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The World’s Daily Newspaper 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 
‘ London, Thursday, August 7, 1997 


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■■i 3 No. 35,593 


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Survivor Saw a Hole Open Above His Seat Microsoft to Invest 

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Washington Post Service *e jolt threw him against the seat in fronL "The sounds were awful” he said “I heard a baby "*■ ' m 'r r ''■*“*'* 1^ wv/1. 

• AGANA, Guam — Befiw iKp * ■ r i ^ ^ fore inro three pieces. Mr. Hong cry; I heard a small child cry, ‘Help me! Help 

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landing,” Mr Hong one of the J ^thinking about my wife and my kids," he said into the mud. Then, Mr. Hong said, a terrible fire lit A ft ft C T/Jft TttfJli ff/rV /V/IDI/?W 

AS^FUeht8ni g ;S! sof “ esumvor s or Korean 1 kept thinking, I want to live. I want to live.' ” up the sky, and he saw a woman on fire. -M-fUll J.UU JLiUlU^iry 1 Jilt l ft?# 

i ' , aiu * . As he aroDed in the darknwee in a tlilllf roirina Ua on«/l Iia blW Vuolivtrl rin rtff kdr kiiminn I ■M 

Then suddenly, there was a loud "boom,” the 
sound of the plane hitting a hillside, Mr. Hoag, 36, said 


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All the lights of the plane cut out, and in the darkness, 
the jolt threw him against the seat in fronL 
As the plane tore inro three- pieces. Mr. Hong 
looked up and saw a hole iu the ceiling. Somehow, he 
then found himself sitting in a downpour in the dark 
about 100 yards from the front of the plane. 
w He is not sure whether he was thrown or climbed oul 
“I was thinking about my wife and my kids,” he said 
“f kept thinking, ‘I want to live. I want to live.’ ” 

As he groped in the darkness in a hilly ravine, 
treading through high sawgrass and on slippery 
rocks, the terror of a routine landing that had sud- 


denly turned into a fiery coffin rushed over him. 
"The sounds were awful” he said "I beard a baby 
cry; 1 heard a small child cry, ‘Help me! Help 
me!’ ’’ 

■ The pieces of the plane were scattered along the 
hillside. Some screaming passengers were trapped 
inside pans of the plane that had burrowed deeply 
into the mud. Then, Mr. Hong said, a terrible fire lit 
up the sky, and he saw a woman on fire. 

He said he had helped rip off her burning clothes 

See SURVIVOR, Page 6 


28 Escape the Crash 
Of Airliner on Guam 

ffkather and Radar Are Focus of Inquiry 



By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Trib une 

WASHINGTON — Rescuers 
dragged charred and battered bodies 
Wednesday from the wreckage of the 
. Korean Air jet that crashed in rain and 
darkness into dense undergrowth on a 
hill near the capital of Guam. 

Twenty-eight of the 254 people on 
board Flight SOI from Seoul survived, 
though many of them were badly 
burned, Korean Air officials said. 
Three people were receiving intensive 
care at Guam Memorial Hospital. 

Most of the survivors had seats in 
the forward section of the plane, which 
emerged nearly intact as the craft 
plowed into rocky terrain on the un- 
inhabited rise known as Nimitz Hill, 
not fa r from Aga/ia, the capital 

But officials said there was ho hope 
I ,of finding any others in the twisted and 
[ smoldering wreckage. ‘’We scoured 
the whole area,'* Colonel A1 Riggle of 
•the U.S. Air Force said. • 
i : .: The jumbo jet was approaching 
Won Pat International Airport when it 
' slammed into the ground, three miles 
(five kilometers) short of completing 
the 2,000-mile flight from Seoul. 

The crew had received clearance to 
Jandand appeared to be making a_nor- 
mal apjffoach wlien the plane vanished ‘ 


from radar screens, the Federal Avi- 
ation Administration said. 

Most of the passengers were Korean 
tourists headed to the tropical island, a 
popular vacation spot The passenger 
list included 13 U.S. citizens, many of 
them with dual nationality. Three of 
the 13 survived. 

The plane, a 13-year-old Boeing 
747-300, was about half-full. Its pilot 
and co-pilot were missing and pre- 
sumed dead. 

Rescuers, many of them from the 
American air base or naval install- 
ations on the U.S. -administered island, 
faced a daunting task as they worked 
among dense, razor-edged sawgrass on 
mud-covered 45-degree slopes. 

It took four hours to bring survivors 
to a hospital only a mile away. 

Workers managed to extricate 69 
bodies before daricness forced them to 
stop. 

A team of 18 National Transpor- 
tation Safety Board investigators — 
the agency’s so-called Go Team — 
was dispatched from Washington, and 
investigators from the Federal Avi- 
ation Administration were to assist in 
the inquiry. 

The team’s work should be sim- 
plified by the fact that there are sur- 

Sfee CRASH, Page 6 





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A mother weeping in Seoul after she learned that her son was included 
on ihe passenger list of the plane that crashed while landing at Guam. 


Pol Pofs Siblings Wrestle With Anger and Shame 


By Seth Mydans 

'■» ‘ New York Tunes Service 

PREK SBOV, Cambodia — Rocking slowly in his 
hammock, an old farmer named Saloth Seng re- 
numbered the sunny holidays when a much-loved 
schoolboy dressed all in white came home to this tiny 

V village by the river. 

It was his little brother, Pol PoL 

“He was a very polite boy; he never caused trou- 

V We,” Mr. Saloth Seng recalled Tuesday, in words that 
; A were repeated by another brother and a sister who live 

nearby. ■ 

But the years since then have been filled with 
trouble. Mr- Saloth Seng, 85, is one of his brother’s 
many victims, and love has turned to anger. Like 


millions of other Cambodians, he was driven from his 
home during Mr. Pol Pot’s four years of brutal rule 
from 1975 to 1979. 

And like many others, he lost a son among the more 
than 1 million people who died during those years. 

"He hurt me,” he said as a rainstorm rattled the 
banana leaves dial surround his wooden house. "He 
broke my heart He made me stop loving him." 

Mr. Pol Pot was obsessed wim secrecy, and it was 
only in the last year of bis rule that his portrait was 
made public. It was then that his siblings learned that it 
was their brother who was causing their suffering. 

Mr. Pol Pot’s sister, Saloih Roeung, 81 , round-raced 
and smooth-skinned like her infamous brother, had not 
heard of title show trial at the end of July at which Mr. 
Pol Pot was denounced, and sentenced to life im- 


prisonment by his fellow Khmer Rouge guerrillas. 

“Someone is carrying him; is he sick?” she asked, 
when shown a photograph from the trial in her broth- 
er’s jungle hideout in the northern town of Anlong 
Veng. 

"Old, old,” she said, smoothing the photograph 
with her fingers. "He looks sick. But he deserves 
whatever he got The good receive good; the bad 
receive bad." 

The son of a farmer. Mr. Pol Pot — who was bom 
Saloth Sar — was sent at the age of 6 to live with 
relatives in Phnom Penh, 145 kilometers {90 miles) to 
the south, and his sister and brothers said they had 
never known him as an adult. 

See POL POT, Page 6 


By Victoria Shannon 

International Herald Tnht uie 

BOSTON — Steve Jobs, taking force- 
ful action to revitalize Apple Computer 
Inc., surprised the technology industry 
Wednesday by forging an alliance with 
Microsoft Corp. and shaking up the 
board of directors of the company he co- 
foonded in his garage two decades ago. 

Before a throng of the company's 
fans at the Mac World Expo in Boston, 
Mr. Jobs announced that Microsoft 
would invest $150 million over three 
years in non voting Apple stock and, 
more significantly, would continue to 
develop business programs for the 
Macintosh platform for at least the next 
five years. 

Apple also revealed a board of di- 
rectors comprising some of the top 
names in the computer industry, in- 
cluding Mr. Jobs and Lawrence Ellison, 
the chairman of Oracle Corp. Mr. Jobs 
recently rejoined the company as an 
adviser, but he took on an expanded role 
after the ouster of Gilbert Ameho as 
chairman last month. 

The reaction on Wall Street was sharp 
and favorable. In heavy afternoon trad- 
ing, Apple's shares were up $6.75, to 
$26.50. They closed as low as $13.0625 
last month. 

Sortie analysts saw the announce- 
ments as a sign that the charismatic Mr. 
Jobs bad reclaimed control of the com- 
pany. But other observers at the Boston 
conference noted that despite his in- 
spirational presence, Mr. Jobs was still 
an adviser to Apple and not the chief 
executive officer. 

Apple said it was recruiting a new 
chief executive, who would be asked to 
join the board, and that a chairman 
would not be named until a CEO was 
found. The computer maker has tra- 
ditionally split- those positions. 

The unexpected developments, along 
with word of good unit sales of the 
company’s new operating system, gave 
investors hope that Apple, the only sig- 
nificant competitor to Microsoft in the 
desktop computer business, has some 
life, perhaps even profitability, left in it 

“This was the most pragmatic Steve 
Jobs I’ve seen,” said Tim Bajarin. in- 
dustry analyst and president of Creative 
Strategies in San Jose, California. "He 
was very. realistic — he talked about 
issues that were important. Ir was very 
clear that he realizes they need some 
serious management to trike them for- 
ward.” 

Apple has lost hundreds of millions 
of dollars over the past two years as 
Microsoft’s Windows software carved 
into the 15 percent market share that 
Apple’s Macintosh computers bad in 
home and office desktop computing. 

"I don’t think Apple is in the clear, 
but I think now they have people who 
know what to do. now they have to 
execute," Mr. Bajarin said. 


Microsoft, in addition to its invest- 
ment in nonvoring Apple stock, com- 
mitted to developing Macintosh soft- 
ware in concert with Windows versions 
for at least the next five years. Microsoft 
already sells more than $1.5 billion in 
Mac software each year, Mr. Bajarin 
estimated, "so this was a predictable 
promise for them," he said. 

The stock investroenr shows that Bill 
Gates, the Microsoft chairman, was in- 
terested in “partnering with Apple, not 
owning ii” Mr. Bajarin said. Mr. Gates 
appeared on screen in Boston via a 
satellite connection and drew hisses 
from the audience of Apple faithful 
The audience also groaned when Mr. 
Jobs said Apple would make Mi- 

See APPLE, Page 6 


Talking Turns 
Bitter Between 
Palestinians 
And Israelis 


By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Sernce 

JERUSALEM — Even as Crown 
Prince Hassan of Jordan appealed for 
renewed cooperation between them, the 
level of discourse between the Israeli 
and Palestinian leaders descended 
Wednesday to a point as confrontational 
as any time since the end of the Pal- 
estinian uprisings four years ago. 

Yasser Arafat, ihe Palestinian leader, 
was reported to have told party activists 
in a speech late Tuesday night in Gaza 
that "the future will be worse than the 
past” and to have urged them to “stand 
our ground in the coming battle.” 
ffhe U.S. secretary of state, 
Madeleine Albright, said Wednesday she 
was planning to travel to the Middle East 
by the end of the month. The Associated 
Press reported from Washington. 

President Bill Clinton, at a news 
conference following the announce- 
ment, said, "On the substance of the 
peace process, the parties still have to 
make the final decision.” He added that 
it was time to restore confidence on both 
sides, and that the United States would 
"provide its best ideas."] 

In the week since a terrorist bomb 
exploded in a Jerusalem market. Prime 
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel 
has demanded that Mr. Arafat and his 

See ISRAEL, Page 6 


Revamped Greens Join 
Germany’s Mainstream 


1 " “ By William Drozdiak 

; Washington Post Service 

FRANKFURT — - When they first 
'^entered Parliament in 1983, Germany's 
: Green Party members flaunted their im- 
: i^e as pacifist tree-huggers. Clad 
mostly in blue jeans and sandals, they 
' marched into Bonn’s legislature waving 
anti-NATO banners and clutching pine 
branches damaged by acid fain. 

But the pressures of conventional 
politics took their toll. The Greens soon 
lost infl uence as internal power 
struggles sapped morale and rival 
parties embraced environmental causes. 
When the Cold War ended and . Ger- 
many became unified, the Greens’ fail- 
ore to build a new agenda led to a 
humilia ting defeat in 1 990 in which they 
lest all their seats in the Bundestag, the 
.. lower house of Parliament 
' The hiatus in the political wilderness 
nurtured a healthy pragmatism that re- 
lived the party’s fortunes. Havingre- 
J?5ined their place in Parliament in 1994, 
: ihe Greens are attracting wider support 
' from young professionals and even 
business by advocating moderate yet 
inventive programs to prepare Germany 
fer the 21 st century. 


The latest opinion polls show the 
Greens may win as much as 15 percent of 
the vote in general elections scheduled 
for next year, a result that would make 
diem the third biggest party and likely 
kingmaker in German politics. In a fresh 
sign of respect for the Greens’ newfound 
maturity, a majority of Germans say they 
no longer have any qualms about a 
Greens role in the next government. 

"I think Bosnia was the turning 
point,” said Joschka Fischer, a leading 
Greens member of Parliament who has 
revamped the party's thinking about the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization, die 
United States and the use of military 
force. "Our party was bom in the peace 
movement, but the scenes of genocide in 
ihe Balkans changed the views of even 
the most hardened pacifists.” 

See GERMANY, Page 6 



AGENDA 

Clinton Sees Lowest Deficit in 23 Years 


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WASHINGTON (AP) — President 
Bill Clinton on Wednesday forecast a 
smaller-than -expected $37 billion fed- 
eral deficit for 1997, the lowest short- 
fall in 23 years. 

“These past months have been a 
remarkably fruitful time for bipartisan 
actions in the national interest," Mr. 
Clinton said at a news conference a day 


The Dollar 


Nw York Wednesday® 4 P.M. previous dose 




P*'- •*' 1 11 rr-|- 


«l Wildic/Rcatcp 

GOLDEN — Hicham Guerrouj of Morocco kissing the ground after 
winning the 1,500 meters Wednesday at the championships in Athens. 
Fermin Cacho won the silver, and Reyes Estevez the bronze. Page 18. 


The Dow 


Wednesday doee 


+71.77 


previous dose 

6187.54 


Wedwsday 0 4 P.M. pmwouBaosa 
960.31 952.37 


after he signed landmark legislation to 
balance the budget in five years and io 
provide the biggest tax cut since 
1981. 

"1 have some more good news." 
Mr. Clinton said. 

The new deficit projection for fiscal 
1997, which ends Sept 30, would be 
the lowest federal deficit since 1974. 


PAGE TWO 

Right to Privacy vs. First Amendment 

THE AMERICAS Pago 3. 

Funding Scandals Don't Stem FUne 

ASIA/PACIFIC Page 4. 

Seoul Is Upbeat on Peace Talks 

Books Page 10. 

Crossword Page 10. 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages W-19. 


The 1HT on-line http://vAVW.iht.com 


Coming Soon From a Faucet Near You: Bottled Tap Water? 


By Sam Howe Verhovek 

New York Tones Service 


HOUSTON — Some people love to drink water out 

__ Newsstand Prices bottles especially if the words on the label make the 

Bahrain 1 .000 BD Malta. -55 c beverage sound all jhe more , 

Cyprus C E 1.00 Mgeria ...125,00 Naira gvocarivetannJM ‘ArtesnG._&M 

Denmark 14.00 DKr Oman 1 - 2SO S5 "Crystal Clear, * Mountain Fres fr- UJ?P 

Fktfand 12DG FM Qatar 10.00 OH Now some new labels may be coining to su 

Gfcraftar._I £0.85 Rep- IrtiancLJR £ 1-® nennaiiet shelves and the question is whe&CT they 

fraat Britain.. JE 0.90 SautS Arabte-..10 SR P^sSlarly entice customers: ‘ Houston, Kansas 

Egypt. ,£E 5.50 S. Aftica~-R12 + VAT ,, Miami Beach. 

1.250JD UAE 1 0.00 Dh Cl 5^i* n g ^ the booming, $4 billion-a-year mar- 

Jsnya K. SH. 160 U.S. MB. (Eur.) wfeSed water, officials in these ernes say they 

KiniM Q. 7b«h3hiM 7kn.53Q.0Q ket tor po . _ . __ uratfr from their rau- 


Rrtand_„12r» FM Qatar — — 10.00 QH 
Gferaltar , .. c 0.85 Rep- IretencLJR £ 1-M 
Britain.. J: 0.90 SautS Arabia-.. 10 SR 

Egypt.. __.£E5.50 S. Africa^-R12 + VAT 

Jattan_ 1.250 JD UAE 10.00 Dh 

tenya K. SH. 160 U.S. MB- (Eur.)--S 1-20 

Kuwait TOO FBs Zimbabwe.- 3n.530.00 


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'70294 805049 


ret tor ^^"“^lo raarket water from their rau- Water officials said they were 
are exploring piansio m™ ^ eve<atching hbfs i s . about it, though they rejected the 
clcipal supplies, «wnp Jhat can be opened water in bottles might imply tb 

and the ever-popuiar 


anu K-r , - jl 

by willing with onc ^ these cities are 

through their water 


mains into residents’ homes: Thus, the marketing 
plans dare consumers to pay as much as $1 or more for 
a bottle of water that could be drawn from their own 
taps and be cooled in a refrigerator for a fraction of a 
cent 

"This is a bit ironic,” observed Jennifer Levine, a 
spokeswoman for the International Bottled Water As- 
sociation, a trade group for the industry. "They’re 
setting themselves up to compete against their own tap 
water.” 

In Houston, some people say the idea sounds like 
something out of P.T. Bam urn (“There’s a sucker bom 
every minute”), while others see it as a testimony to 
American marketing genius. 

Water officials said they were completely serious 
about it, though they rejected the notion that offering 
water in bottles might imply there was something 
wrong with the tap water. 

“what comes out of the tap here is truly excellent 
water ” said Jimmie Schindewolf, direcior of public 


works and engineering in Houston, who dreamed up 
the idea after repeatedly observing customers picking 
bottled water off die shelves in his supermarket ‘ ‘We 
have a superior product, and this would simply make 
that product available in a different form." 

And Dan Jones, deputy director of the Public Works 
Department, said: ‘‘You’re asking. Why would the 
city do this? Why would we encourage people to buy 
water in bottles? We really don’t Municipal water 
professionals have always laughed at people paying 
ridiculous amounts of money for water that they know 
is not better than the water they get out of their tap. 

*‘We don’t even enter that argument We just note 
that for whatever reason, people seem to like to get 
their water out of bottles these days. And we’ve got 
especially good water, as municipal water goes.” 
Houston $ water, which flows from underground 
sources and from rivers to the north, has indeed been 

See WATER, Page 6 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


TV’s Insatiable Appetite /IVagedy as Entertainment? 


A Right to Privacy vs. the First Amendment 


Nursing Home? 
6 Fd Rather Die’ 


By Maura Dolan 

Los Angeles Times Service 


S ANTA MONICA, Cali- 
fornia — Ruth Shulman 
lay pinned inside her fam- 
ily's overturned car. her 
legs sticking outside, in a ditch 
along a freeway. She moaned in 
pain, begging to know if her chil- 
dren hadsurvi ved and at one point 
urging a paramedic to let her die. 

Little did she know thar the 
crash that left her a paraplegic 
would be weekend fare for mil- 
lions of television viewers across 
the United States. 

The paramedic had worn a mini- 
microphone. A cameraman on the 
helicopter ambulance had taped 
the frantic trip to the hospital 
"They took one of the most 
tragic moments of my life and 
made it entertainment for the na- 
tion,'' said Mrs. Shulman, 53. 
who sat stunned in her hospital 
room three months later, watch- 
ing herself on a syndicated show 
about real-life rescues. 

Mrs. Shulman sued the show’s 
production company for invading 
her privacy. The suit is before the 
Califo rnia Supreme Court, one of 
dozens of similar cases across the 
United States against broad- 
casters who put ordinary people 
on television without their per- 
mission or knowledge. 

Mrs. Shulman’s case is at the 
cutting edge of an evolving body of 
law pitting the rights of individuals 
to keep their most harrowing mo- 
ments private against reality tele- 
vision's insatiable appetite. 

At issue are the practices not 
only of tabloid television, but also 
investigative journalism reports 
that deploy hidden cameras. 

The cases have raised many 
questions: When do programs 
cross the line from news to en- 
tertainment? In which situations 
do people have a legally protected 
right to privacy from increasingly 
sophisticated high-tech snoop- 
ing? Can reporters use deception 
in their search for the truth? 

The law is “developing before 
our eyes," said Lee Levine, a 
lawyer in Washington who rep- 
resents several media companies. 
“There are no legal rules yet, at 
least not definitive ones.” 
Although television can be in- 
trusive, it is a visual medium 
whose power lies in what the 
camera can capture, broadcasters 
say. 

Mrs. Shulman r s episode on the 
now-defunct “On Scene: Emer- 
gency Response” involved a mat- 
ter of public concern — rescues 
by a helicopter ambulance li- 
censed by a county government 
— all sides agreed. Media law- 
yers say they are concerned that a 
broad ruling in Mrs. Shulman’s 
favor could restrict freedom of the 
press beyond television. 

