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INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World-5 Daily Newspaper 


London, Tuesday, April 29, 1997 



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Small Expectations 

Blair’s Appeal Lies, in Part, in Tory Fatigue 


By Warren Hoge 

New York Times Service 


LONDON — Last fall, Britain's La- 
boor Party put oar its official platform 
and boasted that its nostrums for what 
win Britain bad been unanimously ap- 
proved by the entire party conference. 

Bor mare recently, with die party 
entering a national election campaign, a 
substitute manifesto emerged, this one 
bearing the stamp of only one person — 
the party's leader, Tony Blair, very 
Ekely to be the country’s next prime 
monster before this week is oul 
What had been a 40-page typed con- 


as a list of 10 principles, 
Mr. Blair's own crabbed 


_ in 

.. . Mr. Blair’s own crabbed handwriting 

With three days to go, the Labour Party leader, Tony — scribbled down, his campaign man- 
Blair, arrived at a rally in the Midlands on Monday, agers said as they distributed photo- 


copies, in die solitude of his backyard. 

Mr. Blair had been sitting in “a 
patch of sunlight,” they said, and they 
circulated pictures of the luminous mo- 
ment. 

The piety of ihe presentation illu- 
minated how emblematic Mr. Blair has 
become of the party that he has re- 
fashioned into what he calls “New” 
Labour, and how reverentially his 
pitchmen are treating his image in wbar 
is being called the most personality- 
centered election in British history. 

He has gained wide acceptance for 
his personal mission to become the 
next prime minister, but his tightly 
managed »nd cautious campaign hay 
shed less light on his plans for the 
country than it Has on him . 

See BLAIR, Page 7 



Part McBhoe/nt Aratd Plea 


Prime Minister John Major with his secretary for 
Northern Ireland, Sir Patrick Mayhew, left. In Belfast. 


Jakarta Sentences 
Political Activists 


Candied bf Ow StogPmtDapecia 

JAKARTA — A court imposed prison sentences of be- 
tween seven and 13 years Monday on five young opposition 

* activists accused of subversion. 

A The five, members of the People's Democratic Party, were 
arrested after riots in Jakarta last July and had faced possible 
death sentences under Indonesia’s subversion law. 

. Only three political parties currently campaigning for the 
May 29 general elections are legally recognized in Indonesia. 

: The People’s Democratic Party, whose members wait un- 

* . derground after the arrest of their leaders, have never received 
legal recognition. 

• Central Jakarta State Court judges, in announcing then- 
verdict on the party’s chairman, Bachman Sudjatmiko, 26, 
said that while he had committed a serious crime that deserved 
punishment, they did not agree with the prosecutors’ demand 

* for IS years’ imprisonment. 

“It is already proved that Budiman Sudjatmiko committed 
a criminal action under the main charge of subversion,” one 
of the judges. Syoffian Sumantri, said in sentencing him to 13 
years minus the time he had already spent in custody. 

After the sentencing. Mr. Sudjatmiko said, “We reject the 
verdicts, as the court does not have die legitimacy to sentence 

■ us/’ ... ^ 

The other eight defendants received prison' 
from 1 8 months to 12 years. Last week, farce People’* Demo- 
cratic Party activists in Indonesia’s second- largest city, Sura- 
baya, weresenteaced to between four aixi six years in prison cm 
the same charges. Two other defendants are still on tnaL 

“The message to the community is dear,” said Bambang 
Widjojantoa, a lawyer with toe independent Legal Aid In- 
stitute. “Whoever has a different opinion from toe gov- 
ernment and who is thought to be be hind events will be 
heavily punished.” (AFP. Reuters, AP) 



Italy Communists 
Back in Limelight 

Prodi Group Needs to Court Them 


By Celestine Bohlen 

New York Tunes Service 


John MHOMpUMfBBB 

Bo diman Sudjatmiko, leader of the People's Democratic Party, center, 
being escorted from court before he was sentenced to prison Monday. 


A 



Germans Begin to Accept a Changing Face 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Pas! Service 


-SP'V - • 



BERLIN — When CeanOzdemir entered toe 
German Bundestag in 1994, the event was 
hailed as more than a personal triumph. 

:~Tbe 30- year-old Green Party member, who 
was born in a Black Forest village but did not 
acquire a German passport until he was 18, 
became the first Turkish German to be elected 
ea Parliament. . 

Unlike his family and friends, Mr. Ozdenur 
saw nothing special in breaking one of the 
country’s most enduring political barriers. 

' “I just thought it was time to stand up and 
declare that mini ms like me should play a role 


in this democracy,” he said in an interview. 
“One out of every five babies are bom to 
foreigners, so it should be obvious a future 
Germany will be represented by people from 
different ethnic backgrounds.” 

To a degree that alarms some politicians, the 
human face of Germany is changing rapidly. 
Indeed, Mr. Ozdemir’s election is just one of 
many signs that the homogeneous, blue-eyed- 
blond image once nurtured by this nation of 80 
million is bong supplanted by something more 
diverse. 

Ihe wave of guest workers who began mi- 
grating from Italy, Greece and Turkey nearly 
four decades ago to help resurrect Germany’s 
economy from the ashes of World War II has 


been augmented since the fall of the Berlin 
Wall by a huge influx of Poles, Iranians. 
Yugoslavs and Russians. In the last decade, the 
number of foreigners — meaning everyone of 
non-German ancestry regardless of country of 
birth — living in Germany has nearly doubled, 
to 73. million, or 9 percent of the population. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl insists that Ger- 
many must not become an immigrant nation 
like toe United States. Hie Bonn government 
has taken measures to close a porous frontier 
that borders eight countries. It his curtailed one 
of the world's most libera] asylum policies, 
discouraged toe resettlement of ethnic Ger- 

See GERMANY, Page 7 


ROME — As it struggles to keep a year-old promise to 
make Italy eligible for the start of European monetary union, 
toe last thing Prime Minister Romano Prodi’s center-left 
government needs is more proof of its dependence on a 
minority party of uninhibited Communists. 

But that's what it got in scattered municipal elections held 
Sunday throughout toe country, including Milan and Turin, 
the urban twins of the Italian industrial north. In both cities, 
toe candidates from Mr. Prodi ’s Olive Tree coalition were 
trailing their rivals on the right, and could win run-offs to be 
held May 1 1 only by courting the votes of the Refounded 
Communist Party. 

“Now the Re founded Communist Party will be the de- 
terminant,' ' said Fausto Bertinotti, the party leader known for 
his strong rhetoric. “Without us, the Olive Tree will go to its 
death.” 

In several medium-sized cities, including Siena, Ravenna 
and others where leftist candidates did well, their lead could 
be attributed to a pre-election coalition between tile Re- 
founded Communist Party and the Olive Tree coalition. The 
biggest loser in the voting Sunday was the Northern League, 
the secessionist party, which lost Milan city hall after a stormy 
four-year stint under Marco Formentini. 

Even before the election, the Refounded Communist Party, 
a splinter party that held its ideological ground in 1991 when 
Italy's mainstream Communist Party changed its name and 
moved to the center, had maneuvered itself into a key 
position. 

Although it won less than 9 percent of toe vote in national 
elections last year, its parliamentary deputies — who number 
34 out of 630 in the lower chamber — are the swing vote for 
toe government on major policy issues. Earlier this spring. 
Mr. Bertinotti succeeded in publicly humiliating the Prodi 
government by refusing to back its multinational mission in 
Albania. 

But the key test for toe Prodi government lies ahead as it 
tries to tackle the generous social spending programs — 
mainly health care and pensions — that Italy needs to trim if 
it is to be among the first countries to join the European single 
currency in 1999. 

Since he took office almost a year ago, Mr. Prodi, an 
economics professor who once managed Italy's largest state 
holding company, has said over and over again that he would 
resign if he failed to bring Italy into monetary union in 1 999. 
Unto now, he has been able to count on the strong pro- 
European sentiments historically shared by Italians. But his 
single-mindedness has begun to annoy even his supporters, 
particularly now that they have seen their paychecks reduced 
“Euro-tax,’ 


by his 


a one-year revenue-raising measure 
See ITALY, Page 6 


EU Is Ready 
To Return 
Diplomats 
To Tehran 

Bloc Won’t Impose 
Tough Sanctions, 
Senior Officials Say 


By Tom Buerkle 

true manorial Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — European Union 
countries will return their ambassadors 
to Tehran without additional diplomatic 
or economic sanctions beyond the re- 
cent suspension of Europe’s so-called 
critical dialogue with Iran, senior EU 
officials said Monday. 

The lack of support for tougher mea- 
sures indicates that many Euroj 
governments are reluctant to risk 
age to their economic interests in Iran 
despite a recent German court ruling 
that the Tehran leadership was respon- 
sible for the murders of three Kurdish 
dissidents in Berlin, officials said. 

EU foreign ministers, meeting in Lux- 
embourg on Tuesday, were expected to 
agree to return toe bloc's ambassadors to 
Tehran within a week, officials said. 
They also were expected to endorse a 
declaration calling on Iran to respect 
international law and renounce terrorism, 
reaffirming the suspension of Europe's 
critical dialogue earlier this month and 
maintainin g a long-standing European 
embargo on arms sales to Iran. 

The ministers were considering pro- 
posals for additional measures, includ- 
ing imposing visa restrictions on Iranian 
officials, expelling Iranian intelligence 
agents from embassies in Europe and 
suspending ministerial visits. But of- 
ficials said those ideas lacked the unan- 
imous backing of all IS EU govern- 
ments. which is needed for adoption. 

A failure to agree on new measures 
could increase tensions with the United 
States, which has lobbied European 
capitals heavily in toe past week to 
adopt tougher sanctions. 

It also would provide comfort to Iran, 
whose president, Hashemi Rafsanjani. 
predicted earlier this month that Europe 
would quickly go back to business as 
usual with Iran. State- run Tehran radio 
said Monday “it appears that the EU has 
lost its past enthusiasm in dealing neg- 
atively with Iran,” Reuters repotted. 

Fearing just that, opponents of the 
Islamic regime prepared to demonstrate 
outside the ministerial meeting to press 
for tough new sanctions. 

“If they go for a weak position, that 
would send the worst possible signal to 
Tehran.” said Sbahin Gobadi. spokes- 
man for the National Council of Re- 
sistance of Iran, a coalition of dissident 
groups. “That would tell Iran they can 
get away with murder.” 

The reluctance to stiffen European 
policy toward Iran largely reflects toe 
cautious stance of Germany, Iran's 
biggest trading partner in Europe. Bonn 
succeeded in getting its EU partners to 
recall their ambassadors and to suspend 
toe critical dialogue within hours of the 
April 10 court ruling, but since then 
German officials have sought to contain 
the damage to relations. 

Officials said they had been encour- 

See IRAN, Page 6 


AGENDA 


Dollar Rises Despite Warning From G-7 


LONDON — The dollar on 
Monday elbowed aside weekend 
warnings from the governments of the 
world’s seven largest economies toat 
its two-year increase had run just 
about far enough. 

The U.S. currency rose Monday 
against the Deutsche mark and toe 


yen i 
Tieh 


Nem'ttrk 

DM 


The Dollar 


Monday O *P-M- 
1.7328 


piwteadw 

1.7274 


Pound 


1.8247 


1.6245 


Yen 


12&0S5 


12&30 


t despite fresh warnings from Hans 
ietmeyer, the president of the 
Bundesbank, and Finance Minister 
Hiroshi Mitsuznka of Japan. 

Most currency traders said they 
thought toe dollar had farther to go 
and toat die G-7 would be powerless 
to stop it. Page 11. 

PAGE TWO 

Hanoi’s Spy Missed at US. Reunion 

STYLE f**9*10- 

Hermes Revolution: a New Designer 


5A4 


5.8295 



Books. 


+44.15 


6783.02 


S&P 500 


6738-87 


Crossword... 

Opinion 

Sports 


— Page 9. 
~ — PageS. 

— Pages 8-9. 
Pages 18-19. 


L - change Monday O 4 PM. piwtougdOBe 


international Ctasa/Oed 


Page 4. 


+7.6 


772.97 


765.37 


Coming Soon: Brave New World of Digital Viewing 


By Paul Farhi 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — The television 
set of tire near future may be the one 
sitting outside Jim McKinney’s office. 
It’s as big as a refrigerator tipped on its 
ride, and has a rectangular screen that 
provides breatotakingly sharp images. 

Or it may turn out to be something 
like the personal computer sitting in 
Craig Mundie’s office. It could give 
lower-quality pictures, but could bring 
users some impressive other features — 
like instant bios of TV stars while the 
show airs, or a batter’s statistics during a 
crucial baseball game. It also could sup- 
ply a daily electronic newspaper or 
function as a mail-order catalogue. 

Either way. there's no question that 
television is about to change. After 10 
wearying years of debate and testing, the 
U.S. government opened toe door for a 
new kind of broadcasting — “digital** 
broadcasting — earlier tits month. A 


simi lar shift in broadcasting standards is 
under way in Asia and Europe. 

In the United States, toe Federal 
Communications Commission gave 
each of the 1,600 U-S. TV stations a 


second channel over which to transmit 
programs and other information in di- 
gital form, the computer language that 
has become the lingua franca of modern 
communications. The industry predicts 



Wxlwc l IB n,/Tbf Tulmpwi IVal 

An HDTV set in a Washington studio. The screen is 62 inches ride. 


that digital broadcasts will start in some 
cities in about 1 8 months. 

But it is still not clear what form 
digital broadcasts will take, or what kind 
of sets viewers will use to receive them. 

About all that is certain is that the 250 
million televisions now in use nation- 
wide won’t be up to the job. They will 
have to be replaced or outfitted with 
special converter boxes that Industry 
executives said will cost from $50 to 
$ 200 . 

The big television outside Mr. 
McKinney’s office is a prototype of a 
“high-definition” set, which people 
would have to buy to receive the 
sharpest possible pictures. Mr. McKin- 
ney, a TV station manager in Wash- 
ington. D.C.. rigs up a demonstration to 
show what this means; on the 62-inch 
f 1 57 centimeter) HDTV set, ’ * Lawrence 
of Arabia' ’ looks as good as it did on any 
movie theater screen. Commercial ver- 

See TV, Page 7 


Newsstand Prices 


Bahrain i .000 Din 

Cyprus C. £ 1.00 

Denmark... 14.00 D.Kr. 

Finland 12.00 RM. 

Gibraltar £0.85 

Greer Britain -JEDA0 

Egypt iEMO 

Jordan-- — 1^0 JD 
Kenya...— K. SR 180 
Kuwait 600 Fte 


Malta. 


..55 & 


Nigeria ...125,00 Naha 

Oman 1.250 Rials 

Qatar 10.00 ffiato 

Rep. lretand_lR£ 1-00 

Saudi Arabia ,10-00 R 
S. Africa -R12+ VAT 

UA£ 10.00 Orb 

us. Ma.{Eur.>.-S1-» 
ZMjebwa.-2imS30.00 


Conduct Unbecoming? Sex Code Puts a Strain on U.S . Military 


By Tamara Jones 

Washington Post Service 


3 

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a# 



WASHINGTON — On the morning of her 
court-martial, lieutenant Colonel Karen Tew 
pinned the ribbons to hex dress uniform and pocked 
a s uitcase far jail. She knew she could be facing up 
to 10 years behind bars- 
ln toe courtroom that day, she wept as she 
entered her guilty plea, wondering aloud what 
would happen to her two teenage daughters and 
elderly parents. She apologized for bringing dis- 


to the U.S. Air Force. “No words can 
: die shame and humiliation I feel as a result 
of my actions.” declared the 41 -year-old career 
officer. The jury sentenced Colonel Tew to dis- 
missal. Barely a year short of retirement, she would 
lose everything — her job, her pension, her ben- 
efits and toe only way of life she had known as an 
adult. 

Colonel Tew’s crime was uniquely military; She 
had had an affair with an enlisted man. Estranged 
from her husband, she had committed adultery. 

Five days after toe March 1 1 trial at Scott Air 


Force Base in Belleville. Illinois. Colonel Tew 
waited for her parents to leave for church, then put 
a shotgun between her eyes and pulled toe trigger. 
Her suicide raised questions about the private lives 
of America’s servicemen and women, and toeir 
accountability in a military culture that considers 
order, discipline and integrity key to its survival. 

Like Colonel Tew, a growing number of soldiers 
are facing felony criminal charges for love affairs 
that, in civilian life, would break no law. But with 
renewed emphasis on a mote family-oriented ser- 
vice and the embarrassing legacy of sex-abuse 


scandals, toe Pentagon appears to be cracking 
down on adultery and related offenses. But it is not 
just allegations of pandemic sexual misconduct, 
such as those at the Aberdeen Proving Ground, that 
are attracting prosecutors’ attention. Private affairs 
between consenting heterosexual adults are also 
ending up before toe jury. 

In the air force alone, toe number of people put 
on trial for adultery more than quadrupled in toe 
last decade, from i6 in 1987 to 67 last year; the 

See MILITARY, Page 7 







I 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1997 


page mo 


A Vietnamese Reporter’s Double Life / Tim© CpiTOSpondont and Viotcong Officer 

At Hanoi’s Insistence, the Spy Skips a Reunion 


By Robert D. McFadden 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — Hewasalumiliarfigure 
at the military briefings and diplomatic 
affairs in wartime Saigon, a wiry Vi- 
etnamese reporter who seemed to know 
everything and everyone. He had great sources, 
his analyses of Vietnam’s labyrinth political in- 
trigues were astute and he shared information and 
insights with his American colleagues, many of 
whom regarded him as a kind of sage. 

He had gone to college in California, and his 
enthusiasm for America seemed boundless. He 
was so well-connected that some correspondents 
thought he worked for the CIA. Eventually, 
Time magazine, for which be worked 10 years, 
made him a full staff correspondent, the only 
Vietnamese to be accorded that distinction by a 
major U.S. news organization. 

Once, the story went around, he mysteriously 
secured the release of an American reporter who 
had been captured in Cambodia. And as Com- 
munist forces closed in on Saigon in 1975, be 
sent his wife and four children to the United 
States — they returned to Vietnam a year later — 
and risked tns life to get Vietnamese who had 
worked for the Americans out on the last heli- 
copter from the roof of the U.S. Embassy. But he 
stayed behind. 

It was only after the war that Frank McCulloch 
of Time magazine, Stanley Kamow of The 
Washington Post, David Halberstam of The New 
York Tunes, Moriey Safer of CBS News and 
other correspondents learned that their col- 
league, Pham Xuan An, had ail along been a 
secret agent for Hanoi: a colonel in the army of 
North Vietnam. 

Three decades after a conflict whose passions 
reduced all understanding to black and white, 
some of these correspondents gathered Monday 
with veterans and diplomats at the Asia Society 
in New York to discuss the legacy of Vietnam. 
Mr. An, 69, now a retired general in Ho Chi Minh 
City, was not there. He accepted an invitation but 
sent word Sunday that he could not come. 

In a letter to the organizers. Mr. An spoke of 
the need to help heal the mental and physical 
wounds of the war and of his regret at not being 
able to see those with whom he had worked long 
ago. It did not say why he would not come. But 
the organizers said they learned late last week 
mat be had been refused an exit visa by die 
Vietnamese government. 

A nd dial is regrettable, say some of the 
fanner correspondents, who regard 
him as a Mend For as they tell it, the 
story of Pham Xuan An — a tale of 
intrigue, of divided loyalties and friendship be- 
tween enemies, of acts of courage with lives 
saved or muffed out — may be one of the keys to 
understanding the tumultuous war years and 
Vietnam in the 1990s. 

“An was tom between two loyalties,*' said 
Mr. Kamow, who won the 1990 Pulitzer Prize 
for history for his book, “In Our Image: Amer- 
' ica's Empire in the Philippines.’' 

“His loyalty in the case of America was to his 
colleagues," Mr. Kamow said. “His loyalty to 
Vietnam was to his nation. He felt he was doing 
his patriotic duty by being an agent, but we were 
his friends and he had great admiration for the 
United States, and I think he was a tom person." 

Mr. McCulloch, Time’s Saigon bureau chief 
in the war years, said of Mr. An’s dual loyalties: 
“It tore him iro. But I’ve never resented it If 
circumstances had been reversed, if hundreds of 
thousands of Vietnamese had occupied my land. 


I would probably have done the same thing. I’ve 
never had any ideological or political animus. To ' 
my knowledge be never warped his reporting. He 
remains a good and highly respected friend." 

Mr. Safer agreed, and he rebuked Hanoi — a 
regime that recently established frill diplomatic 
relations with the United Stales, says h wants 
reconciliation and actively seeks Western in- 
vestment, business and tourism — for refusing a 
visa to a man who risked his life for years to give 
Hanoi information on its enemy's military activ- 
ities and behriud-tbe-scenes politics in the South. 

“The irony is that he is a patriot, a na- 
tionalist," said Mr. Safer, who wrote a chapter 
about Mr. An in his 1990 book, "Flashbacks: On 
Returning to Vietnam." 


who is frail but in good health, to visit New York. 
But Mr. Whisnant said he was informed last 
week dial Hanoi had refused to grant an exit visa. 
No reason was given. 

Much of Mr. An’s story was related to Mr. 
Safer in Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon, in 
1989, while Mr. Kamow learned parts of it in 
more recent visits with Mr. An in Vietnam. 
“Like a lot of other Vietnamese, he got into fee 
Vjft tfwmh when he was a kid," Mr. Kamow 
said. 

It was in 1944, when he was 16, feat Mr. An 
and most of his classmates joined the Com- 
munist national liberation movement known as 
the Vietminh. (Years later. South Vietnam 
would call it the Vietcong, pejoratively.) In those 



As Communist forces closed in on Saigon in 1975, Mr. An risked his life to 
get Vietnamese who had worked for (he Americans out on the last 
helicopter from the roof of the (7.5. Embassy. But he stayed behind. 


“He has done his best to follow his conscience 
and for this they apparently regard him as a 
dangerous character.” 

As planned some weeks ago, Mr. Kamow and 
Mr. Safer, along wife Mr. Halberstam, the au- 
thor-journalist who won the 1964 Pulitzer Prize 
for his Vie tnam reporting and left The New York 
Times in 1967. and Robert Muller, president of 
Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation, were 
to have been joined by Mr. An in a forum on 
Vietnam’s legacy and future before 300 guests 
Monday at the Asia Society. 

The discussion is one of a series of events, 
including an exchange visit of American and 
Vietnamese doctors this summer and a 17-day 
Hanoi-to-Ho Gii Minh City bicycle trip for 
hundreds of international riders, many of them 
disabled Vietnam veterans, next January, being 
sponsored by World Team Sports, an inter- 
national group based in North Carolina. 

Stephen Whisnant, executive director of 
World Team Sports, said that a plane ticket had 
been sent and preparations made for Mr. An, 


early years, as the Vietminh 
the Japanese occupiers in World War R and later 
against tire French, Mr. An was little more than a 
courier. 

After the French defeat in 1954 and the coun- 
try's partition into North and South Vietnam, 
Mr. An joined the South Vietnamese Army and 
was later assigned to work with Colonel Edward 
Lansdale, the CIA operative who conducted a 
clandestine campaign of sabotage and rumor for 
Saigon against Hanoi and the Vietminh. 

Mr. An feus became a double-agent loyal to 
the Vie tmin h. 

In 1956, be left the army and went to Cali- 
fornia, where be enrolled at Fullerton College cm 
a State Department scholarship. He worked on 
the school newspaper, had an internship at The 
Sacramento Bee and traveled around the United 
States, staying often in private homes. 

Returning to Saigon in 1957. he became a 
part-time correspondent for The Associated 
Press and later for Reuters. He also resumed 
work for fee Vietminh. 


Hi 


“The real work started in 1960, when I was 
working for Reuters,” Mr. An told Mr. Safer. I 
held the rank of regimental commander. I never 
wore a unifo rm of course. I never carried a 
weapon.” 

By the mid-1960s, as U.S. involvement m 
Vietnam deepened, fee news media assigned 
staff correspondents to Saigon, and fee press 
corps grew into a throng. Many of the Americans 
hired Vietnamese assistants for language skills 
and other guidance, and Mr. An,- who stood out, 
was hired by Mr. McCulloch. 

Mr. An was in his late 30s, a slender, engaging 
man wife a good sense of humor and a good 
sense of news as Americans saw it. He had an 
open intellectual face and innocent experienced 
eyes behind horo-rim glasses. American report- 
ers. especially the new c omers, took to him, and 
he briefed them on Vietnamese politics and fee 
military picture. i. 

is persona, Mr. McCulloch said, was 
feat of an American-educated, very 
conservative Vietnamese from a well- 
to-do Mekong Delta family that had 
lost its la ndholdin g s to the Communists. 

As the war expanded in the 1960s, his con- 
nections seemed astonishing. He was one of a 
few Vietnamese reporters allowed to attend off- 
the-record UJS. military briefings. Hie went to 
diplomatic functions in Saigon and traveled fee 
country, to Quang Tri and Hue in the north, to 
Nha Trang on the South China Sea. gathering 
material for Time — and for the Vietminh, in 
greater detail. 

“I had access to all the Vietnamese bases and 
their c ommander s.” Mr. An recalled for Mr. 
Safer. “My superiors wanted to know the 
strengt h s of various units. They wanted^esti- 
mates of the capabilities of commanders — who 
was corrupt and who was corruptible. They 
wanted all the political stuff, fee same stuff yon 
gays wanted." 

Beyond access to the briefings and bases, Mr. 
McCulloch said, ‘'Time’s bureau must have 
been apriceless listening post Everything came 
through it. You had political reporter s saying 
what was and what was not happening. You had 
cofibat people scoffing at body counts, saying it 
was not 700 killed, it was 20. 

Mr. McCulloch, who left Time in 1972 and 
retired from a long news career six years ago, 
said he never saw Mr. An distort reports for 
Time. Mr. Safer quoted Mr. An as saying he 
never planted stories or engaged in disinform- 
ation. Doing so might have compromised his 
secret identity. 

Mr. An, who sometimes disappeared for day s, 
was debriefed by Vietminh agents in Saigon and 
in fee Ho Bo Forest, 16 kilometers (10 miles) 
northwest. He said he encouraged rumors that he 
worked for the CIA to enhance his cover. 

A colonel at war’s end, Mr. An was eventually 
promoted to general. His oldest son, Hoang, 
studied En glish at the Pushkin Tnstimtp. in Mos- 
cow and for several years studied political sci- 
ence at the University of North Carolina at , 
Chapel Hill, wife expenses quietly paid by some, 
of Mr. An’s former news media colleagues in , 
Saigon. -The son is now an- -official- of the- Vi- 
etnamese Foreign Ministry, an aid-provider 
said. 

Mr. Kamow, who has written numerous 
books of history, said he regarded Mr. An’s 
loyalty to the Vie tminh as an expression of the 
intense nationalism of apeople who have fought 
foreign invaders for thousands of years. He also 
said he did not believe Mr. An had feigned 
affection for his colleagues or America. 


Keeping ‘Ticketless Travelers’ 
Informed of Their Rights 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


By Cindy Skizycki 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — The Department 
of Transportation has acted to ensure 
that airline passengers who have 
brought electronic tickets are told of 
their rights and the airlines' liabilities 
when it comes to lost baggage, over- 
booked flights, refunds and other is- 
sues. 

Holders of paper tickets find their 
rights spelled out on the inside of ticket 
"jackets” or on the ticket itself. 

The, Department of Transportation 
has now spelled out a variety of ways 
that airlines could convey this infor- 
mation to “ticketless travelers'’ who 
make electronic arrangements for travel 
and may receive only a confirmation 


number for a flight rafeer than a tra- 
ditional paper ticket. 

Instead of having to mail the infor- 
mation after an electronic transaction, 
airlines may provide it at the gate, men- 
tion it in a phone conversation wife 
customers, put it on a World Wide Web 
site or occasionally mail it to frequent 
fliers. 

An earlier Department of Transpor- 
tation proposal would have had con- 
sumers notified of their rights “within a 
few days after the purchase transac- 
tion." 

The department's final word says pas- 
sengers need to be informed “no later 
than the tune that they check in at the 
airport for fee first flight in their it- 
inerary" — a flexibility that the airlines 
very much wanted. 


Orly Faces Disruption 

PARIS (AP) — Controllers at Orly 
airport have called a 24-hour strike 
Wednesday demanding pay bonuses on 
days when there is increased air traffic. 
Colleagues at Charles de Gaulle, Paris's 
other major airport, already have similar 
benefits. 

Airport authorities, at Orly, which 
mainly serves France’s domestic routes, 
say they will be able to schedule a 
minimum of 350 flights of the 800 pro- 
grammed for Wednesday. 

British Airways continued Monday 
to refuse to use a check-in area at 
Charles de Gaulle airport pending a 
court hearing over security involving 
Air Algerie. a spokesman said. (AFP) 

British train managers on Eurostar, 
which runs the high-speed rail service 


between London, Paris and Brussels, 
are threatening to begin a series of 24- 
hour strikes over a pay dispute, unions 
said Monday. The results of a ballot will 
be known next month. (AFP) 

Visitors to Lebanon from the Euro- 
pean Union, the United States, Canada, 
Australia, South Korea and Japan can 
now get their visas at Beirut airport, 
seaport or Lebanese border check- 
points, the government said. (AP) 

New Delhi authorities were ordered 
by the High Court to produce plans to 
fight the mosquito -borne dengue fever. 
Dengue killed 322 people in New Delhi 
last year, and 12 cases have been con- 
firmed this year. (AFP) 

The Staten Island Ferry will soon 
be free. New York’s mayor plans to 
scrap the 50-cent fare. (AP) 


Huge Parade . . I0 1 P 
Hails Saddam l3 #’ rnia 

On His 60th 


in 


\\TtA ftfc 


TKRTT, 


Reuters 

i Tens of thousands of 

Monday in President 
Saddam Hussein’s hometown, marking 
his 60th birthday with pledges to stay 
loyal to him. . . •* 

The crowd walked past tnerewjewiag 
stand on the outskirts of Tiknt, 170 
kilometers (105 miles) north erf Bagfa- j 
dad, shouting ‘ ‘With our blood, wife our 
soul, we shall defend you, Saddam! 

The display of loyalty was one of 
many held throughout the country ex- 
cept for Kurdish areas, which have been 
outside Mr. Saddam’s control since fee 
Gulf War over Kuwait in 1 991. 

The parade in Tikrit was attended .by 
almost all Iraqi leaders excep t Mr. Sad- 
dam, who remains injpower despite fee 
nrinous war and punitive trade sanctions 
imposed by fee United Nations for 
Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait-in 1990.- .-* 
T-rrat Ibrahim, vice president of fee 
Revolutionary Command Council, 
presided over the ceremonies in Tikri t, 
which in recent years hav ebee n turiaal 
into one of Iraq’s national festivals. ■ 


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ish costumes danced and sang a birthday 
song: “Hap 
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song: “Happy birthday to you, Saddaiq, 
'« beloved of millions.” * . 


Military groups paraded in front of 
Mr. Ibrahim while formations of ai^r 
force planes and helicopter gonships 
flew over the agricultural town. Tin 
celebrations lasted two hours. \ 

Iraqi radio and television airedspeaal 
pi n g r a ms and during fee breaks, a choir 
of young girls and boys sang: “Happy 
birthday to you. Papa Sa d da m .” 

■ LLS. Opposition Firm 

The United States sees no alternative 
to maintaining sanctions against Iraq as 
long as President Saddam remains in 
power, a former U.S. aide said Monday, 
Renters repented from Cyprus. ; 

Robert Pelletrean, a farmer assistant* 
secretary of state, said that U.S. poli- 
cymakers believed the Iraqi ■ Army 
would soon be back on the borders of 
Kuwait should the sanctions be re- 
moved or the United States reduced its 
own military posture in the Gulf. " 
“Wife the current Iraqi g o vemmesft 
ruthlessly and resiliently maintaining 
power” in Baghdad “and with mistrust 
and l ack of cohesion among various 
elements of the opposition, the United 
States sees no practical alternative tb 

maintaining the hnx ground Ra ghriaH mb 

tightly as possible,” Mr. Pelletrean said . 
at an international ofl forum. 


Winnie Mandela 
Wins Re-election to 
ANC Women’s Unit 


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^ TOPICS 

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Dutch Townfolk Take 
Drug Tourists to Task 

Reuters 

ROTTERDAM — About 30 Rotter- 
dam residents took the Law into their own 
hands by beating up two French and two 
Belgian drog tourists and wrecking a car, 
the Dutch police said Monday. 

The disgruntled inhabitants of Span- 
gen, a western suburb of Rotterdam that 
draws tourists from around the world, 
attacked the four people in separate in- 
cidents Sunday, beating them and des- 
troying a car, the police said. - 

Spangcn residents demonstrated in 
1995 against tourists attracted to the 
Netherlands by the Dutch policy of tol- 
erating the possession of small amo unts 
of “soft drugs.’’ 

But the police are taking a hard line 
toward vigilantes, no matter how angry 
residents are about the drug houses in 
their area, “This will absolutely not be 
tolerated," a police spokeswoman said. 


lorn - Figure 


Reuters , , 

JOHANNESBURG — Winnie Mat 
riflrizela-Mandela easily won re-eleo 
Eton as president of the African National 
Congress Women’s Leag u e, league of- 
ficials say. 

Despite speculation that 
Nelson Mandela’s framer wife would 
be voted out because of her style- of 
leadership, she defeated her mam bp- 
pooent and deputy, Thandi Modxse, 656 
to 124, during a meeting of 1,000 del- 
egates in Rustenburg m North-Wfest 
Province on Saturday. ■ - - A - 

A source in the governing African 
National Congress said her victory 
proved that she still had a strong fol- 
lowing despite scandals that have em- 
barrassed the party and Mir. Mandela. 

“'Winnie has always been a fighter, 
and this proves that she is still populajy" 
the source said Sunday. i 

“There was no serious chaDenge;" 
the source added, “and the women nave 
democratically chosen Winnie to lead 
them otto the next nriflennium." ,ri * ”’v i.-.p 

Political analysts said the victory rej£ T ... 

resented a comeback for Mrs. Ma® 1 -, C 5cvc ta! X .U-* 
kizela-Mandela, 62, from political affairs " 

lation since her divorce in 1995 firafl" i. 

Mr. Ma n dela, who dismissed her in fee 
same year as deputy arts, culture, seir 
ence and technology minister after her 
criticism of his unity government. . 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1997 


; K 4 - - mj) 

' s ad^ Bump in the Road for Term Limits 

Will CaBfomia Ruling Slow EfTnrttn TTirowOnt Vrfpran Pniiri raatis? 


THE AMERICAS 


By B. Drummond Ayres Jr. 

» New York Times Service '■ 

NEW YORK — When a federal 
- -,v ■ i judge last week overturned California’s 

utragh law limiimg how long leg- 
-jslatcKs can hold office, it marked a rare 
* r. obstacle in the efforts nationwide to 
' f m k yforce out career politldans. 

, t‘\ Although members of Congress con- 
^ .v-tiXiue to resist setting term limits for 

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'■recent years. A huge turnover of xtyre 
- lawmakers is now well under way. 

One of California’s legislative 
■-houses is fiZ led entirely with members 
who were elected since the state's term 
dftnits law passed in 1990. If voters 
substitute the current law with a legally 
^defensible measure, term limits could 
'Continue to stir the state’s po litics I pot. 
■’--•Term limits have been successful at 
bringing new faces into politics. Less 
*tear is whether they are making any 
practical difference. 


j,;: AMERICAN 
§ TOPICS 

£. ; : A Washington Isle 
ij ! » Plugs In, Drives Off 

^ ' ■’ Earlier than most, inhabitants of 
^ ' Orcas Island, off the coast of north- 

west Washington, have tasted die fu- 
® ture, and in many ways it is as sweet 
4 as the boosters ofelectric vehicles had 
-T ■ • "promised. They are clean, quiet and 
7^ ■ • cheap to nm; with the island’s mild 
T. ■ ’ winters, expensive gasoline and 
7 ■ ‘green~mindedresidents.it seemed the 
£ . ideal setting for batiery-powered 
’ t * -cars, notes TTm: New York Tunes. 

“* But even with what local officials 
C , '^y is titettghest ratio of electric cars 
’ to traditional ones in die country, die 
' Verdict is that such cars remain a thing 
of die future. Part of a federal pro- 
„ ^gram to test die vehicles, the county 
’ mat includes Orcas Island now has 
. 7 ; ^pue electric vehicle for every 750 
“ noncommercial vehicles. 

_ ■ ! ~1 But the same obstacles apply here 
as elsewhere. The cars' range is short 
.7 ' — a newer GM model has a 90-nriIe ; 

>r • J 1 45-kilometer) range — and o riginal 

ll ' purchase prices are two to three times 
* those of other cats. For now, even on 
— -Oix^s Island, tbe majority of residents 
are saying, “WeTltirink about it.” 

. , * !*. - 'T V 

d $ ‘ ; '-j£ .. . i-; 

Short Takes 

if * One hundred years after Pres- 
ident Ulysses S. Grant was interred 
j with ce remony befitting die Civil 
*1 War hero that he was, 3,000 people 
gathered Sunday to rededicaie his re- 
stored tomb an a bluff over the Hud- 
« ^ -son River m New York. The granite 

-mausoleum was long a major land- 
* marie, drawing 500,000 visitors an- 
!• nually before official neglect allowed 


Propooents of the new laws promised 
greater accountability to voters and an 
end to closed-door, old-boy networks. 
And the newcomers, brimming with re- 
formist hopes and impatient with tra- 
ditional procedures and stilted political 
polites sc. are indeed a switch bom the 
entrenched veterans they are replacing. 
In particular, there are more women and 
more' members of minorities present 
than ever before. 

For the moment, however, the new- 
comers are mostly demonstrating their 
inexperience. 

In the few legislatures where many 
newcomers have taken office, like the 
California Assembly and the Maine 
House and Senate, some new legislators 
have risen in a matter of months to lead- 
ership positions traditionally have 
taken years to secure. While they are 
guiding some bills to passage, there often 
seems to be more drift than action. 

Proponents had argued that term lim- 
its, besides ridding legislatures of career 
politicians, would also weaken the in- 


h to deteriorate. In 1993, a Columbia 
University student and volunteer 
worker at foe tomb, Bank Scatnrro, 
wrote a scathing report that accused 
the National Park Service of having 
allowed foe site to become a haven for 
drag users and vandals. The agency 
dismissed foe unpaid Mr. Scatuno. 
But after outraged family members 
threatened a lawstrit to move the bod- 
ies of Grant and his wife elsewhere, 
the government spent $1-8 million to 
clean foe site. Family members say 
they are pleased. And Grant will re- 
main in Grant's Tomb. 

Delegates from Unitarian Univer- 
safist churches in five Southeastern 
states have voted to continue calling 
their region foe Thomas Jefferson Dis- 
trict They had considered changing 
foe name because Jefferson owned 
more than 130 slaves. Over the week- 
end, 75 of 126 delegates, from North 
and Sooth Carolina, Virginia, Ten- 
nessee and Georgia, voted to drop the 
name, but that was font of foe re- 
quired two-thirds majority. 

You would think that the spon- 
sors of Take Our Daughters to 
Work Day, which has spread rapidly 
across the country in recent years, 
would have resented a countezcam- 
paign in New York called Don’t ^ Take 
Our Daughters to Work. But no. The 
counter-campaign, organized ter a 
clothing union, is intended to send the 
message to garment workers that 
child labor is often dangerous and 
illegal; The union -has focused its' 
ramparign on two OHDese- American 
neighborhoods In New Y ork~ where* 
garment factories flourish and con- 
ditions can he tough. The Ms. Foun- 
dation, sponsors of foe original Take 
Our Daughters campaign, supports 
foe new effort to end exploitation, 
said its president, Marie Wilson. 
“This day is afl about respecting your 
daughter,” she said, “and that's what 
this p r o gra m does.” 

Inunutionai Herald Tribune 


fluence of lobbyists wife strong ties to 
foe veterans. But while veterans are 
being pushed out, many are simply mov- 
ing over to the legislative chamber on 
die other side of foe Capitol, running for 
Congress or seeking appo in tive jobs. 

while lobbyists have lost some coo- 
tacts, they are countering by expanding 
their ranks and increasing efforts to get 
to know new members. 

Lynne L each, a Republican assemb- 
lywoman from Walnut Creek. Califor- 
nia, is one of foe newly arrived re- 
placements in Sacramento, foe state 
capital. Until encouraged by foe new 
term limits law to nm for public office, 
she was content to work, as a business 
consultant, though now and again what 
was happening in Sacramento, or not 
happening, nagged at her. 

* f I saw foe chance to do something 
about something I had been displeased 
with for a long time,” foe said. “The 
others have baa their chance. Now it’s 
our turn. We come in with afresh eye and 
fresh energy. Yes, it's confusing for us at 
times and we get a bit lost But I believe 
we’D do a better job in foe end.” 

California voters in 1990 approved a 
lifetime limit of three two-year terms in 
the Assembly and two four-year terms 
in the Senate. 

Bat the future of term limits in the 
state is now up in the air. A federal judge 
last week overturned the law, calling the 
lifetime ban a “severe burden on the 
right of its citizens to vote for candidates 
of their choice.” Six other states impose 
lifetime bans. 

California legislators are considering 
whether to put anew measure, without a 
lifetime prohibition, on foe ballot 

The impact of term limits in Cali- 
fornia alreray has been profound. All 80 
members of foe California Assembly 
were elected since voters approved the 
law, and some of those will be leaving as 
early as next year. Before term limits, 
the average Assembly member had 
eight years of experience, and one who 
had held office for six years was con- 
sidered ready for a leadership post. 

The new Assembly speaker, Cruz 
Bustamante, a Democrat, has been in 
elective office for four years, about a 
third of foe experience that some of Ins 
predecessors had when they took over 
the top job. 

One of the committee chairmen Mr. 
Bustamante appointed t hr e e months ago 
has only just field that committee’s first 
meeting. On foe Assembly floor, there 
has thus far been a two-hour debate on a 
resolution to adjourn in memory of No- 
torious BIG., foe murdered tapper, but 
hardly any debate, or voting, on bills of 
governmental substance. 

- When foe leader of tile California 
• Senate,' -Bin Lockyer. -a Democrat, 
looked around recently for a passed 
Assembly bOl to which be could attach a 
quick piece of Senate business, he found 
none. 

“It was just some housekeeping stuff 
that we needed to rush through." he 
recalled. “But there was no vehicle 
available. They hadn’t accomplished a 
thing over there in weeks. Term limits? 
I’ve been around here the better part of 
25 years — got to leave myself in 1998 

— and I can't see the progress.” 




A^rOMMai 

CANADA CAMPAIGN KICKS OFF — Jean Charest, leader of the Progressive Conservative Party, 
standing in the door of his bus in Ottawa before the federal election campaign, which started Monday. 


