be present at the meeting. 

Nicholas Bums, the Stale Depart- 
ment spokesman, said fee new aid was 
decided on after consultations with 
Seoul and Tokyo. He explicitly rejected 
any linkage to Pyongyang’s demands. 

‘‘There is no relationship between fee 
announcement by fee United States 
today on food aid (o fee political dis- 
cussions that will take place tomor- 
row," he said. “We view fee issue of 
food for children as a humanitarian is- 
sue only. 

"It is not linked to politics." he said, 
"nor should it be.” 

But the decision appeared to show up 
a rift, or at least a difference in em- 
phasis. between fee U.S. military and 
diplomatic establishments. 

Late last week, while in Seoul. De- 
fense Secretary William Cohen de- 
nounced North Korea's focus on its 
military and said large levels of aid were 
unlikely until Pyongyang began redu- 
cing its threat to fee South. 

Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright has said that aid to the North is 
necessary to avoid instability. 

There have been mounting signs of a 
potentially disastrous famine this sum- 
mer in North Korea, and some U.S. 
officials say they fear tensions there 
could provoke dangerous incidents 
along fee demilitarized zone dividing 
fee Korean Peninsula. 

Catherine Bertini. executive director 
of fee UN World Food Program, which 
is overseeing fee aid effort, said the new 
U.S. assistance pledge was “extremely 
welcome." The aid would go to feed 
children under 6 years, she said. 

The food program has called on na- 
tions to provide $95.5 million in aid. 
Before Tuesday's announcement, about 
$22 million had been raised. 

North Korean government food 
stocks are expected to run out by June, 
Ms. Bertini said from Rome. Famine 
could reach severe proportions before 
the autumn harvest, she added. 

The food program hopes to provide a 
total of 203.000 metric tons of food to 
the Norfe. 

But even if nongovernmental orga- 
nizations were to provide an additional 
100,000 tons, said Trevor Rowe, a food 
program spokesman, fee shortfall would 
still be an estimated 1 million tons. 

See KOREA, Page 6 


3 Indictments Forecast 
In Israel Cabinet Inquiry 


AOENPA 

A Fire Outside Mecca Kills 181 Pilgrims 












DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (Re- 
uters) — Saudi state radio said 181 
M uslim pilgrims were killed and about 
800 were injured Tuesday by a fire that 
broke out in a tent city near Mecca. 

The fire raged through about 50.000 
tents on the plain of Mena, where about 
2 million Muslims had gathered for fee 
start of fee annual hajj rite, diplomats 

Stocks Soar on News 
Of Stable U.S. Prices 

U.S. markets rallied Tuesday on re- 
ports of a meager increase in fee con- 
sumer price index in March, continu- 
ing a comeback that began Monday. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, 
which rose 60.21 points Monday as 
several U.5. companies issued surpris- 
ingly strong earnings reports, surged 
an additional 135.26 points to close at 
6,587.16. The two-day surge more 
than canceled out a 248-point drop 
Friday in response to a report on 
wholesale prices that fueled fears of a 
return of inflation. Page 21 . 


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ZAIRE POWER PLAY — A rebel soldier gesturing Tuesday in 
Lubnmbasbi, entered a day earlier by the rebel leader Laurent Kabila. 
Meanwhile, protests again brought Kinshasa to a halt Page 6. 


Books 

Paoik 11 

Crossword 

Pamll 

Opinion „ 

.... Pages 10.11. 

Smuts 

... PaPK YT 71 


International Classified 

Pages. 

| The IHT on-line http:, 

:7vvw'.v.iht.com | 


said. It was thought to have been 
caused by fee explosion of a gas cyl- 
inder. 

Official news organizations report- 
ed feat fee fire began at 1 1.45 A.M. 
and spread quickly in high winds. It 
was extinguished shortly after 3 P.M., 
they said. The injured were taken to 
hospitals in Mecca. 


The Dollar 


New York Tuesday Q 4 P.M previous dose 
PH 1.727 1.7315 

Pound 1.S28B 1.6205 

Yen 126125 126.63 

FF 5.8126 5.B17 


+135.26 6587.16 6451.90 

change Tuesday O 4 P.M. previous doss 
+1099 754.72 743.73 

PAGE TWO 

Europe's Showcase for VS. Culture 

THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

New Republican Attacks on Reno 

ASIA/PACIFIC Page 4. 

China Sidesteps Censure on Rights 

INTERNATIONAL Page 6. 

Ukraine Quits Iran Reactor Deal 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY APRIL 16, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


John Adams Institute / Showing the Hidden Face of America 


In Amsterdam, a Showcase for U.S. Culture 


Cairo Daily Drops ^ 
Israeli Cartoonist 


A MSTERDAM — In a handsome 
mansion here, almost four cen- 
turies ago. a group of Dutch mer- 
chants and politicians examined a 
crude map and made their faceful decision: 
they would buy the faraway island of Man- 
hattan and build a fort there that they would 
call New Amsterdam. 

Today, the affairs of New Netherlands, an 
embryo of the United Stares, are once again 
at hand in this historic Amsterdam building, 
the headquarters of the once powerhil Dutch 
West India Co. It is not commerce, though, 
but American writing and thought that are 
now being discussed and analyzed. 

What's more, at a rime when Congress is 
squeezing the budget for American diplo- 
macy and the United States' image abroad 
is increasingly shaped by Hollywood and 
McDonald's, the flag- waving for Amer- 
ican culture taking place here is being paid 
for by the Dutch. 

At issue is the John Adams Institute, a 
modest but vigorous private cultural center 
that offers an unusual window on American 
literature and ideas. Created by a small 
group of local citizens in 1987. the center 
brings prominent Americans here to read 
their poetry, join debates, discuss their nov- 
els or pontificate on the past or the future. 

By setting up a rich range of encounters 
with the likes of John Kenneth Galbraith. 
Amy Tan and Saul Bellow, the institute has 
turned itself into a prestigious fixture on the 
city's lively literary scene. 

‘ ‘We try to show some ol the hidden face 
of America,” said Anne Wertheim, the 
institute's director and driving force. 
"What do Dutch people see? They may see 
CNN and Disney World near Paris ana the 
movies. They see the commercial on- 
slaught of America in which some of the 
most interesting parts remain concealed.” 


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board of the Dutch West India Co, com- 
missioned Cryn Fredericksz to build Fort 
Amsterdam. And it .was here, some time 
later, that it named Peter Stuyvesant the 
first governor of its short-lived possessions 
along the Hudson. 

Over the years, (he mansion served as 
hotel, orphanage, home for the elderly and 
warehouse. In 1975 it was badly damaged 
in afire. 

After its restoration, the owner, a private 
foundation, sought a suitable tenant, and 
the idea for an American center was bom. 

"It was named after John Adams, the 
president,” Mrs. Wertheim said, “because 
he was the first American ambassador here 
and for a while he lived in a canal house 
nearby.” 

Ho alen emt hie con Tnhn fliiiilru ths-rt 


A Rival Publication s Protest 
Cited Lurie's Service in Army 


By Douglas Jehl 

Sen- York Times Service 


meat that appeared in A1 
Ahram on Monday said thar 


He also sent his son John Quincy, then 
i. to the nearby Amsterdam Latin School 


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R emarkably, although speak- 
ers are paid no fees because the 
institute cannot afford any. it has 
nonetheless drawn a range of 
prominent Americans who back home can 
command high sums on the lucrative lec- 
ture circuit. 

“Some people may come because they 
like Amsterdam or because they'd like to 
discover iti” Mrs. Wertheim said, citing 


I • 

• . . 



13. to the nearby Amsterdam Latin School 
in 1780. But the future sixth president of the 
United States was expelled for disobedi- 
ence. and the headmaster pronounced him a 
bad influence on his “amiable” younger 
brother Charles. 

By 1782, John Adams had managed to 
raise 5 million guilders among the bankers 
of Amsterdam, then Europe’s money mar- 
ket. The money became the American Con- 
gress’s first loan from abroad. 


CAIRO— Egypt’s leading 
newspaper has announced 
that it is suspending publi- 
cation of work by an Israeli - 
American political cartoonist 
because of complaints that he 
once served in the Israeli 
Army. 

The decision by the news- 
paper, Al Ahram, was in re- 
sponse to a fierce campaign 
waged by a rival Egyptian 
publication against the car- 
toonist, Ranan Lurie, and it 
showed how sensitive ties to 
Israel have once again be- 
come in Egypt even after the 
18 years in which the two 
countries have formally been 
at peace. 

Mr. Lurie, the world’s 


OME of that early bonding appears 
to survive, at least on this side of the 
ocean. The mayor of Amsterdam, 
Schelto Patijn, dropped by on a 


most widely syndicated car- 
toonist, had been repeatedly 
attacked since he began to 
draw a daily cartoon for Al 
Ahram last month. 

In addition to other things, 
the popular magazine Rose al 
Youssef asserted that Mr. 
Lurie, 64, had been a “mur- 
derer” who had taken part in 
massacres of Egyptian sol- 
diers during the Arab-Israeli 
wars. 

Nineteen top Egyptian car- 
toonists had also submitted a 
petition to Al Ahram de- 
manding that it stop publish- 
ing' Mr. Lurie’s cartoons, 
which they said violated the 
rules of the country's press 
syndicate, which bars jour- 
nalists and news organiza- 
tions from joining in the nor- 
malization of relations with 
Israel. 

Mohammed Abdel Mon- 
eim, the managing editor, of 
Al Ahram, said in an inter- 
view that be believed that an 
investigation would prove, 
that the more lurid charges 
against Mr. Lurie were false. 

But in the current political 
environment, a time of in- 
tense Arab hostility toward 
Israel’s conservative govern- 
ment, Mr. Abdel Moneira 
said that it had become im- 
possible for the newspaper 
“to staid as one against so 
many;” 

A front-page announce- 


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Anne Wertheim, the director of the John Adams Institute in Amsterdam. 


past appearances by Stephen Jay Gould. E. 
Annie Proulx and Francis Fukuyama. 


Annie Proulx and Francis Fukuyama. 

On a visit here. Gore Vidal scribbled on 
an invitation going out to Susan Sontag. 
“You should come, Susan, the audience is 
great” (She did.) 

It is true that writers are revered in this 
country, which has one of the world's 
largest per- capita book sales figures, and 
even mote so in Amsterdam, city of pub- 
lishers. bookstores and literary circles. 

More unusual is that the institute can 
survive on mostly private donations in a 
country that, like much of Europe, is ad- 


dicted to government financing of culture. 

Part of its secret is minimalism. In con- 
trast to the ambitious newly built American 
Center in Paris, which could not afford its 
S6-million annual operating costs and had 
to close last year, the John Adams Institute 
gets by on an annual budget of $130,000. 
This covers two employees, rent, office 
expenses and speakers’ travel. 

Mrs. Wertheim said she was nonetheless 
forced to beg for discounts and contri- 
butions; plans for a library, courses and 
performances have had to be scratched. 
The U.S. Information Agency gives close 
to $5,000 a year, which barely covers post- 


age. Surprisingly, most of the budget is 
donated by Dutch companies that do busi- 
ness in the United States. 

Why would Dutch business people pay 
for the promotion of American thought and 
literature in the Netherlands? Behind this 
fervor is not only pragmatism but also the 
link with New Amsterdam, later renamed 
New York, which is remembered by the 
history-conscious Dutch. Most of all. there 
is the building. 

The early 17th-century mansion at 97 
Heren Market is sometimes called the 
birthplace of New York. For it was here, in 
1 625, in die oak-beamed main hall, that the 


1 0th anniversary. He declared how pleased 
he was (hot it was “alive and kidting,” all 
the more so because he was “an ardent 
reader of American literature.” 

Alfons Lammers. a professor of Amer- 
ican history at Leiden university, preferred 
irony and said Americans had the strong 
belief that “the Dutch and the rest of 
Europe embrace all things American more 
or less spontaneously.” 

Therefore, he quipped on the podium, one 
way to help the financially constrained John 
Adams Institute would be to bring back, at 
least temporarily, “a healthy dose of old- 
fashioned Dutch anti-Americanism.” 

The main speaker on this anniversary 
night was the novelist Malcolm Bradbury, 
who, although British, was deemed a most 
appropriate guest. 

His subject, and that of his latest book, 
“Dangerous Pilgrimages,” was how 19th- 
century American and European writers 
shaped the views of one another’s con- 
tinents and created “myths and fictions” 
about the other side of the Atlantic. 

There was laughter on the subject of 
piracy of artistic creations, now a pet com- 
plaint of American trade officials. Mr. Brad- 
bury said 19th-century American publishers 
simply ignored copyrights when widely re- 
printing European writers’ works. 

When Diaries Dickens and others pro- 
tested. he said, there were hostile reactions in 
the American press. Americans argued that 
“reprinting was part of the free market” 


Ahram on Monday said that 
the newspaper would suspend 
publication of Mr. Lurie’s 
cartoons “until allegations 
related to his participation in “ 
anti-Arab warfare have been 
verified.” 

Mr. Lurie, who now lives 
in Greenwich, Connecticut, 
has said (hat he served as a 
major in the Israeli Army in 
the 1967 war. and that he led 
an infantry unit in combat 
against forces of the Arab 
League. 

But in letters to Rose al 
Youssef and in Al Ahram, he 
has said he never Wiled Egyp- 
tians or took part in combat 
a ga i n st them, and has said his 
role in the 1967 war was “a 
reserve major defending my 
country.” 

“This is really justice at its 
worst,” Mr. Lurie said in a. 
telephone interview on a 
Monday, saying be feared r 
that Rose al Youssef and oth- 
er Egyptian publications that 
have been bitterly critical of 
Israel would be emboldened 
“to fabricate anything about 
anyone, knowing that it will 
be accepted as a fact that has 
to be investigated.” 

In the pages of Al Ahram, 
Mr. Lurie has been described 
only as an “international car- 
toonist,” but he said that the 
editors of the newspaper, the 
largest in the Arab worhL-had 
been fully aware that he was 
Jewish and held Israelias well ^ 
as American citizenship. r 

None of the cartoons that ' 
has been published in Al 
Ahram under the arrange- 
ment that began last month 
has shown evidence of a pro- 
Israel tilt. 

But ah Egyptian cartoonist 
who led the campaign against 
Mr. Lurie said that hishistcuy 
alone meant that his work had 
no proper place in an Arab 
newspaper. 

“Tile Israelis themselves 
have not forgotten their dead 
in Nazi Germany, so why 
should we forget our soldiers 
who died defending our 
land?” said the cartoonist, 
Gonxa Farahaf. 

“Lurie fought against us,” 
he said. * ' ' -*■ 



k\- 



rou 




' '*?-• it* 
■- 11 niX ' 


travel update Israel Finds a Friend in Turkey, Thanks to the Generals 


br.M 


Flights Slashed in French Strike 


PARIS < AFP) — Continuing strike action by workers angry 
at British Airways’ plans to merge its French airline sub- 
sidiaries TAT and Air Liberte cut flights by 60 percent 
Tuesday, the companies said. 

Pilots, mechanics and cabin crew have been on strike since 
last Wednesday over wages and conditions of service linked to 
the merger. On Tuesday, the companies said they were 
running 98 of 250 scheduled flights. They said no talks were 
planned with workers. 


By Stephen Kinzer 

Neve York Times Sen-ice 


Belgian Train Traffic Is Paralyzed 


BRUSSELS (AP) — Unions paralyzed train traffic through 
much of Belgium on Tuesday to protest a lack of consultations 
on the restructuring of the state-owned rail company, officials 
said. 

The strike turned the morning rush hour into a huge traffic 
jam. with main highways into the capital congested for several 
dozen kilometers. The strike hit six of Belgium’s 10 provinces 
and blocked most major rail lines, because they each move 
through several provinces. Two more 24-hour strikes are 
planned for next week. 


Continental Airlines Inc. said its request to fly daily 
direct flights between Newark. New Jersey, and Brazil had 
been approved by the Department of Transportation. The 
airline, beginning July 10, will fly between Newark and the 
cities of Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, pending final approval 
by die Brazilian government. (Bloomberg) 


ISTANBUL — When the fiery 
Islamic politician Necmettin 
Erbakan took office as Turkey’s 
prime minister last June, it was lo- 
gical ro expect that he would tone 
down his passionate denunciations of 
“Zionist imperialism” and stop call- 
ing for a jihad, or holy war. to liberate 
Jerusalem. But few expected to see 
him sitting down for a friendly chat 
with the Israeli foreign minister. 

That improbable meeting took 
place a week ago at the Foreign 
Ministry in Ankara. True to form, a 
group of protesters assembled in 
Istanbul to bum an Israeli flag and 
declare the visiting dignitary. David 
Levy, persona non grata. 

What was remarkable was not the 
protest but the fact that Mr. Erbakan, 
who a year ago might have led it, 
was now its target. 

During his visit. Mr. Levy met 
with several high-ranking Turkish 
officials in addition to me prime 


minister, discussing civilian cooper- 
ation and ways to increase trade. But 


undoubtedly his most substantive 
meeting was with the chief of the 
Turkish general staff. General Is- 
mail Hakki Karadayi. They re- 
viewed the rapidly expanding Turk- 
ish-Israeli security relationship and 
agreed to deepen it. 

Over the past two years. Turkey 
and Israel have quietly forged a re- 
markable program of military co- 
operation; in the process, they have 
established what is now the most 
powerful military friendship in the 
Middle East. 

The relationship is continuing to 
develop, improving the security of 
both countries even as relations be- 
tween Israel and the Palestinians 
deteriorate and as the entire region 
sees a rise in fundamentalist Islamic 
movements. 

In particular, the relationship can 
only make Israeli leaders more con- 
fident that they can take tough po- 
sitions in dealing with their Arab 
neighbors. An alliance with Turkey 
could go a long way toward neut- 
ralizing Syria in any major crisis. It 
also could make Syria think twice 
about stirring up trouble to Israel’s 


north, however preoccupied Israel 
may be with quelling unrest among 
the Palestinians. 

Solidarity between Turks and 
Jews stems in part from their com- 
mon history of conflict with Arabs. 

Turks ruled much of Arabia until 
early in this century, when their rule 
was overthrown in a series of Brit- 
ish-backed rebellions; Israel has 


now directing a $600 .million pro- 
grain to modernize Turkish fighter 


jets. Israeli pilots are practicing ma- 
neuvers in T urkey ’s vast airspace — 


neuversm Turkey s vast airspace — 
and, according to the International 
Institute for Strategic Studies, are 
“almost certainly” flying- recon- 
naissance missions aimed at nearby 


Tel Aviv in February and pledged 
Ankara’s friendship. > j 

Not surprisingly, nearby countries ’' 
have been sharply critical of Turkey. 

In February Leaders of Syria, Egypt 


and Saudi Arabia issued a joint ap- 
peal urging Turkey to reconsider, fr- 


countries such as Syria and Iraq. 
Turkish and Israeli cadets and of- 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


lived its whole national life in con- 
flict with some or all of its Arab 
neighbors. Today both countries 
count Syria and Iraq, together with 
Iran, as threats' to their security. 

Turkey’s military planners por- 
tray their country as caught inside a 
Bermuda T riangle of chaos, with the 
Middle East on one side, the Cau- 
casus on another and the Balkans, 
including their traditional rival 
Greece, oq the third. Like the Is- 
raelis, they feel the need for a strong 
friend nearby. 

These cold strategic calculations 
are the basis for a growing military 
relationship. Israeli technicians are 


fleers attend each other's military 
academies. Naval units hold ma- 
neuvers off each other's coasts. 

Some analysts predicted that 
these arrangements would collapse 
after Mr. Erbakan took office last 
year. If be had remained faithful to 
the oratory he used in his 30 years in 
opposition, they might have. 

But after he made some anti-Israel 
statements early in his term, the Turk- 
ish military, which views itself as the 
country’s long-term guardian above 
and beyond politics, stepped in. 

Publicly and privately, com- 
manders lectured Mr. Erbakan on 
the security value of Turiris h-Israeli 
ties. To show the world that they had 
convinced him, the senior com- 
mander, General Karadayi, flew to 


peal urging Turkey to reconsider. Ir- 
an and Greece also complained. The 
Turkish Foreign Ministry responded 
tartly that the wave of protest “does 
not concern us at all.” 

Many Tuxks, with the exception of 
pan-Islamists in Mr. Erbakan's 
party, seem to support their coun- 
try's embrace of Israel.' Despite 
widespread anger here at Israel’s 
treatment of Palestinians, they ap- 
pear to believe that the friendship is 
in their national interest. 

Evidently Mr. Erbakan agrees, 
which suggests that his Turkish na- 
tionalism is stronger than' his Is- 
lamic militancy. He also is bowing 
to a reality of Turkish political life ... | 
that has remained unchanged since$ >.■ 
the founding of the modem Turkish 
republic 74 years ago; In important 
security questions, the military 


*£■" 




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v'i.a.'T... 


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-Mtt jw 


makes key decisions, and the gov- 
ernment follows. 




Yeltsin, ‘Man of Year,’ Heads West 


WEATHER 



Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asia" 


*Jlona 


I«e a Uiur* Moior Yacht Built in 1087 
r. S'Jt-i'-im. Uj in 1: prw pin*- 

-rjf.'»p.llj>«ki;.ipeii:»ar, • i^ri unofrjnd \ j 


Conran Wtofr 


Teli +44 171 3817600 
Fax: +44 171 381 7601 

E-puif- wlrwramtiln-drinoii iO.uk 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — Boris 
Yeltsin travels to Germany on 
Wednesday for what should 
be a congratulatory slap on 
the back from Western public 
opinion and his friend Helmut 
Kohl, but which could see 
ticklish moments over NATO 
and looted an. 

The Russian president will 
receive a ' “Man of the Year” 
award from the German me- 
dia in the resort of Baden- 
Baden. an honor previously 
given to President Francois 
Mitterrand of France. Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Is- 


rael and Mr. Kohl himself. 

But despite a hearty per- 
sonal rapport between Mr. 
Yeltsin and Mr. Kohl, the 
talks between the leaders are 
likely to present some awk- 
ward moments. 

The serious business will 
focus on intensive efforts to 
negotiate a charter defining 
Russia's relationship with the 


North Atlantic Treaty Orga- 
nization, as well as on bi- 


FOR INVESTMENT 
INFORMATION 

Read 


even Sdlurdav 
in the IHT. ’ 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELOR'S * MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 

For Y.’oric. Lrfe met Academic tetewflee 
Through Convenient Home Study 
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fa* or s*nd d?24Ki NssijTie Tw 


nization, as well as on bi- 
lateral economic ties. 

Germany is Russia's 
biggest financial backer. It 
has been irritated by the Rus- 
sian Parliament's refusal to 
return a hoard of art treasures 
seized by the Red Anny from 
the defeated Nazis. 

Mr. Kohl told die Itar-Tass 
news agency on Monday he 
was confident in their “per- 
sonal trust and friendship.’ ’ 
He also predicted that Rus- 


sia’ s dispute with NATO over 
the alliance's plans to take in 
former Soviet-bloc countries 
as members ivouid be settled 
to mutual satisfaction. 

“I have no doubt there will 
be such a settlement of these 
issues, which will offer Rus- 
sia a solid position, worthy of 
this country, in a future 
European security architec- 
ture and reflecting Russia's 
interests.” Mr. Kohl said. 

Less vital but no less awk- 
ward could be discussions 
about the vast collection of art 
treasures shipped out of oc- 
cupied Germany by Stalin. 
Bonn wants them back. 

But the Communist-led 
Russian Parliament is insist- 
ing they stay. They overruled 
Mr. Yeltsin's veto this month 
and the matter seems to be 
heading for the constitutional 
court. 


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showers to much ol the Thursday through Satur- 
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THE AMERICAS 


2 Top liS* Trade Negotiators With China to Quit 


By Paul Blnsteih 

WastungmPostSmnr. 


Clinton administration’s 
two top trade negotiators with China ‘will leave the 

°, f ^ Sands, the assistant hade 

«Sasasaaseas 

the U.S. trade representative. J 

.3]^.!!^ *^ at ^ were' planning to leave. 



representative Mickey Kantor. about joinfcg bis law 
firm in a new legal practice to represemtuS compa- 
nies seeking access to China and other Asian mar- 

Their departures will “certainly make* much more 
difficult to conclude the talks with China by the end of 
this year or early next year,” said Jeffrey Schott, a trade 
specialist at the institute for International Economics. 

He said the loss of Mr. Sands will pose a serious 


jlem because of bis encyclopedic knowledge of 
i trade baniers. 

Moreover. Mr. Schott said, Mr. Sands’s job-seeking 
activities may intensify congressional accusations that 
the administration's China policy is too tilted to special 
interests. 

Government ethics experts said the discussions Mr. 
Sands and Ms. Lehr held with Mr. Kantor did not 
appear to violate any laws or regulations. But word of 
the discussions has salted arousing criticism in Con- 
gress that die two negotiators might feel reluctant to 
offend their Chinese counterparts in the talks. 

Mr. Sands said he had consulted ethics counsel to 
make sore he was adhering to the rules, and. he dis- 
missed suggestions that his toughness in the talks with 
China might be tempered by his job plans. 

“Whatever I do after this is completely separate 
from whaiFm doing now,” he said. Mr. Sands said he 
had long planned to leave government service because 
of the toll his job had taken on his family life. A single 
parent whose 1 5-year-old daughter lives with him, Mr. 
Sands travels overseas constantly. 

In a conversation several days ago, he said his plan 


was to “see this negotiation through” before leaving 
government, but Monday he said He was p lanning to 
leave after an important negotiation with the Chinese in 
May. 

Starting today, we’re transitioning to a new team, ' ’ 
Mr. Sands said in a joint interview with Ms. Lehr. “Ail 
I'm going to be doing until the time 1 leave, which is 
early summer, is make sure the negotiations are in good 
shape and the transition goes well.'* 

Ms. Lehr said she too felt compelled to leave the 
government, because she is the mother of a 14-month- 
old baby and her husband lives in New York. 

Mr. Sands and Ms. Lehr are both civil servants. 
Under federal ethics guidelines, they are permitted to 
negotiate with an employerfora job while still working 
in government. 

Mr. Kantor’s firm, Mayer, Brown & Platt, is setting 
up a new trade practice arid has no clients for the 
practice yet, according to a partner of the firm, who 
spoke on condition of anonymity. 

No offer has been formally extended by the firm, bur 
it was hoped that Mr. Sands would accept an offer “at 
some time in the future,” the partner said- 


Reno Is Threatened With Investigation Herself 



James McDougal leaving federal court in Arkansas after he was sentenced to prison over the Whitewater case. 


POLITICAL 


Jersey Tax-Cutter 
Paying Het Dues 

MONTCLAIR, New Jersey The 
storybook rise of Governor Christine 
Todd Whitman from small-town New 
Jersey freeholder to national Repub- 
lican celebrity began when die made A 
brazen campaign promise and ' man- 
aged to keep it 

Mrs. Whitman cut income taxes- 30 
percent and balanced her budgets with- 
out shredding government. She made it 
look so easy that Bob Dole promised 
throughout his 1996 presidential cam- 
paign * ‘to do for America what Christie 
Whitman has done for New Jersey. ” ' 

But as Mrs. Whitman kicked off her 
re-election campaign Monday, she is 


ew Jersey history, prompting charges 
that the bill is finally coming due far 
her popular slashing of tax tones. 

Mrs. Whitman balanced bear first 
three budgets largely by reducing state 
payments to the $45.5 billion stale em- . 
ployees' pension fund that she said had 
been set unnecessarily high by her 
Democratic predecessor, Jim Florio. 
This “pension reform” initiative, so 
technical it stirred scant public reaction, 
eliminated $3.1 billion, or more than 
half the budget hole Mrs. Whitman bad 
to fill to carry out her tax cuts. 

But pension obligations do not just 
fade away, like debt, they. get bigger 
the longer delayed. Under Mrs. Whit- 
man’s 1994 plan, the state's annual 
obligation to its pension funds would 
rise tenfold to $1 billion in 2031 — $3- 
billion in 2055. This year, she says she 
owes it to future taxpayers to lighten 
their load. But Mrs. Whitman’s latest 
plan has beat stopped in its tracks by 
six state sen a tors. 


“My mall and phone calls and per- 
sonal contacts are 100 percent against 
the bond issue,” said Senate Appro- 
priations Chairman Robert LitteU, the 
Republican chairman of the state Sen- 
ate Appropriations Committee, an op- 
ponent who calls the plan the opposite 
of fiscal conservatism. “I'm not sure 
why all of a sudden the governor wants 
to .'do this, especially in an election 
year.” (WP) 

Democrats Lobbied 
For Fund-Raisers 

WASHINGTON — The Democrat- 
ic. National Committee urged that 
about 60 of its leading fund-raisers be 
given jobs in President Bill Clinton's 
first administration, identifying them 
as-’tausr considers,” according to 
newly released documents. 

■ In many cases, the committee spe- 
cified' what agency and position the 
fund-raisers desired. About baif of 
those (Hi the committee's list won jobs, 
ranging from ambassadorships to high- 
level executive branch positions. 

The committee's efforts on behalf of 
the fund-raisers were spelled out in 
thousands of pages of documents re- 
leased by the party Monday after it 
turned them over to a congressional 
committee investigating financial im- 
proprieties in last year's elections. 

'The papers are only a small fraction 
■ of those subpoenaed by the House 
Government Operations Committee. 
Many of the papers came from the files 
of John Huang, the Asian-American 
fund-raiser at the center of several in- 
vestigations into the Democratic 
Party s fund-raising practices; the rest 
came from other committee staff mem- 
bers. but related to Mr. Huang. 

Both of the major political parties 


have long used ambassadorial and oth- 
er appointments to entice and reward 
major donors. For the Democratic 
Party, though, advocating appoint- 
ments when Mr. Clinton was first 
elected president eventually developed 
into an elaborate strategy to keep him 
in office. (WP ) 

Just Don 9 t Let It 
Join the Debate 

WASHINGTON — The Senate was 
caught short in its compliance with 
federal anti-discrimination rules 
Monday when a visually impaired aide 
to Senator Ron Wyden, Democrat of 
Oregon, was barred from bringing her 
guide dog onto the Senate floor. 

Mr. Wyden promptly introduced a 
resolution to allow disabled people to 
bring “supporting services,” includ- 
ing dogs, onto the floor, and senators 
scrambled to sponsor the proposal. 

The Senate is fussy about who — 
and what — it allows into its chamber, 
and dogs have never been among the 
favored few. (WP ) 

Quote/ Unquote 

Attorney General Janet Reno, iu heT 
letter to the chairman of the Senate 
Judiciary Committee, Orrin Hatch of 
Utah, explaining why she was not pre- 
pared to appoint a special prosecutor in 
die Democratic fund-raising scandal: 
“Absent specific and credible evi- 
dence of complicity by a covered per- 
son, it has never been suggested that 
the mere allegation that a foreign gov- 
ernment may have been trying to 
provide funds to federal campaigns 
should warrant appointment of an in- 
dependent counsel” (WP) 


Clintons Earned $1 Million, 
Thanks to Hillary’s Book 


By Peter Baker 

Washington Post Service 


HINGTON — Hillary. Rodham 
earned nearly $750,000 in roy- 
•t year from ho" book, * 'It Takes a 
” pushing the first family s total 
over SI million for the first time. 
Clinton's income far edrpsed 

rt Bill Clinton's S200.000 salary: 
the Clintons, who paid nearly 
10 in taxes last year, will see no 
jm Mrs. Clinton's publishing 

; they donated all of *e earnings 

penses to charity, according to 
ms made public Monday- - 
love was a considerable 
Hintons, who face nearly S2J25 
in outstanding legal .bibs gen- 
rs attorneys defending mem m 
te water matter and other cases. 

iret lady’s book about sonegr s 
^ responsibility for rajang^r 

snt 19 weeks on the New York 
Stfcover best-sellers list and 
skTon the fist : of top-selling 


The publisher declined to 

Kara*; sales figures, but said most of the 
400.000 hardback and 200,000 trade pa- 
perback copies had been sold. 

While his wife’s work was flying off 
the shelves; Mr. Clinton’s own election- 
year campaign treatise, ’‘Between Hope 
and History/* bombed. He reported no 
income freon the book on his tax forms 
because be had waived royalties. 

Of the $742,852 paid to her by Simon 
& Schuster in 1996, Mrs. Clinton gave 
$590,000 to charity, used $125,000 to 
pay federal taxes resulting from tire roy- 
alties; used $20,000 to pay Arkansas 
taxes and spent therest on administrative 
costs of. handling the royalty fond, ac- 
cording to the White House. 

: The Clintons benefited from the 1996 
surge on Wall Street, reporting 5140.000 
in income from in vestments, interest and 
dividends. The bulk of that came from 
$100,066 in capital gams from their blind 
trust managed by Boston Harbor Trust 
Co„ tire largest such profit they have 
made during Mr. Clinton's presidency. 


Away From Politics 

• The FBI criminal laboratory has se- 

rious problems, from faulty scientific 
procedures to erroneous testimony, the 
Justice Department said after an internal 
investigation. (AFP) 

• Florida has issued a list of the 949 

doctors in the state who have been dis- 
ciplined by colleagues or paid at least 
three malpractice cl aims - (AP) 

• The Village Voice, founded 42 years 

ago in New York by apostles of urban 
culture, will begin a sister publication. 
The Long Island Voice. (NYT) 

• A cadet faring iHsmksal from the 

U.S. Military Academy over accusations 
of having consensual sex last year with a 
male classmate on toe grounds of West 
Point said she was raped by that class- 
mate and charged toe army with botch- 
ing its investigation. (WP ) 

• A former principal of ft suburban 
Cleveland high school was convicted 
after pleading no contest to charges he 
secretly videotaped cheerleaders while 
they were changing clothes. (AP) 


Ca*rBedbf OurSvjfFrcm Kfortex 

WASHINGTON — Republicans 
threatened Tuesday to call Attorney 
General Janet Reno before congression- 
al panels to defend her decision to block 
again their demand for an independent 
counsel to investigate Democratic fund- 
raising m the last presidential election. 

“My heart goes out to her,” the House 
majority leader, Dick Armey, said in a 
television interview. “I think she's an 
honest. decent person. But she's caught 
in a web where everything ends up get- 
ting dumped on her. She feels compelled 
to try to protect the White House.” 

Representative Armey. Republican of 
Texas, said congressional investigators 
might decide to call Ms. Reno to testify 
because “it is imperative that we get the 
truth of this.” 

Ms. Reno announced her derision in a 
letter to Senator Orrin Hatch. Republican 
of Utah, the chairman of the Judiciary 
Committee. Last month he asked her to 
appoint an independent prosecutor. 

“I am unable to agree, based on the 
facts and the law, that an independent 
counsel should be appointed to handle 
this investigation," she wrote. 

In her letter, Ms. Reno relied on a 
provision of the independent counsel 
law that requires appointment only if an 
internal review finds specific evidence 
of a federal crime committed by any one 
of about two dozen senior administra- 
tion officials, including the president, 
vice president and members of the cab- 
inet 

Ms. Reno said that Justice Depart- 
ment lawyers had decided that none of 
the issues raised by Senator Hatch ne- 
cessitated the appointment of an inde- 
pendent prosecutor. 

Republican leaders reacted with 


ftuy. 

The! 


: Senate majority leader, Trent Lott, 
called her decision ‘ ‘inexcusable.* ’ 

The House speaker. Newt Gingrich, 
said: “As a historian, I do not see any 
possible way for the attorney general to 
defend toe decision not to have an in- 
counsel” 

jssutc on the administration also 
increased as a former Whitewater as- 
sociate of President and Mrs. Clinton 
said he had tired of covering up for the 
president. 

James McDougal, who was sentenced 
to three years in prison Monday for the 
18 fraud and conspiracy charges on 
which he was convicted last May, ac- 
knowledged that be had changed his 
story on the role of President dm ton in 
the granting of a loan to Mr. McDougai's 
former wife, Susan. 

“I just got sick and tired of lying for 
die fellow,” Mir. McDougal said. 

Mr. McDougal faced up to 84 years in 
prison, but the Whitewater independent 
counsel Kenneth Starr, pleaded for a 
reduced sentence. 

He said that die former banker in 
Arkansas bad offered information on ‘ ‘a 
wide range of matters, including matters 
previously unknown to us.” 

“He has assisted us and continues to 
assist us in having a fuller, broader, 
deeper understanding of that evidence,” 
Mr. Starr said of Mr. McDougal, adding 
that the defendant had led Mr. Starr's 
investigators to new documents and wit- 
nesses. 

Mr. McDougal said he did not believe 
he had betrayed the Clintons. 

"I think the Clintons are really sort of 
like tornadoes moving through people’s 
lives,” he said, ‘ ‘that I'm just one of the 
people left in the wake of their passing 
by.* (NYT, WP, AP) 


Powell Is On the Run, 
But Not for President 

General Seeks Volunteers to Help Children 


By James Bennet 

New York Tunes Service 


ALEXANDRIA, Virginia — Once 
again. General Colin Powell is not run- 
ning for president, at a furious pace. 

Take Tuesday, for example. He 
planned. General Powell said, to tape a 
TV appearance first with “Oprah” 
(Winfrey, of course) in Chicago and 
then with “Ted” (Koppel that is) in 
Portland, Oregon. He said he would 
give a motivational speech in Portland 
and visit a boys and girls' club with, as 
he put it, “a lot of press in atten- 
dance.” 

All this in the service of a national 
campaign to encourage volunteers to 
help children. And nothing else. 

In two weeks. President Bill Clinton, 
former President George Bush, Gen- 
eral Powell and other luminaries will 
convene in Philadelphia for the Pres- 
idents' S ummi t for America’s Future. 
The goals of the meeting, organized by 
a private group that recruited General 
Powell are to persuade corporations, 
communities and volunteers to supply 
children with mentors, with safe plans 
to leam outside school, with skills and 
more. General Powell will be chairman 
of the effort, to be called “America's 
Promise — Alliance for Youth,” and is 
already Peking up corporate commit- 
ments. 

“I don't want to give anyone the 
impression that this is some sort of 
stalking-horse PAC,” he said, refer- 
ring to a political action committee as 
his clipped cadence gathered speed, 
“stealth PAC, stealth committee, 
stealth this, stealth that — ‘He's ba-a- 
ack!”’ 

In an interview chi Monday in his 
sunny, s mallish office here. General 
Powell said that he did not intend to run 
for president But be acknowledged 
that all the speculation tod have a ben- 
efit “If it wasn’t there, then I wouldn’t 
get as much attention that allows me to 
talk about” volunteerism, he said. 

This is not an unfamiliar formula for 
General Powell. In 1995, as he dangled 
d re possibility of running for president 
before enthusiastic backers. General 
Powell embarked on a hugely success- 
ful national tour for his autobiography. 
After tbe tour had ended, he announced 
that he would not run in 1996 because 
die campaign would require ‘ ‘a calling 
that I do not yet bear." 

Over ana over on Monday, he 
gently but firmly nudged tire conver- 
sation back to toe subject that he said 
preoccupied him now, the plight of 
children who are living “in an en- 
vironment that makes diem nothing 
more than farm teams for jails dial 
we're building at a rapid rate.” 

He bemoaned the need for prisons 
like Rikers Island in New York, which 
he called “a warehouse for black fa- 
thers.” 

The question for society, be said, is. 


“How do we keep their children from 
being locked up? ’ 

As he occasionally sipped a drink or 
downed a Girl Scout Thin Mint cook- 
ie, General Powell reflected on the 
lessons about molding people that he 
learned growing up in die South Bronx 

— “I was a ‘poor people' once,” he 
said, mocking stereotypes — in the 
military and even when watching 
nature programs on television. 

“You know at what point the paw 
comes out, and some cub gets swatted 
in the head,” the general said ap- 
provingly, later recalling similar treat- 
ment he received from relatives alert 
to naughtiness. 

If the volunteerism effort succeeds. 
General Powell said, in five ro seven 
years “you'll see fewer youngsters 
who are on drugs, who are having 
difficulty in school and evidencing tbe 
sorts of social pathologies that are 
giving us all such nightmares now.” 

General Powell is volunteering his 
services to the campaign until 2000. 
The date, coming as it does in an elec- 
tion year, is, of course, a coincidence. 

General Powell said questions 
about how the volunteerism effort 
might conform to political ambition 
were inevitable. 

“It's a Hobson's choice,” he said. 
“I could either stay in my basement 
and pretend there’s nothing going on 
outside. And thereby nobody is asking 
the question anymore — maybe. Or I 
come out and use the position I have in 
American society for some utility and 
beg lots of questions that I’ve already 
answered rattier definitively, I 
thought. And I continue to answer 
them definitively." 

Although he referred to it. General 
Powell, who Is 60, did not repeat the 
unequivocal rejection of the presiden- 
cy that Genual William T. Sherman 
offered the Republican National Con- 
vention in 18&4 (“! wifi not accept if 
nominated and will not serve if elect- 
ed”). 

“I choose not to plagiarize General 
Sherman,” General Powell said, 
adding, before he could be asked why 
not, ‘^Because, you know, why? It's 
just going to go on.” 

General Powell, known for his cau- 
tion as a military leader, said his vo- 
lunteerism organization would stay 
out of politics entirely and would not 
even endorse any legislation. “It is 
nonpartisan,’ ’he said. “I prefer that to 
bipartisan.” 

General Powell said that after he 
had left the government he said to 
himself: “I've always tried to speak 
out for civil rights as a government 
employee. But now, in private life, I 
want to do something that would help 
African-Americans, blacks.” 

He also wanted a role that involved 
action — “something operational" 

— not study. The volunteerism cam- 
paign made a good fit, he said. 


Clinton Said to Pick Rohatyn 
As New U.S. Envoy to France 


By Steven Lee Myers 

New York Times Service 


WASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton has selected Felix Rohatyn, tbe 
investment banker who played an im- 
portant role in helping New York City 
avert bankruptcy in the 1970s, to be 
ambassador to France. 

The White House has not yet an- 
nounced Mr. Roharyn’s nomination. 


which was expected, but the president's 
national security adviser, Samuel Ber- 
ger, notified Mr. Rohatyn by telephone 
last Friday. 

An administration official said 
Monday that the White House had not 
yet sought the tacit approval of France. If 
confirmed by tbe Senate, Mr. Rohatyn 
would succeed Pamela Harriman. who 
died in Paris on Feb. 5. 

Mr. Rohatyn ’s appointment could be- 
come an early test of whether the long- 
standing practice of rewarding political 
contributors with ambassadorships 
comes under new scrutiny because of the 
controversy over campaign financing. 


Mr. Rohatyn and his wife, Elizabeth, 
have contributed about $600,000 to the 
Democratic candidates or the party since 
1993, according to campaign finance 
records. 

Bom in Vienna, Mr. Rohatyn moved 
as a young boy to France in 1934, where 
he lived until his family fled the German 
occupation in 1942. His investment 
firm, Lazard Ereres & Co. of New York, 
is the sister company of Lazard Freres & 
Cie. of Paris. 

Tbe selection of Mr. Rohatyn, 68, a 
senior partner at Lazard Freres and a 
major campaign donor to the Demo- 
cratic Patty, comes as the president ap- 
peared to be picking up the pace of 
filling important diplomatic posts. 

Tom Foley, tbe former speaker of the 
House of Representatives, bas emerged 
as a leading can d idate for ambassador to 
Japan. Other potential nominees include 
Reginald Bartholomew, now ambassa- 
dor to Italy, as ambassador to Israel, and 
Nicholas Burns, the State Department's 
skesman, as ambassador to the Czech 
public. 


ROBINSON: Memories of His Major League Debut 50 Years Ago 


Continued from Page 1 

York governor known for wrestling with 
ambiguities, Robinson's arrival in New 
York was * ‘both a happy and an unhappy 
thing.” 

“Why should it have taken until 
1947?” he said." You'd already had the 
First World War, the Second World 
War.” Mr. Cuomo left the borough of 
Queens in 1951 to play minor league 
baseball in Georgia, “and for a guy like 
me who played ball with black guys in 
south Jamaica, toe idea they weren’t 
playing in the major leagues was sur- 


"You knew how good they were, 
Mr. Cuomo said. "What Robinson re- 
minded people of, and should remind 
them today, is of toe tremendous un- 
tapped potential in this country.” 

4 T loved the guy without ever know- 
ing him,” Mr. Maher said, and dozensof 
a certain age spoke reverently in in- 
terviews of a man challenged to perform 
a hero’s wort: in full view of the world. 

“It was Jackie Robinson that sparred 
my love for baseball,” said Beatrice 
Wall, an administrative assistant at the 
Cornerstone Baptist Church in the black 
neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant in 


Brooklyn. “We lived on Hancock Street 
and we would go to Ebbets Field, and it 
was just a treat- My God! He inspired the 
black people. My grandmother, my sis- 
ter and two cousins. His name was a 
household word to us.” 

It was Robinson's accomplishment that 
even Dodger foeswexe drawn to him. 

“All of a sudden I saw this country as 
I’d never seen it before,” said Felix 
Rohatyn of Robinson’s ascension to the 
Dodgers. Then 19 years old, having 
come to the United States in 1942 to 
escape Nazi-occupied Europe, Mr. Ro- 
hatyn said he had not fathomed the depth 
of the country's segregation until then. 

“I saw what a big thing it was for a 
black man to play for toe Brooklyn 
Dodgers, and it made a profound im- 
pression,” he said. Mr. Rohatyn was a 
ran of the New York Giants. “Of course, 
it didn’t keep me from rooting against 
him when he played against toe Giants,’ ’ 
he added. 

As a Dodger fen, admittedly biased, 
Mr. Glasser of the ACLU was fervid. 

