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Published with. The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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:?* No- 29,921 


PARIS, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 1979 


Established 1887 


SteppedrUp.Arms Race Feared 

Moscow Reported to Deploy 
New Missile in E. Germany 


' . By Richard Bun 

' WASHINGTON, April 24 
(NYT) — The Soviet Union report- 
. (| , - edly has begun to tirnloy a new, 

' hv S . nuclear-armed missile in East Ger- - 
" v “• many, a step that Carter adminis- 
1 Jn 'i, t tration officials described yesterday 
»e- as increasing the risk of a slepped- 
Jhc- up anus race in Europe. 
a The officials said that the new 
l , ‘'f’.-s r missile; designated the SS-2I by 
\:-j, US. intelligence analysis, recently 
, was observed with Soviet forces 
1 . stationed in East Germany, li is 

;j said to be the first new midear mis- 
sile deployed in Eastern Europe in 
more than a decada 
The missile also is said lo be only 
■ I j. one of three short-range rockets 
•■"jr*, 1 (hat the Soviet Union recently has 
developed, and a White House aide 
. said that the other two systems 
could show up in Eastern Europe in 
tte coming months. 

.... r The SS-21 is' described by offi- 

• dais as belonging to the class of so- 

. . : called “tacticaF nuclear missiles 

. F ■* that both the United States and die 

- Soviet Union have deployed cm the 
.. * territory of their European allies 

' _" t since die mid-1950s. At present, 

‘ " 1 r i both countries deploy several him- 
died short-range midear missiles in 
a v Europe as wdQ as atomic bombs 
: ■ r -H! that can be carried by fighter air- 
craft based in the region. 
k With a range of about 75 miles, 
/' • the SS-21 is believed to be amflar 
'■ - in design to the U.S. Lance mignte 
1 which was deployed in Western Eu- 
" rope in 1972. It also is said to form 
part of a broader effort id upgrade 

* • |l fl ( . Soviet nudear capabHiiies directed 
=*“ T °**i against Western Europe, which in- 

< Ti\s dudes a new intermediate- range 

missile known as the SS-20. based 

in the western portions of the Sovi- 
T $ y enn et Union. 

^ The Soviet Union’s evident ded- 


siori to expand its sliorter-range mi- 
dear arsenal was made as Moscow 
and Washington were reaching the 
final stages of a new treaty limiting 
. long-range, or strategic, weapons. 

The SS-21 would not be limited 
under the projected treaty, and ad- 
ministration aides view the Soviet 
decision as a worrisome sign that a 
new accord covering strategic arms 
could have the effect of shifting the 
nudear arms race toward increased 
competition in shorter- range mis- 
siles deployed in and around 
Europe. 

Several West European leaders, 
inducting Helmut Schmidt, the 
West German chancellor, have ex- 
pressed concern about new Soviet 
nuclear deployments and privately 
have' urged President Carter to in- 
dude the weapons in the arms-con- 
trol negotiations. So far, the uegoti- 

Soviet War Units 
Seen m E. Europe 

PARIS, Apnl 24 (AP) — French 
military experts say that they are 
worried by reports that the Soviet 
Union has 800 commando units in 
Eastern Europe, trained for sabo- 
tage and psycholcgjcal warfare in- 
side Western countries in case of an 
all-out war. 

These experts, whose concerns 
were expressed tins week during a 
large-scale military maneuver in 
south western France, said that the 
units consisted of 25 to 50 mien who 
would infiltrate Western nations by 
helicopter, parachute or submarine. 

They said that intelligence re- 
ports reaching here showed that 
150 of these units were trained to 
operate in Fiance and attack ener- 
gy installations and bridges. 


Closest Majority in U.K. Cabinet 

Owen Faces a T ough Campaign 


man stood 
a housing 
ka against 


, By R.W. Apple Jr. 

' f-; ’ Je * PLYMOUTH, England (NYT) 
” — The youthful-lookmg man stood 
in the stark stairwell of a housing 
J project, huddled in a parka against 
. the draft, and began nis campaign 
pitch: “Hello, I’m Dr. David Owen 
' :\and. . 

. -iL .iwn The man behind the half-opened 
L door cut him off. demanding to 
•’■know the foreign secretary's poa- 
tkm on abortion, and Mr. Owen, 
' who is a physician, replied that he 
. .woivww favored the present Jaw, which 
. - leaves the decision to the physician. 

: He started to explain his point of 
. view, but after a few moments, the 
■■ m m cut him off again: “Wen, then, 
’ you're a murderer, and I won't sup- 
_ port you.” He shut the door. 

_____ “1 don’t understand it,” Mr. 

Owen said as he walked away. 
]] “How can people, refuse to discuss 
f an issue, not talk to you?” 

rC'K Those are difficult days for Mr. 

/r- ^fSlflflsOwen. Were there no general dec- 
"* tkm, he would .be in Quna on an 
mission. Although he is 

— ‘only 40, he has spent the last 26 

months meeting with presidents 
( .^(K^and prime ministers around the 
‘ ‘ " world. At home, he has been a fix- 

— tore on television, and some have 
spoken of him as a fixture prime 
. . .. ;**«*. minister. 

Constituency 

But for this month at least. Ins 
..'■..stage has shrunk drastically. All his 
energy must be poured into his 
.. consutuency, a slice of this old port 
■ . v iV M ' a .• city in southwestern England called 
Devonport, containing the naval 
dockyards, the business area and 
1 the spot from where the Mayflower 
.jprtei sail in 1620. 


Mr. Owen is defending the nar- 
rowest majority of any member of 
the Cabinet in the May 3 election. 
He won by only 1259 votes in 
October, 1974, and in February, 
1974, he survived by fewer than 
1 , 000 . 

To make maLtera worse, his op- 
position to the internal settlement 
in -Rhodesia and what his critics 
consider a certain arrogant off- 
handedness in his personality have 
made him one of the most contro- 
versial figures in British politics. 

A swing from Labor to the Con- 
servatives of 3.2 percent in Devon- 
pert would bring Mr. Owen down, 
and a Gallnp Poll published Sun- 
day suggests a national swing of 4.4 
percent. With 10 campaign days 
' left, the foreign secretary will Ipse 


Publication of Photos 
Of Moro Body Banned 

MILAN, April 24 (UPI) — The 
widow of former premier Aldo 
Moro won a court coder yesterday 
that bans further publication of 
photographs of her husband’s nude 
and bloodstained body on an au- 
topsy table. 

A judge here enjoined the 
newsmagazine L’Europeo from 
making farther use of the pictures 
or from reprinting or distributing 
its issue of April 5, in which they 
appeared. He said that hearings 
would start within two mouths on a 
damage suit filed against the maga- 
zine by Eleonora Moro. Mr. Moro 
was kidnapped in Rome March 16, 
1978, and was assassinated 54 days 
later. 


France Says. Shipper Sold 
Table Wine as Burgundy 


, PARIS, April 24 (IH7) — A new 
, .'i vine scandal broke yesterday as a 

- dripper of Burgundy, Bernard 
j, ‘ Gnvclet, was accused by die 

.• French service for the control of 
' wines and liquors of shipping ordi- 
wine to the. United States un- 
iw prestigious labels. 

- About 70,000 bottles, worth up 
o 5 milli on francs (SI 25 million), 

^vire involved. 

Top-quality Burgundies with 
•'^tgeB-known appellations such as 
seU for as much as 100 
£> * ^francs, while ordinary wine goes few: 
: 1 ‘ ,. tetween 3 and 5 francs a bottle. 


» r jr The quantity invtrived is not’ 
’ .vpat, but- other shipjwrs may have 


lane as much without being 
j+attght. Mr. Grivelet says that he 
as no intention of becoming -a 
, .'capegoat for the others. If no one 
«^se is indicted, he threatens to tell 
■■ 'TTiOw much fearing is going on and 
dioisdmngit. 

The Burgundy scandal has devel- 
iped five years after the Bordeaux 


ByJonWinrorh 

-A new scandal and a few weeks after a 
[ay as a fraud was discovered arvoKtog or- 
Beroaid dinary wine. Wine importers, espe- 
by the dally the United Slates, may won- 
itrol of der bow effective are the supposed- 
ng ordi- ly strict Reach laws of appellation 
lies un- tTorigine eontrole t. 

- The West Germans and Swiss 
orth up have been buying heavily in Bur- 
nillion), gundy since their strong currencies 
protected them from the soaring 
s with prices of the last few years. But 
iuch as they may begin to temper their 
i as 100 enthusiasm. They could turn to far 
goes for more reas o nably priced-. Spanish 
tile. and Italian wines. . ' 

is not As for the United^ States, « al- 
ay have ready impons.tnore wine from Italy 
being than from any other nation. Spam 
that he is Jar behind, but when Americans 
□ring a discover moderately priced S pani sh 
no one Rida and Penedes wines, French 
s to tdl exports could suffer — doubly so 
on and with another scandal to live down. 

* ’ The only good that could come 

s devel- of th* Burgundy scandal is a drop 
jrrferiux in wildly inflated prices. 


unless he runs well ahead of his 

P /SLdesian policy is the center- 
piece in the campaign of: Mr. 
Owen’s main opponent, Kenneth 
Hughes, a 57-year-old budding ex- 
ecutive with a gift for malapro- 
ptsms. “Owen has demeanored the 
office of foreign secretary,” said 
Mr. Hughes, the Conservative can- 
didate. 

“His policy on Rhodesia has 
shown that be is incompetent, and 
it’s unpopular here. I bear it on the 
doorsteps: People want to support 
their kith and kin in Rhodesia. 
They feel toward them as they do 
toward Australians and Canadi- 
ans.” 

‘Rule Brittania’ 

Mr. Hughes, whose campaign 
van plays a recording of “Rule Bnt- 
tania” as he drives about town, 
went to Rhodesia in October as a 
miest of the government of Prime 
Minister Ian Smith. He returned 
with the conviction dial Britain 
should remove economic sanctions 
and recognize the multiracial gov- 
ernment resulting from the elec- 
tions that ended Saturday. 

He has received' letters from afl 
over England con mining contribu- 
tions for his fight against the for- 
eign secretary. Mr. Owen and his 
canvassers have encountered some 
of the same sentiment, especially 
.among those with relatives in Rho- 
desia or with past military connec- 
tions with southern Africa. A wom- 
an swept his campaign leaflets off 
. her table with an angry comment 
about “people who want to give Af- 
rica to lie Africans.” 

But, as the foreign secretary said, 
“Elections aren’t won and lost in 
Britain on foreign-poScy issues.” 
What he fears most is defections 
among past supporters who are dis- 
satisfied* with Labor’s economic 
record or who fear the power of the. 
large trade unions. 

He also may suffer from Mr. 
Hughes’s efforts to portray him as 
an absentee member of Parliament 
who has never paid enough atten- 
tion to Plymouth, even before his 
Cabinet j ob took up so much of his 

(Contimed on Page 2, CoL 8) 

5 News Firms Protest 
Poland Fee for Visit 


ROME, April 24 (UPI) — Five 
international news agencies yester- 
day called on (be Vatican to help 
eliminate a $350 tax imposed by 
the Polish government on each 
journalist covering Pope John Paul 
JI'5 visit to Poland this June. 

The agencies were United- Press 
International and the Associated 
Press of the United States, Agence 
France-Presse, Deutsche Presse 
Ageptur of West Germany and the 
EFE news agency of Spain. Poland 
said that the money covered ac- 
creditation and the right to use 
press facilities but that the actual 

cost of usin^ the fatalities had to be 

pad separately. 



•' v ."i i v*-.- V. :; 







ioiSv.- x’v •> • 



..... .. • 


f0 


atioss have not focused on nuclear 
anus deployed in Europe, but Mr. 
Carter has said that, iduowmg the 
completion of a strategic arms trea- 
ty, he wants to malta this categoiy 
of weapons a prime subject of a 
new round of negotiations. 

Secretary of Defense Harold 
Brown and the defense ministers of 
the major Western European coun- 
tries are scheduled to meet tomor- 
row ax Homestead Air Force Base 
in. southern Florida for two days of 
secret talks on whether the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization i also 
should modernize its short-range 
nuclear arsenal. 

New Missile * 

In particular, officials awl »h«r 
the defense ministers would 
the sensitive subject of developing 
and deploying a new nudear mis- 
sile that would be based tn Western 
Europe and would be capable of 
striking at targets in the Soviet 
Union. 

Although senior Defense Depart- 
ment officials are prodding allied 
governments to agree to a plan for 
the new missile by the end of this 
year, many Europeans are skeptical 
and are said to be asking the ad- 
ministration-first to investigate the 
possibility of limiting new tactical 
nudear "arms in Europe in talks 
with Moscow. 

Officials said that the appear- 
ance of the Soviet SS-21 in East 
Germany would be likely to inten- 
sify this debate by putting in- 
creased pressure on West Germany 
and other countries to approve U.S. 
plans for moderaizmg NATO's 
tactical missile forces, fin addition, 
some Pentagon officials also argued 
that h could raise once again the 
controversial question of the de- 
ployment of the U.S. neutron 
weapon. 



Rhodesia Y ote 

To Muzorewa; 

\ 

Protest Lodged 

From Aftenn- Dispj/iArt 

SALISBURY. Rhodesia, April 24 — Bishop Abel Muzoivu a uas in iinc 
today to become Rhodesia's first black prime minister after his pans 
easily captured a majorin' of seats in parliamentary elections. 

The United African National Council, led by ihe Methodist bishop, 
won the right to inherit the troubled leadership of Rhodesia after nine 
decades of while minority rule when his puny swept SI of the 100 seals in 
Parliament, amassing more than 67 percent of the votes. 

But the uneasy alliance of Bishop Muzorewa, 54. and two other mod- 
erate black leaders collapsed under 
the pressure of election reverses. 

The Rev. Ndabaningi Siihole, 53, 


EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT — This bttikfing in Strasbourg, France, will house the new 
European Parliament to be elected in June by the voters of the 9 Common Market countries. 


Bases in South Lebanon 

Israelis Shell Palestine Targets 


BEIRUT. April 24 (AP) — Israeli 
planes blasted Palestinian targets in 
southern Lebanon at sundown 
today, and Israeli gunboats com- 
plete] a two-day pounding of Leb- 
anese coastal towns that have been 
used as bases for terror attacks 
against Israel, the military com- 
mand in Tel Aviv said. 

Hundreds of families headed 
north from southern Lebanon, flee- 
ing the shelling. Lebanese officials 
said. 

Egypt condemned Israeli attacks 
on the Palestinians, saying that the 
action could have a negative effect 
on the Israeti-Egyptian peace trea- 
ty- 

The air attack was directed 
against artillery positions north of 
the Litani River near the towns of 


agreements reached regarding on 
Egyptian-lsradi peace treaty and 
the efforts to achieve a just settle- 
ment of. the Palestinian issue.” it 
added. 

The Egyptian Foreign Ministry 
also condemned Israel's decision to 
establish two new settlements in 
the occupied West Bank of the Jor- 
dan River. 

[State Department officials said 

• Saudi Arabia breaks relations 
with Egypt, but annual subsidy 
remains intact Page 5. 

• West German anti- terrorist 
agents are said to meet with 
PLO in mi at t em pt to prevent 
raids. Page 5. ' 

yesterday that Israel had disregard- 


trailing badly with only 12 seats 
and 15 percent of the ballou 
charged “gross irregularities*’ and 
demanded an investigation. 

The United National Federal 
Party of Chief Kayi&a Ndiweni won 
nine seats, and 1 1 percent of the 
voie. 

White Seats 

’ The other 28 seats reserved for 
whites were won by Prime Minister 
Ian Smith's Rhodesian Front in an 
election two weeks ago. 

The Zimbabwe uni Led People's 
Organization of Chief Jeremiah 
Chirau. the third moderate black 


developments followed an Egvp- leader with Bishop Muzorewa and 
tian pattern — established after Mr. Siihole in the biracial iransi* 
President Anwar Sadat's 1977 visit tion government, failed to win any 
to Jerusalem — of condemning spe- seats. 



cific Israeli actions while continu- 
ing to seek peace. 


Under the constitutional 
arrangement. Bishop Muzorewa 


In Jerusalem today. Prime Minis- would get the premiership and 10 
ter Menachem Begjn's office an- Cabinet posts for his parry, Mr. 
nounced that Israel and Egypt Sithole's party will gel two minis- 
would exchange treaty-ratification tries, and Chief Ndiweni’s group 
documents in the Sinai tomorrow one. 

as planned, despite reports from Mr. Siihole declared yesterday 
Cairo that the exchange would be that the five-day election last week 
postponed until Thursday-. expressed the “will of 2 million 

Lebanese officials said that six P^e." But a few hours later, after 
persons were killed by the Israeli n^Moffiaal returns put his party 
shelling, raising the reported toll to m p ^ ce m ^° 1 * 1 ^ lS ^ uri ' 31111 
13 Lebanese and Palestinian dead 


rd place i 
second 


i both Salisbury 
largest city 


i-’ AAuauy^t. iuiu i tuwauiiiuii mmu n . w n . . « a .« 

in northern and southern Lebanon 

since four PLO terrorists attacked i*JSE 

managing the voting. He said that 


ArtKMm and Natetiyeh, the Israeli ZZSSTS hri?™ 

IS " ahead - with forma] approval for two 
** new Jewish seitiemSSs in the occu- 
Meditenanean towns hit by the Is- ^ Wcst ^ New York 

radiNavy. . Times reported. 

The Egyptian statement deplored [The settlements, known as Bon 
the cycle of violence between Israel Moreh and Shiloh, were approved 
and the Palesti nians , but did not by the Israeli Cabinet Sunday over 
condemn the Palestinian strike the appeals of both Israeli Deputy 
Sunday .on the Israeli coastal town Prime Minister Yigael Yadin and 
of Nahariya. which took the lives of the United States. About 10 days 
four Israelis and is believed to have ago. U.S. Ambassador Samuel 
sparked the Israeli attack. Lewis had urged the Israelis not to 

(-muiimiwrim proceed with the settlements, which 

had received preliminary Israeli 

“The ^yemment oT Egypt cog- government approval, department 
demos with all its strength, the ag- officials said, 
gresave Israeli action which contra- [Mr. Lewis is said to have sug- 
diets the efforts to establish a com- gesxed that the decision to author- 
prehensive peace in the Middle ^ the settlements could endanger 
East." the statement said. impending Egyp tian - Israeli negoti- 

The actions “also have a negative ations on Palestinian self-rule in 
effect on the implementation of the ^ West Bank and Gaza Strip. 

making it even more difficult to in- 
n M • terest Palestinians and Jordanians 

rope Names Mediator in the negotiations.] 

VATICAN CITY, April 24 (UPI) A* Cairo was condemning Israel, 
— Pbpe John Paul II today named fe Egyptip news agency saidthat 
Italian Cantina! Antonio Samore Israeli Defense Minister Ezer Weiz- 
as his official mediator in the dis- would arrive in Cairo tomor- 

pute between Argentina and Chile row for talks. 9 n d* P® 106 ti-eaty s 
over the Beagle Channel at the tip nohitary provisions, 
of South America. These seemingly contradictory 


Pope Names Mediator 

VATICAN CITY, April 24 (UPI) 
— Pbpe John Paul II today named 
Italian Cardinal Antonio Samore 
as bis official mediator in the dis- 
pute between Argentina and Chile 
over the Beagle Channel at the tip 
of South America. 


in Nataliya, live miles south of the to ? P“2 ' vd L no< “ n “ dcr ft ' - 
LebtmS&er. suite “iteverdtet of. the people” un- 

, .. ■ .. ... „ . to his charges were investigated. 

Israeli radio said that Mr. Begin 
plans to ask his Cabinet to approve 


He said that he had reports 


the death penalty for terrorists “from black and white farmers. 

rnsmJ ..ulisi „r .m> Mark and rivil vreanft" 


found guilty of any “unusually 
cruel” act. Mr. Begin announced 
his intention at a dosed meeting of 


a parliamentary committee, the ra- polling booths. 


black teachers and civil servants" 
that the department “instructed 
people what party to vote for at 


diosaid. 


But Bishop Muzorewa’s cam- 


Ndaboningl Si thole 

paign director. Ayouh Kara said: 
“It is high time Mr. Sitholc accept- 
ed defeat gracefully.*' 

And Chief Chirac declared: 
“The elections are over and that's 
it." 

Pmtictioas Confirmed 

The returns bore out predictions 
of observers before and during the 
dection that Bishop Muzorewa's 
party would come in first and that 
he would become prime minister. 
But Mr. Siihole had predicted that 
his faction would win. 

Mr. Sithole’s charge was certain 
to be seized on by guerrilla leaders 
Joshua Nkomo and Robert 
Mugabe. Vowing to continue their 
seven-year war. they boycotted the 
dection and contended that the 
new constitution is a sham that 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


Bazargan Is Reported to Escape 
Tehran Assassination Attempt 


TEHRAN. April 24 tAP) — Pre- fore be could fire,' the guards 
mier Mehdi Bazargan and members kicked him to the ground and took 
of his Cabinet today reportedly es- him' away, the witness said. A sec- 
caped an assassination attempt as ond man was reported arrested. 


they walked in the funeral proces- 
sion of a general assassinated yes- 
terday. 

A man in an Iranian Air Force 
uniform tried to throw a hand gre- 
nade at the premier and his col- 
leagues. a witness said, but guards 
walking alongside the procession 
knocked it from his hand. The man 


Mr. Bazargan appeared shaken 
by the attempted attack, the wit- 
ness said. Militiamen surrounded 
him and pushed him into a car, and 
he was driven off with other offi- 
cials. 

The two men arrested were not 
identified. Later, an aide to Deputy 
Premier Abbas Amir Enuzam 


'You Think a Doctor is God’ 


Abortion Anguish: 4 Case Histories 


Women In Western European 
countries that allow legalized abor- 
tion sometimes find themselves vic- 
timized by their doctors and hospi- 
tals. In the but of a twO-part 
series, several women describe the 
anguish of obtaining their abor- 
tions. 

By Mazy Blumc 
PARIS (1HT) — “I found 
IT myself m the freezing cold 
at 6 a.m. on the platform of Vic- 
toria Station, It was a nightmare 
and all because of a doctor who 
made a mistake — and knew per- 
fectly well what he was doing. 4 ’ 

Annie, speaking softly in the 
Paris office of tue .Mouvement 
Francois Pour Le Planning Fami- 
lial (MFPF), is 19. She has the 
wdl-brought-up air and carefully 
groomed look of a gtrl from the 
provinces who has not yet got 
used to big city ways. Only to- 
wards the gna does her voice 
tremble slightly with emotion: 

“There was so much I didn't 
know. I was taking the pfll but I 
thought if you mused oat day 
you took two the next. You see; 
no one had told me. I went to a 
gynecologist when I missed my 
period and he gave me a preg- 
nancy test It was positive but he 
said that didn’t mean I was preg- ■ 
nan t. He told me to come back in 
two weeks and again the test was 
positive. He said I wasn’t preg- 
nant and gave me medicine for 
my nausea. Time passed. He did 
another test and . then another, 
and finally he told me I was 20 



weeks pregnant. He then told me 
he was against abortion. 1 told 
him I was determined so, he sent 
me to someone else who gave me 
on appointment two weeks later. 
The other doctor gave me the ad- 
dress of a clinic in Holland. The 
clinic had dosed three yeazs ago. 
By then 1 was 23 weeks pregnant 
I got on the train for London. . . 

“When you crane from the 
provinces like I do, you -think a 
doctor is God. When I saw that 
that one wouldn’t help me it was 
an awful shock. He had been so 
nice, so helpful — - like a snake 
but 1 didn't realize that, until it 
was too late. If I ever ran. into 
him a gain I won’t even address 
Mm as Doctor.” 

Pushed Aroiffid 

Annie is typical of many wom- 
en who are pushed around by 
doctors in France, Italy and 
other countries where the law is 
supposedly liberal Usually then- 


raised a submachine gun, but, be- claimed that the assassination at- 
tempt “did not happen." But other 

- sources confirmed the report and 

said that possibly more than two 
j, men were arrested 

« (The report also was denied by 

“ UPI photographer Shir 

Tf* • Mohammed Parsa. who was pres- 

e Histories ' 5«* Inl f n i? lio i al 

reported. Mr. Parsa said that the 
i mn »i rumors spread alter an afrOi Air 

cases are ignraed because : people Forcc ^ approached MV. t Sozax~ 

assume the law works. But the ^ ; apparent attempt Rrfwnd 
story of Florence mode head- ^ apctitI ^ P 

““S - . . (“There were armed airmen on 

non ^L"« duties all over the place," 

came pregnant brnher fatter M r . Pan* said. He said Lhat ihe air- 
cons «“£ a boruon so ste man was canying a rifle and had a 

7“ Shcjrem 10 de strapped to his belt, “like 

four hospitals and dimes in her 0 thersT’ r and was prevented 

S 63 0 *nF TB u CC ' ■. by guards from approaching Mr. 

Marne. One hospital agreed to BaztirRon.} 

■?* 1 S5i p, SE? sed a for Mr. Bazargan. Mr. Entizam and 
^ .’ ro . uld , other Cabin« ministers were walk- 

p f*m Cd k? **** ^5“* ing in the funeral procession for 

of lO weeks. the las« pnm dm- ^ Mohainmed ^ 0aranl lhe 

10 JJSJSS first army chief or staff appointed 

after the revolution. Gen. Qarani 

KKo to GcteC^iji^ killed for his role 

wnaoic " in the death of innocent parole m 

overdose the Kurdish dtv of Sanai^ dur- 

° f ^stdafshTisa notiiical refugse in& government 

month, and because of his col la bo- 
JKftcd ralion a,,,, MpharamKl Raa 

E roblems and a failing marriage pah] - 
ave made hex highly nervous: at . _ . . . 

the MFPF office ter sharp- Jailed by Shah 

boned face is drawn with tension Gen. Qarani was the shah's raili- 
and she speaks in a rapid, insis- tary intelligence chief but was 
tent tone. “The doctor said I jailed twice for opposition to the 

wasn’t pregnant and as my monarchy. He was named chief of 

weight had.aropped to S6 pounds staff two days after the revoiuuon- 

it seemed unlikely that I was. ary forces took control but was 

When r went back again he told fired six weeks later after he failed 

me I was 314 months pregnant.” to convince deserting soldiers to 
Estela was persuaded to nave the return. 

baby. At the start of her pregnan- Little is known about Forghan, 
cy she was already taking 10 which is a name for a holy book. H 
(Contin ue d on Page X CoL S) announced its formauon 18 months 

- ago. 


Local newspaper reports said 
that the assassins rented a room for 
several days in the Hotel Jam. 
across the street from Gen. 
Qa rani's house, and left the lights 
and radio on the day of the attack 
to Tool the hotel management. A 
search of the hotel room uncovered 
several documents, including the 
statement claiming responsibility 
for the assassination. 

Meanwhile, Ibrahim Yazdi. the 
U.S.-trained physician who has 
been a top aide to Ayatollah 
Ruholtoh Khomeini, has taken aver 
os Iran’s foreign minister and 
dropped his job as deputy premier, 
government officials said today. 

Mr. Yazdi hod been handling the 
foreign-affairs portfolio m addition 
to his job as deputy premier for 
revolutionary affairs since the rea- 
«4gnaiidn of Foreign Minister Karim 
^Sanjaonpn -April 16. 

Mr. Yazdi's functions apparently 
included providing a liaison be- 
tween the govern men i and the 
Islamic Revolutionary Council of 
Ayatollah Khomeini. ‘ 


U.S. Reporter Says 
Russians Accused 
Him of Vandalism 

MOSCOW. April 24 (API — 
Business Week reporter Peter Hann 
said today that Soviet officials had 
accused him of vandalizing a hotel 
room. 

Mr. Hann said that the eom- 

g taint was made yesterday by the 
oriel Foreign Ministry to U.S. 
Embassy officials, who were prev 
jesting tile alleged harassment of 
U.S. News and world Report cor- 
respondent Robin Knight and his 
wife during a tourist trip last week. 

Mr. Knight today told the Soviet 
Foreign Ministry that he was 
“angry” -about the alleged harass- 
ment. He said that he had been 
drugged and that his wife had been 
manhandled by Soviet tourist 
guides. 

Mr. Hann, 45, said that he per- 
. sonally had received no word from 
the Russians about his alleged con- 
duct. but he denied that he had 
committed any vandalism during a 
trip he took in February to Soviet 
Central Asia. 


,, , 





I 


Pa**e 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 1979 


Red Brigades Reportedly Had Headquarters in Paris 


By Joseph Pitched 

PARIS. April 24 (IHT) — Italy's 
Red Brigades reportedly had a 
clandestine headquarters in Paris, 
and Italian and French security ser- 
vices intercepted their phone calls 
to Italy planning terrorist opera- 
tions there, including the Aldo 
Moro kidnapping. 

The allegations, primed - today in 
the Milan newspaper Corriere della 
Sent, were not confirmed by Italian 
or French officials. France’s Interi- 
or Ministry spokesman said that 
the two countries had routine anti- 
terrorist contacts on the case. 


Fascist Offices , 
Police Station 
Bombed in Italy 


ROME. April 24 (AP) — Bombs 
went off in sections of Rome and 
Milan before dawn today. No one 
was injured. 

Two explosive devices went off 
in Rome, both at offices of the neo- 
Fasdsi Italian Social Movement 
They damaged the offices, nearby 
buildings .and cars parked in the 
vicinity. 

In Milan, the targeL was a police 
station. The bomb was hurled 
through a window into a toilet and 
the explosion damaged the walls of 
the room and shattered windows in 
several buildings. 

Police said no one had claimed 
responsibility Tor the three blasts. 
But they believed that they might 
be the work of leftist extremists. 


Citing an Italian secret agent, the 
'Italian newspaper said that Italian 
leftists met regularly in a cafe and 
in a language school in Paris. The 
leaders telephoned instructions to 
conspirators in Italy by direct-dial 
calls, “feeling safe ... and speak- 
ing openly, not suspecting that the 
French secret service was monitor- 
ing every word.” the Italian source 
sskL 

The newspaper said that British 
and Belgian investigators also took 
part in the Paris operation, but it 
gave no explanation of why the sur- 
veillance failed to lead Italian po- 
lice to earlier arrests. Frequent 
callers between Paris and Rome re- 
port that the service is erratic be- 
tween the two capitals. 

Most of the terrorist acts of the 
Red Brigades, who apparently were 
responsible for the shooting today 
of a television journalist in Turin, 
have remained unsolved. Paul Hof- 
mann of The New York Times re- 
pealed from Rome that today’s re- 


ports about terrorist activities guid- 
ed by long-distance telephone calls 
from Paris were apt to increase the 
nation's bewilderment. 

Commentators in Italy said that 
the secrecy rules of. Italian penal 
procedures added to the confusion. 

The newspaper allegations about 
an international dimension of the 
Red Brigades coincided with the 
pretrial nearing in Italy of Prof. 
Antonio Negn, a radical leftist 
theoretician arrested tins month 
with 23 other suspects. He 


accused of revolvement in the Aldo 
Moro murder Iasi spring. 

Prof. Negri has denied the accu- 
sations. He spent most of his time 
between March and June last year 
in Paris, and cl aims that he learned- 
about the abduction during a'din- 
ner with friends near his apartment 
on the Left Bank, according to 
press reports citing his defense law- 
yers. 


is 


Although judicial secrecy covers 
the Italian hearings of Mr. Negri, 


Despite Modernized Law 


China Wife Finds Divorce 
Is Still Hard to Envisage 


reports from Rome said, that the 
prosecution evidence includes 1,800 
tapes recordings, some of them ap- 
parently recordings of the Paris- 
Rome calls. The Corriere della Sot 
report did not accuse Mr. Negri di- 
rectly of participating in the Red 
Brigades cell in Paris. 

Dining his months in Paris, Prof. 
Negri taught seminars at the Ecole 
Nonnale Superieuie and at Paris 
University on modern revolution- 
ary theory and. on transitions in the 
Italian Co mmunis t Party, a course, 
that be continued during visits here 
last month. 

Prof. Negri’s ultraleftist doct- 
rines advocate “workers’ autono- 
my 7 ’ in class struggle and stress that 
revolutionaries should operate in- 
dependently of Communist and' 
er political parties. 


Bv Fox Butterfield 


U.S. Panel Restricts 


Aer Lingus Charters 

WASHINGTON, April 24 (AP) 
— The Civil Aeronautics Board 
told the Irish airiinb Aer Lingus 
yesterday that it no longer can op- 
erate charter flights between the 
United States and Ireland without 
board approval. 

The move, effective in 30 days, 
was in retaliation for the Irish 
government’s refusal to let two 
U.5. carriers. Texas International 
Airlines and World Airways, fly 
charters between the countries. 


GALERIE ROLLER 


Ramis tr 8 ZURICH 

Tdb 0147 SO 40 Ttfau 38300 

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May 17th through June 2nd. 1979 



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HUNTINGS «.f the 17ih oratory: 

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A Uree roller ihm or Rl’GS and CARPETS. TAPESTRIES. RARE 
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SHANGHAI (NYT) — It could 
almost have been a tale, out of an 
old Chinese noveL The irate wom- 
an. angered by her husband’s filial 
devotion to his parents rather than 
to her and by her mother-in-law's 
scorn what she Tailed to give birth 
to a son. sued for divorce. 

Under a liberal divorce law 
decreed by the Communists to less- 
en what they view as the oppression 
of traditional family tife. she was 
entitled to the divorce, because her 
husband's family, which she had 
been forced to live with, was guilty 
of what the Communists term feu- 
dal thinking. 

Bui in practice, as Wei Jinfeng, 
35. found out fn a protracted court 
mediation session here that was 
open to visiting U.S. legislators, 
asking for a divorce can be asking 
for trouble. It goes against the feel- 
ing for social harmony and eco- 
nomic efficiency, and it exposes a 
married couple 'to the full force of 
community pressure. 

After a 2 ^-debate involving Mrs. 
Wei. her husband, a judge, two as- 
sessors and half a dozen representa- 
tives from the couple's work places 
and neighborhood. Mrs. Wei 
agreed to a reconciliation. She 
alone had argued for the divorce. 

Country's Needs 


the lingering “poison of feudal 

thinking," as in Mrs. Wei's 

instance. The law calls for attempts worirera’le^i^iri^' 
at reconciliation before a divorce is 


His concept of “autonomous 
cells" has beat claimed as an ideo- 
logical basis by the ' French 
“autonomes.’’ A month ago, 
masked “autonomes” clashed with 
police and smashed ISO shops in 
the center of Paris after a steel- 


approved. 

As Mrs. Wei described hex situa- 
tion, the couple's “contradiction” 

— the Maoist term for troubles — 
began when she gave birth to a 
daughter instead of a son. Male off- 
spring have traditionally been more 
treasured because they can earn 
more and stay with their parents af- 

— marriage. A daughter is like 


Journalist Shot 


ter 


“At present our country is carry- 
ing out the four modernizations," 
the judge told her, referring to the 
government's economic develop- 
ment program in agriculture, sci- 
ence and technology, defense and 
industry. “Our country needs sta- 
bility and unity, so families must 
practice stability and unity also.” ’ 

“Our duty is' to educate people, 
not to attack them." he counseled 
both Mrs. Wei and her husband. 
Hung Sungdao. a 39-year-old clerk 
in an import-export office. Their 
names differ because in China a 
woman does not adopt the 
husband’s name. 

The judge and the others who 
urged tf 


spilled water, according to an old 
saying, because ^she moves to' her 
in-laws after marriage. 

Women Quarreled 

When Mrs. Wei came home from 
the maternity hospital, she told the 
court her mother-in-law greeted 
her by bolding up a male infant a 
sign designed to insure that die 
would have a boy next time. Later 
the two women quarreled over how 
much Mrs. Wei ate, and the 
“contradiction” sharpened when 
she secretly bad an abortion, fear- 
ing the consequences of another 
daughter. 

Mrs. Wei then moved out, taking 
a small room for herself and her 
child, and demanded that her hus- 
band give her their share of the 
family's ration cards for tfre many 
essentials that are strictly rationed. 

Her husband recalled the story 
differently, testifying* that she 
showed no respect for his parents, 
smashed much of the furniture in 
anger, ripped his clothes one day 
when they met on the street, and 
to nts 


In another develop men l in Italy, 
the Red Brigades today “knee- 
capped” a television journalist. 
Franco PicdneRi, 44, the chief of 
the Than bureau of the national ra- 
dio and television network. He was 
struck by five bullets, and doctors 
said that he would need three 
months to recover. An unidentified 
woman called Ansa, the Dalian 
news agency, and claimed that, the 
ambush wa$ the work of die Red 
Brigades. 

Mr. Hofmann of The New York 
Times said that the way that the at- 
tack was carried out and reported 
to Ansa followed the pattern of ear- 
lier Red Brigades actions. Several 
journalists during the last two years 
nave been the targets of “kneecap- 
pings," or gun wounds in the lower 
part of the body, by the Red Brir 



A policeman arrests a youth during rioting in London Monday. 


340 Charged After Police 
Battle Leftists in London 


LONDON, April 24 
340 demonstrators were charged to- 
day with offenses committed dur- 
ing six hours of clashes at an ex- 
tremist election rally in west Lon- 


don yesterday in which a man was 
killed and mi 


Soviet Squatter. 
Reported in U.S. 


more than 20 policemen 
were injured. 

Three-policemen were still hospi- 
talized today with more serious in- 
juries suffered in the running street 
; in Southall with about 5,000 


leftists protesting an election rally 
by the rightist National Front Par- 


went 


office more than 140 


times to complain about his behav- 
, he did not want a divorce. 


ior. Still, I 
After husband and wife finished 
testifying, some of the people they 
work and live with took turns urg- 
ing them to make up. “You should 
cany out more ideological Work 
with your mother to correct her 
feudal thinking,” a man (old the 
husband. “In 


MOSCOW, April 24 (UPI) — An 
Armenian woman who held an 82- 
day sit-in protest at the UJS. Em- 
bassy last year has received her So- 
viet exit visa and has flown to the 
United States; embassy sources 
said today. 

The sources Said that EJisa 
Ovsepyan, 34, and her two sans left 
in rmd-February for Los Angeles to 
join her mother, Rosa Ovsepyan, 
80, and her aster, Azatouhie Mos- 
kovyan, 38. 

Mrs. Ovsepyan entered the em- 
bassy Aug. id, joining seven Pfcn- 
teoostalist squatters who had been 
in the building since June. Mrs. 
Ovsepyan weed to leave the em- 
bassy Nov. 1 after talking by tele- 
phone with her husband in Soviet 


ty- 


SouthalL where almost half the 
population is Asian, has one of the 
highest concentration of immi- 
grants in Britain. 

The dead man was identified by 
police as Blair Peach, a New Zea- 
land schoolteacher in his 20s or 
30&. He staggered into a house with 
blood streaming from his head and 
cbUapied. He died in a hospital 
four hours later, the police said. 


Variety of Off eases 


A police spokesman said that- it 
the t 


was the worst rioting since demon- 


strators fought? police and National 
oembers in the London dis- 


can be airplane pilo«.Uke men, so . Armenia. The Penlecostalists xe- 
girls are not less good than boys.-; -- main in the embassy. 


our society women 

couple to get back to- 
gether did not use the term love, 
which is officially regarded as a 
suspiciously decadent Western 
bourgeois conceit. Instead, a co- 
worker of Mrs. Wei’s at the Shang- 
hai Meteorological Instrument Fac- 
tory advised, what they needed was "M/T _ • •_* • • Til* J " • IT _ 

Majority in Jmodesia Vote 


Muzorewa’s Party Obtains 


political understanding, su 
she had with her husband. The re- 
mark eUciled a titter from specta- 
tors. 

Mrs. Wei, who held her 5-year- 
old daughter on her lap during 
much of the session, applied for a 
divorce in August. If both partners 
agree, “there is freedom of 
divorce,” the judge. Li Haiqing, 
explained. 

Divorce can also be granted, he 
said, in cases of adultery or if the 
couple did not have a chance to get 
to know each other well before 
marrying, or when one partner is 
discriminated against because of 


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Soudi Arabia, Kuwait and the Gu 



(Continued from Page 1) 
gives the blacks the trappings of 
powers but preserves white control. 

Election officials said that 63.9 
percent of the estimated 2J& iznllion 
blacks and 106.000 whites voted in 
the election. Arguing that the turn- 
out showed majority support for 
the new constitution, they said that 
the U.S. and British governments 
should end their attempts to bring 
Mr. Nkomo and Mr. Mugabe into 
the government and recognize the 
new elected government. 

In the United States, pressure 
was building up on the Carter ad- 
ministration to accept, the election 
results and lift its diplomatic and 
economic boycott of Mr. Smith and 
his black associates. But informed 
sources in Washington . said that 
Richard Moose, the assistant secre- 
tary of state for African affairs, and 
Ambassador Donald McHenry, an 
adviser to Andrew Young, the am- 
bassador to the UN, believe that 
the election was a fraud. 

The sources said Mr. Moose and 
Mr. McHenry are recommending 
that the administrator! continue to 


insist on an election under interna- 
tional supervision in which Mr. 
Nkomo and Mr. Mugabe partici- 
pate. They argue (hat acceptance of 
the election list week would, pit the 
U.S. government against the pre- 
vailing sentiment in’ virtually every 
black African country. 


Front mem 
trict of Lewisham — another area 
heavily populated with Asian immi- 
grants — two years ago. ■ 

“All 340 persons ^arrested have 
been charged with a variety of of- 
fenses including assault and caus- 
ing public disorder and win appear 
in court within about two weeks," a 
police spokesman said. 

Two policemen were stabbed 
and others suffered broken bones 
and eye injuries, the police said. 

TrouWe flared because the Na- 
tional Front, a vocal minority 
which has no members of .Parlia- 


Frotn Agency Dispatches 

— About came from outside the district The 
disturbances occurred three days 
after 25 policemen were i mured 
during clashes at a National Front 
rally in the Midlands. 

James Jardtne, chairman of the 
Police Federation, the policemen’s 
union, said he believed leftist dem- 
onstrators were using the National 
Front as a pretext to attack the 
police. 

* Violence Condemned 

Prime Minsiter James Callaghan 
and Conservative opposition leader 
Margaret Thatcher both con- 
demned the violence and the poli- 
cies of the National Front. 

• Fighting erupted when some of 
the demonstrators threw paint and' 
stones at the police surrounding the 
building. Attempts to smash past 
police tines were repulsed by scores 
of mounted officers and running 
battles erupted at several points 
around, the town hall.'; . . 

Meanwhile, the largest number 
of candidates to contest a British 
national election was nominated 
yesterday for the ballot May 3. - 
Officials said that 2,571 candi- 
dates were entered for the races in 
the 635 constituencies that each 
send one member of Parliament to 
the House of.Commons. The previ- 
ous highest figure was 2,252 candi- 
dates in October, 1974/ 

The National Front has 30) can- 
didates In the election, the largest 
number after the three major par- 
ties. The governing Laborites nave 
625 candidates, the Conservatives 
621 and the liberals 575. 


U.K. Journalists 


mem but which advocates compul- T n lJ 
sory repatriation of imnrigraiifs. x UJU iv -xicejict/t. 
were holding a rally in the local p # ^ 


town halL 
However, the police said that 
many of the demonstrators arrested 


The Anguish of Abortions 

Tf ri m ¥T# , Times and not to worl 

In .Europe: 4 Lose Histones p^«*. ^ 


LONDON, April 23 (Reuters) — 
The main British union of journal- 
ists tonight instructed its members 
to honor a picket line of the 
printers’ union -at the London 
Times and not to work on. the 


overseas 



British Rabies Sentence 

BR1XHAM, England, Apwil^ 
(Reuters) — Swedish freighter 
Capt. Leonard Eriksson was sen- 
tenced today to 60 days in jail for 
breaking Britain’s jratf 

dogs board vntfnit^i^ning 
the ship’s cat. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
tranquilizers and sleeping pills a 
day for her nerves. 

Odette is a working-class woman 
in a clean but shabby' tan raincoat 
who looks older than her 32 years. 
Her face wears a constant expres- 
sion of bafflement, as if she knew 
things were not going quite right 
but tacked the means to do any- 
thing about it. “The doctor said to 
me you don't have the face of a 
pregnant woman. He wouldn’t even 
take a 'test. I was on the pflL Next 
time I miss a period and a doctor 
says, nothing. I’ll see another. In- 
stead of , one pifl, HI take two. It 
isn't that 1 don't want more chil- 
dren. 1 just can’t afford them. I 
went to England but I should have 
been able to doril in France. After 
aU, it .wasn't my lault- If 1 ever see 


The headquarters of MLAC (the Toe Times has not published its 
Movement for the Liberty of Abor- daily and Sunday newspapers or its. 

1 r> -- » . . • Miuml rMnlMMii- nnnk Kl«u 


that doctor again PU jjut a photo of 


my face-that-doesn’t- 
on his. desk. People like that si 
be retired.' 


PARIS 


T 


Hotel California 


Just one short block from the Champs -ElysAes 


All 170 rooms have been completely redecorated 
in Louis XVI 'style, and equipped with self-dial 
telephone, TV, radio and nurd-bar. 
Traditional in style and furnishing, it offers 
the high quality service you require. /. 
Several meeting rooms in period decar accommodate 
meetings from 20 to 120 people. 


For dining and en t e r ta in ing, you am choose between 
the needy decorated Golden Gate Bar and Griff, ■ 
the dawered path during the summer months 
and various salons for banquets. 


Our Food and Beverage Manager 
will help you with my arrangements. 


Hotel Calfforhki 

16, rue de Berrl/75008 Paris - Tel. 359.93.00 
Teiejc 660634 Ccrtef - Coble: Califorotel 008. 


lion and Contraception) are in a 
shabby buikling in the Marais sec- 
tion of Paris. The offices have beat 
bombed three times. MLAC is a 
feisty radical women’s organization 
that, while it has announced that it 
had arranged abortions in defiance 
of the law, has always made its po- 
sition clear. “Abortion should only 
be a last tesort." When liberalized 
abortion became the law, MLAC 
like other European women’s 
groups, thought, they would be able 
to concentrate pn other' problems. 
Instead, like other European 
women’s groups, they spend as 
much time on abortion counseling 
as before. 

Abortion advice is given twice 
weekly and. as at other centers, the 
women meet in groups. There are 
sofas, lumpy and stained, to sprawl 
on, but most of the women sit tip 
very straight, and if they use the fa- 
miliar French “to" form, they use it 
uncomfortably. It isn’t natural to 
talk about such things, especially 
when you have been made to feel a 
fOOL 


several supplements since Nov. 30 
because of a dispute over the intro- 
duction of cold type photocomposi- 
tion which threatened the jobs of 
many primers. 

Earlier today, the Times chapter 
Of the National Union of Journal- 
ists, which has agreed to the new 
technology; said its members 
should consider crossing the picket 
tine as a “matter of conscience.” 

Many of them crossed Ll But lat- 
er, the NUTs- national executive in- 
structed members not to cross. The 
NUJ chapter at the Times, Britain's 
oldest paper, plans to meet tomor- 
row to reconsider the matter. 

The Times planned a circulation 
of about 30,000 for its weekly, 
which was to be printed on the 
Continent and not osculated in 
Britain. The NUJ .accused ■ the. 
Times of a provocative act and an 
attempt to split the unions. 


To ease the atmosphere, one 
woman in the MLAC group talks 
about her abortion. She is’ plump 
and red-cheeked, naiurally bounty 
sod smiling. She tells in fight tones 
about how the doctor in the private 
dime, she watt to left his patients 
on a row of tables while be talked 
to his girlfriend on the telephone; 

the dinic, telling them cheerfully, 
pfou*rc out of luck; tonight's nurse 
is hopeless," how the women 
each other during the night, 
soma of them ' bled, -which 
made the doctor very cross because 
he would have to change ihe sheets. 

The- story was told . weft, with 
considerable humdr. But no one in 
the room laughed. 


Arabs Walk Out 
Of News Talks 


VIENNA, April 24 (AP) — A 
conference of Arab and European 


HARRY’S N.Y. BAR® 

■Ed. 1911 - 


5 me Baffin, PUIS.. 
FOurtm Str. 3 Umk 


news agencies broke up today with- 
out accomplishing any business af- 
ter 16 Arab states walked out to 
protest the presence of Egyptian 

delegates. 

The third armnat conference of 
the agencies opened yesterday, but 
scheduled discussions of coopera- 
tion between - . Arab and' European 
agencies could not take place be- 
cause Arab refused to 

participate with Egyptian repre- 
sentatives present. 

The European agencies said that 
they could not exclude the repre- 
sentatives of Cairo's Middle East 
News/Agency. When the meeting 
reopened this rooming, the confer-' 
cnce was postponed indefinitely. 


17 KIDed in Brazil Clash 


UNHARES, BraadL April 24 
(AP) —A husband a truck collided 
here yesterday, killing 17 persons 
and' tztjuring more than 20, police 
reported-. 


Owen Faces 
Tough Race 
To Keep Seat 


.Hffl 


tf 


f! 


io 


(Continued from Page 1) 
time. The Conservatives are playing 
on affection here for Joan Vickers 
(now Lady Vickers), who represent- 
ed Devonport from 1955 to 1974 
and devoted much of her time to 
solving, the problems of her constit- 
uents. . 

In rebuttal. Mr. Owen points to 
the vast three-bay dry dock in the 
shipyard, the funding for which 
was -approved when He was Navy 
minis ter, and to the new Rank- 
Toshiba electronics factory, which 
be helped to bring here. 

Mr. Owen is told by his local 
supporters that he is going to win. 
that Labor defectors are more than 
matched by former Conservative 
voters who now plan to vote for 
him at least partly because of the 
publicity he has attracted. He is en- 
couraged ..but not persuaded, at 
least not yet. 

“I believe in polls," be said, “so 1 
have to think that- Fm in trouble. 
But it's a funny election- Our pri- 
vate polls show that we’re dong 
better in the marginal seats than in 
the others. - You don’t hear too 
much hostile comment, but there is 
a quiet vote: people who don’t 
proffer their views but are probably 
worried about trade-union power.” 

And if he loses? 

.“Fm not in politics for job secur- 
ity,” he said. “Perhaps Til find an- 
other seat, perhaps noL My train- 
ing is as a physician, and I could 
happily go batik to that. Or maybe 
ru write or maybe just go to grass 
for a while.” 


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David Owen 


diraff 

Egypt Minister. 
Accuses Syria of. 


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CAIRO, April 24 (AP) — Interior , ^ ^ 
Minister Mohammed Nabawi i** if. 4 . u, ni . ' 
mail accused Syria today of under- ■ 
taking a campaign of terror and , ' r ‘ “ 
sabotage against Egypt, in which, 
one person has died and eight have * 4 
been wounded: . * 

. A Syrian' and a Lebanese weie ^k4ikcN 
displayed at a news conference, ii 
and Mr. Ismail said that were 3^,^ 
caught with explosives and others - 
sabotage material before they could ^ ^ 
use them. Others had escaped froat'ij " * 


two men said that they were , 
Syrian intelligence to canse .* • 

trouble in Egypt because of .its,^ # Jr/ 
peace treaty with IsratiL Ibrahim d- ^ n„a. f ln 
Daya said that he had been as- J 
signed to blow up the ‘ f ! 

Foreign Ministry, when Foreign ^ 


when For 
Minister Butros Ghati was in 
office. 


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Last week, daring national voi- 
5 on the peace treaty, a pared.^^ 


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bomb blew up at tije main Cairo 


post office, lulling a customs 
spector and wounding four per- 


sons. A group in Beirni, the Eagles 
of the Palestinian Revolution: 


claimed responsibility. Mr. broad 
contended that this orr~' - ~‘*~* 
was a front for Syrian in 
cplod 




A bomb that exploded -and wound; ^ 
ed. four persons at the -Sheraton 4 jr* 1 - 1 

Hotel in Cairo last Februaiy rose ^ MV 
was planted by Syrian agents. ML \ 
Ismail maintained. 

C *.U, 


Carter Joins 
l/.S. Ceremony 
For Holocaust 


WASHINGTON. April 24 
(AJP) — President Carter today 
reaffirmed his comnntmezu to 
insure that events like the 
World War II Holocaust “will 
never recur on this earth again-'” 
. In remarks prepared For a cer- 
emony in the Capitol ip mem- 
ory of the Holocaust, the pir 
dent said, “We must teach. 1 
lessons of the Holocaust And 
most of all we ourselves must 
remember.” The ceremony was 
one of a series erf events had 
International Holocaust Cc 
memoration Day to mark the 
deaths of l.l.mfiutHi persons, in- 
cluding 6 milli on JCWS, from 
Nazi persecution. ’ " ■ 

The president recalled ’that 
when he visited Israel five *”® 
„ he saw the manorial to tb* 
lazis’ Jewish victims. *1 vowed 
then. a& people all over t® 
world are doing this week, W 
reaffirm our unshakable com- 
mitment that such an event 
never recur on thi&eartb again*. 
Mr. Carter said. . • 

Mr. Carter again urged. ** 
Senate to ratify the mternsttro®". 
al genocide treaty, wto* 
sponsored by the United Nfr 
ttons but Much tbe Senate 

refused for years to approve. - 






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Carter Says Tax-Plan Foes 
Try to 'Hoodwink’ Public 


Bv Martin Toichin 



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#J5rrT H d April 24 stability of our currency and even 

(NYT) — President Carter said yes- the security of our nation.” he add- 
terday that public support of his ecL 

energy plan had led opponents “to The president-asked the sdemific 

tiy 1 to hoodwink the American peo- community to bdp him to enact axi 
pie by passing a windfall-profits enogy nteu and also called upon it 
taxitatisinfactachOTade." “to fulfill (he trust of the American 

Ihe presideni sajd that those op- people by creating the new energy 
ponents tad shifted thar strategy technologies that are vital to the ft- 
irom outright opposition to an rf* tore well-being of wir nation.” 

create aiough loopholes VO Mr. Carter also made a plea for 

siippon of a st ra tegic arms limicar 
tion treaty with the Soviet Union. 1 

“We have lived too long with no- . 
clear weapons— the president said. 
“We have grown too accustomed to 
their shadowy preesence in our' 
iivesu We are too apt to forget what 
the ultimate honor would be.” 

Jody Powell, the president's 
press secretary, said at a briefing 
that Mr. Carter needed the support 
of “powerful" and “influential" in- 
stitutions in order to gain 'Senate 
approval of a SALT-2 treaty. 

- Mr. Powell said that tbe' presi- 
dent could not do- tbe jdb alone. “It 
wiD not be approved by the Senate . 
if the altitude, is. This is the presi- 
dent's responsibility, and his alone,’ 
"he said. ■ % - 

“This society has a wide variety 
of institutions, that exercise conskf-' 
erable influence on the functions of 
government,” Mr. Powell added. 
He declined, however, to identify 
the institutions that he said the 
White House' expected to play a 
role in supporting the treaty. 


make such a tax 

The vehicle for this charade. Mr. 
Carter said, was a proposed “plow- 
back” provision that would enable 
oil companies to escape the tax by 
putting tbdr profits into the devel- 
opment of new energy sources. 

“It isn’t a “plow back'; h is a 
*plow under* and a ‘kickback.’ " 
Mr. Carter told the .annual meeting 
of the National Academy of Scienc- 
es. 

The president told the audience 
of scientists and engineers that op- 
ponents of his proposed tax had 
shifted their strategy “because tbe 
public supports our proposals. 

“Many of those who only a few 
weeks ago were dedicated to killing 
oat right the windfall-profits tax 
have now given up on that- fight," 
Mr. Carter said, reflecting tbe 
views of congressmen who returned 
yesterday from their Easter recess. 

In just three weeks, the outlook 
for such a tax has undergone a sur- 
prising reversal. Virtually written 
off by many political experts the 
day that it was proposed, the tax 
proposal has gained so much 
ground that many observers, appar- 
ently including the president, now 
believe that' the only question is the 
form that it wiH take. - 

“The tattle is far Irorfi over.” 
Mr. Carter said. 



BRIEFCASE BICYCLE — Juan Sznmowski sits on the 
foldable bicycle that won him first prize in a British design 
contest Sznmowski, 29, an Argentine-bom architect in 
London, came up with a bicycle that folds to briefcase size. 


Claims to Split Hydrogen, Oxygen 

Inventor to Test a Water-Powered Motor 


■ By Robert Lindsey . 

LOS ANGELES (NYT) — Sam 
Leslie Leach, the inventor of a con- 
troversial process which he con- 
tends can economically separate 
the hydrbsen and oxygen in water, 
says that- he has refined his design 

. , ... . . and- begun budding a system that 

Oil remains by far our most nn- will be capable of naming an auto- 
ponam energy source, and we are mobile on hydrogendwed from 
m the painful situation -of relying water ‘ . 

on a greedy and unreliable foreign Mr] Leach's mention has been 
cartel for neariy half the oil we the subject of both . mysteiy and. 


-Strong Language! or OPEC 

On another front in the 
tattle, the president used mu 
strong language to characterize the 
Organization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries 


to maintain the reaction. 

In 1922. Niels Bohr, the Danish 
theoretical physicist, first defined 
-the electrostatic forces that bind 
electrons and protons as “extrami- 
dear" energy. Mr. Leach’s conten- 
tion that he has found a way louse 
the energy in the way he describes 
is likely to evoke additional skepti- 
cism from other scientists. 


use," Mr. Carter said. 

“As that onrushing river of for- 
eign oil flows into oar country, a 
river of money flows out. threaten- 
ing the health of our economy, the 

Floodwaters 
Cut Into Dike 
In U.S. North 

NEW YORK, April 24 ( AP> — 
Steady rains and floodwaters today 
cut a hole in a dike protecting the 
neighboring Red River, towns of 
Grand Forks. NJX, and East 
Grand Forks, Minn-, sending water 
8 feet high through some residential 
sections. : 

Hundreds of volunteers worked 
through tbe night in cold and rain 
to shore up the dikes. The river was 
at its highest level of the century. 

About 70 familes were evacuated 
from the Riverside Park area of 
Grand Forks when a 10-foot hole 
burst in a primary dike, flooding 
several homes. About 200 other 
families remained homeless in die 
English -Coolie area of Grand 
Forks, where water behind the 
dikes has flooded a 5-square-mile 
area with depths to 6 feet. 

Mood watches were also in effect 
in Louisiana, in southeast Texas.. 


controversy since he said in 1976 
that he had devised ah economical- 
ly' efficient means of splitting 
water, a contention that promised a 
cheap source’ of hydrogen as a re- 
placement for fossil fi 
. Mr. Ltach, a multimillionaire 
professional inventor .who has sev- 
eral basic patents in the field of 
optics, has been trying to interest 
the federal government and indus- 
try in hlsconcept for more than 
three years, but has been largely 


Violates Laws of Phytics- . 

For the.most part scientists have 
ridiculed the concept; arguing that 
h violated, basic laws of physics. 
’Any system of splitting water, they 
contend, has to consume more en- 
ergy than it produces. 

Mr. Leach has refused to discuss 
the. details of his system or how if 
purportedly works. Bur last spring, 
an innovation research center at the 
University of Oregon, financed by 
the National Science Foundation, 
evaluated part of the technology 
over a period of two weeks and 
concluded that, based on its analy- 
sis, it did not violate the laws of 
physics or thermodynamics. 

The center said that the process 
appeared to"be technically sound 
ana have commercial potential, but 
its report did not dampen skepti- 
cism in the scientific community: 

Two critics of the system, How- 
ard.Ricse and Donald Bunker, both 


where the N echos River Was expect- 
ed io crest later today, and in Ala- professors at the University of Cali- 
baraa. where the rising Bayou Sara foroia. argued, for example, that it 
Creek drove 300 families from their was impossible for such a system to 
homes late yesterday. 






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work as Mr. Leach contends 
because, in effect, it would be a 
“perpetual motion machine.” The 
inventor denies such a characteriza- 
tion. 

Rigjbts Protected 

In an interview, Mr. Leach said 
BALTIMORE, April 24 (UPI) — that be bad declined to make public 
Women who smoke dm* 
nancy run 
nonsmokers 


Smokers 9 Babies 
Seen in Danger 



or undersized tables, a Johns Hop- 
kins University researcher said yes- 
terday. 

Epidemiology Prof. Mary Meyer 
said that a new study, testing 
51,000 women and their infants, 
shows that smoking inhibits a fetus' 


men is of the process. Last week, a 
second was issued "by the U.S. Pat- 
ent Office. After its issuance, he 
agreed io give some details of how 
the system purportedly works. 

In its simplest terms, be said, tbe 
process uses a laser-like device to 


System of Nebulae 

But be asserts Lhat the process he 
uses to maintain the water-splitting 
action is identical lb one observed 
by astronomers in energy interac- 
tions that occur in gaseous nebulae. 
- the great masses of interstellar gas 
that absorb ultraviolet radiation 
from stars and re-emu it .as viable 
light. 

The following is a more detailed 

Retrial Ordered 
In Suit for Slain 
Blade Panthers 

CHICAGO, April 24 (AP) — A 
federal appeals court yesterday* or- 
dered a new trial in the $47.7-m3- 
tion rivfl-rights suit stemming from 
a 1969 police raid, in which Black 
Panthers Fred Hampton and Mark 
Clark were killed. The original 18- 
month trial in U.S. District Court, 
which ended in June. 1977, was tbe 
longest in tbe.history of the federal 
court system. 

. Tbe 7th U.S. Circuit Court of 
Appeals here reversed the District 
Court actum, which dismissed 
charges against a former Illinois 
State's attorney and 20 of 27 other 
law enforcement officials. The suit 
was brought by the families of the 
two Panther leaders, as well as 
those of seven survivors of the raid. 

Mr. Hampton and Mr. Clark 
were killed in a predawn raid Dec. 
4. 1969, on a West Sde apartment 
Four other persons were injured. 
Authorities testified that the police 
fired 82 to 99 rounds into the flat 
Ballistics experts linked one shot to 
a Panther weapon. 

When the District Court jury had 
been- unable to reach a verdict. 
Judge Joseph Sam Peny issued di- 
rected verdicts in favor of seven po- 
licemen who fired Weapons during 
the raid. Panther lawyers com- 
plained thar Judge Perry had 
shown bias and hostility, one law- 
yer remarking that h had been like 
Splaying in the World Series 
against the Yankees with their 
manager as umpire." 


Governor Testifies on Harrisburg Accident 

U.S. Urged to Tighten Atomic Plant Controls 


water vapor (and which are re- -account of how Mr. Leach says the 
leased in the waier-splruing action) system works: 


Tbe reaction is started with an 
input of electrical energy from out- 
side the system, from a battery or 
electric line: This energy is convert- 
ed. by using an “opticaJpump" and 
other components, into large 
amounts of nluzmoldi radiation of 
a specific ' wavelength that is 
precisely tailored to ionize hydro- 
gen and oxygen molecules in the 
steam thar' nas been fed into a tu- 
bular reaction chamber. 

The chamber is flooded with the 
radiation. During the ionization, 
electrons are momentarily liberated 
from their atoms and molecules. 

Recaptured, Recombined - 

Microseconds later they are re- 
captured and recombined with the 
proton or nucleus of the atom. At 
this point, the energy that was re- 
quired to ioaize it reappears and ra- 
diates away. ... *• 

This radiation then ionizes an- 
other molecule. Very soon a chain 
reaction begins that Involves mil- 
lions of molecules and atoms. 

The process's concept Mr. Leach 
said, manipulates the recombina- 
tion of electrons and protons as hy- 
drogen and oxygen instead of water 
vapor. Some of the hydrogen, he 
said, can be used to generate elec- 
tricity to continue the initial input 
to the process and. in effect, be self- 
sustaining as long as additional wa- 
ter is pumped into the system. 

Mr. Leach asserted that he had 
demonstrated the validity of his 
theory in 1 1 experimental machines 
that split water into hydrogen and 
oxygen. He said that the machine 
now bong built for nse in an auto- 
mobile was of a more sophisticated 
design and was intended to drive a 
245-horsepower automobile 

Early Sumner Test 

A spokesman for a company that 
is assembling the device under a 
contract with Mr. Leach said it was 
hoped the machine would be ready 
for testing in early summer. 

Scientists have tried for more 
than a century to separate water 
into its two components, oxygen 
and hydrogen. Electrolysis, nuclear 
reactors and other means have been 
employed to do so, but every meth- 
od has consumed far more energy 
than tbe hydrogen that was pro- 
duced. 

The availability of a- cheap 
source of hydrogen would have im- 
mense implications for the world 
economy. Not only could hydrogen 
be used as a substitute for gasoline, 
but it would also be used as a re- 
placement for home-heating fuels 
and other energy sources. 


By Robert C Toth 

WASHINGTON. April 24 — 
Congress was urged yesterday to 
tighten UR and state controls over 
nuclear power plants and to order 
more on-site technical expertise at 
such installations in the aftermath 
of the Three Mile Island accident. 

Gov. Richard Thornburgh of 
Pennsylvania told the Senate nucle- 
ar regulatory subcommittee that 
regulatory standards for the plants 
- should be enforced more strictly 
and that power company execu- 
tives, as well as plant operators, 
should be required to obtain li- 
censes to run nuclear reactors. 

He also said that states should 
' have the authority to inspect power 
plants without prior notice. The 
governor also said be had ordered 
Ins staff to study the need for state- 

employed regulatory and inspector 
personnel. 

Data Was Scarce 

Gov. Thornburgh told tbe sena- 
tors that the scarcity of accurate in- 
formation — as well as conflicting 
information and recommendations 
— was perhaps tbe most difficult 
problem be faced in trying to make 
policy decisions during the acci- 
dent. 

Information from persons at the 
plant site was far more reliable 
than that which came from else- 
where, he said. He seemed particu- 
larly dismayed by what he called 
“the garbled gap' between Harris- 
burg and Washington." 

Gov. Thornburgh said that until 
President Carter sent Harold Den- 
ton of the Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission to the site to take 
charge, he received no reliable in- 
formation on which to base the de- 
cisions he was confronted with. 

The governor also testified that 
statements early in the accident by 
the plant's operator. Metropolitan 
Edison Co„ were “less than 
accurate." and he. tad to look else- 
where for information. 

This data came from U.S. offi- 
cials who were at the site, not in 
Washington, he emphasized, and 
permitted him to “offset an ava- 
lanche of misstatements and sec- 
ond-guessing from virtually every- 
! Who had an opinion." 


presence of LLS. personnel at nu- 
clear plants. He urged that “a fed- 
eral monitor (be] in the control 
room of nuclear power plants at all 
times." 

Sen. Gary Han, D-CoJo_ the 
subcommittee chairman, indicated 
that he favored giving the Nuclear 
Regulatory Commission authority 
to take ova private nudear plants 
in times of crisis. This stand 
prompted a mild debate with in- 
dustry spokesman Carl Walske. 
representing the Atomic Industrial 
Forum. 

“In mv experience, including 
time in the federal government." 
Mr. Walske said. “I don't see great- 
er basic competence in safety 
[working] with public officials in- 
stead of private individuals. It's not 
automatic that if you overlay gov- 


ernment omo problems that it will 
make them [the problems] better." 

“It's not an issue of competence 
but accountability.” Sen. Hart 
replied. 

Officials of Metropolitan 
Edison's parent company. General 
Public Utilities Corp., took limited 
blame for the accident and ap- 
pealed for aid in spreading its cost 
among its customers and employ- 
ees. as well as its stockholders. 

William Kuhns, chairman of 
General Public Utilities, said that 
his company will go bankrupt un- 
less the Pennsylvania Utility Com- 
mission grants a rate increase. He 
said he recognized that there was a 
feeling that the utility should be 
punched Tor the accident. If inves- 
tigations now under way show that 
Metropolitan Edison executives or 


workers were responsible, he said, 
"punishment should be dealt out 
sev erely and promptly ." 

The "fact that two crurial valves 
in the plant's back-up cooUr 
tern were closed when they sf 
have been open was "dearly a fail- 
ure on our pan,” the utility’s presi- 
dent. Herman Dree Lamp. said. He 
estimated that the contaminated 
plant might be out of operation for 
two or three years, at least. 

• Lt* .filer tn Tima 


Shutdown Recommendation 


Testers Could Have Warned 
Of Fallout Threat, Aide Says 


one 1 


1 opinion. 
Toughest Decision 


Gov. Thornburgh said that his 
toughest decision was not to order 
the evacuation of tens of thousands 
of people in the area. Weighing the 
potential risk of nuclear emissions 
against the proven hazards of mov- 
ing people under panic conditions, 
he chore not to order evacuation, 
he said. 

Michael Bancroft, of the Public 
Citizen Litigation Group, also 
urged the subcommittee, an am of 
the Senate Environment and Public 
Works Committee, to increase the 


LAS VEGAS. April 24 (WP) — 
Civilians exposed to radioactive 
fallout from U.S. atomic bomb 
tests could have been warned of po- 
tential hazards without jeopardiz- 
ing the nation's development of nu- 
clear weapons, a House subcom- 
mittee was. told yesterday. 

Atomic Energy Commission offi- 
cials sometimes took a “cavalier 
approach" to residents claiming 
fallout damage, the subcommittee 
also was tola by Mohlon Gates, 
manager of the Nevada Test Site. 

Mr. Gates’ concessions came un- 
der questioning by Rep. Bob Erk- 
hardu D-Texas.." who had just 
heard Martha Bordoli Laird tell of 
die death in 1957 of her 7-year-old 
son. Butch, who had leukemia. 

No Food Tests 

“At no time were, we ever told 
about' the effects of radiation or 
what it could do to us." Mrs. Laird 
testified. “At no lime did they 
come and test our food and our 
water, and all this time we were 
feeding it to our children." 

Mrs. Laird and Mr. Gates 
appeared during a second day of 
hearings by the House subcommit- 
tee on oversight and investigations 
into the health effects of above- 
groynd nuclear testing on residents 
exposed to fallout from 1951 to 
1962. In that time, fallout drifted 
from the lest site 102 times. Since 
then. Mr. Gates disclosed yester- 
day. so-called below ground tests 
have sent radiation from proving 
grounds 31 times. 

After the atmospheric testing 
childhood leukemia, thyroid cancer 
and birth defects rose in areas of 
Utah exposed to fallout, with resi- 


dents claiming the fallout caused 
those increases. 

While no detailed studies of Ne- 
vada residents have been conduct-' 
ed. a nuclear physicist disclosed 
here that a preliminary survey indi- 
cates that leukemia is at least as 
high as. and probably higher than, 
could be expected in areas of Utah 
exposed to fallout. 

Possible Compensation 

A major purpose of these hear- 
ings is the question of compensat- 
ing fallout zone residents for what 
Rep. Eckhardt called “the injustice 
to the persons sacrificed unwitting- 
ly.” 

Because radiation-induced can- 
cers look the same as cancers 
caused by other factors. Rep. Eck- 
hardt has said that the government 
may have to compensate all cancer 
victims <in fallout areas to make 
sure that no fallout-related victims 
or relatives of victims are left 
uncompensated. 

About 600 claims seeking tens of 
millions of dollars in damages have 
been filed with tbe government by 
relatives of cancer and leukemia 
victims, including Mrs. Laird, alleg- 
ing that the illnesses were caused 
by fallout. 

While the subcommittee is taking 
a broad look at the health and envi- 
ronmental effects of low-level expo- 
sure to radiation, including the re- 
cent Three Mile Island nuclear 
power-plant accident, it was Mrs. 
Laird's testimony that drew the 
most attention. 