Democrats Reassure Donors 
They’re Backing a Winner 

MIAMI — Democratic Party leaders have reassured top 
campaign donors that the future is bright despite the party’s 
large debt and reports of campaign-finance abuses. 

Several party leaders said that finding candidates was 
easier this time, but the Senate minority leader. Tom 
Daschle, conceded that (he fund-raising dispute was far 
from over and that some Democrats were reluctant to 
become candidates. 

The council is made up of 2.000 business people who 
backed the party last year. Each member must give at least 
$10,000 to qualify. Companies or political action com- 
mittees must give at least $15,000. 

With debts over $12 million, the Democrats need to 
energize the group for another election cycle. 

But many donors may be edgy about bad publicity. 
“There is some need to apologize to donors who are 
understandably embarrassed." said Senator Robert Tor- 
ricelli of New Jersey. (AP) 

Republican Pollster Rebuked 

WASHINGTON — Frank Luntz. pollster, political 
strategist and one of the chief architects of the Republicans’ 
“Contract With America” in 1994. has been formally 
rebuked by foe leading professional polling association. 

The executive council of the American Association for 
Public Opinion Research criticized Mr. Luntz for refusing to 
disclose the wording of poll questions and other details about 


Away From Politics 

• Human remains found at the rite of the crash of a U.S. 

Air Force jet near Vail, Colorado, have been identified as 
those erf Captain Craig Button, tile pilot who flew 800 miles 
off course before going down, the air force said. The 
identification was made through DNA testing. Teams are 
still looking for the four 500-potmd bombs that were aboard 
foe jet (AP) 

• The judge who presided over O J. Simpson’s civil case 


surveys he conducted in 1994 for the Republican Party. 

Before the elections that year, Mr. Luntz said his polls 
showed strong public support for all of the provisions of the 
contract but balked when be was asked for details about how 
those surveys were conducted. 

“When researchers make public arguments based on their 
research data, then refuse to say how their research was 
conducted, that harms the public debate on issues and reduces 
the credibility of all survey and public opinion research,” 
said Diane CoJasanto, the association’s president 

like many political pollsters, Mr. Luntz is not a member 
of the association. (WP) 

Gingrich Tapers Fined $1,000 

WASHINGTON — A Florida couple were fined $500 
each for illegally intercepting a telephone conference call 
between the House speaker. Newt Gingrich, Republican of 
Georgia, and other House Republican leaders. 

John and Alice Martin of Fort White. Florida, pleaded 
guilty to charges that they intentionally intercepted the call 
on Dec. 21, the day that Mr. Gingrich’s agreement to admit 
that he had violated House ethics rales was made public. 

They faced maximum fines of $5,000 each. (WP) 


Quote /Unquote 


Brooke Shields, an actress, speaking after a broken 
TelePrompTer forced former President George Bush to 
throw away his speech and ad-lib to volunteers at the 
Presidents' Summit for America’s Future: “I agree with 
everything you didn't get a chance to say. ” (AP) 


denied Mr. Simpson’s request for a new trial and called the 
$33 .5 million in damages awarded to the plaintiffs “rea- 
sonable.” Superior Court Judge Hiroshi Fujisalri said he 
found no validity to defense claims of juror misconduct or 
arguments that Mr. Simpson would be unable to pay. (AP) 

• A $100,000 reward offered in the unsolved slaying of 
JonBenet Ramsey, a 6-year-old beauty queen who was 
found in her parents’ Colorado home in December, was 
renewed in a newspaper ad. The reward was initially offered 
in early January, with $50,000 put up by the Ramseys and 
$50,000 offered by The Globe tabloid newspaper. fAPJ 


Li * 

^Architect of the Peru Rescue 

A Shadowy Figure Close to Fujimori Emerges 


'll - By Clifford Krauss 

III New York Tbues Service 

Information is emerging 
indicating that a shadowy 
figure who is the unofficial 
head of Peruvian intelligence 
was the chief planner for the 

assault last we«k that rescued 
■71 'hostages at the Japanese 
ambassador’s residence in 
Lima, several specialists on 
. Peruvian affairs say. 

V'Tbe man, Ivan Vladhniro 
Manterinos, a cashiered 
afeiy captain, former lawyer 
for. drug barons and the alter 
■ego of President Alberto 
Fujimori for the past five 


fear and fascination in Peru. 

Like a good spy — one 
who has long been reported 
to- have ties to the .Central 
Intelligence Agency — Mr. 
tyfomesinos had appeared be- 
fore news cameras only ooce 
in several years. 

-- So when he strode tn- 
unaphantty, wearing dark 
glasses, with the army chief 


addphia, said people “dose 
to Peruvian intelligence” 
had indicated to turn that Mr. 
Montesinos’s intelligence 
service was responsible for 
“the basic planning” of the 
raid. 

Noting that the newly con- 
stituted 150-man commando 
nmt that conducted the raid 
was a combination of special 
units from the police, the 
army, the navy and the air 
force, Mr. Radu said, 
“Montesinos is the only per- 
son who could faring these 
four rival — at times bitterly 
rival — forces together.” 

Although the military con- 
tributed by far the most com- 
mandos for the operation, it 
has long suffered from a 
leadership vacuum. 

But the appearance of 
General Nicolas Hermoza 
Rios, officially head of the 
armed forces, along with Mr. 
Montesinos as they reviewed 


the victorious troops at the 
Japanese compound ap- 
peared to signal a consolid- 
ation of the two as partic- 
ipants in Pern's governing 
troika, along with Mr. 
Fujimori. 

One former American of- 
ficial who worked in Peru 
said he believed Mr. 
Montesinos had worked 
closely with the CIA. The 
former official, who contin- 
ues to keep in touch with 
Peruvian security officials, 
said Mr. Fujimori had relied 
heavily on Mr. Montesinos, 
who he said constantly 
“nudges” him in a “hard- 
line direction.” 

Among Mr. Fujimori’s ad- 
visers, Mr. Montesinos, who 
is in his 50s, is commonly 
thought to have been tire 
chief advocate of the pres- 
ident’s decision to dissolve 
Peru’s Congress and its su- 
preme court in 1992. 


Two Hostages 
Freed in Texas 

Reuters 

FORT DAVIS, Texas — 
Separatists demanding inde- 
pendence for Texas released 
two hostages Monday in re- 
turn for having one of their 
members set free from jail. 

The prisoner exchange 
took some of the beat out of a 
12-hour standoff between the 
self-styled Republic of Texas 
and the police, but officials 
said they had not decided 
whether to withdraw FBI 
agents from near the group’s 
compound in the Davis 
Mountains of west Texas. 

The crisis began Sunday 
when Bob Scbeidt, foe 
group’s “chief of security,” 
was arrested by sheriffs 
deputies for carrying two as- 
sault rifles. Separatist leaders 
retaliated by taking Joe and 
Margaret Rowe hostage. 

The group’s leadws say 
they believe Texas was an- 
nexed illegally in 1845 and 
claim it should be recognized 
as an sovereign nation. 


A Court Victory for Local Goveraments 


UJ 5UUI r 

aaese compound Wednes- 
. day, followed by a television 
Madiera crew, it was a sign 
that he had emerged as an 
even stronger figure in Peru. 

Mr. Montesinos took 
licavy criticism from rivals 
within the security apparatus 
for the intelligence break- 
down that led to foe guerrilla 
hostage -taking last Decem- 
ber. But his brand of secret- 
ive authoritarianism may 
now be politically acceptable 
again as Mr. Fujimon pre- 
pares to run for a third term. 
” “Montesinos is the man of 
die hour." said Enrique 
Qpando, a Peruvian special- 
fst pn military affairs. * fts- 
ajvicn sources say be 
Planned the operation, and 
gfrpubiic appearance is «c- 

iraerainary, especially after 

> tumors that he was in poht- 

* icad trouble.” 

Michael Radu, a Peru 
scholar at foe Foreign Pdjtcy 
Research Institute in Phil- 



VACHERON CONSTANTIN 

Geneva, since 1755 


VBCheron Constantin, rue des Moulins 1. CH-1204 Geneve 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — A deeply divided 
Supreme Court on Monday made local 
goveraments less vulnerable to lawsuits 
over excessive force used by their police 
officers, setting aside an $818,000 
award against an Oklahoma county. 

The 5-to-4 decision also could make 
it more difficult to sue local govern- 
ments over other violations of federally 
protected rights. 

The court said that Bryan County was 
wrongly punished for an incident in 
1991 just across the. stare line in 
Grayson Cotmry, Texas. 

In that incident. Reserve Deputy 
Stacy Bums threw Jill Brown to the 
ground with such force that she has 
since undergone four operations and 
will require total knee replacements. 

Mr. Burns had been hired by his 
uncle. Sheriff B J. Moore, despite a long 


record of misdemeanor convictions. 
Oklahoma law bars only foe hiring of 
convicted felons to such law enforce- 
ment jobs. 

Justice Sandra Day O’Connor wrote 
for the court that although Sheriff 
Moore’s decision to hire Mr. Bums may 
have been a poor one. it did not make the 
county vulnerable to Mrs. Brown's law- 
suit. 

The court’s dissenters said that the 
decision watered down a line of Su- 
preme Court decisions, dating back to 
1978, that subject local governments to 
civil rights lawsuits when individuals’ 
rights are violated. 

Justice O’Connor said, “Congress 
did not intend municipalities to be held 
liable unless deliberate action attrib- 
utable to the municipality directly 
caused a deprivation of federal 
rights.” 


In another case, foe Supreme Court 
ruled that states could bar political can- 
didates from appearing on an election 
ballot under more than one party ban- 
ner. 

The 6- to- 3 ruling allows Minnesota 
to rejoin about 40 other states that limit 
candidates to one listing on a ballot. 
Such laws do not violate political 
parties' right to freedom of association, 
foe justices said. 

“Stales may. and inevitably must, 
enact reasonable regulations of parties, 
elections and ballots to reduce election 
and campaign-related disorder," Chief 
Justice William Rehnquist wrote for the 
majority. 

Four states allow candidates to be 
listed as the nominee of more than one 
party: New York, Oregon, Vermont and 
Utah. About 40 states prohibit multiple- 
party candidacies. 


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Chemical Arms Pact Takes Effect, With China Joining In 


Ageitct France-Presse 

BELTING — China has joined the 
United States in ratifying the interna- 
tional Chemical Weapons Convention, 
Chinese officials announced Monday, 
leaving Russia as the only permanent 
member of the UN Security Council 
outside the treaty. 

A Foreign Ministry spokesman said 
China submitted the letter of ratification 
to die United Nations on Friday to be- 
come the 78th signer of the conven- 
tion. 

The convention, which was finalized 
in 1993 after 20 years of discussion, 
goes into effect Tuesday. It bans the 


development, production, stockpiling 
or use of chemical weapons. 

“China is pushing its profile as a 
dependable member of the international 
community,” a Western military expert 
said, "and this is an easy area where it 
can show its will to act as a responsible 
power, without having to take much 
action.” 

By ratifying before the deadline, 
China has also become a founder of the 
Or ganizati on for die Prohibition of 
Chemical Weapons, the body charged 
with enforcing the convention. 

Only founders will sit on the orga- 
nization’s executive committee, which 


will direct monitoring and have access 
to confidential data on world stocks of 
chemical weapons. 

The United States, one of the five 
permanent Security Council members, 
ratified the convention a day before 
China did. 

France ratified it in 1995 and Britain 
did so in 1996. 

The Russian lower house of Parlia- 
ment, die State Duma, voted Friday to 
postpone ratification because of "very 
difficult economic conditions.” 

China had previously expressed re- 
servations about signing the treaty be- 
cause of die monitoring and inspection 


procedures, which it feared could be 
used to interfere in its domestic affairs. 

But the 23d session of the standing 
committee of the National People’s 
Congress agreed to ratify the conven- 
tion earlier this year, witboutmaking the 
decision public. 

“The timing of its announcement, 
directly after the United States’, indi- 
cates two things,” an Asian diplomat 
said. “Hist, that Beijing was waiting for 
Washington ami, second, that it wanted 
to get maximum media coverage for the 
ratification.” 

The treaty requires member states to 
destroy them chemical weapons stock- 


piles and production facilities within a 
specified time period. The goal is to 
eliminate such weapons by 2007. 

Officially, flhina states that the only 
chemical weapons on its territory are 
those left b ehind by Japan. But U.S. 
allegations that Beijing was helping Iran 


develop chemical weapons emerged in 
the early 1990s. 


the early 1990s. 

In its first year of operation, the Or- 
ganization for die Prohibition of Chem- 
ical Weapons mil have a provisional 
budget of about $52 milli on. It plans to 
have 140 inspectors on the ground and 
make visits to about 100 chemical-arms 
sites. 


New Indian Government 
Rocked by Prosecutions 



r;-r ■ 

* 

: ■ 

' ’ V/. 


The High Court in the west oast 

sate of Malacca found l^nGran 

Eng youth leader of the Demo- 
cratic Action JParty, gatoym** 
charges of sedition and spreading 
false news. „ ___ . 

He was fined » W 
($6,000) for violating the Stedftion 
Act and the Printing and Publi- 
cations Act. _ . _ 

Under article 48 of the consti- 
tution. a member of Parliament is 
disqualified if he is seatencedte 
year’s jail or a 2,000 ringgit fint 
The disqualification takes effect 14- 
days fiom the day of conviction. 
Mr. Lira was charged with mat- 
false statements m 1995 about- 


CMpM^Or&^FnM P UjjtJuAu 

NEW DELHI — Federal investi- 
gators have decided to prosecute top 
leaders of the governing coalition, 
casting a shadow of scandal over the 
government of Prime Minister Inder 
Kumar Gujral. 

Leaders of the coalition’s main ally 
also have been targeted in the inves- 
tigation. which involves the alleged 
theft of $138 milli on fiom a state treas- 
ury, news reports said Monday. 

The accused include the president 
of Mr. Gujral’ s Janata Dal and a re- 
gional leader of his United Front co- 
alition's main supporter, the Congress 

0) Party- 

Mr. Gujral and his ousted prede- 
cessor, HJX Deve Gowda, belong to the 
Janata Dal, which is the biggest com- 
ponent of the 15-party United Front 
coalition with 45 of its 178 deputies in 
the 545-seat lower house of Parlia- 
ment 

A series of scandals has battered pub- 
lic confidence in India’s government. In 
a reflection of voter discontent elec- 
tions last May left no party with a clear 
majority in Parliament 

The Central Bureau of Investigation 
said 56 people have been accused in the 
scandal. They include: Laloo Prasad 
Yadav. the highest elected represen- 
tative in the eastern state of Bihar and 
president of the Janata Dal; Chandradeo 


Prasad Varma. another Janata Dal mem- 
ber and Gajral’s minister fix’ rural 
areas and employment; and Jagatmaih 
Mishra, Bihar state Congress (T) Party 
leader. 

Mr. Yadav denied involvement 
Monday, saying be was among the first 
to call for an investigation. 

*' ‘How can I be an accused when I was 
a complainant in this case?” he said. 

Mr. Yadav said he would not resign 
as chief minister, as his critics have 
demanded. He had aspired to become 
prime minister himself, but was 
hampered by the scandal, which has 
been under investigation for several 
years. 

Mr. Varma also has denied wrong- 
doing. 

The bureau is repeatedly planning to 
seek the permission of the president and 
state governor to bring charges against 
Mr. Yadav and Mr. Varma. Such per- 
mission is necessary because the ac- 
cused hold high political posts. 

The 56 are accused of siphoning bil- 
lions of rupees away fiom tire state 
government* s animal husbandry depart- 
ment. Instead of going to feed cattle, the 
money allegedly went into the hands of 
politicians and government officials in 
the 1980s and 1990s. 

If convicted of corruption, tile ac- 
cused could face up to seven years' 
imprisonment. 



then by a 15-year-old schoolgiri of- 
h nving an affair witii hex. Mr. - , 
Rahim, a rising star in the ruling^ 
party, denied the charge. 

Afr. Lim said he that would ap-: 
peal, but that “the severity of the; 
sentence does not leave muox room- 
for optimism.” (Reuters), 


Court in Singapore > 
Alters the Record :[ 


DELHI PROTEST — Buddhist monks lying in a street Monday in New Delhi to demand fall control of the 

Rnrfhgaya tpmpk> m rtBrarv, whore ftiiHriha k raid fn haw attanwd WiKghtwimwit Tlw> hmipfe k shniwi with HbiHik 


Adding to Mr. Gujral 's woes was a 
call by four leftist parties in his coalition 
for changes in the 1997-98 budget, due 
to be discussed in Parliament this 
week. 

The Left Front issued a statement 
calling for chang es in the areas of in- 
surance, taxes, divestiture of stale en- 


terprises, public di stri b uti on, c ustoms 
duties and excise duties. 

The budget, which would cot taxes 
and boost private investment, was seen 
as a litmus test of both the new gov- 
ernment’s commitment to economic re- 
forms and its cohesion. 

Mr. Gujral ’s government was also 


awaiting word from former Finance 
Minister P. GhiHamhra^p 's Tar pil 
Maanfla Congress cm whether the re- 
gional party would decide to join the 
government. Mr. Chidambaram was the 
main economic strategist in Mr. Deve 
Gowda's cabinet and drafted the 
budget. (AP, Reuters) 


Under Cloud, Chinese Starts U.S. Visit 


SINGAPORE — The High:- 
Court ordered Monday that dispar- 
aging remarks about Malaysia-' 
made by Senior Minister Lee Kuan 
Yew. which triggered a bitter dip- 
lomatic exchange, be stricken from- ; 
a court document. 

The order was issued at the re- 1 
quest of the former prime minister, / 
who twarie a rare court appearance 
to explain his application to delete ' 
the remarks from an affidavit! 
against a political opponent, Tang; 
Liang Hong, who has fled to 
Malaysia. 

“The powers of the court must be 
used to maintain friendly relations 
between Singapore and every other' 
country,” lodge Lai Kew Chai said 
after a tinee-hour tearing. 

Mr. Lee had depicted the Malay- 
siaa state of Joboie as “notorious 
for shootings, muggings and car- 
jackings.” (AFP) 






FROM THE TOP — Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto of Japan 
inspecting the ceremonial band at Parliament House in Canberra on 
Monday, the first of a two-day visit to bolster ties with Australia. 


Agence France-Presse 

WASHINGTON — Foreign Minis- 
ter Qian Qichen of China began a three- 
day official visit to the United Stales on 
Monday that has been clouded by al- 
legations that Beijing illegally tried to 
influence the general election in the 
United States last year. 

The White House declined last week 
to say whether President Bill Clinton 
would raise the issue of Beijing’s pos- 
sible electoral meddling during his 
meeting with Mr. Qian on Wednesday. 

But in his first substantive c omments 
on the issue, Mr. Clinton played down a 
report that the FBI had found substantial 
evidence Unking fop Chinese leaders to 
a scheme to buy influence witii Amer- 
ican politicians. 

influence,” Mr. Ctinfon^dirta^tile 
House news conference Friday, "the 
workings of the United States executive 
or legislative branches, obviously that 


would be a matter of serious concern. 
But 1 tirinlr it is important that we not 
accuse people of something that we 
don't know for sure that they have 
done.” 

American officials acknowledge 
privately, however, that the allegations 
will make the annual fight to maintain 
China 's no rmal trading privileges with 
the United States especially nasty, since 
legislators are loathe to look beholden to 
Beijing. 

To complicate matters, analysts say, 
the administration has little to show for 
its policy of “engaging " China except a 
1996 trade defiat of nearly $40 billion, 
cozier ties between Moscow and 
Beijing and a Communist crackdown on 
dissent. 

That, in him, has fueled a new an- 
tipathy toward China among American 
opinion leaders, who experts say are just 
catching up with widespread popular 
suspicion here that the world's largest 


rising power may not be friendly to U.S. 
interests after all. 

An effort to assuage congressional 
concern. about Chinese arms sales to 
Iran and Pakistan, analysts say. could; 
shore up support for renewing China’s 
mos t-favorea-nation trade privileges in 
early June. 

Even then, however, there are no 
guarantees: Some members of the Re- 
publican-run Congress have raised the 
possibility of renewing the trading priv- 
ileges for six months rather than the 
current 12. 

Mr. Qian’s official visit was to in- 
dude a threo-hour meeting and working 
dinner late Monday with Secretary of 
State Madeleine Albright. 

His meetings here, which will also 
cover U-S.-Chinese collaboration to- 
ward a Korean peace treaty, are ex- 
pected to pave the way far an exchange 
of summit meetings late this year and 
early next year. 


Muslim Protesters 
Are Shot in China 




BEUING — Police officers in a' 
region of China shaken by sep-;' 
aratist protests and rioting lolled' 

. two people and wounded five when 
they, fixed an a crowd of Muslims 
who surrounded buses that wore' 
tatting convicted rioters to jail, an - 
official said Monday. 

The shooting last Thursday: in. 
Yining. in the northwestern region 
of Xinjiang, followed a pubhc rally 
at which three people were sen-;, 
fenced to death and 27 to prison for 
their involvement in anti-Chinese 
riots in February. 

A crowd of Uighurs, the region’s 
Muslim majority, blocked buses 
carrying the prisoners and ignored : 
police warnings to disperse, said an - ■ 
official at the C ommunis t PufarY . 
h eadqu ar ters for Xinjiang. (AP) ■ 




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PACE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1997 

EUROPE 


For the Turin Shroud, the Narrowest Escape Since 1532 


By Celesdne Bohlen 

New York Times Service 


TURIN — Almost everything about the Shroud, 
of Turin is surrounded by mystery — its age, its 
authenticity and die identity of the bearded man 
with deep-set eyes whose image is imprinted on the 
length of yellowing linen, still believed by many 
Catholics to be the burial cloth of Jesus. 

Now to add to the legend, there is also the 
mystery of the fire that ripped through the 17th- 
century Baroque chapel built to house the shroud 
and that spread into die upper floors of die neigh- 
boring Royal Palace on the night of April 12. The 
shroud itself was saved but the chapel was gutted, 
just weeks before the scaffolding was to come 
down after a three-year restoration. 

Whether it dates from the Middle Ages, as 
carbon testing done on tiny swatches of the shroud 
concluded in 1988, or to the time of Jesus, the 
centuries-old fascination with the shroud has only 
increased since the fire. 

The shroud is normally rolled up and kept in a 
silver casket, which is itself sealed behind bul- 
letproof glass. Loral church officials will lay out 
the shroud for viewing here next year from mid- 
April to mid-June, and they now say that the 
crowds will exceed their earlier expectations of 3 

milli on. 

A second showing is planned for the year 2000, 


declared a Holy Year by the Roman Catholic 
Church. 

Only after the two showings will the shroud be 
submitted to more tests, but these will be mostly 
dedicated to finding new and better conservation 
methods. “The big question remains, and that is 
how was the image formed,” said Marco Donatti, 
editor of Turin's Catholic weekly newspaper. 
“And here we have still made no headway.” 

The last rime a fire started near the shroud was in 
1532, in Chambery in southeastern France, when 
the cloth itself — described as a fine, rightly woven 
herringbone twill — was slightly damaged as a 
drop of molten silver from its casket fell on it and it 
was doused with water. The shroud still bears the 
water marks and signs of scorching. 

This time, the fire never really came close to the 
shroud's casket, which was housed in the adjacent 
cath edral during the chapel’s restoration, in fact, 
Mario Trematore, the 44-year-old fire fighter who 
rushed to its rescue, had to swing his sledge- 
hammer several times before he broke die heavy 
glass protecting the shroud. “I was afraid for the 
shroud because when I smashed through the glass, 
I could easily smash the casket and the shroud, and 
then 1 would have been known as the biggest cretin 
in die world.'' he said. 

The fire destroyed the interior of the chapel, 
designed by Guarino Guarini. Its distinctive cupola 
was left standing, although there is still some fear 


that it too could collapse if the weather turns bad. 

Local cultural officials now estimate that it 
could take as much as $40 million to repair rite 
damage in both the chapel and title palace — 30 
times the amount spent on the restoration work that 
went up in smoke. 

Like all mysteries in Italy, the cause of the fire in 
the Chapel of the Holy Shroud has produced several 
elaborate theories. Turin is also a city known for a 
proliferation of Satanic cults, and it did not take loog 
before some were suggesting that the fire was the 
work of devil worshipere. Others linked the blaze 
wife a suspected plot against Pope John Paul D in 
Sarajevo. The comctdenoe, some have said, points to 
a global plot against fee Catholic Church. 

But the most plausible and damning theory is 
that the fire was accidental, set off by a short 
circuit faulty wiring, an overheated lamp or elec- 
trical appliance, perhaps left on by one of the 
restoration crews that had been working there that 
afternoon. As several commentators noted this 
week, Italy's cultural monuments are typically 
most at risk when they are under restoration — as 
Venice’s La Fenice Opera House was in January 
1996 when it was reduced to rubble by fire. Early 
reports that the Fenice fire may have been set are 
still under investigation. 

“If (he fire here was accidental, then we have to 
ask ourselves, 'How can that be?’ ” said Giuseppe 
Ferrando, the chief prosecuting magistrate m 


charge of the investigation into the fire. “If it was 
deliberate, then you can’t really defend yourself, 
any more than the World Trade Center could 
protea itself.” 

A coincidence that Mr. Ferrando finds par- 
ticularly Intriguing is the gala dinner that same 
night at fee Royal Palace to honor Kofi Annan, the 
UN secretary-general, which was attended by this 
industrial city’s business and political leaders. 

The dinner, prepared off premises except for a 
risotto, which needs to be cooked on the spot, was 
held in a part of title palace that actually surrounds 
fee chapel. The 130 guests — who included Gio- 
vanni Agnelli, chairman of Fiat, the Italian auto- 
mobile company based here, and former Prime 
Minister Giuiio Andreotti — had their aperitifs in 
the Gallery of the Holy Shroud, before moving 
onto dinne r in the splendid HoU of fee Swiss. 

The dinner was over, and fee guests had filed out 
when smoke alarms in the palace’s empty upper 
floors went off, shortly after 11 P.M. But the 
custodians who went upstairs to check found no 
evidence of either smoke or fire, and it was not until 
a half-hour later, when flames were seen shooting 
out of fee chapel’s upper windows, that a general 
alarm was sounded. 

“The guests left between 1 1 and 1 1:10, when the 
alarm went off, which means that the fire had already 
started, and so was happening during the dinner,” 
Mr. Ferrando said. “This is very strange." 


Ciller Affirms 
Her Support 
Of Coalition 



* Mi 

* Hit* 


On French Election Trail, 
Few Champion the Euro 

Socialists Now Cool to Common Currency 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Times Service 


PARIS — The promises and perils of 
a common European currency nave not 
yet become the fixation of fee French 
election campaign as they have in Bri- 
tain. but the euro, as fee unit of currency 
would be called, has few unconditional 
defenders in Paris. 

The deficit-cutting measures required 
to qualify Fiance to be among the 
founders of the new European currency 
in 1999 have sapped fee popularity of 
Prime Minister Alain Juppe's govern- 
ment. And President Jacques Chirac 
called new elections in hopes of bring- 
ing “new 61an” to the sterility of recent 
French political debate. 

Public opinion polls predict a narrow 
conservative victory in the two-stage 
vote for the national legislature, on May 
25 and June 1. But differences about 
monetary policy in the Gaullist camp 
emerged Saturday from an election 
speech by Charles Pasqua. a- conser- 
vative and former interior minister who 
stands to the right of Mr. Juppe on 
domestic issues. 

“There will be no new dlan,” Mr. 
Pasqua warned his followers, “if France 
continues sacrificing full employment 
to currency.’ ' Mr. Pasqua made noeffort 
to conceal his view that Mr. Juppe was 
not up to leading the campaign to vic- 
tory. 

Mr. Juppe said Sunday night dial he 
was not campaigning to succeed him- 
self, but it is widely expected that he 
would be reappointed to lead a new 
Conservative government. 

The criteria for the common currency, 
including a strict limit on budget def- 
icits, were set by the late President Fran- 
cois Mitterrand, a Socialist, and other 
European leaders at a meeting in 
Maastricht, the Netherlands, at the end 
of 1991. 

But the leader of the Socialist op- 
position, Lionel Jospin, distanced his 
party from its former leader’s position 


Primakov to Meet With Talbott 

Agent e Fmnce-Pnsse 

MOSCOW — Foreign Minister Yev- 
geni Primakov, back home after surgery 
for gall stones, will meet Wednesday with 
the U.S. deputy secretary of state, Strobe 
Talbott Russian news agencies said. 


on the common currency in an interview 
published in Le Journal da Dimanche . 

“If fillfilling fee Maastricht criteria 
requires imposing still another austerity 
cure, the country simply can’t accept it 
economically and socially,'' he said. 

In a campaign interview on French 
national television Sunday night Mr. 
Juppe said: “If the Maastricht criteria 
didn't exist we'd have to do the same 
thing anyway. The French economy is 
asphyxiated by public expenses and 
taxes." 

But he said that further austerity mea- 
sures would not be required to shake 
France out of fee doldrums of double- 
digit unemployment now at 1X8 per- 
cent 

“When growth returns, and every- 
body is premeting growth of 3 percent in 
1998, that will permit us to reduce taxes 
and deficits,” ne said. 

A common currency, administered by 
an independent European central bank, 
would take many of these decisions out 
of national hands, fee main reason why 
so many Conservatives in Britain op- 
pose introducing the euro there. 

Mr. Mitterrand was among the prin- 
cipal architects of the treaty, and Mr. 
Jospin’s Socialists campaigned for its 
acceptance in a hotly contested refer- 
endum in 1992. 

According to the public opinion polls, 
they do not stand to win a majority in the 
new 577-seat French legislature, but 
might be able to form a government with 
the Communists if there were a leftward 
surge in the vote. Asked by his in- 
terviewers if he would consider gov- 
erning with the Communists, Mr. Jospin 
said, Where’s the problem?” 

Communist leaders have been fun- 
damentally opposed to fee European 
currency as an anti-inflationary sellout 
of the working class to the interests of 
global capitalism. On the far right. Na- 
tional Front, led by Jean-Marie Le Pen, 
is also against the euro, which he sees as 
an unacceptable surrender of French na- 
tional sovereignty to European Union 
bureaucrats. 

So, Mr. Juppe argued, the only man- 
ageable electoral outcome was a con- 
servative majority to pull Europe in the 
same direction as France ’s conservative 
president as the century ends. 

“If the majority is returned, France 
will know where she is going,” be said, 
campaigning Saturday in Bordeaux, 
where be has been mayor since 1995. 



the alliance came to 

will continue to work wife sek 
bility!” Mrs. Ciller raid after mxtrng' 
with Prime Minister Necmemn 

^^ 0 ° cabinet members from Mre.* 
Ciller's True Path Party resigned over . 
the weekend, raying they angarrf 
by Mr. Erbakan’s reluctance to revise 
sine of his Islamist poh«« as he had 
agreed to do in February under pressure . 
from the military. ,, . 

Mr. Erbakan signed a communique by; 
fee notary -dominated National Secu- 
rity Council on Saturday, agreemg to 
measures that included the extension of 
secular education at the expense of re- , 

Mr Btoakan’s Islam-based Wei- ' 
fare Party is expected to oppose the, 
education changes in Parliament- , 
Interior Ministry officials sard - 
Monday feat fee police had closed down.' 
eight Islamic schools that were oper- 
ating illegally. . j 

Seven schools in fee western city of 
Bursa and one in the northern town of 
Zonguldak were closed after it was found 
that they had been operating without fee- 
license of the government’s religions 
affairs directorate, fee police said. 

(Reuters, AFP) 

■ Turkey Sees Aid Approval 
The Turkish Foreign Minisay said; 

Monday that it expected Greece to lift its 
veto of a multixmllion dollar European; 
Union aid package for Turkey during 
tulles in Luxembourg, The Associated 
Press reported from Ankara. 

“We have a very constructive and 
positive attitude.” said Omer Akbel, a" 
Foreign Ministry spokesman, when" 
asked if Turkey would seek fee removal . 
of the veto. “We believe feat similar. 


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REMEMBRANCE — Albanian children standing with flowers on Monday near an Italian camp in More. 
They were there to commemorate refugees who died last month when their boat collided with an Italian ship. 


side.” 

The Greek veto affects a five-year J 
$4313 million aid package, which fee; 
Union has approved to help small and. 
mid-sized Turkish companies offset any ‘ 
damage they suffer because of a Turk- 
ish-EU customs union that took effect* 
Dec. 31. 1995. . * 

Foreign Minister Tansu Ciller will 
represent Turkey during the meeting; 
with EU representatives in Luxembourg; 
cm Tuesday. / 


Pet Food Gave Dogs 
‘Mad Cow’ Disease 

Agence France-Presse 

LONDON — Government researchers 
found six years ago that dogs were sus- 
ceptible to a form of bovine spongiform 
encephalopathy, or "mad cow” disease, 
from eating contaminated pet food, ac- 
cording to reports published Monday. 

The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries 
and Food, commenting on a report in The 
Independent, confirmed feat fee results 
of fee 1992 study not been published and 
that no follow-up study had been done. 

Government scientists studied the 
brains of 444 hunting hounds (hat had 
died after showing signs of distress as- 
sociated with the disease and found ab- 
normalities that also were noticed by 
scientists studying scrapie, a spongiform 
encephalopathy in sheep. The scientists 
said the study confirmed that some of the 
brains showed signs of a canine equi- 
valent of mad cow disease. 

Stephen Dealier, a microbiologist who 
is a leading critic of fee government’s 
handling of the disease, said it was “in- 
credible that this experiment was known 
about before the last general election," 
which took place in the spring of 1992. 


BRIEFLY 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 
i Sluggers' stats 
s Theme of this 


10 Capital of HaJIa 
14 Bum soother 
u Filibuster, in a 
way 


i« Hawaiian music 
makers 
17 EcWor's 

definition of this 
puzzle's theme 

as Prevent legally 
21 Popular 

beverage brand 


Manur’d 

Est. 1911, Paris 
' Sank Roo Doe Noo * 


A Space for Thought. 


22 Shea nine 
2» More crafty 
2fi Allowable 
as Beckon 

33 University of 
Maine site 

34 do-well 

33 Dickens 

protagonist 
33 Mapmaker's 
definition of tills 
puzzle's Theme 

42 Compass 

heading 

43 Pseudonymous 
sbarf-story 
writer 

44 Backing for an 
exhibit 

48 Peaceful 

47 Sentient 
41 Insurance giant 
si Negative m 
Nuremberg 
S3 Competed tn 
the 

Hambieionlan 
sc Ftibeye, e.g. 

bo Physician’s 
definition of this 
puzzle's theme 
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command 

•7 Driver's license 
prerequisite 
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DOWN 

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particles 
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7 Back muscle, 
tamillarfy 
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soul 


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sign, maybe 

10 Muss up 

11 Animal with 
zebra- striped 
legs 

12 Actress Oberon 
is Questioner 

12 Indian da/m 
ia Political 
cartoonist 
Thomas 

23 Kid's 
make-believe 
telephone 

24 Elude the 
doorman 

25 Canter 

27 Ayatollah's land 
2a Dunce cap. 

essentially 

28 — - pinch 

31 Where St. Mark's 
Cathedral is 

32 Investment 
vehicle, for short 

as Famous tower 
locale 

38 Roman road 
37 See 49- Down 
as Enzyme suffix 

4Q Shanty 
41 Bird's cry 
4 s Purpose 
40 “Phooeyf 
48 Not perfectly 

upnght 

40 With 37- Down, 
famous W.W. II 
correspondent 

so ag 

handbags 
52 Wight and 
Man 

54 List shortener 
85 Singer Martin, 

to friends 

57 Therefore 
se In ewe 

58 Basketball's 
Malone 

31 Neither's 
companion 
02 Do basic 
arithmetic 


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®New York Times/Edited by WU1 Shorts. 


es Sociely column 
word 


Solution to Puzzle of April 28 


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sesaa aaaa ar 


Spanish Liberalise Labor Laws 

MADRID — Employers and unions signed a historic 
agreement Monday liberalizing labor laws in Spain, in an 
effort to reduce fee country’s record jobless rate. 

The unprecedented accord came a day after the Group of 
Seven Leading industrialized nations called for Europe to 
introduce reforms to cut unemployment levels. 

“It is a great day for fee economy, for businesses and for 
the Spanish, who can now look to the future wife more 
confidence.” said Antonio Gutierrez, secretary-general of 
the pro-Communist labor confederation. 

The signature of fee accord is seen as bolstering rightist 
prime minister, Jose Maria Aznar, who has made reducing 
unemployment his main priority for the year, (AFP) 

Albania Official Urges Elections 

TIRANA, Albania — The justice minister said Monday 
that time was running out for holding planned elections by 
June and called on parties in fee national reconciliation 
government to agree quickly on the form of fee vote. 

“Politicians should be more reasonable, get rid of their 
passions and try to reach a gentleman’ s agreement Where all 
the parties may profit” Justice Minister Spartak Ngjela 
said. 

The 1 0-party government formed March 9 in response to 
widespread unrest in the Balkan nation, cannot agree over 
what type of voting system to use. 


President Sali Berisba’s Democratic Party is holding out 
for a first-past-the-post system. The other nine parties want 
some form of proportional representation. - (Reuters) 

Russia-Belarus Union by June? 

MOSCOW — A proposed union between Russia and 
Belarus could come into force by June, an official working 
on the agreement between the two former Soviet republics 
said Monday. 

“I believe there will already be a union by June,” said 
Vladimir Grigoriyev, deputy head of a joint Russian- 
Belarussian council feat is overseeing creation of the urrida. 
“It’s the will of fee people, and the will of its pres- 
idents.” 

Experts from both sides are still working out details of 
how integration will take shape. Russian officials have said 
both countries would retain their sovereignty. (Reuters) 

Bucharest and Kiev Beach Pact 

BRUSSELS — Romania has reached a “compromise 
treaty” wife Ukraine that guarantees stability and the 
strategic interests of Romania, fee Romanian foreign min- 
ister, Adrian Severin, said Monday. 

On fee sidelines of a North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
meeting here at which Bucharest made its case for alliance 
membership, Mr. Severin said that fee pact would' be 
initialed in Kiev on Saturday. (AFP) 


i >• 
i<* 


ITALY: Swing Vote in Communists’ Hands 


Continued from Page 1 

adopted last fall to meet the European 
budget deficit guidelines. 

with fee same insistence, Mr. 
Bertmotti has said that his party would 
oppose structural cuts to the generous 
welfare system. Like other small parties 
in Italy, on this issue and others the 
Refounded Communist Party has suc- 
ceeded through track-room negotiating 
to overcome a lack of broad-based pop- 
ular support. 

Strengthened by the party’s showing 
in Milan and Turin, where its candidates 
received almost 10 percent of the vote, 
tire Refbunded Co mmunist leaders were 
promising Monday that they would 
strike a hard bargain for their support for 
Olive Tree candidates in fee run-offs 
May 11. 

“Givenfeat we got so many votes, 
this will give more importance to both 
our social spending and structural re- 
form position — a position that says that 
social reform will happen, but without 
cuts to spending,” Mr. Bertmotti said in 
a television interview Monday. “If we 
reach a clear agreement, we will be able 


to go to Milan and Turin and other cities, 
and win.” 

One year after a landmark election 
that gave the Italian left its first national 
victory, fee Prodi government is caught 
in a ever-tightening vise, many com- 
mentators noted. It can either bargain 
wife fee Refounded Communists, or, 
according to a front-page analysis in the 
Turin newspaper La Stamps, it can sum- 
moo the “courage feat has been ail too 
often lacking on fee center-left these last 
few months” and gamble that its 
policies will survive anyway. 

The Prodi government Lately has 
suffered a series of embarrassing set- 
backs. They started with a vote of con- 
fidence on fee eye of an international 
mission to Albania, followed one week 
later by the news feat the flagship of the 
Italian Navy had run aground on a sand- 
bar outside the Albanian port city of 
VI ore. 

Bui the most dishtautffnirig report 
came from the European Commission, 
which said last week that Italy was trail- 
ing Spain and Portugal in its efforts to 
meet the guidelines for the new Euro- 
pean currency. 


Vandals Desecrate German War Graves 


The Associated Press 

ERFURT, Germany — Vandals 
toppled the gravestones of 29 World 
War H slave laborers in fee eastern city 
of Gotha in what is being investigated as 
a possible attack by extreme rightists, 
police said Monday. 

Thirty-one other graves at the main 
cemetery were also vandalized, includ- 
ing three graves containing victims of 
wartime air raids. 


At six sites, crosses were ripped out 
and rammed into fee ground upside 
down, suggesting that the desecrations 
could also involve a satanic cult, the 
police said. 

The slave workers' graves contained 
fee remains of eight Lithuanians and 21 
Latvians forced to wort for fee Nazis. 

The vandalism probably occurred late 
Saturday or early Sunday, the police 
said. There were no suspects. 


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IRAN: 

EU Envoys to Return 

Continued from Page 1 

aged when fee Iranian government pro^- 
tected the German Embassy in Tehran' 
from mobs protesting fee Berlin court 
ruling. They also said they did not want ’ 
to provoke hard-liners in Iran before fee * 
presidential elections to be held theni' 
next month. ■ • 

“We are not interested in going to anj 
all-out war wife Iran.” a senior Gerihad" 
official said. “We are not trying to es~-l 
re la t e. We find feat the Irani anside, for 
what it’s worth, is trying not to etc slate, 
either.” . 

Officials in other European capitals' 
said they were striving to strike a baLanop’ A 
that would m a in tai n pre s s u re on Tehran 1 r 
while rejecting fee economic and dip-, 
lomatic isolation practiced by Wast£ 
mgtoTL “The 15 are unanimous in want- ,, 
ing to m ain t ain a certain European! 
autonomy toward Iran.” a senior French 
official said. 

A U.S. undersecretary of state; Peter. 
Tarnoff, visited London, Paris, Bond: 
and the Hague last week to press Wash^ ; 
ington’s case for tougher measures, but; 
American officials payed down their'- 
expectations. : * 

“We realize feat getting a consensus'; 
among 15 countries is not fee easiest 
thing in the world to do," a U S. official ' 
said. Nevertheless, the official said, “we. 
hope there will be some gestures.” 1 - 

Small EU countries are reluctant to; 
expel suspected Iranian intelligence; 
agents because any mutual retaliation by 
Iran could nearly eliminate their smafl; 
embassy staffs in Tehran, officials said!! 
Germany expelled four Iranian diplo-; 
mats immediately after fee court j 
and Iran responded in kind. 


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PAGE 7 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


ion 


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‘Devolution’ 

* On His Mind, 
Major Hits 
Road in U.K. 


