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INTERNATIONAL 




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The World’s Daily Newspaper 

Slap at U.S. 
As Russia 
Gets Jakarta 
Fighter Deal 

Move Defies Congress 
And Could Set Trend 
In Asian Markets 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Defying its human 
rights critics in the United States, In- 
donesia said Tuesday that it would buy 
Russian fighters and helicopters after 
canceling a deal for American-made F- 
1 6s because of congressional attacks on 
its human rights record. 

Jakarta’s decision to turn to Russia 
was a serious setback for U.S. defense 
companies trying to sell weapons in the 
fast-growing but increasingly compet- 
itive Asian market, analysts said. 

. The news could encourage other U.S. 
customers in the region, they said, in- 
cluding the Philippines, Thailand and 
South Korea, to start buyin g Russian 
weapons, which cost substantially less 
than comparable U.S. equipment 

The Philippines and Thailand, both 
operating under tight budget con- 
straints, have expressed interest in low- 
cost Russian fighters and associated 
missiles, while South Korea has said it is 
considering a futuristic Russian Sukhoi 
jet for a major order of 1 20 fighters to be 
delivered after 2002. 

Ginanjar Kartasasmita, Indonesia’s 
state planning minister, said Tuesday 
that Jakarta would buy 12 Sukhoi Su- 
30K fighters for the air force and eight 
MI-17-1V troop transport helicopters 
for the army’s elite commando Special 
Forces. 

The decision was “based on a study 
and comparison of various helicopters 
and fighter planes,” Mr. Ginanjar said. 
He indicated that Russia would prob- 
ably get subsequent arms orders. 

_ While Indonesia wanted 20 of die 
fighters “for the first phase, we decided 
on eight helicopters and 12 fighter 
planes.” Mr. Ginanjar said. “There is a 
possibility we can buy more in future 
from Russia.'! • 

Indonesia’s armed forces had also 
shown interest id Russian radar and 
missiles for a planned major upgrade of 
the country's air defense system, ana- 
lysts said. 

Most of Indonesia’s military equip- 
ment is from die United States or 
Europe. Its most recent big order before 
the Russian purchase was announced 
Tuesday was for 16 Hawk fighters from 
Britain, worth about $260 million. 

While Britain’s Labor government 
confirmed last month that the Hawk 
contract with Indonesia would go 
ahead, it unveiled new rules to halt arms 
sales to regimes that might use British - 
made weapons for internal suppression 
or external aggression. 

“There is a worry in Jakarta that 
Britain might cut future military con- 
tracts,” said Jusuf Wanandi. chairman 
of the supervisory board of Indonesia's 
Center for Strategic and International 
Studies. 

“It is good to warn them now that we 
can buy from other countries without 
human rights conditions attached,” be 
said. 

Indonesia canceled a plan in June to 
buy nine F- 16s from the United States to 
add to an existing squadron because of 

See INDONESIA, Page 6 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 
R Paris, Wednesday, August 6, 1997 


No. 35.592 




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Crashes tMliuam 

29 Survivors Found, Police Say; 
Airline Tally Puts 257 Aboard 




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SLiP^R SPRINT — Michael Johnson taking a victory lap in Athens after winning the men's 400-meter 
final Tuesday at the World Athletics Championships. It was perhaps his most difficult medal yet. Page 18. 

New Problems on Mir Spacecraft 

Oxygen Generators Fail as Replacement Crew Heads to Rescue 


The Associated Press 

BAIKONUR, Kazakstan — A Soyuz 
rocket blasted off Tuesday, carrying a 
replacement crew to the troubled Mir 
space station, where the old tp-am 
grappled with a new problem — the 
breakdown of oxygen generators. 

The Soyuz-U booster rocket lifted off 
on schedule at 7:36 P.M., Moscow time 
cairying a capsule with two cosmonauts 
who have trained extensively for a dif- 
ficult repair mission aboard the'Mir. 

Anatoli Solovyov and Pavel Vino- 
gradov are to dock with the Mir on 
Thursday, 250 miles (400 kilometers} 
above Earth, and are expected to spend 
more than six months on board. 


Their most important mission will be 
to repair the damage caused by a col- 
lision with a cargo ship on June 25. 

At Mission Control near Moscow, 
flight controllers watched quietly as the 
rocket lifted off on video screens, then 
applauded when the third stage sep- 
arated from the capsule. 

The Mir has suffered a string of 
breakdowns in recent months, and the 
latest problem with the oxygen gen- 
eration system renewed concerns about 
the safety of the 1 1-year-old space sta- 
tion. 

Russian and U.S. officials played 
down the seriousness of the newly dis- 
closed breakdown, which they said has 


been an on- and -off problem for the past 
week. They said the three men aboard 
were in no danger. 

Bnt the problem put the focus on the 
Mir’s difficulties only hours before the 
new crew blasted off from the Baikonur 
Cosmodrome. The two crews will over- 
lap for about a week. 

The two Russians and one American 
on board were using oxygen canisters 
Tuesday for the second straight day, 
NASA said 

The oxygen system breaks down 
periodically, but the Mir is so large that 
the existing oxygen supply can last for 

See MIR, Page 5 


CivnM br Our SktfTFmii Dbfmhrs 

HONOLULU — A Korean Air jum- 
bo jet with 257 people aboard crashed 
early Wednesday while trying to land on 
Guam, the airline said. 

The police said up to 29 people had 
survived the crash, but rescue personnel 
could not confirm the number. 

In Washington, reports from the 
Pentagon said that the last radio mes- 
sage from the jet indicated that a fire had 
broken out on board. The United States 
has military bases on Guam, a U.S. 
territory. 

Flight 801 from Seoul to Guam was 
cleared to land when contact was lost as 
it was 3 miles (5 kilometers) from Agana 
International Airport, said Tom Rea, the 
Federal Aviation Administration’s Pa- 
cific representative in Honolulu. 

Frank Mataoe of the Guam police 
told the MSNBC network that 29 people 
had apparently survived. He said the 
plane went down “in rough terrain, up 
in the hills.” 

A local radio station said the plane 
had crashed on Nimitz Hill, a rugged hill 
on the approach to the airport and one of 
the island's few unpopulated areas. 

Korean Air said that the Boeing 747- 
300 was carrying 234 passengers and 23 
crew members. 

A spokesman for the Guam Airport 
Authority told the CNN network that 
there were unconfirmed reports that the 
airliner had had “some difficulties with 
its engines” on its approach to the air- 
port shortly after 2:35 A.M. 

Ginger Cruz, a spokeswoman for the 
governor of Guam, told MSNBC that 
some witnesses had reported hearing an 
explosion before the plane went down. 

A spokesman for the airport. Jay 
Sprague, told the network, “It rained off 
and on all day. but it’s too early to say if 
weather was a factor.” 

Aviation sources in Los Angeles said 
that there had been reports of flights* 
being delayed because of the poor 
weather around Guam. 


Dollar Powers to an Eight- Year High Against Mark 


Bundesbank Keeps 
Hinting at Rate Rise 

By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The dollar continued to 
power ahead against the Deutsche mark 
and other European currencies Tuesday 
in spite of remarks by the Bundesbank’s 
chief economist that seemed to imply 
the German central bank was ready to 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl goes on a 
legislative offensive. Page 5. 

raise interest rates to defend its cur- 
rency. 

The dollar climbed to 1 .8797 DM in 
late trading in New York from 1.8663 
DM the day before, and at one point it 
touched its highest level against the 
mark in more than eight years. 

A deep expression of concern about 
the mark’s slide by the Bundesbank's 
chief economist, Qtmar Is sing, was at 
first interpreted in financial markets as 
signaling a rate hike, but it was shrugged 



Source; Bloomberg 


off almost immediately. 

Currency-watchers attributed the 
dollar's strength to a combination of 
factors, including data released last 
week showing that the U.S. unemploy- 
ment rate had dropped to 4.8 percent. 


plus new signs of weakness in the Jap- 
anese economy and a perceived lack of 
confidence in the political leadership of 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl in Germany. 

The dollar’s seemingly irresistible 
ascent, which has already produced an 


18 percent appreciation against the 
mark since the start of the year, is also 
based on a persisting view in financial 
markets that the marie will be replaced 
by a weaker euro once Europe com- 
pletes its single-currency project. 

The dollar began to move higher 
against the mark Tuesday after the 
Bundesbank kept its’ key interest rate 
steady at 3.0 percent. 

Buyers of the U.S. currency then sent 
it upward again when the chief econ- 
omist of the Ifo Institute, Germany's 
most influential economic think tank, 
suggested that the Bundesbank might 
act if the dollar were to rise beyond 1 .90 
DM. 

“It’s very difficult to say what would 
prompt a rate rise, but I could imagine 
that a dollar above 1 .90 marks would set 
alarm bells ringing in Frankfurt,” said 
Willi Leibfritz, the Ifo economist 

Analysts said the market, rightly or 
wrongly, had interpreted the remark as a 
virtual forecast and decided ro test die 
Bundesbank's willingness to move 
from jawboning to' action. 

There were, however, no reports of 
central bank intervention Tuesday, and 

See DOLLAR, Page 12 


Staff at Guam Memorial Hospital 
was placed on alert, though a spokes- 
man said the hospital had no numbers on 
possible victims. 

The U.S. Coast Guard had ships in the 
area to provide medical services and 
lighting for rescuers. 

Lieutenant Thomas Robinson of the 
Coast Guard told CNN that rough terrain 
and rain squalls at the crash site would 
make it a “difficult” rescue mission. 

There was no immediate information 
on the victims. But a spokesman for the 
South Korea Embassy in Washington 
noted that Guam was a popular des- 
tination for Asian newlyweds. 

The crash came a little more than a 
year after a TWA Boeing 747 exploded in 
midair off New York, killing 230 people. 
On Sept. 1, 1983, Soviet fighters shor 
down KAL Flight 007 in Soviet airspace, 
killing 269. (AP, IHT, Reuters ) 


Thais Commit 
To Austerity 
And Will Shut 
More Lenders 


By Thomas Crampton 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

BANGKOK — The government said 
Tuesday it would raise the value-added 
tax and close dozens of financial 
companies to qualify for a $10 billion 
credit line from the International Mon- 
etary Fund that would help the country 
overcome its economic crisis. 

“Thailand has signed IMF surrender 
terras,” said the head of regional re- 
search for Seamico Securities, Barry 
Yates. 

• They have now come clean as to the 
full extent of the financial sector's dif- 
ficulties." 

Finance Minister Thanong Bhidaya 
and the central bank governor, Chaiy- 
awat Wibulswasdi, said 42 finance 
companies would be shut in addition to 
the 16 dosed in late June. 

The finance companies will have 90 
days to arrange mergers among them- 
selves or with stronger partners, Mr. 
Chaiyawat said, but they will not re- 
ceive additional government aid. 

Mr. Chaiyawat said die government 's 
Financial Institution Development 
Fund had spent 500 billion baht ($15.7 
billion) supporting the companies, 
which are suffering as borrowers are no 
longer able to repay their loans. 

The package included an unspecified 
amount of government spending cuts as 
well as raising the value-added tax to 10 
percent from 7 percent as of Aug. 16. 

Prices already are rising as the baht 
falls, and the increase in the tax could 
add to inflationary pressure. 

Mr. Thanong predicted 8 percent to 9 
percent inflation this year. An IMF of- 
ficial said the fund, which helps sta- 
bilize troubled currencies, was pleased 
with the news and would work to get an 
assistance package within as little as 10 
days. 

See BAHT, Page 6 


The Battle of the Oder Helps to Unify Germany 

■ ; Vfhzi amazed and delighted this na- Parliament, Mr. Kohl said the money competition of free-market capitalism. 

By William Drozdiak tion of g0 m ;;i t y, n citizens was the dra- would go to help the region recover Bui East Germans contend they have 

Washington Post Service » .j: lumiun r!o,_ fiwm rK, Hmicniinn 1 heen ‘*enIoni7j*H” Hv a niicHv “^IKnw 


AGENDA 

China and Taiwan Face Off in Americas 


— =jrr. — What amazed and delighted this na- 

By W imam urozaiak. tion Q f gg minion citizens was the dra- 

WrtriiirtgMH Post Sen-ice malic show of solidarity' between Ger- 

‘BERUN — 77ie flood waters in Cen- mans long divided by the Cold War and 
traf Europe that threatened Eastern Ger- by rancorous dl5 P Dt ^ ^ , 
many with its worst natural disasto 1 m a nmficanon prwess 8 


half-century have accomplished 
something that a trillion dollars in aid 
money and countless political initiat- 
ives could not — an unprecedented dis- 
play of national unity. 

As the swollen Oder River receded, 
Europe’s largest country gave a sigh of 
relief and counted its blessings. Tele- 
vision shows and newspapers heaped 
praise on the heroic efforts of solvere 
and volunteer aid workers who worked 
round the clock to shore up muddy dikes 
and prevent a catasnophe from engulf- 
ing a huge swath of farms and villages. 


...... . . .... t 

them together in 1 990 after the collapse 
of communism. 

[The government is ready to approve 
500 million Deutsche marks (S270 mil- 
lion) in aid for victims of the floods. 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl said Tuesday. 
Agence France- Pres se reported. 

[In a statement ai a special session of 


Parliament, Mr. Kohl said die money 
would go to help the region recover 
from the devastation.] 

Western Germans often complain 
about high taxes and subsidies they 
must pay to provide more than $100 
billion a" year in aid ro buttress living 
standards in Eastern Germany. 

With unemployment reaching 30 per- 
cent in some areas of the east, Germans 
in the west complain that they are forced 
to carry the burden of providing welfare 
for lazy cousins who do not want to 
abandon cushy socialist habits for the 


been “colonized” by a pushy “elbow 
society” in the west that they find cold 
and heartless. 

They argue, with some justification, 
that they lost jobs largely because west- 
ern enterprises bought up the companies 
that employed them with the sole in- 
tention of shutting down those compa- 
nies and eliminating any competition in 
the eastern market. 

See GERMANS, Page S 


Soon after Hong Kong revened to 
Chinese rule, Taiwan's foreign min- 
ister embarked on an 1 1 -nation tour 
starting in Central America to shore up 
ties with Taipei’s closest allies. 

The region has become a battle- 
ground in the diplomatic straggle be- 
tween China and Taiwan. 

Although both strive to increase 


. Newsstand Prices 

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(Anfifes 12.50 FF Morocco.... 


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Clinton Readies New Attack on Tobacco 

Directive Will Tighten Smoking Ban at Federal Executive Buildings 


iCamaraai 1.600 CFA Qatar 10.00QR; - 

<Eaiipt ; .EE5.50 Reunion 12.50 FJj WASHINGTON — 1" sle P “* war a ? ai ? sl 

'{ France I"Z!Iio.OO FF Saudi Arabia...--iO W, toba( :co, President Bill Clinton plans to sign an executive 

jfeton i.ioo CFA Swegal....- 1 .l00g^} ^ wee k imposing the broadest bw ewr enacted 

taty 5,800 Uns Spain. « Gainst smoking on federal property, including a prohibition 

. I^tty Coast.1250 CFA onUghting up outside office building entrances, Washington 

ifiSZZ .TOOFte U.S. M8.(E W-) S J20. m . ice s and many federal agencies already 

. 77T ,Jri ct smoking in their facilities. Bui until now departments 

H c sSi II 1 1! wwld «* » *■*■«» 

M 9 91 rll rhe government and extend existing prohtb- 

f II Idons to places cmfen.ly exempt, such as office* clubs. 


By Peter Baker 

lOt/acghtfi Pml Service 


-Oi* 


$ 


“it's become clearer and clearer that this is a Significant 
health risk, and we wanted a uniform government policy that 
brings all the agencies up to that level,” an official said. 

The order would ban indoor smoking in virtually every 
executive-branch building owned or leased by the govern- 
ment and forbid outdoor smoking in courtyards and near 
entrances to buildings, according to officials. 

Generally, the only exceptions would be rooms with sep- 
arate ventilation systems that have exhaust vents directly to 
the outdoors. Housing units such as barracks would also be 
spared and some other narrow exceptions could be allowed, 
such as in “undercover, military or diplomatic situations that 
are essential to accomplish agency missions," officials said. 

See PUFF, Page 6 


<! The Dollar § 

NewYOffc 

Tuesday 8 4 P.M. 

prevkxedoea 

DM 

1.6797 

1.8683 

Pound 

1.6245 

1.6317 

Yen 

119-25 

118.35 

FF 

B.3485 

62935 


The Dow 

HUH 

Tuaedaydese 

previous ctosfl 

-10 

8187.54 

8198.45 

1 S&P 500 1 

change 

Tuesday • 4 P.M. 

previous do« 

+2.07 952.37 950.30 


PAGE TWO 

Apartheid Horrors on Stage. 

Books „ Page 10. 

Crossword.. Page 10. 

Opinion — Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 18-19. 


Pages 4,7. 


The Intarmarket 


The IHT on-line http://www.iht. 


their influence in the region, their 
methods are different While China 
plays diplomatic hardball, Taiwan is 
giving out economic carrots. 

Taipei's approach has had results. 
Of the 30 countries that recognize 
.Taiwan as the official Chinese gov- 
ernment. 14 are in Central America 
and the Caribbean. Page 4. 

IMF Poshes Turkey 
To Repair Economy 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — Tur- 
key needs to take bold steps to stabilize 
its fragile economy and reduce a raging 
inflation rate of 80 percent, the In- 
ternational Monetary Fund said Tues- 
day in a strongly worded statement 

"Directors highlighted the adverse 
effects of high inflation on fhe sus- 
tainability of output growth,” the 
IMF executive board said in a sum- 
mary of its annual review of the Turk- 
ish economy. 

The directors urged the govern- 
ment “to embark on a bold and com- 
prehensive program of stabilization 
policies and structural reforms to re- 
duce inflation and set the economy on 
a sustainable growth path.” 

The IMF said consolidation was 
the key to any stabilization effort, 
including a reform of the country’s 
deficit-ridden social security system. 


>■ 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1997 




South African Playwrights / Grappling With the ‘Truth Commission 


Theater Spotlights Horrors of Apartheid 


By Donald G. McNeil Jr. 

Sw York Times Sen-ice 


G RAHAM STOWN, South Africa — One play begins in classical style, 
with Ubu, the fat, id-driven psychopath of French burlesque, roaring 
an obscenity. The other begins with a strikingly modern image: a 
sprinter staggering off the blocks with a wounded African National 
Congress guerrilla on his back, then running straight out of the stadium and on 
to 20 years of exile in London. 

Both moments were lived, vicariously, 
by their authors. William Kentridge. the 
creator-director of “Ubu and the Troth 
Commission." danced naked in front of 


Kentridge' s blackboard-style cartoons. In one notable moment, a sleek modem 
skyscraper appears, one that resembles John Vorster Square, the cheerful 
looking blue-and-white Joh anne sburg police headquarters. Only when he 
zooms in close does one see prisoners being electrocuted, savaged by dogs and 
flung screaming out those airy windows. 


his own camera to develop the supplic- 
/hi( 


a ting and defiant poses in which his obese 
anti-hero would meet his accusers. 

Paul Henzberg, the author of “Dead 
Wait.’* spent 20 years in exile after 
serving twice in the South African mil- 
itary, once in Angola, South Africa's own 
Vietnam experience. 

More important, both plays, which were 
centerpieces of the annual National Arts 
Festival here, have a common subject. 
South African artists are just beginning to 
grapple with the most absorbing and con- 
tentious event in the countiy today: the 
daily hearings of the Truth and Recon- 
ciliation Commission, which is probing the 
ugliest depths of apartheid's worst crimes 
— and then offering amnesty to the tor- 
turers and killers who committed them. 

Even though the hearings are to con- 
tinue until January, a few writers are 
already managing to pick lifelines of plot 
out of the torrent of national catharsis. 
Related works by foreign writers were 
also explored here at Africa's most im- 
portant cultural gathering. 

Ariel Dorfman, the Chilean writer, 
came to discuss his play. “Death and the 
Maiden” (later made into a film by Ro- 
man Polanski), about the torture and dis- 
appearances in Chile in the 1970s and 
Chile's own Truth Commission. 


J ANE Taylor. Mr. Kentridge' s col- 
laborator, has also created “Fault 
Lines,” a mixture of readings, art 
exhibits and radio drama about the 
commission's work. 

Tlie artists here universally applauded 
die commission for its role in what one 
called “drawing the poison out of 
people, ' ' and said they felt that theater had 
a place in helping South Africans rec- 
oncile with each other. 

“Artists deal with death, suffering and 
loss,” said Ms. Taylor, a professor of 
English at the University of the Western 



Mr. Kentridge is known in the United States for his previous works with the 
andsnrinc Punnet Company, including “Faustus in Africa” j 

s plot 

encounter in England. He was on a train. 


and “Woyzeck 


Handspring Puppet Company, including 

on the Highveld.” Mr. Hertzberg, by contrast, got his plot from a chance 


and met a man who described his South 
African nephew’s experience in Angola. 
His unit captured a wounded man they 
suspected was an important African Na- 
tional Congress guenilla, and the young 
soldier was forced to carry him for days. 

The two formed a bond. The captain, a 
rural Afrikaner who hated the young 
draftee for being wealthy and well-edu- 
cated, saw this. When the patrol' was 
slowed down by its prisoner during a 
Cuban counterattack, he forced the young 
roan to kill him. 

Mr. Hertz berg's soldier, Josh, now 39, 
has come home to confess to the com- 
mission. but also to find his former com- 
mander and force him to grovel or die. 

Their hardest task, the authors said, 
was to avoid the cheap way out: makin g 
the Afrikaner police and army officers 
into cartoon villains. 


Peru Allegedly Tapped 
A Candidate’s Phone 





VUm VfcHif I..A lim.— 


Cm 


^pe. “I felt that the arts could probe Buxi Zokufa , left, and Dawid Minaar in k Ubu and 
ifncult terrain that the commission nr r ■ ■ ? a c l 


couldn't afford to take on while main- 
taining irs legal brief.” 

The raw material from the hearings is 
nearly endless. Mr. Kentridge's “Ubu” 

puppets repeal the actual words of witnesses, in their original language. 
Sometimes he echoes one of the disturbing juxtapositions of the bearings, in 
which a mother’s tearful breakdown describing her son’s dead body will be 
rendered by a translator in a flat monotone. To add life to the testimony, actors 
play Ubu and his wife, a puppet crocodile plays Ubu’s political master and a 
Cerberus puppet plays his killing team. 

On a screen behind them, a film mixes documentary footage and Mr. 


the Truth Commission.' A few writers have plucked 
lifelines of plot from the torrent of national catharsis. 


R. HERTZBERG drew his 
platoon leader as a man of 
crafty intelligence, a brave if 
sadistic soldier who loved 
army life and felt be was lighting com- 
munism. By the Lime Josh finds him, he is 
51. divorced, drunk, in a dead-end job 
reporting to a black boss and living in a 
railroad fiat — and recounts a tough child- 
hood. 

“I didn't want him to seem like a 
raging lunatic, so I gave him as brutalized 
a background as possible.” Mr. 
Hertzberg said. 

In public discussions before the 
premiere, the “Ubu” creators were asked 
if they hadn't erred in picking Ubu as a 
symbol of the apartheid state. After ail. a 
skeptical professor pointed out. the Ubu 
created in 1888 by Alfred Jarrv was an Idi 
Amin-type figure, a thoughtless bully 
with a childlike delight in satisfying his 
appetites. The apartheid government's 
brutality, he argued, was coolly rational 

Ms. Taylor answered: “That rational 
state deployed psychopaths to break 
down other people’s psyches. When I 
watch interviews with these men. I’m 
always struck by how little psychological 
content they exhibit in describing why 
they did what they did. They always 


seemed to be driven by simple needs, like 
male-bonding. They would joke abour it 


afterwards over a beer. 

The first previews of the work. Mr. 
Kentridge added, were in Weimar. Germany, and the reactions there suggested 
that its view of evil — clumsily brutal deeds committed in the service of a 
calculating state — is universal. “People said it was a perfect example of what 
was discovered when the Stasi's files were released,” he said, referring to the 
East German secret police. "And we had one woman from Romania who came 
up, extremely moved. She was convinced the play was completely local — and 
about Romania.” 


The Associaied Press 

LIMA — Government agents eaves- 
dropped on telephone conversations of 
Javier Perez de Cuellar, a former UN 
secretary-general, when he ran for pres- 
ident of Peru in 1995, a television sta- 
tion has reported. 

Mr. Perez de Cuellar, who lost to 
Alberto Fujimori in the April 1995 elec- 
tion, called the reported espionage 
“criminal'' and said he would urge the 
attorney general to investigate the re- 
ports and punish anyone responsible. 

The wiretap allegations have cast 
doubt on the election’s fairness and 
could further erode the credibility of Mr. 
Fujimori, who is facing increasing com- 
plaints that his government is corrupt 
and authoritarian. 

“They have blatantly violated elec- 
toral law, the constitution and my hu- 
man right to privacy,” Mr. Perez de 
Cuellar said at a news conference Mon- 
day. “The government must investigate 
and punish the criminals responsible.” 

He also said that the allegations sup- 


serious irregularities.” he said. 
Channel 2 television first reported on 

, - „»Mt9nnino in miri. 


thee lection-season wiretapping in mid- 
July, when it released 19/ tape 


ported suspicions he had harbored of 
dirty play during the election. “We 


were convinced at the time there were 


juiy, wucli it h.mw,» --- taped con- 
versations it said it received from an 
anonymous source. Conversations in- 
cluded those of journalists, business- 
men and politicians, including a former 
foreign minis ter. Francisco Tudela. 

On Sunday, the station for the first 
time released conversations of Mr. 
Perez de Cuellar, made from his home 
from October 1994 to August 1995. The 
I 000 or so conversations involved Mr. 
Perez de Cuellar’s political associates, 
friends, relatives and even the family 
maid. Mr. Perez de Cuellar’s home 
served as campaign headquarters for his 
Union for Peru coalition. 

The government has denied that in- 
telligence agents wiretapped phones, 
and said it wants the allegations in- 
vestigated. 

In the 1995 election, Mr. Fujimori 
received 64 percent of the vote and Mn 
Perez de Cuellar won 22 percent 

“What is painful is that they invaded 
not only my political life, but my private 
life,” Mr. Perez de Cuellar said. 


Tokyo 9 s the Priciest City 
And Hong Kong Is Next $ 


The .-t shH tuied Press 

GENEVA — Tokyo’s still at the top, 
but high housing costs and a strong 
cunency have made Hong Kong the 
second most expensive city for foreign- 
ers spending dollars to live, according to 
a survey published Tuesday. 

Eight of the 10 priciest cities for 
expatriates are in .Asia, including No. 4. 
Osaka, Japan, and fifth-ranked Beijing. 
The only European city in the top five 
was Moscow — No. 3 because of the 
high cost of Western-style amenities. 

The study was conducted by a private 
company in Geneva. Corporate Re- 
sources Group. It compared the costs of 
more than 200 items relevant to for- 
eigners living abroad, including hous- 
ing. food, clothing, cars, drink and en- 
tertainment. 

New York, with an index of 100. was 
used as the starting point, and was the 
most expensive American city on the 
list. 

Toi 
while 


Geneva and Zurich dropped out of the 
top 10 for the first time. 

London, by contrast, rose 14 slots to 
be ranked 14th, largely because of the 
strength of sterling and housing costs. . 

In international terms, North Amer- 
ican cities became slightly more ex-. 
pensive than a year ago because of the 
dollar. New York, ranked 38th last year, 
moved up to 31st. 


D.C. Airport Outage 
Not Risky, U.S. Says. 


1. 

Tokyo had a rating of 169 points, 
tile Osaka — traditionally in second 


place behind the Japanese capital 
dropped to fourth with 


148. A weakened 


against the dollar dropped both 
about 15 


yen 


The AssociJted Press 

WASHINGTON— U.S. aviation of- 
ficials said safety was not compromised 
when lightning knocked oat the main 
radar system at National Airport outside 
Washington on Monday, rat an air 
traffic controllers’ association called the 
backup sysrem "inadequate. " ' 

The system stopped working at 1:08 
P.M.. forcing controllers to switch to 
backup radar at nearby Andrews Air 
Force Base until technicians restored 


71 


15 points from last year. 

The strong dollar also meant that 
European cities became comparatively 
cheaper. For instance, all German cities 
ranked below New York while the tra- 
ditionally expensive Swiss cities of 


National's system at 3:30 P.M. 

But the National Air Traffic Con- 


trollers Association said “controllers 
found the secondary system inad- 
equate” and warned that future outages 
could cause major delays. 


As Italian Rail Apologizes, Another Mishap 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Reuters 

ROME — The state rail- 
ways promised Tuesday to 
compensate passengers after 
a weekend of travel chaos. 

But attacks on the govern- 
ment’s transportation policy 
grew after another rail acci- 
dent Monday took three lives. 


In an advertisement in 
Italy's major daily newspa- 
pers, the state railway system 
FS promised to mail a free 
ticket to everyone who could 
prove they had traveled by 
train through Rome and 
Naples over the weekend, 
when rail travel was brought 



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to a standstill by a derailment 
and a construction accident. 

“FS apologizes to its cli- 
ents for the enormous disrup- 
tion,” the full-page ad said. 

The weekend’s woes were 
compounded Monday night, 
when an express train 
slammed into an automobile 
at a crossing near Rome, 
killing two people, including a 
pregnant woman. A third per- 
son died later in the hospital. 

News reports said the ac- 
cident may have been caused 
by an overload of traffic on the 
route related to the havoc of 
the past weekend — one of the 
.busiest of the year, as tens of 
thousands of Italians began 
their August breaks. 

"Black August for the 
Railroads” was the top head- 
line in more than one major 
Italian daily. 

"This is what happens 
when plans and projects are 


concerned only with balance 
sheets and do not place at the 
center of attention the interest 
of and respect for people,” 
the Vatican newspaper Osser- 
vatore Romano said. 

Prime Minister Romano 
Prodi, Transport Minister 
Claudio Burlando and the rail- 
way system's president. Gi- 
ancarlo Cimoli, ail under at- 
tack over the accidents, held an 
emergency meeting Tuesday. 

The chaos began when a 
train jumped the tracks in 
Rome on Saturday, injuring 
four passengers; then a crane 
working to remove it col- 
lapsed Sunday, blocking the 
main links that connect north- 
ern and southern Italy. 

Tens of thousands of trav- 
elers passing through Rome 
were crammed onto buses that 
ferried them between trains. 
Some were stranded at sta- 
tions for as long as 12 hours. 


Airline Talks Collapse in Nairobi 


NAIROBI (Reuters) — Airlines flying to and from Kenya 
canceled, diverted or rescheduled flights on Tuesday, the 
fourth day of a work slowdown by air traffic controllers. 

Aviation officials said talks collapsed Monday when the air 
controllers rejected a government request to return to work 
and give officials two weeks to study their demands for more 
pay and benefits. 

They said rhe air controllers might step up their action. 


which began Friday. Kenya Airways canceled six flights 
Tuesday and Wednesday. A Saudi Arabian Airlines flight was 
turned away and others have been diverted to Tanzania and 
Ethiopia. 


French Resort Opens War on Dogs 


DE AU' VILLE. France (AFP) — The authorities here have . 
opened a war on dog droppings to keep the beaches dean. V) 
Distributors provide a paper bag and a spade, and signs ask 
dog owners to * * head for the nearest bin." 1 


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Europe 


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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu Weather. Asia 



North America 

Heal will continue lor much 
Qt the West Thursday 
through Saturday A siorm 
will drop through central 
Canal* producing show- 
ers and thunderstorms 
(rom Mannoea south to ihe 
northern Plains Cool 
weather will move Out ol 
:fw Northeast, put n should 
remain piea;ar.i 


Europe 

ADnormaliy warm and dry 
weather roll continue tot 
much ol Scandmavia 
Thursday through Saturday 
as tugn pressure remains 
in lum control Damp arm 
:oal weather wifl return to 
rhe Untied Kingdom It will 
6e hoi across in* Mediter- 
ranean region from Italy to 
Greece Not as hot m 
Madrid 


Asia 

Typhoon Tina mil move 
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ana h*gn ronds to pans -oi 
Shivofcu and scutft*rn Hon- 
shu Thursday nigh! or Fri- 
day Hoi v-sether will per- 
sist across v/estsm China 
Tnundarstoims mu damp- 
en southeastern China 
Monsoon ram will continue 
over India n*ar Bomoay 


North America 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


PAGE 3 


Call for Official Apology on Slavery Rips Open Racial Wounds 

Rv Mirh-aal A Hicinx* mk n ... . c . . . . . ... i- i .l. _ ■ , . • .. _ 


By Michael A. Fletcher 

Washington ftui Sen in 

WASfflNGTON — Not long ago. Repre- 
sentative Tony Hall saw a congressional apology 
tor slavery as a simple and moral starting point 
lor a new effort to heal the nation’s gaping racial 
wounds. 

But since the Ohio Democrat broached the idea 
aunosr two months ago. it has fallen victim to all 
the contentiousness and misunderstan ding that 
characterizes the worst of American race re- 
lanons. Few legislators have embraced the mea- 
sure, and even Mr, Hall now concedes the idea is 
virtually dead. What he has left is hundreds of 
letters and phone messages, most condemning 
ms idea, often with harsh racial language. 

One man wrote tftar the government should 
apologize to him for stripping his great-grand- 
•Vi his 435 slaves. Some said African- 

--- Americans should be thankful that slave traders 
rescued their ancestors from Africa. Others ar- 
gued that their ancestors are immigrants who had 
no connection to slavery or that, beginning with 
*h e 350,000 Union soldiers who perished in die 
Civil -War, the nation has done more than enough 
to atone for slavery. Many African-American 
leaders rejected the idea, too, saying it would be 
meaningless without a well-funded effort to re- 
pair the damage. 

■ “The reaction has stunned me." said Mr. 
Hall, a white congressman from a predominantly 


wane district who once fasted for three weeks to 
protest the demise of the House Select Com- 
mittee on Hunger. * "If we can’t do something as 
simple as saying we’re sorrv. we’ve cot a lone 
way to go." e B 

In the weeks since Mr. Hall offered his one- 
sentence resolution suggesting that Congress 
apologize for slavery, it has become ev- 
ident that the notion of forgiveness is a 
powerful thing in America. 

"An apology is a much more complex 
and powerful phenomenon than most 
people realize," said Susan Heider, a clin- « 

^ _ & 1 rs a 


saying that "an apology, under the right cir- 
cumstances, those things can be quite impor- 
tant." 

Subsequently. Mr. Clinton has been noncom- 
mittal on the subject. 

Yet the power of an apology has not been lost 
on Washington. In 1988, Congress apologized 


powerful thing in America. 6 If we can’t do something as simple 

An apology is a much more complex . , « _ * 

and powerful phenomenon than most *S saying we re SOriy, we VC got 
people realize," said Susan Heider, a clin- a i nn<r wav to ? 
ical psychologist in Denver. a tong way ro go. 

Many whites say an apology needlessly 

dredges up a horrible but long-closed chapter of and paid reparations to Japan ese-Aroericans 
history, while ignoring the nation's vast racial who were interned in the United States during 
progress. Many blacks, meanwhile, see an ape- World War H. Two years later. Congress apo- 


logy without some form of compensation as 
hollow symbolism. 


Jogized lo uranium miners and those contam- 
inated by nuclear tests in Nevada. And in 1993, 

^ J « • I _ - _ TT r ^ 


iilaUXI DY nULlCfiU ICM> ill ruiu in 177 J, 

"An apology by definition admits one's own Congress apologized to native Hawaiians for the 

sponsibilirv for WfOnodninP ” UiH ^Iiun rnl* nf rh» TlnirpH in overthrow ina the 


responsibility for wrongdoing,” said Susan 
Fiske, a psychologist at the University of Mas- 
sachusetts, Amherst. “An apology for slavery 
would say it may not have been me but it was my 
people or my government that did this and we 
now see that it was really a crime and a sin. It is 
potentially healing. It shares responsibility for 
ending racism and it acknowledges that slavery 
has some relevance to today. " 

Shortly after Mr. Hall’s proposal. President 
Bill Clinton expressed some inrerest in the idea. 


role of the United States in overthrowing the 
Hawaiian government a century earlier. 

Earlier this year, Mr. Clinton apologized to the 
victims of Cold War radiation treatments and to 
the black men who were left untreated for syph- 
ilis in the infamous Tuskegee experiment 

But an apology for slavery is different, some 
say, because it cuts so close to the nation’s black- 
white divide. Indeed, public sentiment toward 
the idea varies sharply depending on one’s race. 
Two recent Gallup polls found that two out of 


three whites oppose the idea of a congressional 
apology, while two out of three blacks support 
the proposal. . 

"It raises all sons of emotions," said Andrew 
Hacker, a Queens College political scientist. 
“Many white people don’t want to hear any 
more about obligations that have not been ful- 

filled. People say, ‘We. have done 

““ everything we have to do. We had af- 
firmative action. We supported civil 
rights. Don't call us anymore. I sense a lot 
of that feeling out there." 

While the idea has found grass-roots 

support among African-Americans, it has 

received little public backing from prom- 
inent African-American leaders. Only three 
black members of Congress are among the res- 
olution's 18 co-sponsors, and many prominent 
civil-rights leaders see the measure as a cheap 
political gesture. 

‘ ’If is like you drive over somebody with a car, 
leave the body mangled, then you decide to come 
back later to apologize with no commitment to 
help them get on their feet,” said Jesse Jackson. 
‘ ‘There is something empty in that. It is just more 
race entertainment. ’ 1 

Many African-Americans believe the nation 
should pay monetary reparations to the descen- 
dants of slaves. For’years, Representative John 
Conyers Jr., Democrat of Michigan and the dean 
of the Congressional Black Caucus, has 
sponsored legislation to establish a committee to 


study reparations. Also, the National Associ- 
ation for the Advancement of Colored People 
has passed resolutions in support of reparations, 
including one at its recent national convention. 
But the idea has never gotten anywhere. 

Some of Mr. Clinton’s advisers, wary of the 
criticism from both the left and the right, think 
the country is not ready to apologize for 
slavery. 

"My view is that the moral force of an apo- 
logy depends upon understanding,” said Chris- 
topher Edley, a Harvard University law pro- 
fessor who advises Mr. Clinton on racial matters. 
"But people disagree sharply about the extent of 
racism today and the relationship of it to slavery. 
So, a presidential apology would be a cynical 
political gesture without more understanding." 

But supporters of an apology say that much of 
the debate misses the point, and consequently, 
the potential power of an apology. 

"An apology is a simple offer resulting in a 
simple acceptance," said Representative Sheila 
Jackson Lee. Democrat of Texas, one of the three 
black co-sponsors of Mr. Hall’s resolution. "It is 
simply the reasoned and right thing to do. It 
doesn’t say, ‘Don’t askmefor anything else.’ For 
that matter, it doesn’t have to be accepted." 

But Ms. Heider said for an apology to be 
meaningful it must include not only an ex- 
pression of regret but a plan to repair the damage 
— a proposition that vastly complicates any 
apology. 


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Panel Urges Abolishing 
Immigration Agency 


By Eric Schmitt 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — In an effort to 
improve the U.S. immigration system, a 
federal advisory panel has decided to 
recommend abolishing the troubled Im- 
migration and Naturalization Service 
and assigning its duties to other gov- 
ernment agencies. 

Declaring that the service suffers from 
"mission overload," the U.S. Commis- 
sion on Immigration Reform is propos- 
ing that the Justice Department, die im- 
migration service’s parent agency, retain 
responsibility for controlling the border 
and removing illegal immigrants. 

The State Department, which handles 
visas through U.S. embassies overseas. 
Would handle immigration services and 
benefits, like citizenship requests. The 
Labor Department, which monitors wage 
and hour laws, would also enforce roles 


covering the hiring of foreign workers, 
according to a draft copy of the report, 
* ‘Structuring, O rganising and M anaging 
an Effective Immigration System," ob- 
tained by The New York Times. 

’ "It’s very hard for one agency with so 
many conflicting missions and so much 
fragmentation to have priorities set and 
missions realized,” said Bruce Morris- 
on, a commission member and a former 
Democratic representative from Con- 
necticut, explaining the reasoning for 
dismantling the immigration service. 

Democrats and Republicans in Con- 
gress who have been briefed by the 
commission in the last few weeks gen- 
erally embrace the proposal to separate 
along ftinctional lines the disparate im- 
migration duties. But the immigration 
service and the Justice Department are 
gearing up to fight the proposal. 

"We’re against splitting up INS," a 
Justice spokeswoman said. “We believe 
the enforcement functions and benefits 
functions really do work hand in hand,” 

The proposal comes as Congress and 


many of the nation ’s governors are grow- 
ing increasingly exasperated with die im- 
migration sendee's inability to cope with 
soaring requests for citizenship, weed out 
criminal aliens living in the United States 
and crack down on the steady stream of 
illegal immigrants entering the country. 

“The message to the administration 
is that this is not about rearranging deck 
chairs on a sinking ship, it's about get- 
ting results," said Allen Kay, a spokes- 
man for Representative Lamar Smith, 
the Texan who heads the Judiciary sub- 
committee on immi gr ation and has been 
briefed on the proposal. 

The House Appropriations Commit- 
tee directed Attorney General Janet Reno 
last month to review the commission's 
report and, along with oiherfederal agen- 
cies, "develop a restructuring plan" for 
more efficient handling of immigration. 

Led by Harold Rogers of Kentucky', 
the head of the Appropriations subcom- 
mittee that oversees the Justice Depart- 
ment. House members are urging the 
administration to act on the proposal by 
Ociober 1998, The commission’s report 
is to be released by late September. 

The scope of the panel's recommen- 
dations has surprised many senior ad- 
ministration officials. Policy-makers 
who have been briefed on the com- 
mission's findings, including Patrick 
Kennedy, die acting undersecretary of 
state for management, declined to com- 
ment on the conclusions. Privately, 
though, administration officials said the 
report would be a starting point for a 
spirited debate on how to manage the 
burgeoning immigration system. 

Officials at die immigration service, 
one of die fastest-growing agencies in the 
government — its budget has doubled to 
$3.1 billion this fiscal year from four 
years ago — said tbe commission’s pro- 
posal would reverse this financial in- 
vestment and ignore improvements the 
agency had made in recent years in re- 
sponse to congressional criticism. 



Kcvn Wcj/Thc taraunl Pi» 


SMOKE AND ASH AGAIN — Soufriere Hills Volcano in Montserrat erupting in the newest explosions 
in a year of activity at the formerly dormant Caribbean site. A blast early Tuesday led hundreds to flee. 

Note Said to Demand Militants’ Release 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — A note allegedly 
written by one of the men charged in an 
apparent 'plot to bomb a New York City 
subway reportedly demanded the re- 
lease of six jailed Islamic or Arab mil- 
itants, including two men on trial for the 
1993 World Trade Center bombing. 

According to unidentified sources 
cited Monday on ABC’s World News 
Tonight, die note spouted hatred for 
Jews and demanded the release of 
Ramzi Ahmed Yousef and Eyad Is moil, 
who are on trial for the trade center 
bombing. 

Investigators found the note in a 
Brooklyn apartment occupied by Gazi 
Ibrahim Abu Mezer, 23, and Lafi Khalil, 
22, hours after they were captured in a 
predawn raid Thursday. ABC had re- 
ported earlier that Mr. Abu Mezer wrote 
the note. 


According to the reports, the note 
found in the apartment also demanded 
the release of other prisoners, including 
Sheikh Omar Abdel Rahman, now 
serving a life sentence in the United 
States' for directing a conspiracy to 
bomb New York landmarks, and Sheikh 
Ahmed Yassin, spiritual leader of the 
Islamic radical group Hamas, who is 
being held in Israel. 

Mayor Rudolph Giuliani said Mon- 
day that the raid on the apartment could 
have left scores dead if one of tbe sus- 
pects had managed to trigger a bomb at 
his bedside. The man tripped one of four 
switches bur was shot before he could 
flip the other three, the mayor said. 

The bomb, he said, probably would 
have killed eight police officers in the 
building and many other people in the 
area — even though about 90 people had 
been evacuated from nearby buildings. 


Clinton Signs BudgetLmc 

■ -WASHINGTON — In a moment that all agreed 
. was too long delayed. President Bill Clinton on 
Tuesday signed into law a balanced federal budget 
and tax breaks for Americans that he vowed would 
“renew our nation and restore its promise. 

At his side as he signed was tire speaker of the 
■House. Newt Gingrich, Republican of Georgia, who 
said he does not intend to abandon the spirit of 

cooperation that led to the agreemenL 

"This has been a long time coming, Mr. Gin- 
grich said. "We have proved together that the Amer- 
ican constitutional system works, that slowly, over 
rime, we listen io the will of the American people. 
'Mr. Clinton hailed the new laws as "a true mile- 
stone for our nation,” not only for what they do. but 
for the way they came to be: after Democrats and 
Republicans abandoned their political grudge s and 
worthed in good faith for the benefit of ordinary 

~ every generation of Americans before us. 


we have been called upon to renew our nation and to Ms. 

restore its promise, " he said. "In common, we were judges 
able to transform this era of challenge into an era of control 
unparalleled possibilities for the American people. ” dennin 
The legislation calls for balancing the federal Rem 
budget by 2002 and trimming taxes by $ 152 billion speed l 
over five years, the largest tax cut since 1981. It Tuesda 
provides health care funding for uninsured children, icon B 
tax credits for college tuition and assistance to direct, 
blighted inner cities. (AP) Thei 

district 

Reno Hits Senate on Judges 

SAN FRANCISCO — Attorney General Janet 
Reno accused the Senate bn Tuesday of an "un- \JUL 
precedented slowdown" in confirming President *- 
Bill Clinton’s nominees for federal judgeships, say- Mar 
ing the delay was harming tbe justice system, Califor 

She said the framers of die Constitution "did not forcing 
intend Congress io obstruct the appointment of missinj 
much-needed judges, but rather simply to ensure that look lil 
well-qualified individuals were appointed to tbe fed- selling 
era! bench." admini 


Ms. Reno also deplored escalating criticism of 
judges — including calls for impeachment over 
controversial rulings — that she said seeks to “un- 
dermine the very credibility of tbe judiciary." 

Reno bas previously appealed to the Senate to 
speed up its confirmation of judicial nominees. But 
Tuesday’s speech, prepared for delivery to an Amer- 
ican Bar Association convention, was particularly 
direct. 

There are 101 vacancies among about 800 federal 
district court and appeals court judgeships — 12 
percent of the judiciary. The Senate confirmed 17 
federal judges lasr year and nine so far ibis year. (AP) 


Quote /Unquote 


Mary Jo McGrath, a lawyer from Santa Barbara, 
California, on the widespread legal difficulties of 
forcing bad teachers out of the classroom: “Dis- 
missing an incompetent teacher makes the O J. case 
look like a cakewalk. Unless a teacher gets caught 
s elling drugs or in bed with a student, most school 
administrators don’t take action.” (NYT) 


The suspects were under heavy FBI 
guard at Kings County Hospital Center, 
where they were arraigned on charges of 
plotting to bomb a New York subway 
station " and other locations. 