Mr. Gates, who joined the Neva- 
da testing program in 1972. main- 
tained that his predecessors acted 
with concern for public health and 


WASHINGTON. April 24(UPU 
— The Nuclear Regulatory Com- 
mission may decide by tomorrow 
whether to temporarily shut atomic 
power plants built by (he same 
company ‘that constructed the 
Three Mile Island reactor in Penn- 
sylvania. 

Two leading commission staff 
experts yesterday recommended 
that plants built "by Babcock and 
Wilcox be shut for a month of 
more pending a review of thar 
problems. But Harold Denton, di- 
rector of nuclear reactor regulation 
for the commission, said that he 
would rather wait until more infor- 
mation is studied on putsible de- 
fects in the plants. 

Of the nine Babcock and Wilcox 
reactors built, only four — three 
units in South Carolina and one in 
northern California — are operat- 
ing; the others are closed for re- 
pairs or maintenance. 


and the 


luring a 
Cold W; 


ar after that. 


oxygen and hydrogen. It then uses 
the electrostatic forces that normal- 
ly bind electrons and protons in 


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growth and could also kill it, since generate ultraviolet radiation that 
smoking reduces the amount of ox- phoiochcmicaliy splits, steam into 
ygen that reaches the baby. 

Prof. Meyer said her research 
team also found that women who 
smoke tend to deliver premature 
babies that are not as beahhy as 
full-term infants. Doctors "had 
believed, she said, that smaller ba- 
bies were born to smoking mothers 
because the habit depressed their 
appetites. But tbe study found that 
“the baby is smaller because of 
(smoking's] effect on tbe pregnancy 
itself” 


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Sen. Baker Urges 
Asylum for Shah 

WASHINGTON, April 24 (AP) 
— Senate Republican leader How- 
ard Baker yesterday called on the 
Carter administration to grant 
asylum to Shah Mohammed -Reza 
Pafalavi. 

The Carter administration has 
made it known to the exiled shah of 
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INTERNATIONAL 

Heralb^a^sSribune 

PuldiNiMtl uilll 11 k* Vm lurk Tinn>n him) Tlie ftna 

• Page 4 Wednesday, April 25, 1979 * 

U.S. Technological Lag 


For years. U.S. industry has dominated the 
world /narkei for everything from passenger 
jets and computers to oil-drilling equipment. 
But government officials and industrial exec- 
utives have been growing worried about tech- 
nological development. Now. President 
Carter has ordered a comprehensive study of 
how official policies affect industrial innova- 
tion. and is pleading with Congress not to cut 
his budgetary request For basic science re- 
search funds. 

The world challenge to U.S. technology 
results partly from other nations' recovery 
from World War 11. They are marketing their 
own new technology in the United States and 
elsewhere with skill. The British- French 
supersonic Concorde was a major technologi- 
cal feat, though an economic disaster. But 
the same high skill in aircraft-manufacturing 
has produced the European-made Airbus, a 
wide- body plane that has already been pur- 
chased by several leading airlines and in 
which several other companies are seriously 
interested. In the past, these airlines bought 
U.S. plunes almost exclusively. 

U.S. scientists invented the transistor, but 
the Japanese have collected many of the divi- 
dends. It was a Japanese firm that perfected 
a "one-gun” technology for color television 
and marketed it worldwide against the con- 
ventional "three-gun’ technology of U.S.- 
made sets. British scientists invented both 
the hip replacement device that has helped so 
many victims of arthritis and the CAT 
scanner which has revolutionized medical 
diagnosis. The French pioneered the discov- 
ery oF the phenothiazine drugs that have rad- 
ically altered treatment of psychotic patients. 

Data on new patents further evidence the 
greater progress of other nations. Between 
1971 and 1976, for example. U.S. patents is- 
sued to U.S. corporations dropped by about 


20 percent, while patents issued to foreign 
corporations increased almost 25 percent. 

Why is this happening? Sam Tinsley, the 
director of corporate technology at Union 
Carbide, puts the blame on Washington. He 
says some officials keep asking. “Where are 
the golden eggs?" while other officials “beat 
hell out of the goose that lays them” with 
what he regards as obstructive regulations. 
Other business critics charge that govern- 
ment- spends far too little on research £nd 
development and that tax policies discourage 
risky private ventures. 

The other side of the coin, however, is that 
government regulations have spurred innova- 
tions for the more economical use of energy, 
for the recycling of scarce materials, and for 
finding substitutes .for carcinogenic materi- 
als. Should Washington spend more on re- 
search and development, some of its business 
critics are certain to complain about high 
taxes. But that would be shortsighted. Busi- 
ness leaders ought to consider the view ex- 
pressed by Derek Bok. the president of Har- 
vard. on behalf of a group of university presi- 
dents and scientists. Bok calls money for 
basic research “an essential investment if we 
are to retain our leadership in world 
markets." 

We agree. The technology gap deserves the 
attention the president is giving it — and 
support by Congress for his budget requests. 
He asks $4.3 billion for the next fiscal year to 
fund basic research. Opportunities to elimi- 
nate regulations that impede innovation 
should also be sought. W. Michael Blumen- 
thal, the secretary of the Treasury, has well 
described the choice the country faces: “Our 
technological superiority is not mandated by 
heaven. Unless we pay dose attention to it 
and invest in it. it will disappear.” 

THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Big Fight Begins 


Congressional ideas about the U.S. budget 
have changed drastically over the past year, 
and you can see the results in this week's 
debate in the Senate. The first draft of the. 
budget resolution has come to the floor, with 
its stringent limits to next year’s federal 
spending and deficit. A majority of the sena- 
tors now seem to accept the principle of a 
balanced budget as political imperative — 
for the first time since the Eisenhower years 

— and (he only question is how fast to get 
there. 

Sen. Edmund Muskie's Budget Committee 
is recommending a resolution that would 
commit Congress to a balance in fiscal 198 1 

— the fiscal year that begins five weeks be- 
fore the next election. This drive toward bal- 
ance is particularly remarkable since the 
Budget Committee warns that a mild reces- 
sion is likeiv later this year. It’s the first time 
in a least a generation that leading senators 
of both parties have been talking about cut- 
ting a president's budget in the face of rising 
unemployment. 

It's not the Senate alone. A similar, if 
slightly less, draconian, resolution comes to 
the Floor of the House next week. The rest of 
the year is going to be filled with hitter quar- 
reling over who’s to hear the brunt of the 
cuts — whether the poor, or the slates or the 
Pentagon. But the main mechanism moving 
the budget toward balance is not the cuts in 
spending. It is the autom atic and continuous 
tax increase that inflation imposes by moving 
taxpayers into higher brackets. 

With cruel and explicit logic, the Senate 
Budget Committee warns that, if the budget 
is to reach balance before next Election Day, 
Congress will have to forego the expected 


pre-election tax-reduction bill. Conversely, if 
Congress wants to enact tax relief next year, 
the balanced budget will have to wait until 
1982. There's a certain mean irony to this 
point, since the balance-the-budgel move- 
ment is drawing a lot of its support from 
people who think that it necesarily will bring 
lighter taxes. 

Since World War II. most people just as- 
sumed that the ultimate purpose of economic 
policy was to generate jobs and keep unem- 
ployment low. It was a social and moral 
judgment that had a wide consensus behind 
it. But recently, after six years of inflation 
unprecedented in the experience of the Unit- 
ed Stales, that view has been changing. If 
Congress enacts a final budget resolution 
next September that is anything like the pres- 
ent drafts, it will have moved to a very differ- 
ent position. It will be saying that it finds an 
inflation rate of 10-plus percent more dan- 
gerous to U.S. society than an unemploy- 
ment rate around 6 percent and fairly stable. 
It will also be acknowledging tbal temporary 
stagnation in the economy is preferable to a 
permanent balance-ihe-budget amendment 
in the Constitution. 

Congress would be right on both points. 
But as the economy slows and federal funds 
become less lavish, the burdens will not Fall 
equally on all citizens. Speaking of morality, 
it is important to remember that those who 
benefit most from lower inflation will not 
necessarily be those who are out of work. 
The iwo budget committees have tried to 
provide more help for the people most at 
hazard, and that concern needs to be pre- 
served in the hard bargaining ahead. 

THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A Home for the Shah 


The dethroned shah of Iran needs a place 
to live. The United States, along with most 
other Western countries, is trying to help him 
— provided he goes elscw here. 

Bui the United Stales is not most other 
Western countries. It has been a haven for 
the homeless, especially those who are not 
likely to become puhlic charges. It should be 
a haven particularly for diplomatic allies of 
long standing. And better than most coun- 
tries. it should be able to manage the awk- 
wardness of sheltering the shah while seeking 
good relations with his successors. All this 
argues for trying to accommodate the fallen 
emperor and his family provided the national 
interest permits. 

Sentiment alone cannot decide these mat- 
ters any more than sentiment decided the 
shah's price for oil. Nor are we much im- 
pressed b’y Henry Kissinger's charge that 
President Carter has dishonored the reputa- 
tion or the United States for hospitality; the 
former secretary of state once refused even to 
lunch with the exiled Alexander Solzhenitsyn 
lest he offend the Soviet leaders. 


A fear of ofFending the new rulers of Iran 
is said to be one of Carter’s reasons for urg- 
ing the shah to stay away. That strikes us as 
too timid. The fear that Iranians might seize 
Americans and demand the return of the 
shah in exchange is probably more substan- 
tial. but a determined administration should 
be able to establish some ground rules with 
Tehran for receiving the shah. What it would 
need in exchange, however, is a clear state- 
ment of abdication and a pledge that the 
shah would not use U.S. soil for any effort to 
restore himself or to challenge his successors. 

Other problems have been cited to the 
shah, but they are for him to weigh. His safe- 
ly would require a circumscribed life. And he 
may face legal action in connection with his 
family foundation's assets in the United 
States. If he chooses to ran those risks, the 
administration should accept rather than 
evade the challenge of making his retirement 
here possible. Americans should welcome the 
unwanted, proudly. 

THE NEW. YORK TIMES. 


In the International Edition 


Seventy-Five Years Ago 

* April 25, 1904 

NEW YORK — The arrival hefe of Hugo 
Kupffer. editor of the Berliner Lokal-Anzeiger, 
to study U.S. social institutions, has aroused 
much excitement. Mr. Kupffer complimented 
the city's newspapers, was impressed with the 
care the city bestows on wayward youngsters, 
and thought the streets could use a cleaning. Vis- 
iting Bellevue Hospital, he noted' that “it was 
crowded beyond capacity, as arc all large institu- 
tions.” Mr, Kupffer was impressed by the proce- 
dure of brightening the wards with plants and 
flowers, to him a new procedure. 


Fifty Years Ago 

April 25, 1929 

LONDON — While the British press continues to 
accord unrestricted approval to the U.S. naval 
disarmament policy os set forth in Geneva by 
Ambassador Gibson recently, it has been 
learned that the government considers the mat- 
ter of such importance that tomorrow’s Cabinet* 
meeting will be devoted to a full consideration of 
the U-S. proposals. The Admiralty, however, is 
not expected to be enthusiastic. Ramsay Mac- 
Donald, former prime minister, said: "If Labor 
were in office, we should at once range ourselves 
alongside of the United States.” 







A Triple Lesson 
From Mrs. Thatcher ^ 1 


By David S. Broder 


L ONDON — No one had told 
me that Margaret Thatcher <is 
really Jack Kemp dressed up to 
lot* like Mis. Miniver. Nor had I 
been warned before coming here to 
watch the windup of the British 
dec lion campaign that the Tory 
leader ' has an on-camera . smile 
which could chill a daffodil, a tight 
drawing back of the lips that makes 
Jimmy Carter’s tooth-showing ex- 
ercise" a model of spontaneous 
friendliness, by comparison. 

Finally, no one had suggested 
that the lady the polls say is only 
eight days away from becoming 
Britain’s and Europe's first female 
prime minister is quite the tough 
and skillful politician she obviously 


ricly — to say nothing of the good 
life — will surely result from the 
proper cultivation of the profit 
motive. 

Whereas Rep. Kemp is still 
struggling with other young Repub- 
licans to convince his party elders 


i-S 


that tax-cuts are more politically 
ludgels. Mrs. 


potent than balanced nudge is. Mrs. 
Thatcher has swung the Tones lo 
her own admittedly doctrinaire eco- 
nomic theories and seems on the 


verge of persuading the country 
that it must reward the economics |- 




ly strong instead of forever nursing 
the needy.' 


* So there was a triple lesson for 
•this visitor in the 40-minute “Ask 


Mrs. Thatcher” BBC-TV program 
rea 


the other night that served as my 
introduction to the campaign. 

No Slouch 


The Sick Men of Asia 


By Joseph Kraft 


B aghdad — without prior 

knowledge no one would ever 
guess that modern-day Iraq occu- 
pies the scene where once people 
“look their ease in Babylon." For 
this country — the North Korea of 
the Middle East — is run by a 
lough, sometimes brutal clique of 
closely-knit revolutionaries. 

Bui even in this bastion of iron, 
there are signs of the contagious 
disease that is sweeping across the 
tier of states bordering the Soviet 
Union from Turkey through Iran to 
Pakistan and Afghanistan. It is the 
disease — compounded of religious 
fervor, ethnic division and great- 
power rivalry — which produces lo- 
cal weakness and even chaos. 

The inner circle of power here in 
Iraq is as tightly-knit as a family. 
President Ahmed Hassan al-Bakr is 
a former schoolteacher from Tak- 
riu a town about 100 miles north of 
Baghdad on the east bank of the 
Tigris River. Thd No. 2 man in the 
regime. Vice President Saddam 
Hussein of the ruling Revolution- 
ary Command Council, is also from 
Tak'rit. 


Moslem, and he has a following 
among the Shiites of Iraq who 
make up about 50 percent of the 
population. They are particularly 
strong in Karbala and Najaf. the 
most holy of Shiite shrines. 

The regime, which is largely Sun- 
ni Moslem by heritage and secular 
by conviction, is plainly concerned 
lest there develop here a wave of 
Shiite fundamentalism, akin to that 
which swept the shah from power. 

The hard policy against the 
Communists sums up all these wor- 
ries and one more. The Iraqi Com- 


munists tend to draw their support 
from among Shiites and Kurds. So 


the crackdown is a warning against 
using the. present discontents to 
gain more power internally. 

It also delivers an external mes- 
sage. The Iraqis believe that the 
Russians, if not responsible for. are 
at least prepared to make the most 
of the recent troubles in Iran, Paki- 
stan. Turkey and Afghanistan. By 


cracking down on the local Com- 
munists. the regime here in Bagh- 
dad is warning Moscow not to 
meddle in the internal affairs of 
this coin try. 

The significance of all this, of 
course, is chiefly that it is happen- 
ing here is Iraq. The downiest of 
U.S. doves, the warmest sympathiz- 
ers with the cause of the Palestini- 
ans and the ayatollah, those most 
prone to criticize U.S. meddling 
and the national security .state, can- 
not for one minute imagine that 
this revolutionary country has been 
bitten by the bug of Western impe- 
rialism. 

Concern about what is happen- 
ing in this part of the world is not. 
in other words, the ravings of na- 
tional security freaks. The concern 
in Iraq proves that there may in- 
deed be malting up among the sick 
men of Asia a fundamental shift in 
the world balance of power. 

* ’’1979. Field Enterprises, Inc. 


What I had heard was that if the 
Tories won the election on May 3. 
it would be despite Mrs: Thatcher 
and not because of her. Indeed, the 
polls do show that- Labor Prime 
Minister James Callaghan is more 
popular than the opposition leader. ' 
despite the disenchantment with 
the policies of his government. Giv- 
. en her public stillness as symbol- 
' ized by that tight-lipped smile, it is 
easy to see why: 

But the woman who showed up 
for that long, unrehearsed televi- 
sion quiz show the other night was 
no slouch. Quite the contrary. She 
handled a series of pointed and 
probing questions from some obvi- 
ously well-coached voters with a 
skill few U.S. politicians could 
match. Watching her, you could see 
why she was one of the youngest 
Tories elected to Parliament in the 
1959 election and the first of her 
freshman dass to achieve cabinet 
status. 

Looking every inch the well- 
tumed-out British matron, Mrs. 
Thatcher argued tenaciously — and 
even bluntly — 1 for the restoration 
of individual incentives in this wel- 
fare-state society. “We can have 
German standards of living.” she 
told one questioner, "when we have 
German standards of work. They 
have become a success because they 
have lower taxes and more incen- 
tives” 

Listening to her is tike hearing a 
Rep. Jack Kemp, R-N.Y., who had 
.gone to Oxford instead of Quarter- 
backing the professional football 
team, the Buffalo Bills. They are 
equally convinced that the good so- 


“Whal I want to see." she told a 
viewer asking about her policies for 
ailing industries, “is Britain build- 
ing mure successful firms. The help 
for ailing, firms only comes from 
successful firms, and if you’re going 
■to drain ' away all the resources 
from the successful firms lo help 
the ailing firms, what you're going 
to get is far loo few people creating 
wealth and far too many consum- 
ing it. Temporary help is fine, but 
you can't _ keep yesterday’s jobs 
going forever.” 

Her economic policy — like that 
advocated by Rep.. Kemp and some 
of the other “new breed” Republi- 
cans — is based on a sharp cut in 
income taxes, to be partially offset, 
she says, by an increase in consum- 
er luxes. 

£he takes this tine with the same 
square-jaw*, no-nonsense manner 
with which she advocates a curb on 
unions and a cutback in the immi- 
gration of nonwhites — two other 
controversial stands on which she is 
basing her bid for power. 


T ;, ‘ .. 


. sc 


. \ 


X - • • 


J- 


•V - 
% ■ 

4 


' j •, 


Gender vs. Policy 


- ,*1 * 
-..if.. 


There are some here who want to 
make her gender, rather than her 
policy, the issue: But Mis. Thatcher 
is having none of that. On the tele- 
vision program, a voter named Ann 
Hartley-Jone said that, “My - hus- 
band, although a committed Con- 
servative. is also a male chauvinist. 
He feds woman’s place is in the 
kitchen, not the House of Com- 
mons, and I’m afraid hell abstain, 
rather than vote for a woman ” 

Mrs. Thatcher, cool as ever,. 
asked Mrs. Hariey-Jones to remind 
her husband.ihat “One of our great 


0iC 


Wei 


v .*•> 

. i .. 


■:& 


'.Un- 


success periods in this countryjvas 


under Queen Elizabeth l 
great heavens," she exclaimed, “if 
your husband had thought the 
same thing then, we might never 
have beaten the Spanish Armada.” 

And she smiled a real smile that 
time. 

£19/9. The Washington Post- 


’.3*4 ■' 
& , 


:Ci.*-. '• 


The No. 3 man. Minister of Inte- 
rior Izzat Ibrahim, comes from the 
town of Douar. just across the river 
from TakriL The minister of 
defense. Adana Khary-Allah, is the 
son-in-law of President Hassan al~ 
Bakr and the brother-in-law of Vice 
President Hussein. 


Letters ■ 


TV" 

r’ J ’ 

t--' 

J**V 




• 4 i i'X 


■■ 


U.S. Taxes Abroad 


That tight little group controls 
the government through the Ba'ath 
Socialist Party, a once-clandestine 
organization Mill filled with the fer- 
vor of socialism and Arab unity. 
The party controls the country 
through an apparatus ot state pow- 
er over political, economic and cul- 
tural life which seems almost Com- 
munist in its totality. 

Despite this solid base, however, 
the regime here shows manifest 
signs of unease. Two army divi- 
sions are stationed up north in the 
mountainous district around Su- 
laimaniya near the Iranian border. 

In Baghdad, there has recently 
been a move against gambling. The 
horse races in the suburb of Man- 
sour have been stopped So has the 
local lottery. 

Further south, in the shrine cities 
of Karbala and Najaf there have 
been religious demonstrations. Vis- 
itors report the showing of pictures 
of the Iranian religious leader. Aya- 
tollah Khomeini. 

Controls Tightened 

All over the country, there has 
been a tightening of controls on the 
Communist Party.Even though par- 
ty men are in the Cabinet, and 
though the party is theoretically 
joined in a Progressive Front with 
the Ba’ath. leading Communists 
have been hounded and harassed 
Most members Central Committee 
hare left the country. The Commu- 
nist daily has been banned fpr a 
month. A dozen officers suspected 
of Communist connections have 
been arrested and are under inter- 
rogation. • ■ 

Behind all of these actions there 
is the fear that Iraq might catch the 
disease that is infecting countries to 
the north. The tightened military 
presence around Sulaimaniya is a 
precaution against a revival Of 
Kurdish nationalism. The Iraqis 
have to be on guard, because the 
Kurds across the border in Iran 
have taken advantage of the weak- . 
ness in Tehran to assert once again 
their bid for an independent state. 

The restrictions on gambling in 
Baghdad and the tolerance of pic- 
tures- in the religious shrines are 
both gestures toward the new ruler 
of Iran, Ayatollah Khomeini, Kho- 
of course, is a Shiite 


Re Donald C. Lubick's article 
"The U.S. Position on Taxing 
Abroad” (IHT. April 19): 

Mr. Lubick makes the statement 
that very few overseas Americans 
objected to ibe obligation of paying 
U.S. income taxes. I think Mr. Lu- 
bick misses the central point in this 
issue, namely that overseas Ameri- 
cans do indeed object to paying 
UJS. income taxes because it is un- 
fair and in my opinion against the 
spirit of the founding fathers. I be- 
lieve there is some historical evi- 
dence that earlier generations, ob- 
jected to paying taxes without rep- 
resentation. Even -thoagh 
Americans now can vote -in U.S. 
elections, they are still not repre- 
sented as a group in either House 
or the Senate, nor does it seem like- 
ly to happen for some time to 
come. Second, there is the notion 
that taxes are needed to pay for 
government services in toe area 
where toe people tire. That there 
was a disproportionate time spent 
on toe tax bill in both the executive 
and legislative brandies is not at all 
surprising, because many people 
must have realized they were touch- 
ing on a difficult issue and deep in 
their heart must have suspected 
unfairness. 

What I am afraid ties behind the 
whole matter is jeakmsy. Sen. Wil- 
liam Proxmire. D-Wis., illustrated 
that sentiment by his remarks that 
Americans abroad were spending 
their money on fur coats aria at toe 
casinos. Somehow, the overseas 
American is often perceived at 
home as a playboy, a person who 
does not pay taxes and rolls in 
money. Perhaps we have helped to 
create this image when, in our 
enthusiasm, we mow visitors from 
home only the cheoy aspects of 
our life over 'here, because who is 
interested in frustrations, after all? 
No, Mr. Lubick, l am afraid yon 
have not convinced me. 

ALBERT C van DAALEN. 
Geneva. 


and certain foreign countries which 
are designed "fra* the avoidance of 
doable taxation with respect to tax- 
es on income." However, the J951 
Convention between the United 
States and Switzerland does not, in 
fact, accomplish such avoidance, as . 
the U.S. Department of toe Treas- 
ury has admitted ia co nespondencc 
which I have had'wito it. The Swiss 
fed (to nvy mind, quite rightly) that 
persons living in a country should 
pay -taxes to compensate for the 


Herald Tribune should publish, 
such an irresponsible article. 

[LORDJCHALFONT. 

London. 


West was unassailable superior to ,- T ' - 
that of the Soviet Union would the jv 


services winch they enjoy by such 
1st 


residence. The United states (to my 
mind, quite incorrectly) imposes its 
taxes bn its citizens even when not 
residing within the United States. 

GARRET G. ACKERSON Jr. 
Geneva. 


Editor’s Note: 

The .allegations referred to by 
Lord Chat font were made by a for- 
mer officer of the shah’s court. The 
International Herald Tribune be- 
lieved that the allegations were 
newsworthy. Publication of the arti- 
cle in jhe International Herald Tri- 
bune did not imply that any of the 
allegations was valid, and all of the 
journalists mentioned in the original 
article have denied the allegations. 


Kremlin even consider mitigating -'-fl- 
its implacable hostility to the free p-, 
world, let alone abandoning its ag- vrr< 
gressive and predatory designs. 'v -v 
PAUL de HEVESY. U,v. 
KitzbuheL Austria. 


Going, Going . . 


Hangs a Tale 


Donald C. Lubick’s apology for 
US. policy on taxing its atoms 
abroad is but another callous bu- 
reaucratic attempt to gloss ova* the 
obvious inequities of the newly- 
adopted policy with a smoke screen 
of rnetonc. 


A dose reading of toe Intcrna- 
erald Tribune 


through 
.1 me the 


tional Herald 
April 1-7 has finally taught 
past participle of a most difficult 
English verb, to hang: pictures are 
hung, people arc hanged. . . now. 
sadly, more frequently than ever/ 

DAHLIA PFEFFER. . 

Oslo. 


Scott Ostler’s article on baseball 
broadcast re-creations (THT. April 
6) was welcome reading, ana it 
brought to mind those broadcasts 
we used to have in Boston, where 
the fact of a road-game being re- 
layed via telegraph was not only 
made known to the listener., bat 
augmented by the sound, in toe 
background, of the telegraph oper- 
ating. 

In fact. Bob [HUct] and Ray 
[Goulding], in their pre-game color, 
g ot Jots of laugh mileage oat of this 
circumstance: One of their best 


r* •«» . 

its:-: ■ 

^M;; .. 
j 1 "* ifc- V 

t?** ■ 
i-y- s 

ykiifr. • . 


gags, while giving a “play-by-play" 
after a long 


Not cmly are the new special de- 
ductions W rfi« T Tmjnat»ng exclu- 
sions for only certain 'hardship 
areas unfair, tan they continue to 
favor those with executive salaries. 
There are few meaningful deduc- 
tions for those who can scarcely af- 
ford expensive and luxurious hous- 
ing and costly "American-type 
schools.” 


Peace or War? 


However, continuing Mr. 
Lubick’s logic chat Americans re- 
siding overseas benefit "at least as 
much as those at borne” from toe. 
unfortunately, large U-S. defense 
expenditures, wouldn’t it be just as 
reasonable to levy a tax on every- 
one in the world? 

. ROGER V. STEVENSON. 
Poitiers. France.- ■ 


The goverments of all countries, 
whether they are free or whether 
they are enslaved, should be re- 
minded that Lord Grey of. Fallo- 
don. who. as Sir Edward Grey (the 
British foreign secretary at toe out- 
break of toe World War 1) said in 
1922 that World War . 1 was 
"unavoidable” by reason of the in- 
tense rivalry among the great pow- 
ers, who had all striven to outdo 
each other in the strength of their 
armed forces and in the efficiency 
of to ear armaments. 


by ticker, was. 
sequence of accelerated furious 
clicking, to gravely announce the 
result, thus: “Foul . . . over the 
roof!” LEO SIMON. 

Carmarthen, Wales. 


.V 

"'■Irt, 


Energy Problem 


A Denial 


World War ID will also, be 
"unavoidable” unless all arma- 
ments are destroyed. Few ‘would 
deny that destruction of ar mamen ts 
is preferable to destruction of the 
human race. 


menu. 


The International Herald Tri- 
bune welcomes letters. from read- 
ers. Short letters have a better 
chance of being published. All let- 
ters are subject to condensation 
for space reasons. Anonymous 
letters will not be considered for 
pubfication. Writers may request 
that their letters be signed only 
with initials but preference wiU be 
given to those fully signed and 
bearing the writer's complete 
address. The Herald Tribute 
cannot acknowledge letters sent 
to the editor. • 


Donald Lubick's article is inter- 
esting as it gives toe other side on 
UJ3. taxing abroad. I was, however, 
surprised by the statement that 
“Very few Americans, nearly none, 
objected to toe obligation to pay 
UJS. income tax.” I cannot recan a 
angle American who did not object 
or a single American or non-Ameri- ' 
can who did not wonder ' why the 
United States should be (so far as 
most of us are aware); the only 
country to tax its riuzens living 
abroad, thereby subjecting them to 
double taxation. 

I was many yearn in toe Foreign 
, Service and paid full U.S.. taxes on 
my' income, including official sal- 
ary. In those days, representatives 
of U.S. companies were exempt 
from U.S. taxation on the major 
share (if not all) of their salaries. 


On Nov. 17, 1978, you published 
an article under the heading 
“Newsweek’s Borehgrave. Other 
Western Reporters Accused ” 
“Shah’s Ex-Aide Alleges Corre- 
spondents Were Bribed.’’ 

The article dearly alleged that I 


had received gifts and payments of 

im official sources in' 


expenses from 
Iran in return for laudatory articles 
about the shah’s regime. 

Upon reading toe article. 1 im- 
mediately issued a denial and in- 
structed my solicitors m' London to 
institute proceedings for libeL I was 
advised that it was inappropriate to 
enter into correspondence with toe 
International Herald Tribune at 
that stage. .. 

There is 'absolutely no truth 
whatsoever in toe suggestion that I 


Only if an international 
mem for the destruction of aii ar- 
maments could not .-be . concluded 
and enforced should the advice of 
Patrick Blouet (Letters, April 2) be 
followed and the defease forces of 
the free world be increased and 
raised to standards of training and 
equipment far superior to those of 
toe Soviet Union. . 

Only if the armed might of the 


When President Carter accuses 
the oil companies or ripping-off the 
US. public, he is talking about an 
industry that supplies goods and 
services at a price toe public wiB 
pay and at a profit. Oil companies 
employ people, pay item well for 
their work and pay. their taxes un- 
der the law. There doesn’t seem to' 
be anything. shady about this with- 
in the free enterprise system that 
the United States presumably 
prefers. 

What is questionable is toe value 
of the U.S. -Energy. Department 
which reportedly costs $20 bxlttoo a 
year and doesn't supply a product 
or sendee. Is this not the area that 
the president ought to be concen- 
trating his attention 1 ? . 

1 find the lack of a posUiveap- 
p roach to toe energy problem simi- 
lar to our previous efforts to put 
men on tire moon of more concern 
titan toe prospect of U-S. priraie 
enterprise earning a ' profit for 
doing its job. 

ROY KfRKDORFFER 
Moutos-Sarloux. France. 


% }hient 

Hi 

k*i 


H'V.- : 

s r---ir v . 

•VI 






• ' i 


INTERNATIONAL 


HetaUi^* 8 fe 2 !ntnme 


t Natt ut w iI . M .Tbr NfwVHbTtaftn, MJTVWrtjumwl^ 

Chairman . Co-Chairmen 

Katharine Graham 
Arthur Ochs Stdzberger 


John Hay Whitney 


received such gifts or payment of 
did I not 


However, I was exempt from taxa- 
ttry whee I was the 


lion by the country v 

U.S. consular or d iplo ma ti c repre- 
sentative, whereas toe business rep- 
resentatives were not (in many 
countries) so exengti. 

There arc conventions in exis- 
tence -between toe. United States 


expenses. Not only 
receive any such benefits but ai no 
stage was 1 ever subjected directly 
or indirectly to pressure as to whai 
1 wrote.- My articles and broadcasts 
on Iran reflected my personal 
views. 

, It is difficult bo imagine a more 
serious attack on toe integrity of a 
professional journalist and I am 
shocked ihai 'a newspaper of the 
reputation of : toe International 


Publisher 

Robert R. Eckert 


Editor 

MortRosenMum 

*• -H*nyl 


Managing Editor 

WilfiamR. Holden 

r.SafcrEfmlriWjter ■ . 



ImenauroU Haald Tribmt S a. m ctaial del 200000 P R.c Pirn No 73 B 21 11 
^ Neuitt»-*Ji-S£ine Cain. 

Trf. Tff.t2ff.TdcL- 6R7I8 Herald Paris Cabin: Herald. PariW * 


U Direacurdeja naUjafai' Walter N- tinm-T 
Daily CMCpt Sunday 


Swand dtfepowagrp aij irLoHMaod Cuy/Pi 5 ' 
r- |W Imemuioad HenM Tribune. All nahtt 
CantminiOD Fadiaire No 14 ZJT 


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reserved 



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l:\TKflNATIONAI, IIKKALD TKIBl MS. % KUMSSlVW M’K!!.£>. 1<>7<> 


Passe 5 


«( 


Integration Slow, Controversial 


s *iii 


Black Unit Reflects Shifts in S. Africa Army 

By_ Caryle Murphy <lisclo« the specific targets for have been that the chanae in - 




By Caryle Murphy 
v lenz Military base. South 

Africa fWP) — Jodah'Moeng ad- 
mits that he gets a lot of criticism 



ii,. 5 ' ''52,070, Mr. Moeng receives on-the- 
■>, job training, promotion opnortuni- 
lies, free uniforms, medical care, a 
w'jSO-day annual vacation and a pen- 





4 'iii 

l " , ‘ • -sion when he retires at 60. 

’ l * 


disclose the specific targets for 
black participation- in the defense 
force, which now stands at 13 per- 
cent. 

There are also six battalions of 
black volunteers serving in South- 
West Africa (Namibia) in what is • 
scheduled to become a separate 
army at the end of this year.". • - 

According to the military sourc- 
es, about 20 percent of South Afri- 
ca's manpower ■ in the Namibian 
“operational area” is black or 



increasing military 
which was- described 
a local magazine as “digging in. 
for the ‘White Man's Last Stand/” 

Record Budget 

A record military budget this 
year' of S2.1 billion, 25 percent 
more than last year, and the highest 
white draft (15.000 last January) 
since World War II also reflect 


This is the kind of job' that most ‘ bES2S£‘JSh 12£! rat^rlc rJannms TK. nl.n.!.. 


' ° r of Smith Africa's 18 million blacks 
can only dream about in a labor 
• -h, , force in which urban unemploy- 
jH^-ment is estimated at between 16 
. percent and 22 percent. . 

On further questioning, Mr. 
, Moeng, a career soldier .in the 
‘-t'r South African Army, says that his 
'’<• friends' criticism is also political, 
■'fih /‘They say we are fools, they think 

(I . |( ^ mllow lAlrtavl 9 n4,ir. «vm.|H. If. 

"R 


Black soldiers'gei the same rations, 
accommodation' and “danger pay" 
as the whites, although their baric 
salary is 60 percent of what their 
white counterparts earn. Military 
officials say that the government is 


committed to closing gradually that . Africa. 


planning. The planning is taking 
place as changes in South-West Af- 
rica and Rhodesia, where blacks 
make up a majority of the army, 
threaten to deprive South Africa of 

its last “buffers*’ from black-ruled 


wage gap. 


‘•'T 


u 0 _. 


'I 


Coloreds, Indians 

Even greater participation in the 
armed Forces is planned' for co- 
loreds and Indians. Compulsory 
two-year military service. Dke that 
for -whites, is expected in five years' 
time, military spokesmen said. 

The integration of these groups, 
into the defense force, however, 
does nof present the same problems 
as that of the blacks, since the. gov- 
ernment hopes eventually to share 
some national political power with 

nlack soldiers serving in black units ^ envisage sccb^^dcvdoor^t 
rf South Africa’s Arcny in the -next b S?^ devdopment 

The elevation of blacks to full 


we have joined a white anny," Mr. 
Moeng said. “But that's not true, 
the army was.declared white at one 
tune, but now'h's multiracial/ 1 

Black Unts 

_ The South African Army is a 

^foog way from bring multiracial, 

J / but an important and controversial 
, j “"rirange is taking place. If the de- 
; tense chiefs have their way. Mr. 
Y 'Moeng will be among thousands of 
«das— » — ting in 
Army 


■““•ft-jeveral years. 

, " v!l i x At the moment, his 21st Battal- 
" ■’‘‘• jrf-on of 515 volunteers is the poly 
,r ’ 'Is :3ne in a career force of about 
" ~ 0.000 men. At least four other bat- 

1 -' n «hi.;,alion-sirength units are planned 
1 • or the initial stages of the estab- 
p ishmriit of black units, according 
• • n>iifr 0 military sources. They decline to 


combatant status has been gradual- 
ly gaining acceptance since the ear- 
ly 1970s under the initiative of 
Prime Minister Pieter Botha, who is 
also in his 13th year as minis ter of 
defense. Before that, Hack volun- 
teers hrid only noncombat jobs. 

In recent months, however, there 


Obituaries 


Maurice Clavel of France, 
Writer and Philosopher 


political and philosophical writings 
with rriigjous considerations that 
made him one of the most popular 
or contemporary Catholic philoso- 
phers. 


':>*• li. r-. 

- • i ilhi'i ft; 

• '■»«.! Mi* Tt 
! 1 :| »-is inn*- 

' ■’ "’ll'l IUl Rf: 

■ 1 ‘‘- Ilui -Ml- 
'• •• -• •iiimnia; i 

1 'lull iJuf.- 

" 1,1 ' PUc t-c 
■iu limiH-.ili 

1:1 *' I no lie lias PARIS, April 24 (1HT) — Mau- 
'• i " .« Himji ice-Clavd, 58. a French writer-phi- 
:■ ini ,.mi f .osopher, died yesterday after a 
i -■ '..in-, [orieart attack at his home in 
'it i inr .t ,u Asquins. central France. 

.i- ihr. i.iujin A polemicist, who became 
■ ii.Miv ih | mown in 1965, during the Ahmed 
h. ,-uiantten Barka affair, for demanding 
-I t-.iii iiknethat the troth be published about - 
*e nndu he kidnapping o t the Moroccan 

• s;'inHi \jft.-«pposition leader. Mr. Clavd end- 

ujisnid his ties with the Gaullist move- 
nent when the authorities tried to 
uppress the incident His ties to 
)e Gaulle and to Gaullist political 
novements dated to the German 
ccupation. when, as a young phi- 
osophy teacher, he entered the Re- 

distance and took part in theiiber- 

ition of Chartres. 

. .u«r He became a. journalist before 

i ; x.i'he war endecL and he remained a 
. ns^.'osphy teacher until 1968. His 

■ *-.• Dim i,. ifctlicles appeared m Combat the 

| ^^. efunct newspaper founded by At- c* . j - . 

i' ,'V. Ji-iff erl Camus, and in several other LO«lfl8 tO utllUV 
i i iiru.nagazines and newspapers, include J 

1 303 -Le Nouvd Medicine Abroad 

WASHINGTON, April 24 (UPI) 
— The government has said that it 
wants to’ crack down on loans to 
VS. medical students attending, 
classes abroad. 

The Office of Education .said 
that there are increasing numbers 
of U.S. citizens attending foreign 
medical schools, and ' there have 
been reports of “questionable edu- 
cation practices or lower academic 
standards at some of them.” 

About 3,000 of the 5,000 to 8,000 
U.S. students studying medicine 
abroad receive federally insured 
student loans. They would not be 
affected by the proposed regula- 
tions, the office said Sunday. 

A section of the Higher Educa- 
tion Act mandates that foreign 
schools can participate in the loan 
program only if the commissioner 
of education finds them compara- 
ble to a U.S. institution. < 

The government plans to judge 
the schools by the performance of 
their students on a standardized 
test now administered to foreign 


A rapidly escalating guerrilla war, 
on tbe northeastern border*- when' 

. tbe Rhodesian conflict is over is ' 
one of the military's main -concerns. 

In addition, the military also ap- 
pears to be preparing for a contin- 
ued major role m South-West Afri- 
ca, given the conviction by txatilary 
and political leaders here ih« the 
United Nations peace initiative, 
even if it is carried out, will not end 
the Soviet-backed guerrilla war 
there. The six black battalions so 
South-West Africa, w hich are now 
pan of the South African Driense 
Force, are intended as a basis for a 
Namibian army once that territory 
achieves independence. 

The scarcity of job opportunities, 
especially in rural areas, had led in- 
- creasing numbers of blacks to join 
the army. The unemployment prob- 
lem, and laws that make it a crime - 
to disoourage participation in the 
defense force, make n difficult for 
black leaders who oppose the 
government's racially disc riminate - 
ry policy of apartheid to speak out 
against a trend that they deplore. ~ 

Zulu Stand 




! r “ 





But Subsidy Remains Intact 

Saudi Arabia Breaks With Egypt 


WAR TROPHY — A British Army bomb disposal expert 
smiles as he display s his latest discovery in Epping Forest 
near London. It is a fuse, he has just extracted from a 
1,000-pound bomb ditched by a German Junkers 88 bomb- 
er before it crashed in World War II. The bomb was found 
by amateur historians who were searching for the plane. 


Japan Mobilizes AU Police 

political parties, led bv Zulu Chief I 

Gatsha Buihdezi. declared last . rj n m m vv o • 

For Summit Talks Security 

it (the alliance) will not urge the 


Archbishop Furey 

SAN ANTONIO, Texas, April 
24 (UPI) — Roman Catholic Arch- 
bishop Francis Furey, 74, died of 
cancer last night in Community 
Hospital, where he had been hospi- 
talized a week. 

A native of Summit Hill, Pa.. 
Archbishop Furey had held his 
post with the 'archdiocese since 
Aug. 6. 1969. It included south and 
west Texas, areas with large .Mext- 
can -American populations. 

U.S. May Restrict 


TOKYO. April 24 ( AP) — Police 
have begun a nationwide security 
check of apartments and are buy- 
ing seven bullet-proof limousines 
for the economic summit meeting 
in Tokyo and President - Carter’s 
state visit in June. 

Tbe nation's 200,000- man police 


, He was also a prolific play- 
' 1 r ' ' night, novelist and essayist, whose 
i-u.K kdusi-Gaullist views became in- 
, i. .,:u«i*ilin teasing leftist after he broke with 
K.iJjiip 3e Gaulle, and extreme leftist in' 
;. .,i after the May students’ and 

.... ir. IWi« rorkers’ fevolt His Maoist stand, 
i , Mirt r^bwever, remained heavily imbued 
, . mi !- Western humanism; and he 

On- Ws*j«s one of tbe first French philoso- 
,i 1% - - tiers to postulate that the “Gulag 

i i !u- ii-lm^^as not an accident of Marxism, 
ut its inevitable consequence.” 

... ; j [|i. > r| a’ At about the time be broke with 
" , | pic i^-te Gaulle he was, in his words 
■ V.'i.i-js .* «nick down by the revelation of 
* ( lri o^rod," and he often combined his 

i Soviet Scientists 

...-I* JP** 


black community to pmrtiripate in 
the military defense of the apar- 
theid regime." 

Their stand is an example of 
what a military officer wined a 
“reasonably delicate problem” in 
tbe recruitment of blacks for the 
defense forces: Under present gov- 
ernment policy, black South Afri- 
cans eventually mil- lose their citi- 
zenship in South Africa to become 
citizens of one of 10 black home- m a . 

lands destined to become “inde- 1 O AlTCSt 20 
pendent” black states. 

Technically, therefore. South 
Africa's -blacks will become 
“foreigners" in what remains of 
white-controlled South Africa. 

Rear Adm. -Ronnie Edwards, who 
is in charge of personnel for the de- 
fense 'force, said. “Eve*y black is 
' potentially 1 a Citizen of another 
country. Then all blacks will belong 
to an individual state, which means 
. thr 21st Battalion will be a foreign 
lepra.” 

Chid 1 Buthekzi said recently. 

“They expect us to be ‘patriotic* 
foreigners. We are called upon to 
offer our lives in defense of the bor- 
ders of a country in which we will, 
now be foreigners. . _ I have never 
seen such insensitivity in my whole 
life." 

A random- sounding of the mem- 
bers of the 21 si Battanon revealed a 
discrepancy between their expecta- 
tions and those expressed by Adm. 

Edwards. “We consider ourselves 
to be South African citizens,” said 
Riebert Khoza, 25. “And we expect 
in five years time to still be/ he 
added as his colleagues, training to 
become black instructors for the 
new black recruits,, nodded in 
agreement. 


Argentina Said 


Labor Leaders 

BUENOS AIRES. April 24 (UPI) 
— Argentina's military regime sum- 
moned labor leaders who had 
threatened a nationwide strike to a 
meeting yesterday, then arrested 20 
of those who said they would go 
walkot: 


ahead with 
sources said. 


the 


jut. .labor 


force will be involved in security 
for the meeting of seven govern- 
ment leaders of France, Britain, 
Canada. Italy. West Germany, the 
United Slates and Japan, and the 
state visit by President Carter, said 
Tomoharu Yoda. chief superin- 
tendent of the national police se- 
curity division. ' 

• He said that Japan will use 
25.000 police per day in Tokyo dur- 
ing the summit meeting June 28 
and June 29. including 15.000 riot 
police. With the national security 
check that is to begin before Mr. 
Carter's visit a few days earlier, he 
said, the country's entire police 
force will be involved. 

For the summit meeting, streets 
will be blocked near the state guest 
house, where the meetings will be 
held: the New Otani Hotel, where 
staff and reporters will be staying: 


The reported roundup coincided . at embassies if the heads of govern - 
'■*■ ' men is choose to stay in them, and 

along the travel routes of the lead- 
ers. Seven bullet-proof limousines 
for the leaders are being Ordered 
from the United States at a cost of 
nearly SI million. Mr. Yoda said. 


with a government statement 
charging that the strike scheduled 
for Friday was “irresponsible and 
clearly violates” laws that prohibit 
urupn activity. 

The labor sources said that the 
military regime had asked the 
members of the “Commission of 
25,” one of the nation's major labor 
groupings, to meet with officials at 
the - Labor Ministry to “ratify or 
rectify” their stands on the strike. 

At least 20 of the 25 labor lead- 
ers stood by their support for the 
strike — and were led from the 
building by plainclothes officials 
and put into government cars, tht 
sources said. A labor source S3id he 
understood that all members of the 
group that called for the strike 
would be arrested. 


By Jim Hoagland 

WASHINGTON. April 24 (WPl 
— Saudi Arabia carried out its 
threat yesterday to break diplomat- 
ic relations with Egypt to protest 
Prcszdcni Anwar Sadat's peace 
treaty with Israel. The Saudis, how- 
ever. made no immediate move to 
cut off the estimated S13 billion 
annual subsidy that has helped 
keep Mr. Sadat in power. 

The Saudi action left Mr. Sadat 
politically isolated in the Arab 
world. Tt occurred shortly after 
Kuwait broke its economic and 
diplomatic links with Egypt to 
comply with resolutions condemn- 
ing Egypt that were adopted at a 
meeting of foreign and economic 
ministers in Baghdad last month. 

The latest action, announced by 

the Saudi news agency after a Cabi- 
net meeting in Riyadh, represented 
a disappointment for the Carter 
administration, which had ap- 
pealed to the Saudis not to oppose 
the treaty. 

Since Lhe Baghdad meeting, ad- 
ministration officials in private and 
public statements had held out 
hope that the Saudis would adopt a 
liberal interpretation of the Bagh- 
dad resolutions and continue ties to 
Mr. Sadat. 

4 Zu»kt Enemy' 

Information Minister 

Mohammed Abduh Yamani said in 
Riyadh that the decision had been 
taken In retaliation for Egypt's plan 
to “exchange diplomatic represen- 
tation with the Zionist enemy, 
without taking into consideration 
the minimum demands’’ of Arab 
countries. 

The Cabinet statement did not 
refer to the Baghdad resolutions 
and said nothing about Saudi fi- 
nancial commitments to Egypt, a 
Saudi source in Washington noted, 
saying that these omissions indicat- 
ed that tbe Saudis were not slam- 
ming the door on Mr. Sadat. 

Egypt responded by announcing 
that it had decided to cut diplomat- 
ic relations with Saudi Arabia and 
Kuwait. The two countries provid- 
ed much of the oil money that en- 
abled Mr. Sadat to turn away from 
the Soviet Union in 1972. launch 
the October War in 1973 and then 
move toward peace negotiations 
with Israel. 

The Egyptian announcement 
specified that it expects Saudi Ara- 
bia and Kuwait to maintain inter- 
est sections in third-country embas- 
sies in Cairo but it was not'inunedi- 
atdy clear they would do so. 

Some Support 

Mr. Sadat severed relations with 
Algeria, Syria. Iraq. Southern Yem- 
en and Libya in December. 1977. 
following Mr. Sadat's visit to 
Jerusalem. Jordan withdrew its am- 
bassador from Cairo last month. 

The only Arab countries that 
have offered full support to the 
peace treaty have been the Sudan 


and Oman. Sudanese President 
Gaafar Nimeiri responded to at- 
tacks on Sudan's continuing friend- 
ship with Egypt by breaking diplo- 
matic ties with Iraq, news agencies 
reported from Khartoum. 

A suspension of Saudi aid. said 
by Egyptian officials to be about 
SI 5 billion a year in financial and 


military subsidies, would pul new 
pressure on the United States, its 
European allies and Japan to in- 
crease their aid commitments to 
make up (he shortage. 

Mr. Sadat already has said (hat 
he hopes for a SIS billion from a 
“Carter plan” to aid Egypt after the 

signing of the peace. 


Bonn Agents Said to Meet 
With PLO to Prevent Raid 


By John Vinixur 


BONN. April 24 (NYT) — Anti- 
terrorist experts from West Germa- 
ny have met in Beirut with leaders 
of the Palestine Liberation Organi- 
zation in an unusual attempt to 
head off what they reared would be 
a terrorist attack against officials or 
property here, a qualified West 
German said yesterday. 

Although the Interior Ministry 
declined lo comment, the inform- 
ant. who furnished a detailed ac- 
count of the meeting, said that the 
encounter took place last month 
and involved convincing the Pales- 
tinians that, contrary to evidence 
the Palestinians had gathered, no 
West German agents took part in 
the assassination in January of Alt 
Hasson Solamah. the security chief 
of the el-Fatah guerrilla group, 
headed by Yasser Arafat. The 
group is part of the PLO. which is 
also headed by Mr. Arafat. 

Mr. Saldmah. 38. better known 
as Ahti Hassan. was killed on Jan. 
22 when' a bomb in a car near his 
home in .Beirut was detonated by 
remote control as he and his body- 
guards drove by. Four bodyguards 
and five passers-by also were killed 
by the blast. 

The West Gentians were be- 
lieved to he furious that his assas- 
sins left a trail pointing to a West 
German agent as one of the killers. 

Mr. Salamah w as widely believed 
to have been the organizer of the 
attack at the 1972 Olympics in Mu- 
nich in which II Israelis were 
killed. According to the source, the 
West Germans assume that Mr. 
Salamah was assassinated bv the Is- 
raeli secret service. Although the in- 
formant said serting a trail to West 
Germany was “professional sport, 
apparently without any political 
motive;” ’the traditionally strong 
contacts between West German 
and . Israeli intelligence were 
thought to have been impaired. 

The initiative of the federal crim- 
inal bureau reportedly came with 
the approval of Interior Minister 
Gerhart Baum, who has gone to Li- 
bya to try to persuade the Libyans 
to stop harboring West German 
terrorists. The decision to confer 
with the Palestinian guerrilla group 
apparently followed receipt of in- 
telligence that a reprisal for the as- 
sassination might be in prepara- 
tion. 


The Palestinians, according to 
the source, determined that one of 
the assassins was a Erika Maria 
Chambers. 31. who has lived at var- 
ious time since 1975 in Wiesbaden, 
where the criminal bureau is locat- 
ed. and in Cologne, which bouses 
the federal counterintelligence 
agency. The West Germans tned to 
convince the guerrillas that the 
woman was a foreign agent who 
iried io develop a West German 
identity. 

There was no indication whether 
lhe West German officials had 
received any promises from the 
Palestinians.' In' the pjst. Palestini- 
ans have provided sanctuary, train- 
ing and operational help io Wot 
German terrorists. 

The West Germans were also un- 
derstood to he seeking mformauon 
about four members of a West Ger- 
man terrorist group colled the Red 
Army Faction. The four were be- 
lieved to have gone to the Middle 
East after their arrest and release in 
Yugoslavia. The West German au- 
thorities seemed to think that re- 
ports of police contacts with the 
Palestine Liberation Organization 
would upset terrorists remaining at 
large. 


n 




^Assail U.S . Effort 
To Aid Dissidents 


MOSCOW, April 24 (AP) — So- 

j r.iT rict scientists yesterday took a firm irai w *v*«-*^»* 

Ii:T ^-iand against the efforts by thou- 'school graduates; to pariicipatt m 
i nt/aads of US. scientists to curb ' the loan program, 'a. school must 

• 1 *' 1 " .1. !»1 Ilf . ~ IaIm* ab Lhsib neazlimtAzI 1 1 Q CtllripnfC Ufhrt 


>a*l-West contacts and joint re- 
[/-each to protest the treatment of 
’ Vi > 111 > ,<r ’ ,0 7i el dissidents. 

•• jiHnn 11 Pravda carried a lengthy article 
•• : signed by five members of the Sovi- 

' I -Academy of Sciences who have 
■ !v " leading figures in the develop- 

..of rent of U.S.-Soviet cooperation in 
• i ' 1 " j^'Cienceand technology. 

■ • |V The academicians wrote that ef- 
, . f s - wis to curb cooperation wotild not 
••■•‘ r ’‘p^-arm Soviet science, and they ex- 
i . ‘ ressed hope that “positive tenden- 

. jies and a reasonable approach will 
•i'I 15 ' . pike the upper hand.” 

.• l Last month in Washington, an 
r: ' d hoc group announced that more 

„rian 2,400 U5. scientists had 

. , i 1 ' V gned petitions demanding the 

r ! ‘ ase from orison of Anatoli 


sase from prison 
„..’hchanmsky and Yuri Orlov. 


.ii.® 


have graduated U.S. students who, 
during a 2-year period, had a pass- 
rate of 95 percent the first time 
they took the standardized test. 

Cuba to Invite Hussein 
To Talks in Havana 

AMMAN. April 24 (AP) — Cu- 
ban Communications Minister An- 
tonio Andreeo arrived here today 
to invite King Hussein to Havana 
in September for the sixth summit 

meeting of nonaligned states. 

Mr. Andreeo will deliver a per-, 
sonal invitation to the Jordanian 
monarch from President Fidel Cas- 
tro. The communications minister 

is the first Cuban official to visit 
Jordan. 


Stolen Rembrandt Bought in U*S. 
By FBI Is Turned Over to France 

WASHINGTON, -April 24 (UP!) — The FBI yesterday gave 
French diplomats a stolen Rembrandt that supposedly sat wrapped 
in plastic in a Buffalo, N.Y., basement for three years before under- 
cover agents bought it from an art fence for 520,000. 

- The painting. “Le Rabbin,” a 1655 portrait of a bearded rabbi, 
was stolen in 1971,' with three other paintings, from a museum in 
Bayonne. France. The Rembrandt was recovered by the FBI two 
years ago through an undercover fencing operation; it was the last* 
of the four recovered. A Frenchman and a German were convicted 
for the 1971 museum thefL 

FBI agents obtained the painting through an operation in which 
an agent and an -informant ran a fake fencing ring to purchase 
stolen goods. The ring, run in a Buffalo antique shop by a bureau 
informant and monitored with a hidden television camera, has led 
to 31 convictions. - 

The bureau played the videotaped record of Thomas McShane. 
an FBI art expert, and the burglar-turned-inf ormam purchasing the 
painting from John Gandolfo on April II. 1977. “I've been .like a 
little baby with that painting.” Gandolfo says on the recording. 
“The last three years it's been silting in a friend of mine’s basement 
in a dry place — completely soiled." 

After haggling Mr. McShane bought the painting for 520,000 in 
taxpayers' money — in S 100 and 550 bills, plus a 52^00 commis- 
sion to a contact man. The 520,000 was lost because Mr. Gandolfo ' 

still is a fugitive. 

FBI Director William Webster presented the painting to Ambas- 
sador Francois de Laboulaye of France at a brief ceremony. 


He said that ’notice expect “many 
demonstrations^ by leftists and 
radical students, but that they will 
not be allowed at the- conference 
site or along the travel routes. 
However, permits for demonstra- 
tions in other areas apparently will 
be issued. 

A nationwide apartment check is 
being conducted through neighbor- 
hood police “boxes.” In Japan, 
each neighborhood has one of these 
tiny police stations, and their offi- 
cers will have to vouch for the resi- 
dents of every apartment In tbeir 
area. The apartments of those they 
are not sure of will be searched by 
police. Mr. Yoda said. Only apart- 
ments are being checked. ___ not 
homes, officials indicated, because 
apartment dwellers are considered 
more transient. 

Although Mr. Yoda said he con- 
sidered the possibility of terrorism 
’’remote.” Japan has enlisted inter- 
national police organizations and 
other countries to cooperate in 
checking on terrorist groups. 

S. Africa to Penalise 
Oil Data Disclosures 

CAPE TOWN. April 24 (Reuters) 
— The South African government 
yesterday announced plans to im- 
pose jail sentences of up to seven 
years and fines up to 7,000 rand 
(58,250) on anyone who publishes 
information about the oounays oil 
supplies and reserves. 

A bill published here said that 
the penalties will apply to anyone 
causing the information to be Is- 
sued outside South Africa, as well 

as internally. South Africa has no 
oil of its own. 


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Philippine Rights Abuses 
Are Reported to Continue 


By James P. Sterba 


MANILA (NYT) — The regime Marcos critic, was detained briefly 
of President Ferdinand Marcos . -at the airport. After a cal] from the 
continues to be a serious. vidflior of presidential palace,. he was allowed 


human rights .although repotted 
.cases of torture, abduction and 
murder of dissidents by military 
and constabulary authorities have 
shown a 'marked reduction in the 
last year, according to the Roman 
Catholic Church and U.S. Embassy 
officials. ■ 

The president, early this month, 
vowed to continue to use his mar- 
tial law authority to “neutralize 
subversive elements’* intent on us- 
ing the nation’s current economic 
woes, including rapidly escalating 
prices and energy shortages, to 
foment social and political unrest.' 

More than a dozen persons were 
detained in Manila recently after 
painting slogans and handing out 
leaflets calling for an end rarnartial 
law. Amnti Begornia, a presidential 
spokesman, called them ^profes- 
sional subversives" and said that 
some of their slogans, including 
one portraying the president as a* 
Nazi, amounted to inciting people 
to overthrow the government and 
were thus c riminal. 

Asked if the government contin- 
ued to maintain lists of government 
critics tanned from overseas travel, 
Mr. Begomia said “No. no. Most oF 
those people are free to travel 
abroad if they want to. They say we 
are stopping them as a way of criti- 
cizing us.** 

Last summer. Cardinal Jaime 
Sin. the archbishop of Manila, a 


to fly to a Vatican meeting. 

Meanwhile; the latest UJS. State 
Department human rights report to 
Congress, released in February, 
said that at the end of last year, the 
government reported having 461 
“public order violators” under mili- 
tary detention, compared with 620 
the previous year. Chorcti.au- 


m 


thorities call them political prison- 
ers. 

According to the Association of 
Major Religious Superiors of the 
Philippines, which attempts to 
monitor such detentions, between 
500 and 1.000 persons have been 
held as political prisoners during 
the last two years. 

The State Department report 
which for the Philippines was com- 
piled by embassy officials here, 
said: “There have continued to be 
credible reports of torture in 1978 
as well as of the involvement, of 
military units in abductions and 
murders of dissidents as an alterna- 
tive to their arrest and imprison- 
ment. However, there has been a 
marked reduction in such reports in 
Manila during this past year.” 

Reports of abuses by military 
and police constabulary troops 
.continued to emanate from the 
countryside, however. ! especially 
from areas in which concentrations 
of troops are conducting operations 
against Communist and Moslem 
insurgent forces. 




As Refugees Trek South 

Vietnam 

Cambodians in Thailand 



•BANGKOK. April 24 (AP) — 
'Vietnamese artillery shelled tens of 
thousands of Cambodians treking 
south, in long columns along the 
. frontier inside Thailand today, bor- 
der officials said. 

The Thai officials said (hat.more 
than 60 rounds, fdl among the ref u- 



Fenfinand Marcos 


.Military authorities, in the 'last 
year have made a. point of publiciz- 
ing in the government-controlled 


press reports of abuses by military open count™ and provides little or 
units against civilian populations ■ ^shelter against artillety fire. 


Thai authorities said that 
of the shells dropped in the 
of the columns, . which n 
large numbers of women and 
dim. - . ’ " 

An .estimated 50.000 -.dvffiSK a>'* 
and sol diets, driven from_the tit ‘ 

fields . Of - northwestern Cambodj ^ 1*^’ 1 ’ 

__ Iqyai to ousted Premier Pol . by a Vietnamese offensive to Cm* -i •- 
L They said that they believed the Pol Pot forces before the rain ftr ’ ' 

....... — season, were. reported movinglini f’j' 1 "' 

a mountainous -area of Cambod 
about 30 miles southwest Of t] 

Thai border: town . of Ar ? ,«■ * 
nyapratbeL- ;> 

The group fled -into Thail^ i'~ 
during the weekend to. escape'll ■ ■ 

tank-led Vietnamese forces ko -j 1 . \ 
their Cambodian allies-loyal to tfa 
of President Ho 


there were casualties but -could not 
confirm this immediately. . 

The Cambodians, carrying be- 
longings on . . their backs or in 
oxcarts, began moving out of 
Klong Had village toward the Thai 
border village of Tap Prifc, 10 utiles 
away, when iheshdling began. 

The area around Klong Had is 


mp e 

December. Defease Minister Juan 
Ponce Enrile relieved a battalion of 
constabulary combat police ' in 
northern Luzon, citing numerous 
abuses. 


Waldheim in Malaysia 
To Begin Asian Tour 


Military authorities have report- 
nlOOO 


ed that since 1974, more than 
officers and men have been disdp- 
lined on charges ranging from mur- 
der to indiscriminate use of fire- 
arms. and that over ZQOO cases are 
pending. . 

Church' sources, said however, 
that attempts to follow up on disci- 
plinary proceedings have often 
rafted and tl 


been - thwarted ana that they had 


KUALA LUMPUR. Malaysia. 
April 24 (AF) — UN Secretary- 
General Kurt Waldheim arrived to- 
day at' the first stop; of an Asian 
tour that will take him to Vietnam. 
China, South Korea, North Korea, 
the Philippines. Indonesia, Singa- 
pore and ThaHand. 

Mr.. Waldheim will meet with 
Malaysian Prime Minister Datuk 
Hussein bin Onh to discuss the. 
Vietnamese refugee issue, the Indo- 


receivcd reports that discipline for china situation and other matters 
some troops amounted only to their ' during his three-day stay, a govern- 
ment statement said. 


transfer to other' units. 


Greece-Albonia Flights Fail to Thaw Frozen Border 


IO ANNIN A, Greece (NYT) — 
For over a year, Olympic Airways’- 
once- weekly Flight 115 has been 
taking off from here for Tirana, the 
capital of Albania. Its mere exis- 
tence had spawned hopes for its 
being an important link between 
the insular, hard-line Stalinist re- 
gime of Enver Hoxha and the rest 
of the world. But those hopes have 
yet to be realized. 

Expectations ran strongest in 
this' city, the capital of the 
northwestern province of Epiros. In 
1914, there were border changes, 
and 300.000 Greeks in Epiros 
found that they had become Al- 
banians overnight. And since the 
Communists seized power in Al- 
bania in 1945, sealing its borders, 
people here have been waiting for 
the day when easy passage across 
the frontier would again allow 
them to see relatives who have been 
locked inside the Stalinist state. 


It was expected that the flight 
would facilitate some movement, 
but, in fact, few Greeks have been 
permitted to go to Albania on per- 
sonal business. OF the flight's 64 
seats, usually fewer than a dozen 
are occupied, invariably by diplo- 
mats ana Greek businessmen. 

The flight was initiated a s n re- 
sult of gradually improving rela- 
tionships between Greece and Al- 
bania and as a result of Albania’s 
bitter split with its former ally, Chi- 
na. It was hailed as the forerunner 
of a new era in Albanian diploma- 
cy- . ' 

AsDiffioMtasEver 


“We had hoped that permission 
for us to go. to see our people in 
Albania, would follow normaliza- 
tion of relations, the way it hap- 
pened with Bulgaria," said Xeno- 
phon Kountouris, president of the 
Northern Epiros Society. “But it's 



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INTERNATIONAL 



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T >is offer valid through June 30, 1979. 


just about as difficult to go to Al- 
bania now as it ever was.” - 

He also said that from infoima- 
tioir he has ‘reeeryed, the life of 
G reeks in Albania has not im- 
proved much, although there re- 
ported ly is some Greek being 
taught in the schools. During the 
30-year freeze in relations, mem- 
bers of. the Greek minority wefc of- 
ten separated, being moved from 
their native villages in south era Al- 
bania to scattered villages in the 
north in order to undermine Greek, 
claims to northern Hpirosl 

Mr. Kountouris said that while 
some of Albania's restrictions had 
been moderated, control was- still 
strict. When Greek entertainers vis- 
it Greek areas in Albania — in cul- 
tural exchange programs that are. 
part of the current thaw — tickets 
to performances are available only 
to those whose loyalty to the party 
is unquestioned, he said. 

Religious observations of any 
kind are forbidden, and dll church- 
es. mosques and synagogues have 
been destroyed or, u they have his- 
torical value, have been turned into 
museums, he added. “They have 
even knocked the crosses off the 
tombstones," he said. 

The refusal of the Albanian gov- 
ernment to relax its hold, particu- 
larly on the Greek minority, has 
obliged the Greek government to 
limit its dealings with Tirana. 

“The Albanians want very badly 
to expand relations with us, far be- 
yond the. present scope, especially 
in the commercial area,” said a 
high official in the Greek Foreign 
Ministry. “Since their break with 
China, they've been completely cut 
off from the rest of the world, and 
they need some way to breathe.'’ . 


Greece is the direction they want 
to go, but some of . their policies, 
particularly those involving the. 
Greek minority, make it politically 
difficult for' the government here to 
go as far as the Albanians want. 


Relations between Albania and 
Greece are therefore at an impasse. 

The Greeks are disinclined to im- 
prove relations with Albania unless 
the Albanians open their country 
more. But the Albanians show no 
indination to permit more cross- 
border movement, apparently be- 
cause they fear that extensive expo- 
sure to Greeks would threaten the 
bold the Albanian government has 
onitspeople. 

“More than 3,000 Greeks with 
relatives in Albania have asked per- 
mission to visit them.” said 
Athanasio6 Gogonis, who publishes 
a newspaper for northern Epiros, 
"but the Albanian Embassy in 
Athens [has) issued only about a 
dozen such visas this year.” ' 

Some Greek diplomats and poli- 
ticians feel that their government 
should expand relations with Al- 
bania without any conditions, and 
that a softening of Albania’s poli- 
cies would follow as a matter of 
course. They also believe that such 
a step would in time allow Greece 
to .serve as a bridge for contact be- 
tween Tirana and the West, includ- 
ing the- United States. 

No Contact 

The Albanians have hinted to 
Greek diplomats that they might be 
receptive to American overtures, 
which the Grades have relayed. But 
so far, these initial soundings have 
not prodneed-any contact between 
Washington ami Tirana. 

Other Greeks, including a num- 
ber of diplomats and businessmen 
who have taken Flight 1 15, see no 
(odicanoix that the Albanian regime 
would relax its rule or improve the 
treatment of the Greek minority as ' 
a natural result of increased diplo- 
matic and commercial business 
dealings. 

They point out that the Albani- 
ans have had a kmg history of re- 
fusing to bend when it comes to id- 
eological differences with another 
country — even if it has meant los- 
ing China, their only ally. 


’ "INTERNATIONAL TEACHING JOBS’" 
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' To place your ad contact your local IHT representative 
(addressee in today’s Classified Section) 
or International Herald Tribune, 

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new government . 

Samnn. But it appeared that „ 
soldiers had forced some of the^f? ' x 
vilians to cross the border again tf' 1 ‘ . 
their wilL. ... T & i * 

Thai villagers said that forirl ’fiP 1 ' , 
five ethnic Chinese were killed} ^ 
the soldiers and others who resist ri j3ri V 
were tied to' bamboo poles aj 
forced to march -along at gunpoin s rJ " . 

-Thai authorities, who asked ii lj ’ ' 
Cambodians to return to : >r j ' f 

country to prevent the war spillS 'p * 11 
into Thailand, were escorting tl - v '"' 
group'. . • : fl . 

The Pol Pot troops said that tht 1 1 
wanted to reorganize and strii 
back at the Vietnamese- Heng SaSi, 
rin forces. They said that 
planned to move into the Ma 
hills,” a series of peaks about l,i 
feet high near the frontier. . 

About 2,000 Pol Pot 
some riding .on motorcycles 
trucks, trailed the main columns. 

- The Heng Samrin govennbe^' 1 



and the Vietnamese have acaiseft^iC^ ,- 

>n :i- ■ _r ..j.l .i i ' ■ ' 


Thailand of siding with the Pol Ptar- 
loyalists, but the Thai government 
said that it is neutral in the strug- 
gle. It has provided temporary shel- 
ter to the Pol Pot forces in recent , i 
weeks and allowed them tp mqwwf 
through Thai territory. . : lllik > 

-Some senior Thai officials said 
privately that they -hope that the. ,„ 
Pol Pot forces will continue ' 1 “ 

ing so that Vietnam, which thryirf 
gard.as a potential threat. wiQ M 
tied down and weakened. 1 
Vietnam invaded Cambodia Dm 
25 and set up a pro-Vietaame*j 
government in Phnom Penh mb 
weeks later. Bui soldiers loyal to 
?cA Pot have been waging guerrilla 
war ever since. 


Conservatives 
Lead in Local 
Japanese Voting 


TOKYO. April 24 (AP) - hr 
cumbent conservative and cemrisT 
candidates continued their strong 
showing while progressive cafii^ 
dates lost key posts in the second 
round of local ejections in Japan. ' 
The conservative and central 
candidates won 98 mayoral posts, 
the progressives 19, independents 
34 and a minor party 1 in the 153j 
seat 'contest Sunday. At Futtsu, a 
Chiba Prefecture, south of Tokyo] 
none of the candidates had a mdj 
jority and a runoff election win bi 
hekL Fifty of (he 153 elections wen 
uncon tested. ] 

, A fisst round of local elecnm 
contests was held April S^and can 
didates backed by a coalition of dn 
ruling Liberal- Democratic Parti 
and other conservative and centra 


groups won 14 of 15 posts for j 
fectural 


fectural governor. - i 

The elections brought a reconj 
low turnout of 76.09 percent of vot 


urn out or /fc.uy perceat oi 
era, the Home Affairs Ministrj 
said. :< 


Vietnam Returns 
China Pilot’s Body 


BANGKOK, April 24 (AP) - 
Vietnam today returned the bod) 
of a Chinese pilot whose aircraft 
crashed on April 15 in a northern 
province, the Vietnamese new 
agency repor^d. 

■ Vietnam said that the aircrar 
went down in Ha Nam Ninh Pro* 
ince, 70 kilometers south of Hana 
Wiling the pilot instantly. His boa} 
was returned to the Chinese Em 
bassy in Hanoi. 

Last week, China asked Vienun 
for peraiisaon to visit the ate o 
the crash to recover the wreckage 
but the request was denied. 



. The American 
Community Schools 


N°9 


BUSING 


The American Coauniwdy 
SchooI's Heet of buses 
offers an extensive 
door-to-door service 
cowering much of central 

and suburban London 
and adjacent counties. 

; Shuttle services 

' are available to many 

Ideal train stations. 


For full details 
of all seven Schools, contact 


An*ericin^?o«iiO'Tlty Set* 3 **' 
5CrtnwDPh«. 

