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V „--v 





Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


World’s Daily Newspapet 


R 


London, Tuesday, August 5, 1997 


ope Drying Up 
North Korea 

id Famine, Monsoon Skips 
died, Exhausted Land’ 


By Barbara Crossette 

Net v York Times Service 




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^NTTHD NATIONS, New York — The monsoon rains are 
j ^^po ming to North Korea this summer, and relief officials 
^Epiuntted to visit this reclusive country — its economy 
by the most bizarre of Communist systems, its 
\^fcty net of Soviet bloc nations gone, its food stocks severely 
dot back by two years of floods — say this unexpected 
i-UfQOght may finally bring nearly all 24 million North Koreans 
■;to.the brink of starvation. 

j-.v'; -Officials from international organizations and private 
^ agencies said in interviews in recent days that they had not 
Seensuch severe effects of malnutrition since the famines in 
^ Ethiopia and Somalia. 

difference is that in Ethiopia and Somalia you had 
iifpik&s tha 1 were affected because of drought or war, but it 
jftaso’t a generalized phenomenon, " said Trevor Rowe, 
spokesman for the World Food Program in Rome, which has 
~ money for emergency food aid from govem- 

-infcnts. “In North Korea it is far more, generalized. As the food 
igbes down, everyone is suffering. ’ ’ 

The North. Korean drought threatens to decimate the tra- 
ditional early harvest in October on which the country's hopes 
- Tor ah alleviation of a serious food shortage were pinned. The 
country was expected to harvest 4 million tons of food this year. 
' Projections show that at least 1 3 million tons will be lost. 

; , /-Four LIN agencies and two independent organizations work- 
ing in North Korea said Monday that the drought — more than 
60 days with no rain and hot temperatures — had already cost 
the country 70 percent of its com crop, including virtually all 
plants that were not irrigated. Falling water levels will soon 
threaten rice crops, they added. 

An World Food Program official wrote to the headquarters 
in Rome: “Flying over the northeast in a chopper from 
Pyongyang to Hamhung and Chongjin provides stark visual 
data on the extent and severity of the drought. Vast expanses 


Nationwide Strike Hits UPS 


Z+W- v* «vj 



Victoria AioeWThe Akv«uk 4 Prcm 

A Teamster picketing a United Parcel Service 
center in Massachusetts on Monday after man- 
agement said it had made its “final' offer. Page 11. 



China’s Chance for WTO Fades 

U.S. Says Beijing Is Not Doing Enough to Enter Trade Group 


By David E. Sanger 

New I’.'rl 1 Times Serrii e 


WASHINGTON — After several 
months of slogging negotiations, U.S. 
officials say they now doubt they will 
reach broad agreement this year (o ad- 
mit China to the World Trade Orga- 
nization. an accord they once hoped 
would be the centerpiece of President 
Jiang Zemin 's state visit to Washington 
in October. 

American officials had hoped thaf 
during talks in Beijing and Geneva that 
concluded Friday. China would make a 
comprehensive offer to open its markets 
and allow foreign competitors to take on 
state-owned Chinese industries, which 
employ a majority of China’s urban 
population. 

But instead, officials from the United 
States and Europe said, China’s ne- 
gotiators offered piecemeal conces- 
sions. Now. American officials are 
questioning whether Mr. Jiang, who is 
assembling a leadership team that will 
be formally endorsed at a major party 
congress just before his visit here, is 
ready to take the politically difficult 
steps required for his country to join the 
club of trading nations. 

Then? are now 131 countries and re- 



exposing sandy soil, rocky outcrops and scrub vegetation. - ’ 
-“Terraced slopes that bugged the contours of die hillsides 
are laid bare," the official added. “Even the wide, fertile, 
fltivian plains that one would expect to see fanned are bare. 
Many of the rivershave dried up. Others are filled wilh boulders 
and pebbles from last year’s flood. A blue lake that 1 flew over 
appeared almost like a mirage in a sea of sand. The sense I got 
was one of exhaustion: parched, dried, exhausted land." 

North Korea will for the first time take pan Tuesday in talks 
F JOjredyce tensions on the Korean Peninsula. Relief officials 
say that the talks- to be held in New York, are much more 
important to the North Koreans than they have admitted. 


egohaiors say they hope the talks, at Columbia University 
in New York, will lead to the drafting of a treaty to replace the 
1953 armistice that halted fighting in Korea. 

B Pyongyang Hands Over Remains of 4 Americans 

• In a goodwill gesture on the eve of the landmark four-nation 
talks. North Korea on Monday handed over the remains of four 
U.S. soldiers killed during the 1950-53 Korean War, news 
agencies reported from Seoul. The remains were excavated by 
u) Americans who arrived in the North last month. 

Withio hours of the handover at their border. North and South 
Korea linked their public phone lines for die first time since the 
peninsula was divided at the end of World War n, Seoul 
officials said. The lines will allow South Koreans preparing to 
I build nuclear power plants in the North to communicate with 
their families and headqua r ters. (Reuters, AP , AFP) 



Actum SchoilcmmMcsan fram e -Prarg 

A RIVER BATTLE — A German soldier catching a sandbag Monday at Hohenwutzen 
on the Oder at a point where the dike was showing signs of rupture. But the waters 
started to recede and 10,000 soldiers and civilians began to relax. Page 5. 


In Arab World, Nervous Steps Toward Democracy 


By John Lancaster 

Washington Post Service 


•KUWAIT CITY — Every Tuesday, 
a£ many as 50 robed male deputies 
gather in the hushed, lavishly appointed 
Chamber of the National Assembly here, 
a- glistening white edifice on the Gulf 
feigned by Jom Utzon, the Danish 
gtchitect who planned the Sydney Op- 
era House. 

■ Fingering their worry beads, the 
I deputies rise to address the issues of the 
t day, each prefacing his remarks with the 
P declaration, “In the name of God Most 
Gtadousl” 

Seated in the front rows, draped in 


formal gold-trimmed capes, are min- 
isters in the government’s cabinet, in- 
cluding members of the Sabah family, 
which has ruled this wealthy oil sheikh- 
dom for more than two centuries. 

But the mood is anything but rev- 
erent. . 

Deputies take undisguised pleasure 
in making the ministers squirm, grilling 

Second of two articles 

diem on questionable relationships with 
businessmen and auditingtheir budgets 
with prosecutorial zeal. They point fin- 
gers. 

In a thinly veiled swipe at the edu- 


cation minister the other day, one went 
so far as to accuse Kuwait University 
administrators of being “retarded." 

This is not a story about the flowering 
of democracy in the Middle East. Even 
in relatively liberal Kuwait, women 
cannot vote, political parties are illegal 
and ultimate power rests with the emir, 
Sheikh Jabir Ahmed Sabah, whose dis- 
solution of Parliament in 1986 lasted six 
years. 

In some respects, it is a story about 
what is not happening — about the 
uncanny staying power of autocratic 
Arab rulers in the face of a global demo- 
cratic trend that in recent years has 
toppled totalitarian regimes from Latin 




agenda 


•;U.S. Severs Links With Bosnian Envoys 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — The 
, United States joined its West European 
•Jibes Monday in suspending contact 
Ivitb Bosnian envoys to try to force tne 
country’s factions to divide its am- 


■MWtiaiuw" i—v- . 

A . State Department spokesman 
cffisnednodetails of bow the suspension 
i 'would be implemented, but said n 
kstaoid have no effect on economic 
l*SSkiment assistance to Bosnia, ine 
US. move was in line with actions taken 

r w n i ..J Anctna 



. UdllUUlY _ 

make die move Sunday. Pag 6 


The Dollar | 

NwYorti 

Monday • * P-M- 

previous dose 

DM 

1.8663 . 

1.883 

Pound 

1.6317 

1.6315 

Yen 

118-35 

118-385 

FF 

6.2935 

6 2BZ 

mm 

iBTfiSIZSfl 


lit 

Monday dose 

prewcusckae 

+4.41 

8198.45 

8194.04 

H S&P500 | 

change 

Monday ® 4 P.M. 

previous dose 

+3.16 

950.30 

347.14 



America to Asia to Eastern Europe. 

The authoritarian bent of Arab re- 
gimes and their sluggish approach to 
economic reform have contributed to an 
impression of a region largely cut off 
from the forces of democracy and free 
markets that have brought prosperity 
and political stability to much of the 
post-told War world. 

But the glass, if not half full, is not 
entirely empty. There are growing signs 
that the countries stretching from Mo- 
rocco on the western coast of North 
Africa, across the Middle East to Iraq 
and Iran are not so impervious to de- 

See ARABS, Page 6 


Oldest Person, 122, 
Is Dead in France 

Jeanne Louise Calment, who was 
born in Arles in 1875, died near that 
city Monday. She had become an in- 
stitution in France, with reporters ask- 
ing her every year the reasons she cred- 
ited for her longevity. “God must have 
forgotten me,” she once said. The new 
champion, who will soon be 1 15, lives 
in San Rafael, California. Page 5. 


\gtvn IW-IW 


Books - 

Page 10. 

Crossword- 



Page 8-9. 

Sports 

Pages 18-19. 

| The IHT on-line 

hUp://v;ww.iht.com ] 


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32 


Japan’s Elderly Despair Over Solitude 



I 


By Nicholas D. Kristof 

Not York Times Scnkc 

died, all sympathetic and loving, and a 
^WhSfshemairied 56 years ago.Mrs- 

£££- died. But 


now, as she and her husband straggle 
with age and sickness in this little town 
in central Japan, her house is full of 
emptiness that resounds with the ab- 
sence of her grandchildren. 

“I took care of my parents-in-law. 
but nobody will take care of me,” she 
said. “I suppose,” she said, and for the 
fire! time a hint of bitterness crept into 
her tone, “it’s better for young people 

this way.” , . 

The sense of unfairness endured so 
stoically by Mrs. Kanbe is common 


among the elderly in Japan even though, 
by everyone’s standards but their own, 
the Japanese are models of filial piety. 
Some 55 percent of Japanese over the 
age of 65 live with their children, com- 
pared with fewer than 20 percent in the 
United States and virtually every other 
industrial country. 

As the baby-boom generation ap- 
proaches retirement, threatening the 
bankruptcy of social security systems 

See ELDERLY, Page 6 


gions that are members of the World 
Trade Organization, with the notable 
exceptions of China and Russia, and 
Beijing has sharply criticized the West 
for setting conditions that it believes bar 
it from entry. 

China must reach agreement with its 
major trading partners before its can- 
didacy for WTO membership is put to a 
vote. Once an agreement is reached, a 
simple majority would allow China 
entry into the trade group. 

But U.S. officials say that China is 
unwilling to make large-scale conces- 
sions that would allow, for example, 
foreign companies to sell stock, deliver 
packages commercially and sell tele- 
communications services across the 
breadth of China. Currently, a number 
of companies are permitted to do these 
things, but only on an experimental 
basis in some cities. 

“China's offers were tepid,' * said 
Charlene Barshefsky, the U.S. trade 
representative who has supervised the 
delicate negotiations. 

“This was a view shared by a number 
of our trading partners/' she said, noting 
that this even included Japan and Europe, 
which have pressed for quicker admis- 
sion for China under relaxed rules. 

“If China wishes its hopes to enter 


the WTO to be a key element of the 
meeting with President Clinton, it must 
move quite rapidly now," she said. 
“But there is no indication at this junc- 
ture that China intends to move mean- 
ingfully forward.” 

Some of the comments made by Ms. 
Barshefsky ’s negotiating team and their 
Chinese counterparts in recent days 
were clearly part of the posturing that 
accompanies the complex economic ne- 
gotiations that have become the 1990s 
successors to arms control talks. But the 
negotiations over market openings in 
China are particularly fraught with 
high-level politics in both capitals. 

Chinese leaders have to weigh wheth- 
er it is worth surrendering further con- 
trol over the nation's economy to mar- 
ket forces in order to meet the entrance 
requirements for the World Trade Or- 
ganization. They also have to consider 
the potential political costs if open com- 
petition. and a phasing out of subsidies 
to state-run industries, results in waves 
of unemployment across the country. 

In Washington, the current investi- 
gations into China's possible roie in the 
1996 presidential and congressional 
campaigns have also lurked in the back- 

See CHINA, Page 6 


If Euro Needs Defense , 
Who’ll Call the Shots? 

Paris and Bonn Split Over Central Bank 


By John Vinocur 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — The current pressure on the 
Deutsche mark foreshadows a situation, 
once the installation of a single Euro- 
pean currency is complete, that has no 
certain answer in the manual on how 
Europe will be run in 1999. 

How would the new Europe respond 
to eventual instability in its new cur- 
rency. with who consulting whom about 
what to do, and with what forces or 
institutions having the last word? 

This is a “who’s-ihe-boss" question 
that deals with who controls European 
monetary policy once monetary union 
takes effect. Jt lines France up against 
Germany, with the French pressing for a 

NEWS ANALYSIS^ 

politically based oversight group to con- 
trol the theoretically independent Euro- 
pean Central Bank and the Germans 
insisting that, according to the 
Maastricht treaty, the bank must func- 
tion autonomously with complete au- 
thority over monetary policy. 

Whatever else Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl and Prime Minister Lionel Jospin 
plan to discuss about Europe at their 
meeting in Bonn on Aug. 28. this issue is 
present as a constant subtext because it 
involves wbar both sides, without quire 
saying so, recognize has become a dis- 
cussion over how power will be held 
within the European Union. 

Hie mark's present weakness brings a 
hard focus to the issue. As Europe’s 
single monetary heavyweight, any de- 
cision by the Bundesbank in the coming 
weeks to raise interest rates to protect the 
exchange value of its currency affects 
Germany's neighbors. They are virtu- 
ally obligated to match a rate increase, 
even though higher interest rates, in the 
current weak economic climate, will 
serve as disincentives to investment. 

Although there is plenty of talking 
with Frankfurt, the Bundesbank retains. 

See EUROPE, Page 6 


3 Zeroes Lost 
In Makeover 
Of the Ruble 


By Daniel Williams 

Uu.dnfn.Mti Pf\t SivTirr 

MOSCOW — Russia plans to 
lop three zeroes off ruble banknotes 
next year in an effort to simplify 
commerce and to demonstrate that 
a seven-year collapse of the cur- 
rency and accompanying economic 
depression are at an end. 

The “redenomination" of the 
ruble is a seemingly straightfor- 
ward mathematical operation: 
Come Jan. 1. for instance, instead 
of spending two 1,000-ruble bills to 
take a subway. Muscovites will be 
able to use a pair of newly minted 
one-ruble bills. 

President Boris Yeltsin tried to 
imbue the move with historical 
meaning by declaring an end to the 
1990s era of hyperinflation; "We 
declare that there will be no more 
inflation. New zeroes will never 
again appear on our banknotes." 

Sergei Dubinin, chairman of the 
central bank, went further. He said 
Russia was about to break out of a 
slump marked by the closure of 
hundreds of factories, high unem- 
ployment and declining wages. 

“All necessary conditions are in 
place for moving into economic 
growth,” he said. 

In a televised speech from 
Volzhsky Utyos, where he is wind- 
ing up a summer vacation, Mr. 
Yeltsin stressed the benefits of the 
exchange, saying. “It will be easy 
to count without so many zeroes." 


‘Killer’ Dolphins Retire 

Ukraine Seeks Peaceful Jobs for Navy Porpoises 


By Michael Specter 

New York Times Service 


SEVASTOPOL. Ukraine — There 
was a dark lime, not so long ago, when it 
seemed as if the killer dolphins of the 
Black Sea Fleet would never find peace 
without war. 

Trained, in the words of a spokesman 
for the Ukrainian Navy, to “seek, find, 
kill,” the 70 special forces dolphins lost 
their sense of purpose when the Wall 
felL 

Like John Le Carre, another Cold- 
War superstar knocked off balance by a 
world of freedom, the dolphins couldn't 
seem to get the point of the watery 
universe if sniffing out mines — and 
occasionally exploding them — was no 
longer necessary. 

“When the Cold War ended, we 
thought about everything,” said Cap- 
tain Nikolai Savchenko, the chief 
spokesman for die Ukrainian Navy. 
“We tried to persuade oil companies to 
retrain them. But nobody was inter- 
ested. In a way, it was your typical case 
of defense conversion. These dolphins 
woe raised in a world that had ceased to 
exist” 

Well, sort of. Speaking purely in 
evolutionary terms, dolphins were nev- 
er meant to be fitted with headgear and 


loaded into special cages where they 
could dive hundreds of feet in search of 
mines and foreign frogmen. But these 
animals clearly performed way beyond 
Darwin’s expectations. 

“You can't really call them anim- 


als,” said Dr. Lyudmila Lukina, a phy- 
sician who runs a program using the 
dolphins in a new role: therapy for chil- 
dren with autism and other problems. 
“They are far too smart for that." 

When the dolphins found enemy 
mines, they would simply attach a spe- 
cial glue to the metal (with a gentle nose 
kiss) that let Soviet sappers, who could 
blow them up, know where they were. It 
is unclear if this ever actually 
happened. 

Captain Savchenko asserted that the 
dolphins were even ■ occasionally 
dropped from helicopters with para- 
chutes, although the puipose for this 
type of mission is impossible to divine. 

Scientists would travel to Sevastopol 
from across the Soviet Union to study 
dolphin behavior and try to figure out 
better ways to make use of their unusual 
intellectual gifts. But in this city, where 
every job bad some military purpose, the 
Ukrainian Navy was left bankrupt after 
the Soviet Union dissolved in 1991. 

See DOLPHINS, Page 6 




rUB >?TO 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


4*' 


The Neiv National Geographic / No longor Nonprofit 


An Aristocrat of a Magazine 
Discovers the Bottom Line 


v kl’ 1, 

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By Constance L. Hays 

New York Times Sen-ice 


' J 


ASHJNGTON — NationaJ Geographic has 
always stood apart from most other 
magazines, a yellow-bordered aristocrat 


I 


T ▼ clinging toils Victorian sense of purpose: “the 
increase and diffusion of geographic knowledge. 

No miracle diets or sex tips here, just exhaustive ex- 
aminations of the Roman Empire or startling pictures of 
somewhere on the fringes of the galaxy. 

And for millions of Americans, for more than a century, 
that has been just fine. With a circulation of 9 million, 
NationaJ Geographic has become as sturdy an icon as the 
school bus, with many a suburban bookshelf sagging under 
the weight of the musty magazines that people can’t bear to 
throw away. 

But now the National Geographic Society, the $500 
miliion-a-year enterprise behind the m a ga zi n e, is changing 
from a traditional, nonprofit monolith into an explorer of an 
assortment of other media, this lime for profit. The move 
comes as Gilbert Grosvenor. the last link to the society’s 
founding family — an illustrious clan that included Al- 
exander Graham Bell — has disappeared from die daily 
operations, leaving brasher newcomers in his place. 

And though with change there is nearly always protest, 
here the protest is so sustained that it suggests the society 
may be abandoning what has made it unique all these years 
— and, in the process, trading in its rather classy image for 
a more commonplace devotion to the bottom line. 

“The question always is: When you take away what is 
special about the Geographic, do you take away what the 
audience perceives as special?” said Peter Benchley, the 
aueftorof the novel “Jaws" who has written several articles 
for the magazine, including the June cover story on French 
Polynesia. 

Jennifer Ackerman, a former staff member whose article 
on barrier islands is in the August issue, said: “Everybody 
is concerned, largely because there’s uncertainty about 


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Gilbert Grosvenor, lefL the last link to the society's founding family, is now absent 
from Us daily operations; Reg Murphy, the chief executive, is upbeat about the changes . 


Society executives set up the dual structure to avoid 
jeopardizing National Geographic's tax-exempt status as it 
competed in other media. 


Except for the flagship magazine, which is sent monthly to 
anyone who pays the $27 annual membership fee. just about 


members — atlases, videos and books, for example — will 
finally be offered to the masses, a nod to the 17 percent 
decline in membership since 1989. 

To help that rollout, the map division in January corn- 


direction. It has been a very rapid change." 

From the way it treats its photographers, to its rush to 


embrace other media to its willingness to pursue corporate 
sponsors like Pizza Hut, the made-over society, led by its 
president and chief executive, Reg Murphy, has aroused 
curiosity and anger within and outside its walls. 

For decades, an air of collegiality prevailed. The editorial 
side rarely heard from the business side. Time and money 
flowed for as long as an article or its photographs required 
— which sometimes was for years. Any change came 
slowly, as when an earlier Grosvenor decided to get rid of 
the oak-leaf decorations on the magazine’s border, re- 
moving them one at a time over several years. Readers 
barely noticed. Financially. National Geographic also 
looked robust, with a huge endowment amassed from its 
accrued tax-exempt profits. 

But a closer looks shows chat the business has not been so 
healthy lately. The 1996 consolidated financial statement 
reported $496.7 million in revenue, but $500.9 million in 
expenses. Contributions. $6.4 million in 1992. were only 
$2.2 million last year. Circulation has fallen from its 1989 
peak of 10.9 million to 9 million today. 

Were it not for selling some securities in its endowment, 
the society would not have been in the black either of the 
last two years, although its executives attribute the recent 
higher costs to downsizing. 


That explains, in part, the attraction to the world of for- 
profit media — even if it means eventually paying taxes. 

The society has yet to pay the government anything for 
its new ventures, which have racked up a $24 million loss 
that, under current law. could shelter future income. 

Apart from the tax issue, the tension is palpable these 
days in the hallways of the offices clustered in three 
buildings along 16th, 17th and M Streets. “A lot of the 
people who are making decisions right now have business 
backgrounds,’* said another editor, Robert Poole, who is 
second-in-command. ‘ ‘All of this is particularly difficult 
for people like me who work for the magazine. ' ’ 

Some people argue that the change is Tong overdue, that 
National Geographic enjoys an unfair advantage by clas- 
sifying itself as a nonprofit society. 

‘ ‘National Geographic isn’t nonprofit — it’s simply non- 
taxpaying,” said Dean Hammond, chairman and chief 
executive of Hammond Maps, which for decades has 
considered National Geographic a competitor. “ As a small 
family-owned business, we have paid thousands of times 
the taxes they have ever paid, and yet they have this self- 
poiished halo and (he reputation of being good guys.” 

Mr. Murphy, who succeeded Mr. Grosvenor a year ago. 
counters that National Geographic created the interest in 
maps in the first place. 

The changes at National Geographic started slowly but 
are now in overdrive. First came the switch from not-for- 
profit status to a partly taxable institution in 1 994, when the 


anything that becomes a high- volume business or is sold in 
commercial venues where it vies with products from tax- 
paying competitors can fall under the for-profit division. 

The shift may have spared the society, historically a 
darling of Congress, from completely losing its tax-exempt 
status, as other organizations have recently. 

But it did not inoculate the society altogether. Fine print 
in last week’s tax package will force the society to begin 
paying taxes on millions of dollars of rents and royalties it 
collects from its for-profit subsidiary as of Jan. 1, 2000. 

“We are strongly, negatively impacted by it,” Suzanne 
Dupre, the society's general counsel, said of the tax bill. 

But like someone’s great-aunt who suddenly decides to 
take ap bungee-jumping, the fin-de-si&cle Geographic 
faces other perils besides taxes. 

"Talk about a shift,” said Peter Miller, senior assistant 
editor for expeditions, who is generally enthusiastic. “You 
have a new lord and master: What can we do that will thrill 
people and still make money?” 


pieted the society’s first-ever acquisition, a $2 million 
Colorado company called Trails illustrated, and struck a 
partnership with the Geosystems Global Corp. to produce 


T HERE ARE PLANS for all kinds of ventures, from 
full-length feature films to CD-ROMs that contain 
every issue of the flagship magazine — an in- 
formation trove that might help loyalists feel better 
about finally shedding those back copies. 

Cable television broadcasting partnerships have been 
forged with NBC and Rupert Murdoch's British Sky Broad- 
casting. Hallmark is a sponsor of a made-for-tele vision 
mini-series about Stanley and Livingstone that will be 
broadcast on ABC. And talks are on with two movie 
studios, Columbia Tristar and Francis Ford Coppola’s 
American Zoe trope. 

Materials that have long been offered exclusively to 


society created National Geographic Ventures, the for- 
profit arm that includes its television, on-line and map- 
making businesses. 


the first National Geographic Road Atlas by this fall. 

That is not all. About $20 million was spent for a 44 
percent stake in Destination Cinemas, which creates giant 
Lmax theaters in places like William Randolph Hearst's 
castle and national parks. The magazine's site on the World 
Wide Web (www.nationalgeographic.com) is up and run- 
ning. Two Spanisb-language editions, one for Latin Amer- 
ica and one for Spain, will start soon. 

The guiding principle is “branding,” the use of the 
trademarked yellow rectangle to promote other products. 
“The model company that tends to get talked about a lot is 
Disney, that it’s great at brand awareness and brand ex- 
tension,’* said Bernard Ohanian, the editorial director of 
international editions, whose job just became much busier. 
The idea is that when the new ventures are profitable, they 
will help pay for society expeditions, research and 
classroom programs. 

But the society's staff members, the true believers in that 
mission, are not taking as well to the upheaval, which many 
say has threatened the quality of the magazine."You have 
the new regime saying, ‘Why do you have to spend so much 
time in the field?’ ” Mr. Ohanian said. “And the editors 
say. ‘No one else produces the product we do.’ ’* 

Mr. Murphy is unfazed by the upheaval. “Change is the 


Skid 


rock in everybody’s shoe." he said. “Some people limp.” 
But there are rumors that Mr. Grosvenor and 'Mr. 


But there are rumors that Mr. Grosvenor and Mr. 
Murphy, the past and the present, are at each other's throats. 
A senior editor, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said: 


"This place is like a Southern family with a dead aum 
upstairs.' Everybody knows she’s there, but nobody wants to 


talk about it 


Air-Traffic Slowdown Adds to Pressures on Kenya 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


CJ\EP> 1 . 

Cl- ii:\ . 
Hi TV: 

- 

SSR 7- • 
iVfetrr:; 

WtC: ■ 

otf ' _• 


Reuters 

NAIROBI — Pressures on 
President Daniel arap Moi’s 
government grew Monday as 
an air traffic controllers' work 
slowdown brought chaos to 
tourist flights, and the 
Kenyan currency weakened 
further against the dollar. 

The third day of the protest 
by controllers delayed pas- 
senger and cargo flights for 
up to 12 hours in the high 
season for one of Africa's 
main tourist destinations. 

The Kenyan shilling came 


under new pressure amid high 
dollar demand after the In- 
ternational Monetary Fund 
halted a $205 million aid 
package Thursday because of 
high-level corruption. 

* ‘The go-slow is in its third 
day,” an air traffic controller 
said at Nairobi's Jomo 
Kenyatta airport, “and it is 
absolute chaos out there.” 

A Kenya Airways official 
said planes leaving Kenyatta 
were delayed 3 to 12 hours, 
while arrivals were forced to 
wait up to two hours to land. 


On September <). 199 • the If IT 
nil I pith 


a ^intnsore 


>ertion on 


The lMi ii \(HM 

Industry 


• liio convergence of communications 
and information technologies - 

a new indust rv emerges. 

• Solutions to the problem of Internet 
access speed. 

• Web TV. digital TV: the next addition 
to the interactive industry. 

• telemedicine - how does it work? 


“We are moving to crisis 
point,” the official at the na- 
tional carrier said. “We hope 
the government will inter- 
vene to resolve the issue.” 

But officials said formal 
talks between the controllers 
and the government had yet to 
begin. 

Kenyatta is the main cargo 
and passenger hub for East 
Africa. For some air cargo 
carriers, it is even more im- 
portant than airports in South 
Africa, the continent's eco- 
nomic leader. 

The protest is also affecting 
other Kenyan airports at Mom- 
basa, Kisumu and Malindi. 
The controllers are demanding 
a 50-fold pay increase, hous- 
ing allowances and govern- 


ment-backed mortgages. Me- 
teorologists who supply 
weather information for air 
traffic have also reduced out- 
put. increasing problems in 
flying in all of East Africa. 

Lufthansa Cargo said most 
of its Frankfurt-bound perish- 
able cargo this weekend was 
delayed more than 24 hours 
because late departures from 
Nairobi meant most connec- 
tions were missed. 

Air I ink said it stood to lose 
completely a cargo of five 
tons of fresh flowers, await- 
ing a connection to South 
Africa since Saturday. 

Tourism is Kenya’s lop 
earner of hard currency, with 
flowers and fresh produce in 
fourth place. 


The controllers struck as 
the Moi government was 
squeezed over corruption and 
political reforms. 

The shilling opened Mon- 
day at 62.50 to the dollar, 
compared with the Friday 
close of 61, and weakened to 
nearly 63, according to com- 
mercial bank rates. 

An alliance of opposition- 
backed groups is calling for a 
general strike Friday, but 
Labor Minister Philip Mas- 
inde declared such a walkout 
illegal Sunday. 


Finnair and Lufthansa 


To Go Separate Ways 

HELSINKI (AFP) — Finnair and 
Lufthansa have agreed to discontinue their 
air-traffic cooperation agreement as of OcL 25 
in order to develop pacts with other airlines. 
Finnair said on Monday. 

The deal between the carriers has covered 
scheduling coordination, joint marketing and 
sales activities and frequent-flyer programs. 
The frequent-flyer cooperation is to remain in 
effect through the end of the year. Both air- 
lines have had pacts with other carriers during 
their work with each other. 


Egypt and Malaysia will be linked by; 
twice-weekly flights starting Oct. 6 aimed at! 
bolstering trade and tourism, a senior Egyp-; 
tian official said Monday. [AFPu 


Finland signed an agreement for visa-; 
free travel with Lithuania, the last of the> 
three former Soviet Baltic republics to work; 
out such an arrangement. (APi\ 


Authorities in the Chinese province of, 
Henan are planning a November trial run for; 
the country's first high-speed train, which is. 
to reach a speed of 250 kilometers per hour; 
( 155 miles per hour) in its run between Suqiao; 
and Xiaoshangqiao. lAFPl'. 


WEATHER 


Europe 


Forecast for Wednesday throut^i Friday, as provided by AccuWeaftw, 


ADVERTISEMENT 


ADVERTISEMENT 


A message to the newly elected President of 
the Islamic Republic, Mr. Mohammad Khatmm 


Eighteen years after the advent of the Islamic regime, Iran is still in the 
gnp of economic mismanagement, moral bankruptcy and ideological 
totalitarianism. 


Following your irauguration, we should like to remind you that you 
were elected to the otfice of the preadenev because of the hopes ’and 
aspirations of those Iranians who placed their faith in your promises 
to create a better future for thorn arid thar children. 



This section coincides with the ITU s Telecom Interactive 
'97 Forum and Exhibition. For further information, 
please contact Bill Mahder in Paris at +33 I 4 1 43 93 78; 
fax: +33 I 41 43 92 13 ore-mail: supplements(&iht.com 


THE WORLD'S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


The fulfilment of your undertaking requires adherence to a number of 
universal principles without which any attempt at reform will be 
meaningless. Thee principles require that: 

1. Iranian national interest take precedence over all policy-making 
considerations. 

2. Human rights and freedom of choice are promoted; in particular 
harassment of women and stifling of the youth are eliminated. 

3. The rule of law is reinstated, and measures are taken for the 
establishment of a "Civil Society". 

4 Iranian foreign policy' is based on the principle of non-interference 
in the affairs of other nations, free of adventurism and the 
promotion of bloodshed. 

We, along with the international community, shall monitor your 
efforts during the coming months and shall evaluate vour sincerity on 
the basis of your progress in the a ttainmeni of these cbiLCihv*. 

Front Line, The Constitutionalist Movement of Iran 

P.a Box 326. London SW15 3NN. UJC 

Front Line e a democratic pctocal organsatan detScated to We flute of Law and the 
pimabanaf tan srataial /merest 


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CVTERNATIOJVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 5 , 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


PAGE 3 





Mystery ‘Mastermind’ 
In Trade Center Blast 

W® Trial Uncover Secrets of the Bombing? 

By Benjamin Weiser apartment. The judge said opening ar- 


' ' By Benjamin Weiser 

New fed Times Service 

■ ^.NEW YORK — One February night 
jwo years ago, a helicopter carrying 
Ramzi Ahmed Y ousef , the man accused 
. 01 masterminding the WorldTrade Cen- 
jer bombing, sped along the East River 
on the last Teg of Mr. Yousefs journey, 
jj?!? Pakistan, "where he had recently 
been captured, to detention and trial in 

% the United States. 

f , As die helicopter flew over mid-Man- 
hattan, William Gavin, a senior official 
in the FBI’s New York office, pushed up 

his captive 's blindfold. 

* Mr. Yousef squinted as his eyes ad- 
justed to the tight Then Mr. Gavin 
pointed at the Trade Center towers be- 
low, their lights glowing in the clear, 
cold night 

“Look down there," Mr. Gavin told 
Mr. Yousef. “They’re still standing.” 

* Mr. Y ousef replied, “They wouldn’t 
be, if I had had enough money and 
explosives,* 5 recalled Mr. Gavin, who 
has since retired. 

* Mr. Yousef may have boasted of his 
role in die Trade Center blast, which 
killed six people and hurt more than 
1,000 others on Feb. 26. 1 993. Bet as his 
trial was expected to begin this week in 

|] federal court in Manhattan, important 

* questions remained a boot this figure 
and the extent of his participation in 
Ivhat at the time was the worst terrorist 
attack on American soil. 

[Opening arguments in the trial were 
postponed Monday due to the illness of 
one juror and the- dismissal of an al~ 
lemate juror. Renters reported. 

! [U-S. District Court Judge Kevin 
Duffy said the first alternate juror had 
been taken off the trial because of the 
possibility someone could identify him. 
He also said one of the 12 permanent 
Jurors had called in sick but was ex- 
pected to be in court Tuesday. 

. [Judge Duffy questioned all of the 
jurors about whether their impartiality 
had been affected by last week’s suicide 
bombing in Israel and the discovery of 
five pipe bombs in a raid on a Brooklyn 


guments would begin Tuesday if he and 
lawyers were satisfied that the juror who 
was absent Monday could remain fair.] 

The trial will seek to elucidate if any 
country, group or person — beyond Mr 
Y ousef — sponsored the Trade Center 
blast. Evidence in previous trials 
showecLthaube bombing cost less than 
$20,000 to carry out, but it is uncertain 
where the money came from. There have 
been recent reports that three years be- 
fore the blast, Mr. Yousef lived in a 
house in Pakistan paid for by Osama ibn 
Laden, a wealthy Saudi Arabian who has 
been accused of supporting Middle East- 
ern extremists, and who is now under 
investigation by a federal grand jury. 

Is there any connection between Mr. 
Yousef s (rial and the incident Iasi week 
in Brooklyn in which two men were 
arrested, accused of plotting suicide- 
bomb attacks in New York City? 

In Mr. Yousefs trial, which is likely 
to last three to four months, prosecutors 
are expected to focus not on the larger 
mysteries surrounding the defendant but 
on proving his guilt in the Trade Center 
blast. A second defendant, Eyad Ismoil, 
is also on trial, accused of conspiracy. 

“There is certainly a legitimate pub- 
lic curiosity to the question of, was mere 
a great force behind this, and if there 
was. who was it?” said Henry DePippo, 
a former prosecutor who tried the first 
World Trade Center case. “But you’re 
not likely to get the answers to questions 
in the context of a criminal trial because 
the prosecution is much more limited." 

Mr. Yousef fled the country on the 
night of the Trade Center bombing and 
was not present at the first trial, which 
ended with the convictions of four 
lower-level defendants. 

After Mr. Yousefs arrest in Is- 
lamabad. Pakistan, be was tried last year 
in federal court in Manhattan and con- 
victed of a second conspiracy: a plot in 
Manila, not carried out, to blow up 1 2 
American passenger airliners. For plan- 
ning that crime — what prosecutors 
called “48 hours of terror in the sky" — 
he laces a mandatory life prison terra. 


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A STEP AHEAD OF FLAMES — Fire fighters moving to clear brush 
in the path of a blaze near Santa Clarita, California. The largest of six 
fires, covering 720 acres in San Diego County, was contained Monday. 


Away From Politics 

• A federal appeals court in an ex- 

traordinary last-minute reversal of a 
panel from ihe same court, has blocked 
the execution of a California man who 
was convicted 14 years ago of rape and 
murder. (NYT) 

• A hot-air balloon struck a Douglas 
fir as its pilor tried to land in Oregon, 
sending its eight passengers tumbling 
to the ground and killing one. (AP) 


• Three-year-old twin brothers who 

had apparently wandered from a Con- 
necticut playground were found dead 
in a parked car whose interior tem- 
perature police estimated had reached 
127 degrees Fahrenheit. (NYT) 

• A 65-year-old man jumped in front 

of an Amirak train, killing himself. 
When the authorities went to his Og- 
den, New York, home, 30 miles from 
his suicide, they discovered his wife, 
daughter and 4-year-old granddaugh- 
ter stabbed 10 death. (AP) 


POLITICAL 


Republicans Spar 
Over Weld Hearing 

WASHINGTON — The second- 
ranking Republican cm the Senate For- 
eign Relations Committee says he is 
willing to defy the panel’s chairman, 
Jesse Helms, to try to force a hearing 
on William Weld’s nomination as am- 
bassador to Mexico. 

Senator Richard Lugar, Republican 
of Indiana, said Mr. Helms, Repub- 
lican of North Carolina, “cannot be 
dictatorial ultimately when a majority 
of tbe committee, a majority - of the 
Senate and a majority of the American 
people want action.” 

Mr. Helms, who has refused to bold 
a hearing on the nomination, opposes 
Mr. Weld, a fellow Republican, as too 
soft on drugs to serve in a country 
heavily involved in narcotics traffick- 
ing. 

Mr. Lugar’s comments, on ABC’s 
“This Week” television program Sun- 
day, portend another escalation in a 
nomination fight that the politically 
moderate Mr. Weld has vowed to turn 
into a “land war” against the powerful 
conservative chairman. Mr. Lugar said 
tiie nomination fight was causing 
“civil war in the Republican Party." 

Mr. Weld “has the right to be beard, 
so that his views are clarified and so 
that Mexicans have a pretty good idea 
of what they’re getting," Mr. Lugar 
said. (WP) 

States Face Pressure 
On Health Coverage 

WASHINGTON — The good news 
is that tiie five-year budget deal wait- 
ing for President Bill Clinton’s sig- 
nature gives states a free hand and $24 
bills on in new money to extend med- 
ical coverage to millions of uninsured 
children. The bad news: State officials 
may be unprepared to assume control 
of tbe largest expansion in health-care 
services in 30 years. 

With relatively few strings attached 
to the money, America’s governors say 
they are eager to begin creating a 
health-care system capable of insuring 
children wbo lack coverage. But the 
first installment of nearly $5 billion 
becomes available Oct 1, which leaves 


only two months for state officials to 
largely rework the way they have been 
delivering medical coverage to the 
poor for nearly three decades. 

The new law does not penalize states 
that do not spend the money when it is 
doled out Oct. 1 . But it creates a sense 
of need for state officials to quickly 
come up with plans to purchase in- 
surance for children, for whom a 
month's delay can turn an untreated ear 
infection into permanent hearing loss. 

The Congressional Budget Office 
estimates that the additional resources 
can provide medical coverage, for as 
many as 2.2 million uninsured children 
annually, while the Children *s Defense 
Fund estimates that the number could 
climb as high as 5 million. (WP) 

A Quest for Balance 
On Greenhouse Gases 

WASHINGTON — Trying to build 
support for his environmental agenda, 
Mr. Clinton told Fortune 500 business 
leaders Monday that he was looking 
far ways to combat global warming 
without hurting the country’s econ- 
omy. 

The president renewed his call for 
“realistic but binding limits” on tbe 
greenhouse gases blamed for global 
climate changes. A global convention 
being negotiated for signing this 
December in Kyoto, Japan, aims to cut 
back emissions of carbon dioxide and 
other gases. 

Mr. Clinton met with 10 business 
executives as part of an effort to build 
U.S. support for steps to reduce emis- 
sions. Businesses and conservative 
lawmakers have warned that the limits 
could cost jobs. 

“I believe there should be realistic 
but binding limits to emissions of 
greenhouse gases," he said. ‘ ‘I believe 
that we have to do it in a way that keeps 
our economy growing.’ ’ (AP) 

Quote /Unquote 

Suzanne Kane, 15, on the move by 
Congress to increase tiie tobacco tax, in 
part to discourage teenagers from tak- 
ing up die habit: “Whether you’re 
smoking to be cool or you’re chain- 
smoking, 1 5 cents is not going to make 
a difference.” (AP) 


Showdown in Paradise: Outsiders Sue to Use Parks in Rich Suburbs 


’ . By Blaine Harden 

‘ ' WdshingtonPast Service 

• GnREENWICH. Connectic- 
ut — There is a spot of trouble 
£ere in Cheever country, the 
suburban promised land 
tehere moneyed executives 
ride the train to Manhattan and 
return each evening to sprawl- 
ing homes and cool breezes 
off Long Island Sound. 


It started when a law stu- 
dent. Brenden Leydon. went 
for a jog. 

. His run began in the not- 
quite-so-tony adjacent town 
of Stamford and was brought 
up short at a guard shack that 
stands vigil at the entrance to 
Greenwich Point Park, a 
handsome spit of beach and 
picnic tables, of shorebirds 
and wild beach rose. 


Mr. Leydon was not a res- 
ident of Greenwich. He did 
nor have the park pass that 
only Greenwich residents can 
get.’ So he was denied access 
to the town park. Being a 
young man, just 27 at the 
time, Mr. Leydon shrugged it 
off. figuring he could sneak 
into the park some other day. 
But he could not. 

So, being a lawyer in train- 


ing. he sued. The lawsuit will 
be" heard this fall in Superior 
Coun in Stamford. And now. 
at the height of beach season, 
ii is raising necriesome ques- 
tions of class bias, of snob- 
bery, even of racism for the 
58,000 residents of one of 
America’s oldest and richest 
suburbs — a gilded suburb of 
the kind immortalized in the 
stories of John Cheever. 


Worth magazine this year 
listed Greenwich, where just 
7.2 percent of the population 
is nonwhite, as the 40th 
richest town in the nation. 
That is up from 87th the year 
before, mostly because of an 
explosion of profits on Wall 
Street 

Greenwich, the Connecti- 
cut bedroom community that 
is closest to Manhattan, has 


: AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

California Registry Is Pulled Over 
For Issuing Bogus Drivers licenses 

In California, 79 employees of the Department 
of Motor Vehicles have been fired and two have 
been jailed after investigators found that thou- 
'l sands of fraudulent driver's licenses had been 
issued by clerks in exchange for bribes of as much 

- as $1, OCX) each. 

Some of the licenses bear bogus Social Se- 
curity numbers or phony identities, but if checked 

- by a police officer, they appear to be valid. 

Increasingly in the. United States, the driver’s 
license is a basic identification document, a so- 
.* called gateway card for other forms of iden- 
tification. Licenses are needed for everything 


from applying for welfare to buying a gun to 
checking baggage at an airport. The California 
card incorporates, numerous ^safeguards to make 
"tampering or counterfeiting difficult. An unin- 
tended result: People who need licenses and can’t 
get them legitimately — undocumented immi- 
grants, people with revoked licenses, some felons 
and others — increasingly try to buy them by 
bribing clerics. 

Short Takes 

A lone guide has begun offering daily tours 
of Manzanar, one of the camps where Japan ese- 
Americans were interned during World War IL 
The tours are the latest step in a long campaign to 
tbe California camp a national park so that 
die wartime episode — in which 120,000 people 
of Japanese ancestry, most of them U.S. citizens, 
were interned in the panicky days after the bomb- 
ing of Pearl Harbor — will not be forgotten. 

A tobacco ban has taken effect at Indiana's 32 
penal facilities. Other states are watching to see 


how it works. Tensions reportedly are high be- 
hind bars, where a pack of cigarettes is akin to 
currency. Opponents of the ban predict that it will 
lead to an increase in black-market trading of 
tobacco products once sold at prison commis- 
saries. 