They both are recovering from mul- 
tiple gunshot wounds, their lawyers 
said. 

The mayor and Senator Alfonse 
D ’Amato, Republican of New York, are 
demanding that federal immigration of- 
ficials explain how Mr. Abu Mezer and 
Mr. Khalil got into the United States. 

"Not only does this defy the prin- 
ciples of good public policy, it defies 
common sense, they said in a letter to 
Doris Meissner, commissioner of the 
U.S. Immigration & Naturalization Ser- 
vice. 

Officials from the immigration 
agency did not immediately return a call 
seeking comment. 


Away From Politics 

A gunman aimed his pistol at a se- 
curity gliard in tbe Pentagon and de- 
manded to see an admiral. He was dis- 
armed and taken into custody. (AP) 

A small plane crashed into a house in 
New Richmond, Wisconsin, killing two 
people aboard. In Poygan, Wisconsin, a 
single-engine plane crashed into a field, 
also killing two. ( AP) 

A toxic spill at a paint factory in 
Chicago forced thousands of people to 
flee their homes, schools and work- 
places. f AP) 

A Marine stationed in Oceanside, Cal- 
ifornia, was jailed in connection with the 
shooting deaths of two Marines. (AP) 

A gunman held his ex-girlfriend hos- 
tage in Indianapolis, keeping police at 
bay for three hours, before releasing her 
and killing himself. (AP) 


Gene Finding 
May Restore 
Curing Powers 
Of Antibioties 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Doctors once 
could control meningitis cases with a 
common antibiotic — until the bacteria 
mutated and could overpower the drug 
in some cases. 

But in a study published Tuesday, 
researchers say they have found a way 
to rum off the genes that make bacteria 
resistant 

"This method could restore the full 
usefulness of today’s front-line anti- 
biotics, thus bypassing the tremendous 
expense of developing new antibiot- 
ics," said a Nobel Prize laureate, Sidney 
Altman, who led the Yale University 
team that made the discovery. 

A report is being published in the 
Proceedings of the National Academy 
of Sciences. 

The team found a way to insen ar- 
tificial genes into bacteria, making the 
germs sensitive to two widely used an- 
tibiotics. chloramphenicol and ampicil- 
lin. 

Mr. Altman cautioned, however, that 
the technique has been demonstrated 
only in laboratory cultures and could 
require fi ve more years before it is ready 
for testing in human patients. 

Antibiotic resistance has become a 
growing medical concern in recent 
years. For instance, the bacteria that 
causes meningitis once was routinely 
controlled with ampicillin, a commonly 
prescribed antibiotic. Now. about 20 
percent of such infections resist ampi- 
cillin. 


U.S. Approves 
Brain Implant 

Los Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Food and 
Drug Administration has approved a 
bold, "deep brain" implant that prom- 
ises to ease the uncontrollable tremors 
experienced by thousands of patients 
with Parkinson’s disease and another, 
equally disabling disorder called "es- 
sential tremor." 

The deep-brain stimulator, which has 
been available in Europe for several 
years, has enabled many patients once 
again to eat, drink, write and perform an 
array of daily activities by themselves, 
said Michael Friedman, acting commis- 
sioner of the Food and Drug Admin- 
istration. 

The device, an electrode that emits a 
steady stream of electrical pulses, bas 
proved particularly effective for pa- 
tients with severe essential tremor. 

It has also significantly reduced 
tremors among Parkinson's patients, 
but because it does not treat other symp- 
toms of the disease, it produced less 
dramatic effects on their quality of life. 


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hensive yet concise, informed yet impartial, the affairs of the world unfold on the pages of the World’s Daily Newsps 



PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 6. 1997 



Taiwan Battles China to Keep Its Influence in Central America 


By Larry Rohter 

.Vm Yuri Times Sen-kv 


PANAMA cm' — No sooner had 
China regained Hong Kong lost month 
than Taiwan's foreign minister em- 
barked on a three- week, 1 1 -nation tour 
to shore up ties with his country's 
closest allies. 

His first stop was Honduras, where he 
and his Central American counterparts 
issued a joint declaration condemning 
China's designs on Taiwan. 

Though half a world away from East 
Asia. Central America has in recent 
years emerged as one of the main battle- 
grounds in the decades-old diplomatic 
struggle between China and Taiwan. 

Now, with Hong Kong under Chinese 
control, the scope and intensity of the 
conrest between Communist Party lead- 
ers in Beijing and the prosperous island 
they regard as a renegade province have 
rapidly ' escalated in this region. 

Of the 30 countries that recognize the 
Republic of China on Taiwan, rather 
than the People's Republic of China in 
Beijing, as the legitimate government of 
China, 14 are in Central America and 
the Caribbean. Taiwan's influence and 
generosity throughout the region are 
widespread and have led to increasingly 


conspicuous efforts by Beijing to neu- 
tralize that advantage. 

For Taiwan, relations with CencraJ 
America and rhe Caribbean provide both 
political legitimacy and a promising mar- 
ket for trade and investment. This re- 
gion's trade with China and Hong Kong 
us also booming, bur China has been 
markedly less successful, until recently, 
in persuading countries to recognize 
Beijing — a move that would weaken 
Taiwan's international standing. 

“There have been rumors that after 
the first of July, perhaps the relations 
between my country and the nations of 
Central American and the Caribbean 
would be affected," John Chang, 
Taiwan's foreign minister, said in an 
interview during a visit to Panama City, 
referring to the date when Hong Kong 
came under Chinese control. 

“But those relations are solid and 
quire cordial, and I have come precisely 
to seek a better and more effective way 
to deepen them and increase our mutual 
support in the international arena." 

The maneuvering is intense and fo- 
cuses on the Panama Canal, which the 
United States is scheduled to hand over 
to Panama on Dec. 31, 1999. China is 
the fifth-largest user of the waterway, 
while Taiwan has cultivated a close 


relationship with the Panamanian gov- 
ernment and has made large invest* 
men is here, including an industrial park 
and a comainer port at a former Amer- 
ican submarine base. 

“The Chinese, both China and 
Taiwan, have spotted an opening and are 
trying to exploit it." an American mil- 
itary official in 
Panama City said. 

“The United States is 
leaving Panama, 
there’s a void, and 
each wants refill it." 

To increase its 
limited leverage in 
the region, China has 
not hesitated to bran- 
dish Hong Kong. Even before assuming 
control of the former British colony, 
Beijing warned nations that recognized 
Taiwan that they would have to close 
their consulates and negotiate new ar- 
rangements if they wished to maintain a 
diplomatic presence in Hong Kong. 

That alarmed many governments in 
this region that had made millions of 
dollars selling visas or passports to 
Chinese from Hong Kong and the main- 
land. Typically, a relative or close friend 
of a president is appointed consul gen- 
eral in Hong Kong, and a healthy per- 


The maneuvering 
focuses on the Panama 
Canal, which the U.S. 
is leaving in 1999. 


centage of the revenue from passport 
and visa sales flows back into trie pock- 
ets of top government officials. 

In Panama's case, there is also an 
implicit threat to the lucrative business 
of ship registrations. Panama is the flag 
of convenience flown by thousands of 
ships around the world, including many 

owned by Hong 

Kong or Chinese 
fleets. 

In the past, those 
fleets have often 
registered their ves- 
sels and crew mem- 
bers through the 
Panamanian consu- 
late in Hong Kong; 
but now they may be tempted to turn to 
the Bahamas, a competitor that broke 
relations with Taiwan in July. 

Taiwan, however, is fighting back, 
casting out its own lures. In his meeting 
with Central American foreign minis- 
ters, Mr. Chang indicated that Taiwan 
might be willing to hire Central Amer- 
icans to replace its estimated 240,000 
“guest workers" who currently come 
from the Philippines, Thailand, Malay- 
sia, Indonesia and other countries that 
recognize Beijing. 

“At the moment it is just an idea, bur 


I think it is a very good idea,” he said. 
“Not only does it help create jobs in 
countries that are our friends: at the 
same time, it satisfies my country’s need 
for a larger work force." 

During the meeting in Honduras, Mr. 
Chang indicated that Taiwan was will- 
ing to contribute S100 million to a re- 
gional economic development fund. 
The countries of Central America said 
they supported Taiwan as "a sovereign 
country" and that only “peaceful 
means should be used to reach national 
unification.’ * They also agreed to a sum- 
mit meeting with President Lee Teng- 
hui in September in El Salvador. 

With the United States now reducing 
its aid to the region, signs of Taiwan's 
largesse are an ever more visible pan of 
the Central American landscape. Police 
cars and garbage trucks in Haiti, for 
instance, proclaim in French that they 
have been "donated by the Republic of 
China on Taiwan." as do the trash cans 
in Castries, the capital of the Caribbean 
island of Sl Lucia. 

Missions from Taiwan have helped 
increase rice yields and organized fish- 
ing and agricultural diversification pro- 
jects. Taiwan also helps pay the op- 
erating costs of several foreign 
ministries and police forces in the re- 


gion and regularly sponsors trips by 
government officials, military officers 
and journalists to Taiwan for training 
courses or * ‘familiarization visits.” 

A result, in both Central America and 
the Caribbean, has been a sense of ad- 
miration for and identification with 
Taiwan. The transition of a small and 
threatened island from poverty ro af- 
fluence, and from an authoritarian gov- 1 
eminent to democracy, has impressed 
heads of state throughout this region. ; 

"They definitely have been a model 

for us, " Denzil Douglas, the prime min- 
ister of St. Kitts and Nevis, the smallest 
country in the Western. Hemisphere, 
said in an interview. 

China's hard-line approach to the re- 
gion. in contrast, seems to emphasize; 
the stick much more than the carrot, and 
those hardball tactics appear to have 
generated resentment. 

"You gringos have pushed us around 
for 150 years, and we never liked it," 
said, the foreign minister of one Central 
American country, “so what makes the 
Chinese think that kind of great-power 
arrogance would be any more palatable 
coming from them?” For them to tell us 
not to recognize Taiwan is no different, 
than Washington saying we shouldn't 
have relations with Cuba.” 


BRIEFLY 


South Korea Cabinet 
Gets Some New Faces 

SEOUL — President Kim Young Sam 
reshuffled half of his 22-member cabinet 
on Tuesday but retained the key ministers 
of defense, foreign affairs and economy. 

The 24th reshuffle since Mr. Kim 
came to power in 1993 replaced min- 
isters who also hold posts in the gov- 
erning New Korea Party so they could 
concentrate on the presidential election 
in December. 

The presidential spokesman. Yoon 
Yeo Joon. became environmenr min- 
ister, and the chief secretary in charge of 
government affairs. Shim Woo- Young, 
was named government administration 
minister. New people were named to 
head the ministries of justice, home 
affairs, agriculture and forestry, edu- 
cation, health and welfare, maritime af- 
fairs and Fisheries. (AFP) 

China Activist Urges 
Trial of Ex-Party Aide 

BEIJING — A Chinese dissident is- 
sued a daring call on Tuesday for the 
disgraced Beijing leader Chen Xitong to 
be brought to justice, blaming him for the 
1989 crackdown on democracy protests. 

In an open letter to the leader of 
China’s National People’s Congress, 
the dissident, Jin Cheng, 38, said 
Beijing residents were awaiting a public 
accounting for Mr. Chen's actions. 

Mr. Chen was removed from his posts 
as Beijing Communist Party secretary 
and as a Politburo member during a 
corruption scandal in 1995. 

He should be held responsible for his 
part in the scandal and for his role in the 
crushing of student-led demonstrations 
in Beijing on June 4, 1989. Mr. Jin 
wrote. 

Mr. Chen, he asserted, had misrep-. 
resented the motives and goals of the 
demonstrators, prompting leaders to or- 
der an army assault. (Renters) 

Beijing Reply Is Cool 
On Talks With Taipei 

TAIPEI — A leading Chinese ne- 
gotiator turned a cold shoulder Tuesday 
to calls here for resumption of talks that 
Beijing suspended in retaliation for a 
visit by President Lee Teng-hui to the 


United States in mid- 1995. 

"Certain conditions and atmosphere 
are required if talk.*; are to reopen,’ ’ said 
Liu Gangqi, the highest ranking 
Chinese official to visit the Taiwan in 
more than two years. 

Taiwan, he said, “must move back to 
the one-China principle.” Mr. Liu is 
deputy secretary-general of China's 
quasi-official Association for Relations 
Across the Taiwan Straits. 

China has asserted that Mr. Lee's trip 
was made to promote formal indepen- 
dence for the island. Mr. Lee has denied 
the charge. (AFP) 

For the Record 

Prime Minister Ryu.taro Hashimo- 
to of Japan will visit Russia in early 
November for talks with President Boris 
Yeltsin aimed at improving bilateral re- 
lations, a diplomatic source in Tokyo 
said Tuesday. (Reuters) 

Japan is to station a diplomat in 
North Korea for the first lime, as- 
signing an envoy to the office of a U.S. 
led consortium that is building nuclear 
reactors for Pyongyang, Japanese For- 
eign Ministry officials said (AFP) 

Thailand's navy has taken delivery 
of an aircraft carrier, the Spanish- 
built HTMS Chakri Naniebet. the first 
carrier to be commissioned by a South- 
east Asian country, a Thai Navy spokes- 
man said. (AFP) 

China has lifted a travel ban on 
about 8.000 mainland cadres working 
in Hong Kong, allowing them to take 
vacations and business trips following 
the territory’s smooth July l handover, 
the Chinese-language Apple Daily 
said. (AFP) 



North Korea Embraces 
Armistice as Talks Open 


m. 


twill Cue) ffteuicr- 

LIGHT ON A DISASTER — Rescuers working Tuesday under a 
helium balloon that lit the site where two ski lodges were crushed by 
a landslide at Hired bo, southwest of Sydney. A survivor was pulled 
out 64 hours later. Ten people were dead and eight were missing. 


C,v«ivnl h. Om Shift Fnwu Ou/v ft *r« 

SEOUL — In a dramatic reversal 
hours before the opening of preparatory 
peace talks in New York, North Korea 
said Tuesday that it was ready to abide 
by the 1953 armistice that ended the 
Korean War until a new peace mech- 
anism came into effect. 

The statement, attributed to a Foreign 
Ministry spokesman, was carried by fie 
official" North Korean press agency, 
KCNA, and came just before the four- 
party talks began. 

"As a matter of course, we think the 
Korean armistice agreement should be 
maintained until a new institutional 
mechanism is established to replace the 
present armistice body," the spokes- 
man said. 

The statement was a reversal of the 
stance North Korea took on June 24, 
1995. when it declared the armistice 
agreement “dead "in an apparent effort 
to pressure the United States into a 
bilateral peace agreement, bypassing 
Seoul. 

The about-face appeared to augur 
well for the talks, which got under way 
Tuesday at Columbia University in New 
York and brought together the two 
Koreas. the United States and China. 

The meeting has a limited agenda; to 
set a date, time, place and agenda for the 
opening of substantive negotiations, 
probably in September. The United 
States and South Korea want the four 
governments to negotiate a permanent 
settlement to replace the 1953 armistice. 


Grenade Attack on Club Ratchets Up the Tension in Phnom Penh 


C. M OiirStef Fwhi Du/vk-hn 

PHNOM PENH — A grenade attack on a 
nightclub sharply raised tensions in the Cambodian 
capital as Parliament prepared for a crucial vore to 
replace the first prime minister, who was ousted in 
a coup a month ago. 

Twenty-seven people were wounded, one se- 
riously. w’hen three men in military uniforms 
hurled a grenade into the packed club in rhe center 
of Phnom Penh late Monday, the police said. 


Senior police officials and Tea Banh, co-min- 
ister of defense, said the blast was not connected 
with the political crisis. "We were told that before 
it happened a soldier had asked some people to 
toast him with their drinks but they refused.” said 
a police colonel. Mok Chito. 

Mr. Tea Banh said: "In my opinion the grenade 
attack has nothing to do with politics because it 
happened in a nightclub where a lot of people go 
for enjoyment. If politics was behind it. it would 


have happened somewhere else.” 

Bur the attack triggered a wave of rumors across 
a capital that is still on edge following factional 
fighting last month, during which the second prime 
minister, Hun Sen. deposed the first prime min- 
ister, Prince Norodom Ranariddh. The prince is 
expected to be stripped of his title after Parliament 
chooses a new co-prime minister Wednesday. 

Members of Pari lament are expected to confirm 
Foreign Minister Ung Huot as the new first prime 


minister. He was nominated by remnants of the 
royalist Funcinpec parry in a move blessed by Mr.- 
Hun Sen. The vote has been assailed in advance by 
opposition lawmakers in exile as illegal and un- 
democratic. 

Meanwhile, about 3,360 refugees who fled fac- 
tional fighting in the northwest last week returned 
home Tuesday from Nongchan. Thailand, after 
fighting ceased and the government guaranteed 
their safety. Cambodian aides said.MFP. Reuters i 



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The preliminary talks also are an im- 
portant lest of the commitment of com- 
munist North Korea to go forward with, 
the effort led by the United Slates and 
South Korea to reduce tensions on the. 
Korean Peninsula. 

“I hope we have a good dialogue, 
today v ” the head of the South Korean 
delegation. Song Young Shik, told the. 
other delegations at the start of the meet- 
ing. The United States and South Korea 
proposed the four-power negotiations 
last year. It took months of discussions, 
starting in New York in March, to get 
the North Koreans to agree to meet to 
lay the groundwork for substantive ne- 
gotiations. (AFP. Reuters, AP) 

■ Urgent UN Mission to North 

The UN World Food Program said 
Tuesday that a team of experts would' 
leave next week for North Korea to 
assess the effect of severe drought on 
this year’s food crop-.Agence France- 
Presse reported from Geneva. 

The team had been due to travel to the 
famine-stricken country in October but 
it was decided to move forward the nip 
after a report by UN and private agen- 
cies warned that 70 percent of the. 
North's com crop had been lost. 

The World Food Program team and' 
specialists from the Food and Agricul- 
ture Organization will evaluate the ex- 
tent of damage caused by the two-month 
drought, the worst in the country in 60 
years, said an agency spokeswoman, 
Christiane Berthiaume. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1997 

' EUROPE 


PAGE 5 


Voting to Restart Tax Reforms, Kohl’s Coalition Goes on Offensive 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl’s govern- 
ment went on the offensive 
Tuesday to try to counter the 
image of legislative paralysis 
and coalition disunity. 

Dogged by the impression 


sue that in the past has 
threatened Mr. Kohl’s gov- 


to arbitrate between Mr. 
Kohl’s and the Social Demo- 


uSEFau S £?? cr ^ concepts of tax re- 
1982. All the parties agreed form. 


that the tax, to finance the 
integration of East Germany, 
would be reduced next year to 
5.5 percent, from 7.5 per- 
cent 

The chancellor moved to 


,L„, 4 ,7 RUk. tiuuuutuui U1UVCU to 

that most of Mr. Kohl’s re- regain the initiative as his ma~ 
iSI nS , are m legislative grid- jority in the Bundestag, the 
c ? ailllQ " Tuesday lower house of Parliament, 
proposed a last-minute mea- voted ro restart the govem- 
sure to give taxpayers some mem's package of tax re- 
re , ® ■* year from the es- forms, which was rejected 

caiatmg mandatory premi- last week by a parliamentary 
orns they pay into Germany’s committee controlled by the 
stateretirement system. opposition Social Demo- 
inis is meaat to send a crats. 
political signal that not In a special session of the 
everything is stagnant,” said Bundestag, Mr. Kohl’s allies 
an aide to one of Mr. Kohl's carried out their threat to 
parhamentaiy depu ties. overturn the committee *s ver- 
Mr. Kohl’s coalition also sion of tax reform, which the 
managed to quell infighting Social Democrats had drafted 
within the three-party alii- and which Mr. Kohl's gov- 
ance, at least for the time be- eminent steadfastly has re- 


loading Social Democrats 
seemed intent Tuesday on 
thwarting Mr. Kohl’s latest 
attempts to reassert his au- 
thority. 

Ingrid Matthaeus-Maier, 
spokeswoman for fiscal af- 
fairs for the Social Demo- 
crats. said the two sides were 
still far apart on tax policy. 
She repeated her party's po- 
sition that Mr. Kohl should 
bring forward general elec- 
tions that are scheduled for 
September 1998. 

”1 do not think that we 
should continue this discus- 
sion for another 14 months,” 
she said. “Let’s have elec- 
tions now so that each side 
can put its case to the 
voters.’* 

While Mr. Kohl wants to 
reduce the national tax bur- 


lower income-tax brackets, 
the opposition says that tax 
cuts will recklessly widen the 
nation's deficit while giving 
tax relief mainly to the rich. 

Rudolf Scharping, parlia- 
mentary leader for toe Social 
Democrats, said it was a 
waste of time and money to 
interrupt the summer recess 
to debate reforms that have no 
chance of becoming law. 

“This special session costs 
a lot of money and toe result is 
already clear,” Mr. Scharp- 
ing said. “The mediation pro- 
cess will be resumed, and as 
far as I’m concerned, we 
could do without it” 

The opposition likely will 
use its majority in the upper 


house of Parliament, the 
Bundesrat, to block Mr. 
Kohl’s changes in financing 
state pensions, said Karl- 
Heinz Klaer. a political op- 
erative in Bonn for toe Social 
Democrats. 

In its motion Tuesday, the 
government voted to avert an- 
other consecutive annual in- 
crease in taxpayers' mandat- 
ory premiums into 
Germany's pension system. 

Under current terms, tax- 
payers and (heir employers 
currently split a monthly pay- 
ment of 20.3 percent of each 
employee's gross pay to fi- 
nance the retirement system. 
Pensions are one of the com- 
pulsory payroll deductions 


that have inflated the cost of would torpedo Mr. Kohl’s year. The Free Democrats 
German labor and diminished latest pension initiative. have taken an uncompromi- 
nel income of most Germans, "The government is in a sing stance, threatening to 
who already complain of their crisis," Mr. Klaer said. "You leave the coalition if the gov- 
steep post-unification tax can see that every day." eminent fails to reduce toe 
burden. Prior to toe Bundestag de- unpopular levy. 

Unless toe government can bate, leaders in toe Boon co- the intercoalition agree- 
find another source of fund- alition agreed to reduce toe ment Tuesday is a setback for 
ing. that figure is set to rise to solidarity income-tax sur- Mr. Kohl’s finance minister, 
at least 20.6 percent next year, charge next year, even if toe Tbeo Waigel, and other mera- 
Mr. Kohl wants to increase 
Germany’s value-added tax 
to 16 percent, from 15 per- 
cent, as a way to lower pen- 
sion contributions below 20 
percent of gross pay. 


latest pension initiative. 

"Tbe government is in a 
crisis," Mr. Klaer said. “You 
can see that every day." 

Prior to the Bundestag de- 
bate. leaders in the Bonn co- 
alition agreed to reduce toe 
solidarity income-tax sur- 


broader tax reforms eventu- 
ally fail and tons deprive the 
government of a way to make 
up for toe 7 billion DM in lost 
revenue. 

The Free Democrats, toe 


With their control of toe junior partners in Bonn’s co- 
Bundesrat, toe Social Demo- alition, demand a reduction in 


crats have suggested they 
might block toe value-added 
tax increase, knowing it 


the solidarity surcharge by 
two percentage points to 5.5 
percent from toe start of next 


bers of Mr. Kohl’s Christian 
Democrats who fear that a cut 
could rip a new hole in state 
finances as Germany 
struggles to keep borrowing 
under control for Europe's 
single currency. 

But toe Christian Demo- 
crats appeared to back down 
from their opposition to it for 
toe sake of government unity. 


?a Enibfam 

* Talk * Op* 


mree-party alii- and which Mr. Kohl's gov- While Mr. Kohl wants to 
ance, at least for the time be- eminent steadfastly has re- reduce the national tax bur- 
mg, oyer a proposed reduc- fused to accept The govern- den by 30 billion Deutsche 
non m the ‘ solidarity” ment’ s allies voted to make a raarics t$ 16 billion) through 
income-tax surcharge, an is- second attempt in September reductions in toe upper and 

GERMANS t Battle of the Oder Is Spur to Unity 

Continued from Page 1 essary to bolster the soggy “Through toe brutal reality 


First Look at a New Russian Anti- Ship Missile 


The bitter polemics be- 
tween the two halves of Ger- 
many that still endure nearly 
eight years after the fall of the 
Berlin Wall have given rise to 
a popular axiom: that Ger- 
mans are still divided by "a 
wall in their beads." 

The squabbling has 
seemed so grievous at times 
that many politicians and 
commentators predict it may 
take at least 20 years before 
Germans feel truly united. 

But the extraordinary res- 
cue effort in coping with the 
flood, one of toe worst this 
century, has prompted a re- 
assessment of that dire prog- 
nosis. 

Donations worth millions 
of dollars have been pouring 
in from across the country in 
answer to Mr. Kohl's person- 
al appeal to aid eastern fann- 
ers and their families who lost 
their homes and livelihoods. 


essary to bolster the soggy 
embankments saved toe day. 
“Those of us who spent 40 


“Through toe brutal reality 
of fighting Mother Nature 
have Germans found their in- 


years in East Germany never ner unity between East and 
had it as good as those in toe West. One can only hope that 


west," said Magdalena 
Schroeder, 63, of Hoben- 


it will be sustained.” 

For toe German Army, the 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Jane’s Defense 
Weekly published the first photos 
Tuesday of a new Russian supersonic 
anti-ship missile that its developers 
hope to sell to toe Middle East and Far 
East. 

“Supersonic anti-ship missiles in 
this category are still very rare birds," 
said Mark Daly, the magazine's news 
editor. 

"We've known about it, but now 
we know what it looks like,” he said. 
“It's a powerful new missile from 


’ v 


wutzen, a village in toe roost msis on the banks of toe Oder Russia - It is ship-launchixl, bur it can 
vulnerable pan of toe north- ^ provided ^ invaluable also be launched from a submarine, an 
era Oder basin. opportunity to win public airl and a coastal station." 

We learned how to help S upnon. Jane s published a picture of toe 

one another because we had *K phfll - h ._ K_ n missile on toe cover of its Aug. 6 

to, and that is just what we are f _ r _™ r u c issue. The 8.9-meter (29.4-foot j Yak- 
doing now. But the western- bom missile, produced by NPO 

ers brought their technology Qroe h f^, ( ? pie “ ^bobsh the jVDshinostroemya, is powered by a 
along with the soldiers, and if c J >nsc ^P l * orce m f a ^ or of an engine and can travel at 2.5 


they hadn’t we would have 
been under water a long time 
ago." 

Now that the water level is 
dropping and toe danger point 
appears to have passed, many 
Germans say toe harrowing 


all-volunteer professional 
force as exists in toe. United 
States, Britain and soon in 
France. 

Bat toe sight of ap to 
10,000 young soldiers, many 
who will serve only for their 


also be launched from a submarine, an 
aircraft and a coastal station." 

Jane's published a picture of toe 
missile on toe cover of its Aug. 6 
issue. The 8.9-meter (29.4-foot) Yak- 
hont missile, produced by NPO 
Mashinostroemya, is powered by a 
ramjet engine and can travel at 2.5 
times toe speed of sound to targets 
from 120 kilometers (75 miles) to 300 
kilometers away, according to the 
magazine. 

By comparison, the most powerful 
French-built Exocet missiles have 
ranges of about 70 kilometers, Mr. 





The Yakhont can travel at 25 times the speed of sound to targets up to 300 kilometers away, Jane’s said. 


experience of staving off obhgatoiy nine-month tour of Daly said. The nearest American 


more disastrous conse- 
quences of the floods — toe 
100 deaths and incalculable 
damage inflicted on Poland 
and toe Czech Republic — 


duty, sweating and shoveling 
sand up to 12 boms a day to 


weapons are Tomahawk and Harpoon 
missiles, but like the Exocet they are 


save die lives and property of both subsonic, he said. 


“This is where we have to has yielded a new appreci- 
prove that unified Germany is ation of unity, 
one Fatherland,” Mr. Kohl “In toe last couple of 
said during a visit to the weeks, people from all parts 
Oder’s inundated banks last of Germany who have battled 


eastern compatriots won 
cheers and admiration across 
the country. 


The U.S. Congress has been con- 
cerned about the impending sale to 


missile, toe supersonic SS-N-22, 
known as the Sunburn. In June, toe 
House of Representatives reversed its 
own earlier vote to cut off arms-re- 
duction aid to Russia if Moscow sold 
SS-N-22s to China. At stake was $2 1 0 
million to be used to dismantle Rus- 


had warned that the sophisticated of sound. But he said the Sunburn was 
missiles coaid end up in Iran, where not as versatile as toe Yakhont. 
they could threaten U.S. Navy ships Jane's quoted unidentified officials 
patrolling the Gulf . The missile has a at Mashinostroeniya as saying that 
range of 96 kilometers. Mr. Daly said talks were under way about the in- 


Sunbum missiles, carried on war- 
ships, are blazer and more powerful 


China of another Russian anti-ship sian nuclear weapons. Republicans an 


ips, are bigger and more powerful 
d also cruise at 2J5 times the speed 


talks were under way about the in- 
stallation of toe Yakhont on non-Rus- 
sian surface ships. It did not identify 
toe country or countries involved. 


Germany Scraps Plan to Levy 


the flood waters have helped a 
nation rediscover its forgot- 
ten identity,” wrote Peter 
Jochen Winters in toe Frank- 


I mom Penh j 


week, when It seemed that the the flood waters havehelped a f A . pf c T f A Tnt^rnpt 

dikes would not hold. nation rediscover its forgot- LCCb AOIT X v/o J ili i Kc u Ilf lulclllcl 

But emergency deliveries ten identity,” wrote Peter R 

tons of sand and gravel nee- ^ 

• 7 ~ After threatening to hit PCs linked to the Internet with toe 

urrn j -\r /-* pi . same fee now charged for owning television sets, represen- 

l Y 1 1 tV i A eW LfClC masts UIJ tatives of German state governments bowed to pressure from 

politicians in Brain and said they would not impose the tax. 

Continued from Vase 1 astronaut, Michael Foale, The ARD and ZDF networks had discussed extending toe 

have been preparing for die television fee to Internet PCs used by businesses. The idea was 
several days. In addition, the new crew’s arrival, packing based on a regulatory gap between state laws imposing fees on 
crew has enough oxygen can- equipment into the Progress televisions and radios and a federal multimedia law that took 
isters to last for more than two cargo ship docked with Mir. effect Aug. 1. • 




trades of -toe thousands of furter Allgemeine, a leading 
tons of sand and gravel nee- conservative newspaper. 

MLR: A New Crew Blasts Off 

Continued from Page 1 astronaut, Michael Foale, 


mitfSJ 


months. 

Kathleen Maiiga, a NASA 
spokeswoman at Russian 
Mission Control, said the 
problem surfaced last week 
when the oxygen generation 
system, which had been off, 
was turned back on but sub- 
sequently began turning itself 
off Repairs have been under 
way for two days, she said. 

“We’re not worried,” die 
said. “Obviously we’d like 
for it to be wcuking, and we’re 
talking to the Russians, but 
nothing happened different 
today from yesterday. 

Th the rm lik ely event all 
five Mir occupants have to be 
evacuated during the time 
both crews are aloft, they 
would be able to escape in 
'two vehicles — toe Soyuz 
now standing by, and the one 
jised by the replacement 
crew. 

The two new crew mem- 
bears lifted off after a tradi- 
tional sendoff from space of- 


The Progress will be dis- The fee proposal would have exempted home Internet users 

engaged Wednesday to make who had already paid the television fee. But toe proposal left 
room for toe arriving space- unclear whether schools, universities, hospitals and gov- 
craft The cargo ship will re- eminent offices would have to pay PC fees, 
dock in two weeks and later Education Minister Juergen Ruettgers had appealed to toe 
be jettisoned. It was during a sates to avoid the fees, saying they would dissuade companies 
practice docking that the sup- from investing in Germany and hinder toe development of 
dIy ship ramme d toe Mir. Internet-related jobs and businesses. 


be jettisoned. It was during a 
practice docking that the sup- 
ply ship rammed the Mir. 


BRIEFLY 


Britain Curbs Troops 
For Attack in Cyprus 


emissions until a United Nations meeting in 
Japan in December. (AFP) 

Complaints in Turkey 






P*n) VVrde/ApTWr Fiani IVaw 

A HEAD FOR BREWS — A technician examining beer quality Tuesday at London's British Beer Festival. 


a eoo^ong 1 ^ ISTATffi^— An blamist human rights 


jised by the replacement Frirre _ bm lifted over toe last 18 wiaziumoer group, me i»».uue 

55. S&wtoretaposed on toe fm* m Tmkey is unfortunately very 

The two new crew mem- K Battalion. Kings Regiment, to be re- dais. , 

beta lifted off after a tradi- ^ Mervyn The report focused on abuses m am- 

tional sendoff from space of- ^yrme-Jones a spokesman for the British necnon with religious freedom. (Reuters) 

SfS* » “S^lS^nned visits to are Dutch Cut Bosnia Ties 

when they will attempt a dit- . September 1994 after three sol- _ 

ficult repair effort to restore . a r vamsh tour guide. ( Reuters ) THE HAGUE — The Dutch govemme 

.4 m 1 .a. afotinn fA UJUI * 7 1 _ _ imth ATTlKnCCI 


when they will attempt a dif- 
ficult repair effort to restore 
the damaged space station to 
more or less full power. 

'*■ -the Mir has been running 
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by Gen^y. France. Sweden and 4 e 

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jr rapwredlte SglS^ming, but said that Wash- citizenship and, pafsprals and also the re- 

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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIB UNE, WEDNESDAY , AUGUST 6, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 




R 



^4 Squeeze on Palestinian Budget 


By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Sen-ice 


JERUSALEM — Using a harsh new 
economic weapon against the Palestin- 
ian leadership, die Israeli government 
has suspended reimbursement of taxes 
and other fees that it owes to the Pal- 
estinian Authority. The 'money accounts 
for nearly two- thirds of the authority's 
annual revenue. 

Israeli officials concede that it rep- 
resents an unambiguous violation of the 
peace accords that Israel has signed with 
the Palestinians. 

Under the accords, Israel is obligated 
to transfer to the Palestinian Authority 
all but a small fraction of the nearly $500 
million it collects each year from Pal- 
estinians who work or buy goods in 
Israel. 

As the scope of the plan became clear 
on Monday, Western officials said the 
U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv had fought in 
vain over the weekend to persuade Is- 
raeli officials to reverse the decision. 

American diplomats warned that halt- 
ing the flow of funds could have the 
opposite effect of die one intended by die 
Israelis, who hope that die suspension 
will push Yasser Arafat and his Knees to 
step up the battle against terrorism after 
the suicide bombing in Jerusalem last 
week. 

Israeli officials have said that some 
and eventually all of the payments would 
be restored if Mr. Arafat and his forces 
adopt a harder line toward Islamic mil- 
itants. But Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu said that until they do so, 
they should be subject to the same kinds 
of draconian economic sanctions that the 
United States imposes on countries like 
Libya, Iran and Iraq. 

"The Palestinian Authority must de- 
cide what kind of regime it is,” Mr. 
Netanyahu said. "If it decides it is a 
regime that does not fight terrorism, we 
will continue our measures.” 

A senior Clinton administration of- 
ficial stud Washington had told Mr. Net- 


anyahu that cutting off money to the 
Palestine Authority was "counterpro- 
ductive and only undermines those in the 
authority responsible for security, 
namely the police, who make up the bulk 
of the payroll." 

"We think the Israelis should resume 
transferring funds,” the official added. 
The American position was expressed to 
Mr. Netanyahu in a telephone call from 
Dennis Ross. Mr. Clinton's special envoy 
for the Middle East, the official said. 

Among those who have objected to 
the suspension of payments is Ehud 
Barak, the leader of Israel's opposition 
Labor Party. "It's not our money," Mr. 
Barak said in a telephone interview 
Monday. “It's their money, and I don't 
see how this can last very long.'' 

Many times in the past, the Israelis 
have imposed severe economic hard- 


‘It’s their money, and I 
don’t see how this can 
last very long.’ 


ships on the Palestinians by sealing die 
borders of die West Bank and Gaza, 
preventing tens of thousands of Pal- 
estinians from reaching the jobs in Israel 
that are their livelihood. Israel has also 
.repeatedly stopped the peace talks with 
the Palestinians, as it did after the bomb- 
ing last week. 

But since reaching its first agreement 
with the Palestinians in 1993. Israel has 
never halted die reimbursements that it 
promised to provide. The decision to do 
so now has exposed the extraordinary 
degree to which the Palestinians are fi- 
nancially dependent on Israel's willing- 
ness to make good on its pledge. 

Of the $814 million that the Pales- 
tinian Authority plans to take in as part 
of its 1997 budget, $513 million was to 
come from the reimbursements from Is- 
rael. Each month, Israel has transferred 
to Palestinian accounts a sum that in- 



wd*ti a l|i tii n 


The planning minister, Ginanjar Kartasasmita, announcing the purchase of Russian fighters Tuesday. 

INDONESIA: In Slap at U.S., Jakarta to Buy Russian Fighters 


Continued from Page 1 

what the government said were "wholly 
unjustified criticisms’ ’ in Congress of its 
human rights record, particularly in East 
Timor, a former Portuguese colony in- 
vaded by the Indonesian military in 1 975 
and annexed the following year. 

Indonesia also pulled out of a U.S. 
government- funded military education 
and training program. 

"If arms sales are linked by any coun- 
try to whal we believe are extraneous 
issues, then we will simply find other 
suppliers.” Ali Alaias. Indonesia's for- 
eign minister said after the planned F-I6 
purchase was scrapped. 

In a sign of Moscow's readiness to 
export its top-of-the-line military hard- 
ware without conditions, Indonesia will 
be the second country, after India, to get 
the advanced Su-30K fighter, which is 


considered superior to the Su-27 that 
China has acquired from Russia. 

Analysis said that the Su-30K. which 
can fly at twice the speed of sound, has a 
combat range of 3.000 kilometers ( 1 ,800 
miles), about three limes that of an F- 16 
without aerial refueling. 

They said that provided the Su-30K is 
properly maintained and supported, it 
should be well-suited to long-range 
patrol and interception missions in In- 
donesia. an archipelago of over 17.000 
islands stretching for 5,000 kilemciers 
(3.000 miles) along the Equator. 

Mr. Ginanjar did not say when the Su- 
30Ks would be delivered. 

But India's deal with Russia in 
November for 40 of the planes was re- 
portedly worth about SI. 8 billion. A 
similar deal with Indonesia would there- 
fore be worth some S500 million. 

India has already taken delivery of the 


first of its Su-30Ks. Russia is expected to 
provide similar rapid delivery of both the 
Fighters and helicopters to Indonesia 
when its pilots and support crews have 
been trained. 

Mr. Ginanjar said that the Indonesian 
and Russian governments had yet to 
finalize details of the price and payment 
conditions, technology transfers, spare 
pans and after-sales backup. 

But he indicated ihai at least pari of 
the cost of the purchase would be a 
counter- trade arrangement in which In- 
donesia could exchange its commodities 
such as palm oil. coffee and rubber for 
the Russian aircraft instead of cash. 

When Malaysia ordered 18 MiG-29 
fighters from Russia for S600 million in 
1995. becoming the first Southeast 
Asian country to buy Russian combat 
aircraft, it insisted on paying for pan of 
the deal with Malaysian commodities. 


Israel Is Urged to Ease Its Siege 

Arabs and the West Say the Demands on Arafat Are Too Harsh 


3 


By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Senice 


ShJyurttu/TV AnoaalcJ Prcw 

Palestinian women and girls watching Tuesday as an Israeli Army bulldozer demolished a Palestinian's bouse in 
the West Bank town of Sa'ir. The authorities destroyed the house because they said it was built without a permit. 


eludes ail of the customs duties, value- 
added taxes, fuel-excise taxes, health 
taxes and 65 percent of the income tax 
collected by Israel from Palestinians. 

Because tens of thousands of Pal- 
estinians work in Israel, and because 
even those who do not work there buy 
goods that are produced in Israel or are 
imported via Israeli ports, .the sum of 
money collected by Israel is large. The 
two sides have applied the same prin- 
ciple to money collected by the Pal- 
estinians from Israelis, but that sum is 
insignificant. 

The cutoff in payments began Friday 
when Israel failed to make a scheduled 
payment of nearly $25 million owed to 
the Palestinians as part of their July 1997 
allotment, and it has caused havoc. 

The paychecks that were to have been 
issued Friday were set aside, and the 
Palestinian cabinet has circulated a stem 
directive imposing severe austerity mea- 
sures throughout the government, bar- 
ring all but the most vital expenditures. 

Palestinian officials said Monday that 
civil servants and police forces had been 

S lid their full monthly salaries Sunday. 

at a Western official who works 
closely with the Palestinians said that it 
was not clear that the authority had the 
money to make good on the checks. 

Neither Mr. Netanyahu nor his aides 
have directly blamed Mr. Arafat or his 
advisers for the bombing. 

But they have said the Palestinians 
have done too little to round up sus- 
pected Islamic militants, and they have 
accused Mr. Arafat and others of en- 
couraging some attacks. 

The Palestinian authorities have yet to 
arrest any of 150 suspected militants that 
Israel has urged them to take into cus- 
tody, or to hand over to Israel any of 31 
people who are accused of killing Is- 
raelis and are believed to be living in 
Palestinian-controlled areas. 

Mr. Arafat has said that his forces 
have taken adequate steps and that he is 
being blamed for incidents beyond his 
controL 


JERUSALEM — Israel came under 
mounting pressure Tuesday to ease the 
siege ii has imposed on the Palestinian 
Authority in the six days since a suicide 
bombing attack underscored what the 
Israeli government has allied the Pal- 
estinians' failure to root out Islamic mil- 
itants responsible for terrorist violence. 

As world leaders began a quest for a 
diplomatic solution to the crisis, top 
Arab and Western officials joined in 
suggesting that Israel may have deman- 
ded too much of Yasser Arafat, the Pal- 
estinian leader, whose government is 
reeling from the harsh measures that 
Israel has ordered. Meeting in Cairo, the 
Arab League labeled the Israeli action 
"a declaration of war against the Pal- 
estinian people." 

After separate consultations with 
Prime Minister David Levy of Israel, 
President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt said 
chat Mr. Arafat was "not powerful 
enough” to do all that Israel has de- 
manded. 

And in an embarrassment to Israel, 
which had announced that King Hussein 
of Jordan would travel to Jerusalem on 
Wednesday to help mediate in the crisis, 
a spokesman for the king said he had 
made no such commitment. A spate of 
backbiting followed, with some Israeli 
officials suggesting that King Hussein 
had changed his mind under pressure 
from other Arab leaders, while Jorda- 
nian officials accused the Israeli press 
and Prime Minister Benjamin Netan- 
yahu's office of having jumped to un- 
warranted conclusions. 


The grim mood was further reinforced 
by a statement issued by the militant 
Islamic group Hamas, which warned 
that it intended to carry out "a chain of 
martyrdom operations” that would ex- 
tend "into the depth of the Zionist en- 
tity.” A pair of leaflets issued in the 
name of Hamas had claimed respon- 
sibility for last week's bombing, which 
killed 13 Israelis along with two suicide 
bombers, but these had been treated with 
some skepticism by Israeli authorities. 

But the statement faxed to news or- 
ganizations Tuesday was described by 
experts as unquestionably the work of 
die military wing of the militant group, 
known as the Qassam Brigade, which 
said it intended to make good on an 
earlier threat to resume its attacks unless 
Israel released Palestinian prisoners by a 
deadline that lapsed at 9 P.M. Sunday. 

Hamas recommended that ‘ ‘the Zion- 
ists” should move swiftly "to open their 
hospitals and medical centers once again 
to absorb new clients who will be burned 
by the flames of our holy war which will 
bum every Jew on the land of Pales- 
tine.” 

More diplomatic efforts to resolve the 
crisis are scheduled to resume Wednes- 
day, when Crown Prince Hassan of 
Jordan and the country’s Prime Minister. 
Abdul-Salam al-Majali, will travel to 
Jerusalem in place of King Hussein to 
meet with Mr. Netanyahu. Dennis Ross, 
the American special mediator, is due to 
arrive in the region by week's end. But 
even as Israel came under criticism, Mr. 
Netanyahu and his aides maintain ed a 
rigid stand. 

They have said they will do nothing to 
restart the peace talks, to ease a severe 


closure of Palestinian territories or to 
resume the flow of millions of dollars in 
funds owed to the Palestinian Authority 
until Mr. Arafat begins to round up. or at 
least to disarm, Islamic militants from 
Hamas and other radical organizations. 

Mr. Netanyahu said flatly Tuesday 
that the Palestinians had taken "no ac- 
tion” since last Wednesday's attack to 
respond to the Israeli demands, and he 
declared: "Without these demands be- 
ing met, the peace process between us 
and them is in real danger.” 

Mr. Arafat contends that the Pales- 
tinian authorities have taken some steps 
to combat terrorist violence, but he has 
su gg ested that his power is limited. 

A top Palestinian official said that ^ 
Israel’s economic and security siege, 
which has sealed off the West Bank and 
Gaza from Israel more securely than 
ever before and has included the un- 
precedented suspension of the reim- 
bursements owed to the authority, was 
costing the Palestinians $9 million a 
day. 

Maher al Masri, the Palestinian Min- 
ister of Trade and Economy, said, 
"There is no foreign trade, tens of thou- 
sands of workers are being kept from 
their jobs, industrial production has 
stopped, the agricultural sector is para- 
lyzed and transportation has been halted. 
The result is total collapse." 

Among the Western officials who 
have voiced criticism of the Israeli pres- 
sure tactics is Europe’s Middle East 
peace envoy, Miguel Angel Moratinos, 
who said during a visit to Gaza on Mon- : 
day: "We cannot really understand 
some measures that instead of brin ging 
security are brin g in g insecurity." 


BAHT: Thais Commit to Austerity and Will Close 42 More Firms 


Continued from Page 1 

He warned, however, that Thailand 
would have to provide additional details 
of its plans. 

"Nobody involved wants to extend 
this process,” the IMF official said, 
"but there are still a lot of details that 
have to be sorted out and clarified before 
we can actually sign a letter of intent for 
the full package.” 

Analysts said that with IMF backing 
of its plan. Thailand probably could 
count on Japan to provide loans. Japan is 
Thailand's largest creditor. 

Acceptance of IMF conditions came 
after months of government insistence 
that the economy was sound despite a 
downturn in exports and waning con- 
fidence among foreign investors and 
creditors. 

From 1985 until 1995. Thailand ex- 
perienced torrid economic growth, an 
average expansion of almost 8 percent a 
year that was fueled with short-term 
loans at low interest rates from overseas 
leaders. 

