Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

See other formats



if! 

Cl 

ar 

la 


ih 

m- 


kn 

bo 

OV 


G. 

mi 


ait 



INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


World’s Daily Newspaper 










Paris, Friday, August 1, 1997 


No. 35.5 88 


• to Offer 
rth Korea 
oad Plan 
For Peace 


Hi 


Proposals to Include 
Security Steps and 
Development Aid 


By R. Jeffrey Smith 

Wteftington P<fsi Service 


a r- 


It 


t- 

V 


WASMNGTON - The United 

r5? ff opose next wefi fc North 

J“5J booth Korea work out new ways of 
reducing military tensions and avoiding 
M marfverttsjl war — possibly by es- 
tablishing a hot line for communicating 
in a crisis, exchanging military visits 
and providing notification of military 
maneuvers, U.S. officials say. 

Washington also will signal its will- 
ingness to help North Korea cope with a 
worsening famine and rebuild its 
shattered agricultural system by arran- 
ging for badly needed fertilizers and 
pesticides to increase yields. 

American officials also will propose 
helping in reforestation of some of the 
vast North Korean landscape stripped of 
trees for fuel. 

These are among the ideas that of- 
ficials of the Clinton administration say 
they want to explore in forthcoming 
negotiations involving the four nations 
that signed the 1953 Armistice to end 
the Korean War — the two Koreas, 
China and the United Slates. 

The four-party talks were first put 
forward by Washington and Seoul in 
April 1996 and tentatively accepted by 
North Korea last month. 

The precise timing, agenda and site 
for the negotiations are to be discussed 
Tuesday by officials of the four coun- 
tries at a meeting at Columbia Uni- 
versity in New York. 

Washington wants negotiations to 
begin in September in Geneva — the 
site of an earlier agreement between the 
United States and North Korea that shut 
down the North's nuclear weapons pro- 
gram, the officials said. 

The four-party negotiations, once 
they get under way, may last a year or 
more and will probably be difficult, an 
official said. 

Hie four countries have already 
agreed that the central sum is to replace 
the armistice with a permanent peace 
accord. But they have not begun to 
address the issue whether the new ac- 
cord should be a formal treaty and how 
any military disputes that occur in the 
meantime should be settled. 

The official said Washington prefers 
that 'he agenda be “very generalized” 



J\ v . ^ 


Twttn hgenue Franu-ftme 

LANDSLIDE AFTERMATH — Rescue workers searching for survivors Thursday amid the ruins of two 
ski lodges in southern Australia. Police estimate at least 20 people were trapped under the debris. Page 4. 


See KOREA, Page 12 


In Deep Blue Sea, a Trove of History 

Nuclear Submarine Helps High-Tech Explorer Find Ancient Ships 


By Ken Ringle 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — Robert Ballaid, 
an explorer, sailed into the National 


Geographic Society with photographs 
lartifai 


and arti facts of what he described as the 
largest concentration of ancient ship- 
wrecks ever found in the deep sea. 

But his presentation underlined a 
rarely appreciated fact about the once 
highly secretive world of deep-ocean 
search and discovery: Almost every 
man-made object ever sunk in the sev- 
en-tenths of die world covered by wa- 
ter is now recoverable. 

In the age of computer imaging and 
fiber-optic cable, the world may have 
lost forever the term “lost at sea." 

Mr. Ballard's mediagenic discov- 
eries of the doomed Titanic and the 
German battleship Bismarck have 
made him a kind of underwater Indiana 
Jones. But a six-week expedition to the 
Mediterranean in May and June, using 
the world's only nuclear submarine 
with wheels, yielded eight ships, and 
thousands of artifacts spanning more 
than 2.000 years of human history. 

At one point, he said Wednesday, 
the borrowed 13-man U.S. Navy sub- 
marine NR-1 “was finding a Roman 
ship every other day. We had to tell 
them to stop.' ’ 

Since the end of the Cold War, a 
wealth of undersea technology' has 
emerged from military secrecy to ci- 
vilian availability. The advances have 


included satellite- based global posi- 
tioning systems — once both clas- 
sified and prohibitively expensive, 
now under $200: computer-enhanced 
sonar imagery, which turns sound 
echoes of underwater objects into col- 
or pictures, and vastly improved fiber- 
optic cables. 

On Wednesday. Mr. Ballard was 
touting new. software permitting digit- 
ized mapping and exploration of each 
wreck s.-ic's various levels so quickly 
and so precisely that “someone will be 
able to come along later and re-excavate 
it on a computer in a different way 
asking a different set of questions.” 

Anna Marguerite McCann, adjunct 
professor at Boston College and the 
expedition’s chief archaeologist, said 
that "this sophisticated technology has 
come along at just lhe right lime." 

She pointed out that the Institute of 
Alt' -A h. • p -.5 !( 

years excavating a single Bronze Age 
wreck in Turkey with the rraditional 
hand tools of divers and underwater 
archaeology. 

But the mapping techniques Mr. 
Ballard experimented with on his 
latest expedition, he said, permitted 
the compilation of an exact electronic- 
camera photo mosaic of one entire 
wreck in just four hours — an ex- 
traordinary acceleration of work pos- 
sibilities on the ocean floor. 

While such savings are crucial 



in 


See TREASURE, Page 12 


Rrnl &tmn*/Thc AwciiicU Pm> 

Robert Ballard at the National 
Geographic Society in Washington. 




Kohl to Put Tax Defeat 
To Use in His Campaign 


By John Schmid 

International Her did Tribune 



FRANKFURT — Chancellor Hel- 
mut Kohl’s government will try to turn a 
stinging legislative defeat into an elec- 
toral strategy this fall after an oppo- 
sition-controlled parliamentary com- 
mittee on Thursday rejected his far- 
reaching proposal to overhaul the tax 
system ana revitalize the economy. 

Although the decision rendered tax 
reform all but a lost cause, the gov- 
ernment vowed to make another attempt 
to pass the package as parr of Mr. Kohl’s 
re-election campaign before parliamen- 
tary elections next year. 

The government vowed to start a new 
round of negotiations in September be- 
tween the Bundestag, where Mr. Kohl's 
allies hold a majority, and the oppo- 
sition-controlled Bundesrat. which con- 
sistently has resisted his plan to trim 30 


billion Deutsche marks (SI 6.3 bill ion 1 
from the national tax burden. 

By forcing the opposition Social 
Democrats again to reject tax reform 
measures, Mr. Kohl hopes to portray the 
left- leaning opposition as enemies of 
change and secure victory for his Chris- 
tian Democrats in the 1988 elections. 

Mr. Kohl's finance minister, Theo 
Waigel, said another round of nego- 
tiations would show “who wants re- 
forms and who does not." 

“We will fight politically for this 
reform," Mr. Waigel said. “If this 
doesn't happen, then the SPD alone 
must bear the responsibility.” 

Mr. Kohl’s drive to cut tax rates and 
restructure Germany’s maze of levies has 
become synonymous with Germany’s 


ability to compete internationally. 
■ busii 


Backed by business leaders. Mr. Kohl 



See GERMANY, Page 12 


Mictael L'rtun/R'!Ulcr< 

German Finance Minister Theo Waigel, right, and the labor minister 
Norbert Blue mu at a news conference in Bonn after the vote Thursday. 


U.S. Data Show Inflation and Growth Cool Enough 


By Erik Ipsen 

Iniernational Herald Tribune 


showed, allaying fears of an overheat- 
ing that might rekindle inflation, push 
up interest rates and bring the astound- 
ing bull market to its knees. 


vrrm/ vrvDif The roar in the en- ujk uu«» n»un»» •— •— — — 

NEW YORK ine ro* U.S. gross domestic product grew at a 

fiL.Wo^gP-TSccnd 
quarter, figures released Thursday 


Mawsatana prices 


Andorra.. 10.00 FF Lebanon --^.Ood 

Annies -...12.50 FF 

Can»TOi...1.600CFA Oaar.. 10 _“® 

Egypt EE 5.50 Reunion 2 

fSS, 10.00 FF 

taly ,2,800 Lira 5 ?El" fSIS, 


Raw .........i'.BUU un* MV—..- 

Kuwait 700 Ffc U.S. Mil. (Eur.) Si .20 



quarter, less than half the average pace 
in the previous two quarters, according 
to the Commerce Department. 

Even more encouraging, the govern- 
ment reported that a key measure of 
inflation dropped to its lowest level in 33 
years in the second quarter. The closely 
watched GDP price deflator showed 
prices creeping upward at an annual rate 
of 1 .4 percent, well down from the still 
modest rate of 2.4 percent posted in the 
first three months of the year. 

“This was the good news that die 
market has been waiting for for 


The Dollar 


Ngw Y&rfr ThutSday fl 4 P M. previous dCKO 


DM 


1.8363 


1.B3G5 


Pound 


1.6404 


1.629 


Yan 


H8 675 


118.385 


FF 


8.1994 


6.1935 


Thursday cfcwe previous flkMO 


- 32.28 


92Z2 61 


8254.89 


S&P 500 


efwvpo Thursday a 4 f> m previous close 


+ 2.00 


954.31 


952.31 


months,’’ said Cary Leahey. chief U.S. 
list at High Fn 


nurnuu, 

economist at High Frequency Econom- 
ics in Valhalla, New York. 

In fact, so good were the official 
statistics emanating from Washington 


on Thursday that some economists 
found them hard to explain. 

“I have explanations for why infla- 
tion is not picking up. but they get 
stretched a bit thin when inflation in fact 
continues to edge downward,” said 
Rosanne Cahn, an economist with Cred- 


it Suisse First Boston. 

With an economic recovery into its 
seventh year and with unemployment at 
30-year lows, some economists had ex- 
pected inflation to rise in the face of 
increasing shortages of labor and ma- 
terials. A him that there may yet be a bit of 
life in the old inflationary dragon caused 
bond and stock prices to pull back from 
their early gains Thursday. 

Those indications came from a report 
by the Chicago Purchasing Manage- 
ment Association, which said that man- 
ufacturing in the Midwest had slumped 
slightly in June and that, in response, its 
index of prices paid had jumped to 60.6 
in July from 53.7 in June. That news 
stopped the advances in stocks and 
bonds, although the bond market was 
rising again- near the end of the trading 
session. 

Die-haid inflation-watchers, known 
as “hawks, “continue to insist that price 


See INFLATION, Page 12 



Israel Threatens 


To Send Troops to 
Palestinian Areas 


Ii Also Urges Donors to Stop 
Aid to Arafat’s Government 


The Associated Press 

JERUSALEM — Israel threatened 
Thureday to send security forces into 
Palesunian-niled areas to arrest militants 
if Yasser Arafat failed to rein them in, 
one of several measures announced in the 
wake of a double suicide bombing that 
killed 15 people in a central market 
Israeli troops arrested 28 Palestinians 
on Wednesday night and early Thurs- 
day , ordered the arrest of the Palestinian 
police chief and asked the United States 
and other foreign donors to suspend aid 
to the Palestinian Authority- 
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu 
said he would not be limited by borders 
in the pursuit of the attackers. 

“1 will do whatever is necessary, 
wherever we think it is necessary, at the 
time we think it is necessary,” he said. 
“We don’t preclude any possibilities.” 
Nabil Abourdeineh, an Arafat 
spokesman, speaking to reporters in 
Jericho, condemned Israel's decisions. 


N.Y. police find bomb materials in a 
Brooklyn apartment. Page 12. 


’ ’These dangerous measures, if they are 
continued, will destroy the peace pro- 
cess,” he said. 

Mr. Abourdeineh said Israeli and Pal- 
estinian security officials held three 
meetings after Wednesday's attack. 

“Even though we have no respon- 
sibility for this attack, we share the 
understanding that it is a vety dangerous 
situation,” he said. “We ask the gov- 
ernment to respect the agreement and 
come back to negotiations.” 

Israel suspended peace talks imme- 
diately after the Wednesday afternoon 
blasts. Other measures included stop- 
ping the flow of tax revenues to the 
Palestinians and jamming Palestinian 
radio and television stations. 

Israeli troops arrested the families of 
two young Palestinian men in Dahariya, 
a village south of Hebron, early Thurs- 
day. Relatives said the men, who were 
known Hamas activists, disappeared 
more than six months ago. 

The families were taken to the 
morgue to see the bodies of the bombers 
and said they could not identify them, 
Israel Radio reported. 

The bombers had been disguised as 
Orthodox Jews. They carried briefcases 
packed with explosives and nails into 


At Market 
Blasts Hit , 
Defiance 
And Grief 


See ISRAEL, Page 12 


Cotnplrdt* Our Suff Fnoi Pttyuirttn 

JERUSALEM — Merchants re- 
opened stalls and Israelis crowded 
into the Mahane Yehuda open-air 
mark et Thursday in a show of de- 
fiance a day after 1 5 shoppers were 
killed there by two Palestinian sui- 
cide bombers. 

‘ ‘Nobody can frighten Jerusalem 
people away from the market,” 
said Yigal. a fruit seller. 

But the mood was a mixture of 
grief, vengeance and perplexity. 

“An eye for an eye; we must 
avenge ourselves. The Arabs hate 
us and understand only war.” said 
Kokhava Yacov, 61 . 

Israel Cohen, 61, a war veteran 
with two artificial hands and scars 
from bums on his face, said he lives 
in Tel Aviv. But he took a day off 
work and came especially to ex- 
press solidarity with the people at 
Mahane Yehuda. 

“They will never gain anything 
by bombing,” he said. “The only 
way they will achieve anything is 
by dialogue.” 

A woman was arguing with 
Moshe Shachar, chairman of the 
Mahane Yehuda Market Camni*- 
tee. “Why do you let Arabs work in 
the market?” she said. “You let 
them earn a living here and look 
how they repay you.” 

* ‘It wasn’t the Arab workers who 
brought the bombs,” Mr. Shachar 
replied. ' Tt was two extremists. Do 
you want peace or not? If you do. 
you can't prevent a Palestinian 
from earning a living." 

It was only in the narrow 
Tapuach Street, where the two ex- 
plosions took place, that the bustle 


See MARKET, Page 12 


French Joblessness Hits 
12.6% 9 a Postwar Record 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — France's unemployment 
has edged upward to a postwar record 
12.6 percent of the potential work force 
— a trend sharpening the political chal- 
lenge for the new Socialist government 
to deliver on its pledge to turn around 
the country's worsening joblessness. 

Raising the total of job-seekers to 
3,130,900, the official figures for June, 
released Thursday, marked an unex- 
pected further deterioration after May, 
when France registered its worst 
monthly increase in joblessness since 
October 1993. 

The two-month increase, adding 
nearly 50.000 to the jobless total dealt a 
blow to prospects that unemployment 
had bottomed out or even eased as some 
people had hoped after a brief uptick in 
jobs in the months before the previous 


conservative government called — and' 
lost — a soap election in June. 

Taking a cautious line, the govern- 
ment of Prime Minister Lionel Jospin 
has said that unemployment cannot be 
expected to drop before late next year 


U.S. pushes France to seek new air- 
transport accord. Page 12. 


and may not even stabilize until late this 
autumn after an initial round of hirings 
in a plan to employ 350.000 young 
people in the public-service sector over 
the next five years. 

Already, Mr. Jospin's team has start- 
ed coming under fire from some trade 
unions for being too timid in its pre- 
liminary job-creation proposals, which 
are due for negotiation this autumn in a 


See FRANCE, Page 12 


AGENDA 


Murdoch Is Closer to Owning Dodgers 

PAGE TWO The seemingly glacial pace of 

Forgotten Hero ofGtsU Rights Era i Ame F?" I ma - i ° r ,ea £ ue 

— — i ^ baseball team picked up when the 

EUROPE pane 6. s P° rt ’ s ownership committee agreed 

-Mania Requests U.$. Advisers RSjSf 

Dodgers, Peter O Malley. open the 

Bonks Page ii, re®™ s books to the Fox television 

Crossword Pane 4. ° etwor * /ad toe network’s owner. 

Sports J”~ pJSiSl n ■ ° ,MaUey caikd the decision 

- - Pages -Q-21. an important step. “I’d say we’re in 

The Intermarket Pages 6 - 7 . „ a nine-inninc 

E TC imuiim i Tij vm garae ’ ^ ^ of die proposed sale 
M li ralllKTlB»II : MlhrffriV| l ftt aaiaaaM announced on Jan- 6. Page 20. 

Clinton Replaces Air Force Chief Who Quit 

idem Bill Qinto aflSSy nam£ decisicra £ howSrthH^ a f Pema 8° n 
General Michael Ryan, commander of eral Tenvl ™ softer air force gen- 
US airfb^ bE^,^^ 

will succeed General Ac 

Ronald Fogleman. who resigned in Saudi Arabia St year. P^T™" 




^ - 


n 


i . ■ 

; ii 


■ i/ 

; -i 


• ^ 


1 is 
i .i 


U 

Ci 

a 
a ' 
;s 


! VS 


ii 


■ fc 

i l! 


: I 
.? 1 


•i a 

» ti 
: ri 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD 11081™, FRIDAY. AUGUST 1, 1997 

PAGE TWO 


A Forgotten Hero / Casualty of the Civil Rights Era 


Overlooked Tighter 9 Gets Some Recognition 


By Rick Bragg 

Sen York Times Sen-ice 

M ILLEDGEVILLE, Georgia — 
A hero of the freedom move- 
meat marches still, but only 
across clean, quiet grounds, 
through hallways of vacant stares and 
dreamy, narcotic smiles. 

In what history refers to as the Albany 
Movement, an 18-year-old college fresh- 
man named Ola Mae Quarterman defied 
the racism that gripped southern Georgia in 
1962. When a driver ordered her to the back 
of a bus, she told him, *TU sit where I 
want.*' A judge gave her 30 days. 

Heroes are made this way. The legend of 
Rosa Parks, a living legend of the civil- 
rights movement after the 1955 Mont- 
gomery, Alabama, bus boycott, was bom in 
such a way. 

But Ms. Quarterman 's stoiy did not ring 
out from Albany, which was in many ways 
a testing ground for the nonviolent 
strategies that would prove so effective in 
Birmingham, Alabama, and elsewhere. 
There was no decisive, poignant victory for 
Albany. The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther 
King Jr. left the city in disappointment, and 
national attention gradually died away. 

Ms. Quarterman, Like many others who 
took such risks, has paid a price for her 
moment in history. She was ostracized, she 
said, not only by an angry white community 
but by some in the black establishment who 
opposed the civil-rights movement. She 
was expelled from a black college. Albany 
State. Later, when she needed work, no one 
would hire her. 

Bitter disappointment, aggravated by a 
difficult childbirth that left her weak and 
sick, was finally too much for her. Her 
mind drowned in its own sadness. 

”1 had a nervous breakdown in 1965,” 
she said, walking in hot summer sunlight at 
Central State Hospital, the state's psychiatric 
institution. “I've been here ever since.” 

She has all but disappeared inside the 
long hallways of this red-brick complex, 
like some half-forgotten heirloom in a 
dusty attic trunk. Now and then some kind 
person with a respect for history will find 
her, polish her legacy with a ceremony or 
some other honor, and then pnt her back. 

She is 53 now, and her commitment to 
the hospital is voluntary. 

As she recently neared a patch of tall, 
yellow sunflowers, she leaned close to a 
visitor to share a secret. “They gave me 
shock treatments,” she said, “till I couldn’t 
remember how to count.” 

That was a long time ago, when she first 
came to the hospital. In lime, the hospital’s 
long-term-care division became a home. 
Sum members — a few of them know of 
her history — treat her with warmth and 
respect and she calls them “my family.” 
While there is no scientific link between 
the events of 1962 and her condition, dia- 


' V 


3te : 


r.i 




i „ 

A . • 







PI® 

t: ZM'm- 




L ' Sf-uifi, rwf| p ji« 






L sWTi- .■■■..! V 


used a divide-and-conquer plan.” 

The Albany Movement relied heavily on 
young people for sit-ins, voter-registration 
drives and marches. Ms. Quarterman 
joined that nonviolent army, even though 
the Albany State college president vowed 
to expel any students who were arrested. 

Ms. Quarterman ignored the dangers. She 
traveled around the southern part of the stare, 
registering people to vote. She was cap- 
tivated by Dr. King's speeches and the words 
of other less famous men and women who 
spoke from pulpits and picket lines about a 
world on the brink of momentous change. 

“She was always outspoken, what we 
used to call a fighter,” said Arthur Seales 
Sr., the retired editor and publisher of The 
Albany Southwest Georgian and one of the 
leaders of that movement. “Asking her not 
to attend a demonstration was like asking a 
bull not to fight in the ring.” 


Did 2d Gas Plume 
Hi t U.S. Troops? 

Iraqi Depot Hit in Gulf War 
May Have Exposed Thousands 


H ER MOMENT in history 
happened almost by accident. It 
was not even so much that she 
wanted to sit in the front of the 
bus, or that she disliked the back. 

“Ijuit wanted to see the scenery,” said 
Ms. Quarterman, and the only window seat 
that day was in the front. She took it. Some 
drivers did not mind, but this one did. He 
ordered her to the back. 

“I said, ‘I paid ray damn 10 cents and I'll 
sit where I want.' " she said. "Then he 
stuck his finger in ray face. I don’t like 
nobody to stick their finger in my face. I 
said, * Get your damn finger out of my face. 1 
Just like that.” 

The driver, apparently, had never been 
talked to that way by a black person. 

“He said I cussed him out.” she said. 
“But I didn't” 

He stopped the bus and found a police 
officer. “The policeman said, ‘Come on. 
Ola Mae,* and locked me up/ * she said. She 
was charged with disorderly conduct but 
was also chastised for being disrespectful 
to the driver and for cursing. She refused to 
pay a $102 fine and served 30 days in jail. 

Her arrest moved the leaders of the move- 
ment to boycott the city’s bus lines, which 
largely served black people. Bus service 
came almost to a halt as Ms. Quarterman 
became the boycott's figurehead. 

“That was the beginning of it.” said Mr. 
Seales, who handled public relations for the 
movement. 

But it was also, in many ways, the end of 
everything. 

The college president kicked Ms. 
Quarterman out of school because she bad 
disobeyed him. Four other students who 
were expelled for the same reason got schol- 
arships to other colleges, in part because of 
that involvement. But Ms. Quarterman was 
somehow passed over, perhaps because she 
was so outspoken and so young. 

“She was too hot to handle.’ ’ Mr. Seales 
said. 


\Lir? Snnrr'Th-'.Vm Inrt Tins'* 


Ola Mae Quarterman, briefly a symbol of the civil-rights move- 
ment, has spent 32 years in a Georgia psychiatric hospital. 


gnosed as chronic paranoid schizophrenia, 
she wonders what her future would have 
been if her fleeting glory had not been 
snuffed out so soon. 

“People got results from it,” she said. 
“But it didn't do me any good.” 

Even with ail she has to remember. Ms. 
Quarterman is not morose or lost. Her 
words are faintly slurred, but her mind 
seems quick, direct. Her smile is almost 
nonstop. It slips when she remembers the 
worst of life, then clicks back into place, as 
if it is on automatic. 

“I wish that hurt would just fly away/' 
she said. 

Finally, in the hindsight of history, she is 
getting credit for the sacrifices she made, 
honored with a few proclamations and cer- 
emonies. 

“What America has done with the civil- 
rights movement is to pick who they want to 
represent what happened, ’’ said Jane Austin- 
Taylor, who owns the Austin-Taylor Mor- 
tuary-in Albany. "Those were the people on 
stage. They weren't the ones bearing the 
taunt” of retaliation inside the community. 

Ms. Austin-Taylor staged a recognition 
ceremony for Ms. Quarterman two years 
ago. "She was the root of die civil-rights 
movement in Albany/' Ms. Austin-Taylor 
said. “Then 'the names’ came in and took 
over. You look in history books, you see 
her name nowhere." 


While Ms. Quarterman’s name has been 
lost in the civil-rights struggle as a whole, it 
does appear briefly in some chapters about 
Albany. In a chapter from his 1987 book 
“Bearing the Cross.” David Garrow 
wrote: 

"On Friday, Jan. 12, an 1 8-year-old black 
student, Ola Mae Quarterman, was arrested 
for refusing to move to the back of an Albany 
city bus and for allegedly saying ‘damn/ ” 

She knew what she was risking that day. 

She had picked what seemed like a mil- 
lion miles of cotton to make enough money 
to go to college in Albany. She desperately 
wanted to break free of the cycle of stoop 
labor that so many others traveled, season 
after season. 

“I just wanted to better myself,” she 
said. She wanted to major in sociology and 
counsel people with troubles. 

She was smart and sweet. Everybody 
said that. But she Was also full of the fire of 
the moment. On the matter of civil rights 
she was outspoken, which was a dangerous 
thing in the South in 1962. 

Like other cities where the realities of 
living sometimes overcame ideals, Albany 
had a black community that was divided. 

“The people here, and the power struc- 
ture, had devised a method of controlling 
blacks/' said Walter Johnson, publisher of 
The Community Examiner, a newspaper 
that serves black readers in Albany. “They 


By Philip Shenon 

Nn- York Times Service 

BUFFALO, New York — 
The United Nations has an- 
nounced that clouds of chem- 
ical weapons may have been 
released from a second Large 
Iraqi ammunition depot in the 
vicinity of American troops 
during the 1991 Gulf War, 
raising the possibility that the 
number of troops exposed to 
chemical weapons could be 
far larger chan the Pentagon's 
latest estimate of as many as 
100,000. 

UN weapons inspectors 
said Tuesday that Iraq in- 
formed them only last year 
that hundreds of rockets filled 
with mustard gas and nerve 
gas bad been stored during the 
war at the depot in Ukhaydir 
in southern Iraq, about 185 
miles (295 kilometers) north 
of the Saudi city of Rafha, 
where thousands of American 
troops were deployed. 

The United States received 
this evidence earlier this year. 
On Tuesday, the Pentagon 
and the Central Intelligence 
Agency confirmed that the 
Iraqi site had been bombed on 
Feb. 14, 1991. and that the 
United States now presumed 
that the bombing by the 
American -led military alli- 
ance had released a plume of 
chemical weapons. 

They said that preliminary 
computer models suggested it 
was unlikely that the cloud 
had reached’ American troops 
in Saudi Arabia, although 
more modeling was needed 
before it could be ruled out. 

“Obviously you don't 
want to end up alarming 
people about a situation like 
this,” said Robert Walpole, 
who is overseeing the CIA 
investigation of chemical ex- 
posures during the Gulf War. 

He acknowledged that if all 
of the hundreds of rockets had 
been destroyed at the site, the 
plume of chemicals would 
have "come close” to Amer- 
ican troops in Rafha, but he 
said that it was highly un- 
likely. 

This is the second time in 
two years that the UN 


Senators Advance Clinton Nominations 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


By Steven Lee Myers 

AVh York Times Sen we 

WASHINGTON — Sen- 
ator Jesse Helms may be 
blocking William Weld’s 
nomination as ambassador to 
Mexico, but his committee 
has moved to approve nom- 
inees for a raft of positions in 
the State Department and at 
U.S. embassies. 

The Senate Foreign Rela- 


tions Committee, which Mr. 
Helms heads, voted Wednes- 
day to recommend the con- 
firmations of 19 nominees, 
including some which had 
just been appointed. 

The nominations, some of 
which would fill important 
posts that have been vacant 
For months, now move to the 
full Senate for consideration. 

The nominees approved 
Wednesday included Felix 


In this Saturday 


Vi safes 

m *5? m llg J§ 


Investing 
on Vacation 


w 


Rohatyn, the investment 
banker from New York, nom- 
inated to be ambassador to 
France; John Komblum, the 
assistant secretary of state for 
European and Canadian af- 
fairs, as ambassador to Ger- 
many: James Collins, a special 
envoy to the former Soviet 
republics, as ambassador to 
Russia, and Philip Lader, 
former director of the Small 
Business Administration and 
founder of the “Renaissance 
Weekend” retreats, as ambas- 
sador ro Britain. 

The flurry of activity by the 
committee followed a 
squabble between Mr. Helms 

DEATH .NOTICE 
KENNEDY 

Terence Frank (Teddy) 

In London on 29.luly in hi> ‘UHh yeir 
Requiem Mw will he held at 
ihc Church ol ihc InnnacuLnr 
Concvpuon. Firm Smn L-nd-.-n w 1 j 
ji 10 W am on T uodav. 

5ih Au|:a-4 foUtmcd hy inicrmeril , 
in France Durui i- m lieu «-■! 
flower? >hou/J hr >cn; {«« ihc- ! 

Kennedy ln«iiuic uf Rlwunuiolop j 
1 Aspenlw Road. London Wc»«LH J 
Sadly mewed hy his pjruiur j 
John Henderson and hi- family and | 
nun v friends w 'rid^> nJv j 


and Senator Thomas Daschle, 
the Democratic minority 
leader, who accused Mr. 
Helms last week of stalling 
Mr. Clinton's nominations. 

In a statement. Secretary of 
State Madeleine Albright 
noted that 57 of 67 people 
nominated for diplomatic 
posts this year had already 
been approved by the com- 
mittee. The statement said the 
approvals reflected the “ex- 
cellent working relationship" 
between the Senate and the 
executive branch on diplo- 
matic appointments. 

The committee also recom- 
mended approval for a series 
of nominees to be senior aides 
ro Mrs. .Albright. They in- 
cluded Bonnie Cohen, a 
former assistant secretary at 
the Department of the Interior, 
to be undersecretary of state 
for management; David An- 
drews. a former deputy gen- 
eral counsel at the Department 
of Health and Human Ser- 
\ices, to be the State Depart- 
ment's legal adviser. Marc 
Grossman, a former ambas- 
sador to Turkey, lobe assistant 
secretary of stale for European 
and Canadian affairs, and 
Stanley Roth to be assistant 
secretary’ of stale for East 
Asian and Pacific affairs. 


Paris Tourist Bonanza 

PARIS (AFP) — Paris is heading for a 
record tourisr year, buoyed especially by Brit- 
ish visitors reaping the benefit of favorable 
exchange rates, according to a study. 

Visits by the British are up by 17 percent. 
After the British, U.S. nationals are the most 
numerous, with visits up 9 percent. They are 
followed by Germans (up 14 percent) and 
Japanese (13 percent). 

So many New Yorkers tried to call 
friends and relatives in Israel on Wednesday 
after learning of the bombing in Jerusalem, 
the international phone lines became jammed. 


Now, this special, temporary number has been 
established: (212) 442-9490. \NYT) 

Saturday will be the most difficult day of 
the year on French roads as July vacationers 
cross paths with those beginning their hol- 
idays in August. f AFP) 

The railroad between Hong Kong island 
and the new airport on the outlying island of 
Chek Lap Kok has been linked up, a spokes- 
man for the Mass Transit Railway Corp. said 
Thursday. A spokesman for Hong Kong’s 
Airport Authority said the exact opening date 
for the airport would not be decided until 
September. (AFP) 


WEATHER 


hat to 
buy when 
you go away. 


This wav to 


INTERNATIONAL 



• Europe 


Algofti 

Firslerdam 

antara 

APK-W 

BaiTAKra 

B-W 73 O 0 

Srrttn 

Snr4-*- 

E J Sol 

Dut'iu- 

EO-rt-urjo 

FrjnHul 

HtfST-kj 

lyansul 

KK-v 

L 4 S Cilnul 

Lonesn 

Uafl(*i 

UaMro 

liur- 

LIkccw 

'.lUM'l 

Ns-. 

0- .ii 

Pvr. 

r-ajua 

fir*-,, 

STMTOJTJ 

T.lPnr 

TtBcl 

1- WU 

Zurich 


Forecast tor Saturday through Monday, as provided bv AccuWeaiher. 


ToSay 

Htgti Lm« 

gif or 

19*6 1*64 i 
»■» 12-53 pt 
31 a® 22T1 pc 
16. 15 19,66 5 
3056 1*61 pc 
■5.66 1W5U1 
184K 17'STr 
31/70 16-61 « 
31iTO l*Vpe 
3148 19« 5 
24? 3 1G.C1 ih 
.’173 11MW 
38 83 1 4.-67 
;B-6i IMB« 
l!AI i&5-*r 
3173 13'55 pc 
MK 15* s 

24.75 17-62 s*i 
3577 KW-4 5 
3I.U6 31,75- a 

1666 c 
35 35 Ifi-W i 
24-5 217I)t; 
27.JO 15.-5? c 
i'VO 19-66 > 
1966 

26-79 1946 c 
212373 I4.ii pc 

34- 75 1*561 c 
17-62 1 1 S3 s*> 

14(67 1AE6I 

35- — 16 61 p: 

27«C i- 03 PC 

34 - 5 16.61 I 
21-p 1601 » 

21.76 15 Mr 

2,-7i 1155 pc 
B-'.l 13.0? pc 
1ST? ’5-55 pc 
21.70 1253 c 
33 “ 1 1355. r 
1*00 1165- * 


Tomorrow 
High Low W 
OF OF 
29.84 3C*M b 
24-75 13155 * 
3148 1457 ps 
31* 2-3(73 pc 

2&U2 22.71 pc 
39-4J IMS pc 
24(75 13(55 oc 
2S.-77 1155, 
3475 i7(o2 1 

21- 70 1152K 
31* 2271 -t 
21.70 <2. 53 K 
1 (*-->' 1 3(55 pc 

27- 00 1»«4 * 
24 76 13-53 PC 
31.88 17.62 k 

22- 71 1155. wi 
3904 21.70 pe 
27 T 0 17 « 2 k 
34. -c. iww | 
30(86 21-70 ss 

36- 79 1457 

37- W 21"75 PC 

28- 82 33,71 o- 
2144 21-70 pi 
27 B0 '763- pc 
21(~£) is-lic 
27-M 32-71 tr. 

22 71 1155 ih 

27 « 1467 pc 
7.1 -3 14.51 c 

14 57 n>50pe 
20.73 I ' K 
32- K 2 " 76 pc 

26-r- 1*64 £< 

22--1 lirSin 
35.77 1(*'"J s 
22 71 14.5* sr 
-'2 2371 t < 

15 “7 ""AJl 
27 90 17-62 K 
2J ’5 1353 tc 
2 3.-7 IH 64 t 




! Uir*ui 4 naMi 

CoM 


I IJrn-cuOMtl) 

04*1 


>4alr™,ij) N.VSiJ “ Y.’SA CC 

North America Europe 

Hoi in New Vc-rk Cnv ar-d Cool lor the summ-ii in 
Washington. D C . Saim- Affvn5 Ihu weekend. v*h4* 
Oj/. Dul ft could thunder. Ir.ionOul can hjie a lew 
Siorm tale in lh*» day or al 5hc*»e>6 Al tejii pariiol 
rtnjhl. ocoiei Dy Sunday O’ sur.ih- n* Saturday and 
Monday Typical iun'-met. Sunday in London Paris, 
time heal and t-umidiiy itn*, Bru-.5ei6 ana H.iniuurg 
weekend in Housinn ana P.nUy rtoudv -jv“i Uie 
Dallas Breeo ana ccci weekend ■n Liston, a 
Sunday and Monday in uiowhi or hio Cannot b“ 
Monvoal -uiedoul 




Asia 

A »?ve>coing rrcpicji sionn 
could Dnng lirrernjal. Wcvi- 
•n._j (Hinc lo Taiwan and 
southeastern China this 
weeLend ana -rro Mcrday 
Bailing w6l r-nve nil weairv 
ei ihu weekend, ever, 
inc-ugh .i couic Ihunder- 
sioim Me s;iy sunny and 
sra-jciiao-v nc-i -n Tokyo 
Soiu'div croj Sunday 


AlPUU 

Bat 

carujiic* 

ftnw 

&CTTU..V, 

Cjicunj 

Cllury KLi. 
H.moi 

Mo Cr.1 (to-. 
H :r-i * 
(hii-jpo; 
JakwV 

» L .73^' 

K ►.•lUfclli 
Utn-U 
.’faw C**" 
P*in)*r D^r.n 
Oiui 1 
Bjnoicr- 
Sr’.DUl 
Sr,jnr-/Lu 

3 

T.-CM, 


Today 

High Low W 
OF UF 

lift- ir-Cpc 

30 ft 3068 ;c 

31 mi. ;-•« ■ 
23 36 26 75 , 
:*■«: ;7«i 
li88 26 75oP. 
31 US 35 77 - 
» H 24 “ z ; 
K"35 36 7-, i 
31 33 24 7£- 


1 i 95 33 — it 
25 74 33 -• p; 
W 3 C 7 .. 

34-93 25 T? c 
3253 2i-7,c 
•• 33 3-NC - 

311 :6-r- 

»’>: 24--5-L. 
32 5? 2--f;o 
?i ft 32 7i >: 

SO* 25 77 r ‘ 


Tomorrow 
High Loti W 
CiF OF 

;«R2 us'-c 

39-84 21 -.in 
Aif: 2£":r 
AJ62 25 77 
uS • c 
3199 27 t: 

2-: ■ c-: 
33V 27 L . ■ 
iT-93 25” 
ji ft ;&*• 
y, 172 72 "> ■ 
?; v; 22 • i ; 

i'« 24” :t 
;-'6.3 32 7: 4 : 

r-.-aa W~- :: 

14 Ol 3# -1 
26- ■ 
U i- 23~- 

33 33 23 j 

j: ft 

t;*. 2' •- 


North America 


run wno *ttb m 'I* iou rows ra rai •uat'cnn ron 

THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


A two-month trial 
subscription. 
Save up to 60% 

Try a special, low cost 2-inontfi trial subscription to tbe 
International Herald Tribune to enjoy delivery to your 
home or office every morning AND save up to 60% off 
the newsstand price- 


Don't miss it. A lot happens there. 


Middle East 

*UiC-iuPi 4J-KM .11*4'. 
Pma 2*79 1 

Cwo 33.91 75 6H1 

Dirwc-r. Ji- HJ 14-57 » 
3" P'7 14-57 •. 
LjiM 18 170 18.-M 1 

R.,afF- 43'Ipi 21. *7 , 


42.-if.r 2f-94y 

35. 94 22- '1 pc 

33 -jI 21 70 pc 
i-9-34 1401 y 
27 .3 ir-01 pc 
34100 22-'i 
41 iO> Ml 1 


An&Wft 

Today 

Magh Lo%w 
C.F CIF 

19.00 irSS m* 

Tom 

Mgh 

OF 

fHr;j 

omw 

LmW 

Uf 

■ox: rc 

{Mm 

32B-I 

21 78 ; 

31 W 

!4 >A pc 

Cnc.vK 

'JVHt, 

>■' M j 

:n pr 

lFbfJpc 

Cl4S,V, 

MS 

27 733 

it* >5 


Cnjmwi 

32-89 

i 

33 it. 


C-OTW 

39 if- 

t'.-TJl Pi' 


1 - fa' 

Mcri^-Ai 


2.XT-JP: 

j; 



K8? 

2J*75 1 

Xi |«J 

73 73 1 

L-:-- Ary^iliii 


ir.Gi ^ 



Mum 

?2 8-i 

24/75 t 

4981 

.■*77 pr 

Logond: wunmi pc -0.3-1^ -Jrxtov. c-i5uij-.’ sin 


klinr-. v> ii-. 
Minardi 

c«l(ifvlc. 

Pl.vru, 

.-■>1. Pi in 
£•• my. 
Tciimlu 
-'incouv.T 

W.iilwujTf^ 


Today 

High Low W 
UT Uf 

i)8l. l-**.0 DC 

37 83 'Obi pc 
-Vi « 3J7Cpc 
33'if* 22 'I 
.11 HI 23 7)1 
4.i 1 1-7 2H82* pc 
r>73 1457 , 
23.-3 1JV< PC 

2' W 11,01 PC 
2i-7fi 1 1 53 fC 
V.i T‘ ;i.Ms 


Tonmnaa 
High Loi»W 
CIF UF 

29-84 l« -a pc 

35*2 15 551 
92WV 24 75 p< 
32 K- 33-71 r 
»-!*1 23-7? pc 
41 10b 28/83 I 
722-73 |4J7pc 
2170 13.55 w 
25.79 I3,*5i 
154» '<350 50 
93*11 32.71 pc 


Africa 



Cuvr T^Ati 

K»jro 

L>]09 

N*r*> 

l’f2 5-41 

2- i'73 i»#4i 
23T i?r594 
20-73 Br"?r 

■\ -1 1132; 

3- 59 S--^» 

3- 1-.^ 

:e- “? n -o •*. 

:S" -S =*: 
2~ ^ : 

iiu i? w oc 

Latin America 

Pid .«« 

12 5? 0 32 CC 

ift Sc 1 2»4IC 


31 ft 2475 pc 

21 ne 24'=.-: 


357? 30-68 C 

M r«. 

MuuDSCrtV 

J4T5 13 55 c 



36.79 2' 7C i 

r /' - ■ : 

•j irtfLiqa 

C72 s 



Oceania 


ST-onyu. rC/ W-Wr w Al nwpt, lOracBSNand (turn provided by AccuWeamo*. Inc. e 1997 


40CU4-I1 1155 543; 


COUNTRY / CURRENCY 

1 MONTHS 
NFWSSTANO 
PRK3t 

1 MONTHS 
OFFER 
PRICE 

DISCOUNT 

OFF 

COVER PRICE 

AUSTRIA 

ATS 


<550 

3572 

StLGIUMyLUXLMR. 

bit 

3^380 

1.3SO 

<50% 

D6NMARK 

DKK 

780 

360 

54% 

fINLAND 

FIM 

6,24 

310 

30% 

FRANCE 

FF 

S70 

210 

60?; 

GEKfAANY 

D£M 

182 

72 

60% 

GREAT BRFFAJN 


47 

22 

53% 

HONG KONG 

HKS 

(S76 

284 

57*.; 

ITALY 

FTL 

145^.00 

58,000 

60% 

JAPAN 

V 


12.150 

53% 

MALAYSIA 



101 

44% 

NETHERLANDS 



78- 

60% . . 

NORWAY 



390 

53% 

SINGAPORE 

SS 


82 

43% 

SPAIN 

PTAS 

U,70O 

5,000 

57% 

SWEDEN 

S£K 

832 

350 

58% 

SWITZERLAND 

CHE 


M> 

60*-. 


S 

7® 

33 

38% 


J Y«. t v-oufcf tfc© to itort nrcanng rf*f Mfrmaiionaf Herat/ Tribune 
J O M y cbeck is endered Iptn-abla to the IHT) 

| Charge my □ Ame> CH Diners O VISA O Accta* MaMerCard Cj Eumcaid 
l Fa- c'-US and Anon pr-roi enjd-i eertk — il be cha-ci*d .n French Fiona ol am evil r«K 

I Cord No £.p Dab? 

I S-gnMure 

| For buinais orders, indracde vour VAT Mo 

. |-(Ff7 i'/tT fypmtjer f874’32'|T;r 1 

1 Mr /Mrs/Ms family Name 

! Firs? Nemo Job Tilt* 

| Moving Address 

| Gt).'Cc-do _ 


Home Tel No Buunass W No 

E-Nto! Addnsss — 

i gol ih-j ccf y af ihc IHT rjl ; toi'. Cj ho«*J •. Cir.--ne -_ t-io' 

1*1 1 do ins! w-lF to rocoive intormohon From 'Sihdr caraS»lly ic'-mned :?-S?i ci 
Ala-/ or la* to tn/emanonal Hemid Tnfcune 
EUROPE. MIDDLE EAST A AFRICA 
1U1 Ave Criodes o« Gaullo ^?521 Mem In Cede* Franco 
Fn» -33 \ Al dJ 92 10 fcl *aJ 1 Jl 43 <5; 5] 

THE AMERICAS 

850 Hurd Avenue. T-Jcw Yorfc. N T IO , J22-4i?l. USA 
Fa* yl 2»2 -■’55 8785 W [tall free) 1 -60C'-5a: 

ASIA 

7/F ,'Aalayua Bkig 50 Gboccster Rd V/owfiai. hong ‘ ong 
Fax 11W W -B52 2922 I i 7i 

E-Mail: subtdNht.cotn Asai tobshiciSihthk.com 

Offer vd>d fer new subscribers cn'v 


M 1 '- 


.- : ! r e 


4 ’ - /' r : 


weapons inspectors iiave 
provided the Pentagon |vith 
unwelcome news about ’he 
possible exposure of AJIle lt ,, - 
lcan troops to chemicak 
weapons. They are testifying > 
in Buffalo at a regional meet- 
ing of the Presidential Ad- 
visory Committee on Gulf 
War Veterans’ Illnesses, a 
special investigative panel. 

For more than five years 
after die war, the Defense De- 
partment had insisted that it 
had no evidence to suggest 
that American troops had 
been exposed to Iraqi chem- 
ical weapons — and no an- 
swers for the thousands of vet- 
erans who had complained of 
mysterious health problems. 

Last 'year, however, the 
Pentagon reversed itself and 
announced that it had re- 
ceived evidence from the 
United Nations suggesting 
that American troops had 
been exposed to a cioud of the 
nerve gas sarin when they 
blew up a sprawling Iraqi de- 
pot in the southern Iraqi vil- 
lage of Kamisiyah, in March 
1991, shortly after the war. ' 

Initially, the Pentagon sug- 
gested that only a few hun- 
dred American soldiers might 
have been exposed to chem- 
ical weapons released from 
Kamisiyah. But the estimate 
has grown repeatedly over the 
last year, and last week the 
Pentagon announced that its 
latest computer models 
showed that the plume of 
nerve gas had passed over as 
many as 98,900 American 
troops, or about I out of every 
7 American soldiers who 
served in the war. Saudi and 
Iraqi civilians may have been 
contaminated as well. 

James Turner, chief inves- 
tigator for the White House 
panel, said that Tuesday’s an- 
nouncement on Ukhaydir was 
“obviously a significant de- 
velopment” given the possi- 
bility that many more troops 
were exposed to chemical 
weapons than previous ‘-■Re - 
thought. 

“We need to do modeling 
to determine whether there , 
was any U.S. downwind haz- ■ 
and from that bombing,” he 
said. 

The committee, which in- 
cludes scientists and physi- 
cians, was created by Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton in 1995 to 
investigate the ailments being 
reported by thousands of Gulf 
War veterans. More than 
1 00.000 veterans have sought 
special medical checkups 
from the Defense Department 
and the Department of Vet- 
erans Affairs. 

In a report in January, the 
committee said that chemical 
weapons were probably not 
responsible for the veterans' 
health problems, although it 
called for millions of dollars 
in new research on the health 
effects of exposure to low 
levels of chemical weapons. 


"« A>f; • 


f 1 Nt# ; ■ -• 

I*- 

Jlfl? ' - • 


7 W'- 

I? 

Shift- 10 ‘ 

r^STP/- 1 . 


jtf iu* 
ijoaiibn •- 

tuurcri’-'-' 
/pn nr- 


¥ t e * 

t £ % 


^•XrT:- 

iniuUw!-- 
Df-tr J*- ' 

tydtti 

fi*-: 

iOBEiU— 
ZDfl. P* - f 

nix? he 
suma?'- 
Hu 

and ort 
•jincoirr :- 
, nrjecifdr^' 
fiadaru-:: . 
(kcmk : 
Imcall} r -‘. 

RepuM- 
nai the V- : 
mac Parr. 
•rffrurnir;/ ■ 
r<jiinjpr. ■ 
Jnras/iLj.v 
fern 2/ -• 
taneei . 
Party, id 
/:•• • . 
JMskH-.-t.- 
TtV:*r: 
you hjjF }:-. ; 

Wtt" $zn;.y • 

ten of { r 
H'fiiJCyh... ■.* 
fc/..- .. 

Of ikfTf" • 

Mr I-; ' 
awUsJs- .• 

Yfluroi‘r».:r. 

to meiCv . 
Whue H -: < ■ ■ 
wnal G.-is-’ -- 

^ Whii7 y.. r 
iy n;.-.- 

had. i -- - 

•Vnair-r - 
nun .ij . 

u'S- 

Wwiy r,; - 
cusuif ihc 
« Miter . 
r, mrpirrei - ' 

31 hey-"' 

» T> ' 

: • 

^Honuip..; 



5K»- 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, AUGUST 


THE AMERICAS 


Army Inquiries Find Sex Bias Is Widespread 


-7 




By Eric Schmitt 

New York Tim es SetWce 

f ASHINGTON — Two U.S. Army 
’stigations into handling of sexual 
onduct have found widespread ev- 
il**® of discrimination by male coro- 
fiders against women, staffing that 
.t°° sergeants to supervise 

B a Section system that al- 
/ed wife-beaters tofiil &e prestigious 
c Stressful job of drill sergeant, army 
Ticials and lawmakers say. 

Neither inquiry held anyone account- 
able for the problems, said officials fa- 
miliar with tlie reports. 

Those were among the conclusions 
reached in separate inquiries by the 
array's inspector general and a panel of 
officers and civilians who spent eight 
months interviewing 35,000 soldiers 
and commanders at 59 bases. 

Both reviews stem. from accusations 
that male drill sergeants at the Aberdeen 
Proving Ground tr aining base in Mary- 


land had engaged in sexual misconduct 
with female trainees. 

The army said Tuesday that it would 
delay releasing the reports — due in 
June — until mid-September to give the 
secretary of the army, Togo West Jr., 
more time to devise remedies for the 
problems. But in Congress on Wednes- 
day morning. two generals on the in- 
vestigating panel gave three members of 
the House a private briefing. 

Tlie findings of die investigators are a 
ringing indictment of policies that had 
been expected to prevent sexual har- 
assment and misconduct. 

The inspector general. Lieutenant 
General Jared Bates, could brief law- 
makers as early as this week on his 
report, which examines what went wrong 
at Aberdeen and other t rainin g bases. 

“The corrective action will take 
years,” Representative Stephen Buyer, 
Republican of Indiana, said Wednesday. 
Mr. Buyer heads foe National Security 
Committee's personnel subcommittee. 


Mr. Buyer received the briefing with 
two colleagues from the subcommittee, 
Jane Harman, Democrat of California, 
and Tillie Fowler, Republican of Flor- 
ida. The two generals were Major Gen- 
eral Richard Siegfried, chairman of the 
seven-member panel, and Brigadier 
General Evelyn Foote, vice chairman. 

The two retired officers were recalled 
to active duty last fall to head the panel. 
The panel’s findings are so troubling 
that the lawmakers said they would hold 
hearings as soon as the reports had beeu 
made public. 

They said they would insist on testi- 
mony by Mr. West and General Dennis 
Reimer, the chief of staff. 

Mr. Buyer said the panel’s findings 
and recommendations closely followed 
those of an inquiry the subcommittee 
completed in June. That congressional 
review found that the army's process for 
selecting drill sergeants was not rig- 
orous enough and did not consider a 
candidate's emotional maturity. 


“We haven’t been looking at their 
backgrounds closely enough.” said an 
officer familiar with the report. “There 
was no close scrutiny of situations 
where some drill sergeants had beat 
their wives. Guys at Aberdeen had prob- 
lems with this. 

The panel and the subcommittee also 
concluded that the ratio of trainees to 
drill sergeants was dangerously high, 

Mr. Buyer said. 

The army standard for basic training 
is 20 trainees for each drill sergeant, but 
at Fort Leonard Wood, a major training 
base in Missouri, the congressional in- 
vestigators found the ratio was 35 train- 
ees for each drill sergeant. Such ratios, 
in an already stressful job, might lead to 
misconduct. 

Another common finding was that 

enforcement by commanders of rules 

against sexual behavior varied widely. 
The panel found “overt and covert dis- 
crimination by commanders," an of- 
ficer said. 



paign-Funds Inquiry 
a Suspect Donor 

sas. After Mr. Clinton was elected pres- 
ident. Mr. Trie moved to Washington to 
cry to use his connection in business 
activities. In March 1996, Mr. Cardozo 
testified, Mr. Trie, whom he had never 
met or heard of, walked into his office 
and shook open an envelope containing 
about $460,000 in $1,000 checks and 
money orders made out to the defense 
trust This was almost half the amount of 
money the trust had raised by that date. 

Mr. Cardozo said he was immedi- 
ately suspicious. Some money orders, 
he said, had sequential numbers and had 
been filled out under different names 
but in the same handwriting. 

Although legal defense fends are not 
covered by campaign-finance laws, Mr. 
Clinton’s trust had established rigorous 
standards, Mr. Cardozo said. It limited 
donations to $1,000 a person and said it 
would not accept money from people 
who were not U.S. citizens. 


* By David E. Rosenbaum 

New YorkTimes Service 

WASHINGTON — The Senate com- 
mittee investigating campaign financ- 
ing has turned its focus to large dona- 
tions that Yah Lin (Charlie) Trie, a main 
•figure in the inquiry, offered last year to 
a private fend that had been established 
lo help President Bill Clinton meet per- 
sonal legal expenses. 

. [A private investigator hired by the 
■Presidential Legal Expense Trust told 
senators Thursday (hat his firm had been 
instructed not to interview Mr. Trie and 
never did so, The Associated Press re- 
, ported. 

- [“X am certain we were told not to 
.contact Charlie Trie,” said Terry Len- 
•zner, president of Investigative Group 
Inc; “we were to start with finding out 
•who he was, what his background was, 
'starting with the public database.!’] 

, The donations, which eventually 
totaled meat; than $600,000, were legal 
L -and not - subject tub campaign-finance 
strictures' but the . trustees of the fund 
rejected than because they did notmeet 
standards ffee fund had established and 
. because. Jiey might have proved po- 
litically embarrassing. 

. r Republicans suggested Wednesday 
*r«hat tire White House and the Demo- 
cratic Party shonkThAve" beerL equally 
nrcnmspect in dealing with Mr. Trie, 
^estimony cro Tuesday described Mr. 
jfrie as laundering Jsvgc sums of money 
, foom .-al»rcfeicl.-^33iax ' 'Aen. gave or ar-..- 

janged to fee ^.vot to the Democratic 
Party, in violation of U.S.' law. Testi- 
mony also showed that he visited the 
-White House about two dozen times. 

Tm perfectly willing to stipulate that 
,you handled this in . an admirable fash- 
don," Senator Robert Bennett,. Repubr 
Jican of Utah, told the main witness 
•Wednesday. Michael Cardozo, a Wash- 
ington lawyer who is executive director 
of the Presidential Legal Expense Trust. 

Mf. Benneit continued: “You 

Ismelled a rat when you met Charlie Trie. 
Your other trustees smelled a rat when 
they met Charlie Trie. But the folks at the 
White House and the Democratic Na- 
tional Committee allowed him to enter 
the White House 23 times and didn’t 
seem to have the sense and antenna that 
Vou had. 1 think that's a fairly telling 
tiling in this overall dreams tance.” 

Senator Fred Thompson, the chair- 
man of the investigating committee, 
briefly interrupted Mr. Cardozo’s testi- 
•mony to read 30 statement ac- 
cusing the White House of having failed 
to submit requested evidence to foe' 
..committee until it was no longer useful 
in the hearings. 

- Mr. Trie, a U.S. citizen, owned a 
Chinese restaurant in Little Rock. 
Arkansas, and became friendly with i Mr. 
Clinton when he was governor of Arkan- 



Rid WilknGflteucn 

Michael Cardozo, head of the president’s legal defense fund, testifying 
about Yah Lin (Charlie) Trie, whose donations are under investigation. 


Quietly, an Opening for Gun Imports 


By John Mimz 

Basra*:?*: P&Ser.ice 


■ WASHINGTON — Millions of sur- 
plus U.S. military rifles 3nd pistols, 
some of them easily convertible to auto- 
matic weapons, could enter America 
under a measure hurriedly approved 
with, almost no discussion this week by 
the House of Representatives’ Appro- 
priations Committee. 

The amendment had been pushed by 
the National Rifle Association and U.S. 
gun wholesalers, who see significant 
profits from importing the M-l Garand 
and M-l caziune rifles as well as .45- 
caliber M191 1 pistols. 

The comminee voted Tuesday to at- 
tach the amendment, sponsored by Rep- 
resentative John Murtha, Democrat of 
Pennsylvania, to the Treasury Depart- 
ment’s appropriations bill. 

John Stmunn. who was former Pres- 
ident George Bush’s While House chief 
of staff, is one of the measure's key 
proponents, congressional sources said. 
He did not return telephone messages 
seeking comment. 

“If the gun lobby warns to flood our 
streets with 2_5 million more weapons 
and enrich foreign governments, they 
ought to have the guts to do it in the 
open,” said Senator Frank Lautenberg, 
Democrat of New Jersey, the measure’s 
leading opponenL 

M-I s, much loved by U-S. soldiers in 
World War H, are too heavy and bulky 
to appeal to criminals, gun importers 
say. But critics of the gun industry’ say 
the lighter, smaller M-l carbines are 
easily convertible to automatic weapons 


and could be attractive to robbers and 
mobsters. 

Convened M-l carbines "could be a 
problem for law enforcement.' ’ said 
Raymond Kelly, undersecretary for en- 
rbramem at the Treasury and a former 
New York City police commissioner. 
"This is a policy change that shouldn't 
be made without more deliberation.'' 

But Bill McIntyre, a spokesman for 
the Firearms Importers Roundtable, a 
gun importers’ group, called it "out- 
landish” to raise fears of criminals tot- 
ing converted M-l carbines. He quoted 
a police detective as saying he was 
“more likely to be attacked by an es- 
caped tiger from the zoo” than by a gun 
that had been convened to an auto- 
matic. 


Since the 1950s, the United Stales has 
given away or sold at discount almost 3 
million surplus military firearms to al- 
lies or former allies. While those types 
of guns sell for S300 to 5500 in the 
United States, importers contend they 
could sell them for as much as Si. 000 
each, depending on their condition. 

The Murtha mea.su re would bar fed- 
eral agencies from spending govern- 
ment funds to block applications seek- 
ing to import such guns and grant 
millions of dollars ia subsidies to U.S. 
gun importers and to other governments 
involved in the gun sales. U.S. officials 
said. The bill would drop Jong-sianding 
requirements that if those allies ever sell 
the firearms, they would have to repay 
the Pentagon, they said. 


PAGE 3 



POLITICAL NOTES 


Budget Bill Passes 
Both Houses Easily 

WASHINGTON — With Repub- 
Li cans and Democrats alike claiming 
victoty and credit, the Senate and 
House of Representatives voted over- 
whelmingly to approve landmark leg- 
islation to balance the federal budget 
by 2002. 

The balanced budget bill and a 
companion bill io cut taxes represent 
significant political achievements for 
President Bill Clinton; the House 
speaker. Newt Gingrich, and the Sen- 
ate majority leader, Trent Lon. 

The bill passed in the House on a 
vote of 346 to 85, with most of the 
opposition coming from the far ends 
of the political spectrum. Although an 
unassailable majority of Republicans 
— 193 of them — voted for the bill, 
the 32 dissidents included many of the 
conservative junior members who 
were involved in a move this month to 
oust Mr. Gingrich. The Senate ap- 
proved the bill by 85 votes to 15. 

Richard Gephardt, the House 
minority leader and a possible can- 
didate for the presidential nomina- 
tion, was among the 52 Democrats 
who voted no. (WIT) 

Republicans Lead 
Governors' Contest 

LAS VEGAS — For a generation, 
governors’ offices around die country 
have been the main source of policies 
and leadership for the Democratic 
Party. But political operatives 
gathered here for die annual meeting 
of the National Governors’ Associ- 
ation say next year’s elections will 
probably confirm that this vital polit- 
ical base will belong to the Repub- 
licans into the next century. 

Republicans hold 32 of the 50 gov- 
ernorships, and Governor Teny Bran- 
stad of Iowa, head of the Republicans' 
1998 state-level campaigns, said he 
hopes that number will increase to 35. 
His Democratic counterpart. Gov- 
ernor Howard Dean of Vermont, said 
his goal is to bring the Democrats to 
parity, but conceded that “it will not 
be easy for us.” 

The Republican advantage is dra- 
matically greater in die key races. 
Nine of the 10 biggest states, all but 
Florida, have Republican governors; 
and the Republican Party has strong 
candidates in every one of them. Flor- 
ida looks shaky for the Democrats in 
1998, and Republicans are favorites 
in at least six of the other nine largest 
stales. 

The governors elected next year 
will be key players in the redisuicting 
of the House and state legislatures 
that w ill follow the 2000 census and 
set the battle line- for the next de- 
cade. 

Equally important, they will exert a 
growing voice in domestic policy . as 
Washington’s effort to balance the 
budget shifts more and more respon- 
sibility to the states. 

“The debates you will hear in next 
year’s gubernatorial elections will tell 
you more about the direction of na- 
tional policy than anything coming 








Erasing the Red Ink 






; QvK-wvwkvs: 


t *1 r- f - ■ . ,) * ^ 

ri ' ■: • £ 

MS: 



. ••■VWA ■ J' 

»&:" j? ^ . 

•.v'v.a 




. . .'CSw ■ 



NY T 


out of Capitol Hill.” a Democratic 
strategist said, “We can't afford to 
lose in that arena." (WP) 

Congressman Finds 
Lots of Friends 

WASHINGTON — The chairman 
of the House Judiciary Committee, 
Henry Hyde, collected more than 
$60,000 in contributions to pay legal 
expenses stemming from his service 
on the board of a failed Chicago-area 
savings and loan association. 

Contributions to the Illinois Re- 
publican's legal expense fund came 
from Republican colleagues in the 
House, current and. former House 
aides, corporations and trade asso- 
ciations, House records indicate. 

Mr. Hyde was one of 12 former 
directors and officers of the small 
Clyde Federal Savings and Loan As- 
sociation of North Riverside, Illinois. 
The directors were sued by federal 
regulators, who claimed they were 
grossly negligent in their duties. 

The case was resolved on March 5 
after all the defendants but Mr. Hyde 
paid the Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corp. a total of 5850,000. Mr. Hyde 
refused to pay any money without a 
trial, saying he had done nothing 
wrong. (WP) 

Quote /Unquote 

Mark Rosenbaum, legal director 
for the American Civil Liberties Un- 
ion of Southern California, after 
Susan McDousal. a former partner of 
President Bill Clinton 1 *, in the White- 
water land venture, was transferred to 
a federal jail after months of protest- 
ing her detention m grim Los Angeles 
County jails that the organization said 
was a pressure tactic by the special 
prosecutor: “This is a smashing legal 
victory for Susan McDougal and an 
embarrassment to Ken Starr and his 
invesusaiion. ’ ’ (ATT / 


Away From 
Politics 


■ Seventeen Miami Beach police 
officers have asked to be taken off 
their special unit in protest because 
a SWAT team from the larger 
Metro-Dade Police Department 
was called in to rush the Miami 
Beach houseboat where the sus- 
pected killer Andrew Canarian 
was found dead. (AP) 

• Nine Delta Air Lines employ- 
ees were arrested and three others 
were being sought as suspects in 
what law-enforcement officials 
said was a sophisticated drug-traf- 


ficking operation that moved as 
much as 10 tons of Colombian 
cocaine, most of it to New York, 
on Delia airliners from Puerto Rico 
over a period of three or four 
years. (SYT) 

• A grand jury in Texas began 
debating whether charges were 
warranted against a Marine in an 
anti-drug patrol who shot and 
killed an armed teenager near the 
U.S. -Mexico border. (AP; 

« Virginia Polytechnic and State 
University has become the first 
U.S. university to require its 
graduate students to post their 
master’s theses and doctoral dis- 
sertations on the Internet. \NYT) 


LASSERRE 

closing August 2 
after dinner 
Reopening September 2 



English 

books 


Co yooi* door 
Io 7-12 ilajn 
3S0JJO0 titles • not a club * tm catalog 
Tel: +33 (0)1 39 07 01 01 
Fax: +33 (0)1 39 07 00 77 


Do you live in Austro 
Belgium, Luxembouf 
or Sweden ? 

For information about subscribing call 
Austria 01 891 363 830 
Belgium 0800 17538 (toll-fri 
Luxembourg 0800 27113 (tolHre 
Sweden 020 /97D39 (toll - ! 