Dennis Saban's car-rental customers know 
where 10 find his business number: in the Yellow 
Pages, near the top of the list. Mr. Saban owns A- 
Aaable Rentals, a name he chose 27 years ago to 
keep bis business in Phoenix, Arizona, high in the 
phone-book listings. But the regional phone com- 
pany. U S WesL recently said that so many A's 
created dishonest competition. So Mr. Saban filed 
suit and won an injunction ordering the inclusion 
of A-Aaable Rentals in tbe next edition of the 
Yellow Pages. Said Mr. Saban: “Their regional 
manager comes to my office and says, ‘What are 
you going to do, sue the phone company?’ So 
that's what I did." 

Brian Knowlton 


become a trendy home for 
young brokers who have 
struck gold in the bull market. 
Average home sales here this 
spring topped $1 million. 

“We are supposed to be 
one nation under God indi- 
visible, but when it starts to 
affect your back yard, people 
throw that principle out the 
window." said Mr. Leydon, 
who filed his lawsuit two 
years ago. 

“Since I filed the suit, I 
have had a number of Green- 
wich residents tell me they 
wouldn’t particularly care if I 
came in, but it was wbo would 
want to come in behind me 
that they would be worried 
about" 

Mr. Leydon is white and 
said be believes that those 
comments were circuitous 
ways of referring to blacks 
who live in neighboring 
Stamford and Port Chester, 
just across the New York 
State line. 

Greenwich, of course, is 
not the only well-heeled com- 
munity to be forced to wrestle 
with complaints of elitism. 
From Cape Cod to Puget 
Sound, Lake Tahoe to tiie 
New jersey shore, affluent 
municipalities and rich 
private estates have been 
challenged again and again 


by outsiders demanding ac- 
cess to the strip of land that 
runs along the edge of oceans, 
sounds and major lakes. 

Although there is no hard 
and fast national legal pre- 
cedent guaranteeing access, 
courts and legislatures in 
many states have been in- 
clined in recent years to give 
outsiders limited pedestrian 
access to the beach. 

Out in Greenwich Point 
Park last week, as they 
strolled between Eagle Pond 
and a stretch of western Long 
Island Sound that affords a 
view of the Manhattan sky- 
line. town residents denied 
any racist or elitist intent in 
restricting access to park. 
They were painfully aware of 
Mr. Leydon and his lawsuit. 

“It is a legitimate law- 
suit.” conceded John Ken- 
nedy, a retired engineer from 
Greenwich who was walking 
with his wife. “But it is an 
annoyance.” 

To control the annoyance, 
townsfolk have set up a legal 
fund, which has reportedly 
collected hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars. They also 
have hired a prominent Hart- 
ford lawyer, Ralph Elliot, 
who teaches at the University 
of Connecticut Law School. 

“It is our belief that the 


Greenwich ordinances which 
the plaintiff is attacking are 
both legal and constitutional, 
and that is the beginning and 
the end of the inquiry," Mr. 
Elliot said. 

Asked whether Green- 
wich’s policy of denying out- 
siders access to its beach is 
snobby, he explained: "This 
case is about what's legal and 
what’s constitutional, not 
what policy is good or bad. 
Policy questions are for leg- 
islative bodies^ legal ques- 
tions are for courts. * 

Greenwich says it has the- 
right to restrict access to its 
park because, since the town 
bought the 147 -acre site in 
1944. it has refused federal or 
state funds to keep it up. 

“We've never taken a 
dime," said a Greenwich first 
selectman, Tom Ragland. 

"We didn't buy this thing, 
the park, for everyone. Char- 
ity begins at home, by and 
large.” 


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1997 

Summits ft 
Conferences 



As an extension of the news and commentary the International Herald Tribune 
brings to its readers, the newspaper has a successful and highly-respected worldwide 
summit and conference program that focuses on economic and political issues. 
The program for the second half of 1997 includes: 


■ 

Korea Summit 

Seoul 

September 10-11 

■ 

World Water: Financing for the Future 

Istanbul 

September 3O-0etober 1 

■ 

Romania Investment Summit 

Bucharest 

October 29-30 

■ 

Oil ft Money Conference 

London 

November 18-19 

■ 

Southern Africa Trade ft Investment Summit 

Gaborone 

November 18-19 


For further information on any of these events, please contact Brenda Erdmann Hagerty, 
International Herald Tribune, 63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH. 

Tel. (44 171) 420 0307 Fax: (44 171) 836 0717 E-mail: bhagerty@iht.com 


THE WORLD'S UArt-Y N'E^l SPAPER 




. M>M>KM .ho likMumib H "I® ^30' 


PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. AUGUST 5, 199* 


ASWPACIFIC 


Hnn Sen Asks Legislators to Return 

He Offers Guarantee of Safety, but They Seek ASEAN Shield 


GxnptlnJ by Our Su& Fwm Dtspoxhn 

PHNOM PENH — Hun Sen called 
Monday for exiled legislators to return 
home by Wednesday to take pan in a 
vote on replacing die country's ousted 
co-prime minister. 

The Cambodian strongman, who 
overthrew the first prime minister. 
Prince Norodom Ranariddh and seized 
power in a July 5-6 coup, said that he 
would guarantee the safety of the leg- 
islators. 

But opposition politicians who fled 
the country after the coup replied that 
they did not trust Mr. Hun Sen and 
wanted a security force of the Asso- 
ciation of South East Asian Nations 
to ensure their safety in their home- 
land. 

Mr. Hun Sen, the second prime min- 
ister, made his comments after a meeting 
over the weekend with envoys from 
ASEAN who were trying to find a way to 
resolve the crisis in Cambodia. 

The invitation on Monday was the 
first official indication of when the vote 
to confirm Foreign Minister Ung Huot 
as first prime minister would go for- 
ward. 

Mr. Hun Sen’s statement, read od 
national radio, appealed to exiled leg- 
islators to “join die meeting of the Na- 
tional Assembly which is expecting to 
vote on your confidence in the candidate 
for nomination of first prime minister of 
the Kingdom of Cambodia on Wednes- 
day.” 

Cambodia was now calm and the Par- 
liament was functioning normally, he 
said. But members of the newly form- 
ed opposition movement, the Union of 



.07 

w* 

-4r 

V 

•ft* 


Daren Whkexbk/KaMen 

Hun Sen praying Monday at a 
Phnom Pehn hospital wing opening. 

Cambodia Democrats, said at a news 
conference in Bangkok that they did 
not trust Mr. Hun Sen and his guar- 
antee. 

The opposition movement is made up 
of the Khmer Nation Party of Sam 
Rainsy, the Funcinpec party of Prince 
Ranariddh, die Khmer Neutral Party 
and the Buddhist Liberal Democratic 
Party. 


“We do not trust the promise of Hun 
Sen to guarantee our safety, so we will 
return when there is a mechanism set up 
to guarantee our safety,” said Ahmed 
Yahya, a Funcinpec member of Par- 
liament who fled to Thailand last 
month. 

Those who left included about 23 
Funcinpec lawmakers and at least three 
members of Parliament from the 
Buddhist Liberal Democratic Party, Mr. 
Sam Rainsy said. 

He said others were in hiding in Cam- 
bodia. 

Human rights workers say about 40 
opposition politicians were killed in a 
crackdown after die fighting in the cap- 
ital in July. 

Mr. Sam Rainsy said die opposition 
politicians would consider returning to 
Cambodia if ASEAN security forces 
agreed to provide security ami escort 
them back. 

4 4 We can consider some additional or 
alternative guarantee.” he said. 

Cambodia is due to hold an election 
next year. 

The United Nations sponsored elec- 
tions in Cambodia in 1993, after which 
Prince Ranariddh and Mr. Hun Sen 
formed an uneasy coalition. 

ASEAN foreign ministers said they 
wanted Cambodia to comply with its 
constitution and hold free and fair elec- 
tions as planned next year. 

Prince Ranariddh left Cambodia on 
the eve of the fighting in July. Mr. Hun 
Sen has said he is free to return, but that 
he must face trial for conducting illegal 
negotiations with the Khmer Rouge 
guerrillas. (AFP. Reuters) 



The Blue Ridge arriving in Hong Kong on Monday. U.S. warships will continue tp make regular stops there.* 

U.S. Whrship Visits Chinese Hong Kong 


10th Victim of Landslide Found 

THREDBO, Australia — Rescue workers on Monday 
found the body of a 1 Otb victim of a landslide that buried two 
ski lodges. Fears of new slides hastened efforts to find the 
eight people who are still missing. 

Nineteen people were trapped under die mud and wreck- 
age when a landslide struck the Thredbo resort 1S5 miles 
(300 kilometers) south of Sydney on Wednesday, and only 
one person has been found alive in the nibble. 

Late Monday, the police verified that a woman believed 
to have been caught in the landslide was alive and well at her 
country home in New South Wales. Her husband had 
reported her missing and then failed to notify the authorities 
when he located her after the slide. (AP) 

Gunmen Kill 8 Pakistan Muslims 

LAHORE, Pakistan — At least eight Shiite Muslims 
were shot and killed Monday by two unidentified gunmen in 
the town of Shorekot in Pakistan’s Punjab Province, height- 
ening sectarian tensions in the area, the police said. 

The gunmen fired from a motorcycle at shops belonging 
to Shiite Muslims in a market and later targeied a Shiite 
group in a suburb of the town, a police official said. Seven 
other people were wounded in the attacks. (AFP) 

Top Chinese Aide Visits Taipei 

TAIPEI — A senior Chinese official arrived in Taiwan on 
Monday for a nine-day visit, becoming the highest-level 
mainland representative to visit the island since Taipei- 
Beijing relations turned sour in 1995. 

Liu Gangqi. deputy secretary-general of the semi-official 
Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Strait, said 
after arriving in Taiwan that he and his delegation of 30 


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scholars and experts, had been invited by Taipei's China 
Modernization Promotion Foundation. 

They will attend a two-day seminar to discuss the mod- 
ernization of China. (Reuters) 


Reuters 

HONG KONG — The flagship of the U.S. Seventh Fleet 
steamed into Hong Kong on Monday and invited the 
People’s Liberation Army to lunch. 

llie amphibious command ship, the USS Blue Ridge, was 
the first foreign warship to visit these waters since Britain 
handed its former colony over to Beijing five weeks ago. 

Sailing into the world’s busiest harbor in the wake of the 
worst typhoon in 14 years, the Blue Ridge took a berth at 
Ocean TerminaJ. normally used by cruise liners. 

Vice-Admiral Bob Natter, commander of the Seventh 
Fleet, said the U.S. Navy would continue to make 60 to 70 


port calls a year at Hong Kong, despite the territory's Juiy 1. 
reunification with communist China. 

The ships stock up on supplies, and the sailors go ashore, 
to visit Hong Kong's shopping malls and nightlife spots., 
bringing $50 million a year into the local economy. 

Officers from the Seventh Fleet planned to meet China’s. 
garrison chief in Hong Kong, Major-General Liu Zhenwu, 
Admiral Natter said. * 

“We have scheduled an official call tomorrow to visit the. 
PLA garrison commander,” he said. “We anticipate en- 
tertaining them to lunch on board tomorrow as welL We . 
look forward to that very much.” , , 


Train Blast in India Injures 15 Refugee Alarm Turns Out to Be a Hoax 


NEW DELHI — Ar least 15 people were injured Monday 
in an explosion on a passenger train in southern India, news 
agencies reported. The authorities had not yet determined 
the cause of the blast 

More than 12 people, including a junior minister, were 
injured when another train derailed near the capital, New 
Delhi, the Press Trust of India said. (Reuters) 

For the Record 

Chinese zoologists say they have discovered a colony of 
about 30 giant pandas living in the wilds of northwestern 
Gansu province. Only 1,000 pandas are believed to remain 
in China. (AP) 


Agence Franee-Preue 

HONG KONG — Police were sent on 
a wild goose chase on a sparsely pop- 
ulated island of Hong Kong on Monday 
for as many as 600 people who. ac- 
cording to a group of Vietnamese illegal 
immigrants, had sneaked ashore during 
the night 

Dozens of police, backed by a heli- 
copter and marine patrol units, scoured 
the shoreline and nigged hills of Lantau. 
west of Hong Kong Island. 

But die search was called off late 


Monday after it appeared that the tip was 
a hoax. Eleven people were rounded up 
during the day, according to the Hong 
Kong Security Bureau. The police said 
only eight had been detained. 

Some of the Vietnamese said they had 
arrived with as many as 6 00 people 
aboard a freighter that had set off from 
Quang Ninh in Vietnam on July 23, the 
police said. Most came ashore late Sun- 
day near Chek Lap Kok, on the northern 
Lantau coast, where Hong Kong’s new 
airport is being built, according to this 


testimony. A few hours later, some of 
the detainees said, others came ashore 
from the same vessel at Mui Wo, a port 
on Lantau ’s southern coast. 

“As a result of what they told us, 
conducted an operation at Chek Lap Lok 
and checked out the coastline arouqd. 
Lantau using a flying services’ heli- 
copter,” said a Lantau police official, 
Steve Camuhers. “There was nothing 
untoward or suspicious. ” 

A few hours after dark, the police 
called off the hunt, RTHK radio said., '. 


Landslides and floods touched off by torrential rains in' 
South Korea over the past two days have killed nine people 
and left two missing, officials said Monday. (Reuters) 

A total of 102 Chinese said Monday that they plan to sue 
the Japanese government for damage caused by its germ 
warfare unit during World War H, demanding both an 
apology and compensation from Tokyo. (AFP) 

Phoolan Devi, India's “Bandit Queen” who is now a 
member of Parliament, threatened to kill herself to protest 
the revival of criminal charges against her. Miss Devi, who 
was accused of gunning down 22 high-caste Hindu men, 
was jailed for 1 1 years and released in 1994. (Reuters) 


Jiang Set to Attack Party Hard-Liners 


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Return 

BELIING — A first draft of 
the address to be given by 
President Jiang Zemin at a 
key Communist Party con- 
gress next month contains an 
attack on hard-line Marxists 
opposed to badly needed eco- 
nomic reforms, Chinese 
sources said Monday. 

The bid by the president 
and Communist Party chief to 
win support for new, sweep- 
ing reforms at the I5lh party 
congress scheduled for late 
September or early October 


echoes the anti-leftist call by 
Deng Xiaoping. Mr. Jiang’s 
mentor and the late para- 
mount leader, in 1992 that 
triggered China’s economic 
boom. 

Diplomats have voiced sur- 
prise at signals indicating that 
Mr. Jiang has felt a need to 
confront hard-liners, believed 
to be a spent force since re- 
form ignited the economy. 

“We must be on guard 
against rigbtism, but priority 
should be given to vigilance 
against leftism at this junc- 


KjfcJHM 

Alan Friedman 
Glolfnl Economics 
Correspondent 


ECONOMICS 

Authoritative. 

I incisive, perceptive, 
j leading edge reporting. 

I If you missed his exclusives in the 
IHT, look for them on our site on the 
r World Wide Web: 


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tore,” a party source quoted 
Mr. Jiang's report as saying in 
a reference to Mr. Deng’s 
policy of maintaining a bal- 
ance between reformers and 
Marxist extremists. 

Mr. Jiang’s battle cry is 
aimed at enacting difficult re- 
forms that would reduce the 
role of the state sector in the 
economy and could force 
thousands of flagging stare en- 
terprises toward bankruptcy. 

The deputy prime minister 
and economic czar, Zhu 
Rongji, who has emerged as 
the strongest candidate to re- 
place Li Peng as prime min- 
ister next year, is determined 
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only if the economy is stable, 
the sources said. 

He is in favor of slashing 
the number of employees of 
state firms enjoying cradle- 
lo-grave welfare and of im- 
proving the efficiency of such 
enterprises, the sources said. 

State companies still form 
the backbone of China's eco- 
nomic system, although 
Beijing has tried gradually to 
reduce their role while allow- 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1997 


PAGE 5 



.Oldest Person in World 
Is Dead in France at 122 


EUROPE 


hui” h 


<>H(r 


o Hi* a Hoax 


! By Charles Trueheart 

• ■ Washington Post Service 

- .PARIS — Jeanne Lonise 
palment, officially the oldest 
Person in the world, died 
Monday near Arles at the age 
p£l22 e 

■ i Officials at the nursing 
home where she was taken 
;when she was 110 gave no 
specific cause of death for 
Mrs. CalmenL 

i She was confined to a 
h wheelchair after a fall nine 
" -years, ago, was nearly blind 
jaad very hard of hearing. 

• -She gave up a two-ciga- 
jette-a-day habit a few years 
ago — not for health reasons, 
a doctor said, but because she 
could no longer light up with- 
out asking few help. 

• In her last decade, Mrs. 
Calment became a French in- 
stitution, regularly described 
in the news media as the 
r ‘doyenne of humanity. ” 

• Every year on her birthday. 
JFeb. 2 1 . she regaled reporters 
Iwith quips about her secret of 
■longevity. They changed 
every year and included 
daughter, activity and “a 
stomach like an ostrich's.” 

<j ! Her most memorable ex- 
r J>1 aaatioo was, “God must 
have forgotten me.” 

« Despite her faltering phys- 
ical faculties, Mrs. Calment 
continued to show impressive 
mental acuity and high spirits. 
rTve only ever had one 
wrinkle, and I’m sitting on 
at,” she said when she turned 
• 1 10 . 

*^_For her 121st birthday last 
year, she released “Mistress 
of Time,” a four-track CD of 
her spoken reminiscences re- 
corded over a background of 
rap and other tunes. 

The retirement-home su- 
pervisor who brokered the re- 
cording contract was sub- 
sequently removed from her 
post after charges chat her il- 
lustrious client had not fully 
/$£ understood what was in- 
volved. 

‘The Guinness Book of 
World Records pronounced 
Mrs. Calment the world’s 
oldest person after the pre- 
vious record-holder, 120- 
year-old Shigechigo Izumi. 
died in Iapan in 1986 — by 


coincidence on Mrs. 
Caiment's 1 1 1th birthday. 

The world’s new longevity 
champion, Guinness said 
Monday, is a Danish-born 
American, Christian 

Moitensen, who lives in San 
Rafael, California- He will 
turn 1 15 the week after next. 

Mrs. Calment was born in 
Arles in 1875, before the in- 
vention of the light bulb and 
the phonograph, die airplane 
and the automobile. 

According to a legend 
amplified by die Reach 
press, as a young teenager she 
met Vincent Van Gogh, when 
the artist spent a year in 
Provence and bought his can- 
vasses at a local art-supply 
shop owned by her future in- 
laws. 

Prompted by reporters, she 
described Van Gogh as “very 
ugly, ungracious, impolite, 
sick.” “We called him a 
madman,” she said. 

She turned 40 during the 
first months of World War I 
and reached the retirement 
age of 65 at die outbreak of 


World War H. 

She was married in 1896 
and went on to outlive her 
husband by 55 years, their 
only child by 63 years and 
their only grandchild by 37 
years. 

Mis. Calment was even 
more celebrated in France for 
having outlived a much 
youager notary, who bought 
her two-bedroom apartment 
in 1965 under a special ar- 
rangement — the “viager” 
system — by which older 
people sell their property at a 
price well below market in 
exchange for the right to oc- 
cupy it and collect payments 
from the buyer as long as they 
live. 

The frustrated buyer died a 
year ago. having paid about 
four times the value of the 
apartment. 

One year, Mrs. Calment 
sent him a note that said: 
“Forgive me for still being 
alive but my parents didn’t 
raise second-rate goods.” 



Ulster Politician Looks South 

Hume May Run for Presidency of Irish Republic 


By James F. Clarity 

New Vurt Timex Service 

DUBLIN — John Hume, 
the most influential and 
prominent mainstream Ro- 
man Catholic leader in North- 
ern Ireland, is seriously con- 
sidering running for president 
of the Irish Republic, in the 
south. 

Mr. Hume said in an in- 
terview that officials of Ire- 
land 's two largest parties had 
offered to make him their can- 
didate in the Oct. 30 election, 
which would almost certainly 
allow him to run unopposed. 

The current president. 
Mary Robinson, was elected 
to a seven-year term in 1990 
and is not seeking re-election 
because she has accepted the 
United Nations post of high 


commissioner for human 
rights. 

The Irish constitution 
makes citizens of the entire 
island of Ireland eligible to 
run for president. No North- 
erner has ever been president, 
although Northerners have 
held seats in the Parliament in 
Dublin. 

The main Irish parties, 
Fianna Fail and Fine Gael, 
want to avoid a costly and 
possibly volatile election 
campaign. 

Mr. Hume said in the in- 
terview in Dublin last week 
that, while he has not made up 
his mind, he was tending to- 
ward accepting the offer. 

Two months ago, he 
brushed aside suggestions that 
he run for president of Ireland, 
saying that he preferred to stay 


Unnnul Pmuino- 

John Hume, Ulster’s most prominent Catholic leader. 


New Disaster in Italy 
Adds to Railroad Woes 


BRIEFLY 


Old Bombs Delay Flood Work 

FRANKFURT AN DER ODER, Germany — Soldiers 
building a backup dike along the swollen Oder River in 
eastern Germany had to stop work Monday when un- 
exploded World War II bombs were found in a gravel pit. 

Workers digging up gravel for a secondary levee found 
seven small G erman - made bombs, a mine and several 
grenades in the pit near Reitwein, a village in the Oderbruch 
flood plain, north of Frankfurt an der Oder. 

Elsewhere along the 160-kilometer ( 100-mile) dike, sol- 
diers and an array of volunteers patched up small ruptures 
late Sunday and early Monday, and officials said the river 
was continuing to recede. (AP) 

EU Bans Fish From 3 Nations 

BRUSSELS — The European Commission, citing health 
and safety concerns, said Monday that it had banned fishery 
products from Bangladesh, India and Madagascar. 

The decision to halt imports of products such as shrimp 
and squid from the three countries, last year valued at some 
320 milli on European currency units (S338 million), is 
temporary and will be reviewed before Nov. 30. the Euro- 
pean Union executive said. 

“The decisions result from visits by inspectors from the 
commission’s Food and Veterinary Office, who recently 
inspected fish processing plants in the three countries 


concerned.” it said. The inspections were said to have 
shown deficiencies in hygiene and processing. (Reuters) 

2 Cosmonauts Cleared to Fly 

BAIKONUR, Kazakstan — Two Russian cosmonauts 
got a clean bill of health and the final go-ahead to blast off 
Tuesday on a mission to repair the troubled Mir space 
station. 

The commander, Anatoli Solovyov, said Monday that he 
was confident he and his colleague. Pavel Vinogradov, 
could restore full power to the space station, which has been 
running on about half power since a June 25 mishap. 

A Soyuz-TM-26 space capsule carrying the two cos- 
monauts will take off Tuesday night. (AP) 

New Cases of Mad Cow Disease 

LONDON — The British government said Monday that 
21 people — an increase of two since last month — had 
been struck down by anew variety of brain illness linked to 
mad cow disease 

Last month, the government reported 19 suspected and 
confirmed cases of the new variant of Creutzfeldt- Jakob 
disease. 

The Edinburgh-based surveillance unit reports every 
suspected case of the brain-wasting disease, which usually 
affects abour one in a million people. ( Reuters i 


The Associuied Press 

ROME — An express train 
south of Rome slammed into 
a car crossing the tracks Mon- 
day, killing two people and 
injuring one, news reports 
said. The accident blocked a 
major southern rail link that 
was just getting back to nor- 
mal after two days of chaos. 

Even before evening news- 
casts announced the latest ac- 
cident, opposition politicians 
were demanding that railroad 
executives and the transport 
minister resign for leaving 
thousands of passengers 
stranded for hours over the 
weekend. 

In the latest disaster, news 
agencies reported, a train 
traveling between Rome and 
the Benevenio in the south hit 
a car at a crossing near Fro- 
sinone, about 80 kilometers 
(50 miles) south of the cap- 
ital. Two occupants of the car 
died instantly and a third was 
seriously injured, the reports 
said. 

Rail travel in Italy was 
already a nightmare before 
Monday’s accident. A derail- 
ment on Saturday, followed 
by a crane accident on Sun- 


day, blocked north-south 
traffic over the weekend. 

State television newscasts 
and newspapers were filled 
with interviews from angry 
passengers, who said they 
were abandoned under a hot 
sun with no information 
available. 

A consumer group deman- 
ded that each stranded pas- 
senger be reimbursed a mil- 
lion lire ($560). There was no 
immediate response from the 
railroad. 

The transport minister in 
Prime Minister Romano 
Prodi’s center-left govern- 
ment, Claudio Burlando. said 
he had no intention of resign- 
ing. 

He blamed the railroad’s 
problems on decades of neg- 
lect. 


involved in the Northern Ire- 
land peace effort, which he 
started in 1993 with Gerry 
Adams, the president of Sinn 
Fein, the pouticai wing of the 
Irish Republican Army. 

With a new IRA cease-fire 
starting its third week, Sinn 
Fein is likely to be admitted to 
the next round of peace talks 
in Belfast next month. It had 
been barred from the talks 
after the Irish Republican 
Army broke a previous cease- 
fire. Helping to bring Sinn 
Fein to the negotiating table 
has been Mr. Hume's highest 
priority in recent years. 

If Mr. Hume were elected 
president of the Irish Repub- 
lic. it would change the face of 
politics both in Ireland and in 
tile British province of Ulster, 
where he is idolized by many 
Catholics and respected by 
most Protestants. He has been 
a member of the British Par- 
liament since 1983 and of the 
European Parliament in Stras- 
bourg since 1979. All pres- 
idential speeches and foreign 
trips have io be cleared by the 
government, but the govern- 
ment could authorize him to 
stay involved in the Northern 
peace talks. The presidency is 
largely ceremonial. 

He said in the interview that 
he had begun recently to think 
of what kind of a presidency 
he would run. “1 would be a 
super-salesman for Ireland,” 
he said, “trying to bring in- 
vestment and jobs here.” 

He discussed his plans in a 
meeting in Dublin last week 
with friends, and with the U.S. 
Senator Edward Kennedy, 
Democrat of Massachusetts; 
Jean Kennedy Smith, the 
American ambassador to 
Dublin, and Tim Pat Coogan, 
the' historian and author of 
several books on Irish politics. 
At the meeting, his friends 
told him that as president he 
would be an important symbol 
of Irish unity and peace. 


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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBU NE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 199 < 

INTERNATIONAL 


Israelis Lay Blame 
At Arafat’s Door 

His Ambivalence Was a Factor 
In Suicide Bombing ■, They Say 


S — 7 T cr: [An aide to Mr. Arafat said signs 

By Steven Erlanger now pointed to militant groups out- 

Nev’YorkTunrsSWce side East, Reuters re- 

WASHINGTON — In the welter ported from Jemsalem. 
of outrage and agony that has fol- [“There are too many signs that 
lowed the suicide bombings in a these are people who came from 
crowded Jerusalem market, the abroad, 7 ’ said Ahmed Tibi, adding 
most piercing Israeli allegation has that pictures of the perpetrators pub- 
been that Yasser Arafat bears lished in the Palestinian press drew 
primary responsibility. The Israeli no response, 
government says the Palestinian [Mr. Netanyahu countered that 
leader has made angry or incendiary even if the bombers came from out- 
coraments, failed to condemn such side, they had to be assisted by Arab 
statements by others and refused to militants operating under Mr. Ara- 
cooperate fully on security matters, fat's nose. 

Israel's delegate to the United [“It is a reasonable assumption. 
Nations, Dore Gold, said immedi- based on previous incidents, that 


bshed m the Palestinian press drew 

no response. 

[Mr. Netanyahu countered that 
even if the bombers came from out- 
side. they had to be assisted by Arab 
militants operating under Mr. Ara- 
fat's nose. 

[“It is a reasonable assumption. 



Aide Says Clinton l 
F ondled Employee* 


ately after the bombings on 
Wednesday that “preliminary ev- 
idence" on the source of the bomb- 
ing pointed to Hamas, the militant 
Palestinian group that opposes 
peace with Israel. “However, we’re 
pointing the finger of blame to the 


wherever they came from, they were 
assisted by a local group and a local 
infrastructure," Mr. Netanyahu said 
in Jerusalem.] 

Senior American officials said 
Mr. Arafat was “shocked" by the 


U*ne<! UmshVlpan- Foan-I V*.- 

An Israeli bulldozer demolishing illegally built Palestinian housing in East Jerusalem on Monday. 


commitments," especially in secu- 
rity. “Had they fulfilled those com- 
mitments — in our judgment — this 
type of incident wouldn’t have oc- 


Palestinian Authority," Mr. Gold also aimed at him. despite claims 
said, referring to the governing body that be has been inconsistent in 
that Mr. Arafat heads. cracking down on terrorists. 


No one is suggesting that Mr. 
Arafat authorized or gave a ' ‘green 
light" to the bombers. Mr. Arafat 
was quick to respond to the bomb- 
ing. saying, “I condemn it com- 
pletely, these terrorist activities, be- 
cause it's against the peace 
process.” 

But Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu of Israel has accused Mr. 
Arafat of doing little to stop vi- 
olence, creating an atmosphere in 
which Islamic militants feel free to 
stage attacks. 


attack and understood that it was curred," he said, 
also aimed at him. despite claims The Palestinians, in return, say 
that be has been inconsistent in Israel violates its commitments un- 
cracking down on terrorists. der the Oslo accords mi greater Pal- 


careful about his own public state- 
ments, especially this year, since the 
Hebron accords. Sometimes he has 
been angry or frustrated, but rarely 
incendiary. More problematic, they 
say. is his refusal to condemn in- 
flammatory statements or actions by 


Agent* France-Presse 

WASHINGTON — A 
former White House employ- 
ee cold a friend that President 
Bill Clinton kissed and 
fondled her in his private of- 
fice in .1993, Newsweek re- 
potted Monday. 

The report quoted a friend 
of Kathleen Willey, who has 
been subpoenaed to testify in 
a sexual harassment case 
against Mr. Clinton brought 
by a former Arkansas state 
employee, Paula Jones. 

Newsweek interviewed 
Linda Tripp, a White House 
employee who said she 
bumped into Mrs. Willey 
after the 1993 meeting, and 
said Mrs. Willey indicated 
Mr. Clinton took her into his 
private quarters adjoining the 
Oval office. 

After the encounter, Mrs. 
Willey was “disheveled, her 
face was red and her lipstick 
was off," Ms. Tripp was 


“One can’t expect 100 percent 
results when fighting terrorism," 
Samuel Beiger, the national security 
adviser, said in a U.S. television 
interview. “But there can be a total. 
100 percent unrelenting effort I 
think the effort’s been uneven. It has 
to intensify." 

Mr. Gold asserted that after an 
American-brokered agreement in 
January on the withdrawal of Israeli 
troops from much of the West Bank 
city of Hebron, the Palestinian Au- 
thority “failed to fulfill any of its 


es Hnian self-rule, creating political 
and economic despair in which ter- 
rorism thrives. 

To bolster the Israeli case, Mr. 
Netanyahu's office and other pro- 


others. including his own cabinet Har Homa in Jerusalem in March, 
ministers or the Voice of Palestine followed by a Hamas suicide bomb- 


strategy of providing and withhold- was off -» fcfc Tripp was 
mg security cooperation as a form of quoted as saying in the report, 
leverage on Israel. . 6 Y 

The Israelis have documented a 
decline in security cooperation from 
the Palestinians since the uproar 
over an Israeli housing project at 
Har Homa in Jerusalem in March, 


“She was flustered, happy 
and joyful." 

Mrs. Willey, 5 1 , who was a 
volunteer before being hirejj 
at the White House, was nofat 
ail “appalled” after the 
leged meeting, according tb 
Ms. Tripp. f 

White House officials have 
expressed anger over the 
move to subpoena Mrs. Wf£ 
ley in connection with tiri 
Paula Jones case, saying ' : h 
was an attempt to further erif- 
barrass the president. 

But lawyers for Ms. Jones,/ 
who claims that Mr. Clint On > 
asked her for sex while he wad 
governor of Arkansas, siy 
Mrs. Willey’s testimony 
could show a pattern of sexual 
harassment. ‘ - 

At the time of the alleged 
en counter at the White House 
in 1993. Mrs. Willey whs 
seeking a job because of 
heavy debts incurred by her 
husband, according to Nefr* 
sweek. • i ‘ ! 


radio. 

“While there is a level of Pal- 
estinian frustration that be, as their 
leader, must acknowledge," an ls- 


Israe) groups keep a running list of raeli diplomat said, “there are tacit 


Palestinian statements that are con- 
sidered incendiary, called “golden 
nuggets" by the Government Press 
Office, and make them available on 
the Internet. 

But even Israeli officials and dip- 
lomats, speaking on the condition of 
anonymity, say Mr. Arafat has been 


messages. If he chooses not to say 
something, that carries messages, 
too." 

Under the Hebron accords, the 
Palestinians promised to prevent in- 
citement and hostile propaganda. 
More important than the words. Is- 
raelis say. is Mr. Arafat’s open 


ing in Tel Aviv on March 21. The 
Palestinian Authority has released 
“dozens" of Hamas and other ex- 
tremists from detention in what Is- 
rael calls “a revolving door 
policy," while failing to extradite 
terror suspects or confiscate illegal 
weapons. 

They say Mr. Arafat has done 
nothing about allegations that the 
Palestinian police in die West Bank 
city of Nablus ordered attacks on 
Jews. 


ARABS: In Lands of Age-Old Monolithic Rule, Signs Appear of Nervous Steps Toward Democracy 


Continued from Page 1 

mocracy as they sometimes seem to the out- 
side world. 

Kuwait's increasingly assertive legislature 
is but one example. Though not without some 
obvions shortcomings, national or local elec- 
tions have been held in the last year in Yemen, 
Algeria, Morocco and Lebanon. 

Jordan is holding legislative elections in 
November, for the third time since King Hus- 
sein reinstated Parliament in 1984, after a 10- 
year hiatus. Municipal elections are to be held 
later this year in Qatar, the Gulf state whose 
emir deposed his own father in 1995. 

One of the most striking developments 
concerns Iran, the largest non-Arab state in 
the Middle East, where a relatively moderate 


controls, slightly relaxing curbs on the press 
and permitting die emergence of a growing, if 
grudgingly tolerated, network of civic groups 
dedicated to promoting democracy and rule of 
law. 

“We're challenging this notion that there is 
something in the Arab culture that is es- 
sentially undemocratic." said Saad Eddin 
Ibrahim, an Egyptian sociologist who runs a 
pro-democracy think tank in Cairo with oc- 
casional interference from local authorities. 
“That is nonsense, absolutely." 

A handful of Arab countries have begun the 
painful process of economic reform, liber- 
alizing trade regimes and dismantling cum- 
bersome state-owned industries in a bid to 
attract foreign investment. 


cleric, Mohammed Khatemi, scored a start- such steps inevitably will erode the power of 
ling upset in May's presidential contest over the state, opening the door to greater political 


Many democracy advocates theorize that Among 19 countries in the region studied 
such steps inevitably will erode the power of by Freedom House, a New York-based group 


public corruption continue to define Arab 
political culture. 

The Arab leaders have served, on average, 
for more than two decades. Governments 
dominate broadcast and print media, either 
through ownership or stringent licensing re- 
quirements; the most respected Arab news- 
paper. A1 Hayat, is published not in the 
Middle East but in London. 

After the collapse of communism in East- 
ern Europe in 1989, Arabs anticipated "that 
the winds of change were going to engulf us 
— Jet the ruling class tremble,” recalled Wal- 
id Kazziha. a Syrian-bom political science 
professor at the American University of 
Cairo. “But they stopped at the borders of 
Turkey.” 

Among 19 countries in the region studied 


the candidate of religious conservatives who 
dominated Iranian politics since the 1979 
Islamic Revolution. 

Even in moderate Arab states friendly to the 
West, autocratic leaders face no such chal- 
lenge. But some have begun to ease political 


pluralism and, eventually, genuine democ- 
racy. 

By and large, however, they are still wait- 
ing. 

The secret police, rigid censorship, dis- 
regard for basic civil liberties and rampant 


that surveys worldwide democratic trends, ail 
but five are rated “not free." Jordan, Kuwait 
and Morocco are rated “partly free." Israel is 
the only country in the region given the rating 
of “free.” Turkey, though considered a de- 
mocracy, was rated as “partly free” because 
of military interference in government and the 


government’s alleged violations of human 
rights, especially of the Kurdish minority. 

The absence of democracy in Arab coun- 
tries lias many causes: the authoritarian leg- 
acy of Ottoman rule, meddling by colonial 
European powers in the early 20th century and 
the continuing struggle with Israel, which 
Arab leaders long have cited as an excuse to 
postpone political reforms. 

But the most immediate explanation in- 
volves the rise of Islamic fundamentalism, 
whose adherents support the replacement of 
existing governments with ruling systems that 
would govern according to a strict interpre- 
tation of Islamic religious law. 

The fundamentalist movements strongly 
oppose peace with Israel and are hostile to the 
West, and some have embraced violence as a 
means to their goal. In many countries. Is- 
lamic movements have emerged as the only 
credible internal opposition to secular Arab 
regimes. 

The Islamic threat has had dire con- 
sequences. Since the assassination of Pres- 
ident Anwar Sadat by militants in 198 1 , Egypt 
has been governed by emergency laws. 


EUROPE: Who ’ll Call Shots ? ELDERLY; A Change in Attitudes Casts Shadows Over Japan 


Continued from Page 1 

within the parameters of the 
German Constitution and 
German political convention, 
total independence of action. 
With it comes virtual control 
for the time being over the 
grand lines of the European 
monetary order, and the ca- 
pacity to create economic 
facts outside the will or in- 
fluence of Germany’s part- 


nipulation. In the French 
mind, monetary policy is the 
province of the state. At the 
moment, we're trying to link 
these two thought processes 
through compromise. The re- 
sult until now is not very sure. 
If the outcome goes in 
France's direction, then we’d 
be turning the Euro into a 
political currency." 

The No. 2 official in Ger- 
many’s Finance Ministry, 


Continued from Page 1 

across the globe, Japan in one sense 
seems to be the best positioned of all 
major countries. 

It has a flexible and caring system that 


of young people now.” 

Such comments are particularly sur- 
prising because Mrs. Kanbe is, by West- 
ern standards, well-cared for by her chil- 
dren. They visit regularly, and her sons 
have asked her to come and live with 


might be able to cope with retirement of them after her husband dies. 


the baby boomers: the family. If retirees 
can depend on their children for care, the 
nation is likely to survive the demo- 
graphic upheaval relatively smoothly. 

Yet in the winding alleys of little 
towns like Omiya, a farrrvi ng community 


□ers. It is exactly this circum- Juergen Stark, has spoken of in the mist-shrouded hills of the Kii 


stance that could free 
profound change with the ar- 
rival of a European monetary 
union. 

Germany's prime conces- 
sion to the construction of the 
EMU and the euro, its 
planned single currency, has 
been to turn over its de facto 
monetary sovereignty to the 
future central bank. But this 


the possibility of an informal 
club for coordination and co- 
operation but insisted last 
month that "there will be no 
‘economic government' in 
the narrow sense of the 
word." Economic policy, he 
said, “is not going to be made 
a communal thing." 

Gerhard Schroeder, the 
likely Social Democratic can- 


was done with confidence didate for chancellor in the Oc- 
both in Bonn and Frankfurt to her 1998 elections, has also 
thattheirEU partners ’accept- made it clear that Mr. Jospin’s 
ance of supposedly inflexible government would find no ally 


convergence criteria and a 
stability pact to govern eco- 
nomic behavior after intro- 
duction of the common cur- 
rency would result in a 
European monetary rule book 
that was a mirror image of 
Germany's, enforced by a 
new Frankfurt-based central 
bank able to pass as the 
Bundesbank's clone. 

In practical terms, from the 
German point of view, this 
meant no big changes, no sig- 
nificant surrender of lever- 


in him for watering down the 
Germans' notion of how mon- 
etarypolicy is to be made. 

“The French attempt to turn 
the European Central Bank in- 
to the vassal of a political body 
breaches the Maastricht 
treaty,” Mr. Schroeder said. 
“In Germany, no one would 
accept nibbling at the inde- 
pendence of the bank, because 
that would push international 
investors out of the mark.” 

Mr. Jospin's cabinet min- 
isters say France no longer 


Peninsula nearly 300 kilometers (200 
miles) southwest of Tokyo, the mood is 
one of disquiet. 

A revolutionary shift in attitudes to- 
ward the elderly appears to be under way 
in Japan and. to some extent, in Korea 
and China as well. One result is that an 
increasing share of the elderly in East 
Asia are growing old apart from their 
children, and the resulting loneliness, 
guilt and resentment cast a long shadow 
on family life across the region. 

Even if a bit more than half of people 
over 65 live with their children in Japan, 
the proportion has plummeted from 80 
percent in 1970. Surveys suggest that 
Japanese attitudes are changing very 
rapidly and that many young Japanese 
feel even less of a sense of debt to their 
parents than young Americans do. 

"Young people are scary." Mrs. 
Kanbe said, as she kneeled on the tatami- 
mat floor a few feet from her sick hus- 
band. "The reason young people can kill 
humans as if they were insects, or fail to 
understand the feelings of their own 
parents, is mostly because they haven't 
bad proper moral education. I’m scared 


Yet she and many elderly women like 
her are reluctant to move in with their 
children because they know they would 
not occupy the traditional throne of the 
mother-in-law. that of matriarch of the 
household. Instead, they would be 
guests, slaying by the grace of their 
daughters-in-Iaw. 

Japanese families are sometimes built 
more on proximity than closeness, and 
tensions revolve in particular a round the 
traditional axis of home life in East Asia: 
the relationship between the mother-in- 
law and daughter-in-law. This relation- 
ship is so important that once Deng 


The term for widow in Japanese, 
mibojin, means “a person who has not 
yet died,” and Mis. Hayashi's plight, as 
such a person awaiting death and living 
alone, sends a shudder down die spine of 
any traditional Japanese. Yet it is be- 
coming steadily more common. The pro- 
portion of elderly people living alone has 
almost doubled since the early 1970s, to 
13 percent. 

“There are tough-talking daughters- 
in-Iaw around here.” Mrs. Hayashi said. 
“ so the grannies just sit around in the 
shadows and complain.” 

The elderly grumble in part because 
they grew up steeped in concepts of filial 
piety that once pervaded not only Japan 


German Minister Tells Iran 
Not to Exclude Ambassador 

BONN — Germany warned Iran on Monday that EU^' 
countries would send their ambassadors back to Tehran 1 ^ 
only if it agreed not to exclude Germany, with whom/ 
relations are tense. , 

“The German government believes, along with other 
member states of the European Union, that discrimination „ 
regarding the return of die ambassadors is out of the 
question," Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel said. I' 1 . 

EU ambassadors were called home after a Berlin court/ 
suggested in a ruling last April that top Iranian leaders- 
were linked to the 1992 murder of four Iranian dissidents'^ 
in Berlin. The departing Iranian president, Hashemi Raf- “ 
sanjani, announced late Saturday that his country woulct 
accept the return of certain EU ambassadors to Tehran,!; 
but left Germany out, saying it should withdraw its : 
claims. V- 

Mohammed Khatami, the moderate cleric who was “ 
sworn in as Iran's fifth president on Monday, pledged to - 
strive for “ddzente” in die Islamic republic's relations., 
with other countries. (AFP) 

France Rejects Island Rebels -■ 

PARIS — France on Monday rejected demands from 
separatists on the Comorian island of Anjouan to return to ; 
French colonial rule, saying any solution to the crisis,, 
should respect the Indian Ocean archipelago’s integrity.': 

Yves Doutriaux. a spokesman for the Foreign Ministry 
expressed France's hope that the Comoros government . 
could find solutions to Anjouan ’s social and economic-:; 
problems through dialogue. He said the Organization of,-- 
African Unity would probably have to step in if thercrists^. 
continued. 

Thousands of protesters demonstrated on Anjouan on,-- 
S unday in favor of a return to French rule after President 
Mohammed Taki asked the islanders to submit proposals 
for ending a constitutional crisis caused by their demands 
for secession. The separatists want a status similar to that 
of the adjoining island of Mayotte, which voted to remain ' 
part of France in the 1970s. (Reuters) 

Explosion Hits Havana Hotel 

HAVANA — A small explosion, possibly caused by a ; 
bomb or firework, damaged the lobby of central Havana's 
top hotel early Monday, witnesses said. ■; 

Roberto Koppens, a Dutch tourist, said he arrived in the ! 
lobby of the Melia Cohiba hotel several minutes after an ( 
explosion and saw smoke and minor damage to fur- 
nishings. He also said he could smell gunpowder. ! 