“ft's hard to imagine for this gen- 
eration what it was like for a white boy in 
the late 1940s to have a black man as his 
idol” Mr. Glasser said. 

“Where I lived in East Flatbush, you 


could walk for 10 blocks in any direction 
and not see anyone who wasn’t white, 
maybe not even anyone who wasn’t Jew- 
ish. Most of my friends were intense 
Dodger fens, and we had with tbe team a 
peculiarly intense relationship, and into 
that relationship comes Robinson. 

“And on a team filled with heroes, he 
became a hero. On die empty lots where 
we played, when those lots transformed 
in our minds to the lush grass of Ebbets 
Held, we chose to be Jackie. We tried to 
incorporate everything about him into 
our styles. I had a friend who even wore 
his sneakers on the wrong feet to make 
him walk pigeon-toed.” 

It is a measure of the Robinson repu- 
tation that personal memories of him 
linger even for people who are not base- 
ball fens. 

“In 1947, let’s see, I was 17 and 
didn't know much of anything, but I can 
sing you toe song, ' ' said Annie Ross, the 
jazz singer, and over the phone, she did. 
It was written by Count Basie: 

Did vou see Jackie Robinson hit that 
ball? ’ 

Well, he hit it, yeah 
And that ain’t all , 

He's going home, yeah 
Jackie's real gone. 



PApE4 . . 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1997 


R 


ASIA/PACIFIC 



ing’s Man in Hong Kong Grapples With ‘ Image Problem’ Abroad 

».■ I.L. Mr. Tunp_ wiri^Jv known as has Tunc or anyone else says before the accorded any leader-in-waiting. But ica, people read articles and many of’ Mr. Tung has 


A 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Past Service 


HONG KONG — The honeymoon 
did not last Jong for Tung Chee-hwa, the 
business executive Beijing selected to 
run this territory when it reverts to 
Chinese control on July 1 . 

With Mr. Tung set to take charge here 
in just over 70 days, his allies and ad- 
visers — and reportedly Mr. Tung him- 
self — - are fretting over what they see as 
his ' 'image problem,’' particularly in the 
West. 

Once described as soft-spoken and 
conciliatory, the perfect person to deal 
with China’s Communist leaders, Mr. 
Tung is now more often depicted as 
Beijing's man in Hong Kong, a hard- 
handed authoritarian who would strip 
away civil liberties and roll back demo- 
cratic reforms. 

Thar image was hi g hli g hted by Mr. 
Tung's announcement last week of 
tough restrictions on political parties and 
public protests, which be said will be 
imposed soon after China assumes con- 
trol. 

The Tung camp considers the new, 
negative depiction as grossly unfair, and 


Mr. Tung, widely known as “C.H-", has 
been described by aides as feeling 1 ‘ frus- 
trated" with the image problem. Said a 
foreign diplomat here, "He seems to be 
in a mood of injured surprise that he‘s in 
some kind of trouble. I think he has 
found the reaction so far sobering, even 
shocking/' 

Bur Mr. Tung's aides and allies are 
deeply divided about how to solve the 
image problem. 

Some advisers have urged Mr. Tung 
to make an immediate trip to the United 
States to repair the damage. They argue 
he needs to move quicidy to reassure 
American policymakers, and a skeptical 
U.S . public, that Hong Kong is not on die 
brink of a totalitarian nightmare and that 
he is not merely Beijing's mouthpiece in 
the territory. 

But other influential aides, including 
his business associates, have cautioned 
that any U.S. trip be delayed until at least 
six months after the handover to give 
Mr. Tung time to build a record at home 
first. 

* 'That's the debate among some of his 
aides." said Tsang Yok-sing, a member 
of the Chinese-appointed shadow leg- 
islature. “I don't think anything C.H. 


Tung or anyone else says before the 
handover can dispel people’s doubts or 
suspicions about the future of Hong 
Kong.” By waiting several months, "he 
can say, ‘Look, all those doomsday 
prophecies have not been fulfilled, Hong 
Kong still enjoys its liberties.’ ” Mr. 
Tsang said 

[Mr. Tung has shelved plans to visit 
the United States next month. Agence 
France-Presse quoted sources close to 
his office as saying on Tuesday. The 
cources cited a “huge amount of work" 
as the reason for the decision.] 

Michael DeGolyer, who heads a long- 
term project monitoring attitudes in 
Hong Kong about the transition and re- 
lated issues at Baptist University in 
Hong Kong. said. “I think he certainly 
has an image problem overseas." 

The executives who advise Mr. Tung 
to visit the Uniled Stares later in tire year, 
he said, show “a complete misunder- 
standing of image management.” 

“The PR people are right the busi- 
ness people are wrong,” Mr, DeGolyer 
said. “This isn't business, it's politics, 
and it’s totally different,” 

The local press generally still treats 
Mr. Tung with the reverence naturally 


China Sidesteps UN Censure Motion 

Western-Backed Resolution on Human Rights Fails for 7th Time 


Reuter. 

GENEVA — For the seventh year in a 
row, China averted censure at the United 
Nations Human Rights Commission on 
Tuesday by successfully quashing a 
Western resolution critical of its re- 
cord. 

The 53-member fonun approved a 
“no-action motion," presented by 
China, by a vote of 27 countries in favor 
to 17 against, with 9 abstentions. 

Delegates erupted into applause when 
the vote, nearly identical to last year's 
result, was announced after more than 90 
minutes of sometimes acrimonious de- 
bate. 

Wu Jianraen, China's representative 
atthe United Nations in Geneva who 
heads his country's delegation, offered 
the "no action" motion and fiercely 
denounced the Western resolution, 
which was sponsored by Denmark with 
backing from 14 countries, including the 
United States. 

It was. Mr. Wu declared, “a tool of 
power politics directed not just against 
China but also against all developing 
countries." 

In die later vote, Beijing won the 
support of the overwhelming majority of 
Third World states on the commission. 


Assistant Secretary of State John 
Sbatnick and the British delegate. Henry 
Steel, objected to the Chinese “no ac- 
tion" maneuver. Mr. Sbaituck said the 
rights situation in China was “a subject 
of considerable concern" although 
Washington did not seek confrontation 
with Beijing. 

Earlier Tuesday, China gave Denmark 
and the Netherlands a diplomatic slap on 
the wrist by postponing official visits in a 
dispute over their support the resolution. 

The Foreign Ministry said China 
“will delay important exchanges of of- 
ficials that are under discussion and halt 
exchanges and cooperation with Den- 
mark on human rights.” 

Beijing then postponed scheduled vis- 
its by two Danish ministers. 

Denmark has been the moving force 
this year behind the resolution. 

Denmark "is interfering in China's 
internal affairs and hurting the feelings 
of the Chinese people,” die ministry 
spokesman. Shen Guofang, said. 

Copenhagen, he said, "has set up 
obstacles to the smooth development of 
relations between the two countries.*' 

China had warned chat relations with 
countries that sponsored the resolution 
would be affected. Denmark, the Neth- 


postponed ' 
Foreign Mi 



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accorded any leader-in-waiting. But 
public opinion surveys conducted by 
Mr. DeCrO Iyer’s Hong Kong transition 
project show that many people still know 
little about Mr. Tung, and a significant 
number who are familiar with him con- 
sider him a puppet of mainland China. 

The bigger problem, Mr. Tung’s allies 
believe, is overseas. Foreign corespon- 
dents. they say, have mtsreported or 
distorted some of Mr. Tung's conser- 
vative views. The well-known leaders of 
Hong Kong's small box vocal camp of 
democracy advocates, tike Martin Lee of 
die Democratic Party, are accused of 
"bad-mouthing'' Mr. Tung and Hong 
Kong on trips to the United States, 
Canada and Europe. And, in the view of 
Tung advisers, the departing British- led 
government has used its “propaganda 
machine” to turn world opinion against 
China’s Incoming chief executive. 

“What Mr. Tung has cot got at this 
time is a public relations machinery,” 
said Rita Fan. president of the appointed 
shadow legislature. “The British gov- 
ernment has got a PR machinery that is 
turning oat all kinds of official com- 
ments from undisclosed sources.” 

“In the foreign press, in North Amer- 


impress 
U.5, au 


ica, people read articles and many of 
these articles are sourced back to the 
British government or the British Hoog 
Kong administration,” Ms. Fan said. 
“Mr. Tung, in his current situation with 
only a few dozen staffers, can hardly 
counteract.” 

Some Tung friends and alliessay they 
believe his image problem in the United 
States is linked to Americans’ negative 
sion of China itself, with some 
v authors and opinion-makers using 
questions of illegal campaign contribu- 
tions and Beijing’s human nghts record 
to try to turn China into a new enemy. 

i think; most people in the United 
States have a negative impression of 
China,” Mr. Tsang said, “and Hong 
Kong is being taken over by China.’ ' 

But Mr. Tsang and others concede 
that many of Mr. Tung’s current prob- 
lems are self-generated. He came out 
strongly in favor of abolishing the demo- 
cratically elected legislature and setting 
up the appointed one — a move deeply 
unpopular here. Then he backed China 
on plans to rewrite the local bill of rights 
and other civil liberties ordinances to 
restrict demonstrations and other types 
of political activities. 


BRIEFLY 


Mr Tung has defended those changes 

as balancing individual freedoms 
against the need for “stability. But his 
lengthy explanations, couched in legal 
language describing the changes as 
“techrucal." have failed to win over 

^Mtnierms of the public perception of 
this issue, it's been a disaster, an ab- 
solute disaster," said a Western dip- 
lomat who generally sympathizes with 

Mr. Tung. . „ 

Mr. Tung's friends and advisers here 
attribute the rockiness of the last few 
months to Mr. Tung’s inexperience in 
the political arena. 

<J One cannot say that C.H. is a really 
seasoned politician.” said Mr. Tsang. 
■ ‘Before he was appointed to his post, he 
very seldom said anything in public, and 
he seldom spoke to the media.” 

Among other things, some aides say 
Mr. Tung is still uncomfortable in the 
world of sound bites, where complex 
thoughts and ideas have to be reduced to 
short, catchy and quotable phrases. They 
say Mr. Tung dislikes giving interviews 
where his views might be distilled into a 
few short quotes, and he prefers longer, 
speeches or discussions. 


t 


erlands. the United States and 12 other 
countries co-sponsored the motion ur- 
ging Beijing to observe human rights and 
protect die cultural identity of Tibetans. 

Denmark took the initiative with the 
resolution in Geneva after France re- 
fused to do so, shattering consensus in 
the European Union. 

Besides France. Australia. Canada, 
Germany, Greece. Italy, Japan and 
Spain, which had all previously crit- 
icized China's tough policies, opted not 
to back this year's motion. 

Beijing informed Denmark that visits 
to China by Social Affairs Minister Karen 
Jespersen in June and Justice Minister 
Frank Jensen in the autumn had been 
until further notice, the Danish 


rign Ministry said. 

But Copenhagen said a visit by Edu- 
cation MinisterOle Vig Jensen would still 
go ahead as scheduled in May, as would a 
private visit by Crown Prince Joachim 
and Princess Alexandra, set for July. 

In The Hague, the Economic Affairs 
Ministry said China had postponed a 
Dutch trade mission to Beijing sched- 
uled for June. The mission would have 
visited China from June 7 to 14 under the 
leadership of Economic Affairs Minister 
Hans Wijers. 



lbs 

Jobrn nr finr-IW 

Riot police confronting opposition protesters in front of the Indonesian Parliament building Tuesday. I 


Advance Troops to Hong Kong 

HONG KONG — China and Britain have agreed that am 
advance party of Chinese troops will arrive in Hong Kong 
next week in preparation for the territory’s return to Chinese 
sovereignty July 1, a Hong Kong government spokesman 
said Tuesday. 

The party of 40 People’s Liberation Army soldiers would 
prepare communications and buildings for the future gar- 
rison, the spokesman said. (Reuters) 

Taiwan Gets U.S. Fighter Jets 

TAIPEI — Two U.S.-made warplanes have arrived to 
join the Taiwan Air Force, the first since Washington 
bowed to Chinese demands and agreed to stop selling 
advanced weapons to Taiwan IS years ago, the air force 
said Tuesday. 

U.S. and Taiwanese pilots flew the F-16s. the first of a 
batch of 150, to Chiayi Air Base in southern Taiwan on 
Monday, arriving a day early to avoid publicity, the United 
Daily News said. 

The United States stopped selling sophisticated arms to 
Taiwan after it established diplomatic ties with China. But 
the Bush administration agreed in 1 992 to sell Taiwan the F- 
16s for $6 billion. (AP) 

North Korea Chief Misses Event 

TOKYO — The North Korean leader, Kim Jong D, 
missed an official ceremony Tuesday held to celebrate the 
birthday of his late father, Kim XI Sung, according to North 
Korean news media reports of the event. 

The official press agency KCNA did not mention Mr. 
Kim in die list of dignitaries who took part in a ceremony at 
the Kusumsan Palace mausoleum where the embalmed 
body of the deceased leader is preserved in a glass coffin. 


Kim 11 Sung died on July 8, 1994. Had he lived, Tuesday 
would have been his 85th birthday. (AFP) 

Opposition Protest in Indonesia^. \ 

JAKARTA — Hundreds of supporters of Megawpti 5 
Sukarnoputri staged a protest outside die Indonesian Par- 0 
liament house Tuesday in a show of strength for the oustec 
minority party leader before general elections in May, f 
Chanting slogans and waving banners reading “Mega 
Nothing.” up to 2,000 people demonstrated outside 
building for roost of the day, witnesses said. , • f T 

Scores of riot police watched silently, but made nomovje- 
to intervene. (Reuierty 


> 


For the Record 

Hong Kong and Macau people will need permits to wadr 
in Taiwan after the transfer of the British and Portuguese 
enclaves to China in July 1997 and December 1999, re- 
spectively, Taiwan officials saki Tuesday. (Reuters) 

VOICES From Asia 

Shen Guofang, spokesman for the Chinese Foreign 
Ministry, using the Chinese name for Martin Lee, toe 
leader of the Democratic Party in Hong Kong, in dis- 
cussing bis meetings with top U.S. officials, including 
President Bill Clinton, latex this week: "Li Zongming 
incites international forces everywhere to meddle in Hong 
Kong affairs. " (Reuters) 

Wang Lingyun, about her son, the dissident Wang Dan, . 
in wake ofa report that be had been offered release on health 
grounds if be agreed to leave Qrina: "I asked him if toe 
authorities spoke to him about medical parole and he said ' 
there has been no such thing.” (Reuters) 


* 


Prince Barred in Return to Cambodia 


Catted by OaSaf From Obpacfte 

HONG KONG — The exiled Prince 
Norodom Sirivudh was barred Tuesday 
from returning to Cambodia, where he 
had hoped to challenge his conviction of 
plotting to murder the co-prime min- 
ister, Hun Sen. 

Prince Sirivudh was stranded in Hong 
Kong after an airline refused to fly him 
home after warnings he would be ar- 
rested. He said toe government had 
nothing to fear as be led no army. 

“I mil ask toe Hong Kong authorities 
to allow roe to find a solution to go back 
home,” toe half-brother of King Noro- 
dom Sihanouk said. “I’m still a member 
of Parliament and ask not for a violent 
solution, bat just a review of my trial.” 

"I accept to be in jaB, to be under 
house arrest,” he added “That’s how I 
ask to review my trial case.'* 

Prince Sirivudh. who left his home in 
Paris on Monday, had been issued a 
boarding pass by the Hong Kong airline 
Dragonair for an afternoon flight to 
Phnom Penh. 

But Dragonair would not let him 
board, saying it had been told by Cam- 
bodian officials that toe prince would be 
arrested in Phnom Penb. 

"I don’t understand Dragon air’s at- 
titude,” Prince Sirivudh said at the air- 
"I am a Cambodian holding a 
bodian passport.” 

Prince Sirivudh said he would try to 
board a flight to Phnom Penh on 
Thursday. 

The prince went into exile in Decem- 
ber 1995 after being held for one month 



OwiA Vrftf/Rwiwi 

The prince stranded in Hong Kong. 

on charges of involvement in a con- 
spiracy against Mr. Hun Sen’s life. He 
refused to return for toe 1996 trial and 
was sentenced to 10 years in prison. 

The co-interior minister. You 
Hockry. said earlier Tuesday that Prince 
Sirivudh would be arrested on arrival. 

Mr. You Hockry said he discussed the 
issue Sunday with his co-minister, Sar 
Kbeng of Mr. Hun Sen’s Cambodian 
lie’s Party, which formed an uneasy 
ition with toe royalist Funcinpec 


party after UN-run electrons in 1993J 
Funcinpec stands for United NationaM 
Front for an Independent, . Neufin ‘ A 
Peaceful and Cooperative Cambodia. 

"Sirivudh must come arirti 
don,” said Mr. You Hockry; a roy: 
“Without a royal pardon FunCrrq* 
cannot do much legally.” ■ ; ~ ■ >. 

King Sihanouk said last weektharl 
was not ready to anger Mr. Hun $en 
granting an amnesty and warned 
would abdicate if toe Sirivudh afiair V 
seated by violence. , 

Prince Sirivudh derjamri.fris inten^j 
tions were non-violent. ' ' ■ ' .• 'S 
“I don’t have an army /*fy. said, 1 Ting 
just a member of Part foi£ 

democracy, human rights \ fight for an* 
ideal not with weapons.” (Reuters, AP% 

■ Party Rivalry Heats Up : ■'£ 

Mr. Hun Sen’s formerly Ccmraantisfi 
Cambodian People’s Party joined a bid to* 
uraeat the leader of Funcngjec, Krs£ 
ftime' Minis ter Prince Norodom Roost-* 
itkto, and half-nephew of Prince Skivucflir 

Aa»rii*fewif*-P* — ' '... ■* 


- two parties are iwunron 
on toe battlefield that are now then 
partners in toe current ruling' coalii 
despite remaining bitter ptili 
nvals. ’■ 

Mr. Hun Sen’s party said it ag 
with a dissident member- bf Fhncm 
the minister of state Ung ^han, 
announced in a television broadcast 
he was one of a “ large portiefc” ^ c ~ 
mraobers who could no longi 
Fruice-Ranariddh’s leadership 














































































% 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY APRIL 16, 1997 

EUROPE 


PAGE 5 


* 


Marches Into Albania 

Initial Deployment Goes: Smoothly 






By Celestine Bohlen 

New York Times Servic e 

ROME — With much fanfare a nd 
some uncertainty, the first wave of' a 
modest multinational force, to be made 
HP °f 6,000 • soldiers from eight 
European countries, arrived in Albania 
■% on Tuesday, one month after the Balkan 
country collapsed into near-anarchy. 

Known as Mission Dawn, it is 
Europe’s response to the latest crisis 
along its southeastern rim, and an im- 
portant foreign policy test for Italy, 
which has’ been charged with the military 
CQt nnian d of an international mission for 
the first time since World War DL 

The first arrivals, a contingent of 
1.200 Italian, French andSpanish 
troops, which landed Tuesday mo rnin g 
in the port city of Durres, were greeted 
by Prime Minister Bashldtu Fino, wbo 
said AJhanians were grateful for help in 
restoring “peace and order.” 

Italy, which faces Albania across a 
narrow stretch of the Adriatic Sea, has : 
pushed for international- intervention 
ever since the collapse of fraudulent 
investment schemes triggered a wave of 
& violence across a country that was 
" already the poorest in Europe. As unrest 
in Albania spun out of control, about 
13,000 Albanians made their way to 
Italy in a steady stream of rickety boats, 
turning a foreign policy crisis into one 
with pressing domestic consequences. 

“It is an indispensable mission,” said 
President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro of Italy 
on Monday) “because this is a country, 
70 kilometers or just two steps away, 
where the state is falling apart. It is a . 
world where people are taking justice 
into their Own hands, where there is a ! 
multiplication, of weapons, and every 
boy carries guns, Kalashnikovs- on his 
back as it they were nothing.” 

The refugee crisis never grew to the 
% proportions of the exodus of 1991, when 
more than 40,000 Albanians poured 
across the Adriatic to escape political, 
unrest, but Italy this time soon began to 
discourse the new wave of immigrants 
with afore vigorous patrols of its coast 
' But . when the Italian government 
went looking for European partners- who. 
shared its sense of. urgency about the 
chaos in Albania, it got a chiUyrespaase, 
notably, from Britain and Germany. So- 
instead of a pan-European mission* the 
expeditionary force to -Albania became 
an ad-b'oc coalition, put together bywhat 
has become known as a “coalition of the 
willing,” consisting of. France, Spain, 
Greece, Romania, Denmark, Austria, as 


well as Iialy, which is contributing 2^00 
troops, by for the largest number. 

Ota ifc first day ovd, the mission, 
moved forward smoothly, easing linger- 
ing concerns about the organizational 
abilities of the Italian militar y, which 
hashad little operational experience out- 
ride the NATO context. There were 
further doubts in other capitals about 
Italy’s leadership late last week when 
the center-left government of Prime 
Minister Romano Prodi faced a political 
crisis overthe parliamentary vote for the 
Albanian mfoiq op 

Thai crisis passed, altbough-h left Mr. 


enhancing Italy’s reputation for reckless 
political ' brinkmanship. As numerous 
analysts here have pointed out in' recent 
weeks, the stakes for Italy in this AK 
tianian mission are high: Failure could 
damdge Rome’s efforts to enhance its 
influence in the Balkans, both diplo- 
matically and economically. 

Charged with a three-month United 
Nations mandate to provide protection 
to humanitarian aid and assistance now 
due to arrive in Albania, the multina- 
tional force, under die command of Ad- 
miral Guido Venturoni. Italy’s chief of 
staff, began officially Tuesday morning 
in the pre-dawn hours as French Marines 
swept the Durres harbor for mines. They 
were followed by a French transport 
ship, which docked moments after 150 
Italian paratroopers on six transport 
planes landed at Tirana airport, 40 ki- 
lometers (25 miles) to the east. 

The different national contingents 
■ will be spread around the country, with 
Italians, Greeks Romanians cov- 
ering the port city of Vlore and the 
southern half oF the country where the 
political situation has been most chaot- 

Even before die hoop deployment 
began, international aid officials have 
been warning that the food situation in 
Albania was getting worse. About 470 
tons of wheat flour, beans and vegetable 
oil from the UN World Food Program 
was doe to arrive Tuesday in Durres, 
destined for orphanages, old-age homes 
and other social institutions. 

. - Admiral Venturoni, at a press con- 
ference Monday, insisted that this force 
will have a freer hand than did the UN 
forces stationed in Bosnia during the 
early years of the war. “The troops will 
have the right to defend themselves and 
.others from violence. We are certainly 
not setting out to look for guns, but we 
can disarm anyone who threatens us 
directly” 



Boric Harot/Agencc Fnott-Pirue 

FROM JAIL TO DESK — Bernard Tapie, the jailed French busi- 
nessman-politician, leaving his employer's office in Marseille on Tues- 
day. He was on day-release after being hired by a business colleague. 


E U Summit in May 

BRUSSELS — European Affairs 
Minister Michel Bamier of France said 
Tuesday that the European Union 
would hold a special summit meeting 
next month to speed up its negotiations 
on a new treaty. 

“There will be a meeting of the 
heads of state and government on May 
23.” Mr. Bamier said. 

Talks on a new treaty are due to be 
wrapped up at the Union's midyear 
meeting in Amsterdam in June. But Utile 
agreement has been reached to date, in 
pan because the bloc is writing for 
Britain's elections on May 1. ( Reuters ) 

French Strike Ends 

PARIS — French hospital interns 
decided to end their five-week-old 
strike against government belt-tight- 
ening, but they promised other forms 
of protest 

The walkout, which affected nearly 
all of France’s 26 university hospitals, 
had been losing steam in recent days. 

The strike's end represented a small 
victory for the government, but the 
interns announced a daylong strike 
April 24, the day the cost -controlling 
reform takes effect. (AP) 

Tudjman Party Wins 

ZAGREB, Croatia — President 
Franjo Tudjman’s Croatian Democrat- 


ic Union said Tuesday that it expected 
to govern the capital after weekend 
elections, but its grip on country's 
second-biggest city loosened. 

Winning 35.67 percent of the Zagreb 
city council vote, the Croatian Demo- 
cratic Union received 24 seats, die 
biggest fraction in the 50-seai local 
legislature. The Social Democrats, the 
former Communists, came in second 
with 24. 18 percent and the centrist So- 
cial Liberals third with 1251 percent 

But in the Adriatic port of Split, 
Croatia's second-biggest city, results 
gave the opposition a chance to dump 
the Croatian D«nocratic mayor by 
forming an alliance. The Croatian 
Democrats claimed victory in parlia- 
mentary voting in 19 of 21 counties. 
Preliminary results gave the party 41 of 
68 seats in the Chamber of Counties, 
four more than in the last elections in 
1993. The Social Democrats gained 
three seats for a total of four. ( AP) 

Ulster Church Bums 

BELFAST — A Roman CathoUc 
church in Northern Ireland was set 
afire Tuesday amid a growing wave of 
attacks on churches and community 
halls by rival Protestant unionists and 
Irish CathoUc hard-liners. 

Security officials said the interior of 
the church in Stoneyford, County An- 
trim, sustained severe damage. It was 
the fourth CathoUc church in the Brit- 
ish-ruled province to be burned this 
month. (Reuters) 


Rival Party Enters 
Tax Talks With Kohl 
With ‘Will to Agree’ 

Reuters 

BONN — Chancellor Hclmur 
Kohl met Tuesday with leaders of 
the opposition Social Democrats 
for talks on tax reforms that are 
seen by both sides as a last chance 
to achieve an early deal to boost 
jobs and investment 

Arriving for the negotiations, 
the Social Democratic leader, Os- 
kar Lafontaine, said: * 'We are go- 
ing into these talks with a will to 
agree. We want results” 

“Any decision that serves the 
battle against unemployment will 
win our support” he added. 

Peter Hintze, general secretary of 
Mr. Kohl’s Christian Democratic 
Union, said if the talks failed the 
govermnentwould try to get its own 
legislation through die Bundestag 
before the summer break. 


EU Agrees to Cut Fish Catches 
As France and Britain Lose 


Camp&d hr Ovr Fian Dapatcha 

LUXEMBOURG — In an 
effort to restore Europe's 
dwindling fish stocks, the 
European Union on Tuesday 
voted to reduce fish catches 
by as much as a third. 

After two days of talks, EU 
fishery ministers decided, 13 
to 2. to cut fishing in the wa- 
ters of the 15-nation Union 
further. The cuts of up to 30 
percent cover a five-year 
period to the end of 2001. 

France and Britain were 
the only countries to vote 
against the plan, which leaves 
it up to members to decide 
how to achieve fishing reduc- 
tions of 30 percent for en- 
dangered species like cod and 
herring. 

Reductions of 20 percent 
will be imposed for other 
varieties that are over-fished 
but not yet facing extinction. 


The agreement affects only 
boats that are longer than 12 
meters. Targets must be 
reached within five years, 
either by taking ships out of 
use or by reducing the number 
of days a ship spends at sea. I 
Britain’s fisheries minister, ! 
Tony Baldry, vowed to ignore , 
the cuts, protesting what he 
said was the EU’s permissive 
policy toward “quota hop- 
ping” — the practice by 
which foreign brats can buy 
up British fish licenses. 

“We are not prepmed to 
continue to see a situation 
where over a quarter of the 
British fishing fleet is for- 
eign -owned and foreign-con- 
trolled," Mr. Baldry said 
after the vote. 

Fisheries is one of the few 
areas where the EU sets na- 
tional quotas, he noted. 

(AP, Reuters ) 




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NATO -Russia Talks Hit 
6 Red Lines’ and Stall 


Moscow Wants Promises From Solana 
New Members Won’t Upgrade Forces 


By William Drozdiak 

WuhtH.ijfiM Poji Service 


BERLIN — Negotiations between 
NATO and Russia on a new security 
partnership have stalled on Moscow’s 
refusal to accept any upgrade in military 
infrastructure on the territory of new 
members in the east, senior NATO dip- 
lomats said Tuesday. 

The NATO secretary-general, Javier 
Solan3 Madariaga, held four hours of 
intensive discussions in Moscow with 
the Russian foreign minister, Yevgeni 
Primakov, to cry to clear up lingering 
points of dispute. But they failed to make 
breakthroughs that NATO officials 
hoped would clear the way fora signing 
ceremony by NATO and Russian 'lead- 
ers next month. 

After the fourth round of negotiations 
that began in January. Mr. Solana and 
Mr. Primakov issued a terse declaration 
thatnoted “a convergence of positions" 
on some issues. 

But they said “complex questions re- 
main to be resolved in order to achieve a 
mutually acceptable document on re- 
lations between NATO and Russia.” 

Mr. Solana flew back to Brussels on 
Tuesday evening and it.imediaiely con- 
vened a meeting of ambassadors from 
the alliance's 16 members to assess the 
results of his talks with Mr. Primakov 
and to ponder the nexL phase in the 
negotiations. 

“We are now confronted by what 
appear to be red lines for both sides." a 
senior NATO diplomat said. “The Rus- 
sians say they can’t make further con- 
cessions or they will lose support in the 
Duma and their military hierarchy. But 
the allies also can’t move any further or 
we would jeopardize the rights of new 
members." 

NATO diplomats said the charter text, 
which runs about 15 pages, is about 80 
percent complete. There is full agree- 
ment on a political section that includes a 
statement of general principles, areas of 
mutual cooperation and the format of a 
permanent consultative council in which 
Russian and NATO representatives will 
meet on a regular basis. 

Bur there are stubborn disagreements 
in the final section involving the military 


makov is still demanding binding com- 
mitments that the alliance will not sta- 
tion troops or nuclear weapons on the 
territory of new member states, nor 
move any of NATO's military infra- 
structure closer to Russia's border. 

NATO has declared it has "no in- 
tention, no plans and no reason" to 
move nuclear weapons closer to Russia. 
Nor does it see any need to deploy sub- 
stantial numbers of combat troops on the 
soil of new members. And in the current 
security environment. NATO officials 
say rapid reaction forces based in West- 
ern Europe will be adequate to guarantee 
the defense of new eastern members. 

But NATO insists it cannot give etern- 


al guarantees because nobody can pre- 
dict the future security environment The 


implications of NATO enlargement. 
U.S. and NATO officials say Mr. Pri- 


dict the future security environment The 
allies say they must remain flexible 
enough to change strategy and do 
whatever is necessary to ensure the 
safety of all members. 

Mr. Solana has told Mr. Primakov that 
any unconditional ban on moving 
NATO troops and equipment to the ter- 
ritory of eastern states would compro- 
mise their membership rights. Under 
NATO’s founding treaty, an attack 
against one member’s territory must be 
created as an attack against them all. 

NATO has proposed a package of 
confidence-building measures de- 
signed to ease Russian anxieties about 
the encroachment of a Western mil- 
itary alliance it once considered its 
mortal enemy. The allies have offered 
to inform the Russians about transfers 
of troops and equipment and to let 
them attend exercises, carry out on- 
base inspections and even monitor 
NATO airspace. 

Mr. Primakov, however, argues that 
these assurances are not sufficient unless 
Russia receives absolute commitments 
that any improvement in the war-fight- 
ing capability of NATO’s prospective 
members — likely to be Poland, Hun- 
gary and the Czech Republic — will not 
change the balance of military power on 
the Continent in a way that could 
threaten Russia. 

Even though the Russian government 
says it now accepts the view that NATO 
is a defensive alliance, it soil expresses 
fears that the military impact of NATO 
expansion will pose intolerable security 
risks. 



U.S. Envoy to Hold 
Talks With Arafat 


JERUSALEM — The U.S. spe- 
cial envoy, Dennis Ross, wul meet 
with Yasser Arafat in Gaza on Wed- 
nesday to discuss reviving the peace 
talks between the Palestinians and 
Israel, a Palestinians official said 
Tuesday. The negotiations have 
been suspended for a month. 

Prime Minister Benjamin Netan- 
yahu's office said the time of Mr. 
Netanyahu's meeting with Mr. Ross 

had yet to be set. Israeli radio had 
said the U.S. envoy would meet 
with the prime minister on Wed- 
nesday. .. „ 

"Dennis Ross will meet Pres- 
ident Arafat in Gaza at 7:30 PAL to 
discuss ways to salvage the peace 
process suspended by Israeli in- 
transigence," said Tayeb Abdel 

Rahim, general secretary of the 
Palestinian presidency. 

He also said that Deputy Foreign 
Minister Viktor Posuvalyuk of Rus- 
sia would meet with Mr. Arafat in 
Gaza car Thursday. (Reuters) 


Watch on Nigeria 


Mr. Primakov, left, and Mr. Solana at the start of their talks Tnesday in Moscow. The levity did not last long. 


Ukraine Quits Iran Reactor Deal 


By Michael R. Gordon 

New York Tuna Service 


MOSCOW — Responding to Amer- 
ican and Israeli appeals. Ukraine has 
decided against providing turbines for 
the nuclear reactor tha 1 Russia is selling 
to Iran. 

The decision is a victory for Western 
efforts to curtail nuclear cooperation 
with Iran. American officials said they 
hoped it would delay the Russian project 
but did not expect it to prevent the sale of 
the reactor. 

Ukraine *s decision was discussed ar a 
meeting in Kiev on Monday between the 
Ukrainian president. Leonid Kuchma, 
and Natan Scharansky, the Israeli min- 
ister of industry and trade. 

Mr. Scharansky disclosed the de- 
cision in a telephone interview. Amer- 
ican officials said later that they had 
received similar assurances. 

At the heart of the issue is a Russian 
decision to sell a nuclear power reactor 


to Iran, a move that has long been a 
major irritant in U.S. -Russian relations. 

The cash-starved Russian nuclear es- 
tablishment insists the reactor will be 
open to inspection and used for peaceful 
purposes. The sale is also part of Mo- 
scow’s diplomatic campaign to nurture 
closer ties with Tehran. 

But American and Israeli officials 
said they feared that the sale of the 
reactor would help Iran develop its nu- 
clear expertise and aid its drive to de- 


bines for these Russian power reactors/' 
an American official noted. 

American officials said the Ukrainians 
might also have been interested in 
providing other components, like pumps, 
as weU as services, like welding. 


Ukraine’s involvement in the project 
is a major impediment to closer U.S.- 


was a major impediment to closer U.S.- 
Ukrainian ties. Officials said it-had pre- 
cluded cooperation on commercial nu- 
clear technology. 

Israel was also alarmed. Mr. Schar- 
ansky said that the Israeli government 
asked Mr. Kuchma to back out of the 
deal when the Ukrainian president vis- 
ited Israel several months ago. 

After repeated appeals. Mr. Kuchma 
signaled during a private meeting in 
Kiev on Monday that Ukraine would not 
take part in the reactor project, Mr. 
Scharansky said. 

American officials said that Mr. 
Scharansky ’s information was also con- 
sistent with private assurances that the 
United States received. 


velop nuclear weapons. 

while U.S. -Russian differences over 
the project have been well-publicized, 
Ukraine’s involvement in the project. has 
been less well known. 

A Ukrainian company. Turboatom, 
was planning to sell several turbines for 
the power reactor, working as a sub- 
contractor to the Russian Ministry of 
Atomic Energy, according to American 
officials. 

“There are only a couple of compa- 
nies in the world that build the big tur- 


GENEVA — Condemning im- 
prisonment and executions of gov- 
ernment opponents, the UN Human 
R igh ts C ommissio n overcame Afric- 
an opposition and voted Tuesday to 
put Nigeria under special scrutiny. 

As a result, the United Nations 
will appoint a special investigator 
on Nigeria under a procedure re- 
served for serious violators such as 
Burma, Iran. Iraq and Sudan. 

Die resolution expresses deep 
concern at “continuing violations of 
human rights and fundamental 
freedoms in Nigeria, including ar- 
bitrary detention.’’ The vote was 28 
to 6. with 19 abstentions, mainly 
from African countries. (AP) 


Tibet Talks Sought 


BILBAO, Spain (Combined Dis- 
patches) — The Dalai Lama said 
Tuesday that be was ready to ne- 
gotiate Tibet's future as soon as 
Beijing indicated it was ready. 
Talks could take place anywhere 
and with no preconditions, be said. 

Beijing said earlier Tuesday that 
a channel for talks between Beijing 


and the Dalai Lama remained open. 
But the Foreign Ministry accused 
the exiled god-king of Tibet of fad- 


ing to renounce independence. 

■ The Dalai Lama said he was not 


Juppe Promises Kinshasa Is Crippled for a Second Day by Opposition 


demanding Tibetan independence. 

"The Chinese government is 
very •' distrustful and dunks 
everything is a separatist move- 
ment," be said. (AFP, Reuters) 


To End Illegal 


Phone-Tapping 


By Garry Pierre-Pierre 

New York Times Service 


Reuters 

PARIS — Prime Minister Alain 
Juppe pledged Tuesday to stamp out 
illegal phone-tapping, a practice at 
the bean of a scandal darkening 
President Francois Mitterrand's 
legacy. 

"I intend to put an end to totally 


deplorable practices that j 
individual freedoms/’ d 


individual freedoms/’ the center- 
right prime minister added to cheers 
from his party’s deputies days after 
new revelations of wire-tapping un- 
der Mr. Mitterrand’s presidency 
from 1981 to 1995. 

Files from Mr. Mitterrand’s 
former anti-terrorist cell, extracts of 
which were published by the media, 
show he personally oversaw wide- 
spread illegal taps of journalists, 
lawyers and politicians. Many pa- 
pers carried his handwritten com- 
ment: “Vu” (“Seen"). 

Later, Paul Bouchet. head of the 
National Commission for Control 
of Intercepts and Security, handed 
his annual report to Mr. Juppe, and 
Mr. Bouchet said France’s record 
on phone bugging was not bad by 
international standards. 

“We're trying to bolster the rule 
of law in our country/’ Mr. Bouchet 
said. “It is already better than many 
people say. It does not suffer in a 
comparison with many foreign 
countries." 

He declined to discuss his report 
before a news conference set for on 
Thursday. 


KINSHASA, Zaire — This sprawling 
capital city struggled for the second day 
to return to normalcy as a strike called by 
the opposition forced stores to close their 
doors and impeded travel, crippling the 
usually bustling city. 

In the last two days, as rebels continue 
their advance throughout the country, 
supporters of the recently ousted prime 
minister. Etienne Tshisekedi, have 
brought the capital to a halt while de- 
manding that President Mobutu Sese 
Seko step down. 

The strike Tuesday was to be a "mo- 
torized’’ march where students were to 
commandeer cans and parade throughout 
the streets. But it had the unwitting effect 
of shutting down the city, giving the 
opposition more power. 


A heavy military presence, however, 
evented students from seizing cars as 


prevented students from seizing cars as 
planned. Throughout the day, truckloads 
of soldiers armed with automatic 


weapons roamed the streets, and major 
thoroughfares were blocked off. pre- 
venting students from reaching schools 
where they could gather. 

[South Africa on Tuesday predicted 
dramatic progress within days in ending 
the civil war in Zaire and said that the 
rebel leader, Laurent Kabila, might visit 
the country soon, Reuters reported from 
Cape Town. 

[Deputy Foreign Minister Aziz Pahad 
said that South Africa would accelerate 
efforts to make possible talks between Mr. 
Kabila and the ailing Marshal Mobutu. 

[But Mr. Pahad said reports that Mr. 
Kabila was in South Africa or expected 
in the country on Tuesday were pre- 
mature.] 

Opposition leaders quickly called the 
day of protest a success, and said that even 
if their intention had not been to close 
down the city, die message had been sent 
that they wield significant power here. 

"It is intended to show the powers 
here that they represent nothing at all, 
except for the money that they can dis- 


tribute," said Marcel Mbayo, a top aide 
to Mr. Tshisekedi. "It is to show the 
political class that it is not in communion 
with the people. And it is to show Kabila 
and anyone else that we are here and we 
have waged a struggle." 

The show of force in recent days by 
Mr. Tshisekedi and his Union for Social 
Progress and Democracy was as much a 
message to Mr. Kabila as to Marshal 
Mobutu, diplomats and analysts here 
said. 

‘ ‘Tshisekedi knows that unless he acts 
decisively, he risks irrelevancy/’ said a 
Western diplomat who spoke on con- 
dition of anonymity. "But I’m not quite 
sure how Kabila will interpret any of 
this/’ 

The rebels, known as the Alliance of 
Democratic Forces for the Liberation of 
the Congo — Mr. Kabila has said he 
intends to restore the name Congo to the 
country — have targeted Kikwit, about 
400 kilometers (250 utiles) southeast of 
Kinshasa, as their next conquest. 

On Tuesday, the Zairian government 


admitted for the first time that the war, 
which began last October in eastern 
Zaire, was not going well for it But 
officials blamed the civilian government 
of former Prime Minister Ken go Wa 
Dondo for the rout saying it gave the 


JEWS: 


generals little money to fight the war. 

Information Minister Kin-Kiey Mu- 
(umbu said chat Zaire was prepared to 
issue a warrant for Mr. Kengo for pil- 
laging the country’s coffer before leav- 
ing office last month. 

In their advance, the rebel army has 
waged a successful psychological war- 
fare, spreading rumors, dropping tracks 
and using infiltrators to announce their 
imminent arrival. So government offi- 
cials here have come to believe the me: 
dia. particularly the international press. 


A Russian Scapegoat 

Continued from Page 1 


branches of academia, business and gov- 
ernment. Russians still brand Judaism as 
a nationality like Russian or Armenian 
ethnicity. But in new internal passports, 
not yet issued, citizens will no longer 


required to list their nationality. 
Russian Jews, who are estim 


are part of the rebels’ ploy. 

During a news conference here, Mr. 
Kin-Kiey accused the international press 
of demoralizing the Zairian Army. 

"This is a media war/’ said Mr. Kin- 
Kiey. “The press has become more and 
more intolerable." 


ENGLISH: With Expensive Private Lessons All the Rage, Seoul Decides to Crack Down 


Continued from Page 1 


ISRAEL: 

Indictments Forecast 


Continued from Page 1 


top political aide, acted as a conduit in 
negotiations between Mr. Deri and the 
prime minister over the Bar-On appoint- 
ment and that investigators recommen- 
ded that Mr. Lieberman b? charged with 
breach of public trust. 

Mr. Netanyahu has denied he knew 
anything about a deal, as have Mr. Deri, 
Mr. Hanegbi, Mr. Lieberman and Mr. 
Bar-On. The prime minister refused 
comment on the reported recommen- 
dations. 

On Monday, Mr. Lieberman was 
questioned by the police for seven hours 
before they ended the investigation. 

A police announcement said that the 
chief investigator. Sando Mazor, gave 
Ms. Arbel a 995 -page report. 


are raking in all the business. 

The language boom poses new prob- 
lems for the South Korean government. 
Government officials have been aiming 
to even out education opportunities, so 
that rich children do not have a greater 
advantage. Last month, the Education 
Ministry mandated that English be 
taught to all third graders, effectively 
making it illegal for those students to 
take private English lessons. 

South Korean students are recognized 
internationally as top-flight, but there is 
growing concern about the huge sums of 
cash that families are paying for cram 
schools and tutors. It is common for 
families to spend more than SI 0,000 on 
extra lessons in a variety of subjects for a 
child in primary school. 

There are also worries about the toll 
on children who spend 18 hours a day 
studying, with little time to play or so- 
cialize. under pressure to pass exams and 
gain admittance to top schools. 

Even government officials acknowl- 


edge that a single law cannot stop South 
Korean parents determined to give their 
children the best opportunities. 

So far authorities have not prosecuted 
any parents on an English-language rap, 
but some parents who have flouted the 
no- tutoring law have been “given guid- 
ance," according to an official from the 
Education Ministry. 

There is more of an effort to nail the 
Americans, Australians. Canadians, and 
others who arrive on tourist visas to cash 
in illegally on the English boom. 

There are no statistics for the number 
of foreigners deported for teaching Eng- 
lish without proper visas and wont per- 
mits. but the sharp increase in die total 
number of deportations mirrors the re- 
cent boom in interest in English. Slightly 


are here legally, earn a combined 
$72,000 a year from a language institute, 
plus free housing and health insurance. 

Mr. Alandete said he could earn a lot 
more teaching “on the black market," 
but that can lead to problems. The gov- 
ernment catches some illegal tutors 
when they show up at a bank trying to 
exchange a big roU of Korean won for 
U.S. dollars. Bank officials are on alert 
for foreign era with suspiciously large 
amounts of cash. 

Money changers are required to check 
the passport and visa status of foreigners 
exchanging money, so the "backpacker 
tutor’ ’ or ‘ ‘cowboy tutor’ ’ can be tripped 
up. 

Park Bum Jin. a member of the Na- 


tion ’s best tutors into every home free of 
charge. As an added incentive for stu- 
dents to watch, questions on the national 
exams are to be discussed on the show. 

But Mrs. Koh, the mother of the 
second-grader, wants her son to learn 
English from a tutor whose native lan- 
guage is English and who has only a few 
students at a time. 

“There might be 30 children in a 
school class, and lOof them may already 


have pretty good English," she said, 
"bat those kids will be stuck with one 


"bat those kids will be stuck with one 
teacher who must teach the whole group. 
They won’t learn anything.” 


more than 30,000 people were deported 
or were asked to leave last year, almost a 


or were asked to leave last year, almost a 
20 percent annual increase. 

“There are a lot of people working 
here illegally on tourist visas; it’s a big 
business." said Miguel Alandete, 34, 
who came last year from Annapolis to 
teach English. He and his wife, Joy, who 


tional Assembly, said outlawing tutor- 
ing was “unrealistic and difficult to err- 


ing was “ unrealistic and difficult to en- 
force." 

But he said that there was no plan to 
repeal the law. 