But critics say the explosion of 
such reality-based shows as 




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well,” the court said. But it ruled 
that a jury should decide whether 
the segment inside the helicopter 
was offensive and whether that 
intrusion was outweighed by the 
incident's newsworthiness. 

Both sides were disappointed. 
Mrs. Shulman thought the court 
should have recognized her right 


That’s Choice of Many Elderly. 
Facing Long Care, Survey Says 


By Susan Gilbert 

New York Times Service 


to privacy at the accident scene. It 
had been closed off to everyone 





had been closed off to everyone 
but emergency personnel, said 
Antony Stuart, her lawyer. 


M edia lawyers 

also were perturbed. 
Because the broad- 
cast was truthful and 
about a matter of public concern, 
they contend that it was protected 
by the First Amendment and no 
balancing of newsworthiness vs. 
offensiveness was required. 

Freedom of the press is “a ba- 
sic constitutional guarantee, and 
it has to be protected zealously, 
and it has to be protected even 
when it is unpopular,” said Terry 
Gordon, who represented the 
companies responsible for the 
rescue show. 

People who file privacy law- 
suits rarely win. A study by a law 
professor at the University of 
Arkansas found that state and fed- 
eral courts dismissed more than 
70 percent of invasion of privacy 
lawsuits filed in 1992. 

But some legal experts say 
broadcasters may face more re- 
straints because of today’s more 
intrusive technology. Media law- 
yers fret that any more restrictions 


could stifle aggressive reporting 
and impinge on freedom of 


Lury Motra/Tbr IWimpoa Km 


A highway accident in Maryland. When do TV programs cross the line from news 
to entertainment? “The law right now does not look good for privacy plaintiffs 


“Cops" and “Rescue 911" has 
led to excesses as camera crews 
ride along with police officers and 
emergency workers, capturing 
people in their darkest moments. 


S OME SHOWS, including 
“Cops," obscure faces rf 
subjects’ permission can- 
not be obtained. “On 
Scene” never sought Mrs. Shul- 
man's consent. It showed her face 


only when it was partially covered 
with an oxygen mask and used 


only her first name. A newspaper 


previously published an account of 
the accident with her full name. 


tiie accident with her full name. 

“The media did not cause her 
damage,” said Frederick Mumm, 
assistant general counsel for 
CBS, who represents Group W 
Productions and 4MN Produc- 
tions, the companies responsible 
for the show. "The damage was 
from the automobile accident. 
She is looking in the wrong di- 
rection for recompense.” 

Similar suits against broad- 
casters have been settled out of 


court: A woman in Oakland 
dialed 911 to say her husband was 
beating her, only to find a camera 
crew at her door. A warehouse- 
man in Sacramento said he was 
humiliated when a network 
broadcast showed him in his back 
yard as his car was being repos- 
sessed. A widow in Los Angeles 
saw her husband’s dying mo- 
ments on television. 

After agreeing to review her 
case, the California Supreme 
Court broadened its inquiry and 
accepted another privacy lawsuit 
over ABC’s use of hidden cam- 
eras in a 1993 expose about a 
telephone psychic service. 

Both cases involve broadcasts 
of people without their know- 
ledge, although the circumstances 
differed sharply. 

The court is expected to decide 
Mrs. Shulman's case within a 
year, deferring action on the ABC 
dispute in the meantime. 

Mrs. Shulman's accident oc- 
curred in June 1990, when her 
daughter lost control while driv- 


ing and the car spun off the free- 
way. Her husband, daughter and 
son were not seriously injured. 

Although her free had been 
partially obscured in the broad- 
cast, Mrs. Shulman said, ac- 
quaintances recognized her voice. 
After her episode was broadcast a 
second time, she decided to sue. 

“It was gruesome and upset- 
ting,” she said in an interview. 
“The real tiring I hope this law- 
suit will do is stop the whole 
process of vulture videos." 

She added: "Who gives any- 


one the right to take my private 
life and put it on national TV if it 


isn't a news story?" 

An appeals court in Los 
Angeles ruled that Mrs. Shulman 
had a potential privacy right in the 
helicopter but not in the ditch, 
which the court considered a pub- 
lic place. 

"Involuntary public figures, 
such as accident victims, lose their 
right to privacy not only in regard 
to the accident itself but, to some 
extent, to other information as 


speech for journalists. 

"The law right now does not 
look good for privacy plaintiffs," 
said Andrew McClurg, the law 
professor at the University of 
Arkansas who wrote the 1992 pri- 
vacy study, “but Supreme Court 
justices are like the rest of us. The 
more they watch the shocking ex- 
cesses of tabloid television and 
reality television, the more they 
are going to be influenced and 
think this is going too far. 

“The problem is, where do you 
strike the balance? There is al- 
ways the fear of going down foe 
slippery slope of foe First Amend- 
ment How do we say this is 
private and this isn’t?” 

Lawsuits over the deliberate 
concealment of cameras have 
proliferated, discouraging smal- 
ler television stations from using 
them, media lawyers asserted. 
Their fears grew with a S5.5 mil- 
lion jury award against ABC for 
an expose about food safety. 

Two ABC producers obtained 
jobs at grocery stores owned by 
Food Lion after providing phony 
resumes. Once inside, they secretly 
taped footage that allegedly 
showed unsanitary food practices. 
The jury decided that ABC had 
committed fraud and trespass, ver- 
dicts that are on appeal 


NEW YORK — Surveys 
find that most people would 
rather continue living at home 
than go to a nursing home. 
But foe aversion to such a 
facility is so strong that a new 
study of seriously ill people in 
hospitals found that 30 per- 
cent of those surveyed said 
they would rather die than 
live permanently in a nursing 
home. 

The study was foe first to 
ask seriously ill patients to 
state a preference for either 
living in a nursing home or 
dying. The findings come 
from foe so-called Support 
study, the largest investiga- 
tion in the United States of 
decision-making at foe end of 
life. They were published in 
foe July issue of foe Journal of 
the American Geriatrics So- 
ciety. 

ftw foe study, 3,262 pa- 
tients at five hospitals across 
the country were asked, 
“Would you be very willing, 
somewhat willing, somewhat 
unwilling, very unwilling, or 
would you rather die than put 
up with living in a nursing 
home all the time?” 

Twenty-six percent of foe 
respondents said that they 
would be very willing or 
somewhat willing to live in a 
nursing home, and 37 percent 
said that they would be some- 
whar or very unwilling to do 


so. Thirty percent said that 
they would rather die than 
live permanently in a nursing 
home, and 6 percent said they 
were undecided. 

The study also found that 
patients’ families and doctors 
often misjudged the patients', 
feelings about nursing-hora^f 
care. When asked whether a 
patient would be willing to 
live permanently in a nursing 
home, family members were 
correct only 35 percent of foe 
time, and doctors just 18 per- 
cent of the time. 

Dr. Thomas Mattimore, as- 
sociate clinical professor of 
medicine at foe University of 
Galif omia School of Medi- 
cine in Los Angeles and foe 
study's lead author, said that - 
in many cases the decision for 
nursing-home care lay not 
with foe patient but with in- 
surance coverage, because 
many insurance plans pay for 
nursing-home care but not for 
24-hour home care. •- 

Still, he said, foe findings® 
have implications for foe r 
medical treatment a patient or 
his family chooses at the end 
of life. "In our study, the pa- 
tients who preferred aggres- 
sive care were those who 
were willing to go to a nursing 
home,” he said. 

Dr. Mattimore said people 
should tell their families and 
doctors how they feel about 
nursing-home care long be- 
fore they need it to ensure that 
their preferences be followed 


44% in German Poll - 
Want to Die Before 80 


Agence France-Presse 

BONN — Nearly half of all Germans want to die" 
before they pass foe age of 80, and fewer than one in five> 
want to reach their centenary, according to a survey 
published in the weekly Die Woche on Wednesday. • 

But the survey also found that 54 percent of respond- 
ents would slash their calorie intake by half if it would' 
help them live an extra 20 years, 2 1 percent would agree to ; 
organ transplants, and one in 1 0 would give up sex. 

The survey said 44 percent of Germans believed that 80" 
years was long enough for them,' while only 18 percent- 
were looking forward to -their 1 00th birthday. Four per- 
cent said they wanted to be immortal. 

Experts say Germany’s population is getting older in- 
any case. By 2000, the number of people aged 90 or more" 
is expected to reach l million. 

Germans' average life expectancy, meanwhile, has- 
more than doubled since late in the 1 9th century. In 1 88 1 , 
according to Figures from the federal demographics of-; 
fice, men could expect to live 35 years and six months,- 
while women lived an average of three years longer. 

Today, baby girls can expect to live nearly to 80 and 
boys to 73. 


Clarence Kelley, Who Led FBI on New Missions, Dies at 85 


Poles Claim U.S. Embassy Land 


New York Turns Service 

WASHINGTON — Clar- 
ence Kelley, 85, foe square- 


Mr. Kelley served as FBI 
director until early 1978 and 
was widely credited with for- 


jawed former police chief cing the FBI to adopt more 
who headed the Federal Bu- modem crime-fighting tools. 


reau of Investigation from 
1973 to 1978, steering it away 
from its campaign against 
communism and into a new 


like computers, to track crim- 
inals. 

He also allowed agents to 
develop more undercover in- 


Ruth Adler, 87, Keeper From 1947, when she foun- 
OfN.Y. Times Legends T T* s J3' l 980 ' 

NEW YORK m - gy 

g 7 - w 5° I ^ tIhe m covering ware. Si and 
staf f of T he New York Times pound ampnigm — and 
informed about its own mile- ra0 re routine do- 

swnes and behind-*e-scenes ^ _ for [he newspaper ' s 

adventures and shaped the le- s .000 employees io a house 
sends and lore of The Times 


battle against white-collar vestigations and the "sting” 
and organized crime, died operations for which the FBI 


Josiah (Jo) Lancaster, 84, 
an American artist who spe- 
cialized in portraits, land- 
scapes and Paris scenes and 


who had lived and worked in 
France for 32 years, died 
Monday of a heart attack at 
his Doixlogne summer home. 


Reuters 

WARSAW — More than 
70 members of an old Polish 
aristocratic family gathered 
outside the U.S. Embassy in 
Warsaw on Wednesday, 
claiming ownership of the 


land on which it stands. 

Members of foe Czetwer- |j 
tynski family submitted a let- 
ter to Ambassador Nicholas 
Rey, saying the land was con- 
fiscated by foe Communist 
regime after World War II ■ 


WEATHER 


gends aml lore of The Times o^datu/umeofthebMI 
for other journalists and stu- „ ri _ 


Tuesday at his home in Kan- 
sas City, Missouri. 

His wife, Shirley, said Mr. 
Kelley had been suffering 
from emphysema and had had 
several strokes in recent 
years. 

Mr. Kelley, a 21-year vet- 
eran of foe FBI, was choseo to 
head foe bureau in 1973 by 
President Richard Nixon. At 
the time he was Kansas City 
police chief and bad run the 
city force for 12 years. 


has become known in recent 
years, Terry Knowles, an 
agent from 1965 to 1989, 
said in Kansas City on Tues- 
day. 


rr MU ; and most widely read peri- 

dents for 33 years as editor of Starts on foe practice of 
the newspaper s mOsmgu- journalism. She aL was the 


Europe 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by AccuWeather. 


nal Times Talk, died Friday in 
New York of heart failure, her 
nephew, Peter Lewis, said. 


author of the 1971 book "A 
Day in foe Life of The New 
York Times." 


Mgen. 

Amsterdam 


High Low W 

Of C/F 


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of ca= 


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28/84 1G/8I PC 30/96 IB/M pc 


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27 *> 16/61 s 27/80 17/62 1 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


•ffsfcara liriidlcikKJr. 

1U naaaiag aetfanakaa. 

For ai n c d aa wvea contact 
GW Marpb^ IMaactu 
INTERNATIONAL COMPANY 
SERVICES (1KELANDI LTD 
109 Low* Bosom Shorn. 

DuMn 7. Ireland 

Tel: Hr 353 1 661 B490 
Fax: +353 1 661 8493 
E-Mail: irt-iafo@lcsl.co<n 


Flights Canceled in Kenya 

NAIROBI (Reuters) — Airlines canceled 
flights Wednesday as Kenyan air traffic con- 
trollers ignored a government order to resume 
work and stuck to a go-slow for a fifth day. 

“The go-slow is still on but things appear to 
have improved. We are moving much faster.’ ’ 
said an official at national carrier Kenya Air- 
ways, worst affected by foe action. 

Airports at Nairobi, the port city of Mom- 
basa, Kisumu and the tourist resort of Malindi 
were hit hard by the dispute. 


Rescue authorities said they had given up 
all hope of survival for the three climbers who 
were missing on Mont Blanc, Europe’s tallest 
mountain, on Sunday. 

The accident on Switzerland's most fa- 
mous peak happened in late afternoon, ac- 
cording to the Air Zermatt rescue company. 


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North America 


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Czech Dies on Matterhorn 


ZERMATT, Switzerland (AP) — A Czech 
tourist plunged to his death from the Mat- 
terhorn on Wednesday, and three French 
climbers were feared dead on Mont Blanc, 
raising the toll in the Alps to more than 40 
dead in less than a month. 


A shortage of aviation fiiel has grounded 
all domestic flights in Sudan, the independent 
newspaper Alwan reported Wednesday. The 
five-day shortage, attributed to transport 
delays, has also forced Sudan Airways to cut 
its international flights by 30 percent, costing 
(he company 2 billion Sudanese pounds ($1.3 
million), Alwan said. (AP) 


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2271 17/62 8 tfiraugh Sunday. A siorir imue io bring unusually high winds aver South Pl 

227i '4/57 pc crossing ceniral Canada warm and dry weather io Korea Hits weekend U will 

™ '»«* * l " spark showers and much ol Scandinavia Fn- be warm and humid in %c<*a 

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Today Tomorrow . 

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OF OF OF CJF 

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and ihe Southeast 


Romania. Noi as hoi m cool and damp over 


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North America 

Today 


Middle East 


British Airways said it was running all its 
long-haul flights from London Heathrow Air- 
port again, almost a month after a three-day 
strike by cabin crew. ( Bloomberg ) 


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1 




. PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


Hit.} 


nr K s 




Contributions Flood 
Major Parties ’ Coffers 

Fund-Raising Scandals Don’t Stem Flow 


By Leslie Wayne 

New York Times Service 


- ' WASHINGTON — For all the talk 
-about campaign-finance reform. Re- 
publicans and Democrats alike have 
raised record amounts of donations in 
the first half of 1997, and firnd-raisere 

financial scandals of the last mail campaign, and without holding 'a 
having little ef- single fund-raising event in his Georeia 


Newt Gingrich, the speaker of die 
House of Representatives who recently 
had to fend off a coup attempt within his 
own party and who is a prime target for 
Democrats, topped his previous fund- 
raising efforts by raising a record $1.8 
million since the last election. He did it 
largely through an aggressive direct- 


■i\ 


/fir 


feet on the flow of money. 

* According to a study released Tues- 
-day by Common Cause, a nonprofit 
■ •group, a record $34 million in so-called 
_ soft-money has been raised since Janu- 
°ary by both parties. Soft money refers to 
'donations made to political-party com- 
mittees. These donations, unlike dona- 
tions to political candidates, are not 
-limited by federal election law. 

According to the study, Republican 
"Party committees received $23 million 


w his Georgia 

district 

Leading the Democratic congres- 
sional list was Representative Charles 
Schumer of New York, who hopes to 
take over the seat of Senator Alfonse 
D 'Amato, Republican of New York, in 
the 1998 elections. Mr. Schumer has 
raised $1.8 million this year alone, on 
top of the $6.5 million in cash be had on 
hand The race between Mr. D’ Amato 
and Mr. Schumer may cost each can- 
didate as much as $20 million. 

The House minority leader. Rirharri 


;'.js 

i 


' w rmuim 

it h'* lifforn/J, 


-jaa soft money in the first half of this 

.year, w^e.Deraoei^c Paj^commiP Gephardt, a poten^i^eniocratic pres^ 
~«©es received $11 million. idential candidate in 2000, has raised 

K pycpmpariwn, the two parties raised $1.4 million this year, surpassing the $1 
;-only $13 million in soft-money dona- million he raised in the comparable peri- 
-Uous after the 1992 presidential race and od in the previous election cycle. Rep- 
.-,$30 million after the 1 994 congressional resentati ve Joseph Kennedy 2d, Demo- 
■campaign. — 

Typically, the post-election months 
are slow for fund-raising. But, like the 
?parties, politicians themselves also have 
>?Qeen raising money at a record clip. • 



Tobacco Documents 

Show Conspiracy 

* , The Associated Press 

WEST PALM BEACH, Florida — 

.-The tobacco industry released sealed 
-documents Wednesday that the state of 
.JFkrnda says show cigarette makers con- 
•spired to hide the dangers of smoking. 

Eight documents dating back to 1964, 

“Some of them handwritten, were re- 
; leased after cigarette makers said they 
' had exhausted their legal appeals to keep 
; them secret Industry lawyers distributed 



PACKAGE PICKET — Striking teamsters protesting passage of a United-Parcel Service truck in Chicago. 


Away From Politics 

• The use of illegal drugs by teen- 
. agers is down, according to the annual 

I -Lk National Household Survey on Drug 
; • Abuse, which said that 9 percent of 

«ISl American teenagers used drugs in 
1996, compared with 10.9 percent in 
1995. MPJ 

• The California Supreme Court 

struck down a state law that would have 
required minor girls to obtain permis- 
sion for abortions. (LAT) 

• The Mars rover awakened from a 

deep sleep for the first day of its ex- 
tended mission on the Red Planet by 
trundling through an area known as the 
Rock Garden. (Reuters) 

• Two weeks after Andrew Cunanan 

shot himself in Miami Beach, the po- 
lice in Chicago said they have fin- 
gerprint evidence that they contend link 
him to the killing of a real estate de- 
veloper. (AP) 

• A 16-year-old Boy Scout who was 

driving an army Humvee without per- 
mission or training at the Scouts’ Na- 
tional Jamboree was ktiled'whrnhe lost 
control of the military transpoit'- 
vehicle. (WP) 


Vincwni IJom/Apiu, rimn t-ii — 


-.Ji 


i - 





if. 




• *+:■ 




crat of Massachusetts, has raised $1 
million. 

The donations came despite a cam- 
paign-finance controversy that has 
drawn new attention — and criticism — 
to die amount of money flowing to can- 
didates and parties and has put the spot- 
light on the role played by large dona- 
tions from corporations and individuals. 

*‘111686 numbers really show there is 
no sense of shame,’ ’ said Ann McBride, 
president of Common Cause. “This is a 
Systran out of control. Democrats and 
Republicans are out eagerly raising re- 
cord amounts of huge, unregulated and 
corrupting soft money.” 

Only fee Democratic National Com- 
mittee, now$16million in debt from the 
last election and from mounting legal 
expenses, has had trouble raising 
money. 

Democratic committees raising 
money for House and Senate candidates 
say they have been unaffected by sug- 


Prosecution Sets Scene and Shows Bomb Victims 


By Benjamin Weiser 

New York Times Service 


% 


the documents before the official release 
of the records set fqrlater Wednesday; — gestioas-fe at - th e- Dem ociatiir National 
The state Slid the documents should Committee may have received illegal 


be considered in its lawsuit seeking to 
! recover the costs of treating sick 
; smokers on Medicaid. 

• One document from RJ. Reynolds 
! Tobacco Co. said the industry should 
; deny feat fee ingredients of cigarettes 
! caused health problems. “There has been 
; no scientific proof that any ingredients as 

• used in cigarettes pose a health hazard to 
; humans or increases the risk, if any. of 
; cigarette smoking.” it said. . 

• The4tirPisttict Court of Appeal ruled . 
; Tuesday feat fee documents nom Lig- 
•» gett Group showed evidence of industry 

; fraud and. should be considered in Flor- 
; ida’s lawsuit seeking to recover the costs 
■ of treating sick smokers on Medicaid. 


donations from non-U.S. sources. 

“We’ve got a very aggressive fund- 
raising program going on for the 1998 
elections,” said Dan Sallick, commu- 
nications director for the Democratic 
Congressional Campaign Committee, 
which has raised $1.8 million for 1998 
House races, or 30 percent more than 
was raised during the comparable peri- 
od in 1995. 

Phillip Frempni-Smith, a spokesman 
far the National Republican Congres- 
sional Committee, which has raised 
$3.4 million for 1998 House races, said 
the impact of the campaign-finance 
scandals had not extended much beyond 
Washington’s Beltway. 


NEW YORK — It was Friday, Feb. 
26, 1993, at 12:17 in the afternoon, a 
federal prosecutor. Lev Dassin, told a 
jury in U.S. District Court in Manhattan. 
“A light snow had begun to fall in fee 
city,” he said “At the World Trade 
Center complex here in lower Man- 
hattan, tens of thousands of people went 
about their business as they did on any 
other day.*’ 

Wife that, the government began its 
case against Rama Ahmed Yousef, fee 
man accused of organizing the World 
Trade Center bombing, and a second 
defendant, Eyad Ismoil, who is charged 
with assisting in the conspiracy. 