The explosion at the Cohiba came just three weeks after ; 
two bombs rocked the lobbies of two other Havana hotels, 
the NacionaJ and the Capri, causing damage and slightly ' 
wounding three people. Officials at the Cohiba, which is • 
state-owned, declined to comment ( Reuters J ! 


DOLPHINS: Peacetime Jobs 


The elderly grumble in part because Continued from Page 1 
they grew up steeped in concepts of filial 

piety that once pervaded not only Japan Soon the dolphins, which 
but also China and Korea and other can live to the age of 55 and 
countries influenced by Confucianism, eat more than 30 pounds 1. 14 


countries influenced by Confucianism. 

In Japan, in fact, filial devotion tra- 
ditionally ran a close second to loyalty to 
one’s feudal lord, but in the mid- 19th 


exactly like what you do to a 
hanger when you lock yotfr 
keys in your car and you havf 
to break in — and pointed a* 
among others, this correspot£ 


kilograms) of fish a day, were dent. It started to twirl wild! 
on the edge of starvation. The when she stuck it about 


Xiaoping, during his leadership of China, century a new government tried to sub- 


gave a major speech on mother-in-law 
and daughter-in-law relations. 

Because men are working most of the 
time and pay little attention to child 
rearing, it is the two women who spend 
the days together and who battle over the 
children's future. 

In a growing number of cases, the 
divide between mother-in-law and daugh- 
ter-in-law has led elderly people to move 
in not with their eldest son — the age-old 
custom — but instead with a daughter. 

“Life is upside down now," com- 
plained Akemi Hayashi. an 83-year-old 
widow who Jives alone and who has not 
even received an invitation to live with 
any of her three children. “The daugh- 
ter-in-law is on top, and granny is a 
nuisance." 


age. Bui since the EU summit uses the phrase "economic 
meeting in Amsterdam in government” to describe 
June, it has been clear that what it wants, settling for the 
France would push for moment for formulations like 


CHINA: Doubts Grow About WTO Entry 


‘‘something,” in the words of one last week from Foreign 
Finance Minister Dominique Minister Hubert Vedrine, 


Strauss- Kahn, “that should 
exist alongside as a counter- 
weight to the European Cen- 
tral Bank." 

In the past six weeks, both 
sides have been exchanging 


who talked about the need for 
“real politically responsible 
people who are able to make 
real decisions on the Euro- 
pean level." 

Whatever this meant pre- 


signals that they are willing to cisely. Eddie George, gov- 
talk but without clearly sig- emor of the Bank of England, 


noting how much power they 
want or how much they would 
be wilting to give up. 

"In Germany.” said Kun 
Biedenkopf. the Christian 
Democratic minister-presi- 


said he thought the markets 
had already decided on its sig- 
nificance. Le Monde quoted 
him as saying that investors 
had "the perception that the 
EMU process is now deter- 


dent of the state of Saxony, mined more by politics than 
“the constitution protects the serious economic considers- 
currency from political ma- tions." 


Continued from Page 1 

ground. Chinese officials have warned 
that they would not make a compre- 
hensive trade offer if they believed that 
Mr. Clinton could not enter serious ne- 
gotiations with them. 

China’s intentions may also become 
clearer in a series of high-level visits by 
American officials to Beijing over the 
next several months. 

Administration officials say Mr. Clin- 
ton’s national security adviser, Samuel 
Berger, is considering a trip there later 
this month, if the latest Middle East 
crisis recedes. Treasury' Secretary 
Robert Rubin is planning his first trip to 
China in late September, and that may 
rum our to be the last opportunity to 
settle on agreements that could be fi- 


nalized during Mr. Jiang’s state visit. 


vert feudalistic loyalties by re-emphas- 
izing the primacy of filial piety. 

Schools taught famous stories about 
filial piety, tike the tale of the couple 
who decided, after running out of food, 
to kill their child so they would have 
more to feed their parents. They were 
rewarded for this when they dug the 
child's grave and found a treasure. 

After World War II, Japan reorgan- 
ized itself socially and cast off many 
traditions, like the classes in s ft us fun, or 
moral education, which had drummed 
the idea of filial piety into schoolchil- 
dren. Tire notion of special reverence for 
parents faded, and two years ago Japan 
even abandoned its traditional law de- 
creeing a harsher punishment for the 
slaying of a parent or parent-in-law than 
for other murders. 

“In the old days we had shushin to 
teach us filial piety." said Masae Mi- 
nami. 86. the matriarch of a family that 
runs a clothing store in Omiya. "Bur 
now that's all gone. Now it's as if you 


But Ms. Barshefsky said that she had can do anything you like to parents." 
no immediate plans to travel to China. Most of the discussion of extended 
despite an announcement by China’s families in Japan focuses on the benefits 
chief negotiator. Long Yongtu. that she to the elderly, but there may also be 
was coming to Beijing soon. Her direct advantages to the youngest generation, 
participation in the talks would be the Children in Japan are much more likely 


surest sign that a deal was nearing. 


than youngsters elsewhere to understand 


Negotiators who have sat at the table what it means to get old: to see firsthand 
with the Chinese for several weeks re- the frailty, the ill health, the fading 
port that there has been modest progress, memory and finally death. It is often 
For example, the Chinese promised nol heartbreaking, but it arguably gives ihe 


to provide export subsidies for agricul- 
tural products. 


children a richer acquaintance with life. 
“The kids here who grow up in a 


At a meeting last month, Mr. Clinton’s three-generation home, they understand 
economic advisers generally agreed ihar old age,” said Tamotsu Wakimoto, prin- 
the most that could now be hoped for cipal of Aso Elementary School in Om- 
from Mr. Clinton’s summit meeting with iya. “They see weakness. They see sick- 
Mr. Jiang is a commitment to keep talk- ness. And 1 think generally that ’s a good 
ing. rather than a real accord. thing. 


base here had aJI but ceased to 
function. Stipends had disap- 
peared. Dozens of warships 
bobbed hopelessly on the 
edge of the sea. Then some- 
body had the therapy idea. 

ft was not such a radical 
notion. Dolphin therapy has 
been used for years in such 
countries as Israel, Japan and 
the United Slates. Because 
dolphins are highly sophis- 
ticated and intelligent, most 
physiologists and researchers 
believe they are better able to 
communicate with humans 
than any other species — al- 
though their nickname is still 
only man's second best 
friend. 

“They work with all sons 
of children," said Svetlana 
Matyshovna, a marine 
physiologist on the base who 
supervises some of the dol- 
phins' new activities. “Aut- 
istic children, shy children. 
Dolphins can cure many dif- 
ferent problems. They make 
people feel at home. They im- 
prove their auras.” 

Their what? 

“Auras,” said Mrs. Maty- 
shovna. a 29-year veteran of 
research at Sevastopol, who 
also said she had studied lev- 
itation and the effect of UFOs 
on the population, in addition 
to her dolphin work. “The 
field around a person that per- 
mits him to live and breathe 
freely.” she said, mattcr-of- 
factly. “That is his aura." 

Oh. that Mrs. Matyshovna 
whipped out a metal vs ire with 
a wooden handle — it looked 


inches ( 10 centimeters) frorp 
my chest. ■' 

"Very low aura." she 
muttered. “Jf you spent som£ r 
time swimming with the dol- 
phins. it would improve in& 
mediately.'* ‘ 

Perhaps, but we will never 
know. 

Dr. Lukina said dolphins 
can cure bed-wetting, dissip- 
ate anxiety, help mute chit 
dren speak. She said the pro- 
gram had only about 2& 
dolphins now*, and she wee 
unwilling to discuss whether 
their military research con!- 
tinues. ' 

She could not account for 
the absence of the other ddt- 
phins in the original prograift 
and. although two buses full 
of youngsters passed by, the 
staff was unwilling to mak$ 
them available to talk about VJ 
their experiences. ' 

“This is a private sensa- 
tion.” she said, standing on a 
rotting pier and tossing cod ^1 
her charges. She regularly 
turns away rich Russians, 
usually vacationing nearby ifi 
Yalta, who want to swim with 
the dolphins. ‘,1 

“Whatever these dolphins 
did before was serious busi- 
ness,” she said. “But now icJs 
serious, too. We have a go 
here, and it’s about learning 
and healing. And that is;p 
miracle because for years this 
was a secret base where 
nobody could come. Now wje 
have found a new purpose en 
our work. And so have 
dolphins.” _■[ 




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EVTERIVATIONAJl HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, AUGUST 5. 1997 


PAGE 7 


INTERNATIONAL 


♦The Albanian Quandary 

Economy and Public Morale Are Shattered 


By Edward Cody 

Washington Post Sen-ice 


peddles watches with his father from a table in 
the Dunes street marker, where Mr. Bad was 



.He and his wife XinTifo *» Bertha s government stood behind 

same vW? 3 ™ fe ». a .yacher at the the funds and that such high-rolling was part 

school, have received their monthly of the new capitalism he brought to Alhanh 
*^0“ *■ upheaval dot ex- Against that bSund ^fuSi ^TS: 

ntnyta^ nn«: rv _ ■ I r ~ _ . “ 


pioded last spring, even though classes were 
Suspended for three months. Unlike hundreds 
pf thousands of Albanians, they did not lose 
savings in the pyramid investment schemes 
Whose collapse set off the revolt And their 
? me ^ school in this Adriatic port escaped 
e armed bands that have wracked die coun- 
try and made most of its highways unsafe for 

But as a new government 
seeks to impose authority and - - - 

Albanians try to reb uild from 
■the rubble left by five months 
Qf mayhem, “better" has be- 
came a relative term. 

7s,Mr. Baci, 51. and his 48- 
.year-old wife have been re- 
ceiving a total of $12 a month 
— their combined salaries. 


ploded against Mr. Berisha personally when 
the pyramids came rambling down, but also 
against the institutions he had come to rep- 
resent. 

Making the institutions work again has 
become a priority not only for Mr. Nano, who 
has promised as much to the Albanian people, 
but also for Italy and Albania's other neigh- 
bors. These countries have long been eager to 
prevent a new' crush of Al- 
banian refugees from press- 
ing at their borders and to 
dampen further discontent 
among restive Albanian 
minorities in neighboring 
Serbia and Macedonia. 

When he took over in April 
1992. Mr. Berisha seemed 
like the right man to lead Al- 
Meir daughter Egle, 28. has helped out with bania out of its long communist nightmare. 
gSpney from her job in Italy. Even with her Proclaiming himself to be an ardent believer 
contribution, the couple cannot make ends ' 
peet. And, in a country paralyzed by law- 
lessness and a disintegrated government, they 
have found little reason to hope for swift 


The police and 
army hare fallen 
apart, and civilians 
have the guns. 


improvement 
i 1 ‘People are so fed up with the disorder that 
|they are ready to only eat once a day, if only 
they could get it over with and return to some 
kind of normality,'’ Mr. Baci said. “But it will 
jtake time, because there are still arms every- 
where.” 

Prime Minister Fatos Nano, the Soc ialist 


in ffee-market capitalism and European val- 
ues, he sought early membership in the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization's Partnership 
for Peace program and in the European Un- 
ion. 

The United States started a military re- 
lationship with Albania, and aid money 
flowed here from Europe and the World 
Bank. 

But within four years. Mr. Berisha had 


■■ t 


created what Human Rights Watch last March 

called "a one-party state based on fear and 

Party leader who came to power on July 24, corruption.” 

has undertaken what looks at first glance like He organized for himself a re-election land- 
an impossible mission. His police force has slide in May 1996. w idely seen as fraudulent. 


U - : 


■ f ' 
lit ’ V 


- '• n 


Jargely fallen apart, as has his army, and 
civilians have the guns from their arsenals. 
Economic activity — undeveloped only five 
years after the country emerged from xeno- 
phobic communist isolation — was further 
jdis totted by the widely subscribed investment 
frauds, then was halted altogether by the vi- 
olent revolt 

; Presenting his government's program to 
Parliament on July 28. Mr. Nano warned that 
J40 percent of the people in Albania’s coun- 
tryside, and a t hir d of those in cities and 
towns, were too jpoor to live no rmal lives even 
^before the uprising. A fifth of the population, 
he added, gets by on $70 a year. 

' Perhaps most serious, the government of 
former President Salt Berisha and his Demo- 
cratic Party sapped faith in public institutions 
•among Albania's 32. million people only a 
■few years after they had shaken o ff one of the 
world's most tightly closed communist sys- 
tems and tamed Westward. Albanian and 
'analysts m Tirana; the capital. 56 
kilometers (35 -miles) east of here, say restor- 
ing some of that faith will be necessary if Mr. 
Nano is to put the country back together for 
'people like Bahri Baci and his neighbors. : 
“We have sold hardly anything these last 
few months,” said Alket Kettalli, 19, who 


and turned rhe justice system into a political 
instrument. He expanded the National In- 
telligence Service to a force of 3.000 agents 
supported by another 3,000 informers which 
operated as an arm of his party. 

With the defeat of Mr. Berisha's party by 
Mr. Nano's Socialists in a two-round vote 
June 29 and July 6. the intelligence service has 
lost its power — officially, at least. 

Its director. Bashkim Gazidede, fled .Al- 
bania just before the Socialist victory was 
confirmed, as did the commander of the pres- 
idential guard, Xhahit Xhafeiri, and the na- 
tional police director. Agin Sbehu. 

But the new interior minister. Neritan 
Ceka. said in an interview that some intel- 
ligence agents, working with Democratic 
Party officials, are trying to form armed com- 
mittees to resist efforts to restore government 
control in Shkoder. a Berisha stronghold 120 
kilometers north of Tirana. 

Until that kind of subversion is ended, as 
well as highway robbery and exercise of loco) 
authority by ad hoc armed groups. Mr. Ceka 
said, the economy cannot resume operation, 
and foreign aid cannot be put to good use. 

“We recognize die obstacles," Mr. Nano 
told Parliament, “but they are not insur- 
mountable. 


/.■ 

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ETHNIKl KEPHALEOU S.A. 
ADMINISTRATION OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


It is announced that, according to publications mthegxeek pro 
r^ncW Tbn« (of LondonUhi assrts of TOURJSTIKI &ORCSki 

A . nnm<n f I DD A C t .aM k.> nnWKo onrtinn swvfwninrr 


►ress and in the 
EXAGOG1K1 


SA - PORTO CARRAS are being sold by public auction according to art 46a of 
L. 1892/90. These include an area of 17,709,815.- sqjn. approximately situated in 
Porto Carras, Neo Marmara, at a distance of 125 km from Thessaloniki, by the sea 




on which there are the following tourist and industrial installations. 

1. SJTHONIA BEACH. An A-cIass hotel with 836 beds in 433 rooms and 20 suites. 
The hotel also includes 3 restaurants, 3 bars and 2 rented shoos. The hotel is 
under lease to Casino Porto Carras SA, from 1994 to 2006, which runs a casino, 
established within the hold bu ilding . 

2. MELTTON. A luxury hotel with 827 beds in 428 rooms and 18 suites. The hotel 

also includes 4 restaurants, 3 bars and 10 rented shops. „ . 

3. VILLAGE INN. A B-class hotel with 178 beds in 75 studios, i suites and 

7 bungalows. The hotel also includes I restaurant, 2 tavernas. 3 bars and 

28 rented shops. The hotel has been ptoced {g? mJTI&S 

sharins contracts have been concluded from W 1 Both MEUTOJN and 

VILLAGE INN are under the management of GRECOTCL SA ^mdwiD remain so 
until the assets are sold, at which time the management ,eai * r ] 

In the case of the Meliton Hotel only, should the maDapmM j^ to Grg^] 
cV. expire at a* me the Manager (Crecotel SA.) has signed contracts with tour 
operSTextending into thefc&ing tourist season, the management lease shall 

up to 45 metres in le^Ujwilh 166 ber^j 
outi^fr^h^- an/electricity aSd buildings that are bemg used as a yacht 

i'w-hoie GOLF COURSE over an area of 640 stremmas, 9 TENNIS COURTS 

over an area of 2,400 sq-m. indudmg a guardhouse 

(252 sq-m.) and a chapel 

£32 pgmit granted by pubKc aulhorife ^ 6 par.* of 169/ 1968) 


JO. inui r r" ■ ti i ■ . 

1. Complete v-inen in covered area of about S.2M ' yo. 
a mpress - refinen 1 in covered are* of about 2,350 aq-m. 

3. Bakery, about 5uch ts biological sewage treatment plant, 

Corp0rati ° n " i °" “ d PUmP 


C winery trademarks, ready and semifinished 

hOT> 

to the Company- ^ ^ ^ e^alents are not included in the assets to be 

■ r U mvpn in the Oi 




B total JoaftwThc A„> 


STRIKE IN NEPAL — Porters sitting idle in front of shops in Kathmandu on Monday as many 
businesses closed their doors to protest a new value-added tax being introduced by the government. 

Pretoria Hit Squad Given Amnesty 


The Associated Press 

CAPE TOWN — The commander 
of an apanheid-govemmem hit squad 
who later switched sides and joined 
the black opposition in exile was 
granted amnesty Monday for the 198 1 
murder of a human-rights lawyer. 

The Truth and Reconciliation 
Commission, which is investigating 
abuses by both sides during the 
apartheid era, granted amnesty to 
Dirk Coetzee and two former se- 
curity policemen, who were con- 
victed in May for their murder of 
Griffiths Mxenge in Durban. 

The family of Mr. Mxenge. who 
was disemboweled and had his throat 
cui. objected to the amnesty ruling. 


The Truth Commission said it was 
convinced Mr. Coetzee had acted on 
the “advice, command or order of 
one or more senior members of the 
security branch of the former South 
African police.*' 

“We are satisfied that they did 
what they did because they regarded 
it as their duty as policemen" while 
engaged in the struggle against the 
African National Congress and other 
liberation movements, the Truth 
Commission said. 

The panel, which is headed by the 
Nobel Peace Prize winner Archbish- 
op Desmond Tutu, can grant am- 
nesty if the perpetrators of a crime 
make a full confession and can 


demonstrate the crime was politi- 
cally motivated. 

Mr. Coetzee has applied for am- 
nesty in 23 incidents, including 14 acts 
“involving gross violations of human 
rights." But Monday’s ruling applied 
only to the murder of Mr. Mxenge. 

Mr. Mxenge was a member of Mr. 
Mandela's African National Con- 
gress, which was outlawed at the 
time. His body was found outside his 
home near Durban. 

Mr. Coet 2 ee, 51 , who later became 
involved with the anti-apartheid 
struggle, was the commander in the 
1970s and 1980s of a special police 
group known as the Vlakplaas unit, 
which killed ANC activists. 


4 More Cut Off 
Contacts With 
Bosnia Envoys 


CmtfMifd br OnrSe&Pnm Dupon-)*, 

PARIS — France, Britain, Sweden 
and Austria joined Germany on Monday 
in suspending contacts with Bosnia- 
Herzegovina’s envoys abroad to put 
pressure on the country’s ethnic factions 
to settle a dispute over the distribution 
of ambassadorial posts. 

The spokesman for the French For- 
eign Ministry, Yves Doutriaux, an- 
nounced the action by Paris after the 
international community’s high repre- 
sentative in Bosnia, Carlos Westendorp, 
recommended to Western powers that 
no ambassador be treated as a legitimate 
representative of Bosnia until a law gov- 
erning the appointments was agreed 
upon. 

“This measure aims to ensure that the 
ambassadors of Bosnia-Herzegovina 
represent a single government and will 
speak on behalf of all three Bosnian 
communities," Mr. Doutriaux said at a 
news briefing. 

“Consequently, we urge Presidents 
Alija Izetbegovic, Kresimir Zubak and 
Momcilo Krajisnik to fully assume their 
responsibilities and quickly reach a 
definitive agreement on this issue," he 
added. 

Germany was the first Western coun- 
try to declare a suspension of contacts 
with Bosnia’s envoys. 

At a NATO, summit meeting in May, 
the Western allies threatened to impose 
penalties on the joint postwar govern- 
ment of Bosnia unless the Serbian, 
Croatian and Muslim factions settled 
their differences by Aug. 1 over the 
division of ambassadorial posts, and 
also reached agreements on laws gov- 
erning citizenship and passports. 

Mr. Westendorp extended the dead- 
line to Monday because progress had 
been made on the laws governing cit- 
izenship and passports. (Reuters, AFP) 




3J- 


The 

Korea 

Summit 

1997 


Summit Hosts 

^ DAEWOO A HYUNDAI 

Summit Sponsor 

Peregrine 

Korea’s leading business groups are joining forces to host the Korea Summit on September 10- 
11 in Seoul. Held at a time of great opportunity and challenge, this important event promises 
Korean business and government leaders and their international peers a high-powered forum where 
together they can examine and discuss issues of vital importance to one of the world’s most dynam- 
ic economies. 

As the newest member of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, and one 
of the world's strongest trading nations, the Republic of Korea will further accelerate Saegaewha , 
its ambitious economic liberalization effort aimed at greater globalization. Saegaewha will open 
the Korean market to foreign trade and investment and will further strengthen corporate Korea's 
role on the international business stage. The Korea Summit will concern itself with the Who, 
Where, When, and Why’s of this remarkable undertaking. 

With unprecedented joint support of Korea's leading conglomerates including Daewoo, Hyundai 
and Samsung, and the sponsorship of a select group of international corporations including 
Peregrine Investments Holdings Ltd., and cooperation from the Korean Government, the 
International Herald Tribune's Korea Summit offers sponsors and individual participants a rare 
opportunity to develop business goals in Korea and elsewhere in the world with Korea’s most 
powerful business groups. 

For information on sponsorship and delegate opportunities, please contact Lesley Varlinden at 
the International Herald Tribune in Hong Kong on tel: (852) 2922 1 107 or by fax: (852) 2922 1100. 


Corporate Sponsors 


LOCKHEED II 

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PAGE 8 


TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Jtcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLJStnm WITH THE NEW YORK TIMKf AND THE WASHINGTON TOST 


Middle East Choices 


Sributt^ Arafat and Netanyahu Are Not Being Serious 

i THE WASHINGTON TOST J j/ VV' 


V>F 


A Gallup Israel poll conducted only 
hours before the cruel bombings in 
Jerusalem illuminates the choices be- 
fore would-be peacemakers at this' 
grave moment in the Middle East 

The Israeli government, led by Ben- 
jamin Netanyahu, has toughened its 
already tough line on terrorism to the 
point where, among other measures, it 
threatens to pursue terrorists into 
areas controlled by Yasser Arafat’s 
Palestinian Authority. Regardless of 
whether one thinks such a step is re- 
quired or justified by the suicide 
bombs, there is no denying that it could 
have explosive consequences. Wheth- 
er the current peace talks would sur- 
vive in any form is problematic. 

The new poll, reflecting a consistent 
view in Israeli public opinion, rep- 
resents another option. According to 
an Israeli analyst, 60 percent of Israeli 
Jews polled support establishment of a 
demilitarized Palestinian stats, and 
more than half would grant Palestin- 
ians sole or joint sovereignty over parts 
of East Jerusalem. A similar majority 
supports withdrawal from- most of the " 
Golan Heights, in exchange for a peace 
agreement with Syria and security 
guarantees from the United States. 

The latest bombs, like earlier 
bombs, surely will darken Israeli pub- 
lic opinion for a while. But the evident 


fact remains that most Israeli Jews 
favor peace with the Pales tinians on 
terms that the Likud government, re- 
sisting territorial concessions and a 
Palestinian state, rejects bur chat most 
Palestinians would probably accept 
By the time of the bombings, Mr. Net- 
anvahu’s pursuit of a “secure peace” 


alternatives to bis strategy. 

These are the realities that the 
United States most consider as it charts 
its own course. 

Given a Palestinian demonstration 
of seriousness in the struggle against 
terrorism, the Israeli public can be ex- 
pected to return to its pre-bomb read- 
iness for a peace that would meet both 
Israel's quest for security and the Pal- 
estinians’ for a state. For the United 
States to go this way would put it into 
tension with the Netanyahu govern- 
ment but would put it into step with 
most of the Israeli people. 

Up to now, President Bill Clinton 
has a voided ^confronting, the, implica- 
tions ofMr. Netanyahu's reluctance to 
bargain territory for a Palestinian set- 
tlement. Now he must decide whether 
to minimize short-run frictions with 
the Israeli government or reach for a 
long-term peace. 

—THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Caspian Oil Fever 


The Caspian region nowadays is 
best defined as a large body of un- 
dersea oil surrounded by nations 
anxious to tap it The industry reckons 
that the Caspian reserves contain up to 
200 billion barrels of oil worth as much 
as $4 trillion at current prices, plus 
comparable reserves of natural gas. 
Little wonder that two potentates man. 
the Caspian and Caucasus area. Pres- 
idents Heydar Aliyev of Azerbaijan, 
and Edouard Shevardnadze of Geor- 
gia, journeyed to Washington this 
summer seeking to improve diplomat- 
ic and commercial relations. The 
danger is that American political con- 
cerns will be overwhelmed by the pet- 
roleum juggernaut. 

On one level, the challenge for 
Americans is practical Only a relative 
trickle of Caspian oil can reach mar- 
kets through a soon-to-be reopened 
pipeline that passes through unstable 
Chechnya to the Black Sea. But build- 
ing new pipelines that extend west and 
south involves intricate political con- 
siderations in the region 's eight coun- 
tries and in neighboring Russia, China, 
Turkey and Iran. Many of the region's 
leaders are autocrats and hope to re- 
main so with die help of oil wealth. 

The challenges, to Washington were 
outlined recently in a speech by Strobe 
Talbott, deputy secretary of state. He 
rightly stressed die enormous promise 
of a new Silk Road, a corridor of 
commerce Unking east and west, but 
cautioned against letting oil trigger an 
imperial scramble among great powers 
to the disadvantage of the region’s 
inhabitants. “In pondering and prac- 
ticing the geopolitics of oil,” he said, 
“let’s make sure we are thinking in 
terms appropriate to the 2lst century 
and not the 19th." 

Yet in one respect Mr. Talbott 
seemed to ignore nis own advice by 
calling for immediate repeal of a 1992 
congressional ban on American aid to 
Azerbaijan. The statute. Section 907 
of the Freedom Support Act, was 
meant to punish Azerbaijan for its 
trade embargo against Armenia stem- 
ming from a deadlocked conflict over 
Nagorno-Karabakh. 


The ban is of particular interest to oil 
companies since they seek U.S. gov- 
ernment-backed Joans for drilling and 
pipeline ventures, assistance now for- 
bidden in projects in Azerbaijan. Their 
cause is supported by a veritable battle 
fleet of emeritus diplomats, including 
former Secretary of State James Baker 
■■■aad former - national security. Adhere 
Brent Scowcroft and Zbigniew Brze- 
analri, all of whom have some business 
„ interest in development of Caspian oSL~ 

Nagorno-Karabakh is emblematic 
of the area's political and ethnic volat- 
ility. It is a predominantly Armenian 
enclave wi thin Azerbaijan created by 
S talin when he carved up Soviet ter- 
ritories in an effort to suppress various 
ethnic and religious groups. In 1988, 
Nagorno-Karabakh erupted in vio- 
lence as Armenian Christians 
clamored for real self-rule within 
Azerbaijan, whose people are mostly 
Turiric-speaking Muslims. An ugly 
war resulted that ended in stalemate 
when newly independent Armenia sent 
its own army across the frontier. Both 
sides have slaughtered civilians, and 
the conflict has displaced 800,000 
Azerbaijanis. A cease-fire has some- 
how held for the last four years. 

There. may be a case for ending or 
modifying Section 907 now that Amer- 
ica has joined Russia and France as co- 
chairs of Nagorno-Karabakh peace 
talks. But Washington ought to proceed 
with great caution as it adjusts policies 
there and in the wider Caspian area. 
The former Soviet Communist leaders 
who remain powers in the region are 
not alike. Mr. Shevardnadze has proved 
a reformer and a democrat Mir. Aliyev 
has not Armenia’s president Levon 
Ter-Petrossian, was re-elected in a 
1996 vote of dubious fairness. 

Corruption, political repression and 
human rights abuses remain endemic 
in the region. The United States has a 
nasty habit of subordinating its demo- 
cratic principles when access to for- 
eign oil reserves seizes the attention of 
politicians and their corporate bene- 
factors. It happened in Iraq. It should 
not happen in the Caspian basin. 

-- THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


A Chance for Germany 

Germany and its leader are drown- 
ing in troubles. An old but creaking 
system of consensus, the lingering loy- 
alty of bosses and employees to an 
unaffordable social welfare model, and 
a web of constitutional checks and bal- 
ances designed to prevent even the 
most fleeting thought of another 
tyranny have all made it extraordinarily 
haul to cany out reform in Germany. 

The current mess could, however, 
produce a bonus. It could force Ger- 
mans to start considering, more se- 
riously than before, both the gravity of 


Helmut Kohl's electoral chances may 
seem now, he should not be counted 
out. He is a formidable winner of elec- 
tions — and the election campaign has 


now, in effect, begun. If he is gal- 
vanized into explaining the need for 
radical reform, be may yet haul himself 
and his country out of the bog. 

— The Economist f London j. 

Beware of the Jungle 

The good news is that Pol Pot has 
finally been brought to book, sen- 
tenced to life behind bamboo bars. The 
bad news is that it was the KhmeT 
Rouge who did it. For in so doing they 
confirmed that the force to be reckoned 
with in Cambodia isn’t in Phnom Penh. 
It lurks in the jungle. In many ways, 
[this -is}, foe oldest, lesson- of -civili- 
zation: Control the jungle or ultimately 
it will control you. 

— Far Eastern Economic Review 
(Hong Kong}. 


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W ASHINGTON — What do the 
suicide bombers in Jerusalem 
and New York City tell us? Something 
we already knew: There are Palestinian 
extremist groups that are nourished by 
terrorism against Jews — and it doesn’t 
matter who is in power in Israel how 
active the United States is, or whether 
peace talks are moving or stalled. The 
question is how to deal with them. 

One option is permanent war between 
the Israeli and Palestinian peoples. But 
both the Israeli and the Palestinian ma- 
jorities know that this is futile. 

The architects of the Oslo peace had 
another idea: Build a peace between 
Israelis and Palestinians that will sat- 
isfy the center of each community. 

You do this not because it will erad- 
icate all terrorism. That is impossible. 
There will be Palestinian ana Israeli 
extremists who will never reconcile. 
No, you do this because it creates a 
better way to diminish terrorism — 
having the Israeli and Palestinian mod- 
erates fighting together against the Is- 
raeli and Palestinian extremists. 

We were in theprocess of testing this 
strategy when Yitzhak Rabin was 
gunned down by an Israeli fanatic. Ever 
since then, the Oslo experiment has been 
slowly eroding. And if this is not re- 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

versed, we are heading back to a war of 
tiie Pales tinian middle agains t the Israeli 
middle — only it will be much worse 
because now Palestinians have guns. We 
are heading for Bosnia on the Jordan. 

The two men with the most power to 
halt this slide are Yasser Arafat and 
Benjamin Netanyahu, and what is 
really depressing is that neither seems 
up to the task. 

Mr. Arafat's leadership has been fool- 
hardy and self-defeating. He has learned 
nothing from dealing with Israelis. Look 
at the Hebron deal last year. 

Mr. Netanyahu, a lifelong advocate 
of keeping Hebron under Israeli con- 
trol relinquished most of it as part of 


the Oslo deaL Why? Because 75 per- 
cent of Israelis wanted Oslo to proceed. 
And they believed then that Mr. Arafat 
was making a real security effort 

In other words, a weak Arafat was 
able to triumph over Likud ideology 
because he had the leverage of the 
Israeli public on his side of the table. 

So what happens? Immediately after 
Hebron, Mr. Netanyahu, to restore his 
right- wingCTedentialv starts a provoc- 
ative building project at Har Homa in 


Jerusalem, and Mr. Arafat instead of 
finding other ways to express his dis- 
gust tries to hurt Mr. Netanyahu by 
turning Palestinian security coopera- 
tion on and off. 

Naturally, the Israeli public sides 
with Mr. Netanyahu. Mr. Arafat loses 
all his leverage; peace talks halt. 

Even though it was Arafat men who 
helped Israel uncover (he Hamas Beit 
Sahur suicide bomb factory, he opens 
himself to charges of not doing enough 
on security because of bow he has 
turned it on and off. He is, and should 
be, paying a price for his little games. 

As for Mr. Netanyahu, his leadership 
has been incompetent Yes, be has 
floated the idea of a Palestinian mini- 
state in the West Bank and Gaza. But 
while he has leaked those ideas to the 
Israeli press, he has never shared them 
with the Palestinians or developed any 
realistic strategy for working with Pal- 
estinians to achieve his ends. 

So Palestinians assume that his ideas 
are just a fraud, meant for CNN, and 
that they are supposed to provide Israel 
security while Mir. Netanyahu diddles 
them, or tosses them a concession only 
when it is politically cost-free for him. 

When the Americans asked Mr. Net- 
anyahu to temporarily freeze building 


at Har Homa so that peace talks could - 
be resumed, he offered to do so over a ; 
four-day holiday when there would be f 
no construction anyway — an idea 
deemed too ridiculous to even pass to ' 
the Palestinians. 

When Mr. Netanyahu wants to lead, l 
he ran. He showed that in Hebron, and * 
just last week he blocked a new pro- 
vocative building project in Jerusalem. 
But be usually debases what he has ‘ 
done by placating the ideologues in his - 
party with acts that drive the Pales- 1 
tinians to despair. t 

So the Americans, Palestinians and 
his coalition partners have all con- 
eluded that he is a man with no core and ' 
that the person who puts (he latest ! 
greatest pressure on him gets the most ‘ 
It is so revealing that, even with the ‘ 
peace process frozen, the latest Gallup 
Poll in Israel showed 60 percent of , 
Israelis favoring a demilitarized Pal- 
estinian state, and even some sharing ; 
of Jerusalem. 

The Israeli people have a core — 
they know there is no military solution, ! 
and that without the two centers finding * 
a way to cooperate, there is only a future I 
frill of yesterdays. It’s a shame they 
have no leaders to show them the way. 

The New York Times. 


A Jewish Time of Mourning , Plus Usual Recriminations 


J ERUSALEM — In Jewish 
tradition, these -summer 
days are a time of mourning. 
Orthodox men don’t shave, 
weddings and other public cel- 
ebrations are suspended, the 
religious radio stations play 
only vocal, not instrumental, 
music. These are the “Three 
Weeks” marking the ancient 
Roman siege of Jerusalem and 
culminating in the fast day of 
foe Ninth of Ab. There is no 
more somber or ominous time 
of the Jewish year. 

Into the Ninth of Ab are con- 
-densed Jewish history’s .major 
disasters: foe destruction of 
both the first and second 
temples, foe loss of national 
sovereignty, foe expulsion of 
foe Jews from Spain in 1492. 
World War I, die beginning of 
modem Europe's disintegra- 
tion that led to foe Holocaust, 
also began on the Ninth of Ab. 


By Yossi Klein Halevi 


Nature, too, conditions the 
religious Israeli to expect dis- 
aster in summer. The rains, 
biblical symbol of God’s fa- 
vor, entirely cease, and foe 
earth reverts to thistle and 
stone, a land of graves. 

And so last Wednesday’s 
terrorist atrocity in Jerusalem 
can seem to be part of a pre- 
determined pattern, a reasser- 
tion of hostile history. 

The attack occurred at a time 
of increasingly vocal specula- 
tion about imminent war. The 
most serious threats come from 
the Middle East's three most 
pathological regimes. Western 
and Arabic intelligence reports 
quoted in foe Israeli press say 
that Iran, Iraq and Syria, 
alarmed by Israel's growing 
strategic alliance with Turkey, 
are trying to resolve their long- 


time mutual antipathy and cre- 
ate a military pact. 

According to Israeli intel- 
ligence, the Syrian army is ac- 
tively preparing for war, or at 
least an attack ou Israeli po- 
sitions in the Golan Heights. In 
Lebanon, Iran is encouraging 
fundamentalist guerrillas to in- 
tensify attacks on Israeli sol- 
diers and provoke retaliation. 
Leaders of foe Palestinian Au- 
thority warn of a “spontan- 
_ eous explosion of the Pales- 
tinian street” — by which they 
mean orchestrated violence. 

Like foe Jews of ancient Je- 
rusalem who accused one an- 
other of treasonous accommo- 
dation with or provocative mil- 
itancy toward Rome, modem 
Israelis agree only about this: 
If foe next war happens, other 
Israelis will be to blame. 


Leftists fault foe Netanyahu 
government for failing to nur- 
ture die fragile peace process 
and accept Arab territorial de- 
mands. Rightists assert that foe 
countdown to the next war 
began with foe empowerment 
of Yasser Arafat’s terrorist 
army as a police force in foe 
heart of the land of Israel. 

Orthodox Jews say secular 
leftists and rightists summon 
God’s anger by polluting foe 
Holy Land with Western vices. 
The salvation of Israel insist 
rabbis who travel foe country 
preaching penitence to in- 
creasingly larger audiences, 
won't be found in any political 
formula but only in a return to 
the ways of foe Torah. 

Even as we mourn the de- 
struction of ancient Jerusalem, 
we debate foe fate of resur- 
rected modem Jerusalem. Is 
Prime Minister Benjamin Net- 


anyahu 's refusal to call back 
foe bulldozers from Har Homa « 
a provocation that has restored ’ 
us to pariah status and opened * 
the way to foe next war? Or is ' 
his unexpected opposition to ’ 
building a new Jewish neigh- • 
borhood in East Jerusalem's' 
Ras al Amud a betrayal of Jew- ; 
ish history and foe beginning > 
of foe dismemberment of foe 
city between rival Palestinian ' 
and Israeli sovereignties? 

Like foe Jews in Roman 
times, we are trying to discover— 
foe way out of foe siege. We 
search, each group in its way tfB 
for the political or religious 
solution to the mutually con- 
flicting demands of history and _ 
security and morality. 

Mr. Halevi, a senior writer 
for The Jerusalem Report, con- ' r 
tributed this comment to the‘ r 
Los Angeles Times. r 


Don’t Try to Shoulder Russia Out of the Caucasus Oil Game 


W ASHINGTON — On foe 
campus of Georgetown 
University, a handful of dem- 
onstrators last week protested 
foe visit of Azerbaijan’s pres- 
ident, Heydar Aliyev. "Aliyev 
— Money Won’t Buy Re- 
specl” one sign proclaimed. 

If the protesters had stepped 
into the auditorium where Mr. 
Aliyev was speaking, they 
might not have been so sure. 
A standing-room-only crowd 
welcomed the former KGB 
chief and Politburo sycophant 
as a great statesman. 

Former U.S. national secu- 
rity adviser Zbigniew Brzezin- 
ski had foe “distract pleasure 
and privilege'’ of introducing 
him. Richard Armitage, a 
former assistant secretary of 
defense, led the audience in a 
post-speech standing ovation, 
thanking foe visiting leader for 
his “insightful and indeed in- 
spiring message." 

. _ ..Why such-sudden respect for 
the coup-installed leader? One 


By Fred Hiatt 


word: oil. Azerbaijan claims 
title to a good-sized patch of foe 
Caspian Sea oil and gas re- 
serves. Along with Kazakhstan 
and Turkmenistan, on foe Cas- 
pian’s facing shore, Azerbai- 
jan has become foe object of an 
oil rush as nations and compa- 
nies jockey for access to that $4 
trillion prize. 

Washington’s foreign policy 
establishment has not been im- 
mune to oil rush fever. An all- 
star cast of former top officials 
— including, although their fi- 
nancial interest was not men- 
tioned during the Georgetown 
forum, Mr. Armitage and Mr. 
Brzezinski — are working or 
consulting for oil companies 
with an interest in the region. 

Many foreign policy experts, 
with or without personal finan- 
cial stakes, are urging the Clin- 
ton administration, to pay more., 
attention to this Caucasus and 
Central Asian region, with an 


emphasis on promoting "great- 
er access" and on building 
"multiple pipelines," as Mr. 
Brzezinski said. Translation: 
Get foe oil to the West without 
going through Russia. 

There is a valid policy goal 
underlying that advice. These 
former Soviet republics, after 
decades under Moscow's 
thumb, are working hard to 
flesh out their new indepen- 
dence, and it is in America’s 
interest to help them succeed 
They cannot as long as every 
pipeline for oil export runs 
through Russia. 

And when it comes to trade, 
military training, cultural influ- 
ence and more, these countries 
do nor want to limit themselves 
to their former overlords to foe 
north and Islamic fundamental- 
ists to the south. America can 
.and should offer another option. 

But — and here is where 
many pipeline strategists and 


Journalists Who Risk Death 


G uatemala city — 

In foe last 10 years, 173 
Latin American reporters, 
photographers, columnists 
and editors have been 
murdered. They were not cov- 
ering wars or something else 
that might be considered haz- 
ardous duty. They were just 
doing their ordinary job: Hy- 
ing to publish the truth. 

The chilling thing about 
those murders is that almost 
none of them have been solved. 
Official corruption, indiffer- 
ence and threats have preven- 
ted serious investigations. 

That grim record was the 
subject of a conference put on 
in Guatemala City last week 
by the Inter-American Press 
Association. Hundreds of 
journalists, lawyers, political 
figures and others mer to call 
for an end to unpunished 
crimes against journalists. 

What made the conference 
remarkable was testimony 
about the victims. Widows, 
colleagues and others told 
about their lives and deaths. 

Jorge Carpio Nicolie, a 
leading Guatemalan editor, 
died when 30 hooded men am- 
bushed his car on a remote 
country road on July 3. 1993. 
“They asked if he was Jorge 
Carpio,” his widow, Marta 
Amviiiaga de Carpio, said. 
"Then they shot him. My hus- 
band fell in my arms." 

Mrs. Carpio. who has taken 
over as editor of the news- 
paper El Gr&fico, said those 
whoordered the killing remain 
unknown. The police official 


By Anthony Lewis 


in charge of the investigation 
was murdered, evidence de- 
stroyed — and all this at a lime 
when Jorge Carpio’s cousin 
was president of Guatemala. 

Viol eta Chamorro, foe 
former president of Nicaragua, 
spoke of the 1978 murder of 
her husband, Pedro Joaquin 
Chamorro, an editor who op- 
posed the Soxnoza dictator- 
ship. He and foe others who 
died, she said, “could have 
had a safe lifestyle — but they 
had a commitment to truth." 

Many in the conference hall 
had suffered experiences that 
were painful even to hear de- 
scribed. An Argentine editor’s 
2-year-old son was kidnapped 
daring that country's dirty 
war, and never found. 

Irma Flaquer Azurdia, a 
Guatemalan newspaper col- 
umnist, was kidnapped in 
1 980. Her sister, Anahella 
Flaquer. told how the family 
had been warned not to in- 
vestigate her disappearance. 
“I have been condemned," 
she said, ‘ ‘to the torment of not 
knowing how Irma died. ' ’ 

The focus was on cases 
from Mexico, Guatemala and 
Colombia. But others were 
mentioned, not only in Latin 
America but in Russia, Al- 
geria, India and elsewhere. 

in most cases foe suspicion 
is that government officials or 
military elements were behind 
foe murders: foe victims had 
often spoken out against of- 


ficial crimes and abuses. In 
Colombia, drug lords targeted 
the press, and drug traffickers 
working wjfo corrupt officials 
seem to be doing foe same in 
Mexico. A Mexican editor, 
Benjamin Flores Gonzalez. 
was machine-gunned to death 
just three weeks ago. 

It is murder with impunity. 
To see that is to understand 
that more is at stake than the 
lives of journalists. Flagrant 
killing that goes unpunished 
rots a society, destroying foe 
people's faith in law. 

The purpose of the murders 
is to send a message — to the 
press and to all citizens. The 
message is: Do not disagree 
with the powerful; do not 
speak out against evil. Un- 
challenged. the result would 
be a silent society, and that is a 
terrible price to pay. 

Rosaiina Tuyuc Velasquez, 
a Mayan member of foe Gua- 
temalan Congress, said: “A 
people without information is 
a dead people." 