Instead, the government is already 
planning its next tactic: television tu- 
toring. Backed by government funding, 
public television will soon bring the na- 


KOREA: 

U.S. Aid Is Increased 


Continued from Page I 


BELGIUM: Report on Child Sex Killings Cites Police Blunders 


Continued from Page 1 


nur 

Vrfo and Antiques 

i'Vitn SalunJiiv 


officials and victims' families. It re- 
counted bow the police, acting on a tip 
that Mr. Dutroux was constructing base- 
ment cells to hide children, found him 
working there but accepted his explan- 
ation that he was building a new drain- 
age system. It also described how of- 
ficers later searched the basement twice 
while two kidnapped children were in- 
side. and heard girls' voices, but thought 
they came from the street. 

Warnings from the mother of Mr. 
Dutroux, a convicted child rapist, were 
ignored by the police; a magistrate went 
on vacation at a crucial stage in the 
investigation; and parents of the victims 


were dismissed as irritants by inves- 
tigators. the report found. 

"If the right derisions had been taken 
in 1995, the children would without 
doubt have been found, perhaps alive.” 
the report said. 

The committee called for an overhaul 
of Belgium’s police, replacing the cur- 
rent three services — the local police, 
judicial police and die national gen- 
darmerie — with one local and one 
national service. It also said the Brussels 
prosecutor, Benoit Deiemeppe. “did not 
folfill the conditions of his job, saying 
he failed to supervise his team of in- 
vestigators. 

"There was a flagrant failure to pass 
information between the prosecutors and 


the police/ ’ said Nathalie de T’Serclaes, 
a committee member who presented foe 
recommendations to Parliament. 

The report also detailed a number of 


other proposed changes that the gov- 
ernment of Prime Minister Jean-Luc De- 
haene has already endorsed, including 
giving victims’ families the same access 
to criminal investigations as defendants. 

Mr. Dutroux has been charged with 
murder and Michel N3houL a business- 
man, has been charged as an accomplice 
in tile deaths of four girls, while another 
convicted child mobster. Patrick 
Derocbette, has been charged with rape 
leading to the death of Loubna Benaissa, 
whose body was found stuffed in a trunk 
beneath a Brussels garage last month. 


"The arithmetic is fairly brutal/’ he 
said. 

On a recent trip to North Korea. Ms. 
Bertini said, she saw early signs of fam- 
ine and longer-term malnutrition, in- 
cluding stunted growth, listlessness, or- 
ange-tinted hair, distended bellies, thin 
limbs and blemished skin. Site was in a 
farming area in the southern region, 
where die food supply presumably 
would be better than in northern areas. 

Mr. Boms said Washington bad seen 
evidence that "the food situation in North 
Korea will reach a critical stage tins 
spring, with certain vulnerable groups. 


especially children, severely at 
cited what he called credible : 


cited what he called credible reports of 
death by starvation in the countryside. 

Through the World Food Program, 
Mr. Bums said, the United States would 
monitor aid distribution to ensure that it 
reached children. 

Some critics of food aid to the North 
have asserted that such support would 
simply permit Pyongyang to maintai n 
rations for the military ana thus help the 
Stalinist government cling to power. 


Russian Jews, who are estimated to 
number more than half a million, have 
re-established Judaism as a religion and 
a culture. Religious schools and syn- 
agogues are flourishing. 

Boris Berezovsky, a car dealer turned 
media, banking and real estate tycoon 
who is deputy chairman of the National 
Security Council, is one of the more 
prominent Jews in Moscow. 

Mr. Berezovsky is a subject of con- 
troversy in Russia, and there are le- 
gitimate questions about his business 
dealings, government contracts and in- 
fluence in the Kremlin. But oddly, when 
be was appointed to his government 
post, Izvestia and other respected news- 
papers focused mainly on the fact that he 
once applied for Israeli citizenship. 

Communists and extreme nationalists 
are not shy about complaining that Jews 
control banks and the mass media. Mr. 
Berezovsky, whose company Logovaz 
owns a large stare of Russia’s largest 
television networic, ORT, is twinned in 
the public imagination with Vladimir 
Gusmsky, another powerful banker, 
who owns die second-largest nongov- 
ernment network, NTV. Mr. Gusinsky is 
also chairman of the Russian Jewish 
Congress. 

Deputy Pome Minister Anatoli 
Chubais, the country’s chief architect of 
economic reform and, accordingly, one 
of the least popular politiciansmRussiap’ 
is no t Jewish. But his more extreme 
detractors do not believe that 

Some of the namtw most freq uently 
cited as leaders of a Zionist plot to un- 
dermine tile Russian government from 
within do not quite fit foe job descrip- 
tion. Alexander Livshits, the former fi- 
nance m inister, is Jewish. He was de- 
moted in a recent cabinet shuffle. Grigori 
Yavlinsky, a leading reform economist, 
is haif-Jewish, but he is not in gov- 
ernment In fact, he is one of the gov- 
ernment's most ardent liberal .critics. 

Boris Nemtsov, foe farmer governor 
of N iz hni Novgorod who recently be- 
came first deputy prime minister in 
chage of economic reform, is Jewish. In 
ffli interview, he denied that anti-Semit- 
ism was a problem for him personally. 

*T have been elected three times, not 
by Co mmunis ts but by ordinary voters^ 
93 p ercent of whom are Russians," be 
said, referring to foe ethnic category that 
would exclude Jews. "People tend to 
judge whether you are a thief or honest, 

competent or not” 

There are signs that anti-Semitism is 
not as widespread as many Russians 
believe. The American Jewish Commit- 
ree sponsored a public opinion survey in 

SS 7 concluded that open 

nostihty to Jews was relatively low. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1997 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1997 


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PAGE 10 




INTERNATIONAL 



Srtbunc 


Pl'BLTSHED WITH THE NBtt YORK TIMES AND THE WASHIMUTIKi POST 



It bothers Americans that the Euro- 
peans, their eye on trade, seem in- 
sensitive to acts of terrorism and re- 
pression conducted by the likes of Iran 
and Cuba. But of course it bothers 
America's trading partners in Europe 
that the United States wields sanctions 
against them when they do not support 
American foreign policy in such places. 
These tensions are a well-etched fea- 
ture of the post-Cold War scene. For- 
tunately, sometimes something posi- 
tive happens to ease the strain. 

In a particularly raw case, the United 
States had penalized the European Un- 
ion. in the so-called Helms-Burton le- 
gislation, for dealing in expropriated 
Cuban property. The EU responded by 
filing a complaint against Washington, 
in the dispute-settling World Trade Or- 
ganization, for trying to extend Amer- 
ican embargo law beyond American 
temtoiy. No party has acted entirely 
from high principle in this dispute. But 
both finally accepted the need to head 
off a major collision that could have 
spoiled a fledgling trade institution, the 
WTO. that is critical to American as 
well as European free trade interests. 
Key legislators remain skeptical, but 
the Clinton administration and the 
European Union have bought time to 
work out joint and improved standards 
for the protection of property rights. 


Meanwhile, American efforts to en- 
list the Europeans in isolating Iran 
have received a boost A German court 
convicted three Iranians for the murder 
of three Kurdish dissidents in Berlin 
after finding that the killings had been 
ordered by an Iranian body including 
the country's president and its para- 
mount spiritual leader. Faced with 
these facts from one of their own. the 
Europeans had no choice but to ter- 
minate the “critical dialogue" by 
which they had spun the made-pro- 
tecting illusion of Iranian moderation, 
and to expel Iranian ambassadors. 
Now, If reluctantly, they are to con- 
sider targeting other items of Iranian 
travel ana commerce. 

These deliberations will go on under 
the shadow of a fresh report linking a 
senior Iranian official to the Saudi 
group suspected of the bombing in 
Saudi Arabia last June that took 19 
American lives. A finding that Iran was 
as directly responsible for the Khobar 
To were bombing as the Berlin court 
found it was in the Mykonos restaurant 
bombing would have implications ex- 
tending beyond trade. These include 
possible American military reprisal. 
Europeans who shy from that possi- 
bility can best discourage it by getting 
tough on the economic side. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


At Fault in Dhahran 


It will be interesting to see if Defense 
Secretary William Cohen has the moxie 
to hold the U.S. Air Force accountable 
for security failures in Saudi Arabia last 
year. So far the Pentagon’s handling 
of the terrorist bombing in Dhahran 
that killed 19 American airmen and 
wounded hundreds has followed a dis- 
mally familiar script. The Air Force 
high command has sloughed off re- 
sponsibility, betting that top civilians 
will once again bow to the shopworn 
argument that punishing a commander 
is unfair and would damage morale. 

Mr. Cohen, who knew how to cut 
through thick Pentagon smokescreens 
as a senator, can set an admirably ex- 
acting standard by overturning the Air 
Force decision. The principle of civilian 
leadership of the military requires the 
application of independent judgment in 
cases like this. Since Air Force Sec- 
retary Sheila Widnall seems a willing 
captive of her service. Mr. Cohen must 
show that accountability in the military 
is not governed by the protective in- 
stincts of the officer corps. 

The security breakdown at the 
Khobar Towers apartment complex in 
Dhahran last June is beyond dispute. 
Although safeguards were enforced to 
prevent a suicide truck bomber from 
entering the compound, the towers 
were left exposed to attack from a 
nearby parking area. When a large 
truck bomb was detonated there last 
June, die explosion sheared off the 
northern facade of two towers. 

The perimeter security fence was 
barely 35 meters from die buildings. 
Despite intelligence warnings about a 
possible terrorist attack. Air Force 
commanders made only a feeble effort 
to extend the perimeter. Even the most 
elementary and inexpensive defense 
— covering windows with a plastic 


film to prevent shattering — was not 
used. Many of die deaths and injuries 
were caused by flying glass. 

These and other lapses were made 
plain in a Pentagon investigation con- 
ducted by a retired Army general. 
Wayne Downing. The Downing report 
concluded that Brigadier General 
Terryl Schwalier, the Air Force com- 
mander in Dhahran, “did not ad- 
equately protect his forces from a ter- 
rorist attack." General Schwalier did 
not even bother io make security a 
primary concern on his watch. 

Now comes General Ronald Fogle- 
man, the Air Force chief of staff, ar- 
guing that the case for accountability is 
nothing more than a Washington scalp 
hunt. His view, in essence, is that Gen- 
eral Schwalier and his staff did 
everything they reasonably could to 
secure the compound and that the 
method and explosive power of the 
bombing exceeded any threat that 
could have been anticipated. 

Yet the destruction of die Alfred P. 
Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma 
City 14 months before the Dhahran 
attack showed die power of a large 
truck bomb placed near but not inside a 
high-rise bunding. It was lesson enough 
for the Secret Service, which quickly 
dosed a stretch of Pennsylvania Av- 
enue to expand the security perimeter 
around the white House. 

General Fogleman mistakes his 
blind loyalty for leadership. Morale is 
not served by dodging responsibility 
and circling the wagons around a fellow 
officer. Perhaps honor and duty are just 
quaint notions, but Mr. Cohen might 
actually do wonders for the morale of 
Americans in uniform if be rules that 
the Air Force cannot escape respon- 
sibility for its failures in Dhahran. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


By the time he turns 30, Tiger 
Woods may have nothing left to do but 
retire and write his memoirs. That at 
least is the impression you could have 
had on Sunday evening when the 21- 
year-old golfer made his momentous 
walk onto the green at Augusta Na- 
tional's 18th hole to wrap up the mosr 
decisive major tournament victory 
anyone has scored in this century. 

It would be a false Impression, of 
course. So much has happened so fast 
in Tiger Woods's compressed and su- 
perheated athletic career that it is easy 
to forget that only last Thursday he was 
on the verge of blowing himself right 
out of the Masters tournament when he 
shot a horrendous (for him) 40 on the 
first nine holes of the first round. But 
then he readjusted his game in mid- 
course, recorded a 30 on the back nine 
and never faltered again. 

He will have many more such mo- 
ments when self-doubt overtakes him in 
front of 10,000 people on some per- 
versely challenging course. It is the 
nature of a game in which there is no 
opponent to put a hand in your face or try 
to knock you down or throw a fastball 
past you. but only yourself to overcome 


— and understand. He also will have 
distractions at home ro cope with, more 
money than any young man should have 
showered on him, and swarms of kiddie 
fans and photographers and cameramen 
following his every move. 

How he handles these things will be 
the great story about Tiger Woods and 
the ftiture of the game he plays. So far, 
so good. With his beautiful swing and 
confident stride, this African-Asian na- 
tive American is bringing millions of 
new fens to what has historically been 
the most exclusive of pastimes — ex- 
clusive especially with regard to race. 

It would be nice, of course, if people 
could disregard Tiger Woods's ethnic 
origins, but that is not exactly an es- 
tablished tradition at places such as the 
Augusta club, which admitted its first 
black members only six years ago. or in 
the Masters, where Lee Elder became 
the first African-American participant 
28 years after Jackie Robinson joined 
the Dodgers. On Sunday, anyway, it 
was nice enough just to see the black 
cops in the Tiger Woods detail wallring 
tali with him toward the 18th green at 
Augusta National. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Making Golf History 



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I 61997. Imenusiomd fferqlJ Trihune : All right named. ISSN: 0294-8052 



I 




WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1997 



EDITORIALS/OPINION 


I l 


{ Union 


How Peace in Zaire Can Help Transform 



P RETORIA — "The shape of Africa 
resembles a revolver, ' ’ the Algerian 
author of “Wretched of the Earth," 
Franz Fanon, wrote, ‘‘and Zaire is the 
trigger." The image captures the central 
importance of Zaire to Africa. Trouble 
in Zaire means trouble everywhere. 

It was King Leopold of Belgium's 
effort to secure the wealth of what is 
now Zaire that led to the Berlin Con- 
ference of 1884 at which the colonial 
powers divided Africa into spheres of 
influence and imposed most of the con- 
tinent's present-day national borders. 

The centrality of Zaire during the 
Cold War led the West, fearing Soviet 
influence, to condone the establishment 
in Zaire and elsewhere in Central Africa 
of autocratic regimes in the 1 960s. 

The collapse of those regimes today 
can either trigger catastrophe across the 
whole of Central Africa or. if resolved 
wisely, lead to the most important post- 
Cold War development on the continent 
since Nelson Mandela came to power in 
South Africa: peaceful integration of 
the Great Lakes region that transcends 
the artificially grafted colonial borders 
and makes prosperity possible. 

Zaire anchors that part of Africa 
which has the greatest potential for 
development It has great mineral 
wealth — diamonds, gold, copper and 
cobalt. It has high population density 
but the capacity to feed not only its own 
people but also the test of Africa. 

Because of the water supply and 
extensive irrigation systems, the Great 
Lakes region could become Africa's 
breadbasket. And large amounts of 
land and resources remain unexplqited, 
which is why so many international 
companies, as well as the big powers, 
are so interested in the fate of Zaire. 
Because of the vast migration of 


By Mohammed Sahnoun 


countries that border it but also with 
countries from East to West Africa. 

Consequently, if Zaire implodes and 
refugees spill out. it will spread the 
kind of chaos and destabilization, al- 
though on a vaster scale, with which we 
are already so tragically familiar in 
Rwanda and Burundi. 

If, instead, these links between many 
peoples become the basis of a more 
integrated region, in which wealth and 
resources ore shared, Zaire could be- 
come the other leg, along with South 
Africa, by which Africa gets on its feet 

Unfortunately, during the Cold War 
Zaire’s potential was squandered. Gov- 
ernment mismanagement, corruption 


The final wave 
of African 
independence is at 
last under way . 


populations over the centuries, Zaire 
has trite 


tribal links not only with the nine 


and violations of human rights were 
allowed to fester because Zaire was an 
ally in die global battle against com- 
munism. The West closed its eyes. 

One result of that policy was that no 
professional -managerial class, or even 
an independent business class, 
emerged that had any power to in- 
fluence affairs when the Cold War 
ended. The country had. no strategy for 
development, only a regime of graft. 

This era of what the Nobel laureate 
Wole Soyinka calls the “toad kings" 
of Africa is coming to an end, not only 
in Zaire but in the rest of Africa. They 
will not go easily, but the old guard, 
which took over after independence 


and became die corrupt political class, 
has exhausted its power. The final 
wave of African independence is at last 
under way, with the coming to power of 
a new generation of activists who de- 
mand human rights and development 

The United Nations peace plan de- 
signed to make way for this transition 
while bringing security and stability to 
the Great Lakes region has two main 
components: 

• There must be security and sta- 
bility in and around Zaire. 

The rebel leader Laurent Kabila now 
practically controls the rich, eastern 
pan of Zaire. Kinshasa is cut of from 
resources and isolated. So in the short 
term our effort is to negotiate a soft 
landing, a political solution to the trans- 
fer of power, not a military one. 

This means that, for stability’s sake, 
this last phase must be an inclusive one. 
To humiliate the old guard by driving 
them unceremoniously from power 
will only ensure that they will regroup 
somewhere, sometime, to wreak havoc 
on any new government and continue 
to destabilize the region. 

That is why we are encouraging Mr. 
Kabila's movement to look for the 
peaceful compromise of a coalition 
government in Kinshasa. At the same 
time, the government must understand 
that fundamental change is necessary 
and the old regime is at an end. * 

The central question in Zaire at this 
moment is not about which personality 
will rule. The real issue is the estab- 
lishment of a capable governing class, 
including key elements of civil society, 
that can stably run a modem state. 

• Second, under United Nations aus- 
pices an international conference will 
be convened that I call the anti-Berlin 
conference. 

The Berlin Conference of 1884 es- 
tablished borders which divided areas 


lived together 
natunmy, not knowing \fter national 
borders were. The movement of people 
and the trade in goods task no bounds . 
The whole of Central Africa existed as 
one region. 

hi a sense, die aim of ails new con- 
ference will be to erase, the colonial 
intent of dividing up *e spoils with state 
boundaries and seek i nstead to share 
them through new intestate coopaa- 
tion, beginning with a common market 
The aim is to take advantage of die 
population links that aready exist to 
create a web of relationsups not only in 
trade but also within dvil society — 
small business, the rcigious leadens. 


women's groups, the i 
st, the crit 


not least, the critically i 
elders. These groups 
dialogue across 
Only an approach 
free movement of p 
across Central Africa, 
ity of population can be 
the available resources, v 
trend of crumbling states 
approach can hope to 
investment. 

A peaceful transition 
Zaire can trigger change 
across the whole continen 


ntsiaand. 
po riant tribal 
essential for 


enables the 
e and goods 
at the dens- 
with 
reverse the 
y such an 
ice foreign 


I* 


. ittt'i* 




,'t 


-.i 


power in 
the better 


The writer, an Algerian Iplomat, is 
the special representative oUie United 
Nations and the OrganizaOn of Afri- 
can Unity for tfie Great LakA region cf 
Africa. He is conducting njptuuions 
in South Africa with the paies for a 
peaceful transition ofpowekn Zaire. 
As part of the peace plan. }e is or- 
ganizing an international ckference 
aimed at creating a new re&nal in- 
tegration of Central Africanjates as 
the longer-term solution to joy in the 
area. This comment was districted by 
the Los Angeles Times Syndict 


Xenophobic Hysteria Toward China Isn’t the American my 



P HILADELPHIA — * ‘Amer- 
ica does not go abroad in 
search of monsters to destroy." 
said John Quincy Adams in 
1821, and Americans have tend- 
ed to obey that dictum. 

They declared war on Britain 
in 1812 only after IS years of 
grievances, on Mexico in 1846 
after a decade of strife over 
Texas, and on Spain in 1898 
after years of slaughter in Cuba. 
They were late entrants in both 
world wars, and reluctant cold 
warriors. Perhaps the United 
States should have identified 
some of its foes as “monsters" 
much sooner. But that is not die 
American style. 

So why are so many people 
now eager to brand China an 
archenemy? Do they see the 


By Waller A. McDoogaU 


People’s Republic as the rein- 
ofN 


carnation of Nazi Germany or 
Stalinist Russia? Are they hop- 
ing to advance their careers, 
score points against President 
Bill Clinton, unite fractious Re- 
publicans, boost military spend- 
ing. promote protectionism? 

Or are they just “shocked” 
that Democrats took illegal 
donations? Americans have al- 
ways hated it when foreign 
powers appeared to meddle in 
their politics. 

Grover Cleveland made tariff 
reduction a centerpiece of his 
1 888 re-election campaign. Bri- 
tain was the champion of free 
trade. “Cleveland Runs Well in 


England" ran the Republican 
slogan. A flier falsely quoted 
The Times of London to die 
effect dial “the only time Eng- 
land can use an Irishman is 
when he emigrates to America 
and votes for free trade." 

The attacks did not hit home 
until the Los Angeles Times got 
hold of a letter written by the 
British ambassador. Sir Lionel 
Sackville-West, indicating that 
Mr. Cleveland was preferable 
to Benjamin Harrison. Mr. 
Cleveland demanded that die 
ambassador be recalled to Lon- 
don, but the president's cam- 
paign was doomed. 

In Federalist No. 3, John Jay 
warned that factionalism would 
expose die United States to 
“foreign arms and influence,” 
and the 1790s brought ample 
evidence of that danger. 

Citizen Genet, the first rep- 
resentative of the French Rev- 
olution to America, seeded the 
states with French money. Sec- 
retary of State Edmund Ran- 
dolph allegedly tunneled foreign 
dollars to the Whiskey Rebel- 
lion. Jeffersonians accused Fed- 
eralists (notably Jay) of being 
flacks for British plutocrats. 

No wonder George Wash- 
ington condemned “perma- 
nent, inveterate antipathies 
against particular nations and 
passionate attachments for oth- 


ers,” lest America become “in 
some degree a slave. ' ’ 

Indeed, American exception- 
alism in foreign policy lies less 
in utopian dreams of a new di- 
plomacy than in a fierce com- 
mitment to sovereign freedom 
from foreign corruption. The 
trouble is. this longing for polit- 
ical purity is itself utopian. 

Ever since Herod Agrippa 
took up residence in imperial 
Rome to lobby on behalf of his 
fellow Jews, governments have 
tried to nudge the domestic pol- 
itics, and hence the foreign 
policies, of others. 

Louis XTV's gold tinkled in 
every chancery In Europe, and 
subsidies to foreign rulers were 
the weapon of first resort for 
British intelligence. French 
money underwrote the Americ- 
an Revolution, and czarist bribes 
greased the Russian transfer of 
Alaska through Congress. 

Before World War L France, 
Germany and Russia subsidized 
newspapers in each other’s cap- 
itals. In imperial China it was 
customary for treaties to be lub- 
ricated with bribes to ensure 
that all relevant officials had a 
stake in their execution. 

Pristine Americans largely 
abstained from meddling in 
others’ affairs until the Cold 
War convinced them that their 
liberty was under assault by an 


Why Wink at Croatian Fascism? 

J^EW YORK — Hitler had 


By A.M. Rosenthal 


willing, no ally more passion- 
ate than the fascists of Croatia. 
They are returning. 50 years 
later, from what should have 
been their eternal grave, the 
defeat of Nazi Germany. The 
Western allies who dug that 
grave with the bodies of their 
servicemen have the power to 
stop them, but do noL 

Croatian fascists, known as 
the Ustashe, fought alongside 
German troops against Serbs, 
Muslims and Croats who were 
trying desperately, and vainly, 
to block the Nazi conquest of 
Yugoslavia. In 1941. Hitler 
rewarded Croatian fascists by 
carving out a Croatian stare 
and letting them run it. They 
did not let him down. 

The Ustashe slaughtered 
Serbs. Jews and non-fascist 
Croats — and with such glee 
and such cruelty that their 
name became a terror and 


stench throughout Europe, 
disapp 


Croatia disappeared with 
Hitler’s annihilation in 1945. 
A half-century later, the West 
created a new Croatia by re- 
cognizing the secession from 
Yugoslavia of Croatian nation- 
alias led by Franjo Tudjman. 

Not all were fascists, by any 
means, but now the Ustashe is 
running in elections, brutal- 
izing its enemies — Croat, 
Serb or Jew. Mr. Tudjman is 
giving them what they need 
most: presence, and the re- 
writing of history. 

Two documents are a short 
course on the Ustashe. To 
honor the murdered and pro- 
tect die future, read them. 

From Pages 323 to 32S of 
the Encyclopedia of the Holo- 
caust (Macmillan): “More 


than a half million Serbs were 
killed, a quarter million ex- 
pelled, 200,000 forced to con- 
vert to tiie Catholicism of the 
Croatian Fascists. 

“Thousands were hurled 
from mountain tops, others 
were beaten to death, entire vil- 
lages were burned down, wom- 
en raped, people sent on death 
marches in toe middle of 
winter, still others starved to 
death.” Ante Pavelic, the 
Ustashe leader, announced that 
the Jews would be 1 ‘liquidated 
within a very short time.’ ' They 
were, most of the 40,000. 

But some chosen as victims 
did survive. Study the picture 
of the children after the camps 
were freed. They wear only 
bones and tightened skin. 
Serbs? Jews? 

The second document is 
fine journalism from Croatia 
by New York Times corre- 
spondent Chris Hedges (IHT. 
April 12) about the rebirth of 
fascism there: the bullying, the 
sieg-ing and heil-ing in Croa- 
tian, the whole nastiness. Most 
important is Che increasing 
work of Mr. Tudjman (a long- 
time Holocaust denier) to re- 
cast the fascists as patriots and 
founders of the new Croatia. 

This man likes to talk about 
how he himself fought Ger- 
man soldiers. Now a major 
political, military and finan- 
cial beneficiary of the West, 
he permits pictures of fascists 
dead and afive to be plastered 
around the country. He gives 
special status and pensions to 
ustashe veterans. 

He tried to get the body of 
the killer-chief Pavelic re- 


turned from Spain, where he 
had fled, and mined with hon- 
or in Zagreb — like reburying 
Himmler under the linden. 
The family objected. So he 
brought back another Ustashe 
killer, this one alive, and made 
him a member of Parliament. 

Western recognition of Cro- 
atia was pushed hardest by 
Germany despite warnings 
from Bosnian Muslims that the 
riming could set off war among 
themselves, Serbs and Croats. 

Franjo Tudjman is now 
ours. The West cannot evade 
responsibility for the rebirth of 
fascism in Croatia. Peter Gal- 
braith, U.S. ambassador to 
Croatia, told me he had de- 
nounced Croatian ethnic 
cleansing of Serbs last year, 
and considered the glorifica- 
tion of the Ustashe an insult to 
Croats who fought Nazis, and 
to American veterans of World 
War EL Mr. Tudjman and his 
fascist proteges brush off am- 
bassadorial protest with insult 

Would he brush off the 
presidents of the United Stales 
and France, the British prime 
minister or the chancellor of 
Germany if they took, action to 
Stop Croatian fascism? Such 
as denouncing the Tudjman 
buildup of the Ustashe, then 
reducing Western represent- 
ation to sub-ambassadorial 
and slashing economic help to 
Croatia — die whole list? 

That win not change the 
Ustashe or improve Mr. Tudj- 
man’s sickness of body and 
character. But it could force 
him to end fascist rehabili- 
tation work. Or has die West 
become so sick itself that it 
will permit Croatian fascism 
to live on beyond the grave? 

The Ne w York Times. 


enemy whose preferred tactic 
was subversion. Whereupon 
they put all previous bribesters 
to shame, beginning in the 
1940s with covert aid to anti- 
communists in France and 
Italy, and building up to billions 
in “foreign assistance" to 
friendly and pliable regimes. 

America's munificence made 
its own politics toe target of 
every lobby on earth. Pro-Is- 
raeli, -Arab, -Greek, -Armeni- 
an. -Japanese and -Korean polit- 
ical action committees have 
been regular, legal contributors 
to American campaigns. 

Not one but four China lob- 
bies have vied for American 
support: the Christian mission- 
aries of the 1920s and ’30s who 
took China's side against Japan; 
the “old China hands’’ of die 
1940s whom McCarthyites 
deemed dupes of Mao; the 
China lobby of the 1950s and 
’60s, which Cold War liberals 
denounced as a front for Taiwan 
Nationalists; and today’s “New 
China Lobby." alleged to be in 
the pay of Beijing. 

But for all the anxiety, no 
critic has suggested that the 
American national interest was 
ever sold for 30 pieces of silver. 
On the contrary, the putative 
“pinko" Dean Acheson ag- 
gressively waged the Cold War 
in Asia, and the putative re- 
actionary Richard Nixon was 
the one who went to Beijing. 

Don’t get me wrong. If of- 
ficials are found to have com- 
promised American interest for 
foreign lucre, they should be 
dealt with as scoundrels were in 
John Quincy Adams's day: 
tarred, feathered and run out of 
town. But the fact remains that 
the United States and China 
need each other, nor Least' to 
defuse Asian time bombs like 
North Korea. 

The real danger is less that 
American foreign policy may 
be manipulated in the shadow 
of foreign donations than that it 
will be radically altered in the 
glare of xenophobic hysteria. 

The premise of the China- 
threat lobby is this: What if 
China continues its explosive 
growth, does not crack up like 
the Soviet Union, waxes nation- 
alistic, remains under the thumb 
of authoritarian leaders and 
strives for Asian military hege- 


1 States 
from 
ft we 


less 


far 


many even as die Uni 1 
grows weak and 
the Western Pacific? 
be sorry then that we 
to Beijing back in the i 

But the odds of 
what-ifs coming to p 
ceedingly long, 
decide that today's 
dragon will soon 
what would the China! 
lobby have America do? 
a ring of containing 

Not likely, because 
China goes on the 
laration of another Cold 1 
would be the surest way o: 
ing America’s Asian men 
to the arms of Beijing. 

Would the United States 
up its own military? ^ That, 
unlikely, since it has t 
Philippine bases, 
lower profile in Japan and 
soon lose its justification 
main in Korea. 

So the only 
policy available is a trade 
technology embargo of the 
imposed on the former So 
Union. But that weapon, wi 
sharp, would wound Ami 
companies and those of 
that have huge investments 
China. By some estimates, o: 
a quarter of every dollar “ 
in China" stays there in 
form of wages and taxes, 
rest flows abroad as payment ft 
management and materials or 
profits for foreign investors. ? 

Again, don’t get mei wrong. If > fl: 
China starts grinding its ueigbj 
bore or vital U.S. interests un-T -‘ . 
derfoot, it will deserve the treat'? ^ 
ment that Americans have bis-§! ; '■ 
torically afforded monsters. 

But we Americans should not 
forget that our traditional wis- } * 
dom is based bn refusing to cry L 






before we ark hurt, going the j 
to ensure Ant rtvm* t« ■ - 


extra mile to dnsure that there is 
no doubt about who is to blame, fr- 
aud letting tbi enemy take the 
first shot Only from such wis- J J 
dom ran we derive a frank, con-'. - 
structive policy toward China y ‘ 
that will serve and survive the I -f . 
Clinton administration. 


m 


■>, ' - j 




9® 


m 


The writer, -a Pulitzer Prize- ** 
winning historian, is author of 
"Promised hand. Crusader 
State: The American Encounter ~ 
With the World Vince 1 776. ” He 
■contributed th\s comment to 
The New York imes. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


v - 


. 1 • %*■— 


C-. . • _ . 


"- ii 


^ <: 



■7i. 


1897: Russia in Corea 


LONDON — The 7tmes says: 
“Russia onderstood that there 
is no fulcrum in Corea on which 
to work the lever of reform. She 
saw what the Japanese did not 
see: that no organization can 
evolve an honest administration 
where all possible administra- 
tors are corrupt to the core. She 
perceived clearly that she could 
effect no reform in Corea until 
she could control the actual 
dominant forces of the country. 

11— J L. ■ - 


Series, except luck Weaver, 
have shaken m dust of Chi- 
cago from thar boots. Joe 
Jackson disapp ned after the 
courts found no possible legal 
action against Em. Only the 
memory of the s une that they 


brought to the 
behind them. 


lingers 


1947: Pkct 


Her reward is that she is now in 
the calm enjoyment of the as- 
cendancy for which the Japan- 
lt and defeated China. 


esefou 


1922: Baseball Shame 


CHICAGO — The opening of 
the baseball season emphasises 
how the expelled members of 
the White Sox baseball team of 
1919 have passed into oblivion. 
All of the players implicated in 
the plot to throw the World 


MOSCOW — 
Foreign 

abandoned today f, 
frier attempts tone, 
power pact to 
armament and 
of Germany for ft 
the occupation. 
State George CJ 
squarely laid the bj 
failure on the Sovi 
flatly rejected a 
to extend the scope 
on the grounds that 
usurp, for the four 
treaty powers which 
the Allied nations as 


lotted 

Council of . 
virtually 
15] fiir- 
a four- 
foe dis- 
on ■ 
after * 
of 7 

Marshall - 
for the 
hion. He 


treaty 

“would 







,• j .. • -*•<: . 


• . -.-5* ■ 


tCyi;: 


st'.. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. APRIL 16, 1997 


R4GE II 


OPINION/LETTERS 


rica | 


en Ha 


* as rung Hinton , 
eeds the Facts ? 


T WASHINGTON i- Back 
'▼ when I was a loiti report- 
. I used to greatly fenvy my 
) [leagues who coMred • the 
1A. Write what y t would 
j bout the spy agency either it 
» isoonded with “no c nment” 
;■* denial that no o ; would 
j areve anyway. Afte all. its 
. |iusmess was to lie. 

; Now the Clinton W1 e House 
s in the position of thold CIA.- 
- it has. I concede, cine by its 
Might honestly — by smetimes 
lor telling the truth, y some- 
rimes not telling it irfi timely 
fashion and by somomes not 
knowing the truth. A'a result, 
there’s hardly a joumist within 
or without the Betyay who 
doesn't think that Bi, Clinton's 
first instinct, when cifronted by 
an unpleasant queion, is to 
feign amnesia. 

For Mr. Climo the’ con- 
sequences have notsen good — 
although, as you niht have no- 
ticed, he's in his se<nd term and 
: £?joying high* appval ratings, 
fit for the press, onically, the 
consequences ha been even 
worse. It seems jat for some 
publications and Smalists, Mr. 
Clinton has freedom, from any 
restraints whaisoer. 

They don't he to be fair, 
they don't have) be accurate, 
they don't have be precise and. 


*y Richard Cohen 


on occasion, they don’t even 
have to make any sense. 

We start, as we. must, with the 
conservative newspapers who 
helped establish die credibility of 
Gary Aldrich, the ex-FBI agent 
whose book, “Unlimited Ac- 
cess,*' is a mighty grim fairy tale 
of many things that did not hap- 
pen. It was Mr. Aldrich, you will 
recall, who wrote that Mr. Din- 
ton hid under a blanket and was 
sneaked out of the White House 
so he could meet some woman at 
the Marriott Hotel here. 

It turned out that Mr. Aldrich 
didn't know what he was talking 
about 

No m a tt er. The Washington 
Times and other newspapers fea- 
tured the book, and The Wall 
Street Journal, whose editorial 
and op-ed pages are toxically anti- 
Clinton, turned over some opsed 
space to Mr. Aldrich, identifying 
nun as a former FBI agent and 
an “ investigative- writer,’’ The 
former is true, the latter the worst 
sort of false labeling. 

The Washington Times, in 
particular, has been remarkably 
receptive to almost any sort of 
crackpot anti-Clinton piece. As 
my colleague Howard Kurtz has 
pointed out. it has recycled the 
mad scribblings of one Ambrose 
Evans-Pritchard, Washington 
correspondent for the London 



Corporate Gold Diggers 
Menace Montana River 

Bv David James Duncan 


Sunday Telegraph, who was 
among the first to reveal the 
“cover-up” regarding the death 
of Vincent Foster. 

The loony right's hate for Bill 
Clinton is well-nigh inexplicable. 
Its feelings transcend politics in 
the usual sense, and Mr. Clinton 
is treated not as someone with a 
different ideology, but as an il- 
legitimate president foisted on the 
country by the dark and powerful 
forces of immorality — in other 
words, misguided voters. 

Yet tbe right-wingers are nor 
alone. Even elements of the more 
mainstream press tend to treat 
Mr. Clinton as if his tendency to 
occasionally trim the truth means 
that he is an across-the-board li- 
ar, corrupt as well . and as a result, 
so loathsome a character that the 
ordinary rules of fair play need 
not be applied. 


Take, for instance, a recent 
column by Michael Kelly, die 
usually astute editor of the New 
Republic. Why. he asked, did 
Mr. Clinton not show more curi- 
osity about who had arranged for 
Webster Hubbell to be paid 
about S5 00.000 in fees in the 
year before the former associate 
attorney general went to jail? 
The answer. Mr. Kelly says, is 
that Mr. Clinton already knew: 
his friends and White House as- 
sociates. Fair enough. 

But then Mr. Kelly goes on to 
call the fees “hush money” and 
note that “Hubbell has indeed 
hushed up.” Well, maybe he has 
— although Mr. Hubbell says he 
merely has nothing more to re- 
veal. But however suspicious the 
payments might seem, there is no 
proof they amounted to hush 
money and, anyway, we don't 


icha.*zd ye end 


even know what supposedly was 
hushed up. Surely, the word “al- 
leged” or “purported" belongs 
in there somewhere. 

It may turn out that all this 
speculation is right on the money 
— that Whitewater is another 
Teapot Dome. Mr. Foster was 
muixlered by the CIA. the billing 
records were hidden in a Cali* 
forma cult-house and (much 
more likely) the Clinton admin- 
istration broke the law in the way 
it raised campaign funds. But 
none of thar has yet been proved 
nor, 1 might point oul alleged in 
a court of law. 

Until that happens, it seems to 
me that the press ought io treat 
Bill Clinton no differently than it 
does anyone else — with healthy 
skepticism, of course, but with 
due regard for the facts. 

The Woshin^ion Poa. 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


on Chixi 


* J^ra Lewis 'erectly asserts 
- . - »archina polics again becom- 

V.~ig a heated <pestic political 
, ebaie in Amea (“Simplifying 
. te China Deb Can Be Dan - 
crow.” Oppn, April 3 ). 
(owever, to opare the current 

- ' ituation to tf*of the 1950s is 
" . yperbole. : 

'.‘While Preffnt Bill Clinton 
.'as yet to aiulate a coherent 

- 7 oreign policbr China, the do- 
rr nestfc politi {debate — no mat- 
er how heat; — ‘ s hardly com- 
iambic to - national crisis 

. 7 reated by, Mtor Joseph Mc- 
.. '.7arthy. 

.’. During th950s. Senator Mc- 




THE BJS& DECLINE 
)F THEVITED 
STATES? A 
VORLDJWER 

:'jy Donall White. 551 
7 i ages. $3fal* University 
3 rest . ' 

'Michaqlliott 

A T tl/ear’s World Eco- 
noL Forum in Davos, 
-riwiizerd. the acknowl- 
edged s&f the show was the 
'Jnitedtes- 

Busismen like Andy 
Jrove rirel and Bill Gates 
- if Misoft strutted their 
ituff. sre in the knowledge 
chat tl spoke for a high- 
-echney industry whose 
end o that of otheT nations 
-s noveasureless. 

U.Jfficials had to battle 
ngainthe temptations; of 
.mugs, so strong did the 
oomy look compared 
:urith s competitors' in 
,- -: U roor Japan. There was 
a session at Davos 
„ “inTriary technology (if 
hereis, I missed it — : Oa- 
, /os like that) that u all 

:• ikelod concluded that 

Amea had an edge dere, 
oo. he new “military ev- 


Carthy decimated the State De- 
partment’s corps of experts on 
China and ft.«p.nti»ll y hah«H the 
Truman administration's practice 
of foreign policy. 

The excesses of McCarthyism 
were not limited to the U.S. gov- 
ernment: Academics. movie pro- 
ducers and ordinary citizens dike 
were attacked as subversives. 
America's best-known Sinologist 
at that time, Edgar Snow, exiled 
himself to Switzerland to escape 
from the national hysteria. Dis- 
parate opinions on China were 
effectively silenced. 

Ironically, it is precisely be- 
cause anyone aDd everyone can 
express his or her own opinions on 
China that there is no coherent 


BOOKS 


policy in 1997. The Chinese gov- 
ernment has admonished the 
United States to speak with one 
voice cm China (“ Beijing Criti- 
cizes Gingrich for 'Improper 
Statements on Taiwan , ” April 4). If 
it. were not for die charges that 
China tried to buy influence in 
American politics with campaign 
contributions last year, it is un- 
likely that C hina would be “hot.” 

Despite what Flora Lewis calls 
the State Department's “Kokosan 
strategy,” the important policy 
concerns, such as human rights 
and China's potential role in Asia, 
are not getting the attention they 
deserve. 

SYBDLLA G. DORROS. 

Boston. 


Legalistic Minutiae 

David Broder calls Vice Pres- 
ident Al Gore's news conference 
defense of himself “legalistic” 
/ “ A Rough Bide for Gore" Opin- 
ion, April 4). Bui the pillorying of 
Mr. Gore and President Bill Clin- 
ton is equally legalistic — does it 
really matter if fund-raising phone 
calls were made from Mr. Gore's 
office or from elsewhere? 

Legalistic minutiae obscure the 
substance of the issue. Is the role 
money played in the 1996 pres- 
idential elections substantively 
different from that in years when 
it received no attention? 

MATTHEW TAMAS. 

Helsinki. 


What Matters 

Regarding “Some Long-Term 
Plans for Long-Tenn Care" 
(Money Report, April 5 ) and 
"U .5. May Lift Ban on Latin Arms 
Sales " { April Sk- 
it's a sad comment on the state 
of civilization when people are 
frightened they may not be able to 
afford care when they are elderly. 
Societies should be judged by how 
they provide for their people, es- 
pecially the very young and old. 

Would it not be better to assure 
care for children and the elderly 
and deprive the world armaments 
industry of resources? 

BERTRAM A. WEINERT. 

Nice. 


M issoula. Montana — 
Montana's Blackfooi River 
— scene of the Norman 
Maclean's novel and the movie 
“A River Runs Through It” — is 
one of the most beautiful rivers on 
earth. Home to vast herds of elk. 
endangered grizzly bears, bighorn 
sheep and wild trout, this area 
draw s tens of thousands of fly- 

MEAiNWTHLE 

fishing and namre-loving pil- 
grims every year. 

But thanks to a new .American 
gold rush, the Blackfoot is facing 
a grave threat. While mining cor- 
porations enjoy a bonanza, we 
American taxpayers subsidize the 
industry and pay billions to clean 
up the mess left behind. 

The Phelps Dodge Corp. of Ari- 
zona. in a joint venture with a 
Colorado company. Canyon Re- 
sources. wants to mine gold at Mc- 
Donald Meadows, an eight- 
square-mile site on the upper 
Blackfooi. Phelps Dodge plans to 
use trainloads of explosives to turn 
a riverside butte into a hole more 
than a mile in diameter and as deep 
as the World Trade Center is tall. 

The only comparable hole in 
America is the nearby Berkeley 
Pit in Butte, source of the Clark 
Fork River Superfund sites that 
are costing $1 billion and a once- 
legendary trout stream its life. 

Phelps Dodge proposes to dry 
out the Blackfoot pit by lowering 
the water table of the upper Black- 
foot Valley by 1.300 feet. Then it 
plans to extract millions of tons of 
rock to reach low-grade ore con- 
taining just one-fiftieth of an 
ounce of gold per ton. 

To glean tiny gold flecks from 
the ore, the company proposes 
stacking it twice the height of the 
Statue of Liberty over an area 
larger than New York's Central 
Park, and pouring billions of gal- 
lons of cyanide-laced water over 
it. This technique is known as 
cyanide beap-leach gold mining. 

To protea the river, Phelps 
Dodge plans to line the base of this 
waste heap with plastic the thick- 
ness of two pennies. When mining 
is-done, the heap is abandoned. 

This plan is madness. No one in 
America has ever dug so huge a pit 
right beside a river. No one has 
ever safely dug up so much toxic 
and acidic rock. No one has safely 


used cyanide technology in this 
brutal climate, where temperatures 
can reach 69 degrees below zero. 

In SummitviUe. Colorado, 
w here the climate is similar, a now- 
bankrupr Canadian company. 
Galactic Resources Inc., opened a 
cyanide heap-leach gold mine in 
1986. The plastic containment sys- 
tem ruptured, spewing millions of 
gallons of poison, killing all life in 
the Alamosa River and seriously 
damaging much of the upper Rio 
Grande. Cleanup has cost taxpay- 
ers SI 50 million and the Alamosa 
remains lifeless. 

Phelps Dodge claims the Black- 
foot mine wilf creaie 390 jobs for 
1 0 to 1 5 years. But many more jobs 
than that, as well as family farms 
and ranches downstream, will be 
threatened. The Blackfoot is the 
lifeblood of the region and the eco- 
nomic heart of recreational tour- 
ism. the most lucrative and stable 
industry' in die state. 

Gold mining, by contrast, is of 
little economic benefit to the state. 
But it is of great benefit to mining 
companies, thanks to the 1872 
Mining Law. under which compa- 
nies can stake claims on federal 
land for no more than S5 an acre. 
They also pay no royalties on the 
billions of dollars worth of min- 
erals they' mine each year. 

Already, some 50 billion tons of 
waste from old mines are scattered 
around the country- and mining 
has ruined more than 12.000 miles 
of rivers and streams and 1 80,000 
acres of lakes and reservoirs. Es- 
timates of cleanup costs range 
from $33 billion to S7I billion. 

Last year's outcry over a pro- 
posed niine on the borders of Yel- 
lowstone Park inspired the Clinton 
administration to propose a buy- 
out of the claim. Because of the 
1872 law. President Bill Clinton is 
scrambling to find $65 million 
worth of public property to give to 
the company. Yet there are an- 
other 6.000 mining claims on land 
in the Yellowstone ecosystem. 