Total foreign debt has now grown to 
an estimated $90 billion — almost three 
times the country’s foreign reserves — 
with about 90 percent of it owed by the 
private sector. 

When the growth of exports began to 
slow last year, Thailand’s creditors 
began to have second thoughts about 
their money. 


By Jnly, pressure on the baht forced 
die authorities to float the currency, 
which had been firmly pegged to a bas- 
ket of hard currencies for more than a 
decade. 

As well as triggering speculative at- 
tacks on currencies throughout South- 
east Asia, the floor of the baht wiped out 
many Thai corporate profits. 

The U.S. dollar feii against the baht in 
Asian trading after the package was an- 
nounced. 

The dollar was trading at 31.85 baht, 
down from 32.15 on Monday. 

Before the Southeast Asian region’s 
currency crisis began in earnest last 
month, it took only about 26 baht to buy 
a dollar. 

As pan of the currency-stabilizing 
package, the government pledged to 
keep its reserves of foreign currencies 
above $25 billion. 

The central bank said Thursday its 
reserves were $32.4 billion in June, 
down from $33.3 billion in May. 

In a related measure, Mr. Thanong 
said he would limit the current-account 
deficit to 5 percent of gross domestic 
product in 1997, compared with 8 per- 
cent in 1996. 

The package will take a toll on eco- 
nomic growth. Mr. Thanong predicted 
the economy would grow 4 percent in 
1997, compared with 6.4 percent last 
year and annual averages above 8 per- 
cent from 1985 to 1995. 


■ New Concern Over Liquidity 

Keith B. Richburg of the Washington 
Post reported: 

While analysts in Bangkok generally 
welcomed the package as a sign that the 
government was serious about taking 
unpopular steps to resolve hs crisis, the 
surprise announcement about the sus- 
pension of the 42 finance films suggested 
that the liquidity crisis in the financial 
sector was even more acute, and more 
widespread, than initially believed. 

Some economic analysts expressed 
concern that the problems in the financ e f 
companies could spread to tbe com- 
mercial banking sector, prompting a run 
on banks such as happened in Argentina 
two years ago when one-quarter of de- 
posits were yanked out of the country. 

Dominique Maire, associate research 
director at UBS Securities in Bangkok, 
called the government actions Tuesday 
"a hot and cold shower. ’ ’ 

The austerity package was the "hot 
shower,” since it clears the way for Thai- 
land to deal with its balance of payment 
problems. But the closure of die finance 
companies points to a domestic liquidity 
crisis that will not be so easily solved. 
Thailand has 91 finance firms, so die 58 
now closed are more than half the total. 

Those firms together have borrowed 
500 billion baht to cover their bad debts, 
a total said to equal about 12.5 percent of 
Thailand's money supply. 


PUFF: Clinton Will Tighten Ban on Smoking at Federal Buildings 


Continued from Page I 

Because the president cannot control 
work conditions in other branches of the 
government, his order will not affect 
Congress or the federal courts. But of- 
ficials estimated that more than half of 
the 1.9 million executive branch em- 
ployees work in agencies that will have 
to tighten rules. 

The order gives agency managers a 
year to conform to the new standards. A 
signing ceremony has been placed on 
Mr Clinton's schedule at least three 
times and then postponed. 


Officials said Monday that it would be 
made the focus of the president's weekly 
radio address Saturday. 

“This decision is important symbol- 
ically, but it's also important to the 
health of federal government employees 
and the people who visit government 
buildings," said Matthew Myers, di- 
rector of the National Center for To- 
bacco-Free Kids. 

“Such an executive order guarantees 
an individual’s fundamental right to 
work in an environment free of un- 
healthy smoke,' ’ said Senator Tom Har- 
kin. Democrat of Iowa. "Risking lung 


BRIEFLY 


The sources said an additional 15 
people were wounded. Security forces 
tried to intervene but came too late, 
witnesses said. 

On Sunday. President LiamineZer- 
oual gave a tough speech threatening 
further action against the Islamic mil- 
itants suspected of carrying out (he 
recent attacks, which have killed more 
than 600 people in less than two 
months. 

He told the cabinet that (he gov- 
ernment would "pursue the implac- 
able battle against this phenomenon 
with all the rigor of the law.” 

"The state will continue to assure, 
with unfailing determination, ali its 
responsibilities so that the criminals 
pay for their actions,” he said. (AP) 

Bolivian President 


Kenyan Opposition 
Will Stick to Strike 

NAIROBI — The National Con- 
vention Executive Council, a group 
demanding reform of Kenya's con- 
stitution, on T uesday rejected the gov- 
ernment’s attempt and announced it 
will go ahead with a countrywide 
strike Friday. 

Council officials said after a special 
meeting that they had decided ihe 
national strike would go forward "be- 
cause there had been no meaningful or 
useful response from the government 
on demanded reforms." 

The council rejected two govern- 
ment reform bills put forth in the past 
week, saying it was an insult to the 
public that they had been published 

without any consultation or discus- • ti A f 

sion with the council or any other UttlCiall'Y Al)prOV€(t 
interested parties. I AFP) *'*' J a L 

LA PAZ — Congress on Tuesday 
overwhelmingly confirmed Hugo 
Banzer. a former dictator turned 
democrat, as the country's next pres- 
ident. 

Since the retired general, who is 7 1 . 
did not win a majority in the June I 
elections, gaining only 20.8 percent of 
the vote, the final decision w;ls made 
by Congress. 

Mr. Rnnzcr was supported by 1 18 
lawmakers, while Juan Carlos Duran, 
who had 17 percent of ilie vole, was 
backed only by the 30 legislators from 
his Nationalist Revolutionary Move- 
ment. Mr. Kanzer will be sworn in 

Wednesday. 

Some remember his 1971- 1978 
term as violent, while others sav it was 
a time of economic growth (AFP) 


26 Killed in Algeria 
After Tough Talk 

ALGIERS — A day after Algeria's 
president threatened more tough ac- 
tion against those responsible lor "de- 
mented” attacks on civilians, armed 
attackers slit the throats of 26 people 
Monday. 

The latest attack look place in the 
village of Amroussa. in the Blida re- 
gion south of the capital, where many 
attacks have occurred. 

The victims included a dozen wom- 
en and a 3-monlh-old baby, hospital 
sources said on the condition that thev 
not be named for fear of reprisals. 


cancer or heart disease shouldn’t be a 
sacrifice a person should have to make 
for career advancement.' ’ 

Such a directive was first contem- 
plated late in George Bush's presidency 
but never acted on. When Mr. Clinton 
took over, he banned smoking in the 
White House but never followed 
through on the broader order. 

Mr. Harlan, Senator Frank Lauten- 
berg. Democrat of New Jersey, and 
Richard Durbin, Democrat of Illinois, 
wrote to Mr. Clinton in June asking him 
to consider the directive again. Mr. 
Lauteobeig, Mr. Durbin and Represen- 
tative Henry Waxman, Democrat of 
California, have introduced legislation 
banning workplace smoking in govern- 
ment offices and private businesses ex- 
cept for separately ventilated rooms. 

This is similar to proposals under con- 
sideration by the Occupational Safety 
and Health Administration and included 
in tbe proposal recently negotiated with 
the tobacco industry. 

But Thomas Lauria. a spokesman for 
the Tobacco Institute, said extending a 
smoking ban to outdoor areas is an out- 
rageous overreach unjustified by evi- 
dence of any harm to nonsmokers in 
open-air settings. 

"If we start banning behavior that 
annoys one another, then we’re going to 
become a si rail jacket society before you 
know it.” he said. 

In many federal workplaces, it will 
make little practical difference because 
they already ban smoking. The 
Pentagon, the Health and Human Ser- 
vices Department, the Postal Service and 
the Environmental Protection Agency 
have among the toughest policies.' 

But others are not so strict. A survey 
by Mr. Lauten berg's office revealed a 
patchwork set of rules that vary from 
department to department. Officials say 
the Transportation Department has 
smoking lounges, the Housing and Urb- 
an Development Department permits 
smoking in some restrooms and other 
agencies allow it in cafeterias. 

Commerce Department workers can 
smoke in private offices while enlisted 
military personnel and others are al- 
lowed to smoke in military-owned res- 
taurants and bars. 

Among the most visible changes will 
be the ban on outside entrances, where 
many workers escape fora smoke during 
lunchtime and coffee breaks. 

An earlier draft of the new policy 
called lor a ban within 50 feet ( 15 me- 
ters) of doorways, but the final vciMon 
does not define how far the no-smokins 
zone would extend. 


U 


• r— 










M ItS S 

* r, V'0 ir t . 7 ^ 

' INT'L FRANCHISES 


4 THE INTERMARKET 


“TT ++4 171 420 0348 


f TELECOMMUNICATIONS jl BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


JUST PUBLISHED 

International Herald Tribunes 
International Franchise Guide 
EVTERNATIOiXAL MASTER FRANCHISE 
® area DEVELOPMENT OPPORTIATHES 

TVdrfinime guide defied >>olely io immutioruil frunrliiHii-. 
‘tailed, un-lunlalc profile' on lire world'- I'-iuling inia-niatioiul 
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Aw/ '» *HT liuide. PJ). Bov 12m Oakland. C\ <Uh"4. G»Il W (Infer. I'm 
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. See FridayN Intermarket 

for Hfiljdin* a TW»w*L Kf«ideaiixi 
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Tel: (201) 567-8500 ext. 23 
Fax: (201) 567-4405 USA 


COM. REAL ESTATE 


^ Strikingly ^ 
predominant site on 

Germany's top-ranking 
Shopping Mall, 
ZeiI121, 

Frankfurt am Main 

to be auctioned Wednesday 
Sept 3, 1997 

09:00 hrs, Frankfurt/Main 
Gerichtsstrasse 2 B, Room 137 
Fax enquiries to 

k +449 40 363615 J 


THE INTERMARKET 
Starts 
on Page 4 


GERMANY 

COMMERCIAL STORAGE 
FOR RENT, 

20,000 sq.m. Conveniently 
located between Essen and 
Dusseldorf. DM 4,90/sq.m, 
or best offer. Direct inquiries 
to: 

Johann Scheldt, USA 
Fax: (201) 945-0363, 

Tel: (201)943-8131 


READERS ARE ADVISED 

that the International 
Harold Tribune cannot be 
held responsible for loss or 
damages incurred as a 
result of transactions stem- 
ming from acfverfisomenf5 
which appear in our 
paper. It is therefore rec- 
ommended that readers 
make appropriate inquir- 
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money or entering into 
my brntUng commitments. 


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LARGE GRADER OF USED CLOTHING 
-O; ttomsi - rtci - chiOrer 

FRatw.i * :ou=snc cuAurr 

D sm .=-;i3 i 0=NlU JACKETS 
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A=?a; -S1A. EUROPE US-EAST. 

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. USED LEVI SOI JEANS • All cotem & 
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□ SWISS MONOPOLY 

NTL PROJECT 
FWANCtNG 

REAL ESTA7- EQUITY 
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JOINT-VBfTURE 
UTflQUE CONCEPT FOR 
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Alin. CEO. AJA. Sfrot, 

P.0. Box 508. 4001 Basel, 
Swflzfirfarei." 

Fax: 0041 ei 311 8003 


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Drwrs bcer^es Email' 
C3ac'Suwin£tm rax 53-2-831 7S5C 


HcralbS-Sribunc 

THE »ORIJ» mm NEHi-PUTR 

PLANNING to run a classified ad? 

o! . j „ uic LK, and snsily, contact your nearest IHT office or naresmtatw. with your 

tet ass-rf ^ ,s » ar at/w " 

S lnr within 48 hours. All mo|or Credn Cards Accepted. 

sueopc LATIN nwauca 

EUROPE 

NttPoii iou/v 39355 *^8Si®iBr. . 

*b= , E5v|E522AE5 


LATOJ AMERICA 


m^ORRA: Arsfcm li Velb 

Tel. &IV1 
fy. Si- 523 

COMAftf AUSHBA & CBJISAL EUROPE 

9712500. 

g,S««7T2Sflai) 

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fat 


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ioamON. 5Y72A: ury 

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SAUDI ARABIA: Ccr^ 

ToL. 71 SSs 4SJ?- 
ftr, 7‘. 24C Z2--4 

iMT3) ARAB EMRATB 3br<L. 

TeHMKlj^ 

ftn i:-t;r4S38 . 

SOUTH AFRICA 




WgRWMjSgft 

MEW YORK; 

:21 21 752-^4 

Tci: 1 - 

'ilfc. «* 

TEXAS: 

i 21 -JCi-vfcJ 
7;J 77M 

1 ATM AMERICA 

?t, is: -3, 5 : 


BRAZIL S=s r&ac 
Tol.l55"l953-«33 

ASAPAPFIC 

HOWSKONG: .... 

To. S532S52-I-K 
n.. J! T70 .WT-X 
5 =r3522?22-ii« 

NOOICSAJa^rGKtai 

•e 52-21-25! 1 4^? 1445. 
=at. 32-21-25I 2501 

JAPAN: Tc^i, 

T<t SOI C2 _ 
^ ^273. Fst 3201 0109 

MALAYSIA: &sb Lur^ur, 

“ !e^-!C2<"PB12Sl4 
rat ,t03: C G-C5 ^32 77 5i. 

PHlpaNB: %sa2ffr. 

7.' 527 321 1 

rst- 333-0751 

SNSAPORtERUNB: ^ 

Te. 2236473 
22C34I 
“c SBTivtilSK 

IHABAM). BURMA: BmJsL 

'd 257^164. 267-V. 35 
-sc 2i7-?16d 

AUSTRALIA 

rs. 5*34611 


ATTENTION 
CALLBACK 
DISTRIBUTORS & 
AGENTS: 

IDT WANTS 

Your Business! 

b~. u; DT. 9Mij us ,70 asemt: 
12S? aei^r 31 am pur 15: 

:-j -jre s.sci r J vow Miwres re-rr^ 

*1 your pocket 

IDT •.* a onset,' tTcJM US eorpo-aen 
;0TCi We art we financed tti a 
same tianagmeni sndire 

CALL US 

BEFORE IT’S TOO 
LATE! 

Telephone: 201-92W433 
Fax: 201-907-5112 


OFFSHORE BANKS 

COMPANIES & TRUSTS 

IUUIGRAT10N/PASSP0RTS 

0ar*iifrAcoiuniing4eaflanal 
'/a Reaslralxavimwcjig 
lAai-PtoV-Fax Sennces WtwJmde 

Aston Corporate Trustees 

19 Pael Road, Douglas. Isle of Um 
let +44 (0) 1624 626681 
FtE +44 (0) 1624 625126 

London 

Tel: +44 (0) 171 233 1302 
Fac +44 (0) 171 233 1519 

E Hail: astondenterprise.net 


BUSWESS OPPORTUNITY 
IN TELECOM 

M*XSe Eastern Co irartung m Telecam 
sree 75 rah wide experwte is boWng 
lor rtemaSonal jamas for pm 
venue n the area, me mart« s 
lewaled gradual h; (a many ser/icesi 
Please lax you swgssKn to 
Franca +33 (0)4 SO 20 14 89- 
(AS offers eiiil be snried careUifi. 


LIVE AW WORK M FRANCE 
CANAL BARGE COMPANY 

Estat&ted 1°83 1W « chaw boa. 

d pessergeis. 4 ae* wceBen 
conaon iwjtesi tepuawi. mnfeus. 

rffitv veheule. aianig Qgtetf . 
sarr-if support MNinued rnatetlng 


FINANCE AVAILABLE FOR 

■ LETTERS OF CREDT 

' STAIflffiY LETTERS OF CRGfT 
• FINANCIAL GUARANTEES- 
* PROOF Or FUNDS 

■ INVESTMENT LOANS 

Fax appocatiotts onh to -SO 392 2238291 


ANONYMOUS BANK ACCOUNTS 
TRADE FINANCE 
BANK INSTRUMENTS 
Fast nquoy orty Ui +90 302 228291 


2nd PASSPORTS i Driving Licences 
Degrees'CamoriladS Passpori&'SecTFi 
Bank Act oil its. GU PO Box 73302. 
ALhens 16610. Greece. Far 8562152. 
hjgj./avagbbaFfwrey an 


ARE YOU BITE RESTED W MAKWG S 
nodes) Invesimert and Rearing in the 
USA’ For more ntorrebon: Hay 1 Pa, 
P.C., ABomeys Mpj-Yniiw^Aet' Wff r 
Emai- bppeegtrgjifl Tet 71SSD-3033 


HAWAI Ictf mflffliacMrt'g Co S75K & 
3 bedroom home i a ere S400K Tel: 
H&23W258 Of 0C8-£35«45 



PRE-QUALIFICATION OF 
MANUFACTURERS/SUPPLIERS 


An ongoing Five Star Deluxe Hotel Project at Mumbai (Bombay) 
with 550 rooms will shortly require the following items: 


1. Inreractiw TV 5yst«i» 

2. Health Club Equipment 

3. Gymnasium Equipment 

4. Beauty Saloon Equipment 

5. Mini Bats for Geese Booms 


9. Carpets 

10. Banquet Movable Partitions 

I ■- Light Frttm^/Hxtunes Both 
Indoori Outdoor 
(2. Artificial Plants 


6. Jacuzzi System-Outdoor i Indoor 13. Heat Recovery Wheels 

7. Audio Video System 14. Dimmer Control Panel 

8. CATV Equipment 15. Linen & Tapestry 

Interested suppliera/manufacturers may respond immediately 
within a period of two weeks from the date ot the advertisement 
giving details & value of the worit carried out and current job on 
hand at the following address: 

ENJAY HOTELS LIMITED 

R.S. Nos. 416 & 417. B.J. Road. 

Bandra (W). Mumbai 400 050. INDIA. 

Tel: 0091-22-6441234 • Fax: 0091-22-6441208 

Inniioom 


03 IDEA OR 
V^INVENTION? 


PEFINH* 

...then 

America s leading product 
development company It rmerested 

NTERNATIONAL PRODUCT DESI6N 
1 Harley Straat, London WIN IDA 



EMPIRE STATE BUHMNG 
ADDRESS 

Omih Instant cmfibility. 
Establish a NY presence in 
trie world's best-known 
building. Mail received, phone 
answering, conference 
room, lumished minl-otflees. 
BMC STATE OmCESSlMCB 
TEL 2 T 2 - 73 U 672 * FAt 212 - 584-1 US 



USA OPPORTUNITY 

Enlvr an exerting pan ol Ifia 
tian5ponanon business in trie USA 
Atvrays profrat'fe ne're i«d closely io 
irte new produa Oaveicproera process a 
one d toe B g Three van am} irorii *■#- 
sons We are consisleraly m the* icp 10 
n both quaky and votine Our mdusuy 
ts consewaing-oj mere can b? no new 
entrants when (he market explodes apn 
in*0 explain ehyi 12 NET audited 
statement Fnwerfiil managemen learn 
vrtl slay up to 18 months, iraemaicnal 
pcs^Hres 

Box 361, fotemariona! Herald Trfcune 
B50 Third Art, N.Y. N.Y. 10022 USA 
Fax: 1-708-7634819 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

READY UADE CO i. FULL AELUN 
TRADE DOCUMENTS AND LC 
BANKING & ACCOUNTING 
CHINA BUSINESS SERVICES 

Contact Statta Ho tor immetfere 
setvees & company brodue 
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2-6 Gram* Road. TST Koafoon, 
Hong Kong, e-mai nacs€hlLa<»«J« 
Tel: 8S2-ZT241223 Fax 27224373 


USA/UK HEALTH FOOD Hanufacturer 
setiotg martmng and maniaacMtng 
aBartces «h prtvfle Conpanies win 
esubSshM rionercal and con6umef 
related outlets. We oBer an 
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whefy from fresh apples, and dasslted 
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Sippressa* It eriws a strong croduo 
Benlity serving w acfrre wo rld niche 
mark# Mth siywcanr grwffi prosperis. 
Reach us on lax rxjnttc 441244538857 
or E-mal address. fecherSnoelat or 
vat our Home Page on the ireemet http*’ 
iwwwioel ArKiriinBlnctMds'aliorne him 


PRIVATE PLACEMENTS 

Securities company can provltfe 
private piacernerts and crecfit 
facHUes tor quaifiad comp a raaa, 
Rapiesent our fine In your axes by 
contract. AsraeOw fee aVueture. 

Call FIRST DUTCH SECURITIES 

IN USA: 1-242-322-SOO} 

« EUROPE: 323-213-2139 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES. For free bro- 
crtiie or advice T* Lcnrton M 181 7*1 
1224 Fax. 44 181 748 6558*338 
wwiran^emotu* 


REAL ESTATE COMPANY created m 
1989. capital 50QD.000 BEF sedis In- 
vestors (3,000.000 8ER tor South-East 
Asa protects 7eW=ax: ^384^4.64 


SJL IN BRUSSELS talking for any prill- 
(Brie business prepostion pertly real 
e6iate company). Please call 
+32J.646 IZ14 


SWISS BROKER DEALS! CO tor sale. 
Registered «rt Federti Barb no comrxs. 
sion - offers over S250.000. id 1+41) 
91 610207 Fax 1+41} 91 610.2206 


UNSECURED VISA CARD AVAILABLE 
to anyona. Ore* Umt minimum S5.000. 
For tree information please Fax. 
T^iO 623429 


US INVESTMENT CO. needs reps. Ex- 
ceptional opportunity to earn A W.R I . 
210 Fey SL. San Francsco. CA. SaiCG 
Fax: 707B380383 E-mait AmQadcur 


VSmNG PROFESSOR, rare oppottuto- 
tes. prestigious life. US University. 
EmatmtobiBrehamdcom 


Telecommunications 


CTl - International 
lifematbnal PcgaitJ Cetos 
Exhemefy Compettfve Pricing 
Ttt 39-01-5096243 Far 39-81-5096772 
3422 Old Cepfei Trap. Sue 670. 
Mrirgon. Debwara 19006-6192. USA. 


Business Services 


YOUR OFHCE IN SWITZERLAND. 
We tiler todmdual lelepnore'answring 
and seoetanal service, representative 
and cotporae donaae 
City Telephone k Office Senfcaa Lto. 
BahnhtSasse 44. 7002 QurSusw 
TeJephme +41 61 255 3333 
Tetaax -41 B1 252 3340 


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ANNOUNCEMENTS 


WORLD TRENDS: 


It >>'U want riw wry t+N ins+iL-r 
o ui uiHi 1 an) mirihgence 
O -nui t 

THE SPECIAL OFFICE 
UK Fax: 01608 650 540 

No pp -rainrrfj. n.' chjr,v 
Kn vi-ji wi'iilJ kurr. ihc 


2ND PASSPORTS. Visa tree travel & 
banking back door to Spato A EU 
Aaerfc are '.yticome Tet 972 50883135. 
Fax 972 4 8643236 or E-mal 
^asspoiiepasspon oBat> 


RUSSIAN BUSINESS Visas mdudjng 
mutH-enby plus an olhei navel semces 
va on ttotmtmn Uosctr-v office Tet t 44 
(01113 232 0062 Fax (0,113 232 0228. 


MAILING LISTS by Sergar S Company 
Eunpean business and consumer data 
Tfl 44 1312262956 Fa> « 1312S7301 


MULTILINGUAL DUTCHUAN. 46. reli- 
able. seeks position as represemairve 
Fax -31 20 6442609 


YOUR OFHCE IN LONDON 
Bono Sn?ei - MW. Frions -ax Telex 
Tfl « Cl 236 fiaai Fa- IT- 453 cl’ 


YOUR OFFICE W NEW YORK 
UalFimf Servre 
212-9090515 - tcp. ut ntr^m 


Consultants 


FINANCIAL CONTROLLING SERVICES 
German nahonai (fluere Enofisl+Frerch)- 
Key areas m Accounimg CcntnJ&ng. 
GAAP-Feportmg Auditing. Orgamsafron 
German fixes Acrg Furdninay on in- 
terim base andcj special assgnmeres 
Fax. +49-4122-96 49-2 i Germany i 
E-mae: e.muetet®efrnshom.nflsuil de 


Business Networking 


YOUR U.SJSW1BS EXPANSION NOW! 
Reps. Mtcuiws deal & travel to you. 
No from lee, Success-fee 1 Free Wo it 
you fox oiler to M S P. +41 t 7131597 


Capital Wanted 


PUB BREWERY CHriA 
in^i confany swttia partners n JV in 
Chma. Hqh rettans and grea potential 
tor eaanson Mn inveament £40.000, 
max. E40O.OOC Fax -M 1OJJ8I 522U24 
for desk Prhdpafa Only 


SWISS COMPANY SEEKS In vestment 
partner tor USS1214. Actrvitv relates io 
(afrrady ensttogl nemaUonalV palenrad 
cEdraaion systems of active mgredrems 
tnh excaOem paerfal tor cosmetic, nu- 
trirtonal and phamaceuficai appteahons 
Please coraaa CERATECH Fax +4i 22 
819 19 00 


HIGH RETURN LOW RSK PROJECT. 
Rapid cash tav and astrmomcal profit 
As ccxsderatnn tor US5 ID mifen the 
Investor ml recetve substamal equiy. 
Rax 603-7175412 


Capital Available 


ANCJLO AMERICAN GROUP 
— 

PROJECT R NANCE 
VOTIIRE CAPITAL 
GLOBAL COVERAGE 
NO MAXIMUM 
BROKERS WELCOME 
For Corporate Brodure and 
formation pack 
Tel *44 1924 201 365 
Far. -44 1924 201 377 
You are aekame io visa us 


CAPITAL C0RP. 

M & A 

Corporate Fnancmg 
Venue Capua! 
iWoridwlei 

Tel: M1-407-24M3M 
Fax: 001 -407-248-0037 USA 


GLOBAL PROJECT FUNDING VEN- 
TURE CAPITAL-JOINT VENTURES- 
PROJECT FINANCING 


lMiritllV.ll VtNTtlli 

Til: +44 113 2727 550 Fax: +44 113 
2727 560 Fees are not reforested ptta tD 
an tifer ti tvndng Dwg made 


C0HMEBC1AUBUSINESS FINANCE 
available for any viable projects trorld- 
wtde. Fax bnet synopsis m EngEsh to 
Copctoe Advances, f* (44-1273^1300 


\ EINT L15 E 
CAPITAL WANTED 
US$20,000,000. 

NAPOLEON J REN Cl I CHEESE 
FRENCH W INERY PRODUCT 
MADE IN CHINA SINCE 1993 

j 

BEIJING VI ADI FOOD CO. LTD, 
GSELS. S1FOM GILLES 

120 Cliemin du (Yu* 

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n-bLLSHEn mm THE >ork times \vd the WASiiiMimN post 


Waiting for China 

is political. Mr. Jiang appears to covet 
the political glow of leading China, 
which will soon be the world's largest 
exporter, into its rightful place in the 
club of international traders. 

Membership is also important to 
ihose Chinese officials who want to 
embrace markets as the driving force 
of the economy- Once China is a mem- 
ber, these officials can use the threat of 
WTO sanctions as a hammer to hasten 
reform. China may also anticipate the 
day when its exports bump against 
protectionisr forces abroad and it will 
wish to invoke international sanctions 
froru inside the WTO. 

For the West’s part, membership 


American officials are disappointed 
that months of negotiations on whether 
'to admit China to the World Trade 
Organization have failed to produce an 
;agreement to open China's booming 
'economy to foreign imports and in- 
vestment. But the Clinton administra- 
tion has wisely decided that it would 
rather let an artificial deadline. Pres- 
ident Jiang Zemin 's visit to Washington 
in October, slip than hastily invite China 
into the WTO on the wrong terms. 

China’s economy relies heavily on 
companies owned and subsidized by 
the state. For admission to the WTO, a 
country must agree to sell its exports 
free of government subsidies and to 
permit imports to compete against its 
domestic products on commercially vi- 
able terms. It must also allow trading 
partners to monitor whether these fair- 
trade rules are obeyed. China resists 
these changes in part because they 
would prove wrenching. The Chinese 
would need to make government sub- 
sidies explicit and then agree to phase 
them out at a steady pace. That could 
throw huge numbers of Chinese out of 
work before a well-functioning labor 
market could steer them into new jobs. 

It is uncertain how many market- 
based rules that govern tariffs, quotas, 
subsidies and other trade barriers 
China is willing to swallow. So far the 
Chinese have made only timid offers to 
the United States, which has assumed 
the lead in negotiating terms of China 's 
entrance into the WTO. 

Beijing's hesitation is unsurprising. 
It already reaps, without making con- 
cessions, the benefit of most-favored- 
nation status in America and most oth- 
er countries, which guarantees that ex- 
ports from China are taxed no more 
than exports from any other country. 
Membership would therefore give the 
Chinese little economic advantage. 

To Beijing, the lure of membership 


offers an effective way to side wi 
Chinese reformers in converting China 
to an economy governed by rules sub- 
ject to international judicial proceed- 
ings. The United States would no 
longer have to play the role of a bully 
threatening sanctions for Chinese trade 
violations and could instead let an in- 
ternational body resolve disputes. That 
would deflate trade and political ten- 
sions between the two countries. 

Despite nearly a decade of nego- 
tiations. the fractured Chinese lead- 
ership appears unready to embrace a 
specific schedule of steeply lower tar- 
iffs and elimination of other trade bar- 
riers like restrictions on the right of 
foreign companies to sell products in 
China or of foreign investors to export 
products from China. 

The West will not demand that Chi- 
na turn itself into a clone of the West by 
privatizing state-owned companies. 
But it will demand that China, like 
other WTO members, end subsidies for 
state-owned companies that are used to 
promote exports and block imports. 

China has not made up its mind to 
accept the WTO on its terms. The West 
can wait until it does. 

— THEKEU YORK TIMES 


Arming Latin America 


Twenty years ago. the United States 
could control the terms on which Latin 
America bought American big-ticket 
defense items. It banned their sale. The 
American rationale was that in the ab- 
sence of a credible external threat. Lat- 
in militaries would use new weapons 
only to strengthen their illegitimate 
political authority and to divert scarce 
funds from essential social projects. 

Today there still is no perceptible 
external purpose to be served in a re- 
gion free everywhere of the stuff of 
hemispheric conflict, except in the 
carefully watched Peru-Ecuador dis- 
pute. But Latin America's shift to 
democratic governance and civilian 
control of the armed forces has pro- 
duced considerably more American 
confidence in Latin militaries than ex- 
isted when the ban on high-tech mil- 
itary equipment was imposed a gen- 
eration ago. 

Local "military establishments are 
clamoring to modernize. American de- 
fense contractors, seeing their com- 
petitors moving in, have joined the cry. 
This is the basis on which Washington 
has now relaxed its ban. subject to 
case-by-case review. 

A tinge of apprehension about pos- 
sible Latin backsliding lingers, and it 
should. Not only can some American 
arms sales be interpreted as advance 



approval of the local military’s next 
nationalistic whim. The institutions of 
democratic civilian rule are not every- 
where strongly moored — not even in 
the three largest Latin countries that 
are considered to be the likeliest new 
customers. 

But Argentina. Brazil and Chile do 
run elections that let voters hold lead- 
ers accountable, and do allow parlia- 
ments to scrutinize their budgets. They 
use their forces internationally. Ar- 
il in the Gulf War, while 
, and 
_ ex- 
porter) in Angola. It would be awk- 
ward to pursue freer trade with these 
countries, as the United States has in 
mind, and to exclude arms from the 
trade to be freed. 

There is. nonetheless, a soft spot in 
the new Clinton policy. It lies in its 
failure adequately to encourage Latin 
governments to set their own 
guidelines for arms purchases. The 
United St3tes tried quietly to plant the 
idea, met some resistance and quit 
early. It is still a good idea. A Latin 
America mature enough to work its 
way free of patronizing foreign re- 
strictions on its purchases of weaponry 
ought to be mature enough to weave its 
own diplomacy of restraint. 

— WE HASH/XOTOM POST 


Campfire on the Net 


The on-line bookstore Amazon.com 
hit a public relations bonanza when it 
launched an “interactive novel” to be 
written on the Internet over the next six 
weeks by readers in collaboration with 
renowned author John Updike. The 
appeal of this venture, as measured in 
the enthusiasm with which readers 
have poured in contributions, turns out 
to be curiously old-fashioned. The 
game is the old one of adding chapters 
to a tale in round-robin style. 

Each day the novel, dubbed “Mur- 
der at the Magazine. ' ' advances by one 
paragraph, chosen by Amazon.com 
staff from the submissions ot' the day 
and awarded a S 1 .000 prize. When Mr. 
Updike, who started the tale off. adds 
the Final paragraph in September, there 
will be a grand prize of S100.000. 
along with, it is clearly hoped, lots and 
lots of “hits" on the web site. 

Judging from the response, the 
charm still holds in an era in which 
telling stories around a campfire, or 
even waiting for successive install- 
ments of a story’ in a magazine, have 
long since retreated in the face of tele- 


vision and other less "interactive” 
pastimes. Nor is it the first time the 
shiny new Internet technology has 
proved, against all expectations, to tap 
people's persistent but otherwise in- 
visible attachments to the communi- 
cations technologies and enjoyments 
of the past. The widely remarked re- 
birth through e-mail of letter writing 
between parents and children is one 
example: another is the stunning initial 
success of Amazon.com itself. 

The big bookstore chains such as 
Bames & Noble have taken the hint 
and stampeded into cyberspace after 
Amazon.com, which is fighting back 
with extra discounts and innovative 
gimmicks, the round-robin novel con- 
test being one. It deserves to thrive. An 
upsurge of book sales in cyberspace 
could have dramatic effects on the for- 
tunes of the already fey and contra- 
dictory world of book publishing. This 
is an unfolding on-line drama worth 
watching, whether or not the one by 
Mr. Updike and his collaborators turns 
out to be any good. 

— THE WASHINCmX POST. 


IVTLRMTUlMI 


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v/«*\ Hcrj’J Tribune Ml njjiifi tinned IjS% b2‘0-'i':2 



What to Do if Mideast Peace Is Really the Goal 

v », nf the IJnil 


J ERUSALEM — The July 30 mas- 
sacre at the Mahaoe Yehuda market 
in Jerusalem followed the announce- 
ment of immin ent resumption of dead- 
locked negotiations between Israel and 
the Palestinian Authority, an interrup- 
tion of U.S. mediation activity and ad- 
option by die United Nations of an Arab- 
initiated resolution condemning Israel. 

Evidently, the cycle of Palestinian 
terrorist action is not fortuitous. It 
seems to be related to the course of the 
peace negotiations. As long as the pros- 
pects of progress appear to be dim. 
terrorist organizations associated with 
fundamentalist Hamas lie in wait, re- 
lying on the politicians to halt the peace 
train. When it starts moving again, 
Hamas terrorists strike to derail it. 

Take the multiple terrorist attacks in 
March last year, to which 59 Israelis 
fell victim. They were launched when 
the Shimon Peres government was ac- 
tively engaged in negotiations with 
Yasser Arafat’s representatives on im- 
plementation of the Oslo accord. Si- 
multaneously. ambassadors of Israel 
and Syria, with U.S. assistance, con- 
ducted intensivepeace talks . 

Moreover, 1996 was a year of na- 
tional elections in Israel. The Labor 
government led by a wide margin in the 
polls. By all estimates, its re-election 
would have accelerated the negoti- 
ations and improved the prospect of a 
successful outcome. Mr. Peres’s de- 
feat, to which the attacks contributed 
decisively, would seal the fete of peace, 
or so the enemies of peace assumed. 

Note, too, that on July 15 this year 
the United Nations adopted an unbal- 
anced resolution saddling Israel with 
responsibility for the suspension of 
peace negotiations. 

For half a century the United Nations 
has been involved in the Arab- Israeli 
conflict. On Nov. 29, 1947, the General 
Assembly resolved to settle the Pal- 


Bv Gideon Rafael 


estine problem by partitioning the 
country into Jewish and Arab states 
linked by economic union, with Je- 
rusalem placed under a a international 
administration to be reconsidered after 
10 years In a referendum by the pop- 
ulation of the city. 

The Jewish side, although regarding 
the solution as a painful compromise, 
accepted it. The Arab side rejected it; 
its head of delegation, Jemal Husseini, 
declared that "the line of partition will 
be a line of blood and fire.” 

His statement was meant not as an 
empty threat but as a declaration of war 

One-sided UN votes 
against Israel are 
damaging to the, 
peace process. 

against the nascent Jewish state. It be- 
came the battle cry of the Palestinian 
leadership, sounded by its represen- 
tatives in every arena, heralding an a 
long chain of violence that erupted into 
five full-scale wars. 

The Arabs, failing to wipe out Israel 
on the battlefield, turned the United 
Nations into a substitute battleground, 
launching an unceasing worldwide 
campaign of defamation of Israel; the 
aim was its international isolation as 
a prelude to its eventual elimination. 
Unfortunately, the United Nations 
proved to be more effective in pro- 
longing the conflict than in terminating 
it by peaceful serdemenL 

The hope that the conclusion of 
peace between Egypt and Israel nearly 
20 years ago. an event of far-reaching 


significance for the Middle East, would 
become a turning point for the United 
Nations was deeply frustrated when the 
organization denied its support of the 
peace treaty. 

Nor did the Oslo accord of 1993, 
designed to end the conflict once and 
for ever, produce a basic change in the 
attitude of die United Nations. 

On various occasions when nego- 
tiations between Israel and the Pal- 
estinians were stalled by major dif- 
ferences. Mr. Arafat turned to the 
United Nations, counting on a vast 
majority to blame Israel for the dead- 
lock. The 130-odd votes that he has 
succeeded in mobilizing twice in recent 
months against Israel probably encour- 
aged him. Whether they advanced the 
cause of peace is another matter. ' 

Experience has shown that one-sided 
condemnation of Israel by the United 
Nations produces at least four harmful 
effects. It reduces international influ- 
ence oq Israel's political decisions, 
it weakens America's position in the 
international community, it prods 
Arab extremism, and it impairs the 
standing of the United Nations as a 
promoter of peace. 

What actions are useful for a suc- 
cessful outcome of the peace nego- 
tiations? Among the major factors: 

• Readiness of the parties to make 
reasonable concessions: 

• Determination by the Palestinian 
Authority to refrain from use of and 
incitement to violence as a means to 
influence the course of die negoti- 
ations, and the resolve above ail to 
suppress effectively the organizers and 
perpetrators of terror. 

• Abstention from unilateral action 
by Israel that stirs up the emotions, 
deepens the frustration and increases 
the social and economic distress of the 
Palestinian people. 

• Strong resistance by responsible 


members states to abuse of the United 
Nations as an instrument of political 
warfare in situations that call for the 
promotion of conciliation rather than 
aggravation of confrontation. 

• Most important is the need for 
sustained intensity in U.S. participa- 
tion in the peace negotiations. Repe- 
tition of statements at high levels of the 
administration that “only the parties to 
the conflict themselves can make 
peace" is ineffective. It defies the his- 
toric fact that not a single Israeli-Arab 
agreement from the original annistice 
accords to the peace treaties with Egypt 
and Jordan, was achieved without ac- 
tive involvement of the United States. 

The problem is not lack of will- 
ingness bv the negotiating parties to 
make peace bur their inability to re- 
move roadblocks by themselves. Pa- 
tience and caution alone, the cherished 
attributes of diplomacy in a bygone 
age, are not the right prescription for 
coping with the realities of our rough- 
and-tumble world. 

The action of the United States from 
Haiti to Bosaia and beyond shows that 
Washington recognizes the need to ap- 
ply a convincing measure of deter- 
mination to deal with dangerous in- 
ternational crises. 

The present deadlock along the 
whole negotiation front from Gaza to 
Jerusalem. Damascus and Beirut con- 
tains the seeds of disaster. 

Resolute U.S. diplomacy, backed by 
America's European allies and respon- 
sible Near Eastern governments, can 
avert that and lead the peace effort to a 
successful conclusion. 


The writer was a member of Israel’s 
first delegation to the United Nations 
and inter its UN ambassador and di- 
rector general of its Foreign Ministry. 
He contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


America Has Had a Social Contract, and It Is Being Shredded 


W ASHINGTON —The fu- 
ture of the safety net pro- 
tecting the average American 
(Social Security, Medicare and 
the rest ) strengthened a bit when 
Congress decided not to raise 
Medicare premiums and the 
Medicare retirement age. But 
cutbacks are surely coming. 

A bunch of middle-aged U.S. 
senators who call themselves 
poor on $133,000 a year have 
no a u alms about demanding a 
surcharge on “wealthy” 66- 
year-old Medicare couples liv- 
ing on $75,000 a year. Seventy 
senators voted for that sur- 
charge. and they will be back. 

What may be the most im- 
portant sign is the terminology 
used by two of the most prom- 
inent critics. Senator Edward 
Kennedy and House Minority 
Leader Richard Gep-hardt. 
They said this kind of change 
violates America ’s * ‘social con- 
tracL” It's about time that point 
was made, although you may 
need a definition. 

Is the "social contract” a) 


By Kevin Phillips 


the name of an upscale dating 
service in Little Rock, Arkan- 
sas; b) the title of a book by the 
18th century French philoso- 
pher Jean- Jacques Rousseau; c) 
a term for the postwar U.S. 
political consensus to protect 
the interests of ordinary Amer- 
icans, which Congress and the 
president seem inclined to 
dump; or d) all the above? 

For sure, *‘b” and ”c.” and 
the one to note is “c.” 

Most of the federal safety net 
programs were pul in place 
from the 1930s to the 1960s. As 
late as the early 1980s, even 
conservative politicians were 
insisting that they would not be 
cut — that supply-side econom- 
ics would unlock so much 
growth that the safety net in 
America, like the welfare state 
in Europe, would flourish. 

Since the late 1980s, that 
commitment has been with- 
drawn. Governments have 
sought to reduce or reshape 


health programs, pensions and 
education spending (Sony, 
folks, budget pressures) even as 
they manage to find the money 
to cut taxes on wealthy indi- 
viduals and corporations. 

If the politicians are going to 
have any credibility in propos- 
ing solutions to die runaway 
costs of Social Security and 
Medicare, they are going to have 
to start taking a candid look at 
who has got whai in the past 10 
to 15 years, how straightforward 
or corrupt these changes have 
been, and how they stack up 
against the implicit promises of 
30 or 40 years ago. 

Take the campaign finance 
hearings that began in Wash- 
ington last month. They have 
not attracted a whole lot of ap- 
plause for a very plausible rea- 
son. The people running them 
want to point at specific, limited 
abuses, mostly involving for- 
eigners, and say: Isn’t this aw- 
ful? What they don’t want to do 


Look at What Hate Groups Say 


B altimore — Now 
showing on a computer 
near you: White power, skin- 
heads, neo-Nazis and “Chris- 
tian” hate groups from Nor- 
way to Utah. 

Parents who have been 
wringing their hands over their 
children’s access to smut on 
the Internet now have some- 
thing else to consider the easy 
availability of home pages 
touting hatred of blacks. Jews, 
Arabs, immigrants, homosexu- 
als. white people and cops. The 
engines of hate are all available 
with a feu* clicks of a mouse on 
the World Wide Web. 

A 33-year-old Harvard lib- 
rarian has made the hate pages 
even easier to find. 

Last year, Samuel Macy de- 
cided to track the hate-spew- 
ing groups after he read a Bos- 
ton Globe article on a Web 
page for a neo-Nazi group 
called * * Stormfron t . * ’ He 

found that scores of hate 
groups, from extreme nation- 
alists in Norway. France and 
Canada to so-called Christian 
Identity groups in the United 


Bv Jeff Stein 


States, were spewing their 
venom on the Internet. He 
began cataloguing their Inter- 
net addresses on a Harvard 
University library home page. 

The project soon grew too 
large. So. with an initial grant 
from the software developer 
Lotus, he launched “Hate- 
Watch.” a state-of-the-web 
operation thar not only dis- 
plays the net offerings of ex- 
tremist groups but offers 
weekly audio updates on hare 
crimes around the world. 

“I wanted to go our there 
and aggressively confront and 
contain this stuff, to expose 
these people to the light.” he 
said. “These groups relish their 
obscurity, because it allows 
them to do things in a coverr 
manner, like ~ cockroaches. 
Shine a light on them, and they 
scurry* to the comers ... They 
don't have popular support, but 
their ideas are pernicious, and 
they need to be shown for what 
they are. They do a much better 


Stockbrokers Need to Be On-Line 


A ROUND a quarter of all 
American households 
now have personal computers 
with modems attached. The 
modem boom tup 35 percent 
in just one year! is a shor 
across the bow of every tra- 
ditional stockbroker, financial 
planner and mutual fund. 

Boomer investors and the 
younger generation behind 
them live on-line. They don’t 
need intermediaries to get 
them investment information 
or take their orders. They 
don't want to make phone 
calls and wait on hold "for the 
next available agent." They 
can do it all on the Internet. 
24 hours a day. 

A few years from now, a 
financial firm that is not on die 
Web will effectively not be in 
business. 

Managing money is the 


third most popular use of PCs 
(after games and teaching aids 
for children), according to a 
study by Jupiter Communica- 
tions and FIND/S VP. New 
York City research firms on 
emerging technologies. 

Nearly 7 million house- 
holds are using assorted in- 
vestment-related services. Ju- 
piter says. Nearly 3 million are 
checking stock quotes. 

Investing by Web is not 
only convenient, it is cheaper 
for "investors who buy stocks 
and other products that cany 
sales commissions. With the 
click of a mouse, you can com- 
pare the fees charged by one 
on-line broker with another. 

— Jane Bryant Quinn, in 
The Washington Post. 

Other technology articles: 
http .*'<« ■»» -mm htxonilHT ITECHt 


job hanging themselves than 
I ever could.” 

The language of some so- 
called Christian Identity 
groups is unrestrained. Their 
Web pages say Jews are the 
product of a union between 
Eve and Satan, and they call 
nonwhites “mud people." 

These groups have separate 
Web pages, but they are con- 
nected by a common thread. 
anti-Semitism. A constant 
theme of such “Christian” 
pages is that the Nazi Holo- 
caust never happened. 

Another group of Christian 
extremists, the World Church 
of the Creator, has a Web page 
that says: "Indeed we believe 
that what is good for the While 
Race is the highest virtue, and 
what is bad for the White Race 
is the ultimate sin.” 

Hare Watch signals Nation 
of Islam Web” pages that 
blame Jews for the slave trade. 
The pages include the rantmgs 
of Louis Farrakhan, and Na- 
tion of Islam dogma that says 
white people were genetically 
engineered by a mad black 
scientist named Yacub on an 
island 6,000 years ago. 

Homophobia is a theme of 
other pages. Neil Horsley, the 
Creator’s Right Party candi- 
date for governor of Georgia, 
has a page with his campaign 
pledge to “arrest faggots of all 
types.” Another page is en- 
titled "God Hates Fags.” 

Mr. Macy argues that 
people need to know about 
hate groups in their regions, 
and how to register protests 
w ith local Internet providers. 

He recently started select- 
ing the most outrageous mail 
and reading it to his Web pace 
visitors in what he calls the 
“Hate Mail of the Week." 