The spread of democracy in 
Latin America has not ended 
the phenomenon of crimes 
against the press without pun- 
ishment. Intolerance of free 
expression remains despite foe 
fall of authoritarian regimes, 
and sodocorrupi or ineffective 
police and justice systems. 

But there is courage, too — 
courage that moved those 
conung from foe safety of the 
United States. Latin journa- 
lists are prepared to challenge 
foe culture of silence. 

The New York Times. 


unreconstructed Cold Warriors 
go astray * — building up foe 
new nations should not mean 
cutting Russia down. Russia is a 
neighbor, with a role to play. 

The.question is what kind of 
role. Many in Moscow still see 
these nations as colonies, only 
nominally and perhaps tempor- 
arily independeoL Russian of- 
ficials covertly inflame ethnic 
tensions in foe region to un- 
dermine the new nations and to 
retain some control. 

But those officials are play- 
ing a losing game. While foe 
Heritage Foundation warns of a 
possible "new Russian em- 
pire" that might seek “exclus- 
ive control over foe region's 
pipelines," the real Russia's 
army is disintegrating, and its 
efforts to form a closer com- 
monwealth of former Soviet re- 
publics have been rcbuffed. 

Mean while, a new element in 
Russia, is beginning to under- 
stand that it can benefit more 
from commercial ties among 
equal nations than from foe 
threats of foe past. While Rus- 
sia’s Foreign Ministry denies 
Azerbaijan's exclusive right to 
any Caspian oil, Russia's 
privatized oil companies wheel 
and deal alongside Amoco and 
Chevron. Entrepreneurs on a 
smaller scale import and export, 
oblivious to politics. 

it is in everyone’s interest for 
these Russians ro be included, 
not excluded — for Russians to 
see that they, too, can benefit in 
a nonimperial world. 

The competition for influ- 
ence does not have to be a zero- 
sum game. Deputy Secretary of 
State Strobe Talbott said re- 
cently. “We want to see all re- 
sponsible players in the Cau- 


casus and Central Asia be-' 
winners." 

There is an analogy here K r 
Russia’s western border, where? 
foe West is seeking to bolster, 
the sovereignty of former Soviet 
satellites while helping Rus^a; 
to join the world, in part through ■ 
a Russia-NATO Council , . 

That policy opens the Clinfon ! 
administration to attack from; 
both sides. Opponents bf 
NATO expansion accuse it of 
jeopardizing U.S.-Russian ties, 
while those who demonize Rus- 
sia accuse Washington of "ap- : 
peasing" Moscow. . ! 

In fact, nothing would be sup- 
pler than to stop "appeasing" 
Moscow. The United States: 
could cram NATO expansion; £ 
down Russia's throat, and -it ; ** 
could seek to shut Russia out of 
foe Caucasus. It takes neither 
courage nor cunning to kick 
someone when he is down. , 

But the strategy of hying to 
integrate Russia while bolster- i 
rag its neighbors is more cp-j 
herent than what critics from, 
either end can propose. The; 
stronger Azerbaijan and At- - 
menia grow, and Estonia and 
Poland, the less opportunity they 
present to would-be Russian ajJ; 
venturers and nationalists. 

And foe more Russians find 
legitimate opportunity in Azer- 
baijan. foe greater foe chances 
of peace throughout the region. 

Ir is easy and maybe prot- / 
liable to lionize Mr. Aliyev for 
keeping foe Russians at bay. To- 
support Azerbaijan in good mea- 
sure while encouraging Russia's, 
democratic and economic devel- 
opment is a more sophisticated 
game — and. in foe long run. a 
more rewarding one. 

The Washwnton Post 


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IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGOi '^6 


1897: Economic War 

PARIS — M. Henri Boucher, 
foe French Minister of Com- 
merce, regards the new United 
States Tariff Bill as a decla- 
ration of economic war against 
Europe. The United States, he 
says, have thought fit to indulge 
in fantastic experiments, feel- 
ing secure in the monopoly of 
their conon and oil supply; but 
in this calculation they arc 
likely to be deceived, for there 
is reason to believe that a sub- 
stitute will be found for oil in 
alcohol, and as for the provision 
of cotton it will be possible to 
seek it in the colonies. 

1922: Flemish Trial 

BRUSSELS — A trial of acute 
political interest will com- 
mence, when foe Flemish 
Deputy. Ariel de Beuckelaere. 
former corporal, will have to 
answer to charges of treason- 
able relations with Germany. 


De Beuckelaere attained notorij 
ety on account of his Flamingo 
ant views while he was still wit^ 
foe colors. Captured with his 
squad during a German raid, De 
Beuckelaere became an objeej. 
of flattering attentions on foe J- 
part of foe enemy on his views 
becoming known, as the Gerr 
mans were counting on foe po:»>- 
sibiiity of splitting the country 
in two with the help of fof 
Flamingant movemenL i 

1947: Congo Uranium* 

PARIS — Shipments of uranf 
um ore to United States atomif: 
plants from the mines of the 
Belgian Congo, cloaked in of- 
ficial Belgian government 
secrecy, totaled 1,648 ions in 
foe first three months of 194^ 
Communist spokesmen em- 
phasize that the export of mani- * 
um to America is placing Bel- 
gium in a "colonial position 'l j 
that Belgium herself should ta& ; 

foe field in the atomic race. - j 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1997 


PAGE 9 


l r, 0ll 


OPINION /LETTERS 




1 

Days of One Nation Are Gone 

Lto the idea of America°as one ^* c ^ael Clough War there is no longer as mu 


2KL r Sf*? - United States is and will re ma , n 

divisible under God. That tstheim- one nation with a common culture 

b r «e of and a clear set of “nation^’ ’m 
A^cas defining institutions. Me- terests is deeply ingrained in the 
WiL-ii *u r r , . . Amencan political psyche. It is a 

Sp^(^y f the fast-food giant a vision based largely on a myopic 
reorganizing its U.S. operations into view of U.S. history, 
five relapvely independent geo- The America that emerged after 
graphic divisions. The days of one World War n was the product 01 a 
hamburger, one America are gone. long process of nationalization its 


The underlying trends that 
forced McDonald's to regionalize 
its restaurant decision- makin g are 
the same ones that make it increas- 
ingly difficult for other U.S. 
institutions to develop effective 
national strategies, including foreign 
policy and governance, 

For better and worse, it is less and 
less possible for nationally minded 
elites, sitting in Washington and 
New York, to construct policies that 
simultaneously protea and promote 
the interests of Los Angeles, San 
Francisco and other emerging re- 
gional metropolitan centers. 

Instead, a new, much more de- 
centralized model of governance, 
one capable of accotnmodatmg the 
growing diversity of the American 
politico-cultural economy, most be 
developed Short of that, the stage 
could be set for a series of economic 
and cultural civil wars pitting regions 
of the country against each other. 

A rapid series of economic, social 
and technological changes, espe- 
cially immigration and economic 
globalization, have transformed the 
United States into a microcosm of 
the world. The exceptional uniform- 
ity that characterized American so- 
ciety in the early post-World War n 
period has been supplanted by ex- 
treme diversity. 

The most integrated national mar- 
ket in the history of the world is 
splintering into an array of niches. 

Nevertheless, the idea that the 


milestones were: 

• The opening of the Erie Canal in 
1825 and the emergence of New 

America is destined to 
become a country of 
independent regions . 
each with its own 
politico-cultural 
economy , governing 
elites and interests . 

York City as the commercial, fi- 
nancial and corporate capital of a 
highly integrated industrial heart- 
land stretching from Massachusetts 
to Illinois. 

• The defeat of the South in 
the Civil War and passage of the 
13th, 14th and 15th Amendments 
to the U.S. Constitution, which 
extended the principle of equal 
rights to blacks and established 
the primacy of national citizenship 
over state citizenship. 

• The rise of die progressive 


War there is no longer as much of 
a need for a vast national security 
of 1924 and the success of the establishment. 

“Americanization” movement. Although this transformation is still 

• The rise of radio and. later, tele- in its infant stages, the shape of the 

vision, which helped to nationalize future is becoming clear. America is 
politics and popular culture. destined to become a country of dis- 

• Tbe automobile revolution that tinct, relatively independent regions, 

turned America iato the most in- each with its own politico-cultural 
temaJly mobile nation in the world economy, metropolitan centers, gov- 
and spurred the development of a eraing elites and global interests, 
network of interstate highways. Based on existing economic and 

• The Great Depression. World demographic trends, it is possible to 
War Band the on set of the Cold War, imagine 20 or more core regions 
all of which greatly increased the stretching across the country. 

need for a strong, centralized, na- The character of each region will 
tiooai government. be determined by the nature of its 

Today the flow of U.S. history is principal industries, the ethnic corn- 
moving in precisely opposite direc- position of its population, the poiit- 
tions. National unity is being eroded ical orientation of its dominant elites 
from above and below. and the extent and location of its 

• The national economy is be- global connections. At present, this 

coming part of an integrated global evolution is most noticeable and ad- 
economy, and the primacy of the vanced along the southern and west- 
old industrial heartland is now em borders of the United States, 
challenged by the emergence of Given the strength of the cen- 
new economic centers in the trifugal forces at work, it is a naive 
South and the West, each with and dangerous ambition to cling to 
its own set of interests. the idea of one nation, one culture. 

• The campaign for equal rights Naive, because it assumes that 

and integration has metamorphosed newly powerful regional elites un- 
into a series of demands for the re- grudgingly will cede the clout and 
cognition and acceptance of social influence they have won back to 
and cultural differences. national elites in Washington, whom 

• The primacy of national govern- they believe to be largely out of 
mem is challenged by more and more touch with the changes. 

calls for new forms of global gov- Dangerous, because it could block 

emance and efforts to re rum greater the United Stales from developing a 
authority to states and localities. new formula for national gov- 

• Immigration, legal and illegal, emance, one that would preserve a 
has eroded the homogeneity of place for national authorities while 


the U.S. population and multiplied 
the connections between American 


movement and the development of society and other societies around 
Teddy Roosevelt's New National- the world. 


ism. which provided the intellectual 
foundations for the emergence of an 
activist national government. 

• The homogenization of the 
American population following 
passage of the Immigration Act 


• The communications revolution 
simultaneously has turned national 
media giants into global media 
mega-giants and spurred a prolifer- 
ation of new forms of local media. 

• Finally, with the end of the Cold 


giving regional elites more latitude 
to develop the strategies that best 
promote their region’s interests. 

The writer, a senior fellow at the 
Council on Foreign Relations, is co- 
chairman of the New American 
Global Dialogue. He contributed 
this comment to the Los Angeles 
Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


1 III Game 


On Middle East Peace 

« 

1 How many more bombings 
. l-'f- ajnd killings of civilians will 
• ' " Jerusalem and Tel Aviv have 
! to face until both the Israeli 
*■*. prime minister and the Pal- 
estinian leader understand 
that there is no other choice 
than to go on with the peace 
process in the Middle East? 

The dialogue has pro- 
grpsseettoo far for either side . 
now to call it quits. This 
means that both the Israelis. 
asd the Palestinians are 


doomed to continue their 
walk toward peace, whether 
they like it or not. 

The Islamic terrorists 
know it, as do the Jewish ex- 
tremists. Now it's up to their 
respective governments to 
show these people and the rest 
of the world that they will not 
be coerced by barbarous, 
cowardly militants. 

. BERNARD HENRY. 

Garches. Fiance. 

Regarding " Don’t Bow to 
Terror" (Editorial. Aug. 1): 


Yasser Arafat must crack 
down on terrorist organiza- 
tions. regardless of how dis- 
appointing have been the re- 
sults of negotiations with 
Israel. For him to undertake 
single-mindedly the suppress- 
ive action which is probably 
required to succeed , he needs 
broad domestic support. He 
can hardly count on that un- 
less he rekindles in the heart 
of Palestinians the hope of the 
rosy future they expected 
from the Oslo agreement. 

Unfortunately, the Pales- 



tinian leader is not being 
helped in this regard by 
Benjamin Netanyahu's state- 
ments and actions. The Israeli 
prime minister has said "no" 
to a Palestinian state. In the 
name of security, he punishes 
law-abiding Palestinian cit- 
izens by closing borders so 
they do not have access to 
making their living. 

All of this crushes the 
hopes of Palestinians and 
drives them toward despair. It 
advances the cause of extrem- 
ists who want to wreck the 
peace process, and it under- 
mines Mr. Arafat's standing 
as the brave liberator. 

Believers in peace, Israelis 
and Palestinians alike, wish 
their leaders would take ac- 
count of each other’s legit- 
imate concerns. Immediate 
resumption of dialogue, with 
the direct involvement of the 
United States, is what is 
needed to salvage the peace 
process and avert further 
bloodshed. A fair settlement 
is the best guarantee of a last- 
ing peace and security. 

S. A. SHERIF. 

Montreux, Switzerland. 

Regarding “Mideasi's 
Drift Toward Disaster Con- 
cerns Us All" ( Opinion . Aug. 
2) by Jim Hoagland: 

The suicide bombings in 
Jerusalem by members of the 
military wing of Hamas are 
directly linked to the 1988 
chatter of Hamas, which is a 
blueprint for genocide. 


CROSSWORD 


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28 OWie's partner 
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23 Popular oil 
additive 

25 Tough as 

87 One leads to 
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3« Mounted again 
35 Collection of 
anecdotes 
30 One of 7-Down 
38 Small drum 

M Signal for an act 

to end 

41 Holy chalice of 
legend 

43 Telephone 
sound 

44 It increases by 
degrees 

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51 Stnped 
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55 It hangs next to 
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a# Growth on the 
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68 Reverberation 
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71 One of 7~DO« n 
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Sermonizing and Moral Uplift 
Aren’t What Hollywood Is For 


W ASHINGTON — If the 
Fust lady is going to 
worry about Julia Roberts as a 
role model, you'd think she 
would object to “Pretty 
Woman,*’ in which Ms. 
Roberts channingly presented 
prostitution as another yuppie 
avenue of upward mobility — 
leading to respect, rubies', es- 
cargots, good table manners, 
flossing and Richard Gere. 

Or “Everyone Says I Love 
You. “ in which the actress 

MEANWHILE 

played a married woman who 
has an affair with Woody Al- 
len. Or “Something to Talk 
About.'* in which she tries to 
poison a philandering hus- 
band. Or the upcoming “Con- 
spiracy Theory,” in which 
she is a Justice Department 
employee who hooks up with 
Mel Gibson, a conspiracist 
cab driver who thinks NASA 
is trying to kill the president 
with earthquakes. 

Instead, Hillary Rodham 
Clinton chooses an easy target, 
scolding Ms. Roberts for 
smoking in * ‘My Best Friend’s 
Wedding.” Her chiding syn- 
dicated column appeared on 
the same day that the U.S. 
Postal Service had a red carpet 
ceremony to unveil a stamp 
with a handsome image of 
Humphrey Bogart who epi- 
tomized tire cool of smoking 
and who died of lung cancer. 

“This portrayal of a mod- 
em woman so reliant on cig- 
arettes is particularly trou- 
bling given that more young 
women are taking up the 
deadly habit” the First 
Columnist wrote, adding: “A 
dynamic woman smoking 


As Mr. Hoagland points 
out “the world’s interest in 
stability in the Middle East is 
too great to allow the deadly 
drift to ever larger disaster that 
now prevails to continue.” 
We all have a duty to de- 
nounce those movements 
whose basic charters spell out 
their murderous aspirations, 
often transforming religious 
and spiritual values to narrow 
poJitico-jdeolpgfcaJ ends. 

Beyond the necessary de- 
nunciations. there are ram- 
pans of international law to 
help stop these tides of hate. 
The Convention on the Pre- 
vention and the Punishment 
of the Crime of Genocide of 
1948 prohibits the public in- 
citement to commit genocide, 
as is done regularly by 
Hamas. It is up to the states 
party to the convention to in- 
voke its mechanisms and thus 
stop the deadly drift. 

RENE, WAD LOW. 

Geneva. 

Curbing Pollution 

Regarding "Heartland to 
Washington : You Just Don't 
Matter ” (Opinion. July 30) 
by James K. Glassman: 

I agree with Mr. Glass- 
man’s assessment that Wash- 
ington politics and priorities 
often seem ludicrous from 
afar. The self-importance of 
the nation’s capital and some 
of its more powerful residents 
is indeed shocking at times. 

Yet 1 do not buy Mr. Glass- 
man's blanket statement that 
“government at the federal 
level just isn’t important to 
people's lives.” 

Take one example: the 
environment. Mr. Glassman 
himself uses this example 
to prove his own point, sug- 
gesting that among other 
“devilish” tasks performed 
by the government, efforts to 
protect air quality and curb 
global wanning will harm, 
not help, Americans and the 
economy at large. 

But if there is one area in 
which the U.S. government 
must be involved, it is in curb- 
ing excessive human deple- 
tion of limited natural re- 
sources. improving air 
quality, and protecting the 
ozone layer. If the govern- 
ment does nor do so, then who 
will? Thoagh certain ele- 
ments of the private sector are 
becoming more environment- 



By Maureen Dowd 


throughout ‘My Best Friend’s 
Wedding/ an intelligent sci- 
entist Lighting up in ’Contact' 
and Leonardo DiCaprio play- 
ing a chain-smoking Romeo 
in 'Romeo and Juliet’ send 
children the wrong message.” 
(“Romeo and Juliet” sends 
children the wrong message.) 

“Instead of hiding behind 
the excuse of artistic license.' ' 
she continued, Hollywood 
big shots “should admit that 
most film scenes depicting 
smoking are gratuitous — 
whether it’s Will Smith cel- 
ebrating evety triumph by 
lighting a cigar in ’Indepen- 
dence Day’ or Kurt Russell 
unveiling a pack of red, white 
and blue cigarillos with the 
brand name ‘Freedom' in ‘Es- 
cape from LA.’” 

Ms. Roberts's character in 


havior through media started 
several years ago when Jay 
Wins ten of Harvard began 
lobbying to have prime-time 
television programs insert 
designated driver and anti- 
violence themes. 

His success caused lobby- 
ists for every disease and 
social problem to besiege 
Hollywood. 

It was one thing to make 
TV and movie people more 
conscious that characters 
might buckle their seat belts 
or use condoms or talk about 
consequences. But now 
the focus on subliminal mes- 
sages has become an obses- 
sion. as every show is pres- 
sured into becoming a 
thousand little sermons. 

Critics complain that 
Christine Baranski's deli- 
ciously cynical character on 
“Cybill” should not drink so 
many martinis. Lucie Arnaz 


A holier-than-thou celluloid universe 
where people are portrayed as ice want 
them to be , not as they are , is not art 
or entertainment l It's propaganda. 


ally responsible, these efforts 
are not yet sufficient. 

The truly “devilish” thing 
would be to ignore the gravity 
of the environmental chal- 
lenge and to leave the mess in 
the hands of our children and 
grandchildren. If Washington 
can successfully make strides 
to improve the long-term 
healih of this planet, then this 
is one area where it deserves 
praise, not criticism. 

MELANIE JANDi 
Geneva. 

Mr. Glassman writes that 
global warming is “a threat 
that good science shows is 
minor, if it exists at all.” His 
comment contradicts conclu- 
sions by thousands of scien- 
tists that global warming ex- 
ists and that what remains to 
be ascertained is the extent by 
which it will continue to in- 
crease in the next century. 

Furthermore, these experts 
say that global wanning may 
be irreversible. As polar ice 
caps melt and glaciers recede, 
solar radiation will be ab- 
sorbed by the exposed land 
and not reflected back by the 
snow and ice. This will re- 
inforce die wanning process. 

FRANK S. RUDO. 

Paris. 

The writer is professor of 
chemistry at the City Uni- 
versity of New York. 

Language of Math 

Regarding “InThis Golden 
Age of Astronomy. Wake Up 
and Be Curious ( Opinion . 
July 29) by Charles Kraut- 
hammer: 

Mr. Krauthammer writes, 
“Mathematics is the lan- 
guage of the cosmos.” 

I have always taught my 
students never to be intim- 
idated by the mathematics 
that scientists use to charac- 
terize scientific phenomena. 

Mathematics, like any oth- 
er language, can always be 
translated and explained. 

More efforts need to be 
made to demystify science 
among the public, as a deeper 
understanding of nature by all 
engenders a more profound 
respect and tolerance for the 
world in which we live. 

MICHAEL PRAVICA 

Cambridge. Massachusetts. 

The writer is a teaching 
fellow at Harvard University. 


that movie bothered me. 
too, but smoking was the least 
of it. What about her 
willingness to lie and manip- 
ulate and break hearts and 
even get her best friend fired, 
just so that she could steal 
him from his fiancee? 

I don't care if the woman 
had a smoking problem. I do 
care that she had a means- 
ends problem. Or should chil- 
dren be taught that it’s O.K. to 
behave like Machiavelli if 
you don't tight up? 

I've always loved all those 
old movies that glamorize 
smoking. But it never made 
me want to smoke. I’ve always 
loved those old movies that 
glamorize bank robbers. Bui I 
never wanted to rob a bank. 

It was my older brother 
who made sure I would never 
rake up smoking. He told me. 
early and often, that men 
found women who smoked 
unattractive. TV and movies 
are a powerful influence, but 
it is the family’s role to shape 
behavior and instill values. 

A movement to modify 1 be- 


wishes her parents’ smoking 
scenes could be cut from “I 
Love Lucy” reruns. 

The first lady is straying 
into commissar territory. The 
purpose of movies is not mor- 
al uplift, and Mrs. Clinton 
does not know what is good 
for everybody. 

A holier-than-thou cellu- 
loid universe where people 
are portrayed as we want 
them to be, rather than as they 
are, is not art or entertain- 
ment It's propaganda. It is 
their flaws that make char- 
acters interesting. 

The state has no authority 
over culture. It is the purpose 
of art — it is even the purpose 
of Julia Roberts movies — 
to explore all aspects of life. 
Politicians are not parents. 
Studiu executives are not 
parents. Only parents are 
parents. 

The problem with most of 
the stuff that comes out of 
Hollywood is nor that it is 
unedifying. The problem is 
ihar it is unwatchable. 

The Sey* York Tunes 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1997 
PAGE 10 



& 


At Home With Texture and Light 


By Elaine Louie 

New York Tima Service 

N EW YORK — As a fashion 
designer, Han Feng designs 
three collections a year for the 
New York runways. Bat it has 
taken decades for her to design her first 
home. 

In it, she has created an en- 
vironment that is reminiscent 
of her clothes, with a subtle 
Asian understanding of tex- 
ture, light and balance. Her 
luminous Thai silk jackets, 
wide-cut pants and simple 
columnar dresses express 
graceful motion and diaphan- 
ous coolness setoff with Asian 
touches, deftly enriched by a 
silk and, tassel or frog clo- 
sure. And like her designs, her 
home is aiiy and beguiling. 

When Han Feng and her 
husband were divorced earli- 
er this year, the designer 
moved from a five-room, 
1,600-square-foot (150- 
square-meter) apartment on 
the 13th floor of the Ansonia 
on the Upper West Side to an 
anonymous 2,400-square- 
foot loft on the sixth floor of a 
garment district building on a 
side street 
“For me, the Ansonia had A three-, 
such a strong personality — 
the moldings on the ceiling, the round 
living room, the beautiful view, the ter- 
races all around — 1 didn’t want to touch 
the detail, 1 * said the 34-year-old de- 
signer who was bom in Nanjing, China, 
and came to the United States in 1985. 
Han is her surname, and Feng is her 
given name, but she always uses the two 
names together. 

The rented loft offered her a blank 
slate for her interior design ideas. First, 
she and David Hu, a New York ar- 
chitect, gutted the space. Out came the 
walls that divided the loft into four dark 
and dreary rooms. Out came the closet 
and bookshelves that obscured five of 
the 16 windows. Sunlight filters through 
white muslin, which on warm summer 
days billows at the open windows. 


By day, the sheer fabric diffuses the 
light so there is never any glare, and the 
curtains become a scrim through which 
one rs **} glimpse Manhattan rooftops. 
When shafts of sunlight cut through the 
openings between the panels of muslin, 
they form evanescent stripes on the 
cool, dark concrete floor. At night, the 


X' 1 




MR. CmmVnie New YotkTtaM 

sided muslin tent defines the living area. 

space glows with dozens of candles, the cand 
some in bowls aligned along the floor, Lantern < 
others in delicate metal fixtures sus~ piped in 
pended from the ceiling. really nt 

“I want to make my home very a table i 
peaceful, very quiet, 1 ’ Han Feng said. * T float in 
want you to reel the flow of the air.” objects 

The loft is divided into three parts: possesse 

living room, dining room and bedroom, their ten 
But unlike the awkward partitions that For t 
originally broke up the space, the areas swagged 
are now delineated only by the place- sided ter 
meat of furniture, including Chinese table, ch 


rest of the loft With its open carvings and 
geometric latticework the 9-by- 12-foot 
screen is both massive and airy, at once 
romantic, lacy and slightly austere. 

“It was originally used to divide 
rooms in a traditional Chinese house in 
Hangzhou," Han Feng said, referring to 
the eastern Chinese city where she spent 
her student years. Originally, 
rice paper was glued behind 
the latticework to give com- 
plete visual, if not auditory, 
privacy. 

The bedroom has the feel- 
ing of an aerie, and the plai- 
fotm bed seems to float in 
space, ft has a canopy made of 
pale blue mosquito netting, 
the fabric held by steel fiii- 
greed debacles, which the de- 
signer bought in Beijing in 
1982. On the bed a white 
cloud of a comforter floats on 
top of the mattress, which 
rests on a bleached wood plat- 
form. Even the pillow shams, 
which are linen edged with a 
deep band of silk organza, ap- 
pear almost weightless. 

The single chair is a light, 
graceful 1905 Hoffmann 
rocker with circular arms and 
a rattan seat and back. An 
armoiie and a baby grand pi- 
« Yc*k r.«c ano are the bulkiest objects in 
a. the room. 

At night. Han Feng lights 
the candles and turns on an electrified 
Lantern covered in canary yellow silk 
piped in crimson. The dining room is 
really nothing more than a grouping of 
a table and chairs, Tliey also seem to 
float in the middle of the loft, and the 
objects themselves have such a self- 
possessed integrity that they define 


pieces and those by Josef Hoffmann and 
Kolo Moser, the Viennese pioneers in 
modernism who founded the Wiener 
Werkstatte in 1903. 

A 100-year-old six-paneled Chinese 
screen separates the bedroom from the 


their territory. 

For the living area, the designer 
swagged and draped muslin into a three- 
sided tent, under which nestles a round 
table, chairs with curved spindle backs, 
and a love seat, ail designed by Hoff- 
mann. The intimate space is a place for a 
tele-a-tete or a solitary cup of jasmine 
tea. The stiff formality of the Hoffmann 
furniture is offset by a comfortably 
cushioned sofa placed just opposite. 


For Clients With Money to Burn 


L 


By Sarah Lyall 

New York Times Service 

ONDON — Tuaano Mazzilli is sure , he knows 
what all the sniping surrounding his oltrahip doth- 


^ to be very successful, people get jealous, he said 
the other day at Voyage, dressed in his own creations: olive- 
linen drawstring pants and a T-shirt of Sea Island cotton 
worn under a transparent purple nylon shirt. “But all these 
people don’t understand voyage, what it is. They don’t 
even know the difference between silk and cotton.” 

In the six years since Mazzilli and his wife, Louise, 
opened Voyage, on trendy Fulham Road in the Chelsea 
section of London, the store has gained a reputation for 
producing stunningly ethereal concoctions — some float, 
some cling, some do both — in rich colors and eclectic, 
unusual fabrics. It has also developed a reputation for being 
extremely exclusive and extremely expensive. A wisp of a 
see-through chiffon skirt, for instance, sells for about 
$1,140; a popular velvet frock coat for men sells for about 
$2,000. An American customer recently spent more than 
$131 ,000 there in a single heady shopping expedition. 

• But though the store has worldwide sales of almost $18 
million a year, Mazzilli has had to contend with some 
determined grumbling lately. In an article in The Sunday 
Times of London, for instance. Penny Wark wrote that 


shopping at Voyage was a "surreal combination of hu- 
miliation and desire,” and complained that one of its big- 
selling cardigans — short, tight, in wild colors and trimmed 
in velvet was overpriced at £295, or $480„ 

“She forgot three-quarters of what the cardigan was 
about," Mazzilli protested. "The little flowers are hand- 
made in Japan. When the flowers arrive, they're indi- 
vidually installed by hand. There’s a silk lining inside. All 
the hooks in the cardigan are individually put in by hand, 
and the cardigan ts individually dyed." 

Indeed, money appears to be no object for many of 
Voyage's zealous fens, including a healthy contingent of 
celebrities (Dustin Hoffman, Madonna. Nicole Kidman, 
Melanie -ffith) and the highest of high-profile models. 
“Last v. , Linda Evangelista came in and said, T can't 
survive w . oiout your clothes,’ " Mazzilli said. 

Not does cost seem to be a problem in the United States. 
At Barneys and Bergdorf Goodman’s, where prices are 
comparable to those in London, the Voyage line has been 
very successful. “People are spending $1,344 for a spa- 
ghetti-strap slip dress," said a spokeswoman for Barneys. 

“The clothes make you feel a little more glamorous,” said 
Caroline Michel, a book-publishing executive: "They have 
such a sense of color and fabric, and there’s nobody else 
doing quite what they do. I think they are overpriced, but the 
problem is their clothes do become an obsession, and because 
they change everything so often, you never get bored." 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


T AL SHAKED, the United States 
junior champion, made a very nice 
showing in the June edition of the First 
Saturday tournament series in Budapest, 
but came up short of what he wanted. He 
did indeed win the competition, with a 
9 Vi-3 Vi score, and in doing so surpassed 
three grandmasters. By a half- point, 
however, the 19-year-old Shaked 
missed achieving the norm that would 
have made him a grandmaster. 

It is difficult nowadays for Amer- 
icans to reach grandmaster rank when at 
least one of the tournaments to measure 
their skill has to be of the round-robin 
type. In the United States, sponsorship 
for these high-expense events is not 
easy to come by. That is why Shaked 
traveled to Hungaty, and why he will 
have to go on looking for admission to 
another appropriate foreign tourney. 

Dimitry Bunzmann of Germany, the 
player Snaked defeated sharply in the 
10th round, also undershot the norm he 
was shooting for — international master 
— but by a full point. Bunzmann could 
have done it by winning their game, but 
Sahked never let him get close. 

Rubinstein’s 5 Ne2 .against the 
Nimzo-Indian Defense was originally 
intended to reply u>-JBc3 by Nc3, 
avoiding doubled pawns. Still, 5..J3a6 6 
a3 Bc3 7 Nc3 d5 8 b3 0-0 9 a4 Qd7 10 

BUN2MAMU/ULACK 



Be2 Nc6 11 0-0 Na5 12 Ba3 Rfd8 13 
Rbl c6 holds White to only a slight 
advantage. Shaked prefers the tortuous 
6 Ng3, which is based upon developing 
a heavy center and an attack. 

In games where Black has responded 
to9d5 by 9...ed 10 cd Bd3 1 1 Qd3, he has 
not found chances for counterattack. 

Bunzmann 's solution to the question 
of the center was lJ...Ne5, which put 
pressure on the c4 pawn. Shaked was 
persuaded to break up his bishop pair 
with 12 Be5 de. 

After s low-motion preparation. 

Shaked opened a front on the king’s 
wing with 20 f4! On 20...ef 21 Qf4e522 
Qg5 Qd8 23 Rf6, Bunzmann should 
have played 23...Qe7. but it is still not 
clear whether he can defend his king. 
For example, 23...Qe7 24 Ref l Kh8 25 
Qh6 Rg8 26 Rd6 Qd6 27 Rf7 forces 
mate. And in this same line, 25..-NC5 
loses to 26 efl Qf6 27 Nh5! 

Shaked ripped into 23...h6 with 24 
Rg6! fg 25 Qg6 Kh8 26 Qh6 Kg8 27 
Nn5. If 27..JRe7. then 28 Qd6 Rh7 29 
Re3! Qh4 30 Rg3 Bg4 31 Be2! Qh5 32 
Rg4 Rg7 33 Rg7 wins. In this line. 
29...Bg4 loses to 30 Qd8 Rd8 31 Nf6. 

After 28 Re3, defense by 2S...Qh7 
would have been defeated by 29 Nffi 
Rf6 30 Rg3 Rg6 31 Rg6 Kh8 32 Rd6. 
Bunzmann tried 28...RJ4. but with 29 
Rg3 Rg4 30Nf6Kf731 Ng4 Shaked got 
his sacrificed material back while re- 
taining his mating attack plus three extra 
pawns. Bunzmann gave up. 

N1MZ04NDIAN DEFENSE 


SMAKEDfflftHTe 

Position after 47... Qe7 


White 

Black 

While 

Black 

Shaked 

Baiun’s 

Shaked 

Bunzm'u 

1 <M 

Nffi 

16 Qc2 


2 c< 

efl 

17 Qe2 

Nd6 

3 Nc3 

BM 

18 M 

Bd7 

4 e3 

b6 

IS Qd2 

Rae8 

S Ne2 

Bag 

20 M 

ef 

6 Ng3 

0-0 

21 Qf4 

e5 

7 e4 

46 

22 QgS 

Qd8 

8 M3 

c5 

23 RTfi 

hfl 

S 45 
10 Bf4 

Nbd7 

Bc3 

34 Rg6 
25 QgS 


11 be 

Ne5 

26 Qb6 


12 Be5 

de 

27 Nh5 

Qe7 

13 0-0 

QC7 

Beg 

28 Re3 

Rt4 

14 Qa< 

29 Rg3 

Rg4 

15 Rsel 

Ne8 

30 Nffi 

31 Ng4 

Kf7 

Resigns 


GREAT APES 

By Will Seif. 404 pages. £15.99. 
Bloomsbury. 

Reviewed by Katherine Knorr 

W ILL SELF was in the news most 
recently for his brief, alarming 
career as the Observer’s answer to 
Hunter Thompson. After he admitted to 
snorting heroin in a toilet on John Ma- 
jor’s campaign plane, he became the 
mostly unwitting victim of a small 
newspaper shooting war. all of which 
combined to overshadow the fact that 
“Great Apes." his second novel, is a 
terrific book. 

As a writer. Self has specialized in the 
outrageous, showing off high-voltage 
style in pursuit of the frankly gross, 
notably in "Cock & Bull" and “My 
Idea of Fun." Although “Great Apes” 
is plenty gross, with its up-close and 
personal view of chimp grooming, it is 
also so far superior to the previous 
books that it rises above the special 
effects; this is a book that should make 
people take Will Self very seriously. 

Artist Simon Dykes is hot. Provoc- 
ative and useful rumors about his most 
recent work, images of carnage, have 
created a buzz around his coming gal- 
lery opening. He himself is hallucino- 
gen! cally introspective, mean-streeis- 
cynical and on a fast track to an over- 
dose. When he wakes up from a long 
night with his girlfriend, Sarah, he finds 
she has turned into an ape. Then things 
get really strange. 

“Great Apes" is the hangover from 
hell the one that never goes away: Dykes 
will become an object of interest, fear and 
intense scientific scrutiny as the wretched 
ape who thought he was a man. 

Dykes is put into the care of Dr. Zack 
Busner. a media-sawy psychiatrist 
known for taking on strange cases. Bus- 
ner has a lot more than usual riding on 
this one, as younger associates want to 
challenge his preeminence and as sus- 
picion grows over just exactly what 
caused Dykes to morph into delusion. 

A world of chicanery and ambition 
thus clusters around our wolfman in 
reverse, which allows Self to take us on 



if' * 


At the Victoria <& Albert, a tea set from about 1750, above, and an 
engraved snuffbox given by Charles II to Nell Gwyn in about 1680. 


With a Silver Spoon (and Fork) 

V&A Museum Explores a Metal of Practicality 


lery, ong- 


By Paula Deitz 

L ONDON — For a peak aes- 
thetic experience, nothing else 
in this city equals a random 
stroll through the Imposing cor- 
ridors of tixe Victoria & Albert Museum, 
where old-fashioned display cases are 
filled with wondrous objects from Bri- 
tain’s past. 

Fortunately, trendy or neutral back- 
grounds favored by other museums for 
exhibit purposes never caught on here. 
The success of the V&A's new English 
Stiver Galleries is due in part to their 
setting in the old Ceramic Gallery, orig- 
inally completed in 2869. 

When Henry Cole became the V&A’s 
fust director in 1852, the museo logical 
fashion was to coordinate the decoration 
of a gallery with die objects displayed. 
The V&A’s grand ceramic staircase, for 
example, signaled the delicate wonders 
on view in the porcelain palace above, 
with its series of paired columns en- 
cased in celadon and white majolica. 
The galleries were further ornamented 
with painted Italianate ceilings and a 
frieze bearing the names of pottery cen- 
ters from Abruzzi to Zwickau. 

The galleries eventually succumbed 
to changing tastes in the next century, 
but the tiles were wisely preserved in 
storage in the basement Now, hand- 
somely restored, the galleries glitter 
again, this time with a magnificent array 
of more than a thousand pieces of Eng- 
lish stiver dating from 1300 to 1800. 

Philippa GlanviUe. the V&A’s chief 
curator of the metal work deportment, has 
arranged objects so as to interest visitors 
who might otherwise be overwhelmed 
by intensely packed chronological dis- 
plays with long academic captions. 

“To begin with," GlanviUe said, 


“silver is practical and hygienic, so it 
worked from the be ginning on a simple 
human level in everyday tire." Nothing 
demonstrates this better than a nursery 
saucepan from 1740. 

In almost every aspect of living — 
eating, dressing, worshiping, entertain- 
ing, writing — silver is omnipresent. 
And there is little mystery to the history 
and provenance of English silver; die 
guild standards and hallmarks estab- 
lished by the Worshipful Company of 
Goldsmiths, as well as the family cus- 
tom of personalizing stiver with coats of 
arms, saw to that 

In an attempt to answer two questions 
— what were these pieces for and who 
used them? — GlanviUe and her staff 
have organized part of the exhibition 
around themes tike dining; tea, coffee 
and chocolate; writing and lighting, and 
specialized silver for men, women and 
children. (At her husband's death a 
woman gave up the family stiver to his 
heir but kept a few thimbles, buckles 
and diaper tongs as pan of her personal 
paraphernalia.) There is also a more 
traditional chronological display of lar- 
ger items beginning with medieval 
ewers and basins. 

In one series of showcases, an entire 
history of dining is laid out, covering 
nearly all of the 1 8th century. Since the 
folk was an Italian invention, the earli- 
est English fork dates from only 1632. 
Table settings were composed mostly of 
spoons, but these were cleverly crafted 
for many functions, for example, as 
marrow scoops. 

This range of uses also gives an idea 
of the daily fare. To be ultra-sa/iitaiy, a 
man might travel about town with his 
own cutlery — a knife, fork and spoon 
that folded neatly into a beaker. 

With the coming of the Rococo age in 
the 1730s, serving platters and tureens 


were differentiated in shape and or- 
nately decorated, and flatware, designed 
in sets, was stored in mahogany casef 
inlaid with stiver. 

Everything having to do with the serf 
vice of wine was made in silver, in*- 
eluding the bottle tickets, or labels, that 
identified the contents at a glance. , a 

As the century progressed, the real 
explosion of style came in serving 
pieces. In place of a clumsy fork and 
spoon, specialized tools were tailored to 
the foods they served, among them i 
pudding trowel, an ice spade and a 
strainer spoon with a central divider. * 


A WAY from the dining rootn^ 
the toilet service displayed the 
greatest range of stuqtes and 
containers, including covered 
cups for the new hot chocolate drink 
served at breakfast gatherings in tb£ 
bedchamber. With its assortment- -of 
powder and clothes brashes, jewel 
boxes, perfume flasks,- bowls and pin- 
cushions clustered around a handsome 
silver-mounted minor, the toilet service 
was a luxury that soon went out of 
fashion, replaced by a smaller version 
that fit into a traveling case. , 

The V&A is planning more galleries 
covering later centuries, but in the 
meantime, a lively and readable cata- 
logue of essays about silver, edited by 
GlanviUe, is available. 

And the museum’s continuing com- 
mitment to contemporary silversmiths 
is shown by an elegant display that 
includes a teapot by Johannes Kuhnefl 
that in its way is as sensuous as the 
engraved snuffbox Charles U gave to his 
mistress Nell Gwyn. 

Paula Deitz. co-editor of The Hudsob 
Review, wrote this for The New York 
Times. 


BOOKS 


a wildly funny ride through a world that 
isn’t, hoo hoo euch-euch gmnn, all that 
different from our own pant-hooting 
and knuclde-walking universe. Nobody 
comes out of this terribly well, except 
perhaps those wild humans howling 
something oddly familiar out there in 
the darkness. 

Self sends up the contemporary art 
circus, with its poseurs (“Like, chimp, 
we don't groom’ ' ). its crooks and thugs, 
and the passive-aggressive journalists: 
“Whereupon other critics, throughout 
the gallery, also put their rented glasses 
on the floor, braced themselves and 
began to vocalize. 'HoooooGraa! 
HoooooGra?* The air was thick with 
their vinous exhalations — Some of the 
critics even began drumming on the 
walls and floors, until solicitously re- 
quested not to by the gallery females." 

Self also serves up to great comic 
effect animal-rights arguments, anthro- 
pological theories on the origins of — 
well, whoever turns out to be the more 
advanced species — and race relations, 
not always too good between “Caucasi- 
an" chimps and “Bonobos": “A 
gaggle of tough' Bonobo sub-adults was 
hanging out on the corner, holdings cans 
of Special Brew to their pink lips and 
signing to each other with the fluent 
gestures of patois. Their body fur poked 
in tufts through the holes of their string 
vests: their head fur was either razored 
with lightning strikes or carved into 
squares and triangles." 

The modem plague is here, of course. 
CIV, which may or may not have come 
from the bite of a wild human. This is 
“Planet of the Apes” for intellectuals. 

Attractively repackaged and re- 
marketed, “Great Apes” might also 
serve as one of those how-io manuals 
for wage slaves with office politics 
problems. 

Enough of all those coy tips from 
management consultant phonies about 
how to handle difficult people or how to 
win raises and influence your boss’s 
boss by metaphorically bobbitting your 
colleagues — "Great Apes” is a world 
of jungle office politics where the play- 
ers really act out. 

The jacket cover could say. At last the 


true formula for influential grooming 
and butt-kissing, the only book you will 
ever need to succeed in a world full of 
alpha males. This may be the novel that 
finally gets at the Meaning of Life. And 
what a lot of fun it is. 

InhYHjinvuil Herald Tribune 

SQUEAKY: 

The Life and Times of 
Lynette Alice Fromme 

By Jess Brovin. 432 pages. $25.95. Buzz t 
St. Martin s. 

Reviewed by Carolyn See 

Y OU may not like some things he 
does / and you may feel ignored / 
but all your troubles won’t be solved / by 
shooting President Ford." So wrote 
some thoughtful bizarre in Martinsville, 
Illinois, in response to the attempted 
assassination of that bemused leader 
outside the California slate capital 
building by Squeaky Fromme. It was a 
silly event, a nonevent, really. The gun 
didn't go off; indeed, the safety might 
still have been on. There was spec- 
ulation that she might not have known 
how to use the gun, or perhaps even 
have been loo frail to pull the trigger. 
She was tiny, dressed in a homemade 
costume; she looked like an elf. Under 
other circumstances, she might have 
been arrested for attempted assault, put 
away for a few years, and that would 
have been that 

But these weren’t ordinary circum- 
stances. Lynette Fromme, 19, and her 
best friend. Sandra Good, were enthu- 
siastic members of the so-called Man- 
son family. They had drawn X's on their 
foreheads during the dramatic trial of 
their “god," their own Charlie. Their 
elf costumes were really robes for a new 
religion Manson was dreaming up daily 
from prison. The two were waiting im- 
patiently (and pathetically) for the 
Armageddon he had promised. 

America was supposed to have been 
drenched in blood by now — irale chil- 
dren rising up against their parents, 
blacks and whites duking it out in 
pitched battles full of hate, corrupt 


CEOs immolated by the deserving and 
undeserving poor. Or something Ukje 
that! But Helter Skelter, the fruit of a 
thousand Charlie Manson acid dreams, 
hadn’t really happened. Only the Man- 
son family’s own gruesome murders, 
the Tate-LaBianca killings, had 
happened. Those who had done: them 
were all in jail now, and the authorities 
had thrown away the key. 