• LouiMS.fV.72P 





4 




INTERNATIO-NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 1979 


Page 


Sh 


% 


Films In Paris 






The Great Train Robbery’ Is Derailed by Message, Slow Pace 

is sagging 
crial {It is 


By Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

f PARIS, /rani 24 (IHT) - “The 
i - t, Tram Rbbbory” was the 


'.•in "Mivi, .. 

rf the Erst American action 
. ,fflnL . wntten, directed and photo- 
1 .in. HIJ Vi 5™?**“ by the motion picture pio- 
u..„i ' <* iea ' ?*■** S* p orier in 1903, it 
in,,. ";!>ts ( “*’ as a product of Thomas Edison's 
iV New Jersey studio and in the 
a single reel it recounted 

Jad holdup in the Wfld West 

i ttt pursuit and capture of the 
dif It was a sensational sue- 
d, introducing a fresh use of 
J ling medium which had 
mimicked standard stage 
nre, it has since been the 
in technique for most s prh 


gom Stwely squares to sleazy East 
Bid lanes, the aristocratic dubs, 
the gambling hdls, a brothel (in the 
pari or of which a string orchestra is 
* , “Champagne 


popular hit of the f850sl die rail- 





MU .. ) £ 
‘■ihlte '•« 

, ; ,,uu «r u , 





U ‘‘J 'md 



neo-“Great Train Robbery” 
e Publias Champs- Hysees 
BouTMich in English) is ro- 
to its forerunner in name 
It is in 12 reels and, unlike the 
flicker, it takes an inlemrin- 
Ume to tell of two - crooks of 
rian England who s cheme to 
ieir hands on a cargo of gold 
- being shipped in a baggage 
from London to Folkestone, 
gold is to pay soldiers at the 
ean War front and the 
ef actors must obtain a set of 
s to open the treasure chests. As 
keys have been distributed to 
era! guardians, this task occu- 
th nee-fourths of the footage 
d is so laboriously related that 
e wishes Porter were back to 
icken the pace. , 

If what is knovtoi in the movie 
l'.«i rade as “an wodt" were all this 
*•* n„ . i„ M Juggish rogues" comedy of Michael 

'“■‘l Hk nU(n ^rienton would receive an A-l rat- 
n - ' mint! in decor and costuming the 
“'"■.mux ^ /sngland of 1855 has been resur- 
■' t'lnii: uni, ,. '««d yi* persuasive detail and 
’“i :n- lhj, j.^riod flair. The streets of London 

* 1 1 u-i.ira 
| i«tcd liuif., 

i i'-i 

1 lllfil 

ll.ll >• Mil, .71 

'•"••I IllJI 
ib.ii ilir\ . 

\ UM !! !li l :T.^DAR3^ April 24 (IHT) — Shirley 
one of France’s fa- 
can stars, returned to 


road stations and yards, the quaint 
train, Hyde Park and its bridle path 
on a sunny morning with the 
strollers In holiday finery, air eve- 
; firewodci display in a riverside 
a public han ging — all 
provide strong atmmp hf-rjr 
aid, but ance the scene is Dicken- 
sian, one regrets that the story is 

not by Dickens. 

A jocosity as leaden as a sue* 
pudding accompanies the plotting 
of the Host by a pair of dandified 
thim/es who engage in a repertory 
of d isgu ises and wigs in their ir w x- 
hanstible but ufi convincing tricker- 
ies. Sean Connery and Donald 
Sutherland are rather supercilious 
as the quick-change men. Lesleys 
Anne Down as the mist re s s of the 
former steals the film, but her act 
mily consumes petty larceny. As 
the bad men escape justice, the 
scenario preaches a erime-does-pay 
lesson, but movies with such mes- 
sages, statistics indicate, are apt to 
end up in the red. 

* * * 

“Les Folles a ventures de Picas- 
so** (at the Elysees Lincoln anil the 
Quintette in bad taste and same- 
times in bad English) is an unpalat- 
able Swedish export that would 
spoof the career, tire art and the 
personality of the great Spanish 
painter. Why Picasso should be 
dispa t ched to the pillory is impossi- 
ble to fathom. He did once write a 
dreadful play, called “Desire 
Caught by the Tail,” but if this gra- 
tuitous insult is delivered to 
rep rave him for that misstep the 
punishment is cmdnly severe. 



ir : ‘ ■ 

Sean Connery and Lesley-Anne Down between crimes; 

The producers of the monstrosity of Tchaikovsky, Lisa and others 
wnte: “The film biographies of they, like he, unable to supply a 
Toulouse-Lautrec, Van Gogh, Billy . minimum of amusing burlesque re- 
Hobday and Edith Piaf romance sort to being disgusting. The 


and lie 70 percent of the time. We 
have decided to lie 95 percent." 

Two hundred percent would be a 
closer estimate, for it is not that 
they have betrayed most of the 
facts, but that they have hideously 
distorted them into an idiotic caba- 
ret revue; Their approach hints that 
they have taken Ken Russell as 
their model and as in his* portraits 


EntorfiilmtiAn t 

< Shirley MacLaine’s One-Night Stand 

V, ’ 


U'llMRI 

' ■' 1 for a ingle appearance 

„ " r that Was recorded by CBS for 

hn '™ Showing nfet month on U JS. tdevir 


it, but only Deetmgly 
ice at the 


r Bui "W401J, 

i' ’’ Ktn 


The sin le perfc 
►le tenornu 


Orman ce became 
i double berformance. The femi- 
, line boss i has yet to be liberated 
ervative" cx P° sl « on American TV, and 
is tbe Ido girls appear bare- 
j iireasted i cover-up version had to 
I i a LOCalre shot. V hat with both a bra and 
. i bra-less dition being enacted, the 
1 1 fSC V 0^° w ^ asl( 1 far into the nighL 

> v-.-.i 'i iif. Tout P ris in gala fmeiy received 

' ' ' .guidance ram an American direo- 

adr . . 

- i.-niinucJ itsi 
a Ink- pr-iptsad 
k‘» p<i-(.-Uld 
u .n I'kMkwnq 
i.M-rt.iii'v all 
n.M U S rossj 
■•■iv. I«. latej 
; ; I ■ u *1 p.liwll 
.• Si i: iib' Vt 

l.illNl' ■•*!&{ 

H . .HlJlJj*^ 

(.IH.III irteK 
,.i i I k- I5 ; defl 


t.'i.iul Hf 
V.,. hold 
.. U‘il h\ 

, I . rr..] I Vnwfljl 

ia-1 I' I**! 



7 ^1^ 

Il.iriir 


tor in a checked sweater cut when to 
applaud, when to sit stiD and wh en 
to circulate, as though they had 
been, assigned from a movie-lot cat- 
tle yard. Among the obedient dress 
extras were Princess Caroline of 
Monaco and her husband, Philippe 
Junot; Maria Felix* Catherine 
Deneuve, the Duke and Duchess of 
Bedford, Franco ise Sagan, Line 
Renaud. Jean-^PauI Belmondo, Al- 
berto Sordi, Horst Buchholz and 
Marthe Keller. When the TV cam- 
eras swept the hall Shirley Mac- 
LaineT spying a celebrity, exclaimed 
from tire stage. “1 know why they 
putyou there — so you’ll show ” 
The cherished Shirley entered in 
characteristic happy-go-lucky man- 
ner. wearing her travel suit and car- 


ya 

A J 


k n 



am 



s » 

l. ui.i 


\pn. -V 




■ iB- 


,‘"^f 

1 1, NJf 

11 , ' - 


Shirley MacLaine and friends at the Lido in Paris. 

Exploration 


ryirfg her Ju^age to empbaiicaDy 
express her joy with a rousing, 
beai-thc-bhnd greeting, a number 
prepared for the moment. "Gee. 
I'm' Glad to Be Here.” 

Afterward, in dazzling music-hall 
costumes, she entertained royally 
recounting her career, whic 
ranged from chorus line to the 
White House, in a paean to troup- 
ing. “1 Love IL” She reminded 
spectators that the minuet, the can 
can and.the disco are of French ori- 
gin and gave her impression of the 
cavorting of the lasL 

She did a scene from her film, 
“The Turning Point," in which as a 
ballerina retired* to housewife she 
urges her daughter to follow her 
terpsichorean trail; and she entered 
into jazzy r high-stepping — black 
straw hat and sequmed tights — 
with the Bluebell Girls. 

. As it was the eve of her birthday, 
the orchestra struck up the custom- 
ary chords at the end and shouts of 
good wishes rang out. Just which 
anniversary was being saluted was 
not divulged. Some say 45. some 
say not. It makes no difference, in 
appearance and figure she/ is 
unchanged, the girl of golden glow 
with tire devil-may-care -charm of 
exuberant youth. 

The inimitable star of mis- 
chievous twinkle did not shine 
alone. There were other guest art- 
ists on the Lido boards for the 
occasion. Charles Aznavour. red- 
vested and of wistful countenance, 
master of many nostalgias, sang his 
ballad, “I Want to Donee in the 
Old-Fashioned Way," as he glided 
to its stow tempoed key. Tom 
Jones, the Welsh sex symbol in 
tight blue pants, took a more jaun- 
ty backward glance in his call for a 
return to the rhythm of the Timmy 
Durante era and in ringing tire pra- 
ises of all tbe giris he'd loved 
before. 

—THOMAS QUINN CURTISS 


traces of Lost Scottish Colony Found in Panama 


By John Noble Wilford 



■:- x -.hbvoiid expedition known as Operation j 
"’’I %« •d a sunken trading ship and other remains of 
'.^all-fated 17th-centuiy Scottish colony at Caledonia 
la on the Caribbean coast of Panama. 

The ship, the Olive Branch, was found covered in 
d at tire bottom of Caledonia Bay, where it sank in 
on its way to resupply the beleaguered colony, 
ohn Blashford-SneH a lieutenant colonel in the 
tish Royal Engine ers and leader of the expedition, 
d in an interview* here last week that the discovery 
“extraordinary in that tire ship was uot only corn- 
icle. but complete with all its trading goods." 
‘Excavations on shore unearthed the fortifications of 
>n Saint Andrew, which tbe Scottish colony built in 
98 and abandoned in 1700. 


young explorers are rotated into the expedition every 
three months, their costs of 55.000 each borne by cor- 
porate sponsors. 

Seven young Americans were joining the expedition 
in Panama this week. 


9 


Many Shipwrecks 



Working out of a base camp at Caledonia Bay. 
about 150 miles south of Panama City, the expedition 
conducted studies of animal and plant life in a tropical 
r ain forest and provided 'nredical care to tire Cuna 
Tn/iiang but their primary mission was archaeological 
Old maps indicated tbe approximate rite of the New 
Caledonia colony, and contemporary accounts told of 
many shipwrecks oat in the bay. 


he 

rfril 


-Ol 


v“ 


-gftftiaifc Horton; a Cambridge University archaeologist F ^ 
Afl 1 -.wo directed the excavations, said that he had tio _ 


The colony was a 
William Patterson, w 


five venture organized by 
later founded the Bank of 


unto 


, " c jno directed the excavations, — 

■^•ubt" that this was the rite of the colony of New 


lledonia. 

The archaeol 


. found the moat and earthem 

imparts of the fort, and inside they found numerous 
** ■ eces of Scottish pottery', clay pipes, weapons, trading 
ads and two coins, one showing tbe Scottisir motto 
dated 1695. 

Tribute to Drake 

tion Drake embarked from Plymouth. Eng- 

last October as a working tribute to Sr Francis 


Many Scots lose their money and their lives in the 
vain hope of establishing an overseas empire of their 
own to share in some of the trade wealth that was 
imarily to- their neighbors and enemies, tfre 



nod. conducting some oceanographic experiments 
V* , 1 -ir d stopping at several islands and countries for more 
*' ; tailM explorations on land. 

After Panama, where the expedition has been since 
■ •" x *' r ‘ member, tbe next stops are the Galapagos Islands, 
irfji. Papua New Guinea. Celebes. Singapore, the Cha- 
Islands and Port Sudan. 

* addition to experienced explorers and. scientists, 

’ V. a ' • r crews are composed of persons between the ages 0* 

( and 24 from many countries. Twenty-four of the and preserving 


But the colonists were defeated by Spanish soldiers, 
malaria , and yellow fever. Few of tbe original 1,200 
colonists ever saw Scotland again. 

In Operation Drake, a magnetometer survey of tbe 
bay near old Fort Saint Andrew found a number of 
shipwreck rites- Royal Air Force (fivers and some of 
thetyoung explorers then went down to a wreck, drilled 
holes in its well-preserved oak hull and extracted sam- 
p. They found china still in packing 
pipes (tire colonists seemed to have 

possibly to chase off flies and mos- 

quitoesfand die bones of salt pork. 

Col Blashford-Sndl said that a comparison of the 
cargo with written accounts enabled, the expedition's 
archaeologists to identify the ship as tire Olive Branch. 

The ship had come to grief one night when the coo- 
per sneaked into the brandy storeroom for a secret nip. 
His candle ignited the brandy fames- and set fire to the 


_ disgusting. 

they have manufactured would be 
eschewed by the lowest of low com- 
ics. Trust French taste. A matinee 
of this screen botch found only 
three customers in attendance, two 
of them drunk. 

* * * 

"Viva El Presidenie" (at the 
Hautefeufile in Spanish), seen at 
the 1978 Cannes Festival in three- 
hour form and now reduced to two 
and a half, is a lackadaisical gesture 
at political satire, which even cut 
down to more tolerable size re- 
mains heavy going. 

Tbe editing has failed to sharpen 


r tight 

structure, while tire mat 
adapted from a novel by AJgo Car- 
pentier) has a shopworn air. Latin- 
Araerican dictators seem to differ 
very little and have been tire subject 
for sport from the days that Wil- 
liam Howard Taft was m tire White 
House and Richard Harding Davis 
was their popular portraitist. Their 
autocratic savagery, their penchant 
for Paris — and moving the’ treas- 
ury there while they stiU hold the 
throne, their parvenu comportment 
and their inevitable debacle are fa- 
miliar in fiction, song and musical 
comedy. 

Miguel Limn has sought to draw 
his protagonist in the oils of serious 
psychological study, but his sub- 
ject, often in the midst of a third- 
act melodrama situation, skirts car- 
icature and the whole film lacks 
harmony mmI distinct purpose. 

* * * 

The discussions provoked by the 
showing of “Holocaust" on French 
television have led to the re- release 
of Marcel Ophuls' memorable doc- 
umentary on the Nazi occupation, 
"Le Chagrin et la pilie" Cat the 
Paramount Marivaux, the Publias 
Saint-Germain and the Publicis 
Matignon in French). “The Sorrow 
and the Pity" in its entirety runs for 
four and a half hours. It is a mon- 
tage of newsreel footage and inter- 
views with survivors who witnessed 
the dark years and with officials 
and statesmen of varying political 
shades. It is a work of extraordi- 
nary interest and value and it is a 
privilege to have it before us again. 

* . * * 

The Studio Action is presenting a 
Sene Noire festival, a program of 
American gangster films. Included 
are "Public Enemy" with James 
Cagney. "Little Caesar" with Ed- 
ward G. Robinson. "I Am a Fugi- 
tive From a Chain Gang" with Paul 
Muni "The Killer Is Loose" with 
Joseph Cotton and "Kiss Me Dead- 
ly" with Ralph Meeker. 


hip, which probably sank quickly, putting out the fire 
mfl preserving most of the cargo. 



PHILIP MORRIS 



La capacite. 



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aircraft can transport 500.000 cu.fr. of freight daily; serving 153 worldwide destinations.That's capacity. 

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NYSE Nationwide Trading 3 p.m. .Prices Apr. 24 


Tables include ihc nationwide prices up to 3 p.m. on Wall Street. 


Ctt'orr 

12 Month Stock sis. 3£L/"- Prev 

High Low Dlv.inS YU. P.'E 100s. Hiah Low Quot.3PJn. 


cn'oe 

12 Month Stock Sis. lam. Prw 

Htoh low oiw.InS Yld. P/E .WOs. High Low Oust. 3 tun. 



aw 

13 Month stock Sis. 3pxn, Prow 

High LOW Mv.lnl YhL P/E 100s. High Low Quot.3run. 


7ft MBmJRL JO 
M MftBon-gh 2 
19% 14 Buttertn sJQ 
15% MButttS 


29ft ACF 11Q 
IJVaAMF 134 

15 AMtntl J8 
81k APL 1 

331k ARA IjU 
10& ASA I 
8ft ATO 48 
29ft AMH Lb 1 

16 V. ACRMC .1 JO 
V* AdmDfl -W 
10* Ada E* 1280 
31k AdmMI 20e 

35%A*tn oLI 230 
17% Ahmani 1 
2 Alioen 
23t% AlrPrd 40 
\S‘i AirttFrt I 
I1L Akcona JO 
71. AI0P dpi J7 
57ft AlOP Of 11 
73 AtaP pt&28 
141% AtOQSCO 140 
13% Ataskln 44 

I9to Albany 1 
4V. Alberto M 
3IJI'i Albrtsn ljo 
26% AtcanA 2 
22% AicoSW i.«a 
5% Alexdr Ml 
Tift AIIOCP 1 
tViAitosAir 

18 Alin Pt 1J7 
UXAIIgLd MB 

30 AltoL pt 3 
21 AltoL Pr2.!9 
IV.. AllaPw 1.72 
14% AllenGp S 1 
20* Allergan J » 
27% AlldCh 7 

9ft AlldMnt JO 
20*A|MStr ISO 
27L AllisCh 1J0 
UliAllrAu Mb 
14 % AlptiPr J7a 
40!% Alcoa ZM 
13ft AmlSug 1 
32% Aawr 270 
as Amax pf£25 
381% Amax pf 3 
14 Amcord 1JD 
16V. Amree IJ2 

31 Amrc pR. 40 
23* A Hess lb 
54 AHes Pt3J0 
10* AmAIr 40 

3XAmAir wt 
191% AAlr pt 2.18 
12* ABakr UDb 
4Sft ABmd* 449 
22Vb ABrd pn.70 
X%ASrfl PfZTS 
28*ASnI PtZt? 
32% ABdcst 130 
13*% ABUM 70 
34ft AmCon 2J0 
19V ACon pfT.7S 
21% AConlrv 

19V, AC red t TJ0 
233% ACvon 140 
n% AmDIstl 
22V» ADT 1 JOB 
81% AOualVI J4Q 
14!% ADvl Pt J4a 
20*. AElPw 2.18 
271% Am Exp 1.80 
BLAFamll 40 
IP 4GIM l.We 
151% AGnCv 1.9SC 
221% AGnlrtS 1 
2V AGln pflJO 
PThAHcrifLf 48 
12 AmHolM 1 
24 A Home 140 


63 7 123 33*. 

74 7 93 141% 
1J 6 375 169% 
« 25 101% 

44 8 143 36% 
At 107 84* 

49 S 22 121% 
3913 436 33 

6.1 5 28 IP*. 

19 5 34 4 
11. 219 13 

3.9 7 16 51% 
6.J J 1435 44* 
47 4 U 21% 

17 214 

2.1 9 293 281% 

till 47 2214 
42 7 38 131% 
11. 3 81% 

11. zM 101 
11. 140 75 

97 7 2 1416 

3413 122 17V. 
2910 27 3614 
44 10 15 77% 

37 8 85 369% 
54 5 138 37V. 
AS 5 9 25* 

59 6 476 71% 

4-1 7 129 241% 

4 861 10 
BJl 1 22ft 
69 9 48 181% 

94 15 331% 

10. 20 211% 
11. 8 155 161% 
67 7 IS 141% 
1711 72 299% 

A9 8 384 33V. 

64 8 9 12V. 

6J 6 300 234% 
SI S 97 339% 
47 7 2 13 

34 S 27 19* 
44 51345 569* 
54173 14 19 
St 9 179 53 

4.1 3 127 

64 2 48ft 

S7 4 29 219% 
ST 5 7 22V. 

S9 2 37* 
XI 9 697 32*. 
47 IB 72 
34 3 385 121% 

64 5 

II. 23 194% 

7.9 7 31 151* 

7J B 367 U60* 
64 6 u2Bto 

BA 532 329% 
84 W7 31% 

34 7 337 36V. 

50 7 3 1«V% 

74 6 122 381% 
87 3 21 U 

3 49% 

2711 76 48* 

S3 8 195 27 
70 129% 
44 9 46 24* 
XI 10 101% 
17 S 14* 
1X10 531 211% 
SB 71137 31(6 

4.9 6 129 1293 

95 27 281% 

11. 11 189% 

35 S 312 28* 

11 35 354% 

XT 8 2 12* 

S3 6 66 16 

S3 12 1013 268% 


331% 33* 

169% 16*+ * 
159% 16 + 1% 
10* 10%+ * 
369% 36*+ 9% 
249% 344% 

12 129%+ V. 

329% 33 + * 
19* 199%+ 96 
39% 3* 

111% 11%+ % 
59% 59%+ V% 

441% 44*+ U 
219% 2196— * 
2* 2* 

279% 28*+ * 
2196 22V.+1L 
129% 13 + * 

8V% 89% 

101 101 
75 . 75 
141% 141% 

109% 1996+ * 

36 36 + * 

7* 7* 

35* 36 Vb 

37 37*+ 9% 
ZS 25* 

79% 7%+- W 

249% 24* 

9% W9r- V% 
229% 229% 

171% 181%+ * 
32* 334%+ to 
21 * 21 % 

169% 164%+ 96 
149% 149% 

28* 29ft+ to 
43to S3to+ Hi 
131% 12*+ Vt 
239% 231%+ to 
339% 33*+ * 
12* 12* — * 
IV t% — >u 
559% 559%+ to 
181% 19 + to 
579% 52to+ 9% 
127 1Z7 +5 
'40Vj 48V%+1 
21 219% 

22 * 22 * 

37* 37* 

31 to 22%+lft 
67* 72 +2% 
119% 121%+ * 
4* 5 + * 

191% 19to+ VC 
15 15*+ * 

58to 60 +11% 
279% 289%+ * 
31* 32 + 9% 
319% 3l*+ 1% 
35* 369%+ * 
149% 141% 

37 3&to+ll% 
7TK 21* 

4 49%+ 1% 

48 48*+ 9% 

26* 77 + * 
12 12 
249% 24*+ * 
103% lOto 
14* 14*+ V% 
21* 219%+ V% 
319% 31to 
119% 121% 

289% 20to— lb 
189% 18Vi 
28to 289%+ * 
35to 35to+ * 
12* 1216 + * 
15* 16 
26* 26V%+ 1% 


32* 23%AmHo*p JO XI TO 76 25% 25* 261% 

131% BtoAmlnvkt JO 2514 24 109% 101% IBto— to 

354% 18 AMI M X0 9 142 27* 2*9%' 27 

9* 4* AmJMIrs 41767 89% 8% 89%+ 1% 

47 36 ANotR X20 XQ 7 220 40 39to 399%- 9% 

28 24to ASLPta nAOa 22 6 194 ifl** 26 269% +1 Hi 

189% 10* AShlp JOa 6A26 71 12* 12to TTto 

531% 3S* AStand ZAO 5-4 7 74 48* 48to 48*— to 

9* 6 AStorll 32 *A 9 82 7V% 7* 7*— 9%. 

56 29toAm5tnt 22* AO 9 315 55* 55* 559%+ * 

64* 589% ATT 5 X4 8 2775 59* 59* 59*+ * 

679% 619% ATT pt . 4 6 A 7 624% 62* 62* 

49to 43to ATT pf 3A* X0 270 459% 45* 4596—9% 

SB* 449% ATT Pf 174 XI 37 46* 46%- 46to— to 

l?to 10* AWaWle Jfl 73 S JO 17% 129% 121%— 1% 

18to 14toAWal Pfl-43 XB Z120 16* 16* 16*+ 1% 

149% lltoAWat pfl-25 11. X50 11* 11* 11*- to 

23* 15VjAfflt«Wl 1 52 6 6 19* 199% 1T9%— * 

169% 9to AmcsD Mb Z9 S 7 13to 139% 13to 

37* 27* AflMtefc 1JQ S3 T 61 34 329% '33*+ to 

20to IStoAmfoc >.30 5.9 6 79 20* 20to 20to 

48 28* AMP Ihc Jt 2J13 327 33to 329% 331%+ to 

169% 12 Ampca A0 41 7 35 1«% 14to !«%+■ to 

199% lOtoAmpex 10 179 15* 149% 15*+ to 

69% ZtoAmmCP 13 23 4* 49k 4* 

319% 14V%Amstttr 1J5 7.1 12 159 19* 1»% ]♦.. f .* 

45 29* lAmsied 173 4A 7 84 37to 36to 3^+J* 

1691 14* Analog s 17 250ulB 161% TJJ+lJfc. 

31to 24*AndtfH 1J0 67 5 142 279% 26to 2«+ to 

26 lBtoAnOClav 1 SI 7 75 20 19to 19to— 9% 

. 8* 59% Angelica JO 49 7 43 6* 69% 69% 

1 1446 ItoAniJrter J2 23 8 32 13* 1» T»+ * 

28* 139% Apactte JO 1.9 9 35 27 26* » + * 

20* 20* Apache Wl 6 209% 209% 209%+ 1% 

229% &* ApidDto ■ 104 10* 10 10 


4f* 20* ApkiDtB t»n XI 


4 241% 241% 241% 


11 59% AppIMo 8 77 Bto I* 8to— to 

179% ArcatoC .96 47 7 41 23* 23 23 

19* 12* ATCtWD 70b 1.118 62 18 17*% 18 

IT* 6 ArcficEnf .I0e TJ 7 38 10 Wfc 70 + * 

Tito 18*ArlzPS 1J8 9J 7 196 191% 19* 19* ■ 

181% 109% ATkBst AOb S4 5 5 Uto 119% 119% 

38* 28* AricLGs 270 5J 9 134 389% 37* 38 
5* 1H ArlenRIv 57 2 2 2 — 9% 

8* * 5* Armada 8 2 5* 5* 5* 

22to 17 Armaa 1J6 6A 5 287 311% 20* Zlto 

301% 25* Arm pf 2.10 74 4 28* 27* 28*+ * 

21* 14?% ArtnstCk 1 .. 5A 8 277 18 171% 18 + to. 

481% 41* ArmC otX75 XS z200 42V% 429% 42to 5 

22 18* ArmRu 170 U 4 17 20to 20* 20to+ 1% 

25* 15* AraCarp 1 49 7 5 201% 20* 20* 

14* 7* Ar row E TOr 14 6 104 141% 13* 14*+ to 

23* 12 Arvin 1 U 4 M 159% 14* 14to+ 9% 

20% 13* Asarco 40 XI 11 SOT IS* 189% 1B*+ to 

441% 31 AsftJOitS 2 44 B 257 U45!% 44* 45 + 9% 

25* IStoAsdDG ISO 7 J B 269 19* 18* 19* +1 
21 14* A! mono 170 S9 5 95 20* 20* 20*— 9% 

23?% 17* AtCvEI 174 94 B 34 18* 18* IBto 

66% 47* AttRlcn 2J0 4J10 B0Z 65* 64* 65*+ 1* 

220 1629% At IRC pf 3 14 4 220 219 220 +29% 

781% 57 AtIRC pfXBO 34 7 78 77 78 +lto 

15* 9to AttasCP 54 13* 13* 131% 

36M 27* AufoDta S3 1415 52 31?% 319% 319%+ to 

35 181% AvcaCP 170 54 3 101 2)9% 21* 21 *- to 

70 42 Avco ptl20 6.9 15 4ftV% 461% 469% 

19to 12* Avery J2 X0 8 38 171% 17* 1716—* 

23* 13* Avnat JO 47 7 673 1996 189% 1916+ to 

63 . 45* Avon 240 5J12 636 4996 4816 48to+ to 


3 11% BT Mis 

llto 6toBaChe 40a 
41* 259% Bokrint 44 
25* ITtoBaMwU 170 
37* 38 BUU pf 246 
28to 2196 BallCP 170 
78* 2416BailyMf .10 
271% 23 BoitGE 278 
2696 18(6 BanCol .92 
16* 1196 Bandog A0 
31* 17* BcnnPnl 40 
42to 25 BcmP pf 2 
38 3Uto BnkNY 244a 
17* 139% BkofVa l M 


T 2* 
44 6 136 9 

1.114 346 40 
44 7 09 u27to 
S3 4 u3T 
S5 6 23 221% 
.129 084 75 
97 7 309 2316 
A3 5 59 311% 
34 9 119 15* 
2J S 29 21* 
7 JO 3 28* 
74 5 38 '32* 
74 5 512 14* 


214 216 

8* 9 + 9% 

399% 39to+ * 
25* 2716+1* 
38* 39 +1* 
22 22 +16 
73 ' 74V%+1U< 
23 23 

2116 711%+ to 
1516 15*+ * 
21* 21*— 1% 
28* 38*— 9% 
3216 32*+ to 
14 149%— 1% 


29* 

22 BnkAtn 1.10 

45 71073 

45* 

25* 

25%+ * 

40 

32*BonkTr 3 

85 6 

94 

36* 

36ft 

36%+ ft 

29* 

25* BkTr 04250 

95 

1 

26* 

26* 

26*+to 

SI* 

43ft BkTr pMJS 

9.1 

22 

66* 

46ft 

46ft 

21% 

8* Bonner .12 

J9I4 

63 

Uft 

13* 

13ft+ * 

Sto 

21% Barber IM 

5.110 

36 

31% 

30ft 

31ft+ % 

18* 

to* BordCR 32 

Z5I0 

153 

1J 

1266 

13 + * 



45-6 

2511 

6 

53 

23* 

17* 

23* 

17% 


65* 

42ft BatesMf JO 

.1530 

7 

60% 

60ft 

60ft 

SI* 

32XBauscti 1J2 

3J9 9 

304 

44* 

44 

44 

49% 

33* BoxtTrv 58 

1JM 

209 

99% 

389b 

39to+ * 

5% 

2* BavColP 

61 

49 

4% 

4* 

4% 

31% 

IffKBoySlS 156 

ja 8 

4 

19%. 

19ft 

!PVb+ % 

10% 

8* BavkCb M 

-5.1 5 

33 

9% 

9ft 

9ft- to 

33% 

25 Bearing J8 

M 9 

36 

28 

27* 

27* — * 

28* 

21 BeotFd 150- 

55 81849 

22 

21% 

21%+ to 

SM 

44ft BeatF pern 

74 

392 46 

45* 

45* 

25* 

21 Beckm 58 

1513 300 

21*d20* 

21 

41 

30% BectnD J4 

2412 215 

34% 

34* 

34*+ to 

311% 30 Beech 32 

35 1 

89 

26% 

26ft 

26ft + * 

8% 

2* Befcee 


102 

7% 

7ft 

7%+ ft 

31% 2*% BetcoP a JO 

2J 6 

117 

29ft 

28ft 

28*+ % 

36ft 

19* BMm TA4 

6J0 5 

27 

24% 

34% 

24ft- * 

9 

6* BeUnH 36b 

45 7 

2 

8 

8 

a — % 

23% 

14* BellHow 56 

6J 9 

95 

16% 

15* 

16 

91% 

S* Boiling .12a 

14 5 

86 

7% 

7% 

7%+ * 

SVft 

48 BMICd 456 

73 8 

1 

59 

59 

59 — * 

24% 

ttftBamb MO 

65 6 

9 

22* 

■22 

22*+ * 

43% 

33ft Etendtx 256 

65 6 

38 

39% 

39to 

39%+ ft 

85ft 

681% Bendbc pf 3 

34 

4 

78 

78 

70 

26% 20%BcnfCh IJ0 

74 6 

182 

24* 

24% 

24%—* to 

S3 

43 Benef pU50 

10. ZT00 

44ft 

44ft 

44ft+ ft 

115ft 

91 Beiwf p(550 

5.1 

(10 108ft 108ft 108ft— 1ft 

28* 

23ft Bonef pf25B 

ia z130 

25 

25 

25 

5% 

2ft BonptB 

8 

48 

3% 

3* 

3* 

9% 

4ft BerfceyP 

10 

38 

6% 

6* 

6* 

34* 

20ftB*stpg .16 

4 9 

76 

a 

27% 

a + * 

27ft 

19ft BelttSll L40 

55 5 

790 

23% 

23% 

23%+ * 

40* 

29* BlbTttr JO 

Z1 13 

377 

a 

37* 

30 +1 

21 

14ft Blnnay JO 

44 9 

8 

18% 

18* 

18%+ % 

29ft 

T7ft BHsFSL 1 

15 6 

S0u291% 

28% 

28ft— ft 

22ft 

15ft BlockOr jig 

ii n 

489 

21* 

21* 

21*+ % 

33 

IMJIah-Jn MS 

45 7 

57 

28* 

a% 

28*+ % 

26 

19ft BlefcHR 1-36 

S3 

9 

a* 

23 

23%+ to 

26* 

18* BlueB 140 

64 6 

333 

25* 

24* 

25 + * 

18 

4* Bluetord 30 

25 6 

28 

9* 

9% 

9ft— to 

7* 

4* Bobbie Br 

4 

38 

4% 

4% 

4K+ to 

45* 

40ft Badn s 

91515 

43% 

42* 

43ft +1 

3Sto 

23ft BatoeC 150 

45 7 

485 

34* 

34% 

34*+ to 

31% 

24% Barden M2 

7J 6 

168 

a* 

25* 

26 —to 

34% 

26 .Boraw 2 

64 5 

238 

»* 

29% 

30% +1 

9* 

3* Bortims .10e 

14 5 

18 

6% 

6% 

«%— % 

25* 

21ft Bos Ed 254 

11. 6 

60 

ZlftdTlX 

21% — to 

93 

82 BchE pf&JS 

11. 

OT 

S3 

•2 

03 — % 

12 

10ft BosE prl.17 

11. 

21 

11 

10* 

11 + to 

15 

13 BosE PTU6 

11. 

i 

13* 

13* 

Uft- to 

18% 

9*BranHf 56 

3J 5 

748 

12ft 

lift 

12 + * 

33ft 

20ft BntunC JO 

22 9 

123 

30ft 

29ft 

29*— to 

31* 

25 BrlaSI 158 

3410 

96 

29* 

29ft 

2V% — ft 

40% 

30ft BrlstM M4 

4.112 

234 

35 

34% 

35 + * 

461% 

35ft BristM Pi 2 

SO 

1 

48* 

40* 

40*+ * . 

Sto 

13* BrltPet 54e 

Mil 1313 uTS* 

24* 

«*+ to 

191% 

21% 

15% BrkwGI 158 
18% BkyUG 202 

92 7 

9 

73 

17 

20* 

17 

20* 

17 

20* 

26* 

24* BkUG pf247 

94 

12 

26* 

a* 

26*+ * 

23* 

UtoBwnShp JOb 

<0 

6 

19* 

19* 

I9%+ % 

19* 

7* Braun 50 

25 5 

33 

13* 

13% 

13* 

30 

23toBwnGP 1J0 

70 5 

24 

25* 

a 

25* +1 | 

16 

11 BwnFer 40 

4518 

106 

13* 

13ft 

10%+ % 

Uft 

12* Bmswfc JO 

55 6 453 

14* 

14ft 

14%+ to. 

34* 

27% Bmsk pf3L40 

11 

4 

29% 

29ft 

29%+ to 

32* 

20 BrutolW 140 

45 A 

1211134% 

32* 

34* +1% 

21% 

15* BucvEr J8 

45 7 

301 

19* 

19% 

19M+ to 

31* 

22 BufFe MO 

4J 6 

11 

2flh 

28% 

26W 

15 

10 Bundy 

75 5 

7 

12% 

12ft 

12% 

21* 

17* BunkrM M6 

18. 

1 

18% 

18% 

18ft- * 

33ft 

9% fltinkR. J4 

35 7 251 u24* 

23% 

34 + * 

25ft 

18 BnkR pf)5D 

SJ 

52u25% 

a 

2SU+TX 

22% 

16* BurtliM 140 

7.9 7 

203 17* 

17ft 

17% — ft 

47% 

35 Burl Mo 1J0 

30 5 

239 

47 

46ft 

47 + % 

7* 

6% BrINa pf J55 

72 

40 

7% 

7 

7to+ M 

47 

36 BrINa pfUS 

65 

9 

45* 

45ft 

45%+ ft 

25% 

17ft Bunxty JB 

34 10 

6 

24* 

24ft 

24*+ U 


.44* 449% CBS 240 
11* 4*CCI 
29* 10 Cl RTv 20e 
371% 29 CIT 240. 
IS* OtoCLC . 74 
14* 7toCMAFn 
18* 1396 OfA pf 1.10 
12to 9HCNA1 UBo 
55 45* CPC 3 
17* 1496 CP Nat 144 
21* UtoCTS 40 
39* 29*CabafC 140 
13* ■ 7* Cc-iwat 
799% 14 Caesars 
.17* 13 Cantm JOb 
4* 2* Camera 
401% 25* CmpRL JOa 
38 31toCam5p 176 
m, 33 CwnpT TUB 
26 15* CdPOC IJOe ' 

15* 9 Canal R 44 
24* TStoConMinn la 
47* 36*CapCfts 70 
269% lBtoGopHaM J92 
4* 3* Carl meO JHo 
409% 22 'Carl We U0 
12 5*CaroFrg 40 
23* 1916 GarPw 176 
29* 25* CarP Pf 247 
3) 27* Car Tec 140 

281% 17 CarrCp 1 
50* 31 Carr pf 1J6 
131% 10* CairGn joe 
24 UViOxnnr U0 
20to 13*Car1Haw 1.10 
10 6* CartWoi 48 

9 otoCascNG'Jtr 
231% MtoCastICk JOb 
45 5296 CntrpT X10 

1596 lOtoCecaCp 40 
48(6 3StoCManw 3 
509% 44(6 Cetan M450 
8* 3 Cenco 

28* 1496 Centex TO 
17* 141% CanSoW 142 
22 lPtoCenHwl 176 
17* 15(6 CenlILt 1.70 
499% 449% QlILt pf4J0 
2Wfc 26 CMU 01237 
14* 1216 CenllPS 178 
30 18 CenLoE 1J2 

^ 

279% 23 CenTei 1J4 
45 Uto'CbntrOat 1 
Sto 6*CntrvT«t J4 
24* I5toCrLfeed 30 
22 16* CessAlr JO 

2616 lBtoChmpIn 174 
26* 1996 Oiml pflTO 
12* 9 ChamSp JO , 
16 4 amrtCo 32 . 

»to 1 ChartCn wt 
351% 289% dirfNY 244 
9* 7*ChasFU 42a 
37* 28*ChOsM 240 
81 72 OmM pfB 

92* 8) CJxjsM pfC 
14* 89% Ctwhba 40b 
45* 36 ChmNY XU 
24* 209% ChNY pflJ7 
. 51* 26*ChesYa l JO 
27* 289% CtwaPn IJB 
.34* 24* Chose* 2J2 
59 46* ChlBrl 2a 

19* 5* ChfMtw . 

SZto 119% ChlMlw Pf 
34* 23* ChlPneT 2 
7to 3*ChkPuil 
15* 6*Oirfsat . ' 

■ 32 20 ChCfl pflAO 

9 4* CbrWn 40c 

24* >4* Chroma U0 
. 93 8* Chrysler 40 

5* 3 drn wt 


5J 320 3* 39% 
2J11 740 72* 71* 
4.1 ff 33 IT* IT* 
92 U9 10* 1 T* 

c—c—c — 

54 7 773 46* 46 

4 «$ 8* 7to 

J *35 . 34* 24* 
44 9 195 36* 36 
XU0 15 11* 119% 
4 145 13* 13 
S3 11 17* >17* 
IX x33. M ID* 
'XV * ISO 49* 48* 
IV 12 3 15 15 

44 8 73 18* IS* 
33 7 267 34* 36 
S' 21 mt lOto 
471599 739% 71 
XT 14 26 17* 17 
7 21 4* 4* 

2J15X1I 32* 32* 
S3 T 77 33* 33* 

44 T 11 249% 24 

' O S100TU26* 25* 

45 8 8 Uto 149% 

43 8 36 23to 23* 
J10 21 3T* 38* 

46 7 45 209% 20 
A 738 ■ 49% -4* 

41 6 '9 39* 38* . 

55 4 18 7* 7* 

IX 6 205 19* IT* 
IX 1 25*025* 
S3 7 V 28* 28 
XT J HI 2536 ’ 25 
40 1 46* 46* 


3* 

72 

19*— »% 
10*+ to 


469%+ 9% 
8 

24*+ * 
369%+r* 
II* 

13*+ * 
17*+. * 
10* 

49*6+ * 

is — to 

ii*— *■ 


3694 — * 

10 *+ to 


10 *+ ft 
7Z*+Z* 
17*+ 9% 
4ft 

32 *+* 
33*-* 
24*+ ft 
26*+ * 
14*- * 
239%+ ft 
39 
20 
4* 

38*-'* 

7* 

IT* 

35*- ft 
209%+ * 
25*+ ft 


X3 8 11* lift 
US SU 17* 17* 
4J 7 1821*96 18ft 
54 T 85 8 7 to 

878 42 T Sto 

57 8 178 15* 15* 
37 8 1064 56* 56* 

47 5 9 12* 12to 

67 5 221 45* 44* 
9J 1 46 46 

6 49 4*' 4* 

712 558 27* 27 
97 7x1102 159% 15* ’ 
93 6 5 19* 19* 

IX 9 30 17 16* . 

TO. (20 44 044 

77. zT25D 2ftt - 26 
1X8 41 12* 12* 
579 291 29* 2Sto. 

iv \ i# Mfi m 

77 8 272 25* 25* 
2718 329 45 43* 

647 22 8 * 89% 

54 7 32 M 15* 

44 7 141 17* 171% 
-47 61421 25* 20% 

48 28 25* 2416 

7J 7 123 W* 10* 
17U27Wul7ft 169% 

3810 oil* 10 * 
7J 5 34 32* 32* 
67 20 9* 9* 

47 61786 35to 351% 

7 73* 73* 
■1 82* 82*. 
S3 4 18 11* 11* 
83 5 73 389% 38* 
XT 28 21 * 21 
85 12 77 4394 42 
4710 8S3 22* 22 
7J 4 121 38 29* 

4210 14 47* 47* 

17 725 U* 15* 
11 39ft 39 
67 8 226 29* 28* 
21 4 4- 

8 80 14ft 13* 

45 3 31 31 

60 5 14 6 * 69% 

5J 5 48 19ft 19 
41 404 9* 9* 

44 3* 3* 


llto 

T7*+ * 
II*- ft 
■ + u 

9 + to 
151%- 
56* 

12* 

45 + * 

46 + ft 
4* 

zm- 9% 
15* 

19*+ ft 
16to+ ft 
44 —4 
24 to— ft 
12*— ft 
29 —to 

MB-* 

25V*— r * 


89% 

Id + U 
179%— ft 
25to+ to 
25*+ to 
10 *- ft 
179% +19% 
llft+1* 
32*+ * 
9* 

35*+ * 
73*+ * 
83*—* 
11 *- 
38*+ ft 
21 

42*+ 1 
22*+ * 
29*— * 
47*+ 1% 
14*— I* 
39 —Oft 
29 — * 
4‘ 

14 + * 
31 

4|L 

]Tft+ * 
9* 

3*+ ft 


l9*chnns pTZ75 
20toauirCh 40. 
269% On Bell 233 
U*ClnGE 1.96 
48 anG Pf 475 
96 CinG of 930 
77ft ClnG pf 744 
96ft CinG pfTJS 
24 OnMIl 1.10 
229% Offer* I J» 
44*OHe4Sv 370 
1 aWou-Rt 
ratoCttyluv 170 
21 -320 tY I nv wt 
21 CHyln Pf- 2 
3T*a«rke 2. 
ITto-CtarkOf! 20 

ZStoCtvCH 170Q 
16* dev? I -172 

7 aevcpk 40- 
TtoCtofta 76 
9* ChiettP* 40 

]0ft ChieHP. pf 1 : 
T&Coaav n M 
imCatStGa JO 
l7*C8t5G PfTJ3 
T4: CstSG pn.1T 
5ft CocoBII 40 
38ft Cocoa 174 
22*OdwBk. 140 
imCaieNt 72 
TtoColcca 
16* CoIgPcH U08 
‘ 8* CeHAHl 72 
9ft CoUfflF 78 
19 ColPan 170 
30ft Cattlnd 250 
25ft Cott pf 140 
25ft CMGw 244 

54 CMGs pfS48 
14* CotuPcl 200 
TOftColSOh 272 
22* CSO pt 242 
279%CmbCm 70 
31*CmbEn .2 

TtoCmbEp .74b 
24 CmwE 240 
IBtoCWE pf 1.90 
20* CwE Pf 2 
25* CwE Pf 277 
26 CwE Pf 2J7 
36*Comsot 2 
lXtoOoPsvc JO 
18* COmPS MS 
ZJtoCofnpgr 78 
9ftG»mpScl 
43ftCptvtsn n 
17* ConAss 1.16 
21*ConeMI 1JQ 
16* Gonpotm 1 
17 ConnM 1J8 
TT* Conroe JOb 
21* Con Ed 244 
71 Core Pf « 
43ft ConE Pf465 
46* Con E pf 5. 
21 ConPdS 140 

55 ConF pR50 
ITtoOnPrt 1.1 0 
33*CnsNG 3 
20ftCoruPw 274 
7Z*CnPw Pf773 
ITftCnPw PT273 
2I*Cnpw pf243 
85 CRf>« pf 6 

8 ContAIr J0e 
3*ContCop ' 

22*CntlCorv 2 
50 CMC pfBXSO 
25* Coll Grp 230 
229% CntGp pr 2 
24* Corrtlll 144 
13* Conti IP 1 J2e 
2* CoofllRf 
24ft CnntOfl 170 
149% ConITei 174 
27* CtlOota 40 
43toCnOI pf 4J0 
21*Conwd U0 


IX 86 SBft 2fFft 
2411 SB 26* 24* 
7J S 19 2H%- 29* 
IX 7 306 IT 19 
9J 2100 50 50 

97 Il» 97 « • 

97 100 81 81 

-97 Z475BUO 102 
XI 8 28 369% 359% 
55 6 404 »to 23* 

4.9 IS 1352 U65* 64 

11* 1ft tto 
XI 3 312 1$ Mft 
JO . 1ft 1ft 
85 36 23* 23* 

SJ 6 43 3? 38* 

XI 10 309 23* 21 
40 9 16 29* 291% 

11. 8 242 17* .17 
5J» 176 10* 9ft 
71. 7. 739 11 10* 

55 6 47 11 . 10* 

95 1 Uft 10ft 

7 5 3 67 «ft- 8 
1J 8 792 229% 22* 
U 8 23* 23 . 
57 3 22* 22* 

S3 9 371 6 * 6 * 

4713 481 4Q* 39* 
35 7 1 40* 4096 

‘S3 i 1 12* 12* 

35 3* ’ 3* 

55 8 324 18* Hft 
77 5 102 18* 9* 

11 7 60 13ft 13* 

53 J 356 22* 22* 

67 5 581 40ft a 
XI 1 31* 31* 
XB 7 94 27ft 27ft 

9.9 1 53ft 539%- 

XQ 4 109 23* 23* 
1X13 68 331% 23 
1L 1 23 . 23 

412 7 34 34 

54 8' 82 37ft 36* 

1713 70 10* 10ft. 
11. 7 800 Uft 24 . 
9.7 60 30 19* 

9J 1. 20ft 209% 
92 . 7 34* 34* ‘ 

11. 8 36* 26* 

44 9 90 45*: 44* 
2410' 43 19* 18to 
97 7 14. 30* 20ft 

414 180 44* 43* 
10 54S 12* lift 
2Z 04 461% 46* 
65 5 6 .17* 17*. 
64 4 27 38* 38 
47 6 71 23* 23 ' 
8717 288 20* 20ft 
SO 27 9 14* H 

IX 6 3S9 23* 23* 

73 2 » 76 

IX Z1530 45*. 45* 
IX '2 49 48* 

77 7 100 2» 32 
7J 1 57ft 579% 
47 4 11 26ft ' 24* 
77 7 49 39* 38* 

11. 6 292 21 20* 

IX xlOO 76 76 

11. 8 20ft 20* 

IL 5 SOX 23 - 
77 2 83ft dBSft 

37 3 61 9ft 9* 

36 6ft 6* 

74 S 321 27* 26* 

47 2 57ft 57ft 

75 8 69 29* 28* 

87 It 23 23 

S3 6 114 27ft 27* 

5457 432 24* 24* 
IT 41% 4 - 

SO 8 1176 03* 33* 
75 8 1594 16* 16* 
1.1 71495 36* 35ft 
IX zlO 44* 44ft 
57 8 13 29 28* 


20ft+ ft 
24*+ ft 
29*+ to 
19 

50 +1 
96 + ft 
81 -ft 
1B*+ * . 
36 +1 - 

6W+2 

1* 

14 to— * 

. 1 *+ ft 

23*- * 

39 + ft 
23*+l* 
29*+ * 
171% 

T0*+ * 

11 —.ft 
11 + * 
Uft 
I.- 

22ft+ *- 
23 -ft. 
22*— to- 
6 *+ * 

40 + to 
AJV.+ * 
13*- ft 

' 3to— to 
18* + ft 
Sto — * 
u*— ft 
22*+ ft 

40ft + 9% 
31* : 

27*+ ft 
551%. . 

23*— to 

23 

23: + V% 

34 .+ * 
37*+ to 
ID* - 

24 

19*+ to 
2W% 

26* 

26*+ to 
4SV6+ * 

19 — to 
20ft 

44*+]* 
121%.+ * 
46ft— * 
17*— 1% 

28 — * 
239L+ * l 
20*+ * | 
14 . 

w'Vft i 

4S96+1 ' f 
48*- ,ft . • 
229%+ ft \ 
57ft 

26ft+ ft 
39ft+ to 
20*— ft 
76 — ft 
20* + ft 
21 — * 
63ft— lft 

9ft+ 1% 
MW— ft 
27V%+ * 
57ft+lft 
29*+ ft 


OIL, BUT... S 


Oil is only a part of the 
MAPCO pictuce-This inte-. 
grated energy company v ‘ 
also produces and markets 
coal-gas and. gas. liquids, 
operates LPG ahd anhy- ' 
drbus ammonia pipelines, 
retails LPG and fiquid fen- 
tiiizer. product sonic in- 
strumentation devices, fiK 
tration equipment and 
other water pollution. con- 
trol products.. For a closer 
look at MAPQO’s.; diversifi- 
cation and profitable 
growth, write for our cur- 
rent report. .'.": 

*Z>maKo 


Depi P. IBOO S. BblUHaia Ave. 
Tulsa. OkblKuna 74119 
SYMBOL MOA - NYSE *' 
MWSE-PSE ; 


— — . .. -U 1 

- .OflBtoi + 

. 12 Month Stock Six . 3 pju, Pray? , 1 . 

High Low Dlv.inS Yld.' P/E l00x Utah Law Quat.3pan.> «•' 

I rr?' J 


8 * StoCookUn 79t , S0 12 810 r 8 7* 7to+ * 1? - 


279%— ft 
24* 

4 — ft 
3398+ * 
16*+ 9ft 
36* +1* 
44ft 

28*— * 


60 41ft Coapin' I J4 34 8 186.. 51ft 50* 51ft+1 1* •i.-i! 
26 MtoCoopLOb M 1.711 139 23ft ■ Oft 23*- to f : ‘ , , 

14 109% CoopT R JO 65 4 7 ’12* 12* 12* 1** * 

18 12* CopT pfl^S .9.1 4 13* 13* 13* >• 

25 17* Copeimi J4 4J 8 77 21 20 * 21 +*- 

22ft 15*C0PPWd 178 47 7 8 IT* 19 19 - * -fi? ’ 

6* sftGonhira M X611.26 5* Sft 5ft 

14ft ) 2 to Corain 8 52 ' 34 7 5 Uft UX 14ft+ to , . 

65 49ftComG .08 37 9 42S 56* SSto 56%+ T* >‘ Jl 

32to 20ft Con-BIk 156 19 10 7 26* 26 24*+ % *y. ■ 

25ft HftCowfeS 50, 19 IB 18 23 221% 23 + * 

61ft 36ft CoxBdct 72 1711 9 41* 61 41 -ft I- 1 „ 

Uft -V CraiS 50 <3 7 ” 16. Iffft 10 ft 1096-16 a %&' 1 

37 23 Crane 140b 45 9 125 31ft 30ft .311%+ ft 1 ; 

I2H 6 toCrtdfF 44 « 8 108 10* M Uft—* 

39 24 CrockN 2 67 5 52 29to 29ft 2p4 " »/•' 

27* 22 ft CrckN MX 18 SJ 10 24* 24ft 24*+ * Ts..(i 

19 12fftCnnPK 1J4 63 6 26 Uft 15* l4ft+ ft 

28to 19*CrouHI 175. A3 9 30 25ft 24ft Sft+ ft & VJl 

98 77 CroH PfX3S X9 1 86 * 84* «to+3to ' 

35* 26ft CrwnGfc : 7 72 29ft 29* W4— * ; 

38 29*CrwZel 170 - SJ 8 44 349% 34ft Wft+ V, . hHB r« 

44* 30V3 CrihtiF X0B : XT 4 90 40* 48* 4 0*- * .' 

20 * 10 ft Culbro 1 9.1 3 1 » 19 . 19 - 

(Coitlinued on Page 10) . ‘ , 


( Advertisement) 


DKBS ECONOMIC JOURNAL 


Centributions U) GNP Growth Rate 


April 1979: VoL &No. 4 


Business is recovering in Japan, 
though there are still uncertainties 


The Japanese Government's 
long-time efforts to spur busi- 
ness from fiscal as well as 
monetary aspects seem to have- 
been bearing fruit ■ since 
autumn last year to early this 
year. 

Firm domestic demand 

From the macroeconomic 
viewpoint, domestic demand 
has been - getting firm. Ac- 
cording to the preliminary 
report on national income 
statistics announced recently 
by the Economic Planning 
Agency, the nation's economy 
was expanding ala yearly rate 
of 6.9 per cent, real in the 
fourth quarter t October- 
December) of last year. In 
other words, the gross national 
product in the fourth quarter 
rose 1.7 per cent from the 
preceding quarter in real 
terms. 

Domestic demand rase 3.2 
per cent, real from the third 
quarter, or 13.5 per cent at an 
annual rale Among demand 
factors, public fixed capital 
formation and private plant 
and equipment investments in 
the fourth quarter increased 
remarkably, recording a gain 
of 6 A and 5.7 per cent, 
respectively, from the 
preceding quarter. Also, 
private housing investments 
and personal consumption 
expenditures remained firm, 
recording a 2.1 and 0.9 per cent 
rise, respectively. 

Private inventory invest- 
ments in the fourth quarter of 
last year rose 78.7 per cent 
from the preceding quarter, 
indicating that inventory ad- 
justments by private business 
have made a round. 

The surplus of the nation on 
current account, which is 
almost identical with exports 
minus imports, plunged 60.0 
per cent, nominal from the 
third quarter, or 24.6 per cent, 
real. 'Hus was largely because 
of the yen’s sharp appreciation 
against the U.S. dollar which 
pushed exports to fall and 
imports to rise dramatically. 
The big fall in the external 
demand thus braked the ex- 
pansion of GNP. - 

Reflecting the slowing ex- 
port; rising import tendency, 
the nation's surplus in the 
balance of payments has been 
steadily narrowing. The sea- 
sonally adjusted current ac- 
count surplus cm an Inter- 
national Monetary Fund basis 
came down to $220 million in 
February after recording $330 


million in January, an average 
of $730 million in the October- 
December quarter of last year 
and an average of $1,530* million 
in the July-September quarter. 

From the microeconomic 
viewpoint, - business is 
recovering steadily. According 
to corporate business statistics, 
operating profits of all in- 
dustries in the fourth quarter of 
last year increased 25.7 per 
cent from ' the year-earlier 
level. The rate of increase was 
the highest since the third 
quarter of 1976. Their sales also 
gained 9.0 per cent from a year 
before. 

The effective job offer to ap- 
plicant ratio, an indicator of 
employment, improved to 0.65' 
in January from 0.60 in the 
October-December quarter of 
last year and 0.57 in the July- 
September quarter. The im- 
provement in business thus is 
visible also in the labor raarkeL 
P rices 

Despite these favorable 
factors, not a few have mis- 
givings over the future course 
of business as the uncertain 
world oil situation triggered by 
Iranian political unrest has 
been casting dark shadow on 
the Japanese economy, which 
is particularly vulnerable to the 
oil supply. Moreover, foreign 
pressures on Japan have been 
mounting with the approach of 
the Tokyo Summit. 

Government officials, busi- 
nessmen and economists are 
uneasy about the movement of 
prices. The rising tempo of 
wholesale prices has been 
gradually accelerating. In Feb- 
ruary, the nation’s wholesale 
price index showed a 0.9 per 
cent gain from January, or a 
remarkable gain of 11.4 per 
cent annually. Although the 
February index showed a 0.9 
per cent decline from a year 
earlier, the year-to-year 
decrease rate shrank for the 
fourth consecutive month since 
November, last year. The 
movement of wholesale prices 
in the future is highly un- 
predictable under changing 
world oil situations. 

On the other hand, the 
movement of consumer prices 
has been calm. The consumer 
price index of Uie Tokyo’s 
metropolitan area in February- 
slipped 0.6 per cent from 
January -and represented a 2.5 
per cent' rise over a year 
before. However, consumer 
prices seem unlikely to remain 


quiet as they will be affected by 
the soaring of wholesale prices 
and the expected raises of 
utility charges. 


Industrial activity 


The mining-manufacturing 
production index in January 
rose 0.3 per cent from the' 
preceding month after seasonal 
adjustment. The rate of in- 
crease, however, was far. 
smaller than the 1.4 per cent In 
December, last year and the 1.3 
per cent in November. 

Although industrial activity' 
will remain firm in the coming 
months, the rising pace will 
slow down when compared to 
the performances in late last 
year. 

The m ining- manufa cturing 
shipment index in January rase 
1.9 per cent from December 
after seasonal adjustment 
Similarly, a sharp 1.6 per cent 
gain was recorded in the 
mining-manufacturing in- 
ventory index. 

The operating rate index 
(1975 average = 100 ) of the 
manufacturing industry, after 
hitting . 112.8 in November and 
115.2 in December, climbed to 
117.0 in January. 

All in all. industrial activity 
is firm. 

In sharp contrast to the 
favorable trend in domestic 
demand, external demand, 
namely exports, has been poor. 



NEW YORK CAP>— 
Tim foUcMns iw*i» o 
Mto etod national Saot- 
rlttas Dwaian Asm. 
me ms cnuMar Bank. 
Inawmi A industrial 
stacks. 

kCLIlM 7* BX 

AFAPror ii* nx 

AVMCto 4ft S 

Add now 11*121% 

AOvRttU 3 3ft 

. AdvMfcr 36 26* 

AMkAIok 27* 281% 

Alien Inc 23* 23* 

A»WiB 9ft TOft 

AFftiCn 25 26 

AFum 37-16311-16 
AGrast 12 12ft 


Selected Over-die-Coimter 

KfAPt- i ' Closing Prices, April 24. 1979 


CrawM 

CrosTr* 

CuMrFad 

CrcKnm 

DortyM - 

DlaOM 

-DaytMai 

DsMbAg 

DeLuxC 

DafConr 

Mints 

DewvEI 

DtoCrys 

OlxnCrv 

DaaiM 

DoilrGn 


AlrtNSp 

AMicnto 

A W tdri o 

Amtorr 

Ahadfto - 

AnhotHB 

AntaCo 

ArdsnGa 


lift- 14 
WATT* 
3* 3ft 
•ft fto 
24ft 25 
«* 9* 
4 4* 


ArteWGs 2B* 27 

AsdCota 22ft 23* 


Basic Rs 

BanIFr 

SovtaMfc 

Baalim 

BotzUto 

BBtoCa 

BlrdSon 

Blrtchr 


161% 149% 
8* 8* 
14ft 15 
13* 14ft 
7ft 7ft 
16 1C* 

root 10 * 

tft 91% 
30* 31ft 
13ft 14. 
22ft 24 
2* 2ft 
25* 26 
41% 4 ft 
33ft 35 


■OorCftGs 
DcrylDB 
OuntdnD. 
P ur Iro n 
EcmtLob 
EIPusEJ 
EWerB* ' 
- ElsNutU 
ElModul 
r EnrOav 
I EnfwMJ 
EatOU 
EttwnAI 
I Fowl 


FtEmpS 

FrWnFbi 

Fl fetasr 

FVjuIPu! 


BrwTom 21* 22* 


BudcBw 

Buckeva 


CnJWtSv 

CanrodH 

CapSwC 

CapiAAtr 

CaraCp 

CnVtPS 

CWnLsa 

CMun 

ClrctoF 


Source: Economic Pfenning Agency 


Private capital spending 


Plunge in exports 


The sharp appreciation of the 
yen in the latter half of last 
year is the biggest factor for 
the fall of yen-denominated 
exports in recent months. -The 
Finance Ministry's customs 
clearance statistics showed 
that yen-based exports in Feb- 
ruary were 13.7 per cent 
smaller than the year-earlier 
level. Eves in terms of the 
dollar, the February exports 
showed an increase of merely 
4.6 per cent. The year-to-year 
'increase rate was far smaller 
than the 7.3 per cent rise in 
January and the average 18.1 
per cent gain in the October- 
December quarter. 

However, exports concluded 
by trig traders, receipt of ex- 
port letters, of credit and other 
leading indicators of exports 
show that exports have hit the 
bottom. Under the cir- 
cumstances, it seems unlikely 
that exports will decline 
sharply in the coming months. 


Among private demand 
factors, plant and equipment 
investment by private 
businesses has been increasing 
at an unexpectedly fast pace. 
Although power companies bad 
been the leaders in private 
capital spending, non-ferrous 
metal companies, ceramics 
makers and some other 
businesses in the manu- 
facturing sector have been 
spending more money for 
expansion of their plants and 
facilities.. 

Mirroring these moves, or- 
ders for machinery, a leading 
indicator of private plant and 
.equipment investments, have 
been' on an upward curve. 
Orders for machinery, ex- 
cluding those for ships and 
those from the power industry, 
in January rose 3.8 per cent 
from the preceding month, 
after recording a 2.2 per- cent 
gain in December, last year. 

However, corporate 
managers seem still cautious 
about making fresh, inventory 


investments at this stage 

As to personal consumption 
expenditures, there is a gap in 
the expenditure - level between 
wage earner’s families; and 
other households (such as' 
families of self - employed 
persons operating cottage 
businesses. 

According to the Prime Min- 
ister's Office, living ex- 
penditures of salaried people’s 
households in December, last 
year rose 4.2 per cent nominal 
and 0.7 pa- cent, real from the - 
year-earlier leveL Such ex- 
penditures .by other households 
in the same month shot up 10 J. 
per cent nominal, and 6.4 per 
cent real from a year before. 

As consumer prices have 
been stable, real personal con- 
sumption expenditures 'can be 
said to be firm. However, once 
consumer prices begin soaring, 
there is a strong possibility that 
such expenditures wifi decline 
in real terms. Undo- the cir- 
cumstances, it is bard to pre- 
dict the future course of per- 
sonal consumption expendi- 
tures. 


CttxUtB 

OorkJL 

QowCp 

CotuVmt 

GomCIH 

CoKStir 

CimrTof 

GoanGn 

Con Pap 


6 6ft 
16* 16* 
5ft Sto 
31ft 33 
2 * 2 * 
12* Uft 
3ft Sto 
7* .8* 
15* Uft 
24* 25* 
9* 10M 
4* 5* 
37ft 38* 
33ft 34* 
38 31ft 
•to Sto 
11% 2ft 
25ft 2Sto 
24 26 

38 41 

37* 37* 
41* 43* 


FamtO 

FamdoU 

Frank Cp 

FronkEI 

GrtRIEst 

Ga Rains 

GavEFti 

GroatlM 

GrovAdv 

Gtfintst 

Gvradyn 

Hanhak- 

HrpRow 

HorpGp 

HarHMI 

HanrflF 

HotaOm 

Hoavw 

Harlzns 

Hyatt] nt 

indNud 

lafralod 

inteJCp 

intrcEnr 

IntmtGs 

InSkW* 


: 15* It* 
IF* 19* 
1 . 1 * 
15 Uft 
21*22* 
13* mi 
23ft 2Sft 
26* 27ft 
33*34- • 
.« 13 
23ft 24ft 
1* 2* 
2SU 26* 
27 28ft 
• 8to 
9ft 18 
21ft 22ft 
15* IS* 
20ft 21* 
14ft IS 
17 IB 
21*23* 
18ft 10* 
8* 9ft 
«V% 6ft 
4* 7* 
II* 19ft 
3 3* 

22 23 
3SYS 36ft 
* 1 
32* 33* 
37 37* 

28ft 21* 
10*11* 
5ft 5* 
13*13* 
12*13* 
1*11-16 
-12* ,18ft 
.2ft 3* 
•8ft 9 
12* 13* 
8*10 
170 174 
11* 12ft 
11* 12* 
35ft 31ft 
15ft 17 
4* 5 

13 13* 
13* IT* 
2J* 24ft 
11* 17* 
20* 21 

2* Z* 
12* 12* 
I * 1ft 
Uft 16ft 
4* Sto 
3* 3* 
42 43ft 
7ft M% 

14 14ft 
9* ** 


i. IwaloUt 
l JamWPy 
< Jamsbv . 
JHtvFd 
1 JoslynM 
I KMsStpf 
Kohrarv 
i teaman 
I KmpAm 
KatcGra 
I Kavcam 
KMhrSv 
KMittM 
Klntbaa 
Ktoalat 
KnopaV 
KratM 
Loncifto 
; LandRas 
LamCo 
i LMSter 
LhiBCSt 
Lojwtrn 
MadsGe 


34* 24% 
7* 8 
17ft W*‘ 
V% , * 
17* IS. 

n is*-. 

2ft 2* 
18* l«ft 
10* 11* 
U « 
3 3% 

SBft 30 
IS 14 
17* 17* 
U 14 
IS* 1596 
Uft. 15ft 
'19*30' 
3* Jto 
22* 23* 

■ 7*. Bft 
40 as* 
11* 12* 
ISM 16* 


MoyatlPat JS-M 3ft 
AUIrRtv 1 5-161 9-16 
nankrt 28*29* 


MatAsH 

MauILP 

McCann 

McQunv 

MktoKW 

MdWCpp 



MaaraPdl 

MotoRm. 

MostokH 

Matdun 

Motaub 


24ft 24* 
27ft 29 
Uft 15 
10ft 11* 
20ft 21ft 
4ft 7 
. ' .4% 4% 
38 29 
27* 21 
14* 15* 
8'. 8% 
U* 17* 
3* 3 
23* 24* 
,15ft 16ft 
5* 5* 
ZM 23* 
.33* 24* 
.14* 15*. 
14* 15* 
14* 15* 
34* 25* 
21*25* 
11*11* 
74ft 76. 
TO* 11* 
.16* 17* 
20* 30* . 
21* 23ft 
5 9 

28* 31% 
8 8ft 
U 13ft 
33* 34. 
.8* 9ft ; 

. Bto V* 
1516 IS* - 
59 53 


[Pattfban - 
PtarcaSS- 
Ptnkrtn 
PlanHIB 
PktsHnt' 
POUll: 
Progrp 
: PbSvNC 
PortBan 
PutDCop 
Qualums 
RoocnPr 
Ravcfm 
-Ravrond 
I RacsEa 
Road Ex • 
! RoOOMy 
Raulan 
Roose . 
RunStov 
SodUer 
SeonOt 
SctIppH 
StteOwt 
Sucmstr 
Strawntt 
SaUdSIS 
SCalWTr 
SwGiCp 
S wEISv 
stonavn 
SMRags 
smnHP 
sun st 
stro««o . 

Super El 
TIME DC 
Tarwax 

TaaimP 

Torment 

Tiffany 

Tlarory. 

ToaeoCP 

TrnsOcO 

Trite Pd 

TrltnOC 

Ty*qnF«l . 

UnMcGO 

USSara- 

USTrck 

m/oBsfi - 

UpPoup 

VefvGas 

VttnOus 

VanaSn 

Valero. 

VoMBsh 

WSiiEnr 

WetiORs 

itoWtrn 

wtotoMo - 

welbGa . 

wmMto 

WmurC. 

■WoodWot 

WWEna 

WMshlW. 

ZlanUto 


20* 77* 
18ft 11* 
» 31 
21% 221% 
1ft 3ft 
Sft 6 
1ft tft 
18* lift' 
IF* 20ft 
9 9* 

6* 6% 
7* 8% 
81 K 
25ft 26Vi 
8* 9ft 
27Vi 28*- 
38 48 . 

3* 4* 
11* 11* 
IS* 14* 
3* 4ft . 
2% 2% 
58 53 

12* 13* 
28ft 27ft 
33* 34* 
10% IF* 
Uft IS* 
11* 11% 
15 IS* 
„2lft 29* 
34* 25* 
24* 25* 
5* t* 

27 28Vi 

7%-S . 
7ft 8* 
aw 29% 
64 66 

28 a . 

48 42 

9ft 10 
14* 15 
n*20ft, 
58ft 53ft 
5% 4ft 
14ft 15ft 
. 10 II 
19* 30* 
15* 16% . 

24ft 25 
17* 18 
IB 18ft 
19*. 20 ft 
5 S96 

10* 10% 
14* 151% 
14% 15% 
14 M%. 

2 ffli- 
8ft +ft 
Z* 4ft 
4% 4% 
5216 33 
37* 28ft 
. 7% 7* 
5* 61% 
19* 30* 


UIIUIUKU W » f 

• J . L-srsi »';■ 

Paris Commodities rn - 

I Ftaurwm French franc* per itafrkhin) ’ ’j £0J 

'■ April U. 1979 . . • 'V (»'•): 

Htan Low CUa Cfe ' i-an <!(•• 

h 

ICAR' 

r H.T. N.T. . 880 1»: ' 

« . ' 908 9oo mo m r-4i<r ue i- 

t 948 . «S • ,.945.980 -+8 .^.; 

(V , ' - N-T. M.T. 940 ' 950 -B i 

* I 1 98S f 9* .-'-pf I3'«l • 1 



Htoh 

Low 

SUGAR 



Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. . 

Aug 

' 908 

908 

Oct 

948 

- 945 

Nov .. 

* N-T. 

N-T. 

Dec 

1 

1 

Mar* 

1J35 

103* 

Mav 

*N.7. 

N.T. 

Jlv 

1 ■ 

1 

260 lo». 



cocoa ; 



MOV 

1.420 

Mi 

Jut 

N.T. 

N.T. 

SOP 

M45 

MX 

oec • 

L470 

M7D 

Mar . 

N.T. ' 

N.T. 

Mav 

1 

'I 


i lice 

1^08 ' Mia Aft 43 

N.T. M10 Uadi.- 1 ■ 

1A30 148 TWO +1 -I*' >•' 


•H- ! •»- •< 

. -«wni!i(.,- 


-.V ■ ■ ! 

London Metals Mirki 


v 

tFtowaskistarllnsnarmatrHjaal-' 

(Silver In pence par troy oanoi) - • 

Aorfl.M, 1979 >.£' 

Today -lUiiBy^T. 
Bid Adnd 8u ,i 

Caaoer wire Bars: : '. Vm L. , • 

Siwit iMun i/nuo 

3mamtn ‘\JK7joo 1JB7J0 • 99U8- j. 

Catfiadu: spot TJQS00 UKUJB 990JT 

TraopttB UXQjfl IXUXflO 987JP .HURfl 

Tin: SPOT ' . 7JBBJ8 7JWJ8 7J10Jr743Mff7 n '' • 

. 3 months 7.1 1) JO 7.12000 7. WOO 73*1*5; bu!/ 

Lead: spot . 539 JM 54000 9293] 

-amanita SU 0 B 515JR.588J1.MaK.. 

XbiC: spot 377 JO 379 JO 2T1SL 3B§' f f 'lj 

J mop ms 3KM 3HU8 3K» SMNa to. . 