It’s time for Congress' and state 
lawmakers to ignore mining lob- 
byists and reform a corporate 
welfare program that devastates 
land, water, wildlife and regional 
economies. 

The writer, author of the novels 
“The Brothers K" and “The River 
Why” contributed this comment 
to The New York Times. 


ohmon,” the Economist has 
recently said, “the already 
preeminent United States is, 
vastly ahead of enemies and 
allies alike.” ; 

Obviously, judgments like 
these can change. Not long 
ago, 'a decant way to sell a 
book was to write about the 
“Japanese miracle.” 

It was even the fashion, 
around about 1992, to' think 
that Europe was on tile verge 
of a new economic and polit- 
ical dawn- The present power 
of tbe United States will slip; 
that is the way of the world. 
All the same, any book whose 
subtitle includes a reference 
to the decline of the United 
States as a world power raises 
a question or two. 

Donald W. White, who 
teaches history at New York 
University, has written a Tong 
book that tries to explain bow 
the United States came to ben 
giant among nations alter 
1 945, and how it was laterlaid 
low. {In fact, much the greater 
part of the book is about the 
rise of tbe United States; its 
supposed decline gets much 
shorter shrift.) Ten years ago. 
White would have got a good 
bearing; now, his book seems 
str ang ely otherworldly. 

There is much ' that is en- 


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4 CONVERSATIONS 

WITH GOD. by Neale 
Donald WabdL 5 

5 PERSONAL HISTORY. 1 

hv Katharine Graham 4 

6 THE MILLIONAIRE 
NEXT DOOR, by Tlranas 

J. Stanley nod William D. 
Danko-.'- r- 6 

7 NAKED. by Dmnd 

Sedan's — — — M 

8 MIDNIGHT IN THE 

GARDEN OF GOOD 
and EVIL, by John 
Berrodt- — — 7 

9 THE KISS, by Kathryn 
Harrison - —• — ■--vrzz b 

10 DR. SUSAN LOVE’S 
HORMONE BOOK, by 

Susan M. Love wilh Karen 
Lindsey — --vr- *- 

11 FLYING BLIND. FLY- 
ING SAFE, by May 
Scbiavo w™ Slira 
demand----- — — 

I» MY' SERGEL bv a*ie- 
riaa Gordeeva with E M. 

Swirt — V 

15 A RETORT® s LIFE, by 

Walter Croi^iW. . - -- 
|4 JOL'RNFi' NI 0 DARK- 
NESS. by John Daaghs 
nnd Mat Otshate^-.- H 
15 THE MORALKTaJJ- 

gence of children. 

by Rotwl Coles • — 

advice, bow JO 

AND MISCELLANEOUS 

I H GHT WEEKS TO 
OPTIMUM HEALTH, by ^ 

^L^NDANCE. ^ 
Uv- Sarah Ban B rtJlhna ck 

by Jawn TbeodoMlDV. 
Adiferfy and Bany 

4MACTERSG the 
ZONE, by Barry Sears — 


joyable about White’s world. 
His descriptions of the cul- 
tural and economic confi- 
dence of Americans in tbe 
1950s is illuminating, and his 
examples are well chosen — 
whether Sears. Roebuck pros- 
elytizing in Brazil or spec- 
tators watching the ocean 
liner United States return to 
New York from its record- 
breaking maiden voyage, 
paint stripped off its hull by 
Atlantic waves it had cleaved 
at an astonishing 38 knots per 
hour. Those were great days 
to be an American. 

White is good, also, on tbe 
way in which America's 
world role in the years after 
1945 was played back in do- 
mestic politics and culture, in 
films like “The African 
Queen” and in the rhetoric of 
the Reverend Martin Luther 
King Jr., who shrewdly bor- 
rowed the language that the 
Establishment used against 
communism to legitimize his 
own people's struggle for 
civil rights. 

Yet there are important 
problems with this book. It is 
tempting to regard 1945 as a 
decent starting point for a dis- 
cussion of modem America, 
and White does so. 

But this is singularly un- 
wise. America’s position then 
was extraozdinary, a function 
of the fact that almost every 
other country was in ruins. 

We can look back to the 
immediate postwar years 
with all kinds of emotions; 
one that we should deny 
ourselves is the idea that those 
years were normal a bench- 
mark against which we can 
measure our present condi- 
tion. They were nothing of the 
kind. 

Moreover, as 1 have sug- 
gested above. White takes 
tittle account of the revival of 
U.S. power — economic, mil- 
itary and, no less important, 
cultural — in the 1990s. 


Sensible historians have 
long guarded themselves 
against what the British call 
“tbe Whig version of his- 
tory”: the assumption that 
events proceed from the past 
in an orderly way to a vin- 
dication in a marvelous 
present. 

What White gives us is 
Whiggery in reverse: the idea 
that from the early 1960s the 
familiar congeries of Viet- 
nam, Watergate, racial strife 
and the rest have pushed the 
United States coward whai he 
calls a “waning optimism 
about the nation’s pros- 
pects.” 

Next year we will mark the 
30th anniversary of the Tet 
offensive. Thirty years. It is 
surely long since time that we 
dropped the idea that White 
implicitly endorses, that the 
1960s marked a rupture in 
American life with whose 
consequences we still live. 

A NEW, post-Vietnam 

America connects with 
and thinksabout the rest of the 
world in ways very different 
from those that pertained 
either in tbe 1950s or the 
1970s. (To take but one ex- 
ample. mass immigration in 
die 1980s and 1990s has com- 
pletely transformed Amer- 
ica’s everyday contact with 
the outside world; according 
to New York City's planning 
department, more than half of 
those who now live there are 
either immigrants or the chil- 
dren of immigrants.) This new 
America need be destined 
neither to pessimism nor to a 
decline in its world role. Ask 
die panjandrums of Davos. 

Michael Elliott, the editor 
of Newsweek International, 
wrote this for The Washington 
Post. His latest book is "The 
Day Before Yesterday: Re- 
considering America's Past. 
Rediscovering the Present. ” 



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TRAVEL COMPANION OF AIK FRANCE 







international herald tribune, 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1997 
PAGE 12 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 




‘American Daughter: An Uneasy Venture Into Politics 


N EW YORK — The members 
of the audience practically 
pun*, like cats anticipating a 
favorite meal in a warm kit- 
chen. when the curtain goes up at the 
Con Theatre. There before them is a 
tasteful but comfortable environment 
that evokes affluence, education and 
reassuringly human disarray. 

Technically, what they re looking at 
is a living room (wonderfully designed 
by John Lee Beatty L hut for theatrical 
purposes, it's a drawing room. Winy 
words will doubtless be spoken here. 
Romantic, familial and even political 
conflicts will surely occur within a 
structure as attractively upholstered and 
sturdily made as the furniture onstage. 

This is. after all. the world of Wendy 
Wasserstein. the author of “The Sisters 
Rosensweig” and “The Heidi Chron- 
icles" and one of the few American 
playwrights since S JM. Behrman to cre- 


By Ben Brantley 

Sew Ku'i Turn's Sen ire 


ate commercial comedies of manners 
with moral and social heft. And at least 
the first five minutes of "An American 
Daughter"' seem to confirm fond ex- 
pectations. which unfortunately will be 
dashed all too quickly. 

A 1960s pop song, redolent of lost 
innocence, floods the air: a woman of 
obvious importance (you’ve just heard 
her nomination for surgeon general an- 
nounced on television) dances along 
like a goofy schoolgirl, and no sooner 
does a second character enter than the 
sharp repartee soars. 

It doesn't take long, though, to detect 
a sweaty uneasiness in the play, a sense 
that its creator, in venturing into the 
strange land of national politics, is op- 
erating from the premise “When in 
doubt, add more." The one-liners just 
keep accumulating from characters who 
tend to describe themselves in the terms 
of comically annotated resumes os soon 
as they enter a room. 

Themes l big themes), relationships 
(deep and confusing ones), plot com- 


plications I of the melodramatic variety) 
are piled to the toppling point, most of 
them never satisfactorily defined. 
Neither Dan Sullivan’s chipper, keep-it- 
moving direction nor Wasserstein's 
justly famed ear tor dialogue and bone- 
deep sense of craft can conceal the feel- 
ing that she doesn't know entirely where 


she’s heading or how to get there. 

Lyssa Dent Hughes (Kate Nelligani. 
ihe title character of “An American 
Daughter." is a brilliant doctor. loving 
wife and mother and scintillating Geor- 
getown hostess who. at the play’s be- 
ginning, seems poised fo take on the 
additional, immense duties of the sur- 
geon general. Is such a juggling act 
possible? Is she indeed, to use her own 
word, overcommitted? 

Very similar questions are suggested 
by the play itself, which follows w hat 
happens when Lyssa and her family 
come under the grotesque media scru- 
tiny that is the sorry lot of nominees for 
public office. Indeed, like her heroine. 
Wasserstein often seems to be operating 


LONDON THEATER 


‘Tom & Clem’ Go to Potsdam 


By Sheridan Morley 

fnirnuihuMl Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — Michael 
Gambon is not only 
one of the greatest 
actors in the land but 
one of the most fortunate; a 
couple of seasons ago he 
starred on both sides of the 
Atlantic in David Hare's 
“Skylight,” arguably the best 
relationship play of the "90s. 
and he is now at the Aldwych 
in another stunningly brilliant 
new script, this one from a 
first-time dramatist. 

Stephen Churchert’s “Tom 
& Clem" is the best original 
drama in town, and if we get 
another half as good, this year 
may yet prove vintage. It ima- 
gines a meeting al the Pots- 
dam Conference of July 1 945 
between Clement Attlee, the 
newly elected Labour prime 
minister, and Tom Dribergthe 
gay. louche renegade M.P. 
and journalist. 

On one level this is the old 
Peter Shaffer debate between 
the man of icy principles and 
his poetic-romantic alter ego. 
and Gambon is matched line 
for line by an equally brilliant 
Alec McCowen as Attlee. But Mic/tat 
“Tom & Clem' ’ is about more 
than their differences: it is also about the 
birth (and death) of postwar British so- 
cialism. about gay rights, about the com- 
ing of die H-bomb and. topically enough, 
about Britain crying to find its way out of 
a long period of Tory rule. 



Michael Gambon as Tom Driberg in "Tom &. Clem." 


A subplot featuring Sarah Woodward 
d Daniel de la Falaise about Anglo- 


and Daniel de la Falaise about Anglo- 
Soviet espionage is perhaps less suc- 
cessful. but one can forgive a lot more 
than that of a drama about compromise 
and conscience, socialism andsex. ideas 
and ideals in constant conflict. Mc- 
Cowen and Gambon are a stunning 
double act. each often given five-minute 
speeches with which to mesmerize first 
each other and then us. 

“Tom & Clem.’ * a wonderfully com- 
ic. reflective and touching history of the 
roots of modem Britain will, if there is 
any justice, be around here and Broad- 
way for many, many months to come. 

I have been somewhat bemused at the 
amount of publicity generated by the 
Battersea Arts Centre’s invitation to 
four of my London drama-critic col- 
leagues to direct plays in the current 
“Up for Review" season. Are we 
really to believe that this is some son of 
revolutionary' crossover? A century ago 
Harley Granville-Barker and George 
Bernard Shaw were drama critics run- 


ning the Royal Court Theatre; since then 
many of us journalists have worked 
backstage and on stage, and there are 
now innumerable actors, directors and 
dramatists writing journalism on a reg- 
ular basis: indeed the best of the current 
election columns comes from David 
Hare. So why havethe rest of the media 
suddenly decided that some separation- 
of-powers act has been mysteriously 
and even dangerously breached ? 

The two productions I have thus far 
seen in the Battersea season are certainly 
characteristic of them directors: Michael 
Billington. who has already staged an 
RSC play, comes up with a double-bill 
of Strindberg’s “The Stronger" and 
Pinter's “The Lover" in which he has 
seen some remarkable parallels. The 
titles are indeed interchangeable, and 
both plays are about marital power 
games running out of control. Billington 
has delivered an academic, immaculate, 
if faintly static production, one that un- 
expectedly reveals the Strindberg to 
have aged better than the Pinter. 

Nicholas de Jongh has done us a con- 
siderable favor by gening back to An- 
ouilh's “Traveler Without Luggage" 
3 script of apparently so little note that 
neither its original London star (Den- 
holm Elliott) norhis 1959 director (Peter 


Hall) even bother to list it in 
their credits. What de Jongh 
thus offers is a revelation: a 
strange, imperfect, haunting 
tale of a shell-shocked World 
War I officer unable to re- 
member his identity until he 
is given several others by 
predatory' would-be relatives. 
Somewhere halfway from 
Priestley and Pirandello to 
"Martin Guerre." this is at 
once sentimental and satiric- 
al. a memory play based on 
the premise of no memory at 
all. and a rich, rare cast { Faith 
Brook. Rosemary Leach, 
Valentine Pelka) deserve a 
longer life beyond Battersea. 
A season that gives us this 
can 't be all bad. even if it does 
lead to next year’s ICA ex- 
hibition of paintings executed 
by art critics. 

One certain sign of advan- 
cing years is when they start 
producing solo celebration- 
concerts about people you ac- 
tually knew; I wrote one of 
the very first biographies of 
Marlene Dietrich, and got to 
know the old bat when she 
was still touring the world 
with a long-playing record 
wm consisting entirely of her ap- 
"lem." plause in various theaters. A 
dauntless German drum ma- 
jor with a pronounced limp: she would 
stand on stage and become Peter Pan in 
a series of sultry love and war songs. 


croaked TeutonicaUy to the only people 
she really trusted, the man high on the 


grid who shone the pink spotlights and 
the ladies who ran down the aisles on her 


the ladies who ran down the aisles on her 
cue with the flowers she would then 
economically re-use on the following 
night. 

Like the Statue of Liberty, whieh her 
stage presence so often recalled, Die- 
trich was a quite remarkable feat of 
engineering; money, time and herself 
were all exquisitely preserved against 
need, and although cold to frosty to 
often frozen before the footlights (the 
whalebones of her sculptured dress 
would hardly allow her to breathe, let 
alone move), swathed in acres of white 
fur she would pass again and again the 
ultimate stardom test — the ability not 
just to do something but to stand there, 
defying us not to applaud. 

In Pam Gems's somewhat sketchy 
stage biography. “Marlene," at the 
Lyric. Sian Phillips does a supremely 
faithful vocal and physical impression, 
while Sean Mathias 's staging (featuring 
his ow n mother as Marlene's ever-silem 
dresser) proves that whatever else she 
was. Dietrich sure wasn’t inimitable. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Screamer s 
necessty 
6 Manhandle 
9 Peer G /nr 
dramatist 

14 Otei'o e g 

15 — mode 


i*i: maiiescu'iea 
dang 


17 Souna of old 
floorboards 


1* Whan Guy 
FawHes Day is 
ceiebcaied 
Abb' 




Est. 1911. Pans 
“Sank Roo Doe Noo ' 


is u be static 
20 Cult Canadian 
comedy troupe. 
w»Jb 'Trip' 

22 Operates 
aaTatalam'y 
25 Flood stage 

28 Xing (S'Qrti 

2 * "The Gold Bug' 
author 
w Need a<r 
conditioning 
32 60's war capital 
34 Boy or gm 
lead m 

35 1 869 Twain 
novel, with 
-The' 

41 Season of 
peace 

42 Move stealthily 

43 Provided for. as 
a widow 

47 N Y C clock 
setting 

48 Lrq measures 

Si Gives the green 
light 

5201 service 

54 Untouched 

55 1934 Lillian 
Heilman play 
with ’The" 

58 Genius 

80 Hood s gun 
Gi Hem on a pole 
62 Plane seating 
Choice 

S3 Charlottesville 
sen 

64 And grow 

on 

65 Gibson, e g 

66 Gibson, eg 

67 Victim of a 1 955 
coup 


3 Had to have 

4 Not Astroturf 
SH H Mufiro 

pseudonymi- 

cally 

6 Roman temple 

7 56- Down 
salutation 

a isn't decisive 
9 if 

10 Unwelcome 
mail 

11 Heel style 
n Sea bi'd 

13 Yule serving 
zi Peter of 
Herman s 
Herrmts 

22 Hem s panner 

26 Home video 
format 

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20 Campaign 
money source 
3f Harmless prank 
32 Reason tor 
darning 

33' 

De-Lovely' 

3* Preti* with 
Chinese 

as Cranny's pannei 

37 io 00 program 

38 Sony 

M 'Homage to 
Clio" poet 
40 Oner sandwich 
4« Spoiler 
■ 45 Immigrant s 
study, tor short 
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4oCrter 

49 Loyally following 
60 Address of St. 

Patrick s 
Cathedral’’ 



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K .Yetr York Timex/Ediled bv Will Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of April 15 


A Space for Thought. 


1 Poky 

2 Revolt 


63 Plucky 
54 Drop a dime, so 
lospaak 
58 See 7-Down 
57 Call it a day 


58 Farm can 
88 Rocks 
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from a FHofax overetuffed with lists of 
things to accomplish: issues to address, 
emotional buttons to push, jokes to sell. 


The cast also features Hal Holbrook, bad 
as professionally avuncular as ever as says: It s like, a column. 

Lyssa’s father. Alan Hughes, a Repub- forgotten they w re people l know 

Pe S Co»r Yet fte playAight U ; also work 

Smith as the television reporter who principally in sizesljeesof s° u i 
J cin ft fnreotto sentiment and ttimor. When a cftarac 


plot points to chart- 
Many of the worli 


Many of the work's characters bring 
enough topical and emotional weight to 
be given plays (or at least magazine 
profiles; all their own. Judith B. Kauf- 
man (Lynne Thigpen), Lyssa's best 
friend, is a woman's oncologist who is 
black and Jewish and. in her 40s, strug- 
gling desperately to conceive a child. 


discovers the trivial sin (Lyssa forgot to 


rtll Ol LLICjC UUtUOVLCia VUII V- n> 

funny in describing just who they are what has com- before. 

and what, in social terms, they rep- The actors « * *e_ most superfici 


W ALTER Abrahmson (Peter 
Riegert), Lyssa's husband, 
is an academic and author 
of an influential (if nearly 
forgotten) study of liberalism and deep 
in a midlife identity crisis. 11160 there’s 
Morrow' McCarthy (Bruce Norris), a 
close friend of Lyssa and Alan (though 
why. exactly, is never explained), a pun- 
dit who is young, conservative and gay. 
And the euphoniously named Quincy 
Quince (Elizabeth Marvel), a Naomi 
Wolf- type second-generation feminist. 


and what in social terms, they rep- l ** actors pm we most supertici 
resent. But their relationships with one parts 

another are never credible, again in part plained oooBflan are kept to arau 


because Wasserstein is trying for too 
much, i Do we really need the flicker ot 
a possibility of a romance between 
Morrow and Judith?) Serious acts ot 
betrayal occur in this play, but since no 
persuasive motivation for them is es- 
tablished, they have no dramatic 
clout. . . , 

Wasserstein may be saying something 
about a world that reduces people to 
sound bites and social abstractions. At 
one point. Morrow, trying to justify his 


plained comxLuuuons are sept to arau 
imum. (Mansi provides a delec*(fo. 
cartoon of a voman for whom feminisi 
is only skin c?ep.) The others, accon 
plished perform all, seem largely ur 
comfortable, glsping for feasible' me 
meats to playje dazzling Nelligan. a 
expert in portrang conflicted souls, i 
wasted in an idfized, passive role tha 
seems little nie than a poster fo 
Wasserstein's ffiings abour a councn 
that continues | thwart its best ant 
brightest worae 





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THE TOBLirs DAILY NEWSPAPER 












STAGE/ENTER TAINMENT 


Hollywood Bartender Hits Jackpot 


•■w'jjg'i'jif* 

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s: 


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l have not changed, my life has," says new screenwriter Troy Difffy. 


By Sharon Waxman 

Washington Post Struct 

L OS ANGELES — Stuff like 
this only happens in the 
movies. Seven weeks ago. Troy 
Duffy was fending bar in a 
West Hollywood dive, living off 14- 
cent ramen noodles, coffee and all the 
beer he could drink. Today he’s a mil- 
lionaire screenwriter and director, and 
the honest property in town. 

The 25-year-old former bouncer/ 
roofer/shon-order cook was signed by 
Paramount last month to write two orig- 
inal scripts for $500,000. Two weeks 
later. Miramax won a bidding war to 
buy his screenplay "The Boondock 
Saints." about two outlaw Irish brothers 
on the run from an FBI agent, for a 
writing-directing fee of $450,000. 

He has no previous screen writing ex- 
perience and has never directed a movie. 
But Hollywood believes that Duff/ has 
that elusive something, and has sprinkled 
him with its special brand of fairy dusL 



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In 1997, the IHT will publish a series of Supplements on: 

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Andrew Thomas, IHT Singapore. Tel (65 ) 223 64 78, Fax: (65) 325 08 42 

or e-mail: supplements@iht.com. 


1 taS&gigst 


1 Qiia* -«tKO" 
MU*** 



If die rags-io-riehes legend is a dearly 
held parable of American society, only in 
Hollywood does it unfold so immedi- 
ately. A guy can go from living in the 
bock of his car to landing a role on a 
prime-time TV’ show, as Jim Carrey did. 
In Duffy's case, he went from taking 
buses around Los Angeles to riding in 
chauffeur-driven limousines, from flip- 
ping burgers in a topless joint to hiring a 
staff for his production offices. 

‘T was very. very, very poor. I'm 
coming into my own." acknowledges 
Duffy', a beefy', sardonic man with a 
penchant for getting into barroom 
brawls. "But I don't figure success in 
terms of money. It’s in terms of achieve- 
ment. All this stuff is nice, but what l 
really want is to sit down in a theater and 
see my movie on the screen." 

In the meantime, the stuff will have to 
do. He has a new cellular phone (though 
he doesn’t yet know how to use it).~ a 
computer and plans to buy a car. Sud- 
denly surrounded by agents, lawyers, 
supplicants and sycophants. Duffy is 
almost an industry unto himself. He 
goes everywhere with an entourage of 
six to eight buddies, several of whom he 
has gainfully employed as of last week. 
They include two fellow bartenders for 
whom he wrote pans in the movie. 

Also along for the ride is Duffy 's 
younger brother Taylor. 24. who helped 
inspire the lead characters of ‘ ‘Boondock 
Saints." the vigilante twins Connor and 
Murphy McManus. The McManus 
brothers do things like dropping toilets 
on evil Russian mobsters from fifth-story 
windows. The Duffy’s did things in their 
teens like jumping 100 feet into a quarry 
swimming hole. Taylor Duffy is in a 
unique position to observe the radical 
changes in his older brother's life. 

"He’s — tnmmm — magnified,’’ 
Taylor muse*, as the entourage waits for 
a table at California Pizza Kitchen in 
Beverly Hills. Troy Duffy will pay for 
lunch. These days he always pays. 

With the bravado of youth. Troy Duffy’ 
insists that none of this will change him. 
"My deal is the most unprecedented 
deal,'' he says. "If that hasn't changed 
me. then I don't think anything will. It's 
only been about six weeks, but even in 
Boston on the location scout we had 
limes, hotel suites, the whole thing, and I 
invited my friends up to eat everything in 
the fridge.” He considers this. He con- 
siders Hollywood. "I don't know. I just 
feel like I'm immune to all that I might 
not be, but I feel that way." 

It started with a few lines in a note- 
book, scribbled as he stood guard at the 
door of J. Sloan's, a bar in West Hol- 
lywood where the beer comes in pitchers 
Mid the TV monitors feature mud wres- 
tling. Like a lot of people, Duffy had gone 
to one too many horrible movies and 
thought. *T can do better than that.’’ 


But slowly ihe script began to take 
over his life. Until last summer. Duffy's 
main occupation had been with the 
Brood, his four-member rock band (he 
and Taylor are the lead guitarists h After 
consulting a couple of scriprs to leam 
the proper format. Duffy found that the 
tale spilled out uncontrollably. He typed 
it on a rented computer. 

Duffy- finished the script last fall and 
told his friends about it. One of them 
was a producer's assistant at New Line 
Cinema (the two had worked at the 
topless bar the previous year i and man- 
aged to get it read by a fairly senior 
executive. For several weeks, the script 
was passed from hand to hand, up and 
across Hollywood's matrix of influence, 
until an undeniable buzz had been cre- 
ated. Agents came courting while Duffy 
poured drinks at the bar. Over at Sony 
Pictures, producers Rich Zinman ("Mi- 
chael”) and Rob Fried ("Godzilla") 
got copies, and showed up at Sloan's. 

"What was amazing is a lot of guys 
started to come over to the bar. being 
brought into my circle." says Duffy. "I 
started liking them as people." In ’Feb- 
ruary he signed with the William Morris 
Agency. 

This period of frenzied negotiations 
led to some odd situations. A still-car- 
less Duffy had to take the bus to a 
meeting with agents and lawyers at an 
upscale sushi restaurant in Beverly Hills 
last month. The doorman at the res- 
taurant saw him get off the bus and 
refused to let him in until Duffy tapped 
on the window and his agent intervened. 
Within days of that meeting, he had 
several six-figure offers for the script. 
Duffy accepted none of them, holding 
out for an offer to direct, fn the mean- 
time. he signed the deal with Para- 
mount. 


this won't be around just, on ■ 

a one-shot deal.' “ says Wein- . 
stein. ' 'The proof is in the words. ’ 

1 read a lot of scripts that get near 
"Boondock Saints’ but that don't dose 
the deal. They're imitations. They're 
mechanical. These characters come from 
Troy Duffy's soul." 

On March 31. Duffy faxed his moth- 
er. a secretary, a copy of a story that 
appeared on the from ’page of the Hol- 
lywood Reporter about his deal. Across 
the cover, he scrawled: "I shook up the 
world. Ma. Love. Troy." 


G ROWING up in Exeter. New 
Hampshire, m a raucous Irish 
American family. Duffy re- 
members being poor until his 
mid-teens. Clothes were hand-me- 
downs; sometimes there was only oat- 
meal for dinner. Seven people were 
living on an English teacher's salary. 

Undersized and dyslexic as a child. 
Troy was drawn to the underdog in 
school. When a friend's brother beafup a 
mildly retarded classmate whom Troy 
had befriended. Duffy recalls entering die 
classroom and calling the teenager to the 
principal's office. Then he beat him up 
and locked him In the janitor's closet. 

With his close-cut hair and a scruffy 
red near-beard, Troy Duffy looks like a 
tough, but he's also a bom raconteur. 
Ask him about his childhood and he'll 
reel off srories that could have been 
taken from the movies. More than likely 
they ‘I! turn up in his own movies. Like 
ihe time he was savoring a Cherry Coke 
after riding seven miles on a broken- 
down bike to a Little League game. 
Someone sicced a dog on him. and he 
went after the dog. then the bully, with 
his baseball bat. 

Somewhere in all this, both brothers 
taught themselves to play guitar, to sing 
in harmony and to break dance. Bur 
Duffy was determined to pursue a stable 
career, and his father rejoiced when he 
was accepted to a pre-med program ai 
Colorado State University. But the aca- 
demic stint didn't last longer than two 
years. Playing in bars around campus. 
Duffy realized that what he really 
wanted to do was compose music and 
perform. With a new wife. Lisa Marie 
Jan is. he set out for Los Angeles in 1993. 
Then came the night job flipping burgers 
at the topless bar. the das job at a West- 
wood cafe, the house between a crack 
den and a whorehouse. (He’s now shar- 
ing a house with three buddies in a safer 
neighborhood.) His marriage couldn't 
bear the strain, and broke up last year. 
He rook odd jobs with a contractor, 
ripping up roofs and refurbishing 
houses, then landed the job at Sloan's. 

Then came script mania. He quit the 
bar seven weeks ago. with an advance 
on his deal with Paramount. 


T HEN, the day after the March 
24 Academy Awards. Miramax 
co-chairman Harvey Weinstein 
lumbered through the doorway 
of J. Sloan's, sat at the regulars' table 
with Duffy and asked: "What will it 
take?’’ 

Duffy replied: "I want to buy the 
bar." 

“How much?" asked Weinstein. ^ 
"Three hundred thousand dollars." 
"O.K.," Weinstein said, agreeing to 
buy the bar outright and give Duffy half 
ownership. That, along with granting 
Duffy's wish list — including direct- 
orial control, final cast approval and 
hiring the Brood for the soundtrack — 
clinched the deal. 

Hollywood is full of clever, hopeful 
young men like Troy Duffy. What makes 
him different from a thousand others? "I 
loved the script thar he wrote. Then he 
told me ail the ideas for other films that 
he had, and I said. ’A guy who thinks like 


Haitians Greet Fugees as Heroes 


By Neil Strauss 

Neu York Times Scmcc 


P ORT-AU-PRINCE, 
Haiti — Hie Fugees 
had some distin- 
guished personnel 
working on their crew one 
night when they performed 
here. 

President Rene Preval ran 
down the catwalk jutting from 
the stage to the center of the 
crowd to stop people from 
hanging onto the scaffolding. 
His ad hoc intervention was 
successful, though the 30 ma- 
chine-gun-toting police of- 
ficers who accompanied him 
might have helped. 

As the president tried to 
show he was a man of the 
people, the audience's Creole 
chant of “Ger down. 1 ." dir- 
ected at those on the scaf- 
folding. slowly transformed 
into "Down with the high 
cost of living!” 

At one point, the man guard- 
ing the entrance to the stage was 
Raoul Peck, the minister of cul- 
ture. who like most politicians 
during the week the Fugees 
spent here seized the opportu- 
nity for Haiti and for himself 
and associated himself with the 
band as much as possible. 

Why the Fugees? Two of 


the three members of the best- 
selling pop and rap group have 
Haitian roots: Wyclef Jean, 
known professionally by just 
his first name, was bom here, 
and his cousin. Prakazre] 
Michel, known as Pras. is the 
son of Haitians who emig- 
rated to the United States. 

"It's the return of the di- 
aspora!" some of the band's 
more optimistic supporters 
cheered, a reference to the 
many thousands of Haitians 
who have left the island for 
cities like Miami. Montreal 
and New York, where the 
Fugees are based. 

It was also the only concert 
by a popular American group 
to take place in Haiti that any- 
one here could remember and 
the biggest staged concert the 
country has ever bad, attracting 
an estimated 75.000 people. 

Though the concert was in- 
tended ro raise money for 
orphans and Haitian refugees 
who have been sent home, the 
more symbolic contribution 
was the pride it inspired in a 
country that is weary of being 
stigmatized as a breeding 
ground for violence and 
AIDS. 

From the moment they ar- 
rived at the airport last Wed- 
nesday until their departure 



A FUNNY THING HAPPENED 
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Mate Wed £ Sat 2 pm. Sun 3p.m 
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Sunday, the Fugees were re- 
ceived' like heroes. Fans and a 
welcoming band mobbed the 
runway and the airport when 
the band flew in. racing down 
the street to catch up with the 
group's car as it sped off to 
the hotel with police escorts. 

In a society riven by great 
economic disparities and hos- 
tility between haves and 
have-nots. Iight-sltinned and 
dark-ski ruied. it is rare to ap- 
peal successfully to the entire 
population. The trio was en- 
thusiastically welcomed at 
orphanages, where aspiring 
musicians greeted the Fugees 
with versions of their hits 
"Killing Me Softly" and 
"Ready or Not." 

At cocktail parties and at a 
fund-raising concert at Club 
Med, the Haitian elite swarmed 
around them for autographs 
and photos. At the Presidential 
Palace, Preval (with Prime 
Minister Rosny Smarth at bis 
side) heaped praise on the 
Fugees as ministers and dip- 
lomats looked on. 

Ai La /ami Se/avi. a home 
for street children, the founder, 
former President Jean-Ber- 
trand Aristide gave the band a 
tour, and arranged for the chil- 
dren to interview the group on 
the center's ramshackle radio 
station. “It's good to see what 
can happen when a band like 
the Fugees uni res us in the 
middle," Aristide said. “They 
are stars among stars. Through 
them, Haiti can tell the world 
how it's not just poverty we 
have here. We are rich from 
our culture." 


When was the last time the 
Haitian population united like 
this? "In 1994. when I came 
back." said .Aristide, exag* 
gerating a bit. (He was re- 
stored to office three years 
after a military coup, i 

One reason the Fugees re- 
ceived such an overwhelming 
welcome was that, unbe- 
known to his fans everywhere 
else in the world. Wyclef. the 
band's leader, has been re- 
cording songs in Creole on 
his own for the last seven 
months and sending them to 
Haitian radio stations. 

"Cenain songs just started 
coming out of me in Creole. " 
he explained. "So I just re- 
corded them, not to sell but to 
play to the kids. And every 
song I sent down here — 
of them — became No. 1." 


T HE band didn't just 
play pop. rap and 
reggae. Much to the 
audience’s excite- 
ment. it was able to leap into 
rasin troots music i and rara 
(carnival music/. From his 
moves to his melodies. 
Wyclef tried to portray imself 
as a Haitian Bob Marlev in the 
making. 

"This place needs Haiiian- 
Americans with a vision to 
come back." Theodore i Lolai 
Beaubrun of Boukman Ek- 
spetyans. one of Haiti's most 
important rasin groups, said 
backstage. "But the govern- 
ment doesn’t want the edu- 
cated to return, because people 
might get ideas, and the gov- 
ernment doesn't like that." 


THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


For ticket prices & availability call The Broadway Line in N.Y.C. 
212-563-2929, LIVE BROADWAY is a registered 
trademark of The League of American Theatres and Producers, Inc. 


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w : 


PAGE 14 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1997 


| SPONSORED PAGE 


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World Heritage Cities 


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A Glimpse of Spain’s Past 


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and man-made wonders, 
from the Grand Canyon to 
the Galapagos Islands, from 
the Taj Mahal to the 
monastery of El Escorial, 
just outside Madrid, all 
deemed worthy of protec- 
tion and preservation. 

Although Spain joined the 
World Heritage convention 
only in 1982, the country 
now has more than 20 sites 
on the list including the old 
towns of eight cities - 
Cuenca, Toledo, Segovia, 
Avila, Salamanca, Santiago 
de Compostela, Cdceres and 
C6rdoba - all wonderful 
destinations for discerning 
travelers. 

“These cities, or their his- 
torical centers, are unique 
culturally, and that is why 
they were chosen,” says 
Manuel Benavides, secre- 
tary general of Spain’s 
Unesco administration. 
“Spain boasts many cities 
celebrated for their histori- 
cal and artistic magnifi- 
cence. These have been 
selected so that, as in the 
case with all Unesco sites. 


paradors. often housed in 
historical buildings) provide 
every comfort required. 

Most visitors to Spain 
find themselves in Madrid 
at some point, and Che city 
makes a good base for day 
trips to explore several of 
the World Heritage dries. 


monument is undoubtedly 
the Gothic cathedral, con- 
taining works by one of 
Spain's greatest artists and 
hometown boy, El Greco. 

Roman architects and 


Around the capital 
Spain's latest addition, in 
December 1996, to the 
Unesco World Heritage List 
is the fortified medieval 
town of Cuenca, two hours 
southeast of Madrid. The 
city is renowned for its 
casas colgadas, or hanging 
houses, wooden structures 
built to project over the 
steep gorge that divides the 
old city from the new. 

Visitors here need stout 
legs and strong lungs since 
it seems almost everything 
of interest is uphill from 
somewhere else, including 
the charming Plaza San 
Nicolas, the views over the 
Jucar River defile and the 
ancient castle. 

An hour's drive south of 
the capital across the 
Castilian plain is Toledo, for 
centuries famed around the 
world for its finely wrought 
steel weapons. But die 
Toledanos also practiced 
more peaceful pursuits. 

For several centuries 
around the end of (he first 
millennium, when much of 
the Mediterranean world 


engineers 
left their 
legacy iu 
Segovia, an 
hour’s drive 
northwest 
of Madrid, 
specifically 
in the 

breathtak- 
ing double 
aqueduct, 
built to 

bring water 
to the city 
from 18 kilometers (11 
miles) away. Supported by 
128 arches, this wonder of 
ancient engineering, con- 
structed entirely without 
mortar, was built around 
A.D. 50, and the (op channel 
is still in use. 

This granite behemoth 
runs through the center of 
Segovia, where traditional 
restaurants dish up local del- 
icacies like c ochinilto, or 
roast suckling pig. After 
such a repast, a stroll uphill 


is in order, through the old 
part of town and oast the 


was riven by conflicts 
between Christians and 


Muslims, Spain - and 


they can be saved and pro- 
tected.” 


Toledo in particular - was 
an island of religious toler- 


Vuitors to Spain keen to 
experience more of this fas- 
cinating country than just 
sun, sand and sangria are 
amply rewarded. A long and 
rich history, which saw 
invasions and occupations 
by Phoenicians, Greeks, 
Romans, Visigoths, Moors 
and others, has bequeathed 
to Spain a plethora of cultur- 
al influences and historical 
monuments. 

At the same time, Spain's 
state-of-the-art transporta- 
tion infrastructure ensures 
that visitors can reach these 


an island of religious toler- 
ance, with adherents of 
three faiths living and work- 
ing in harmony. 

Under official patronage, 
learned Christians. Jews and 
Muslims translated the great 
scientific, legal, cultural and 
philosophic works of the 
Arabs for Western scholars. 

Daces of the city's influ- 
ential former Jewish resi- 
dents can be found at two 


marvelously decorated syn- 
agogues, the 14th-century 
El Trans ito and the 12th- 
century Santa Maria la 
Blanca. Toledo’s Moorish 
arches, gates, baths and the 
Las Tornerias mosque attest 
to the Arab presence, while 
the city's greatest Christian 


places easily. Once there, 
five-star hotels (including 


five-star hotels (including 
the chain of famed state-run 


part of town and past the 
cathedral, Romanesque 
churches and 14th- and 
I5th-centuiy palaces of 
local worthies Do the fairy- 
tale Alcazar castle. 

Another of Spain's rich 
historical eras is reflected in 
the medieval walls encir- 
cling the city of Avila, about 
65 kilometers west of 
Segovia, set against the dra- 
matic backdrop of the near- 
by Credos mountains. 

Called Avila -de los 
Caballeros, or AvQa of the 
Knights, because of its large 1 
number of noble residents, ! 
the city was a bustling 
metropolis in the Middle 
Ages and the birthplace of 
Spain’s revered Saint 
Teresa. 

Those well-preserved 
walls run more than 25 
kilometers around Avila and 
are punctuated by nine gates 
and 88 toweis, which once 
kept watch over the 
approaches across the high 
Castilian plains. 

“One of the most beauti- 
ful plazas in Spain, if not all 


Win a week for two 
in Spain ! 


Simply find the answers to these two questions 
relating to the text on this page: 

1 . What historic walled town in Spain was 
added to the World Heritage List in 1 996? 

2. What Spanish city was the seat of a 
Muslim caliphate from 929 to 1031? 


3 Chances To Win ! 

This competition will appear 3 more times 
in April. Each time, Che questions will change. 
You may enter the competition each time the 
competition is published, but with only one 
entry per week. 


Once you have the answers, send them to us with the completed 
coupon below for a chance to visit Spain. The first three entries drawn 
with the correct answers will be the winners. 

(Entries must be received no later than May 16. 1997.) 


>4*' r 



SPAIN 


A casa cofgada, or hanging house, In Cuenca, the latest Spanish 
dty to be aftfed to the Wartd Heritage Ost 


of Europe,” is a comment 
often heard from visitors to 
the western city of 
Salamanca and its elegantly 
arcaded Plaza Mayor. The 
square is certainly lively, as 
It serves as die main meet- 
ing point and by sting place 
for the thousands of stu- 
dents attending one of 
Europe’s most prestigious 
universities. 


Mind and soul 
Schools of higher learning 
already existed in the city 
when King Alfonso IX 
founded the University of 
Salamanca in the 13th cen- 
tury, and it was ranked as 
equal to those of Oxford, 


Paris and Bologna by Pope 
Alexander IV. The stunning 
facade on the Escuelas 
Mayores university building 
is considered one of the 
finest examples of Spanish 
plateresque architecture, a 
style characterized by elab- 
orate ornamentation sugges- 
tive of silver plate. 

Along with educating the 
mind, caring for the soul 
was Salamanca's other main 
concern, and there are fine 
religious structures in the 
city, including two cathe- 
drals. The Catedral Vieja 
(Old Cathedral; dates from 
the 12th century and is 
Romanesque in character 
and style, while the nearby 
Gothic Catedral Nueva 
(New Cathedral) is from the 
16th century. Both are so 
large that it takes 10 minutes 


to walk around the entire 
cathedral complex. 

Religion was the raison 
d’etre for Santiago de 
Compostela in northwest 
Spain's wild, lush green 
region of Galicia. 


According to legend, the 
remains of the apostle Saint 


remains of the apostle Saint 
James - or Santiago, as he is 
called in Spanish - were 
buried nearby. After their 
discovery in 813, the city 
became the Christian 
world's third-hotiest pil- 
grimage site, after Jeru- 
salem and Rome. 

For centuries, faithful 
from all over Europe made 
the long, difficult and dan- 
gerous trek to this far comer 
of the Continent. As they 
approached the city, they 
were rewarded with a view 
of the magnificent cathe- 


dral, one of die largest and 
most ornately decorated in 
all of ChristeDdonL* . .. 

To serve the spiritual and 
earthly needs of the pil- 
grims, over the centuries.- 
hostels, churches, hospitals; 
and monasteries were built 
all structures lovingly pre- 
served and easily visited on 
a walk through Santiago's 
rain-slicked, cobbles toned 
streets and alleys. 

In the far west of Spain is 
Ggceres, founded by the 
Romans, conquered and lost 
by the Arabs, and finally 
established as a prosperous 
city around the I5th century. 
Nobles and their families 
flocked here, constructing 
opulent fortified homes, 
palaces and towers in die 
old dty center. 

Today, the old town of 
CSceres. perched behind 
defensive walls and looking 
over the city’s Plaza Mayor, 
retains its ancient feel, with 
not a smg]e ; modem struc- 
tore and almost no business- 
es of any kind.. 


The Caliphate of C&ndoba 
When the Arabs stormed 
into Iberia in the eighth cen- 
tury, they brought with them 
a sophisticated civilization 
marked by a deep apprecia- 
tion for literature, art and 


architecture. This last disci- 
pline is exemplified in tire 
historic center of; C&rioba, 
the base of the Umayyad 
dynasty and the rear of a 
Muslim caliphate from 92? 
■to 1031. 

Tins period was the city s 
apogee. It was considered 
one of the finest, and most 
learned, cities in Europe and 

had a 400,000-volume 
library. It was also Europe’s 
largest city, and legend has 
it that the population — 
Muslims, Christians- and 
Jews - numbered 1 million. 

The mosque at Cdtdoba 
was one of the grandest in 
the Muslim worid. Its 
dozens of striking red-and- 
white horsestioe-shaped 
arches support a ceiling of ’ 
carved wood, and the prayer 
niche, toward which the- 
faithful would bow, is con- 
sidered one of the most 
beautiful ever built. Along 
with the mosque, which was 
later con vested into a catfae- 
draL and a nearby syna- 
gogue, much of the rest of 
Cdrdoba’s old quarto; 
where whitewashed houses 
are centered around a patio, 
has been faithfully pre- 
served or rebuilt, proyicfing 
a fascinating glimpse .into 
the history and culture of 
Spain for travelers today. • 


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die International Herald Tribune. 

Wetter: Benjamin Janes in Madrid. 

Program Director: Bill Mahder. 


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THREE WINNERS! 




Grand Prize: A week in Span for tw next Xty. staying in a 
Parador (hrtEls) of toe same regm Akiine tickets by foeria. 
Plus a oneyear subscription to me 1HT. 


Second Pros: A weekend for two next July ir a Parador 
(hotef?. Airfine tickets by beria. Plus a (month stijsapljon 
IheHT. 


Question 1: 
Question 


i subscription to 


Third Prize: AcotectinotbooksatxiutSpananda 
3roonlli subscriplion to the HT. 


NAME 

JOB TTTLE. 
COMPANY 
ADDRESS. 


RULES AND REGULATIONS 


1) Open to European residents. 

2} Travel roust be completed on dates specified. 

3) Entries mist be received no teter than May 16, 1997. 

4 ^or^wfierefegaL No poriiase necessary. 

5J Entries wfl not be atrapfed from staff and femfes of the 
HT newspaper, TURESRVW, nor from ifieir agents or 
subsidiaries. 

6) No correspondance wd be entered into. 

7) No cash aftemaliw to prizes. 

81 Wm&s yj8 be draw on May 22, 1997 and pubSshed ^ 
thereafter n tie newspaper. The first three enfries drawn wdh 
Ite correct responses m be the winners. 

9J On afl matters, the PuNisha'S rtewon is fnaL 
lOT The Pubfelsr reserves the right in his absolute dsorebon 
to^JtiSyaiventry.Mflpelitaran 
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t\ fc opinion, make it ciesnite to cancel the competition at 















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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1997 



Intern.ation.al Funds Listing 

Track the performance of over 1.800 
international funds, eivnden: on the IHT 
site on the World Wide Web. 


http:^www.ihtconi 


PAGE IS 


Paris Again Seeks to Win 
Top European Bank Post 

Officials Say Dutch Chief Is Still the Favorite 


. By Alan Friedman 
' International Herald Tribune 

r~ S" 0 ?*? 11 finance officials 
said Tuesday that Prance was mo tmrin p 

• a new behind-the-scenes political can? 
paign to try to ensure that the first pres- 
ident of the future European central 

Cj bank will be a French national. 

But two well-placed monetary offi- 
' dais, commenting on a German press 

report that Paris would like the job to go 

to Michel Camdessus, managing direc- 

Tbe European Monetary Institute 
takes a hard line. Page 17. 