Hcratba^Srib 


THE tmffLDIi PUP VFWSPlfEB 


¥ * 



As an extension of the news and commentaiy the International Herald Tribun. 
brings to its readers, the newspaper has a successful and highly-respected worldwide 
summit and conference program that focuses on economic and political issues. 
The program for the second half of 1997 includes: 


Korea Summit 

Seoul 

September 10-11 

World Water: financing for the Future 

Istanbul 

September 30-Qctober 1 

Romania investment Summit 

Bucharest 

October 29-30 

Oil ft Money Conference 

London 

November 18-19 

Southern Africa Trade ft Investment Summit 

Gaborone 

November 18-19 


For further information on any of these events, please contact Brenda Erdmann Hagerty, 
International Herald Tribune, 63 Long Acre, London WC 2 E 9JH. • 

Tel. (44 171) 420 0307 Fax: (44 171) 836 0717 E-mail: bhagerty@iht.com 





PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Landslide Rips Australian Ski Site 

At Least 20 People Are Buried by Debris at Southern Resort 


briefly 


CjwpnWft' Our Sufft'r.m pitpatbn 

THREDBO. Australia — Rescuers 
dug with their hands through freezing 
rain Thursday night, seeking survivors 
in the ruins of two Australian ski resorts 
destroyed by a landslide that buried at 
least 20 people. 

Scores of emergency service officers, 
most dressed in bright orange jumpsuits 
and hardhats and working under the 
glare of floo dligh ts, formed a bumau 
c hain to lift bricks and other debris piece 
by piece from the rubble. 

The body of a man was found in the 
ruins, but the police said they could not 
identify it 

Thejpolice said the victims included a 
New Zealand woman, a middle-aged 
couple from California and 1 7 Australi- 
ans. Most were employees of the 
Thj:ed bo Alpine Resort, which has a 
winter population of about 2.000. 

By me time geologists allowed res- 
cuers into die unstable wreckage site — 

1 1 hours after the slide brought tons of 
earth, trees and cars down on the lodges 
just before midnight Wednesday — aud- 
ible cries for help had laded. 

Sensitive sound-detection equipment 
no longer picked up survivors, police 
said 

“There are no signs of life at all. but 
we are hopeful,'* said Bruce Johnson, 
the chief superintendent of the police. 

The scanning equipment, he said, was 
nor infallible, ana it was possible the 
scan did not penetrate deeply enough 
into die rubble to detect any possible 
survivors. “But it is fairly accurate.” he 
added. 

' ‘Miraculous things have happened in 
other parts of the world," said Graeme 


Field, an ambulance officer, as he 
waited. 

Workers were frustrated by the slow 
pace of the search. Mr. Johnston said. 

“It is like a house of cards, a set of 
dominoes,” he said. “If you move 
something, you have to be sure something 
else is not going to follow it.” 

Thredbo, located at an altitude of 
1 .370 meters (4.495 feet), sits on a ridge 


AUSTRALIA 
Area of 


\ cfeMf 

WaQ 


■ AUSTRALIA 





NYT 


.facing the snow-covered mountain 
range of Kosciuszko National Park. The 
resort is 400 kilometers (250. miles) 
south of Sydney. 

Australia’s ski season runs from June 
to October but has started slowly this 
year since little snow has fallen. 

Police say seepage from a mountain 
spring may have caused the earth to give 
way. "Lodges further down die slope 


escaped die landslide, allowing rescuers 
easy road access to the scene and making 
evacuations easier. 

While the other 19 victims were 
trapped inside two lodges, Carinya and 
Bimbadeen, when the landslide hit, an- 
other woman walking home with her 
husband was swept away with the land- 
slide. 

“He was walking on the road with his 
wife, ’ ' Mr. Johnston said of the husband. 
“He happened to be a few paces ahead 
of her. He was saved, she was gathered 
up in the slippage.” 

Eyewitnesses said the landslide hit 
like a “ tornado,” sending the side of a 
mountain crashing into the Carinya 
lodge, which contained one person, and 
sending it cascading onto the Bimbadeen 
lodge, which had 1 8 people inside. 

Ron StiebeL who was undressing for 
bed in another lodge, looked out of his 
window as the landslide ripped past. 

* ‘It was just like someone was empty- 
ing a giant vacuum cleaner bag, he 
said. * ‘It sounded like it W3S a jet fighter 
caking off, or an express train going 
past" 

Prime Minister John Howard of Aus- 
tralia sent a message of support to the 
families of those trapped in die rubble 
and to rescuers from a- hospital in 
Sydney, where he was recovering from 
pneumonia. 

“The thoughts and prayers of the en- 
tire nation are with those pe< 
said. 



people,” he 


Deputy Prime Minister Tim Fischer 
said in Tokyo that he would cut short a 
visit to Japan because of the landslide 
and that he would visit (he area at die 
appropriate rime. ( Reuters , AP, AFP) 


Cambodia Killings Continue, UN Says 


GwiM /»• Ot ir Svi f Piwxifi in 

TANG KRASAING. 
Cambodia — Extrajudicial 
killings are continuing in 
Cambodia three weeks "after 
the ousting of the first prime 
minister. Prince Norodom 
Ranariddh, by his rival. Hun 
Sen, UN officials said Thurs- 
day. 

The renewed charges of 
killing came as the second 
prime minister. Mr. Hun Sen. 
said he would welcome re- 
gional mediators after reach- 
ing a compromise with the 
Association of South East 
Asian Nations. 

Mr. Hun Sen rejected 
ASEAN's mediation efforts 
last month. 


“I have just received in- 
formation that we have 
reached a compromise.” Mr. 
Hun Sen said in an interview 
with the U.S. television net- 
work .ABC that was broadcast 
Thursday on Cambodian ra- 
dio. “There will be a meeting 
between us on Monday even- 
ing.” he said. 

Officials of ASEAN con- 
firmed the' agreement The 
Philippine foreign secretary. 
Domingo Siazon. said that en- 
voys could fly to Phnom Penh 
as early as this weekend. 

“We expect we are now in 
the process of arranging the 
time," Mr. Siazon said. 

Foreign Minister Ali Alatas 
of Indonesia said in Jakarta on 


Mondays 

* 

Wednesdays 

Fridays 

and 

iturdays 

are 



HTs Iniermarket regularly features 
o pages of classified advertising 
for the following categories: 

.Y Recruitment Education. 

Secretarial. Internet Sen ices. 

VY Business Opportunities. Franchises. 
Commercial Real Estate. 
Telecommunications. Automotive. 
Entertainment. 

AY Holidays. Travel. Dining Out 
Residential Real Estate. 

VY Arts. Friendships International 

Meeting Point. Nannies & Domestics. 

leal ha ppe ns at The Int e miarket. 
all Wr rsliof on +44 1 0_4200:m 

gggg 

nir wnnurs nun \i;wm»iplr 


Thursday that he would depart 
for Cambodia for the talks be- 
tween ASEAN and Cambodia 

4 ‘either at the end of this week 
or early next week.” 

Mr. Hun Sen also invited 
his exiled opponents to return 
to Cambodia, including 
Prince Ranariddh. 

“He can also come,” Mr. 
Hun Sen said, “but when he 
comes be must face trial. We 
cannot grant him an amnesty 
before he is convicted. If he is 
convicted then the king can 
amnesty him if he sees fit” 

Human rights workers said 
there was strong evidence 
that up to 50 people had been 
victims of extrajudicial 
killings since the two-day 
battle in Phnom Penh on July 

5 and 6. which was won by 
Mr. Hun Sen’s forces. 

On Thursday, UN human 
rights workers uncovered the 
corpse of a man. believed to 
be a bodyguard of the prince. 


From NPR’and 
PRi; intelligent 
radio in a new 
weekend mix. 

Time to National Public Rada ' 
and Public Radio International' 
this weekend on the America 
One channel, and hear whet's 
new. Every day, 24 hours a day, 
you can hear America's quality, 
independent radio on Asm 18 
Satellite. Transponder 22. 1 1-538 
GHz iVH-J.l. V-Pof.. Audio Sub- 
earner 7.74 Mriz Also on cable! 


Amariea One weekend schedule 

tali limes CEP 

0500 
0800 
0830 


0900 

1000 

1100 

1 230 


TiOO 

JJ0J 


7700 


1900 


2000 


2100 

220C 


2300 

0000 


0700 

orco 


All Things Considered' 
St Paul Sunday ’;5un' 
Marketplace iSati 
America & The World 

[SlWIJ 

PHI'S The World' Btfi 
West Coast Live iSi.fi 
Fresh Air iSar/ 

The Splendid Table iSat 1 
CarTaflt iSu.-* 

C-SRAN Weddy Journal 
I Sat 

A Prairie Home 
Companion' with 
Garrison Keillor -.Sun' 
Weekly Edition Sa:‘ 
Weekend Edition' 

The Best of Fresh Air 
’Sat- 

A fr o p op Worldwide' 

(Sun 1 

Whad'ya Knew? with 
Michael Feldman . Sac! 
Mountain Stage' ;&jt! 
Car Talk iSjt’ 

Marian McPartland's 
Pfaito Jazz'Su-iJ 
Weekend Edition 'Sat' 
On the Media iS-“J 
Sounds tAc Science .St - ! 
Schicfcefe Mix’.Sa: 
living on Earth' 5u-. 

AO Things Considered 
A Prairie Home 
Companion with 
Garrison KeOlor :Sari 
Bridges :Sun/ 

Jazz After Hours .Sun; 
Hot Jazz Saturday Night 
<&>:■ 


h> 


CL 


AMERICA ONE’ 

Your public radio station 
In Europe. 

11 ■ . v r.-f ■ ar-; r "aarie 

. j- ir ; : trni j i«-’i'zll i4i -■ it<v — e 
-.Jf!;;? - t, t~jn rs-t? 
Jin-g -.ttk: ■ i •.iSinTB: n : T s ■ 

Mrfon AC LU £ itaj*7. 


The body was found near a 
military base seized by Mr. 
Hun Sen's Cambodian 
People’s Party troops from 
royalist forces. The man had 
died four to five days earlier, 
die workers said. 

The man bad been beaten, 
strangled and his neck 
broken, they said. His body 
was found in a shallow grave 
in a field near die Tang Kra- 
saing base, 11 kilometers (7 
miles) west of the capital, 
Phnom Penh. 

“We received information 
that he had been beaten to 
death and we found him ex- 
actly where we expected,” 
said Raja Gopal, of the UN 
Center for Human Rights in 
Phnom Penh. “He has ob- 
viously- been interrogated, 
beaten and strangled.” 

“The important message 
of this body is that the killings 
have not stopped since the 
unrest, contrary to the official 
version,” Mr. Gopal said. 

UN rights workers said 
they had information that up 
to six more corpses were bur- 
ied in the same area. 

The victim was identified 
by informants as one of many 
people detained by the Cam- 
bodian People's Party after 
the battles, the rights officials 
said. The United Nations said 
there had been 35 confirmed- 
and presumed executions 
since the clashes between Mr. 
Hun Sen’s forces and royalist 
forces. The rights workers 
said they had “solid infor- 
mation” on 15 other killings. 

The prince’s father. King 
Norodom Sihanouk, con- 
demned human rights viola- 
tions in Cambodia since the 
coup, telling a Paris-based 
press monitoring group that 
* ‘recourse to armed force pre- 
vails over respect for the 
law” in Cambodia. 

In a letter to Reporters 
Without Borders, the king 
wrote. “I am very upset by 
such a destructive and 
destabilizing evolution for 
my country', Cambodia, now 
considered and I fear irre- 
deemably for many years to 
come as the ’sick man’ of 
Asia.” f AFP. Reuters i 

■ Incident on Airliner 

An associate of Mr. Hun 
Sen pulled a pistol on a flight 
Wednesday, ordering the crew 
to hold the plane and fellow- 
passengers to get off, wit- 
nesses said. The Associated 
Press reported from Bangkok. 

Orieni Thai Airlines re- 
sponded b\- issuing an apo- 
logy to the Hun Sen associate, 
Teng Bunina, a Cambodian 
tycoon who is president of the 
Cambodian Chamber of 
Commerce. Mr. Teng 
Bunma. who once shot out the 
tires of an airliner after his 
luggage was lost, refused to 
comment on the incident, say- 
ing only that he was free to go 
anywhere he wanted. 

On Wednesday . he boarded 
a Bangkok-bound flight at 
Phnom Penh’s international 
airport with his armed body- 
guards and demanded that the 
pilot delay departure to await 
friends of Mr. Teng Bunma *s 
who had booked seats but had 
not arrived, witnesses and air- 
line officials said. 

A passenger, Yupapom 


Saengtong. a news researcher 
for Fuji TV of Japan, said she 
had seen Mr. Teng Bunma 
briefly display a pistol to the 
crew. 


£mnuBm?l Douod/tfmr- FiwJVm, 

A fighter for the Afghan opposition leader Ahmed Shah Masoud lugging ammunition across a ruined bridged 

appear quite stubborn on their precondition that they will go 
back home only if democracy is ashered in Myanmar,” a - 
senior official said, using Burma’s official name. 

Burmese ethnic refugees, known as Rohingyas. crossed 
into Bangladesh in early 1992 to escape alleged persecution 
by Burma’s military junta. • 

About 21,000 refugees begamefusing food-last week to 
protest Bangladesh ’$ expulsion of around 400 refugees. 

But at one camp, Burmese refugees have started accepting 
food rations, defusing a potentially explosive situation, said 
a spokeswoman for the United Nations High Commissioner 
for Refugees in Geneva on Thursday. (Reuters. AFP) 


Talebari Claims Military J / ictory 

QA1AI MURAD BEG, Afghanistan — Forces of the 
Islamic Taleban militia on Thursday took a small town north 
of Kabul, according to a senior official. 

“We have taken the town of Gul Dara,” said Mullah 
Khairullah Khairkhwa, the Taleban interior minister, “and 
we have surrounded the opposition in Mir Batcha Kol ’ 

Opposition forces of the former government launched an 
offensive, said Mullah Abdul Manan, a frontline com- 
mander, “and after they were exhausted, the Taleban forces 
pushed forward.” 

The opposition postponed until Friday a meeting with the 
United Nations special envoy to Afghanistan, Norbert Holl. 
Mr. Holl had beam scheduled to meet Thursday with op- 
position leaders in their stronghold of Mazar-i-Sharif m 
northern Afghanistan. (Reuters) 

Drought Imperils China Harvest 


BEIJING — .Farmers in central China are reaping record 
summer grain harvests, but drought in the northeast spells 
trouble for autumn crops, according to official reports 
Thursday. 

Some rivers in northeastern Heilongjiang, Jilin and 
Liaoning provinces have completely dried up because of 
abnormally high temperatures and low rainfall, tie China 
Daily newspaper reported. • 

Much of the fall harvest will be seriously damaged if _ *’ ' ' ' _ 

there is no rain during the critical growing period over the EOT tfl€ R&COTCl 
next few weeks, the report said. It said the drought was the 
worst in the area since 1982. (AP) 


India Bans Foreign Universities 

NEW DELHI — .An Indian court has prohibited foreign 
universities from conducting classes; collecting fees and 
awarding degrees in India, the Press Trust of India reported 
Thursday. 

The High Court in the southern city of Madras asked die’ 
federal government and the University Grants Commission 
on Wednesday not to permit foreign universities to operate 
in India directly or indirectly. 

The court order followed a petition alleging that foreign 
universities violated Indian laws by operating in the country 
through local institutions and that, if allowed to continue, 
they would “destroy” the Indian educational system. 

(AFP) 


Burmese Jfbn’t Leave Bangladesh 

CHITTAGONG, Bangladesh — - Government officials 
■said Thursday that Burmese refugees insist they will not 
return, home until their military-ruled country has achieved 
democracy. 

“We are at a loss, as the defiant Rohingya refugees 


A Japanese court has sentenced a UB. Navy ser- 
viceman, Chief Petty Officer- Raymond Cunningham, ro 
three years in prison for the assault and attempted rape of a 
woman near Misawa Air Base in northern Japan. ( Reuters l 

A majority of Bangladeshis are suffering fronf acute 
malnutrition as their average intake of calories, protein and 
fat declines, according to a study funded by the World Bank 
that was released Thursday. . (AFP 1 


CiKfxJnl Ik OrcrSsjffFrwi Dupurrbn 

BEIJING — China urged the United 
States on Thursday to pro tea their re- 
lationship by blocking President Lee 
Teng-hui of Taiwan from carrying out 
any pro-independence activities during 
transit stops in the United States. 

The Foreign Ministry stopped short of 
demanding that Washington refuse to 
issue Mr. Lee a transit visa, making clear 
instead that Beijing would be watching 
carefully to see how the planned Hawaii 
stopover was managed. 

The U.S. State Department said Wed- 
nesday that it expected to issue Mr. Lee a 
visa allowing bun to stop at Honolulu 
Sept. 4-5 and Sept. 17-18 oq his way to 
and from a conference in Panama. 

Taiwan welcomed the State Depart- 
ment announcement, but said some de- 
tails still had to be worked out. 


A spokesman for the Taiwanese For- 
eign Ministry, Roy Wu, thanked Wash- 
ington for the “goodwill it has dis- 
played.” But he added; “More 
discussions are needed before both sides 
can work out details on things like re- 
ception, respectful treatment and 
safety.” 

A Foreign Ministry spokesman in 
Beijing said China hoped the United 
States would “not allow the eminent 
politicians of Taiwan to engage in ac- 
tivities aimed at splitting the mother- 
land.” 

“The issue of Taiwan is always the 
most important and sensitive issue in the 
Sino-U.S. relations,” he said, “and the 
proper handling of this issue is crucial to 
the development of a sound and stable 
Sino-U.S. relationship.” 

The spokesman said Taiwan wanted 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Taps 

io With 15- Across. 
Iirtguini topping 

14 Connecting 

flight? 

is See KMcross 


to QuesDonod. m 

away 

i7 Kin ot hyper- 
is Could tell 
19 Milk 
ao Charge 
aaOidWorid 
evergreens 


EMBASSY SERVICE 

Furnished / Unfurnished Rentals 


YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
Tel: + 33 ( 0)14720 3005 


M Bottom 
20 Like loggers' 
boots 

at River at Rennes 

32 Just above 
normal. In a 
sense 

33 “Hold On Tight’ 
group 

34 Woll'S 
give-away in 
■Little Red 
Riding Hood* 

as Good name for 
a cook’ 

36 it's north of 
- Liverpool 

36 Auditory 
at Launders, m a 
way 

40 Title lor 
Marquette 

41 Picnic 
hamperer 

42 Tied up 

44 Venomous 
snake 

47 Compulsive 

50 Western based 
On a Louis 
L'Amour story 
oi Tears 
as Mayflower 
Compact signer 
se Summaries 
57 immediate 
s« Occidental 
[ounsr? 

DOWN 

1 Tnp instigator 

2 Mineral sutfi* 

3 Run up the 
phone bill 

aSewhiskered 
s Essays 
e Clip component 
7 Galoots- 


a Certain plaintiff, 
at law 

0 Toys smee 1902 
to Touches base, 
so to speak 
it Fretted 
instrument 
12 Israeli seaport 
is Drink lor Robin 
Hood 
isTubos 

20 Off course 

21 Place for an 
unwanted nng? 

22 Artist’s piece, 
perhaps 

24 Between- Fr. 

26 Everywhere 

27 This comes 
Before a million 

28 -Hoy r 

29 Undivided 

30 Mild expletive 
32 Some 

Aslan- 
Americans 
34 Largest lake in 
central Europe 
37 Much-covered 
R.&B. sang 
36 Kind of market 

42 Turn outward 

43 Pash 

44 Tnbal chief 

49 Cameo, maybe 

46 Lick 

promise 

eaWrfdpeny 

49 Clinches 

62 Royal flush 
necessity 
S3 Kind of neck 
64 Former Union 
member: Abbr. 


r- 

r 

n 

4 


r~ 

r- 


r~ 


w 

1 ) 

nr 

IT 

ir 4 















a~ 






















1 

IV 





r 

in 

_| 

B 1 





a - 





ssr 

1 

-J 





a 






ZB 




—i 

__ 


1 











j r 



i 








1 

35 



B“ 

! 



17 

r 






1 

38 


— 


S“ 










4 U 





4 ™ 





43 

4 J 





M 

• 

“ 


b 

| 


<* 


fl 




so 






S’ 






52 

_J 

53 


5 “< 

— 

— 


— 


M 









f] 

n 




H 



□ 

b 






ncBdanyOOTaMR ru giwo n 

©iY«e York TimesfEdited hr fflll Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of July 31 

I 


nnnso anna acaaa 
□HHmra naan . 
001300 aanca saga 
HHasHHEJaanana 
ana anna 
nnnn 
ana 
sann 

□ODD 

SEQE 

a 

□□LU 
BBHn 
QEJQQ 
□□00 



China Urges Tight Leash for Taiwan Leader 


to use such stopovers as opportunities to 
promote independence for the island. 

Beijing regards Taiwan as a rebel 
province and seeks to isolate the island’s 
authorities from the international arena. 

Defense Minister Chi H action said 
Thursday that Beijing had not renounced 
the use of force to regain sovereignty 
over Taiwan. (AP, Reuters I 

■ Congress in Accord on Tibet . - 

Congress has accepted Secretary of 
State Madeleine Albright’s propositi to* 
name a special U.S. policy coordinator* 
for Tibet. The Associated Press reported* 
from Washington. 

“What they’ve come up with is sat- 
isfactory to me,” said Senator Jesse 
Helms, the North Carolina Republican 
who is chairman of the Foreign Re- 
lations Committee. 








INTERNATIO NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


PAGES 


Bank Secrecy Was Bern’s Wartime ‘Weapon’ 


ranSZ Ulricl l J ? st * * professor of 

f hislor >' a{ th * sum 


Q&A/Huns Ulrich Jost, Swiss historian 


S nis country s wartime past. He 
Wh Robert Kroon of the Inter- 
I Herald Tribune about the role 
Swiss banking establishment, 
5 ™rrent!y under international 

t. 

publishing ihe names on al- 
,U00 donnant accounts of the 
ust era, fee Swiss Bankers As- 
|n has lifted part of its secrecy 
> this a major policy change? 
lo. The banks haven’t changed 
ategy and they never will, if they 
***■ hd P it- From the banks’ point of 
,r‘ V|ew » donnant accounts are no 
ear m ??L“ lan nettle some peanuts. This so- 
Si caned act of transparency was a tactical 
move to ward off the threat of American 
retaliation in the face of a possible class- 
action procedure. Losing their operating 
license in the U.S. would be the biggest 
ca ^strophe for the major Swiss banks. 

Q* why is the bank secret such a 
sacrosanct article of faith in this coun- 
try? 

A. It’s an integral pan of our history, 
in prewar times, the Swiss service sec- 
tor. mainly banking and insurance, had 
already superseded industrial produc- 


tion. At one time, 70 percent of the 
German insurance industry was under 
Swiss control. Today banking and in- 
surance accounts for 30 to 40 percent of 
national revenue and the banks never 
miss a chance to remind the government 
of it. 

Swiss reluctance to join the European 
family is partly dictated by the Euav 
angst of the bankers, who fear an 
erosion of the bank secret. Banking 
secrecy was promulgated in 1934, 
mainly to attract major foreign tax 
dodgers, because under Swiss laws tax 
evasion is not a crime. That also brought 
in Jewish depositors looking for a safe 
haven. 

During the war, the banks convinced 
the government that banking secrecy 
was neutral Switzerland’s prime defen- 
sive weapon. As early as 1941 astrategy 
was developed to optimize the banks’ 
position in the postwar world. After all. 
ihe dollar and the Swiss franc were the 
only sound currencies. In today's 
fiercely competitive global economy, 
the bank secret is still a crucial asset, so 
the strategy will nor change. 

Q. Does that help explain Switzer- 


land’s economic cooperation with the 
Nazis? 

A In a way, yes. It was a very com- 
plex network, actively involving Swiss 
embassies in occupied Europe and even 
Japan. 

Aside from laundering the Nazi gold, 
Switzerland cooperated with the Third 
Reich in many other ways. After the 
invasion of the Netherlands and Nor- 
way. die Germans seized the assets of a 
great number of local companies, which 
were then transferred to Latin America 
via Swiss bank conduits. After the Nazi 
defeat, the Allies had problems con- 
fiscating German businesses with Swiss 
affiliations. A case in point was the 
chemical giant I.G. Farben, which had a 
Swiss joint venture in Basel. 

To avoid seizure by the Americans, 
I.G. Farben Switzerland changed its 
name to Imerhandel. which then be- 
came the subject of a bitter fight with the 
United States. The legal hassle lasted 
until the early ’60s and drove the Amer- 
icans crazy. Finally, the Union Bank of 
Switzerland struck a deal with the 
Kennedy administration, which by then 
was more pre-occupied with the Cold 






Jm> Ipa-T Frin/.-f'm*' 

■ The wreckage of a Federal Express cargo plane smoldering on the runway Thursday at Newark Airport. 

5 Escape Fiery Crash at Newark Airport 


NEWARK, New Jersey — Five crew members escaped 
unhurt when their Federal Express MD-11 cargo plane 
crash-landed early Thursday at Newark International Air- 
port, overturned and burst into flames, officials said. 

The ciash created major headaches for travelers, but no 
one on the ground was hurt and the five on board received 
only minor injuries. 

“It was a very hard landing," a New York/New Jersey 
Port Authority spokesman said. “The plane, on impact, 
flipped over and began to burn. All five crew members on 
board were able to crawl out the cockpit window. They all 
walked away from it-’’ 

The five were treated for unspecified minor injuries at a 
hospital in Elizabeth, New Jersey. 

“They were very calm, actually." said a Port Authority 
police detective, Dennis Moriarity , one of the first to reach 
the plane. 


“They were a little scratched up, roughed up." 

Hours after the crash, firefighters were still battling the 
burning, charred wreckage with foam. 

The airport, the New York City area’s busiest, was shut 
down for several hours and about 300 flights were canceled. 
Two of its three runways were reopened for departures 
about 7:30 A.M. and the first arrival came in about 9:30. 

Arriving aircraft were diverted to John F. Kennedy 
International airport and La Guardia Airport in New York, 
officials said. 

The cause of the crash was not known. Officials said 
investigators for the National Transportation Safety Board 
would visit the site to begin their inquiry once the blaze was 
extinguished. 

Fedex is the world’s biggest cargo airline. It carried 3.77 
million scheduled freight tons in 1996, ahead of Lufthansa 
with 2.88 million tons, according to the International Air 
Transport Association. 


Cohen to Fault General on Saudi Blast 


By Bradley Graham 

U’i/j<i»i.gfn» Fu>si Sen irf 

WASHINGTON — Defense Secre- 
tary William Cohen will block the pro- 
motion of the one-star air force general 
who commanded the U.S. troops in 
Saudi Arabia that were blasted by a 
terrorist bomb last year. Pentagon of- 
ficials say. . .. _ . 

The action against Brigadier General 
Terry! Schwalier reflects Mr. Cohen’s 
conclusion that the general could have 
done more to assess the extent of the 
terrorist threat in Dhahran and prepare 
for it. particularly by conducting evac- 
uation drills and installing alert systems, 
the officials said. . 

The move goes against two air force 
reports that maintained General 
Schwalier had done all that could rea- 
sonably have been expected to make the 
Khobar Towers apartment complex se- 
cure. They cited scores of preventive 
measures that General Schwalier took, 
and noted that the puck bomb was too 
large to defend against in any case. 


Air force members have warned that 
any punishment of General Schwalier 
would demoralize the force and hand- 
icap future operations by driving field 
commanders to focus more intently on 
protecting troops at the expense of other 
duties. 

Anticipating Mr. Cohen’s decision. 
General RonaTd Fogleman. chief of staff 
of the air force, resigned Monday, say- 
ing he felt “out of step" with the 
Pentagon leadership on the issue. He had 
publidy defended General Schwalier. 

General Schwalier was commander of 
the air wing in Dhahran. which flew 
patrols over southern Iraq, when a 
bomb-laden truck exploded outside the 
Khobar Towers complex, killing 19U.S. 
airmen and wounding hundreds of oth- 
ers. The Senate had approved General 
Schwalier' s promotion to two-star rank 
before the June 1996 attack, but the 
move was suspended pending review of 
the bombing. In the meantime. General 
Schwalier assumed a previously planned 
and prestigious assignment supervising 
air force operations worldwide. 


Mr. Cohen was to meet with Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton on Thursday to re- 
commend that General Schwalier’s pro- 
motion be undone, which would 
effectively end his military career. 

Mr. Cohen’s decision carries far- 
reaching implications for commanders 
and then responsibility to guard against 
terrorist attack despite often imperfect 
intelligence. The question of respon- 
sibility for the Dhahran bombing has 
prompted fierce arguments among gen- 
erals and lawmakers over whether field 
commanders are being held to unreal- 
istically high standards. 


War. A full report on this settlement has 
never been published. 

The Swiss also had a stake in hun- 
dreds of companies in southern Ger- 
many and fought tooth and nail to fore- 
stall Allied seizure of their assets- In this 
context, it is also remarkable that in 
3945 and 1946 more than a hundred 
Swiss firms transferred their corporate 
seat to Latin American countries. No 
light has ever been shed on their cor- 
porate ownership. 

Q. What does that all this say for 
Swiss neutrality? 

A. Neutrality served as an alibi for 
this economic strategy. 

Wartime policy was based on three 
pillars: solidarity between the govern- 
ment, the people and the army to keep 
neutral Switzerland out of the war; re- 
stricting the influx of mainly Jewish 
refugees; and, finally, the shadowy eco- 
nomic policy. 

In Swiss contemporary history, it’s 
the first pillar that has been elevated to a 
national myth — albeit slightly stained 
by the rejection of refugees, which was 
already known during the wartime 
years.’ 

But the Swiss people have been con- 
sistently and deliberately kept in the 
dark about wartime economic collab- 
oration. 

Bern Resists 
Pressure by 
U.S. Senator 
For Apology 

Ciqipdfd Py Om Stiff Fruat [nsp&tkB 

GENEVA — The Swiss president, 
responding to a threat by a U.S. senator, 
ruled out Thursday apologizing to a 
former bank guard who is hailed as a 
hero in the United States but is under 
criminal investigation at home for vi- 
olating bank secrecy. 

The security guard, Christoph Meili, 
who fled Switzerland in May with his 
family, was granted permanent resi- 
dence in the united States by President 
Bill Clinton on Wednesday. 

Mr. Meili claimed he bad been har- 
assed and received death threats for res- 
cuing archives from a shredder at Union 
Bank of Switzerland and handing them 
over to Jewish groups. The bank con- 
ceded earlier this week that the doc- 
uments may concern property that Jews 
were pressured to sell in Nazi Germany. 

Senator Alfonse D’ Amato, Repub- 
lican of New York and chairman of the 
Senate Banking Committee, demanded 
Wednesday that Switzerland apologize 
to Mr. Meili or risk sanctions against 
UBS because of the shredded docu- 
ments. 

“It is unconscionable that even with 
ihe admission by UBS that sensitive 
documents were destroyed, there has 
been no regret expressed as to the treat- 
ment Chnstoph has received,” Mr. 
D’ Amato wrote in a letter to President 
Arnold Kolier of Switzerland. 

But Mr. Kolier told the daily Blick, 
"There is no reason to do so.’’ 

In Vienna, Simon Wiesenrhal, the 
Nazi hunter, asked the international 
community Thursday to show some re- 
straint in its criticism of Switzerland for 
its role in handling Nazi assets during 
the war. 

Mr. Wiesenthal drew a parallel be- 
tween Switzerland’s current situation 
and that of Austria at the rime when Kurt 
Waldheim was president (1986-1992). 
Mr. Waldheim was assailed at the time 
by the World Jewish Conference in New 
York for his role in Hitler's army. 

Mr. Wiesenthal warned that if a mea- 
sure of “fair play” is not adopted to- 
ward Switzerland, the country might 
undergo the "Waldheim effect" — an 
allusion to the wave of solidarity that the 
Austrian population showed toward 
their head of state when he was assailed 
by foreign criticism. 

In Paris, the newspaper Liberation 
reported that Credit Suisse transferred 
funds to a Nazi espionage center during 
World War EL The funds were sent by 
Credit Suisse ro the account of a pub- 
lishing house that fronted for Nazi spies, 
the daily said, publishing a photocopy of 
a 1946 document obtained from U.S. 
intelligence agencies. (AP. AFP) 


What If the Suit Hadn’t Fit? 

iY/ISA’s Shift of Plans Catches Russians Off Guard 


Jak, 70, Acerbic Cartoonist 
For Evening Standard, Dies 


The Ansi-cured Prca 

LONDON — jak, 70. the combative 
newspaper cartoonist whose sharp-wi - 
ted work entertained Londoners andoc- 

casionally outraged them for fore man 
30 years, died Sunday after surgerj 
lowing a heart attack. . . 

Jakfbom Raymond Jackson. joined 
The Evening Standard m 195- and 
worked there for 45 years. London-bom 
and bred with a wry sense of 
punctured the pomposity of 
and revealed the absurdities of sta 
affairs. f 

“He will be remembered as.oneor 
the finest political cartoonists. Prime 
MinisterTony Blair said in an interview 
with the paper. 


Chen Daisun, 97, Economist 
And Adviser for Beijing 

The .\siccuiied Preis 

BEUING — Chen Daisun. 97. a 
prominent Chinese economist, died 
Mondav after an undisclosed illness, the 
state-run Xinhua news agency report- 
ed. 

Mr. Chen earned a doctorate at Har- 
vard University in 1926. He laier taught 
at top Chinese colleges and worked as 
an adviser to the government. 

Miguel Estrada Iturbide, 88. who 
helped form the National Action Party 
in 1939. died Tuesday in the western 
city of Morelia. Mexico. 


Reiners 

MOSCOW — Russian space of- 
ficials said Thursday that they were 
surprised and confused by the sudden 
U.S. decision to replace the next 
American astronaut scheduled rejoin 
the troubled Mir space station. 

“For us it was very unexpected,” 
said Valeri Lyndin. a spokesman for 
Mission Control, outside Moscow. 

On Wednesday, Wendy Lawrence, 
an astronaut with the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration, 
appeared at a news conference eager 
to fly aboard Mir and replace Michael 
Foale in September. Then NASA of- 
ficials announced that David Wolf, 
her backup, would take her place 
aboard Mir. U.S. officials said they 


made the decision because Ms. 
Lawrence, a navy pilot, had no ex- 
perience with spacewalks and the Or- 
Ian Russian spacesuit did not fit her. 

Boris Kryuchkov, deputy director 
of Russia’s Star City cosmonaut train- 
ing center, said Thursday that since 
the American woman pilot was not 
expected to make any spacewalks, 
she had never been fined for a Rus- 
sian space suit, all of which are the 
same size but have adjustable arms 
and legs. Ms. Lawrence is 1.6 meters 
(5 feet 3 inches) tall. 

Also Thursday, Russian cosmo- 
nauts Anaroli Solovyov and Pavel 
Vinogradov left for the Baikonur cos- 
modrome in Kazakhstan ahead of 
their scheduled Aug. 5 trip to Mir. 


Mars Rover Gets Rock Out of Its Shoe 


The Asroeuied Press 

LOS .ANGELES — The Mars 
rover was able to get itself out of a jam 
after a rock got stuck in one of its 
cleated wheels and stalled a wheel 
motor. 


Sojourner freed its wheel using a 
solution practiced in tests in a sand- 
box. Designers programmed it so that 
if it ever noticed that such a jam 
occurred, it would stop, back the 
wheel up and let the rock fall off. 



Fran SihranW*=nrc France-Pre«e 

AFTER YOU — Prime Minister Mahathir of Malaysia, left welcoming 
Prime Minister Sharif of Pakistan to Kuala Lumpur on Thursday. 


5 Japan Extremists 
Sentenced in Beirut 

BEIRUT — Five members of the 
Japanese Red Army extremist group 
were sentenced by a court here Thurs- 
day to three years in prison for using 
forged documents and illegally resid- 
ing in Lebanon. 

Although the Beirut Criminal Court 
hailed one defendant, Kozo Okamoto, 
for his “heroic action against the Is- 
raeli enemy,” it ordered the five de- 
fendants expelled from the country 
once they completed their sentences. 

Japan has asked for the extradition 
of the Red Army members, but Tokyo 
and Beirut are nor linked by an ex- 
tradition treaty and it is up to fee 
Lebanese cabinet to decide whether to 
hand them over. 

Mr. Okamoto is fee sole survivor of 
a 1972 attack on Tel Aviv's Lod air- 
port in which more than two dozen 
people were killed. He was sentenced 
to life in prison in Israel but was freed 
in a swap wife Palestinian guerrillas 
in 1985. The others convicted were: 
Kazuo Tohira, Haro Wako, Masao 
Adachi and Mariko Yamamoto, fee 
lone woman. (AFP) 

Car Bomb in Algiers 

PARIS — A car bomb killed eight 
people and wounded 25 others out- 
side a restaurant in El Biar, on fee 
outskirts of Algiers, Algerian news- 
papers reported Thursday. 

The blast Wednesday ended a two- 
week lull in terrorist attacks in fee 
capital; It coincided with an attack on 
a police patrol in another area feat 
killed a policeman and a civilian and 
wounded two policemen, Le Matin 
newspaper said. 

The last big bomb in Algiers ex- 
ploded in a market July 14, ktiling at 
least 21 people and wounding about 
40. (Reuters) 


Kenyans Call Strike 

NAIROBI — Kenyan reformists 
will call for a nationwide strike next 
week unless President Daniel arap 
Moi responds to their four-month-old 
demand for democratic reforms, re- 
form leaders asserted Thursday. 

If the strike does not work, “there 
will be intensified peaceful mass ac- 
tion,” said Kivufea Kibwana, an op- 
position leader. (AP) 

Burundi Executes 6 

BUJUMBURA, Burundi — Six 
people who were sentenced to death 
for taking pan in the genocidal 
slaughter of Tutsi and Hutu in 1993 
were hanged Thursday after a crim- 
inal court here rejected their appeals, 
fee Justice Ministry said. 

The three Hutu, two Tutsi and one 
Twa were convicted in February, 
March and April in connection wife 
fee genocide fear took place after fee 
assassination of Burundi 's first demo- 
cratically elected president. (AP) 

Egypt Cracks Down 

CAIRO — After repeated reports 
that businesses were using thugs to 
settle financial disputes, fee govern- 
ment has applied emergency laws to 
battle the problem. 

The media reported Thursday that 
fee government has issued decrees to 
broaden the use of emergency laws 
fear allow fee police to detain sus- 
pects without charge and to put them 
on trial before military courts. 

Justice Minister Farouk Seif el 
Nasser said thuggery has become "a 
kind of social terrorism * ’ that needed 
to be dealt wife promptly. 

But Ai Wafd newspaper said: 
“After 16 years of applying an emer- 
gency law, we do not Deed laws feat 
bring us back to fee old ages of 
tyranny and dictatorship. ’ ’ (AP) 


Sierra Leone Coup Leader 
Says He Will Hold Power 


Centfed In Our Stuff From DapvKhn 

FREETOWN. Sierra Leone — De- 
fying international pressure, the leader 
of the coup feat ousted Sierra Leone’s 
elected president has declared feat the 
military junta will hold power for at 
least four more years. 

Major Johnny Paul Koromah’s. an- 
nouncement, broadcast Wednesday 
night, swiftly triggered the collapse of 
negotiations between the junta and 
neighboring West African nations. 

Delegates from those nations sought 
a tightening of economic sanctions to 
force fee junta to reinstate President 
Ahmad Tejan Kabbah, a civilian who 
was ousted in the coup May 25. 

They said feat with fiiel for power 
generation and basic transportation run- 
ning short in Sierra Leone, and wife 
food prices soaring, their aim was to put 
pressure on the government while stop- 
ping short of military action. 

Bui Major Koromah. 33, said his re- 
gime would not be stampeded into a 
return to civilian government and was 
ready to fight any aggression "to the 
last drop of its blood." 

The Nigerian foreign minister, Tom 


Bcimi, said Major Koromah had reneged 
on an agreement to reinstate Mr. Kab- 
bah. Mr. Ikimi said fear he and foreign 
ministers from Ivory Coast, Ghana and 
Guinea would recommend to Nigeria’s 
military ruler. General Sani Abacha, 
who is chairman of fee Economic Com- 
munity of West African States, feat an 
embargo should be' tightened to ensure 
Mr. Kabbah’s return to power. 

Nigerian-led troops are in Sierra Le- 
one under a pre-coup defense pact. Their 
attempt to dislodge die coup leaders with 
a naval bombardment June 2 backfired 
when Sierra Leone soldiers and rebels 
attacked exposed Nigerian positions. 

In his broadcast. Major Koromah said 
presidential elections to return Sierra 
I^one to civilian rule would be held in 
Novemher 2001. He made no mention 
^-j^bbah. who took office in 
March i 996 after multiparty elections 
feat ended four years of military role. 

Conditions in Sierra Leone have de- 
tenorated sharply since fee coup, wife 
food and medical supplies dwindling 
West African naval 
blockade and limited highway access 

(AP. Reuters) 


Do you live itv Athens? 

For a hand-delivered subscription 
on the day of publication, 
call 00 33 1 4143 9361 

Jtmlti^Sribunc. 


Ja#! u 9 O 








PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. AUGUST 1, 1997 


EUROPE 


Albania Is Eager for Return of U.S. Military 

membership. This was a welcome per- 
spective for a military that since World 
War n had passed from alliance with’ 


By Edward Cody 

Washington Post Service 

TIRANA, Albania — It seemed 
like a good idea at the time. Albania 
bad a president eager for close re- 
lations with the United States to help 



flict in nearby Bosnia-Herzegovina, 
were eager for a compliant country to 
serve as a military and intelligence 
platform for the unstable Balkans. 

This marriage of interests — be- 
tween a prostrate country just 
emerged from four decades of xeno- 
phobic communism and the world's 


for regional allies — flourished for a 
while and seemed destined to grow. 
But this being the Balkans, things 
swiftly got complicated, and before 
long they were impossible. 

First, the strategic partnership was 
strained last year by a president in 
Tirana who, it turned out, resented 
political advice from Washington. 
And since this spring, it has been put 
on hold because of a violent rebellion 
that swept across Albania, pushing 
the president from power and shat- 
tering the military along with most of 
the country's other institutions. 

The question facing officials in 
Washington and Tirana now is wheth- 
er they can — or should — pick up the 
pieces and renew the extensive mil- 
itary cooperation that had given the 
Pentagon hopes of a reliable ally in an 
explosive region and Albania hopes 


of developing a modem army capable 
of membership in the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization and other Euro- 
pean groupings. 

For Prime Minister Fatos Nano's 
new government, which took office 
July 24, the answer is clear. On Tues- 
day, Defense Minister Sabit Brokaj 
banded U.S . Ambassador Marisa Lino 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

a formal request that American mil- 
itary advisers return and that military 
aid and training of Albanian officers 
resume with the same intensity as 
before. 

'‘With die new government start- 
ing work now, we hope the military 
activities with the United States can 
return to the same level as before, and 
even get better,” said the deputy-de- 
fense minister, Alfred Moisiu. 

But the Pentagon is cautious. One 
official there said the United States 
will consider nonlethal material aid, 
such as vehicles and radios, but only 
when the army here is re-established 
enough to protect its military stock- 
piles from bandits like those who 
looted arsenals last spring. 

But he added that $300,000 re- 
maining from a $600,000 appropri- 
ation under the International Military 
Education and Training program has 
been cleared to resume flowing. 

The U.S. military advisers and an 
assistance specialist in the military 
attache’s office also can return to Tir- 
ana soon, the official said, but there 
has been no discussion so far of the 


larger-scale aid promised in 1995, 
when then-President Sali Beils ha 
looked like a dependable ally and the 
military relationship was at its peak. 

At that time, CJ.S. reconnaissance 
planes were flying out of Gjader Air 
Base in nonhem Albania to photo- 
graph bombing targets and monitor 
Serbian communications in Bosnia. 
U.S. military advisers were involved 
in everything from marine map-mak- 
ing to antiaircraft batteries, while 
their Albanian counterparts trained in 
die United States. 

"We got a lot of good from the 
relations,” said a retired major gen- 
eral, Perlar Sula. who led the Albanian 
Air Force and ground-based air de- 
fenses at the time. ‘ ‘ Thanks to these 
contacts, there was a lot of evolution 
among the Albanian officers.” 

The U.S. adviser attached to the 
defense minister, a retired colonel, 
Denny Lane, became particularly 
popular with Al banian officers. 
Among other things , he helped trace 
the names of a number of U.S. sol- 
diers and intelligence agents who 
made contact with resistance forces 
World War H. 

The Pentagon also promised Al- 
banian officers S2 million in aid from 
its 1996 budget that would include a 
pair of TOW antitank missile systems 
and five Vulcan antiaircraft batteries. 
The word was that this was only the 
beginning. 

Albania, already an active partic- 
ipant inNATO 's Partnership for Peace 
program, appeared to its top military 
officers to be headed for frill NATO 


membership. This was a welcome | 
ramilita 
passed: 

the Soviet Union to alliance with 
China to a fierce isolationism. 

Then, about 40 months after it 
began, the U.S. -Albanian love affair 
soured. Mr. Berisha, accused of hu- 
man rights abuses, led his Democratic 
Party to an overwhelming parliamen- 
taiy majority in May 1996 in an elec- 
tion that was widely condemned here 
and abroad as a fraud. Although the 
military contacts continued, Wash- 
ington began distancing itself from 
the leader it had so ardently embraced 
only a few years earlier. 

Mr. Berisha, who was growing 
more authoritarian and less willing to 
heed advice, responded by forcing 
Colonel Lane to leave, according to 
high-ranking officers. 

Although Colonel Lane was re- 
placed ana the adviser team remained, 
there was no more talk of big-ticket 
aid. The TOW missiles, anti-aircraft 
systems and trainer jets were never 
delivered. At the same time, the war in 
Bosnia wound down, and the U.S. 
spy-plane operation at Gjader drew to 
a close, thus reducing the immediacy 
of Albania’s strategic value. 

The final blow came in January, 
when a network of pyramid-invest- 
meat schemes collapsed, touching off 
public rage that resulted in a violent 
revolt against Mr. Berisha and left 
much of the country in the hands of 
armed gangs. American citizens and 
the advisers were evacuated, effec- 
tively ending the military program. 



trfiaid Jufim/ ■Vp-w* Frarai- 

Prime Minister Fatos Nano at an aid conference on Albania in Rome on Thursday, 


BRIEFLY 


German Orthography Reform Spells Trouble 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Sen-ice 

BONN — Just a year ago, it 
was all settled. A new gen- 
eration of Germans would tra- 
verse its school years with no 
.exposure to the last vestiges 
of Gothic spelling, entering a 
brave new world of ortho- 
graphy in which, for example, 
spaghetti would lose its H and 
ketchup would gain an S, and 
- German, the language that so 
befuddled Mark Twain, 


would be, well, simple. Or so 
it seemed. 

The people who print dic- 
tionaries pruned new ones 
with all the new spellings. 
The new orthography, which 
took a decade to negotiate and 
was the first since 1901, was 
introduced in elementary 
schools. 

Austria and German- 
speaking Switzerland pressed 
ahead with the reforms. But in 
Germany, the complex effort 
to smooth a complex language 


Living in the U.S.? 

Now printed in New York 
for same day 
delivery in key cities. 

To subscribe, call 

1 - 800-882 2884 

'‘Tft- 4 k LVTE&MIIfMI.I"** ♦ | 

Itcral o^fe fcnbunc 


puuaom *im nm vr*> tm mt 

. THE TORUTS 0A11Y NEWSRLPER . 


has tripped not only into con- 
fusion but also into a profound 
philosophical debate about 
the relationship between edu- 
cation and democracy. 

On Tuesday, in response to 
a legal challenge, a court in 
the state of Hesse in Wies- 
baden, near Frankfurt, 
ordered a halt to the intro- 
duction of the new ortho- 
graphy in the state's schools 
because it infringed on pa- 
rental rights over their chil- 
dren's education. 

On Wednesday, a court in 
Weimar in Thuringia, another 
of Germany's 16 federal 
states, ruled that it constituted 
no infringement 

Because it would be incon- 
ceivable for one German state 
to use different spelling from 
another, most commentators 
here said the impasse was 
likely to be resolved by ahigh- 
er court or by Parliament 

But some German officials 
saw the challenges as a sign 
that the new orthography 
would fail. “The child has 
finally fallen into the foun- 
tain,” said Juergen Ruettgers, 
the education minister in 
Bonn, employing fairly old 
German usage to say that the 
reform had fizzled. 


Some have taken the re- 
sistance to the new spelling as 
emblematic of broader na- 
tional characteristics — con- 
servatism, fear of change, or, 
as Horst Wenzelburger, a 
member of a parents ’ group in 
Frankfurt put it, “Goman 
self-righteousness. ’ ' 

According an opinion sur- 
vey last year, only .12 Ger- 
mans of every 100 favored the 
changes, even fewer than the 
.number who support the in- 
troduction of a new Europe- 
wide . currency. Indeed in 
many' parts of Germany, op- 
ponents have banded together 
to gather signatures demand- 
ing a referendum on the re- 
forms. 

If the legal results of the 
case provide a clue to the op- 
ponents’ concerns, die real is- 
sue is not one of spelling at 
all, but of much headier mat- 
ters redolent of Germany’s 
tortured recent history: de- 
mocracy and the separation of 
legislative and administrative 
powers and the reinforcement 
of human rights that may not 
be circumscribed by the kind 
of decree issued collectively 
by the state governments last 
year to introduce the spelling 
reforms. 


The court in Wiesbaden 
ruled on Tuesday: “Teaching 
according to the new regu- 
lations of German ortho- 
graphy in the subject of Ger- 
man and in all other subjects 
would be possible only if the 
introduction of the ortho- 
graphy reforms had been 
ordered by a law. No such law 
exists.” 

The ruling came in re- 
sponse to a case brought by 
the father of two sons who 
objected to the new spelling 
rules. The father was not 
identified by name in the 
.court documents. 

“From the principles of a 
state based on the rule of law ' 
and of democracy, it is clear 
that basic decisions in school- 
ing are to be made by the 
legislature, not by school ad- 
ministrations.'’ the ruling 
said. 

Just to make matters mis- 
tier, though, the court in Wei- 
mar addressed the same is- 
sues Wednesday with 
different conclusions. 
“These areas," it said, re- 
ferring to the same democrat- 
ic principles, “are not af- 
fected by instruction 
according to the reformed or- 
thography.” 


Jospin Wants To Relax 
Immigrant Restrictions 

PARIS — A report on immigration 
ordered by Prime Minister Lionel Jospin, a 
Socialist, recommends relaxing some of the 
tough measures adopted by the previous 
conservative government 
The report, issued Thursday, said the 
government should stre amlin e immigration 

S sdures, adopt measures that promote 
ly reunification and broaden criteria 
for political asylum. 

The proposal also includes changing nat- 
uralization laws to allow all children boro in 
France automatically to receive Frfench cit- 
izenship. 

One of the first laws the conservative 
government passed after its election in 1993 
took away that right The law now requires 
children bom on French soil of foreign 

B arents to ask formally for citizenship on 
leir 18th birthday if they want to be 
French. (AP) 

German Dike Crumbles 


ceeds a special draw of the national lottery 
to the victims of “terrorism” and their 
families, the government announced Thurs- 
day. 

The Spanish national lottery is one of the 
riches tin the world. Its jackpots often ran to 
several millions of dollars. (AFP) 

Chechen Talks Sought 

GROZNY, Russia — Amid fresh signs 
that Russia and Chechnya want to work out 
their differences, a top Chechen official 
said Thursday that the republic would pro- 
pose a draft treaty giving it the status of an 
independent state. 

■ Such a proposal is unlikely to be swiftly 
embraced by Moscow. President Boris 
Yeltsin told the ITAR-Tass news agency 
Wednesday, “We are not.ready so far for 
another full-scale treaty." 

But the proposal could be a negotiable 
starring point for talks that Mr. Yeltsin 
wants to have soon in Moscow with Aslan 
Maskhadov, president of Chechnya. The 
Russian leader expressed interest this week 
in an agreement with Chechnya that would 
resemble Moscow's relations with other 
regions, such as semi-autonomous . 
Tatarstan. ' '(AP) 


BAD FREffiNWALDE; Germany — 

Thousands of people were evacuated 

Thursday from their flood-threatened _ in i 

homes along the Oder River in eastern £Or the ReCOTu 
Germany, and even the soldiers fighting to 
save their villages were forced to retreat 
temporarily for fear the crumbling dike 
would break. 

Nonstop sandbagging around a major 
tear prevented a complete break overnight, 
but the dike cracked again before dawn, 
prompting the evacuation of another 8,500 
residents from the Oderbrucb flood plain, 
northeast of Berlin. (AFP) 


The European Union has asked the new 
Yugoslav president, Slobodan Milosevic, 
to accept international observers at Serbia’s 
next legislative and presidential elections, 
set for Sept 21. (AFP) 


Cash for Terror Victims 

MADRID — Spain is to donate the pro- 


The Italian Parliament on Thursday 
approved a bill introducing a ban on the 
production, sale and use of anti-personnel 
land mines. Italy has been singled out in die 
past by the United Nations as a major 
producer of many of the 120 million kind 
mines planted worldwide. . (Reuters) 



LiiM THE INTERMARKET 


S +44 171 4200348 




GENERAL 


Personals 


THANK YOU SACRED HEART Of Jesus 
and 5ah Jude for prayers answered. 
Signed D.W. 


Announcements 


BAREME AS 24 

AU lev A0UT 1B7 
Pita Has TVA en tote locale 
[traduction (fcponWe sur demands) 
Reirptace tes terpnes anierieus 

FRANCE [zone 0 en Ffil - TVA 216°. 
GO: 3.73 FDD* 227 

scar- 5.« scsp-. sa 

UK en.T-TVA 175% (tad 8S) 

GO 05477 FOtr 0,3476 

AUEMAGNE (BMW Q DW1 ■ TVA 15% 


ZONE ) - 

G: 



GO- 

1B5 



ZOKEtt- 

l: 



CD: 

105 

SCSP 

1.43 

ZONE JO 

■F: 



GO 

Ifli 

SCSP: 

1.38 

ZONE IV 

-F: 



SCSP. 

137 



ZONE !Y 

■G: 



GO: 

1.03 

FOO 

0.70 

BELGIQUE en FBI ■ 

• TVA 21 "i 


GO. 

2130 

FOO 

10.68 


SCOT 33.64 SCSP- 31.16 

K0UAM3E poneZl NLGfl ■ TVA 17^% 
GO: 1297 FOO. 0,902 

SC97: 1,983 SCSP: 1523 

LUXEMBOURG an LUH - TVA 15% 

GO: 13.13 

ESP AGUE (zone A| en PTASfrTVA 16*. 
GO. 8357 

SCOT: 101 55 SCSP- 102.41 
• Usage regfemerte 


TIE EDUCATION A WELFARE d sew 
mans S poets if you would Vke id 
know nm about mw wot: & how you 
can /wfp wrie Fatter Matthew Bodriey. 
Sl Joseph Raraen Cstafc Church. POB 
829Ck Saipan, mp 96950 Common- 
weatti d ttu Northern Manana Wands 
an A nattQckSlajmam 


Legal Sendees 


DIVORCE 1-OAY CERTIFIED 
MOfF»t7l4iS38fl8B Wrie. 1OTB7 
Beadi BM. #137. Huntington Beach CA 
32549 USA.- e-mai - MwmBjunacom 


DIVORCE M T DAY. No trsvaf. Write- 
Brn 377. Sutury, MA 01776 USA. Tel: 
5QGM43-8387, Fate 5004430183. 


Auto Rentals 


tm AUTO DERG1 FRANCE Wwkend 
FF500. 7 days FF1500. Tal Pans +33 
10)1 4368 5555 Fax (0)1 <353 S529. 


Financial Services 


FUNDING PROBLEMS? 

for 

SOLUTIONS 

Contact 

BANCOR 

OF ASIA 


to to secure funding 
veflie projeefc 

VENTURE CAPTAL 

EQUITY LOANS 

REAL ESTATE 

Lang term wfetaa! 

Supplied Graanses 

Ftoc (632) BIO-8284 
Tet (632) 894-5358 

(Commission earned only upon Fuvfingi 
atom Commission Assured 


PRIME BANK 
GUARANTEES 

Venture CapM Finance ArataUe 
lor Government Projects and 
Grommerc Companies 
ttel are tar sale 
Lags Fbjms our SpeciaUy 
Also Long Term Finance for 
Large and Small Companes 
No remmrssai UntS Funded 

REPRESENTATIVE 
Needed to aa as bason 
Please rqty to Erg&st) 

VENTURE CAOTAL CONSU LTANTS 

16311 Ventura BM, Suite 999 

Entires, CaBtante S1436 USA 
Fax Hu (616) 905-1696 
Td: (618) 7BMH22 
Hoflard Sr Assoc Delta OG Leiystad 


Business Opportunities 


ATTENTION 

CALLBACK 

DISTRIBUTORS & 

AGENTS: 

IDT WANTS 

Your Business! 

Sign 19 wsh IDT, bring us vnur customer 
base berore August 31. 1 SOT and pul up 
to one month of your customers' revenue 
m you pocket 

IDT is a ptfdy traded US cwaraiion 
flDTC). We art we* Snared art a 
stable managmet stracure. 

CALL US 

BEFORE IT'S TOO 
• LATE! 

Telephone: 201-9284433 
Fax: 201-807-5112 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
IfflfflGRATKMWASSPORTS 

BarsarKHW^riu-^^ecretare.' 

Va fiKsraCT.-irrvtCPg 
Mai-Ptae-rax Ser-ses WWit-.de 

Aston Coiporate Trustees 

19 Peif Road, Duagtts. Me of Mai 
T«t *44 (0)1624 826591 
F»J: +41 (0) 1624 625126 

London 

Tel: +44 (D) 171 233 1302 
Fax: *44 (D) 171 233 IStt 

E Mai: astonSenterprisejiet 


VIRTUAL PET (TAMAGOTCHI). 

Our company manufactures VIRTUAL 
PET GAMES. Paries Interested please 
contact Hong Kong SMAHTAW LTD Far 
(852) 2796-6415 Tet (852} Z79M383 


OFFSHORE COMPARES, ft* free bro- 
chure or acMca Tet London 4« 181 741 
1224 Fax: 44 181 74B 655W6338 
www^ptetoncai* 


CD - International 
International Prepaid Cards 


Tet 39-81 -5096243 Far. 39-61-6096272 
3422 OW C**al Tra* State 670. 
Wfcnmglon, Delaware 198084192. -USA. 


Business Services 


OFFSHORE BANK 


with correspondent relationship. 

Class A commercial license. 
Immediate delivery. US S60,000. 

Nassau, Bahamas 

Tel: (242) 384-7080 Far (242) 394-7082 
Agents Wanted Wohuwtde 


Telecommunications 


New Lower 
International 
Rates 

Germany 31 cents 
Japan 38 cents 
France 33 cents 
UK 20 cents 


* No Set Up Fees 

• No Umsrts 

' Ss> Seccnfl BHng 
24-hour Uiij-frgual Cuscmsr Serve* 

• AT ST Cuaftv 


kauback 


Wren Steodate are Sat not Hal 
B Tat 12*509.1991 
Fax.lJ0ft599.19B1 

End: Intoflfcdhartrom 
wwwJAacLeom 


YOUR OFFICE M LONDON 
Bond Strea - Mail. Phone, Fax. Tear 
Tel 44 171 290 JO® Rh 171 499 7517 



Employment 

Business Travel 

Executive Positions Available 

IsUBusfcwss Class Frequent Trawlers 
Wotttwide up a 50% on. NO coupons, 
no resMtttoro Impeto Canada Tet 
1-514-341-722; Fa*. 1-514-341-7996. - 
e-mail address: imperial e login. net 
MtpAvwwJDgfrinBtNfnperlte 

■ INTERNATIONAL Financial Services 
Group seeks Financial Olfcer. preferably 
Soutt African based. DutrYEncfcn 
speata). towfunCy a navel. Africa. 
Europe. USA • tor the ngw man or 
woman Quaffica&ans and C V w§ 
retea salary package. Age open 
Please reply to Bm No K<. KT. 

63 ling Acre. London WC£E 9JK UK 



International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 



THE INTERMARKET 
Continues 
on Page 7 


Escorts & Guides 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

WORLDWIDE 

THE FHEST ft THE MOST SWORE 
18 - 38*- NTERHAT10NAL 
BEAUTIFUL ft ELEGANT STUDENTS 
SECRETARIES. (UR HOSTESSES ft 
MODELS + 

AVAILABLE AS YOUR COMPANION 
BY APPOWTMENT (EXCEPT LONDON) 

Efcol Agency Crete Carte Welcome 

TEL: LONDON ++ 44 <0] 

0171 589 5237 


ARtSTOCATS Escort Service 

3 Stntidharo SL London W1 
0171 258 0090 


ANNE MARIES ESCORT SERVICE 
and Drier Can Servce London 
Tel 0171 385 1174 


BEAUTIFUL SCANDINAVIAN BLOND 
Mods! Hiqh Class Escort Swvea Tel 
L an** 0171 343 3716 or 0467 626 116 


BEAUTffUL YOUNG MEN 

’.CNDON ESCORT SERVICE 

FOR OR HER Ta 0181 366 2183 


BLACK BEAUTY ESCORT SERVICE 
Ettircr.-e Elegant Entreated ft Fnewfly 
Uttto. 5 Heatons Q1819T62261 Catfs 


INTERNATIONAL ESCORTS 

JUS RemSered Tradamart) 
Wbritfs Fust S Mos Exdume Saw 
Motels, Beauty Ouims, AcMAM 
Entertainers. Hutsaen. Secretaries 
UuHhgusI Trent Companions 
■Rated 'Bast in New York’ by New 
York Man. Featured in Remationai News 
Mtfa S TV VidM tapes & PtofflK avai- 
awe lor setectm Crete cants accepted. 

; 1-212-765-7696 
Mlrtt-ncatsxan 
usa a woffljjwne 


BUTTERFLIES INTERNATIONAL 
SUPERIOR ESCORT SERVICE 
LONDON OFFICE 0171 311 *53 


HIGH SOCIETY 

Executive Escort Serve® 
Germany, Pars. New York. London 
Teh London 0171 266 1033 


ISABELLA AQUINAS 

Tire Worlds Finest Lades 
Escort Agsmcy under 9J7i 4955799 


HBDfS HGH S0CSTY*WENNA*PAR1S 
COTE DAZtlR-ZURICH'GENFtltjNItH 
Werratonal Escort S Travel Ser.ice 
V«ina ■*+43-t.53S4fG4 all crerfi cants 


DO YOU LIVE 

in Athens? 

For a hand-delivered subscription 
on the dav of publication, 
call 00 33 I 4143 9361 



THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


VENUS IN FURS 

24 HR WORLDWIDE ESCORT 5 BMCE 

LONDON 0171 362 7000 

M cards AAana bawsjs 


•GUYS & DOLLS ESCORT SERVICE* 
Wby:'?0VE , iTALY , LQfG0VrARl5 
=£Ha.UiaUG«40t5EllW^?Wi 
iCTE D-ATLST-SCAf.lHWVWTOKYC 
Tet *39 (Or 335 61? M23 Creit Cara 


CHELSEA ESCORT SERVICE 
51 Beauchamp Place. London SWi 
Tel: 0171-564 6513 


FAR EASTERN 0850 521 074 

Japanese. Asan, Korean. Carsean 
Thai. Cfcrase 5 

under. Escet Ager-T 


MILANO MODELS * +39(0)335m09S3 

• FIRST CLASS lAC'ES ELITE 1 

• ALL ITALY SCWE PARIS RIVIERA * 

• Travel Ccrraocn Servce arsrtJ.Ti? ■ 


MtSHUKO taemaiional Escci 3 UJV 
ft Sempra 2- hr ft'SrtjsKie EKCrt Ser- 
Lento TfJ — -3*771 5P- 3355 


NICOLE VERT PRETTY AND SHAPELY 

yyr-3 E'nsa P^aie Sstm 
Lwto Tei yi: m a? 