Silver: spot . 3050 363J5 358*. '3*%, 

3 months 37158 371 JO 34SJ»:-»sfi- Lj: 


TTbjspot 

■ 3 months 
Lead: spot 

■ 3 months 
Zinc: spot 

Jmanffis 
SWvar; spot 
3 months 


Nickel: 3 months 2J8SJM 2J9DJ0 2J35J03 


London Commodified 


The ingot watch by C GRIM 

an authentic Swiss ingot, 999.9"/<to pure gold 


The international bank 
with your interests 
at heart. 



I Figure* tat sterling nor metric toB ; 

April 24. 1779 r.; 

'High Lew Qooe Pfta 

(Bki~Asketi> . mi 

SUGAR 

MW 97«0 9540 . 9620 . »2S 97J|L 

4*1 10240 HUMS M1JB W1JB HUB 

Oct 10625 104A0 M4.95 10100 184.153 

Dec llftii 10BJ0 HXJS 108 58 110381 

Mar. U440 11300 11350 11140 1147»fl 

Mm 11560 11550 115J5 11590 TM.Wji 

Aug N.T. N.T. 1T9JS 119A0 138.101 

VB8 lot* of 50 tans. 

COCOA 

Mav IMS IASS L644 L649 MMi 

JUI 1420 1590 1504 UB 

Sep U38 1416 L62J UB5 UD 

Dec 1595 1476 .UM 1482 140 

Mar IJ20 1JW WB8 1J89 Uft ! 

May 1J43 IJ43- IJ23 1J37 1J32 i 

Jlv N.T. N.T. tJ45. IMS 1459 

2513 lots ot man*. 

COFFEE 

MW 1572 LS6S 1567 1569 . LOT 
,J{6 .1554 1536 US1 L352 L5» 

Sen IJH 1538 L54»“.tOT 1429 

Nov 15S2 1540 1547 1J49 1538 

JOT 1552 1543 1544. T545 1517 ' 

Mac 1542 1534 1537 1J» LOT 

Mm .1538 1535 1536 1515 lOT 

35V0 latestS lots. . . 


International 
Stock Indexes 


+o»r prow . Htoh 
Aralerdoralf? 9200 9JJ0 M2B 
Brussehiai, . JLA. . 13248 ' TBJ2 
Frankfurt (2] 15072 14955 15941 

London 30 ' 54758 53650 5*9JB 

London 500(4) 299^0 .2M46 299J0 
Ml kW (3) . ■ 73,73 . 7347 KU2 




Parta C6) . 
Srdner{7l 
Tokva I8J • 
Tokyo Wl 
Zurich (Ml 


nisi - 

7373 . 7357 8252 S^M: 

12556: 1200 tZTJS *»; ;j ’-ll . 


56*39 STOH- S97M 
44844 44AJ4 4037. 

6439.17 6.12057 651778 
wat - 335J0 34050 


1. AnwCjn tngj X -conunHaten - * jN nj *~*:i • 


Bnwnwr-lnd,: 3. HordviteiWt tod. ;- F 
ad T)mm imtorxat; 1 Bopco Comortobto 
nralruL! AAgMltod.: T.-AdortMorter 
t First wetton stock md.j aNflUMH 
tad.; 10. Swin Bonk Corg. fed. 


Bnmete «tr London, D«ss*rtdeY» R*n nan le lira Office* •»; Franlitun, Pans Subridierin* at: AMsTOrdaPt. Zurieh . London 
Affilcetad and AsocUrad Conv«*k»|t: London, lunomburg 

Hoad Office: 6-2. Mara noocfn l-ehome..Chivoda-ku.Tokyo 100 Tel. 103) 216-1111 Brandw and Affindwac Nw 
Voric. Las Angeles. Taipei. Seoul. Singapore nopraawitatiw Ottkm at: Chicago. Houston, T oramo. S ao F^uto. _ 

Cnv. Caracas. 8eir j t. Jakarta. Sydney Subddiarto* av Chicago. Hong Kong fttfilbted and Ajasoatad CampaiM at: « io 
dr? Janeiro. Hong Kong. Singapore. Kuala Lumpur. Bangkok. Jakarta. Manila. Melbourne. Sydney. 


c 


£ 

CORUM 




We hw« your interests at heart. 

DAMCHI KANOYO BANK 


Artisans d ' Horlogene Fine 


The sot DKB noethiy report will appear May 25. 


A ID u. fur a !j<!' Issued and numbered b' the- l.nion 

Hank nf Swil/t-il;n:tl. Noiid IS vl. <jolr! ease. \t the finest jctocHcrv 
K<,r a brochure, v,ri!e io < » )Rl AJ. 2/Sll l a I haux-de-fomk 

v«il/iTi’jii(l. Purmfed mudt'l 


Stocks, Usage 
For U.S* Grains 


NEW .YORK. April 24 
— U^. soybean stocks as of A 
were up 3 percent from a year 
er at. 871 5. million bushels; 
com stocks were 14-perceni 
at 4.4 billron bushels, the A 
ture Department rimoned- Jaor 
terday. ; ' 

However, the department aJ»j 
diriiled that demandTor las? ‘ 
record crops was running at 
pace during the first quarter. 
9-perceht tncrease in com 
and a - 7-percem rise in 
consumption. 


m 










INTERMnom 


Business 



^Tribune 


Finance 


Poblikbed nidi The New York Times and The Vtoshingtoa Past 


PARIS, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 1979 


Page 9 


It. : . 

j Oil Trade 

" Jw ti; I: ‘ " 


:,r, es 

■'•'Ilf 



The Price of Vflgette’s 
Premium Crude 08 

Dotes a barm for BraatHWenidb 


.iuji, 

■ r CLf . 




63a 


In Nigeria 

After Huge Loss 
During ’78 Slump 

By Carey Winfrey 

T AGOS, Nigeria (NYT) — 
L The ofl business is boom- 
ing here once again, so much so 

that the government’s HBwdp n 
to add scrriiarees of nearly $4 
over the OPEC cartel price has 
met with widespread approval 
from Nigerians acre. However, 
burned by the results of an ear- 
lier pricing mistake, .the conn- 
r try's government is prepared to 
. ease up 1 quickly u demand 
3 Bi| should soften. • 

. v - Nigerian low-sulfur crude 
. now sells for about $18.50 a 
barrel, or 27-percent above the 
benchmark price set by the Or- 
: gamzation of Petroleum Expogrt- 
y mg Countries last month, 
r r'- But due to the painful mem- 
ory of the great oO slump of 
1978, the eovermrient reacled . 
slowly to me Iran cutoff and 
C • skyrocketing dQ prices. Last 
• l year, overpricing, rigidity 
i. ; toward discounting and low de- 
‘ mand nearly knotted Nigeria’s 
'• ■ crude out of the world marVi«L 
This year Nigeria has mowed 
7 - < more, cautiously, not adding the 
':/■ surcharges until after the two 
other African producers of 
sweet crude. Algeria and Lybia. 
acted. 

Reveuttes Last 

Part of the problem last year 
was that Nigeria thought it had 
an agreement with Algeria and 
Libya to raise prices in concert. 
But as demand dropped, the 
other two producers switched 
signals, began discounting their 
du by 50 cents a barrel, and left 
Nigeria han g in g . Over the next 
year, Nigenan petroleum pro- 
duction dropped 163 percent as 
nearly a third of the nation’s 



fc-i 


iin 


•i.inindb 

• mi 


lt«*c 

A I- 

s 


*■« 

•1 Ih 


customers went -shopping else- 
where. 

“By. the lime they realized 
what was happening,'’ says a 
VJ5. economist here, “thev’d 
lost S13 billion in revenues.^ In 
a country where petroleum ac- 
counts for 90 percent of the for- 
eign-exchange earnings and 80 
percent of the federal, budget. 

. that was a near disaster and [[ 
forced Nigeria into heavy bor- 
rowing. 

Today, with world demand 
high, the nation’s production is 
approaching a record 23 mil- 
lion barrels a day, its effective 
maximum production limit. 
And with imports of many con- 
sumer items now banned, Ni- 
geria is projecting a balance-of- 
payments surplus this year — 
the first in several years. 

The government’s National 
Nigerian Petroleum Corp. owns 
SS percent of most of the 1 dozen 
Nigeria subsidiaries of foreign 
oil companies ' currently in- 
volved in exploration and pro- 
duction. These include Gulf, 
Mobil Oh, Texaco and Shell BP, . 
a British and Dutch company 
that has been operating here for 
41 years and by far the largest 
oil producer in the country. 

Contracts Changed 

Under the partnership agree- 
ments, the foreign company acts 
as the operator, with each part- 
no 1 putting up a proportionate 
share of costs and receiving a* 
proportionate share of recov- 
ered oil. Nigeria needs little q 0 
for domestic use and sells most 
of its share back to the operat- 


ing companies at prevailing 
market prices. 

As Nigeria opens up new 
high-ridt offshore and Chad 
basin drilling leases, however, 
the state-owned oil concern in- 
tends to follow the Mideast's 
lead in writing service contracts. 
The foreign company will un- 
derwrite the entire cost of explo- 
ration and assumes the entire 
risk. If the company strikes oil. 
the government corporation will 
reimburse all costs plus interest 
and a profit percentage on the 
o3 that is produced. 

F.RA. Marinho, manag in g 
director of National Nigerian 
Petroleum, said the profit distri- 
bution would be “equitable 1 * 
but declined to-be specific. 

He added. However, “our pol- 
icy is well defined. Anything 
Inal has to do with export, even 
refilling, we are still expecting 
to invite foreign capital and for- 
eign interests. We intend not 
only to continue with this policy 
but to make it even more attrac- 
tive in the future.” 

Nonetheless, “this country is 
not being seen as a firm invest- 
ment diinare because of the po- 
litical situation," a Western dip- 
lomat said. A civilian govern- 
ment is scheduled to takeover 
control of the country Oct. 1 af- 
ter 13 years of army rule. 

But most cal men feel that no 
matter what kind of goyeme- 
merit comes into power, it will 
need oQ revenues. ^We’re politi- 
cally neutral,'* in the words of 
one expatriate. “Whichever way 
the Cookie crumbles, .we plan to 
stay and do business.” 


France Tightens Bank-Lending Rules 


>trl 


.4 By Jack Aboaf . 

“i PARIS. April 24 (AP-DJ) — 
• France has formulated new re^uto- 
ons governing banking operations 
signed to -Strengthen their fin a tv 
, .. al base. Economics Minister Rene 
lonory said today. 

.M mm The main objective of the new 
' gulations, to be applied' to all reg- 

’’ tered private and state^nm mstv 
7 ^ tions. is to bring the resources- 
nding ratio to 5 percent. 

' l The government also eased cur- 
. ; * *ni restrictions on consumer cred- 
wi in an attempt to stimulate conv 
*ttion among lending institutions 
7 * ; ih the aim .of reducing interest 
m v g tes charged on insta lm e n t buying, 
; ^ Because of the . low resources 
, -i : se of some the larger establish- 
•*. * mts, including the three national- 
' ' <3 banks which dominate the 
adit market, the government will 
’ a three-year transition period 


ending June 30, 1982, during which 
time all institutions will have to 
comply with the new rules. 

Bank* with a ratio of 5 percent 
or more tot Jan. 1 vnU nave to 
maintain this leveHn hue with the' 
growth of credits. Those with ratios 
of more than 3 but less than 5 per- 
cent will have to make up the dif- 
ference between their cur re n t ratios 
and 5 percent. Those with ratios 
under 3 percent will have to in- 
crease them by i percent by June 
30. 1982. 

To achieve the new ratios, banks 
are authorized to float debentures 
to contribete up topO percent of 
the required increase of their 
resources. 

'Hie regulations also Include a ra- 
tio for spreading risks designed to 
ensure that banks' do not grant 
large credits to a single borrower in 
proportion to its own resources. 
Mr. Monory said that credits grant- 


r apan Prices Seen Up 1%; 
Capital Outlays Will Rise 

• r j jrOKYO, April l_24_ (Reuters) — 


economic upturn in Japan is 

-lining momentum but the accom- 
nying rise in prices is alarming, 
ink of Japan governor Teiichixo 
' Iwinaga waned today. 

; ; He told a conference of the cen- 
i ‘J bank’s branch managers that 


percent to be issued at 99 to percent 
to yield 7379 percent to sub- 
scribers on maturity, it said. 

The Finance Ministry also re- 
ed net foreign sales of Japanese 

in Marco totalled 5220 mil- 

lion compared with net purchases 
of $5 million in February. Net for- 


ported 

bonds 



arch after rising 0.9 percen 
til February ana March. Howev- 
he said he expects the 0.75-per- 
nt increase in the discount rate 
- V aril 17 wfll be useful in control- 
« tg inflati on because the' step was 
•- ken at an eariy stage. 

Meanwhile, the Ministry of In- 
maiional Trade Industry said a 
rvey showed Japanese manufac- 
j^ring industries plan an average 
crease of 10.1 percent in capital 
. Muttlays in the fiscal year started 
pril 1. This will be the first rise by 

- panese manufacturing industries 

five years^and compares with a 
, dine of 0.9 percent in the previ- 

• > fiscal year, it said. 

National Bonds Planned 

• - ‘ Banking and securities sources 
-■ an while said the Finance Minis- 

•t and a syndicate of underwriters 

. ve formally agreed to issue 1 tril- 
o yen (about $4.6 trillion) of 10- 
, '.ar government braids in ApriL 
Vie bonds will carry a coupon of 
. 2 percent, up 0.7 point from the 
arch issue, and will be sold at a 
scount of 99to raising the yidd by 
■704 point to 7.286 percent^ ■ - 

S However, Finance Ministry 
« ' ‘wees said the agency plans to 
.'djjrk out an overall national-bond 
i U 1 magement policy by mid-May to 
. tiliate the digestion of large ma- 

• oal bond issues by the coital 
irket. The ministry believes ex- 

■ '^tsive rhang ps in national-bond 
. magement will be ’ necessary in 
' .sw of the continued decline in 
•• ' . xmdary-market prices,, despite 
t increased coupon, they said. 
..The coupon rate on corporate 
. nds will also be raised by 0.7. 

- ini 'from next month, the Un- 
rwriters Association said. The 

• ‘ .w coupon rate for 12 -year, dou- 

' s-A corporate bonds will be 7% 


There were net foreign sales of 
Japanese bonds in the fiscal year 
ended March 31, the first time in 
five years, of $193 million, com- 
pared with net purchases of $5.03 
billion in the previous fiscal year, 
the ministry said. The net sales 
were partly due to a ban from 
March 1978 to February 1979 on 
□on-resident purchases of medium- 
arid long-term yen bonds. 

Net foreign sales of Japanese 
stocks in the fiscal year narrowed 
to $923 million from SI. 12 bilhou 
the previous year. 

Company 

Reports 

Rmnn, Prat»* ta ftUHIm of teller* 

American Broadcasting 


France Has 
Surplus oh 
March Trade 

Italy Posts Surplus 

For January-Februaiy 

. PARIS. April 24 (AP-DJ) — 
France had a trade s urplu s of 1-29 
billion francs (about $295 million) 
in'. March, seasonally adjusted, 
compared with a deficit of 9 mil- 
lira) francs the previous month and 
a surplus of 1.48 million francs a 
year, earlier, the Foreign Trade 
Ministry said today. 

Exports rose 2 percent in March 
from February to 333 bilHon 
francs and were up from 31.1 bil- 
lion francs in March. 1978. Imports 
declined 1.7 percent in the month 
to 323 billion francs but were up 
from 29357 billion francs a year 
5°- 

For the first quarter, the season- 
adjusted trade surplus widened 





to 1349 bilHon francs from 14 mil- 
lion francs a year earlier. 

Trade Minister Jean- Francois 
Dcnian noted that exports of food 
and farm products had exceeded 
imports by 293 million francs. ~ 

The country’s energy deficit fell 
by 1 billion francs from the “excep- 
tionally high” level of February to 
5.4 billion francs in March, be said. 
He noted that February’s import 
volume was 20 -percent above nor- 
mal levels, reflecting precautionary 
buying ahead of recently ■ decided 
price nikes. He also pointed out 
that the oil-price increases will add 
SOO-to-600 million francs* to 
France’s monthly energy bill. 

He said consumer goods imports 
surged in March, leaving a deficit 
of 615 million francs. 


HtQmr 

i m 

TT71 

Revenue. 

451.60 

415.10 

Frofus... 

25.46 

2138* 

Per share 

0.91 

0.78 

Ki Otter 

Asarco 

m» 

'. rm 

Revalue. 

40239 

242.82 

Profits... 

3734 1U3 toss 

Pei Share. 

132 


WOtNtr 

BetUeem Steel 
im 

TOT 

Revenue.. 

1,740. 

1,380. 

Profits... 

59.20 . 

1.10 

Per Stare. 

136 

0.02 


Borg-Wsmer 

1 OT 

Revenue. 

..... 63130 

525.70 

Profits... 

3530 

2630 

Per Share 

135 

132 

lit Own* 

GrT Financial 
TW 

w n 

Profits.... 

27:03 

.1637 

Per Share. 

'130 

0.78 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 1) 


ed to a single borrower cannot 
exced 75 percent of an institution’s 
own resources. 

' The new regulations are in line 
with a gavermqeni decision, . an- 
nounced last' October, to progres- 
sively set up solvency ratios (the re- 
lationship between the resources of 
a bank and credits outstanding), 
and the spreading of risks (the ratio 
between overall credits and those 
granted to a single borrower). 

■Observers say that the new ratio 
, requirements wifi force some banks 
to increase their paid-up capital by 
calling on shareholders and to im- 
prove their profit margins. The new 
measures are also seen as an addi- 
tional tool for the monetary author- 
ities aimed at controlling banking 
operations in the event the govern- 
ment decides to abolish current 
credit curbs. But the government 
maintains that credit curbs are nec- 
essary to contain the growth of 
money supply. 

Consumer Credit 

Foreign banks will not be affect- 
ed by the new regulations so long 
as. rules prevailing in the country of 
origin are as strict as the new 
French requirements. 

The government also announced 
the dismantling of consumer credit 
regulations which were governed by 
a fixed basic interest rate of 173 
percent on instalment buying, a 
minimum 20 -percent down pay- 
ment and maturities of 21 to 24 
months. 

-Mr. Monory said that institu- 
tions specialized in consumer credit 
will now be able to fix conditions 
on a case-by-case basis and thus 
compete within the limits author- 
ized by current credit terms. The 
new . liberalization does not affect 
mortgages. 

Overall credits to consumers last 
year amounted to 34.8 billion 
francs (about $7.9 billion), of which 
18.7 billion francs were for instal- 
ment buying and 16.1 billion for 
personal loans. 

Van Lennep Reappointed 

PARIS, April 24 (AP-DJ) —The 
Council of the Organization far 
Economic Cooperation and Devel- 
opment reappointed Emil van Len- 
nep as secretary-general for 2'a 
years ending March 1982, the 24- 
naiion organization said today. The 
council initially reappointed- Mr. 
Van Leimep for a third five-year 
term, but accepted his reque& that 
he stay on tbejob for 214 years. 


then be offset against 

rale-tax rates. 


corpo- 


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For more details of how you can benefit, write: 

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17/8 


Borg-Wamer, Firestone End Talks 

Borg- Warner and Firestone Tire & Rubber have 
called off their proposed merger after failing 
reach agreement on rautuafiyaccep table terms, 
gotiations broke down after Firestone directors pro- 
posed changes in terms that would have substantial- 
ly increased the value of securities to be handed over 
to Firestone shareholders on completion of the 
$1 J5-biffioo merger, which would have been one of 
the largest in U3. business history. “While there has 
been some flexibility in Borg-Wamer’s position re- 
garding financial terms because of ehnngprf market 
conditions.” says chairman James Bere, “the Fire- 
stone proposal simply asks more than we fed is pru- 
dent for our shareholders to pay.** But chairman 
Richard Riley says Firestone’s board “felt that 
changes in conditions since the time the proposal 
was first made (last November), justified a signifi- 
cant increase in the proposed conversion rate for the 
(Firestone) convertible preferred stock.” 

Hitachi to Build Plant in U.S. 

Hitachi, Japan’s leading electric appliance and 
electronic equipment producer, has established a 
company in California to make color televisions. 
The parent company has not exported any color TVs 
to the United States since mid- 1978. leaving its sub- 
sidiaries in Taiwan and Singapore to handle that 
business. However, exports from Taiwan have been 
cut 40 percent under an orderly mark 1 
ment with the United States. Shinichi 


deputy general manager of Hitachi’s consumer prod- 
ucts group, says the wholly owned company, capital- 
ized at S4 million and initially employing about 120 
workers, will begin operating in August turning out 
about 3,000 to 4.000 19-incb color TVs a month. By 
January, 1980. production expected to rise to 
8.000 units. The plant will later branch out into 
other home appliances such as stereo sets and mi- 
crowave mens. Hitachi originally wanted to estab- 
lish a joint venture with Genera! Electric, but that 
was blocked by the U.S. Justice Department for a 
possible violation of amimut laws. The two firms 
are still discussing possible technological coopera- 
tion. Mr. Kobayashi estimates 40 percent of materi- 
als used for produtioo at the new- plant will be pur- 
chased locally, with the rest shipped from Taiwan. 
Singapore and Japan. 

Generali Plans -I-for-15 Bonus Issue 

Assicurazioni Generali, the most widely held com- 
pany in Italy, plans a bonus distribution of shares to 
raise its capita] to 100 billion lire (about SI IS mil- 
lion) from 79 billion lire at present. This would be 
effected bv giving shareholders four additional 
shares for every 15 currently held. The insurance 
company will finance most of the long-expected op- 
eration but of reserves, the board announced. The 
capital increase must be approved by shareholders at 
the annual meeting June 30. Generali parent compa- 
ny premiums exceeded 1 trillion lire lost year to reg- 
ister a gain of at least 21 percent from 827 billion 
lire in 1977. chairman Cesare Meiragora says. 


ITT Begins Low-Rate f City-CalV Service 


Italy Reports Surplus- ' 

ROME, April 24 (Reuters) — Ita- 
ly had a provisional trade surplus 
in February of 342 billion tire 
(about $404 million) compared 
with deficits of 321 billion tire in 
January and 80 bUlicfn lire a year 
ago, the statistics institute said 
today. 

Imports rose 193 percent in the 
month to 4.41 trillion lire while ex- 
ports jumped 41 percent to 4,76 
trillion. For the first two months of 
1979. this gave a trade suiplus of 21 
billion lire, compared with a deficit 
of 203 billion a year ago. 

Oil imports totalled 1.16 trillion 
lire in the two-month period, white 
trade In other products gave a sur- 
plus of 1.18 trillion lire, the insti- 
tutesaid. 

Bulgaria Seeks 
7-Year Euroloan 
Of $100 Million 

LONDON, April 24 (Reuters) — 
The Bulgarian Foreign Trade Bank 
is arranging a Eurocredit of up to 
$100 million at a spread Of % per- 
cent over London interbank of- 
fered rates over seven yeais, bank- 
ing sources said today. 

The loan, which carries a grace 
period of 3V6 years, is being put to- 
gether on a club-deal basis — in- 
volving a small group of banks and 
not for general syndication. Coor- 
dinating and agent bank is Toron- 
to- Domini on Bank, the sources 
said. Banks are being asked to take 
$10 million each and the commit- 
ment fee is 14 percent, the sources 
added. . 

Petroleos de Portugal (Petrogal), 
the state-owned oil concern, is ar- 
ranging a S 60 - million, eight-year 
Eurocredit with a spread of 1 to per- 
cent above Libor, sources said. The 
loan, which carries a grace period 
of 4to years, has been increased in 
size by $10 million due to success 
in .syndication, the sources said. 
The loan, currently in syndication? 
has a six-month drawdown period 
and fees of to percent are being of- 
fered cm participations of SI mil- 
lion, the sources added 

Lloyds Bank International has 
been awarded the mandate to put 
together a joint-lead management 
group for a $230-mfilian commer- 
cial credit tO Dubai Alu minium 
,Co., market sources said No de- 
tails on the terms of the credit, over 
eight years, are available yet, they 
said 

Midland Bank is syndicating a 
SlOO-miUion, 1-year credit forKo 
rea Electric at margin of only to 
percent over Libor. The low margin 
is only optica] as the loan is aimed 
at U.K. banks which can' take ad- 
vantage of the tax benefits which 
raise considerably the net return to 
participating banks. Interest pay- 
ments are to be mad4 net of with- 
holding tax. The tax^aid could 


By N.R. Kidnfidd 

NEW YORK. April 24 (NYT) — 
International Telephone & Tele- 
graph formally introduced its do- 
mestic long-distance telephone ser- 
vice yesterday. "ITT also revealed 
rates that it said were significantly 
below those of American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph but comparable 
to those of two other competitors. 

Known as City-CalL the service 
will save customers spending at 
least 573 a month on phone calls 
between 15 and 86 percent of Bell 


petitor to enter the arena because 
of its vast resources. 

Initially available in 11 cities. 
City-Call is slated for 34 by the end 
of the year, ITT expects revenues 
from the service to amount to $2 
million this year and SI? million 
next year ana anticipates that City- 
Call should reach the break-even 
point after 18 months. 

The first 'ITT customer was pro- 
vided service two weeks ago and 10 
customers have been signed up. 
Most of them pay phone bills of 
about 5500 a month. ITT said it 


was primarily gearing us marketing 
to companies spending at least 
$200 a month it here is a minimum 
.charge of S50 a month). 

City-Call works much the same 
as Ex ecu net and SPRINT. A sub- 
scriber is given an access code, 
which he punches into a standard 
push-button phone. He then 
punches his number and an author- 
ization code and his call is connect- 
ed. Customers would still have 10 
use the Bell System for local calls 
or calls to cities not in the ITT net- 
work. 


Execunet service and the SPRINT 
service of Southern Pacific Com- 
munications. For example, a min- 
ute-and-a-hair weekday call from 
New York' to Chicago using City- 
Call would cost 50 cents. ITT said, 
compared with a Bell charge of 84 
cents. 

All of these offerings are aimed 
at the rapidly growing multibillion- 
dollar market for business custom- 
ers. ITT is regarded by industry ob- 
servers as the toughest AT&T com- 


Ford Drops New European Plant 

DETROIT. April 24 (Reuters) — Ford Motor said today it had in- 
formed France and Austria that it had decided not to build a new assem- 
bly plant in either of those countries. 

Instead, Ford said it would expand some existing plants in Europe, but 
it has not dedided which ones. 

Industry sources in Vienna said the derision would also rule out con- 
struction of a new plant in Spain or Portugal, two other locations under 
consideration. 

Ford said its engine requirements in Europe will be met by a new plant 
at Bridgend, Wales, which will start production in mid-1980. It will pro- 
duce about 500.000 engines a year, it said. 

Ford noted that demand is growing in Europe for its products and said 
a firm decision on which plants it would expand would be made soon. 


Prices Are 
Higher on 
Big Board 

Big Oils Active* Firm 
On Strong Earnings 

NEW YORK, April Zi .IHTi — 

New York Stock Exchange prices 
wen: higher in late aftemCvR trad- 
ing as oil companies continued to 
report sharp rises in first-quar:?.' 
net earnings. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age, which gained 3.12 points ve>- 
terduy. wjs up 9.96 to S7,i i!5 at .» 
p.m. Advances led declines tv* 
473. 

Major oil shares were active and 
higher as Texaco. Gulf and She!! all 
reported uxlav that profits were up 
sharply for the first quarter 

Texaco, the nation’s third largo: 
oil company, said its earnings were 
up SI percent kirgclv because of 
higher petroleum prices. The com- 
pany also raised us quarterly divi- 
dend to 54 cents from 50 cents 

The announcements followed by 
one day a report by Exxon, the 
nation’s largest oil company, that 

f irofii.x were $955 million 1 r. the 
irst quarter — a rise of 37 percent 
over last year. 

Gulf Oil chairman Jerry McAfee 
said that in light of the unproved 
first-quarter performance, he would 
recommend to Gulfs hoard a SilXl 
million increase in Gulfs l‘.S. capi- 
tal and exploration budget N 7 o 
He said that Gulf wi!! be "spending 
about S2.25 billion worldwide or. 
exploration projects (hi.-, ve.tr of 
which $1.5 billion will he spent in 
the United Slates. 

Mr. McAfee also ioid the annual 
meeting he will recommend a 
mod cm increase in iite dividend 
from the current 47.5 cents quarter- 
ly- 

Banka meriea also raised its quar- 
terly dividend to 33 cents a share 
from 27.5 cents. 

Schering-Plough said it increased 
its quarterly dividend to 56 cents a 
share from 31 cents. It also said it 
will repurchase up 10 I 2 million of 
iu. shares on the open market or by 
private transactions during 1979 
for the future requirements of its 
employee benefit plans and other 
corporate purposes. 

Among other companies raising 

3 uarterly dividends were Borden to 
S l i coils from 43 cents. Flagship 
Banks to 15 cents from 10 cents. 
(Continued on Page 12, Cnl. 7) 


A Whole Wbrldof Quality 
in One State! 

Baden- 

Wurttemberg 

Driving through the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg, the eye feasts 
on unparalleled beauty. Mountains and valleys, forests and lakes, idyllic 
small towns and large cosmopolitan cities, excellent hotels, famous 
restaurants, sports, theaters, ballets and concerts - these are some 
of the reasons that attracted 8.7 million tourists to BadenWuerttemberg 
last year. 

But that's not all! We are the most highly industrialized State in 
Germany. Our products are known and respected all over the world 
for their quality, aesthetic beauty and functional design. 

We make transmissions that move American locomotives, trucks 
that transport ores in Siberia, clocks that tell the time from Scandinavia 
to the Cape of Good Hope. 

Our universities - among them some of the oldest and most 
renowned in the world - our excellent educational and training 
system, our skilled labor force with its traditional love for hard work 
and precision are among our main assets. 

Looking at the map of. Europe, you'll find us right in its center, at 
the crossroads of the world, right at the spot with the most intense 
business activity. 

Whether you are interested in wandering through the most 
famous European forest, whether you are looking for products that 
have become status symbols in their category, or even searching for 
a plant or business site in Europe’s most advanced State write to us. 

Well gladly send you detailed information according to your specific 
needs. 



DR. ERNST OTTO 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS 
STATE OF BADEN-WUERTTEMBERG 
THEODOR-HEUSS-STR. A 
7000 STUTTGART • WEST GERMANY 


Please send information on 

J | Industrial Development 
I J m Baden-Wuerttemberg. 


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Touristic 

possibilities 


« I 
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i 





Pape 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25. 1979 


NYSE Nationwide Trading 3 p.m. Prices Apr. 24 


CtfW 

13 Month Stock Sis. - -3 p.m. Prev 

High Low Dlv.jnS Yld. P/E TOPS. HlBti Low Quot.3 tun.. 


Ch'ga 

12 Month Stock Sis.' 3 pjti. 

HIbTlSw Dlv.ln S Yld. P/E WO*. HWi LW Qwt.3 wrv 


Chva 

13 Month Stock SI9. 3 pm. Prsv 

High LOW Dlv.lnS Yld. P/E 1008. h| BB Low Quol.3pjn, 


Tables include Lhe nationwide prices up io 3 p.HL on Wall StreeL 

gf | ■ 01*09 I Wot 

ev 13 Month Stock Sta. 3 pm. Pm * »« are i fihT,V 3^ 

m. I High Low Dlv.lnS Ylfl. P/E 100s. High LOW Quot.3 tun. I Htgn Low Pfv.lns YrtL P/e Iffl* High Low Ouot.Jpjtl. 


32 23%GATX 
25% 11* GCA 
14 MGDV 
7* 4% OF Ena ■ 
4 lMGMKPr ‘ 


1 7J t 11 Sh 9 27Vft+-% 

.20 .917 1f3 22% 214* 33%+l% 

5 593 10* 9% 10 + * 
41 9 5* JW 5%+ Ik 
4 lfaGMRPr ‘ 13 2 ZH 21k ZH— V% 

3SVk SttGomsk 1 JO Ml ? 20 2B 30 

90* 39* Gannett l.W . 4014 101 44* 43* 44*4- * 

17* 6* GosStr JO 2J 5 137 13* 13. 13 — * 

33* IMAGorabn 1 1112 701 U33% 33* 32*4- % 

29* 14* Gorftnh 1 54 6J 4 5 11* 18* 18*-* 

15* 12%Co*Svc 136 9.1 5 5 14* 14* 14*—* 

9* 4 GDttwy M 73 4- 14' B* 8* 8* 

47* 23*GeaitrtO M J 30 187 43* 43* 43%+ * 

1 15 9 58 28* 28 Wtv + * 

1 33* 22* 22*+ * 

IS* 13* Gwnin UD 11 3 15* IS* 15*+ * 

11* 9*GAlnv132e If. 34 10* 10* 10*+ * 

49* WftGnAmO 40b 13 24 108 48* 47 48*+* 

18 IHfcGftBcsft JO 13 4 Z 15* 15* IS*— * 

20* 12%GflCaWe 1.10 4311 23811 17*‘.l7*+ * 

24* 30 GnCM prl.94 84 13 23* 22* 23 + * 

V* 6% GflCsre S 8 15 7* 7* 7%+ * . 

20* W GCInma s t X KM Itft ifhs— * . 

37* 28*GnDyn» 130 17 . 346 32* 33 32*+* 

57* 45* GenEI 240 53 9 871 49* 48* 49*+ * 

36* 28 GnPds 1J0 SA 7 131 33* 33 33*+ * 

29* 21*GflGttl L54e 5419 6 38* 38* 28* 

16* S*GnKaSt 40 1710 ISO IS* 16* 14*c— * 

41* 23* Gnlnst .40 14 9 733 39* 39* 39*+ * 

40* 31 Gnlnstr pf 3 74 5 39* 39* 39*+ * 

21* llMGcnMed 44 1711 35 13 11* 12 

34* 34%GnMiHs 1.16 47 9 269 24* 24* 34*+ * 

66* 53% GMot 60 10. 53090 60* 59* 59*+ * 

52 43*GMetPttJ5 82 1 45* 45* 45*-* 

69* 59 GMot of 5 83 IB 41* 60* 60*+ * 

16* 9% GnPart 40 4.1 6 42 14*. 14* 44*+ * 

19* 11% GPU 1J0 16. 53667 11% dll* 11*-* 

10* 5 GnRefr 10 8* 8* «W 

33* 24* GnSFgnl 1 34 V 205 29* 29* 29*+ * 

9* 6* GnSfeeJ 40fa 44 7 38’ 9* 9 9Vk 


5 595 10* 91ft 
41 9 5* 5* 

ii i zh Ik 


(Continued from Page 8} 


42* 39*CumEn 1J0 5X £ 50 36* 34* 34*— * 

12* 10 Currine 1.10 11. 4 25 10* 10* 10*- * 

20* lUiCuftW JO 55 7 64 14* 14* 14* 

33 17*CvClpB 88 43 3 11 22% 21* 21*+ * 

371ft 1?- Cyprus 406 2.1 8 1S9U37* 37* 37* 


14* 8* DPF 
a* 4* Damon 30 
17* 9*DanRiv 88 
32* 24* Dana Co 144 
22* IS Daniel 36 
49* 3416 Dprtlnd 140 
49* 341ft Dart pt 2 
73* 49*DataGan 
49* 35* DataTer J0e 


4 38 

i71M 60 
55 6 128 
53 6 136 
1410 25 
4.1 8 580 
44 -531 

15 27B 
415 B7 


11* II 
51ft 5V. 
16* 15* 
2flVft 27* 
IV* 18* 
64 4316 

44 43% 

71* '69* 
65Vft 45 


11*+ * 
5*- * 
161*+ * 
27*+ * 
17*+ * 
4316+ 1ft 
43% + 16 
70* + l* 
45*+ * 


101* 

08 Duk« Pf&TO 

94 

Z30 

92* 

93* 

92*— % 

97 

84 Duke PfWO 

94 

zl60 

88% 

87 

87 —3% 

93* 79* Duke pt7J0 

?J 

21000 83* 

83* 

S3*— % 

29* 

20* Duka of2J9 

9J 

173 

27* 

27% 

37% 

38* 30*DunBr 1.76 

5013 

1 99 

35* 

34* 

35%+ * 

IB 

14% DuqLt 172 

11.12 

252 

15* 

19* 

15% 

36 

20 DIM pfA2-10 

10. 

X400 

21 

20% 

21 +1 

33 

18 DM Of 1 J7 

ML 

zlO 

1ft* 

18* 

18*— % 

23 

19 Duo Pt 2 

15 

a 20 

19% 

19% 

19% 

24 

19 DUO Of 2J5 

1L 

zT20 

30 

19% 

19%— Kft 

24% 

19% Dm Of 2.07 

9.9 

zlOO 

31 ' 

21 

21 

24- 

20* Dm or 2.10 

IL 

4 

21 

31 

71 

26* 

21 Duq pr 137 

ltt 

am 33 

23' 

23 

29% 

25 Dm pr 175 

11. 

2240 

25* 

25* 

25* 

12% 

6 DutahB .16 

1J 

7 

10* 

10* 

10*— % 

7% 

4*DvnAtn .10a 

IJ7 3 

1 11 

5* 

5* 

5% 


. — 

E E- -E — 




S3 

44% ODtaani 

16 

70 

78* 

77 

■78 +1* 

IB 

13% Daves JOB 

15 4 

2 

14* 

14* 

14* 

44* 

33* DoytHd 140 

4JJ 4 

111 

40 

39% 

40 

18* 

14% DaytPL 174 

11.9 

194 

16 

15% 

15% — % 

83 

71% DPL of 7,70 

ML zl4fl 

74% 

74% 

74%+ltft 

122% 110 DPL pfl2J0 

11. 

Z40 111 

111 

111 —1 

38% 27* Deere IJO 

43 7 094 

34% 

34Vu 34*+ * 

14% 

12% MmP 1J8 

ll. 7 

354 

13 

12% 

13 + % 

SB 

36% DeltaAIr i 

2J i 

74 

40* 

39% 

39% 

12% 

5% Dal tec 5J0c 

21 

2 

0% 

0% 

6H+ % 

15* 

711 Dettona 

32 

37 

12% 

12* 

12%+ % 

21% 

17% DtnMI s 1 

SO B 

30 

20% 

20 

20 

35 

20 Danny* JB 

4J0 8 

104 

22* 

22% 

22*+ % 

25% 

13% Dentsply JO 

4J14 

59 

17 

16% 

16% 

17% 

11 De5ota 1 

9M 9 

36 

11* 

11 

11%+ W 

16% 

13% Del Ed 140 

11. 9 

254 

15% 

14% 

15 + * 

74 

59% DetE PtSJO 

M 

2 

65* 

65* 

65* 

97* 

81 DfltE Pf9J2 

11. 

zsa 

87% 

86 

86 —2 

80% 

66* DetE Pf7J6 

11. 

230 

TO 

TO 

70 + % 

27% 

24% DetE PT2.75 

11. 

3 

25V* 

25% 

25% — % 

27% 

24% DE DfB2L75 

11. 

17 

25 

24% 

24% — % 

24% 

20 DetE Pr2J8 

11. 

10 

20% 

20% 

20% — * 

23% 

16 Drxier JO 

33 9 

46 

21% 

21% 

21% 

14* 

9 CM dor 48 

33 8 

578 

13% 

13 

1J + * 

25 

15V« DtalCp 120 

5J 7 

x9 

21* 

20% 

21*+ % 

40% 

30 Dio Ini 730 

62 8 

85 

35% 

35* 

35%— % 

29% 

19 D1om5 148 

6J 7 

388 

22% 

22* 

22%+ % 

-29% 

11%DICtaph 32c 

2510 

28 

28% 

28% 

28%+* 

25 

14% Diebold jo 

2513 

382 

24% 

24* 

24* 

»* 

40% DigltalEq 

15 #40 

53% 

52% 

53*+ % 

11% 

7 CHlUnom S3 

55 5 

134 

9% 

9% 

9 Vft — % 

26% 

20Vi Diungm pf2 

82 

1 

23 

23 

23 + Vft 

34% 

27% Dillon lJ2b 

4510 

5 

29% 

29% 

29%— % 

47V( 

15% Disney 48 

1-312 

190 

38% 

37% 

38%+ % 

4% 

1% Dlvratdln 

101151 

4* 

4 

**+ % 

6% 

2% DIvriMtb 


39 

4* 

4% 

4 %— (ft 

20* 

13%DrPaflpr JB 

4413 

73 

15% 

15* 

15%+ % 

100% 

65 CtofTieAA JOo 

.910 x55 

88% 

86% 

88 +1* 

6% 

3% DonLJ .14 

3J 13 

7 

3% 

3% 

3% 

33% 

24% Donnlv 1 

3510 

50 

28% 

28% 

28%+ * 

22% 

11 Dorsev JO 

44 A 

50 

14 

12% 

14 +1% 

52 

39% Dover 140 

23 9 

7 

51% 

51% 

51% — % 

30% 

23% DowCh 140 

54 81082 

27 

26% 

26%— * 

39 

31* Dowjn 144 

4.112 

6 

35% 

35* 

35%+ % 

35% 

24% Dravo U8 

4J 8 

49 

28% 

28% 

28% — * 

47% 

35 Drestr 1 

24 8 

460 

44* 

43 

44+36 

16% 

14% DrexB 1J0 

10. 

14 

16% 

15% 

16 + % 

17 

10 Drovts 37m 

54 7 

5 

14% 

14% 

14% 

144% 109!ft duPont 6 

65 8 

393 134% 133% 134 + (ft 

49 

42% duPni a 1050 

8.1 

10 

43 

43 

43 

62* 

54% duPnt pi 440 

82 

B 

54% 

54% 

54%— % 

21% 

18 DukeP IJO 

ML 71653 

18lftdl7V> 

17%- % 

80 

74 Duka p*6J5 

9.0 

4 

75 

74% 

74*— Vft 


33* 22*EG8G 40 

316 2* EMI .18e 
35* 21 E 3x5 130 
25* 19 EoaftP 80 
30* 17* EOSCd 130 
IS* 7* East Air 
25* 22* EsAlr pf2J? 
20* 13 EdsrCF JO 
16* 14* EastUtl 140 
68 Vk 48* EsKod 240 
41% 33 Eaton 235 
39* 34 Eaton Pfl.19 
18* 14* Echtln 44 
33* 2316 Ecfcrdjk JO 
34* 24* EdtsBr U2 
26* 14 Edwrd 40a 
18* l3*£IPow 1J2 
25* 21 EPG tlPfUS 
12* 816 EkcarCp 30 
12* 4* EiecAssc 

24* 15* EDS 84 
8* 4 ElMeMs 
11* 8* EMM pf25k 

28* 1716 Elgin 140 
6* 3* Elixir 
35* 24* Eltra 13d 
39* 3216 EmrsEI 144 
28* 16* SmrvA I 
45 30* Emhart 230 

'5* 13* ErnpDS 140 
21* 13* EmpGas JO 
39* 20* EngMC 140 
19* 9* Ennis B 80 
24* 14* Ensrcft 136 
18 14* EnttK 80 

29* 16 Envrtec 1 
28* 20* Equllx 230 
13 10* Eaurtmk .96 

34* 32* Eqi/tGs 384 
21* 16* E«»U 3 
32* 23* Esnwk 183 
15* 8* EMuIrg 40 

17* 10* EsstxOi 30 
30* 9* Estrlln 40 
26* 19* Ethyl 130 
67 51 ERiyl Pt240 

-25* 15* EvonP 130a 
15* 13* Evan priJO 
35 23* ExOlO 140 

19* 15* Exeter 133c 
54* 43 Exxon 340 


1814 207O34* 32* 

6316 429 2* 2* 

44 9 6 37 26* 

13 9 22 34* 24* 
■ 48 6 69 20* M* 
3 281 7* 7* 


II. . 6 24* 24 
4410 386 MVk It 
It 7 15 15 Uft 


1711 1480 64* 63* 
S3 5 303 40* 39* 


7 39* 39* 
42 17* 17* 


2311 565 25* 25* 

3.9 9 4du)4* 33* 

34 5 17 16* 16* 
73 8 451 18* 18* 
10. 26 23 22* 

1.9 9 6 10* 10U 

12 48 6* 6* 

4.013 171 21* 20* 
5 99 4* 4 

43 B* 8* 
84 7 25 19* 18* 
4 9 4* 4* 

58 6 56 27 26* 

43 12 248 33* 33* 
58 14 122 IB* 17* 


6.1 i 81 35* 35 
10. 8 12 13* T3* 


24 9 30 20* 20* 
4.1 8 977 35 34* 


48 7 51 18* 1816 
6414 404 21% 21 


51 7 91 15* 15* 
5L013 14 20 19* 


1 22 22 
2 10* 10* 
6 35* 35* 
4 IB 17* 


7.1 7 129 25* 25* 
3.9 7 12 15V. 15* 


5.1 A 33 13* 13* 
13 B 137 19* IS* 


44 6 363u26U» 2516 
34 2 67 45* 

5 9 5 317 2016 19* 
10. 1 13* 13* 

5J 7 19 30 39* 

10. 15 17* 1716 

68 92039 5316 52* 


34 +1* 
2 *— * 
26*— V. 
24*4+ * 
20—16 
7* 

24 — M 
18 

14*+ * 
6416+ * 

39*+ Ifc 
39*+Z16 
T7*+ * 
25*+ * 
34*+ * 
16*+ * 
18*+ * 
22*- 16 
10*+ V. 
6 *+ <6 
21*+ * 
4* 

8 *— * 
19 
4* 

27 + * 
33*+ * 
IBH.+ * 
35*+ * 
13*— * 
20* +1 
34*—* 
1M+ * 
2116+ V. 
15*+ 16 
19*+ * 
22 

10 *+ * 
35* 

18 + * 
25*+ 16 
15*+ * 
13* 

IB*— * 
26*+ * 
67 +2 
2016+ * 
13*+ V. 
30 + * 

1716— 16 
53* +1 


13* 7* Fohrge 40 
8* 5* FObrlCtr J4 
7* 3* PcmtEnt - 
45* 26* Falrcm 80 
35* 18* Falrind 1 
ll* 8* FalrmtF .76 
19* ll* FrWitFn 
5* 2*FaranMt 
7* 4 Fodders 
46V. 31* FudCa 240 
29* 22*PedExpr 

19 • 15* FdMeg s > 

)«fc 15 FcdNM 1JB / 
27* 15V. FudPB 80 
33* 18* fiPos pn JO 
16 12* PdShml e 

41* 30* FedDSt I JO 

35 18* Ferro 1 J8 

12* 7 Fid Pin 40 
35* 29* Fid Uni 340 
31* 22* Fldost Ufa 
18* 9 Fnmwv Jfa 
14 10 FlnCpA JO 

18* 11* RnSBor 1 
45* 21* FliUFM 1 M 
15* ll* Flrftstn 1.10 
20* 14 FtQirt 80 
25* 17 FStChiC 1.10 
39* 31* FfBnTx IJl 
38* 3116 Fllnen 140 
16* 8 FstMIsB 40 
33* 25 FstNBO 3 
25* 21 FNStBn 280 
17* 12* FslPo 1J2 
3* 1* FstPo wt 
3* 1* FtPoMlg 
14* 10* FtUnRt 188 

. 7 ■ 6* FtVaBk JO 
29* 22* FtWbc 186 

36 Z2*Rxi>Ml>m 

15* 7* FIshFds 40 

19* 13V. FhhrSd 44 
16* 10 FleetEnt 82 
23* 15* Fleming JO 
25* |3 FiexfV JW 
39* 24 Flntkt 180b 
40 21* FlOGQB 144 

29* 23 FtaPL 240 
33* 28* FtaPOW Z74 
35* 20HFIOSH 140 
43* 29* Fluor 140 
103 74 Fluor pf ] 

23* MUFooteC 14D 
51* 3V FordM 4 
23* 17* ForMK 184 
14* 12* FlOear TJ4 
45* 33* Fr+How 1 J2 
45 26* FoBWh 180 

19V. 8* Fotomot JO 

44* 24* FaurPtM 
14* 8* FoxStoP 40 

40* 29*Faxbro 180 
11* 5* FrankM 80 
47* 19* FrWMln 140 

20 11 FrWm 82 
34* 25* Fruetif 280 

14 7* Fuauo 44 

15* 1216 Fuoo pfL2S 


44 8 76 9* 

3J 6 2 7* 

35 4 4* 

1.9 91155 43* 
38 6 Z7 30* 
84 9 23 9* 
3 S 13* 
30 3* 
125 IBB 5* 
58 6 18 45* 
10 152 26* 

6 44 18* 

7J 5 330 16* 
3824 200 24* 
48 3 30 

7 3 IS* 

54 5 259 31* 
48 0. 267 23* 
AXI 4 26 10 
Lit 6 33* 
48 5 2 28* 
1J 7 64 13* 

4.1 6 ' 15 12* 
JJ 5 57 17* 

34 6 420 »* 
88 2732 13* 
48 S 330 17 
6J 5 58 17* 
38 7 114 35* 
48 7 49 33* 
2835 181 14* 
78 5 55 27* 
98 6 21 23* 
10. 7 134 13* 
51 2* 

10 2 * 
7813 62 u14* 
78 5 58 6* 

78 5 xl3 2d 

6.1 6 36 2316 
4J 9 122 12* 
28 7 '43 17* 
58 4 179 10* 
58 7 103 17* 
44 5 314 re 

4.1 6 49 3414. 

4810 325 30* 
08 6 408 2716 
98 7 87 3016 
48 5 9 34* 

38 81286 41* 

3.1 2 97 

78 6 13 18 
88 3 568 45V. 
6J 5 52 19 
98 1 12* 

3811 243 4416 
2J 9 SOB 1*45* 
5812 48 V* 

14 291 37* 
58 7 39 11* 
38 9 2 36* 

3J 5 90 7* 

3826 685 47* 
1811 38 14* 

7.1 4 416 31* 
38 5 307 11* . 

9.1 8 13* 


9*+ * 
7*+ * 
4Vr+ * 
42*—* 
30*+ * 
9 + 'A 
43* — V. 
3* 

5 + * 
4516+ * 
26 V. + *. 
1816— *' 
16*+ Vi 
24*+ * 
30 + * 
15*- * 
31* 

23*+ * 
TO + M 
32*+ * 

. 28*- (6 
13*— 16 
12 *— * 
17*+ % 
39*+2* 
13*— * 
17 + * 
17* 

35 

32*+ * 
14*— 16 
37*+ * 
33*+ * 
1316 

2 — * 
VU— * 
14 
6* 

24 + * 
23—16 
!2*+ * 
17*— * . 
TO* 

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ie + * 

34+46 
37*— 1 
27*— V. 
30 — Vi 
uu 

40*+ * 
97 +1* 
IB + * 
45*+ * 
19- + * 
12* 

4416+ 16 
44 — * 
916+ * 
37*+l* 
114k— * 
36*+ * 
7* 

46*- * 
16 + * 
31*- * 
11 *+ * 
13* 


38* 33HGamSk 1J0 58 T 7 28 ZB 
50* 39* Gannett L76 . 4814 101 44* 43* 


17* 6*GaPStr JO 23 5 137 12V. 12. 
8* 16* Garabn 1 1112 701U33* 33* 


29* 16* Gorflnk 1-34 68 4 5 18* 18* 
15* 12*Co*Svc I J6 9.1 5 5 14* M* 


9* 6 GOtCwy 80 73 4- 16' 8* 8* 
47* 23* Goai-MO J8 830 187 43* 43* 


34* 23 Geko 1 15 

34* 20l6G«mCP 
16* 13* Gamin 180 n. 
11* 9*GAInv lJ2e 11. 


15 V 58 SB* 28 
1 22 * 22 * 


2 15* 15* 
36 10* 10* 


24* 31* Humo pfUO 11. 7t 23* B». OJk+ Vk 

17* 10* HuntCh 80 1011 35 14* 1»J jj*» * 

16* 8* HuntlR 167 11 10* 10*— ^ 

as is* Huftep 8i «« i « IL1 J*S2L !I«4±,5 

14* nkHUVCk J3 6.1 9 67 11* 11*- lMS+'Vk 


49* 39V. GnAmO 8 Uj 1J 24 108 4816 47 
18 )2*GftBC5ft 80 SJ 4 Z 15 * Uti 
20* 13* GflCnNe 1.10 6211 23818 17*- 

24* 20 GnCbi prl.94 84 13 23* 22* 

9* 6* GflCsre 5 8 15 7* 7* 

20* W GCInma s 9 X 20* 19* 

37* 28*GnDyn» UD 3.7 . 346 3216 32 
57* 45* GenEI 260 5J 9 871 49* 40* 


36* 28 GnFtJs 1J0 54 7 131 33* 33 
2916 21* GflGttl L54C 5419 6 38* 38* 


16* 8*G<lHast 40 1710 150 16* 16* 

41* 32* Gnlnst .80 18 V 733 39* 39* 


40* 31 Gnlnstr pf 3 78 5 39* 39* 
21* 11* G«lM«d 44 1711 35 12 11* 


66* 53V» GMot Ae 10. 

53 43* GMot pfl>5 &2 

69* 59 GMot pf 5 82 


16* 9* GnPart 40 4.1 6 42 14*. 14* 
19* 1116 GPU 1J0 16. 5 3667 ll* dll* 


1016 5 GnRefr 


9V. 6* GnSteeJ 40b 44 7 38- W* 9 
32* 27* GTE 248 8J 71858 28* 28* 


28* 34* GTE pt 248 9J 2 2SH6 25V. 
IS* 1216 GTFI pfl 25 10. z20 12* 12* 


01* 22* GTIre 1JO 58 5 253 2616 2» 
7* . 3* Genasco 134 SV. 5* 

36* 22*G«nstr 2 6 13u37- 36* 


2816+ '6 

25 V»— * 
12* 

26 
5* 

37 . + * 


. 33* 32* IC.Ind 180 
51 39*tCln pfUO 
I .4" ICN . 

47* 36 INACp ‘ 3 
im 33 INA pf ftlJP 
-18V* miNAId 183 
13* 99k IU Int .95 
40 289blUlnt A 
27Kr W»1UW fflJS 
17 13*lUlnt pfUA 
27* 24 tdohoP 238 
28 18* IdealB 180 

. 0* 4 Ideal T -2dr 
25* 31* IllPowr 228 
28* 20* ITW 1 
24*15 ImpICp 1 
21* 74* INCO JO 
23* 19* IndtM PI2.1S 
24* 2D*lfldlM pf2J5 
sms 24* incllGoX'240 
24* Zl*lfldfPL 2.12 
19* 15* Into Mat 144 
22* -11* mown .H 
-6416 1 44* IraerR 3.16 
44 30* InoR pf2J5 

15* 10*IIWTOC JO 
41* 33* InlndStl 2J0a 
1716 -ll*inelieo J4b 

19* 13»lnsilc pflJS 

2*. 1* ImllnvTr 
21 13* Inteaan 44a 

2216 10* I Ta>S* 1.72a 
45* 34 Interco 220 
38* 12* IntDtv 8.11c 

29* 21* Inhlk 2J0 
18* 10 Int Alum JO 
322 ZS3 IBM 13JA 
27* 20* IntFlav 80 
44* 29* IntHarv 230 
47* 34 Int Min 3 


68 5 317 26* 2416 24*+ * 
M 8 43* 43* 4SH+ * 

98 5* . 5* 59k— Vk 
U 5 431 45 43* ■ 64*+ * 

7.9 35 24 33* 24 + * 

98 3 16* 16* 16* 

7843 412 13 12* 12* 

. 1 39* 3f* 39*+ * 

62 1 20* 20* 3016+ Ui 

8J 2 16* 16 10 — * 

Ml d 84* 24* 24* 

6J 6' 52 23* 23* 23* 

4J 35 5* 5* J*-* 

IOl 8 134 32 . 21* 21* 

3Jt S 26* ' 26* 26*+ * 
4J 5 49 23* 23 23*+ * 

IS 56 346 20* 20* 20*+ * 
10. 2 21 21 21 +* 

11. ..8 21* 21* 21*— * 

171 1 27* 27* 27*+ 16 

98 8 232 '22* 22* 2ZVk- * 
BlIJ 13 15 17* 17* 

^20 138 17* T7V. 17*+ 16 
64 7. 86 49* 49 49—* 

78 10 XT* 33* 3396+ * 

33 17 6.15* 15* 15*+ * 

74 5 16030 3746 38 + V. 

78 6 45 U* 13* 13* 

78 4 16* 15* 16* + * 

15 2* 2* 2* 

28 8 20 17* 17 17*+ * 

93 13 30 19* 17* 

53 6 110 38* 38 3S*+ * 

6 11 27* .27* Z7M+ * 

0315 43 26* 26* 26*—* 

4.1 7 M .12* 12 12*+ * 

4414 046 312* 309* 311M+1* 
38 15 250 22* 22 22*+ * 

5J 5 241 39* 39* 39*+ * 

AJ 7 191 44* 44* 44*+ * 


26% 

22% GuruPI in 

33 13 

66 

24* 

24 

24 

' 25% 17 lntMuIt.1.10 

S3 7 

30 

21% 

21* 

21% 

32% 

24 GaPoc 1.10 

31 91401 

28% 

28 . 

28%+ % 

49* 35% 1 rtf Poor 220 

4J 6 

871 

45% 

44% 

45%+ % 

36* 


2935* 

35* 

35*-* 

16 8%- int Recti 35 

2J 6 

76 

12% 

12% 

12%+ % 

24% 

24% GaPw pfn2J6 11. 

142 34% 24* 

24*— (ft 

34% 26%lntTT 220 

7J 6 

916 

28% 

28% 

2S%+ % 

27% 

23%GaPw pf2J2 

11. 

27 

23% 

23% 

23%+% 

01* 47% InfTT ptH 4 

73 

2 

S 

Kt 

52 +1* 

29% 

25* GaPvr pOTS* 

ML 

4 

26% 

26% 

26%-— (ft 

56% 44* InfTT Pfcl 4 

&3 

1 

47* 

47% 

47* +1 . 

81 

70% GaPw pf7.72 

11. 

z30 

71 

71 

71 

55% 44 inrrrptK 4 

86 

78 

46% 

44 

4A%+1 

37* 

21* Geasrc J8* 

1.911 

58 

36 

35* 

35%+ % 

61% 49% InITT pfO 5 

9J 

14 53% 

S3* 

S3%+ % 

34% 

25%G«rtiPd IJO 

5 A e 

11 

27% 

27% 

27* — % 

41% 32% InfTT pfZJtS 

S3 

17 

35%. 

35% 

35%+ % 

47* 

33 . Gaily 1J0 

2JT2 

569 

46% 

45% 

46%+ % 

50% 47% IntTT pf4J0 

89 

15 

50% 

50 

50%+ * 

18% 

17% Getty pnJ3 

63 

30 

18 

18 

18 — Hi 

23% 15 Intrpce IJO 

6J 6 

25 

W% 

19% 

19% 

IM 

6% GtdntPC JO 

61 13 

19 

7% 

9% 

9%+ * 

39* 29 IntrpGP IJO 

45 7 

50 

35% 

35% 

35%+ Hr 


16* 10* GfbrFn 80 4J 6 55 M 


Iff* 12* GldLcw JO 4J 4 413ul7 16* 
16* 13M GIHHII S JO 58 5 • 14* 14* 


33 24 Gillette 180 68 8 212 26* 26* 

12* 6* Glnoslnc -30 IS 6 23 8 7* 


2fffc_14 Gleasw JO 13 » 16 24* 24 


10*GhibMar 


10 131 IB* 18* 


14 m*GUWFn JO 17 6 181 13* 13* 
23* ISHGdrtch T44 73 4 69 IV* 19* 


18* 15*G00dyr 1J0 73 <1655 18* 17* 

22* 16*GordJw 80 28 5 18 21* 21* 


34* 25 Gauld 180 68 8 164 26 
32* 25* Grace 1.90 68 6 98 29 


38 28*Grotngr 3t 2311 13 32K 32* 
17* ig* Granltvl 1 68379 13 11* 11* 


IV* 12* GrayOr JO 53 6 53 15* IS 


28* 22 FMC 140 
37* 31* FMC pf 285 


5J 6 49 25* 25V. 25*+ 16 
63 14 34* 34 34*+ * 


15* V*GAF 48 5.9 5 101 11* 11* II* 
19* 14* GAP pfl JO 73 22 16 15* 15* 


914 5 GtAfPe 

42* 24*GTLkO la 28 5 42 39 38* 

27* 21*GNIm2J5e 85 9 7 26* 26* 


ui m m 

24 5 42 39 30* 



<@>s 


BANQUE VERNES 
ET COMMEROAIE 
DE PARIS 


Thv \iimul Shareholders meeting w*. held at the Paris head oflire on April 19. 
>979. Shareholders- have approved ihe ammnt- For 1978, which were presenird 
for ihe [iru time in nxpret erf the new bank accounting standard*. 

\> uF ftf. 31. 1978 the hank's balance sheet totalled F.K- 6.08 billions versus 
F.F. 5.4 btlliuiw on Dec. 31. 1977. with deposils reaching close to F.F. 3 
hillums and credits to clienls nearly 3.5 billions. 1978 avenge deposits and 
outstanding credits showed an increase over 1977 comparable Figures of res pec* 
lively Z^r and lJ'e. Net pro Fit alter taxes for 1978 amounted to F.F. 25.1 
milliiinfe including lung term capital gains of F.F. 0.8 millions; 1977 figures 
were F.K. 27.6 millions and F.F. 2j27 millions respectively. 

Shareholders \uted a net dividend of F.F. 13.50 per shore of F. 100 par value, 
iifcntiral to 1977* » one; this dividend applies to a capital increased from FJF. 
120 millions to F.F. 125.1 million* in 1978 as a consequence of the merger 
with BANtyL'E Al'XILlAIRE. They also autlnrizrd the Board of Directors to 
proceed In new ordinarv bond issues for j, maximum amount of F.F. 250 
millious. Mr. Pu-rre VERNES and COMPACN1E GENERALE D'ELECTRO- 
NIQI C wen* reelected number* of the Board for another six rears. 

In his aiUrrss to shareholders, chairman Jean-Mare VERNES pointed out the 
effort* nudf during the last two years in order to build up a larger branch- 
network fit was increased from 1 1 to 3.1 2i ram-bo among which a large r<^ranal 
one in Lwm); 

"This aihicvcmmt nrrvsvitdted new investments and general expenses: 1978 
results, before long term capital gains can thus be considered as satisfactory; as 
soon as 1979 should wt collect the Iniit. of this policy". In hie conclusion. 
Chairman VERNE indicaled: 


"IVspite a trembled mienMlionaL-ittulion and periods of agitation due to Fre- 
queni elections, my o pin ton «. that die onlv way In ensure work ami profit For 
everyone is liberalism". 


On the tame dav the Board of Director*, making partial use of the shareholders 
aurharizflion. dtvided ru issue F.F. 120 millions of 9.80^ rwelie years bonds 
mi ihe Frenrh financial market. 


3816 26* GtNoNk 140 19 81078 3616 3Srk> 

19* IffUGtWRn Mr U S 689ol96> 18* 


International Bonds Traded in Europe 

. Midday Indicated Prices 


14* 11 Gravh 1J4 89 9 409 12 11* 

1* S-lAGrevhnd wt 55 9-16 * 


11* 7* GrowG 44b 48 6 55 9* 9* 


6* Z*GfftRtV 


24* 14* Grumm 1J0' 6J 6 257 19* 18* 
20* 14 Guardln -36 1.9 7 79 18* 18* 


16* 1116 GifWstn J5 82 3 516 14* >4* 
78 55* GlfW Pf 3J7 S3 2 <8 <7* 


Dollar Bonds 


Armv8-87 92* 

Ashland 7*42 95* 

Australia 816-83 94* 

Australto 0*91 94* 

Austral lo 816-92 90* 

BTokve7*-84 91 
Barclays 81ft*92 91* 

BCHyd.7*8S 9116 
Seif Can 7*-87 90 

BFCE 8*-83 9716 

Brazil 916-84 95 

Brit Gas 9-81 98* 

BrakcnHIII 845 93 

C pc rierm. 816-84 90 
Cdit NatIR 8*46 92* 
Chorbonss 8*81 97* 
arr Invest 8*-M 93* 
Cons Food 7*-9l 87* 
Conoco B-86 95* 


Cutler Kant M7 92 


EEC816-8? 
EEC 7* -84 
ECS 8*411 
ECS 8*>97 
EIS 816-83 
El B 8-84 


Elf AAUit.8U.-85 93 


EMI 916-89 
Ericsson 81 ft-89 
Esso 8-86 now 


Euroflnia8*-B3 97 


Fiat M2 94V. 

Flrsf CMC 7-80 97* 

Gatoverkenaift-87 91* 
Gould 9*83 101' 

GulfWestn 8*-84 93* 
Homsrsley<lM4 95* 
Home 011 9*86 98 

ICI 8*40 92* 

ISE Cndo 982 97* 

i.t/jOv*rsros983 96* 
KlddeW.8Vft-85 92* 
Kockums 8-83 «** 

Manitoba B*-B3 9«* 

AWctief to 916-86 9816 


I Mkfld Inti 8*84 
Montreal 916-83 
NCBoardS-87 
NOtWest 986 
N Brunswick 983 
I N Brunswick 884 
NZealand9'6-SZ 
NZealand8*83 
NraKombk 8*81 
Norsklryd 8*92 
Norway 8*81 
Ocddontal 9*83 
-Oftth Min 8*85 
Ontario 983 
OnfarfoHyd840 
PravSaskot 8*86 
QuobProv8*81 
QuebFrov983 

Ralston 7*87 
SaabSamtaSVft-av 
S4LS.M5 
SMI886 
Shell 7*87 
Slnoer B*82 
SttndB*88 
Swoden 81687 
SwedStCo- 7*82 
TMoV7*87 
Textron 7*87 
Tran socoan 886 
Transocean 7*87 
UnOil 7*87 
Utah 887 
Vwooon 7*87 
Volvo (Marl 840 


96*. 97*| 
98* 99*| 
90* 9TM| 
96* 97*! 
98* 99* i 
92* 93* 
99 «l ] 

97 98 I 
92* 93* 
90* 91* 
97* 98(6 
99* 100* 
92* 93* 
98* 99* 
98* 91* ' 
95* 96* 
97* 98* 

98 99 
91* 92* I 

91 92 

93* 94* 
95 96 

92 93 I 

95* 96* I 
98 99 


Broad Hale 4*87 71 73 . 

Carnation 488. 71 73 

Chevron 588 IS IS 

Chrysler 4*88 82 64 

Chrysler 588 . *4* 66* 
cr Suisse 416-91 nwuizm 
Cumminf 6*86 86* 88* 

Dart ind 4*87 ' 81 83 

East Kodak 4^86 B4* 86* 


36* 2816 GlfWf Bf2J0 7 J. 3 32* 32* 
2716 22* GlilfOfl 1.90 7 J 7 IDS 27* 26* 


14 8* GtllfRes 33 2J 9 656 13* 12* 
IT* 14* GOffR aft JO 72 11 T8* IT* 


1W 1516 GWfR pnjQ 8J 15 18* 18* 
14* msGUSlUt 1J6 ML 8 113 13* 13* 


Iff* 12* GullUM .52 63 7 110 U* 14* 
n* 6 Got Ion M 35 I 74 irn IT* 


14 

16*+ * 
14*— * 
26*+ * 
8 

24 — * 
TB*+ * 
13* 

19*- H 
IB + * 
21*+ * 
25*- * 

m 

32*+ * 
11 *— * 
15*+ * 
7*- * 
39 + 1ft 
36*— 16 
36 — * 
T9H+ * 
11*— * 
* 

9*+ * 
S 

1916+1 
18*- * 
14*+ * 
68 
32* 

27*+ * 
13*+1* 
T8M+* 
18*+* 
13*+ * 
14*—* 
1T»+ 16 


16 >4 fnfsfFw IJ0 

38(6 17* irrtrwav JO 
53* 33*lawaBf J2 
2116 HKldwaBf wl 
T7*.. 14* fowafff 7 JO 
22 19* lowilG 2 

27 23* lowill pf2J1 

28 . 23* IowoPL 240 
23* 79* lowaPS 104 

916 4* IpaiHB -T2 

32* 14 ItakCp 
37* 18* ItotCP JO 
15* 73 net pf \M ' 


10. 8 T9 14* 74* 
24 6 911 3416 31* 
13 5 24 42* 41* 

5u21* 21* 

11. 7 79 UtA 14* 

ML 7 xl4 19* 19* 
10. Z100 23*023 

9J 7 14 2416. 23* 
93.7 58 Zt 20* 
2JJ ' 14 5* 5* 

14 21B 24* 22* 


14*— * 
32*— 1* 
42*+ M 
21*+ * 
MVk— * 
19*+ * 
23 — * 
24*+ V. 
2? + 14 
5* 

34*+Hft 


3J 5 342 2D* 20* 2B*+ 16 
17. 4 73* 73* 7314— * 


2816 19* JmesF 1J0 57 9 10 2) 20* 

14* 6* Jamswy J08b J 5 25 ** 9* 

19* 14* Jarttefl 1 SA 6 16 18* 7816 


13* . VWJcntoF lJ6e 16 11910 - 9* 

K* 2816 JeffPUt 1JM 13 B 94 31* 31 


44 3616 JerC pf 4 11. Z20 37 . 37 

88* 70 JerC pf 8.12 12 zS20 69*069* 

97 68 JerC pf 8- 12 sN. 69* 69* 

122 108 JerC pftlSO IX z3S0 1B7V. MM 
IMF* 99* JerC pf IT 11. Z350 108 100- 
25* 18* JerC pf 278 11. ' 4 19* I9K 


4 19* 19* 


18* JewatC 1J8 72 6 136 23* 22* 


'2* Jewel cor 


9 173 3* ■ 3* 


34* 2ZVftJhnMan 1J0 7.1 51417 25* 24V. 
43* 60 JfmMnpfn 5J0 93 6442* 42* 

89 67* JohnJn 2 2J14 S38 7116.-7016 


12 5*JohnEF 15 24 7* 7* 

34* 21* JohnCn 1.10 2J 8 199 30* 29 

3WS 28* JoffttC Pf 2 S3 I 38 38 

16* 11* Jen Lon JO 6J 8 134 15* 14* 


21 + * 
10 + * 
78*+ * 
10 . 

31*+ * 
37 

49*- 16 
49* '. 

