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INTERNATIONAL 





(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 





The World's Daily Newspaper 


London, Tuesday, April 22, 1997 



No. 35.502 


Vv- 



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General Boro ng, left, and a Chinese diplomat, Chen Znoer, waving Monday at the Hong Kong border crossing. 

Changing Guard in Wary Hong Kong 


i t 


By Edward A. Gargan 

New Tort Times Service 

HONG KONG — Under ashen skies, 
the first elements of the People's Lib- 
eration Army of China crossed the bor- 
der into Hong Kong on Monday, the 
convoy journeying down roads over 
which more than ode million people 
marched to protest the killing, by mat 
same army, of protesters in Beijing in 
1989. 

The contingent of 40officers and 
soldiers, the fust Chinese troops to take 
up positions in Hong Kong in 150 years, 
arrived to begyv preparations for 
China's resumption of sovereignty, at . 
midnigh t Jnne jQ . 

^ShortlyAKter noon; doff inorifiditif 
after a Royal Navy ship fired a 21-gun 
salute to boodr Queen Elizabeth H's 


birthday, the Chinese troops crossed 
into the British colony at Lok Ma Qian. 
The troops, who were in their green 
uniforms but not armed, were led by 
Major General 22iou Borong. 

Unescorted, the right-vehicle con- 
voy, including three camouflages 
painted trucks containing communica- 
tious equipment, maneuvered through 
fearsome traffic and arrived ar the 
headquarters of the British garrison. 

' ‘ ‘This is a historic moment for both 
British and Chinese aimed forces.’ ' said 
Major General Bryan Dutton, the com- 
mander of British forces, as be stood 
next to his Chinese counterpart. “We 
will be woriring hard together to achieve 
our c ommon purpose — die smooth 
trahsflS^flPffiVl^^TtSpohSibUity ’fob 
Hong Kong.” 

General Zhou, speaking in Mandarin, 


lg fi 

“mutual cooperation' ' in die days lead- 
ingup to the change in sovereignty. 

The Chinese Army is regarded with a 
mixture of fear and uncertainty here, 
with memories of its savagery still fresh. 
Virtually every television broadcast an- 
nouncing the army's arrival here in- 
cluded scenes of the People's Liberation 
Army assaulting Tiananmen Square in 
Beijing on June 4, 1989. 

Aware of its scarred image, senior 
Chinese officers have tried to assuage 
Hong Kang fears by repeatedly prom- 
ising that Chinese troops would behave 
in a wenming, or civilized, manner. 

Chinese soldiers, who will not be 
permitted to wear then 1 uniforms while 
outside military bases, are banned from' 

See TROOPS, Page 4 


AGENDA 


Iraq Sets Pilgrim Airlift in Defiance of West 


In a new sign of defiance, Iraq said 
Monday it would dispatch helicopters 
to the Saudi border to pick up Muslim 
pilgrims returning from Mecca, de- 
spite a ban by the Western allies on all 
flights in the area. The White House 
called on Baghdad to reconsider, and 
warned that the United States would 
"respond appropriately” to any vi- 


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elation, but it said that civilian heli- 
copters would not be shot down. 

. The U.S. Defense Department, 
meanwhile, said it might consider a 
request from Iran to exempt the pil- 
grim flights for humanitarian reasons. 

It was not immediately clear bow 
many helicopters Iraq intended, to dis- 
patch or when it might do so. Iraq sent 

Toxic Leak Is Found 
Id Mir Space Station 

MOSCOW (AFP) — A substance that 
nan cause brain damage is Pairin g from 
the ah-cooditksung system erf tire Rus- 
sian space station Mir, Moscow Echo 
radio said Mondtw. A cosmonaut, Al- 
exander Lazmlrin, has been treated for an 
allergic reaction after a drop of the pois- 
onous solvent ethylene glycol fell into his 
eye, the radio said. Five Russians and an 
American are aboard Mir. 


an Iraqi Airways jet with 104 sick and 
elderly pilgrims aboard to Saudi Ar- 
abia ou April 9 despite a United Na- 
tions prohibition on international 
flights. The UN Security Council 
called on Iraq not to fly more planes 
without its consent, but stopped short 
of regarding the flight as a breach of 
the embargo. Page 2. 

RAGE TWO 

Africa Mokes Amends for a Scourge 


THE AMERICAS 

Page 3, 

Flood and Fire Cripple Grand Forks 

Rnnkfl 

P«!e 9. 


. Page 1ft. 


Pages 8-9. 


. Paces 18-19. 

* ^ 

International Classified 

Paged. 

\ The IHT on-line http:. 

.•/vv'.vvv. iht.com | 


Netanyahu Shores Up Israeli Coalition 

But Foes Seek to Overturn Decision Not to Indict Prime Minister 


By Barton Ge liman 

Washington Post Service 


JERUSALEM — A flurry of legal 
filings Monday sought to reverse a pros- 
ecutors’ decision to drop a criminal in- 
vestigation against Prime Minister Ben- 

• jamin Netanyahu and his justice 
. minister, but Mr. Netanyahu brushed 

the affair aside and tightened his grip on 

• office. 

Legislators from the opposition 

Meretz and Labor parties asked the Su- 
preme Court to overturn what they 
called an “extremely treasonable’’ 

• exercise of prosecutorial discretion that 
they said left the integrity of the legal 

r system under a cloud. 

— Sunday, Attorney General 


On 


Elyzdrim Rubinstein rejected police rec- 
ommendations to indict Mr. Netanyahu 
and Justice Minister Tzahi Hanegbi for 
fraud and breach of trust over their 
handling of a political appointment, 
saying there was insufficient proof 
against them. But in their filings, the 
opposition parties argued that the police 
recommendation, together wife the ev- 
idence in a prosecutors* report, raised 
implications of criminal behavior that 
required resolution in conrL 

Mr. Netanyahu, who acknowledged 
error but no wrongdoing in the case, 
Monday announceomimation of a com- 
mittee to screen the selection of can- 
didates for future high-level jobs. He 
named to the committee Finance Min- 
ister Dan Meridor and Trade Minister 


Natan Sharansky,, cementing their de- 
cisions not to resign. 

Wife those last two successes. Mr. 
Netanyahu finished a swift job of neut- 
ralizing every serious threat to his gov- 
erning coalition. Mr. Meridor and Com- 
munications Minister Limor Livnat had 
been the likeliest threats with die Likud 
party to desert Mr. Netanyahu, while the 
defection ' of Mr. Sharansky's Israel 
B'Aliyah party could have cost him 7 of 
his 66 seats in the 120-seat Parliament 
Mr. Sharansky was reported Monday 
to have asked for Mr. Hanegbi’ s de- 
parture, but he did not make that a 
condition of his own return to the fold. 
In a news conference and report re- 

See ISRAEL, Page 6 


France to Vote a Year Early 

Chirac Seeks * 'New Elan 9 in Approach to Euro 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Times Service 


PARIS — Trying to clear the decks 
before a difficult French rendezvous 
with a common European currency in 
1999. President Jacques Chirac an- 
nounced the dissolution of the National 
Assembly on Monday and called elec- 
tions for the end of May, a year early. 

Voteis will go to the polls May 25, 
with a second round June I in electoral 
districts where no candidate wins a first- 
round majority. 

“We have to go further down the 
road of change without delay.” Mr. 
Chirac said in a nationally broadcast 
speech Monday night. “To succeed, 
France needs a new 61 an. which can 
come only with the clearly expressed 
support of the french people.'' 

Skimming over the unpopularity of 
the efforts he and Prime Minister Alain 
Juppe made over the last two years to 
bring change to France’s unemploy- 
ment-ridden welfare state, Mr. Chirac 
appealed to European ideals. 

“Europe is unity, and in unity there is 
strength,” be said 

He asserted that Europe could remain 
an economic and financial power only 
with a currency, the euro, that is equal in 
strength to (he dollar and yen. 

An opinion poll published Monday in 
Le Figaro, a Paris daily, found 45 per- 
cent of die voters favoring a victory by 
Mr. Chirac’s renter-right coalition 
parties in the new five-year legislature 
that will be chosen in the vote, but by a 
much smaller margin than the center- 
right victory in the last parliamentary 
elections, in 1993. 

Mr. Juppe had the support of 465 of 
the 577 members of the National As- 
sembly that is being dissolved, but if the 
opposition Socialists make the gains the 
poll predicted, the conservative major- 
ity would be whittled to about 320. 


Mr. Chirac apparently is gambling 
that the elections will leave him with a 
majority in the legislature for the rest of 
his term and ease the way for inau- 
guration of the European currency. 

The extreme-right National Front 
could also win between 14 percent and 
1 5 percent of the vote, the poll said, but 
since it takes a majority of votes, not a 
plurality, in an election district to win a 
seal, it would probably win no more 
than two or three seats. 

Mr. Chirac appealed to voters not to 
give their support to the National Front 
“The answers to the great questions of 
today do not lie in falling back upon 
ourselves or in recourse to fear and 
intolerance,” he said, alluding to the 



Bony tic fa) MamBacre/Tt* AJnoccurd Pres 

President Jacques Chirac, right, 
with Philippe Seguin, president of 
the National Assembly, on Monday. 


Threats to London Bring 
Road-Rail-Air Chaos 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 


LONDON — A series of coded bomb 
threats, thought to be the work of the 
Irish Republican Army, forced the evac- 
uation of major railroad stations and 
airports in and around London on 
Monday morning, throwing the city's 
traffic into chaos. 

With traffic backed up for 10 miles 
(16 kilometers) cm the M25 beltway 
around fee capital, and wife many key 
inner city streets blocked off. a subway 
line completely closed and others badly 
disrupted, London was fee place to 
avoid Monday. 

“Basically, west London and central 
London are dosed.” said Hater Brill, a 
spokesman for the Royal Automobile 
Club. 

At one point, more than 4,000 pas- 
sengers were trapped in planes, unable 
to disembark at Gatwick Airport after 
the evacuation. At the height of the 
crisis, a Gatwick manager told The As- 


sociated Press that he was trying to find 
temporary accommodation for 8.000 
people who had been cleared from the 
airport's south terminal. 

By noon, the situation had returned to 
normal in most of London, after police 
searches failed to turn up any bombs. 
Prime Minister John Major praised trav- 
elers for their patience in coping with 
unexpectedly long and tortuous morn- 
ing commuting. 

While Britons handled the latest 
mangling of their schedules wife 
aplomb, there were signs that their pa- 
tience was wearing thin. In a front-page 
editorial next to the headline “ERA 
Halts London By Phone,” the Evening 
Standard asked, “How long can a great 
nation tolerate being made fee victim of 
a devastatingly effective cat-and-mouse 
game by a gang of terrorist fanatics?” 

It went on to argue in favor of ig- 
noring future warnings rather than sub- 
mitting to the whim of the IRA, in an 

See LONDON, Page 6 


National Front's hostility toward im- 
migrants. 

The party’s leader, Jean-Marie Le 
Pen, is expected to run for the leg- 
islature. possibly from Toulon, where 
his party controls the city council. “A 
real electoral holdup.” Mr. Le Pen said 
of the president's decision. “If the euro 
is really at stake, it would be enough to 
call a referendum on it, as fee National 
Front has repeatedly demanded.” 

Getting ready for European Monetary 
Union has required France. Germany 
and other countries to keep a tight rein 
on welfare-state spending at a time of 
soaring unemployment and to get their 
budget deficits down to no more than 3 
percent of gross national product by the 
end of this year. 

The Socialist opposition leader, Li- 
onel Jospin, has been sharply critical of 
imposing economic sacrifices on the 

See FRANCE. Page 6 

A Gamble 
That Could 
Backfire, 
Europe Says 

By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The decision to call 
early elections in France is a high-risk 
gamble that could turn French political 
preferences into a decisive referendum 
on Europe's single currency project, 
officials and analysts warned Monday. 

The rationale for going to the voteis 
nearly one year early — to win backing 
for the belt-tightening needed to qualify 
France for monetary union — sent jit- 
ters through the financial markets. 

“The risks are high because of 
French attitudes," said J. Paul Horae, 
senior economist at Smith Barney in 
Paris. “The French are feeling partic- 
ularly sorry for themselves. They’re put 
upon by austerity, and there’s more aus- 
terity in the pipeline.” 

In Bonn, a senior German official 
noted the potentially worrying parallel 
wife fee 1992 decision by then-Pres- 
ident Francois Mitterrand to hold a ref- 
erendum on the Maastricht Treaty on 
European Union. It nearly backfired 
when a majority of less than 51 percent 
endorsed the treaty’s blueprint for a 
single currency. 

“That was a clear mistake of Pres- 
ident Mitterrand,” said a senior official 
in Bonn. “This could be a mistake of 
another French president” 

A senior EU official in Brussels said 
fee French elections could be seen as the 
conclusive referendum on the single 
currency and noted that Mr. Chirac was 
“taking a really big risk. ” 

Uncertainty about the result weighed 
on the franc and other French assets in 

See MARKETS, Page 6 





[livid ThoBHiip/.Vpmrr Fiaiwr-freuc 

A police officer Monday on London’s Strand, a normally bustling street emptied by bomb threats. 


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Finland ,-~-l 2.00 EM. 

Gibraltar £0.85 

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Jordan 1350 JD 

Kenya ~K.SH.160 

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India’s New Prime Minister Vows to Ease Tensions With Pakistan 


By John F. Borns 

New York Times Sendee 



NEW DELHI — As a young man, in 3947, IK, 
Gujral , who was sworn in Monday as India's prime 
minister, joined, die fencings of Hindu and Muslim 
migrants who left their homes when Britain's 
colonial rulers partitioned the Indian subcontinent 
into the two new nations of India and Pakistan. 

As Hindus wife roots in Jbelum, in fee northeast 
of what became Pakistan, Mr: Gujral and his 


family fled eastward across die new frontier and 
made a new home in New Delhi, the Indian capjtaL 
It was an embittering time for millions of people. 
Large numbers of Hindus and Muslims were killed 
tty enraged mobs as they migrated, and those who 
survived were left to struggle with the loss of loved 
ones, properties, and livelihoods. 

Some migrants never recovered, and some on 
both sides harbored resentments that developed 
into support for hard-line policies on issues di- 
viding India and Pakistan, cut Mr. Gujral did not 


allow his memories to harden into enmity. He grew 
to maturity as an Indian politician with a yearning 
to do something to ease the tensions that led to 
three wars between India and Pakistan, The re- 
lationship, nearly 50 years after partition, is still 
marked by deep estrangement and suspicion, par- 
ticularly over the explosive issue of fee disputed 
territory of Kashmir. 

When he went u> India's presidential palace 
Sunday wife other stalwarts of the United Front 
coalition that elected him as its leader on Saturday, 


Mr. Gujral, 77. told President Shankar Dayal 
Sharma that he was ready to form a new government. 
It will succeed the one headed by the previous 
United Front leader. H.D. peve Gowda, who has 
been caretaker prime minister since his admin- 
istration was defeated in Parliament on April 1 1. 

Already, Mr. Gujral. who has twice served as 
India's foreign minister, most recently in Mr. Deve 
Gowda's 10-monfe-long government, has said 

See INDIA, Page 4 







PAGE TWO 


A Societal Revolution / Jobs for the Disabled 


Africa Tries to Make Amends for a Scourge 


By Stephen Buckley 

Washington Post Service 


N AIROBI — The disabled once were 
Africa’s invisible men and women, con- 
demned to lives of privation and shame 
because they were blind or crippled or 

“slow." 

la their youth, their parents blamed the dis- 
abilities on corses, often refused to send them to 
school and sometimes simply denied their exist- 
ence. 

Today, many disabled Africans are overcoming 
such obstacles to become members of Parliament, 
officials, entrepreneurs and professionals. Disab- 
ility-rights groups have spread around the con- 
tinent, and a number of countries have adopted 
legislation or constitutional guarantees outlawing 
discrimination against the disabled, although many 
Africans remain ignorant of the new laws and some 
countries continue to discriminate. 

“Society's attitudes toward people with disab- 
ilities are definitely changing" in Africa, said Seth 
Mpooya, deputy executive director of the National 
Union of Disabled People of Uganda. "More of us 
have jobs. Our standard of living is higher. People 
see that we are as smart as anybody else. ” 

Those changes in attitudes have wrought ex- 
traordinary results in such places as Uganda, where 
at least five members of Parliament are people with 
disabilities. Recently, the government appointed a 
disabled person to a judgeship — an act believed to 
be unprecedented there. 

That judge, Christine Kama, 46, never dreamed 
she would see such success after a car accident left 
her paralyzed from the waist down 19 years ago. 
She thought her legal career was effectively over. 

“I knew I would have to work doubly hard to 
prove myself," said Miss Kama, executive director 
of the disabled people's group. “ Before I was 
paralyzed, I didn't know anything about the rights 
of people with disabilities. I didn't think about the 
issue very much.” 

Neither did most Africans. In the not-so-distant 
past, parents with disabled children often forced 
them to live in shacks behind the main family house. 
In pans of West Africa, disabled youngsters were 
forced into slavery. 

Rural Africans saw disabled people as useless 
because they were unable to fetch water or gather 
firewood or herd livestock. In African cities, people 
with disabilities were scattered along sidewalks, 
extending gnarled limbs for spare change. 

Those who escaped beggary found jobs as teach- 
ers. receptionists, telephone operators. Rarely could 
disabled Africans find more lucrative employment 
in the face of hiring discrimination. And employers 
usually fired workers who, through sickness or 
accident, became handicapped. 


V ICTOR KAMAU, a blind attorney, re- 
calls interviewing for a job as a gov- 
ernment lawyer in Kenya 10 years ago. 
The first question pertained to his un- 
derstanding of a legal term. Then this: How will you 
get to work? How will you do your research? How 
will you get around the courtroom? 

Mr. Kamau did not get the job. Today, he runs his 
own law firm. He handles criminal cases primarily 
and has a special interest in human rights issues. 

At the request of a government task force, he 
recently wrote a 60-page report detailing various 
Kenyan laws That be says discriminate against 
people with disabilities. 

He is most concerned that while the Kenyan 
Constitution outlaws discrimination on the basis of 
sex. tribe, race, place of origin, creed or religion, it 
ignores people with disabilities. 

“We are not going to get far in changing the laws 
of this country unless the constitution is changed," 
Mr. Kamau said. "Right now, it's like having a 
blanket that covers my head but leaves the rest of my 



Kepha Anyanzwa grew up shunned by his village because he had no use of 
his legs . Today, the Kenyan builds wheelchairs to accommodate the disabled 


body to freeze. There is really no protection.” 

Mr. Kamau may have unnerved his interviewers 
a decade ago, but today his legal colleagues afford 
him no unwelcome attention — or questions. 

In the High Court in Nairobi recently, an assistant 
helped Mr. Kamau weave through knots of lawyers 
clogging the corridors. As he moved along, dressed 
smartly in a charcoal gray suit, he drew no startled 
stares. Lawyers and clients barely turned their 
heads. 

Mr. Kamau and other advocates for the disabled 
credit no single event for the evolution of attitudes 
and laws on the continent. Some note the im- 
portance of international conferences organized by 
the United Nations during the l9S0s. Others cite the 


blossoming of democracy in Africa during the early 
1990s as having galvanized traditionally down- 


trodden groups, such as women and the disabled. 

“As disabled people, we had a special interest in 
die democratization process." said Alexander 
Phiri, a Zimbabwean who heads the African Fed- 
eration of the Disabled, an affiliation of groups in 10 
Southern African countries. "We started saying, if 
democracy has come, why are we being discrim- 
inated against?" 

Mr. Phiri said all S3 African countries now have 
advocacy organizations, whereas perhaps IS did a 
decade ago. During that decade. Zimbabwe. Mali, 
South Africa, Zambia, Botswana and Uganda have 
prohibited discrimination against the disabled. Sev- 
eral African countries now also have at least one 
handicapped person in their legislatures. 

Maria Rantho. a paraplegic who is a member of 
the South African Parliament, said her nation's 


decision to enshrine rights of the disabled in its new 
ithaii 


constitution “means that the disabled are no longer 
the forgotten citizens of our country." 

“Our rights can no longer be trampled upon." 
she added. 

But the battle to change attitudes continues, 
goading people such as Kepha Anyanzwa. The 
Nairobi businessman makes wheelchairs and mo- 
torbikes for the handicapped and redesigns cars to 
allow people with disabilities to drive. 


Mr. Anyanzwa. 43, is prodded by a passion bom 
in his youth. Unable to use his legs, be found that 
residents of his v illage — including his extended 
family — doomed him to a life of uselessness. They 
told ms parents not to send him to school. They said 
he would burden the whole village. They wanted’ 
him out of sight 

Mr. Anyanzwa’s parents defied the village. They 
insisted on keeping Him in school. The family was 
too poor to afford a wheelchair, so Mr. Anyanzwa'* 
father would cany him on his back. 


W HEN THE BOY became a man, "I 
knew what it was like to have people 
tell you that you couldn’t achieve any- 
thing," Mr. Anyanzwa said as he 
threaded his way through Nairobi traffic in his 
modified car. "I knew how tough it could be for 
disabled people." 

Feeling the toughest challenge was simply get- 
ting around, be started making wheelchairs, using 
local parts so customers could easily repair them. 
He and his staff produce 100 wheelchairs a year. 

Mr. Anyanzwa. the father of four, takes delight in 
fashioning chairs that require something extra. 

He designed a wheelchair with a potty for a 
paraplegic whose incontinence had kept him house- 
bound for five years. He frequently receives calls 
from governments and from advocates for the dis- 
abled. asking him to lecture at conferences.. His 
travels have taken him to Sweden, Ranee, Britain, 
Germany and Canada, and be receives orders from 
neighboring countries. • . 

He dreams of becoming a member of Parliament. 
Too often, he said, he has seen merchants refuse to 
allow the disabled into their shops. He has seen bos 
drivers pass by the disabled and real estate agents 
refuse to sell houses to them. Laws change such 
attitudes, he said. 

Bin for now, be takes pleasure in his work, which 
has helped disabled people go to their jobs, visit 
friends, attend the theater. 

"I’ve helped to show that disabled people can do 
what everybody else can do,” be said. 


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TRAVEL UPDATE 


Belgian Strike Could Hit Eurostar 


BRUSSELS (Reuters) — Belgium faces a day of travel 
chaos Tuesday, with rail workers striking for 24 hours over 
reorganization plans in a selective stoppage that could also 
disrupt Eurostar service between Brussels and London. 

Disruption from the strike, which was to last until 10 PJ1 
on Tuesday, was expected to be worst in the southwest and 
northeast, but (he Belgian railroad also warned that Paris- 
Brusse Is- Amsterdam service could be affected, as well as the 
Eurostar. It advised travelers to head for Lille, in France, to 
board trains to London, Paris and (he south of France. 


SAS Flight Breaks a Sexist Ceiling 


STOCKHOLM (AFP) — Passengers aboard a Scandi- 
navian Airlines System flight from Dublin to Stockholm 
witnessed a first: an all-female crew operating the MD-8 1 jet. 


according to the Swedish daily Expressen. 

Captain Charlotte Trygg, one or two women who are SAS 


captains, and Jeanette Groenlund flew the jet Sunday. The 
flight attendants and the purser also were women. Passen 
applauded an in-flight announcement of the event. 


The two 
igers 


Beer Consumption 
Flatter in Germany 


Agence F rance-Presse 

BONN — Germans are drinking 
less and less beer but remain the 
world's top consumers, along with 
the Czechs, brewery statistics re- 
leased Monday showed. 

Annual consumption of 1 3 1.7 
liters per head in 1996 was down 
from 135.9 for the previous year, 
the German Brewers’ Federation 
president. Michael Dietzsch, told 
reporters in Bonn. 

In 1991. the average German 
drank 141.9 liters of beer. 

The brewers’ federation said a 
change in the drinking habits of 
young people, as well as poor sum- 
mer weather, was responsible for 
the falling consumption. 


White House Warns Iraq 
Against Pilgrim Airlift 




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■n&dteh 


Ca^dbfOa-SaffFn 

WASHINGTON — The White 
House warned Iraq on Monday that it 
would take action if Baghdad violated 
the Western-imposed flight-exclusion 
zone to bring back from the Saudi-Iraqi 

* • * , J I... I iwaag tf> 


state-run media on whether the flights 

IfcSU said, “We would en- 
courage (he government of Iraq to meet 
its own obligations under UN security 
Council resolutions, and we wB mqt^ 


border Iraqis who made a pilgrimage to 
i in Saudi Arabia. 


Mecca u . 

“We certainly recognize the signif- 
icance of the hajj, but there are other 
means and procedures available for foe 
transportation of hajj pilgrims,” said 
Michael McCurry, foe White House 
spokesman. 

The Defense Department, mean- 
while, said it might consider a request to 
exempt foe hajj flights for humanitarian 
reasons. 

Iraq announced Monday that it would 
defy foe ban on flights over the south of 


_ 


die ‘no-fly* - — . . ■_ 

Slates would "respond appropriately , 

to any violations. 




grimage to Mecca, Islam’s holiest city. 

Iraqi leaders met before the decision 
was announced and warned the United 
States against any attemp t tO intercept 
the helicopters, the official Iranian 
press agency, DMA, reported. The meet- 
ing was headed by President Saddam 
Hussein, it said. 

"Any American practice threatening 
the safety of the helicopters and the 
pilgrims will be met with an appropriate 
action." the press agency quoted an 
‘‘authoritative’’ source, as saying. 

The Iraqi press agency said die heli- 
copters would ferry foe pilgrims to their 
home areas from the border, but did not 
say how many aircraft would be involved 


rrw ” , — . M i 

vilian helicopters, obviously. 

Secretary of Defense William Coheq, 

meanwhile, said that although Wash- 
ington would not allow Iraq to violate 
tile fli gh t-exclusion zone, it might agree 
to a request for an exemption- 

"The Iraqis are in no position to give 
any kind of dictates to the American 
people, or NATO or foe United Na- 
tions," Mr. Cohen said. 

"Obviously when there are human- 
itarian issues involved that we would be 
most receptive, foe United Nations 
would be receptive,” he said. 

Iraq flew a civilian plane to Saudi 
Arabia on April 9 carrying 104 elderly 
and sick pilgrims to Mecca despite UN 
sanctions. The plane returned borne the 
same day. . •- 

The UN Security Council issued a £ 
statement calling on Iraq not to fly mor g ” 
planes without its consent, but stopped 
short of regarding the flight as a breach 
of an embargo on flights in and out of 







. >• .)■ 


vk; 


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As night 
was no word 


in Iraq, there 

Iraqi officials or the 


Security Council in 11 . . 

The Iraqi press agency said “j 
rin»i reasons" prevented Iraq • — __ 
sending the plane back to transfer foe 
pilgrims home. (AFP, Reuters) 


£*■ 
, <■„ m 



Aid to Refugees Is Suspended .. 
After Attacks by Zairian Mobs, 


KASESE. Zaire — Aid workers sus- 
pended operations in Rwandan refugee 
ramps Monday after an outbreak of 
looting, murder and »n»ric.< on foreign 
journalists and aid workers by Zairian 
mobs. 

Tflirians went on a rampage and at- 
tacked foreigners near Kasese. 26 ki- 
lometers (16 miles) south of Kisangani, 
after at least six local people were 


murdered and two were injured. The 
Hutu mili- 


Zairians blamed Rwandan 
tiamen for the killings. 

The World Food Program said Zairi- 
an mobs also raided a food depot, and in 
a separate incident looted a trainload of 
food intended for Rwandans in refugee 
camps, while Zairian rebel soldiers did 
nothing to stop them. 

"Almost on every front, we are fa- 
cing problems.” Michele Quintaglie of 
foe world Food Program said by tele- 
phone from Nairobi. 

"At this point, we cannot continue to 
keep sending food worth tens of thou- 
sands of dollars without assurances 
from the rebels." 

The food supplies are essentia] to 
100.000 refugees, who are dying at a 


rate of about 60 a day from starvation 
and disease as they wait for rebels and 
ajd ag encies to agree on plans to send 
them home. ■ -. 

Tensions have been high between 
Zairians and foe refugees because local 
people accuse Rwandans of stealing 
their crops. Even though it was not clear 
who committed foe murders, Zair i ans 
blamed the refugees. 

Armed with knives, machetes and 
clubs, the angry Zairians said they ha$l 
looted vehicles at the urging of the Tut- 
si -dominated rebels, who nave seized 
more than half of Africa's third largest 
country. (AP, Reuters) 

■ Mobota-Kabiia Talks Delayed^ 

Last-tnimite haggting has delayed fop 
first face-to-face encounter between 
President Mobutu Sese Seko and Sis 
civil war rival, Laurent Kabila, Reuters 
reported from Cape Town, quoting 
South African government sources 
Monday. 

But they said President Nelson Mart 
dela telephoned Marshal Mobutu ovef 
foe weekend and remained confident 
that talks to avert a rebel assault o$ 
Kinshasa would go ahead. 


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HERICAN TOPICS 


tedPiai:- \ irV.t.t! 


New Foe for Rebels: Inflation 


i !.-■ ■■ 


The Asso ci a ted Pros 

LUBUMBASHI, Zaire — Rebels on 
a triumphant march through Zaire have 
discovered that President Mobutu Sese 
Seko still controls a potent weapon: the 
printing presses of the national mint 

In recent months, foe faltering 
Mobutu regime flooded the Lubum- 
bashi region with New Zaire bills in 
huge new denominations to pay off gov- 
ernment debts, even though the national 
treasury bad no reserve to back them. 

Wien anti-Mobutu rebels seized 
Zaire’s second-largest city on April 1 1, 
they found it in the throes of a currency 
crisis. The collapse of the New Zaire's 
value in Lubumbashi forced local prices 
out of reach for many. 

For the rebels, seizing control of foe 
currency has proved tougher than seiz- 
ing control of the city. 

Soon after taking Lubumbashi, foe 
rebels tried to restore order to the local 


currency market by declaring Marsha) 
Mobutu's new 500,000 and 1 million 
New Zaire notes worthless. Elsewhere 
in Zaire, no (tills larger than 100, OO0 
were accepted. 1 

Residents left holding the worthless 
bills took to the streets in protest, jeering 
"Dollar, Dollar" at the rebel finance 
minister. Nearly all stores in foe city 
closed down. ’ 

For many, even a few of the big bills 
represented most of their savings. ! 

"It is like they killed me,” moaned 
Mbanga Gedone, a salesman, waving 
500 million in large New Zaire bill^, 
worth $3,500 at foe official rate and 
now, he feared, worthless. "And there c 
are many who have a lot more than thi^.'n 
What are we going to do now?” 

The panic forced the rebels to temr 
porariiy reinstate the (tig bills as legafl 
tender Friday, although few people wiH 
now accept them. | 


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Belgium Attacks Reckless Driving 


BRUSSELS (Reuters) — Belgium began a campaign 
Monday against reckless driving that is aimed primarily at 
cutting the number of children killed and injured. It will 
include signs marking spots where accidents have occurred. 

About 1,000 children are killed every year in traffic ac- 
cidents in the country, and 5.000 others are injured. 


WEATHER 


Europe 




The Australian Tourist Commission plans to open an 
office in China tins year, following a 26.7 percent increase in 
the number of mainland Chinese who visited the country in 
1996. to nearly 54.000, foe commission said. (Reuters) 


Bam 

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Japan celebrated the completion of a 9. 6- kilometer tun- 
nel for auto traffic under Tokyo Bay, part of an expressway 
between Kawasaki and Kisarazu. which the Construction 
Ministry said would be finished in December. (AFP) 


Coeoviagan 
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heading for Singapore in 
April. 50% off at the 
stylish boutique hotel in 
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(wwhee. Tokyo be dry 
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and central Europe. 


through the period „. MI 
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lift 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1997 


CAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


> Ghost Town, U.S.A., for a While 

North Dakotans May Be Away From Flooded Homes for Jfkeks 


By Dirk Johnson 

New York Times Service 


■ ■£' 
t. , __ 


; GRAND FORKS, North Dakota — 
'As most of the last ddehards fled from 
JEs onlivaHe dty, struck by both flood 
abd fire, readeaats have begnn co ming tn 
Slips with the knowledge that it may be 
weeks before they can return. 

_ The supply of drinking water has run 
f ’due here, and the sewage, off and animal 
- ndreasses fouling the flood waters have 
"prompted fears of disease. 

And to give this battered region the 
reel of a plague, a fire added to the 
misery during die weekend. At least six 
buildings were destroyed as toe fire 
damaged parts- of three downtown 


blocks. Its canse is still unknown. “It’s 
a ghost town,” said CUnrBlomqnist as 
he headed out of Grand Forks is a red 
pickup truck, giving a lift to other 
refugees: two women and a 5-year-old 
boy. “It’s devastating.’' 

In whak is being called a 500-year 
flood, the river lore to more than 53 feet 
(16 meters) cm Sunday, nearly twice the 
flood stage. The National Weather Ser- 
vice predicted that die river would crest 
Monday at about 54 feet and stay at that 
level for about a week. 

Water has flowed into more than 70 
percent of Grand Forks, a city of 
roughly 10 square miles, or about 26 
square kilometers. 'Mayor Pat Owens 
has urged all of the city’s 50,000 res- 


idents to evacuate. An air force bare 
west of town is being used as a shelter. 
More than 3,000 people fleeing the 
flood have checked min die bare. 

The flooding was even more exten- 
sive in East Grand Forks, across the 
border in Minnesota, where nearly the 
entire town of more than 8,500 people 
was flooded- 

Patients at the only hospital in Grand 
Forks, United Hospital, were trans- 
ferred to other medical centers because 
of a shortage of clean drinking water. 
The evacuation began Saturday, and the 
last patients were moved out Sunday. 

As of Sunday, there were no reports 
of serious injuries or deaths related to 
the flooding. The fire in downtown 


y CANADA 



POLITICAL NO TES 


Grand Forks erupted Saturday after- 
noon. The water was so deep in the 
streets that fire trucks could not get to 
the burning buildings at first. 

The fire was tarred Sunday as heli- 
copters dropped water on it and two fire 
trucks reached the area on giant flat- 
beds. 


New Rules Shield Clinton From Party and Foreigners 


By Alison Mitchell 

New Tort Tunes Service 


an \ 


r~ > 


^' WASHINGTON — Faced with crit- 
icism of the National Security Council 
in several campaign finance controver- 
, sies, Samuel Berger, President Bill 
1 'Clinton’s national security adviser, is 
ifisthuting new rules to limit the Demo- 
icratic National Committee’s recess to 
$us staff and to screen foreign visitors to 
fte White House. . 

In an interview, Mr. Berger defended 
his staff and insisted that the Nati onal 
Security Council tod always mad? its 
■foreign policy recommendations on 
tfieir merits and not for campaign pur- 
poses. He praised his predecessor, An- 
thony Lake, for setting “die right 
tone.” 

But acknowledging that management 
problems had exited inside the council 
that analyzes foreign policy options for 
Jhe president, he said, “What Lwant to 
jSb is take that tone and bmld a system 
* around it so there is clarity wfth respect 
to procedures." 

. ' ' Mr. Berger’s new policies come after 
weeks of reports that die security coun- 
-cfl staff was not consulted about die 
propriety of the president’s meetings 
.with some foreign visitors connected to 
Democratic donors, and that its warn- 
ings in other cases were not heeded. 

™ To avoid what Mr. Berger described 
as “ad hoc-ism,” he said that be was 
outlining a clear chain ofcommand for 
screening foreigners invited to visit Mr. 
Clinton or other White House officials. 

; ~ Requests for background checks 
from domestic offices in the White 
House, he said, would be relayed from 
the White House chief of staff through 
Brigadier General DonaMKenick^ire 
deputy who oversees operations for die 
National Security Council, at least 72 
hours before any visit. 

The council's recommendations 
'would then be soit back to die domestic 
Side of the White House through the 



ftrf Usm&WOw New YbckTia 


Samuel Berger, national security adviser, wants to end ‘ad-borism’ in the chain of command for screening visitors. 


same chain of command, to protect any 
classified information from bong im- 


tut Mr. Berger said that the National 
Security Council would continue to 
have rally advisory power, not veto 
power. “We do not have a staff to be a 
police force," he said. 

-He^ddedthMreotherdqxity, lames 
Ste in berg, woald be the only person on 
die national security staff allowed to 
have contact with the Democratic. Na- 
tional Committee. He said that the party 
would not be banned completely from 
making inquiries to the National Se- 


curity Council because ’‘there may be a 
legitimate need for information’’ on the 
president’s policy positions. 

Because of reports that donors re- 
ceived access to the National Security 
Council, Mr. Berger said dud he 
planned to tell his staff members that 
meetings with people outside die gov- 
ernment must - be -judged on- whether 
they are useful in making policy or 
useful in explaining policy and building 
su p port for it. The goal, be said, is to 
“insulate die NSC from partisan polit- 
ical considerations but not isolate the 
NSC from the world." 


Mr. Berger said he had instructed his 
senior directors not to accept briefings 
from outside agencies that are offered 
under the condition that the information 
cannot be given to their superiors. 

Mr. Berger's moves would bring the 
screening of visitors in line with that of 
previous adminis trations, but would not 
- go as far as the kind of controls in- 
stituted by Zbigniew Bizezrnslri, na- 
tional security adviser to President 
Jimmy Carter, who said he required 
each ofhis senior staff members at day’s 
end to send him a one-page summary of 
the day’s activities. 


Second Thoughts 
From the President 

WASHINGTON — In the weeks 
after last year's election. President 
Bill Clinton publicly maintained that 
the furor over his fund-raising tactics 
had not cost him a Democratic Con- 
gress. ‘Tm absolutely certain it 
didn't have anything to do with win- 
ning the House back,” he said. 