VAIENTWES INTERNATIONAL 

VI? Esac Ser.ce phetes ta v\e* central 
Lsftton elSce 0:7’ s« OC"35 all am 



. 


- V 


* ZlfftiCH * CAROLINE * 

%. ' 

Esc« Ser,« 


Tel 05 ' 551434" 


•■EXECUTIVE CLUB** 


. LGCOri ESCC=T SERVICE 

$/ ■ 

t=l G17I 722 SB3 Crew Caros 

V/' 

•""'FIVE STARS ESCORTS 

. y*r. 

SUCATSD. CHAJUSta ft PRETTY 


Sera FR A N K F U R 70r5-£SK- 

V 

1? 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1997 


ini 2 


THE INTERMARKET 



PAGE 7 



^ +44 171 420 0348 


• :a :: : 1%: l -r' y : * C V : 


♦ HOLIDAYS 



2 


HOTELS 


\L : ^OTE-L iVE&iR I T‘1 ” 

Me??™* 5ein * and lhC P ‘ ,nthe0 " in lhe h « rt ^ Latin quarter 

flf • R<n«^ rrom^OCt FF tc- ,2»i0 FF 

I ERAG£ DISCOUNTS FOR 1IHUID TRIBUSE READER j 

II Room Riw« a r- - »_ — ._. . 


I .• .oih . T 

1 day 
3 dav* 
b dais 


Rc*;.- 

!.:■ 
700 FF 
1,800 FF 
3.000 FF 

i. 'k.4.1 


R'>t \ 
AlCL'I 

600 FF 
1.600 FF 
ZSOOFF 


.V- 1 

Ll- 

WOFF 
2.400 FF 
J.200FF 


Ar-rrvr-.T 


L _. . iJ .Ws-.-.v ■ •• . 

w. r. des rfOSPans-TeF. -,5*tu 1 41 41 31 -?SiJl } 

M. KtR Si Michel Notre Dames - PaxktJig nearby. 


SOOFF 
2.100 FF 
3900 FF 


lb 33 93 22 


• * ^ 


THE INTERMARKET 
Starts 
on Page 6 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 




Bed <S Breakfasts 


UANHATTAH LODGINGS. NYC. Shut 
stav iu>ury apamwms. superior B & B 
r&gi£iry many locations 
W :;:<75-2D90 Far &2-477-WS) 
E-Mail irlo&imnhaianiodgngsconi 


Hotels 


Lebanon 


HOTEL AL BUSTAN. =asl ot Bern/!. 
- star tibiae Exceptional tocawn. secu- 
tfv ccrr.ion hne cmsifie comet® wo. 
business services, TV 1 6 rm 

Harder irom airport free UTELL Fax. 
i96l: 4 972439 ; l-33j (0)1-47200007 


Auberge la Cle des Champs 


**NN Logis de France 
Tennis - Heated Swimming Pool 
Equestrian Center 
24550 VUlefranche-du Perl sort 
Tel: +33 (0)5 53 29 95 94 
Fax: +33 (0)5 53 28 42 96 


U.SA 


BREATHTAKING VIEW OF NEW YORK. 

20 tt glass vail Cennai Part, i C.rv 
Luxuriously furnish") para fax. caiie 
Foi business, musician or hewvmoon 
couple i block tc Cameo* h»d. : to 
Lfflierrror.. 5 to Lucom Genet Muse- 
ums. Ttieaiers lYeeMv Kordhty 3 ter 
weekerds Immimumi or lonq term 
Tel 212-262-i5cl Fax riF-KW 


Days kin Hottf-N. 3sgai Ns? jen?, 
Itayn- aHeman-e !o Nee Yo* Cay al 
budget prica. Doitfes SS& IO : mils tc 
iredfonn Manhattan 201-5-S-ScX- 


Housing Exchange 


PARS - NEW YORK Lour: •anstted : 
Deflrpcm apsoroen: m -srr. area, ‘c: 
eaiwafert si Mm Yjrt Ciy Fnm 5r~. 

dates flsxfife Tel Lcn -3; 6439?:;? 


PARIS 

LES SUITES SAINT-HONORE 

13. rue D'Aguesseau. 75008 Paris 

J'i i ■ i\ % mJ The m * A.7in i* 

A LUXURY APARTMENT HOTEL RESIDENCE 

e\.‘Ls e ioc-ite-i in one o; -he mi.**i pre-nciou- neigh- 
ts:'Ut+,.v j.- Faubourg Sami -Honors unJ Champ' Ely *eev 
Tr.ireer. reronalizeJ bra ap^rtuienK up u« 13»» «q. leei 
•lompieiely re»io:ei .n 1^4“ w;ih mih equipped h;i».heii'. }i% - 
!r:t-J:*::r.2 ' •.■'tr.%. j. well a' one or :w o bedo> -ni'. one or Itto 

nurote biihriv'm. _r.d v“c wiih 'tudit'. 

Ideal :or ?-'*r :ar,nK h»il:day> and bu<ine'> trips, a peneci 
■■pie.i-a-:erre”. 

Al! h::e: '?r.tve>. DjiK maid >ep. ice. Air c>>nditionnin£- 
Unjer*7i‘ :.nd curl-ur.g. C"jnpleie -eeunty. 

r.-.,- ... ... ... ■■ #oe oi\. M.\ i/fitV'i'i &■' 

-33 <0> 1 42 M 35 70 ,.r . -33 tl»il 44 51 1b 35 ' 


AUBERGE — 
DU VIEUX VILLAGE 
D'AUBRES OTi'ONS) 


F.\- •• )i- 


Holiday Rentals 


Caribbean 


ST. SARTOELEUY. F.W1.. Sy==. 200 
rRivi-i viG-T'G'S '.^Z-S - reacn- 
'Tin tc f.tr:= i.-. ;?ci; Gu: acer.ts 
-*! TiZroS" s '.fei C-Smnill-.' n(Jt 

:asef;3H‘r r 5: Ea-s 3: M=rvr. An- 
•?Aa Ea-n::s •Ojst?* r? teo is- 
la r -K Z: 33 3 EAFT- - J£ 

40i.=af-::‘2 “2J bi'-iiT. ■-•'XT, 

==viC| ;s v. -i :: ■ = - :3_-‘;D o 



YOU DESERVE 
A BREAK 
FROM THE ORDINARY 

A. 



F-cing r/iont-Bbr: - 
_ 10 k.r irom Geneva 
me innkeece: awaits vou 
Tel: 04 50 41 54 07 
Fax: 04 50 41 90 61 I 


French Provinces 


NEAR DIEPPE Tudot style r,cj? 2 
iwjfCMU 2 bacii it. green er ^ 
Kdrs 20 ■mn sea “j'ODsv. lUfl- 
co» r.-s’ase -:3 to* S K a H 


3EAJ0LAIS NEAR LYON ■ ze. «l 

aeAjnW nix se: c, esn parfisnr: fc' 
ten,- d£3'i Tetia* i>i "4C ,'*ii 



• Le salon de l'Hotel des Marronniers *** 
21. rue Jacob- 750 0t> PARIS 
Tel: 33 tD) 1 43 23 30 60 Fax: 33 lO) 1 40 46 83 56 
And very close by. under the same management 
• L'Hotel des Deux Continents *** 

25. rue Jacob - 75006 PARIS 
Tel: 33 (O) I 43 26 72 46 Fax: 33 (Oj 1 43 25 67 80 

• L'Hotel de Seine *** 

52. rue de Seine - 75006 PARIS 
Tel: 33 (0) 1 4b 34 22 SO Fax: 33 10| 1 46 34 04 74 

THREE CHARMING UTTLE HOTELS 
IN THE HEART OF THE ANIMATION 
OF SAINT GERMAIN-DES-PRES. 


ACCOMMODATIONS 


Luxury in the heart 
of the Lee Valley. 

i (bit - , njr ;vv«t, rvise-r.it'rsai wlsk 
f.kmaet Ccl.ir' 5 o-jr ^osi-r c+fls. 2C 
rn-.+ trufn C ;r. -accr 
Tal -353 '0)21 33 S5 fti -333 »W1 236 sU 


French Riviera 


CANNES luxury apamnen vda steeps S. 
3 Bids 2 OBShS. pod FT 5.GW - FF7S00 
per seek. 14 Ocner *13 lOU 9318 ’’533 


VAIB0NNE: Near gol: lenrus luxury 
rodem .'ilia Steeps < From 22-S n r*S 
Tel *13 *0)4 931292%) Fa* 93129295 


DISCOUNT TRAVEL 



Paris & Suburbs 


BETTER THAN A HOTEL’ Eryoy an «- 
cepDonai 55 sqm fial on Pom Neof. 
unrjue vtwj ewa Sane S75GV.+. indud- 
mg fcerecleaifig. Tef +33(0iU2<sC51i 


Pte tost location . H.ES =5 EAUX LOGIS 

hMOapnafPiM HOTELS *** 

Two ciumlng hotels djoto / ten x .p 'A' 

located totvrten ( 1 ) *= *f 

the Louvre Museum and = b. 

Place dels Concorde |~ j 

UP 

10 45% 

DISCOUNT. 



Hospitality , Elegance , Comfort 


Hotel Louvre St Romain 

Hotel du Continent 

5-7 r-e Saini-Rocn. 

30 oft du Mcw-Tfaja' 


75001 Ps r s 

?2l C1.-4 50. 3: 7: . F-r ;-T AZzj UJ X 

'£■ ?■ "t -- -k * “2/ . r" 

• 54 Sirv= •, aepe *'si ra:"s aii a- t 

• Z: ‘Enneo ‘.-'v o'’-:;"‘12.'.ii'53. 

rate :s:rirci~s ar*Tv. 

r=:£r:'v rc-t-.eiw ‘-loms is-aT>jnr.g 

n-iinibsis. ’■■ r cc~ sals, -a-irysi 

:a: 4 TV. - caij 521® rac tuygis 


I.H.T. Readers Special Package 
-SUMMER in Paris" 

Special Rate: 570 FF for two pen. one night ail induded 
Special Packages on Request t tor a numnium of rwu nigliLs stay i 
r 'Summer R-ircs' includes Antrncin Buffet breukHw and all cutes* 
Valid fn»m 2“ June in <1 August 1 v** — 

AH Mitjfrr Cretlil Cur/fs Acivptet! 


FRENCH RIVIERA RENTALS 


RE1AIS DE LA REINE SA & JOHN TAYLOR 

offering at 

CANNES 

-i2 LA CROISETTE 

In a unique reside nee between the Carlton Hmcl vK: Fe<tiv.i]s 
Palace, lo apartments 3 rooms, higlih liu\iirioiis. superbly 
equipped, renting furnished. .\1J scn?ce>a\aikible. 

Tel: Louis FORTIN 

Tel: +33 l OF# 93 Ob 60 OO or +33 iOU 93 3» 00 66 
Fax: +33 f0>4 93 06 60 20 or +33 ( 6)4 93 39 13 65 


Scotland 


TWO LUXURY FIVE ■ Sirov /bis 
Georgen twin rouses Crflsal Edutixor. 
Conderg?. vam paranc «c inwnatwi- 
al fesm-ai 16-30 Awrust isi sleeps 4- 
£1 60G-'tt€+k • 2no Sleeps 2- il 000.- 
eert. Tel +« lf- ( 151 557 99W 


Switzerland 


SWISS CHALET, HUfunvOtarua. 7: ton 
5 0 i Zwct Beautiful alpm? seiner; 
Ideal Im Ltong. tuning, i.r-wrung 31*3 
“ominonu: skurg 3 cmooirs s^eps 
7 rai. *J1 55 6*3 70 03 


t 




\1 

i 

In * 


RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE 


See Saturday's hlennaiiei 


Inr ArK Friend diips. Imernaitooal 
PmsL \annir« & Domrstirv 
It* ndrrrtue contact Sarah Wmhaf 
on +» 171 120 «32b 
urkx+44 171 ISO 0338 
A GREAT DELL U\PPE.\S 
AT THE LYIER>t\RKET 




Real Estate Services 



PjCJULC 


YOU OWN A PROPERTY M FRANCE 

Cw stores sw in wsi atoer». 
asrtenarce. toaneg gatormg, Tpass 
ttiBcrj-uo cl ids. gemmed toes, ear 
PLcASE DC' ACT HESITATE TO 
COVTACT US FOR IfiRs DETAILS 
FAX +33 10)4 50 S5 94 34 
Tel- (DJ4 5D 9S 35 35 
7 Ccmere to Cievin *—74750 Bossey 


Real Estate 
for Safe 


Polynesia 


TAHTTiyiiOOHEA-FRENCH POLYNESIA 
a«omi owner ot a TaNtian tungaioa. 
w v» k ir. me sMWiiH wwe tonter^ 
tocn RemaB assured, laatoartages 
to? cunen nzuoraisDa ftnsi Wame- 
tion r; Fa* *6B9 56 J? 96 


Bahamas 


PRIVATE ISUfffl K 
TAX HAVEfWAHAHAS 
r v sp«nM land & sra part m Em- 
^as sw alltie mss magntort rfands 
;00 mat b tor sale 35 a erct 
5 bearnts 1 bgt»n__3 oceans S5iM 


‘7 French Provinces 


NORTH CHARENTE 

e. rural Fiance W erty 2 1i2 
iswii t:in Fans on IM ”GV SiAM 

House refwaedftfai 

am*rii> 10 hfltosi 'Xmron sasw®- 

sMCtaaiai w**s Guest house 
SV w*xa«f Total 7 tewr. 

lino a.'3«cie eKWJg *&***** 
omAmrs availaUs on ra pg* 

^JSSSSSK 


Aik ro to ™ 
iinwgR* 1 

% W V»^5C'=C^ , t® i, 5 

T 3 ':. •« '*S3 .0)1 AS £ J W 
Aeaui! 

- Lj.lUf.- r 'TC=- 


65 30: 
41 » 


40 MIN by boat hwn QUSERON r 

snall Atlaroc sia -c e-rh nc :« 
HftSE f nasal uw sety : '■ ” - 
rcnpensir.- preledei ::r+ tr' 
sfai^as K*r. .-fa i rr» o:< *: 
VS bean ??:l* +i- -M sTtZ fZ- 


Italy 

=: , .'E-::jsf-V -z=—i- 

CfT i" 

; ZS-'L ^Zi ■Tf" '.'“J’ 

=•: i r:?r. 4: 

-•cz-tz -i. .‘4 r 

French Riviera 

2APF55W 

s&r.T - x:’ ^ 

rf3.-r.*. 4 

Vsr.’tt*: -si. r.\ : ::e _ . -S’.’ 
»t=4.7 KUS 

V.jytr: ■ rz =^»: — J** 
— 37C 'z" rztc'. - 3 ” s:“. i-'j 
Sic.-- 1 - ’■ ra-S" :re 5>:-e 4:r: 

HAISSBASK 

TM: +23 (Ei 4 3 03 4»45 
• F» +23 |0> 4 93 25 iC S3 
Uotefa: +33 1C) 5 07 74 30 39 

'■SC-J: ~ S EIIT‘ ■,„ .1 : 
.jc :- -i :+i- -Hi - : 

7n=:3Wr3ENZJL : iPi.-."?" 

• ar? “ s-q *■=- -=A. 

CAP MARTIN NEAR MONACO 

lage ~ sr. acarrec 
pets 45 sqrr 22 .-sn lersze *?h an 
ecepoa vs*. +.«na»ng ffrt sea & 
me b^Ts d Ucae Cara. Ths \?z 
& snBUi v. a smai eete.-e Be« 
teater.v: cmt. secu^y 4 a ro? 
lop peef Ftotes and ian aved£e 
Pica. Fre_3JA c«j are? S ffltwsr 
Phooe U. atet (0)4 33 23 57 28 

Monaco 

U0NTE CARLO, 

388 *v n_ 2 ji.2 ars 

"iti+ri-s ~ :-:47Ut-: 
csss,, lan yja :era:« 

:-a v» ^ 'Ktsanor, a=': 
•.‘zrscz- k -.sa Zrr -n sr-:? 
_£J- IV *=r:.?r =r fie r. 

Tefc +33 >9$ 08 37 03 W. 

NEAR CANNES - CastOana le Vte» 

in DieapL- eSate s^rsb 2” sqm 
house a c?f«i oosStn .ara <rz 
3 bedrooms 2 “5 - jaesr# 3r^9 
«5i tetoneae aim and cair+ U&cs 
loom 3C2 sgr. eroscaped cs-ton 
Access pod c?d? tool* iui-? 

rrBSl Tei’ -33 |5(4 93 7i 24 zz 

UONTE-CARLG JiTAR. fKing d» sea 
=e^?r ‘ciijo »3 r$. J 
r~ r "J Casic 54 ^ 1 ? 

Exclusivity AFtti” 137^93 30 98 59 

ST PAUL OE V&CE, IS fflina airpon 
Vte CBUWtf -wo. 170 i^m. » - 
levels 3 teliccms. 1 rah 2 tC'.r 
rcems Celir garage xvracs. 22 iC 
sqm pme game- ? ooi sessile 
Fi =U (.lessee 12 ow«r Ter -33 *0r 
43 51 22 39 ?%t -23 >2:'. 434 0S3C 1 

Paris and Suburbs 

LQUVECIENNES- West Paris 

VERY Mffl^. ( P?OPEm 

ffi ?Tr. ©cecsa’ n:jse n pedec 

= ;^rc—s a* teft. 

fzzjgiei 'c?r 2 '- to=ss7'3. 
Fi^ace. a 2 ~ 5 .511 sun. sicsc 
C2K. lens As<'5 ^ nfiiCu 
Tefc +33 (0)1 48 93 27 73 (offreel 
Fu +33 (0)1 43 90 25 82 

FORMER SHEEPFOID, 15 sqr. twng 
^ace 23 fa ;<S SC- sqm? anctossd s 
traea and natsi ewsrar. :eiepttcne 
vav am area 1 : urs Ca^ie 1 w 

Ncs &rp?tl Frl.acv.-.'. 7w -S 
(CU S3 25 34 Fax iM 34 70 54 IT 

NEAR ANTIBES. SfflUtiM M»d v4a 
envale peel U rrms Nice anpon 
£250530 Tel 33 '0)4 93 22 S 32 

Germany 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE OR RENT 
Your dfce arc: fcxirous vdh 
m Haitos-5e.ua>, nes-nsidero 
tcuse. rugh Cess presogx u. 
toirojs 9 teerre ir faraus rsajgnT? 

N(A CORPORATE TRUSTEES 
TM +49 40 86JT7B ft* +49 40 8663958 
wra3 O«3a67175-1?r-oafae 

78 - FFUCHEROLLES - 
15 106 PASS U DEFENSE 
17th cat HOUSE. USTHJ 
5-. «rr. unesa 
Tefc *33 (Cjt 30 Si S3 SS 

PARS-CHE DE LA UUSQUE rsrTJ? 
23-rocr jC. te:,- r 3 ,i?.-£«l Case Ir-'- 
fc + ternom. * 3 +^ *«jfeas. 
?.ag. jaassTi. T;’ ready 3 rrer.-e- 
T. Hfcac. Tt= 2 x -32 rjil 42321357 

Great Brfta/n 

H0MESEARCH LONDON Le! US 
jeaich tw you. Y/e tort homes < tes 
to tw and roa and prenide coifcias 
leaciton serves For mhviduais 
art cen^ates Tel +44 171 833 
itet Fax - 44 171 652 l0~ 
iqt. iorneseardiotui/hcm 

nb iffTRO GEORGE V, rus Bassac. 
testers a Terns. £js: r 

+et*^ at> fe-irp hear. Ki sunr:.' 
trepak, afl sstK. qcner FFi i5G!J. 
T&-3S!:,:47S45EZ rrj+d(ll!SJ3D=3454 


Sivffzeffanff 


□ 


LAKE GENEVA & ALPS 

5a e “• kt* z-t b a.r-? 3c 

aur speciality since 1975 


«e , «; s t. 

2. Vr=r4ar :^:2*1 3E*.s.A 2 
"e :* - rsi •: » 


-A* :* -X- 

i- 

5.7j;j "5 2-: " - i- + t*:"; 
L=‘ : -- 2 -r.riZ -ir 


USA Residential 


NYC.NY 

SUPB1B UANSKM 


Lsnesr 3 Vcrisao Enrv seaugn 
'jIhjS S. rra.w tscr -.'.tn magrx:=r: 
Srep'ia i «cg?P3 siii^ase 

Cxcisec <3 uc 1 ?* •• | +' 3 nezanres 
Dours wgis (17 ft liigfio rtj L-.-tg £ 
2 t*q rcc^o, & ttamak 2-stciy Le^sy 
Vaster c+^mtoesseig room sure £ 
2*3 toJMT.5 AH isri iiT«ec« Ser- 
rate secern quarter Hus an mccme 
eweratm; proiessionai suite & a fcocr 
jr ugh cCsrrfiTS vifitn car. also to n- 
trxraS mvo tto ovma s premses 

C:-ipaherew resoraton tecenf; ct.m- 
r-sed 1 r/ v.’O.+MeiKmned im : ardwen 
'nrnsSaetu' aataUe enptv uSSioLfF 
Sw firm pice Sola hy oi'.w x*t to to 
rKif, .Ttefesiea parties ~ :to:r autho- 
tjk reoesemar.-es, 

=21 real regia- is *1-2T2-2StWM6P 


DIRECT from owner 
.'.■XURY BPlCK. rUUS. sen many am+ 
n.«s such ss r.ixe stvmfiq pool 5- 
zas garage, k T«o-cearxm apanmen 
attanea 4: stall oam vnth 2 -totooom 
anarmart era oft*. For safe- or trade 
ter anytterg cl value Musi self Only 
* fTHOion LocaMd in SW Midi 15 
inr tom Send INC- and 15 » 
from Chicago 'ocp wf rmance Please 
q 3 Snan f US a *i-2i?-2S2-0QCn a 
Fs> »1-2lS-2Q-iilC 


NY^Wvmpc Twer 720 ^ 

DUPLEX WITH VIEWS!!! 

This b a Mime diance ic obtain 
House-Wee space m a WJifd iwitrsiied 
C 50 SD. Jt> omwp rooms Serc-us seler. 
W canton 

Darnela Kuren 

ri2.89l-7S1t.Res rt?-*7f>4524 

DOUGLAS ELLIMAN 


NEW YORK CRY Upper ’.Vest Sle Fur- 
nished flut&i tor ale. 24 hr dOORW* 
S69.COO. Fair. -41-22-903 KSS 




HcralbSSnbunc 

Tilt WBJftBdB HWSffil 

planning to run a classified ad? . nu ^ , 

. . , -l, contact your neorest IKT office or rgjmsertotive wifi your ted. You will beintormed ot 

modeySrod wiU eppeor within 3, hours. All major Credit Cards Accepted. 

^ NORTH AMERICA 


EUROPI , 

- -mi H iTW - 3 - 

MBS : *■ % r ; Tt- 

rn« jtifT r-trft 

s.'TT" 

r : ! •'." .uniloC 


;T, v;i si 
FWLa^./^-.'s r.i 


[jALY:Ml»n 

fcL 5531 573S 
St 553 30936 

4 - ;> 2363dl^-i 

NORVWWr. SrtHSN KDENMAHt 

MSffsre 

1- i-iS?'73K 


^ a£72656 

^45=4074 


rat — 

Sl-'SS':^ 3291 


TISKFT isttdsJ. 

Tei 22C5S96/232 7150. 
Fac 2479315 

UMTOi®«)OM;lcndw 
TM.0171 e364a)2 

MIDDLE EAST 

ERAHiw A«», 

H. 97299-26245. 

9T2W 536246 
fe97W354£5 

SAUK ARABIA.- CsnWbndcn, 

d. 71336 4802. 

4*71 2402254 

SOUTH AFRICA 

JOHMKSWG; 

W 1271)1 SC93S92 
Fac (2711} 803 9309 


MORTH AMBffCA 

asjsffl?” 

ASIAPAOhC 

teSs?2«MiW 

owGAPQflE, ERUt® Smgopore. 

223 &47B, 

Fa*. 325 0842: 

TU ^749 IHT3N 


OASIS IN WEST LOS ANGELES. H-aS £ 
te' Sale : heocom : zsr. zvi j?a 
I replace E=G pea:r. "« a-'l :rsr« 
Z:n •■: Sen, an; =:■ Sums 
-.•?S27?'av = a* D. - .i¥' !;r r-:-+ Cf2* 
a: a cal. r-i-::; N-j 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


French Provinces 


ue a Ctiaielam in Loire Valley 

■«*■>*:« 2jle :• 'Iii : + 

4 'zr- - 5 ass. a-j: *+:-r :: :+'f : 

iriV! ri T,ri ro' ? T -. 

“5-'.c-y m:-.r :• i«*. 

OR 

Aunt Agttto'i Deftaous Cottage 

I.M?e at garwu 2 -:r^ :• rims 

ftiiig -j.e/t- fuTT*“*T£ 
rr6.bC? mom r = 21-M 'Ws» 

Tel +33(0(545211502. Fb I0t5458539e 


French Riviera 


GRASSE - RENOVATED FARMHOUSE. 
RjBv equeped, 1.50 acres, pool - 5 
Bettopms • 1 Duiroq Rocitn - 2 Lr»mg 
Rooms. Mtnniy r*rgal iGeTOener. pool 
ser.-ice. toil/ fttmtan). Tei USA (775' 
33442S6 • ft* F772) 354-G244 


Holland 


PENTHOUSE INTERNATIONAL 
No 1 fiHotend 

lor isemT hnstod housesito. 

Tel. 31-20-6443751 Fac 31 -20-646590Q 
N lwen 19-21. 1063 Am Amsterdain 


HOUEFINDEBS INTL HeranoractH 141 
1015 5H Amflertam Tal +31205332252 
Fa 6392262 E-maff-.voonseiecl C lip nl 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


Italy 


VILLA W ITALY TO RENT. EiSI via 
KS lot 'Urnt’S- tr, 2 fjin fT.z» 

pc:i ana ht.w :?uT : per::-- ! 
:atns an amrivij ien.a": y: :v 
rere.’ mwau a-.yw.-ia. -r •*“ * 
ciii: JitX-w .-.re* a-: 
nc: s:v ; -..1 ,i, : r-s yt; 


VENICE ZATTERE. ELEGANT 


•401 T_ 

c" - :i;;- 


London 


SHORT STAY APiRTL'Ef.Ta 

lw-x, = sir + S:~r"= ■ Vi-a 
vate ah *«*£-: .? rear 

j+swr.M pc:i nr 4 -* gi-r- s': :=• 

parsuvq ft « tar : a. t: : 

Cal ?iaa Estates 44 .;• :Cf 


CAPITAL Apartments i nojiS-: te' rr 
shci tong sU. hs 5 see .-.rilcurgs." j- 
di leteprwie +-44 tw 


Paris Area Furnished 





ideal acconunodam studo-atodreoms 
Oua»v and sax-ceasswEd 
READY TO HOVE M 
Tel +33BH 43l2ffl00 Fa E-|1 43129M3 


CAPWALE' PARTNERS 
Handpched qualy apamreis. 
al sees Pans and suburta. 
Tefc -OJ (WT 42 68 35 B3 
Far 433 (0)1 42 68 S 61 
We tefc you bestl 


MOUFFETARD - Mean ot Pans, maitet 
place, sunny calm, tuft- pquipped. 2 
room rial, renovaled rra.50(i net + 2 
rrtrti dejxjGfl Tit -33 (0)1 4707 2755 
totore itemaligt Spm a ew message 


14th. ALEStA. Sfi(4 97-May SB. 60 sqm 
19B c buttnq. Balcony, item, surety 
view. Bo living n bed), bedroom, bath. 
SlJOtfrto Otnef Tel +33 10)145413241 


3RD, MARAIS, 5 mns Pomprtsi Centre. 
23 sq m studio shon«. Wctowtie 
F330Ono net Tat -33 ion 48H M04 


FRANCE 


W PARIS 

'SQUARE AVENUE FOCH 

IN HISTORICAL TOWNHOUSE \ 

_ a-wii-.s:- 

Tel + 33i0;i W55 5GOC . 
Fox*- S3 '.Oil 42 60 55 91^ 


‘■EAt 5A5”iL-£ ■ — '-ii *• 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


7th. st. gesua r« 

c+r.: ::.-.r-:.«T iz r- 1?:.-. tivi-'- 

-2=1+1 

ra^esir :-f f'" 

»*■ x > £;£l- -:-4 


PARIS STUDIO. 18 Bid BesumareteKS. 

23 sqm ratflfir. i s:r.+-.^f -?'• 
FF43CO myrti »jmase s s: ;cssi^ 
T«l S Fax ++41 €2 ?4r is 1? 


Switzerland 


GENEVA. LUXURY FURNISHED «an- 
msrts From siulcs It 4 oedrooms Tel 
+41 22 735 6335 rax -!1 22 735 27' 


GERMANY 



USA 


BEVERLY HILlS 5:i. '. • -• ••r: 

'.;V : V. : ’ r. 

^--1 .*r : : + *ir.ij 

tzym ir" V - 

-r'ir v .?• “»• j*y.= 


IDEAL CORPORATE PBlTHOllSE 

Cifiie* Farcrarrr v« ;* V»“ 

j C53m:rn 5 '2 "j-t’e rsrs zrv.n- 

m ru 10 roir, *rom 
mcrah Tei tC-i-K+Jcr-ii^::? 


NYC FURNISHED APARTOEUTS. '■ 
seek 10 1 vear Sreat lc-:b:.:t< 2a c 
PiL'ChqUI 211-44f-322; Far 2tl- 
448-iafi EA.tat atKir.wxi&.ccm 


DINING OUT 


UJt 


PARIS 4th 


BREAD, WINE, CHEESE 

Onea ifinntr, wtollft fandut 
Xn* Godfrey YAb£ 

TM: 01 AUAJff Slftnvyt 


PARIS 6th 


LE BILBOOUET 

A jazz IhvIs dnc» 1947 

whkb tods Aa greeewF jassnan. 

At heart oF5air K ^m wi iKtes-Pr« 
far draw or a drink. 


13, rue SaMatnA T. 01 4MIL81.34. 


PARIS 17th 


al goldenberg 

Mds barings ■ tamn- ■ Cman dw« bogd 
■M (n luHoda - Chos* rafct I MI ff» m. 

JmUi me. 09 ft*, da Wa^sn. 

Tib 01 412744^. E+oryifayi? to mkfaqht 


VIENNA 


KERVANSARAY 

^ 51M843. Air conAoned. BOaOptoo. 
Noon-3 pjn. SuntkI Y , 


RECRUITMENT 




Vou win find lwlo«’ a seKlion of employmeiii offers published in Iasi Monday s lnterauiional Her.ild Tnlmne 
For a copv of last Mondav s paper, please contact Kimberly Cuerrand-Betnine. .urt on Pans (O) 1 4 1 .43 . b 

POSITION 

COMPANY 

CONTACT . 

Classified Sales Executive 
based In London 

International 
Herald Tribune 

Sarah Wershol • 

European Advert. Mana^r/CIasrifferi 
63 Long Acre. London ^C2E r ^JH 
l nited Kingdom 

Part-time 
Business Manager 

■ Chevalier BY 

Mr. Evert Chevalier 
Chevalier BY International 
P.O.Box 210. 

3340 AE Hendrik-JdcrAmbai-ht 
The Netherlands 

Seaport Director 

Metropolitan Dade County 

Ms Maria M. Casellas 
Director. Employee Relations Dpt 
Stephen P. Clark Center. Suite 2110 
111 N.T. Ut Street 
Miami. Florida 33 1-8-1907 - I'SA 

Professor in heat 
and mass transfer 

Ecoie Folytedtnique 
Federal? de Lausanne 

Presidenee de l’E<ole Polytechnique 
Federale de Lausanne 
CE-Ecublens. CH- 1015 Lausanne 
Switzerland 








INTERNATIONAL ffFHATn TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1997 





OPINION /LETTERS 


^Clinton Approval Score 

Keeps Defying Gravity 


Cl 

ar 

fa 

vs 

[h 

m- 


kn 

bo 

ov 

Gr 

mi 

ait 

Hi 


By Richard Cohen 


T ^Washington - Thirty 

1 IfcJ T four ago this sum- 
* kid named BiU CUnton 

4, 2°* *** a president 

named John F. Kennedy. The 
Tony, m °n»nt, of coarse, was photo- 
like Q? graphed for history — and. as it 


duxfe 

Sa 

prov 

"7 


tuw 
sh> \. 


' u 


ft 




f l 

IS 

f s 

• I 

> : 

I i 

» 

I I 

» J 

V 




; I; 


. J 


\ 




Earned out, Mr. Clinton's own 
presidential campaign. For this 
and other reasons — their youth, 
good looks and unbridled am- 
bition, among others — the two 
presidents have often been com- 
pared, with Mr. CUnton often 
conung off second best. Now. 
though, char may be changing. 

Mr. Clinton is emerging as 
Mr. Kennedy’s equal. 

The president's triumph is in 
the numbers. On the date they 
shook hands. President Kennedy 
had an approval rating of 61 per- 
cent That was low for Kennedy, 
who had enjoyed approval rat- 
ings in the 70s and high 60s for 
most of his presidency (he even 
hit 83 in Apnl of 196 1 ), but as his 
first term was winding down, so 
was his phenomena] popularity. 
President Clinton, in contrast, is 
going the other way. His latest 
approval rating was 64 percent. 

In ha, there is nothing to sug- 
gest that it would not be even 
higher if measured today. Hie 
economy is so good Alan Green- 
span has resorted to spe aking 
plam English. Unemployment 
seems to have gone to Europe and 
inflation to Br azil . The stock mar- 
ket is up and up, increasing the 
wealth of the 40 percent of Amer- 
icans with a stake in WaU Street 


Americans are enjoying the 
sounds of silence from abroad. 
This is not to say all is well — 
Wednesday's bombings in Israel 
prove otherwise — but, from a 
strictly parochial point of view, 
things could not be better Amer- 
icans are not dying overseas. 

Those twin areas — peace and 
prosperity — usually make or 
break a presidency. It hardly 
matters to the average .American 
if. in fact. Mr. Clinton has merely 
been in the right places at the 
right times or, say, that this is an 
Alan Greenspan-Robert Rubin 
economy. What matters is that 
President Clinton presides. He 
takes the rap, he takes the credit. 
That’s the way American pres- 
idential politics work. 

In yet another area, though. 
Mr. Qinton’s success is clearly 
of his own doing: He has re- 
oriented the Democratic Party so 
that, once again, it can claim the 
allegiance of the middle class. 
No longer does it appear to be the 
party of minority groups — a 
parade of special interests — but 
it can now claim to represent 
Middle America. That, anyway, 
is how the White House suc- 
cessfully positioned itself during 
the negotiation with the Repub- 
lican-controlled Congress over 
the recently agreed upon tax- 
budget-and-everything-else bill. 
Now it's the Republican Party 
that seems ideologically strident 
and out of touch with the average 
American. 

It has taken some time for Mr. 



Clinton's success to become 
apparent. 

He twice won election with 
less than SO percent of the vote, 
the first pan of his first term — 
remember the health care bill? — 
was a debacle and he has been 
dogged by scandal the appear- 
ance and the reality. For a man 
gifted with the narcissist’s desire 
to be loved, he nevertheless re- 
mains a polarizing figure. 

Some of that. I think, is 
earned. Mr. Clinton, after all, has 
cheapened both himself and the 
presidency by skirting — if not 
breaking — the laws on cam- 
paign financing. His unrelenting 
rummage sale of nearly every 
aspect of the White House was 
just plain tawdry. He occasion- 


ally has a hard time telling the 
truth, his ideology is sometimes 
hard to detect and he can be a 
shameless political ponderer. He 
has weakened civil liberty pro- 
tections and would, if there were 
any votes in it, support the death 
penalty for traffic violations. 

But there is no denying that at 
this moment Bill Clinton is tri- 
umphant. All this could change, 
of course. The economy could 
sour, the stock market could fall 
and I think it is just a matter of 
time until someone in Bosnia 
tests America's resolve by re- 
sorting to violence. Success can 
turn into debacle in a single day. 

In a sense, it’s silly to compare 
Clinton to Kennedy. JFK has be- 
come a virtually mythical figure 


and, what's more, he presided in 
a time of crisis — Cuba, Berlin 
and always the Cold War. Pres- 
ident Clinton has not been able to 
rise to any crisis because there’s 
been none. His historical burden 
is peace and prosperity — dull 
times, dull reading. 

But if, as now seems possible, 
his eight years are followed by a 
Gore administration (.another 
eight?), he will have established 
a Democratic political era 
second only to Franklin 
Roosevelt's. That may not make 
him a great president, but it sure 
would make him a great politi- 
cian. As President Kennedy him- 
self always recognized, you can't 
have one without the other. 

The Washington Poa 


Inside the Grand Tour, 
A Furtive Outsider 


By Sam Abt 

tVaRIS He had a furtive stage and waited at the f^nced- 

X look, which set him apart from off finish line 
the other people in die press- 
room at the Tour de France. The 
others looked bored, happy, 
busy or any combination of these 
but not fumve — they belonged. 

The green card with an individ- 
ual photograph that hung on 
their chest said so. Hie fellow 


MEANWHILE 


with the furtive 
green card. 


look had no 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Opter Space Treaty 

j Regarding “ Colonizing Mars?" 
f letter. July 30): 

I There is no need to draft a UN 

? Dnvendon on Mars. Such a con- 
ention has been in existence for 
10 years. The UN Treat}’ on Prin- 
ciples Governing the Activities of 
States in the Exploration and Use 
bf Outer Space, including the 
Moon and Other Celestial Bodies 
I — signed Jan. 30. 1967 and m 
force from Oct. 1 0 of that year — 
provides that outer space’ is free 
tor exploration and use by ail 


states without discrimination of 
any kind. 

Moreover, it indicates that the 
celestial bodies cannot be subject 
to national appropriation by claim 
of sovereignty, by means of use or 
occupation or by any other means. 
More than 1 00 stales, including all 
space faring nations, are ponies to 
this convention. There is wide 
agreement among scholars that the 
phrase “celestial bodies” includes 
all planets of our solar system. 

So there is no need to con- 
template the drafting of a new 
treaty. The planets are already 


the province of all mankind. 

PIERRE M. MARTIN 
.Toulouse. France. 

. Tunisian Response 

Regarding "Too Afraid of Is- 
lam" ( Editorial . June 20): 

The editorial contended that the 
Tunisian government “has arres- 
ted thousands of members and 
sympathizers of Nahdha, an Is- 
lamic party that behaved demo- 
cratically.” 

Islam is the religion of Tunisia 
and no group can therefore claim a 


political monopoly over it. Tunisi- 
ans are attached to their faith and 
realize that fundamentalists at- 
tempt to use religion for their own 
political ends. 

It is difficult to see .how any 
definition of democratic behavior 
can accommodate the activities of 
extremists who did not hesitate to 
engage in acts of political vio- 
lence. Their ulterior motives are 
too transparent to mislead any- 
body, and pro-democracy advo- 
cates in particular ought to know 
better than to defend democracy's 
outspoken enemies. 


As to the figure cited in the 
editorial, fewer than 400 people 
from this group were tried and 
convicted a few years ago for their 
involvement in criminal acts. Their 
activities were beyond the pale of 
democratic political behavior in a 
country that has engaged in a com- 
prehensive democratic process and 
reached a respectable level of hu- 
man and social development 

LOTFl BENREJEB. 

Washington. 

The writer is director of the 
Tunisian Information Office. 


Then how did he get past the 
two guards at the door and into die 
pressroom? No problem there: 
Lots of people do it. They like to 
take photographs of reporters at 
work, popping bright lights into 
their eyes. Then they look un- 
comprehending when a reporter 
asksif he can visit their grocery or 
shoe store some afternoon and 
stare at them, maybe even take 
photographs while they try to 
make a sale. 

There are also people in the 
pressroom who ao have the 
proper accreditation, that green 
card, but have never been known 
to write an article. Didier, the 
super fan. is one of them. He 
shows up ax every Tour, and many 
other big bicycle races, struts a bit 
and never misses a buffet table. 
He represents a press agency 
named for hims elf and no doubt 
based in his living room, good 
enough for whoever issues press 
credentials. 

Unlike Didier. the furtive fel- 
low did not strut He was too old 
for that — at least early 50s — and 
too heavy set He looked hunted. 
His eyes were never still, as if he 
was searching for the person, 
among the hundreds in the press- 
room, who would betray him to 
the authorities and cause him to be 
evicted. 

Until then, he showed up in the 
pressroom day after day wherever 
the race traveled. He seemed to be 
carrying more too, all of it 
clutched tightly to his body: In 
Rouen, at the start, a black 
briefcase: by Pau. midway 

through, a couple of filled Tour 
plastic bags joined the briefcase. 
He gave the impression of a man 
fleeing a fire with all his pos- 
sessions. 

Everybody else needed a pass, 
but he circulated in the by-invi- 
tation-only area before each day's 


long time trial in St- Etienne, 
where the riders set off individu- 
ally to race the clock, he collected 
autographs from dozens of them, 
crossing the barriers with impun- 
ity to chat with riders as they 
wanned tm on rollers. He took 
photographs, using the kind of 
camera that gets turned in at the 
developer's. 

It got to be too much, a few 
reporters felt. Generally they 
don’t like super fans, believing 
Thar even if they do no real harm 
and never get in the way. they 



ue the seriousness of Jhe 
pomp 

is.) Near the end of the three- 


budesqt 
job. Of 


that sounds pompous, it 


week race, some of these report- 
ers discussed the furtive man 
and whether he should be turned 
in and barred from the press- 
room, the finish line, the warm-up 
area and all the other places 
where only people with the right 
papers could go. No decision 
was made. 

The furtive man was around 
for the last stage, of course, the 
one on the Champs-Elysles in 
Paris. Once the riders sprinted 
across the final line, they all 
headed for a nearby hotel and 
so did he. This time he was 
clutching not only the briefcase 
and the plastic bags and his cam- 
era and a notepad for autographs 
but also the hand of a boy in his 
early teenage years. The boy had 
thick glasses, a vacant stare and a 
heavy way of walking, as if he 
was dragging his thick legs, not 
striding. 

His father was pointing out 
riders to his son. walking hand in 
hand to where they were getting 
off their bicycles, c allin g them by 
their first names and introducing 
the boy. He had spent his Tour 
makin g friends and now he 
wanted them to meet his son. No 
reason to be furtive about that, is 
there? 

ImerntiiitHhil Herald Tribune 


Leners intended for pnblLa- 
rion should be adtirvsscd “ Leners 
in the Editor" and contain the 
writer's signature, name and full 
address. Letters should be brief 
and ore subject to editing. Ur iu«- 
mnbe responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts 




•• • v Wt M * 




DO YOU LIVE IN 


FRANCE? 


*4| 

— ./h. 




."r 





Subscribe and SAVE up to 60% 
off the cover price. 

Also available: PAY MONTHLY 
by easy, low cost, 
direct debit. 

EARLY MORNING DELIVERY TO YOUR HOME OR OFFICE. 

A cosmopolitan, comprehensive and concise newspaper delivered every day to your home or office. 

In and around most of Paris the International HeraldTribune offers early morning hand delivery on the day 
of publication, Monday through Saturday. And, because it is printed in Paris.Toulouse and Marseille, it can be 
sent by post to arrive on the same day in most of France at no extra cost 
The result ? 

Unique coverage of the world you live in, brought to you as it changes - daily. 

For more information about easy ordering and availability of hand delivery 
call our Subscriber Customer Service Unit: 

Toll free: 0800 437 437 
or Fax: 01 41 43 92 10. 


FAYM£NTBY monthly direct debit 

□ YES, I'd like to subscribe and have my bank account 
fabited monthly by FF 1 62. 

Please start my subscription and send me a bank 
form to arrange my payment. 


YOUR DETAILS 


Family Name: 
First Name:_ 
Job Title: 


Mailing Address: Q Home □ Business 


□ YES, I’d like to subscribe and pay for the following 
term: 

□ 1 2 months (+ 2 months free): FF 1 ,950 
(Saving off cover price: 46%) 

□ Special, 2-month trial subscription: FF21 0 
(Saving off cover price: 60%) 

□ My check is enclosed (payable to the IHT) 

□ Please charge my. 

□Access QAmex ^Diners 

□ Eurocard □ MasterCard QVisa 

Credit card charges will be made in French Francs at 
current exchange rates. 


Postal Code:. 

City 

Tel: 


.Fax. 


E-Mail Address: 


YourVAT N° (Business orders only) 


Card N“:. 


.Exp.:. 


Signature: 

□ Please start delivery and send Invoice. 


(IHT VAT N* 747 320 21 1 26] 

I got this copy of the IHT acG kiosk □ hotel □ airline O other 
□ I do not wish to receive information from other carefully 
screened companies. 1-8-97 

This offer expires on December 3 1, 1 997 
and is AVAILABLE FOR NEW SUBSCRIBERS ONLY. 

Return your completed coupon to: 
Subscriptions Director, International HeraldTribune, 
181, Avenue Charles-de-Gau!le,9252l Neuilly Cedex. 
Fax: 0 1 4 1 43 92 1 0 E-Mail: subs@iht.com frm 


Thinking is more than just sitting ... 


3k 



READERS IN OTHER COUNTRIES CAN SUBSCRIBE BY CALLING: 

EUROPE MIDDLE EAST & AFRICA ^ ! ttOO^ 8 2 - 2 0 8-1 Tel: +852 292 >2 1171 

J ‘V. qi i n Fax: +1212 755 8785 Fax: +852 29 22 f I 99 

Fax: +33 I -1 1 +3 


■ j ;% 


* f r 

f 


Understanding our eating habits 
requires a very close involvement in oil 
forms of human activity. 

Mental effort and a sedentary 
life-style demand nutrition to sustain 
thought without the tiredness that heavy 
foods can give. 

Good food is more than taste 
and convenience: it must give the right 
nutrients in the right proportions, 
with calorie level and absorption rate 
appropriate to the activity 


■*.«.■*■■*•** - 


As the largest food company 
in the world we must be concerned with 
food problems in their widest sense, 
and. by extension, have a close interest 
in all forms of human activity. This, in 
the end, is what makes Nestle products 
more titan just food. 


Nestle 


more than 


just the world's largest food company. 











A ;r - s .« 


i 



.-i. 


t 







T ** ' 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1997 




DINING 


It 5 Earthy, 
It’s Local, 
It's French 


By Patricia Wells 

tnwrnai'umal Hcmld Tribune 


P ARIS — Pure regionalism 
is all but dead in Paris. 
Yes. we have foie gras 
from die southwestern 
farmyards, tapenade from Proven- 
cal olive groves and langoustines 
that sing with the freshness of Brit- 
tany seas. But dial's all simple ven- 
eer, a tease for the palate. 

So along cranes La Table 
d'Aude, a tiny rectangle of a res- 
taurant the size of a cozy railroad 
car. not far from the Luxembourg 
Gardens. No. this Little jewel is not 
named after a lady chef, but the 
Aude, as in the French department, 
that long stretch in the Languedoc- 
Roussillon beginning in the Massif 
Central and reaching all the way to 
the Mediterranean. Both the city of 
Carcassonne and the Canal du Midi 
are within its borders. 

La Table d'Aude serves as a ver- 
itable ambassador for the region, 
offering dishes that are not simply 
regional, but local, and rarely found 
beyond the confines of a village or a 



PAGE 10 


Wind and Salt Air With a Franglais Flavor 


By Marialisa Calta 

C AP-AUX-MEULES, Quebec 
— It was die boat that first 
intrigued us: a high-riding 
white ferry plowing crisply 
through the midnigh t-blue waters of the 
Gulf of St. Lawrence, on its voyage from 
Souris, on the eastern shore of Prince 
Edward Island, Canada, to Cap-aux- 
Meules on the Iles-de- la- Madeleine. 

The boat, glimpsed from the P.E.I. 
campground where we've vacationed 
for several years, had the same effect on 
us as watching Canada geese in flight: 
We felt landlocked, rooted. We wanted 
to go. So last August we took a five-day 
break from P.E.L and found ourselves 
on the deck of the Lucy Maud Mont- 
gomery (since replaced by the larger 
Madeleine), on a five-hour, 70-mile 
(112-kilometer) trip northwest to the 
Magdalen Islands (as they are called in 
English) of Quebec. 

Six of the archipelago's nine main 
islands — there are also numerous islets 
— are connected by fragile barrier 
beaches to form the crescent-shaped, 40- 
mile-Iong chain most accessible to vis- 
itors. A seventh inhabited island, the tiny 
English-speaking enclave of He d 'En- 
tree, is a short boat ride away. The only 
numbered road on the Magdalens — 
Highway 199. the Chemin Principal — 
travels the length of the six connected 
islands over miles of sand dunes; at 
many points along the highway one can 
see water from both sides of the car. 
While die dunes are undeveloped, the 
anchoring hunks of land are dotted, hel- 
ter-skelter, with houses, trailers, stores, 
restaurants and motels. 

Remote but Civilized 

We had expected the Magdalens to be 
remote; it was a shock to find ourselves 
amid bistros and mini-malls. But we 
adjusted quickly. On the Magdalens, we 
could enjoy beaches as lovely as those 
on Prince Edward Island and indulge 
ourselves with good food, wine, music 


and people- watching. Had we so 
chosen, we could also have windsurfed, 
sea-kayaked, cycled, ridden horses, 
fished, birded and scuba-dived. 

The Madelines, as natives call them- 
selves, are descended from the Acadians, 
who settled the islands in the mid- 1700s, 
as well as from the Native Americans 
and the English walrus hunters who pre- 
ceded them, and from the survivors of 
hundreds of shipwrecked boats. 

It was obvious from the moment we 
boarded the fezry north that we had left 
the Anglophone culture of the Canadian 
Mari tiroes behind: The ferry cafeteria 
serves poutine (a Quebecois dish of 
french fries, cheese curds and gravy,) and 
the musician in the bar was playing die 
Cajun-sounding rhythms of the local mu- 
sic. We communicated in our elementary 
French, in Franglais and in pantomime. 

We had planned the five days as a 
driving trip to get a sense of the place 
and to identify our favorite spots for a 
return visit. My memories are of wind, 
salt air, dramatic red sandstone cliffs, 
tiny multicolored houses, green fields, 
white beaches, sea birds calling and 
■ water everywhere. 

When we landed in Cap-aux-Meules, 
we stepped at the well-stocked tourist 
bureau by the ferry landing to collect 
maps, brochures and a tide table (for 
beachcombing), and headed to the south- 
ernmost island. He du Havre Aubert, 
where we had booked a room for the 
night. But the next day we found die inn 
of our dreams — and the one we'd like to 
stay at when we return — a few miles 
away, the Auberge Havre sur Mer, a 
lovely eight-room inn with unbeatable 
ocean views. 

On He du Havre Aubert, we walked 
through the artists' colony of La Grave 
and toured the nearby Musee de la Mer 
and Aquarium des Des, which has a 
touch-pool for children, with sea 
anemones, starfish and sea urchins. La 
Grave has some of (he island's most 
picturesque architecture, with shingled 
cottages and shanties r eminis cent of a 
New England fishing town, it was there 
that we found our favorite restaurant, die 


Cate de la Grave, a friendly 
place with book-lined walls 
and a bohemian air, and Edith 
Piaf on the sound system. 

We camped for the next 
few days on He du Cap aux 
Meules, at Le Barachois 
campground in the town of 
Fatima. There we found a 
snug campsite in the woods 
(sites on the beach were also 
available, but we feared tbat 
the constant southwesterly 
wind would wreak havoc 
with our tent), a tiny camp- 
ing store (that even sold 
wine), and an even tinier res- 
taurant serving breakfast and 
dinner. 

IATINO OUT OR IN? We 

were tom between the culin- 
ary possibilities offered by 
eating out and by cooking 
our own meals at camp; the 
supermarkets on the Mag- 
dalens offer a stunning array 
of fresh produce, wines, 
p&tes and meats, and near the 
ferry we found a well- Etangc 
stocked fish store offering 
fresh and smoked fish and a bakery, 
Boulangerie La Fin'Croute, where 
baguettes, pastries and home-made tarts 
and seafood pies were in no short sup- 
ply. We settled on picnic lunches of 
bread, p&tes, fruit and pastries, which 
we ate at shaded tables provided at 
nearly every beach. For dinner we pat- 
ronized a variety of roadside casse- 
crouies (snack bars) and bistros. 

We climbed several of the buttes that 
dot the island, offering spectacular views 
for very modest effort, and visited the 
glassblowing studio of La Meduse on He 
du Havre aux Maisons. We swam at the 
beach on Dune du Sud, recommended by 
residents as one of the best beaches for 
families on the island, protected as it is 
from the wind by the d rama tic red sand- 
stone cliffs with caves and tunnels 
carved by the surf. Our children de- 
lighted in exploring these caves and col- 



Etang des Caps in Quebec's Iles-de-Ia-Madeleine. an archipelago of fine beaches. 

bakery, lecting shells along the beaches. We beach. We would like to see the sand 
where stopped in the fishing port of Old-Harry, castle contest (being held on Aug. 16 
ade tarts the only English-speaking community this ye&rl and to take a bird-watching 
tort sup- on the main is lands , and took a tour (in boat to the nearby islands of Rochers 
iches of French) along the northwest coast of He aux Oiseaux or He Brion to see some of 
«, which du Cap aux Meules, perched in a mo- the 200 species of nesting, migratory 
tided at torized rubber raft that darted in and out and indigenous birds that have been 
we pat- of spectacular sandstone grottoes. spotted in the Magdalens. I'd head for 

s casse- the Centre de Thaiassoiherapie, which 

T HE night before our 8 A.M. ferry specializes in seaweed wraps and other 
was to ieave, we pulled up our tent spa treatments, 
stakes and headed for an Inn near And someday, perhaps, we'll return in 
died the the ferry landing, La P'tite Bale, a March, when helicopters bring visitors 
seonHe charming auberge with antique-filled onto the ice floes surrounding die islands 
m at the rooms. We couldn't stay for breakfast, to watch the arrival of hundreds of thou- 
indedby but the innkeepers packed us a bag sands of migratory harp seals, who come 
ches for breakfast of fruit, bread and juice. to give birth to their furry white pups. 

i as it is Our brief trip to the Magdalens left us 

edsand- with a long to-do list for our next visit a Marialisa Calta. who lives in ler- 
tunnels snorkeling expedition, a boat trip to see mont and who has traveled frequently in 
bren de- the seals and other marine life, sea Atlantic Canada, wrote this for The New 
and col- kayaking, horseback riding on the York Times. 


■**! 






0^' 


■m: 


SSt:nl 

0Tffk" 




NK.-U1K AKiK/IKT 

farmhouse. Here the food is not just 
hearty, bur earthy, the sort you ex- 
pect to find while wandering down 
a country road, searching fora place 
for an authentic Sunday lunch. 

Add to this the warm and chatty 
welcome of Bernard Pautou and his 
demure wife, Veronique. And then 
there’s the wine, rich, inky, deep 
and delicious: Minervois, Fitou, 
Corbieres and La Clape. The region 
produces more than half of 
France's red table wine, and is un- 
questionably the country’s up and 
coining wine region. 

SOUTHWESTERN FLAVORS So, 

come for the cassoulet de Castel- 
naudary, that rich blend of fat white 
beans, grilled "Black Mountain" 
pork sausages, pork skin and a 
choice of duck or goose confit. 
Tuck into a saladette du Cabardes, 
a mixture of wilted greens, crunchy 
raw artichoke slices and morsels of 
earthy dried pork liver. 

The food is salty, but your palate 
nudges you on — to devour a plat- 
ter of haricots du Pere Falcou, 
plump white beans cooked ro a soft 
and soothing confit in goose fat, 
then doused with rich olive oil and a 
shower of raw minced garlic. 

Move on to the chicken facon 
Grand Mere, cooked without fan- 
fare but with plenty of flavor, 
sauced with a blend of white wine, 
mushrooms and olives. Or go for 
the convincing coq an vin, properly 
chewy, marinated and simmered in 
the red vin de Limoux, a generous 
dose of white onions and a touch of 
herbs. For dessert, don’t miss die 
refreshing thyme sorbet: You’ll 
feel as though you just walked in 
from the thyme-strewn woods. 

And wash it all down with a 1993 
Minervois Fontalieres, a pure 
niourvedre that's a pure bargain at 
1 15 francs ($18.50). 

La Table d'Aude , 8 rue de 
Vaugirard. Paris 6; tel: 01-43-26- 
36-36. Fax: 01-43-26-90-91. Open 
daily. Credit cards: American Ex- 
press. Master Card. \iso. 99-franc 
weekday lunch menu, including 
wine, coffee and service. 145-franc 
dinner menu, including vine, cof- 
fee. and service. A la carte. 200 
francs. Reopens Aug. 18. 


The Charm of Helsinki: Islands, Markets, Outdoor Arts 


By Anita Peltonen 

ELSJNKI — In summer the normally 
sedate Helsinki receives a large shot of 
energy from the long hours of sunshine. 
Sidewalk cafes are in full bloom, the arts 
take to the outdoors, and it's far easier than at any 
other time of year to find what's offbeat and fun. 

The Finns’ love of the arts pretty much rules the 
month of August, The crowning event, from Aug. 
22 to Sept 7, is the Helsinki Festival, which began 
as Sibelius Week in the L950s. Although still 
music-intensive, it has expanded to encompass 
many other arts. One of the festival ’s most popular 
— and most bohemian — features is the Night of 
the Ans, on Aug. 28. Galleries, bookstores, concert 
halls and theaters combine to produce a mul- 
timedia bacchanalia, offering free performance art, 
readings, music, and visual and decorative arts. 
People throng the streets in high spirits, and one 
can expect anything from avant-garde video in- 
stallations and plays on white witchery to an open- 
air performance by Finland’s greatest baritones. 

summer REAimr Helsinki is beautiful in sum- 
mer. Thick, leafy trees cast soft shadows. Res- 
idents play bocce. relax on park benches, and sail 
or take motor boats to nearby islands. The vast 


forest park, Keskuspuisto, has miles of paths for 
hiking and cycling. Sugar snap peas, far red straw- 
berries, dwarf apricots, raspberries and wild mush- 
rooms are summer staples at Kauppatori (Market 
Square), the produce and crafts market at the 
harbor. And it's a good time to walk around 
Katajanokka, a neighborhood of sumptuous Art 
Nouveau architecture just east of Kauppatori. 

T HE quickest and least expensive introduction 
to the city is provided by tram 3T, which 
passes through the major areas in 50 minutes. 
There's an English-language guide booklet avail- 
able on board. A good place to start the loop is at 
the main rail station at 1 Kaivokatu. Fare: $1.75. 

Suomenlinna, a living historic island village 
framed by 18th-century fortifications, is a 13- 
minute ferry ride from downtown. There are nu- 
merous small museums here, art galleries, res- 
taurants, cates, boat races and a beach. Renov- 
ations are nearing completion for a yearlong 
celebration of the fortress s 250th anniversary next 
year. Tickets for the feny, which leaves from 
Kauppatori. are $3.50 round trip. 

Helsinki has many outdoor markets, adjoined by 
small indoor halls selling various foods. The most 
famous outdoor bazaar is Kauppatori. where pro- 
duce and crafts are sold from stalls and boats. It's 
on the South Harbor under the graceful watch of 


the President’s Palace and Uspenski Orthodox 
Cathedral. Hietalahdentori. on Bulevardi-Hiet- 
lahdenranta, is sometimes referred to as Red 
Square because of the growing number of Russians 
selling junk there. The first Sunday of each month, 
Hakanieraentori. at the intersection ■ of 
Hakaniemenrama and Siliasaari in a buzzing, 
working-class district, will burgeon to several 
times its normal size, selling produce and tra- 
ditional Finnish snacks like meat pies. 

The steamship J. L. Rune berg offers tours of the 
city's archipelago, passing tiny islands with cabins 


and saunas, ana stopping 18 miles to the east at 
historic Porvoo, the oldest town in southern Finland. 
Established in 1346, Porvoo is known for its gabled- 
roof brick cathedral, whose foundations date from 
the 13th century, although the present structure is 
from the 18th century. Multicolored wooden houses 
line the hilly cobbled streets. It leaves from eastern 
Market Square; fares start ai $9. 

Secret Agents, Post-Soviet Chic 

The Helsinki Tourist Association. (358-9) 601- 
966. offers guided walking tours in English by 
arrangement for S140 for a group, bat you can 
infiltrate the city's history of secret agents and 
agents provocateurs on your own. 

Situated on the old political cusp of East and 


West, Helsinki long attracted people with business 
in botfa spheres. At the Hotel Tomi the betrayers oi 
Minna Craucher. Finland's Mata Hari, are bid to 
have met. The grand Helsinki Railway Station wu 
a favorite meeting place for intelligence operates 
from all over, like the triple agent Sidney Reilly. a 
British spy who vanished in the Soviet Union n 
1925. Lenin's Helsinki hangouts were many: n 
1906-7 he had an apartment at 35 Vuorimiehei- 
katu (a 15 -minute walk west of Market Square n 
the Uilanlinna section » and at I Somaisten Rantate 
(25 minutes north of the square in Kallio), a fait 
noted by markers on each budding. 

Anybody intrigued by retro-Flniiish-Soviet chc 
can hop on East-bloc farm machines at the Zeur 
Tractor Bar at 3-5 Mannerheimintie (extra seating 
on milk cans), where the decor is authentically 
agricultural. 

The centerpiece at the Linnanmaki amusemert 
park. 1 Tivolikuja, is the 195 1 wooden roller coasrei, 
along with music and plays on an outdoor stage. 

The Helsinki Tourist Office, 19 Pohjoisespla- 
nadi. (358-9) 169-3757, can answer most ques 
tions. Helsinki Helpers, roving tourist-informarioi 
personnel who speak an array of languages, can bt 
round all around town from 8 A.M. to 8 P.M. 

Anita Peltonen. a journalist who lived in Finlant 
for three years, wrote this for The New York Tunes 


Mr b. Brown 

Directed by John Madden. UJ(. 

Queen Victoria, sorrow dragging at her 
shoulders like a heavy cloak, struggles 
with the weight of both crown and grief 
in "Mrs. Brown," an engagingly genteel 
costume drama about her relationship 
with John Brown, the strapping Scots 
manservant who helps her overcome 
despair and return to public life. The 
story befits a lurid period romance, ex- 
cept that nothing untoward comes of her 
royal majesty's alliance with the out- 
spoken Highlander in this altogether dis- 
creet re-creation of an intriguing but neg- 
lected chapter of HRH’s 64-year reign. 
Historians support the film's portrayalof 
a platonic albeit vivacious interplay be- 
tween the two. But at the time, the public 
was scandalized that a commoner had 
gained intimate access to the queen, 
nicknamed Mrs. Brown by London's 
scrappy tabloid press. Judi Dench brings 


RECORDINGS 


• STEVE SWALLOW "Deconstruc- 
ted" (WATT/ECM): Too many CDs 
are released every year. Too many of 
those are uninteresting and/or too long. 
CDs need to be (that's right) decon- 
structed- This one from the bassist Swal- 
low is just the right amount of notes, and 
rhey come from both head and heart. It 
should appeal to all hands, from swing 
fans to modernists and avant-gardists. 

• ORNETTE COLEMAN/JOACHIM 
Kuhn "Colors" (Harmolodicu Re- 
corded last year at the Leipzig Opera, all 
the songs were composed by Ornette 
Coleman. If "songs" is indeed the 
word. Even though this is acoustic 
(Kuhn's pianoforte work is impec- 
cable), it's still “free jazz," which has 
no, or only bints of, preordained form, 
harmony and melody. It's all about 
where the players take their intimations. 
Here they are aligned and empathized. 