CixrfOrd by Qwr Sn^Frvm OnpaaAn 

LONDON - — Prime Minister John 
Major flew to Northern Ireland and Scot- 
Mind on Monday to stress Ms commit- 
ment to the United Kingdom, an issue he 
has emphasized in the w aning days of 
V foe election campaign. _ 

Mr. Major’s trip, with plans for a stop 
in Wales, underlined his opposition to 




. 1 
-r~ 


5 plans 

some legislative responsibilities to as- 
semblies in Wales and Scotland. 

Condemning the Irish Republican 
Army for their campaign of disruption 
before the British election on Thursday, 
Mr. Major urged votes in the province 
to give support to what be called “genu- 
inely democratic parties.” 

IRA guerrillas, who last year resumed 
an armed campaign to expel Britain from 
the province, have cansed chaos in main- 
land Britain in recent weeks with bombs 
and bomb hoaxes. 

. The IRA's political arm, Sinn Fein, 
accuses Mr. Major of squandering the 
potential of a 17-month cease-fire that 



Aba LewnAgesce Frxw&ecur 

British security forces examining a car Monday near Sinn Fein offices in Belfast that was found to contain 100 
pounds of explosives. Prime Minister John Major, in a campaign visit the same day, condemned IRA violence. 


rein into talks on resolving darades of 
conflict in Northern Ireland between the 
majority pro-British Protestants and the 


minority Irish Catholics. Mr. Major said 
as he swept through a central shopping 
area of Belfast on Monday that the elec- 
tions were being “abused” by both Sinn 
Fein and the IRA. 

“Anyone who votes Sinn Fein in this 
election is condoning the violence/’ he 
said. 

The Labour Party leader, Tony Blair, 
attacked the government's record on 
health Monday and warned supporters 
against overconfidence as the election 
neared. 

“The UK. has four components/' 


Mr. Major said in Belfast- “The interest 
of the government extends to every part 
of die UJSL, and we are concerned with 
the security of the UJC." 

Mr. Blair said, “I think there is 
something slightly absurd about Mr. 
Major touring round the UJC saying that 
Scottish devolution is a disaster for the 
U JL, when what he proposes for North- 
ern Ireland is precisely that same de- 
volution.'’ 

Mr. Major’s government and the Irish 
government have jointly proposed a 
form of self-government for Northern 


Ireland, but have said that they will 
support any agreement reached in all- 
party negotiations. Labour has suppor- 
ted the government's policy, and North- 
ern Ireland has not been a campaign 
issue. 

Public-opinion polls, including one 
by Gallup published Monday that 
showed Labour 19 points ahead, give or 
take 3 percentage points, outlined the 
possibility of a landslide on the scale of 
that of 1945, when Labour crushed the 
Conservatives, who were then led by 
Winston Churchill. (AP, Reuters ) 


BLAIR: ‘New’ Labour Leader, Banking on Tory Fatigue, Makes Few Promises to Britain 


i'.* Continued from Page 1 

'.-■irttii ’ The same voters who are 

pollsters that they re main unsure of 
■' he envisions for Britain are also con- 
V fuming that they will vote Thursday to 
. - ~ put him in the country’s highest office 
and, if the polling numbers are even 
. J ' - nSmotely accurate, back him up with a 
' substantial majority in Parliament 

r - - - ( The attraction is Mr. Blair himself, an 

articulate and contained Oxford gradp- 
• ate who has raised little expectation oth- 
er than a change of personality in No. 10 
^owning Street He speaks in unreveal- 
ing contradictions, saying he wants 
change but continuity, toughness but 
cpmpasskmand, in what has become the 
mantra of the latter days of a campaign 
that has made few promises, something 
he calls “radical centrism.’* 

• . v Approach Mr. Blair cm a campaign 
Stop with a plea for a specific pledge on 
a concern of particular mreresr to Labour 
-i- like education, health or welfare — 
apd you will not get a typical politician's 
laundry list of predictions. A smiling 
piomise to “do better" is the extern of 
the commitment 


The party’s appeal cannot be attrib- 
uted to the policy alternatives it is of- 
fering the public. Its proposals so re- 
■ serable those of the governing 
Conservative Party that Paddy Ash- 
down, the leader of the liberal Demo- 
crats, has said the campaign between 
Labour and the Conservatives reminds 
him of “synchronized swimming.” 

Part of tiie reason for Labour's 
double-digit lead is public weariness 
with die Tories, who, despite producing 
a robust economy and significantly im- 
proving the lot of the upwardly mobile, 
have worn out their welcome after 17 
years in power. 

“Labour will win because it is not die 
Conservative Party and because it is not 
much different from die Conservative 
Party,” said Ross McKibbon, a histor- 
ian. at Oxford, of the Labour Party. 

That thinking has been behind La- 
bour's strategy of criticizing the tactics 
of the Tories while promising not to 
tamper with the results of their policies. 
On becoming the Labour leader in 1994, 
Mr. Kair set out to make the party a 
mainstream alternative to the Conser- 
vatives. 


He brought profound change to the 
party, doubling hs membership, redu- 
cing its dependence on the financial 
backing of trade-unions, democratizing 
its internal procedures and rewriting its 
charter to get rid of language supporting 
nationalized industries, broad union 
power and the growth of the state. 

In the campaign, he has gone further 
to assure people worried about Labour's 
stormy past that the party has learned its 
lessons. He has pledged to maintain 
Tory spending limits for the next two 
years and not to raise income taxes for 
ti be next five. New Labour has aban- 
doned its bedrock notion of using taxes 
to redistribute income and now, in the 
words of Mr. Blair, is “pro-entrepre- 
neur, pro-business." 

He has apparently succeeded in the 
tricky task of maintaining the trust of 
people despite frequent skittering to the 
right on basic issues like privatization, 
union legislation, Britain’s integration 
into Europe and autonomy for Scotland 
and Wales. 

Mr. Blair has proved to be an elusive 
target for the Conservatives, who began 
the campaign lik ening him to Stalin and 


Kim H Sung for his tough stewardship of 
the Labour Party and are ending it by 
saying he is too weak to "stand up to 
Europe." 

Mr. Blair speaks with great fluency, 
but he is given to uttering bromides. The 
manifesto supposedly composed in the 
flush of inspiration speaks of “stable 
economic growth," getting “tough on 
crime and the causes of crime," safe- 
guarding the environment and reducing 
the costs of the National Health Ser- 
vice. 

While passionate about public ser- 
vice, he can sound distrustful of politics, 
particularly when talking about the con- 
ditions in die Labour Party he joined in 
19S3 and watched lose three national 
elections. 

The one goal Mr. Blair has been very 
clear about is the need to win, and that 
accounts for the discipline he has 
.brought to the party. In 1 995. a group of 
union leaders, distressed at signs he was 
altering the parry’s philosophy, asked 
him whai his secret plans were. 

“We have an agenda." he said, “and 
it's not secret. It's to win the next genera] 
election." 


Jura 






i;.S. Knvoy, in Zaire, Says Crisis Has ‘No Miliary Solution’ 


CY ip ‘I ihyOmSttfFnm nryrtrr 

KINSHASA, Zaire — Bill Richardson, 
die U.S. special envoy to Zaire, arrived here 
Monday and declared that the United States 
wanted to see a negotiated settlement in the 
Central African nation's seven-month civil 
war. 

‘ ‘The United States believes that there can 
be no military solution to the crisis/' Mr. 
Richardson said, “bat rather a negotiated 
settlement leading to an inclusive transi- 
tional government and fiair and free elec- 
tions.” 

“I am also here,” he added, "because of 
our grave concern for the plight of several 
thousand refugees and displaced Zairians." 

He said he would meet President Mobutu 
Sese Seko cm Tuesday and then travel to 
Lubumbashi. in rebel-held territory, on 
Wednesday to see Laurent Kabila, the rebel 
leader. 

Mr. Richardson, the U.S. delegate to the 
United Nations, was bringing a personal 
message from President Bill Clinton to Mar- 
shal Mobutu. Marshal Mobutu’s son and 
&kAScAa^A^ftnc4w adviser, Nzanga Mobutu, said earlier that the 
‘ Bill Richardson, left, the U.S. special envoy to Zaire, whis- message was to be delivered to the Zairian 
pering to an aide during his arrival Monday in Kinshasa, leader at his residence. 



Rebels stormed a pediatric hospital in 
eastern Zaire on Saturday, a UN spokesman 
said Monday, and dragged away 50 
Rwandan refugee children. The UN said the 
attack was carried out the night before die 
rebel leader gave the United Nations two 
months to get Hutu refugees out of Zaire. 

The children were taken just days after 
tens of thousands of sick and exhausted 
Rwandan refugees fled squalid camps near 
Kisangani. 

On Monday, an international team al- 
lowed into that area of central Zaire reported 
the first sign of large groups of refugees — 
numbering in the thousands — emerging 
from the dense forests near Kisangani. 

In tiie attack Saturday, about 20 rebels went 
to the hospital in Lwiro, near the border with 
Rwanda, and took away Rwandan children 
and adults who were with them, said Roger 
Botralahy, a spokesman for the UN children’s 
agency. 

In talks with UN and European Union 
officials Sunday in Kisangani, Mr. Kabila 
abruptly gave the United Nations two 
months to track down and evacuate the 
refugees, Filippo Grandi of the UN refugee 
agency said. ( Reuters . AFP. AP} 


• GERMANY: Nation Begins to Accept Changing Ethnic Makeup 


Continued from Page 1 

mans from Eastern countries and started 
the forcible expulsion of as many as 
80,000 Bosnian refugees. 

‘ Many Germans, meanwhile, have 
cpme to believe that there is an urgent 
need to defuse mounting tension ana the 
dangers of a two-tier society by inte- 
grating foreigners who have settled here 
. especially the many Turks, who 
began arriving in large numbers in the 

1960s to help ease labor shortages. They 

now number about 2 million. 
r “Whether or not we like to admit it, 
Germany already has become a society 
of varied races and cultures, ” said Cor- 
nelia Schmalz-Jacobsen, the commis- 
sioner for foreigners. 

1 ‘We are now into the third generation 
of families who came here in the 1 950s, 
she sad. “It’s ridiculous to talk about 
them as guest workers or foreign fellow 
citizens. These people are German.^ and 
they have to be recognized as suen. 

A clear political majority that cuts 
across party lines is now coalescing 
around the need to abandon Germany s 
status as the only major Western nation 
that bases nationality on blood tines. 
Laws may be passed that wffl ease 
the naturalization process and grant dual 
citizenship to children bom here of im- 

^SrlyevSybody agrees that thecair- 
rent citizenship law, rooted m a 1913 

Under the principle of inherited napon- 
oUrv milli ons of ethnic Germans who do 
not speak German and whore ancestors 
lived for generations in the Volga reg 10 ” 
of the former Soviet Union have amved 


in recent years to. a strange and be- 
wildering land where they are entitled to 
citizenship automatically. 

But Turkish Germans who were bom 
here, speak fluent German, work for 
German companies and pay German 
taxes still face enormous bureaucratic 
obstacles in gaining citizenship. Until 
1993, foreigners were obliged to wait 15 
years and spend thousands of dollars in 
fees to apply for German citizenship, 
and even then there were no guaran- 
tees. 

Now an applicant must have only 
eight years' residency, reasonable flu- 
ency in German and prove be can sup- 
port a family without state assistance. 
But die bureaucratic obstacles to cit- 
izenship remain daunting. 

Germany's long-standing refusal to 
integrate foreigners, many Turks argue, 
has contributed to the tense climate of 
'racial antagonism in post-unification 
Germany. More than 30 foreigners, 
many of them Turks, have been killed in 
arson attacks since 1990. Eighteen at- 
tacks have occurred this year, causing 
four deaths and seven injuries. 

Hie racial violence has aggravated 
serious strains in Germany’s relations 
.with Turkey, which claims Bonn is not 
doing enough to protect Turks here. 

“Wherever we go, we tend to burrow 
in deeply/’ the Turkish interior min- 
ister. Meral Aksener, said last month. 
“Arid since they could not throw us out, 
die Germans are trying to bum us out” 

Her remarks outraged the Bonn gov- 
ernment, which noted police findings 
that some arson attacks were carried out 

by feuding foreigners, not by racist Ger- 
mans. Nonetheless, the episode helped 
rekindle debate here about tile need to 


heal a breach in relations with foreigners 
who feel consigned to second-class 
status. 

“The situation is becoming very 
alarming.” * said Mr. Ozdemir. the mem- 
ber of Parliament. “Many of the young 
Turkish Germans who were bom here 
feel completely rejected by this society. 
So they are Cuming toward religious 
fanaticism or nationalistic movements 
that one day could tear this country 
apart.” 

Young members of Mr. Kohl's Chris- 
tian Democratic Union share Mr. Oz- 
demir’s sense of urgency about giving 
young foreigners a larger stake in Ger- 
man society. They believe the time has 
come for a dramatic break with the blood 
inheritance principle. 

Horst Eylmann. a Christian Demo- 
cratic legislator, said: “It has to be in our 
interests not to leave these young people 
out in the cold, but to lead them to take 
on responsibilities toward Germany. If 
they are bom here, go to school here, 
tram for a job h ere, they should auto- 
matically be German." 

But foe reformists face fierce oppo- 
sition from Teutonic purists in their own 
ruling party and in foe Bavarian Chris- 
tian Social Union. Opponents contend 
that at a time when a record high 4.7 
million Germans are out of work, it 
would be foolish politically and eco- 
nomically to offer the benefits of Ger- 
man citizenship to millions of foreign- 
ere. 

"We believe it is completely unac- 
ceptable that millions of our citizens are 
unemployed while more than a million 
work permits are issued to foreigners 
each year.” said Michael GIos. die Bav- 
arian party’s parliamentary chief. 



Tta BnicTODm/Aceaw Fra»x-fte*ie 

Cent Ozdemir, the first Turkish 
German to be elected to Parliament. 

But the work permits are for the 
manual labor jobs that Germans are re- 
luctant to take or consider to be beneath 
them. 

Both sides say the emotional debate 
can be resolved only by the highest 
political authority. Until now, Mr. Kohl 
has generally sided with the conserva- 
tive argument, emphasizing the need to 
fc Germany’s Teutonic identity 
>m the influences of immigrants. He 
has not indicated what kind of law he 
would be willing to support 

Bui Mr. Ozdemir and his allies are 
hopeful that the chancellor’s positron 
will ultimately be swayed by a private, 
family affair: Mr. Kohl’s son Rater. 32, 
has just become engaged to El if Sozen, 
the daughter of a prominent Istanbul 
businessman. 


MILITARY: 

Unforgiving Justice 

Continued from Page 1 


overwhelming majority have been found 
guilty. An even larger number of people 
were punished administratively. Such 
cases also frequently include charges of 
sodomy if the lovers are suspected of 
engaging in oral sex. and fraternization 
if the romance involves an officer and 
enlisted person — a crime considered 
more senous than simple adultery for its 
implied abuse of power and authority. 
The air force was the only branch of 
service willing or able to provide figures 
for such crimes. 

And while imprisonment for these 
crimes is rare, the price of forbidden love 
in the military can nonetheless be high 
— careers are ruined, reputations des- 
troyed, families traumatized. 

At Minot Air Force Base in North 
Dakota, tbe country’s first female 
bomber pilot will be court-martialed on 
May 20 for adultery. She had an affair 
with a civilian who has stated under oath 
that he tied to her when he claimed to be 
legally separated from his wife. 

“Oh. I'll admit I made mistakes in 
judgment,” said Lieutenant Kelly Flinn. 
26 and single, “but I don’t think they 
were federal crimes, nor should there be 
the potential that I spend the rest of my 
life as a convicted felon.” 

Lieutenant. Flinn also is charged with 
fraternization for having sex with an 
unmarried enlisted man. The man, who 
was not in her chain of command, was 
given immunity to testily against her. 

“Tue air force is going back to the 
Dark Ages,” said Lieutenant Ftinn’s at- 
torney, Frank Spinner, a retired lieu- 
tenant colonel and former Jaw professor 
at the U.S. Air Force Academy who has 
defended several other officers on sim- 
ilar charges. “To a great degree, this is 
vindictiveness taking place.” 

Adultery, sodomy and fraternization 
have been forbidden under the Uniform 
Code of Military Justice for more than 
200 years, but experts, official docu- 
ments and lawyers suggest violators are 
being pursued now with particular zeal. 

In the air force, detectives from foe 
Office of Special Investigations are 
known to file official reports detailing a 
defendant’s sexual performance, type of 
foreplay, preferred positions and method 
of birth control. 

Friends, acquaintances and unsus- 
pecting family members are questioned 
about the sexual habits of foe suspect. 

Tod Ensign, director of the nonprofit 
advocacy group Citizen Soldier, said a 
2 3- year-old lieutenant recently tried in 
Biloxi. Mississippi, was interrogated for 
five hours about a one-night stand with 
an enlisted man. Both were single, and 
he was not in her chain of command. 

“They were teasing out every single 
detail.” Mr. Ensign said, “asking things 
like what kind of music was playing, 
how were you lying on the bed, did you 
talk about your sexual fantasies.” 

He added: “1 believe it’s a form of 
sexual harassment." 

Military officials say sexual miscon- 
duct is prosecuted vigorously because 
illicit romances can damage troop mor- 
ale and destroy cohesion of a unit. They 
also say it is imperative to protect sol- 
diers from being victimized by superiors 
who wield considerable influence over 
their daily lives. Critics suggest there are 
other reasons as well. 

Jon Tonies, a Kansas City defense 
attorney who is a retired air force pros- 
ecutor and author of “The Servicemem- 
ber's Guidebook," believes foe crack- 
down is as much a matter of economics 
as principle. 

“First of all, there’s less crime in the 
military overall than in the past," he 
said, suggesting that prosecutors now 
have more time to pursue crimes like 
adultery and fraternization. 

Increasing numbers of women in the 
military also have recast fraternization 
into a carnal crime, where before it was 
more likely to be “the general playing 
poker or drinking with some enlisted 
man,” Mr. Tomes said. 

And, he said, “in this age of down- 
sizing, the military is kind of looking for 
any way it can to get rid of someone 
where years ago they would've just 
winked.” 

In her statement at tbe trial. Colonel 


BRIEFLY 


Nigeria Vows End 
To Tribal Clashes 

LAGOS — Nigeria's military au- 
thorities have said they will no 
longer tolerate tribal violence 
threatening the nation's vital oil in- 
dustry and will take stem measures 
to restore order. 

“We have had enough of this,” 
Major General Felix Mujakperuo, a 
member of the Provisional Ruling 
Council, said over foe weekend in 
Warn, an important oil-producing 
city in western Nigeria. 

Troops were deployed in Wari 
last month in an effort to end die 
violence. But fighting in foe vicinity 
over the weekend forced Royal 
Dutch/Shell Group to suspend some 
of its oil production. ( Reuters ) 

Yemen Chief Ahead 

SAN* A, Yemen — The party of 
President Ali Abdullah Saleh won a 
majority of the districts counted 
Monday in parliamentary elections. 

With 49 of 301 constituencies 
tallied and other returns delayed un- 
til Tuesday due to a large turnout 
and complicated ballots, Mr. 
Saleh’s General People's Congress 
had won 33 seats. Its principal rival, 
foe Yemeni Zslah Party, took nine 
seats and independents won seven, 
according to a monitoring group 
working with the Supreme Elec- 
tions Committee. (AP) 

450-Year Sentence 
For Brazil Officer 

RIO DE JANEIRO — A judge 
sentenced a former police officer 
Sunday to almost 450 years for foe 
massacre of 21 residents of a Rio 
slum, saying his actions ‘ 'demeaned 
all values of human existence." 

Under the law, foe former officer, 
Paulo Roberto Alvarenga. cannot 
serve more than 30 years. But the 
symbolic sentence was seen by 
some human rights activists and 
relatives of the victims as a positive 
sign for dozens of trials to follow. 

Mr. Alvarenga, 38, was the first 
of 51 policemen to be tried for the 
1993 massacre, described by pros- 
ecutors as revenge for the killings of 
four stale police officers. (AP) 

New Manitoba Peril 

WINNIPEG, Manitoba — Brisk 
winds were forecast Monday for 
southern Manitoba, raising fears 
that high waves on the huge lake 
that now covers the region could 
threaten dikes protecting towns. 

The Red River, which continued 
to swallow up vast tracts of rural 
land in Manitoba, was estimated to 
be 18 miles 129 kilometers) wide at 
foe border with the United States. 

About 17,000 people were evac- 
uated south of Winnipeg, but hun- 
dreds more were awaiting rescue 
Sunday night. (AP) 


Tew said she feared losing her benefits 
because of a lump she had just dis- 
covered in her breast, and because one of 
her daughters was being created for a 
brain tumor. She admitted that her affair 
was wrong. “I was lonely,” she test- 
ified. “vulnerable." 

Aware of her depression, foe air force 
provided extensive counseling to Col- 
onel Tew before, during and after her 
court-martial, officials said. 

"There was a great deal of concern 
she might commit suicide by all parties 
concerned." said Captain Bill Barks- 
dale, the spokesman at Scott Air Force 
Base. 

In a suicide note. Colonel Tew ex- 
pressed hope that "now the healing pro- 
cess can begin.” By dying before her 
dismissal had been processed, she pre- 
served her air force benefits for the fam- 
ily she left behind. At her funeral, foe air 
force provided an honor guard and gave 
her a 2 1 -gun salute. 


TVs Digital Viewing Is Wave of the Future 


Continued from Rage 1 

sions of this prototype set. he points out, 
will be smaller but just as sharp. 

His view has foe backing of the tele- 
visiou-manufacturing industry, which 
has been promoting HDTV for more 
than a decade. 

‘ 'I believe in high-definition TV more 
than any consumer electronic, product, 
more than the VCR," said Gary Shapiro, 
president of the Consumer Electronic 
Manufacturers Association. "People 
will love the wide screen, the crisp pic- 
ture, the surround stereo sound. ’ ' 

But Mr. M undie. a senior vice pres- 
ident at Microsoft Corp., thinks few con- 
sumers really want such pretty pictures, at 
least not at the price that set manufac- 
turers are projecting for their first HDTV 
models — from $3,500 to $5,000 a set 
Instead. Microsoft and others in foe 
computer industry have begun a cam- 
paign to persuade broadcasters to aban- 
don HDTV and transmit multiple chan- 
nels -within -a-channel of lesser-quality 
digital pictures, as well as electronic data 
that can be easily and inexpensively dis- 
played on computer monitors and other 
receivers that are smaller and less ex- 
pensive than HDTV consoles. By doing 
this, they say. digital broadcasting will 
catch on far fester than HDTV will. 

The emerging industrial brawl be- 
tween television manufacturers and 
computer makers has huge stakes. 
Americans spent $19 billion on com- 
puters and $10 billion on TV sets last 
year, according to foe Consumer Elec- 
tronic Manufacturers Association. 

Caught in the middle of this fight are 
broadcasters. At the moment, many are 
leaning toward HDTV, but there's no 


real industry consensus nor government 
requirement to offer strictly high-defin- 
ition broadcasts. 

Some networks, notably CBS and 
NBC, said they would be ready to offer 
their popular programs, including 
prime-time movies and sitcoms like 
“Seinfeld,” in high-definition format 
by late next year. Others, such as ABC, 
haven't committed to a set schedule. 
Cynics point out that the pictures may 
become sharper but foe programs them- 
selves might nor get any better. 

Still others, such as foe media baron 
Rupert Murdoch, doubt that there is 
much economic foundation for land- 
based digital broadcasting at all. Mr. 
Murdoch is backing a venture that pro- 
poses to send digital pictures from earth- 
orbiting satellites. 

Set manufacturers, who once sugges- 
ted foot HDTV sets would cost about 
$2/500, now say the starting price will be 
more than twice that for a true high- 
definition set with roughly a 40-inch 
diagonal picture. But they aren't worried 
that that’s beyond the reach of all but the 
wealthiest couch potatoes. Prices, they 
said, will come down quickly as sales 
grow and production gears up. 

* ‘When the first color TVs came out in 
1953. they cost about the same as a 
Chevy,” said Bruce Allen, vice pres- 
ident of technology for Thomson Con- 
sumer Electronics, foe French-owned 
maker of RCA sets. “The consumers 
we’ve questioned have not questioned 
the price. Their only question is, 'When 
can we get one?’ ’’ 

Even if that is true, it could still take 
years for high-definition televisions to 
catch on with a significant portion of foe 
population. 






PAGE 8 


TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Herafo 


INTERNATIONAL 


n/nusHSD wrru the new tork timis and the Washington tost 


Expand NATO? The Senate Should Just Say No 

_ * j » * - - -* — T * * 4T tnime 


Krem 

* ’ fir 



Kabila on Notice 


By a cruel refugee policy. Laurent 
Kabila, (be rebel leader in Zaire, is 
spoiling much of the friendly reception 
be might otherwise hope to reap in his 
country and abroad for ousting Mobutu 
SeseSeko. If his African and European 
sympathizers do not prevail on him to 
respect international norms, there will 
be scant reason to think be will be any 
improvement on the fading longtime 
dictator. 

The problem arises from the mostly 
Hutu Rwandans, who, after conducting 
genocide against Tutsi in 1991, were 
chased out — offending militias and 
innocent citizens alike — into eastern 
Zaire. Mr. Kabila’s political base there 
lies among Tutsi, and his advancing 
forces have been conducting what the 
aid agencies and others find to be a 
pattern of anti-Hutu abuses verging on 
“ethnic cleansing." The refugees are 
being killed in the hundreds and “dis- 
appeared," denied humanitarian relief 
from the international agencies, kept 
from being airlifted back to Rwanda 
and driven ever deeper into inhospit- 
able terrain. The UN secretary-general 
accuses the rebels of “killing by star- 
vation." The other day an isolated 


camp that had held about 50.000 or 
more sick and exhausted Hutu was 
found to be completely empty. 

The Kabila elements on the cutting 


edge of this abuse of refugees profess 
to be hunting down Jailer Hutu soldiers 


to be hunting down Jailer Hutu soldiers 
and militiamen who cynically use 


attack and as their respectable front in 
cadging international aid. But such a 
practice, to the extent that it goes on, is 
no excuse for the depredations of the 
Kabila forces. They have a respon- 
sibility to act toward civilians in a way 
consistent with the roles of war, as 
difficult as that is under the conditions 
of ethnic conflict that exist in Zaire and 
central Africa. 

Their failure to do so leaves Mr. 
Kabila himself to be held accountable. 
He is. after all, no longer just a leader of 
insurrectionary forces. He is a claimant 
to leadership of a large, sovereign stale. 
The U.S. State Department, among 
others, has put Mr. Kabila on notice 
that Zaire will need international^ so- 
licitude and support in abundance if be 
comes to power. Right now he is fling- 
ing away his chances of gating it 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Danger in Croatia 


Croatia, like many other countries, 
has a neo-Nazi fringe, complete with 
ethnic hatred, nationalist symbols and 
a fascist salute. The danger in Croatia, 
however, does not come from this 
small group of extremists but from the 
more sophisticated leaders in the coun- 
try's mainstream who share their de- 
sire for a larger, ethnically pure Croa- 
tia. While attention has been focused 
on Slobodan Milosevic in Serbia, 
Croatian nationalism is probably more 
dangerous to Balkan peace. 

Extreme nationalism is prominent in 
Croatia not because most Croats en- 
dorse it — they do not — but because 
the nationalists intimidate their oppo- 
nents. They are also rich, thanks to 
smuggling and the support of hard-line 
Croatian emigres. The nationalists are 
powerful enough that President Franjo 
Tudjman’s Croatian Democratic Un- 
ion party has taken rate of the four 
small neo-Nazi parties as a coalition 
partner. Extremists also control the 
right wing of Mr. Tudjman's party. 

The wing's leader. Defense Minister 
Gojko Susak, is Mr. Tudjman's closest 


Mostar is in Bosnia, bat Mr. Tud- 
jman treats the Croatian side as part of 
Croatia and keeps close ties to the thugs 
who run it He kicked off this year's 
Croatian election with a trip to Mostar. 
Croatia’s currency circulates there. Mr. 
Tudjman could sack Mostar's leaders 
and keep his pledge to integrate the area 
into the Federation of Bosnia-Herze- 
govina. He apparently chooses not to. 

The Croatian government also con- 
tinues to block ethnic Serbs from re- 


turning to parts of Croatia where they 
lived. It has harbored Bosnian Croats 


adviser and may well become pres- 
ident after Mr. Tudjman. who has can- 


ident after Mr. Tudjman, who has can- 
cer. (ties. 

Mr. Tudjman's regime has revived 
some of the symbols and ideology of 
World War U Croatia. The era is at- 
tractive to many Croats because it was 
the first time in centuries that Croatia 


was an independent nation. But the 
state was a Nazi ally whose collab- 


orators, known as tile Ustasbe, killed 
hundreds of thousands of partisans, 
Serbs and Jews. 

The larger danger is that the nation- 
alists in the government, who are often 
supported by Mr. Tudjman, want to 
extend Croatia to encompass all eth- 
nically Croatian areas. This squeezes 
Bosnia, and threatens the Bosnian- 
Croat military alliance that can keep the 
Bosnian Serbs in check. The crucial area 
is the city of Mostar. Under the peace 
accords, it is supposed to be governed as 
a unified city by Croats and Muslims. 
Instead, it resembles Cold War Berlin. 


lived. It has harbored Bosnian Croats 
indicted by the international war crimes 
tribunal for directing massacres. Mr. 
Tudjman even gave one of them a post 
in the Croatian Army and a medal. 

Mr. Tudjman is not immune to pres- 
sure from the West. When he was 
threatened with losing important loans, 
he persuaded one of tee indicted Croats 
to nun himself over to the tribunal. Yet 
tee United States, Germany and other 
European countries have squandered 
repeated chances to press him to re- 
strain his and his allies’ nationalism. 

Mr. Tudjman and his party owe much 
to the West, which built up Croatia's 
military to fight the Serbs. Retired 
American soldiers trained Croatia's 
array. Washington has become more 
critical of Mr. Tudjman since 1995. 
With the war over it needed him less. In 
addition, his defiance of unfavorable 
election results and his attempts to con- 
trol the press have grown more blatant. 

But Croatia is still flooded with 
loans from international institutions. 
Until the law was softened late last 
year. Washington was required to op- 
pose such loans if Croatia harbored 
indicted war criminals. The United 
States never did so, but officials now 
are rightly threatening to block a major 
pending loan if Croatia does not turn 
over an indicted criminal it has ar- 
rested. This is welcome, but Wash- 
ington can and should do more to per- 
suade Mr. Tudjman to democratize, 
control tee Mostar warlords and anoint 
a moderate successor. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Bringing Up Baby 


At an unusual White House con- 
ference earlier this monte, scientists, 
doctors and sociologists discussed new 
evidence teat speaking to very young 
infants has a profound effect on brain 
development and the ability to learn. 
There could be no more compelling 
argument for an expansion of support 
for new parents and of high-quality 
child care programs. 

Studies have long stressed tee im- 
portance of early intervention, from 
prenatal care to preschool, to promote 
the healthy development of children. 
But many people have accepted the 
notion that, by the time a baby is bom, 
tee brain has been genetically deter- 
mined and what is most needed in tee 
first few months is love and care. Re- 
search by neuroscientists, however, 
shows that after birth, experience 
counts even more than genetics. The 
way in which billions of brain cells 
make connections and develop into 
networks that enable children to be- 
come smart, creative and adaptable 
depends, to a remarkable extent, on 
how an infant is nurtured. Infants are 


stimulated by a range of sights, sounds, 
touches and smells. But language and 
eye contact are most important to tee 


complex process of brain develop- 
ment. The language does not have to be 


esoteric. Constant charter from a 
caring adult is what counts most. 

That means young children will fare 
better with caregivers who are verbal 
and patient It also means some parents 
will need more help in understanding 
the process of building active, curious, 
healthy young minds. 

President Bill Clinton offered no new 
programs but pointed to existing fed- 
erally supported efforts to help parents, 
including health, immunization and nu- 
trition programs. Some business lead- . 
ers at the conference acknowledged the 
importance of giving parents of new- 
borns time off as encouraged by tee 
1993 Family and Medical Leave Act. 

Some states have created programs 
to help children right from birth. All 
states need to recognize that, during tee 
critical early years, children require not 
just caretakers, but quality caregivers. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


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W ASHINGTON — The Clinton 
adminis tration is about to em- 
bark on tee biggest celebrity hostage- 
taking since tee Tupac Amaru gnear- Senate: “Boys and girls, it's too late, itatioo pact teat sets strict limits along 
rill as rounded up wO dignitaries in Sure, maybe NATO expansion isn’t a their 4,000-mile border and will enable 
Pent. The Clinton team is going to take perfect idea. But if we {mil back now , China co redirect some forces toward 
tee entire U.S. Senate hostage. having gjven our promise, American Sooth Asia — hardly aU.S. interest 

You can see why if you just review credibility — yes, the big C-word — Yes, even without NATO expansion 

Wednesday's testimony by Secretary will be irreparably damaged. A vote Russia might be cozymg up to China or 
of State Madeleine Albright and Sec- against ratifying expansion is a vote for Iran. But the degree to which Russia 
retaxy of Defense William Cohen be- damaging U.S. credibility. You are moves in that direction, and America’s 
fore the Senate Armed Services Com- hostages to our commitments.” ability to inhibit it, will be a function of 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


mittee. This was the first time top 
Clinton officials testified in full on 
their plans for expanding NATO to 
Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic 
and ultimately up to tee Russian bor- 
der. Mrs. Albright and Mr. Cohen got a 
thoroughly bipartisan reception from 
the senators: bipartisan skepticism. 

The senators asked different ver- 
sions of the same three questions: How 
could the administration say NATO 
expansion would erase the dividing line 
in Europe, when it was only creating a 
new one? How could it say expanding 
NATO to the Russian border wasn’t 
anti -Russian, when it obviously is? 
How could it say expanding NATO 
won’t dilute the alliance’s power and 
coherence, when it obviously will? 

Senator John Warner spoke for many 
in tee room when he said of NATO: “I 
come freon the school that if it's not 
broken, why try and fix it?" And re- 
member. this was a committee of 
‘ ‘know -somethin gs. ’ ’ Imagine what 
happens when the ‘ ‘know-nothings’’ in 
Congress start debating expansion, 
which could cost alliance members $40 
billion and involve committing U.S. 
troops to nations few people know. 

No wonder Mrs. Albright sighed after 
hearing tee doubting senators. “In 
listening to you.” she said, “there is do 
question that we have a very difficult job 
ahead of us" to win Senate ratification. 

.And that’s why I think the Clin- 
tonites will resort to hostage-taking. 
NATO expansion was driven largely 
by a Clinton desire to attract East Euro- 
pean ethnic votes in tee '96 election. It 
was hatched by a tiny group in tee 
administration and never properly de- 
bated. The Pentagon brass always 
thought it was a harebrained idea. 

But now that tee election is over, 
Ctintonites are unwilling to back down. 
So teeir secret strategy is to force 
through expansion at tee July 8 NATO 
summit meeting and then say to the 


We are already paying a price for this 
approach. Witness last week’s summit 
meeting between tee Russian and 
Chinese presidents, which was drivenin 
part by Russia’s desire to counter 
NATO's expansion by drawing closer 

to China The Clinto n admin istra tio n is 

pursuing reverse Kissmgerism: Instead 
of trying to play Russia and China off 


against each other, it is driving teem is 

closer together by expanding NATO, teat Amen .... expert 

Russia and China signed a froop lun- ‘crep- 
itation pact teat sets strict limits along War area- - 

teeir 4,OT0-mfle border and will enable bility ^ ^ should never; 




ability to inhibit it, will be a function of 
tee overall U.S.-Rnssaa relationship. 


And to say that relationship will not 
raoded bv exuandme a Cold War 


be eroded by expanding a Cola war 
allian ce to Russia's border is to speak 
nonsense, I have no problem aggra- 
vating tee Russians, but let’s get 

something for it, and we get nothing for 

NATO expansion but a bill. 

The Senate can resist bring taken 


‘‘It’s natpiaiSbietoday- The world . 
is now safe to correct American mis- 
takes m foreign polipy.’' 

The Senate should opt for a Ke- 
aganesque solution — Nancy Reagan ■ 
— “Just Say No.” 

The New York Tates. 


:■ • -■* - , 

■ 

*: -V-w* tef 

1 

' ■ 


ip 



Eastern Europe’s Security Is the Real Issue 


O SLO — In the lengthy and oc- 
casionally high-pitched debate 


By Olav Riste 


about NATO expansion, it is becoming 
increasingly rare to find reference to 
Ae original starting point — the wish of 
tee new democracies of Eastern Europe 
to establish a basis for teeir long-term 
national security. 

That, however, is tee real issue. To 
talk about NATO expansion as 
something that the current member 
states favor — or don’t favor — side- 
tracks tee debate, and plays into tee 
hands of Russian internal politics. The 
rightand duty of independent nations to 
provide for their security is die foun- 
dation of tee expansion issue, and it is 
i m port a nt that this not be obfuscated by 
tee imaginary or real feats of Russian 
politicians. 

It is good to remember teat if Soviet 
objections had been the determining 
factor in 1949, when the Norte Atlantic 
Treaty Organization was founded, then 
Norway, and probably Denmark and 
Iceland, would have been barred from 
membership. 

This is not to say that Russian con- 
cerns can be dismissed as just so much 
bluster. Russia’s difficult transition 
from its Soviet imperial past to 
something we hope will become a 
stable and democratic state is a major 
aim in the construction of a post-Cold 


War international order. This isa pro- 
cess that must take time, and it is nec- 
essary for both NATO members and 
candidate states to take Russian sens- 
ibilities into account. But it is clearly 
unreasonable to expect European se- 
curity politics to remain on hold in the 
meantime. 

Allowing Russian politics to deter- 
mine the security situation of the 
former Soviet satellites would also be a 
disservice to Russia itself. Jt is there- 
fore about time to tell the Russians that 
if they persist in warning of tee dire 
effects of letting the Eastern European 
countries into NATO, teeir arguments 
will backfire. 

If Russia’s progress toward stability 
is so uncertain that Polish, Czech and 
Hungarian membership in NATO can 
throw the process into reverse, teen 
Eastern Europe will indeed need to 
seek guarantees, not jnst as a shelter 
against an uncertain future but spe- 
cifically for security against Russia. 

Any movement down that road would 
also dimmish tee willingness of tee 
Eastern European states to take Russian 


By crying wolf about NATO ex- . 
pansion, Russia’s spokesmen in fact ■ 
hmtee risk of calling forth tee ghost of ; 
the Cold War. 

It is therefore time for responsible. 
Russian leaders to tell the trouble- ., 
makers at home — as Andrei Kozyrev, , 
tee former foreign minister, has tried to 
do — that tee best way to ensure good 
relations with their neighbors is to ac- * 


tv prafe 


cept the neighbors’ right to choose their - J 
own road to national security, and to ■ J 


replace the echoes of Russia’s imperial, ' 
past with gestures of cooperation. 

A good model would be tee way.. 
Stalin's Soviet Union managed to , 
turn a state of belligerency with fin- ■ 
land into a friendly and cooperative - 
relationship in the space of a few . 
years. In tee tense climate of the Cold . 
War, NATO membership was never ., 
in the cards for Finland. But Finland’s t . 
place in the West was never in ques— 
tion. . . V 

Membership in NATO has lost lts^ 
anti-Soviet rationale — at least so V 
long as tee Russian leadership does, 
not, through shortsighted politicking, : 
succeed in calling up a ghost Z' 




.hm 

Mi 


interests mto account for example by 
comb in ing membership in NATO with 


comb in ing memi 
certain confident 


measures. 


The writer, director of research at- 
Norway's Institute for Defense Studies, ~ 
contributed this comment to the In- - 
temational Herald Tribune. 


‘ j. 

J* 


: rj | 

In Japan, the Old One-Party System Seems Back in the Saddle 




W ASHINGTON — Not 
quite four years ago. Ja- 


YV quite four years ago, Ja- 
pan seemed on the threshold of 
a new era. The party that had 
ruled for two generations had 
been thrown out of office, and a 
real transfer of power was tak- 
ing place. 

Yet when Prime Minister 
Ryutaro Hashimoto visited tee 
White House for his first Wash- 
ington summit meeting on Fri- 
day, be was standing at the bead 
of that same old rulingparty, tee 
Liberal Democrats. The politi- 
cian who had tried to bring two- 
party politics to Japan — Ichiro 
Ozawa, Mr. Hashimoto’s 
former comrade and at one time 
tee most powerful man in Jap- 
anese politics — was back 
home in Tokyo, beading a 
dwindling band of forlorn op- 


By Fred Hiatt 


positianists. The Liberal Demo- 
crats, who had run Japan almost 
uninterrupted since tee end of 
the U.S. postwar occupation, 
looked as entrenched as ever. 

Japan's apparent return to 
one-party dominance — appar- 
ent because not everyone be- 
lieves it will last — holds great 
significance for U-S.-Japan re- 
lations and also for other de- 
mocracies where one party bolds 
sway — Mexico, for example, or 
Soute Africa. And it contains the 
compelling story of JVfr. Ozawa 
himself, a power broker turned 
reformer for whom things 
haven’t turned out as expected. 

In his new book, “Shadow 
Shoguns: The Rise and Fall of 
Japan's Postwar Political Ma- 


chine,'* Jacob Schlesinger says 
Mr. Ozawa may go down in 
.history as “a kind of Japanese 
Gorbachev." Bote bravely 
tried to spark reform from com- 
fortable positions of power, and 
bote were cast aside — at least, 
in Mr. Ozawa’s case, for now — 
by the processes they helped set 
in motion. 

In another way, though, the 
two men are opposites. Mikhail 
Gorbachev initiated reform in 
an effort to save the system and 
his Communist Party's unchal- 
lenged rale; he ended up help- 
ing to destroy the system, the 
party and his nation as well, but 
he certainly never meant to. Mr. 
Ozawa, on the other hand, 
wanted to blow up Japan’s one- 


party system — but may have 
succeeded only in Mowing up 
his own perch. 

“It’s a kind of tragedy, 
^really,” says former Japanese, 
ambassador to Moscow Koji 
Watanabe. . “Those in his 
closest entourage one by one 
have become his enemies. ’ * 

As supreme LDP power 
broker, Mr. Ozawa never be- 
came prime minister, but he 
helped determine who did, and 
be often told tee nominal lead- 
ers what to do. In those days, a 
triumvirate of conservative in- 
terests — the ruling party, a 
competent and honest boreaa- 
cracy and a thriving big-busi- 
ness community — ran Japan, 
and most Japanese seemed sat- 
isfied with the results. 

Bat as Japan’s go-go 1980s 
gave way to its go-slow ’90s, 
Mr. Ozawa became convinced 


internal dissension. Mr. Oza-j 
wa’s party moved into oppo- 
sition and, in elections last year, 
placed a distant second to die 
LDP — which won on an Qz? 
awa platform, pledging reform. 
“We destroyed ourselves, 
through dissension and confu- 
sion,’' he said during a recesf 
interview in his Tokyo office.'' 