• tor of the International Monetary Fund, 
. predicted that die post would not go 

anyone from either France or G erman y 
“The decision will be made in the 
spring of 1998, and it will have to be 
: Ifnade on the basis of unanimous agree- 
ment, ” a high-level European monetary 
. official who spoke on condition of an- 
‘ onymity said. 

1 ‘Whatever Fiance wanes, the smaller 
countries will not support a Frenchman, 

nor will they support a German,” 

The official added that France 'siock- 
I eying for position could be a harbinger 
of the political difficulties that- would 
accompany the launching of a single 


coordinate policies. 

The favored ranrfwfafr* to run the 
European central hank once a single 
currency is launched is still Wim Duis 
enbeig, currently governor of the Dutch 
gptral bank. 

”Mr. Dmsenberg. 61, has been the 
favorite since be was named last year to 
take over this July as head of die 


European Monetary Institute, die fore' 
runner of the central bank. 

French opposition to Mr. Duisenberg 
was fim expressed at a European Union 
summit meeting in Dublin in December, 
when President Jacques Chirac the 
Dutch candidate would not automatic- 
ally be entitled to toe post. On Tuesday, 
Catherine Cokama, a spokeswoman for 
Mr. Chirac, declined to comment except 
to say, “We made a statement in Dublin, 
and that statement is still valid.** 

hi January, European officials told 
the International Herald Tribune that 14 
of the IS EU government heads had 
assured Mr. Dmsenberg that be was the 
leading candidate for toe job. 

But on Tuesday, the Frankfurter 
AUgemeine Zeitnng said France would 
oppose Mr. Duisenberg’s appointment 
and instead propose Mr. Camdessus. As 
part of a supposed deal with Germany, 
France would then back a German to 
head the IMF, the newspaper reported. 

A senior non-German official said 
Tuesday that France was arguing that 
because toe headquarters of the 
European central bank will be in Ger- 
many. France should be granted the 
presidency of the bank, 

“Ihe French are making a new push, 
they are campaignin g, hm it wall not 
work,'’ said the official, who is in daily 
contact with top monetary officials 
throughout toe European Union. Both 
this official and another European fi- 
nancial official familiar with single-cur- 
rency politics said France was in no 


IMF job to a German or anyone else. 

In recent months, European officials 
have said that Jean-Claude Trichet, gov- 
ernor of the Bank of France, hartors 
strong ambitions far die job. 



Murdoch Names Son 
To Head Australia Unit 

Analysts See Move as Hint to Succession 


Lachlan Murdoch, 25, with his father, Rupert Murdoch. 


bfOm Staff Fnm Duptarba 

SYDNEY — Rupert Murdoch said 
Tuesday that his 25-year-old son. Lach- 
lan, would take over News Corp.’s Aus- 
tralian division. News Ltd. 

Analysts said the move puts Lachlan 
Murdoch one step ahead of his siblings 
in the race to succeed his father, who 
built News Carp, into a 11.3 billion 
Australian dollar ($8.8 billion) com- 
pany from one afternoon newspaper pa- 
per in Adelaide. South Australia. 

“He's now in a position of slightly 
higher authority than his siblings, but 
time will tell, ** said Lachlan Drummond, 
an analyst at First Pacific Stockbrokers. 

The younger Mr. Murdoch will take 
the place of Ken Cowley, 62, who is 
stepping down after 33 years with News 
Carp, and who was seen as his mentor. 

“As managing director of News Ltd., 
Mr. Lachlan Murdoch will assume over- 
all responsibility for our Australian op- 
erations," Rupert Murdoch said. News 
Ltd. dominates Australia's newspaper 
market and has interests in pay TV. 

News Coro. stock closed II cents 
higher at 5.83 dollars in Sydney. 

Lachlan Murdoch was graduated 
from Princeton University in 1994. He 
was appointed general manager of 
News Corp.’s Queensland Newspapers 
unit that same year. In December 1995. 
he joined the board of News LtcL, and 
his appointment as managing director of 
News Ltd. came within a year. 

He has long held ambitions to take 
over the reins at News Corp. from his 
father, and in July 1995 he became pub- 
lisher of The Australian newspaper. 

Lachlan's main rival for the top job at 


News Corp. is his sister. Elisabeth. 28. 
who is working at another Murdoch 
company. British Sky Broadcasting 
PLC, in London. 

The other Murdoch offspring. James, 
23. runs a recording studio and is not 
involved with News. 

“You would have to say Lachlan is 
the favored one at this time," said an 
analyst, who asked not to be named. 

Mr. Murdoch. 66. has not said when 
he plans ro retire, or step aside from the 
company which he founded more than 
30 years ago. 

Some analysts doubted whether 
Lachlan wouldmake any vital decisions 
without reference to a higher authority. 

Analysts have speculated in the past 
year or so that either Lachlan or Elisa- 
beth would eventually take control of 
toe international media once their father 
chose to stand aside. 

“I would be flabbergasted if either of 
them were in a position to make a de- 
cision off their own bat without having 
to get it through appropriate people,' * an 
analyst said. 

But one media analyst said Lachlan 
might take a more competitive mar- 
keting and sales position than Mr. Cow- 
ley did against its metropolitan news- 
paper rival. John Fairfax Holdings Ltd. 

Mr. Cowley, meanwhile, will remain 
a member of the News Corp. board and 
will continue as chairman of Ansett 
International and Ansett New Zealand, 
chairman of magazine business PMP 
Communications and a director of An- 
sett Australia and New Zealand's In- 
dependent Newspapers Ltd. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg. AFP ) 


K. 


f 


In Compromise, Management to Retain Control of Government’s Gazprom Stake 


CanpOnUrfOm SoffFrm DUptmia 

MOSCOW — RAO Gazprom’s 
chairman, Rem Vyakhirev, and the Rus- 
sian government ended their straggle 
over control of toe world’s biggest nat- 
ural-gas producer with a compromise, 
analysts said Tuesday. 

Gazprom’s share price had fallen as 
much as 10.4 percent last week after 
Russia’s first deputy prime minister, 
Boris Nemtsov, suggested that toe gov- 
ernment reorganize tile company sod 
take back control of its stake from man- 
agement . . „ 

Mr. Vyakhirev said Tuesday that 
Gazprom r s directors^ would maintain 
management control over the 35 percent 
stake in the company owned by the 
government. 

His announcement comes a day after 
Mr. Nemtsov and Gazprom walked out 
.4 compromise over the monopoly gas 
producer's tax debt of 14.8 trillion 
rubles ($2-57 billion). 

Under an outlined tax accord, 
Gazprom will be allowed to set off its 


unpaid taxes against gas lulls owed by 
organizations financed by the federal 
budget, such as the military. Gazprom 
executives and government officials 
will meet in- mid-May to workout toe 
details of the payment offsets. 

Gazprom, which owns nearly a 
quarter of toe world’s natural-gas re- 
serves, also said it would pay off at least 
$1-2 billion of hs tax debt by June 10. 

"Hopefully they’ve stopped fight- 
ing,” said Alexei Kokin, Russian stock 
analyst at Renaissance Capital in Mo- 
scow. “Both parties to the argument are 
quite influential and can do a lot of 
damage to each other.’* 

Garprom’s share price rose 3 cents, 
or 4.8 percent, to 65 cents in Moscow, 
after Mr. Vyakhirev’s announcement 
that Gazprom’s board of directors 
would continue to manage the govern- 
ment’s stake. 

Hie shares “must remain” wito com- 
pany management, Mr. Vyakhirev said. 

■foe war of words between Mr. 
Vyakhirev and government officials led 


by Mr. Nemtsov began April 9, when 
the Gazprom chief told the lower house 
of Parliament that the Finance Ministry 
and UB. oil and gas companies were 
colluding to break up Gazprom. 

Mr. Nemtsov responded the next day 
wito a suggestion that the government 
take back control over its stake. Hie 
govern m ent owns 40 percent of toe 
company as a whole, itself managing 5 
percent of Gazprom’s shares. 

. Mr. Vyakhirev also said be wanted 
legislation to limit foreign ownership of 
Gazprom shares. 

“We’re already working cm a law 
project so that no more than 10 percent 
can be owned by foreign investors,” he 
said. 

Mr. Vyakhirev has also called for a 
delay in issuing new shares to foreign 
investors. 

Mr. Vyakhirev also detailed plans to 
spin off certain noocore businesses into 
separate or partly owned companies by 
the end of die year. He said that those 
businesses, which are not related to nat- 


Inflation News Makes Wall Street Smile 


OogAd by Our 5 *# Fnm DbptOha 

WASHINGTON — Consumer prices 
in the United States edged up a slight 0.1 
percent last month despite the biggest 
increase in a year in airline faxes, toe 

Labor Department said Tuesday, as nat- 
ural -gas costs posted a record decline. 

The report gave a sharp boost to the 
Wall Street rally that began Monday. 

The scant rise in the consumer price 
igdex was substantially below toe 0.3 
percent advance registered in February 
and lower than economists had pre- 
dicted. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, 
which rose 60.21 points Monday as 
several companies issued surprisingly 
strong earnings reports, surged 135.26 
points to close at 6,587 .16. The two-day 
nm more than canceled out the aver- 
age's drop of 148 points posted Friday 
after a report on wholesale prices re- 
kindled inflation worries. 

U.S. bond prices posted their biggest 


gains m two months affix the price report, 
and the benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond dosed up 31/32 at 94 1 1/32. The 
yield fell to 7.08 percent from 7.17 per- 
cent Monday. 

Bonds have dumped in the past two 
months, driving yields to nine-month by increasing borrowing costs. But crit- 
highs Monday as bond investors feared ics of the Fed, who attacked the March 
that the economy's strength would lead rate increase as premature becaose there 
to higher inflation. were no signs of inflation, could point to 

‘ ‘The Goldilocks economy Kves; this the new data to bolster their argument, 
continues to be toe best of all possible Ina separate report Tuesday, the Corn- 

worlds,’ ’ Robert Dederick, an econo- merce Department said business invent- 
mist at Northern Trust Co. in Chicago, cries rose 03 percent in February, to a 
said. “Despite tight labor markets, in- seasonally adjusted $1 .02 trillion, after a 
flation is refusing to emerge." revised 0.4 percent increase in January. 

But even with the new report, the Analysts said the increase in unsold 
market was likely to remain edgy as goods was not worrisome, because the 
investors wondered what the Federal Re- rising inventories were still being out- 
serve Board would do at its next meeting paced by increases in sales. 

May 20. At its March 25 meeting, the Total business sales were up a strong 
cemraTbank nudged a key interest rate up 1.4 percent in February. For the first 
by a quarter of a percentage point, its first 

increase in rates in more than two years. See STOCKS, Page 16 


Many analysts say toe economic ex- 
pansion that is now in its seventh year — 
the third-longest in U.S. history — is too 
rapid and that the resulting wage and 
price pressures will trigger higher in- 





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Rates appRcBbie to hituOunS depcafo am /nOTon minimum (oroqutoitrrB. 


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Comncr 

htnrt.pan 

AutreMnS 
Aufrfansdk 
Bralmaf 
CfckKSCTCM 
Cnch knRna 
Danish krone 

ESJfJrf.pMWd 


Greek drac. 
HeagiMgS 

tMHS-feitBt 

InflanrapH 

lade-nwinh : 
UtshS 
un*h*h«kr 
Kmr dinar 
ttakV.iMh 


Um.pm 

Kmim 
PM. pm 
reasiMr 
Pratiscm 
Re stntte 
Sand rtyai 


I Rates 


3 Mb, eww omtatit 

1J953 1JW26 jaw 

JJ289 1J2S* 17715 


ns i wry Pars 
s.Mr.rari 4 mo 
S.KM.WW 99490 

S — A ha iw 7 JSfn 

TahmS 27^0 
Thafem TASft 
TartShlra T 31*25. 
UAEAhtoi asm 
V — g -bOtt L 477 JO 


125 At 125.10 12453 
TMS8 1^913 1.4565 


Key Money Rates 

MiMSMb Oku 

DtaMBTralk 5JSt 

Pihinih IM 

Fadmlhads S9 it 

SdgrCOtMtn SM 

UMvIZMlR 5J0 

3 — I h Tra o wi yMU 5.15 

l-VkorTNamyka sss 

&42 

Sfera-Ttewraakr 473 

7-yaarTraasrayane 480 

KHnerTraBOiyMit 487 

a n y wrireasaytm >joe 

459 


BrtMn 

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CdSawey 

l-raeMtMvfhnK 

Swattbrieitafc 

Muariifatahaik 

10-rear 


400 400 

400 400 

6V» 5W* 

6V» 6Vs 

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i— Ihhifcrti m 
1 ■Ba th le tei ftan k 
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m tcme aE an rate 110 3.10 

Qdooaer Wt 3¥* 

l-OHaih Wertrank 3¥m 

3-nsaA tdorbaS 3W M 

Oamrikk rita tk 3W 3H 

lOyarOAT 472 551 

Smiax Renta* BkmOem Mtrnn 

Lfflrt. Bank of Tokra-MlhubletiL 

CannnkaDkOB«lyanatt. 

®°* d AJW. PJ*. CBV 

Zurich 34575 WJO — 473 

Landn 34500 34X00 -3JS 

KewYkrt 3443Q ■ 343.90 -480 

US-ttoBars per amaa. London offfdot 
8xtng£ Zurich and Haw York gpif&HI 
and dosing pifeesr New Yak Coinm 
UonaJ 

Som cHeutox. 


ural -gas production or distribution, em- 
ploy about 100,000 people. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters) 

■ Ukraine Investors’ Committee 

President Leonid Kuchma said he was 
forming a committee with representa- 
tives of foreign companies to improve 


the investment climate in Ukraine. 
Bloomberg News reported from Kiev. 

‘ ‘We don’t need more companies like 
Motorola leaving Ukraine," he said, 
referring to Motorola Inc.’s plan to pull 
out of a $500 million investment. 

The committee will include repre- 
sentatives from several foreign compa- 


nies, including Asea Brown Boveri 
Ltd., Deutsche Telekom AG, Daimler- 
Benz AG, Siemens AG, Boeing Co., 
Cargill Inc. and Nomura Securities Co. 

Mr. Kuchma may also veto last 
week’s parliamentary decision to cancel 
tax holidays for companies wito foreign 
investment, an adviser said. 


Global Private Banking 


Truly exceptional service 


STARTS WITH CAREFUL LISTENING. 



HenJqnarttn of Republic- 
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fSuuteJ AJ. m Centro. 


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For example, it may make sense to some 
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Strength. Security. Service. 

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f RrniUii' ^dltnll Bank >if Nm Yak. 


m 


PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


The Dow 


RUM ~a 





Intel Warning Depresses Shares 


STOCKS: Price Data Buoy Wall Strek \ 


tetH’k'* U 
:>«* 


Continued from Page 15 


slightly 


from 64 percent in 


: Dollar in Deutsche marks H Dollar in Yen 


1.70 


1.» -J- 


120 


150 V ! - 1f|l ~ , . 

N D J F M A " U N D J F M A 
1996 1997 1996 1997 


.Exchange. .JrKfcaL. 1 • Tuesday Prev. 

•• " ?-3 £.7 A .. ' dos* "\Cfcarib& 

i-MJfSE ''..’ Tfepak ■>. ; . ,0451.90 

I WYSg 3 " S&p 5$Q ' >T’ - / 743.73 ■ =*t.4 8 ; 


— t x/i TTicVior Intel executives said the price cuts second quarter would be flat to 

By LawTMce fiSDer wou i^ be similar to previous Intel slightly down from 64 percent in 

^”f* T y ig f gn y* efforts intended to move the com- the first quarter. The company said 

SAN FRANCISCO — Intel pany’s higher-end products into it expected gross margins in 1997 
Corp.'s shares slumped Tuesday lower-cost personal computers, to be 60 percent, plus or minus a 
after the company cautioned that it They declined to comment on spe- few percentage points, 
expected sales to be flat or only cific cuts. But Michael Murphy; publisher 

slightly higher in the second For the first quarter. Intel re- of the California Technology 
quarter, even though first-quarter ported earnings of $ 1 .98 billion, or Stock Lester, said Intel's business 
results easily exceeded Wall Street KL20 a share, more than twice the w3s stronger than Wall Street ana- 
estimates. $894 million, or $1.02 a share, in Wsts believed “They are sold out 

Analysts said that die results, the quarter a year earlier. Revenue for the June quarter,* * he said. 


to be 60 percent, plus or minus a 
few percentage points. 

But Michael Murphy; publisher 


5c cuts. But Michael Murphy; publisher 

For the first quarter. Intel re- of the California Technology 


For the first quarter. Intel re- oi me unuornia tecnnoiogy 
rted earnings of $1 .98 billion, or Stock Later, said Intel's business 


ported earnings or * i .vo ouiion, or oiock Lensr, said iniet s □ us mess 
ft? 20 a share, more than twice the was stronger than Wall Street ana- 
$894 million, or $1.02 a share, in lysis believed “They are sold out 


Ete" 54 ^ 1 ” ■ Texas Instruments Cains 

were strong but had also benefited Analysts had widely expected Texas Instruments Inc. said 

from some extraordinary gains in Intel to earn $2.07 a share. first-quarter earnings rose a great- 

the quarter that earnings Drew Peck, an analyst with er-than-expected 4.5 percent, to 

look better *fr»n operating results Cowen & Co., said Intel's earnings $138 million, as increased demand 
would indicate. They added that inducted 5 cents a share in interest for specialized^ semiconductors 
the prospects for future earnings income and gains from the sale of offset lower prices for memory 
growth remained uncertain. securities plus 5 cents a share in chips, Bloomberg News reported 

Intel's shares closed at $131. lower expenses, neither of which is from Dallas, 
down $Z 75. repeatable. “On a normalized The company's shares gained 

The shares bad fallen 11 percent basis, I think earnings came in at $1.50 to close at $84.50- 
in the three previous sessions on $2.10, which wasn't high enough Semiconductor sales trailed last 
concerns that price cuts coming at to give people the upside they year’s levels because of lower 
the end of the month would weaken wanted.' ‘ he said. prices for memory chips, dragging 

profit margins. In a conference rail Intel said it expected its gross down total revenue, the company 
with securities analysts Monday, profit margin percentage for the said. 


wsts believed, lhey are sold 
for the June quarter,’ ' he said. 


■ Texas Instruments Gains 

Texas Instruments Inc. said 
first-quarter earnings rose a great- 
er-than-expected 4.5 percent, to 


fevss 


■ ' Composite-' :y«wag. - aft:4g-’ 

■ . Nasdan CociBPSftB 1212.72 r 1216.42 -0.30 


Toronto • 18B taWtai 
IS&o ParfdT';Bqreapa " 

Buenos AfrBsMei^^''r ; 7" 

Caracas ' l 

Source: Bloomberg. Beaters 


y.5 mte .. 6677.40 +066. 

3793384 •• 37S3.02 r 
7 8633 .66728 : +2.68 

"'Ktm7'" 7 ’5340.78 ' 
6230L24- “ 6224.69 44X09 


s for memory 
News reported 


chips, Bloomberg News reported 
from Dallas. 

The company’s shares gained 
$1.50 to close at $84.50. 
Semiconductor sales trailed last 


give people the upside they year’s levels because of lower 
inted,’ ‘ he said. prices for memory chips, dragging 

Intel said it expected its gross down total revenue, the company 
ofit margin oerceacaee for the said. 


IhIcctujkxuI HcroJd Tritons 


Very briefly: 


Value Health Accepts Cash Bid 


U.S. Banks Post Strong Quarterly Gains 


AVON, Connecticut (AP) — Value Health Inc., a man- 
aged-care company, said Tuesday it had agreed to a $1.1 
billion cash buyout offer from Columbia/HCA Healthcare 
Corp. while spuming an offer from MedPUrmers Inc. of $1.24 
billion in stock. 

In mid- January, Columbia made a stock offer of $2335 a 
share, or about $13 billion, for Value. But Columbia's stock 
has fallen sharply since then amid reports of investigations of 
possible Medicare fraud. 

The new cash agreement would pay $20.50 a share. 

MedPartners, a manager of doctors' practices, had offered 
about $22.65 a share in its own stock. 


Ompitd by Otr Suff Firm D u p a cha 

NEW YORK — Chase Manhat- ness in the U.S. consumer-credit “Their credit-card unit is stink- 
tan Corp. and Citicorp, tbe two environment" as well as to expand ing, but they make up for it with 
largest banking companies in the its franchise in emerging markets other consumer and commercial 
United States, reported strong and in “the globalization of our business and good expense con- 
ouarterJv ftmims Tuesday, lifted processing base." trols." Michael Ancell, an analyst at 


plans to “offset continuing weak- rose 37 percent to $212.1 million. 


Their credit-card unit is stink- 


United States, reported strong and xn “the globalization of our 
quarterly earnings Tuesday, lifted processing base." 
by improvements in their key bust- Profit from Citicorp's consumer 
nesses but held back by poor results business, including credit cards, 
in credit cards. dropped 3 percent to $490 million. 

Chase Manhattan, the largest U.S. The primary factor was a 14 percent 
bank in terms of assets, said it earned decline in profit from credit cards. 


business and good expense con- 
trols." Michael Ancell, an analyst at 


$927 million in the first quarter, in- 
cluding restructuring costs related to 


Profit from Citicorp’s consumer Edward Jones, said, 
business, including credit cards, Wells Fargo & Co. said first- 
dropped 3 percent to $490 million, quarter net income rose 28 percent. 
The primary factor was a 14 percent to $339 million, as the bank cut 
decline in profit from credit cards, overhead, though at the cost of al- 


partly offset by improved earnings lowing deposit and loan portfolios 
in the consumer banking business, to shrink. (Reuters, Bloomberg. AP) 


three months of this year, consumer 
prices were rising at an annual rate 
of Just 1.8 percent, far below the 3.3 
percem increase for all of 1996- 

The improvement reflected mod- 
eration in both food and energy 
costs, which had been adding to price 
pressures through much of last year. 
In March, the cost of gasoline, home 
hearing oil and natural gas ail de- 
clined. The 4 2 percent chop, in nat- 
ural-gas prices was the biggest one- 
memm decline since the government 
began keeping records in 1952. 

Total energy costs were down l .7 
percent, the biggest decrease since a 
2 percent decline last June. 

Food costs were unchanged in 
March after having jumped 0.3 per- 
cent in February. 

Excluding the volatile energy 
and food categories, the- so-called 
core rate of inflation posted a mod- 
est 0.2 percent increase in March, 
matching the February gain. 

So far this year, the core inflation 
rate has been running at an annual 
rate of 2.6 percent, only slightly 
higher than the 2.4 percem for ail of 
1996. 

Airline fares were up 43 percent 
in March, the biggest increase since 
February 1996. partly due to re- 
sumption of the federal ticket tax. 

Aside from the good news on the 
inflation outlook, U.S. stocks were 
also helped by better-than-expected 
earnings for a range of companies. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index 
closed with a gain of 10.99 points at 
754.72. 

Bank stocks were among the 
biggest beneficiaries of good 
quarterly results. Citicorp rose % to 
106%, and JJP. Morgan climbed 2% 
lo97V4. 

Other stalwarts such as Caterpil- 
lar and Johnson & Johnson also re- 
ported strong results that buoyed the 
broader market. 


Bur the technology sector 
to share in the broader market en- 
thusiasm. amid disappointment 
with Intel’s warning dial its sales 
erowth was slowing. 

The Nasdaq composite index 
posted a loss of 3.64 to dose, at 

D 12-77. • 

Newmont Mining. Barrick G6fi 
and other gold stocks were amoffg 




U.S. STOCKS 


the day* s biggest losers, in line vftth 
the new data auguring mild infe- 
rior]. Gold is often used as an-'ia- 
fiation hedge, and spot gold feint 
percent- to $342.75 an ounce, m 
biggest one-day loss since Marcfc 

''Some traders noted that a single 
set of encouraging numbers wcadd 
not erase inflation jitters. 

“Influential analysts are tailing 
about raising cash on rallies, instead 
of buying on dips." said Peter 
DaPuzzo, president of Caoibr 
Fitzgerald. “If that sunk in. rallies 
are going to be short-lived." 

Lucent Technologies rose 1.5^2 
to 52 13/32 after the telecomra*- 


■< 


ffrr/i 


n J» m ri 


ni cations equipment company said 
it had signed twocontracts valued at 
more than $ 140 million to supply its 
products to companies in Taiwag- 
Avant! plummeted 12 to 12%, 
losing nearly half of its value, afigr 
six of the software company's em- 
ployees, including its chief e*S-t 
utive, were charged with conspirf 
acy and theft of trade secrets fit»a 
Cadence Design Systems. 
American General shares postil 

and ffoa^al-services company 
said h had bought back 6.4 mQHbn 
shares for $234 million. * ~ 
Colgate-Palmolive surged after it 
was upgraded by CS^Fwst Boston, 
and Harley- Davidson posted * 't 
strong gain as the motorcycle coifr. 


. -^v 


pany was upgraded by RobinSoa 
Humphrey. (AP. Bloomberg) 


• Pfizer Inc.’s first-quarter net income rose 1 6 percent, to $602 
million, driven by surging sales of newer drugs, including die 
antibiotic Zithromax and the anti-depressant Zoloft 

• Caterpillar Inc.’s first-quarter net income rose 33 percent, 
to $394 million, on strong North American demand for its 
heavy machinery. 

• Johnson & Johnson’s first-quarter earnings rose 15 percent, 
to $909 million, thanks to increasing sales of its newer med- 
ications, including the schizophrenia treatment Risperdal. 

• Weyerhaeuser Co.’s first-quarter profit fell 68 percent, to 
$46 million, as prices for its pulp, paper and packaging 
products declined. 

• Kmart Corp. plans to convert 450 of its stores a year over 
the next three years to a format that devotes more space to 
customers' most frequent purchases, such as soda pop and 
laundry detergent. 

• Honeywell Inc.*s first-quarter earnings rose 16 percent, to 
$75.6 null ion. as expected, thanks to wider margins on sales of 
it space and aviation-control products. 

• Genentecb Inc’s first-quarternet income fell 17 percent, io 

S3 1 .6 million, as research costs increased. Bloomberg 


million in tbe year-earlier quarter. Chase's stock price rose 51-25 to 


which included a merger-related $91.75, while Citicorp fell 25 cents to 
after-tax charge of $1.03 billion and $10925 in late New York trading. 


Mild Inflation Report Tames the Dollar f 




$70 million in special items. 
First-quarter revenue was $4.15 


Two major regional banks also 
reported first-quarter earnings 


billion, compared with $4.04 billion gains, fueled by fees and lending. 


a year earlier. 

Net credit losses amounted to 
5.66 percent of outstanding credit 
card balances, up from 4.66 percem 
a year earlier. Chase declared un- 
collectable $358 million of credit- 
card charges, up 33 percent. 

Citicorp, the second-largest 
banking company, said its net in- 
come rose 9 percent to $995 million 
in the first quarter, despite continued 
weakness in US. consumer credit 


BancOne Corp.'s earnings rose 
72 percent to $370.7 million, on 
“solid loan growth and strong per- 
formances from lines of business," 
Chairman John McCoy said. 

Revenue climbed 8.9 percent to 
$2.7 billion as the bank made more 
loans and took in more fees for de- 
posit accounts and other services. 

BancOne. which is acquiring the 
credit-card giant First USA Inc. for 
about $7 billion, ran into trouble 


Bloomberg Nrm 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against other major currencies 


and at 126.125 yen, compared with ance from U.S. assets, which re- 


126.63 yen. 


sponded well to die CPI figures:^ 


Tuesday as a smaller-than-expected Swiss francs from 1.4720 francs and 
rise in U.S. consumer prices - m ■ ■■ ■■ 


dampened expectations that interest FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

rates would rise. 

"The CPI number was lower than to 5.8 1 26 French francs from 5.8170 
expected, and people are looking at francs. The pound climbed to 
it and saying, ‘Maybe the Fed’s go- $1.6288 from $1.6205. 
ing to hold.’ ” Stephen Jury, a di- Hie dollar rose earlier to a 37- 


The currency also fell to 1.4670 Mike Wallace, a currency econo- 
viss francs from 1.4720 francs and mist at MMS International, said, r 
- ' - - ' ' - - The dollar was also given a bri$f 


John Reed, Citicorp's chairman, with losses from credit cards and 
said die company was accelerating other loans. Net loan charge-offs 


rector of foreign exchange at Union 
Bank of Switzerland, said. 

Tbe dollar was quoted in 4 P.M. 
trading at 1,7270 Deutsche marks, 
down from 1 .73 15 DM on Monday, 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE by 9^ Issin > 

bank s chief economist, who said he 

to 5.8 1 26 French francs from 5.8170 saw a possible shift into dollars after 
francs. The pound climbed to die start of Europe’s ecorkrrmcand 
$1.6288 from $1.6205. monetary union. Mr. fasing sa32 

Hie dollar rose earlier to a 37- shifts from mark to dollar assets were 
month high against the mark, pulled “possible, especially in the in&s- 
up by surging U.S. stocks and bonds ductory phase, while the reputatioa 
after the prices report calmed fears of the euro is being estabfishelf ’ 
of rising inflation. Thai fueled concern die mark would 

“The dollar got a bit of exuber- be replaced by a weaker cunency. 


-r 


after the pices report calmed fears 
of rising inflation. 

“The dollar got a bit of exuber- 


WvmKMxKKt IS 




AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday's 4 P.M. Close 

The lop 300 most ocliw shoes 
up to the dosing on Wall Street. 
The Assocsted Press. 


im La»s* dtb* Indexes 


Most Actives 


April 15, 1997 



Dow Jones 


i«*» -»» 

a* m 


India UMS9 u „„ 

ran UI&H %U0M MM J* ZWL9Z +35JT 

U» 212.13 2123a 2HUP 21135 tS- 98 

Cnp 20».fi 20»l40 2UL93 207440 +3545 


Wtt. MW 
8QSB7 3M 

h-3s 2M 

54107 41 
4VK2 im 
47306 4flM 


Law LB* 
3M 14$ 
ZM ZBH 


Hign low Lam* aw* apint 


Standard & Poors 


5H +M 

im ** 


» +)» 

2Wr +J» 

3 ■tt 

n j* 

6 4* 

I 

1« _ 

21 -IM 

1% — 

ia +n 

T» »tt 

JV> 4k 

It. ♦*» 

M +¥» 


Mg* dm atm *m 

Industrials 87X10 860.71 873.10 88M0 

Tramp. 544^8 537J2 54170 550SM 

UnHa 18174 18179 183.14 18153 

Rnana M.01 8275 8190 B5J0 

SP50O 74373 73154 74173 75472 

SP 100 72101 712JD7 72100 73&41 


13? 

awn W» 

34391 BA 
3SSM J3M 
3S4S. *A 
34973 33V. 


16M TM 

M 4 S 
SW> SMk 

3B 3Bft 
BUk BA 
1344k 1171k 
ZW 2W 

S3 84Vj 
32*1 334k 
71»k WJl 
32 V) 32* 


CORN (CBOT) 

JUnodu minimum, cam pw Dinhd 
MOV 97 30354 299 30254 —1 102JB& 

juiw 3M an aw -avnaoK 

Sep 97 297 JS7 290« —Hi 20LS7I 

Dec 97 289 29354 3B754 -3VI 9M5S 

Mor9B 292 2*8 221 -254 9.40* 

Etf-toltt MA. Mon's. sons 7M77 
Mon’s epen in* 360793 uo XK* 



Wgti 

LOW 

Latest Oiffe 

open 

ORANGE JUCE (NON) 



15600 fea.- cent* per lb. 



10605 

Mavto 

75JO 

7190 

74JB 

—065 

Jul 97 

710 

76,10 

770 

—Are 

10.107 

seoto 

81 JO 

79JI 

7965 

— i.U 

47« 

Nov 97 

8125 

1228 

820 

-are 

2676 


High Low Low* Cfcge QoW 


EW-smes NLA. Mon's. soles ZM 
Mon's own In* 290M up 45 


10-YEAR FRENCH COV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FF50O000 - pis 0( 1 00 pet 
Jun 97 12878 128434 12876 400416X456 
Sop 97 12&5B 12A58 12&60 +004 5233 
Dec 97 9124 9&24 Mu26 +004 0 

Est. volum: 77,912 . Open InU 160689 off 
430. 


High Low Lnhra Chg* . Qjtal 
Industrials 


Nasdaq 


3D I9K 

Htk HM 

«v. SB 

« sw 

47* tilt 

15Vk im 

KM 
7». » 

I! 1111 

A Wi 

m i*. 
JV| Xk 

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an. s 

24’* » 

17V) |A 

4 

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1*14 M*a 

sn s. 

21 2A 

tv. n> 

121 11 


IA -ft 

4k. ft 

13tt 44 

1911 4k 

Wt -ft 

(Bi *v« 

A 4* 

42% -1ft 

14ft -ft 


Nasdaq 


ums I4MLC U12M *iA0 
MOM 1646.00 1651JH +11B4 
BSB.I0 85491 BMJ1 *474 


W Hft« 
1 133ft 
ram* 53» 

7*266 46ft 
75104 391k 
69242 73% 
63074 15 
68214 23 
54336 8ft 
51102 30*k 
454S9 SOft 
44709 94 
*■"07 25 
571k 


120ft 131 

49ft 5m 
17ft IM 

^ SI 

36ft 30m 
70kk 72ft 
1214 12ft 
2ZV> 22’Vk 
B m 
?£* »» 
47ft 4714 
BOVS 90ft 
23ft 24ft 
49ft 514* 


SOYBEAN MEAL [CftOT) 

100 Mm- dHkn p« ftn 
May 97 276-BO 20JD 27100 —070 35131 

JUI97 27120 267 JO 27180 -0A) 36J32 

AW 97 2UJ0 241 JO 26i*> -7.W M.7BI 

SeP 97 2S100 24000 2S1GCI 5610 

Od 97 ZJ1.DQ 22100 23030 —WO U76 

Dec 77 223JD 23000 222J0 -U» 11349 

EsLsiAb HA Man’s.sales 20J9S 
Man's open W 110304 up 251 


G0UXNCMX] 

leapvroz- dWkvs par troy ot 
Apr 97 3030 34000 31170 -470 398 

May 97 342JB -470 2 

Jun 77 MUO SOX SO 9B — UO 65784 

Aug 97 39LB0 3*1M 3MJB -4.90 I3J14 

Oc*97 3S2H) 3000 349.10 -500 5197 

Dec 97 3559 3508 3SLM -500 21.729 

FtbW 35500 35400 35590 —5.00 5077 

Apr 90 36080 357 JO 3S7J0 — 5.W 3,149 

EsLstJes NA Men's, scries 11,177 

Man's open** 155387 off *» 


SOYBEAN CM. (CBOT) 

MUU Bss. cants per ft 
AAOV97 2422 STB 241B +0JB 

JW97 3462 3419 24J8 -*0JS 

Aug 97 347B 2438 2475 -074 

Sep 97 24J8 3468 2438 ♦076 

0097 2498 2465 2498 *078 

Dec 97 2435 2116 <-031 

&*. sates NA MatTB- series 14174 
Man’s open i*t 99.19 aR 5M 


20% ** 
3ft 

lift -ft 
■ft *ft 

m 

3ft -ft 
3ft 
to 

J»ft *ft 
14ft -ft 
Ift 

134 

17ft O* 
W. -ft 
2ft 

8ft -ft 
lift ft 
7ft -ft 
n 

»• ft 


55530 59277 55449 +172 


734*. 741r H +1fti 


- Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bands 

louflltta 

lOIndusMato 


SS It 

5241 20 19ft lWk -ft 

5002 42ft 41ft 42ft *lft 

3717 I2tt lift lift *(* 

37D7 4ft 6V. Cft -ft 

3590 4 I V» 47, 41AI +ft 

3934 W ft ft _ 


31ft 31ft flft +ft 
26 2Sft Bft +ft 


SOYBEANS Ksan 

soenbu minimum, arts ner bushW 
Mar 97 Xm 818 04 *3 

julfj BQ 05 861 +2 

Aug 97 830 815ft 838ft +ft 

Sep 77 756 769 754ft -Zft 

N(W 97 706ft 06 701 -3ft 

Est. scries NA Man's, sates 60,197 
Mon’s open Uil 185425 all 2549 


HI eiUVOE COPPER (NCMX) 

254kn ml- cents pent. 

Apr 97 10780 106-90 607JB0 +1.15 

Moy 97 107 JD 10545 10525 +0JP 

Jin 97 10*40 W550 W55D +6^5 

JUI77 10550 10400 10475 <-090 

Aug 97 1049) 193-95 BUS +040 

Sep 97 10160 102-BO mi5 +0-90 

0097 10275 MEiH 10240 +575 

N0WV7 103-00 101 JEO 101-80 +0150 

Dec 97 10140 108J9 101-00 -0.90 

Es*. scries NA Man's, sates 72)92 
Mon’sacenM 49X32 oft 173 


ITAUAN GOVBIWMEirT HOMD OIPFB 

m. 2 W rarito* -pis er loo pd 

Jtrtg 129JS 12435 1»JH + acs 11UX8 

sep97 125-90 12538 12597 +0187 <098 
gt scries: 73MT. Pier, sates 65813 
Prey, agon lot: 115117 op U61 

EURODOLLARS (OUER) 
iimoicn^itsofioopa. __ 

tfur/V MOB 9405 >507 tun 30X1) 

Jun 77 9401 93J95 9400 +OB4 4974W 

Jut 97 91B9 9XB4 9358 +010 X74I 

Sep 97 9372 9363 9171 +086 412,29 

Dec 77 7X43 9X30 9XO +081 301,301 

Mar 98 9127 9XW 918* +510225X8 

Junto 9115 9103 9114 +0.10 1958* 

Sep 98 9386 9194 9X06 +00815502 

DCCto 9196 9186 9195 +089 125827 

MOT 99 9197 9106 9296 +0.10 99,257 

Jim 99 9194 9104 9Z92 +6® 79 MS 

Sep 99 9192 928J 9190 +089 61817 

Est scries NA Mao's, sates 432874 
Man's Open W 2^77424 up 7*5 


COTTON JtNCTN) 

SOJUIO perBL __ 

May 97 7ZJD Tt.W 7L7 S -040 

Jiri97 7410 7175 7340 -044 

0097 7548 7450 7465 -4MS 

Dec 77 7500 75.16 7540 -036 

Mar 96 7570 75» 7638 -035 

May 9V 7745 —OX 

BO sates na Man's, sales -11.717 
Man's open in* 75372 nO MS3 



BOTCH FOUND (GMBU 

42400 pounds. % Ptr pound 

Jan 97 14390 14130 14272 35450 

Sep 97 14366 14200 14M 886 

Dec 97 14)44 . 101 

Es*. sates NA Man^, scries 4287 

Man's Open W 36480 r0 477 


Trading Activity 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

SJMD bu nrinhnum- eenn per bums! 
May 97 4JJft 415% -7ft 

Jul 97 40 419ft 421V — 6ft 

S»97 US 423ft 426ft -«ft 

DSC 97 450ft CD 434ft -6ft 

EM. sates NA Mar's. MSS 9,778 
Man's open tel 81408 Off 966 


SILVER (NCMX) 

SJJoa Cray az.- cents pur Buy az. 

Apr 97 489J0 -UO 3 

May 97 47150 46500 47U0 — 1 jB S&618 

An 97 47130 — UO 2 

Jul 97 477.50 471 JO 47X70 -UO 25863 

S8P 97 4BUD 47780 *050 — U0 4822 

Dec 97 49080 48150 487J0 -1411 5J16 

J*1 96 49030 —1.60 17 

Mar 98 4KJ0 49UB 49530 -180 5837 

Ea. scries NA Mon's, sales 55M 
MorTsopenM HD. 138 up 1382 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

100800 daKars. t ner Cite, dr 
JW97 -7206 7172 7136 75811 

Sep 97 7261 7309 7221 5893 

DBCto 7275 7368 7® 7,175 

Morto 7167 772 

EsL serins NA Mon's, solos 3,947 
Man's open M 83783 ufl 1781 


HEATM0OR.INMBU 
42800 Old. cents Mr 96 _ •••; 
Movto 552) 5*75 5470 +0.B 

Junto 5545 5140 ~M5 

JUl 97 um 5150 SI* -430 

Aug 97 5*80 5555 8565 

Sep to 2X5 «5Jm 5580 -C41 

Odto 56.15 5*85 5*85 -0J8 

Nov 97 5590 5tB 5698 +IH85 

DiCto 5745 57.10 57.10. -0J5 

Jan 96 5775 5745 5775 -4» 

FebW to* 5780 SJ7 -MO 

Ed. sates NA Man's, sates 2WM 
Man's apai W 141,101 gif 713 
LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMBD 
tAnttbL-dbabnpertM. 

May 97 2089 19J» 1977 -4U3 

JUnto 2084 )9J8 1974 -817 

JMto 2083 1945 1974 -4L18 

Aug 97 2080 1970 19.73 -8.18 

Sep 97 T9J7 1977 1973 -5M 

OctW 1987 1981 1975 —MS 

Nov 97 1948 1979 19-85 -&B3 

Dec 97 1982 W48 1972 -0.14 

Jon 96 1986 1979 1971 -887 

Fttto 1986 1976 H7i -0.10 

Mar 98 1978 1973 T973 -012 

Est sates NA Mart's: sate 55,115 
Man's open tei 410592 bB 1878 


- v- 

.. 4i 


... +i- 

‘ ? 1 


’? r«.+. 


- * « 

>*r 
"■ ¥ 

■ to 

‘A :*• * 


At »b 

IVt, 4tt 

\ 

7J» 

1ft 

5ft +ft 


Nasdaq 


sage 


a n 
■ft v 
irt 2»k 
lift TIN 
17+ 13 

30 ZM> 
2«ft Wi 
l+’l IP* 
IS 1ft 
'A I* 

P, « 

w J* 
2ft 2ft 
left rst 

s i 

W*l w» 
7ft 6ft 
w. »tt 
ft ft 
15ft 15ft 
2ft 2ft 
4ft 4ft 
7s*+, m 
494. 40ft. 
9ft W 
Oft in 

24ft a» 

1H 1ft 
Ift Ift 
»H lift 
Uft 12ft 
9ft »ft 
Ml* lift 
3Sft B 


7ft .ft 
17ft tft 
3 *ft 
ft 


jT NewHVa 
TZZ NewuSs 


2033 170 

1354 2193 

5751 5750 

48 34 

IE 209 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMER) 

«J00 to.- OM1 per b. 

ACT 97 2088 71185 7030 


Market Sales 


Wft .ft 
13ft> -to 


29ft +v* 
2ft 4k 
14ft -ft 
IV. 


Si NYSE 

195 AEWC 
720 Nasdaq 
24 In mB}on& 


SUXS2 47886 

1012 21.79 

54073 47184 


^ ^ iii— _ 10.130 

Junto 6565 44.95 65.43 +015 367M 

Augto <435 MM 6462 — (L07 W851 

Odto 609 6007 SOW —015 1&836 

Dec 97 7032 6987 082 -022 702 

Feb 98 7097 7070 70J8 -080 4804 

Es*. scries 19894 Man's, series 1X091 
Man's open by 180887 us 629 


PLATBOM (NMER) 

Mlrwaz.- dtilkrs per firov oz. 

Apr 77 364JS0 —1.90 19 

May 97 38050 

Junto 1487 -SB 

Jul 97 3080 36450 36750 -Z70 1X792 

Odto 37180 38750 3070 -270 2.Z7S 

Jon 90 37180 37080 371.90 -U0 1.10 

Est. sales NA Man's, scries tot 

Man’s open W 14241 oil 161 


Close 

UWDON METALS (LME) 
Deters per metric ton 
Montana OHM GroiteJ 


OCRMANMARK UMBO 
126800 marks, t per mok 
Junto 5823 5700 5820 

S«fP to 5BS? 5820 5857 

Dec to 587* 5876 587* 

Morto 5936 

Est. soles NA Man's, sate 11732 
Man's open W B5J17 up 2327 

JAPA2C5EYBI (CMER) 

12JmWon yen. Siaw Ipawi 
Jaito 8009 JS67 8«W 

S*97 8110 8098 5110 

Dec 97 JCB .3207 5230 

Est.scriea HA Mon*t.sates 8.997 
Men's open W 81929 off 203 


NATURAL GAS (NMSU 
105B0 nen Mo's, c per mm blu 
May to 1857 1725 iJftss . 

Junto ZOOS 1.9SI 1875 

Jlrito 2835 2£SS 1015 

Augto 3M5 im 2Sm 

S*W 2JB5 2840 2850 

Odto 2880 2865 2810 

NOV97 2210 Zm M1B 

Dec 97 2340' 2J2# 2335 - 

Jan 98 2380. UK 2375 

Est. sates NA Men's, sate US& 
Man's open M 17UI5 i» 3946 


“teQ,w., 




Spot 151880 151980 151380 151480 
Forward 1&51W 155480 154880 154980 


Tft ft 

Ift - 

I5ft 4* 

W -ift 

7ft 

A Ji 

7ft +ft 

9ft +ft 

ft ft 

15ft 4k 

7ft ft 


Dividends 

Cmi pqny 


Per Ant Rec Pay caavanr 


Par Amt Rec Pay 


IRREGULAR 

Jefferson Smuritt b ^378 4-1 B 6-30 


STOCK SPLIT 


Anchor Find 
BancOne 


REGULAR 

a 


FEEDER CATTLE ICMSU 
S&ma cants Mr BL 
Acr 97 7182 71.15 7182 +aU 1,945 

May 97 72-40 7150 7155 WW 

Augto 7585 7425 7430 — 0.15 6.127 

Sep to 7495 74.10 74.12 -02S 1^4 

Odto 7525 7485 7445 -825 

Non to 76-JO 76.15 7630 -087 MW 

Est. SOUS 1356 Man’s, scries 4570 
Man's open H 195M up 14 


S0BS FRANC (CMBO 
1 2 S 8 H rineics. soar Pane 
J«i97 5871 5826 5873 

See to 5935 8895 8938 
Dec 97 8990 

Est. scries NA Man's, sates 9371 
AtaTsaaenW 45286 off to 


Spat 43380 63480 60180 42280 

Forward 64280 64380 63180 63280 


Spot 723580 724580 707880 7080.00 
HiwaRl 735080 735580 713580 719080 


34UNTH EURQMARK QJFFB 

□Micmam-atsafioopd 

AarlSlM 

Ufa Tto 9676 9676 96J6 , 
Junto 7676 9674 9675 H 


UNLEADB}GASOLME(NM0O 
«J»p p6l ca m e per gte 
Moyto 6225 61.15 fl* -^2 

Junto 6185. 6W • H20 . 