106 —1* 
100 
Iflk 

21 *+ * 
3*— * 
2S*+1 
42* 

71 + * 
7 * — * 
29 “—1* 


51 '44 JOKLOUpf 5 11. ZSO 44* 44 
37* 27* Jorum 1J0 35 6 1 33* 33* 


Ford 64* 92 94 

Ford 548 83* 85* 

GenElec4*40 77 79 

Gen Foods 4*40 91 93 

Glllet1e4*-B2 86* 88* 
Gillette 4*40 73 75 

GulWeshl586 84* 86* 
Honnevweil 6-86 85 87 

ICI6*47 98* 99* 

INA 6-97 95* 97* 

ISE 6*39 86* 88* 

ITT 4*^7 73* 75* 

JUSC0 6-92 109 110 

Komatsu 7*-90 133* 134* 
Maroon JP 416-87 93 95 

Nabhtco5*4ia 95 97 

Owensill 4*40 100* 102* 

Penney JC4*-87. 71* 73* 
RCA 5-88 82 14 

Revlon 4*83 136* 138* 


73 75 

84* 86* 


91* 92* 
94* 95* 


89* 90* 
91 'A 92* 


95* 96* 
91 92 


95* 97* 
86* 88* 
73* 75* 
109 110 


Convertible Bonds 


Revlon 41687 
Sperry 416-88 
Soulto* 416-87 
Texaco 4*88 
Texas 7*93 
Tyco 8*88 
UnCortr 416-82 


116 . 118 
97* 99* 
84 86 

76 78 

89* 91* 
103* MB* 
89* 9t* 


4H 2MHMW ' 
40* 3216 HocfcW X«0 
746 4* Hdfoca 
31 22 HallFB 134 

70* 55* Holllbt 1JO 
26* 17*HamrP iao 
17* 14 HanJS t Jle 
21* 17*HQnJI 1J4a 
24V. 11 V. Hndlmn 1 
23* 14* HandvH JO 
4116 28* Hanna ijso 

41(6 24 HorBrJ 144 
18* 8(6 Horaces 34 
23* 12*HornlsM l 
40* is*Harroh jo 
34* 26* HorrBk U6 
37 25V> Harris -JO 

36* 28 Horace 1J0 
16 10 HartSM 88 

27* 16* HarteHk J6 
V4V. 7 KartfZd JO 
17* 14* HotlSe I JO 
28** 24 HtodEI HA 
26V. 15* HavosA IjB 
17(6 10(6 Hozeltn JO 


7 20 3* 3* 3* 

89 8 3 40* 40* 40*+ (A 

3 14 5* 5* 5* 

43 11 22 26* 26* 26*—* 

2610 6*5 68* 67V. 68*+* 
60 7 211 23* 23* 23*- * 
10. 187 15(6 14* 15*+ (6 

99 28 19* 18* 18*- V. 

7J 5 137 13* 13* 13M+ W 
33-11 4 20* 20V. 20(6 

4J14 10 39* 39* 39* 

3623 84 39* 39* 39*+ (6 
10 5 30 11* 11* 11*+ * 
7312 S3 13* 13* 13*- V. 

1112 49 24 23* 23* 

42 6 21 26* 26* 26*— 16 
2311 449 26* 26* 26*+ * 
56 7 30 32* 31* 32*+' * 

-78 6 106 12* T2 12*+ * 
2712 3 20* ZB* 20*+ * 

34 5 12 11 IB* 11 
9810 4 15* 15(6 15*— (6 

86 8 8 26* 26* 26* ' 
7811 8 17* 17* 17* 

39 7 24 15* 15* 15*- * 


23* 14* -fastens 84 4J 8 42 18* TS*. 
38* 27* JoYMta 164 XT 9 39 3216 32 


33* 

18*+ *. 
32*+ * 


4614 10 39* 39* 
3623 84 39* 39* 
10 5 30 11* 11* 


38 5 12 11 
9810 4 151 

86 8 8 2d 

7911 8 17V 


87 49 KLM IJSr 

29* 22* Kmart M 
21* 16* KafsrAI 1 
73 ' 56 KatAI P94.12 
81 63 KOI 6401495 

VH IffV KalCe T90 
31 17* KohrSt 1 JO 

9* 6* KaneMII 98 
19* 12* Kaneb 90 
29* 24 KCfvPL 2J56 
42 37 KCPL OI380 

28* 17*KCSoln JO 
12* 10 KCSau Pf 1 
ZT 17* KanGE TJ0 
23 18* KanNb 168b 

22* 19 KanPLt U» 
28* 24. KaPL PT232 
26* 21* ICaPL pt233 
11 5* Kaiylnd 

28* Iff* Kafy pfIJ* 
10* 5* KoofBr 94 
19*. 11 Keene ' 60, 
14* 6* Keller 80b 
24* 17 Kellogg 190 


Amexco 4(6-87 
Ashland 5-88 
Beatrice 6*91 
Beatrice 4*82 
Beectiam 6*-92 
Bao*6*-93 
Barden 6*91 
Borden 5-92 


75* 77* 
115* 117* 
M3 105 
85 87 

117* 118* 
111* 112* 

E * 101* 
* 85* 


WarnLamb 4Vk07 74(ft 76* 
wamLamb 4(688 70\> 72* 
Xerox 5-88 75 77 


27% 

15 HaaltiTec 

5 

19 

22% 

221ft 

22*— % 

23% 

12* Kaltwd 1.12 

14% 

8% Hacks JO 

2J 7 

39 

11% 

11% 

11% 

39 

29%Kmmtl M2 

11% 

4% HedoM 

23 

81 

10 

9% 

10 + % 

29 

19 Kennel JOe 

28% 

20 HeiimB a 

8 

76 

28* 

27% 

28%+ % 

22 

17% KylHfl 2X4 

44* 

35% HphuH 2 

SJ) 9 

86 

40% 

39% 

40%+ % 

17% 

11% KctrGla AO 

34% 

27% Heinz Pfl JO 

5J- 

1 

30* 

30* 

30* 

56% 

4HftKorrM 1J5 


Boadtrade—Index- 

BesisOec.n, 1946 -1881 

Mott. Lwm. 
win 9Ui ttjj 

O Vte— 9530 8931 



Tokyo Exchange 

M April 26 1979 

WmM >\ Price 

I lo Yon •" _ 

iTZpPX/ AioMGfcm 340 Matsu 6.Wks 


xVnother v - 
siM*(*(‘ss[ul year for 

Credlto 


Net profit for the year Lit. 4.897 083.040 
(inaeased by '21.10%): Lit. J. 800.000.000 
ID the shareholders. Lit. 3.000.000 000 to the 
Ordinary Reserve. 

Dividend per share: Lit. 1 80 
flasl year: Lit. 150 p.s ). * 

Customer's deposits amounted to 
Lit. 1.632.367.034.821 f+ 23,50%) 
and advances to clients rose to 
Lit. 704.022373.690 (+ 18.30%). 

All sectors achieved good results: secu- 
rities turnover showed fe profit of Lit. 
1 2. 938 .000. 854. foreign activities were 
further improved and figures regarding 
foreign exchange transactions' profits .were 
Lit. 1.285.362.551. 

Documentary credits, endorsements, gua- 
rantees and acceptances continued to grow 
and totalled Lit. 144.435.81 8.1 66 
The bank is net supplier in the interbank 
markets. 

Personnel T622 people were employed in 
1978 {+ 7,7%). 

it has been and it is our policy to increase 
our domestic are) International activity by 
holding our services entirely at the disposal 
of our clients, and giving all manors our 
highly personalized attention. 

The majority of our shades has been 
recently taken over by “Monte dei Paschi" 
group. 

Chairman: Mr. Cetera Panizza 
Vice Chairmen-. Mr. Edoardo Catelbni 
Mr. Alberto Falck 

General Manager: Mr. Giuseppe Lazzaroni. 
Chief Foreign Manager: Mr. Haim on do Eruzzi. 


HIGHUGHTSOFOUR 
BALANCE SHEET FOR 1978: 

(in billion Lit.) 

DEPOSITS AND LIABILITIES 


• customer deposits 

1.632 

• jSue lo banks 

267 

• others 

204 

LOANS 

• customers 

704 

m due from banks at sight 

164 

• others 

429 

• compulsory reserves with 
Banca <f Italia. 

23T- 

GOVERNMENT AND OTHER 


SECURITIES 

641 

CAPITAL, RESERVES 


AND FUNDS 

66 


Old tradition, modem banking. 


CREHTO 

Milan, Italy 


AMfllGfaM 

Canon 

Dal Nip. Print 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Hitachi 

Homta Mater 
Clteh 
Joann Air L. 
KanMlELPw. 
Kao 5oa» 

Kirin Brewery 

Komatsu 
Kubota 
Matsu El. Ind 


Yob * ' _ 

340 Matsu fLWks 
5Tb MltsuMNw-IM. 
582 MltsutM Carp. 
317 Mitsui Co. 
on Minutaahl 
.264 Nippon Else. 

»t Sharp 
212 SenyCo n> 

2804 Sumitomo Bank 
968 TalshoMarlnp 
495 TokKta 
438 TplIJn 
349 Tokyo Marine 
284 Taroy 
74i Tovato 


11* 6*HeteneC 
21(6 14 Hellrlnt 1.10 
51V. 35(6 HetmrP 68 
2* 1* HemCap 
21* 13* Hercules 1 
23* l7*Hcrshv 130 
1316 7 Hesston 
31* 25<6 Heublln 1J2 
97. 72* HewtIPk 60 

11* 5ViHghV11 .10 
37* .25(6 Hlllpnbd 1J» 
35* 22 Hilton 1 
23(6 15* Hobart !«' 
33* 15V. Holiday 66 
29* 15 HoBvS 
11* 10 HmeG afl.ia 
40 29 Homstk 1.10a 

30* 22 Honda 47e 
75* 49(6 Honwll 730 
25* 18* Hoovll 1J4 
5* 2* Horizon 

34* 24* HOSPCP JO 
27 13*Hostlnn 60 
38* 19* Handle 1 JOa 
32% 21*HauoM MO 
11* 5* HouaFb 36 

21* 16* HoushF US- 
35* 28* HauF Pf2Ja 
33* 24* Housin ZM 
29* 19* HousNG 1 
17 9 HowdJn A* 

18* 15* Hubbrd 160 
21 17 HudsMIn 

51* 30V. NuglnTI .92 
33* 14(6 Human 35 


5 5 7* 

63 4 55 17* 

J11 29 51 

2 2* 

5J0 7 318 19* 

08 6 118 19* , 

10 10* 

5.110 323 29* 

617 24* 97 

1 J 11 54 8* 

38 8 X4 34* 

38.12 578 34(6 33*. 33*+ * 

58 8 -61 IB* 18* 18* 

33 9 360 79'6 1«* 19* 

5 17* 17(6 17(6+ * 

10. 13 Ml* 10* 10*+ <6 

3611 91 31* 31* 31* - 

U 15 3 27* 27* 27*- * 

38 7 474 48* 48 48(6+ (6 

50 4 58 32* 22 22 

21 3* 3* 3* — * 

18l| 11 29 28* 29 + 16 

38 4 5 »' 16 10 + (ft 

3.1 12 407 U38* 38* 38*+ * 
4*4 7 4 31* 31* 31*+ (ft 

6.1 14 35 6 . 5* > 5*- * 

88 A 389 18* 18 18*+ * 

83 ' 5 30 29* 30 + Vi 

76 7 735 30V. 29* 30*+ * 

3J 9 460 28* 28* 20*+ * 

48 7 639 11* J1 11 

8810 9 II* 18 18*+ * 

38 16 18* IS* 18*+ * 

1.910 351 49* 48(6 49*+ 1* 

U14 47 S 28* 28*+* 


7* 7*- * 
17* 17*— * 


SO*- * 
2* 

19*+ * 
19*+ * 
10* 

29*+ * 
96*+ * 
- 8(6+ * 
36*- 


16* 9* KeyjCan 
25* 16* Keys Int 48 
30* 27* KldtteW 1 JO 
52 41*Kldde-prB4 
50* 42* KWde ptC 4 
50* 39% Ktmha ZJ8 
18 ■ 71* KlnoDSt 80 ' 
30* 16* Klrjch 133 
29* 22 KntgtRd'60 
25* 14*Xoptu1n .7 
3516 27* Kotrtl pf Z75 
.31* 19(ft Kaltmr 64 
24* mfcXoppr* U0 
53* 43* Kapprpf 4 
12* 7W Korocp J4 
49* 43 Xraff y 
1216 7* KrWllr - 

42* 30* Kroger 282 
T9* 13* KUMbi 80a 
14 9 Kvaor JO 


26 4 5 50 

1210 534 26* 

48 51238 20* 
58. -.1 69* 
68 2 39 

4.9 4 404 24* 
5212 61 V 

35 8 77 7* 

44 9 534 10* 

10.7 20 25* 
ML *90 37* 

36 7 31 27* 

98 Z10 10* 

ML 8 04 18(6 
.73 7 7 30(6 

18.7 53 19* 

9J 2 24* 
« 2 24* 

.3 102 7* 
7J -0 19* 
17 8 112 8* 

V S » M* 
U 7 x5S .10 
0510 73 IS* 

88 7. 4 13* 
14 9 39(09* 
17151 734 22* 
10. 7 43 19* 
28 6 143 U* 

1211 421 48* 

6 8 - 12 * 

2-113 127 23* 
51 5 167 3116 
88 2 44* 

98 4 44* 

6JZ 7. MM 40* 
68 7 138 13* 
66 S .11 Wfc. 
26 M) 59 23* 
53 5 T36 19 
9.1 2 30* 

1112 105 30*; 

55 7 31.31* . 
9.1 zlOS.- 45 
36. 4 21 18 
6J 7 121. 45* 

12' 9* 

58 6 84 40* : 

56 0 2 14* 

63 5 45 13 


55 55*+l* 

26 26*+ * 
20(6 20(6 
69* 69*' 

79 79 +1 

23* 24* + * 
28* 29 —(6 
7* 7*-% 

15* 16 + * 
25* 25*+ * 
37(6 37*—* 
26* 20*-* 
10* 10* 

18 18* ' 

20 : 28*+ * 
19* 19* . 
24* 24%— *, 
24 34 — * 

7 7*+ * 

19* 19*+ * 
8* S*+ (ft 

14* 14% 

9% 10 + * 
1ft* IS*- * 
13* 13* 

38* 39* +1* 
23* 22*+ * 
19* 19*- * 
44* 14%— * 
47% 48 + * 
12* 12*— * 
23 . 23 + Vft. 
30* 31*+ * 
44* 44*+ * 
44* 44%^.% 
45* 4098+1 
13* 13* 

19* , 19(4r- * 
23%"* 23*+ % 
18 1IK+ * 
20* 30*- * 
30% 30*+ * 
21% *1* 

44 44: —1 

10 -10 + 1ft 

45* 45* 

9* 8*+ * 
39* 40*+ * 
14* M*— * 
12 * 12 * 


1.910 351 49% 
16 14 47 39 


49%+l% 
28*+ % 


13* 5*LFE .Mkr 
18% 14* LITCQ . 1 

13% 5% LTV . 

19 9* LTVA . J2t 

9* 6% LTV pfl 
3S* 2146 LTV pf 240 
12* 8 LQuint UBt 

22* TObLocGOB L86 . 
24% 1346 LamSe T 
23% 12*LomBrv ] 
35* 22% Lorter JO 
15 8* LftwtCh J8 : 

24 14% LmTSb 1JD4 . 

59 36 LftarS pf!25 


8 8 

21 17 
503 9* 

1 13% 

2 9% 
54U2S* 

196 11 
7 20% 
48 24*' 
S3 19* 
.5 3»- 
90 13* 
798 20* 
-» • 58- * 


8 + * 
14*— * 
9%+ * 
13%-— % 
-* 9Vft— % 
28*+.% 
18%+ * 
20 *- % 
24*+ % 
19*+ % 
35*+.% 
13%-=-"* 
' 20 *+ %. 
SO +1* 


12 Month Stack. 5ft. Jfcm. *25* 

High Low Dtv. In 1 YU. P/E TOOL Hloh Low Quw.j^ 








fllM'l 


;'-p $ H [ '■» 






f 1 1 ' W *7 








I I W’‘ 






tJtMl 




Ed|ptS 



12. z200 
12. X420 

70 

64 

69% 

d65 

70. "-H u- 

65%-fftq w 

12. i7 a 

w 


a -* 

9X 1 

EC 


zriL=i 

8J 2 

23K 

23* 

23% 1 JAw/ff 

11. 6 552 
5 

S3 7 16 
3X11 18 

1 

14* 

2% 

T9 

27% 

14%+. 1 

19%+9'fijlwrt 

27%-T 

ax 9 76 
1-713 3 


26*- 

18* 

3l*+» 

IK6 — ■ 

ii*.. . 

Ul 4 
4211 67* 

Hf 

KTO 


Curt '..j 

9J 6 44 


■ i 


M 9 23 

22 8 108 
53 6 39 
84 9 7 

B 

u* 

35% 

51* 

11% 

IM 

m 

n% fe. 

%'»■.. 

"W '.'Jr 

11. 4 



Pr 

vWiS.- 

6.1 7 1070 
13 37* 

1J 7 49 

7.1 7 292 
12 275 

83 6 2 

uTW 

2% 

UW 

13V 

12 

14% 

77% 

2* 

14* 

12* 

11% 

14% 

S3 

ii%- r 

M%-i 

ft»n. 

%r. 'O 

1318 79 
63 6 278 
SJ 7 10 

£ 


ism 


Umm-iMya 

n 



9 A 21 

•19% 

w* 




Eft 


Wi+%. 


W. .',r 

■bTJTj 

e*+1 


Irt* 




S* 5%MlgTrAm 7 68 S* S* »*-* 

(Coniinued on Pace ll) 


Notice of ' Redemption 


Eurocurrency Interest Rates 



IM. 10*- 10* 

ZM. 1896-19%. 

3M. 10%-Wfc . 
IM. 1013716-1015/16 
IV. ia%-HM~ 


53/M-5S/16 
J*-5* 
5*-5% 
596-5* . 
6 - 6 *. 


s win 

Franc Start! oc 

15/16-17/16 T2V*-m» 

1 5/1+1 7/16 . 1 121/M- 12 5/14 
1*-1% . 121/16-125/16 

2* -2% " 12 1/16-125/1 6 

2% -2% 1 1 13/16-12 i/16 


Fn«» 
: FroM 
77/14-7 n/U 
794-9 
7*-M 
■ 9/16413/16 
9%-W 


Currency Rates 


By reading across ibis table of the April 24, 1979 's closing inter 
foreign exchange rates, one can find the value of the major airrf 
in the national currencies of each of the following financial centaa^^. 
These rates do not take into account banlc service charges. 



FMiH. 

lAMtooCbl 


s 

: c 

DM 

FF 

I.IL . Cktr. 

Wrarn. 

S-teF. 

10545 

-4J49- 

108J9* 

47.14* 

03434 — 

- 6834* 

11966 

30.055 

63.1+5 I5J70S 

6.9025 

3J605* 14.0385 


17509 

1.8953 

X92 

. 

43 J2* 

2J44x 9Z34* 

630? 

noe 

2.86745 

y ■ 

3.919 

9JOOR 

I.746J 42*625 

63.19 

3549« 

H44.95 l.TJKIS- 

440.17 

194.18 

411.46 

atra 

49150 




NewVwfcte) 10675 IJM8 4351 

Rwfa 4J57 9JW9S '22986* 

Zwidi I.7I64S 3J4915 'W.6U25* 39.4301 


NA ' 1054 NA. w I.7H 

5.VS7 x 2(212* 144805“ 

’ 0.20? IS 83J52TJ » 5.711* — rr l- 




I JJ47I 0645 SOS 15298! 5J1467 I.IZ7.SJ 17«|0 401514 12922.’ 


2* faflowinj ve doOir vxloct as oooicd on Ihe laodcs forogp Mthiao mstkw: ^ 


Ul Caamnneal-fraore (bi Anouau needed lo buy w pound.' (tiAnaiunb. needed 1 
(nUmikorioa.tciUmBor ijwo. T 

. ECU rEuropon Cuneriey UniLM quoted in Brnscts. • 

T^orofTji^ruc^te&(ropanamt<rnc2pm^ra«atorN<^Y^ 


. : ''SW.'Ai 

ft 




HBM 


BUY A 

FLORIDA BANK 


Qualified parties please contact us for details of Rorkto 
bonks available with equity investments of from $6 rrvl~ 

lion 4 a tic Viz. l _ * _i ■ . r ~ 


' — """ wHunjr iijwsnnenis ot nram 

|te»n to $45; mHlicw). . We furnish complete refewte®**. 
Please ask for Robert ,L Hoyt, Kori bishopric or AM 
Pareira. crts 

(305)379-073 1 

Mrst Eqnlty Cerp. of Florida 

'. ■; . . fnvmthnent Banket* 

Wvcf., Mkimi. Florido 3313i 













'i ..l 


\ INTERNATIONAL HERAU>TR1BUNK, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 

s Z NYSE Nationwide Trading 3 p.m. Prices Apr. 24 W k a* 

i * ^^'«»di^theraiiobwidcpjtasopto3p4iuonWaDScrm. • 

!°°1Sw V ' • * - - r , , IB OttPMlVH 50 U 4 21 ll« 

J u lf» ft- raAttniti Stock Sb - aiua' PrS . 13 Month Stock . SH. - 3 run. *PreJ . 12 Month Sleek 5*. 3 pan. Pm impunG lita HjSb 

i; **'t v jHktti Low Diw.tni YW. P/E lOOt Htek lx»w Q«oi.3p>iu High Ura Dlv. bi S VkL P/E UOs. High Lo«r Quc*. 3 run. Mail Low Oiw.inS VIOL P/E 100s. Htoti Low Dual. 3pjn. 10% 4 plerl M 25 5 7] 101k 

f i,* tl i : : 1 1 : — — ■ ; - m 22 pu«xv 15a +2 f 47 Mft 

'• 111 ' • f/YinKnT.n.1 — r._ _ <B 4M NtaMpf 525 11. 330 30 SO SO —1 — P— R — '■ 3434 24ft Plotter 1.92 S3 9 17 33ft 

ta* iS' (Contfamed frosi Page 10) jw. NtooSh ijto «' 38 m to* 1044+1 *. »* is*phhgp m x? • a mo 17 17*+ * ?» i«6PioiirE_i __ _ w * a 


Hla '' 4, ! i * :? 




OfM 

TOMonlh Stock • SH. - 3 pjil Prev 

H W* LOW Dtv.faiS Vld. P/E Mb High LOW QuOL 3 tun. 


Orff* 

. 12 Month Stock 51s. 3 ajtl Prow 

Mail Low Dtv.JnS viol P/E 100S. Hiati Low Quat.3pjn. 




2:*s a a- 


'« hi TSftMerHar L26 48 9 44 29V. 28* 29 ^ U 

■' 2k? ^ 54^ 36 MOtrota 1.20 28W 1*7' 42ft 42ft 42*- * 

I S; »,! «Vj 27 MfFral 120 U> 11 M 3344 - 33ft 33ft— 14 

M» *. ■ l; \ TP* 24lkMtSTorx32" S3 7 a 26* "26ft 26*+ ft 

* \lU*k SttMonfard fl W iT-ft 

t. J? it?: / MO"W PlJO S3 ' 25 7* - 7ft 7ft 

IL *.' uj hi' * Iff* UsiMynsrra 128 7JT0 7 15ft 14ft M*+ * 

?!• rH uSjfflfc ltUMunArin itwi 10 icu. "421 7r 


£> iTltt* llftMurphCUB 43310 19 ISft 14ft Sft+ ft 

?' *157* 341A MurpDll 1 2013 W 49ft 42ft 

m ft'S? Ji..!* 1 !!*?. ' 547 7 ww» wft ioft-ft 


TO* 12ft MutOro 132 


10 13ft 13ft 12ft 


7ft MyersL 30 48 7 69 lift lift *1*+ ft 
* 5 ; i _ ~ H» H - H — 


• 4 " a »•. 5 • 12ft WCH ■ ■ JH '■ 3Jf 9 43 17 «ft 77... 

■ ' « w V ! 72ft 49 NCR 140 ' 23 9 5U 49 . 48 Aflft+i 

IS ,l !“ >T. s g* 14ft NUnd 1J0 53 9 236 £ft S m+ ft 

■ » . I ' S 'twlSbl , 112 47 l 785 23ft »h+.» 

i« • 7ft Ntf F 3 $ 54 -736 701 73&+ ii 

in lu! 1* 28ft 23 NOWSCO 1 50 ' 43 B 227 TtV, 24 24ft+ ft 

' <. ? ,7 - Sift WftNoka. 136 4JM7 w 34 Sft 34 + ft 

1 V Ji ; gft Wft NOfCO 58 43H 39 Uft Mftl ft 

4' T? &s: 39 2Tft Nostwo 1 J0 55 S 71 2JW2 2ftt^7A4-ft 

i 11 ?: ? «ft IS*"?*"-' ■» uw 131 Wft 34ft ;Sft- ft' 

' t l ' S : » 113, 75 131 28ft 2fft- 28ft+ Ur 

... F** 14 WtCtm J2 M 9 10 19ft 19 19ft+ ft 

(v i’TM,: »ft 9 NtClYL 50 41 9 49 lj 14ft l«ft— U. 

,* - ’i ; 2Li‘ Z7ft NtPWr ij». . 4.1-5. 11 31 n 31 _ m 

»: C ’h! 5?* « NOtDtat 150 7.9 7 2J7 22ft ZIft 22ft + 1ft 

•; J v u. «, 19ft NOW PT1JS 9.1 3 36ft 20ft 20ft + ft 

' Z' IT 1 ».. 2J0 95.4 « 25ft 25ft 2Sft_ ft 


35 » a 17 


t W *- 172ft 49 NCR 150 ~ 23 9 514 49 . 68 

17. S2* IMNUnd 1J0 53 9 236 2314 23 

,U ! V* 19 NLT 1.12 47 7 *5 Oft » 


>S, TF4i 7V7NVF 9 


58 49ftNkMofUS 11. z30 50 30 50 -1 

'Uft 9V. NbioSh 151a « 38 l«b rtft lOft-h ft - 

30ft 26ft N1 COR 252 85 7 41 2Sfc 28ft «k 

30ft 36- NICOR pfLfO 47 1 2Bft 28ft 28ft . 

279k ZDftNormn 144 - 72 t 02 »- 25ft 25ft 

26ft 18ftNomn 150 75 4 117 B aft aft— ft 

27 20ft Norris 150 57 6 31 34ft 23ft 23ft- ft 

. » MftNACoM 56 25 6 3 22ft. 22ft 22ft 4- ft 

5 2ft NoAMtg 33 4ft 4ft 4ft 

36ft 34ft NQAPhi 150 5.1 5 3* 29ft 29ft 29VH- ft 
lift -SftNoCAlr 30 XI . 4 72 M A 6164- ft 

TYi IftNoCAlf Wt 64 2 1ft 1ft 

10ft fftfioBStUt USB IL 7.363 9ft Oft 9 —ft 

17ft a NCOtSL JO 43 5 S V .17 17 

lift 15ft NlmtPS T5D 9510x114 Uft Uft I5ft+ ft 

43ft 3Zft NOTNGs 240 63 7 345 431k 42ft 42ft— ft 

TOlft 96WM0NG pfBAB 85 z20 94 ft. fift 

27ft 22ft NOSIPWX16 95 7 67 22ft 22ft 22ft— ft 

1 103ft 9SftNSPw atom 95 Z30 91ft 9SV6 91ft— ft 

•4ft -73ft NSPw nf 7 M z34» 75ft 74ft JHM-1 

4»fe 25ft MorT«l 50 2011 473 40 : 39ft 40 + ft 

4» aOftHOrtTP 150 S3 5 74 34 33ft 34 + ft 

37ft BftNwWAJrf 50 3510 646 28ft 2f 2*ft+ ft 

2M a NwtBcp 1.14 4J 7 133 Mft 26H 24ft+ ft 

■ 39% HftMwtCnr X40 73 6 ff 32ft 38ft 3Zft+ ft ' 

as 23 Nwtind US SJ 6 314 30ft 29ft BK+ ft 

JW 9ft NwMLf 1 b UL 9 II 10U tO H — ft 

zn* 73 Norton 1.15 43 7 40 27ft 26ft 27ft+ ft 

aft U NorSbn J2b if 4 157 Uft 15ft 15ft 

a 25ft Nucor A* 1.1 7 25 (1 40ft 40ft+ ft 


L* U ■ WftN^FG 238 95.4 . a 2ft 25ft 2Sft- ft 

Ifc ZjM 24 NPC 0233 .9.1 3 25ft 25ft 25U 

lit 1 IS, 15ft NfftGvp 157 7J 4 in Uft Uft lift— ft 

*>» I*. 4ft ZftNfrtHORl B Xh MS 7U 


'-»* - V 


’’■* It- 4ft Zft NfltHora . B0 2ft 2ft 2ft 

9% 7ftNHJWVBJ« 33 4 44 6ft 8ft 896+ ft 
•n« a 27 15ft NMdCr 56 3312 95 24ft 24ft 24ft+ ft 

H '* t ■ 16ft 12ft NiMotf E s 11 174 15ft 15ft UV6+ ft 

il £’ 20ft 11WNWHMSV56 4313 30 13 U 13 

«■. £ - 24ft 15ft NtPrwt 150 9.111 1 16ft 16ft . 16ft 

•V. i' 33ft 18ft INSorniC - 9 336 aft 20ft 21ft+ ft 

*• *• 18ft 13 NtSvIn lJOB 43 6 13 17ft T7 T7VS+ ft 

f' 23ft 14ftN5tontf 154 75 6 A Uft Uft 16ft 

>1-. ‘ 35ft 25ft NOttS tl 250 77 6 99 B* 30ft 33 + w 

; 52ft 34HiN0tDm 2JD . 47 5 331 > 44ft M Mu+t 
it, V 35 ZtftNotmpnAO 55 « TO m TO9 6 

1* . T 24ft 20ft NovPw lu 10. 9 35 aft 21H aftl ft 

1Q-, 24tt a NbwP nf2J0 U. 1400 21ft 21ft lift 

Jl ^ 20ft 18ft NovP pfl.95 IL 1- Mft Uft wL. ft 
■l £ 24ft WftNEnaEI X10 10.6 77 a 20ft 

lf*f ** 1716 15 NEnGE 150 1T. 6 "41 15ft 15ft 15ft 

* . f 1 f* - 517 37 42ft 41 4Zft+1 


41 

25U Nucor 

A* 

34 

U*OKC 

130 

32 

14* Oakum 

40 

26* 

U*Ocdp«t las 

13* 

4ft OcdP#f 

■Wt 


97ft 78ft Oh Ed 01844 IL 
109 99ft OPE Pfl048 JO. 
83 74ft OhP Pf 854 IL 
25ft aftOhP PfG227 1& 
123 TT4 OhP PfF 14 T2. 


•t r. 24ft 20ft N Ena El XI0 
X, V 17ft U NEnGE 150 

. I T7 ilCNiiH tn 


jj ’ £- 29ft 26ft NEnP P<276 97 1 28ft »ft Uftl ft 

aftNEnaT 3.U 95 8 17 TOM S-M 

oii'- 5* ^ ^SEG 7^8 10.7 74 17* 1« 70ft- ft 

— , • 42 5 NVS Of UJ IX zlOO 36 34 . 36 

I.; ’ »ft 82 NVS Pf 850 11. 8140 84 O S — ft 


-7 • 45 35 NVS Pf 3J5 

S 96ft 83 NVS Pf 850 


« 32ft 21ftKMi4>an 50 24 7 7 aft- a 3} — ft 

' s* u ssr-f! h» “ “ **+»■ 


1. V 66 Nswf PM50 
V 13ft 7ft Newark 
^ 3.- 15ft 13ft NioMP 154 
- 39 33 NioMpf 340 

L k. 54ft 45Vi NipMpI 455 


54 2 81 |1 a —ft 

U 575 Ul3ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
IX 7 604 13ft 13ft 13ft—' ft 

IL z50 34 34 34 

IX eMO 48ft 48ft 48ft +1 


26ft MftOcdPot US £846 1030 aft a 7Vn+ ft 
Sf 4ft OcdPtft wt 204 Ift 7ft 8ft+ ft 

42ft 26ft OcdP PZ2J6 A3 2 34ft 34ft 34ft 

Mfc 48ft OcdP pfSLU il 35 70 48ft 70 +H4 

82ft 41ft OcdP Pf 4 55 .4 68 67 68 +1 

26ft a OcdP pf25D 11. 3B 23 23 

24ft 19ft OcdP pQJO IL 8 21ft 21ft 21ft— ft 

35ft 26ftOgden 150 59 5 a 30ft 30ft 30ft + ft 

19 14ftOM0Bd T76 1X13 341 Uft Uft 15ft— ft 

43ft -MfeOhEd p£L90 IX 810 36ft 36ft 36ft— 1 

49 41 Oh EC 04440 IX ZlOO 42 42 42 + ft 

97ft 78ftOhEdPft44 IL dS 78ft 78ft 78ft— ft 

109 99ftOhE PH 048 |X 1200 Witt lQltt mtt 
a 74ft OhP Pf 854 IL fll H 474 75— ft 

25ft attOhP PfGZ27 TX . 6 27ft 22ft 22ft 

la ru OhP PfF u a. no no* iuft ncft— 1 
18ft 16 OfctoGE 150 95 8 789 UfttflSft Uft— ft 

24ft UftOfctaNG 158 83 6 x21 aft aft aft— ft 

25tt Uft OUn 58 39 7 4U a 22ft 22ft- ft 

23ft UVSrOmidB 56 35 7 8 2Tft 21ft aft+ ft 

lift 9ftOPdlko 54 75 4 -1 10ft 10ft 10ft— ft 

Uft 14ft OranRk 1J2 1X7 » Uft 14ft 14ft+ ft 

10ft 4ftOroiKM 30 30 4 49 6ft Aft 6ft 
lift 7ft OrtonC J0 X7 8 174 lift 10ft 1IM+ ft 
23ft. 15ft OutMOr 150 75 S 14 17h 17ft 17ft 

33ft aftOutWCo 1 45 4 4 20ft 30ft 20ft 

Uft U OverhDr 54 45 6 M 17ft 17tt I7tt— ft 

26ft 14 - OvrnTr 110 £4 5 9 20ft 19ft 20ft+ ft 

29 .20tt OvarSit Jtt> 25 5 49 25ft 24ft 25tt— ft 

35ft MftOwanC M0 4 J 6 452 26ft 26ft 2»ft- tt 

34ft 17UOWMIU 156 65 5- 76 20ft 20ft 20ft+ ft 

lift 8 - ObdriUP 58 - 65 5 19 M 9ft 10 


19tt 15ft PHH GP M X7 9 22 17ft 17 17tt+ ft 

Oft 8 PNBM7 56* U I Id IK 10 10tt+ tt 

aft 23ft PPG 154 64 6 140 28* a «ft+ tt 

aft 12 PSA 5 159 H 14ft 14ft 

Uft llttPOCAS 154 IX 11 12ft 12 12 + ft 

25ft a* PacGE 232 TO. 6 *02 23 22ft 27tt— ft 

22 UftPacUo 2 95 4 55 21ft aft' aft— ft 

57ft 38ft PoCLm 230 5513 W 44ft 44ft 44ft 

Oft 17 PNwTd 154 85 7 19 If lift 19 + ft 

a 1914 PocPw LW 95 8 140 20ft 20 20 — ft 

W4 U PocTT 150 M ft 75 14ft 1«ft l«ft+ ft 

16ft 10 PDCTln 50 48 7 9 Uft 16ft 16ft+ ft 

13ft 6ft PcdnoW M 55 4 «3 f Bft M 

20ft Uft PofcnBc Mfl 49 5 38 -17ft 17ft 17ft + V. 
H> KkPomkte .12 3567 40 4ft 4 4 

10ft 5ft PonAm 2 007 6 5ft Stt— ft 

SOtt SAftPonEP 280 58 7 18 48 47ft 48 + ft 

23ft UftPoprcff LI4b XI 7 » 18ft lift lift 
Uft IBft Potobs 158 7512 3 Uft Uft Uft + ft 
27ft lMPcrkDrs^M 10 B 364 25ft 2S% fitt+lft 
30ft 22ft portion 150 44 I 12 27ft 36ft 37*+ ft 

a 28ft PatkPn 400 15 9x89 Aft » 32ft+ ft 

Mtt 7 PtJtPtl 305 Uft Uft 13tt+ tt 

21ft 15ft POVftAw 40 35 7 11 » 18ft Wft+ ft 

29ft 19ft Poobdy JOfa Ul 90 aft 20ft 2T*+ ft 

Uft 5ft taw 100 9 Bft 9 + ft 

a* 13ft PanCan 114 aft 20* 30ft— ft 

Wft 9ft PMnCn prA IX 10ft 10ft 10ft 

6ft 5 PiMOt PTB HO 5ft 5H 5ft+ ft 

6tt 2ft PanDbc 77 5ft 5ft 5ft 

tH.SVbPMMV 1J6 59 7 664 30ft 39tt 29ft+ ft 

64 51ft PoCO PM42 7J ‘ 1 64 64 44 + ft 

22ft 19 PftPL 254 11 7 163 19ft 19ft 19ft 

50ft 43ftPaPL«*U0 9-9 Z120 45V* -44ft 44H.+ tt 

51ft 44 PffPLpfASI 95 *120 45ft 45ft 45ft— 1 

Wft N PflPLpflL40 IX *50 81 81 . 81 

in 101 PflPLpf 11 11. M0 184 103ft 103ft— 1ft 

127 112 POPL pf U IX *10 113 TO 113 —1 

42ft 30ft PMwN 130 75 7 49 31* 31ft 31ft- ft 

36ft 19* PUB** pflAO 7J 1 20* 20* 20*+ ft 

38 - 26* psora* 250 55 10 1219 u38ft 37* 3ttt+ ft 

M 7*P*QPDr 54 25 A 9 Wtt IB* TO 
37* JlttPWwG* 288 85 7 103 34tt 33* 34 + ft 


33* 23* ppMICa 


4510 637 » 34* 23 + ft 


34ft IBttFPridnE 52 1514 321 a* 31 

17* BftPprtoc 7 120 10 94 


17* 8W Portae 7 120 10 9ft 9*+ ft 

49* MttPdri* 150 U11 63 36* 36ft 36*- tt 

38* 27ft POWOln 154 25 9 34 37* 36* 37*+ * 

25* 20*P*tR* X470 IL 8 21ft 23tt 23ft+ ft 

a if petRi Pius 85 6 a* aft a*+ w 

a 28* Pfiaw 152 45111400 32 a* 31*+ tt 

30tt 19* PtMrtPO 50 25a 247 a* 25* 26tt+ ft 

19 15 PMIaEI 150 TL 9 473 16ft 15* M 

52* 42 PhHE P6458 IL MO 43ft 43 43 —1ft 

a* 73ft PtUlE pf 7 9J n00 75ft 75ft 7Sft+ ft 

180ft Uft PhHE Pt8J5 TO. Z300 86ft Uft Uft . 

■8* 72* PhHE P4755 11. 1330 74 74 74 +]' 

106ft flftPtlllE Pf9J0 IX Z5D 93 93 93 

86ft 73 PhUE Pf750 IX 101 77* 75* 75* 

«* 19* PWtaSoh 1.10 39 9 24028 27* 28 + tt 

76* 6IWPM1MT 250 3710 569 67* 67ft C7*+ ft 

8ft 3*Ptdllnd JO i7 5 27 4* 4* 4ft+ ft 

13* 9* PMIlnd Pf T TX 3 ID 9*10— ft 

36ft 28* PhMPtl 150 35 B1746U36* 35* 36ft+ * 


18 VttPttflVH 50 Sl 2 4 a 11* 

14ft «*PiedAvt 54 15 6 37 13 

17* 15*PI«MG 156a M 713 17tt 
10* . 6 Pterl 50 M 1 71 10ft 

47* 37 PiWXV 153 45 f 47 Mft 

34* 24ft Plotter 1.92 57 ? 17 33* 

27ft UftPtonrEI TO i 22 

29 a* PltMVB 150 45 8 246 27ft 

25ft lfftPIKFrs .90 L0 9 1 22* 

26 16 Pimin 1-20 A930 433 20* 

TO* 4*PtonRsc 8 111 6* 

B* 13ft Ptarrtm .16 414x262 lftt 

32* 0*pksvbov .12 4 a 204 if* 

Mtt 16ft PtatHsr JDt 25 9 6 a* 

aft U Pncumo T il 8 4 If* 

16 lift PoeoPd -50b 1511 2467 u16* 

«tt 29*PotaraM 1 19411912 36ft 
30ft ISftPndren 50 XI 6 319 t9tt 
36 aftPonaTof 1.14 40 5 5 20* 
aft 13 Portae JQb U 1 8 17* 
00* 70ftPortr P&5D 75 z200 75 
19* lift PflrtGE 1 JO 9.912 1U 17* 

» 23ft PorG pf240 IL 31 24ft 

39tt 27ft Pofttch 1.16 XI I 8 37ft 

15* UttPotmEI 154 TO. 8 112 13 

47 39 PMEIPMdM 95 aS690 44 

28 >A 30ft Premier M X311 1 28ft 

44* att PrimeCm 22 lu 36* 

n 78ft ProctQ 350 4212 359 Mtt 

Iff* 9V& PnodRili s 9 21 l>10* 

a llttproftr 55* 1513 2 24tt 

18ft 13* PSvCof 140 99 9 930 16* 

24* a*PSCd ptXlO 95 2 Mtt 

29 24 PSInd X32 95 9 HO 25* 

42* 35ft PS In pfXSC 94 an 36ft 

13ft 1DU PSIn Pt 154 9.5 Z250Q 11 

Uft 10* PStn Pf 158 M 22190 11* 
22ft ISftPSvNH XU 11. 6X134 IB* 
28* S PSNH pf2JS II. y350 39* 
22* 18* PSvNM 1 J6 85 7 44 If* 

24* a II. 7 285 20* 

50ft 42 
25ft a* 

27tt 24ft 
80ft 76 
■7* 76 
187 97 

10* 5ft 

0* 3ft 

7* 4* 

IStt 15* 

48 28ft 
»M 14* 

8* 3 
30* 22ft 
27* a* 

1 9ft 12* 

29* 18* 

12ft 4* _ _ 

— R — B — R — 

31* 23* RCA 140 49 9 6a 27* 
74 57* RCA Pf 4 64 1 60tt 



!5, 1979 


Chtte 
3eon. Prev 
Low Guot.3pan. 


11* 11*+ ft 
12* U + ft 
17tt 17* 

9* 10tt+ ft 
Bft 36ft + * 
33* 33* 

a a + * 

V 27ft -f * 
22* 22*— tt 
20ft 20*+ tt 
6ft 6tt+ ft 
18* -19tt+ * 
19 1V*+ * 

a* 21*+ * 
19* IT*- ft 

15* 15*— tt 

34* a — * 
10* 18*— ft 
31* 20*+* 
16* 17*+ * 
7S 75 
17ft 17ft- ft 
24ft 24*- ft 
37ft 37ft 
U* 12* 

42* 44 -1ft 

a* 2ift + ft 

36* 36*+ * 
79tt BOtt+t 
ID* TO*+ tt 
Mtt 24tt+ ft 
16 Uft 
22* 22* 

25ft 25* + ft 
36ft 36ft 
Wft 11 + tt 
lift 11*+ ft 
lift lift 
25* 25*+ * 
19* 19* 

20* 20ft— * 


Page 1 1 


CtiTO 

12 Month Stock Sts. 3 P.m. Prev 

High Low Dtv.iaS Vld. P/E 100s- Hfth Low Ouot.3 pm 


Choc 

12 Mon m Stock Sit 3 !*" , Pr ** 

Mon Low Div.lns YW p/E UKK Htoh Low 3uot.3PJV* 


SB* 39* ROythn U0 XS 9 235 4*tt «5* 

32* 18*R«edB0t 1 42 I 189 23* 23* 

a l2ttRBRrt 153 UL 8 a 14* 14* 

7* 3ft R o d m an Mm 15 4 61 4* 4* 4* 

11* 7ft RoecsCP 40 44 7 I » » W 

m a* ReevsS 140 45 4 1 30ft 30* 30ft + ft 

Uft 18* RetchCh JA 5410 xl U* 12ft 12*+ ft 

41 29*RainEI 140 L7 I 147 34 33*34+* 

4314 29tt RdnGo 1400 19 4 59 41tt 41 41 

45* 45ft ReIG pf 226 XS l Cttt 63tt 43tt+ * 

27ft 23* ReiG of 240 IX 2 25* 25* 25* 

28* S (Win pfXM IX 3 26ft Mft 26ft 

25ft 11* RapCo AS* Ul U 34* Mft 24*+ tt' 

a* a RapFnS 154 45 5 I 30* 30* 30*+ tt 

3 IftRopMtB M 2ft 2ft 3tt+ ft 

2 Itt a* ReoSH 150a 45 3 41 27* 27ft 27*+ * 

25ft 20ft RtpTtX 1 45 5 I 23tt 33 23ft+ ft 

U* 9 RftvOll 54 1513119 Utt 15* 16tt+ * 

36* IV* RMMI nfUS 49 73 35* 24ft 35ft + * 

33ft 20* RoueeO 44 25 TO 944 25* 2Sft 2S*+1 
Wft lift Raw* 4 94 15* 15* 15*+ ft 

59 43ft Ration 1J0 2J13 387 40 47U> 48 + * 

22ft Uft Rixhom 50 XO 9 9« Mft 31ft 31ft+ ft 

Mtt 15ft Roxnrd .94 SJ 4 40 II* II 18 - ft 

64 53ft ROVnin 280 44 6 3a 57* 57ft 57ft— * 

75 9tt Ravin PfJJS XS 2 63* 43* 63* 

41* 48* Rev In Pin +10 83 4349ft 49* 49ft + tt 

31* 27* ROVMn I JO 4L7 4 *7 Utt 37* 38 + tt 


ID SPoul la 
26*StRa«P 180 
SftSoiont 80 
TttSomhos 
14ttSD*GE 1.44 
fWifeonR I55t 
12*Sondwi 40 
29ft 5 Feint) 240 
8 SFeln pt 50 
Mtt SFelni J2 
13 Sotwat 58 
4* SOUIRE 
3ft SOVASlP 
7 SmOnO .40 
10* SavElP 1 
12*5ovEA 1J4 

llftSovE BI1J8 


95 xli Wft KHz 
5 9 7 70 31 30tt 
45 e 35 6* ift 

14 ZB I 7ft 
»j 7 157 lS'-f. I5U 
tl» 73 17* 17* 

1510 665 71* 21ft 
64 6 991 37* 37 
55 31 10 10 

2J 17 346 30ft 30l*i 
63 7 17 Utt 14* 

12 BI>1 Sft 

15 59 7ft 7* 

45 8 5A 10 9* 

92 4 57 Wft Ul* 
IX 5 13 13 

II. 9 11* lift 


4* Saxon 
2* Schaefer 
271* Schrpto 134 
fWSdillte 48 
66*Schlmo kl.W 


50 25 5 750 18 


4 118 5* 5* 

5 3* 3* 
43 81174 29ft 21* 
1925 03 10* 10ft 
1.S 19 Wi3u75* 74ft 


9.1 

zlO 

47ft 

47ft 

47ft— 1 

98 

2 

23 

23 

23 — ft 

98 

11 

25* 

25* 

25* 

ML 

z270 

79* 

7KU 

78*—* 

98 

mo 

79 

79 

79 — 1 

93 

z» 

99ft 

99 

99 — * 


4B 

8 

7* 

> + * 

5 

24 

4ft 

4 

4 

3 

10 

5 

5 

5 

9.7 7 

7fl 

MU 

16 

Uft 

55 B 

119 

21* 

31ft 

31*— ft 

75 8 

49 

16* 

16ft 

16ft 


68 

7* 

7ft 

7*+ * 

43 1 

7 

27* 

77ft 

27ft 

S3 6 

71 

22* 

22* 

22*+ * 

6510 

301 

14* 

14U 

14*+ ft 

15 9 

71 

29 

2fft 

2Bft 

2511 53 8 
R--B--R — 

7* 

8 — ft 

5.9 9 

623 

27* 

26* 

27 

48 

1 

60* 

60* 

68*+ ft 

55 6 

58 

10* 

Uft 

10* 

33 5 

165 

15ft 

14* 

15 — ft 

S3 8 

991 

11 

Iff* 

11 + * 

15291060 

11* 

11* 

lift 

48 7 

» 

16* 

16 

16*+ * 

43 2 

as 

14* 

14U 

14*— ft 

5.1 6 

27 

31* 

31 

31*+ * 

S3 5 

43 

TO* 

18* 

18*+ * 


■4 

41ft RayM PK50 

58 

5 

TO 

78 

78 + ft 

25* 

Mft RtenCn 130 

U S 

* 

30* 

20ft 

Mft- * 

31 

21 RctiMar 154 

439 

151 

22ft 

22 VU 

22* 

21* 

15* RlMMtT 150 

U 8 

TO 

lift 

11 

18 — * 

35* 

2l*RtoGran 1 

Xl 7 

17 

33 

32* 

32*— ft 

18* 

12* RIoGr pf jo 

48 

as 

16* 

14* 

14* 

20 

TO* RtaAld 54 

25 8 

Uf 

21* 

21 

21*+ ft 

29ft, 

17 Koomhw 130 

58 t 

» 

21* 

21ft 

21*+ * 

35 

S*RbMto 180 

5.9 4 

134 

32* 

31 

32 +1 

IZ* 

8ft Rotkra 80 

48 8 

99 

9* 

9 

9ft 

19* 16* RocttG 1840 

U7 

28 

16*016* 

16* 

20ft 

Uft RoctlTI 156 

83 7 

S4 

ra* 

18* 

18*+ ft 

15* 

10ft Rockowr 1 

78 5 

39 

Uft 

14* 

14* 

40* 

30*Rncfc«4 280 

6.1 6 

79 

39* 

3** 

39*+ * 

97ft 

76ft Rktnt pM35 

+9 

25 

97 

97 

97 + * 

36 

27* Rklnt P(1JS 

19 

1 

34* 

3<* 

34*— * 


Mtt »V* RotanH 133 It I B 38* 38* 


19* TO Rahrlna 
23* IS* Roans 80 
40 28* Rata l 

4tt 2ft Ronton 


S 11 Uft 14* 
XI 10 ZU 2214 21* 
2* 209 37tt 35* 
60 9 3* 3ft 


11* 9* Ronir % .90 04 5 U 11 ID* 

21ft 13* Raw Ji 4911 230 15* 15 

2! 15 Rosario 80a 2311 70 23* aft 

27tt 13* Rowan .10 4 13 326 23* 3 

20ft 13 RCCOS 154 7.187 3*4 U* 14* 

68* 55* Roy ID AJB# 73 7 420 47* 47tt 

34tt a* Rufatorm .76 33 9 11 24ft TO 

U* 9* RuSSToe 81 18 7 17 IBtt Uft 

23* 14* RvonH 1 53 7 U 18* IBM 

30* It RvderS JO 34 7 M7 23* 23* 


10* 5*5CA 351 
24* littSCM LW 

23* naspsrec jo 
36* 23ft Sabine 86 
13* 8 Safadln 32 
44 MftSaftwy 280 
16* 8*5aoaCp 44 
39* aftXMMn 130 
U IMSUoLP 136 
-43* 34* SILSoP 254 


43 It 160 7ft 
43 5 324 3* 
28 8 Mt 19ft 
18 M 73 34tt 
2413 71uUft 
75 71765 37* 
48 5 19 9ft 

1113 M 25* 
IX 7 11 12* 
40 5 46 42* 


14*— tt 
»ft- ft 
34*+ ft 
3*+ ft 
10 *+ tt 
I5ft+ * 
231%+* 
23tt+ ft 
14*+ * 
67*+ ft 
24ft + ft 
Wtt+ ft 
18ft+ tt 
23*+ ft 

7* 

23 tt— ft 
19ft + ft 
34 + * 
13*+ ft 
37ft + * 
9ft 

3S*+ * 
12*- ft 

41*— l* 


TO 5CQA i M 13 8 46 24* Mft 
3Vi Scot Lad J6r 75 61 5 i 5 

22 ScotFet 180 40 4 12 27 24* 

13ft ScattP .92 £5 4 697 10ft It* 

BftScaitvm 32 24 8 M Utt 13ft 

17* Scovlll 140 48 6 43 20V) »* 

6ft SMdtftr 16 |1 |V) |ft 

lift 5*aCA Pfl44 11. 3 12* 12* 

UftSeaCanl 42 19 6 228 « 21ft 

23* SeabCL 230 78 4 304 21* Z7* 

fftSeoBWA 40b 25 I 244 14* 14* 

a Sea 1st 1.12 43 7 14 26le M 

22* Seoerm 1.12 14 12*31 33tt 32* 

lOftSeosn* 37e 18 7 | 15* 15ft 

lftt SeoJPw 1,10 JJ I 76 a* a* 

10ft SoorleG 82 1311 nf 151. ISU 

m Sears 130 XI 7 1941 2VA »;• 

7 Seatrofcn • 0S4 7ft 7* 

27* 5ecPOC nl JO 43 5 1*2 2ttt 29 
25* Seoca 84 20 10 37 E 31ft 

lift 5e>BLt 130b 9.1 6 17 13* 13 

7*5hokBPr 82 53 7 1 10 10 

llftShoklee 34 A7 6 285 lift 15ft 

a stiopeii .is 3 4 a a 39* 

7*5JworH .40 XI 3 101 n II* 

JDttSheUOtl X 48 8 989 u41* 40ft 
39 StwtlT U3e 2011 45u65M IS 

BttSneiGfO 30 44 5 1W lltt 10* 

UttShelG Pfl35 7.9 14 17 17 

U SnetG pfl4D 95 3 Wft lift 

IffkShrwtn TO 81 21V. 21* 

44 Shrw Pf440 93 zlO 47'V 47<A 

12ft SierPoc 133 48 7 51 Utt Uft 

19* Signal JO X9 4 253 27* 37* 

2S*sionode 148 u t in a* nu 

10* BlmPrac 34 1314 213 u> is* 

I* SinwPat 86 5511 306 II* 101k 

12ft Stnoer 80 58 4 393 Uft 13* 

30tt 5hwr pfXSO 11. 4 31* II* 

20*Skaae» 80 Xl I U 25ft 25ft 

9* Skyline 48 46 I IN MU 10* 

17* SmttPlA 1.40 75 3 x13 19ft 19ft 

36tt Smtltllnt .92 1310 439 54 53 

41ft SmtkHi 240 1416 399 99* 90 

Uft SmithTr JO 44 « 20 if 17* 

14ft Smucher 1 55 7 21 20* » 

(Continued on Page 12) 


IBft 

30*+ * 

6*— •* 

0 

I S'*— ft 
lJtt- ft 
21*+ * 
37*+ ft 

10 + tt 
J0ft+ ft 
Utt— la 

•ft+ '<■ 
7ft % ft 
U + 
10V- ft 
13 
II* 

17* + * 
5ft+ ft 
3*+ ft 
29VI+1- 
Wtt+ ft 
75ft ♦ U 
Mft- ft 
Sib 

2**— ft 
lift* ft 
13ft + ke 

ao"3+ * 

ns 

12*+ -a 
11* + it 

an*i 
1411+ tt 
24 + ft 
att+ * 
Uft— 'a 
20*+ V? 

15*+ * 
21* ♦ * 
7*+ * 
29 

R + ft 
13 ft + ft 
10 

I5W+ * 
!f*+ * 

II * ft 
61* + 1* 
45ft 

11 + tt 
17 + tt 
1515+ * 
21*- * 
47tt+ tt 
U'%— ft 
27*- ft 
Rtt— * 
lift + * 
lltt 

13* + ft 

a* 

25ft 

10** '% 
19*+ * 
54 +IU 
99ft +2tt 
10 + * 
20 + ia 


-4 2^ ^ Ouatattans in Canadian funds. 

.•■it. j, ‘S, ^ All naalas cents unless marked 5 

i,> it. :• High Lew dose Qroe 

•tt ;'■! ? 14985 Abttlbi 517* 17* 17*—* 

11 v * - 2200 Ackiands S15* 15*- IS*— M 

■ 13-. " 3081 Aardco E 16* 6* 6*+ U 

■ ■ 4 ‘i i-' ?■ 300 Agra ltd A «* 7* 7M+ * 

• > ,. ' U559 Alta Gas A S20 TO* 20 + tt 

ijm J ■ MO Alta Nat 553tt 53* 53tt— « 

• I ' IM r .■ 130 Alao Cent S3 23 23 + ft 

- :>| ,1 i 1 587SAm Bonza 819* 19b TOtt 

-■ If * 490 Andres W A OS 15 15 + U 

% * * vZ » 700 Asbestos 846 a- 45* ' 

IWOAfSB ■* 
h-. , -r ? 5397 SP Can 

• 1 -w 0924 Bank N S 

S' .200 Baton B 

... ”* “! . . tnnn»n> n n> A mnu. uu uu.4. tt 


.200 Baton B 


a- 45* ' 
830* 20* 20* 

S3* 23M 23M • 
823ft 22* 21ft + ft 
*13* 13* U*+ ft 


v, iTj-.lOOBeth COP A a 6b 14* 14*+ * 
v " l'- 50 Block BR» SB* .8* 8*—* 

r 3175Braler Ra Ml Iff* 10*-* 
18 IB — ft 

■ „ f 1466 Brenda M SIBft 18 I8ft+ ft 
^ *'■ > 24550 BCFP 820* 20* 20*— ft 
u Mt) I«nr B>— 818* 18* 18* 

87ft 7 7 — * 

S9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 
826ft 36* 26ft 

* 3* 5 960* Cad Fry KS- ■ -U* 15+1 
41 4J,3 jobs Cal PDW A M3* 43ft 43*+ ft 


, ; lii mi. »’ * 

4.‘ • r » £: 50 Block Bros 
o J iiWBnalar Res 

* - >c «” 4300 Brnmaiw 

ij’ ' 4466 Brenda M 
., ' ?> fr-’ M5S0BCFP 

' “ ‘l! 1 7. 6500 BC Phone 

•m m.S?- /4BBnH»wk 
.M 4tno3>, S. iflOBudO Auto 
. . * il‘ 1 6® CAE A 
.v ?t s . no* Cad Fry 


10 ! r - »> MBS Cantflo 


Sl3ft 12* 13 


■ A It XS J 2S00C Nor West 89* 9ft 9ft 
‘ ' 11 ^ * J .11860 C Pockrs 828ft 27* »ft+l* 

1 7 A 662S Can Perm 518ft 10* 10ft+ ft 

• v h k 922 Can Trust ASM* 26* 26* 

* V V- » 1300 C Tung » 25* 35*- * 

•• >v* - & 3285CCabiesv A 820* 20* 20* 

•4 »' )t 5. 2K5Cdn cal 810 9* 10 + * 

' •»-, ■•'i tt T225DC1 Bk Cam B7* ZX* 27b— ft 

• ff' us C 6243 Cdn m A S30 29* 30 + b 

< -a i mobc unties sib*' »* ib*+ * 

in c it. P -9800 Casslaj; W0* 10ft 10ft— ft 

^ tot :+ i 3125 Cetanes* .85* 5ft 5b+ ft 

U: 6 : 10 CHUM «1* 11* 11*— ft 
.■ :too .n j . looc Holiday l —9* 

i. * vo tf n9. JWC«l DfatCtJ .812ft. 12ft 12b— *. 
■ 7# Cni -130 Cans Gas. .sa* a* 21* 

.JK. to * 1154 Con Portly 340 33S 340 

US' « d TOOConwasI 86 5* 5*—* 

: 'it dtp* ^ 

r , : 11 MB v 

] l Monday *s 

< > } New Highs and Lows 

. iS s r 

, NEW HIGHS — 37 

‘ ,-*Am Brands Coasts* Gas NoNG X4BPI 

„ r t CkhMi Credit CstSIGspfA Nucor 

. jiAnaJaaDvs CoxBdest Oakind 

; *; u ;,Boidwuid Federal Co ■ PopoProd 

n fiBbhlwU 256pf FostWticel Safeard Ind 

N 5.flbarvnSL Freepf Min -Shell Trans 

* , .... r. Brush We 1 1 GafdDenv standex 

^bitter i nts GenstarLU Staring B ocp 

‘ ' ;.C«jscde NGs LouLd Exp SunCmnp 

1 - •« Centex Cora MoraftmOll SunComppf 
r* , ^CentrnOata Monog Ind Timken CO 

• 1 ‘ ■/ „NwrterCo NewprkRes Trteo Ind 

‘ .* r. c.3«ortarCowT 

’ + *' NEW LOWS- 14 

: I, J Beckman MarianLob _ 11M 

^ "ComwEtJU AMtEdPfG Wtygt U Tfl 

. . -> 1*: *CpPwi50pt MetEdPtJ ■ SJ^wavStr 

• ',8 >r, *GoPw256p»n MetEdptl USToboc 

. , .• r- ? JwCeXT2uf NlM350Pf WlnnDbc 


I + European Gold Markets 

t ' April 24, 1979 



AM. 

PJUL 

NjC. 

London 

. 24050 

23930 

+255 

Zorich 

240875 240.125 

4025 

Ports (125 kHo) 

34232 

242.71 

+157 


, l{,.l|tt Official mornlna and afternoon flxlnas tor 
-l London and Paris, opening and closing prlc- 

+9 for Zurich. 

... UJ. dollars per ounce. 






. H V ,- <MW mmkm npppwwv 

’•» " h , ■ to* W«M* A»pldr have b—n 

. IX? boa Jmdm Mwe 

’ I'inJP' REPUBLIC OF KENYA 

WAT MBSOKmn 
,U.- T . ■ INVITATION TO TENDER 
1 ■' ' MOMBASA AND 

I 

i Invites 

. 0 - Sup- 

and Erection of Com- 
1 munTcaflons and Flaw Measortno 
. | Equipment. 

• • .sgawgus s aasftffl^ 

■ • ,r l rra I *z«S Supervisory control System 

r-units ossodared wRfiowalwrJ fnwt- 

■ - 1 • wetriBaa BMgg 

ed equipment of reservoirs. _ 

r|V > Twd subiwteston o* tenders will be 2 
* Vy months. Fimu who wWitotrobared 
with tender documents should OPftfY 
Id wiirlns for - 

The Director. . 


m 


ote' F A 

Ll.cZ ; 


Nairobi 

Kenya 

ISffSUggESSU&i&i 

i sum shall be t 


of-ai^h 


This sum shall be t 
money order or f 
Kenya currency 
Director, Wafer 
sum will be non- refundable 


De a artrmn 
and camH 
Plant CoH 


manufacture the 


Toronto Stocks 

dosing Prices April 23, 1979 


Hieb Lew ciou a* 


49709 Caseka R ■ *7* 7ft 

2235 Credo mt 86* A* 
1100 Crush . lnt> Sll* 11* 
3900 Cyprus SMb 16 
7400 Daen Dev ffl* lift 
100 Doan A . 87ft 7ft 

7975 Den tsan 530* 20ft 

2040 Dick ran *6ft 6* 
3105 D Bridge 832 a 
-46485 Oofosco A 834* 34b 
1850 Dom- Stare 518ft 18b 
1540 Du Pont :ta 30ft 

IMOODylex L A 816 15* 

1390 East Mol . IBS TOO 
2225 Electhom A 85* 5* 

3800 Emco no* 10b 

17230 Falcon C 88 7* 

4949 Fibre Nik A 855* 54b 
3000FOd Ind A 87* 7ft 
9350 Francana «1b 10ft 

115 Fraser A Sl5tt 15b 
1600 Fruehaut m* lib 

1540 G M Res 460 455 

150 G DMrb A 39 9 

. 25G -Distrb w 370 270 
29800 Gibraltar 88* 7ft 
200 Graft G S43ft 43ft 
6200 Granduc 128 115 

6903 Gt Dll Sds 815* 15* 
7340 GL Forest 847b 47 
1420 Grey lux! . 800* 20* 

400 Guar Tnd ft' B 

1300 H Group A 425 420 
500 Hard Op A . 345 330 

1750 Harlequin 815ft 15b 

5005 Hawker A 512ft 11* 

446 Haves D. -. 02* 12ft 
13397 H Bay Co -827* 27ft 
4250 I AC 08* 17* 

12900 indal 814* 14* 

150 fadusmln 820ft 20ft 
2958 malts 03* TO* 

635 Inland Gas 812ft 12b 
925 ltd Mogul .85* 5* 
7000 int Pipe A H9 Ifl* 
1300lvoco A 815* 15 
9555 Jannock ' 834 ' 23* 

8230 Kaiser Re 819* TO* 
4400 Ram Keffa i 4W 400 
lOOKebev H • 827b 27b 

irniDKerr A A . 89* 9* 

BTBOLobatt A 530ft 20b 
2S0 Lab Min 841ft Oft 
19150 Locona eft 5* 
1600 LOnt Can 85* 5* 

244 LL Lac 290- 290 
400 Lab Co A 4SS 458 
500 Lab Co .B 440 440 

422 Loeb M 811ft ID* 
3200 MiCC 811b 11 

11B43MB Lid S22Vl 22* 
2300 McGrow H 59* 9ft 
1070 Matson A 825* 25ft 
8985 Moore 838ft 38b 
1900 Murphy SIS* 15b 
150 Nat Trust 522* 22* 
asUNorando A 842* 42ft 
24338 Moreen 830* 20* 

82BNTecm B w 133* 23ft 
15IKMOCD W 827* 27* 
8072 Oakwaad P 86* 6* 

1Q2J5 Ocelot B 814* 14* 
47X5 Oltiawa A 80* 8ft 
11700 Page Pet lUb 13* 
SOOPamoar A - 86 5* 


85* 5* 

no* tob 

88. 7* 


S47b 47 
820* 20ft 

88 ' 8 


S12ft 11* 
812* 12ft 
-837* 27ft 

at* it* 

814* 14* 
820ft 20ft 
813* 15* 


7* 

6* 

Il*+ b 
16 — b 
11*+ b 
7ft 

20ft— ft 
6ft- b 
32 + ft 
34ft+ * 
18ft 

20ft— ft 
16 + ft 
180 

5ft— ft 
10*— ft 
7ft— ft 
54ft- b 
7ft— b 
II + ft 
15*+ b 
nb+ b 
,460 —15 
9 

270 —10 
7ft— * 
43ft 

119 —5 
15*+ b 
47ft— ft 
20*+ b 
8 — ft 
420 -30 
330 —15 
lib— b 
13ft . 
12ft— b 
27ft*- b- 
18' 

M*- * 
20ft+ ft 
13*+ * 

1 f*-. * 
18* 

15 —'ft 
23*+ * 
1**- b 
400 — S 
27b— b 
9*+ ft 
20ft 

41ft— ft 
5ft + ft 
5*+ ft 
290 

455 —5 
440 

11ft+ ft 
11 — ft 
22ft- * 
9ft 

2S*+.b 

38ft 

lift 

22* 

42ft— ft 
20ft 

23ft— ft 
27*— lft 
6*- ft 
14* - 
- 8ft 
Uft— b 
6 + ft- 



Hieh Low Clew Ck*ee 
4198PonCon P 848ft 48 48ft + b 

4100 Pembina ft* ■* 8* 

4959 Petroftno 829ft 28ft 28ft- ft 

4200 Peyta CNfi no* 10* Iff*- ft 

10425 Pine Point S34M 34 34ft+ ft 

12150 Place G 340 330 330 —S 

4522 Placer 827 26b 26ft— lb 

1000 Ram so* 8* tab- ft 

300RedPStfa 814* 14* 14*+ ft 

8110 Rd Stenhs A 89 9 9 + b 

3775 RelcMiDld SUtt 13 13b 

20070 Revnu Prp 115 172 175 

. 1600 Roman 827 26ft 26* 

S7ft 6* 6ft— ft 

nrn 12b Q*+ b 

SUM 18b Iff* 

i a ift il* lift— ft 
290 as 215 — 5 

A 89 . 8* 9 

818* 18ft 18ft- b 
838 27* 27*+ ft 

839* 29ft 29*+ ft 

418 390 390 -20 

300 Tara a 4ft Uft 14Vi + ft 

3691 Tec* Cor A SUb M 14 — ft 
17S21 Teck Car B 813ft 13ft 13ft- ft 
2540 Teledyne 89 8* I* 

3233 Tex Can S6lft 61 61ft+ b 

7778 Tham N A 817 16* 16*+ ft 

7568 Tor Dm Bk «23b 22ft 23b+ * 
lOOOTorstar B 819b 19ft 19ft— ft 
1266 Traders A *17* 17* 17* 

16310 Tms Ml A Sll 10ft 10* 

6178 TrCan PL 819* 19ft 19*+ b 

lS37Turbo a B no* 10ft 10ft+ ft 

lOfflfUGas A m 10* 11 

564UnIOa OU 822ft 23 22ft+ ft 

1065U Ksna 813* Uft 13*+ ft 

8583 U sacoe 89ft 8* 9*+ ft 

TOOUn Carbld *22* 22* Sft— ft 
4900 Van Der 85. 5 S 

4100 Verst I Car 814* Mft 14ft+ ft 
. 1 300 VoStgOKi, : 513* 13* 13*- ft 
iraovavaaer'. P 04 24 24 

995 Weldwad 822 21* «*- b 

11010 West Mine 85* 5ft 5*+ ft 

.1110 Weston 336 23* 23*— * 

36MWOodwd A . 822* 22* 2Zb+ b 
10300 Vk Bear 86* 6ft 6M+ ft 


1065 U Ksna 

8582 U Sacoe 

TOOUn Carbld 
4900 Van Der 
oaoverell Car 

'BRSB% 

995 Weldwad 
lino west Mine 
.1110 Weston 
3600 WBadwd A 
10300 Yk Bear 


Total sales 3307,126 stares 

^Montreal Stocks 

Posing PHces April 23, 1979 

Quotations In Conodton funds. 

All qosfcs cents unless marked 5 


230 AleamaSi 
5305 BnkMonl 
■ 6300 Basic Res 
200 Can Cm! 
2025 Can Both 
1000 DomTxIA 
1540 FCAInf 
125 Imasco 
300 MnfTrsf 
400 RallandA 
13a Royal Bk 
1171 RavTrA 
10150 StambraA 
2913 Zdlars 


Utah Law CtaS CM. 
829 29 29 

824* 34* 34b— ft 
SO* 8ft 8ft- ft 
813* U* 13*- ft 
" 813ft 12* U 
a 4* 18* M*„ 
340 310. 340 +5 
TOfft 39ft 3fft+ b 
819b 19b 19b 
8 8* 8* B*+ ft 

840* 40* 40*- ft 
■16ft 15* 15*- b 
S25ft 26* 26ft+ b 
810ft 10ft Wft— 1 


Total roles 30X776 stares. 




Investing in North Sea and American ail 
arid gas production through . 

VIKING RESOURCES 
INTERNATIONAL N.V. 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange. 

The Annual Report as of 31st December, 
1978 has been published and may be 
~ obtained from 

Pierson, Hefdrtng & Pierson N.V., 

Herengracht 214, Amsterdam 


ITALFORTUNE INTERNATIONAL TTJND S.A. 
11, Boulevard Grande-Duchesse Charlotte 
LUXEMBOURG 


R.C. Luxembourg 8735 
ATTRIBUTION GRATUITE 

l.'assnnbUe j^ninle d» acuoanoires. r&txnie le 24 evril 1979. a decide de 
proccder a one aBrilmtt«fl patuite de 3 ./. (trojs) on anions par prfWwanem 
sur la reserve extraordinaire (valeur aomuiale SU.3. l.-J cede attribution se fere 

' a partir do 25 ssril 1979. h base des actions en drfulwiofi le 25 a«ril 1979, 
i -outre rnnioe du coupon omnium 2. 

L« sriiooB Bernal eolfe at bourae de Luxembourg nitaupoa uumexb deux a 
panir du 25 avril l979.' ■ . . 