Fromme and Good had invented 
"The International People’s Court*- of 
Retribution" in which all the rich capi- 
talists who were polluting the planet — 
cutting down the redwoods, using aer- 
osol spray and so on — would die 
bloody deaths. They compiled a list of 
offenders and sent them threatening let- 
ters. Violence was to have been the 
order of the day, but there was a catch to 
all that. The catch was, they were two 
young, unemployed women, with no 
money and no power at all. They were 
nobodies, living out an illiterate con- 
vict's bad dream. 

Jess Bravin does a fine job. just zero- 
ing in on Lynette Fromme, a sweet little 
girl who pew up in tract-house L.A„ 
just a few blocks from Loyola Mary- 
mount University, who was bright and 
did well in school, who was hounded 
and harassed by a brutish father who 
kicked her out of the house in her mid- 
teens so that she ended up weeping on a 
street in Venice with nowhere to go. 
Manson rescued her. He rescued a lot of 
girls, and the question is: What had 
happened to society that a guy could go 
grazing up and down the western United 
Stales and end up with close to threp 
dozen girls and a few complacent guys, 
and their own birth families just let them 
go? 

Bravin treats Fromme, who is serving 
a life sentence, with objectivity, cour- 
tesy and respect, qualities that must 
have been in very short supply over the 
course of her life. This is an important, 
thoughtful book, a close look at the 
enduring enigma of the '60s, a puzzle in 
our collective psychic life that continues 
to play out today. 

Carolyn See reviews books weekly for 
The Washington Post. 






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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1997 


PAGE 11 


At Barney’s, 
Luxury Is a 
New Owner 

* Hong Kong Retailer 
Will Inject Capital 

By Jennifer Steinhauer 

Neiv York Tones Service 

NEW YORK - — Barney’s Inc., the 
cutting-edge retailer of luxury goods 
that fell into bankruptcy when its ex- 
pansion dreams collided with a Jap- 
anese partner, announced Monday that 
Dickson Concepts (International), a 
r Hone Kong-based retail concern, 
I would take control of the famil y. 
i owned business. 

’ The sale, announced in Hong Kong 
' and subject to the approval of the U.S. 

Bankruptcy Court, is clearly pleasing 
' for both the Pressman family, which 
founded Barney’s, and for Dickson. 

^ Bob and Gene Pressman, who have 
jf been ar war with their former Japanese 

' partner, Isetan Co., will now be able to 
untangle themselves from the bank- 
ruptcy and the litigation that went with 
it. Further, they may realize their 
dreams of an international Barney’s, 
albeit with a new owner in charge. 

Dickson Poon, die chairman of Dick- 
son Concepts, now gets his foot in the 
door of the U.S. retail market, a territory 
he was longing to enter, and die op- 
portunity to meld some of the oper- 
c ations of his other luxury-goods basi- 
* nesses, including Harvey Nichols, a 
^ high-end department store in London. 

“We are thrilled to death with this 
; deal.” Bob Pressman said. “Dickson 
1 Poon’s vision is identical to our vision, 
^ which is the globalization of luxury 
k ; retailing.” 

Under terms of the agreement, 

| which was reached Friday, Dickson 

* 1 Concepts will take control of 51 per- 
cent of Barney’s, paying $78 million 
for the equity stake. 

Dickson also will provide about 
r $1 27 million in new financing for the 
company, $52 million of which will be 
‘ in the form of a senior convertible note 
; that will be repaid to Dickson or turned 
■ into another equity stake. A $42 mil- 
lion note also will be issued, to be 


- 5 s ijhsfS : 

^ § 5 '. 





’ ~ mm 


Uirwnph.-r 

Barney’s Madison Avenue store In New York, which opened in 1993. 


repaid by future royalties from Isetan 
for the use of the name Barney’s New 
York in Asia. 

Barney’s creditors will be left to 
divide the $205 million and the 49 
percent of equity that has been left on 
the table. 

The biggest question is how much 
would go to Isetan, which is almost 
certain to be a landlord of Barney’s in 
the future and is currently its biggest 
creditor. 

Bob and Gene Pressman, ihe co- 
chief executives of Barney's, have 
been guaranteed a role in the reor- 


ganized company, although it is not 
yet clear what their titles or respon- 
sibilities will be. 

It is quite likely, however, accord- 
ing to people dose to the deal, that Mr. 
Poon will put Joseph Wan, the chief 
executive of Harvey Nichols, in 
charge of Barney's. 

The Dickson offer came after IS 
months of negotiations during which 
other retail and financial suitors, in- 
cluding the parent of Saks fifth Av- 
enue. also expressed interest. Dickson. 

See BARNEY’S, Page 15 


Teamsters Begin Strike at UPS 

Package-Delivery Company Says Its 'Final’ Offer Stands 


CotHFilrd bv Qv Staff Frcmt Dafvkhrs 

ATLANTA — Union members, 
some brandishing picket signs prom- 
ising “We’ll fight," walked off the job 
Monday at United Parcel Service of 
America Inc., disrupting operations at 
the company that controls four-fifths of 
the U.S. package-delivery business. 

Pay, pensions and (he full schedules 
worked by “part-time' 1 employees are 
the main sticking points between UPS 
and the Teamsters, who represent nearly 
two-thirds of the company’s 302,000 
U.S. employees. 

“It’s imperative that we take a stand 
now or we won’t have a future,” said 
Connie McArthur, a 19-year employee 
picketing a UPS distribution center in 
Seattle. “We’ve got the part-timers 
working double and triple shifts, and 
they’re still called part-timers.” 

The midnight walkout by the more 
than 185,000 Teamsters was the first 
nationwide strike in the 90-year history 
of UPS. a privately held company that 
delivers 12 million parcels and doc- 
uments a day. UPS estimated that a 
scattered, one-day walkout in 1994 cost 
it $50 million. 

The Independent Pilots Association 
is backing the strike and said its 2.000 
UPS pilots also would refuse to work. 

But UPS said it was not prepared to 
sweeten its contract offer to entice the 


striking International Brotherhood of 
Teamster members back to their jobs. 

Dave Murray, UPS's chief negoti- 
ator, said the company would not budge 
from the “last, best and final” offer it 
made to the union last week. 

That offer, made Thursday, the day 
the old contract was to expire, proposed 
to raise hourly wages by about $2.50 an 
hour over five years. Full-time UPS 
drivers now earn $19.15 an hour. The 
union quickly rejected it. 

“We will do whatever we can using 
our management and ocher nonunion 
people to operate to the extent that we 
can,” a UPS spokesman said. 

President Bill Clinton said Monday 
that he would not order the striking 
Teamsters back to work. He urged both 
sides to resume negotiations. 

To send the strikers back to work. Mr. 
Clinton would have to invoke the Taft- 
Hartley Act, which empowers presi- 
dents to end strikes that are judged to 
imperil the nation’s health or safety. 
“Taft-Hartiey hasn't been invoked since 
President Truman, so J don't anticipate 
presidential action,” said Michael Mc- 
Curry, the White House spokesman. 

It was difficult to gauge the strike’s 
immediate effect, though UPS said just 
the threat of the strike had cost the 
company 1 million packages on Friday 
— about 8 percent of its daily business. 


Hie union’s main demands are limits 
on subcontracting and more full-tiros 
jobs. Nearly two-thirds of the Teamsters 
at UPS are part-timers. 

, Henry Stewart, a truck driver in At- 
lanta, said he was still a part-time worker 
after nine and a half years, even though 
be averages 45 to 50 hours a week. 

“I'm presently doing the same thing 
as a fttll-timer,” said Mr. Stewart, who 
said he earns nearly $ 1 7 hourly as a part- 
time driver but would make nearly $20 
an hour full-time and would have much 
better benefits. 

But UPS says it has three- to four-hour 
busy periods in the morning and after- 
noon and that it would not make sense to 
guarantee employees a tull-time job. The 
company said it would make medical 
supplies and other emergency deliveries 
its first priority, and that it expected to 
keep up us international service. 

Federal Express Coip. repotted a 
sharp increase in business in recent 
days, and imposed limits including cut- 
ting drop-off times by two hours, sus- 
pending money-back guarantees and 
declining new regular accounts. 

The U.S. Postal Service announced 
temporary measures on Monday, in- 
cluding limiting customers to four par- 
cels a visit The service said “an ex- 
traordinary increase in volume” was 
expected- (AP, Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Hiccup in Sell-Off of Norilsk Nickel 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — Prime Minister Viktor 
Chernomyrdin threw a monkey wrench 
in the works of Russia's privatization 
drive Monday by ordering the suspen- 
sion of a tender for 38 percent of the 
mining giant Norilsk Nickel. 

With less than 24 hours to go before 
the winner was due to be announced, 
news agencies quoted unnamed gov- 
ernment sources as saying Mr. 
Chernomyrdin had ordered the contro- 
versial sale to be stopped. 

A source at Uneximbank. which is 
bidding in the tender, confirmed the 
instruction existed but other parties in- 
volved were kept in the dark about the 
order. * 'So far, we have not received any 
such document,’ ’ said Igor Lipkin, 
chairman of the State Property Fund. 
• ‘But if the prime minister signed such a 


document, then we would carry it 
out'* 

But a spokesman for Bank MFK, 
which is organizing the sale, said the 
tender winner would be announced as 
planned on Tuesday with only a small 
delay in the announcement, now ex- 
pected at about 6 P.M. local time. 

Bank MFK, the investment bank af- 
filiate of Uneximbank. said Mr. 
Chernomyrdin could not stop the sale at 
the last minute. 

“According to the civil code of Rus- 
sia. it is not possible to change or add to 
the conditions of the sale already set 
out,” Oleg Sapozhnikov. MFK spokes- 
man. said. 

The confusion surrounding one of the 
last big state property sell-offs in Russia 
is the result of growing public and polit- 
ical pressure on the government io look 


into die terms and conditions of the 
sales. Just last week, controversy erup- 
ted over die privatization of AO 
Svyazinvest. with the losing bidder su- 
ing the leader of the winning consortium 
for suggesting he had tried to mount a 
“backroom deal.’ 1 

The sale, raising $1,875 billion for 
Russia's empty state coffers and the 
biggest privatization so far, drew angry 
comment from some Russian television 
channels and newspapers, apparently 
triggered by media moguls said to have 
been part of die losing consortium. 

Observers had little doubt that media 
attention would turn to Norilsk, which 
Uneximbank was also widely tipped to 
win. The bank won control of the 38 
percent stake, which represents 51 per- 
cent of voting rights, under a shares-for- 
loans deal in 1995. 


in - a Cut* i 


STOCKS 



Spain’s Utilities Look to Latin America 


PRIVATE BANKING 


v AFX News 

M ADRID — Recent acquisi- 
tions in Latin America by 
Spam’s leading utility 
companies could bring 
strong gains from a market growing 8 
'(percent a year, compared with growth of 
barely 1 percent in Spain, analysts said. 
* Last week, Iberdrola SA led a con- 
sortium that acquired 65 percent of Coel- 
ba, a state-owned Brazilian utility com- 
pany, for about $1.6 billion. Empresa 
JSac’ional de Etectricidad SA announced 
that it had acquired 29 percent of Enersis 
SA, Chile’s largest electricity producer 
tand distributor, for about $13 billion. ^ 
The operation consolidates Endesa's 
position as leader in the Latin American 
-electricity market, where the group 
■already holds significant stakes in 
Companies in Brazil, Peru, Argentina. 
'Venezuela and the Dominican Repub- 
lic, analysts said. 

“ Iberdrola now comes a close second 
with assets in Chile, Argentina. Bolivia 
and Brazil, they said. 

“ The latest acquisitions “reflect the 
[confidence both Endesa and Iberdrola 
’Save in their respective financial situ- 
ations and in their future growth po- 
tential. said Ignacio Cornejo, analyst 
‘it Beta Boisa. 

Analysts said both companies baa 
'high levels of cash flow, with Endesa s 
totaling about 400 billion pesetas (S2.6 
Million) while Iberdrola's was estimated 
at around 300 billion pesetas. 

-■ “Endesa’s financial situation is tne 
better of the two because of ite cra- 
Hitionaliy low levels of debt, Mr. 


Cornejo said, but Iberdrola “has also 
been able to reduce its debt substantially 
over the past year because of lower 
interest rates." 

“Both companies have been smart 
enough to see that potential growth in 
the domestic electricity market is very 
limited, especially against a background 
where demand is growing about 1 per- 
cent and tariffs are continuing to de- 
cline." Mr. Cornejo added. 

The average annual increase in elec- 
tricity consumption in Latin America is 
estimated at about 8 percent, Mr. 
Cornejo said. 

With its latest acquisition, “at a stroke, 
Endesa has transformed a collection of 
T jinn American electricity holdings into 
a solid business," said Chris Rowland, 
an analyst at Merrill Lynch. 

“Without doubt, the Spanish elec- 
tricirv market will not see the same kind 
of growth as in the late 1980s or early 
1990s,” Mr. Rowland said. “It’s logical 
that the major companies will focus on 
investing in areas of faster growth." 

Mr. Rowland said Endesa would 
have “a diversified base of electricity 
interests in the fast-growing markets of 
Latin America.” 

As part of the Chile operation. Endesa 
will launch a takeover bid for five 
Chilean investment funds that hold 
stakes in Enersis. 

Endesa has said it expects the Enersis 
acquisition io increase its net profit by 
19 percent in 1997, adding that it will 
raise its worldwide electricity produc- 
tion by 29 percent while sales are ex- 
pected to rise 20 percent 


In a research note. Schroder Securities 
said recently that Iberdrola’s Brazilian 
acquisition — which represents an in- 
vestment of about 95 billion pesetas to 
acquire a 39 percent managing stake in 
Coelba — “represents an important stra- 
tegic move for Iberdrola, which has no 
major presence outside the domestic mar- 
ket” Coelba operates in the northeastern 
region of Brazil and has 2.3 million cli- 
ents, compared with about 8 million for 
Iberdrola in Spain, analysts said. 

Analysts said the strong earnings con- 
tributions from Banco Bilbao Vizcaya 
SA and Banco Santander SA’s Latin 
American units, and moves into the Lat- 
in American market by other major 
players such as Telefonica de Espana 
SA and Repsol SA, offered further proof 
of the region's growth prospects. 

“If you look at companies Uke Tele- 
fonica and Repsol, and in particular the 
leading banks, they have all been forced 
to look outside die domestic market to 
fuel their expansion,” Mr. Cornejo said. 

Banco Santander said last month that 
its investments in Latin America in the 
first half accounted for 18 percent of its 
investments outside Spain, a ddin g that 
its activities in the region had made a 
significant contribution to group results. 

In addition to the acquisitions already 
made over the past year in Argentina 
and Peru, Repsol's chairman, Alfonso 
Cortina, has said that about 500 billion 
pesetas was already earmarked for pur- 
chases in Latin America. 

Reginald Dale is on vacation. His 
‘Thinking Ahead" column will resume in 
September. 


CURRENCY 8 t INTEREST RATES 


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Sauarlleutos. 


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m 


30-Year T-Bond Yield 




vr-rrir'- m 




''HiT A M J J A , 

1997 : " ■;■" 




1 . Air Force Ona 
' 2 . Spawn 

3 . Gauge of foe Jungle 

4 . MenfnHiaefc 

5. Pteture Perfect 

6 . Contact 

7 . Air Bud 

8 . NrtMtg 1 o Lasa 
9 -FanffMf 
HLGaod Burger 


(Cahmbia Pictures) 
(NewUaeOnema) 
(Watt Disney) 
(CoNmbta Ptetmes) 
(TttenBehCaHwyfa) 
(Warner BmsJ 
(WOHDbney) 
(Tauchskino Pictures) 
(Paramount) 
(Paramount) 


S 2 t 2 mBtlon 
S 21 -S rnfflon 
« 4 mfflton 
J 8 million 
S 7 - 5 milio<i 
$ 4.1 million 
S 47 mfflan 
Wnfflcn 
534 million 
$34 million 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUES DAY, AUGUST 5, 1997 

THE AMERICAS ___ 


InEnulioaal Herald Tribune 


Source: Bloomberg. Reuters in*rauiwad HeraM Tribune 

Very brief lys 

• Dow Chemical Co. agreed Monday to buy Sentrachem Ltd., 
a South African maker of agricultural and other specialty 
chemicals, for 2.07 billion rand ($449 million). 

• Time Warner Inc. plans to sell seven cable systems as part of 
a plan to pans the company’s debt of $17 billion. The sykeras, 
which analysts valued at about $350 million, serve 154,000 
customers in Fnnfciana Mississippi, Tennessee and Michigan. 

■ Oracle Corp. will buy the privately held software company 
Treasury Services Corp. for $120 million. Treasury Services 
provides profitability and risk-analysis applications for large 
finan cial institutions. 

• Henry Schein Inc. agreed Monday to buy Sullivan Dental 
Products Inc. for about $3 18 million in stock, making it the 
world's largest distributor of dental equipment and supplies. 

• Kohlberg, Kravis, Roberts & Co., the leveraged-buyout 
specialist, is considering making a bid for Fisher Scientific 
International, a maker of laboratory equipment, sources said. 

• Microsoft Corp. has filed two lawsuits to try to stop people 

from making its programs available on the Internet for down- 
loading without paying licensing fees. Bloomberg 


Weekend Box Office 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — “Air Force One” dominated the U.S. 
box office over the weekend, with a gross of $26.2 million. 
Following are 'the Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday’s 
ticket sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


By Seth Schiesel 

■ New York fanes Service 

NEW YORK — With the aim of 
creating a new transcontinental 
wireless-telephone system, seven 
regional wireless companies from 
the United States and Canada an- 
nounced an alliance Monday that 
would eventually allow customers 
to use the same mobile phone from 
Portland, Maine, to Portland, Ore- 
gon. 

The seven companies are band- 
ing together in part because each 
has budt its network around a dig- 
ital wireless technology known as 
GSM. for global system for mobi !e 
communications. How much the 
partners will spend to link their 
networks is not clear, but a U.S.- 
wide network would be compat- 
ible with GSM systems elsewhere 
in the world, including Europe. 

The system is the world’s dom- 
inant digital wireless standard but 
has not found much favor in thp 
United States, where such big na- 
tional wireless carriers as AT&T 
and the Sprint PCS consortium 
have chosen rival technologies 


known as TDMA, for time divi- 
sion multiple access, and CDMA, 
for code division multiple access. 

Because the carriers using GSM 
have tended to be smaller compa- 
nies and regional Bell telephone 
companies, none of them bought 
licenses for use across the United 
States when the Federal Commu- 
nication s Co mmis sion auctioned 
the rights to offer a new generation 
of wireless phone service known 
as personal comm unicatio ns ser- 
vices a few years ago. 

With AT&T, Sprint PCS and 
Nextel Communications, which 
cobbled together licenses previ- 
ously used by truck dispatchers 
and the like, trumpeting their na- 
tional networks, the regional GSM 
companies saw linking their smal- 
ler systems as a survival strategy. 

“We really want to improve the 
competitiveness of each of the sev- 
en member companies in our mar- 
kets," said Donald Warkentin, 
chief executive of Aerial Commu- 
nications Inc. and chairman of the 
GSM alliance. “We see big ben- 
efits to continuing to run our 
companies as local companies, but 


we also want to be fully compet- 
itive with the national players.’ ' 

In addition to Aerial, the other 
members of the alliance are Om- 
nipoint Corp.: BellSouth Mobility, 
a unit of BellSouth Corp.; Mi- 
crocell Telecommunications of 
panada: pacific Bell Mobile Ser- 
vices, a unit of SBC Communi- 
cations; Powertel Inc., and West- 
ern Wireless Corp. 

“This is actually pretty impor- 
tant,’ ' said Thomas Lee, an analyst 
for Smith Barney. “What it's go- 
ing to really highlight is that the 
GSM carriers are all actually nat- 
ural allies, not competitors, and 
they are really going to be in a 
position to be one or the true na- 
tional" stock plays. 

The alliance asserts that its 
members hold licenses to offer 
wireless service to roughly 97 per- 
cent of the U.S. population, plus 
90 percent of Canadians. The only 
major U.S. markets that alliance' 
members do not own licenses for 
are Chicago and Dallas. 

Members currently offer ser- 
vice to about a quarter of the U.S. 
population. 


IBM and Motorola Ship New Chips 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — International 
Business Machines Corp. and Mo- 
torola Inc. introduced PowerPC 
computer chips Monday that were 
said to be speedier and more efficient 
than their predecessors, advances 
that could double the performance of 
some Macintosh computers. 

The chip introduction came a day 
before the MacWorld trade show 
begins in Boston, where Apple 
Computer Inc., which makes the 


Macintosh, hopes its new machines 
will inspire the excitement needed 
to help revive its sagging fortunes. 

The PowerPC 604e, a new ver- 
sion of an existing chip, now runs at 
speeds of as much as 350 megahertz. 
The 740 and 750 chips, a new 
design, run at maximum speeds of 
266 megahertz but generate less heat 
than other microprocessors. That ad- 
vantage makes them useful for 
laptop computers, which are less tol- 
erant of heat than larger machines. 


‘Many’ at IMF Urge U.S 
To Look at a Rate Rise 


"We're giving them a huge jump 
in performance without any in- 
crease in price of the processor,” 
said Will Swearingen, Motorola's 
product-marketing manager for the 
PowerPC chip. 

Computers running on the new 
chips will be introduced in the next 
few months, company executives 
said. The new chips also represent 
the latest attempt by IBM and Mo- 
torola to give a boost to their lagging 
microprocessor efforts. 


By Mitchell Martin 

Inlemjnonal Herald Tribune 

The International Monetary 
Fund seems to have its doubts about 
die idea that America’s economy 
has entered a new era, saying Mon- 
day that “many” members of its 
24-person executive board think the 
Federal Reserve Board should con- 
sider raising interest rates to fore- 
stall inflation. 

Market reaction was mured to the 
statement, which is unlikely to be a 
deciding factor in the Fed’s delib- 
erations. The central bank’s policy- 
setting open-market committee is 
scheduled to bold its next meeting 
Aug. 19, and many expect it to 
maintain its current stance despite 
signs last week of accelerating eco- 
nomic growth. 

The dollar rose after the IMF 
statement was reported by news 
agencies, but it remained below its 
highest levels of the day. An interest- 
rate increase would draw investors 
to the dollar as short-tom deposit 
yields rose. But if the Fed refrained 
from such a move, the currency 
might benefit anyway if securities 
markets then added to the big gains 
they have made so far this year. 

In its annual review of the Amer- 
ican economy, which was largely 
complimentary toward U.S. author- 
ities, the IMF said that “many” of 
the board members ‘ ‘cautioned that 
undue delay in tightening monetary 
policy could undermine the current 
expansion by increasing the risk 
that aggregate demand pressures 
would build,” Bloomberg News re- 
ported from Washington. 

“Several" directors, however, 
said the Fed did not need to raise 
rares. Bridge News reported. 

The statement seemed not to take 
account of the pressure a rate rise 
would have on outer economies, par- 


Technology and Retailers Give Stocks a Boost 


CoeiMblQarSk£Fwm DispAlms 

NEW YORK — Stock prices 
were higher Monday, led by tech- 
nology and retail shares, despite 
weakness in bond prices. 

Intel led a semiconductor rally 
that drove the Nasdaq composite in- 
dex above 1,600 for die first time. 

Investors also speculated that the 
retailers would post better-than-ex- 
pected sales results this week. 

“Valuations are high, and in- 
vestors want constant reinforcement 


the perfect economic scenario is still 
intact.” said Barbara Marc in, a 
money manager with Citibank 
Global Asset Management 
The Dow Jones industrial average 
closed 4.41 points higher at 8, 198.45. 

U.S. STOCKS 

The Standard & Poor's 500 Index 
rose 3.16 points to 950.30. The Nas- 
daq gained II. II to 1,605.44. 

The slow-growth, low-inflation 


picture that has been sending stocks 
to records since April was shaken 
Friday by unexpectedly strong re- 
ports on jobs and manufacturing. The 
reports revived concern that the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board might raise rates 
to keep inflation in check. 

That fear sent the benchmark 30- 
year Treasuty bond down 10/32 to 
101 30/32. taking the yield up to 6.48 
percent from 6.45 percent Friday. 

Even a report Monday showing 
that U.S. construction spending un- 


expectedly fell 1 . 1 percent in June to 
the lowest level since January failed 
to give bond prices a lift 
Some investors said there was no 
reason for the rally to the end if 
corporate profits grow. 

GM fell after the largest U.S. 
automaker announced it would buy 
back 52.5 billion in stock, its second 
big buyback program in a year. The 
company left its dividend un- 
changed. disappointing investors. 

f Bloomberg . AP) 


ocularly those trying to forge a mon- 
etary union in Europe. In Germany, 
the Bundesbank has shown signs oh. 
unhappiness with the depreciation or 
the Deutsche mark, which was worth 
about 65 cents at the start of the year 
but only 54 cents Monday. Amer- 
ican interest rates already are higher.; 
than those in Europe, which explains. - 
much of the dollar's attraction. 

If German central bankers opt to , 
raise interest rates to defend their., 
currency, essentially forcing mosty 
other members of the European-, 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE = 

Monetary System’s exchange-rare - 
mechanism to do the same, the con- 
threat's already slow economies*, 
would face new pressures as they 
strove to reduce their deficits to qual-_ 
ify for the planned monetary union..- 
Germany and France, which are vital,' 
to tire single-currency project are 
struggling with hig h unemployment - ' 
that makes budget -cutting difficult : 
even under current conditions. 

The IMF board members, • 
however, tend to be “somewhat | 
curmudgeonly,” said Cary Leahey, ; 
chief U.S. economist at Higb-Fre- i 
quency economics in Valhalla, New ’ 
York. Their view is conservative, he j 
said, “particularly since the United • 
States' own central bank, which has ' 
a pretty good inflation-fighting re- ; 
cord, has soft-pedaled” the threat of j 
pricing pressures. ; 

Mr. Leahey pointed out that Alan 
Greenspan, the Fed chairman. ! 
raised the same issue as the IMF in ; 
February in his semiannual testi- 
mony to Congress on central-bank , 
policy. Last month, however, he; 
downplayed the threat of inflation; : 
indicating that the American econ- I 
omy might have entered a new era in j 
which technological advances have • 
vastly increased productivity. If this ■ 
is the case, then the economy has | 
room to grow more rapidly than the , 

2 percent to 2.5 percent rate that the \ 
central bank had been viewing as be ; 
the limit before serious inflation! 
would set in. ; 

Economic statistics, however, do • 
not directly support this theory, al- » 
though indirect measures provide | 
evidence that productivity gains are < 

■ being undercounted. 

In 4 P-M- trading in New York, ; 
the dollar was quoted at 1 .8663 DM, ! 
up from 1.8630 DM on Friday, at; 
118.350 yen, down from 118385’ 
yen, and at 1.5253 Swiss francs, t 
down from 1.5267 francs. It was’ 
also trading at 6.2935 French francs. • 
up from 6.2820 francs. The pound! 
rose to $1.6317 from $1.6315. ; 


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tn Dow Jones 

.in onto HMh Lft, lid on- 
to mow 8T48J4 021107 0134.11 B19L45 .441 

*M Trans 395145 298171 2940.79 297*49 ,25.19 

.ft uti 73107 rag .rii^s mw -asv 

ft Comp 1S16.11 253099 1511.88 7S76J1 *6319 

ft Standard & Poors 


Most Actives 

NYSE 


Aug. 4, 1997 


High Low Lotto! Olge Optnl 


Industrials 

Transp. 

Utilises 

Finance 

SP 500 

SP 100 


-111126 1117.63 

— 67673 6 &L 40 

— 200-55 199.77 

— 11071 10 Mff 

— 947.14 95030 

— 92376 928.01 


NYSE 

W lom tot Oft. 
CMpftBB 49131 489 JM 49LS3 +Q.9S 

InfliBfrtols 63440 *1*54 47183 4141 

Tramp. UTI* UL3* UU3 4193 

WSty 79151 289-52 29140 4140 

Foam 45940 45677 458.13 -177 


Nasdaq 


Nasdaq 


<0151 59073 140543 *11.10 

26544 25744 126546 *UB 
72167 71436 17TL67 »IL57 

716.19 706JH 171531 -2J4 

2W7.1B 903852 TOfOs 51 B 
103833 07743 1037.06 *641 


64663 64256 6469? *940 


ftL Mto 
71201 Ift 
61020 57V. 
58421 11 
56771 23M 
H9W 34fi 


45838 33M 
43044 27ft 
42626 64V, 
43441 459k 
35416 32V* 
34929 24ft 
M34 37W 


173404 97 
171577 IM 
96064 27HM 
84735 B 


57426 142 
546)0 19ft 
51543 OSH 


U* IM CM. 

•a & 

10ft 11 -ft 

*3 

?7ft 47?j| -1ft 
O 0 ft -ft 

32ft 33% t-ft 
24ft 771* *2 ft 
(Jft 42ft -IH 
44ft 44ft -ft 
30ft UK 
74ft 7to -ft 
32ft 37ft rlH 


92 ft 9 *U 
W ft 
24 M 36 ft 
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2 ft 3 ft 
Mft lift 
83 83 V* 
29 lift 
SIM 55 V, 
179 »ft 1410 . 
19 ft 19 U 
931 * 94 V* 
3344 33 *. 
ft 

52 ft 53 ft 


SOOO bo minimum- e«ts per butM 


Sra »97 

275 

362 ft 

263 * 

- 4 * 

58 J 30 

Dec 97 

276 

363 

Ml 

-4 I 5 IJ 8 I 

Mar 98 

283 

271 

173 

- 3 * 

32 J 58 

Moy 98 
Jill 98 

386 ft 

276 

277 ft 

- 3 ft 

6.950 

289 

279 

380 ft 

■an 

11434 

Sep 98 

270 

367 ft 

263 ft 

• 4 ft 

1 J 43 

Dec 98 

771 

267 H 

264 * 

4 

6,276 


Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 
IQUtSties 
10 Industrials 


10442 10445 

101 as 101.93 

106.95 106.98 


76339 ft MM 
73706 VSftJ 94 ft 95 M 

10570 ft M M 

9971 31 XI* 30 ft 

9402 59 . 4 ft 5 ft 

9400 7 M 7 7 * 

7883 12 % 111 . 11 M 

6847 9 ft 9 M 9 ft 

4467 lit* lift in 

4400 ft H ft 


Trading Activity 


Aewncea 
DetfWd 
UKtagtf 
Total tesun 

New Han 
New Lain 


Advanced 
Doomed 
Oncrangod 
Total aaum 
New Hkpts 
NewLOva 


Nasdaq 

One Nee*. 

UM 1063 Advanced 

13 M 1847 Declined 

S 3 ? 496 Unchanged 

3 JI 5 7403 TMWbSUBS 

214 70 * New HiBte 

15 14 New Lows 


1425 1945 

1747 2160 

2131 140 

5503 572 ? 

140 .'33 

45 57 


Market Sates 


Ed. sedto 90.000 Firs sotei 74351 
FiT* open W 244841 . up 1201 

SOYBEAN MEAL KBOT) 

100 tons- daflan per tan 
Aug 97 *6140 75540 26030 +. 
Sep 97 23640 23100 734.10 * 
Oa 97 22500 71 650 21970 - 


EcL Mito 77400 Fit* sales 27.746 
Fit* open Int 109,261 up 698 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT 1 
603)00 lbs- cents per tt> 

Aug 97 2 X 45 2137 71.95 4.13 

Sep 97 22.70 22.05 2112 -0 16 

Od 97 2145 Z 2.27 2126 4 .T 6 

Dec 97 2345 2157 2249 -015 

Jon 9 # 2335 22.73 2175 4.15 

Mot 98 2365 2198 2107 4 J) 

EsL sales 20000 Fits Mies 74480 
Fit* opto W 98436 off 512 

SOYBEANS fCBOD 
S 000 bu minlmuDi- certs per busM 
Aug 97 778 757 7651 * + 31 * 

Sep 97 7 D 6 M 672 V* 477 V, ^Vi 

Noe 97 675 642 Vr 646 % 914 

Jon 98 *79 647 V, 650 ft 9 

Mar 98 6«2 65515 659 4 % 

EsL vote 56000 Fifs sates 46665 
HU open M 131626 olf 814 


WHEAT tCBOT) 

5400 bu ndnlmwn cents per bushel 

Sep 97 367 3531 * 354 ft 4 ft 40.753 

Dec 97 383 368 3 * 9 M -7 41094 

Mar 98 391 378 ", 380 % - 7 M 11537 

May 98 391 381 3 B 1 M .7 1,281 

EsL sides 77400 Fhs soles 18499 

Fit* open W 103276 up 746 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER) 

40400 lb*.- cents per lb 


in xi 

us im Amex 

734 728 Nasdoa 

** » In mm 




Aug 97 

6740 

66.90 

67 JO 

-021 

19 . 79 ? 



Oct 9? 

7047 

KJ>2 

70J0 

032 

57 J 33 



Dec 97 

72 J 7 

7140 

72.13 

4)45 

20.772 

«<e 

CCS?, 

Feb 98 

73 L 52 

7202 

73 J 7 

-0 1 / 

9 . 7 B 2 

456 00 

623.49 

Apr 96 

7520 

74 AS 

7542 

■ 0.17 

X 667 

2 ) JO 

34-58 

.fun 98 

71.90 

7147 

T 1 J 5 

-047 

2 J 43 

56 (L 28 

584.03 

E sL sates 1 44)00 Frfs totos 1 1 431 



Dividends 

Company Per Amt R«c Pay 

IRREGULAR 

AfledCapCammd . S3 9-19 9-30 

AlBed CapMng . M S -)4 8-71 


Sttwi Peru Copper 
UniinarCo 


- M 8 - 14 S 71 

_ 37 8 - 1 S 9-2 

_ Jf) 8-14 8 -ZV 


INCREASED 

Conestoga Entwpr Q 306 8-29 9-15 

Heritage Bncp Q .13 9 -t 5 9-30 

PatrirtBli Q 4925 8-18 8-29 

YEAR END 

KUH Royal Dutcti g 4853 8-7 8-26 

INITIAL 

Ambanc HaMlisg » .05 8-15 8-31 

F* Banking _ .15 9-15 9-30 

REGULAR 

Arctic Cat O J 56 B -20 9-3 

Bloc*, Drug A O -T 1 9-12 10-1 

Coastal Sncp Q . 1 ? 8-15 9-15 

Convnun TrBncp Q .18 9 - 1 S 10-1 

Computer Long Q .10 B-ld B -29 

Ciodter Banal Q .005 9-12 9-26 

DAE Conamm O 4967 B -29 9 - 1 S 


Company 

Developer* Div 
FstFIn Btehrs Inc 
Fulton Find 
General eimfing 
General Motors 
Hancock Pat Set 
Halteras income 
HaveityFum 
H overly Fum A. 
Ltobey Inc 
Natures Surshtne 


SJWCore 
5 t Frands Cop 
Sctwwk Inc A. 
Security Bk Hid 
Sfrowboot Inc 
Superior Suig 

TrastmorK Corp 

VOnKom AdvMun 
WHG Bncstirs 
Zwekg TaM Ref 


Per Amt Rec Pay 

Q ^3 8-13 9-30 

0 3S 915 10-1 

O .17 9-22 10-15 

a .11 8-22 9-22 
a SO 8-14 9-14 
M 1031 8-11 B -29 

M 495 8-15 B -29 
Q 08 8-12 B -25 
Q 475 0-12 B -75 

O 075 8-18 9-4 

Q 4333 8-12 8-19 

D .14 8-75 8-29 

Q .165 9-15 9-30 
Q 43 9-2 9-23 

Q 445 8-15 9-2 

Q -57 8-11 9-1 

O .12 8-11 8-22 

O 465 9 -le 9 - 3 o 
S .11 B -12 B -19 
Q .025 9-15 10-10 
0 .11 8-11 9-22 

Q .14 9-2 9-15 

<W 48 8-15 B -29 
- 05 B -20 9-10 

IH 47 B -11 B -25 


o-nawwd.- b iwujdywt a biuewrt per 
share/ ADR, g-pcyable la Ctomkan funds; 
avmqotttty; g-g u arterty , s-senrt-annual 


Fils Open M 106242 UP 1.715 

FEEDER CATTLE ICMEW 
50000 lbs.- cents per lb 
Aug 97 01-59 8047 BOftl 442 

Sep 97 01.15 0030 80.00 -045 

Oct 97 > 1-30 8035 8145 -045 

Nov «7 B 3.50 8145 82.17 -0 45 

Jan re 8245 81.90 8247 -022 

Mar 98 82.20 11.75 8245 4 L 25 

Eli BUM 3M6 PrtS srtto 332*1 
Fits open W 24443 . off 130 

HOCA-Iwoa (CMER) 

40400 fcs.- conls per ft. 

Aug 97 82.90 81.00 82 05 * 047 

00 97 7600 75.15 75 02 * 045 

Dec 97 7175 70.90 7147 - 0.47 

Feb 98 70-00 4935 49.92 , 032 

Apr 98 65.05 6457 64.97 , 035 

Esf. safes 6 1 <8 Fits srtrn *403 
Fits Open lot 37.711 up 771 

PORK BELLIES (CMER) 

40000 lbs-- cents per ft 
Aug 07 8940 8735 8915 * 1.15 

Feb 98 7940 7740 7845 - 0 J 0 

Marts »» 7745 7 B 90 tIJS 

EsL soto* 2^3 Fits soles 4.141 
Frti open M 6001 . up 145 


COCOA (NCSE) 


Stock Tobies Explained 

Soles figures am unofficial. Ycariy Kgtis and taws reflect the previous 52 weeks plus ihc anatt 
meek, but nalRielalesHracing day. WhercassB or slodidMdend amounting la 25 percent or more 
has been paki the ywa* fngb-tow rnige and dMdcnd aw shown lor trie new stoda only. Unless 
oBiewriae noted loiesolita n dends aw annual dafawsemenfc based on OieiatBl d edn i uhc iL 
a • (Eyfcfend otso extra Is}, b - annual rate oi dividend pins slack dvidend c - bquldotfng 
dhrtdendee-PE exceeds 1 99 .CM- called, d- new yeoriy low. dd-tass ui ihc last 12 month*, 
e - dividend deefarcd or paid in preceding 12 months, f - annual rate, increased on last 
dedaralion. g - tfividend m Canadian Hinds, subject ta I S'*, non-residence fox-i- dividend 
declared otter split-up or stock dividend j - dividend paid Ini* year, omitted deferred or no 
action taken at tales dhrtdcna meeting, k - dividend declared or paid (Ms year, an 
accumulative issue with dividends bi arrears, re - annual rate, reduced on last declaration, 
n ■ new issue ui the pasl 52 weeks. The hign-low range begins with [he start of trading, 
nd - netd doy defirery. p - Mini dividend annual rate unknown. P 7 E - priee-eormnps ratio, 
q - ctased-end mutual fund, r- dividend declared or paid in preceding 1 2 months, plus sloe* 
dividend, s - stack spBL Dividend begins with date of split sis- sales, t - dividend paid in 
stock in preceding 1 2 monthi estimated cosh value on u-dhridend or er-dfehihimon date. 
■ - new yearly Irigh-v - trading halted, it * In bankiuptcy or recmeratiipw being remgenUed 
undertbeBonkiupIcy Act or scarcities a s sumed by sueft a t m pa ni e*.wd- when msinbuted. 
ml - when issued/ oral • wflti warrants. * . n -dMdcnd or ex- rights, x&s - a-dlsMMttan. 
nr - without warrants, y- ex -dividend and sales in hJtayta- yidd. l - sales In fuiL 


1577 

149 5 

>500 

-17 

22 I 7 S 



1546 





ISM 

-IB 

24.907 


1599 

15 M» 

-19 

10.994 


1619 

1619 

-17 

IJI 6 

1664 

1639 

1639 

-17 

3.743 


Ed total 5409 Fits soles 5426 

Firs open tat ioCLM6cfi7iO 

COFFEE CfMCSEI 
37400 oh.- asm per ft. 

Sep 07 1967 S 18340 1*195 *040 9.114 

Dec 97 16*50 14050 16070 *640 6.364 

liar 90 15200 14640 15155 *425 3.777 

my 90 14640 141.00 145 00 * 3.75 930 

Jut 98 141-50 137 JO 140 JO ,300 565 

Eli. sides 6814 Fits totes 2422 
Frls open W 20437 . an 1.157 

sueARvraftLO II (MGSE> 

112400 OK.- cants oer ft 

Oct »7 1168 11 J 6 1158 -047 112404 

Mar 98 1144 11.75 11.77 847 57.745 , 

Mar 98 1179 11 J 1 4.08 12 J 40 I 

M 90 1170 11.41 11.64 4)05 7,177 i 

Est steer 11400 Fit* wles IS. 9 n 
Fits open M 1 93.91 X up 443 \ 


High Law Latest Chge Optat 

ORANGE JUICE MCTN) 

lyno lb*.- cants per h 

Sap 97 7540 74 J 0 75.10 4)45 16689 

Nov 97 7740 7680 7720 -030 8477 

Jon 98 8040 80.00 90 JO - 0 J 0 1753 

Mar 98 8170 B 2 J 0 8325 4)20 2 J 63 

Est. sates NA Fir* sates I 486 

Firs open ini 32486 up 121 


GOLD (NCM 70 
m hoy at- dorian per tray «. 

Aug 97 32670 323 JO 32100 -040 1491 
Sep 97 32670 -040 2 

Od 97 32740 325 JO 326 « -440 I 68 ZS 
Dec 97 329 JO 32760 328.10 4380 101377 



Feb 98 

330.90 33000 333.40 

-080 

11318 

11995 

Apr «8 

33340 

-040 

& 17 ? 

20210 

Jim 98 

33540 J 3 A 70 334.70 

- 0 JSJ 

7415 

15.936 

Aug 98 

33740 

-040 

3.11 1 

39,294 

Od 9 B 

33940 

-aao 

106 

5.748 



UQ 2 

Fits opan ini 1 B& 5 B 9 , up 1.876 




HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 




25.000 lbs.- oecits per lb 




Aug 97 

106 JO 105.10 10640 

- 0 JS 

1099 


Sep 97 

107^0 10470 10670 

-1 05 

aura 

1861 

Del 97 

10 SJQ 105.10 105-10 

- 1.15 

1479 

30.704 

Nov 97 

10475 IO 4 J 0 104 J 0 

- 1.25 

1758 

15886 

Dec 97 

1 OJJ 0 10340 103.90 

-125 

7,718 

41*78 

Jan 98 

103 JO 

- 1.15 

645 

OJJ 6 

H* 9 B 

102-90 102-40 102.40 

-145 

61 S 

A *04 

Mar 98 

10270 107.70 10170 

-IJ 5 

2795 


Apr 98 

100 A 5 10070 10045 

-145 

39 B 


EsI. sates 6000 Fits sales 7,067 
Fris open tat 42421 up 1*9 

SILVER CNCMX) 

6000 fray certs par (ray ca. 

Aug 97 44840 *170 

Sep 97 45600 445 JQ 450 JO *170 

Qrt 91 45440 *170 

Dec It 44 OJ 0 45140 45720 *170 

Jan 98 458.90 ,370 

Mat 98 4 * 4.00 460 JO 45160 *170 

May 98 66740 *170 

Jul«B 47140 *170 

Est stees 10000 Frfs sates 14413 
FrT. open Int 9151 1 , off 3 J 32 

PLATINUM (NMER) 

50 troy at- doOois per troy ec 
00 97 45 BJM 438 JO *5520 *1670 
JoiVS 44740 43600 44520 *1 7 70 
Apt 98 442.00 42150 43820 *l &70 

Esl ides 1671 Frts totes 1949 
Frfs Open in) 15 * 657 . up 710 

Ctasa Pi 

LONDON METALS (LME) 

DoUors per ineWc ten 
Ateretaua (HJgS Greto) 

Spat 174140 174100 17*40 1 

Forward 173400 173500 I 73 *v- I 

Capper Cathodes (High Grade) 

5 pof 231940 232240 7339.00 i 

FarermJ 229040 727140 731040 2 

lewd 

Spot 6 l 7 te 623 M 62600 

Forward 63100 63 700 438 i? 