‘‘We want to brine these 
characters our of the Tight of 
reason, the light of good cit- 
izenry. to take a close look at 
them, and make them less neb- 
ulous.” he savs. "We sav 
'Take a good look at them — 
this is who they are.' " 

Tin- Biilimi. «iv Sun 


is add up the whole tawdry bi- 
partisan blowout, admit that 
Congress and the White House 
have broken an “ethical con- 
tract” with the electorate, and 
then shape laws to drive big 
money out of politics. 

Assembling the whole picture 
for voters to froth over and de- 
mand action isn’t in the script 
Before the French Revolu- 
tion, Rousseau wrote that gov- 
ernments, in essence, had a con- 
tract with those they governed. 
This idea is not much more pop- 
ular in the Washington of the 
1990s than it was in 1790s Par- 
is, because government once 
again, seems to exist more for 
the few than for the many. 

Forty years ago that was not 
so. President Franklin D. 
Roosevelt had more or less set 
out a deal — a New Deal — that 
government in general, and So- 
cial Security in particular, wen? 
a compact with the average cit- 
izen . Roosevelt said he had 
wanted Social Security to be 
paid for in part by individual tax 
contributions so that contribut- 
ors were entitled to ir. so that the 
program could not be means- 
tested and turned into welfare. 

Many Republicans, but also 
some Democrats, want to scrap 
the old Rooseveltian approach. 
They want to privatize Social 
Security and Medicare, or they 
want to means-test them so that 
each can be split — p3rt (for the 
poor) to become de facto wel- 
fare, part (for the better off) to 
be handled by private fiscal 
management or insurance. 

This, in rum, grows out of a 
larger change that began in the 
1980s: Cut taxes that mostly fall 
on the people at the top: cut or 
forgo services mostly used by 
and vital to the people in the 
middle and at the bottom. 

If the Rooseveltian blueprint 
involved redistribution of in- 
come downward, the essence of 
the new one (tax reduction, 
spending cuts, deficit reduction) 
has pushed redistribution in the 
other direction: away from labor 
and ordinary people toward cap- 
ital and the financial elites. 

This debate should be en- 
larged and broadened. For years 
we have seen the ever clearer 
results of social contract break- 
age. A new book. “Money: 




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I-*. - 


Who Has How Much and 
Why,” reports that since 1975 
the top 5 percent of Americans 
have increased their inflation- 
adjusted incomes by 54 percent, 
the middle 20 percent by 6.7 
percent and the bottom 20 per- 
cent by 1.5 percent. 

In 1991, Mr. Clinton, as a 
long-shot presidential candi- 
date, talked about these trends 
in detail and with emotion. 
When he closed in on the pres- 
idency in 1992, his words grew 
bland. Since then he has offered 
almost no action. 

Indeed, his 1997 budget 
compromise with the Repub- 
licans — his willingness to con- 
join Medicare cuts with capital 
gains tax breaks for the upper 
brackets — legitimizes an anti- 
Rooseveltian tide that other- 
wise would have been stymied 
by hostile public opinion polls 
and die growing fratricide 
among Republican" leaders. 

Now that the Senate’s con- 
troversial Medicare proposals 
have died in the House-Senate 
budget conference, the changes 
needed in Medicare and Social 
Security could require some 
kind of national commission. 
This is where the social contract 
yardstick, with its equity man- 
dates. should be applied. 

Sacrifice should not be im- 
posed on Social Security* or 
Medicare recipients until it is 
imposed on everyone else. 

Means-testing could destroy 
broad support for the programs. 
In Medicare at least, fraud is 
rampant. Strong criminal stat- 
utes could save the government 
far more money than means- 
testing and age changes. 

Considering the willful 
breach of the Rooseveltian com- 
mitment in the last decade or 
two. any bipartisan reform of the 
Social Security and Medicare 
systems should be postponed 
until an even more important 
debate is begun: a coast-to-coast 
national town meeting on the 
20th cenrury U.S. social con- 
tract and what it should mean for 
21st century America. 

The m riter. publisher of Amer- 
ican Political Report and author 
of "The Politics of Rich and 
Poor." contributed this L onimeni 
to the Los Angeles Times. 


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IN OUR R4GES: 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Stripping Off 

LONDON — Both London and 
the provinces are experiencing 
intensely hot weather. London- 
ers went about like wet rags. 
Numerous deaths, plagues of 
mosquitoes and thunder storms 
are reported from various parts 
of the country, but the most start- 
ling weather incident occurred at 
the Law Courts, where the Lord 
Chief Justice, after having 
ordered doors and windows to be 
opened, exclaimed: "Really this 
is too oppressive! I shall remove 
my wig and gown, and allow 
barristers before me to do the 
same." He then deposited his 
wig on the (able by his side, and 
several barristers timidly fol- 
lowed his lordship’s example. 

1922: Troops Riot 

LONDON — Following the ar- 
rest of two of their number in a 
brawl, five hundred Territorials 
at Aberystwith [Wales] at- 


tacked the police-station there 
last night. Some units of the 53d 
Welsh Division received their 
pay yesterday [Aug. 4] and 
spent the evening in town. 
When two intoxicated soldiers 
were locked up. their comrades 
began the assault on the station 
with whiskey and beer bottles, 
which were "hurled through the 
windows so fast that the police 
were compelled to keep within 
the station. 

1947: American Held 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States today demanded an apo- 
logy from the Communist -dom- 
inated Hungarian government 
for the arrest by political police 
of Stephan Thuransky. an 
.American citizen. The" State 
Department said that the U.S. 
representative to the Allied 
Control Commission for Hun- 
gary had also "approached" 
the Soviet chairman in connec- 
tion with ihe arrest. 


4 




1 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1997 


RAGE 9 


>' th , 


ii^diih 


OPINION/LETTERS 


Germans Feeling Good About NATO 
And Germany’s Useful Role in It 


By Peter Schneider 


— .wmw ui uiviaiuua ui 

territory, new drawings of borders and a new balance 
of power. 

wbat I am referring to, of course, is the neariv 
noiseless expansion of NATO into Eastern Europe'. 

Astoundingly, the new balance of power has been 
effected with scarcely a hint of discard or even debate. 
Apart from the audible grumbling of the Russians, the 
indisputable losers in this tectonic dislocation, hardly 
a word of protest has been uttered. 

In Germany, above all, the new, expanding North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization is enjoying unprece- 
dented approval. An overwhelming 90 percent of the 
4 Bundestag supports the entrance of the new partners, 
\ and even die news media register hardly a protest. 

■ But anyone with either a memory dr an archive 
must be rubbing both eyes in disbelief. After all, a 
significant portion of my generation and the fol- 
lowing one has always viewed NATO as an ag- 
gressive power and a threat to world peace. 

It wasn’t that long ago that hundreds of thousands 
took to the streets to protest the stationing of cruise 
missiles and Pershing rockets. Or marched in Bonn 
to protest the American-led NATO intervention 
against the Iraqis in Kuwait. 

And while the United Nations stood by and 
watched for three years as genocide was carried out in 
Bosnia — a genocide ultimately stopped by the in- 
excusably belated intervention of NATO — the Ger- 
man peace movement thought it best to devise ways to 
obstruct the participation of Goman troops in this 
operation. Evoking nothing less than the "lessons of 
history.” Greens and Social Democrats alike warned 
against a ‘‘militarization" of German foreign policy. 

So how is it that such outspoken opponents of 
'.j NATO have suddenly grown mute? Has the peace 
d movement reconciled itself with its former ad- 
versary? Are the critics now saying the NATO 
generals were right to c laim that the greatest and by 
far most successful peace movemenr in the world 
was NATO itself? 

I think the matter is somewhat simpler and more 
complicated. 

The broad but covert German acceptance of NATO 
expansion adheres to a concept that at least in Ger- 
■ many is considered politically incorrect: ‘'national 
inreresr. ' ' The entrance of the Easr European partners 
offers a considerable boost to German security. 

As John Vinocur has observed in the International 
Herald Tribune (July 7}. thanks to the expansion of 
NATO the Germans find themselves in an unfa- 
miliar situation; All of a sudden they are completely 
encircled by alert friends. 

And they are more than happy to relinquish their 
role as Outpost of the Western Alliance to their new 
Polish, Czech and Hungarian partners. 

The Poles, who for centuries have been dis- 
membered by. their two overpowerful neighbors, 
| now seek to protect themselves by taking refuge in 
the relative security of NATO. It turned out that the 
best way to beat NATO was to join it Besides, die 
more numerous the signatories, the more super- 
fluousthe alliance will become. 

In any event, the primary reason for NATO’s 
‘ ‘victory’ ’ in the peaceftil war with the Warsaw Pact 




was not its military but its political superiority. The 
silent war in Europe was won not by armored 
invasion but by people “voting with their feet." 

NATO is the only military alliance in the world 
that has bound itself to defend freedom, human rights 
and democracy. Where the Warsaw Pact consis- 
tently resorted to military pressure to keep its mem- 
bers in check, NATO relies on a waiting list to save 
itself from being inundated by new volunteers. 

For its part, the German army, which swelled after 
reunification ro a size that was formidable if not 
downright foreboding, has been pruned back in 
amazingly short order. The former East German 
Volksarmee, a well-equipped fighting force of about 
170,000, virtually dissolved into thin air — * along 
with its equipment. 

I would like to add my own small experience with 
NATO and Germany's new role in iL 

Ultimately, despite ail the objections of the NATO 
opponents, German units did participate in the 
NATO peacekeeping force in Bosnia. 

In the spring of 1996, I visited the former 
Y ugoslavia for the second time since the outbreak of 
the war. 

In the middle of the old town of Sarajevo, I came 
across two German soldiers assigned to NATO as 
pan of the peacekeeping contingent. The two men 
were discussing an overpriced restaurant bill. If only 
out of deference to the memories the German lan- 
guage can awaken in that country. 1 would have liked 
them to speak more softly, to" walk a little more 
slowly, more discreetly, in their NATO boots. 

A half hour later. I was sitting at a sidewalk caff, 
just starting ro doze off. In my half sleep, I saw a 
NATO armored personnel carrier drive by so closely 
I had to pull my feet in. On the camouflaged rear of die 
vehicle was sitting one of my two German soldiers. 

I had been in the city in the middle of the war. and 
had ridden down the same street at 1 10 kilometers 
(70 miles) an hour in a Volkswagen with riddled 
window panes. My driver had explained that it was 
the only way of keeping out of the long-range sights” 1 
of the Serbian snipers. 

Now, three years larer, as I watched the German- 
speaking soldiers roll past in their NATO vehicle. I 
was overcome with a feeling of gratitude I had never 
considered possible. Along with everyone else in die 
caff. I was grateful for the presence of this armored 
personnel carrier. 

I had never thought what a good thing an armored 
carrier can be. Whoever was driving it — evidently a 
German — was personally seeing to it that both the 
aggrieved people of Sarajevo and myself, the Ger- 
man tourist, could for the first time since the war 
bask in the spring sun and drink their coffee in 
relative tranquillity. This vehicle of war was the 
guarantee that civilian life could be resumed. 

As I finished my espresso. I thought that it was good 
for the people in 'Sarajevo that this armored car had 
driven by. and that it was good for the German soldiers 
who were in it that the people in the caff had waved to 
them. It was a new experience for everyone. 

— — # 

Mr. Schneider is the author, most recently, of 
“Couplings." a novel. He contributed this article, 
translated from the German by Philip Boehm, to The 
New York Times. 




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'You dirty capitalists going to let little kids starve?' 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Travel in Lebanon 

Regarding “US. Lifts Lebanon 
Tra\'el Ban " {July 31 J: 

The U.S. secretary of state. 
Madeleine Albright, was quoted 
as saying thar although the re- 
strictions had been lifted, trav- 
eling in Lebanon was still dan- 
gerous for American tourists. 

Having just returned from a trip 
to Lebanon to celebrate a friend’s 
wedding, I was astounded by the 
remark. I felt safer in Lebanon 
than in most big Western cities. 

The Lebanese and Syrian armies 
do maintain a high visual presence 
in Lebanon, manning road check- 
points and guarding monuments. I 
was jolted when l saw' what looked 
like loaded AK-47s and M-16s 
strapped around their shoulders. 

But they had no interest in scar- 
ing tourists. Approaching check- 
points, i received nothing but bored 
hand signals waving me on. At the 
Roman monument in Bybios, a sol- 
dier happily posed for a photo. 

Visiting" the Roman temple in 
Baalbek in the Bekaa, the alleged 


A Posthumous Tribute 
To Frank Lloyd Wright 

By Karl E. Meyer 

N EW YORK — The ribbons took his inspiration from the Weli 
were finally cut the other day poer-savior Taliesin, with his war 


home of the militant group 
Hezbollah, the only real threat to 
my person came when I was 
stricken with Beirut belly and 
couldn't find a toilet. 

My guidebook said Lebanon 
was one of the few countries in the 
world where women could hitch- 
hike safely. You couldn't say that 
about the United Stares. 

KAREN BERG AN. 

London. 

Outer Space Treaty 

Mahmood Elahi ( Letters , July 
30) wrote that the landing of 
Pathfinder on Mars "raises a num- 
ber of legal and political ques- 
tions. ’ ’ He said there was a need ro 
define the role of nation-states in 
the exploration and colonization 
of the red planet, perhaps through 
a United Nations convention. 

In fact, the Outer Space Ex- 
ploration Treaty of 1967 prohibits 
the annexation of celestial bodies 
such as the moon and Mars. 

TONY MARTIN. 

London. 


IN were finally cut the other day 
at Monona Terrace in Madison, 
Wisconsin, six decades after the 
convention and civic center was 
firat proposed, and 38 years after 
the demise of its creator. Yet 
Frank Lloyd Wright was clearly a 
presence at the inaugural fete. 

As if on cue, storm clouds 
hovered behind the arched lake- 
side structure as the state's polit- 
ical leaders offered their safely 
posthumous praises to a rare Wis- 
consinite known the world over. 

To those of us from Madison 
familiar with the background, it 

MEANWHILE 

was a splendid epiphany, a fitting 
end to an unseemly dispute. Not 
once while he lived was Frank 
Lloyd Wright granted a commis- 
sion for a public building by his 
state or by us great university. 

In 1938, at the request of art- 
minded local citizens, Wright pre- 
pared plans for a “dream civic 
center on the shores of Lake 
Monona, three blocks from the 
Slate Capitol. City authorities 
raised, practical objections. 

Wright redesigned it five times, 
without a fee. The project became 
a bitter political issue, owing 
partly to the architect's libertarian 
ways and views. 

Remarkably. Monona Terrace 
provoked seven referendums, re- 
current court challenges and the 
passage of a special state law in 
1957 banning construction of any 
lakeside building more than 22 
feet (7 meters) high. 

“Every aspect of this building 
has been dissected, resected and 
warmed, grilled and stewed — 
and me along with it," remarked 
Tony Purtnam, who as a Wright 
apprentice worked on the plans in 
the 1950s and who led the final 
redesign team after the $67 mil- 
lion project was revived and ap- 
proved in the 1980s. 

Thus its completion heralds a 
new millennium, a century after 
Wright completed his first radical 
structure, Romeo and Juliet, an oc- 
tagon-shaped wooden windmill at 
his family farm in Spring Green. 

Indeed, Monona Terrace is em- 
blematic of this regenerative geni- 
us who prevailed over bankruptcy, 
scandal, fire and the sly gibes of 
colleagues. As Meryle Secrest 
notes in her biography, Wright 


took his inspiration from the Welsh 
poer-savior T aliesin. with his wand 
and magician's cape, a spinner of 
riddles whose name means radiant 
brow, a mythic druid destined to 
die and be reborn. 

So it was that Wright moved 
restlessly from style to style 
and place to place, ranging from 
Chicago to Berlin, from Los 
Angeles to Tokyo. 

Still, he always returned to seek 
renewal in the bills of Wisconsin, 
and there he began building 
Taliesin in 191 1 . A tew years later 
Taliesin was destroyed by a fire 
set by a demented servant, which 
killed Wright's mistress and her 
Children. He immediately began 
Taliesin IL rebuilt it again after 
two more fires in the 1920s and 
started his own school of design. 

With banks nipping at his heels 
during the Great Depression, 
Wright purchased 800 acres (320 
hectares) near Scottsdale, Arizona, 
moved his family and fellowship 
south during the winter and from 
scratch built Taliesin West. 

Like a force of nature, he un- 
dertook major commissions in his 
60s — the Guggenheim Museum, 
Edgar Kauftxiahn's Faliingwater 
in Bear Run. Pennsylvania, the 
Johnson Wax factory in Racine, 
Wisconsin — and in spare mo- 
ments he rewrote his autobio- 
graphy three times. 

Outwardly he was impossible, 
preferring, as he said, an honest 
arrogance to mock humility. Yet 
neither his imagination nor his 
work was set in concrete. 

Taliesin in Wisconsin was nev- 
er finished, nor intended to be 
finished, as guides explain to vis- 
itors surprised by its capricious 
catwalks and illogical nooks. He 
was true to the old Turkish saying 
“When the house is completed, 
death comes in the door.” 

Now his afterlife seems fust as 
unfinished. Wright would have 
been amused by the Monona Ter- 
race dedication testimonials from 
Governor Tommy Thompson, a 
conservative Republican, and 
Paul Soglin, the former mayor of 
Madison and a onetime anti- Vi- 
etnam War radical — and even 
more amused by talk of building a 
Lake Monona boathouse whose 
blueprints were recently redis- 
covered. He first proposed the 
project while he was still an ap- 
prentice — in 1893. 

The A!n»- York Times 


Mondays 

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i 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1997 
PAGE 10 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 




* 10 * 


Uneasy Freedom 
For Filmmakers 

New Wave From East Europe? 


By Alan Riding 

Nr* York Times Service 


K 


ARLOVY VARY. Czech 
Republic — While Mos- 
cow was ruling Eastern 
. Europe, the region 's movie- 
makers knew where they stood. If 
they made conformist films, they 
were assured of government financ- 
ing. If they stepped out of line, their 
films would be banned. 

Yet, as soon as political controls 
were relaxed in Czechoslovakia, Po- 
land and Hungary at different mo- 
ments of the J960s and 1970s. di- 
rectors of the stanrre of Milos Forman 
and Roman Polanski promptly ap- 
peared. Surely, then, with the collapse 
of Communist governments, a new 
New Wave of East European movies 
would not tarty. 

So, where is it? 

The last eight years bave changed 
the region beyond recognition. An- 
cient lands have rediscovered their 
identities; new countries have been 
created. Most have freely elected gov- 
ernments, and many have come to 
terms with the good and the greed of 
market economies. Yet, puzzUngly, in 
film, that most exportable of an forms, 
expectations have so far been dis- 
appointed. Could it be that democracy 
Is a lesser muse than dictatorship? 

Certainly, freedom's unannounced 
arrival stunned the region's film- 
makers. They were no longer muzzled 
but, as government subsidies were 
slashed or canceled, they struggled to 
find money for even low-budget pro- 
ductions. New television stations, 
cable channels and booming video 
sales began stealing traditional 
moviegoing audiences, forcing hun- 
dreds of dilapidated government- 
owned movie theaters to close. 

Surviving theaters — plus a hand- 
ful of new cineplexes — were soon 
showing Hollywood movies almost 
exclusively. 

Then there was the predicament 
faced by directors who for so long had 
been silenced or had b een forced to 
convey their screen message through 
obscure codes and symbols in a kind of 
unspoken conspiracy with audiences. 

“When you’re not allowed to talk, 
you know what you want to say," 
explained Forman, the Czech director 
who made his name with such films as 
“Loves of a Blonde" and “The Fire- 
men's Ball' ' during the Prague Spring 
of the mid-1960s and who opted for 


exile in the United States after the 
Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in 
1968. “Censorship identifies what's 
worth talking about. But when you're 
free, you have to decide what's im- 
portant And that’s more difficult." 

There were other unpleasant sur- 
prises. Under communism, American 
and European audiences eagerly em- 
braced Soviet bloc movies that “es-' 
caped" to the West — those by, say, 
Forman. Jiri Menzel (“Closely 
Watched Trains") and Jan Nemec 
(“The Report on the Party and the 
Guests") from Czechoslovakia, or 
Polanski (“Knife in the Water") and 
Andrzej Wajda (“Ashes and Dia- 
monds") from Poland, or Is tv an 
Szabo (“Mephisto”) from Hungary. 

Then, almost overnight. East Euro- 
pean films found themselves strug- 
gling no less than other foreign-lan- 
guage productions to find distributors 
in the United States and Western 
Europe. If once the magical aura of 
political dissidence had sufficed, now 
they had to measure up as entertain- 
ment 

Still, if at times they have come 
close to despair since 1989, film- 
makers in Eastern Europe have not 
given up, above all in the Czech Re- 
public, Poland and Hungary, coun- 
tries with traditions worth reviving. 

In the past governments determined 
movie budgets; now independent pro- 
ducers must put together packages in- 
volving domestic and West European 
investors, the Council of Europe's 
Eurimages Fund and, above all, newly 
affluent television companies. 



Mmnnai 

The Czech Jan Sverak, whose '‘Kolya” has been a global success. 


HE great majority of the 
movies made in the region 


T 

■ since 1990 have been em- 
inently forgettable: cheap 
pastiches of American action films, 
and soft-pom movies galore. 

Yet there are encouraging signs. 
Across the region, serious directors 
have begun tackling the gzeat un- 
touchable subjects of the last half- 
century, from the Nazi occupation 
and the Holocaust to the tedium and 
oppression of the Communist years. 

Some, among them Krzysztof 
Kieslowski, the Polish director who 
gained international acclaim for 
“Blue,” "White” and “Red" before 
his death last year, have also looked at 
the new moral questions posed by the 
onslaught of primitive capitalism. 

This veiy seriousness also^poses a 
problem. Many moviegoers in East- 


ern Europe prefer the escapism of 
Hollywood (and even locally made) 
action movies to the discomfort of 
confronting an unpleasant past and a 
confusing present In any event, the 
blockbusters are what is on offer be- 
cause theater owners feel more secure 
showing American .movies, which 
now account for more than 90 percent 
of the box-office take in the region. 

Further, the dramatic drop in the 
number of available screens (from 
3,081 in Bulgaria in 1989 to just 209 
in 1996, for instance) insures that 
thoughtful movies from Eastern 
Europe can be seen by few people, 
even in their countries of origin. 

Fairly typical is "Bolshe Vita,” a 
film by the Hungarian newcomer 
Iboly a Fekete about three Russian men 
and two Western women who meet in 
Budapest as communism crumbles. It 
was well received at several festivals 
but was seen by just 4,700 people over 
a 10-week period when it was released 
in Hungary last year. 

In contrast. Istvan Bujior’s "Three 
Guardsmen in Africa.” a locally 
made comedy with no political con- 
tent, drew 207,000 moviegoers, but 
even so it ranked only eighth, behind 
American films like “Independence 
Day" and “Twister," among the hits 
of 1 996. 

Unsurprisingly, East European 
films that have won prizes in festivals 
struggle to find buyers in Western 
Europe and the United States. Emir 
Kusturica's “Underground," a sur- 
realistic allegory about postwar 
Yugoslavia, which won the Palme 


d’Or in Cannes in 199S. was ignored 
by American distributors. 

So far, only one post-Co Id War 
movie from Eastern Europe — 
"Kolya" by Jan Sverak of the Czech 
Republic — has been a big success. 
Still showing in the United States six 
months after its release, this poignant 
story of an abandoned Russian boy 
and a womanizing Czech bachelor 
won the Academy Award for best 
foreign-language film this year and 
has so far earned almost S13 million 
worldwide. 

The Karlovy Vary International 
Film Festival, which took place last 
month, hopes to change this. 
Throughout the Communist era. this 
elegant spa town formerly known as 
Carlsbad, in die western Czech Re- 
public, was host to a biennial festival 
of government-approved films from 
the Soviet bloc. It also carefully se- 
lected movies from the West. 

Now, however, the festival has been 
revamped to be held annually and sees 
its role as a display window — and 
above all a marketplace — for the best 
movies from Eastern Europe. 

"It's very important to give space 
to this cinema,' said Eva Zaoralova, 
the festival's director. "In the past, 
the Cannes and Berlin festivals would 
look for films from Russia, Hungary 
or Poland, but now they say there is 
nothing interesting being done there, 
that there's a crisis of aesthetics. 

‘ ‘I don 't think this is true. B ut since 
these festivals are snubbing Eastern 
Europe, we can profit from this and 
make our own discoveries." 


Doing Pygmalion 
The Slim-Line Way 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — To lose one director 
and star on a short pre-London tour 
of a revival as safe as George Bern- 
ard Shaw's "Pygmalion" (Al- 
bery) might, as Lady Bracknell never said, 
be considered unfortunate; to lose two of 
each begins to look ominously like care- 
lessness. All the same, we are now seeing 
the third star and the third director involved 
in this project w ithin two months, and they 
have retrieved a disaster only to replace it 

LONDON THEATER 

with an immensely efficient and competent 
if somehow vaguely unsatisfying staging. 

True, there is always a problem with 
running “Pygmalion" at its full three 
hours. During the more loquacious scenes 
one begins to yearn for a 
song or two from "My Fair 
Lady,” especially as the 
genius of Alan Jay Lemer 
was to take many of these 
great Shavian speeches and 
set them virtually un- 
changed as lyrics. 

Moreover, any director 
now approaching the non- 
musical script still has 
many options: Do we go 
with the play in one of the 
many versions Shaw wrote 
of it, or with the film script 
he wrote for Leslie Howard 
and Wendy Hiller in the 
1930s, or with the Lemer 
cut, and if so does Hoggins 
end up with Eliza or just his 
“damned slippers"? 

All these options are per- 
missible since Shaw himself explored them 
at some length himself; but what the master 
of farce Ray Cooney has done for the present 
production is essentially die slim-line ver- 
sion, gening the script down to two brisk 
hours by deleting whole sequences of Eliza's 
linguistic education and several of the quar- 
rels between Higgins and his termagant 
mother. 

There are some splendid performances 
here, especially from Moray Watson as Col- 
onel Pickering and Marcia Warren as the 
long-suffering housekeeper. Mis. Pearce; but 
Barbara Munay is a somewhat lightweight 
Mrs. Higgins, and the drama-school ■‘dis- 
covery'' Carli Norris is attractive and fear- 
less but goes out there an unknown and 
comes back a hugely reliable stand-in who, 
given luck and more experience, may de- 
velop into an interesting talent. 

Michael Elphick's Doolittle is in the best 
Stanley Holloway tradition, but. as Higgins, 


Roy Marsden offers a touching overgrown 
schoolboy with a mother fixation but no 
very plausible charm with which to ensnare 
his wary pupil; there are even moments 
when one starts to think she might be rather 
better off with the appallingly chinless 
Freddy Eynsford-Hill. 

About “Art” (Wyndhams) I have to say 
that I still don’t get iL This is the con- 
versation piece that opened in London nine 
months ago to huge acclaim with a cast 
headed by Albert Finney and Tom Cour- 
tenay, having already been staged in 20 
European capitals in the two years since 
Yasmina Reza had written it in France. It has 
become the first truly legitimate Euro-hir. 

But why ? Why has this 90-minute dia- 
logue among three friends taken off like the 
Concorde? Can it be the script alone? 
Surely not; even Christopher Hampton s 
immensely elegant, spare translation can- 
not disguise the fact that there only two 
issues here: the importance 
of preserving friendships 
and modem art's existing 
solely in the eye of the be- 
holder. Is it theo the acting? 
Certainly, tins week’s new 
cast (Henry Goodman, Ro- 
ger Allam and Stanley 
Townsend) have got it to- 
gether rather more subtly 
and effectively than their 
starry forerunners, but 
some other clue is needed. 

When I reviewed the 
London staging unfavor- 
ably, the argument of those 
who disagreed with me 
seemed to be that the play 
was immensely chic and 
mercifully brief. They wrote 
of ‘ ‘Art" almost as though it 
were a new restaurant by 
Terence Conran, minimalist, elegant and the 
place to be seen, and in that sense it may have 
broken new ground by tempting into the 
stalls a fashionable London audience. If so, 
good luck to "ArL" Its admirers may just 
possibly move cm to explore other, less fash- 
ionable but perhaps better, new plays. 

If you wish to escape theater foyers and 
indeed sidewalks that have not in my re- 
collection been so tourist-packed since the 
1960s heyday of Swinging London, you 
could do a lot worse than the cool basement 
bar of the P izza on die Park where Steve 
Ross , the quintessential Coward and Porter 
pianist, has now given up his piano stool to 
Andrea Marcovicci, the greatest cabaret 
singer of her generation and a Don Smith 
discovery from the Algonquin in New York. 
She plays Tuesday through Saturday 
through August, giving way then to Richard 
Rodney Bennett in the richest cabaret sum- 
mer I can ever recall over here. 



MuVtWi 

Carli Norris as Eliza. 


BOOKS 


THE LAST GOVERNOR 

By Jonathan Dimbleby. 462 
pages. £25. Little. Brovi n. 
Reviewed by 
Philip Bowring 

T HIS account by the well- 
known British journalist 
Jonathan Dimbleby of Chris 
Patten's five years as gov- 
ernor of Houg Kong is es- 
sentially written from Pat- 
ten's perspective. As such it is 
a sympathetic, without being 
obsequious, portrayal of 
someone who when he left 
Hong Kong a month ago was 
at least as popular in the com- 
munity at large as when he 
unveiled his 1992 proposals 
for a modest advance in rep- 
resentative government. 

In between he had endured, 
usually but not always with 
grace and humor, everything 
that Beijing, self-interested 
businessmen and assorted 
colleagues from London 
could throw at him. 

However, in the hands of a 
Houg Kong writer, or of a 
British writer with fewer ties 
to the British establishment, 
there is material here that 
would lead unequivocally to 
three conclusions: 


• The betrayal of the Hong 
Kong people’s interests in self- 
governance between die 1983 
Joint Declaration on the future 
of Hong Kong and die arrival 
of Patten was greater and more 
deliberate than even the cynics 
among them had imagined 

•lie ability of British of- 
ficials to keep secret matters 
that not only do not touch on 
national security but also are 
of direct constitutional in- 
terest to millions of its sub- 
jects is a major blot on its 
democratic institutions. 

• A closed and self-per- 
petuating civil service elite is 
able to create and operate its 
own agenda. The satirical 
British TV series “Yes, Min- 
ister" — depicting how the 
bureaucracy outmaneuvered 
its political masters — was 
close to the mark. 

The tragedy for Hong Kong 
was thar it had three succes- 
sive diplomat governors who 
could never quite escape from 
the influence of their London 
peers, and particularly Sir 
Percy Cradock. It was this 
Beijing ambassador and lead- 
er of group of academic Si- 
nologists in the Foreign Of- 
fice who masterminded policy 
toward China, and by exterf- 


BEST SELLERS 


New Yurk Times 

This list u basal on re pons from more 
(hu l.OijO bookstores throughout the 
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necessarily consecutive. 

FICTION 


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SCOLD MOUNTAIN, by 
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6 THE PARTNER, by John 

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7 THE NOTEBOOK. K- 

Nicholas SparLs _ 8 

8 DECEPTION ON HIS 

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Bradford t 

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6 MIDNIGHT IN THE 
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7 CONVERSATIONS 

WITH GOD: Book 1. by 
Neale Donald Walsch 8 33 

8 THE MILLIONAIRE 
NEXT DOOR, by Thomas 
J. Stanley and William D. 

Danko 9 28 

9 THE GIFT OF FEAR, by 

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10 JUST AS I AM. by Billy 

Graham II 12 

11 MARTHA STEWART - 
JUST DESSERTS, by 

Jerry Oppraheirner ........... 10 3 

12 CONVERSATIONS 

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Neale Donald Walsch . . . 13 II 

13 UNDERBOSS, by Peter 
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14 BILLIONS .AND 

BILLIONS. by Carl 

15 THE ' STOR M.'t* 

Tom Clancy with Fred 
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ADVICE. HOW-TO 
AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 MIRACLE CURES, by 

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2 SIMPLE ABUNDANCE 

by Sarah Ban Biraihnack 1 69 

3 MEN ARE FROM 
MARS. WOMEN ARE 
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4 MARS .AND VENUS ON 

A DATE, bv John Gras 3 5 


— 14 |4 


sion toward Hong Kong’s 
political arrangements. 

At every step, Cradock 
sought to appease China by 
obstructing Houg Kong's 
political development along 
the lines its people thought 
had been promised in the 
Joint Declaration and a sub- 
sequent white paper on rep- 
resentative government. On 
his retirement Cradock set 
himself up as Patten's prin- 
cipal scourge, taking his cam- 
paign to anyone who would 
listen in Hong Kong and Lon- 
don. His remarks persistently 
gave much comfort to Beijing 
and his former diplomatic 
colleague. Zhou Nan, bead of 
the Hong Kong branch of 
Xinhua, the Chinese Commu- 
nist Party's propaganda arm.' 

The early history of British 
surrenders to Beijing over de- 
mocracy in Hong Kong is well 
enough known to those in 
Hong Kong at the time: prom- 
ises to Hong Kong never kept; 
a survey of local opinion whose 
results were turned upside 
down at the Foreign Office’s 
behest to pretend that people 
did not want direct elections. 
Dimbleby describes these as a 
“blatant act of perfidy." 

However, worse was to 
some in a series of secret dis- 
cussions with Beijing, some 
conducted by Cradock, which 
effectively enabled China to 
dictate the nature of change in 
Hong Kong without reference 
to the interests or expectations 
of Hong Kong — a commu- 
nity of which Cradock, like 
most of his diplomatic col- 
leagues. had little experience. 

Dimbleby not only reveals 
these discussions but also notes 
that Patten was only informed 
of their existence after he had 
formulated his constitutional 
proposals. Patten could justi- 


fiably argue that all were in 
accord with China's Basic Law 
for Hong Kong but is a moot 
point whether they went back 
on the secret “previous agree- 
ments and understandings" as 
Beijing claimed. 

Either way, Britain’s prior 
behavior, its dishonesty, 
secrecy and blatant attempts to 
gain commercial advantage 
from _ undermining Hong 
Kong's expectations, was ig- 
nominious — particularly after 
the 1989 Tiananmen massacre 
heightened local interests in 
representative govemmenL 

Patten’s efforts may ulti- 
mately come to naught. But he 
did leave Hong Kong with the 
population thinking better of 
Britain than was deserved by 
most of its post- 1983 actions 
and with Hong Kong enjoying 
more open government than 
appears to exist in a Britain 
where secret deals made by 
civil service Mandarins pass 
with little comment 

The constitutional issues 
aside. Dimbleby 's book is 
well written and" comprehen- 
sive but contains little that 
would be new to Hong Kong 
readers and perhaps has too 
many names and faces to be 
easily digested outside Hong 
Kong. Its sources are limited 
and it barely addresses Pat- 
ten's obvious failures — shy- 
ing away from tackling oli- 
gopolies in banking, law, etc. 
that he identified, and allow- 
ing housing production to 
slump, to the great profit of a 
cartel of developers. 

The quality of the photos is 
quite extraordinarily bad fora 
book of this sort. But on the 
key constitutional issues it is 
an important contribution and 
merits more detailed follow- 
up. 

International Herald Tribune 


Britain’s Channel 5: Rocky Start 


By Sarah Lyall 

New York Times Service 


L ONDON — Started in March 
with a huge wave of publicity, a 
catchy slogan ("Give Me 
Five”) and an appearance by 
foe Spice Girls, Channel 5 was meant to 
bring fresh air to British broadcasting. 

Bur four months later. Channel 5 — 
which has joined Britain's two BBC sta- 
tions and two commercial stations as foe 
country 's fifth noncable, nonsaiellite sta- 
tion — is still struggling to find its way. 
While some of the problems that have 
bedeviled it can be forgiven as common 
to any start-up station, others seem more 
troubling, industry experts say. 

These include technical difficulties 
that have left nearly 40 percent of Brit- 
ish households unable to get foe station 
and a programming lineup thar has 
failed to capture the imagination, or the 
attention, of much of the public. 


"They haven't brought a radically 
□ew dimension to British broadcasting, 
with programs that people can get ex- 
cited about.” said Rob Brown, media 
editor of The IndependenL "They seem 
to be trying to do foe same thing as 
everyone else, only more cheaply." 

But David Elstein, Channel 5’s chief 
executive, says that people are just ad- 
justing to foe station's presence and that 
things are running smoothly. He said in 
an interview that foe station had met its 
own expectations so far, with advertising 
revenue in line with its business plan. 

Channel 5. which is owned by a con- 
sortium of investors, took in £29 mil- 
lion, or S47.3 million, in its first three 
months on foe air. people in foe industry 
said, and it expects to take in £80 million 
by foe end of its first nine months. 

And although Channel 5’s ratings 
seem low. with audience shares gen- 
erally in the 3 percent range, Elstein said 
that was expected, too. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1 Understanding 
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tool 

9 Barks 

13 A dime, 
dollar wise 

14 Hideout 


18 Calamitous 
17 Filer's aide 
IB ’Rule. 

Britannia’ 

composer 

19 Rack site 
ao Pink slip 

23 Arafat's org 


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24 Menu selection 
35 Saoasuania 

seeds 

31 Firsi sign of 
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33 Xmas gift 
recipient 

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coupon value 

as Wharf 

38 Mass hours 
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41 Bolivian capital 

42 Plumbing 
convenience 

44 Court stat 

47 “Who. me?’ 

48 Means to an 
end 

S3 Jivers 
84 Devoid of 
rocks? 

55 Sen. Thurmond 
SB ’The Thin Man’ 
dog 

88 Semi support 

80 Troy story 

81 'Boy, that was 
closer 

82 Cap that may be 
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as Watchers 

DOWN 

1 Communica- 
tions giant 

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a Over 

4 Short on cash 

5 The Mary Tyler 
Moore Show" 
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8 Jai 

7 ’Nuts!’ 
a Get m a good 
one on 


9 Decides to use 
to Hudson, e.g. 

11 Soeur's sibling 

12 Brains 
18 Undoes 

21 Tiki 

22 Retaking and 
Richards 

29 Boxer LaMotta 
28 ’Baffle Cry’ 
author 

27 Like new 

28 Close In films 

29 Actress BeuLan 
ao First name in 

rock 

33 Passageway 

34 River through 
Bern 

35 One whose 
work Is always, 
changing 

37 Southwestern 
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38 With 
old-fashioned 
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40 Where Virgo 
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41 Actress Kurtz 

42 Lumber mill 
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37 flx writers 



Solution to Puzzle of Aug. 5 








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‘ ‘We got on foe air on time, on target 
and in good shape, and we’ve hit all our 
taj'gets," Elstein said. "Viewing habits 
are rather conservative here, and 
changes do take time. ” 

One of Channel 5’s most popular 
programs is “Xena, Warrior Princess.” 
which regularly draws 800,000 viewers. 
Other popular programs have included 
"Plasnc Fantastic." a documentary’ 
series on plastic surgery; “Instant Gar- 
dens," a gardening series, and "Family 
Affairs,” a five-night-a-week soap op- 
era. The station has also been successful 
with some sports broadcasts. 

Bat nothing has yet caught fire, it 
seems. * ‘Their branding is super, and foe 
look of Channel 5 on foe screen really 
does give it an identity." said David 
Cuff, broadcast director of Initiative 
Media, a media management company 
in London. “But the programs they 
have are fillers. They haven't got any- 
thing that people must watch." 




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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1997 


i "... . 

•A'O- • v 






Major Bank 
In Russia 
Wins Stake 
In Norilsk 


V* 

Si'* 



. : 4 


«^a*rfh-OBr Ouparte 

^? S< T° W A group ,ed by Un- 
w? ban ^ one of Asia’s biggest 
™» ' an auction Tuesday forcon- 
trol of ilAO Norilsk Nickel, said Dmitry 
Ushakov, chairman of the commission 
Paganizing the sale. 

The sale of Norilsk, one of Russia’s 
leading industrial enterprises and a major 
international metal producer, took place 
despite a last-minute complication when 
Prime ^Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin 
ordered that it be suspended. 

A group bidding under the name 

Syift, including Uneximbaok, bid 236.2 
million European currency units ($250.3 
million) for a controlling 38 percent 
sts S? “Norilsk topping a bid of 171 
million ECUs from a group bidding un- 
der the name Advanced Industrial Tech- 
nology, said Mr. Ushakov, who also is 
deputy chairman of Uneximbank. 

Uneximhankhas been custodian of the 
shares since 1995, when it lent the gov- 
ernment $170 million and held the shares 
as collateral in one of a series of “shares- 
for-loans’ * auctions that transferred con- 
trol in many large Russian companies to 
banks. Uneximbank has been under fire 
from the media and from banking of- 
ficials since it won a tender last week for 
25 percent of the AO Svyazinvest tele- 
communications company. 

Mr. Chernomyrdin wanted to have 
the sale delayed because of concerns 
that it violated Russian law and would 
give the Unexim group control over a 
prize asset at a bargain price. But a 
representative of the government said 
all legal concerns had been laid to rest 

“Norilsk was the jewel in Unexim- 
bank’s crown,’ ' said Philip Mandnca at 
London-based Eldon Capital Manage- 
ment Ltd “They had already invested 
significant amounts of capital and time 
in the company, and they were never 
going to let it go.” 

The winning bidder is obliged to in- 
vest $300 million to help Norilsk de- 
velop the Pelyafinsk gas field to supply 
fuel to Norilsk’s plants and to pay Nor- 
ilsk's debts to pensioners and other 
costs totaling about 400 billion rubles 
($69 million). (Reuters, Bloomberg) 



PAGE 11 


Pro-China Tycoon Buys 
His Way Into Jardine 


Li’s Move Prompts Takeover Speculation 


Coofileil by OurSaigFruei Duparbn 

HONG KONG — U Ka-shing has 
bought a $370 million stake in jardine 
Mafeeson Holdings Ltd. and its real- 


estate subsidiary, prompting speculation 
that the pro-Beijing billion; 


Jilih Shall R-iili'TJv Waiainl IWt> 


A customer waiting to mail four boxes, the maximum accepted by the US. Postal Service during the UPS strike. 


‘Part-Timer 9 Issue Drives VPS Strike 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York. Tunes Service 


NEW YORK — The walkout 
against United Parcel Service of 
America Inc. steins from the inevitable 
clash of two powerful forces in the 
U.S. economy — the revitalized labor 
movement's opposition to the use of 
part-time workers and corporate 
America's contention that it needs 
them to remain competitive. 

That collision pushed the Interna- 
tional Brotherhood of Teamsters to 
begin a strike Monday against 2,400 
United Parcel depots — a high-vis- 
ibility move that involves more work- 
ers than any strike so far this decade. 

United Parcel Service managers 
who worked their way up through 
company ranks climbed back into de- 
livery trucks and package sorting lines 
Tuesday, while customers had to make 


do with limited shipping alternatives. 

Most of the company’s European 
services remained unaffected by the 
strike, and its 24,000 employees there 
were working normally, a UPS Europe 


“I hope they’ll go back to the 
table,” he said, “but at this time I 
don’t think any further action by me is 


:e. 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


statement said. But traffic from the 
United States 1 ‘is expected to be some- 
what impacted,” the statement added, 
although the strike was expected to 
have little effect on U.S.-bound ship- 
ments. 

“All international volume to and 
from the U.S. is receiving top pri- 
ority,” the company said 

No talks were scheduled Tuesday 
between the company and the Team- 
sters, and President Bill Clinton re- 
fused to get involved to end the na- 
tionwide strike. The Associated Press 
reported from Atlanta. 


Even before the 185,000 drivers, 
loaders and sorters walked out, the 
Teamsters drew a line over the issue of 
part-time workers. 

Wife the U.S. economy and United 
Parcel’s profit booming, the Teamsters 
are angry that only 8,000 of the 46,000 
unionized jobs that fee company has 
created since 1993 have been full-time. 
On average, the part-time jobs pay $9 an 
hour after two years, while frill-time 
jobs pay $19.95 an hour. 

In an era in which flexibility and 
speed are corporate watchwords. 
United Parcel sees the lower-paid part- 
timers as an economic lifeline. 

In a quick-turnaround business, cor- 


uonaire could be 
planning a takeover of the territory’s 
oldest British-founded trading firm. 

Jardine Mafeeson said Tuesday that 
Cheung Kong (Holdings) Ltd. and its 
Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. unit, both 
controlled by Mr. Li, together held a 
3.03 percent stake in Jardine and a 3.06 
percent slake in Hongkong Land Co. as 
of Friday. 

Cheung Kong's motives were un- 
clear, analysts said, but the stakes 
sparked debate about a possible 
takeover bid for either Jardine or 
Hongkong Land, which is fee biggest 
landowner in Hong Kong’s Central 
business district 

Cheung Kong, along with several 
other big companies, made a raid on 
Hongkong Land in 1987. After fee Oc- 
tober 1987 global stock-market plunge, 
fee raiders sold fee shares back to 
Jardine and agreed not to attempt an- 
other takeover for seven or eight years, 
analysts said. 

“Naturally,*’ said Herbert Lau. an 
analyst at the brokerage Vickers Balias, 
“fee local market will look back to the 
1980s and Li Ka-shing 's earlier hostile 
takeover bid on Hongkong Land. 
People will be wondering whether he is 
preparing to launch a renewed bid.” 

The move would also fit wife Cheung 
Kong's real-estate plans, analysts said. 


e 


Some analysis discounted the idea of 
a takeover. 

“If you look at Cheung Kong, at any 
sort of takeover bid, I think it is extremely 
unlikely given the present shareholding 
structure of Hongkong Land, 1 1 an analyst 
at an Asian securities house said 
The Jardine group holds about 32 
xcent of Hongkong Land through 
online Strategic Holdings Ltd., which 
was set up after fee 1987 raid as an 
investment vehicle to hold fee group's 
investments in listed companies. 

Teresa Wong, an assistant to fee group 
company secretary, N.M. McNamara, 
said Jardine Matheson’s directors were 
“quite comfortable” wife the Cheung 
Kong companies as shareholders. 

“As a matter of courtesy," she said, 
the directors were told of the intention to 
buy before fee official disclosure state- 
ment was issued. 

Ms. Wong said that the Cheung Kong 


companies had not spelled out the motive 
id thi 


for fee purchases ana feat she could offer 
no comment on whether fee Jardine 
group intended to seek clarification. 

The stakes indicate Chinese compa- 
nies' interest in stakes in British-linked 
companies after fee July 1 handover of 
Hong Kong to China, analysts said, 
while Pamela Lam, research director 


at Pacific Challenge, dismissed the pur- 

nm- 



space 
three or four years. 


coming 


chase as too minor to have any 
damental impact on Cheung Kong and 
Hutchison, she said it was symbolic of 
the interest by Chinese capital in stakes 
in British-controlled companies. 

“In this sense fee symbolic meaning 
is far greater than any immediate ef- 
fect,” she said. 