In an opening statement, Mr. Dassin 
gave the jury a crisp account of the 
"government’s “evidencerdescribing fee 
role that the prosecution contends Mr. 
Yousef played in recruiting accom- 
plices, buying the chemicals to make a 
bomb, creating a “bomb factory” in a 
Jersey City, New Jersey, apartment and 
renting the van that carried the bomb into 
fee garage at fee World Ttade Center. 

[On Wednesday, jurors began viewing 
morgue photographs of the six people 
killed in the terrorist attack. The As- 
sociated Press repotted from New York. 

(The jury was allowed to see the 
photos over the objections of a defense 
lawyer, who called them potentially 
prejudicial] 

The trial is the second in four years 
involving fee bombing. In 1994, while 
Mr. Yousef and Mr. Ismoil were still 


fugitives, four Jower-level defendants 
were convicted in the conspiracy. Last 
year, Mr. Yousef was convicted in fed- 
eral court in Manhattan for his role in a 
separate plot, never carried out, to bomb 
12 American passenger airliners. 

Mr. Yousef sat stone-faced during the 
prosecutor’s presentation. His lawyer. 


Roy Kulcsar, offered few hints about his 
strategy, but did suggest that he would 
attack the government's forensic and 
scientific evidence. Mr. Kulcsar might 
modify a tactic used by the defense in 
fee 1994 trial, when lawyers tried to 
show that there was no way to link 
debris from fee bomb feat exploded 


wife chemicals the government said 
were purchased by the defendants. 

Mr. Dassin told the jury that Mr. 
Yousef flew to fee United States in 1 992 
on a mission “to bomb targets on Amer- 
ican soil” and “to kill as many people 
as possible in retaliation for the gov- 
ernment’s support of IsraeL ” 


Bomb-Plot Note Deepens Confusion 


By John Kifner 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — A copy of a threat- 
ening note found last week in the apart- 
ment of two men accused of planning 
-bomb attacks had been mailed two days 
earlier to a federal program offering 
rewards for information on terrorists. 
State Department and law-enforcement 
officials announced. 

The disclosure deepened a mystery 
over the alleged bombing plots, and 
officials said Tuesday night they were 
uncertain what to make of the infor- 
mation. 

One theory is that fee plotters were 
actually hoping to cash in on reward 
money by tipping off the authorities to a 
supposed bombing plan, some officials 
said. 

But they did not rule out the pos- 
sibility that the mailing of the letter had 
been a genuine effort by someone to 
prevent an attack. 


Officials said the letter received by 
the State Department reward program 
had offered no specific information 
about who was planning the attacks or 
where. 

All that was included was fee same 
rambling, unsigned message — de- 
scribed by investigators as a possible 
suicide note — as fee one found in fee 
suspects’ apartment. 

It threatened a series of attacks and 
demanded the release of jailed Islamic 
militants, including Sheikh Omar Abdel 
Rahman, who is serving a life sentence 
related to the World Trade Center 
bombing in 1993 and a plot to blow up 
other New York City sites. 

The predawn raid Thursday, in which 
the two suspects were shot, sent a tremor 
through fee city at the thought of a 
suicide bomber boarding a crowded 
subway or bus. 

But investigators who have been re- 
tracing the steps of fee suspects, Ghazi 
Ibrahim Abu Mezer and Lafi Khalil, 


have become increasingly puzzled. The 
two seemed more like drifters and street 
hustlers, hanging out and pursuing 
young women, some said, than like 
highly religious, disciplined fiindamen- 
lalists ready to die for a caused 

Investigators feus ore examining the' 
possibility that others were involved in 
the bomb plot and had enlisted the two 
young Palestinians in some minor ca- 
pacity. 

The new twist in the case Tuesday, 
first reported by ABC News, raised an- 
other possibility — that Mr. Abu Mezer 
and Mr. Khalil had dreamed up a 
scheme to claim the reward money. 

The document, threatening a chain of 
bombings in New York, was sent to fee 
widely published address of a State De- 
partment program known as Heroes. 

The program, which offers as much 
as $4 million in rewards for apprehend- 
ing terrorists or stopping terrorist acts, 
has been publicized on fee Internet and 
on posters in English and Arabic. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


No Apology for Slavery 

WASHINGTON — The White House has 
scuttled the idea of a national apology for slavery, 
at least for now. saying President Bill Clinton did 
not consider fee proposal an appropriate first step 
for his national dialogue on race.— • - 

The White House spokesman, Michael Mc- 
Curry, said Mr. Clinton decided after his June 14 
speech on race fear he was not interested in an 
ilogy, although fee president said in interviews 
icrwaid that he would consider the idea. 

“That came up, and.he indicated that that’s fee 
procedure we’d use,” Mr. McCurry said. 

An apology 1 ‘is not fee place feat he c hooses to 
begin this dialogue,” fee*pcdresraaireaidr7 
— He "added, ‘T don’t anticipate fee president 
putting, any of fee focus of his energy on feat 

subject anytime soon.” (AP) WASHINGTON — Vice President A1 Gore 

„ . J . o ‘ telephoned ax least 38 major Democratic donors 

House Ethics tuiview JlUllS from the White House to solicit campaign funds 

during a six-month period in 1995 and 1996, 
according to a document 

A summary of the calls released Tuesday 
provides fee first detailed accountin g of Mr. 
Gore’s controversial fund-raising calls from the 


unresolved a more parochial issue that had been 
pending for more than six weeks: overhauling fee 
way lawmakers police themselves. 

A task force of six Republicans and six Demo- 
crats on June 17 proposed a set of modest changes 
intended to make fee process more timely and 
more bipartisan. 

But no House vote on the changes, which 
would require a revision of House rules, has been 
seL 

In the meantime, a moratorium on filing ethics 
complaints, first put in place when the task force 
was established in February, has been extended. 
House Democratic leaders have signaled that fee 
roost recent extension, which lasts until Sept. 10, 
_»dll-be-fea -test (WP ) ' 


West Wing of fee White House. The appeals 
apparently resulted in a limited number of large 
contributions to help pay for a costly Democratic 
media campaign. 

In March. Mr. Gore acknowledged having 
placed fund-raising calls from his White House 
office in 1995 and 1996. 

But fee vice president maintained that he and 
President BUI Clinton — who has said he does not 
remember whether he made such calls — were 
exempt from a legal ban on such actions by 
federal employees. 

At fee time, Mr. Gore said he made fund- 
raising calls “on a few occasions” from his office 
in December 1995 and the spring of 1996. 

"The -White "House- subsequently said he had 
made as many as 50 calls. (LAT) 


1 1 uuUij' mJ\e 

Gore Fund-Raising Details Quote/U te 

ui a cilTMnTOM Virw Piv»cirli»nr A 1 firm* X 


WASHINGTON — The House left for its 

■ monthlong summer recess last week after speedily 
: dispatching legislation cutting Americans taxes 

■ and saving money in benefit programs but leaving 


Michael Pryor, 29, a professional chef staked 
out at his favorite fishing hole in Kansas City, 
Missouri, who was less than excited as Mr. Clin- 
ton signed the tax and budget bills in Washington: 
‘’There’s catfish here, and trout, too. But noth- 
ing’s biting this morning. Sometimes it’s better at 
the other end of the pond.” (WP) 


AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


A Scientific Tip for Sweltering Cities: 

Tighten Up the Pavement and Roofs 

l On ft summer day, fee downtown areas of big 
cities like Atlanta, Chicago or Washmgron typ- 
’ icallv suffer temperatures- 5 to 8 degree warmer 

- £K2 JSSSog submts. D°n’ t b^fee 

Usual suspects, U.S. Energy j CVlAvt ^ 

JOS M^TFactodes, 

■S«£Sg 28 |r^ 

aSffiwsagir 

. awucnmg . nlantme more trees 


•WOlUiUlUTlUk. — _ , - 

known as evapotranspiration 


like Los Angeles $175 million a year by lowering 
air conditioning costs, and $360 million more by 
reducing smog-related health expenses, fee study 
asserts. u 

Americans, incidentally, spend about $40 bil- 
lion a year on air conditioning, one-sixth their total 
energy bill. 

In engineering a cooler environment, the re- 
searchers note, fee choice of trees is important On 
sooth-facing sides of buildings, deciduous trees 
provide shade in summer but, wife their leaves 
gone in winter, allow warming sunshine through. 
Evergreens on the north side, shielding a house 
from wintry winds, can cut heating bills 10 per- 
cent 


Maine lobsters, ’fine and dandy. But North 
Dakota lobsters? Could happen. Brian Stange, a 
biologist at North Dakota State University, has 
beenraising 30 young red claw lobsters to see 
whether it would make sense for fanners in fee 
rand northern state to do so commercially. 

The lobsters, technically Australian crayfish, 
have begun reproducing and soon will number in 
the feIXds. Fully grown, they bnng $20 a 
pound. Wife start-up costs as low as $200 — 


farmers can use converted plastic fertilizer tanks, 
filled wife old tires and feed bags to give fee 
creatures shelter — Mr. Stange believes fee tasty 
animals should make sense even in frosty North 
Dakota. 

Visitors to St Louis who can spare fee time 
may wish to drop in on the International Bowling 
Museum and Hall of Fame, a heartland shrine to a 
sport long linked wife goofing off. 

In fee early days, many of fee country's upright 
burghers considered bowling a waste of time. The 
settlement of Jamestown passed a law in 1608 
banning it locals were bowling when they were 
supposed to be building a fort. One theory holds 
that a 10th pin was added by early colonists to skirt 
anbf&er bah on wfaat feen- was commodyajiine- 
pin game. Now bowling is fee nation's tnosT pop- 
ular recreational sport. 

The museum, under fee city's famous arch, pays 
tribute to the conventional — Earl Anthony's $1 
million game, Lyndon Johnson’s bowling shoes — 
and fee quirky. In fee latter category must fall fee 
perfect 300 game feat a gifted hustler. Count 
Gengler, claims to have bowled in total darkness. 


Brian Knowlton 


jnvestment information 

Read THE MONEY REPORT 

every Saturday in the IHT. 



THE WOiaP’S.DAlLY-MEWSEAPEB 


ETHNIKI KEPHALEOU S JL 
ADMINISTRATION OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


It is announced that, according to publications in the 
Financial Times (of London), die assets of TOURISTCKI ' 


and in the 
EXAGOCIK1 


SA - PORTO CARRAS are being sold by public auction according to art 46a of 
L. 1892/90. These include an area of 17,709,815.- sq-m. approximately situated in 
Porto Carras, Neo Marmara, at a distance of 125 km from Thessaloniki, by the sea 
on which there are the following tourist and industrial installations. 

A. Tourist I ns ta ll ations 

1. S1THONIA BEACH. An A-dass hotel with 836 beds in 433 rooms and 20 suites. 
The hotel also includes 3 restaurants, 3 bars and 2 rented shops. The hotel is 
under lease to Casino' Porto Carras SA, from 19M to 2006, which nms a casino, 
established within the hotel budding. 

2. MEUTON. A luxury hotel with 827 beds in 428 rooms and 18 suites. The hotel 
also includes 4 restaurants, 3 bars and 10 rented shops. 

3. VILLAGE INN. A B-class hotel with 178 beds in 75 studios, 7 suites and 
7 bungalows. The hotel also includes I restaurant, 2 tavernas, 3 bars and 
28 rented shops. The hotel has been placed on a time-share basis and many time 
sharing contracts have been concluded from 1991 to 2040. Both MEUTON and 
VILLAGE INN are under the management of GRECOTEL SA and will remain so 
until the assets are sold, at which time the management lease expires. 

In the case of the Melrton Hotel only, should fee management lease to Grecotel 
SJL expire at a time the Manager (Grecotel S.A-) has signed contracts wife tour 
operators, extending into fee following tourist season, fee management lease shall 
bmd fee new owner for feat period. 

4. MARINA, 5 metres deep tor craft up to 45 metres in length wife 166 berths, 
outlets for fresh water ana electricity and buildings feat are being used as a yacht 
dub. 

5. 18-hole GOLF COURSE over an area of 640 stremmas, 9 TENNIS COURTS 

and a HORSE RIDING CLUB 

6. GALANI luxury guesthouse over an area of 2,400 sqm. including a guardhouse 
(252 sqm.) and a chapel. 

7. Other auxiliary areas. 

8 . Hie right to utilize fee MARINA installations, described above, according to a 
special permit granted by public authorities (art. 6 par. 4 of L 69/1968) 

B. Indnsty fol ^imp lex tdMiadidffll ffllfeg machinery 

1. Complete winery in covered area of about 5^200 sqm. 

2. Oil press - refinery in covered area of about 2^50 sqm. * -- . 

3. Bakery, about 1.320 sqjn. 

4. Other auxiliary installations such as biological sewage treatment plant, 
workshop, garage, Public Power Corporation sub-station and pump room. 

C OTHER ASSETS 


Also for sale are the Company’s winery trademarks, ready and semifinished 
winery products, means of transport, receivables and any other items belonging 
to fee Company, 


It is pointed out that cash and cash equivalents are not included in fee assets to be 
transferred, but will be used to cover the expenses concerning fee liquidation. 
Binding offers may he submitted until Monday,. September 29th, 12:00 hours to 
fee Thessaloniki Notary Public Mrs- Ioanna Chroussala-Bilissi, No. 11 Tsimiski St 
Thessaloniki 546 24 Tel +30-31-270653, 272622, 287385, Fax: +30-31-225772. 
Binding offers must be accompanied by a Letter of Guarantee issued in 
accordance with the sample Letter of Guarantee contained in the Offering 
Memorandum, by a bank, legally operating in Greece, to remain valid until fee 
adjudication, for fee amount of FIVE HUNDRED MILLION {500,000,000.-) 

A detailed description of the assets offered for sale is given in the Offering 
Memorandum, which may be obtained from fee liquidator “Efeniki Kephaleou 
SA, Administration of Assets and Liabilities* 1 , 9a, Chryssospiliotissis St. Athens 
10560, Greece, Tel-: +30-1-323.14.84-7, fax: +30-1-32 1.79.05 (attention of 
Mrs. Marika Frangalas), or the Liquidator’s agent, Mr. George Dimtsas, Frangmi 
St 9, Thessaloniki, TeL +30-31-268.626, fax +30-31-2371 10. 





INTERNATIONAL HERA LD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


Parliament Backs Hun Sen’s Choice 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Post Service 


BANGKOK — One month after Hon 
Sen claimed victory in a bloody coup, 
the Cambodian Parliament moved 
Wednesday to consolidate the power 
grab, confi rmin g his choice for the ne w 
first prime minister, and voting to strip 
the ousted Prince Norodom Ranariddh 
of his legal immunity from criminal 
prosecution if he ever returns home. 

With Parliament now firmly con- 
trolled by Mr. Hun Sen, 86 members 
voted in favor of his choice. Foreign 
Minister Ung Huot, to replace Prince 
Ranariddh , six more votes than needed 
far the requited two-thirds majority. 
Only four members voted against Mr. 
ring Huot, six abstained and three bal- 
lots were reccxded as spoiled. 

But at least 19 members of Parlia- 
ment, who fled Cambodia during and 
after the coup, mostly languishing here 
in hotel coffee shops in Bangkok, im- 
mediately denounced the vote as illegal 
and labeled Mr. Ung Huot a “puppet” 
of Mr. Hun Sen. The exiles called on the 
international community not to recog- 


and fair expression, and we cannot ac- 

said no actions taken by the Par- 
liament in Phnom Penh will be valid 
until Prince Ranariddh and the ousted 
opposition members return. 

Sam Rainsy, a popular former fi- 
nance minis ter who formed the Khmer 
Nation Party, said in a statement that 
Wednesday's vote was conducted “in 
an atmosphere of intimidation and fear” 
and called it “totally illegal.” 

Mr. Sara Rainsy said only King Si- 
hanouk, currently recovering from med- 
ical treatment in Beijing, had the power 

to form 


Cambodia,” Mr. Sam Rainsy said. 
“Half the government is outside the 
country.” 

Mr. Hun Sen has called on all the 


exiles to return, saying their safety is 
after his troops ex- 


to designate a party leader to rorm a 
government ana become prime min- 
ister. 

“In this strange selection and ap- 



nize any actions taken by a Parliament 
riled 

Sen. 


controlled and intimidated by Mr. Hon 


up the role of the king, 

Rainsy said. “Nobody is fooled by the 
theater play staged today in Phnom 
Penh.” 

The return of the exiled parliamen- 
tarians and other politicians has 
emerged as a key issue in the regional 
diplomatic maneuverings to find a polit- 
ical solution to Cambodia's continuing 


quagmire. A group of regional foreign 
t Mr. Hun Sen over the 


“The world community should not 
recognize the result of the coup d’etax, 
otherwise it sends a bad signal to demo- 
cratic countries around the world and 
sends a signal to dictators that they can 
do what they like,” said Ahmad Yahya, 
a member of Parliament from Prince 
Ranariddh's party, known by its ac- 
ronym Funcinpec. 

“We are 19 outside,” he said. “We 
did not leave the job. We ran away for 
our lives from the coup d’etat So any 
meeting of Parliament is without free 


ministers who met j 
weekend tried to convince him that a 
return of tire exiles was a primary con- 
dition to restoring legitimacy to the gov- 
ernment and paving die way for elec- 
tions next May. 

Mr. Sam Rainsy said there are 117 
leaders and activists of his KNP party 
now living in Thailan d, including 25 
members of his 35-member steering 
committee, plus another seven are in 
hiding. In addition, 1 2 government min- 
isters are outside, meaning 1 ‘there is a de 
facto split in the royal government of 


guaranteed. But 
ecu ted at least 40 opposition political 
and military figures in the wake of the 
coup, the exiles are unwilling to take the 
assurances at face value. They are call- 
ing on some farm of international pro- 
tection, including a disarming of Mr. 
Hun Sen’s private and an armed 
foreign presence on the ground. 

“How can we protect ourselves?'' 
Ahmad Yahya said in an interview. “If 
we go back, will Hun Sen’s troops come 
and protect us? We will be in Cambodia 
like prisoners.” 

Another sticking point in the nego- 
tiations between the regional mediators 
and Mr. Hun Sen appears to be the 
future role of the vanquished Prince 
Ranariddh. Most countries, including 
die United States, say publicly that they 
still recognize the prince as first prime 
minister. But with Mr. Hun Sen vowing 
to have the prince tried if he sets foot 
back in Cambodia, few are willing to 
make Prince Ranariddh's immediate re- 
turn a firm condition for a settlement. 

Parliament’s vote to strip Prince 
Ranariddh of his legal immunity now 
makes it more difficult for the prince to 
contemplate a return. 

Mr. Him Sen has said Prince Ranar- 

of il- 
ibodia. 



Khmer 

Rougeliard- liners at Anloug V eng and of 
infiltrating Khmer Rouge guerrillas into 
die capital Even if Wednesday’s vote is 
not recognized internationally, it still al- 
lows Mr. Hon Sen’s troops to arrest 
Prince Ranariddh if he goes home. 


Seoul Sounds Upbeat Note on Talks 


CoHfM by Our Stiff From Dapadrt 

NEW YORK — South 
Korea sounded an upbeat 
note Wednesday on pros- 
pects for four-party Korean 
peace talks despite conflict- 
ing signals from the North 
during and after a key meet- 
ing started in New York. 

“Yes, it is possible to say 
after this meeting that the 
peace talks could be held 
within six weeks,” Lee Kyu- 
Hoong, spokesman at South 
Korea’s Foreign Ministry, 
said in Seoul. “The first day 
of talks proceeded without 
major problems. The parties 
concerned had presented 
similar propositions." .. 


China, the United States 
and the two Koreas resumed 
preliminary talks Wednes- 
day at New York’s Columbia 
University. 

IT successful they will 
hammer out agreements on 
venue, timing and the agenda 
for talks ultimately to replace 
the shaky truce left after the 
1950-53 Korean War with a 
durable peace accord. 

But alter the first session 
had ended. North Korea de- 
manded an unconditional 
withdrawal of the 37,000 
U.S. troops from South 
Korea as a first step toward a 
durable, peace. The demand 
made by I 


was made by Neath Korea’s 


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THE WORLD'S EMlUf JVfcWSRIPEB 


ruling Workers Party in a 
commentary carried by the 
Korean Central News 
Agency. 

“freeing the Korean Pen- 
insula from foreign troops is 
the way of ensuring a durable 
peace and a main task to be 
fulfilled by ’four-way 
talks',” the party newspaper 
Rodong Sinmun said. “If 
this issue is settled, other 
matters can be resolved be- 
tween the north and the south 
of Korea, not by four 
parties.” 

Ji Won Suh, a spokesman 
for Sooth Korea’s delega- 
tion, said that the four parties 
had agreed to settle the least 
contentious issues first, in- 
cluding the time and place of 
the talks, while leaving the 
most contentious — the 
agenda — to the end. 