Yet in private, the president har- 
bored second thoughts, according to a 
new book that chronicles the 1996 
elections. Disappointed by a re-elec- 
tion victory that failed to gamer a 
majority of the popular vote or re- 
capture either chamber in Congress, 
Mr. Clinton came to regret his own 
strategy of ignoring the finance issue 
in the campaign's final days, accord- 
ing to die book, “Whatever It 
Takes,” by Elizabeth Drew. 

“The question the president asks 
now is should we have done tele- 
vision to respond to that in the last 
moments, because he feels we paid a 
price for that at the end of the elec- 
tion,” Ms. Drew quotes an uniden- 
tified White House aide as saying. 
The president, the aide said, con- 
cluded that the controversy depressed 
Democratic turnout in key races and 
“that a strong response would have 
helped more than it hurt" 

President Clinton has plenty of rea- 
sons to rue that decision. The same 
fund-raising questions he tried to 
duck during the campaign are now 
being asked by House Republicans 
with subpoena powers. (WP) 

More China Dollars 

WASHINGTON — Federal inves- 
tigators tracing the movement of hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars from 
mainland China into California banks 
suspect it came directly from the 
Communist government and went 
partly to the campaigns of California 
politicians, Newsweek reported. 

The magazine said the focus of the 
investigation was Ted Sioeng, an In- 
donesian businessman living in Los 
Angeles who donated $250,000 to the 


Democratic National Committee at 
the behest of John Huang, a friend and 
key figure in die controversy over 
special donations to the party. Mr. 
Sioeng also reportedly contributed 
$50,000 to the California state treas- 
urer, Man Fong, a Republican run- 
ning for the U.S. Senate. 

Mr. Sioeng owns a Chinese -lan- 
guage newspaper in Los Angeles that 
be switched from a pro-Taiwan pos- 
ture ro a pro-Beijing orientation after 
purchasing it last year. 

The report said funds w ere wired 
from China in late 1994 or early 1995 
into an Asian-owned bank in Los 
Angeles where the Chinese Consulate 
has its accounts. ( AP) 

Medicare Harmony 

WASHINGTON — After being 
criticized by bis own party for giving 
up too much, too soon in budget .talks 
with Congress, President Bill Clinton 
has won an endorsement from the 
House minority leader, Richard 
Gephardt, for a key component of his 
new budget offer, further cuts in 
Medicare spending. 

“It looks like we can make that 
work," Mr. Gephardt, Democrat of 
Missouri, said of Mr. Clinton’s pro- 
posal to reduce the growth in Medi- 
care spending by another $18 billion 
over five years. “But when you get 
beyond that figure you are then get- 
ting into really hurting Medicare." 

With the additional $18 billion in 
cuts, Mr. Clinton is proposing to cut 
about $100 billion from the growth in 
Medicare spending over five years. 
The cuts would come from reducing 
payments to doctors, hospitals, 
skilled nursing facilities and other 
health care providers. (WP ) 

Quote / Unquote 

President Clinton criticizing Sen- 
ate Republicans for holding up con- 
firmation ofhis choice of Alexis Her- 
man as labor secretary: “You know, I 
don’t refuse to work with them be- 
cause they won the election. I know 
they wouldn’t have voted for me — 
and that goes two ways.” (WP) 


Away From 
Politics 


• James Earl Ray, who has termin- 

al liver disease, was transferred from 
a prison medical wing to a hospital in 
Nashville, Tennessee, a hospital 
spokesman said. Mr. Ray, 68, is 
serving 99 years in prison fra the 1 968 
assassination of Martin Luther King 
Jr. He confessed but recanted three 
days later and has been seeking anew 
trial ever since. f AP) 

• An off-duty Chicago police officer 
was convicted of shooting a home- 
less man who approached him for 


money carrying only a bucket and a 
rag. After six hours of deliberation, 
the jury found Gregory Becker guilty 
of armed violence, involuntary man- 
slaughter and three counts of official 
misconduct. Sentencing was not im- 
mediately scheduled. Mr. Becker 
faces at least 15 years in prison on the 
armed violence charge. (AP) 

• A 14-year-old boy was killed after 
being thrown from an amusement 
park ride, and two -other teenagers 
were critically injured when a car on 
The Wildcat ride at Bell’s Amuse- 
ment Park in Tulsa, Oklahoma, slid 
down the track as it was being pulled 
to the top and collided with the car 
behind it. (AP) 


B 




V 


: AMERICAN TOPICS 

Pentagon Flans Virtual Military Training 

In the latest blurring of reality and its virtual version, 
L the U.S. Marine Craps has enlisted a Massachusetts 
f 'software trompanytodesign a video gaine that can be used 
' for military training — or fra home entertainment. 

“It’s the first tune the Department of Defense has 
'worked with a game producer to design a game from 
■scratch,” said Warren Katz of Mak Technologies Inc., the 
software company that won the $800,000 contract. 

’ The world's military organizations have used com- 
puter simulations for years. But the lower costs and 
i 'soaring power of personal computers, led die Pentagon s 
, ’to adopt this new approach. The Boston Globe reports. 

With tire new prog ram s, troops will spend more time 
"using simulation software on ordinary desktop computers 
_ linked in networks. The trigger-happy teens who boy 

■ somewhat less detailed civilian versions will bear much 
of the cost of software development 

* Skeptics say they hope video-trained sokfiers will not 
■" forget, in battle, that poshing those little buttons and 
' triggers on their weaponry can have real-life results. 

■Short Takes 

r . uproar it woo\^amc vAm^^teed in 1974 that new 
' toilets use no more than 1.6 gallons (6 liters) of water per 
’flush, less than half the standard 3.5 gallons. Homeown- 
ers say the new models do not get tbejob done —with the 

frequent result being a double or, heaven forbid, triple 
.finch But manufacturers have wasted so. time in de- 
veloping new technologies, reports Popular Science. 
Some systems use compressed air. But that m a ke s a 
Pose idon- Adventure-tike sound, and can cost $200 more 

than other designs. A newer cme relies on a partial vacuum 

to boost flow rate, and keeps price and noasedown. 

■ To fight false alarms, the New York Fire Department 
plans to install cameras in or near its fire alarm boxes. So as 
to allay concerns of snooping, the cameras will be used only 
when people report emergencies. “It is not a Big Brother 
watchmg system," a department spokesman said. 

Two girls at a M gh school in Ambridge, 
Pennsylvania, near Pittsburgh, who wanted to wear pant- 
suits for their induction to.the National Honor Society 
were blocked from taking part in the ceremony. The 
mother of one of the giris called the ruling a throwback to 
less-enlightened times. Her daughter, she said, was 
supposed to be honored for her scholarship, character, 
serviceand leadership,” adding, “She wasnot rec- 
ognized for her clothing." 

International Herald Tribune . 


Wreckage in Rockies Appears to Be From Missing Warplane 


By James Brooke 

New York Timex Service 


EVERGREEN, Colorado — Apparently 
ending a military mystery that bedeviled the 
U.S. AirFrace for almost three weeks, search- 
ers have spotted what they believe is the metal 
wreckage of a warplane that vanished into the 
thin air of the Colorado Rockies oo April 2. 

“It is our collective judgment that what we 
have seen is likely to be A-10 aircraft pieces," 
Major General Nels Running said Sunday 
from the search base in Eagle, 100 miles (160 
kilometers) west of here. General Running is 
deputy commander of the missing pilot’s 
home unit, 12th Air Force at Davis-Monthan 
Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona. 

The search is to resume when a helicopter 
that can withstand high winds arrives from 
Washington state with the search crew. 
Weather permitting, teams will be sent to 


positively identify the gray and yellow metal 
parts sighted Sunday on a “sheer face’’ near 
the summit of a 12,467-foot mountain, mid- 
way between Aspen and Vail. There was no 
sign of die pilot, the general said. 

It now appears that the ^ “ 

Button, a 32-year-old native of Long 
left a training exercise on the Arizona-Mex- 
ico border, flew 800 miles northeast, and then 
crashed into a ridge of New York Mountain. 

For almost three weeks, the disappearance 
of the $9 million plane and its pilot. Captain 
Button, embarrassed the air force and fueled 
wild conspiracy theories on the Internet. 

As Americans pondered the mystery, the air 
force scoured the Colorado Rockies with tech- 
nology that ran from satellites with infrared 
cameras to explosives experts with metal de- 
tectors who hiked into the backcountry. 

Radar images were provided by U-2 and 
SR-71 high-altitude spy planes. In about 400 


sorties, spotters with binoculars studied the 
area from Uh-IH “Huey" helicopters, C- 130 
cargo planes and Cessna flights flown by 
volunteers from the Civil Air Patrol. 

Chi the ground, seismic sensors were stud- 
ied for traces of die impact of the plane, which 
was carrying four 500-pound bombs. 

But the 19-day search was repeatedly 
hindered by the same blizzards that prompted 
die nearby Vail ski area to extend its season. 

On Saturday, air force officials distributed 
photographs of previous crashes of A-10 
Thunderbolts, which showed fields of small 
metal parts. No engines or large pieces of 
fuselage remained after impact 
Meanwhile, conspiracy theories flourished 
on the Internet To disprove theories that the 
warplane bad been stolen, the air force 
double-checked about 140 small airports and 
landing strips in a 75-mile swath along the 
missing plane’s flight path. 


Finding the wreckage is not likely to re- 
solve the central mystery about whether the 
crash was an accident or suicide. A-10 planes 
do not carry the “black box" flight recorders 
that help to determine the causes of crashes of 
civilian passenger jets. 

According to the accident theory. Captain 
Button might have suffered from hypoxia, or 
oxygen deprivation. He left his training for- 
mation minutes after a midair refueling, and jet 
fumes could have accumulated in the cockpit, 
causing a lack of oxygen and disorientation. 

Critics of this theory say that the pilot left his 
formation while flying at 6,500 feet, and then 
managed to thread his way into the high Rock- 
ies, crashing into a 12,467-foot mountain. 

After the captain’s disappearance, a senior 
air force official in Washington had said that 
the pilot bad appeared despondent after a visit 
from his parents in March, and that his mother 
had recently adopted an anti-war religion. 


Albright Buzzes America With a Diplomatic Offensive 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Washington Pox Service 

WASHINGTON — 
Madeleine Albright, the most 
media-savvy secretary of 
state since Henry Kissinger in 

toe 1970s, was putting her 
message on the air. 

Shortly before 10 AJvL. 
Friday, she gave a televised 
interview to John Lomax of 
WKRC in Cincinnati to urge 
Senate approval of a treaty 
banning poison gas weapons, 
calling toe accord “good for 
the American people.” 

Seven minutes later, she 
gave virtually the same in- 
terview to Steve Gullien of 
WBRC-TV in Birmingham, 
Alabama. Next in line was 
WMC-TV in Memphis. Then 
came a local station in San 


Antonio, foDowed by San 
Diego, Seattle and Denver. 

In just over an hour, Mrs. 
Albright reached untold thou- 
sands of Americans with the 
clear-cut, simply worded 
me s-sage that the Chemical 
Weapons Convention is good 
for them and that the Senate 
should approve it when it 
votes Thursday. She did it 
without leaving her chair in a 
commercial television studio 
in downtown Washington, 
where toe State Department 
bad purchased satellite time 
to get her image and message 
out to toe nation. 

The event was more polit- 
ical campaign than diploma- 
cy, and in many ways it was 
typical of how Mrs. Albright 


lias operated 
three months in 


her 


She 


has said repeatedly thaioneof 
her highest priorities is to 
convince Americans that for- 
eign policy matters, and she is 
using techniques never before 
seen at the State Department. 

So far, Mrs. Albright has 
made more trips within the 
United States man overseas, 
addressed more Americans 
than foreigners and sought 
offbeat channels of commu- 
nications to reach new audi- 
ences. In addition to the usual 
Sunday television talk shows 

— she was cm NBC’s “Meet 
the Press” and again pushed 
the chemical weapons treaty 

— Mrs. Albright has ap- 
on CNN’s “Larry 

Live" and National 
Be Radio’s “Diane Rehm 
Show. ’ ’ For her only solo for- 
eign trip so far, she opted to 


give a seat on her plane to Fox 
Television rather than 
Agence France-Presse. 

Her ratings in some opin- 
ion polls have soared so high 
that former President Gerald 
Ford last week called her “toe 
Tiger Woods of foreign 
policy,” as she recalled with 
relish in a brief interview. 

“Having me out there talk- 
ing in very plain language on 
an issue that is important has 
its own value,’ ’ she said. ‘ 'but 
also it projects the fact that 
American foreign policy can 
affect tbeir lives." 

“I think we’ll have a pay- 


off for this in Senate approval 
of the chemical weapons 
treaty,” she added, “but 
we’ll have a larger payoff in 
terms of people understand- 
ing what it is we do.” 

Like a political campaigner 
delivering the same simple, 
catchy message at every stop, 
Mrs. Albright ignored the nu- 
ances of the chemical 
weapons issue in favor of 
broad, easily digested lan- 
guage that might prompt 
listeners to call their members 
of Congress: “This is a treaty 
that has 'Made in toe U.S A.* 
written all over it.” 


“People will wonder 
what's toe matter with us,” 
she argued, if toe Senate fails 
to ratify an arms control 
agreement that 1 ‘ was initiated 
by President Reagan, signed 
under President Bush and em- 
braced by President Clinton. 
We thought this treaty up!” 
Mrs. Albright likes to say 
that when she became a dip- 
lomat, “I had all my partisan 
instincts surgically re- 
moved." Whether these ef- 
forts will produce the desired 
results is still “the miliion- 
dollar q ues Hon," one of her 
senior aides said last week. 


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I 


PAGE 4 



India’s Political Winds 
Buffet the Gandhi Cap 


■ Jtlljt 


Wm- 


Congress Sidelined as South Gains Clout 


V W# 


By Kenneth J. Cooper 

Washington Past Service 


NEW DELHI — This month, India 
faced a choice for prime minister be- 
tween two senior politicians, both 77, 
old enough to have fought for inde- 
pendence from Britain and to have spent 
decades in the Congress Party, which 
ruled for most of the last 50 years. 

One favors the kind of white cotton 
cap that Mohandas K. Gandhi wore in 
his long walk to freedom, while the other 
often dons Western-style business suits. 

The politician who does not wear a 
Gandhi cap and no longer belongs to the 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


Congress Party, Inder. K. Gujral, pre- 
vailed. ending three weeks of political 
uncertainty. 

The man who engineered the ouster of 
former Rime Minister H. D. Deve 
Gowda, the Congress leader. Sharam 
Kesri, had to be satisfied with watching 
as President Shankar Sbarma conducted 
the swearing-in ceremony at his official 
residence. 

The failure of Mr. Kesri ’s power play 
and Mr. Gujral's emergence as leader of 
the governing coalition signifies the 
political change under way in the world’s 
largest democracy. The Congress Party 
has declined to its lowest strength in 545- 
member directly elected house of Par- 
liament, but no single party has so far 
occupied the vacuum in India’s difficult 
transition to more competitive politics. 

“The new approach in Indian politics 
is to have coalition governments,” said 
Chandrababu Naidu, coordinator of the 


governing United Front “Coalition 
governments are here to stay.” 

The present coalition represents siz- 
able constituencies that have abandoned 
Congress, disaffected by corruption and 
the party's failure to serve their interests. 
Small parties from the south and far 
northeast feel Congress governments 
have neglected their regions and favored 
northern India. Lower castes, more pre- 
dominant in the sooth, have complained 
chat their living conditions hove not im- 
proved enough. 

“Congress has failed to recognize 
that power has traveled from the upper 
classes, the upper castes, the richer sec- 
tions down to the people in villages, to 
intermediate castes, to people at the very 
bottom of the social ladder,” said former 
Finance Minister P. Chidambaram, once 
a Congress member. 

Some political analysts have de- 
scribed the current political fragment- 
ation in India as rhrRay»ning to unravel 
the world's most socially complex, na- 
tion, which was previously held together 
by a strong central government. Others 
have contended that the change rep- 
resents a democratidzing trend, with the 
lower-caste Hindus, more than 70 per- 
cent of India's 950 million people, as- 
setting themselves and overturning what 
could be considered minority rule by 
upper-caste Brahmans, who make up 
less than 5 percent of the population. 

When the United Front was formed a 
year ago, coalition partn ers selected Mr. 
Gowda, a southerner and middle-caste 
fanner, to become prime minister. At least 
half the members of his cabinet, which 



briefly 


Inder K. Gujral, left, greeting the Congress (I) Party leader, Sitaram Kesri, after Mr. Gujral was swor n in as 
prime minister. He vowed to support “social justice,” shorthand for advancing the interests of lower castes. 


As a northerner and a member of the 
warrior caste, the second highest after 
B rahmans in Hinduism's traditional 
hierarchy of religious and social stand- 
ing, Mr. Gujral's background does not 
reflect his coalition's demographic lean- 
ings. Bm in his first public remarks Sat- 
urday after bring made the coalition’s 
leader, he vowed to stand for “social 
justice” — in India, shorthand for ad- 
vancing the interests of lower castes. 

Mr. Kesri failed in his bid to form a 
Congress-led coalition and become 


Mr. Gujral has largely retained, were from 
ver castes or religious minorities. 


prime minister because no parties inthe 
United - 


Front were wilting to defect. The 
Congress Party dropped its power grab 
rather than face an election, agreeing to 


back Mr. Gujral’s government on a vote 
of confidemre scheduled for Tuesd ay^ 

Mr. Stoee weeks ago?*M^Kesri 
accused him of being anti-Gougress be- 
cause his government had conducted cor- 
ruption investigations against Congress 
members. Virtual one-party rule by Con- 
gress has been accompanied in the last 
two decades with a public p erception of 
increased corruption, the issue Congress 
insiders have blamed most for thrir defeat 
in last year's election. 

But some Congress dissidents have 
contended that alleged corruption is not 
the party ’ s only problem and mat it badly 
xilitical m 


image, a forward-looking message and 
perhaps a lewd^ 1 from a new generation. 

Since the 1991 assassination of Rajiv 
Gandhi, the party has adopted a sort of 
seniority system that has elevated sep- 
tuagenarians tike Mr. Kesi and former 
Prime Minister P.V. Narasimha Rao, 
who have at times appeared out of touch. 
Mr. Kesri, for instance, continues to 
wear a Gandhi cap that has gone out of 
style and lost its power as a symbol of the 
founding father’s virtues. 

In popular movies, die white cap has 


instead come to identify a dishonest 
ting hot 


needs a political makeover, with a new 


politician — suggesting 
image of the Congress pa 
since independence in 194' 


>w much the 


North Korea 
Skips Another 
N.Y. Session 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — North Korea 
kept U.S. and South Korean ne- 
gotiators waiting Monday, appar- 
ently offering no clues to whether it 
was ready to accept their proposal 
for peace talks. 

Members of the three delegations 
talked for three hours Sunday night 
in New York, where the North 
Koreans reportedly repeated their 
demand for massive food aid as a 
condition for four-way peace talks 
with South Korea, the United States 
and China. 

The United Stales refuses to link 
food aid to North Korean accept- 
ance; South Korea wants the North 
to accept the peace talks first 

The three delegations talked 
Wednesday, and ILS. and South 
Korean officials said they expected 
to bear the North's decision on 
peace talks then. But no answer 
came, and the North Koreans never 
showed for scheduled sessions Fri- 
day and Saturday at a Manhattan 
hotel. The North Koreans said they 
woe waiting for instructions from 
their government. 

In Seoul, the highest-ranking de- 
fector ever from North Korea was 
settling in Monday after arriving in 
on Sunday. 

Although Seoul acknowledges it 
plans to press Hwang Jang Yop for 
information about North Korea, 
South Koreans said they do not ex- 
pect tensions over the defection to 
interfere with the New York talks. 


1NDIA.I New Prime Minister Plans to Make Better Relations With Pakistan a Priority 


Continued from Page 1 


thatan effort to improve relations with 
Pakistan would be one of his main pri- 
orities. Borrowing from a phrase made 
famous in die speech made at the mo- 
ment of independence in 1947 by Jawa- 
barlal Nehru. India's first prime mm - 
ister, Mr. Gujral said after bis election as 
party leader, “We have to formulate 
another tryst with destiny, ’ ’ including an 
effort to create more neighborly rela- 
tions with Pakistan. 

Mr. Gujral also pledged to attack the 


political corruption that is endemic in 
India. 


And he promised a renewed effort 
to tackle the problems of poverty, il- 
literacy and disease that have kept India 
close to the bottom of many tables that 
rate the progress of developing nations. 
In a nation with 950 million people, 350 
million of whom are officially con- 
sidered as living in poverty, pledges to 
ease deprivation and to crack down on a 
pervasive political culture of kickbacks 
and nepotism and graft have been part of 
every prime minister's mantra. 

But promising to improve relations 
with Pakistan is by no means so obvious 
a step. That is especially true fora leader 
who, in Mr. Gujral’s case, will confront a 

Janata Party, a rightist Hmdu chauvinist 
group. The Hindu party has advanced 
steadily in recent elections with policies 
that harp on the need for vigilance against 
Pakistan and on the rights of India’s 
Hindu majority to fashion a country that 
does not “bow its knee” to the minority 
of 120-arillion Indian Muslims. 

The first test for Mr. Gujral’s ap- 
proach is likely to come in mid-May, at a 
regional meeting in toe Maidive Islands, 
where the Indian prime minister is sched- 
uled to meet separately with Pakistan's 
new prime minister, Nawaz Sharif. 

As foreign minister, Mr. Gujral laid 
the groundwork for reduction of ten- 


sions with Pakistan by unilaterally eas- 
ing travel and visa restrictions for 

Pakistanis v isitin g India. 

Whether Mr. Gujral can overcome 
obstacles that have embittered relations 
with Pakistan, notably over Kashmir, is 
widely doubted in India. But assess- 
ments of Mr. Gujral that filled the pages 
of Indian newspapers in recent days em- 
phasized aspects of his character that 
suggest he might be more willing than 
some of his predecessors to break new 
ground by taking an independent stand, 
even at risk his own c are e r. 

One example was Mr. Gujral’s ex- 
1975 with Prime Minister 
Mr. Nehru’s daughter, 
after she declared an emergency, sus- 
pending civil liberties and arresting 
thousands of political opponents. Mr. 
GujraL who had been a key member of 


Mrs. Gandhi’s “kitchen cabinet” during 
her early years as prime minister, was 
her mformation minister at die time. He 


toe presidential palace and 


rejected a demand by Mrs. Gandhi’s son, 
San jay, that he be atic 


in 


lowed to censor the 
news bulletins of All-India Radio. 

In response, Mr. Gujral was forced out 
of toe cabinet and named ambassador to 
Moscow. He later joined anti-Gandhi 
dissidents from the Congress Party in 
forming the Janata Party, forerunner of 
the party that dominates the United 
Front, the Janata DaL 
Before joining the Congress Party, 
which led India to independence, Mr. 
Gujral was a member of India’s un- 
derground Co mmunis t Party, which was 
strongly linked to the Soviet Union. 

■ Gujral Vows to Speed Reforms 

Mr. Gujral took the oath of office at 


pledge was answered by a stock 
market surge that saw glare prices in 
Bombay dose almost three percent 
higher on the day. Mr. Gujral said: 
“Even though there is a change in the 
government there will be no change in 
policy or framework of economic re- 
forms. Our political parties may be weak 
or strong but the system is strong.” 
Meanwhile, four ministers who 
served under Mr. Deve Gowda, includ- 
ing tiie highly regarded finance minister. 


Palaniappan Chidambaram, boycotted 
the new government following their 
party *s acrimonious bathe for the United 
Front leadership, front officials, 
however, said Mr. Gujral would try to 
lure Mr. Chidambaram back into the 
finance department. 


TROOPS: As Chinese Soldiers Arrive, Bong Kong Is on Guard 


Con tinned from Page 1 


carousing in karaoke clubs, bars or res- 
taurants and will be prohibited from 
moonlighting or gambling, according to 
Chinese officials. 

Unlike his British counterparts, the 

Chinese senior general in toe territory will 

earn only 1,200 yuan ($145) per month, a 
sum that covers an evening meal for four 
at a midrange restaurant 

The People’s liberation Army, 
though poorly paid, is heavily involved 
in businesses in China — from man- 
ufacturing dolls to vehicles, from con- 
trolling major drug companies to selling 
Baskin-Robbins ice cream. Although it 
contends that its division here will not 
engage in business, there is some con- 
cern in Hong Kong that the temptations 
of commerce will overcome toe form- 
ality of prohibition. 


Last year, as Chinese troops began 
training for their duties in Hong Kong, 
Major General Liu Zhenwu, who nf- 
timately will command the 10,000 troops 
expected — more than three times the 
number of British troops that had been 
based here — said that his men would 
attend classes to “learn about discipline 
and loyalty to the party.” Hie added, 
“The classes are primarily to define and 
ensure their political correctness.” 

But Martin Lee. die l e ader of Hong 
Kong's Democratic Party, which has 
been critical of the Chinese approach to 
resuming sovereignty, offeree a word of 
caution about the arrival of the first 


future under Chinese rale. “But I hope 


they would Jbllow their orders strictly.” 


contingent of Chinese troops. 

Kong people 


Hong 


“I don’t think 
would feel tool 
of troops,” said Mr. Lee, who met with 
President Bill Clinton last week to ex- 
press his concerns about Hong Kong’s 


40 Chinese officers and men ar- 
rived in Hong Kong on Mooday to begin 
preparing for toe arrival of the full con- 
tingent, winch will occupy 14 military 
sites throughout the territory. 

As the Chinese soldiers arrived at the 
Prince of Wales barracks, British troops 
snapped salutes. 

‘we were told to salute," a British 
soldier said. “Normally we wouldn’t” 

While the brief welcome ceremony 
took place, the sound of cranes and bull- 
dozers filling in yet more of the Hong 
Kong harbor rumbled across the parade 
ground. A construction worker watched 
the horde of reporters and toe abrupt 
arrival of the Chinese convoy. 

“I dcai ’t really have anything to say, ” 
he said. “We really don’t know yet what 
they will do.” 


New Clashes Erupt 


In Java Before Vote 


JAKARTA — New political vi- • 
olence hit the fodor^ian province < 
of Central Java, just days before the ,4. 
campaign for general elections m 
May starts officially, news reports - 

and residents said. __ 

The Jakarta Post newspaper on 1 
Monday quoted sources as saying : 
one person was injured tn a mage 
- south of the ■ 


in 


rna 


and 


vincial capital, Semarao 
Saturday between _ . 
supporters of the Muslim-oriented **p 
United Development Party- T 

In nearby Pekalongan. residents 
sftiH two people were injure d wh en 
about 300 United Developmrat 
Party supporters attacked the office 
of toe assistant regent Sunday. The -f 
reason for the attack was not im- 
mediately clear. 

j ffp ii government officials said - 
the incidents were minor, and the 
police said the situation was calm 
and under control. (Reuters) 


Vietnam Assails - 
Voice of America 


HANOI — The Communist 


of America radio station Monday 
for its report on Hanoi’s plans to 3 

-.U-JI. «Hml<irinniny ' fervor 4 

of a new 


through construction 
north-south expressway. 

“The allegations and distortions, 
aimed at causing disunity and sus- 
picion, cannot sway the will of each 
and every Vietnamese person who 
loves toe country and so ci a l is m ,” 
the official dally Nhan Dan said. 

The commentary also took the 
U.S. station to task for claiming that 

the project, whose cost has been put 

at about $525 billion, would be 
achieved through a compulsory 
labor program. (Reuters) 






.&*■*-*• m 


pledges 
jit # 111 

filiations 


Japan Opposition 
Wins Governorship \ 


TOKYO — The governing party 
has lost a gubernatorial election in 

northeastern Japan fca- the first time ‘ 

in more tom four decades. 

An independent, Sufcesinro Te- 
rata, 56, barked by toe opposition 
New Frontier Party and three other 
parties, on Sunday became the new * 
governor of Akita Prefecture, 450 ' 
kilometers (280 miles) north of 
Tokyo. 

The election is a major victory . 
for the New Frontier Party, which 
has been dealing with. intense in- 
fighting since losing seats in an 
election last year for Parliament’s 
more powerful lower house. 

The election was held after Gov- 
ernor Kikuji Sasaki resigned to take 
responsibility for dubious spending 
by prefex^ural government officials 
of more than 900 million yen ($7.2 
minion) oh food and travel. (AP) “ 




Sri Lanka Rebels 
Kill 12 Soldiers 


-t! 


COLOMBO — Tamil Tiger 
rebels ambushed an army patrol in 
eastern Batticaloa District on 
Monday, killing 12 Sri Lankan sol- 
diers, military officials said. 

A military spokesman confirmed 
the attack but said he was unable to 
give casualty figures immediately. 

Casualties among the Liberation ^ 
Tigers of Tamil Eelam rebels were 
not known, militaiy officials said. 
The rebels seek an independent Vjj 
homeland for minority Tamils in 
the north and east. (Reuters) ■ 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1997 


PAGE 5 





* 


EUROPE 


■ ^ 
r, 




With Foes Feuding, Milosevic Regains Stride and Shores Up His Rule 


By Chris Hedges 

New York Times Service 


i BELGRADE — President Slobodan 
Milosevic of Serbia, the Balkans’ wid- 
est political escape artist, appears once 
a^am to have defied the expectations of 
bis opponents and reasserted his grip on 
bower. 

i Mr. Milosevic, wbo was knocked off 
Stride by months of protests by the polit- 
ical opposition, is now moving to limit 
qridctsm of himself by the independent 
.i news media. He has sidelined those who 
I were disloyal to him in his moment of 
Weakness and appointed a longtime loy- 
alist as chairman of the electoral com- 
mission. 

! He has capitalized cm disarray in the 
tanks of the opposition, which began 
squabbling almost immediately after 
tpey took power in many of Serbia’s 
largest cities. 

! And, to the consternation ofhit r ririrs :. 
he is preparing to run for the Yugoslav 
presidency. The post is now largely ce- 
remonial. But many in Serbia believe 


Blair Pledges 
. Fresh Start for 
Britain in EU 
Negotiations 

Casptkd byOwSefPnm Diyak** 

• MANCHESTER — Just 10 days be- 
fore the general election on May 1, the 
Opposition leader, Tony Blair, used his 
only set-piece foreign policy speech of 
the campaign on Monday to argue that 
tjbe Labour Party alone can stand up for 
Britain's interests overseas. 

’ He also spurned his opponent’s offer 
v of advice on European Union nego- 
tiations if be wins. 

; “I will not take lessons on how to 
negotiate from this textbook of incom- 
petence written by die prime minister,” 
Mr. Blair said at a campaign meeting 
after Prime Minister John Major offered 
confidential advice. 

, The rebuff was tbe latest h umiliati on 
Air Mr. Major, whose party is trailing by 
around 17 points in polls. 

; Mr. Major has depicted himself as die 
bulwark against an erosion of British 
Sovereignty, both under a new EU treaty 
to be completed in mid-June, and a single 
European currency, due to stall in 1999. 

; Mr. Blair, in Ins speech in the north- 
ern city of Manchester, said: “To ne- 
gotiate well you have to have respect 
from those with whom you are nego- 
riating. If you don’t; you fitiL And if yon 
have neither the respect of those with 
whom you negotiate nor those on whose 




,S« 




Major has 
surrendering his negotiating position in 
advance of the EU summit meeting in 
June in Amsterdam and of stifling dis- 
•jent in his own party with “Stalmia” 
tactics. 

! Sticking to bis message that only he 
\ was experienced enough to negotiate for 
Britain, Mr. Major said that Europe was 
‘ ‘becoming more centralist and all Con- 
servatives oppose that centralized 
Europe and support our memberahip of 
a Europe of nation-states.” 

; He shrugged off the polls cm Monday, 
telling a London news conference; 
‘>This election is there to be woo, of that 
1 have not a shadow of doubt, and I 
believe we are going to win it.” 

I Mr. Major’s gamble on making 
Europe a big. election issue h as hi gh- 
lighted divisions over Europe within Ins 
22-member cabinet, provoking media 
speculation dial his closest aides are 
already jostling to succeed him if he 
leads the party to defeat. 

‘ Over the weekend. Home Secretary 
Michael Howard said the new ECJ treaty 
dSuld threaten Britain's future as a na- 
tron-state. Tbe chancellor of die Ex- 
< dSequer, Kenneth Clarke, who is Mr. 
7 Major's pro-European treasury minis- 
ter, contradicted Mr. Howard. 

_Tbe Conservatives and Labour are 
bpth uncommitted on the euro, and both 
promise a referendum before any de- 
cision to join the common currency, but 
Mr. Blair adopts a more c onci liat o ry 
tone toward the EU. 

In Manchester, Mr. Blair accused the 
Tories of “a narrow, crabbed nation- 
alism.” 

. ’ “It is a natural reaction to insecurity 
1 and fear in a changed world, but it leads 
nowhere." he said. “It is not a real or 
.lasting answer to the changes, which, 
;for better or far worse, are going on 
■around us.” _ 

He also could not resist a stream of 

withering personal invective. 

- He called Mr. Major's negotiating c>f 
ithe crisis over “mad cow” disease “a 
’ * Textbook of incompetence’ ’ and said n 
, ‘was an “undignified spectacle” for a 
v prime minister to have to try to stop his 
party from falling apart in the middle of 
an election. 

1 Mr. Blair promised a fresh start m 
Europe and said tie policy of perpetual 
isolation followed by the Conservatives 
■since 1979 was misguided. He said be 
■would stand up firmly fra Britain’s m- 
jerests and was prepared to stand alone 
’if necessary- 

On the question of the single cur- 
■rency. Mr. Blair repeated that he saw 
formidable obstacles to first-wave entry 
and was skeptical about the chances of 
Britain doing so any time in the next five 


t .years* 


(Reuters, AP) 


Sec our 

Business Center 

every Wednesday 


that Mr. Milosevic will maintain his 
sweeping powers if he is elected by the 
federal Parliament, which is dominated 
by members of his Socialist Party. 

Yugoslavia is made up of 
Montenegro and Serbia, and Serbia’s 
constitution bars Mr. Milosevic from 
serving a third term in Serbia. 

The heady excitement of the daily 
street marches, called after Mr. Milo- 
sevic nullified opposition victories in 
November in several large cities, in- 
cludmg Belgrade, has dissipated in die 
smoggy, slate-colored skies that hover 
over the capital. 

“ We faited as a people, as a country ' 
said Miomir Bride, the editor in chief of 
the independent daily Nasa Borba. “We 
should have formed a movement during 
thestreet protests to build a united, non- 
partisan front to fight far & democratic, 
parliamentary system. 

“Instead we followed politicians who 
lacked vision, wbo cared only fori 
and who now spend their time bid 
among themselves like street vendors. 
We have a terrible deficit of leaders.” 


To be sure, Mr. Milosevic is weaker 
than be was a year ago. He has lost his 
top security chief, Radovan Stojicic, 
who was assassinated this month in a 
gangland-style shooting while sitting 
udth his son in a Belgrade restaurant. The 
killers and their motive remain unclear. 

He is also locked in a Utter battle to 
remove the Montenegrin prime min- 
ister, Milo Djukanovic, who has called 
on him to step down. 

And with salaries and pensions often 
paid months late, if at all, and state-run 
industry at a standstill, the International 
Monetary Fund and the World Bank 
have not renewed Yugoslavia’s mem- 
' berships nor granted the country a spe- 
cial concession to attract foreign in- 
vestment 

“Milosevic has capitalized on tbe 
disarray within the coalition,” said Sto- 
jan Cerovic, a columnist for Vreme, an 
Independent magazine. 

“But be has not recovered his power 
completely. The assassination of 
Radovan Stojicic, tbe leader of Milo- 
sevic’s praetorian guard, was an assault 


on Milosevic and his inner circle. It sent 
an ominous message to Milosevic, that 
no one is safe anymore, and it signaled 
to those around Milosevic that they 
could not count on being protected. 
Things are still falling apart. 

Mr. Milosevic, a former Communist, 
has been one of the leading voices of 
Serbian nationalism in the region, and 
his government supported Serbian 
rebels in Croatia and Bosnia through 
years of brutal warfare. 

His artfully timed concessions have 
allowed him to survive two significant 
rounds of public protest. The first, in 
1992, arose after security forces viol- 
ently repressed an opposition march. 
This year, after months of demonstra- 
tions and concerted international pres- 
sure, Mr. Milosevic allowed the op- 
position to move into the city hall in 
Belgrade and other cities. 

Afterward, he dismissed the bead of 
state television, reshuffled the cabinet 
and proposed legislation on the news 
media that would make it possible for 
the government to impose hefty fines on 


its critics.' The bill is now before Par- 
liament. 

Mr. Milosevic’s best ally has turned 
out to be the fractious coalition Zajedno, 
which led the street protests this winter. 
The two principal leaders in the tfrree- 
_■ coalition, Zoran Djindjic and Vuk 
skovic, have been feuding over who 
will run for the presidency of Serbia. 
Elections are expected later this year. 

The daily barbs fly through the press, 
with Mr. Djindjic, now the mayor of 
Belgrade, dismissing Mr. Draskovic's 
candidacy for the presidency by saying 
the coalition cannot afford to “run a 
frog in a horse race.” 

Mr. Draskovic has attacked Mr. 
Djindjic for holding at least one secret 
meeting with Mr. Milosevic during the 
protests and denying at the tune that it 
took place. 

In this disarray, Mr. Milosevic has 
proposed the law making it illegal to 
criticize the president and other senior 
officials. He has also signed a cooper- 
ation agreement with the leadership of 
the Bosnian Serbs. His alleged 





Frost and Drought 
Both Plague Europe 


Winegrowers In the south of 
France were counting tbeir 
losses Monday after freezing 
... (mperatures destroyed large 
sections oftbeir crop of grapes 
forirsew^I)ry,warm 
conditions ripened grapes 
earlier than usual this year, 
leaving them more susceptible to 
cold. Michel Rfen, right, a wine 
producer, inspects the damage 
in his vineyard in Suze la 
Ronsse. In Belgium, however, 
the weather that everybody is 
talking about but nobody is 
doing anything about is drought 
Firefighters, above, have been 
battling brash and grass blazes 
in the region near the Dutch 
border. Widespread European 
drought is attributable to 
record-low rainfalls. 





donment of them was a point of attack 
by the opposition. 