In 1994, Jardine moved its secondary 


The company is probably building up 
in the two Jardine companies to 


a stake 


listing to Singapore, where it trades in 
U.S. dollars. There, its shares closed 80 


See UPS, Page IS 


s companic 
gain access to Hongkong Lana’s assets, 
said Mark Simpson, head of research at 
Schroder Securities. 

“They are trying to greenmail assets 
out of the Hongkong Land portfolio,” he 
said. “Cheung Kong might be counting 
on those assets for redevelopment” 
The managing director of Jardine 
Matheson, Alasdair Morrison, would not 
directly respond to such speculation. 

“We just believe that they bought the 
shares because they recognize good 
value in fee companies,” he said. 


cents higher at $7.85, while Hongkong 
Land rose 53 cents to S3.08. 

Though most of its businesses are in 
Hong Kong, its stocks no longer trade 


there. Jardine has been widely reported 
to be seeking to relist in Hong Kong after 


getting assurances from Chinese offi- 
cials feat Beijing was willing to provide 
assistance to Jardine's businesses in 
China. Cheung Kong's shares finished 
unchanged ai 87.50 Hong Kong dollars 
($11.30), while Hutchinson Whampoa 
shares rose 1.25 dollars to 78.75. 

(AFP. AFX. Reuters. Bloomberg) 


MEDIA MARKETS 


i Mart Tower Air Trumpets Safety, Not Price 


By Kenneth N. Gilpin 

New York Times Service 


H I 


I— 


- * 


i - , 



N EW YORK — Some airlines 
often hint in their ad cam- 
paigns that they are safer than 
their competitors, but in fee 
wake of fee ValuJet Airlines Inc. and 
Trans World Airlines Inc. disasters, at 
least one, Tower Air Inc., felt it needed to 
put a more explicit edge on its message. 

General concern about safety among 
low-cost, start-up airlines and some 
negative publicity about Tower Air’s 
own safety record led to a sharp drop in 
load factors, or seats filled on a per- 
centage basis, at Tower following fee 
ValuJet and TWA crashes last year. To 
restore confidence among travelers, fee 
airline radically altered its advertising 
strategy. 

In fee spring. Tower began a $5 mil- 
lion print and television campaign toot- 
ing itself as “fee perfect size airline,” 
one big enough to operate a fleet of 17 
Boeing 747 aircraft but not so small as to 
outsource its maintenance work, a direct 
slap at smaller airlines like ValuJet. 
which was criticized for the practice 
after the crash. 

Tower’s print ads have been running 
in all three major New York dailies^as 
well as in The Los Angeles Times. Tbe 
San Francisco Chronicle and The 
Miami Herald — all in cities feat Tower 
Air serves. Television ads, which had 
been running earlier this summer, will 
resume in September. 

Previously, Tower Air, wtoch is 
based in New York, spent much of us 


advertising dollars promoting its cheap, 
unrestricted fares from Kennedy Inter- 
national Airport to destinations like 
Miami. Paris, Athens and Tel Aviv. 

Before VahJet's fatal crash, “the 
public used to have faith the Federal 
Aviation Administration would take 
care of them, and they didn’t distinguish 
between carriers,” said Glenn Engel, an 
analyst at Goldman, Sachs & Co. But 
after the crash, “fee public punished all 
small carriers,” Mr. Engel said. “I nev- 
er like it when a company criticizes a 
competitor, bat Tower needed to es- 
tablish a brand name.” 

Gad Romano, president of Romann 
& Tanneholz, the agency feat won tbe 
Tower Air business late last fall after the 
carrier put its account under review, said 
bis mandate was straightforward. 

“We were told to comraunicare, ‘We 
are a thoroughly safety-conscious air- 
line,’ ” he said, “We want to tell fee 
prospective passenger we share the 
same values, to communicate clearly 
the security and safety aspect of Tower 
and fee length fee airline goes to provide 
that. ” 

Competitive fares are still part of the 
message, but get less emphasis. 

“Fare strategy will still be fee point 
of our overall marketing strategy,” said 
John Ruzich, Tower Air’s vice pres- 
ident of marketing and sales. “But fee 
message is we will produce a low, 
highly unrestricted fare that comes 
along wife experience, full service and 
wide-bodied airplanes, ” Mr. Ruzich 
said. “The mission of fee campaign is to 
separate Tower from fee new, start-up 


airlines and move it toward an axis 
between the start-ups and fee more tra- 
ditional carriers. ” 

Tower, which was. founded 1 1 years 
ago, also had to overcome some bad 
publicity surrounding an incident in 
December 1 995. when one of its 747s slid 
off a runway at Kennedy Airport, as well 
as an Federal Aviation Administration 
that rated it last of 23 carriers in 
ity between 1990 and 1 996. 

The sting of that report was eased 
somewhat last month by a study con- 
ducted by the Air Travelers Associ- 


ation, a passenger representative group 
in Washington. In its first Airline Safi 
Report Card, which tracks tbe fai 


s 


accident record of 260 scheduled pas- 
senger airlines in 107 countries using 
Western-built jet aircraft, fee associ- 
ation gave Tower an “A.” 

“We know they have had a number 
of incidents, from minor to somewhat 
serious,” said David Stempler, the as- 
sociation’s president. “But based on fee 
number of nights and no fatal accidents, 
they had a perfect score.” 

Mr. Ruzich said feat load factors had 
been rising, and on July 21 Tower Air 
reported second-quarter net income of 
$3.6 milli on, up 24.1 percent from fee 
comparable period in 1996. The airline 
posted a loss of $1.8 million for the first 
half of the year, significantly less than 
its net loss of $5.2 million for fee first 
six months of last year. 

“We have turned the company 
around, and righr now aU fee arrows are 
fating fa fee right direction,” Mr. 
uzich said. 


£ 


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swed. krona 

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(Dec J 

Source: Roden. 


Global Private Banting 


IGOROUS. DISCIPLINED. PRUDENT. 


AND PROUD OF IT. 



:if itaf mif nr 
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f iff neru. 


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To our way of thinking, it is security 
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VnrtJ iinJqujrt.'n I.( 
RtpaUit Vyfi'niid/ Bant n( 
.\W With in \\ne )nrt. 


!J Republic National Bank of New York" 

Strength, Security. Service. 


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PAGE 12 


30-Year T-Bond Yield 




X 130 

S'-^V 














*v^i&SM 


i. r^sT^x ;.- * aasgsz. 

Source: Bloomberg, Routers 

Very briefly: 


Equity Office Expands Holdings 

CHICAGO (Bloomberg) — Equity Office Properties Trust 
said Tuesday that it agreed to buy 13 office buildings and a 
parking garage for a total of $284.7 million. 

Tbe company said li of the buildings woe in tbe Phil- 
adelphia area and were bought for $144.7 million from Acorn 
Development The other two buildings and the parting garage 
are in New Orleans and were bought for $140 million. 

Equity Office is the largest U.S. owner of office buildings. 
Before this transaction, it had 90 properties and 14 parting 
garages. 

Aon Uncovers Loss at New Unit 

CHICAGO (Combined Dispatches) — Aon Carp, said 
Tuesday it was seeking a government investigation of Al- 
exander & Alexander Services Inc., after discovering $27 
million of previously undisclosed losses at the company, 
which it bought in January for $1.2 billion. 

Aon, one of the world's largest insurance brokers, said the 
Josses came from derivatives investments, including bonds 
linked to home mortgages called collateralized mortgage 
obligations. 

Aon courted Alexander & Alexander for three years before 
tbe purchase. Frank Zarb, chairman of Alexander, then left to 
become chairman of tbe National Association of Securities 
Dealers in Washington. (Bloomberg, AP) 

• Oxford Health Plans Inc. stock tumbled $3.6875. to 
$81,125, after its founder and chairman, Stephen Wiggins, 
resigned the chief executive post, overshadowing strong 
second-quarter profit for tbe operator of health-maintenance 
organizations. Net income climbed to $37.2 million in the 
quarter, from $22.5 milli on a year earlier. 

• Intel Corp. said Deutsche Telekom AG ordered "tens of 
thousands” of the ctripmaker's videoconferencing systems, 
expanding a three-year-old marketing agreement. Bloomberg 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, W EDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 

Net Vigilantes Destroy Postings 


n* 


1-01 M_ A M J J A : 110 M A M J J A •. 

1957 1997 


■■■■■ v.. — : r.J 

Intnpauaiial Herald Tribune 


By Rajiv Chandrasekaian 

Washington ^ ost Venice 

WASHINGTON — A group of 
Internet users who are angry over 
the mass posting of ads on the 
electronic bulletin boards of (he 
global computer network have 
blocked or destroyed thousands of 
postings made by customers of 
UUNet Technologies Inc. 

Affecting ads and occasional 
noncommercial postings, the group 
has effectively declared war cm any 
posting sent through the Internet 
service company, which it con- 
tends has failed to adequately crack 
down on people who post ads. 

The action began over the week- 
end and in its first 24 hours, or- 
ganizers said, blocked more than 
80,000 postings by UUNet custom- 
ers. About 600 of die postings were 
not product pitches, they said. 

It was the first such action aimed 
at a major Internet provider, com- 
puter industry specialists said, and 
it prompted a sharp outcry from 


UUNet and some free-speech ad- 
vocates. UUNet 's chief executive, 
John Sidgmore, called the cancel- 
lations "digital terrorism." 

"These people are not govern- 
ment agents or the police,” Mr. 
Sidgmore said. "They have abso- 
lutely no right to cancel service on 
someone else's infrastructure.” 

Mr. Sidgmore said the company 
would pursue "every available le- 
gal recourse we have." to stop the 
cancellations. 

“We're trying to send a mes- 
sage to UUNet," said Dennis Mc- 
fTiflin- F tirmansiri , a spokesman for 
the group that is trying to eliminate 
the postings. "They’ve been flatly 
ignoring our complaints. We don’t 
want to punish them or cause them 
problems. We just want them to 
stop causing the Net problems.” 

The protest hig hli g hted the un- 
regulated and anarchistic nature of 
the Internet, where a few tech- 
nically savvy people can have a big 
impact Some network users called 
tbe action a "Usenet Death Pen- 


alty," refoning to the section of 
the Internet that houses electronic 
bulletin boards where people can 
post messages for others to read. 

Those bulletin boards increas- 
ingly have been filling up with 
junk postings that offer, among 
other thing s, pornographic pictures 
and get-rich-quick schemes. The 
postings almost always are unre- 
lated to die subject of the board, 
and the volume of those postings 
has begun to cripple an increasing 
number of boards, experts said 

UUNet sells Internet service to 
other companies, which, in mm, 
sell the service to consumers under 
another brand name. UUNet has 
tried to go after people originating 
the commercial postings, Mr. 
Sidgmore said, but its contracts 
with the companies that actually 
sell the service to consumers pre- 
vent UUNet from ordering that 
specific accounts be terminated 


http://wwwJht.comJIHTITECH/ 


Blockbuster Gives Viacom a Loss 


Om^tkd ty Our StrfFmn Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Viacom Inc. 
posted a second-quarter loss Tues- 
day as problems at its Blockbuster 
Entertainment Group video-store 
chain offset gains at its MTV Net- 
works cable channels. 

The company posted a loss of 
$217 milli on for the quarter, after a 
$323 million pretax charge at 
Blockbuster and a $65 million gain 
from the sale of television stations. 

Excluding the extraordinary 
items, its loss was $14 million, re- 
versing a profit of $26 milli on a year 
earlier. Revenue in the quarter was 


up 8.8 percent, to $3.03 billion. 

Sumner Redstone, Viacom’s 
chairman and chief executive, said 
the company bad "to a large extern 
identified the issues” that contrib- 
uted to Blockbuster’s “unsatisfact- 
ory” performance. 

He said a new management was 
/‘putting operational and marketing 
initiatives in place” to refocus the 
business and forecast "a period of 
renewed growth next year” for it 
He said all of Viacom’s other di- 
visions had “turned in solid per- 
formances” in the latest quarter. 

Blockbuster has been suffering 


from an industrywide drop of 8 per- 
cent to 9 percent in video rentals in 
the past year, exacerbated by a man- 
agement upheaval, distribution 
problems and a changing marketing 
strategy that has left analysts ques- 
tioning Blockbuster’s future. 

“The whole world is on a ‘show- 
me’ with Blockbuster,” said 
Richard Read, an analyst at Amhold 
& Bleichroeder. 

"I don’t ever see it performing 
well,” Harold Vogel, an analyst at 
Cowen & Co., said. 

Viacom closed at $30.50, up 
3 1 .25 cents. ( Bloomberg . Reuters) 


Share-Shuffling Leads 
Blue-Chip Index Lower 


OrpEMAp O* SaffFitmtDIspaitlm 

NEW YORK — Stocks were 
mixed Tuesday as investors sold 
their holdings m blue-chip compa- 
nies that had soared in the past year 
and bought computer-related 
shares. 

"Investors are pushing coins 
from one basket to another,” said 
James Margaret, who oversees $3.9 
billion as chief of equities at Rainier 
Investment Management in Seattle. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed Tuesday at 8,187.54, 
down 10.91. Declining issues out- 
numbered advancers by a 10-to-9 
ratio on the New York Stock Ex- 
change. Procter & Gamble, op 64 
percent the past 12 months, lea the 
30- stock index lower. 

Broader market measures rose. 
The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index 
finished at 952.37, up 2.07, and the 
Nasdaq Composite Index rose for a 
sixth day, gaining 16.08 to close at 
1,62153, an all-time high. 

Intel, up 11 percent the past 
week, gained, and Cisco Systems 
rose as investors expected strong 
earnings from the world’s largest 
networking company after die mar- 
ket closed. 

No major technology companies 
have yet reported earnings disasters 
with the second-quarter earnings 
season drawing to a close, said John 
Rati edge, an analyst with Loomis, 
Sayles & Co. 

"Most of these companies have 
been doing quite well," he said, 
"and investors are willing to pay 
more for them on tbe belief that 
profit growth will be more predict- 
able in the future.” 

Aetna shares tumbled as much as 
12 percent. Although die insurance 
company reported profit in line with 
expectations, its prognosis for fu- 
ture growth disappointed analysts. 

British Petroleum PLC’s Amer- 


ican depositary receipts «»e^ r 
Europe’s second-largest J 0 ®" 

pany said it would buy back an 
undisclosed amount of its stock. It 
reported a 14 percent nse ra 
quarterly profit, beating expecta- 
nons and sending its shares higher 
in London trading. . 

BankAmerica shares fell alter 
die company's investment rating 
was downgraded by Byron Wien, 
Morgan Stanley's investment 
strategist. Other banks also de- 
clined, including First Union and 
NationsBank. 

US. STOCKS 

Shares of Ensexch and Enserch 
Exploration fell after Enserch Ex- 
ploration, which is 83 percent- 
owned by Enserch, issued a lower 
estimate of the size of its oil and 
natural-gas reserves. The news 
came a day after the Securities and 
Exchange Commission approved 
Enserch’ s acquisition by Texas 
Utilities. 

Investors displayed little reaction 
to two reports showing that the 
economy's course was steady and 
that inflation was not a threat. 

The Conference Board’s index of 
leading economic indicators was 
unchanged in June at 103.8. and the 
Commerce Department reported 
that the number of housing units on 
which construction was completed 
fell in June, making the fourth con- 
secutive monthly decline and 
reaching the lowest level in almost * 
two years. 

Bonds fell after the government 
sold $16 billion of three-year notes 
at a higher yield than traders ex- 
pected. The benchmark 30-year 
bond fell 7/32, or $2.19 per $1,000 
bond, to 101 22/32. Its yield was at 
6.49 percent, op from 6.48 percent 
Monday. (Bloomberg. AP) 


K i# ;' 

in* 1 :-.; 

.- r;: 

W " 


DOLLAR: U.S. Currency Powers Ahead Against the Mark, Undeterred by German Rate-Rise Talk 


Continued from Page 1 

several economists said they did not 
expect any move to raise German 
interest rates until at least next week, 
and possibly not before the next 
scheduled Bundesbank council 
meeting Aug. 21. 

Although any rise in German 
rates could damage the fragile eco- 
nomic recovery now under way in 
Germany and elsewhere in Europe, 
the Bundesbank’s economist was 
quoted Tuesday expressing serious 
concern about the mark's slide 


against the dollar. The dollar 
inhered briefly after Mr. Issing was 
quoted as telling Boerse Online 
magazine that the mark's exchange 
rate was among the key indicators 
the central bank used in deciding on 
interest rates. 

“The fact that the mark has 
weakened so fast and so signifi- 
cantly certainly gives us something 
to think about,” Mr. Issing told tbe 
ma gazin e in an interview that was 
conducted July 29. He also said he 
thought an interest-rate increase 
would not damage the economy de- 


spite Germany's high unemploy- 
ment level and its uneven recovery. 

While this was interpreted as 
tough talk from an influential 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

Bundesbank official, the force of 
Mr. Issing’s remarks was diluted 
almost immediately because be ad- 
ded that there was "no automatic 
link" between the dollar-mark rate 
and interest-rate decisions. 

Analysts said, however, that the 
Bundesbank may decide to raise in- 


terest rates anyway, if only to signal 
that it remains independent in the 
run-up to monetary union. But they 
added that a small interest-rate in- 
crease might not stop tbe dollar. 

Alison Cottrell, international 
economist at PaineWebber in Lon- 
don, said that currency traders ap- 
peared to have decided to engage in 
“Bundesbank- baiting.” 

"The currency market seems to 
be on a roll, and it expects an in- 
terest-rate hike in Germany,” Ms. 
Cottrell said, "so it is as though 
every hour it doesn't see o no, it 


pushes the dollar up higher." 

Tbe dollar was also up against the 
French franc, at one point reaching 
its highest level since November 
1 989. In 4 P.M. trading in New York, 
the dollar was at 63465 francs, up 
from 6-2935 francs Monday. 

The U.S. currency also pushed 
ahead against the yen, trading at 
1 19.25 yen, up from 1 18.35 yen. 

Tbe dollar also fetched 15350 
Swiss francs, up from 15253 francs. 
Die pound eased against the dollar, 
being quoted at $ 1 .6245, down from 
$1.6317. 


n v 

V - 


mi"; 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday's 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 most active shares [junrun 

up to liie dosing on Wai Street. I mbvwi 

The Associated Press. 



Mg* um um ami 


Vi % 
?»k TV,. 
I 9k 
M 3 
IWk IS** 
U U*i 

tjvi rm 

IU B* 
m in, 
pw pv* 

3 Vi n 

n jv» 

w *• 

5*k 5ft 


Most Actives 


ZW *1 

3H +ft 


4ft 4 
Vk 9 
lift U 
MV 3P« 


lift lift 

jwr am 


ii’* 0 

36 +»k 


i*ft +ih 
irvi -v» 


7ft 7 
1TV. I?ft 
4>» ib 


I* I»k 
1ft I** 
16H 14<V 


4>> < 

6 '« ft, 
WTj Iff* 


4*i - n 

17** + V. 

S*» -V 
M»< .ft 
35 -u 

m* 4* 

Hi •>.. 

7>* -ft 


Sft P. 
w • ws* 
61>4. 61 >4. 
aft m 


TB 9ft 

IJll IJVi 


6l»*< .nta 

Wl -!>» 


Dow Jones 

opaa mm Lew urn a*. 

Indus B19&B3 <009.14 (16145 11(7.54 -lap 

Time 2981-36 2997.15 77764? 299144 +14.95 

UK 733.13 23154 23246 23121 +431 

Corap 25283)4 2SJ454 2521-71 237699 +118 


Standard & Poors 


Industrials 1 123.37 11 1342 IT 1841 
Tramp. 690.05 682.00 687.01 

Ufflffles 20226 20095 20110 

Finance 11117 110.7? 111*8 

5P 500 957.73 948*9 95429 

SP 100 93445 924J9 92949 


Mm L>» pm am. 
4*341 491.15 49196 +1JO 
6K99 622JI 6H4S +161 
44996 447.19 44906 +1 27 

29192 7VQL7D 291.11 -042 

458.13 4SSJ9 450! -192 


Nasdaq 


Nasdaq 


Composes 162141 160938 1671.53 + 1608 

Industrials 127640 136691 12/09 +1811 

BdlU 172533 171797 172593 + 236 

Insurance 172245 171193 172221 +690 

Finance jy 3049.77 7064.94 +1139 

Transp 1S3M9 103845 103173 -132 

AMEX 

Him lw im cat. 
65863 64846 65865 +406 

Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 
10 UtOines 
10 Industrials 


VM. HW 
107291 SSVa 
95399 7416 
72217 *ft 

m » 

56439 45ft 
55162 lift 

5307? S8ft 
51161 34ft 
50017 78ft 

S& 

44577 6*4 
44342 35ft 
43629 329k 


VM, MM 
207977 100ft 
135235 DM 
13*96 ft 
111748 34ft 

SSi & 

76507 B4ft 
71135 144ft 
68236 35V* 
61664 

59414 3ft 

55643 18 
55122 22ft 
51877 469W 
51760 97ft 


Urm La* 
5W+ 56*V 
23ft 23'*'* 

&3Stt 

41ft 44ft 
3 W 45ft 
10ft IBM 
57ft 58ft 
339. 33ft 
279* 28ft 
nntum 
24ft 24V» 
67ft 67ft 

309* 32 


■ftt »k 

31V* 344k 

3 

31ft 3411 
*a ft 
2ft* 2V» 
16V. 17ft 
19ft] 22ft 
45ft 46 Vk 
94ft 96ft 


1 5519 17ft „ 17 17V. -9 

ins 95ft* 94Jft] 95*k +W 

13337 V. ft fte 

17808 6Vk 1ft ift .ft 

10045 lift 30ft 300, 

6946 10 9ft 9V* 

6770 ift 4ft .5 

6708 7ft 79a 7ft 


Trading Activity 


MvoncM 
Beamed 
UncMrftM 
TlMBUKS 
Now HKBB 


Advanced 
Deemed 
ijnaiai+jad 
ToUlHMH 
New Higlis 
New Lorn 


Nasdaq 

(tow Pvwv. 

1*15 U9A Advanced 

174 1179 Drafted 

567 54 Uncflarw 

3476 3115 fatal Blow 

2« 715 New MOBS 

IB 15 New LOWS 

Market Sales 

Om Pm 

325 307 

756 287 MYSE 

IS Amo 

™ Nasdaq 
7 s Inmtions. 


1734 2DU 
1546 7011 
2154 7697 
5474 S790 

163 238 
5? 63 


514-33 563J7 

23 JOS 28Z1 

65597 593J0 


Dividends 

Company Per Amf Rec Pay 

IRREGULAR 

CwnpTdCWte b 617 8-14 8-28 


Wsfn Deep Level 


b AS 8-8 106 


LIQUIDATING 

Owe Trust Rtt? _ Z10 8-12 8-19 
INITIAL 

BkAmern _ JOS 8-20 9-12 

INCREASED 

Brush Weffman Q .12 9-16 9-30 

West Inc 0 .151022 11-5 

REGULAR 

AGL Resources O 27 8-15 9-1 

Am Bus PdOs Q .155 9-2 9-15 

Arlesian ResA. 0 23 8-12 8-20 

Bakto Elect 0 .12 9-9 9-30 

Baxter inli 0 7825 9-10 lOl 


Company Per Amt Jtec Pi 

BnJIEtearGMnco M SS7 8-15 8-i 

Coco-Cota Botttng Q J5 8-22 9- 

Cohen Slew Toll “ "»»-•**• 

Cousins Props 
EO Telecom 
Emerson Eled 
Hetslny Foods 
Home Bancorp 
Liberty Corp 

KM 

McDermott Inti 
Mentor Inco Fd 
NVTxExmpf 
PerTB-Gjo WS q 0 J08 9-3 10 

Resour BcsmsMtg 0 .03 8-20 9-1 

TMbotsInc .11 9-2 9-1 

Union Amor HMg b ill 56 9-8 0-3 

a-amiMfc b-appraxkoate mmnit per 
stun/ADR; p-payoMe hi Canm&aR ftndsg 
■ m w n llW . - q-qaart t rlr? s-somt-nnmwl 


Per Amt Rec Pay 

M J7 8-15 8-29 

Q -25 8-22 9-5 

M ,0B B-15 8-79 

O 31 015 8-26 

O JB B-15 B-2B 

Q 37 8-15 9-10 

Q JO 8-25 9-15 

O JB 8-39 9-18 

Q -28 9-15 10-2 

□ .04 B-15 8-29 

M M3 B-15 B-29 

Q -OS 915 10-1 

M .07 8-15 8-29 

M £&3 OIS 9-2 

O «l W lOl 

0 .03 8-70 9-10 

.11 9-2 9-15 
b -0156 9-8 9-30 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sates flaw res one unaffictoL Yearly Wghi and lows reflect me previous 52 weeks plus the 
current week, but not the latest frecPng day. Where a lpfitorstock dividend amounting to 25 
percent ormoie has been paid, the years Mgft-tow ran geanddMdendaie shown to the new 
slocks only. Unless otherwise noted, rotes of tflvidends ora annua I disbursements based on 
the latest decJarotSan. 

a • dividend also extra (si. b - annual rate of dMdand plus stock dividend, c - Hquldotina 
dividend, ce - PE exceeds 99.CM - colled, d - new yearly law. dd - loss In the lost 12 months, 
e - dividend declared or paid in precedkig 12 months. ( - annual rote, increased on lost 
declaration, g - dividend in Canadian funds, subfeet to lS%non-residefK* tax: E - dividend 
declared after sptH-up or stock dividend, i - dividend paid this year, omitted, deferred, or no 
action token at latest dividend meeting, k - dividend declared or paid this year, an 
accumulative issue with dividends m arrears, at - annual rate, reduced on Iasi declaration, 
n - new Issue in the pem 52 weeks. The high-tow range begins with tno stmt ot trading, 
nd - next day delivery, p - inMtol dividend, annual rata unknown. P/E - price-framings ratio, 
q ■ dose d-end mutual fund, r- dividend doctored or paid In preceding 12 months pkrs stock 
dividend, s - stock split. Dividend begins vritti date at spat sis - soles, t ■ dhrldond paid in 
stock in preceding 12 ntcn&ub estimated emit value on ea-dMdend ar«-tiSfrQHition date. 

u - new yeariy high. v. tracSng hailed, vl - In bankrupteyorneatvenhlp or being reoiganUed 
utidorlhe Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies, wd- when dlsbfeuted. 

wt - when Issued' ww - with warrants, x* ex-dividend Of w-rigM*. wfls - ex-dtsMbirtton. 
jtw ■ without warrants, y- ex-dividend and sales In ML yld- yield. *- soles In M- 


Aug. 5, 1997 

High Low Latest Chga OpM 

Grains 

CORN (CBOT3 

MOO bu oVniinwB- cants per bushel 
5ep97 263ft 254 354ft 57J03 

Dec 97 265 257 2S7U -7ft 154215 

Mar 98 273 265U 265ft -7ft 32.742 

May 98 27714 249ft 269ft A 7,158 

Jul 98 280 272 272 -8 ft 11,962 

Sep 98 365ft JWft 259ft -3ft 1345 

Doc 98 263ft 260ft 260ft -4 4130 

EsL softs 71000 Itarrx sates 8L488 
Mam open Int 274934 up 2A93 

SOYBEAN MEAL (C BO TJ 
100 tons- deltas par kin 

Aug 97 261 JH 257 JO 25880 -180 11.900 
5ep97 235 JH 231 JO 232J0 -180 211213 
Oct97 719-00 21410 21550 -4.20 15651 

Dec 97 21400 20850 210.20 -110 39899 

Jon 98 211.50 20400 208J0 -3.10 5917 

Mar 98 210JJ0 20500 20430 -2-00 8LOI7 

Est sales 2UJOO Mon* softs 21,153 


High Low Lutes! Chgu OpM 

ORANGE JUKE (MCTN) 

15000 lb*.- mts per to. 

Sep 97 7565 7480 7515 Urdu 16^27 

NOV 97 77 JO 7490 77.10 -0.10 8416 

Jan 98 30.70 8080 8410 -0.10 5940 

Mar 98 8175 82.90 8110 -0.15 2897 

Est softs KA. Mam rates 1861 
Mom open ini 32^11 off 73 

Metals 

GOLD (NCMX) 

100 troy oi- doilon par Iray or. 

Aug 97 33430 71 7J» 32040 -150 1.321 

Sep 97 32IJD -380 7 

Oct 97 325J0 31980 32250 -150 15852 

Dec 97 92820 32180 32460 -150 105,774 

Feb 98 32950 32400 32480 -160 12218 

Apr 98 32880 32860 32880 -160 5155 

Jim 98 331.10 -160 7.620 

Aug 98 33240 -160 1111 

0d 98 335 JO 33580 335.70 -140 106 

BL softs 4Z800 Mom soles 14156 
MamsMnln! I8&024 up 1«<3S 

HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 


High Low Latest Chge Op Ini 


High Low Latest Oige Optra 


10- YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT1R Sep 98 9428 9414 9414 -0.10 35850 

FF50Q.000 ■ pts of 100 pd Dec 98 >439 94J5 9425 -0.10 25.492 

"fr™ 1 9818-052 14922 FMv.apealra^ 373^461 op 445 

EsL rates: 188.928. 

Open WL 191877 ott 2879. , , , , , 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND OlFFE) 
m. 200 m«on - pb at 100 pd 


Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NCTN) 

54000 Bis.- mb per to. 


Sep 97 13427 13495 135.15 -0.75102443 Oct 97 75L06 7455 7483 -023 1L310 

Dec 97 10780 10782 10744 -042 1300 Dec 9 7 7490 7440 7470 -114 42,955 


EsI. rales: 77,125. Prev. softs; 61520 

Piev men 105803 oil 2.760 M °7 58 7460 7460 41.18 1771 

UMR«NT1|5SeW a w.05 7498 7498 -0.17 1.538 

S3 nOBIon- pis oM 00 pd. EsL sales N a Mam sales 4258 

Aug 97 9436 9435 9435 uadi. 24768 Mans opan lid 7S£S4 all 34S 

Sep 97 9434 9433 9414 imch. 14339 

0d 97 9432 9431 9432 (inch. S07B HEATING OIL INMEFO 

EsI. rales 1741 Mam sales 4442 42800 gd. coils par gal 

Mam open Inl 4U24 up 697 Sep 97 S8«0 57.70 SBJ 


EURODOLLARS CCMER) 


H EATING OIL mMER] 

42800 gaL cents per gai 
Sep 97 S8«0 57.70 5882 -0.12 44450 

Od 97 5985 5835 5882 -4U4 34186 

NCV97 »J0 5885 59J2 -419 17.900 








2 StC»tas-osnh par lb. 




SOYBEAN OIUCBOT! 




Aug 97 

10700 

9645 10730 

+ 1.10 

z*n 

60000 R»- amis tor lb 




Sep 97 

107J0 

10460 

10720 

+1.00 

2105 ; 

Aug 97 

2202 

2103 

2108 

027 

1765 

Od 97 

106.10 

005 

10605 

+095 

1492 

Sep 97 

2230 

21.78 

2704 

028 

20.733 

Nov 97 

10540 

10330 

105.40 

+a9o 

U70 

Ocl 97 

2239 

21.96 

2200 

026 

15.926 

Dec 97 

104.75 

102J5 

10475 

+005 

7.717 

Dee 97 

22.72 

2227 

2234 

025 

42,977 

Jan 98 

10440 

102.90 

10440 

+aoo 

646 

Janto 

2209 

2209 

2149 

026 

M60 

Feb 98 



10U0 

♦ato 

615 

Mar 98 

23.10 

2280 

2205 

017 

4716 

Morto 

102-55 

101.10 

10235 

♦085 

2396 

EH. sales 19000 Mam sates 19.278 


Apr to 



101 JO 

+085 

398 


SI mdlan-pls of 100 pd. Dec 97 60.10 5832 5987 -0.19 19848 

Aug 97 9428 9427 9427 unch. 22,113 Jan 98 6430 5970 60.12 -Cl 9 14060 

Sep 97 9426 9425 9425 unch. 527,224 Feb 98 59.90 39SS 5982 -CI9 1099 

0d97 9417 9416 9417 unch. 2745 Mar 9» SBJ5 5780 5867 -024 7243 

M^n Esi-«*»2&093 Mam softs 41846 

Jun98 9390 9384 9387 -081 269.436 Aftxrs Open felt 14*3» up 2453 

Sraito 9381 9176 9179 -081 210,141 , icmt cwrriTT ronnp niMPDl 

Dec 98 9169 9166 9348 -0.07 161779 , CHU PF, 

Mar 99 9348 93A5 9367 -082 124528 ^2?S re S?.“ ,L _ Bn u .. 

Jun 99 9164 9J6l 9163 4UH 96832 S?Pj? 20. ^4 2055 2080 +085 99814 

Sep 99 Ofl ^59 9160 4HH 845» »■« ^ K.71J 

D*P> 7154 9152 Sm 71176 Nav77 2180 20 JO 20.90 +087 35886 


Mam open W 9&0I& aH 616 

SOYBEANS (C80T) 

1000 bu mMimim- cenb per bushel 
Aug 97 768 755ft 763 -21* 12270 

Sop 97 678 666 468 -9ft 11179 

NOV 97 647ft 631 634ft -lift 75W43 

Jan 98 651 636 639ft -lift 1S914 

Mar 98 659ft «4Jft 648ft -10ft S108 

EsL sales 45800 Mans sates 51822 
Mans open hit 1338M up 938 

WHEAT (CBOD 

5JM0 tw iWnlmum- cents per bushel 


Sop 97 

354 

348 

353ft 

■Ift 

40.10) 

Dee 97 

3+9 

363 

368ft 

■1ft 

44426 

Morto 

380 

375 

178ft 

-1ft 

13413 

May to 

380ft 

376ft 

379 

-2ft 

1.310 


EsL sides 22800 Mam sales 31084 
Mam open ltd 104419. up 1.145 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER1 

40.000 lbs.- cents per lb 

Aug 97 6720 6635 6642 -087 
0097 7022 6945 6950 -080 

Dec 97 72-07 7155 7157 855 

Feb 98 7140 7190 72.95 -442 

Apr 96 75JM 7457 7460 -0.42 

Junto 71J5 71.42 7142 022 

Ed sales -1 6391 Mnri sales 14724 
Mam open Ini 107.292, afl 950 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 
ittan Bis. ■ ceirts per to 
Aug 97 8130 KUO 80.32 857 

Sep 97 BIOS B0 20 8025 -0.65 

Od 97 81 JO 8050 8065 -0.40 

Now 97 07-40 8155 B157 -OJU 

Jan 98 B250 Bl.to B1.97 4L40 

Mar 98 82.15 8150 8165 -0.40 

EsL sates 1799 Mans sides 1980 
Mom open M 24561. up 18 

HOGS- Lean (CMER) 

40.000 to*.- amts per lb. 

Aug 97 0230 BOAS M.8S -200 

Od 97 7145 7192 7192 -2J» 

Dec 97 7132 6967 6967 -2.00 

Fob 98 6960 6792 6>92 -200 

Apr 98 64JD 6330 6417 -O.BO 

EsL sales 10443 Mom solas 7519 
Mamopon lid 38439, up 726 

PORK BE LUES (CMER! 

JOlOOOBh.- cents per to. 

Aug 97 8850 8627 8652 -752 

Feb 98 7835 755S 7655 -300 

Mar to 7730 75.90 7590 -300 

Ed sides 1.949 Mam sales 2.7B7 
Men open tel sM up 59 


Food 

COCOA (NCSD 
10 neffle tons - 1 per ton 


Sep 97 

1504 

1481 

Ida 

•17 

22002 

Dec 97 

1549 

1 STB 

1529 

-17 

26181 

Morto 

1580 

1563 

1563 

•17 

34883 

w 

1590 

1583 

1S83 

-16 

11.003 

1609 

1603 

1603 

•16 

1330 

Septo 

1623 

1620 

1623 

-16 

3.743 


Ed sides 7317 Mam serins 5954 
Mom open lid 10A999. up 693 

COFFEE C(NCSE) 

37500 ns. ■ amts per to 

Sap 97 204 SO 19200 70310 »9JS 93» 
rw 07 ITS 50 16400 17470 .600 6534 

Marto 15600 iso 50 I512S -370 333a 

May to 1 48- SO 14650 14850 -J SO 970 

jSat IASlSO 14050 14400 *3 SO 633 

Ed rafts 8-146 Moos sates 4747 
Mam open Ini S1.19S up 5S8 

SUOARWORLDII WOE) 

112000 tos^unti per lb .. 

Od97 1144 1150 11A1 >003 111368 

Ntorto 1150 11.21 11 77 unco 58.347 

Say to 1173 1166 1172 WK7I. 12419 

1164 1157 1164 imen. 7JI7 

EsL sates I 1 S 80 Mom sates 12361 
Man open Ita 1*1741 off 170 




Ed. rales 9JJ00 Mam rates 4068 
Mam open tnl 41096, up 474 

SILVER (NCMX) 

iOOO Iray to.- cants per Iray or. 

Aug 97 479.70 -18.90 

Sep 97 45000 429.00 43150 -1920 53387 

Od97 435.10 1 9 JO 78 

Dec 97 45650 436JJ0 43750 -19.40 18105 

Jon 98 439.40 -1950 20 

Mcrto 46430 44400 444-00 -19.60 10314 

May 98 467 JO 44750 44800 -19.60 1968 

■M 98 452.00 -1*a0 2JW 

EsL soles 30000 Mom sates 8468 
Mom open Nil 91 ,808 off 1.703 

PLATINUM (HMER1 
SO Iray az.- daBan per Iray az. 

Od97 466.00 43950 4«»60 -5 a0 11345 

Jan to 45400 41100 43940 -550 1400 

Apr to 432+0 42500 432.60 -St 0 405 

Ed. sates N A Mam sales 1679 
Mm open Ini 14730 Oh 927 


Close l 

LONDON METAL5 (LME1 
Dodors per metric ton 
fthwft i r d Uftfi Grade) 

Spot 1725ft 1776ft 174150 

Fanranl 172100 172100 173400 
Copper Cathodes (Hftb Grade) 
spot noejn 2311.00 2awj» 
Forman) 7782.00 228400 229000 
Lead 

Spot 592.00 59300 622ft 

Fanranl MM 609 DO 63630 

NkW 

Spol 711500 712100 720500 
Fpmartl 723000 723000 7300JM 
Tie 

Spol 557000 5530 JIO 55-MOO 
Ftrwranl 5520.00 55800Q 5590 00 


Ztec (Special Htek Grade) 

Spot 158100 158800 158400 1587JM 
Forward 1494.00 1497 XKJ 148800 1489.00 

High Low Ctasi* Oigo Optra 

Financial 

UST BILLS (CMER) 

II nOion- pft of 100 pa. 

Sg>97 MBS 9487 9JM uneft. 4035 
D«97 94.77 94 75 94 75 4L02 823 

Morto 9465 -0411 7 a 

Esl sates 422 Mom sates 753 
Mom apwi M 7JJ34 Off 12 

5 YR TREASURY (CBOD 
Sioam prtl- pis & 64ttK of 100 nd 

' 07-09 106-62 107414 04 228739 

DOC 97 104-5* 104-49 106-53 -04 9,981 

Esl. Mdn 3*100 Mom sates 31973 
Mem Open kit 238728 oH 54 

Mn Pts 8 32nds ol 100 pa 

SepM 109-76 (09 1/ rov.ji .m m-m 
!» « »»« 109-13 -01 33.789 

M»« Iqojn 1094] 1 own 

EsL sates 78001 Mom sates *1051 
Mom open mi 12 . up I*]* 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT1 

"Mw-Pt*. 4 32n*^ ratoopen 

!!tl? j! 4 - 19 ” 522.189 
2^1* !;*!? 113-31 114-08 -oi 48628 
113-30 113-27 113-30 -02 S«7 
113-18 - 02 2,137 

Esl sa tes 350000 Mop, sates 31 6,3911 
Mom opon im 604798 o+lsvi M 

WNGGILT IUFFE) 

H?Wf> • PteB JSMbar 100 ad 

g®«RS-- 

nnu^sw 

232.23*. Pre, * 

^ 0PMH1I. 228158 cf.T«| U37 




Ed. rates 371821 Mam sates 409.997 
Mam open kit 2.7*1.51 & off 4254 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

62300 pounds, t per pound 

Sep 97 1.6374 Lalto 1 .6208 -0.OO54 48224 

Dec 97 1^218 1.6148 lal 48 -0.0054 864 

Morto 16090 -0JM54 209 

Ed. sates 7.047 Mam sales 5,387 

Mom open W 49397. up 14Q 


Doe 97 20.94 1983 2890 +809 51 .TO 

Jon to 2036 W-65 3D JV +802 24491 

Feb 98 2880 20*3 20.75 +802 18820 

Ed rales 12*135 Mom sales 122313 
Mam open Ini 02580, up 125S4 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER1 
Hxuna deflars. S per Cdn. db 


864 NATURAL &A5(NMER) 

209 18000 mm bhrs,t per nun btu 

Sep 97 3-00 £300 2374 unch. 42246 

Od 97 1440 2329 2381 +0.013 24587 

Nov 97 2330 3-440 2476 +0.013 11670 

Dec 97 1620 2550 2576+8011 18492 

Jai 98 2630 2565 2600 +0015 17407 


Sep 97 .7272 .725 » .72*180010 4IJ03 F<*W 2530 2470 2500 +0015 11-509 

Dec 97 .7300 .7785 7345 00010 2084 Esl. soles 71372 Mam sates 76248 


Morto .7325 .7373 732J -00010 

Esl. sates 1153 Mam udas 2825 
Mom open tel 45,724, up 183 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

125000 mortis, (permcvfc 


618 Morn opon lnM921 89. up 9035 

UNLEADED GASOUNE (NMER) 

42000 got tenls pes gal 

Sep 97 6720 66.10 67.10 +0.J6 45478 

Oct 47 61.70 u.90 61 57 +037 16.148 


Sop 97 ^95 .5324 5334 03X05 130303 Nov 97 5960 5175 9»37 +847 1924 

D«V7 ^81 Jan -5367 0X034 1253 Dec 97 S195 5705 5837 +852 IBM 


Mar 99 J3to -5383 JE398 0003* 
EsL rates 21054 Mans sales 20X3 
Mom opon kd 134008. up 513 


545 Junto S1OT 57 JS 5607 +OJ2 7.765 
Feb 98 59JJ9 +052 1.957 

Morto 59.54 59.15 5934 +0-17 4.007 


(CJ AERJ Est. sales 26.045 M 

125maionwm S IKtlOO yen Mans open tel 95.9 

AS25 8420 043000077 74474 

Dk97 .8592 JB13 '•«» BRENT OIL (IPE) 

r*T ._ A.. .. eust 0.0077 413 ui. doflon peroan 

Ed. sates 16064 Mam Mies 14,725 Sep 97 1*38 1 

Mom open xd 78035. alt 2512 0d97 19A1 1 


Apr to 61.94 +052 1.260 

fat. sales 76,045 Mam sates 35.233 
Mans open tel 9S.9II. up 2449 


SWISS FRANC (CMER) 
121000 hones. 5 per franc 


413 U3. daflan per barrel - tots ra 1000 bands 

SCO 97 19JB 1930 1932 +0.06 68474 

Od 97 1931 1930 1934 +011 51.326 

No»97 1906 1935 19.60 +014 11J7S 

Dee97 1930 1939 1965 +017 11521 

Janto 19*5 I9J9 1963 +017 U30? 


&V. ■**£ ■® £n AMI -80032 61,434 Feb98 1936 1936 1936 +816 6.B1 


Doe 97 6628 .6604 .6619 0.0033 2222 

Motto 0686 .6675 6686 0.0034 967 

Esl. ram 1 1337 r*vn sates 9,766 
Mom anon ml 64,731 up 552 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

500000 pesos. S per iiesa 


Motto 1 9-49 1932 1969 +815 2614 

Esl. sales: 51.000 . Prev. sates . 45318 
Prev open teL 171793 up 2462 

GASOIL (IPE) 

U S. daUara por metric Ian ■ late oil DO tons 


Sop 97 .12630 12585 .12675+ 00262 20433 &?« !»■?! *{j2 !!'? 

DOC 97 .12190 .12155 .12190+ 00262 11835 jjHI !’ ,43 S 

Mar M M787 117/0 » i aw . mw • H.r GtJ v» I ''■IS 177.75 I ^ 25 *■! -25 10,7 b* 

r?, , . , ■ ,+S.. ■ "ratlBlSt 5,765 NovVI 1B1O0 17925 181.00 +430 1B00 


^ S07O Dec 97 101.00 17930 18100 +330 12374 

Mom open 10141399. up 41 398 Janto 18030 11930 1*1 oo +125 1.773 

Febto 17930 17925 179.75 +300 5.T0I 

3-MOKTH STERUNC (UFKE) ^ 

C5Daoao-phoMOOpd E-dsaiesriMno. Prev sates .11.614 

Sep 97 9270 9268 9269 +002 130466 Pwv °PW lw -44.745 UP 2214 

ST'— JJ 40 * IJW +0-« 1364W2 

Morto 9232 92. jg «249 +002 102183 Slnr-k Inrlpvae 

£3 ™ ^ dSSl 3SK S? DEX,CMEH1 

Mar99 9270 toii “Sffi St* g* 97 96900 9^30 W& *13 '"i 11 


Stock Indexes 

SPCDMP INDEX (CMER) 

500 1 Index 


essffi&sts-us- j»r 

JhMONTH EUROMARK OJFPE) Mam open tel 106,792 off 801 

DMi muton ■ pis at loo pa 

Aug 97 96 JO 94.70 p*J0 Q 07 1,041 FTSE IPOfUFFE) 

Sep 97 9665 9638 «660 —0.03 267076 £23 per Index potol 

Od 97 N.T N.T. 9+33 —0 02 1628 Sep 97 497*0 492J0 J949 0 -49 0 7+ oar 

Dec 97 9646 96.37 96-40 -003 310731 Etec’7 5034.0 5000 0 5013 0 + 50 0 il ?7 

Mcrto 9634 9*.22 9aJ5 -0 05 261374 *«.T NT50S70 +490 ij 

Sptowas SS =S5JiS^a 

Due 98 9569 9535 9538 -007 163345 •*"». open ml. 78203 oH 385 

Mw99 95.49 9535 9539 —0,06 106,716 rirnmir 

Jun 99 9529 95.16 9519 -006 68931 

Ed. rates- 295413 Prev. sates 239,052 Aug 97 3035 00 2965 0 -+ho 0 „ __ 

Prev open tel, 1633376 up S513 3M0O TOOO 5wJZ?S 

3-MONTH PIBORlMATin ^ «7 M*3aa3063 MM21JM - 7J0 

FFSmlllan - pis at 100 pet Esl sates: 11622 

S*p 97 9646 96 36 9639 - 004 79.109 Open tel : 71048 alt 641. 