U coupon Bumire deux poam eiie pfweniJ ea w de ratutbulion jumpiau 
,24 svriJ 1984 aupris d e&. rtaWksrr a e nia stuvanlK 

- Bantpr Imernatiohale A Luxcmboure S 2, bid. Royal. Luxcmbourp 

- Bam Toscana, Via del Carso. 6, Firerae (ItaBe) 

- t'n>diio Varnana. Via Vittorio Vcneto, 2. Varese- (ltiEe) 

- Crrdih) Arfipaiio. Pm a Sul Fedde, 4, Milano 

■ Banra f- Sidntiamlki and Co, Via dri SsasetlL 4. Firerae (Italie) 

• Bam San Paolo. Com Martin Delia Liberia. 13. Brescia (Italie) 

• Banco Pima Cavour, 15, Como (llalie) 

. Bane* di Valle Gunouica Bronx Brescia (halte) 

- Baorn di Santo Spirito, Pima dd Rarianwmn, IB. Roma (Italia*). - 

'• . Bans Pnaalpina, Via Bakstra, 10. Lujpno (Sd«e) 

I, rmwril ifadminifil ration, i decide de dortnr* a Meaurare Ira Anion- 
nairn la powibiBtf fTartWidir & b rentainc sapibieurr ka adkma rjui pro- 
vitmnrni de rat^mentalion paliiie de capital par Facbal d*«1iot» i b 
valetor nrtlt' iTimwitaire, mm commission de oousrriplMB. 

POUR LE CONSEIL O'ADMlNISTRATlON 

BANOUE IHTCRNATIOKALE A.LUXEMBOURC 
• > 50CHTE ANONYME 


This year, we’ve given you T7% more 
reason to send for our annual report. 


W.R. Graced Co. Financad HighBghfi 

(DoOor tmotmU in ikousmadi except per short— 1977 warned} 

For the Yets: 

Sain 

Income before Taxes 
Income Taxes 
Net Income 

Earnings per Share 

Earnings per Share assuming Full Dilution 
Capital Expenditures 
Research and Develop mem Expenses 
Depredation, Depletion and Lease Amortization 
Working Capital provided by Operations 

Cash Dnrideada on Common Stodi 

Per Common Share 

Average Nnmbcr of Co mm o n Shares O utstandin g 

At Ycar-Erefc 
Tbtal Assets 

Net Properties and Equipment 
Working Capital 

Long Term Pet* - 

Shareholders* Equity— Common Stock 

Shareholders' Equity— Per Common Share (Book Value) 
Common Shares Outstanding 


Percent 

Change 


$4309.588 $4,063,646 

320,816 271.219 

156^413 125,480 

178,483 145,739 

4J3 ‘ 3.63 

3^3 338 

275308 270,01 S 

40347 34,186 

I43J14 134.030 

339459 327.436 

71388 66,462 

L85 1.775 

40436300 39.912,000 


$3368438 $2.992367 + 9% 

1317459 ""uirjlV 7 
748331 626.902 +19 

727325 754370 -4. 

13«M74 1350304 +11 

3336 31.32 + 7 

41357,744 39.924,163 + 4 


]978 was a growth year for Grace. Net 
income and earnings per share were both 
up 17%. And sales reached $4.3 billion— 
the highest in our 124-year history. 

As you can see from our financial highlights, 
that's not all that was up at Grace last year. 
In fact, about the only thing that went down 
was our long term debt. And, of course, 
our debt-to-equity ratio. 

It takes balanced diversity and an aggres- 
sive business posture to achieve results like 
these. And we think Grace has both. 

Our specialty chemical operations, 
including packaging materials, petroleum 
and automotive catalysts, and construction 
products, showed a 16% increase in 
operating income, after taxes* 

Our natural resources group, with interests in 
coal, natural gas, oil, and oil field services, 
showed a 16% increase on the same basis. 

And in the consumer area, after-tax 


operating income was up 19% -despite the 
high costs associated with a 30% increase 
in the number of specialty retailing and 
restaurant units. 

Our long term picture is equally impressive. 
Since 1968, Grace's net income has grown 
by an average annual rate of 16%. 

And we see no reason why the trend 
shouldn't continue. 

For a complete financial review, send 
for our annual report. VWte to Grace 
Brothers, Ltd., 34 St. James's St., 

London SW1A lfHD, or to James Kuhn 

and Company, Avenue des Arts 50, 

B-1040 Brussels, Belgium. 

With record sales and 17% higher 
earnings, there's more reason than ever 
to take a closer look at Grace. 

•Cnmputad bafore g&ra ta bswi O" cfcporal of bupnossei, foreign currency iroralation related 
to FAS No.8 end ofloanicn of general corporate merheod end goneiol coi pewote intereu 

One step ahead of a 
changing woridy^bf^ A 


GRACE 

ehemeoH - noma woutcfft - earaumw oroducb 


W. R. Grace & Co., 1 1 14 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N. Y. 10036 



Fairo 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 1979 


NYSE Nationwide Trading 3 p.m. Prices Apr. 24 


Tables include Hie nationwide prices up to 3 p.m. on Wall Street. 


Cirtw 

12 Wontti Stack Sis. 3 tun. Prev 

Kifld LOW Dtv.lBS m P/E lOQs. Hmh Low Ouoi. 3 o.m. 


(Continued from Page tl> 


Cft'BO 

i2Montti Siock Sis. 3 ojtl Prev 

High Low Div. InS YlcL P/E 100s. High Low Quot.3pjn. 


Chtae 

12 Mon 1 11 5 lock 51s. Sfcm. Prev 

High Low Div.lnS Y1(L P/E 100s. High Low Quot.JPJn. 


4* r n 3J% SnapOn 1 2B 3.1 17 177 41% dm 41%+1* 

10* 7% SonvCp ,10e 13 18 335 m 10* 10% + % 

2 TVs 173k SooLIn a B 16 17% 17% 17% 

4% TteSoAIITr. 2 4% 4% 4% 


21% 17% SooLIn a 
4% TteSoAIITr. 

19 16 SCrEG 138 

45% WU5ouiOwn 30 
15% lv.-iSoeiBk 30 

9% 7 % skips i.m 
27% 22% SoCalE 2M 


2 4% 4% 4% 

18. 8 179 14% 16% 16%-— % 
13 7 6 41% 41% 41%+ % 

S3 4 42 14 13% 13% 

15. 7 7 7% 7% 7% 


9* 7% SKIPS l.m 15. 7 7 7% 7% 7% 

27% 22% SoCalE 238 93 6 313 25* 25% 25* 

Wn 13V. SoglhCo 134 11.91073 13% 13% 13% 
20% 17% SalnGE 132 83 9 10 18 17% 17% 

39% 29%SoNRes 185 33 7 04 38% 37% 37% 


40 J4%SNETal 330 93 6 >4 39 

34% 25 SouPac 2 M S3 6 145 30 

57% 44%SouRt 330 5.9 6 54 54' 

29% 24% SeRv pf nl40 93 2 271 

24% 18% SQUnCo 1.76 6.9 8 44 251 


33 7 04 38% 37% 37%+ %. 

93 6 >4 39 38% 38%- % 

83 6 145 30 29% 29%+ % 

5.9 6 54 541ft 53% 54%+ % 

93 2 27% 27% 27% 


24% 19 Sundsfr I 3.7 S I52(f2ft% 26U 24%+ % 

17% 9 SunsAA 30a 1319 38 15% 15% 15%+ % 

2D'A IfhSvprVOl 34 Z« 9 158 18% 18% -1B%+ % 
388 244% SimrOII 280 J51 74u394 387 390 +2- 

14% 9*SupmkG -42 11 5 126 1378 13% 13% 

12% 5 $yp«p 4 5% 5% 5% 

.11% 7% SutroM .97 b 9.710 IB 10% 10 : 10 — % 

' 29% 19% Swank 1-4 Da 63 6 31 21 Vi 20% 21%+ % 

23% 14%Svbron .96 43 8 116 21% 20% 21%+ % 

40% 30 Svhrri P 12.40 63 11 35% 35% 35*- % 

16 -7% Systran .10 1.1 9 « 9% W 9% — % 

_T— T~T — • 

20% 10% TRE 34 U 9 44 IWr 14% 14%+ % 

42% 33% TRW 130 4J 7 66 38% 38 38%+ 'A 

92% 73% TRW pi +40 53 1 B3V. 83% 83%—% 


10% 9%SupmkG XI 
12% 5 SUPKP 
11% 7% SutroM .97 b 


40% 30 Svhrri P 12.40 
16 m Systran .10 


21% 17% Trow s 


389. 27% TrtnUn 2.12 a i IS 


8 7D 1914 19 


30% lJftTWC 4 426 19% 18% 19 + % 

23% 17%TWC Pf 2 10. 5 19% 19% IY%- * 

18% 1S%TWC PflJO 12. 47 16% 14% UU 

19% 14% 7Yansm 1 iS 5 214 ISM V 1>%+ % 

23V£ 19% Tran Inc 2 9.9 31 20% 20% 20%+ % 

28% 14%Transco L24 4310 402 27 24% 24%+% 

14% 7% Tronsai 30 53 7 29 11% 11% 11%—% 

79*6 73% TrGP pK45 59 HO 74% 74% 74*— % 

97% 88% TrSP p«44 96 1 50 91% 91% 9114 


19% 19 19% 

31H 31 31%+ % 

19% 18% 19 + % 
19% 19% 19%— W 
14% 14% UU 


13 Month Sleek 5%. 3«n. Prev 

High Low Dlv.lnS YM. P/E 1U0* High LOW Quo!. 3 tun. 


37 31 USTobc 134 5810 142 31% 31% 31%+% 

52% 35% UnTech 220 SA 7 701 40% 40 40V9+ % 

70% 49V. UTeh pf!87 7.0 IS 55 54% 55 +1 

20 imunrrei i m 74 i 345 ib% ib* ia% 

24% 11% Uni trod JO 1112 43 33% 22% 23%+ % 

9% 6% Uni tot 66 65 8 37 8% BVa tj% 

22 J4% UnirFcT M 52 7 38 15* W> 1S£— % 

24 15%UnLeof 180 U 7 » 18% 18% 18%- % 

.56 38% Uoletan 1J2 3810 226 44% 45% 46%+ % 

25 17 USLlFE M Z7 7 15B 34% 23% 23%—% 

11% W-VflifeRI Mb 9J 12 9% 9% 9% . 


Oitoe 

13 Month Slock Sis. 3W**r ' Pr ™ r 

High LOW Dlv- m S YUt P/E iflfe. High Low Oinf.3 Am. 


39% 30U. WosN pfZSO 
3416 20>*W5tlWt Z06 
3i% zmwasiBffl jo 
26% 15 Walk taJ. 40 
7% 4% WOVGOS At 
19 16 WovG BfUO 

9% 4% WtanUn JO 
13% 12% wean pH .26 
38 imwehbD JO 


0 J ^ 9 36% 36% 36%+ % 
M 7. 27 22% 22 22%+ % 

T7-4 137 29% 29 29%+ % 

L723 160 23% 23 .23 — % 

70 B 4 4% 4% 6%+ % 

M 4 17% 17 17 - % 

3J 7 2 4 6 6 

94 3 T3% 13% 13% . 

1 Jl 13 340 19% 19% 19%+ % 


12 Month Stock Sit. Swk. Prvy 

HtohLwl EHv.ta3.YllL P/e 1006. High LOW Quoting 


43 26%WBIw ptZ20 53 - 72 41% 41% 41%-^ ; 

12% 5 WOrWAIr 25 22 7% 7% 7% 

77% 56% Wrlglv 540a 57 0 . 8 65% 65 65 — \ 

i% 9%wurHzr M 44 6 7 10% ta . io + % , 

19% 10% Wvkrin JO -KB 6 <7 14 13%- 13%+ £';‘> 

I1H 6%wvteu> JO +911 a 10% 10% 10%-*+* 

7% rrawnv 24 wo 4% 6 4% 

— X — Y— X — . / 

64 .47 Xerox 280 +1 101094 58% 57% ,58%+l -.jf 
20% 1416 XTRA B J2 Z5 4 774 20% 19% 20%+ VJ‘ 
34% 13%Y0ta« JO SI 9 22% 22% 22%- V 
21% 15 ■ ZoteCp 1 6.1 7 46 16% 15% l«*+ v ^. 

17 UMZatePfA A 41 ) 12% 12% 12% *■ 

18% 1014 Zapata ‘JOb 1820 1W 16% 16 16% 

17% 9V6ZovreCP . 3 174 12% 12% 12%+ % r- 

19% 12 ZtnllhR 1 U 11 .461 .13% 15 15%+ 

19% 12Vk Zumtrti JO 4J 1 75 16% 16% 16%+ % * 


29%+ % 
23 -% 
6 %+ % 
17 - % 
6 


7916 73% TrGP pf6J5 
97% 88% TrGP pf&64 
1 26% 23% TrGP pf550 


24% 24% 24% 


19% 17 t/taPL Ui 9JI0 243 18% 18% 18%+ fe 

31% 27% UIPL P«JD 9J 3 28% 28% »%- % 

24% 20%Utt»L pfZ04 9 A 1 21% 21% 21%+ % 

— V— V— V — 

21 ]£% VP Co 140 73 6 12 19% 18% 19%+%- 

24% 14 VSlCp JO 10 7X13 20% 20% 20%+ «' 


33% 25%WrilsF 1.72 59 5 40 »% 29% % 

15 10% WelFM- 1J256 8J10 15 14% 1«J 

40 31% WtPtPe Z8Q « I 4 3« » 5 


im-MlMV JO 7J? 17 11% 11% 11%-* 


20% 10% TRE J4 
42% 33M.TRW 1J0 
92% 73 V? TRW pUAO 
25% 17% TaftBrd JO 
4% 1%Taicatt 


6 30% 38 38%+ 'A 

1 83% 83% 83%— %. 


27 7 95 22% 72 


4 


18% 12%TmsOb M> 17 4 29 14% 14% ld%— % 

29% 19% Tronwy 1J0 -7.3 5 23 22 72 72 — % 

40% 30% Trov Ira 2J8 5J 4 95 37% 37% 37%+ % 

44% 33%Trovdr n»2 A9 .1 41 41 41 + % 


34% 18V3 SQUnCo 1.76 59 8 44 25% 45% 25%- % 
34% 24 Souffnd .720 2J to 22S 27% 27% 77%+ % 


67 39<4 SouRdvI 1 

19% 16% SwtAJr sJ8 
29% 22+ SwtBsh 1.24 

19% 10% SwtFore A0 
38 21% SwiFI pflJO 

15% 13V, SvrIPS 128 
17* 12ia SpertF M 


1.519 SB 66% 66 66%+ % 

US 39 18% lBta 18% 

55 6 63 22% 32% 22%+ % 

Z2 6 496 18% 17% 1BV3+ % 

4.4 IQ3 34% 33% 34%+] 

M S n 13% 13% 13%+ + 

2J 7 24 15V? 15% 15%+ 'A 


15% 10% Tallev 1 
15% 1 0%. Talley Pf T 
21% 16»TcnnPE 1+4 
34% 19% Tandy 
4% 3% Tondvcft n 


1 9J 4 59 10ft 10% W» 


44% 334* Travelr of 2 A9 
20% 16% TrICen 1.94e 11. 
31% 27 THCn pfUO 9J 


7.9 8 151 lBta IS 
7 280 23% 23 


II + % 
1810 

23% — % 
39b- % 


4% 3%Tondvcft n X 328 4% 3% 39b- % 

13% 7%T<MMn .28 Z3W 85 l»b 114b 12%+ U 

15% 9 Tdmcalr JO 4J 9 51 12% 12% 13%+ % 

14% 79e Technlon ' II 82 13 12% 12%+ % 


3% 1% TrlSaM 2 76 3% 3% 3%— % 

13% 7% Trtalnd .11^ 1J 9 9% 9% 9%+ % 

24% 14% TrloPe J2 3J 7 25 20 19% 31+% 

12% 6% Tried .16 U12 300ul2% 11% 12%+ % 

75 159bTrln!vin 1 *A 7 54 22% 21% 22%+ ^ 

17% 14%.Tuc&nG IJ U1 117 16% 15% 16U+ % 

42% 24* TCFOJt U0O 3+ 6 150 41% 41% 41%+ % 

34% 17 T winds 1 5.1 7 18 19% 19% 19%— % 

3344 14% Tyco Lab JO 4.1 4 U 19% 19% 19%+ % 

IV* 13%TylerCp AS IB 7 58 16% . 16% 16*—% 

47% 21 Tymshr 17 182 40 30W 39%- * 

— u—u—u — 


.1 41 41 41 + % 
68 17% 17% 17%—% 
1 27% 27% 27% 

76 3% 3* 3 Vi— % 

9 9% 9% 9%+ * 

25 20 19% 20 + % 


15% 10% Spartan JO 4.917 19 12* 12 


269k ISVhSpectPh 14 276 21% 309b 21% 

23% 14% SPerryH 1 U 5 12 16* 15% 15%— % 

39% 30* SporyH pt 3 9J 1 32 32 32 — % 

51% 38% SprryR 1J2 Z7 8 446 49% 48% 49%+ V 

20% 1Z SomgsM 1.0S 6J 5 56 16% 16% 16*— Vb 
Z7 19% SauarD lit U I 33 24* 23* 24<A+ * 

37% 24 SdulbO I JIB 3J13 449 33% 32% 33*+ % 

13% lUb StQRIle n.70 SJ 6 29 12% 12* 12*+ % 

23 16% Staley 1 4J14 14 20% 20* 20%+ * 

29% 22* StBrad 1J6 SJ 9 87 34 23%+ % 

35 19% StBPnl M 3JJ 9 29 21% 21* 21* 

20% 13% SMMotA U id 8 6 17% 17* 17%+ * 

50% 38% StOIICI Z80 5J 8 961 u50% 49% 50% +1% 

63% 46%StQlnd .} 4J 9 608 63% 62% 63 + * 
52% 28% SIC 1 1 Oh JS 1J 12 714 49% 49% 49%+ % 
12* 7% SI PacC P JUb 5.5 4 68 9% 8% 9Vb— %■ 

18* 12% SlQndex JS 3J 9 110ul9* 18* 1B%+ % 

29 22* StcmW ^JX 3J S 28 28% 2B 2B%+ % 


14% 7%T«Jinlcn ] 

57 38* Tokirnx J4 1J1 

10% 6* Telecor 
130% 80% Teledn 9.921 7.9 
16% 8* Tolprmf 

9* 3% Telex 1 

34% 29 Tonnco Z20 6J 
89Vb 81%Tenc W 7^3 8J 
128% 108% Tennc PfSJO *J 
12% 6* T wore 

25% 17% Tesor pfZ16 9.1 
27% 22% Texaco 2 73 
41% 35V* Tex Cm uo 33 
47 32 TexEsl Z30 S3 

27* 25% TxET PfZ4D 9 jD 
30 26* TxET PfZ87 TO. 

48% 34%TexGT XiA 63 
47* 34% TxGs Pfl30 17 


1! 82 13 12% 12%+ % 

1314 110 55* 55 55%+ * 

8 62 10% 10% 10% 

7.9 6 499 1264k 125% 124 
21 520 16* 15% 15% 

It 465 5% 5* 5%-Htft 

63 7 904 32% 31% 32*+ % 
8J 3 84% 84% 84% 

*J 3 117% 1T7% 117%+1% 

6 21T 11* 11 H*+ * 

9.1 41 23% 23% 23% 

73 821 69 26% 26% 26*+ % 
33 8 109 39* 39% 39% 

53 B 111 42* 42 42%+ % 

9 JO 2 26% 26% 26% — * 

ID. I 28% 28% 28%— % 

63 7 70 42 41% 42 + % 


24% 14 VSl CP JO 10 7 X13 
«* 4* Valley in A0 SJ 3 56 
169s 10% VanDrn .92 73 5 1 

21* 11* Vartan A0 1171 545 
14* 7% Vara 32 12 6 121 

24* 16% Veeco A0 1 J 10 172 
9% 4 Vends 143 

3% 1* Venice . 25 

14* 11* Vests* 136* 11. .5 1 

33 18* Viacom 32 1315 46 

IS* 12% VaEPw 132 11. 71349 
99* 89 VoEP PfBJQ 93 zSD 
104% 94% VOEP pfVJS to. zlW 
30% 26% VoEP PH.90 11. 3 

18 7* VortxKta S3 19 

i 16 9% VuldnC 75 53 5 41 


S3 3 56 7 6* 6% . 

73 5 1 13% 13% 13% 

1171 545 19% TS* 19%+ % 
37 6 131 10% 10 10%+ % 

1 J 10 172u25% 23* 24%+l% 
143 5* 5Va 5* 

25 3 3 3 

11. .54 12% 12% 12% 

1315 46 31% 30 31'A+l* 

11. J 1249 12% 12% 12%— 'A 
95 Z8D 90% 90% 90% 

IK z190 95* 95* 95* — I* 
11. 3 26% 26% 26% — *■ 

S3 100 17* 17* 17*+ M 
S3 5 48 15 14* 15 + % 


14% 7*WnAlrL A0 
37 23* WAIr pf 2 

30% 23 WnBnc 136 
37% 20*WnCoNA A0 
SO 24* WPOtfn 1 


73 12 25* 25% »%- * 

43 6 186 2B% 28% 28%+ % 
1312 Z14u32% 30% 32% +2% 
23 269u51% 49 51% +2% 


12% 5 worth Air 
77% 56* Wrlglv 2A0a 


18% W* Zapata ‘JOb 
17% 9*ZoyreCP . 
19* 12 ZtnittiR 1 
19% 12% Zumlnd 30 


27% 15 WflPUhl 38 3312 107 27% 2«b 27%+ * 
22 MVjV/Untan 1A0 73 8 191 18% 1» * 

11%- 9*WUndafl.lB 12. .21 IWb 

25%-Zl ITUTl p/254 12 4 22% ® ® T “ 

25 16 WetfgEl .97 SA 5 654 18 Iff* ’7tt+ » 

30% 23* WsIvaC 132 4A 8 W 30% W* »*+ » 
24* 16 WoyWS 138 SJ 5 87 W% 19‘ V9 — % 

32% 23% Weverfir 1 33 9 3B7 M% » »*+ * 

47% 36%Wtvr POBQ 63 S <3 «* « + » 

41 27* Wheel F 170 43 8 485 M* 30 30 ■ - % 

44* 32 Wheel F pf 2 67 2 32% CTb 3»b+ * 

2D* 9 WheelPH. 2 90 19 18* 18%+ * 

58* 48% WhelPIl' pf* 1Z ilOO 49 49 49 

24* 17% WtllrW 170 63 7 74 20 19* 19* 


37* 26% VuknM 1 Jo 43 8 14 36% 35* 35%— * 


45* 23% UAL 1 ‘ 
22 16* UGI 134 

22* 14 UMC 170 
3% IVhUMETTr 
34% 16 UNCRes AO 
39 17 UVInd 1 

99% 60% UVin pfSSO 
14* 10 U narco JB 
64* 49%UnlNV Z93e 


1' 43 2 1208 25* 24* 25% 

134 7.9 7 5 20* 20* 20* 

130 75 6 31 15* 15% 1S%— % 

T • 41 3 2* 3 

i A3 2J J 840 17* M* 77%+ % 

1 23 9 144 39 38* 39 + % 


37% 17% WUI 30 
Z!% 11* Wabash 30 
21 15% Wachav 76 

7 3%WUdiRtV 


1 J12 257 35% 34% 34%+ % 
23 4 53 10% .18 18 

43 7 32 17% 17 17 — W 

♦ 16 4* 4* 4* 


T8U 12* SlQndex JS 33 9 110ul9U> 18* 1B*+ * 
29 22* StcmW 138 33 B 28 28% 28 2B*+ * 

30* 22*Starret 1J2 4J a 1 28% 26% 28* 

6% 3% SlMullnv 22 34 5 4% 4tb— % 

11* 9* StOMSC 1.05 10. xlO 10% 10* 10%+ % 

49* 36% SfaufCh Z30 50 7 93 43* 43* 43*+ * 

13 B’.i Slerchl J8 6.9 5 13 918 9* 9%+ * 

8* 6* SlerlBcp J6 7.7 5 87 8* 8% B% 

19* 14 StarlOg .77 4.1121011 18* 18* 18*+ Vb 

4% 3-.I SferPrc .12h 3J3 13 36 3* 3* 3*+ % 

25% I?* Sterndnf JO 2AI7 68 25* 25 25%+% 

IB* 13% SlevcnJ 1200 8.1 5 16114* 14* 14*+ * 

38* 2711 StewWa 2.10 6A 6 36 33 33 33 

31% 18* StakVC 1J2 +3 IQ 174 30% 29 30*+l* 

12* 10Tb StakVC Pf 1 9.1 z2l0 11 11 11 

51* 38 StoneW Z75r 6.7 S 48 39% 39% 39* 

29% lOlbSronCon JO Z3 20 13 26* 26% 26*+ % 

20* 14V. StopShR UQ 6.9 4 55 17* 17* 17%— * 

47% l/r# SlarTec 181084 45* 45 45 + % 

41 26 StarerB 1J0 3A 9 26 38* 38* 38%+ * 

17* I2ta SfrldRif I J8 JS 6 22 14% 14 14* + * 

32* 271* StuWor 1 JS . +4 5 60 28% 28% 28%— * 

5 2* SuavSho .20 4.4 16 77 4% 4* 4% 


47* 34* TxGs PflJO 17 2 41 41 41 

22* 16 Texlnd M 2J 5 65 21* 21* 21*- * 

92% 72 Texlnst 2 2A13 M 83% 83* B3% + 1 

IS* 5* Texlnt 30 601 14% 13* 14*— * 

39* 24*TexOGs J6b .910 509 38* 37* 38*+ * 
57 .2% TxPcLd A5e J21 35 SKi 53 55 +2% 

22* 18 TexUHl 1J4 BJ 8 324 19* 19% 19*+ % 

25* 17* Texsglf 1 JO 5.1 14 218 23% 22* 23%+ % 

44* 35* Texalt of 3 ?A 14 41* 40* 40*— % 


6.9 5 

13 

9Ttl 



13% 

3% Texfl Ind 

5 

129 

8* 

B 

8% 

7.7 5 


8% 



35 

23% Textron 140 

6-9 6 

161 

264S 

2&% 

26% — % 

4.1 121011 

IB* 

18* 

18*+ % 

39% 

U'U Thiokol 130 

34 7 

16 

36% 

36% 

36%-*% 

331] 

36 

3% 

3* 

3H+ M 

48* 

38% ThmBet 162 

3413 

31 

<»Wi 

42% 

42%+ % 

24 11 

68 

25* 

25 

25%+ % 

14% 

8* Thamln 62b 

55 5 

14 

9% 

p% 

Wb- % 

0.1 

V6114* 

14* 

14*+ * 

33* 

20 ThmJW 180 

68 6 

15 

26% 

36% 

2fi%+ % 

64 6 

36 

33 

33 

33 

16% 

6 Thrifty 40 

3413 

132 

16% 

16% 

16*+ % 

4310 

174 

30* 

29 

30%+Vtt 

37* 

lB*Tlcor 168 

34 9 

128 

37% 

37* 

37* 

9.1 

z2ia 

11 

11 

11 

28% 

lO’A Ttdvralr .90 

36 9 

78 

24<* 

24 

34%+ % 


6.9 8 48 39* 39% 39* 

23 20 13 26* 26% 26%+ % 
6.9 4 55 17% 17% 17%— * 
1810M 45* 45 45 + % 


34* 19 Ttaerfnr jo 1! 6 352 26* 25% as + % 


32% 77% StuWor 1JS .44 5 60 28 

5 3U SuavSho .20 4.4 16 77. 4 

23* 16% SubPrG 1A4 6J 7 13 21 

32 22 SimChm JO Z1 5 S 28 

28* 19 SunEI JO 13 U 52 27 

51% 36* SunCo 3 5.7 8 4I2U53 1 

53% 37% SunC PfZ£5 4.1 2Bu5S 
a 16* Sunbm 1-40 &j 7 200 22 


6J 7 13 21% 21% 21%+ % 

11 5 S 28% 28* 28*— * 
1314 52 27 26% 26%-% 

5.7 H 412 u53% 51% 52*+1* 
4.1 2B u5S S3* 54*+1* 


50* 37% Tlmeln 1 J6 45 7 284 37% d37 37% — % 
32% 26* Tlml ptfl 157 5.7 387 27% 27% 27*— tb 

35* 26%TimesM 120 4J 7 520 30* 30 30%+ Vb 

58* 45 Tlmkn 3 52 7 49 58% £7* 58% 

9 5* Toft In P 2 7% 7* 7Vb+ % 

3«% 15% ToddSh 7 15 26% 26* 26%+ % 

25% 12%TokhelmJ0 1510 129 24% 23* 23%+* 

24* 19*T<HEdlS 120 11. 7 64 20% 19% 20 . 

24% 20% TolEd Pf221 11. 9 U 20* 20*— % 

12% 7* Tanka Co 37 11 10% It + * 

14* 8* TootRol AOb 42 6 5 9% 9% 9*- % 

29% 17% ToroCo .72 16 9 52 27* 27 27* 

19 15*Tracor a AO 12 B 41 18* 18 18*+ * 


24% 20% TolEd Pf2J1 
12% 7* TankoCp 


14* 8* TootRol AOb 42 6 5 9% 9% 

29% 17% ToroCo .72 16 9 52 27* 27 


99% 60* UVin pfi50 SJ 1 99 99 99 + * 

14* 10 Unarm J8 ■ 7 J 5 3 12 12 12 + % 

64* 49% Uni NV 193o 42 6 17 63* 63* 63*+1* 

SZ* 40*UCamp 140 4J 9 W 50 49* 49*+ %. 

43* 33% Uncart? 180 7J 6 7M 38* 37% 38*+ * 

11* 7% UnCmrce JO 1211 2 9* 9* 9* 

7 3% UniuiCn Jlr 5J 7 71 5% 5* S%+ * 

15* 13* UnElec 1A4 11. 7 149 13* 13% 13*- * 

24* ZMrUnEl pffi.13 9J SO 21* 21* 21*+ * 

28* 25% UnEI pt!72 10. 17 26% 26% 26% 

69* 46* UnOCal 160 V B 1312 u 70* 68* 70* +2* 
.63% 42% UPOCC 130 3J10 453 u64 62* 63*+ 1* 

BVj 5 Unlroval 19 557 7* 7 7*+ * 

82 42 Unlrval Of 8 11 zllO 59% 59* 59%— * 

15% 7%UnBmd .15* 1J 5 28 9* 8% 9*+ * 

21* imuBrapnso. 10. 4 11% 11* 11%+* 

40% 29% UEnRs 148 6J 6 151 40* 39* 40*+ % 

30* 28% UFlflCal S.90 3J 9 55 29* 29* 29* 

23% 13% UnGfty .16 .7 B 48 21% 21% 21%+ * 

27* 22% U Ilium Z5fi 11. 7 15 22* 23% 22*— * 

23* 19 UlUupfl20 11. Z200 20 19% 19%—% 

22 12% UnltlRd J5b A9 6 42 17* 17* 17%+ * 

IS 10% Unltln pf.42 U 1 13* 13* 13*— *1 

19* 8* Unlllim 32 Mi ID 11* 11* 11*+ * 

13% 11 UJerBk 1J4 8.9 5 7 11% 11* 11*+ * 

2* 1* UnPkMn 27 2* 2 2* 

25* 16 UnReta J4 13 5 B2u26 25 25*+ * 

16* 14% USFoS 1580 9J 42 16* 15* 16%+ * 

37* 29 USFId 2A0 68 5 64 85* 35Vb 35%+ % 

33% 23% USGyps 2 6J 5 321 30* 29* 30%+ % 

30% 22% USGv pflJO 6J 12 27* 27% 27%+ % 

13% 6* USHom 52 45 4 298 12% 12% 12*— % 

ID 6*USInd J4 75 S' 58 9 8* 8%+ % 

20% 12* USLeosp 52 313 6 28 16% 16 16 — % 

7% 4% US Rlv 44 7 6% • 7 + *’ 

30% 19* USShoe 1A8 68 S 51 21% 21* 21%+ % 

30% 21 WUS Steel 1J0 68 B 1162 23* 23% 23*+ % 


2* 1* UnPkMn 
25* 16 UnReta J US 
16* 14% USFoS 1580 98 
37* 29 USFId £48 68 S 

33% 23% USGyps 2 6J 5 
30* 22% USGv pflJO 6J 
13% 6* USHom 52 45 4 

10 6*USInd J4 75 S' 
20% 12* USLease 52 313 6 
7* 4* US Rlv 


29% 

19% WalMri 60 

1.114 

114 

26* 

26% 

26*+ 

* 

31% 

20 V. Wa tom 140 

58 6 

33 

27* 

27 

Z7%+ 

%. 

40 

28 WnkrA 140a 

46 8 

13 

37% 

37% 

37*- * 

29% 

17* Wal/Au 140 

60 4 

50 

23% 

23% 

23*+ 

% 

35% 26% WattJm 140 

50 6 

148 

32* 

31% 

32%+ 

* 

12* 

10 kiraiiJ pf 1 

90 

zlO 

10* 

10* 

10* 


37% 

27% WaltJ Pfl40 

46 

20 

34 

33% 

34 + 

% 

12* 

7% WdrdFd 

8 

35 

10* 

10% 

10%— H 

13% 

7* Wamoco 

5 

12 

10% 

10* 

10% 


32% 

21* Warns 140 

56 8 

6 

29% 

29 

29% 


37% 

34*wmCom si 

Z9 7 

539 

35% 

34* 

35 


113 

75% WmC pfl.2S 

14 

1 

92* 

92* 

92*— 

* 

32% 

22* WamrL 1-20 

40 9 

373 

24* 

24 

74* + 

% 

27 

22% Wash Gs 240 

9410 

20 

25 

24* 

25 + 

* 

31% 

22% WshNat 140 

48 7 

364 

29* 

28* 

29%+ * 


2D* 9 WheelPH. 2 

58* 48% WhelPIl pf6 1Z 

24* 17% Wtilrtpl 1.20 68 7 

27* 16* WWtC 150 48 6 933 27* 26* 27%+ % 

44 -37 White PIC 3 75 -17 40 40 40 + * 

15* 5%WhIttMt 4 521 7% 6* 7 + % 

18* 9% WhlMnk 50 3L4 7 116 14% 16% 14*+ % 

19% 11% Wtckes 184 78 5 BS 15 ■ 14* 14*+ % 

12 6% Wlebldt A4 4811 75 11% 10% 10%- % 

23* 14. Wllllania 1 5540 285 W 18% .19 + * 

11* 6 WllshrO .14 1A 28 263 10% 10 10%+ * 

31* 26*MnDx 1.44 54 B 28 26%d26% 25*- % 

7% 3 Wlmtogo 16 65 3% 3 3%+ % 

13* 9* Winter J 1 9512 6 10% 10% 10% 

29% 25 WtsEP 254 85 7 313 25* 0% 25%+ % 

23 19 WIsGos 1.92 19 7 17 21* 21% 21% 

21% 18* WIsePL 7.74 9A 9 x45 19% Iff* 18* 

21% '17% VMscPS 1J2 98 7 13 18% IB IB 

25 IBtelMtao 150 48 6 19 24% 24% 24% 

17% » WlttrR 80 7A 5 44 10* 10% 10* 

im 6%WatvrW 50 ZB 7 113 Utt 10* 10%- * 

19% 12% WOmetC JO 51 8 464 19% 19 19%+ % 

31% 1SH WtaodPf AS 1 J 15 121 29% 20% 29% +1 

32 17%.yvalwth 1JQ 54 71176 29* 29% 29* 



17%Walwth 1J0 


NEW YORK, April 23 — Cash 
prices in primary jnarkets as_ regis- 
tered today in New York were: 


U.S. Commodity Prices 


Man .Year aoo 


2% 

25*+ * 


8 %+ % 
16 — % 
7 + *' 


EMPLOYMENT 

PEHSUWrLW t\TEP 

AIR CCMDfnOMNG SERVICE 
ENGG4EBI 

RIYADH, SAUDI ARABIA 


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

t _ - 

(Continued from Back Page) 


EMPLOYMENT 


AUTOS TAX FREE 'j HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


MARHABA 

Yoarl Pant contact 
the fined mote and faeole uxwpqnpn 
Every one ogam- 340 38 14. 


must be experienced m axnnMobnmg. ■ ■ - 

tew down, lepar and maintenance of SITUATIONS W ANTED 

33KS . SiSESLSZ 

^ r iS?ftrirsi?94 

So£?Si^«s3lM AMERICAN MAIE, PROIBSH3NAL 
phrt housing and ear. Wm g™irg per- writer, toumdnt. editor, formerly with 
loud hetory and experience M: McGrow HU. seeks responsible posi- 

tion with kill company in Paris. Fluent 


BMW CONCESSUNNABBES G-B. 
LTD^ the U.K. importers con offer fax- 
free from stock BMWs m RHD, IHD, 
UJ. and Ainhakan speafiaassars. 
New speed prices tar 1979. US k»c 
models paid for m US doBars. CaS « 


OiARTBl A VAtEF YACHT 
m Greece drett from owner d larged 
fleet in Europe. American management. 
Excellent crews, service, mcwitonanaa. 


TRANE SA. 
P.O.BOX 38, 
AGFBA PARASKEVl. 
ATHH4S.GUECE. 


lion with Inti company m Paris. 
Enafak French ft Greek. Cad 


today. Export Dwdon. 56 Park Lane, ( gout bonded. Vdef Yodds Ltd, AW 
London W1Y 3DA. TeL: 01-6299277. j TtarmtoUecMB Z2C, Pireus, Gr eece. Tel. 

4529571 , 4529486. Telex i 21-2000. 


. Don’t nth* 

INTERNATIONAL 
SECRETARIAL JOBS 

MONDAYS 

intheMT Oaswfied Sedtan. TRANa/ 

xpeoani 

_ neer. £ 

EXECUTIVE SALESMAN vrayjj 

EUROPE ^ 

wow 

A U.S. based conwmer products com- France ( 
pxry manutacfwng ammdnm occas- YOUNG 


Engtah. French ft Greet Call Pans 
41614 85. 

FORMBI MBtCHMARY. neeck tab bo- 
dyguard or any other aperotmm Free 
la travel any tune. CoQ Simon, Pant: 
636 06 38, 1 am, • 2 cun. 

ITALIAN LADY PARS BASED, 5 lan- 
guages, mt'l sucreKnal and P-R. eoepe- 
rtences, top reformes, person nk ty 
and appearance, free unmtstainly, 
willing la travel. Bax 539, Herald Tri- 
bune. 92521 Ntudhrcodex, France. 

TRANSLATIONS FSDKH-B4GUSH. 


yis. Fluent Telex; 261360. 

Cod Ports DUTY RE 74 BMW, 1602 76000 
km*. $2JD0. Luxembourg. 436 476. 


TUXEDO ESCORT INTERNATIONAL. 
The best mole and female 
escorts in Ptvis. 

Teb Plans 222 60 55. 


BELLES OF NEW YORK 

ESCORTS . 
212-2230981 


AVIATION 

PRIVATE AMINE CO. seeks tar lease 
on a yearly centred baa owners of 
I King 90.’200 or Citation 1/11 planes. 
Watts Bax 526. H era l d Tribune, 92521 
NeuMy, Cedes Prance. 


SSE EUROPE M STYLE FOR IBS Save 
with Trafcfaer Tows [Europe's moot 
experienced escorted caaditour oper- 
ator) - departura deity from London. 


□tor) - departures daily from London, 
with prices from $130. uxge chocs of 
routes. ReSdbfe aigonisehon with tas- 
ty yean' experience. See your travel 


t CHLOEMGBCVA 

- far a pleasa n t time. French/Geraim' 
■1 Enghsh^Sparxsh. Call 32 55 83. 


Common tty and unit Mon, 

FOODS 

Cacao Accra, tt> N.Q. 

Caffe 4 Sartos, m 1J0 

TEXTILES 

prtatdath64J038V3-vd • (Us 

METALS 

Stent billets (Pltt.l. ton 28BJH 

Iran 2 Fdrv. PNku ton 22756 

Steel scrap Na.itwv Pitt - 106-1D7 

Lead Boot. lb. 0J8 

Cooper elect, lb 9Mb 

Tin (Straltil.tb.w - MW 

ZbK.E.Sf. 1-Saetete 039% 

Silver N.Y.oz. 7AM 

GaM N.Y.OZ. 237.10 

COMMODITY Indices 
MOMfy'sindex (base 100 Dec 11. 19311 

April 21 1979............. 1J44J0 f 

o— Preliminary 
f— Final , 

■— Nominal 


Omen HJsrh Lew Close chg- 
Dec 14875 151 JO 14750 15050 +085 

Mar 15150 .153.15 15150 15380 +085 

6 St- spies- 1573 sales FrL830. 

Total open Interest FrL 6542 off 7+ from 
Tnur. 

ORANGE JUICE. 

1SM0 lbs.- cents per %. 

MOV 10BJO 110-00 10850 11080 +150 

Jul 109 JO 111J0 109J0 HUM +250 

Sep 10950 111 JO 1QZ45 11150 +Z35 

Nov 1BS50 10750 10130 10750 +285 


Open High Low Close ate. 

OATS 

^bu.-danagporbu. 

TuT - UB* 1J9*1J8 
Sep 154% 155% 1-54* 1-55% +82 

Dec 1 J2 1J2% 1 Jl* 162% +■« 

fAar 188 1JB 1JB IM +81% 

Bales Morn 498. 

Total open interest Mon. CT0Z off TO from 
FrL 


10S50 10750 10130 10750 +285 LIVE BEEF CATTLE 
10155 10350 10150 10365 +ZAT 408B# ttc; cents Mr lb. 


SUGARNO.ll 

1 128W Ibs^oenfs per lb. 


SrMjTSSSii*'iiS: BAGGAGE SHIPPING 

I 20d 71 9Z " ^ 

! VERY ATTRACTIVE DiSCRHT Stack **?”*?*«£ 


England. Tot 01 4&8 4388- 
CHARTBl A LUXURY YACHT. We 


BAGGAGE SHIPPING ™^^l^ yad^G^er 

— : ■ — “ — ^ — ana Nichabons, Sea Trade HeBos Ltd, 


Saties and elections ;amumer products 
seeks an aggteuive tell starter, ttrang 
ckher. Should Fose detailed Lnowtadgo 
of European Renata'S and WtwIesqJers. 

We efter top csmperjotion package in- 
dudnsg satary. bonus and expenses. 
Only top espcenced people need 
OPW 

Euvt ' H Rose. Vice Prescient taler •vt 
ttanal O^erancr.. will be at Ooridgci 
Hctel. London. Engtand, May 6 ■ May 
12 !o conduct personal interviews Td 
01-tf*S360 


U S. ryrl m L01 Angeles, 23, seeks pan 
bon as travel campamOn. Box 14101, 
Herald Tribune, 92521 Nearly Cede*, 
France or leL rfia 673 4370. 

YOUNG RBttFMAH fluent EngSjh, 


seeks position as Private Soaela-y. 
Wnte A Lecoq. 45230 Chaidtan- 
Cokgny, France. 

IHIMISIV. 

srn'fflONavANTCti 

ENGLISH MUM'S HOPS, Names, 
hee now. NASH Agency, 27 Grand 
Parade, Bntaean, UKTt.681 668. 

LOVING BBTOH NANNY, fu*y expe- 
rienced. babtes upwards. og«l 21 
seeks position USA. Avadafate 5e[Rwn 


Pans-9e TeL- 2462455 Ca« Charlie. 
Ahosriai'meaiun mcvmgv 


SERVICES 

NURSQ QUAURB). For private 
portents, home or dimes,- days a» 
nights. TeL: 5616266. Genre Wema- 
horxd dTnfirnvefe* Pu rees, 66 Rue La 
Boehe, PmsBdi. 

ROME CA5TH1L Gexffeur. treatments, 
massages, perfumes, boutique. Vbj 
fraSoa 52-54. Tefc 6780066 ,, I 
FEOJNG late? - hawmg pcaUemG I 
SOS HHP crisis-Sne m Enrasli. 7 pnv- 1 
I 11 Am TeL Para 723 BO «T , 1 


and Niehakora, Sea Trade HeBos Ltd, 
4 A Themorokleous. Pxaeus, Greece. 
TeL 4511322. H*. 213157 BOAT GR. 


HOTELS 

RESTAURANTS 

NIGHTCLUBS 


SR-TIZERLAND 


HOTEL 

zum STORCHEN 

Wemptat* 2 


Oi PMufliD to. S.H. Rene. Univrrid 
Security inaiuments 10324 1 DolficJd 
Rood OmeaMk MD 21 117. USA 2 RENQi 
tei- iJJII 363W3. Trier 87675 p 


ZURICH, switzoland 

■elw^MraJ.W, Wch A^ncy. erpofnates London 01-235 472B. BHiqM<1 ^ooc port .of Zundi arty c 


NEW AMSIGIOAM 
Fenwyno escorts in Fun Gty. 
Mon. MFri. (020) 73 08 30. 


IN LONDON? 

Remember .. For the mast setae* escort 1 
service 01-499 1013 ■ 3 p.m.-1 1 pm 


KARIN'S LADIES . 
The best esoorti m Paris. 

Gafi57931 53. 


LUTET1A WTRNATIONAL 
Mwbffiwgud Top Escort Service, 
fcfa. 277 7944. 

SAMANTHA ESCORT 

PARIS: 525 81 01. 


Mar 10155 10450 10155-104.10 +280 

■ 237 - w 171,5 mov unjB 10480 lazoa i04jo +Sjo 

I Jul 18US 10380 10235 104.90 +255 

100 Dec 11. 19311 

184480 f B99-90I Est. soles: 1550 sates Frl. 804. 

Total open Interest FrL 7463 up 33 from 
* Thur. 

COTTON, NO. Z 

50800 lbs j cents per Ob. 

umwADL- d miss c?c May 5855 5885 5785 5767 —0.95 

NtW YORK FUTURES Ju i oOJ9 mss s> ss st/a — o.so 

Awil 23. 1979 oct ms ozao oim +aa« 

^ ’ Dec 6200 62.11 6185 6TJ2 -0.14 

MlalI . nw r . _ Mar 63J0 6365 . 6382 63.1 Q 

Open High Low Close Cng. pw 63 . to . 

COFFEE -C 

77^se itis^ cents per It. Est.soler.7jS0 sales Frl. illf. 

May 14480 10440 I4Z25 14Z75 —1.10 

Jul U7.75 I47.75 145 JO 14656 —102 Tata! opwt Interest Frl, 35J77 off 376 from 

Sep 15180 151.00 14980 15089 -081 Thur. 

Dec 15000 150.90 14855 15053 —008 

Alter U7J0 147.90 14425 I47J1 —154 COPI^ER 

Atav 14B80 14850 14*55 147J5 -1J4 SjMlbiL- cents per tb. 

^ ‘May 8950 9180 B9.10 9095 +145 

L Est. sales: 2JT0 soles Frl. 3516 , un 90,00 vaffl 908Q 9145 

I 'jul 9050 9280 9050 9155 +250 

Total open inferesf Frl. 9J6T up 168 from sep gjjjO ruo 90-85 9285 +285 ' 

I Ttatf. .. Dec 91.15 9Z30 9085 9215 +185 

Jan 9090 91J5 9090 9250 +185 1 

Mar ' 9150 9240 7150 9130 +1.75 

u-lt. May 91.45 9145 9145 9240 +180 

753 750 751 -0.13 «]-» V," Sfc tl* 

OOO 7.92 7.92 —0.13 Seri 91JB 9180 9TJ0 92J5 +145 

036 857 028 ^0!l2 Si'S SS SS * 

049 840 840 —016 -tan 9280 9280 9280 9280 

gj|6 ^ —014 E*t. roles: 9.100 sales FrLT 4545- 

9J6 9 JO 9jo —0 14 Total open Interest Frl. 50581 off 1.131 from 

9.90 985 985 -OlO 'T 1 **- . 


Jun 7750 7857 7855 7655 —150 

Aug 7565 7840 7440 »4 40 —150 

OCt 7380 7350 7167 7167 —150 

Dec 73.10 7367 7150 7150 —150 

Jan 7350 7340 7155 7155 —150 

Feb 7255 7350 7147 7150 —147 

Apr 7355 7340 7150 7152 —148 

Jun 7385 7360 7155 7180 —145 

Aug 7150 73.15 7155 7162 — 15B 

Oct 7260 7160 7140 7140 —1.10 

Est sales: 24457; sales Man. 24829. 

Total open Interest Mon. 70464. up 2867 
Irom Frl. 

FEEDER CATTLE 1 

428*0 Ibsj cents per Ok 

May 9150 9280 9065 9045 —150 

Aug 9140 9180 »5S 8955 — L» 

Sen 8985 -9080 8045 BB4S —150 

Oct 8750 88.17 B640 8640 —150 

Nov 88.12 8860 8687 8887. -150 

Jan 8955 8950 8755 B75S —1.50 

Mar B950 8980 8855 8855 —150 

Apr .69.97 B957 89.97 8957 

4F 

Est. tales: 3460; sates Mon.Z981 

Total open Interest Maui 21,911, up 858 from 
FrL 


757 757 750 751 -0.13 

758 BJJO 7.92 7.92 —0.13 

853 BJ6 857 858 -0.12 

848 849 840 840 —0.16 

0.77 8.77 077 0.79 

955 953 9.16 9.17 -0.141 


304*0 cents ner HZ 
Jun 5065 

5165 

49.12 

4960 

-162 

Jut . 

5050 

•5180 

49JO 

4945 

-!5S 

Aug 

4745 

4880 

4682 

4667 

— 160 

Oct 

■4433 

44JB 

4335- 

4347 

— 62 

Dec 

44 JS 

44.97 

4350 

4337- 

— 45 

Feb 

4460 

4465 

4342 

4X42 

— 68 

Apr 

4Z1Q 

4265 

4162 

4162 

- 88 

Jun 

4400 

44.10 

4345 

4345 

+ 83 


Bd. London SW3 Tel: London 
. Cable Searchagy ft*. L*1 
4 G04TLEMEN took tar per. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


■n tac quel hasonc pari at Zi 
2 mmute walk to the shmp 
nonoal center. The only 1st 


Est. roles : 3850 sales Frl. 4407. 

Total Open Interest FrL 33863 off 536 from 
Thur. 

COCOA 

30800 lbs.; cents per lb. 

Mov 14380 143.90 141 55 14350 -0.10 

Jul 144.10 146J9 14380 14680 +280 

$ep 14650 14850 145-25 14880 +155 


Market Summary 

April 24. 1979 

Previous NYSE Actives 


N.Y8ILVER. 

5860 truv oz; cents trov oz 


PARIS 


INTI FRM COMPANY -egintn expe 

netted binvjuel Enolnh-Fionch yhc*i- 
tunc secte’Wi JEnglnli mother 
•i'rguci Atpitobte mimronte’v far 5 
mori'hv CVS. iolcay leqv'irmenJ; 10 
SvvKr dp rrlicnnei. T0 'UP Trcrvon, 
P«i» 17lh Tei. 'C4J1 u«t 3trT. 

RAIS OfflCE NEW YORK Stack E- 
crtnrtgp *-im iJ tootnng lev bilingual 
*rle» apeurtu Hlxit'. p 30 10J30 am, 
? 7 ftn Rcplt to Ear 525. Herald 
Tiibunc W52i tveu.lv Ccdw, Home 


Rtanent paenar. as chauBeur, cook, 

U5. LAWYER, mgraura. 1215 N. 
92521 NmnUv Cede*. ROM. Santa Ana, ^A 92701, USA. 


b °’" Kalla. Tet76641 94.11a.m. -11 pm. 

TeU 01/211 55 10. Telex 53 354. 


aid Tribune, 92521 NewMy Cede*, 
France. 

38 YEAR OLD GOVBWESS taflWy ex- 
perienced wuh private tandm, seeks 
poll abroad. Fry Staff ComJtarrs, 7 
Querns Rd, Farnbaraugh, Hampshire. 
UK Tel- 0252 426B8. 


AUTOMOBILES 


LOW COST FUGHTS 

rtf /Mmulwul fjrralj Tnbuur 
cjorm •each for rfir | 

cf 

/btfaaJtirtatdhekKr. 


I'-S-A. 

H. 304 East 4_2nd 


ring. Go/I: 757 62 4ft 


(UDOR HOIB. 304 cost 42nd 

Street New York City- In hate 

5^1^ UN*S^K S» EOTT5 AlWe 

dwibles from S4Q. Telex; 42295'. 


77 PORCHE TUIOOT 264)00 WAS- BRUSSaS/N.Yj 1-woy F.563. reiym 
MO ma -JONO VE a b/.^ ^ ofl rntrej. faregn ptoes, F 1 1 69, Ctecooa, 1-woy FJ^TB^utor 

urgent Coll mornmgi 965 07 B3 Pom. ftdiwv Pnns/lv.Y. charter. rewnF 
1 5 Ini I «vms. ImmedoK ^ ISO. I-wgyFJSO ITS 22Sf239 Para, 

Vmp.-'e'.ll .ue Tranche.. GLOBAL LOW COST AIR FARES. 


mot F:end- E'rtih vrcrrraim lor 
Amrican & tail I* ms. Immctiate 
opemfHT- I'nipni'. II 'ue T'anchei, 
Pomfn. 1f l.V.J5 62 
UXGCNT2.Y NEEDED tar Americen and 


FOR SALE A WANTED 

VHRBCh Pre-recordar CaueKes. Large 
Selection of Englth Speakxig Pto- 
grammes and films. Enquma Box 


359-6273, 212-961-1945, 212461- 
6091. (Escort opokoenta, coilL 

PARK WELCOME M1BMAHONAL 

Mad axqusrie Escort Service tar the 
dhcnminohng u erth uiju rv For a memo- 
rable tame, c*%c:a ttJ 970 49 48. 


Pota Prod 

Sates Close Chg. 
418800 16 +1* 

CaasarSWId 

395400 

70 -6% 

GPUCp 

360.100 

11% — % 

CharterCa 

344600 

15* +1* 

CharterCowt 

331800 

9% +1* 

Ramada In 

300400 

11% — * 

BollyMta 

289.900 

72% --7* 

AmTT 

289800 

59* — * 

Gulf Oil 

24B800 

26* + % 

Merck Co 

231600 

*5* — * 

Polaroid 

220600 

35* + % 

Gen Motors 

211600 

59% + * 

Woatwarfh 

189.900 

29* — * 

InterwavCri 

171600 

34% +3% 

Scoff Paper 

154.900 

10% — % 


RGHfllY NEEDED -y and AUTO RENTALS 

ims Fur^. ntiUher lijrgue & bi ■ — — — ■ ■ — - 

sngusl Ftpncrt caj^h icci stone- Cdl AU. RENAULTS *79 inducing small oa- 
Pms 533 1® M tomcrics a* very cheap weekly ft 

— monthly rotes. Gefl- EURAUTO, fteiv 


n ti lfl ll^ « _LNTFJJ , 

International Teaching Jobe 

wpw Ti each Satuidav n rhe WT Gx 
ulied Sechar.. Tc p’ace sw od camaci 
yoa local IHl repretentoiive i addresses 
Jl today I OauJied SnCl'Cnj O': 

IwtawBeBar He ra ld Trhxme, 

1S1 a ve nue Charters da GouAe, 
92200 NwWy, France 
Teh 747 12 65 Tx: 612832 


STV VTlt l\> TL 1 5VTK11 


FRENCH LADY. 32. TRIUNGUAL c* 
euFve toaetey [ExigWi. Getnwn), 
good Mian. 10 sees irternafKivtal e»- 

S ence la. 4a for c CHALLENGING 
1 1 nrt resporeiblnrs. UxxPtcn any- 
where r. tui ape. I with p<oforenCe. 
Ge»mony i Wmc Ec* 535. Hciald Tn 
bum*. 93521 Neatly, Cede* France. 


{roman rertonol, Ca-jcuwai evigm age 
4Q, German engmeeiirg graduefe. T5 
yean ol bread e>prri#iK* m comtruc- 
nan and varwus aaopated fields of 
teduKry, lost 3 yean os iratependent; 
eveeltenl camnand of 
Engfiah, French, Gerannn 
Ruitean, Iranian bnvsagei; 
flfubb perwndity. seeks irterertnsj. 
tumble padhan bated in Europe Please 
C3flKK> C'o M Frar-vnan. Meirasiraal 7, 

9770 Kruahouft™. Wgmm 


•omrUKi as v 
monthly rates. 
5»S7frP 


Sunshine Trevete TeL 2422QZ Sint 
Joeobutroat 42. Amrtirdwn. 

AIR CHARTBCS ‘ACCS' - Sinn 1«69 
(recommended by ambaacs] - 5 rue 
d'ArtOfS, Parts fth. Tel 523 02 15/16 


grcxmvn and Hum. cnqumrs nan — 

S848.IHT.1 03 Kmgsway. London WC2. I ESCORT B4IBNATIONAL PARK. I Volume tin millions) 


faxaudl auxhs. Foe Para Advanced 
l^SerwMwftSH VoluritoUo fktmlllloft5t 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


AUTO SHIPPING HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL REGENCY - USA 


TRANSCAR: Europe s larged Offices 
in USA Bow terms to Ntxth Amenea 
end wsxidwide. Baggage and house- 
hold goods shppedTDeWery aM aver 
Europe. Brochure and quotes:- Lon- 
dan, W l„ 44 New Bond St, Tel. 491 
4131 Geneva 1219, 30 Ava. du Lig- 

shSpycrir CAR TO UJSJL VIA ANT- 
WEW AND SAVE. Free hotel, accom- 
modation. Regular sailings 
JFK.'McGuue Airport delivery. 
AMESCO. Knbheihoat 2. Anrwerp. 
Tel - 31 42 39 Office far Germany, 
tel 068-443071 _ 

TRANSCAR 20 rue Le Sueur, 75116 


ITALY - GREECE 
BY RAIL AND 
CAR FERRY 
BRINDISI -PATRAS - 
ATHENS 

FOR RJUL DETAILS, CALL: 


Top echelon private escort service 
catering to a top echelon dtentole. 

NEW YORK GTY 

| TeL 212-8380027 

ft 212-753^1864 


CONTACTA WTL The na 1 executam 
escort Service in Europe; 
GBIMANY: Frankhirt, Cologne, Bonn, 
Duesse kkxf, Wiesbaden, Mbto. 
SWflZHtLAMfe Zimch. BoseL Winter, 
thur, Lucent, Bme. 


p?™ oivx!f LONDON 4990076. 7306357 Central Booking for the above men- 

6). Antwerp-339985; Opines: 39 43 44. pAWS 7422284. 2M0090 honed atm, Germany 08105-80122. 


U.S. AUTOMOBILES 


61. Antwerp-33 W0ZUFnes:JY‘U+t. 7432294, 2660090 

COLOGNE." 234911 

FRANKFURT 20757 

AUTOS TAX FREE »*** 2012536. 2now 

G»46VA!!!!!"::f! , !;:iB7*iY. , 2i55ii 

— ; ' BRUSSELS 5387659.5138399 

U.S. AUTOMOBILES Stew-; 

wagons. SrandT new, diff colon. VENICE 291 K. 30306 

same day deBvery with Swiss 

papers Ota to me jJat es. Paymenr 

nuidofe THE EURAILPASS 

RAMPY MOTORS WC, CUIDC 

Wgenidtow. 60 , SHIPS 

3005 Berne, SwtaerfoneL 
T du 031 . 45 , 10 - 45 . Tetaw: 33850 

! : EGNAT1A - APPIA 

CASTALIA 

Tey roro ESPRESSO OLBIA 


honed aties, Germany 08103-80122. LONDON ESCORTS, wtektoe, 

^icreet. TeL : UX 01-402 7748. 


most exclusive Escort Service aft 574 Declined 

Volume DOv 

M STUTTGART ■ MTBCNATK3NAL, UnchansH 
ot tr octani, dsarrmn u . TeL |Q) 711- Total iKjUee 
223842 from 11; 00 Sm New htahs 

New lows - 

CAROUNE tS VERY CONSERVATIVE. 

Meet your best guide m the poH. IL... 

TeUohoniiLorxion 01^25144. UOU 

ESCORT SERVICE. By v*ri eduaMd 
and attractive gwdes, Aireterdam. Tel: 30 
247731. Telex 17178. 20 Tm 

SUZY Bit AMSIQDAM. Open 7 days. 

2 pjn> to 5 am. FtamunyLoon 21, 

A'dam. Tel: 715931. Std 

LONDON CONTACT for Iricu sorrvKye 
reaBy fpedd. OMOB 4000 OR 01-736 
6571. _ _ Composite 

WHEN IN LONDON cat Chetsea G*rl industrials 
Escorts far the prettiest aid FitandKeP Utilities 

vSnlntSLamEUNaioijiK <XSS 

fESassffa.'ttas:””' 

LONDON ESCORTS, ««W*. very 


Declined 

Volume Down (in mill tons I 

UnchansM 

Total Issues 

New tilahs 

New lows - 


Today Prev. 
NYSE Nataamv 
3 pm. Close 
NJi. 2989 
842 77B 

N.A. 1Z75 
473 644 

NA 983 
NA 482< 

NA 1804 

Nft B 


Doic Jones Averages 

Provloui Today 
Open High Low Close 3pm 
Kl BU77 B6U1 852-3® 8WL10 NA 

m 2318S 23Z23 22951 231.11 NJV. 

>tl 10281 10121 102.00 10283 NJL 

Ik 7*25* 394JS1 29080 29389 NA 


Standard & Poors 


73610 745J0 73360 74380 + 5.90 
74480 75480 74480 74980 + .560 
74960 75860 74680 75650 + 650 
76060 76980 75660 767 JO + 6.90 
77560 78360 77180 78Z40 + 760 
78060 78760 77980 78780 + 7 JO 
79060 79680 78680 796.90 + 760 
80060 B0&00 00080 806JD + 780 
80980 80980 80560 91660 +.880 
81 7 JO 817-70 81787 82630 + .820 


Total open Interest Frl. 1B6J87 off Z616 . 
from Thur. _ 


April 24, 1979 1 . 

GOLD 100 trav ounce conTroOte 
Apr 24180 24Z7P 23960 24280 + 0J0 

Jun 242.40 24488 24L20 24430 + OAO 

Aug 24680 24880 24520 24880- + 0JQ 

Oct 251 J0 253.10 24960 2S260 + 0JO 

Dec 25560 25780 25380 25680 . + 0J0 

Feb 26060 261.90 259 JO 251.10 + 0J0 

Apt 26480 25560 263 80 25540 + 840 

Jun - 26760 25JJ0 26780 269 JO + 040 

Aug 27260 27380 27180 27480 + 040 

Dec 28160 282-20 Ml 68 28260 + 040 

Feb 2B6J0 28680 2E540 2*780 + U4Q 

Est. sates: 18800 rotas Man. 17408. 

Total ooen Inle re s t Mon. 159.101 up 46 from 
FrL — 


CHICAGO FUTURES 
April 24, 1979 

Open High Lew Close Chg. 

WHEAT 

580Q he.; dollars p e r b u. 

MOV 342 347* 341 347 - .+87* 

Jul Z3B% 134 128 133* +87* 

Sea 131 136% 130* 386% +87* 

Dee 341% 349 140% 348* +89% 

Mar 361 366% 149 365* +87% 

May 355% 368 155 US +86 

Sale* Man. 2459. 

Total open interest Mon. 37,976. up 226 from 
Frl. 


Est. sales: 6425; sates Man. 1637. 

Total open Interest Moil 23821. up 534 from 
Frl. 


EMM Futures 



Ofh 

Htoh 

Law 

Ctose 

ci» 

SWISS FRANC 




June 

06912 

05915 

05 m 

06900 —00006 

Seri 

44077 . 

04027 04021 0 04021a —00004 

Dec 

04146 

-04143' 04132a 041220 -HL0004 

Mor ■ 

N.T. 

- N.T. 

04222 

04222 

UncJi 

June 

N.T. 

N.T. 

(MW 

04305 

Uncti 

GUILDER 





June 

. N.T. 

ALT. 

049*8 

0L499l t 

.Uncti 

Sept 

N.T. 

N.T. 

05043 

06043 

uncti 

FRENCH FRANC 




June 

N.T. 

N.T. 

08310 

02313 

Unch 

Seri 

N.T. 

-N.T. 

8X06 

02356 

Unch 

YEN 






June 

4626 

4629 

4610 

. 4610. 

-0009 

Seri 

*667' 

.4«2b 

4661a 

4661 0 

—0016 

Dec 

4715 

4715 

47BSa 

4705a 

— -OQ2D 

InfftanUD omitted 




STERLING 





June 

20635 

20645 

2JB55 

24650-031040 

Seri . 

20585 

Z0990 

20490 20500b —00115 

Dec 

jlKM 

21050 

20470 

2 800 

Uncti 

Mor 

N.T. 

2JHS0 285300 20SDa 

Uncti 


CANADIAN DOLLAR 

June 01750 08777 08747 01769 400005 

Seat 08755 08741b BJ77F 08789a 40OBM 

I DOC *8778 0874) b 08787a 08783 408005 

star amoa aenob osmo oneab uncti 

: DEUTSCHE MARK 

June 05328 05320 0630* . 05314 400010 

Sept 06387 05387 06371 -053*2 400013 

Dec 05427 06433 06(25. 05431 400008 

Mar N.T. 06485 0605 05485 408010 

June N.T. N.T. 06315 ' D651S Uncti 


Prices Rise 

On Wall St. 


Previous Today 
Htoh Lew clow 3pm. 
102.00 11XL6S TOB67 10246 
11381 112J1 11386 NA 
50.09 . 496S 49.73 NJL 

IZ05 1160 11.99 NA 


MM bu.; idoUars per Iml (Contioocd from Page 9) 

imza Z 62 Hf* Tjflvitsa* Rollins to 18 cents from IS cents^ 

t+A sep 2J2 254* 2j2 . 2J4% +83* Edo : Corp. to 15 cot ts from 12 W 

3 a: Dec Z65* 159 Z6S%2JB*+84 ^ nlc , AmcioJ Tnri net rinc t.v Art 

NA Mar 173* »5* 173* Z76* +84* "r 1 f KlllS “ 1 ® W _ " 

May 179% 282 z79 282 +84% cents from 43 cents and Coca-Cola 

5otaS Mori. 24455. ° f NeW Yorfc to11 ^ 

-from 10 cents. 

. Total open interest Mon. 161444. off aw. . Sears Roebuck said it will no 
*™ TlFrL ' ' • longer accept federal contracts or 

MMM^Minrsperbu subcontracts for goods and .ser- 

May . 781 767 735 785 +jw% vices. The company said it will not 

Jul 745 762 739 7ST% +.10* hiri Fat ny arrynt onvprnmmit rv\n_ 

Aug 744* 762 738 761% +.13% ^ 

Sep 7.16 781% 7.11 78D% +89 Uftcfs ior an mdefwite. time, be- 

^ 15S1/2L ginning imraediatdy.’' 

Mor 7.18% 784% 7.16% 714% +87% . Sears said about J2Q million in 

mov 787% 733 785 732% +87 goods and services have been ptis- 

• Soiee Man. 19868. dmed from it annually under fed- 

eral contracts. The company said 
^Tctai^opeti interest won. 120842. off 38s fh e action was because the Office 

soybean meal Federal Contract Compliance 

in tons; tumors per Km Programs has begun “what appears- 

w be n campaign of .harassment, 

Jul 19U0 19830 1 9560 19760 +130 ... .» 1-— o— . ...««« jjumm ■ l. 

aw 19980 199J0 19731 W86B +160 subterfuge or reuliauon aga insi 

s«p 17780 W80 19530 19*30 +130 Sears. 

Oct 19160 19288 TOJO 19240 +T60 ffl-J 

Dec - - • 19180 i9zao 18980 19160 +i6o Mars meo son in January 
job - 19260 i«360 19130 .19150 +240 against the office and nine other 

j£ iSm ISIS TO? +S fed 5^ agencies in what it said was 

an a ton. to resolve conflicting laws 
sole* Moa 5371. and regulations which xestrierjobs 

Total open Interest Man. 5233S, off7tffrwn ^ promotions forminorides and 
Frf. ... - women. 

: • . U -S- Sied'said its board “relue: 

May 2Aio Mm yiw 2*47 + 50 had accepted" the request of 

Jui toss 26js 2582 2532 .*.49 Edgar Speer that he retire as chair* 

£? i.£: rndas adroaor due-to poor 

ocf 7535 25js 7S3B 25jz + 44 health. The board announced the 

Dec 25.13- 2340 24.91 2535 + JP election at Daviri Rndprirtt bc 

Jon 25.10 2530 2465 2535 +30 ™ l T 0a ? n< * ■*. 

■Mar . 25.15 2SL2S 2*95 2535 + 32 chairman and chra execunve effec- 

37 ■ tS IS 28 IS tS today. Mr. &eer had held the 

• ** .- posmons since 1973. 

' -saw Mon. &40f AmericanStodc Eitchangeprices 

Trial open Int Brest Nton; 58458. oft H7 from with the index, up lv67 

ew. J- \ *$1X2,55, . : :.“ 


NYSE Index 


SSBOLG. DRIVING, (RAW-) 

COFFEE TRAD® 

With 15 yea's expttience n all aspects 
of lu te * te i hand hading series pwmon 
wrtfi fesp o ns w xfJy, Pfefiyatfy region 
Lausanne'Geneva. Please wnte 10 Bo* 


TAX NOS CARS 
BJROFEAN DBJVBTY 
AU. MAKES - AU MODELS 

li s urance-Stapraeni 
Open Monday through Saturday. 
Call or write fry FREE catdag. 

SHIPSIDE 

SHIFSIDE BUILDING 


W105. Hcrrid Tnhjje. 9252T N«8y. 

raKB - Phone: {20)152833. Telex 12568 


YQWWB*OUSWflA IA Vw FrwKli. 
vhde e'lpBitenae ui managenwriano 
otaunnlratiart Goad pietontarta". 


LOTUS CARS LTD. 


Die magnmcBif 

STB1A SOLARIS 

The yochitike 

-STELLA OCEAN1S 
3-4-7 DAY CRUISE5 

The b*t of tee Greek faarxfc ft Turkey. 
Evpy A4anday ft Friday from FVorus. 


AMANDA JAY 

Of Mayfair London 
EXCLUSIVE ESCORTS 

01-4997319/7310 


COSMOS 

OkteU ft Masi ReMde Ewsrt Swvxa 
Wide tetedxw of kjvriy 
and imAffmuwal estortL 
Open ewyday WB P-ov. until 2 a.m. 
Pari497697 65. 


BELGRAVIA 

iMiftaii'c mote euatoiive 

teerttervicg. 

Ring 736 5877 

fry flmtejflraipeoalajnipaflioa 


DUKBDOWI^ KOUSTW. 


G* 0211-492605. 


Provtoui Tgdar 
High Low awe 3pm. 

5739 5787 '57.29 5780 

jEvifT- • . - ... r - 11 utovstrtan 6346 63,13 63.46 '64.14 - 

ESCORT S*V1tt for Frankfurt. GoB y r0ic4 ,. 45.90 4546 46.90 NA S86C 

for a raw tmifc 563609- . . Utilities .3129 3833 3833 NA May 

JADE »l OB4EVA. Forrvcehtrw - ro- Flnanoe . 5937 5941 5967 NJL Jul 

fitted Kddaotete.Tri.-022/31 95 09. auo 

•USSSSSIXU?* Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. S 


SEE LONDON WIH DONNA TeL Shares 

01-9353917. _ Buy Sate* *01*7! 