Mr. Milosevic also has shuffled the 
government to strengthen his grip on 
power. The president's wife, Miijana 
Markovic, who heads a party in co- 
alition with the governing Socialists and 
who is unpopular, has disappeared from 
public view. 

Meanwhile, the opposition spends its 
fury on itself. Tbe state-controlled press 
trumpets every new disagreement, 
while calling opposition leaders “Serb 
traitors on foreign payrolls.” 

Mr. Brkic, the editor, said, "Milo- 
sevic is like a vampire, surviving off the 
blood of his enemies.” 

For his part, Mr. Draskovic has 
mounted a campaign to restore the Ser- 
bian monarchy, picking one of the most 
divisive issues within Serbia. He also 
proposed naming the street in front of 
Mr. Milosevic’s house after Draza Mi- 
hajlovic, the Serbian royalist command- 
er who in World War II fought the 
Germans as well as the partisans, and 
was later executed by Tito. 


BRIEFLY 


Bulgarian Victors Seek Support for Economic Plan 


Reuters 

SOFIA — The Union of Democratic Forces, 
which won a big parliamentary majority in 
elections Saturday, said it would meet other 
parties Tuesday to seek their support for its 
program to lead Bulgaria out of economic 
crisis. 

The party leader, Ivan Rostov, said Monday 
that his priorities were carrying out reforms 
sought by the International Monetary Fund; 
fighting organized crime and corruption; open- 
ing secret police fries on public figures, and 
tanging Bulgaria into the European Union and 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. 

“We are proposing that the newly formed 
Parliament pass an anti -crisis declaration, and 
tomorrow we start talks with the other main 
forces for agreement on its principles,” Mr. 
Rostov said at a news conference. 

With all hut a handful of results counted, the 
electoral commission said the Union of Demo- 
cratic Forces had 137 seats in the 240-seat 
assembly to the Socialists* 57. 

Three smaller parties will also enter Par- 
liament. 


Mr. Rostov said he hoped the agreement 
would include the Socialists, who were driven 
out of power in February. 

"I think dialogue with the Socialist Party is 
possible; after all, its current leadership helped 
resolve the January crisis and signed the dec- 
laration for support for the actions of the care- 
taker government,” he said. 

Asked about a formal coalition, he said vari- 
ous options would be considered. “Anyway, I 
am optimistic that in the course of the talks we 
shall find the formula of the agreement in tbe 
name of the country's future.” be said. 

The Union’s National Executive Bureau 
meets Thursday and is expected to nominate 
Mr. Rostov as prune minister and decide on the 
makeup of the cabinet 

Deputy Prime Minister Alexander Bozhkov 
is expected to retain the trade portfolio, over- 
seeing the restructuring of the state sector. 

Economic Policy Minister Krassimir An- 
garski is expected to take the finance portfolio, 
and Bogomil Bouev is expected to continue his 
campaign against organized crime and cor- 
ruption at the Interior Ministry. 


The first task of the new Parliament will be to 
pass a 1997 budget and a package of banking 
laws needed to create a currency board, which 
is required by the IMF as a condition for $657 
million in financing. 

Other crucial steps the new government must 
lake are privatizing and restructuring tbe state 
sector; ' freeing prices and trade rules, and 
providing an investor-friendly legal climate to 
aid a swift transition to a market economy. 

Bulgarian Brady bonds rose sharply on the 
secondary debt market on reports of the Un- 
ion’s victory. An outlook report from Banque 
Nationale de Paris said the bonds could out- 
perform the global Brady index under, .a cur- 
rency board. 

The combination of falling inflation with a 
strengthening currency underpinned by fiscal 
adjustments and industrial restructuring was 
ideal for bond investors, the report said. 

The lev, the national currency, traded lower 
on the interbank market on Monday, but Fi- 
nance Minister Svetoslav Gavriiski attributed 
that to speculation, saying traders were buying 
dollars in anticipation of the lev’s fall. 


$2 Million Political Gift an Irish Bombshell 


By James F. Clarity 

New York Times Service 


DUBLIN — The former chief executive and 
part-ownCT of Irelata's largest department store 
rhflin told a government tribunal Monday that 
he had provided about $2 million for tbe use of 
a former prime minister. Charles Hangbey. 

The businessman, Ben Dunne, the former 
chief of Dunnes Stores, told the tribunal that be 
made four payments intended for Mr. Haughey 
between 1988 and 1991 and that be was told tbe 
money was to help Mr. Haughey overcome a 
personal business problem. 

Mr. Haughey, who was prime minister three, 
times for a total of eight years ending in 1992, 
has said nothing, not even whether be will 
before die tribunal if, as expected, he is 


PS 


Tribunal officials said there had been no 
allegations that any donations were illegal. 
Ireland has no law limiting contributions to 
politicians, but gifts are subject to tax. 
Newspaper and television reporters have 


traced the money to bank accounts in the Cay- 
man Islands, but have not confirmed that any 
money reached Mr. Haughey. 

Tbe disclosure has thrown Irish national 
jlitics into turmoil as Mr. Haughey’s party. 
. 'ianna Fail, now the leading opposition party in 
Parliament, is preparing to challenge the coal- 

Ireiand has no law limiting 
contributions to politicians, 
but gifts are subject to tax. 

ition government of Prime Minister John 
Bruton, the head of the Fine Gael party, in a 
national election campaign. 

The Ftarma Fail leader, Bertie Ahem, said he 
feared that Mr. Bruton would set die election date 
soon in an effort to take advantage of the negative 
effect of disclosures about Mr. Haughey. 

The tribunal is also expected to hear testi- 
mony that Mr. Bruton’s party received about 


5280,000 from Dunnes and that his coalition 
partner, the Labor Party of Foreign Minister 
Dick Spring, received about $22,000. 

A Fine Gael minister, Michael Lowry, 
resigned in December after it was disclosed that 
he received at least $300,000 from Dunnes to 
build a wing on his house. This disclosure 
prompted Mr. Ahern’s party to demand a 
tribunal to investigate. 

The government agreed and then, to die 
chagrin of his party, allegations about dona- 
tions to Mr. Haughey began to be heard. 

Since he was forced out by his own party in 
1992, Mr. Haughey. 71, has lived the life of a 
country squire, yachtsman and owner of thor- 
oughbred horses. 

He is also a member of the Council of State, 
which advises President Mary Robinson on 
constitutional issues. 

During his career, Mr. Haughey ’s critics and 
some journalists often questioned how a man 
who spent virtually his entire adult life as an 
elected official on relatively modest salaries 
was able to become obviously wealthy. 


Chernomyrdin Says Opposition 
To NATO WiUNot Change 

PRAGUE — Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin of 
Russia said Monday that a pact between Russia and 
NATO could be signed on May 27 but that Moscow's 
opposition to the eastward expansion of the alliance 
would not change. 

North Atlannc Treaty Organization officials earlier 
said a new round of talks between Secretary-General 
Javier Solana Madariaga and the Russian foreign min- 
ister, Yevgeni Primakov, aimed at overcoming remaining 
Russian objections, had been set for May 6 in Lux- 
embourg. 

After talks here with the Czech prime minister, Vaclav 
Klaus. Mr. Chernomyrdin was asked at a news con- 
ference if the deal could be signed on May 27, as stated by 
President Boris Yeltsin last week. He replied: “If the 
president said die 27th, that means it will be ready on the 
27th. As for NATO expansion, we will be against it even 
after that. ” 

“It is not a question of NATO,” Mr. Chernomyrdin 
said. "We are talking about the military components of 
NATO. We should not allow new divisions to appear in 
Europe, new blocs. That is why we are today against the 
expansion of NATO. ' ' ( Reuters ) 

Russia Denies Reported Theft: 
Of Nuclear Warheads in Urals 

MOSCOW — Russian officials said Monday that 
Moscow had never had any atomic warheads stolen and 
dismissed a claim by a Russian disarmament expert who 
told a German newspaper that drunken workmen took 
two nuclear warheads in 1993. 

“This is really idiotic," said Nikolai Yegorov. Rus- 
sia’s deputy atomic energy minister. "I have never heard 
anything more idiotic." 

Sunday’s Frankfurter Allgemeine quoted a Russian 
nuclear expert. Vladimir Orlov, as saying two drunken 
workers stole two warheads from a Urals factory on a bet 
in 1993 and hid them in a garage in a residential area. 

It quoted Mr. Orlov, head of tbe Moscow Institute for 
Security and Politics, as saying it was the fust time a 
nuclear weapon had been stolen. Mr. Yegorov dismissed 
the report and said no nuclear warheads had ever been 
stolen. (Reuters) 

Kohl’s Party Fails to Agree 
On Plan for Naturalisation 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut Kohl's Christian Demo- 
crats failed to agree Monday on a plan that would have 
offered German nationality to the children of immigrants. 

The proposal would have conceded for the first time 
that German nationality is not just a matter of blood lines 
and can be acquired by being born in Germany. 

Younger members of Mr. Kohl's CDU have proposed 
giving dual nationality to immigrants' children bom in 
Germany, but making them choose at maturity between 
German citizenship and that of their parents’ country. But 
tbe plan has hit stubborn opposition from older CDU 
members and above all from the Christian Social Union, 
the Christian Democrats' Bavarian sister party. 

The CDU genera] secretary, Peter Hrnlze. said the 
leadership had agreed only that “better integration of 
foreigners should not be reduced to the issue of dual 
nationality.” (Reuters) 

Italian Farmers Demonstrate 
In Brussels for More Subsidies 

LUXEMBOURG — Thousands of Italian farmers on 
Monday protested outside a meeting of European Union 
farm ministers here, demanding higher subsidies for 
agricultural exports. 

Between 7,000 and 10.000 fanners demonstrated for 
the right to produce more milk, and demanded better 
protection from cheaper Mediterranean produce. The 
demonstration was organized by Italian labor groups. 

Farmers demanded an increase of 600.00C metric tons 
in Italy’s annual milk quota of 9.9 million tons, according 
to Carlo Gottero, vice president of the National Con- 
federation of Direct Fanners. f AP) 


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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAX, APRIL 22, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Aid Workers in Albania Wonder Why They Need UN Troops 


As First of 6,000 Soldiers Begin Patrols, 
‘ 'Not a Single Incident ’ Has Been Noted 


.,w ■ ■■ * ■ 

. i r* 


By Mike O’Connor 

New York Iona Service 


TIRANA, Albania — About half of 


Cross and the Word Food Program, that 
there are very few hungry people, and no 
one is starving. 

“Despite the chaos in die govern - 






Argentina | 
Gets Praise __ 
For Opening 
A Dark Haven 


Hun l 




the 6,000 foreign soldiers being sent meat, the markets are open, food is being 
here with United Nations backing are imported through regular commercial 


>V-i; 


By Calvin Sims 

New York Times Service 


.-:***»• 

&r. 


seeing up camp and beginning patrols, 
but there is confusion about what else 
they are to do. 

Ostensibly, the soldiers are to ensure 
that aid sent to Albanians is not hijacked 


channels," Mr. Boucher said “We have 
a real problem for some people who 
were very poor before the chaos and who 
now need some help short term." 

The Wold Food Program, a UN 


by armed gangs, which have roamed the agency, says 140,000 families need one 
country since January, when several donation each of about 100 pounds (40 


fraudulent investment schemes collapsed 
and thousands lost their life savings. 

But the two relief agencies in charge 
of distributing the food are not sure the 


kilograms) of flour, a large bag of beans 
and some cooking oil. 

That. Mr. Boucher said will get diem 
through until the harvest in July. He 


soldiers will be much help. In the last predicted distribution could take about a 
month the Red Cross has distributed month. The troops are expected to be 




more than 40 tons offood and 15 tons of here for three months. 


medical supplies across the country, and 
has found the task much easier than 
expected 

11 We’ve bad not a single incident," 
said Nina Winquist-Galbe, a Red Cross 
spokeswoman. “There’s nowhere we 
have not been able to go." 


Hundreds of thousands of civilians Cross officials say. 


The Red Cross says Albanians who 
need food die most are those in hospitals, 
orphanages and homes for the elderly, 
where almost ail the food used to come 
from the government 
Normal deliveries to these institutions 
have been severely interr up t e d Red 




still have guns and ammunition that they 
were given by the government or that 
they looted from the military. But as the 
World Food Program workers began to 
distribute food this week, they did not 
plan for a military escort 
“They can come if they want" said 


Asked why the countries say their 


Atcmdra MndtfMMSc ftaofrfian 


soldiers are needed. Mr. Boucher Italian soldierejwddling their dinghies ashore Monday at the port of Vl<Hie in Iteswib of Albania as part of a 

i: i .i j i i i j . u.. wixt i « _ j rue i. j « ckvou 


replied “The only way they could get 
their coming here approved by Hie 
United Nations was to say it was for 
humanitarian assistance." 

That foreign soldiers are spreading 


coordinated land and sea effort by UN troops to secure a bridgehead. Officers termed the operation a success. 


stop the outpouring of refugees to their would be coming had calmed Albania personnel carriers splashed onto tbe 


Jean-Marie Boucher, the World Food across the country for any reason has 


Program manager for the Balkans. “We 
would not be impolite.” 

The soldiers, led by the Italian Army 
and including troops Grom France. 
Spain, Greece. Turkey. Romania, Aus- 


made many Albanians suspicious. 
Though mistrustful of their own gov- 


coun tries. 

“The Italians have found a reason for 
coming here since they were Romans," 
said a dockworfcer in Dimes last week. 
As he spoke, two ships were unloading 


and made tbe delivery of food easier. 

■ Bridgehead Secured 

Heavily armed Italian and Greek 
troops swept into the southern port city 


BUENOS AIRES — Long criticize 

for harboring Nazi war cnimnab, A& 
gentina is now winning prme ftpgj A 
some Jewish groups for its efforts ; to 
track down Nazis who came here afige 
World War H and to locate stolen assajg 
they may have brought with them. ^ 
Ruben Beraja. a prominent Argentmg 

Jew who is a member of tbe Voldtjqf 
Committee, which is investigating Nazi 
gold deposits in Europe, said fee gw* 
eminent of President Carlos Saul M*- 
nem deserved credit for helping bong 
Nazi war criminals to justice and lift* 
covering their booty. ,£ 

“This government wants to make a 
dear break with the Argentina of feg 
pa yf which is seen as haying been prjj^ 
Nazi, or a haven to Nazism,” Mr. Bexaja 
“Mr. Menem has assured me of his 
personal support and that of his ad* 
ministration feat we investigate this 
sue to the very end and to let him knowjjf 
we have any problems." 

Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean of fee Los w 
Angeles-based Simon Wiesenfeal Cen» 


,r-i '=*ȣ * . 

.AW*-. 

7. -.a .wt 


ihf% 


-.r.y VI.'.K. 


'i- jw. 
. ri 


beaches near tbe port after landing craft ter, which is devoted to exposing Nazi 
brought them close to shore from a nans- war criminals, said Argentina needed tp 


port ship anchored outside tbe port. put more “punch" into its inves 
Some 160 Italian piarines leaped off tions. but he applauded the_ Menem 
their fan nch** and hovercra f t. With their ernment for taking the initial steps, 
rifles at a ready position, die soldiers Such praise comes at a time * 


ernment and grateful for outside an- sacks of food; five foreign ships were of Vlore on Monday, securing a key 


thority. Al banians , who have been ruled 
or dominated by neighbor countries for 


tna and Denmark, say they are needed so much of their history, are cynical enough 


hungry people can be fed. ‘ ‘We are here 
to escort h umani tarian aid to fee 


to believe that tbe impulse to do good is 
not die reason other countries send in 


stationed nearby. 

Many Albanians say some countries 
sending soldiers are eager to show that 
their armies can work in coordination 
with other European forces. 


jjupatiiaik. 81* 


bridgehead into Albania in a coordinated immediately began searching buildings 


hungry," said Colonel Paolo Bianchi of their armies. 


show of force. Reuters reported 
Nearly a week after soldiers from the 
multinational security force arrived and 
secured two other key ports of entry. 


tbe I talian Army. “That is our first, our 
main goal.’ ’ 


Perhaps the most common explan- 
ation offered by Albanians is that the 


But French officers insisted that their Italian and Greek troops drove into 


It turns out, according to the Red Italian and Greek governments want to 


mission was solely humanitarian. They 
said they believed that just the announce- 
ment last month that foreign soldiers 


Vlore early Monday as Italian marines Vlore and much « 
rushed ashore after arriving by sea. have been controlle 
About 30 Italian tanks and armored tees since February. 


near the port, where the air was tense as 
sporadic gunfire sounded in the dis- 
tance. 

“Everything went well," said General 
Girolamo Giguo of tbe Italian Army. 


many European countries have coral 
myW sharp criticism for refusing to 
cooperate with Jewish groups and in= 


(India Sin 




cooperate wife Jewish groups and m= 
ternational commissions feat are seeking 
to locate gold, bank deposits, property, 
art and other assets that the Nazis are 


Vlore and much of southern Albania believed to have stolen from Jews duriqg 
have been controlled by rebel commit- the war. _ ___ si 


U.S. University Le Pen Faces Suit for Repeating 6 DetaiV 


Loses Appeal 
Over Equality 


Reuters 

PARIS — An anti-racist group said 
Monday (hath would sue die French far- 
right leader Jean-Marie Le Pea for say- 


Anti-Racist Group Condemns Gas Chamber Comment 


FRANCE: 

Elections Are Called 


The New Yorker asked Mr. Le Pen 
about his 1987 comment that Nazi gas 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — In a closely 
watched dispute over sexual equality, 
the Supreme Court on Monday let stand 
r uling s feat Brown University illegally 
discriminated against its female ath- 
letes. 

The justices,- without comment, re- 
jected an appeal in which fee Ivy League 
school's lawyers said lower court rul- 
ings could require schools nationwide to 
oner varsity opportunities far women 
based on a "stark numerical quota." 

The dispute over women’s sports 
dates from 1991, when Brown imposed 
university- wide budget cuts. The school, 
which then funded 16 varsity sports for 
men and 16 for women, cut off financing 
for four teams — men’s golf and water 
polo and women's gymnastics and vol- 
leyball. 

The move affected 37 men and 23 
women. Some of those women sued. 


ing gas chambers had nothing to do with chambers were a mere detail in war- 
anti-Semitism and re pe ati n g that they time history. His reply was: “The gas 


were a mere detail of World War IL 
France’s Movement Against Ra- 
cism said Mr. Le Pen’s comment, in an 


chambers have nothing to do with anti- 
Semitism. When I say that the gas 


Henri Hadjenberg, president of the 
Council of French Jewish Institutions, 
French Jewry's umbrella organization, 
said he hoped Mr. Le Pen would be 
prosecuted over his latest comments. 

"We condemn this new provocation 


Continued from Page 1 


interview for the U.S. news Tnagran* the second world war. it’s obvious. 

TV. NT™., V U™. *‘K ..™. taL. . V V 


chambers are a detail of the history of and hope the French justice system will 


The New Yorker, was part of a de- 
liberate strategy of inciting racial 
hatred." 

. The movement “solemnly requires 
fee justice minister to start legal pro- 
ceedings agains t Jean-Marie Le Pen." 


a de- “If you take a book on fee second 
racial world war of a thousand pages, you 
will have four pages on deportation, 
uires and on these four pages you have six 
pro- lines on the gas chambers." 
ten.” Mr. Le Pea was takes to coot in 


it said. "Fbr its part it intends to as- Fiance over his 1987 statement and 


sume its responsibilities by taking 
court action." 


ordered to pay heavy damages to war 
victims’ groups. 


itself initiate legal action on this pro- 
vocation," Mr. Hadjenberg told 
French radio. 

-He also voiced outrage at a com- 
parison Mr.. Le Pen made between 
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu 
of Israel and’ Hitter. “If it's national 
and patriotic ideology feat is tbe basis 
of Nazism, then Netanyahu is a super- 
Hitler," Mr. Le Pen said. 


French people in the name of the euro. 
The government's economic policy had 
foiled, he said, denouncing the “Anglo- 
Saxon and inegalitarian” economic 
model that Mr. Chir ac seemed to be 
steering toward and calling on the 
voters to elect him prime minister in- 
stead. 

Over fee last two years. Mr. Chirac 
has not managed to convince the French 


Since be took office in 1990, 
Menem has sought to distance himaejf • 
from past Argentine governments, in?* 
eluding that of Juan fteroo, that welf * 
corned scores of Nazis fleeing Europe 
after World War II and sheltered theip 
from prosecution. »•*. 

In 1992, Mr. Menem announced fe$ 
Argentina was “paying its debt to h% 
inanity” by releasing all secret files on 
Nazis who fled here after die war. After 


-vs hs ’ 


of documents, investigators said they 
had uncovered over 1,000 names of $□£ 
peeled Nazi war criminals who found 
refuge in Argentina, many times mo « 
than had previously been documented^. 

In 1995, tbe government approved fee 
extradition to Italy of Erich ftiebke*a 
former SS captain who lived in Ba^ 
tioche, an Andean resort town, for .50 


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people that reducing deficit spending years and admitted taking part in fee 
and the burdensome taxes feat finanw. killings of 335 Italian civilians, many of 


tire welfare state would be fee best medi- 
cine to bring down fee country’s 12.8 
percent unemployment rate. 


whom were Jews. Mr. ftiebkeis on tr^fl 
in Italy fbr war crimes. . , ■ 

Last year, the Argentine govermnem 


MARKETS: Europeans See French Gamble That Could Backfire 


Continued from Page 1 


financial markets Monday. The franc, 
which just last week rode growing op- 


mem from Mr. Kohl's Christian Demo- 
cratic Union. 

But many Germans questioned 
whether a conservative victory would 


"Together, we have to reform the provided investigators with bank ret; 


| state to permit lowering at public ex- 
penses, me only way of lightening the 

rn * /*r i in I /»•. taxes and charges feat weigh too heavily 

2 lhat isOUld Backfire on jobs," Mr. Chirac said. 

His decision cut short discussion by 
said, “we have to impose a new cure of fee legislature of a government bill to 


it lowering of public ex- 


tunism about the single currency to a lead the French government to 


contending that Brown had violated a four-year high of 33615 to the Deutsche tougher austerity measures to meet 
1972 law known as Tide DC The law. mark, tumbled to 33764 to the Deutsche Maastricht criteria, especially given 


austerity on tbe country to respect tbe make it easier for fee poor, homeless and 
criterion of 3 percent, my answer is, unemployed to gain access to state ben- 
‘No.’ ” efits, and may presage further spending 

The German official asserted that a freezes, budget cuts and possibly other 


efits, and may presage further spending 
freezes, budget cuts and possibly other 


credited by many wife changing fee face 
of women's sports and societal attitudes 
about women, bans discrimination in 
education based on sex. 

In other actions, fee court: 

•Turned down the government’s ef- 
fort to force Texaco to pay at least SI 


mark, tumbled to 33764 to the Deutsche 
mark late in (he day, from 33705 at the 
opening. 


Socialist victory in France “could put even more unpopular measures feat may 


the current government has abandon 
social security reforms in fee face 


the euro in serious jeopardy. 


explain why be called fee election now 


cords that may help them track down 
transfers of gold, cash and art to A& 

r ina by Nazi agents. On Thursday 
Menem announced die creation 
an international troth committee to 
sure that investigators have access to 
the information they need. ; iqA 

“We are taking these steps because* 
we want to satisfy our debt to society fog 
fee sins feat Argentina committed ??! 
accepting the Nazis after the war," Foq 
eign Minister Guido di Telia said. “We 


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Yields on 10-year French government protests despite the fact that it holds 80 
bonds, which rise when fee bonds’ price percent of the seats in Parliament. 


ed Philippe Brossard. an economist at instead of waiting until the aquation of are also taking these steps because /uq 

of ABN Amro in Paris, said: “It’s going to tbe legislative tenn next spring. gentina has become a multiethnic, mufc 


fall, edged up to 5.795 percent, from 
5.755 percent Friday. 

French stocks also dipped, wife the 


biUionmorc in taxes on Saudi Arabian oil CAC-40 index losing nearly 1 percent to 


"If we had a similar parliamentary 
majority.” an official said, "we 
wouldn't dream of having early elec- 
tions." 


it sold between 1979 and 1981. Tbe court finish at 2322.67, after closing at 


raise some tension with Che Germans and 
tbe Bundesbank. It's going to be a rocky 
path to ecooomic and monetary union, 
rather than fee soft one if the conser- 
vatives win." 

Mr. Brossard said the government’s 


tbe legislative tenn next spring. gentina has become a multiethnic, miy£ 

Aides said he also acted now to keep ticultnral society and we owe it to qpi 
French domestic political turmoil out of Jewish citizens to set the recced 


rejected the government's argument that 234736 Friday. 


Texaco can be taxed on profits earned by 
its foreign subsidiaries because ofbelow- 
market pricing of Saudi oil. 


A victory by the opposition Socialist odds of winning the elections were no 
Party was not expected to lead to an better than 50-50 because of the un- 


German officials, who spake on con- immediate postponement or cancella- 


dition of anonymity, said Mr. Chirac 
raised the possibility of early elections 


tion of monetary union because the party 
negotiated die Maastricht treaty and 


• Rejected appeals by six Branch when he met with Chancellor Helmut continues to endorse the euro. 


Davidians who were convicted in die 
shoot-out that began the 1993 standoff at 
the cult's compound near Waco, Texas. 

• Ruled in an Arizona case that par- 
ents cannot sue states to force them into 
overall compliance with a federal child- 
support enforcement program. 

• Refused to free ABC television from 


Kohl in Bonn two weeks ago. 

Some German officials clearly hope 
fee ballot will resolve mice and for all 
fiance’s hesitations about the single 
currency and the fiscal discipline re- 
quired for its adoption. 

“If it stabilizes French policy in a way 
that France has a clear agenda for eco- 


a $1 million libel award over a news nomic and monetary union, it's a good 


report on a Georgia county's troubles 
with its garbage-recycling machine. 


idea," said Elmar Brok, a leading Ger- 
man member of fee European Paxiia- 


The risk, officials said, is that the 
Socialists will demand conditions — 
such as a softening of tbe deficit re- 
quirement or the inclusion of southern 
European countries like Italy and Spain 
— that make it difficult or impossible for 
Germany to accept. 

Lionel Jospin, the Socialist leader, 
underscored those fears in a television 
interview Sunday night 
4 ‘If with fee jobless rate we have." he 


precedented nature of Mr. Chirac’s de- 
cision. 

When French presidents have called 
early elections in fee past, it has been 
because of a national crisis such as the 
social protests of May 1968 that had 
brought the country to a halt This time, 
French officials said. Mr. Chirac was 


the decision to start tbe new European 
currency, which be hopes wOl help pull 
Europe out of economic stagnation. 

Mr. Chirac and European leaders will 
meet next April, when fee elections 
would normally have been held, to de- 
cide which countries qualify. 

His electoral gamble caught fee So- 


straight" s .£ 

So for government bank records ha,ve 
not shown exactly what assets the Nazis 
brought to Argentina, leading local Jeyg 
ish investigators to conclude feat A& 
gentina, like Spam and Portugal, mqjj 
nave been a transit route for looted as- 
sets- “Argentina didn’t offer fee lrind ; q£ 


i-x r.-- 

3*^ - 

... 

*7.““ *■•’**; 




" Wet.. 


Hue, to forge a common line, but the 


French officials said, Mr. Chirac was If Mr. Chirac’s calculations and the 
acting to avoid a clash between tbe nor- polls are right, be would lock in con- 
mai election date of March 1998 and the servative control of die legislature 


decision, due in late April or early May 
next year, on which countries will 
launch tbe euro on Jan. 1. 2 999. 

Mr. Brossard, however, said, “It’snot 
clear why we’re having elections.” 


ISRAEL: Netanyahu Shores Up Coalition 


Continued from Page X 


leased Sunday night, the nation’s two 
senior prosecutors, Mr. Rubinstein and 


Netanyahu’s chief of staff. 

Prosecutors said Mr. Netanyahu es- 
caped indictment in part because his 
case, unlike Mr. Deri’s, would have re- 


state Prosecutor Edna Arbel. said they quired the use of hearsay testimony that 
found enough evidence to raise “tan- is not admissible in court. 


jble suspicion’ ’ of a corrupt deal in Mr. That explanation did not satisfy some 


fetanyahu's appointment of Ron! Bar- of Mr. Netanyahu’s opponents. “There 


On as attorney 
But they sai 


neral in January, 

they lacked sufficient 


are too many signs that our prime min- 
ister was a partner to a plot," said Yossi 

n ■ J m J . P 1 fj. < 11 .. 


evidence admissible in court and de- Sarid, leader of the leftist Meretz party, 
tided against indictments of Mr. Net- who filed one of the Supreme Court 


anyahu and Mr. Hanegbi. 

The prosecutors made clear feat they 
believed the central allegation of tbe 
case, which is that three influential fig- 
ures used connections and threats to 
induce Mr. Netanyahu to name Mr, Bar- 
On to the nation’s highest law enforce- 
ment position in hopes of easing their 
own legal troubles, nut they said they 
could not move that unlawful motives 


appeals Monday. “We can’t accept the 
idea that the Israeli state is being gov- 
erned by a gang." 

Another legal filing Monday, by tbe 
Movement for Quality Government, 
asked the court to remove Mr. Hanegbi 
and to suspend Mr. Lieberman. 

The court has jurisdiction to order 
indictments and removal of public of- 
ficials who have not been convicted of 


were Mr. Netanyahu's only reasons for crimes. 


the choice. 

One of the three was Aiyeh Deri, a 
Netanyahu ally who heads the ultra-Or- 
tbodox Shas party. Mr. Deri is said to 
have threatened to topple Mr. Netanyahu 
by withdrawing his 10 parliamentary 
seatt from the coalition, and prosecutors 
said they planned to indict him for ex- 
tortion, fraud and breach of public trusL 

Police charges are still pending in fee 
case against Avigdor Lieberman, 1 Mr. 


But it is seldom exercised, and legal 
commentators generally doubted the 
court would intervene tins time. 



servanve control of die legislature 
through the remaining five years of his 
seven-year term, which began in mid- 
1995. But if they are wrong, it could 
mean a rough ride not only for French 
politics but also for monetary union, 
with Mr. Jospin as prime minister and a ' 
leftist majorify in Parliament 
After Mr. Chirac won the presidency. 


money to stay, but it might baye 
laundered it," said Mr. Beraja; who§ 
the vice president of the World Jerwfca? 
Congress. .. — 

An initi al review of government bank 
records shows that in 1943 Argentina 
received about $150 million from Ger- 
man companies like Krupp and Hiyssen 
feat transferred the money legally 'W 
Argentine companies. ' > 

“Even if the money had not: befen 
looted from Jews, it does make fee poiri^ 
about tbe kind of relationship that Ar-t 


iL. ■; ■ 


.. >i n. 

. ... 

h t* t*0NS 

; 

• m 

. f. tx tWG 

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v. . v 
K= w kellies. - 

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i . -a 4 


Aius- jvir uwac wra me presidency, gentina had wife Nazi Gennamr, and it’sj 

^ I lS n ^fe Re ^? eopte ’ ,ro J ,bled ““portant for people to know this," MrJ 
by double-digit unemployment, “pro- Beraja said. ^ -i ] 


found change." That, he said during hie 
c amp ai gu . meant lower government 
payroll taxes on employers to encourage 
them to create jobs, and reduced un- 
employment. I ns t ead, Mr. Juppe raised 
income and sales taxes soon after caking 
office, and joblessness rose. 


The Menem government’s efforts to( 
break with Argentina’s pro-Nazi past 
have often been undermined by affords 
on local Jewish targets in recent years^ 
The atta ck s have fueled tbe perception 
feat Argentina remains a country hostile 
to Jews. i 


LONDON: Threats Bring Traffic Chaos 


Continued from page 1 


evocation of the fighting spirit of Lon- 
doners during the wartime Blitz. 

On Friday , a small bomb exploded at a 
railroad station in Leeds, while bomb 
threats forced the cancellation of many 
trains across the north of England 

Earlier in the month, coded threats 
attributed to the IRA forced the closing 
of some of Britain's most heavily used 
expressways, while anotter threat forced 
the postponement of one of dwnmnWf 


On Friday , a small bomb exploded at a 


airports. London’s busy Heathrow Air-J 
port es caped relatively unscathe d, wife a 
threat causing only a partial and brief 
dosare.of 0 °C of its four terminals- ; : 
Tne Channel port of Dover was also 
briefly closed while police carried out 
bomb searches after a warning. : ■ 
^ Party leader] 
called tiie bomb threats intolerable. ^ • 
The Liberal Democrat leader, Paddy 
Ashdown, whose own campaign bus btH 
came ensnared in tbe traffic iams, lam-* 


J* en Leader Hememhm 

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■5Mstmiaxn Wonntfed 


Aryeh Deri with a supporter after a prosecutor said be could be indicted. 


Israeli troops wounded five Palestini- 
an demonstrators in the West Bank vil- 
lage of Sotuif on Monday, Reuters re- 
ported, quoting Pa l esti n ia ns . 

They said the clashes broke out when 
the Israelis sealed off the village and 


brought in a bulldozer to demolish the 
home of a resident who was arrested for 
involvement in attacks on Israelis. 

Sourif, in a part of fee West Bank still 
under Israeli control, was fee home of a 
bomber who killed himself and three 


Israelis in a Tel Aviv cafe last month. 

Earlier tills month, security forces un- 
covered an Islamic Hamas cell of six 
Sourif residents suspected of killing sev- 
eral Israelis in a series of attacks over 
two years. 


the Grand National sterolechase S SnSl A?S2^- teITOnsm ’ 

AgaSri !««= 


Jtr l iHfP ij g] 


forced shutdowns of fee King’s Goss, St. 
Pancras, Paddington and Charing Cross 


' Rights 


experts 




ofaUoperatioia.GatwickaSS ^ pse!oBm ^ Docktoi wojws, '2.^, 

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Cuerrtwv 




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APRIL 22, 1997 


PAGE 7 




INTERNATIONAL 


^Leftist's Run Unnerves Mexico's Main Party 


By Sam Dillon 

New York Jiaes Service 

'w - CnaDhtBm oc Cardenas, ah 
Mexico City’s first mayoral 
T22&!*. people at a suburban campaign 
stop com plain the other day of government m- 
umerence to local water 


.flows out of fee tap like chocolate.” 
G^^^^ono. a neighborhood activist, told 


^At another rally, Mr.. Cardenas heard villagers 

accuse a ward boss from fee governing In- 
ghmonal Revolutionary Party, or PRI, aftwr- 
Wunng local archaeological treasures. 


later, at a meeting in a nearby plaza, 
“MKhcds of Cardenas backers drowned out a 
Heckler they believed to be a su pp orter of the 
governing party with a chant that resonated off 
fefc bell tower of fee village chapel: “Kick out 
®e PRI! Kick out fee PRI] ” 

' r "Mr. Cardenas, Mexico’s most prominent left- 
ist leader, has been hearing fee roar of «mi - 
govemmem crowds all across North America’s 
largest city during fee first weeks of an election 
campaign feat is shaping up as a crucial marker 
in fee country's trudge toward democracy. 

^ .The winner of fee election — until now fee 
mayor was appointed by fee president — is 
wcpected to immediately become the second 
most powerful politician in the country. 
"-^“PfedpTe don’t warn another three or six or 20 
Sears of more-<rf-fee-same 1 ,, said Mr. Cardenas, 
who lost presidential bids to Institutional Rev- 
olutionary party candidates in 1988 and 1994. In 
i an interview 'last week as his convoy moved 


through remote suburbs where industrial waste- 
lands give way to palm-shaded colonial plazas, 
be said, “People want change.” 

Mexico is moving toward national elections 
July 6 that will be a watershed not only because 
of fee first Mexico City mayoral election, but 
also because opposition parties have their first 
credible chance at wresting control of fee 500- 


For half a century after Mexico s modem 
political system was consolidated in the 1920s, 
successive PRI presidents governed with vir- 
tually unchecked powers. 

. Since the early 1980s, opposition parlies have 
been chipping away, winning hundreds of city 
and four state governments, but fee central in- 
stitutions of Mexican power have remained in 
fee hands of the institutional Revolutionary 
Party; 

Recant polls suggest that if the elections were 
held now, Mr. Cardenas, and his Party of the 
Democratic Revolution, or PRD, would nar- 
rowly win fee mayoral election while fee In- 
stitutional Revolutionary Party would just man- 
age to maintain a majority in Congress. 

These prospects have seemed to rattle Pres- 
ident Ernesto Zedillo. Last week, he appeared 
before an assembly of bis party to lecture his 
followers on fee need to retain control of the 
legislature. 

The dangers of a defeat for fee governing 
party are obvious: an opporiti on-coo trolled Con- 
gress could commission the first serious in- 
vestigations of government corruption and es- 
tablish oversight committees to monitor the 
secretive military and fee national budget 


“The stakes are extraordinary because the 
PRI has never had to work with a divided gov- 
ernment, and they don’t know how,” said Fe- 
derico Estevez, a political scientist 
The loss of Mexico City would be a tre- 
mendous blow, Mr. Estevez added, because 
about 20,000 of fee city's more than 60,000 
bureaucrats are governing party functionaries 
and would probably be dismissed by an op- 
position mayor. 

Betting that this kind of shake-up is attractive 
to fee dty’s residents, both Mr. Cardenas and fee 
other mam opposition mayoral candidate, Carlos 
Castillo Feraza, a former president of the con- 
servative National Action Party, or PAN, have 
built campaign slogans around fee word 
“change.' 

ha contrast the governing party and its may- 
oral candidate, Alfredo del Mazo, a former gov- 
ernor of the state of Mexico, are gambling feat 
Mexicans fear turmoil and will vote for star 
bility. 