NKkte 

Spar 770540 721500 740040 7 

Forward 730040 731040 74 BS 0 Q 7 

TTe 

Spat 554540 555500 5405.00 S 

Forward SS »040 560000 564040 5 

Ztac Dpetete HM Grade) 

Sptt 758440 J 58740 > 549.00 I 

Forwart 148800 148900 146500 I 


Wgh Law LateU Chge OpM 

Dee 97 11620 11441 11449 -06 41715 

Marre 11440 113-24 11440 -05 31454 

Jun 98 111-20 113-14 113-20 -05 1138 

Esl. totes 22 ft 000 Frrs sales 726209 
Ftps open lot 607.256 up 816 

18 -YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS CMATIF) 

FF50ft00C - plsaf 100 pet 

Sep 97 130.16 12968 1 29 J 6 - 064 186*17 

Dec 97 99.10 98 JJ 9870-062 *439 

Marts 98.32 9832 9810-042 0 

Esl sales: 136768 

Open nit - 198756006373 

LIBOR 1 -MONTH (CMER) 

53 gflkn- plsaf 100 pd. 

Aug 97 9636 9635 9435 441 21 J 52 

Sep 97 9635 *634 9634 Un*. 9471 

0(3 97 9433 9631 9632 Undv 6881 

Est. sates 1941 FfTs sales 7.751 
Firs open liri 43529 . up IJfiJ 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

51 nuftavptt ai 100 pel. 

Aug 97 9628 9627 9678 Undi 22441 

3 < 5 p 97 9627 9625 9626 Undt 528357 

Da 97 9617 9616 * 4.17 4.01 294 t 

Dec 97 9611 9607 9609 441 471 J 13 

Mar 98 9603 93.98 9600 442 313197 

Jun «8 93.92 9386 9399 403 271423 
SepOS 9343 93.77 *180 403 211,186 
D«: 9 B 9173 9167 9 X 70 403 166033 

Marto 9372 9165 9169 403 124213 

Jvin 99 9168 91*2 93*5 443 96829 

Sap 99 91*4 9159 91*2 443 B 3 . 7 B 3 

Dec 99 9159 93-63 91 S 5 404 71 , 93 * 

Ed. soles 416987 Fits sates 979,429 
Fits open inf 3765 , 7 * 9 . up 45.973 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

63500 pound* 5 per pound 

Sep 97 1.6290 1 *128 142*2 4.0022 48098 

Dec 97 1 A 3 M 1.6186 1 6307 44072 851 

Mar »8 14170 1 . 6)60 1414444022 208 

Esl srtas 6195 Frts sates 8498 

Fits Open int 49 . 1 57 . up M 58 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

100400 doBara. S per Cdn. db 

Sep 97 7275 .7257 7271*0 0009 41 . 6 » 

Doc 97 .7310 7300 7305-04009 34*9 

Mor 9 B .7335 .7327 . 7333-0 ax* *15 

ESI. totes 1.985 Frts sates 54*9 

Fils open Bit 48541 , up 127 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

126000 marks. S per mat 

Sep 77 J 3 BA 5362 J 37 T 4000 * 138020 

Dec 97 5414 Si90 5403 - 0.0009 1223 

Mor 9 B J 4 I 9 5419 5434 44009 545 

Esl. sates 16.333 Frts sates 45574 

Fits op an frvl 1 33493 up 7.925 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

1 15 mtUan yen. 4 per 100 yen 

Sep 97 .8516 .8466 4502*00004 78964 

Dec 97 461 * .8586 8612*00004 1.970 

Mar 98 8726 * 0.0005 413 

EM sates 1 1,257 Fits sales 29 . 1 24 

Frts open Ini 01 - 3 * 7 . up 1 , 7*7 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

125.000 francs. S par franc 

Sep 97 6 * 0 ) .6547 4504*00003 60,919 

Dec 97 4658 4624 6 * 39*00003 XI 95 

Mar 98 4720,00002 9*7 

Est. sates 8978 Fits sales 14551 

Firs open Ini 64 181 . up 3112 


High Law dose Qtgc Optal MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 


Financial 

US T BILLS (CMER) 

81 mfflkm- pts of 100 pet. 

Sep 97 9449 9447 9448 -601 74717 

Dec 97 94 77 9477 94 77 4)02 78* 

Mar 98 94 67 0.07 43 

Esl sates 613 Frts sates B30 
Frts open M 7.846 up 67 

SYB TREASURY ICBOT) 

s 10 QL 0 O 0 prliv pf* & * 4 Hk ot 100 pa 

Sap 97 107-90 1074)0 107418 07 770490 

dec 97 10*57 I06-St 106- S7 .07 9484 

Est. sedrn 17,100 RTS sum 9344 B 

Fflr: open «) 73 ft 774 . art X 79 I 

10 YR TREASURY (CBOT 1 
SI 00.000 prirv pt-, & £nds of 100 pel 
Sep97 109-30 109 17 109-24 04 377,263 

One 97 109 90 109419 109-14 os 2X7S2 

440,98 10*415 04 771 

Esl sates *9,9*0 Fits totes 181.331 
Fits open taf 4)1.76*. all 6*1 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT 1 
18 pd-SlOOJXXHUs A finds « 100 pel) 

5ap97 1154)0 1 14-1 2 114 71 -as 52&J7S 


500000 pesos. S per peso 

Sep 07 .17590 .17520 . 12587 * 4)0461 71.235 

Dec 97 13157 .12085 17152*00511 13274 

Marre 117*0 .11700 . 11740*80532 5,746 

Esl. Intel 5.167 Frls wtes i »99 

Frrs open Ml I. ofl 414)40 

3-4*0 NTH PIBOR (MA71F) 

FF 5 mteten . pis at 100 pd 

Sep 97 9*46 96.47 96 X 3 - 004 78133 

Dec 97 96 J 6 96,26 9627 -010 34423 

Mar« 9677 9617 9617 — 0.11 36831 

tan 98 9615 9 * 0 * 9606 - 0.10 25 A 71 

Sep 98 9*02 *&S 0 95 . 94 - 04)9 js. It* 

Est. sates: 77 J 04 

Omi M : 273.772 up 6995 

Industrials 

COTTON 2 INCTNI 
SftOOO IDs ■ cents per lb 

Oct 97 7810 74 JI 754)6 -0 tj IUH 

Dec 97 7535 74.60 7484 4 L 28 43 J 29 

Mar 98 76.20 7583 7613 -ftl? 18748 

May 98 77.10 7**5 7 * 78 4112 3786 

Jwre 77.30 77 is 7715 4 ) IQ 1 J 39 

Esl. sates N-A. Frts sates 6709 
Fits apmi Ini 76901 up 93 


High Low Lotto] eng* Qplrd 

HEATING OIL (NMER) 

43000 goL cants per gal 

S 97 5880 56 » 5844 * 1.88 41194 

97 59 JO 5615 5896 *118 21779 

Nov 97 59 JO 57-50 5911 *IJ 8 18010 

Dec 97 6820 5815 59 J 6 + 1 J 8 17,459 

Jon 98 6840 5810 <011 * 1-53 15 . 15 T 

Fab 98 6810 5810 59.91 * 1 J 8 8179 

MB’ M 5880 57 JO 58 - 7 * * 1-23 7 . 160 * 

EM sues 37 J 66 Frts tolas 289*6 , 

Frts open tal 146908 off 62 , 

UGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) I 

UKO DbL-dolaiB per bbt _ _ 

S 97 2192 19.95 2873 ,047 «J 07 H 

97 20.97 20.10 2886 -*855 53384 , 

Nav 97 20.95 20.15 2013 *853 3 * 445 , 

Dec 97 20.90 2815 2011 *052 48679 , 

Jan 98 2015 281 S 20 J 7 *OJO 28844 

Feb 98 2023 2020 3873 +053 12 . 746 ’ 

Esl sales 1 19 J 44 Fife sales 72262 
Frfs open W 4280 B 6 off 6144 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

IftOOO mm mux S pe, ram btv 

Sep 97 2 J 85 L 230 2 J 70 *8131 37 J 65 - 

00 97 2380 ZJ 35 2265 * 0.120 2 X 881 - 

No* 9 ? 1480 2250 1460*8100 12138 

Dec 97 2-590 2.475 2 J 75 *0095 15.773 

Jdnre 3615 ISOS 2-573 *OJOO 17.200 

Fsbre 2 J 05 2-410 8485 *8068 1 W 4 » ; 

EH. sues 75 J 09 Frts sates I 9 J 58 

Fihi Open lot 183154 Up 492 ~ 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) r 

42.000 gal certs per gal 
Sep 97 67.00 64.70 66.74 *)J 7 43340 - 

Oct 97 61 JO 5915 6120 *883 1 * 6*3 

Nov 97 59 J 0 5810 59.10 *073 8.318 

Dec 9 ; 5815 5725 5835 *873 8995 

Jan 98 58 J 0 57.10 5 RJ 0 * 5-73 7 J 51 

Feb 90 SBS7 5740 5857 *873 1 . 934 - 

Mar 98 5917 *873 17 S 7 - 

Apr 96 61 42 *048 968 

Esl rates 35138 Firs Sd 85 3&550 
Frts open Int 92 ^ 4 ?. up 411 3 


GASOIL (IPE) 

U.S Ucstan per metric tan • tots 
Aug 97 17 X 50 I 71 J 0 172.25 
Sep 97 174.75 172.75 173 J 0 

Ofl 97 176.00 17425 17510 

N 9 V 97 176-50 175 75 T 76 JB 
Dec 9 ; 1 77.75 17625 17750 
Jen 98 17775 1 7700 177 75 

Fab 98 > 77 JO 176 JM 176.75 
MOT 98 17525 17500 174.75 
Est totes 1 1 , 000 . Piev sales 
Prow, open MIT.: 81571 off 15 


al 100 tons 
* 0.73 17.692 
* 0 J 0 18715 
*a 25 9.939 

,IJW 1J»4 
*100 12.249 
* 0 J 5 7,749 

* 0 J 0 4078 

*025 2.489 


BRENT OIL (IPE) 

Ui. OoUars per bctrei - lots of 1 JXH boneh 
Sep 97 19J4 1830 19,46 *0.51 61 961. 

OC197 I960 1883 19 43 . 84* 4fc47Z 

NOW7 ia*2 18.91 19*6 *043 11030 

Dec-97 1964 18.97 1948 * 040 17.785 

JM198 19J9 1903 19 44 * 029 1C40» 

FebW 1940 1897 1940 *836 ftOCI 

Marre 19 43 18.99 19.34 . 0 J4 1717 

Esl. sates 43.06? . Prev sales 27446 

Pie* Open W: 173331 art 787 

Stock Indexes 

SP COMP INDEX (CMER) 

500s<ndej 

Sep 9 7 95840 947 JO 95490 *1.90 >78323 

Dec 97 968 00 958.10 94800 *J60 397? 

Mar 98 97365 Until 164J 

Esl sales N A Fits sates 6AWS 
Frrs open ini 187.091 off 999.617 

CAC 40 (MAT 1 F) 

FF7W per Incte* pc*fl 

Aug 97 3115500 79860 29973-560 »,09fl 
sep97 3063803002003005 00 - 56 0 2l6«l 
Dae 97 3083 009079 001030 00 - 54 0 970 

Esl. sain: 15.258 
Ooon ml • 71 J8*Ort 189. 

Prices tram Hie LanOan Inf w nationti 
Hnanoal Foflwus Estimige an not araBable 
Monday due lo p roblems al ihe sauce 


Commodity Indexes 

Close Previous 
Mow* 1.541 JO J.S59 JO 

Reuters 1.92&60 1.93620 

□J Futures 152-02 IS126 

CRB 24526 24226 

. Soweesj Mafic Associated press. London 
lari Financial Futures Encnorxje. Inn 
Petroleum Exchange. 


Arts & Antiques 

Appears i-vcry Saturday. Tn advertise ronlaet Sarah Wershof 
in oi i r London office: Ti-L: + -W 1 71 120 0326 / Fax: - 14 J 7] +200338 
or your nearest IHT oITur or repre»entativc. 

”76 « c rvnjMmiNsL m _ a 

ncralOs^^enbunc. 

THE UHBLlrs limy NIXMltfa 


IWU>?K: 



’Mi,** 



-Wo*/* 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1997 


PAGE 13 


EUROPE 


-Pearson Sets a Goal 
To Double in Value 
As Profit Rises 55 % 


!fc 4 


nt illations 


if 


Oil Game 


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$ 




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C’BTplW frv Afl- Sitf f-ipsi Onjxartn 

LONDON — Pearson PLC set 
itself a target Monday to double in 
value m five years, after the media 
wmpany reported that first-half net 
income rose 55 percent as charges 
and profits rose at its Financial 
Tones newspaper and Penguin 
books operations. 

•To achieve its growth target, 
Pearson plans to restructure its port- 
folio of businesses over the next two 
yrars to leave itself more focused, 
with fewer businesses, the finance 
director, John Makinson, said. 

‘ ‘The analysis we've done has not 
assumed a change in the business, 
but we have taken some decisions 
about strategy and shape, and 


«» 


in 


Scania’sNet 
Drops 34% on 
Weak Demand 

■ Cau/wM by Our Staff Fan Dapacbn 

STOCKHOLM — Scania 
; AB said Monday that net profit 

• in the first half fell 34 percent 
from a year earlier, to 1 billion 

■ kronor ($125 million), as de- 

- mand for trucks in Europe re- 
: mained weak. 

Sales rose 9 percent, to 18.94 
billion kronor, but currency fluc- 
‘ tuations and increased costs off- 

■ set the impact on profit Scania's 

■ share of the West European mar- 
ket fell to 15.4 percent from 16. 1 
percent, the company said. 

Scania sold 22,433 trucks 

• and buses in the first half, down 
■■from 23.012 in the first half of 

• 1996. But it sold 12.274 in the 
second quarter, up from 10,159 

: in the first quarter. 

“The six-month result was 

• marked by low sales volumes 
and continued price pressure in 

■ Europe,” Chief Executive Leif 
Os iling said, adding, “The up- 
turn in demand for heavy 

■ trucks, which began at the end 

- of the first quarter, strengthened 
: during the second quarter. The 
‘ increased order intake will not 

- show in sales until the second 
: half of 1997,” he said. Scania’s 
; B shares rose 2.50 kronor to 
; dose at 22750. (Reuters. AFX) 


time we will be implementins 
those, he said. 

Pearson's chief executive. Mar- 
jone Scardino. said of the com- 
pany's financial goal. ■ * We have the. 
people and the franchises to achieve 
it, and our shareholders have reason 
to expect iL” 

The company said profit rose to 
£34.4 million ($56.1 million), com- 
pared with £ 22.2 million in the first 
half of 1996. Sales rose 1.9 percent 
to £958 million, compared with £940 
million a year earlier. Pearson said h 
would raise its dividend 8.7 percent, 
ro 7.5 pence a share from 6.9 pence a 
share a year earlier. 

_ Pearson also said Mindscape, its 
ailing U.S. software unit, had per- 
formed better than expected and 
would be profitable bv vear-end. 

Pearson said the half-year figure 
had benefited from a £31.3 million 
injection from the sale of the British 
local newspaper group Westminster 
Press and from a rise in sales of Lhe 
Financial Times newspaper and 
strong results at Penguin. 

Pearson’s television business had 
a loss of £1 1.7 million as a result of 
start-up costs associated with the 
launching of Channel 5, a television 
station in which Pearson has a stake. 

Profit at Lazard Partners, the in- 
vestment bank in which Pearson has 
a 50 percent stake, fell 55 percent to 
£8.9 million, compared with £19.8 
million a year earlier. 

First-half results exceeded expec- 
tations, and Pearson shares rose 4.5 
percent to dose at 695 pence. 

Pearson said the earnings should 
be seen as a first step toward im- 
proving performance so much that 
the company’s value would double 
in the next five years. 

Its earnings have declined in the 
past three years as acquisitions have 
contributed less than expected. 

“Certainly there is scope to tight- 
en the running of the ship and 
squeeze better returns from the ex- 
isting businesses,” said Anthony de 
Larrinaga, an analyst at Panmure 
Gordon & Co. 

* ‘But whether those targets can be 
achieved within that time scale 
without more significant restructur- 
ing is another question. There are 
structural weaknesses in TV and 
electronic information because they 
don’t have the global scale and abil- 
ity to invest back in the business, 
which that requires.” 

( Bloomberg , AFP. Reuters t 


Eurojitters in Bonn and Paris 

Ifo Institute Says Both Face Trouble With Fiscal Criteria 


CtfhjitW ta Gw Skiff From Dispatcher 

BONN — The Ifo Institute said 
Monday it would be difficult for 
Germany to meet its stated lax 
revenue targets for 1997, bringing 
into question its ability to meet the 
fiscal criteria for European eco- 
nomic and monetary union. 

The German institute also said 
France would miss the deficit tar- 
get for a common European cur- 
rency. but added that missing the 
target would not stop it from be- 
coming a founding member of a 
European common currency. 

Countries hoping to be selected 
for the European Union's currency 
union, due to start in 1999, are 
required to meet a series of eco- 
nomic targets, which include hold- 
ing budget deficits to 3 percent of 
gross domestic product. 

In its assessment on Germany. 
Ifo said: ‘ ‘Income from some taxes 
will increase significantly because 
dampening effects will disappear 
in the second half of the year. It 
will still be difficult to meet the 


results in the government esti- 
mates for 1997.” 

In May. a special commission 
said federal, state and local gov- 
ernments could expect to collect a 
total of SI 3.1 billion Deutsche 
marks ($436.4 billion) in revenue 
in 1997. That was down from an 
estimate of S3 1 billion DM fore- 
cast in November 1 996. 

The larger-than-expected short- 
fall for 1997 further hinders Ger- 
many's ability to squeeze its def- 
icit to 3 percent of gross domestic 
product or below. 

Separately, the Economics Min- 
istry said that industrial production 
in Germany rose 1.4 percent in July 
from June, lifted by a rebound in 
the construction industry and in- 
creased output of durable goods. 

In Ifo’s assessment on France, it 
said: “In 1997, the Maastricht 
threshold of 3 percent of GDP will 
probably be missed by up to half a 
percentage point.” 

But the institute said France 
would meet the other entry targets 


on mflatioD, exchange rates, long- 
term interest rates and public debt 
‘‘fairly well." 

“ Allin all, there is little reason 
to object to France being among 
the first members of the European 
monetary union right from the out- 
set in 1999," Ifo said. 

While saying that France's 
economy was in good enough 
shape to adopt the common cur- 
rency, the institute criticized 
“various strong and permanent ef- 
forts by the French government to 
weaken the autonomy of the Euro- 
pean central bank.” 

A European central bank will be 
established on July I , and will take 
control of Europe-wide monetary 
policy when nations’ exchange 
rates are tied together irrevocably 
on Jan. 1, 1999. 

In another German assessment 
of the French economy, Deutsche 
Bank Research said that the 
French deficit would at least 
amount to 3.1 to 3.3 percent of 
GDP. (AFP, Bloomberg) 


Investor’s Europe 





Source: Telekurs 


Imenuliflnal Herald Tribune 


Very briefly; 


• Laura Ashley Holdings PLC shares rose 8 J percent, to 
close at 57 pence (93.3 cents), as it confirmed it had hired an 

outside consultant, the U.S.-based Parthenon Group, to try to 

II P O- *1 II A 9 I ■ /**■ T> /I improve its profitability. A three-person team from Parthenon 

Before Strike, BAs Front Rose 47% 

• Taittinger SA, which controls 53 percent of the French 
hotel operator Societe du Louvre, rejected for the second time 
an offer by Asher Edelman, a U.S. corporate raider, to buy the 
hotel company. 

Volkswagen AG said it should not be forced by the Euro- 


ConjAlrd fcy Our Staff Fnra Dispart ftrs 

LONDON — British Airways 
PLC reported a 47 percent rise in its 
financial first-quarter profit Mon- 
day, helped by a one-time gain. But 
BA said the strong pound had den- 
ted earnings and that its dispute with 
flight attendants would cost the air- 
line £125 million ($204.6 million). 

The figures surprised analysts, 
who had been expecting strike costs 
to total about £80 million. British 
Airways' shares fell 25 pence to 
close at 615. 


The carrier said profit for the three 
months ended June 30 rose to £220 
million from £150 million a year 
earlier. It said it had booked a one- 
time gain of £130 million in the 
quarter by selling its soke in a former 
airline partner, US Airways Inc., but 
that the strength of the pound bad cut 
profit by £77 million. 

Revenue climbed to £2J22 billion 
from £ 2.10 billion. 

BA's chief financial officer, 
Derek Stevens , called the results “a 
mixed bag” but acknowledged that 


the costs of the labor fight would be 
"indeed higher than we estimated.” 
The Josses from the dispute began 
near die end of the second quarter, 
when British Airways braced for the 
walkout. Lost bookings and the 
price of setting up contingency 
plans cost the carrier about £15 mil- 
lion in June. The walkout in early 
July — and subsequent flight can- 
cellations — would depress its 
second-quarter earnings by a further 
£110 million, BA estimated. 

(AP. Reuters, Bloomberg ) 


Cell-Phone Sales Power Nokia 


Cauptlai t*-'Our Suff From Daeatcin 

HELSINKI — Nokia Oy said Monday that second- 
quarter net profit more than doubled as the company, 
the world's second-largest maker of mobile phones, 
resolved inventory problems amid rising demand for its 
phones and networks. 

Net income rose to 133 billion markkaa ($242.3 
million! from 518 million markkaa in the second 
quarter of 1996. The profit exceeded expectations, and 
Nokia’s shares finished 930 markkaa higher, at 482. 

For the first half, net profit jumped to 3.33 billion 
markkaa from 1.13 billion markkaa a year earlier. Sales 


in the half rose 44 percent, to 24.39 billion markkaa. 
Sales of digital mobile phones rose 94 percent in the 
first half, Nokia's chief executive, Jorma OUila, said. 

Nokia lends to outperform Motorola Inc. of the 
United States because it, like its Swedish rival Ericsson 
AB, does not also operate in the semiconductor in- 
dustry, allowing it to benefit more fully from a global 
expansion in mobile telecommunications. 

* Demand for cellular phones continued to grow in all 
major markets globally,” Nokia said. Second-quarter 
sales for the mobile-phone division rose 49 percent, to 
7.32 billion markkaa. ( Bloomberg , Reuters) 


pean Commission to repay a disputed 91 million Deutsche 
marks ($48.9 million) that it received as a subsidy from the 
East German state of Saxony. 

• Tele West Communications PLC shares climbed 7.6 per- 
cent, to 85 pence, after the British cable operator said it had 
received an approach from NTL Inc., a U.S.-based tele- 
communications company, that could lead to a merger. 

• Virgin Group Ltd. is considering establishing a retail bank 
to add to its airline, entertainment and financial units. 

• The Swiss and Italian state railways will form a joint 

company for rail cargo transport to try to improve their 
competitive edge . Bloomberg . Reuters 


Lufthansa Hangs Up on Telekom 

The Assoc idled Press 

FRANKFURT — Lufthansa AG is ditching Deutsche 
Telekom AG as its global telephone service provider, the 
German airline said Monday. 

Lufthansa said cost and service were among its reasons for 
switching to VIAG Intetkom, a unit of VIAG AG. 

VLAG formed the joint telecommunications venture with 
British Telecommunications PLC andTelenor A/S of Norway 
to challenge Deutsche Telekom, which is still 75 percent state 
owned. Deutsche Telekom, long criticized for high rates and 
poor service, will lose its monopoly on local service in 1998. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Low dos* Prw. 


Monday, Aug. 4 

- Prices In local currencies. 

Tetekurs 

Hk* Low Claw Piw. 


Betasdnrf 


8M¥ 

CKAG Cotaita 
Comment™* 
DtdmfwBenJ 


Amsterdam 


ABU -AMRO 
Aegon 
Ahold 
AkznNoM 
Bum Co. 

Bois Wesson 
CSMcvo 
DonflKfie PW 
DSM 


lAmw 

Getronics 
GScDCCva ' 

REST 

Hoodgwnswa 
Huni Doughs 
IMG Group 
ILM 
KUP BT 
XPN 

NedfloydGp 
Nutrtdo 
OccGrifltefl 
Pumps Sec 


IHdg 

RotaCD 
RodomcD 
ftofinen 
Rorenta _ 
Row* Dutch 
UndMCfCua 
VendBlflll 
VMU 

Novas Klcva 


4BJ0 
156.90 
SOM 
347 
14150 
4X40 
10640 
I17J90 
220 
37 3D 
93 

"3 

11X80 
326 
13980 
9520 
ium 
78 
47.40 
BX30 
AUO 
35650 
26150 
167 JO 
119.70 
9450 
20750 
6550 
21XW 

11950 
11680 
474 
113JO 
49 JO 
291 J70 


AEXMWBgWS 

Previous: 9HL74 

47 4750 4X30 
153 15120 1565D 
59 XJO sa* 
339 34150 34050 
13X50 1 3950 140.90 
4250 4X70 42 90 
104JO 10550 
114® 117 

21B 


21650 

3540 

9050 

7010 

77.20 

109 

31X50 


104 

115 

217 

3X50 

9UV 

71 

80 


91 JO 
7150 
7SJ0 

no in.90 

321 3J4J0 

137 JO 13850 134-80 
9250 94 95 

«U 0 W-70 99.90 
7190 76* 73 

46 4650 47 JO 
8080 81.90 8350 
6950 70 69.40 

rayt 3S550 35350 
258.70 25X70 26150 
16X60 16520 165.80 
11X10 118 112 

90.60 9120 91-30 
207 207 JOT 

6190 6190 65-40 
210.X 23&7D 209-70 
11850 11850 11950 
UX70 116 114 

469 470.90 467 JO 
10880 111 JO 11038 
4&8D ABO 4880 
273 283 27190 


High Low daw 
8X0 87J5 8845 
Beww 4UD 4050 41X0 

BMW 1475 1450 USA 

184 180 18250 

6X10 4155 6150 

149.25 14670 14685 

10150 99 100 

Deutsche Bonk 720.10 717.10 117.40 

DeulTeteknm 4X80 4110 4X65 

82-30 8030 B0 50 

346 3* 341 

15570 155 15530 

323 31950 322 

11110 11130 11150 

159 156 159 

101 100 100.10 

455 450 455 

83 8050 8X70 

8X95 82 8255 

693 675 675 

93 9250 9250 

1352 1322 13* 

3555 34.73 34.75 

55050 546 54950 

885 874 ‘878 

Mete8gese8sdHtl41Jft <050 4050 

96-20 95 9U0 

Munch RuKk R 6KB 
549 


Dre&doerBank 
Fiesenhn 
FrewntusMed 
Filed. Kropp 
Gehe 

HeSddbgZwi 

Henkfil pM 

HEW 

Hoddief 

Hoedfcl 

KOTtodi 

UdweyH 

Unde 

Lufltan&a 

MAN 

Mameunann 


PTCUS5U3 

RWE 
SAP pfd 
Sdrertng 
SGI Carton 
Siemens 
Springer (AkH 
Suedwdter 

VEW 


20150 


6730 6730 

542 54850 
8X2 0 79.90 8050 
427 419 J24 

199 20050 
24B 246.* 247 

123.70 1 2170 122-85 
163S 1635 1635 

890 382 BS7 

414 40950 412 

107 JO 10640 106JQ 
574 574 574 

775 764 774 

1401 1365 1369 


8880 
4150 
1491 
1BL5D 
6X65 
148.90 
10105 
122 IS 
4330 
8X90 
346 
15X50 
32650 
113 
157 JO 
102 
455 
8150 
8540 
69950 
9X20 

554 
88550 
42 
97 JO 
6930 
555X5 
B 2 J 0 
43150 
20X70 
7A 
127X0 
1635 
885 
416 
10835 
576 
792 
1407 


GF5A 

Imperial Hdgs 

taBweCari 

iscnr 

Johnnies IMS 

Liberty Hdgs 

Liberty Life 

LtoUfeSbat 

A'.iwnca 

Hemp® 

Meta* 

RexnbfQMSGp 

Rfcbemid 

RisfPtohnHn 

SA Breweries 
Snramcor 
Scnol 
SBC 
Tiger Oots 


9Ck5B 

6050 

J3J0 

237 

6650 

381 

143 

1850 

96 

19 

9475 

A 

68 

. ® 
148 
417$ 
56X5 
71750 
78X5 


90 

60 

33 

226 

6550 

330 

140 

1835 

9425 

1825 

92 

4520 

67X5 

81 

146 

40 

5525 

217X5 

78 


9050 90 

60S3 61 

2X10 2320 
3X7 329 

6550 6550 
380 384 

14850 14350 
1850 1850 
9525 92 

1BJ0 18-8® 
9225 95 

4520 4620 
6750 6825 
8L75 8050 
146 1A 
JO 4025 
56 56 

21725 210 

78 78X5 


Kuala Lumpur 


AMMBHdgs 

Gcflbng 

MM Bonking 
Md Inti Ship F 
PetronosGos 
Pitflon 
Pvbbc BK 
Renong 
Resorts Worid 
RrftwiunsPM 
Sene Daisy 
Telekom Aid 
Tenqqa 
Uld Efngbrems 
YTL 


1440 

1120 

25 


14 14 

10 JO 10.90 
2430 74* 


Su». Sum. Susm. 
925 MO 920 


9. 

1120 

324 

142 

750 

Z52S 

8X5 

9.® 

1020 

18 

73S 


9.10 
10.90 11 

3 M 366 

3X8 138 

725 7X5 

Z450 25 

7.95 8 

925 925 

10 1010 

\jja 1750 

7.10 750 


1120 

24.90 

6-70 

925 

11.10 

374 

326 

750 

27 

8X5 

9X0 

W.iS 

18 

S 


Scot Power 
Securicor 
Sevan Trent 
5hea7nupR 
5Kbe 

Smim Nephew 
SmatiKfitw 
SnultBlnd 
SthemQec 
Stagecuoch 
5tnul Cborfer 
Tale A Lyle 
Tesco 

Thames Water 

3l Group 

Tl Group 

Tomkins 

Unilever 

Uftf ASSWdKX 

Via News 

UMUtffite 

Vendone Lx uts 

Vodafone 

WhUfaread 

WHomsHrigs 

WotHtey 

WPP Group 

Zeneca 


High Low l 

□as* 

PlW. 

4J4 

4.14 

420 

420 

2-77 

175 

175 

276 

SM 

X47 

X47 

XM 

446 

436 

4 44 

439 

1X95 

10J« 

IX® 

1X93 

1J5 

1.73 

1.73 

175 

11.70 

11-52 

11.60 

11.71 

7.97 

7.W 

7.93 

7.96 

4 47 

437 

442 

444 

6BQ 

6J0 

471 

679 

IX* 

9.91 

1X08 

9.94 

405 

4 

401 

404 

424 

4.17 

420 

4M 

7JQ 

7.71 

72B 

7J7 

473 

4J2 

462 

472 

X44 

X32 

543 

526 

110 

XD5 

3JB 

106 

1X42 

1X17 

1X40 

1X33 

435 

430 

42S 

432 

. 7J05 

6J6 

6.90 

7 

698 

6.90 

6.93 

7X0 

i 450 

447 

449 

452 

3JQ7 

3JJ3 

1M 

325 

X57 

849 

X55 

X54 

127 

324 

126 

326 

437 

432 

435 

432 

165 

158 

162 

156 

2104 

19® 

20-03 

7X19 


High Low Close Prev. 


Oslo 

AkerA 


OBX index; 70000 
Previous; <9742 


Chnsftmia I 
DennonkeBk 
EBem 

HnfclimdA 

KxowwAso 
Monk Hydro 
NonkeSkogA 
Myoamed A 
Orkta Asa A 
Pefliu GeoSvc 
SagaPeflmA 
Scftbrted 
Tronsaoean Off 
Sforebrond Asa 


148 

195 

28 

3110 


146 14750 
192 195 

24.90 2752 
3230 3110 


146 

195 

27.10 

3220 


15450 

ISO 

154 

151 

47 

4X50 

47 

47 

439 

43X50 

439 

44150 

400 

396 

396 

398 

284 

27B 

278 

284 

15S 

M3 15750 

153 

M8 

546 

546 

550 

425 

417 

41/ 

416 

1S3 

1® 

151 

150 

129 

127 

177 

133 

615 

615 

6IS 

620 

4X20 

47.90 

4X10 

4/ JO 


OS Union BkF 
ParirenyHrigs 
Sembttwang 
Sing Air forvign 
Sing Land 
Stag Press F 
Sing Tech hid 
SngTeieanm 
Tat Lee Bonk 
UkUndcHfeijl 
UldOSeaBkF 
whig Ted Hdgs 

**itL5. daflore. 


High 

LOW 

Owe 

Prev. 

940 

920 

925 

9* 

655 

650 

&JPJ 

6.60 

6-65 

620 

655 

X70 

1140 

1X30 

1X50 

nso 

745 

2XM 

725 

28 

2X50 

720 

1720 

ITS 

X68 

3.70 

370 

278 

174 

278 

176 

223 

278 

278 

2J3 

1.15 

UO 

1.11 

1.15 

1520 

15 

15.10 

1528 

424 

354 

196 

4 


Stockholm 

PTevtoos 352X37 


Madrid 

Acerinox 

ACESA 

Agues Bonxfoa 


Balsa Hd*c5KL72 
PtwrioBK 59251 


Bangkok 



SET Mex: 64U2 
PrertWE 65X04 

236 216 234 216 

2S2 244 252 246 

3450 3225 3450 3325 

414 410 414 414 

653 628 628 632 

137 133 136 133 

45 JO 4150 4475 -OM 

5250 5050 52 » 

170 154 162 153 

137 135 136 134 


Helsinki 


EnsoA , 
HuhtanoMl 
Kern ire 
Kesko 
Media A 
MeftoB 
Mrtsn-Seria B 
Neste 
Nokia A 
Orton- Yhtymae 
Outokumpu A 
UPMKyDHnene 
Vatmef 


HEX to**: 36^56 

PrMfSUfc 360959 
4950 49.10 49.10 49J 
250 247 248 249 

aso 5250 52-80 5X* 
77 JO 7650 77 77 

2 X 10 H50 2 X 10 2 X 10 

1B7 18550 18650 186 

a 4580 45J0 47 

138 137 W.» 

*SS m 47250 

701 19950 19950 
106 105-50 106 1^30 

13X70 133 13X70 13XM 

8750 87 8720 87.10 


Bombay 

Atria 


BntefMa 

tad Dee Bk 

nc 

MohonogurTel 
Beknceiml 
State BklnSa 
SteABBwrity 
Tfria Eng Loco 


MO 

152X50 

49950 

10425 

554 

30050 

36825 

33525 

2650 

403 


tSOMriC 446X37 
previous: 4347.32 

92X50 927 92X50 

1476151550144X75 
490 49425 493 

10150 1« I* 

541 S4625 539 

2SWS 29225 TM-75 
StS 3*425 *050 
^ 32875 320 

2S25 26 

39425 TO 390 


Hong Kong 


Brussels 

Afenonj! 
BaRom 
BBL 
CBS 
Cohnyf 
DeftaiuLkn 
EtadreOei 
Etedroftw 
I AG 



171® 
795 0 
9440 

m> 
i m 

1 975 

s 

7970 
3690 
6050 
14625 
158® 
154® 
4970 
11275 
3565 
2 » 
ISOM 
1297® 


Copenhagen 

iGBonk. ^ 

1010 

393 

DwDanskeBk 735.06 
tVSSeendbrgB 

KSt 


f®taFss 


’S’SS’iS 

9050 9070 94TO 
3280 33® 3440 

17500 175® 181® 
19® 19® 1945 

S3 38 1 
as 2$ i 

5W0 59® S9ffl 

MK® 14425 146® 
15500 1 55® 1 §S2» 
15025 15025 ISM 
49» 4925 4975 

iSs im ® 

3500 3510 

HK0 245® 23000 
16825 14891 149® 
1250® 1250® 130000 

Cfwrfc 6riBC 647-52 

Meta* 6 ^® 

379 381 Sf 

nca 360 362 

in ’“12 

186 387 294 


Amoy Preps 
Bk East Asa 
Cathay PocSc 
CheatigfcaM 

CKWiWhyd 
Chino ughl 
caicpwac^ 
poaHengBh 
FeslPOcmc, 
Hangtuoatev ^ sM 
Hang Seng Ht )U 
HejJasanbw 

HendefsonLd 
HK China Cas 
HKEIecttt 
HKreteawB 


9 
32 
14JS 
8X50 
27 JO 
4X50 
48.90 
47 JO 
935 


bskst 

HDtd»onm) 

Hyson Cm 
JtfnsonB 


♦lew - ___ 
OritnWPiS 
PesriOriewW 
SHK PfW» 
ShuiTokHrigs 

%£& 

Whedock 


9 
75 

16® 

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5 
269 
7BJ0 

25J0 

Hdg 20.3a 
1950 
5550 
110 
1.29 
10X50 
<178 
125 
7JS 
74 
33 
19.10 


Haeg Sea® 1*259-59 
Pnwtoot 1079 33 
am 880 890 

&aa 31.10 32.70 
1448 14t>5 U60 
S&JS 87 iO 8735 
26J0 26J0 26J0 
4140 -350 44® 
47.70 48 48J0 

47 4730 47 10 

920 9 JO 9 JO 
1X25 1x35 1555 

110 111 HI® 

875 B75 9 

7275 7125 75 

1675 16-40 16*® 
3170 3170 3150 
1950 1975 IMS 
ATS 4.75 485 

262 264 268 

7650 7750 7725 
SS 2555 25.15 

M ms KM 

19 1935 19 

tB & sS 

lS 177 1-27 

9975 10150 10050 
4J3 A6fl 455 
8JQ5 8.10 8JS 
7 JO 735 7« 

73 7350 7350 
32J® 31^ 3110 
mm 1X85 19.10 


London 

Abbey Natl 
Ailed Domed! 
Anglian Wrier 
Argos 

ASdoGraw . 
Assoc Eh Obafs 
BAA 

Barclays 
Bass 
BAT tad 
BanL Scotland 
Blue Ode 
BOC Group 
Boots 
BPS hid 
Bril Aeroep 
Sril Always 
BC 

Brit Lam) 
BntPeflm 

& 
BritTeteoan 
BTR 


FT-5E lift 4t9&70 
Pmrioas: 4899 JO 


852 

447 
TJB3 
630 
143 
X16 
549 

13 

X41 

X 10 

448 
4.11 
77.12 
777 
135 

1142 

6J3 

247 

SM 

826 

442 

148 

4JS 

1J8 


Burmafa Cenhtx 1047 


BurwiGp 

Cable Wirelexs 
OriStWSdW 
Cnrtfoo Caron 
Canrol Union 
CoaipanGp 
CourtnulriE 
D&ans 
Etedrocoropoiwits *51 
EMI Cm* 570 
625 
1SU 
174 
9.17 
156 
1044 


128 

605 

5J7 

188 

699 

615 

115 

6fri 


cnterTOseun 
FornColoniDl 
Getii Acddeffl 
GEC 
GKN 

CkproViMmue 1X09 
Granada Gp 845 
Grand MM 
GR£ , 
GreawtsGg 
Gahness 
GU5 


HS^HWgs 
10 _ 

InaHobocco 
Kjna 


Jakarta 

Astra M) 
Btirnindcxi 


iiMBH 

I JtobtirfBwme 

IhoHarikskB 


sDoftsnXB 
iBtffka 
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^ $ I! 

Wi ra 7U 

969 97047 « 

384 J®® 

% 412 ^9 


„ jGfflm 

bldOPOTHtf 

tadofood 

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S !£ 1 « 

1450 VgS 
9B50 9775 

42® 4175 42® £00 
ALT N.T. M-T. 5075 

mi ns go gw 

90K ®S0 WO 96® 
Sod 4800 SSB 51® 
^ TOO 397S 3975 


Land Sec 
Lnsnio 

Leg^GeriGrt 

UoydsTSBGp 

jjjoosVOrity 

MBjaSpencer 

vex 

Naftond Grid 
Natl Poser 
NoWfest 
Ned 

Norwich Union 

OndWe 
PfcO 
Peonton 


Johannesburg »KSjjKS8 

iion it TO 3640 


Frankfurt 

SB 


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« 'B»,S 'S5 

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25-23 SS a® 75.95 

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1BJ5 10-55 ,asS 


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PwdwWfl 

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FUankGWW 

RedwLDBll 

Redtaid 

Recdhd 

RentoWWaol 

RflutenHOgs 

Re*»n 

BMC Group 

Rorol^SunAit 
Satevn 
SetasM 
5dn*« . 

Scat Newcastle 


5.94 

2 » 

647 

586 

617 

567 

2 XM 

1028 

182 

772 

2J1 

9JS 

179 

08 

756 

1.97 

597 

4J2 

1160 

19? 

545 

8-75 

745 

123 

IW 

634 

599 

1J7 

725 

610 

609 

785 


292 

612 

2-16 

640 

242 

9J5 

238 

648 

985 

505 

X88 

429 

1835 

725 


828 

438 

TM 

623 

1 * 

505 

557 

1258 

830 

426 

427 
4J4 

vm 
747 
128 
1348 
6U8 
237 
5-75 
515 
458 
140 
337 
1 JO 
1032 
123 
692 
5J3 

484 
667 
6.10 
110 
602 
447 

5- 60 

619 
694 
1J3 
9JI 
14 0 
10/48 
1X92 
836 
58a 
288 
436 
575 

6- 08 
562 

2085 

10.13 
179 
782 
240 

9.13 
25 
430 
7.18 
1 J 1 
586 

485 
1148 
256 
S33 
858 
755 
117 
287 
615 
US 
133 
7.10 
5J0S 
592 
759 
157 
948 
183 
603 
2 .H 
625 
2-57 
945 
236 
637 
9.75 
492 
383 
422 
1785 

7.13 


8X2 149 

4* 447 

74B 782 

624 629 

143 142 

510 519 

544 543 
1290 1257 
840 834 

581 504 

S 446 
4.14 

1787 17.74 
731 736 

135 3 J 8 

1X54 1X61 
615 £40 

240 247 

5.91 5.90 

822 8.19 

440 441 

146 141 

423 427 

182 185 

1038 1041 
127 137 

5.96 683 

194 5J6 

486 487 

682 680 
615 613 

115 114 

SM 607 
441 451 

547 541 

631 621 

7J2 6.95 

132 134 
SJF 9.14 
345 3-50 

103 1051 
1X04 1387 

939 l-S 

690 in 
250 251 
440 443 

583 583 
615 616 

S44 543 

2155 21.18 
10.18 1X15 
X78 2 ® 

7J1 786 

id lit 
9 JO 934 
177 176 
49 4X6 

7J7 726 

7.96 152 

589 5.94 

491 489 

1150 1160 
159 257 
5X7 542 

167 170 

759 7M 
117 321 

289 2JB 
630 618 

695 65 5 
1X6 1X5 

7.11 726 

585 589 

599 5.93 
759 783 

160 156 

986 958 

289 250 

a » 
a a 

lS 2J6 

638 646 
9.76 9J2 
493 5M 
IBS 183 

,7^ 1 ^ 

722 724 


Bl 

Bantsta 

BonMnter 
Bco Centro HUP 
Boo Popular 
Bos Santander 
CEPSA 
Corttnerte 
CcrpMapfre 

FECSA 
Car Nahral 
Iberdrola 

Prytn 

Repsol 

5wjBanaElec 
Tobacoleni 
Tetetonlca 
Union Fenoia 
MUenc Cement 


28000 

1790 

5930 

8400 

3980 

1465 

7860 

SM® 

3*500 

4120 

4700 

3275 


3§S 

1785 

2975 

6220 

1425 

8170 

*45 

1235 

2545 


27510 27550 
1755 1755 

5768 5800 
8050 8120 
3880 3945 
1425 1430 

7510 7400 

5700 5800 

34140 34260 
4230 4260 

46* 4660 
3060 3230 

8110 
3095 315 
1235 1235 

6MB 7000 
1750 1740 

2860 2925 
60fSO 6100 
1375 1400 

7710 7710 

3M5 3990 

1215 1230 

2510 2545 


27880 

1775 

5930 

8*0 

4000 

1450 

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5900 

34400 

43* 

47® 

32® 

85® 

31® 

1260 

7250 

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151 

152 

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84 

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Suez Lyon Eoux 


csr 


To Our Readers 

Some stock market prices 
were not available Monday 
because of transmission prob- 
lems. 