Now, Mr. Ozawa says, he'd 
like to move into tee “conclin^ 
fve phase” of realignment 
What does teat mean? Because' 
he and Mr. Hashimoto novf 
agree, at least officially, on a); 
most every major issue, from 
reform to tee U.S.-Japan secue^ 
rity relationship, he may be com^p 
templating remarriage, with a 
more pacifist, left-wing party ds 
opposition. $ 

But Mr. Ozawa has alienated 




m l ! : j : 
•06Ii.n-.-iM: 





Charity Can’t Bridge the Chasm 


that Japan’s closed, cozy, highly 
regulated system couldn’t cope 
with the challenges of global- 
ization. It couldn’t foster the 
creativity, leadership or entre- 
preneurship which Japanese so- 
ciety lacked Japan, be said, 
needed a tend revolution — as 
sweeping as the Msiji reforms 
teat had opened Japan to the 
world a century before, and as 
the U.S. -led democratization 
that followed World War IL 
Mr. Ozawa’s calls for change 


even many of his allies with his 
autocratic style. And the LOT 


ioCr-- . 


N EW YORK — What a 
dazzling array of Ideas 


By Mario M. Cuomo 


and proposals made up tee ex- 
travaganza in Philadelphia 
called tee Presidents’ Summit 
for America’s Future! 

Americans helping Amer- 
icans out of a deep compas- 
sion for the disadvantaged, 
especially for tee IS million 
children at risk. 

“A new way of doing busi- 
ness’ ’(in the words of the sum- 
mit meeting’s organizers) tear 
will, by tee year 2000, give at 
least 2 million of these children 
better health, better education, 
a better chance at a good job, 
safer places to live and work 
and even better relationships 
with teeir parents or mentors. 

No one will be taxed to pay 
for it, nor will there be any 
grubby partisan politics. Any 
political benefits will redound 
to both major parties. And 
maybe most appealing of all, 
on the outside of the brightly 
wrapped package for all to 
see, these words are em- 
blazoned: “The Era of Big 
Government Is Over.” 

There is no doubt that the 
Philadelphia gathering will be 
well-received by the Amer- 
ican people and that it will do 
some good. The idea of vo- 
lunteerism is an irradicably 
American tradition. Ameri- 
cans lave been marvelously 
generous with teeir own time, 
ideas and resources for more 
than 200 years. Think of the 
countless groups already at 
work: religious organizations, 
foundations, corporations, 
not-for-profits such as the 
American Red Cross — not to 
mention volunteer firemen 
who risk their lives for their 
neighbors simply because it’s 
a good thing to do. 

Indeed, for more than most 
of our history, much of what 
we Americans now call social 


services were provided by 
private charities. Long before 
welfare, unemployment insur- 
ance. Medicaid, Medicare or 
even a public school system, 
people in need were helped by 
charities or not at alL 

So a well-organized, highly 
motivated bipartisan effort to 
stimulate further our instinct 
for mutual aid and community 
activity is an intelligent and 
useful appeal to tee better an- 
gels of our nature. 

But there is the danger we 
will feel so good about being 
good to one another privately 
that we will be tempted to 
believe government does not 
need to do anything more. The 
summiteers’ own statements 
make appallingly clear how 
great is the need for help. 

They mention millions of 
children at risk and 40 million 
poor people in America. They 
mention the need for better 
education and skills tr aining . 
There are estimates teat just to 
repair public school buildings 
around the nation we will need 
nearly $100 billion. 

The sumnriteers mention 
better health: More than 40 
million Americans are without 
health care insurance. Bote 


problems of industrialization 
created greater needs than 
charity alone could meet. 

Private effort should come 
before we use government to 
serve a need: Government is 
best used rally where private 
effort is inadequate. 

But private effort is clearly 
inadequate to do what we have 
to do to make any real pro- 
gress in dealing with the vast, 
complicated, rooted problems 
associated with poverty. 

Ask the operators of the 
soup kitchen at New York 
City's Cathedral of Sl John 
the Divine. Ask the Ohio Hun- 
ger Task Force, which feeds 
10,000 Americans each year. 
They will tell you the truth: Of 
course, the summit meeting is 
a good thing; of course, we 
will profit from the encour- 
agement and even from a little 
prodding. But American char- 
ities. at their very best, can 
build a bridge only a short part 
of the way across the chasm. 

The rest must be done by the 
real, ultimate form of vohm- 
teerism, oar government. 


lie. When a heart attack in 1991 
propelled him, at age 49, to tee 
very un- Japanese step of renoun- 
cing liquor and cigarettes, that 
furthered his image as new-style 
poL In 1993 he abandoned the 
LDP over which he’d heki sway, 
formed a new party and — again 
as die power behind the prime 
ministership — led it to victory. 

_ The new regime lasted only 
eight months, brought down by 
old corruption charges and new 


autocratic style. And the LOT 
has become more single- 
mindedly devoted to drains 
nance than ever. 

The process Mr. Ozawa set tif 
motion eventually may prodocA 
the result he sought, although 
maybe not in time for him. He 
says he always knew one elec- 
tion wouldn’t do iL Bnt the side- 
lining of political realigomenL 
at least for now, calls into ques- 
tion Japan’s ability to cany out 
other reforms that every obfe 
agrees it needs to deregulate 
and open, up its economy -~ 


'■jt 


... 


• • 

. . j . *?m m : 

ir'ti bjf *"■» 
■:.:vy hg p tfK 

• ••■* -T 


fi. ,b ... 


Its 

•tut 


porters. Bote types of lefonfT, 
after all, call for a volontaiy. 


ceding of power — by the LDP* 
in one case, and by the triuni; 
virate of tee LDP, the burean- 
cracy and the special interests tq 
tee other. And. as Mr. OzauS 
has learned, no one cedes pawet 
easily .even when tee nation^ 
future is at stake. 

The Washington Post. 


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IN OUB PAGES; 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AfiO 


^ V- . 


1897: ‘Cem Kilos’ Chib 


Democrats and Republicans in 
Congress admit tee lives of 
many children will be reined 
unless they are given access to 
early and regular health care. 

The reason America went 
from almost purely private so- 
cial services to welfare, food 
stamps, unemployment insur- 
ance, Medicaid, Medicare, 
public schools and a highway 
system was not because we 
stopped being charitable. It 
was because the size of our 
population, tee density of its 
gathering and the nature of the 


apart from the people, but is 
rather the coming together of 
Americans to decide how best 
to handle common problems 
wife common resources. 

If bote parties in Congress 
can agree to waste $50 billion 
on so-called corporate wel- 
fare; if our Congress says we 
can afford hundreds of billions 
of dollars in tax cuts, and if we 
can afford to give our tidiest 
Americans Social Security 
and Medicare payments they 
don’t need, how can we refuse 
to build the bridge all tee way 

from here io decency? 


PARIS — The members of tee 
“Cent Kilos” Club, proud of 
their weight and splendid 
health, have decided to show 
themselves to tee Parisians. On 
May 6, they will leave tee 
headquarters of the dub. and 
ate carefully testing the 
springs of tee carriages, win 
fake a long drive thro ug h tee 
city. No doubt Paris ians will be 
phased to see the members of 
the “Cent Kilos,” but will they 
have a thought for the horses 
which are going to ding foe 
heavily-loaded carriages up die 
steqp avenue de Versailles? 


white people of tee Sooth, 
though Northern philadteropy 
has been a noble aid. Taxes # 
tee Soute devoted to edneafira) 
of tee negroes amounted last 
year to $13,000,000. Jn balT* 

century the farms that they own. 

have increased in nomber frotfr 
20,000 to 1 ,000,000, amounted 
now to 20.000,000 acres. 


t!I- 

FLr- „ 

4 17 . 


+i'-r 1 JfWW 

v.‘/rrer mr. 


M r e -' 

Wt 


1947: Easing Travel 


■ ■■ *»sh » v iJr 16 
I'.' ' ' ' pa-wi :r« 

.. ■'•'i..: I Cm' % — 

Bsa-L ' 

■** ri ’aafc jj " 

'*/. ■ - 


1922: Negro Progress 


Mario Cuomo is the former 
governor of New York state. 
He contributed this comment 
to The New York Times. 


PARIS — The Hampton Insti- 
tote, Virginia, brought into 
clear light some facts regar ding 
tee progress of the negro in 
America since tee abolition of 
slavery. This progress is largely 
due to tee public spirit or tee 


GENEVA — The experts'’ con- 
ference on passpotts and frp^ 
tier formalities has issued i® 
report to be presented to tee 
United Nations Economic sri? 
Soca' Council. The rrocatcou- 
tains some forty recommend^ 
tions for simplification' of 
port and visa requirements, w 
cunency control and enstoofe 
and health inspection at 
tiers to make travel easier 
However, tee conference 
cided it was not yet possible fo 
Tetom to tfaepre-IQi/t regime of 
ctitaplete freedom of travel. 


ibry 






■&***»* 









EVTCRNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1997 


PAGE 9 




OPINION/LETTERS 




Yeltsin’s New Golden Boy 
| jin the Kremlin Snake Pit 


V _ 


By William Safire 


H 


'"'<4 


■YY7 ASHINGTON — He 
1 YY speaks English well, in a 
Squid, deferential tone. His age is 
37. He is slim, dark-eyed and tele- 
genic. 

{ He is a physicist drawn into 
polidcs by lus opposition to a nu- 
, clear power station, who wan a 
seat in die last Soviet Parliament 
as a foe of fee Communists. After 
S {standing with Boris Yeltsin 
* against coop plotters in 1991, be 
{was rewarded with appointment 
jas governor of the N izhni 
Novgorod region — once the 'no- 
torious closed city of Gcoky, 
Jvhere the troublesome were seat 
into internal mule. 

I He wore sweaters and jeans to 
the office and was early in de- 
nouncing die war in Chechnya. In 
privatizing state-owned busi- 
nesses, he followed tbe economic 
policies of the reformist Grigori 
^Yavlinsky rather than the apparat- 
pleastng methods of Anatoli 
lubais; in so doing, he gained 
bWi 


behind his Kre mlin ears, to ran the 

crucial 1 ‘natural’* monopolies. 

This waspleasing to tbe people, 
who have vaulted Mr. Nemtsov to 
the top of the polls, largely be- 
cause of his opening stunt in strip- 
ping bureaucrats of perks and de~ 
manding all government 
limousines be Russian -made. 

It also pleased Mr. Yavlinsky, 
tbe only reformer who is building 
a grassroots political party fra: die 
long hauL Mr. Yavlinsky, whose 
Yabloko bloc is supportive of 
today's policy but remains inde- 
pendent of the regime, pledged to 
supply Mr. Nemtsov with expert 
staff and recoaimeadations to de- 
centralize economic power and 
break up tbe stagnating monopol- 
ies. 

How long does the new man’s 
writ run? Mr. Yeltsin is a past 
master at riding others' popular- 
ity. His last horse was General 
Alexander Lebed, whom be 
pushed forward with TV exposure 



Bom of a 63-Year- Old, 
A Truly Wanted Child 


By Marcia Angel! 


LETTERS TO TBE EDITOR 


V- 


khe confidence of the World Bank at election time to split the na- 
and turned ins region into tbe re- ' tionalist vote, appointed to a high 
form center of Russia. - - - 

; Boris Nemtsov was plucked out 
pf tbe blue in March by the 
resuscitated President Boris 
{Yeltsin to serve, along with Mr. 

Chubais, as first deputy prime 

fcnnister. 

J That thrust Mr. Nemtsov into a 
snake pit of intrigue. Mr. Chubais 
is seeking to oust the wealthy 
Viktor Chernomyrdin, who was 
made prime minister when Mr. 

, Yeltsin needed tbe financial sup- 
port of the former Communist 
hankers and industrialists who 
have been stealing Russia blind. 

Mr. Chubais, a renegade reformer 
despised for bis insider compro- 
mises by purer democrats, is 
blamed by most Russians for the 
giveaways of state businesses and 
bould not be elected wolf catch- 


in the Sat 


er. 

{ Neither could tbe stolid Mr. 
pherDomyrdin, whose only loyal 
constituent is Vice President A1 
pore. Both unpopular Yeltsin ap- 
pointees bad recently reached a 
standoff over control of die richest 
jewel in tbe Kremlin crown: tbe 
oil-gas-power monopolies, flic 
Oligopoly dial is die source of Mb’. 
Chernomyrdin's strength. 

Then Mr. Yeltsin pulled one of 
bis famous fast ones. Instead of 
lotting either of the two control tbe 
resources, lie crossed up both by 
appointing Mr. Nemtsov, still wet 


post with much fanfare, then Jet- 
tisoned when be acted uppity. 
General Lebed suddenly finds 
himself tied far ‘ ‘most trusted” in 
polls with Mr. Yeltsin’s new fa- 
vorite. 

Curiously, in a country where 
Jews are a tiny minority and anti- 
Semitism is widespread, Mr. 
Nemtsov’s Jewish roots have not 
hurt him politically. Perhaps 
that’s because he has plenty of 
company in government: tbe 
loony Vladimir Zhirinovsky tries 
to hide his Jewish ancestry, while 
Mr. Yavlinsky does not 

Mr. Chubais is rumored to have 
a Jewish parent, but says nothing, 
and fee spymaster who is now 
foreign minister changed his 
name from Finkelstein to Pri- 
makov to conceal his back- 
ground. 

Could tbe Pushkinesque Mr. 
Nemtsov make it all the way? 

Maybe he is being set up by Mr. 
Yeltsin and Mr. Chubais fora wild 
ride and a sharp fall The job could 
be too. big for any one man with 
derivative power. 

At the same time, when his 
friend Mr. Yavlinsky warned him 
against joining “a whole detach- 
ment of well-fixed kamikazes,” 
Mr. Nemtsov smiled and replied, 
“A kamikaze can live for a very 
long time.” 

The New Tor* Tunes. 


Business Bribeiy 

Reginald pale's article on 
bribery (” Foreign Bribery Should 
Be a Crime,” Thinking Ahead. 
April 4) misses a point that has 
also seemed to escape many Euro- 
pean business executives and gov- 
ernment officials: Bribeiy isn’t a 
goad deal. 

Those who accept bribes can 
get caught, imprisoned and some- 
times executed. Tbe recipients 
may have overstated their influ- 
ence. They sometimes are de- 
moted or fired, or they quit. In 
short, they often don’t deliver. 
There are countless cases where 


a sate after being caugbL Some- 
times they are banned from selling 
to anyone in the country. Bad 
press damages their credibility 
both at borne and abroad. 

When investing in an already 
risky foreign venture, does it 
make good business sense to com- 
pound that risk by paying bribes? 

Most American companies will 
acknowledge that they now em- 
brace die ILS. Foreign Corrupt 
Practices Act, despite an initial 
period of skepticism. These 
companies are now breed from 
having to make die risky decision 
of wbether to bribe. They can sell 
based on quality, rather than pray- 
ing that their bribe-laden bene- 
factor doesn't get caught or de- 
fect. When asked for a bribe, they 
can defend themselves by saying 


it is illegal. European businesses 
deserve to have fee same pro- 
tection. 

Countries should ban bribery 
because of the morality. If for no 
other reason, businesses should 
stop paying bribes because of fee 
inordinate risk it adds to any for- 
eign sale or investment. 

THOMAS L. BO AM. 

Dosseldorf. 

Defending Spanglish 

Regarding “No Gracias, and 
No Thanks” (Opinion, March 29} 
by Roberto Gonzalez-Echevar- 
ria: 

While efforts to preserve a lan- 
guage in its country of origin are 
laudable, Mr. Gonzalez-Echevar- 
ria seems more concerned about 
keeping Spanish “pare” in fee 
Western Hemisphere, which had 
no native Spanish speakers. 

Immigrants, he should remem- 
ber, tend to add to their language 
when they move to a new country: 
as much as Europeans tried, they 
found that they could not elim- 
inate a people's language without 
e liminating fee people. So we 
have people who are descended 
from the natives of fee Western 
Hemisphere or other non-Spanish 
people, who learn second-hand 
Spanish, and while they're at it, 
learn words from other languages. 
Since the other major language in 
the Western Hemisphere is Amer- 
ican English, we have Spanglish. 


If Mr. Gonzalez-Echevarria 
cannot accept this he should go to 
Spain where, perhaps, he will feel 
more at home. 

ALLEN L. BROCK. 

Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. 

Yes, Tara Is a Role Model 

Regarding “A Real Role Model 
Would Stay In School " (Opinion. 
March 26 J by Richard Cohen. 

In contrast to Mr. Cohen, I be- 
lieve that Tara Lipinski, the 14- 
year-old ice-skating champion, is 
a worthy role model not only for 
youngsters but also for adults. I 
became acquainted with Tara and 
her family a few years ago and can 
say her grit and determination are 
an inspiration. Would that we all 
had such tenacity! 

Critics say Tara is damaging 
her body wife rigorous training 
and ruining her mind by using 
tutors instead of attending school. 
These critics, noting Tara’s 
“wee” stature, fail to realize that 
she comes by it naturally: Tiny 
■Tara has a tiny mother. As for her 
education, it is obvious that her 
parents are doing their very best to 
ensure Tara acquires the best 
schooling possible. 

Tara is pursuing her dream, not 
her parents', with a gusto and a 
drive that most of us would do 
well to apply to our own dreams. 
Tara is one of my heroes. 

CAROL A. CAVANAUGH. 

Perugia, Italy. 


B OSTON — To any middle- 
aged mother, having a baby ai 
age 63 probably seems like a co- 
lossal! y bad idea. 

The constant backache, the 2 
A.M. feedings and fee endless di- 
aper changes — didn't nature ar- 

MEANWIHLE 

range for us to stop doing this son 
of thing after our mid-40s? 

But nature has been overruled. 
It has recently been announced 
that a 63-year-old woman gave 
birth late last year to a healthy 
baby girl. 

A doctor implanted into her 
hormonally primed uterus an em- 
bryo created in a test tube with her 
husband's sperm and a young 
donor's egg. The woman ’s doctor. 
Richard Paulson, said she had lied 
about her age to get around his 
limit of 55 years for in vitro fer- 
tilization. 

The 63-year-old woman was 
not fee first postmenopausal 
woman to have a baby, only the 
oldest. In fee past several years, 
doctors have pushed the age bar- 
rier higher and higher. So we now 
must contemplate the curious pos- 
sibility of women on Medicare, 
fee health insurance program for 
fee elderly, becoming pregnant. 

Many people are probably of- 
fended. even repelled, by post- 
menopausal women having ba- 
bies. To them, it seems somehow 
unethical: they believe that if a 
woman doesn't know any better, 
her doctor should. There will 
probably be calls to regulate this 
technology and keep women of a 
certain age from receiving in vitro 
fertilization. 

This would be a mistake. Why 
is it wrong for a woman in her 60s 
to have a baby? If the technology 
exists, why shouldn't she take ad- 
vantage of it? For a healthy wom- 
an who is willing to take the med- 
ical risk of being pregnant at an 
advanced age, it may be her last 
chance to become a mother. 


Letters intended for publica- 
tion should be addressed “Letters 
to the Editor " and contain the 
writer's signature, name and full 
address. Letters should be brief 
and are subject to editing. We can- 
not he responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


Many people will object that it 
is unnatural for postmenopausal 
women to have babies, that it is a 
perverse use of a technology that 
has been widely accepted for 
younger women since 1978. To 
these critics, women in their 60s 
are simply too old to become good 
mothers. 

But all sorts of women who, by 
nearly anyone’s standards, are ex- 
tremely unlikely to be fit mothers 
can choose to have babies, in- 
cluding teenagers, drug abusers 
and the homeless. 

Some people also point out that 
an older mother is less likely than 
a younger mother to live long 
enough to raise her children to 
adulthood. But any responsible 
mother, young or old, should 
make provisions for the care of 
her baby should she die before her 
child is grown. A postmenopausal 
woman who is wiling to have a 
baby is especially likely to do so. 

Much of fee distaste for older 
women having babies, I suspect, 
is age and sex discrimination mas- 
querading as ethical concerns. 

Why is older 
motherhood seen as 
so distasteful? 

Many of us feel uncomfortable 
when old people behave in un- 
expected ways, like deciding to 
have babies. 

Our expectations are more re- 
strictive for older women than for 
older men. We are more likely to 
react to older men becoming fa- 
thers with amused tolerance rather 
than disapproval. 

One thing is clear: Women in 
their 50s ana 60s who are willing 
to undergo the rigors of preg- 
nancy, childbirth and child-rear- 
ing must really want to be moth- 
ers. Their children will be greatly 
cherished in a world where many 
children are not and where many 
young women have babies with 
scarcely a thought. 

If an older woman still wants to 
become pregnant after the risks 
are explained to her, I see no good 
reason not to help her. 

The writer, executive editor of 
The New England Journal of 
Medicine, contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


BOOKS 


I J. . .u? . 


BOGART 

By AM. Sperber and Eric Lax. 
Illustrated. 676 pages. $27 JO. William 
Morrow A Co. 

BOGART: A LIFE 
IN HOLLYWOOD 

By Jeffrey Meyers. Illustrated. 369 pages. 
\'$3 0. A Peter Davison Book! Houghton 
Mifflin Co. 

Reviewed by 

0rristopher Lehmann-Haupt 

W HY only now, 40 years after his 
death, are we finally getting two 
major biographies of Humphrey Bogart 
“Bogatt,” by AM. Sperber and Eric 
Lax, and “Bogart A Life in Holly- 


wood,” by Jeffrey Meyers? One can 
only speculate. To judge from these two 
books, part of the reason may be that 
Bogart's career was so viable, not only 
because of the scores of films he made 
and tiie gossip that tbe Hollywood pub- 
licity machine ground oat, but also be- 
cause of fee many memoirs published by 
his friends, family members and pro- 
fessional associates, ranging from the 
director John Huston to Lauren Bacall, 
Bogart’s fourth wife. 

Another explanation may be that col- 
lective memory has only lately begun to 
gain perspective on fee era in which 
Bogart was a star. This was the time of 
studio domination, when Warner Broth- 
ers cranked out films involving tough- 
guy urban characters so perfected by 
Bogart fear even when he eventually 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


A T fee age of 14 years 2 months. 

Etienne Bacrot of France, has just 
won the coveted title of youngest grand- 
master ever. In Round I in the Enghien, 
France, International Tournament, he 
* b^al Viktor KorchnoL 
” TTae Nimzovich Attack, 2 b3, is a 
hypermodern opening aimed at control 
of die center from one wing or some- 
times both. After its main development 
ui the '20s, it was rejuvenated by Bent 
Larsen in fee ’60s and by Mark Taiman- 
w at the beginning of this decade. 
Nowadays, it is usually played as a way 
bff the beaten path. 

The doubling of the white f pawns 
wife 3. J3f3 gf may be dogmatic, yet it 
does eliminate White's chief theme of 
posting a knight at e5. 

-Bacrot’s exchange with 15...de to te 
sfraightened tbe white pawn formation, 
but it allowed him to begin an attack on 
fee d3 pawn with 16-.RM8. 

1 On I7...e5, Korchnoi might have 

Vied to limit the black pieces ’scope by 
t8f5,butl8...gfI9Bh3Ne720Bf5N£5 
21 Rf5 e4! is strong for Black. 

The recapture wife 19 ef was un- 
desirable because it conceded fee 04 
square to Bacrot. But the alternative 19 

BAcrernuLADK 


Rf4 could have led to 19.^Ne5 20 Bfl 
Bh6 21 Rh4 Bg5 22 Rh3 Nfg4 23 Qel 
Qc624e4(24Bg2?Qf8! wins a pawn) 
Bel 25 Rcl £5 with clear positional 
superiority far Black. 

After 21 Rb2, 21_.Qd3? would have 
blundered away malarial to 22 Rd2. 

On 22..J3h6, Korchnoi could have 
tried 23 Rcf2, but 23.„Qfl5 24 Bh3 Qh4 
25 Kg2 Rd4 26 B£5 gf leaves White 
feeing myriad problems. He acquiesced 
in a pawn-down ending after 23 Bh3 
Qd324Qd3Rd3,relymgon25B£5gfto 
nullify the black kmgside pawn ma- 
jority, but he underestimated Bacrot's 
excellent piece play. 

AfteT 36~b4!, Korchnoi could not 
have held on wife 37 Na7. Thus, 37.. Ji3 
38 Kfi Rdl 39 Ke2 Rhl 40 Kf3 Rfl 41 
Ke2 Rf2 42 Kd3 Rc2 43 Kc2 Bg 1 44 b5 
Bh2 45 a4 Bg3 46 a5 h2 47 ab hl/Q 48 
b 7 Qg2 49 Kb3 Qf3 50 Ka4 Nc3 5 1 Ka5 
Qb7 wins. 

But his 37 Nd4 cd 38 Bb2 was de- 
molished by Bacrot’s 38_h3 39 Kfi 
Rf3 40 Kel Re3 41 Kfl (41 Re2Rb3! 42 
Be 1 Rbl 43 Kdl Nc3 44 Kc2 Rcl ! is no 
better) d3 42 Rcl Re2. Korchnoi, feeing 
43--Rb2, 43.JRh2, plus 43..J4d2 44 
Kgl Rg2 45 Khl N£3, with a mating net. 
gave up. 


NIMZOVICH ATTACK 



e d 

KDRCHNOWTHTTE 

Position after 3*Nb5 


wane 

KM*nol 

1 NTS 

2 VS 

3 BhZ 

4 gf 
5e3 

8 n 

7 Bg2 

8 43 
8 c4 

16 Nc3 
11 0-0 

12 Na4 

13 Rbl 

14 Bel 

15 a3 

18 to 

17 NM 

18 KW 

19 ef 

20 N* 

21 Rb2 


Stack 

WWte 

Keek 

Bacrot 

KWnri 

Bacrot 

d5 

22 Rc2 

Bhfi 

|g 

23 Bb3 

Qd3 

24 Qd3 

Rd3 

Ntt 

25 SB 

B* 

C5 

28 Nc3 

NIB 

Nee 

27 Bb2 

KtS 

e« 

28 Kg2 

ReS 

6 

29 Bel 

30 Rfl 

Bg7 

RedS 


■ 31 b4 

Rt3 

d4 

32 KB 

RU3 

QdB 

33 Kg2 

Ne4 

RacS 

34 Nd5 

Bd4 

bS 

35NC7 

b5 

de 

36 Nb5 

t*4 

RMS 

37 mu 

at 

e5 

38 Bb2 

b3 

et 

39 Kfl 

R23 

N<M 

40 Kel 

R£3 

NS 

41 Kfl 

d3 

NhS 

42 Rcl 

Re2 


43 Resigns 


played a different type, like Charlie 
Allnut in “The African Queen” or Cap- 
tain Queeg in “The Caine Mutiny,” 
part of the appeal of his performance 
was fee contrast. 

Still another possibility is simple nos- 
talgia for a dramatic form in which, for 
all the moral ambiguity of die characters 
Bogart played, the issues of good and evil 
were dearer. This, at any rate, is the main 
appeal of reading about Bogart at length 
in these two exhaustive biographies. 

In other respects, Bogart s life seems 
all too femiliar. The derails of his priv- 
ileged background as tbe eldest child of 
Dr. Belmont DeFdrest Bogart and Maud 
Humphrey, a nationally known illus- 
trator, are not that revealing (although 
Sperber and Lax do disclose what a 
dysfunctional family Bogart was raised 
in). Nor are the events leading to his 
breakthrough in the role of the sinister 
Duke Mantce in Robot Sherwood's 
stage play “The Petrified Forest." 

Unsurprising, too, are the major 
themes of these biographies, Bogart's 
four stormy romances t I must have a 
wife,” Meyers quotes Bogart as in- 
sisting); his Jong and exhausting 
struggle wife Warner Brothers for fee 
freedom to play the roles he wanted to, 
and his near-brush with public disap- 

Sammittee on Un-Ammam Activities 
in the early days of the Cold War. 

And in neither of these books does fee 
account of Bogart’s courageous fight 
against a fatal esophageal cancer sur- 
, Alistair Cooke's description in his 
essay “Humphrey Bogart: Epi- 
i for a Tough Guy.” 

Jo, where both these books become 
more absorbing is on fee sets of fee major 
movies Bogart made. 

Which of these two books tells Bog- 
art’s story better? Both contain essen- 
tially fee same material. 

What you want, of coarse, is the quick- 
er, more compelling read, and paradox- 
ically you get it in the longer work. 
“Bogart,” which was begun by Sperber, 
who wrote “Murrow: His Life and 
Times,' ’ and was taken over at the time of 
her death in 1 994 by Eric Lax, the author 
of “Woody Allen: A Biography." 

Meyers may use fewer words, but too 
many of them seem beside the point. He 
fills space wife jumbled plot summaries 
of Bogart’s minor movies. He exposes 
the ugly sides of Bogart, like his tend- 
ency to needle people when he was 
drinkin g, without first developing a 
context, thereby making Bogart seem a 
boring bully. He writes about Bogart’s 
sexual affairs wife fee trace of a leer. 

Lax, by contrast, rarely mentions a 
plot wrinkle in a Bogart film without 
relating it to some larger issue. He digs 
deeper into Bogart's story, as when lie 
interviews Robert Blake about his ex- 
perience playing the 13-year-old street 
urchin who sells Bogart a lottery ticket 
in “Treasure,” but such excursions al- 
ways sharpen the picture of Bogart. The 
result is altogether smoother and more 
coherent. 


Christopher Lehmann-Haupt is on 
the staff Of The New York Times. 


■k ■ • WT~ 


tyJ-3 L VTA.; 


S^^tlcuttura) Readings in the News. 


•v 






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Living in a World at War 
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styles (interviews, reports, casual analysis, etc.), the 


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Clockwise from bottom left: Summer for winter. Princess Caroline in white lace: Blumarine fur-trimmed cardigan; from Saint Laurent, 
navy and white; Marc Jacobs’s summer velvet; the Met’s Latvian winter costume, and impressions of summer by Frederick C. Frieseke. 


By Suzy Menkes 

international Herald Tribune 


N EW YORK— Like 
asparagus, salmon 
or strawberries, 
fashions now are 
never out of season. May 
should be the month to shake 
out the silks, freshen up the 
cottons and take out those 
white shoes put to bed last 
fall. 

Especially the white 
shoes. 

The final death knell for 
fashion's seasonal etiquette 
was sounded by Kathleen 


cep table moment to wear white fur, to a fifth season, velvet or even funy trims, 
white, the social barricades That is the modem world of while Dolce & Gabbana’s fall 
had stood firm. But they have “cool wool.” lacy knits and collectionhad rose and cherry 


finally been breached. A sharp the around-the-year bare leg 
intake of breath greeted Prin- — be it ever so blue, mottled 


cess Caroline of Monaco or goose-bumped. 


when she appeared in a white On the walls, quotations staple of navy and white, 
lace Chanel dress in March from Proust, Shakespeare and Whal has happened in 

(March!) at a formal reception etiquette experts like Miss fashion to produce the sar- 
to honor Mstislav Rostrop- Manners recreate the lost tonal equivalent of the deep- 
ovich. world of seasonal dressing, frozen petits pois or the air- 

“The complete abandon- Our Deportment magazine freighted mango? 
merit of seasonal etiquette is a suggested in 1882 that “for ‘ ‘It is not incidental that the 

phenomenon of the 1990s.” winter, colors should be rich show has a fiber sponsor,” 
said Richard Martin, curator of and warm,” and the “Book Martin said, referring to the 
“The Four Seasons” exhib- of Etiquette” in 1922 decreed support of Du Pont Tactel 
ition at the Costume Institute that “summer frocks in their nylon. Fabric innovations 


collection had rose and cherry 
prints. Only Yves Saint 
Laurent, aiming for classic el- 
egance, offered the spring 
staple of navy and white. 

Wbal has happened in 
fashion to produce the sar- 
torial equivalent of the deep- 
frozen petits pois or the air- 
freighted mango? 

“It is sot incidental that the 
show has a fiber sponsor,” 


ition at the Costume Institute 
of the Metropolitan Museum 


Turner in the 1994 movie (until Aug. 17). “There are 
“Serial Mom.” She turned virtually no vestiges of the old 


her killer instinct on the un- 
pardonable sin of wearing 
white shoes after Labor Day 
— and every cinema-goer un- 
der 35 chortled at such quaint 
suburban standards. 

In Paris, where May Day is 
supposed to be the first ac- 


rules of dress.” 

Significantly, the show is 
orchestrated (and yes. Vivaldi 
is playing on the sound track) 
from spring greens, through 
the white Edwardian summer 
muslins, leaf patterns for fall 
and snowballs of winter- 


airy flimsiness and gay colors 
are ideally fitted for ... a lawn 
party." 

But here is Harper’s Bazaar 
in March 1997: “Spring is 
dead: Cream off die froth . . . 
and what you’re really look- 
ing at is a roster of clothes you 
could wear at any time of the 
year.” Hence winter-for-sum- 


nylon. Fabric innovations 
have transformed the season- 
al pattern, for microfiber is as 
warm as wool and a synthetic- 
velvet dress seems appropri- 
ate for summer. 


pallid dress. That fresh air and 
escapism appears in modern 
times as a pink gingham- 
checked dress from Cormne 
des Garcons or a red-and- 
whiie napkin-checked suit 
(complete with embroidered 
ants) by Marc Jacobs. 

Proust once described a 
Fortuny dress as “a spring- 
time decanted, reduced to its 
essence.” Thai same spirit is 
captured in a salmon-and -cu- 
cumber pleated dress from Is- 
sey Miyake, and a gather-ye- 
rosebuds 18th-century gown. 

Witty touches are scattered 
through the show, which 
opens with aspring shower a 
clear vinyl raincoat sparkling • 
with rhinestone raindrops (by 
Oscar de la Renta in 1967). It 


Youthquake in Paris: ; 

Margiela Joins Hermes | 




Central heating and air- closes with a 1993 sweater 
conditioning, by providing dress by Jean Paul Gaultier, 


constant temperatures, have 
killed the need for clothes as 
armor against die elements. 


where the argyle-pattem knit 
is deconstructed into a mesh. 


rner shows were filled with The Met shows an 1860 en- 
semble from Latvia — an ei- 






deidown jacket trimmed with 
feathers. And fashion’s de- 
fensive role is also empha- 
sized in fashion illustrations 
of warmly dressed men strug- 
gling rm a gusty day to control 
their umbrellas. 


M UCH has been 
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which flags fly briskly above a 


something has been lost by 
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“To every thing there is a 
season, and a time to every 
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sky in cheny -picking time. 


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01 4742 50 10 


International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — In a bold and imaginative 
gesture that will stun the luxury 
fashion world, Hermes — a com- 
pany dedicated to status-symbol 
silk scarves and leather bags — has ap- 
pointed as design director Martin Margiela, 
king of fashion deconstruction and thrift- 
shop recycling. 

The Belgian designer, who just turned 
40. will create toe ready-to-wear women’s 
collections for Hermes, which had world- 
wide sales of more than 4 billion French 
francs ($690 million) in 1996. 

Margiela’ s appointment is a fresh tremor 
in toe youtoquake shaking Paris fashion. It 
follows toe news that 55-year-old Stella 
McCartney is to succeed Karl Lagerfeld at 
Chloe and fills one of many empty designer 
seals. They include vacancies at Balmain, 
Balenciaga, Cerruti and Loewe. 

“I am not looking for a revolution, bat 
Hermes has always been an innovator and 
Martin Margiela has a savoir faire, an at- 
tention to detail, a global vision and toe 
ability to project into tbe future,’ ’ said Jean- 
Louis Dumas, president of Hermes, on 
Monday, adding that he and his new prot£g6 
both feel nervous about their collaboration 
— but in a positive way. 

“It’s vexy eariy. I have to start and see 
how it is going to work out,” said Margiela, 
whose first collection will be shown in 
1998. “We are very flattered. Hermes has 
to do with quality and tradition and it seems 
close to our way of being.” 

Why would high-class Hermes take on 
Margiela, whose anti-coosumerist fashion 
ethos tnarked the end of toe bravura fashion 
years in toe 1980s? His shows, featuring 
visible seams, raw terns and recycled jeans 
(pockets, knee pads and all), have been held 
on squatters’ wasteland or famously in a 
Salvation Army goods depot in 1992. 

More recently, Margiela has been ob- 
sessed with the technique of couture. His 
March show in Paris featured models who 
tumbled off buses wearing wigs made of 
recycled flea-market fws. They were ser- 
enaded by a brass band as they stewed 
coats in various stages of completion, from 
the basic canvas through versions with just 
one sleeve. 

But behind the provocative shows, the 
reclusive Margiela (who refuses to be pho- 
tographed) is a brilliant te chnician, pas- 
sionate about toe craft of fashion. His in- 
ventive mind is applied to everything from 
knitwear (often recycled or using boiled 
wool) to his signature Japanese sock-boots, 
divided at the toes. 

Margiela’s flea-market style is really a 
sophisticated and intricate study of toe tail- 
oring of the past to re-create his vision of tbe 

future, where the an and craft of couture 
once again become the cornerstones of 
fashion, in that, he and Hermes are at one. 

“I was not looking for a star to perform in 
my theater — I want to nourish the style of 
Hermes, Dumas said. “And I always 
dream rhai our signature will be discreet and 


that toe chic of the garment will speak for i 
itself.” I 

That seems hanl to reconcile with brassy ■ 
“H” for Hermes belts, toe distinctively j 
whimsical neckties and toe new fancy- 
colored Kelly bags, which are star products. | 
Ready-to-wear clothing accounts for only ■ 
13 percent of Hermes sales. i 

But discretion is certainly Maigiela’s J 
spirit. His own “designer label” is a square ; 
of plain white cotton stitched an at each • 
comer and he is a shadowy and enigmatic , 
presence, wearing a traditional couturier’s , 
white smock and signature sailor's cap. 

With profits up 13.1 percent in 19% over I 
the previous year at 404 million francs, ; 
Dumas can afford to take a risk — es- ■ 
peciaUy since he is keeping one of toe . 
previous design team. Thomas Maier, co- ! 
designer for Reviflon, will continue to week ; 
at Hermes ;on tailoring and leather. He said < 
that Margiela will "give a lot of oxygen.” ! 

Margiela. a graduate of the Antwerp ! 
Academic des Beaux Arts, and one of the so- j 
called “Antwerp Six" designers in the ! 
1980s. worked as an assistant for Jean Paul ! 
Gaultier for three years and laimrJWI hfr first ’ 
Paris show in 1989. He was the first designer ; 
to bring ecology to fashion's cutting edge by • 
stressing the poetry of loved and Iived-m ! 
clothes — even using photo prints of old ; 
clothes cm the new. His edgy presentations 1 
have included in 1994 a “retrospective" of 5 
all his previous work, dyed gray. J 

The dedication of Margiela and his col- \ 
laboraior Jenny Maims has been appre-J 
ciated by forward-looking retailers, al- . 
though many say off tbe record that they are*” 
maddened by the pretentious presenta- 
tions. 

“I am an absolute fan of Martin’s talent* 
and craftsmanship and for his respect for 
artisanal skills,” says Maria Louisa Pou-" 
maillou, who stocks Maigiela’s clothes in^ 
her Paris boutique. “But he turns me bflr 
completely with his insistence on staying*! 
underground and avant-garde. Why doeshe*' 
do those shows that make the dothes so,; 
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Barneys in New York, admires tbe^ 
fact that Margiela has “made him-" 1 
self an enigma,” describing ft as a j 
"carefully orchestrated image that lookfr' j 
nonchalant.” uj 

Bonnie Pressman, the fashion direettff, at 1 1 
Barneys, praises the new appointment as ^ I 
modem approach. .“ 

“Itisarealst^jforHennesiiuotoeneict^ 

cent ury,’ ’ste said. “Martin is so right pa 

his proportions, cuts, tailoring and knit-? 
wear. He can be boto very classic^ or - 
avant-g^ide. I think it is brilliant of Hermes? 
to do this and they’ll both get a lot front one- 
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HrealiQBSritront 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1997 


PAGEU 




% 


On-Line Maverick Bets 
The Far ir 1 on the Future 

Cisco Strives to Make the Internet Profitable 


By Steve Lohr 

New Tori Times Service 


NEW YORK — As the leading 
maker of the netw orkin g gear that 
keeps the Internet running, Cisco Sys- 
tems Inc. is an Internet company 
through and through. But recently, 
Cisco has increased its bet on the Net 
even further. 

The Silicon Vall ey company not only 

sells Internet equipment; since last Au- 
gust, it has been selling its gear on the 
Internet. The results have been impress- 
ive and couldpoint the way for busi- 
nesses to finally turn the World Wide 
Web into a money-making wwfinm , 

Sales from Cisco’s site on the Web 
have reached nearly $5 million a day, a 
rate in excess of $1.8 billion a year. By 
July, the company expects the rate to 
hit $2 billion a year, equal to nearly 
one-third ofits current wnrmai sales. 

This on-line order-taking, moreover, 
is just one of the operations thatCisco 
has moved onto die Internet. Its credit 
checking, production scheduling, basic 
technical support and routine custom- 
er-support inquiries are alsohandled on 
line. The benefits, Cisco says, are fester 
service, quicker production cycles and 
savings — measured in everything 
from labor costs to printin g charges — 
of $535 millio n a year. 

As one ofNcgfeem California’s hi gh- 
tech stars, of course, Cisco cam move its 
busmess-to-bosmess daaKngg onto die 
Internet more readily than many other 


companies. But Peter- Solvik, Cisco's 
chief Info rmatio n officer, wirisK that 
before long, companies in any field will 
be able to do the same. 


what we’re doing is going to 
commonplace,” Mr. Solvik said. 
“Busmess-to-bosmess commerce is 
the killer application of the Internet.” 
The promise of cyberspace has typ- 
ically been portrayed by technology 
enthusiasts m visionary terms — a 

Tbe personal computer industry is 
stffl growing strongly. Page 12. 

populist vision of on-line shopping, 
playing games, watching movies and 
doing homework. No facet of enter- 
tainment or education, culture or com- 
merce, and no American household, 
will be untouched by the technological 
transformation led by the Internet, the 
visionaries say. 

~ y, it may happen — as it did 
with the telephone, initially an instru- 
ment of busmess-to-business commu- 
nications that only later became 
household necessity. But to _ 
die biggest opportunity for using 
temet technology soon, shift die focus 
from the visions to the details inside 
the offices of corporate America, 
where workers handle chores such as 
purchasing, accounting, customer ser- 

See CISCO, Page 15 


a 



Andre; S nJi^m /Tbc No. lock Tima 

Sales from Cisco System’s Web site have readied nearly $5 million aday. 


Dollar-Buyers Ignore 
Warning From the G-7 

More Gains Predicted as Currency Rises 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 


LONDON — The dollar seemed to 
brush aside warnings Monday from the 
governments of the world's seven 
largest economies that its two-year in- 
crease had gone far enough. 