• JACK SHELDON "Playing for 
Change" (Uptown): Sheldon played the 
trumpet for many years on the Merv 
Griffin TV talk show. He was good for 
laughs as well as music (he was well 


known for that combination). Once 
when Griffin asked him on camera if he 
had ever finished high school, Sheldon 
rolled up a sleeve, pointed to his aim and 
said: "I had the highest marks in my 
class." He played so much like Chet 
Baker, it was said thar Chet played like 
him. (The elegant Barry Harris on pi- 
ano.) 

• PRANK SINATRA WITH THE RID 
Norvo quintet "Live in Australia. 
1959” (Blue Note): This package 
should include a demonstration bottle of 
booze. Sinatra introduces "Angel 
Eyes" as a "saloon song.” And his 
sensitive phrasing is notenapped by his 
attitude — (to a stageside table: “Get 
your hand off that broad"). Still, OF 
Blue Eyes sure could sing. 

• keystone TRIO “Newklear Mu- 
sic" (Milestone): John Hicks, George 
Mraz and Idris Muhammad explore the 
music of Sonny Rollins with vigor and 
without ostentation. The pianist Hicks 
tops many people's underrated lists. 


Mike Zwerin/tHT and lives 


enormous dignity as well as a wealth of 
insecurities to the title role. Crowned as 
an 18-year-old, Victoria has become ac- 
customed to getting her way without 
regard for the wishes of family and 
friends, much less servants. And like 
many modem athletes and entertainers, 
she’s cosseted by toadies and flatterers, 
none of whom would dare question her 
brarty behavior or petty self-indulgences. 
All that changes when she summons 
Brown (Billy Connolly.) to Windsor 
from the less formal Balmoral Castle, 
where the affable Scotsman bad become 
a favorite of her late husband. Brown 
arrives in 1864, three years after Albert's 
death, yet the queen remains in what her 
personal secretary Henry Ponsonby 
(Geoffrey Palmer) describes as "a state 
of unfettered morbidity." The queen 
doesn't deign to look up from her papers 
when Brown is first ushered into her 
presence, bur Btowti quickly wins her 
attention and affection with tiis honest)’, 
wit, loyalty and charm. In time. Brown 
becomes de facto head of the household 
and even the Prince of Wales (David 
Wesihead) must go through him to com- 
municate with the Queen Mum. Partly 
funded by "Masterpiece Theatre." this 
is classy' fare, with posh settings, gor- 
geous scenery and lots of polishing from 
director John Madden and writer Jeremy 
Brock. fRiia Kempley. WP > 

Box of Moonlight 

Directed by Tom DiCilb. US. 

"Box of Moonlight." a seductive fable 
from the very’ clever director of "Living 
in Oblivion,” offers a whimsical new- 
way of celebrating Independence Day. 
It is early July when Al Fountain, a 
strait-laced engineer played with dead- 

f jan skill by John Turturro, decides to 
eave his workaday life behind. Turning 
his back on a dead-end job, a closet full 
of white shirts, an impatient wife 3nd a 
son hooked on video games. Al sets out 
in search of a lost childhood paradise. 
He gets lucky and finds something bet- 
ter. Meet the Kid, the neo-hippie 
sidekick played by Sam Rockwell, who 
is this film's big find The wiry, jubilant 
Kid wears a ba gg y Davy Crockett suit 
and lives in a backwoods amusement 


MOVIE GUIDE 


park of his own making. (Breakfast 
menu: chocolate cookies and milk in a 
dog bow], ) The Kid survives by stealing 
and selling ceramic lawn ornaments, 
among other pursuits, and something 
about prim, hopeless Al just tickles him. 
As these two join forces to help Al 
temporarily drop our of society, DiCillo 
makes it clear that they are two sides of 
the same coin. The I970s-style premise 
of "Box of Moonlight" is so dated and 
fanciful thar this quixotic film winds up 
seeming amazingly fresh. As it turns 
out. neither empty lives nor adorably 
free spirits have gone out of style. And 
DiCtiio’s taste for cool understatement 
takes che treacle out of his story , which 
proves far more moving than might be 
e spec ted . f Janet Maslin . A' IT 1 

Alive and Kicking 

Directed by Nancy Meekler. U.K. 

Screen acting that transports you into the 
skin of a character is so unusual that 
when encountered, it can actually be 
unsettling. And in "Alive and Kick- 
ing." a British drama set in a dance 
world decimated by AIDS. Jason 
Flemyng gives a performance of such 
fiery visceral intensity that there are 
moments when you feel you are in- 
habiting his HIV-infected body. 
Flemyng’s character. Tonio. is an ar- 
rogantly saucy artiste of mercurial tem- 
perament who has lost a lover c and who. 
in the film ’s early scenes, loses his men- 
tor and best friend > to AIDS . He is also a 
shameless flirt who stalks about with the 
imperious flounce of the young Rudolf 
Nureyev. Tonio refuses to take drugs to 
help fight the disease lest they interfere 
with his dancing. (The story, set in 1 995. 
makes no mention of the new protease 
inhibitors that have rendered thousands 
of AIDS patients asymptomatic i. A fa- 
talist. he has decided to keep on dancing 
for as long as he can and hope for the 
besL One night at a disco. Tonio meets 
Jack (Antony Sheri, a stocky, balding 
older psychotherapist with a large AIDS 
clientele. These two opposite person- 
alities begin a wary courtship that even- 
tually lands them in bed. In the stormy 
love affair that develops. Jack, who is 
HIV-negative, proves as needy and vul- 




r; i. 




^ a- ■ 


Connolly as John Brown and Dench as Queen Victoria in "Mrs. Brown. " 


nerable as Tonio. The movie has its 
weak and even embarrassing moments. 
For instance, a running subplot that fol- 
lows Tonio 's friendship with a lesbian 
dancer named Millie < Diane Parish) 
feels tacked on. and a scene in which 
they try to push their friendship into the 
sexual realm becomes a tedious, silly 
game of show and tell. But "Alive and 
Kicking" confronts the terror, rage and 
helplessness of knowing that the body 
you have honed into a fine artistic in- 
strument is in the process of betraying 
you. {Stephen Holden. NIT) 

Dream With the Fishes 

Directed by Finn Taylor, U.S. 

"Dream With the Fishes" is pretty much 
your average nude bowling movie. There 
have been worse nude howling movies 
and undoubtedly, though the genre is 
small, there will be better ones, but for 
now , ■ ■ Dream With the Fishes' ‘ will have 
to do. Suicidal Terry i David Arquette), a 
nerd presumably unable to recover from a 
shattering dumping by his girlfriend, is 


saved from a leap off die Golden Gate 
Bridge by free-spirited, gun-toting Nick 
(Brad Hunt), who is actually dying .»t 
some unnamed disease. The two bond, 
using Terry's dough to finance a last \\ ild 
boys-on-tlie-road splurge, and the 
repressed Tern learns many valuable life 
lessons from Nick, including how to pic); 
up a 3-10 split while naked. (The gir.s 
rent a bowling alley and two Hookers: 
don't ask why. because there is no why. . 
Over the last few days of Nick's liie. 
Terry meets hrs twisted girlfriend, weird 
aum* abusive father and screwball friend, 
they hold up a bank and a drugstore: drink 
loo much beer: and get too sentimental. ;< 
mistake the old "Harold and Maude" 
never made. The movie was written and 
directed by Finn Taylor, a *cnrenwn;-;r 
behind the" camera for the first time. v\j„, 
persists in locating every possible pr.*. 
lenuous angle. If he could have gotten 
into Frisco's manholes, be would haw 
shot from there But the two actors aren i 
without their small moments of grace. 

(Stephen Hunter. W’p 


! m I 


4, peri ; : ' 
R9er.'-" 

■tfpllr, . . ' 

5?wfc-.v ■ 

'■ • 

T • 

■?, j,'-'.- 


v ... 

."•til/-' 
yi-y' ■ 
. ' - 
TK ' • 

" • 













•V* ■-? ' v 



IN TERN ATTON AT. HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, AUGUST 1 , 1997 

00 ° D J«*v7rTT7T7 



CAR COLUMN 


St^Kc Dweitre 



Sffil 


-K— I 

.7 

* 



Ki--. 





*£■ 

ft-. 

± - - 



iii- 


i r. 




f 


SrJ V a^iri 
%,>=' ■- 
sfe-V-.t 


fci&v 

W;l: 

a*7i r - 

- 

«£’■ »- 
: 4- - ' 

l • 

■•■ --.I- 

r*** ■ i*. 


I 



•.’* i 


Surviving the Crowded Skies 


By Roger CoUis 

hm-rrjjndiul Heraki Tnbune 


IX billion airline passengers 
■• worldwide by 2002 s ? Yes, ac- 

2B cording to industry insiders. 
WMF Travelers s offering the miser- 
ies of air travel this summer.— packed 
planes, congested airports, terminal 
gridlock getting to the airport, unac- 
countable delays — may feel dial 
Armageddon has arrived. Where on 
earth are all these people going? How- 
can they afford ir? And. more to the 
point, why do they all seem to be trav- 
eling with me? 

Help is said to be on the way with the 
’ promise (or threat) of 800-seat jumbos, 
new technology for better control of the 
• airways and new airports and te rmin a ls . 
’But expect things to ger a lor worse 
before they get better. Airlines can order 
up new planes in a few months. Bm 
- airport and infrastructure improvements 
‘ can rake years. 

The numbers are daunting. 1ATA, the 

International Air Transport Associ- 
ation. reports that world airlines carried 
. a staggering 1.4 billion passengers on 
scheduled services in 1 996. Internation- 
al passengers (400 million, an increase 
i‘ of 9 percent over 1995) represented 30 

■ percent of the total. A growth of 10 
percent year-on-year means that the 
number of passengers will double every 

■ seven years. 

' CAN AIRPORT* copi? Tbe world ’stop 

t 30 airports handled more than 1 billion 
‘ . passencers in 1996, an average increase 
; of 6 percent. Asia-Pacific airports are 
^omwine at an even faster rate than those 
Idn North America and Europe. SrouU 
write w orld’s ninth busiesr airport with 35 
^million passengers last year. g« by 
5 12.2 percent; Sydney (20 j Htult°f}' 
^Eiew bv 13.2 percent Osaka <19 mil- 
Kon) flew by 14.2 percent; Beijing 
m 2 * Smlgew ^ Percen t and 

! W*.< STorld’s 

^aossneas 


and Toky o Haneca >47 million-. Air- 
pons like these have a large: daily pop- 
ulation than many major dries. 

Many airpons’are making a a error:. 
Amsterdam. Heathrow . Frankfurt. Paris 
Charles deGanlle and JFK in New Yens 
are building new terminals. A fifth ter- 
minal ai Heathrow wiB increase the air- 
port’s annual capacity to SO million 
passengers. 

Singapore's Changi Airpon, with 
24.5 million passengers last year, is con- 
sistently voted the world's favorite air- 
port by business travelers. One reason is 

The Frequent Traveler 

that Changi has managed to expand 
capacity faster than demand. Terminal 
3, due to open in 2004, will cater for 
‘600-seat aircraft, expanding total ca- 
pacity to 64 million passengers a year. 

Hong Kbng’s much vaunted Chek 
Lap Kok, built on reclaimed land off 
Lantau Island, to replace the old and 
overcrowded Kai Talk, is scheduled to 
open in 1998. There is an airport build- 
ing boom throughout Asia as govern- 
ments race to establish the dominant 
regional hub. China plans to build 25 
new airports by 2002. 

What makes air travel even more of a 
misery this summer is that planes are 
packed as well as airports. The .As- 
sociation of European Airlines reports 
that overall “load factors” for member 
carriers are on course for a record 71 
percent this year, while long-haul load 
factors have already reached 75 percent. 
1 have made three roand- trips this month 
— within Europe, across the Atlantic, 
and in the United States. Each plane was 
chock-a-block. 

Airlines are now making money (S12 
billion p ro fi t s on revenues of S281.5 
billion in 1996. according to LATA) 
because they bave for once been able to 
match capacity with demand. This has 
led to record-high air fares— especially 
in first and business class. 

“I think we’re right at the top of the 
supply curve, the peak of the economic 
cycle,” says Richard Lovell, rice pres- 
ident Europe at Carlson Wagonlir 
Travel in London. “Which is why air- 
line prices are rocketing at the moment. 


BRIDGE 



American Contract 
■T Bridge League's Summer 
Nationals started ^" % ' {ex . 

•ItSSw- 

' &mal match 
. from Louisiana 

*9amc tiow >e\ ,■ hioan . 

-toil by II 

; The winners Alta# 


star-studded group: Jeff 

Wotfsoo, Robert L&m, Jeff 
Meckstrotb, Neil SiNwnm. 
Richard Pavlicek and Mi- 
rhael Seamon. The 
diagramed deal, fanning 

tort play and . def Sfr 

helped them tvin dieir 

guess when his left band«j 

igfpfKihus > in his meihods. 
m il exited ro show . 

brushed it 

ssrrtsss- 

jSsfjsrt | 

^ SSiine were on his 
^' J Ho put up dummy s 


queen, deliberately weaken- 
ing himself in the suit. 

Now when he led the club 
jack and finessed, losing to 
the queen. West continued 
with the diamond king to es- 
tablish his suit, and South 
took ten tricks. But if the first 
diamond trick had been won 
in the closed hand. West 
would probably have found 
die fatal shift to hearts. 

In the replay, Pavlicek as 
West opened two diamonds 
and also defended three no- 
tmmp. The diamond lead was 
now less attractive, for South 
had doubled and then jumped 
ra three no-trump after a two- 
hean response, west tried a 
«jade, and when this was won 
bydoromy'sjac^ and the club 
finesse was taken, hearts 
seemed to be the only hope 


NORTH 
A J fi 3 
0 108743 
$072 
+ JS 


WEST (D) 
4874 
CA52 
O K38643 
*<3 


EAST 
♦ 109 5 
<7K J96 
05 

*87932 


A Toyota Designed for Europe 



ft A|R cama dmiii.to n 

\ Wortdwide 

j 

" * : •; . a.- w 

Aeropian and HHonors members can earn one tree weekend night for every 

hi? D< i ubte Di P sta ys at more than 400 Hilton. Conrad and Vista 

hotels. Until Aug. 31. 

1 FRANCE 

Britain to United 
\ States 

Rounc^tnp fare from Heathrow, London City, Manchester or Birmingham to 
New York via Pans with Concorde for £4,746 (S7.900) saves £554 on 
normal fare. Companion fare for £2,373. Until March 31, 1998. 

p ' ,ri ZEALAND j Asia 

Air Points members earn 1 ,000 bonus points on flights from Tokyo, Osaka, 
Nagoya, Fukuoka, Seoul, Taipei, Hong Kong, Bangkok, Singapore and 
Denpasar to New Zealand. Until Sept. 30. ^ 

AMERICAN AIRLINES 

New York 
to London 

" D ^ Y ? r ?f ' ^ excuTSi °n fares, available on 8.30 A.M. departure from JFK 
and 8 AM departure from Heathrow, cost $508 round-trip for travel on 
weekdays and S558 for travel on Saturdays and Sundays; 21 -day advance 

purchase. For travel before Sept 30. 

BRITISH AIRWAYS 

France to Britain 

fa ^ s Pans-London, 690 francs (S110); Nice. Toulouse-London, 
1,330 francs; Bordeaux. Lyon, Marseille, Montpellier-London, 1,390 franca 
Some conditions apply. Until Aug. 31. 

lufthansa/sas 

Europe 

Miles and More or EuroBonus members can claim an economy round-trip 
anywhere in Europe for 25.000 to 35,000 miles. Awards can be redeemed 
on either airline. 

OLYMPIC AIRWAYS 

London to Bangkok 

• 

. ■ — 

Round-trip to Bangkok via Athens — with optional stopover in both di- 
ctions plus unlimited domestic flights in Greece for £25 per sector — for 
£374 (S623). Minimum stay of 7 days: maximum stay of 6 months. For travel 
before Oct. 25. TraiJfindets (44-171) 938-3939. 

SABENA 

Britain to Belgium 

• 

sicypass costing £799 (ST, 330) plus tax allows unlimited business-class 
travel for one month on routes between London (Heathrow. Gatwick or 
London City), Brussels and Antwerp. 

VIRGIN ATLANTIC/ 
RAOISSON 

S36S smiam 

HILTON 

INTERNATIONAL 

— 

London to Boston 
Europe 

Round-trip fare and three nights in Radisson Park Plaza (based on double 
occupancy ) for £473 (S787) per person. Extra nights for £59 per person per 
night. For departures between Oct. 15 and Oct. 31. Maximum stay 5 days, 
but no Saturday night requirement. Trailfinders (44-171) 937-5400. 

Weekend rates save around 20 percent on rooms at 40 hotels in 1 6 countries 
and indude buffet breakfast Minimum two nights; Friday, Saturday Sunday 
Until Dec. 31. 

MERCHANT | Sinqapore 

COURT HOTEL I 

* 

^ i 

Summer Executive Plan offers a 40 percent discount on “deluxe" rooms — 
singles from 174 Singapore dollars (S1 18) plus a 30 Singapore dollar voucher 
for incidental expenses in the hotel. Until Sept 30. 

MER1DIEN HOTELS $ Worldwide 

I 

“Summer Passport" rates offer savings of up to 50 percent for two nights or 
more. Untf Aug. 31. 

NEW WORLD HOTELS j Asia f 

X a 

1 ! 

i • 

Summer discounts are available at hotels in Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, Ho 
Chi Mirth City. Manila. Beijing and Guangzhou and Shanghai. Example: Single 
rooms in Shanghai for $115. Until Aug. 30. 

RITZ-CARLTON ? Osaka J Introductory rate oi 40.000 yen (S344) per night for a “deluxe” room includes 

i ; an upgrade on availability, a 5.000-ven iood-and-beverage credit, 100 busi- 

< ' ness cards in Japanese and English and daily newspaper. Until Sept 1 . 

Although*!* MT caiatuty chads was* o9an. ptfrass be ‘crp.va.-r.e- tru: sire agsts “3, =e .-a**-* r* re~i :■ as* :s coc* them 


By Gavin Green 


T OYOTAS are reliable, 
predictable and well- 
made and provide hon- 
est, no-nonsense trans- 
port. That is why Europeans 
don't like them. Europeans want 
'"more” from their cars (even if, 
in reality, it's less). They want 
style, sex appeal, grace, a certain 
opulence, musical motors, and 
various other intangibles, and if 
that compromises reliability, 
hurts comfort or means that die 
odd model costs a bit more, then 
e'est la vie. 

Why the Europeans expect 
their motorized tin boxes to 
adopt almost anthropomorphic 
characteristics is a question that 
only a Freud-on- four-wheels 
may be able to answer. Tbe Euro- 
peans will say it is because they 
have more innate style and class, 
and they no more want ro drive 
around in an anonymous car than they 
would want to wear anonymous clothes. 
And the Japanese won'r care why; 
they’ 11 simply set out to make something 
that suits. 

A Smiling Face 

So, Toyota has launched a Corolla 
specifically for Europe. Ir isn’t that 
much different from its American and 
Japanese cousins: The major change is 
in the styling. Hie European car has an 
oddball, bug-like, smiling face, which 
Toyota hopes the Europeans will find 
characterful. The new car will be built in 
Europe, at Toyota’s new factory near 
Derby, England. Production starts next 
year. Until then. Corollas will be im- 
ported from Japan.The Euro Corolla 
certainly looks different: It’s the first 
Corolla that has ever stood out from 
others, as opposed to seamlessly blend- 
ing in. Whereas ail previous Corollas 
had no individuality — they could just 
as easily have worn Nissan, Mazda or 
Chevrolet marks — this one demands a 
second look. A quick survey of friends 
and family showed that most seemed to 
like the style, about 60-40 in favor. Our 
test car was a Liftback (Toyota-speak 
for five-door hatchback), but you can 



also buy a three-door hatch (which looks 
racier), a wagon or a four-door sedan 
version. 

The cabin is less adventurous than the 
exterior. It is flair-free Japanese, per- 
fectly acceptable, bur with none of the 
clever plastic finishes or interesting in- 
strumentation graphics we're seeing 
from some European makers. More of a 
drawback is the back seat, which is 
cramped for die class. If lugging around 
adults in the back is part of the deal when 
you buy a new car, shop elsewhere. 
Equipment levels, in typical Japanese 
style, are fabulous. The 1 .6 CD liftback 
test car had twin airbags, air-condition- 
ing and electric everything as standard. 

IT's in the RIDE The most surprising 
part of the new Corolla, apart from the 
face, is the ride. Japanese cars have poor 
reputations in Europe for ride comfort 
Yet tbe Corolla is amazingly supple, 
caressing road surfaces with almost 
Peugeot- or Citroen-style delicacy. 

The flipside is poor handling. The 
Corolla tosses about, on winding roads, 
like a small boat in a swelL Its tires start 
to screech at surprisingly low speeds, 
and road holding isn’t all that great. Fun 
to drive, it is not. 

But easy to drive, it is. The clutch and 


gears work with typical Toyota precision 
and everything is light and effortless. 

The engine is also a gem. The Jap- 
anese invariably make great little four- 
cylinder engines, and the l .6 fined to the 
test Corolla is no exception. It revs 
sweetly, parcels its power out in a steady 
manner, is economical and will no doubt 
never go wrong. 

T OYOTA hopes that the common- 
sense argument will now be sup- 
plemented — at least in Europe — 
by a new-found reputation for stylish, 
emotion-charged motoring. Its Euro- 
pean disguise can’t alter its basic char- 
acter. But it may be enough to persuade 
Europeans to try it. And then be 
charmed by a car that has always ex- 
celled because of its sheer quality. 

■ Toyota Corolla 1.6 CD Liftback. 
About S23.000. Five-door hatchback. 
Four-cylinder engine, 1587cc, 109 bhp 
at 6,000 rpm. Five-speed manual trans- 
mission, front-wheel drive. Top speed: 
191 kph(119mph). Acceleration.O-lOO 
kph in 1 1.2 seconds. Average fuel con- 
sumption: 9.4 liters/ 100 km. 

Next: The Peugeot 406 coupe. 

Gavin Green is the editor in chief of 
Car magazine 


ARTS GUIDE 


BELGIUM 


But if you look at forward orders for 
aircraft! there's massive capacity com- 
ing on tor 1999-2000. which could well 
coir c id e with the next downturn in the 
economic escle.” 

Business fares in the United States 
have risen 3! percent in the last year, 
according to Eric Altshul, vice president 
of consulting services for American Ex- 
press. Industry analysts predict that pas- 
senger numbers will continue to grow at 
a faster rate than available seats. Load 
factors will be around 70 percent, so 
corporate deals and discounr seats will 
be harder to come by. 

Kyle Davis, director of the American 
Express European Airfare Index in Par- 
is, says: “Fares are rising much faster 
than inflation. Western European busi- 
ness fares had their highest increase in 
over two years in the first quarter of 
1997. This reflects strong demand for 
long-haul travel to most business des- 
tinations. More people are traveling 
farther. Fares from Europe to Hong 
Kong, for example have risen by 25 
percent. You’re going to see some huge 
increases.” 

A T present, business fares from 
Britain to Asia and especially 
North America are the highest in 
Europe, and have the greatest spread 
between business class and economy. 
(The best discount bargains are in Lon- 
don.) For example, the round-trip busi- 
ness-class fare from London to New 
York is currently more than £2,800 
(54,600), while a round-trip business- 
class ticket from Paris to New York 
costs some 17,000 French francs, or 
about S2.750. 

There are still deals to be had, es- 
pecially on lesser-known carriers, or car- 
riers making stops en route to or from 
Asia or North America. “Cross-border 
bubbing’ ’ often makes sense for travelers 
based in Europe: Business class can be 
much cheaper from Amsterdam, Frank- 
furt, Rome or Athens than from London. 
It always pays to travel midweek and as 
early as possible in the day, before 
crowds and delays scan building up. 
Book a flight before the one you would 
normally take, and never trust “official 
connecting times’ ' at transit airports. 


Brussels 

Hotel de Ville, tel: <2i 279-6438. 
closed Mondays. To Nov 12: " Ali- 
ens Mucha, l Esor;l 25 I An Nou- 
veau" More tr.an 140 works by 
Muens M 860-1944;. the Czech 

painter based .n Pans Mucna's 
pictures in 'An Ncuveau" style 
v.ere so sueeessfu ra: reve- 

rr.en was rgirai-y ca'ec ne 
*Muci*a style*. 


BRITAIN 


Edinburgh 

Royal Scottish Academy, *1: 
(31) 556-8921 . open daily To Oct. 
5: '•Raeburn." The portraits by the 
Sconish pamier &r Henry Raeburn 
(1756-1823) jnitror Sccdand_at the 
end ot the Enlightenment The 70 
works an show wfl travel to London. 

London 

Tate Gallery, tel: (171) 887-8000. 
open daily. To Nov. 30: “Mondrian: 
Nature to Abstraction." More than 
60 works by the Dutch pioneer of 
abstract art. Piet Mondrian (1872- 
1944). The exhibition traces the 
artist's evolution from his eariy at- 
mospheric paintings to full abstrac- 
tion in the 1920s. 

■ FRANCE 

Paris 

Centre Georges Pompidou, tel: 
01-44-7B-12-33, closed Tuesdays. 
Continuing^ To Sept. 29: 
“Fernand Leger" More than 200 
paintings and drawings highlight 
Lager's affinity with architecture, 
ballet and literature, as well as his 
strong political commitment. 
Instrtut du Monde Arabe, tel: 01 - 
40-51-38, closed Mondays. Con- 
tinuing/To Oct 5: "Jondanie: Sur 
les Pas desArcheologues.’’ An ex- 


ploration into Jordan's past. Trie 
viewer is led on an archaeological 
survey of the Ommeyad castles of 
the 7th century, the Byzantine mo- 
saics. the Roman period mat fol- 
lowed the Nabatean expansion, 
and the Iron and Bronze Ages 

■ C 8 IWIAHY 

Bonn 

KunstmusBunt. :e i225' 77-52- 
60. closed Moneays Continuing! 
To Sept. 7- Muttpie Ssertty. 
Amenkamsche Kufls: I375-1525 
aus dem Whitney Museum cf 
American Art." More man B0 paint- 
ings. video msraJiafcons. photo- 
graphs and drawings created dur- 
ing the last 20 years chart me 
artists* engagement with social is- 
sues. 

Bremen 

Neues Museum Wsserburg, ref: 
(421) 598-390, dosed Mondays. 
To Oct. 19: “Marcel Broodthaers: 
Bucher und Ephemera.” The Bel- 
gian artist (1924-1976) decided to 
enter the world of art at 40, and in 
the 10 years before his death, de- 
veloped an enigmatic oeuvre in 
which Pop and Conceptual art, and 
quoted literature intermingle. This 
exhibition presents a selection of 
the artist's books. 

m JAPAN 

Tokyo 

Museum of Contemporary Art 
Tokyo, tel: (3) 5245-4111. dosed 
Mondays. To Aug. 17: “Jasper 
Johns: A Retrospective." More 
than 150 works created since toe 
mid-1950s by the American paint- 
er (bom 1930), when his paintings 
of flags, numbers and targets 
seemed to put an end to Abstract 
Expressionism. While in the early 
1970s, his works often incorpor- 



Neolithic statue from Jor- 
dan, now s/town in Paris. 

ated found objects, they later took 
a new turn with allusions to other 
artists such as Picasso. Munch 
and Cezanne. 

B ntrn»uwps 
Rotterdam 

Kunsthal, tel: (10) 440-031, 
closed Mondays. Continuing/ To 
Oct. 5: “Monet, van Gogh. Picasso 
and Others." More than 120 paint- 


ings, sculptures, drawings and 
pnnts dating cacx to toe eariy 19th 
century. Features works cy Dutch 
artists (Jongkr.d. Mandnanj and 
toer European ccnrempcraries 
i*.A cnet. Sc*:ee Bacon. Morar.d.). 

■ROLAND ~ 

Warsaw 

Centre tor Contemporary Art. 

■e ‘2, 'z2B-7i22. z zu-z Vr'Sa/s 
T: Sep: 7 . ra-t'S 

rp : .S“ ?S r* -g r r e '.‘Jz’S 
ZySZrxr’pjr&r,- art s .*5 

■ UNITED STATES" 

Boston 

Museum of Science, :e' ;S27; 
723- 2500. open daily. Continu- 
ing/ To Sept 1. "Lecnarra Da 
Vino: Scientist Jr venter. Arast" 
Anatomy ar.c engineering 
sketches and models cf his inven- 
tions trace toe work of toe Italian 
artist. 

Washinqton 

National Museum of American 
Art, tel: (202) 633-9898. open daily. 
To Nov. 30: “Megatron/Matrix." A 
multimedia installation by video 
amst Nam June Paik (bom 1932). 
Two adjoining walls with 215 tele- 
vision monitors combine random 
images from cultures around the 
world on a background of Korean 
folk music and rock 'n* roll. 

CLOSING SOON 


Aug. 3: "The Nude: Prints, Draw- 
ings and Photographs." Rijksmu- 
seum, Amsterdam. 

Aug. 3: "Cartier: 1 900-1 939.’’ Met- 
ropolitan Museum of Art, New 
York. 

Aug. 4: "Karl Schmidt-RoWutf.'' 
KunstHausWien, Vienna. 


BOOKS 


for the defense. So he cashed 
the ace and continued, giving 
his partner the' setting tricks. 
Flonda gained 12 imps. 


SOUTH 

♦ A KQ 2 
OQ • 

❖ A 10 8 
AAK1094 

North sect Sooth were vulnerable 
Tbe bidding: 

West North East South 

i N.T- Pass 2* 3N.T. 

pass Pass Pass 

West led toe diamond six. 


LOUIS ARMSTRONG: 

An Extravagant Life 

By Laurence Bergreen. 564 pages. $50. 

Broadway. 

Reviewed by David Nicholson 

L OUIS ARMSTRONG claimed the 
Fourth of July as his birthday, and why 
not? In his rise from humble beginnings, 
his was a particularly American life, em- 
bodying, as Laurence Bergreen writes,’ J a 
distinctly American brand of optimism 
and striving.” More than that, however, if 
Armstrong did not actually invent jazz, the 
quintessential American ait fonn, he re- 
made if in his own image. And, as its 
symbol and leading exponent, he brought 
to die world “the sound of America, die 
sound of freedom and celebration.” 

Such a life places special demands on 
a biographer, demands akin to those of a 
musician bold enough to test himself 
against Buddy Bolden, King Oliver or 
Bunk Johnson, the New Orleans greats 
who inspired the young Louis. With 
“Louis Armstrong: An Extravagant 
Life,” Bergreen acquits himself hon- 
orably. Scrupulously researched, draw- 
ing on oral histories and unpublished 
writings by Armstrong himself, this is 
likely to be the standard biography of 
Armstrong for some time. Sad to say, 
however, the book lacks that certain 
something that would make Armstrong 
live throughout its nearly 500 pages. 

To be sure, all of the details are here, 
from Armstrong's birth in New Orleans 
(on Aug. 4, 1901) to his death on July 6, 
1971, in New York. Bergreen gives us 
an unflinching portrait of Armstrong’s 
childhood and adolescence in die 


poorest of New Orleans neighborhoods. 
He retells the familiar story of Arm- 
strong’s arrest for firing a pistol into the 
air on New Year’s Eve, and his sen- 
tencing to a term in New Orleans's 
Colored Waifs Home, where be joined 
the brass band. 

Released from the juvenile reform- 
atory. Armstrong fell under the influ- 
ence of Oliver, then perhaps the best 
jazzman in New Orleans. When Oliver 
went north to work in Chicago after 
authorities closed down Sroiyville (New 
Orleans’s red-light district), .Armstrong 
took his place in a band led by the 
trombonist Kid Ory. A few years later. 
Oliver asked his protege to come to 
Chicago to play second cornet in his 
band. There, Armstrong — his style 
honed in Ory’s band and in a riverboac 
ensemble led by Fare Marable — pro- 
ceeded to reinvent jazz, transforming it 
from an ensemble music into one that 
emphasized the virtuoso soloist 

As Bergreen writes, “He was giving 
them a new musical language — It was 
as if Louis had taken their music out of its 
infancy and given it a powerful breath of 
new life and independence. He showed 
them ways to be inventive, to have fun, 
and strut their stuff as never before. No 
matter what their instrument, there was 
something in Louis’s virtuosity for each 
of them.’’ 

As that last shows, Bergreen writes 
with genuine love and respect for Arm- 
strong's art Those who remember Ami- 
strong as a grinning, mugging, handker- 
chief-holding clown will find a- more 
nuanced man here. Who would have 
thought, for example, that he was an 
indefatigable correspondent, a man who 


spent hours at his typewriter in the dress- 
ing room between shows, a man as ap- 
preciative of language as be was of mu- 
sic. “She has that routine down to the last 
frazzle,’’ Armstrong wrote of his wife, 
Alpha’s, heroic efforts to do his laundry 
on the road, and closed one letter to a 
friend, “Red beans and ricely yours.” 

This is, however, no dutifully respect- 
ful biography, as Bergreen does not shy 
away from exploring uncomfortable as- 
pects of Armstrong’s life, including his 
four marriages (the first to a prostiiute) 
and his extramarital affairs. At the same 
time, for the most part Bergreen refrains 
from psychologizing. When he does, re- 
fleciing’on Armstrong's singular “will- 
ingness to turn the other cheek" when 
confronted with bigotry or cruelness or 
on his need for strong father figures 
(from Peter Davis, music teacher at tbe 
Waifs Home, to his longtime manager, 
Joe Glaser), the results are both dis- 
concerting and unconvincing. 

In tbe end, though, despite Bergreen 's 
best efforts, Armstrong remains some- 
how elusive. But perhaps that shouldn’t 
be surprising. Who can explain genius, 
whether in a James Joyce or a Louis 
Armstrong? But perhaps the key to the 
mystery is to be found in the epigraph 
from Ralph Ellison that opens Ber- 
green ’s took: “Shakespeare invented 
Caliban. Who the hell dreamed up 
Louis? Some of the bop boys consider 
him Caliban, bur if he is, he is amask for 
a lyric po eI w ^° ** much greater than 
most now writing." 

David Nicholson, a Washington 
writer, wrote this for The Washington 
Post. 












-x*r \ " 


PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIB UNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


Bomb Tip Leads Police 
To Raid N. Y. Apartment 

Anti-Terror Force Wounds 2 Suspects 


The Associated Pros 


too had co 


limeoted the police de- 
em does not anoear to be 


found what appeared to be bomb ma- 
terials, forcing the evacuation of nearby 
apartments, the authorities said. Officers 
wounded two men in the apartment, and 
federal terrorism investigators were put 
on the case. 

Mayor Rudolph Giuliani said inves- 


tigators were looking at the possibility on the case. 


McCrary said, adding that the president 
was glad for that, “obviously.” 
Attorney General Janet Reno said the 
FBI and .the joint ter r oris m task force in 
New York, which includes the FBI and 
state and local police, had helped work 


tbatliwre was a plot to sow tenor by The police w*ntto ** 
bombing the subways. Wednesday mght after a ^ 

“ Weknow there is information sag- was a bomb in the building, asmall,t wo- 
eesting there was,” he said. “We don’t story structure behind a storefront in 
know how realistic ir is at this point” Brooklyn's Park Slope section. 

Whether the devices actually woo An investigator who spoke on con- 
bombs was still being determined, the ditiou of anonymity told The Associated 
mayor said, but there was live ammuni- Press that a man had flagged down a 
tion in the apartment. Long Island Rail Road police officer and 

Mir. Giuliani described the wounded said that there were bombs m his apart- 
men and a third occupant, all of whom meoL 

were arrested, as Middle Eastern, but The man was taken to a city police 
cave no other details about their iden- station for questioning and officers were 
titles He said that officers shot the men dispatched to the apartment 
because it appeared they were trying to They evacuated adjoining buildings 
detonate the explosives. and cordoned off streets before going in. 

He turned aside questions about the When they found the suspected explo- 
nature of what be called “bomb sives, they stopped the subways, 
devices' ' or the. intent of the suspects. Hie occupants were asleep when the 

“We don't know exactly what this police entered and Mr. Giuliani mid that 
is,” added James Kails trom, head of the officers opened fire when the two men 



'• .-m . ” 

\ 

vx- 

. “<• • V V- 

o.v 

V ' • 

* " • t . 




k *.•■. mm - 


A pot more than 2,000 years old that was recovered from the wreck of an andentship in the Mediterranean. 

TREASURE: Deep-Sea Explorer Finds Trove of Shipwrecks 

Con turned from Page 1 This spring, he returned mice again to to trundle along the sea floor sacking 


New York office of the Federal Bureau “longed toward what appeared to be a 
of Investigation. bomb.” 

Mr. Giuliani said repeatedly that he Pasquale Failo, owner of a building 
knew of no danger “now” to the city, next door, said that he had noticed lots of 

Michael McCurry, White House different people living there. “It was a 

<1 «* CQirt tliot PrAClflAflt Dvll f'IJri TC»rnliN*iA ** I J 


This spring, hei 
the area ltX) mile! 
2,500 feet ■ deep. 


Pasquale Failo, owner of a building 
next doer, said that he had noticed lots of 


ocean depths like those where Mr. Bal- 2£Q0 feet, dee; 
lard found the Titanic, he said, they are leased research 
also invaluable in the Mediterranean, was the Navy’s 
Though shallower, it averages 9,000 one-of-a-kind 


% he returned once again to to trundle along the sea floor sacking 
mBes Off Tunisia in water sediment from artifacts and removing 
Jeep. Accompanying his them with its mechanical pincers, 
ch ship Carolyn Chouest “It’s the closest thing to my boyhood 

ry's NR-1, a 28-year-old dream of Captain Nemo’s Nautilus” — 
L research submarine from Jules Verne’s “20,000 Leagues 


feet (2,740 meters) in depth and off the powered by a tiny nuclear reacts “the Under the Sea,” Mr. Ballard said. 


spokesman, said that President Bill Clin- revolving door,” he said. 

Palestinian Council Votes 
For Dissolution of Cabinet 


size of a trash can." The reactor allows Among the expedition’s discoveries: 

the sub to stay on the deep ocean floor up • A trading ship, 100-feet long, dat- 

to a month at a time, avoiding toe ascents ing from 200 to 100 B.C. One of the 
and descents that can take less versatile earliest such ships ever found, it boasted 
submersibles the better part of a day. two lead anchors and cargo holds fore 
The 150-foot NR-1 also has wheels, and aft containing fine bronze vessels, at 
and for this trip it “was equipped with least eight types of tall double-handled 

_ «nn< ofYmtuwQ onri an ari nxr nf 


coast of Greece plunges to 20,000 feet size of a trash can.” The reactor allows / 

With this summers expedition, Mr. the sub to stay on the deep ocean floor up • 

Ballard was returning to an area of the to a month at a time, avoiding the ascents ing 
Mediterranean he first surveyed some and descents that can take less versatile earl 
nine years ago. He has long believed submersibles the better part of a day. two 
that ancient mariners, far from being The 150-foot NR-1 also has wheels, and 
confined to coastal trade routes as has and for this trip it “was equipped with leas 
been long believed, were often forced a giant vacuum cleaner” permitting it jars 


The Associated Press 

RAMALLAH, West Bank — The 
Palestinian Legislative Council, re- 
sponding to a report of widespread gov- 
ernment comiption, voted Thursday in 
favor of dissolving Yasser Arafat’s 18- 
member self-rule cabinet. 

“We demand the dissolution of the 
Palestinian cabinet and we ask President 
Arafat to set up a new cabinet,” the 
council said in a resolution that passed 
byavoteof 51 to 1. 

The elected 88-member council has 
no legal power to enforce its resolution, 
but it puts Mr. Arafat under serious 
pressure. 

Arafat aides had said that he planned 
to shuffle his cabinet anyway. 


ded that three officials. Planning Min- 
ister Nabil Shaath, Civil Affairs Minister 
Jamil Tariff and Transportation Minister 
Ali Qawasmeh, stand trial on corruption 
charges. 

The report included allegations that 
foreign aid had been diverted for per- 
sonal use. Conspicuous by its absence in 
the report was an investigation of Mr. 
Arafat's office itself. 

The investigative committee was set 
up after a state comptroller’s report two 
months ago found mat $326 million of 
the Palestinian autonomy government’s 
$800 million annual budget had been 
squandered through comiption or mis- 
management 

Mr. Qawasmeh admitted Wednesday 


by time and weather to gamble on 
shorter, deep-water voyages where 
their ships were often overwhelmed by 
famously treacherous weather. 

“They were entrepreneurs,” he 
said. “They wanted to get their 
products to market” 

In a post-Titanic interview 10 years 
ago, he predicted that “literally thou- 
sands” of ancient ships — Roman, 
Phoenician, Egyptian and others — lay 
waiting for discovery on the sea floor 
along the ancient Carth age-Rome trade 
route linking Europe and Africa. 

After additional surveys in 1989 and 
die discovery of a fourth-century ship, 
he returned to the site in 1995. dis- 
covered two more ships and completed 
preparations for this year's expedition. 



tg it jars called amphora and an array of 
kitchen and other household wares. 

• A trading ship from about the time 
of Christ It was loaded with amphorae 
indicating trade contacts with North 
Africa, Southern France and Campan- 
ia, in southwest Italy. 

• Two first-century trading ships, 
one carrying a heavy cargo of granite 
building stones, monolithic columns 
and a large iron anchor; the other-car- 
rying wine and oil amphorae from 
North Africa. 

• A merchant ship from the late 
fourth century, with amphorae from 
North Africa and other parts of the 
Mediterranean. A cluster or iron. anchors 
lay on the remains of the deck along with 
s mall hand-operated mills, a lamp from 

nyt Carthage and a Roman coin. 


committee on Tues- that his ministry committed violations 


day found extensive abuses in ali 18 
government ministries and recommen- 


but blamed the mis managem ent on his 
predecessor. 


FRANCE: Unemployment Rises to a Postwar Record of 12.6 % 


Continued from Page 1 


ISRAEL: Palestinian Areas Under Threat 


Continued from Page 1 


inrsday 


said Hamas would cany out more at- 
Jerusalem’s main fruit and vegetable tacks if Palestinian prisoners were not 


Muslim Prophet Mohammed as a pig. It tire new figure mi ght be a peak before 
said Hamas would cany out more at- unemployment starts to taper off, if 


only those people who are actively seek- working — and might be expected to be 
ing a frill-time job. In contrast, many productive as experienced employees, 
economists prefer to measure a coon- Da addition, a very high percentage of 

try’s job performance in simpler terms as these early retirees are benefiting from 
a percentage of the working-age pop- government-subsidized plans, which 
ulation holding full-time jobs. weigh as heavily as unemployment in- 

Not counted in the jobless figures in surance in welfare budgets. 


market, killed 15 
themselves, and woi 


>le, including released by Sunday. 

more than 150 As in the past, Israel imposed a clo- 


France’s current export boom leads to 
stronger economic growth. Indeed, the 
CAC-40 index of blue-chip shares 


Not counted in the jobless figures in 
France, for example, are people who 
have accepted early retirement. 


Tbe latest official figures also min- 
imized other dark spots in the employ- 


raw ratio of employment to meat picture that point up the impression ferent carriers. 


U.S. Keeps 

Pressure on 

i 

France for j 
Airline Deal 


The. Associated Press . j 

WASHINGTON — Pushing for anew 
aviation accord with France that would 
lift barriers to trans-Atlantic services, the 
. Clinton administration warned Thursday 
that further delays could have a bad effect 
on the French tourist industry. 

“We hope that, as the new French 
government assesses its economic in- 
terests, it will conclude, as we have, that 
aviation services are a critical component 
of economic expansion and vitally im- 
portant to the majOT industry of tourism,” 

| Charles Hunnicutt, the Transportation 
Department’s assistant secretary for avi- 
. ation, told a Senate subcommittee. 

“Tbe multi-billion dollar tourist in- 
' dustry of France shoold be appalled as its 1 
economic fare sits on so unstable a foun- 
dation,” Mr. Hunnicutt said. . 

Services to France by U.S. passenger 
airlines have been restricted for four 
years, since France renounced the 
former, relatively liberal air-transport 
■ agreement between the two countries. 

Two rounds of negotiations aimed at 
replacing the aviation agreement have 
faded over French insistenc e on assuring 
a bigger market share for Air France, their 
ailing national carrier. 

This spring, the state-owned airline 
announced its first profit in eight years. 
But it is now absorbing the money- 
losing domestic carrier Ajt Inter. 

Another obstacle to a new bilateral 
accord is the French insistence on a nine- 
year transition period to phase in the 
“open skies” arrangements that the 
United States has with Britain, Germany 
and other European countries. The 
agreements have contributed to a boom 
in bilateral services. 

Mr. Hunnicutt warned that the United 
States would not allow Air France to join 
any of the U.S. -European code-sharing 
allian ces — such as Delta-Austrian Air- 
Sabena-Swissair or United-Lufthansa- 
SAS — until a bilateral agreement was 
in place. 

“As these major alliances continue to 
expand and flourish, airlines such as Air 
France will find it increasingly difficult to 
compete,” he said. “Thus, to ignore the 
economic reality of this changing in- 
dustry is to assure mediocrity, at best.” 
Speaking to tbe aviation subcommit- 
tee of tbe House Committee on Trans- 
portation, Mr. Hunnicutt said he hoped 
that the French would conclude that 
* ’open rides is not a threat to Air France, 
but is essential to its survival and future 
prosperity.” 

Last year, Air France agreed to co-. 
ordinate operations with Delta Air Lines’, 
and Continental Airlines and to pool- 
their sales and marketing efforts. 

But in the absence of an aviation < 
accord, the airlines have been unable to 
progress to a more lucrative code-shar- 
ing arrangement in which carriers use; 
the same code on tickets. This enables 
customers to avoid rechecking baggage 
when switching planes belonging to dif- 


otfaers. Israel Radio reported chat 71 re- sure on tbe West Bank and Gaza Strip, closed at a record high 3,075.67 points population of employable age, interna- that France’s economy remains in trou- 


mained hospitalized Thursday. The 15th 
victim died Thursday. 


barring tens of thousands of Palestinians 
from jobs in LsraeL About 20 Palestinian 


It was tbe worst attack since Mr. Net- legislators were stopped at an Israeli 
anyahu came to power in May 19%. The Army roadblock Thursday and preven- 
prune minister immediately suspended ted from traveling from the WesfBank to 
peace talks with the Palestinians, which their homes in Gaza, 
the two sides had only this week agreed Israel also issued an arrest warrant for 
to resume after a four-month hiatus. Brigadier General Ghazi Jabali, chief of 


A leaflet signed by tbe Islamic mil- the Palestinian police. Tbe Israeli gov- 
itant group Hamas took responsibility eminent has accused the general of send- 
for the attack. A second Hamas leaflet, ing three policemen to shoot at Jewish 


cited by the Israeli newspaper Ha’aretz, 
said it was carried out in response to an 


settlers in tbe West Bank this month. 
“Israel’s government has no right 


on Thursday, up 6.37 points. 

Most French executives say radical 
labor-market changes are needed, in- 
cluding cuts in welfare payments and 
more freedom to fire employees, if the 
country is to make significant gains in 
creating jobs. 

The government has played for time, 
apparently hoping that its planned job- 
creation measures, including an expan- 
sion of die public-service bureaucracy, 
will spur demand chat in torn will trans- 


tional comparisons last year showed the ble despite a strong export performance. 

United States with 75 percent employ- For example, a recent accounting TTVyO'p A # 
meat and Britain with 71 percent, com- change in Fiance, adopted by the pre- JVvXlAA_j i V • 
pared with 59 percent for France and 64 vious government, no longer counts n A TT C Ol 
percent for Germany. This gap is wider people as “unemployed” who work. mjTOCUI ± ICLTt 

than the often-cited disparity in unem- more than 20 boors a week, even in low- 


ployment rates based on government paid part-time internships. Often a thinly 
definitions — tbe official U.S. unem- veiled way of circumventing France's 


ployment rate is 5.0 percent, compared 
with France’s 12.6 percent figure. 


high minimum wages, these training 
programs reduced the official unemploy- 


A significant pari of the difference, ment rolls by 10 percent last month. 


Continued from Page 1 

but also clearly express a mutual desire 
for the reduction of tensions on the pen- 


economists say, reflects Europe’s rising 


tana into growth and jobs to keep pace number of early retirees, many of whom 


Israeli woman’s poster depicting the even to think about arresting me,’ ’ Gen- with France’s growing work forceand, by forced to stop working on the the- 

eral Jabali said at a news conference early next year, cut into imemploymenL or y that their departure would make 
11/f A RYFT* Thursday. “If they come here to Gaza or Even that hope may prove overop- room far younger people to be hired. 

1T1x1J.1J.VAj A • anywhere else to catch me, they will timistic. The overall rise in unemploy- As a result, barely one person in three 

A II™, nf never return.” , ment included an even sharper jump m the between 55 and 65 has a job in France or 

Tn. MJttj OT uej lUflCC Israeli officials warned that other at- numbers of young people who have never Germany. In contrast, the employment 

tacks were possible, and additional po- had a job and workers who have been out rates for people in that age category last 
Continued from Page I lice were deployed extensively through of work for more than one year. year were 56 percent in the United States 

Jerusalem. 

The Palestinian negotiator Saeb 


gave way to sadness. Tbe shoe store of 


David Nescu, 43, who was killed in one Erekat said Mr. Arafat and U.S. Sec- 


early next year, cut into imemploymenL °ty that then depart] 

Even that hope may prove overop- room for younger people to be fined. 
timistic. The overall rise in unemploy- As a result, barely one person in three 
ment included an even sharper jump m the between 55 and 65 has 
numbers of young people who have never Germany. In contrast, 
had a job and workers who have been out rates for people in that 
of wont for more than me year. year were 56 percent in 

As bad as these official figures are, the 48 percent in Brit 
French performance would emerge in a statistics from the Qrgs 


rolls by 10 percent last month. insula. 

Under the old system that counted Such a step, U.S. officials said, could 
such people, the jobless total would eventually lead to a pullback of some 
stand at 3 3 million people — a 5 percent military forces and weaponry from tbe 


ory that their departure would make annual rise. Even the new system now demilitarized zone between the coun- 


shows a 9 percent annual rise in long- 
term unemployed, and some French cit- 


between 55 and 65 has a job in France or ies have 25 percent youth joblessness. 
Germany. In contrast, the employment The figures will worsen in the coming 
rates for people in that age category last months, economists predicted, because 
year were 56 percent in the United States people who leave school each spring are 
and 48 percent in Britain, according to only counted as unemployed if they are 


French performance would emerge in a statistics from the Organization for Eco- jobless in September. 


of the blasts, was closed. Black- 
bordered notices of his death were pas- 
ted on the metal doors. On a wooden stall 
next door, passe rsby lighted candles. 

At Mr. Nescu ’s funeral Thursday. 


reuny of State Madeleine Albright had used the accounting methods cu 
spoken Wednesday night and discussed among international organizations, 
ways to increase security and the need to The key diff erence is that France, in were forced to 
continue with the peace process. its system, now counts as unemployed t * le y would ft 

Mrs. Albright planned to meet at the _ 


!y worse light if the government nomic Cooperation and Development, 
the acco unting methods current Interpreting these figures, economists 


said that many people in this category 
were forced to take early retirement when 
they would have preferred to continue 


That bulge will be particularly big this 
year because France has halted the draft, 
which until now has kept nearly 200,000 
young men off the unemployed rolls for 
up to 15 months. 


mourners said Prime Minister Benjamin White House on Thursday with the na- 
Netanyahu, who came to power last year tional security adviser, Samuel Berger, 


promising to end t eno r attacks, had be- the special U.S. envoy, Dennis Ross, and 
trayed them. other members of the Clinton. Middle 

“You lied to us.” a man said to Fi- East team toassess recent developments, 
nance Minister Yaacov Neeman as the said the White House spokesman. Mi- 
two stood over Mr. Nescu’s grave. * ‘We chael McCurry. 


the special U.S. envoy, Dennis Rostand GERMANY: Kohl to Put Tax Defeat to Use in His Campaign 

other members of the Clinton. Middle ** 1 ° 


voted for you because you said you’d be 
strong, but you’re just like tbe Labor 
government — weak, in the hands of 
Arafat." 


Continued from Page I 

defends tbe package as the nation's best 
plan to combat a record 1 1 -percent un- 
employment rate and attack tbe ccon- 


It would also have lowered a tax sur- board, said, “The failure of the tax re- role in the negotiations, also said that 
charge imposed after reunification to form is a declaration of bankruptcy over North Korean officials complained they 
help rebuild east Germany, from 7.5 to Germany’s ability to reform.” did not feel “there is a level playing 

5_5 per cenL The German Industry Federation field” in the talks because their 


tries, and perhaps pave the way for 
peaceful unification. 

Because the armistice stopped the 
fighting but allowed hostilities to persist, 
the inter-Korean border remains one of 
tbe most heavily militarized in the 
world. North Korea has more than a 
million troops within a short distance of 
tbe border, facing an estimated $87,000 
South Korean and U.S. soldiers. 

Sam Nunn, a former Democratic sen- 
ator from Georgia who visited the North 
last week to discuss negotiations with 
Foreign Ministry and military officials, 
said; “I think it’s going to be a long, bard 
process. They feel cornered and des- 
perate, but remain very proud." 

Mr. Nunn, who does not have a formal 
role in the negotiations, also said that 


■ Netanvahn TJrses Pnswuie P™ « coraoat a record 1 1 -percent un- 

■ netanyann urges rreseure employment rate and attack the econ- 

Mr. Netanyahu said Thursday that omy’s structural problems. The plan 
Mr. Arafat had done nothing to stop would have slashed corporate and per- 


5.5 per cent. The German Industry Federation field” in the talks because their 

Leading members of the Social Demo- called the vote a “fiasco,” that ignored archenemy. South Korea, has warm re- 
crats promised to reject the govern- middle-sized companies and the record lations with both China and the United 
meat’s second attempt at passage as well, number of unemployed in Germany. States, 
ittressing the view of political analysts Social Democrats charged that the tax The North Koreans “bristled,” Mr. 

d newspaper commentators that Mr. cuts would benefit mainly high-income Nunn said, when he urged them to un- 
atal’s initiative had no chance. individuals. They also complained of dertake structural change in their farm- 

Just as Tony Blair’s Labour Party in fiscal irresponsibility, contending that ing system. They insisted they would 
itain seized on conservative ideas in the revenue shortfall would widen the never abandon their independent, state- 
platform, Social Democrats promised deficits. managed economy, he added, 

inrsday to put tax reform back on die Mr. Kohl has more immediate reasons As a backdrop to the talks, relief 

enda if they win the chancellorship to keep tax reform hopes alive. Rejection workers who have recently traveled to 
xt year, even though their version of tax reform worsens the tensions that the North have told U.S. officials that 
uld not be enacted until 2000. have been tearing at his frail coalition starvation is spreading and have urged 


Others focused their anger on Public Palestinian militants and that the in- sonal taxes and simplified complex rales buttressing the view of political analysts 


Safety Minister Avigdor Kahalani. terna tional community had failed until 
“You promised us peace!” they called, now to demand he do so. 

“We want action!” “I insist on a real peace, and it begins 

City workers had spent the night with Arafat's battle against terrorism,” 


in a bid to bolster investment and create 
jobs. 

The plan would have lowered the min - 


and newspaper commentators that Mr. 
Kohl’s initiative had no chance. 


field” in die talks because their 
archenemy. South Korea, has warm re- 
lations with both China and the United 
States. 

The North Koreans “bristled,” Mr. 
Nunn said, when he urged them to un- 


cleaning a covered passage in the market he told Reuters in an interview. He said from 26 percent 


that the two bombers, positioned at each 
end, turned into a corridor of death. 

(AP. Reuters. AFP) 


that was what the international commu- 
nity “has now the obligation to demand. 
It hasn’t done so far, up to now.” 


[personal income rax to 15 percent, Britain seized on conservative ideas in 
26 percent. The highest personal its nlatfbnn. Social Democrats promised 


from 26 percent. The highest personal 
tax rate — for incomes of 553,000 or 
higher — would have dropped to 39 
percent from 53 percent 


INFLATION: U.S. Data Show Growth and Prices Cool Enough 


its platform, Social Democrats promised 
Thursday to put tax reform back on the 
agenda if drey win the chancellorship 
□ext year, even though their version 
could not be enacted until 2000. 


Their announcement prompted new government all year. The junior coali- 


Continued from Page 1 

pressures have not yet died. 

“Yes, we are seeing the slower 
growth and lower inflation that financial 


with a singe in homeowners refinancing 
their mort gages to take advantage of fall- 
ing interest rates and with consumer con- 
fidence at stratospheric levels, many fore- 
casters say they believe that retail sales 


the economy in the spring was U.S. trade 
performance. Relatively weak U.S. ex- 
ports and surging imports, exacerbated 
by the recent strength of the dollar, corn- 


government complaints of a “scorched 
earth” strategy. .It accused the oppo- 
sition of deliberately worsening the eco- 
nomic climate in hopes that voters would 
throw out the incumbents next year. 

After 16 hours of negotiations that 
ended at 2 A.M. Thursday, the two sides 


never abandon their independent, state - 
managed economy, he added. 

As a backdrop to the talks, relief 
workers who have recently traveled to 
the North have told U.S. officials that 
starvation is spreading and have urged 
much larger deliveries of food aid than 
the United States and its allies have been 
willing to provide so far. 

Catherine Bertini, a former assistant 
secretary of agriculture in the Bush ad- 
ministration who directs the United Na- 
tions World Food Program, said 


k 

y?_ 


"■ • 

' 

' 

**r . • 

: - 

$k : - 

A 

* ■ 

cs&k • ;r - : 


markets have come to love, but I think it will roar back in the second half of the 
represents only a pause in growth,” said year, pushing the economy forward at an 
Ken Mayland, chief economist at Key- annualized rate of as much as 4 percem. 
Crap in Cleveland. In the second quarter, however, all 


bined to knock nearly a percentage point agreed only on the abolition of a rel- 


In particular, Mr. Mayland and others 
said, what was missing in die second 
quarter was the consumer. After torrid 


year, pushing the economy forward at an 
annualized rate of as mnen as 4 percent. 

In the second quarter, however, all 
was quiet on the consumer fronL Instead, 
the biggest push came from company 
spending on plants and equipment. Cap- 


off die second-quarter growth rate. 

But some suggest that the rosy eco- 


atively minor tax on business assets. 
Hans Peter Stihi, head of the German 


nomic picture may lull investors into Federation of Chambers of Commerce, 
complacency. “Tire biggest problem is called the abolition of tbe tax “only a 


that everyone’s expectations are now so drop in the bucket and sa 
high,” said Hans Nilsson, senior econ- jection of the broad plan was 
omist at A. Gary Shilling & Co. in New the face to the economy.” 


called the abolition of tbe tax “only a darity” surcharge on income tax even if 
drop in the bucket”, and said the re- the broader tax reform package fails. 


cion partners, the Free Democrats, have the United States and its allies have been 
based their political survival on a tax- willing to provide so far. 
cutting stance. Keeping tax reform on Catherine Bertini, a former assistant 
tbe agenda, at least marginally, allows secretary of agriculture in the Bush ad- 
Mr. Kohl to appease the Free Democrats, ministration who directs the United Na- 
who repeatedly have threatened to leave lions World Food Program, said 
the government this year if Mr. Waigel Wednesday in Washington that the 
takes a stand on raxes they oppose. “situation is bad and getting worse” 
The Free Democrats have served no- because food stocks have been cx- 
tice that they will press for a long- hausted and tire next major harvest will 
awaited reduction in the unpopular “sou- not begin until October, 
darity” surcharge on income tax even If “The children are emaciated," Ms. 
the broader tax reform package fails. Bertini said. “Half of them are skin and 
Mr. Waicel is resisting, because with- bones.’ ’ 


mending growth in the first two monlhsof ital-goods spending rose at a robust 20.4 Jersey. “Many people expect that in- 
tne spending by U.S. consumers has percent annual rate. flation is dead and recessions are a thing 

been flat. But with stock prices booming, One major negative factor acting-on of the past” 


a slap in Mr. Waigel is resistin_ 
the face to the economy. oul the define! rax package, he cannot She said the country urgently needed 

Martin Kohl hauss en , president of the compensate for the resulting shortfall of on esti mated . 800,000 tons of rood and 
Association of German Banks and chair- tax revenue, which is earmarked for re- that drought might have killed up to a 
man of Commerzbank AG s executive construction in Eastern Gelffiany. quarter of this year’s crop. 


, because with- 
age, he cannot 




« :;v 


hpantf . 

prt ID 

Ifceltr:-;'; 
loanoni. ■* 

Hie - ' 

Tk ics •" ■< 

.-fafniLE - - * 

60, us r— ' ; 
owns - v - 

A Kifj.’ t 

pas io j.* • 
teferage 1 - 


Bat i \szr. ■ 
brsdar i - 


Token I a*- 


Of 'll: 

f'LT-. - - - 


I fora Stvi 


j 

j fry : ’ 

! wnis Ck ^ 
sow n t • / ' j 
^IKiOirv- ‘ 

felnaiftv.l; 

; Roofer - • 

;*ould *££...■■ 

ur iT’.?* 

xfrkk ■ 

I*® 1 Maw ‘ 

V-- 
■ • 

sa?*-. 

*haatj ?>;- ' 

"" 


Key 


Vo 






0ti * - 

Tokyo Raids 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


FRIDAY. AUGUST 1, 1997 


PAGE 13 


Oen 


eaj 


*»> I 


pomes of 
fKamaichi 
Executives 




■ . j. . . , 


a. - 

^ r- 

* • .'Jft 


■s r: 






f j*fc»r :S". 


.-'iifrs-x-- - • • -4£- - 

•• jflRj 

* 4^--=. 

j. rfiSSfiwsSiv " 

■ , r -orf- ' 

t'-c '- *%i; ' V -'M- ■ '=■. 




* ~ T -- r ‘ 





: W’y% 




fxsifc- -'SU.-. 

•i ; -T v 




in** 






CVaptM M- rw Amw Dii^Vj 

- - TOKYO — In a deepening scandal 
involving suspected payoffs to a cor- 
porate racketeer, Tokyo prosecutors on 
Thursday raided the homes of senior 
executives of Yamaichi Securities Co., 
a major Japanese brokerage. 

The action followed searches the pre- 
vious day at the company's headquar- 
ters in central Tokyo and several other 
offices. 

Yamaichi is suspected of illegally 
funneling about 79 million yen 
($667,000) in 1995 to Ryuichi Koike, 
who has been arrested on racketeering 
charges, to make up for trading losses be 
suffered. 

Mr. Koike also has been accused of 
extorting money from Japan's bi gg est 
brokerage firm, Nomura Securities Co., 
and receiving shady Joans from Dai-Ichi 
Kangyo B ank, 

Mr. Koike is believed to have ob- 
tained 300,000 shares in each of Japan’s 
Big Four brokerages — Yamaichi, 
Nomura, Daiwa Securities Co. and 
Nikko Securities Co. The stakes are 
high enough to allow him to ask at 
shareholders' meetings for changes in 
top personnel. 

Prosecutors think Mr. Koike bought 
the shares in 1989 using questionable 
loans obtained from Dai-Ichi Kangyo. 

Japanese corporate racketeers" buy 
stock in target companies and threaten 
to raise embarrassing questions about 
executive sex scandals or business 
losses if they are not paid off. Doing 
business with them is illegal. 

The Thursday raids covered about 20 
locations, including offices and facil- 
ities related to Yamaichi, Jiji Press 
said. 

. The homes of .Tsugio Yukihira, 65. 
chairman of Yamaichi, and Atsuo Miki, 
60, its president, were among the lo- 
cations raided, Japanese media said 

A Kyodo news, agency report said 
that the two men would soon resign their 
posts to take responsibility for die 
brokerage’s alleged involvement in a 
high-profile payoff scandaL 

But a Yamaichi spokesman said 
Thursday that the executives had not 



Aleunkt \j<nuLin,Kaacr> 

MOSCOW HOT LINES — Vyacheslav Kostikov, spokesman for 
the media and banking executive Vladimir Gusinsky, announcing 
the filing of a slander suit in Moscow on Thursday over allegations 
surrounding the partial privatization of RAO Svyazinvest. Page IS. 


expressed any intention of resigning. 