Total B 
Ustaor 
Vole® 



Prevtaw: 304944 

«? 

925 

933 

995 

220 

70940 21X90 

219 

973 

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725 

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119 JQ 

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106 

237 

146 

233 

287 

615 

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282 

264 

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241 

23450 

18650 

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325 

34X50 

213 

180 

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217 


10650 107 

105 10550 
230 230 

14150 145J0 
224 225 

282 28150 
598 600 

352 354 

331 332 

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415 41550 
27450 276 

260 26250 
30050 30450 
235 235 

223 22750 
1B1J0 1B3 

8850 89 

319 32350 
337 339 

206 210 
174 17650 
13050 13150 
252 254 

213 21450 


The Trib Index 

Pneas as o> XOO PM Now York arm 

Jan. i. 7 992. joa 

Lav* 

Oianga 

% change 

your to data 





% chong* 

Worid Index 

177.99 

-0.75 

-0.42 

+19.34 

Raglan* InctaxM 





Asia/PadTic 

129-20 

-1.84 

-1.40 

♦4.67 

Europe 

195.58 

■2.45 

-1.30 

+15.12 

N. America 

213.30 

+2.90 

+1.42 

+31.74 

S. America 

171.32 

-2.41 

-139 

♦49.72 

liwuxrial tariuan 





Capital goods 

230.32 

+0.15 

+0.07 

+34.75 

Consumer goods 

196.81 

-0.B8 

-0.34 

+2132 

Energy 

199.38 

+1 -38 

+0.70 

+16.79 

Finance 

132^6 

-2.06 

-1-53 

+13.82 

Miscellaneous 

190.16 

+1J21 

+0.64 

+1734 

Raw Materials 

191.77 

-1.70 

-0.88 

+9.35 

Service 

168.68 

+O.01 

+0.01 

+22.84 

UtMes 

165.58 

-2.30 

-1.37 

+15.42 

The emmatenot Humid 7mnjna World Brock index €> tracks ffw US. doSsr mums of 

280 imBmaHonoDf mvastaUa stocks from 2S cownrioa. For mom Momaaon. a turn 

booktnt sarraBabte by wrung to The Tab index, WAvanuo OmriesOe GuOe. 

| 92521 Noutty Codas. France. 


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17J2 17J5 1X01 
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TokyuCnp, 

Tanen 

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Tormrtad 
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Tories) 

Taya Trust 
Toyota Malar 
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PrevtaiiK 731 AS 

Doan 960® 940® 965® 950® 

Daewoo Heavy 7B5t( 76SD im 7830 

HyumUBlB. 20600 202® 20500 20500 

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26CT1 25JOT 260® 3M 
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Pormasa Plastic 
Hua Han BK 
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Friendships 

Appears every Saturday in The lnlemiarkel To advertise contact Christelle Forestier 
- ixTour London office: Tel.: 4- 44 l 71 420 0329 / Fax: + + 44 1 71 420 0333 
Or your nearest IHT office or representative. 


Tint murt nuur HCTsiwWt 




Market Oosed 

The Toronto stock market 
was closed Monday for a hol- 
iday. 


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' I 


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«* 


IV 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1997 


PAGE IS 


ASIA/PACIFIC 




Bank’s Curb 




* 


But News of Controls' 
Hurts Malaysian Stocks 

l; Ca^toOvStGFnmDapacto 
. KUALA LUMPUR — Malaysia’s 
currency rebounded Monday, but the cen- 
tral bank’s decision to limit fee amount of 
nnggit feat foreign speculators could ob- 
tem m the swap market pressured interest 
rates and the stock mar ket 
„ The dollar fell here to 2.6135 ringgit 
from 2.6285 ringgit Friday and traded as 
low as 2.58 ringgit during tbe day. 

- “The ringgit’s swap restrictions were 
me main catalyst that led fee ringgit to 
strengthen,” said Andy Tan, general 
manager of MMS International, a finan- 
cial-services unit of Standard & Poor’s 
£orp. The central bank, Bank Negara, 
said Sunday that local banks must limit 
currency swaps with overseas customers 
dial are not trade-related to $2 million. 

*. Swap agreements can be used for cur- 
rency speculation or by multinational 
companies that have financial dealings in 
various countries. By limiting those that 
dre nor trade-related, Malaysia made it 
more difficult for speculators to get hold 
of ringgit. 

- The ringgit had fallen more than 4 
percent against the dollar in the midst of 
the regional currency turmoil set off 
when fee Thai baht was floated July 2. 

■ “I don’t think this move in itself has 
too much impact,” said Chaing Yao 
Chye, head of Asia-Pacific research at 
CIBC in Singapore. “But what people 
are worried about is that it could pat 
Malaysia a step back in terms of trying to 
be a financial center." 

- Deputy Prime Minister Anwar 
fbrahim, who is also finance minister, 
said the central bank was not planning to 
former restrict ringgit trading. The re- 


Banks Are Said 
To Back Thailand 
With $5 Billion 

CaB&Mt*O*Su0‘f : mmDtf>iHehn 

TOKYO — Major commercial 
banks from the United States, 
Europe and Asia have decided to 
provide a $5 billion line of credit 
for Thailand to help defuse tbe 
country’s currency .crisis as part of 
a multilateral support program, a 
Japanese report said Monday. 
-Japanese banks are expected to- 
provide half -of the line of credit 
because they are Thailand’ s biggest 
creditors, the report said. 

The private sector aims to com- 
plement programs designed by the 
international Monetary Fund and 
the Export-Import Bank to cover a 
shortfall in Thailand’s foreign-cur- 
rency reserves. . 

It is not clear whether actual 
loans will be necessary. 

Meanwhile, Thailand moved 
closer to completing a multibillion- 
dollar international rescue package 
as economic mini sters approved a 
bailout agreement with the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund. 

The agreement, whose details 
are still being worked out, is likely 
to include a credit line while re- 
quiring the government to raise 
taxes and cut spending. 

Thailand’s 49-member cabinet 
will consider the plan Tuesday, and 
officials said that political oppo- 
sition may prompt a change in some 
of the details. 

“The IMF doesn’t always come 
to terms wife a country, but I don’t 
think that will happen here,” 
Robert Denham, chairman and 
chief executive officer of Salomon 
Inc., said after meeting with Fi- 
nance Minister Thanong Bidaya in 
Bangkok. 

(Bridge News, AFP, Bloomberg) 


W^HAHCl RATES 
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lUwH I iJi'H.ul.i 


Kuala Lumpur money-changer counting out newly stronger ringgit Monday. 


striction on swaps has had some side 
effects, creating a shortage of ringgit that 
put upward pressure on interest rates and 
depressed stock prices. 

Bank Negara injected close to 1 bil- 
lion ringgit into the money market Mon- 
day via local banks to lower pressure on 
the one-month interbank rate, according 
to C.S. Lum, economist with Philecn 
Allied Securities, to try to cool excessive 
demand for the ringgit 


In the stock market, the benchmark 
Composite Index of 100 stocks fell 
24.07 points, or 2.40 percent, to close at 
978.56. 

“It shows how worried the central 
bank is about the currency situation,” 
said Ami Morris, head of institutional 
trading at Gapitalcorp Securities. “Cap- 
ital controls are always badly received 
by the equities markets.” 

( AFP, AP. Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Growth in U.K . 
Buoys HSBC 

First-Half Profit Rises 11% 

CttaviM t’w Suff F m* Dufwrtrs 

LONDON — HSBC Holdings PLC, the international 
financial group that grew out of Hongkong & Shanghai 
Banking Corp., said Monday that first-half pretax profit 
rose more than expected on strong growth ar its British 
bank. 

Net profit was up 11 percent, to £1.76 billion ($2.88 
billion), while pretax profit rose 13 percent, to £2.62 
billion. The company proposed an interim dividend of 20 
pence a share, an increase of 33 percent. 

In Hong Kong currency terms, HSBC’s net profit rose 19 
percent, to 22.2 billion Hong Kong dollars ($2.9 billion). 

HSBC is based in London, but its main interests are in 
Hong Kong. It reports earnings in both currencies. Its 
assets include Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corp. and 
Hang Seng Bank of Hong Kong as well as Midland Bank 
PLC of Britain. 

Midland Bank reported net profit of £512 million, an 
increase of 17 percent from a year earlier, year, as fee 
income rose strongly and costs were virtually unchanged. 

The highlight of the first half was rapid expansion in 
Latin America, with acquisition announcements in 
Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Peru and Argentina. 

Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Oirp.’s net profit rose 
7 percent, to 10.31 billion Hong Kong dollars from 9.67 
billion dollars. Hang Seng Bank, a Hong Kong bank 
controlled by Hongkong & Shanghai, said prom rose 
14.5 percent, to 4.98 billion dollars. 

HSBC’s chairman, Sir William Purves, said that de- 
spite the rise in tbe value of the pound over the first half 
of the year, which had an adverse impact on earnings 
comparisons, “our capital strength enabled us to make 
major investments while maintaining dividend 
growth.” 

Analysts said fee earnings showed that British banks 
were continuing to benefit from strong growth and low 
inflation, while those in Hong Kong were profiting from 
record levels of mortgage lending and strong economic 
growth. 

“They were very good numbers, and the dividend 
increase is something that really catches the eye.” Nigel 
Cobby, an executive director at Morgan Stanley, Dean 
Winer, Discover & Co. in London, said. 

(AFP. Bloomberg) 


Investor’s Asia 


Hbi^ifong Sin 

Hapg£ercg- • v" ' 

: .17000 ' 2275 

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15000 — kJII • 2126 

=■14000 ~/V. 2060 - - 

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1987 1997 1997 



;gxehaia|£ - 

: ‘‘ii 




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^okyo- ' Nikkei 22S 

"•■’hSwot. 

Kuala Uitapur Composite 


Bangkok . ; SE fu: "--- 




! 

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1 

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Jakarta. : V; Ppn^o^U^x 


Wellington MZSE-40 

2^558.78 

Bombay . Index 


Source: Tetekurs 

InbmaunuJ HeraU Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Rise in Capital Spending Bolsters Hong Kong Growth 


CMnfOtdbfOirSLffFmnDtiaL-ka 


HONG KONG — The economy grew at a 

1 percent 


oray | 

faster-thao-expected annual rate of 6. 
in fee first quarter, government data showed 
Monday, as capital spending increased 
sharply. 

The Census and Statistics Department, mean- 
while, said real, or inflation-adjusted, growth in 
gross domestic product for 1995 had been re- 
vised downward to 4 J percent from 4.7 percent 
and fear 1996 GDP growth had been revised 
upward to 4.9 percent from 4.7 percent. 

The government predicted in May that the 


economy would grow 5.5 percent this year. 

“Growth will accelerate in fee next few 
quarters,” said Enzio von Pfiel, chief econ- 
omist at Clarion Securities Asia Ltd. “You 
have the feel-good factor following the hand- 
over,” be said, referring to Hong Kong’s re- 
version to Chinese rule July 1. 

The implicit price deflator of fee GDP, a 
broad measure of inflation, rose 6.6 percent in 
the first quarter of 1997 from a year earlier. 

Re-expons, mainly to and from China, rose 
55 percent from a’ year earlier in the first 
quarter, after adjusting for inflation, while do- 


mestic exports fell 3.9 percent Taken together, 
exports rose 4.0 percent after inflation, the 
government said, and imports rose 6.4 percent 
in the quarter. 

Consumer spending rose 5.0 percent in real 
terms, while government spending rose 4.4 
percent 

Construction spending rose 2.0 percent in 
real terms, while spending on machinery and 
equipment jumped 26 percent 

Exports of services rose 5.8 percent in the 
quarter, while imports of services increased 7.1 
percent (AFP. Bloomberg) 


• Japanese auto stocks fell 3.8 percent, and domestic auto 
sales tumbled 1 0. 1 percent last month in Japan. Toyota Motor 
Corp. fell 220 yen to close at 3,290 (S27.71J, Nissan Motor 
Co. dropped 55 to 730, Honda Motor Co. fell 100 to 3.730, 
and Mitsubishi Motors Corp. lost 15 to 670. 

• Toyota Motor, the world’s chird-largest carmaker, is to 
build a $170 million plant in India, a $3 billion-a-year anto 
market now dominated by Suzuki Motor Corp. 

• Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp. confirmed reports 
that it planned to acquire a 35 percent slake in Sri Lanka 
Telecom Ltd. for $225 million. 

• KDD, a Japanese international telecommunications com- 
pany, is to link up wife DDJ Corp., a domestic long-distance 
carrier, to try to combat rising competition. 

• Nippon Hoechst Marion Roussel Ltd. was ordered to pay 
more than 500 million yen in extra taxes because of un- 
derstatements of its revenue in 1990-94. 

• Telekom Malaysia Bhd. shares dropped 4 percent to a four- 
year low after Malaysia's biggest telecommunications com- 
pany posted weaker- than -expected first-half earnings. The 
shares closed at 9.25 ringgit ($3.55), down 0.45. Telekom’s 
net profit for the first half of 1997 rose 5.7 percent, to 889.9 
million ringgit. 

• MDX PCL’s shares were suspended by Thailand’s stock 
exchange because fee property and power-plant developer 
missed a payment on a bond last week. MDX owed 57 million 
baht ($1.7 million) in interest on a 1 billion baht bond. 

• China's Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications cut the 
price of international calls from Shanghai and Beijing by 40 
percent between 1 A.M. and 7 A.M. to fight competition from 
companies offering cheap call-back services. 

• South Korea’s expons of 64-megabit dynamic random- 

access memory’ chips brought in S749 million in the first seven 
months of this year, or 17 percent of the country’s $4.4 billion 
in total chip exports in the period, the Trade, Industry and 
Energy Ministry said. Bloomberg. Reuter*. AFX. AFP 


Kia Gets a Break; Suppliers Don’t 


CaetpiM fw Ota Slag From Oapauhn 

SEOUL — Creditor banks gave Kia 
Group a two-month reprieve on paying 
its debts Monday, but they refused to 
advance any cash to fee conglomerate, 
putting about 5,000 contractors at risk. 

“There was no measure to support 
cash-drained Kia contractors,’’, an of- 
ficial of the Kia Subcontractors’ As- 
sociation said. “We’re hopeless now.” 

Nine Kia contractors have failed since 
the conglomerate was placed under 
bankruptcy-law protection last month. 

After two meetings that failed to lead 
to an accord, Kia’ s 59 creditors Monday 
to extend a grace period on loan pay- 
ments until Sept. 29. But they also de- 
cided to delay extending new loans 


totaling 185.5 billion won (S208.6 mil- 
lion) because Kia's management had 
failed to suhmir resignation letters and 
to get labor unions to agree to job cuts 
that would reduce fee work force by 
about 20 percent. 

Kia owes about $10 billion. Chairman 
Kim Sun Hong and other managers said 
they would resign only if their cost- 
cutting plan failed Kia proposed to shed 
43.5 billion won in assets, reduce its 
number of subsidiaries by 80 percent and 
cm 8,800 jobs to tty to improve its fi- 
nances. Kia plans to concentrate on autos 
by reducing its divisions to five from 28. 
It also plans to raise 3.1 trillion won by 
selling real estate and subsidiaries. 

(Bloomberg, AP. AFP) 


Sales of CD-ROMs Help Profit Triple for LG 


Bloomberg A'w 

SEOUL — LG Electronics Co., 
South Korea's largest borne appliance 
manufacturer, said Monday its current 
profit more than tripled in the first half 
of fee year because of increased sales of 
CD-ROM drives and air conditioners. 

The profit surge also reflected a bet- 
tex-than-expected 20 percent increase in 
exports to Asian counties, said Seo Eun 
Sil, an LG spokeswoman. 


Current profit in fee period rose to 
1 1 2.2 billion won ( $ 1 26.2 million) from 
35.1 billion won a year earlier. Sales 
rose 19.7 percent, to 4.4 trillion won. 

Current profit is pretax profit that 
includes gains and losses made on in- 
vestments in stocks and bonds, as well 
as profits and losses from other non- 
operating activities. 

LG Electronics shares rose 900 won 
to close at 44.900 won on Monday. 


fc BARNEY’S i Its Hong Kong Buyer Brings the Luxury of Capital 


Continued from Page 11 

however, was the only suitor 
able to satisfy both the Press- 
man family and creditors of 
Barney’s. 

• Barney’s, which was start- 
ed in 1923 by Bob and Gene 
Pressman’s grandfather 
Barney with money he got 
from pawning his wife’s en- 
gagement ring, grew over the 
years under fee stewardship 
of fee Pressman family a 
luxuiy specialty store feat of- 
ten featured the most daring 
hew fashions. 

;• The company filed for pro- 
tection under Chapter I I of 
fee U,S. Bankruptcy Code in 
January 19% as a result of a 
cash crunch from its aggres- 
sive expansion and a dispute 
iwiihlsetan. , , 

-• Isetan, which financed the 
ions traction of the three flag- 
ship Barney’s stores on 
^Madison Avenue in Manhat- 
tan and in Chicago ana 
Beverly Hills, maintained 
feat it was owed millions or 
dollars in rent for those 
con- 



jeosts were investments : 

node in exchange f? r 3,1 
equity stake in the business. 

* Thai dispute spiraled into 
feare litigation and bitterness 
'than was occasioned by 
nearly any other retail bank- 


ruptcy of the decade and in- 
cluded a judgment of 5197 
million against the Press- 
mans for loans they had per- 
sonally guaranteed 

The next step of dividing 
up the .spoils will depend 
largely on negotiations wife 
Isetan, absent from fee ac- 
quisition process with Dick- 
son, and what the Japanese 
company is willing to settle 
for. Isetan, however, cannot 
block the deal wife Dickson 
Concepts. . 

The creditors, in particular 
so-called vulture investors 
who took the risk of buying 
Barney’s trade debt for 80 
cents on the dollar or less, pe 
going to insist on recovering 
fee balk of their claims. 

Those who take equity in 
the company will be betting 
that its future earnings, 
which have been largely de- 
pressed by the prcKracred 
bankruptcy, wiU 
pack wife Mr. Pc — 
s eeing the bottom line. 

The deal is far removed 
from fee one reached wife 

jsetan at fee end of fee 198te, 

when many retailers sought 

l0 expand overseas and 

Barney’s was determined not 
to be left behind. 

Mr Poem, who will control 
Barney’s outright, will have 
*e final say on how tte com- 
pany spends money. He has a 


strong record in making retail 
and luxury-products invest- 
ments. 

Beyond Harvey Nichols, 
he has a controlling stake in 
Seibu Department Stores in 
China, - 

The deal was struck after 
negotiations and on the heels 
of other offers. Saks Hold- 
ings, which owns Saks Fifth 
Avenue, made a bid in con- 
junction wife Isetan for $290 
million for fee company, 
which was rejected, and Saks 
has said it will offer no 
more. 

Dickson Concepts also bid 
$240 million earlier, but fee 
less complicated deal was 
firmly rejected by fee cred- 


itors’ committee. Texas Pa- 
cific Group, an investment 
firm, was also negotiating 
with the company through 
Friday but did not get to the 
same numbers. 

“The folks at fee Black- 
stone Group, Peter J. So- 
lomon and Cleary, Gottlieb. 
Steen & Hamilton pulled it 
together to get a complicated 
deal done,” said Bob Press- 
man, referring respectively 
to Barney’s investment bank, 
advisers to fee creditor’s 
committee and the law firm 
representing Poon. 

Tbe companies have until 
Aug. 15 to complete their 
agreements and file a motion 
with fee court. 




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PAGE 18 


Keratb^^Sribunc. 


TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1997 


Wild-Card Johnson Trumps His 400 -Meter Rivals 


Switzer Is Arrested 

The Dallas Cowboys coach 
Barry Switzer was arrested Mon- 
day after a loaded revolver was 
discovered in his carry-on baggage 
at Dallas- Fort Worth Internationa/ 
Airport, officials said. 

Switzer was detained, his .38- 
caliber weapon was confiscated 
and he was released about two 
hours later on his own recogniz- 
ance. Carrying a weapon into an 
airport is a third-degree felony, 
punishable by two to 10 years in jail 
and up to a $10,000 fine. 

• The Philadelphia 76ers guard 
Allen Iverson, last season's NBA 
rookie of the year, was arrested early 
Sunday in Virginia, after his Mer- 
cedes was stopped for speeding and 
a state trooper smelled marijuana 
and found a gun. the police sard. 

Iverson, who was a passenger, 
was arrested on charges of 
marijuana possession and posses- 
sion of a firearm while in possession 
of a controlled substance. (WP ) 



tea C. FvIxteMd/The Avuculni Pm 

Martina Hingis hitting a back- 
hand return to Monica Seles. 

Hingis Beals Seles Again 

tennis Manina Hingis won her 
ninth title in 10 tournaments this 
year, beating Monica Seles, 7-6 (7- 
4), 6-4, in the final of the Toshiba 
Classic in Carlsbad, California, on 
Sunday. Hingis has won all five of 
her matches against Seles. 

• Chris Woodruff won his first 
ATP Tour title, using his aggressive 
play and strong serve to beat No. 6 
seed Gustavo Kuerten, the French 
Open champion 7-5, 6-4* 6-3. (AP) 

Mickelson Wins on Points 

golf Phil Mickelson broke his 
own tournament points record as he 
cruised to victory in the Sprint In- 
ternational on Sunday. He bad five 
birdies and a bogey, finishing with 
48 points under the modified 
Stableford scoring system used in 
the event, to beat Stuart Appleby by 
seven points. Skip Kendall was 
third with 38 points. 

The victory lifted Mickelson to 
fifth in the U.S. Ryder Cup table 
and locked up a berth on the team. 

• Colleen Walker shot a final 
round of 8- under- par 65 to win the 
LPGA du Maurier Classic, the final 
women’s major of the year, in Oak- 
ville, Ontario, on Sunday. Walker, 
40, beat Uselotte Neumann of 
Sweden by two strokes. (AP) 

Sri Lanka Fights Back 

cricket Sanath Jayasuriya and 
Rosban Mahanama shared un- 
broken second wicket stand of 283 
Monday to take Sri Lanka to 322 
runs for one wicket at the close of 
the third day of the first Test against 
India. 

Jayasuriya made 175 not out and 
Mahanama reached 115 as Sri 
Lanka replied to India's first innings 
of 537 for eight declared. (Reuters) 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 

ATHENS — Reports of Michael 
Johnson bad been exaggerated. All re- 
ports. Those put out before the world 
championships predicted he might break 
the world record of 43.29 seconds in the 
400 meters, which doesn ’t seem likely at 
the moment. They were followed by 
suggestions that he might not even qual- 
ify for the 400-meter final. 

He soothed those fears by starting his 
semifinal heat hard Monday night and 
decelerating to win with ease in 44.37 
seconds. 

Johnson, who was a wild-card entry 
into these championships, will be one of 
four Americans in the final Tuesday, 
joined by three Britons and a Ugandan. 

World Athletic* 

Johnson might seem vulnerable — com- 
paratively — after suffering a leg injury 
early this summer, followed by the de- 
mise of his 400-meters winning streak at 
eight years and 58 races, and then in his 
second-round heat Sunday slowing 
down prematurely and almost failing to 
advance. 

“I was disappointed in myself for 
doing it," Johnson said of that mistake. 
"I actually felt good yesterday. I'm 
ready to go out and try to do the best I 
can and by to win the race." 

His fellow Texan, the former world 
champion and defending Olympic 
champion Charles Austin, will miss the 
high-jump final after failing to clear the 
qualifying height of 2.28 meters. 

Medals were decided in four events 
Monday. The favored Cathy Freeman of 
Australia became the first aboriginal 
gold medalist when she overcame a 
lousy assignment in lane 1 to win die 
400 meters in 49.77 seconds, just two 
one-hundredths ahead of the surging 
Sandie Richards of Jamaica, with the 
American Jearl Miles-Clark third in 
49.90 seconds. 

Freeman, 24, responded with a re- 
markable lack of glee, as if she thought 
another round was still ahead for her. 
She has been a figure of some con- 
troversy at home since running a victory 
lap with an aboriginal flag at the 1994 
Commonwealth Games in Canada. This 
time she walked* carrying flags from 
both her constituencies — aboriginal 
and Australian. 




Last year, less than three months be- 
fore the Olympics, Stephane Diagana of 
France suffered a stress fracture of his 
right foot and didn't compete in Atlanta. 
He recovered some of his lost satisfaction 
by persevering over the final grueling 
stem of die 400-meter hurdles to win in 
47.70 seconds, the world’s fastest time 
this year. A late charge over the final 
hurdle earned Llewellyn Herbert of 
South Africa the silver medal in 47.86 
seconds, two one-hundredths foster than 
the American bronze-medalist Bryan 
Bronson, who had run the four fastest 
times this year. 

Sabine Braun of Germany won the 
heptathlon with 6,739 points, more than 
200 behind her personal best More 
emotionally received was the women's 
triple jump when Olga Vasdeki of 
Greece moved briefly into third place 
with a penultimate jump of 14.62 me- 
ters, a national record. She finished 
fourth behind the Czech gold medalist 
Sarka Kasparkova (a world-best this 
year of 15.20 meters), Rodica Mateescu 
of Romania (15.16) and Yelena Go- 
vorova of Ukraine ( 14.67). 

The Greeks could only imagine bow 
much further Vasdeki might have 
skipped if launched by the cheers of a 
full house. These championships now 
seem assured of being played out in a 
half-empty stadium. 

"I'm really sony that the stadium is 
not full," said Lambros Papakostas of 
Greece after he had qualified for the 
high jump final. "Athens is bidding for 
the Olympics, and the people of Athens 
look down on such a great organization. 
I would like to thank with all my heart 
those who came to root for me." 










ffi 


\up Nh-HrinftjjiV Vt*- 

Cathy Freeman, right, with Sandie Richards, left, and Jearl Miles-Clark after winning the 400 meters. 


U.S. Track Needs Help 9 and Europe Is Willing 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 

A THENS — In one hotel. 
Maurice Greene and Marion 
Jones were celebrating the 
greatest American sprinting triumph in 
29 years. In another, the godfather of 
their sport was explaining with great 
comical accuracy the crisis of American 
track and field. 

“We have made a development pro- 


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Steve Smith of Britain clearing the bar in the high jump qualifying round. 


gram for athletes in Africa, Eastern 
Europe, South America, Asia, all of the 
ex-countries of the Soviet Union — and 
now it will be a little surprise because 
we are going to make a program in the 
U.S.,” said Primo Nebiolo, the 74-y ear- 
old Italian who oversees the IAAF. the 
ruling federation of international track 
and field. 

"It is the most powerful country in 
the world, so it could seem ridiculous to 
go to the U.S. and help them." 

The Americans could use every hand 
Nebiolo is willing to extend, even though 
American athletes have been dominant 
since the Cold War'^final years. - ' 

Track and field -was dying commer- 
cially in the United Stales even.as Carl 
Lewis was beginning in 1984 to claim 
his title as the sport's greatest performer 
ever. The more that Jackie Joyner- 
Kersee, Dan O'Brien and Michael John- 
son celebrated, the less Americans 
seemed to care. 

These days, track and field is hard to 
find on American television. It is covered 
irregularly by the American press. Craig 
Masback, the new chief executive of 
USA Track & Field, the American fed- 
eration for the sport, admits that many 
Americans aren’t aware that it is con- 
tested in non-Olympic years. 

When Greene, 23, and Jones, 21 . won 
their world championships Sunday 
night, it was the first time since 1968 
that an American man and woman were 
first across the 100-meter finish line in a 
major, nonboycotted championship. 
They represent the newest stubborn 
generation of American champions who 
understand, for the time being, that they 
will have to earn their money from 
meets and sponsors in Europe and Asia. 
They aren't likely to find any huge 
bonuses or victory parades waiting for 
them next week when they return 
home. 

Much of the blame is shoveled upon 


Ollan Cassell, the preceding director of 
the American federation, who oversaw 
the wealth of U.S. gold medals and the 
sport’s paradoxical decline by all other 
measurements. 

"1 was for 20 years president of the 
Italian federation," Nebiolo com- 
plained dryly, "and athletics became 
the second sport in Italy. Now, in the 
U.S., track and field is the 25th sport, 
after billiards. 

“I was always believing he could 
face athletics in a different manner," 
Nebiolo continued, referring to Cassell. 
"If I had the talents he had in the U.S.. 
and I was there for *20 years? What I 
could do. I am always dreaming to be 
young and come back and to be ap- 
pointed as director of U.S. track and 
field.” 

The larger problem, apart from Cas- 
sell's managerial ambivalence, was as 
vast as the differences between America 
and Europe. 

The European sports are run by fed- 
erations, which were originally amateur 
organizations staffed by volunteers, and 
which to this day are maintained by 
political leaders whose currency is 
power. Nebiolo is their caricature: He 
maintains his position and makes his 
sport grow with a complicated arrange- 
ment of handshakes, threats, promises 
and favors. 

Nebiolo deserves applause for mod- 
ernizing his sport, making the athletes 
professional, creating these world 
championships in 1983 and introducing 
the ever-radicai concept of prize money 
this year. 

But could you imagine someone like 
him trying to lead the National Hockey 
League or National Basketball Asso- 
ciation? Nebiolo wouldn’t want the job 
held by Paul Tagliabue, whose success 
as the National Football League's com- 
missioner is tied primarily to television 
ratings and commercial income. Just as 


the lawyer Tagliabue would never want’ 
a job that depended on his ability to* 
make a political ally of the track and- 
field delegate for Ruritania. • 

The challenge for Masback, who took* 
over USA Track & Field three weeks 3 
ago, will be to turn an old-world fed- * 
eration into something resembling aa 
American bottom-line entity. He has 
eveiy qualification to do just that. Hr- 
was the 1980 U.S. indoor champion in 
the mile, in 1 979. he ran an outdoor mile 
of 3 minutes. 52.02 seconds, then the 
sixth-fas test time ever. He ran profess 
sionally in Europe and worked- for the. 
International Olympic Committee at its- 
fledgling musetim. He 'made- a short 
career in sports marketing, announced* 
track and field on television and, most 
important, he became a lawyer. 

He has plans to seek out press cov- 
erage for American athletes beginning: 
in their hometown newspapers, plans re- 
arrange a more coherent year-round cal- 
endar of indoor and outdoor meets and 
road races. 

On Monday, he talked about doing' 
more to serve the 1 . 1 million American ■ 
high-schoolers who run cross-country.’ 
or track and field. He spoke of.a coro-^ — 
mitment to entice new sponsors to the 
sport. He pointed out how much global, 
track and field had grown in the past two 
decades without the richest country -in. 
the world. r , 

He admitted that he and Nebiolo had 
not yet made any firm plans to cot. 
operate. And although he carries him- 
self like Nebiolo's polar opposite Trf 
almost every way, the point at this early 
stage seemed to be that the two worlds 
were meeting in a common language. Ai 
last, someone was promising to sell the 
world’s oldest sport re the country that 
desperately needs the most selling. ! 

“We need the U.S..’’ Nebiolo 
agreed. "Without the U.S.. athletics is 
not athletics. So we will do our best.’S 


KVlKfijr... 


Scoreboard 


Major League Standings 
juimcAN wool 



EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Baltimore 

69 

39 

639 

— 

New York 

63 

45 

583 

t 

Detroit 

51 

57 

.472 

18 

Toronto 

51 

57 

J72 

18 

Boston 

52 

59 

.468 

MW 

CENTRAL DMSiaH 



Cleveland 

56 

49 

533 

— 

Milwaukee 

54 

54 

500 

3’s 

Chicago 

53 

56 

-484 

5 

Minnesota 

49 

60 

450 

9 

Kansas Ctty 

46 

6) 

.434 

11 


WEST DIVISION 



Anaheim 

63 

48 

568 



Seattle 

<2 

48 

564 

Vi 

Texas 

51 

58 

468 

11 

Oakland 

43 

70 

381 

21 

MUmONJU. IUSOI 



EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pel 

GB 

Atlanta 

70 

42 

.625 



Florida 

63 

46 

578 

5”4 

New York 

61 

48 

560 

7'S 

Montreal 

57 

52 

523 

ll'4 

PModMpMa 

35 

73 

324 

33 

CENTRAL DIVBtON 



Houston 

61 

50 

550 

— 

PIBsbwgh 

55 

56 

495 

6 

SL Louis 

52 

58 

473 

8tt 

Cincinnati 

46 - 

62 

426 

13‘« 

Chicago 

45 

<7 

402 

MW 


WESTomawN 



San Frend3C0 61 

50 

550 



Los Angeles 

60 

51 

541 

1 

San Diego 

53 

58 

477 

8 

Colorado 

52 

60 

464 

S’-, 


COMBAT'S Lwncont 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Toronto Ml D10 OM-2 9 0 

Detroit 021 001 19*— S 9 1 

W.vracms, Dam (7}. Quonfrill m and B. 
Saratoga OBiten (71.- Blair. Sugar (7), 
ToJones (VI and WaBxxfc. W— Blair, 11-4. 
L— W. WWlams. 6-10. 5*— ToJones Q1J. 
HRs— Detroit F roman 06J. HcmeEn [12). 
Nieves no). 

Boston 010 100 000-2 7 0 

Kansas CHy 001 100 3B*S 6 1 

Waturfleid and Hatteberg; Banes. Oban 
[BJ, J. MontyonKry (9} and Modartana 
W — Banes 2-1 L— Wakefield, 5-13. Sv — J. 
Montgomery (A). HRs— Boston. J eff er son 2 
nil. Kansas aty. J. Bel (IB), Mocfartane 2 
(7).Y.B«iBez(fl. 

MlMRSdO 010 Oil m-S 7 I 

Now York 000 330 W*-4 9 I 

Hawkins Fr.Rodriguei (51, Guardado (71, 
Trombley (81 and GJWyera. Gooden, 
Mendoza t6), Neban i B). At fflwra (5? and 
Posada. W— Gooden 5-3. L— Hawkins, 3-7. 


Sv— M. Rtvera 02). HRs— Minnesota, 
G.Myerc W. New York. Be. Williams 2 (13). 
Seattle 001 140 000-4 11 0 

MilwauteB 010 2M 020—5 T 0 

RaJotmson, nmJm 17). Slocumb 19) and 
Marzanoi JJAorccdas A-Reyes (51, ViDane 
(71, Do Janes (81 and Molheny, Levts (81. 
W— RaJotmson. 15-3. I— A. Reyes 0-1. 
Sv— Slocumb (18). HR— MIL. Bumdz (19). 
BoRhnon! 010 030 300-7 II 0 

Oakland 3M 100 010-5 0 0 

Krivda BosMe (5). Rhodes (7). A. Barite 
<B). RflMyera (9) and Holes' Wengeit 
MohJer (53, TiJMaltKm (71. A. Srrwfl (8). 
Groom (8), Tailor (9) and IWoTno. W—Saskie, 
6-4. L— TJ-Mathews. 1-I.Sv-RaMyen (31 >. 
HRs— Baltimore, C Ripken (13), Baines (131. 
Oakland, Bratus (10). 

Chicago 000 000 109—1 5 2 

Anaheim 000 011 1U— I 7 0 

Baldwin, TCasWlo (81 and KariunrlCB 
CFWey, Percivol <91 and TrLGreene. W— C 
Finley, 11-6. L— Baldwin 7-12. Sv — Percivol 
(1 61. HRs— Chicago. Korfumce M. 
Anaheim. Halite (12). 5atmon (20). 
Oewtand 111 120 001—7 IS 1 

Texas 101 021 003—8 13 0 

Colon Mesa (61, Assenmocher (81, M. 
Jockson (B> and S. AlomaE Slurtze. Moody 
[51, Gunderson (7). Patterson (0), Wettetond 
(9) and I .Rodriguez. W— WotMand. 6 - 2 . 
L-M. Jadoan 2-3. HRs-OevehmcL GBes2 
II 31, S. Alomar (151 . Texas. Ju -Gonzalez (24), 
GO 14). 

NATIONAL LEAOUE 

SI. Loots 000 010 000—1 7 1 

PtiBodaipMa 00S 320 00>— 10 12 0 

Osborne. Frasartore (4), Beltran (61 and 
Lumpkin. M. Letter and Lieberthal. W— M. 
Letter, 7-11. L— Osborne, 1-1 

HRs— Philadelphia. Sefdk CO, Rolen (14). 
San Diego 020 DM Ml— 2 3 0 

Montreal 0M 060 Ota— 4 12 2 

As flirt. Bnisfee (SI, DnJackson (7). 
Tt Worrell (7) and Romero.- PJ Martinez and 
Fletcher. W—PJ Martinez. 13-5. L— Ashby 6- 
8. HRs— San Diega CambiW (12). Montreal 
Fletcher (121. Strange (71. 

Colorado ON 003 100-4 9 0 

Pittsburgh 110 010 OSx— 8 14 0 

Jm. Wright 5. Reed IB), Leskanic (B) and 
Menwariitff Liefest P.Wognor (7). Ruebel 

(7) , LolMfte (91 and Oslk. W— Puebot 3-2. 
L— S. Reed. 3-5. HRs — Cutorodft N. Perez 
141, Helton (2). Pitfiburgft Womack IS). 

Son Francisco 0M 0M 120 5-8 11 1 
Cmdnatl ON 012 0M 0-3 8 2 
(10 Innings): Estes, Tavarez (6), Poole (71, R. 
Hernandez (8), Bede El CO and BerryhlU, EL 
Johnson (7); Morgan Rerolh)0erf7), Bebmto 

(8) , Shaw (10), Pe. Rodriguez (10) and J. 

ODvar, Toubensw 00). W— R. Hernandez, i- 
0. L-Shaw. 3-1. HRs— Son Francisco. 
VtzcchiD (31. Cincinnati. R. Sanders 07). 
New York 2M 000 000-2 < 1 

Houston 000 009 201—3 7 1 

Bahcnon, Acevedo (6), MeMtchad (B) and 
HonOcK KernohOr Moyne me («. t, Mmttn 
(81 and Ausznus. W— T. Martin, 4-2. 


L— McMlchaeL 7-9. HRs— New York. 

Hundley 031. Houston, Biggio (16). 

Atlanta 001 120 000-4 7 0 

Honda 241 no ms to t 

AlUHwaod Byrd (4), E mb ret (6), Brefecki 
(B) and J. Lopec A. Fernandez. Nen (9) and 
Zaun. W-A. Fernanda. 13-8. L— MWwood 
2-3. HR— Altmrta, ChJoras (18). 

Los Angeles 010 MW 100 Ml-3 9 0 

Chicago DM 001 010 002-4 11 0 

L Valdes. Radinsky (7). Drwfort (81, HaR 
(91, Osuna (10). TaWoneB DZ and Piazza: 
Tnxhsel Patterson OU, Wended (8). Rojas 
(10), R. Tafis (12) and S enrols. Houston (81. 
W— R. Tatis, M. L— To.WantIl 1-3. 
HRs— Los Angeles. Mondesi 2 (251, Gagne 
(7). Chicago. Sosa (23). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS 



G 

AS 

R 

H 


FT homos CtlW 

96 

355 

75 

126 

555 

SAtomarOe 

83 

307 

46 

107 

349 

WCtarkTex 

96 

355 

50 

120 

■338 

Ramirez Cte 

97 

357 

57 

119 

-333 

ONeONYY 

102 

378 

69 

125 

481 

Cara Sea 

103 

404 

79 

133 

429 

M Vaughn Bos 

90 

332 

64 

109 

428 

EMarl Inez Sea 

110 

393 

78 

129 

428 

iRadnguez Tex 

104 

414 

64 

135 

426 

Greer Tex 

106 

405 

71 

130 

421 

RUNS— Knoblauch. 

Minmsoto. 

84- 


Gardapams Boston. Me Jeter. New York, 80: 
Griffey Jr, Seattle, 80b Cora. Seattle, 79s E. 
Martinez, Seattle, 7B; ARodrigueL Seattle, 
76. 

RW— Griffey Jr, Seattle. 102; T. Martinez. 
New York. 10ft F. Thomas. Chicago. 92, 
Saimaa Anaheim. 901 JuGonzalez, Terns. 8* 
Tudor*. Detroit. S3: 0. ■Not. New York. 82. 

HITS — GanJapano, Boston Ml; I. 
Rodriguez, Terns 13$; Cere. Seattle. 1 33; G. 
Anderson Anaheim, 132; Jeter, tt. V. 130; 
Greer, Terns 130; E. Martinez, Seattle, 129. 

DOUBLE5— <7 tZeOl !CY. 34: JhValenfkv 
Boston 32; Cora Seattle. 32: A. Rodriguez, 
Seattle. 3ft arfBo. MBwoukee. 3ft Ramirez, 
Cleveland XL' RDore. Seaffe. 29, I. 
Rodriguez. Tex. 2% S, Alarm Oevektnd. 29. 

TRIPLES— Gudapura Boston, 9? Jeter, 
New York 7; Knoblauch. Mmmsota, 1: 
Damon Kansas Gty. 6. Burnttz, MSurouhen 
A Vlzginl CJenekmd, 4 A Sega. Anaheim, &■ 
ByAndereon BaOimcre. 6. 

HOME RUNS—T. Martinez. New York. 34: 
McGwire. Oakland, 34.- Grtftey Jr, Seattle. 33. 
Thame, Cleveland. 29; ToCloric Detroit, 26; 
Buhner, SooTOn 26. M Vaughn Boston 2$; F. 
Thomas. Chicago. 25.- Ms. WiSlsnts. 
OevekvuL 2S. 

STOLEN BASES— a. LHuntor, DrtroJLSl- 
Ntmn Toreren *5. KnoMoucts Minnesota 
43: TGoodvrin Tan 37; VizaueL Cleveland. 
30; Durham, Onega 25.- A Rodriguez. 
Seattle. 22. 

PITCHING (13 DectsKMK) — RaJohnson, 
Seattle. 15-3. ^33.248; Cfemens. Toronto. 16- 
4. jna 1.7a- Rodkc. Minnesota 15-5. .75a 
34A Mussina Banmom 12-4 75H Ai*t 
BEotr. Detroit 11-4.7XLA.I1; Moyer. Seatte 


11-4 J33. 434: Encksan Bdlimore, 13-5, 
.722, 3 SO. 

STRIKEOUTS— Ra Johnson Sealffe. 224 
Cana, New Tort, 199: Clemens. Toronto. 192: 
Mussina. Baltimore, 147; CFinfey, Anaheim 
145: Angler. Kansas City. 13a Fasscro. 
Seatfle, 131. 

SAVES — M. Rivera. New York. 32 
RaMyets, Baltimore. 31; R. Hernandez, 
Chicago, 27; Do Jones. Milwaukee, 23; 
Wettekind. Tents. 22; ToJones. Detroit 21; 
AguOere. Minnesota 20. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Avg. 
L Walker Col 108 J00 103 157 392 

Gwynn SD 106 424 68 165 .389 

Ptazzo LA HU 348 63 130 J53 

Lofton A8 74 312 54 107 J43 

Joyner SD 90 312 44 106 340 

MaGfaceChC 102 349 54 123 333 

ArionzaNYM 98 331 49 107 323 

LonktorriStL 87 314 61 101 320 

Biggio Hau 111 436 100 139 319 

Galarraga CM 107 419 82 133 317 

RUNS— L. WaOcr, Colorado. 101 Brogta. 
Houston 100; Banda San Frendsca 83, 
Galarroga. Colorado. 82. Bogwek Houston 
78; E. c Young, Ctriotada 71 Mondesi Los 
Angcics. 71. 

RBI— Grtaragn Colorado. HD. BagweL 
Houston 94- Gwynn San Diego. 94.- L Walker. 
Colorado. 91 ClUanea. Alktrea 89. Kerri. San 
Franctaca 85, Bichette, Colorado, 85. 

HITS— Gwynn San Diega lei L Walker. 
Caforada 157; Biggin Houston 13ft 
Gataroga. Coloreda 131 ChJones. Attanra 
131; Mondesi Los Angclen 131; Piazza Los 
Angeles, 130. 