Jul 97 <0.90 sm~ mx -0-18 o 

AUBto 5980 5980 . XX -**- (KjH 

Sep 97 5820 57-90 -SAW +8ffl 

OdW S68D- 5655 *6J» +WR JjP* 

EM soles NA Men's, sols! 22892 ^ 
Man's open W 100854 up 130. ^ 

GASOIL (1PE) n 

U3.c*otors per mebfc ton- Ws oei00«S 

May 97 16680 16X25 16525 +&» ZU» 
Jun 97 14780 16580 +OM 

Jtri97 16980 16780 16835 +0-50 6JgB 


1 te '-3 n 

'-■> V '-- 

.v 

'.b - 1 -"’ • 

v. _ ” 


'■ J* 


* -V* 

j-*i Hi' 


-ft 

* rite' ' * 


r‘ -T ' : "'¥ 


75ft. *lft 
0ft. *fta 
to* »ft 
lZft *n 
3*ft .Ift 


NMksn Barrie 2 tori spAL 
Menfll Lynch 2 ter 1 spflL 
OWoVpdey8k4lar3spBL 


CMAC .. _ 
CnmiKJ Net Lease 
Ciown Cork 
Curttris- 


snroex 

FocriMI todrpend .10% 6-6 6-20 

Sot NUguel c 10% 5-15 6-27 

c - sMwMera oppnrae. 


INCREASED 

German Am Snip Q JB 4-27 400 


II 10k 
wn a 
lift lift 


AMIon Bk 
Men* Lyr 


Wk »} 
Wh » 


OMoVafley 

Phmoeek 

Washington Mlril 


Q M 4-30 5-15 
O JO 5-2 Ml 
S 8375 4-30 5-16 
Q 34 4-21 5-1 

O J5 M HS 
O 3d MO 5-15 


rSM 
Fedl Natl 
GCMHIInooDllr 
Interstate John 
Liberty Temi 99 
Loews Com 
Nortbem Border 

NtaWNaturGos 

Putnm HfYlAdv B 
Star Gas Partners 
SirategtoGW 

VFCtep 


a .14 4-25 4-30 

O 38 6-13 6-30 

O .70 4-25 5-6 

Q 83 5-6 6-3 

Q 80 *30 5-15 

O 35 5-2 5-20 

O 35 7-15 7-31 

Q SSI *-22 5-1 

Q 22 4-25 5-1 

a 31 4-30 5-25 


9 n 

nit ms 


DM 19ft 
I** ift 
Hi 2ft 


INITIAL 

Fsf Nil Corp SC - -1» 4-24 SJ? 


Q 22 4-25 5-1 

a 81 4-30 5-25 
M .106 4-22 430 
Q .04 5-2 5-23 

M 837 4-23 Sr- 7 

0 2S M M 
O 85 4-38 5-15 
Q .3® 4-M 5-15 
0 .14 4-25 5-9 

M 86 4-1S 4-25 
Q 85 5-1 5-15 
M .095 4-24 4-30 
Q 88 6-10 6-20 

SbortoADR; g-payable le CanacOao ftnMh; 
BHftWiIWi; C M wa i te H yr s jem l aniraal 


HOSS-LriM (CM6Z) 

40800 ua.- cants nnr B 
Apr 77 7442 

Junto 8X40 8222 0307 +887 

Jul 77 8100 R2JH 8282 +0.15 

Augto 8U7 7945 «JJ5 *115 

OdW 7140 72JS 73J2 +WI7 

Decs? 7785 7045 70L9S +1» 

EsS. series 7^76 Mon's, sales 9437 
MorrS open rt 37,902 oft 925 


S»S 568580 569580 565580 566580 

Fawani S73S80 574580 571080 571580 

flue CSpoOari Hlga GmJe) 

5pol 1234V* 1235V* 1211'n 1212V* 

rOmanl 725880 125980 123615 723714 


ri 125880 125980 I236K 723714 
High Law dose Chge 0 pM 


pork bbjjes (anau 

4UUlkL~GVtfSJ>irlt, 

Meyto 8162 110 8280 -427 

Jul to 8280 81.10 8187 -432 

Aug 97 79.77 7830 7480 +4W 

Fab *8 7100 71.70 712 -03 

MorM n w 

Moy98 72.80 

Bt scries 2838 Mon'S- scries 1A0 
Man's open bit 7,119 aft 170 


Rnancial 
W5T.B415 ICMBQ 
si nribftn- Dtsonoopci. 

Junto 9157 915* WL39 +0JM 7,104 
Sea *7 9420 9123 9429 +D8& 1787 

Dec 97 WX3 847 

Est- scries NA Mon's. S®es 414 
MairscpenM lani all m 

5 YR. TREASURY (CBDT1 

stBOMOprin-ptfisemenmea 

Jun 97 104-30 103-61 104-24 +23 243826 

Sep to HQ-* 1,190 

Dec 97 1IQ-34 10 

Bt.nies NA Marfs. scries 29.914 

Aten’iaaenM 244,776 off 493 


Mnto 9676 9676 9676 +081 3 

JMto 9676 9674 9675 +081226 

JulW 9674 9614 9674 UncA. 

SepW 9670 9687 9670 +084215 

Dec«7 9654 9649 9654 +OA71M 

Mag 9M0 9U2 9640 + 089 139 

Jam 9A2D 96)2 9620 +089 US 

9ig 9570 tut + 0-08 72 
D«S8 9573 95 AS 9573 + 089 62 

MOT99 KM K39 9SM +089 34 

Junto S5-25 95.13 vt :?: + 089 24 

S «W 9473 9485 9693 +D.1D 29 

D«99 9485 9659 9486 +089 10 

McsOO H4I 9*35 M8 +ft« 1 

EV-sates iKWss. Pre». sates; louos 
Piw.apwlirij U17813 up 331 


Aug 97 17180 16975 1M80 UndL 
Seal 97 172.50 171.7517175 Undu 
Ocf97 17580 173.50 17175 +0|5 


* m "w ‘WT- 

r 5 -- ■ 


inn hi* 

V. *» 


14 lit* 
lift lift 
4*. M 
ft ft 


v* 

ft 

ft 

_ 

1W 

16ft 

!« 

+ft 

V* 

ft 

ft 


Ift 


4ft 

♦9k 

w 

3ft 

w 

]0ft 

10 

loft 

• ft 

III* 

lift 

lift 

<n 

r 

1&1 

10ft 


toft 

m 


ji** 

lift 

im 

ift 

j 

V* 

i 


im 

lift 

lift 

— 

n 

3ft 

3ft 

-ft 

if 

Ift 

Ift 

-ft 

lift 

lift 

lift 

5ft 

4ft 

5ft 

tn 

lift 

9ft 

9ft 

A 

lift* 

itn 

left* 

rVt 

15=.. 

ISV> 

15V, 

*9* 

111. 

m* 

in. 

+lri 

13ft 

lift 

17* 

-ft 

ft 

ft 

V* 

— 


Stock Tables Exptoined 

Sates 8ijnresflieunoBidBl.Vtafr Meta red loin nsftWRtepreiteus 52 weeks pte Ihe cur&i 
pieBlLltiitrtiriirc U6R ti q i*B0iy-iWtBftna p teor5lod<iMtaid a iiijij<ttigtegpeK^ 
hs beat poUteyeoa faigi^iwreftM(MM«rAoimtateriews»dGar^. unless 
durwlse noted nrio of dMdends are cnual dsbuncmeres based an the tafesl Oedarattai 
g - dMdcflrf also sxfrer til- tr^ - attitott itrlte of cfMdwid frius stock flteWemt e - ItoMcatng 
dhldeniL ce - P E ettends 99dd - oofled. tf - new yerety iw. dd ■ has in tta kid 1 2 months, 
e - (firtfenrf dedored or poM to preceding T2 mwiffti f - amsal rate Increased art Icb» 
dedaration. g - dMdnnd In Canadian funds, wb|eo to 1 S% n«v4GSIdenoe fia. i- dividend 


dedand after spflNp orsosefc dMctemt {- cflyidetM paW toils yep. oai itlwt deterred ortra 
action token at tatet dlrldeiid mering. k - iSvtdend deck red or paid mis year, an 
n«wTiiilatta issue wHftifriftterKte to fl*TBafSLB*ariiioat rate, redooedOT last declararlloni 
b - min Issue In ihe past S3 wgete- Tt» WfiWasr range begins with ihe sloit of trading. 

. next day deflyery. p - fnffiai dvfdenct annual rate unknown. P/E - ptteMtmtajs nrtta. 
a -dgoedtatd motuol tund. -dividend dodored or paid ki preceding 12 months, plus stock 
ShiS^i-sfcicfcspra. OMdirtddofltewtlh ds»o#siiffl .* - sates, t- dMdHtfDMkt 

0odilnpiK«ftiDl2nianltB.eslim0edCBShrialwonBi-clh*ldend0«-4Rst!lb«ilon«tete. 

imdw1twBonluvplWAcLoiTeBuillte*a8SiinigdbysuchomTtpanfes.wd-whendWT™ted. 

wi * when IshiwV ww - wtdi wionb. x - te^Moeno or ex-rtgfits. ufe - tst-rtefillwWon. 

yw-wtttiout'inrrante.y-BX-cfiyWend and sates In futt-yM-ytetH- sates in futt. 


Pood 

cocoa mesa 

iOnwteteloRS>lperian 
MBTto WJ7 1413 1414 -4 7JK 

Jul to 140 1454 UB -6 

Sec 77 M0 1475 1477 -6 0804 

Dee 97 IS* 1498 1496 —5 U.1B 

Mar 98 ISM 1SS1 1ST -4 W*2 

Est. sites NA Man's, Mes 1670 
Man's apentef <K2 is im 2146 

CDFRBECmCSQ 
pjaite-emn'N ... 

Moyto >01^ 19180 19140 -060 ,M» 
Jul 97 181 JO 17600 1766S —US TM» 
SIP 97 14650 16085 14095 —180 UM 
DeGto 15180 >085 M&40 -ZS3 MW 
B*. series NA Man's, series UO 
MorstmnM 31633 oft 1211 


SUGARtaORLDIimcSE) 

U28M®6-«ntritew fc ' 

Moyto 1181 TLM 11.13 -4LTI 

juto ni* iu 1181 -an 

Odto ULM 1478 WJ9 —AM 

Marts 1674 100 NU0 -0.10 

BsLsoie& NA Matfsana m2W 
MOrrtonenW 173822 up 305 


MYR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

SHXLttttMn- Mk632n*NM lWoc* 

Junto 106-03 105-05 105-26 * 10 330.700 

Sec 97 105-18 204-29 705-73 + 2f 7Z99B 

Dec 97 106-14 1800 

BJ. scries NA Mon* v tales 36512 
Man’s aaentnl 355870 eft 2743 

W TREASURY BONDS KBFO 
U Pd-ttM800-«l*A3MdsBl «»ne*J 
Junto M7-27 106-17 107-19 *39 43,126 

Sen 97 107-12 106-12 107-06 + 30 35829 

Dec 97 106.31 ns-;* TOd-33 *104 6234 

jta« 105-17 1,955 

Eat Kites NA MonX sates 07833 
MOrtaotnlrri 488811 Cri* V5 

GERMAN GOVEWNMENT BUND QJFFQ 
DMTSWoa-msirfioOKl 
Junto 100-90 IQCUD 100JD +0.96256182 
9985 99.14 9935 +694 X09J 
EM- teta; mna Pmr.jxri* 

Fry*, epen Hit, 1 246375 eft 


MHONTH STERLING (UPFE) 
LSOoooo-pBBngqnd 

Junto 93-0 9140 9143 +01011834* 

ISS Sll S-1J *S5 b Km 

2^ %%%%%% XfH 2^ 

2££ + mS 3§3io 

Sep98 9255 9149 9254 + QJU nm 

S BSgiS* 

atjeriet: 4A756.Piav.UteK 50885 
Ptev. open biL- 466441 up 1503 
S»ONTH PtBOR (MATIF) 

FF5ranUar -ptecriTOOnc} 

SS 85 88 

S£« 85 88 

SW 8 9587 Ok!? +1M I9lM7 

r£ « £2 SS 9SS1 +°80 IB m 

2®" 2 9SU2 — Ojt | 72807 

JtmM SIS 

jun w yi.(2 vS_2fi 9552 +CLflo 
S-I- H.T.-SSM ISO 

Drie W N.T. NJ. 94J5 +ojo eg** 
Est volume: 18,991 Open ML: 2UMT off 


Nov 97 176-00 175-50 175J5 +0-5O m 
Dec 97 176-50 175.50 1 AB Mg 

Jan 98 N.T. N.T. 176JB +A» OT 
Feb 98 17175 175J517.US -F 1 

Est sates 11,225. Opw8A;41<0» W-0D 
BRENT OIL UFO . . ‘TZ 

UAdoDors pw bcnral- fate rfUBPbarqS 
May97 18.16 17JB4 1Z96-S® JSfig 
Jimeto 18^3 18.05 1L14-A2SB4D 
■July to 18J3 1RO.WB -a.14 2if» 
Augto 1663 1638. WriU -AM, TZfig 
Sep 97 1865 I860 J8J0 —0.12 62W 

. qaw 1869 I860 1654 -M2 
Navto 1865 1865 1856 -0.12 SW 
Decto 1869 1865 1856 -AW 9>3i* 


fis '«4 - 


•.* ' 

* tote- 




ll|5t soles; 50325. 0p«nlnt:17Z2ar : <jf 

Stock Indexes -,-j 

SSPCGMF.DDEXCCMEW - 

sooxmoex —Tii, 

Junto 7396P 74SJB 75LTO 


JUnW 7396J 7452B. HLW +A» 

SWW 767J» 758JJ0 WJ0 +US *“» 
Decto 77150 770115 TO*' +1845-3® 


-W*i 


Decto 77150 77085 7J3J»- +W45 JOT 
«»« BIB 

grijotes NA MoYlSte* BW» 

Mon's open W 190/ff 0f . .»« 


j^EianUFFE) . v • :">js 

431 ^ am OKO +'0A 4CT* 
5 toto N.T JIT xsaa +Aft JWpS 


9 ^-.>' 

■.* ’< ■* 




grates n237. Pnjy.»ate« 1L330- . 

Sw-BRWhfc 6403 -. UP 36 
CACdt (MATIF) 

PPMOpertatepcriM - 

4ar97 257Z0 JSfflj) S66J5 4AM2M01 

May W^S 25176 ms +W» 

Jun 97 253X0 24716 25275 +A00 2C.3 
Sep 97 2541J1 2S280 +AM ®3$- 

Dec to U.T. it T. 3561.5 «£5 vjig 
M« » . N.T. N.T. 2S8X5 44)60 tm 
SOP 98 N,T, 'N.Ti2SSt5 40J».^^ 
Est. Hriome 14,711 Open MRj 6 A 2 ^bS 
IBS- ' - M.I4 


rln I- .. 

f ? - 

i" 


y+ #T'' ,i 


‘5- 


: 1 .^/V* 

V4 ' » 


WfWttLTejFPEj 

£50000 -BBJ t32ncbrt IflDpa 
Junto 10987 108-29 18M4 >1 


JwgT 109-27 108-29 18M4 -829167612 
Sejm N.T. N.T. 109-19 + M0 J63S 
Ett suSwc 6Cl3B.Pnw.S0te: 35345 
Pie*, open 81:178247 oR 4J1S 


US 9X28 + 009 107681 

Sevto toil 9153 9360 1 0.10 70JC7 

SSJ Soft 

l s£5 ■ 2«S 9368 9X7S + 0.10 

kSnS SiS toJo + are SaJ 

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Moombcrg News 

*n HONG KONG — Airbus .Indus- 



me said Tuesday it had offered “an 
*a*r***yn package’* to Continental 
, Inc. to try to persuade it not 

fo- become the third U.S. airline to 
fray all h& planes from Boeing Co. 

-■ -If Con tin e nt al were to agree to 
_,|puy only Boeing planes, that would 
_giye the Seattle-based planemaker a 
Jpck on three of foe.five largest U.S. 


scconfing to John Leahy, chief of 
sales at Airbus. 

Delta Air Lines 


kMUUViO. 

Boeing won 52 percent of world- 
wide orders for new airplanes last 
^year, while Airbus won 44 percent. 


Japan Firm 
Sees Future 
In the Wind 


t- t Bloomberg Mews 

, TOKYO — Toanen Coip., one of 
Jean's largest trading com p a n ies, 
.will spend 150 billion yen ($1.19 
7 billion) in Europe to build the world's 
largest network of wind^powor gen- 
_eraiars, a Spokesman said Tuesday. 

Die company win bnild 1JXJ0 
1 wfadmili-type generators in Spain, 
Italy and Portugal similar to ones that 
have been operating in ralifhmiii 
since 1987, die spokesman said. 

, Tomen said the network of wind- 
,111111 generators would be able to 
produce 760,000 kilowatts of 
power, more than four times the 
'generating capacity of those in Cali- 
fornia. The generators are to be built 
jnjtages, with the last one scheduled 
-for completion in 2003. 

Spam will have the largest wind- 
mill Geld, with 619 generators and a 
■total output of 525,000 kilowatts, 
Tomen said. Italy is to have 361 
Jnnd-power generators rated at 
360,000 kilowatts, and Portugal 
would have 20 generators with a 
total output of 10,000 kilowatts. 

. -Tomen w31 contribute 25 percent 
of the project’s cost and finance foe 
rest through bank loans. It also plans 
to set up a company called IPP to sell 
the power to local utilities. 

The company said it expected 
about 30 billion yen in annual sales 
-from die generators. Tomen is ex- 
pected to report sales of about 4.6 
trillion yen for tire year that ended 
March 31. 


Inc. said last 
mont h if would buy all its new jets 
from Boeing for 20 years or more, 
starting with a 106-aircraft order val- 
ued at $6.7 billion. In November. 
AMR Corp.’s American Airlines hie. 
agreed to buy 103 Boeing jetliners 
valued at $6 billion and make Boeing 
its exclusive supplier of new jets. 

Airbus’s offer to Continental fo- 
cuses on convincing foe airline that 
the Airbus A3 30-200 is a better 
product, rather than a cheaper one, 
Mr. Leahy said in Hong Kong. 

Continental been looking to 
replace its McDonnell Douglas Cap. 
DC-10 jets and to expand its fleet 
The airline has not said bow many 
planes it is seeking to buy, bat the 
number has been widely estimated at 
as many as40, valued at $4 MQkra. 

Airbus,' a consortium based in 
Toulouse, France, composes 
Aerospatiale of France, British 
Aerospace PLC, Construcciones 
Aeronauticas SA of Spain and 
Deutsche Aerospace AG of Ger- 
many. 

CantinentaTs fleet now includes 
only Boeing andMcDoraneD Douglas 
rtanes. A British new 


Monetary Institute Warns EU 


FRANKFURT — The 
European Monetary Institute ex- 
pressed serious concern Tuesday 
that many EU countries have not 
yet managed to rein in their na- 
tional deficits enough to join in 
launching the single currency as 
planned in January 1999. 

The institute, forerunner of whai 
win be the European Central Bank, 
warned countries against using 
one-time tricks to create a better 
budget picture, and said 4 ‘durable’* 
action was needed to ensure the 
success of a single currency. 

“On die fiscal side, the situation 
remains far from satisfactory in 
many countries,” foe president of 
the institute, Alexandre Lam- 
falussy, wrote in a foreword to its 
annual report 

“Despite efforts made at con- 
solidation, which have contributed 
to a fall in actual deficits, the latter 
still overshoot the reference values 
laid down in foe treaty in most 


countries,” Mr. Lamfalussy wrote. 

The stem tone of the report 
came as no surprise to analysts, 
who bad expected the institute to 
take a hard line on the Union’s 
dismal record on debt control. 

“If monetaiy union were left 
purely down to the EMI, then you 
could say this report is bad news 
for the broad EMU story,” said 
Darren Williams , European econ- 
omist at Union Bank of Switzer- 
land in London. 

The institute also said that coun- 
tries must take into account the 
effects of budget-cutting amid per- 
sistent unemployment and aging 
populations. Too many cuts in 
public investment could hurt 
growth, it wanted. 

About one year remains before 
the European Commission will 
reach a decision, based on 1997 
data, on which EU countries qual- 
ify for economic and monetary un- 
ion. 

A Maastricht Treaty clause calls 


for national debt to total no more 
fo an 60 percent of gross domestic 
product — or to show significant 
progress In falling toward this 
level — and for budget deficits to 
be 3 percent or less of GDP. 

But statistics compiled by foe 
institute, which date from autumn 
1996, showed an overall EU debt 
position of73.5 percent of GDP and 
a deficit level of 4.4 percent, well 
over target Germany, the linchpin 
of the euro project and the fond- 
best performer on price stability, 
had a deficit rate of 4 percent. 

Mr. Lamfalussy said chat pro- 
gress had been made toward har- 
monizing inflation and bond yields, 
and that exchange-rate stability had 
been broadly maintained. But be 
said more efforts were needed. 

“Setbacks in the consolidation 
of public finances or other factors 
that may reduce confidence in the 
EMU process may negatively af- 
fect financial markets.” the report 
cautioned. (Reiners, Bloomberg) 


Investor’s Europe 


Fra^cfurt 

London 

Paris 

DAX 

FTSE 100 Index 

CACAO. 

3600 

- — ' 4650 

2850 

m- ■ 

fL 4500 a 

2700 

3200 

r' m A 

2550 

-f 

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2400 


4050 hj* 

2250 Ay 


F M A ^NOJFMA 

2)00 N d 


1996 


1997 


1996 


1997 


1996 


1997 


Sweden Hopes to Balance Budget in 1998 


Exchange 

Amstenfem 

' Index 

AEX 

Tuesday 
Close 
736L37 ■ 

Prev. 

Close 

■716.21 

% 

Change 

+2^1 

Brussels . 

BEt-20 

2,129.81 

2.D9&34 

+155 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

3^27.68 

3,279.90 

+1.46 

Copenhagen 

SockMatei • 

529.40 

529.86 

.-0,09 


HEXGenaaf 

2,79480 

a768.42 

+1jQ3 

Osfo 

OBK-- 

- -59&41 

585^5- 

+1.61 

tondoft . ■ ' 

FTSEtlXT 

4288.60 

4,251.70 

+O.B7 

Madrid 

^ocJfExchar^ 

& 481,77 

476.44 

+1.12 

moan ■ 

iWIBL.- 

1 2,320 iffl 12,088.00 +2.09 j 

Ptuit r 

CA C40 

2^20.63 

2^86.13 

+2.12 

Stockholm 

.. 

. 2464-14 

2,774.87 

+2 J36 

Vienna 

ATX 

1,188.77 

1.154.40 

+0^0 

Zurich ‘ ■ 

SPt 

2,935.72 

2^oaes 

+0^9 

Source: Tetekurs 


Internal mrkil Herald Tnhune 

Very brieflys 


!’s chief executive officer, 
Gordon Betbune, on Monday as say- 
ing he was mtrigoed by the low prices 
Boeing had offered American and 
Delta. Analysts last month estimated 
that Boeing rave Delta a discount of 
20 percent off list prices. 

■ Boeing Gets Aeroflot Order 

Aeroflot will sign a final deal with 
Boeing Co. an April 30 to buy 10 
737-400 jets valued at about $400 
million, an executive with the Rus- 
sian airline said, according to a Re- 
uters report from Moscow. 

The announcement came as Pres- 
ident Boris Yeltsin urged citizens to 
help Russia’s ailing economy by 
choosing domestic products over 
impests. 

Valery Oknlov, Aeroflot's acting 
chief executive, said the planes 
would be delivered in 1998-99. The 
two sides signed an agreement on the 
sale in September. 

Mr. Okulov said the 737-400s 
would replace short-range Tupolev- 
134 jets on Aeroflot’s domestic and 
international routes. 

'We need these planes to im- 
re air safety and to make our 
ights more profitable,” be said. 


Co^AJliyOwSafFnmtXaalcka 

STOCKHOLM — Sweden’s 
budget will be balanced next year 
for the first time since 1990, the 
Swedish government said Tuesday 
in its preliminary 1998 budget pro- 
posed to Parliament 
The government also said it 
wanted to spend 16.3 billion kronor 
($2.17 billion) to stimulate employ- 
ment more than the 10 billion 
kronor Prime Minister Goran 
Persson had proposed earlier this 
year for spending on jobs in 1998. 


As unemployment has risen, 
voter support for Mr. Persson has 
fallen, and foe prime minister has 
vowed to cut unemployment to 4 
percent by 2000. Last month, 8.4 
percent of the Swedish work force 
was unemployed, up from 7.6 per- 
cent in the same month a year ago. 
Only a quarter of Swedes support 
Mr. Persson as prime minister 
today, down from the 44 percent that 
voted for his party in 1994. 

Of foe 163 billion kronor in the 
jobs package, the government ex- 


pects that 23.9 billion will be 
covered by a budget surplus next 
year, while 2.4 billion will be fin- 
anced through tax increases and 
spending cuts. 

State counties and municipalities 
will get 8 billion kronor for new jobs 
in health care as well as in youth 
education. The government also 
plans to create space within the 
school system for continuing edu- 
cation and to spend on jobs that are 
expected to improve the environ- 
ment (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Roche to Step Up New-Product Spending 


move 

flight 


CawriMbrOwSkffFnmDaptmcha 

BASEL, Switzerland — Roche 
Holding AG said Tuesday it expec- 
ted to significantly expand its sales 
organization in line with planned 
new-drug launches, a move that 
would result in a substantial rise in 
marketing costs. 

The pharmaceutical concern also 
announced an 18 percent increase in 
first-quarter revenue, to 4.45 billion 
Swiss francs ($3 .03 billion), oa rising 
sales of its six top-selling drugs. 

Rocbe said the positive growth 
pattern it showed in 1996 had con- 
tinued into the first months of 1997. 


As a result, the company said it 
expected to report strong earnings 
for the year. 

“Barring extraordinary events, 
we expect to post another good 
yearly result for 1997 despite the 
high levels of investment,” Roche 
said in its 1996 annual report, re- 
ferring to the cost of launching the 
new products. 

The company also moved to dis- 
pel speculation that it planned a big 
acquisition, saying it had no plans to 
change its share structure. 

The company said its planned 
new products included Posicor. a 


cardiovascular agent, Xenical, an 
anti-obesity product, and Tasmar, a 
treatment for Parkinson's disease. 

“The successful launch of these 
innovative products will require us 
to significantly expand our sales or- 
ganization serving the general-prac- 
titioner segment,” the company's 
report said. 

Last month, Roche said its net 
profit rose 16 percent in 1996 to a 
record 3.90 billion francs as sales 
and financial income singed. In 
Zurich, Roche’s dividend-rights 
certificates closed ai 1 1 ,835 francs, 
down 95. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


• Vendex International NV, a Dutch retailer, said net profit 
rose 30 percent last year, to 539 million guilders ($278. J 
million), as sales rose 8 percent, to 12.1 billion guilders. The 
company also said it would spin off its services division into a 
new company, Vedior NV, by early next year. 

• Lucas Vanity PLC said it earned £32 million (S52 million) 
in pretax profit last year as it took a £250 million charge ro 
streamline operations. The company, which was created Sepr. 
6 when Lucas Industries PLC was combined with Varity Cctrp. 
of the United States, said sales rose 4 percent, to £4.6 billion. 
Lucas Varity plans to pay a43 pence per share dividend for foe 
year to January 1998 and buy back 3 percent of its stock. 

• LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton SA said its first- 
quarter revenue rose 10 percent, to 10.9 billion French francs 
($1.88 billion) as sales increased in Asia and the company 
benefited from the strength of the dollar. Shares in the 
company rose 60 francs, or 4.7 percent, to 1 347 francs. 

• British Telecom muni cations PLC shareholders approved 
foe company’s planned $25 billion purchase of foe 80 percent 
of MCI Communications Corp. it does not already own. 
Reviews by European and U.S. regulators are expected to be 
completed by autumn. 

• The Bank of Spain cut its benchmark lending rate to an all- 
time low of 5.5 percent, from 5.75 percent, amid slowing 
inflation and a stable peseta. 

• Western European new car registrations fell 3 percent in 
March from a year earlier, to 1341,100. In Germany, the 
largest market, registrations fell 9 percent, to 343.000, while in 
France, they fell 21 percent, to 1 51 ,400. 

• Portugal Telecom SA and Telefonica de Espana SA have 
reached an agreement that will include the exchange of shares, 
a spokeswoman for foe Portuguese company said. Details of 
the accord are expected later this week. 


BUKmhcrv. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 




Tuesday April 15 

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1547 1538 
655 435 

731 M7 
680 677 


740 

630 

660 

629 

1.10 

SJJ5 

508 

1030 

748 

510 

113 

199 

9 

683 

348 

1226 

648 

145 
544 
647 

585 

146 
638 
243 
991 
148 
442 
515 
695 
643 
677 
335 

514 
194 

1863 

698 

608 

150 

801 

168 

943 

1096 

663 

690 

248 

515 
69S 
634 
522 
1633 
698 
400 
653 
132 
7J1 
232 
347 
££0 
US 
492 
663 

1245 

120 

525 

677 

678 
2.10 
- 5 » 
7JD 
LIB 
628 
685 
563 
638 
633 

742 
343 

1040 

3J7 

582 

121 

947 

141 

527 

.943 

632 

245 

125 

1515 

640 

379 

242 

743 
1823 

9M 

L79 

897 

740 

625 

.615 

nra 

638 

253 

as 

s 

527 

243 
1540 
653 
7.16 
672 


Madrid 


Bobo fante 481 J7 


Prartmt: 47444 

AeeriMK 

21000 

20420 

210* 

281* 

ACE5A 

1670 

1610 

1670 

1605 

Affuas Brateton 

5530 

5400 

55* 

53* 

Araentann 

BBV 

fKn 

8770 

61* 

8650 

6330 

8740 

62* 

85* 

Bototo 

1115 

lOUb 

1115 

1*0 

SonftSsfsr 

moo 

19400 

19390 

19370 


3920 

*40 

Nib 

3825 

Bco Exterior 

2780 

2750 

2780 

27* 

Boo Pt-arlnr 

271* 

264* 

26160 

26320 


9890 

9718 

98* 

97* 

CEPSA 

4420 

4260 

4405 

43* 


2570 

2510 

2565 

2485 

Car^Maptra 

7150 

94* 

7020 

91* 

7130 

94* 

(970 

9UQ 

FECSA 

1240 

1205 

1240 

12* 

GosWriural 

31950 

30650 

31950 

30520 

IfcertfeJlO 

1660 

1620 

1650 

1610 


25* 

2535 

2560 

2 JU0 

Repeal 

6230 

6110 

61* 

60* 

SasSanaEtac 

1290 

1275 

12* 

1270 


7160 

/B 50 

run 

7030 

TeMonks 

3510 

3460 

3505 

3435 


1195 

1170 

1195 

1165 

VtdancCeneid 

1750 

1135 

1740 

1740 

Manila 


P5E Itote 2949/6 


Pmtm>29aJ4 

AyotaB 

2435 

24 

3425 

2425 

ArataLond 

BkPMnptel 

26 

2550 

2530 

2530 

163 

160 

161 

164 

Ctf Homes 

11-25 

1ILSD 

I0J5 

I0J5 

IMnltaElKA 

121 

119 

121 

117 

MaboBtft 

650 

MS 

650 

635 

Patan 

980 

9M 

930 

9J0 

PCI Bar* 

345 

340 

340 34730 

PbB Long Hst 

1565 

1555 

1568 

1560 

Sac Miguel B 

82 

8050 

82 

*J0 

SM Prime Hdg 

7J0 

730 

7M 

730 

Mexico 


Bebatadwc 879071 


PrariMB 87*65 

AHaA 

4630 

4480 

4585 

4460 

BanacdB 

17JB 

I7J2 

17.64 

17.74 

CenuCPO 

2830 

2735 

2735 

27 JO 

CflraC 

1156 

1136 

1140 

11/0 


39.10 

38/0 

38/0 

39.10 

GpaCaisaAl 

GpaFBaenr 

49/0 

175 

4830 

1.72 

4935 

1J5 

49 JO 
1.72 

Gpo Hn Inbuna 
KtarirCtoricMex 

205 

27 JO 

2885 

27 JO 

3035 

29 JO 

30.15 

30JO 

TstavtaaCPO 

103jOO 101JD 10130 ItOJM 

TeiMexL 

16.10 

16J0 

1406 

1686 

Milan 

MIB TetnaDOae 1232M0 


PtemEQHMO 


125* 

12040 

12420 

1193Q 


37* 

39* 

3670 

34ft 


46* 

4430 

44* 

44* 


1272 

1735 

1260 

12* 


219* 

21350 

21750 

215* 

CltoSto IMiono 

3405 

3375 

23« 

2375 

Edison 

9280 

8*0 

*10 

8995 

ENI 

8150. 

8570 

8735 

H455 

FW 


5/* 

5850 

5645 

Genenfll Aisle 

38750 

297* 

vm 

39650 

1MI 

15245 

14968 

15000 

I493U 

INA 

2340 

2210 

2315 

2320 

itafgas 

Medkaer 

6110 

7)85 

5905 

70S 

6110 

7130 

5935 

7045 

Medtobanoa 

11100 

KIOTO 

11055 

103* 


1175 

1148 

1171 

113b 

OBveffl 

558 

534 

550 

52/ 

ParawfeS 

2630 

2575 

75ft 

2650 

PW8 

3870 


3825 

3725 

RAS 

15210 

14905 

15103 

14810 


16B60 

16260 

16655 

162* 

SftHta Torino 

11925 

11505 

11505 

11525 

SM 

7940 

7845 

7910 

7740 

Tetocotolhdta 

4495 

4420 

4420 

44* 

TIM 

4945 

.48* 

4910 

4820 

Montreal 

Motriota Woe 2777 37 


PnetouK 2HKJD 


42 

42 

42 

4M 

CdnTheA 

2490 

2490 

24* 

2460 

Cdn UIBA 

3130 

30/0 

31 

30/0 

CTHfflSwc 

3M 


3ZM 

33U 

GocMataa 

1/ 

1630 

1630 

1695 

GMfcMLfeO 


23 

73 

2X20 

Imocro 

3495 

3415 

34ft 

3165 

IrvesJotsGtp 

2435 

2435 

7435 



17.10 

17 

17.10 


U70 

T4i 

un 

14 

Power Cora 
Power Bm 

27K 

27.10 

21V, 

97 JB 

2465 

•m 

24V5 

7495 

QwfaKerB 

2416 

.MM 

3430 

& 

RegereComoiB 

IX 

735 

735 

RoynlBkCda 

52.15 

51 JO 

5135 

5035 


i AMi 
Ahj-UAP 
BunCDhc 

BIC 

BNP 

Canal Pha 

Carrefour 

Cnslno 

ca> 

CetHen 

Chrtafcn DUM 

CLF-Deda Pnu) 

CredVAgrimie 

Danone 

EB-Aqultalne 

BUndaBB 

EMwfsnw 

EuraMUW 

Gen. Earn 

Havm 

Intend 

Lofon* 

Lqpnnd 

LOnal 

LVMH 

LnoEaux 

MUtetaB 

ParttaBA 

PwDOd RKaid 

PeugeotCB 

Pfcwutt-Prtnt 

Pramodia 

Renault 

Read 

RfrPcwfcncA 

Sonofl 

Sdinridtr 

5EB 

SGS Thomson 
Ste Generate 
Sodexho 
aeebafo 
Soez 

SnrtMabo 
Thomson C5F 
ToM B 
Ustaar 
Voleo 


886 

20890 

9E4 

673 

35860 

775 
853 
241 
1144 
3554 

m 
ms 
66 1 
848 
SB3 

1255 

901 

553 

893 

1515 

655 

776 
427 48 

814 

376 

1017 


1356 
545 
33670 
367 JO 
31690 
638 
2462 
1990 
14660 
1670 
18450 
551 
330.90 
1045 


865 

19640 

877 

657 

35190 

748 

832 

233 

1125 

3467 

25650 

25170 

642 

835 

574 

1255 

B82 

535 

859 

10 

645 

757 

415 

798 

369.10 

985 

1931 

1335 

529 

326 

301 


655 

2778 

788 

289J0 

700 

193 

471 

9070 

367 


2373 
1955 
139 JO 
1646 
174-Si 
534 
319 
1015 
380 
637 
2757 
765 
28610 
601 
18890 
463 
89 
359 


883 860 

19990 197 

899 881 

673 658 

35860 35740 
773 745 

846 830 

23880 232 

1136 1137 
3550 3473 

257 JO 25840 
257 JO 25190 
656 640 

846 813 

576 575 

1255 1255 
899 880 

549 532 

886 886 
1805 1805 
6J5 855 

770 755 

426 41131 
809 795 

3753B 372 

1009 99B 

1983 1945 
1347 1287 

534 541 

331 32&80 
367 358 

31 450 303.70 
629 625 

2434 2353 

1978 1967 
14140 14160 
1655 1660 

7 SI JO 17410 
558 591 

33040 317.10 
1023 1018 

404 376 

653 639 

2765 3762 
786 759 

2B6 28SJS0 
690 677 

19240 10940 
46990 46340 
9045 8940 
36490 359 


BeckniuxB 

Ericsson B 

HernwsB 

incmBteA 

Investor B 

MoDaB 

Nantbanken 

PhannAipfohn 

SandvkB 

Scnnia B 

SCAB 

S-GBankenA 

SkandaFan 

SkamfcaB 

SKFB 

SpaihankAnA 
SMshypatekA 
Sign A 
Sv Hoodie* A 
VahoB 


478 464 

254 247 JO 
1060 1050 
507 494 

343.334J0 
21450 209 

252 241J0 
27450 26850 
194 18750 
18850 18150 
167 159 

81 79.® 
218 21150 
34150 334 

187 TO 
139J0 131 JO 
190 190 

96 95 

222 215 

19850 19450 


474 461 

2S350 24150 
1080 1051 
507 494 

343 la 
21350 21050 
252 241 

27350 26450 
189 187 

18850 18350 
166 159 

8350 78 

218 214 

m 330 
17550 181J0 
138 133 

19® 190 

9758 97 

222 71450 
198 T92J0 


Sao Paulo 


kdweTSMJO 
9455J9 


BradescoPfd 

Bn*map« 






jPM 

IT 0 ” 


THBl 


CVRD PM 


890 
715.00 
47 JO 
55J0 
1592 
46090 
537 JO 
44200 
32490 
21190 
15850 
37 JO 
890 
119.98 
14250 
17690 
30490 
3820 
1.17 
2591 


866 
71090 
47 JO 
55L3W 
1875 
45690 
57590 
44290 
32490 
20990 
15790 
37 JO 
865 
11799 
16190 
17490 
29690 
3890 
1.15 
25J0 


875 875 

71190 71090 
4790 4790 
5550 5£90 
1592 15.70 
45790 45390 
50790 57090 
44290 44290 
32490 319.99 
20950 209 JO 
15831 15890 
37 JO 3720 
869 865 

119j 6D 11790 
162.10 IflOJO 
17690 17490 
30190 29790 
3819 3819 
1.16 1.16 
2590 25.15 


Sydney 

All OnBerate 2381 JO 
PreriooK 236410 

Amorr 

5 

7.93 

7M 

7M 

ANZBHng 

7J5 

7.70 

IJ2 

131 

BHP 

1681 

1660 

1660 

16/6 

Btsol 

167 

164 

165 

3/4 


21 JO 

21/5 

21 JS 

21 JO 

CBA 

1382 

I10R 

1126 

1387 

CCAraaffl 

1406 

1188 

14 

1385 

CoheMyer 

6 

534 

536 

694 

rnmalm 

620 

610 

615 

416 

CRA 

1160 

1BJ0 

1153 

1888 

CSR 

4/4 

434 

45# 

463 

Fosters Braw 

235 

2J3 

235 

233 

GaadnnaRd 

1/7 

1/5 

1/6 

1/6 

K3Amrofa 

11/0 

1135 

1189 

1 ■ .75 

Lend Lease 

2150 

2110 

23/5 

23 

AUMHdB 

NatAuHSmk 

1M 

16 

1/3 

1580 

1/3 

1588 

US 

13J7 

Naf fflutuol Hdg 

135 

131 

1.93 

1.93 

News Carp 

584 

673 

ua 

472 

Padfic Dsmtep 

119 

113 

116 

115 

PtaneerlBH 

434 

424 

430 

422 


655 

646 

635 

64# 

Si George Bans 

7J4 

7J0 

7 JO 

7.67 

WMC 

7J0 

7/5 

7/6 

7J4 

WBtaocBUng 

WnStaePet 

670 

9/3 

6/1 

9/0 

462 

9/0 

637 

9J4 

Wooiworita 

173 

168 

JJ0 

164 

Taipei 

Stock MWM Irate 861611 
PiataraWMI 

oatwy Lbelns 

166 

163 

163 

165 

Chang Hwa Bk 

T16 

75J0 

113 

7450 

113 

75 

11450 

7530 

OdnaDaKipait 

11930 

118 

118 

120 

China Steel 

3130 

31.10 

3180 

3UD 

Rref Bank 

118 

115 

ns 

119 


72 

70 

70 

72 


106 

0730 

103 

0450 

Ml Comm Bk 

75 

7350 

1150 

743J 


6930 

6850 

69 

AI 

SMnKtngLMe 

TatenSard 

103 

101 

101 

1* 

89 

85 

w 

#350 

Tatung 

UfcMflooHee 

5630 

7030 

55 

O 

5530 

69 

56 

66 

lltd World Chbi 

7230 

7130 

7130 

7230 


The Trib Index 


Prices as of 3-00 P.M. Now Yak time 


Jan. 1, 1992= tOO. 

Level 

Change 

%ciiange 

year to data 
% change 

Worid Index 
Regional Indexes 

151.70 

+1.15 

+0.76 

+15.04 

Aaa/Pecmc 

110.77 

-0.19 

-0.17 

-17.50 

Europe 

160.79 

+2JJ6 

+1.43 

+15.53 

N. America 

175.96 

+1.42 

+0.81 

+37.17 

S. America 
Industrial Indexes 

138.61 

-0.90 

-0.65 

+55.67 

Capital goods 

175.76 

+2.94 

+1.70 

+32^7 

Consumer goods 

170.28 

+1.06 

+0.63 

+23.33 

Energy 

183.06 

+2.94 

+1.83 

+34.98 

Finance 

112.93 

+0J31 

+0.28 

-1124 

Miscellaneous 

156.63 

+1.06 

+0.68 

+15.33 

Raw Materials 

182.19 

+1.28 

+0.71 

+26.46 

Service 

162.74 

+6.81 

+057 

+18.95 

Utmes 

132.97 

-0.42 

-0.31 

+4.59 


The Intomaticnal Henkt Tribune Woriri Stock Index C tracks Ora US doBai values ot 
XO kitenvritormty invariable stocks from 25 couttrioB, For mom Information, a tree 
booklet Is evaSabte by writing to The Trto fndox.1B1 Avenue Charles de GaoSe, 

92521 NoulBy Codex. Franco. CoirpBed by Btoombeig News. 


Tokyo 


NRhEi 225: 17932JV 
Pmtans 174KL47 


Seoul 


.... BC 70159 
Piwtaes 70420 


Doaan 

Daewoo Heavy 
Hyundai Eng. 
BoMolore 

Korea Q Pwr 
Karen Each Bk 
Koran Mob TU 
IGSestOsm 
PotmginnSI 
Sonsunp Dtatair 


SMitlKii 


104000 101500 
4730 4600 

19900 19208 
16200 15900 
27500 27200 
5920 5610 

470000 465000 
31800 30400 
53100 £2300 
42000 41100 
64000 62W 
11000 10600 


101500 102000 
4600 4650 

19400 19900 
16200 15600 
27400 27200 
5630 5610 

468000 465000 

3Q4» aran 

52300 53000 
41500 42000 
62500 63400 
70600 70600 


Singapore 


Strata Tlaec2032J7 
Pierian: 203494 


Oslo 


MXI«>ac5H41 
PiwWasr 


StogTedi ind 


AfcrA 


DennonkeH 
Elton 
HofdmdA 
KweMWAsa 
Meak Hydra 

KaatoScgA 
HiamedA 
OddaAso A 
PeftmGeaSra 

SagaPtdmA 

SdSeted 

TransacmOH 


171 166 

1« MOJO 
2420 2X80 
27 JO 2870 
127 124 

4650 4620 

S 

330 22450 

hS % 
SS % 

138 115 

IS 

& 4490 


,» 170 


143 
24 23J0 
27 2870 
127 122 

4620 47 

336 335 

329 325.50 
232 222 

10450 1Q2J8 
560 548 

286 273 

120 114 

129 124 

430 425 

45 4520 


7/0 

6* 

7J5 

630 

9.10 

aas 

830 

110 

11* 

1130 

11* 

1110 

15 

14* 

15 

14* 

070 

0/9 

0JD 

069 

NJL 

liA. 