Mr. Ji added that during 
the closed negotiations, Kim 
Gye Gw an, North Korea's 
delegate who is deputy min- 
ister for foreign affaire, had 


expressed hopes that die talks 
would “result ii 


in a fruitful 
conclusion.” (AFP, NYT) 

■ Missing in Action 

The U.S. Air Force had 
indications two years after 
the Korean War that dozens 
of missing American airmen 
were alive in Chinese or 
North Korean prisons, ac- 
cording to a newly declas- 


sified report, The Associated 
Press reported from Wash- 
ington. 

The 1955 report provides 
new details about how many 
men were left behind — even 
after the exchange of pris- 
oners — and who these 
Americans were. It also de- 
scribes a dramatic failed at- 
tempt to resene five members 
of a B-29 bomber crew who 
were shot down six months 
before the war ended in July 
1953. 

The report, labeled 
“secret,” said the five 
“were known to be alive in 
Communist hands as of the 
close of the Korean con- 
flict” The five never re- 
turned. 

Their names — - and most 
of the others mentioned in the 
newly released Air Force in- 
telligence report — are on a 
Defense Department list of 
389 men from all services 
who were unaccounted for 
from the war and about 
whom the U.S. government 
believes China or North 
Korea had information. 

The declassified Air Force 
report, dated Oct 19, 1955, 
and prepared by the Escape 
and Evasion Section of the 
6004th Air Intelligence Ser- 
vice Squadron, offers no 
proof that any of the 1 37 men 
it mentions were then still . 
a live. 



Ltny ChwiScwcr* 

LUNCH AND A CHAT — Lieutenant General Liu Zhenwn of the People’s Liberation Army leaving the 
USS Blue Ridge on Wednesday. The commander of the Chinese garrison in Hong Kong conferred with the 
commander of the vessel, the first American warship to visit the territory since it reverted to Chinese rule, -j 


U.S, Move on Tibet Irks China 


BEUING — C hina on Wednesday accused the United 
States of trying to meddle in its domestic policy by wanting 
to appoint an official to handle Tibet-related affairs. 

In the first public reaction since Secretary of State 
Madeleine AJbnght last week proposed appointing a U.S. 
policy coordinator for Tibet, die newspaper China Daily 
warned Washington to “draw back the band that tries to stir 
China's business.” 

“No one has received an invitation to do such a ‘favor’ 
for China,” said the editoriaL “No one has even asked 
China’s opinion of such a move, in which the U.S. again 
takes a hand in another’s domestic affairs,” it said. 

Mrs. Albright’s offer came after Congress demanded the 
appointment of an ambassador to handle contacts with the 
Dalai I*™, the exiled Tibetan religious leader, and to 
handle U.S. government activities affecting the remote 
Himalayan region. 

But her proposal stressed that the position would not 
imply diplomatic recognition of the Tibetan government- 
in-exile, which is led by the Dalai Tama, and would not 
promote Tibetan independence from China. fWP) 


be reached for comment. The Taleban Army controls two- 
thirds of Afghanistan and captured Kabul last September. TJ 

(API 3 


Hong Kong Optimistic •, Poll Says 


For 2 N 1 " 




* ; ; 


PU * 


HONG KONG — A poll released Wednesday showed T. 
that 72 percent of those questioned were confident that 
Hong Kong would remain prosperous and stable under 
Chinese rule. 




Only 8 percent of the 1^527 respondents to the poll, 

mere 1 


conducted by die Home Affairs Bureau in July, said 
would be problems in the future. Half of those polled were 
satisfied with the performance of the government of the 
new Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, a rise of 1 1 
percent over figures for die last colonial administration. 


according to a similar poll conducted in May. 

Half of the respondents expected conditions to remain !l 


the same, bat 24 percent expected- things to get better, „ 
compared with 20 percent in May. (AFP) 


Rebels Criticize Burma Regime 


* 


16 Die in Landslides in India 


CALCUTTA — landslides triggered by heavy monsoon 

10 ii 


rains killed ar least 16 people and injured 10 in the Darjeeling 
hills district of eastern India on Wednesday, the police said. 

“We have so far recovered 16 bodies and sent 10 people 
to the hospital,” said Prasun Mukherjee. a senior police 
officiaL He said landslides were reported from five places 
in and around the hill town of Darjeeling. 

Local officials said earlier Wednesday that they expected 
the death toll to rise because reports of more landslides were 
emerging from other parts of the scenic region. Relief 
operations were hampered by the heavy rain, they said. 

(Reuters) 


BANGKOK — The Karen National Union, the last 
major ethnic group fighting the Burmese government, said 
Wednesday that the Burmese military has burned 178 
villages and killed 83 civilians in a bid to cut off support to 
the Karen group. 

About 46,000 civilians have been left homeless or forced - [ 
to relocate in four districts in Karen state and in the Pegu 
division in eastern Burma since junta forces launched a 
major offensive against the Karen National Union in Feb- 
ruary to flush out resistance. • 

‘ ‘The SLORC do forced relocations, they kill, they rape, 
they even bum the food supplies of villagers, to scare tiiem, 
to make them obey,” said Mahn Sha, the Karen group’s 
joint general secretary. The SLORC, or the State Law and 
Order Restoration Council, is the official name of the '| 
Burmese junta. (AFP) 


Taleban Repels Attack on Kabul ru- r in n 

_ .... China tracks Down on Drugs 

TCARIFI. — Thr* Talehan militia nnsh<*rf enemv tronrre 


KABUL — The Taleban militia pushed enemy troops 
away from the capital in fierce overnight fighting, a Tale- 
ban front-line commander said Wednesday. 

Opposition forces, led by the ousted government defense 
chief, Ahmed Shah Masoud, attacked from two sides late 
Tuesday night until well into Wednesday morning. Com- 
mander Mullah Abdul Hamid said. The opposition was 
pushed back one mile (1.6 kilometers). 

The commander said there were heavy casualties, but he 
did not have exact numbers. Opposition officials could not 


BEIJING — A three-month police crackdown on illegal 
drugs in China’s southern province of Guangdong has 
netted 3,801 suspected dealers and 1,000 kilograms (2,205 
pounds) of narcotics, the Xinhua press agency said 
Wednesday. 

Anti-drug battlers uncovered 33,600 drug addicts in the 
period ending in mid- July, putting 28,000 of them into _] 
rehabilitation centers and forcing another 3,100 into labor 
camps, it said. (Reuters) 


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Montenegrins Begin to Dream of Independence 


By Jane Perlez 

Nn- York Times Service 

Montenegro -- From the 
^luded raoheval fort of Sl Stefan on the 

rli in . \° “ e mountainous ancient cap- 
j , Cetinje, Montenegro was once in- 
dependent. 

^Annexed by Serbia in 1918, it went on to 
oecome a playground for the rich and famous, 
attracting foreign currency to Tito’s 
Yugoslavia. 

■ Montenegrins have now become restless 
under the autocratic thumb of President 
Slobodan Milosevic of Yugoslavia. 
Montenegro and Serbia are ad that remains of 
that fractured country, and Montenegrins talk 

. of regaining their pre-World War I inde- 
f pendence. 

; They dream of Montenegro as a tax haven 
or of turning the turquoise coastal waters. 
Shrouded by palm and olive trees, into a 
KJurist mecca again, a boar ride away from 
crowded Italy. 

j The Liberal Alliance, a political party ded- 
rcated to making Montenegro a separate 
country, is gathering strength. The alliance’s 
green graffiti are evident in the smallest vil- 
lage. 

■ The intrigue surrounding the future of 
Montenegro is many- layered. But one thing 
became clear recently: the desire for a better 
deal from Serbia was out in the open. 

w-i 28, visiting politicians from Mr. 
Milosevic’s government were greeted with 


hosdhty, their cars kicked bv protesters and 
pelted with eggs as the police stood by and 
watched. 3 

A number of factors contribute to the un- 
ease chief among them anger at the cost of 
the Yugoslav war. The Montenegrins will- 
ingly collaborated with the Serbs, contrib- 
uting troops and leaders, including Radovan 
Karadzic, the wartime Bosnian Serb leader, 
who was bom in Montenegro’s northern 
mountains. The majority of Montenegrins 
are, like the Serbs, Orthodox Christians. 

Now the economy is moribund, die few 
factories dying, the main steel mill kept run- 
ning with scrap metal trucked over back roads 
from neighboring Albania. 

Because Montenegro is pan of the Federal 
Republic of Yugoslavia, it falls under the 
same constraints from the World Bank and 
the International Monetary Fund as Serbia. 
The United States has insisted that until Mr. 
Milosevic cooperates with the International 
War Crimes Tribunal at The Hague, gnri turns 
over those like Mr. Karadzic who have been 
indicted on war crimes charges, Yugoslavia 
cannot borrow from international finan cial 
institutions. 

Several months ago Milo Djukanovic, 
Montenegro’s prime minister, an economist 
who favors market reforms, tried to convince 
the World Bank that Montenegro deserved 
credits on its own merits, despite the Han. 

But the prime minister’s envoy in Wash- 
ington, Raifco Knezevic, complained of being 
kept in the lobbies of international orga- 


nizations only to be told that Montenegrins 
might be nice people but they kept bad com- 
pany. 

Recently, Mr. Djukanovic, who also con- 
trols the uniformed and secret police, began 
publicly criticizing Mr. Milosevic as the 
wrong man to lead Y ugoslavia. And he turned 
against Mr. Milosevic’s political ally. Pres- 
• ident Momir Bulatovic of Montenegro. 

The prime minister managed to oust Mr. 
Bulatovic from the governing Democratic 
Party of Socialists, leaving a humiliated pres- 
ident to hold political meetings in coffee 
shops. 

Mr. Djukanovic, now leader of die anti- 
Milosevic faction in the Democratic Party of 
Socialists, is a long way from proclaiming an 
independent Montenegro. But be is pressing 
for near equal standing with Serbia, even 
though Montenegro has only 600,000 people 
compared with Serbia's 10 million ana is far 
smaller in territory and wealth. 

Mr. Djukanovic does have one strong bar- 
gaining point The Montenegrin port of Bar 
on the Adriatic is Serbia’s only access to the 
sea. 

Without that outlet, Serbia would be land- 
locked; its exports would have to pass 
through less -than -friendly neighboring coun- 
tries. 

But the Serbs know how to play hardball. 
After emerging from his egg-splattered Mer- 
cedes at Mr. Bulatovic ’s presidential palace 
on July 28, Zo ran Lilic, the Serbian Sociaiisr 
Party leader and an ally of Mr. Milosevic’s, 


heaped praise on the beleaguered 
Montenegrin president and warned that 
Montenegrins “had better consider the con- 
sequences” if they pursue independence. 

To many Montenegrins, the threat sounded 
chillingly familiar. The Seibs had uttered 
similar words before the fighting that ac- 
companied the secessions from Yugoslavia 
of Slovenia. Croatia and then Bosnia-Her- 
zegovina. 

Montenegrins say the situation has hardly 
reached that point. But the demonstration 
against Mr. Milosevic’s lieutenant enhanced 
their self-confidence, said Miodrag Perovic, a 
mathematics professor and publisher of Mon- 
itor, a popular weekly magazine that ad- 
vocates autonomy for Montenegro. It was the 
first time the government had sanctioned an 
anti-Milosevic rally. 

“It is only possible to live with Serbia if you 
give up part of your identity,” Mr. Perovic 
said. “People don’t want to do that. Mr. 
Milosevic was very popular here 10 years ago. 
Today people gather together to call him Sad- 
dam Hussein. This process will continue.” 

But if Montenegro is to stand up to Serbia, 
it must improve its economy. One way might 
be to restore the grandeur of once-glamorous 
coastal resorts. Fashionable guests — Jac- 
queline and Aristotle Onassis, Sylvester Stal- 
lone — are now faded memories at Sl 
S tefan’s fort. The visitors these days are of a 
different variety; “Our own and the Russian 
mafia,' ’ said the tour guide at the fort's fres- 
coed Orthodox church. 


I > Crew Prepares Mir 
For 2 New Arrivals 

Major Repairs Are Set for Spacecraft 


Breathing 


Oxygen aboard Mir Is normally supplied by two Elektron oxygen generators, which separate hydrogen 
and oxygen from waste water and return oxygen to the station. Since last week, when the second of the 
two generators malfunctioned, the crew has relied on oxygen-producing “candies,” their primary backup 
air supply. Here is a look at where Miris air comes from and how the crew has coped with the latest 
episode of diminished supply. 


Ctrmpdni fry t'i* Staff Fnai Disfuuhn 

MOSCOW — Russia’s troubled 
Mir space station undocked Wed- 
nesday from its Progress supply ship 
ip make room for a relief crew to 
arrive Thursday, an official at Mis- 
sion Control said. 

' 'pie Progress T-35 supply ship 
delivered oxygen, food, water and 
tools to Mir on July 7. after the space 
Station collided with a previous sup- 
ply ship on June 25 in the worst 
mishap in its history, 
j The Progress will orbit the Earth 
until Aug. 15, when the departure of 
the current crew will allow it to 
redock with Mir. 

• “The undocking took place on 
schedule,” a Mission Control 
spokesman said shortly after the op- 
eration. The seven-meter (23-foot) 
long. 7 J? 00- kilogram (15.800- 
pound) Progress is now filled 
mostly with garbage. 

Space officials said undocking 
the Progress would create a “park- 
ing space” for Anatoli Solovyov 
and Pavel Vinogradov, who blasted 
off from Earth on Tuesday and are 
expected to arrive at Mir in their 
Soyuz TM-26 capsule on Thursday 
shortly after 1700 GMT. 

Mr. Solovyov and Mr. Vino- 
gradov will cany out repairs crucial 
to the future of the 11 -year-old 
space station, which has problems 
with its oxygen system anahas been 
working on limited partial power 
since June 25. 

• The two Russian cosmonauts on 


board. Vasili Tsibliyev and Alex- 
ander Lazutkin, will return to Earth 
Aug. 14 after half a year in orbit 
Officials will attempt the Aug. 1 5 
redocking of Progress in automatic 
rather than the manual pilot used in 
the June 25 mishap. 

As the relief crew approached, the 
Mir team struggled with the sta- 
tion’s faulty oxygen generators. 

The Russian deputy mission 
chief, Viktor Blagov, said the crew 
hoped to fix the spacecraft's Elec- 
tron oxygen-generating system by 
the time the replacements arrived. 

“There’s nothing catastrophic in 
this breakdown,” Mr. Blagov said. 
“It's the 12th year that some ele- 
ments of the system have been 
working in orbit.' and they can be- 
come capricious.” 

Mir has two Electron systems, 
one of which was shutdown a month 
ago to save power. The other has 
been shut down for eight days. 

When Mr. Tsibliyev, Mr. 
Lazutkin and the U.S. astronaut, Mi- 
chael Foale, turned it back on Tues- 
day, it worked for only 20 to 30 
minutes, according to Mr. Blagov. 

“This has happened repeatedly.’ ’ 
he said. “Crew members know the 
system perfectly well and will soon 
locate the problem” 

Even if the crew fails to fix the 
oxygen system, they can use the 
backup system or oxygen canisters, 
enough to last for more than two 
months, Mr. Blagov said. 

Earlier, while also downplaying 


•The oxygen generator on the Kvant 2 module was shut 
down when power cables from Spektr, damaged in 
a collision on June 25, were disconnected. 


MIR CORE MODULE 


/P>k 

‘'SE- 


RVANT 1 


KVANT 2 


Wrt 


SOYUZ CAPSULE 


j Source.' NASA 

the seriousness of the latest trouble, 
Russian and TJ.S. space officials 
said the generator had been causing 
problems on and off for the past 
week. They said die Mir crew had 
been using oxygen canisters since 
Monday. 

If the new team can’t manage 


r- «When plentiful oxygen later arrived in 
tanks aboard a Progress resupply ship ... 

«... die crew turned off the second 
generator, on Kvant 1, and opened the 
hatch to get air from Progress. 

SPEKTR 


•Preparing for the arrival of Russian 
cosmonauts, the crew released 
Progress from its docking port, where 
the next crew will dock . . . 

«... and tried to start the oxygen 
generator in Kvant 1 . The generator 
failed to start up and has been 
malfunctioning in the days since. 

•For now, the crew is using oxygen 
“candles,” canisters containing 
chemicals that give off oxygen when 
a wick is ignited. There are enough 
canisters aboard Mir to supply about 
two months' worth of oxygen. 


grueling repairs to reconnect the 
power cables, the Russians may ul- 
timately have to abandon Mir — the 
last jewel in their space program. 

"In fact, not only the ratine of the 
station but the prestige of the entire 
Russian space program depends on 
the success of their mission,” the 


business journal Kommersant wrote. 

U.S. officials, in turn, have said 
they , will have to re-evaluate the 
Mir’s safety before deciding wheth- 
er to send an American replacement 
for Mr. Foale on the U.S. space 
shuttle Atlantis when it arrives at 
Mir in the fall. (Reuters. AP) 


As Floods Recede, German Soldiers Make Dike-Repair Plans 


The Associated Press 

FRANKFURT AN DER ODER, Germany 
— With floodwaiers receding, the German 
Amy pulled soldiers from emergency sand- 


JLXjerKxvci. , , . , 

• ’ Although die water level continued to sink, 
officials said the danger of a dike break was 
still great ar several weak spots along then ver. 
Thousands of people who have been evac- 
uated from their homes would probably not be 
given an all-clear to return until Friday, they 

^Meanwhile, the flooding, which claimed 
aixmi 100 lives in Poland and the Czech 
Republic last month, has apparently led to two 

Czech newspaper, the Mteda 
Dnes reported that two people had died from 
a bacterial infection spread by rodents, in- 


cluding one man who had been infected dur- 
ing a rescue mission. 

At least one other person has been hos- 
pitalized with the disease leptospirosis, it 

said. 

The Czech news agency CTK also reported 
that 80,000 children in die flood-affected re- 
gion would be vaccinated against hepatitis 
with $3 .5 million of vaccines donated by the 
United States. 

In Germany, work continued on a tnree- 
kilometer-long (rwo-mile-long) backup dike 
in the village of Reitwein, north of Frankfurt 
an der Oder, in case the soggy main dike 
should break under continued high pressure. 

The army still has 10,900 soldiers in the 
flood zone, which stretches about 160 ki- 
lometers along Germany’s border with Po- 
land. On Wednesday, though, 2,000 soldiers 
were told to stop working on the dike and were 
put on standby status. 


Water levels continued to fall overnight at 
three key points along the swollen river — 
Frankfurt an der Oder, Eisenhuettenstadt and 
the northern Oderbruch region — and emer- 
gency workers said they had noticed only one 
leaky spot on the dike. 

Defense Minister Volker Ruehe said the 
soldiers would re main to help repair the wom 
dike before winter. “The work is not over 
yet,” he said. 


The Brandenburg state interior minister, 
Alwio Ziel. said repairs to the only major dike 
break — south of Frankfurt an der Oder near 
Aurith — would begin in 10 days. But he said 
it would be six weeks before the water that 
first flooded fields and villages two weeks ago 
could be pumped out. Some 450 people were 
driven out of their homes in the low-lying 
area, which is now a small lake covering about 
50 square kilometers (20 square miles). 


Adams Meets U.K. Secretary 

Sinn Fein Leader Pushes Agenda for Ulster Peace Talks 



- «»$t M r § 


gMaii- 


The German defense ^ 

in Vogelsang on Wedneso». • 


Reuters 

BELFAST — The leader of Sinn Fein, 
Gerry Adams, held his first talks Wednesday 
with Marjorie Mowlam, the British secretary 
of state for Northern Ireland, and told her to 
oversee the aid of British rule in the 
province. 

“Sinn Fein enters negotiations as an Irish 
Republican party seeking to promote the 
broad nationalist objective of an end to British 
rale in Ireland,” Mr. Adams said to Ms. 
Mowlam at their first meeting, which was 
maria possible by the July 20 cease-fire called 
by his IRA allies. 

He said that “while I welcome Mo Mow- 
lam as the first woman British secretary of 
state for Northern Ireland, I hope she will be 
the last” 

Mr. Adams used the two-hour meeting to 
set ont the agenda he wanted discussed if Sinn 
Fein were admitted to Anglo-Irish peace talks 
in September after being banned for years 
because of the IRA’s 28-year war against 
British rule. 

Ms. Mowlam said that Sinn Fein would be 
invited to participate in the negotiations — 
provided that the Irish Republican Army 
stuck by its latest cease-fire “in word and 
deed.” She said that she wanted the talks to 
include all the province’s rival pro-British 
and pro-Irish parties. 

Mr, Adams, who includes Martin Ferris, a 
convicted IRA gun-runner, in his negotiating 
raised the key issues he wants included 
on die agenda, over which he and successive 
British governments have been at odds. 

The Sinn Fein leader urged the Labour 
government in London to persuade Northern 


Ireland’s Protestant unionist majority to stop 
clinging to British rale and to be part of a re- 
united Ireland. 

The British government should “play a 
crucial and constructive role,” Mr. Adams 
said, “in persuading unionists to reach a 
democratic agreement on the issue of Irish 
national reunification with the rest of tile 
people of this island and to encourage, fa- 
cilitate and enable such agreement." 