IN LONDON Your attradtve eroort Sal- April 23 1S5.9M 36146+ 1340 

lvAriToi-3706573- APrtl20 140897 317416 1377 

LW®ONWnHA LATW TOUCH- awfm ISO® M «< 

^TE «SrT^ PAW 5 TeL 5« <3 KMM 1^ 

UTE BCOW w paro. iefc 5T4 4i *Tiies» Totals art indutfed In the sales Ho- 

PARE: YOU! HOSTESS - afternoon. urt5< 

Jill caumg anyone bse cdi Previous AMEX Active 9 

ib“ Fqrit: 539 51 67. sates Cion Ch- 

IWWW ESCORT HKrs^.Rtte & -i* 


5otaS Mod. 244S5L 

Mar - Total open (nteresf moo. 161444, off 839. 
Ipm. froniFrL ■ . 

MJ4 SOYBEANS 
NA 58*0 buj danare per bu. 

KA. May 731 737 735 736 +JW% 

NJL Jul 746 762 739 »6T% +.10* 

y Aug 744% 762 738 761% +.13% 

Sep 7.16 731% 7.11 730% +89 

' Nov 6.98 785 664 784* +89 

Jan 788 ' 7.14 785 7.13% +88* 

te«rt Mar 7.18% 734% 7.16% 734% +87% 

I*35S- May 737% 733 73S 732% +87 


SaiM Man. 19468. 


Previous AMEX Actives 


jmwsn r sa 

MANDmiME IN FARISs Tel: 

HCHBafNB*Sa.qWn^0J*Bl tongerOH 
MADRID, YOUR ATTRACTIVE moan. 

Coft 457 2698- 

IN FRANKHJRT CAlf H ELG A. 

Beautiful end am uring . i*L JU/ iB. 

VRANKRWT B03^SKVKI (Wer- Volljm . l!on 


14ft700 46% —1%' am 
113800 7 Sep 

W400- 1* Oct 
75,100 42% +2% n Z. 
73800 30% +1% vS 
66JOO 21 Vk —1 Mg, 
59300 14* — 1* «ot 
56400* 19 
53600 19* + % 

50300 18% — % ' 


19160 19260 <9040 W240 +160 
19180 19380 189J0 19T60 +160 
19150 19360 19130 .19150 +240 
19580 19630 1W30 79630 +2 3D 
19780 19860 19650 19B£0. +280 


■ 1 1, i*. 1 r *' * Volume (m millions) 

HOSTESS -S»*M . . nofeondt Cat 598ffl& t Advanced 

GD*VA aHraetive. ft dtown^eKort. volume Up (In mllifanst 
Frankfurt. Wfebaefav frtam*. Bonn, Fesirieor mpto-Cal lflfa»7fr V. Declined 

Calogre ard Dustridori. MKHBlfS far tee speed exert. Loo- Volume Down (in millions) 

TBi 06171-76*47- &>« 937991a Unchanged 

LONDON MAl£JK»n&Py«nt. Total llswes 

- — 1 ■ «h »i young gun. GA 727 3322. New highs 

SBECiMmJUGB^T PARTNOS Go Newtpws 


Today F?eiy. 
AMEX MoKonw 
3 pm. dose 
MS ZBB 
350 291 

NJL . 16S 
21 B 296 
NA 169 
NJL 847 
NJL 14 

«fc 4 


sates Mon. 6371. 

■ Total Open Interest Man. 52635, off 740 from 
Frf. ... - 

SOYBEAN OIL 
«WM UMLj taffare per 708 Q» 

May 24.10 2660 2*82 2647 + 5D. 


847 Oct 
M.J Dee 


wtl companv basad in Bnnsrii. W4l»fl San and Japanese waficonoin ovaJ- . 

to rtarel ftecso write to- Uw able in Bta. fid* as 6pnt For tal de- 

Hubbard, 11 Are. de Fevner, B 1200 tab amtacr Mika ftihap. Utea Can . 

Bnntek D«L fwbAjM. (0953) MAUWTlUS/SEYa«UB/ S. Aarari- 

*034)1. TJexT 97401 . m Tro*ri Cntare London. Tel: 01437 

91347 Telex Z7t 57. 


PARIS ESCORT LADY dS? TOwfe T Htw«. 1 'Sndcxv 


HBH . WPUkCTWt* DBCREET 
Gal 579 01 70. 


7301840. 

PARIS MTSBWIONAL. TeL Fare: ■ 
rea *7 

FOR YOUR ESCORT M PAWL 
aJ: 5007388. 18065 


AMEX Stock Index 


Freviwc 

oom 

18088 


25.10 2S37 M60 2537.. + 37- 
2S85 2530 24.95 K30 + 37 

-Sates Men. 6404L 


Trial open tatereu Mon.58458. oft 
Ert.- . ■ 


where highd: with the index. uoh67 

stJSZSsT/. - 


Open High Low Out Che> 
PORK BELLIES >• 

84880 Ittu ceate per lb. 

May ‘ »60 6035 5740 5762 -lA.' 1 -^ 

Jul 5845 5935 5647 S647 

Aug 5565 5635 5332 5337 -UsT-* 

Fab S4J» 5430 SBLOS S3 80 — LOL^ 

Mar ' 5360 5362 5130 5230 — 

May ' . - . SIX 

Jul 5360 5335 SITS 5335 — 

Aug 5260 5260 5185 SUE —35,-^ 

Eft. eates: 4888; wtesMon. Z72i ’j -5 

Total oned Interest Mori. I06«B, up32Sfrorn ,- J ‘ 

prt '. . -.Tf. 

ICED BROILERS . H-U 

30800 Hnj caris per lb; . 

Apr 4588 + jOT-l 

MOV 4980 4980 4880 460 + a*- 

Jun 5260 5260 5Z30 5240- ~ . lit- 

Jul 50.90 50.90 5025 5040 - -25+ 

Aug 4945 4260 4980 4960 - 21 

Seri - - 4635 . 

Oct 4480 4400 4400 44JB — UBj, 

NOV 4300 4380 4300 4380 — I.XH^ 

DOC 6SLM 4580 4580 458Q 

Soles Man. ijrf; * 

Total open Interest Mon. 1302, off 20 fron^ r 
Fri. 

SHELL. EGGS tib 

22600 dor j cents per dot. 

MOV 5440 5460 5170 5438 - -2f>» 

Jun 5580 5580 5530 553* - S’! 1 

Jul ' 5760 5760 5735 5750 . - 

Aug . . 57JE . -if' 11 

Sap ' 6135 6140 60.90 6065 ~ 31*4 

Oct . ■ 571 M . .k- 

Nov 6200 . • . 

DOC - 6300 63.10 6260 6Z9B - Jb|=5 ' 

Est. sates: 141s rotas Man. 2B^ri ■ 

: Total open Interest Men. 1325. up 2 Iran w - 
Frl. - 

LUMBER 


22460 22780 22300 22660 +1 
22180 22240 21930 222.10’ 
21460 21580 21380 21560 - 
20420 20460 20130 20440- 
20480 20530 20400 20S20 
20780.20730 2IMJ0 20730 _ 

Est. sates: 2374; sates MonJU 


TahM open fnternsf Mon. 7836. off lMffae£i , 
Frl. f, c 

U6 TREASURY BILLS J* 

*Tmnilw;i»ts.ofl8*Pct. ' ’T” 

Jun 9087 9087 9077 9068 v 

Sari ■ 9065 9065 90 jST 9049 : — JB 

Dec 9067 .9068 9048 9049 - 

AAhr 9004 9084 9063 9065 —Mtf 

Jun 9087 9088 9077 90JB -ill 

Sep 9086 9086 9078 9069 . -Jff 

Dec SO05 9087 9069 9069 -B71‘ Z 

Mar 9086 9087 9080 9001 

Est. rotes: 6673; sates Mon, 

Total open Interest Mon. 55350 off ZBM j « 

Fri. 

PLYVKOOD f >ri 

7A0» w tt: dononwimw ft. ■ J - / 

MOV - 20480 20460 20260 20330 - I * 

Jul 20780 20730 20S30 20C8O —LB &* 

Sep - 20660 207.10 20150 20640 - 8 w 

Nov 20680 20630 20460 20550 — LSgr-. ; - 

J art . 20660 207 J10 28050 20780 — JJN s. 

Altar . 20760 20880 20760 20880 - 

AZOV 20750 20880 20750 20000 Mj,- 

Jul 20860 20860 20880 20800 -A;,* 

Sep - 20860 2OA50 20800 20880 . 

Sates.- AtaLJ^ri 
Total open interest Aun. 3857, off-io ■ ’ ’it!' 1 * 
fromFrL . .. al J 


European Markets 


Brasses 


ATtXHt 

GBL (BJemb) 

cockeriir 

Eteetrabei 

Hoboken 
Petrefina 
pu.Go»eart 
Soc. Generate 

Solway .. 
uiLMbto 


Thorn (A) 
Tube Invest. 
■Union Carb- 
Vlckere 
wor L3V» 
West Deep . 
vnestDrief 
west Hold 
west Min 
Waefwarfh 


Frankfurt 


Bowater 

BATJndL 

BOClrrH 

Bril Pet 

Burmah 

CedbwvSc. 

Chartered 

CaurtauMs 

De fleer D 

DaasRee. 

Dtstlllere 













'»*!». 


"St 


INTER NATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1979 


>« 




’s 


|« I 

T: Si 




AMEX Nationwide Trading 3 p.m. Prices Apr. 24 


Tabfeindode the nationwide prices np to 3 p.m. on Wall Street. 

*t. Qyw 

tZMonth ,S4bcb a*. Stun. P m 

■,bH T-ow Dtv.lnS Yin: p/e 100k. HIM Low.Quel.3iun. 




<&' 


iv 

" , k 

ft 3* 

1L-. 

£f* 
le 
I? 

Is' 

S 


94k AAR 
MAPS 
1 ATI* 


V 

V* 

Hfc 

itt 


n avx 

’.bU 3* AZL 

SWAbnMM JOb 
IA AemePr 
nAoraU 38 
2* Action 

7* ActonCp JO - 
Tit AdORlR ,13 
... „ „ 3k 13* AdobeO JQ 

’‘■fvA MkAesteCo 
’*.«><*»»■ 9AAeroFlo JSQ 
3 Aerence 
V .l 5VkAffllHsi'J4 
« TO* AffflPtftj J 0 
ri . ^ «k 5*AH*Slx 32 
i m Auteur Mr 

2A-A1&0W .150 
5 Alenloc .10 
ZAAflagA wto 
5* AllkmT Mb 
5 Almvst JOe 
39* ASphoin ,lOe 
7* Aliomtl JBe 

13-10 AMeCp 


A — . - . 

» UA 

nw 

mb+ A. 

75 

8* 

BA 

fi*+ A 

12 

1* 

1* 

1* 

X 

JITS 

38* 

31. + A 

1 

3A 

Mb 

5A+ A 

fi 

7A 

7A 

7* 

3 

11S 

1A 

1A- 

< 

12* 

12* 

12*+ A 

2 

3Vj 

3A 

3A — A 




’m.?* '»-;«* 

riSS 

01 

«*>**■ 


34 7 

SJ A 

itn 

u 

5J i 

93V 


Ul B 12» 

Jll 33 rt 

4» 2BBu2Hk 
4 17 3 ‘ 
U4 1 IB 
a 19 m 
1870 16 6* 


17V. 

1» 

a 

TK 

IB 

.5 . 

t 


Wo> 


I 12 AftorFd 4Q 
’ 1 ‘ I* 41A Alcoa POJS 

***.'* 25*Amdhl JB 
■a* 5*AmAon> 
vn MAntBilt .12 b 
n ’’ *iw lft » AmBid wt 
‘ 7VkAftusPd JO 

... S* AContrl 46 

*, Ok 7 AGorPd J4 

- *V«l 6* AlldPlef 

■^l* 2u>AiwtKH «e 

' „ JA 6A AMzaA At 

• "''- ***,.!* BftAMzsB J8 

ft* JMAmHtfB 1M 
, ,nt * S, FW 7*AA4dBld JO 
BttAMOtta JO 
7 ■ ZZAAmPetf 3L20 
t* 7*APrec» jo 

Opm, u „ 5»ASdE Mm 

.r«. MlWl L** U*AmS«at JO 
15* 8 AmTuc JOo 

? !" IB s* 

S ?2 r? *2 


121b— * 
13A+ A 
2Ab+I* 
2 - 

18 — W 
514+ lb 
616+ 16 


ZJft 2JA 23*++ 16 

«* <* .«* 


5* 

. 416 
S 

4* 

M 

6% 

18 

lift- 

1 


3 

416 
7* 
4* 
8 ' 
fift 
» 
TFA 
1 


516+ tk 
416— 10 
-8 

48>M 

Mb+Tb 


w. 

nw 

.1 — Vfc 


.'■t M 
» ■>: 
>4 li> 


4,7 

*3 Mi Jf«k 

si j;S 


2V* Andrea .14* 
BUAneloC Mb 
PUAnhen _52 
MAmtionv JO 
MApIDta .16 
- SUApkIOav 

, i. lflkAauitCa 49 

A 7 Armhi .12 

- S1 «Jff * ArrowA 40 

* 6Sk Arundel 

i «<■•• jo* ilk lmkAsomer JO 

H AskfnSvc 

' 4V» t-u 1H AfttCM 45> 

3*kAUotCp wt 
■n 31k Aucflolr .12b 
EOS PA 433b Augat M 

«» Prr lb. Wt TO. AutaTm 

116 IlkAiitmRad 


« (W *1. ^Kk 2836 AirtoSw 140 
K:« tSS'llk 4VfcAVEA*C 44 
5o»o lMAvaodl 140 

li 2 > * r 791 Avtf,n 

itBi ux ^ «-« BRT r ” 
■ *<mi 21k BTU • 


ii it- 
i: ,, 

SO At 
«V i< 

J4|M1 

4 “». ooj ai 


34 8 
U S 
3a a 
15 3 
£3 B 

4410 
10 3 
1013 
24 4 
25 

24 1 297u2M6 Wk 40VH-M’ 
B4 1930 43 4216 43 

414 834 444k 421k 44 +Dk 

. 10 .12 161k 1M 1M* 

U 5 6 Mb 916 9tt-« 
5 an*. 30 aowrt- 16. 
44 7 7 91k W '-936 

34 6 3 "936 936 . 936 

U» O imu 1016 low— 16 

49 9 9 9 

24 3 13 3*4 336 336 
SJL 6 3 916 9 916+ lb 

34 6 3. 91k 9 916 

54 4 1 38 31 3B — 16 

2415 59 141k 1416 1436+ K 

£0 7 IS 143k 146k 1496+ 36' 

A7H UU3316 - 33 33 

44 1 13. Uk 836 . 89k+ 3k 
A SAM 616-16 
3012 4 13V. 1316 1316+ Vk 

46 4 41 9 BA » 

3412 5 4 4 4 + 16 

1J 9 134 I6A MI6 1636+ 1b 
2710.92 1916 1916 1916—16 
44 5 14 9 M 81k- 16 

14 7 4 1036 1016 1016 

17 75 BA 836 Wk+ A 

1414 2U 26 2416 26 +2 

410 36* WA 14A 141k— A 
2.1 6 7 9A 93b 936- A 

• 4 3 936 9A 936- A ’ 

24 . 57 T4A T4A 14A+ A 

» 34 3A 3 316+ A 

1435 191 ' 3A - 3 3M 

w 7. SA .516 SVr—Vt 
2J 5. 7 5Ut 5V. 516 

1J14 B&U3ZA 3TA 3ZA+ A 
19 1A 1A IA+ A 

3 236 236 336 

2412 3 42ft 4216 '4216— ft 

63 5- 5 5A 516 - 536+ A 
7411 3 I7M 17A 17*6- A 

12 IB 14ft 14A 1436- A 


I S.W, 

M 

S A 

rnf* nr, ocii SA 

■*4 411 M J SSj;*. 


S'. Ik. s<ki uj 


iSW Arl? 1 * * JO 

W * l e, UABoldor 48 
, M ISA Bonn 142* 

“*1A 1A Bandar wt- 
7 Banfstr JO 
236 BarooCa .12 
10A Barry R 40b 
33k Barths 
2M Bartons 
ZHBartKbF 
136 Barwfck 

JO 

= -™ n bcroo -24 u 
,1 n rf c> pft 1336 BroB Pfl.15 7J 
r ;ft TABwnzO 
136 BertfMi ' 

41k Bewdrty 4te 5 9 
B BfcPon JB 44 B 
136 Blckfrd 06 U t 
BftBKfVSOS M‘ 7J 5 
18 BMkMf lb SA 6 
5A Blessns 44 
61k Ban Bar 40 
A 14A BowVoU .10 


r A HU BnCStB 
' “ 566 536 BergnB 


'" n tfjtjjj 

■aJ« IJI b»^ 



ini AV*i Ifl; . 


IZABcmne JBb 
5ft BradMN 46 
3A Branch 40 
BABraniff wt 
Brocnn le 
SMBnaCo' 

3A BroDart 40 
10 BraaksP J4 
1 BrasmCo wt 
23VhBrnFA 1.10 
“ »a 223kBrnFB U6 
4 BmF pi JO 
3ft Butldsx 
ABwgai 
SA BuroSln 40 - 


>-i .T'U' T2£;v 

■' w rr *?*sr* 

r.: r ;.\n 

Si* 

i.n/, 

... h st/rr" 

... a 

i •• .nr. .... -joy^ 


JRVSIllS „ 

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•.vc 6-r* 

;i •• If' - 

i... ■ • ... '■ W'4 t 

■ ;n 

p .. is 3' >6 
s. •>!■*» 3! 
vflS- 3*56 
•. «. *'l' 3.* t 

6 

i . ..." r "/ '^6 

6 



13k 136 

* .* 

Wft 1036- A 
28A 3H6-A 
1B36 MA 
1A TA 
936 936+ ft 
4Wr 436— A 
2Zft 22A 
4A 4A 
33k 3A 
4A 43k+ A 
2 2 
23A ZAh 
8A 8ft + A 
15ft 1536+ A 
2ft 2ft 
2A ■ 236+ ft 
536 4ft 
9ft M + ft 
2 2+16 
BA fft+fe 
1836 1816-36 
73k 7A 
12ft 1236 1236— ft 
23ft 2236 23 + A 
3ft 33k 3ft+ ft 
20ft 2036 2016- ft 
9*6 9 9 — A 

436 43k 43k . 

10 ID 10 
2B« 20ft 20A+ ft 
1316 12A 1236— A 

1M 1A& 1&+A 
.316 3 3 — ft 

33A 3316 3336- 36 
3436 34A 3476— Vk 
«A 4A 4A+ ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft 
Wr ««r 2ft 
WV. 103k 1036 



10 CRPSt 
5ACDI 

MCHBFd 47t 
3ft C*ll CP 45s 
9ACR5 JB 
4ftCO0ldA 45a 
13 Coktar JO 
4ft Cal camp 
26 CalPtC UOo 

•■„-.*-s£-b H3k Cameo 40 

6 4 CoOibA 
6 SACdnHomO 
. b SftCdMOrc JO 
a/iioikw* ,J “fJ:Jb 12 CdnMatr 

: «sn^9* OftCdnOoc JBa 
rt< :■!’»' ®?5k « OkiSupO. 

,iy V .«: If » 3ft CapItIFd 40 
:»<*. .vt* V'l.V* 3 Caressa 45a 
■. ;tiri«* A»yk 25 Comet 140 
V ••> .Tl^ 1 *■*& llACnroEn 140 
"...v. Sft CarrolDv 


— c-c-c — 

M 1.139 43 15 
' * H » 
741 14 736 
14 9 n. 5 
24 5 . 2 TOA 
J S M 716 
24 7 5 l*3b 

15 253 9A 
34 7 85 45A 
14 9 8 19* 

15 5ft 
25 125 12ft 
3410 51 18ft 
13 11 14A 
2120 40 Z73b 


1436 1436+ A 
•A 816 
7A 736 
436 .5 
1M6 IDA - 
7 7ft 
19ft 11*+ A 
836 9A+ A 

4CA 4536+ ft 
1936 1936+ ft 
5ft 5ft + ft 
lift 12ft+ ft 
10 10 
14A 14A 
2636 27ft + ft 


.V '■ 


V8V Stf jfc 1316CastlAM n 
“*'3V 196k Cos Fd 140a 




Will* 


5A Cavltm ,10a 
, Kr * lACailuCfT 
k 33A CentA POJO 
> 5ft CantSa 45 
k 18ft CeaS PflJS 
MnJ? IHbCanwtn 1 
itlalft TftCerWCp 
6 11-16 Cartoon 
, —b 3ACatee 48 
. .1 ■«« 1A ChempHo 

UftCrwiM s 
-• MkChnwW J« 
..pk'^br 19ft CWRW 140a 
o-in* W 153kChl*iOav la 
MOiUdWld, 

m^W> P 6 

6 


16 A 102 101ft 10116+ ft 

47 5 2 4* 4*6 4A+ ft 

1410 * 7 4A 4A 4A 

54 8 52 . 26A 2516 2516- A 
74 6 2 1536 ISA 1W 

Q SA CU OL cy, 

54 « 24 15ft 17ft 18ft +1 ft 
74 2 30A 20A 2036+ A 

747 12 Wft 13A 14 + A 
.« 17 .236 236 246 

10. XX 34 36 34 — A 

It . 5 6A 6 5ft 


ill IwJl 1 

rtiiiH 


.s»‘l 




5ftCMttnCa 48 
12AardeK 1 
7ftOtatIan 45 
SftCtorkC ABB 
SftCtarostol 
BftCtopoy 42 
2ACahu .15* 
UACatemn 42 
9A Co tCml 
636 Colwell 40 
22*CamJnc 2 
UHComAti 40 
9V.ComMy 40 
13ftCamdint 
lftComdrCP 

. -ri ■ 8A Cameo s JO 
\V b lACompuD 
‘ _rt<*b 13hl6Complnv 

lOACanchm 40 
-r+b 3ftCDnordF 
036Caadee 401 
236COnntJyC 
16ft Canrac* 40a 
3ft Canrov .16 
5*6 CoraOG 
BACansRof 40 
« CanUMl 
ACoatTBi wt 
SACoefclfl 40a 
. 13*6 CaafcP .151 
2A CoopJr ,10e 
>-■ * 13 CoroLb J8 
* lift cameo 40b 
10 *r ■ 13*k Commas 40 
p,^r i : 2A Cromer 
“ ^ k' 9ftCrasK)U 24a 

«r 18 CramPt 1J0 

1 

Li.r» — 


,ir»- l!> 6 

: 

6 

.■+* k 
«* f ^6 

h 

6 

. k 


6 

A 


7ft 

17ft 

vn 

53k 

10ft 

9A 

4ft 

19* 

ISA 

lift 

3136 

18* 


* 


r<fl“ 


64 *150 
6J 5 33 
A 12 
7 

1411 39 
390 
6 3 

34 8 2 

75W 5 

2929 38 

6 9 

34 4 2 

54 9 92 
54 7 2 

34 7 10 

7 5 

35 5 8 

3813 12 

44 B 239. 

51 196 
54 B 2, 

54 9 5 

2.1 7 11 
37 4 54 
.9 161 
, 29 W 
1414. 61 
11 A 
9 

3410 2B0 . 

6 10 
27553' 6 
1 

32 8 12 
34 5 14 
119 

57 4.-4 
6 10 
12 

33 3 U 

. 19 9 

24 11 

1.117 24 

34 9. B 20ft 20ft 

44 9 4 Wft 18* 

2 » » 
1223 176 18* 17ft 


19ft 

W. 

5A 

1 

5ft 

2 

14ft 
7ft 
21A 
S 
9Vb 
7ft 
ISA 
10 
5A 
IT 
9A 
4U 
19ft 
15A 
11* 
32A 
19 
15A 
27ft 
2 
11 
2A 
3A 
25A 
436 
lift 
2A 
27ft 
4ft 
11 - 
9 

5ft 

A 

6 

32* 

3ft 

25ft 


19ft 

15* 

5ft 

1 

5 

1* 

14ft 

7ft 

21 


19ft— A 
15*+ A 
5ft+ A 

' 5A+ ft 
1* 

14ft 

7ft 

21A+ A 


3436 34* 

9A 9ft- A 
7A 
17* 

10 

5A+ A 
11 + A 
9A+ A 
4A+ A 
19A+ ft 
15*+ A 
11*+ A 
3136— * 
19 + ft 
15* -16*+ * 
25* 27*+ 1* 
2 2 + ft 

10 * 11 
2 1 
3ft 3ft 
25ft 25A+ ft 
4* 4* ' 

11* 11A— A 
2* 2*+ ft 
27 27ft+ A 

4ft 4ft+ ft 
10* 11 + A 
9 9 + ft 

5ft 5ft 
5-15 5-15— ft 
5* 6 

32A 32ft— A 
3ft 3ft— ft 
2SA 25A 
20ft 

18*+ A 
236 

17*— A 


47 5 


30 


30 —A 


j2Manq> Stock 51s. 3««k p£S 

Htsb Law Ofv.lnf YM. P/E WO*. Hlfiti Low Qud.3pm 


32ft 21 Cn»A.T 1 3410 IB 27* 

«6 SACrawtM JO 62 . Z ' SA 
7IA 2S*CwnCP 40a » 1 134 55 

** MkCrewnC JO 4.1 7 7 4* 

Wft f CmmiB 28 32 4 10 8* 

17ft OAOutcR 25 13 W a 15A 

32* WACrrtMO j» 10496 US » 

29* IMCdWcCp 40 JJ 7 30 IS* 

22ft lSU.CurfkB Ufl SA 3 4 30* 20A 


37 

8ft 

53A 

416 

836 

15* 

29* 

law 


4A 

2* 


4ft 
2ft 
3* 

10* 9* 

19ft 19A 
12* 12A m» 


»*+ A 
Sftd- ft 
5«ft+7A 
4ft : 
f*+ A 
1* + A 
29*- A 
1**+ ft 
2036+ A 

4A+ * 
2A+ ft 
3* 

UA+ ft- 
19ft+ A 


4* 2ft DCL ■ 4 52 

3* 2ft DWG 251 13. 7 37 

■ 4 ■ 3*DwneaC 6 3 

14A Damson . 55 175 

.35* mDataMI JO 15 9 38 
U* 9. DevMaJSa £842: 27 

■..4ft Jft Decorotr 24 

. 20* UftDdLaiaJB 

a* 4 DefclO JBSB 
9* 7 DttbadFJO 
22 A ISADeaTal JO 
.23* 21* Dwwitr sUO 
.15* 9 OtvCeA . 

42A SOftDevooGp 
5ft 2*DWewk • 

ISA 14ADiB*fd JO 
I 2* 1 Dlodae 
3* iftBbfftb 
A UADoeunat 
B19A STAOomoPt 
23.. 15A Domtr 140a' 

Hft UftDowfl} M 
12ft 8 DrivHarr 
iflt 7 Dr Fair JO 
1*1 3-A Dunlap JS8r 
19* 13 DpIxPd Jo 
13ft IHDurre JOb 
6 A TADynictn 
27A MftDynew 72 

' 7 3AEAC JOB 
If* I1A EarftiRoa 1 
22 * 16ft EsteCo 1JD 
SA lAEdmas 
13* 7*Chm .10a 
7A MElAudD 
3<A iSAEtactroe T 
15* SAEIecEna J4 
35ft 27A£AcAm IJ0 
9A EAEmrltd 
ISft JAEneyRs 24 
1ft- SAESPW -15r 
77ft nftEnRd J7e 
5. 1ft EtzLau .1 A 
.20* 13 EwansAr JB 
8 * jftExectva 


IS 5AFPA 
9ft 3ft FSFlnd J2 
11 * 10 Fablnd % 

■ ffi 2AF0lrTex 
3ft TAFolrfNab 
. .7* 2ftFairmC .is 
15ft t FamOIr 25 
15 OAFamwP JBa 
21 lift FMSMart 40 
19A !4*f=estRi 125 
8 A 4ft FedRes 
29* lOAFafmd J5 
5ft 2Mi FhWco 
M i llAFtnGan JOb 
13* Wft FbiGnA JOb 
TOA 7ft FtCana l 
MA 16 FtSLSb lb 48 5 7 -21A 20* 21 + ft 

6 A 3A FstmrV • . B 5 4A 4 . 416+ A 

19A ft FtachrP .It 7.1 8 19 14A 14 14ft+ A 

4ft lAFManan 2 26 26 » 

11 * 3*FlanEnt 6 II 4ft 4ft 4ft 

41 A 21* FUshtSf 28 718 48 39A 3SA 39*+ * 

12 6ft FlaRdt Jle 23573 9 8ft 9 +' ft 

17ft 5* FtowGan 12 11 15A 15ft 15ft 

15ft TOA Flowers J4 3JB2513 12AI3+A 

10* T7A FlulceJ a 13 23 ISA IBVk 18A+ A 
M 5ft Foadrm JB ~ 
oft 6 FaetaM 
25A 9A Formic .10 
7* 3* FarmtLafa 

7 4ft Frietfm 24b 
15ft 5A Friend Fr 
10 ft 9ft Frfana s jo 
9 ft 5 Fr bchs Job 
19A 9AFrantA JOb 
9* 4 FraatA wt 

2A TM SlExpt _ 

Oft 2ft GiT 
10ft 4AGR1 . JB 
2A 1AGTI 
9 A 5ft Gabuev 461 
15ft 6*Garan Jit 
4ft 2ft Gotland 
28ft IBAGatUet JOb 
4 2AGavlrd JOa 
"3A AGdyner 
- .5 2ft GflEmp 24a 

10 ft 4A GeaExp 
5A 2 Getibco 
I * 4ft GernDr .lOr 
291k l3AGarbSc 20 
27A IBAGIantF U0 
14ft TAGntYWJ 40e 
7A_ 5 Gtasrack 
34* WftGlattnr \20 
. 11* 6 GtanGcr .15 
30 UAGiianr . 72 
13A 7*GtobaIa 70 
n* 7A Glosser JO 
3A. lAGfewar 
18* 5AGeMeCvc 
44* 7*GldNt>Bt4M 
15* .7 GeidWH 44 
1 * AGohtflatd 
2 A AGdrtai wt 
21 19 GarmR 120a 

ISA 9AGmdCtf JO 
19ft OAGranerA 
9* 5AGtAmlnd* 

8 4ft GtBasinP 
31* IBAGtUcCti 28 
10 5*GREIT JO _ 

125* T6ftGronT 1J4 64 7 

15A 11* GoarUC 40b 44 9 

23* lift GuH ford 40 25 4 

42A 23ft GtfCan 1J0 £411 
11* 5 Gulfstrm 9 


« 9 

-x 

2A 

iS 

2* 

12 n 

. 9 

IS 

15 + A 

au am 

n 

12A 

12A+ * 

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7 

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3 

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33 B 

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17* 

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38 7 

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25 

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4 

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3* ZAMIChS b£24‘ 
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9* 6A MUler H 
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36* UAMttcME .12 
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7A 4 ManMe J4 
18* 11 Maae job 

•A 6 MtBGIt* J9a 
5* IHMsvMcb 


14* 11 NFC n .15 
18 916 Nopco AO 

7ft 4A Nordo At 
Uft 12ft NCnvSt nJO 
47ft IBAHatCStS A2 
8 * 5* NaiEdu .its 
9* NtHttE 
1* NKlmy 
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4A NtPaterrt 
5 NtSecR J8e 
4ft NlSIlyr JOa 
3 NTSptnn X 
3* NalsLB J2t 
1* NastLM 45e 
29* 16 . NHamp JOa 
2 ft 1A Nidrio jOSa 
17* 9 NMxAr Jll 
11 9* NPbiRt sTB 

11 5* NPrac J5a 

12 A 5*NawbE AO 
106 13ft N owe or sJ6 
5 2 Nexus 

32A I6A MIoaFSv JO 
61k 3A Nichols 42r 
2 ft lANoaliiid 
lMfc 3ft Nairn 
U 7ft Norin JO 
13* 10* Nor! pi 1 jo 
75 2* Kartell 44 

25* 13* NoARay AO 
UA TftNaCdO 
19A 9ft NudDto 
32* IB Numac 471 



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lift 7*OutdrSP AO 
9* 4*oxarkA Jbe 

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17A 14* PGEeCA 1 JO 
16 13A PGEptB 127 

14* 11 PGEefD IAS 
14* 12ft PGEpfE 12S 
14* 11* PGEpfG IX 
29ft 24*PGEetW 257 
26ft 21* PGEefV 222 
29A 24* POEpfT 254 
30* 75 PGEpfS 242 
Uft UMPGEpm 1.12 
X »ft PGEpfR 2J7 
3316 X PGEpfO 2 
73 TBAPGEptM IX 
76 21 A PGEpfL 275 

M TO PGEstK 244 
XA 21* PGEnU 2J2 
1W lOAPCEell 149 
50 41A PocLt Pf436 

18 Hk PacTrst J5r 



43 

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1.910 

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38 7 

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£9 9 

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1839 

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11* 

11* 

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50ft 

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£43 

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lift 

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125 

10 

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ore# 

12 Month Slock- Sis. 3p.m. prev 

High Lew Div.kiS YM. P/E IKK. High Low Guot.lpm. 

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13 Month Stack Sft. 3pm. Prev 

High Low Div.kiS YUL P/£ IKft. High Low Qu0l.3run. 

12 Month Slock 

Htoh Law Div.lnS YU 

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P/E 100s. High Low OutP-Soin. 


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12 695 

15* 

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UA 

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£8 3 

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1* 

1* 

1* 

12* 

MftPenEM M 

52 5 

9 

lift 

lift 

llft+ * 

18 8 

69 

23* 

29* 

23*+ A 

3ft 

2AP6CP J2t 

1£ 5 

IS 

Zft 

2A 

ZA- A 

25 765 

IA 

1 

1 

5A 

SftPenobS X 

48 6 

1 

A* 

4* 

4* 

75 

13 

TO* 

10* 

IDA— A 

31ft 

)0 PepCoro J80 

73 1 

a 

30* 

SBft 

20ft- A 

7 

15 

1* 

7A 

7*+ A 

15* 

SAPerM JO 

33! 13 

4 

Uft 

u* 

13A+ A 




(Continued from Page 9) " 


CSties Service 


Company Reports 




AMT 


eoue 

'fits 

s ' share 


IAGQ. 

78.50 

Z83 




\, t* -Doe 

cnoe 



+V Share 

S'l- • 


1979 

45060 

2234 

Z66 


111* 1,1 


■v.-snue..- 

:T ■ its 

T.^share 


Crane* 

1979 

31330 
S.14 
0.81 


1979 

1,190 

55-30 

ZOO. 


HO* 

360.40 

20.83 

Z47 


28730 

5.14. 

0.49 


iPre Ws lw M MWms. M Pa Wwv 


Uttar 

Revenue.. 
Profits.... 
Per Share- 


Textron 

197* 

.. 854.10 

41.77 

1.11 


kan p adjusted for two percent 
* t dividend Feb. f 979. 


■C-; PMC 

.•••* *mr ‘ WU 

|hme 769.70 

‘is 38.90 

-‘fi hare 1.17 

% Gulf OH 

; ta no 

1 .+*'fflue 


tt>t 

633.40 

31.80 

0.94 


Lockheed* 

utCMior . wt 

Revenue 1,000. 

Profits 40 30 

PeiShare . 0.77 

+ ffet and share figures after pre- 
ferred dividends. 

Marathon Ofl 

WQMr Jj" 

Revenue 1,470. 

Profits. 104.47 

Per Shoe 3.45 

Monsanto 

Utoner , Wf 

Revenue 1,620. 

'Pitots.. 16130 
Per dure .r... 4.44 

Norton Simon 

U7» 


WB 

703.10 

1.70 

ai3 


L230. 

5026 

• 1.66 

1971 

1340.' 

135.70 


13830 

7.10 

0.61 

197B 

Z60Q. 

193.12 

131 

1971 

1.740. 

170.80 

I.U 


Times Mfrror 

iBOaar IWt 

Revenue 34Z60 

Profits 2830 

Per Share 033 


IxtQuor 

Revenue 

Profits 

Per share 


a-dQeer - 

Revenue....... 

Profits.:.; 

Per Share. .... 


-•;'^*hare 


5JSJ.0. 

24930 

138 


155.00 

0-79 


Revenue 

Profits.—.... 

Per Share 


664.40, 

26.53 

052 

1*79 

ZD10. 

90.14 

1.75 


Neir York Times 

manor 1979 

Revenue 145.10 

Profits 7^4 

Per Share 0.64 

SheBOa 

lit Quo 1 1979 : 

Revenue 3,100. 

Profits 22339 

Per Share ' ' 1.47 

Pldfips Petrofeum 

Mtaer 1979 

Revenue 1,990. 

Profits 177.00 

PerSharc. ..i. 1-15 

* Quarrerfy dividend increased to 35 
3.71 . from 30 casts, a share, payable June 
/, record May 4. 

Texaco* 

maser 1979 1971 

Revenue 8360. 6.990. 

Profits 30657 169.70 

Per Share.....' 1.13 0.63 

• Quarterly dividend increased w 54 

83.91' bom 50 cents a share, payable June Profits 

139 8, record May B. ' * Per share 


U-S-Sted 

1979 


1979 

72720 

39.82 

1.06 


1971 

305.00 

26.91 

0.77 


1971 

Z400. 


3,100. 

42.00 58.70 loss 
' 0.49 


1*7B 

62330 

2527 

0.48 

' 1978 

1,760. 


Warner-Lambert *■ 

MOear W79 MB 

Revenue, 764.60 64Z60 

Profits ' 5722 . 5226 

Per Share..... 0.72 0.66 

* Quarterly dividend increased to 33 
from 30 cents a dare, payable June 
9, record May 4. 


UtOaOr 

Revenue 


Xerox 

.. TO* 

1370. 

133.80 

1.66 


U7B 

1230. 

105.60 

131 


New Issue 
April 25. 1979 


■ ■■ * ■ • 

This advertisement appears • 

as a matter of record only. I 


MITSUBISHI 

INDUSTRIES 

Tokyo, Japan 


CHEMICAL 

LIMITED 


A 


DM 70,000,000 

6Vz% Deutsche Mark Bonds of 1979/1984 

irrevocably and unconditionally guaranteed by 
The Mitsubishi Bank, Limited 

Offering Price: 100 "A 

Interest: -6 Vj °/o p. a., payable annually on April 30 

Repayment: on April 30, 1984 

Listing: Frankfurt am Main 


Deutsche Bank 

Aktianaesalfschaft 

The Industrial Bank of Japan 
(Luxembourg) SA. 

Morgan Stanley International 

Umited 

Algernon# Bank Nadariand N.V. 

Amhold and S. BMchrooder. Inc. 

Banca (M Gattordo , 

Bank Jtiffus Bear Intanaitonal 
Limited 

Bank Maw & Hop# MV 

Benqaa Bruxaflw Lambert SA 
Banque da rindochln# at da Sew 
Banqaa da Naeffixa. SchKnnbargar, NlaKat 
Bengua Pepulatre Suisse SA Luxembourg 

Baysfische Hypothakon- und Wectaat-Bank 

Barthtar Bank 
AktiongesallsAalt 
Jana Capal * Co. 

ChrMiania Bank og KradltkssM 

County Bank 
Limited 

Credit Subao First Beaten 
Limited 

DaHcM Kangyo Bank Nodorlaad N.V. 

Deutsche (UraMidrala 
- Deutsche KommanaBwak - 

Dreadmr Befdt 
Akxiengesel Ischaft 
Phat Chicago 
Limited 

Handetfbenk H.W. (Owreenl 

Limited 

E. F. Hutton International |LV. 

Rradlatbanfc N.V. 

Lexard Brothers ft Co., 

Limited' 

Manufacturers Hanover 
Llmltad 

B. Hettier HtL Sobn ft Co. 

Morgan Guaranty Pacific 
Limited 

The Nikko Securities Co- [Detitschtand} GmbH Nippon European Bank SA 


Yamarchi HitBrnational (Europe) 

Limited 


Kidder, Peabody International 

Limited 

The Nikko Securities Co. 
(Europe) Ltd. 

A. E. Antes & Co. 

Limited 

Atlantic Capital 
Corporation 

Banco tS Roma per la Svtersr* 

Bonk fur Gemeinwirtschaft 

Aktiengwetlsdult 

The Bank of Tokyo (HoRand) N.V. - 

Bangue Francatse du Commerce ExArieor 
Banque Internationale i Lnxamboorg SA. 
Banque da Paris at dee Pays-Bee 
Banque Rothachikt 

Boyeriscta Lan das be nk 

Girazentrele 

Bartiaar Handels- and Frankfurter Bank 

Csaanov* ft Co. 

Commerzbank 

Ahrlengeselischafi 

CrhcOt Com me rcial do France 

Creditanstah-B a nkyneln 

Den Dansfcs Bank 
af 1871 Aktmelskab . 

DG Bank 

Deutsche Genomanschaftsbank 
EffaetenbanV- Warburg 

Aktlengesel Ischaft 

Robert Flaming ft Co. 

Limited 

Hwsistha undetbetk 
- Glroaenttale - 

tndustriebedk von Japan (DmriadilantQ 
AktinegwoIHchatt 
Kretbotbank SA. LuxembourgaolEO 
Lazard Frbea at Clo 

March, Finch ft Co. 

Saaieal Montagu ft Co. 

Limited 

MTBC ft Schroder Bank SA 


Nomura Europe ILV. 

SaL Op pan helm ]r. ft Cla. 

PKbanken 

Satemea Brothers Intemationaj 
Slngiporoslapn Marctaant Bank- Ltd. 


Sodhth Banoaira Baralays (Salssel SA. 
Strauss, Turnbull ft Co. 

Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) 
Limited _ 

J. Ventobel ft Co. 

Wwtdaotsdia Landosbank 
Giroxantrale 


NorddoutBCta UndeabMk 

Gfrozantrafa 

Orion Bank 

Limited 

Prfvatbanbsn 

Akiieselskab 

X Henry Schroder Wogg ft Co, 

Limited 

Skmdkiavwka EnskBda Han ken 

SodMGdnMt 

Svensha Handalabanken 

Varband Sdiwotaarischer Kentons Ibaaken 


M. M. Wwborg-1 


n, Wirtz ft Co, 


WOod Guody Limited 


Mitsubishi Bank (Europe) SA 


Swiss Bank Corporation (Overseas) 

Limited 


Aimtard am - Rotterdam Bank N.V. 

Banco Com more Isla I Uliana 

Bank of America Intomatfona) 

Limited 

Bank Lou !n lunation a! Ltd. 

Banque Are be et Intometionele 
d'lnvastisseaiam IBAI.I.] 

Benqua GMnli du Luxembourg SJL 
Banque NatHmafo do Paris 
Benqua da Peris et des Pays-Bea (Suisse) SA. 
Baring Brothers ft Co, 

Limited 

Bayorische Veram shank 

Galas# des Dhpdts et Consignations 

Chase Manhattan 
Limbed 

Copenhagen Handetsbank 
Credit Industrial at Commercial 
Dalwa Europe N.V. 

DelbrGck ft Co, 

DWon. Read Oversew Corporation 

European tanking Company 
Limited 

Groupement des Banquier* Privti Genavols 

Hill Samuel ft Co. 

Limited 

Ktalnwort Bansoo 
Limited 

Kuhn Leeb Lab mao Brothers Asia 
Lloyds Bonk inrsmatioml 
Limbed 

MarriR Lynch International ft Co. 

Morgan Granfall ft Co. 

Limited 

New Japan Secaritfw Europe 
Limited 

Nippon Kangyo Kakumaru [Europe) 

Limited 

Don norske Crodhbank 

Platoon, HeWring ft Pratson N.V. 

N. M. Rothschild ft Sons 

Limbed 

SchrBdtr. MBndimayor. Hangs! ft Co. 

Smith Bkrnay, Harris llpbam ft Co. 
-Incorporated 

SocMtd GAnArale da Banqaa SJL. 

Trinkaus ft Burkhanh 
Vareiita- ued Wwtbank 

Aktrengotallachaft 
8. Q. Warburg ft Co. Ltd. 

Yamaidtf ImamatkuiaJ (Deutschland GmbH 


»ft%— BUtftftftftlt l t »* t BUtftftl 


1 


Pape 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 1979 


Crossword. 



ACROSS 

1 Skill, in Seville 
S Neighbor of 
Can. 

• " Now. My 

Love?": 1966 


13 News 

14 Make suitable 

15 Network 

If Author of “My 
Life in Court’’ 

IB Carnegie or 
Faneuil 

19 International 
breather 

20 Any woman 
adviser 

22 Galena and 
pyrites 

23 Composer 
Barthk 


34 Area between 
neck and 
abdomen 

27 Cathedral 
church of 
Rome 

38 Aaron's burial 
place 

31 Director De 
MilJe 

33 TDbe.in 
Barcelona 

35 patriae 

37 Get ready for 

another day 

39 Stir 

48 Principle 

42 “And thereby 
hangs " 

44 Buntline of 
dime-novel 
fame 

45 Pavarotti’s 
role in “La 
Boteme” 


47 Salesman’s 
delights 

49 Long, narrow 
shoal 

58 Air: Comb, 
form 

51 Appointed lot, 
to an Arab 

54 C-notes and 
grands 

57 Reticule’s 
relative 

58 "Alice Adams" 
author 

<1 Dollars for 
quarters 

82 Word with 
closet or 
shower 

83 Pasternak 
heroine 

*4 He wrote: “A 
bit of talcum/ 
Is always 
waleum" 

85 College in N.C. 

01 Zest 


17 Glacial 


DOWN 

1 Piercing tool 

2 Large crucifix 

3 Align' 

4 Greeley was 
one 

5 Mine entrances 
f While away the 

time 

7 Zoo inmate 

8 Peddler’s* 
province 

i Name in U.S. 

Journalism 
19 M. P.’s cry 

11 King of the 
Huns 

12 Weblike 
membrane 

14 Added to 


21 Certain club 

23 Life raft 

24 Kipling’s "The 

Light 

Failed" 

25 He painted 

"The Life 
Line” 

28 Maine town 

27 Skipper’s order 

28 Make amends 
28 Washington 

watchdog 
32 Skill or 
proficiency 
34 Laver and 
Steiger 
M'Syndicated 
sportswriter 
38 Fizz ingredient 
41 Small 
European 
shark 

43 Mistaken: 

Abbr. 

48 Rich or Lou 
48 Narrow. 

wooded valley 
51 Poet or former 
jsena tor from 

51 ”01' Man 
River” 
composer 

52 Graceful tree 

53 Relaxes on a ~ 
beach 

54 Czechoslovak 
city 

55 Relative of etc. 
51 Bird called an 

ortolan In 
England 
58 Bother 
«8 Masefield 
heroine 


Weather 


C F 


C F 


ALGARVE 

22 

72 

FUN 

MADRID 

14 

57 

Cloudy ' 

Amsterdam 

9 

48 

Simian 

MIAMI 

33 

74 

Rate 

ANKARA 

14 

57 

Owarcast 

MILAN 

12 

53 

Rain 

ATHENS 

17 

43 

FliN 

MONTREAL 

12 

54 

Cloudy 

BEIRUT 

— - 

— 

HA. 

MOSCOW 

7 

45 

Biiowors 

BELGRADE 

31 

70 

Cloud* 

MUNICH 

4 

43 

Rain 

BERLIN 

?4 

41 

dowdy 

NEW YORK 

» 

47 

Cloudy 

BRUSSELS 

7 

*5 

Overcast 

NICE 

16 

41 

Pina 

BUCHAREST 

20 

48 

Cloudy 

OSLO 

4 

40 

Rain 

BUDAPEST 

17 

43 

Ovarcxat 

PARIS 

H 

57 

Qwarcast 

CASABLANCA 

18 

44 

Ovarant 

PRAGUE 

9 

40 

Snawars 

COPENHAGEN 

1 

44 

Rain 

ROME 

14 

41 

Overcast 

COSTA OIL SOL 

— 

— 

NA. 

SOFIA 

- 14 

41 • 

Flna 

DUBLIN 

11 

S3 

Fla* 

STOCKHOLM 

5 

41 

Foo 

EDINBURGH 

10 

50 

Simrar* 

TEHRAN 

_ 



NA. 

FLORENCE 

14 

St 

Rote 

TEL AVIV 

23 

73 

Fine 

FRANKFURT 

10 

SO 

Shwnrars 

TOKYO 

20 

48 

Oyarcost 

GENEVA 

11 

52 

Ckwdv 

TUNIS 

25 

77 

Ovarcost 

HELSINKI 

s 

41 

Ovarani 

VIENNA 

10 

44 

Ovaroaat 

ISTANBUL 

12 

53 

Fin* 

WARSAW 

IS 

64 

OvorcHt 

LAS PALMAS 

19 

46 

Cteudv 

WASHINGTON 

19 

44 

Cloudy 

LISBON 

14 

57 

Clawdv 

ZURICH 

| 

44 

Ovarcost 

LONDON 

10 

J0« 

SHOWN* 





LOS ANGELES 

14 

40 

CNar 

(YasterdenrV raodlnn U-&. ana Canada of 1700 


GMT; UK AnnM at 2000 GMT; ml ottm at 
1300 GMT.) 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


ADVERTISEMENT 

April 34, 1079 


Th* A*f auat wafcr* t pr oftrfor u drawn Mow ora wpfrfM by fh* Fundi fated wMi Hm 
urapflon of MnwSwbs fundi who** qeotei <va bawd an Item price* tin foftawing margin- 
al cymbals mdkate frequency at gaatailaas uip p H e il Far th* IHT: |d) — daNy; far) -awMg 


|w | m o nthl y, (r) rag u teit y ; (I) h rsgular ty . 
BANK JULIUS BAER ACaLM: 


Other Funds 


— id 1 Boar bond . 

— id » Conbor . 

— (aiCratttr... 

— id I SI ocx bar . 


sf naio 

SF 484 AO 
5F 60" .oa 
sf mao 


BAN QUE VON ERNSTACIE 


— WlCSFFund. SF 1653 

— Id I Crouton, Fund SFJ.93 

— Id ) ITF Fund *4. V S9.14 

BRITANNIA tftusT MNGT.ICIi Lid.; 

—Iwl Universal Dollar Trot) .. *5.67 

—<w> Inn High miersxi Trust 10.9S 

— Iwl Hmti Intertet Sterling. E0.99 


iw) Atcxanoer Fund ...- 

ir I Arab Finance i.F 

lw| Trust cor |m. Fd IAEIF] 

l»l Austral. Select Ffl 

twi Sondtele* ■ Issue Pr 

Iw] CAM IT 

twi CoMlal Gains Inv 


S7J2 

SJ.0S7.92 

S7J1 

SMB 

SFT3J.93 

sum 

*13.10 


W ) Canllal Rentlitwesl 

Id I CariMco Open-End Fund 

(w) Cliodd Fund 

In) Cleveland Offshore Fd 

twi convert Fd Ini A Certs.. 


UF IJ41.00 
120*71 
S121 
*975^3 
*6.99 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL . 


— ml Quito i im 7 Fund 

— In) Caoiiai llolla SJL. 

— In! Convertible Cooltal SA. 


IUI4 
S 10-32 
S 37.73 


CREDIT SUISSE. 


Ini Convert Fd Int. B Certs . 

Id 1 Convertible Japan 

(wlO.CC 

Id I Dollar Fund tnx Olvm.) , 
id I Oreyhis Funa inn 


*1*04 

Mil 

*«5JI 

.*0.17 

*1*50 


— Id 1 Actions VHSMS. 

— id I Conosec 

— id ICS. Foote- Bonds. 

— Id I CS Foods lot i.... 

— Id I Cneroie- Valor. .. 

— idtuuec 

— Id I Europe Voter. .. 


SF JOBSS 
SF 409.01 
SF 62.75 
5FOT.OO 
SF 77.50 
SFA3j.ua 
SFllSJD 


OIT INVESTMENT FRANKFURT: 


— Id 1 Con two Ira 

— id I loil Reo ten Iona.. 


DM 19JBQ 
OM4L8Q 


Iwl Orevfus Intercom loom . 

la l Come* Fund 

(a l Europe Otdlooisons 

iwl First Eoote Fund 

Iwl First intemT Fund 

Iw) Fonsoloe issue Pr 

Iw I Formula Selection Fd . 

•la t Fondltolio 

Id I Frankt.-Trusl Inter; Ini 
ia l Fund or N.v. (ox-aivial- 


*1**7 
15.14 
LF I.I37JM 
J **30.70 
*33*99 
SF IARjOO 
SF 58.10 
* IJ.ll 
DM 4002 
SUI 


FIDELITY po Bo« 670. Hamilton. BemmOo: 


(dl Global mn Fund. 

(w) Hauswnoim Hhws. Nv .. 
(i) h.o.i.t Honet 


DM 038 
*39X4* 
*3035 


— Iwl Fidelity Amor Asset*... 

— Id I Fidelity Olr.Svgs.Tr, ... 

— )•*) pto&mv inri Fund 

— Iwl Fidelity Pacific Fund ... 

— Iwl Fidel LIT World Pd 


*30.09 
*0384 
*S LH> 
4*0.9* 
J 14 JV 


Fidelity POB 195. Sf Heller. Jersey Cl.: 


— Iwl Fidelity Sterling A 

— (wi Fidelity ttrrllno B-- 
— 1-1 Fidelity Sterimo D . 


E340 
tw 
E I4.ll 


G T. M AN AGE ME NT LTO - 


Id! ICOfund 

(a ) Indosue* Muttl bonds A. 
(d I fiKtowe* MuKibonds B... 

Id) nuerfunaSA. 

Iw) Intermarkot Fund 

Iwl Inrnnc Fundi Jenevl... 

(r l mri Securities Funa 

(a) invesia DwS 

Ir ) invest Aikrathiwn... 

(a ) IkjIdmeriCa SA Fund..., 
Ir I rtoffortuoe Ififl Fd SA.. . . 


*11.64 
* 10030 
SMOTE 

ms 

S150J7 

SOM 

S6A7 
DM 3AM 
45X05 
S9JB7 
1847 


— Iwl Berry Pac FO. Lid.. .. . 

— iw) G T Atte Fund 

— mi G T Bond Funa 

— Iwl GT. Dollar Fund - .. 


*4744 

HMNJ2 

stxn 

*7 JO 


JARDlNE PLEMlNC: 


— ir i jordJne Jorxm Funa... . 

— Ir) JormnrS East Asia 


vtjt 

1 14.99 


Iw ) JOROfl Select ion Fund... 

Iw) Jflpon Pacific Fund 

Id ) KB liteune Fund 

Id ) Me inwort Benson Ini. F 
Iwl Ktelmrarf Bens. Jap. F .. 

ti l Leverage Cop. Hold 

iwl Luxfvfld 


sun 33 
* S CM 
LF lJOflOO 
*1X54 
S 3X5* 
*4786 
*2*24 


LLOYDS BANK INT. POB4J8 GENEVA II 


-—♦(*») LhnfH innGrowtn 
— HW Lnnttv tntl Income . 


SFjSLqO 
SF 30*00 


ROTSCHILD ASSET MGMT IBermudO) l 


— 1*1 PafervaAuifiFaLM .... 

SOFID GPOUPE GENEVA 

*•» 

- (r 1 Parian 5*. R Est 

— If 1 SMvrwb).. 

SFIJJ48* 

SF unuo 

SWISS BANK CORP' 


— tai Amtrtay-Vator 

— tdl intervotor.. .. 

— Idl JcnanPortlglto 

— la 1 Sw**»40tor Nmv Sar 

— Id | untv. Bona SHdci 

— id ) Univtoo* Funa 

SFJ3Z» 
SFS280 
SF3MSD 
SFH62S 
SF40DB 
SF 7351 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND: 


— (« ; Amca W4- Sh 

— IdIBanainvM 

— Ill | CORwarMRwst 

— (a i Eurit CvnNosn 

— Id 1 Fonsa swh» sn 

— Id i oiottewaM 

— Idl Pacillc invest - 

— idlRoHrataeimrast 

— idl safii south Air Sn- 

— id I Sima Sates RCst 

st hr 

SF»7S 
SF6LSD 
SF 12540 
SF 10*50 

sFssun 

SF 71 JO 
SF2094W 

SF 14*50 
SF 20050 

union in VESTMENT. Frankfurt 


-Idl Attenuated*. 

— 10 1 Emanofandi 

— (diunitanas. 

— Id l UnWvnla^ 

— Id ] unlwaoii 

f|||| 


Id ) Medtetooute SeL Funa 
Id l Neuwtrtn inti Fund.... 
(d l Neuwinti inv. Fund .. . 

(w) Nippon Fund 

Iw> Nor. Airier. Inv. Fund., 
(w) Nor. Anicr. Bank Fd ... 

Iw) NAM.F 

Id l Pirtnam inrernt Fund. 

(d ) Renia Fund 

td I Rentinvesi 


WIJH 
S044 
*IJ7 
* 17.71 
553 
5U7 
)IU0 
*29 A l 

*4114 
LF 13100 


|d ) Safe Fund 

Id ) Sole Trust Fund...,..,...,,, 
(wl Sonuirol Port to! to 

(w) Soero INAV.i 

|w) SMH snectef Fund 


5*24 
*949 
5 F 4*45 
*1*94 
DM 9*40, 


|w ) Soros Fund 

Iw) To Ten) Global Fund 

iwl Tokyo p«. Hold (Seal 

(w) Tokyo Pat Held N.V. 

tw) Transpacific Funa 

Id) UN ICQ Fund 

ir I Untilfe Assurance (Two*., 

(w) United Cap Inv. Fund 

(mi Uid mn Band Fd. 

|d > UJL Trust ImmtFd 

iwl West era Growth Fund 

(d I World Eauhy Orth. Fd 

(mf tvortdwtae Fund Ltd 

(w) W orldwide Socurties 

Iwl Worldwide SodUal 


S 49025 
S»J8 
S44J0 
54 X 80 
13953 
DM51J* 
*050 

sia 

110*84' 
JJliH 
5 7 A3 
*47*17 
Sflik 
*73,11 
*1,432*1 


OM — Deutsche Mark; * — Ex-DhUdcnfl; 

— New; NA — Not Available; SF — Befsi- 
um Frond; LF —■ Luxembourg Francs; SF - 
Swiss Francs; +— Otter pnoes;B--AUied; 
b — Bfd Cnaaae P/vfia rojtoer onif. s/s— 
Slock Spill: •• - E* RTS; "S* - Suspended; 
NLC > Not communicated; • — ■ * - RwOenud 
price -EK-Counm. 



Gamut, 
could yju 
TELL IB A 
IFFOBA- 
1; BOUT AMT 
YOOBEUBC 
m N 


fit BELIEFS AND CDth 
MUHSAREUMr 
m PEont choose. 

TO REJECT ON ME. 

I SB: NO NED FOR 

mrOFM/OUN.^ 


TfB&NDNKHTHHS 

[ 8UTEHOJT mSaCHL1&Km£\ 

CONVtCnONS. ARE ONLf POLITICAL 

mu mm pressures, lpfo- 
ADDRESS SO- MGET0 RESPOND 
ml needs? fo/uop-nm. 


WE PROBLEM GTHS: HE KM A 

(£AlXRSHIPaUSGNTmCONm\ 

TOBERaFSmceSHP AMERICA. THE 

PEOPLE MANTA tEADBL 44540*1 

Itmr IS SOMEONE MUmL~REP-\ 

RESENT 7H&Z&EKy UHM.—' 


X THOUGHT* 

7MTMMSA BBFtR ST.THE 
fVLWHER MFST SHAU.TAKE 
I * NBUHPMPSHme. 



I THAT SCRAMBLED WORP GAME 
by HanH Arnold and Bob Lm 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Unscramble friaae kxir Jumbles, 
one lettar to each aquara, to tam 
fowoidnaryiNonja. 


NABOR 


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O — 1 Now anranga the dnded )808f8 to 
fonn the auforisa an sw er , as au0- 
gaslacf by the above cartoon. 


(Answers tomorrow) . 


Yesterday’s 


JumHer. BERET DECAY SPONGE ADJOIN 
Answer: Too heavy for the chair — resu its in trie kind 
of anguiw— ^DEEP-SEATED" 


"Registered as a newspaper at the Post Office* 
"Printed In Greta Britain" 



BOOKS. 


WHAT ARE FRIENDS FOR? 

By John Jacob Clayton. Utile, Brown. 239pp. $9.95. 


Reviewed by Anatole Broyard 

«TTERFS some reality,” Sid that he is an actor with an eo< 
jLJ. says when he meets Joan repertory. - Sid can no Iqj 
in “What Are Friends ForT He is conceal From himself the humfc 
25 and she is 38; be Feels that he fact that he doesn’t know "hot 
would like topractice adult behav- be a son to a father who feels ( 
ior with her. when all else fails, re- about his life." 
spoosibility breaks the monotony. .. 

Sid has run out of youthful diver- T . 

aoiis. He can’t go tack ro school, Joan has some down-to-e 
for he. is alrea^ too theoretical, moments, too. with her husl 
His political activism has shrunk to Tom, an Air Force pilot who 
the poiht at which it is nothing just returned from Cambodiai 
more than a camaraderie based on ter fighting with her for cusiod 
irony. Mindless sex has lost its tbejr four children. Tom says a 
charms, because it is bis mind now, his oldest boy, "I’m his faihet; 
not his body, that lusts for contact, we have nothing to talk about 
Joan Jias four children. She is You may be crazy," he say 
life, in small, noi capital letters. Sid Joan, “but at least you’re use 
won’t have to invent it for hdr. She them.” , 
and her family are a nation in Listening to this bedeviled, 
themselves, fighting for the most el- appointed man. one pities hur 
enoentary kind of democracy. With U narrow, of course, but thei 
her, Sid is about to step into oae of narrowness is only another def 
the -footnotes from his schoolbooks, just as being with it or any o 
He believes in Joan, be says. He other syndromes are deft 
feels that she can “go through against .chaos. When Tom sa 
things and keep going.” Joan. “I don't trust you." this \ 

firing Too UferaDy ISn. near a 

Joan is going to separate the man “What Are Friends For?” 5 
from the boy in Sid by introducing that Clayton knows what | 
him co the particular. One hopes doing. As Sid strolls along 
that it wiU improve his rhetoric, for street, things begin to fall 
he sometimes says things such as, place in Ms head. He undersi 
“You love someone and they bum his biggest mistakes, sees a 
him or blow him up or his mind is lighL He wants to tell someotu 
wasted.” He takes his reading too Eureka, but he con only find 
literally and says, “But if history is cocaine pusher he knows, 
not to be solipszzfid as nightmare, it A l is poring over a paperha 

was also no fairytale." a pornography shtm. Sid inter 

Sid is very likable. For all his him, seizing him by the arm 
pretentiousness, he is natural, good splashing him with lnsighL “Y 
company, one of the boys. There , coining on too fast, man.” A1 
are so many inscrutable diameters “You on speed?” Sid grabs A 
in novels now that Sid i& like a hugs him. A1 is uneasy, but 
long-lost brother. We are glad to cool. So he grins add says. “Y 
see him, to find ourselves back in- okay, man.” And he’s right Sh 

side human nature. He invites us to . 

step in and make ourselves at home Bro ^ j habookm 

in his perplexity. Comeon, man. he /o . The New York Times. 
seems to be saying, hop me figure ' 
this out 

John Clayton is something of a n-p* 

Sid himself. An award-winning JUUBr! 

short story writer, be lets flis pease lie New York Tmes 

slip every now and then and loses. Tfato list i* based oa repartafron me 
the aesthetic distance between his MO) boolatons ihwughoct the Gniia 
characters and himself. Like a fond w ooH * Me , ^S^ nlyco,, * ec - ia ,v. — 
parenu he indulges Sid. m action . 

It’s not as off-putting as it «.* ^ ' . 

sounds. Not at all; in fact- Sid’s i good as ■gold, by Joseph ‘ 

mistakes are youthful, sometimes Henc r 1 - r \> 

even definitive, and there is some- 2 T£n?!f? 5 CIRCLE - ' 

thing appealingly ancere about his 3 War and remem: -j\w \ orr 

empirical approach to reality. So 'BRANC’E.tyHenDuWa*.. 4’ 
many people seem to look for by- * by Jmne* a. 

passes these days. 5 . 'wSSSadXaK'hS: 4 -S * ■ 

Joan is a mess bolding itself ky .jv.v 

together. She is hungry, angry, 5 s&GB.byLoaDe^htoa " r 

stubborn, manic. Si 7 ^ NTA Y0 - •*"“* 

Sid “witbout irony ” this is a mod- 8 DUBDra'uvE& R^ Bmwi 

ern versioa of tenderness. She is „ Midytmid - « r*-». 

not easy to be with. As Sid says, he 9 JOHi r ’-V cy 

6ate ter-whin her voice fefiito ,o ■ ’ 

its fiaL masochistic drone, no mod- Tn«ouiv wfrtn i .. 

ulations, just a winding down at the. ** Manhattan, by Neal 
end of the sentence as if aU the en- , 2 EVERGRE^'.^fi^ n^ n 
ergy had given OUL 13 PROTEUS. by Moms West - 

But there is always something J* aa 4. 

happening with Joan. S5ie may be 15 R»cW *** ■ 

exasperating, but she’s not dull. NONncrioN'"' dW 

^serto’ve partly because her , thp^S^scaks 
life cites out for intercession. You dale medical diet, by 1 

might say that bet's is a busy body. Henaim Tamower. MJ>. and ■ * “ '•? 

fn a breather from Joan. Sid ^ i Wfcvr-as 

its his parents. Now that Joan has myself\ by Uura wi i *** > - 

rubbed bis nose in- reality, he looks 3 how to Prosper dur- 
at bis father and sees for the first . 

lime that his job. as a alcsmarL is 4 . tSeSSS3SS1%^' . 

gigantically difficult, that he has ky Lyk !Z.T_T is r i 

to turn himself oa day after day. 5 sophia, living and , 

J LOVING, by A£. Hotetoer.. 

6 MOMMIE DEAREST, by 111- V 

1 — 1 1 1 ' Cinstm Crawford 1 fill 

7 THE COMPLETE BOOK OF * dll 

• Sohltioa to Pteribas Puzftie - ^^WdNG. by James P. Fax 9 . 

8 A DISTANT MIRROR, by 

Baxhanlbcbrau) - 

9 LINDA GOODMAN'S . 

U)VE SIGNS, by Linda .X-j. ir , 

10 AMERICAN CEASAR. by ' « ' ••• 

WiKam Manchester. Ur Li . 

11 WRSE.by PwyAndenoii.. IrS:#,- 

12 THE CULTURE OF NAR- 1 

OSSISM, by Cbiisiopher t. . 

La**..... :.X7. Il» 4 '*-a ,, . .. 

13 A WALK ACROSS AMEJU- ' "• 

' CA. by Peter Jenkins Vr -l - 

14 EV SEARCH OF HISTORy. 

by IbeodorQ While ; 13! 

13 HOW TO GET EVERY- r ?>, 

THING YOU WANT OUT }• , - i - : - 
OF LIFE, by Dr. Joyce Bralb- ; . 

to J. w'-iLi,,, 

■ '■ ■ I;: 

BREDGE___ — By Alan Tru $ ’- 

■ 

FIntfing the right drfensive play The winning defense was / 
a 'SP°? diamondjadt at the s«C’> 
W?® 4 ^ck- West would not continue;^ ■ 
to it is in the beat of battle. Two moods m the hope of niff, fo;. > ' •. 
last playera missed the right would know thatif East want, ; *i. 1 

^uencc of plays on the diagraased nrfT te wouW cash his second , 

winner before leading diamond^* 
to?™* ^est- would revSlto dubsj^ ** 
that they can do better than the ex- . taking the diamond are. :f - 

. . r .-West would again promote , . 

^The COBB**. .a four hearts,, nick for the def eve. But this . . 

JSSS 1 ^ North it would be the setting trick, f4 v * . ' . ' 
a f A l J aaS ^ *"* diamond ace would already Si 
partner’s response of two hearts, the bag. U> 

West led the dub six,. and the dam- * % 

my appeared with solid spades. , V f 

How should East plan the drfense? north (P) ^ 

In practice, both East players +AKQ107 ? 

tow their two dub cricks and \ . a 

a third round of the suiL OQ52 \ ’ . “ 

; was successful up u> a point, *W8- . ^ 

for West was able to Tuff and force WEST EAST , • „ 

an honor from the dummy. +J86 . |||t[|!|| -*«2 1v . 

This left East with a surer crunm HI III i L 

rick, but i* 10 ’" 43 ii«sT ' ‘ 

the contrad. South ovenuffed in * 64 ! • ■ 5 

dummy, cashed two trump winners ’ « 4 

ffld played spaides. By the time = SOUTH • 1 

East -was able to niff with his » . *®5 l ' - 

» winner, the declarer had dia- ' . 9AK432 y 

l of bofit his diamonds, and the / 

contract was safe. . +QJ75- ^ ■- 

. J^Wgwi moretime to S0Bai 

the problah, he would have ^ j| y 

aed that his partner was likdy to ^ Pi 

ace, it would pug pas 7. *■>. 

be helpful to cash it before rar mn n- . j 

mg dubs, ... wwfcd^iitibaw: 


naa odooo nmon 
non onncnc bidbr 
□OnaBOaDQBBODGC 
□□□□□□□ I3DEI3C 
CJQQD ODUB 
□□□□□□ DDHE EEC 
anaa oeqcd gdg 
Q nnannnEQDDEEDE 
and QfJDOQ OBEG 
QOQ QQDQ UDDDEE 

anno nnnn 
OQ0DQ nanDEDD 
DDOQDDDDGE3EDDEE 
OEDO OOPQDQ ODD 
□ona OUDDIJ QOQ 





Wii*h 



1YTKR YVTIOV4L IIKK \IJ> TRIBl NK. W KIlMvSO O- \I»KII.25. 1<>7«> 


Paj»«» IS 


i m . > n^. 

n K ,l ; r u, ^S* n a Dodger coach,, moves between Pete Rose, the Phases’ first baseman (left), and 

!, >-i .u |, * v Etcher Andy Messersnuth as flie two exchanged words during PWIaddtphia’s 4*3 victory in 10 
^ratings over Los Angeles. Rose had tagged Messersmitii on the chest at first on an infield oat 

Phillies Outscore Dodgers 9 4-3 

v«i.i— PHILADELPHIA. April - 24 blooped 4 run-scoring single off beat Chicago. 4-3. Paul Sphltorff 
l .. j 35 tUPl) — Mike Schmidt singled Phil Niekro in the 10th inning to and Al Hrabosky combined to beat 

ti. ‘ ‘‘H ome Larry Bowa with one oat in give Sl Louis a 3-2 victory over the White Sox and hand Rich 

lV ie 10th inning last night, leading Atlanta. Niekro, seeking his 199th Wortham his first defeat after three 


essersnuth on the chest at first on an infiejd oat 


Phillies Outscore Dodgers 9 4-3 


^ tv r Philadelphia Phillies to a 4-3 career victory, carried a six-hit victories. 


i , .... r ' niJl iictory over the Los Angeles shutout into the -ninth inning, but i> nnran .m. - to,** i-™n 

x ■' i Jodgers. the Cardinals tied the score at 2-2 ' Ranges 5, Blue Jays 0 

. '^f't^^Bowa and Pete Rose worked re- on two-ool. run-scoring angles by At Arlington, Texas. Doyle Alex- 

,,'J v"«ver Lance Rautzhan for walks Bemie Carbo and Garry Tempto- aader finally got bis act together af- 

"cjij Ht ~nd Bowa moved to third on Greg ton. Gary Matthews and Jeff Bur- ter three had outings and combined 

1 1 wiizinski's Dy to right before Toughshomered for Atlanta. with Jim Kern to help Texas stop 

'■ “J 1- - >■' leJi-chmidi lined a single to center to * e ~ •» Toronto. 5-0. on three hits. Alexan- 

der. who had not lasted more than 


Royals 4, White Sox 3 


V- i.i'l !' h|f 


Ganfinafe 3, Braves 2 


. n-u \K>sf l -ncAt Atlanta, Jerry Mipnphrey 

I’.'i.. .r I .■.•him 

, 'i^Mondxcy Line Score* 

I ■•»!*! ILt h im NATIONAL LEAGUE 

I" ->• Loot* BOO D00 B02 r— a n 0 

i k • --i* t« sis an boo o-a a i 

‘uduwlch. Bruno «>. UttMI flrj and Slm- 

■ .I 1 . ! . i' ' KuJ« ns: P.NIrtTOnndMurT*ffl. W— Lm»M,2-0.L— 

•. : \ ^lekro, I -4. HR*— Attamrta. Matttam (3). Bur- 

nt® 11). 