The dollar reached a three-year high 
against die Deutsche mark and the yen 
before giving up much of its gains in late 
New York trading after fresh warnings 
from European and Japanese officials 
that the currency’s appreciation had run 
its course. 

In Washington, Finance Minister 
Hiroshi Mitsuzuka of Japan warned the 
markets Monday that the Group of Sev- 
en was losing patience with the dollar’s 
continued rise. He also hinted again that 
Tokyo might intervene to prop up die 
yen. The Bundesbank's president, Hans 
Tietmeyer. said. “We don’t want an 
overheating of the dollar.” 

The dollar was at 1.7328 DM at 4 
P.M. in New York, compared with 
1.7274 DM on Friday. It was also at 
126.895 yen, up from 126.300 yen, at 
1.4735 Swiss francs, up from 1.4685 
francs, and at 5.8400 french francs, up 
from 5.8295 francs. But the pound 
edged up to $1.6247 from $1 .6245. 

Despite die warnings, wluch echoed 
statements made over the weekend, cur- 
rency traders said they thought the dollar 
had further to go and chat the G-7, which 
comprises the United States, Japan, Ger- 
many, France, Britain. Italy and Canada, 
would be powerless to stop it 


Many analysts agree with the G-7 
officials that die economic fundament- 
als now favor a stalling in the dollar's 
rise. Where they differ is on the ques- 
tions of timing and levels. Many fore- 
casters continue to expect a rise in the 
dollar to around 130 yen and 1.80 DM 
over the next three months. 

Economists expect fresh impetus for 
that rise to emerge this week from a 
series of economic statistics that are 
expected to show strength in the already 
robust US. economy, a picture that will 
contrast markedly with the weaker econ- 
omies of Japan and Germany. 

Those figures are also expected to 
increase pressure on the Federal Re- 
serve Board to raise interest rates at its 
next meeting May 20 to try to cool the 
economy and to avoid an surge in in- 
flation. Such a rate increase would in- 
crease the attractiveness of holding dol- 
lars instead of yen or marks, as Japanese 
and German rales are expected to re- 
main flat for the rest of the year. 

Nonetheless, with the dollar having 
gained 50 percent against the yen and 
nearly 25 percent against the mask in the 
past two years, even admirers of its long 
run admit that it is looking a bit winded. 

“The dollar is losing, not gaining, 
momentum,” said Paul Meggy esi. senior 
currency economist at Deutsche Morgan 
GrenfelL “I think from here it will just 
grind out its gains rather than spurting 
ahead” By most accounts, it is likely to 
fare best against the German currency. In 

See DOLLAR, Page 12 


Boeing’s Earnings Triple but Still Fail to Meet Wall Street’s Lofty Expectations 


I URfUijiaraf Ana Ofwto 

! SEATTLE — Boeing’ Co. said 
(Monday that its first-quarter profit 


liveries and profits from its new do- 
■frase and sparc units, bm fee company's 

* stock plunged because the earnings did 
| not meet analysts’ expectations. 

• Boeing reported 9377 million in 
! profit, up from $119 mURoa a year 
pearlier. Revenue climbed 70 percent, to 
‘$73 billion from $43 billion. The re- 


sults included a $64 million one-time 
from stock held in a trust account 
■employees. 

Boeing s shares fell $6,625 in New 
York trading, to close at $95375. 

During the quarter ended March 31, 
Boeing delivered 68 commercial jets, 
compared with just 40 for the same 
period last year. Boeing said approx- 
imately 90 aircraft deliveries were 
planned for the second quarter and 340 
for the year. Total rales for the year are 


forecast to be about $33 billion, up from 
$22.7 billion last year. 

The latest quarter was tile first full 
period to include earnings from the de- 
fense and space units Boeing boughr 
from Rockwell International Corp. last 
year. But the gain was partly offset by 
higher research and development ex- 
penses, bigger interest payments and a 
higher income tax rate, Boeing said. 

Separately in Brussels, the European 
Union’s top trade official told U.S. of- 


ficials that America gave too much in- 
direct support to U.S. aircraft makers. 

“We have questions about the level 
of indirect subsidies,” said Peter Guil- 
ford, a spokesman for the European 
trade commissioner, Sir Leon Brittan. 

The EU complaint abour subsidies 
could add a new wrinkle to an inves- 
tigation by Europe’s competition office 
of Boeing's proposed acquisition of 
McDonnell Douglas Corp. 

Sir Leon wrote U.S. authorities about 


six weeks ago expressing dissatisfac- 
tion with the level at which a 1992 
accord on aircraft subsidies has been 
Mr. Guilford said, 
iwhile. Boeing, which is based 
in Seattle, is teaming up with the tikes of 
Motorola Doc.. General Motors Corp., 
American International Group Inc.. In- 
ternational Business Machines Corp. 
and General Electric Co. to protect their 
growing business in China. Hie compa- 
nies have started a lobbying effort to 


persuade Congress to renew China's 
most-favored-nation trading status. 

“This time around, were trying to 
pull a lot more people into the debate 
who may not have been there before," 
said Tim Neale, a spokesman for Boe- 
ing. “This is a grassroots effort to show 
other businesses they have a stake in this 
debate. It isn't just Boeing that exports 
to China; we have suppliers in every 
state who one way or another are af- 
fected.’ ’ (AP, Bloomberg, AFP) 


>■ 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


Euro Vote Lets France Set the Pace 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribute 


W 


and Chancellor Helmut Kohl of Germany has said the need 
to pilot Germany carefully into the euro is one of his main 
reasons for running far re-election next year. 

ASHENGTON — More than any other country. The political contexts are different. Italians and Span- 
France has set the pace of postwar European iards generally want their leaders to take them into the 
— sometimes dramatically applying angle currency. In Germany and France, the onus is rather 

on the leaders to persuade their populaces to follow. British 
leaders share their voters’ doubts. 

But throughout the Union. Euromooey is bringing Euro- 
politics in its wake. As the pooling of national sovereignty 
reaches into such deeply sensitive areas as control of the 
currency, debate is spilling freely 


integration 

the brakes, at other times the throttle. 

Now, with President Jacques Chirac’s sudden call for 


integration is once again in French hands. 

whatever other issues may emerge in the campaign, the 
vote will be widely seen in France and 
beyond as a referendum on the Euro- 
pean Union's plan to introduce a single 
currency, the euro, in January 1999. 

If Mr. Chirac's center-right coali- 
tion retains power, he will take that 
victory as a mandate to do whatever 
may be necessary to bring France into 
the euro, improving the chances that fee currency will start 
on time. If, on the other hand, fee opposition Socialists were 
to win, the European Union’s move to economic and 
monetary union would be in jeopardy. 

It seems inconceivable that Germany could accept the 
Socialists’ current conditions for joining the single cur- 
rency, which include demands for greater political control 
over ~~ ’ ’ - - “ 

Italian r - 

taxation of fee strict budgetary disciplirc feat Germany has 
made a prerequisite of entry. 

The French vote will also inevitably be taken as a 
barometer of opinion in other countries. "Wife the single 
currency now at the heart of die political agenda m virtually 
every member state, economic and monetary umon has 
become the biggest EU-wide political issue since inte- 
gration started in fee 1950s. . . _ . 

The euro is a wild card in the British elections this 
Thursday; the leaders of Italy and Spain have staked then- 

futures on joining fee smgte currency as fom»d» members. 


The French vote wiD be ■ 
taken as a barometer of 
opinion in other countries. 


across national frontiers. 

The process first became clearly vis- 
ible in 1992, when Danish voters ini- 
tially rejected the Maastricht Treaty, 
on which economic and monetary un- 

ion is -based, in a shock referendum 

result that immediately became a sym- 
bol of much wider opposition to European integration. 

Denmark’s verdict was subsequently reversed. But fee 
initial “No” encouraged french opponents of the treaty, 
who very nearly succeeded in derailing it in a referendum 
three months later. Now, if the french elections reveal 
mounting doubts about fee euro and the Socialists do well. 


_ Germany's Socialists may be encouraged to campaign 

■7 European monetary policy, a- relatively weak euro, against Mr. Kohl in a similar vein next year, breaching fee 
jan ana S panish membership from the start and re- Goman establishment’s consensus in favor of economic 

.v u. that IVmiimv hat siul imirm nn lh(* n ir iwit terms. 


and monetary union on the current terms. 

The Europeanization of the debate can only be welcomed. 
Continental Europe’s political and economic elite has done 
a poor job of t ransmi tting its enfeusiasro for the euro to the 
public at large — despite pious promises to do better. 

The euro is the next essential building block in the 
construction of a united Europe. But the EU's leaders have 
to a stronger case for it — a union without broadly 
based democratic support will be built on sand. Mr. Chirac 
will have a lot to answer for if his electoral gamble fails to 
solidify the foundations in fee next few weeks. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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Basletel.41 61/284 22 22 • Zurich tel. 41 1/217 86 86. Lugano tel. 4! 91/923 51 65 
Paris tel 33 1/42 95 03 05 -Luxembourg tel 352/476 831 442 • London tel 44 171/499 91 46 
Monaco tel 377/93 15 73 34 . Vienna tel 431/531 50 120 ■ Montevideo tel 598 2/95 08 67 • Miami tel. 1 305/375 78 14 
Hong Kong tel 852/28 02 28 88 • Singapore tel 65/535 94 77 






PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 



Investor’s America 


30-Year T-Bond Yield 



5700 

535 rru. 

[ Dollar ;n. Deutsche marks 









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Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 

Imcnuncaal Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Marvel Unveils a Rescue Plan: Merge With Toymaker 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Marvel Enter- 
tainment Group Inc., the force be- 
hind the Spider-Man and X-Men 
characters, said Monday it planned 
to merge with a company that made 
toys based on Marvel characters to 
tty to emerge from bankruptcy-law 
protection. 

The plan, which drew opposition 
from the company’s bondholders, 
represents yet another twist in the 
saga of Marvel, which has pitted die 
1980s-style financiers Carilcahn and 
Ronald Perelman against each other. 

In February. Mr. Icahn, Marvel’s 
leading bondholder, won a major 


ailing in bankruptcy court that gave 
bondholders the right to seize 79 
percent of the comic-book com- 
pany's stock. Mr. Perelman, who 
currently owns those shares, with- 
drew his own plan of reorganization, 
which included a merger with the 
toy company. Toy Biz Inc. 

The new plan would give Marvel’s 
bank lenders 28 percent of the com- 
bined Marvel and Toy Biz plus the 
proceeds of a new S250 million term 
loan, a five-year, $170 million note 
from the combined company and full 
ownership of Marvel's Flecr/Sky- 
Box trading-card unit arid its Panini 
children's sticker subsidiary. Those 


units then would be sold. Holders of Scott Sassa. chairman and chief 
Marvel shares, who would largely be executive officer of Marvel, said the 
the current bondholders after they new p lan treated all parties "as fairly 
foreclose on Marvel's shares, would as possible" and provided "an op- 
get warrants to buy 12.5 percent of portunity for Are holding-company 
Marvel/Toy Biz. bondholders and Marvel's equity 

Bondholders expressed displeas- holders to receive a recovery. " 
ure with the deal Marvel said its chief lender, Chase 

“Under this proposed plan, the Manhattan Bank, supported toe pro- 
banks and Toy Biz would gain a posaL, which will have to be approved 
windfall ai the expense of the share- by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Helen 
holders," said Paul Cazniniti, a Bahck in Wfinungtoo. Delaware, 
spokesman for toe bondholders’ among other procedural sreps. 
commitiee. Marvel, the largest comic-book 

“We will fight this plan vigor- seller and the leafing producer of 
ously with every legal remedy avail- trading cards in toe United States, 
able under toe bankruptcy laws." got into financial trouble when col- 


lectors who bought its cards ami 

appetite for such puK* 0 ^,-,. 

In its bankruptcy court fflmg m 
rwgmber Marvel, based in New 
YorkJisted assets of $229.6 million 
and liabilities of $693.2 million. 

^el'snewreorganizattmi^ 
said the company wouMj 
other bids for toe combined Marvel 
and Toy Biz, or for 
certain circumstances. 

than Marvel would be paid a S7 s y 
million break-up fee. 


• 3 DO Co. plans to sell its hardware business to Samsung 
Electronics Co. for $20 million. 

• AirToucfa Communications Lnc-’s first-quarter profit rose 
23 percent, to $64 million, or 13 cents a share, from $52 
million, or 10 cents a share, a year earlier. 

• Chase Manhattan Bank is offering its own free on-line 
banking service, as the largest U.S. bank competes for a 
growing piece of the so-called tellerless banking market. 

• Ford Motor Co. is cutting 125 jobs at its plant in Avon 
Lake, Ohio, because of slow sales of its Mercury Villager 
minivan. 

• Newmont Mining Corp. and its operating unit, Newmont 


Satellite-TV Deal Hits a Snag 


CiMfailgf by (7w S*ff Fnm D Lpa ihes 

WASHINGTON EchoStar 
Communications Corp. said 
Monday that News Corp. may 
drop its plan to invest $1 billion in 
the satellite-television company if 
EchoStar does not agree to use 
News Corp.’s subscriber-security 
system. 

The companies said they were 
delaying their applications for reg- 
ulatory approval because they 
have not been able to resolve the 
dispute. “There can be no assur- 
ance that News Corp. will proceed 
with an investment in EchoStar." 
EchoStar said. 


News Corp. and MCI Commu- 
nications Corp. agreed in February 
to spend SI billion for 50 percent 
of EchoStar and combine tbeir 
satellites into a new satellite-tele- 
vision company called Sky. The 
companies planned to invest as 
much as S2.5 billion in 18 months 
on a network to reach 75 percent of 
U.S. viewers with small satellite 
dishes. Cable companies that are 
battling the plan refer to it as 
“Death Star.” 

EchoStar said News Corp. 
asked it late Friday to abandon its 
Nagra S A conditional access sys- 
tem. The system involves a card 


inserted into subscribers’ set-top 
box. which allows the broadcaster 
to ensure that the signals are re- 
ceived only by paying customers. 

EchoStar said it requested ad- 
ditional information about News 
Corp.’s conditional access system 
to determine whether it would 
meet terms set in the letter of agree- 
ment between the companies. 

-The chairman of News Corp., 
Rupert Murdoch, may be seeking 
to gain more control over the net- 
work, analysts said. Mr. Murdoch 
will be chairman and toe EchoStar 
chairman. Charles Ergen, will be 
chief executive. (AP, Bloomberg) 


Profit Optimism Buoys 
A Cautious Wall Street 


PC Industry’s Growth: Pretty Cheery 


Gold Co., said first-quarter earnings rose 91 percent as a 37 
percent increase in production offset declining gold prices. 
Net income rose to $20.4 million from $10.7 milli on a year 
earlier as revenue rose 62 percent, to $266. 1 million. 

• Tyson Foods Inc_ the world’s largest poultry processor, 
said its second-quarter earnings more than tripled, to $48.2 
million, or 22 cents a share, from $14.5 million, or 7 cents a 
share, a year earlier. Bloomberg, ap 

Weekend Box Office 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — “Volcano" dominated the U.S. box 
office over the weekend, with a gross of $14.7 million. Fol- 
lowing are the Top 20 moneymakers, based on Friday’s ticker 
sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


By John Markoff 

New York Tunes Service 


SAN FRANCISCO — Despite Wall Street anxieties 
about toe market for home computers, the personal- 
computer industry continues to show strong growth, 
according to two reports issued Monday. 

Figures from Dataquest toe. and International Dara 
Corp. indicate that the PC industry grew by about 16 
percent worldwide during the first quarter, compared 
with a year ago. 

Wliile Compaq Computer Corp. remains the world 


leader in PC sales, the latest figures show that struggling 
Apple Computer Inc. has fallen from toe global top five 
PC makers for the first time. International Data reported 
that toe top five computer makers for the quarter on a 
worldwide basis were Compaq, IBM Corp., Dell Com- 
puter Corp. Packard Bell-NEC and Toshiba Corp. 

The two market-research concerns differed, 
however, in their assessment of the PC market in the 
United States. International Data said that it grew by 20 
percent in the quarter, faster than any region in the 
world. But Dataquest put toe U.S. growth rate at 15.2 
percent, slower than the global market. 


DOLLAR: Buyers Shrug Off Warning by Group of Seven 


1. Volcano 

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AUarUar 

(UtUversaO 

S60mlDon 

5. The Saint 

(Paramount) 

S5mHllon 

6MunSera1 1600 

(Warner Bros) 

$47nUBon 

7. Grasse Potato Blank 

(HoOmood Pictures) 

S3mimon 

& Scream 

COtmenstor Hints] 

SI.4 m«lor 

9. TtiB DcvIKs Own 

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S13mBon 

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Sl.t million 


Continued from Page 11 

part that reflects a view that Ger- 
many, as well as France and Italy, 
would welcome the economic stim- 
ulus that a weakening of their cur- 
rencies would bring their exporters. 
Japan may have equal if not great- 


er need for an economic boost, com- 
pared with the Europeans, but with 
America’s trade deficit with Japan 
soaring because of the yen’s decline, 
a further erosion of its value would 
be politically unwelcome. 

Still. Paul Chertkow, head of for- 
eign exchange for Union Bank of 


Switzerland, said Washington and 
Tokyo may yet come to terras over 
die dollar’s rise. “With the U.S. 
economy still robust and with U.S. 
exports running at record levels, I 
think that there is less concern in 
Washington with bilateral trade 
Sows with any one nation," he said. . 


CimfAiJ bfOurSs^Frem Dt yaA e x 

NEW YORK — Stock prices 
rose Monday as relief over better- 
than-cxpected corporate profits off- 
set a decline in Boeing's shares. 

But the market’s tone remained 
hesitant amid anxieties about 
whether the inflati on and interest- 
rate outlook would worsen with this 
week's economic reports. 

“If there are any economic trig- 
gers char will influence the Federal 
Reserve Board’s policy direction at 
its May 20 meeting, they will most 
likely be unveiled this week,' ’ said 
Robert Froehlich, chief investment 
strategist for Kemper Funds. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed 44.15 points higher at 
6,783.02. The Standard & Poor’s 
500-stock index rose 7.60 to 
772.97. and the Nasdaq composite 
index gained 7.74 to 1217.03. 

“There’s a lot of financial en- 
gineering going on, but you still 
have to be impressed with what 
American management is doing," 
said Wayne Nordberg, a partner 
with Lord Abbett & Co. “Our costs 
are way below that of Europe and 
Japan, and our management sys- 
tems axe more flexible." 

About 400 of the companies in. 
the S&P 500 have released results 
so tor this quarter, and 75 percent 
have said profits had matched or 
exceeded toe latest expectations. 

That offset some concern that 
economic reports this week would 
show growth strong enough to 
prompt toe Federal Reserve Board 
to raise interest rates, which can 
hurt corporate profits. 

Bonds were little changed as in- 


vestors braced for reports on labor 
costs, economic output and employ-; 
ment this week that may set the stage 
for another interest-rate increase. ! 

“The bet seems to be that we’re 
getting bad news" for bond inves- 

U.S. STOCKS : 

tors that could give the Fed reason 
to raise rates again to try to cool the 
economy, when central bankers 
meet next month, said John Kohn at 
TradeStxeet Investment Advisors. , 
The benchmark 30-year Treas-f 
ury bond rose 12/32 to 94 2/32; 
taking the yield down to 7.11 per-: 
cent from 7.14 percent- • 

American Express, one of the 
biggest gainers in toe Dow, rose 3Va 
to 64*/4 on a report that its credit^ 
card business was growing faster 
than its competitors'. Last week^ 
American Express reported first-- 
quarter earnings that exceeded ana-} 
lysts’ expectations. - 

Other financial shares climl 
with Travelers Group up l%to5 
and J.P- Morgan up 7M at 98%. The 
shares had been on a downtrend the 
past two months as bond yields 
rose. Analysts said their shared 
were inexpensive compared with 
their expected earnings. 

International Business Machines 
fell V* to 150V6, but Compaq Com4 
purer gained H to 7936 after a mar-1 
ket-research firm said worldwide 
personal-computer growth had ac- 
celerated. _j 

McDermott International fell 14 
to 21 ; toe energy-services company 
will report a loss of $90 million for 
its latest quarter. (Bloomberg, AP) 


a 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


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1=7=500000 - pis on 00 pet 
Jim 97 12S4Z 72822 T2S42 +CM15&3B4 
Sep 97 12706 12676 12678 +004 0054 
Dec 97 9650 9660 902 +004 0 

Est tounieBOBl .Open MU16M3B off 
2AS9. * 

mvUA ff OOV EiatMBTT BOMD OflTE} 

sSS ^- 7D 

sep97 127JB 12670 12697 +082 4,977 
go- ««« O40L Pw.toes: 3«I1 
Pift.apBPlnL- 113772 up 3236 

EURODOLLARS (CMBU 
SI mBBooft, at 100 pd. 

Mtrn MS es 

May 97 9X08 K06 9M7 —001 41^80 

Am 97 9198 9396 9197 — OjOI 479A55 

A4T7 9187 fill 9166 —1101 <791 

Sep 97 91ffl 9165 93A6 -0JC 411734 

Dec 97 9139 9135 9137 -102306444 

Mc»9B 9X24 9120 9123 -001 231537 

Am 98 9112 9106 9111 -002 207753 

Sep 98 9102 9256 93JE -001 10750 

Dec 98 9192 9209 9291 -030130,147 

Mcr 99 92.93 72» 9271 -002 IM.I74 

Am 99 9289 9205 9188 -001 81.404 

Sft99 92*5 9202 9286 -001 62051 

Esi-scfts NA- Frr&sd« 1360 
FcTsopenir* 44A2B off 25517)6 


37008 

630 

W1 


76090 

MB 

1>254 


Pievtoos 


■19670 

2X33 

49779 


Dividends 

Company Per Amt Rec Pay 

IRREGULAR 

ALPwrwflplA93 * 0412 6-3 7-1 

CopttalsmwsT - JO 5-15 5-30 

PiupaTyCapTr . 06 5-12 5-23 

5cwWerGfwtoco - .14 4-25 4-30 

INCREASED 

Creator Find Q 39 5-5 5-21 

FJWlnUA, 0 A0 4-3 4-17 

UnSeOFedSrgs Q 06 S-TS <2 

SPECIAL 

IPCMoUsgs - 1.00 &-10 6-26 

Ntllimr>Crpn . 108 5-5 5-9 

PrapotyCapTr _ M 5-12 5-23 


;{* YE ARE HD 

lit coca Cob Femso .0668 


5-9 


INITIAL 

AttarOlc Hdifid n .7125 S-I6 6-13 
Dime Bern corp _ 04 5-16 6-16 

REGULAR 

Apartment few Q AOS M 5-15 

CR Find Q JO 3-31 *-20 

CbwiITtoCbfim O 09 55 515 

CsrainCOUOg 5 .15 513 6-30 


Compony 
Ferro Corp 
Find Bancorp 
FstFtnHou 
Fst Patriot 
Hencadc Pot Set 
Hareeis Casino 
Highlander Inca 
IPCHotrSng 
Investors Fm 
Iretto Apartment 
LSlIndost 
LTV Corp 
Lo*rter Inti 

LuttlzotCorp 

MCN Enemy 
McDonald Doug 
MerchorrtsGmup 
MlrruJernon Inti 
NCNohffGcs 
OlhXosh True* B. 
PttksWlRn 
Ptn node West 
SISBanato 
SvgsBk Finger 
SensomwflcEi 
Standard FZi 
Ur*reredMfB 
YonkeraFln 


(A 


Per AjjjT Rec Pay 
Q .155 515 6-10 
a .10 56 5-20 

Q .18 59 5-23 

Q .03 5-9 5-30 

M .1031 5-5 5-30 

Q 05 515 4-1 

M 094 55 528 
Q JI75 6-10 6-26 
Q 02 4-30 5-15 
q -365 55 530 
Q 05 513 530 
Q 03 515 
0 .10 516 

a 05 

0 JC 5 . . 

Q .12 56 
05 516 
.11 530 515 
05 530 513 
-125 56 513 
09 59 5» 

275 52 

.12 
.10 

055 55 519 
.10 4-30 51S 


44 

. 53 

59 510 
59 523 
7-7 
52 


51 
5S 523 
57 521 


05 5S 52D 
05 <28 515 


o-OHoatb-aporadaote amount per 
8 nV>P8i g-p oi ito le to fim o dlm , toady 
n- muo l lil T: q-qmiTTgtv: s-s e nd-gmi u ol 


An 97 6400 OJD OJS —407 31483 

Aug 97 64.12 6187 64JB -085 3<S69 

00 97 66. 40 6872 l&JS -005 13^23 

DK 97 7622 7007 76.15 -60S SA* 

FttW n0D 7aw 7075 5AS 

Aft 98 72J0 7275 7170 -80S 971 

EsLtoas 9739 FfTitoes 9.933 
FtViCpenW 91.953 up 41 

FEEDER CATTLE {CMER} 
som tbs. -cam ear m 
May 97 7X35 7195 7100 -0.17 

A*«97 7S.9S 7557 7L96 +005 

SBp 97 TITS 75AJ 7570 +03S 

0097 76.10 7570 7605 MUO 

NW*7 7780 77 JO 77 JO +045 

JOn 98 7U5 78.10 7825 +020 

Esttoes 2013 Frt-Ltoe 3473 
FrTsBpenM 20228 up 205 

HDC5LeoiiavSU 
«A0O to., cent, par to. 

An 77 844 8140 Bin -442 

Jilt 97 |U5 KM IU0 -025 

Aug 97 8300 8147 8270 — 0.17 

0077 TUB 71« 7£4j -037 

Dec 97 73.90 7X50 7270 -070 

Es.toes 7 JOi Ffi'i.toes &3S4 
Frfs open inf SAS up 177 

PORK BELUES (CMS?) 

«UX» to.- cent, ftc to- 
MB997 7700 9035 9075 -105 

All 77 72JD 9035 9025 -Ji8 

AupTT 1835 tt.W ES75 -872 

EsLscfcs 3.717 Fri’s, toe *0*6 
FVfsooovlnt 8000 UP -Q5 


Food 


Close 

LONDON METALS QJAE) 
Dtttorepermefrtckn 

l^^ S |»3J» 154756 1S7DH 

TOoBSyg" 1599flo 

246500 246700 2S61V5 2S63V4 
^ 236500 236600 237200 237300 

Fftworf 


5783 

7.19S 

1494 

1499 

7*280 

3W 


17754 

6056 

5765 

47(3 

1127 


2088 

OB7 

10C 


61900 

62900 


62000 

63000 


61900 

63000 


62000 

63100 


Spot 733500 734500 
FWwd 745600 746000 
Tip 

Spot 568500 569500 
fijfwont 573000 574000 

Foiwml 126600 1266 H 


732500 733500 
743500 744500 

569000 570000 
574000 574500 

124719 124954 
126900 127100 

High Low Oom Chge Opfait 


I k. 4, 
<»* A 

in m 

IM NW IM 
7tr> Jff » 

14 10 14 

m m in 
p< uu m 
16*6* Kh 16V. 
1»» IO* 15 


rrtt 

im 

►ft 

1*1 

nv» 

-ft 

Hfa 

1BW 

ft 

lift 

ISM 

►Vk 

ft 

ft 



1 

1 

ft 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sales Kgores m imafBcki Ysxtf Nfa end lom reflto 52 web <*s the ament 

to but nttOie fatal noting doy- Wlww spNorttoditfiiWefldoiiourtngio25 patHrtannafe 
ms bean ptta the yeas Ittfwow range oat dMdend at dom fcrthB new stocks arty. Untess 
uHiswtonoleAwOeaaliiwjetiifcttettVMilOMtoi^oicfetiasHlttiltolBAftlda rin r a lluiL 
a - dividend an ema fsj. b - amwirf rale at dwWentl ptos stock tiiHenL e- fiquWating 
dMdend. cc - PE esoetos nx* • cafcd. 0 - tiem yearly law. dd . las In Ihe last 1 3 months, 
e - dMdend dedotto or paM to preceding 12 monffis. f- onnuol rate Increased on lost 
dedarmion. g - tfvWenrt m Canodkm eubjed to 15% nan-reNOence fa*. I - dhWend 

»!«Siiaclat>er3plil-uporstodidlvideficLI-cfl»W0nilp«totte7eo , .iimlt(«L*fcrtttJiori» 

action token at latest dnifend mseBng. k - dWdenO *dared or paid ttib year, on 
occutnatoffw b*ue rth dividends In aneaa. at - annual mte reduasl an ^dectadiaa. 
a - m issue In me past 52 weeks. The MgMarn mnge booms ^ wWi (toi start at tiwHng. 
to -itod dm deBwy.p-WBalifitfldend. annual rote unknown. fVE-prtce-eanWngsnrtla 
g-ctoBto-ato mutual tuto.r-i8*HetrtdeciareawpaWtoprecedl^l2nwot^plj«aoc< 
dMdend. s - SWA spSL DMdend begins wflli date at spffl. Sis - sates, t - dMaend paid in 
stark In orettdiin 12 monttis, esftnaled cosh wtoe on a-dMdeto wawfctrfbutlon dole. 

u«newreartvhlAv-titn^teltedd-totwnkiupfcyorrecB*ereAtowW^re«gm*atf 

undeftlieBOTkroSicyAtto7»antteBS8Ww edty5Ucft axTtoanto 

to - when teuetfw - Willi «rrarts. x - 

me - without wammb. r ovtoeWend and sates In yW lieu, i- soles mtulL 


COCOA (NCSE3 
lOiTWrietens-s wkn 


MOV 77 

M6 0 

M43 

WO 

-s 

Jifl97 

1468 

UW 

HM 

-15 

Stp 77 

M92 

1478 

1478 

-12 

tee 97 

1W 

1479 

1499 

-12 

MW 98 

153 

1SB 

ISM 

-5 

Mm 98 



ISO 

— 13 


475 
S733 
11530 
17071 
19013 

- WB 

EsI. sales 2014 Fn * ides 8016 
Fri'sooenW 7701 8 up V90 

C0FFSECWO83 

VJOQto-opftperto. 

MOV 97 22065 216J0 22025 +379 2036 

All 97 197 JD I920J I9&S0 ‘I2S I<ffT 

Sep 97 17950 17550 17100 +150 6017 

Dec 97 14200 15865 U10D +-IJ0 <260 

Marts 15100 14950 +075 1.766 

Es). sales SJBi Frfs. soles 08 
FfTisosnirt 30044 IS> *2 

SUGAfMMRLDIl MCSE) 

1 12ABB nv- tee to. 

M0997 1157 11A) 1149 -006 34J74 

A497 11.13 1101 1107 -fl.07 K767 

0097 10.92 1185 1190 —006 3U5< 

McrfB IIS 1080 ISA? -OOJ 32067 

B».tofiS 41023 Frfs. toes 17423 
Frrsinnirt 177,172 off 1878 


Fbiandsl 
U5T. 8X15 ICMHt) 

U mean- mar ISO act 

S 97 KSi M54 M54 -402 <943 
77 94S 9*04 9404 — QJB 1448 

08C 97 9408 8C 

Btsttes NA. Fit's, soles 68< 

FVTlteponM I <611 UP 70 

5 YR. TREASURY (CB0T3 
MM8B erto- PK & Mho at wo pa 
Jun97 104-M lw-06 106-10 —01 234428 

StonKfl-M m-B 10-58 -81 1565 

tec 97 103-51 20 

EfitoW .NA. RfS-SBlEi 39047 
Frf&Qaenmi 210540 off 27SBI 

18 YR. TREASURY (CSOT! 

0“j«»5in- «s < ttitooi iso ro 
An 97 I0S-I4 105-W 185-14 —81 3&OS3 

Sep 97 105-01 106-38 105-00 km 

DBC97W-T7 low; »4-77 -* TSf 

g.80tes NA. Frfs.88186 B0*S 
FrfsopenW 349J5 off Sit 

US TREASURY BCR0SS (CBOT) 

«»pctj 

Jim 97 10749 106-30 1B7-W 651031 

Sent? 156-24 106-17 104-23 tDl 42.WS 
CtoWlOWB 106-04 104-08 -02 tUm 

Myvs town 2JOT 

Brt.toBS HA. FrfAtoBS »»,*« 
FrfsopenM 549550 UP 407)8 

LOMGCHLTUJFFEJ 

ST'W5in& 

^sap^sf T “ m ° <um > 


BRTTBH POlN) tCMBO 
62000 t>ounas.SPar pound 
Jur 97 15254 10194 1JBO 
Sep 77 10238 10180 l-fflCO 
0scf7 10170 

Est toes NA Frflxito 3014 
Frfsopentnt 38729 off w 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMSt) 

100000 doBorv S Mr Qfcv dh- 
Jun77 7173 7144 7168 

S»>97 7715 jm Jm 

Doc 97 7266 7240 7343 

Estates NA Frfs. toes 4022 
FrfsmnM 83022 up 453 

amunmoBo 

13S0BO marks., ear marts 
Jun 97 5852 5748 5798 I10S3 

S»V7 JSH1 5836 -5836 3.183 

DK77 5085 5885 5888 3RD 

Rfs-ictes M0U 
Frfi open Ini 84085 up ? sss 

JAPANESE TO* (CMSQ 

izs MBon vtn. t par loo von 

Jur 97 JQ22 7501 7940 83074 

S®>97 012B 0046 JOSt 1^99 

DOC 77 0230 1165 0145 705 

Etf.sotos NA Frfs. toes 1<401 

FrfsopenM 85088 up 1941 

SWS5 FRANC (CMER) 

12M0D francs. Spar ime 
Am 97 0885 0800 0829 4.184 

Sjp97 0950 0880 0»7 2.KJ7 

Da 97 01Ri 428 

Eft toes NA Fri*s.toes 71705 
FrfSopenH 45771 off 1506 

iSRSP* aiFra 

goaooo-p&Qnoopd 
A mg 9306 <S3l 

Sap97 BiOB 9X03 

Dto7 9204 9279 

kSff S2 5^1 71£r * wn 

Mn 9256 9201 

9207 9201 

Date 9207 9204 

IWJJ 9230 9X29 

JUB99 912S 922* _ 

jrt-toet ? 34010. Pm. toes 53530 
Pmw.epenlaL: 477A2S up SUB 

tffS "i N-T. MM 4-001 <398 

Sjp77 7400 9407 

DW7 9653 965D 

76J3 9435 

iS3 2S-K 

TO &t 

jwg ^ 

S559 945S 9453 

tec 99 9409 9407 

NmOO 940S 9401 

S: 1-8 * 144199 

Pre*.os«eit 1071576 op 22.IBI 
»«Ol4THWaM(MATIB 

^^^§^^33 4^74,3,4 
MA3 MJ8 9L39 

Doc 97 9403 9635 904 ni j<ju 

ffffgS Bfi 8548 S! 

Mft 99 9551 9552 9552— an? loiS 
S« 99 9505 «« tn 00 
««00 9456 9*56 ^ 

y ». whmie; S4SM. open hL- Z8<343 op 

WWKTOBUROUlAOIffE) 
m.1 RAon^NeottoOpc} 


S2 -Ml 11M49 
7304 UactL 94203 
9201 * 003 79061 

na *om sijso 

92B +003 <0803 
9205 *083 24729 
TO36 +083 71039 
9229 ♦ CUD I4SI6 
9224 + 003 10625 


9673 Ifotfa. ' 1572 
9607 - 002 204385 
9651 —003 23510* 

9556 —002 114348 
95-70 — cun 7X046 
9504 6<?« 
95.19 —003 3<779 
9494 — 802 27,786 
9407—00 VUK 
9404 -I 


High urn Uftst Chao OpM 

OcJ97 7500 7475 7500 +03J 2 AT* 

DOC 97 7S5S 7500 7550 +0.C3 23049 

Mir 98 7701 7670 77 X +405 2 Ml 

Mar 98 7700 77J2 7700 +0J* 739 

Eft toes NA FWxtoes 7779 -» 

FrfsopenM 73075 off 551 
HEATWCC8LMMSD T 

4UBg«d,ft*sftM „ _ „ ji 

May 97 5671 5500 Si® U08 

Jun97 5405 SMS flflJ +M2 KJSS 

A097 500 5100 5190 +8® JfcMS 

Aua 97 JUS 5115 5U5 *0.12 

Sap 91 S03 70« 

Prtl7 51*5 BJO S80 +OB2 7019 . - 

Nov 97 5605 5600 5600 + 0J2 Mg %T 

Doc 97 3X 57211 57JD +4U7 11419 T 

Jon ft 5775 57J3 5700 +<12 <953 

Estates NA Frfs. Sites 27022 
Frt’SdPBlklt 144006 UP 83 
UWTNIKTaBJOe (KMBU 
lAMMl- WiftBM , 

AmW g03 1703 1992 -087 706728 

AAW 2002 IMS 1995 -005 5100 

Aug 77 1998 1908 1993 -005 28077 

S22 !!■” ’’■S 1? - 50 -M* W ' 4B 

OCJ97 1990 1905 1904 -006 15,163 

NDV97 1998 1905 1905 -005 V2,U1 

Dec» 17JD 1700 1703 -005 320C 

PSS. 2-5 I** 19 JH -001 1*3 

Ftb 98 T9 05 T9S 1905 -001 7,9M 

Mftto 1902 7902 1902 -803 4013 

^eoles NARYs-toes BAS 2 

RfsoPOiW 379082 off 3020 «, 

NATURAL GA5 CNMQl) 7 

lAOOOmcnHvX s oar mmbru - _ 

Jun 97 1118 2075 2065 35JBB 

A097 2.T6 2.115 2125 22JC 

Aug 97 2.155 2.130 2M0 Kill 

SEP 97 2165 2.140 2.115 TT487 

0097 2.770 X150 2055 lilg 

NW97 22H 2250 2250 7.1» 

Dec 97 2360 2358 2350 MV593 

Jcmte 2000 2390 2398 12073 

Ftota 23® 2335 2335 -70» 

MorU 2358 2340 2240 •- <932 

Ed. toes NA Frfs soles 3WB» ? 

prTsopmM mm up 2227 
UMUEA0BI6AS0LME CNMBO . 

•to to Nteftjpi . 

May 97 425D £1.90 6230 — <30 K426 

Jl*V 97 4195 6100 £1.15 —043 fLKD 

M97 6(100 60.30 UJ0 ^ u3t U' 

05% 2-5 59,5 »-* -*«■ lssz 7 

3 ft 97 5120 57 SB 57L05 — (LZ7 1820 

22. « MAO 5600 — 0.T7 ZU8 

Nov 97 0570 5570 syg ]jli 

tec 97 5800 0508 5500 —033 LBB 

gr-sate NA Ftfs.s<tes 2tm 
^"^"9*^22 off W2 - 
GASOILQPE) . . .1 

UA doUare per imMc tar -Msto 100 tans'! 

May 97 16600 16500 16&75 4-035 19 0W 
Juil 97 16635 16535 16600 UodL 1<5» 
0077 16735 16675 16735 UndL 70« 
A*9.77 1 OJ5 16600 16900 +000 <0» 
SetfP7 17075 17035 17100 +000 2773 
Oct 97 17200 17235 17300 +000 3J96 
Now 77 17375 17335 17435 +025 V® 

Dec 97 17475 17475 17500 +03S 7 S* 
EsttoetASSS. OpenMto9/32Sup915 

BRarroiL(ipe) f i 

U A (Man per tetref -- lols of 1000 1 

Jaao77 1831 18.18 1837 UndL 

July 97 1<4 1 1837 1839 — 3S SOM 2 

Aug 97 180D 1838 1839 ^404 153*2 

^ 1807 —ac3 am 

0097 1802 1802 1800 —002 5032 

{*0977 N.T. N.T. 1IL52 UnS- Mti 

Dpdg 7805. 1802 1802 ItoS 8J0S 

Jan’S N.T. N.T. 1801 +002 7041 

20.753. Open InU £7056 OP 


Eft. 

1068 


Stock indexes 

SCFCDMP.BOEX (CMBD 
SUx tome 

Am97 778.10 747.15 77600 *70 
Sep 97 78640 77190 71300 +69 

fft.sctes NA Frfs.toes 55,47? 
FrPsflpenW 18M5S off HM 

CAC«(MATIB 

May 9725400 25180 25200 — 40 
Jim 77 25150 24960 24W0— <0 
Sep 77 25260 25060 25100—30 
2« 2 KT. N.T. 25300 —30 
Ww 70 N.T. N.T. 25525—30 
Sep 79 N.T. N.T, 2531 j— S0 
toume: 47093. Open mtil 


Jun97 _____ 

9229 9239 

tSSi SS 5^? 

to 

to W 9141 9137 

Sr 3 ** ■‘*^0*-Pren.M«S: 38344 
PIYV.4P8BIK: 321366 up 10£3 


+ 006 125094 
Si +007 79093 
«<« +007 51399 
U5D + 009 BAK 
93A8 +809 22039 
7341 + tLD9 <746 


EpSlOBU, 

8%, K 


ConMiKxftty tndmes ~ 




Industrials 

ammuNcm 

MftA-amBirh. 

MW77 7209 7)05 7IJD -003 SB 
3617 7173 7320 7305 -4M 41,Sff 


£22? 


NA . 1&&30 
1.77630 L9M0O 

15739 ‘ 160-S 

24627 VSM 


4 




it-n-Afr"' 





H 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1997 


PAGE 13 


EUROPE 







Price-Fixing Study 
Targets 3 Firms’ 
Units in Germany 


dmraai br Oer Sag From 

*- BERLIN — A into of Siemens AG 
and the German subsidiaries of Alc- 
atel Alsthom SA and ABB Asea 

Brown Boveri Ltd. STB bC2D£ iove$- 

^ 


picion of having fixed prices in die 
1.5 billion Deoiscbe mark (S877 mil- 
lion) market for electrical cable, the 
Federal Cartel Office said Monday. 
" A representative of the cartel of- 
fice said the investigation centered 
on Siemens’s power-generation unit 
KWU, Felten & Guiileaume Ener- 
fejetechnik AG, ABB Kabel & Draht 
GmbH, KWO Kabel GmbH and two 


Domestic Rival 
To BT Rises 2% 
On First Day 

CanpStd by Our Staff Fran DispaSehes 

LONDON — Shares in 
. Cable & Wireless Communi- 
cations PLC rose 2 percent on 
their first day of trading 
Monday. 

Cable St Wireless Cornznu- 
nicatioas was formed by the 
merger of Cable & Wireless 
PLC's Mercury Communica- 
tions Ltd. subsidiary with the 
British cable-television units of 
Nynex Corp., Nynex Cable- 
Comms, Bell Canada’s BeD 
CableMedia and Videotron. 