Britain and its Irish partners in a peace 
process that has lasted for three years, say that 
Northern Ireland’s British status cannot 
change until a majority of its 15 million 
people, 60 percent Protestant and 40 percent 
Catholic at present, want it to change. 

But Mr. Adams, rehearsing arguments he 
will bring to the conference table in Septem- 
ber, said that Northern Ireland was “an illegal 
statelet’ ’ and that its future should be decided 
by the overwhelmingly Roman Catholic pop- 
ulation of the entire island of Ireland 

In remarks released to the news media, Ms. 
Mowlam said that the British government 
wanted both the IRA and pro-British loyalist 
guerrilla groups to surrender their weapons as 
talks progressed. 

But Mr. Adams and his chief negotiator, 
Martin McGuinness, said that the IRA, in 
statements to the media, had made clear that 
ihe organization would give up nothing be- 
fore a final settlement was reached. 

The issue is a crucial one in the peace 
process because Northern Ireland’s main 
Protestant group, the Ulster Unionist Party, 
which is headed by David Trimble, wants 
Britain to force ihe IRA to disarm during, not 
after, die talks. 


BRIEFLY 


French Nuclear Scientist Quits 
In Conflict With Greenpeace 

PARIS — A leading French scientist has resigned as 
the head of a nuclear safety commission after attacking 
Greenpeace activists as “totalitarians” who were pre- 
paring the world for “a gigantic collective suicide,’’ 
officials said Wednesday. 

Charles Souleau, leader of a government-appointed 
commission that was studying France's controversial La 
Hague nuclear reprocessing plant, had been accused by 
colleagues of misrepresenting data. 

Mr. Souleau announced in June that his ream bad found 
no link between waste discharged from the plant into the 
English Channel and a clusterof leukemia cases in young 
people living within 35 kilometers.(20 miles) of the area, 
on foe Normandy coosl 

But the Greenpeace environmental group found high 
radioactivity levels in waste spewing into the Channel, 
and in sediment on the sea bottom near foe plant, which is 
ran by the stare nuclear company Cogema. (Reuters) 

Turkey and Turkish Cypriots 
Move on 'Partial Integration 9 

NICOSIA — Turkey and foe self-styled Turkish Cyp- 
riot state moved Wednesday to further strengthen their 
ties toward a “partial integration” envisioned in earlier 
statements. 

The two sides signed an agreement to establish a joint 
committee to coordinate improvement of ties that was 
called for in declarations in February and July. 

Turkey and Turkish Cypriots announced last month 
that they would move toward partial integration to 
counter the European Union’s decision to start mem- 
bership talks with the recognized government of 
Cyprus. 

The partial integration they have spelled out does not 
go further than what foe two now have in practice, but has 
been seen as a symbolic move to show Turkey's de- 
termination to defend the Turkish Cypriots' rights in the 
international arena. 

Turkey is the only country thar recognizes foe break- 
away Turkish Cypriot state, which relies on Ankara for 
economic, political and military support. 

Rauf Denktash, leader of foe Turkish Cypriot state, is 
due to hold a second round of talks with foe Greek Cypriot 
president, Giafcos Clerides, in Switzerland. (AP) 

Yeltsin and Patriarch Ease Rift 

MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin and the Russian 
Orthodox patriarch kissed at a ceremony consecrating a 
church Wednesday and resealed their long-time alliance, 
shaken by a controversial religion bill. 

Mr. Yeltsin and Patriarch Alexy II, standing together 
near the Chapel of Sl Boris and Gleb, pledged to mend 
the rift and further strengthen their cooperation. 

“No obstacles shall separate us, because we know the 
role and foe importance of the restoration in Russia of 
Orthodox Christianity and the Orthodox Church,” Mr. 
Yeltsin said. 

The fortunes of the state and the church, entwined since 
the 1991 Soviet collapse, were put to a stern test last 
month when Mr. Yeltsin rejected a church-backed bill to 
restrict “nontraditional” religions. 

But the president and the patriarch said they would set up 
a conciliatory commission to smooth out sticking points of 
foe bill which won overwhelming support in Parliament, 
the Itar-Tass and Interfax news agencies reported. 

“I am satisfied that foe president has moved to meet the 
aspirations of tens of millions of our church’s faithful,” 
Patriarch Alexy said. 

The dominant Orthodox Church claims 80 million 
followers — more than half of Russia’s popu lation — and 
the patriarch bad warned that believers would protest 
should Mr. Yeltsin decide to completely kill the le- 
gislation. (AP) 





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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 



our 


To Salvage Balkan Deal 


In Return to Region, U.S. Envoy Meets 
Croatian and Bosnian Muslim Leaders 


Reuters 

SARAJEVO — Richard Holbrooke, 
the U.S. envoy, returned to the Balkans 
on Wednesday to pressure leaders in the 
former Yugoslavia to abide by the peace 
agreement he put together to end the war 
in Bosnia- Herzegovina. 

Mr. Holbrooke was expected to dis- 
play his customary tough diplomacy 
with the same politicians whom he bul- 
lied and cajoled into agreeing to the 
settlement in Dayton, Ohio, in 1995. 

“He’s coming here to read the riot 
act,” a diplomat in Sarajevo said. 

Mr. Holbrooke, accompanied by the 
U.S. envoy to Bosnia, Roben Gel bard. 


One year later, Mr. Karadzic con- 
tinues to wield power covertly and his 
allies have sought to undermine the 
Dayton accords, which divided Bosnia 
into autonomous Serbian and Muslim- 
Croat territories ruled by a small central 
government 

But Serbian hard-liners loyal to Mr. 
Karadzic have blocked the return of 
Muslim and Croatian refugees and tried 
to portray their autonomous territory as 
an independent state. 

During his visit, Mr. Holbrooke 
planned to promote Mr. Karadzic's rival, 
the Bosnian Serb president, Biljana 
Plavsic. He was scheduled to fly from 


met President Fraujo Tudjraan of Croa~- Croatia to "Banja Luka' On Thursday 


da and the Muslim chairman of the Bos- 
nian presidency, Alija Izetbegovic, in 
the Adriatic port of Split on the first day 
of his tour. 

“It's clear to me from what Am- 
bassador Gel bard told me and from what 
I've observed, that progress is being 
made but at much too slow a pace,” Mr. 
Holbrooke said. 

“We’re here to encapsulate what has 
happened and try to accelerate the pro- 
cess and keep it moving forward. ” 

Diplomats said Mr. Holbrooke would 
mak e clear to Mr. Tudjman in particular 
that he had to ensure that his Bosnian 
Croat protdgds lived up to agreements to 
strengthen the troubled Muslim-Croat 
federation, which covers half of Bosnia. 

Ir was Mr. Holbrooke's first visit to 
the region since last year, when be ne- 
gotiated a deal that forced the wartime 
Bosnian Serb President Radovan Karad- 
zic to step down from office 

Under the agreement, which 
signed by the then president of Serbia, 
Slobodan Milosevic, Mr. Karadzic, who 
has been indicted for war crimes, pledged 
to stay out of the political arena. 


Court Transfers Ex-Nazi 
To Rome Army Hospital 

Reuters 

ROME — A military court on 
Wednesday ordered the convicted 
former Nazi officer Erich Priebke to 
leave a hillside monastery and serve 
his five-year prison sentence in a 
Rome army hospital. 

Mr. Priebke, 84. was sentenced 
last month for his role in Italy's 
worst World War n atrocity. He has' 
been at a monastery since last year. 


morning to hold talks with Mrs. Plavsic. 

Although an ultranationalist herself, 
Mrs. Plavsic has won Western support in 
her battle with Mr. Karadzic, whom she 
has accused of running vast smuggling 
rackets. 

Balkan analysts said Mr. Holbrooke 
would pledge U.S. support for general 
elections Mrs. Plavsic called after dis- 
solving Parliament in Bosnia's Serb Re- 
public. They said he would probably 
push Mr. Milosevic, now president of 
federal Yugoslavia, to throw his support 
behind Mrs. Plavsic and stop propping 
up hard-liners loyal to Mr. Karadzic, 
threatening him with sanctions unless he 
abided by his Dayton commitments. 

“It’s all right there on the table, both 
economic incentives if Milosevic co- 
operates, or sanctions,' ' a diplomat said. 
“It’s up to him to make a choice. ' ' 

The issue that was expected to dom- 

mate Mr.-Holbrooke’smeetings was the. 

was prosecution of indicted war criminals 
who remain at large. 

Croatia and Yugoslavia have tried to 
avoid their obligations under the Dayton 
treaty to hand over suspects wanted by 
the United Nations war crimes tribunal. 

British soldiers in the NATO-led 
peace force arrested one suspect and shot 
dead another who opened fire last month 
in an operation in the Serbian-controlled 
Prijedor region. 

The arrest operation sparked off a 
wave of retaliatory bombings against 
NATO and international monitors bnt 
the low-level violence has tapered off 
over the past week. 

Some commentators speculated that 
Mr. Holbrooke might deliver an ulti- 
matum, wanting that the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization would go after 
more suspects if authorities failed to turn 
them over. 


GERMANY: Greens Join the Mainstream 


Continued from Page 1 

Under Mr. Fischer’s prodding, the 
Greens supported the participation of 
German soldiers in the NATO-fed peace- 
keeping mission in Bosnia. In a dramatic 
reversal of the days when they led 
protests against the deployment of U.S. 
missiles in Europe, Mr. Fischer and other 
Greens now endorse a strong American 
presence at the heart of an expanding 
NATO they envision as the foundation of 
a pan-European security system. 

“There is no other choice, because 
Europe haS proved incapable of building 
its own common defense,' ’ Mr. Fischer 
said. “We need theUmfed- S tat es to ta k e -tixatdrey-wotdd abuse resp onsibil ities 
the lead in building a NATO-based se- and behave like wild-eyed radicals, 
curity alliance that stretches all the way Rupert von Plottnitz, who as a lawyer 
to Vladivostok. Only die Americans can defended- leftist guerrillas ■ vowing to 
provide the 'big stick' to enforce peace overthrow the state, was named Hesse’s 
m Europe.” justice minister two years ago. By all 

While some Greens still pay lip ser- accounts, be has proved a capable de- 
vice to the dissolution of NATO and the fender of the administration that he and 
abolition of the German Army, their his clients once believed was ripe for 


geese to trim grass, the Greens now 
promote “eco-capitalist” notions that 
encourage enterprises to make products 
such as ozone-friendly refrigerators and 
unbleached paper. 

Largely because of Greens' lobbying, 
German industry has become a leader in 
environmental technology and controls 
more than 20 percent of a global market 
worth more than S3 billion a year. 

Here in Mr. Fischer’s home state of 
Hesse, where he served twice as en- 
vironment minister in ruling coalitions 
with the Social Democrats, the Greens 
have racked up an impressive record in 
regional government and allayed fears 


views have been overwhelmed by Mr. 
Fischer and other advocates of a new 
post-Cold War realism stripped of anti- 
American rhetoric and the utopian ideals 
of global disarmament 

“The old line about taking the Ger- 
man Army out of NATO belongs to our 
revolutionary past’* says Rezzo Sch- 
lauch, another Greens member of Par- 
liament who has steered the party toward 
more pragmatic policies. "We now want 
to show we can be capable of running a 
future government ana not just get by on 
the charm of saving the forest and other 


revolution. 

“It’s a new page in our history,” Mr. 
von Plottnitz said. “We now know we 
can improve the system by working from 
the inside. My main mission is to safe- 
guard the independence of the judicial 
system so it remains above any suspicion 
of political corruption." 

Mr. Fischer says the party hopes ro 
expand its ambitions by making a se- 
rious bid for power next year. He is 
convinced that a majority of voters yearn 
for profound change because the reform 
process is paralyzed after 15 years of the 


ecological niceties.” conservative ruling coalition headed by 

Some Greens policies Have become Chancellor Helmut K6H, 


mainstream views in Germany. In the 
wake of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear 
disaster and the heavy toll of air pol- 
lution, much of the country now em- 
braces Greens demands such as shutting 
down all nuclear power plants and im- 
posing highway speed limits. 

While swift geopolitical changes in the 
post-Cold War era compelled the Greens 
ro adopt new foreign policies, the impact 
of the information revolution and the new 
global marketplace has created a recept- 
ive audience for their calls to explore 
alternative ways to boost Germany’s 
competitiveness and solve its job crisis. 

Instead of zany schemes like banning 
lawn mowers in favor of using hungry 


Kohl is getting old and tired, and 
Germans are starting to realize he is not 
the man to lead our country into the 21st 
century,” Mr. Fischer said "Economic 
growth is stagnant, and unemployment 
is rising above 5 million. How can Kohl 
possibly make the case that people will 
be better off if be stays on as chancellor 
for another four years?’ ’ 

Mr. Fischer, who has been touted as a 
possible foreign minister in a new gov- 
erning coalition, believes a “red-green" 
alliance of Social Democrats and Greens 
could break the impasse and overhaul 
the tax, welfare ami pension systems, 
which many experts say Europe’s 
biggest economy badly needs. 



Continued from Page 1 

vivors, and that the on-flight voice and 
data recorders were retrieved 

Those so-called black boxes, which 
should include recordings of crew con- 
versation, and data on the plane's in- 
strument settings, wing flaps and precise 
heading, were being sent to Washington 
for analysis. 

“It'll be very revealing,” a former 
safety board vice chairman, Susan 
Coughlin, said on CNN. 

One South Korean survivor, Hong 
Hyon Uung, 35, said there was no fire or 
explosion before the crash. 

Though the terrain in Guam is rugged 
the retrieval of bodies and wreckage was 
not expected to pose anything like the 
problems the safety board faced last July 


after the explosion of TWA Flight 800 
off Long Island, New York, that killed 
all 230 aboard or that they faced a few 
months earlier, when a ValuJet airliner 
crashed into a Florida swamp. One hun- 
dred and ten people died in that crash. 

The safety board is expected to ex- 
amine the possible roles of the weather 
in Guam — the plane crashed in heavy 
rains and limited visibility — and the 
fact that a type of radar that can aid pilots 
in landing was not working. 

The so-called glide-slope equipment 
was in the process of being moved Nor- 
mally it provides electronic guidance in 
approaching an airport at the proper alti- 
tude. But other navigational equipment 
should have permitted a safe landing, as 
it had for other flights before the crash. 

Reuters quoted officials of All Nip- 


SURVIVOR: Hole Opened Above Seat 


Continued from Page 1 

and had given her his own shin. 

.Among, those who lived through 
Flight 80 1 was a stewardess thrown out 
of the plane, an 11 -year-old Japanese 
girl found in the rubble, a New Zealand 
pilot and a girl from Atlanta who lost 
three members of her immediate fam- 
ily. Some survivors are in critical con- 
dition, many are severely burned, and . 
others walked away with minor cuts 
and bruises. 

Mr. Hong, one of those barely hurt, 
was the first survivor to speak publicly 
about the crash. He said in a hospital 
interview that he believed the plane was 
flying too low on the rainy night as it 
approached the international airport on 
this island in the South Pacific. 

“It sounded like the landing gear 
rammed into the hillside," Mr. Hong, a 
Guam restaurant owner, said. 


For two or three hours after the 1:50 
A.M. crash, he said, he and the woman 
whose clothes had caught fire waited for 
rescuers. At one point, the woman took 
her white blouse and waved it like aflas to 
catch the attention of the helicopter pilots 
searching the crash site with floodlights. 

“I am O.K., but too many died,” he 
said in his bed in the U.S. Naval Hospital 
here, beside another male survivor who 
did not open his eyes, severe red cuts 
covering his head. 

Mr. Hong said he was lucky he was in 
the front section of the plane. He said he 
always took special care of the elderly and 
the handicapped at Korea House, his res- 
taurant here, and maybe that was why he 
was allowed to live. He had been in Seoul 
visiting his sick father. His wife and two 
children, aged 3 and 1, were still in South 
Korea. 

"I like to fly,” he said. “I will again 
visit my father.” 


Thursday. 


POL POT: Siblings Are Ashamed to ‘ Share a Drop of his Blood’ 


Continued from Page 1 

But they straggle with the 
knowledge of their intimate 
connection with the man who 
brought so much misery to 
their country. 

“I have cut off that piece of 
my flesh,” Mr. SaJolh Seng 
said. “I fee! that Pol Pot and I 
live in two different worlds. I 
feel nothing for him.” 

His sister added: “I am not 
happy that 1 share even a drop 
of nis blood. If our parents 
were alive today, they would 
be very sad.” 

Mrs. Saloth Roeung said 
her grandchildren refer to 
their great-uncle dismissively 
as “a-Pot." which means 
“the despicable Pot." 

Mr. Pol Pot’s sister re- 
called seeing his photograph 
in 1978. “It was a shock to 
realize that it was not ‘Pol 
Pot* but my brother.” she 
said. 

“I was speechless. At first 
I was angry. How could he do 
such a thing to the people? 
But I didn’t say anything to 
anybody. 1 was ashamed.” 
Mr. Saloth Seng said he 
shared the news with his 
brother. ”We were sur- 
prised,” he said. "We said to 
each other, ‘This is not Pol 
Pot: this is Saloth Sar!’ " 

The man who is reviled as 
one of the mass killers of the 
20th century was bom in this 
muddy village, the eighth of 
nine children of Pen Saloth. a 
prosperous farmer with 18 
hectares (22 acres) of rice 


land and a comfortable tile- 
roofed house. 

His mother, Sok Nem, was 
described by Mr. Pol Pot’s 
biographer. David Chandler, 
as being widely respected for 
her piety and good works. 

Mr. Pol Pot's birth dale is 
uncertain, reported as either 
1925 or 1928. His sister and 
two brothers — his only sur- 
viving siblings — appeared to 
confirm the earlier dale Tues- 
day, saying he was bom in the 
year of the ox, or 1 925. 

His youngest brother, 
Saloth Nhep, 70. a poor farm- 
er whose thatched house 
looks out across the river, 
seemed still to have affection 
for him. 

"1 was very close to him in 
school," he said. "He was a 
nice boy, very polite. He was 
happy and sometimes made 
jokes.” 

Asked about these jokes, 
the brother suggested an edge 
ro Mr. Pol Pot’s apparent 
mildness, even at a young 
age. 

"He said what he meant,” 
Mr. Saloth Nhep said, “but he 
would laugh and make a joke 
of il.” 

Despite its rural back- 
ground, the family had a con- 
nection with the royal palace 
in Phnom Penh. Mr. Pol Pot's 
older cousin. Khun Meak. 
joined the royal ballet in the 
1920s and became a consort 
of the king’s eldest son. 
Prince Sisowath Monivong. 
with whom she had a child. 

Because he was such 


sweet boy, Mr. Saloth Seng 
said, Mrs. Khun Meak took 
Mr. Pol Pot to live with her at 
the palace, where he enrolled 
for a year in a monastery. 

Mr. Pol Pot's sister, Mrs. 
Saloth Roeung, said she also 
had lived at the palace and 
become a consort to the 
prince. 

Though she did not know it 
at the time, it was her younger 
brother who later brought an 
end to this happy time. When 
the Khmer Rouge came to 
power in 1975, they emptied 
Phnom Penh, driving its 2 
million residents into the 
countiyside. Mrs. Saloth 
Roeung fled with the others. 

After his year in a mon- 
astery, Mr. Pol Pot studied at 
a French-run high school, 
then received a scholarship to 
study in France in the 1950s. 

There, he became a convert 
to communism and met some 
of the men who would be his 
closest lieutenants in the 
Khmer Rouge. 

He returned to Phnom 
Penh, married and became a 
popular schoolteacher as he 
worked in the communist un- 
derground. In the early 1960s 
he fled to the jungle, where, 
apart from his four years in 
power, he has lived since. 

From that point on, his sis- 
ter and brothers insisted, they 
hardly heard from him. 

Last May, researchers for 
the Documentation Center of 
Cambodia visited Prek Sbov 
and talked to Mr. Pol Pot 


a relatives as part of their work 


of compiling evidence for any 
future trial of Khmer Rouge 
leaders. 

The center, which receives 
financing from the United 
States, the Netherlands and 
other nations, discovered 12 
mass graves in Kompong 
Thom Province, which in- 
cludes Prek Sbov. They cal- 
culated that more than 
300.000 people bad been ex- 
ecuted by the Khmer Rouge 
in the province. 

The center’s researchers 
said Mr. Pol Pot's two broth- 
ers told them that they each 
had a son who had gone in 
recent years to live in Aniong 
Veng with their uncle — per- 
haps to escape conscription 
into the government army. 
But when asked about this 
Tuesday, both men strongly 
denied it 

Mrs. Saloth Roeung also 
angrily denied rumors circu- 
lating in the village that Mr. 
Pol Pot had sent her money. 

"Who said that?" she 
snapped. "He never contac- 
ted us. He does not respect his 
own family.” 

All three siblings seemed 
to be at a loss when asked 
what they would say to their 
brother if he suddenly ap- 
peared on their doorstep. 

"I would ask him, ‘What 
are you doing here? You were 
happy in the jungle,' " Mrs. 
Saloth Roeung said. “I can- 
not imagine asking questions 
of him. I would say to him: 
‘Why have you come 
back?’ ” 




R 


briefly 


Mirh»H 'W^lhp Wnriunl IVi^. 