The daily Nihon Keizai Shimbun 
quoted Mr. Miki as saying that he would 
consider carefully whether he should 
resign as president. 

Kyodo said Mr. Y ukihira intended to 
resign from the chairmanship of the 
Japan Securities Dealers’ Association, 
an industry body for brokerages in Ja- 
pan. 

An official of the Tokyo District Pub- 
lic Prosecutor’s Office refused to com- 
ment on the investigation. 

Meanwhile, the Ministry of Telecom- 
municatioQs said Thursday chat its 
postal insurance system and’ the postal 
savings system have decided to suspend 
new. business with Yamaichi for" the 
time being because of the scandal. 

On Wednesday, the Finance Ministry 
ordered Nomura* ana Dai-Ichi Kangyo 
to suspend key operations until ike end 
of ike year as penalties for tiseir in- 
volvement in alleged payoffs to Mr. 


WAU. STREET WATCH 


Tobacco Executives Look to Payday 


By Myron Levin 

~ ' Los Angelo Times Service 

L OS ANGELES — - Top to- 
bacco-company executives 
personally stand to gain more 
than S200 million in profits 
from stock options if Wail Street re- 
mains enthusiastic about the settlement 
agreement reached between the 
companies and state governments, ac- 
cording to a new report 

The biggest winner would be Geof- 
ttev Bible, chief executive of Philip 
Morris Cos., whose stock options could 
trxxiw in value by S72.9 million, ac- 
cording to a report issued Wednesday by 
the Institute for Policy Studies, based in 
Washington. 

Two other Philip Morris executives 
w ould see the value of their options rise 
by more than $20 million each, and RJR 
Nabisco Chairman Steven Goldstone 
and Vincent Gierer Jr., chairman of 
UST Inc., could profit by S8.4 million 
and $6.7 million, respectively, the re- 
port said. Stock options allow exec- 
utives to buy shares in their companies 
at beiow-maricei prices and protit mom 
the higher current price of the stock. 

The report did not take a stand on the 
S56S.5 billion tobacco accord, w hich ir 
ratified bv Congress will restrict future 
lei’jl claims against the industry m 
exchange for big settlement parents 
and an array of concessions on health- 

reI Rvt Sar 1 *! Anderson, a fellow at the 
results should “raise 


some warning flags.” She said the 
executives headed “an industry that 
has caused a lot of deaths and health 
problems” and that die settlement 
should be “about improving public 
health and not about lining die pockets 
of these executives.” 

However, tobacco officials said rais- 
ing the stock price of their companies is 
what executives are paid to do. 

"Any time a stock moves up, all of 
the company’s shareholders benefit,” 
said Jason ’Wright, a spokesman for 

Company heads could 
sain a lot from the 
proposed settlement with 
state governments. 

RJR Nabisco. “That obviously in- 
cludes management shareholders. 

"To try to single out any class of 
shareholders is just plain silly.” 
Another industry spokesman, who 
asked noi to be identified by name, said 
the analysis had been based on as- 
sumptions that may or may not come 
true. This is “speculation about a fu- 
ture that can’t be known,” he said. 

Wall Street reacted favorably to the 
tobacco truce, bidding up tobacco 
stocks' prices about 15 percent be- 
tween April 1. when peace talks began, 
and June 20. when die deal was an- 
nounced. Although cigarette price in- 
creases required to fund the deal are 


likely to cut sales and profits, the cig- 
arette makers would benefit from 
greater predictability in their future 
costs and reduced legal vulnerability- 

Therefore, the companies and many 
analysts are expecting the companies' 
share prices to climb briskly in the next 
12 months if Congress approves the 
deal Using proxy statements filed with 
the Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion , the report estimates that rising 
share prices will create a jackpot of 
S206 million for 15 top tobacco-in- 
dustry executives. 

Executives from three other cigarette 
companies were not included: Brown 
& Williamson Inc. because its British 
parent, BAT Industries PLC, does not 
file executive-compensation data with 
the SEC; Lorillard Inc., because it does 
not reward its executives with stock 
options; and Liggett Group Inc., which 
reached a separate legal settlement. 

The report, co-written by the Stake- 
holder Alliance, another Washington- 
based group, estimated the gains on 
stock option gains by comparing share 
prices as of April 1 with prices it said 
were likely to be reached if Congress 
approves the tobacco accord. 

Those target prices — S60 a share 
for Philip Morris, S44 for RJR and $40 
for UST — came from estimates by 
Gary Black, an analyst with Sanford C. 
Bernstein &' Co. 

Philip Morris shares fell 8 1 .25 cents 
to close at S45.125, RJR Nabisco fell 
Si. 0625 to S32.9375. and UST was 
unchanged at S29. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates ^ ^ 

Li ::‘-i 

-Ni — 

ftm wwr .‘fr *_ 

.-tt 

tftwfcrt •> — -'.I. l- 


Nta W* ,7 
** 

"Vtt* : 

V 

Wet . ; 

ticu ' 

»»* 

fw.Tc- “7i 

pm j -' . . -v s 

• e US ' ' nrS " " ‘ 

Other Dollar Values 

■ Pr-l ^ fTrt ° 

( imn *7; C;rt * 

**** *** 

.«***»» *.rT. rti-r.5 

to»rw^' \ 

< r .t! 

v*. 

CM •r=r-'’> •• 

■wr-F*"'* viti'" 5 


Ju!y 3r 

SJ. Y«J tS 
IJeS ■'5 h - 4 . 

gr 71-- 

::rs 

;rti Tjsn V£± 31525 
:»u; "tT'iaS ■ 

• SP3 ’JWfi t!» 
’•r" '■.’Ti I273J "oilS 

ii*. ir r* i-oz ye* 
^ — si?: w-b 

C XI WaF* — -tS! 

‘Sts SSF 

. -fter js.iwi- Nfw Yjf* &~ 


Ubid-Libor Rates JulyJ1 

Swiss Fnwcii 

DnBor D-Mmfc Fn« STwCnfl Fume Ten f cu ... 

, j. *%i 3 . a 1 * 1^4 -IV* H«-t 3 l «-3%* 

3«.3*n 

m-n. 3^-^ h-b ^ 

wwtolerri). 




z\r*T*i 

w«v?c« . ” 

N.:ec:crtS f-j 

NCT w.if6« in 
e sn-‘S3 
i.-Z. 5 


pwS Canrorf 
--ii S.Afr.'u™ 
s.K«r.w«i 
Tv- £w 
- TatnasS 
TS3iS=i»t 

-~~t Turfcsfi I,r= 

r,:= L*AE*«ro 
7 r; vaMz-w* 


:: 1*lH'm**r* 


Rates 


««I ^ 


Key Money Rates 

UMWd States “os* Piw 

Dbcwmiwfc 

Print rote |Jr 

Federal turn* 1 S? ^ 

9 Wfi 7 CDs dotes 1*7 5A 

ISMoyCPUKtes W7 SO 

SimmttTwTrtnrlHB 5.0 JJJ 

JEBSJS ^ 13 

7-JBflf TreosWV B 0 J]L tS 

KJSJS ss is 

Wl 5,11 

030 OlSO 

DBCDWlTrew 045 042 

Ceomooer nc , q n 

SS !£ 

Loffitod rt» 3 ^ 1(0 

CsH « nDne » K . rt _ B * 113 H3 

i-eaiOTwM*” M 3.18 

UT|«rMa* 3-p 3 3o 

tfriertan* 577 J ,77 

;c-ifecr Bo * 1 


CL50 050 
045 042 

053 0J3 

040 041 

Qi3 145 
236 144 

4J0 450 

3.03 103 

an an 

118 3.18 

120 330 
577 5-77 


Britain 

Bant Mw rote 
CaBmaMy 

1 -worth MtertHRk 
amontft iafertwm: 
4*monHi BiteidWk 
1 e-yew Gtft 

France 

InUrwol ten rate 
Can money 
l-meofti inlettHmfc 
Smnortlti btferbenk 
c^aoiitti Interiwnb 
lo-ywr OAT 


6* 64 

W i 

6ft 6ft 
Tv* 7W 
7te TV* 
6.91 6.*1 


latarwdllen rate 11 0 3- ,Q 

Can money SVu Vf* 

1 -BNRlBinleiMnk 3 'a w 

3^narttt brferteWk 3%. V** 

6-raontli InteAooh V/» 3?e 

10-yem OAT 5J5 530 

Seurat: UeuiM%_Bk>oaiben. Afwnjt 
Lynch. Bonk at Tot t/o-Miisublshl. 
Camaietsbank, CmU Lyamals. 

Gold PJW. CJITJO 

T-rirti 32630 326JM +0.10 

Sn moo 336JS -130 

JjEVort 32PJ» 324.10 -1-90 

Si dSsiW price* a*** Cma * 

(Aug-i 

Sou 


Daimler’s Profit Grows Slightly 

But Cains , Bolstered by Weak Currency, Are Less Than Expected 


Cimp&rJ by rttf- Stuff Ann Oopaictn 

STUTTGART — Daimler-Benz AG, 
Germany’s largest company, said 
Thursday that first-half net income rose 
27 percent, below expectations, as its 
aerospace unit swung to its first profit in 
six years. 

The company also said that unprof- 
itable currency hedging and high taxes 
had eaten up a strong rise in operating 
profiL 

Net earnings rose to 992 mi 1 1 inn 
Deutsche marks (.$538 million) from 782 
million DM a year earlier. Sales rose 14 
percent, to 55.9 billion DM. Operating 
profit, lifted by favorable currency fluc- 
tuations, more than doubled, to 1.85 
billion DM from 827 million DM. 

Daimler said that Mercedes, its 
largest and most profitable unit, posted a 
1 percent increase in operating profit, to 
1.43 billion DM. High investment costs 
for the launch of new models, including 
its A-Class and M-Class cars, tempered 
gains from booming sales. 

Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG, which 
has not turned a profit since 1991 , posted 
a first-half operating profit of 74 million 
DM, rebounding from a 677 million DM 
loss a year earlier. The unit benefited 
from a reorganization program begun in 


1995 and from the strength of the dollar. 

Daimler gets 60 percent of its sales 
abroad, helping it to benefit from the 
weakness of the German currency. The 
mark has fallen more than 16 percent 
against the dollar since the beginning of 
the year. 

Daimler is among the German ex- 
porters whose sales are benefiting from a 
weaker mark, which raises the value of 
foreign revenue and makes German 
products cheaper overseas. The gains 
were partly offset by currency hedging, 
which cost the company 111 million 
DM, compared with a 205 million DM 
gain last year, after the mark fell more 
than Daimler expected. 

‘ The numbers are a bit disappointing 
as far as net profit goes, but operating 
profit is roughly in line with expec- 
tations.” said IGaus-Juergen Melzner, 
an automobile analyst at Deutsche Mor- 
gan Grenfell, the research aim of 
Deutsche Bank AG. 

Daimler-Benz shares fell 4.50 DM, or 
Z9 percent, to close at 154.80. 

“'we had low expectations for 
Daimler's figures, but we remain pos- 
itive for the stock,” said Jacques Ab- 
ramovicz, who helps manage 1 billion 
DM of stocks at WestKA Westdeutsche 


Ka pital aniagegesell sc haft mbH in 

Duesseldorf. 

First-half earnings also were 
bolstered by the sale of Daimler's AEG 
postal-automation unit. 

Daimler paid 263 million DM in taxes 
in the latest period, in contrast to a 164 
million DM tax credit last year, based on 
its loss in 1995 of 7.2 billion DM. 

Daimler said earnings would be 
helped in the second half by a one-time 
gain from the sale of its share in the- 
French software company Cap Gemini 
SA. Analysts have estimated the gain 
will be about 700 million DM. Daimler 
declined to confirm the figure. 

(Bloomberg, AP. Reuters J 

■ Peugeot’s Sales Bolster Shares 

PSA Peugeot Citroen SA's shares 
rose 4 percent after the French carmaker 
said sales growth accelerated in the 
second quarter, Bloomberg News re- 
ported from Paris. Offsetting a drop in 
domestic sales, growth was strong in 
Asia and Eastern Europe. 

The French carmaker said sales rose 
11.6 percent in the second quarter, to 
51.13 billion francs ($8.23 billion), after 
a 0.6 percent rise in the first quarter. Its 
stock rose 28 francs to close at 716. 


Koreans Bristle at U.S. Carmakers 


Koike. 

The daily Asahi Shimbun, mean- 
while. reported the major broker had 
guaranteed Mr. Koike yields of more 
than 1 0 percent on some 300 million yen 
he deposited in an account opened under 
the name of his brother's real-estate 
company in June 1994. 

Yamaichi promised to rack up gains 
in the six months to the end of 1994, 
while making a discretionary trading 
contract on behalf of Mr. Koike, the 
major daily quoted informed sources as 
saying. 

The company refused to comment on 
the report, saving prosecutors* inves- 
tigation was under way. 

Mr. Miki said the linking of Yamaichi 
to the scandal would adversely affect 
business in its corporate division but 
that the brokerage would still be able to 
post an interim and full-year profit in the 
current business year ending on March 
3i. I99S. ’AP. AFP. Reuters t 


Bloomberg IVot' s 

SEOUL — Carmakers here objected 
Thursday to a call from their American 
competitors for U.S. sanctions against 
South Korea's auto market: 

The Big Three U.S. automakers are 
asking Washington to punish South 
Korea for its auto-import barriers. The 
American carmakers also seek an in- 
vestigation of Japanese trade practices. 

The requests from the American 
companies came at a sensitive time in 
South Korea, where Kia Motors Corp., 
the country's third-biggest automaker, 
is on the verge of bankruptcy. 

*'!t is outrageous that the U.S. talks 
about sanctions when the Korean auto 
industry struggles to survive,” said Huh 
Wan, general manager of South Korea’s 
ear-industry association, which repre- 
sents Hyundai Motor Co.. Daewoo Mo- 
tors Co’.. Kia Motors and Ssangyong 
Motors Co. *’We have no discrimina- 
tion against imported cars." 

The American Automobile Manufac- 
turers Association, which represents 
Chrysler Corp., Ford Motor Co., and 
General Motors Corp.. asked the U.S. 


trade representative. Charlene Barshef- 
sky, to investigate South Korean prac- 
tices that could warrant the country be- 
ing designated as in violation of U.S. 
legislation known as Super 301. 

The legislation allows for sanctions 
against governments found to have re- 
strictive barriers to U.S. exports. 

In a letter dated July 10, die U.S. 
association said that “a series of import 
and investment barriers'* was curbing 
sales of imported cars in South Korea. 

It said exports of cars and trucks to 
South Korea rose only to 10.315 last 
year from 6.921 in 1995, leaving the 
total at less than 1 percent of the~1.64 
million vehicles sold in South Korea. 

Mr. Huh said South Korea’s 8 percent 
tariffs on imported cars were lower than 
those in many other countries. The 
United States imposes tariffs of 2.5 per- 
cent on passenger cars and 25 jpercent on 
imported commercial vehicles; the 
European Union places a 10 percent 
larift on all cars. 

Mr. Huh also said the imported- car 
sales figures ciied by the U.S. association 
were misleading. 


He said foreign cars accounted for 23 
percent of South Korea's market for 
cars with engine sizes larger than 2,500 
cubic centimeters. 

■ Auto Firms to Help Kia 

Sooth Korea's two largest carmakers 
agreed to inject cash into a Kia Group 
division, a deal that the troubled con- 
glomerate termed a breakthrough, Reu- 
ters reported. 

A Kia statement said Hyundai Motor 
Co., the country's largest carmaker, and 
Daewoo Motor Co. had agreed in prin- 
ciple to buy stakes in Kia Steel Co., 
which makes specialty steel used in 
manufacturing cars. 

In a hastily arranged meeting Thurs- 
day, Hyundai Motor's honorary chair- 
man, Chung Se Yung, as u ell as Dae- 
woo Corp.’s chairman. Kim Woo 
Choong, and the Kia Group chairman, 
Kim Sun Hong, agreed tha: their compa- 
nies would form a consortium :v save 
Kia Steel. The agreement came or. the 
cicofatruj.'ji rr.j^:r.a n.* K:„ trel’Jr.C' 
to discuss the fate ot she emratlied -on- 
glomerate. 


Edelman Raises Bid for Hotel Group 


Bhhmihrrg Sews 

PARIS — Asher Edelman 
offered Thursday to buy the 
French hotel company Soci- 
ete du Louvre, which owns 
some of the most prestigious 
hotels in France, for 3.9 bil- 
lion francs l$630 million). 

The deal would be the first 
for Mr. Edelman, who was a 
known player in the mergers 
and acquisitions world in the 
1970s and 1980s, since he 
came out of retirement in 
1995. 

A takeover of Societe du 
Louvre would give Mr. Edel- 
man control of the famous Le 
Crillon hotel, which over- 
looks Paris’s Place de la Con- 
corde, the Concorde Lafay- 
ette hotel in Paris and the 
1' Ambassador and Le Mar- 
tinez hotels in Cannes. 

Societe du Louvre also 
owns the crystal maker Bac- 
carat and Annick Goutal. a 
perfume maker. 

Mr. Edelman 's bid of 310 
francs for all 12.58 million 


Top EU Aide 
Slams Clinton 
Over Boeing 

Reuters 

PARIS — A European 
commissioner accused Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton era Thurs- 
day of harassing European 
Union leaders to win the EU 's 
approval for Boeing Co.’s 
purchase of McDonnell 
Douglas Corp. 

“This American pressure 
is quite inadmissible,” the 
EU research commissioner, 
Edith Cresson, said in an in- 
terview with France Inter ra- 
dio a day after the commis- 
sion, the EU executive board, 
formally approved the $15 
billion merger. 

Approval of the deal aver- 
ted a trans- Atlantic trade war. 

"Mr. Climon telephoned 
several beads of state and 
government leaders,” Mrs. 
Cresson said. 

She said the calls were 
“quite abnormal, absolutely 
abnormal.” 

She added that Mr. Clinton 
had called the prime minister 
of Luxembourg, Jean-Claude 
Juncker, “at two o’clock in 
the morning.” 


shares represents a 33 perceni 
premium to Wednesday's 
closing share price of 233 
francs. On Thursday, Societe 
du Louvre shares closed at 
265. up 32. 

Mr. Edelman already has a 
small stake, less than 5 per- 
cent, in Societe du Louvre. 
The businessman said he be- 
lieved the company's value 
was “greater than its current 
share price and that it can be 
run on a more profitable 
basis." 

Luxury goods companies 
with significant brand names 
have become popular acqui- 
sition targets, especially since 
the dollar has gained 19 per- 1 
cent this year against the 
franc, encouraging U.S. cit- \ 
izens to spend more money in 
France, Europe's biggest i 
tourist market. i 

"Luxury hotels in Paris are 
full at the moment,' ' said Thi- 
erry Girardet, fund manager 
at Fival. "Business is doing 
very well.” 


Anne-Claire Taittinger- 
Bonnemaison, president of 
Societe du Louvre’s manage- 
ment board, said the company 
did not have enough details to 
comment on the Edelman 
bid. 

In May, Mr. Edelman 
made a 275 franc-a-share bid 
for the entire company. Tait- 


tinger SA. Societe du 
Louvre’s main shareholder 
with about 53 perceni of its 
voting rights, rejected the of- 
fer, saying it was a strategic 
pan of its holdings. 

The bid made Thursday 
represents a 13 percent in- 
crease over Mr. Edelman's 
previous offer. 


Peter Catranis L 

Professional Trailer ■ 

r<ym S Figures SowcatoH 

tegrrfs ISDOISSU 

ratal 08001 HOOK 

tow asninw 

YZfttal U8CCU418SO 

Spm omm 

08008TC3 
tktt dfopton OStCmnH 


SUPERIOR 

OUTSTANDING 

EXCE PTIONAL 

FREE 

COMMISSION 

COMMISSION 


Selection ot Uaiugea Accounts 
Analysis lot All kls/or MaOtm 
Execution Foot or Futures 
Trading Software 4 Pnw Data 
Spot FX 2-S Pip Pnce Spreads 
Fuluras SI2-SX Per R nuv-Tum 


R rfca« WCL55WI 

finer OKWCtt 

hml iTTHWIIlC 

La/Biuur’ OHWffi 

M 0501 13KC 

M flarws 

ratal nui KDi icitti? 
(tttdssas imww 


UBBISSt lined ttrai!<ei55l5 Dnxai SDnfMS 

(HOME-* GwifOWIMraiW? Owns ni*KS«i 
ITWOUllG lull I «g¥a Jqw ' DNI3M) 

08IK5S item 95W087<i;ra VA-i*± W03tfT 

D5QII2U2 Snwwr KRlSEdl iVmu 6KDM>W 


FIDELITY WORLD FUND 

Societe d’lnvesiissement a Capital Variable 
KansalUs House. Place de f'Etoife. 

B.P. 2174. L- 1021 Luxembourg 

RC B 9497 


NOTICE OF ADJOURNED EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING 

As the Extraordinary General Meeting of July 14. 1997. did not reach the quorum of 50* 
required by law, notice is hereby siven that an Extraordinary General Meeting or Share- 
holders of Fidelity World Fund Sicav ("the Company") will be held at the registered office 
of the Company in Luxembourg on August IS. 1997 at 1 1.00 a.m.. or oo any adjourned date, 
to consider the following agenda : 

1 . To resol ve to liquidate Fidelity World Fund. 

2. To appoint Fidelity Investments Luxembourg S.A, as the Liquidator and to determine 

the powers to be granted to the liquidator and the liquidation procedure. 

3. To fix the date of the second Shareholders’ Meeting to hear the Report of the Liquidator 
and to appoint Coopers & Lybrand as the Auditors of the Company. 

4. To fix the date of the third Meeting of Shareholders to hear the Report of the Auditor 
and to decide the close of the Liquidation of the Company. 

No quorum of shares present or represented at the Meeting is required in order to deliberate 
validly on the agenda. A decision in favour of the Resolution no. I of the agenda must be 
approved by Shareholders holding at least 2/3 of the shares represented at the Meeting. 

Subject to the limitations imposed by the Articles of Incorporation ot the Company with 
regard to ownership of shares which constitute in the aggregate more than three percent 
(.Wkof the outstanding shares, each share is entitled to one vote. A shareholder may act 
at any Meeting by proxy. 

Dated: February 19, 1997 
By Order of the Board of Director* 


Fidelity 


Investments 






I ‘i 


PAGE 14 


THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 


I The Dow 

■ 30-Year T-Bond Ytefcf \ 

8000 +S 


^yiVk. 


6400 

6.40 ^ 




m 

« F M 
1997 

Exchange 

NYSE 

A M J J . 

Index 

The Dow ■ • • 

130 

110 F M A M J J 
1997 

Thursday . Prev. % ■' ' 

• 64PU. Ctose ■ Ctwjgs 

SS227^ 8^t«9 t0.33 

NYSE 

'"Ste*Soo •• ' 

' 'SOCtl . .^2-31 • +0.40 

NYSE • • 

SSPtt» . 

&3Z-7& 828.30 .+0.48 

NYSE 

Ctomposhe-' 

4SS2S 48357 +OJ34 

XIS. 

:Na»feqCtorapdsile WSSLSO .tosaoB 

AffiEX " 

Martta Value 

&te.1S .645.22 +0,13 

Toronto ‘■’■l 

TSE index ' 

' 6881-30 G&&.W -*0,4& 

S&oPtwfo,. 

BswsspA'. . • 

- law a^t 

tteKfcoiChy 

Bi&a ' . 

■ 506*04 ■ .4857:77. +2JJ2 

| Buenos AlresMotval - 

;3sSt«5 WiOO. .; *0&7 

Start! ago " 

IPSAGarwrof"' 

sm& emsa \ *a6 

CiiaotB . 

Capitetf General 

-.*&i >9408.27. < 

Source. Bkxynoerg. Reuters 

[nicmtuiml Kmkl Tnhune 

Very briefly: 


Brazil Picks Spain’s Iberdrola 


BfiHimherg Mews 

RIO DE JANEIRO — A group 
led by the Spanish utility company 
Iberdrola SA won the bidding 
Thursday for a controlling stake in 
Cia. de Eletricidade do Estado de 
Bahia, paying a generous 1 .73 bil- 
lion reals (SI . 6 billion) for a slice 
of Brazil’s rapidly growing energy 
market. 

The Iberdrola group, which in- 
cludes Brazil’s Previ pension fund, 
paid 77 percent more than the min- 
imum price set for the stake by the 
northeastern state of Bahia and al- 
most triple what other companies 
have paid for stale electricity as- 
sets in Latin America. 

“Unbelievable,” Walter Sioep- 
pelwerth, an analyst at Robert 
Renting Securities in Sao Paulo, 
said just after the auction. “This 
group is paying a very expensive 
price. They must be incredibly op- 


timistic about growth prospects.” 

This is Iberdrola's second foray 
into Brazilian state asset sales this 
month. The Spanish utility also has 
entered power markets in Chile. 
Bolivia and Argentina Energy con- 
sumption in Brazil is growing twice 
as rapidly as in the United States, 
according to Edison Electric Insti- 
tute, a U.S. utilities trade group. The 
soaring demand has drawn atten- 
tion to Brazil's plan to sell $30 
billion of utilities assets over the 
next two years. 

Iberdrola will pay $310 firm 
value per megawatt hour, which is 
an analysis of the price paid in 
relation to market value plus debt, 
according to Mr. Stoeppelwerth. 

That is three times as much as 
investors paid in earlier sales of 
Latin American utilities. Brazil’s 
Espirito Santos Centrais Eletricas 
SA was sold for $ 1 1 1 firm value 


per megawatt hour, while Empress 
Distribuidora Sur SA. in Argentina, 
was sold at a rate of $ 1 24 under the 
same calculation method. 

Coelba. as the Bahia power util- 
ity is known, already controls most 
of the electricity market in the vast 
northeastern state of Brazil. 

About the size of France, Bahia 
has a population of 13.7 million 
and counts itself as the fifth- 
biggest economy of all the states in 
Brazil. 

The purchase of the 65.64 per- 
cent stake in Coelba provides Iber- 
drola with 23 million customers in 
413 cities and towns in Bahia, cor- 
responding to 56. percent of the 
electricity consumed in the state. 

“Coelba deserved the price we 
paid.” Eduardo Lopes Aranguren, 
director of Iberdrola, said after the 
auction at the Rio de Janeiro stock 
exchange. 


Stock Prices Retreat 
On Slower Profit Gams 


Household Products Lift P&G Net 


Western Bancorp, to Buy Bank 

NEWPORT BEACH, California (Bloomberg) — Western 
Bancorp, agreed Thursday to buy Santa Monica Bank for $ 1 98 
million in stock and cash, increasing its business in the 
wealthy areas of Los Angeles. 

With the combination. Western Bancorp, benefits from 
Santa Monica Bank's eight “large, well-located branches” 
and its “very successful trust business,” said Hugh Smith, 
chairman and chief executive of Western Bancorp. 

Dissidents to Control Sallie Mae 

WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — Shareholders voted 
Thursday to hand the reins of the Student Loan Marketing 
Association to a group of dissident board members as the 
company, the buyer of one of every three U.S. student loans, 
cast off its 25-year-old government charter. 

Shareholders backed the Committee to Restore Value at 
Sallie Mae, which now takes control of the private corporation. 
The company buys student loans to hold in its own portfolio or 
to package into asset-backed bonds for sale to investors. 

• Tenet Healthcare Corp., the second-largest U.S. hospital 
company, posted a loss of $339-5 million for its fourth quarter, 
which ended May 3 1 , wiping out a net profit of $7.6 million a 
year earlier. The loss reflected charges related to the com- 
pany's purchase of OrNda HealthCorp. 

• Nomura Securities Co.’s U.S. subsidiary plans to spin off 
its real-estate lending unit, one of its most profitable busi- 
nesses, into a private company led by the group's executives. 

• Southam Inc-, a publishing concern, reported a second- 
quarter profit of 34.9 million Canadian dollars l$25 .3 million), 
more than double the year-earlier earnings. 

• Pixar Inc/s chief executive, Steve Jobs, has turned down an 

offer to become the next chairman of Apple Computer Inc. to 
continue working for the animation company, published re- 
ports said. Bloomberg. AP 


In ijur Suff Fnm OapiBfba 

CINCINNATI — Procter 


& 


Gamble Co. said Thursday its profit 
rose 10.3 percent, to $6 11 million, 
in the quarter ended June 30, helped 
by strong sales of its Pampers di- 
apers, Tide laundry detergent and 
other household products. 

Sales rose to $8.95 billion from 
$8_58 billion, alleviating investor and 
analyst concerns that the company's 
sales growth was not keeping pace 
with a five-year cost-cutting drive 
that saved P&G about $1.6 billion. 

4 ‘That’s the single greatest area of 
concern for P&G this year." said 


Michael Grant, an analyst at J.P. 
Morgan Securities.. "Today’s re- 
sults show the acceleration analysts 
had been hoping to see.” 

P&G also said it planned to con- 
tinue its stock buyback program by 
acquiring another $1 billion in 
shares during its upcoming financial 
year. The company's stock was 
quoted at $1 52.75 in late trading, 
down 37.50 cents. 

P&G achieved its biggest sales 
gains for the year at its Europe. 
Middle East and Africa division, 
which generated about half of total 
unit sales growth. Revenue in that 


region rose 1 percent, to $1 1.58 bil- 
lion, on 7 percent volume growth, 
the company said. 

In North America. P&G revenue 
rose 2 percent, to $17.7 billioa, and 
unit sales increased 4 percent, led by 
sales of laundry detergents and fab- 
ric conditioners. 

In Asia unit sales fell 7 percent, in 
pan because the company is im- 
plementing a new distribution meth- 
od to retailers. 

Unit sales in Latin America fell 2 
percent because of slow economies 
in the region and lower-than -expec- 
ted demand. [Bloomberg. Reuters l 


M ito Sun Fr. « fkgvn ton 

NEW YORK — Stocks were 
lower Thursday amid concern that 
share prices cannot keep rising to 
records as profit growth slows with 
the economy. 

But bond prices rose after a re- 
port showed economic growth and 
inflation slowed in the second 
quarter. 

"It’s more of the same story — 
growth is fine and inflation is ex- 
cellent," leaving room for more 
gains in bonds, said Barry Evans of 
John Hancock Funds in Boston. Mr. 
Evans said he was positioned his 
holdings fo benefit from falling 
yields. 

Mr. Evans said he did not expect 
reports Friday on jobs and man- 
ufacturing to disrupt the rally, 
which drove yields to their lowest 
levels in almost a year and a half. 

The benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond was up 9/32 at 104 10/32. 
taking the yield down to 630 percent 
from 633 percent on Wednesday. 

“There’s a tag of war going on 
here between lower bond yields, 
which imply lower inflation and a 
slowdown in the economy, and re- 
cord stock prices, which imply re- 
cord profits," said Lawrence Rice, 
a stock market analyst at Josephthal 
Lyon & Ross. “You can't have it 
both ways." 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age fell 32.28 points to 8322.61. 
after setting a record of 8,254.89 on 
Wednesday. The Standard & Poor’s 
500 Index rose 2.02 to 954-31. 

“We think profits are going to 
continue to grow, and we think in- 
flation is going to stay under con- 
trol.” said Richard Jandrain, head 
of equity investments for Banc One 


U.S. Growth Data Help the Dollar to Advance 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against most other major currencies 
Thursday as reports showing U.S. 
economic vigor outweighed concern 
the Bundesbank might move to bol- 
ster the weakened German currency. 

A Commerce Department report 
showed the U.S. economy expanded 
while inflation remained subdued in 
the second quarter, heightening ex- 
pectations that U.S. assets would 
continue to lure global investors to 
the dollar. 

“The economic data underpinned 
the dollar," said John Hanly. man- 
ager of foreign exchange at Bank 


Austria. "The U.S. economy con- 
tinues to grow at a reasonably 
strong, nonmflat ionary rate." 

The dollar rose to 1 .8383 DM in 
late trading from 1 .8365 DM a day 
earlier and to 118.675 yen from 
1 18.385 yen. 

The U.S. currency fell to 1.51 15 
Swiss francs from 1.5 130 francs, but 
it rose to 6. 1984 French francs from 
6.1935 francs. 

The pound was at 51-6404, up 
from $1.6290. 

In earlier trading, the dollar 
weakened against the mark after the 
Bundesbank’s vice president. Jo- 
hann Wilhelm Gaddum. said the 


central bank would retain a tight 
grip on interest-rate policy for the 
foreseeable future. 

"The Bundesbank remains able 
to set monetary policy until the euro 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

is launched,” Mr. Gaddum said in 
an interview broadcast on German 
television. He referred to Europe's 
planned single currency, which is 
scheduled to replace the mark as the 
Continent’s benchmark currency in 
January 1999. 

Speculation that Germany might 
raise its lending rates surfaced last 


week after the Bundesbank at the 
start of its summer recess unexpec- 
tedly left its benchmark money-mar- 
ket rate fixed for two weeks, rather 
than for the typical four weeks. 

Since then, other central bank of- 
ficials have hinted they might lift 
rates, or sell dollars, to defend the 
mark, which was down about 15 
percent against the dollar this year. 

Many traders, however, do not 
expect the Bundesbank to raise rates, 
because that could slow an already 
sluggish economic recovery, and a 
strong dollar helps Germany’s ex- 
port sector by mak i ng German 
products more competitive abroad. 


L 

Investment Advisors Corp. 
‘■Stocks are going to continue to ’do 
well." 

Still, some investors saw no rea- 
son to commit new money rigfct 
away, especially before they gotlb 
key reading of the economy frorp 
the July unemployment report. 3 
"We’ve had a big run. and every^ 
body’s looking for an excuse to sell'' 
so I don’t think anybody’s going to: 

•US. STOCKS 

stick their neck out with a big num- 
ber coming out," Mr. Jandrain said. 

Stocks initially rose after the gov- 
ernment reported inflation at its low- 
est since 1964. suggesting that in- 
terest rates were not headed higher. 

The signs of a slowing economy 
hit the stock of Caterpillar, which 
does best in an expansion. 

Provident surged 5% to 63% after 
the company reported strong second- 
quarter earnings. The company also 
declared a 2 -for - 1 stock split and 
raised its quarterly dividend. 

Coke fell after' an analyst at Sch- 
roder & Co. cut her rating to “per- 
form in line" from “outperform 
significantly.” 

Personal-computer stocks topped 
the active list after a Morgan Stan- 
ley, Dean Witter, Discover & Co. 
analyst, Mary Meeker, raised her 
earnings estimates on Dell Com- 
puter. Compaq Computer, the most 
active stock, rose I 15/16 to 56 15/ 

1 6. and Dell gained 3 W to 85& 

Not all companies are beating 
Wall Street forecasts. SBC Com- 
munications fell % to 59 3/16 after 
reporting lower-than-expected 
second-quarter profit. 

Wendy’s International fell after 
the fast-food retailer’s earnings 
rose 16 percent in the second 
quarter, meeting expectations. 

(AP. Bloomberg l 

■ Mexican Stocks Surge 

Mexico’s Bolsa Stock Index 
topped 5,000 points for the first 
time as consumer spending finally 
caught up with a yearlong economic 
recovery, bolstering optimism for 
reconi company earnings in coming 
months. Bloomberg News reported 
from Mexico City. 

“ft looks like the consumer is 
back,” said Paul White, fund man- 
ager at Atlantic Richfield Co. “I 
don ’t see a lot of holes in the macro- 
economic picture.” 

The Bolsa rose 94.25 points, or 
1.9 percent, to close at 5.068.48. 
Earlier it climbed as high as 
5. 127.70- The index has surged 7.5 
percent in the past three days. 



Udir: - 
" 

■Hu- ■ 
*£• - • 
■rX ■■ 

V.: 

iW~’ : 



Thunas. .. 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursday’s 4 P.ll, Close 

TlK top 300 most active stares, 
up to ttie dosing on Wail Street. 

The Associated Pross. 


an 

* 

aw 

Hnrqi i 


AUofti 
Afthagn 
AWN 
Amro: a 

An* aw 

is 

in 


AWteWB 


MUrqj* 

Asmc 

Aim* 

AvdRB 

3S&. 

&?"“ 


Sdis Hgt Lnu uteff aw 


21* 3ft 
Si* ft 


iMt l*Vk 
jw n 
iw «»l 
21 H W*. 

II*. lift. 

». 4H 
19H TBvh 
1M MW 
MU MW 

!> hi. 

Sft. 5*. 

SW SW 
l*W l*W 
t» 12 % 
I2*« IIW 
I 0 W W*> 


A JW 
IP* ITU 

i» raw 

jw 3 

n>. n- 

46H Mil 


MDJan 

CEFAo 

cfxcp * 

cam™ 

CaNnpi 


CifcOcdg 

CBTOlijD 

CftlAM 

CfOcJ 

CFCdna 

CtaflBr 

ObiUFSi 

CBW 

CBWd 


Conitwu 

C&OAS 

CinaiAp 

CimoTCTi 

OvMfl 

Cnwrc 

ConMon 

CourtU 

'lire. 

CirCP 

CraCPB 

ft Cm rt. 

CMiin 

asx 

C Frau a 

Oiftw 


% 


Donum 

Detainer 

Ones 

Dsv 


B|>P»rii 

Dtata 

Ontlaai 

DmUu 

ocfrrs im 

EctBfia. 

Edhlo 

EftHf 

SWrtlBI 

Eba* 

Emerffw 

EwT 

EnvCar 

Enxe. 

EMw. 

€ unroll 

Fomin i 

(own 

FI Ami 

FAmSr 

FlCnm 

FfOftCt 

F*W.f 
Fan Ha’S 
Fnwsn 
fpkEi 

Fit-On 

FrtVTB 

FiOfOAdi 

■IS r Ten 
God 

UOKOi 1 

CfKWo 

GKHIF4 

flOT 

GMifW 

Gawo 

uWSBrP 

Orejlmdl 

5iS«iw 

hofEP 

wowet 

Ho*'" n 

nawjft 

HanrOv 
Han niB 

Haimo. 

Hnu 

h«n 
Hmrtctrn 
Hornet'll n 

frovn 

H00JJHI 

HGfwin 

riwnEn 

loam. 

imsC'Ji* 

impoug 


lM Ui'-» W>, 


SIS l»v. iy 


vim wf d. Lowi om Indexes 


MS 

IM7 

IS 

'SS 

Ilf 

£ 

12 

IMS 

10 M 

710 


m 

su 

« 

715 

Iff 

MS 

M 

IM 

220 

**» 

IM 

UU 

103 

I2f 

323 

*417 

151 

329 

S24 

*57 

101 

TO 

533 

IS 

611 

1*1 

M23 

Ul 


4W 4W 
5W SW 
«V. 7% 

l» lift 
TV, 7W 
4W f* 

% 

u w 
in isw 

41W oaw 
21* SW 
3W IV* 
lfft. 19v» 
IW 1 « 


5W 

IW 

17* 


s? 

17 


law It* 

3F. V* 
l»* Sf* 
411, 4* 

MW 5SW 
4W 


I1W 

21 

IW 

•h 


12 * 

MW 

IV* 

W 


IIW 11 W 
M 3v, 


I? 

78* 

law 

SW 

i* 

I2h 

4t, 

I7W 

u- 

fW 


T 1 W 

l»W 

i« 

SW 

ft 

fv* 

12 * 

4ft 

law 

»<ft 

IW 






Ma 

2J1 

121a 

H 2 

727 

SB 

34* 

l» 

10549 

U> 

loo 

3785 

735 

3*7 

12 ft 

531 

n* 


107 

436 

ir 

IMA 

m 

251 

IM 

1 S 1 

210 

ISS 

475 


1*SW 

1274 

TOW 


saw sow 
a** n* 

SW tt 


4 Pft 
IT 0 *, 77W 

24w a* 


4W 

SW 

% 

s 

* 

IS*. 

AIW 

n* 

3ft 

If*. 

1 * 

5ft 

f! 

17* 

16* 

Jft 

5ft 

4*4 

MW 

4* 

I2W 

35ft 

7 

h 

fW 

AW 

M* 

IIW 

JW 

liv* 

IIW 

IIW 

SW 


1*» 

low 

w 

4 


-w 

**» 

*1W 

* 

•ft 


-V* 

ft 

■5s 


-w 

Jm 

♦ft 

♦ 2 * 

♦W 

ft 


♦W 

4* 

-ft 


♦ ft 
-ft 
-ft 


UM 


Dow Jones 

om «•*» 

Min 0771.15 £02.77 0207.20 OZ1AI -22J0 
TraM 2971*2 Jm33 29*1.27 2*7135 ♦ IB-82 
Ifni ZUM TSLtl 234.15 Z3'J6 *1.19 
Camp 2540.7? 2547.91 252*49 2SJ102 WLAA 

Standard & Poors 

Piwmb Todor 

Wjh Lmr One 4 P JW. 
1719.87 1107^5 1)1100 >118^5 
68635 67 6M <MA7 687.01 
207.18 200.02 201.18 202.11 
111. IB 108.90 11095 III 88 
953.90 941.98 952J9 954.31 
930/46 917J0 92X25 929.99 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


Industrials 

Transp. 

Utilities 

Finance 

SP 500 

SP100 


NYSE 

CaraxBito 

liMuJJnah 

Transp- 

unny 

Fkionce 


Nasdaq 

Ctnmosto 

In0u5trtato 

Sarto) 

iTtynoTC*? 

Rnanee 

Transp. 

AMEX 


MW* Low SP.WL 
495.91 492.17 4B54 
6JfBa 42129 42*23 
450.71 4465* 4^57 

29104 291.10 2V2.B3 
4AM3 461315 46J29 


HWI Low JPJl 

I595A0 1585.09 1 59109 
126204 125509 12*0.75 
172550 170091 1724.90 
V71737 1710 li 121275 
206549 205750 2061*. 
1027 88 101*12 102445 


MW* Law IP* 

606.9? 6U36 «46 4“ 


Oft 

♦ 1.97 

♦ 1.70 
♦2J9 

♦ 061 
♦401 


*7.04 

♦ ZA4 

♦ T7J6 

-191 

♦ 545 

♦ 191 


CM MCA ■. 
Compaq 1 
MKmT 
Unbrs 

). morl 

PftlAVjTS 
Teifte 
Conseco i 
AT4TS 

OW 60 W 

pm Bee j 

Wcndv? 

iwsdAds 

PeouCa 

FamMae 


Nasdaq 


OeHCiiis 

Fann 

Asoan) 

TeieCamA 

3Com 

AiEntorn 

OuanniiBs 

Aln&en 

EMMtWI 

MO 

Cnilrrcti 

WIUTClII 


AMEX 




VM. 

125017 37ft 
*8*12 57ft 
63447 ‘ 

52015 
442*7 
420*1 
41 \« W'. 
4*59 47*'* 
40036 37ft 
40129 6JW 
37507 71ft 
34970 SW 
34577 53ft 
34471 30W 
17355 47* 


v*L H«* 

15371* 35ft 
1 4M30 92 
»4267 *59, 
83733 I *ft 
A4S63 55 
61325 17* 
59371 SAW 
57135 21* 
5051* 8 'ft 
50254 79ft 
495SJ IS* 
40913 ft 
45950 35“ » 
45*33 5ft. 
*WT» M 0 l » 


mw* in >4i 


45* 40ft 
9* Vft 
lift lift 
449, 45 

S4W 5Sft 
40 40* 
36H* 3*'*4 
M-» Alto, 
70ft 70ft 
74 24ft 


Low MS 
S3W J4ft 
09‘, 91* 
83* as 

14ft lAft 

52ft 54* 
lA-J IT)', 
54ft SA* 
20 W 71 

7*b Oft 
20ft 29 
I2 1 * 14 sw 
ft * 
34", 35 >, 
4 46, 

!»’• lilft 


Oft- 

• 1 * 

‘ttS 

’♦ft 

-i»» 

•1* 

♦rl: 

•7* 
♦ 2 W 
.* 
♦ 1 


:K 

♦■-» 

-1 


►IV, 

♦ft 


v*L hw> tin. Loti □, 


Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bands 

launi/ties 

lOlnduVriats 


Ook 

104.70 

102JS 

107.03 


• 1.17 

Amow 

391T7 


U*» i|to. 

•'■re 

SPCiR 

19509 

»*lx 

95>e 95 



VST 

19443 

11630 

I 2 ^» 

7 

11V lj'i, 
*>• t-< 

♦ re 


Ptc:r* 

105*9 

144. 

I3'» 13 . 

• i 

ON- 

Hasbro s 

7922 

30'. 

30’ 1 3ff-> 

•Vj 

* 0.02 

Fcnaflay 

6*9* 

5‘v 

*i, i 


Madia, 

*9*3 



_ 

♦oas 

Nabors 

4*D 

W- 

309, j,:. 

• • 

- 0 J 0 

APC 

5421 

s- .» 

5— 5't 

* *t 


13* 

4>, 

IF. 

>. 


lJto, 
7ft 
■ 1 
4W 
24W 
3^» 
I'. 


r-i 

J4‘l 


Trading Activity 


NYSE 


AOwmcaa 
Oedlnra 
Undented 
T am nun 
Nc« M.gnt 
Ne» Lew 


Nasdaq 


:."* 

7C83 

Adicwd 

I'll 

n:i 

H 6 « 

05 

DcCUncff 

■Ml 

1 ft, 

597 

5'S 

Uncnwiffco 

7071 

179? 

77 w 

>C* 

Tuel issues 

{■*% 

5JH 

3*4 

u: 

!WwH«hs 

■ 90 

31.1 


July 31,1997 

High La» Lnrcnl Chgc OpttU 

Grains 

CORN ICBOT) 

S JM DU imnamim- ODdft cm- buolwl 
5«> 97 26*'., 260ft 2651 'j 60/173 

DK 97 2lfV] 262’-i 76Pit 1*7.717 

776* 2Mft I75ft 79.253 

AtorfO 280W 274 2*0ft 6.21* 

Jt* 98 2BJ 2/7W 2fift KM 

Sect* 266ft 2*6 266ft 1 J55 

Dec 98 270V. 267ft 770ft 6.006 

Est. sales NA. Wetfi se*e5 73446 
Wetfswwnint 3*1.005 ofl H34 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

I0O lanv (Mars per tai 

AW 97 239 j0 25190 25040 15824 

Sec 97 23500 22980 23380 19.740 

Od 97 222 00 11150 2IIJ8 15J45 

Dec 97 21580 20780 21520 31496 

Jan «* 71150 ZOM HIM 5775 

AWT98 71000 203 JO 209 10 B.|9? 

Ea sales NA Wetfs. sides JI.*ao 
W ed's ocen <nr I09jm 0 u 2309 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOTJ 

6 tWWit>vc*tiiiDeTl* 

AU9 97 22-47 3182 2285 -04« 5.497 

Sea «7 2285 23.01 SJ54 .0.51 ».7I7 

«t*7 2280 22.22 27.7J .[LSI 15863 

Dec 97 nw 2253 7107 *0.54 43800 

Jon 9* 23JD 2272 211* -US) 6.1« 

/As « 23 60 73 05 2147 oitJ 3.305 

Est safes NA Waffs. sides MJ56 
Wed'S Open im 97447 oh 7*82 

50YBEAM5 (CBOT) 

wimwiv cents post Bmhri 

Aw 97 77S .’SDft 760 11*49 

Sec 97 6*9 4*6 685 16.673 

NOV 97 6*0 633 6 5* 75.119 

Jon 98 662V; *38 6S?ft 11910 

7.1 Or 98 670 64*v, 6t«ft 5 TAl 

EB. soles NA Wetfv sacs aO. 117 
Wed S open eit I36JJ30 otl 1*05 

WHEAT (CBOT) 

S.a» Si' m.n.n» mi - emu 1 am- 
>p97 J64 JS3 162 41.577 

Dec ; 7 j7*ft 369 376’.; 41858 

IM 93 is: J78 386 10.943 

MOV 98 3t'. 3 78V; J84 1.267 

Esi.sdcs *i a. weffs icW- w.5M 
iveff -.(venuii 87.149 off I8i'4 


High 

lorn 

Latet 

Chffv 

OpM 

ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) 



1 5.000 IDk - calls par ID 




Sep 97 76)5 

75.10 

7585 

-005 

17.544 

Nov 97 7885 

77 JO 

77.® 

-0J5 

8.321 

Jon® 1155 

80.15 

8080 

-are 

3.657 

Mar 98 84.10 

8X10 

C® 

-015 

2J56 

Esr. sate NA. 

wed's sate 

1.973 


Wetfs open inl 

328% 

i» J72 




Metals 

GOLD [NCMXJ 

lop vw at- dollars ocr irov at 

Aug 97 329.80 321*0 32410 -1.90 6.121 

Sep 97 ESJD -188 4 

0097 17970 32180 3MJ0 -ZOO 14.913 

Dec 77 33180 328.00 32860 -2.00 98.913 

FeC 78 33170 33080 331180 -Z» 12^0? 

Act 9* 3JM0 33780 33280 -100 5.17* 

JunM 337.70 335 00 33500 -200 7M* 

AUB98 137 JO —200 1111 

OP 90 339.60 —200 106 

EV sales NA Werfs.soies SUP 

Wecf s open ini l o« *179 

HI GRADECOPPER (NCMXI 

75 OOOIM.-Cmrspef B. 

AU0 97 109.® 10680 l«« ‘295 1.747 

Sep 97 10980 106® 108.90 ♦J00 7M12 

Od *7 IO7J0 10580 107.50 * 290 IJ 8 J 

Nov 97 107 JO lllSJO 107 J0 »2W IJ04 

Dec 77 IB6J0 110.75 lOtJO -2A5 tJSt 

Jon 98 10570 -280 441 

Fed 98 104.70 im® '04.70 -100 »20 

Mar 98 10370 KH.90 10370 - 2 » 2A13 

Apr 98 101*0 10170 10180 *250 J85 

Ew sah-S NA. w«rs sales 10.9B8 
WeffsoceninT JJ.IAJ an 4*6 

5TLVB7 (NCMXI 

S.OOO trov a» • oems per to, it 

Aug 77 446.90 ♦II.® 

S«p?7 .ISOM 43*00 479.® >11.70 5*.4II 

DC 97 45270 

Dec 97 .156 ® 414® 45540 *11 ® 17880 

Jan *8 457 i(i .||jo 20 

Mar 98 463® 455J0 4AI.ro -11 90 10,035 

MOV9* 4*560 *17.® ’971 

A* 98 4*9 JO J63® 469 JO -12 M 7.0*7 

Esi N A Waffs Wes M.7JS 
Wed's iPcnini 77.160 off *17 


High Low Lolesl Oige OpW 

LONG GILT (UFFE) 

tSOOOC - pis 2 72ads at t® pci 

Sep 97 1)6-02 115-10 115-14 — 0-15 107.822 

Dec *7 116-11 11500 115-01 -0-15 7,470 

Est. sates: 74737. Pro., sales- 83016 

Pre* open ml 195.297 up 11497 

10-TEAR FRENCH GOV. BONOS (MAT1R 

FFSW,000-plso( IM DCS 

Sep97 131.14 130AI 1308* -ttlO 20X339 

Dec 97 99.96 99.88 99 72 - 0 12 6888 

EsL sedes: 1 19J07. 

Open ml: 710227 off 5771 
ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BONO OiPFEl 
ITT. 200 mflftcm - pis al I® pet 
Sep 97 138JB 136.65 13783 -0.99 105.748 
Dec *7 100.70 109 70 I® 9 a -08S 2757 

EsI. sales 60.747. Prev sales; 613147 
P>ov open W- UHL500 off 1.1 71 
EURODOLLARS ICMSU 

*1 >Tuinnn-pisa< IW ect. 

An? 77 74JI *4J9 *4J0 


High LOW Late! Chgo OpM 


Industrials 
COTTON 2 (NCTN) 

SLO00 Ins,- CMS ner lx 

Oct *7 7580 7480 7487 -Otof 11473 

Dec 97 7130 7445 7585 -08) 42446 

Mar 98 76J0 7491 76JQ -4L3i 10J74 

May 78 778D 76J0 7685 —027 2754 

JU198 7745 7725 77J5 -US 1,523 

Esf.fotes NA Weffs.sales 3.960 
wed's anenlr* 74,765 up IB 
HEATING OIL (NMER) 

42000 uaL cam per oaf 
Aug 97 56.10 54 ® 5561 


taat«s“ 

5^-:- 


G*‘: 


Sep 97 901 
0097 9125 

Dec 97 94J7 
Mar 99 94.19 
JUnfl 94.1 1 
Sepre 9483 
Dec 98 9373 
Mtr9« 9X92 
8*1 99 93 *8 
Seo« 93 M 
Dec 99 9178 


908 
902 
9417 
94.13 
94 05 
9177 
9387 

9186 

9187 
9179 
93.72 


94JB 
905 
M.21 
9417 
9489 
9401 
9191 
91«0 
9187 
93.8* 
93 77 


-081 23 Jl* 
♦081 00.15? 
♦OJD 2732 
*0® 46U97 
♦am 3’, 3.381 
•081 260.90? 
•082 TOtJbi 
•002 168803 
-007 125.798 
•003 95 JOS 
• 0 W 8DA24 
-0.04 71.457 


Sep 97 56.60 
OU97 57JS 
Nov 97 57.10 
Dec 97 5035 
Jan 98 5080 
F<b9S 5050 
Mir 98 57.44 
Apr® 5670 


5605 

5110 

55.60 

54-50 
5745 
57 JD 
56.® 
5545 


56.19 
54.79 
5747 

58.19 
58 J4 
5039 
574* 
55.94 


Est. idles NA Wetfs. sales 40,952 
Wed's oaenint I5U06 off 30*4 

UGHT SWEET aHlOE INMERJ 
1800 ton - doHan oar MO 


-017 7.201 

♦007 41993 
-012 76,272 
■117 I7J49 
♦022 15.973 
*117 14,970 
♦117 8437 
*814 1W9 
—083 3.011 


‘V .‘il AMEX 


I3i 
IT'. 
<9 ■ 
V\ 
J'V 
12 - 
11 
IV 


Maul 
OecSned 
Unffionged 
Tofcdbsun 
New Hies 
Mvw Lews 


•43 


TM*V LOW. 

Market Sates 


rj NY3£ 

181 Arne* 

7 W Nasdaq 

Momma 


Livestock 


CATTLE ICMERJ 

4C» •D*’. - TYT . x®*r m 





U 10 
■0*5 

*:jo 
,■0 10 

*7s: 

70*7 

•0 30 
ns? 

30 AW 

48888 



Dc-.tr 

rita 

T® 

73.50 

-041 

70.213 



Fi*9a 

TJ-jT 

•’7 30 

7157 

-1)17 

9 633 


38 j; 
7TJ95 

Aor98 

75 M- 

7J« 

75 10 


J.A’5 


Jim '3 

ti n 

71*2 

7)77 

-045 

3. 'S3 


E'J sate IT tj 

•" 0 s '.ate 

15.4*5 



PLATINUM (NMER) 

SOwcm MOV !>.• 

cv-1 ?.' jp od on® 42 sjo iio in.'s 

Jan)* 42501 II7J0 JI2« -0 m) 7.117 

An® jfftiM JO ISO J07 58 -1?V> 785 

Esr <dn N A who’s, sail-, 1.770 
W.'ffsaprnint U.ejj up 7*1 

Cl w 'ftnw. 

LONDON METALS iLMEI 
C- iftr-. [-■! mvliic Ion 

r iHie* Grade) 


12 '. 

lift 

Jft 


M.B 
sift. 
HP » 


Dividends 

Company 


(Leffsapenwi: 104.170 « f sel 

FESTER CATTLE ICMER) 

-j 00(1 IB'. - U*U1 16 


Per Amt Rec Pay Company 
IRREGULAR 


Pec Amt Rec Pay 


«7 70'. tt: Tff-i 

*77 1 'ST 

» I I Ift I ■ 

!♦! 17 H'i lift 

10 3. ]>. 

160 *>. «ft J-.. 

?» J 1 ■ 7T 

940 38’ ■ ]n>. Nft 


m 

s 


BeorSlfcoro odipli 

Carci.na Fmccrp 
Free SI Consol 
Grupo Radio 
Imperial Cnam 
Nth Europe 04 
Srudder Paiti Bal 


STOCK SPLIT 

Fst United Bnqs SC 3 far 2 spiff 
NB jur/jery 3 ftr 2 spin 
Pert 'tei once Tcchifar JscM 
Pr 6 tfT(ted Cos 2 for 1 spul. 

SF'S Tech 2 tar I spiff. 

Sipru Cm® 2 for I split. 

STOCK 



.•£75 

'•-30 

10-15 


36 

S -8 

8 30 

b 

.229 

3-£ 

ID -6 

b 

1177 

8-4 


b 

62 

8-23 

1 C— 1 4 


Jt 

8-15 

8-27 

_ 

.» 

7-30 

731 


INITIAL 

NJOvlIncoBd 33’ i ?-31 S-1S 

ShcDCdana . .ie SIS 91S 



51 «S 

iff 95 

PI 67 

• 0 7’ 

8.051 


81 67 

M«5 

81.72 

-os; 

3. '.II 

Ort 77 

S3 00 

fll 15 

*1 IS 

-037 

5.771 

I.-i.-v 97 

83 50 

1370 

S3 02 

• 0 30 

j m 


83 45 

a; as 

ns: 

-032 

IAO 

May 1 ' 8 

0195 

e u 

R7 70 

-0® 

*55 


REGULAR 


Esl sate 3. 1 7 ? Weds sate 443S 
Wed's (W« int .ft fS' 1 off I’* 


l«i 

lTfcS 


■i SlerrakVcnt Bncp 


5'- 

3-rr: 

3 2» 

INCREASED 



* '• Conseco Int 

c 

I2S 

9-17 

= 0-1 

ConaotTomofc 

5 

-IS 

5 ir 

9 2* 

Fat Ni«n Gas a A 

1 

3a 

■i.g 

*33 

-■i Provide^ Cos 

0 

.23 

it- 23 

0.10 

i • Slhn Peru Cooper 

<2 

37 

■15 

9? 

YEAREKD 



P PICO A 5714 Ad 

S 

jIS 

2-> 

8+ 


Apple South 
As area Inc 
CammonSensc 
Dynamics C fi 
HemePcii 
IES Iftdnsl 
Kansas City LI 
Him 7.1 un Inca P 1 
fcliton ■'.'■'jn Term II. 
NCH Car® 

Nth Am scvnvjs 
Nor/ralk Svqs 
CWsis Pesidcniiai 
Fewer CorpCdn a 
SaScmifi. 
Sandwich Co-op 
Sltm CA '.Voter 
Simcnr Inc a 
VK E»ch Fd 
vVI Enemy 


O 

01 

S.|5 

8-29 

HOGS-Leoo ICMER) 




-ft 








ft-7^ 



83 IS 

81 IS 

M*3 

057 


.lv 

5-8 

°-3 


?54J 

74 15 

?5 15 

- 1.15 

s 


3- 14 



n JO 

'033 

71 36 

■ 0ft 

Q 

-'■2J 



p9.^ 7P 


6AM 

67 67 

-0 9? 

0 

44 

HI 

a-:.; 

Pa 95 

6' SO 

(4 10 

IS IS 

-100 


Spd 

171):® 

l.m® 

\r&r.'- 

I/O?' 

Forward 

1699® 

1700 « 

1683® 

I/.HV® 

Capper Cettmies (Hlah GitoOv) 


5por 

7U.1 

}Un 

774. ' ul 

.’ll 2 W 

Ferriaid 

71 TO iVi 

7371 00 

371 MV 

7317® 

Lend 





'.pol 

•'.77 00 

633 W 

615'- 

MM 

tonr.vonl 

itboo 

*25' 

67V® 

/,J>O0 

Nickel 





Spot 

7330® 

ixioro 

»3l>4 DU 

7316® 

Fi.rward 

7410 00 

7:20 00 

TT*)® 

A®® 

Tin 





SpN 

54’5lJ0 

4485 00 

:jts .» 

'.-IKS® 

Forward 

isrooo 

fcijnui 

5510 On 

»liDI 

Snc (Special HW> Gredel 



Spill 

ISIS® 

1175 Ik) 

1640® 

■ 55080 

Forwmd 

1455 00 

1460® 

1450® 

USiW 


.V. 

C-3 

8-5 

a-:? 


04 42 

8 5 

F-?7 

0 

-50 

9 2 

VIS 

o 

■2C 

6-7 

8 30 

c 

.10 

fl-B 

B-77 

C! 