A flotation of 14.7 percent of 
the new company, which aims 
to compete with British Tele- 
communications PLC in tele- 
phony, the Internet and tele- 
vision entertainment, started 
trading in London and New 
York simultaneously. The 
stock closed S pence higher in 
London, at 299.5. 

Analysts, who have valued 
the new cable company at about 
£4.5 billion ($73 billion), were 
eager to see how the market 
would value it. The merger was 
announced in October. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


A l ca t el units. Cartel authorities 
searched the offices of the compa- 
nies and several smaller cable 
makers in September, the represen- 
tative said, aid evidence that was 
seized then is being examined. 

The representative declined to 
comment on the status of the in- 
vestigation, which she said was still 
under way. She said resoles of the 
investigation were expected soon. 

^ T he cartel office refused to con- 
firm a German newspaper report 
that Siemens, Germany’s largest 
electronics company, and AIcateL, a 
French maker of telecommunica- 
tions equipment, could be fined as 
much as 90 million DM. 

Siemens called the sums men- 
tioned in the report “speculation” 
but would not comment further. 
Analysts said die investigation 
might damag e the companies’ im- 
age bat was not likely to have a big 
effect on earnings. 

“At first glance it doesn’t seem 
that interesting,” said Pierre Drach, 
an analyst who covets Siemens at 
Independent Research in Frankfurt. 

(AFP, Bloomberg) 

■ Daimler-Benz Denies Cuts 

Daimler-Benz AG denied repents 
that it planned to cut 23,000 jobs, or 
about 8 percent of its work force, by 
1999, Bloomberg News reported 
from Frankfurt. 

“Statements about a supposed 
catting of 23,000 jobs at Daimler- 
Benz are false,” a spokesman for 


“There are no such plans.” 

A newspaper report quoted Wal- 
ter Riester, who is deputy chairman 
of Germany’s largest union, IG 
Me (all. and a member of Daimler’s 
supervisory board, as saying that the 
company planned to increase sales 
by 26 percent by 1999 and to reduce 
staff by 8 percent. 

Separately, the aerospace unit of 
Daimler-Benz said it was interested 
in buying the defense-electronics 
business of Siemens AG. A Daimler- 
Benz Aerospace management board 
member, Werner Heinzmann, said 
the company was interested in the 
Siemens unit as part of a restruc- 
turing of Daimler’s defense and 
civil-systems business area. 


Czechs Face Up to Austerity 

Poll Results Are Good, but Many Want Heads to Roll 


By Peter S. Green 

Special u> the Herald Tribune 

PRAGUE — Die government is 
facing a tough sell as it tries to win 
support for its two-week-old eco- 
nomic recovery package from 
business, investors and voters. 

Executives and investors say the 
austerity plan looks good on paper, 
but they want to see how the gov- 
ernment puts it into practice, while 
a new poll says voters want to see 
several government officials fired. 

Faced with a growing trade def- 
icit. falling productivity and the 
cumulative effects of years of fi- 
nancial sca nda l* and fraud rhar 
have shaken public confidence in 
the country’s economic transition. 
Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus in- 
troduced a bold package of re- 
forms April 16. 

He promised to cut the budget 
by 253 billion koruny ($836.6 
million), or 5 percent; halt public- 
sector wage growth; clean up the 
capital markets; privatize roost of 
the state’s remaining holdings, and 
take other measures to encourage 
industry to restructure. 

To stimulate the economy, bank 
reserve obligations wiD be cut. and 
food and consumer goods, which 
make up 30 percent of imports. 


will face import hurdles. 

The reforms could halve gross 
domestic product growth to about 
2 percent this year and force 
Czechs to tighten their belts, Mr. 
Klaus said. 

A poll taken by the Factum 
agency after the reforms were an- 
nounced showed that popular sup- 
port for Mr. Klaus’s austerity pack- 
age was 45.6 percent, with 43.2 
percent of voters opposed to it. But 
about 70 percent of those polled 
wanted the resignations of Ivan 
Kocamik. the finance minis ter, 
who is widely blamed for allowing 
dozens of investment funds to vir- 
tually collapse, and Jan Strasky, 
the health minister. 

Mr. Klaus first ruled out any 
cabinet changes, but under mount- 
ing pressure from his coalition part- 
ners, he said 1 ast week that he would 
probably shake up his cabinet. 

“1 don’t think its going to have 
any influence is the short term,” 
said Miroslav Singer, chief econ- 
omist for Expandia Finance, a 
Czech investment-fund manage- 
ment group. “We are in the same 
overall position. We have just 
changed where we are releasing the 
money — the budget cuts will be 
balanced by relaxing die minimum 
reserve requirements for banks.” 


Industrialists say the plans 
could encourage companies to re- 
structure, invest and cut unneeded 
staff. But many were cautious. 

“What was said is, of course, 
good, but we are waiting for con- 
crete steps before we can really say 
if it will be effective,' ’ said Vaclav 
Brom, a spokesman for CKD 
Holding AS. a machinery maker. 

The stock market has also been 
cool to the plan. While the main PX- 
50 index has remained relatively 
steady, trading volume has halved 
since Mr. Klaus's announcement. 
Foreign investors have pulled out 
more than S500 million this year, 
and brokers say no new money is 
coming into the market. 

Alex Angel of the brokerage 
Wood & Co. said poor company 
results, along with insider trading, 
weak regulation, and unpunished 
fraud have scared off foreign in- 
vestors and most small Czech in- 
vestors. 

“If you had a couple of high- 
profile regulatory appointments, 
and a couple of high-profile im- 
prisonments for massive fraud and 
a string of impressive corporate 
earnings, then you'd have investor 
interest in the Czech Republic,” 
he said. “Until then, its just a lot of 
hot air.” 


Yeltsin Clears Sale of Telecom Stake 


CntpilnJ by Our Sktf Fran DaptUtAa 

MOSCOW — President Boris 
Yeltsin approved a long-delayed sale 
of 49 percent of the telecommuni- 
cations company RAO Svyazinvest 
on Monday, including a 25 percent 
stake that will be available to foreign 
investors. 

Deputy Prime Minister Alfred 
Kokh, who is in charge of privat- 
izations, said die 25 percent stake in 
the company would be priced at $ 1. 1 
billion, the news agency Itar-Tass 
reported. 

In 1995, the Italian holding com- 
pany STJET cried to acquire the stake 
for $630 million plus a pledge of a 
further $770 million in investment 
but then pulled out of the deal. 

That proposed purchase by So- 
rieta Fmanziaria Telefonica fell 
through at the last moment in Decem- 


ber 1 995. when STET raised concern 
over Svyazinvest's ability to control 
its regiona l telephone companies. 
But STET said it was interested in 
bidding again. The new pice reflects 
improvements made to the aging net- 
work, which will still require a huge 
investment. Svyazinvest controls 85 
regional telephone companies. 

The government has said it would 
try to attract investors by giving 
Svyazinvest 38 percent of the state’s 
share in Rostelekom, the main Rus- 
sian long-distance company. 

Miles Davenport, head of Rus- 
sian Telecommunications Develop- 
ment Corp.. which is controlled by 
U S West Communications Group, 
said Moscow had made it clear that 
it did not want a foreign company to 
become a strategic investor and was 
looking only for “passive” in- 


investor’s Europe 



Amsterdam AEX 


N ’ tf J F' M‘ A 

1996 1997 

Monday Prev. ■ % . 
Close * Close . Change} 
749.76 . 752.62 -Q £8 


Mussets • 


2,217-16. Z2QZZ2 +0.68 

Frankfurt '■ 

OAX 

3^63J» 3.374.10 -C.03 

Copenhagen Stock Maries! 

543.38 542.98 +007 

Koteinfci 

HEX General 

2858^0 2.8?7.79 

Oslo 

cex 

595.72 59631 -O.JO 

London 

FTSriOO 

. 4^89.^8 4^69.70 . +0.48 

Madrid ■■ 

^jck Excfwge 

501,17 48221 ' +0^9 

MBao 

uiBTEL 

12075 . 12177 . -OM- 

Pari* . 

CAC.40 

2£5&25 25^26- +CL55 

SfockhOlai 

SX1S 

2708.47 2J5B2? ^1.81 

Vienna 

ATX 

1,20237 1^50621 ,-i3tr 

Zurich 

SPI - 

3,03756 3.1»a *£A 443,44 

Source: Tetekurs 


imermniLi] Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


vestors. “For us, without an op- 
eration role, it is not interesting,” he 
said. 

SepOTiely, the government plans 
to retain a controlling 51 parent 
stake in RAO Unified Energy Sys- 
tem, the national electricity company, 
instead of breaking it up, the first 
deputy prime minister, Boris Nemt- 
sov, said. 

Mr. Nemtsov suggested he favored 
preserving the company's monopoly 
on power distribution, though he also 
has suggested that consumers would 
benefit from greater competition 
among power producers. He said a 
system of generating companies 
would be set up to sell power at 
competing prices to a wholesale mar- 
ket and that this would make it pos- 
sible to cut electricity charges. 

(AFP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


•A Paris court heard additional arguments on procedural 
questions and on the merits of a lawsuit brought against 
Georgia Tech Lorraine, the French campus of toe Georgia 
Institute of Technology, for using English on toe school’s Web 
site in violation of a 1994 law mandating the use of French in 
sales of goods and services on French territory. The presiding 
judge said her decision would be announced June 9. 

• Almazy Rossii-Sakha, Russia's dominant diamond pro- 
ducer, said the target date of this Thursday for government 
approval of a stalled gem deal with De Beers Group of South 
Africa might not be met. 

• RAO Gazprom of Russia signed a 28-year agreement that 
would more than double natural-gas exports to Turkey. 
Gazprom wifi start increasing exports to Turkey this year, 
adding 8 billion cubic meters annually by 2001. Turkey 
imports just 6 billion cubic meters of gas a year now. 

• Lego Group, a privately owned Danish toymaker, reported 
a 9 percent profit increase for 1 996, helped by higher sales and 
income from theme parks. Net profit rose to 470 million 
kroner ($71 million). 

• Credit Immobiller de France still would like to buy Credit 
Fonder de France, but any new offer would be on new terms. 
Immobilier’s managing director. Jacques Mimin, said. 

• Allas Copco AB's first-quarter pretax profit dropped 8 
percent as global demand for the company's industrial ma- 
chinery remained sluggish. Pretax profit for the quarter fell to 
735 million Swedish kronor ($94 million). 

• A Kontrollbank AG director, Gerhard Praschak, 46, shot 

and killed himself in his office, Viennese newspapers re- 
ported. Mr. Praschak, the bank's political appointee in charge 
of state-backed export guarantees, left a six-page suicide note 
saying he feared losing power at the bank, which is state- 
controlled. !HT, Reuters. Bloomberg. AFX 


-WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Mgk lam do m Pim. 


« Monday, April 28 

Prices In local currencies. 

Tbttws 

~ Kite Lao Ckn« Pim. 


Amsterdam 




ASM- AMRO 
Aegon 
ASM 
AkmNgfael 
Barm Ok. 

Bob Mess cm 

CSMcvo 

DonfedxPrt 

BLr 

Fortls Aw 
Gdrartcs 
■Brae cm 


Hoogwentcva 
Hurt Oo«i9»> 
i NG Group 
KLM 
ICNPBT 


Gp 


Oce Crimen 
PMtoCtoe 


I Hdg 

Hoboes 
RbdaaKS 
Romeo 
Roronto 
Rond Dutch 
Unfever evo 
Vendee Inti 
VNU 

waiters Kl an 


I3ZJ0 

138J0 

mao 

M3 
9X2D 
3&M 
11 1JN 
367 JD 

mso 

31 
73LM 
5880 
MS) 
167.90 
3243Q 
BX*0 
IMA 
75J0 
SAM 
3X30 
6980 
45 
293 
23580 
99M 
to 
17*50 
16050 
(CM 
1030 
109 JO 
34AM 
37X50 
9X10 

am 

227 


13T 
137 JO 
13020 
252 
96 
30 
110.90 
36420 

?<U0 

30 M 
71 JO 
57.10 

euo 

166,10 

31650 

0750 

159 

7430 

55JO 

3750 

6050 

4430 

29080 

23250 

«.TO 

92 

172.10 
15950 

16250 

10090 

342 

372.10 
92 
40 

223 


Bangkok 

MvHoSjk 
Bangkok BkF 
Knma TnaiBfc 
PTTEeptor 
Stem CauwnlF 
Slam Com BkF 
TdecamoM 
Tirol Akims 
Tirol Farm BkF 
Utri Drown 


206 

260 

35 

JQ 

7S6 

163 

40J5 

4050 

170 

137 


Bombay 

BuU Auto 
Hindus* Lewr 
Htadusl Peton 
hid DevBk 
ITC 

MlutorrogurTei 

Jtetaiceind 
SMaBk India 

Stool Authority 

<ruto Eng Loco 

Brussels 


960 

1100 

415 

09 

417-75 

300 

308 

319.75 

2250 

40150 


AlmaMI 

Bratoind 



~ — l AG 
ticMCrt 

imBongvf 

Kndtetoank 

v— « 

r 1.1 1 ill a a-i 

Poweifln . 

* Sue Gen Beig 
Setwy 
TioaeMi 
UCB 


BE Lf£9 Mac 2217-16 
PnWtWii* 22B232 

14000 14100 13975 
4030 6050 60TO 

85S® 8640 8440 

3425 305 3435 

1469) 14725 14650 
1800 1605 1795 

Wl 0060 
3938 3520 3520 

4250 6250 4250 

2640 2650 M30 

5100 ,51» SMO 
14450 14475 14M0 
13325 13575 13325 
13*0 12575 12SM 

3®° 2212 
moo 

3060 3120 onro 

aoras woo 

15125 15725 15100 
97400 98000 97050 


141S0 

6090 

0690 

3480 

14900 

1810 

8090 

3520 

4320 

2655 

5150 

14575 

13600 

12625 

5030 

9090 

3S3® 


9020D 


Copenhagen 

BG Bank „ 29459 

sswtf 

[Virfy-n 391 

evs mi b zwoo 

FLSUrfB 951.90 

fig 

A S 


Pf*Wt«JK542S* 
291 291 297 
396 «0 399.38 
864 870 87087 


545 56643 570 


945 950 956.96 

*3J MO 4509 8 

652 662 661.16 

81093 815 812 

S 8 3 

316 3» 331 


Frankfurt 

7UWBB 1300 1300 1300 1310 


DAftSWJj 
pm iMO: 3376.10 


Hfct Lm owe Pick 


XEXMee7«76 

FnMMK7SU2 


J3UC 131-50 
137 JO 1362)0 
13020 131 JD 
25250 262 

M10 9040 
3060 3756 

m.io m 

366 36488 
189.09 19040 
3048 3070 
7150 7160 
57 JO 5X30 
6149 63JO 
166J0 16650 
31650 323.10 
8750 SB 
15010 140 

7A90 75 

5620 5550 
38 3828 
6S60 6060 
4460 4430 

293 291J® 
2335B 234 

9090 9650 
9110 9160 
17110 17350 
15950 16170 
4050 60.715 
16180 16520 
10890 10020 
34180 34280 
27260 3Z2J0 
9250 9250 
40.10 4050 

223 23490 


S2L 
8K«. 
83 S” 


SET Mae 67168 
Pmtora:6MJe 
200 200 290 

256 260 254 

3350 3175 35 

300 SB 322 

724 732 m 

156 157 162 

3925 3925 « 

3950 40 4650 

165 166 171 

147 ISO 157 


Adktos - - ' 181 - 

ABmzHdo 33650. 

AthSETO 1355 

BkBafln 3648 

BASF 6630 

BoysrHnoBk 5180 
Bcy.V erafa stew* 6720 
6839 
9058 
44 
1395 

riCAGOotonta 153 
Coownenbonk 4620 
DDlmtef Ban 12720 
Oepuwi 8050 
Deutsdro Bank 8920 
Deut TdEtom 3720 
DnrodMrBmk 5520 
Frasadin 383 

FmmhaMcd 156 
Fried. Xrapp 319 
GMro 11490 

HekMbgZni 14050 
HentetpH HI. 
HEW 495 

Hoctebf 64 

HokM 6750 

KnrtlOdl 520 

Lutaroyer 6920 

Unde 1223 

Lafthansa 2359 

MAN 49550 

M aewnwnn 660 

Munch Rueck R 4060 
Pwwsiia 43625 
RWE 7T310 

SAP ptd mso 

Senates 16150 

SGLCmbon 240 
Stamm 90.48 

S prtnper .WaaeD 1^ 
Suodnicler 830 
myssen 37380 
Wba 9120 

VEW 5W 

76050 
1087 


lS&«iaoen 


177 
322 
1332 
3SJS 
65.45 
51 JO 

6650 
67X7 
88 
4350 
1383 
151 
4550 
12&75 
79.10 
BIHS 
3650 
5430 
376 
154JD 
317 
111 JO 
140.10 
N.T. 
495 
6320 
67 JS 
51750 
60J0 
U15 
23.©i 
49250 
663 
3445 
162 
4B40 
43450 
6X80 
39750 
16® 
23S 
8925 
1«5 
830 
3765D 
90 
499 
750 
1068 


-177 177 

. 322 3260 
1334 1345 

3548 3540 
t&m 66 
S.65 SIM 
6650 6720 
6820 68.10 

90.10 8820 

44 44 

1388 1410 
151 15250 
4555 4640 
13675 12745 

79.10 71140 
8865 0958 
3860 3755 

55 S 

376 37650 
15550 154 

318 317 

112 11490 
140,10 141 

N.T. 92 
0)00 OJO 
S3iS8 6150 
6740 6620 
51750 501 

6850 68 

1215 1205 
2355 2355 
495 49550 
£6650 670 

3485 3490 
16150 165 

4050 4085 
43450 435 50 
«95 0935 
309 30590 
16035 16UH 
23850 242J0 
8990 90.10 
1455 1490 
830 831 

377 JO 379 

9095 9125 
500 497 

760 769 

1070108550 


bidocenent 

3300 

3225 

3300 

3225 

Vendor* Lx uts 

5.15 

5.10 

5.13 

MdoArod 

5000 

4900 

5000 

4935 

Vodatim 

2J3 

2 61 

on 

Indosot 

6775 

6675 

6725 

6675 

WM! bread 

7J5 

7J1 

IM 

SarapbonroHM 

9825 

9775 

9800 

9700 

IMOomsHdiiS 

133 

115 

433 


5975 

5875 

5950 

5850 


5 

490 

498 

‘MufwwitfrFtf 

3625 

35SO 

3550 

3600 

WPP Grasp 
Zeneai 

156 

1B32 

2J2 

IB 

154 

1838 


High Low Close Pm. 


3.18 


High Low Ctac Ptsv. 


Kuala Lumpur cmpjgteiwjM 


ia^ 


AMMBHdpS 

Gertlno 

MolBoiMnp 

MoUrtlSMpF 

PoomnooGus 


PnMcBfc 

Ranong 

RosorisWOrid 

RoHmniPM 

StawDwtw 

IWtkoroMal 

Temoa 

IW^dneen 

VTL 


17 

1680 

17 

17 

1190 

1160 

1170 

1180 

3175 

2535 

2535 

26 

£45 

545 

545 

545 

8j50 

355 

155 

B35 

15 

1410 

1440 

1490 

434 

422 

424 

436 

150 

332 

332 

332 

9J5 

BJ0 

830 

9.10 

2150 

2130 

2140 

Z330 

7J5 

7J0 

7J0 

775 

1740 

17.10 

17 JO 

1730 

11J0 

11J0 

njo 

1140 

1150 

17 JO 

1730 

1870 

10 

9 JO 

10 

10.10 


London 

Abbey Ndl 
AlW Damocq 
Aatfan Water 

AsiacSrraMs 
BAA 
BaUo) or 



Helsinki hex 


Seasa 38 tadBC 282597 
Pr Moec 38 2557 


94225 94475 95125 
103S 109025 109X50 
409J0 410 

B7J0 87.75 B850 
41X25 41325 41550 
293 29325 29225 
30175 305 30525 

31350 31X25 31425 
2125 2135 22 

39750 39850 39925 



Hong Kong 


fe 




sS 

11 


Paul Oriental 
5HK Props 
SJiunfokHdsp 
Sbw Land Co. 
StbCHfew PM 
SwbcPnc A 
Wharf Hdgs 
Wheetock 


740 
2640 
12.10 
6750 
22.10 
3490 
4340 
36J0 
940 
1425 
86 
805 
6450 
1245 
27 
1X05 
405 
188 
5650 
21 JS 
19JS 
1750 
CM 
293 
198 

"i 

7.10 

455 

5950 

2940 

16.10 


Hm8Saa:13e8J7 
PlHfcWK 1264SJ6 

745 750 755 

26.10 2625 2635 
1150 12 1125 

6425 57 6725 

21.60 2110 2125 
3460 3460 M 
41 JO 42 41.60 
35 M X 36.10 
9.15 9.15 925 

1418 1425 1425 
BS 0525 8625 
795 8 7.90 

6X75 64 6425 

1233 1135 1240 
2630 27 26.90 

1290 1305 1105 
195 195 .403 

IBB 189 189 JO 
56 5625 5625 
21 JO 21 2L35 

19 J5 1925 T9J0 
1728 17JD 1740 
41 JO 4230 4140 

1« Z« I” 
^ “s 

430 630 645 

5825 5825 5825 
2690 29.10 2940 
1520 1550 16.10 


:HldB» 


Mtsaint 

NaOonaK 


Market Closed 

The Johannesburg stock 
market was closed Monday 
for a holiday - 






WBkScot 
^SunAfl 


Jakarta 

Astra tod 
B»W1lndon 
BAN*poro 
Gudaafl GanD 


CB -rsassJis 

i^ is iS a 


For investment information 

Read THS MONEY WEPOgT every Way in *eIHT. 



FT-SE 100: 438920 
PlmtoOK 836928 


113 BJ6 
430 435 


Brit! _ 

BrilTetecota 
Bin 135 

Buntudi Cos&al iojjs 

Burton Gp 133 

CoUeWbetasa 482 

CodbutTSdw SJ3 

QMhroCMHn 522 

Comrol Union 4.B7 

CanpoasGp 634 

CMriraUdS 325 

□texts 5.05 

EtediDControaenta 4JD3 
EMI Group 1223 

EaerorGnrop <95 

EnteTttfteOS 6.15 

RnCDtaoM 133 

Gem ActXtert 835 

GEC 172 

GKN 9.77 

GtanWeBome 1125 

Granada Go 889 

Grand Met 412 

GKE 228 

Green* Gp 412 

Guinness 417 

p, “ 

3sr 

Land Sec 

Kek*"" 

1ST 


248 232 

10 1044 


398 4 

1113 1119 
485 488 

411 6.13 

132 133 

8.19 832 

337 339 

9M f-U 

'K "bS 

SlOS 410 


6.90 731 

403 405 

632 635 

129 131 

733 735 

237 229 

335 489 

533 526 

133 134 

494 496 


428 430 

828 8J1 

333 154 

11.15 11J9 


388 


Madrid 


BetsaMacSOLir 


PrnlenB 49931 


21150 

21230 

21350 

21240 

ACESA 

1670 

1635 

1660 

1635 

Afluos Sutonlon 

5500 

5430 

5480 

5400 

Araroitarta 

BBV 

6460 

9350 

6410 

9260 

6460 

9320 

6470 

9310 

Bfflsasto 

1320 

1240 

1320 

1225 


20870 

20370 

20B6Q 

20370 


4425 

4385 

4410 

4295 


30770 

30050 

30600 

*«» 


T0360 

1(070 

10310 

103U 

CEPSA 

4600 

4525 

4600 

4650 


2495 

2450 

'^S 

2490 


7620 

7500 

7500 


9880 

9760 

9860 

9 m 

FECSA 

1170 

1150 

1155 

II6U 

Gas Natural 

30600 

30300 

30510 

3U3S0 


1615 

IMU 

1605 

1610 


2500 

2484 

2495 

2515 


606B 

6000 

6010 

60W1 


12BS 

12/0 


1365 

Tnbacalrra 

7200 

7120 

7110 

Tetataafcn 

3 m 

3614 

3600 

36S5 


1205 

1190 

1200 

1201 

Vatenc Cemefll 

1750 

1710 

1750 

1/50 

Rflanila 


PSE Mac 283? J1 


PtwfcteS. 287237 


22 

20.75 

20.75 

22 

Ayrdo Laid 
BkPMIpHI 

1135 

2050 

21 

26 

156 

150 

IM 

15/ 


11 

KLM 

KLM 

lUS 

MtaBaEtecA 

119 

11/ 

118 

119 

MetoBnnk 

610 

595 

595 

600 


1035 

10 

1025 

IQJ5 

POBanfc 

WJCff 

344 

3W 34150 

Phi L«K Did 

1555 

1540 

1545 

1555 

Sen MSgud 9 

83 

83 

83 

BJJ0 

SM Prime Hdg 

7 JO 

7 JO 

7 JO 

/JO 

Mexico 


Bobu tadac 3757 J5 


Previous: 378242 

AKa A 

4430 

4330 

43J0 

4440 


17J0 

16J4 

1654 

16.9* 


27.15 

2675 

2680 

27.00 

abac 

1240 

1Z1B 

12J4 

I2J4 


4130 

<075 

40 75 

40l75 


4745 

4695 

47 JO 

46JS 


177 

173 

173 

17/ 

Goo Ftn Inbursa 

KfanbCUkMA 

27.10 

2735 

27 JM 

37 J5 

3030 

29.90 

29.90 

MM 

TetevtsaCPO 

9130 

9130 

91.10 

9420 

TriMexL 

1633 

1628 

16J8 

1444 

Milan 

MIR Teteretaac 1207330 


PrariHB: 12177 Jl 

AfleownAssk: 

33045 

17850 

11950 

12040 

Bar Comm IM 


3500 

3560 

3540 


4340 

4250 

4200 

4295 

Ben dl Room 

1269 

1236 

1269 

1253 


JTMflO 

21700 

22200 

22 W 

Owflto Ikdano 

twn 

2315 

2340 

7335 

Edbon 

8890 

8700 

8/18 

0820 

ENI 

nv 

859B 

B605 

nulls 

Hot 

w 

5340 

5355 

5430 

Gemma Atac 

29400 

29650 

28650 

39350 

IMI 

14720 

14450 

14460 

14690 

INA 

2265 

2250 

2250 

2250 

Holms 

5790 

7095 

5710 

7000 

5730 

7045 

5/80 

7090 


10575 

10460 

10470 

10500 


1155 

1132 

1134 

1158 


509 

497 

500 

510 

Preorotal 

2490 

7425 

2470 

MW 

PM« 

374S 

3625 

3635 

3/40 

RAS 

14295 

MOM 

14180 

14070 


17300 

17160 

17300 

17200 

SPooio Torino 

11570 


TI490 

11400 

Stiss 

7850 

7735 

THU 

7740 

TBtacon ItaBa 

4400 

4320 

4370 

4380 

TIM 

5245 

5160 

5160 

5190 

Montreal 

tednstrtas todac 28*076 


PreiiOOKZmU? 


43.15 

4i w 

41M 

43.15 

HI 

Sffi 

2M 

24*6 


3170 

31.90 

32 

CTRirrSw: 

33 

33 

33 

3110 

mSa. 

17JS 
2 » 

17JS 

2316 

1716 

23U 

17J0 

23Vi 


36JD 

36J5 

36.90 

37 


2465 

2466 

2465 

2460 

LdtenrCos 

174S 

17J5 

17 M 

17J0 


1516 

15.10 

15.15 

15J0 

ESSS? 

2BU 

28 

28J0 

2860 

26U 

26 

2610 

26 

QuebecoTB 

2410 

7405 

2405 

J4W 

raw 8 


680 

53.10 

6.95 

S3J5 

6.90 

53J5 


Paris 


Accor 

AGF 

AteUaoUa 

AkntroAism 

Ant-UAP 

Banculie 

BIC 

BNP 

Canal Plus 
Candour 
Casino 
DCF 
Cetetero 
CubflmDtor 
CLF-Cteda Frai 
Crodtt Aflitaiie 
Danone 
EJf-Acuffloine 
EridanlaBS 
Euiwflsney 
Eurotunml 
Gen. Edict 
H aws 
It netii 
Lutorpe 


L< 

LV66H 
Lyon. Emjx 
MWib&iB 
PoribasA 
Pernod Rkmd 
FeupeotCB 
Pteault-Prim 
Promodes 
RennuB 
Rrswl 

RK-PoulencA 

Senofl 

Schneider 

SEB 

SGS Thomson 
Ste Generate 
Sodexho 
SlGababi 
5uaz 

SmHwiofao 
TtewsonCSF 
Total B 
UHiror 
Video 


842 

826 

an 

835 

18470 

1832? 

18240 

184 

843 

834 

838 

833 

637 

619 

623 

634 

3S560 

35310 

35540 

3S2J0 

770 

75 9 

765 

/5J 

877 

856 

873 

852 

238.90 

23340 

237 JO 

23680 

1060 

1025 

1049 

1045 

3477 

3436 

3475 

3436 

270 

262 

2A5J0 

257 JO 

254 

251 

252 

251 

669 

459 

669 

655 

aw 

847 

855 

857 

548 

536 

538 

533 

1255 

1255 

1255 

1262 

852 

837 

850 

839 

559 

549 

557 

554 

HA0 

m 

855 

H4U 

9.90 

9J5 

9.90 

985 

645 

650 

640 

645 

m 

74* 

773 

//i 

409 

40460 

4119 

40650 

mo 

801 

810 

BIO 

366 

359 

3*0 

355J0 

969 

MS 

962 

93/ 

1975 

1951 

19/3 

194/ 

13* 

1336 

1346 

1325 

527 

519 

MU 

521 

J2B 

324JB 

3 V 

32/JO 

367 JO 

367 

367 JO 

362 

29/ 

292J0 

295J0 

293J0 

570 

563 

566 

562 

2350 

2305 

2336 

2303 

1907 

1871 

1898 

IB68 

I34J0 

12BM 

132 

13020 

1600 

I5KU 

1589 

1580 

I81M 

18130 

18140 

184 

539 

526 

53S 

530 

32140 

318 

320*1 

318. A) 


996 

1002 

1009 

402 

395J» 

39/JO 

394 

6Z / 

618 

620 

622 


2665 


3600 

779 

HA 

/47 

762 

28650 

2/8.30 

229 JO 

27BJ0 

689 

675 

680 


179 JO 

17610 

1/620 

1/681 

468 

460 

467 

46340 

87 JO 

85 

B6J0 

8540 

349 JO 

341.10 

345 

3445U 


Sao Paulo 


BrodcscoPfd 
BrotuiH Ptd 
Canto PM 
CESPPM 
Copal 
Etetrobras 
HaufaanatPM 
fSenridos 


iPM 
PooOstnUz 
SUNadmaf 
Soijzd Cna 
TetetuttsPM 
Tdemto 
ratal 
TeiespPW 
Untoanco 
UdnknsPM 
CVRD PM 


165 
77400 
4735 
5730 
1590 
47530 
56030 
45000 
33400 
22130 
1. 
.720 
840 
12120 
16630 
18030 
30400 
3734 
124 
27.10 


890 

72100 

4730 

5630 

1140 

46730 

55130 

44930 

33030 

21730 


6230 16030 
3720 3730 


840 

11VJ0 

16530 

17330 

29930 

3690 

122 

2160 


tadroc 977117 
977125 

840 820 

72390 72400 
47.40 47.10 
5730 5690 
1540 1520 
473.® 46930 
K&U0 55730 
44930 45130 
33430 33030 
22090 21930 
16130 16030 
374B 3720 
840 142 

12130 12025 
16630 16630 
77730 17430 
30100 30330 
3734 3641 
123 123 

77 30 2730 


Seoul 

Dacom 

Daewoo Heavy 
Hyundai Enp. 
Ida Motors 
Korea B Pwr 
Kona E«2i Bk 
Karoo Mob Tei 
LGSemton 
Pahang Iran ST 
SamsongDWay 
Sorasuna Elec 
Sftto hen Bank 


Singapore 



739 730 

1037 10.71 
931 9.10 



7 

6.95 

695 

7 

9 

B.9S 

9 

9 

1240 

12 

12 

1270 

1480 

1420 

1440 

1480 

022 

0.71 

022 

022 

17 

1680 

17 

17.10 

446 

488 

458 

462 

1020 

10.10 

10.10 

1040 

2.13 

288 

no 

115 

545 

530 

5J0 

540 

330 

3J4 

138 

138 

685 

625 

6JS 

655 

384 

380 

182 

186 

484 

480 

482 

480 

3.90 

388 

190 

150 

16-90 

>440 

1640 

1680 

955 

9J5 

9J5 

980 

6 

585 

6 

685 

640 

635 

685 

645 

1250 

1230 

1240 

1220 

640 

645 

645 

680 

27 

26J0 

3680 

3680 

324 

340 

160 

174 

281 

2J9 

240 

282 

3J2 

128 

322 

3J6 

1.13 

1.10 

1.10 

1.14 

14 

1140 

1340 

14.10 

190 

1S2 

104 

190 


Stockholm 



High 

Low 

Close 

Pita. 

Electroha B 

486 

<71 

473 

476 

Ericsson B 

239 33150 237 50 

349 JO 

Haines B 

1110 

1097 

noa 

1110 

incenHyeA 

509 

505 

506 

510 

Investor B 

336 

330 

336 

334 

MaOoB 

228 

319 

220 

227 

NanHmken 

249 

234 

234 

244 

PtromVUpiahn 

Z31 

21480 

219 

232 

SandrikB 

194 

185 19350 

189 

Sarnia S 

IPS 

192 

IM 

19380 

SCAB 

171 JO 

164 16780 

172 

S-EBankenA 

00 JO 

79 

0080 

B0 

Skandla Fare 

224 

217 

223 

221 

SJumskaB 

334 

324 

334 

330 

5KFB 

169S0 

166 

16080 

16880 

Sparbanken A 

13450 

129 

132 

13450 

Stodsnypotek A 

190 

190 

190 

190 

stonrA 

106 

107 

10650 

105 

Sv Handles A 

217 

212 

216 

21550 

Volvo b 

19150 

18B 

192 

192 


Sydney 


Amcor 

ANZBklng 

BHP 

Bonn 

Brarahtes Ind. 
CBA 

CCAmofll 

CoiMMyer 

Comoico 

CRA 

CSR 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman FW 
ia Australia 
Lend Lease 
Ml M Hdtp 
Nat Aim sank 
Not Mutual Hdg 
News Carp 
PadHc Durfop 
Pioneer inrf 
PubBraadcad 
StGeupeBank 
WMC 

vvoonsioe ret 
Wodworms 


A80nlnwlesiM61J8 


PrrorioaK 247670 

8.18 

8.10 

613 

618 

1» 

883 

B04 

606 

17J0 

17 J8 

17.46 

382 

374 

175 

181 

23 

2275 

22.73 

2288 

1174 

1165 

1173 

1172 

15.18 

14.92 

1499 

1520 

6.18 

616 

617 

617 

671 

664 

648 

664 

19.12 

1697 

19 

19.10 

473 

4-70 

471 

474 

246 

289 

2J9 

247 

147 

145 

146 

148 

1111 

1285 

1285 

1120 

2451 

24J2 

7441 

2440 

1J5 

172 

173 

1.75 

17J0 

1698 

17.18 

1787 

155 

1.91 

ITS 

152 

5.95 

585 

5 87 

485 

143 

3J9 

142 

144 

423 

414 

422 

415 

674 

672 

673 

673 

7.96 

751 

7.92 

7.95 

772 

788 

740 

774 

696 

680 

685 

697 

10 

985 

9.96 

989 

17B 

171 

174 

374 


Taipei 

caamrUtehs 

OrongHwaBk 
OdaoTunB Bk 
CMwDewipffll 
Otero Steel 
First Bank 
Formosa PtasSc 
Hue Nun Bk 
IralCanm Bk 
Nrai Ya Ptostta 
Shin Kang Ute 
Taiwan Semi 
Tatung 

UtdMkroElK 
UW World CNn 


Stem Marita tadae B66026 



Prerious: B66172 

165 

161 

162 

162 

130 

121 

127 

12080 

74 

73 

7150 

7350 

m 

117 

J17 

118 

30-50 

2980 

29.90 

2980 

128 

121 

125 

120 

7180 

6980 

£950 

7080 

128 

120 

12150 

120 

7150 

70 

75L50 

71 

75 

73 

7150 

73 

105 

101 

103 

10350 

9150 

9® 

9080 

8980 

M 

5750 

5850 

57 

7D 

b7 

67 

*650 

7150 

71 

71 JD 

7180 


CeropadtetodecTM.16 
pnvtearo mat 

102500 98000 100000 98500 
5QSO 4700 4070 4510 

18800 18000 18300 18000 
16700 16200 16500 16300 
27300 26500 20900 26500 
5900 5390 5800 5570 

465000 453000 460000 452000 
28000 27000 27000 27300 
56000 5370a 55100 53500 
42900 41200 42400 41200 
62000 58500 61500 S8500 
11000 10300 11000 10300 


Tokyo 

Albnmato 
Ml Nippon Air 


NUTOZ2S: 1B670J7 
PIM 005:1161236 


angsTtaKc 199629 
Prerfaac 201930 


Aiatdl 
Asa hi Orem 
Ascdd Glass 
Bk Tokyo Mltsu 
BkVPkatroaro 
Bridoeskme 
Canon 
aurta Elec 
Owgokii Elec 
OalSfiS Print 
Oatel 

DaUcN Kang 

Dalwa Bank 

DateaHance 

DateaSec 

DDI 

Denso 

East Japan Ry 

FcTOlK 
Fufl Bank 
“ i Photo 


Hocnflunl Bk 

HtaKM 

Hondo Motor 

IBJ 

IHI 

Roam 

Ro-Yefcado 

JAL 

Japan Toboco 

Jusco 

Kajkna 

KantaElec 

KOD 

Kawasaki H*y 
Kawa Steel 
KlnMNIppRy 
KWn Browery 
Kobe Steel 
Komatsu 
Kutroto 
Kyocera 
Kyushu Elec 
LTCB 
Ailaru beta 


SX 16 iBdax: 278837 
Pieilan: 27S82T 
106 102 10450 103 

9150 9190 9390 9290 
JW 18993 191 19X9 

309 299 300 MB 

195 1M 190 IBS 
29090 283 284 283 


Matsu Comm 
AAatuiElec lad 
Matsu EteCWk 
MflwtrfsW 

Mitsubishi Ch 
Mitsubishi EJ 

*«tsoW*WEa 

MttjvtasMHrr 

AWeuUHAIW 
Mitsubishi Tr 
Mitsui 


1140 

726 

37S0 

7S0 

710 

1120 

I960 

501 

2620 

2970 

7080 

2060 

2380 

606 

1350 

398 

74SS 

837 

2780 

2180 

1380 

4790 

1150 

3890 

1310 

<72 

6090 

ODttO 

567 

2190 

499 

370 

713 

1040 

235 

916 

587 

7410 

2070 

355 

487 

2040 

3220 

2030 

1240 

USD 

409 

,698 

1650 

M5 

887 

1310 

950 


1110 

715 

3670 

715 

700 

1100 

I960 

496 

2580 

2910 

3060 

2030 

2230 

m 

1320 

380 

1400 

798 

8110b 

2710 

2150 

4360 

1350 

4748 

1300 

1128 

1130 

1290 

465 

6CQ0 

486 

3720 

546 

2170 

1420 

493 

368 

709 

1010 

231 

901 

565 

7380 

2050 


370 

710 


710 

573 


2000 

3160 

2010 

1220 

1160 

401 

692 

1600 

837 

877 

1270 

935 


338 

482 


The Trib Index 

Prices as ot 3~00 PM. Now York tmo. 

Jan. 7. 1fla2 = «M. 

Level 

Clronoe 

%dumg« 

year to data 
Mdiento 
+1.04 

World Index 

150.68 

+0.08 

+0.05 

Regional Indues 

Asm/Pactfic 

108.24 

-0.87 

^O.BO 

-12.31 

Europe 

159.3S 

-0.06 

-0.04 

-1.14 

N. America 

175.31 

+1.19 

+0.68 

+B26 

S. America 

Industrial Indexes 

143.93 

-0X12 

-0.D1 

+25.78 

Capital goods 

182.85 

-0.75 

-0.41 

+B98 

Consumer goods 

172JJ2 

+1.T5 

+0.67 

+6.68 

Energy 

177.76 

-0.25 

-0.14 

+4.12 

Finance 

108^0 

-0.42 

-039 

-6.83 

AfisceHamous 

152. IB 

-OJO 

-0.52 

-5.93 

Raw Materials 

178.09 

-0.42 

-054 

+1.55 

Sendee 

141.40 

+0.35 

+0.25 

+2.97 

Lftmes 

132.41 

+0.04 

+0-03 

-7.70 

The bit/xnattoml Herald Tribuna World Sleek Index C tracks the US. doter values at 
SeOiniamsltonifrimvstaliie stocks tram 25 countries. For more Information, a Hoe 
hooktot « amAujo fiy miHnn to The Trib Index. IB 1 Avonuo Owrtas do Gaufe. 

02521 Ateidfy Codex, Franco. 


Compted tty Boomberg Nome 


High Low Close Pray. 


1130 1100 

722 716 

37 SO 3670 
730 770 

Ml 715 
1120 1110 
1960 1990 

500 409 

2590 3610 

2970 2950 

2070 2070 

203® 2040 

2250 2290 

604 606 

1330 1330 

390 402 

1420 1-tS) 

BIB B4S 
B200a 8030a 
2760 2710 

STBOd S390o 
2160 2170 

<290 4300 

1360 1370 

4790 4740 

1320 1310 

1120 1120 
1150 1130 

3880 3840 

1310 1300 

469 467 

586 SB5 
6090 6140 

486 481 

7950a 7900a 
3800 3750 

547 546 

2170 2I7D 
1450 1410 

496 496 


Mitsui Fudosn 

AADnd Trust 

MuratoMfa 

NEC 

Nikon 

NlkkoSec 

Nintendo 
Map Express 
Nippon OU 
Nippon Steal 
Nissan Malar 
NKK 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 

NTT Date 

OP Paper 

Osaka Gas 

Ricoh 

Roteti 

SakmoBk 

Sanfcyo 

SanwaBmk 

Sanya Elec 

Seajra 

Seim Rwy 

Sektsul Cheat 

Seklsui House 

Seven-Eleven 

Sharp 

Shikoku El Pwr 
Shinto 
Sltovetaj Ch 
SMsahto 
Shtookb Bk 
Softbank 

^Suamo 
Surahomo Bk 
Sun It Chain 
SuraBomn Elec 
SuniUMelid 
Sarah Trust 
Tatalu Pharm 
TakedaChera 
TOE 

Tahoku El Pwr 
Total Bank 
ToteoMiatw 
Tokyo El Pwr 
Tokyo Electron 

Tokyo Gas 

Tokyo COrp. 