Dec 97 9633 9615 *6.71 —0.06 34369 

Morto 9622 9606 9604 -000 78.920 ~ 

Junto 96.11 9596 95*0 -0.08 26390 — 

Septo 95.97 9583 9585 - 009 34028 COtnmOCntl 

Eli sales. 98353. 

Opon W-- 274,748 up 2W8. 


Commodity Indexes 


3-MONTH EURO LIRA (UFPEI 

ITL 1 reel Pan - pH al 100 pci 

Sep 97 9126 9318 9320 -0OJ 110611 

Dec *7 9159 9148 9352 -0 04 91.137 

Morto 8188 *3.7# 8178 -007 51147 


nw+v +j.,o — v.B* 56147 ’"’i r-.nancmi Fl/lurp^ r»-(T— ,_7 

Jun 98 9413 94.00 9400 -ogg *1332 Permeum f+coanae 


M«WV4 1,55070 P I t“ U « 

R ouiers 1 Qip 44] 

DJFuiures 

C , 3*3-58 3?; '? 






v ilu. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1997 


EUROPE 


*: ' 
Mf- 

■y 

*<• 

to* ' ; 

«£•., • 


Saudis Aim 
For Savings 
In Sale of 
State Firms 


Rl’llh'rs 

DUBAI. United Arab Emir- 
Saudi Arabia has spelled 
out its privatization plans, say- 
ing it aims to increase the com- 
petitiveness of its industry, at- 
tract foreign capital and cut state 
spending while providing more 
iobs for its I?, mill;™ 






jobs for its 12 million citizens. 

In its weekly meeting late 
Monday, the cabinet said the 
kingdom was committed to giv- 
ing the private sector a bigger 
role in the world's largest" oil 
producer and exporter, the of- 
ficial Saudi Press Agency re- 
ported. But it gave no details on 
which state enterprises or func- 
tions it might privatize, nor did 
it indicate when the process 
might be started. 

The cabinet plan said Saudi 
Arabia should "gradually se- 
lect ' companies or functions ro 
be privatized. 

Some analysis said the most 
likely candidate was the 70.per- 
cent state-owned Saudi Basic 
Industries Corp. 

Key goals include attracting 
capital, increasing job oppor- 
tunities, raising per-capita in- 
come and increasing the ability 
of the Saudi economy to face 
world competition, "especially 
in light of joining the World 
Trade Organization." it said. 
Saudi .Arabia hopes to join the 
world trade body by 2002. 

Many services, including wa- 
ter. electricity and air travel, are 
heavily subsidized in Saudi 
Arabia, contributing to its high 
government budget deficits 
since the early 1980s. 

The cabinet's plan calls for 
reducing state spending and 
"alleviating the government’s 
budget burden by" allowing the 
private sector to finance, op- 
erate and maintain some ser- 
vices it can cany out." 

The kingdom has said ir plans 
to sell off Saudi Arabian Air- 
lines. bur economists said that 
would be difficult as long as the 
airline remained unprofitable. 


r. «! q<*j ft. our sun Fuih pu/w. v. 

PARIS — GEC Alsthom and 
rramaiome Connectors France SA. 
a state-controlled nuclear-energy 
company, said Tuesday that they 
were interested in buying the enerev 
operations of Westinghouse Electric 
Corp. 

The companies declared their in- 
terest after the French newspaper 
Liberation reported that Framaiome 
and GEC Alsthom. a joint venture of 
Alcatel Alsthom of France and Gen- 
eral Electric Co. of Britain, planned 
to bid up to $300 million for West- 
inghouse 's power-generation activ- 
ities and to assume nuclear- related 
legal liabilities and S500 million in 
debt. 

Westinghouse is planning to spin 
off most of its industrial units this 
year to focus on broadcasting. 

"It s a highly logical expansion 
for GEC Alsthom and a logical dis- 
investment for W’esiinghouse." said 


Neil Barton, an analyst at Merrill 
Lynch & Co. 

Liberation said Pierre Bilger. 
GEC Alsthom’s chief executive, 
and a dozen executives met with 
Westinghouse officials in the 
United States on July 7. It printed 
photographs of what it said were 
GEC Alsthom documents relating to 
the bid. 

GEC Alsthom stressed the doc- 
uments obtained by Liberation were 
only working papers after one meet- 
ing with Westinghouse. It said it had 
no mandate from Framatome to ne- 
gotiate on its behalf. 

Alcatel Alsthom owns 44 percent 
of Framatome, with 5 1 percent con- 
trolled by French state-owned 


companies and 5 percent owned by 

employees. 

Framatome said it was interested 


force a French position in any even- 
tual evolution in this sector. ” 

It pointed out that Westinghouse 
had not yet said it wanted to sell 
those activities. 

Acquiring Westinghouse’ s 

power businesses would bolster 
GEC Alsthom’s activities at a time 
when GEC is looking to get out of 
the joint venture. 

Linking with Framatome to bid 
for the nuclear businesses could also 
rekindle plans for a closer alliance 
between the two companies, ana- 
lysts said. 

A plan to merge GEC Alsthom 
and Framatome failed earlier this 
year after GEC refused to accept a 
French government condition that 
the British company hold less than 


cautious of the companies' plans. 
"A nuclear disaster could surpat 


in Westinghouse’ s nuclear-power 
businesses and agreed that bidding 
with GEC Alsthom would "rein- 


50 percent in the new company. 
While GEC-Alsrhom does vi 


While GEC-Alsrhom does very 
little direct business in nuclear en- 
ergy, a spokesman, Jean -Georges 
Micol, said it had worked closely 


EU Asks U.S. to Alter Telecom Rules 


Reitreis 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Commission asked the United States 
on Tuesday to reconsider proposed 
rules concerning a global agreement 
on telecommunications trade, say- 
ing its current proposals discrim- 
inated against non-U.S. operators. 

Saying the United States risked 
"violating its world trading oblig- 
ations." the executive body of the 
European Union said it reserved the 
right to appeal the matter to the 
World Trade Organization. 

The dispute centers on Washing- 
ton’s interpretation of its obligations 


under the agreement reached 
through the WTO in February. 

The multinational accord estab- 
lishes guidelines for a so-called 
General Agreement on Trade in Ser- 
vices. 

The commission said it was par- 
ticularly concerned that the U.S. 
Federal Communications Commis- 
sion’s draft text on non-U.S. compa- 
nies' participation in U.S. telecom- 
munications operations continued 
to rely in part on "broad and unclear 
public-service factors" in deciding 
on license applications. 

The U.S. agency's proposals, the 


EU body said, allow such factors as 
law-enforcernent, foreign-policy or 
trade concerns to be considered in 
reviewing applications, and they al- 
low the refusal of a license on the 
grounds that it would pose a “very 
high risk to competition." 

The U.S. proposals, published 
June 4, also dismantle a competition 
test for access to international ser- 
vices. a move the EU has welcomed. 
But Washington must make changes 
to the rest of the draft rules, the 
commission said, or the EU will 
reserve the right to "challenge those 
rules under the WTO.’’ 


KLM’s Profit 
Slips but Beats 
Expectations 


Results Pummel Nat West’s Stock 


Reuters 

LONDON — Shares in National Westminster Bank 
PLC fell sharply Tuesday after the banking company 
reported a slump in investment-banking profit and 
disappointed some in the market by ruling our major 


ecuuve. and six other managers. NatWest Markets' 
profit slid to £58 million from £219 million in the first 
half of last vear. 


acquisitions or a merger. 

The bank said profit from continuing operations in 
the first half was £775 million (SI. 26 billion), or £5 
million more than ir forecast in June. 

The increase came despite a loss of £77 million from 
a mispricing of options contracts at the company's 
investment-banking arm, NatWest Markets. 

The discovery of dial loss prompted the departure in 
June of Martin Owen, NatWest Markets' chief ex- 


The company also raised its interim dividend by 10.4 
percent, to 10.6 pence a share. 

Lord Alexander, chairman of NatWest, also said the 
bank did not need a partner. News reports have spec- 
ulated that talks with Abbey National PLC and Pruden- 
tial Corp. on a possible merger had broken down partly 
because of disagreement over which executives would 
run the business. NaiWesr’s chief executive, Derek 
Wanless. added that NatWest Markets was not for sale. 

NatWest shares declined after the results, dropping 
35 pence to close at 835 pence. 


r. tHfMlrd ir; Our Sk0 Fran CHSfxnch'S 

AMSTELVEEN, Nether- 
lands — KLM Royal Dutch Air- 
lines NV reported a higher-than- 
expeeted second-quarter profit 
Tuesday, and the airline's re- 
organization took hold when 
Leo van Wijk took over from 
Pieter Bouw, who announced his 
resignation as chairman in May. 

Net income for the quarter 
was 1 90 million guilders ($90.4 
million), compared with fore- 
casts averaging 123 million 
guilders, as burgeoning traffic 
revenue outstripped cost in- 
creases. The Figure was down 
from last year’s First-quarter net 
of 271 million guilders, which 
was lifted by a one-time gain 
from a revaluation of its pref- 
erence shares in Northwest Air- 
lines of the United States. 

The flag carrier last week de- 
cided to sell its 19 percent stake 
in Northwest, paving the way to 
expand its alliances to include 
other airlines in hopes of raising 
its European market share. 

The company's shares 
slipped in Amsterdam trading, 
dosing at 76 guilders, down 
0.40. (Reuters. Bloomberg) 


r-ifX . 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


r. .-..c-.-, - • 

*&& '• ~ ~ 


Tuesday, Aug. 5 

Prices in local currencies. 
Telekurs 

High Low Chao Prat. 






Amsterdam 




rr ;* • - 


AB N-AtAPO 
Aegon 
Mold 
Akro Nobel 
Bonn Co. 

Gels Wesscva 

CS.IAcvo 

Dorifscne Pet 

DSM 

Etewfer 

Forts Amev 

OetroftKs 

G- Erne ewi 

Hogeraeycr 

Heuwfcen 


Hooawensoa 
Hurl Douglas 


m z 


INGGrcuii 

KLM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

t Nedllcnrd Gp 
Nutriaa 


OccGrirtw 

PhSpsElec 

FWywwn 
Panosiad Hdg 
Rr*e<:o 
Rodnmco 
RoGnco 
Kcrento 
Bond Dutch 
Vnikterpra 
vwmex inti 
VNU , 
‘.Totten Kl cm 


4 JM JO JO 
152-80 15120 
5950 59.20 
33870 341 JO 
14250 179-20 
42.10 42.70 
111 lOiffl 
119 117 

212.80 218 
36.40 3*00 
89J0 9) JO 
t<UQ T\ SO 

64.90 7880 

109.10 110 

325.50 321 

134 138-50 

92.90 94 
9750 98.70 

7i 76.M 
4640 46.40 
82 81.90 
6760 70 

35650 3555) 
260 50 258.70 
167 165.20 
139 TIB 
9540 9a20 
208 207 

M0G 6490 
IWM 210 LTD 
119 11850 
118.90 116 

■1700 470.90 
111 111.80 
48 48.80 
278 283 


High Law Dose Prev. 

- Deutsche Bartf 119.70 11650 116.90 117.40 

DeuiTetofcora 43.10 4225 4250 4255 

Dresdner Bonk B1J3 79 79 B05C 

Fnneime, 341 339 343 341 

Fresenius Med 153 15050 151.40 155.3) 

Fried- Krvpp 324 370 32050 322 

Gebe 113 111.50 1)2*0 11150 

HetdeU*) Zmt 157.50 1 55 15£» 159 

Henkel pH 101.75 10050 10050 100.10 

HEW 455 453 455 455 

Hochtief « 81 84 6170 

Hoedtst 84J0 83.70 8420 3255 

Knretodt 685 663 663 675 

Lahmever 9670 94 9*50 WOT 

unde 1365 1350 1365 1 340 

Lufthansa 3555 3515 3555 3475 

MAN S57 5« 544 54950 

MomKsnwrai 891 878 88050 878 

MetaUgesefeClxrtl 40.90 £050 40.82 *50 

Metro 94.90 9165 9355 95J0 

Munch Rueck R 6845 6790 6815 6730 

Preuswa 565 553 562 5J8J0 

RWE 81.65 80.50 81 KL50 

SAP pH 432 424 42450 424 

Seftenng 2C6.W 202 70350 20050 

SGL Canon 24550 241.75 242.75 247 

124W 120.4) 1213) VO£ 
SprmgerfAxef] SS 

Suecbucker 8GB 888 887 

TmSwT 413 40Z50 403 412 

Ve&T 108.15 10750 107-60 106*1 

VEW 583 573 583 574 

Vog 760 77250 77450 774 

Vrdiawxjen 1396 1365 1373 1369 


SA5re-A«~S 

Scma=sr 

SS5J 

S3X: 

TroerCss 


High 

Law 

Close 

Prev. 

* 

High 

Low 

aos« 

■ ^ ■: 

Itai 

14e 

14ft 

Utd UMihes 

7 02 

*.« 

*.*9 

43 


4C 

43 

Lendcrneuurs 

457 

450 

4 i0 

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Vodofcne 

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301 

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21705 

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77 

75 

78 

T3 

■MOiaimHeas 

mu 

128 

ft50 

ZoB 

in 

2*2 

V-3 

2*S 


High Law Close Prev. 


CAC-yh 2984.10 
PfwiMlSw- 299141 


Kuala Lumpur 


AMf.'.B H-js 
Genllng 
6 ATO Banting 
Mat taB S tag P 
Ptfraras Gas 
Proton 
Public 3k 
Renong 
Resorts World 
Rnttunaiw Pfc* 
SimeDartjy 
TetefcoraMal 


1350 1350 
1040 10.70 
23 JC 2130 
Susn. Suss. 

B55 aas 
icao io3 

5.6s a 73 
122 126 
7.25 7.40 

2350 2450 
7.45 7*5 

3.95 8.95 

9J0 9.78 

1660 1670 
7 JO 73 


Madrid 


Balsa Mac 58*56 
Prwtows: 58172 


London 


FT-SE 100:496660 
PrwKJOV 48T5J6 


Abbey Not! 154 
AIBed Domecq 


Affled Domecq 4*7 

Angina Water 732 

Argos '** 


833 352 

138 464 


VEW 

Viag 

Volfcsrngen 


Asda Group 
Asset Br Foods 
BAA a . R 

Barclays 119a 

Bose 

BATlnd j 
Bank Scotland 
Blue Circle i0» 

SOC Group It -27 

Boots 
5PB Ind 

Brit Aerosp 1170 

BrttAjroars 

BG 

Brit Lund 
BrilPMlm 

Irt^et 
BrBTeteeom 
BTR 

Buiroch Casbal 10JO 

Burton Gp 13 

Cable Wireless 5.99 

Cadbury 5dm 6-03 

CailtaflCanrn 4.90 

Coraittl Union 694 

Can pass Gp 615 

Gwrtcufds 1)6 

Dixons 600 

etedrocomoonens 4^ 
EMI Group 673 

iss&ss ® 

Fom Colonial 1.74 

Genl Acadertt 960 

GEC 168 

GKN 1088 

Ktm> VJeUanne 1135 

GronodaGp 3.C 

Grand fAet 
GRE 

GreenoOsGp 
Gutmess 
GUS 

ia 10J9 


757 7.78 

554 430 


Helsinki 




Bangkok 


SET kutot: MOW 
Previous: 64352 


Adv InfoSvc 
BLF 

Knew Thai BK 
PTTfcxplor 
Store Cement F 


Siam Core BkF 
TrtecoJiroiio 


TrtecoJiroito 
Thai Airways 
Thai Farm Bl F 
UWConun 


216 22* 23* 

242 248 252 

3150 32 3 

3W 4W 414 
604 &32 62B 

126 139 13* 

42 75 4175 44.75 
47 75 4«50 52 

150 156 162 

132 1 34 136 


EnsoA 

HuhtamaKil 

Keroiro 

Kesko 

Media A 

Metro B 

Metsa-SertaB 

Neste 

Nokia A 

Onon-YMymae 

Outokumpu* 

UPMKyremene 

Valinet 


49 <9.10 
245 246 

52 S25n 
77 77 

2130 53.10 
188 18650 
dJ] 4550 
138 138 

471.90 482 

201-50 199. JO 
105.70 10* 

132-ftO 13120 
87 87 JO 


Hong Kong 


Hoag Softs '*37152 
. Previous: 1825959 


Bombay 


6--< Bmai Autc 
t tnlULti Lever 
. HodvsfPettm 
ind Dev Sk 
,TC 

Moftareso; Tei 
Retoneo rod 
Stole Bk India 
Steel Aultionry 
Tola Eng Loco 


lS lSfin7Bl51^0 

ilft 492 51550 4MJ5 
102 J5 103 104 

5M 5^8 585 54675 

300 294 29BJS 2«J5 

365 374 36425 

33850 330 75 33325 32675 
56 75 “* ? V 25.75 26 

I6 4fll W 39950 396 


Cathay Poafic U55 
Cheung Keno 


Cheung Kang g 
CKIntmstrud 27^ 

Chino bald ■O-TO 

CmcPadftc. 


- 


Brussels 


BEL-70 Index; 2«i72 
previous; 2470.34 


Almarni 

Saco ind 

BBL 

CSR 

Criruft 

Dethaire Lion 

Eiedfubei 

Ekdmfina 

Foitra AG 

Gwoert 

GBL 

GenBan^ue 

Kratetetnx 

Petrefina 

Pwserfvn 

Boyate Beige 

SttGenSeio 

Sohray 

Tradetai 

Utt 


, 1650C 170K iTflg 
I 74fi0 7550 7600 

| 7070 9120 907JJ 

; 3210 3260 3£» 
| 17625 17825 17500 
I 1855 1890 19® 
> 7*70 7663 7740 

3685 3490 37M 

I 76®j 7700 78W 

3425 3125 3420 

I S950 5975 5WP 
I 14200 1-B25 ]ljM 
i 15223 15275 1^0 

I *ss ® 
s ] s ’S ’if 
i 1 ] $ SS 8S 

| yjk 127700 USOQO 


Hang Seng Bk 
Henaerson Inv 
Henderson Ld 74J5 
Hk.ailaa.Gas J4J5 
HK Eleflnc 3150 
HK Telecomm 19.90 
HopeweUHdgS 190 

i SA 7§ 

SSSZm H 

Kerry Piejs 19.TO 
NenVVW«Dev: 5650 

Oriental Ptw* J.J5 
Pearl Orient^ Uf 


IKSW ia 


Svio Land Ca SJ0 

SthOuno Post 795 

Swire POC A 7550 

WJMitHdgs 

Wheeto* 


690 1 IB 

31 31.10 31.10 
U.QS 14.25 1455 

87 8750 87^ 
2ft.80 27J0 2680 
4350 4360 4350 
48 48-20 48 

47 JO 47 JO ^JO 
9J5 955 950 

1SJ5 

111 

a*a B4» 8.75 

7275 74 7125 

14 1605 1640 

30.80 31 3150 

WJ0 1940 19.75 
470 475 4J5 

260 269 3W 

7750 78.75 7750 
2550 2550 2565 
20l 35 2040 2015 
1950 1970 19Jf 
5450 54 55 

3JQ 3.10 355 

in J-S 

102 10550 10150 
460 ±4(1 458 

855 AJO 8.10 
755 770 75s 

73 73 7150 

32.40 3170 32J0 
1885 1890 1885 


1A2 1.46 

5)6 5.18 


562 580 

12JS 1Z77 
8J) 843 

£OT SOS 
4J0 440 

3.94 199 

nra 1177 
7.40 7.74 

337 3M 
1157 1157 
6)2 631 


Acer w* 

ACESA 

Aqrjns Barceton 

ArnenSnta 

B0V 

BfflWStO 
Brnitanler 
Bco Centro Htsp 
BcoPoputa 
Bco Santander 
CEPSA 
Cantinente 
grg^Btre 

FECSA 
Gas Noturol 
Iberdreto 
Piycn 
Repsai 

SevOanaElec 
To6acaiero 
Teletanlcn 
UnlanFenosa 
Valenc Cetnenl 


27520 27550 
1800 1755 

5750 5800 
8040 B120 
3935 3945 

1440 1430 

7540 7400 

5780 5800 

34970 34260 
4285 4260 

4ft00 4660 
3200 TOO 
B370 8320 

3075 3130 

1265 1235 

6860 rrn 
IBIS 1760 
2985 2925 
6210 6100 
1425 1400 

7750 7710 

40ft5 3990 

1235 123D 
2610 2545 


Manila 


PSE Index: 267626 
Previous: 2439 JO 


2J8 740 

5 -96 


822 8.48 

AJ2 iSS 


la 6 1 M 

3J0 4.18 


AyatoB 
Ayala Land 
BkPNliphl 
CiP Homes 
Manfla Elec A 
Metro Bonk 
Prtron 
Pa Bank 
PM Long DW 
SanMiguelB 
SM Prime Hdg 


18-25 1825 1825 

2125 2130 21-50 

ISO 151 151 

9.90 10 920 

64 86-50 84.50 

555 565 565 

6.10 620 6 

220 224 225 

940 945 945 

6150 64 63 

8 820 7.90 


AirLrauide 
Alcatel Ahstti 
Aro-UAP 
Bancaire 
BIC 

BNP _ 

C mai P lus 

Canetaur 

Casino 

CCF 

Cetefem 

Chrtman Dkr 

CLF-Dexia Fran 

Credtt Agricole 

Danone 

EttAqortDfne 

EridanoBS 

Eimxftsney 

Eurotunnel 

Gen. Eoux 

Haws 

kmeial 

Latorge 

Legrand 

LOreal 

LVMH 

MdtellnB 

Poribos A 

Pernod Rtawd 

Peugeot at 

Fmauit-Print 

Promotes 

Renault 

Rexel 

Rh-PautencA 

5onofl 

Schneider 

SEE 

SGSTltomsoi 
Ste Generate 
Sodexho 
SI Gabo In 
Suet (Gel 
Suez Lyon Eaux 


948 933 

214 703-50 
954 932 

851 829 

405.70 400-80 
784 766 

530 511 

284 774 

1150 1095 

4100 3987 

287.20 284.60 
312 29850 
710 697 

985 9S2 

595 584 

1269 1260 

963 950 


6W 671 
871 B21 


9 8.70 

7A5 720 


743 728 

415 406.10 
(0 8<6 
15 41840 
1180 


945 933 

11520 212.90 
941 947 

B45 845 

40170 400.40 
775 764 

514 530 

775 78850 
1100 1135 

3996 4051 

286 70530 
307.90 310 

701 700 

952 977 

507 584 

1260 1270 

954 952 

673 476 

043 864 

890 9 

7J5 755 

mi 740 

407 41190 
846 868 

422-80 419.60 
1195 1205 


EledrafuxB 
EnciSon b 
HennesB 
Incentive A 
Investor B 
Alto Do B 
Nardbanhen 
Ptrorm/Uptohn 
Sandvik B 
Scania B 
SCAB 

S-E Bankcn A 
Skando Fors 
Skmuku B 
SKFB 

SpartxmkenA 

SkunA 

SvHtmdleeA 

VblwB 


600 615 

153 35550 
333 33150 

o36 «0 

415 <2l 

274 275 S3 
260 261 
296 301 

236 239 

230 22150 
182 l&f 
86 JO 88 

315 315 

337 339 JO 
710 ?IJ 
176-Si 180 

131 13230 
249 250 

21330 21530 


Sydney 


All CMbtariev 27*730 
Previous: 270800 


Suez Lyon Eau 
Srettelrow 
Thomson CSF 


1030 1033 
1J7 1-30 


153S 1527 
38030 379.90 
44130 44810 
306.40 300-50 
690 493 

2715 2738 
2359 2386 
170 166-90 
1650 16*2 

258 Z5S.30 
619 613 

341 JO 339.10 
1015 1025 

579 560 

800 810 
2999 3045 
889 B87 

1535 1670 

656 667 

7S9 760 

15840 160.10 
<04 6W 
11730 115.10 
382.90 393 


Amcor 
ANZ BMng 
BHP 
Bora) 

Brambles bid. 
CBA 

CC Amalfi 
Cries Mytf 
Como to 
CSR 

Fo5tereBrew 
Goodman Rd 
ICI AustraSa 
Lend Lease 


846 848 

1033 1031 
1737 1735 
4-01 406 

27-60 2735 
1632 1633 
14.CC 16.14 
878 677 


817 815 

2L63 239 


MIMHdV 
Hat Au st Bank 


Nat Ad st Bank 
Hat Mutual Hdg 
News Carp 
Pacific Dunlop 
Pioneer Inti 
Pub Broadcast 
Rio Unto 
Sf George Bank 
WMC 

SSKpS’ 

Woatwartfa 


2.06 2-02 
13-21 13J5 
3805 29.85 
132 i.n 
1934 1937 
222 223 

6.05 6-09 

361 158 

44* 4.84 

8.24 830 

2068 2067 

sm an 

766 7.20 

843 846 

1125 11.10 
426 424 


5-81 5.90 

535 895 


Mexico 


A 34 435 

885 891 


BofeaMe* 51 73.14 
PrevtoOS: 513824 


808 809 

112 214 


5.97 801 

450 435 


860 870 

810 620 


7 7.04 

123 124 


AHd A 
BonacdB 
Cemex CPO 
Gfroc 

EmpModenta 
Gpo Corea A1 
GpoFBcnmv 


9Jt9 939 
344 331 


Gba Fin Irdxnsa 
idmb dark Mac 
Televisa CPO 
TdMnL 


1037 iaB5 
1101 1125 
72ft 823 


63-20 6160 6140 
2430 25.00 2440 
41 JO 4140 4125 
1186 1188 11« 
4230 4190 4100 
6110 6110 62-00 
342 183 142 

37.00 37.00 37 JO 
3720 3820 3740 
12150 12100 12150 
21.75 21J5 27.7J 


Sdo Pauio Bom^imai. 


Taipei 


Stock Mretot Index: 991968 
Previous: 1086526 


55B 5.90 

190 1?1 


MIB Tetenolteos 14K4J0 
Preitoos: 14438JH) 


833 4J4 

£79 £83 


821 829 

868 876 


ImptTotwxo 184 


2IJ8 2140 
1020 1076 
328 102 


Jakarta 


CorepositeiBflegnlSS 
Pimtos: 71871 


Copenhagen 


“ttSSStS 


3G Bank 
Cortbtros 
Codon Fere 
Dciwca 
D&lDonskeBk 
asSvendbrgS 
D-s 19;; 3 
FLSinaB 
f CoMAtfmsvn? 
tlm NcrtTisk P 


fc=tosBera 
Tele Dcrork E 
Iryg Botlun 
Jadaaroark A 


3S0 385 

^ 354 360 

m m ’§J2 

722J0 

■ nV5 :i5 

714 ? ,s 

a*s 

405 J 1 - ' ,2 


Astro ltd* 
BkinM Intfon 

BkNegora 

GafonsCam 

indoconent 

IndetatU 

indosei uu 

SompcomaHM 
Semen Gres« 
Tetekamnskasi 


eOSO 8075 8050 

1825 1775 '800 JBg 
USD 1 -25 1450 1450 

7/SO 9625 W7S ^ 

4200 4100 Alg j^O 

5150 4WS 50GJ 5075 

807S 8000 KJ50 

8050 0525 0573 
.325 4550 4550 ^5 
4025 3950 3775 3775 


Kingfisher 715 

UuCuato 158 

LarC Sec 

Lcsmo _ _ 

Legal G«il Grp ass 

Ltopfa rsgGp 

LucasVartty ’ “ 

Spencer 

MwSy i|S 

Natjaiwl Grid ■ 240 

Noll Poem 
NatWest 

Nad i*r 

Noroicfi Union 125 

Orange 2.10 

P&O *-5 

Pessan ;■£ 

SSS iS 

Premier FameH 5.08 

oroaefllud 

HBTttekGp 

RaftkGnW 
R«kittO*n 


7J6 7J8 

151 242 


922 937 

103 

445 

725 TJS 


1.93 l.« 

5J5 S» 


■808 4.95 
1348 1344 
153 245 


838 841 

0.19 aa 


745 749 

3.16 122 


2JJ7 109 
627 627 


AHeonza Assic 
Bcu Cumin Ho) 
BcaFldeuram 
Bead) Roma 
Benetton 
cnwiaoare 
ElfiSUt 
ENI 

Fkd 

GeneraBAuic 

IMI 

IMA 

I taigas 

MetOoid 

Mediobanca 

MontHflson 

□tveifi 

Parmalat 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rata Banco 
SPooJoTanno 
Telecom ItoCa 
TIM 


14910 14500 14500 14700 
4005 383S 3870 39M 
6000 5555 563) 5830 


BrodesooPfd 
Brahma Pfd 
CemwPfd 
CESPPW 
Cupel 
EWrabras 
Ifoudanco PM 
Light 5ervido5 

P§roErosPW 

PauBstaLu* 
Sid Naaonal 
SouzoCna 
Tt**nn Pfd 
Triemig 
Teter| 
TefespPfd 
llnimnoo 


24803 26900 
3305 3445 

7960 8215 
10350 10300 
5880 5925 
34300 34700 
16810 17050 
2565 5615 

5325 5345 

784S 8030 
11345 11695 

1121 me 

645 *29 

2510 2515 

4785 4750 
14525 14905 
20150 21050 
13405 13500 
10970 11040 
6065 6150 


Usiminas PM 
CVRD Pfd 


114) 1145 

810.00 794.M 
571V 56M 
7800 78 AO 
1820 1820 

549.99 540.00 
62500 4200 
53880 537 DO 

455.00 453 DO 
305-00 310D1 
207.50 20100 

34.70 3461 
11.10 11.10 

150.00 14800 
18800 18141 
16800 16440 
MU® 34600 

3900 4X00 
12J2 124)8 
2810 294)0 


Chang HvroBk 

CtitaoTimg Bk 


ChtooTung Bk 

China Develpmt 
China Steal 
First Bank 
Friroasa Plastic 
Hud Nan Bk 
toll Comm Bk 
Nan Ya Plastics 
Shin Kong life 


Tatung 
UW Micro Elec 


160 761 

117 11940 
80 

133J0 136 

3020 3120 
117JHI 120 
65 65 

126 12840 
63 64 

7340 75 

104 108 

158 163 

47 4720 
13850 144 

6440 6340 


Tokyo 


MM 22& 1*514145 
Previous: 19&68D7 


Composite wd«c 7488* 
Prevtaes: 734.19 


Docorn 

Daewoo Heavy 


Hyundai Ertg. 

Kto Motors 
Kwac El Pwr 
Korea ExdiBk 
LSSerotaKi 


Pahang Iron St 
Samsung Dislai 


SWnfoon— . 
5K Telecom 


96000 94500 96000 94500 
TOT :7750 7W 78® 
21000 20500 20700 20500 
14900 imo 14000 15200 
26300 26006 26300 26000 
5590 5400 55» 5400 
45400 44000 iSm 44900 
58900 57500 58200 50100 
45600 44006 45400 45000 
69000 66200 69000 6SM0 
9580 9400 9450 9540 
458000 450000 458000 453000 


AD Nippon Air 

Amway 
AidtiBank 
AsaNChem 
AsaN Glass 
Bk Tokyo MASU 
Bk Yokohama 
Brtdpesfcvw 
Canon 
Chubu Elec 


Qiuooko Elec 
Oal ftipp Print 


7 751 

1J4 1J7 


Singapore 


7.10 7.12 

5 S 


5.98 810 

7JS 7-iB 


Montreal 


HMMBSj! 

Piwxws: 372X97 


353 156 
9 JO 9D2 


Johannesburg 

AroBigarntil Bk-' 34.10 34^ 

J8 #53” 

AngJcAm-Cjrp . 15 24825 24125 

ArrotoAniGrid / ^4 204 204 

^wtaAmtnn Jia0 


Frankfurt 


AKBB 18?- 

Atoos 2**^ 

5“ 

BkBn&n 4595 

BASF 71 y> 

h gpy.Vfemnthani. *• 

gniu T* ns 




CfAGCdcnia "5- 
-wtreacDonk 1 2au 
Do ""tor Bm: 

OOTfta l.'* 


Previous: .,29i.V-* 

!6ii J. 6 ? 

..Ip 

?352 7v'J0 

%% "3? y'a 
it% rs.it 

i f s 

'trz ii=? i3 }% 

62.20 >» K 

l&lt’ '■»?? 
1TO 5^ 


’M i 

ESS- ■ ^ 

De3e»rs 37 E.75 3X75 

DrietoJl»o 37 ^ 37 37 

rStkaNh* jnP 10 J ia*5 «A5 

GF5- y ‘ L 7T injn ifljD 6850 

imperial Hdgs gg 2110 73 . jg 

IBS®* - mI 812 327 327 

»CCC , (AJS 6530 bt® 

jritnmW ^ 1 67 f5i jggtfs 3 ffi J80 

UDeri Hd3* 148® 

rjtaft'fi L* jfi® 1850 11 S 

L»L*S^ « 95^ 9525 

MtatfCO ia® 1802 1M? 

,‘JCropak or pgjjj 9205 922ft 

NeS4=r .tcjj *5A5 4570 

HemnroriJ^ 7?^ 67 tj PS) *730 

Richest! s 9 * SI 75 ol i5 

g.jtf pttFJWm 


EeedlnH „ , 
RwttoM.lnJW lij 

Reuters HdOS »J2 

Rezam 

MAC BMP 

I 

Scteosty 3.W 

Somsttury 4 jsi 

ISSen 17.95 

ScjtNWKOsfie 7^J 

ScotPOdP 
Seniricar 
Severn Trow 
SheUTrastspR j-- 

sieae 

smiinftopbew 174 

SirtthKSne 11.9? 

1&& 

«S 

TnleiUta -10 

Tews 


X83 20fl 
6.03 6.11 


112 2.17 
bjti 560 


9.70 9D0 
2JJ5 2JB 
537 6lSD 
9J9 9.92 

4.91 509 

585 3.91 

4J7 437 

1775 17« 
7.1 S 7.17 

A}7 

173 177 

844 851 


Bee Mob Cora 

Cite Tire A 

CdtiUhlA 

CTRrtlSic 

GazfAetro 

Gt-WtstUfeco 

lntpsai 

investors Grp 

LobtowCn 

Natl Bk Canada 

Power O^c 


MM a 4560 4855 
27.70 27.15 7Tb 271? 


Asia Poe Brew 
CerebasPac 
CUyDevBs 


39M 39U X* 4005 

4195 42*5 Jl« 43fc 


1885-1860 Wi 

33<z 331a 33*i IP* 

41 JO JO J0.9S 40rt 

37.80 37AS 37AS 38 

2(uo m 

1714 1755 17.70 17J0 


Power Ftal 
QueteoxB 


30.S5 38.70 38* » 

3810 37D5 . 38 37» 


Qoebeaif B „ 
RoanCfmmB 
Royal BftCrio 


27J5 2720 27t« 272| 

1865 1865 1065 1065 
66>« 6580 6* *620 


Fraser& Neave 
HK Land" 
JardMathesn 
Jerri smilesfc 
KeapelA 
KeppelBank 
Keppel Fefci 
Land 
Cfoml 


TicmesWiier 7B7 


Urema Vca 

U« AssaranC* 


10.92 14« 
1J1 1.72 

1166 11.86 
7.97 8 W 
4J7 4^ 

660 ,M9 
a 93 10JJ8 
4 <08 
4.1* 4JI 
7.72 7.82 

460 <60 
565 iS5 
3D7 3.11 

1835 1835 
<33 <37 

605 6 .SB 


Aker A 

BergeswDtiA 

CJvGtoKdaBk 

DvnnorskeBk 

Efcertr 

Hafslund A 

KvoamerAu 


Honk Hydra 
NoBkeSkngA 


MycamedA 

DrtdoAsoA 

PetknGeoSw 


Sage PetimA 
Srflbstod 
Tiaitucnnun 
Siaretorand Asa 


OBXtadtt 70832 
• Previous; 7MD0 

146-53 147 14760 

IB 197 195 

1 v *° 2S 

33JO 3360 SIM 
154 15660 154 

45 4560 47 

1 440 441 4^9 

397 3W 3W 
27760 280 278 

145 150 15760 

552 553 54* 

416 424 417 

> 153 15160 151 

■ 12860 129 127 

070 625 415 

1 J830 4830 4810 


PBrtwiryHdjp 
Serobawng 
Stag Air' 

Sing La 
SSnaPrasF 
Stag Tech Ind 


Sing Triecoram 
TafUMtBankH 


Tat Lm Bank 
Utd Industrial 
UMOSeu BkF 
WlngTriHdgs 

1/n USdoBori. 


580 5D0 

565 560 

1120 12.90 

1110 12.00 

895 060 
1920 1810 

460 460 

1040 905 

324 200 

825 7 JO 
420 200 

625 820 

3JB 174 

896 4.90 

420 420 
1470 1420 
9 JO 9.10 
470 450 

660 8M 

1870 1360 
765 705 

2860 2760 
300 170 

2J2 760 

200 2.78 

1.12 109 

1110 1440 
3.94 304 


500 5.90 
560 560 

13 1260 
13L10 13 

0.94 007 
1833 I860 
452 462 

9.90 1060 
308 26S 
705 7.05 

412 176 

625 625 
174 872 

492 5 

400 430 

1440 1440 
920 925 

460 465 

890 465 
13J0 1350 
70S 740 

3700 2860 
170 3.70 

260 278 
279 278 
1.10 1.11 
1470 1M0 
306 896 


Dotal „ 

DaHdtlKang 

DsJwnBonJt 

Daiwa House 

DoiWOSec 

DDI 

Denso 

East Japan Ry 

Elsai 

Forme 

a Bank 
Photo 


HadtitufliBk 

Hitachi 

Honda Motor 

iBJ 

IHI 

Itochu 

Ito-Yriunta 

JAL 

Japan Taboos 

Jusca 

Kajtata 

KanttiitoC 

Kao 

KoMKoJOHny 

KawaStad 

KtaUNIppRy 

KMnBrewenr 

Kobe Steel 

Komatsu 


Stockholm 

pirewii 


AGAB 

ABBA 

As^Ooman 

Astro A 
After CWWA 
AutoHv 


10850 107 1O70D 107 

100 1QS60 107 10550 

231 229 23) 230 

15060 147 14960 14560 

334 31750 233 225 

291 285 2B9 28360 


Marubeni 

Mann' 

Matsu Comm 

Mateu Elec Ind 

MafwElecM 

Mttsubtahi 

MllsSHilCh 

Mitsubishi B 

MireuMswSf 


Mitsubishi Hvy 
Mitsubishi Mot 


Mltsufai»hiM< 

MBsutWhJTr 

Mitsui 


1070 1070 1090 

702 705 705 

3550 3580 3620 

B35 838 837 

£00 608 609 

1050 ID50 1060 

2130 21® 21® 

560 565 569 

2740 2770 7770 

34ft0 3530 3b20 

2020 2040 2020 

1970 1990 1976 

2690 2710 2710 

830 B90 860 

1430 1450 1440 

549 M0 560 

1330 1340 1340 

780 790 798 

7630a 7660a 7B30a 

2760 2000 2S30 

5100a 5140a 5100a 

2470 2480 2400 

50B0 5090 S25D 

1420 1450 14* 

•ffiSJ <770 4000 

1680 1700 1740 

1110 1130 1100 

1310 1330 1350 

3590 3620 - 3730 

1540 1580 1560 

391 391 394 

526 529 537 

6500 6550 6500 

«8 492 500 

9200a 92600 9380a 

3220 3350 3210 

557 563 581 

2220 2250 2240 

1700 1720 1760 

460 471 470 

324 325 

679 683 £84 

1070 1070 UNO 

181 182 180 

800 815 7M 

492 492 492 

9560 KM 9990 

1950 1990 1950 

503 509 515 

*46 452 459 

1840 1OT 1920 

4700 4010 5050 

2410 2410 24X 

1350 1360 1440 

1200 1220 1220 

304 304 306 

607 £16 621 

1549 1 560 ISOS 

011 824 807 

640 650 669 

1610 1610 1640 

1070 1090 mo 


PAGE 13 


Europeans Seek Westinghouse Energy Unit 


Fnmkfuit 

:Dax • 


with Framatome in France and 
China on nuclear plants. 

Its main activities include energy 
production, transport and distribu- 
tion of energy and rail transport. The 
company is ‘a member of a group 
developing a high-speed rail system 
in Florida. 

The issue of which company 
would take on the risks involved 
with nuclear reactor construction 
and operation made some analysts 


4500 - 

m 

3900 

3600 


•jffidon Paris 

FTSetto index CAC40 

5200 1 3250 -- •- 

■m j- 3100 

: 4900 2950 ] 

4600 WV 2800- — .-J 


— 2650/ 


3000 i.- Air, tt 


'm am J j a 

1997 


M AM J J A 
1997 


fflOOv/J-ij 

MAM 




apse.. 


"A nuclear disaster couldsurpass 
anything imaginable and it seems 
that only a state would be capable of 
taking on such a risk," said Denis 
Branche, an analyst at Credit Ly- 
onnais Securities/Choler-Dupont. 

Alcatel Alsthom shares closed 
Tuesday in Paris at 845 French 
francs ($134). unchanged from 
Monday. GEC shares closed in Lon- 
don at 361 pence 155.89), up 18 
pence. (Bloomberg. Reuters) 


BrttssejaT 

Frankfort:.' 


Hefe?nki 


'S£L-*2Q;v; • • • 

;1f3AX;:' 

/Stock.y adtsr; 


2,455.?2 2,470^1 

4^02^5 4£96M 


S3659 


3,604.70 3.632 88 
708^32 708.00 


LondofV'.T 


grss'jfto 


A9S7JO 4595,70 


58041- 586,34 


;059 
.*0.‘l'3 
-0.7 T 
•■■4k78 
+1.1S 

-1.06 


Paris?:-;... CAQ40. 


[ Zurich: ■ ^Pt 

Source: Telekurs 


2^84.10 2,992.41 * 0^8 
3^30-83 3,506.94 *Oj6* 
... . „ ’ V S36-48 , 1,452.11 -1.08 
" ^3,681^1 3,68687 -0.12 

ImnualitMial Htrakl Tn^unw* 


Very briefly; 


• Stora Kopparbergs Bergslags AB, a Swedish forestry 
company, said second-quarter net profit rose 70 percent, ro 439 
million kronor ($54.3 million), or 1.35 kronor a share, from 
258 million kronoT, or 0.80 kronor a share, a year earlier. 

• Saab Automobile AB, owned by the Swedish investment 
concern Investor AB and the U.S. automaker General Motors 


Corp., posted a first-half pretax loss of 600 million kronor, 
widened from 428 million kronor a year earlier. Sales rose to 


widened from 428 million kronor a year earlier. Sales rose to 
10.98 billion kronor from 10.13 billion kronor. 


• PepsiCo Inc. unveiled a plan to drop its Swedish drinks 
partner Spendrups and link up with its Norwegian -S wed ish 
rival, Pripps Ri agues. 

• Union Bank of Switzerland posted a 67 percent increase in 
first-half profit, to 1.86 billion Swiss francs (SI. 19 billion), 
from 1.11 billion francs a year earlier. 

• Italy's industry minister. Pierluigi Bersani, confirmed spec- 
ulation thar AT&T Corp., IF1L SpA, Compagnia di San 
Paolo and Mannesman □ AG were interested in becoming 
core shareholders in Telecom Italia SpA when the company 
was privatized. 

• Willis Corroon Group PLC, a British insurance broker, 
blamed intense competition and the strength of the pound for 


a fall in first-half profit Pretax profit slipped to £60.2 million 
pounds ($98.1 million) from £68.2 million a year earlier. 


British Petroleum PLC earned £73S million in the second 


quarter, compared with £587 million a year earlier, an 8.7 
percent rise. Revenue rose to £1 0.80 billion in the quarter from 
£10.34 billion a year earlier. 


• Smiths Industries PLC agreed to buy Graseby PLC for 
£ 1 36 million to expand its range of medical products. The final 
offer valued Graseby shares at 21 1 pence each, 41 percent 
higher than Monday’s closing price of 149.5 pence. 


Monday’s closing price of 149.5 pence. 

AFX. Reiners. AF Bluvmbcry 


High Law Claw Pm. 


The Trib Index 

Jin. 1.1982*100 Li 


Pnce s as of 300 P ¥ Hen VJ'« we 


World Index 

Regional indaxM 

Asi a Pacific 
Europe 
N. America 
S. America 

Industrial Index** 
Capital goods 
Consumer goods 
Energy 
Finance 
Miscellaneous 
Raw Materials 
Service 
Utilities 


Lev*! 

Change 

change 

yarn to dste 
*0 change 

177.£6 

■0 35 

-0.14 

-13 H 

128 16 

-t.04 

-c.eo 

-:-s3 

185*6 

-0.10 

-0.05 

-15 06 

213.03 

-0.27 

-0.13 

-31.57 

172.10 

*0.73 

*0.46 

-50.40 

231.11 

+0.79 

*0.34 

+3522 

195.97 

■0.84 

-0.43 

+21 .40 

200.46 

♦1.0B 

*0.54 

+17.43 

131.81 

■0.75 

-0.57 

+13.10 

169.64 

-0.52 

-0.27 

*1722 

192.33 

*0.56 

*0.29 

+9.66 

T67.6S 

-1.00 

-0.59 

*2 2.11 

166.09 

*0^1 

*0.31 

*15.77 


The rmemsrtonat HeraU Trtotme WMC Stock /Max o mefes m u 5 UoUer values or 
280 mtemaoonaHy i nvesrable stocks mm 25 countries. For more information a tree 
booklet is avaUatxo by writing to The Trio Index, zsi Avenue Cnarfes da owjufle. 