NA 

18.10 

496 

4* 

4* 

4J2 

11 

1030 

1070 

11 

126 

2.17 

2J6 

117 

5/5 

US 

SM 

530 

338 

3 M 

148 

332 

9J5 

830 

630 

835 

192 

338 

330 

330 

AM 

484 

424 

448 

488 

41B 

418 

430 

17J0 

17/0 

1730 

17.90 

10.70 

9JD 

930 

930 

410 

405 

410 

405 

UO 

440 

440 

6/0 

1135 

11J0 

1130 

1130 

7.10 

43S 

7 

7.15 

NA 

UK 

NA 

27 

170 

3/4 

3/4 

170 

2J0 

176 

177 

179 

3/0 

384 

334 

338 

1.15 

1.13 

1.13 

1.14 

NA 

NA 

NA 

1470 

418 

410 

418 

406 


I Nippon Air 
Ammy 
AsaMBank 
AsddCheni 
AsaMGtes 
Bk Tokyo MUsa 
BkYakotana 
BrMoeskBW 
Canon 
CbubuElec 

fhHQHkll QjC 

Dal Nlpp Prirfl 
Ddel 

Dot-kHKana 
□ahnBank 
Dahn House 
Datura Sac 
DDt 
Denso 

East Japan Ry 
Bsnl 
Fdnuc 
Fuji Bonk 


Stockholm 


5X16hdQC 285414 
PmtaMS 277487 


HacNIuniBk 

HDadd 

Honda Motor 

IBJ 

IHI 

flotte 

Ka-Ybkndo 

JAL 

JaptmTabooco 

Justs 

Knltaa 

KansalElec 

Kao 

KawasaUHvy 

Knwc Steel 

WnWWOpRy 

MflBnmry 

Kobe SIM 

Koaaba 

Kubota 

Kyocera 

K^ m nBec 

Manibenl 

Moral 

MOHBQmm 
Mobu Elec Ind 
:Wk 


70S 

3350 

721 

668 

1090 

1850 

508 

2550 

2840 

2020 

1990 

2190 

546 

1Z1D 

379 

1410 

719 

8340O 

7610 

5300a 

2210 

4180 

1320 

4220 

1200 

1110 

1140 

3760 

1140 

472 

564 

5850 

470 

B1900 

3RD 


968 
700 
3270 
697 
654 
1080 
1700 
498 
251 D 
2790 
1990 
19S0 
2130 
532 
1160 
365 
1370 
712 

8210a 

2560 

5150a 

2160 

4140 

1250 

4170 

1280 

1080 

1110 

3710 

1100 

460 

555 

5760 


2140 

1350 

502 

363 

718 

1010 

311 


492 

2070 

1330 

495 

359 

716 

975 

210 


985 978 

70S 700 

3Z70 3250 

705 697 

654 653 

1090 i£*0 

1840 1760 

498 499 

2550 2530 

3840 Wnp 
3SW 1W8 
vm 1950 
2180 2120 
546 535 

1200 1150 
374 365 

7380 1370 

716 714 

8330b 821 On 
2500 2550 

5Z70n 5150a 
515® 2200 
4170 4130 
1300 1230 

4220 4140 
1290 1Z70 

1080 1080 
1120 1130 
3730 3700 

1110 1090 
464 464 

£ 

456 458 

8060a 8200a 
3490 3510 

m *£. 
2130 2080 
1340 1340 


Ugh 

LOW 

am 

Pre*. 

1370 

13* 

1330 

1330 

577 

557 

545 

561 

46S0 

45* 

46* 

4550 

1510 

1480 

1510 

ISM 

1810 

1760 

I//0 

17* 

598 

578 

595 

57B 

9250 

9110 

91* 

91* 

826 

811 

■ ILl 

na 

534 

516 


509 

361 

357 

FI 

359 

732 

724 

EJ 

733 

260 

256 

257 

260 

1140 

11* 

1120 

1130 

8760a 

86.50a 

BTJOn 

8/300 

352* 

349* 

350* 


604 

596 

602 

5* 

295 

288 

2ft 

287 

14* 

14* 

14/0 

1460 

93* 

9320 

9990 

9350 

629 

605 

630 

601 

32* 

3210 

3210 

3300 

1240 

11* 

1230 

II* 

454 

444 

447 

450 

72* 

7170 

72* 

/in 

5720 

5640 

5640 

5660 

11* 

1*0 

10* 

10* 

10* 

low 

10* 

10* 

7950 

7M> 

79* 

mo 

1510 

14* 

15* 

14* 

19* 

18* 

19* 

1870 

512 

499 

506 

517 

2470 

2440 

24* 

2460 

15* 

1570 

1530 

15* 

10B0 

1050 

1*0 

1050 

7250 

71* 

TOO 

74CJI 

9010 

0930 

*10 

8950 

834 

813 

813 

834 

13* 

1260 

1270 

1230 

502 

495 

501 

495 

1710 

17* 

1710 

1/* 


2* 

795 

294 

Ej 

86/ 

899 

866 

3030 

29* 

30* 

3030 

2820 

27* 

2820 

7 300 

6840 

8730 

8790 

6750 

1960 

1910 

1950 

1910 

070 

B34 

847 

#34 

1210 

11* 

12* 

II* 

2150 

2110 

7140 

7110 

46* 

44* 

46* 

4540 


791 

BK'? 

294 

HIT] 

610 


609 

11* 

1170 

nm 

1170 

1570 

1530 

1540 

1570 

745 

734 

744 

33 S 

717 

705 

710 

301 

2710 

36* 

26* 

264(1 

642 

£27 

633 

631 

33* 

3340 

3370 


36* 

3410 

3411) 

EJ 


Methanes 

Moore 

Newbridge Net 
Noam do Inc 
Nareen Energy 
NSrem TeJearn 


One* 


PaboCda 


RlaAlgam 
Rogers CanrelB 

isrs? 

Slone ConwU 
Sunenr 
ToBsnan Eny 
TecfcB 
Teiegtobe 
Telus 
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1 







PAGE 18 






















































ASIA/PACEFTC 



eregrine 
am Held on 


Tax- Evasion Charge 


- u ?^ N0 J"7 Per ®8 rine Investments 
; Holdings Ltd. said Tuesday that its 
. VietMni managing director was ar- 
' rested Monday on tax-evasion 
.charges, the latest in a series of set- 
i hacks for fee Hong Koog-bued in- 
vestment-banking concern in Asia’s 
^emerging markets. 

; Nguyen Trung Trbc, who headed 

- Peregrine Capital Vietnam, was de- 
' tained for allegedly violating per- 

- sonal-tax regulations, an offidal at 
;the People’s Prosecutor Office of 
; Ho Chi Minh City said. The offidal 
;said no charges had been lodged in 
..connection with Per egrin e’s activ- 
ities in Vietnam. • 

: Alan Mercer, chief legal counsel 

- with Peregrine Investment Holdings 
.in Hong Kong, said the company 
had not been given detai- ; of the 

"charges, but he said Australian Em- 
bassy officials were seeking Mr. 
True’s release on baiL 
i. Mr. True, 44, is an Australian 

# citizen who returned to Vietnam in 
•1990. The warrant said he could be 
-held for as long as four months 

[ Prosecutors searched Mr. True’s 
Ho Chi Minh City home and con- 
fiscated documents related to die 

* case, the arrest warrant said.' 

- ' Mr. Mercer said Mr. True’s aiest 
..concerned personal-tax affairs and 
.tax matters related to his personal 
-companies. Mr. True said in March 
-that eight Vietnamese companies 
-owned by members of his family 
l ; would lose their licenses as part of 
the investigation into his financial 
; activities. 

► The eight family companies held 
distribution rights in Vietnam for 
.products made by Hewlett-Packard 
Co. and Johnson & Johnson of the 
" kited States and Honda Motor Co. 
ad Minolta Co. of Japan. 

’’ Foreign companies in Vietnam 
lean distribute products directly only 




iftbey have a manufacturing license 
through a joint vulture or wholly 
foreign-owned inves tment 

‘"Because of the restrictions on 
■ foreign -companies operating 
through the representative-office 
vehicle, companies such as Pereg- 
rine have been forced to take cre- 
ative approaches that have attracted 
the scrutiny of the Vietnamese gov- 
ernment,” Harold. Hske, a Hanoi- 
based attorney with the U.S. law 
firm Russia & Vecchi. said. 

Mr. True has had his passport 
withheld since the investigation 
began in May 1996. His wife was 
also prevented, from leaving Viet- 
nam. but officials said the attest 
warrant named only Mr. True. 

Mr. True's arrest cranes less than 
two months after Peregrine was 
fined about $9,000 for conducting 
business in an unauthorized office in 
Vietnam without a permit. The au- 
thorities recommended an addition- 
al $50,000 fine. 

The company, which built itself 
into one of Asia’s biggest invest- 
ment banks within a decade, also has 
encountered regulatory problems in 
Bangladesh, Burma and South 
Korea. But Peregrine Capital Vi- 
etnam will continue with its business 
activities, Mr. Mercer said. 

In 1995, Peregrine Capital Vi- 
etnam received a license from die 
Hanoi government to engage in di- 
rect investments and fin ancial ad- 
visory services. 

Peregrine’s business activities in 
Vietnam have not been profitable, 
however. This month. Peregrine’s 
chairman and co-founder, Philip 
Tose. said die company was review- 
ing its Vietnam operations to deter- 
mine whether tokeep than open. 

Pereg rin e Capital Vietnam is 60 
percent owned by Hong Kong-based 
Peregrine Investment Holdings Ltd. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Tokyo and Osaka 

king 



Exchanges to Allow Options Trading 


Bloomberg Novs 

TOKYO — The Tokyo and 
'Osaka stock exchanges said Tues- 
day they would start trading op- 
tions on listed stocks in July as part 
of Japan's effort to restore its stand- 
ing as a world financial center. 

Trading in depositor receipts — 
similar to the American depos- 
itary receipts traded in the United 
States — probably will also be 
allowed in Tokyo after June 1 . 

Although options and depos- 
itary receipts are commonly 
traded in New York and London, 
Japanese exchanges have delayed 
introducing the products to allow 
local 'brokerages time to prepare. 

As part of Japan’s drive to re- 
duce financial-market regula- 
tions, options on individual stocks 
will give investors more oppor- 
tunity to protect their portfolios 
from losses as .well as to make 
larger bets with smaller invest-: 
merits. For companies, options 
may help attract investors to 
stocks by stabilizing the market. 

Asian companies have lobbied 
Japanese exchanges to introduce 
depositary receipts, which allow 
investment in foreign companies 
without the complications of pur- 
chasing shares abroad. 

“It’s another step in the grow- 
ing sophistication of the market.” 
Alicia Ogawa, analyst at Salomon 
Brothers Asia Ltd., said. 

Exchanges in Tokyo and Osaka 
said they had not decided how 
many shares would be linked to 
listed options initially, or which 
shares they would be. The shares, 
they said, could include compa- 
nies in the Nikkei 225 and Nikkei 
300 indexes. Options trading will 
begin July 18. 

While Japanese exchanges 
have offered trading in options on 


Japan’s main stock indexes — the 
Nikkei 225, Nikkei 300andTopix 
Indexes — options on individual 
shares have not been listed on 
major Japanese exchanges. 

Nikkei 225 futures also are 
traded on the Chicago Mercantile 
Exchange and on the Singapore 
International Monetary Exchange. 

Individual stock options are 
routinely traded in financial cen- 
ters such as New York and Lon- 
don. They allow the owner to pur- 
chase or sell a share a i an agreed- 
upon price by a specified date. 

For now, options are traded 
only over the counter in Tokyo, by 
a small group of foreign broker- 
age concerns. Listing them on Ja- 
panese exchanges is pan of a 
broad effort by Japanese officials 
to remove regulations and revital- 
ize Japan's financial markets. 

The so-called Big Bang re- 
forms, which take their name from 
the proposals that deregulated 
London s financial markets in the 
mid-1980s, also include elimin- 
ating restrictions on foreign-ex- 
change trading, freeing broker- 
ages firms' trading commissions 
and abolishing taxes on most se- 
curities transactions. The reforms 
are to be completed by 2001. 

■ Output Falls in Japan 

Japan's industrial output in 
February fell a revised 3.7 percent 
from January, the International 
Trade and Industry Ministry said, 
according to an Agence France - 
Presse report. 

Preliminary data showed a 3.4 
percent decline. The ministry 
forecast that industrial output in 
the quarter that ended in March 
would be up 1.9 percent from the 
ious quarter and 6.5 percent 
a year earlier. 


China Trade 
Swings to 
Surplus of 
$6.7 Billion 


G/BpSed M OarSttfrnrr. Dc 

BEIJING — China's trade surplus 
mushroomed to S6.70 billion in the 
first quarter, wiping out a deficit of 
51.16 billion a year ago. the Customs 
Administration reported Tuesday. 

The surplus — already more than 
half of last year’s 5 1 2.24 billion total 
— may further exacerbate trade 

S oblems between China and the 
nited States. Last year. America 
ran a $39.5 billion trade deficit with 
China, its largest with any country 
except Japan, sparking criticism of 
China’s trade practices by both 
parties in the U.5. Congress. 

The surplus also suggests that 
Chinese consumers are reluctant to 
spend even as the country’s exports 
boom. The figures show that exports 
rose 25 percent in the quarter, to 
$35.5 billion, while imports fell 1 .8 
percent, to $28.8 billion. 

"The mucb-talked-about acceler- 
ation in domestic demand hasn't ma- 
terialized.” Ma Guonan. a Hong 
Kong-based economist with Bankers 
Trust Co., said. “China is still in a 
stage of inventory cleansing.” 

China’s gross domestic product 
grew 9.7 percent last year. Seine for- 
eign economists say tire growth rate 
masked a buildup of inventories. 
Some of those inventories now are 
being exported, and discounted local 
products meanwhile are competing 
well with imports. 

Japan still led the list of China’s 
trade partners, followed by Hong 
Kong and die United States. 

The fall in imports came despite a 
cut in tariffs of about one-third as of 
April- 1, 1996. that should have 
spurred purchases from abroad. 

Foreign-funded enterprises drove 
the decline, cutting their equipment 
imports by 25 percent in die first 
quarter, though they remained net 
importers of goods. 

(Bloomberg. AFP) 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

1400G 

1500 
13000 
12500' 


Singapore 

Simile Times 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 



Exchange - 

Index. . 

Tuesday 
dose - 

. Pwv. 
Ciose 

Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

W4Z.62 

12^9527 +0.37 1 

Sii^apt>ne 

Straits Times 

2JS3Z37 

2.034J64 

■4JJ08 

Syttoey 

AS Ordinaries 

2,361.70 

2,366.10 

+0^6 

Tokyo 

NMcei225 - 

17,933^9 

v* 

W 

! 

1 

Kr^ Uimpur Ccmposrte 

IfiBSJBT 

L1QU38 

-T^T. 

Bungieak 

SET 

dosed. 

713.62- 

- 

Seoul 

Composite Index 

■ 701^39 

6S6.95 

+O.S4 

Taipei 

Stock Market Index 

8,487.9 1 

+1S1 

Kano* 

PSE 

2,94946 

2,932.64 

+0^7 

Jakarta 

Composite kxtex 

GSLZT 

635.17 

4X61 

KtoHkigton 

NZSE-40 

2^43J» 

2^27.10 

+0.72 

Bombay 

Sers^ve index 

3,647/44 

3,633.73 

+0:38 

Source: Tefekurs 


inenuukxul Herald Tnbone 

Very briefly: 


• Hyundai Motor Co.. South Korea's largest carmaker, said 
it had reduced production work at some vehicle assembly lines 
by four hours a day because of sluggish domestic demand. 

• South Korean banks are considering a bailout of Jinro Ltd. to 
prevent it from becoming the third major industrial concern to 
collapse this year, after Hanbo Group and Sammi Group. Jinro, 
the country's biggest liquor producer, has debt of $33 billion. 

• South Korean banks' capital-adequacy ratio, which rates die 
overall quality of bank assets according to the Bank for In- 
ternational Settlements' standards, fell to an average 9.14 
percent at the end of last year from 933 percent a year earlier. 

• Chevron Corp. plans to transport narural gas from the 
Kurobu field in Papua New Guinea to customers in Australia's 
Queensland state in a project valued at 3 billion Australian 
dollars (S2.3 billion). 

• Korean Air said it would supply Boeing Co. with wing 
parts in an accord valued at $82 milli on over four years. 

• Ayala Land Inc.*s first-quarter net income rose 15 percent 
from a year earlier, to 1 .42 billion Philippine pesos ($53.9 
million) from 1 .24 billion pesos, as sales of its condominium 
projects grew 24 percent. 

• India's central bank cut the rate it charges banks for loans by 

one percentage point, to 1 1 percent, and eased restrictions on 
lending. Reuiers. Bloomberg. AFP 


Samsung to Buy Out AST, Raising Its U.S. Profile 


Bloomberg News 

SEOUL — Samsung Electronics Co.. 
the world's largest memory-chip pro- 
i.ducer, agreed Tuesday to buy the 54 
-percent of AST Research Inc. that it did 

- not already own for $477 million in cash 
-andassumed debt. 

- The acquisition of the personal-com- 
’puter manufacturer, which is based in 
Irvine,. California, supplements Sam- 

' sung's existing businesses and could 
'make it easier for fee South- Korean 
company to crack the U.S. personal- 
.coraputer market. 

For AST, which has lost mound in 
^Asia to Compaq Computer Coip. and 
-other rivals, the move may provide ad- 
.ditional capital to help revitalize its un- 
■profi table business. 

“PCs wife ah AST brand will def- 
. initely sell better in the U.S. market than 
tJhose with a Samsung tag, "Tony Jung, 
Tan electronics analyst at Jardine Flem- 
-mg Securities Co, in Seoul, said. 

“The $477 million is no big deal for 
-Samsung.” he added, as fee comj 
•has “deep pockets” and the 


would allow it to expand its markets. 

A Samsung spokesman said the com- 
pany would buy fee 31 million shares of 
AST it did not already own for $15.40 
each and would assume $307 million of 
the company’s debt 
Kim Kwang Ho, the former chief 
executive of Samsung who now over- 
sees U.S. operations, said the acqui- 
sition confirmed “the company’s com- 
mitment to firing up AST as the world’s 
leading PC maker.” : 

He said, “It is apparent that in order 
for AST to continue as a viable com- 
petitor in the intensely competitive PC 
mdnstry, significant further support 
from Samsung will be necessary.' 

Full ownership of AST by Samsung 
would give die computer maker better . 
access to Samsung’s components and 
other resources, be said. 

Samsung sold 839,000 personal com- 
puters last year, 26 percent more than in 
1995. The company’s personal com- 
puters are sold in Korea, and it plans to 
sell notebook models through AST in 
.overseas markets. 


Samsung previously offered to buy 
the remaining shares for $5. 10 each but 
raised fee price in response to objections 
from a committee set up by three in- 
dependent AST directors. 



Some AST shareholders also criti- 
cized the earlier Samsung bid as too 
low. Shareholders filed at least six law- 
suits saying AST had failed to maximize 
the value of the company. 

“We decided $5.40 a share was ap- 
propriate and fair,” said Yoon Jong Jin, 
a Samsung spokesman. 

In afternoon trading in New York, 
AST was quoted at $5.1875 a share, up. 
43.75 cents. 

Analysts said the deal may enable 
Samsung to improve its competitive- 
ness. The world personal -computer 
market is expected to increase steadily 
beginning next year, Mr. Jung of Jardine 
Fleming said. Samsung paid $378 mil- 
lion for a 40 percent state in ASTin July 
1995. It raised that stake to 46 percent 


when itpaid off a $90 million note to 
Tandy Corp. in July. 

Samsung also owns options that, if 
exercised, would give it an additional 3 
percent of AST. 

AST’s problems began in 1995 when 
it was late in releasing several new mod- 
els and then became mired in cost-cut- 
ting, restructuring and a scramble to 
design competitive products. 

AST has posted losses for the past 
eight quarters. 

“AST has lost ground in Asia and was 
never a top-ten seller in the U.S..” Lily 
Wu, regional technology analyst at Sa- 
lomon Brothers Hong Kong Lid., said. 

Other Asian electronics companies 
have made similar moves. NEC Corp. 
last year bought Packard-Bell Electron- 
ics Inc. to gain access to the U.S. per- 
sonal-computer market. 

Samsung and other large Asian man- 
ufacturers can leverage their other busi- 
nesses, such as memory chips, disk 
drives and computer monitors, to reduce 
personal-computer prices and compete 
better in feat market. 


Indonesia Confirms Delay 
In Approving Bre-X Requests 


CatyStdbyOw SbJTFuw n Duptarhn 

JAKARTA — The minister of 
mines and energy confirmed Tuesday 
that President Suharto had delayed 
approving two applications made by 
the Canadian exploration company 
Bre-X Minerals Ltd. for mining priv- 
ileges at fee Busang gold property in 
East Kalimantan Province. 

Local newspapers had quoted the 
minister, Ida Bagus Sudjana, as say- 
ing that Mr. Suharto would not make a 
decision on the applications until the 
results of an independent audit of the 
Busang site were known. 

The contracts are crucial for the 
further exploration and development 
of the Busang property, which has 
been in the limelight since Bre-X an- 
nounced feat it held 70.95 million 
ounces of gold and later said fee es- 
timate might have been far too high. 


Bre-X has hired Strathcona Mineral 
Services Ltd., a Canadian mining con- 
sultancy. to carry out an independent 
audit on fee Busang site to determine 
the amount of gold in the property. 
Strathcona has concluded its survey of 
the site, and fee results are expected in 
early May. Strafecona’s resting was 
prompted by a rep on from Fneeport- 
McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc. . which 
was surveying the deposit while ac- 
quiring a 15 percent stake. Freeport 
said it had found “insignificant” 
quantities of gold at fee site. 

Bre-X. which originally discovered 
fee deposit, holds a 45 percent stake in 
it; the Nusamba holding company led 
by Mohammed Hasan owns 30 per- 
cent, and the Indonesian government 
holds fee remaining 10 percent. 
Nusamba is 80 percent owned by Mr. 
Suharto. ( Reuiers . Blooniberg ) 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


TODAY’S 


BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 

spears on Page 8 


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INTERNATIONAL 



a Dual Role 

Zeneca, Now in Management, Can Prescribe Its Own Products 


By Elisabeth Rosenthal 

. New York Tines Service 


chose to accelerate the timetable, buy- 
ing the nest of the company two weeks 
ago. Few analysts had expected that the 
deal to be completed so soon. 




NEW YORK — a bi^ 
maceutical manufacturer has taken over 
the management of 11 cancer onto k 

the ^SSeSf^ mlSy SiS?! “5??® of *? company’s day-to-day 
acmallv operations and serve as a buffer be- 

acmauy overseeing then prescrrottoiL tween Zeneca and the hospitals. 

Dr. Salick said he was shocked last 
yeek when Zeneca executives in- 
formed him that they no l ong er required 
his services; his employment contract 
was supposed to run through 1999. He 
said he decided to leave Monday after 
the company offered him die post of 
chairman emeritus and relieved trim of 
most of his responsibilities. 

Zeneca is replacing him with Mi- 
chael O’Brien, a 25-year employee of 
the drag company who Zeneca said had 
most recently overseen its specialty 
businesses group. 

Dr. Salick said that, while he ex- 
pected his centers to continue to deliver 
good care, he was concerned that the 
new arrangement might msitu die doc- 
tors at the centers less independent. He 
said he .had hoped his management 
team would serve as a “safety vafve” to 
make sure that doctors could prescribe 
whatever medicines they saw fit. 


Zeneca Group PLC, the BritisTdroe 
: company, said Monday that the 
founder of its Salick Health Care Inc 
unit had resigned and that it was as^ 
starring management of the unit’s 11 
cancer centers at American hospitals 
including Cedars Sinai Medical Center 
in Los Angeles and St. Vincent’s Med- 
ical Center in New York. 

“We are unaware of anything like 
this . elsewhere,’ ’ said Clifford Hewitt, 
an analyst with Sanford Bernstein & Co. 
“h i s very unusual for a product com- 
pany to own a service business of any 
kind, and this arrangement is a first-” 
Some medical ethicists were trem- 
bled by what they saw as a conflict of 
interest because Zeneca, the world’s 
second-largest .manufacturer of cancer 
drugs, would be directly overseeing pa- 
tients' cancer care. Dr. Bernard Salick. 
the founder and chief executive of the 
clinics, said he was concerned about 
how the centers he had built would be 
treated by the new management as well 
as about the continued independence of 
physicians working al them. 

Zeneca bought half of Salick Health 
Care in 1995 and Had an option to buy 
the rest this October. But tne company 


David Barnes. Zeneca's chief exec- 
utive, said, “Weare sony that Dr. Salick 
did not take the role offered to him." 

He added dial Zeneca's purchase 

Dr. S alick, aJadney specialist turned had been part of the company's strategy 
entrepreneur, was expected to remain of “seeking broader opportunities to 

provide services and expertise — as 
well as pharmaceutical products — to 
the bealih-care industry.” 

Salick Health Care is known for its 
skill at providing cost-efficient cancer 
care for patients in managed-care 
jabms, as well as for innovations such as 

Other haspirals at which Salick op- 
erates cancer centers include the Aim 
Bates Hospital in Berkeley, California; 
Mount Sinai Hospital in Miami, and 
Desert Hospital in Palm Springs, Cali- 
fornia. Dr. SaHck also owns or operates 
more than two dozen dialysis crimes. In 
recent years, phannaceuiical makers have 
started owning drug-distribution compa- 
nies and home health-care agencies- But 
never before has a company employed 
dooms who can prescribe its drugs. 

“From a business standpoint this 
makes sense,” said Uwe Reinhardt, a 
health economist at Princeton Uni- 
versity. * ‘They’re going to get their arms 
around cancer care in managed care and 
the same time make sure their 


“I am very distressed about this,” products get a fair chance at the table. 
Dr. Salick said. “I didn't feel I would But “from the patient standpoint,'’ 

he added, “you would wonder, is this 


be able to control quality.” He said be 
was starting a health-care company that 
would focus on diseases such as cancer 
and acquired immune deficiency syn- 
drome to compete with Zeneca. 


the Zeneca cancer clinic, and do they 
have the whole palette of products, if 
you go to a Mercedes-Benz dealer, you 
get Mercedes-Benz products.” 


Manila Seeks New Amatil Sale Terms 


BtocmhfTg .Vns 

MANILA — San Miguel Corp.’s 
plan to sell its soft-drinks unit to Coca- 
Cola Amatil Ltd. of Australia came un- 
der fire Tuesday from its biggest share- 
holder. which called for a renegotiation 
of the agreement. 

Magtanggol Gunigundo. chairman of 
the Presidential Commission on Good 
Government, a government agency that 
controls 48 percent of the Philippines* 
largest food and beverage company, said 
San Miguel should have received more 
than 25 percent of Amatil in exchange 
for its Coca-Cola Bottlers Philippines 
Inc. unit. An additional 10 percent of 
San Miguel is held by the country's 
Government Service Insurance System 
and social security system. 

Mr. Gunigundo said he was not sat- 


isfied with the valuation of the soft-drinks 
unit’s shares used in the transaction. “We 
want management to consider this in the 
negotiations with Amatil so the price 
disparity can be narrower,” he said. 

Mr. Gunigundo also said San Miguel 
should get more than the agreed three 
seats on Amatil's 12-member board as a 
result of the transaction. His comments 
came after San Miguel's shareholders 
approved a share swap Tuesday between 
Amatil and the bottling company. 

San Miguel’s chairman, Andres Sori- 
ano m, indicated a renegotiation of the 
agreement was unlikely. 

“We'll see what we can do about this, 
but the terms have been negotiated,” 
Mr. Soriano said. ’ ‘We think this was an 
excellent deal.'' 

Later, however, San Miguel’s pres- 


ident, Francisco Eizmendi. said some 
changes might be possible. “Until we 
close in June, it’s not final,” he said. 

San Miguel plans to sell die soft- 
drinks unit by mid-July for S2.7 billion in 
Amatil stock, creating the largest Coca- 
Cola bottler outside die United States. 

San Miguel would receive shares val- 
ued at $1.9 billion, making it the second- 
largest Amatil stockholder. Coca-Cola 
Co. of the United States, which owns 30 
percent of the Filipino bottler, will have 
33 percent of Amatil. 

Shares in San Miguel have tumbled 
since the stock swap was unveiled April 
3 amid concern the transaction under- 
valued the soft-drinks company. On 
Tuesday, however, San Miguel's Class 
B shares, which foreigners can own, 
rose 1.50 pesos to close at 82 (S3.1 1). 


Enron Faces New Challenge in India 


Agence France-Presse 

NEW DELHI — A trade 
union has issued a legal chal- 
lenge to a S25 billion Enron 
Power Corp. project in India, 
court officials said Tuesday. 

The Center for Indian 
Trade Unions has appealed to 
the Supreme Court to chal- 
lenge a lower court ruling that 
gave permission for work to 
restart on the project in the 
western state of Maharashtra 
in December. 

The Enron power station 
the largest foreign-invest- 
ment project so for in India, 
was delayed for 1 9 months by 


lawsuits demanding that the 
contract with Enron be rene- 
gotiated. 

The trade union's com- 
plaint centers on the renego- 
tiated deal between Enron and 
the Maharashtra government. 

In that accord, Enron 
agreed to reduce electricity 


SB 


tariffs, change the fuel it used 
from liquefied natural gas to 
naphtha and raise generatin; 
capacity from 2,015 to 2,4: 
megawatts. 

But the trade union said the 
state government had lost out 
during the renegotiation be- 
cause Enron had secured a 


project “three times the size 
of what it originally got. ” 

In an earlier challenge to 
the project, the trade union 
charged that Enron had 
bribed officials to ensure that 
the deal went ahead. The 
Bombay High Court rejected 
that claim in December. 


Philippine Companies Finagle Foreign Financing 


Bloomberg Nn y 

MANILA — Philippine 
companies, hungry for foreign 
capital and impatient with the 
of the government's re- 
form efforts, appear to be tak- 
ing matters into their own 
hands. 

Companies such as Ben- 
pres Holdings Corp., Philip- 
pine Seven Holdings Corp. 
and Jollibee Foods Corp. 
have turned to such 
stratagems as complex asset 
transfers and derivative in- 
vestments to maneuver 
around the red tape. 

Greater access to foreign 
cash is crucial to growth in the 
Philippines, where the sav- 
ings rate is about 17 percent of 
gross domestic product, one 
of the lowest in the region. 

■The government has re- 


laxed investment rules in 
banking, telecommunications 
and insurance industries, but 
foreign investors are still 
banned from investing-in me- 
dia companies and retailers. 

“It’s foreigners that have 
the money,” John Mangtm of 
Connell Securities Inc. said 
On ■ ’ Monday, Benpres’s 
board approved a pi an to trans- 
fer its ABS-CBN Broadcast- 
ing Corp. unit to a separate 
company, which would give 
foreigners access to Benpres 
shares for the first time. ABS- 
CBN’ is ihe country's hugest 
television network and gen- 
erates more than half of Ben- 
pres’s earnings. 

in January, Benpres, 
whose interests include elec- 
tric power, highways and 
telecommunications, won a 


25-year contract to run half of 
Manila’s state-owned water 
utility . Benpres needs 200 bil- 
lion pesos ($7-59 billion) over 
the fife of the contract to up- 
grade the system. That 
amount is equivalent to about 
ooe-ihird of the government 
debt market 

“They want to have more 
cash for their telecoms and 
water utility projects,” 
Bomber Arimgote of Citicorp 
Securities International Inc. 
said “Locals may not 4be 
able to satisfy their needs.' ' 

Philippine Seven Holdings 
dorp., toe local franchise 
holder for 7-Eleven conveni- 
ence stones, plans to sell war- 
rants allowing investors to bet 
on the performance of the 
convenience-store chain. Be- 
cause they do not constitute - 


direct ownership, the warrants 
can be bought by foreigners 
without violating laws barring 
ownership of retailers. 

The Philippines' largest 
fast-food chain, Jollibee 
Foods Corp., also is looking 
for foreign funds. Jollibee 
wants ro sell 15 billion pesos 
of convertible bonds or war- 
rants, some overseas, to fi- 
nance expansion. 

Foreigners have been will- 
ing to pay a premium for Phil- 
ippine companies that catch 
their fancy. That can be seen 
in the divergence between 
prices of Class B shares, 
which foreigners are allowed 
to own, and Gass A shares. 

Class B shares of Manila 
Electric Co., for example, 
closed at 195 pesos Tuesday, 
while the A shares finished at 


12 1, even though both have 
the same voting privilej 
and claims on dividends. 

For investors seeking ways 
to bet on the Philippine econ- 
omy. the new investment out- 
lets are welcome. But as the 
new investment instruments 
develop, die Class B shares’ 
premium over Class A shares 
may be chipped away, 
spelling disaster for owners 
of Class B shares. 

‘ ‘There is a risk, and we’ve 
already seen some evidence 
of it.' ' Scott Gibson, research 
head at ABN-AMRO Hoare 
Go vert Securities Inc., said. 

Speculation that San Miguel 
Coip. was poised to offer for- 
eigners a derivative security 
based on Gass A shares helped 
drive down prices of the B 
shares this year. 


CliRRIiNCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 



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YOUR GOAL IS OUR GOAL 
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Eletrobras 

Centrais Eletricas Brasileiras SA 


4 



IT’S TIME FOR BRAZIL 


44 



Eletronorte 

Centrals Eletricas do Norte do Brasil SA. 

FURNAS 

CENTRAIS ELETRICAS SA 


Minist&rio 
de Minas 
e Energies 


SPECIFIC PROCUREMENT NOTICE 
NORTH - SOUTH INTERCONNECTION 

PROJECT BR-0275 

INTERNATIONAL TENDER C0.1.DAS.G.0016.97 

The purpose of this tender is the procurement of equipment for control, command, 
protection and telecommunication for 500kV substations included in the expansion of the 
North - Northeast Transmission System, to be constructed nearby the city of imperatriz, 
in MaranhSo State, and Colinas and Miraeema, in Tocantins State, and Included in the 
expansion of the South - Southeast Transmission System, to be constructed nearby the 
city of Qurupi, in Tocantins State, at the Serra da Mesa Hydros I e trie Plant, in Goias Stale, 
and nearby the city of Brasilia, DP, Brazil. Upon conclusion, these substations will enable 
the interconnection of the North - Northeast and the South - Southeast Transmission Systems 
now operating as isolated systems. 

This tender is open to suppliers of equipment originating in Inter-American Development 
Bank (IDB) member countries, with both experience and tradition concerning the supply of 
said items. 

ELETROBRAS has been dully authorized by the Brazilian Government to proceed the 
construction of the specified substations with the support of FURNAS. ELETROBRAS is in 
the process of negociating with IDB and EXiMBANK-Japan the funds required for the above 
mentioned supplies, which are subject to the terms of the Loan Contracts to be signed with 
these international institutions. 

The Bidding Documents will be available for consultation and can be obtained at 
a cost of RS 200.00 (two hundred reals) starting April 30, 1997, at address N B 1 below, any 
further information may be requested at the same address. Air mailing of Bidding Documents 
wiH be charged an additional USS 100.00 (one hundred dollars) cost. 

The supply of equipments under this Tender will be ended by late August, 1996. 

The Qualification Documents and Proposals will be received at 10:00 a.m. on 
June 30. 1997 at address N B 2 below, when the envelopes containing the Qualification 
Documents will be opened. 

Address N* 1 - FURNAS - CENTRAIS ELETRICAS S.A. 

Central de Atendimento ao Fomecedor - CAF 

Rua S&o Joao Batista, 60 - Terreo - Botafogo - Rio de Janeiro - RJ - Brasil 

Tel.: (55-21) 528-4272 - Fax: (55-21) 266-2142 

Address N* 2 - FURNAS - CENTRAIS ELETRICAS S.A. 

Rua Real Grandeza, 219 - Bioco “A" - 8* Andar - Audftorio B 

Botafogo - Rio da Janeiro - RJ - Brasil 


VICTOIRE ARIANE 

>i. EbiulnJid Emnuniwl Scrvois L-25J5 Luvaubourp 
R.C LmertJbMn}: 8 Xl 

AVIS AUX ACnONNAIKES 

A pjnjr du 16 Avril 1*W, il sera {we un dindeade I'SD 59.50 par 
jetv in c* mn' nanrc du coupon n 1 3 des ccrn riots au porteur a la 

BANQUE DE GE5TION EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD 
• LUXEMBOURG 
- Sodcte Anonym e - 
20 , Boulevard Emmanuel Seraus 
L-253S LUXEMBOURG 

A p.irrir du 10 Avril 199". I’acrioa wr cotec ra-dividendc cn 
BUl'RSli DE LUXEMBOURG. 

Pour la societe, 

L'Afiom paveur . 


DICAM WORLD WIDE INVESTMENT 
FUND 

Sodete dlnvcstissement k Capital ’SfcriaMe 
14* rue Aldringcn, L-1118 Luxembourg 
Commercial Register: Section B 2L325 

NOnCE OF THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF . 
SHAREHOLDERS 



INVtSIlvlCi^l runn vnw™ 

liering and voting upon the following mattecs. 


e manay“ • 
e report of The auotor. 

ationsand 

!«. 



H l I io* 

sparge the directors 
^Slv^cemberlMS- 

ectthedr 

^Shareholders, 
uther business. 


d r ended 31 December 1996. 
respect to Thar performance of 



Eetrobr£s^ 

Centrais E16tricas Brasileiras SA IT'S TIME FOR BRAZIL 

Eletronorte 

Centrals Etetricas do Worts do BrasS S A. 

FURNAS Minlsterio 

W CENTRAIS ELETRICAS SA de MlflCfS 

e Energia 

Eletrobras ^ 

Centrais Eletricas Brasileiras SA IT'S TIME FOR BRAZIL 

Eletronorte 

Centrals Eletricas do Norto do BrasJJ S.A. 

FURNAS Ministfcrio 

XPJP' CENTRAIS ELETRICAS SA de MinOS 

e Energia 

SPECIFIC PROCUREMENT NOTICE 

NORTH - SOUTH INTERCONNECTION 

PROJECT BR-0275 

INTERNATIONAL TENDER CC-BO-1 0.089/97 

The purpose of this tender is the procurement of series fixed capacitors, series 
controlled capacitors and static compensators for 500kV substations included in the 
expansion of the North - Northeast Transmission System, to be constructed nearby the 
cities of Imperatriz and Presidents Dutra, In Maranh§o State, and the cities os Cotinas and 
Miraeema, in Tocantins State, Brazil. Upon conclusion, these substations will enable the 
interconnection of the North - Northeast and the South - Southeast Transmission Systems 
now operating as isolated systems. 

This tender is open to suppliers of equipment originating in Inter- American Development 
Bank (IDB) member countries, with both experience and tradition concerning the supply of 
said items. 

ELETROBRAS has been dully authorized by the Brazilian Government to proceed the 
construction of the specified substations with the support of ELETRONORTE. ELETROBRAS 
is in the process of negociating with IDB and EXIMBANK-Japan the funds required for the 
above mentioned supplies, which are subject to the terms of the Loan Contracts to be 
signed with these international institutions. 

The Bidding Documents will be available for consultation and can be obtained at a 
cost of fi$ 200.00 (two hundred reals) starting April 16, 1997, at the address below. 

Air mafling of Bidding Documents will be charged an additional USS 100.00 (one hundred 
dollars) cost 

' The supply of equipments under this Tender will be ended by late August, 1998. 

The Qualification Documents and Proposals wilt be received at 3:00 p.m. on June 18, 1997 
at the address below, when the envelopes containing tha Qualification Documents will be 
opened. Any .further information may be requested at the same address. 

CENTRAIS ELETRICAS DO NORTE DO BRASIL S.A. - ELETRONORTE 

Qerdncla de Apoio e Assessoramento Juridicc a Licltagdo e Contratagao - GSSJ 

SON - Quadra 06 - Conjunto “A" - Ecfificio Venanclo 3.000 - Bioco “C - Sala 710 

CEP 70.71 8-900 - Brasilia - DF - BRASIL 

Phone: (55-61) 212-6658 - Fax: (55-61) 212-6659 

SPECIFIC PROCUREMENT NOTICE 

NORTH - SOUTH INTERCONNECTION 

PROJECT BR-0275 

INTERNATIONAL TENDER C0.1.DAS.G.0014.97 

The purpose of this tender Is the procurement of series fixed capacitors, series 
controlled capacitors and static compensators for 500kV substations included In the 
expansion of the South - Southeast Transmission System, to be constructed nearby the 
city of Gurupi. in Tocantins State, at the Serra da Mesa Hydroelectric Plant, in Goias State, 
and nearby the city of Brasilia. DF, Brazil. Upon conclusion, these substations will enable 
the interconnection of the North - Northeast and the South « Southeast Transmission Systems 
now operating as isolated systems. 

This tender is open to suppliers of equipment originating in inter-American Development 
Bank (IDB) member countries, with both experience and tradition concerning the supply of 
said items. 

ELETROBRAS has bean dully authorized by the Brazilian Government to proceed the 
construction of the specified substations with the support of FURNAS. ELETROBRAS is in 
the process of negociating with IDB and EXiMBANK-Japan the funds required for the above 
mentioned supplies, which are subject to the terms of the Loan Contracts to be signed with 
these international institutions. 

The Bidding Documents will be available for consultation and can be obtained at a 
cost of RS 200.00 (two hundred reais) starting April 16, 1997. at address N e 1 below, any 
further information may be requested at the 3amd address. Air mailing of Bidding Documents 
will be charged an additional US$ 100.00 (one hundred dollars) cost. 

The supply of equipments under this Tender will be ended by late August 1998. 

The Qualification Documents and Proposals will be received at 10:00 a.m, on 
June 18, 1997 at address N° 2 below, when the envelopes containing the Qualification 
Documents will be opened. 

Address N° 1 - FURNAS - CENTRAIS ELETRICAS S.A. 

Central de Atendimento ao Fomecedor - CAF 

Rua Sao Jo5o Batista, 60 - T&rroo - Botafogo - Rio de Janeiro - RJ - Brasil 
Tel.: (55-21) 528-4272 - Fax: (55-21) 266-2142 

Address N° 2 - FURNAS - CENTRAIS ELETRICAS S.A. 

Rua Real Grandeza, 219 • Bioco “A” - 8° Andar - Audltbrio B 

Botafogo - Rio de Janeiro - RJ - Brasil 








PAGE 22 


Hcral h^^^ ribttng 

Sports 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1997 




World Roundup 


Woods Lifts Ratings 

golf Even in a runaway. Tiger 
Woods's victory in the Masters on 
Sunday produced one of the highest 
rated rounds of golf in U.S. tele* 
vision history. 

The 15.8 preliminary overnight 
ratine amounted to a 65 percent 
lew cram a 9.6 last year. It equates 
to 9 million TV households. 

A 15.8 rating would be the 
highest rating for any tournament in 
two decades, and certainly the 
highest for a Masters, exceeding 
the 12.0 in 196 6 for a Monday 
~ won by Jack Nicklaus. 
fet it would not be golf s highest 
rated round. As lead-ins to die Su- 
per BowL, the final round of the 
1971 Bing Crosby Pebble Beach 
tournament produced a 19.2 and the 
final round of the 1976 Phoenix 
Open posted a 16 J. But those were 
in the era before cable. 

If confirmed, the rating would 
approach last year's NBA finals, 
which averaged a 16.7, and exceed 
the 1996 baseball All-Star game, 
which drew a 13.2 rating. 

“Plenty of people built their day 
around watching Tiger Woods," 
said Lance Barrow, who produced 
the Masters broadcast. “What he's 
done is to bring the fi inge golf fan 
to the sport" (/V1T) 

Zaire to Play in Togo 

soccer FIFA, the governing 
body of world soccer, said Tuesday 
that because of the civil war in Zaire 
the country's next home World Cup 
qualifier against South Africa would 
be played in Togo. The Africa group 
three meeting is scheduled for Lome 
on April 27. (Reuters) 

NHL Sets Crowd Record 

ICE HOCKEY A record 
17,640.529 fans attended NHL 
les this season, with the 
fontreal Caaadieas becoming the 
first team to average over 20.000 
with a 41-game mark of 21,002 at 
the Molson Centre. 

The league averaged 16,548, a 
3.5 percent increase over last sea- 
son. Last season's Stanley Cup fi- 
nalists, Colorado and Florida, had 
sellouts for each of their 41 home 
games, the Avalanche drawing 
16,061 per game to McNichols 
Sports Arena and the Panthers 
14,703 at Miami Arena. (AP) 

Broncos Sign Smith 

FOOTBALL Having freed up 
money under the salary cap by re- 
structuring John Elway's contract, 
the Denver Broncos signed five- 
time Pro Bowl defensive end Neil 
Smith to a one-year contract 

Reports say Smith, 31, who had 
86 sacks in rune seasons with Kan- 
sas City, will make $1 million to 
$1.5 million in base salary, with 
incentives that could swell it to $3 
million. (AP) 

Bosnian Game Blocked 

soccer A benefit match for Bel- 
gian Jean-Marc Bosnian planned 
for Brussels hit a snag Tuesday 
when the Belgian soccer union, 
which runs the nation's soccer, said 
it would oppose the game. 