A team of U.S. navy, air force, army and coast guard rescuers removing a survivor from the Boeing 747. 

CRASH: Weather and Radar Woes Will Be Focus of Investigation 


pon Airways and Asiana Airlines as 
saying they were satisfied with the air- 
port’s safety standards. 

In Seattle, Jim Hall, chairman of the 
safety board, said that he wanted to know 
whether the 747 crew was familiar with 
the Guam airport. 

Originally, an Airbus had been sched- 
uled for the flight. 

The Guam airport has the nation's 
only privately contracted control tower 
directing 747s and other large passenger 
planes. 

About 500 U.S. military personnel 
joined Guam government workers in the 
rescue operation, 200 of them at the 
crash site. Bulldozers cleared and 
leveled a circular patch atop a knoll to 
allow helicopter evacuation. Two CH- 
46 helicopters ferried in rescuers and 
flew out survivors. 

The governor of Guam, Carl Gutierrez, 
who lives near the crash area, was among 
the first on the site, pan of a group that 
arrived in four-wheel-drive vehicles. 

“It was eerie.” he said. “As I got 
close to the scene l could hear the 
screams. We only had a single flashlight. 
We had to follow the sounds io find 
them.” 

He helped rescue an 1 1 -year-old Jap- 
anese girl, slightly hurt, who was trying 
to tend to a critically injured flight at- 
tendant. 

Lieutenant Commander Jim Lehner, 
head of the rescue operation, said he 
heard a small voice call out in Korean. 
He pulled a child from the wreckage, 
then found her mother. 

In Seoul, about 500 anguished rela- 
tives gathered at a Korean Air building 
near Kimpo International Airport. Sev- 
eral protested that the airline was deny- 
ing them information about the crash. 

A U.S. military transport plane was to 
return some of the survivors to Seoul on 


Iraq Set to Sell Oil 

BAGHDAD — Iraq is to resume 
exports of crude oil from Aug. 1 5 to 
**0 under the UN oil-for-food ac- 
cord. after a suspension since early 
June Oil Minister Amir Mo- 
hammed Rashid said Wednesday. 

Mr. Rashid said a new pricing 
formula for the exports was sub- 
mitted to the United Nations on 
Tuesday. "We are waiting for ap- 
proval very soon,” he said. 

7 Slain in Algeria 

PARIS — Algerian security 
forces have killed seven Muslim 
rebels south of Algiers following 
massacres there of villagers, an Al- 
gerian newspaper said Wednesday. 

The rebels were shot Tuesday in 
the hamlet ’of Houach Germain in 
Btida Province, the daily La 
Tribune said. They were suspected 
of taking part in the massacres of 
more than 40 people in the area last 
month, die paper said. ( Reuters } 

Lima Crush Kills 2 

LIMA — Two girls died from 
asphyxiation and 107 young fans 
were injured during a music concert 
in Pern, the authorities said Wed- 
nesday. 

Hysteria and overcrowding 
among about 100,000 concertgoers 
brought chaos when the Venezuelan 
duo Servando y Flore n lino came on 
stage for an encore Tuesday, police 
and fire fighters said. Some of the 
injured were crashed, while others 
fell and were trampled. (Reuters) 

Call for Peru Probe 

LIMA — Javier Perez de Cuellar, 
the former UN secretary-general, 
has filed a complaint with Peru’s top 
prosecutor charging that his tele- 
phone was tapped while he was a 
presidential candidate in 1995. 

He accused government agencies 
of the wiretapping. (AFP) 


a 




WATER: From the Tap, at a Buck a Bottle APPLE: Microsoft Forges Alliance With Its Ailing Competitor 


Continued from Page 1 

rated "superior” by environmental of- 
ficials, and one test name for the bottled 
product is “Houston Superior.” 

But whether the beverage will stand 
up to Evian and Calistoga in the con- 
sumer battleground remains to be seen. 

Many bottled-water distributors insist 
that their product is far preferable to 
municipal water, either because it has 
not been subject to extensive chemical 
treatment such as chlorination or be- 
cause it has been filtered. 

The bottling industry also got a boost 


from public-health scares such as the 
1993 outbreak of the parasite Crypto- 
sporidium in Milwaukee. 

In some cases, the terms are mis- 
leading. Companies may use words like 
“mountain fresh" or "glacier puns” 
even if their water comes from places 
nowhere near mountains or glaciers. 

More than 35 percent of all bottled 
water sold in the United States is mu- 
nicipal water that has been through a 
filter, said Jack Hoffbuhr, executive di- 
rector of the Denver-based American 
Water Works Association, which rep- 
resents many municipal suppliers. 


Continued from Page 1 

crosoft’s Internet Explorer the default 
browser for viewing the World Wide 
Web on Macintosh computers. 

That development was a blow to Net- 
scape Communications Corp., which 
maxes a more popular competing 
browser. Mr. Jobs assured the crowd, 
however, that browsers such as Net- 
scape's Communicator would remain 
available to Mac users. 

“We have io let go of the notion that 
in order to for Apple to win. Microsoft 
has to lose,” Mr. Jobs said. “The era of 


setting this up as a competition between 
Apple and Microsoft is over as far as I’m 
concerned.” 

Nonetheless, by appointing Mr. El- 
lison to the board, Apple has made one of 
Mr. Gates’s top competitors one of its 
directors. 

Oracle makes popular database soft- 
ware, and Mr. Ellison popularized the 
idea of network computers, which in- 
stead of running on a high-powered op- 
erating system such as windows or 
Macintosh, tap into central servers and 
run programs that essentially reside on 
those units. Mr. Gates at first opposed 


the idea, although he has softened his 
position. 

Also joining the Apple board are Bill 
Campbell, chief executive of Intuit 
Corp.. which makes Quicken, the lead* 
ing personal-finance software. Another 
new member is Jerry York, vice chair- 
man of Kirk Kerkorian's Tracinda Corp. 
Mr. York, described by Mr. Bajarin as 
"a hard-nosed superstar in the world of 
money management” had been chief 
financial officer of International Busi- 
ness Machines Corp. and Chrysler Corp., 
both of which overcame situations of the 
same scale of seriousness as Apple's. 


ISRAEL: 

Tense Confrontation 

Continued from Page 1 

security forces take concrete steps against 
Islamic militants, but the report by the 
official Palestinian news agency said Mr. 
Arafat had declared that the Palestinians 
"will never bow. even if we have to eat 
the leaves from the trees,” a rallying cry. 
last used in the days of the iraifuda. 

During a visit to Jerusalem on Wednes- 
day, the first by a high-level Arab official 
since the current crisis began. Prince Has- . 
san made it clear that, like other Arab and 
Western leaders, he had recommended 
that Mr. Netanyahu adopt a softer line, r* 

But at a news conference after their"-, 
meeting, the Israeli prime minister de- •'* 
dared. “We will not rescind our ex-! 
pectation." Speaking in English and - 
then in Hebrew. Mr. Netanyahu likened . 
the punitive measures that his govern- ' 
ment has imposed against the Palestinian : 
Authority, Israel's peace partner since Z 
1993, to the sanctions that the United 1 ; 
States imposes on the world's most no- 
torious sponsors of terrorism: Libya, 
Iran and Iraq. He said Israel would ease 
its harsh blockade, including an un- 
precedented halt in the reimbursement of 
millions of dollars owed to the Pales- 
tinians. only if and when the Palestinians 
complied with Israel's cal! for action. 

The United States has objected to the/"* 
halt in reimbursements, but Mr. Nei»<£ 
anyahu said that he would not reconsider* 
his decision until the Palestinians duf" 
more to earn "a ticket to the club oflj 
organized and civilized communities.”^ 

It was unclear whether the language^ 
used by both sides represented rhetorical 
excess or whether both the Israelis and& 
Palestinians were digging their heels in*5« 
to intractable positions. Z* 

Prince Hassan said Mr. Netanyahu had* 
assured him chat he would make good otr*. 
a pledge to allow shipments of food and^ 
medicine to pass into the Palestinian^ 
ruled areas of West Bank and Gaza. For Z 
the first time since it imposed the.mea** 
sures on July 30, Israel allowed tracks** 
carrying flour and other vital goods to* 
unload them Wednesday for passage to* 
Gaza through a crossing that remain? » 
closed to commerce. It also permitted aC 
small number of Palestinians who live in* 
Palestinian -ruled areas of the West Ban£~ 
to travel to their workplaces instead of* 
being confined to their municipality. I; 

Certainly, the verbal and economic* 
combat between the two sides has noti 
erupted into the violence of last auturmC^ 
when tensions over Israel's decision \qZ 
open a tunnel beneath the Old City of J 
Jerusalem led to clashes in which dozens* 
of Israelis and Palestinians were killedrZ 
Bui it was evident at least that Dennis^* 
Ross, the American mediator, who is du£* 
to arrive in the region Saturday night;* 
would face a daunting task in trying t©.-* 
bridge the gap benveen two sides. “5 

At a news conference Wednesday afȣ 
re moon. Prince Hassan made it clear that" 
he wished both that the Israelis would? 
exercise a lighter hand and that the Pai-^S 
es unions would prove more amenable ttvj 
stepping up their battle against terrorism^ 
But he warned that the situation ha<H! 
reached the stage of a "very dangerous^ 
crisis.” He publicly challenged Mr. Nei£#t 
anyahu’s suggestion that his crackdowijg 
was similar to U.S. sanctions against? 
Libya, saying that “with all due respect • 
the comparison "was not directly re££ 
evant to Israeli-Palestinian relations.’’ 

■ UN Helicopter Crashes 

A United Nations helicopter crashe<£* 
Wednesday inside the Israeli-controlled? 
zone in southern Lebanon, killing at least? 
five people, Reuters quoted a spokesman's 
for the UN Interim Force in Lebanon aa£ 
saying. The cause of the crash was noC^ 
immediately clear. — ' - 












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PAGE 8 


THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1997 

EDITORIALS /OPINION 


,{ 




i i * 


Itcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISH KD WITH TUB NEW YORK TlSfRf A HD THE WASIHNGTOPi POST 


India Sets an Example 


tribune Back to Square One for Vulnerable Cambodia 

- ■» .i .-usuntrvciHi*. more uliUl DoiT 


.2 1 111' 


tl 

h*' 




Say what you will about India's nu- 
clear stubbornness, its chemical re- 
straint deserves respect and emulation. 
The government ofl. K. Gujral, ending 
decades of Indian silence, has an- 
nounced that it possesses both stock- 
piles of chemical aims and the pro- 
duction facilities to make more of 
them, and will renounce them. It did so 
in complying with its ratification ob- 
ligations under the new Chemical 
Weapons Convention. No one else has 
come clean on chemicals the way the 
Indians now have. 

India was not previously a declared 
or identified possessor of chemical 
aims. It had accepted, and respected, 
the post- World War I treaty outlawing 
the use of chemical weapons. It kept its 
chemical secret through the posl- 
World War II decades, when there was 
no further international treaty to help 
spur either the disclosure and renun- 
ciation of a chemical capability or its 
verification. 

The latest Indian action is an ad- 
vertisement for the new treaty, ratified 
by the United States a few months ago. 
It has opened a policy course that New 
Delhi shunned before. Thus does India 
polish its arms control credentials and 
improve its position to nudge China and 


Pakistan, two important neighbors with 
which it has been at war, to turn their 
backs on the chemical option, too. 

The derails of India s declaration, 
under the terms of the treaty, have not 
yet emerged into full public view. At a 
certain point it will be necessary for the 
body putting the treaty into effect to 
conduct a “routine” military inspec- 
tion — of a sort that the United Slates 
has already undergone — in order to 
add the essential comforts of inter- 
national verification to the initial 
promise of national disclosure. 

India's admission comes at a certain 
price, since it was sure to be criticized 
for holding and hiding this dread ca- 
pability. But its readiness to review an 
old position is refreshing. India resists 
nuclear constraints cm the grounds that 
nuclear arms control distinguishes be- 
tween old powers that already have and 
declare weapons and new ones that 
either don’t have them a- (like India) 
don't declare them. By contrast, chem- 
ical arms control is acceptable in Indian 


eyes for involving one set of rules ap- 
plicable to everybody. This is a dubious 
nuclear alibi, but the important thing 


here is that India is showing the way to 
bringing the threat better under control. 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Two-Faced Nigeria 


With the United States and France 
losing interest in military and political 
intervention in Africa, local powers are 
taking their place. South Africa, 
Uganda and Rwanda, among others, 
have all plunged into their neighbors’ 
conflicts, with motives ranging from 
noble to murderous. The prize for hy- 
pocrisy, however, must go -to Nigeria, 
which is ostensibly defending demo- 
cracy in Sierra Leone and Liberia 
while still crushing it at home. 

For all his brutality, Nigeria's lead- 
er, General Sani Abacha, shows great 
sophistication in clinging to power. He 
has easily weathered the weak inter- 
national response to the baseless 1995 
murder conviction and execution of 
Ken Saro-Wiwa and eight other Ogoni 
environmental and human rights ac- 
tivists. He is now intimidating his 
people more quietly. 

Among Nigeria's roughly 7,000 
political prisoners, for example, are 20 
other Ogoni activists held for the same 
murders. Most have been in prison for 
three years, several in solitary con- 
finement One of the group died, one 
has gone blind, and another lost his 


fingers during torture. General Abacha 
knows that executing or even trying 
them would draw unwanted attention. 
Instead he seems prepared to let them 
die in jail untried. 

He has been equally shrewd in ma- 
nipulating electoral issues. He has styled 
hims elf not as a dictator but as manager 
of Nigeria’s retain to democracy, pro- 
mised for 1998. He has allowed the 
establishment of political parties, but all 
are scrambling to make him their can- 
didate. When the leader of one party 
announced that he might ran himself, he 
was deposed and briefly arrested. 

It does not seem to have occurred to 
General Abacha that Nigeria already 
has an elected president. Moshood 
Abiola was widely considered die win- 
ner of democratic elections in 1993, 
which the military then annulled. He 
has been imprisoned for treason since 
trying to claim his presidency in 1994. 

After peacekeeping in chaotic 
Liberia, Nigeria's military will find 
it easy to contribute to democracy 
at home. It need only go back to its 
barracks. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Oldest of All 


With die passing of Jeanne Calment 
this week at the age of 122, the Guin- 
ness Book of World Records is seeking 
a new entry in the category of world’s 
oldest Living person. A leading can- 
didate is a nursing home resident in 
San Rafael. California, named Chris- 
tian Mortensen, who will turn 1 15 at 
mid-month, according to documents 
being presented on his behalf. The 
skeptical Guinness people, however, 
wish to take a longer look at him and at 
several others as well. 

Mr. Mortensen, a Danish immi- 
grant, came to America when be was 
21, the same year the Wright brothers 
flew their plane. If the news reports are 
accurate, he appears to possess the 
primary quality required of the oldest 
person: being good-natured enough 
not to mind being called “spry " all the 
time when you feel nothing of the-sort 
— when in fact you feel about 115 
years old. That and being able to put up 
with a lot of nonsensical questions 
from news reporters on your birthday. 


Other Comment 


It’s Risky to Be a Woman 

The most c hillin g conclusion of the 
latest report from the United Nations 
Children's Fund is that to be born a 
woman is to be bora at risk. The doc- 
ument says that violence against wom- 
en and girls is now deeply embedded in 
all cultures and that such violence is 
today the most pervasive form of abuse 
of human rights in the world. 

Unicef believes that more than 60 
million women who should be alive 
today are “missing” because of violent 
discrimination predominantly in South- 
west Asia, China and North Africa. The 
West need not feel smug, for foe report 
reveals foal in foe United States a wom- 
an is abused in one way or another by a 


partner every nine seconds. The Unicef 
report is hard-hitting and warns that 
unless communities can accept foe ac- 
cusation that the abuse of women is so 
deeply ingrained in some cultures that it 
is almost invisible, the very fabric of 
society will break down irrevocably, 
f — Khaleej Times (Dubai). 

Bicycling Is Good for You 

Did you know that bicycling bums 
450 to 800 calories per hour, doesn't 
hammer your skeletal system the way 
other aerobic sports do, and is a great 
way to get to work and get fit? 

— From a promotional advisory, 
for articles on health subjects, by 
the New York Times Syndicate. 


*9* K ivhumhoivalm • * 

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C TOCKB RIDGE, Massachusetts — 
O As the era ofpostcoloniai wars and 
superpower rivalry recedes. Southeast 
Asia is subtly reverting to foe balance 
of power that existed before foe arrival 
of Europeans in the raid 19th century. 

Cambodia and Laos had been king- 
doms that easily could have been sub- 
sumed into Vietnam or Thailand. Now 
once again they are weak and beguiling 
pieces of real estate that Thailand and 
Vietnam are ready to dominate. 

Had the French not established their 
Cambodian protectorate in 1863, foe 
land east of the Mekong River may well 
have become part of Vietnam, while 
land to foe west may have become part 
of Thailand. And had foe French, 30 
years later, not united three small king- 
doms descended from Thai warriors to 
form a Laotian protectorate, Laos might 
have been submerged by Thailand. 

When foe French left in 1954, die 
Thais and Sooth Vietnamese resumed 
their assault on Cambodia, for which 
their pro-American anti-communism 
was merely a pretext Cambodia was a 
natural resource paradise waiting to be 
raped. It has foe region's densest forests. 


— By Robert D. Kaplan 


fertile alluvial soil, and Tonic Sap Lake, 
which is among foe richest freshwater 
fishing areas in the world. 

The Cambodian countryside has al- 
ways been foe least developed in 
Southeast Asia. While Thailand began 
modernizing in the 1960s and 1970s, 
Cambodia was debilitated by civil war. 
Then Pol Pot’s reign from 1975 to 
1979, which killed more than a milli on 
people out of a population of 8 milli on, 
destroyed what was left of foe economy 
and infrastructure. 

The Vietnamese, meanwhile, have 
in recent years been renewing their 
regional ambitions and building their 
economy with foe same aggressive 
acumen with which they dug tunnels 
along the Ho Chi Minh Trail. 

In 1979, Vietnamese troops drove 
Pol Pot out of Phnom Penh and in- 
stalled Hun Sen, a former monk, in 
his place — the same Hun Sen who 
recently staged a coup, ousting his co- 
prime minister. Prince Norodom 
Ranariddh. 


Hun Sen’s historical association 
with the Vietnamese, though, may be 
less crucial to Cambodia’s future than 
whether he can create an effective state 
machine rhar is able to defend the coun- 
try against its rapacious neighbors. 

Four years of Cambodian democracy 
did nor strengthen the country, but kept 
it weak. Corruption and factionalism 
within foe government made ir easy for 
foreigners to log 4 percent of Cam- 
bodia's old-growth forests yearly and to 
trade illegally in gems, drugs and even 
children for foe Bangkok sex markets. 

Thai business interests now re- 
portedly control foe Angkor Wat 
temple complex, one of foe archae- 
ological wonders of foe world. Plans 
for tourist development will make it. in 
effect, an appendage of Thailand. 

Democracy did not die suddenly in 
Cambodia. It never really took root, 
and began crumbling almost imme- 
diately after foe elections in 1993. The 
weakness of foe civilian regime al- 
lowed the army to become an unruly 
mob at roadblocks. 

Because of the government army, as 
well as foe Khmer Rouge presence in 


the countryside, more than half foe 
country was unsafe at any given mo- 
ment Long before the recent roim. 
journalists and relief workers expected 
Hun Sen to move against Prince Ranar- 
iddh to end the pseud o-denvoCTacy . 

The United Nations spent $2 billion - 
in foe early 1990s on a national re- 1 
conciliation and denxxcratizanon pro- ■ _ 
gram in Cambodia in which 22,000 - . 

noops oversaw an election. 

But democracy would naturally ; . 
have difficulty taking hold in a country - 1 
where foe literacy rate is only 35 per- ; 
cent and the rural interior is isolated, 
psychologically as well as physically; ; 
from the cities. Without paved roads 
and intensive literacy campaigns, the ; 
country could never develop a modem ; 
consciousness of itself. : ; 

Cambodia’s future now depends on 1 
whether Hun Sen sells out to corporate , 

and military interests from neighboring ' ; 

countries, and if so, to which ones. ~ 

The writer, author of “The Ends of '' ; 
the Earth: A Journey to the Frontiers of ; 
Anarchy," contributed this comment to ; 
The New York Times. 


Korean Peninsula: Four- Way Talks to Achieve Peace at Last; 


S EOUL — Envoys from 
South and North Korea, 
China and the United States are 
holding talks in New York to set 
the dates and agenda for Jong- 
awaited four-party negoti- 
ations. The preparatory talks 
started this Tuesday. 

Much energy has been ex- 
pended trying to get foe North to 
show up. Now comes foe really 
hard part. 

For Washington and Seoul, 
the aim is to replace the 
armistice on the peninsula with 
a peace treaty. U.S. and South 
Korean officials have proposed 
that the agenda include confi- 
dence-building measures. 