Tonen 

TappaiPriro 
Toray ind 
Toswxw 
Tostetn 
Tayo Trust 
Tnyrta Motor 
Yarannoottt 

a: * minx urn 


1500 

14*0 

1460 

1470 

Methanes 

1280 

12J0 

12J5 

709 

*95 

TOO 

701 

Mown 

2885 

28 

2BW 

4540 

4540 

4540 

4600 

Newbridge NH 

4180 

41 

4180 

1540 

1520 

1530 

1630 

Ncnaida Inc 

29* 

29.10 

29.70 

17W 

1770 

1790 

1780 

Noreen Energy 

2780 

2780 

VM 

£90 

654 

680 

697 

Nthan Telecom 

99 

97 JO 

98 

9200 

9100 

9150 

9150 

Now 

1U4 

11 JO 

1185 

866 

B55 

056 

856 

Onex 

22.90 

2280 

2214 

5/9 

555 

575 

548 


55l* 

55 

55 

3*3 

359 

362 

3S9 

PTOraCda 

71 JO 

2185 

2185 

769 

756 

756 

m 

Placer Dame 

22-15 

ZI85 

22.10 

267 

260 

264 

270 

Ptco Petbri 

13.70 

1385 

1385 

1390 

13*0 

1370 

1390 

Potash Sosh 

1D6J0 

105 

105 


8780a BTOfti 8740a B840n 


£12 

*09 

as®' 

60S 

304 

299 

300 

302 

1500 

1490 

1490 

1490 

W4J 

9410 

941® 

9600 

650 

£30 

64* 

645 

3370 

33*0 

33*0 

3370 

»« 

1310 

1320 

1330 

47 9 

4*7 

474 

444 

7640 

75*0 

7570 

7640 

6080 

6010 

£010 

6070 

1230 

1210 

1220 

1220 

1140 

1110 

1130 

1148 

8000 

7910 

BOOQ 

7950 

1630 

1*00 

1620 

1630 

1920 

1900 

1910 

1910 

*03 

579 

585 

575 

2510 

24*0 

2480 

2500 

1760 

1*80 

1760 

1670 

1110 

1090 

1090 

1090 

7510 

7040 

71*0 

7610 

9150 

9110 

9140 

9140 

822 

812 

821 

813 

1400 

1380 

1380 


519 

513 

518 

519 

1710 

1690 

1710 

1M» 

313 

307 

312 

310 

1010 

997 

1010 

990 

3060 

3010 

3050 

30*0 

2B40 

2810 

2030 

2810 

9100 

90*0 

9080 

9100 

1930 

1910 

1920 

1910 

920 

905 

913 

913 

too 

I2T0 

1270 

1230 

1240 

2220 

2240 

2230 

4850 

4790 

4840 

«0 

299 

294 

298 

297 

£53 

£44 

653 

4M 

1100 

11*0 

lira 

1170 

1620 

1600 

1610 

1600 

788 

774 

779 

788 

£99 

491 

693 

693 

2900 

2050 

2900 

2850 

BOO 

790 

795 

801 

3600 

35® 

3570 

3590 

2*70 

2630 

2650 

26*0 


REnatssance 
Ria Aigara 


39.90 

3<9fl 


370 

708 


1020 1000 

234 235 


916 

507 


7400 7420 
2060 2060 


335 

486 


2000 2040 

3190 31 B0 

2030 2010 
1240 1OT 
1170 J ISO 
407 407 

695 698 

1610 1600 
845 850 

878 910 

1310 1290 
947 934 


Toronto 

TSE laibtaiWs: 5829J7 


Previous: 5B3U1 

Abillbl Price 

2130 

23 

23J0 

Min 


3QJD 

.MM 

3080 

SOM 

Akwi AUraa 

46J0 

4ii5 

46 

4W* 

Androsonlxoi 

16.40 

16.10 

1630 

1680 


491* 

4885 

49 

491* 

Bk NOW 50*0 

51 JD 

51.15 

51 JO 

5185 

Bonk*. Goto 

3080 


30J0 

3080 

BCE 

6380 

62.90 

63J0 

6280 

BC Telecomm 

2BM 

28 

28.15 

28.65 

Bkchecn Pharm 

23 

23 

23 

2316 

Bm&bonfler B 

27.95 

7/80 

2785 

27 70 

BiascanA 

30.45 

30 

38-30 

X 

Bre-x Mlnends 

410 

3 1 * 

3JQ 


Camera 

4780 

47 

47 


CISC 

31*1 

3B.9S 

3130 


CdnNotlRaB 

kxos 

5216 

5385 


CdnlMRH 

339. 

3X10 

3X30 


CdnOaddPei 

2785 

2735 

27.45 

2780 

CdnPtKfflc 

31M 

32.75 

33tf 


Carol nco 

36 

35V5 

3580 

3516 

□olaseo 

2X70 

2145 

2X45 

2380 

1185 

Doraiar 

11U 

1185 

111* 

DrwshneA 

2780 

7/80 

77 JO 

771* 

Du PortCda A 

3490 

34<£ 

34ta 

34 

EdperGnup 

23 


23 

23 

EumNevMrig 

3916 

36<6 

371* 

•19.55 

FalitaiFM 

297V6 

295 

295 

297 

FaKanbridge 

2816 

27 JO 

28.15 

28.10 

Fk+chtr Choi A 

2280 

22J0 


27 JS 

Fmnce Nevada 

MAS 

6380 


67 

Graf Ctia Res 

10 

9.7U 

10 

9N 

'mpwM CH 

6150 

61 

6180 

till 

Inca 

43K 

u* 

4X15 

4X40 


47.15 

1880 

41 

18J0 

4185 

1BJ0 

41 «* 
1X90 


39 JO 

39 IM 

39.10 

39 JO 


19J0 

19 

19.15 

19.15 

MopnalnllA 

TON 

/aio 

7046 

70 w 


RogenCafltMB 23J0 


lCO 
5he8CdaA 
Stone Cantod 
Sunca ip Energy 
Taltaman Eny 
Tech B 

tst* 

Thomson 
TorOora Bank 
TumsoHd 

TransCda Pipe 
Trimark Flrd 
Trtwc Hahn 
TVXGoW 
Wesknast Eny 
Weston 


High LM dose Prey. 

1MB 
2816 

41 
29 JO 
27 JS 

9BW 
11-48 

22.90 
55V6 
21 M 
2214 
1165 
lost* 

40 

34JS0 

23M 

52.10 
54 

22J5 

63.90 

42 
78J0 
39 J0 

19V* 
281* 
mas 

1SJ5 
2540 

42.10 
2840 

7¥ 
23M 
70A 


52M 
53J4 
23 
64 
42 
28U 
39.95 
1940 
2840 
3 M* 
1545 
2540 
43te 
29.10 
7J0 
Z3J0 
71 


39te 39 JO 
3460 34JO 
2160 2170 
51.90 52J0 
5160 5160 
23 23 

6340 6380 
4140 4140 
27 JO 27 JS 
39H 39» 

19.45 1945 
271k 2W4 

3816 38J5 
15J0 IS!* 
25J0 25J0 
42 <2»6 

28J0 29.10 
740 745 

7355 2160 
70 70.15 


Vienna 


Boehter-Udaeh 
Credltaita Pfd 
EA-Generail 
EVN 

FtaSrofenWIai 
OMV 

OestEtefctriz 
VA Stall 490 

VATedi 1911 

Wleneriterg Bau 2232.75 


915 

458 

3150 

1594 

503 

1290 

855.90 


ATX katero 1202J7 
Previors: 1206J1 

888 892 882 

456 458 

3106 3106 3110 
1568 1575 1589 

4963a 49940 498 

1356 1361 J013S4J0 
844 85110 B47J0 
48SJ0 48550 48BJ5 
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ASIA/PACIFIC 


Korean Banks to Make 
Loans to Salvage Jinro 


CcmtAdbfOtrSaffFnMnDupa kJ i a 

.SEOUL — Creditor banks of Jinro Group 
agreed Monday to extend emergency loans to 
save the liquor giant from becoming the third 
; South Korean conglomerate to go bankrupt 
tins year. 

“A spokesman for Commercial Bank of 
Korea, Jinro ’s key creditor bank, said it had 
agreed to provide 80.4 billion woo ($90.1 
. million) in emergency, loans to six subsi- 

■ diaries of Jinro Group before die end of July. 
? The creditor banks plan to extend the loansm 
tbe fim half of this year, the Korea Federation 
ofBanks said. The banks froze the group's debt 

■ payments under an earlier agreement. 

-Analysts said the bank loans would be 
enough to keep Jinro afloat until the group. 
South Korea's 19th-largest conglomerate, 
raises its own funds by disposing of some of its 
real-estate and other unprofitable affiliates. 
‘'The bank decision today inri«snn»s tfceir 

strong will not to let bankruptcies in tbe top SO 

conglomerates happen again, at least this 
year," said Yoo Choon Yup, an anal yst at 
Hanwba Securities Co. He was referring to the 

Figure in Hanbo Case 
Kills Self, Police Say 

The A sso ciated Press 

* SEOUL — A former bank executive who 
had been questioned by Parliament in a 
bribery scandal that has rocked tbs govern- 
ment, was found hanged at his home Monday , 
the police said. 

Police officers confirmed that Park Suk 
lae, 59. had killed himself but said that his 
motive was not known. 

.Mr. Park, a farmer loan officer at Korea 


face that this is an election year in South 
Korea. The decision followed an announce- 
ment by die Chairman nf limn Group, 

Jin Ho, that he would spin off one or two of 
Jinro’s six cash-strapped subsidiaries. 

Tbe spokesman for Commercial Bank of 
Korea said die loans would be supplied after 
Mr. Chang issued a letter allowing banks to 
dispose of his family's stake in die group’s 


Jinro’s troubles underline die problems 
faced by Sooth Korea’s biggest companies. 


Hong Kong: Ad Hot Spot 

For Handover, Media Sell Space at Record Price 


It was unclear whether Mr. Chang had 


banks are Jinro LttL, Jinro Industries Co., 
Jinro General Foods Co., Jinro Corns Brew- 
ing Co., Jinro Construction Co. and Jinro 
Maas Merchandising Inc. 

Together, they account for 8 1 percent of die 
group's total sales and 90 percent of its total 
assets, according to group statistics. 

Representatives from 29 creditors con- 
vened Monday to work out details of their 
joint bailout measures. Among other steps, 
commercial banks and merchant banks would 
defer debt payments from die six Jinro units 
nnril July 27, die Commercial Bank spokes- 
man said. 

The amount of new loans to be provided by 
each bank will be in proportion to its existing 
loans to Jinro. 

Jinro, built around brewing, distribution 
and construction, had $3.5 billion in debt by 
the end of February because of its hasty 
expansion into new ventures and a widening 
financial burden. 

Large industrial concerns including Dae- 
woo Carp-, and Hyundai Carp, are negotiating 
to buy some of its holdings, according to 


Blo om berg News 

HONG KONG- — The first thing viewers 
of Hong Kong’s biggest television station 
will see after the colony’s July 1 handover 
to China might be an invitation to leave. 

A local travel agent, whose name has not 
yet been released, paid $100,000 — 50 
times the usual price — far a 60-second spot 
that will appear just after midnight as Hong 
Kong's final evening as a British colony 
ends. 

“Usually, after midnight there isn't so 
much demand," said Leung Kin-wah, con- 
troller of sales and marketing at Television 
Broadcasts Ltd., the territory’s biggest 
broadcaster. 

“But on June 30, our handover coverage 
is packed with commercials. It’s a golden 
o pp ortunity to tap companies that wouldn't 
usually use television advertising.'* 

The gilt-edged time slot highlights the 
price {hat companies are willing to pay to 
demonstrate their commitment to Hong 
Kong after tbe handover. 

Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., the only 
local long-haul airline, aid Cheung Kang 


(Holdings) Lid., one of die big ge st de- 
velopers, are plaining advertising campaigns 
whose theme is expected to be “Welcome 
Back — What Took So Long? "according to 
advertising executives in the territory. 

Bank of East Asia Ltd. spent “a few 
million dollars'' to sponsor a 100-day series 
of two-minute programs on the handover, 
Mr. Leung said. Tbe broadcaster hopes to sell 
20 million Hong Kong dollars ($2.6 million) 
of advertising for programs related ro die 
handover. It had advertising income of 2 
billion dollars for all of last year. 

Advertisers are far more optimistic about 
Hong Kong's future now than they were six 
months ago, said John Maicora, publisher 
of Time Asia. 

“Advertisers don’t like being associated 
with anything that might be negative." he 
said “It's really changed a lot in six 
months." 

Maggie Choi, media director at Zenith 
Media (HJC) Ltd_ said that while that 
agency's clients were not “running to bum 
their money just to participate.' ’ business is 
still up one-third from last year. 


Vietnam’s Trade Gap Shrinks 30% 


CmtfiMtyCha-SafiFnmDItpmhrs 

HANOI — Vietnam released statistics 
Monday showing double-digit growth in in- 
dustrial output and a trade deficit that fell 30 
percent, but a government report expressed 
concern about signs of economic slowdown. 

Tbe General Statistics Office said indus- 
trial production rose 13.8 percent in die first 






liamentary committee investigating the col- cash, after beginning ambitious expansion ef- in 1996. Meanwhile, the country’s trade def- 
lapse of Hanbo Steel & General Construction forts in the 1990s. icit, a growing cause for concern last year as 

Co. in January. The Hanbo and Sammi groups collapsed imports rose faster than goods could be sold 

The steelmaker had $6 billion in debt, much tins year under a combined debt of $8.2 bfl- abroad, narrowed sharply from a year earlier, 
of it in kvans made by Korea First Bank. lion. (AFP. Reuters) to $962 million. 


imports rose faster than goods could 


about economic stagnation. It pointed to news 
that consumer prices had dropped for die 
second month in row, taking die year-on-year 
inflation rate down to 1.6 percent, the lowest 
in more than a decade. (Re users. Bloomberg ) 


Japan’s Auto Exports Rise 7.5% for First Annual Increase in 5 Years 


Con&dh OwS^Pnrm Dbpacha 

TOKYO — Japan reported its first annual 
increase in auto exports in five years Monday, 
a 715 percent gain for the year that ended in 
March, helped by a weak yen and strong U.S.- 
bound exports. 

Total motor-vehicle exports rose 6.2 per- 
cent from the previous year, to 3,847,865 units, 

the Japan Automobile Manufact ur ers Asso- 
ciation said. Car exports grew to 2^)67,568 
units, the association said, exports of trucks 
increased 1.9 percent, to 835330, and bus 
exports were up 3 percent, to 44,967. 


Meanwhile, Japan’ s industrial output, which 
declined in Much for the second consecutive 
month, rose 4.1 percent for die year, compared 
with a Z0 percent rise the previous year. 

The Ministr y of Tnfp-rnatinnal Trade and 
Industry said output in March was down 13 
percent from the previous month, after a 3.7 
percent fall in February. But the March figure 
was better than the 1 .8 percent decline that had 
been forecast by many economists. For April, 
the ministry forecast arise in industrial output 
of 1.9 percent from March, revised from a 
previous forecast of a 1.0 percent gain. 


“The trend in the quarterly production 
movement and the sharp upward revision to 
the April forecast suggests the significant 
strength of industrial production will be main- 
tained," a ministry official said. 

The automakers’ group forecast a steady 
export performance for the sector. Although 
theU.S. market for its vehicles might shrink, it 
said, continued strong shipments to tbe 
Middle'East and Central and South America 
would keep total exports from falling. 

Vehicle s hipm ents to the United Stales rose 
S3 percent to 1,169,420 in the latest year, the 


Hong Kong Sfogapore 

Ha^gSBfig '/■ -3$ tfatts Tarts 

‘14000 — . 2250 -jijp 

5:500 TOumA 2200 -W-^V 

2150-1 

12000 s- « 2050 - 

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— 21000 
- -- 20000 
19000 

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17000 



1996 1997 ■ 1991 

Exchange ' ■ ' index'' 

Bong Kong HfaigSaog 
• Singapore Straasrnto ss 
. S Sftfcwy ' ' '' V'Mpafirartes’’ 


' . .SET . 


-FSE 


F M A ,,UUU N DJ FMA 
1997 1996 1997 

Monday Pnw. % ' 

Qose ■■ Close Change 
124510.17 12.645.76 -028 
tfiSSJB 2,059.60; -1.13 
2,461 JO 2,474.70 -053 
18£7B37 18.812.88 +0.31 
1,87488 1,089,45 -1.34 
672*8 - 684.00 -1.68 

704:16 •• 682.48 +1.69 

K BfiGOJS 6.661.72 -0.01 
233731 .2,872.37 -152 


Cpmposte rndox ' 69S33 66248 


Sws&fe Index • 3#atS1 3,8S£57 Uncfc] 

lnccmaiKflaJ Herald Tribune 


The figures may ease concern that the trade 
deficit was reaching levels that risked leaving 
Vietnam with a crippling debt burden. Vi- 
etnam's trade deficit in 1996 was S4 billion, a 
record high and equal to about 18 percent of 
the nation's gross domestic product 
But despite the apparently glowing picture 
painted by those figures, a government report 


first gain there in two years, die association 
said. Japanese exports had more than 30 per- 
cent oftheU.S. passenger-car market — a level 
that threatened to bring countermeasures from 
the leading U.S. automakers, analysts said. 

Vehicle exports to the rest of Asia fell 4 
percent, to 606,415, for the first decline in two 
years as Japanese makers shifted production to 
Thailand, the Philippines and other countries. 

In terms of value, Japan’s annual vehicle 
exports fell 12 percent from the previous 
year, to $7834 billion, their second con- 
secutive annual (tecline. (AFP. Bloomberg) 


Source: Tefekurs 


Very briefly; 

• Western Australia faces a statewide 24-hour strike Tuesday 
as workers protest plans to introduce laws banning industrial 
action that has not been authorized by a secret ballot Under the 
laws, striking workers can be sued by their employers, and union 
officials’ rights of entry into workplaces will be restricted 

• About 800 workers at Sam Yang Co„ a Vietnamese supplier 
to Nike Inct, stopped work for several hours over the weekend 
to protest their contracts; workers at a Nike supplier in 
Indonesia also staged a protest to try to get their pay raised to 
the equivalent of $2.50 a day. 

• Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. is being investigated by South 
Korean antitrust regulator after a local bottler. Bum Yang 

EVvwi C ' n mmnlniiwt fhnr [FC nMimnv hart ‘ ‘unfairly ’ ’ 


Stopped supplying extract to Bum Yang after trying to buy its 
plants and sales network. Coca-Cola plans to spend $400 million 
on a new bottling system in South Korea. 

• Shiseido Co., Japan’s largest cosmetics maker, bought 
Helene Curtis Japan Inc from Unilever NV of the Neth- 
erlands. Terms were not disclosed 

• Yamaichi Securities Co. reported a parent-company net 
loss of 164.8 billion yen ($1.3 billion) for the year that ended 
in March, reversing a net profit of 15.9 billion yen a year 
earlier. Much of the loss came from a write-off of 15(7 billion 
yen in financial assistance to affiliates, afp. Bloomberg. Renters 


China Consolidating Car Firms 

Ageitce France-Presse 

BLUING — China plans to organize its “scattered and 
disorderly" auto industry into six large plants in place of the 
126 small factories that dot the country, the official China 
Daily reported Monday. 

The publication also said Beijing planned to consolidate the 
industry into three large companies — echoing the U.S. “big 
three" of Chrysler Corp., Ford Motor Co. and General Motors 
Corp. — by 2010. 


CISCO: Firm Works on Making the Internet Pay 


Continued from Page 11 

vice and employee benefits. 

These tasks make up many 
of the nuts-and-bolts opera- 
tions of tbe modem economy, 
consuming millions of horns 
oflabor and hundreds of bil- 
lions of dollars a year. 

$ If such work can be made 
move efficient, the economic 
payoff could be considerable. 
No wonder companies have 
come to view Internet tech- 
nology as a communications 
tool that can reduce the ex- 
pense of many transactions, 
whether buying factor)' equip- 
ment from outside suj^liers or 

processing expense accounts. 

Various electronic systems 
for l inking businesses have 
been available for years, fait 
these usually required costly 
private data networks and 
specially mole software. As 
such, these first-generation 
electronic communications 
were available only to an elite 
group of big companies and 
their chief suppliers. 

But Internet technology — 
y Set of public-domain soft- 
ware standards and a global 
web of computer networks — 
is . t ransf orming these eco- 
nomics. making it cheaper 
and easier to set up in-house 
corporate networks and es- 
tablish electronic ties with 
outsiders of all sizes. 

As a result, the corporate 
dash to the Internet is not 
merely for big companies any 
longer. Tbe race also includes 
thousands of small strivexs. 


such as Dakota Electric Sup- 
fay Co. in Fargo, North 
Dakota, and Strong Tool Co. 
of Cleveland. 

Today’s corporate uses of 
Internet technology fall into 
two broad categories: elec- 
tronic communication inside 
company walls, which often 
replaces mountains of paper- 
work; and electronic commu- 
nication outside the company 
walls, as a means of condnet- 
ing business- to-business com- 
merce or sharing information 
with suppliers and customers 
anywhere in the world. 

“We’re trying to reduce 
transaction costs, and the In- 
ternet is the way to do it," 
said Arne Breflcjem, a mar- 
keting manager at Dakota 
Electric Supply, a 125-person 
concern that sells goods rang- 
ing from light switches to 
telephone cable. “That’s as 
true for us in North Dakota as 
it is in Silicon Valley." 

Dakota Electric Supply's 
Internet site on the Web went 
up last October on a busaness- 
to-business commerce ser- 
vice run by International 

Business Machines Got. The 

company, a $40 mflfion-a- 
year business, has invested 
$5,000 in the site so far, and, 
ahhough die network has re- 
ceived electronic-mail inquir- 
ies from as far away as Aus- 
tralia, sales have been scarce. 

Still, Mr. Breikjeni is not 
discouraged by the slow start. 
“I have absolutely no doubt 
that a large portion, perhaps 
even a majority, of oar busi- 


ness will be done on the In- 
ternet someday," he said. 

Lured by die Internet’s 
cost-saving appeal, thou- 
sands of corporate new- 
comers to cyberspace are ex- 
pected to begin selling goods 
to one another on line, wheth- 
er power turbines or toilet pa- 
per. Such bosiness-to-busi- 
ness commerce, estimated at 
$600 million last year, is pro- 
jected to soar to $66 billion by 
2 000, according to Forrester 
Research Inc. 

Consumer commerce, 
however, will lag far behind, 
Forrester predicts. By 2000. 
the research firm estimates, 
on-line retailing will increase 
to $7 billion. That would be up 
sharply from last year’s $530 
million but barely over one- 
tenth of the anticipated market 
in TwinnTiia tin faintnmn mtr i 


Escorts & Guides 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON - PARIS 


''hi. 1 |i n ’ ■ ' - iT:l 


SingTel Drags 
Market Down 

Bloo mb er g News 

SINGAPORE — Stock 
prices plunged to their lowest 
level in mare than two years 
Monday as Singapore Tele- 
communications Ltd. exten- 
ded its slide to a record low 
amid concern about new 
competition. 

The Straits Times index of 
30 stocks fell 22.81 points, or 
1.13 percent, to 1,996.79, its 
first close below 2,000 since 
Jan. 25, 1995. Singapore 
Telecommunications fell 13 
cents, or 5 percent, to 238 
Singapore dollars ($1.65). 

SingTel's monopoly ended 
April 1, when Mobil eOne 
Asia Pte. became a compet- 
itor in mobile-phone services. 
SingTel also faces competi- 
tion in paging services. 


Creative Technology 
Posts Strong Results 

Bloomberg News 

SINGAPORE — Creative Technology LtA’s shares 
soared 5.9 percent Monday to their highest point in more 
than two years on third-quarter results that were better 
than expected and on a rosy outlook from the wold’s 
biggest maker of computer sound cards. 

The stock has now risen 64 percent this mouth. 

The results prompted analysts to raise their earnings 
forecast for Creative, best known for its Sound Blaster 
cards, which bring sound to personal computers. 

The company had earnings of $44.2 million, or 48 cents 
a share, in die quarter ended March 31. In the year-eariier 
period, charges related to bloated inventories resulted in a 
net loss of $33.1 million. Tbe average forecast by analysts 
surveyed by Zacks Investment Research called for earnings 
of about 30 cents a share for tbe quarter. 

Creative’s stock ended at 2130 Singapore dollars 
($14.89), up 130, its nighest closing price Ctot. 25, 1994. 
Trading totaled 371,950 shares, more than twice the 
stock's three-month daily average. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1997 


Monday’s 4 PM. 

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PAGE 18 


Sports 


TUESDAY, APED- 29, 1997 


World Roundup 


Russia Strikes Late 

ice hockey Russia scored three 
goals in die third period Monday to 
beat Germany, 5-1. in the World 
Championships in Finland. 

With Russia leading. 2-1. de- 
fenseman Anatoli Fedotov 
hammered in a shot in the 47th 
minute give his team a two-goal 
lead. With 21 seconds left, Mikhail 
Sannatin scored into an empty 
goal. Alexei Morozov chipped in 
Russia's fifth goal with two 
seconds to go. 

Bruno Zarrilio scored the tying 
and winning goals as Italy re- 
covered from a three-goal deficit to 
beat Latvia, 5-4. ( Reuters ) 

Graf Will Return in Berlin 

tennis Steffi Graf will return to 
tournament play at the German 
Open, which begins May 12, tour- 
nament officials said Monday. Graf 
has not played for three months 
because of an injury. ( Reuters ) 

• Top- seeded Michael Chang 

beat South Africa's Grant Stafford. 
4-6, 6-2, 6-1, Sunday in the final of 
the U.S. Men's Clay Court Cham- 
pionships in Florida. It was 
Chang’s fourth title this year. He 
climbed to No. 2 in the ATP world 
rankings on Monday. (AP) 

Sri Lanka Edges in Front 

cricket Sri Lanka bowled 
Pakistan out for 292 in Colombo on 
Monday for a first innings lead of 
39. Sri Lanka reached 1(3 without 
loss in its second innings at the close 
of the third day’s play. (Reuters J 

Women Accepted at Last 

rowing Leander, which is based 
on the T ham es in London and is die 
oldest rowing club in the world, 
voted Sunday to drop a 179-year 
ban on women members in order to 
qualify for British national lottery 
money. (Reuters) 

Nobilo Wins Playoff 

golf Frank Nobilo birdied six of 
his final 1 1 holes and added a 
scrambling par on the first bole of a 
playoff with Brad Faxon to win the 
Greater Greensboro Chrysler Clas- 
sic on Sunday. 

Nobilo. a New Zealander, started 
. the day five shots off the lead and 
shot a 5-under-par 67 in die rain to 
match Faxon (72) at 14-under274. 
Nobilo earned $342,000 for his first 
U.S. PGA Tour tide. (AP) 

Fighting Players Fined 

BASKETBALL Sam Mitchell of 
the Minnesota Timberwolves was 
fined $10,000 and Kevin Willis of 
the Houston Rockets $7,500 by the 
NBA on Monday for fighting dur- 
ing a playoff game. 

• Mike Dunleavy announced his 
resignation Saturday after five dis- 
appointing years as Milwaukee 
Bucks general manager. (AP) 

Shihon Kicked Out 

soccer Leyton Orient of the 
English third division said Monday 
that it planned to release Peter 
Shilton, the 47-year-old former 
England national team goalkeeper, 
because he could not kick the ball 
far enough. 

"Pfeter is magnificent for his age 
and if he could kick a ball I would 
keep him, ’ ' said Tommy Taylor the 
Orient manager. 

"It sounds silly but you need a 
goalkeeper to kick it into your op- 
ponents' penalty box to make 
chances in this division." 

Shilton clocked up his 1,000th 
English League appearance during 
the 1 0 matches he played for Orient 
after joining it from West Ham in 
November. (Reuters) 


Bewitched, Bothered, 
Bewildered Bullets 

Jordan (55 Points) Puts On a Show 
As Bulls Jump to 2-0 Series Lead 


By Ira Beikow 
New York Tutus Service 


CHICAGO — The cold, bold sci- 
entific facts should probably be presen- 
ted even before the shimmering artistry: 
Michael Jordan scored 55 points as the 
Bulls beat the Washington Bullets, 109- 
104, in Chicago. 

Thai was more than half his team's 
points, as he paced — no, pulled, 
pushed, lifted, verbally challenged and 
carried like some kind of magnificent 
flying spirit — the Bulls to a 2-0 lead in 
their three-of- five -game playoff series. 

Jordan accomplished his feat — the 
eighth time in his career that he has 
compiled more than 50 points in a play- 
off game — by scoring 20 of his team’s 

23 fourth-quarter points on Sunday 
night. Only a 3 -point shot by Scottie 
Pippeo down the stretch interrupted 
Jordan's spectacular streak. 

‘‘That shot gave me some relief,’ ’ 
Jordan said later. “It was like the cav- 
alry was getting some help. And then I 
got recharged." 

Bemie Bickerstaff, the Bullets' 
coach, said: 4 *We did everything con- 
ceivable to contain Michael. He ba- 
sically put them on his shoulders. He 
showed why be is probably the best 
basketball player who is playing 
today." 

Bickerstaff said he had told his team 
regarding Jordan: “Make him be 
great” He shrugged. ‘‘And he was.” 

Chris Webber, the Bullets' center/ 
forward, said: ‘‘It was so frustrating. He 
would go by three defenders." 

The Bulls' coach, Phil Jackson, said it 
was “the best game Michael has played 
this season." And Chicago needed just 
that kind of game. 

‘They’re a young team, and they're 
playing with a lot of hunger,” Jordan 
said of the Bullets, "and they pushed us 
hard.” 

They pushed so hard that the Bulls 
were behind, 65-58, at the half, and 
Jordan, who had 26 points by then, 
raised his voice in the locker room, 
blasting his team for a lackluster effort 
"And in our building! ’’he said. "I was 
mad.” 

Dennis Rodman, who had been suf- 
fering with an injured left knee, returned 
to the game midway through the third 
period with a more comfortable brace 
than the one he wore in the first half, and 
immediately helped pick up die team on 
the rebounding end. But it was Jordan 
who hit two jump shots to bring the 
Bulls to within 2 points. 

Then Luc Longley. die center, hit a 
jumper to tie the game, and Jordan hit a 
3-pointer to give the Bulls the lead for 
the first time since the first minutes of 
the game, at 76-73. 

But the Bullets kept making runs at 
the Bulls. "I'm proud of my team.” 
Bickerstaff said. “They hung in there 
when they could have surrendered." 

They came back within 86-84 with 
10:45 left in the fourth quarter. Jordan 
hit two free throws and a jump shot and 
a driving dunk. Again, the Bullets 
fought back, and Webber sank a 3 -point 
shot to bring the Bullets within' 1 point, 
94-93, with about six and a half minutes 
left in the game. It was Webber's third 
3-pointer in five tries in the game. 

"I didn't know he could shoot from 
there so well." Jordan said. 

Not to worry. 

Jordan hit a lay-up and a 15-foot 
jumper, then stole the hall and hit per- 
haps the most spectacular of his 
routinely spectacular shots in the game. 
He came across the free throw line, 
dribbling to his right, seemed to trip 
over his defender, Gilbert Cheaney, and 


went up for a jump shot Juwan Howard 
leaped to block it, but Jordan hung, 
hung, hung in the air. then as he began to 
descend, he lofted the ball up, and in. 

Pippen, who was observing this piece 
of mastery nearby, put his hands to tais 
head in disbelief. The crowd of nearly 
20,000 screamed. It was now 100-93 
with 4:06 left 

And still the Bullets would not col- 
lapse. With 53 seconds left Rod Strick- 
land hit two free throws, and it was 105- 
102 . 

"Are you tired?" asked Cheaney, 
who was guarding Jordan, hoping to 
distract the scoring machine even just a 
little. “No," replied Jordan, "because 
we haven't won yet” 

Then he hit a (hiving lay-up, and, the 
next time down, was fouled and sank 
two free throws. 

The only other Bulls scoring in 
double figures were Pippeo, with 14 
points, and Ron Harper with 10. Chaney 
led the Bullets with 26. while Tracy 
Murray, who had a hot hand in the first 
half, finished with 22. 

"I have no problem carrying the team 
if I have to," said Jordan, who is being 
paid $30 million by the Bulls this sea- 
son. "That's what I get paid the big 
dollars for. I’m the leader. I want to win. 

I want to win another championship.'’ 

In other games. The Associated Press 
reported: 

Lakers 107, Trail Blazers 93 Shaqiiille 
O'Neal scored 30 points as Los Angeles 
made the most of its home-court ad- 
vantage, jumping to a 2-0 lead in its 
series against Portland. 

The Blazers did a better job of con- 
taining O’Neal, who had 46 points in 
Game 1, but Eddie Jones had 19 points 
for the Lakers. Elden Campbell added 
16, and Nick Van Exel had 13 points and 
nine assists. 

The Lakers went ahead for good by 
outscoring the Blazers. 13-2, to start the 
second half, giving them a 62-53 lead. 
They blew the game open early in die 
fourth quarter. 

SuperSonies 122, Suns 78 In Seattle, 
Shawn Kemp had 23 points and 15 
rebounds, and Gary Payton scored 23 
points to leadlSeattfeto a 44=-potot vie- “ 
toty. 

The defending Western Conference 
champs, using the fastbreak with aban- 
don against the smaller Suns, scored 22 
of the game’s first 24 points and stayed 
ahead by at least 10 points for the rest of 
thenighL 

pistons 93, Hawk* so In Atlanta, the 
Pistons outscored the Hawks 29-15 in 
the fourth quarter to give themselves a 
chance to clinch the best-of-five aeries 
on their home court, where the next two 
games will be played. 




Titleist Pulls 
Ads Over Piece 
About LPGA : 


By Constance L. Hays 

New York Tunes Service 


- 1 


Stott Ohoa/Bodm 


The largest advertiser in Sports D- 
Iustrated’s Golf Plus supplement has sus- 
pended more than $1 million m advert- 
ising after the U,S. sports magazine 
published an article on April 7that de- 
tailed tbe lesbianparty soeoe at the 

Professional Golfers Association -s 
Nabisco Dinah Shore tournament. 

Wally Uihlein, the chairman and chief 
of Titleist and Foot-Joy Worldwide, said 
that he baited most of the $1.5 million 
his company had planned to spend this 
year because he bad been disturbed for 
some rime about the tone of articles t jn 
women’s golf that had appeared iji 
Sports Illustrated or Golf Phis. 

“The Dinah piece was the straw that 
broke the camel’s back,” Uihlem said. 
“It’s just symptomatic of a condes- 
cending mind-set toward women in golf 
ingeneraL” . ■ * 

The other articles were a feature m the 
■fHflgaTTnft about the golfer Muffin Spen- 
cer-Devhu acknowledging that she was a 
lesbian, and an item about the golfer 
Laura Baugh, who had been promoted 
for her good looks by the LPGA, the 
article contended, but who had earned far 
more in endorsements than tournament 
winnings and wound up in treatment tor 
alcoholism and an eating disorder. 

The Dinah Shore article, written by 
Stephanie Mansfield, a reporter for The 
Washington Post, discusses tbe weekend 
festivities that have sprung up around 
tournament and refers to than as a time 


Michael Jordan going up for a jump shot against the Washington Bullets, "less about sports than babes — hordes 

II ■■■■ n. ml raft owf ' 


A Game to Remember 



Elsewhere, Udisoisses the “image prob- 
lem” of the LPGA and talk that it migfe 
move the tournament to "detach itself 
from lesbian spring break," as the week- 

From ‘ Best to Ever Play’ SSSsssSa 

other articles done from towns where 


By Michael Wilbon 

Washington Post Service 


The Miami Heat’s coach, Pat Ri- 
ley, exhorting his team to victory. 


CHICAGO — It was during the 
stretch when Michael Jordan was scor- 
ing 14 straight points for the Bulls that 
Tim Legler thought to himself: “This is 
O.K., because the guy is going to. start . 
missing. When his"teammates are^x?:,, 
eluded from the offense like this’ all hc 
has to do is bit one cold spell— one — 
slightly bad stretch. His teammates will 
be cola because they won’t have shot 
tbe ball in 10 minutes. If we can just cool 
him off for two or three shots in a 
row.” 

It was absolutely, perfectly, totally 
logical reasoning, except for one thing: 
Jordan never hit that cold spelL Never 
hit a slightly bad stretch. Didn’t look for 
or at his teammates, who hadn't done 
squat anyway. 

Calbert Cheaney played tbe defensive 
game of his life Sunday, scored a team- 
high 26 and still his phis -minus when the 
dust settled was somehow minus-29. 

After eight years out of the playoffs, 
this was the Washington Bollets' NBA 
baptism by Michael Joidan. It was such 
a wondrous solo performance, Jordan 
publicly apologized to the Bulls’ of- 
fensive coordinator, Tex Winter, for just 
dissing the entire team system with his 
55-point runt "Sorry, about the tri- 
angle, Tex,” he said of the famed tri- 
angle offense. 

There were no apologies to the Bul- 
lets, however, who have joined the Celt- 
ics, the Heat, the Suns, the Cavaliers and 
the Knicks as vic tims of a 50-point 
playoff outburst by the greatest bas- 
ketball player who ever lived. Like all of 
the above, there was nothing the Bullets 
could do in their 109-104 loss. 

Cheaney took away Jordan's favorite 
not-expendmg-much-energy shot, the 
post-up. The Bullets used Juwan 
Howard and Tracy Murray to double- 
team. They forced Jordan to take out- 
rageous, off-balance shots with the 24- 


second clock winding to nothing. At 
least four times, Cheaney had his hand 
on the ball, literally blocking Jordan's 
shot, but Jordan pulled loose, re-cocked 
and got off a gcxxi shot anyway. After 
the best defensive game of his life, 
Cheaney needed consoling. 

“We (fid. everything conceivable,” 
'Bemie .Bickerstaff said: "Calbert 

layed a greai game. He just met Mr. 


tournaments take place. ‘ ‘At tbe British 
Open, we did a stray on tbe town of & 
Andrews,” be said. "Our viewpoift 
was, if you have 20,000 like-minded 
anything gathering near any golf tour- 
nament, it would be of interest” 
Uihlein said he was further aggra* 


Harvey Grant: “What can you do? 
He was on a mission. This is why he's 
die best player to ever play the game.” 
Grant then looked atRoa Strickland and 
said, “Why did he have to do it 
today?” 

Urn Legler: “It’s like he was looking 
at certain spots on the floor and just went 
there and elevated and just left you on 
die floor. To put on that pe rfo r man ce, 
when the stakes are Chat high- Yoa have 
to look where he jumps and where be 
lands. He's lands eight to 10 feet away 
from where he jumps. He's fading 
away. He’s jumping sideways. He's 
holding the tall until the last possible 
moment before he hits the ground.’ ’ 

Chris Webber. "Not only does he go 
by three defenders, but he seems to be 
tbe only one doing anything. He’s tbe 
sole reason they won. There’s no special 
solution, no Jordan rules. We’re not die 
oldPistons. He put the nail in our coffin, 
no one else.” 

Jordan: “Once I got in that mode, I 
just couldn’t tom it off. I felt compelled 
to stay in that mode.” 

Every word of it is true. It's the reason 
why you watch Michael Jordan and the 
Bulls above all others. It’s the reason the 
NBA’s popularity has skyrocketed. It’s 
the reason kids from Eastern Europe to 
the Caribbean who would otherwise 
never have heard of the NBA are wear- 
ing Jordan T-shirts and basketball shoes. 
That one play late in the game, with the 
Bullets behind, 98-93, when Jordan took 
Cheaney, Murray and Howard off the 
dribble was vintage ’80s Jordan. 


. who, he said, “was condescending, and 
said, ‘We think it’s a news stray.’ 

Colson offered Uihlein the chance id 
respotKJmacolumnnomraHydeyctoltq 
outside opinion, wirich.be dkL But Uih- 
lein also insisted on "taking some steps 
to modify our advertising schedule.” Z 
“lit remains to be seen whether this 
was a good marketing decision or not/* 
Alan Klein, a spokesman for the Gay 
and Lesbian Alliance Against Defama- 
tion m New York, said oftoe decision by 
Titleist and Foot-Joy. ‘ T would imagine u~ 
there is a substantial market of lcsbiam 
that enjoy golf. If that’s the case, 2 
would be counterintuitive to pull ad- 
vertising around an article like this.” ' . 

Uihlein dismissed any suggestion that 
people might see ' his move as homeg 
phobic. “Itreally is a separate issoe,” he 
said. *' “This has to do with a major weekly 
publication and its policy of fairness as to 
how it’s covering men’s golf, women’s 
golf and golf stones in general." ■; 

Titleist and Foot-Joy, a unit of Amer- 
ican Brands, has a 70 percent share of 
the market for shoes and golf tal& 
among professional women players, 
Uihlem said. * 

Alvaro Saralegui, Sports niustrated?s 
general manager, said the publication, 
which is owned by Time Warner, did 
not clear its articles with advertisers. ■ 
“The way we all believe it works ii 
you.jwt out a great magazine, you get 
terrific readers and that will attract great 
advertisers,” he said. The Golf Phs sup- * 
plementis bound into 450,000 subscribed 
copies of Sprats Illustrated sent to readers 
identified as "serious golfers," or those 
who play 26 rounds or more a year. 



The Associated Press 

The Florida Marlins opened tbe season 
with high hopes only to see a fivejjame 
losing streak take a little of the luster off their 
high-priced lineup. But over the weekend 
they ran into another team trying to live up to 
great expectations, the Los Angeles Dodgers, 
and, helped by the Dodgers' mistakes, Flor- 
ida swept the series. 

“Expectations were high after a great 
spring," the Marlins' manager, Jim Leylaod, 
said after Sunday night’s 4-3 victory. “We 
don’i want to say we were pressing, but if you 
don’t hit, you don’t win." 

With the NL East-leading Atlanta Braves 
off to their best start this century. Florida has 
a lot of pressure to keep winning. 

Los Angeles, which has lost six of seven, 
helped the Marlins by making two mental 
errors and one that could have been ruled an 
error. 

With one out in the ninth and the score 3-3, 
Cliff Floyd hit a one-bopper off Dairen Hall 
that went off the glove of the second base- 
man, Nelson Liriano, into right field. Floyd 
hustled to second and was given a double. 

Luis Castillo walked and Edgar Renteria 
followed with a ground single that just eluded 
Liriano. 

The Dodger rookie Wilton Guerrero was 
called out when he rounded second after a 
popout and forgot to retouch the base as he 
returned to first- 

And the Dodgers third baseman, Todd 

^ ff „ Zeile, made a gaffe in tbe first. With runners 

Roberto Alomar of the Orioles hitting into a force play on second and third and two outs^he grabbed 
in the sixth inning against the Red Sox in Baltimore. MoisesAlou’s grounder and stepped on thud. 