4525 

8-8 

B-19 

<2 

70 

9.0 

9 SO 

c 

.10 

SIS 

•.MO 

O 

V- 

4-31 

ft-15 

O 

-31 

8 11 

91 

a 

17 

'•-IS 

9-3J 


6« Jte S.950 'Ai-rf-, 'lik-S AJO: 

’A»3',apenni 36*99 0 e 

POM BEUJES (CMERI 

:o topte - jui ' c,* Hi 

4l-j97 8620 41 X Pa 73 IW 

A.® 98 ?4 94 74.4) 7* iS Iff) 

Mar 98 74 JS 7409 ’A IS -7SS 

6-J sote ?.•»» Weffs sate 3 T'A 

Wed's cren ml 5 aP> uo 1«9 


«-i «0 
IS '70 
5 9*2 
7. IW 
1.371 


KWh L<1* ckr*' Ctoy 


Opwff 


3 li ft 
?.i*J 
59 


j: «?« 
m s-r; 


« -Y‘ 
4-3 


a-aanucL- B-asprouiaate o mount pur 
shura.'ADR; ypayaHe m Cn n cfcc n hmOV 
m-manffity. a-quarterty; vsemt-onnuol 


Food 


J4 12 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sate, figures are ur^ctSL ' tiytk iid lg» reflect Ihe {trewous -X! wee«. phA itk airtet 
w«*. tut hot neiatel treo-yj day. Where : sciifcr stx». dividend sr . ourtwi lo iSpe-cir-.l r> mere 
lies awn paid, me y«rs hrjh lrr.-. range tn; dwidcnd an? snewn tar mo mra s JotJs on^ unless 
olherjwsi- noted, isnsaf dt* -ends ere snnvia doDurft-nMfc Sovdon the West etercraiicii 
0 - dividend olio crt'O fsl. b - annual rate cl dividend plus slack dividend, c - liqmdal.nej 
dividend cc - PE e»cet-3S ss eld - called d - ne-.v yearly lew dd - loss in tnc Iasi I J mc-nihs 
e - dividend declared jr arid cr. pre ceding 13 njnihs I - annual rate, increased on Ijsi 
decImsMm. g - div.derid in Canadian ‘ini-, swPiCCt t j 1 5 - - nen -res.. lento fn, ■ . dividend 
oedared otter spnl-up or srock ivide'i j - dendena paid tnre >car. amittcA 6rlw( d ji :u. 
sdion talcn ct tale-si er.idi id rwiApj k - ra.idend dvdered er miO Ihis ,ear sn 
ac .umulaiive ism /.ilr. C'.iSeiss ■» err-sars. m - annual ictc. redorrd on icsl d cte'Cifn. 
n - new issue .n the- past 5T r.ue >.s. ".’ic regh-lu.". range begins »dh in.-' staff c! fradiffd 
nd - n L «t day delivery p - m.tis.' i". Mdnni anrucl rate unkre.vn. P/E - pr.ee -ta-iiro^ rslit'. 
q -cJosed encmiiluoll'i.-.l r- dividend declared er paid in preceding 1? months effus steel 
dividend i - sr.jck spiii Gma-md scg.n .silh idle ot split sb - sales. I - div.dcno paid m 
sieci ,n preceainq 12 mcrlns es:rr;tps :csn vsl'.re on in-dividcnri or c* dnWtutisn dote 
U - new yearly high, v - Iradi ng n ;,ted. W ■ >n bcnkniplcy orreccnienhip or tt intj reoiuemccd 
under the Bent liifci AC. er-*cwitvrsessumed *>v such ioin^oiwsnd- .vtividnitibutea 
wi - r.tien issued m - ■.■■•■tn ACrr^ns. i - v,rtmdcnd or ci -nqhrs. xdis - e»-drsln0i'licn 
iw • ?.itho'j! .-.'srQnis y- it-O-vtSer.i end sales n full yld - yield, z - 'ate. >n 


COCOA (NCSCl 

lOrrv. Iru. I «r-tl»r 
Sep»T 
Or.-evT 


1547 

1510 

1*13 

—76 

73.498 

1587 

1557 

15*0 

-7> 

75J9 t 

l6l> 

1577 

IS* 

—25 

74.79* 

Ifcj' 

1*1* 

1*1 s 

—75 

H».9» 

1,55 

i»JS 

16JJ 

—25 

'.jus 



1*53 

—74 

JL-’O 


t-J ii te .' &1? V.eC's mte llj 7 'j 
tVeiJ i aw rf ;0I 3»T UP «IJ2 
COFFEE C INC5E1 

exi 31 • --m*-. r Cj 

sew 9* I7IJ3 1811-7 l"4S0 -126 I0»7> 

Dee:-' 'M'^3 10 ltl-5 • 1 7* * -17* 

Wor"? IMH.' rj',»r 14* uO — 7W J 7J» 

tto, »t resjo u? ;s is::- ?> o-'i 

jima tm>s ij'sJ ijsss -:vj no 

e-,' ■jt'-c-, twa . s-*- 

Y-iS* y ifre ml 77002 752 

SUGAR-WORLD 11 INCSEI 

i i • im irr* - ■ • itl% pit <0 

II .11 I1i> M *4 .0. mi.- 7*0 

ii tt ii* -OM ss;as 

lift lie 0IC ir.r-rj 

*...„ .... n s3 ii ‘i •<’D ! * »:■» 

F-l |« 791 .VlC'l M.WJ 

> «• l.eY iU 1 '- '•t* 


Off 9’ 

«><l 'It” 
r.tn.n ii r 


Financial 
US T. BILLS (CMCR) 

\l ui I TO eel 

5rw97 91 91 94 97 « 9J 4.9*9 

Doc?' 94 90 visa »4 9o .nivj :;o 
Morn* 6*87 C 

Esl sole. I«1 Weds scV'S I SGI 
Wff'. lOUinl •'»» pH 644 

5 VR. TREASURY (CBOT1 

Fllll OOOpr.P- rr. TV Mltr .<• Wi|.,i 
Sep •» 100414 107-11 I0'-4J II 77.1449 

Dm- rr IP >1 |0.'-JV I0'-W ■ n j |7,’ 

Esl soil-. N A Wntfs sate, 47 AtO 

V.ed's ».n 411 JALO.V IIP IW'j 

HI YB. TREASURY ICBOYl 

lijs neu , ■■ ..ud.AiMiii 

.-fti*.- 111-03 1 10-70 111-dtf ■ 04 375.044 

0.07 IIO . i llfl.14 llv-.’l -06 77.151 

Mar ft I Iff- 14 110.174 lip.i.t on :B 

Esi jp.-. N* v\ nil s sate 

Wte .onen-rM Jvr j]T 10| d .> 

US TREASURY WMrOS (CBOT) 

■- f-HOu lO*.« III . X 1?IU,|4 IOUp.il 

iT.9' ■ lb- JI I1AH7I llr^ri ■ 17 JltoS'A 

Lre =■ IIA.|4 tl;-7i I la.- 11 l; 47.M4 

Vet 9* I lA.ff, ll;-3P Ild-Uj 1 : 74.411 

l™'-* ll>2r • 1/ 7 ID 

E- 1 N A V..M . . >0 a», 1| > 

'■ViT'/iWo* -rl ;ol ,ji' 1*787 

LinOB I -MONTH (CMER] 

-'■VT*.' 9.1 Jt. 14 J-' -.J )- 73.17ft 

. * ,i, 9 1 vtjf 0 M 4 

S - 00 L IN 

f - ) • '. -teits -4*-. ; 717 

•V k JsiRwn > r>r -l.* .366 « ;.'4 

GERMAN GOV HUND iLIFFEl 
• J' iw r'- el laaprr 

'S’;- 1 in? 11 ' 0.7J7.A.9IH 

l “' v If? ft- 10? ra ic? )« <j_jh ri>ji» 

•*• ru.’AW. ti.w-.alre. I.-I njj 

1 »■! Ten >.s i,p im 


Est sate 576 in Wuff's sales 319 M4 
Wed's 'Xrenmi 271280* 'ffl *256 
BRITISH POUND (CMERI 
»7.S00oQunh l perr pound 
S«>9T 1.6*70 IA^4 1 6377 46.774 

Dec?) 18340 1 62® 1.611? 8*0 

Mar 98 1.6260 I *210 1.6252 7W 

Esi sate 7.407 Wed's, sales 1L2W 
Wed's open in: 47.788 off 7*04 
CANADIAN DOLLAR ICMEKI 
l»omrWi»t. SperCOatV 
Sur?? 77W 7250 7775 41.053 

pne «7 7J70 \1B ?309 1.075 

Mar ft 7340 -’US 7337 *35 

Ev. soles 6(04 weffs. sales slid 
Wed's anon m 41 '782 off J?) 

GERMAN MARK I CMERI 

|«.OOOfiiari , ..5p- ( * mort 

3ep»T 548J SW 

G« 97 Stf> JJ.ft SJS7 3 AH 

Mart* iSU 5-ii 

Esl sales I?, v . 7 Wed's -ate 
weffs Tmai i?a o« i<ii 

JAPANESE YEN (CMERI 
i; imiwn i,«-» im 
•■091 tVA H'’. 77 j.'J 

w Oi.’A Sift i-'Xl I «a.- 

Mar98 8T0 S’®: 47IK II) 

E A sate 17 ff - toed'-., sate iTi.oro 
V. Ml .ill 79 r 43 IJD 71S 
SWISS FRANC (CMERI 

li'TOlir jr... liMVeK 

5eP*7 It'D 6675 10A33 

!>«• 9. *:» 6*9 1 6.06 7.«.’ 

Mar *8 477j 

fcj 10.31' ftrj v 43Je( I4 5J7 

w.-a . Avnffil *3.63' jH Jt- 

MEklCAN reSO (CMEP) 

widen p. 1 1 *- i—--c 

VP 97 |JJ»S l?5i» I Tied 19 633 

17117 I70w) l.’l.'J 13.730 

Morft IHH 11670 I IT’S S 179 

Esl '4*7. V .’■..9 'ffidt V».d 8.703 
Wtriawai jo :iq ■« 

J-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 
csoaog 

3ep9* 

Lte ‘I 
7,10194 
Jen »:i 
S-ffiW 
rvc'<H 

Alar 99 
Inn 9« 

E'.l »«i-- '7.T8' nn 

Pie'. mi r.7ia9T up wa 

1. MONTH EUROMARK (UFFE) 

DM I million pi', at I On per 
Ai.n) 9* 9, ve 7* 4* >/. Un.;n 


Sep 97 2a® 19.65 

00 97 20A5 19.77 3117 

Nov 97 H14J 1985 XUS 

Dec 97 2040 19 BD 2015 

Jan ft 703* '19.9* JB.17 

Fe0 98 M3 2X13 20.13 

Mar ft ?0 73 l».W 20.15 

Anrft 3005 MM M 05 

•Wav 98 70 05 aiOS 20.05 

Junft »» 1990 2005 

EH.sote N.A. Weffi sate. I09J«0 
Wed's open m 4Z7.51B up 19149 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

1 mm Blu’i. i per mm 


2ai5 -a 15 90280 
-4U4 * 2.565 
— C 14 31.093 

-an *9.584 
-089 26349 
-0.12 1X307 
—043 6.133 

-4LI9 5A57 
-462 fUMI 
-017 77JI7 


SOP "7 

7 205 

3165 

2177 

34.177 

Od 97 

7700 

xieo 

217* 

234*6 

1*017 9? 

2035 

3J85 

2J03 

12494 

Ck-:97 

14)5 

3430 



Jen 93 

7485 

7450 

7.470 

17810 

Feb 93 

2)95 

3X70 

2380 

11816 

Mar 93 

2280 

3760 

1370 

7.174 

*t» »? 

I14S 

2IJQ 


3.76* 

f.Vi.'.U 

xicc 

? tro 


3131 

Junfi 

:o« 

2470 

20M 

i.079 


Es; .w. m ft v.ea i sate 2LJJ5 
Wed s C«n ml IQ oTB orl B3 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 

47 Cft*. yff L--, btj 


*V9 W *i W 
Vs 6T tj 
•:c* ••• ni: 
M- : ' iSli 
Oec 17 57 sS 
Jen 9? CO 

fczk rw 
•Mar 91 


rt 13 
»l i3 
S9.X 
56*0 
5*10 

:* io 

T23 


*7 00 

-7 9! 

v 

67 73 

-40t 

38 ii: 


-035 

Is* * 

rjs 


'ir 

PX 

-on 


S«fJ 

-017 

7JKI 

r « 


1 931 

j'*; 

L9.683 

)75- 



ft'.'i S open .«| *7..** 4 oY 7730 
GASOIL IIPEI 

l* 1 tAlr*. c«'r rrviiv; nn . M-. cl 105 leir. 
ftulC? 1 77 75 Ij^Cff 'r-9 ’J — | 75 le.7;’ 
5cr 175 « i*9 J5 170 jc — Ice;; 

VCI97 l“i 00 ir: 7; I.TJ5 -IJS 9 39; 

NO**' 1'S'S 1 73 CO 175 75 — 0 ■'< 5.37s 

D^c »* ”S^7 |7ft7'. I’S-M -0 JO l?.l;.- 

Inn*- 1 7 7 06 I '..Of 1 ?f 7J -a 75 - 4 - 3 

FiOft V7s 50 17410 1?4 'S -075 itii 

Mbi«S i’ 5« 173 73 173 7i -0 75 lies 
E:i vjFj. Iil*l Pm vale-. Iv OR. 

Pro, caen mi ra73iui)503 


IW K1 

07 77 

0 0) 

l"4v) 

BRENT OIL IIPE) 

17 i +8J :r. tr-r bnnr- W-. ul 1 

IT Min is 1 

N - 


V? 57 -OOJ 

121 179 

S-tti ®7 

15 09 

1,45 

1* 9J 

—OOJ 



17 r 4 

97 57 — 4Cj 

97 836 

U%1 « ■ 

19 09 

I9J7 

is.<: 

- c.e: 



*7 A 1 

«3e7 Oflj 

21.397 

H efi? 

19 14 

15 64 

i“« 

— 0 0* 




«7 68 

-003 

52.459 

’ 

l« IS 

IS 7J 

19 07 

• om 



v; ,-j 

>‘7.n 

- <103 

44.251 

J'lrt'/V 

19 l> 

IS rt 

I9Q7 

• Off] 

i^r: 


*2 11 

T7" -08J 

39.625 

Fnc ;? 

tv 10 

TJ 99 

i« o; 

.003 



■ir? ’ft 

■-2 18 -Iffl 

Ji.9'7 

fijifid 

N i 

:i t 

14 Tj 

-083 

'L'\~ 



■jrpto," •»!. n 9.. f.9 -’ll. To '.'iKh 2T3.I3S 

Oil VJ NT NI ftr.7 Unch 1.771 

Dm 97 Vast <ajj ,*^4 lHuh 7»6J1I 

Morft V(,4* ft 41 -><.47 -001 7M.74A 

JlWM 96 79 vr. 71 v* 74 -001 19*133 

Vp9i VAUH mu 7 9,.J4 -0 01 15149? 

I>11 9rl is 84 9S7T1 VJ. -v -O0I IJ7.0I7 

Mnr*9 9-.V-4 •• '. VSS9 -OtUICftpv* 

Jun "9 4* 44 9J, il Si 40 001 

V'P 'TV 9S ?n •>•-] 4 95 74 -007 J9 6rw 

E-jvos utt.40* Pit Aim. roiiu; 

Pi i-v nyvn .nl I sll'.lll up 17*14 

3-MONTH PI BOR (MATIFS 

FFl.nvIRun pl.allOOpcT 

r>p97 TftSJ **<l 9*SI — Ortl rjlj.'rf 

P.iV.' >6 44 ft 41 ft. 41 -OOI 37. DC 

V.or ft ft 35 ft 31 }.' - 0 01 Ir, 'JS 

Jiin**H ft. 74 ft7l ft.:i - OBI 36.1797 

S-TI VN ‘ft 1 1 ft an v. (1« UlKlI 15 101 

p,v9!i -'S-r; v-.n i- pi i)wk 7'. It' 

Yerti vs n IJH ft 7 1 . Out l.'SvJ 

lug, ft ft ft ft Si ft IS .0 07 VTJ: 

SpK «r* 41 VS JO VI 40 - Oil? t 7»S 

Esl lute JS.i78 
Cl*T oil 713496 up I.63S 

J-MONTH EUROURA (LIFFEI 

111 I iiiiDwii pi-. .-4 l(k)|>i 

♦ |. 9.' V33I ul ;n 9JJ0 Uncn IIO.o.'fr 

Lteff' Vlr.v ffJe'1 . 001 893W 

*vir ft tier, ft ft vj ft a oj ;.lji j 

JunOM 'j 31 94 J4 94 JI -ijo: 4H f-7* 

•if. m 94 SI 44 41 94 44 -.104 Uftt 

Drr 90 VJeJ *:>•• 00J ?S.'3* 

r-.T. »Ote JIMS I'm -Jll.v i ' 

IS,, n>v nl vjil* .ffl I ill* 


Ei» Mk-S 45 9*0 F/r.1 ;*S 

Frrt cpvniri I '4HC3 'JC l.lw 

Stock Indexes 

SAP COMP. INDEX (CMERI 

91 P ■ ■ 

>F *’ »M 10 *Sj oi 4tCJj - 3 15 I 
0-1797 J- a 97163 -4J5 

ai» « ir 

Es» soles '• 4 t,«% ire, Sijtj 

'■■■'« locrO'T If7« 4." I4ei45 

CAC 49 fMATIFl 
FFllWpvriniJci cf re.l 
J-j|9' M7100 3Cn7 fC 7103 96 -3C0 
iuu i: 31 14 K j"-’J ® :>7S2 30 - 0 50 

>p9’ 31300C3C?t:sC?79iJK. Un nii 

n., tr jirjw.iis.jCjns* too 

'.'or r| T .v ( ju; V) - JSC 

Esl JIF-. Jiw 

Open ml AiJ.'S iff" I *1! 

FTSE 1W(LIFFEJ 
C2i C'-* mdoi iaml 

Sep 97 c-T-J 49! *0 -7a 0 

Dre.v ■-1V41} KM( 49W u ,i 
Vor f., NT TJ 7 fOJS O —78 0 

(V nl.-, V pr-.-, 4>. ; 4'J 

.i|.-, ciwniiT .c.71j ■ill H*' 


Commodity indexes 




Mkffdr'- 

I'llilrp, 

D J r-uhjrr- 
CRC 

Si7i“V.i’« '■ 


Close Previous 

:.5Sr.J0 1-505 vc 

1 5.'4 :-■) l.ffjj.26 

liiJ? 14993 

.'4? ' > 741 >/ 

MrJiH' '-cVd °nrts i-*> r*.— 


.-■■r inc -a •' ■ --Ti us t rc'-jn-;- 

r , -er w.t £ * -ci ■ 


<ZT&\ , 






'«Ret 


»'eat 

1 




9eJ- *••• •. H-> -• 


’. 1*. , 
■‘ i »M.f •_ 

jpk- . J.!- • J£_ l .;. 






. = 






■4 


: 1 


Volvo Sells Its Stake 
In Renault to UBS 
For $737.7 Million 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1997 

EUROPE 


Feud on Svyazinvest Heats Up 


PAGE 15 




London 



: i GwyiWfw Our Suit From Diyvtcln 

■ i STOCKHOLM - Volvo AB 
Sweden's Jargcst carmaker, said 
m Thursday it had sold its 1 1.3 percent 
J stake in the French carmaker Renault 
f SA to UBS Securities for 5.9 billion 
!■ kronor i $737.7 million). 

' ’The sale of our stake in Renault 
is in line with the strategy the board 

■ set up in 1994,” Leif Johansson, 
Volvo’s chief executive, said. “The 
timing now is because we .warned to 
take advantage of the price increase 
Renault shares have had in 1997.” 

Volvo’s srake in Renault was one 
• of the last remnants of a cooperation 
pact between the two carmakers that 
ended in 1994 after Volvo share- 
holders rejected a proposed merger. 
Renault said it was not surprised 

Vendorne Adds 
LanceltoList 
Of Top Brands 

Bloomberg News 

PARIS — Vendorne Luxury 
Group PLC agreed Thursday to 
buy France’s Lancel for 342 
million Swiss francs ($226 mil- 
lion), a transaction it said would 
- increase its leather-goods sales 
by about 40 percent 
Vendorne said the purchase 
of Lancel, which has 85 shops, 
mostly in France, would help it 
build its position in the luxury 
leather-goods market: where it 
competes with LVMH Moei 
Hennessy Louis Vuitton SA. 

Vendorne, whose luxury- 
leather brand names include ; 
Cartier. Alfred D unhill , Mont 
Blanc and Seeger, said Lancel 
offered it “a young image and a 
wider customer base. * * 

Vendorne said the acquisition, 
expected to be completed by 
Sept. 30, would have no material 
effect on its financial position. 

Jean Zorbibe. chairman and 
managing director of Lancel, 
will remain chairman and be- 
come a minority shareholder of 
Lancel. 


at Volvo’s move to sell die stake and 
said it would sell its 3 percent stake 
in Volvo when the time was right 

UBS will place the 27.2 million 
Renault shares on the market at 1 7 1 
francs ($27.52) a share. Renault's 
shares, which have risen 40 percent 
in the past two months, closed in 
Paris at 172.40, down 0.30. 

Volvo’s shares rose 1.30 to close 
at 213.30 in Stockholm. 

Renault's stock rose to a one- year 
high of more than 187 francs last 
week, buoyed by a rise in the French 
stock market to record levels, gains 
in the pound that are expected to 
help Renault's results and strong 
sales of the popular Megane Scenic 
minivan-style car. 

The sale of the Renault stake is pan 
of Volvo’s strategy to get rid of assets 
unrelated to its main business. 

“This is a long-awaited trans- 
action, and the next step we're wait- 
ing foT is Volvo selling its Phar- 
macia & Upjohn shares.” Mats 
Liss, an analyst at Swedbank Mar- 
kets, said. “The sale was made at a 
berter-than -expected gain. ‘ ' 

Volvo said it would make a cap- 
ital gain of 750 million kronor from 
the sale. 

Volvo holds 19.8 million shares, 
or a 4 percent stake, in Pharmacia & 
Upjohn Inc., a Swedish-American 
drugmaker that posted a 34 percent 
drop in second-quarter net income 
this week. 

Volvo is one of the largest in- 


ducing cars, trucks and buses as well 
as marine and aircraft engines. Much 
of its cash from selling assets has 
been invested in introducing a num- 
ber of car models in the past year, a 
move that helped raise its second- 
quarter net income 4S percent. 

“This will add to Volvo's already 
strong financial position," Mr. Liss 
said. “Possible targets of invest- 
ment include the construction di- 
vision and Volvo’s L'.S. truck op- 
erations.’ ’ 

This year. Volvo sold its stake in 
Pripps-Ringnaes fora capital gain of 
3.1 billion kronor and its 4.7 percent 
stake in SAS Sverige AB, the 
Swedish-listed portion of the Scan- 
dinavian airline, for a capital gain of 
221 billion kronor. 

i.\P. Reuters. Bloe mber \FP 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — The feud that has 
broken out among business ty- 
coons with links to the Kremlin 
turned uglier Thursday, with one 
media magnate suing a rival and 
suggesting that the uproar could 
bring down young reformers in the 
government. 

The minister in charge of eco- 
nomic reforms, Anatoli Chubais, 
tried to cool tempers Wednesday, 
saying that President Boris Yeltsin 
was satisfied with the sale of a 
quarter of RAO Svyazinvest. the 
state telecommunications holding 
company. The Svyazinvest stake 
was sold for $1.88 billion to a 
consortium led by a Russian 
banker and former government 
minister and backed by the nat- 
uralized American ' financier 
George Soros. 

But the feud kept simmering 
Thursday as Vladimir Gusinsky. a 
businessman identified by several 
by political and industry sources as 
a key player in the losing bid. 


brought a slander suit against the 
leader of the winning consortium 
for suggesting he had tried to 
mount a “backroom deal.” 

Mr. Gusinsky controls the Most 
banking and media empire. A 
spokesman for Mr. Gusinsky said 
that Most had taken no pan in the 
losing bid, whose backers have not 
been officially identified. 

The spokesman, Vyacheslav 
Kostikov, who read a statement 
announcing the suit, also stoked 
the political temperature by hint- 
ing that Mr. Yeltsin could and 
should act “firmly” against min- 
isters who had supported the sale. 

As a result of the sale, “cracks 
have appeared in the face of the 
government,” Mr. Kostikov said. 

He praised a move by Prime 
Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin to 
study the Svyazinvest sale more 
closely. Mr. Kostikov, a former 
spokesman for Mr. Yeltsin, con- 
tended that the buyers were for- 
eign speculators with links, to top 
ministers. 


Mr. Kostikov, in an apparent 
reference to ministers eager for 
economic reforms, said it was pos- 
sible that these “activists” might 
“find themselves experiencing an 
unintentional and unforeseen 
loneliness.” 

Some leading business groups, 
through the newspapers and tele- 
vision channels they control, have 
lambasted the sale, which was the 
country's biggest privatization. 
They have accused so-called lib- 
erals in the government of col- 
luding with the winning bidders. 

The auction’s winner. Mustcom, 
Ltd., is led by Vladimir Potanin, 36, 
the chief of Uneximbank. He dis- 
misses the criticism as grumbling 
by the losing bidders. 

Mr. Chubais, 42, the deputy 
prime minister who is also finance 
minister, and Deputy Prime Min- 
ister Boris Nemtsov, 36, another 
reformer, as well as' financial ana- 
lysts have welcomed the auction for 
being competitive and for valuing 
Svyazinvest at a realistic price. 


■PAX: ‘ 

FTSE 100 index 

4500 

5200 


3600 1~~ 

4600 

3000 F M A M J J 

4200 F M A M J J 


Pari$ 

CAC 40 ' ' 

3250 

3100 — — 

2950 J 

2900— - J- 

2650 aA J fon r~~ 

25flQL_-_tfV .. . 

■ ™F m A M n 

1007 


Amsterdam. 

Brussels, 


■Ijondoft 
Mpdrid. 
Mfiari /'"* 
•• Ffffe:... . 
.Stockholm 


. . . index 

; 'AEX 

BELtZQ • 

, .PAX: 

t -Stoat Market- ' 
HSfrGeneiaJ 
•pBX 

FTSB-100 ' .. 

. Stock Exchange 

MfBTEL '' ' 

. CAC40 


Thursday Prev/ : % 
Close Ctosa Change 

383,33 ; 875.31 ’; +082- 
2,579.30 2596.36 -0.66 
4»438.93 ' 4,4£l-72 +0.39 
64559 644.06- +050 

3,587.15 +0B0 
+0.77 

4,807.50 '4.924 TO -0.34 


14684 : ' 148G5 -0.75 

3175.67 A069.30 
3519-16 3,576.3$' -U$0 


Glaxo Profit Slips on Higher Pound 


Vfenria ATX 

Zurich ■ SPI 

1 ,480.49- f ,47401 
3,752.66 3,78797 

+0.44 

*0.41 

Source: Telekurs 

Ink-ituii'^ul Her 

UJ Trihunc 

Very briefly: 


Cl iipitof M Our Sfcjf Fnm Dojhhi «r> 

LONDON — Glaxo Wellcome 
PLC reported a 2 percent fall in half- 
year profit Thursday as a strong 
pound and the expiration of key 
patents, principally for the anti-ul- 
cer drug Zantac, dented sales. 

The pharmaceuticals company 
said it had pretax profit of £1.52 
billion ($2.48 billion) for the first six 


into fewer pounds at home. Revenue 
was £4.11 billion, compared with 
£4.19 billion a year earlier. 

The company left its dividend un- 
changed at 15 pence a share. 

Glaxo Wellcome said it had £1 .26 
billion in sales from new drugs in the 
first half of the year, a 31 percent 
increase. The company’s shares, 
which have risen 40 percent since 


day selling the drug in the United 
States as competitors fight in court 
over who can sell which generic 
version. 

Glaxo -said it was on target to 
achieve its previously announced 
goals of low single-digit sales 
growth in 1997 and 1998 and 
double-digit sales growth in 1999. 
with new drugs making up for the 


£1.55 billion in the firsr half of 1996. close at £12.92. * likely to be unchanged ini 997 and 

The rise in the pound was the main The U.S. patent for the ulcer drug 1 998, and after that Glaxo expects to 
reason for the decline, the company Zantac expired last Friday, but the see “significant growth” in 1999. 
said, as its sales abroad translated company is still making $5 million a f AP, AFP. Reuters. Bloomberg) 

BT Hopes to Speed MCI Decision 


t.'V-'- Om f > i,ii ftj fwi-fc) 

LONDON — British Telecom- 
munications PLC said Thursday that 
it expected to decide in "weeks 
rather than months” whether to 
renegotiate iis 520 billion purchase 
of MCI Communications Corp. of 
the United States. 

Robert Brace. BT’s finance di- 
rector. said, “We aim to complete 


the strategic review as quickly as we 
can, and! would expect that to be 
weeks rather than months.” 

He made the comment as he an- 
nounced a 1.4 percent rise in first- 
quarter profit, to £881 million 
f S 1 .43 billion 1. Revenue came to 
£3.80 billion, compared with £3.64 
billion a year earlier. 

Plans *for the takeover of MCI 


were thrown into doubt this month 
when the U.S. company warned of 
heavjer-than-expected losses in its 
local-phone operations. 

BT launched a review of the fi- 
nancial plans related to the proposed 
takeover, which is a linchpin of the 
former state monopoly's strategy 
for global development. 

•AFP. Reuters 1 


• Societe Bic SA of France acquired the U.S. pen man- 
ufacturer Sheaffer. Terms were not disclosed . 

• Ba ye rise he Vereinsbank AG will seek a srake of ar least 40 
percent in Bayerische Hypotheken- & Wechselbank AG 
but no more than 45 percent in the first stage of their proposed 
merger. 

• Britain appointed David dementi, a leading investment 
banker and the architect of several of the previous Con- 
servative government’s privatizations, as deputy governor of 
the Bank of England. 

• Rosneft, a Russian state-owned oil company, said it would 
withdraw from a Si billion oil deal with Azerbaijan that 
Russia recently said it had been a mistake to enter into. The oil 


v iurKmenisian. 

• Germany's Transport Ministry said the government's 35.68 
percent stake in Lufthansa AG would be sold in the autumn 
through the government development agency, (Creditanstalt 
fur Wiederaufbau. The sale is expected to raise 5 billion 
Deutsche marks (S2.71 billion 1. 

• Groupe Bull, France's biggest computer maker, returned to 
profit in the first half, reflecting the sale last year of its 
unprofitable personal-computer unit and strong growth in its 
core businesses. Its net profit of 64 million francs (SI 0.3 million) 
contrasted with a year-earlier loss of 612 million francs. 

• SAP AG. the world's leading maker of business software, 
will buy an unspecified minority stake in Schmidt, Vogel & 
Partner GmbH, a privately owned software firm. 

• Allied Irish Banks PLC's fust-half pretax profit rose 20 
percent, to 242.2 million Irish punts (5351.3 million), well 
above expectations, as all divisions reported strong earnings. 

• KNP BT NV's second-quarter net profit more rhan doubled, 

to 105 million guilders 1 S50.7 million*, largely or. a one-time 
gain from the sale of some businesses, lu .,1, • \r 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Thursday July 31 

- — -Prices ifOoca) cvnvnciu, - - - 
Tetckim 

High Uni Closa Pr*v. 


Amsterdam 


ABK-AMRO 
Aegon 
Ahold 
AkzoNoM 
Bonn Co. 

Sob Wesson 

DcrttsdwPtf 

DSM 

Elsevier 

FcrtfiAmw 

Genomes 

G- Brecon 

Hagemerw 

Hewenen 

HocssmucuB- 

Hunf Douglas 

ING Group 

KL7A 

FJ9PBT 

KPN 

NcdltavO Gp 

Ni/irtcto 

OceGnfiwn 

PruUps Eik 

Pofygroffl 

Ran citoa Hdg 

RgUccc 

pjdcmcc 

Pounce 
Roren!3 
Koycl Putcn 

Unilever evo 

•rende* Inn 

•,'NU 

Waters Kl eva 

Bangkok 

Ad9 UlScJ.-S 
BcrgtaJ afc F 
nnmoTrs’Bk 
PTTEieW _ 
Siam Ce--.nl F 
Siam Cor s* F 
Teiecoma 
mo. Air.-.r^S _ 
The. Feral =i r 
Utd Ccf’ 1 '- 


45 JO 48 JO 
158 15530 
61 5940 
333 310 

145.70 14080 

43.90 4160 
101.10 9850 

118 11550 
220 207 

37JD 36-* 
95J0 9350 

72.90 71 

76 73 

11450 112.7D 
32230 31740 
13130 12550 
97 95.20 
101 40 100.40 
74.80 73J0 
57 JO J7J0 
8520 84 

4950 69 

35450 352 

264.90 25850 
171 163 

11120 10920 
224 22050 
209 207-20 
46 64.90 
209 20880 
11950 11E50 
117.20 114.70 
45680 <48.30 
109 106. H) 
4953 47 JO 

74.90 267 


4870 4840 
15770 156 

5950 60 

mSO 30250 
142.60 1J2J0 
4350 40 

101 9950 
117 11610 
21850 2115) 
3650 36.W 
9450 91® 
72 7250 
76 7130 
114 11170 
318 322 

12550 129 

9650 9670 
10080 10040 
7190 7450 
£7aD 4a 71 
85 8450 
49.30 6850 
3S2 355 

259 26080 
168 166 <0 
11050 10950 
221.70 2215) 
209 20630 
65J0 64.70 
20880 206.70 
11B.6Q 119 

no ns 

455 -14950 
10680 107.10 
49 JO 4780 
27280 26&40 


High dose I 

DeeHtfs Bm*- "Ci jl ‘ 

De-STeefcar 43.65 43—3 

Diesdne’ deal £430 3430 itx 

►melees 25i 346 1)6 

Firantft.VJg 15853 :5fc 157 

Fried. Kftxp 127 121 325.73 

Gehe V.&SC ItilO 135.1: 

HeeJeawZnl '-57 1SSSC 157 3 

HertuapW 10155 1015C 15250 

HEW 452 443 4S3 

HoQdief 82 80 8150 

HsKftSt 8&90 3620 8615 

tostan TT7 706 71S 

Lohmerer 91 JE 8950 8950 

Unde 1365 TIG '.360 

Lufthansa 37 X 3695 3725 
MAN 859 55450 E5&S3 

Mamesmonfl _ 863 846 65252 

MetatoeseQschcfl 42-0 <155 41.93 
Ketro 99^ 99 99J5 

AUmcfl Ruedt R 4920 6342 <912 
Picusmg * 567 558 558 

RVJE B1-G0 8150 8185 

SAPpW 434 428 43050 

Sdwrtig 2C4J0 202.10 20250 
SGLCartcn 24650 243 2«50 

Siemens 1320 12760 1MX 
Sponger CAmO 1670 16» IeS 

Stsedzuura S85 882 E33 

Tftwvsn 41950 <76 47553 

VS 107.10 10633 136-93 

vew m ^ 

\ r IO a 794 793 793 

Vb&itt3BT 7419 1<X 1406 


Hssi tew Case Pnev. 

v-znmr.z: ’A"- *4753 U'li ‘i’li 

S zrzrzv 41"; xr. X’S 

5=4. r *4 5c': 

r=: :';je r- : ■ 

'■r&VCZ 8Ui V! 33 Z 


Kuala Lumpur 


High tew Gom ftw. 

.72 _■ ..:»s " 

■r:.-ej.*! <54 44" iil 4i0 

•:5;rer4- 13- 1:' 3 5; 23; 

= 4” ill :5< iSi 

ST’.*-.?. 31: 11s 

424 417 fJi 4 13 

A&&SZ li4 i— 14? :<■; 

Zeresa 13^ 7-’2; ::i 1 


High Low Ooso Prrv. 


High Low Oose free. The Jflfa IrideX 


A1 LVS 

ViaTL-J 

Vi.r'-Sisps 


4^ 

9783 Teszx 
SW CKscjroes 

S6 V7i 

r..i2 

4J3 

J2 London 


T4^ 

25 

5--1S. Sec 

_?Ji 

ik ’it; 

343 323 

7.72 T~: 

S 2750 
345 Els 
9.55 955 

1133 cC5G 

ns: less 
aa: 0 


SETtadW: 64462 
Previous: 67953 

248 222 228 242 

262 246 2<8 264 

3325 3375 3 < 35 

438 420 <20 <38 

641 625 644 644 

!4J IJ7 137 JX> 

49 44 44 3L75 

176 152 153 ITS 

140 128 132 128 


Bombay “““S5SSSS 

:S; lSSuiawwS 

HjKSr'I-i « ‘Jg _25 484.25 

'hr'ill. Pe’-'h T01 10115 132.75 

=* 51S 476 75 515 472 » 

• T - T-1,75 792-31 27a.S3 


sar?5 ,,i3C ,^ 75 j- 2X75 

SWr' S.S75 390 3S853 


Brussels 


SEL ?4SS;g3 

'S3 'm 'SS 'S| 
fe r>: as VM 


Helsinki 

EkoA 

HoWcmekii 

Knars 

Kfsks 

MerKsA 

Metre 3 

Mtts s-SefloB 

Neste 

toha A 

Orton-YWymse 

OctetarespA 

UP.V.Kynnnene 

Vahnel 


Hong Kong 


Catery Padfcc 15« 
Cheungtoq 8650 
CK infetna <7-K 
Chino LigM 
OrisPocfe 

Sftg? 1| 
% 

HerJefsnlBv »1Q 
MenlenonLd 
HK Chine Gas 
rIK SeCnc 
HK Tetecraai 20 j. 

HrKPsreil Higl -7= 

heictwp: ■' 

HyssflDev 
iE.Tscn=IH53 
Kerry Props 'f-CS 

Nea KS« “t- 

CwnfclPreS 
PeclCteefiti 
SHR ?re» 

S)nmT=3HS 3 
SJnsL=«5ji 8-'S 

S3i CfeurtJrt s 

5ereP^ A 
•.VhofHSCS 
ATisaiC* 


HEX General tadtac 30557 

PreiWBt»27.1J 


SHI 4353 

2<8 ZB 

an sit: 

77 7iS 
3? 2332 
18953 ’53 

<780 <783 
J38 137 

47452 <6753 

199 a: 

1 C< 7C283 
1330 13iW 
B8.15 88 


HOMSnSrJggJJ 

PitvknG 15983.18 

ZSO 855 SIS 
32 3 37JO 

la 15.15 1532 
M B* SI 
26.73 

jaro 4V12 3i5 
eaS! 47J3 4t4T 
9-3 55S 9.22 

1483 15-15 1465 
11250 13 JJj 

9 9.1C 890 

73 75 50 71-5 
16-40 1682 16.90 
31J3 3160 3140 
19.6S 2115 1983 
.sea 473 443 

256 m 254 
7425 7553 73J5 
2445 2445 2425 
2150 235s 
18M '.8.95 >? 

5275 £515 527j 
; iS L°e 
125 l<e 'J7 
9655 W 9=5 
4±= 453 4_r l 

7.9: 8.13 7tC 

785 S 
n 7Z2i 69 7a 
31 JC 31-F. 

lass is.73 :ai< 


A3eiDsr«!j 4<I 

Aa^cnlVater 8C5 

Are=s 655 

AsP Gysj l-S 

AssxBrnstfs io 

BAA 582 

Borisys t2X 
3» aa 

3*7 ind 543 

3anfc5C31=r=( 445 

BiyeCude 4iT 

5SCGra.T l’-<2 
Beds 7^ 

Bra IaJ jj7 

ST! AWS5 13-44 
A.-TWY* 573 

BS 282 

3re Lend t.12 

Br-Peas a« 

SSrrS 483 

BrCSted 1-73 

BruTdecar. 43 

BT3 1.52 

Bu=not>C3Snsl 1C-63 
3sraoGp U3 

LezieWctfess i-i| 

CsSrejSffl* 592 

CsttsoCrt- 5C2 

C^aH'JKs 685 

CirewaGc 6.15 

Cscnwids 2.J,* 

3j32S 6 

aeeia=irscMCK 487 
EVJGicp 53b 

mss s 

C-w; rrHrT i-4 1.76 

GesrIAcddenr 5^C 

GsC - -o3 

3KN 1177 

5l30i7K4yw 1246 
GrereubGp 840 

Graal.VH 685 

ME 154 

Gfwno2sSp 

** ~ L QO 


FT-SE 100: 490748) 
Prerioes: <92780 

885 S3S B57 
432 435 437 

7.93 bjxi a 

636 631 682 

142 143 U2 

£81 5J4 £45 

173 £.74 580 

1173 1286 1187 
3.16 884 887 

5.15 5.16 £20 

431 445 484 

412 41< 420 

1121 1113 1122 
7.72 723 777 

329 126 380 

1328 1384 1144 
453 624 683 

145 2-50 282 

5.97 5.97 612 

8-3< 634 385 

463 46) <7< 

1.65 186 1j69 

173 <2* 481 

188 1.9L 1J0 

IDO 1084 10^ 
127 72S 129 

611 614 613 

525 171 527 

486 487 487 

67H 687 689 

6.10 £13 6.19 

825 112 308 

5.97 608 5.96 

448 451 449 


Jakarta § 


384 HSKKK5S ^ 

an wio 

3425 :rn' TobPC! 1B4 

714w 732 

52.75 Lend See 9.44 

Z°c jsao 28< 

127 LtgtdGeCGtp A3 

9i-£5 L3cydsT5B &p 

4JC LuzaVc^y 'i? 

7.9C Verb Sphser £?4 

-.95 ‘.'tit 495 

6925 VerCBryAssci 14C3 

318: HainclGcii 

-a:£ IfcSrtiae: 583 

ffcllfife; 852 

Nad 7.66 

Nsfniaiiltiai ^25 


.*13 3c:. r . 

zliZ/j jiw - 


Ajssir. 
g, indai 

aiNfrS- ? 

rSacpneot 




Copenriageft 


5£-? $ 

:tes m - "• 

3PVV. . 

Zer r.r-'“3! 




i^-aera HV 


7975 79£3 
1835 lSJ; 
1475 !<K 

AOS <2» 

as sac 

s~-v, 7375 
e--.- 4715 

sS: re? 

4j75 <»»9 


793 STE 

1*5 iasi 

1475 1475 

5075 9^3 
4225 4325 
51 S ^ 
BBS 
r.s m 

SOS 

43X S7 a 


. r., : . -.—x 4-8*- r 


Johannesburg 


■-w •;»=—■« 


Frankfurt 


pa* ~Hi 

PienwV"* "* 


rfaraerftnaJ 

PtjOk aa 5.W 

RzflCJCkGp 
RatkGRcp 3S 

RedttB Cotas %5D 

aedteri J® 

aeriiawSd 13 

JiSS,- ™ 

Sr-5 te.'a 

itn 


iiifJmaslJe 

*9 

sSw, g 

5^Trns?iJ ^ 
IS; Kr^tk l- 7 ® 

m i 

S-w9« Tui 


2 i-?i - r I i-;s-csa 

4:^ v==: ;ri»i49 ill 


S;.r ‘ ;■ X . -- j. 

Ae-rrVo* . v " j. " - r- 

... 


•• ■<58; ,.'f. , : r -^sBi'irar 

■ ; : •" £ ~ • : •: 1: i "jc “rfhkVA 


TTB se<: 


- --StK 

f.e.vs 


589 584 

682 686 
£92 £82 
1.75 124 

9.17 903 

153 386 

1022 10-80 
1192 1325 
828 827 

5.9S £05 

192 189 

448 482 

585 5.91 

626 £27 

669 £26 

2122 2120 

10.07 923 

ZB0 170 
720 784 

2.47 247 

923 943 

Z79 220 

435 420 

£74 £B6 

188 1|6 
6fi9 577 
490 437 

11« 1169 
287 288 

S6d 335 

780 729 

120 117 

110 in 
621 £0< 
£01 6.95 

122 123 

72! 784 

i,J f-JI 

684 539 
7.94 7J7 

xa H 

92B 921 

234 184 

i12 

119 119 
658 £65 
146 US 
991 984 

224 13 
£40 429 
939 1034 

5.04 502 

335 383 

425 420 

1&23 78.15 
728 729 
421 450 

2.77 177 
&63 143 
gj 149 

10.97 10* 

1.77 127 
13-90 1118 

8.04 8.11 

683 639 

1035 1005 
Art 4.15 
4« 415 

flip 822 
XK 474 
546 £43 

M7 111 
17 69 \7X 
4 T1 424 
734 6»4 


Madrid 

Ajk l TJI 

ACESA 

A arasSas etM 

Areeatara 

fiotf 

ShnesJD 

Bantanter 

BaCeonoHap 

SasPayjire 

Bca ScnScnder 

CEPSA 

CocTte erde 

Corp Mapfre 

Ewtea 

FECSA 

Gos Natural 

Iberttoln 

Prycn 

Reasd 

Sevitlana Elec 
Tahaariera 
Taeftmici 
UmonFenosa 
Valeric Cement 


Manila 

Ayala B 
Ayala Land 
BkPhUiplSl 
CAP Homes 
Manila Elec A 
Mem Bonk 
Pg™ 

POBreik 
PMLcmgDlsr 
San Miguel B 
SA'.PrtneHdg 

Mexico 

Aft] A 
BanacdB 
CeroetCPO 
CrtrnC 

Emo fAorJeraa 
GpoCanoAl 
Gpo F Bcomer 
Gpo Bn Inbutsa 
Kimh Oort: Mex 
TeJevisaCPO 
Tetftact. 


AfleauaAsslc 
Ben Comm Hal 
Bca F«Jeuram 
Sen * Romo 


C^aawflAsflC 

IM1 

IMA 


AVMloset 

Uedotxmca 

Montedison 


Parmalat 

Pma 

ftAS 

ft* Banco 
S Potto Torino 
THecatn naBo 
TIM 


Montreal 

Bee Mob Com 
CdnTlreA 
CdnUtDA 
CTfirtSec 
Goz Metre 

GMHes) Lifeco 
Iidoscd ^ 
liwesbnGrp 
LoDlawCm 
NoOBk Canada 
Power Cora 
Power Full 
QuafceearB 

Rogers Comm B 
Royal BkCda 


AkerA 

8SB.V 

OennaskoBk 
Eftem .. 

HcfttondA 

itimernaAso 

Norsk HWro. 
Hor#e5kog A 

Nyamml* 

OrWaAjoA 

PeOnGwajC 

^mPe&nA 

Sdehsted 

TraflsoewnM 

StonftrandAso 


Bobo anlex: 59470 
Pretjoot: <0171 

27710 25230 25300 
17E5 1515 1,-33 

S&f £9 63 5W9 

B522 65S2 8703 
4205 4CS5 4090 
1470 1473 1475 
79K S3C0 TWO 
S953 5950 5990 

34183 24423 24340 
4310 4340 4300 

4683 4*90 4X15 

3345 -fiffl 33H 
8500 SAW 8640 
3200 32W 3300 
1250 1265 1265 
7510 7600 7M0 

1695 1725 1710 

2965 3000 3050 
4200 6220 6290 

1420 ICO 1440 
79SJ 8290 8200 

4100 4165 4200 

1215 1235 1230 
2500 2520 2540 


PSE index: 241630 
Previous: 259642 

1880 18 18225 1780 

21.75 2135 2180 22 

155 151 151 155 

9.10 930 9 

83 B280 83 82 

5S3 540 560 540 

4.10 680 6 5M1 

230 229 230 225 

990 960 970 930 

6480 62 63 6480 

780 7.60 780 780 


BHsoMbk 5127.14 
Prrrkms: 4974.23 

61.40 62.70 6120 
2280 24i» 2180 
3880 39.90 3865 
lla2 1166 1158 
4380 4380 4385 
62.00 6180 62.00 
101 124 300 

3845 3880 3880 
36J0 mra 3W0 
11780 121.60 11780 
21J0 21.70 21.40 


MIB TetomoMco: 1468A06 
Prmws: 1480580 

i950 15200 15200 15970 
1250 4105 4105 4205 

HUB £810 5825 6100 

710 1643 1543 TSS6 

1500 26800 2 6000 27700 
1585 34B0 3570 3565 

1520 8315 8330 B450 

1750 10370 10185 10680 
>145 5925 59M .6045 

r400 36100 36700 36800 
1545 17250 17300 1 7670 
1655 2595 2600 2655 

i64S 5490 54«0 5545 

000 8150 8150 8105 

240 11750 13150 13H» 
1186 1151 1 52 1179 

660 675 646 

2500 2500 2495 

4855 4855 4925 

K40 15000 15000 15440 
”00 3150 S150 2M00 
1065 13600 13800 13S35 
630 11160 11400 11300 
,5a) 6050 60® 6140 


lwten taaw3aiji 

Previous: 369081 

jo 4885 4885 89Jw 
2745 27 JO 27.45 27.35 
39- 3980 39.15 
id 4J 44 44 

wn 18j35 lBJs 1U| 
34 33W 33£ MA5 
40.90 4080 4065 40.90 
36M 36.10 3M6 35b 

2BJH 1980 1980 1985 
18 1780 17.90 1W 
39 38.15 39 38 

38tt 38 38U 3740 

7JM 27.20 2 T* IT* 
1080 1080 1080 10* 
6585 64.10 65.90 


QBXIodeB6K81 
Previous: 693-49 

146 148 14SJ0 

172 19£» J91 
2680 26.90 2£M 
3180 3210 3170 
15180 IB IB 
46 47 46 

jjQ 443 440 

369 39780 395 

2B5 287 284 

14980 IB 148 
549 552 552 

495 409 411 

151 IB J® 
137 137 138 

48. J0 4880 «J0 


A4C= 

ASF 

Atr LtqoSe 
Atodei Alshi 
Ac- 'JAP 
Boncoue 

aic 

BNP 

Canal Plus 

Conrtow 

Casino 

CCF 

CetHem 

Chnslian Dior 

CLF-Dexla Fran 

Credit AgricMe 

Danone 

Etf-Aqutaine 

EridantoBS 

Eurod is ney 

Euraftinne} 

Gen Earn 

Haws 

I metal 

Lafarge 

Urarmd 

LOret* 

LVMH 
MidiellnB 
Portias A 
Pernod Rfcard 
Peugeot at 
Plnault-Prim 
Promodes 
Renortt 
iRocd 

Rh- Poulenc A 
Sanofi 
Schnetdsr 
SEB 

5GS Thomson 
SJe Generate 

Sodexho 
SIGobain 
Suez (del 
Suex LyonEoux 


CAC>40: 307547 
PitinOM: 306930 

:;i 7Z1 7ZI 

:a s:sc 21790 

7=s »,* 

K9 791 
iT3 40350 
771 774 

511 515 

295 29740 
132 119S 1196 

168 4185 4225 
!E3 293.50 297.90 
311 301 

723 6 87 

W» 996 990 

S6 614 594 

!90 12901256-30 

978 980 

707 700 

881 S8S 
985 985 

JO 780 785 

F74 783 7M 

80 429.90 43580 
166 B83 B87 

03 43470 43030 
02 1249 1241 

M0 2500 2505 

585 1590 1 597 
.10 385JO 385-90 
“ «5 445 

3917 30730 
716 688 

77 2810 2823 

163 2488 2550 

30 17Z40 172.70 
176 1696 1678 

“ 261 259-40 

» 651 68 

.10 359.10 360 

09 1050 1039 

>60 561 545 

KM BIB 813 
115 3159 3162 
187 888 B97 

85 1685 1630 
168 676 678 

!5B 765 778 

164 16440 16530 

01 622 623 

80 12330 13110 
30 390 38630 


ElectrataiB 
EnciwnB 
Hermet B 
InctrHrve A 
invesTcr B 
'.‘a Da a 
rto32ren*en 
Ptemn Ucpan 
Sond.-A S 
5coiw B 
SCAB 

S-E Barien A 
Skandia Fore 
Skonska B 
SKFB 

SpartemkwrA 

pwoA 


Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZBUng 

BHP 

Burnt 

BramhlBs md. 
CBA 

CCAnwtB 

Cotes Myer 
Conwla} 

CSR 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Fid 
ICI Austroki 
Laid Lease 
MIM Hite 

Nal AustBank 
Nol Mutual Hdg 
New* Coni 
PadkDuntop 
Pioneer Inti 
Pub Breada&i 
SoTInh) 

St George Bonk 
WMC 

Westpac Bklng 

WoodiuePei 

Wootwwths 


"3*7 :r iffr 

in :iss: "til 

*:■ .21 

S S ni 

:±i :j: ;s ps: 


P- rvi is - 1 . 1 .T-V 

tense *-.c*ran;e 


year :a Sa-.o 
'-.Ar-ange 


23U: 



195 4C 

154 

:v 

92 S3 

w j: 

4t=: 

3:5 



^9 

■>C 


1EI 

K5 

r= 

134 

131 

135 

25150 

247 

242 

216 2105) 21152 


AO OnOuorius: 2735.10 
PltViMre: 273580 


8.70 835 

1075 1035 
1842 18-12 
4.19 All 


837 8.70 

10.73 tan 

1884 1874 
4.19 Ala 
27-80 27 JM 
1635 1639 
1683 1680 


7.02 

£B6 

£92 

£99 

7-22 

7M9 

7.12 

7.f5 

5J5 

£DS 

5-25 

£12 

2J6 

2.63 

2.63 

2-63 

2.09 

2.05 

2.06 

2J57 


. World Index ‘HZ’. 2" ' T . * 

* Sugrcrai Indexes 

j ASS °33 m 7 5: 

j Ci.Tr-.- -IA2 -~.il -'HA 

| A* A -"8 '-8 2’ A 7 j ’.As “1 2 '■ -44 ti 

jS^me.TTa TS*.C7 ■' 2- ~1-.i -zr 2A 

( Industrial indexes 

I Caprs<g:ccs 21: -7 -2 34 •! := -si hi 

i Consungr geejs 211 zz -C.45 -2 2 A -2A2- 

Ene'SV 2ZA5T -1 <: -C 7* -'111 

1 Fmansa 13722 -Cs7 -ZaI El 

Miscellaneous *35 .as -1 86 -2 13 -it.tc 

Raiv Maienals 1 56.49 -0.44 -j22 -*2C4 

Service 172.37 +Q.14 *4 C-S -25.52 

UnSties 172.69 -0 56 -0.32 1-2C.23 

7?w intentAiernai He rata Tr&jr.e Wor.J Sic c* tnxx O :mc ns We US artar vaults a* 
280 mamanera/y irvessaaie sraas frsm 2S ssumnea Fzr more Ttstriarsn a frm 
booklet is Ava-iaSie ty * T-e Tns Inset. iSi Avenue CH31U& se Ga’JV. 

9252 » Neuiiiy Cesex France CsT.p es sy Biccrrberg Neus. 


1337 1385 
3035 30.15 
1-90 136 

19*1 1940 

280 273 

6.II £13 
3.71 333 

4.98 487 

883 8.15 

71-07 2085 
834 8-72 

781 7.71 

8.74 835 

1189 1175 
480 418 


1330 1382 
3B4B 3040 
136 1.90 

1934 1931 
274 276 

£17 6 15 

3.70 3.70 

<37 498 

880 8.1S 

2038 20.90 
884 830 

7.79 731 

874 831 

1188 ll-w 
419 479 


Sio Paulo 


BradescoPfd 12-00 11^0 1170 1LM 

Brahma Pfd 821.00 819.00 820.00 82030 

Cemig Ptd 6230 «L00 6170 60.99 

CESPPM 7850 7630 78.00 7779 

Cope! 1930 1930 1930 1980 

Etetrobfas 591.00 583.00 58400 587.00 

RaubanCO Pfd 642.00 63939 639.99 6£30 

LigM SamUjos 570-00 569.00 57030 573.00 

UghtpOT 47130 46630 47030 -16030 

Prtrabras Pfd 33530 327 JM 33030 332.K0 

PoutetaUC 22330 219.99 22230 21630 

Sid Nodonol 3580 3430 353U 3400 

SouraCnre 1080 1045 1045 10.60 

Tetebrns P« 16190 199.01 160.30 16100 

Tetenug 185,Bffl 18230 182-00 18630 

Tetef| 17400 17330 17400 174.00 

Tetesp Pfd 38130 37830 37800 38399 

UrtboiXM 4188 4030 4X00 4130 

Usiminas Pfd 1235 1245 12-54 1239 

CVRD Pfd 2940 2831 2830 2940 


Taipei 

Cathay Life l» 
Chang Hwa Bk 
China Tung Sk 
China Develpmt 
China Steel 
First Bank 
Formosa PlasHc 
Hua Nan Bk 
bill Comm Bk 
NonYa Ptosflcs 
SWn Kang Life 
TohmnSeml 


Slack Mortal Mac 1 NUTS 
Piwioes: 994279 


Utd moo Elec 
Did World Chin 


Tokyo 


162 157 

126 ID 
04 82 

142 138 

33.10 32-40 
126 123 

68-50 66-50 
137 IB 
47-50 6630 
7730 75-50 
118 115 

157 153 

49,70 4840 
137-50 134-50 
6530 6450 


157 157 

ID ID 

83 84 

141 136 

3240 3230 
123 123 

6450 47 JO 
133 IB 
6651 67 

76 7£50 
115-50 115 

155 ISO 
48.90 4970 
136 132-50 
65 64J0 


N Mud 225: 20331 43 
Previous: 2021232 


Seoul 

Doom ,, 
Daewoo Heavy 
HyumUEtw. 
Kfa Maun 
Koto El Pwr 
Korea E*ch Bk 
LGSemkon 
Pahang Iran St 
Samsung Dlstay 
SaimunaEtoc 
Shin non Bor - 
SXTdfiCOnt 


CM|MitikidHb 7J112 
PrwhHn; 724J9 

95000 93500 94500 95000 
7720 7560 7720 7650 

20600 20100 20300 20400 
15100 14800 15100 14000 
26900 26000 26000 2®M 
5160 5090 5150 5090 
43600 42000 43600 43909 
56500 55400 56500 56500 
44500 <3288 44000 43500 
65200 64300 64900 45500 
9658 95TO 9608 9600 
451000 430000 441000 451000 


AsaNBank 
AsrdilChem 
AsrtilGtas5 
Bk Tokyo Mftsu 
Bk Yokohama 
Bridgestone 
Canon- 
Ctiiteu Elec 
rhuautaJ ElfiC 


Singapore r^eBS-g 


DajNtapPrtnl 

Datlchi Kmg 
Date* Bank 
Doluo House 
DahtmSec 
DOI 
Denso 

East Japan Ry 


Asia Pac Brew 
CfirebosPoc 
OyDevlts 
Cyde Carriage 
Dairy Ftmnmt 
DBS' 

DBS— ~ 
RaserfcNeaw 
HK Land* 
JantMcthesfl 
Jard Strategic 

VauudA 

Keppei Fefs 

KtASLand 


(K Union BkF 
Parkway Hags 
Sembawng 
gnoAo^nNun 
Sing Laid 
Sing Press F 


UM Industrial 
UtdOSca BkF 
WfngToiHdgs 
*1»rt 1X5. (fofforj. 


N. T. N.T. 

5B0 STD 

Jl» 12-40 

12.90 1L60 

O. 92 fL8? 
195) 18.90 
4 jWS 454 

1040 955 

154 246 

£90 6 JO 
3.68 3J4 

£35 £20 

m its 

496 490 
438 418 

15 1460 

940 950 
£75 6A5 

£75 £AS 

1190 1350 
740 7.05 

27.90 2£B0 

372 370 
274 271 

284 281 

1.16 1.13 

16 15A) 

406 4 


N.T. 5.90 
5.80 570 

1250 1290 
1190 1ZB0 
a90 0-91 

19.10 19.70 
458 470 
10 1030 
289 144 

£90 £75 

166 164 

£30 435 
3.78 382 
490 5-10 

470 4« 
1480 1480 
955 955 

£75 675 
675 670 
Tin 1140 
715 740 

2770 2680 
170 370 
172 2.71 

281 283 

1.16 1.13 

16 1580 
4 482 


Stockholm 

AGAB 113 110 HI JO 110 

ABBA 108 106 10650 10£M 

AssUTamon 237-® 334 23S 


AstraA 
Alter Copco A 
Auteilv 


149 141 143 148 

D7 228 229 229 

285 27850 , 380 285 


Hochijuni Bk 

Hitedii 

Honda Meter 

1BJ 

IHI 

Itochu 

ito-Yokoda 

ML 

Japan Tobacco 

JtlSGO 

KflSma 

KansaiElec 

Koa 

Kawasaki Hvy 

Kawa Steel 

KMdNIppRy 

Khte Brewery 

Kobe Steel 

Komotw 

Kuhote 

Kyocera 

KwsluEtec 

LTCB 

Marubeni 

Mnnri 

Matsu Conrai 

MatcuEbcInd 

MottuEhcWk 

Mtt3ubbM 

MitoubahiCh 

MftuUsNEI 

MBsubtsWEst 

Mksutrtshi Hvy 

Mitsubishi Mot 
Mitsubishi Tr 
Mitsui 


1140 1110 

744 732 

3700 3620 
890 875 

645 634 

0 1068 
_ 0 2170 
603 590 

2ft* 27W 
3780 3640 
2020 2010 
3558 1980 
2748 2680 
910 882 

1490 1450 
S99 586 

135D 1330 
820 796 

8160a 8000a 

2960 2910 
5210a 5090a 
2470 2430 

5540 5390 
1550 1528 
5020 *30 
1740 1700 
1120 1100 
1340 1310 
3960 3850 
1660 1639 
405 400 

557 551 

6750 6620 
377 513 


1140 1130 

733 747 

3700 3700 
888 900 

645 642 

1070 10£« 
2200 2210 
599 603 

26* 2800 
3780 3650 
2020 2010 
1980 1990 
mn 2690 
901 881 

1470 1488 
599 600 

1340 1340 
813 825 

8140a 8180a 
2930 2950 
5090a 5210a 
2460 2430 

5540 5350 

1540 15OO 
4980 4930 
1740 1720 
1120 1070 
1340 1320 
3960 3890 
1650 1680 
400 406 

557 551 

6750 6780 


Mitsui Fudo&n 1530 

Mitsui Trust 737 

/AunrtaMfg 

NEC 

Nikon 
NlkkoSec 
nunremlo 119D0 
Nliip Ekoiwss 
N ippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nissan Motor 
NKK 

Nomura 5« — 

NTT 1200b 

NTT Data 5J5» 
OK Paper 
Osaka Gas 
Ricoh 

Rohm 14800 

Sahara Bk 
5entere 
San wo Bank 
Sanyo Elec 
Secom 
SabuRtvy 
SekisuICnem 
SekJsul House 1160 

Seven-Eleven 9*0 

Sharp 1520 

Shikoku El Pot i960 
Shimizu ““ 

Slun-etsuQr 
SlUseido 
SMzuofcaBfc 
Softbank 
Sony 11800 

Sumltamc 1060 

Sumitomo Bk 1900 

SumitChera 485 

Sumitomo Etec 1970 
Sumlt Metal — 

SumUTrust 
TailhO Pham 3120 

TakedoOltm 3590 

TDK 10200 

TahokuEIPwr 1970 

Toteii Bank mo 

Tokjo Marine 1510 

Tokyo El Pot 2240 

Tokyo Elearan 7450 

Tokyo Gas 
Tokyo Corp. 

Tonen 

Tappon Print 
Toraylnd 
Toshiba 
Taslem 
Tayo Trust 
Toyota Motor 3640 

Yamonoudil 3730 

dji meixuxxi 


Moore 

NrridnDge liei 
Noranda inc 
Norcen Energy 
htnem Telecom 
Nava 
One* 

Pancfin Pettm 
Pelrn Cda 
Placer Dome 
Pocn Pettm 
Potash Sash 
Renaissance 
RiaAJgom 
Ro gers C amel B 
Seagram Co 
Shell Cda A 
Sunccr 
Talisman Env 
Tech B 
Teteglobe 
Telus 
Thomson 
TorDotn Bonk 
Transaflo 
TransCda Pipe 
Trimark Fml 
Three Hahn 
TVXGdd 
Westooast Eny 
Weston 


High Law 

2 ?>. 29‘. 

72 J0 71 10 
2930 2935 
33*. 33’i 

14490 143. 

1110 11.95 
32 3140 
27J5 27’. 

24'; 24*: 

23.: 2110 

13.90 1370 
105 10195 
34 1 3190 

35 34*. 