North Korea has asked for an 
“other” category to be in- 
cluded. This is seen as a way for 
Pyongyang to renew its quest 
for additional food aid, 
something that South Korean 
and U.S. officials are reportedly 


By Ralph A. Cossa 


willing to discuss even though 
they rejected extra aid as a pre- 
condition for holding the talks. 

North Korea will probably 
make other demands. It can be 
expected to call for economic 
sanctions to be lifted and formal 
diplomatic relations with 
Washington to be established. 

The Clinton administration 
has already modified some eco- 
nomic restrictions, and has said 
it is willing to exchange liais on 
offices (one step below foil re- 
cognition ) under the terms of the 
1994 Agreed Framework be- 
tween Washington and Pyong- 
yang. The North undertook to 
freeze its suspected nuclear 
weapons program and dismantle 
a research reactor thought to be 
producing plutonium, in return 
for two nuclear power plants 
whose fuel is less susceptible 


to diversion for making bombs. 

The United States has been 
reluctant to move further in 
these two areas pending pro- 
gress on other issues, including 
resumed North-South dialogue. 

A further measured lifting of 
economic sanctions does seem 
negotiable, perhaps in return for 
significant North-South confi- 
dence-building measures. 

Formal diplomatic relations 
between Washington and 
Pyongyang are also a reason- 
able demand, but this should not 
precede mutual recognition be- 
tween Seoul and Pyongyang or 
the signing of a peace treaty. 

The United States and South 
Korea should be prepared to re- 
ject demands from foe North to 
remove or dramatically reduce 
U.S. military forces. This long- 
standing aim of Pyongyang is 


likely to be supported by China. 

The absence of a peace mealy 
since foe Korean War ended in 
1 953 has not led to renewed war, 
largely because foe stationing of 
American forces provided a po- 
tent deterrent. Nor will a treaty 
automatically guarantee peace, 
especially if this deterrence is 
removed 

Until North Korea starts par- 
ing its 1.1 million-man army 
(foe fourth largest in foe world) 
and pulling troops back from 
positions close to the demilit- 
arized zone, any reduction in 
the U.S. presence would be 
foolhardy. Only when North 
and South are peacefully reuni- 
fied under one government will 
discussions about a possible 
complete withdrawal of U.S. 
forces be appropriate. 

The proposal for four-party 
negotiations followed North 
Korean threats to abandon the 


armistice. Pyongyang demand 
ded direct bilateral peace talksT 
with the United States. 

The North must not confuse- 
U.S. and South Korean eageff 
ness to get it to foe negotiating' 
table with a willingness to payj 
any price to achieve a peace 
treaty. Peace is better sustained' 
by keeping the current armistice- 
than by reaching an agreement 
that puts foe deterrence strategy 2 
at risk. The continued presence 
of American forces in South'-! 
Korea is for Washington an3P 
Seoul alone to decide. 

_ 1 

The writer is executive di 
rector of the Pacific Forum 1 
CSfS.a Honolulu-based foreign' 
policy research institute affifc 
iated with the Center for Stra- 
tegic and International Studies: 
in Washington. He contributed 
this comment to the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


i •_ 

. i iVf; : i 

■ 


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Hot::--'- 
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Europe: No, France Isn’t Going to Scupper Monetary Union 


Europe t*. - 

For r • ’ 
oa:rr ' - 
GillsiS C." " ' 


. it c.vrj 

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'■."/'I If !* -1 


Mr. Mortensen supposedly cycled 
up to the nursing home 24 years ago 
and announced that he was moving in 
for foe duration. He likes to get outside 
about once a week and smoke a cigar. 
Madame Calment, a Frenchwoman 
bora shortly before foe Francr 'Yus- 
sian War, was also a Cyclist, u she 
reached foe age of 100. Perhaps .at is 
one of those secrets of longevity that 
the press is always asking post-cen- 
tenarians to reveal. 

Madame Calment, who was asked 
often, varied her list from year to year, 
probably because, like most of us, she 
didn’t have foe slightest idea what kept 
her going. The best answer, we think, 
(and which we recommend for use by 
any future holder of tire title, is 
something like “three stiff shots of 
whiskey upon arising, and no vegetable 
products whatsoever in the diet. ’ ’ After 
which foe world’s oldest person would 
wink and step spryly outside to get 
away from the media and have a cigar. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


L ONDON — Every day 
prayers arise in London, 
like muezzins' chants from min- 
arets; that the latest Popish plot 
to lifre'Jbhn Bull into bed with 
Marianne v^ill be postponed or 
will fMi’This is just- one more 
Anglo-Saxon illusion. 

Postponement of European 
monetary union? There is no 
provision for it in the Maas- 
tricht treaty. The treaty did 
provide for the possibility of an 
earlier move to union, but that 
was ruled out at a summit in 
Dublin last December. The 
treaty specifies that foe “third 
stage” (the move to union) wifi 
start on Jan. 1, 1999. 

Before July 1, 1998, foe 
heads of government are to de- 
cide by a qualified majority, 
bearing in mind recommenda- ’ 
tions by foe European Monetary 
Institute, foe Commission and 


By Roy Denman 


the European Parliament, 
“which member states fulfill 
the necessary conditions for the 
adoption of a single currency." 

The commitments of foe 
Maastricht treaty, signed by all 
member states and ratified by 
their parliaments (with opt-outs 
for Britain and Denmark), are 
clear and binding. 

Of course, the governments 
could scrap the treaty. But 
scrapping treaties belongs in 
Europe to a darker yesterday. 

In April 1943. the staff of 
Joachim von Ribbentrop, Hit- 
ler’s foreign minister, presented 
him on his 50th birthday with a 
jewel-encrusted casket contain- 
ing copies of foe treaties be had 
signed. Later it was found that 
he had broken all but two of 
them. Hitler, when told, fell 


about laughing. Europe has 
moved on since then. 

What credibility would foe 
goal of a single currency have if 
foe solemnly confirmed target 
date were missed? No one 
would believe in a new date. The 
currency markets would go into 
turmoil. The swings in currency 
rates would provoke strong 
pressure for import restrictions. 
The single market and all foe 
prosperity it has helped to gen- 
erate would be in danger. Going 
forward has risks, as does any 
great enterprise, but standing 
still has even greater risks. 

Would accommodating 
France mean so weakening foe 
rules as to make the euro an 
unstable currency? 

The target for a candidate na- 
tion’s budget deficit is 3 per- 


South Africa With America? 


W ASHINGTON — A1 
Gore was visibly chaf- 
ing behind the table in the 
Roosevelt Room at the White 
House. A white South African 
reporter was tendentiously in- 
terrogating the U.S. vice pres- 
ident and his South African 
peer, Thabo Mbeki, trying 
again and again to prod them 
into a provocative statement 
about military ties between 
Washington and Pretoria. 

Mr. Gore bristled and 
sought to move on. But foe 
South African deputy presi- 
dent fixed a dazzling smile on 
his tormentor and spun out an 
intricate, reasoned response 
that gave away nothing but 
made clear that only foe most 
ill-intentioned of human be- 
ings would differ with him on 
this or any other question. 

Two decades have elapsed 
since I first saw Mr. Mbeki 
practice this kind of redempt- 
ive magic in Lusaka. Zambia, 
and other exile ports of call 
when be was chief of infor- 
mation for foe African Na- 
tional Congress. 

He now stands on the brink 
of succeeding Nelson Man- 
dela as South Africa's pres- 
ident. He has not lost the sense 
of mission he once brought to 
a seemingly hopeless job. 

That mission was “to 
charm South Africa's whites 
all foe way to defeat,” rather 
than to annihilate them, as 
many of his ANC comrades 
wanted. That jewel of a phrase 
comes from the journalist 
Parti Waldmeir. who in her 
perceptive book "Anatomy of 
a Miracle” quotes Mr. Mbeki 
back in the days of exile: 

“We are talking not of over- 
throwing foe government but 
of nmiing so many people 
against it” and its policies of 


By Jim Hoagland 


apartheid that the white tyr- 
anny would capitulate. Thai, in 
part, is what happened. 

Mr. Mbeki, Mr. Mandela 
and other people of goodwill 
on both sides of the racial di- 
vide succeeded in one of his- 
tory's most amazing psycho- 
logical transformations. 

The whites released Mr. 
Mandela from prison, organ- 
ized the one-man, one-vote 
elections that they had always 
predicted would lead ro chaos 
and the collapse of their way 
of life, and then gracefully 
yielded much of their power to 
their adversaries in rhe ANC. 

Mr. Gore welcomed Mr. 
Mbeki to foe Roosevelt Room 
last week as pan of semian- 
nual consultations, in which 
they and cabinet ministersdis- 
cuss strengthening defense, 
science, financial and other 
ties. As a bonus, this highly 
visible, high-level coopera- 
tion seems to reassure South 
Africa's white minority and 
those in the black majority 
who are not part of foe ANC. 

Those two groups have the 
most to fear from posl-Man- 
dela South Africa becoming 
rife with foe corruption, tribal 
tensions and anti-democratic 
practices that have stymied so 
much of the continent to the 
north. Heavy U.S. involve- 
ment. such as the Agency for 
International Development's 
role in providing new hous- 
ing. is seen as extra protection 
against such a deterioration. 

Is there an American model 
for South Africa? It is tempt- 
ing for Americans to think so. 
Answering questions, Mr. 
Gore favorably compared the 
two nations’ efforts to over- 


come foe racial and ethnic con- 
flict "that unleashes the evil 
coiled in the human soul.” 

South Africa, he said, "is 
the mosi powerful country on 
foe continenL” It has estab- 
lished a moral authority that 
causes others to look to it in a 
crisis as the rest of foe world 
looks to the United Slates. 

One of Mr. Gore's un- 
declared purposes in these 
meetings is to prod South 
Africa to take on more of a 
leadership role in African af- 
fairs than it has been willing to 
assume so far. When expan- 
sion of the LHM Security Coun- 
cil comes, Washington will no 
doubt support South Africa as 
one of three new members 
from the developing world. 

The United Slates would 
like to see Pretoria lead efforts 
to establish a pan-African 
peacekeeping force that 
would head off tragedies like 
Rwanda and Burundi. 

Mr. Mbeki, however, 
showed a reluctance to em- 
brace big new responsibilities 
while so much remains to be 
sorted out at home. That is 
why he ducked on foe jour- 
nalistic questions about U.S. 
military training for South Af- 
rican peacekeepers, ami su«- 
gestions of alliance. 

In contrast to Mr. Gore, he 
emphasized the differences in 
the two countries' racial situ- 
ations rather than similarities. 

That is a measure of Mr. 
Mbeki 's enormous subtlety, 
which blends well with Mr! 
Gore's earnestness. Possible 
future presidents both, they 
stand at foe center of this de- 
veloping, important diplomat- 
ic relationship between two 
countries with much to learn 
from each other. 

The p.w 


cent, but Article 104c of foe 
Maastricht treaty provides two 
qualifying criteria: 

• Either foe rate has declined 
substantially and continuously 
and reached a level that comes 
close to the target. • 

• Or the overshooting is ex- 
ceptional and temporary, and 
the rate is close to foe target 

Lionel Jospin’s government 
has recently announced corpo- 
rate tax increases that should 
help to put the budget deficitfor 
the coming year at 3.2 to 33 
percent And there are other 
hopeful signs. 

France is tackling foe high 
cost in terms of employment 
of the payroll tax, by shifting 
some of the burden from em- 
ployees to all taxpayers. 

French industry is compet- 
itive; interest rates are low; 
there is a substantial balance of 
payments surplus; the franc has 
remained stable against the 
Deutsche mark. 

Prime Minister Jospin talks of 
"making Europe without un- 
making France.” He is right 
The need for consensus and so- 
cial cohesion make progress 
slow, butit is not France which is 
a constraint on Europe. Europe 
is a constraint cm France. 

What matters in terms of a 
viable and durable single cur- 
rency is not debate about frac- 
tions of one- 1 0th of 1 percent of 
GNP but a credible and sus- 
tainable noninflationary policy. 

In the last few years much 
progress has been made in con- 
vergence among the Continen- 
tal economies, particularly in 
inflation rates and currency sta- 
bility. On this basis, a veto next 
year on France or Germany 
qualifying for monetary union 
is about as likely as Franklin 
Roosevelt rising from foe grave 
and denouncing foe New Deal. 


Ail foe members of the Eurof; 
pean Union which want in' 1 


to put its economy right it will 
be difficult for German' 
doubters to blackball it 

Thai leaves Britain, Sweden" 
and Denmark outside (they' 
have all but said they will not _ 
join, at least for some years), ‘ 
along with Greece, which can-.' 
not qualify. ‘ - 

So next year will see foe most’ 
dramatic change in foe map of 
Europe since foe Six signed foe- 
Treaty of Rome 40 years ago*." 
The Europe of the Fifteen wiTT- 
become foe Europe of foe El- 
even, under the leadership of’ 
France and Germany, which* 
have after all been foe motor of 1 
European integration for foe 
last half century. v < 

Europeans outside foe inner 
group are in for a shock. They 1 
will find foe Eleven more and* 
more discussing things among' 1 
themselves. -• 

The British, talking much 
about their global role, are look- ' 
ing forward to a great success in - 
their EU presidency in foe first - 
half of next year. But that pres- 1 
idency will be mainly con=> 
ceraed with foe start of mon- 
etary union. The British will : 
find themselves rehearsing a-. 
play in which they have de- 
clined to participate. So their' 
voice will be little heard. 

The previous British govem-2 
mem knew little about Europe. 1 ■ 
The present one, intoxicated by>. 
its success at the last elections, 
has much to learn. 

The writer, a former repre - ' 
sentative in Washington of the-- 
European Commission, con- 
tributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


au re 

ter- 7 

223. 
Sifts ; 

k'Kr. ; 
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rater-.- 

I ^ 

i 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1897: Chicago Italians lts pre-war whiteness, although 


CHICAGO — The Italians here 
are much excited over the chal- 
lenge sent by General AJbertone 
ro prince Henri d 'Orleans. One 
of the most outspoken is Dr. Lag- 
grio, a prominent physician, who 
said: "I am glad General AJ- 
bertone has issued a challenge, 
and I am sure he will resent the 
insult of the prince as an Italian 
should, to maintain foe honor of 
the Italian army." The Secretary 
of the Italian Consulate was 
equally pronounced in defence 
of the Italian army. He said: "I 
do not see why such slanderous 
statements against Italian valor 
were made, unless they were in- 
spired by personal spite." 

1922: Post-War Bread 

PARIS — Some people may 
lament jusi now the change in 
foe character of foe far-famed 
French breadrHt -is no u many 
months since it began to recover 


not in all places its pre-war 1 ’ 
sweetness of savor. Whiteness 1 * 
is regarded by many people aS‘- 
an essential characteristic of- 
good bread. But this is an egre- 
gious error. Exactly foe contrary 
is true. The whiter the bread foe ’ w- 
less irs life-sustaining quality. ■ 

1947: Tunisian Rising r 

PARIS — Jean Mons. French' 
Resident General of Tunisia;-' 
notified Paris lhai Tunisian 
labor leaders have ended the', 
general strike which left twenty- ' 
five dead and sixty wounded." 

But he indicated that the strike- - 
appeared to have been more of a fI 
nationalist uprising than a 
simple labor dispute. The strike- 
had been called by the General 
Un ion of Tunisian Labor, whose i 
members are exclusively Arabs; *. 
and whose leaders are known to' • ” 
be closely allied to the Tunisian .! 
separatist .movement, the Des- 
tour. and theArab League. 







9 Jf\ 


Mfi£l 


<e* 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY AUGUST 7, 1997 

OPINION /LETTERS 


PACE 9 


Budget Deal Delays 

Day of Reckoning 


toms to r*tM our budget /$ /n thg black!! wy're Bin 4 Ntivr 

MEN IN BLACK! 


lV;u-,.. 


a l Lasi 


J By David 

S acramento. Califor- 
nia — The second-biggest 
government in America/the 
<Jne that is headquartered 
oere, is operating without a 
budget this week, as an im- 
passe between the Republi- 
can governor, Pete Wilson, 
me Pemocratic-dniTima- 
*pd California Legislature 
enters its second mooth. 
Vendore of state services and 
Some public employees are 
tejng paid, and die press 
■ ? "pouncing the politicians 
for their shenanigans. 

♦ Avoiding that kind of 
glam e was one of the driving 
forces behind the budget 
agreement reached in Wash- 
lhgton last week — an 
achievement for which Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton and the Re- 
publican leaders of Congress 
have been congratulating 
themselves nonstop. 

The irony is that the very 
issue that threw the latest curve 
mio the California budget ne- 
gotiations could also have de- 
railed the national budget, ex- 
cept for a bipartisan agreement 
in. Washington to ignore the 
problem. Mr. Wilson decided 
to pay back money that was 
I Jt owed to the state-guaranteed 
v pension funds. Mr. Clinton 
and the congressional Repub- 
licans agreed without a mur- 
rr\ur to ignore the fact that they 
and their predecessors bad 
been “raiding” .federal pen- 
sion funds for years. 

The only person I saw 
pointing out the budgetary 
chicanery in the national 
capital was Senator Ernest 
Hollings, Democrat of South 
Carolina, who for as long as 
I,.can remember has been 
leaking himself a nuisance 
on this subject. 


S. Broder 

Mr. Hollings, a former 
chairman of the Senate 
Budget Committee, took to 
the floor last Thursday to de- 
liver the following remarks: 

“Denny McLain, the Cy 
Y oung Award-winning pitch- 
er for the Detroit Tigers, 
when he got out of baseball 
became the head of a cor-, 
poration, and, unfortunately, 
used the corporate pension 
fund to pay off the debt He 
was sentenced to eight years 
in prison. Tell our friend 
Denny, if you can catch him 
in whatever prison, to please 
run for the U.S. Senate be- 
cause. rather than send us off 
to prison here when we use 
the pension funds to make the 
debt look smaller, we get the 
Good Government Award.” 

Then, referring to the new 
budget agreement, Mr. 
Hollings added: “Everybody 
is standing up with the pres- 
ident and the speaker and the 
majority leader and saying, 
‘How wonderful, boys — • it is 
Christmas in July.’ It is a total 
fraud, absolute farce, and 
everybody ought to know iL" 

Now, you have to discount 
a bit for Mr. Hollings's 
hyperbole. The budget agree- 
ment he calls a fraud and 
a farce has its redeeming 
qualities. 

Bur on the fundamental 
point, Mr. Hollings is right. 
It is only by counting the 
surpluses in Social Security 
and other trust funds — which 
are supposed to be set aside 
to pay for future benefits — 
that the budget deficit is 
eliminated (on paper) in the 
next five years. 

The practice is not new. 
It has been going on for 
years. But the figures Mr. 




j|% *7 


%W 


flows 

5fMHT 

NfffiRMS 

•mm 

TO US- 



Hollings submitted show 
that the cumulative borrow- 
ings from Social Security 
and the military and civilian 
employee pension funds will 
increase by almost $800 
billion by 2002, the year the 
budget is supposed to be 
in balance. The total federal 
debt is projected to increase 
by almost $1 trillion in 
that same period. 

That is where Governor 
Wilson comes into the pic- 
ture. Frustrated by die budget 
impasse, he decided last week 
to repay the entire $1.36 bil- 
lion owed by the state to the 
California state employees' 
pension fund. 

The state had deferred 
scheduled payments into the 
fund during two years of 


a severe economic slump 
earlier this decade, thereby 
helping balance two budgets, 
as required by the California 
constitution. With good 
economic times returning, 
the courts ordered that the 
arrears be made up, but 
did not require that it be 
done in one year. 

When negotiations stalled, 
Mr. Wilson simply ordered 
it done immediately. By do- 
ing so, he took off the table 
money that he wanted to 
use for a S 1 billion tax cut and 
that Democrats wanted to 
use to raise state workers’ pay 
and to fund some of their 
favorite programs. 

He saved California tax- 
payers about $600 million in 
interest that the state would 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


■ t iiion 


***** 

m>r' 

- 


* 

.yr ■' ■“•** " 


Oprwr: 

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jjfc&r'-- - 


1 ^ Europe vs. America 

Four front-page headlines 
j on the same day read: “That 

j| German Crisis: The Shadows 

i Darken,” “Who’s to Blame 

| fflr the Tigers' Woes? Tur- 

I moil Lays Bear Some Cracks 

I in Southeast Asian Econo- 

5 iqies,” “Decades of Political 

^ Stagnation' Hobble Econo- 

\ mes of Arab World," “Dol- 

{ lar Just Can’t Lose; Whatever 
Fed Decides, Currency is Set 
tQ Gain” (IHT. Aug. 4). 

There is a pattern here: a 
2 focus on what is perceived as 

- the continuing economic 

•! downfall of the world outside 

the United States. 

■, But European countries, 
especially those in the North, 
are in many ways successful 
and rich beyond America’s 
* dreams. They have achieved 

many things that America 
i" strives for, and from which 

[ lessons can be learned. 

f „ Aside from having educa- 
\ A don available to all, safe, 
T clean city centers, good pub- 
lic transportation, in Euro- 
pean countries such as die 
Netherlands, people work to 
j live rather than live to work. 