I»'*. '• 1 1\ ! '• Me 

i Anodes on 001 mo 0-3 w 0 

I ‘ |. .nits Ilf jnlodoWda CX» «tt 018 1 -t4 * B 

i . i i<b i> B— nml lB. Rwi tt (I ) . Jk rt r UH o O), Jfcwt- 
i ' s l a 1 h le" 1,1 V*oo*r. Ferouioo »); Lurch, Moa 

, McGrow nm and Boon*. W-McOfOW. l-O. 
‘.VH \ J1 W H HR-niHadrtrtlla. UalraU 

!i. Ml*: AMERICAN LEAOUE 

i \ 1 I *> BOD ODD 000—0 3 1 

I • ’ ■' 1 3» WO Bta-s '7 3 

» %[, *. . t. ^imcr.BAWMralBtsndCWtM. lXAld*ondor, 
i -n (0) and Sandbar*. W P . ft lo xonrtir . 1-C. 

N.iNHi'H'*' Clanev.W. . 

1 * 000 000 138—3 IB 0 

■* !l ' , '% l .™»CltY W0 0» Ota— 4 II 3 

, „ I i» *<- ‘ tari umi . DJtaWraon in and Naborotfav; 

•»«. #wrtfi <i> and Porttr. W-SalH- 

i M ’• 11 " .IfcSa. L- Wbr Hi n m .3-L 
,.*11 l 
•v. i.. IWW** 

■ , .•( . iiMIV'l 1 „ 

. ti.-«wfae rro\ 

:i — ■ — 

viriow Do Yani 

- I- I | 

i, ; . .sn-i i traj By Murray Chass 



Dusty Baker of the Dodgers gets an elbow after being tagged 
out by Manny TriDo of the PKffies as be tried to steal second. 


1 ! ..m3r From Office Ponders Situation . . 

I, viriow Do Yanks Handle Clubhouse Fight? 

Bv Murray Chass long Gossage will be recuperating take a dim view oT that kind frf pen- 

. from the ton ligament in his alty- In Johnson’s case, the* Yank- 

U 1 YORK, April 24(NYT2 thumb, which was operated on ees would be tdling him to work 

Rich Oossage lay m has Jios- night without pay. In Massage's case. 

- y - - - • — IS tfe matter of a guaranteed 


; !,-.aI bed here yesterday following 

rgety on his tight thumb, the 


•; , i v^mkees 

\ i J i»if* , WDi utenn 


Just how much i 
sage and Johnson 


of a.penalty G 
i will be asked 


two important ^naim to be determined. 


without pay.- In Gassage's case. 
Gos- there is the matter of a guaranteed 
ed to contract. The contract has a clause 
lined., listing various prohibited activities 


'.ho J ® Would Dick ’Ddrow and Ron froin ^ Yankees a 


Both players have received letters that would wipe out the guarantee 


.. .h-^ivis serve as sufficient 
jjnis for Gossage in cru 
i> i-' 1 " 1 ' due situations? 


from the Yankees advising them if the pitcher incurred a disabling 
that they would not be paid Tor any injury while engaged in them, 
day that either one was not able to Nowhere does the conixct stipu- 


The Soccer Scene 


What Memories Has a Mere Semifinalist? 


By Rob Hughes “He cannot fed content.- says 

» _ the Forest assistant manager, Peter 

LONDON. April 24 (IHT) — To Taylor. “He’s obviously got prob- 
lose a semifmaJ is one of the nust Jems and our from players will wor- 


.... . , . lems and ourfrom players will wor- 

despainng of emotional downs in « ^ ]|f e out of Cologne's man- 

, . for-man martes." 

A beaten finalist at least reaches To judge how seriously Cologne 
the stage: shares, the contest and, Munich, you need to know 
very often, dips into the pot of ^t Herbert fernnerman. Roger 
goldWhat mcnx^cs has a mere van God and Roland Gerber an 
semifinals!? Codd you, off hand, missed the trip— and only Gerber. 


name even one? 

This week the “second legs" of 
the- European semifinals will 
abruptly guillotine men from life- , , - 

long ambSuon. The youngest may ,^ d * e Psy^pS«al v Englah 
sh4 off the loss as a mere post- ******* that Nottingham wUl 
ponentent of triumph. Players of swamp Cologne, we are unlikely to 
the other extreme wfll ran as if «* ® «P“ l that attacking com- 
their very existence is ebbing away. 1 m of a fortnight ago- 

In a way. in sports, soml feel it- ^ther toe German wUl brmg in 
deep in the gutwbere ambitions «U defender Gerd Sirack to oun- 
bura: others register it at the hank, ^age its aenal weakness and to 
where EuropeV most lucrative help protect the advantage gamed 
bonuses are lodged. Having lia- by three away gods. The onus to 
veiled so far. defSt wffl not leave is on Fores^winch at Norang- 
them penniless, but the on-off ha™ .matched German technique 
point to riches is the gates of the by willpower and h?adxng power 
f inal • Forest is remforced by mobile 

he major trophy, the Champi- defmders Viv Anderscm and Ken- 
up. those gates surround the Bums to cmmtmact the speed 
* Olympic Stadium on May on the break of Van Gool and 
o one is certain to get theti Dieter MuUw. Hmveyer. the cmual 
ngham Forest and FC Col- area. ^ be midfield, whffe the 
drew magnificently 3-3. in BnUsh TOUSl bosde away Cologne's 
ad a fortnight ago. While Aus-' sophisticated possession, 
len was hdd goaless by Mai- Experience suggests that Col- 
Sweden) ogne should justify ones earlier 

thagh&m and Cologne, in pwfictioo^ that it wUL narrowly, 
eyestbe rightful finalists, succeed. However, the teams in 
again in the Muneersdorfer Notungham were so well matched 
uatrin* n. n mWc that whichever rides the tension 


the sweqper. has any irgury doubL 


Borussia Moncfaengladbach has al- 
ready gained a 2-2 away draw 
against relegation stragglers MSV 
Duisburg and. with both coach 
Udo Lattice and striker Allan! 
Si monsen about to leave, it coukl. 
be a case of doing it for the dear- 
departing. Simonscn joins the con- 
voy of supreme international talent 
to be groomed at Moncheaglad- 
bach for the benefit of Spanish 
league soccer: his S2_5 million 


Finally, can Hertha Berlin do for 
Germany what Arsenal and West 
Bromwich Albion failed to do for 


through suspension. If that suggests 
the tough guys are bock, it echos 
the feelings of West Brom. whose 


England: knock out Red Star Bel- coach Ron Atkinson said after his 
grade despite a one-goal deficit? men failed to retrieve that goal to 


Hertha’s need, its decadence on the 
begging bowl to ward off bankrupt- 
cy and its fear that it may have to 
continue to sell to the United 
States, give it as much incentive as 
any team could want. 

No less than five men. three to 


Aside from the bluff, from the 
unreliability of Bundesliga form ^ coac * s sacking. 


Red Star. “They are bloody diffi- 
cult to get by. They break up the 
game an awful lot."' 

Ambition, not least of Erich 
Beer, Berlin’s busy goalscorer. 
might do the trick. Ambition and 
age. Beer is 32. after which (he 


Henha and two for Red Star, re- chance of appearing in a .Euro 
turn after missing the first leg finale are growing thin. 


, lls ‘ k ' r he iim-nrd pitcher, his first victory of the In the American frfft gug. at Kan- five innings in his first three starts. 
" .ntijjjjar. Rautzhan. the fourth Dodger sas City, Frank White’s ' two-run benefited from five double plays. 
• • : i'lu ‘•h-ji 5 richer, took his. second in double capped a three- run fifth in- Al Oliver, who has had at least one 

1-1 ,,lL ‘ Inn* Ft ^ro decisions. ning that enabled Kansas Gty to hit in each of Texas' 13 games, sin- 

him »uh tt^The Dodgers took a 3-2Jead and snap a five-game losing streak and gled twice and scored a ran. 

1 5 ‘ , “ ^pocked out Randy Larch on back- • 1 • 

,,;i ri’-vU 1 Sulaf-back doubles by Davev Lopes 
" uasjjid Bill Russell la the eighth, nut 
'-nri> jno^ie Phillies tied the score in the 
» m \mi h<j^«tom of the inning oh walks to 
dwa and Lozinski and a angle by 
dmridt off reliever Jerry Reuss. 

« \ i T tf Ktuzindd tied the score at 2-2 in 
°*ie sixth with a two-run homer af- 
ir the Dodgers built a 2-0 lead on 
i c .S, flic by Lops and Sun* 

Outride the stadium, striking 
• • i >hj i«i itM ..mpires, joined by sympathetic 

ih,.,tdt»~iembers of the Teamsters Union. 

" 1 * rr "i on car hoods and blocked 

* h ' niK afnc for op to an hour before the 
□ne. 


Brezhnev Puts Politics Aside 

Russia’s Biggest Hockey Fan 


In the major trophy, the Champi- 
ons Cup. those gates surround the 
Munich Olympic St ad rum on May 
30. No one is certain to get there 
(Nottingham Forest and FC Col- 


England a fortnight ago. while Aus- 
tria Wien was held goaless by MaJ- 
rao of Sweden). 

Nottingham and Cologne, in 
many eyes the rightful finalists, 
meet again in the Mungersdorfer 
stadium. Having run each other's 
gauntlets two weeks ago. each has 
uved on its nerves since. 

The sudden, surging goalpower 
of Nottingham dried up in the Eng- 


i the Eng- 


stadium!^ Having run arch other’s that whichever rides the tension 
gauntlets two vnxks ago. each has quickest and best could win on the 

fived on its nerves since. . . .. 

The sudden, surging goalpower Who*at victor meets on May 
of Nottingham driedup b the Eng- 30 is subject to similar uncertainty, 
(ish League, and with it the dub’s ^ <*** in every- seven European 
oopesracatching Liverpool for the games does a team h»e on its own 
lW champioMhip Evaporated. ^^yetevMa draw would 
Cologne, enjoying the freedom or d “ tod « e Mo, !°° f«niis I hard-won 
nid-table. made Europe its priori- advantage pant against Austria. 
y. The safety-first soccer of Lamlo. 

Before the first 1^. its Bundesli- coached by Englishman Bob 
ga form undoubtedly led Forest to Houghton, is far from popular even 
raise conclusions. Yet the reading in Sweden, yet the calm and orga- 
of the Cologne Express that last nized way h. prevailed over the best 
Saturday's 5-1 defeat to Bayern team in Poland and now threatens 
Munich was an elaborate tactical Austria emphasized (hat the higher 
maneuver appears somewhat the competition the more foolish it 
extreme, even foe the foxy coach, is to underestimate the Swedes. 
Hennes Weiswetier. a brief glance through the Mal- 

tno aged players who in their spare 
r time dee out a living as students. 

iWCHOr F&CLQTJU* clerks, engineers and salesmen, 
* . ^ confirms that this represents a one- 

and-only chance of glory. Goal- 
keeper Jan Moller, beaten in only 
American league . one game in Europe this season, is 

a “colt" of 26, but the midfield is 
KnwM to 38 7 i4 x2i marshalled by Bo Larsson. veteran 

AnuwTn i3 - so w ti -cfl of three World Cups, al 34. 

u a i! m m And. if a truly collective effort 
rnnrTMH u 9* 14 3* Mo can throw up a hero, it may fall to 

Rica Bn 13 4s 12 it mm Anders Ljungberg. 31, whose left 

14 SB 11 2B ^MB f °° l SCOrCd g** 1 * CHOUgh tO 

smoncyMn 14 m si n a jw merit the nickname “Puskas". Aus- 

Lcmanciii is 46 12 2 s jn tria. dispirited bul not defeated af- 

i im., ■ .. ter failing to score at home, may 

«ra.Canforaid5; GrttJvCtUHomla. J: D*dnc»fc draw OH the encouraging WQltiS Of 
Balttmar*. 4; Lezcamv MITwcMem, 4; NMIh. _ MallDO-'s HoUgtoa: “Fm SUFC AllS- 
nw. York. 4.- Ftrt-CBiHtniifcA, * iria is even happier than us." 

- Boyior, camonHQ. 23,- cooptr, MihvoufeM. w; Or is that. too. a large dose of 

Lyim, Sostao. 15; Uncono. MH— i fc— . IS; bluff? 

Gnui.camonteUiteMAMMwu. • In deadly earnest in the cup 

AnkinTm **. taw; Joan. Ntwvwh 3a. winners' cup will be Barcelona. 
iact; KooBnon. Mimwrta, w im: cokhwtt. wracked by its own ambition, Bar- 
?*f <ona ?: itV ^ celona confirmed after its single 

wwIBuih# QUCOpCk H JaOi Palmer. WMonb /a nMulm\ nf, n ' rt t u. 

2 -i. m; Eckm*v, Boston mti pvgura. 8°^ W penally) against the part- 
n«w York. 2-i. suMry, nm Yorx. n. 4*7; umers Bevem-Waas of Belgium 
scui tai~tfcKanwaCitv.2-L.M7; woniwt. Miwi>- that Lucien Muller, its coach, was 
^ national lkaoue to be sacked come what may. 


lish League, and with it the dub s 
hopes of catching Liverpool for the 
1979 championship evaporated. 
Cologne, enjoying the freedom of 
nid-table: made Europe its priori- 
y. 

Before the first leg. its Bundesli- 
ga form undoubtedly led Forest to 
raise conclusions. Vet the reading 
of the Cologne Express that last 
Saturday's 5-1 defeat to Bayern 
Munich’ was an elaborate tactical 
maneuver appears somewhat 
extreme, even foe the foxy coach. 
Hennes Weiswetier. 


Major League 
Leaders 


By Craig R. Whitney 

MOSCOW. April 24 (NYT) — 
Leonid Brezhnev, the 72-year-old 
president of ibe Soviet Union 
and chief of its Communist Par- 
ty. seems to like ice hockey bel- 
ter than Kremlin politics. 

Al least this is the impression 
produced by his schedule while 
the 1979 World Ice Hockey 
Championships have been taking 
place in the Luzhniki Sports Pal- 
ace, 10 minutes by Russian Zil 
limousine from Red Square. 

Brezhnev, flanked by his de- 
fense minister. Dmitri’ Ustinov, 
and a long-time Communist Par- 
ty aide, Konstantin Chernenko, 
has been at the games every 
night since they staned*Aprii 14. 

He was there on Tuesday 
night last week, blissfully watch- 
ing the Russians beat Sweden. 9- 
3. after a key meeting of the 
party’s Central Committee. He 
rushed over again the following 
night, after an extraordinarily 
brief 16-minute speech at the Su- 
preme Soviet, in time for a match 
between Finland and West Ger- 
many. 

Making Time for Hockey 

His health has not been robust 
in recent years. He could not 
meet with a delegation of 18 U.S. 
congressmen who were in Mos- 
cow last week, but he watched 


the West German team knock 
the United States out of the run- 
ning for the championship. 6-3. 
on Fridav night. 

On Saturday night, dressed in 
a dark bluejacket glittering with 
five Orders of Lenin. Brezhnev 
walked into the (men VIP booth 
on the )4ih row above the center 
line to see the Soviet team play 
Czechoslovakia, from whom the 
Russians wrested the champion- 
ship last May in a closely fought 
contest in Prague. 

Saturday's game was no con- 

13. S. Defeats 
Poland, 5-1 

MOSCOW. April 24 (Reuters) 
— The United States retained its 


— The United States retained its 
place in the top gremp of the 
world Ice Hockey Champion- 
ships here today with a 5-1 victo- 
ry* over Poland. Poland, new- 
comers to Group A of the cham- 
pionships. will now be relegated 
to Group B to make way for the 
Netherlands. 

Leszek Kokoszka opened the 
scoring for Poland. But Joe Mul- 
len scored (be U.S. equalizer six 
minutes later. Les Auge. Phil 
Verchota. Eric Stroble and Bob 
Collyard followed with the rest 
of the U.S. goals. 


test. The Soviet players outdat- 
ed. outdefended. out goal ed the 
Czech team, 11-1. Brezhnev and 
his companions — Ustinov and a 
junior member of the Politburo, 
Mikhail Solomemsev. to his left. 
Chernenko and other aides to his 
right, and not a woman among 
them — clapped their hands, 
broke out m broad smiles, and 
'dissected key plays as the Soviets 
scored goal after goal. 

A Change of Mood 

Brezhnev had seemed tired 
and weak when he appeared at 
the Supreme Soviet last Wednes- 
day afternoon. On Saturday 
night he seemed alert, cheerful 
and animated. 

A huge sleek black Zil outfit- 
ted as an ambulance waited in 
readiness in the reserved parking 
lot behind the stadium. Inside, 
uniformed police and guards in 
plain clothes warned press pho- 
tographers in the stands 50 feet 
from the VIP booth not to take, 
any pictures. 

The public address system 
never mentioned the presence of 
the leaders. The Russians in tile 
section surrounding (he booth, 
apparently high level officials 
and their families, acted as 
though Brezhnev was not there. 
Nobody gawked, pointed, or 
waved. 


Trying to Live Down a Reputation 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
MNmISMMi 

G Al R 


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Cooper MB 
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Downing Col 
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7 14 El 
W 21 420 
f 24 414 
14 » 413 

14 34 407 

12 l* 400 

13 M 400 

11 SI 400 

12 3i -2*2 

12 25 -ITT 


A Drink of Orange Juice for Sheehan 

Bv Dave Anderson “Five years ago I liked to go out the WHA during the previous four 

Kicu/ vnov a nni ia /M vr\ and have a few. he said in his fast- -seasons. But in 1975 little Bobby 

NEW YORK. April (N Y I ) talking manner. “Bui things change Sheehan was back in the National 

Ten years ago Bobby Sheehan was ^ five 5^^ of ^ ^0^ Hockey League with the Chicago 

a prospect. He suU is. But maybe abom ^ m but gs percent Black Hawks, producing 11 goals 

are just ridiculous. If they were all and 20 assists. 


Limn. Boston. 7: Cooper, MUmuM 5; ABt- 
mConianlai; Gridv California. S: DoOncas. 


a prospect. Fie stiU is. But maybe about ^ m ^ $5 percent 
this time hell stick. Maybe this ^ jusl ridiculous. If they £re all 


Boyior. Caittamia, 23; Cooeor, Mltwoufeoe. 14; Or IS that. tOO. a large dose of 

vim. Boston. 15; Lascono. Mlhrautao. 15; bluff? 

fioi.caWonafcUj^jASjrtnkU. • In deadly earnest in the cup 

jenuns. Tern * 0 . l Jin; jotm. now Y ort. >0. winners' cup will be Barcelona. 
M; Koooman. Mintesota m. low; caMweu. wracked by its own ambition, Bar- 
uiwooj'a o ^^L ts p; ftw onHonu q >1 , celona confirmed after its single 

forfftom# Oucopck H J30j PoJmir. BOHaum -*-^1 / A __ -^*-1 t L. >% - I - 

- 1 . Mt; Eckm*v. Bostoon i-i, mti pvgo«a S°“ w penally) against the pan- 
•w York. xi. u>i cowry, now Yorx. n. 4 * 7 ; timers Bevem-Waas of Belgium 
p«woi-n^Kanin»aiY. 2 -l 447 ; MontipA. woo>- that Lucien Muller, its coach, was 
v national league to be sacked come what may. 

■ h pti l * anl repsoifded with a 6-0 

wMMdso n m « w 42 * league victory, nothing too unusual 

hosier cm u m ii 27 422 to the Catalans, who’ve seen a 9-0 

score already this term However, 
if “ u * jo for all the resilience of the Belgian's 
TriiioPM u a i u m fine international goalkeeper. Jean- 

* * *" ” "71 Marie Pfaaf, the wrath of Bared o- 

Mozzunw re si 4 u » na should tell' in the end. That and 

romu-la it 7 s 7 24 J 4 ? the desire of Johan Neeskends. a 

. .. ' . Dutch competitor seeing out his 

days in Europe before joining Cos- 

(dvrttt>3 __ mos. 

_ , „ • .. . In the other cup winners cup 

*■»*. Fonuia Duesscldorf needs 
onier.saa pf oo.15. only to keep its head, play it tight. 

. jwea 'aaopaMaow) and consolidate on its first-ire 3-1 

effliua. 3 -x moo; Aoduiar. Haartan. 3 A ijjoo; advantage over the Czechs Banik 
-Fflfidi Hourton. Mi 1JMB; RktanL Hototon, Ostrava. 

Germany has a cwtain finalist - 
»a.MonTreaL2-t.447. maybe two — in the UEFA cup. 


time he'll escape his reputation as a ln 
hard drinker that has shadowed ^ 
him throughout his hockey travels. ^ 
After a long season with the 
minor-league New Haven Ht 
Night hawks, the 30-year-old center 33 
is up with the New York Rangers, 
who can qualify for the Stanley ^ 
Cup semifinals against the New ^ 


true. I wouldn't be olive today. I'd 
be walking with a cane. I’d be on 
the Bowery." 

During the recent .American 
Hockey League season, he scored 
33 goals and had 48 assists. 


is up wim me r-cw ^ hoping rd g« called up." 

who can qudify tor the Stanly he said, “bm 1 didnT think it was 
Cup semifinals against the New coins u, hauocL" 

by draimamg Ita *°^ ta . lost to the Fly- 

Philadelphia Flyers in their best-of ^ j n playoff quarterfinal 


Philadelphia Ryers in their best-of- 
seven series. 

Sheehan has been in hockey for 
10 years but it wasn't until Sunday 


ers in their playoff quarterfinal 
opener a week ago. Fred Shero, the 
Ranger coach, decided to bring up 
Sheehan as a faster-skating center 


'i 0 ir c f^\ri,,rr^h ^ Sheehan as a raster-skating center 

for P 31 Hickf y and RonDuguay. 

his fira Stanley^ Cup goal. That s two of ^ wings. Parker 


------ | WO 0 ( fus fastest wings, rarter 

something to celebrate. But when MacD**,^ ihe coach of the 

^ jL^linSTS Rangers' farm team in New Haven. 

wasSntancd. About two o'clock 
*** morning, the phone rang in 
beer and poured hrasdf a b« cup Shavian's home, where he lives 
of orange juice. Perhaps that cup of with his wife and two young daugh- 
o range juice tells more about leTS ^ 0 

Sheehan than anything he tells - Y a.» aot vour wish " Mac- 


iMwtma 

. RtmBflttorflB 

Tartar, OncbMOM. V; Klnaman. Oilcaao» 14; 
JXnu. Haartan. 14. DrteMon. CindamtL 15; 
Torner.San D l ooo. 15. 

Ptfcflto* a Dodrtoaa) 

Bloo. San r r on d ora . * a UBOH Rirthno- PWlo- 
Grtflftla. H IM’ Andular. Haartan. Ml MOD; 
K-Fonch. Hourton. M 1A0Q; tUehart. Hourton. 
Ml 3-000; -tone*, son Dlaoa 3-1. JSB: McOtonaa. 
CMcoao. 2-L 447; Palmer. MantrooL >1. 447; 
Saoa.ManraaL2-l.447. 


about himself. 

“They built my reputation." he 
was saying now. "People say they 
saw Bobby Sheehan walking wall to 
wall on nights when I was borne." 

• He’s a sharp-featured little guy. 5 


g he tells -You got your wish." Mac- 
Donald said. 

l *° n ' . “f “What wish?" Sheehan asked. 
"What are you talking about?" 
kingnanio “You’re going to New York." the 
* coach said. 


Moving Around 

He joined the Detroit Red 
Wings, but after scoring only 5 
goals in half the season he was 
shipped to the now-defunct Rhode 
Island Reds of the AHL. where he 
scored 28 goals. He returned to the 
WHA with the Indianapolis Racers 
but wound up with New Haven. 

“I was the player of the month 
one day in Indianapolis." he said. 
“The next day 1 was Gonzo .Alon- 
zo, gone." 

Now he’s in the Stanley Cup 
playoffs and hoping to live’ down 
the reputation that still follows 
him. 

"I’ll have a few beers after a 
game but I haven’t done any hard 
drinking in the last five years, " he 
said. “1 never had a drinking prob- 
lem. My problem was that I used to 
tell a few stories about myself and 
they got around. But no more. 1 got 
the’old wedding band on now." 

He’s got his first Stanley Cup 
goal too. And a cup of orangejuice. 


tot 7 inches and 155 pounds from Sheehan asked. 


“Where are you — at a pany," 


Weymouth. Mass., with dark 
brown hair and a thin reddish 
moustache. 


‘ iwg situations? j However, that warning did late any&ing about clubhouse Sio Germany has a certain finalist — brown hair and a thin recti 

„ inf** What kind of penalty could not to be the final sentence fights. so*o.m«««l2-i. 447. maybe two — in the UEFA cup. moustache. 

"n leVy J? G P & ^ gC aDd ££ for their fighL 

.■ii ■ iinson. whose locker-room tight .. ... 

^sSSSS£sst' Gorman Still Calls Them as He Sees Them 


rKsdaylol toLhe relief pitch- 
i injury, and not incur the wrath here, Taliis 
ihePliwets Association? ’ cool so anything that is done would 

MthouSfliey had no immediate be done in a dispassionate manno. 
jwera.X Yankees seemed to be A determination be made as 
ire confident of tbeir chances on soon as possible. We don l want to 
: field with Tidrow and Davis make any. nurtaln ^and L£o “y- 
m off the field with the Players thing that is unfair and illegal, 
sociation. Gossage is in the second year of 

‘We’ll keep our eyes open for a a six-year contract worth 
ssible trade." Cedric Tallis, the $2,748,000. His annual salaiy is 


coach said. "Shero J^tS OutSCOTe 
wants you." JAf J • z 1 n 

Aw a”r-i iVordM f ucs » 

ot u &;iS 1 ca^- eormy In WHA Playoff 


Lost In Traffic 


By Red Smith Baseball needs the umpires. The professionals player that he was wrong. So I changed my rea- He knew it was real wnen Mac- 

■ / ,. 1V _ .. are playing, and they should have professionals soning. Donald told him to be in Philadel- 

NEW YORK, April 24 (NYT) wutic Mays umpiring.! think the minimirm salary ought to “ ‘You're oul Joe. because you tagged your- phia for practice the next day. But 
of the New York Giants was batting against Sal ^ $25,000. But they’ve got a contract and they self with the ball.' he got lost in traffic there. 

Maglie of the Brooklyn Dodgei s. whom they honorable men. The best thing would be for “He walked away, mumbling to himself." “1 got to practice an hour late," 

called -Tbe Barber because he shaved hitlers so ^em to honor the contraa and lake a beating Tom Gorman wasn’t right oil every derision be said. “Fred Shero just said. ‘Hi.’ 
d<»e. The first pitch brushed Willie back and fa two years and then go for what they ought to and he isn’t right about everything he says in his then Mike Nykoluk [the Rangers 
the second tow-bridged tom. have." book. H e refers to a time when World Series assistant coach] told me to take 

Tom Gorman, the plate umpire, went to the That’s the guy who tells his tale in “Three and assignments always went to the best umpires, some line rushes with Hickey and 
mound and spoke to Maglie. The pitcher gave Two!" He calls them as be sees them and makes like all Kletn in the National League ana Bill Duguay but I still didn t know if I 


..■rfra 


sooation. Gossage is in me secona year oi 

‘We’ll keep our eyes open for a a six-year contract worth 
ssible trade." Cedric Tallis, the $2,748,000. His annual salaiy is 
nkee general manager, said, “but 5333.000. Johnson is playing under 
rould De that Tidrow and Davis a renewed contract at last year's 


job salary ought to “ ‘You're oul Joe. because you tagged your- 
. contract and they self with the baH.* 
thing would be for “He walked away, mumbling to himself." 
rnd lake a beating Tom Gorman wasn't right on every derision 

u/hnt thev raiohf In ..J U. J.Vi ohm,. «rMH kiiui K. imw in hie 


He knew it was real when Mac- 
Donald told him to be in Philadel- 


I be better *han anything we salary of abont $100,000. 


J-j get in a trade.” 

*Lr i :!' 8-Week Recuperation 


If the Yankees refused to pay the 
players for as tone as Gossage is 
out and that period were eight 


, i ' a wedcs, Gossage would lose slightly 

: ul iijlhanders awl Paul Mnabdla. a than $100,000 and Johnson 

‘ JeWMfeteJter Je slightly more than 530,000! 

1 ,..l.i u l ..4H of the bullpen dnttr for the ' 

" ! w ‘ eight weeks or so. That’s how v The Players Association would 

. | ! * ■ 1 1 9 

- ■ '^fyqjor League Baseball Standings 


Tom Gorman, the ptaze umpire, went to the That’s ti» guy who tells his tale in “Three and 
mound and spoke to Maglie. The pitcher gave Two!" He calls them as be sees them and makes 
the customary explanation: The baU had got no apologies. “An umpire," his book says, 
away from him. The umpire made the custom- -should never ask for mercy or ask to be for- 
aiy response, meaning. “Tell that to your given. A balliteld isn’t a church." 


E hia for practice the next day. But 
e got lost in traffic there. 

“I got to practice an hour late," 
he said. “Fred Shero just said. ‘Hi.’ 
then Mike Nykoluk [the Rangers’ 
assistant coach] told me to take 


confessor.’ 


sorry, 

ris that ri; 


i the plate, “tefl Willie I'm sorry” wiipiayers miss a kh more puiys 
orraan said, “Maglie says he’s “Always remember.” be says < 

“the umpire doesn't have the li 
it?" Willie said. He hit the next the last two words: ‘Get oul’ " 


book says, McGowan in the American. 

: to be for- -Nowadays." he says, “the league office con- 
siders all umpires equal in ability, so no umpire 
ays. “The dominates. . . This is how ii should be." 

1 we do_ This is not how it should be. All umpires are 


“Hey, Tom,” Maglie called as the umpire “Look at it this way " be says. "The dominates . . . This is how it should be." 

liked back to the plate, “tell Willie I’m sorry." ballplayers miss a tot more plays than we do. This is not hcrw ii should be. All umpires are 

“Willie,” Gorman said. “Maglie says he’s “Always remember.” be says on another page, DOl equal in ability, and for the most important 
fry" - “the umpire doesn’t have the last word, he has jobs only the best should be chosen. World Se- 
rfs that right?" Willie said. He hit the next the last two words: ‘GetouL’ ” ries and All-Star Game assignments rotate today 

tch out of the borough. Rounding second base Qwfinai gfn because the umpires' union demanded that even 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 


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■■ i Francisco (Bta»44»ot-Nflw York IZWftry 

J v< 1 nburnft id. fUMnsan >1! at Cincinnati 
. 1 -’ nrM) 


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N«w York 

'Detroit . 

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MnwauKaa 

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Texas 

MUanasata 

Chicago 

Kansas CUV 

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Oakland 


ME RICAN LEAGUE 
East 

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for 25 years and he has a m 
has been writing baseball foi 
Tunes longer than that Hi 
more felicitous collaboration 


publishing 


venture could have more fortunate timing, die play. ^ 
rhirln Sons ant this one out as the ’You 


Charles Scribner’s Sons got this one out as the 
major leafing baseball season opened without 
major league umpires. . 

Mixed Emotions 


Qwfinai sin because the umpires' union demanded that even 

the least efficient gettheir regular turn at the big 

. . v ?*? n J? ls !?* ones. ' 

Two!" by Tom Gorman and Jerry Holtzman. win the New York Meis, one cm ms sion« Tom is a little mistaken on one other point. 
Gorman was an umpire in the National League begins. “In this game he ined to steal second. (e u s about the perfect game Don Larsen 

" came waddling m and went into a slide : — p i tc bed for the Yankees in the 1956 World Se- 

npty de-bump, bumpty de-bump. Worst slide ^ Dodgers. It was the last game 

rer saw. There was a big doud of dust and I Babe Phiefli ever railed behind the plate and 
de the cardinal sin in umpiring. I anticipated Tom says that when it was over Pinelli cried, 

“Not one person." the bode says, “came in to 

YOU re out! _ JS ... A-.A „ r. 


re out!’ 


“Joe goi op. hollering and screaming. Tom- «"gratulaie Pmdli. to say. ‘Babe, you did a fine 

job— 22 years m the league and you finish With 

'Joe, iSfre ouLM -Get away from 8™ j? Wof,d ^ 

^ 4vc, you re uuu 4 muu. j Nobody showed. Not the commissioner, not the 


Komm CByL OiitMB J , MivncM The 

Tto«a5.T«wrtaO ■ 

T> u » n r t con a i _ money. After 25 yi 

Minmaaia (Ertafemi 0-2) arcwwtaia twisfl j om Gorman’s S) 

^DotroK rvcrtwnuatMiirtOMiiaatsiairtiM) ptoy«l by tiic les 
niinyi iLaSrew 0*11 at Karans CMy ILHA- which means lie ! 
ofUM) sympathies on one 


me. 

“ ‘I’m not out!’ 
“ -Why not?’ 


Toronto tumanewK iM» at Tea» tcemar v ^ what he has always done — calls them was a' clean slide.' 


_ . m president of the National League. I thought It 

The umpires have two years to go on a union Imnotout! was a disgrace." 

contract providing to salaries ranging from why not? . . _ _ _ ... . , 

517.500 to rookies to 541,000, plus S54 a day " ‘I’ve got the baU’ he said, and he held up It was a shame that the brass Qidnt salute 
for expenses. They are holding out for more his hand. He had the ball all right- 1 could have Pinelli. but it might please Tom Gorman to 
ears, nobodyhas to ask where dropped dead. know that Babe’s role didn i escape attention. It 

ympathies Ue, but he is cm- " ’What are you going to do nowT he asked, was known that be was retiring and would never 

ague as an umpire adviser. “1 did aD I could do. ‘You’re out for interfer- again work behind the plate. His last derision, 

scouts young umpires. With ence.’ I said. *Getout of here.’ . disputed by some, was a called thud strike on 

jade and his job on the other. ’But. Tom. 1 didn’t interfere with him. It Dale Mitchell. 

Jaaa nttTla i) ■ m r.-i a nlonA oIIAa * rdri Du'Ka” thw uwn nuiflo RmainA 


" ‘I’ve got the baU’ he said, and he held up it was a shame that the 
his hand. He had the ball all right- 1 could have Pinelli. but it might please 
drootied (tod. know that Babe's role akln'i i 


to do aow?* be asked. 


"Good old Babe." they were sayii 


"fianinOT (Poonor 2 .H ot coRfornia (Aa*. 2- as he sees them. . . “All the time he’s standing there holding the the press headquarters that night. 

bi “The imponam thing." he said the other day. ball in the airfor everyone to see-1 baa to get and he made it a big one. 

both sides to sit down and talk it out. out of it some way. An umpire can’t admit to a They 


New YOf* Urtwii-iatOofcianolJrtmoolrtl 

Mlart ( RflflRa M I at Seatita IO. Janes 0>1 1 


“The imj 
“is to bot 


aymg around 
“his last call. 


said it again and again. 


was just up for coffee or if 1 was 
going to play." 

He knows now. In addition to his 
goal, he had an assist earlier in the 
playoff series. 

“I don’t even believe I'm here," 
he Said. "Even with that sign with 
my name on it” 

Hanging near one of the Garden 
loges was a white banner with thick 
black letters spelling out 
"Sheehan." a relic from 1972 when 
he played at the Garden for the 
New York Golden Blades of the 
World Hockey Association before 
that franchise moved to Cherry 
HilLNJ. 

“The people who bring that 
banner are named Sheehan too." he 
said. “1 have a lot of friends here.” 

Debut in Montreal 

Joining the Montreal Canadicns 
when he was 20. he played parts of 
two seasons there, out in 1971 he 
was traded to the California Gold- 
en Seals, owned by Charles Finley, 
better known as the Oakland A s 
owner. 

Ironically, his Ranger locker, 
which is identified by his number 6 
but not by his name; is next to that 
of Anders Hedberg. the Swedish 
right wing with the two-year $1.2- 
million contract who established 
himself with the Winnipeg Jets of 


QUEBECCITY, April 24 <UPI) 
— Bob Guindon scored twice to 
lead a five-goal second-period at- 
tack last night, when the Winnipeg 
Jets downed the Quebec Nor- 
diques. 6-3. in the first game of 
(heir best-of- seven WHA semifinal 
playoff series. 

Marc Tradif collected two goals 
and Bob Fitchner scored the final 
goal at 18:16 of the third period. 

After the teams traded first-peri- 
od goals. Rick Preston beat the 
Quebec goalie. Richard Brodeur. 
on a low wrist shot from the slot al 
2:25. Two minutes later Guindon 
picked up his first tally, beating 
Brodeur on a high bin dine slap 
shot. 

Seven minutes later Morris Lu- 
kowich took a pass from Terry 
Ruskowski and converted with a 
backhander. Guindon got his sec- 
ond goal at 13:53 on a three-way 
passing play with Bill Lesuk and 
Lars Erik Sjoberj to give the Jets a 
5-1 lead. Tardifs second goal came 
on a slap shot at 16:44. 

WHA Playoffs 


(Mallino 
SortuA • 

Onri fl U m m— B n a Hut 

(SwtatM.1-1) 

Apm 21 — Naw Enotand 5. Clralmall 3 
Aflrtl 22— Onctonatl «. nh 
A nHI 24-CMdmaH al N«w Ei^urt 
f—iMlnali 
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SariuB 

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( W fca l- fl rtaoa rartMtlrt) 

Anril 22-WtanbMo 4. Quaboca 
April 2s-4WbnAMa at Qummc 
A pril 77—Qurtwc at winniB— 

April 27—OMbflc at WtanbMp 
«4*nr 1 -Wli wi l raootOuflbtc 
fl-Mav 3-QiMtae« WMilpn 
x.Mar5— wmolpMotOiHtae 

x4t McoMarr 

MnG 

Ertnantmvp-NawGnpianHaBCiaiinihrtnnar. 







Pagf 16 


'INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. H EDN’ESDAV, APRIL 25, 1979 


Observer 


Dangerous Potatoes 


Bv Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — A raw potato Guinness World Book of Records, 
fell out of the sky and shat- On the other hand, while distinc- 


tered on the sidewalk. The sound of 
its impact and the tiny fragments 
into which it exploded suggested it 
came from a considerable height. 

A few inches closer and it might 
have done me in. Life is always a 
matter of a few inches, of course, 
especially in New 
York. Instead of 
ducking into a 
foxhole. 1 inspect- 
ed the fragments. 

The potato was 
raw all right 

“1 was just 
bombed by a raw- 
potato" I report- 
ed upon emering 
the house. The 
news was received 
calmly. Life in New York is a mat- 
ter of keeping calm about things 



tive. death by falling raw potato 
has its social inconveniences. Even 
friends would find it bard to sup- 
press private little smiles as they 
passed the news. “Poor deviL he 
never- knew what hit him.*’ What 
did hit him?’ “Haven’t you 
heard— T 

It would have been harder, of 
course, on the next of kin, answer- 
ing those interminable questions at 
the bier. “Well he had just stepped 
out of the bouse for a moment and 
we heard this dreadful groan and 
there he was. lying there covered 
with potato." 


Baker 


With the passing of years, tins 
sort of bad luck can become an af- 
fliction to the survivors who. unless 
achieve notoriety in their own 


like raw potatoes falling from heav- ri ght 3 go through fife thereafter 


en. 


being pointed out as the son, or 


daughter, or wife of that fellow 


From the window one could see 
the evidence. The sidewalk littered 
with smithereened potato. As- a 
matter of fact, a car parked in front 
of the house had clearly been 
bombed by an egg. The yolk was 
still not quite dry on the trunk and 
a bit of it had run down into the 

gutter. Life in New York is a mat- 

ter of things running down into the- /ailing potato will not 


who was lulled by a falling potato. 

Coming through a raw-potato 
near-miss in fact has one advan- 
tage. ft is such a rare event chat the 
odds' again st bang involved in two 
during one lifetime are overwhelm- 
ing. Hence, it is as dose to statisti- 


cal certainty as a thing can be that 
betheinstru- 


gutter. 

Situated in the shadow of a 400- 
foot apartment building, we natu- 
rally assumed that these failing 
comestibles reflected nothing more 
threatening than a bored child test- 
ing the law of gravity. Life in New 
York is a matter of constantly test- 
ing Jaws. most of which prove 
much less inflexible than the law of 
gravity, at least if you can afford a 
lawver. 

* * * 


But what if the potato had scored 
a direct hit with fatal consequence? 
After a certain age most people 
probably speculate occasionally on 
the manner of their ultimate depar- 
ture. but the possibliiy of becoming 
a potato victim was one that had 
never occurred to me. and I did not 
like it. 

It is. to be sure, probably 
newsworthy in a very small way. I 
have never read of anyone dying of 
a falling potato. On a slow news 
day. it might merit a paragraph or 
two on the Associated, Press wire. 
“Potato Mashes Man.” For all I 
know, it might even have been a 
“first”and- earned an entry in the 


meat of my farewell. 

One can take only limited com- 
fort in this, particularly if resident 
in Manha ttan. The apartment 
house across the street that sheds 
groceries used to send whole win- 
dows flying down on die neighbor- 
hood. which put me in the habit of 
looking up whenever I headed for 

the delicatessen. 

The trouble with looking up is 
that once in a while the manhole 
covers explode from underfoot. 
Look up. then down with every 
other step and you don’t notice the 
oncoming taxicab whose driver is 
determined to assert his manhood 


through the power of his fierce in- 
ternal combustion engine. 

In the end New York breeds fa- 
talism and you quit looking in any 
direction, even behind to see who is 
gaining on you. Living in New 
York is a matter of accepting life’s 
inevitabilities and not boring every- 
body with tales of your near- 
misses. If New Yorkers talked 
about their near-misses, there 
would be no time left for conversa- 
tion over the meat and deadly pota- 
toes. 


Peggy Guggenheim 






Collector Guggenheim: 
^ “Woman’s UB? I was a 


An Addict of Art and Artists 


Susan Heller Anderson 


■\TENICE (NYT) — As a gen- 
Y ted girl from a rich and 


ted 

Moment” New York family, 

Guggenheim set out for 

Europe to have an interesting 
life. Now, frail at fcO, she lives 
alone in a half -finished palawn 
on the Grand Canal, surrounded 


herd 

on 


by the memories of her days as 


darting of the European and 
American avant-garde — and by 
her art collection, which has 
become, finally, the center of her 
life. 

. She sleeps under a peach mar- 
abou coverlet in a sterling silver 
bed designed for hex by Alexan- 
der Calder. On her bedroom 
walls hang 100 pairs of earrings, 
some created for her by promi- 
nent artists. Portraits of ber 
painted in Munich at the turn of 
the century by Lenbach attest to 
a ratified childhood.' 

Now a renewed flurry of inter- 
est swirls around Mis. Guggen- 
heim, as she prefers to be called, 
in October ber memoirs, “Out of 
This Century” and “Confessions 
of an Art Addict,” are being re- 
nte. Nr 


In 1938 she opened her gal- 
lery. Guggenheim Jeune. “1 knew 
nothing,” she said, laughing. 
“My knowledge of art ended at 
Impressionism." Her friend Mar- 
cel Duchamp, whose gift of a 
I of tiny Oriental animals sics 
table in her bedroom, 
helped educate her. “The great 
influence of my life,” Mrs. Gug- 
genheim said. Thanks to him she 
exhibited Kandinsky, Tanguy, 
Henry Moore, Laurens, Calder, 
Brancusi, Arp, Picasso and oth- 
ers. 

“To console the artists for sot 
selling I always bought a work 
myself anonymously to entour- 
age them," Mrs. Guggenheim 
said. “That's bow the collection 
began. 1 

The gallery was unprofitable, 
jso she closed it and decided to 
organize a modem art museum 
with Sir Herbert Read as direc- 
tor. As the war clouds gathered, 
Mrs. Guggenheim set out for 
Paris clutching a list of artists 
and their works that Read had 



liberated woman long before 
- there was a name for it” 


a party so the new one is perma- 
nent 


There were-once-many parties 
at the p&lazzo, but now Mrs. 
Guggenheim lives a quiet, almost 
spartan life. “My life has become 
very boring latejy," she said with 
some repet “I go out every day 
in my gondola." 


Her collection is obviously 


•ft table. 


S ven her, realizing finally that 

le i 


ext 


published in one volume, 
year a biography is due, to be 
followed perhaps by a picture 
book. A curator From the Gug- 
genheim Museum in New Yoik, 
rounded by her unde, Solomon 
R. Guggenheim, has been cata- 
loging her collection, which it 
wm administer in Venice upon 
her death. 


! project was impossible. 

“I then decided to buy all the 
art that we would have 
borrowed," she said. She bought 
at the rate of one a day. “Noth- 
ing was ampler,” she said. “The 
Parisians were on the brink of 
the German invasion and all 
they wanted was to sell and get 
OUL". 


In New York Mrs. 
ham assured heir place in art ! 
lory with her gallery. Art of This 
Century, where paintings were 
displayed on easels made of 
baseball bats. She actively pro- 
moted many American Abstract 
Expressionists: Pollock. Moth- 
erwell, Hans Hofman, Rothko. 

She continued to enlarge her 
collection. “Until I left Paris my 
purchases had cost less than 
540,000" she said. “It’s incredi- 
ble to think that you could hard- 
ly buy one good painting for that 
today." She estimated that her 
collection is now worth around 
$30 million. 


zt source of pleasure and 
fondness for certain works is 
entwined* with her affection for 
their creators. The list of her lov- 
ers reads like, a Who’s Who of 
20th-century ait with time out 
for a sortie, into -the Ulerunr 
world with Samuel BoclretL “He 
was such a strange creature,” she 
said of the playwright “He need- 
ed a lot of drink in him to warm 
him up before he’d even talk.” 

She is doubtful whether artists 
make good lovers. “They’re often 
so wrapped up in themselves,” 
she noted. ‘Tanguy was ‘warm 
and lovely, tbouj 


Taking a Chance 


Honorary Citizen 


An honorary citizen of Venice, 
Mrs. Guggenheim has lived here 
once 1947, but her European 
connections -began in 1921. T 
came not intending to stay," she 
recalled recently in her sitting 
room. She married the painter 
Lawrence Vail in Paris, had two 
children, and drifted to England 
in the 1930s. 

“Finally I was bored living 
alone in the country and wanted 
to work.” she said. “Someone 
suggested either an art gallery or 
a publishing house and I thought 
a gallery would be less expensive. 
Of course, 1 never dreamed bow 
much I would eventually spend.’ 


She was faced with the prob- 
lem of what to do with the art. 
The Louvre refused to hdp. 
“They decided that my collection 
wasn't worth the trouble of 
saving, - ” Mrs. Guggenheim wrote 
gleefully in the preface to the ca- 
talog for her Paris exhibition in 
1974. “That was my revenge, 
writing that,” she confided 
recently. Two days before the 
Germans invaded Paris, she fled. 

By then she had made another 
acquisition: Max Ernst, whom 
she helped flee to the United 
States whom she later mar- 
ried. “I have always found hus- 
bands much more satisfactory 
after marriage than during," she 
noted, although Ernst was an 
exception. "He was most 
unpleasant.” she said. 


“1 longed to return to Eut 
as soon as possible,’’ she 
recalled. “And I bad always 
loved Venice and wanted to live 
here.” In 1947 she returned and 
bought the 18th-century Palazzo 
Venier dei Leoni. 


en- 


Now the collection 
sconced in an adjoining pavilion, 
in basement galleries and in the 
dining room, all open to the pub- 
lic three days a week. The sculp- 
ture is in a large bad: garden. 
When one arrives by water a joy- 
ous man on horseback by Mari- 
no Marini offers an open-armed 
greeting. “It had a detachable 
penis 'which I would remove 
when the nuns came to visit,” 
Mrs. Guggenheim explained. 
“But someone stole it once after 


Potential collector! come to 
seek her advice. “I had so much 
hdp myself in the beginning." 
she said. “But I tell people that 
now it’s nearly impossible. Mon- 
ey-is terribly important. A sense 
of what’s worthy and what isn’t 
what’s significant and what isn’t 
Above all you have to take a* 
chance:” Her last major acquisi- 
tion was a Odder gouache in 
1973. 

But she does not look on her 
collection as her major contribu- 
tion. “I encouraged so many art- 
ists who are now famous.” she 
said. “I introduced them to the 
world by giving them their first 
shows when no ooe rise would 
take the risk” 

Growing old has been accept- 
ed with matter-of-fact humor 
and serenity. “I look baric on my 
life with great joy,” Mis. Gug- 
genheim said. “I think it was a 
very successful life. I always did 
what T wanted and never cared 
what anyone thought Women’s 
lib? I was a liberated woman 
long before there was a name for 
it." 


17 Notional Book Award 
i LUr JLJiu gag Surprise Winner 


Tim O’Brien has captured the 
National Book Award for fiction in 
a stunning upset over favored Pul- 
itzer' Prize winner Join Cheever. 
Three judges chose O’Brien’s 
“Going After Cacriato" over 
Cheever’s ‘The Stories of John 
Cteever." after only a brief discus- 
sion of each of the five nominees. 
“We had a problem." a representa- 


Patd Paine would like to know. F.- . 
is years, (his descendant of That ' 
as Paine has taken it upon lunar ' 
to campaign for a fecial day.:',.- 
honor Isabella, Queen of Cast 
from 1474 to 1504. Sunday was i 
528th anniversary of ter birth, aj 
Paine celebrated it in elegant sn 
with j a black-tie .dinner in a Phi 
delphia town bouse. “1 used to 5 


I 1 ** 


tive of the panel of judges, said at a the Columbus Day parade in Pit^ 
news conference after the an- 'burgh, and it was always anotfc 


Qouncement of awards in seven cat- 
egories. She said Cbeever’s short 
stories, which won the Pulitzer 
Prize for literature earlier this 
month, were written over a .penod 
of several years while 0’Briea"s 
novel was only recently published, 
by Ddacorte Press. Arthur Sdties- 
inger Jr. won the biography and 
autobiography award for “Robert 
Times," pub- 


ethnic group; all the glory was t* 
en away from Spain,” said Paine 1 pH'* ‘ 
hotel manager who once studied I 
Madrid. As be sees it, designs ti ^ ' 

April 22 as Queen Isabella Day 
tiie least that the United States c . „ *>»' 
do to lake note of her 
lions. Said Paine: “She 
been a marvelous person, 
her time.”, Presumably, be (fid i 
have In mind the fact that Isabe 
and her husband, Ferdinand, a] 



Kennedy and His ... 

lished by Houghton Mifflin. 1 rathe- 
•line Paterson was an easy winner of 5 were responsible for the 
the children's literature award with ♦*»» 

The Great Gfliy Hopkins,"pub- 
tisbed by Thomas Y. Crowell. Peter, 

Mattfaiessen took the contemporary 
thought award for “The Snow 
Leopard." published by. Viking. 

Other awards were given to Richard 



: givei 

Beale Davis in the history category 
: in the Cofoni- 


f<V “Intellectual life : 
ai South," James Merrill for poetry 
for “Mirabel!: Books of Number.” 
and Clayton Eshebnan and Jose 
Robot Barest in the translation 
competition for “The . Complete 
Posthumous Poetry” by I Cesar Val- 
lejo. 


In Newport Beach. Calif., actor 
John Wayne, recuperating from 
cancer surgery earlier this year, has 
been admitted to Hoag Memorial 
Hospital with a bronchial infection, 
a hospital official reports. The 71- 
year- old star entered the hospital 
Friday and is expected to go home 
in a few days. The official said 
Wayne had “indeed. up the fin,” 
which then turned into a bronchia] 

. infection. “I think the fact that he 
should be going borne in a few days 
indicates a little bit about his 
condition." the official said. 
Wayne, who will be 72 on May 26, 
made his last mtuor public appear- 
ance April 9 in Los Angeles when 
he presented the Oscar for best pic- ‘ 
ture at the Academy Awards cere- 


mony. 


knows about Christo- 
pher Cohrafaus' journeys in - 1492. 
but what about the woman who' 
paid the bills? That’s what John 


Margaret Trudeau doesn’t mj/ ;i . 
wri ting about her love life, but >. '*■ 
resents being asked about it Ai ; 
when asked by Jane Patdey .- 
NEO-TV’S Today show, she stall 
out in a huff. During the jntervi ■. *' 
she indignantly denied rumors 
affairs with Son. Edward Ream. ; 
and Jordan’s King Hussein — s ■ 
ties she says were made up bT.- 
“very vicious” news media fl 
“managed to really assassinate 
character, particularly in Canad ' . 

She was on the show to prom. .. 
her autobiography, “Beyo' 
Reason.” but when asked to s 
for “cutaway” camera shots la .. 
refused and left, telling an assod < 
she was miffed by Pauley’s qc V 
tions . - .- Meanwhile, from to 
comes a report that Mrs. Trudj 
recently spent two weeks in 
with a local playboy and tcW/', ., . 
Lima magazine: “1 have met ah; ' . 

who understands me.” Mrs. . 
dean was photographed waft' *' 
arm In arm with Jorge Koed 
ran Stein, a 31-y«*r-old Perm . 
businessman, by the lbcal wet - 
Oiga, as the couple stepped .out i - /' 
jetliner at Lima airport after tc 4 - . 
ing Andean tourist spots. Mrs. l- v "‘ 
deau faier told Oiga* that “I an.'- 1 '* ’ 
last very happy. I have met a ■>*■';' 
who understands me and w-- 1 ' 
whom I can relate and share ew^ |lfl iwj* 
thing," she said. Her tap, blond ) 
good-looking boyfriend is :J> •• - 
wealthy businessman of Gentv'.- 
desceni with a passion for tier 
cars. ' • • 

— SAMUEL JUSTT. 



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ANNOUNCEMENTS 


YES SOI the i 


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REAL ESTATE 
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FRENCH PROVINCES 


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the framework of carrtroBed risk. Ddri 
bututsb in «« be ororted to 


n^n con 


produtfs. ffgi conti nu ing monthly 
osgionti are paid. Adyertaing and mar- 

raaMfi m ba m rcwBed «rth 


tour Vice 




dence. Write Be* 

92521 Nauily, Fnmee. 


GB4EVABAS8> 

BUSINESSMAN 


*oeWro 

m famt venture, intarroeonrt troee 
jpead emphreh ori conrtrwATO mrten- 
3EI ! Brians shrppmg. . . S crtlertr 


bet Wrte under 
Pubfidtts. Of-Id 


with 

C iail5164 
ICeewl 


ass- 


MAKE AT 


Sail pmtx bty mudi more} mihe mol 
order buarm free iu forenoon: 


Dbed 

Dr. Dome Brother 1488 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


$6,000/ MONTH PLUS 

WITH DC 

KEMA COMPUTER 

PHOTO SYSTEM 


_. mode from a photo or a five 

, aid reproduced oa a T-dert or 

ether tetdta item ft taa than 2 minutos. 
Start your own <4 oath busnros. Na 

- necema). Ewelenl. lor 

tan; mow orders, oonwveh, 
roots, fairs, hotaik, etc. 
SISJOOO start ccpitol naco a c i or. 
Keren GMRK Beethoverotr. 9 , 

6 Fronldert/Mren, W. Germcrry 
Tdee: 412713. Tel: 747808. 


RENDB5CNTATIVE WANTED 


For United Stores firm to area peopta ft 
matters l e tatir m to LLS. Veas and bu»- 
nro» apporiwtaro. If youoreo bumten 

handle aetata, mi may aucroy ce an 
IntroAimrico van Counal.represmta 
0 v« ft your &y. Su tel<taiij | | ecmftpt 
Borentid. Invesftnert required. 

For debited mfanncitioy, wquem Vise 

Tdb 305 §814*4^ta^wLHerald 


Trftune. 92521 NeuOy Cede*, 


Vitamin Products Msmufeaurer 
Reputable Name - Gxp. 
Wofertta S 14 MM. Softs 
Own Modern PVrt- USA. 
Monagemert wil reman 
9wro Growth Mode far 
r«jnt Cccital Pasfton, 
BonW^tiwaWTiJaune. 
92521 NeuAy Cede*, France. 


DUMOND CUTTWC COMPANY ota 


ottd in New Yoric a loatang far taagn 


a c coun ts. We otn sms y tap grade 

rL I J r_ L j u ' 

HMflo Wii RJOPrappry anmam 

Write: Aims FrondteL-lD W. 47 Si, 
N.Y., N.Y, 10034. 21Z221 0906. 


VBCT UXXAIT^ CHEMICAL specid- 
ty manufacturer n mu faet u ang aar> 
sob, dearer*, deodor ai ta, dsinfee- 


tares. 

Ulers. water 

en. Cixnrtare jondontf CM iactretnd 
Rnro. Sale incfaii whatasde & retaL 
Private label, padeed far consumer 
ch cire . Hare mSerndtanat overs e as 
buuneg. letotang to sefl fa I rtemolwtv 
d firm breed in IMde East, For Easl 
and Europe. Direct inewnes ta M£, 
P.O. Bo* 29372, New Ortaore. LoodU 
ono 70 18?, U4 A 

NEW TOriTS MOST P tHRirFr 
and svccesfui ctaco operofar end de- 
uffmr mstdtar Sore teamed up to 
open super New York type dobs » 
mdor fareiDi chw. Loowtg far public 
atrparaHoa to ewest $3 to $5 oeSon 
far B dubs of fttfivtdual ftvestors for 
eodt ofy. &dro onbnay retuna on 
capild. Write Bax 14099, H aro l d Tri- 
bune, 92521 Net*/ Cades, Fronca- 

THE ARABIAN YBUt BOOK 1979 - 
2nd edftmi Avotable mw with coo 
pitta ftfannot ioti on coiTiro eiSQ l r jn- 
dutiiol firraj fapyf i cn Bdnft, 
Kuwaft Ommt Qatar, Sain Ardtaa 
and Uretod Arab Envoto. Abe m- 
dodss mvM swxfi era end Who’s 
Who sectbns. rnee US S075&flft 
nd . Coa tort: Dor AI Seyestah, P.O. 
Bo* 227Q, Kuwait 

VBtY TBORTABU BWKTMBjrpro- 
gtxmt seeks sdes m eft, wwd advt- 
wv Send bqdnroumL Hwrejt fte. 

SCOTCH WHKKY -CHAMPAGNE. 


&W<SST?NSSJf-. w 


• BUSINE SS 
OPPORTUNITIES 


TO MVESTORS . 

Offshore Go's. We are oassfXftg retd 
b u rrowing any mount from US5 
5JXX) at 9%. fixed, ready far Senes of 
10 to 20 rears. Bonk gummtaro only, 
toply ta BmI^SZ, LKT 
dwnWii 


Eschenhcimer Sir. 


SWISS TBAVtt AGENCY - , boated ft 
Geneva Fufiy ficemnd KATA, etcj, fd 
‘ ownership for sale due to 


or pret 

hedthrt 


Quatfied i n tmo q etPB rt 
~ ies toOvffie 


ond sfcrff avotable- bnjiBriro 
E 18-115176, PubOdtos. 1211 Geneva 


^efarti farwor d. 


_ IAJK2BT AND OUXEST Irterno- 
liond BtmneH Eud ttmg e con put you 
in touch with over 1000 members in 40 
countries. Mit fTTOT 1-7 ArtBery 
Row. London 5WV. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


BUSINESSMAN 


In i eina n oi sJ company pub ot yore 


Buanesi tnmodiai fu c tfti e s 
MrttSnpud J 


Orgamanon for letninon. 
Business arptares 


Med«ri 

Tl __ „ 

Co ntort: B AJ. 122 
75008 Itaa Tel: 359 
Telex 441 947 F. 


FLYING FOR LIFE 


Hying Doctors around the world 24 
hour* a day for FIRMS or WDIViDIJAtS- 
brortnetes/Trereftr* speed member- 
dep far Worldwide Mectad A ssi s ton c e 


CdftJETSKXXMS 
15, me ftofaeera, 75116 Nab 
Tel. 5057575- TU. 611449 


SWISS ADORESSfdomidtation, tall 
trade tromoefarW rtvoiong/SwBi Sank 


COnfcKS. Your fiduciary breed on confr- 
taedrefahons. 


.GS'JStAL 
S, P.OJ.43,CHC&»-A 14. 


YOUR MAN M KDtA. For nterte f 


mabon, kxfion Vmnros practices, tem- 
porary office faditief, m nune re xi 
guides, bason or representation, frao- 
V&onl iwerpr el er A personnel recroit- 
menfc contort GA. Tartwa ni, PjO X 
7 927. B ombay 400 034 Tot 372213/ 
JTWZLTdex; 011-5113-JAM&4N. 

TOP LEVS. MANAGBWtT CON- 
aJLTANT, estobfahed ft Ptarft fair 

doarefaronoBt, is open to p er manent 

or temporary m a gnnita mori m i n g 

rroeorrtv m urot mo ti on A taprroatto- 
lion. Write *1 BcJton, 141 roe lagen- 
cbe, 75Q17 FW or cA 229 26 77. 
WSOTUDMGWORUlIMKfaryau 


Neo3y, France. 


GQM7AME5 FORNB) UX 

and offshore. AAJL Omfrieburrfi tid. 


_ W58. 

US. TAX -RETURNS PREPARE? by 
CAA. fires computer ge uW fl tad » 
USA, For CBpo irt rona i t i 
NewYark 


55454fa| 


t (21Q 39301! 


OFFICE SERVICES 


RAMS 

Snce 19S7 LSLP, pcovidro mo^ fot- 
wanSng, 525/montK Tetobone, 
teles, moating rooms, 5 IL rfArtas, 
Pm Ba TeLT&ATOiTdwt 642504. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


Yoot Own Compcmy 
In Madid 


A COMPA NY O BBtAWB AMD 
NUT EOUPPH) TO CONtXJCT 

rout 



- Private tochers 


Through me* office y rw can arege 

busmen ond wperi-etpat^ ccrdacta,' 

mmheting reseorrtt, odvertiang ^- w . 1 - 
aace, meefeng^ etc. 


In this way you have yow own eompo- 
ny ft Movid without being actually 
prow*. 


mtaeftaSegaafAe 

‘WOUB4GMBP 


WORKN STATV, SLA. 

“Your own company in Madrid" 
C/o Oreme, 68. Mcefad 20 
Tel 270 66 04/3/2 Tb. 43826 K9P e 


A NEW YORK OFFKE 


THE COMPANY TO E5TABUSH 
YOtM NBV YORK OFFTCF 


toerte 


atfffusx 


key wDsort Up your new 
operation. 


A h®V YORK OflFJCF 
1160 Third Avenue 


New York, N.Y. 10021 
m2T2 


_ .. 12988 8284 
GobfaANYOFFKE. 


tOBK»KXSBCVKE 


AMSTERDAM 


Detflnasretr.15% 7G75H. Amtanfara 
TeL (20J 769442 . Tefat 13374 

a ccintart oddrop, 'phone, teftx, FOB. 

• nwitingurt Jeoworirt tervicro 

• IcAftg minutes of meetings. 

• onatgemert of perm an ent office 
premises ondpenonol oenredofin. 

othe r bums support eon be 
offered 


TOUR OFFICE IN NEW YORK 
Your own prmtige. busftesi nsl 
oddres. retabie, effident ... . . 
a n we n ri g. toW» eervia - oB far arty 
USSKUw per monrh. Mad/i 


data. WW YOHC 

£. 12th Floor, 304 EortrtSh 


■nVEOFRCE, . 

ft. N.Y Hy. 10017. USA. ffm QXQ 
661-701; Thu664Q29. 


LONDON-MAYFAIR 


£r3?& b “- 


servKtd offft- 

18 Start 


fiTjfiFri 

Gecroe Street, London W7. 
feL 01-6^9 6934. 


YOUR OFFICE HAMBURG 

gomik omCEsarvKB 
hfo t fa eq 22-34, 2000 Hombural3 
TrtJNO/ilfl 10 Thc2l735B7 Cl5 D. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


PABS-NEW YORUOWOlt bigo- 

na. Athens or Sao ffaula In afl these 
alms we offer fijoRfts and cornpMv 
secretarial services. Writer ftwtige 
Branch Offices. 125 Qwnpe Bysees, 
75008 Ret. (720 26-261. or 5W fifth 
Arem^New Yoric. NX 1 00T7. pi 2} 

lONDON-UDOJMOUS SBKVltB) of# 


fires or just reflabft prestige but 
ess, phone answering, tetox, etc. 


oddero. phone mwwer i ng. 

WWW. ADFOhE Bunness Services 
jest. 19631 150 Begert Sheet London 
Wl. TebOl 439 6X0. Tetae261426. 
LONDON 8USINES5 ADDRESS/ 
PHOh«mBt. Exetartw Suite 66. 
87fiegtrt St. Wl. TeU 439 7094. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


IMOUt CAPITAL MVBTMENr ft 

USA/Horida Wfc construOLftase and 


manage mdustriof^ g u ft os far you 
right m rite heart of Honda (Ocoia). In 
die best ata (most beoUmf mdustry 
pare m 
Mi 101 


We sen tm 

. t. with 600 sqit. knevri- 

— , air-corxfitvjned. to be amt- 

pitted fa Way 1979. We lease, mass- 
age and insure the propc* free of cart 


seBrig price S300.000. enormous vrtue 
ftcrease <* project. Offere to Docono 
— 6, a 9490 Vadu*. 


NOTH AMBttCAN ARGWCUL1UE 

•rtmefed morn potential ^ Particrpa- 


Ban faom_S5A00 and up. Tap 

1 tSyidepi. Secure 


tjo, Pflyllnrit Dfirwal 

mcoree far tfe. Write far free report; 

stating amowrt you vrortd See to 

fares! -STAR. p.O. Bos 111969, 89 
Augsburg ll.W. Germany. 


MONEY 

MANAGEMENT 


K-B 

Copitdl Advisory AG 
KapBal Beraturtgs AG 


8023-Zurifh 

"■ ' • 1 _ J 


46 


Offers octets s5i ig 
money man a ge me nt 
of 

hrghesf profefriwwl 
Wundnrd s. 


Ask far dmt 

- speaafized doeutnertaion. 


*1^ P M -- 


year achraataget 


OFFICES FOR RENT 



SHORT TBM'OtnCB ft ptae pta- 

of London, faBy . famished 
_ Urew e-fae fafadudeal 
Aftktls far * eep ed 

Plette tstaetene G4v 

Office Cerite. London on 6l-24«751 
0T-58M87k 
JOR RBir near LOtMS office afl ta 
with services f necessary- Write to No 
Comne Fubtato,. -20 are. 
_ -75040 Paris Codec 01, or at 
84 SO oflfae bours. .. . 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED. 


AT HOME IN PARIS 


’ ■ Fu e nhhed or Urti wHwd 
' trout aumli to rent. 

MBS NUMO, 18 H du Cbrrtnrt 
Lerooine. 75005 Fans. Teb 325 28 77. 


BFF&TOWHI 


Sufas ID 5 room (unrobed c^Mrtmsnfe 
far one week, two wefts or more. 
TeL 577 5404. TW 200406, 


EMBASSY SERVICE 

Ap. 


.Has 


SALE034T 

26567 77. 


UE^T.LOUIS 


TOO &. 180 to.m. View on 
decorafton. 260 7083. 


RESID0KE SERVICE 


srtes&rertoli. 


Tel. Paris 742 62 65. 


YOURACsvrr 
- IN FADS 


60240 40 

n Adrteary 


MOrOTARNASSK Shtto 


^SSa?S4«: 


Bor, 

room. 


fgofchfB, p n X H X . 

WnUY-aAGATHiE - Owner rents, 
80 spA. Furmshed flat. Larne Svfao. 1 


TeL 602 O 25. 

fteXU.Tr Double living + 2 be d rooms, 
krtehen, bathroom. WC, phone. TeL- 
766 88 41. or 524 17 04. 


■U .->■ 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


16TH NEAR BOIS 


New 

roams. 


double 
2 brtht. 
5j000. 


i 


IE ST. U3UR small studto, d^n*^’^ : 
nhcret. riftUefltiv ffltatLUlilA.i < 


farts, phone, doUghtfiity cfjbg, 
ftoar, tar pi 


.. pttiess rropdnrtta 
ad heat pad fn. 


3962. . 

tOALY OWCt kmuriaui 34 i 
flat, shjrt/to nq tarn . 745 48 % ( 
NEXT TOUR BFFBi Modem 3 t | 
Art, quiet, sun. 224 09 60 an. 4^ 

DWRA i Priyoto to p rivate, 2 frnt.-^, , 
roomsu btdwi. bastv, ptaM. nifli . 

1 .400. TeL 742 70 93. 

SHORT-TERM ia Vrtft Quarto. 


agon, aer ui ra. - ,, 

«H: 180 sM), salon, (inma 
bedrooms, ndten, brth. ns. J .’-; 
neL Teh *52532 02. • 


PARIS AREA LWURNBHB: i". :■ 


lSeme RONT OE SB4E. 


_•*■ \1 ii 


louedtrertanae oppQrtemertdaX'*' • 1 

ing, cuts equipee: 2 pieces rn. jff'j _ . 
ge c e s Frs. 5^200, 4 pieces fis. 7- . 
□nun at ooridna oaassris, U. i “ 


N. 

I t ensel qn e ni e rts 


ao: 


•? a t. 



REALESTATE_}:ti: 


'*■ i.'. . 


WANTED/EXCHAPW 


- V 


JNTL OFFICE 


SfflCS FOR ITS MANAGfiMBti. 

****** Jjgh ■:*■■■ 

rooms, and more. Paris.- 2*5 »»< 


1 3 b e dro atre -■ 


WANTH) PAMS 

q wr fa ien l far 

At lead 3 bedrooms, ' .. 

bafts. Itelermicro.. 
May 1 to see apart* 



W4I . ... 

rent long Mm Smol | 
mem mu bao dvW n... _ ..... 
old Tribune, 93S7I -NaiflD * ‘Lt!.--.. 
-France, or crtl aftor-19hrew**I ^ 
20^ 06. 


PAGE 12 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 




•■Jr 




THE LOW COSL HIGH 
CLASS WAT TO LAKE' 1 

YOURCARTOGRHO 

save money and driving time. 


V- 


A Karageorgis Lines luxury, feny from Ancons, j> . 
Northemltd^roPatrasgetsyourholidayofftoa .. 

fabulous start. _ 

You have a comfortdbieair-<^iiditioned cab^ 

witli private facilities, the finest cuisine, swimmii^V^ 
pools, bar aikl duty-free sht^K: ' - ! 

Tliere are four sailings eveVy week. 
Wliyc^ve-vsdjencruisingcobisnQnwre? ; ;y~^ 

. - Contact your travel agent orKarageoigis ag« ; * ^ 1 

fo London. IVtris/Frankfurt,Bmssefa,Ceiioa,Viertw:/ . , 

Madrid, Zurich or. Geneva. ■ -J 

- Special Off-Season Fares 




KARAGEORGIS LENB 

The ecoiKKitical drive-cruise way v