28.35 2135 
53t 5260 
22-Jfl 31.70 
45 39.05 
42‘: <2’ r 

7155 2760 
50 : 5020 
27 26.70 
3AG0 33-1 
4435 44Q5 
17.10 l£90 
27 80 27’i 
69.40 tfl.65 

31.90 3140 
6-45 ft* - 
28 10 27^3 

104 103 


Vienna atxmu:uma9 

v ici ii to Prevteos: 147401 

Boefder.Uddeh 10651041251049.95104170 
CredHomt Pfd 618 6W» «« 6M.70 

EA-Gerwrafi 3529 3490 3500 3487 

EVN 165)1628-35 1635 1622 

RughotenWIen 568 55750 561 557 

QMV r-'Wai 1761 1790 1772 

OestEteJjfrrz 8jp 880 882 884 

VASftW -MB WAa5 600 

VATech 773490 270250270150 2721 

Wienertwrg Boo 2664 2633 2662 2638 


Wellington 


AlrNZetUdB 

Bnertyliwt 


LionNalhon 4 00 3.95 400 3.97 

Tetecom HI 758 7 80 7.85 7J8 

YFikon Moron 11.95 11.90 11.90 11.90 


4*9 

l&S 

4*9 

467 

1-J1 

140 

\jh 

1J0 

180 

175 

175 

181 

447 

iAl 

£44 

447 

5J1 

536 

ID 

128 

106 

202 

202 

MU 

3J4 

148 

35B 

ISA 

4 00 

19S 

400 

197 

7M 

780 

7J3S 

7.88 


JJ7 513 5J7 575 

9200a 9150a 91 Wn 9250a 
3360 3250 3300 3360 


Toronto 

Abitii cores, 
Alberta Energy 
Alcan Alum 
AntefsonEtol 
Bk Montreal 
BkNovaSaSia 
BanidtCaid 
BCE 

BC Teleconun 
Stodiait Pham 
Bombonfcr B 
Brascan A 


TSE I ados trials: 687737 
Prevton: 6ML57 


28.10 27a 27.95 28 

31.70 3130 31 '6 3f-M 

54.15 5170 5195 5390 
17.60 I7i5 17J5 1760 
5830 57tj 57.90 57.70 

64.15 654: 66-05 i6h 

31.70 31': 31.45 Site 
JlJO 41.65 4205 41 te 

36.10 35-ffl 3605 35^5 

4) 40 40 49 

32 31.60 31>u 32 

35.ffi 35.60 3520 35JJ0 


611 

605 

613 

621 

COflUCD 

53te 

53*-: 

53 c- 

7J80 

21811 

2280 

2200 

CISC 

■&M 

39.15 

3941 

lflOO 

17«0 

1780 

1780 

Cda Natl Rail 

TV 

71 *5 

71*1 

494 

485 

485 

496 

Cun Nat Res 

35.91 

3155 

3S-B5 

DA 

331 

336 

336 

CdnOcdd Pd 

37.15 

3&85 

J/ 

676 

665 

676 

666 

CdnPndfic 

42 JS 

Jl in 

41 ill 

1110 

1090 

1100 

10/0 

Caninci) 

39 te 

39 

39'; 

197 

195 

195 

196 

Dofawn 

29.70 

29 

29A1 

813 

510 

MU 

m 

808 


12'5 

I2J1 

I2A1 

490 

510 

493 

Donohue A 

3465 


34 


10200 9960 10200 10000 
1970 1940 1950 1950 

510 478 510 505 

«4 487 494 489 

2M0 1990 2000 2040 

4990 485D 4960 4840 

2470 2400 2470 2410 

1490 1420 1490 1410 

1298 OT 12?# 1300 

320 300 3C6 318 

654 643 650 662 

1690 1650 1690 1670 

837 825 835 826 

695 660 466 711 

1740 1680 1730 1690 

TWO 1120 11» 1120 


DuPontCdoA 
EdpwGmgp 
EutoNevMng 
Fairfax Ftal 
FWoonfntoge 
Fiddler ChaU A 
Franco Neiratte 
Guff Cda Res 
impenotOfl 
Inco 

1PL Enetvy 
LaMow 
Laewen Grain 
MaaoUBIdl 
Magna UfflA 
Mstaiek 


D-85 24 

43 42.90 
395 395 

29.60 29.45 
23J5 24 

6480 65 


Zurich 


ABB B 
AdecaB 
AlusueseR _ 

AresSeranoB 

AMR 

BarrHdgB 
Botoise Hdg R 
BK Vision 
QboSpecChem 
OariarH R 
Cfd Suisse Gp R 
EleklroMffiB 
EmvChemte 
ESECHdg 
HoWertwnliB 
Liechterest LB B 
Nestle R 
Novartis R 
Deriikn Bueh R 
FargesaHJdB 
PtnrmVenB 
RfchemoniA 

RrefBPC 

Roche Hdg PC 
5 BCR 


SPI index; 3752.66 
Previous: 3747.97 

2189 2149 2U9 2162 
625 58B 589 620 

1417 1370 1375 1420 

2480 2435 2440 2425 
850 850 850 850 

2330 2JM) 2200 2233 
3720 3685 3490 3710 
1250 1240 1250 1250 
144J5 139.25 139.50 143 

1142 1138 1128 1148 

20150 202.50 204 2)525 

537 536 536 536 

6805 6740 S7W 4820 

5000 4900 4980 4950 
19 1399 1413 1420 
598 589 598 589 

1933 1910 1919 1927 
3433 2401 2427 2428 

149 154 157 JO 

1995 H60 1970 2002 
967 957 967 963 

2290 2230 2230 2290 
335 325 DS 3D 

14785 14550 14625 14750 
J17.5D 407 409 41150 


lOte 

10U 

SdilndtefPC 

2000 

1950 

1989 

7715 

71.40 

SG5B 

3065 

3025 

3050 

C7B5 

4120 

SMHB 

HW 

855 

865 

WK1 

5180 

Sutter R 

1165 

1 142 

1142 

2I-* 

21J5 

Swiss Rems 9 

2224 

2190 

2199 

48J0 

41 M> 

Swissair R 

1979 

192.5 

1941 

1A.R0 

19.10 

UBSB 

1700 

1*78 

1AR4 

92.11 

9735 

WtolefthurR 

1500 

1487 

1487 

13 

13 

Zurich AssurR 

6IB 

*10 

616 


’.J .-jT-.J 

It?.-.;-. 




























































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1997 


RAGE 17 


« 


/ 




$ 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Thai Reserves Drop 
Less Than Expected 


l By Thomas Crampton 

* Special to the Herald Tribune 


BANGKOK — Thailand's cen- 
tral bank said Thursday it had spent 
a little less than SI billion defend- 
ing its currency against speculators 
in June, a quarter of the amount it 
spent a month earlier and much less 
than many analysts had expected. 

The Bank of Thailand said for- 
eign reserves fell to a two-year low 
of $32.4 billion in June from $33.3 
billion in May as the country 
fought to keep the baht pegged to a 
dollar-dominated basket of curren- 
cies. But mounting pressure as the 
economy deteriorated prompted 
Bangkok to float the currency July 
2 and to call for International Mon- 
etary Fund assistance this week. 

“The small amount reserves 
dropped was quire a surprise for the 
whole market,” Arpom 
Chewakrengkrai, chief economist 
for Ifeutscbe Morgan Grenfell, said. 
He said reserves were thought to 


have fallen to around S30 billion. 

Given the fall in foreign re- 
serves, many analysts also were 
surprised at the increase in Thai- 
land’s money supply. Its monetary 
base, or the amount of cash and 
bank savings in the financial sys- 
tem, was up 29.9 percent in June 
from a year earlier, at 514.5 billion 
baht ($16-52 billion). A central 
bank official said the chan ge was 
due in part to an increase in the 
amount of money printed but that 
most of it had come from injections 
of cash into the finance sector. 

With the currency-reserves 
data released, analysts said mar- 
ker attention was now focused on 
negotiations between Thai au- 
thorities and the IMF. The Thai 
cabinet is due to decide Tuesday 
whether to accept an IMF- pro- 
posed assistance pa ckage Ana- 
lysts said the package probably 
would require cutting spending 
and allowing insolvent financial 
institutions to fail. 


Early Volley in Tokyo Big Bang 

B anks Will Be Allowed to Start Selling Mutual Funds 


Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — The Ministry of Fi- 
nance said Thursday it would allow 
commercial banks ' to sell mutual 
funds beginning Dec. 1 as part of the 
government's “Big Bang" cam- 
paign ro dismantle the walls sep- 
arating banks and brokerages. 

Under the plan, commercial 
banks can invite companies that 
manage mutual funds — or invest- 
ment trusts, as they are known in 
Japan — to sell the funds at bank 
branches. 

The government said it bad not 
yet decided when to permit banks to 
sell their own mutual funds. Cur- 
rently. almost aU mutual funds in 
Japan are sold by brokerages. 

The ministry will also allow 
brokerages to step on a key pan of 
the banks’ turf, allowing them to 
offer so-called universal accounts 
beginning Oct. 1. Customers will be 
able to have their salaries paid di- 
rectly into these accounts and ro 
have bills paid automatically from 
the accounts. 

Only banks now are authorized to 
offer such accounts. 


.Dai-lchi Kangyo Bank Ltd., 
which is embroiled in a scandal in- 
volving payoffs to a corporate rack- 
eteer. will be prohibited from mar- 
keting mutual funds until Aug. 6, 
1998, as pan of its punishment that 
was announced Wednesday, the 
ministry said. 

In June, the ministry disclosed a 
basic outline of some banking and 

Lehman Brothers to Cut 
Staff at Its Japanese Unit 

. Bridge News 

TOKYO — Lehman Brothers 
said Thursday that it would reduce 
its stock-trading and research staff 
in Japan as part of a global restruc- 
turing that aims to focus on high- 
profir operations. 

The unit, which has about 450 
staff, will focus on such areas as 
bonds, takeovers and real estate, a 
spokesman said. Sources said that 
the equities sales team would be cut 
to four members from around 10 and 
that the number of analysis would be 
reduced to two from eight 


brokerage measures as part of the 
broad deregulation plan that Prime 
Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto pledged 
to complete by 2001. On Thureday, 
die ministry announced a schedule 
for implementing these changes. 

Among the other changes it an- 
nounced, it said it would lift re- 
strictions Friday on the purchase 
and cancellation of money-market 
mutual funds. 

Currently, investors are required 
to pay at least 1 00,000 yen ($845 ) to 
stan such funds. Investors also have 
to pay penalties to cancel these 
funds within 30 days of purchase 
and cannot withdraw more than 1 
million yen on the spot. 

The government also will permit 
mutual-fund management compa- 
nies to include unlisted stocks in 
their investment products beginning 
Sept. 1. 

To further break down the walls 
between banks and brokerages, the 
Finance Ministry will permit banks' 
brokerage subsidiaries to trade such 
instruments as convertible bonds, 
warrants, stock options and stock 
futures beginning Oct. 1. 


INTERMARKET FUND 

Societe Anonvme 
lister ed Office: 


2/ Boulevard Royal, L-2953 Luxembourg 
R.C. LUXEMBOURG B-8&22 


Shareholders are herebv convened to the 

ORDINARY GENERAL tfivmxa 

of shareholder? of our companv which will take place at the 
offices of Banque Internationale a Luxembourg. 69, route 
d'Esck, L-I470 Luxembourg, on August 11, 1997 at 12:00 
for the purpose of considering and voting upon the 
following agenda: 

1. Submission of (be Reports of the Board of 
Directors and of the Auditor: 

Approval of the Statement of >et Assets and of 
(he Statement of Operations for the year ended 
as at March 31, 1397; Allocation of the net 
results; 

Discharge to the Directors: 

Statutory Appointments: 

MiseeBimeowb 


2 . 


3 . 

4. 


The Mf 
not vah'dlv 


convened for July 11, 1997 could 

f liberate due to lack of documents. 


Shareholders are advised that no quorum is required for 
the hems of the agenda of this Meeting and that decisions 
will be taken al the majority of the votes expessed by the 
. shareholders present or represented at the Meeting. 

In order to attend the meeting the owners of bearer shares 
have to deposit their shares five dear days before the 
meeting - al the offices of Banque Internationale a 
Luxembourg, 69, route d'Esch, L-I470 Luxembourg. 

IRE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


Buoyant Dollar Helps Sony to Double Profit 


C.nipiln! Our Staff From Oi 

TOKYO — Sony Corp. 
said Thursday its net prom 
slightly more than doubled in 
the quarter that ended June 30 
as a strong dollar buoyed 
sales of electronic gadgets 
such as camcorders and as its 
Hollywood studios released 


box-office hits such as "My 
Best Friend’s Wedding.” 
Sony’s group net profit 
surged 104 percent from a 
year earlier, to 34.8 billion 
yen (S293.9 milli on), on a 22 
percent jump in sales, to 1.4 
trillion yen. Sony's U.S. sales 
led the way, rising 37 percent. 


INDOSUEZ HIGH YIELD BOND FUND 

Societe d'lnvestissement a Capital Variable 
Registered Office: 39, Allee Scheffer 
L-2520 Luxembourg 

R.C. Luxembourg B: 43.962 


NOTICE TO THE SHAREHOLDERS 


This is to Inform the Shareholders of the INDOSUEZ HIGH 
YIELD BOND FUND Sica* that the Board *'f Din-uorf’ 

di\iil»*nd of 
'ha.'f*. 

The share* will »o evdi'vidend on \ugu« 1997 and ill*- 
payment of the dividend will be carried out or. August l ,J,J 7. 

The Board of Directors. 


Meeting held on JuU 17. 1997 r|rc:d«.-tf to pa> a 
L f D -U50 Der share :o the bolder* of Di-lribution Sh 


to 435.8 billion yen. 

*‘We saw big gains in rev- 
enue from the U.S. market 
thanks to the weaker yen and 
sales growth at our film 
units,” Masayoshi Morimoto, 
a senior vice president, said. 

Analysts say Sony's film 
units should continue to aid 
profit in the current quarter as 
a result of movies such as 
"Men in Black.” a science- 
fiction comedy thaT has 
earned $194.3 million. 

Sony’s shares rose 200 yen 
to close at 1 1 .800. The results 
were announced after the 
close of trading in Tokyo. The 
stock has risen 55 percent so 
far this year and 75 percent 
over the ’past 1 2 months. 

A weak yen helps Japanese 
exporters bv increasing the 
yen value of profits earned 
overseas. Exports account for 
almost 70 percent of Sony's 
total sales. The dollar's 10 per- 
cent advance against the yen 
from the vear-earlier period 
added 90 billion yen to Sony’s 
revenue. Sales in the com- 
pany's core electronics busi- 


ness rose 22 percent, while 
entertainment businesses sales 
climbed 24 percent. 

The strong showing 
prompted Sony to raise its 
forecast for profit at the group 
level in the year ending 
March 31, 1998, by 5 percent, 
to 168 billion yen, on sales of 
6.18 trillion yen. 

“Sony’s doing well in 
everything it does." Kimi- 
hide Takano, an analyst at 
Dresdner Klein wort Benson 
(Asia) Ltd., said before the 
results were announced. 

Camcorders and the Mini- 
Disk audio player were 
among Sony's most popular 
electronic products. 

Sony sold 1 million cam- 
corders in the quarter, up from 
850,000 a year earlier. Sales of 
digital MiniDisk players more 
than doubled, to 550.000 units. 
But sales of color television 
sets fell to 2.45 million units in 
the quarter from 2.65 million 
units a year earlier. Sony at- 
tributed’ the decline to weak 
sales in China and Brazil. 

iBlt'omber j. Reuters > 


Investor's Asia 





; 13000 “-' 
"12000 


F M A MJJ 
1997 


M A MJJ 
1997 


F M A MJ'J" 
1997 


■EiaSwriga Index’. 

. ;.Hahq : Seag • • 


.'Staflapote.T-r' Strife Times..: ~ 


•Sydney;;. \ MOrtfewtes ;. ; . 

tine it’ 

Tokyo’:.'/ ’ • .• ; 

20 . 212^2 :+ 0 .S 8 


. ’Wd* ,. lv«£* 74 - --T .16 

Bangkok • - ...SET-. ' 

£ 66.82 ■ 079 . 68 r':-^aS 

Seoul • • # petaqsowte index 

• • y 72 A 89 -: 

| -Stock Mai^JrHtox ty£> 662 £:& 342.79 

: *Mbf : ••• 


r -Jakarta': ' .^vCtomposite.'lfide^ 


WeBmgton ■ NZS& 4 Q ■ 

2 ^ 71 , 98 . ' -£ 57 5 J 52 . • -&14 

.Bombay ' Seris&e index 


Source: Telekurs 

biienuiiiHul Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• Taiwan's central bank said it would lift the discount rate, the 
rate charged to commercial banks for short-term loans, to 5.25 
percent from 5.00 percent, effective Friday, to help support the 
Taiwan dollar. 

• Hopewell Holdings Ltd. of Hong Kong missed a Thursday 
deadline for submitting revised plans to complete a long- 
delayed road-rail transit system in Bangkok, Suwat Lipt- 
apallop. the Thai transport minister, said. 

• Japanese bonds rose, pushing yields toward record lows, a 
day after a report on June industrial output confirmed that the 
country’s economy was still too weak to withstand higher 
interest rates. The yield on the No. 182 government bond, due 
Sept. 20, 2005, fell one basis poini. to 2.115 percent. 

• Japan's housing starts slipped 1 1.6 percent in June from a 
year earlier, to 1 20.842 units, falling for the sixth consecutive 
month on a year-on-year basis. 

• Pohang Iron & Steel Co. was earmarked for a possible 
credit downgrade by Moody's Investors Service Inc., which 
said the South Korean steelmaker's bid to buy the assets of 
Hanbo Steel, a bankrupt rival, could weaken its finances. 

• Australia's retail sales in June fell 1.8 percent on a sea- 
sonally adjusted basis from May. Retail sales in May were up 
2.9 percent from April. 

• India's Maharashtra state will consider requests by Fiat 
SpA for farther cost concessions for a planned car factory, 
Manohar Joshi. chief minister of the state, said. 

• The Vietnam News quoted Nguyen Sinh Cue. an economist 
with the General Department of Statistics, as saying that 
Vietnam's economy showed a "phenomenon of minus 
growth" in the first seven months of the year amid evidence of 
stockpiling of industrial products and* weak consumer de- 
mand 

• Wanfang Data Corp.. a Chinese scientific institute con- 

trolled by the State Science and Technology Commission, will 
soon launch a computer service supplying scientific and 
technological research and data about China over the In- 
ternet. tT fit «:•. r \FP 'dr'i 



i 

I 


i 



I 


f * ' 


(,(, For haute couture 
you go to Paris . And for 

asset management ? *)j 


T o Geneva, of course. Its Private Bankers have developed 
made-to-measure asset management into an art. Unique 
investment expertise and a global perspective have estab- 
lished their worldwide reputation for capital growth... 
a reputation they have ably defended for 200 years. 


|b&c“ 

E 

m 

t;L . 

F 

ljSIH 


IRSd 

Gen 

VA'Sl 

Pi 

OVAT 

El 

3a h 

JKERS 


LIBERTY • INDEPENDENCE - RESPONSIBILITY 


gORDlER & Cie 


DARIER HENTSCH & Cie 

( 1796 ) 


In Geneva: 

LOMBARD ODIER&Cie 

( 1798 ) 


MIRABAUD & Cie 

( 1819 ) 


PICTET & Cie 

( 1805 ) 


3VT 



































































































mrc .9 i 



an in fideul 


“ ■* ^ 

WASH AMRO Fm* T*-lSM 2 M» 8 «i£r” 

i E®S- A ! '1 

? dJ J 27 .I 5 : 


5 5 a 16 * 

J fBSWL" * *2& 

SSf £b 

©&8W 1 C,ol^& 

-geusK 1 *" 1 «i 

6 S&F" 1 H 

m flE 5 i*B 2 Intgn-BEF BEP TATI M 

0 Ategafe lb m 

wUfflSgW iT £uoifii 

1 ABSOL UTE PERF ORM Tgl 20 677 H7i 

- Chores intwiwono i Ltd i 119.27 

m jBOvnrinn lib { imH 

m Putaor UVUiflt) LM I 1J7J3 

Hi AEBVORLD FOLIO MUTUAL FUNDI 

®S~ J u 
Ss 3 & ‘ as 

a OBM Sand* 1 2<B7 


SSjfV^SS*»K 'LUXEMBOURG! SJL 


m 


J 45 . 11 , 
5 4 i 4 fi. 
DHIU 43 . 

DM M 7 «. 
I IS«t 

s l ra 

,R 10 T 3 B+ 
i siiu 

tf°m + 


EM BSm 11870 

Lg NLC 129 JS 

P >TL lOOlSSo? 


2 I 

3 f 

J Natural % 

a Aw&oSmco^ s 

0 £"*9 Mark* Deb 5 

■ if&§WW l 
: sQh&NF 1 

* A C japan Fund S 

t * 

1 S^W^ffSSd Ecu 

3 BifbSsSU dm 


3 KStmfisR’’ *8 

w AIAATR05 PERFORMANCE HIND 

rr. AfeamiPfiff FhomW S 1603243 

"> AMrei Pm Indn DEM DM 19C6LW 

re AlbaliCT. PHuunur wi U5P 1 7087374 

SM{#g E B n E g!MN“ ,,2,B,M 


A LF^E ^ BETOSICJW 
a CtoDal 
J Germany 

0 tettZBf&nd 
0 cuwee 

3 

0 Japan 


} „ss 


Ecu 30149 

! 250.13 

1161 A 3 
y aoiA 3 


•10 ALLIANCE CAPITAL MANAGEMENT 
era Bant of Bermuda G 52 -® 4 a* 633 V) 

* ABonce US Gi. 5 |ra«s A 1 1543 

m AiBorxa US Gr. Strgie* 8 5 15.21 

a AMano? U 5 Gr. Sirota* I l 25060 

* 4 MD 1 K* user. Strata* N S TaLOl 

eta GOLDMAN SACKS iCA'r’MAN)T- 809949*770 
"» ACM PeamKJi Fd - CBU I S 109145 

' ni ALPHA FUND MANAGEMENT. LTD 
« Par-LD-VUta Rd, HortVhon. hMll Bermuda 
>i Aipna 4 nai Fa LnyjuroO 1 11*44 

™ Aipna Alt* FO-HVC QJun 30 S 11046 

■" Aloha Altai Fd-Tooa'Jun 30 i lTVOi 

» Aipna Emg un DeOvJotflO I 71302 

m Alpha Europe Fa uun 3 m Ecu 30349 

re AiPIta FuluS. Fd pimarfl 
m Alpha GlctaaTFa ClunXD 
Alora MaaFd Cl AUunM 

Alpha HoS f 3 a a-junso 
.. Alpha HSg Fd a C'JurOQ 
ffl Alpha Laiih AmerUuhSW 
m Alpha Pacific Ffl (JiinSSl 
n Alpha SAM 
i- Alpha Snort Ffl UulOO) 

- Alpha TUttota Fa CJun 30 ) 

■n SCA Aipin inMmatt'JunK _ 

t Bucn-Ecu EurHdg jun 3 D Ecu 22762 

Ih CenuEallo Lai Adi AIJun 301 S 147 S2 

i- C-taCDhPSl Vcdue lAAay- 31 ) I 2 Mii 

6 Heheg Japan Fund 
t- inaia Penamunce FGJr<n 30 
■n urirved Value lMai 31 1 
-i P «31 SiA*. Dpp SVI JunSO 
" 5 RmB Ape Cao OH*v Junm 

n The yuuua Ffl uunXU 

012 AMERICAN PHOENIX INVT PORTFOLIO 
a Eurape Muiwunanol Pto I 36.96 

a Gfaoai MumnanoraH Ptfl S 2554 

a US. GraAHi Cos PW t 17 J 7 

a US RmI Emu Sac PM I 1 US 

aSMBHttWHBg" 

• A On Catkin iiifurr S 11571 S 5 f 

■e Amwa inwnidriofrt Fund 5 bmiil 

» DEF AsSaetBBS N.V. 5 17784 49 E 

a Enrte Seleci Fund 3 IODISE 

d Firy Eagle Flinfl S 1086 J 3 JK 

1 - The Global BDMrage Ffl S 134 . 97 = 

. 015 ASIA PACIFIC PERFORMANCE, S 1 CAV 

• APP S U 26 

Sit ATLAS CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD n 

e i me 

i «S 5 S f 

— OntimavM S 1 101 -AS 

; s 

f 7 !!?il^SSSSS!AV 5 661 S 2 

FF ^347 

.. r . jnvtmnie Fa U$H > T^SJ 


> Csmenraie Fa iFFti FF 33 A 47 

•• • heitsSs i Sb 

' Oil BANK BRUSSELS LAMBERT EB- 21 50 OT 
2 SBl MtadM AnwtnCaO 5 
a ifiL i"vwt 9 «ta"Cnp S 92 S 

' j SBL ihtieyi japan Cap T 

a-.B&Lir«*i»U»n“ 5 *rCc 8 
■ a BBL ‘ruyOHiC &CRjna Cep S 4 i 68 

I* 0 BBLlnm: AMrrjfttCaa S 

e SBL Traps! UK CCP J 

4 BBL'L* mv GaMnFhittCap S r ^To 4 


4 BBL ‘L* inn Gatdnehaipns * 
a BBL<U tauMf Ei«P» Cso Lf 4 
i BBl iu incest nwa Can u F 1 

r BBc-Uiiw Bast M*» Cos S 


Y 2437001 

S 7 S!» 
S 045 6 S 

£ 1363 

j irsA 

rn 


a The Drawn Funo 
- i.'aiimn Thj' Ffl Soe 1 Cl A 
:- MSSSF-J'MSflflCIE 
■n .'AavmC Fu» 

-> inaotWK C urr. C l A unw 
3 OartmoraJBWinWWli 
1 T > 3 met:HiW'ftaBflA 
1 * httJielMipliVWMB 
Cr *JUPU lW* 

i ssss^tSgi 

r«o^^^A 

; 

a ISA A 4 ' 0 f1 GW*™ FiWO 
3 I 5 A Jason Res. Grawth Fa 
I I ?3 Po-K-C G* Fmfl 
3 ISA Avan Wmtta.FWa 
= maeiiiK.i ipw° Fin * 

n Wcir;« 3 l Fffhfl 
• MrmsofOnFurO 
^ ttaaneFuna 
K M =«:3 Frrnd, 

S 

3 iS^Ta 

; |^J! 53 ffi.h 3 wft 

l IM 0 W« Awn Pit-mitwi B 
«< BANGUEra ALLIANCE 

P*W 5 
- 3 SSIS 

PmWW 
FWoae 
p^ciae 
pw»f 


S 9507 
5 121.435 

5 111092 

5 174359 

1 OSS! 
J 10757 
5 U 6.-2 

Pw 184656 ® 
S 1071 


S 44 OBI 

HKS 41 Afit 

! *JS 

S 300 . 
S 2034 


5 17741 

to s. 


i 11731 
Ecu 11472 
5 F 1 ?B 71 


PiMlt FF Rram 1 * - 

i SfinT,' I 7^ 

a FhJiBF^esJSSj' 5 n 91 it 

j SjrWI^.iSS ; 1 c 13601 : 

S 7759 : 
5 40270 


j Tw^&ni' 



ytSSnauni^ 
i s%r»- 1 || 

j KPttr. — TWrvS j 4J7T 

- 0 rt 0 B“L. p “ 5 d S 1180 m 

* 26-53: 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1997 


Advertisement INTERNATIONAL FUNDS July 31, 1997 

available on Internet: http://www.iht.com/IHT/FUN/funds.html 


QuotttioiW suppltad by tund groups to Mhiropd Pwla (td: 33-1 40 28 OS 00) SOVlCe SpOftSOted by 

»>aon on how to list your fund, tec Katy Hourl Ht <3S4)4i 43 92 12 or E-mail : functe@Ihtcom ivini/l A 

free daSy quotations for your funds by E-mail : suserfbe as e^undsOihLeem IVUIvIM 


0 enkaiea Ptn Enhanaa Grot 

1 affesMis 

029 cn (TRUST 
r onpwbimonai pwsjl 
HO COMGEST Si- 1 ] £4717510 

r E^i'JKa 

a Cwngata Asa 

: SESKr 

Ml CONZETT HOUHNSS LTD 
Infernal HR mwcoiaaiLaiii 


ASUklLM 

379 

9 j 7 

1572 


For information on howto Bet 
To receive tree dafy quotation 

* ^LTrjii AlO . jmjjj 

* Fl ihiH SnflHrtnfl JF 260.15 

WSSBHBT 1 " 

3 twin curaoiFunfl c 74 n 

5 AM ifl Fiinfl | 16745 

a -o-EastFuns 5 71 S 

fl OflumFnna - ii»T6 

S 1 33 

K< FINANSA GROUP (Fb U 2 2 UMtti 

l ^JSw^S nSaa> ? 474 
tw Vietnam =nrnarFiiixi 5 104 I 

WBS^SSP^ 

1 * '"femewnol Equity Fund t 1 IJ 482 

W F OREIG N 4 COLONIAL EMESG MKTS LTD 
TUiLandofi 171 628 1224 
- * ‘irngi Co 51 cny t 2844 


a UKGrawm L 

092 nALFORTtlNEINTL FJjNPS 

\ mm j 

OB |AM W R JVE R CAPI;m. CORF. f 
" tw 2 > 6 g> l 

m ill 000 ® LM UiW M|M) * 


CANADIAN DOLLAP PORTFOLIO 

j cm a a 

corwwte hkjh income ptfl 

a cm a-i 1 

a OauA -2 i 


: SW ® 8 I B 

e JF OtoOnl Cany Tr. f IfH 


»T«M 


rarTmonifl Fa lm 


IF 19^21 
SF 176321 
SF 328689 


S 

M 3 

b csPonf 

fl CSPgrtf 


DM 1 042.77 

DM llitifl 
5 F 1 CMQ 3 
SF 101748 
S 1137 99 

t noon 

DM -.150214 
DM 1392.04 
ml 17254 1 00 
LTn 329 B 350 D 


S 17 M 09 
DM 147674 
SF 138969 
9 1307.51 

SF IIB 72 
DM 15174! 
Sr 1406 91 
» 13*732 

3 * 4375700 
Cl 151642 
OM 197247 
tlv 1 »1353 
FF 7111.43 


? BB!M©a?" 1 ’SB 

a Lrtn Ama EmpYiao Fd s 10 J 701 

a LOTiri Amaneon Traran Co J T 4 . 7 B 

3 vfeucon invea Co sia» 

« =enjvion mm Co SKx. 
c Pofiih ihresl Co Sica 
c ■ hcjot ran Ca $ 19.10 

4 GU 4 am Mute lm Ca Siatv i 1290 

4 - Ruuran UTMStmara Do 5 331 * 

CTO FORMULA GROUP 

: rcrmuJo Fimd NV 5 115.05 

1 M raiEDBERG MULTI.JECTOR FUNDI 

: pJSsSSs Sims’S™-. 5 

0 rnpooffg ntn PnGOWB 

* -resiwo OBtial Opa Fa us S 113957 

071 FUND MARKETINGGROUPIBID) 

P .0 Bo» 2001 . Hmtffl Oh. Bermuda 

- Ff.uuBtm QOjuni 
hi rMC N. Amer DOJunl 

- FMG - 

- FMDEM 

"■ FV.GOf 30 J„ 
r- e MG Fbaa QOlun) 
a irina Quel Grawm Fa 
■n Tne NuHiBn Fmrai QLnmi 5 39 -fl u 

D 2 FURMAH 5 ELZ FIN AKIAL SERVICES 
Teh -353 1 579 7924 Fat • ISO 1 679 79 M 

» -cncuv II Ffl LW 51 / 01 . 91 771 E 

» Jusrrfpn Cfliri s T 441 L 29 E 

7 -Ota USA Fund s map 

a Acacia USA Oman Funa s 132.41 E 

* crejr«jM copiaug s itefSsiE 

4 L'Pra rnmnneati A Ufl i 134193 E 

* SsusniC* inn ua 1 13878 3 *E 

. ihSradfl Fund Ltd l 931 *3 

r .re PeHragnupinnUd S 17 A 73 ME 

- 071 GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS IF AX 82515 
Tk 353 1 676 2TB8fFrc3£3 I 6760570 

f G:c Hedge 11 S 187 58 

C 3616 A t 19156 

-> C-DU GuaanMd CL II S 97.92 


: jtam 

i JFra&Tnlh 

OtiJUU US BAER CROUP 
j Bairtana 


DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 
a QuA DM 16 J 

5 OanB DM 15 . 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (DM) 
fl DauA -1 DM IS. 

a Qau A -2 DU 20 . 

p 8-1 DM 1 ? 

fl E Du 5-2 DM 20 . 

EUROPEAN BONO PORTFOLIO (USB 
fl cm A-l i 7 . 

a cmA -2 s ia 

II CmB-i 5 7 . 

a cm 6-1 s ID 

POUND STERLING portfouo 
d dot* A E 19 . 

^or^SAe investment GRADE ptfl 1 


fl fuineBond Fun d 

a Aum Band Fund 
fl SwbiBend Fund 
d DM Bang Fund 
d CddVHt Bend Fund 
a Otoas Bend Funa 
0 Eun St«k Fund 
e US Slack Fund 
a Podflc Sm* Fund 
0 SwU* sec* Fun 
fl Snckfl StnualKk 




e BBulj mv Tetfcan A JMC. 5 6 -^iJ 1 

- c BBLm IIWPnOKelM FF 6 f _ J 
fl BBLSeraa Ffl incod l.= sij—™ | 

a bBi-Fcrawipmoi BdCflS ti ,Kfe-S 
3 BBLFCSn-MaamrCep 3S 13 JjKS! ! 
, fl BBL 5 MC rod CaomnMS DM fflCBuJ J 
119 BANOWEBBWE" ASSET MCMTW 1 ID i 

Snore DatrtsuwGuwiny 441 Ml 73*614 1 

s | M 

; gss^SSnfo | ’g 

« was Fwjfl J ,* 3 ; 

s Mlk Fa J « 

■flBM m ™*k 
: BeEu^ if ft* 

n BAMOUE JNDOSUCZ 

* fhTprawn Funa_, „ 1A | .JrS! 


DM 197147 

try 1 4*353 
Ff 7111 A 3 

USB 

PWI 15757400 
SF 431 J 3 
5 209752 

▼ 147578.00 
C 2805 54 
S 135379 . 
DM 483.17 
DM 51970 
FF 148259 
FF 147754 
DM Jsa 77 
DM 52 L 40 
i 183435 
I 23*54 
Pt 3 S 4 T 34 .OO 
Pin 61 1 -.650 
U 1 34779950 
LB USTOBJU 
SF 744.93 
Y 23317 .Q 0 

^ "ffl 

R 112154 
S 41553 
I 467.10 
DM 2 8 i 97 

E m 31553 

M 1924.43 
DM ’22273 
V 60349.03 
5 2132.93 

£ T 48 J 1 

c 119 re 

I "34273 
I 485 77 


S 100 . 49 * 
1 133222 

SF 24859 
SF 4^3 
Y 8645 . 3 : 
SF 1445 "Sy 


Y T 1 EF 50 
i ; ; 05 i 
SF T 9 B 69 

s 

m m 

fe K iil 


Geneva TeUl -22 735553 
7 Gainer SA. 

< Samyi rtflrtt Funa 


I Foul -22 7860105 _ 
1 67137 ^ 


* U' Genesee Ea 5 * 5 24158 

— D 74 GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 

I FAX U 441580 , UK/G«rn 82501 JHMI 25 U 
INTERN ETSlTE MHMIMJddBMMUaM 
QFrSHCSE FUNDS 

II Anid Si Dauotosjol Man * 41 62 *-« 2 a 037 

c GAM iSpeocIBonfl £ 16649 

v- GAM AIKflWttKirFa I 

if GAM Alta lion* S 

» GABlASieir I 

r GAM Asian Dev MMs 5 

■r GAM lusnuiia S 

* GAM Bdra £ ( 

« GAM Bond DM DM 

» GAM Bond SF SF 

» GAV, Bone USS Ora I 

» SAW Sana USS Spodal S 

* OA.M Braidlo S 

» GAiM Caaai Appradoti on in; 1 

* 5 AM CGF Fine S 

1 3 AM QtaM-MraUI I 

1 GAM DinMf $ 

— GAM Donor raid Wtumanonai s 

, GAIA gift Ataa S .... 

r GAM Emera MBi Mnt-Fa J 267411 

r GAM Franc-ad SF Ml* 

« 3 AM Franca F B J 537 J? 

* GAUGAMCO S 

r GAM. HlSBV.eW S 

> GAV. her; Kora _ S 

» 3 AM imiM Trent! Fa me I 
=• GAM Jeoan 5 

n GAV. Le-ransK VC S 

n GAM YJr-F-jroM DM DM 

a 3 AM MDi-Europe USS 1 

< 31 .V. .'.VlOi Ui DM DM 

GAM "uFi dA USS 5 . .. 

. SA'.'PtadKs S 10*5 36 

* 3 AM Prr. E'jraoa SF 

.- -GAV Pen E-jracean 5 

* 3 AM 5 oeree S 

% I^S^SI Bend SF 

* SAV anjessrrMflfcyian S 

— r^^M 7 wd 5 

1 3 All T icdln; V:, DM 

r DAM Trains Uj 5 _ J 

* GAV T ra ?15 II D E V. Cl DM 

■ ilv Traf^f "uS? 3 | 

> 3 AM 5 - .f 9 B' L'SS S 399 i:- 

n SAV 36 S 

* 3 A-.-S- 4 S 3 

: s ’ 

.- iflJSvraeCM zZ 

; 3 SAV •-■,•-«• V« 1 = SF 

: 3 £ 4 VVflfevy«-l if £ 



DLL 113.70 

a “ffis 

I 15115 
Dkk 15955 

dm £ ^ 


199 LEHMAN BROTHERS 2 M 7 J 97 
a UHman Cut Ady. ATS s 

d Mum strataovrd n nv B S 

fl /AuHl-Slrattflf Ffl II NV A 5 
a Mulft-SIrotaflY Fd NV A S 

fl Uum- 5 lrataev Ffl NV B S 

fl PiwniM Finjrss aov AD I 

1 HUBERALBJL 5 . FUNDS 
Tel 1 55 11 1 1 > 4076 Fax : S 5 21 1 U 7350 


MULTI CURRENCT BOND PTFL 

0 &tl l ill? 

a CmB-i S 10^6 

US ^OERAL SECURITIES PTFL 1 
fl Clan A S 964 

fl aauR S to.15 

lit MEKRIU.LYKH IK PORTFOLIO 4 _ 
a aa&A S H.d 

a St 1 11.49 

a One t 1148 

1)7 MG BRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 
a Muntain Inc 1 Ptr 5 A S 10 .« 

1 ssasKIS^aA l 'SS 

me Peso phi □ B s 117 

DOLLAR ASSET? PORTFOLIO 

% a«!« j® 


gwwnwgr ,iM Bnbe 
siifeasraft % M 

m Trraflss GW Curr Ffl Lever. S 1239.98 
m U 5 S Gtataat Curr Fa 5 117442 

120 MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
m Leveraged Funa * 11177 

m Women Premier 5 porti 
m Mamer US Entrapihe 
m Women US Mmta 
m Meraantuin AllWrather 
m Moniertura AAHtmactBr 
m Momerium Dearmai 
Memnrurn Emerald 
... Momennim Maaomaiw 
w Momtrtum Navelior Pert - 

m MarmmiBi Pace + Pflimera 1 157 .W 

m Momentum Rnmhow Fd S 16664 Z 

m Mom*nium 5 anaoti«)od S 127 JU 

ra MdllMilum SlacUniBHr S 2313 Q 

m Atanertmn Tutam Pamern 5 177592 

MamaMum Unlven Hedge * 

Moraeimxn voluenwBer 
122 MULTI MJU 4 AOERN.V. 

S |SSfi|R« i S 2 H 


AJUL&.F. Rind 
I Fund 
F.LUIA li Fund 
FLS.T. I Fund 


S 111026 

. .... 1 IJmji 

fl SAF E. Ffl S 17*5454 

a S.T IB Fund t 22173 * 

a Ubend Hedge ' 31 blMnFd 5 

101 UPPO INVESTMENTS 

esnSsp c 

V /DR l MmSy Mortal Fd 5 15 78 

w Indonesian C-ravrm Fd 5 *9 71 

IB LLOYD GEORGE MNGMT C 8 S 2 J 2845 *40 
a LGAimmaFund s „ 21 -S 

w LG Allan Smoker Coe Fd % 7*^n 

w LG Hldta Fund LW 5 1120 

■ LG Kona Fund pic 5 554 z 

101 LLOYDS BANKIHTLOAHAMASILM 
a Uoyfls America* Partloto 3 >171 

104 LOMBARD. 001 ER 8 PE -GROUP 
A LClSatAl S & MCapi CHr 5 F » 4 g 

e L 0 Mimunoloav Fund SF 23 $ 25 

104 LOMBARD ODIER OPPORTUNITY m 
o Swimronfl 5 F 678.01 

a Francs FF 74 *. '3 

3 Urmfl hTngeom 6 Irelonc £ 1*1 1 » 

fl GermOHY A Ausmo DM 5 Q ; * 

o Swnhair ElllOM SF H 1 U 

c Samaraoua SF 230.38 

OBUPLEX LTD ICR . 

a Muircunraicv . 5 Qn 

3 Donor V.edum Tmih S K 8 « 

a Dollar Lana Terra S 27 “ 

a joflzraco Yen "> 5763 00 

: Pound 5 iert no 

a DeuBcneMS- DM hji 

; Burn Florin ,R 2 AM 

? H v Eura Cunenciei Ecu 2253 

A S-A-fesFImE SF || £ 

s US Dolkir Snflir Term _S |Ja 6 

; HY Elra Zjrt CiV'd Fey = 4 u 126 - 

; Sails Mur.flurensy _Sr 20.70 

S KeT « 48 


m Hedge S 17.94 

123 HAM FOREX MANAGEMENT r 

a NAM Muili Hedge SF 1004 

124 NICHOLAS- APP LEGATE CAP ITU. MGT^ 

ae 1 loi.To 

Z Ba Heaw’Fwi" i tSS 

125 NOMURA IlfTL (HONG KONG) LTD „„ 

d Nomura Jotaata Fund S 1181 

: as a . ss » 

* NS NUtaid tnramoitonoi Ffl DM 24500 * 

>> N 5 Concord Fund _ DWl 280 . 00 * 

r NS intandiwiai Curr Fd i . 20 ^ 0 * 

m NS BdB Mortgage Fund Dkk 1 * 100 * 

— 127 OLD MUTUAL IhTL (GUERNSEY] LTD 

v UKf 5 ed Inttresl C 5402 

i. snrwra Managed £ 5214 

a European Smaanaikei £ *- 2 ® 

. Siertng Special Markul £ 44*1 

w rad Fiud I mares 1 4371 

: I ^ 

* Pacific Stockrrautei S 5394 

■r DMUrSpeciM Market S ).on 

in OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL INC 

HniBam Home. Fvmvlkui HM 1 1 . Bermuda 
Tet *41 392-1018 F®r 44 ! 295-2305 _ 

* a!I W aUuiWFm S 134 .** 

: M&hfl/im \ ip 

* lYfncK EQB«fh Drawn S 16*6 

a Winch, premier S £59 31 

* OWrnpra scr series , % 21177 

* otympra star FF Hedge Ser FF 2809 JC 


S 17127 

i 

S 1175.93 
S 16*6 

S 45»31 
S 21177 
FF 2809 JC 
FF 322 * 5 * 
ECU 1450 71 
ECU 1 * 82.78 
ECU 19 J 9 47 
Ecu 194470 
5 130*57 

S 21 72 

S l'AW 
5 57647 


35 K i 


a Wlndv HHgutflSerD Ecu 19 J 947 

* Winch Hlag Inf! Ser F Ecu 196 AM 

w Drympia GmCdi Hedge 5 130*^7 

a ft'InihReser M iiHlG v Bd S 21 h 
m Oimdo inrl Alttnoge S ll A» 

« Oiymoia Nawral RaniKM s 57*47 
129 0 PPENHE 1 MER * CO. INC FA [Real mrt 

r Aitainage mwnvrhonai S 146 .W 

■ EmeraMknmriii S jaa 

f innHonaifl Fund 11 f 

' Drawn CcrejyS ub Ud J }**■» 

* Dopen InB =Ou.T L 70 I 11 J -44 

> Oppun ?a-flC- 8 1 'TUd S 14321 

* Opcert '.'Slue imi Ud S 11894 

13 IOPTIGESTIOH PARIS 

CROUPE MARTIN MAUREL 
a CsiaesGiaifd-frad'n: DM 2 ^ 3*5 

■x 0 sl'CS 3 Gi:l 1 -a-OflhStcF G-.J 226 B 3 S 
a CpiigurGOiFc-u-TEcSuo DM ili’SR 
131 OPTIMA FUND N^ACEMENT 
r 3 Frarf S!. H=r rar Srm-H 809 r«Wl 65 a 


i' : fe ‘ r'=sW 

:u -ccj* : - 


14 * iCfli C 
3 AV TTCTC; 


' : it vi' sassVe, kNTE~RPS.sE ^ | 

* :5 vagnTvfVn:' 1 


044 CREC 1 T COMMERCIAL SE Fl 
i Ewa v a ry aj _ 
fl SfllUTSU 4 SD B 
BO CREDIT LYOWIAB ROUSE 3 

<- O'* .'SSC -3 

- *.i 3 uac 

IT S* FF-Sra 

- BrASOn: 

t* 3 *U£SmlMSY» 


s :sc *5 

rasMLM 


THf VOtATiOfY FOND 300697 '-JX 

n TneV*S>WYF<!U 5 S * * J 

S 4 i CURS IT OR FUND . 

: issiggsg, s .I 

a Curalcr 5 iar GUT Sas-Fd S 

U DARlEtt HEHT 5 CH GROUP 
T*i 41-22 73. 68 68 

: : Sp^TSSAnd 

? 

fl DH Taaan °=!7 
s Scnsra Ptartths 
a DH Cyarr rj-a * 

MS DELTEC PANAMKICATRUST OL LTD 

- ? n 

- Deeec wondriifle rac rd 

- SetaK Hjgr Y-ss rs 
Ofl DISCOUNT BANK GROUP 

i Sa»Ti ea M.T- "S 3 Cjnra 


r= ’u-z. i 
,k m ■ ■ 

=v 3«2 3 AvSta= 5 c 2 =*-A 

eF *^ 72 r= : •; fe^ 4 r- 


-rs. -e »:i 

' ::-a:-z*z? &£.- z l left 

* sjr v ~ j - 3 -. 3 

? 6>:5&i s i iti 


SF 

= m 
s ? m 


j -ffgitfXgs | M 

a A L afOCVlB C-J { 3 * 1 ^ 

^ ^B^Tm^lS^OHS^CAV 74AJ 

g 9 C 3 HaON.H 3 Ua ASSET MNCT 5 467 

03 GCTTEX FUND MANA&EMRNT 
a S. Sflflfl Ft" lea 1W9 37 

OT. GRANITE CAPITAL pm. GROUP 
* anr-fe cs&ia S 174153 

BB GBOUPE INDOSJE 2 FUNDS 30417 « 

"6 2323*4 54 24 CK 
=g.^S;-a 654 a 

■GNDPO^FG^CS.. 

3 3 MT.-*i 


7 » 9 --t= Fa iir 295-6759 ! * - 4 CCF*- V J“-f-nd 

- 1 C _ ?r g- = .-s- ri=s • “2 1 * Klssnc*: -3 

" -yyy-nvr: 3 '«AT J a VApl-.-j-BLC Ee 

5 i 

CTMlUaFUTl^ASenOHSBCAV ■ 


1 1158827 I 4 


si ass j 

s i!ea 4 1 
ff sdLa ! 


Ifl^BsW—DaUI 
— flf Lr= Send 


1 2 tSf 5i Feseo BjflC 

1 Is^PcaTFcJS 


».v "acy: I 

i 

St 24112 : 

5 2*343 ■ 


a 5 =mBdBl HSncrtTLJSD 
_ Mm Bn .VI H 5 Iort 1 FRr rr 
M H Short T DEM 3 r-L 
■MAN CHF TX" *-»•-» 

. A „„NiinU!S I 

«■ Sasni Egouy Eiiraml 

> Scam Ed M Ameog 

> Sand Ea French 

> Sjmgq je p=n 

a 

■ sseatrMddie 

*? D g 2 SSfK ! 2 vs *™ KMT3 * .*a 

V !Ma»erEcn»e — 7 * 

HI ^M ER DE GESTK 3 N COLLECTIVE ^ 

J l^lSr Sr "Sb 

OB DUSDNERIUNK I NVESTMgHT GROUP 

DIT 5 T IWf rf BW e ttt- ST Cr~„ 

« drarmr.-ggB^^ 

3 im-'Ssnianfa-B - DM _ 8 C 4 i- 

DRESCUER KUilNE.'QRT BENSON INTL 


fl ASEAN 

; Pcc.fi: . 


3 r tai mj^rs 

fl 737 

fl -‘SRSC. .... 


^ ,2o nss 

?W 312 .CC 


LJ 1 «mS 
Y 276 M 


r GruwOlWikA } £ 

1 s 

J I 

• VIPSereOF.rs S 11 

K7 MALABAR CAP MGMT(Bennta) LTD . 

rn Maiataar Irfl Fired S 

IN MANULIFE WJGALHlNP , 

T:( 8 S 2 > 2501 - 91 OCF: 185*28169510 
a American Gra-vm Funa S 14 . 

s EuoDtgn Gravm Fond 5 t. 

£ e-JDUl ReseuTO FLH 3 S 4 . 

■: SS»W%a \ 

2 JODOnua »l Fung 3 4 

C Facrfc Bawi GfDWRi Fortt J J 

5 STSSSFund i i 


a Sfl-'J-I -1 5 14«6 

U 3 OMiSJNVEST Bfi=rfS 294 2300 

a 3 ? » -r-Tfl 'ii:-.-. i 25 49 

« D-si! -e.era^e .. 9 .. i 5 -**-*> 

8 SR!W> 9 w 

fcSSaTPKRs s 1 ^ 9 -. 

j l USS 

? Cr&rtxubl SrftS.fr'V ^ S 

? 8 ss:®^ 7 Pa \ 

J 88 SSiSSSn&% J ffl 

118 FACTUAL 

a SW Hra" Ytala Fd Ud } 2319*00 

a nrair Fund ua S 

a Tuingor Hran Viera Fd I 11 aRI «3 

218 PARA INTERNATIONAL FUND LTD 
m CtaSlASrunW S 144887 

131 PARIBAS 


PARl/ESJ SUBFUNDS 
t O UiT Y K JRT FC UPS 

a ParvB« 


IWSSRSF"^ . - 

TO 94 S '•&> -gaeaj; 

i SSIr 

2 BCT 9 A 3 LD 

s ES£ - jf sffi 

INTERNA TIONAL INCCV.E FUND — , 

tSS&DMK D«i 

(ffl D I F MAN INVESTMENT PRODUCTS 


Ul INVESTMENT PRODUCTS 

u mmtWa 'vmjnshAO-- 
®fl-OnSraay J * 

M-b ej-u ie * ! 


i asss* 99 "" 1 i 

i jaa sy ’= a 

^ 281 ! DM 6 J 78 

i ss’s^r- v 1 jb 

on GRYPHON .FUN D MANAGEMENT LTD 

= SSfSiS SS^ 

- rflaSr-ra Fane Ud » w -* 

085 GOIMNESS FUGHT 
lMl-. 4 | 17 nl 74 nF«B 250 S 

? H 

a GSFOletafllinrt " ' 

S GS F Sj^&'iScnT BSa" . I D-Of 


5 4956 

* 

S 24 J 2 

C lAFMScCXBfGTOttTh * <aas 

284 KAM 1 XO-SP 1 NNER RENAISSANCE FD^ 
“ * (v*rn>/ i 5 lSV * “***** 

BU HASENBICHLES ASSET MANGT GeMAH- 

; ^ssest * 0 i TU 


= 5 If 

j £UIFta* *iflid I 21163- 

: VUT 5 ■ VJ > - S 4*52 

- T"i«nr .■.srtom . i 1437 : 

: sfliWVfl i 19-542 

i ■JsDcwls'SSlSa S S 7 . 1 £ 

; run: MBIOS * 0 ; . gjh 

^“BSlSSrnraN 1 , -® c 

L .. « jkN GLOBAL ADVISORS LTD 

??!j©sia 'sss 

- ‘ 5558 

iwS»e * a-ss 

-- Silsis^fDffk SS 3 

? t 5 n 4 s 3 j|g v P m 

l -Cl” ,CJOj Eeu Jji .1756 

? SrS-r-^- V 

fl 2 fl-"-’p. Ft IS®*; 

: * ' 553 75 

* ‘ ~ ' -ipTAL ^GT j 11*. SJ 

OT B3 6 E*- i i-’-- 

■ V'e .iifl.-a.l-jW- 1 * 1 ' 







A S 

S 

? 1 

tart 


nanFond s 4 KB 1 

Ffl S 14129 

iuSir Fa i asm 

BNAMOALOSOOP EFG 


m ih; 

^ ifis 


Fhcei Cl J 3 M 677 _ 

- Hermes ana CHF Fmrf SF 
*HF 1 B «1 Wend USS Fund S 

- Hamas Euooecn Faa Ecu 
■e Ham Worth AmensalFd * 

s- Hemes Assn Fund „ f 

r HernratEmerta.MrajFraa * 
-n HcsitasSarnCiesFviiC J 
n 1 ii nm NrertnJ Rto 1 

- HBKBtMPCS! ■_* 

r- HBines&acFimu =a 

r- HenauSIviresFq. ; 

- Hemes Lnivid Fd . S 

n Harm uSlftaa me Act 5 
ra HertarasWaSwmnBnGFd . 5 6 
re Henan Grass ECU Ffl =eu 
IBS HUH YIELD WORLD RIND . 
re ui. toT POrrfoBo J 

v swuFfsrrPsnws 5 

* 

2 D 3 IK CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
* RAMMor » 


re cm A * *IJ 0 

194 MAVERIOI (CAYMAN) 045 ) 94944 M 
in Mavenck Fund LDC s 28147 

111 MEESPIERSON __ 

ra 

a UmctHatMa FdPJs,, „ \ M*” 

. i m 

{ MEglULYNCM BANK (SUKSE 1 SJL 

j^'mLBS BaBTOBd A * warm 
* MLB 5 tala need 3 

% KiJIMtiiS 

LIJ X EmBOU RG PWTFOUO . 

J US Dailcr Find In: 

- n» Fund Inc 


a US Donor Balanced 
d ECU Bafcmced 
3 Wtarramge EguiTy 

»EauRi Sa» 

^auiiycrauA 
own crajj 3 

MER^ EI LTNCh“ DEVELOPING LTD 

S^USD PwitoDo Class A 

0 USD Portfolio Ciena B 

s Load ttr Pm -aw AJ 
o Lcatf Ccv PW crass Bi 
u Loal Cc> Ptfl CJOU 5 A 3 

t meal cev pm aou b» » ■•*“* 

113 MERRILL LYNCH EMERGING »«HKET 5 

s ssg * 

114 MERRILL LYI^MUITY/CONVEimBLE 

a cmg \ ,£§J 

lAS^JE PORTFOUO . 

! %Zo SB 

e cm A f 


CD NVER flBLE SECURITIES PTFL^ 

0 CtESB | 

GU ^ ALLOCATION PTFL l USB. 

0 aas l 

GU^l|oUITY PORTFOLIO $ 
e cmB J 

GLOBAL SMALL CAP PORTFOLIO . 



S 111 B 6 D 0 

& 

DU 124187 

° W | m 


LJ T 47 S 290 A 

^ iJfflS 

EF "*f& 
5 2193 


i 10987 

i \%£ 

T FD i^ 

5 16 . 1 61 4 E 
SF 1183321 
I ' 07 * 5 B| 




S“WtJf 

a CtoB 

S 1 *? 

d cm B 


m Prerewr GUM Bd Fd. 
ra Premier Total fcewm F 


i l 084 
1147 
ATIOHAL LTD 


IKES 

Kl PICTET BC 


MGT [HO LTD 
fens* 


Tel: ( 4*1 1295-2912 _ . 

r sse^i&sfs’af 0 i “ 

ran lAMrejnrmwCdDm 

7 ;ssKgMj. i rrW B 

e VSnasn i ra ret Fund j >y| 

a I name pen fund. f 



EU ^ED Uny PORTFOLIO 

J Clou a 

C Ltav A 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOUO 
fl ttBA 

1 3 £a 

a g»| 

PACW EOUITY PORTFOUO 

o Oauf 

0 g»| 

fECH® Sky PORTFOLIO 


Sired -CHF 

Ml* ’USD...* 
Brer tin - CHF 
enaiLoi) 



i 

- S --= ■■■■■■ 

astwPi ...... 

JSICWILTIta. ..fl 


iSgsBir 

: asS 3 f*« 


i i 4 e 

: sgsSgSS* 1 «JSS 

- II=S«^ 3£?=3 i leSS 

'.^TeRLUUJX 


d ggtaer Marfas 
: OkasnGubdSRcieoi 

t Alta Sup ra Dray th 
3 Kl^xn Vfcrannf Rind 
s akj Tiger WcfflW. _ 

0 AaaiCEn Grant] 
e Aneriesn cimreirae 
e AmEohsfsise 


SmS^NATURAL RESOURCES P^FL 
d cm a | * 

\ gsg * I; 

6raS?n portfolio 

2 ?S 5 b s ii 

% WO i P 

fl Das* A t 

fl fVM B 1 

11 S MERRILL LYNCH RLOBALOIBRENCY 



0 EmeroMifl Hi» SL Tirt S SMB 

i* futhom Ei6 lidiScTruO f HOg 

d Pueiom fitgrilhc GNMA Fd I 7-2 

a Pumam Iren Fund * 7153 

IMOUAKTUM GROUP OP FUNDS 

: ^fer«N. v . I M gs 

» Oiwjun Fund N.V. | 

e QutnDm inamrtai I 484 W 

1 Omnium Redf fiinfl J iS-SS 

iv Quasar Inn Fund N.V. 5 PM9 

fe Quota Fund 1LV. * J6l® 

)n M ^HM 0 MAHABEMEMT f LTO »-46 


: ssm^sss™ 


1H 


159 ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 

Tdf-M P 17 F 1 U 34 ^ 0 M Ft* 44171 1403028 
a Asian Copnal Hatfrni Fd 5 


Tel 352 479 3461 RB- 1 S 3 *72 986 
m Emerging Amedeo Fund . .3 |M 53.97 
a FwteCnsn Tnumionnel CHF SF 109 ffi .]5 
0 Farce Cash TmoHonneJ dm dm psim 
a Fore* Coin T-adttionner USS t l'« 9 
w Latann J 30091 ? 

» Oan-Valor _ SF 114781 


PhSS^RW^mi 


FdHYEmnMkB 
Funa Ecu 
Fund U&S 
rFunaEuraM 


M^£IPiS^ 24 j..„ 
fl Eigra EtreParin. inv Tn Ecu 2400 
n European Strai inv ra Ecu ..77 700 
ir LG lidl Fd Awn C-TOWBl > I 32 J 4 M 

fl PncBlc Nlra Fund S 7 78 

e Satocnw invest SA S ,378897 

e nse. * ® 

S SksSsSkSy I 1 S &4 

IS) SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 
ra Emerging Mkt Curr =d * 

m Com manner Fund j 14597552 

*n ENHorer Funa S 223ES29 

155 SKAN DIN AVI SKA EN 5 KILDA tULNKEN 

^^rr? 3 ,MS,T t tJK4 

l IS^ ye \ 

a L 3 »cmu» 0 tl ra: I ; -Vs*re 

c vanden ins S 14 ^* 

fl 4?F sr . , ’ K “fHi 

a Awe ." > „ 

a S.ni'je me 5*; -rf-ii 

j fiarac-nerwc ■*: 4 . 


Sot 184439 

SF 154892 
Y 9718800 
Ecu 119610 


a -urec^i rat 
a S.e-.Ov&aret;-:-: 

* Ai.S?W njt-i-- .v. 

ShA‘iCiF 2 *.r( 

Stall r. V 
: fcsui'r 

1 CSV 1 '* fl ;t‘ 

: rsifl* »- netr.rtal 

I t-~z» 

3 Ec.-rv V.eS ■e~tnec- 
3 Eou.-,r,;rtr.A-e -.3 
3 For Ear: 

3 rnW rreeT '; vsaet 
s Kin Eu-ore. Oise 


a tend rati as * -5 -,rf 

e Rang ran -r: } 

3 Bond E trooe A— * 

3 BonatJ=ae ^ * .tjye 

S l 35 l«iK S t® 

5 eSBISIf^ =v 

5 gSSSSSKIS^ I iiw 

0 sSSw^touBe Sfl A« Sen I 2 A 33 S 

3 Sadden FtaiUV* Bta me Sej IIMeJ 

o sitgn Bam) USD „ ,* .i®? 

a SMI Bone l-aiKUn Krensr 5 e* 1535 *' 

RIVEE GENEVA 
21 B 1 I 313 I . 

Ul 1204680 
lt lOesaacri 

5 109 3* 

5 75580 

S 128580 

l i»«Ja 

rsmnp ^ ”^ s 

5 IsPamISSSfoFRFDI. FF 67*84 








DEW 3187 
ESP 3 *nM 80 


ra TlwCrpru* Fund 

fgfijgF 


* l» 4-37 

? isqr 

F 103147 
S 10380* 


I Ja 

ScBeiui Ffl BonOl Efli K81 

kil^u 

nsoomcAHET management me. 

SAMManded * 

SAM Eurape UK * 

SAMJMcGrvr HHjfle J 

D s f * 

UAM Money Mda Sto £ 

GSAMMnnvyMkwsF -S 
GSAM Money MtSS DM DM 
GAMSAMOnagaFfllne { 

GSAMOrade = 

m Aipna SAM * 

151 WFA FUND LIMITED . n _.~, 


S 1^93553 
IM 7497.1735 


S 2587 
S AJdffi 
S 34790 

■ s 2 J 2 -S 
I ltn^s 
1 206 JM 

D “ m 



e (HatadBixa 

fl Eereperei Bond Pond 

% WZSX*'*™* 

a GtataoiLetaum 


2 

a SNsfngRnefw 


Y 647B-S 

Y 4J4JBW 
S 81100 
I 48500 


3 SF* 

9 A 

’ SF 
FUNDI LTD 


a SBC Money MU 


■LB 4 M us MERRILL LYNCH GMBALOJRRENCY ; PTP! fiAsinA Cop 1 UUX) ,S 

iH 3 

57500 a f*S S 9 J 2 S pffl KnS*Mra' 8 ire 4 l COD SF 

i r|r™ [ H 

4 ni b Is- i 

jnrm d DM P 


U, I ... .In H|mre^rvrn^d««k.ttt(tedihBPalanm»dfdssotliBl : irtGoffardNinai»MfcfarfiBlatiei»a 

HI Nfaq* «!*» Hr* mh» isaMstt BssAaitataTiatij^hfoa^ 


SF 14 ' 942 V 


FF 491 J 30 V 
FF 494880 * 


1 - Hkad r - Qttw Prtc**; NA - tai Anlankr, 
ILC. - No! ConwwiileiMfl; b-N«t.S- 
UBpendad; SS- atsc* Spit *' ■ ExWnWwd:"- 
Bi-Rts; - (f OHar Pries tmin pnfodnga; ' 
* Piris actangK ■» -ABNenlaiii BxdHHigB;»- 
mbquotod nrter. mm regtetttert ulii 
iMuiauiyaMnorirjL P: IHMtiNMdindaltmil 
pres. E: osHmated price f. pries afadned 2 
Biys prior ts puBtoaxi; r Bid pricB. 


Urn urgnl iY«Wi InfleMs (reqaaney o ( 
quaUdoni Mipglieib W-diilr. {*» ■ ■««; W- 
m-nKMitfityr IH - tortn^hltip; W - nflutwif; P> ■ 
M(ce eraetay; N) - mwtWF 


The Communicator. 





































PAGE 20 


Sports 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 1; 1997 


World Roundup 


Grambling Slapped 
With Probation 

Grambling State University was 
placed on two years' probation 
Thursday by the NCAA for vio- 
lations including recruiting, out-of- 
season practices and academic eli- 
gibility. 

The violations occurred in 
Grambling - s football and men’s 
and women's basketball programs, 
the NCAA said. 

In the football program, viola- 
tions included improper recruiting 
contacts with prospective transfer 
athletes, improper tryouts and out- 
of-season practices. 

The announcement came as Ed- 
die Robinson — the winningest 
coach in college football with 405 
victories — was preparing to begin 
his final season. Robinson had 
agreed to retire after this season 
following an effort to force him out 
last winter. He has won eight Black 
College Championships and 17 
Southwestern Athletic Conference 
titles or co-championships in 56 
seasons as Grambling ’s coach. 

In women’s basketball, the 
NCAA said Grambling improperly 
allowed a student-athlete to prac- 
tice and receive financial aid during 
the 1993-94 and 1995-96 seasons 
after an admissions-test score had 
been invalidated. 

The men’s basketball program 
also was cited for allowing a stu- 1 
dent to play in five games in 1993 
while he was ineligible. Grambling 
was cited for failing to educate its . 
football coaching staff on NCAA 
rules governing out-of-season 
practices and tryouts. 

The school must develop a 
“comprehensive athletics compli- 
ance education program” with an- 
nual repons to the NCAA during 
the probation period, the NCAA 
said. (API 

Senate Makes a Move 
On Antitrust Exemption 

baseball Major league base- 
ball was brought a step closer to 
losing part of its 75-year exemption 
from antitrust laws on Thursday 
when a Senate committee voted to 
revoke the pan dealing with labor 
relations. 

By an 11-6 vote, the Senate Ju- 
diciary Committee approved legis- 
lation that mirrored language 
agreed to earlier this year by club 
owners and players. 

The measure now goes to the full 
Senate, which will not take it up. 
until after the August recess. Be- 
fore it can become law. the House 
also must approve the measure. 

The bill would treat baseball the 
same as any other professional 
sport when it comes to labor re- 
lations. meaning players could go 
to court if they reached an impasse 
in negotiations. Until now, players' 
only options have been to accept 
owners ' offers or strike. (AP ) 

NBA Referee Admits Foul 

basketball An NBA referee 
pleaded guilty in federal court to 
cheating on his income taxes and 
agreed to testify against other ref- 
erees allegedly involved in an air- 
line-ticket scam designed to put 
tax-free cash in their pockets. 