“It’s possible to lose everything, overnight” 
says a governing party radio advertisement 
broadcast repeatedly in Mexico City. “Your 
family, your education, your work, you've 
achieved it aD through effort and experience. The 
PAN and the PRD offer change, as if by magic. 
That’s not possible and risks all that we have.” 
Recent polls show Mr. Cardenas to be backed 
by 32 percent of Mexico City voters, Mr. Castillo 
by 30 percent and Mr. Del Mazo by 25 percent 
One reason for Mr. Cardenas’s early lead is 
that he is better known than his rivals. The 62- 
year-old son of General Lazaro Cardenas, the 
almost mythical Depression-era president who 



KcU DMnaraHer/Tbe New Yak Has 


Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, seeking to be Mexico City’s first popularly elected mayor, has 
been getting an earful of complaints about the governing party’s municipal government 


nationalized Mexico’s oil fields. Cuauhtemoc 
Cardenas studied engineering in France and later 
served as a PRI senator and governor of his home 
state, Micboacan. 

In 1987, he led followers in a breakaway from 
fee PRI, charging that fee party had betrayed its 
revolutionary roots, and fee following year ran 
for president against Carlos Salinas de Gortari. 
After the balloting, fee government halted fee 
count, claiming that election computers had 
crashed, and later declared Mr. Salinas the vic- 
tor. But many Mexicans believe Mr. Cardenas 
won. 


During Mr. Cardenas's second presidential 
run. in 1994, the government prevented him 
from buying broadcast advertising, and elec- 
tronic news coverage was uniformly negative. 

But now Mr. Cardenas and his party are rising 
in the polls, and Mr. Cardenas attributed his 
improving fortunes to relaxation of controls on 
the media. 

“For years they bad-mouthed us and distorted 
what we were proposing,” he said. “But now 
they're allowing interviews and coverage, and 
we have possibilities that haven't existed be- 
fore.” 


J5iju Patnaik, 81, Hero 
Of India Struggle, Dies 


By John F. Bums 

New York Times Service 

v NEW DELHI — Biju Pat- 
aaik, one of the most prom- 
inent survivors of the gen- 
eration of Indian leaders who 
y teak part in fee independence 
"struggle against Britain, died 
Thursday. He was 81. 

*-The scion of a princely 
family, Mr. Patnaik twice 
served as chief minister of 
Orissa, a state in eastern India 
With a population of more 
than 30 million people, from 
1961 to 1963, when be was 
credited wife steps feat began 
Us industrialization, and 
again from 1990 to 1995. 

'- But Ins reputation in India 
rested less on his political per- 
formance than on Ins exploits 
te a pilot in fee years before 
dud soon after India’s inde- 
pendence in 1947. 

' * -Enlisting in the Royal Air 
Force, he combined daring* 
dp cm behalf of the British 
forces fighting fee Japanese 
in Burma wife secret mis- 
sions cm behalf of fee inde- 
pendence movement 
■*’ Few dropping political leaf- 
lets to Indian soldiers fighting 
Under British command in 
Burma and flying clandestine 
missions that carried Con- 
gress Party leaders from 
yjEndeouts across India to secret 
meetings that charted the in- 
;fependence struggle, he was 
jailed by tire British from 
r942to 1946. 

H die decade after inde- 
pendence, he founded an in- 
dustrial empire in impover- 
ished Orissa and his own air 
service, later absorbed by In- 
dian Airlines, fee state-owned 
Carrier. 

—'All the while, he keptuphis 
flying exploits, winning 
retro wn for daredevil flights 
that carried Indian soldiers in- 
to battle in Kashmir in 1947, 
arid with a mission in 1948 in 
which Mr. Patnaik rescued 


two Indonesian independence 
leaden from a hideout in In- 
donesia and flew them to In- 
dia, outraging the Dutch who 
were then ruling Indonesia. 

Mr. Patnaik’s political ca- 
reer was less successful IBs 
two stints as chief minister of 
Orissa were dogged by polit- 
ical fending and accusations 
of corruption. 

- In the 1970s, disillnsioiied 
with the leadership of Prime 
Minister Indira Gandhi, be 
broke wife fee Congress 
Parly, and. was one of fee 
many political leaders arres- 
ted and imprisoned by Mrs. 
G andhi . When she lost die 
election in 1977, Mr. Patnaik 
served briefly as steel min- 
ister. . ... 

Among his survivors is his 
daughter, the anfeor Gita Me- 
hta. 

Mary Rockefeller, 86, 
Trustee of the_YMG& 

NEW YORK (NYT) — 
Mary French Rockefeller, 86, 
for more than, four decade* 
active in promoting leader- 
ship opportunities for wom- 
en, died in New York on 
Thursday from injuries she 
suffixed in a fall in her Man- 
hattan apartment 

Mrs. Rockefeller was a 
support er of the Young 
Women’s Christian Associ- 
ation, where she was an ad- 
vocate for women throughout 
fee world. She began in 1951 
as a member of fee national 
board and in 1988 was elected 
to the Board of Trustees. 

Ron 1955 to 1973, she 
was vice chairman and then 
chairman of fee YWCA’s In- 
ternational division, and from 
1958 to 1964, she was chair- 
man of the organization’s 
World Service Council. 

Her husband, Laurence S. 
Rockefeller, whom she mar- 
ried in 1934, is a grandson of 
John D. Rockefeller, die 
founder of Standard 03. 


BRIEFLY 


accusations Monday of new cross-boidaa^cks^fee 
worst outburst of Violence between fee Transcaucasia 

said 

..troops shelled Azerbaijani positions on ^n^feweston 
part of the border late Sunday. Tge fite from bgte 
, weapons continued for 10 mmmes before Azabaj^am 
L returned fire and silenced the adversary, amm- 

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TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



nBUSHBB WfTK THE NEW ttKK TIMES AND THE MMSKHWTUN KHT 


eribltnc Israel in the Desert Needs Clear-Sighted Friends 

A MftiM am 


State Department 


The Clinton administration, having 
Jost control of the issue early on, has 
now pretty much yielded to Jesse 
Helms and agreed to consolidate the 
foreign aid, overseas information and 
arms control agencies into the State 
Department, which is itself due to be 
“reinvented.” This development is 
intended first to secure Senator 
Helms's forbearance on major foreign 
policy issues, including the Chemical 
Weapons Convention and the foreign 
affairs budget. 

The changes, or the process by 
which they came about, do not make it 
the Clinton administration’s finest 


hour. Still, it now has a promising 
opportunity to brine the structures of 


opportunity to bring the structures of 
policy into belated conformity with 
post-Cold War needs. 

The arms control and information 
agencies are slated to lose their 
autonomy and be folded directly into 
the State Department The two have 
their indisputable accomplishments 
and. in small numbers, their partisans, 
bur most people are not going to Jose 
sleep over what they will see as merely 
a change of boxes. 

The amis control function is assured 
of preservation not by bureaucratic 
maneuver but by the national interest 
in restraining the proliferation of 
weapons, conventional and special. 

The government's public diplom- 
acy function already needed thorough 
review. This is not just because the 
Cold War is over. We live now in an 
information age in which the produc- 
tion and conveyance of information is 
overwhelmingly in private hands. 

Some warn that the integrity of of- 
ficially disseminated information may 
be compromised if the source — tike 
the Voice of America — moves from a 
small U.S. Information Agency to the 
much larger State Department. There 
are ways — die Voice's charier, pro- 
fessionalism and so on — to allay these 
fears and avoid the wamed-of con- 


sequences. 

A tougher problem is presented by 
the Agency for International Devel- 
opment This is recognized under the 
proposed reorganization. 

The agency would report no longer 
to the president but to the secretary of 
state; however, it would remain an 


reorganization not to serve die vaunted 
and everywhere-shared goals of rais- 
ing efficiency and establishing ac- 
countability but simply to ax programs 
he didn't like. 

Not that the protracted battle over 
reorganization is anywhere near the 
chairman’s sole fault On this issue the 
Clinton team never got its act together. 
The Low point surely came when the 
first-term secretary of state, Warren 
Christopher, found himself adopting a 
pro-reform position that In turn 1) Mr. 
Helms embraced. 2) Vice President Ai 
Gore rejected and 3) Mr. Christopher 
abandoned. The administration has 
been playing catch-up ever since. 

Mr. Gore's interest remains not just 
in reorganizing in the Helms sense but 
in “reinventing government,” or 
streamlining. For this sort of institu- 
tional makeover, the State Department 
is a leading and u rgen t candidate; its 
new secretary is at work on it 

The reorganization emerging into 
public view is in only tentative form. 
Key obligations remain to be nego- 
tiated. This is what gives the admin- 
istration a chance to recapture the ini- 
tiative. Give Jesse Helms credit for 
forcing the issue; he win no doubt 
insist on remaining in the picture. But 
Bill Clinton, his vice president and his 
secretary of state can take the lead in 
reforming the executive’s own house. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Jews Asunder 


Judaism, like any other religion, has 
a history of passionately argued theo- 
logical disputes. But the argument be- 
tween some Orthodox Jewish groups 
and non-Orthodox Jews over the role 
of the chief rabbinate in Israel and what 
constitutes Judaism is unusually cor- 
rosive. It is also dismaying to anyone 
concerned about Israel and the well- 
being of the Jewish community. His- 
tory shows that an absolutist approach 
by religious groups in a pluralistic 
country endangers the common bonds 
holding society together. Israel is the 
last country in the world that can afford 
an internal religious schism. 

Such a rupture is now threatened 
because of the drive by some Israeli 
religious parties to let the chief rab- 
binate of Israel, which is an instrument 
of Orthodox Jews, retain exclusive 
control over marriage, divorce and 
conversions — and to enlist the power 
of the government of Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu to protect that 
authority. A parallel threat arises from 
a recent declaration by the Union of 
Orthodox Rabbis in the United States 
<a relatively small group even among 
Orthodox Jews) that adherents of Re- 
form or Conservative Judaism may 
be Jews by birth but that “their religion 
is not Judaism.'’ 

The Orthodox group's statement 
sent shock waves throughout the Jew- 
ish community in the United States, 
where most Jews are either Conser- 
vative or Reform. Now the chancellor 
of the Jewish Theological Seminary, 
the academic center of the Conser- 
vative movement, has fired back, call- 
ing for the “dismantling” of Israel's 
chief rabbinate and suggesting that 
American Jews stop their donations to 
groups that oppose the recognition of 
non-Orthodox Jews in Israel. 

Rabbi Ismar Schorsch, the chan- 
cellor, inflamed passions further by 
suggesting that the Union of Orthodox 
Rabbis' intolerance was the kind of 
philosophy that led a fanatical Jew to 
murder Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
in 1995. Rabbi Schorsch ’s compari- 
son was intemperate itself. Orthodox 
Jews ought to be entitled to their opin- 
ion about other Jews whom they regard 
as straying from the faith, without 


being accused of fomenting violence. 

But the chancellor’s overall appeal 
that there be respect for diversity with- 
in a religion was a sensitive response to 
the problem of religious conflict in 
many societies, not simply Israel. 
However passionate or even legitimate 
are the arguments of theologians on 
one side or another, Israel is a de- 
mocracy, and a dictatorial approach by 
one gronp or another is bound to deep- 
en divisions rather titan respect for 
religious teachings. 

There has always been a tension in 
Israel between its role as a modem 
state with civilian authority and the 
fact that it is also a Jewish state, created 
expressly for Jews. Under its current 
setup, the country is less a theocracy 
than a civil society with an established 
religion. The chief rabbinate of the 
Jews has been given the exclusive au- 
thority by tiie state over divorce, mar- 
riage. conversions and other matters. 
Until fairly recently, the chief rab- 
binate was able to impose its doctrines 
without making non-Orthodox Jews 


feel that they were being deprived of 
their rights. But an influx of Jews from 


their rights. But an influx of Jews from 
Russia. Ethiopia and other countries — 
many of whom are adopted or related 
to Jews through a relative other than 
tire mother — has raised tire tensions. 

Since Jewish law defines Jewish- 
ness through matrilineal descent, Israel 
demands that these new arrivals con- 
vert to Judaism if they want to marry or 
divorce. Two years ago, the Supreme 
Court in Israel said that a non-Or- 
thodox conversion would suffice, but 
now the government wants a new law 
saying that only an Orthodox conver- 
sion will do. 

Theological arguments are best car- 
ried out by theologians, but it is com- 
mon sense for Israel to live up to its 
tradition as a place for all Jews. At- 
tempts to delegitimize co-religionists 
because they do not follow the prac- 
tices of the most Orthodox adherents 
may make perfect sense to some 
people theologically. But a single- 
minded pursuit of such an authoritarian 
approach is a recipe for division and 
discord at a time when Israeli unity is 
needed more than ever. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


INTERNATIONAL 


ESTABLISHED 1887 

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6/097. International HeraU Tribune. AB rights reserved. ISSN: 0294-8052. 


N EW YORK — Al sundown this 
Monday night, Jews around the 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


independent agency. Whatever the dif- 
ference, the priority concern ought to 
be not tiie box but the mission. How 
to deal with the tension between the 
development agency's short-term use 
as a political tool and its long-term 
use for the elusive purpose known as 
development? La a global economy 
vastly different from the one in which 
tbe agency was born, which tasks 
should be reserved to national aid and 
which left to tbe international banks or 

private agencies? 

Mr. Helms’s spokesman describes 
the White House position on reform as 
a “victory” for his boss. His remark 
illustrates the partisanship that has 
made the Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee chairman rely on political 
numbers rather than on broad con- 
sultation to move his ideas forward. 


world were gathering to celebrate Pass- 
over and retell the story of the Exodus 
from Egypt. Exodus was not just about 
leaving Egypt It was about coming to 


rabbis in Israel might be able to convert 
people to Judaism, it was offering them 
hope of equal religious status with the 


Judaism is considered legitimate. “The 
moment one group uses the coercive 
power of the state to force a conception 
of Jewishness on the whole society, it 
means man y other Jews will not feel at 
home,” argues Mr. HalbertaL himself a 


Israel and building a Jewish homeland. Orthodox, and an equal set of keys to religious Jew. “In the long run, such a 
More than at any time in its modem the gates of Israel. move would destroy both Judaism and 


More than at any time in its modem 
history, die meaning of Israel as a Jew- 
ish homeland is up for grabs. For 
friends of Israel, this is no time for a 
phony unity. This is a time for taking 
sides. This is a time for using your 
money, or your pen, or your political 
clout or your body to make sure you are 
helping to build an Israel that you would 
want your own children to live in. 

The secular Israeli government has 
always given the Orthodox parties and 
rabbinate de facto authority to regulate 
all religious affairs and conversions in 
Israel. Reform and Conservative rabbis 
had no standing. But in 1995 the Israeli 
Supreme Court opened the way for 
challenges to the Orthodox monopoly, 
particularly on conversions. 

That was hugely important, because 
under Israel’s Law of Return any Jew is 
eligible for automatic citizenship. So 
when the Israeli Supreme Court sug- 
gested that Reform and Conservative 


The Orthodox parties responded by 
striking a deal with Benjamin Netan- 
yahu: They would support his election, 
and he would support a new law — 
which has just passed its first reading in 
the Knesset — establishing Orthodox 
rabbis as the only body authorized to 


tween Israel's Orthodox parties and 
die other streams of Judaism, and be- 
tween those who want to see the peace 
process advanced and thosewhowam 

it frozen. Things will get uglier before 

* OvedSin all this legal brouhaha . 
was the fact that Chaim Herzog, the 
former president, died of a hearty 




, for A 

Out tl 


..... 


«. K * 


“■SSrS-i observed ^ : 

a^S ^“n of a great rabbi,h= fought the 


perform conversions in Israel, and ef- 
fectively de legitimizing Reform and 


fectively de legitimizing Reform and 
Conservative Judaism. 

This law, argues the Israeli philoso- 
pher Moshe Halbertal, “raises the 
question of what sort of Israel are we 
going to have.” Will it be “a narrowly 
defined Jewish state or a broadly 
defined borne for all Jews”? 

Given the radical diversity of how 
Jews relate to their religion — whether 
they are Conservative, Reform, Modern 
Orthodox, ultra-Orthodox, Retigious- 
Ziooist or secular — Israel cannot be 
both a home for all Jews and a Jewish 
state where only the Orthodox stream of 


rituals that have no meaning and breed 
resentment. Orthodox Judaism has a 
proud tradition. It doesn’t need co- 
ercive state power to appeal to Jews." 

What this religious dispute and the 
political scandal involving Mr. Net- 
anyahu have in common is that they are 
rooted in a disregard for the balances 
and red lines necessary to bold Israeli 
society and world Jewry together. 

Mr. Netanyahu escaped indictment, 
but the attorney general's report made 
clear that the prime minister and his 
advisers engaged in some very sus- 
picious behavior. 

I fear that in his weakened political 
state Mr. Netanyahu will only rely 
more heavily on his core ultranation- 


alist and ultra-Orthodox supporters. 
This would only widen the splits be- 


Nazis alongside die British, served as 
chief of Israel’s militaty intelligence, 
defended Israel against charges equat- 
ing Zionism with racism at die urn tea 
Nations. His passing reminds us how . 
for Israel's leadership elite has fallen 
since that founding generation. We are 

in the age of midgets. 

That means that all die little people 
have to stand taller. In the Passover 

service there is a line repeated each year 
that reads: In every generation you 
should feel as though you yourself have 
gone forth from Egypt (to Israel]. 
Amen. Every friend of Israel today must 

help ensure that Israel’s uniqueness 
does not get lost in its current desert of 
moral and spiritual leadership. 

The New York Times. 






- r-r .■i.'rft' bet'M 


High Time to Dig Up and Examine the Cambodian Genocide 


N EW YORK — The faces 
linger in memory, rows and 


i. v linger in memory, rows and 
rows of mug shots taken on entry 
to the prison, men. women and 
even small children. The women 
wear their hair chopped at tbe 
neck and are dressed in dark 
pajamas. Many of the men are 
bare-chested and draped in a 
Khmer scarf. Their faces show 
that they know what is to come. 

Sixteen thousand of these 


By Tina Rosenberg 


people entered Tuol Sleng. tiie 
Khmer Rouse's secret police 


people. Most of those murdered 
had their heads bashed in with a 
hoe to save bullets. 

Many of the killing fields do 
have small monuments. The 
most prominent, Choeung Ek 
outside Phnom Penh, has a glass 
to wer filled with skulls and open 
pits where visitors can see bits 
of bone and clothing. Choeung 


Khmer Rouge's secret police 
prison, from 1975 to 1979. 

There are two places in the 
world to see the rows of faces 
today. One is on the walls of 
Tuol Sleng in Phnom Penh, 
which is now Cambodia's gen- 
ocide museum. The other is at 
www.yale.edu/cgp. the new 
Web site of Yale's Cambodian 
Genocide Pro gram , an organi- 
zation initially financed tty the 
U.S. Congress to gather evi- 
dence for international trials of 
Khm er Rouge leaders. 

Cambodia has so far done 
tittle to deal with the ravages of 
the Khmer Rouge, who killed a 
fifth of die nation's 8 million 


Ek was the burial ground for the 
prisoners of Tuol Siena. 


prisoners of Tuol Sleng. 

The prison is a former high 
school. The classrooms-turned- 
torture chambers are preserved 
largely as they were in 1979, 
with floors still stained with 
blood. Inmates were Khmer 
Rouge cadres or soldiers and 
their families, some the top 
leaders. Two classrooms up- 
staiis are stuffed with 4.000 
confessions that prisoners 
wrote under months of torture, 
absurd admissions to spying for 
various foreign agencies. 

Cambodia has had no trials or 
truth commissions. History 
books stop at 1960. Post-trau- 
matic stress is epidemic, yet 


therapy is virtually unknown. 

Against this silence, the 
Cambodian Genocide Pro- 
gram’s contributions assume 
special importance. Research- 
ers discovered documents that 
appear to establish a chain of 
command from Pol Pot on down 
for some of the killings, crucial 
for convicting top leaders. 

The program's Internet site, 
which may be accessible in 
Cambodia at the end of the 
month, will allow people to put 
names to the photosand read the 
documents, which include bio- 
graphies of thousands of 
Khmer Rouge leaders and re- 
cords from prison camps. 

Progr am researchers have es- 
tablished a documentation cen- 
ter in Phnom Penh, now run by 
Cambodians. They are mapping 
mass graves all over the country. 
They have run a two-year sum- 
mer school for lawyers, judges 
and forensic investigators, com- 
plete with a mock trial. 

Cambodia’s reluctance to 
deal with the past stems in part 


from the nature of the Khmer 
Rouge regime. It murdered not 
only ethnic minorities but all 
potential opposition — anyone 
who questioned, even anyone 
who wore glasses. When it was 
overthrown in 1979 by a Vi- 
etnamese invasion, few edu- 
cated Cambodians had survived. 
Amid such devastation, Cam- 
bodians lack the skills and the 
resources to deal with tbe past 
The other reason is politics. 
When the Khmer Rouge were 
overthrown, they retained a 
powerful guerrilla army; it is 
weaker today but still led by an 
apparently unre formed Pol Pot 
Various politicians formed al- 
liances with them against the 
Vietnamese-backed regime. Tbe 
government is still trying to lure 
Khmer Rouge leaders to defect 
In the last two years. Cam- 
bodian leaders have increased 
their falls for an international 
tribunal to try the top Khmer 
Rouge leaders, although they 
have not yet made the needed 
official request to die United 
Nations. Polls show that the 
vast majority of Cambodians 


support such trials and want the, 
international community to ac-* 
knowledge their suffering. j 
There are still obstacles.; 


Cambodia's judicial system,; 
like the rest of its eoverarnent,;. 


like the rest of its government,; 
is poisoned by venality and in-; 
efficiency. The United Nations? 
seems to be suffering tribunal* 
fatigue, and most Khmer Rouge? 
leaders are at large. The United' 
Nations should support an in-’ 
te manorial commission of in-, 
quiry, which could lay the foun- 
dations for a tribunal. 


Sr* sows 


Even 18 years later, anything- 
at can heh> Cambodia work,** 


that can help Cambodia work- 
through its trauma is welcome * 
Doctors in California know 
of 150 Cambodian refugee 
women who went blind during' 
the Khmer Rouge regime for nd 
detectable physical reason. 
They were overwhelmed with; 
pain that they were forbidden 
even to whisper about. Their' 
minds apparently chose to ab* 1 
sorb no more. In a society 
blocked from expressing n&\ 
trauma, the body politic can- 
ravage itself as welL ’ *■ 

The New York Times. - " 


- r 

-rf L 




.-.y; 

-.-y 


The West Is Turning Its Back on Opposition Figures in China 


W ASHINGTON — Tong 
Yi is a woman of remark - 


▼ V Yi is a woman of remark- 
able courage. In late 1993 and 
early 1994 she spent a few 
months working as a research 
assistant to China’s most prom- 
inent dissident. Wei Jingsheng. 
For that, tbe Chinese authorities 
threw her. then 26, into a labor 
camp, where she was beaten and 
mistreated in other ways. Upon 
her recent release, she was sent 
into internal exile in Wuhan. 

Patrick Tyler of The New 
York Times tracked her down 
there and found that, because 
police won’t reissue her nation- 
al identity card, she cannot 
work, and because she has no 
passport, she cannot travel. 
“You are an egg, and we are a 
rock,’ * police officers have 
warned her. 

“You can beat me to death. 
but I am not afraid," she says 
she replied Sbe spoke of a new 


By Fred Hiatt 


understanding of Alexander 
Solzhenitsyn and his writings 
about the Soviet gulag. 

Mr. Solzhenitsyn became a 
household name in the West, or 


something close to it, in a way 
that no Chinese dissident can 


claim today. 

Wei Jingsheng was a leader of 
China's small democracy move- 
ment in 1979, and was thrown in 
jail until 1993. When freed, he 
immediately resumed his activ- 
ism, although malnutrition had 
cost him his health and many of 
his teeth. After seven months be 
was thrown in jail again, and 
there he remains today. 

Why is the Sakharov of 
China less known and honored 
elsewhere than was Andrei 
Sakharov himself? 

The Chinese authorities tol- 
erate more pluralism, in some 


ways, than did the Soviet KGB. 
More students are permitted to 
travel abroad, and internal travel 
is less restricted. The official 
green light to quasi -capitalism 
has created spaces for people to 
lead private fives, relatively un- 
touched by party or politics. 

But Chinese officials do not 
allow even tbe minimal space 
for writing or meeting with for- 
eigners, which some Soviet dis- 
sidents at times enjoyed. “All 
public dissent against tiie party 
and government was effectively 
silenced,” the U.S. State De- 
partment said in its recent annual 
report on human rights in China. 
“No dissidents were known to 
be active at year’s end.” 

Pan of tbe answer in America 
may be racism, or Eurocentrism 
or unfamiliarity with Chinese 
culture. Chinese names are dif- 


ficult for many Americans. And 
ethnic Chinese in America are 
not, on the whole, great advo- 
cates fra freedom for their 
brethren in the old country. 

Ethnic minorities and captive 
nations made human rights in the 
Soviet Union a domestic U.S. 
political issue — Jews, Lithuani - 
ans, Ukrainians. Armenians. In 
that sense, Chinese dissidents 
are unlucky that neither Tibetan- 
Americans nor Uighur- Americ- 
ans comprise noticeable voting 
blocs in Chicago. New Jersey or 
California. 

Bui the biggest difference 
lies in American perceptions of 
the two countries: The Soviet 
Union was the enemy. China is 
a potential market 

You would never have had so 
many former cabinet secretaries 
working for American busi- 
nesses seeking work in Moscow 


China-related businesses no 
doubt would argue that this for- 
mulation is backward — that 


ZK>7 u.i: \ 

tai i in- 


human rights a key plank or 
U.S. policy precede and do noC 
result from their financial ip* 
te rests. They do what they do 
precisely because China is noj 


an enemy; it does not need cod- m 

fninino rliH tho Ciwiikt f Ini«n r '« 


as top officials now enlisted in 
the China trade. You might not 


taining. as did the Soviet Utrion^ 
but rather as much commercial; 
engagement as possible. ' 7 

But an active human rights 
policy makes sense no matter 
where you think China *i£ 
headed.. •> 

If China is bound to develdp 
into an authoritarian, hegemon^ 
istic rival of the United Stated? 
then certainly we have nothing 
to lose by prodding it on human, 
rights. But if, as the engagers 
main tain — and let us hope they 
are right — China can evolve, 
into a more democratic, more 


•JSTi-i v-..- 

^frwrxrx: 

C 715 ; 5 ., 


(HESS 


Where Is Britain’s Blair Headed? 


have tolerated a top American 
negotiator op Soviet matters 

in the^Russian field^hi^still 


cooperative, more prosperous 
nation, then it makes all the. 


Bv 


L ONDON — It is a near 
certainty that Tony Blair 


JL_/ certainty that Tony Blair 
will be Britain's next prime 
minister. So. who is he? 

He is 43, educated at private 
schools and St John's College, 
OxfonL a barrister who 
entered Parliament in 1983. 
and just 11 years later was 
elected leader of the Labour 


Bv Anthonv Lewis 


and a feat of political lead- 


ership. Mr. Blair has kept the 
old Labour left virtually si- 


Party. 

The question is what be 
stands for. Are there prin- 


ciples for which he will fight 
as a political leader? 

The Labour Party once bad 
strong ideological* commit- 
ments. Ir was closely tied to 
labor unions. It favored public 
spending on social programs, 
and high taxes on the well-to- 
do. Although some in the 
patty objected over the years, 
nationalization of major in- 
dustries remained pan of La- 
bour's program. 

In his three years as leader. 
Mr. Blair has swept away 
those commitments. The con- 
nection with the unions has 
been frayed to the breaking 
point. The nationalization 
clause has been removed from 
the party’s constitution. 

Mr. Blair has promised not 
to increase taxes during the 
life of the Parliament To be 
elected on May l.Hehascora- 
mined himself to maintaining 
the overall public spending 
limits of the present govern- 
ment fra the next two years. 

It has been an astounding 
political transformation — 


lent Prime Minister John Ma- 
jor had it right when he said 
the other day, “After 1 8 years 
in opposition they 're prepared 
to mask their convictions and 
hold their tongues.” 

The fact that the Conser- 
vatives have been in power for 
18 years is Mr. Blair’s biggest 
asset. They are shopworn and 
lagged with too many ex- 
amples of corrupt and sleazy 
behavior. Much of the public 
thinks it is time for a change. 

But Mr. Blair understands 
that the public is also afraid of 
change if it means going back 
to old Labour, tax and spend, 
union abuses. So what he of- 
fers in this election is really a 
better managed status quo. 

That is why many people 
wonder whether he has any 
real beliefs. Someone who has 
known him a long time says: 
“He's a barrister with a brief. 
And the brief is power.” 

He is compared to Bill Clin- 
ton. President Clinton called 
himself a New Democrat; Mr. 
Blair has renamed his party 
New Labour. As Mr. Clinton 
in last gear’s campaign tried to 
steal his opponents' clothes, 
so does Mr. Blair. As Mr. Clin- 
ton has cut away at civil liber- 
ties in the name of fighting 
crime, so has Mr. Blair talked 


of being “tough on crime.” 
The Clinton parallel may be 
good election tactics. It is what 
comes later — governing — 
that worries some people. 
David Marquand, a former 
moderate Labour MP who is 


conducting official talks, as the 
U.S. trade representative’s chief 
China negotiator is now doing 
In those days, too, plenty of 
people warned that concern for 
dissidents should not interfere 
with business, or with the “big 
questions” of U.S.-Soviet ties. 
But there also were more states- 


more sense to stick up for those 
Chinese who would push in tha& 
direction. 


- • 


principal of Mansfield Col- 
lege, Oxford, is one of the 


lege, Oxford, is one of the 
wisest political scholars in the 
country. Writing in the Times 


men free to speak up for die 
Sakharovs and Solzhenitsyns 
— and for a policy that linked 
trade and human rights. 

Former top officials active in 


Literary Supplement in Lon- 
don recently he said: 


As long as China’s dictators 
can keep Wei Jingsheng inpris- / 
on at little cost to themselvte ■ 
and their international standing,! 
they will surely keep right off 
doing so. Jf a few more out? 
siders remembered Mr. Wed, 
and Tong Yi, and let tfi£ 
Chinese know that they cared; it 
might bolster not only the disc 
sidents but also those . who 
would treat them more hu" 
manely. 

The Washington Post. ’T, 


— •** - 


^beb., 

3 =*l ' 

.. 


don recently he said: 

“As the dreadful Clinton 
experience has shown, impro- 
visation without a governing 
philosophy to hold it in check 
can easily degenerate into a 
shiftless, poll-driven oppor- 
tunism.” 

The latest polls show La- 
bour with a lead over the Con- 
servatives ranging from 14 to 
19 percentage points. That 
would mean a majority in die 
new Parliament of between 
roughly 80 and 190 seats. 
Most experts think that the 
margin will shrink by election 
day. but no one predicts any- 
thing but a Labour victory. 

One issue above all will test 
Mr. Blair's substance. That is 
Europe. Mr. Major has al- 
lowed British opinion to move 
alarmingly toward isolation- 
ism. even toward withdrawal 
from the European Union. 
The situation cries out for a 
leader who will persuade Bri- 
tons to accept once again the 
opportunity and the challenge 
of the European venture. 


* V, ,r' :• 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGQ\> 


1897: Old Minstrel Dies 


NEW-YORK— “Billy” Birch, 
the old time negro minstrel, died 


of paralysis, aged sixty-seven 

years. He was penniless, al- 


y wni ww, W" 

though be had made a fortune by 
making others laugh, from 
1844. when he was thirteen 
years old, until the close of tiie 
Old San Francisco Minstrels, 
Birch wras continuously in ser- 
vice. His first appearance was 
made in the town of New Hart- 
ford, where he was bom. and 
during his long career he rarely 
played what is known profes- 
sionally as a “white face" part 


Havana into an amber bolder 
and began to puff contentedly. 
Later, a blonde added to tfiei 
excitement by borrowing tbe cr- 'f 
gar from the elderly woman an<J c 

smoking it to the end That 
apparently satisfied with the 
sensation they had rang aH, both 
women called for brandy night- 
caps before their identity could 
be teamed. 


.V 

%-v : : - 


'SJMS-'ktdS- 

C ** *** 

Vs** AM 

• T. t. 

■ N.\ • ,,{'£*•*£ 
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i . . * ;■’? t 
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hk^P-r..- ;■ ■ in 


>>. . 

. ---A ,Vt. 


1947: Zionists 9 Suicide 




1922: Cigar Sensation 


The New York Tunes. 


P ARIS — Pans has haH plenty 
of shocks from tourists. Last 
night [April 21], while Giro’s 
was filled to stifling with Amer- 
ican visitors, even the waiters 
gasped when an elderly and 
matronly woman calmly called 
for a match, stuck a big black 


JERUSALEM — Moshe 
Barazani and Meir F eins tein. the 
two Jewish terrorists who woe 
jo have been executed today 
[April 22}. committed suicide 
late last night in Jerusalem Cefl* 
iral Prison. “They blew tbap- 
selves up,” a British official 
said. Last week, Irgun Zvai 
Leumi launched a campaign 
a §ainst the British with attacks 
on army personnel and install* 
ations in retaliation for the secret 
execution of Dov Bela Gruner 
and three others of its members. 


pi it , 

•8S , 4 ■ ,»• 

1 Hi 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1997 


PAGE 9 


'"V 


OPINION/LETTERS 


n l](.HX 


Hie incontrovertible truth that 
the Madrid summit meeting is 
obliged to deny is this: NATO 
with Russia inside its ranks is no 
longer Russia joining 

NATO mi ght bring many won- 
derful things, but NATO would 


It 9 s Time for Americans 
To Get Out the Atlas 

By Jim Hoagland 

ASHINGTON — My fel- 

▼ ▼ low Americans, you and 
your neighbor have no doubt 
been _ body whether 

American troops should . promise 
to die for Ljubljana, Taffinn and 
Bucharest if need be. No? Don’t 
waxy. Your political leaders and 
the i f diplomatic advisers are ' 
thrashing it out for you. In July, 

; they will let you in cm their dis- 
\ cussions aod decisions, which you 
! * then get to pay for and fatfiii 
" Relatively few Americans ’ 

. even find the capitals of Slovenia, 

* Estonia and R omania on a m« p t 
much less feel comfortable de- 
ciding how much UJ5. protection 

• these countries need and when 
|! they will need it. So the debate 
‘ over NATO expansion mtn Cen- 

■ tral Europe has beat limttwt to 

■ America’s political and policy- 
1 making elites — "the dbattering 

classes," as a State Department 
memo writer derisively charac- 
terized them recently. 

That changes in July, when the 
16 NATO members gather in 
Madrid to choose three or more 
candidate-members and to issue a 
- statement solemnly declaring that 
the lucky first few will not be the 
last new members. A new wave of 
.expansion will be decided latex. 

Even Russian membership in 
NATO will not be ruled out in 
that statement, which will be 
crafted with the intent to lie to the 
Russians, to the world public and 
even to the governments making 
that statement. 


no longer be the military defen- 
sive organization creased to pre- 
vent or halt an attack on Europe 
from the Kremlin. 

Moreover, major European 
members of the alliance, led by 
Germany, have marie it clear to 
Washington privately that they 
will never permit Russia to join. 
These Europeans fear that amah- 
ting Russia as a full member 
would create an Aznerican-Rus- 
sian dual hegemony over Europe 
inside NATO; Yalta H, for short. 
- The cover for the Madrid de- 
ception on Russia is that the fu- 
ture cannot be predicted: NATO 
and Russia may both change so 
radically that their military goals 
will coincide in the future. My 
view: Russia we can’t know 
about, but we can be sure that the 
Clinton administration is chan- 
ging NATO into something new 
that most Americans will not rec- 
ognize and possibly not support. 

The strategic incoherence that 
exists at the . core of the current 
NATO expansion strategy has 
become clearer as the pre-Mad- 
rid discussions have degenerated 
into a numbers game. 

Russia has .acquiesced to 
NATO membership for the 
Czech Republic, Hungary and 



Poland. But NATO officials are 
being pushed to take in one or 
two more in this first wave. The 
most active candidates are the 
ex-Yugoslav republic of Slov- 
enia and Romania, which is 
strongly supported by France. 

There is not much real debate 
over whether these countries 
qualify for membership: Slovenia 
clearly does. Romania does only 
with a stretch. But there is debate 
ova- the political meaning of the 
size of the initial expansion. 

Here U.S. diplomacy seems to 
follow (unconsciously) the Ern- 
est Hemingway theory of work: 
Always stop writing while you 
still have something to say. That 
way yon know where you will 
start tiie next day. 

Slovenia and Romania could 
be kept waiting as the obvious 


candidates for an easy second 
wave of expansion that would 
not upset Moscow. Thai would 
kick down the road once again 
the thornier question of NATO 
membership for former Soviet 
republics such as Estonia, 
Utaaine and even Russia. 

France’s strategy may be the 
opposite: Take in five now, in- 
cluding Romania as a represen- 
tative of the B alkans , to assure 
Russia that expansion is a one- 
shot exercise. That meets Mo- 
scow’s de man d to exclude the 
Baltics and Ukraine and eases its 
humiliation over expansion. 

This is not Hemingway. This 
is Alice-in-Wonderiand stuff, 
created by the evasions and in- 
consistencies of an expansion 
strategy built on domestic polit- 
ical imperatives. Having reaped 


the votes of 1996 that were de- 
cided by his stand on NATO ex ■ 
pansion. President Bill Clinton 
leaves it to his aides to pick up the 
pieces at Madrid. 

Those aides are already plan- 
ning a vigorous selling campaign 
post-Madrid to convince Amer- 
icans to buy the new improved 
NATO, through Senate ratifica- 
tion of amendments to the al- 
liance treaty. 