A 25 ?? N&uSfy Cedex. France CcmpUea by Bloomberg News 


High ! 
Mxfsul Fudosn 7420 
MUswi Twsf 
MuititaMfg 
NEC 

fffian 

N Beta Sec 
Ntatondo 11400 

NtopEraresi 

Nippon O* 

Nippon Steel 
Nissan Motor 
IVKK 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 1200b 


Moore 

Ncvroridge Net 


NTT Date 
OR Paper 
Osaka Gas 
Ricoh 
Rohm 
SakuroBk 
Sankvo 
Sanwa Bank 
Sanyo Elec 
Secom 


5edwRwy 

SeHsuiChem 


Sekfeul House 1160 


Seven- Eleven 
Slwp „ 


SIWtaku EIPW 1970 


Shlmtiu _ — 

Ston-etsuOi 
Shiuido 
ShLrookuBii 
Sofibank 
Sony 11900 

Sumitomo 
SaailferaoBS 
SuraXChern 
SumBumo Elec 1970 

SumB Metol "" 

SamflTiusf 
Toisho Phorni 3100 

TnkedaChem 3430 

TDK Ml® 

Totwfcu El Pm 2WK1 

Told Baik 1040 

ToUo Marine 1450 

Tokyo El Pm 22*0 

Tokyo Electron 7250 

Tokyo Gas 296 

Tokyo Cap- *39 

Tonei, 1230 


Nwroridae Nel 
Noranda Inc 
Norcen Energy 
NThem Telecom 
Now 
Onex 

PonaJn Petlm 
Petra Cda 
Placer Dome 
PocoPeflm 
Potash Sink 
RenaEsance 
Rio Algom 
Rogers CantH B 
Seagram Co 
She! Cda A 
Stmcor 
Talisman Erty 
TeckB 
Tele globe 
Telus 
Thomson 
TorDooi Bonk 
Transalto 
TrensCaa Pipe 
Trimark Rnl 
Trtrec Hahn 
TVXGdd 
Westcoasl Eny 
Weston 


High Low 

10*» »J 0 
M05 68'- 

30 20D0 

3120 32b 

145 I47ta 
1110 11.95 
31’- 31 

IP. 27 

25J0 2-160 
B-6D 23D5 

13.95 1170 

)Q£95 105 

36.10 35D0 

IS-, 3465 
28*» 28 '* 

5140 S1D5 
2465 23“! 

48 40>« 

4145 42.90 
27U 27 

50.70 SO 1 * 
24D5 2670 

34.95 3« 
44 'ft 4190 
17'j 17D5 
27 Vi 2770 
69V: «Ji 

3205 3110 
6 

27.90 27>^ 

lOBtt 95 


Vienna 


ATX index: 143608 
PrevkXft: 1452.11 


BoeMer-Uddeh 
CredBowi Ptri 
EA43ei>erog 
EVN 

FtoghcfenWen 

OMV 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 



PAGE 15 


£ 



Trade Deficit Rocks Malaysian Stocks 

Cuvmled U Ctmr Stiff n. ■ 


OmipiM ^ oar Safi Front Duputchn 

. KUALA LUMPUR — Malay- 
sian stocks posted their biggest one- 
day drop in 31 months Tuesday as 
bank shares such as Malayan Bank- 
ing Bhd. tumbled a day after the 
country nr - * 

pected ra 

Malaysia said Monday the June 

5?* was Million ringgit 
i .uo billion), erasing a surplus of 
156^ million ringgit in May. 


Analysts said the banking shares 
were falling on concern that the 
Malaysian central bank's latest 
moves to defend the ringgit while 
trying to keep interest rates from 

country 

Jf t S “i" ■ J ™ e L - . . fintmce-tdatcdsharK fell for a fifth 

day, losing 249.93 points, or 2 97 
percent, to 8.173.15. 

The large June trade deficit 
widened Malaysia's currem-ac- 



945.08, its biggest one-day drop 
since January 1995. 

The broader KL Emas Index fell 

'y^poims, or 2.74 percent, to 

Malayan Banking, the country's 
biggest bank in terms of assets and 
branches, dro 

close 

which has interests in banking and 
real estate, declined 0.55 to 7.45. 


of the ringgit, which in turn erodes 
the value of international investors* 
ringgir-denominated holdings and 
causes dollar debts held by Malay- 
sian companies to grow. 

The deficit’s size "stunned the 

market,” said Audrey Ho, head of 

ties, dropped 1.10 ringgit to research at Mohaiyani Research 
“V: • ’ SuT1 . e P^y Bhd., She called the deficit * ‘slightly lar- 

ger than the worst-case scenario.” 
“It’s disastrous." said Joanne 



Source: Bkwwerg 1 KT 

Marie Lopez, a fund manager at 
Utama Merchant Bank Bhd. 

The large trade deficit is ex- 
pected to deepen concerns that 
Southeast Asian currencies are 
overvalued, analysts said. 

“Currency is still the big worry.” 
Miss Lopez said. “If you're an in- 


ternational investor, there s no point 
in trying to look for great returns in 
this market if the currency's just 
going to wipe it out” 

The ringgit has depreciated 3.6 
percent as a result of speculative 
attacks .on regional currencies 
since July 2. when Thailand ef- 
fectively devalued the baht by al- 
lowing it to float, in hope of prop- 
ping up that country's troubled 
financial and property sectors. 

Separately. Malaysia’s minister 
of trade and finance, Rafidah Aziz, 
said Malaysian exporters should 
take advantage of the lower ringgit 
to expand their exports, the official 
Bemama Qews agency reported. 

The lower ringgit will make 
Malaysian products cheaper and 
may lead to an increase in demand 
overseas, she said. Malaysian en- 
trepreneurs should take advantage 
of the situation and aggressively 
push their products overseas, she 
said. (Bloomberg. Bridge News* 


Australia Nickel Firm’s Sweetener Helps Deal’s Chances 




C. *iipiM hr Our S n 4 f Famt PuTwVt 

SYDNEY — The takeover of Billiton Nickel 
PLC by the Australian nickel producer QNI Ltd. is 
likely to get grudging shareholder approval after 
the deal was sweetened Tuesday, analysts said. 

Billiton's stake in what will be the world’s 
fifth-biggest nickel producer will be 52.5 percent, 
rather than the 56 percent originally planned, 
under the new plan. QN1 will sell Billiton 455.8 
million shares in return for the nickel assets of the 
British-based mining company spun off last 
month from Gencor Ltd. of South Africa. 

After completion of the deal, valued at 2.3 
billion Australian dollars ($1.70 billion), the 
company will reduce capital by 30 cents a share, 
making a total payment to shareholders, includ- 
ing Billiton, of 260 million dollars in October. 

The initial purchase plan, announced in mid- 
June, met a wall of dissent from Australian 
shareholders who said they were disappointed 


that Gencor was not paying a takeover premium 
and that the deal overvalued Billiton's assets. 

QN1 and Gencor commissioned an independ- 
ent evaluation of the deal in response to the 
shareholders' complaints. The evaluator’s re- 
port, also issued Tuesday, said that the deal was 
fair and reasonable and that QNl’s valuation of 
Billiton's assets was within reason. 

Analysts and brokers said investors were likely 
to accept the deal at a shareholder meeting, to be 
held around Sept. 5. But they said the approval 
would be more grudging than enthusiastic. 

“I would think it wdl get through now. but 
only because the alternative doesn’t look overly 
attractive,” a metals analyst in Sydney said. 

The new QNI will produce 60,000 metric tons 
of nickel in 1998 and continue to trade on the 
Australian bourse. It will have two main producing 
assets — QNl’s Yabulu nickel refinery in Queens- 
land stale and Gencor's 98.9 percent-owned Cerro 


Matoso nickel mine and smelter complex in 
Colombia, each of which produce about 30,000 
metric tons of nickel a year. It will also have stakes 
in two nickel deposits in Western Australia state, 
which are being contributed by Billiton. 

QNI's chief financial officer, Christopher Foil, 
said the company would have the technology to 
process any type of ore body in the world. 

“It also positions us in mis window that we 
have before Voisey’s Bay,” he said. “We be- 
lieve that Voisey’s Bay will put pressure on 
noDefficient operarors. ' ’ 

When it reaches full production eariy next 
century. Inco Ltd.'s Voisey’s Bay project in 
northeastern Canada is expected to produce 
about 10 percent of world nickel supply at a net 
cost of about 90 cents a pound. 

QNI shares closed Tuesday dowD 1 0 cents, ar 
2.40 dollars, as trading resumed following sus- 
pension last week. (Reuters. Bloomberg) 


Moody’s Says 
Seoul’s Debt 
Faces Risk of 
Downgrade 

Agcitce FruiKf-Pressc 

SEOUL — Moody’s Investors 
Service Inc. said Tuesday it was re- 
viewing two of South Korea’s credit 
ratings for a possible downgrade. 

Moody’s said it was conducting 
the review in light of “a large and 
rapid buildup of short-term debt io 
recent years.” 

The review covers South Korea’s 
Prime- 1 foreign-currency rating for 
short-term notes and bank deposits 
and its A- 1 foreign-cairency rating 
for long-term bank deposits. 

Moody’s said it was examining 
the “weakening financial health erf 
the corporate and banking sectors” 
and the “ongoing deterioration of 
the North Korean economy.” 

■ Union Supports Kia Bailout 

The Korea Automobile Workers 
Federation Automotive said it 
would stage a general strike at the 
nation ' s automakers on or after Aug. 
15 unless the bankrupt Kia Group 
received rescue loans, AFX News 
reported. 

The federation, which has 60.000 
members at five carmakers and 30 
pans suppliers, also called for the 
resignation of Finance Minister 
Kang Kyong Sik. 

Mr. Kang has rejected calls for 
financial assistance for Kia's subcon- 
tractors and endorsed a decision by 
creditors to suspend emergency loans 
to the group. Many Kia subcontract- 
ors face possible bankruptcy. 

The federation said the govern- 
ment and creditor banks were seek- 
ing the resignation of Kia directors 
under a scenario ro support a 
takeover bid by * ‘a certain conglom- 
erate,” apparently referring ro Sam- 
sung Group. 


Investor’s Asia 


W&m::::. \VMvqmr. Tokyo;.;.: 

'RanS'Seng Shafts Time®' ' ■ • mte \225 y ; . 

.17000 2275 — .22000 

• m JL_ • 2200 21000 

■ 15000 xflf— . 2125 Vr— r 20000- 

—ft* '.2050 -'WVj — •- 79000- 

13000W • 1975 — * -1 I 8 OQ 0 HM-. 


12000,1 



MAM J J A 
1997 


M AM J J A 
1997 


17WG- U — T-sj-rnr 
M AM J J A 
1997 


'Ewhangft .'.//frwteJi- -f- \ 

fton£ ;■ 

' Tuesday -Prey; % 

'Cfose.. v ,;;Cfose; Change 


v -1,957.71' 1.46&8&' &6I 

Sydney 


«»s iSSsgu — ... 

- i^4.45.. : .}^^a07v,-0,78 

Lumpur; Composite . : v;;. 


' SET . 

z. 

: Seoul ' 

74CL86 

Taipei- a/ * - Stock Mattel Index %Sf&68. 10.065.76 -1.4& 



Jakarta •' ’• Complete index 


WeTington ; NZSS-40 « •: ! 

=' 2^43,91 : 2£587S 4X58 

'Bdmbay ' Sens&vtilndeit.'- 


Source: Tetekurs 

liuerruuiiru] Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank Ltd., which has been punished by 
the Japanese government for making payoffs to an extor- 
tionist. is temporarily cutting by 10 percent to 60 percent the 
pay of five auditors and all 32 board members. 

• Japan's purchases of foreign-made semiconductors reached 
32.6 percent of its total purchases in the first quarter, the 
United States reponed. the highest rate ever under a pact first 
reached in 1991 that calls for reserving at least 20 percent of 
The market for imports. 

• Japan's international trade and industry minister. Shinji 
Sato, said China had to improve its service sector and tariffs 
before it could be considered few membership in the World 
Trade Organization. 

• Singapore's High Couir ordered the former Merrill Lynch & 
Co. private banker Kevin Wallace, who has been charged with 
money laundering, to return for questioning over assets he 
declared to the court, a lawyer close to die case said. 

• The Philippines' budget surplus will total 6.5 billion pesos 
($226.1 million) this year. Finance Secretary Roberto de 
Ocampo said, and 13.2 billion pesos in 1998. 

AFP. Market News. AP. Bridge Ne vr* 


NTT Buys 35% of Sri Lanka Telecom 


4 


Renters 

COLOMBO — Nippon Tele- 
graph & Telephone Corp. bought a 
35 percent stake in state-owned Sri 
Lanka Telecom for $225 million on 
Tuesday, in the largest single for- 
eign investment in the Indian Ocean 
island. 

Under a strategic agreement be- 
tween NTT and the Sri Lankan gov- 
ernment. the Japanese company will 


gain management control of Sri 
Lanka Telecom. 

The price was more than the gov- 
ernment valuation, which indicated 
a floor price of SJ 10 million and an 
open-market value of $149 million 
for a 35 percent stake. The gov- 
ernment had valued Sri I-anlca Tele- 
com’s entire equity at between a 
floor price of $315 million and a 
marker value of S429 million. 


Bre-X Geologist’s Family Asks for New Inquest 


The Associated Press 

MANILA — Relatives of a Filipino 
geologist who died mysteriously in In- 
donesia said they wanted to re-examine 
his body because thumbprints supplied to 
Indonesian authorities did not seem to 
match the scientist's own prints. 

Michael de Guzman, the former chief 
geologist for ihe Canadian mining com- 
ly Bre-X Minerals Ltd., fell to his death 
1 a helicopter March 1 9, shortly before 


a supposed discovery of a huge gold de- 
posit in Borneo was shown to be a hoax. 

His younger brother, Simpliciode Guz- 
man. said Monday that the family was 
asking for a new test because old thumb- 
prints of his brother appeared to be dif- 
ferent from those sent to them by In- 
donesian authorities. 

“They just don't match," the younger 
de Guzman said. “It doesn’t take an expert 
to spor the difference." He said his broth- 


er's thumbprints on identification cards 
from former employers were different from 
those supplied to authorities by Bre-X. 

He said the discrepancy had given the 
family “some hopes” that the geologist 
was still alive, but he said the family would 
accept the findings of a second test. Bayani 
Palad, the National Bureau of Investi- 
gation fingerprint expert who checked Mr. 
de Guzman's old prints, said officials were 
willing to check the body again. 


China Predicts 10% GDP Growth 

Reuters 

BEUING — China’s economy is ex- 
pected to grow 10 percent this year and 
9.4 percent in the third quarter, com- 
pared with the third quarter of 1996, the 
Financial News said Tuesday. 

Gross domestic product for 1997 is 
expected to reach 7.98 trillion yuan 
(S959 billion), it said, quoting the State 
Economic and Trade Commission. It 
predicted that China’s retail-price infla- 
tion would be about 3 5 percent for the 
year and 1 .5 percent in the third quarter. 


Sales -Tax Rise Bedevils Japan’s Growth Outlook 




Reuters 

TOKYO — The government said 
Tuesday that the economy was recov- 
ering, despite a temporary slowdown 
caused by an increase in the sales tax in 
April. 

But it said the lingering effects of the 
increase, an unusually cool summer and 
fiscal tightening were making it difficult 
to predict a clear course for die economy. 

The Economic Planning Agency’s 
monthly report said the economy was 
continuing to recover but that the pace of 
the recovery was slowing temporarily. 

Housing" construction weakened in 
June after a sustained period of high 
levels, it said, and new-car sales in July 
fell 1 1 .4 percent from a year earlier. 

The agency also announced that 
household spending, a major barometer 
of private consumption, fell 4.7 percent 


in June from a year earlier, partly be- 
cause of bad weather. Private econo- 
mists said the economy was weaker titan 
they had forecast it would be this year. 

“Once negative effects of the sales- 
tax hike are out of the way,’ ’ said Shim- 
pei Nukaya, deputy minister of the Eco- 
nomic Planning Agency, “we can ex- 
pect die economy to get back on a firm 
recovery track.” 

Mr. Nukaya said die agency expected 
die turnaround to start after September. 

But another agency official admitted 
that the sales-tax increase had had an 
unexpectedly prolonged negative effect 
on consumption. 

“We thought the negative impact 
would disappear in the April-June peri- 
od, so we still need to see when such 
effects will vanish,” he said. 

Private economists say they do not 


expect the economy to shrink in the near 
future, but neither do they expect it to 
pick up speed. 

The economy has been slowly re- 
covering since late 1993, after the late- 
1980s collapse of the so-called bubble 
economy of inflated asset prices, but it 
has failed to gather momentum. 

“The government view on the econ- 
omy may be too optimistic,” said Tet- 
suro Sawano, an economist at Nikko 
Research Center. “We cannot expect 
private consumption to recover to a level 
seen before the sales-tax increase.” 

The sales tax was raised to 5 percent 
from 3 percent April I. 

Nikko has forecast that gross domestic 
product will grow by 1.4 percent in the 
year ending in March 1998. The gov- 
ernment has predicted 1.9 percent 
growth- 


UPS: Union Plays for High Stakes in Strike Over Use of Part-Timers 


<1 




Continued from Page 11 

porate officials say. United 
Parcel needs thousands of 
people to sort packages and 
load trucks part-time from 4 
A.M. to 8 A.M., not from 4 
A.M. to noon. 

“Over the last five years, 
part-time work has shifted 
from being an occasional 
strategy to being a way of life 
at UPS,” said Harley 
Shaikeo, a professor of in- 
dustrial relations at the Uni- 
versity of California ar Berke- 
ley. “That’s why there is the 
anger right now. For UPS 
workers it represents, in ef- 
fect, a hidden downsizing.” 

There are high stakes in 
this clash, and not just be- 
cause the strike has created 
chaos for some retailers and 
c atal ogue companies. The 
showdown pits one of the 
most powerful U S. unions 
against America's largest 
shipping company. 

The dispute is also one of 
the rare times when a union has 
walked out to reverse a two- 
tier wage system — a practice 
that many unions regret having 
approved in the 1980s. 

If management retains the 
right to create as many lower- 
paid part-time jobs as it wants, 
employers across America 
are likelv to feel emboldened 
to relv on part-timers and oth- 
er cost-cutting techniques that 
unions detest- . 

If the Teamsters limit. the 
use of part-timers at United 
Parcel, they not only could 
encourage other unions to 
confronf managements over 
part-timers but might also en- 
able the labor movement to 
say a little louder that 11 1S 
alive and kicking. 

“This is a very important 


strike,” said John Schmitt, an 
economist with the Economic 
Policy Institute, a liberal re- 
search group. "You have a 
company that is a textbook 
example of the new economy, 
a service-sector industry 
that’s highly computerized, 
that’s based on information, 
organization and smarts. If 
this kind of company cannot 
offer workers middle-class 
wages, if it pays S8.50 an hour 
instead of S20. that’s a bad 
omen for the future.” 

The Teamsters desperately 
need to win the dispute. For 
die 1.4 million-member un- 
ion. which has struggled for 
five years to shed its corrupt, 
autocratic image, fighting the 
use of pan-timers has become 
nothing short of a crusade. 

When the union polled 
United Parcel workers about 
the issues to focus on, the 
workers — three-fifths of 
whom are pan-tuners — not 
surprisingly told their bar- 
gainers to concentrate c» 

turning more part-time jobs 
into full-time ones. 

The union president, Ron- 
ald Carey, who is mired in a 
fund-raising scandal, has not 
hesitated to embrace the issue 
as away of rallying his troops. 
For the union leader, a long- 
rime United Parcel driver in 
New York, the dispute has 
also been an opportunity to 
show the world that tins is a 
new Teamsters, a union that is 
willing to go toe to toe with 
employers rather than make 
backroom deals with diem. 

-UPS wants throwaway 
fobs that no one can live on/ ‘ 
J said Rand Wilson, a spokes- 
man for the union. "It s nme 

that somebody stood up to 

them and said: Tins is not the 
right direction for Amenca. 


This is not die right direction 
for our communities and for 
working families.’ ” 

The company says it sees 
the strike as a time to stand up 
and say there is nothing wrong 
with faring part-timers. In- 
deed. United Parcel says us- 
ing part-timers has been 
pivotal to its growth over the 
past four years, when it added 
the 46.000 workers. 


The company, whose 
headquarters are in Atlanta, 
has relied heavily on part-time 
sorters for its fast-growing 
overnight air-delivery busi- 
ness. Executives say United 
Parcel has also needed an 
army of part-timers to enter 
information into computers so 
the company can offer cus- 
tomers the ability to track de- 
liveries every step of the way. 



Peter Cabanis 

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PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1997 





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Jicralb^Sribunc 


PAGE 18 


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1997 


World Roundup 


Paying for a Crash 

FOOTBALL Seattle running back 
Lamar Smith has agreed to pay a 
former teammate, Mike Frier, 
$4 million to settle a civil lawsuit 
arising from a December 1994 car 
accident that left Frier paralyzed 
from the waist down. 

The payment, to be made over 
seven years, will come from 50 
percent of Smith’s signing bonuses 
and 35 percent of his income as a 
football player, said Smith's law- 
yer, Allen Ressler. (AP) 

Puerto Rico Beats U.S. 

basketball Guard Edgar Pa- 
dilla led Puerto Rico to a 74-69 
victory over the United States on 
Tuesday in the world under-23 
championships in Melbourne. 

It was the first loss by a U.S team 
in the competition. The Americans 
won the only previous under-23 
championship, which was held in 
Spain in 1993, with an 8-0 record. 

Shariff Fajardo was the top 
scorer with 21 points, but it was 
Padilla who led the way down the 
stretch, giving Puerto Rico a 4-0 
record and dropping the United 
States to 3-1. 

The United States led 59-52 with 
nine minutes remaining before Pu- 
erto Rico went on an I I-Q surge. 
After the Americans polled to 64- 
62, Padilla nailed two 3-pointexs 
and added two free throws. (AP) 

French Women Advance 

tennis Sandrine Testud led a 
French charge into the second 
round of the Acura Classic tennis 
tournament Monday with a 
straight-sets victory over Chanda 
Rubin of the United States. 

Testud banged out a 6-4, 6-2 
victory in 65 minutes over an error- 
prone Rubin to join compatriots 
Nathalie Tauziat and Anne^Gaelle 
Sidot in the second round of the 
hard-court event. 

Serena Williams, the 15-year- 
old sister of Venus Williams, fell 7- 
6 (8-6). 4-6, 6-3 to Magui Serna of 
Spain. 

• Richard Krajicek of the Neth- 
erlands beat Cedric Pioline of 
France 6-3, 6-4 in the first round of 
the ATP Championship in Mason, 
Ohio. Marcelo Rios of Chile also 
advanced, beating Jonas Bjorkman 
of Sweden 6-3, 7-5. Top-ranked 
Pete Sampras begins play Wednes- 
day. (AP. Reuters) 



Even Below His Best, 
Johnson Is Still Best 

American Holds 400-Meter Title; 
Cuban Retains Long Jump Crown 






Mark Ljop/n* AnuoacdPie* 

Richard Krajicek stretching to 
volley against Cedric Pioline. 


By Ian Thomsen 

/mermtlional Herald Tribune 

A THENS — In a way the clock 
validated this victory as much as 
it did his world-rattling-record 
of 19.32 seconds in the Olympic 200 
meters last summer. 

This time the clock was frozen at 
44. 12 seconds, an indecently large num- 
ber for a 400-meters perfectionist like 
Michael Johnson. He was clearly not 
quite himself. Therefore he seemed 
more a champion than ever. 

His victory in the 400 meters Tuesday 
provided the 29-year-old Johnson with 
his seventh world championship gold 
medal, and surely the most uneasy one 
he owns. 

When he completed the unprecedent- 
ed Olympic double last summer of the 
400 and 200 meters, he said he bad been 

World Athletics 

driven by the pressure. But those had 
been high standards of his own making. 
This summer he had suffered a pulled 
quadricep in his meaty left leg, lost his 
400 meters winning-streak after eight 
years and 58 victories, and his invin- 
cibility along with it, and, according to 
an American teammate just the other 
day. Johnson bad lost his heart The 
roles were changed under much con- 
troversy to bring Johnson to these Sixth 
World Championships because the 
global television show simply couldn't 
go on without him. 

But he wasn't ready. He almo st failed 
to advance out of the second round 
Sunday night In the final, after a false 
start, he instinctively reached down and 
rubbed his sore leg. As he came out of 
the turn of the race he absolutely had to 
win he was in third place, in between the 
Briton Iwan Thomas and the Ugandan 
Davis Kamoga. 

“Iwantedtorun21.1 (seconds), but I 
probably backed off." Johnson said of 
die first 200 meters. "It's been a tough 
season. I’m happy to be back." 

It has seemed like years since John- 
son's main competition was another 
runner on the same track. Usually he has 
been chasing Butch Reynolds' nine- 
year-old world record of 43.29 seconds, 
or simply trying to extend his state of 
invincibility. 

Now with half the race to go he had 
ground to make up. No one is better 
accelerating out of the turn than Johnson 
and be made quick work of Kamoga, 
who finished second in a national-rec- 
ord 44J7 seconds as the only “out- 
sider" in a field of four Americans and 
three Britons. Quickly now Thomas, 
who has been injured himself, was being 
left behind. Just then Johnson felt his leg 
begin to cramp. The clock was spinning 
away and he bad to let it go. 

“I wanted to work the third 100 but I 
couldn’t," Johnson said, almost apo- 
logetically. 

His goal for the remainder of this 
season is to get his time in the 200 
meters down below 20 seconds, and to 
finish ranked No. 1 in the world in that 
event Its a goal he can no longer take for 
granted. Next month he nuns 30, and the 
remaining years are more likely to re- 
semble this one than those when be 
seemed so comically fast running on his 
heels like a chap in a bowler hat 


Tuesday’s victory indicated that 
Johnson has more heart than he ever bad 
to reveal before. Just past the finish line 
he grabbed Tyree Washington, the 
bronze medalist (in a personal-best 
44.39 seconds) who had been wishfully 
thinking aloud the other day that John- 
son’s best was behind him. They em- 
braced and Johnson lifted Washington 
up off die ground and an unusual fit of 
happiness and relief. Johnson may not be 
ar his best, bur he is still good enough. 

F OUR OTHER gold medals were 
decided Tuesday, the most im- 
pressive of them going to the Cu- 
ban who happened to come sauntering 
along behind Johnson as he celebrated 
his victory in the basement of the sta- 
dium. Ivan Pedroso successfully 
defended his world title in the long 
jump, but, more important, he claimed 
the inheritance of Carl Lewis's king- 
dom. Lewis, who beat the injured Ped- 
roso in last summer’s Olympics, is re- 
tiring this season and Pedroso proved he 
will be the man to beat as he woo with an 
opening attempt of 8.42 meters and 
spent die rest of the night faulting as he 
sought Mike Powell’s world record of 
8.95 meters. Erick Walder of the US 
claimed the silver medal with a final 
jump of 8.38 meters. 

TWo women's races were filled with 
incident, be ginning with the 1 .500 me- 
ters. Around the penultimate lap the 
Swiss bronze medalist Anita Weyer- 
mann (4 minutes, 4.70 seconds) came 
barreling up the middle like an Amer- 
ican halfoack on die goal line, shoving 
the American Regina Jacobs to an outer 
lane. Sonia O’Sullivan of Ireland ap- 
parently began to- lose her balance — 
and in the chain-reaction she reached 
out and grabbed the top of Jacob’s sing- 
let from behind. Jacobs was yanked 
back and complained afterwards that it 
prevented her from turning her silver 
medal (in a time of 4 minutes 4.63 
seconds) into a gold. 

Carla Sacramento of Portugal won the 
race in 4:04.24. As she was completing 
her victory lap, her Portuguese team- 
mate, Fernanda Ribeiro. jogged over 
and gave taera kiss. A few moments later 
a gun went off and Ribeiro, the Olympic 
champion, set out to win the 10,000 
meters. She could do no better than 
silver in 31 minutes. 39.15 seconds, as 
die 19-year-old Kenyan Sally Barsosio 
ran away in the final three laps to win in 
31:32.92, a world juniors record. 

In the final third of die race, Gere 
Wami. the Ethiopian bronze medalist 
from the Olympics, limped out of the 
pack with 10 laps to go. As she was being 
stretchered off Elana Meyer of South 
Africa, die 1992 Olympic silver medalist, 
tumbled out of contention. Eventually 
she regained her feet and finished 17th. 

The halfway leader of the decathlon 
— in the absence of Dan O'Brien, die 
world and Olympic champion who is 
injured — was Chris Huffins of the 
United States with 4,548 points after five 
events. He held a slim 1 9-point lead over 
Tomas Dvorak of die Czech Republic. 

The completely-unheralded South Af- 
rican Marius Corbett won the javelin with 
a second-round attempt of 88.40 meters, 
an African record. Steve Backley’s last 
attempt of 86.80 seconds earned him the 
silver medal Kostas Gatsioudis finished 
third to become the first Greek medalist. 



i 

■ • •• 

Vi ./.I’.; A.-.f- <■ ,. ; _f • •••>* 


Wilson Kipketer of Denmark, right, cruising to victory in a heat of the’800 
meters Tuesday. Panayotis Stroubakos of Greece, No. 521, was second. 

A Real Crowd Pleaser: 
Nebiolo vs. the Greeks 


The Associated Press 

ATHENS — Spurred by criticism 
that they were a no-show at the year's 
premier sports event, thousands of 
Greek fans Tuesday evening finally 
packed the stadium on the fourth day of 
the World Championships. 

“We were upset about all they were 
saying, and wanted to give a good pic- 
ture for Athens," said Evgenia Tam- 
baki. as she rushed into the stadium with 
her 10-year-old daughter. 

Nearly all the seats in the 85,000 
capacity stadium were full, a stark con- 
trast to some of the previous days, where 
•low attendance led to an acrimonious 
exchange between Prirao Nebiolo, the 
president of the IAAF, and local or- 
ganizers. 

“For us it was not a surprise that the 
fans came, and of course they all came 
with tickets. We didn’t open any gates 
or bring any soldiers,” said Andreas 
Four as. the Greek Sports Minister. 

It was a direct jab at Nebiolo, who is 
Italian, and charges that he had filled 
Rome’s stadium with soldiers during 
the 1987 world championship to make 
the event appear a success. 

“Greek fans love athletics and they 
responded to our call." Fouras said. 

ui one of the stands, a fan held up a 


placard reading “we’re here Primo.” 

Fouras and other officials had ap- 
pealed over the past two days for Atheni- 
ans ro attend the championships, which 
Greece hopes to use as a showcase in its 
bid to win the 2004 Olympics. Oneof the 
rivals is Rome. A decision will be made 
in Lausanne, Switzerland, on Sept. 5. 

The appeal seems to have worked. 

It was a sharp contrast to some of the 
previous days, when low attendance led 
Nebiolo to blame local organizers for 
’ badly promoting what he describes as 
the premier sports event of the year. 

Many Greeks were angered by Ne- 
biolo’s statements, especially when he 
told Athenians to abandon the beach for 
the stadium. Nearly half the capital's 
five million residents are away on sum- 
mer vacation. 

Officials accused Nebiolo of trying to 
torpedo Athens’ chances for the 2004 
Games. They claim Nebiolo will do 
anything to promote Rome's bid. 

Nebiolo said the organizers were 
guilty of poor marketing. Evangelos 
Savramis, the organizing committee’s 
general director, said Nebiolo proposed 
to have vans with loudspeakers drive 
around Athens selling tickets. 

“That's how we sell watermelons 
here," he said. 


Sri Lankan 
Pair Break 
Test Cricket 
Records 


Reuters 

COLOMBO — Sanath Jayasuriya 
and Ronan Mahanama of Sri Lanka 
broke the world record for the highest J 
partnership in a test match when they y 
took their unbroken second-wicket 

stand to 548 runs on the fourth day of (he - 

first test against India. . 

Jayasuriya, a left-hander, finished tfafr 
day on 326 not out, the 14th triple 
century in test history and the highest- 
score ever by a Sri La nka n. The highest 
individual score in tests is 375 by Brian 
Lara for the West Indies against Eng- 
land in Antigua three years ago. 

Mahanama was 211 not out at the 
close. 

They became only the second pair to 
bat through two entire days of a test 
Gary Sobers and Frank Worrell did it for 
the West Indies against England at Brid- 
getown, Barbados, in 1959-60. 

Jayasuriya and Mahanama passed Doa 
Bradman and Bill Ponsford's second 
wicketrecord of 45 1 for Australia against u 
England in 1934 and then beat the pre- 
vious best for any wicket, the 467 scored 
by the New Zealanders Andrew Jones 
and Martin Crowe against Sri Lanka in 
Wellington, New Zealand, in 1991. 

The pair are 29 runs short of the- 
record partnership in all first-class 
cricket — 577 by V.S. Hazard and Gul 
Mahomed for Baroda against Hoikar in 
India in 1946-47. 

With one day remaining, and Sri 
Lanka on 587 runs for one wicket in its 
first innings and leading India by 50, a 
draw looks certain. 

Jayasuriya became the highest indi- 
vidual scorer for Sri I -anV-i when he 
passed the 267 made by Aravinda de 
Silva in the same test that Jones and 
Crowe set their record. 

“Tomorrow I will not think of any 
records but play according to the balls I 
receive," said Jayasuriya. 



Cemunu AmuMsfihc/Tbc Aweulol Pie-* 

Mahanama, left, and Jayasuriya 
hugging Tuesday after the pair 
passed the test record of 467 runs. 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 


EAST DIVISION 



w 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Baltimore 

69 

39 

639 



NewYom 

64 

45 

287 

SV. 

Boston 

53 

59 

673 

18 

Detroit 

51 

58 

668 

18h 

Toronto 

51 

58 

668 

18to 

CENTRAL DITOION 



Cleveland 

S7 

49 

238 



Milwaukee 

SS 

54 

JOS 

JK 

Chicago 

53 

56 

686 

57. 

Minnesota 

50 

60 

655 

9 

Karans aty 

46 

62 

626 

12 


WEST DIVtSJON 



Seattle 

62 

48 

264 



Anaheim 

63 

49 

263 



Texas 

51 

» 

664 

1 1 

Oakland 

43 

70 

281 

2016 

MJEHOIUU. lUOUK 



EASTDtVBtON 




w 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Atlanta 

71 

42 

628 



Florida 

64 

46 

282 

Sto 

New York 

62 

48 

264 

7V, 

Montreal 

57 

52 

223 

12 

PhUwWphto 

36 

73 

230 

33 

CENTRAL DIVISION 



Houston 

61 

51 

245 



Pittsburgh 

55 

57 

691 

6 

St Louis 

52 

59 

668 

8W 

Cincinnati 

46 

63 

622 

13* 

Chicago 

45 

67 

602 

16 


WENT DtVtSWM 



San Francisco 63 

50 

254 



Las Angelas 

60 

51 

241 

17, 

San Diego 

53 

56 

677 

SVi 

Colorado 

52 

61 

460 

1QW 


MONDAY’S UUBWOHS 
AMEBIC All LEAGUE 

Owtoud ida oio ioi — 7 i3 a 

Detroit 010 BIO oat-2 a 1 

Nagy. A. toper (ff> ond 5. Ataman 
SSandm Soger IS). M. Myrrs (7), Mkefl IT). 
Janris {9} and Casanova. W— Nagy. 11-7. 
L— 5. Sanders. 3-9. HRs— Cleveland. RamUez 
115). Thame DO]. Detroit, Higginson (19). 
Hew York 100 102 010—5 8 1 

Kansas CHy 000 000 084— « 7 1 

□.Wefts. Nelson 191. M Rivera IV) ond 
Girardfc Rusdb MLPerer (71. J. Walker OX 
Carrasco (81 and MiSereeney W— O Wete 
12 5. L — RiKCh 34. Sv— M. Rivera (33). 
HRs— New Yc*. £7N«B 1)6). Hows 2 00). 
Kansas Gly. MLSwceney (5). 

Taranto 000 000 201—3 7 1 

Minnesota 000 Ui IB* -9 14 1 

Cmpcnfer. Deal (5). Jorum (7) and B. 
Sanhagtt Radke. Guardado CS1. Trombley 
(9) and Steinboch. W— Radke 14-5. 
L— Carpenter 0-4. HRs — Toronto. B. 

Santiago (7|- Minnesota. Coibninn (Si 
Boston 101 002 034-11 13 0 

Tans 100 012 100 — S 10 0 

Suwon Mahay (7J, Brandenburg (71, 8 
Henry (71 and Hattebera; Burkett Vosbarg 
(6). Whiteside (71. Gunderson 181 , Ppttwson 


(8), Moody (9) and Leyritz. W— B. Henry. 5-2. 
L — Patterson. 7-5. HR— Boston Garciapana 
(19). 

Milwaukee M0 410 000-5 14 1 

Anaheim 010 000 100-2 * 0 

Kart Wkkroan (7). Fetters (9J and 
Motherly; KXiB DaJflay (5), Hasegawo (7). 
Codaret (9) and Kreuter. W— Kart 7-10. 
L-K. Hm, 6-9. Sv— Fetters (6). 
HRs— MBwaukee. Js.Valentfn (10). Nilsson 
(18). Bumftz (20). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Houston 000 001 000-1 4 1 

Rondo OM 202 Q0*-4 5 0 

Ho«, R. Springer (8) and Ausmvs; 
(-Hernandez. Powell IS) ond CJohraon. 
W— L Hernandez. 6-0. L— Hofc 7-8. 
Sw— Powel CD- HR— Florida, BanBia 1123. 
San Francises 001 102 203-9 10 0 

Oacmatj 0M DOT 000-1 7 0 

Ruetet D. Henry (81 ond B. Johnson: 
Carrara. Lewis (4), Fe .Rodriguez (8) and J. 
Oliver. W— Roetec 8-ft L— Carrara O-l. 
HRs — San Francisco, Snow 2 (18), B. 
Johnson (5). 

Atlanta IN 0M 001—6 8 0 

PRfXbur* NO MO 000-0 4 I 

Smoltz and J. Lopes Cooke. P. Wagner (6). 
Christiansen M), Sodowsky (9) and KandmL 
W— Smote 10-9. L— Cooks. 8-11. 
HR— Atlanta A. Jones 031. 

Colorado OH 300 000-3 3 1 

PModalpMa BIO 123 00*— 7 11 0 

FXastHa Hutton (61, McCurry (7) and 
JaReerfc T .Green, Brewer (81, Battalia) (9) 
ond Lieberthal. w-T. Green 2-1. L— F. 
Cash llo 8-10. HRs— Cokxnda Cast Bo (29). 
PhSodcfphia, Rolen (IS). 

St Laths 020 0M 000-3 6 0 

Maw York 002 011 00*— 4 8 B 

Arbor, Pettmraek (fi), C. King (8) and 
DtteBea RJfeeO, Lidle (7). Jo.Franco CD and 
Hundley. W-R. Real 10-4. L— Aydar. 0-1. 
Sv— JftFnmco (29). 

Japanese Leagues 



W 

L 

T 

Pel 

-GB 

Yakut! 

54 

34 

1 

614 

— 

Yokohama 

44 

40 

D 

224 

B 

Hiroshima 

42 

43 

0 

.494 

I0W, 

HaraNn 

41 

45 

1 

.477 

12 

Chwnkhi 

42 

48 

0 

667 

13 

Yomluri 

38 

51 

0 

627 

167, 

NdHCUMUI 




W 

L 

T 

Pet 

.CB 

Ora 

47 

32 

3 

295 



5etai 

46 

39 

2 

241 

4 

Oatei 

45 

43 

0 

2I( 

6'6 

Nippon Ham 

43 

47 

1 

678 

9*v 

La he 

36 

45 

3 

.444 

12 

Kintetsu 

38 

49 

1 

637 

13 


IWnMT'l KSUin 
CENTRAL LEAGUE 
Yamiiat 7. Yakutt6 

Yokohama II, Manshln 1 . 5 Innings, ram 
HilKlMM7.ChrmiCtli2 

PAC04C LEAGUE 
Orb&DaM? 

Lane X Nippon Ham 0 
Seibu vs. Kintetsu. ppn_ ram 


FOOTBALL 


NFL PWESEASON 

Miami 38. Denver 19 


CRICKET 


SKI LANKA VS. M1HA 
FIRST TEST MATCH. «TM DAY 
TUESDAY, W COLOKSO 
India: 537-8 declared 
Sri Lanka: 587-1 


JOHNNH WA1XKK KYMK GDP 

Standings for die 1997 Ryder Cup to bo 
played SepL 26-28 a! Vtadorraraa in So- 
togrande. Spain. The top 10 C nMiora wta 
qualify tor the 1 2-nun Moots. US. uptsin 
TO—Khaandlaa PW omIMuS— 8B>— 
taros wfl select teropleysr* at large to cam- 
plata each team: 

UNTIED STATES 

1. Tiger Woods llftftOOO poMs 2. Tom 
Lehman 1016X86; X Joslin Leonard 888.500; 
4 Jim Furyfc 867.50a ft Phu Miefceteon 
809286; 6, Mark O'Meara 80125a 7. Brad 
Faxon 727.500; a Scott Hach 711246; 9. Tom- 
my TaBes 689285; 10. Davts LOW III 657.164 
11. Jett Magged 646625. IX Steve Janes 
57928a rX Mark Breaks 549250 <4. Pool 
Shmkowskl 503234; IS David Duval 
470.000. 

EUROPE 

I, C. MonKjatnene. Scor^ B41230.7B points 
Z Darren aorta. NJretand 584.9903ft 

X Ion Woosnonv Wales 50X5744% 

4 Leo Westwood. England 441.018.1 7. 

5 Bernhard Longer. Germany 371,577.96; 

6 . Per-Uhtk Johansson. Sweden 333.710.30: 

7, Thomas Bjora Denmark 327,0112% 

X NUguel Angel Madia Spain 3244002a 
9. Coshmhno Rocca. Italy 31455529* 
ia Ignado Garrida Spain 296.92122; 

I I. Padre ig Homngttm. Ireland 38X390.04. 
IX Jose Maria CHazabaL Spam 26X7&L0& 
IX Paul BruadhursL England 755644 6 ft 
IA Roger Chapman. England 23&8S24& 

IX Mark James. England 237609 86 . 


TRACK & FIELD 


World Championships 


daa Miras 

WML 

I. Michael Johnson. US. 44.11- X Dans 
Kamoga, Ugrmdrv 4437; 3, Tyree Washing- 
ton. U5. 442ft A Mark Richardson, Britain. 
4467; X Jerome Young, (IS. 4*51.- 4 Iran 

Thomas. Britain. 4A5£ 7. Antonio Pct H gro w - 
U S. M57. ft Jaime fiauim Broom. 4522. 


LONG JUMP 
FOUL 

1, Ivan Pedrosa Cuba 862 meters; X Erfc 
Walder, US. L3ft X KlriS Sosunov. Russia 
&>& 4, James Bccktont Jamaica 8.14; 
X Kefccn Ferreira Jin. Brazi 8.04 4 Alexan- 
der Gtavatski Befcrrus, B.03; 7. Chefth Toure. 
Senegal 7.9ft ft Kevin Dflworth. US. 7S&- 9. 
Masaki Mortnaga Japan. 7.86. 10. Lao 
Jkwteng, China 7.74; 11. Bogdan Tudor. 
Romania 764 Maurice Wig naU, Jamaica no 
mark recorded. 


RNAL 

1. Marios Corbett South Africa 8860 me- 
tars; Z Steve Bock icy. Brttafei 86.8ft X Kostas 
Gaizloudis. Greece, 8664; 4 Mfck HM. 
Britan 86S4 X Sergei Makarov, Russia 
8622; X Bons Henry, Germany, 8424 7. 
Emeterio Gonzalez, Cuba 83J6; ft Aki Fowl 
olnea Finland 822ft 9. Jan Zetezny. Czech 
RepahUC 82.04 1ft Gregor Hoqier, Austria 
81-54 11 . Andrei Moruyev; Russia 812ft IX 
Patrfk Boden Svredea 8066. 


100 METERS 

HEAT 1— 1. Jaime Penas. Spain. 11.08 
second* X Sebastian Chmnra Poland 1 1 .1 J) 
X Sebosttan Levied, Fiance, I12X- 4 Jock 
Rosendaal Netherlands. 1127; X Indrcfc 
Kascara Estonia 112^ 6. Rop Pizfka 
Lohria 11.77. 

HEAT 2— I, Javier Benet Spain, 1 1.04 X 
Klaus isekenmmer. Germany, 1 125; X 
PhSpp Huber. Switzerland. 112ft 4 Mario 
Antaol Portugal 11.09; X Oleg V Crete ImLov, 
Uzbekistan, ll.lft & BenJranmo Posorina 
Italy, ii.Mk 7, Cedric Lopez, Franca Ii2i. 

HEAT 3 — 1, Roman Scbria Czech Rcpub- 
6c 1021; X DoogkB Pirmi New Zealand 
1Q9X X Ramil Ganiyev. Uzbekistan 10.94 4 
Marcel Dost Netherlands. 10.97; X Michael 
Simlti Canada 1 1 244 Lev Lobod in. Russia 
1 1 .07; 7. Alprr Kasapoqta. Turkey, 1 1 28. 

HEAT 4— 1. Vidor Hou«oa Baric dus. 
10.72: X Predromss KorVizugiou. Greece. 
10.77; X Robert Zmcl*. Czech Republic 
1024 4 Shawn WBboom. United States, 
102ft X Staten Schmid Germany. 10.93; 4 
Pierre- A. Vial France. 11.02.- 7, Japan 
Karnes. Australia il.ll. 

HEAT S— 1. Chris Huffins. United Stales. 
102ft X Tomas Dvorak, Czech Republic 
106ft X Jan Mognusson Amor. Iceland 
10.61; 4 Ertci Nod Esfcmta. 1067; X Frank 
BuscniOTn. Germany. 10 74- 4 Eduard 
Hamotataen. Finland 10.81; 7. Stave Frta. 
United Stain 1096. 

LONG JUMP 

GROUP 1 — 1- Frank Bascmcna Germany. 
7.96 meters X Roman Sebrtc. Czech Rcpobic 
7.71; X Klaus Isekerarner. Gentxarv. 7.5ft 4 
Moral Dost Netherlands, 765: X Oleg 
Verrtdnftov, Uzbekistan. 73Z X Stave Fritz 
U rated Stater. 72ft 7. Pradremos Korfcizogtau. 
Greece; 72ft ft Robert Zmekk. Czech Repuh- 
6c 728; 9. logon Homes, Aut&nSa 727, 1ft 
Michoef Smith. Canada 72x 1 1. PhBpp Hu- 
ber, S wfl z u flc n d 7.I& IZ Douglas Pfttei New 
Zealand. 7.17; IX Indrck Kascorg, Estonia 
7.16: 14 Jaime Penas. Spam, r.ld IX Cedric 


Lopez, Franca 7.1X 16. Morin An Sail Por- 
tugal 72: 1 7, Bento ml no Povsriiw, Italy, 6.93. 

GROUP 2- 1, Chris Huffins, United States. 
725; X Tomas Dvorak. Czech RepubEc 764 
X Ramil Ganiyev, Uzbekistan 72ft- 4 Staten 
Schmid Germany. 72ft X Victor Houston. 
Barbados. 727; 6, Eduard HomaMnea Fin- 
land 72ft 7, Sebastian China ra, Poland 72ft- 
& Jon Magnussan A mac Iceland 7.41 9. 
Eriu Nod Estonia 727:10. Javier Benet. 
Spain 7.1ft II. Pierre-A. VkO. Franca 7.11; 
IX Lev La bod In. Russia. 72ft IX Sebastkn 
Levtaq, Franca 721; 14 Jock Rosendool 
Netheriandx o.9* IS. Shawn WHboum Unit- 
ed Slates, 6.94 14 Alper kosapogiu. Turkey, 
491.-17. Roil Piziks. Latvia479. 