Bosnian forced European soccer 
to relax its transfer rules last year 
after he took Belgian soccer au- 
thorities to the European Court of 
Justice in Luxembourg. Bosnian is 
still suing die Belgian soccer union 
and FC Liege, the Belgian club that 
blocked his transfer to French team 
Dunkirk in 1990. (Reuters) 

Angri? Fans Are Furious 

soccer Irate fans of a local 
league Italian soccer dub invaded a 
town hall Monday after a match 
involving rivals from nearby An- 
gri. 

Around 400 Real Pagan ese sup- 
porters invaded municipal offices in 
the small town of Pagani, south of 
Naples, and smashed windows and 
damaged furnishings. (Reuters) 


The Grand Slam? Tiger Woods Makes It Believable 


By Larry Dorman 

New York Times Service 


of- victory record that had stood since 1 899, then he the tee for the Masters. No one had ever caused Ben 
must be viewed differently. That is what is hap- 
sfo 


What about Troon? The 

the modern era ate MaACalraveecto 


A 


UGUSTA — For a golfer, the modem 
Grand Slam is possible, imaginable, but 
highly unlikely. These are good reasons 
why die Masters, the U.S. Open, the Brit- 
ish Open and die PGA Championship have been 
called the * ‘Impregnable Quadrilateral. ’ ’ 

No one since Jack Nicklaus in l972has been able 
even to win the first two legs. The Grand Slam had 
become golfs Holy Grail, discussed in whimsical 
terms, usually in the context of some fanciful post- 
Masters waxing by writers with azalea hangovers. 

But that was before Tiger Woods and his oth- 
erworldly performance last weekend. Now Woods, 
21, has again altered perceptions of what is, and 
what is not, possible, just as he had done at each 
new level since junior golf. 

As he spent his day after the Masters victory 
doing the talk-show circuit and making appear- 
ances at All-Star Cafes in Myrtle Beach. South 
Carolina and Atlantic City, the rest of the United 
States was buzzing about his prospects for doing 
something that seemed undoabie until Sunday. 

Simply put, he has made the Grand Slam seem 
attainable. When a golfer comes along who can 
break an American major championship margin- 


j. Hardened professionals are talking about 
;'s chances of winning the remaining three 
Grand Slam events. This year. 

“Yeah, it's possible he would win the Grand 
Slam,” said Jerry Pate, the 1976 U.S. Open cham- 
pion. ‘ ‘The British Open at Royal Troon is right up 
his alley. So are foe other two. U.S. Open at 
Congressional? Right up bis alley. PGA Cham- 
pionship at Winged Foot? Right up his alley. I 
think he could probably pull it off.'' 

Naturally, skeptics are running for the record 
books to point out that no one has won the modem 
Grand Slam.They will cite evidence that other than 
Ben Hogan in 1953. who won three of the four, and 
Nicklaus in 1972, who won the first two and led in 
foe British Open at Muirfield before finishing 
second to Lee Trevino, no one has even come 
remotely close. That is. with the exception of Greg 
Norman in 1986, when he held the 54-hole lead in 
all four majors, winning only the British. 

Then again, no one had ever won three U.S. junior 
amateur titles before Woods. No one had ever won 
three straight U.S. Amateurs either. No one had ever 
won foe Masters at the age of 21. or shot 270 at 
Augusta National, or played Amen Comer in eight- 
under-par. No one bad ever averaged 328 yards off 


Crenshaw, who has written essays about both Hogan venue m the jnoaem era m ^ (1973) 

and Bobby Jones, to say, “Words fell you,” fi® AUto *Tprim<£ 

Nicklaus cautiously answered foe Question of and Arnold Palma: (ivtwj. am. 


Nicklaus cautiously answered foe question 
Woods’s chances to go where not even he was able 
to go. “It’s not vety likely, but it’s possible,” 
Nicklaus said. “When you're climbing a moun- 
tain. it’s easier to climb when you're young. But 
let's take it one round at a time. " 

Let’s examine the chances one venue at a time. 

Congressional Country Club has 
one U.S. Open and one PGA Cham 
were won by straight drivers and 
aids. Ken Venturi won the ’64 Open, and Dave 
Stockton the ’76 PGA. 


were long hitters 

familiar? Woods codd win at Troon, 

And Winged Foot? The four U.S. Opens ottos 
very tough golf course m Manmroneck.NewYCTk. 
were won by four fosrincily different 

efs: Fuzzy ZoeUer, who beat Norman m a playoff lrj*, 



T 


[HOSE who believe Woods will have trou- 
ble at Congressional are under the ten- 
sion that the U.S. Open's notoriously 
icult rough will neutralize his power' 
off the tee. Perhaps, but only if the U.S. Golf 
Association decides to shrink the landing areas zn 
foe 275-285 yard zone, where Woods carries his ' 
drives. The simple fact is that he is among the 
straightest long hitters in the game. No. 1 in total 
driving on the PGA Tour, in a class with Norman. 
If necessary, he can hit his 2-iron 255 yards off the 
tee. He can win at Congressional. 


Winged Foot, posting a seven-over-par score Of 
287- BiUy Casper, the 1959 winner, played a draw, 
and was also a tremendous putter. 

Bobby Jones, a great course manager, worked 
foe anv way he wanted in 1929. (Joneswon the 
1930 U.S. "Open and Amateur and British Open and 
Amat eur, then the Grand Slam). 

Take the best part of each of those four players 
games, and you have Woods: ' “ 

• “He may win 10 Masters, just like Jack Nick- 
laus said he might," said Tom Watson. “He may 
be the type of player that only comes around in a 

mill ennium. “ 

• With a new millennium on the doorstep, why not 
a Grand Slam? 


Old Guard Takes Charge in Rome 

In Milan, an Emperor May Press Power on 2 Younger ffeterans 


By Rob Hughes 

liuemaaanal Herald Tribune 


I N THE Eternal City, one of Rome's 
leading soccer clubs has called in a 
man whose finest playing days were 
foe 1940s, and who peaked as a soccer 
trainer in foe 1960s. 

Nils Liedholm, the “new" coach to 
A.S. Roma is 74 years young. That's 
right, seventy-four! 

The situation is desperate: Roma 
needs to climb out of mid-table me- 
diocrity pronto if it is not to kiss goodbye 
to next year's European gravy train. 

You and 1 know the situation. We 
have sprung a leak in the bathroom, we 
are holding our finger on the pipe, and 
we will pay what it takes to bring in that 
reliable, experienced plumber. 

No doubt the old boy remembers 
what makes a good team tick, and if he’s 
as smart as he used to be he won't be 
charging dated fees for his labors. 

Roma sacked its Argentinean coach 
Carlos Bianchi a week ago. The club 
knew that, in foe short term, it could not 
buy replacement parts. It has to be a 
remodelling job, using the players on 
staff, putting confidence and know-how 
and motivation into them. 

So Liedholm it is. The president 
Franco Sensi, long on memory and short 
on patience, has seen precedents else- 
where. Cesare Maldini is getting a grip 
on the Italy national side. Bobby Rob- 
son is defying foe sack at Barcelona. 

A couple of grandpops, they may be, 
albeit a decade or so short of Liedholm’s 
vintage. But sometimes the trainer who 
is long in foe tooth can stimulate young 
minds, can pull foe strands together with 
a well placed word here and there. 

Liedholm, indeed, was the master at 
making others play. Born in 1922, he 
blossomed into a calm, athletic, swift 
tactician. He believed in fitness, expec- 
ted it of others, and plotted foe Swedish 
victory in foe 1948 Olympic games. 


Then, as now, Italy's elite clubs 
bought the best. AC Milan recruited not 
only Liedholm but his partners Gunnar 
Gren and Gunnar Noraahl and the fa- 
mous “Gre-No-LL'' threesome schemed 
and powered Milan to greatness. 

‘ 'll Conte, ’ ' the Count, Liedholm gave 
Milan 367 imperious league perfonnanc- 

Eukopiah Soccer 

es and led it to the 1958 European Cup 
final, where it lost Real Madrid. That 
same year concluded his international 
career, when Sweden lost the World Cup 
final to foe Brazil of the young Pele. 

The Count of Milanello slid grace- 
fully into coaching, first with Milan's 
youth squad. By 1964, he was head 
coach. His team finished second in 1 965 
and led Serie A the following year until 
first jaundice, then panic, cost him foe 
job. He fell ill. the team fell down, the 
familiar ax fell on him. 

He used his wisdom to resuscitate 
Fiorentina and Roma when relegation 
threatened to claim them. Now Roma 
has called again. So, last Sunday, Lied- 
holm shook off the mothballs, sat in foe 
stands and surveyed foe measure of his 
task as Roma lost, 1-0, to Parma. It all 
helps to keep an old man happy, and put 
something m foe kitty for foe grand- 
children. 

Nudging shoulders wifoRoma is Mil- 
an. Lieaholm's first Italian love is also 
laid low, and it could be that one of the 
Swede’s early pupils. Franco Baresi, is 
being lined up for a trial in coaching. 

It was Liedholm who saw the talent to 
play Ubero in Baresi, at that time a 
somewhat stem and unadventurous 
youth. Come, come, said foe Swede, 
you can surprise opponents with stealth, 
imagination and suddenness. 

Baresi skippered Milan to all the 
things the Gre-No-Li never quit finished, 
but even his circle is nearing completion 
now as. 1,000 towering performances 


on. Baresi is aging as his team is ailing. 

The return of Sacchi, failed coach to 
foe Italian team, is not working. The 
players do not respond to his regiment- 
ation; Baresi doesn't have foe legs any- 
more, and Sacchi doesn't have a trio like 
Ruud Gullit. Frank Rijkaard and Marco 
van B as ten to fashion the victories. 

The Dutch period at San Siro went foe 
way of the Swedish one. Great while it 
tasted, but irreplaceable (even by sub- 
standard recruits from Ajax). 

Sacchi broken now. He has lost the 

I dot. is losing games, and will not for 
ong have the aim of Silvio Berlusconi, 
foe Milan grand paymaster, around him. 

Berlusconi, of course, says otherwise. 
He stands by — or behind — his man. 
But losing, 6-1, to Juventus at foe San 
Siro two Sundays ago, and going down in 
the same cauldron, 3*1, to Muan rival 
Intemazionale are humiliations even Ber- 
lusconi may not be able to face down. 

Change will be rapid and costly. Sac- 
chi is the plumber who didn't fix foe 
leak but will demand payment in full. 
Fabio Capello. Milan’s most successful 
coach until obliged to depart by Ber- 
lusconi's vision-less aide Adriano Gal- 
liani, may not be tempted back. 

Capello is toughing it out in Madrid. 
His relationships with foe Real pres- 
ident and some players is combative, but 
as ever results are speaking for him: 
Real Madrid, nine point leaders in 
Spain, should be in the Champions' 
League next season, Milan definitely 
will not be, so why should Fabio retake 
the poisoned chalice? 

At foe Milanello training ground, they 
: two names. Baresi, and van Basren. 
former has long been a kind of 
manager on foe field, the latter opted out 
alter his crippling ankle injury in 1993. 

Baresi and van Basten, untried in 
coaching but strong of will and cold in 
getting results, may make a pair. Their 
ages combined just about beat even Old 
Uncle Nils Liedholm. 



■ Bmb boayefTte Anoatftd Pica 

FOCUSED ON VICTORY — Boris Becker of Germany concen- 
trating Tuesday daring at game against Sebastien Lareau of Canada 
at the Japan Open in Tokyo. Becker won, 6-2, 4-6, 6-2. It was his first 
singles match after a two-month layoff caused' by a wristinjury. 


Armstrong Returns to Old Cycling Hamits and Old Frame of Mind 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — The fellow at foe other end 
of foe phone identified himself with a 
laugh as “a rider chump" and said he 
was in Italy, “just hanging out’’ It was 
Lance Armstrong but a different one. 
This was not foe somewhat solemn 
Lance Armstrong of the last year, foe 
25-year-old bicycle racer who found out 
that he had testicular cancer that had 
spread to his lungs and brain, forcing 
surgery and chemotherapy. 

This was not even the Armstrong who, 
as recently as mid-January, reported that 
his cancer was under control and that he 
was feeling good. He may have felt it 
then, but he didn't look it or act it. 


Now on the phone was foe feisty 
Lance Armstrong, the buoyant one ver- 
ging on brash, the Armstrong who won 
the road race world championship at 21 
in Oslo and consented to meet foe king 
of Norway only if protocol was ignored 
and the rider could bring his mother to 
foe audience. 

He was in Europe to be a tourist and 
also to deal with some business. 

First, he had bought an apartment in 
the south of France to use as a base when 
he resumes European training. 

Second, the sponsor of ms Cofidis 
team, which is based in France, wanted 
him to show up at a couple of races and 
press conferences. 

He was at foe Tour of Flanders one- 
day classic early in April and Paris- 


Roubaix last Sunday and will watch foe 
Fleche Wallonne in Belgium on Wed- 
nesday. He returns to Texas Thursday. 

The first two races did not mean that 
much to him, he said. Armstrong never 
has done well in Flanders and never 
competed in Paris-Roubaix because it is 
scheduled a week before foe Ardennes 
classics, the Fleche and Liege-Bas- 
rogne -Liege, which rank among his 
main goals of the season. 

Last year, he won the Fleche and then 
finished second in Liege-Bastogne- 
Liege. 

First came the Paris-Roubaix press 
conferences. How does he feel? 

‘ 4 I feel good, I feel normaL ” His hair, 
which he lost during three months of 
chemotherapy last fall, has grown back. 


t," be said with 

some 

Is he training? “I do rwo,- three hours 
a day but not very consistentfy.Tt’s still 
something I enjoy, riding my bike. But 1 
missed a day yesterday and it meant, 
nothing. Last year, if I had missed a day, 
1 would have been stressed out'.’. . ; 
Does he have a date for his return to 
tition? ‘ ‘No. Not tomorrow. After ■ 


the Tour de France. Hopefully .Tt!s only 
April and it hasn’t been thai long since I 
was very, vety sick. I want to race, yeah, 
but I want to live. I'm waiting for the 
doctors to give me the go-ahead forhand 
training and hard racing. They would 
prefer that I hold off for this, year.*’ 
“He's happy," said his traveling 
companion and frequent training part- 


ner, J cfori ‘Kori oth, 1 30, .formerly mnafe ur 
racing ctompiqn of TexasV- v 
• "He’a doing aH foe things, he never 
had a chance to dp before — taking his 
boar out, going*, to rock concerts; just 
seeing the bluebonnets coine up. We’ve 
got a lot of bluebonnets in Texas and he 
hasn't <been home in. years to watch, 
those flowers bloom. ” ‘ “ 

Armstrong's mobile phone rang — it 
was his friend and former teammate Axel 
Merckx, who now rides fortbePolti team 
in Italy. He was not entered in Paris- 
Roubaix but would be iatto? Fleche 
Wallonne. They spoke about fo»s and 
that for a few minutes. Then Armstrong 
told him: ‘‘Win foe Fleche forme.” 

"Naw,” he said quickly, “win it for 
you." 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 


Baltimore 
Saflan 
Oetran 
Toronto 
New York 


MMUNUMH 

EAST DIVISION 

W L PCt 

a z aoo 

6 6 aoo 

« 7 J62 

l S Ml 

S 7 .417 


CENTRAL DM8KM 
MBtmikee 5 3 MS 

Minnesota 6 6 3<w 

Kansas City 5 S SCO 

Oevetand 5 6 .455 

Orica 90 3 8 -273 

WESTDmSJOH 

Oakland 7 5 583 

5aoffl* 7 S J83 

Anahdm S 6 455 

Toms 4 S Ml 


Atlanta 

Ftortda 

Montreal 

PWtodetahta 

WwYmjr 


mn w muAoei 

EAST DIVISION 

W L 
V 3 
8 3 

4 6 

3 B 
3 9 


GB 

3 

344 

J'6 

4 


1 

1 

1W 

3V4 


lVi 

Vh 


PCt OB 
.750 — 

J27 if, 
.m 4 
.273 5V| 

-250 <5 


CENTRAL DIVISION 

Houston B 5 A1S - 

andmofl S 7 ,417 354 

Pittsburgh 4 A JCQ 

S/.L0UIM 3 8 273 

Oriojoa 0 10 .000 

WEBTDMEIQN 

Lot Angeles 8 3 .727 

Catomto 9 3 .727 

Son Fnmdsce 8 3 .727 

SanDlego 7 * 536 


2 'A 

l 

6V4 


mnauera dm Kota 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Oakland 00a 000 STO-t 3 a 

Boston 140 0» 03*— 10 14 0 

W Adams, Acre (£}, Groom (7). R. Uewta 
<B) and MaflrRs WakeflekL Trfleefc (81 and 
Hnefemm. w-WouefloW. 1-1. L— w. 

Adorns, M. HRs— Oohtandt Barista 01. 
Boston, Hosahnon OL M. Vaughn 01. 
Sealth 382 000 0*1-6 If I 

demand 000 001 000—1 2 0 

OeMamo, Hurtado (71, McCarthy (8J, 
Ayala (91 and Dc.Wttsan; Nagy. Mesa (HI, 
A ssenmocher (91 and s. Alarm. 
W— OtMarWra. 1-0. L— Nosy, 1-1. 
HR— Semite, R_ Davis CO. 

Kansas ON IN 001 010-3 6 0 

Toronto 000 no 000—2 7 0 

Rusch Bert (81, J. Writer 19), Pkbarda 

{91 and /VWdortane W.WUnoms, Quantnn 
(0). Roue at. Andujar (9) and O'Brien. 
W— Rusctv 2-0- L— Ouarmm D-t. 

Sv— Pichardo CO. HRs — K. City. J.BeK 2 (4). 
Demo OH NO 000-0 4 1 

MBwoakee ON 003 M*-7 12 0 

Matter, AUaB MI, M. Mtws 00 and 
Wattjecfc El*ed DoJorwi C9) and Maftwnr. 
W— Etdtad, 2-fl. L— Moehler, 0-1. 

AmMs* ON 001 040-5 7 1 

New Ytat OH IN 000-1 3 0 

Dfcfcwn, Holtz (9> and Leyrffc ftopen, 
Boehrinscr W, Stanton (81, Weathers (91 
Ota GlreidL W— Olfitean. 24. L— Rogers, 0- 
1. HRs— Anahdm, LeyrtH 12). Entail 0». 
Minnesota 101 ON 000-3 4 0 

BdUman 883 ON f)»~4 9 0 

Tewtebury, TWmbter CB1, Cwrtado TO 
and SMfttoach; Erfctton, toMyart <9J and 
HoOss, Webstw (9). W— eiWown, 2-0- 
L-TewfcriwiY. 0-2- Sv-RoJVtyers IS. 
QMcogo 081 ON 600-1 4 1 

Tans 001 ON 02*— 3 7 0 

AAmz and Kafcavfce. JCHffl, Patterson 
C8]. WetMtand (9) and l.Rodrlguez. 


W— Patterson, 1-1. L— Ateona, 0-3. 
Sv— Wattetand (21- HR— Teras. Greer 01. 
NATIONAL LBAOUE 

Houston m no OM 3-4 11 0 

SL Lout* 110 OM IN 0-2 4 3 

KDe, Wagner OH, Hudefc CIO) and Eunbtoi 

WVonti Pertoysek (7), Fcssos (71, EckBrrtcy 
191, Mathews HO) end Lumpkin. 
W— Wegner, 14L L-€dtoslfly, M. 
Sr— Hudefc CD- HR— Houston Btgcto (1J. 
Montreal 030 112 100-1 13 3 

COtaroda 490 381 Mr-10 12 2 

Judea Telford til, Stull IS, L smith (7). 
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PAGE 23 


SPORTS 


fiO Years Later, Blacks 



By Bill Plaschke 

Los Angeles Times 


* ’ LOS ANGELES — On the eve of a 
notable anniversary for one black Los 
.Angeles baseball player, another is 
watching his inner-city high school 
.team practice. 

- The left fielder is wearing oversized 
jeans and a button-down shirt. The 

VANTlOtf PfifUT 


average player more quick money. 
More status. More education. More of 
the things sadly lacking in inner-cities 
everywhere. 

From where Adam Keonybrew sirs 
-7 wjth his 3.5 grade-point average and 
nightly visits to the Inglewood. Cali- 
fornia, library for quiet study rune — the 
.comparison is sometimes no compar- 
ison. .When it comes to baseball, other 
major sports just malm more sense. 








.shortstop is wearing cutoffs and bas- 
ketball shoes.. . 

. There is no second baseman. No first 
baseman. Players forget to wear their 
•batting. helmets. 

Adam Kennybrew, Locke High’s star 

'quarterback and pitcher, shakes his 
head. 

“Sometimes this is embarr assing, ” 
he says. * 'My friends say, ‘Why do you 
-do this? Why don’t you just stay with 
■football?’ ” . 

. His is just one view, from a weathered 
bench, facing a diamond where grass 
.grows on the base paths but not in the 
outfield. 

Yet 50 years after Jackie Robinson 
; broke major! eague baseball ’s color bar- 
; rier , it is an important one. Hie question 
has been raised: Why are there 2 percent 
■ fewer blacks orr major league baseball 
; rosters today than when every baseball 
1 team became integrated 38 years ago? 

' The. answer,' according to some cur-, 
rent and farmer major league players, is 
t racism. . 

\ The answer from the corner of 11 1 th 
1 and San Pedro is something different. - 
| From his position as former star and 
1 current assistant general manager in San 
; Diego, Dave Stewart accuses baseball 
! of ‘ ‘trying to weed blacks out.” 

> From his position of a 17-year-old 
J soon faced with the most important de- 
icision of his life, Adam Kennybrew 
' looks at it like this: 

/. Upon graduation from high school 
‘ -mext year, if he doesn’t chose baseball 
| over football, it will not bebecanse 
1 somebody wanted him weeded out. / 

’ It is because he wanted himself 
i weeded out. 

| It will be because he, like thousands 
! of other top black athletes, mil prefer to 
1 play another sport 

S It will be because, compared with 

> baseball, other major sports provide the . 



• way." 

In other words, if he is deemed to be a 
potential baseball star, he will play base- 
ball. If he has a chance to be just av- 
' erage, he won’t. 

Six years from now, when somebody 
■ surveys the number of blacks in tbe 
game, he will not be among them. And 
somebody will blame racism. 

If Jadoe Robinson were alive today 
. — Lord, how we wish — my . guess is 
that he would properly attack major 
league owners for their refusal to hire 
more black general managers and ex- 
. ecutiyes. He would properly attack ma- 
jor league field personnel for their re- 
fusal to groom more black managers by 
not allowing blacks to hang around as 
extra players and clubhouse leaders — 
roles held by some great managers, 

: But would he call baseball racist for 
its oyerall lack of black players, starters 
to subs? No way. Because Robinson 
was the sort of person who would have 
visited 111th and. San Pedro, Locke 
High, former school of future Hall of 
Famers Eddie Murray and Ozzie Smith. 
He would have seen what has happened 
to baseball in the inner city. 

Few programs are in as poor shape as 
Locke, but the problems are shared. 

Youngsters are wowed by polished 
basketball and football stars. Hassled by 
peers who' think baseball is only a step 
up from the French Club. Depressed by 
playing on lousy fields with poor equip- 
ment from schools that finance and 
value football and basketball more. 

Locke High is nearly SO percent 
black; the football team is almost en- 
tirely black, while only three of 11 
varsity baseball players are black. 

With disappearing youth leagues and 
role models, baseball in inner-city Los 
Angeles is sometimes as foreign as 
lacrosse in Des Moines. Iowa. 



Series Hero Returns to Haunt Yankees 


The Associated Press 

Jim Leyritz showed the New York 
Yankees thai they might have made a 
mistake when they shipped him to the 
Anaheim Angels. 

Leyritz was one of New York's he- 
roes in the World Series. He celebrated 
his return to Yankee Stadium with a 
two-run homer that capped a four-run 
eighth in Anaheim’s 5-1 victory on 
Monday night. 

Last October, Leyritz 's three-run 
homer off Atlanta closer Mark Wohlers 
in Game 4 helped the Yankees to an 
improbable victory that swung the mo- 
mentum in the World Series. In Decem- 
ber, the Yankees traded Leyritz to Ana- 
heim for two minor leaguers. 

Given a standing ovation by the 
crowd of 15,082 before his first at-bat, 
Leyritz rewarded his supporters with his 
final swing. Though his homer doomed 
die Yankees to defeat, some fans 
cheered as he rounded the bases. 


“I wasn’t sure what the reception 
would be,” he said. “It was race to 
know you were pan of something here, 
and that the fans remember.” 

Rad Sox 10, At Mattes 1 Tim Wake- 
field allowed one hit in seven innings, 
and Mo Vaughn hit his first homer this 
season. 

Mariners 6, Indians 1 Dennis Martinez 
allowed two hits in six innings at Jacobs 

AL Roundup 

Field to beat his former team. 

Jay Buhner went 2-for-3 with a two- 
run double in the first Paul Sorrento, 
who played with Martinez in Cleveland, 
had a run-scoring single in the first and a 
run-scoring double in the third. 

Jose Mesa retired the Mariners in 
order in the eighth inning in his second 
appearance since returning from his 
rape acquittal. 

Brawsrs 7, Tigers o Cal EJdred allowed 


four hits in eight innings, and Jeromy 
Bumitz and Gerald Williams highlighted 
a three-run sixth with run- scoring singles 
as Milwaukee beat visiting Detroit for its 
fifth win in six games. 

Orioles 4, Twins 2 Scott Erickson 
pitched eight innings of five-hit ball to 
improve to 2-0, and~Bajtixnore stretched 
its winning streak to four. 

The game w as played in chilly weath- 
er before a crowd of 36.288, ending the 
Orioles’ string of 47 straight home 
games with attendance of at least 
40.000. 

Royals 3, Blue Jays 2 Jay Bell 
homered in the first and sixth off Woody 
Williams, the third multihomer game of 
his career, and pinch-hitter Bip Roberts 
singled in the go-ahead run in the eighth 
at the SkyDome. 

Rangers 3, white Sox i Rusty Greer 
hit a two-run homer in the eighth off 
Wilson Alvaez. dropping visiting 
Chicago to 3-S. 



Substandard Clippers Beat Mavs to Make Playoffs 


Alien Iverson of the 76ers hitting a 
three-pointer against the Ballets.. 


The Associated Press 

The Los Angeles Clippers, who have 
lost more Qian half of their games this 
season, qualified for postseason play 
for the first time since 1992-93 by 
beating the Dallas Mavericks, 99-93. 
The Clippers will open next week 
against the Utah Jazz, a team they trail 
by 24J6 games. 

The Clippers are three games ahead 
of Sacramento with three games to play, 
but Los Angeles clinched the playoff 
spot because it has the tiebreaker edge 
over the Kings. Los Angeles, with a 36- 
43 record, could be tbe only sub-JOO 
team to- make it to postseason play. 
Minnesota .and Phoenix, both 39-40, are 
fighting for the sixth seed. 

Last season, Sacramento was tbe 
only team, to make the playoffs with a 
losing record. 

110, Kidcks 107 En Indiana- 


polis, Reggie Miller scored seven of 
Indiana's 1 1 points in overtime. Dale 
Davis had 23 points and 18 rebounds, 
and Jaleh Rose added 20 for the Pacers, 
who needed a victory to avoid being 
eliminated from playoff contention. 

“It would have hurt if the Knick- 
erbockers got us,” said Miller, who 

finished with 24 points after a slow 
start “We’re the Hatfields and they’re 
die McCoys." 

BuUats 131, 76*rs no In Phil- 
adelphia, Allen Iverson scored 40 
points, but his final basket — a 3- 
po inter with 19 seconds left — was 
uncontested. The Bullets were miffed 
that the 76ers called time out with 24 
seconds left to set up a shot for Iverson, 
who has scored at least 40 points in five 


successive games. When play resumed, 
the Bullets didn’t defend Iverson, who 
came down and made an unguarded 
shot to extend his streak. 

BuHs 117, Raptors loo In Chicago, 
Michael Jordan had his first triple 
double since he came out of retirement 
25 months ago, leading the Bulls to their 
69th victory. Jordan finished with 30 
points, 1 1 rebounds and 10 assists. Told 
that his last triple double in a regular- 
season game was on Dec. 29, 1992. 
Jordan said: “It’s been that long? You 
guys need to check your records." 

He pointed out that he had a triple 
double in February’s All-Star Game. 

Hornets 94, Caveliars 82 In Char- 
lotte, the Hornets tied a club record with 
their eighth straight win and moved a 
game a brad of Detroit in the race for the 
fifth playoff seed in the East. 

The Cavaliers will probably have to 


win their last three games to make the 
postseason. 

Timberwolves 85, Heat 87 The Tim- 
berwolves frittered away an early 16-0 
lead, but Terry Porter scored nine of his 
16 points in the fourth quarter to help 
his team win in Miami. 

Magic ioo, Pistons 91 In Orlando. 
Penny Hardaway scored 21 points, and 
Gerald Wilkins and Darrell Armstrong 
came off the bench to combine for 14 
fourrh-quarrer points for Orlando, 
which will face second-seeded Miami 
in the first round of the playoffs. 

Kings 120, Spurs 106 
Mitch Richmond scored 33 points, and 
the Kings scored 69 in the first half. 

Warriors 103, Nuggets 93 In Denver, 
Chris Mullin scored 20 points, and Todd 
Fuller had 14, including eight early in 
the final quarter, as Golden State 
handed Denver its eighth straight loss. 


•plj 

' In Sacramento. 


Adding Speed, 
Braves Scoot 
Past the Reds 


The Associated Press 

The Atlanta Braves used to be a team 
that plodded along one base at a time, 
waiting for the three-run homer. 

Since the arrival of Kenny Lofton and 
Michael Tucker, that approach has 
changed. The defending National 
League champion is now a team that can 
beat its opponents with speed, as shown 

NL Roundup 

by a 15-5 rout of the Cincinnati Reds on 
Monday night for Atlanta's ninth vic- 
tory in 10 games. 

Lofton went 5 for 6 to equal his career 
high for hits in a game, scored five runs 
to tie an Atlanta team record and stole 
two bases, T ucker set a career high with 
four runs batted in and had three hits in 
six at bats. 

“It’s a good situation." Tucker said. 
“If the pitcher is worried about the base 
runner more than the baiter, he's going 
to make mistakes. We’re doing a good 
job of taking advantage of the mis- 
takes.” 

Lofton is 17 for 30 during a six-game 
hitring streak that has raised his average 
to .393. Tucker is hitting .38 1 . 

Javy Lopez hit his first career grand 
slam for the Braves, who baited around 
twice, had 19 hits and are hitting .383 
over the last five games.The Reds made 
things worse with eight walks. 

Pete Schourek. the Reds' starter, al- 
lowed five runs on six hits and four 
walks in 3% innings. With an ERA of 
12.14 in two starts, he hardly seems 
recovered from elbow surgery that 
caused him to miss the second half of 
last season. 

The Braves' starter, Denny Neagle, 
won even though he allowed five rims 
and six hits in 5¥h innings. 

The Reds played their game in road 
uniforms that were altered to honor 
Jackie Robinson. Deion Sanders, who 
started a furor over Cincinnati's road 
uniforms when he shortened his sleeves 
in honor of the 50th anniversary of 
Robinson's breaking baseball's color 
barrier, set a career high and tied a team 
record with four stolen bases. 

Threatened with fines because league 
rules specify that all players must wear 
sleeves the same length, the Reds de- 
rided as a team to alter their uniforms to 
match the style Sanders went to after he 
saw a picture of Robinson. 

Rockies 10, Expos 8 Andres Galar- 
raga broke a sixth-inning tie with a two- 
run single at Coors Field and Vinny 
Castilla followed with his sixth homer, 
connecting off Everett Stull, who lost in 
his major-league debut. 

Lany Walker increased his league- 
leading RBLs total to 18 by driving in 
three. 

Jerry DiPoto got the victory even 
though he allowed two inherited runners 
to score in the sixth. 

Giants 3, Mots 2 A day after he 
sprained his neck in a collision. Jeff 
Kent returned and homered against his 
former team again. He hit a run-scoring 
single in ihe third inning and a two-run 
homer in the eighth off Greg McMi- 
chael. getting three runs batted in at 
Shea Stadium for the second day. 

San Francisco stretched its winning 
streak to four and dropped the Mets to 3- 
9. Rod Beck pitched a perfect ninth for 
his major league-leading seventh save. 

Astros 4, canfinals 2 Pinch hitter Bill 
Spiers doubled in two runs off Dennis 
Eckersley in the 10th inning at Busch 
Stadium. 


-DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 






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PAGE 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1997 


OBSERVER 


Interpreting Turkey: A Master’s Vision 


From Jim to Bill 


li 


By Russel i Baker 


VfEW YORK — Jim Mon- 
XN roe was president when 
my great-grandfather was 
bom. He'd just succeeded 
Jimmy Madison. Tommy Jef- 
ferson and Jack Adams were 
stilt alive. Tommy down in 
Charlottesville and Jack up in 
Massachusetts, writing those 
famous letters back and forth. 

Jack’s son, young Jack, 
would become the second 
President Adams to fill the 
prestigious post of chief ex- 
ecutive when great-granddad 
was 8 years old. When 1 was 8 
years old Frankie Roosevelt 
was president, having bested 
Herb Hoover for the job. 

Great-granddad was here 
when Jim Monroe came up 
with his renowned Doctrine. 
He was here when young Jack 
Adams eked out his narrow 
victory in the presidential 
stakes of 1824. besting Andy 
Jackson and Hank Clay. 

All that seems like only 
yesterday when you think of 
your great-granddad walking 
the same earth with the likes 
of Hank Clay, Andy Jackson 
and Danny Webster. 

And Cal Calhoun, too. who 
used to be Jack Calhoun until 
he ran for vice president in 
1 824. With young Jack Adams 


to the notorious Civil War. 

My great-grandfather was 
not much for writing, but the 
story of how Dick Morris be- 


By Stephen Kinzer 

flint- York Times Sen-tee 


story of how Dick Moms be- 
came a political overseer a- 
mused him so much that he 
recorded it in his treasured 
family Bible. 

Morris’s dad was Gouver- 
neur Morris, who helped 
write the world-famous Con- 
stitution of the United States. 
This world-class dad natur- 
ally named his son Gouver- 
neur Morris Jr. 

Young Gouvemeur hoped 
he would someday be elected 
president of the United States 
and follow in the widely ad- 
mired footsteps of the cele- 
brated Georgie Washington. 


I STANBUL — This is the Turkey of the pho- 
tographer Ara Guler A confused child peers 


running for president, having 
Jack Calhoun run for the sec- 
ond position would have been 
one Jack too many. 

Dick Morris, the acclaimed 
political overseer, reminded 
Jack Calhoun that Americans 
were still a poker-playing 
people. A two-Jack ticket 
would encourage jokes about 
needing two Jacks to open, and 
Americans would never vote 
for a politician they could 
laugh at before he took office. 

So Calhoun became Cal 
Calhoun, who later crafted 
the ill-fated Southern seces- 
sionist movement which led 


To prepare himself for this 
trying executive office he de- 
cided to become governor of 
New York, only to be igno- 
miniousiy laughed down to 
defeat when it was pointed 
out that New’ York would be- 
come a laughingstock if it 
were governed by a Governor 
Gouvemeur. 

Why he changed his name 
to Dick after becoming a 
political overseer was a mys- 
tery to dear old great-grand- 
dad. The explanation, which 
is obvious here in the fourth 
generation, is that his political 
genius was ahead of his time. 

Brilliant enough to realize 
that Dick was a winning name 
in presidential politics, ne was 
not shrewd enough to see that 
the country wouldn't go for it 
until it had run through Teddy. 
Howie. Woody, Ca£ Frankie. 
Ike and yet another Jack. 

I never met my great- 
granddad. It's too bad. What a 

f ood talk we could have had. 

could have told him what it 
was like having to choose be- 
tween Bill and Bob. and hav- 
ing so many great laundry’ 
soaps, and about transporta- 
tion without horseshoes. 


Xtographer Ara Guler A confused chi Id beers 
from behind decaying tombstones inscribed with 
ornate Arabic script. Laborers unload hulking 
freighters. Couples walk down foggy streets 
lined with old wooden houses. Men gaze out over 
their drinks or contemplate rugged landscapes. 
Autos jam broad avenues. Horses pull carts up 
snowy hillsides. And Muslim worshipers bow in 
prayer by the hundreds. 

One of the few Turks to have reached an 
internationally acknowledged pinnacle of cre- 
ative achievement, Guler. 69. is driven by a 
passion for his native land and especially for 
Istanbul, where he has lived all his life. 

The archive he has produced has made him 
one of the few Turks with an international repu- 
tation. His photographs hang in many private 
collections and museums, including the Bib- 
liotheque Nationale in Paris and the George 
Eastman House in Rochester. Last month he was 
in Washington to open an exhibition of 43 of his 
Istanbul pictures at Cities, a restaurant in the 
Adams-Morgan section whose decor represents 
a different world metropolis every six months. 
The photographs will be on view until fall. 

“Ara Guler is a great creative artist," Tur- 
key’s most prominent living writer. Yasor 
Kemal. wrote in a recent tribute. “He delves 
deeply into both nature and man. The picture he 


are the eyes of the world. We see on behalf of 
other people. We collect the visual history of 
today's earth. To me. visual history is more 
important than an . The function of photography is 
to leave documentation for coming centuries." 

Guler spends much of his time seeking to 
document what he calls “the lost Istanbul,” 
which he believes is not appreciated or even 
known to today's young people. “What they 
know is the junk of Istanbul, he said. “The 
poetic, romantic, esthetic aspect of the city is 
lost. I understand the smell oflstanbul. Istanbul 
became my subject because I was born here, 
grew up here and know this place intimately. But 
the great culture 1 knew js gone.” 

GuJer dreamed of becoming a film director, 
but his father gave him a 35mm camera when, he 
was a child, and he became obsessed with it. In 
1948 he got his first job. as a photographer for an 
Istanbul newspaper, and since then he has made 
his living taking pictures. For a while his work 
appeared regularly in the Istanbul daily news- 
paper Hurriyet, and in 1961 a British magazine. 
Photography Annual, named him one of the 
world’s seven greatest photographers. 

Yet today his pictures are rarely published in 
Turkish newspapers. “A shame for the Turkish 
press." lamented one of his younger colleagues. 


captures in a single moment is the result of years 
of research. For years perhaps he carries within 


of research. For years perhaps he carries within 
him a certain face, a certain smile, a certain 
expression of pain or sadness. And then, when 
the time is ripe, he presses the button." 

In an interview at his cluttered studio in down- 
town Istanbul, Guler insisted that he is merely a 
“press photographer." (He works regularly for 
major magazines, including Time, Paris Match 
and Stem.) 

“If it's art, it’s art,” he said with a shrug. “If 
it's not, it's not. Other people will decide that 100 
years from now. Photography looks like art. but 
art has to have some kind of depth. Painting is art. 
Music is art. Who is an artist. Yehudi Menuhin or 
Vivaldi? One is only an interpreter. Photography 
is interpretation. 1 can stand for an hour in front 
of a picture by Ansel Adams or Eugene Smith or 
Cartier-Bresson. You can see that they have a 
visual education. But that does not make them 
artists. I hate the idea of becoming an artist. My 
job is to travel and record what I see.” 

“Art is something important.'' he continued. 
“Bur the history of humanity is more important, 
and that is what press photographers record. We 


press, lamented one or ms younger colleagues, 
ffurhan Ozbilici. an Associated - Press photo- 
grapher based in Ankara. 

In recent years Guler has published three 
books. One is a survey of the works of the great 
16th-century Ottoman architect Sinan. who re- 
mains perhaps the most influential designer in 
the Muslim world. The other two books, both of 
which appeared in 1995. are “All the World in 
Their Faces.” a vivid portrait of Anatolia, and 
“Vanished Colors," an ode to Istanbul and the 
Constantinople that lies beneath it. 

In his srudio. amid portraits of figures ranging 
from Churchill and Bertrand Russell to Picasso 


and Tennessee Williams. Guler is hoarding 615 
slides, for what he hopes will be his next and most 


slides for what he hopes will be his next and most 
ambitious book. They make up a collection of 
color pictures he has taken during a lifetime of 
world travel, with large selections from India, 
Bangladesh, Burma, the Philippines, Kenya, 
Senegal and other countries that be describes as 
“paradise for photographers.” 

An Istanbul primer has told him, however, that 
it will cost at least S 1 50,000 to produce the book. 
“What publisher will pay that much for a book 
that will be so expensive to buy that people will 
only look at in bookstores for half an hour and 
then put it back on the shelf?" he mused. “If 
Kodak sponsors it. it will come out. Otherwise 
who knows? But the pictures will always exist 
My pictures are what I leave to the world.” 



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Korean 

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G tiler’s 1957 photo of a child with a doll in front of an Ottoman tombstone. 



PEOPLE 


T HE actor Sidney Poitier will become 
ambassador to Japan for the Bahamas on 


X ambassador to Japan for the Bahamas on 
Wednesday, the Foreign Ministry in Tokyo 
said. Poitier. who holds dual American and 
Bahamian nationality, will take up the post 
formally in a ceremony presided over by 
Emperor Akihito at the Imperial Palace. 
Poitier will not live in Japan but will act as 
ambassador from abroad, a ministry official 
said The Bahamas does not have an embassy 
in Japan. 


“If not. we completely respect his de- 
cision.” 


New York. It will be placed by the New York 
Philharmonic, with Sylvia McNair, the sop- 
rano. The repaired partnership has its roots in 
a question posed to Previn by McNair. "She 


Qual« Kmpa.’Iltt Aancvned Pre*» 

A SONG WILL RISE — The actress Tracey Ullman 
singing to the crowd at Harvard, where she was 
honored by the Harvard Lampoon comedy group. 


Confusion reigns at the Cannes film fes- 
tival. Gilles Jacob, the head of the festival, 
disputes reports that he's mad at Ingmar 
Bergman for deciding not to attend next 
month to pick up an award. In fact, he said, the 
Swedish director has not even won the special 
award, the Palm of Palms. The Swedish news- 
paper Sydsvenska Dagbladet reported Mon- 
day that Bergman was too busy on a book 
project to go to Cannes and quoted Jacob as 
saying that the festival felt “humiliated.” But 
Jacob says that the jury hasn’t picked a winner 
yet, and he denied telling the paper that he’s 
angry with Bergman. If Bergman wins, "we 
would be honored thar he comes, ” Jacob said. 


Eight novels have been shortlisted for this 
year’s International IMPAC Dublin Literary 
Award. The contenders ore two U.S. novels, 
“Reservation Blues" by Sherman Alexie and 
AJ. Verdelle’s “The Good Negress 
“Morvem Callar” by Alan Warner, Scot- 
land; “A Heart So White" by Javier Marias, 
Spain; “Declares Pereira" by Antonio 
Tabucchi, Italy; “A Tilers’ Afternoon” by 
Lars Gustafsson. Sweden; “Novel Without a 
Name" by Duong Thu Huong. Vietnam; “A 
Fine Balance.” Rohinlon Mistry, India. The 
Australian novelist David Makmf was the first 
winner of the 100,000 Irish punt (S 150.000) 
prize last year for “Remembering Babylon.” 


property back. ‘ ‘If he gave me a ticket. I'd rent 
a tuxedo and go enjoy his music." he said. 


once sang a song by him called ‘The Morning 
After,’ for which I had written the lyrics,” 


After,’ for which I had written the lyrics,” 
Dory Previn Shannon said. “She asked him, 
‘Who is this lyricist?’ and he said, ‘I was once 
married to her.’ She was apparently takes 
enough to ask if he would ask me to write the 
text for a piece they were planning for Lincoln 
Center. I said. 'Sure.' ” 


Pladdo Domingo personally wants to 
thank a New York taxi driver who turned over 
a leather satchel the singer had left behind. 
‘Tm looking for this very amazing man,” 
Domingo said. “I’d want to either com- 
pensate him monetarily or with opera tickets 
Dr with a meal or two at my restaurant” 
Domingo said the satchel contained “three 
precious things”: The score of “Die. 
Walkure,' ’ which he had been performing that 


When Andre Previn divorced Dory Prev- 
in in 1969 to many Mia Farrow, their part- 
nership as musical collaborators ended as 
well. This week, they will be reunited pro- 
fessionally when “The Magic Number." a 
work they wrote for orchestra and voice, has 
its world" premiere at Avery Fisher Hall in 


A Nevada casino paid S85.000 for die bul- 
let-riddled shut worn by Clyde Barrow when 
authorities ambushed him and his infamous 
girlfriend, Bonnie Parker. Barrow’s belong- 
ings netted S1S7.809 ar auction at Butterfield 
& Butterfield in San Francisco. The shirt was 
bought by Whiskey Pete's Casino in Primm. 
Nevada, as was a belt and necklace made by 
Barrow while in prison and 17 Barrow family 
photos. The casino already owns the car in 
which Bonnie and Clyde were ambushed and 
killed in 1934 in Gibsland, Louisiana. 


From royal family to diet-program spokes- 
woman to newspaper columnist, die Duchess 
of York’s career path took another turn with 
the debut ofher syndicated column. The former 
Sarah Ferguson's first column for The New 


night, pictures of his family and “copies of the 
prayers I've said before even' one of my 2,700 


York Times Syndicate includes her observa # 
lions on the nation of Argentina. “ Argentina is* 


prayers I’ve said before every' one of my2,700 
performances.” The cabby, Kobina Wood, 
said he was happy Domingo had gotten his 


lions on the nation of Argentina. “Argentina is* 
my second home,” Fergie writes.' 44 My mother- 
stiU lives there. A part of me — perhaps the best 
part — resides there as well.” 



Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 


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