That is when you and your 
neighbors get to gaze at NATO’s 
proposed new borders and decide 
if you want to guarantee them 
into perpetuity . or go back on the 
solemn pledges made in your 
name by Bill Clinton. Jacques 
Chirac and the others. By then 
you will have no other choice. 
And that will be no accident 

The Washington Post. 


Big Issues Drowned Out 
In the Din of Israeli Life 


By Robert B. Goldmann 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Vice Squad 


Regarding “ Clinton's Take on 
His Crusade Against Vice: Its far 
the Children" ( April 7): 

The writer does not sound en- 
thusiastic about what he calls Bill 
Clinton’s “assault on vice." He 
seems to question the president’s 
motives. 

I think Mr. Clinton's actions 
against die liquor, tobacco and 
illegal drug industries are most 
welcome. Statistics show a direct 
correlation between the use of 
these addictive substances and 
many of society’s ills: disease. 


death and crime, to name bat a 
few. 

Well done, Mr. President! This 
liberal supports you all the way. 

MARIAN KUHNS. 

Bembtidge, England. 

Regarding “The War on Smug- 
ness in pie Anti-Drug Fight" 
(Opinion,' April 10) by A.M. 
Rosenthal: 

I am a faithful reader and 
a dmi r er of Mr.. Rosenthal’s 
columns, but he makes a great 
error in fighting the so-called le- 
galization of drags. 

Drug addiction is a disease and 


not a crime. It is. medically speak- 
ing. almost impossible to stop 
mice you arc hooked. 

Then, how do yon pay for the 
staff? There are two main pos- 
sibilities: prostitution or crime. 
The latter involves stealing 
money or becoming a drug dealer, 
keeping some for yourself and se- 
ducing more and more people to 
become addicts — a vicious cycle 
that is corrupting America. 

Heroin is very cheap; con- 
trolled free distribution is the only 
way to stop the drag war, as the 
enormous pressure on addicts to 
clone new addicts will stop, just as 


the exponential growth of neigh- 
borhood crime and worldwide 
drag cartels will slop. 

America needs a surgeon gen- 
eral who understands that drug 
addiction is a disease, not a 
crime. 

WILLIAM KONIGSBERGER. 

Geneva. 

Refogee Children 

Regarding “Rwanda Refugees: 
Not Just Victims ?" ( April 14): 

This article about Rwandan 
refugees in Zaire lends new 
meaning to the term "deadbeat 


dads" and turned my stomach. 

The writer found a “consid- 
erable number of strapping young 
men who look fit, healthy and 
well-fed." One of these men said 
he ate first when his family got 
food, and his children are wasting 
away before his eyes. 

I can imagine the constraints 
that aid workers are working un- 
der, but there should be an in- 
ternational outcry over the plight 
of these children. Isn’t there some 
way to see to it that the children 
are fed first? 

MARGARET ANN DOTY. 

Griesheim, Germany 


M OSHAV BENAYA. Israel 
— Hammers, cranes, hard 
hats, half-finished highway over- 
passes, traffic jams, cellular 
phones, new malls and office 
parks, Russian mixed with 
Hebrew and English ... 

The political situation that 
grabs the world’s attention can’t 
be felt by the visitor as he is 
plunged into the fast, loud, trying- 
to-do-everything-at-once every- 

MEANWHILE 

day life of Israel. Do Israeli Jews 
worry less than Jews in America 
about Israel's fate? It’s a question 
this American Jew thinks about as 
he detaches himself from the usu- 
al political arguments and plunges 
into the life of the country. Or is he 
just overwhelmed by the restless 
enterprise that is building here? 

As acquaintances are renewed 
and old ones made, it becomes 
clear that there’s no way to char- 
acterize Israeli Jews’ feelings 
about their country. Talking to a 
newspaper reporter, the visitor 
quicldy drops back into a familiar 
conversation about the deterior- 
ation of the peace process. Talk- 
ing to moderately observant Jews, 
he hears them complain about in- 
cursions into their way of life by 
the minority of ultra-Orthodox 
Jews. T alking to a police recruiter, 
he listens to her discuss family, 
friends and the difficulties of find- 
ing qualified job applicants. 

Delving deeper into what con- 
cerns Israeli Jews, their differ- 
ences become more evident. 

’ ’Netanyahu is killing the peace 
process" ... “I don’t know 
whether there will ever be real 
peace, in fact I doubt it, but this 
guy Netanyahu is making sure 
there won’t be" ... "Don’t say 
anything bad about Bibi, he is 
doing the right thing. Under Rabin 
and Peres we would soon have 
lost the whole country" ... “Why 
should we crust Arafat any more 
today than before, when he was 
killing our children, and don’t tell 
me he is against Hamas, they’re 
all the same." 

Hammers, cranes, hard hats, 
half-finished highway overpasses, 
traffic jams, cellular phones, new 
malls and office paries, Russian 
mixed with Hebrew and English, 
shawl-covered Hassidim waiting 
to cross the street as sinning 
drivers rush by ... 


Is the pulse of growth and de- 
velopment affected by these dif- 
fering Israeli feelings? On a 
macro scale, probably. But the 
visitor can't judge macro matters. 
He can see only what goes on in 
the streets, or in the stores, where 
he finds more domestic products 
than the last time he visited. 

It seems that the seemingly in- 
soluble problems in domestic and 
foreign affairs and what happens 
at ground level are two different 
worlds. But not quite. Whar is 
more like it is that all Israeli Jews 
are concerned wife these "lar- 
ger" issues, but with different de- 
grees of intensity. 

The academician, journalist, 
politician, religious leader lives 
and breathes big issues. The Rus- 
sian immigrant who has estab- 
lished a successful business is vis- 
ibly enjoying his success: he has 
little time to think about politics. 
The police recruiter comes across 
as one of those solid, clear- 
minded people who give both 
family and job the care and com- 
mitment that come naturally to 
them, and to whom politics are 
real but far from consuming. 

Hammers, cranes, hard hats, 
half-finished highway over- 
passes. traffic jams, cellular 
phones, new malls and office 
parks, Russian mixed with 
Hebrew and English, Hassidim 
trying to keep their distance from 
teenage girls in tight jeans and 
those clunky shoes that are the fad 
the world over ... 

Then you remember: Even as 
arguments rage about the impend- 
ing breakdown of the peace pro- 
cess. about security, about irre- 
concilable dashes in the Knesset, 
even about another war, no one 
talks any more about the Arabs 
trying to push Israel into the sea. 
Somehow, whatever the name of 
the prime minister or the nature 
of the governing coalition, 
something has happened that 
mak es this Passover visit different 
from all other visits. 

Hammers, cranes, hard hats, al- 
most-finished highway over- 
passes, longer traffic jams, more 
cellular phones, more malls and 
office paries ... and the sense that 
it's here to stay. 

The author, who represents the 
Anti-Defamation League, con- 
tributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


BOOKS 


RESIDENT ALIEN: 

The New York Diaries 

§y Quentin Crisp. 232 pages. $21 $5. 
Alyson 

Reviewed by Jonathan Yardley 

Q UEbHTN CRISP is an international 
treasure. Now in the second half of 
*4iis ninth decade. Crisp is any number of 
things, all of them engaging: a writer of 
winy, lucid books and journalism; an 
actor in character roles for art-house 
films; a performance artist whose ait is 
bxmself; a habitat of whatever level of 
society happens to present itself to him, 
whether it be very high er very low; a 
roaster practitioner of public relations 
and self-mocking self promotion; and, 
underlying all of these, a homosexual 


who long ago chose to don the most 
outre raiment as both a bold declaration 
of his inherent differentness and a shield 
against the world's cruelties. 

Crisp was bran in England more than 
87 years ago and made his reputation 
there, but in 1972 — "at an age when 
most people decide to go into a nursing 
home" — he fled the chilly, repressed 
climate of his native land and took up 
residence on the Lower East Side of 
Manhattan, "in one room in a rooming 
house on the same block as a group of 
Hell’s Angels.” 

Crisp loves Americans, and for rea- 
sons that many of his fellow Britons 
deplore: "their belief that personality is 
the greatest power on earth," their in- 
nocence and openness and naiVetd, even 
their "short attention spans.” Many 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


G ARRY KASPAROV beat Jodit 
Polgar in Round 9 in the Linares 
International Tournament. 

The Taimanov Variation of the Si- 
.Vjlian Defense, introduced by 4-_Nc6, 
features a restrained, flexible pawn for- 
mation that does not yield an early object 
rif attack 

Black has the option of adopting a 
Scheveningen Variation with 8~d6, but 
the characteristic Taimanov move, 
8^Bb4, hopes to drive White onto the 
defensive by threatening to win the e4 
pawn. The well-tried 9 Na4!? ignores 
that ready to quash 9.. Ne4 by 10 Nc6 
Qc6 11 Nb6 Rb8 12 Qd4 Bf8 13 Bf3 
with great positional superiority, no 
matti-y what Blade plays. 

—After 11 c4!?, it is still dangerous to 
rake the offered pawn. Thus, 1 I.-Ne4 12 
' Nc6 be 13 Qd4 Nf6 14 Nb6 Rb8 15 c5 
yields White a promising bind. 

.After ll..ri6 12 f3, the traps of the 
opening have been bypassed and White 
lias a slight positional advantage. 

■ ‘ Polgar could not shake off Kasparov’s 
dominant knig ht with 16...Nd7 because 
T7 Nd5! ed 18 cd Nb8 19 dc Nrf gives 

White the bishop pair with superiority in 
POUMMBLACK 


and mobility. But after 16~.Qb8 
17 b5 Be8 18 a4 Nd7, Polgar got hex 
wished-for exchange of knights with 1 9 
Nd7 Rd7, for otherwise die might have 
obtained & satisfactory blockade of the 
queenside with 20._Nc5. 

Polgar’s 23...ab was an intended piece 
of cleverness that backfired. She surely 
locked toward 24 Bg7 b4! 25 Qb2 Ra4 
26 Bf8 Qc5 27 Kg2 Bf8, activating two 
powerful bishops and achieving a grip 
on the dark squares. And she was getting 
a bishop and passed pawn fra: her rook. 

Bat Kasparov crossed her up with a 
nice pawn sacrifice, 24 cbl, the point 
being that after 24...Qc3 25 Rc3 Ra4 26 
Rc7>, he had to recover his material, 
establishing an outride passed pawn, 
while too many black pieces were 
bottled up on the Iringride. 

Kasparov was not taken in by Polgar’s 
sly 26..J3g5; be avoided 27.~Rd4! 28 
Rd4 Be3 by the no-nonsense 27 B£2. 

Kasp arov paid no attention to Pol- 
gar’s 32...g5, but just kept the black 
Iringride pieces in a box with 33 f5! 

Polgar’s 36-.d5 was desperate, but 
her back-rank situation was untenable. 

With 39~Bb5, Polgar was hoping to 
play on after 40 Rf8 Rbl, but Kasparov 
tied that chance with 40 Bb5! Rd841 
3, winning a piece. Polgar gave up. 


SICILIAN DEFENSE 



WMt» 

Easp*ov 


Kuptiv Polgar 


Position after ... 38 IBM 


1 

b4 

C5 

21 

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35 

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18 

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38 

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17 

66 

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19 

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38 

Rcc8 

BbS 

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40 

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41 

Bd3 

Resigns 


Americans imagine themselves resi- 
dents of a country where difference and 
eccentricity are frowned upon, but in 
Crisp’s experience it is the very soul of 
tolerance. He tells about standing on 
Third Avenue, dressed in all the out- 
landish raiment and facial makeup that 
are his trademarks: 

"A black gentleman walked by. 
When he noticed me, he said, ‘Well, my 1 
You've got it all on today.' And he was 
laughing. In London, people stood with 
their faces six inches from mine and 
hissed, 'Who do you think you are?* 
What a stupid question. It must have 
been obvious that I didn’t think I was 
anybody else.” 

AH be wants. Crisp says, "is to be 
accepted by other people without bev- 
eling down my individuality to please 
them." This is by no means an un- 
reasonable request It is because so 
many New Yorkers and other Amer- 
icans have been willing to accept Crisp 
on his own terms that he has been happy 
there, if * ‘happy ’ ’ in his fashion, and it is 
this mood that permeates these diaries, 
written between 1990 and 1994. Die 
tide is taken both from Crisp's legal 
status here and from "Resident Alien." 
a documentary movie about his life in 
these United States, and obviously 
refers as well to the “alien" image that 
has been so essential to his lifelong 
strategy of self-defense. 

For years Crisp has made a big show 
out of being the most campy gay ca- 
ricature imaginable; be has gotten a lot 
of mileage out of it. It is, in fact, a 
wonderfully subtle and funny act Bur 
there is at its heart what can only be 
called a deep sadness, which finds ex- 
pression in various ways. 

Crisp is a relic from a bygone age, and 
the plaintiveness of his comments may 
not sit well with younger homosexuals 
whose public efforts are directed at mak- 
ing the rest of us understand how much 
they are like us instead of how much 
they differ from us. Yet coming to terms 
with being different — with feeling one- 
self an outcast, whatever the reason for it 
— is a passage through which many 
people must go, and as a result I suspect 
that Crisp's intimations of inner anguish 
will strike familiar notes for others who 
do not happen to be homosexual. . 

But to emphasize this poignant side of 
"Resident Alien" is to misrepresent it, 
for mostly it is Crisp at his irreverent and 
witty best It is a dizzying chronicle of 
his ceaseless activity: reading, the theat- 
er and films, parties, travels, lunches and 
dinners, television appearances — all of 
it directed toward maintaining "my 
shaky hold on the high life." 

The famous, the almost-famous and 
the mercifully obscure pass through 
these pages in a long procession that 
tarns out to be. at its end. a human 
comedy of hilarious dimensions. Crisp 
is at once bemused, dispassionate ob- 
server and gleeful participant; “I am 
never bored,’’ he advises us, “but, be- 
cause of my great age, I am occasionally 
exhausted." 


Jonathan Yardley is on the staff ofThe 
Washington Post . 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1997 
PAGE 10 




MJiii 


numlAiM 


From Nagara’s show, traditional woven and iridescent Thai fabrics given a couture spin ; a fruit-shaped evening purse in metalwork, and a traditional patterned straw basket. 







A High-Fashion Spin on Traditional Treasures of Thailand 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tnbunt 


P ARIS — It is only a humble 
straw basket. Yet its surface 
glows iridescent green with the 
fragments of beetles’ wings. 
Such intricate peasant handwork is 
symbolic of the treasures from Thai- 
land on display on the first floor of the 
Eiffel Tower, where the public is peer- 
ing into magnified showcases and 
gasping in wonder at the ultra-fine 
work of h uman hands. 

Keeping crafts alive is the mission of 
Queen Sinkit of Thailand, who visited 
Paris last week as part of the cele- 
brations for the 50th anniversary of the 
reign of her husband King Bhumibol 
AduJyadej. 

A fashion show of graceful dresses 
created from traditional fabrics by the 
court couturier Nagara and the opening 


of “Thailande: Tresors d' Artisans” 
(craftwork treasures! both showed the 
fruits of the effort Queen Sirikit has put 
into her crafts foundation. Support. De- 
signed to encourage artisanal skills. Sup- 
port was set up in 1976. to help the rural 
poor supplement meager incomes by 
drawing on peasant dolls. It has de- 
veloped as a way of preserving arts and 
crafts threatened by the forward march 
of mass production and technology. 

The exhibition is also intended as a 
showcase for Thai crafts, including an- 
cient museum artifacts alongside the 
current work, so that a traditional lac- 
querwork betel-leaf service or vivid 
theatrical masks might be shown be- 
side modem pieces. The current cre- 
ations are intended for museums or for 
use by the court, rather than as high- 
class tourist souvenirs, but some are put 
on sale in specialist stores to emphasize 
that craft is a living skill. 


“The object of the exhibition is to 
make people understand the culture 
and to r ealize that these objects were 
not bom like that — they are part of a 
long tradition.” says Doctor Smitthi 
Siribhadra, the curator, who accom- 
panied Bernadette Chirac, wife of the 
French president, along with Queen 
Sirikit and her daughter, at the Paris 
opening. 

The public is transfixed by the show- 
iest pieces in stiver and gold and the 
grotesque painted faces on theatrical 
masks. 

But Siribhadra says that the object 
that touches him most is not the mag- 
nificent stiver elephani or the extraor- 
dinary figured metalwork sculptures 
representing the footprints of Buddha. 
It is rather the juxtaposition of a recent 
lotus-flower ceramic creation with an 
ancient lotus-shaped oil lamp from the 
14th-century Sukhothai period. 


“It proves that something of our 
culture rests in our soul ,’ 1 Siribhadra 
says of that serendipitous pairing. 

Thai same spirit was shown at the 
opening reception by die floral 
carvings in fresh fruit, with a young 
wo man turning a watermelon into hi- 
biscus flowers to decorate the party. 
They echoed the metal evening purses 
in the exhibition in the shape of ba- 
nanas. papayas and exotic fruit, made 
of niello with gold and silver surface 
decoration. 


A T the opening ceremony was 
Erik Mortensen, Paris cou- 
turier to Queen Sirikit and 
her court for 37 years, since 
her first state visit, when he was as- 
sistant to Pierre Balmain. Mortensen 
has continued the connection through 
his career at Balmain and at Jean-Louis 
Schemer, where he still maintains a 


studio. He reminisced with the em- 
broiderer Francois Lesage about their 
joint creations using the beetle-wing 

Whniqiv, 

Queen Sirikit's dresses on display at 
the Eiffel Tower include a jacket on 
which the embroidery traces die pat- 
terns of Mudmee, an ancient fabric 
technique, and other distinctive Thai 
effects, like the ikat-style tie-dyes. 

A high-fashion element was also dis- 
played in the show staged by Nagara 
S amhanriarflska, a 41-year-old Thai 
couturier, whose studies at fashion 
school in England and whose interest in 
Japanese culture produced an in- 
triguing Asian hybrid. Under the dome 
of Au Printemps department store in 
Paris, and in front of Queen Sirikit and 
an audience that included East-meets- 
West designer Kenzo, Nagara showed 
his collection. 

“I am inspired by my culture and I 


try to show that, working with ail kinds 
of silk,” said Nagara, who has a 
hwitirpift in Bangkok. Some of his ex- 
clusive fabrics, which he uses for in- 
terior decoration as well as fashion, are 
on sale at Bloomingdale’s in New 
York. 

Fabrics were the star of the Pans 
presentation, where simple shapes, like 
side-split dresses overpins, tunics with 
folk-weave patterns and jackets where 
tie-dye effects bled inky shadows on a 
red ground, all displayed a sophisticated 
elaboration on ethnic roots. 

Ear-piece jewelry, spiky head-dec- 
oration and models with arms held out 
added to the sense of drama. But the 
most striking effects were in the crafts- 
manship that can turn beetle wings into 
a jewel of an evening gown. 


" Thailande ; Tresors d Artisans' 
the Eiffel Tower until May 25. 




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From left: Dolce & Gabbana’s flower-pattern sandals; Ferragamo’s “ Evita " wedge: D&G's wood-sole sandal. 


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33 'Dies ' 

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threw 

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84 Guy’s date 
57 "Stop" sign 
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part 

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b Mount of — — 
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11 Operating 
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12 Skyrocket 

is The King * 

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the wind 
ift Ugandan 
dictator 

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24 Where Provo is 

25 invited 

26 English 
dramatist 
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27 Supped at home 

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32 infatuate 
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37 Exceptional, as 
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48 Religion Of 
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Clockwise from top left: Christian Lacroixs coin-decorated thong sandal; Kickers’ Neoprene wedge-heel mule; ’• 
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33 Snappish 
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International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — High off the ground 
they walk. But instead of the 
familiar click! clack! of the 
ladylike high-heel shoe, there is 
a stomping thud. The platform sole, the 
wedge heel and the mule have staged a 
fashionable comeback. 

Shoes for spring and summer are 
heavy. Even the high-bed sandal, held 
to the foot with a couple of straps, tends 
to stand on a built-up sole and sturdy 
heel. For those used to daintierfootwear, 
let’s call it the thin end of the wedge. 

The most popular sandals are rock 
solid: a Chinese platform-sole style 
where the base is as thick as a club 
sandwich, and the wedge shoe, where a 
triangular slab-of-cbeese lifts the heel 
off the ground. 

The one factor the hefty sandals have 
03 common is that they are pretty. Pretty? 
Yes, because instead of being made in 
plain leather, there are dozens of op- 
tions, from fruit-pastel suedes through 
jewel-color velvets and flower-paitem 
fabrics. And leather itself often conies 
decorated, tike the antique finishes and 
embossed flower patterns of Prada's 
1970s revival shoes. Modernist design- 
ers have found other ways to lighten up 
the heavy shoe, by using transparent 
vinyl, perhaps inset with flowers, far the 
instep of amate; or, like Kickers' sports 
sandals, by using Neoprene and repla- 
cing buddies with Velcro fastenings. 


Perhaps the most striking transform- 
ation is of the mtrie. The backless slipper, 
so long associated with boudoir or book- 
er (think Marilyn Monroe in marabou- 
feather mules) has shaken off its fluffy, 
sleazy connotations to become hip. It 
now joins the clog and die orthopedic 
sa nd a l , as part of footwear’s cool scene. 

Where did these many variations on 
conventional summer styles appear 
from? Prada’s sour takes on the 1970s 
have propelled the forward march of the 
platform sole, although it was long a 


feature of Vivienne Westwood’s col- ! 
lections. As so often with modem fasb-^ 
ion, the look started in the flea markets,-* 
where lads bought up what their moms 
had cast out. 

But die Rower Children era had also 
looked back — to the 1940s. WhenC 


-inw • ••».■■'!> 


Ferragamo shod Madonna last year in ^ 

“Evita,” the Italian company alsqv • 


Line Vautrin: 
‘Poet of Metal’ 


International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — You could imaging 
Line Vautrin’s valedictory cre- 
ation — one of her signature 
powder-compacts engraved with 
die scattered letters of “au revoir.” 
Except that the “poet of metal,” 
who died last week at age 83, would 

never have done anything so sen- 
timental. Her jewelry and ter whim- 
sical gilt buttons from hex heyday in 
the 1940s and ’50s were bold, bril- 
liant, barbaric and intricately craf- 
ted and her experiments with resin 
were imaginative and inventive. 


brought bade into its stores re-creationsi--: 
of Eva Peron’s well-stocked war drobe." 
Those 1940s designs showed Salvatore 
Ferragamo’s genius at turning necessity ; 
into invention, for the cork and wooden , 7 
wedges, which he used to overcome war 1 * 
time shortage of steel for heels, ^ became - 1 
an immediate and enduring fashion. 

A whiff of the 1940s in fashion — 
light dresses with sturdy footwear — is?* 
part of Dolce & Gabbana’s look. Their 
flower-pattem sandals with wedge heels j 
have been as much copied asrtada's.: 
velvet platform-sole sandals. ' r .*; 

The origins of platform shoes- have., 
been well-documented by fashion his-V 
torians. They go back to ancient G re ece^ 
when actors wore them to increase- their*! 
stature, and especially to 16th-ccntwy z 
Venice, where chopines w ere worn by 1 " 
prostitutes literally s tand ing out from- 
the crowd. In an era when clothes are " 
modest and minimal, it seems inevitable 

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INTERNATIONAL 


^,-«wW!ira 


ribunc 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1997 


PAGE 11 



What Did Greenspan Mean 
By ‘Irrational Exuberance’? 

He Fears Share Prices May Outpace Earnings 


I v .• > *1 


\ By Louis UchiteUe 

New York Times Service ^ 

NEW YORK — The chairman of the 
■Federal Reserve Board, Alan Greenspan, 
■ seemed to signal to many Americans with 
lone unnerving rhetorical question last 
December that the boom in the stock mar- 
ket was coming to an end. 

Now four months later, Mr. Greenspan is 
gradually providing his own answer: the 
speculative frenzy that could bring a pn> 

; longed market decline is not here yet. 

What he has done in recent speeches and 
I congressional testimony is oner an iater- 
; pretation of what he meant when he naked 
whether “irrational exuberance has unduly 
escalated stock prices.” 

His answer centers on future corporate 
profits. So far, in his emerging explanation, 

I profits are expected to continue growing 
sufficiently to justify the boom in the stock 
market to date. But that could soon change. 

The explanation is important because Mr. 
i Greenspan’s original question — and his 
1 coining of the phrase “irrational exuber- 
ance” — has played a role in unnerving 
investors, making the stock market rather 
volatile. After hitting a high in early March, 
the Dow Jones industrial average fell neatly 
10 percent in just over a month, only to 
bounce back nearly 5 percent last week, its 
biggest weekly rise in four years. 

It was a rare spectacle to have the Federal 
Reserve chairman publicly jawboning die 
stock market, particularly when the effort 
seemed unsuccessful. With last week's 
rise, the Dow is still up more than 250 
points from where it was when Mr. Green- 
span first spoke. 

But that gain appears to be within the 
Greenspan ball park. 

Irrational exuberance only begins when 
millions of Americans, new to stock own- 
ership and never stung by a depressed mar- 
ket, continue Co bid up stock prices even after 
profits are no longer projected to grow fast 
enough to support the rising share prices. 

“The question, essentially, is whether 
profit margins wfl] continue to increase,” 
Mr. Greenspan said in a recent speech. 
Various forecasts available to Mr. Green- 
span for his recent speeches and congres- 
sional testimony suggest that future profit 
growth will support die current high level 
of stock prices. But those forecasts dale 


from March, and new ones could show a 
slowing in the expected rate of profit 
growth. 

Other Federal Reserve policymakers, al- 
though they speak often about what is hap- 
pening to the economy, were reluctant to 
answer questions about the stock market. 

Most consider the subject too sensitive 
for public comment, but the hesitancy may 

IVEWS AJXALYSIS 

also reflect differences of opinion within 
the central bank. The one policymaker who 
did talk for the record said that investor 
at tit udes that stock prices could only go up 
may be changing. 

“I am sure there is a lot of reassessing 

E ing on across the country,” said Edward 
■Hey Jr., a Federal Reserve Board gov- 
ernor. “Markets are not a one-way bet, 
with everyone a winner, and they bad come 
to look like drat” 

Future profit growth, then, is the key 
criterion, in the Greenspan view, for step- 
ping over the line into irrational exuber- 
ance. Although Mr. Greenspan has not 
cited any projections that suggest a rate of 
profit growth insufficient to support stock 
prices at current levels, such a slowdown is 
feared by many economists. 

Some, like Robert Shill er at Yale Uni- 
versity. argue that earnings and stock prices 
arealreadyont of sync. When that happens, 
then millions of Americans cross the line 
into irrational exuberance, if they continue 
to drive up stock juices, unmindful of die 
changed circumstances. 

That sort of optimism cannot last; stocks 
that are too highly juiced will inevitably 
fall, peiiuros over a long period, as they did 
in the mid-1970s. 

■ Gmtan Picks New Fed Nominees 

President B33 Clinton will name Edward 
" Ned ’’Gramlich and Roger Fergus on to the 
Federal Reserve Board, the U.S. Treasury 
secretary, Robert Rubin, said, according to a 
Bloomberg News dispatch from Chantilly, 
Virginia. 

Mr. Gramlich. 57, is dean of die School 
of Public Policy at the University of 
Michigan. Mr. Ferguson, 46. is a partner at 
McKinsey & Co., a consulting company. 

It was not clear when the nominations 
would be forwarded to Congress. . 



AT&T 

Global One 

Sprint 

$12,975 brlfion 

Concert 

MCI/BT 

S6.456 billion 


Source: T 0? Yankee Group Europe" 


AT&T Profit Drops 24% 
As Expansion Costs Rise 


CaopBtd by Onr Staff From Ddpatcha 

NEW YORK — AT&T Corp. 
said Monday that its first-quarter 
profit dropped 24 percent and 
warned that second-quarter earn- 
ings would fall further as it spent 
more to enter new markets and 
fight domestic rivals. 

AT&T said profit from continu- 
ing operations was $1.12 billion, 
compared with $1.47 billion a year 
earlier, excluding results from NCR 
Corp. and Lucent Technologies 
Inc., which AT&T has spun off. 

Revenue from AT&T's con- 
tinning operations rose 1.5 per- 
cent, to $13.05 billion, reflecting 
gains in AT&T's local phone ser- 
vice, long-distance service to busi- 
nesses and wireless services. 

But the expense of new invest- 
ments and struggling sales of long- 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


China Must Join World Trade System 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune , 

W ASHINGTON — Dealing with the rise of 
China is now widely seen as die most im- 
portant long-term challenge facing the United 
States. Yet current American thinking is more 
often shaped by disapproval of China, and by d omestic 
politics, than by a rational assessm e nt of U.S. interests. 

There can be little doubt that those interests would best be 
served by the successful integration of China into the West- 
ern-oriented world economic system in the years ahead. 

Provided the terras are right, China's admission to the 
Geneva-based World Trade Organization should help to 
ensure that Beijing continues economic reforms, opens its 
highly protected market and submits, to the rule of in- 
ternational law. 

The United States, which has taken the lead in ne- 
gotiating China’s WTO entry, is best placed to ensure that 
outcome. But the current climate in Washington is hardly 
conducive to sensible trade policy. 

This summer’s n^nnl congressional debate on extending 
China's most-favored-nation status, a move (hat would 
guarantee regular access to the American market, will 
probably be the toughest yet. 

Politicians on both left and right are advocating the 
withdrawal of most-favored-nanon status, or the threat of it, 
to press China on issues ranging from h u ma n rights, arms 
proliferation, religious intolerance and forced abortions to 
Tibet, Taiwan and Hong Kong. . . 

The ballooning U.S. trade deficit with China is making 
Congress disinclined to grant Beijing commercial favors. 
The House minority leader, Richard Gephardi, a likely rival 
of Vice President A1 Gore for the Democratic presidential 
nomination in 2000. is openly wooing labor unions con- 
cerned about low-wage Chinese competition. 

Although Presided 

attempts to buy political influence in Washington have 


made most politicians nervous about being nice to China. 

But the best way to make China an enemy would be to 
treat it as one: Denial of the trade status would certainly be 
a hostile act. It would severely disrupt trade, shatter Hong 
Kong’s economy just as it reverts to Cnina and sabotage Mr. 
Clinton’s attempts to improve relations with Beijing. 

China would almost certainly retaliate, and switch busi- 
ness to America's commercial rivals, without changing its 
behavior mi human rights or anything else. 

Basically, Washington has got to make up its mind on a 
simple question: Does it want to trade with China? If it does, 
far from suspending the trade status, it should make it 
permanent aim end the counterproductive annual battle on 
Capitol HilL 

One good thing , however, may come of China's current 
unpopularity in Washington: It should stiffen Mr. Clinton’s 
resolve to i nsis t on strict terms for Chinese WTO entry. He 
will have to justify every concession m a de to Beijing. 

That should help to avert the real risk that Mr. Clinton 
might rush through a deal with Beijing for political reasons, 
so as to have big news to announce at a summit meeting with 
President Jiang Zemin planned for this autumn. 

The most important aim should be to ensure Beijing both 
can and will enforce the commitments it undertakes — 
perhaps through some kind of probationary WTO mem- 
bership. Chinese concepts of the rule of law are. very 
different from those of the West. 

The huge U.S. trade deficit actually gives Washington 
important. leverage. China needs the American market and 
would like guaranteed access through the WTO. It also 
needs foreign investment, which WTO membership would 
make more attractive. 

China’s integration into the world economy has already 
gone so far that it would be virtually impossible to pull back. 
For the United States, it would be better to risk that China 
walk away in a huff by demanding tough enforcement 
provisions, than to offer permissive terms that would un- 
dermine the credibility of the rules of the world trading 
Systran. 


Giant’s Global Reach 
Starts to Fall Short 

AT&T Smarts From Loss of Telefonica 


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distance service to consumers hurt 
AT&Ts bottom line. The com- 
pany increased spending on local, 
overseas and other young busi- 
nesses in a bid to diversify. 

Some analysts said the latest 
results showed that AT&T's split 
has yet to produce the promised 
boon to shareholders. 

AT&T shares have fallen 20 
percent since Dec. 31, when the 
company completed the spin-off 
of its computer and equipment 
businesses. 

The stock price fell 62.5 cents to 
close at $33 on Monday. 

Analysts said the squeeze on 
profits would continue as AT&T 
fights MCI Communications 
Corp.. Sprint Corp. and firms that 
have made inroads in the resid- 
ential market. ( Bloomberg, , AP) 


By Seth Schiesel 

New York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — AT&T Corp.’s loose- 
knit strategy for extending its global 
reach appears to be unraveling, even as 
the international partnership of MCI 
Communications Corp. and British Tele- 
communications PLC is strengthening. 

The most recent sign was the decision 
late last week by Telefonica de Espana 
SA, the largest communications pro- 
vider in Latin America, to split from 
AT&T s affiliation of overseas allies to 
form a much tighter bond with the MCI- 
BT group. 

The defection by Telefonica, which is 
also Spain's dominant telephone com- 
pany, underscored AT&T's vulnerab- 
ility at a time when the world's com- 
munications companies are forging 
alliances to serve the voice- and daia- 
network needs of multinational corpo- 
rate customers — the most lucrative 
portion of a $650 billion global tele- 
communications market. 

And not only is AT&T’s alliance 
underpressure from the MC3-BT group. 
A third group known as Global One, 
involving the American long-distance 
carrier Sprint Corp. and its partial own- 
ers, Deutsche Telekom AG and France 
Telecom SA. is making patient, if not 
yet spectacular, progress- 

Telefonica announced Friday that it 
was leaving a group of smaller Euro- 
pean telecommunications providers af- 
filiated with AT&T, called Unisource, 
to go into business with the MCI-BT 
combination, known as Concert. Tele- 
fonica, which operates communications 
companies in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, 
Colombia, Peru, Puerto Rico and 
Venezuela, said that AT&T was in- 
sufficiently committed to the Latin 
American markeL 

“The commitment of AT&T to new 
investment has not been as strong as 
BT-MCL" said Fernando Panizo, chief 
operating officer of TISA, Telefonica’s 
overseas subsidiary. 

“The most important project to us is 
the expansion and consolidation of Lat- 
in America,” Mr. Panizo said “To do 
that we need the commitment of 
someone to go with us in the new in- 
vestment and distribute worthwhile 
global products." 


PRIVATE BANKING 


Many analysts saw the move as a 
coup for Concert, because Latin Amer- 
ica’s market for telecommunications 
services is expected to nearly double, to 
$60 billion, by 2000. 

“It’s a landmark transaction.'' said J. 
Bradford Bunch, a partner at the man- 
agement consulting firm Deloine & 
Touche in Atlanta. “It focused that the 
global supercarrier is now a reality. It’s 
changed the competitive landscape for 
the whole industry.” 

In most of the 47 countries around the 
world where Concert now has partners, 

Exxon Corp. said its first-quarter 
profit soared 15 percent. Page 13. 

the bonds between companies are ce- 
mented by joint investments or an ex- 
change of equity. BT, which has a 
pending deal to acquire MO for $22 
billion, has also purchased pieces of its 
partners in France, Germany and Italy, 
for example. 

And in the agreement announced Fri- 
day. BT and Telefonica received the 
right to each purchase a stake of about 
$445 million in the other company. 

AT&T, however, has generally shied 
away from putting money on the table to 
ensure lasting relationships, both in 
Unisource, which now has only four 
members, and in its larger alliance with 


1 6 foreign companies inside and outside 
Europe, called World Partners. 

“Telefonica shows there’s less of an 
ability of this to be done through su- 
perficial partnerships,” said Stephanie 
Comfort, an analyst for Morgan Stan- 
ley. “It seems you need to have a much 
more tangible lock-up.” 

Looser partnerships may lend flex- 
ibility, analysts said, but can prevent 
companies from providing the seamless 
international communications deman- 
ded by large business customers. 

“AT&T's alliance is deeply broken 
and flawed in its structure." said David 
Goodtree, a director at Forrester Re- 
search, an information technology re- 
search firm based in Cambridge, Mas- 
sachusetts. "BT and MG eachput half 
a billion toa billion dollars into Concert, 
They act with one mind.” 

See STRATEGY, Page 17 


We’re not just on the map. 
We’re all over it 


It’s not only our vast worldwide 
network that keeps us at your 
side at all times. 

It’s our total commitment to serving 
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Banking based on dialogue and 
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The founder of Credit Lyonnais, 
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The combined strength of these 
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CREDIT LYONNAIS 


Private Banking Network: 

Switzerland: Geneva tel 41 22/705 66 66 - Headquarters for Credit Ltonnais International Private Ranking 
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Monaco tcl 377/93 15 73 34 * Vienna tel 431/531 50 120 - Montevideo tel 598 2/95 OS 67 * Miami tel. i 305/375 78 14 
Hong Kong tel 852/28 02 28 88 • Singapore tel 65/535 94 77 






PAGE 12 









































































fifcef*'-* *• r - 





Investor s America 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


Exxon Earnings Surge 15% 


As Bond Yields Rise, 
Stocks Take a Rest 



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Source : Bloomberg, Reuters 


Bloomberg News 

IRVING, Texas — Exxon 
Corp., die first of the major U.S. oil 
companies so re port, posted a 35 
percent jump in first-quarter profit 
as oD and natural gas prices rose, 
but analysts said such growth 
would not last. 

Shares of Exxon rose initially 
after die earnings report and on 
news that Texaco Inc. won a Su- 
preme Court case Monday that 
could mean Exxon will not have to 
pay $2 billion in disputed taxes. In 
addition, crude oil prices rose on 

plies. Bu^the* stock finished 5 ^) 
cents lower, at 553.00. 

The largest U.S. oil company 
said net income rose to $2.18 bil- 
lion. its highest quarterly profit 
ever, from $1.89 billion a year 
earlier. In the year-earlier quarter, 
the company had a one-time gain 
of $125 milli on. Revenue for the 
latest quarter rose 8 percent, to 
$33.6 billion. 