SHOT PUT 

GROUP 1— 1. MichocJ Smith, Canada 
1724 meters. X Tomas Dvorak, Czech P.c 
pubBc 162X1 Jaime Paiax Spain 1521-4 
Mario Anted Portugal 1427; X Steve Pnfc, 
United Stales. 1441; 4 Roman Scbric Czech 
RopWbCc 143X* 7. PMUpp Hubca Switzerland. 
1429; ft Klaus Isekemnetar, Germany. 142ft 
9, Douglas Pufrd New Zealand 14.1ft Ift 
JogonHarm Australia M2& 1 1, Beniamino 
Paserata itaJy. 1404 IX Oleg Veretdnikov, 
Uzbekistan 1X91 IX Indrek Kascara. Es- 
tonia 1327; 14 Manet Dost Netherlands, 
1361; is. Frank Busemam Germany. 13-51- 
14 Pierre- A. VaL Franca 132X- 17. Pradra- 
masKorfuzoqtoaGreeca 112 a 
GROUP 2— l. Eduard Homateinea Fin- 
land 1S.71; X Chris Huffins. United Stales. 
152a. X Sebastian Chmara Poland 1X21; 4 
JonMognuvson Amar, Iceland 15J1X- X Lev 
LabotMl, Russia IS Oft ft Shawn Wilbaum- 
U rated States. 1425. 7, Rama Ganiyev. 
Uzbekistan. 14.74 ft SI cion Schmid Ger- 
many, 145ft 9. Robert Znwlik. Czech Pc- 
pubUc 1428; 1ft Erin Nod Estonia 142X 1 1, 
Rais Pizflri. Latvia M2X IX Alper Kna- 
poglu. Turkey. 1X99. IX Javier Bcnot. Spam. 

1 164- 1 4 Sebaswen Levies F ranca r XSd 1 5. 
Cedric Lopez. France, 136ft 14 Victor Hous- 
ton Barbados. 1222. 17, Jock PosendoaL 
Netherlands. 12.7X 

MGHJIMP 

GROW’ A— I. Chars Huffins. U2. 106 
meters. 859 points: X Joviet Bmrt. Spain. 
201 831: X Jon Mugninsaa tackntd 2 0ft 
8ta 4, Thomas Dvorak. Czech Republic 2 00. 
803; X Pradremos Korklzogtoa Greece. 220. 
801-4 Staton Schmid Germany. 1.91. 77ft- Z. 
Sebastian Levies. Franca 1.94 749: ft Bc- 
mmbto Pnseima Italy, 1.91. 77ft- 9. Marat 
Dost NeBiettands. 1.91. 721 Id Klaus 
Isckenmcier. Gemraoy. I 91. 721- II equal 
ErUNooL Estonia 1.91,771 M equal Shawn 
WUboum. U2. 1.91. 721 IX Piwre-Ate*an 
die Vial France. 1.» 69ft 14 equal Otoq 

Vereteimfeav. Uzbekistan. 12467ft U equal 

Alper Kasapoqta, Tuitey. i.Bx 6 Id ift 
Ptdtw Huber, Switzerland. 1.8ft 67ft Dou 
gta9 Palm New Zeotond, no mor» recorded 
GROUP B — l. Jogon Home?, Amlrolo. 
134 1,031; 3. Sebosflon Chnwm Pekma 
XI 1 9i S; 1 Cedik LOpcz. F ranm 7.09, 887, 4 
Frank Bwnm Gctn*m. 7 «• 887^5, Bo 
man Scbria Czech Repubfc M7. 4 
Rond Gareyev. Uzbekistan. 7.0ft H59. 7. 


Michael Smith, Canada 221 831; ft Indrek 
Koseorg. Estonia 22X 831; 9 equal Mario 
Anteol Portugal 2.01 831, 9 eqaul Victor 
Houston. Barba dor. 3.01 831; 1 1 , RofSPiziks, 
Latvia 2.0ft 80X- IX Sieve Frrtj. U.S. 2.oa 
801- IX Eduard Hamalainca Finland 1.97, 
774- )4 Robert Smotik, Czech Republic 1.97, 
774' !& Lev Lobodin Russia 1.94 749: 14 
Jaime Penns. Spate. 1.9* 749; Jock 
Rosendoal NcttrcriomK did no! dart 

400 METERS 

HEAT 1 — 1 . Vidor Houston. Barboctoa 
47.91 seconds. 913 pwnfe, 2 Sebastian 
Chmnra. Poland 48.34 B9ft X Klaus Iseken- 
nwler. Germany. 4824 882 4 Oleg Vcrclot- 
nikov. Uzbeklstna 48.8ft 86 ft- ft Cedric 
Lopez, Franca 482& 867; 4 Pradremos Ko- 
rkizogtou. Greece. 4929, 834 Shown 
WilHomft U2. <M nol start 

HEAT 2 — 1 , Staten Schmid Genremy, 
48.14 902 2 Roma Gonircv, Uzbekistan. 
4824 891- x Javier Bend Spain. 4869, 884- 
4 Indrek Kaseorg. Eslonta 4864 877; ft 
Pobert ZmeTiK Czech Republic 4929. B4X 4 
Mario AnibaL Portugal 49.71 B27; 7, Be- 
ntermno Paserina Haty. 49.99, 815. 

HEAT 3— I. Thomas Dvorak. Czech Re- 
public 4724 931; X Marcel Dost Nether- 
lands. 47.99. 910: X Philipp Huber, Switzer- 
land 48 0 ft 902 4 Frank Busemonn Ger- 
many. 4821 894 ft Steve Fritz, U 2 - 48 . 7 ft 
874- 4 Lev Lobod in, Russia 49.01 860; Dou- 
qlas Pmnl New Zealand did not start. 

HEAT 4— 1 . Eduard Hamakmen, Firdand 
46.71, 971- XErWNoolEsroma 46.99. 959sl 
Roman Scbric. Czech Republic. 48.14 92ft- 4 
Pierro-Atoxandre Viol Franca 4867. 867; ft 
Chns Hufflm. U S. 49.0ft 859. ft Mkftoel 
Smilh. Canada 4967, 830; Jon Mognusson, 
taetorrd. did not start 

HEAT fr— i, logon Homes. Australia 
49.92. Sift- X Scbasticn Levica Franca 5361 
tel Al(>?r KosopoghL Turkey, dte no) start. 
Ron Piriks, Lohria did nor start Jock 
RoscndaaL Ncthcrtands. did nol start. Jahne 
Pcnos. Spain, did nol start. 

I. Hunt ns 4.548 points: X Dvorak 4527: X 
Busemoiui 4,446: 4 . Hamatolnen 4635: 1 Se- 
Tt ta ™ ra *■ Ganiyev 4256. 

4431 9, Homes 4.29ft la Houston 

WOMIN 
1 SOO METERS 

, r final 

^nimcnla Ponunal L-044L X 
Regina locobs. US- 1 04 40. 1 Arete Wcy- 
-tenlzettend J:(u 7ft 4 . Matte Zu- 

ZtaltefU*? 51 Lco PeBi Coonda 

i? 6 !li* if n * n **“ ldcM «k Czech Repub- 
1 2L 00 N'-fTubova Russia 
Sj* n " Intend. 4-0721; 

Ethiopia, 4:08.15; m Miilin 
Ewertoft Swcdi-n, 4 : 0 B.ea 1 1 . RgftTI) 

10,000 METERS 

final 

. jolly Etar^ruo. Konya 31J29X 
Z Fernondn TorlwaL M yt lf i 3 . 


Maspko Chiba jDpoa 31:41.91 4 Beihone 
Adera Elbiopta. 3168.9ft- 5 . Ren Kluluaa 
China 312061 c. Tcgla Loraupa Kenya 
3200.91 7. Yang Si|U. China 37:0161. ft 
Coltaen De Reucft Soirtfi AWca 32(021; 9, 
Silvio Sommoggia Holy, 321492 ia Chemi 
Tatra has hi Japan 32^361; 1 1, Nora Rocha 
Mexico. 37-3428. IX Julia Vaquera Spain 
322491; 11 Annette Peters. U2. 32:4321 
14 Chontol DreienbacK Franca 322120; 1ft 
AnneMorl Sanded Flntond 33.-00.1 1; 14 Hi- 
rom Masuria Japan 33dn.l4 17. Elana 
Meyer. South Africa 33 £6 22, Gcle Womi 
Ettiopla did not finsh, Moricen Renders, 
Belgium, did nol feusfe Zahia Dahmanl 
Franca did not finish. 

SHOT POT 

QUALIFIED FOR FINAL 
1, Astrid Kumbemiiss. Germany, 2069 
meters; Z Vito Pavlysh. Ukraine. 206& 
X Huong Zhihong, Clwna 19.0ft 4 Svetlana 
Krtvelyova Russia 1861; ft- Connie 
Price-Smith, U.S. 1835. 4 Nod no Klcinert 
Germany, 18.7ft- 7, Stephanie Stara Ger- 
many. 18.12 ft Svefla Mitkova Bulgaria 
1827; 9, Tressa Thompson U2. 18.07; la 
Krystyna DanHczyk. Poland 18.05; 1 1. Vo- 
tovto Allbhousa U2. 1 729. 

Medals Table 


Nothin 

G 

5 

B 

Total 

United Stales 

3 

3 

4 

10 

Germany 

2 

0 . 

1 

3 

Ukraine 

r 

2 

1 

a 

Poriugei 

1 

1 

0 

2 

South Africa 

1 

1 

0 

7 

Australia 

1 

0 

D 

1 

Cuba 

1 

0 

0 

r 

Czech Republic 1 

0 

D 

1 

France 

| 

0 

0 

1 

Kenya 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Mexico 

| 

0 

0 


Britain 

0 

2 

0 

2 

Russia 

0 

1 

2 

3 

Canada 

0 

1 

0 

1 

Jamaica 

0 

1 

0 


Ramona 

0 

r 

0 


Uganda 

0 

1 

0 

1 

Bahamas 

0 

0 

1 

1 

Belarus 

0 

0 

1 


Greece 

0 

0 

1 

1 

Japan 

0 

a 

1 

1 

Lithuania 

0 

0 

1 

1 

Switzerland 

0 

0 

1 

1 

j TRANSIT 

ions] 


AMERICAN LCAOUE 

AMHEIM-Put OF Jim Edmonds on IS. 
day disabled list retroactive to Aug. I. Ac- 
tivated DH Eddto Murray from 15-day dh- 
abtodhsL 

CLEVELAND — Put RHP Orel Hcfshiscr on 
1 5-day dHobird 1st. Pcrolled LHP Jason Jo 
come tram Buftota. A A. 

TEXAS — Pul PHPXowret Hcnandrzon IS- 
day dbalitod list. Recalled RHP Enc Moody 


from Oklahoma City, AA. 

NATIONAL LEA SUE 

CHICAGO -Promoied RHP Len Hart from 
Rockford MidwestL to Daytona F5L 
CINONNATI — Adlvoted SS Bony Larkin 
(mm 15-day disabled list. Put IB Hot Morris 
on 15-day disabled fist. Bought cuntrocl of 
RHP Giovanni Carrara from Indianapolis. 
aa. Optioned IF Enc Owens to Indianapolis 
and recalled RHP Rictoe Lewis from Indi- 
anapolis. 

MONTREAL -Activated RHP Mike John- 
son and LHP Stove Kline. Optioned RHP 
Stove Faftersek la Ottawa IL. 

NEW York — Announced working ogree- 
menf with Oaxaca Mexican Professional 
Summer League. 

st. uiuis -Pul OF Phil Planner on is-dov 
disabled fist. Recalled RHP Manny Aybarand 
OF Scarborough Green from Loutevflte AA. 

•ASkETBAU 

national basketball association 
DENVER-R e-stgned G Anthony Goldwlre. 

football 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
8TIANTA— Released LB Mike Cruel FB 
Robert Baldwin, WR Anthony Ladd and G 
Todd Perkins. 

aNciNNATt —Released RB Defend McCul 
lough and WR Weyne Mcssam. 

OENVER —Stoned DT Mike Uxfch and OT 
Sylvester Stanley. 

GREEN BAY -Claimed DE Ntahotas Lopez 
off waivers (ram Miami Dolphins. Put OB 
Ponnie McAdo an reserve mUitarv Uw 
Wowed TE Lovell Pinkney. 

Kansas cmr— Signed LB Bobby Houston id 
MF varcontroel. Pctoased CB MIchaH Semen. 
Put LB Tammy Dorsey on Injured reserve. 

stATTLE —Signed CB Shawn Springs lo 7- 
ycor contrart. Signed DT Dan Satoaumua 

Agreed » terms with ol Walter Jones on 4 

ywconlfoct. 

ft. Louis— Sinned RB Amp Lea RB Jon 
Vaughn and OL Barry Stokes. Released OL 
Craig Novitsky, OL Aaron Henna RB Don 
H.tswi WR A.C Tethson and P Nate 
Cochran. 

TAMPA MV— Signed FB Dwayne Mablcy. 
Waned DE Rich McKenzie ana RB Jcrmanc 
Wiliams. 

HOC* IT 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAOUE 

ANAHEIM— Re-signed C Ted Orury, F Craig 
Retahcrt F Jeremy Stevenson and F Boh. 
Wren to 2-ycm contracts. 

_ NOSTON— Agreed lo lerrm with C Joe- 
Thomlonon 3-vearcontracl 

Cummins 

and □ Em Wetench. 

MonTBEfta-Re-stoned lw Brian Savage 
and D Jassen Cun, more i° l-year contraTs 
and D Craig Hteel to 2-year contract. 

PHOEHixcoyarES-Signcd LW Jeff Chns. 
nan to a one-vcor contract 

“ r ‘ RCSK,nrt Lw 

cotuar 

Ftmioa sr ate- A nnounced S Robmt 

Homraono and lb Hank Grant have 
dlsmr.se d from tocibgii |com 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6. 1997 


PAGE 19 


SPORTS 


C: 


True Professionals 
Follow the Money 


By Rob Hughes 

Imernurionul Herald Tribune 


A THENS — As much as we 
might aspire to fair play, sports 
are no different to commerce 
when it comes to redistributing the 
spoils of the market place. 

In -Athens, at the World Athletics 
Championships, we watch African run- 
oecs scoop prizes and endorsements that 
might feed whole villages; in soccer the 
profits flow more and more to the in- 
. dividuais, and less to the nations and 
■ clubs that are their breeding grounds. 
Perhaps it was ever thus. When Al- 
fredo di Stefano, the Argentine, and 

World Soccer 



.-.Vfc I 

i 

: * j 

'--■'sat t 

• -1 - :-l; ; 
-Jjg. i 





- f 




Ferenc Puskas, the Hungarian, starred 
for Real Madrid in the early days of the 
European Cup in the 1950s the)' were 
effectively defectors: rich ones. 

Now the trade is global, the contracts 
transient, and the pockets of players and 
agents are filled deeper than the coffers 
of destitute producer clubs. 

Indeed, agents are feeding avari- 
ciously off the freedom of movement 
granted to players under European labor 
laws following the Jean-Marc Bosman 
case two years ago. FIFA, the governing 
body of world soccer, licenses agents to 
try to stop the sharp practice of middle 
men ripping off clubs — as has 
happened for decades in South America 
— but Africa, the new continent of 
unspoiled creative individuality, draws 
the entrepreneurs like bees to the honey 
. p 01 - : 

Take Nigeria, the Olympic soccer 
champion, the first nation to qualify for 
the 1998 World Cup, the homeland of 
players blessed with speed and physical 
and mental toughness, and all manner of 
reasons to get out of the country and 
earn elsewhere. Their national team 
coach, Philippe Troussier, is at home in 
Ranee wondering if he will ever get the 
Nigerian federation to pay his outstand- 
ing salary for June and July. 

Calling the “boys” home for na- 
- dbnal duty is a feat of airline logistics. 
The Odyssey might start with Ams- 
terdam, where Sunday Oliseh, the rangy 
midfielder, has moved to Ajax from his 
former club FC Cologne. 

Oliseh joined his compatriot Tijani 
Babangida. the team’s right winger. 
Ajax regrets that, due to the fact that 
. Milan and others have exploited the 
Bosman effects to siphon off that Dutch 
dub*s own renowned youth, so Ajax 
most now be predatory. ' 

Oliseh and Babangida replace Finidi 
George, now with Beds of Seville and, 
and Nwanku Kanu who. thriilingly, has 
just resumed active service for Inter 
Milan, after heart surgery in Cleveland: 

The plane that picks up Kanu in Italy 
might make the short hop to Turin to 
take aboard Taribo West, the tall, tough, 
athletic defender who has joined Ju- 
ventusfrom Auxerre in France. 

The flight might then detour to Tur- 
key, for Uche OkechuJcwu, Nigeria's 
defensive rock and team captain. He is 
employed by Fenerbahce, as is Au- 
gustine (Jay Jay) Okocha, the gifted 
play-maker, who had a spell in Germany 
with Eintracht Frankfurt 

AIso in Turkey is Daniel Amokachi, 
the explosive front runner who had an 
unsettling two seasons in England 
where Everton failed to use his pace and 
power, which are “English" virtues. 

Nevertheless, even the English are 
learning to appreciate foreign tech- 


niques. Among 126 overseas’ per- 
formers now with England’s Premier 
League teams, Nigeria’s Celesrine 
Babayaro is the newest 

He joined Chelsea, for a SI million 
transfer fee and a five year personal 
contract this summer. But it is not Ni- 
geria that benefits financially from this 
trade. Chelsea’s millions went to An- 
derlechr in Belgium where Babayaro 
was registered. 

The Belgians mined the African 
fields long ago for gifted and young 
players. Tne French too, though France 
in all sports was quick to nationalize the 
Africans. 

Scan the French national team, and it 
is Jean-Marie Le Pen’s worst night- 
mare: a polyglot mix of race, religion 
and color. Good for France, but even a 
sophisticated European country is prey 
to the procurement fashions abroad. 

Fourteen of France’s finest, both 
black and white, play soccer for Italy’s 
Serie A sides. There are another dozen 
in England, not least ar Arsenal ro where 
Arsen e Wenger has imported five of his 
countrymen. 

In 1 1 months since arriving in Lon- 
don from Monaco via the Japanese J- 
League. Wenger has spent S45 million 
on 1 1 new players: only one is bom and 
bred in England. 

The coach argues, as does Ruud 
Gullit, the Dutchman transforming 
Chelsea, that he would buy British if the 
right talent was available for the right 
price. 

“We try all the time to find good 
English players,” they chorus, “but we 
are asked for S 10 million and we can get 
three stars from Europe for that!" 

N ORTH OF the border, in Scot- 
land, Glasgow Rangers has 
spent $20 million -plus this sum- 
mer on Italian experience m Sergio Por- 
rini. Marco Negri. Lorenzo Amoruso 
and Rino Gatuso. as well as the Swede 
Jonas Them from Roma. 

Rangers is omnipotent in its home 
league, the victors of Scotland's cham- 
pionship nine consecutive times. Yet. 
with 15 foreign parts in his squad, coach 
Walter Smith tacitly admits that 
Rangers cannot make any inroad into 
the greater riches of the UEFA Cham- 
pions’ League using only native talent. 

To the south, Gullit articulates whai 
for so long the myopic Brits could not 
see for themselves. 

“To improve your standards, you 
have to have players not only of tech- 
nique and awareness.” says the Dutch- 
man. 4 ‘but the artimde has ro change. ’ ’ 

“I find I have to push English players 
more,” he adds, an ironic rum of phrase 
since it seems to many that in pushing 
Chelsea ro win the FA Cup. and in 



■ .•n- 1 FW.jr.Th- V-oojimI Pi—. 

Jason Kendall of the Pirates, right, upending Mark Lemke of the Braves at second base in Pittsburgh. 

Radke of Twins Wins 12th in a Row 


buying" five more foreign players since 
May, Gullit has pushed the British tal- 
ents right out of Chelsea's Stamford 


Bridge ground. 

“Ya, but you have to see what is 
happening,” he says. “After training, 
the foreign players stay on the field. They 
realize it is not over when the coach says 
stop. Football is a profession, and you 
have to improve yourself every day.” 

Gullit insists he is opening, not clos- 
ing, doors to the youth of England. That 
his imported players, imported habits, 
will rub off on the apprentices at 
Chelsea so that, in tune, the trend will 
reverse itself in England’s favor. Mean- 
while, they buy, and the world is the big 
spenders’ oyster. 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London. 


The Associated Press 

Brad Radke is the hottest pitcher the 
American League has seen in 25 years. 

Radke took his winning streak to 12 
in his last 12th starts Monday night as 
the Minnesota Twins beat the Toronto 
Blue Jays, 9-3. 

According to the Elias Sports Bureau, 
only three pitchers have won 12 con- 
secutive starts since 1 950. The other two 
are Boh Gibson of Sl Louis, in 1968, 
and Pat Dobson, who did it with Bal- 
timore in 1971. 

”1 never really thought I should be 
there.** Radke said of his climb through 
the record books. “It's nice to be up 
there. It’s nice to be on a streak like 
this.” 

Radke. a 24-year-old right-hander 
who entered this season with a career 
major league record of 22-30, allowed 
two runs — both unearned. 

’‘Even- pitch he throws has good 
location.” said Mariano Duncan of 
Toronro, who was 0-for-5. 

The AL record for consecutive wins 
is 16, held by four players. Schoolboy 
Rowe was the last to do it. in 1934. 

The major league record is 19. set by 
Tim Keefe in 1S88 and matched by 
Rube Marquard in 1912. 

Next on the list for Radke is Ellis 
Kinder, who won 13 straight starts in 
1949. Radke will have to beat the New 
York Yankees on Saturday to do that. 

“It’s going to be a big night. ’ ’ he said. 
“It’s going to be tough.” 

Radke allowed five hits, struck out 
four and walked three as he lowered his 
earned run average during the streak to 
1.87. He left after throwing 125 pitches 
in seven innings. 

Greg Colbrunn hit a pinch-hit grand 
slam in Minnesota’s six-run fifth inning. 

Yankees 5, Royals 4 David Wells 
came within two outs of getting his third 
shutout in four starts, Charlie Hayes hit 
two home runs as New York held on to 
win in Kansas City. 


The victory was the fifth in six games 
for the Yankees. 

Wells took a three-hitter into the ninth 
but was relieved by Jeff Nelson with one 
out after allowing a pair of singles and 
committing a throwing error that al- 
lowed Kansas City to score its first run. 

Indians 7, Tigers 2 In Detroit, Manny 
Ramirez of Cleveland homered and 
drove in four runs. Jim Thome hit his 
30th homer and Charles Nagy continued 
his domination of the Tigers . 

Nagy improved to 12-4 lifetime 
against the Tigers, his most victories 
against any club. 

Nagy, who is 2-1 against the Tigers 
this season, and was 3-0 last year, gave 
up two runs on seven hits and two walks 
with seven strikeouts. 

Thome’s homer in the seventh made 
him the first Cleveland left-handed hit- 
ter to hit 30 homers in successive sea- 
sons since Hal Trosky in 1936-37. 

Red Sox 11, Ranger* 5 Troy 
O’Leary’s three-run triple in the eighth 
inning led Boston to victory in Texas. 

With the Red Sox trailing 5-4. John 


Valentin led off the eighth with a single 
off Matt Whiteside and Mike Stanley 
drew a walk. W’il Cordero’s infield 
single loaded the bases and O'Leary's 
drive off the scoreboard cleared the 
bases. 

Nomar Garciaparra went 3 -for- 5 with 
his 19ih homer and his league-leading 
47th multi-hit game. 

Brewers 5, Angels 2 Jose Valentin. 
Dave Nilsson and Jeromy Bumitz all 
homered in the fourth inning as Mil- 
waukee won in Anaheim for its 10th 
victory in 12 games. 

Scott Karl (.7-10) won for the fifth 
time in five starts since the All-Star 
break. The left-hander was charged with 
two runs, one earned, and five hits in 
six-plus innin gs. He struck out six and 
did not walk a batter for the second 
consecutive start. 

Ken Hill, making his home debut and 
second start for the Angels since the 
July 29 trade from Texas, surrendered 
the three home runs in a span of four 
batters after giving up none in his pre- 
vious 30 innings. 


Elway Hurt as Broncos Lose 


The Associated Press 
Denver quarterback John Elway 
left the exhibition game against 
Miami in Mexico City because of a 
partly tom right bicep tendon. 

Elway hurt his throwing arm and left 
during a timeout late in the first quarter 
of Denver’s 38-19 loss Monday. 

“My bicep is partially tom.” Elway 
said. ‘Tin not sure how I did it. It could 
be really good or it could be really bad. 
We'II lrave to wait and see.” 

Miami linebacker Zach Thomas 
broke his left fibula on a kickoff return 
in the first quarter, but said be expected 
to be back by the regular-season open- 
er against Indianapolis on Aug. 3 1 . 

• Bruce Smith, last season’s NFL 
Defensive Player of the Year, had his 


first workout of the preseason with 
Buffalo on Monday. 

Smith, 34. held out for three weeks 
before reporting to the team before its 
exhibition loss to Chicago on Saturday 
night. He was fined S 105.000, $5,000 
for each day missed. 

Smith has been complaining about a 
contract reworked in 1995 that calls for 
him to be paid $2.2 million this season. 
He wants to play out the final year in 
hopes of becoming a free agent. He 
turned down a five-year, $22 million 
offer in May. 

• San Diego linebacker Junior Seau 
underwent surgery to repair tom car- 
tilage in his left knee. He is expected to 
be out four weeks and to miss the 
season opener at New England. 


Grim Tour 
Goes On for 
Slumping 
McGwire 


The Associated Press 

So far, Mark McGwire has flopped in 
Philadelphia and stumbled at Shea Sta- 
dium. 

The mighty McGwire was O-for-4 
with two strikeouts — one with John 
Mabry aboard and no outs in the ninth 
— as the Sl Louis Cardinals lost in New 
York to the Mets Monday night, 4-2. 

Four games into his first tour of Na- 
tional League parks, McGwire is 1-for- 

NL Roundup 

13 with five strikeouts, an infield single 
and a .077 barring average for the Car- 
dinals. 

And this is the same guy who brought 
his major league-leading 34 home runs 
with him from Oakland? 

“He’s got so much talent, he'll make 
it work.” said Tony LaRussa, the Car- 
dinals’s manager. “I'll bet on him find- 
ing a way to make it work.” 

Nothing worked for McGwire 
against the Mets. He popped out, groun- 
ded out, took a called third strike and 
then whiffed on a 1-2 pitch by John 
Fraoco in the ninth. 

“I t hink he’s contending with several 
factors,” LaRussa added. “The new- 
ness. he’s probably anxious to do well. 
He’s probably feeling our offensive 
struggles.” 

Marlins 4, Astros 1 In Miami, the 
rookie Uvan Hernandez (6-0) won his 
sixth straight game with 7 1 /? strong in- 
nings against Houston. 

With Florida ahead 2-1 in the sixth, 
Bobby Bonilla fair a two-out. two-run 
homer and singled home a run in the 
fourth. 

The Astros rookie Chris Holtsook 
took the loss. Houston had a seven- 
game road winning streak snapped. 

PhUfios 7, Rockies 3 In Philadelphia, 
the Phillies won for the sixth time in 
their last seven games as Tyler Green 
pitched seven solid innings. 

Scon Rolen gave Philadelphia a 4-3 
lead with a two-out, two-run homer in 
the fifth and doubled and scored a run in 
the fourth. 

Green, who missed last season with a 
shoulder injury and only returned to the 
Phillies on July 13, allowed three hits in 
seven innings, including Vinny 
Castilla’s three-run homer. He stuck out 
seven and walked four. 

Bravos 6, Pirates O John Smoltz 
pitched a four-hitter for his second 
shutout of the season and Andrew Jones 
provided the power with a two-run 
homer as Atlanta won in Pittsburgh. 

Smoltz did not allow' a runner past 
second until Joe Randa walked to open 
the seventh and reached third on a 
double play. 

Steve Cooke limited Atlanta to one 
run and three hits until the sixth, when 
he failed to retire any of the five batters 
he faced. 

Giants 9, Red* i J.T. Snow hit rwo 
homers and had a career- besr five runs 
batted in to lead San Francisco to vic- 
tory in Cincinnati. 

Snow hit a two-run homer, his 17th, 
off Richie Lewis to put the Giants ahead 
6-1 in the seventh inning. 

He added a three-run shot in the ninth 
off Felix Rodriguez, a 433 -foot (132- 
meter) drive into the third deck in right 
field. 



RjECRinrrMEivr 

Appears every Monday 

in The Intennai-kei. 

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PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6. 1997 


OBSERVER 


Oh, President Ford! 


By Russell Baker 

N ew york — Ail 

through “Air Force 
One” I kept thanking the 
gods who watch over Amer- 
ica for not letting this movie 
be made before Ronald Rea- 
gan left the Oval Office. 

It was terrifying to think 
what Reagan, who was fa- 
mous for confusing movies 
with real life, might have 
done if he'd felt obliged to 
live up to standards set by 
President Harrison Ford. 

The physical ordeals over- 
come by President Ford tHar- 
rison, not Gerald) would re- 
quire a level of physical 
fitness found only in the rarest 
Olympic champion. 

Reagan could never have 
been the good-humored pres- 
ident we all loved bad he felt 
obliged to sacrifice his long, 
refreshing naps and sweat his 
days away under a personal 
trainer determined to tighten 
□p the presidential abs. 

Ford, despite all the bad air 
and sleepless nights that go 
with a successful political ca- 
reer, still has the muscle to 
bear the bejeebers out of a 
half-dozen diehard-Commie 
terrorists and the know-how 
to pump most of them full of 
automatic-handgun lead. 

He also has die cool, witty 
savoir-faire to tell the head 
terrorist “Get off my air- 
plane,'* while tossing him 
through an open hatch. 

□ 

And not only that! This is a 
president who can take a 
punch that would break Mike 
Tyson’s jaw. Does he fight 
back with incisors and canines 
to his opponent's ear? 

How can he? His arms — 
the presidential anus! — are 
tied behind the presidential 
back. He is completely at the 
mercy of his captor, who 


takes the opportunity to de- 
liver a series of brutal bare- 
knuckle punches to the jaw — 
the presidential jaw! 

Any one of these punches 
would shatter the jaw of the 
average president and every 
bone in die hand of die man 
who delivered it. 

Harrison Ford, however, is 
not your average president. 
He has had his old. breakable 
jaw replaced with a granite 
implant. 

□ 

You may be wondering 
why Air Force One — the 
president's plane, not the 
movie — toms out to be as big 
as Logan Airport once you get 
inside. Isn’t it obvious? Ford 
had it built that way. 

“Look,” he told the people 
at Boeing, “one of these days. 
Air Force One is going to be 
hijacked by terrorist fanatics, 
and I'll need a lot of nooks 
and crannies to hide in until I 
can get rid of them.” 

The president’s know-how 
about really good hiding 
places inside Air Force One is 
only one small part of the 
great mass of evidence prov- 
ing that America knew what it 
was doing when it elected 
Harrison Ford to be its chief 
executive. 

Though previously tutored 
only in helicopters, this is a 
president at ease taking the 
controls of his 747 jumbo. 

Is there nothing this pres- 
ident can't do? Yes, and how 
heart-warming it is to see him 
take out a mobile telephone 
and immediately turn to an in- 
struction manual on how to use 
it Of course, this being Pres- 
ident Harrison Ford, it doesn't 
take him two and a half hours 
to learn how to get results. 

This being President Har- 
rison Ford, he does it in 3.5 
seconds. Now that’s going 
too far. It defies belief. 

Aw York Times Service 


At Salzburg Festival, a Different Sound of Music 


n n/ Tii.v,™ — ibilities of his Austrian benefactors, who had 

become enamored of von Karajan’s reac- 
tionary. self-centered ways. But they have 

S ALZB URG — For nearly eight decades, found it hard to quibble with Mortier’s suc- 
Salzburg has savored its reputation as cess in cultivating larger audiences and ex- 
host of the world's most celebrated summer ponding gate receipts. More than any of 
music festival. While Europe’s heathen Europe’s other big summer festivals — . 


music festival. While Europe’s heathen 
masses jam the beaches of Mallorca and 
Saint-Tropez, the world’s most renowned 
musicians, singers and culture vultures tra- 
ditionally descend each year at this time on 
Mozart's birthplace for" several weeks of 
opera, concerts and kibitzing 
that can make or break ca- 
reers in classical music. Gerard A 

After the death in 1989 of , 
its longtime director. Her- ^ mov< 

bert von Karajan, the festival n 

Salzburg festival struggled . . 

with something of an iden- Karajan' 

city crisis. His passing raised 

serious questions about 
whether the festival could survive without 
the domineering maestro whose unques- 
tioned talents served as a magnet for per- 


Gerard Mortier 
lia« moved the 
festival out of von 
Karajan’s shadow. 


theater at Avignon, France; jazz in 
Montreux. Switzerland; or Wagner in 
Bayreuth. Germany — Salzburg now covers 
75 percent of its costs from ticket sales and 
no longer depends on cultural subsidies for 
life support. 

. “The public tends to 

ortier think of this place as a fes- 

d , tival for jet-set snobs,” 

Mortier said in an interview. 
It of von “ Buc we a*® c hanging all of 
chose stereotypes. We are 
> shadow. reserving many thousands 

of seats for young people at 

affordable prices so we can 
build a new generation or classical music 
lovers. At the same time, we are trying to 
make traditional classics accessible to mod- 


formers and audiences alike. The selection of era influences. 


a nonmusician. Belgium’s Gerard Mortier. 
as the artistic director only deepened the 
sense of anxiety about the festival’s future 
among its many fans. 

But to the surprise of many people, Mor- 
tier has enabled Salzburg to flourish in re- 
markable ways by moving the program out 
of von Karajan’s shadow and returning the 
limelight of center stage back to the per- 
formers. He has tried to break down elitist 
boundaries by opening up the quaint baroque 
city nestled at the foot of the Austrian Alps to 
young people and international visitors. As a 
result, the six-week series of performances 
has blossomed into the largest music festival 
in the world, with more than 215,000 tickets 
sold this year. 

Under the stewardship of von Karajan, the 
festival had evolved into a monument to the 
legendary conductor’s enormous ego. He 
insisted on total artistic control, conceiving 
entire musical programs that reflected his 
obsession with composers of the Romantic 
era. He would fly into a rage if the slightest 
detail escaped his approval. He alone would 
decide who could adorn the stage: Those 
performers he liked, such as the tenor Jose 
Carreras or the violinist Anne-Sophie Mut- 
ter, were assured of stardom; those who 
crossed him were plunged into oblivion. 

Mortier’s efforts to popularize high mu- 
sical culture has shocked the starchy sens- 


To be sure, the festival has no intention of 
alienating its faithful adherents. In a tribute 
to Salzburg's most famous son. this year’s 
program features five Mozart operas, rang- 
ing from the early work “Mitridate” (which 
be composed at age 14) to his final two, 
“The Magic Flute” and “La Clemenza di 
Tito.” The list of star performers at the 
festival is no less distinguished than in pre- 
vious years, including directors Riccardo 
Muti and Claudio Abbado, sopranos Jessye 
Norman and Dawn Upshaw, and violinist 
Gidon Kremer. 

But under Monier's direction, this year’s 
festival has focused attention on ambitious 
stagings by the American director Peter Sel- 
lars or Gyorgy Ligeti's “Grand Macabre'-’ 
and by Robert Wilson, also American, of 
Debussy’s "PeUeas er Melisande.” Indeed, 
Monier's willingness to experiment appeals 
to young people. 

Most bizarre of all is a new avant-garde 
version of Mozan’s “The Abduction From 
che Seraglio” that sets the 18th-century op- 
era in cyberspace, using digitalized music 
and computer monitors to question whether 
the information highway is blurring distinc- 
tions between virtual and real life. 

In the original opera, pirates seize three 
friends and hold them prisoner in an Ot- 
toman palace — an exotic scenario that 
captivated European audiences at the time 



Matthias Goerne and Sylvia McNair rehearsing “The Magic Flute” in Salzburg. 


because of their experiences with Turkish 
invaders who had besieged Vienna at the 
height of the Ottoman Empire. 

The new version, created by the young 
Austrian composer Peter Valentin and the 
director Hubert Lepka. depicts the trio dis- 
appearing while surfing the Internet They 
are trapped in a mysterious digital mesh that 
threatens to transform them into computer 
data. An e-mail message helps the hero, 
Belmonte, locate and rescue his beloved 
Konstanze from her virtual abductor. Every 
note of the score was digitally modulated or 


electronically produced to create what 
Valentin calls “a contemporary instrument- 
ation of Mozart's original music. * ’ 

Mortier has encouraged such novel ap- 
proaches, saying he believes it is the only 
way to reach a larger audience of young 
people. “We are trying to push back the 
boundaries of tradition because we realize 
that it cannot be left in a museum but should 
be made part of today's reality,” he said. 
“That is the way that classics have endured 
throngb the centuries, and there is no reason 
why this festival should not do the same.” 


^ i 

d .w'i'r'f 






0' ’ 


HUMOR 


PEOPLE 


A Canadian Wit Looks Back, Not Laughing 


By William Grimes 

ton- fart Times Sen-ice 

N EW YORK — Back in 
the mid-1970s, a new 
moon began tracing a way- 
ward, wobbly orbit in the sol- 
ar system of American hu- 
mor. Readers of The National 
Lampoon found themselves 
puzzling over multipage color 
spreads depicting bizarre 
nonepisodes from a fabled 
past, rendered in the high style 
of U.S. magazine advertising 
from the 1930s to the ’50s. 

One sequence celebrated 
sports of a bygone age, like 
zeppelin-hunting and polo 
played with surplus World 
war I tanks. Another high- 
lighted the 1936 Cairo Bruce ft 
World's Fair, famous for the 
U.S. “Man and His Money" exhibition, 
in which visitors were locked in vaults 
and buried under an avalanche of crisp 
$500 bills. A fake catalog set for* the 





Bruce McCall’s memoir peers into the Canadian soul. 

hibitioo, shrank from exposing his childhood and diately s 
in vaults family to public view. The story was tribute 2 
of crisp sub-Dickensian, the tale of a sprawling Canac 
for* the family teetering on the poverty line, held One of h 


splendors of the 1934 Airdrome line of in thrall to a father who was parr Micaw- 
Bulgeraobiie cars, leading off with the ber, part Mnrdstone. and a mother who 
V-24 Mogul Sedanola. One very pe- slipped into alcoholism at an early age. 
culiar spread followed the voyage of a McCall hesitated, then took the plunge, 
dirigible manned entirely by a crew of From the beginning McCall’s ear was 

skeletons in spiffy uniforms. The ac- a sensitive receiver tuned to the wild 


skeletons in spiffy uniforms. The ac- 


companying text was a rich stew of frequencies of American life. Just across 
Madison Avenue cliches, tabloid Amer- the border, it seemed, people were hav- 
icanisms, and high-pressure sales lingo, ing a special brand of fun denied to 
What sort of mind was churning this C anadi a n s, es; 
stuff out? poky town of ; 

It belonged to a transplanted Canadian As a boy. hi 
advertising man named Bruce McCall, packs and be< 
now a writer and illustrator for The New the window by 
Yorker. The humor had its roots in a on the highw 
miserable Ontario boyhood that he chron- Toronto. Obse 
icles in “Thin Ice; Coming of Age in and complicai 
Canada," published recently by Random later feast on 
House, a portrait of the artist as a young good life, Am< 
man that also peers into the Canadian soul The United 

and, with considerable bitterness, evokes speed and noi: 
rural Ontario and die seedier side of dreary, muffle 
Toronto in the ’40s and ’50s. an appropriati 

“Originally, the idea was to write a sour, slow-mo 
book about growing up and make a lot of family. “Only 
funny remarks about Canada,” McCall McCall, “did 
said. “ But I quickly saw that that would ingly insulatec 
be flyweight. ’ ’ Illustration i 


Canadians, especially Canadians in the 
poky town of Simcoe. 

As a boy, he would collect the Camel 
packs and beer-bottle caps thrown out 
the window by Americans whizzing past 
on the highway between Detroir and 
Toronto. Obsessed with cars, airplanes, 
and complicated machinery, he would 
later feast on advertising images of the 
good life, American style. 

The United States represented color, 
speed and noise, Ontario the opposite, a 
dreary, muffled environment that made 
an appropriately gray backdrop to the 
sour, slow-moving drama of the McCall 


He dreamed up his own film 
studio, Tumoblur Pictures, 
which turned out gems like 
“Oh. Thai Mustard Gas,” 
which were instantly subject- 
ed to scathing assessments by 
McCall, writing as the film 
critic Lee man Bonky . He even 
created his own country. Pu- 
nerania, which occupied a 
rung on the international lad- 
der just below Albania. 

McCall eventually stepped 
into advertising, firsr as a 
lowly illustrator for Chevro- 
let, later as a top copywriter at 
Ogilvy & Mather, assigned to 
the Mercedes-Benz account. 
In 1974, a friend at Car and 
Driver, for which he wrote a 

. . column, steered him to The 

ito the Canadian soul. National Lampoon, where the 
editor, Henry Beard, imme- 
childhood and diately signed him to a contract to con- 
Che story’ was tribute 24 pages of material a year, 
of a sprawling Canada remained on McCall's mind, 
verty line, held One of his early contributions was ’ ‘The 
is parr Micaw- ■ Shame of the North.” a cartoon de- 
a mother who picting a wild and woolly Canadian bor- 
i an early age. der town, where the thnlls on offer in- 
ok the plunge, eluded a burlesque house with “Live 
rCall’s ear was Hadess Girls," a chapel specializing in 
d to the wild quickie baptisms, and Reg Snively's 
ife. Just across Kit-Kat-Klub, a sin bin that boasted of 
>ple were hav- its live organist and free mints, 
ran denied to “The Canadian identity is a senti- 
nadians in the mental wish in a way, but there is a 
consciousness that says, ‘Don't stand 
lea the Camel out.’ " McCall said. “It shows up in 


Frrd X ComaJ/'ni- 'n W Tim 


W ITH the passing of a 122-year-old woman in France. 

Christian Mortensen, 1 14. expects to be recognized 
soon by the appropriate authorities as the oldest person in the 
world. Even before Mortensen laid claim to the title, however, 
a dispute appeared to have broken out. A spokesman for 
Guinness Publications said in London that the firm had 
unconfirmed news of a 1 1 8-year-old woman living in Cali- 
fornia. Another woman, in Brazil. Maria do Carmo Ge- 
ronimo, claims that she is 126, but she has thus far been kept 
out of the Guinness Book of World Records because of some 
questions surrounding her baptismal papers. Mortensen. of 
San Rafael. California, had already taken firm hold of the 
unofficial title of World's Oldest Man on the strength of 
documents recording the birth in Skaarup, Denmark, of 
Thomas Peter Thorvaid Kristian Ferdinand Mortensen on 
Aug. 16. 1882 — the same year that James Joyce, Virginia 
Woolf, and Franklin Roosevelt were bom. In an article last 
year in The Gerontologist, John Wilmoth, a professor of 
demography at the University of California at Berkeley, 
followed Mortensen' s paper trail from the parish of Fruering 
in Denmark and the 1901 Danish census, on to Ellis Island and 
the floor of Continental Can Co. in Chicago, where Mortensen 
made cans from 1929 until his retirement. At a news con- 
ference, Mortensen said he especially liked the time he spent 
as a cowboy in Denmark. “I wouldn’t mind befog a cowboy 
again.' ’ he said. “A cowboy is a healthy life — to live with the 
cows.” Mortensen seemed Jess romantic 3bout women, one 
of whom be briefly married. “The cows — that’s a happy 
life,” he said. But did he have many girlfriends? “No. no. I 
didn’t live with girlfriends. 1 lived with cows.” 


A Saudi heiress denied Tuesday that she had married Omar 
Sharif, the star of the classic movie “Doctor Zhivago” and a 
bachelor for more than 30 years. "There is no truth to press 
reports that I married Omar Sharif.” Nadiya Aja. 50. told 
Agence France-Presse in Cairo. "I was surprised by this 
information, which also astonished my family.” she said. 
“The only thing linking me io Omar Sharif and his family is 
a long-standing friendship.” 


dress, even in a hip, sophisticated place 
like Toronto, where they don’t wear 
.Armani, they wear Eton blazers with a 
tarom tie. They don’t get S100 haircuts, 
because that’s too vain.” 

At the same time, the country has been 
enormously productive in the humor de- 
partment. it has generated most of the 
original “Saturday Night Live” cast, the 
“Second City Television" troupe. Mar- 
tin Short, Jim Carrey and Mike Myers. 

“I’ve always said it’s because satire is 


family. “Only when I got away," said made by the have-nots observing the 


nny remarks about Canada,” McCall McCall, "did I realize how smother- 
id. " But I quickly saw that that would ingly insulated it all was. ’ ' 

; flyweight. ’ ’ Illustration was an escape. McCall cre- 

With Canadian reticence, however, he ated fictional hockey and baseball teams. 


haves." McCall said, “and Canadians 
are always pressing their noses to the 
glass that separates them from the United 
Slates. Enw creates acute observers." 


Carrie Fisher, perhaps best known for her portrayal of the 
beautiful Princess Leia in the "Star Wars" films, has signed 
a multiyear deal for an undisclosed amount to develop and 
write comedy projects for Universal Television. Fisher is no 
new comer to writing. She wrote the screenplay for the feature 
film “Postcards From the Edge." which was based on her 
best-selling first novel, and is now working on her fourth 
novel. Fisher is also well known in Hollywood for her script- 
doctoring work on such films as "Lethal Weapon 3. Sister 
Act." “Hook" and “Milk Money." 


The veteran White House reporter Helen Thomas was the 
star as President Bill Clinton led officials and reporters in a 
round of "Happy Birthday" to mark — what? Clinton 
presented Thomas with a cake but was admirably discreet. 
“We are observing another anniversary- of Helen's 50th 
birthday.” he announced during a photo session in the Cabinet 



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FntU' Fi"* Th- j'-il IV>. 

Christian Mortensen, 114: the world's oldest person? 

Room. Thomas has covered the White House for many years 
for United Press International. (Hint: She was bom in 1920.1 


The wife of the rogue trader Nick Leeson is reportedly 
planning to divorce him. according to a Singapore newspaper. 
Lisa Leeson is “taking steps to end their six-year marriage.” 
said The Business Times, quoting unidentified sources. 
Leeson is serving a six-and-a-half-year sentence in Singapore 
on rwo charges linked to the 1995 crash of Barings batik after 
he lost SI. 38 billion through disastrous investing. 

□ 

What are things worth on Martha's Vineyard in August? At 
a celebrity auction, one of Princess Diana's dresses (obtained 
at the recent Christie's sale) raised S25.000. and three people 
spent S25.000 each on a tour of The Washington Post with 
Katharine Graham, who also chipped in 5257000. Other big 
tickets: a weekend in New York Citv with visits to “Saturday 
Night Live" and the NBA All-Star Game ($27,500); back- 
stage passes and dinner with James Taylor (S7.000), a walk- 
on parr on ".Ail My Children" (S9.000): a visit with Chris- 
topher Reeve ($7,100). and a bagel-making session with Ted 
Danson and Mary Steenburgen (S6.000). The $400,000 
raised goes to benefit community services on the Vineyard 


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