DOUBLES— Grudzielanek. Montreal 39 
Lansing. MontreaL 34 Morandim 
PhflodetohB, 34 L- Wafter. Coloretlo. 34 
Gwynn San Diega 33; Snow. San Francisco. 
3ft BanUia. Florida 30. 

TRIPLES— OeSMeUa. St Louis, 1ft W 
Guerrero. Los Angeles, ft Womack, 
Ptrsburgh. ft Rondo. Pittsburgh. EC 
DSanders. Cincinnati 7; Dauftua Ftonda 7; 
TiKker. Atlanta 6, EcYoung, Coloreda 6. 

HOME RUNS— L. Walker. Colorado. 31 
Bagwell Houston 29: Castilla Colorado. 28: 
Bonds. Son Frendsca, 28; Gatonaga 
Cutorada 2ft Mondesi, Las Angeles, 2& 
Kanos Los Angeles. 34 
STOLEN BA5ES— O. S under* Cincinnati. 
5ft Womack, Pittsburgh, 41; D. c5hirtds. St. 
Lou a. 37; EcYoung, Coktroda 30; LWatVcr, 
Cetorada 25; McCracken Coloreda 24 O. 
Veres. SXHega 24 Henderson SJ3*ga. 24. 

PITCHING (13 Dedswns)— Nonghs, 
Alton) a- i5-l 382, 3XOi Kile. Houston is-L 
333. 2JI5;GMadduiu Atlanta 15-1 331231 
Estes. San Francisca 14-4 ,77a 3.0ft P 
J Martinez, Montrcat 13 5, .722, 1.76; R. 
Reed. Nerr York, 9-4 .692, 2.76. Tudon 
Montreal H-i UO. 432; Gardner. Son 
Fianosca 1 1 -5, 487. 3.72. 

STRIKEOUTS— Schilling Philadelphia. 
2l2r P. JMorUoez. Modreul 19fc Noma Lus 
Angdes. lftl AlBenes, Si. Louis- 14ft 


KJBiawn Florida, 151. Smoltz, Atlanta 145; 
Kile. Houston 143. 

SAVES— Beck. San Francisco. 31 
JoFranco, Hew York. 28; Nen Florida 27: 
ToWOrrefl. Las Angeles, 27; Eckersley. Si. 
Louis, 27; Wohlers, Atlanta 26 Hotfmon San 
Diega 25. 


DU M 4 MUII (SPIN 

MUCMTREAL 

HNAL 

Chris Wbadniff, UJ5. def. Gustavo Kuerten 
(6), BiazA 7-5. 4-6 6-3. 

DOUBLES 

FINAL 

Mo hash Bhupathi and Lcander Poes, In- 
da def. Sehttslicn Loreau. Canada and Aion 
O'Brien (3). U 5. 7-4 (7-51. 6-3 

W ONION 

TOSHIBA CLASSIC 
M CARLSBAD. CALIFORNIA 

FINAL 

Mortino Hingis (11. Swflwriana dof. Mon- 
ica Seles (21, U.S. 1-6 (7-4), 6-4 

DOUBLES 

FMAL 

Martino H loots- Switzerland, and Arantxa 
Sanchez Werio (21, Spam del. Amy Frezrer 
and Kimberly Pa Rolling Hills. U.S. 4-1 7-s. 


CM LAMKA VL IMMA 
FIRBT THY MATCH 
MONDAY. M COLOMBO 
India- 537-8 declared 

Sri Lenka 322-1 

■MUOMT V*. AUFTRAUA 
FOUR DAY MATCH 
MONDAY. M TAUNTON. ENGLAND 
Somerset 284 and 147-3 
Australia: 323 

Ralti Interrupted match declared a drew. 


World Championships 
min 

400 Mim HURBIU 

FMAL 

1, 5 too none Dtogona, France, 47.7ft z 
Llewellyn Herbert South Africa 47.86. 1 
Bryan Branson U-S. 478& 4 Fobrulo Mart, 
Italy. 48.05; 5, Samvel Matctc. Zambia 481 1, 
6. Ruslan MacKtienkn Russia -*8-41 7. 
DmsdBk* Maigaa Jamaica 49j)6, & Jin 
Mum. Czech ReoubUc 

],»OOMIU 

9EHIFMM.S 

MAT 1—1, Hk3mn El Gucrrovt Morocco. 


3 3892, Z Mahomed Suleknan Oalar. 
3:39.15; 3. All HaMmL Tunisia J-J9 SO. 4 
Rudiger Slenzel Germany. 3.J) 42; S. John 
rttoytadc Britain, Ufcaft & k evm Sudlvnn 
Canada. 3:3984- 7. Slew Holnrorw U.S. 
3.1997; 8 Branko Zorka Croatia 141,63.- 9, 
Said Chobrfi, France. 3M1.9S; 1ft Antonio 
Travassos. Portugal 3^2.01; 1 1. Nialt Bruton. 
Ireland. 3:47 jl; Isaac Viciosa Spain, did nut 
finish. 

HEAT a_ i. Noureddinc Morrell Algeria 
3:38.82. 2. Reyes EsImcL Spain 3 J886.- 3. 
Fenton Cocha Spain, 3:38 . 36. 4 Robert An- 
dersen Denmark, 3:38.92; 5, Laban RaflctV 
Kenya 3_fflJ72; (, Nadir Bosch, France. 
3:39 SH; 7, Graham Hood. Canada 339. n ft 
German) Dl Napoli, Italy. 3-J9JS,- g, Dries 
Maazouzl Morocco. 339.99, IQ, Azedbie 
Scdlki. Morocco. 3:40.15.- II, Kevin McKay. 
Britain, 3-4021; 1 J, Andrei ZodarKrtHin. Rus- 
sia 3:42.61 

First S In heats and 2 fastest lasers qualify tor 
Hod. 

400 Him 

SEMIFINALS 

MEAT i — I. T yrec Washing la re U,5_ 44 41;2. 
Mark Wchantoon. Britain. 44 el- 3, Jamie 
Baulch. Britain mM 4 Antonia Pettigrew, 
U5.44.87; S. Davtan Garkc. Jamaica 45.07; 

4 1 bra tana Wotfe. Senegal 4547; 7, Sunday 
Bada Nigeria 45.9a- Robert Mockowkrk. 
Potona did noi smri. 

HEAT*— I. Michael Johnson. U3.44J7;2, 
Jerome Young, U.S. 444jft 3. Lvnrts Kamoga 
Uganda 44J7, 4 I wan Thomas, Britain 
44A1; 5. Clement Chukvro, Niaeria 4526) a 
Rmbort Mortln, Jamaica 7, Tamosz 
Czobal. Pdand. 4S5t: B. Michael McOon- 
aia Jammu) 45.74. 

First 4 In each Iwal qua Wy tar HnaL 
3.000 MrriK 

SEMIFINALS 

heat 1 — 1. Soad Al A oman. Saudi Arabia 8 
minutes 20. IB seconds; 7. Mori- Ostandarpa 
Geimanir. ajftAft 1 Moses YtpkmuL Kenya 
8-JO 76, 4 Hicham Ramnulchc. MoTOCOV 
&7D Aft 5. El Arm KhatobL Maroccn. 8:20.94:6. 
Jim Sronoey. Norway. 8-21.1*; 7. Vladlftor 
Pronin Russta, B.29a9; ft Ramiro Moran 
SpobtSJl .71- 9. Ratal Wo(dk. Poland, BJ328. 
lft Simon Vrecmen HetBcrinretc. B m Tim 
NiThBy. uj. did nor AnKTu Alessandro Lam- 
nruKhbu. holy, did not ImJsh. 

Fbsl 5 m hHh plus 2 feaiest losers guctofy 
for Knal. 

HNMIJUMP 

auALiFiEns 

“° UI J A — i cguaL Gllmqr Moya Colom- 
bia 7.28. Lee jm-toek. Saulh Korea 2 J8i 1 
Lambros Paparmlas. Greece, 2Ja--L Mprtm 
Buss. Germany, jjfl, s, Chariw Auslln U.S. 
7.76. 

a ROUP B— 1 equal, Stemor Horn, Norway, 
jewt Sotomaygr. Cuba Artui Portyka 
Pokrnd. ?.ja 4; Thnothy Forsyth, Australia 
.28; 5. KanshMilinMalusovIch. Israel 228.-6. 
Daawi Grant Britan 138: 7, Jan Jonku. 
Cndi Remwiic. JJ*. ft SenjeJKUuijIn. Rus- 
sia ..2a 9, Stephen Smith, Britain. UL 


FINAL 

I. Sarka t'jzsparkova Czech Republic. 
1 5 20 metres: 1 Radi™ Mateescu. Romania 
15.16.- X Yctena Govorova Ukraine, I4 a 7: 4 
Olga VasdeH Greece, 1462; 5, Ashia 
Hansen Britain, UAft 6. Tereza Mannova 
Bulgaria 14.34; 7. Jdcna Bimwica Latvia 
14.06, ft Betty LVse. France. 14X13.- 9. Gun- 
dega Sproge, Loriria 13.9ft lft Petra Lah. 
Ingot, Germany, 1384; 11. Cynthea Rhodes. 
U.S. 13.7ft 12. Zhanna GuPryeva Belarus, 
1359. 

400 imm 

nr*AL 

1. Coltry Freemon Australia 49 77; 2 
Sandie Richards. Jamaica 49 79: 3, Jean 
MScs-Claris U S. 49.9ft- J. Gni Brener. Ger- 
many. 50.06; 5. FcWal Ogunkaya Nigeria 
50J7; 6. Helena Fuehscva Czech Republic. 
50.6ft 7, Pauline Davis. Bahamas, 50.6ft ft 
Tatyana AJokscymm, Russia 51 J7. 

1,500 Mira 
SEHFWAL 

hsat o— 1. Malta Eweriol Sweden, 
4KJ67S; 2. Lea Pefis, Canada 4.06.76, 1 Kulro 
Do let ha Ethiopia 4:06.9ft- a. Andrea Suldes- 
ava Czech PepubBc. 4K)7.02; 5. Rahyn 
Mcogrtcr, Canada <J37.06. ft Suzy Homffton. 
U5- 4X17.19. 7. Slnced Deuhurffy, Irewna 
4.-0746: ft Thensla kiesL Austria 4.0759; 9. 
Marganri Crawley. Australia 4-10.37; lft 
Margarita Marusava Russia il4 9ft 1 1, 
Fredcrique Quentin France. 4.16 15, 12. 
Svahona Mastery ova Russia 422.74 
WnMHLON 
ZOOMCTEn 

MEAT 1—1, Tlio Hautata. Finland. 25.1? 
seconds B71 points; 2. Joanne Henry, New 
Zealand. 25.24 865. 1 Irina Vostokova Rus- 
S4X 25.81 814; K Ma Chun-png. Taiwan. 
25.82813.-5 InmaCtopec. Spam. 25 84 Bl I a 
Nathalie Too pc. France, 25.87 BD9- Atoina 
Poposotlriou. Grecc,.-. d<a nor swtf. 

meats— 1. Peggy Beer. Germany. 24.20 
9S4, Z Dedce Naltwa U.S, 24J8 926. 3. 
Eunice Borbcr. Sierra Leona 24.8? 901 4, 
Marie ColloflviHc. France. 25.04 881- 5 
Tatyana Gardeycva Pussra. 75.14 874: a 
Svetlana Kazarina Kazakhstan. 25 76 SIB. 
Kfm Carter. U J- did not finish. 

MEAT a— 1, Natalya Sa/anovich, Belarus. 
73.92988.-2. Denise Utah. Britain 24.13968. 
1 Rcmlgia Nazorowene. Lilhuanra 74.12 
961 4. Svetlana fAoskolet', Russul 2J.21 9at. 
i JUana StekpniL Germany. 2422 960:6, kel- 
ly Blalc U S. 2434 94ft 7, Sahrto Braun Ger 
many. 2446 937. ft Ursula Wlaaarczyk. 
Poktod, 74.48935 

LOftG JUMP 

group A— 1, Ursula Wtonarez/K. 6(3 
motros 1,049 potala 1 Svetlana Mask ate Is. 
630 1,007; 1 Mona Melgout. 642 981. 4. 
Remkjw Nazarevieni*. 634 9v* 5. Ncravo 
Sazanorrich. 624 924. 6. Mark: CaHonvilie. 
6.10 180; 7, Kelly Bkur. 6 m 877. 8 Tua Hau- 
I0J0. * 03 85ft ft TDiynno G orden.-vc. J X 795. 
lft Ma Chuii-pktek 5 66 747; 1 1. Amina Pa- 




pasolirtou. did not start. ■ ) 1 — - 

CROUP 8— 1. Denise Lewis 64 7 997. Z l v . 

Sabine Braun 6.42 981; 1 Dedee Nalhda A 

636 930. 4. Peggy Beer, 631 915i ft Joanne |\ * 

Henry 6.17 901 4. Nathalie Teppa 6.IJ 891 Ii W , 

7. Irina Vostokova al I 881 ft Inma Cteaes, 1 » s 

5.71 761 Kym Carter, did not start; Svetlang 
Kazanma t azakhsian. did not start: Eunice j \"W.. 

Barber, did rwt start. . \A/T 

JAVEUN . V-— 

GROUP A— I, Naltralie Teppe, 5182 me-- ^ \ — 

rres 915 points; 1 Kelly Bhttr. 49.94 8S9. 3,' 

Tolvana Gorrieyeva 45 M 776; 4, Marie Cal- 
ionvuio. 44.4a 752 ft Joanne Henry. 4248 7 15,- r ■■ 

ft Tlla Hautalo. 41J0 696; 7. Inma Ckrpw, 

4100 673; A*aChun-ping, did not Start. 

GROUPS— 1. Denise Lewis. 52.70 9121 
Sabine Braun, SI 48 889; 1 Inna Vostokova. 

4774 sift- 4. Dcdec Nathan ust 756: 5, 

UrsuM VJIodaroyk. 44.18 74ft- t. Mono 
Sfeigaul, 43.92 743; 7. Natalya Sazonovrch, v , 

43.71) 73ft ft Rernigia Ngiaravlene, 43^«. 734? Nv 

9. Peggy Sew. 41 06 68& 10. Svetlana -Si, 

lAaskalds, 36.70604. j 

■aoizETEn xJ ! -T 

heat 1— 1, Pegqy Beer. 2:10.00 9&S, z /rS J 

Mane CoHonvMc, 11 j.oo 95ft 3. Tatyana SJ, f - 

Gordcyeva 2:I2.0I93S; 4, Kelly Blair. 2: ) 3 a, ! ■ 

911 ft Tin Hautola. 2:I10B 907. e, jaonno i . 

H on ry- 3:14. 46 900. 7. Nathalie Teppe. 1U.91 it I pT- 

894. ft Inma dopes. 123^2 77S. Sveliana 
McsLaUrts. did noi start - o FS»_ 

HEAT S— 1. Urauta '.Vlodarczyk, 109.59 'Ov I- i 

9/1. 1 Rcmiqta Nazarovtena HQji vstTi- ^ 1 'i5l IN : 

Mo«iSiMrairt.2;J2® 924, ASab;r wBnjlJ *. 1 J ^3/ f N 

2:17J2B6ft 5. Dcdw Nathan IWitlS ‘ 

1 7 ^ 8571 7 - ,ri,w Vos'iHrava W 

2.18.9s 838. 8. Natalya Sazanaviciv 2-I9A7 j '• - 

828, — ! so , 1. 1 

FINAL STANDINGS: I. BfOua !.73> 'H r 

points.- ZLcwn. 6.654; INazarovte-nc. 6.566: - V V "■ 

4. ■Vlodarczyk. 65415, Sazanamch. 6428. 6. \ . 

Steiggirf, 6^06 7, NoJtan, 6 29ft a. Vr^fnl q- . X ., 

V6 6.277.- 9 Beer. 6259; 10. Blew. &.X3. 1 1 S. ^ ’ . 

Tcppe. 6247. n Callonvlllc 6179; 15. ^ .. 

Gordeyevo. 6.0&L u. H au ,q|o. 4.026 15. vX 

Henr* 6011:1 6 Clopes 5.631. 


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Son Jose S. Neiv Engtond I 
Tampa Boy 1 New YarV.rzcw Jersey 2 

Eo5lwn CtottaroaeeiD.C. 39. 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1997 


PAGE 19 



SPORTS 




JVlarlins Show Braves 
they’re Not Dead Yet 


i- ^ 






' . . The Associated Press 

The Atlanta Braves and Florida Mar- 
lins had barely finished tangling with 
each other ■ — not to mention the um- 
pires— when they began loo king ah «>h 

HHKXt weekend at Turner Field in At- 

• 

VJbs the wrap-up of a contentious four- 
dune series at Miami, Florida beat the 
gfrveson Sunday, 8-4, cutting the 
Braves' lead in the National T 

to 5VS games. Devon White had 
fioUr hits and drove in three runs, giving 
.the M a rii ns their third victory in four 

r > 4 "Everyone makes it seem like we are 
riodiing compared to Atlanta,” White 

Ml R ounpqp 

said “But that arouses ourpride. We 
feel we can play with them. Inis is a big 
Series and makes die rest of the year 
important.” 

i The Marlins can really close in when 
tfiey open a four-game set Friday night 
at Atlanta. Hie Braves, just 2-6 against 
Florida, say they will be ready. 

• “It. will leave the last impression,” 
said Chipper Jones, who homered and 
tripled tor Atlanta. “That is why you 
don’t see anybody in here panicking, 
crying or down in the dumps — 5V* 
games back is still a tall task against a 
tpara like us.” 

yAlex Fferaandez (13-8) struck out 10, 
' a season best, in eight innings 
trims. 'Hie Braves rookie Kev- 
iwood trailed 7-1 after three in- 

rtfegs.- 

*SThe Braves and Marlins took turns 
Gtyttesung umpires' calls throughout 
tj* series. 

- '-Bobby Cox, the Braves' manager, 
was ejected for arguing a check-swing a 
day after Jim Leyland, the Marlins' man- 
ager, was tossed. The Florida outfielder 
Moises Alou was ejected Friday night 
- Cube 4, Dodger* 3 Sammy Sosa hit a 
twip-out, two-run homer in tbe bottom of 
the 12th as Chicago rallied to win in Los 
Angeles. 

Sosa hit the first pitch from Todd 
Worrell, the Dodger reliever, high over 
the fence in left field far bis 23d home 
run. Worrell retired the first two batters 
in the 12th but then walked Mark Grace 
before Sosa whacked his game-winning 



homer. 

The Dodgers had taken a 3-2 lead in 
the top of the inning when Greg Gagne 
hit his seventh home run, off the Cubs’ 
reliever Mel Rojas. 

Astnw 3, Mete 2 Greg McMichael, a 
reliever, hit Lois Gonzalez with an 0-2 
pitch with the bases loaded and two outs 
in Ibe bottom of the ninth inning forcing 
home the winning run at the Astnv 
dome. 

Craig Biggio, who homered and had 
three hits, singled with two outs in the 
ninth and stole second. McMichael 
walked the pinch-hitter Thomas 
Howard and Jeff Bagwell, then hit 
Gonzalez in die leg. 

Sean Berry lost a home run when his 
long drive hit an Astrodome speaker and 
dropped back into play for a double. The 
hit came against the Mets' starter, Brian 
Bohanon, who also got a surprise during 
the weekend: a Houston native, he 
found out that his 10-year high school 
reunion took place at the Mets’ hotel 
Saturday night 

Gants a, Rats 3 Jose Vizcaino tied 
the game in the eighth inning with his 
15th home run in 2,508 career at-bats, 
and San Francisco scored five times in 
the 10th to win at Cincinnati. 

In games reported in late editions 
Monday: 

Expos 6, Padres 3 Pedro Martinez 
pitched a three-hitter and struck out 10 
as Montreal beat visiting San Diego. 

Martinez (13-5) gave up just one 
earned ran, lowering his earned run 
average to 1.76, the best in the major 
leagues. Martinez, a career .103 batter, 
also contributed two hits. 

Pirates 8, Rockies 4 Tony Womack 
went 4-for-4, hitting a two-run homer 
that capped Pittsburgh's five-run rally 
in the eighth inning over visiting Col- 
orado. 

Larry Walker was 3-for-4. He leads 
the majors in hitting at .393. 

Todd Helton, who homered in his 
major-league debut Saturday, connec- 
ted again for Colorado. 

PUUies 10. Cardinals 1 Mark Lei ter 
pitched his first complete game since 
last Aug. 12 and also hit a two-run single 
as Philadelphia beat visiting St Louis. 

Mack McGwire was O-for-3, leaving 
him at l-for-9 since Sl Louis got him 
Thursday in a trade with Oakland. 



Time Stands Still 
At the Hall of Fame 

Fox, Lasorda, Wells and Niekro Join 


By Claire Smith 

iVrvr York Times Service 


M«b Lmodier/rhc AaiuRcd Pip* 


Atlanta shortstop Jeff Blauser throwing to first to complete a double 
play in the first inning as Florida's Darren Daulton slid into second base. 


2 1 i- 


Beefed-Up Bullpen Saves Seattle , But Only Just 


. i ■ 

r- 


The Associated Press 

-The Seattle Mariners have had a 
shaky bullpen most of the season. Their 
relievers are still shaking things up, but 
not getting Tattled. 

On Sunday, HeaxhdifF Slocmnb. ac- 
quired Thursday in a trade wife Boston, 

got his first save for Seattle and 18 th 
overall this season when be held on in 
the ninth inning to preserve the Mar- 
iners’ 6-5 victory over Milwaukee. 

Slocmnb worked around a one-out 
walk to Jesse Levis and an infield single 
. by Mark Loretta before fanning Jose 
Valentin and Jeff.Cirillo to end the 
game. 

-■“We'll bring you to the edge, may be 
ttrfote a manager,” Slocumb said. 
‘•But as long as you come out vic- 
torious, that's fine.” 
r Sioicumb, who pitched one scoreless 
inning Saturday in his Seattle debut, 
struck out Valentin after eight fools. 


“I was throwing the guy everything I 
had, fast balls in, fastballs ouL I thought 
he might be stealing the signs or 
something.” Slocumb said. “But we 
just went with what we know best — 
fastballs.” 

Lou Piniella, the Seattle manager, has 
been asking for relief help most of the 
year. 

“Interesting I don't need,” he said 
. with a laugh. “But it's in the win 
column. He got Ins first save here.” 

Piniella needed a strong bullpen on a 
day when Randy Johnson (15-3) wasn’t 
dominant. 

Mike Timlin, obtained Thursday in a 
trade with Toronto, relieved Johnson to 
start the seventh. He gave up a two-nm, 
pinch-hit homer in the eighth to Jeremy 
Burnitz that pulled the Brewers within 
one run. 

Johnson allowed three runs and four 
hits in six innings, struck out six. walked 
three and threw two wild pitches. 

“Even when we knock him out, be 
slips off the hook from us,” said Phil 


Gamer, the Milwaukee manager. “He 
lived on his laurels a tittle bit today. The 
first three outs, we didn’t swing at 
strikes." 

Yankees 6, Twins 5 Bemie Williams, 
who returned Friday from his second 
stint on the disabled list, homered twice 
in New York and drove in four tuns for 
the Yankees. 

W illiam s hit a solo shot in the fourth 
and a three-run drive, his 13th. 

Royals S, Red Sox 2 In Kansas City, 
Mike Macfarlane hit two homers, and 
Yamil Benitez and Jay Bell each hit one 
as the Royals seta team record with nine 
home runs in two games. 

Macfarlane began the game batting 
just .188 with five home runs. 

Orioles 7 , Athletics 5 B J. Surhoff 
drove in die tying and go-ahead runs 
with a sacrifice fly and double, and Cal 
Ripken Jr. and Harold Baines homered 
as Baltimore won in Oakland for its 
eighth victory in nine games. 

Oakland, blowing a three-run lead for 
die second straight day, lost for the 


eighth time in nine games. 

Angels 4, White Sox 1 til Anaheim. 
Chuck Finley held Chicago to five hits 
over eight innings and Tim Salmon and 
Dave Hollins hit solo homers for the 
Angels' seventh victory in eight games 
and 2 1 st in 27. 

Rangers B, Indians 7 In Arlington, 

Texas. Will Clark’s sacrifice fly capped 
a three-run rally in the ninth as the 
Rangers snapped a five-game losing 
streak. 

After the Rangers loaded the bases, 
Mark McLemore hit a two-run double to 
tie the game at 7-7. Jackson intention- 
ally walked Rusty Greer to reload the 
bases. One out later, Clark lifted a fly 
ball to shallow center field, and Tom 
Goodwin beat Marquis Grissom’s 
throw home. 

In a game reported in Monday's later 
editions: 

Tigers 5, Blue days 2 In Detroit, Willie 
Blair won his seventh straight decision 
as Toronto lost its eighth in nine 
games. 


COOPERSTOWN. New York — 
The Hail of Fame second baseman Joe 
Morgan smiled Sunday. His mentor, 
Nellie Fox, the man who put the chicken 
flap in his patented power swing, finally 
joined him in Cooperstown. 

Sandy Koufax, the great Dodgers 
pitcher, smiled, too. His move into the 
major leagues had permanently ended 
Tommy Lasorda *s cfream to pitch in the 
majors, too. That crossroads, when 
Koufax made the cut but Lasorda did 
not, started Lasorda on a different 
course, but one that also ultimately led 
to where Koufax is now enshrined: 
baseball's Hail of Fame. 

This time continuum that envelops 
baseball and keeps it whole was never 
more apparent than Sunday, when Fox 
and Lasorda, along with the knuckle- 
balier Phil Niekro and Willie Wells, the 
Negro leagues’ All-Star second base- 
man and manager, were inducted into 
baseball’s shrine. 

Thirty-four of the 56 living members 
were on hand to welcome the four and 
watch the ranks of one of the world’s 
most exclusive dubs swell to 232. 

Niekro was 58 years young as he 
invited the audience to revisit his child- 
hood and its links to his contributions to 
the game. He spoke of his mother. Ivy, 
who was vibrant in her wheelchair in the 
audience at Coopers town’s Clark 
Sports Center, and of his sister, PbyJIis, 
his catcher throughout childhood. 

Niekro then pointed to a sea of shiny 
faces, all of them belonging to the Silver 
Bullets professional women’s baseball 
team, players he, as manager, now 
teaches fastballs and knucklers. 

Finally, Niekro spoke of how his fa- 
ther, Phil, dusted off a product of his 
from the semiprofessionaJ leagues in the 
coal-mine regions of Ohio — the 
knuckleball — and willed it to his son, a 
gift that enabled Niekro to win 318 
games while pitching an extraordinary 
24 major-league seasons for the Mil- 
waukee and Atlanta Braves, the Yan- 
kees, the Indians and the Blue Jays. 

Remembering those coal mines and 
the position he inherited briefly as a 
pitcher for the company team, Niekro 
said he could hear his late father's fa- 
miliar words: “Son, play bail, son.” 

Niekro. of course, did, turning a $500 
si gnin g bonus and a prayer that his 


knuckler would be given a chance, into a 
career highlighted by five All-Star berths. 
3,342 strikeouts and many victories. 

Sunday, Niekro returned the encour- 
agement that started him out on his long 
road, naming not just the great athletes he 
knew in the majors but also die coal-mine 
players he and his father teamed with. 

He choked back tears as he assured 
the audience that those players, named 
Slash and Joe and Phil, were looking on. 
So, he said, voice choking, “Play ball. 
Dad, play ball." 

Fox and Lasorda also had their ment- 
ors, their connections to baseball's stor- 
ied past. Joanne Fox, the widow of the 
late second baseman of the Go-Go Sox 
who was a 12-time All-Star, spoke of 
how her husband was signed for the 
Philadelphia Athletics by Connie Mack, 
loved to talk baseball with his good 
friend Ted Williams, thrived in part- 
nership with Luis Aparicio and took 
Morgan under his wing. 

* ‘If Nellie were here, I think he might 
say, ‘Why all this fuss?' ” Joanne Fox 
said, 21 years after her husband's death. 
Bui, she added, “as a beautiful bouquet 
of flowers can brighten, so can memor- 
ies of time." 

Stella Wells, the daughter of the late 
Willie Wells, holds her memories 
dearly, too. 

The Hail of Famer Cool Papa Bell, she 
said, called when her father, one of the 
Negro leagues' career leaders in doubles, 
triples, home runs and steals, died. “He 
said. Tm going to gel the committee to 
take me out of the Hall of Fame and put 
Willie in,’ ” she recalled. “Well, I hope 
you and Dad are smiling down on us 
because the Antelope is in.” 

Lasorda. loo, thought of family and 
roots. “When you honor me here,” 
Lasorda said, “you honor my family, 
you honor the organization 1 have rep- 
resented for 48 years.” 

Lasorda, one of the most successful 
managers in Dodgers history, did not 
disappoint. He entertained, just as he did 
all those years when he balanced his role 
as goodwill ambassador with the coach- 
ing and managerial tasks Koufax 
hastened him to pursue. 

The man who went on to lead the 
Dodgers to eight division titles, four pen- 
nants and two world championships mar- 
ried Tinsel Town to Dodger Stadium, 
making the crowd roar when he intro- 
duced. “one of the greatest actors in the 
history of Hollywood — Tony Danza!” 



Phil Niekro, left, and Tom Lasorda, being inducted into the Hall of Fame. 



Friendships 

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PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


Leave Us Some Com 



Buchwald 


M ARTHA'S VINE- 
YARD, Massachusetts 
— Once again the leader of 
the free world is coming to 
Martha's Vineyard. He brings 
with him a battalion of press 
corps people 
who have been 
assigned to file 
interesting dai- 
ly stories about 
the island. 

Most of the 
reporters are 
completely ig- 
norant about 
Martha’s Vine- 
yard and depend on residents 
like myself to provide jour- 
nalistic enlightenment. 

I received my first call al 7 
A.M. from a staffer on a 
Miami newspaper. 

“How big is Martha's 
Vineyard?” he asked. 

“It’s about the size of Eng- 
land,” I told him. 

"What is the staple diet of 
the inhabitants?” 

* ‘Their main source of pro- 
tein is avocado dip and nacbo 
chips washed down with 
California Chardonnay.” 

Chinese Unearth 
More Warriors 

Agcnce Fnince-Presse 

BEIJING — Archaeolo- 
gists at the mausoleum of Qin- 
shihuang (259-210 B.C.). 

China's Fust emperor, have 
unearthed an elite set of terra- 
cotta warriors different from 
the previously excavated 
army, which draws thousands 
of tourists to Xian each year. 

Unlike the foot soldiers al- 
ready on display, these statues 
ride in horse-drawn chariots, 
kneel to shoot arrows and lead 
horses, the official Xinhua 
news agency said Monday. 
The newly excavated area has 
yielded 86 warriors and 44 
horses, it said. 


"What is the income of the 
average summer resident?" 

"Ten million dollars, 
which is immediately inves- 
ted in a lawn sprinkling sys- 
tem." 

“What kind of currency 
does the population use?” 

“It’s called the Moped. 
Somebody will say. Til give 
you four Mopeds for a far-free 
ice-cream cone.’ Or, ‘If you 
give me 10 Mopeds I’ll give 
you enough gas to get you to 
Gay Head.* ” 

□ 

“What are the traditional 
ways of the summer people 
concerning their offspring; ” 

“Each day they place them 
in tiny sailboats and ship them 
out to sea, telling them not to 
be late for dinner.” 

“Why do you think Pres- 
ident Clinton likes Martha’s 
Vineyard?” 

“Because Ken Starr 
spends his summer in Galves- 
ton.” 

“How do the other island 
inhabitants feel about the 
president coming here?” 

“It doesn't bother them as 
long as the Secret Service per- 
sonnel don't eat up their sup- 
ply of sweet com." 

□ 

“What do people on the 
Vineyard talk about?” 

“They’re certain that Elvis 
is on the island, but nobody 
knows if he rents or owns. 

“We also talk a lot about 
whether Chelsea should have 
gone to Virginia Military In- 
stitute instead of Stanford, 
and there is lengthy discus- 
sion over whether the Vine- 
yard should be declared a 
smoke-free island." 

“Do the island people get 
upset when the president 
comes?" 

“No. they only get upset 
when their house guests ar- 
rive.” 


How William Burroughs Wrote His Way Out 


By David Streitfeld 

Washington Post Servict 


W ASHINGTON — If you made the 
journey out to visit William S. Bur- 
roughs in his Kansas exile, he’d probably 
show you his guns. They were kept in a 
filing cabinet in his tiny house's innermost 
sanctum, a place where even the writer's 
beloved cats weren't allowed. With all the 
pride of an Englishwoman showing off her 
roses. Burroughs would bring the pistols out 
one at a time. He’d remove the bullets, 
squeeze off some imaginary shots at the 
wall. Then he’d hand the gun over, ac- 
companied by safety tips. 

“You always have to think about where 
your bullets will end up," he cautioned me 
gravely while I was trying to figure out if he 
had removed all six bullets from one antique 
revolver, or was it possible he bad taken out 
only five? “Those idiot deer-shooters, they 
manage to kill two or three people every 
year,’ ’ he said. "They get out there, drunk, 
and shoot anything that moves." 

Getting gun safety advice from William 
Burroughs was like getting dating tips from 
Ted Bundy. The longtime drug addict, ex- 
perimental novelist, founding Beat and 
genuine cultural icon, who took the ultimate 
trip Saturday night, was ruled all his life by 
the events of Sept. 6, 195 1 , when he tried to 
shoot a glass off his wife Joan’s head and 
missed, killing her. 

Everything in his life before led up to 
this; everything after stemmed from it, not least the writing. 
"I have had no choice," be explained years later, “except to 
write my way out-" He succeeded to an extent no one, 
especially himself, would have suspected The heart attack 
he suffered, aged 83, was an oddly peaceful ending for 
someone who had courted the end countless times, and had 
seen it happen to so many others, including his only child 
"It is a recurring theme of Burroughs’s life that those 
close to him died violently — this book has more corpses in 
it than ‘Hamlet,’ " Ted Morgan wrote in his definitive 
biography, "Literary Outlaw." 

For the last 16 years, Burroughs lived a retiring life in die 
university town of Lawrence, Kansas, a place he had ended 
up more or less in by accident but where he had a retinue of 
business associates and friends to take care rtf him. He 
painted — sometimes, in typical Burroughsian fashion, by 
shooting at a spray can and letting it explode onto the canvas 
— and he oversaw the publication of his letters, some 
unpublished early work and a book of dreams. One of them; 
“I attend a party and dinner at Columbia. Allen Ginsberg is 
there and rich. Has founded some sort of church.” 

This was no dream; this was reality. A half-century after 
the East Coast Jew Ginsberg, (he French Canadian Catholic 



IWip Hoping 

Burroughs in Later years painted and oversaw the publication of some early work. 

Jack Kerouac and the Midwestern WASP Burroughs shared 
an apartment in New Yotk, the church of the Beats is 
stronger than ever, unquestionably the most significant 
literary congregation in America since the Lost Generation 
of Hemingway and Fitzgerald, spawn of academic mono- 
graphs, fat biographies, feature films, celebrations, feuds, 
imitations and still the occasional denunciation. 

All this despite the participants' denials they were a 
literary movement at alL "Never," Burroughs maintained, 
although he conceded a kinship with the key Beat ideas: "the 
search for moral awareness or for more' extremes of ex- 
perience, the feeling of alienation from (he social norms.” 

He bad that last one from the beginning. A very early 
memory was of biting into a water glass and snapping off a 
chunk, no doubt livening up a mundane family dinner. 

Burroughs was from St. Louis, where his grandfather invented 
the adding machine. For decades, everyone thought this meanr 
he was rich, but he had only enough fluids to get by. 

He went to Harvatd, didn't like it and ended up in New Y ark 
where he discovered drugs. "You become a narcotics addict 
because you do not have strong motivations in any other 
direction,'’ he wrote in "Junky," his first book, published in 
1953 as a lurid paperback. “Junk wins by default.” 


For years. "Junky” has been used as a n 
anti-drug text But Burroughs’s own views 
on junk were more complicated. “It’s a good 
servant but a bad master, and few can. keep it 
in its place.” he told me, “I remember when 
I’ve been in extreme withdrawal and got a 
shot, there’s nothing like it.” 

He paused. "Of course, you’ve got to pay 
for anything in this life.” 

“Sometimes more than once,” I said, 
thinking of Joan, shot to death, and their son 
Billy, who had tried to become a better addict 
than his father and had died in a ditch. 
"Always." 

Burroughs was emphatic on this point; 
happy-go-lucky is not a term that would ever 
be applied to him. Despite this, the writings 
can be very funny, although it is still difficult 
to quote from "Naked Lunch” — his 
second book, the most popular and uni- 
versally considered the best — in a family 
newspaper. It's a selection of scatological 
routines, framed by his pursuit of junk. 

Over the dozen or so books that followed. 
Burroughs began to chart the delirium of 
life, cutting up texts and rearranging the 
sentences into haphazardly pleasing com- 
binations. He did enough writing to keep his 
hand in, but except for ‘ ‘Naked Lunch ’ ’ and 
“Junky,’’ he became more talked about 
than read, sought more for his gnomic pro- 
nouncements than for his prose. From a 
1970 interview: 

Q: Is love a solution? 

A: I don't think so at all. I think love is a 
virus. I think love is a con put down by the female sex. I don’t 
think it’s a solution to anything. 

He also believed that space aliens of the type routinely 
written about in the tabloids were real, and demanded they 
visit him. too. Perhaps they would have new drugs. 

Artists who work close to the edge eventually face un- 
palatable career options. There's the James Dean solution: 
Die young and leave a glorious legend. For the living, there 
are the traps of silence, which is self-defeating, or continuing 
to write weaker works, which is an embarrassment. 

Burroughs showed a way to pass into legend without 
undercutting it. The phrase "heavy metal,” in "Naked 
Lunch." was appropriated for a style of music. He appeared 
in commercials for Nike and films like "Drugstore Cow- 
boy," but never seemed to sell oul He was cited as an 
influence by David Bowie, Lou Reed and Patti Smith, 
appeared in a rock video For U2, was paid homage by 
Michael Stipe of RJD.M. at a tribute in Kansas last fall, but 
never seemed trendy. For interviewers, he acted as tour guide 
to his past — but only grudgingly, as if he were doing you a 
favor. When he went to the grocery he still packed a weapon 
or two, and .left no doubt he knew how to use them. I 
wouldn't be surprised if he took them to the hospital, too. 


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PEOPLE 


Pin J Thwawi/nv tom-Mlnl I 

Prince Andrew helping the Queen Mother with some birthday flowers. 


I T is a story that every New York 
reporter believes but few have dared 
to hint at in print, according to The 
Washington Post. Donna Hanover, the 
city's first lady, has not only abandoned 
the re-election campaign of her husband. 
Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, but also is 
said to be on the verge of leaving him — 
largely because of the mayor's dose 
relationship with his communications 
director, Cristyne Lategano, 32. On 
Wednesday, Vanity Fair will amplify 
the whispers with an article that says 
Giuliani, 53, is carrying on an extramar- 
ital affair with Lategano and has 
"cowed” the local press into silence. 
Giuliani denied the report Monday. 
"My reaction is that it’s a scurrilous 
article. It's untrue," he said. According 
to Vanity Fair, the dty 's normally feisty 
tabloids are laying off Giuliani because 
their owners — Rupert Murdoch of the 
New York Post and Mort Zuckerman 
of the Daily News — need his support 
for their media and real estate projects. 

□ 

About 3,000 well-wishers waited six- 


deep Monday outside the London home 
of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Moth- 
er to wish a happy 97th birthday to the 
country’s favorite grandmother, affec- 
tionately known as the Queen Mum. 
Prince Andrew, one of her grandsons, 
stood with her as the Royal Welsh mil- 
itary band marched past playing 
“Happy Birthday to You’ ’ and a 2 1 -gun 
salute boomed out across Hyde Park. 
The Queen Mother, wearing a white silk 
dress patterned with large pink roses, 
walked past the crowd, leaning on a 
walking stick. Then she climbed into her 
chauffeur-driven golf cart to go a great- 
er distance along the line of well-wish- 
ers, chatting with some and accepting 
cards and gifts of chocolate and flowers. 
British reverence and affection for the 
monarchy has waned, but the Queen 
Mother — a keen horse-racing fan and 
great believer in the restorative powers 
of a gin and tonic — has remained 
enduringly popular. 

□ 

Hundreds of Russian musicians and 
music-lovers passed through a darkened 


hall of a Moscow an museum Monday to 
pay their last respects to one of the 
century’s greatest pianists, Sviatoslav 
Richter. As recordings of Richter’s per- 
formances played, mourners placed 
white roses and red carnations next to his 
open coffin. “Today not only Russia is 
grieving, but the whole world,” said 
Prime Minister Viktor Cherno- 
myrdin, who was among those attend- 
ing the service at the Pushkin Museum 
of Fine Arts. Richter, who returned to 
Moscow from Paris less than a month 
ago, died Friday at the age of 82. 

□ 

The former Beatle George Harrison 
is awaiting results of cancer tests after 
discovering lumps on his neck, accord- 
ing to his record company. Harrison. 54, 
had a series of enlarged lymph nodes 
removed late last month. A spokesman 
for Apple said the guitarist was con- 
fident he was cancer-free. “George is 
absolutely fine.” he said. "There is no 
reason why he shouldn't be. He had a 
quick operation for a small lump on the 
outside of his neck.” 


The trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, the 
first jazz composer to win a Pulitzer 
Prize for music, is taking a seat on the 
New York state Council on the Arts. 
Besides his jazz work, Marsalis is con- 
sidered one of the world's best classical 
trumpet players. He has recorded more 
than 30 jazz and classical albums. 

D 

Julia Roberts tweaked the script of 
her new movie, “Conspiracy Theory" 
co-starring Mel Gibson, to add more 
kissing. “I always want more," Roberts 
said in the Aug. 1 1 issue of Newsweek. 
“Put me and Mel in a movie, and people 
are going to be waiting for a little 
smoochie." But she said there was more 
to the film than kissing. The movie, 
which opens this week, features Gibson 
as a maniacal cab driver. It wasn't that 
hard to get inside the character’s mind* 
he told Newsweek. "I know what it’s 
like to feel paranoid,” he said. “I’ve 
had my phone bugged. I have people 
who want star gossip. They follow you 
around, stake you out. They eavesdrop 
on your life. It’s not always so nice.” 


4 


<7 



Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 


makes calling home and to other countries really easy. 


Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country vou’re 


calling from and you’ll get the dearest connections 


home. And be sure in charge your calls on your 


AT&T Calling Card. It'll help you avoid outrageous 


phone charges on your hotel bill and save you up to 


So when in Rome (or an where else for that 


matter) do as main- business traveler do. Use AT&T. 


Check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 





{iff! 


do as the 172-1011's do. 


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Steps to follow for east catting worldwide: 

I . JlBl Uisd tin? AT&T Access Number fur die ojuiiirv - coi 
are idling from. 

J. Dial the phnih? number mu m? billing 

i Dial the ciUttik card number listed abuw your naire? 



•K3I nr 3 



AT&T Access 

Numbers 

EUROPE 


Sweden 

A*Sfria*o . 

Belgium* 

Czodi Repnbfic* 

022-903-011 
0-800-100-10 
08-42-000-101 
.0-800-99-0011 
. . . 0130-0010 
. 00-800-1311 
.. 1 -880-550-0 DO 
172-1011 

Switzerland* 
Untied Kingdom a 

France .... 

Germany 

Greece* 

he land n .... 

Baly* 

EOTPI* ( Cairo )r 
Israel 

Saudi Arabia 


0 WO -822-9111 


Rnssia*A(NhHsnr)t . . 

Spain .... 

. . 755-5842 

.908-99-80-11 

Ghana 
Soulb Aides 


«Z0-73Wt1 

0800 - 09-8011 

0500 - 89-8011 

0800 - 89-0011 


MIDDLE EASf 


510-0280 

177 - 100-2727 

1-880-10 


AFRICA 


0191 

, , 0-800-99-0123 

Can 7 find die AT&T Arms Number for Ihv country you n> calling from? Jurt ick um u|H raiur for 
Kf&T Direct" Service, or \rJt our Web sire ul http://ii-wv»tl-comArai uler 


AT&T 


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