Exxon said it received an av- 


erage price of $2031 for a barrel of 
crude oil in the quarter, compared 
with $1737 a year earlier. Its av- 
erage price for natural gas was 
$2.88 for a thousand cubic feet. 


$2.88 for a thousand cubic feet, 
compared with $238 a year earli- 
er. But oil and gas prices have 
since tumbled. 


kinds of earnings for a while,” 
said John Hervey, an analyst with 
Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette. 

While strong prices in the first 
part of the quarter helped earnings 
in one portion of Exxon's busi- 
ness, falling prices in the latter part 
helped segments that use oil and 
natural gas as a raw material. 

Texaco won a major tax battle 
with the U.S. government 
Monday, when the Supreme Court 
rejected the Internal Revenue Ser- 
vice's appeal in a dispute about 
income mom foreign refining sub- 
sidiaries. The decision could also 
be good news for Exxon, which 
has a similar case pending in a 
lower court. 


Both disputes involve taxes on 
the income from Saudi Arabian oil 
that the companies sold to foreign 
subsidiaries during the energy 
crisis of the late 1970s and early 
1980s. 

The disagreement involved 
about $1 billion in disputed taxes 
from Texaco for 1979 to 1981. and 
more than twice that much from 
Exxon. With interest, tire IRS 
claimed the two companies togeth- 
er owed more than $5 billion. 

The U.S. Tax Court, consider- 
ing the cases together, sided with 
Texaco and Exxon. A federal ap- 
peals court upheld that decision in 
connection with Texaco's case. By 
refusing to hear the IRS’s appeal, 
the Supreme Court left that de- 
cision intact on Monday. 

While the Supreme Court’s re- 
fusal to hear the Texaco case 
doesn’t create a binding precedent, 
it undercuts the IRS's prospects in 
the Exxon dispute. 

Texaco's share price rose 373 
cents, to $104.00. 


b tmMvntl Ikixld Tribgnr 


Very briefly; 

*■ * ITT to Acquire Goulds Pumps 

11 - WHIT E PLAINS, New York (Bloomberg) — ITT Industries 

Inc. said Monday it would buy Goulds Pomps Inc. for $934 
million in cash and debt to expand its pump-making business. 

* The combined com panies will make die world's largest 
maker of pumps, ITT officials said. 

AST Research to Cut 1,000 Jobs 

IRVINE, California (AP) — AST Research Inc. said Monday 
it would cut about 1,000 jobs, or 25 percent of its work force. 

. The move comes one week after the computer -make r 
agreed to be acquired by Samsung Group of South Korea. 

• Nabisco Holdings Corp.’s first-quarter eammgs rose 21 
percent, to $64 million, from a year ago. 

. • Chrysler Corp. said an 11-day strike at a Detroit engine 
t plant forced it to lay off another 2362 workers. Bloomberg 


Weekend Box Office 

The Associated Rms 

LOS ANGELES — “Anaconda” dominated the U3. box 
office over the weekend, with a gross of $123 million. Fol- 
lowing are tiie Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday's ticket 
sales ami estimated sales far Saturday and Sunday. 


Kerkorian Said to Bid for Orion 


By James Bates 

Las Angeles Times 

LOS ANGELES —The Las Ve- 
gas billionaire Kirk Kerkorian is 
negotiating to acquire Orion Pic- 
tures, primarily for its substantial 
film library, sources close to the 
deal said. 

An executive familiar with the 
talks characterized the odds at “60- 
40” that Mr. Ketkorian would buy 
Orion from John Kluge, also a bil- 


lionaire. The sources cautioned, 
however, that the talks were fragile 
and could easily unravel. They ad- 
ded that no decision was expected 
until Wednesday at the earliest. 

The executive said that Mr. 
Kerkorian and Mr. Klug e had dis- 
cussed a price of about $300 mil- 
lion, but added that it was unclear 
whether Mr. Kerkorian sought Or- 
ion’s production arm, which oper- 
ates far below the level of major 
Hollywood studios. Mr. Kerkorian 


bought Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. 
last year for $1 .3 billion. 

What Mr. Kerkorian and the 
MGM chairman, Frank Mancuso, 
value most, the executive said, is 
Orion’s 2300-fihn library. They 
may want to spin off the production 
unit to another party as pan of a 
more complicated transaction, the 
executive said. 

Orion is controlled by Mr. Kluge, 
who is expected by most analysts to 
sell the studio. 


Ompha by Oar Stiff Fan Dupcacha 

NEW YORK — Stocks fell 
Monday as traders were cautious 
after last week's rally and rising 
bond yields tempted investors away 
from shares. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed 4334 points lower, at 
6,66031. Declining issues out- 
numbered advancing ones by a 7- 
to-5 margin on the New York Stock 
Exchange. The Dow gained 3 per- 
cent last week. 

The broader Standard & Poor’s 
500 index feU 5.97 points, to 76037, 
while declining technology issues 
dragged the Nasdaq composite index 
down 18.62 points, to 1303.95. 

The Dow had risen early in the 
day amid stronger-tfa an -expected 
earnings at Exxon and a legal vic- 
tory for Texaco. Trading was tight- 
er than usual because of Monday 
evening's Passover holiday. 

“You've got a bored market that 
is backing from rates and mixed 
earnings,” said John Hammer- 
schmidt of Turner Investment Part- 
ners. 

Government bond prices fell for 
the first time in three days as the 
Treasury and a slew of municip- 
alities and corporations prepared to 
sell some $62 billion of new debt. 

“There's a lot of supply there for 
the market to digest," which may 
hurt prices, said Larry Pavelec, a 
fund manager with M & I Invest- 
ment Management in Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. 

The price of the benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond fell 1 3/32, to 94 
9/32, driving its yield up to 7.09 
percent from 7.05 percent. 

Stocks look relatively less at- 
tractive to investors as government 
bond yields rise. 


Shares of 3Com and U.S. Ro- 
botics, which 3Com plans to buy, fell 
sharply after Intel cut prices on a 
competing computer-networking 
product. Lite! announced price cuts 
on its so-called stackable hub 
products. Hubs, an relatively old 
technology, account for about 20 

g srccDt of 3Com‘s sales, said Chris 
rix of Cowen & Co. “It's an im- 
portant product for 3Com,” he said. 

3Com feti 3, to 26 W, U.S. Ro- 
botics dropped 5% to 45 'A. while 
Intel rose ltt to 138VL 
Autoimmune stock plunged 9V4 

US. STOCKS ~~ 

to 4% after the pharmaceutical-re- 
search company said its drug to 
treat multiple sclerosis performed 
no better than a placebo in final- 
stage clinical trials. Meanwhile. 
Biogen shares rose Va to 3114 after 
the company's Avonex multiple 
sclerosis drug was found to be more 
effective than previously expected. 
Eli Lilly shares rose Vz to 8516 


earnings rose 11 percent, to $432.6 
million as sales of new products and 
reduced costs offset a 2.7 percent 
drop in revenue from its best-selling 
antidepressant Prozac. Revenue rose 
93 percent to $1 .95 billion. 

Stock in Reynolds Metals fell 1 Vs 
to 6556 after die company said it 
would sell its aluminum rolling mill 
in Alabama to Aluminum Co. of 
America and record a loss of be- 
tween $225 milli on to $250 million. 

Coca-Cola Enterprises shares rose 
Vt to 59 after shareholders of the 
distribution affiliate of Coca-Cola 
Co. approved a 3-for-l stock split in 
a move that effectively tripled the 
dividend. ( Bloomberg , AP) 


Uncertainty About Europe’s Single Currency Ruoys Mark 


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Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against the Deutsche marie Monday 
as investors bought the German cur- 
rency amid concern that European 
monetary anion may not proceed as 
planned. 

The latest doubts surrounding 
Europe’s single currency came as 
President Jacques Chirac of France 
called early elections and specula- 
tion intensified that Italy would not 
be admitted to monetary union al the 
outset in 1999. 

“If you throw EMU question 
marks out there, people buy marks 


blindly,'' said John Barlow, a cur- 
rency trader at Bayerische Landes- 
bank Girozentrale. 

The dollar slipped against the yea 
cm speculation that officials from the 
Group of Seven industrial countries 
who are meeting in Washington this 
weekend may try to slow its ascent 
The dollar fell to 1 .6975 Deutsche 
marks, from 1.71 18 at the end of the 
day on Friday. It also fell to 1253 15 
yen from 125.885. 

Mr. Chirac called elections a year 
early in an effort to win afreerhand at 
imposing measures to qualify France 
for the single currency. But early 


elections could backfire, traders said, 
costing the ruling coalition seats and 
derailing Mr. Chirac's efforts. 

Debra Larsen, a currency trader at 
Commerzbank, said a setback for 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

Mr. Chirac in the elections could 
call into question France's efforts to 
implement budget cuts needed to 
qualify for the single currency. 
“That puts into question EMU, and 
you go back into the mark. which 
puts pressure on the dollar against 
the mark.” 


Countries hoping to qualify for 
monetary union must bring their 
budget deficits down to 3 percent of 
gross domestic product 
An Italian newspaper, II Sole, re- 
ported that the International Mon- 
etary Fund had faulted the govern- 
ment’s proposed mid-year budget, 
saying Italy had not paid enough 
attention to structural problems. 

The dollar fell to 5.7347 French 
francs from 5.7668. It fell to 1.4415 
Swiss francs from 1.4560. The 

r ound rose to $1.6355 from 
1.6330. 

Traders said they expected this 


weekend's meeting of the G-7 to 
give the dollar some direction. 

“There's some concern that ex- 
change rates will be a topic of com- 
munication,” said Robert Katz, a 
currency trader at MTB Bank. “They 
may not call for an outright stop, but 
they oould tiy to slow the extend of 
the dollar’s appreciation." 

At its meeting in February, the G- 
7 declared victory in a two-year 
effort to raise the dollar from post- 
war lows. But the dollar soared after 
the U.S. Federal Reserve raised 
rates and fast U.S. growth indicated 
that there could be another rise. 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Monday's 4 PM. Close 

Ite top 300 most odtve states, 
op to flw dosing on Wiri Street 
The Associated Press. 






















PAGE 14 




























































































EUROPE 


Warner 
Said to Seek 
DealWith 

Canal Plus 


r ^TffT t il I 

r PARIS — Warner Brothers 
,:lnc. is poised to take a 10 per- 
; cent stake in the CanalSatellite, 
'the digital satellite TV venture 
'controlled by Canal Hus SA, a 
' French newspaper repented 
C Monday. 

Warner Brothers, a unit of 
Time Warner Inc., has an op- 
tion to buy the stake from Canal 
■Phis in what would be the first 
^ stage of a broad cooperation 
"agreement between Time 
Warner, Canal Plus and the 
French media company Havas 
i-SA, the business daily La 
Tribune reported. Havas is the 
-biggest shareholder in rjwwi 
; Plus, with a 34 percent stake. 

La Tribune said Warner 
; would pay between 500 million 
' francs and 800 million francs 
($87 million and $139 million) 

, for the stake, 

CanalSatellite is 70 percent 
owned by Canal Hus. Com- 
■pagme Generate des Eanx SA 
'has a 10 percent stake, white 
rPathe holds 20 percent 

Warner has not signed up to 
- have its television, channels car- 
ried on CanalSatefiite’s digital 
; service, a source told Reuters. 

Generate des Eaux is in talks 
, with Tune Warner over foe sale 
: of its cable TV writ Compagnie 
"Generale de VTdeocammurric- 
ation. La Tribune said Warner 
would boy foe cable unit from 
Compagnie Generate des Eanx 
as part of the deal. 

(Reuters, BTT) 


From Cordiant, 3 Companies Are Born 


rtm t Ori tr Or-S*f Fnam Dap * tfta 

NEW YORK — Cordiant FLC. 
®e global advertising company that 
went through a stormy shake-up two 
years ago with the departure of two 
founders, Maurice and Qiarfea 
Saatdn, and Monday it would split 
mto three comp ameg , 

Cordiant said shares in Saatcbi & 
Saa td n Advertising Worldwide «id 
Bales Woddwide would trade sep- 
arately on the London and New 
York stock exchanges. & 

Saa t chi will jointly own Me- 

dia, Cor diant V media buying unit 
The decision to dissolve the com- 
pany means the end of foe Cordiant 
name after little more than two 
years. 

The parent company, once known 

as Saatchi & Saatdn Adver tising , 

chose fhatnorry chorffy 

and Charles Saatdri left the firm in a 


at foe end of 1994. 

The jSaatchis went on to form 
their own co mp et i ng agency under 
foe name of M&C Saatchi, and the 
new agency won a number of ac- 
counts from Cordiant, including one 
longtime client, British Airways. 

In May 1995, the Saatchis and 
their former agency agreed to settle 
a legal dispute stemming from their 
ouster. It allowed both companies to 
co n tinue using foe Saatchi names, 
and let a number of executives fol- 
low the Saatchi brothers to their new 


said it has rebounded 

from the troubles of its breakup with 
the Saatchis, and the restructuring 
will allow all of its various advert- 
ising offices and smaller subsidi- 
aries, operating in 90 countries with 
10,400 employees, to become mote 
autonomous and efficient. 


A Cordiant spokeswoman could 
not immediately say whether any 
jobs will be lost. 

Investors applauded the news, 
sending Cordiant up 5.5 pence cm 
foe London Stock Exchange, to 
close at 135.5 pence. 

“Two separate management 
teams will have an incentive to run 
their groups more profitably," said 
Loma Tilbian, an analyst with Pan- 
mure Gordon & Co. "It makes our 
projection of 10 percent margins 
more likely.*' 

Cordiant said last month it had 
returned to profitability in 1996. 
with net income of £27 million ($44 
million), reversing a loss of £34.5 
million a year earfier. 

Bob See lert, now chief executive 
of Cordiant, will become chief ex- 
ecutive of Saatchi & Saatchi, while 
the Bates chief executive, Michael 


Deutsche Tallies Misused Accounts 


Hauers 

FRANKFURT — Deutsche Bank 
AG on Monday described as “real- 
istic" a press report that about 
180,000 chents might be affected by 
a ftmd-mismanagenient scandal at its 
British subsidiary, Deutsche Morgan 
Grenfell Asset Management. 

But foe bank said foe client figure, 
reported in the mass-circulation 
daily Bild, would not mean it needed 
to malm additional comp ensation 
payments. 

Deutsche has said it will face 
£200 million ($326.6 million) in 

oniTip ensBHnin -fihargpy r elated fof- 

alleged mismanagement at three 
Morgan Grenfell funds last year. 

That charge comes on top of a 
£180 minion cash injection by foe 
hwnlr to shore up the niHwg funds. 

Deutsche Bank has set aside 1.1 
billion to 3 2 billion Deutsche marks 
($642.6 million to $701 minion) in 
its 1996 results to cover damages 


related to the incidents at Deutsche 
Morgan GrcnfelL 
A spokesman said Deutsche Bank 
estimated its compensation 
needs on the basis of the volume of 
funds on deposit at Morgan Grenfell 
Asset Management, not on the num- 
ber erf individuals with accounts. 

“We said last December that 
around 90,000 MGAM accounts 
were involved in thia, but we were 
never quite sure how many people 
were behind that number,’* the 


He said foe number of clients 
mentioned in foe Bild account “ap- 
pears to us to be realistic. But this 
has no effect an the compensation 
figure.” 

Last week, foe British investment 
industry watchdog, the Investment 
Managers Regulatory Organization, 
imposed a record £2 miHion fine on 
Morgan Grenfell Asset Manage- 
ment over the debacle, which led to 


Bungey. will run that group. Zenith 
Media Worldwide wu] be run by 
John Perriss, its current chairman. 

Charlie Scott will remain non- 
executive chairman of both Saatchi 
and Bates in their first year as sep- 
arate companies and will then step 
down from one, Mr. Seelert said. 

Mr. Seelert said the spin-off will 
accelerate sales and profit growth, 
increase autonomy ana accountabil- 
ity at its ad networks, and enable 
Bates and Saatchi to compete more 
freely for clients. Now, for example,, 
because Saatchi handles advertising 
for Procter & Gamble Co. products 
such as Tide, Cascade ana Comet, 
Bates cannot solicit business from 
P&G’s competitors. 

Removing the client conflicts wifi 
open about 10 percent of the world 
advertising market to Bates, Cor- 
diant said. (NYT. Bloomberg, AP) 


Investor’s Europe 


- 


the dismiMal of Peter Young, who 
managed two of the funds. 

Separately, foe organization un- 
veiled a plan on Monday to raise 
industry standards and improve in- 
vestor awareness. 

The organization said it wanted to 
do more training of regulators, firms 
and investors and raise industry 
standards by changing its admis- 
sions process. 

“Only through knowledge and 
awareness can foe regulator hope to 
achieve effective investor protec- 
tion,” said the o rganizati on ''s chief 
executive officer, Phillip Thorpe. 

The organization said it would 
improve its admissions process by 
including a second stage that will 
mean that most firms will have then- 
activities restricted before they have 
successfully undergone a first mon- 
itoring visit The regulator said it 
hopes to complete a pilot study by 
autumn. 


Profit Off 17% 
At Norsk Hydro 

A gene c Fra/tce-Presse 

OSLO — Norsk Hydro A/S 
said Monday that its net profit 
fell 17 percent in the first 
quarter from a year ago, to 1-54 
billion kroner ($217.4 million), 
mostly because of poor results 
from on-shore operations. 

Norsk Hydro s share price 
surged 23 kroner to close at 355 
kroner. 

Sales at Norway's biggest in- 
dustrial company climbed to 
23.2 billion kroner, up 8.9 per- 
cent from a year ago. 

Norsk Hydro said satisfac- 
tory oil and gas results and ex- 
panded agriculture operations 
had played a key role in holding 
operating income at a high 
level. 

Income in the light metals 
division was halved because of 
lower aluminum prices. 





k N‘D'J F M'A" 
1996 1997 


asssegf 


m 






D J F’ M A' 21 W >Td J ' F' M' 
1996 1997 1996 1997 


























Source: Telekom 


IptemuoKal Hcnrid Tribune 


Very briefly: 


• Astra AB, foe Swedish drug company, posted a 1 percent 
profit rise in the first quarter, to 3.46 billion kronor ($452 
million), which was below analysts' expectations. 

• Svenska Handelsbanken AB. Sweden's largest bank, re- 
ported a 14 percent rise in operating profit in the first quarter, 
to 1.73 billion kronor. 

• Post & Telekom Austria AG wifi cut long-distance charges 
this year by 33 billion schillings ($273 million) to cry and be 
more competitive before a possible sale to the public. 

• Dassault Systemes SA’s first-quarter earnings rose 34 
percent, to a record level of 1 163 million Bench francs ($20. 1 
million), and the company cited strong sales. 

• AO SL Petersburg Telephone Network plans to sell 44.1 
million preferred shares with the hope of raising up to $45 
million to modernize its network. 

• Internationa] Monetary Fund negotiators are to arrive in 
Moscow this week for talks that may pave the way for the 
release of the next installment of a $1 0.1 billion loan. 

• Societe Europeenne des Satellites SA will begin broad- 
casting Britain's Channel 5 this week via satellite to 2.9 
million households in Britain and Ireland. Bloomberg News. AFX 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


; Monday, April 21 

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To Oar Readers 

Trading was sospeoded 
Monday on the Manila stock 
market due to a power fail- 
ure. 


BasHdenram 
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31030 

31230 

149S1 

14710 

14950 

14855 

5EB 

988 

962 

988 

969 

2305 

22B5 

2285 

23V 

SG5 Thomson 

38300 

37X10 

37X10 

38500 

5950 

5860 

5870 

5800 

EfeGenenrio 

625 

610 

625 

(16 

7118 

TOO 

7875 

7050 

Sodnho 

2749 

2699 

2719 

3701 

10685 

IB70D 

70725 

10703 

SGobati 

751 

739 

751 

7*5 

1173 

1146 

1165 

1150 

Sum 

280L40 

277 JO 28040 

20040 

51730 

495 

516 

491 

SynAeUM 

670 

652 

655 

671 

25V 

2510 

2560 

2538 


18070 

178 

17X60 

18378 

3835 

37V 

3785 

3825 

Total B 

46100 

45(9 45530 

46200 

15100 

14740 

1499 

14756 

Udnor 

8830 

8730 

8735 

8938 

168V 

16510 

16X40 

1699 

VMe 0 

360 

3*6 

360 

35430 

11750 

116V 

11670 

11700 















4*10 

*320 

43E3 

4320 






5715 

5075 

51*0 

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S-EBaikMA 

StamdaFon 

StamtaB 

S KFB 

SpanankmiA 
StodshypateicA 
Stani A 
Sv Handles A 
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193 

187 

149 

81 

217 

34130 

149 

138 

190 

102 

224 

196 


27530 

19030 

IBS 

14(30 

S» 

214 

335 

164 

135 

vm 

100 

221 

191 


276 278 

192 19130 
1 B 63 B 18530 
168 147 

S &90 80 

214 21558 
340 3 JX 50 
149 164 

13(50 13630 

wo ™ 
100 101 
226 221 
195 193 


Montreal 

tadHlltall tariKC 282234 


PraHMK 282101 

Bee Mob Qm 

44 J 0 

4308 

44 

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CdnTlmA 

2470 

.2470 

2470 

2435 

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32 ft 

J 32.10 

32 ft 

3234 

CTRnlSyc 

33 

V 

33 

32 U 

Gaz Mato 

17.18 

1(05 

17 J 0 

17 

ClWriUfaco 

23 

22 V 

22* 

23 

laxw» 

37 

3(90 

3695 

36 ft 

taatoaGip 

205 

2435 

U3S 

24 J 5 

LoMawOu 

17 ft 

1740 

1700 

1705 

NcrilBfc Canada 

K 10 

1405 

1405 

15 

PtwerCotp 
Power rial 

2705 

2700 

2770 

2700 

2(18 

2500 

2500 

2(15 

QuabecorB 

24 U 

24* 

24 ta 

3(15 

Room Coma B 

7 * 6 ) 

700 

700 

7.15 

Royal BA Ota 

5(15 

5 X 85 

5205 

5200 

Oslo 


OBXlRdac 

407 J 4 


Pf**toB*s 59(48 

AkerA 

174 

171 

172 

171 


The Sao Paolo stock mar- 
ket was closed Monday for a 
holiday. 


Seoul 


GHpodetadHc 4 ? 7 J 4 
PICVtoOK 69547 


Sydney 


AB Ordinaries: 244508 
PiMmkJHLV 

Aamr 

830 

X10 

X12 

X14 

ANZBUnp 

(19 

8 JK 

X1B 

X10 

BHP 

1731 

1706 

17.12 

17.16 

HSfifl 

305 

301 

304 

303 

BnrnbtaGlnd. 

2235 

22 

2230 

22 

CBA 

1303 

1338 

1335 

1338 

CCAmafl 

I(C 

1(25 

1437 

1(34 

CataiMycr 

(27 

(18 

(18 

(23 

Comakn 

(35 

(24 

(33 

638 

CRA 

19.13 

19 

1901 

1903 

CSR 

474 

407 

(67 

(73 

Festan Brew 

XV 

203 

206 

X67 

GoottanaFkl 

173 

108 

170 

173 

IQ Aujtnjln 

1109 

1170 

1175 

1109 

LemiLpae 

2475 

MAS 

2430 

2400 

MlMHdas 

NatAastBmrii 

174 

172 

174 

174 

1600 

1(51 

1(79 

1(51 

Mat Mutual Hdg 

100 

10 * 

107 

100 

KewsCmp 

(09 

603 

605 

6 

Pocfflc Dunloa 

338 

330 

136 

333 

Pioneer inn 

(37 

436 

(29 

4J6 

Pirfj Btaadcnst 

674 

605 

605 

672 

StGearoaBai* 

7.97 

700 

7.95 

702 

WMC 

707 

777 

/02 

/75 

WeanacBUno 

WoodsktaPd 

(82 

10 

<78 

90S 

(78 

909 

678 

902 

Wooftwnths 

300 

372 

1/4 

378 


The Trib Index 

Prices as otSM PM. Now York tkno. 

Jan. 1. 1902=100. 

Laval 

Cbango 

% changa 

yaar k> data 



% chang e 

World Index 

150.55 

+ 0.68 

+ 0.45 

+ 0.95 

Raglanal Mens 

Ase/PadBc 

109.81 

+ 1.40 

+ 1.29 

- 11.03 

Europe 

160.57 

+ 1-08 

+ 0.68 

- 0.39 

N. America 

172.81 

■OM 

-023 

+ 6.73 

S. America 

Industrial Indnaaa 

139.76 

-0.01 

-O.OI 

+ 22.14 

Capital goods 

178.59 

+(X 82 

+ 0.46 

+ 4.49 

Consumer goods 

171.60 

- 0.45 

-026 

+ 6.36 

Energy 

176.93 

+ 1-29 

+ 0.73 

+ 3.64 

Finance 

110.20 

+156 

+ 1.44 

- 5.38 

MsceBaneous 

154.80 

+ 1.36 

+ 0.89 

- 4.31 

Raw Materials 

180 27 

+ 1.99 

+ 1.12 

+ 2.79 

Service 

141.10 

■ 0.15 

- 0.11 

+ 2.75 

UtHHes 

130.91 

+ 0.57 

+ 0.44 

- 8.75 

The ItttBmatkmol Homkt Tribune WUrld Stock Index Checks thelXS. doBai vaftiflK ot 

2BO tntBnwtfonaky knmstobto Blocks Irani 25 countries. Ft* mom Momwtion, a free 
booUm ttovaSabto by writing to The Trto tndex,1Bl Avmuo Charles da Gauge. 

92521 Neufy Cedax, Franco. 


Coopted by Bloomberg Wan*. 

Htob 

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PlWA 

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13 V 1165 

105 te 

4 SJ 5 
3435 35 J 0 
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5485 5495 
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6305 6170 
4005 4055 

29 29 
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19 V, 1900 
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3705 3705 
1555 1500 

2570 26 

4100 4105 
2905 2900 
805 80 S 

24 J 0 2445 
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ATX tarirse 1194.14 
PmtaOR 1191.93 

B 4190 837 >38 83700 

468 456 457 461 

31 BO 3120 3125 3139 

1600 1575 1578 1579 

521 JO 51330 51400 51705 
1 3 S 4 1301 3 D 133 X 1 0 131900 
84800 84350 848 84530 

49100 48530 49030 492 

1046 1795 1800 1824 

2284 2210 2250 2189 


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AKNZsddB 

403 

(82 

402 

(02 

Brterty Invt 

138 

139 

IJ0 

139 

Colter HoBord 

119 

3.15 

115 

119 

RetdiChBldp 

RotehCIiEny 

(V 

405 

406 

(M 

430 

(16 

(17 

4X2 

FtaWi Ch Ford 

IV 

107 

108 

108 

FtatdiCh Paper 

201 

XV 

200 

201 

Lion Noihan 

345 

145 

305 

348 

Tsfetom NZ 

(56 

632 

(53 

636 

Mm Horton 

1130 

1130 

11V 

1100 


7 

(V 

(00 

7 

9 

XV 

800 

800 

1200 

1 X 50 

1230 

1200 

1(58 

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15.10 

15.10 

OJd 

008 

(1 itH 

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IB 

17.59 

1730 

1700 

404 

404 

406 

402 

1130 

law 

1000 

11 

XXS 

238 

231 

234 

sm 

530 

535 

530 

142 

336 

336 

300 

9 

878 

870 

X 9 S 

300 

308 

IV 

308 

400 

432 

436 

436 

430 

4 X 8 

4 T 0 

408 

1700 

T 73 D 

1700 

1730 

1 X 10 

900 

ftSB 

900 

60 S 

(30 

(45 

(V 

(60 

630 

635 

645 

1230 

1100 

12 

12 

60 S 

(V 

605 

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2700 

2630 

2630 

27.10 

374 

309 

372 

162 

XV 

273 

273 

277 

300 

338 

13 * 

300 

1.14 

1.13 

1.13 

1.14 

108 

1400 

15 

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4.14 

(12 

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EiXaatoB 

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5 X 16 tadec 279(06 

PmtaaB 202(40 

10 S 

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10(50 

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860 

1 M 

190 

191 

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3*430 

320 32030 

34 X 30 

19836 

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19(30 

19630 

292 

287 

W 

289 

487 

480 

VO 

48 * 

35130 

3*9 

251 

230 

1095 

1080 

1085 

1088 

498 

494 

496 

496 

347 

332 

333 

34130 

21830 

715 21(30 

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259 

256 

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Hodi^uniBk 
Hitachi 
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1010 

737 

3550 

9*7 

713 

34 V 

1010 

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3550 

975 

710 

3430 

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807 

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801 

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22.10 

2105 

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Alberta Enew 

2905 

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1120 

11 m 

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Alans Atom 

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19 V 

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1600 

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530 

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51 JO 

5135 

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20 V 

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ASIA/PACIFIC 


8 

JPaewoo 
Opens New 
Car Plant 

i 

i 

Korean Firm Sees 
Growth Overseas 

t 

\ KUNSAN, South Korea— Dae- 
4«oo Motors Co. opened a $1.2 bil- 
lion plant Monday even as some 
analysts warned that a satur a ted do- 
mestic market and growing com- 
petition in overseas market s could 
slash sales and increase inventories. 

i Korea’s top three aut omaker s — 
Hyundai Motor Co., Kia Motors 
Cjorp. and Daewoo — plan to double 
abnaal car production capacity to 7 
milli on units by 2000, betting on 
growth in developing markets such 


Computers That Speak, in Any Voice 


By Andrew Pollack 

New Tort Hates Service . 

• TOKYO — : Researchers in Ja- 
pan are developing electronic im- 


new movies. Books on tape could 
be made without the person having 
to read the entire book out loud. 


allow words on a computer screen ATR, is con catenati on, which in- 
to be read aloud, such as to the volves stitching together recorded 
blind. In the future, some experts into new co mbina ti ons — 

predict, people will converse with making new sound hires out of 
their computers as naturally as they sound bytes, so to speak, 
talk to a friends — The ATR system, known as 

But one problem now is that Chatr, requires an hour of recorded 
while synthetic speech is quite in- speech from the person whose voice 
telligjble, it sounds artificial, is being copied. The computer 
“Customers don’t like the unnat- breaks this speech down into Isaac 
oral sound and quality,” said sound elements — such as the “c,’ ’ 
Lawrence Rabiner, vice president the “a” and “t” sounds in cat. 
of speech and image processing Then, in malting sentences, die 
services at AT&T Laboratories in comp ute r chooses the example of 
Murray Hill, each sound that will flow together 
New Jersey. most naturally with its neighboring 
ay be able A possible sounds and will produce the proper 

i solution: use a intonation. It takes only seconds 

’ P“ one real person’s for the computer to speak a sen- 

ad to too. voice to make teoce after it is typed in. 

.y, the speech It is still possible to tell that 

IHetnch. sound more nat- Chatr is a machine . Although it 

ural. Indeed, unmistakably reproduces a per- 

AT&T Carp, son's voice, the pacing is not nat- 
has just licensed the technology ural and the connections between 
developed by ATR, which stands sound bits is not always seamless, 
for Advanced Telecommunica- (Hear for yourself at http:// 
tions Research. www.id.air.co.jp/cbarr.) 

Real recordings are already used Mark Liberman, a professor of 

when a machine is required to linguistics and computer .science at 
speak only a limited number of the University of Pennsylvania, 
possible sentences, such as in a said there are other speech con- 


But the technology could also predict, people will converse with 


pan are developing electronic im- have many nefarious uses, such as their c ompu t e rs as naturally as they 

personators — computer systems framing or blackmailing someone talk to a friend. 

that can speak in a particular per- with a fake “recording.” People But one problem now is that 
son’s voice. can no longer absolutely trust pho- while synthetic speech is quite in- 

The systems, which will take to graphs and videotape because telligjble, it sounds ar tificial. 
some y ears to perfect, start with an images can be digitally doctored. “Customers don’t like the unnat- 
rccording of a person and Now, die same doubts will extend ural sound and quality,” said 


tern,” said Kim Woo Choong, chair- 
B^an of Daewoo Group. He said auto 
markets in developing nations were 
growing by at least 5 percent a yea-. 

‘ In addition, Daewoo Motors 


break it down into individual to voice recordings. 

sounds, such as those of syllables New legal questions are also 

or letters. The computer can then likely to arise over the extent to 

string these sound elements togeth- which voices 

er in new , sequences to otter sen- can be protected 

fences m tire persem’s voice that the from exploits- Soon yon D 

person Dever actually said. tion by. others. 

“If we have a recording of your Voces diem- to have yoi 
voice we can make you say almost selves cannot be 
anything,” said Nick Campbell, protected by 
who leads a group that has de- copyright, 
veloped such a system at ATR ht- which applies to 
terpreting Telecommunications created expres- 
Researcb Laboratories in Kyoto, sictcs, said Jose 
which is supported by Japan’s gov- fessar at St. J 
emmera and industry. School of Law ix 

In die future, people might But many stat 


Soon yon may be able 
to bare yonr phone 
messages read to you 
by Marlene Dietrich. 


choose a “voice font” in which to tecting a celebrity’s image, indod- 
listen to computer speech in much ing Ins or ber voice, from being 


to the United States, where it hopes 
. tp sell 30,000 cars this year and 
^ 100,000 cars next year through a 
direct dealership network. 

■ Daewoo had exported cars to the 
United States through General Mo- 
tors Corp. until GM withdrew its SO 
pscent stake in the carmaker in 
1992 after managerial disputes. 

[ The Kansan plant hag an annual 
production capacity of 320,000 
vehicles, bringing die company ’s an- 


the same way they now choose a 

type foot for printing out is doc- withott percussion, be said. ’ possible sentences, such as in a 
ament. A traveling businessman The speech systems being de- voice mail system. But when there 
xmghtbave his electronic mail read veloped at ATR and elsewhere are are too many possible phrases to 
to him over toe phone in the sultry aimed not at impersonation but at record diem all, such as for a sys- 
voice of Marlene Dietrich or the improving the quality of synthetic tem that will read text aloud, syn- 
crisp English of Sir John Gielgud speech. tbetic speech must be used, 

or perhaps in the voice of die Such speech is already used for One approach to this has been to 

sender or his secretary. numerous purposes, from car nav- use various rutes to try to create the 


selves cannot be nKSSaiEes read to VOD voice to make 

protected by , " 6 , the speech 

copyright, by Marlene Dietrich. sound more nat- 

wlrieh applies to ural. Indeed, 

created expres- AT&T Corp. 

sions, said Joseph Beard, a pro- has just licensed the technology 
fessar at SL John’s University developed by ATR, which stands 
School of Law in New York. for Advanced Telecommunica- 

But many states have laws too- tions Research, 
tectinp a celebrity’s image, indud- Real recordings are already used 

ing has or ber voice, from being when a machine is required to 
used far commercial purposes speak only a limited number of 


Lawrence Rabiner, vice president 
of speech and image processing 
services at AT&T Laboratories in 
Murray Hill. 
New Jersey. 

ay be able a possible 



or perhaps in the voice of die 
sender or his secretary. 


With the electronic impersonal- igation systems to systems that al- 
ias and sophisticated computer an- low people to receive bank account 
koation, actors and actresses who balances and stock quotes over the 
have dred might be able to appear in phone. Text-to-speech converters 


thetic speech must be used. 

One approach to this has been to 
use various rules to try to create the 
proper sound waves. The sentences 
tend to come out smoothly bat the 
voice is clearly artificial. 

The other approach, used by 


catenation systems, such as one 
developed by France Telecom ’s re- 
search laboratory. But many of 
these systems modify the recorded 
sound ft l er nflnfis to make them 
chain together more smoothly, so 
that the synthetic speech does not 
sound exactly like the original 
voice. The ATR system is unique 
in that no modification is made to 
die recorded voice, he said. 


b million 


Daewoo also 


makes about 500JXX) vehicles a year TT _I J TTY - j 

Honda s Lxports 

would increase its total vehicle pro- -fWl TT rt Qt . • ' 

doc tion capacity worldwide to 25 //) I / l W/)/iri?|0' 

million by 2000 to become one of the MJekJm kJUlMUM* 

* 1 ji- m - - — v w 


would increase its total vehicle pro- 
duction capacity worldwide to 25 
-. million by 2000 to become one of the 
•World’s top 10 automakers. 

i Mr. Kim reiterated thatiiis com- 
pany still wanted to acquire Thom- 
son Multimedia if die French gov- 
ernment gave it a second chance. 

‘ “I believe die French govern- 
ment will give ns a second chance, 
and if that is the case, we wiD ap- 
ply,” be said. 

(Bloomberg. AFP. Reuters) 

■ Bailout for Jinro Affiliates 

• Sfat affiliates of Rnm Group have 
been designated for “nramatiza- 
tipn” and will be bailed out, die 
Roup’s prime creditor, the Commer- 
cial Bade of Korea said Monday, 
Reuters reported from Seoul 


Petron Acts to Face Deregulation 


Bloomberg Nan 

TOKYO — Honda Motor Co. said Monday its 


Bloomberg News 

MANILA — Petron Ccup_, the Philip- 
pines’ largest o3 refiner, gearing op for in- 
creased co mpetitio n, announced plans 
Monday to increase die size of its distribution 


exports to the United States neatly doubled in March network and spend more on advertising, 
from a year earlier as Honda tried to meet demand for its Petron said it would spend 5.4 billioa pesos 

new GR-V sport-utility vehicle and its Civic compact ($2049 million) tins year, most of it on new gas 
sedan. -. stations and increased advertising, in response 

Honda exported 19,600 vehicles to the United States to the oil industry’s recent deregulation, 
in March, a 98 percent jump from a year earlier. “The name of the game is being acoess- 

Demand far the CR-V, which went on sale in Me,” said Ali Ajmi. Perron’s president 
January, pushed up rales, a Honda spokesman said. Mr. Ajmi also said the company could 
“Tins is a totally new model, so demand is still big,” make another round of staff reductions. Last 
he said. year, Petron reduced its walk force by 25 


Honda also increased exports of the Civic compact percent, to 1,269. 


tjon” and will be bailed out, the sedan “because factories in North America can’t meet 
group’s prime creditor, the Commer- demand,” the spokesman said, 
dal Bank of Korea airid Monday, Stock in Honda rose 60 yen, to 3,710yen ($29.47). 