In return for testifying, Jess Ker- 
sey. 56. avoided jafl time. But he 
must pay a S20.000 Fine and back 
taxes on more than S 100,000 of 
unreponed income, plus interest. 
Four other charges of income-tax 
evasion were dropped. Kersey 
could have been 1 sentenced to l5 
years if convicted on all charges. 

He admitted to filing false tax 
returns from 1990 to" 1993 and 
agreed to sene three years’ pro- 
bation and file corrected returns. 

Kersey also resigned from his 
24-year career as one of the NBA’s 
top officials. His tenure included 14 
NBA Finals and three All-Star 
games. He resigned of his own ac- 
cord. 

Kersey s guilty plea and senten- 
cing came one week after a federal 
judge told him it would be in his 
best interest to negotiate a plea 
agreement because a jury was not 
likely to be convinced bv his de- 
fense. ' f APt 


Athletics Federation 
Eases Drug Penalties 

Minimum Ban Halved to 2 Years 


The Associated Press 

ATHENS — World track and field’s 
governing body reduced its penalty for 
use of banned substances from four 
vears to two on Thursday, falling into 
line with other world sports federations 
on the policing of drugs. 

While the ruling by the International 
Amateur Athletic Federation calls for a 
minimum of two years’ suspension for 
violators, individual national associ- 
ations can impose longer penalties. 

The federation was meeting on the 
eve of the World Championships, which 
begin Friday with opening ceremonies. 

After about a two-hour debate, the 
proposal passed with 1 12 votes in favor, 
56 against and 3 abstentions. 

Several countries voiced opposition, 
including Canada, Britain, New Zea- 
land, Australia, Norway. Nations from 
the Caribbean area objected as well. 

The federation was reluctant to lower 
its standards but did so under pressure 
from the European Athletic Associ- 
ation, which insisted that many coun- 
tries' court regulations prevented en- 
forcement of a four-year ban. 

While the minimum penalty has been 
reduced to two years for a first offense, 
the penalty for a second offense will 
remain a lifetime ban. 

The federation also wiped out three- 
month suspensions for athletes who test 
positive for over-the-counter stimu- 
lants. replacing the ban with a warning. 
A second offense for that infraction will 
result in a two-year ban. 

“This should noi be interpreted as a 
lowering of the guard,” Primo Nebiolo. 
president of the federation, said of the 
new measures. 

The four- year ban was among the 
sporting world's harshest penalties. 
Most other international federations im- 
pose shorter suspensions for first-time 
offenses. 

The amendment's critics argued that 
the reduction was a step backward in the 


anti-doping fight. 

“We objected because we felt that a 
two-year ban is an aberration,” said 
Cecil Smith, a Canadian delegate. “If 
an athlete is injured he's gone for two 
years. What kind of ban is that? It's not 
sending a good message. We’re going 
back to where we were.” 

Also assailing the change was 
Amadeo Francis, area representative for 
North and Central America and the 
Caribbean. He said that “four years was 
having an impact” and that the program 
had been working. 

Many athletes have won court battles 
for reinstatement. Their argument was 
that the ban infringed on their right to 
earn a living. 

Among the countries that have re- 
fused to accept fotir-year bans are Rus- 
sia, Bulgaria, Romania, Spain. Ger- 
many, Austria. France and South 
Korea. 

The federation instituted the four- 
year ban in 1991, three years after the 
Canadian sprinter. Ben Johnson, was 
stripped of his Olympic gold medal and 
world record for testing positive for 
steroids at the 19SS Olympics. 

Ralph Lund, president of Canada 
Athletics, said after die vote, “There 
were strong arguments to retain the 
four-year ban.” 

“The arguments for a two-year ban 
were based on a small number of 
cases,” he said. “The two-year ban 
does not have a deterrent component. 
It’s like a long injury to an athlete. When 
someone breaks the rules and cheats 
there should he a punitive compo- 
nent.” 

He added: ’ ‘The IAAF said that it will 
increase out-of-competition testing sig- 
nificantly. Thar is a positive increase. 
Hopefully they will pursue that with 
some integrity.” 

Proposals to reduce the ban were re- 
jected by the federation in 1993 and 
1995. 



Dodgers 9 Sale ‘in the 7th 9 

Ownership Committee Lets Fox See the Books 


By Jim Hodges 

Los Angeles Times 

LOS ANGELES — The seemingly 
glacial pace of selling a major league 
baseball team picked up when the major 
league baseball ownership committee 
agreed to let the owner of the Los 
Angeles Dodgers. Peter O ’Malley . open 
the team's books to the Fox television 
network and the network’s owner, 
Rupert Murdoch. 

"I’d say we’re in the seventh inning 
of a nine-inning game,” O’Malley said 
of the proposed sale. 

O’Malley stunned major league base- 
bail on Jan. 6 by announcing that its last 
family-owned and operated club was on 
the block. Murdoch confirmed his in- 
terest in buying the club in May. 

“This is a significant step," O’Mal- 
ley said Wednesday of the ownership 
committee decision, adding, "Quite 
frankly, I do not anticipate any surprises 
down the road." 

“I believe Fox will be an outstanding 
owner of the Dodgers," he said. “They 
have an excellent understanding of the 
complex issues facing baseball today.” 

Unlike in the sale of other businesses, 
a baseball franchise must get permission 
from a committee of eight club owners to 
open its books to a potential buyer, be- 
cause of the various shared interests com- 
mon to all teams in a sport. O'Malley 
said, adding that the rule was common to 
most other professional sports. 

In a statement. Bill Bartholomay. 
chairman of the ownership committee 
as representative of the owner of the 
Atlanta Braves. Ted Turner, explained 
the next step. 

“The Los Angeles Dodgers may now 
proceed to draft an agreement with Fox 
subject to the approval of the ownership 
committee and major league baseball 
for the change of ownership of the 
Dodgers.” he said. 

That approval would be sought at 
meetings in September. Two-thirds of 
the National League club owners and a 
majority of those in the American 
League would have to approve the sale. 


The vote would involve Turner, who 
is Murdoch's bitter rival in the cable- 
television industry, and observers are 
carious as to whether he will seek to 
marshal forces to keep Murdoch away 
from the owners' table. 

Neither side has mentioned a price for 
the Dodgers, whose sale includes 
Dodger Stadium, the franchise's 300- 
acre Vero Beach, Florida., spring train- 
ing base and a baseball complex in the 
Dominican Republic. 

Analysts have estimated that the 
package could bring from S300 million 
to $400 million. 

The highest price paid for a baseball 
franchise was the $173 million that a 
group headed by Peter Angelos paid for 
die Baltimore Orioles, but that did not 
include a stadium and the other facilities 
offered in the Dodger package. 

The O'Malley family has controlled 
the Dodgers since 1950. It brought the 
team from Brooklyn to Los Angeles to 
begin play in the 1958 season. 


By Jack Curry 

New York Times Sen-ice 

NEW YORK — The inventive fans 
started affixing crude drawings of beer 
mugs to the upper-deck facade behind 
third base after Mark Bellhom whiffed 
to start the game, and as the afternoon 
went along, each drawing represented 
another strikeout by David Wells. 

The carefree Wells thought the beer 
mug drawings symbolized his person- 
ality perfectly. He likes beer and he 
liked the attention as the Yankees 
quenched the Oakland Athletics, 7-0, at 
Yankee Stadium on Wednesday. 

Inning after thirsty inning. Wells 
ordered round after round with more 
strikeouts, and the fans continued taping 
up the mug drawings in bis honor. 

When the fans ran out of their artistic 
creations after 11, which was Wells's 
previous career best, they flattened 
plastic cups and wound up aligning five 
of those, while the pitcher who looks 
like a bouncer proceeded to strike out a 
total of 16 flustered A's. 

When Wells’s three-hitter was fin- 
ished and before the "designated draw- 
ers" found their designated drivers, he 
waved toward them and tipped his cap 
in appreciation. Only Wells would feel 
honored by 1 1 pieces of paper and five 
crushed cups, all associated with an 
alcoholic beverage. 

Wells (11-5) tied David Cone for the 
second-most strikeouts by a Yankee, 
two behind Ron Guidry's 19-year-old 
record, so it was fitting that Cone poin- 
ted out the honorary beer mugs to Wells 
in the sixth inning. 

Cone, who celebrated his sweet 16 


strikeouts against the Tigers only 37 
days ago, said: "On one hand, it's not a 
good message for kids to see. On the 
other hand, it is David Weils. ’ ' 

So true. On a sunny day when Tino 
Martinez hammered his major league- 
leading 36th homer and boosted his 
runs-batted-in total' to 99, when Luis 

Al Roumdup 

Sojo homered and rapped four hits and 
when , die Yanks swept a three-game 
series from the A’s at the stadium for the 
first time since April 1994, 35,480 fans 
were entranced by Wells. He did not 
allow a hit until Scon Spiezio lined a 
single off a diving Wade Boggs’s glove 
with one out in the fifth. - 
In other games, reported by The As- 
sociated Press: 

Rod Sex 8, Mariners 7 Nomar Gar- 
ciaparra’s bases-loaded single in the 
10th inning capped another Boston rally 
as the host Red Sox came back from a 
five-run deficit to beat Seattle. 

The Red Sox scored two runs in the 
eighth inning and — for the fourth time 
in six games — scored three in the 
bottom of the ninth. Then they scored 
the game-winner in the 10th. an inning 
in which they were forced to use the 
pitcher Steve Avery as a pinch-hitter. 
Followed by light-hitting Jesus Tav- 
arez. 

Orioles 3, Rangers 1 Scott Kami- 
eniecki won his first start in more than a 
month and Geronimo Berroa drove in 
two runs as Baltimore capped a three- 
game sweep of visiting Texas, 

Jeff Reboulet, subbing for the injured 
second baseman Roberto Alomar, went 


Galarraga Helps Rockies Beat Expos 



Cloil Juv-Tlic uicJ IYi“ 


The owner of the Fox network. 
Rupert Murdoch, has moved a 
step closer to owning the Dodgers. 


The AssiKijieJ Press 

Andres Galarraga hit two homers and 
drove in five runs, giving him a major- 
league- leading 101 RJBls. as the Colorado 
Rockies beat the Montreal Expos, 12-6. 

Galarraga went 3-for-4 with a walk in 
Wednesday's game. He hit a rwo-run 
homer in the first inning and three-run 
shot, his 2Slh. in the eighth. Vinny 
Castilla and Dante Bichette each went 
4-for-4 for the host Rockies. EUis Burks 
added a two-run homer in his first game 
since June 17, 11 days before he was 
placed on the disabled list because of a 
strained groin. 

Rondell White, who went 4-for-4. 
Henry Rodriguez and David Segui each 
homered tor Montreal. 

Frank Castillo <S-9i won for the 
second time since being traded from the 
Chicago Cubs to the Rockies on July 15. 
Jeff Juden 1 1 1-5) was the loseF. 

Marlins 6, Reds o Ltvan Hernandez, 
the unbeaten rookie, allowed three hits 
in eight innings for his fifth win. leading 
host Florida past Cincinnati. 

Hernandez, 22. became the first Flor- 
ida pitcher to start a season 5-0. Dennis 
Cook pitched (he ninth and gave up a hit. 
Moises Alou had a three-run homer and 


a run-scoring double, giving him three 
homers and seven RBIs in two nights. 

Pere Schourek (5-7), the loser, allowed 
six hits and four runs in four innings. 

Astros 7, Cardinals 4 Craig BigglO hit 

a bases-loaded triple in the eighth inning 

NL Roundup 

and Darryl Kile won his eighth straight 
as Houston beat visiting Sl Louis. 

After the Cardinals scored three rimes 
in the eighth to tie it at 4. Houston came 
back with three runs. 

Tim Bogardrew a lead-off walk from 
Tony Fossas (1-2) and Tony Eusebio 
singled. Mark Perkovsek. the relief 
pitcher, walked Thomas Howard, a 
pinch-bitter. and Biggio followed with n 
liner into the right-field comer. 

Kile ( 15-3) has won 14 of his last 15 
decisions, including a 6-0 mark in July. 
Kile allowed lOhitsandstruckoutseven 
in eight innings. Tom Martin pitched the 
ninth for his first career save. 

Braves 8, Cubs 5 Atlanta rallied for 
two runs in the ninth inning, handing 
visiting Chicago its seventh consecutive 
loss on Fred McGrifFs RBI single. 

Chipper Jones had Three hits and 


drove in three runs, tying the game on a 
double off Mel Rojas i(M) after Danny 
Bautista led off the ninth with a triple. 

McGriff followed with a sharp single 
to right and Jones easily bear the throw 
by Sammy Sosa. Rojas has now blown 
six saves in 19 chances. 

Doug Glanville's RBI single in the 
eighth capped a two-run inning that gave 
the Cubs a 5-4 lead alter they fell behind 
4-0. Alan Embree < 3- h was the w inner. 

Mots 5, Giants 2 Carl Everett's rwo- 
run single capped a rhree-run eighth a> 
New York rallied n» defeat host San 
Francisco and cut the Giants' lead in rhe 
NL Wesr to a half-game. 

Rick Reed (9-h. who won his fifth 
straight decision, allowed two run> i>n 
five hits in seven innings as the Met-, 
broke a three-game losing streak. John 
Franco pitched a perfect ninth for his 
28th save in 32 opportunities. 

Brian Johnson hit a pair of si.i|r. 
homers for the Giants, w hose half-game 
lead over Los .Angeles is their slimmest 
margin atop the NL West since June 1 ! . 
The Giants led rhe division by stx game' 
at the Ail-Star break. 

Julian Tavarez f 3-3 1 . who gave up 
Everett's simile, was the loser. " 


Scoreboard 


BASE BALL 


Major League Standings 

ZLMIUCAN LBAOHJI 

EAST DIVISION 



W 

L 

Pet. 

Balhotor? 

M 

38 

a35 

New Tort 

41 

JJ 

381 

Torunte 

50 

. p j 

491 

Boston 

St 

So 

.4'* 

Detroit 

Jfi 

56 

hZc.1 


CENTRAL DIVISION 


Cleveland 

54 

48 

Sit- 

Milwaukee 

52 

52 

300 

Chicago 

57 

£3 

4«S 

Minnesota 

49 

58 

453 

Kansas City 

43 

60 

.417 


WEST DIVISION 


Seattle 

6? 

-0 

3e>0 

Anaheim 


J? 

3<.1 

Texas 

50 

5o 

472 

Oakland 

42 

o7 

385 

NATIONAL LXAOUI 


EAST DIVISION 



VI 

L 

Pet. 

Attanla 

t9 

29 

*39 

Florida 

60 

45 

371 

New York 

60 

40 

300 

Montreal 

54 

51 

314 

PnilackHphia 

32 

72 

30 8 

CENTRAL DIVISION 


Houston 

SO 

4? 

34o 

Pittsburgh 

52 

55 

.48* 

SL Louis 

51 

55 

.48' 

Cincinnati 

45 

« 

42* 


Chlcaqo 43 is m li 

WEST DIVISION 

San Fran cisco &> 49 .sj* _ 

Los Angeles 5B 49 _SJ2 

San Diego 52 55 M6 6'i 

Colorado SI 57 .472 8 

WIMIHAT' S U MUCOUS 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Oakland dot MX) DOO — 0 3 2 

New York 31 r 10D 01*— 7 13 0 

Karaev, Wengert ,Mt Srocm 18; ana 
Molina. O Wells and Girardi. IV— O. Welts. 
1 1-5. L— Kareav. 3-11. HRs— Nor. Yofk. Saw 
(2i. T. Marline: i36l. 

Seattle 000 300 040 0—7 12 1 

Boston 003 000 023 1—3 IB 0 

OHvare*. HoJjerner iftj. Lira tot. Ayala ■ 71. 
B. Welh (Bl. Chard on fBl. Hurtado tlO: and 
Da.wwsoa- Support. 5 Henry (-,. Y.asdin 
i8i. Slocumo iSi. Cara. ilCl and Hattoberg. 
Stanley HOI. W— Coni 2-1 L-Hijncdo. 1-2. 
HP— Seattle. E_ Marline: ii”». 

Detroit 100 010 000—2 0 0 

Chicago 020 001 00*— 3 7 0 

S Senders. V.iwll '71. .Wren <8.. 
To Janes ,81 and Y.'albecte OiuMtte C. 
Castillo >71. T. CasliQa i/l. Kcrchner fB', R. 
Hcmondei r0) and Fabreaas. W— Drauek 7- 
7.L— S Sanders. 3-8. 5v — R. Hernandez i27l. 
HR— Chicago, P. Tnomas (251. 

Texas 010 M0 900-1 3 0 

Baltimore 000 200 18*— 3 A 0 

Burkett, vosberg pi ana I Podriguez. H. 
Mercedes Ui. Kamicniech’- Orosco {7). a 
B enitez ifl; Ra.Myers <9> and Webster. 
'•V— KamleniccM. 7-5 L— Burkett. 7-10 


Sv— KojAyera (301. 

Amdiaim 200 Oil 010—5 9 0 

Cleveland 110 000 000—2 5 0 

K.HIH Carfare! p;, Jorr.es .71 and 
fd Greene- Nagy, Assenrnacter *91. Mesa 
tBl ana S. Alomar, tv— K. H,c -^—Ncgy 

10- 7. Sv— James '~1 . hpjs— A noheim 
Edmonds il7». Td. Greene ,4>. Ctev*!dni 5. 
AliMWil3i 

Minnesota 802 000 010—11 14 ; 

Kansas City 000 000 100—1 3 3 

Parted. Ritcfire !8' cmd Stou:fcsci: Sosc-i 
Vrnisencnf :4;. J Walker t,-. I V.ar'tgjmerv 
>91 end MiSmjonpy — Sadie :5-S. 

L— Rusch 3-7 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Montreal 202 000 200—4 17 2 

Colorado 321 001 li»— 12 17 0 

Juden. .Vi. Vaiees <Si. Toitora .v r. votes 
*7). De.Hcrt ifl 1 . Fcrteisek i3. C'a .Vage*: 
F. Castillo. Huron 7; Cip“c iTV V..” uno; 
1?' and .V.nrr.-.cnrr; LV— F. CosT.nc 5-0 
L- -Juden. Tl-S hRa — M anned. R .Vh.io 
lie). Segin HO*. H. Rcdnguez'JTi Cztorada 
Bun-s IE). Odsmcco 2 I2C- 
Cincloet, 000 000 COO— O 4 2 

Florida 301 000 llx-4 14 t 

Schourek, Beflndo !5! Rer-linge* t-i end 
TauSensee L-Hemanoci Cask :?i end C 
Jon risen. w — L Herrcnset 5-0. 

L— Schourek, 5-7. HR— F'-nrc. AJAu ..14'. 
Chicago 000 002 120— S 11 0 

Atlanta 100 210 007—4 10 a 

Faster. R. Tons T. Adams SI. 
Bottenfleid 1A1. Patterson ;r. Pe:;s 3) one 
Houston. Sewfe Si: Smqit aieweis f?i. 
C.Fjr 1 ”, CBthe* :6‘ crrt’ee '=i and J 


LOOM- W— Embree 3-1 L — R :ras- 0-4. 

SI. Louis 001 000 030—1 11 0 

Houston 103 MO 03x— 7 It 0 

ALBcnes. T. J. Mathew* [7t. c ossoS »B«- 
Pethoirseh 18J. Befiran (8- and Dilelfce. 
Lumpkin tB>; Kll&T Martin iV> an UEusei'-e. 
Ausimis :9) ft — Kde IS 3. L — Fosses 1-2 
Sv — T Martin II;. 

New York 000 000 032—5 13 I 

Sen Francisco 000 010 1 00—2 5 0 

RRced. Lidle 'S'. Jo Fipncc- i9- ai-d 
Hundley: Ruder. Takaroi -S’. D i3lc ;?i. D 
Henry (9l- R. Poangue: i?* end E. Jonnwn. 
A— P- Reed. 9-4. L— Tovaioi 3-3. 
Sv— jQ.Fraaco iiBi.HSc— San Francuco. B. 
Johnson 7 iai 

Japanese Leagues 

CENTRAL LUOUl 

W L T Pci. GB 

vokutt 52 32 1 *19 ~ 

Hirostvtno AT 40 — -its tj 

YjLahama ao jo — in 100 

ChuniclB 41 45 — A77 liO 

Hanshrn J) 3 I J?6 

Tomlurl 36 49 — 434 loS 

PACIFIC LEAOUI 
W L T PCI. GB 

0n> 44 32 2 J7R - 

SeiDu 45 37 2 -549 2 0 

Da.ei JS is - J» 33 

Nippon Ham tl 2C 1 .d’l S3 

Kir.tefiu Scl 1 *i~t 120 

Volte 33 44 2 429 113 


THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
CENTRAL LEAGUE 
Hcnshtn 7. Yakut' 3 

PACIFIC LEAGUE 

On* 3. So)bu 2 
Kintetsu e. Nippon Ham 5. 


SOCCER 


UEFA CUP 

PRELIMINARY ROUND. SECOND LEO 
GROUP B 

TBigul Tlrasoal Neuzhctcf hamm 3 
Neu chans Xama> -.-.-on 1 0-1 on aggregate 
CROUP C 

Viluna Slavanqertl Voqvodmp Novi Sad 2 
Aggregate sore 2-3. Viking i-.vn 5-4 on 
penalties 

Coleraine 1 Grasshopper Zinich 7 
Grasshopper won 10-1 on aggregate 
GROUP D 

SpartaJ Tma.ul FC Birtirkpra 1 
Spartak Trnasa wan 4-1 on aggregate 
GROUP e 

M K. laksvlt 2. Uipesl 3 
Ukipesf wan 9-2 <in aggregate 
NefrKhimti. Bourgas 1 Brann Bergen 2 
fiagregate j j gram Bergen wan on away 
3och 

Dundee United 9. CE Principal O 
Dundee United won 1 7-0 on aggregate 
■UIOFUHCOP 

Sofia a Slcaua Bucharest 2 
Stnoiia Bucharest supn 5-3 on aggregate 
V.icfeetv Lodi 8. Ncflchi flak u a 
Wid'c-v won HMJ an agnreaale 


Martha r TcatanKl. Deny City 0 
Manbarwon 3-0 on aggregate 
Croatia Zagreb 5- Parttzan Belgrade 0 
Croatia Zagreb won 5-1 on aggregate 
Gttrsflow Rangers 6. Gl GohJ O 
Glasgow Rangers won 1 l-D on aggregate 
Barry Town 0, Dynamo Kiev 4 
Dynamo Kiev won fr-0 on aggregate 
MTK Budapest A Pyunlc Yerevan 3 
MTK wan 4-3 on aggregate 
IFV Koslcel. AkranesO 
IFV nan 4-0 on aggregate 

UHRTUOttt CUP 
SEMtPWAL. SECOND LEO 
Sparling Crtsiai 4. Pacing Chib 1 
Sporting CnsJol won 6-4 on aggregate 
Colo Cola X Cruzeiro 2 
Aggregate score 3-3 Cruzeiro won 5-4 on 
penalties. 

CHAMPIONS' CIIP QUALIFYING 

Los Angeles GaK&y 4. Santos Laguna AC > 


CRICKET 


SB! LANKA PMSUtMT' S XI VS. INDIA 
THREE DAY MATCH 
THURSDAY. IN COLOMBO 
India 308 and 255-5 
Srt Lanta President's XI- 791 
India drew Ihree-dov match. 


TRANSITIONS 


BAMLAU 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

ANAHEIM — Opiinned LHP Matt Ponsno to 


Vancouver . PCL Bought contract ot LHP 
Greg Cadarel from Vancouver. Designated 
RHP Pete JanKhi tor assignment. 

Baltimore — Put 2B Roberta Alomar on 
1 5-day disabled lift. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

ATLANTA —Optioned RHP Brad Clanr: to 
Richmond. 1L and recalled RHP Pmii Byrd 

BASKETBALL 

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 

NBA— Announced resignation ot Jess 
Kersey, referee 

CLEVELAND —Named Marc lavarom as- 
sistant coach. 

MILWAUKEE -Stoned G Michael Curry to 
muittyear contract. 

PHILADELPHIA — Named Julie Bosley d<- 
redor of camiwinltv relations. 

PORTLAND— Named Mike Duntecrvy CooCh 
and signed 5-year contract 

SEATTLE —Signed F Stephen Howard to 1- 
year contract. 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

Chicago —Signed CB Carey Dowdcn and 
OT Troy Barnett. 

JACKSONVILLE— Put LB Tom McManus on 
Inlurad reserve Signed LB Dana Cotlreli 

Kansas —Signed TE Tony Gonmhu to *■ 
year contract. Signed OT Stove '.Valla ee fie- 
loosed CB Wlllhr Beaman. 

MIAMI -Slgited tVB Jaspei Slranc Signed 
WR Terence Davis and Waived CB Hudarfa 
Ismaefl. WR James Dye and p Rob 
Dcfgnwi- 

Philadelphia— Agreed ta terms with Q9 
CbortCT Dimry on i-yeor contract- 


Pittsburgh — Ar.navnce: DL .Voice : =-. 
ers hjs Jeff comp 

SAM Francisco— V iced C9 Mane Brace 
and CL Mon Lama iVoi.ed CB Core. 
den oi;cm LB Vince** gmato-d on ■ 
reserve Signed CB rie-.' -unjh 
central* Agrcedte terms v.-.tl, CB J.m 
enm'wrcn (;r*n;i. 

WASHINGTON -*:^ned F .Virflt Tuft. T; . s 
mor CunVaC* ^tlt-dsed LB Joreirv 
and C5 Jor jfhar. V.o> a»i! 

HOCKEY 

NATIONAL HOCKEV LEAGUE 
BUFFALO -Named Con '.oyor an ;c. 3 :< 

COCCh 

CHICAGO — Pe.f.ni-ea P.V T-yr.y V 

5 ,, rar iaairafl 

FLonrpA — i.amed jOi Ci-rtia assis'c, 
coart 

LOS ANGELES -A V-frrd Is vrmi .*-!*• - .*. 
Glen Wi'Ti Sr. 7 .egr or.: rac i Aq rr . - I 

term-, ...tf> C Jarcs.r. A’.; 3 r, 
tract 

new vobk iswNDEFs-Aareea i-,- 
.wtp P-.'. .‘.’.air L3-.*e- - c.. 

NEW yory RANGERS— flamed .VSer, P, 3; . c 
vice presidor. 1 51 oo-rct.; n-. 

OTTAWA _F.an.-d 0 JSfor. Yen TO m- -.. 

year centra r. 

COLUOB 

AUBURN- Anri-rcea -.VO H m -.a< 

Men a.sniissed tram Te !ec*tai> from 
GUILFORD- An- iLn erf raSigwriOB c* 
Robert Fulton eaf*>eci: :s:cn 
ILLIN0I5STA7E— ArnSurlCrfi mens 
ba B C Sms F.ir, 


tllf 




V;--. 


Hi"" 


1 1+ 


Hmm Rn UmW ynr, hur IW 

The Yankees' David Wells aiming for a strikeout on his way to a 3-hit shutout of Oakland and his 11th victory.- 

Yankees’ Wells Fans 16 Athletics 


•i- 


\ 


3-for-4 with two doubles and an RBI. 
Alomar was placed on the 15-day dis- 
abled list before the game with a pulled 
groin. 

White Sox 3, Tigers 2 Frank Thomas 
broke a sixth-inning tie with his 25th 
home run of the year, leading Chicago at 
home over Detroit and snapping a four- 
game losing streak. 

Thomas was starting his second game 
as die designated hitter following Tues- 
day's trade of Harold Baines to Bal- 
timore. Thomas, the AL’s leading hitter 
with a .361 average, is I-for-7 in the two 
games: 

Twins if. Royals i Brad Radke. 
handed an eight-run lead before throw- 
ing a pitch, won his 11 th straight start by 
pitching Minnesota past Kansas City. 

Radke (15-5) did not give up a hir 
until Chili Davis blooped a single with 
two outs in the sixth inning. Radke 
allowed three hits in seven imiings. 

Angels 5, Indiana 2 Ken Hill won his 
first start for Anaheim, and the Angels 
completed a four-game sweep at Clev- 
eland's Jacobs Field. 

Jim Edmonds and Todd Greene 
homered for Anaheim, which moved 
within a half game of AL West-leading 
Seattle. The Angels' first sweep at Clev- 
eland since 1988 made them 16-5 since 
the All-Star break. Cleveland went 4-10 
on its longest homestand since August 
1986. 

Anaheim's Tony Phillips was appar- 
ently hit on the helmet by a small object 
thrown from the stands after striking out 
in the fifth inning. Phillips, held by; 
teammates in front of the dugout. had 
flipped his bat near catcher Sandy AJo- 
mar after fanning. 


/ 

\ ' 
- .14 -i c 

I k 

••• u'-n. 

; h • . 

» I **,'•”■ 

i Vf: 

J ,*£•' 


* 

; i i : y 

; 

• , 

? r** 

) yf* ; 


f* L ' ; ' 

Df-"' 

T.2: **: ‘ 

:/ ' S; * 

jflWuV -' 


:er i» 


| I hi': 
i I dlls! 

fer* • 

| kr:.:. v . 

j I ICKi’ - 

■j ) -B«r !.••••; . 
J I oiOih-r. 

; / an 

- *•. 

- I 1 " 

^ | ^l/! UT.V ■*; . 

i \ ‘ ' 

•j . . 

'I jSSSHf.—; 

3|»L th* ' . . 

j UncT". ' 
feniRir.-; .- : 
v . ' - 

; ■ ■. Iff IT- 





Mi f 


I-.*-' " 'f i - 

ftr 'S' - 




.* : \ 

&s:.r 


- 

t 


o*> 


j 

i 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1997 


PAGE 21 


: \ 


SPORTS 


n The Wooing of a Star 

How th e Canucks Got Messier to Sign 


l I By Jason Diamos 

X f-L Nn- York Time* 

I ’JyyWGOWER, British Columbia - 
19. and Pat Quinn, 
C ““ cks ’ general nZ: 

p er * decided to take the initiative. The 
Mucks badly wanted to sign Marie 
lessier, so Quinn figured he would get 

ri oSEr “ST oa orher su itors by flying to 
likeHiUon Head Island to lobby the 
dux Messiers in person. J 

' ! Md another team executive, 
P‘ -p™ Chappie, arrived in South Carolina 
next dfly. Once there, they felt there 
' <vas no going back. 


one's here, he's one of a kind. We 
looked at this as a once-in-a-lifetime 
opportunity. I said to-John McCaw, ‘I'll 
pe kicking myself the rest of my life if I 
get on a plane now and someone swoops 
m and Mark goes somewhere else. 1 ” 

• McCaw, the Canucks* billionaire 
owner, would put up the money. Quinn 
and Chappie would lavish the attention. 
'Hie New York Rangers would offer 
precious little of either. 

• And the story of how Messier became 
a former Ranger, leaving a team and a 
city he did not want to leave, would play 
pm over eight midsummer days on two 
coasts in two countries, ending Monday 
when Messier announced in Vancouver 
that he was joining the Canucks for 
approximately $20 million over three 
years. 

Time and again, in exp lainin g his 
decision. Messier said the overriding 
reasons were that the Canucks believed 
in him and had made him feel wanted 

That was pan of the Canucks* 
strategy all along. Vancouver went to 
Messier. The Rangers never did, not 
even in early July when the team pres- 
ident, Neil Smith, was in the South 
anyway for a round of American 
Hockey League meetings. Nor had the 
Rangers called. 

• Into this void stepped the Canucks. 
Dissatisfied with the way the Rangers 
were negotiating. Doug Messier. 
Mark's father and agent called Quinn 
and told him his son might be interested 
in playing for Vancouver. 

The sides first met on Monday, July 
21. “By Tuesday evening really, we 
already, in my mind, had crossed the 
threshold that this clearly made sense 


for Vancouver," Chappie said. “From a 
deal standpoint, it could make sense. 
And then from there, it went into, ‘Is this 
tiie right thing for Mark?’ ’* 

That, of course, was for the Messiers 
to decide. Doug Messier told Quinn and 
Chappie thai they had just about 
covered everything dial needed to be 
covered. So, Quinn went home on 
Wednesday. But Chappie stayed on, try- 
ing to persuade the Messiers to fly out to 
San Francisco to meet with McCaw. the 
cellular phone entrepreneur who Is 
based in Seattle, on his yacht. Chappie's 
persistence paid off. 

In New York, however. Messier's 
close friends were saying privately that 
he still was not sure about moving, that 
he wanted to somehow remain with the 
team he helped guide to the Stanley Cup 
in 1994, breaking a 54-year champi- 
onship drought. 

“It was clear that he was wrestling 
with a highly emotional situation." 
Chappie said. 

So that evening. Messier phoned the 
Rangers to give them one last chance. 
He warned to know if New York's final 
offer was indeed for $10 million over 
two years, the figure the Rangers had 
leaked to the New York news media. 
Messier said that Smith's reply was one 
year, $4.6 million. 

“And we said. 'Thank you. very 
much/ " Messier said. That is. thanks 
but no. thanks. 

The signing was hailed in the Ca- 
nadian news media as a victor)’ for 
small-market Canadian clubs, whose in- 
fluence has been steadily declining in 
the National Hockey League. 

The Canucks are getting a 36-vear- 
old center with six Stanley Cup rings, a 

g raven leader and fierce competitor, 
•ut they will pay for it. Messier will 
earn $5 million a season for each of the 
next three seasons plus Si million each 
season for promotions and marketing. 

The contract includes team and in- 
dividual incentives that could push the 
total close to S20 million — and the 
Canucks have team options for fourth 
and fifth years that could push the total 
value beyond $30 million. 

So. Quinn was asked, did the Ca- 
nucks overpay for Messier? 

“That's a 'difficult question to an- 
swer," he said. “But we believe he's 
the player we needed." 

And that, in the end, was the difference 
between the Canucks and the Raneers. 



' V • I 

v s . t ' T '- > v ; • .1 

K& v\" . . , • ' 1 




Jorge Soto of Sporting Cristal. center, struggling for control of the ball as Racing Club defenders move in. 

Peruvian Team Reaches Cup Final 


Reuters 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Sporting 
Cristal became the first Peruvian team 
to reach the Libertadores Cup final in 25 
years as it overcame Racing Club of 
Argentina in a semifinal match. 

Cristal' s foe in the final will be the 
former champions. Cruzeiro of Brazil, 
who beat Colo Colo of Chile on pen- 
alties in Santiago after their two-game 
tie ended with a 3-3 aggregate score. 

Cristal, whose line-up includes the 
Ghanaian midfielder Pnnce Amoako, 
earned its berth in the finals by beating 
the 1967 champions. Racing, by a 4-1 
score before a crowd of 45,000 to go 
through. 6-4. on aggregate. Luis Bon- 
net. w r ho scored a crucial late goal in the 
first leg in Buenos Aires, fired the Pe- 
ruvians in front after five minutes in 
Wednesday's game. 


Marcelo Delgado scored on a header 
for Racing after 35 minutes to even the 
score, but Cristal regained the initiative 

World Soccer 

when Julio Rivera scored three minutes 
before the break. Bonnet scored again in 
the 5 1st minute before Nolberto Solano 
added an insurance goal 18 minutes 
from rime. 

Peru has been represented just once 
before in the final, wben Uoiversitario 
of Lima lost out to Indepen die nte of 
Argentina in 1972. Along with Ecuador, 
Venezuela and Bolivia, Peru has never 
claimed the Libertadores Cup. 

The Santiago game began half an 
hour late because of torrential rains and 
was marred by unsavory scenes at the 
end when Colo Colo players attacked a 


Switzer Gives Cowboys a Texas Tongue Lashing 


By Mike Freeman 

• AVii York Times Sen ice 

AUSTIN, Texas — Football fans 
have probably heard all about how 
relaxed the Dallas Cowboys' coach. 
Barry Switzer, is supposed to be, how 
he is nothing but a puppet for the 
team’s owner, Jerry Jones. A baby- 
sitter who shares a laugh and a drink 
with his players, instead of disciplining 
them. 

But after what happened during 
practice this week, those perceptions 
will surely be altered. 

Maybe’ it was the blazing temper- 
atures that prevailed as the Cowboys 
prepared for three days of scrimmages 
with the Oakland Raiders. 

Maybe it was that Michael Irvin, 
Hmmitt Smith and Erik Bjomson had all 
dropped easy passes minutes before. 

Or maybe it was just that Switzer 


thought the team was so lethargic that it 
needed a major wake-up call — and that 
he needed to establish a new on-the- 
fieid demeanor for what looks to be a 
promising season for the Cowboys. 

Whatever it was, about 90 minutes 
into a two-hour morning session on 
Tuesday, Switzer went into such a rage 
that if the Cowboys and Raiders fought 
100 fights, the intensity may never 
reach that of Switzer’s outburst. 

Switzer launched into a two-minute, 
profanity-laced tirade that left his face 
red with anger and the team stunned. 
Much of his anger was directed at the 
offensive linemen Erik Williams and 
George Hegamin. who Switzer 
thought were not concentrating. 

Several times he shoved Williams in 
the chest so hard that the 6-foot 6-inch 
( 1 .98-meter }. 328-pound 1 1 48-kilo- 
gram) lineman took several steps back. 

Then Switzer moved down the line. 


berating other linemen, and when he got 
to Hegamin. he smacked him on the side 
of his helmet several times. They were 
not love taps. Switzer bruised his hand. 

Players and assistant coaches were 
shocked. Irvin, who had taken his hel- 
met off. stood iu total disbelief. 

The Cowboys were shocked partly 
because they had never seen Switzer 
that angry, but also because Switzer was 
taking on Williams — a Pro Bowl tackle 
and one of the team's most valuable 
players — in front of the players, dozens 
of reporters and thousands of fans. 

it is always dicey when a coach 
takes on a star player publicly. Switzer 
has veiled at his players before, but 
never at that level. And he had never 
slapped one of them. And ail of this 
was before the Raiders even showed up 
in Texas. 

“Some guys started to feel sorry for 
themselves." Switzer sard. “We wer- 


en't executing. Dropping balls. 
Everything." 

The Cowboys* lack of concentration 
was unusual. The team is having one of 
its best camps in recent years. Irvin, 
who always practices hard, seems to 
have raised his level even higher. And 
he is taking the team with him. 

After Switzer’s blowup, there was 
another example of the intensity of the 
practices and just how serious this 
ream seems to be on getting back to the 
Super Bowl. 

Dallas, like a lot of teams, hires 
officials to referee their practices. 
When a Cowboys defensive back was 
called for pass interference, he went 
into orbit, screaming at the official. 
Soon, the entire secondary joined in. 
They were so angry that even the of- 
ficial seemed surprised at the out- 
burst. 

Remember, it was only practice. 


Cruzeiro substitute. Da Silva. 

There was also a strange second-half 
incident in which a fan threw an object at 
a Cruzeiro striker, Elivelton, as he was 
about to take a comer kick. Elivelton 
threw the object back and was promptly 
sent off by the referee. Colo Colo's 
Brazilian midfielder, Emerson, was also 
shown toe red card for two offenses. 

A hat-trick by the former Chilean 
international, Ivo Basay. was not 
enough for Colo Colo, the only Chilean 
team to have won toe competition. Trail- 
ing 1-0 from toe first leg, Colo Colo 
leveled toe tie when Basay scored with a 
20th minute header. But Cruzeiro’s' 
Marcelo scored nine minutes later. 

Basay converted two penalties in four 
minutes’ at the start of the second half to 
put toe Chileans ahead on aggregate, but 
a 64th minute goal by Cleison, who beat 
the Colo Colo defense to a loose ball, 
sent the dramatic tie to penalty kicks. 

Basay then undid his good work by 
firing Colo Colo's first effort right at toe 
Cruzeiro goalkeeper, Dida, who went 
on to save the Chileans' next shot. Mar- 
celo Espina then missed another attempt 
as Colo Colo's nerves broke. 

■ No Joy in Belgrade After Loss 

The weather was nice, but gloom 
prevailed Thursday in Yugoslavia, 
where a sports-mad nation was reeling 
from toe 5-0 defeat of its beloved Par- 
tizan soccer team by its arch-rival, Croa- 
tia, The Associated Press reported from 
Belgrade. 

“Net Full of Shame." read a headline 
in a Belgrade newspaper following 
Wednesday night’s match in the Croa- 
tian capital, Zagreb. 

Since the Croats narrowly lost. 1-0. in 
Belgrade in toe first-leg match of toe 
Champions League tie last week, they 
advanced on a 5-1 aggregate score. . 

The two matches in Belgrade and 
Zagreb were toe first official ones be- 
tween a Croatian and a Serbian soccer 
team since the two republics, once part 
of the former Yugoslavia, fought a bitter 
war. 


Ali’s Greatest: 
Christie’s Sets 
Auction of 
Memorabilia 


The Associated Press 

So you'd like to own the robe that 
Muhammad Ali wore when he beat 
Sonny Liston and became heavyweight 
champion in 1964? 

Or maybe you’d prefer the robe All 
wore when he won the heavyweight title 
for toe second time by knocking out 
George Foreman in 1974. 

Perhaps, you'd like toe official cu- 
mulative score cards of AJi's upset, split- 
decision loss to Leon Spinks in 19/S. 

Or maybe a letter sent by Cassius 
Clav before he went to Italy and won a 
I960 Olympic gold medal, which is 
signed, “Cassius Marcellus Clay 
•Rome Bound.' " 

These are among some of the more 
than 3,000 pieces relating 10 Ali's career 
and personal life that Ronnie Paloger 
has collected. They will be auctioned at 
Christie’s Los Angeles on Oct. 19. 

“I believe I accomplished rhe mis- 
sion," said Paloger, of Los Angeles, 
who began his Ali collection in 199_. 
“This will allow millions of fans around 
the world to enjoy these things. 

Don Flanagan’ a sports specialist for 
Christie’s, said. “This will be the first 
auction of its kind to focus on one sport 
and one major figure." 

One of Paloger’ s favorite items is a 
six-page letter sent by Ali to toe state 
director of Selective Service in Ken- 
tucky on Aug. 23, 1966, requesting a 
change in draft classification. 

He wrote . . re-open and consider 
anew my classification as it now stands 
... so that my claim for exemption as a 
Minister of Religion, which has never 
before been submitted to toe Local 
Board, may be determined." It is signed 
in black ink, “Muhammad Ali A.K.A. 
Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr.” 

Ali was convicted of refusing to ac- 
cept induction into toe military in 1967, 
snipped of the heavyweight title and 
tanned from boxing until 1970. The 
conviction was overturned by the U.S. 
Supreme Court in 1971. 

Another of Paloger's favorite pieces 
is toe robe worn for toe first Liston fight. 
It is white terry cloth, featuring the 
words "The Lip" and “The Greatest" 
on the back. It is signed on the back by 
Ali, and its estimated selling price is 
$40,000-560.000. 

The scorecards of the three judges for 
AJi's loss to Spinks are estimated at 
S30,000-S40.000. while the estimated 
price for the official scorecards for Alt's 
first fight against Liston is S60.000- 
SS0.000. The two sets of scorecards are 
the only two known to exist from Alt’s 
entire professional career. 

Paloger said. "I was always a col- 
lector and in 1989, and I got back into 
sports memorabilia — baseball, bas- 
ketbaiL etc. — and I was hooked." 

Then he got hold of his firsr piece of 
Ali memorabilia. It was a 1974 iraintng- 
camp check signed by Ali. He found our 
that boxing collecting was generally 
specialized — books, or posters, or pic- 
tures or gloves and so on. 

"I wanted a comprehensive collec- 
tion," said Paloger, who began col- 
lecting Ali items in 1992. “I would say 
it took thousands of dollars. It was five 
years nonstop. It was a lot of miles, a lot 
of sweat, a lot of tears, a lot of fiin." 

There wiU be a tour of auction high- 
lights to Cleveland t Aug. 6- 1 0 ). London 
(Aug. 27-31). New York (Sept. 13-19) 
and Chicago (Oct. 5-7). 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




m r-,. * upfa 


1 MKTO 0 AND 

CALL HER IN THE MORNING/ 


VYf» ft) TW SCUMBLED WMDUME 

Sjjjnmt ■*»«»«**»» 


SOME PIRATES -KJ5T 
LANDED ON THE BEACH! 
A REAL NASTY 
LOOKING BUNCH! 




I WONDER IF 
THEY'RE HERE o 
TO LOOK FOR 1 
BURIED TREASURE., f 

. — , r*~ i 


THEY HAD CHOCOLATE, STRAWBERRY, 
AND MARBLE FUD6E. BUT I’M SLAP 

v uje All ordered vanilla.. > 


<e? 


HHAY DO VO0 THINK. )S THE 
SKfiET TDHM J P)NGS&? IS 
IT MOMS. POWER OR FAME? 


TP CHOOSE. MONO. 

HAVE ENOUGH MOP®. VCU 
CAN BOY KMER. AND FAME, 
THAT VIM TQVJ'D HAVE IT 
ALL AND BE &AUX HAPPY' 


HAPPINESS (S BEW& FAM0J5 I SOWCfSE’ 
P0R V0UR. FINANCIAL A&UTV TUKfc OUT 
TO WD01GE N EVBN UND WAS TO 
, OF EXCESS. _ — < DEFINE tT. i 



C tf ' 3 


TVS. PART I 
TWm. ID 
UVEBST 
tSO&KHWG 
KOPIE WHO 
SET 
MV WAV. 


GARFIELD 


WIZARD of ID 


HERE'S AN ARTICLE ABOUT A CAT 
WHO RE 5 C 0 EP PEOPLE FROM A 
burning Building , 


I'LL BET YOU 
COULDN'T P 0 
THAT^—^c" 


/ 5 URE I ) 
V GOUlP J 


GIMME SOME 
T MATCHES _ 






r Goo? ^ 

in 

r 

V. marm— J 



m 



gw 







3 HAVE V— 
AfrVK TAX PI 
FEFUNC? /Til 









POSTCARD 


Doing It by the Book 


By Marlise Simons 

AVh Yari Times Service 

M ONTOLIEU, Fiance — 
In its first life, this 
mountain village in southern 
France lived off vineyards 
and olive groves and, blessed 
with fast torrents, it built wa- 
ter mills to drive the wheels of 
textile and paper plants. That 
era ended half a century ago 
when far-off countries started 
making these products ter 
more cheaply. 

In its second life, Monto- 
lieu went the way of many 
other European villages: The 
old termers were encouraged 
to abandon the fields to avoid 
overproduction of wine 
grapes and olives and the 
young people left for the cit- 
ies. Then the kindergarten 
closed. Montolieu was dying. 

This community, which 
once had more than 3,000 
people, has only 800 today. 
But now it has audaciously 
invented a third life. 

Ignoring the Internet age, 
Montolieu has devoted itself 
to books. Its narrow streets 
count one bakery, one grocery, 
one butcher, cue bistro and 12 
bookstores, filled with rare 
and second-hand volumes. 
Other dealers are on the way. 


The devotion to the printed 
word has also attracted a 
binder, a printer and a sta- 
tioner. And on a recent week- 
end, apprentices of all ages 
sloshed through vats of pulp 
as they learned how to mold 
handmade paper while on the 
other side of town adepts 
were practicing calligraphy. 

“It’s comforting to think 
that old books have been the 
engine of all this,” said Max 
Delperieur, who doubles as 
mayor and local headmaster. 

Counting the many spin- 
offs of this love of letters, he 
said that the grocer, the 


butcher and the car mechanic 
had increased their incomes 
and many others had found 
work renovating crumbling 
18 th-century houses, turning 
them into shops or country 
homes for the newcomers. 

And so it was that Mon- 
tolieu. which is not oh the way 
to anywhere and is nicked 
amid rocks and woodlands, 
had almost 100,000 visitors 
last year. 

“These are not polluting 
tourists,” noted the mayor. 
“Book lovers are generally 
calm people. They don’t 
make a racket, they don't 
throw plastic around, they re- 
spect the landscape. 1 * 


Mon to lieu’s remake is not 
a test. When Michel Brai- 
bant, -a bookbinder - from 
nearby Carcassonne, first 
proposed the idea in 1989, he 
got in touch with Richard 
Booth, who had turned his 
native Hay-on-Wye in Wales 
into a book, village in the early 
1960s. The binder also wrote 
to Noel Anselot, a dealer in 
Redu, Belgium, another book 
village. The Welshman and 
the Belgian were the first to 
open stores here, followed by 
a Dutchman from Rotterdam. 
Thus encouraged, French en- 
trepreneurs arrived. 

Most shopkeepers and 
graphic artists are not from 
the region. “Quite a few of us 
have fled the rat race,” said 
yann Lartisien, 30, the owner 
of The Drunken Boat Four 
years ago he had an imp on- 
export business in Le Havre 
and came here as a client. 

“Books were always my 
passion,” he said, caressing a 
tome on the voyages of the 
navigator James Cook and the 
1908 Lloyd’s Register of 
Yachts. “I learned the trade 
from the other dealers," he 
said. ‘ ‘We all know each oth- 
er. Life is good here.” 


ESTERNATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1997 


Corporate Downsizing? For a Writer, It’s Murder 


By Blaioe Harden 

tTjttAt flgwfl PtVi Service 

N EW YORK — If you were 
“downsized” after decades of 
loyal service to a company, what 
would be the most productive way 
to channel your feelings of betray- 
al? Here’s a thought: 

Find Dad’s old World War U 
German Luger, oil it up, take some 
target practice and bump off the 
five most qualified competitors for 
the specialized middle-manage- 
ment job that you know best Let’s 
say the first murder goes wonder- 
fully well: Your victim walks out- 
side to check the mail. Baam! A 


To get at Mo. i, you have to shoot 
his netxlesome spouse. To find No. 
3, you must track him to a garden- 
supply shop and shoot him twice in 
the face while he’s loading up on 
peal moss. Then, to elude police, 
you improvise alternative methods 
of killing, running over No. 4 with a 
Plymouth Voyager and bashing the 
skull of No. 6 with a hammer. Fi- 
nally, you eliminate .the man who 
actually has the job you want, as- 
phyxiating him with duct tape. 

Along the way, you become so 
comfortable with murder as a solu- 
tion to life's puzzlements that you 
give serious thought to shooting 
your wife’s lover, as well as that 
annoying elderly lady who takes 
too long backing her car out of a 
parking space at the shopping cen- 
ter. But, of course, you do no such 
thing. You are not crazy. You are 
channeling your anger in a pro- 
ductive way. 

Donald Westlake, the. mystery 
writer who cooked up this job- 
search recipe and neatly lays it out 
in his new novel, “The Ax,” was in 
New York the other day, talking 
about murder and productivity in 
modem America. 

He was sitting in a nearly empty 
restaurant on the Upper East Side 
shortly before the lunch hour when 
this question came up: “Is that your 
definition of murder, then, chan- 
neling anger in a productive way ?” 


The question made West- 
lake laugh, Ir was a childlike 
laugh — light, lilting, al- 
most helpless with mirth. 

And it was spooky. “The 
Ax” isn’t an especially 
funny book. It is, as review- 
ers nave said, “savage,” 
“relentless,” “excruciat- 
ingly brilliant.” It seduces 
readers into cheering the 
snuffing out of innocent 
middle-aged men. It makes a 
plausible case that murder is 
a rational response to CEOs 
who fire legions of loyal em- 
ployees to perk up stock 
prices. It spindles one's 
sense of right and wrong. 

So whars with the laugh- 
ter? 

Westlake, a gangly, 
loose-limbed man of 64, 
with great tufted eyebrows 
and a bald head fringed in 
white, usually writes comic 
capers. Robbery, burglary 
and murder are almost al- 
ways good, clean fun in the 
more than 40 novels he has 
written under his own name 
and assorted pseudonyms. 

After a good long while, 
the author stops laughing. 

He says he definitely is 
not recommending murder, Don 
although he adds, parenthet- 
ically, that he just received a fan 
letter from an unemployed middle 
manager in Connecticut who wrote 
that ‘ ‘having read your book I can- 
not believe the thought of murder 
never occurred to me." 

“Try to .find another way," 
Westlake says, advising readers out 
there who may be inspired by his 
prose. “But remember that, in 
truth, all bets are off. What I say in 



Donald Westlake, whose new crime novel, “The Ax,” tackles downsizing 


years ago with his third wife 
m an upstate village called 
Gallatin, which has jost 12 
houses. Bom in New York; 
City, raised in Albany and ‘ 
educated ‘‘in colleges all- 
over New York state, withy 
no degrees,” Westlake has 
a loving eye for the North- 
east exurbs where life looks 
so comfortable. ’ j ; r 

“It’s so pleasant here,” 
Westlake’s hero muses, ‘ ‘as 
though there are no prob- 
lems in the world, as though 
there was nothing difficult I . 
had to do.” 

What is perhaps most dis- 
combobulanng about “The 
Ax 1 ’ is that its hero, by mur- 
dering well, becomes a more 
attentive father and hus- 
band. When Devore’s teen- 
55^ age son, Billy, gets caught 
burglarizing a software 
store, his father shrewdly 
limits the- legal damage. He 
rashes home from a meeting 
with police and destroys ev- 
idence, tossing out moun- 
tains of stolen software that 
Billy has hidden in his bed- 
room. The police can pin 
just one burglary on Billy, 

Mum lirakna/kr Th* ffpthjoficm ftw 3Jld the judge l&tS him Walk. 1 f 



layoffs. The news story is about 
International Paper's recent an- 
nouncement that it will reduce its 
work force by 9,000 jobs. 

It so happens that the protagonist 
of “The Ax,” Burke Devore, was 
laid off from a paper company. 
Devore coolly notes: “If I were still 
at Halcyon Mills ... I wouldn't be 
killing people.” . 


is a chilling phrase,” he says. “Be- 
cause if you think about it, your job 


ig. Billy suddenly loves his 
dad, and Devore’s wifeis so 
grateful for her husband’s devotion 
to the family that she stops sleeping 


is not going forward, but from your with another man. 


y 9,000 jobs. peripheral vision you can see other 

os that the protagonist jobs thar are going forward. So it is 
Burke Devore, was tike death, a description of death, 
n a paper company. The slow-motion death thar guys 
y notes: “If I were still in their 50s like Burke Devore are 
fills ... I wouldn't be forced to endure occurs in hand- 
e.” some houses in rural Connection t 


prose. “But remember that, in killing people.” some houses in rural Connection i 

truth, all bets are off. What I say in ‘ Before he becomes an . unem- and upstate New York and vyestern 
the book is that the moral code of ployed murderer, the hero of “The Massachusetts, as bills stack up, as 
our times is that the end justifies the Ax” is told by Halcyon Mills that marital pressures mount, as dozens 
means. I think that is true. That is his job has “ceased to go for- upon dozens of resumes are writ- 
what every issue of every news- ward.” This euphemism “snagged ten, photocopied and mailed off 
paper is telling us.” my eye,” Westlake says, because it and as nothing at all happens. 


“I always believed tbatland my - 
family and my home and my pos- 
sessions and my neighborhood and 
my world were exactly what the 
police were here to safeguard,” 
Devore says in the book. * ‘But now 
I understand, they area ’t here for us 


and upstate New York and vyestem at all, they’re here for themselves, 
Massachusetts, as bills stack up, as and they are not to be trusted.” 


paper is telling us.” my eye,” Westlake says, because it 

Down in Greenwich Village, a was die one AT&T coined when it 
mystery bookshop called Partners gor rid of thousands of mid-level 
& Crime has put “The Ax" in a employees. 


display window next to a New 
York Post clipping about corporate 


* ‘ Somehow that was supposed to 
be a softening phrase. But it isn’t. It 


ed to go for- upon dozens of resumes are writ- 
nism “snagged ten, photocopied and mailed off 
says, because it and as nothing at all happens, 
coined when ft It is in this sylvan world of stone 
is of mid-level walls and tulip gardens that West- 
lake sets all the murders in the 
vas supposed to book. He knows the landscape 


These kinds of thoughts. West- 
lake explains, occur to law-abid- 
ing, middle-class Americans only 
when the rug is pulled out from 
under them, 

“It is the loss of faith, ' ’ he says. 
“That is what I wanted to show. . 
When faith is gone, you are de aling 






well, having settled there seven with another kind of character.” 


hSsfe’ 


PEOPLE 



\ i 




Rnbnvfl Xdrtv''\yni>'FiKni^ i Pl*~- 

Prime Minister Tony Blair and Noel Gallagher partying at 10 Downing Street 



T HE cream of the British arts turned up at 10 
Downing Street for a drinks party hosted by 
Prime Minister Tony Blair to mark three months 
in power for his Labour government. Among the 
guests were the classical actor Sir Ian McKelJan, 
the film director Sir David Puttnam and the di- 
rector of the Oscar- winning * ‘Hie English Patient,” 
Anthony Minghella, Another guest, the Oasis 
songwriter and guitarist Noel Gallagher, said he 
had only decided to come because his mother told 
him to. Gallagher was given a tour of No. 10 
Downing Street, Blair’s office, along with Neil 
Tennant and Chris Lowe of Pet Shop Boys. 

□ 

Naomi Campbell has a new family tie: Nelson 
Mandela has made her an ' 'honorary granddaugh- 
ter.' ’ Campbell took time out from supermodeling 
to meet with the South African president five times, 
most recently in his office in Johannesburg. He 
asked her to help him work on a fund to help 
impoverished and sick children. On SepL 26, she 
will accompany him on the first run of the newly 
renovated, luxurious Blue Train, which will go 
from Pretoria to Cape Town. . . A statue of the 
South African black-consciousness leader Steve 
Biko will be unveiled by Mandela on Sept. 12. the 
20th anniversary of Biko's death in detention. 


Mandela will also rename a bridge in Biko’s honor 
in the coastal city of East London, Biko’s friend 
Donald Woods said in a statement. 


Lisa Marie Presley, daughter of Elvis and 
former spouse of Michael Jackson, has moved into 
a home near a Scientology retreat in Clearwater, 
Florida. Presley, 29, has long been a member of the 
Scientology movement, which was founded by a 
former science fiction writer, L. Ron Hubbard. 


After more than 30 years as one of the world's 
most famous bachelors, Omar Sharif has re- 
portedly married for a second time. Friends of 
Sharif, 65, said he had wed Nadiya Aja, the 50- 
year-old daughter of a Saudi tycoon, at a Red Sea 
resort in April. The Egyptian-bom star of “Doctor 
Zhivago" once said that ne only loved his first wife, 
the Egyptian actress Faten Hamaipa. Their 10- 
year marriage broke up in 1965. 


*‘I am having the wedding I dreamed I would 
have when I was 6 years old. I am not having the 
'mature woman’ wedding. I am wearing a white, 
poufy bridal gown.” So said Cathy Guisewite, 46, 


creator of “Cathy,” the underemployed, over- 
weight shopaholic comics page heroine. It will be 
the first marriage for Guisewite,- who five years ago 
adopted a daughter named Ivy. She met her intended 
— “Nixon" screenwriter Christopher Wilkinson, 
46 — at a dinner where they hardly spoke to' one 
another. But Wilkinson, the divorced father of a 17- 
monfh-old son, took her out a few days later, and 
things haven't been the same since. They’ll wed in 
November in Los Angeles, where both live. 


A mountaineer’s hope of becoming the first 
Briton to conquer all 14 of the world's 8,000-meter 
peaks was thwarted by a sneezing fit brought on by 
the flour from a chapatL The accident on the 8,1 25- 
meter (26,8 12-foot) Nanga Parbat, on the Pakistan- 
Afghanistan border, left Alan Hinkes in apparent 
agony and unable to move after slipping a disc in 
his back, newspapers said. “The flour covering the 
chapati got up my nose, causing me to sneeze 
violently and strain my back,” Hinkes, 43, was 
quoted as saying by satellite telephone from a base 
camp. He said he hoped to continue his quest in 
September. Hinkes has already climbed nine peaks, 
including Everest and K2, the world’s two tallest 
mountains. Only five climbers in die world have 
managed all 14 mountains. 





Not for 


all the tea in 10811 . 


. ■ K v 




Everv countrv has its own AT&T Access Number 


which makes calling home or to other countries 


really easy. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for 


the country you're calling from and you'll get the 


clearest connections home. And be sure to charge 


vour calls on your AT&T Calling Card, it'll help you 


avoid outrageous phone charges on your hotel bill 
and save you up to 60V (remember that old Chinese 
proverb-a yuan saved is a yuan earned). Check the 


list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 


AT&T Access Numbers 


Steps to JbDor far easy calling worldwide 

i. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the courtin' you 
ure calling from 

2 Dfcil the phone number you're calling. 

3 Dial the calling cani number listed above vour name 




S3» 000 6750 Till 

i&ortx 


Auslrta*c 
Belgium* . 

Czech Republic* 
Franco ... 

Germany . 

Greece* 

Ireland^ 

Italy* 

NetherfBiidi* 
Russia** (Moscow) » 

Spain . 


022 ■903-011 
0-600-100-10 
00-42-000-101 

0- 800-99-0011 

0130-0010 

00-800-1311 

1- 800-350-000 

172-1011 
0800-022-9111 
. . 755-5042 
. 900-90-00-11 


Sweden . . . 
Switzerland • .. 

United Kingdom* 


020-795-611 

0800-89-0011 

0500-89-0011 

0800-89-0011 


Egypt *1 Cairo) t 

MIDDLE EAST 

. . 510-0200 

Israel 


..177-100-2727 

Saudi Arable o 


1-800-10 

Ghana 


0101 

South Africa 


0-800-99-6123 


AT&T 


Cant find the AT5.T Accew» Number fnr the country you're calhnp [rani? Just ask any operator for 
AT&T Direct" Smite, or ihit our U'cb she at http V/wwwtartxoiiiArn'eler 


r’ci.irt kuov Lit.t. ouncimti 1 : rr-r-l- v -.u-e- 1 ; com.;. r;i cjI< •- a* l’< .. 

^ ; aJct i-r-.r-c-vir .,•.-,.1,^1 • •.*, .-a - m 

*SVj| -r.-’-.- ‘> 1 - ■>- El f . - ,-.,t .- 


tc ,-'T--r .I,, sriaLn.- - * ■ iaiIjM h*'*! LrVfl.iT, tael olL- iv T'it 1 > in i r -Ki kiLul -Jniip rur h, |iielif-r, Iimw iqmi Ui.r ‘.i its* knei 1 1 t«> 5" 'v\'! jt-1 c-tl-t l-tli ,t ls-cJ:-'- 

■i ... i . Li ' j*-a>- , i-Eil;. , liu ■•iTVod tilt -'ml k-ul *11 ll jit -•« Vn.rxto ■ H»-r> tfni Jlu*rAnr Irtsli'v. - •P-iHS. H ijiiiH' J^«i:n;ciriorpfnuciLnIhe<ltiiM>L , - y jEuTfl isx!#* * j-r vi. - - Ji B 


Bs‘ bv* ; ; ■’ ,r-T 


mart 

dollz "i. - 

/A muezT-^y 

T HBgil 

haifiB !!«-./■ ; 

rnafflulc:-' _ 

! An "er- .v--'- 

®ve in 

taring T ‘ 
raild ^ 

laitfcf&ri.^' - " " 
arintf'-i.'— .' " 
ffid.Aif.v.;: - ' '• 
tefrjsr -• 
Bakdlr.- 
ftti fevers : ■ r: 
erase laL ■; ::: rr.: 
main': LTl" ■: 
• jkld Kkj “ v . 
iurr l : . v v 

IhGet;,. 
tob H _■ 

| wsinii), 

; Jttse BCDlji . 
! fafetutfi, v . ‘ 

: WlOgm;;:.; 
donas -. 
ffMonasr ' ' 

.. Tlefca;:..,.,.. 

V. tr. 

' 

Btoffij---' v • 

" " ' 

Anicr^. 

: nuj' c-r..V l"‘ • 

. 'ft * aji,’; 

. •_ ; 

SaacQoJl f '- . , 

‘ ■ 

^UtE w. • 

• 

- 

•' 


^ ■■■ 


•V wil t-.. 

3b ■ 

>=i: V' 

■St V y ;■ -I . 

‘ 

Hr.-:'- ~ 






i