Error-Prone Dodgers Hand Marlins an Important Victory 


mistakenly thinking there was a force play. It 
cost tbe Dodgers. 

"Thar was bad, costly, stupid, whatever 
you want to say,” Zeile said. "It's not 
something any big leaguer should do, es- 
pecially not an eight-year veteran.’ ' 

Bravo* 2, Padres o Greg Maddux allowed 
just one hit in a game called by rain in the 

Basibau Roundup 

bottom of the fifth, pitching to the minimum 
15 batters in his 22d career shutout. 

Visiting San Diego lost its fifth straight, 
and Wally Joyner, its first baseman, was 
placed on die 1 5-day disabled list after sprain- 
ing his right ankle. 

Atlanta set a team record with its 17th 
victory in April, and its 17-5 record is the best 
in franchise history after 22 games. 

Mot* s. Expo* 3 Rey Ordonez of New York 
hit a two-ran single in the 10th off Lee Smith, 
who was making the 1 ,000th relief appearance 
of his career. Smith allowed his first two runs in 
23 career appearances at Olympic Stadium. 

piratas 7, Cubs o Jason Schmidt held 
Chicago hitless until the sixth inning, and 
Kevin Elster and Jose Guillen h omened for 
visiting Pittsburgh. Elster also added a two- 
run double. 

Grants 3, Astra* 2 Rod Beck, the San Fran- 
cisco relief pitcher, picked up his major 
league-leading 1 1th save after Damon Beny- 
hiil broke a seventh-inning tie with a run 
scoring single, Barry Bonds and GlenaUen 
Hill homered for die visiting Giants, who 
have won 12 of 14. 


... 8, Ro ck ie s 2 Donovan Osborne 
won fra the first time this season as Sl Louis 
' Colorado’s team-record eight-game 
‘ Lg streak. 

. Jphia’s game in Cincinnati was 
postponed because of rain. 

In the American League: 

Mari net* 2, Bkao jays 1 Randy Johnson 
looked like his old, dominating self, striking 
out nine in eight innings as Seattle won in 
Toronto. 

Johnson won his 15th straight regular- 
season decision, a streak that started in 1995 
and continued last year although his season 
was interrupted by back trouble. 

The AL record for consecutive victories is 
17, set by Cleveland’s Johnny Allen (1936- 
37) and matched by Baltimore’s Dave 
McNally (1968-69). Carl Hubbell set the 
major league mark of 24 with the New York 
Giants (1936-37). 

Johnson rave up six hits, arxihbfestbal] was 
clocked at 97 mOes an hour late in the game. 

B«d Sox 13, Oriole* 7 Bill Haselman, who 
previously took his most memorable swings 

at Camden Yards with his fists, hit a home run 

and three doubles as Boston beat Baltimore. - 

Hasdman’s third double keyed a three-run 
rally in the seventh that pot the Red Sox 
a head . 8-6. He hit a two-run homer in die 
eighth, and reliever Armando Benitez was 
ejected after throwing his next pitch near Jeff 
Frye's head. 

H a s el man , who drove in four runs, made a ‘ 
scene at Baltimore in 3993 when he charged 
the nwund after being hit by a pitch fom 
Mike Mussina. 


Mo Vaughn, Tim Naehring, Troy O’Lea: 
md Wil Cordero also homered for the R« 
Sox. Eric Davis homered twice and Cal Rr 
ken hit a three-run shot for the Orioles. 

7, Wild* Sox i Andy Pettitte, se 
home from Yankee Stadium a day earti 
because he had a high temperature, avercaa 
his illness to pitch New York past Chicago 

Pett itte (54)) joined Mel Stotdemyre, b 
current coach, as the only Yankee pitchers \ 
wm five games m ApriL He held tbe Sox 
four hits in 7% inning s. .. ... 

Paul O’Neill hit a three-mn double and 
ado homer for New York. Frank Thomi 
homered for Chicago, and Albeit Belte ta 
two doubles. 

Bnmn s, Indian* s Milwaukee caug! 
Cleveland in the late innings for tbe secoc 
^igfat day at County Stadium, winning c 
Dave Nilsson s run-scoring sinrie with one oi 
to foe bottom of the nmth/frifi Brewersscrat 
twice m the eighth to tie the game, 5-5. 

A * l9# **, 6 ». Ti «* r * 5 Tony Clark, Travis Fr 
man and Bnan Hunter all homered forDeht) 
m tta sixihinning, but Anaheim won at bon 

ra Jim Edmonds s RBI single with two w 
m the ninth 

”?r£7\****** 1 Tim Belcher ner 1 


foe A s to fear singles until foe ninth : 
wtaoJose Jjanseco doubled with one , 
scored on Matt Stairs’s single withtwr 
Ranger* 7, Twin* 3 Warren Newsor 
loose with a homer, a double and a si 
< exas completed its first sweep at toe 
dome $mce May 1995. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 39, 1997 






PAGE 19 GE3 


SPORTS 



Canada Frustrated Again 
***** Goal Drought Persists 

0| «Ufc 


*_ v Ct^t^btOm-SuffFmDitpaKha - 

vf ft Scoter Alex Banbury started to cel- 
' 8 ebrate after te turned on Garret Kusch's 
pass sod blasted it at the open Jamaican 
fepaL He should have known better. 

" Goalkeeper Aaron Lawrence some' 
‘ bow go t a hand mi the 80th minute shot 




^ ■ 


Wotta Cqy loceaa 

a 0-0 draw Sunday and extend Canada’s 
goalless drought to four World Cop 
J qualifying games. 

* “I was celebrating,” said Banbury. 
'7 was ready to go to the bench and hug 
my teammates and do a lap around the 
- V‘ field. Younameit” 

■- Jamaica also had a chance to win 
' when Altimon Butler’s close-in shot 

\ r 'f- was d&tected across the goalmouth by 
goalkeeper Paul Dolan. 

AFRICA Ttmisza moved wftfama point 
-*• i of becoming the first nation to qualify 
for Prance — otter than defending 
. > champion Brazil and host France. 

r :.V- Tunisia beat Liberia, 2-0, in Tunis on 
Sunday. The Tunisians have won all 
four of duir games, and only Egypt, 
. with six points from four games, can 
" catch them. 

' - A penally by Adel SdHnri and a goal 

- _ by Khaled Badra put Tunisia six. points 
clear at thetop of gronptwo andneedmg 
just one point from one of its last two 
“matches to secure a place in France. 

' Tunisia’s victory ended the hopes of 
Liberia's large band of EuropeanAjased 
'i professionals, ted by George Weah, and 
' posted favorite Egypt to the brink of 
elimination. 

: -J ’■ Egypt won, 3-2, over Namibia in 
: - Windhoek on S atmday , after a last- 
mmole goal fay defender Mehdat Ab> 
delhadi. 

, r V v‘ Nigeria went three points clear in 


^roup one with a 2-1 victory over Buric- 
ma Faso in Ouagadougou. Home goal- 
keeper Ibrahim Dianalet an innocuous 
back pass from defender Magaoule 
Diabate roll through his legs and into his 
goal in tte40tb minute. 

Emmanuel Anrunike outsprimed die 
Budanabe defense for die second goal 
before Mamadou Zango scared a late 
goal for the borne team. 

Nigeria’s closest rival, Guinea, lost in 
Nairobi where a penally by defender 
Musa Otieno gave Kenya a 1-0 victory. 

Bassir Sahleddme’s 40th minute goal 
gave Morocco a 1-0 victory in Sietra 
Leone, and it leads Ghana by one point 
in group five. Ghana won its first match 
after three successive draws by beating 
Gabon, 3-0, in Knmasi, with two 
second-half goals from Italian-based 
defender Mobamed Gargo. 

Morocco coold go four points clear 
later, this week if FIFA awards it the 


... - * M 
-i- "h. . 


earlier in tte month. Fans in- 
vaded the pitch in Libreville with Mo- 
rocco leading, 4-0. 

Smith Africa gained a hard-fought 2- 
1 victory over Zaire in Lome, Togo, to 
go on top of group three wife Congo, 
which lost, 3-0, in Zambia. Striker Phil 
Masinga scored a 71 st-minute winner 
for South Africa in the match, which 
was moved from Kinshasa because of 
the civil war in the country. 

Late goals from Bernard Tchoutang 
and Patrick Mboma against Togo put 
Cameroon top of group four, but An- 
gola's 0-0 draw in Zimbabwe meant it 
could s till finish ahead of the Indom- 
itable Lions. 

awa In Asia's lone qualifier, Cam- 
bodia and Indonesia drew, 1-1, in 
Phnom Penh. The Cambodians scored 
their first goal in World Cup soccer 
qualifying. (AP, Reuters) 



Dynamic Duo Powers Ducks 

Kariya and Selanne Help Anaheim Force Game 7 


The Associated Press 

Teemu Selanne and Paul Kariya again provided 
most of Anaheim’s offense in the Ducks’ 3-2 
overtime victory over the Phoenix Coyotes. 

Tbe two players were second and third in scoring 
the NHL this season — Selanne with 109 points and 
Kariya with 99. Chi Sunday night. Kariya scored the 
first and final goals and Selanne assisted on 


NH 1 


Qar SUOff&nc Anurias) PW*» 

Diego Maradona, left, trying to outran Laurent Blanc. 

Overweight Maradona Shines 


Reuters 

BARCELONA — Diego 
Maradona, overweight bat 
still skillful, played for 60 
minutes as his Rest of the 
World XI came back from 2-0 
down to beat Europe, 4-3, in a 
charity game Sunday. 

Only 2,000 fans came to 
Barcelona's Olympic stadi- 
um where tbe European team 
included Eric Cantona and 
Hristo Stoichkov. Rene HI- 


guita played for the World 
team. 

The game was played on 
behalf of the Association of 
International Professional 
Footballers after Spanish soc- 
cer authorities objected to the 
idea of raising funds for Jean- 
Marc Bosnian, tbe player 
whose case brought down 
barriers to players* move- 
ment within the European 
Union. 


the winner. The first-round series is tied, 3-3, with 
Game 7 to be played Tuesday night at The Pond, 
where the Ducks went unbeaten for 16 games until 
losing to Phoenix last week. 

Selanne and Kariya are linemates, close friends 
and by far the biggest offensive threats on their team. 
Selanne had 5 1 goals this season and Kariya had 44, 
while the next-highest Ducks scorer had 19. 

For the game winner, which came 716 minutes into 
overtime on Sunday, Selanne and Kariya used a 
designed play. Kariya was already streaking down 
tbe left wing when Selanne flipped the puck high into 
the air. Tbe puck bounced, and a Phoenix defense- 
man, Gerald Diduck, tried without success to knock 
it away. Kariya got it on his stick and unleashed a 
shot that beat the Phoenix goalie, Nikolai Kh- 
ahib nlin, to the upper right comer 

“We practice that all tbe time,” Selanne said, 
adding that “there's always some luck in- 

Kariya and Brian Bellows had given Anaheim a 
2-0 lead in the second period, but die Coyotes tied 
it on goals in the third by Darrin Shannon and Keith 
Tkach ilk. * 'We should have had it in regulation, but 
we fought back, regained our composure and broke 
tbe game open,” Kariya said. 

The Coyotes will probably be without their star 
center, Jeremy Roenjck, for die deciding game. He 
injured his knee midway through the second peri- 


13, SenatoraO In Kanara, Ontario. Buffalo’s 
backup goalie. Steve Shields, recorded his first NHL 
shutout as the Sabres forced a seventh game in their 
playoff series, to be played in Buffalo Tuesday. 

Shields, who entered the series in the third game 


when Dominik Hasek sprained his knee, made his. 
third straight scan and stopped 3 1 shots. 

Brian Holzinger gave Buffalo a 1 -0 lead in the first 
period, Alexei Zhimik added a goal in the second, 
and Jason Dawe finished tbe scoring in the third. 

The Senators outs hot the Sabres, 31-21, before a 
noisy crowd of 18,500, but home ice has nor been 
an advantage in this series. Each team has won 
twice in the opposing rink. 

“It would have been nice to win here, but Game 7 
sounds awfully exciting,” said the Senators* captain, 
Randy Cunneywonh, who had six shots on goal. 

Red wings 3, Blum 1 Detroit wrapped up its first- 
round playoff series in six games, getting power- 
play goals from Viacheslav Kozlov and Brendan 
Shanahan. 

The Red Wings will continue their quest for their 
first Stanley Cup since 1955. The Blues haven't- 
made it past the second round since 1986. 

With 52.8 seconds left in the second period, the 
Blues' Pierre Turgeon grabbed a rebound and slid it 
into the open left side of the net. But his left skate 1 
was in the crease, and the puck had just slid outside 
the crease. 

So instead of the game being tied at 2-2, the 
referee, Kerry Fraser, waved off the goal, and the 
visiting Red Wings were headed for victory. 

Late goals “really have a way of changing 
momentum,” said Joel Quenneville, the Sl Louis 
coach. “It’s a crazy rule, but I guess it was the right 
call the way the rule was written.” 

The crease rule is designed to protect the goalie. 
In this case, Mike Vernon was nowhere close when 
Turgeon barely violated his space. “I thought it 
was a goal,” Vernon said. ‘ ‘It was very unfortunate 
for them that it was disallowed." 

Stars 3, otters 2 In Edmonton, Alberta, Mike 
Modano scored at 14:42 of the third period to lift. 
Dallas over Edmonton and force a seventh game of 
their NHL Western Conference playoff series. 

With each team playing a man short Modano 
took the puck from an Oilers' defenseman, Luke 
Richardson, in tbe Edmonton zone. Modano tore up 
the middle of the ice and ripped a shot that deflected 
off the stick of the Oilers' center, Doug Weight, and 
past Curtis Joseph for his fourth goal of tbe series. 


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pettMe. Nelson TO and Gton* W-PtOBfo 


5-O.L— Dntbek.1-3. HRs— CNooga, Thomas 
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Cordero CSJ, Hasdotan CO, Olimy TO, 
Narintag m. M. Vaughn (63. BaOtamc, 
CWpkBO CSX, E. Davfc 2 C51- 

SPI PM BIP— 5 I P 

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Bantam trAmtca Ftacte C7), DoJoncs 0} 
and lev* «V-OajenM, H. L-Mnifc IW. 
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Btafc BaaBsta TO, i. Omwilngs 01, 
ToJanas TO, M. Myra TO and Casaamn 
WMsor, P. Harris WJ, Hasanawa TO, Haltz 
TO. Jama TO and teyrita, MWanu. 34 
L— MJttyanO&HRs— DaMbTbCkofcflB, 
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MKIIOIUL LEAGUE 

SaaMPM MP PP-P 1 P 

Mksta BPZ POHZ 7 P 

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M.Tmnpsan, Bute CO, McCuny (7) and 
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Wcndefl To and Samis. W— Scttaddt, 1-1. 
L— Tatemaas 0-1. HRs — Pittsburgh. X 
Gidten C2L Brier TO. 

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BASKETBALL 


NBA Playoffs 


18 (Stdddand A], Chicago 22 (Langley 6}. 

(Odcage leads nries 24} 

» 19 T9 39- 93 

M 20 2S 15- 90 

O: HB 7-19 11-13 2S U»g WM n 
A: Sarita 1 B-19 1-3 22. Laritner B-13 3-2 1ft 
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35 21 29 37—122 

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IteboMds-Ptiorite SB (Peaoa 10), Scrite 
« (Kemp IS). Asrim-Phowl* W (Udd S). 
Serilto 24 (Payton O. 

(sprinted 1-1» 


CE HOCKEY 


NHL Playoffs 


1 1 1—3 
P P P-P 
First Period: B- H o falng er 2 (AudeRe, 
Shannon) tend Periwfc B-ZMMk 1 
(Grant Bamoby) Thhd Period: B-Oawe 1 
(Peaw Word) Shots aa goal: B- 84-7-21 . 0- 
9-144— 31. Garita B-SMelda. O-TugnulL 
(series Bed 3-3) 


Would Championship 

M HCLSOOa. HNLANO. POOL A 

Coach RettubacZ Rmand 1 
GemranyL Russia 5 

nsHDMasi Czech Raoublc 4 patois: 
Russia 3r Finland 2r SJowlda 1; Cemarry ft 
Fiance a. 

0« TURKU, HNLANO, POOL B 
Sweden 7 Canada 2 
Dniy & Latvia 4 

RMinDMMt Svwdon 4 prims Canada 2 
U A 2: Italy 2: Nanmy 0; UMa 0. 


(BriMMWa) 

ftMMT'iitsnn 


(BEtMMnBQ 


IP U 27 29- >7 
BUM 24-104 
Oe PJknlgnoav 10-2050 2& Strang &-10 6- 
71SM:TJ4ankNRv6-184.72ftBmm£-85- 
S 17, Mourning 5-8 7-11 17. 

Rohoands— Ortando39(Shwigia.Mtanl45 
(Maumh«99. Assbb-Oitunito 15 (Shaw 4), 
Mkrad 25 (Hardaway lit. 

b series 24) 

20 25 IP M— 13 
M Id 29 29 — 197 
p. WaBooe 9-14 2-3 21V Rider 6-144-4 1ft 
Andoaon 7-15M IS LA. Lritere SjOHeri 
11-21 8-M 3ft Janes 7-7 3-4 79. 
te ilio aod s P o rtlan d 37 (CAoMnsaa 1(0. 
Las Angeles 41 (Jaoos7).A»ris*s— Portland 
24 (Andwson 7L Lao AnoeissM (Mra Bnl 
9L 

QJLI.iteiT lead series 24) 

» 35 15 24—104 
29 29 28 23—109 
W: Choaneyl 0-18W24 Murray W4 1 0-n 
73; CJORta 22JS 10-10 55,Ptppwi4-lDt6 
14. BMatete Washington M (Webber 12), 
Qdcaoo 45 (PIpiMn 9). AssMs-WasMagtan 


Detta ' i m 

St Laris 19 0-1 

Period: SJ- -Hut) 2,tD-Knztov2fFo- 
doca*. Larianori (ppt Second PriUD-Sha- 
nahan3 (Sundriiim, LMwtihy) (PPl-TWrd 
PMMD-Mamyl (McCaity) Shots oo goab 
D- 6-14-1 0-30. S.U- 5-6-14 — 25. Gorilrc D- 
Vornon. 5A_-Fuhr. . 

(DoMrioraiirTO 
Mias 1 1 1-3 

Ednontoa 1 1 0-2 

M Period: D-UMBien 2 (GSdtast, 
Moop) £ SOrfer 3 (BucMoigoii (Jndg«v) 
Second Poriotb D-Bassen 2 (VeriMWk, 
LnM0)4,E-Czoriunyskl2(LMs«i)ThH 
Period: O-Modam 4 Odfaflnea Hatcher) 
Shots oa gsok D- 1P-11-12-41. E- 7-15- 
13—35. BsoBS ri D-MBOg. E-Joseph. 
(ssrleotedM) 

• 2 • 1-3 
HIM 
First Parted: None. State Ported: A- 
Kariya4 OCiorl MkamA (ppLX A-BoBawsi 
(MbwKN) ThH Period: Phoenix. Shannon 3 
(Ronntog. Gcrtnof) 4. Phoenix, Tkadnik 6 
CAmaaft Quint) Cpp). Omteo:& ArKarfya 5 
(Sckom Ruochto) Shobonpote Arll-lW- 
7—39. Phoenix 8-6-5-2—71. CnteeT A- 
Hebari. Phaarte. KbaWbute. 

(series ted 3-3) 


CRICKET 


MuacmMTOM 

2ND TESL SO DAT 
8m LANKA VS. PAKOTAN 
■aWJXV. M COLMBO 
Sri Lanka: 331 raunmwWioatlau 
Po*fctoc292. 


6. Mkhela Barton, Italy, MG-Terhnapym 47 

7. Laarertl JakSMrt, Franca ONCE 48 

8. Andrei Tehran Ukraine Late 14» 

9. Rolf Aldaa Gram. Deutsche Telekom si 

10. Rett Sorensen, Denmark, Rabobank si. 
MBUD QUO TAWOhOBOl l.BaitoB196 
points Z Sorensen 180. 3. Jalabert 107; 4. 
TchfflB 10« 5. RBs 1 0ft 6. Frederic Guesdan, 
Frantss Fnifl des Jeux 100: 7. Erik ZabeL 
Gennany, Deutsche Tetakora loa 8. Davide 
Cnsarete. IWy, Srigno 9ft 9. Johan 
Mummm, Belgium. Mapri 9& 10. Fredortc 
Mancasshv France. Gan 94. 


KbunOpem 

Fhri acam Btradoy at Ora S794JM0 Klrtn 
Open on the 7,052-yeid. par-72 Barrid QoN 
ChOi Uteri Cnurao In Twdmta. Jepon: 
MnUang-duLSJCocea W- 73-66-60— 278 

Jet On H, Japan 


WORLD euaaOAUKKS 

CONCACAF2DNE 
Canada 0. Jamaica 0 

STAMDCMQSr Medea 8 points. United 
States Ss Casta Rica 4 Jamaica £ Ornate 2 ; 
El Salvador 1. 

Tap ttnee Teams quollty 
ASIA 
OROUP5 

STAHDD*asdndaneski 5 paints; Yemen 
ACavboOn ),■ Uzbekistan 0 
C3ROUP7 

STMODBiaai Kuwait 3 paints Lebanon I; 
Singapore 1. 


1,935c 11 Albert Costa Spam, i^sfc 12. Barfs 
Becker, Gennany, 1451; IlAJex Cantofa 
Spam. 1.792; 14.Tadd Martta, UA. 1^7ft 
15J=enx Manfflla Spain, 1,640. 


TRANSITIONS 


UAJOH LEACUIE BASEBALL 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 

st. Lou a— Designated C Danny Sheafler 
tor assignment. 


Brian Wbfls, UjS. . 
H-Mlyase, Japan 
S. McHuyama, Japan 
Rid: Todd, Canada 
Ediwid PiyatL Eng. 
C. Franco. Paraguay 
H. Tanaka Japan 
Tan Mob Burma 


70-73-71-65— 27V 

69- 70- 71-49—279 

70- 71-68-70—279 
69-68-67-75 — 279 
71 ■ 72-67-70— ZB0 
68-71-71-70 — 280 

71- 68-69-72-280 
7D-69-69-72 — 2B0 
67-69-69-75 — 28C 


2ND VDAY BiTERNXnONAL 
•TEST DSXE8 V& WDM 
BUNDAy. W POUT OF SnUH, T1BMDAD 
West trades: 121 ol aul (43J aeras) 

ItekE )16-fi (2X1) 

iMBa won an taster scaring retain me rakv- 
hB match. 

Teams lew! 1-1 In four-match serias. 


CYCLING 


AbwelOoloBace 

SKTUnDAYL U HAA8TIKHL NETHERLANDS 

1. Bfonw Rte Deroncrtt, Deutsche Tetakom, 
258 -Job to 6 hours 11 minutes 19seonds 

2. Andrea TaftlWy, Mapri at 46 sacands 

3. Boat Zborg, Settc, Mercatone Una sJ. 

4. Laurent Roux Franco TVM sj. 

5. Maura GtaneOL Swiss, Fran des Jeux SJ. 


Tamoa Bay 3, Kansas aty 2. SO (4-3) 
STAo m si am Eastern Ora l urenca . DU 
Wastd n gton 10 polnte,- Tampa Bay 1ft Now 
England 7i NY-NJ 6. Columbus 5. Weston 
CoM urace. Kansas aiy 7) Dallas 7; CoL 
araefo ft San Jose & Lae Angulos X 
pnauunoiuiiVMUH't munu 

US 2 Franco 1 


TENNIS 


PA(UrCOUMBUItHB WM 

SUMMY. LAKE BUBIA VHTA. FLOIWA 
HHAL 

Mlchari Chang, 1„ UX. del. Gram Stafford, 
South AMca. 44. 6-2 6-1. 


Greensboro OuLStec 

Fteri ocano Sunday of the Si-8 raBBon 
Gieelor Q r ee neb oro Cl ir yl er ate o L ontfae 
7j0ta-ymd OMSS-tneur). par-72 Foraot 
Orita Craafoy dub coureo In Oreoaobora, 
North CoRrino (x-eron an find bale a4. 
oteten-deoth pfoynd): 
x-F. Nobflcv New ZeuL 
Brad Fawn, U 


Kirk Triplett, U.S. 

Bily Andrade, U.5. 
Robert Dainran, U4. 
DavfeLmellLU-S. 
Mfte Sfomfly, U-S. 
Torn KHo, OX. 

Mark O'Meara, U-S. 
PM Mtakeisafv UJL 
Racca Mediate. US. 
Emle Ets, Sooth Africa 


69-69-69-67 — 274 
67-70-65-72—274 

67- 4949-70— Z7S 
72-68-67-69-276 

66- 72-67-71-274 
72-69-69-67—277 

68- 68-71-71—278 

67- 68-67-76—278 
72-47-73-67—279 

71- 68-70-70 — 279 

72- 6869-72— 27V 

69- 69-67-74 — 27V 


1. Martina Hingis, Switzerland.- 2 Sfcffl 
Grot Germany;!. Monica Seles, U5J4. Jana 
Nowdna Czech Republic 51 Arantxa Sanchez 
Vknria, Spain; 6.Candil1a Muttncft Spain; 7. 
Lindsay Davenport. U-Sj 8. Ante Huber, Ger- 
rmmys 9. Ivn MafoD, CraaUa: ID. Amanda Co- 
etzer, South Africa,- 11. Irina SpTrtoa Roma- 
nia: 12 Korina Hcfosudava, Skwakta; 12 
Mary Joe Fernandez, UA.- 14. Brenda 
SchuRz-McCarttiy. Nelhertonds IS. Mary 
Pierce; France. 


1-Pete Sampras, UJL &11B palnJs; 
2Michae1 Chang, UX. 2716- 3. Thomas 
Muster. Austria 2309; 4. Yevgeny Katemikov, 
Russia 2147; 5JUthard Krajicek, Nether- 
lands 2JU2- 6-Goran Ivanisevic, Croatia. 
271ft 7.Cartos Maya, Spam, 2342 BMarceta 
Rlas, Oifte 224ft 9, Thomas Enqvtst. Swe- 
den, 2176; 10- Wayne Ferreira, South Africa, 


Dallas— SJ gned CB Kevin Matbh, RB 
Beau Morgan, RB Charles Talley, RB Sean 
Simms. RB Jarvis Perry, OL Todd Stewart. 
DE Brett WB Kants, and DB Montrefl 
WBUams. 

indi akapo us— Signed RBAtoc Smith, DB 
Eric Allen, C Matt Cravens, WR Juan Daniels. 
TE Darren Drexler. P Marti Gagtena, DL 
Gary Hayne& C Jason Johraan, OL Braonoa 
Kidd, WR Tony Latter, S Hated Lusk. DB 
Thn McTyer, OLOwen Nafl, LB D« Osbam 
DLBeaterPIctett.R&MalcolmTltoaias.OL. 
Lorenzo West RB Abu WHsan. ; 

NEW YDMC JETS— WbiWd LB KenThOHlOS-' 
signed G Patrick Augafo, TE Mark BakKiv s 
OuanaBuder, WR-KR Joe Daugkas. WR-GB 
Todd Dooczon, RB Robert Former, CB An- 
thorry Fogle, DE Terry Grooms. LB CndB 
GuesiK John HoftT Joy Hogood, LB Tyrone 
Hines. WR-KR Alonzo Johnson, LB Ertc 
Johnson. FB Ezra Johnson, WR Joy Jones, 
OL Casey Jones. LB Ken Thomas and DB 
Anthony Writer. 

Philadelphia— R e-signed S Jones FuOerta 
I -yoor contract and signed OT Jones Briitr, 
San FHANCtsco— Signed OL Chris Dolman 
» 3-year contrad- 

seatt LB— S igned QB Jbn Aretkmes. WR 
Andre Cooper, WR Roheri Wlftafl, TE Jante 
Clark, G J Ina, G Larry Moore, C David 
Kempfort, DT Myron Ehy, DE Nkh GL 
anacntec. C8 Atorzo Hampton, LB LeVOnco 
McQueen and LB Tyrefl Peters. 
tampa bay— H eteosed G Joel Crisntan. 
washinbtdn— S igned CB Dorrefl Green In 
5-year contract. 

CANADIAN PQOTBALL LEAOUE 
Hamilton— S igned Lfl Melvin AMridgb 
LBTknmHMandLBAhmanl Johnson. 


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CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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5 VPTEK AS FAST 
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BUT W PONT HAVE TD 
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Business 
Message C 

pears every W 
lo advertise contact 

Kimberiy GuraTaod-Betrancourt 

Teb + 33 (0) 1 41 43 94 76 
Fax: + 33 (0)14143 93 70 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY APRIL 29, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


Coming to Term 


Out and Open: A Budding Star Dares Hollywood 


W ASHINGTON — The 
voice on the other end 


vv voice on the other end 
of thephone sounded desper- 
ate. The person said that I 
didn’t know him, but he was a 
student and needed help. His 
assignment was to write a 
team paper on Alan Green- 
span, chairman of die Federal 
Reserve Board, 
and the dead- 
line was Thurs- 
day. 

I said, “I 
confess I don't 
know too much 
about Alan 
Greenspan, ex- 

the stock market went crazy. 
Why are you calling me at this 
tan» date?” 


the pressure that makes you 
do it.” 


By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Times Service 


uu IL. 

* ‘Maybe so.” I said, “but 
why would you call me to 
give you information on Alan 
Greenspan?" 


L OS ANGELES — The de- 
cision by Anne Heche, a fast- 


"I have to hand in a fin- 
ished paper or I don’t gradu- 
ate. I was going to write it 
during spring break, but only 
a fool would work on a term 
paper daring spring break. All 
the kids I know are writing 
theirs this week, so 1 am not 
the only one.” 


“I don 't understand college 
students. They always wait 
until the very last moment be- 
fore doing their papers.” 

‘‘It wouldn't make sense to 
try to write them earlier. It's 


“My mother suggested 
your name. She said that since 
you live in Washington you 
probably have dinner with 
him evety night. For descript- 
ive purposes, can you tell me if 
Greenspan is short or tali?” 
“He's not very talL" 
“How does he decide what 
the interest rate will be?” 

“I think that he used to do 
it on the bus during bis morn- 
ing commute, but now that 
he's married, his wife does it 
for him.” 

“Thai’s good. There’s no 
way my professor can check 
thatouL” 

1 asked, * ‘Are you working 
on any other term papers this 
week?” 

“Pretty much all of them. 
I’ve got to write one on sheep 
cloning, one on the space pro- 
gram and another one about 
Rasputin's love affair with 
the czar's wife. So I can 't give 
you too much of my time.” 
“I’m glad to hear that,” I 
said. “I don’t have to write a 
term paper, but there are other 
things I have to write.” 


rising 27-year-old actress and po- 
tential movie star, to reveal that she 
is in a lesbian relationship with the 
comedian Ellen DeGeneres has 
confronted Hollywood with a 
highly delicate problem: how to 
deal with a gay actress whose ca- 
reer has been built on playing het- 
erosexual roles. 

Never before have movie ex- 
ecutives and directors, who pride 
themselves on their political lib- 
eralism (and some of whom are 
themselves gay), been forced to 
cope with an issue in which their 
tolerance of others' sex lives col- 
lides with their desire to take as few 
risks as possible in making movies 
that cost $50 million or more. 

“There has not been a case in 
time where somebody has been this 


network first: a lesbian character in 
a lead role on prime-time televi- 
sion. Several sponsors have turned 
away from the stow, and the ABC 
aviate in Birmingham. Alabama, 
said it would not show the epis- 
ode. 

While the “Ellen” show has 
generated intense nationwide pub- 
licity, it was the decision by Heche 
to reveal her affair with DeGeneres 
that has struck Hollywood hard. 

In die past, and even now, Hol- 
lywood stats who were homosexu- 


it from the public. One reason is 
that studios assume that the movie- 
going public would not accept a 
gay actor in a heterosexual role. 

But Joel Schumacher, one of 
Hollywood’s most successful di- 
rectors (“Batman Returns,” “A 
Time to Kill”), pointed out that 
audiences fully accept heterosexu- 
al actors playing gay roles. “We 
accept Robin Williams playing a 


public about having a lesbian affair gay man in ‘Bird Cage,’ ’ he said, 
and asking us — and the public — “Tom Hanks played a man dying 



to accept them as a female romantic 
lead,” one of Hollywood's most 
powerful agents, who knows 
Heche, said. The agent, who spoke 
on condition of anonymity, added, 
“It's an important test case.” 
Heche, who is co-starring as the 
romantic lead opposite Tommy Lee 
Jones in "Volcano.” the No. 1 film 
this weekend in the United States, 


of AIDS who kissed Antonio 
Banderas on the Ups. Hanks won an 
Academy Award, and it didn’t hurt 
Banderas’s career." 

Similarly, be pointed out, Shar- 
on Stone played a bisexual in “Ba- 
sic Instinct,” which made her a 

star, and William Hurt won an . _ 

Academy Award for playing a The comedian Ellen DeGeneres, left, and the actress Anne Heche. 


flamboyant drag queen in “Kiss of 


appeared with DeGeneres, the star the Spider Woman.” 


of the ABC-TV comedy "Ellen,” 
at the White House Correspondents 


“It comes down to talent, it’s 
what the arts should be about,” 


one of Hollywood’s top stars, ap- 
proved her casting. The film will be 
made by Caravan Pictures for Walt 
Disney Co. 

Several executives at these 


Dinner on Saturday night in Wash- said Schumacher. Asked whether 


A T-Bird for a Song? 


The Associated Press 

TARRYTOWN, New 
York — The high bidder for 
Liberace's I9S6 Thunderbird 
got a bargain at a vintage car 
auction. The unidentified col- 
lector’s winning bid of 
$28,750 was lower than 
Christie’s $30,000 to $50,000 
estimate for die sporty white 
car with red leather seats and 
red carpeting. It was sold 
along with its original Nevada 
title, signed by Liberace. 


“My mother says that- If J 
don’t get the Greenspan paper 
finished she will never help 
me with my homework 
again.” 

“That doesn't sound like a 
mother who cares about her 


ington. which was attended by Pres- 
ident Clinton. The two sat hand-in- 
hand and posed for photographers. 

People magazine, in its May 5 
issue, will quote Heche as saying. 


he would cast Heche as a romantic 


lead opposite a man, Schumacher companies are known to be per- 
re plied. “It wouldn't stop me for a plexed and dismayed by the pub- 


minute. 

But studio executives and pro- 


“ Ellen and I are very much in a ducers are not so sure. Before 


son. 

“O.K. One more question 
if that’s all right with you. 
When Greenspan raises the 
interest rates, does he ask for 
divine guidance?” 

“Yes, he does, but only 
after the stock market 
closes.” 


relationship, and we are looking 
forward to a long future together." 
And Heche joined DeGeneres in a 
taping of the Oprah Winfrey 
show. 

DeGeneres herself has come out 
as a lesbian in recent weeks, and, in 
an hourlong episode on Wednes- 
day night, so will her character in 
her television series. This will be a 


Heche revealed her relationship 


licity involving Heche. It is highly 
improbable that Heche will lose her 
role in the film. But die question 
Heche and her agents face is wheth- 


Donald, was a minister and church 
organist. He died of AIDS at the 
age of 43. leaving the family in 
poverty. Various published articles 
said that Donald Heche had lived a 
gay double life. Heche has told 
friends that being honest about her- 
self is more important than pro- 
tecting her career. 

Even before she revealed her af- 
fair with DeGeneres, Heche called 


“The Juror.” in which her char- 
acter was seduced and kil^jjby 
Alec Baldwin’s, and Johnny 
Depp's wife in “Donrue Brasco. ■ 
She is starring opposite Dustin 
Hoffman and Robert De Niro m 
“Wag the Dog” by David Mamet.- 
directed by Barry Levinson. 

People close to Heche said 

Robinwn, Addis and Wechsler told 

her they supported her but asked 
her to understand the ranuficatratis 
of publicly proclaiming her les- 
bianism. Heche fired them and 
hired DeGeneres’s manager and 
agents at the Creative Artists 

A8 S£ngsley, the doyenne ofHol- 
lywood press agents who handles 
publicity for some of the town's 
biggest stats, said that Heche s de- 
cision was “entirely new territory. ’ 
Kingsley, who represents De- 
Generes, said that the comedian 
rarry to her several months ago to 
inform her that the “Ellen” char- 
acter would be written as a lesbian. 

“What do you think of the re- 
wsreussions?” DeGeneres asked 

Kingsley. 

Kingsley said she replied: IT1 
tell you I don't know. It’s not been 
done before.” 

In recent years several television 
actors, like Dan Butler, who plays a 
macho sportscaster in “Frasier,” 
tod Amanda Bearse, who plays a 

married neighbor in “Married- 

With Children.” have disclosed 
that they were gay. apparently 
without any repercussions. 

But the two are character actors 
and not potential movie stars. 

Various singers, like Ebon John, 
k.d. lang and Melissa Etheridge, 
have also anno unced they were gay, 
without damaging their careers. 

Jeffrey Friedman, a creator of 
the acclaimed documentary, “The 


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with DeGeneres — the two women er studios will cast her in future 


sponsored by the romantic roles or turn to other act- 


magazine Vanity Fair at Morton’s resses of s imilar talent and beauty, 
restaurant in West Hollywood on Heche may have had deeply pet- 


met at a party sponsored by the 
magazine Vanity Fair at Morton’s 
restaurant in West Hollywood on 
the night of the Academy Awards 
— Heche was cast opposite Har- 
rison Ford in a big romantic com- 
edy. “Six Days. Seven Nights,” 


attention to herself by firing her Celluloid Closet,” about Holly- 
longtime agent, Doug Robinson, of wood’s depiction of homosexuals, 
the Endeavor Aeencv. and her said about Heche: “It seems es- 


sses of s imilar talent and beauty, the Endeavor Agency, and her 
Heche may have had deeply per- managers, Keith Addis and Nick 
nai reasons for making her sexu- Wecbsler. These three had been 


sonal reasons for making her sexu- 
ality public, even at the risk of 


damagin g her career. She grew up 
in a strict fundamentalist Christian 


largely responsible for her ascend- 
ing career. In the last two years she 


directed by Ivan Reitman. Ford, home in Ohio where her father. 


played the romantic lead in “Walk- 
ing and Talking”; a top role in 


pedal (y courageous of her because 
there’s so much at stake far her 
now. She’s not an established 
movie star and not a nobody. She's 
somebody for whom the stakes are 
really high.” 


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PEOPLE 


T HE talk-show host Larry King 
has given his tall blonde “in- 
fomercial goddess,” Shawn South- 


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wick, a “friendship ring. ’ ’ It’s not the 
kind you got in junior high; tins one is 
a diamond band with a ruby in the 
center. “We are committed.” said 
King, grabbing South wick around the 
waist at a party in a Washington res- 
taurant And they're talking marriage, 
she allowed. Among the 100 guests 
who dropped by to celebrate the pub- 
lication of “Daddy Day, Daughter 
Day,” which King wrote with his 
daughter. Chain, was ex-wife Alene 
King, Chaia’s mother. *Tm number 
two and also number four," she help- 
folly explained. By that reckoning. 
South wick would be No. 7. 


Santa Fe, walked by and accidentally 
bumped Brown. “Santa Fe, a pro- 
fessional boxer, then turned as u to 
walk away and suddenly pivoted and 
sucker-punched the unsuspecting Jeff 
about the face and head, knocking Jeff 
to the ground,” the lawsuit said. 
Brown says Rourke later approached 
him and acknowledged that Santa Fe 
was a bodyguard and promised to take 
care of Brown. Brown says he 
suffered headaches, blurred vision 
and “severe emotional pain and hu- 
miliation.” 


what? It's great what we’ve got now. 
But if we go any forther it’s going to 
be less and less and less.’ ” Perry will 
appear with Bruce Willis in the forth- 
coming movie “The Fifth Element.” 


Luke Perry says it's time to take 
television's most famous zip code off 
Fox’s schedule. The heaxtthrob who 


Sir Derek Jacobi is being honored 
with the Shakespeare Guild’s theat- 
rical excellence award. Dame Diana 
Rigg will make; the presentation at the 
65th anniversary gala • of the 
Shakespeare Library in Washington, 
where the composer Marvin Ham- 
lisch will play a piece he wrote for the 
black-tie fete. And two Miami City 
Ballet dancers will do a scene from 
“Romeo and Juliet” 


Co.; Richard R. Duron, managing 
director of JP. Morgan & Co., and 
Alvaro- Saralegni. general manager 
of Sports Illustrated, are all. learning 
the intricate steps of the Latin dance. 
“Someone had the bright idea of hav- 
ing the gala chairmen introduce the 
evening, by dancing with a few. of the 
professional dancers,” Saraleguisdid. 
“We were asked to learn the tango, so 
that we don’t embarrass the . dance 
company, which we may still do.” 


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SINKING FUNDS — A representation used in the filming of the epic “Titanic.'’ Jeff Brown said he was dancing with 
The film’s budget, jointly bankrolled by Paramount Pictures and 20th Century his wife at the Beverly Club in April 
Fox, has risen from an initially projected $110 million to more than $200 million, last year when (he bodyguard, named 


A hairstylist is suing Mickey 
Rourke for $100,000, claiming that 
the actor’s bodyguard beat him up in a 
Beverly Hills nightclub for no reason. 
Jeff Brown said he was dancing with 


played Dylan McKay in "Beverly 
Hills 90210" said he moved on be- 


Hills 90210” said he moved on be- 
cause he was dissatisfied with the 
matcriaL “I am not going to bite my 
tongue and say, ‘I think this is good 
materiaL’ if I don’t think this is good 
material,” Perry said in TV Guide. 
“Somebody has to have enough sense 
to pull the plug and say, ‘You know 


Is it above and beyond the call of 
duty to expect benefit chaJrmen to do 
tiie tango? No, it’s not, according to 
tiie three chairmen of the Ballet Efis- 
panico’s 19th annual gala dinner, 
scheduled for May 5 at the Plaza Hotel 
in New York. M. Weston Chapman, 
managing director of Oppeohenner & 


The author Ken Kesey and. sur- 
viving members of the Merry 
Pranksters hit the road again in a 
replica of the 1960s psychedelic fans 
“Further," on their way from Eu- 
gene, Oregon, to the Rock and RoQ 
Hall of Fame and Museum in Clev- 
eland. Along the way, there will be 
stops in San Francisco, Chicago, And 
Arbor, Michigan, and Colmnbas,'f 
Ohio. Also on board was Mountain ■ 
Girl, otherwise known as Carolvni 
Garda, ex-wife of tiie Grateful 
Dead lead guitarist Jerry Garda. 



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