Reuters reported fiom Seoul Honda plans to sell 1 million vehicles in North 

: The six firms are JznrolitL, Jinro America dnsyear.abont 900,000 of which will be sold 
Indurtries Co^ Jinro.General Foods m the United States. _ 

Go„ Jinro-Coars Brewing Co., Jinro The company’s animal North American production 

Construction Co. andmrro Mass capachy u 800,000 vehicles. It will make up^he 
Merchandising Inc., the bank said, difference with imports from Japan. 


wito imports from Japan. 


Malaysia Firm to Buy Thai Broker 


As pert of wide-ranging reforms to de- 
regulate the economy, die Philippines ended 
more than two decades of fuel price controls 
in February. That opened the industry to com- 

Singapore Sees . 
Smaller Drop 
In Its Exports 

Caused by Ow Stuff Frm Dopadta 

SINGAPORE — Singa- 


petition from foreign companies like Pet- 
roleum Authority of Thailand and France’s 
Total SA, which plan to set up gasoline re- 
tailing outlets. 

Petron plans to add40 gas stations to its 992- 
outiet network and to reforbish 40 stations. 

But many analysts remain -skeptical about 
Petron ’s prospects. Its two long-standing 
rivals, Pilipinas Shell Petroleum Corp. and 
Caltex Philippines Inc., have already stepped 
up their advertising and completed upgrades 
to their gas-station networks in Manila. 

“Deregulation effectively ends die Phil- 
ippines’ history of guaranteed profit mar- 
gins,” said Regina Manzano, analyst at Phil- 
ippine Asia Equity Securities Inc. 

Petron officials said its low costs, and its 
partnership with Saudi Aramco. the world’s 
largest oil producer, would ensure its con- 
tinued dominance of the industry. 


Source: Telekurs tacnttbonal Herald Tribune 

Very briefly; 

• Indonesia said it would proceed with its “national car” 
program despite Japan’s plans to seek a World Trade Or- 
ganization ruling on the issue. Indonesia’s national car policy 
gives PT Timor Pntra Nasional. controlled by President 
Suharto’s youngest son, Hutomo Mandala Putin, tax and tariff 
breaks to produce the Timor car in association with Kia 
Motors Corp. of South Korea. 

•Japan’s leading index of economic activity stood at 44.4 
points in February, unchanged from January and below the 
boom-or-bust line of 50 points for the second consecutive 
month, the economic planning agency said. 

• Hong Leong Corp. of Singapore said it was forming a $40 
million joint venture with AMF Bowling Worldwide of the 
United States to build and operate 20 bowling centers in the 
Philippines, Malaysia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Ibailaiid and 

Hiina 

• Nine current and former executives of the Japanese de- 
partment store operator Takashimaya Co. agreed to pay a 
total of 170 million yen ($135 million) to the company in 
compensation for payoffs to gangsters. 

• The Philippines said its budget deficit shrank 58 percent in 
the first quarter of 1997, thanks to lower-than -expected debt 
payments because of lower interest rates. The Bureau of the 
Treasury said the deficit totaled 648 milli on pesos ($24.6 
million) in the three months ended March 31. 

• American Express Co. said its Australian unit would 
introduce its First credit card, charging a 13.85 percent interest 
rate. 

• Ingerso 11-Rand Co. said it had formed a joint venture with 
Wuxi Boiler Works to make road building equipment for use 
in China's general construction and infrastructure devel- 
opment industries. 

• South Korea said that foreign direct investment jumped 372 
percent in the first three months of 1997 from a year ago, to 
$2.12 billion, spurred by the country’s deregulation drive, 

officials Said. Reuters. AFP. Bloomberg 


Bloomberg News 

.« ; BANGKOK — Amsteel C 
Securities Pl^^f Thailand 


Securities PLC of Thailand in die latest in 
vyhat may be a string of foreign forays into the 
ailing Thai securities industry. . 

- Amsteel Capital will buy 99.6percent of 
t£e firm from Securities One PLC for an 
undisclosed amount • 

? The agreement is the latest move by a 
foreign company to invest in the Thai se- 
curities industry, whose mounting financial 
problems opened the door to foreigners look- 
ing to enter the restricted market cheaply. 

< Amsteel Capital has been seeking a 
foothold in Thailand for several years, in- 
vestment bankers said. It already bas units in 


olNliAPUKc — 5mga- 
lippmes. pore’s non-oil exports fell 2.1 

The company is a unit of Amsteel Corp., percent in March, figures re- 
one of the Lion group of companies con- leased Monday showed, a 
trolled by William Cheng , a Malaysian fin- «n«lter decline than many 
ancier. Amsteel has interests in retailing, economists expected, 
steelmaking, pr operty development and The Trade Development 
stockhroking. Board said exports of non-oil 

Amsteel essentially is buying rally First roods fell to 7.67 billion 
Asia’s securities license, because the Thai Singapore dollars ($53 bil- 
company’s staff and most assets have been lion) in March from a year 
absorbed into Securities One during die past ago, after falling 7.9 percent 
year. in February. 

Shares of Amsteel Corp. dosed up 8 sen (3 Economists said the data 

cents), at 2.02 ringgit, on the Kuala Lnmpor indicated die economy was 


Board said exports of non-oil 
roods fell to 7.67 billion 
Singapore dollars ($53 bil- 
lion) in March from a year 


Stock Exchange. At the close of trad 
B angkok, glares of Securities One had 
1 baht (33 cents) to 263 baht 


STRATEGY: AT&T* Global Plan Unraveling 


Continued from Page 11 

1 j AT&T’s Wraid Partuers program is “more 

.%3ce a membership council, and die mem- 
bership council does not hold the keys of 
investment,” Mr. Goodiree said, 
i AT&T said that h was disappointed in 
Telefonica’s departure but dial it was con- 
fident that the remaining Uhisource partners 
carriers in the Netherlands. Sweden and 
Switzerland — would continue their drive 
toward offering pan-European service. Still, 
John Legere, the company’s vice president 
fpr global strategy, conceded th at die com- 
pany was grappling with how to improve ties 
with its overseas partners. 

’ ‘The issue is sustainability,” he said. ’* As 
techno logy changes, as markets liberalize, as 
(feoduct cycles trod to quicken — bow do you 
splidify that relationship so you’re moving in 
lockstep with new innovations?” 

? Mr. Legere would not say how AT&T 
intended to do that. 

■h . Berge Ayvazian. an analyst for the Yaokee 
’Group in Boston, said that respons i bilit y res- 
ted vwtfa John Walter, AT&T’s president and 
the anointed successor to the company’s 
d h aa man, Robert Allen. 


“AT&T is at a turning point,” Mr- Ayvazi- 
an said. “John Walter has taken only a do- 
mestic operating role and has not jumped onto 

the wadd stage, where AT&T has been flail- 
ing. They need to send him on a diplomatic 
mission to make these personal ielanonshipg. 


on trade for recovery in the 
second half of the year. Non- 
oil exports are closely mon- 
itored as an indicator of the 
health of the inland nation. 
Electronics and related 
products make up the major- 
ity of Singapore’s exports. 

Singapore's growth 
slowed to 7 percent last year 
from 83 percent in 1995 as 
slower export demand 
crimped production. The gov- 
ernment expects growth of 5 


Until now, he’s neglected the intemation- percent to 7 percent tins 


The three big telecommunications alli- 
ances are likely to shift their attention to Asia 
next, where AT&T has made the most pro- 
gress but has yet to enter an ironclad re- 
lationship with a major carrier. 

AT&T’s World Partners include Hong 
Kong Telecom and KDD, the Japanese com- 
petitor to Nippon Telegraph & Telephone 
Carp., but those relationships are not ex- 
clusive. 


(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Li ij’i >. ?ii > i l 


Schlumberger 


TOenadcsB 
29 April, 1 


I m w iw« that m from* 
at Kas-AmodaHt; N-V,‘ 


— Spailrwi 172, Amsterdam, ibe 

elusive. CaUBewet ScUnmbctser limited repr. 

Cable & Wireless PLC, Britain’s main 5 shares of common stock or ustaoi 
competitor to BT, owns a mak>rhy stake of per ■nine, win be p«y»bi* with DOs. 
Hone Kong Telecom. So for. Cable & Wire- 

hues, as bas NTT, an even bigger prize. But USS0475 per .&«). The dividend 
Mr. Ayvazian said that might not last much distribution u not subject to tax with 


“If anything,” he said, “NTT is j 
be impressed with what BT and Mi 
accomplished.” 


holding at aomve. 

P ABXBA S 

A1MONIS1HA31EKANTOOK B-V. 
Amsterdam, 18 April, 1997 


O RRJRNO AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


/PEXC0 


International Foreign Exchange Corporation 
YOUR GOAL IS OUR GOAL 

Mar^ 3 - S% - 24 hour iradng <fes*c 
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on bow to place your listing contact’ 
JuHan STAPLES in London 
TeLt (44) 171 8S6 4802 
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Rcralk ^S Srilmne 


On Wednesday, May 28, 1997 , 
as the 50th anniversary of The Marshall Plan approaches , 
the International Herald Tribune will publish a Special Report on 

The Marshall Plan 
and its Legacy 

Among the distinguished contributors will be: 

■ Stephen E. Ambrose, presidential historian and best-selling author, will provide a look 
back at the plan - its birth and the motives, vision and politics that drove one of the 
century's boldest moves. 

■ Josef Joffe, the widely respected foreign editor and columnist of the Suddeutsche 
Zeitung, will look back at the Plan's impact on a defeated Germany, how it may have 
helped shape the post-war personality of its people and the nation itself, what endures 
today, and whether the same concepts that made such movements necessary 50 years 
ago can work today in the east ana elsewhere. 

■ Michel Crazier, French sociologist and author, who studied at Harvard as a young 
man under Marshall Plan funding, will bring alive both the reality of the immediate 
past-war years in France and central Europe as the continent struggled for momentum 
and the perspective of Europe 50 years later. 

■ U.S. Secretory of Stale Madeleine Albright will write about what she sees as the 
Marshall Plan's relevance today, as governments seek a new departure for post-cold 
war Europe. 

■ Art Budiwald, humorist and columnist, who chronicled the high-jinks and law- jinks of 
post-war Paris for the International Herald Tribune for so many years, will remind us of 
what it was like there in the late 1 940s and early 1 950s when Americans resumed 
their lave affair with France and poured dollars, movies and lots of other things into 
the continent. 

■ Flora Lewis, the distinguished former columnist of The New York Times, will reflect 
upon the truly revolutionary aspect of the Plan, which was not really the ability to 
finance it but rather the imposition of cooperation, the forcing of a new way of 
working together upon countries and mancets. 

■ Joseph FHdieft, the IHFs veteran political correspondent, will take us through the 
colorful yet less grand aspects of these amazing 50 years. The by-products of the Plan 
•were extraordinary, everything from apple orchards in France to the expansion of U.S. 
covert action to penetrate French Communist trade unions. 

■ Barry James, another venerable IHT correspondent, will remind us of the different 
ways that European countries — especially France, Italy and the UK — responded to the 
plan and to each other, haw that era provided a glimpse of attitudes that still prevail 
today, and how one European in particular, Jean Mon net, sought to turn these 
disparate efforts and attitudes into lasting political achievements and European 
institutions. 

Far more information about advertising in this Special Report , please contact Bill Mahder in 

Paris at (33-1) 41 43 93 78 or fax (33-1) 41 43 92 13 or e-mail: supplements@iht.com. 


THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 






PACE 18 





&! C terai 


Nick Price acknowledging the 
applause after making a birdie. 


Price Ends Drought 


GOLF Nick Price won his first 
PGA Tour title since the 1994 Ca- 
nadian Open, shooting a 5-under- 
par 66 on Sunday to complete a six- 
stroke victory in the MCI Classic at 
Hilton Head Island. 

Price finished 15-under par on 
269. Jesper Pamevik and Brad Fax- 
on tied for second. Price said the 
victory was for caddy Jeff 
(Squeeky) Medlen who is suffering 
from leukemia had a bone-marrow 
transplant last week. 

Tom Lehman tied for fourth, 
which was enough to move him 
into top place when the world rank- 
ings were announced on Monday. 
Lehman ended Greg Norman's 96- 
week streak at No. 1. 

• Hale Irwin retained his title in 
the PGA Seniors* Championship 
Sunday, shooting a 4-under-par 68 
for a 12-stroke victory over Jack 
Nicklaus and Dale Douglass. ( AP ) 


Kenyan First in Boston 


marathon Lameck Aguta of 
Kenya won die Boston Marathon 
on Monday, pulling away from 
compatriot Joseph Kamau with a 
mile to go to finish in 2 hours. 10 
minutes, 33 seconds. 

Fatuma Roba of Ethiopia, the 
Olympic champion, won the wom- 
en's race in an unofficial time of 
2:26:24. South Africans ELana 
Meyer and Colleen De Reuck fin- 
ished second and third. (AP) 


Costa Wins in Barcelona 


tennis Albeit Costa brushed 
aside fellow Spaniard Albert 
Portas, 7-5, 6-4, 6-4, Monday in the 
final of the Barcelona Open. Portas, 
a qualifier, was playing his first 
best-of-five-set match. (Reuiers) 


6 Wickets for Spinner 


cricket Sri I-ankan spinner 
Muthrah Muralitharan took a career 
best six wickets for 98 Monday but 
could not prevent Pakistan from 
gaining a first innings lead on the 
third day of the first test in 
Colombo. Pakistan reached 390 for 
nine wickets by the close. 

• Mohammed Azharuddin 
reached 5,000 test runs Monday as 
the fifth test between India and the 
West Indies moved toward a draw 
in Georgetown. Azharuddin was 
out for 31, and India was 301 for 
five wickets in its first innings at 
lunch on the final day. (Reuters) 


WTOWATH3XM. 


Sports 


Webber Lets Loose, 
And the Bullets Fly 



CmpArf by Ow SktfFrua Dbpctdxt 

With 10 minutes remaining in foe 
third quarter of Sunday’s game against 
the Cleveland Cavaliers, the Washing- 
ton Bullets came to realization that they 
were fighting for their playoff lives. 

The point was driven home, emphat- 
ically, by forward Chris Webber, who 




implored his teammates to * ‘Show some 


(expletive) emotion." 

Shaking off their jitters, the Bullets 
responded, and in the process ended the 


NBA’s longest postseason drought. 
Washington's 85-8 1 victory secured the 


Washington's 85-8 1 victory secured the 
ream 's first playoff berth in nine years. 

As a reward, Washington must face 
Michael Jordan and the defending 
champion Chicago Bulls in a best-of- 
five game series. 

* ‘I'm not even think ing about Chica- 
go right now — I just want to enjoy 
this,” said Rod Strickland, the Wash- 
ington point guard, who had 19 points 
and nine assists. Webber led the team 
with 23 points and 17 rebounds, but his 
shining moment may have been his 
court-side exhortation. 

"I was just so nervous — for a lot of 
die game I couldn’t even talk on the 
bench," he said, "Coach told me to 
calm down, but at that point I just had to 
let loose." 

The Bullets had entered the final 
game of the regular season with a one- 
game lead over Cleveland for the eighth 
and final playoff spot in the Eastern 
Conference. But Cleveland, through a 
tiebreaker, would have earned the berth 
with a victory. 

Juwan Howard ended a 3 -for- 13 
shooting drought by sinking a turn- 
around jumper from the foul line to give 
Washington an 84-80 lead with 133 
seconds to play. "For three years, I've 
bad to sit on losing, and that’s not easy 
to do." said Webber, who made the 
postseason for the first time since his 
rookie year with Golden State. 

Howard had 1 1 points. Calbert 
Cheaney had nine points, including a 


dunk and three-point play in the crucial 
closing minutes. 

Buck* 120 , Hornets ioo In Milwau- 
kee. Vin Baker scored 31 points on 13- 
of- 13 shooting as die Bucks, who missed 
the playoffs for the sixth straight season, 
crushed tbs playoff bound Charlotte. 

‘ ‘I don ’t think the guys cared one way 
ox another.” said Dave Co wens, the 
Charlotte coach. "We were kind of in- 
between, whether we cared about win- 
ning this game and solidifying fifth 
place to play the Hawks, or just slipping 
one game and playing New York. 4 * 

Ikd Blazers IOO, Lakers 96 In Port- 
land, the Lakers were down, 98-96, 
when Clifford Robinson clobbered Sha- 
quhle O'Neal as he went up for a layup. 
The Blazers then called timeout to let 
O’Neal, a notoriously poor free-tirrow 
shooter, think about the pressure. O’Neal 
had shot much better from the line since 



coming back from a knee injury and was 
2-for-3 in the game. But his fust attempt 


was far off, and he had to miss tire second 
one to give the Lakers a shot But Robin- 
son grabbed the rebound, was fouled and 
made two free throws with less than a 
second left to give the Blazers victory. 

Rockats 103 , spin 89 In San Ant- 
onio, Hakeem Olajuwon scored 27 


S iints and Charles Barkley added 24 for 
ouston^ which never trailed in the 
second half but could not pull away, 
Nate ioo. Hawks 92 Jim Jackson had 
25 points, 10 rebounds and 12 assists for 
his second triple-double for New Jersey 
this month. Atlanta coach's, Lenny 
Wilkens, rested his starters and reserve 
Alan Henderson led Atlanta with a ca- 
reer-high 19 points. 

Piston s 124, Paeon 120 In Indiana- 
polis, Grant Hill scored nine ofhis career- 
high 38 points in overtime for Detroit. 

Jazz 113, Kings 109 In Sacramento. 
Karl Malone had 18 points and John 
Stockton had 17 points and 14 assists as 
Utah beat the Kings. . 

In a game reported in some editions 
Sunday: 

Raptors 125, Celtics 94 In Boston, 

Damon Stoudamixe scored 32 points for 
Toronto. (WP,AP) 



Basketball Title Is Up in the Air for Europe’s Pros 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 


ROME — Pressure will be the great 
ally for the underdogs in European bas- 
ketball's Final Four games this week. 

Oiimpjia Ljubljana, the highly or- 
ganized champion of Slovenia, must 
hope that Oiympiakos. the Greek cham- 
pion for four seasons, will be hindered 
by the clamoring expectations that do 
not exist in American professional bas- 
ketball in its semifinal Tuesday night. In 
the other semifinal another unfanried 
team, Villeurbanne of France, faces 
Barcelona, last year's beaten finalist 
la the National Basketball Associ- 
ation finals, the Chicago Bulls can af- 
ford to lose the opening game, knowing 
that they still have time to win the best- 
of-seven series. Not so in the Final Four 
of the European championship: The 


finals in 1994 and 1995. Barcelona was 
runner-up last year, though many be- 
lieve it was robbed of the title by. two 
officiating errors in the final seconds. 

Oiympiakos is the favorite largely 
because of its front line. An argument 
can be made that the top three centers in 
the Final Four all play for Oiympiakos. 
They are Panagiotis Fassoulas, the top 
Greek center of all time; Dragan Tarlac. 
who is expected to be scouted personally 
by Jerry Krause, general manager of the 
Chicago Bulls, who own Tariac's NBA 
rights; and the German giant Christian 
Welp, who played in the NBA. Their 
strength under the basket is balanced by 
a depth of European talent through tire 
forwards and all the way back to David 
Rivers, an American who is one of the 
elite point guards in Europe. 


opening game might be the only game 
forOlympiakos. There will be no second 


Ljubljanacould be a terrific opponent 
for fee Greeks. Ljubljana resembles one 


forOlympiakos. There will be no second 
chance if fee team loses to Otimpija. 

If things go according to plan. 
Oiympiakos should expect to advance 
to fee one-game final Thursday against 
Barcelona. 

In that case, each side wpuld feel 
deserving of its first European cham- 
pionship. Oiympiakos lost the European 


of those low-seeded American college 
teams that mow down the contenders 
each year in fee National Collegiate 
Athletic Association tournament The 
team regularly uses five substitutes, 
plays a swarming defense and does not 


depend on one player for its success. 
Ljubljana and Villeurbanne will dra 


Ljubljana and Villeurbanne will draw 
faith from Paztizan Belgrade, fee 1992 
champion; Limoges of France, the win- 


ner in 1993, and Joventut Badafona, 
which won in 1995. All of those teams 
seized the European championship when 
the apparent favorites couldn't withstand 
the pressures of the Final Four. 

Those pressures are magnified for the 
big Greek clubs, which pay exorbitant 
salaries — by European standards — to 
satisfy their supporters, surely the most 
fanatical in world basketball. 

"A team like Oiympiakos knows it 
has one shot, and that one bad day can 
ruin it for them," said Delaney Rudd, a 
former NBA point guard with Villeur- 
banne. "In our case, I could never have 
imagined a team like ours being in the 
Final Four. But now, if a few people on 
the other teams don’t go to sleep the 
night before the game, if they take a few 
bad jump shots tire next day and they 
haven’t put us away wife 10 minutes to 
go, you could find a little team like ours 
being champion. ' ’ 

Villeurbanne beat Barcelona twice 
this season, but both victories came be- 
fore Barcelona was transformed by its 
New Year’s acquisition of the Alek- 
sandar Djordjevic, a Serbian. Djordjevic, 
fee only non-American starting at point 
guard in the Final Four, is probably the 


best clutch player in Europe. 
Villeurbanne has been blessed by fee 




, Cute 





TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1997 




Playoff Picture 
Becomes Gear 
In NBA Finalesr 


' V i'-“ 


* iMr 





I. 


The Associated Press 

The playoff picture in the National 
Basketball Association rci ^ n S, 
cloudy throughout the last day of the? 
regular season. . 

All the matchups weren tfinatiaid un- 
til 9:08 P.M. Sunday when fee fifth ancT 
sixth seeds in the East were finally setr** 
The preceding six hours settled foe- 
No. 8 spot in the East, foe Pacific DP' 
vision tide, the seedings of five teams and^ 
fee matchups in six of the eight senes.-**” 
The first matter to be settled Sunday 
was tiie eighth and final playoff spot m- 
tbe East Washington beat host Clev- 
eland to earn tiie right to face the Chicago 5 
Bulls, the defending champion. "~ 


rw*'f 


***» r 






The Los Angeles Lakers would have 
won fhf* Pacific Division if they had 








beaten Portland, but Shaquille O’NeaL 

missed two late free throws and the Trail' 

Blazers won at home, 100-96. ' - , 

That gave the division to Seattle and *■ 
knocked the Lakers down to the No. 4* 
seed. They will face fee Trail Blazers.- - 
Charlotte and Detroit finished with 
the same record, 54-28, but the Pistons* 
got the higher seed because they won- 
the season series, 3-1. " 

Houston beat San Antonio, 103-99, To 
finis h with the same record as Seattle. 
Even though fee Rockets are fee No. 3' 
seed and the Sonics are No. 2, Houston- 

would have the home-court advantage if 

tire teams met in fee second round be- 
cause fee Rockets won fee season’ 


**& 




--"'i 


_■=? a* 




Mark West, left, of the Cavaliers watching a shot by the Bullets’ Chris 
Webber soar over his bead. Washington won to reach the NBA playoffs. 


return this month of center Ronnie Smith, 
whojjas recovered from major knee sur- 


wnoiias recovered rrom major knee sur- 
gery. He came back after Jim BOba, fee 
forward who captains 1 the French national 


forward who captains the French national 
team, suffered a terrible injury. Running 
off fee court after Villeurfoanne's 
quarterfinal upset of Efes Pflsen-Istanbol 
three weeks ago, Bilba tried to push open 
his locker-room door but shattered a pane 
of glass in fee door instead. The glass 
severed an artery in his wrist, and he 
underwent four hours of emergency sur- 
gery in Istanbul. He will find out in three 
months if he can play again. 

Oiympiakos arrived in Rome without 
its backup forward Evric Gray, who said 
he was suspended for failing a recent 
doping test for the drug ephedrine. 
Gray, an American, said be had been 
taking something called "Up Your 
Gas" — which he described as "an 
over-the-counter vitamin" — for three 
years without being aware that he was 
risking a drug penalty. 

Players in the United States are not 
subjected to fee drug tests routinely 
carried out in most European nations 
where basketball is played. Gray said he 
was going to take a news clipping home 
to show his American friends "feat I’m 
not some druggie — it’s not like I was 
taking cocaine or something like that." 


senes. 

While die playoff teams were wor- 
rying about their opponents, some of tiie’ 
nonqualifies were beginning to cleah > 
house. The Philadelphia 76ers fired 
coach Johnny Davis and general manage^ 
Brad Greenberg. On Monday, the Denvfih 
Nuggets fired coach Dick Motta. r 

The Indiana Pacers' coach. Larry 
Brown, said be would decide whether to 
leave within 10 days. Donnie Walsh, the, 
general manager, said the team was 
willing to let Brown out of the last tw£ 
years of his contract -»•* 

In Boston, the Celtics’ coach and gen- 
eral manager, MJL. Carr, said he would 
take a week’s vacation before deciding; 
what course his team will take. 2 1 
In individual statistical races. Mi- 
chael Jordan won an unprecedented 
ninth scoring title with an average o£ 
29.6 paints. 

John Stockton’s nine-year run as the 
NBA’s assists leader came to an end as 
he finished second to Mark Jackson, qf 
tire Pacers. Jackson averaged 1 1 .4 assists 
— one more per game than Stockton. T.’ 
Dermis Rodman, who missed fee fi- 
nal 13 games because of a knee injury^ 
won his sixth straight rebounding title 
wife a 16.1 average. • ^ 

Gbcorgbe Muresan, tire Washington 
center, had the highest field goal per- 
centage, .604. for the second straight 
year. Z: 

Mark Price of Golden State had the* 
league’s best free-throw percentage, -at*' 
90-6, for the third time in his career. He 
beat Cleveland’s Terrell Brandon by 
.001 percentage points. *. 

Mookie Blaylock led fee league tti 
steals with an average of 2.71, tire low? 

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est leading average since Utah's Rickey 
Green averaged 2.65 in 1983-84. 


Green averaged 2.65 in 1983-84. 

Dikembe Mutombo needed eigfij 
blocked shots to tie Shawn Bradley for 
the highest average, 3.40, but had none 
in the Hawks’ meaningless loss at New 
Jersey. He played just 15 minutes. 

Tire Hornets and Knicks will open tfcje 
playoffs Thursday night. Other games 
feat night are Orlando at Miami, tire Life 
Angeles Clippers at Utah and Minnesote 
at Houston. 5 


« 55 : 



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made an awful mistake in fee first 
minute, the United States rallied twice 
and finally salvaged a 2-2 tie when a 
Mexican substitute, Nicolas Ramirez, 
headed the ball into his own goal in the 
74th minute. 

After a frantic, deflating start, the 
United States regained its composure, 
played wife purpose in maintaining pos- 
session. got assertive defense from Ed- 
die Pope (who also scored) and Alexi 
Lai as and displayed much-needed speed 
and flair from a pair of German imports. 
David Wagner and Michael Mason. 

Still, tire Americans fallal to defeat 
their fiercest rival at home. The Amer- 
icans' general lack of speed and cre- 
ativity was again apparent Sunday. 

Even after forward Luis Hernandez 
was sent off for what, according to Steve 
Sampson, the U.S. coach, was an un- 
deserved red card on a tackle of Lalas in 
fee 69th minute, fee Americans could 
not put the ball in the net wife a man 
advantage Far the final 21 minutes. 

Thiny-nine seconds into tire game, 
Keller took a back toss from Lalas and 
took his time clearing fee balL Carlos 
Hennostiio closed in on Keller, who 



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Eric Wynalda driving past Mexico’s Ramon Ramire* to aS^aMer? 


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reer scoring leader. The bail struck Her- 
mosiflo's forehead, boorneranged over 
Keller and bounced into the net 
Hermosillo said feat the Mexican 
coach “told us to pressure Keller, that 
he gets very nervous." 

In the 34th minute, Mexico failed to 
clear a free kick from Reyna. Pope 


arrived unmarked at the far post and 
pushed tire loose ball past fee sliding 
Mexican goalkeeper, Adolfo Rios, to tie 
fee score. 

In the 54fe minute. Hernandez beat an 
offside trap and chipped the ball over 
Keller to put Mexico ahead again 

But in the 74th minute. Ramirez, deep 
in his own penalty area, attempted to 
head the ball out of play. Instead he 

placed the ball perfectly against the bot- 
tom of the goalpost and it bounced into 
fee goal. 


■ Boca Juniors in Free Fall 

Jose Luis Chilaven. the Velez Sars- 
field goalkeeper, converted another 


penalty to send Boca Juniors sliding 
toward another crisis Sunday. 

Chilavert equalized in the 43 d minute 
after Boca took an early lead. 

A goal nine minutes from the end by 
sinker Claudio Moriggi gave Velez a 2- 
1 away victory and left Boca in 13tb 
place. 

Boca was jeered off fee pitch after 
losing against opponents who played 
wife 10 men after fee 20fe minute, when 
Claudio Husain was shown a red card 
andexpelled. 

Unfashionable Colon, a twwn t+iat has 
never wot a major tide, stayed cop of the 
Clausura championship, meanwhile, by 
beating San Lorenzo, 1-0. 


- I * 



V Li? 










































N 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1997 


PAGE 19 



SPORTS 


T , Cubs Get a Victory 

Mete Succumb to Give Chicago a 1-14 Start 


CrmpOrd by Ol» Stiff Fran Oapacha 

" After opening the season with 14 straight 
losses, winch set a National League recoid, 
tbe. Chicago Cubs finally won. 

They beat the New York Mets. 4-3, in the 


tt 


tin the second game, the Cubs nearly blewa 
4-1 lead in the bottom of the ninth Chicago's 
closer, Mel .Rojas, strained a hamstrin g in the 




ttntj 

ir.V 


eighth inning; Tudc. WendeQ took over in die 
njntii and allowed a bit and a walk. 

./■The Mets' 'slogger Todd Hundley fooled 

out T^^^oce Johnson tapped a twc^nm 
doable, and the Cabs’ precious lead was down 
to! one run. 

-■-But Manny Alexander grounded out to 
shortstop, and the Cubs’ players spilled onto the 
field to shake hands, a simple and si gnificant 
i&ual they had awaited for three weeks. 

. .Chicago’s first baseman, Mark Grace, 
hugged the Cobs' manager, Jim Riggleibaa, 
and the Cubs* reliever Bob Patterson handed 
out cigars in the clubhouse, 
s Cari Everett hit two home runs in the first' 
game, becoming the fifth player in Mets bis- 
ttfry to homer from both sides of the plate in 
the same game.' ‘ 

, -“ft’s a brutal start. I don’t think tins record 
wDI ever be broken,’’ Mark Grace of the Cubs 
said. “Yon have to play bad to do that." 
t',.Mnte Sox 8, Vankoos 7 Tony Phillip s has 
drawn more than 1,000 walks in his major- 
lpague career. By any standard, however, the 
walk he drew in the 1 1th inning that 
Chicago a victory over New Yen* was 
•- Batting with the bases loaded and two out in 
the bottom of the 11th, Phillips ran the count 
to 3-1 against reliever Brian Boehringer. 

. . That's when the fan started. 

- Phillips began stqmmg in and out of the 
batter’s box and Boehringer began stepping 


Cordero Hits Homer 
As Red Sox Beat Orioles 

The Associated Press 

Wil Cordero homered in a three-run 
fourth inning, and the Boston Red Sox 
beat the Baltimore Orioles. 4-2, Monday 
in the Patriots Day meaning game. 

Aaron Sele allowed one run and five 
hits in 6% innings, walked five and struck 
out three. 

Scott Erickson' gave upaUfburnms — 
three earned — in 5V5 innings. Baltimore 
stranded runners in each of the first four 
innings and left nine on in afl. 

Boston went ahead in the fourth when 
Reggie Jefferson singled, Tim Naehring 
doubted, Troy O'Leary hit a sacrifice fly 
and Cordero hit his fourth homer, a drive 
over the Green Monster in left field. 



Oilers Daze Stars 
In 4-3 OT Victory 


Too Shurp/Thc Awnctard Pro* 

Toronto’s Julio Mosquera letting go his bat, which landed in the Blue Jays’ dugouL 


t gave pit 
odd. hit 


on and off the robber. Tbe first-base umpire, 
John Shulock, told both players to get down to 
business. 

. Phillips began barking at Shulock and had 
to be restrained by bis first-base coach, Ron 
Jackson. Shulock said tbe whole thing was a 
waste of time. 

“That was one of die da mn stupid childish 
gooes that these men play sometimes,” 
Shulock said. 

Boehringer’s next pitch was baS four, and 
Phillips walked to first base to score the 
winning ran. 

Qfamte 2 , Martins o Osvaldo Ffemandez 
itched well, and Jeff Kent and Rick Wilkins 
sacrifice flies as host San Francisco ran its 
winning streak to nine games. 

Rodciw 9, Brans 2 Darren Holmes, a re- 
liever making his first major-league start, held 
hot-hitting Atlanta in check, and Lany Walker 
and Quinton McCracken had four bus apiece 
for Colorado. 


Expo* 5, PhtUios 1; Expos 3, PfailOes 0 Pedro 

Martinez, making wily his second start of the 
season, pitched a strong game as visiting 
Montreal swept Philadelphia in a double- 
header. 

Montreal pitchers combined on a three- 
hitter as the Expos ended a threeigame slide 
with a victory in the opener. 

Astros 3, Dodgers i Craig Biggio hit two 
home runs, including a two-out, two-run shot 
off Tom Gandiotti in tbe eighth inning at Los 
Angeles. 

Pirates 5, Reds 3 Jon Lieber allowed one 
earned ran for tbe fourth consecutive stall as 
Pittsburgh beat Cincinnati, continuing the 
Reds’ woes cm the road. 

P edros 8, Cardinals 2 Quilvio Veras, Tony 
Gwynn and Ken Caminiti each drove in two 
runs as San Diego beat St. Louis in the finale 
of the first major-league series in Hawaii. 

Orioles 11 , Red Sox 1 Jerome Walton got his 
seventh straight hit for Baltimore, and Jimmy 


Key shut down Boston at Fenway Park. 

Marina* ji 10 , Twins 6 Ken Griffey hit his 
ninth home run, and Seattle beat Minnesota at 
the Kingdome. 

Tigers a, Athletics 2 Mark McGwire hit a 
491 -foot (150-meter) home run, becoming 
just the fourth player to clear the left-field roof 
at Tiger Stadium. Detroit overcame thar blow 
as Tony Clark hit a three-run homer, and Brian 
Hunter and Daraion Easley also connected. 

R ang e r s io, Blm days 5 Dean Palmer hit a 
grand slam and a home run with no one on 
base as Texas beat Toronto for the sixth 
straight time. 

Angels ii. Royals i Tim Salmon tied a 
career-high with five RBIs. and rookie Jason 
Dickson pitched a three-hitter at Kansas 
City. 

Indians 8, Brewers 4 Orel Hers Kiser pitched 
Cleveland past visiting Milwaukee in spite of 
hitting three batters, a career-high, and mak- 
ing a throwing error. (NYT, AP) 


The Associated Press 

With four minutes to play 
in Edmonton, the Oilers 
trailed the Dallas Stars, 3-0, in 
their Western Conference 
playoff game. 

But the Oilers drew even 
wiih goals by Doug Weight, 
Andrei Kovalenko and Mike 

MHli Playoffs 

Grier and then won the game 
Sunday, 4-3, nine minutes 
and 15 seconds into overtime 
with a goal by Kelly Buch- 
berger. 

Mike Modano, Benoit 
Hogue and Joe Nieuwendyk 
gave the Stars a three-goal 
lead before tbe end of the 
second period. 

The Oilers lead the first- 
round series, 2- 1 , over Dallas. 
Game 4 is Tuesday night in 
Edmonton. 

Bladdtawfcs4, Avalanche 3 

In Chicago, the Blackhawks 
outworked Colorado, the de- 
fending Stanley Cup cham- 
pion. to win on Sergei 
Krivokrasov’s goal 11:03 in- 
to the second overtime. 

The Blackhawks blew a 3- 
1 third-period lead, but the 
Avalanche helped them by 
missing several scoring 
chances. Colorado would 
have been hopelessly behind 
if not for Patrick Roy’s stellar 
goal tending. 

Eric Daze scored twice and 
Tony Amonte once for Chica- 
go. Keith Jones. Rene Corbet 
and Claude Lemieux had 
goals for the Avalanche. 


The Avalanche is ahead, 2- 
1, in the best-of-seven series 
thai resumes Tuesday in 
Chicago. 

Rangaro 3, Pantharo O In 

the Eastern Conference, Mike 
Richter stopped 31 shots for 
his seventh career playoff 
shutout as New York won in 
Fieri da_ 

John Vanbiesbnoucfc had 
blanked New York for four 
and a half periods before 
Wayne Gretzky broke his spell 
with a slapshot in the second 
period of the game Sunday. 

Esa Tikkanen and Luc 
Robitaille also scored for tbe 
Rangers to tie the series at one 
game each. 

Red Wings 3, Hue* 2 In St. 
Louis, Brendan Shanahan and 
Steve Yzerman scored goals 
on power plays to end a dom- 
inating run by St. Louis’s 
penalty killers. Kris Draper 
scored the first goal for the 
Red Wings, who took a 2-1 
lead in the best-of-7 series. 
Brett Hull got his first goal of 
the playoffs and Joe Murphy 
also scored for the Blues. 

The Red Wings had gone 
0-for-14 on the power play in 
the first two games but were 
2-for-9 in Game 3. 

CoyotM 4, Mighty Ducks 1 

Darrin Shannon scored two 
first-period goals while Niko- 
lai Khabibulin held off Ana- 
heim, which leads the series 
2-1. with 30 saves for a 
Phoenix victory at home. 
Mike Gartner broke out of a 
scoring slump to add the 
Coyotes' fourth goal. 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


RMoaiaawSwwpmM 

EAST MWION 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

tetttotore 

11 3 

786 

— 

Tqnxtto 

8 7 

.533 

3» 

Boston 

• B 

JDO 

4 

(Mott 

8 11 

421 

5V4 

New York 

7 11 

789 

6 

CBMTRAL DMBKM 



MMreufcee 

8 6 

-571 

_ 

MkmesaM 

10 B 

.556 

— 

Oentond 

8 9 

471 

114 

Kansas City 

7 8 

467 

111 

CMcngo 

5 12 

794 

414 


waronnonN 



SeaMe 

11 7 

411 

_ 

Ttes 

1 7 

-533 

114 

Oakland 

9 9 

JDO 

2 

AaatKta 

maa 

7 9 

438 

■ 

3 

HI 

BAST DIVISION 

1 



W L 

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Manta 

' 13 .4 

765 

— 

Ftodda 

10 7 

J88 

.3 i 

WKriMal 

T 9 

438 

5H 

New York 

6 11 

753 

7 

PUtadripMa 

5 12 

794 

8 

comAL divibion 



Houston 

11 7 

Jill 

— 

P^tshuigh 

8 B 

300 

2 

SL Louis 

6 11 

753 

4H 

Ctadmatt 

6 12 

733 

5 

Cfdcago 

1 14 

■rarowBHON 

JM7 

814 

SOTFrandsce 

1 13 3 

313 

_ 

CMarada 
Ua Angeles 

11 5 

10 6 

388 

325 

2 • 
3 

SaiDtogo 

9 7 

362 

4 




AUEmCAM LEABOE 

•It Ml OB#— 2 • 1 

SN no IT*—* 12 1 

jCoraoy, R. Lewis CO, Taylor CB3 and 
Moyne MocNar, Warn a) aad B. Johnson. 
W— MoetiMr, 1-1. L — Kanay, 0-2. 

HRs— Oak. McGwire (j£k MogadonCD. Do* 
Egstey CD. B. L Hunter 01. Tadort; P). 
MBwcufc s e n Ml BOO—* 7 3 

flu i d ft* MI HR-4 7 I 

Kent, Hoile (5k Wlekmon (6k Mbomdo OD 
and IMtKivr, HeratttK, KUne C7)r OT. 

Mesa ($9 and S. Atomac. 'H — HmNW, 1-0. 


L— wtdanarv 2-1. Sv Mesc CD. 

HRi— Mlwmkro Bwnta CD. OevNonA 
CbrtbCa. 

- 510 OR 210—11 It c 

lOty DM DM nt-1 3 1 

Dktaan and Leyrf&j Rusdv MLWHnms 
(ffl, R. Vans rex PUmto OT ant) 
MLSwcmy. w-DUm, M. Lr-ftusch.2- 
1. HR— Knmas CBit PoquoBe Q). 

Iliiteenri 000 OR 102—11 IS • 

■him m on pm— i i a 

Kay. TejMattwws OT, A. BaMMad 
Hodov Ganton Hammond CD. B. Henry 01. 
AUnmms 00, Sfaarmb CD, Truest ®J aid 
Haseknan. W-Key, G4L L— Gordon. 1-2. 
HR— Batttaora. Holies CD. 

Iterant* *30 002 BOO-,5 13 • 

Thb 114 12# •!*— 10 13 8 

Guzmv QaaaM (5), SpcAaitc (A, 
Crabtree OT raid Masquero Wirt, Ptritoaon 
OkWMMvidOTatd L Rodriguez. W- WHt . 
34L L— Granai VL HR*—' Toronto, C 
Delgado OT. Color CD. Trans— L Rodrigues: 
OT, ptenor 2 Hk Greer CD. 

Moor Yak M M M 00-7 12 0 

Chicago Ml 310 BOO OX-4 IS 0 

. DMean.Vka$matSLtldeoBOhShaeoo_ 
Ok B u etntn w er flO and Posada Bckfcritv T. 
CasBn CD. Stows I7I, C OBUto OT, 
XUttraanda OT. Lotfnr (ID and Kieutor, 
Kariwta CIO#. - W-Lovloe, 1-1. 

L— BoeMigK M. HRs — CNcaga Kinder 
0). Soopok CA. 

M to u eaHu OM 002 100-4 12 1 

Seat** BM 223 B9S— M 11 • 

MdiCd RBcWc Cfi, Obon (O, Guardado 
OTrAtutom OTand&MymarUbocii OT? 
Wataon. MoCantv OT, AMlo OT. Chartkn CD 
and Mamma. WIM OT. W-Wtott 2-1. 
L-WfcM* 2-Z Sw-Chodtoo CSS. 

KRs— MtemraaSa, T. Waftw (11. Caarear CD. 
SaatJK GrtfleyJrp). 

JMCnoHAL U! AOUE 

CUaif* in BM 000-2 5 I 

HawYott 2BS MB IBM 13 • 

■ RM OonKTradHM Cashm CD, Tab M, 
BoOHiMd OT and Sends Janes aid 
Handhy. W-Jonei, 2-1. b-TracteoJ, 0-3. 
HRs— OdcogaCrartCD. NovrYoiKOIenid 
(SO. Even# 2 CS. 

CMcngo BM 002 200-4 12 B 

Non York BM BIB om-j I 1 

Sscmri Oran: FMBar.Fansaoa OT, Rofas 
OT, IMuMI OT and Houston; Mflckt 
Borland (O, Bohawm («, Manual m. R. 
Jocdcsi OT and ACasINa Hnndtoy TO. 
W-FoflBfr l-l. Li— MOcktr M- Sv-WnruWI 


(l)-H R MssfYOefc M. Franco CD. 
Msatmd B3Q BO BOB— 5 11 • 

PUMRAta BM 100 BBB-1 3 • 

Ffetf atoms Judea Q. Veras OT and 
WMno BJWiaHB, BkEMr (7) and UsbarteiL 
w-JudBn, 2a l-b. Mimra, 04. &*— a 
MroflX 

MsaM 1M 1X0 MS— 3 6 • 

MB BM BBP 0 5 • 

: PJJMarlhMt. UiMna (B) and 
Rektieo Portugal Rofloom CS), Mtenbs OT, 
SpmdBn OT and PaenL w-PjjMartbuz.2- 
Ol L— Portuoot D-l. Sv — Urbina 0). 
CMdaafl Ido til BOO— 3 9 1 

M HsIm M 210 B2B BBS— 5 7 2 

MadVi Banes G3. Beflnda OT, Carrasca 
OT and Traibe n sMt Uetec. LotsaBt an. 
Ericks OT and UndnlL W-Ueheti 1-0. 
Lr-Madoenl-Z Sv—e ticks gg. 

AtaNa «IB ON 001-2 ■ 3 

Cnlarada • 300 B22 11*-* 3D B 

Smoltz, Embraa (O, Oontz C7J, Wide OT, 
BoiomU CBS and JXaprE Habnes. M. 
Munoz OT, L Roed OT, B. Run i OT and 
JeJtMd. W— Habnev 1-4 L— Smoltz, 2-3. 
HR-ABanta, J. Lopez 03. 

Howto* BQl BM Q20—<3 t I 

Ini nnmTri BOB 001 000— 1 c 0 

Hod, Martin QD. Hudek OT and EusObira 
LVUda, QnMB 0), HaB OT. Oattms OT 
and PtaM. vp-hoil 2-r. L-amfiottfc w. 
Ss-Hudsk D)- HR*— Houston, Blnlo 2 OT. 
Las Angela, Mondesi (S>. 

nmm w bm too-o 7 • 

SoNFnmdSCo 110 BOB B0S-4 5 1 

/LFemandm, Cook (7) and C JafmsaK 
OFemandet, D. Heray OT, RJtodH|!UA OT, 
BecfcOTandR.WBUns.W—O.Fornandez.2- 

1. L— A. Fernando. 2-2. 5 v— Beck 00). 

SL tools Ml 108 BBC— 2 * 0 

SOB Mega 201 4 M IBM-2 Z2 * 

Ronola Fio M otora (4k BatdwlQr OT, 
FOssns CR and Lanpkta Sheofltr OTi 
Ashby, B eipraai ffl) and Flaherty. 
W— Ashby, 1-1. L-RnBBb 1-1. HR— 5L 
Loui&GaracD. 


BASKETBALL 


NBASunmmc 


x-Orianda 

45 

37 

749 

16 

x- Washington 

44 

38 

-537 

17 

Now Jersey 

26 

56 

717 

35 

PhOadriphla 

22 

60 

768 

39 

Barton 

15 

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CStlRAL DMnON 



2-CMcoga 

69 

13 

741 

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x-AHanta 

56 

26 

.683 

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x-Dehtrit 

54 

28 

659 

15 

x-Cbariotto 

54 

28 

-659 

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Oevriaod 

42 

40 

-512 

27 

Imflana 

39 

43 

.476 

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MOwaukM 

33 

49 

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Tororto 

30 

52 

366 

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Qikngo vs. Washington 




Mtand wl Ortanoa 





New y o«k vs. Oxatorte 




Aflanla vs. DehoB 





WUIIBS 

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mOWEST PtVBJOH 




w 

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GB 

I- Utah 

64 

18 

780 

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x-Hoastan 

57 

25 

695 

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x-Mbtnesala 

40 

42 

MB 

24 

Dallas 

24 

SB 

793 

40 

Denver 

21 

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756 

42. . 

San Antonio 

20 

62 

744 

44 

Vancouver 

14 

-68 

.171 

50 

mcnconnsoH 



y'SeoMe 

57 

25 

.695 


x-LA. Lakers 

56 

26 

.683 

1 

x-Fwtfand 

49 

33 

798 

B 

x-Ptiaenlx 

40 

42 

488 

17 

x-LA. CBppem 

36 

46 

-439 

21 

Soaomteirip 

34 

48 

-415 

23 

GoUensitOn 

30 

52 

366 

27 


CzHoan coalerance «le3 
bMnnriMdoniffle) 
(x-CDndwd playoff berth) 


ATLANTIC WWaOM 

W L Pd GB 
y- Miami 61 31 JM - 

x-NcwYtxk 57 25 MtS 4 


Utah «. LA.Cteppws 
SeaMa vs. Pimak 
Houston vs. Minnesota 
LA. Lakaravs. Portland 

■SBMOtn 

31 33 29 32—125 
Boston 30 1* 17 20- *4 

T: Stoudranke 12-23 5-5 32, Christo 8-19 8- 
> 27. Stater 0-15 04 21: B: Day 8-172-2 22, 
Wofcer 7-22 54 21 .IWwrad*— Taranto 39 
(Janes 12), Boston 44 (Hamer 8). 
Assists— Taranto 25 (Stoudandredk Boston 
21 (Wtaleyfi). 

» 12 39 ZV- B5 
27 17 22 13 — 81 


W: Webber 9-16 24 23, SKtddand 7-16 54 
1 9; C Brandon 13-26 2-3 21 Patapenko 5-11 
2-2 12 RehauMb — Washington 56 (Webber 
ID, Qnaland 42 (Milts, HH 7). 
Assists — Washington 18 tSIrtOdund 9), 
aemtondKCSurall). 

HOMton 21 33 25 32—183 

San Afltoeio 23 23 21 32- 99 

H: Otatuwra 9-16 0* 27^akiey 0-19 7-9 
24 SA: Herrera 0-20 3-9 T9, WKns 7-13 34 
IB. itobeaft— Houston 54 (Barldey 14k San 
Antonio 5« (Henan 14). Assists— Houston 
20 (Braktoy, AMaaey 4k San Anfbaio 21 
(AtesanderD. 

LJL Lnken 26 22 34 23—96 

FSrBassf 30 » 18 23-1 no 

LAjCranpbeH 12-21 5-5 29. S47Neal 11-21 
2-S 24; P: CJtobfeisan 5-10 7-81& Anderaan 
7-16 2-2 18. Rebeunds— Las Angeles 42 
(Campbell 11), Portland SI (Sa bonis W. 
Assists— Las Angelas 19 (Van End 8). 
Portland 18 fCRoMnsof) 7k 
Ootnrtt 26 22 34 30 12-124 

Indiana 27 29 27 29 0-128 

D: HU 1228 1*Zl 3& MBls 9-14 0424? fc 
Sails 11-24' 7-9 29. Miller 7-14 04 2. 
Rebwnds— Dahntt m (MdOe 8), liyDono 64 
[DJDovts 14L Assists — DcSiutt 19 (HIB, 
MdOe D, IraBana 27 (Jadann ID. 

ABaeta 17 » 22 24-92 

New Jersey is 32 zi »— n» 

A: Henderson 9-181-1 19, Bcsiy 4-11 M 16f 
Njj Jackson 10-1604 25, GO 4-17 11-1323 
Wdes 9-19 34 23. Rebeund s A tlanta S3 
(Hendenon 10k Nm Jersey 65 

(MasscnbUfl 11). Asshto— Aflorda 30 
(Smith 4), New Jersey 31 UacksanlD. 
Chariette 21 34 19 26—108 

MlwaehM 31 33 33 23— 1M 

Cl Rice 7-15 44 21, Aridbon 7-13 2-3 1& M; 
Baker 13-135^ 31, GOflnm 10-11 3421 AHen 
7-1344 21.Reboaed»— Clwilalle 38 (Mason 
11), Mlwnukse SI (Baker, Robinson 8). 
Arabis— Charlotte 19 (Mason, SmBb 5), 
MBwaukea 30 (Dougins 10). 

UtOb 27 23 36 27—113 

SacRMmto 29 zi 28 31—109 

U: Stockton 6-9 44 17. Anderaon 6-12 2-2 
1« 5: Abdtf-Raut 1 1-167-9 34, Polynia 7-11 
54 19. Rebaaofe— mad 37 (Malone 6k 
Sa a uraera o 46 (Polynia 9). Assists— Utah 
29 (Stockton 14k Sacramento ZI (Smith 5). 


HOCKEY 


NHL Playoffs 


nflMUHD 

(BEKT-OF-7) 

BUNDATB RESULTS 

N.Y-Ra*flCrs 0 2 1-3 

Flerlda 0 0 0-0 

First Period; None. Second PerWfc New 
Yarik Gretzky 1 (Lldsteri 2. New York, 
TBJamen 1 (Graves. Messier) (pp). TteM 
Period: New York. RobBalBe 1 CGrWzky. 
Sundshum) Shots oa Beat New York 13-19- 
12—44. F- 144-9 — 31. Goalies: New York. 
(Debtor. F-VanbhsbroudL 
Demur 1 2 0—3 

St Louis 1 1 0—2 

First Period: D-Draper2 (Mrdtby, Kocuri 2, 
ST-Louik Hidll, Second Period: D-Shanahan 
1 (Murphy, Larionov) (pp). 4, SJ- Murphy 1 
(Hull) (pp). 5, D-Yteeranan 1 (Udsiram, 
Larionov) (ppLTMrd Period: None. Shots an 
get D- 13-104—29. S.L- 3415-26. 
GeaOes: D-veman. S-l_-Rihr- 
Coiorade B 1 2 0 B-3 

Orfcogo 1118 7-9 

First. Pertad: C-Dcae l (Carney) Seceed 
Period:' C-Joaes 1 (Soklc Lemieux) 3, C- 
AmantB 1 (Watanfeh, Surer) Tfafad Period; C- 
Daze 2 (Prabeit) 5. C-» Corbet 1 (Yeto, 
Lacroix) 6, C-Lsmleux 3 (Faon, Gusarov) 
Fbst Overtime: None. Second Overtime: 7, C- 
Krfrakrasw T, Shuts ms goah C- 4-12-14-16- 
5-S1. C- 9-194-144-57. GoaBes: C-Ruy. C- 
Hactatt. 

Anaheim 1 8 0-1 

Phoenix 3 B 1-4 

Ffcst Period: Phoenix. Shannon 1 
(Rmnbtg, RoentdO 7, Phoenix, Shannon 2 
(Quht) X PhoeabbTlnduik 3 (Ronnhifl) 4, A- 
Kariya 3 (Dalgneautt Miransv) (pp). Second 
Period— No scortoB- Tkkd Period: Phoenix, 
Gartner 1 (TVerdovsky, Rannkig) Shots ee 
goat A- 11 -9-11-31. Phoenix 7-12-7—26. 
GeMesrArHebert. Phoenix. KhaUbuBn. 
Potto* 2 10 0-3 

Edmaetea B 8 3 1—4 

First Period: D- Modano 2 Quhov) Cshj.2 
D-, Hague 1 (Sydor, Harvey) (pp). Second 
Period: D-Meuwendyk 2 (Hogue, Vrabeek) 
ThM Period: E-welgM 2 & E-, Kovateafca 1 
(Mrachant Mironov) (pp). & E-Grier 2 
IMCCOtw M chan O on) OMrtkne 7, E- 
Buchbemer 2 lUndprea Mironov) Shots ae 
goat D- 11-13-10442. E- 11-7-174—41. 
Gealtos: D-Moog. E-Joseph. 


Fmsamip 

SEMFMAL 

Laval El Nlcel 

WORLD CUP CUUkUmlM 
U^. 2, Mexico 2 

ITALIAN ratSTMVUIOM 
Napol 0, Atakmta 1 

Stahdouu, Juventus 55.- Parma 49: In- 
lernazlDnaie 48r Sampdaria 44.- Lazio 41 
Bologna <3; umne3e4l;Vkxnzn39, Ftorenn- 
na 39, Atokmtn 39; Milan 37; Roma 36: Nopal 
34; Placet im 29; CngRari 27, Perugia 27; 
Verona 23; Regglana 19. 

touoeuAawiooa 
Columbus 2, San Jose l 
Dallas 4 Cotanutol 
New England 2 Tampa Bay 1 
enu m B Mit EasMra Co c leren ce : D.C 9; 
Tanpa Bay 9; New England 6; Columbus & 
MY-NJ at Weste rn Conference: Kansas CBy 
7; Dallas & San Jose « Los Angetos 3 S Qd- 
orado.3. 


TENNIS 


Bawcel-omaOpcm 

PWAL 

Albert Costa (7), Spain, def. Albert Portos. 
del Spain. 74,64, 64. 


ftom 15-day resobfed beL Opflnwd INF Dave 
SDwsIri to Oklahoma Oty, AA. 

Toronto -Put C Benito Saratoga on 15- 
doy dJsoWM Hsf. Readied C JuUo Masquem 
from KnaavUtbSL 

N Ana NAL LEAGUE 

Chicago —Activated IB Marie Grace from 
15-day dtoaWed list. Optioned Brant Brawnto 
Iowa, AA. 

Florida —Sent LHP Matt wtibentam to 
Brevard, FSL, on (nfury rehaWHIattor ossigtv 
nvent. 

Montreal— C tabned RHP Salmon Torres 
on wahers from Semite Mariners. 

Philadelphia -Optioned RHP Ron 
Biazter to Scranton WHkes-Bane of I L 

SAM pkahosco —Put OF Dairy! Hamilton 
an 15-day dfeabled Ifad. 


KATIOMAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 
PHILADELPHIA — Fired Brad Greenberg, 
general manager-vice president of basketball 
operations, and Johnny Davis, coach. 

FOOTXAU 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
Jacksonville —Signed PK Mike HoUs, 
TE Rich Gmnth and DT Andre Davb. 

- Miami -Announced retirement of QB 
Bemie Knar. Philadelphia— Announced 
New England Patriots had matched offer 
sheet to DE Ferric Canon. Signed OE John 
Duff. Re-signed DT Michael Samson. Re- 
leased DB AIM Johnson. Agreed to terms 
wfth LB Darrin Smith on ] -year contract. 

ST. Louis -Signed G John Gerak. 


CRICKET 


mnixsi 

PAKISTAN VS. SHtLANKA 
SSONOAV, IN COLOMBO 
5rt Lanha ton togs: 330 
Pakistan Bmhigto 370-9 


TRANSITIONS 


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Demon —Put C Mari watoedt on 15-day 
disabled Ksf. Recoded C Rouf Casanova tram 
Toleda IL. 

KANSAS OTY -Put RHP Jeff Montaomefy 
an 13-day disabled SsL 
SEATTLB —Assigned P Jeff Famsworih 
and OF MlgutH Correa to Lancaster, CL 
nows — Acttwrted OF Warren Newson 


NATIONAL HOCKEY LEACIto 
Las an ee les— Sent RW Nathan Lafayrito 
to Syracuse, AHL 

Montreal— Recaltod D Brad Brown ham 
FredrlcmAHL 

New jersey— R ecoiled C Pair Sytura and 
LW Patrik EBas from Albany, AML 
New York— A ssigned RW Steve Webb and 
LW Ken Beiangerto Kentucky, AHL 
SAN JOSE -Assigned LW Steve Gualta and 
G wade Flaherty to Kentucky, AKL 
tampa bay -Signed G Zac Blerk. Sent C 
Jeff Tomato Adirondack. AHL 
Toronto -Sent RW Jason Porkflan, D 
Yaiwifc* Trembtay, O Mare* posmy* and G 
Marcel Couslnew to Si. Joiurs, AHL 
Vancouver —Sent C Lorety Bahonos to 
Syracuse* AHL 

Washington —Retimed LW Andrew 
Brunette and RW Jaroskiv Svepcoirsky to 
Pomona AHL 


♦DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


Vj f SQNDY 
■ l — ^ 


WitiBi 


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ART BUCHWALD 


The Wages of Law 

W ASHINGTON — The '“For a criminal case we 
American public always ask for 525,000.” 


watches more crime shows on 
television than any other form 
of entertainment. Most in- 
volve shooting, mayhem and 


“I’ll pay it." 

"That's just for starters. 
Once our law clerks begin ex- 
amining the evidence, we 


lawyers. But die TV produ- charge $500 an hour, not 
cers don’t show you what counting photocopying, fax- 
real ly happens when a char- ing and cellular phone 
acter seeks out a lawyer to charges to our London of- 
defendhim. fice." 

Butch Raton, falsely ac- “You're not cheap." 
cused of killing “ xt '~ 5 — ’ en — * — — 

the man who 
walked his dog, 
is ushered into 
the marble 
halls of What- 
not, Whatnot & 

Whatnot — the 
celebrated trial ||^ 
lawyers — and jJvJL _ , A — 

escorted to the “Do vou take credit 


fice." 

“You're not cheap." 

“We have 150 partners to 
feed as well as expenses for 
the company trip to Bermuda. 
We are one of the top law 
firms in the country. We won 
the Judge Ito Softball Cham- 
pionship this spring. You're 
lucky to get us. 


mahogany-paneled office of cards?" 


Hiram Whatnot. 

Hiram speaks first: “If you 
sit down, it will cost you 
$5,000." 

“But I haven’t even told 
you my story." 

“We don'i listen to a story 
until we get paid. 


‘ "That would be tacky. We 
prefer a cashier’s check or 
cash." 

‘ ‘ What kind of defense do I 
have?"’ 

“It all depends on how 
many TV shows we can get 
you on. The TV producers 
aren't hungry for a man who 


“On television they never aren’t hungry for a man who 
ow a client paying his legal killed his dog-walker. It's go- 


show a client paying his legal 
fee. It gives the public a false 
impression of how the legal 
system works. The most ter- 
rible thing in this country is 
that the American people ex- 
pect lawyers to work for noth- 
ing." 


“I’m willing to pay a rea- no monej 
sonable retainer in exchange like a pep 
for an acquinal, as well as an “Than! 
hourlong interview with Bar- “That 
bare Waken.." $25.” 

"There is no such thing as 
a reasonable fee. Lawyers 
must be compensated as “Can i 
much as TV repairmen. When lion? 
evil lurks in the hearts of men Why d< 

it is our job to get the person lawyers d< 
off. But we can’t do it for on TV?" 
chopped chicken liver. ” “It wo 

"How much do you and won 
want?" damage tc 


ing to be hard even to plead a 
crime of passion." 

“Can I make a deal?" 

"You can, but it will cost 
you an extra $67,000." 

"Could you cut your fee if 
I pleaded insanity?" 

"Insanity is not a good 
thing to plead because there’s 
no money in it Would you 
like a peppermint?" 

“Thanks." 

“That will be another 
$25.” 


"Can 1 ask you a ques- 
tion? 

Why don’t they ever show 
lawyers demanding their fees 


“It would be too violent 
and would cause lifelong 
damage to the children." 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1997 


Hon ler: A Translator’s Odyssey 


By Mel Gussow 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — When Robert 
Fagles translates Homer, le- 
gions of earlier translators are look- r T' 
ing over his shoulder, along with i 
Homer himself, a lively presence 
from 2,700 years ago. Then there is 
what he refers to as "the translation 
police.’ ’ that cadre of keepers of the ql 

Homeric flame who will allow no J ‘ 
divergence from the original. 

In a recent interview, Fagles de- Tht 
clined to name the members of the Lo f 
translation police because he did not J Vh 

want to “call them down from heav- Of • 
en with lightning bolts." Undaun- 
ted, he has had his own way with o a 
Homer, six years a go with his ac- Got 
claimed translation of “The Iliad.’’ Sus 
currently with his version of "The The 
Odyssey." With both books, he has Wh 
approached Homer os a kind of bard- The 

ic performance artist, uncovering a Wa 
spontaneity behind the Japidanan 
poetry. 

Fagles recently was awarded the ^ 

PEN/Ralph Manheim Medal for °f l 

Lifetime achievement in the field of 
translation. One other sign of his the 
success is that, along with the text of 
"The Odyssey" (published by Vik- Teit 

ing), there is the audio version of the 
complete poem, recorded by Ian far 
McKellen on 12 cassettes and run- 
ning 13 hours and 10 minutes. c- 

McKeUen’s performance, in J 

which he acts as narrator and plays > - 
all the characters, is the ideal ac- 
companiment to the book. The pub- 
lished text, now in its seventh print- 
ing. has sold 50,000 copies and the 

audio version 9,000, a bonanza for 
such a literary work. 

Asked why he had chosen to translate 
“The Odyssey," despite all the extant ver- 
sions, Fagles indicated that there are as many 
reasons as there are Disney Dalmatians, and 
the first is that translation is not "a word-for- 
word equivalent, but an interpretation." 
Quoting W.H. Auden, he regards a trans- 
lation as “Braille for the blind." 

“Homer is always changing," he said. 
“You might say that he’s fixed back there in 
time, but he’s always being transformed by 
subsequent ages that absorb him and revise 
him and see him according to their own 


The Starting Gate 

New York Times Service 

T HE opening lines of "The Odyssey” in various 
translations over the centuries: 

The man, O Muse, informe , that many a way 
Wound with his wisedome to his wished stay ; 

That wanderd wondrous fane when He the towne 
Of sacred Troy had sach and shiverd downe. 

George Chapman (1616) 

The Man, for wisdom’s various arts renown’ d. 

Long exercis’d in woes, O Muse! resound. 

Who. when his arms had wrought the destin’d fall 
Of sacred Troy, and raz’d her heav’n-built wall . . . 

Alexander Pope (1726) 

O divine poesy 
Goddess-daughter of Zeus 
Sustain for me 

The song of the various-minded man 
Who after he had plundered 
The innermost citadel of hallowed Troy 
Was made to stray grievously. 

TJL Lawrence (1932) 

Sing in me. Muse . and through me tell the story 
of that man, skilled in all ways of contending, 
the wanderer, harried for years on end, after he plundered 
the stronghold on the proud height of Troy. 

Robert Fitzgerald (1961) 

Tell me. Muse, of the man of many ways, who was 
driven 

far journeys, after he had sacked Troy’s sacred citadel. 

Richmond Lattimore (1967) 
Sing to me of the mdn. Muse, the man of twists and 
turns 

driven time and again off course, once he had 
plundered 

the hallowed heights of Troy. 

Robert Fagles (1996) 


than a writer, there is all the room In 
the world for another performance. 
If Homer were the one telling the 
story, he probably had to ventri- 
loquize his voice into the voices of 
a multiplicity of characters, very 
much what Ian McKellen is do- 

Throiigh centuries, the work hod 
to be banded down by word of 
mouth. The question of authenticity 
leads Fagles to a serendipitous con- 
clusion: "It’s nice not to have to 
face the heirs of Homer. If 1 thought 
the translation police were a prob- 
lem. God knows what the heirs 
would be.” 

Although some translators feel a 
keen sense of competition, be said, 
he takes a more evolutionary ap- 
proach: one translation leads to and 
feeds another. He is, however, dis- 
paraging about George Chapman's 
17th-century version, the subject of 
the Keats poem, “On First Looking 
Into Chapman's Homer." On last 
looking, Fagles retained his skep- 
ticism: “I find him almost im- 
possible to read. He’s everything 
Homer is not He is complicated 
and clumsy and Homer is swift, 
direct and simple." Fortunately. 
“Homer managed to survive Chap- 
man and fall intn Pope's hands," 
and Pope's Homer is “senatorial, 
finished, a highly literary 
product.” 

Two contemporary writers were 
crucial to Homer and closest to 



Fagles: 


DrtU Cdriom«r New 

‘Homer is always changing.” 


belie that, as do the superstores with their 
inventory of over 100,000 titles. 

In his version, Fagles wanted to combine 
the timely and the tuneless. His purpose, he 
said, was “to convey the sound of many 
voices." On one level, this means diver- 
sifying the language. For example, m many 
translations, there are repeated references to 
the “resourceful Odysseus." “If I did that,” 
he said, “I would feel resourceless. In 
response, he reinterprets the Greek word 


New 


V1ULUU UJ I1UU1V/1 (LUU VlWUOi w f 

Fagles. Reading Richmond Lai- polumatis. Depending on the contort, Uuys- 
timore’s “Ilnur as a freshman at seus is varyingly referred to as the .great 


lights." Although the text is fairly stable, 
Homer is “something of a moving target." 


For Fagles, it is as important to know what further revelation. 


oog. Amherst College, he experienced a 
Keatsian epiphany, and ended his 
pre-med curriculum and began 
studying Greek. Robert Fitzgerald's “very 
lyrical, very personal” “Odyssey” was a 


tactician," “the great teller of tales” and 
"the man of all occasions.” On the other 
hand, there are some givens in Homeric 
*• — — “wine-dark 


poets are doing "in the name of Homer, as it 
is for me to master Homer himself.” He 


He admired their work (and Fitzgerald 
became a friend), but he is candid about their 


amended that statement, “Or herself. I doubt perspective: “Both were more interested in 


very much that Homer was a woman, but 
Robert Graves thought so in that fascinating 
book of his called ’The Authoress of the 
Odyssey.* ” It is also theorized that there 
was more than one Homer, but Fagles said he 


translating Homer into a literary artifact than 
in producing a kind of performance.” 
Fagles said there was an awakening of 
interest in Homer, akin to that In Jane Aus- 
ten. “It is a hungering for stories we can sink 


had “always resisted the idea of Homer as our teeth into,” he said. “There’s a lot of 
committee.” He added: “If Homer was a academic hand-wringing about the death of 
performer, as he seems to have been, rather literacy, the death of the book. Such things 


translation: the expression wine-oarx 
sea.” 

Speaking pragmatically. Fagles says there 
may come a time when his version will be 
considered out of date. If so, it will not be 
outmoded by “events or modes of schol- 
arship but by a writer who has an idea for 
doing it in a way that hasn’t been done 

before,” the need, mother words, for “a new 

kind of Braille for the blind.” As with 
Fagles, there will always be intrepid voy- 
agers tn the world of Homer. 

Despite all difficulties, be said, “the busi- 
ness of translating Homer is irresistible.” 


. : 

•T- ’ ‘ „ 

-ss* _y 

U - ■ 






T HE ashes of “Star Trek” creator Gene Rod- 
den berry and the LSD advocate Timothy 
Leary rocketed into the final frontier on Monday. 
The Pegasus rocket detached from a Lockheed L- 
101 1 over the Canary Islands and roared off into 
space, carrying their ashes and those of 22 others, 
including several space pioneers. The flight fulfills 


PEOPLE 

Cold War.” Editors cut it to 10,000 words, and 
Danner balked, saying the point of the piece was to 
reach non-foreign-poticy specialists. Deadline ap- 
proached. Danner refused to allow the truncated 
version to be published. Brown and Danner ex- 
changed vituperative letters, sources told The 
Washington Post, with Danner likening the combat 


the limelight when her husband. King Frederick 
IX, died in 1972, but her easy-going style surfaced 
again last month when she was pulled from a 
burning car, then calmly went oat for coffee while 
her driver doused the flames. 


one of Leary's last wishes, said Carol Rosin, a to a nuclear war with no winners. The Europe issue 
friend who came to Spain to watch the launch. She went to press without him. 
said that the LSD guru had told her last year, when — 

he was dying of prostate cancer, “I want you to get L-l 

me into outer space.” On Leary’s vial, was in- Poets, politicians, hippies and anarchists filled a 
scribed die message: “Peace Love Light You- San Francisco sanctuary to pay a soulful tribute to 
MeOne” Roddenberry, whose 1960s “Star Trek” the late Beat poet Allen Ginsberg. More than 2,000 
TV series gained a cult following, didn’t know people stood for a poetry reading at Temple 
about plans for space funerals when he died in 1 991 . Emanu-EI in honor of Ginsbeig. who died in New 
The Houston-based Celestis Inc., which launched York on April 5. Gary Snyder, Robert Hass and 
the space funeral industry on Monday, telephoned Lawrence Ferlinghetti were among poets who 


MajeJ Roddenberry, who agreed to send the ashes reminisced about the man who redefined modem 
of her husband where he had never gone before. poetry with the graphic, surreal poem “Howl,” in 

1955. 


Into the final frontier: Gene Roddenberry, left, and Timothy Leary. 


of her husband where he had never gone before. 

□ 

Pullinga major article on deadline simply isn’t 
done at The New Yorker. But the veteran staff 
writer Mark Danner did it, infuriating editor Tina 
Brown in the process. For this week’s special 
double issue on Europe, Danner had submitted a 


to a nuclear war with no winners. The Europe issue The mother of the slain rapper Tupac Shakur 

went to press without him. has sued Death Row Records for $17 million. 

p-, claiming that the label had failed to pay royalties. 

The federal suit follows a $7.1 million lawsuit 
Poets, politicians, hippies and anarchists filled a Death Row filed - against Shakur’s estate earlier this 
San Francisco sanctuary to pay a soulful tribute to month, demanding reimbursement for money al- 
the late Beat poet Allen Ginsberg. More titan 2,000 legedly advanced to Shakur for cars, houses, jew- 
people stood for a poetry reading at Temple dry and other expenditures. 

Emanu-EI in honor of Ginsberg, who died in New _ 

York on April 5. Gary Snyder, Robert Hass and * 

Lawrence Ferlinghetti were among poets who The Frenchman Alain Robert, known as “Spi- 
reminisced about the man who redefined modem derman” for scaling high-rise buH dings, has added 
poetry with the graphic, surreal poem “Howl,” in the 32-stoiy Sabah Foundation building in Malay- 
1955. sia’s eastern Sabah state to his list of conquests. 

Watched by a crowd of hundreds in Sabah state's 


Dowager Queen Ingrid, whose common touch 
helped hold her country together during Nazi oc- 
cupation, quietly celebrated her 50 years as queen 
of Denmark. Ingrid, the mother of Queen Mar- 


16.000- word rumination called “Marooned in the gretbe n, is still active at age £7. She stepped out of His most recent climb was for charity. 






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stays mainly in the plain. 


Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 


makes calling home and to other countries really easy. 
Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country 


you're calling from and we’ll take it from there. And 


be sure to charge your calls on your AT&T Calling 
Card. It’ll help you avoid outrageous phone charges 
on your hotel bill and save you up to 60%* Low rates 
and the fastest, clearest connections home 24 hours 
a day. Rain or shine. That’s AT&T Direct" Serwoi 
Please check the listhelow for AT&T Access Numbers. 


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Executives 
(iiitN'oniiira 
hr Scandal 


capital of Kota Kinabalu, Robert reached the top of* 
the building from the 16th floor in less than fivor 
minutes. Robert made headlines in Malaysia when 
he was attested last month for scaling the Petronas 
Twin Towers in Koala Lumpur without pennissiooi 


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Steps to follow for easy calling vorhhridr 
I. Just dial ihe ATCT Access Number fur the country you 
are railing fnxiL 

1 . Dial the phone number you're calling. 

3. Dial the calling rani number listed above \our name. 


838 088 till m 

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AT&T Access Mnmhers 


SndBs 

SsritatrlUHla 

Unfisd BuMtom* 


. middle ust 

Inil* 


— £UB0PE — SndBB . .. 820*785411 

Belgium* W08-1 08-10 UnfiMl KbacnkimA 

Czech Republic* 88-42-800-181 8809-88*8811 

France woo-gs-otti middle ust ~ 

Gennany Oia-8810 Emit^Calrol* 518-8200 

Grt«ee* ... 08-898-1311 kraal 177*106-2727 

IralMtl 1*808-5»8M Saafl Arabia^ 1-888-10 

&»*»• 172-1011 AFRICA 

MettertanSs* 88864 822-Om Sftsna I “ “ ' “ : 0t91 

teda^Mhostw)* T&9U2 Kenyan -MOO-10 

Spain 9OT-9&-0O-11 Scutt Africa . ...... B4M0«8M123 

Cjn i bud (he ATST taess Sumber for rbe cotmln )ou're calling hvtn? Just ask opeeuar tor 

cr«T OirccT Service, or mat oor Web site at hnp^/wwvr^ttxiMnrtraveler 


828*785*811 

..8888-89-8811 

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8809-89*8811 

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