- In the United Stales, the 
“overwork ethic” results in 
productivity. This is good for 
stock prices. But it is not good 
for people or for their health 
or for their children. 

-Why should productivity 
and profitability have to be 
the norm? 

- And why is it that Amer- 
ica’s inrerest in the outside 
world — particularly in 
Europe — seems to be mostly 
,. v limited to celebrating and ex- 
W a ggera ting economic woes? 
y* ROBERT BRAGAR. • 
Amsterdam. 

Regarding "Heading for 

the 24-Hour Business Day 

<J ‘ The United States may be 
“miles ahead’ ’ in creating die 
24-hour business day. bat for 
some reason this doesn t 
seem like something © brag 
about. Might it not be con- 
ceivable that such a society— 
whose citizens are so over- 
worked that they must buy 
toothpaste, plan bohdays or 
organize church activities ai3 
AK-- has something to be 

ashamed of? . 

'■The man who studies time 

, ft ^“economic resourt^ ts 

5 typical of the obsessives^ 

ing of the modem American 
!o maintain control over 
aspect of life ^quitette 
>* opposite happens ^ * “ 

..Inihegiganbt : “ 

peretores’-m^yU.S.cny^ 

sSht of solitary shopper 
^mng loaded 

i fluorescent-lit - 

j night borders on t^d^: cal 

I : But shojymg m a tyP^ 

latiian or French rjjy 
vtsfr or during lunch^g 

Soften a d^ce 

r. experience tha small 
^ at outdoor markets 

local shops. f^d 

-Americans may soon ^ 
that even the weej 1 ^ 
j the moroing are not enoug 


to meet their ever increasing 
demands. 

If this is “miles ahead,” I 
don’t min d staying behind. 

ANTHONY CALABRIA. 

Florence. 

Bankers’ Woes 

Regarding Hot US. Eco- 
nomy Jars Stock Market " and 
Germans TalkTough: A Raze 
Rise in Sight?" (Aug. 2): 

The two front-page stories 
ride by side illustrate well the 
topsy-turvy world of the cen- 
tral banker. 

The U.S. dollar is strong, 
but the Federal Reserve is 
haunted by the specter of in- 
sufficient unemployment As 
a safeguard against menacing 
prosperity, the Fed is consid- 
ering raising interest rates. 

In Germany, the Bundes- 
bank’s predicament is dia- 
metrically opposite. Unem- 
ployment is at a postwar 
record high — surely high 
enough to satisfy. eveD 
the most demanding central 
banker — and inflation is 
low. Consequently, the 
Deutsche m a rie is weak. 
As this might entail higher i 
prices, the Bundesbank 
is considering raising interest 
rates. Even if this doesn’t 
kill off die ever present 
danger of recovery, it will 
have the virtue of at least 
slowing it down. 

I am reminded of the 18th- 
century physician whose fa- 
vorite remedy for all ills that 
beset humankind was to bleed 
the patient If the patient was 
strong, he survived; the phy- 
sician took the credit If the 
patient wasn’t strong enough, 
he died; the physician 
muttered inscrutably about 
“negative humors.” 

JOHN E. RAY. 

Ponienay-Tfesigny, France. 

On Eastern Europe 

Regarding “ Amateur 
Czech Spies Finally Get Re- 
spect" (July 19): 

The article cm the CIA s 
recognition of East European 
operatives paints a picture of 
failed, amateurish operations 
performed out of youthful ro- 
manticism for “Western- 
style freedom.” This portray- 
al is insulting to the common 
ideals of freedom, human 
rights and civil society shared 
by the political traditions of 
Eastern and Western Europe 
and North America. 

1 am particularly dismayed 
by the tei m “Western-style 
freedom.” It implies fori East 
European societies bad me 
choice of some other kmd 
of freedom, and that the com- 
mon people could have em- 
braced some other values 
than those of “Westernized 

intellectuals. . 

Let's set foe record 
straight There are no “West- 
ern” and “Eastern varieties 

of freedom. . 

The Communist regimes 
were 'imposed uponE*rtern 
Europe. Informers for We* 
^intelligence in Easte™ 
&jrope were pnmanty 


serving the interests of their 
own nations. In Eastern 
Europe, they should receive 
public appreciation. 

East Europeans who col- 
laborated with the CIA 
deserve acknowledgment 
first and foremost from 
the democratically elected 
governments of the countries 
whose integrity they defen- 
ded, and only then from 
die United Staies. 

PALNYXRL 

Budapest. 

For-Profit Hospitals 

Regarding " For-Profit 
Hospitals Run Into Complic- 
ation” (July 28 J: 

The article said that in or- 
der to generate profits, in- 
vestor-owned hospital chains 
were seeking “to provide 
shareholders with returns 
more common to makers of 
software or soda water.” 

How can a society allow 


profit to determine the quantity 
and quality of health care? The 
only appropriate health care is 
public, universal and compre- 
hensive. “The pressure of 
Wall Street” has no place in 
the provision of public health. 

BERTRAM A. WE3NERT. 

Nice. 

A Questionable Term 

Regarding “Take Chinese 
Chest-Beating on Taiwan With 
0 Grain of Salt" (Opinion, Ju- 
ly 14) by Jonathan Mirsfcy: 
Mr. Mirsky cites President 
Jiang Zemin’s call for a 
“final solution to the Taiwan 
question.” The “final solu- 
tion” is the translation of 
a Chinese term that could 
have been rendered as “to 
finally solve.” 

Put in an unfortunate con- 
text, “final solution" has pro- 
foundly negative meanings in 
English, which simply were 
not in the original Chinese 



As an extension of the news and 
commentary the International Herald 
Tribune brings to its- readers, the 
newspaper has a successful and highly- 
respected worldwide summit and 
conference program that foefuses on 
economic, social and political issues. 




THE WORLD'S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


Life Doesn’t Prepare Families 
For Complications of Dying 


By Ann Hood 


have had to pay if the 
pension fund had been 
reimbursed slowly over the 
next 10 years. 

It is not a popular move — 
not nearly as popular as 
the decision that the president 
and Congress made to 
cut taxes and increase spend- 
ing while claiming to balance 
the budget: 

But in the long run, debts 
have to be paid. And 
Washington has postponed 
the day of reckoning, leaving 
it to others to make the 
hard decisions that will 
actually bring spending and 
revenues into balance without 
raiding the pension funds. 
“Christmas in July” is an 
apt description. 

The Washington Post. 


P ROVIDENCE, Rhode Island — On 
Easter weekend my father started to die. 
His doctors believed that he started much 
earlier. 

His oncologist had told us in February 
that he wasn’t going to make iL 
His internist had told us he wouldn’t live 
24 hours from when he was rushed to the 
hospital in early January. His pulmonary 
specialist had said when his lung cancer was 
diagnosed in September that he had six 
months to live. 

But for me, the turning point was Good 
Friday night, as I sat alone with him by 

MEANWHILE 

his hospital bed and watched him 
deteriorate, lose the ability to sit up, to 
speak coherently, to use a bedpan. The next 
morning, the rest of the family summoned, 
be was given the last rites. 

When his p ulmonar y specialist finally 
arrived, my lather’s legs had gone blue 
and mottled. He could only moan through 
his oxygen mask. 

The doctor summoned us into the “family 
room,” the place where I had watched fam- 
ilies like us enter hopeful and leave sobbing. 
Odd to call it the family room, like the place 


text and a number of trans- 
lations readily available here. 

DANIEL TRETIAK. 

Hong Kong. 

A Refugee’s Story 

Hans E. Duldner (Letters, 
July 9) reminds “all those self- 
appointed critics of wartime 
Switzerland” of the Swiss 
who sheltered thousands of 
refugees “who made it across 
the border without a visa.” 

I was one of those refugees. 
But only because I was. lucky 
and was not caught by Swiss 
border guards. What about 
the others who were not so 
lucky, and who were thrown 
back to the horrors of the con- 
centration camps? 

Compare neutral wartime 
Switzerland with wartime 
Sweden, which never ex- 
pelled a single refugee who 
“made it across the border.” 
JESHA SHAPIR. 

Tel Aviv. 


“He has an infection,” the doctor said 
carefully. He made deliberate eye contact 
with each of us as he spoke. “He’s dying.” 

“Antibiotics won’t help?” I said. The 
word infection brought me false relief. I 
imagined the bottles of pink amoxicillin 
bought to cure my children’s infections. 

4 ‘They might.' * the doctor said. ‘ ‘But in a 
few days or a few weeks he’ll just get 
another infection.” 

“So what do we do?” one of us asked. 

Now the doctor turned his gaze on my 
mother. “We can make him comfortable.” 
he said. 

“You want to kill him!” my mother 
shrieked 

“I’m not in the business of killing 
people,” the doctor said “I’m in the busi- 
ness of healing. And I cannot heal him. ” 

Withholding antibiotics was a level of 
assisted suicide I had never considered 
It seemed barbaric to let infections take over 
my fader’s body, especially after he 
had fought so long with rounds of chemo- 
therapy and radiation. 

It was those very treatments that had 
killed off his platelets, his ability to fight 
infections. Still, antibiotics had brought 
him around each time. 

And they brought him back that week- 
end, too. The first tiling he said to me when 
he regained consciousness on Easter morn- 
ing was: “Make sure they keep giving me 
antibiotics- Even if they don’t want to.” 

But we had already changed our order, 
from “put him on a respirator” to “DNR” 
— do not resuscitate. 

My father had said to put him on a 
respirator so long as there was a one -in- a- 
miUion chance he would live. That day in 
the family room, we lost that one-in-a- 
million chance. 

Once we made that decision, we were 
plagued with others. Did we want a feeding 
tube if it came to that? Did we want to 
withhold his insulin? His potassium? 
Would we agree to stop having his blood 
tested? Each decision brought my father 
closer to his inevitable death. 

As much as we had read and heard about 
assisted suicide, we had all imagined it a 
one-point decision. Do not resuscitate. 


But there were countless ways to ac- 
complish the task. The hospital social work- 
er visited every day to pressure us to move 
my father to a hospice. Nurses took us aside 
to feel us out, to urge us one step further. 

The doctor decided I was the obstacle to 
letting my father die. He called me on the 
phone and explained what I already knew: It 
was hopeless. 

But my father, who had heard us in the 
throes of our decision making that Saturday 
morning despite all of the medical staff's 
certainty that he was at death's door, had 
made me promise not to stop treatment 
On Easter night, when he would have 
been in the morgue had we heeded the 
doctor's advice, my father called my moth- 
er at home and talked to her at length — 
requesting special foods and making jokes. 
‘ T thought 1 was a goner for awhile there," 
he said, surprised not at being alive, but at 
having been so close to death. 

I watched a TV movie with him that 
night, and told him what the doctors had 
been urging us to do. 

"You won’t let them stop helping me,” 
he said confidently. He asked me to bring in 
my 3-year-old son for a visit. 

I wish this story had a happy ending. That 
we fought to treat my father and we tri- 
umphed. But like all terminal illness, the 
ending is no t happy, and the journey was 
wrought with indecision and ambiguity. I 
struggled not only with the fact that my father 
was certainly going to die soon, but also with 
the weight of the decisions thrust upon us. 

Close friends and relatives who have 
been spared so far did not want to talk to me 

The choices toe toillface 
will not be simply to 
‘fnake him comfortable 


about whri l was experiencing. They did 
not want to glimpse their own futures. 

Two weeks after Easter, my father died. 
Over those two weeks he was sometimes 
alert and present; more often he slept or 
babbled. We spent that last weekend watch- 
ing his breathing become slower and more 
labored. We watched his body turn blue 
from lack of oxygen, watched him take up to 
two minutes between breaths, each of us 
holding our breath until his next one came. 

Slowly we agreed to stop the blood tests, 
the potassium, the insulin. We agreed to 
give him moiphine in anticipation of his 
suffering, which had been minimal until 
then. Parhaps foolishly, we kept our prom- 
ise: The IVs, antibiotics, fluids and nu- 
trients did not stop. 

That January night when he was first 
brought by ambulance to the hospital and 
we were told he wouldn’t make it. 1 
screamed, a loud wail of pain and anger. 

“You can’t do this.” the pulmonary spe- 
cialist told me, grabbing me by the arm. * ‘If 
he makes iL this will happen again and 
again. You will hear these words again. You 
will see things get worse as rime goes on. 
This is serious illness.’’ 

This is serious illness, and none of us can 
escape iL The choices we will face will not 
be easy, wiUf not be simply to "make him 
comfortable.” 

Life is complicated; dying is no dif- 
ferent. 

The writer, whose most recent novel is 
“ The Properties of Water," contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


Korea Summit 

September 10-11 

World Water: 

Financing for the Future 

September 30-October 1 


Seoul 


Istanbul 


Romania Investment Summit Bucharest 

October 29-30 

Oil H Money Conference London 

November 18-19 

Southern Africa Trade Gaborone 

a Investment Summit 

November 18-19 


For further information on any of these events, 
please contact Brenda Erdmann Hagerty, 
International Herald Tribune, 63 Long Acre, 
London WC 2 E 9JH. 

Tel. (44 3 71) 420 0307 Fax: (44 171) 83 6 0737 
E-mail: bhagerty@iht.com 


t 


r 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBU NE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1997 

HEALTH/SCIENCE 



Crocodiles Prove 
They Are Still 
Great Survivors 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

tfew Yitrk Times Service 

ARWIN, Australia — 
With its long, powerful 
jaws, bony armor and a 
muscular tail that can pro- 
pel it for short, aquatic bursts to 50 
miles (85 kilometers) an hour, the 
crocodile is among the world’s great 
survivors. 

Appearing on this planet before 
birds and mammals, and outliving di- 
nosaurs, crocodiles have been around 
as predators, the fossil record shows, 
for at least 240 million years. Yet 
around the middle of this century they 
faced extinction, victims of another 
predator. Homo sapiens. 

After years of intense commercial 
hunting, Australia banned crocodile 
hunting in 1971, and over the last 
quarter-century the population has 
bounced back remarkably, a testa- 
ment both to enlightened wildlife 
management and the crocodiles’ own 
survival skills. Surveys based on spot- 
light counts at night in their well- 
known habitats point to about 
100,000 saltwater crocodiles in the 










country at large, up from 7,500 in the 
early 1970s. 

“Their status has changed from 
rare to common animals,” said Dr. 
Grahame Webb, a zoologist who has 
been studying saltwater crocodiles for 
24 years and advises the government 
of the Northern Territory, where most 
of the animals live. 

But he and other wildlife officials 
freely acknowledge a new set of prob- 
lems: the greater frequency of cro- 
codile attacks against humans: 
mounting livestock losses in areas 
where cattle and horses venture too 
close to the water, and rising demands 
from the public to reinstitute at least 
limited forms of the crocodile hunt. 

Twenty-two species of crocodile 
are distributed among 100 equatorial 
and subtropical countries. They in- 
clude the American alligator. South 
American caimans, Indian gharials, 
the Nile crocodile (a stalwart of Tar- 
zan movies) and a host of slender- 
snouted freshwater varieties. 

But the Australian saltwater or es- 
tuarine crocodile, known to zoologists 
as Crocodylus porosns, outstrips all 
others in size, making it the largest 


Breck P. Kca/Aflfaral* Acjmii* 

Australia now has J 00,000 crocodiles, up from 7f>00 in the 1 970s. 


living reptile on Earth. Males some- 
times reach 20 to 23 feet (6 to 7 meters) 
in length and weigh up to a ton. Fe- 
males run half that length and weight 

Australia is the southernmost ex- 
treme of these animals' range, which 
stretches from the east .coast of India, 
across to the Philippines and Caroline 
Islands and down through Malaysia, 
Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. 
They can live in the sea. tidal rivers or 
completely freshwater rivers, 
swamps and biHabongs. 

In Australia, they exist not only in 
the sparsely settled Northern Terri- 
tory but also in the far north of the 
Australian states of Queensland and 
Western Australia. 


C ROCODILES are inti- 
mately involved with the 
culture and traditions of the 
Australian aborigines and 
figure prominently in aboriginal sto- 
ries and myths and in ancient rock art 
Some aborigines still eat the eggs and 
meat Others refuse to kill them. 

With so many more crocodiles 
around now, signs have proliferated 
warning of the dangers of swimming 
or wading in saltwater creeks, touring 
or fishing from open boats, gutting 
fish on boat ramps or camping near 
the water’s edge. 

One of die more sensational fatal- 
ities occurred 10 years ago on a con- 
crete causeway over the East Alligator 
River, about 100 miles southeast of 
Darwin. A local guide, Terry 
McLoughlin. was pointing out cro- 
codiles to tourists. As the tide rushed 


Many crocodile eggs are hatched at farms and wildlife centers. 


up, he slipped and fell. A crocodile bit 
his bead, killing him. almost instantly. 
Because aborigines consider the an- 
imal sacred, it still thrashes around in 
these waters today. 

Of 31 recorded attacks since 1971, 
18 have been fatal. Most are swim- 
ming accidents, although one man in 
1993 was pulled out of a boat at night 
and killed. 

Between 100 and 200 crocodiles 
have to be removed annually from 
Darwin Harbor. So for this year the 
count tops 60, said Bill Freeland, 
deputy director of the Parks and Wild- 
life Commission of the Northern Ter- 
ritory. The “problem” animals are 
sent to forms, where they are used for 
breeding. 

Both the forms and a plan to allow 
cattle ranchers to kill up to 400 cro- 
codiles a year are signs of the re- 
covery of crocodiles. 

The farms, some open to the public, 
have been around since 1983. They 
now legitimately export about $2 mil- 
lion annually of crocodile meat and 
skins, and are supplied with eggs peri- 
odically collected from wild cro- 
codile nests. 

Not only do landowners now get an 
economic return for their crocodiles, 
but die tourist industry, promoting the 
region as “Crocodile Dundee coun- 
try.” increasingly exploits crocodiles 
to draw more visitors. 

“Crocodiles have come to repre- 
sent a commercial asset, which is the 
best way to assure their survival,” 
said Charles Manolis, a zoologist who 
works with Dr. Webb. 


Aspirin Turns 100 

And Still More Uses Keep Turning Up 


By Sally Squires 

Washtftgion Post Service 


W ASHINGTON — “Take two 
aspirin and call the doctor in 
the morning” may not have 
been such tod advice. On its 
100th anniversary, that little white pill 
keeps on coming up with new uses. 

Well beyond its traditional roles for 
killing pain, reducing fever and controlling 
inflammation, aspirin has proved to be a 
potent medication for a wide variety of 
ailmen ts, from hairin g heart attacks to pre- 
venting strokes. 

The National Library of Medicine has 
logged more than 23,000 scientific papers 
on aspirin, with 880 published this year 
alone on various aspects of its use. Aspirin 
can soothe migraine headaches, stop pre- 
mature labor in some pregnant women and 
control lung inflammation caused by a 
common respiratory virus that is a major 
hazard for premature infants. 

Aspirin is one of the most widely used 
medications in the world. Each year, 58 
billion doses of aspirin are swallowed, 
ripped in fizzling concoctions or taken is 
suppositories, according to Bayer Co., one of 
the largest manufacturers. Americans pop 80 
million aspirin tablets daily — 29 billion per 
year — a figure that works out to 1 17 aspirin 
tablets annually for every man, woman and 
child in the country, according to Joe Grae- 
don, author of “The Aspirin Handbook. ” 
Experts say aspirin consumption could 
rise even higher in its second century as 
researchers uncover new applications. The 
latest scientific findings suggest aspirin can 
help in preventing colon cancer and in 
treating Alzheimer's and other 

forms of senility. It might even play a role in 
preventing cataracts. 

“It's mind-boggling how many new ap- 
plications this simple drug has,” said Paul 
Uetman, professor of pharmacology at the 
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in Bal- 
timore. “It seems that each year we hear of a 
new therapeutic application for die drug.” 
Acetyl salicylic acid is one of the original 
members of a group of more than four 
dozen chemical compounds called nons- 
teroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which 
also includes ibuprofen. These drugs help to 
control fever, swelling and pain. How well 
they exert these effects — and with what 
number of complications — varies from 
drug to drug. But “aspirin is still the gold 
standard that all the others are compared 
to,” said Dr. Lietman. 

Researchers did not begin to understand 
how aspirin exerts its powerful effects until 
the 1970s. although there were many in- 
triguing clues beforehand. Kidney re- 


searchers had found that low doses of as- 
pirin blocked the production of uric acid in 
the kidneys. Pharmacologists had researen 

proving that aspirin reduced pain by acting 
on tissues and nerves throughout the body 
instead of working like morphine on nerves 
in the brain that transmit pain signals. 

Evidence also showed that aspirin 
lowered fever by affecting key centers in 
the hypothalamus rather than by affecting 
blood vessels throughout the body. In the 
blood, aspirin halted platelet function and 
blood-clot formation as well as causing salt . 
and water retention. However, it also 
caused indigestion in some people and 
could produce nasal polyps. 

But there was no common thread to ex- : 
plain these varied effects until the British ; 
pharmacologist John Vane wove them all 
together with the discovery that aspirin 
halts production of a potent group of chern- j 
icals in the body called prostaglandins. i 

“At long last, the salicylate story seemed | 
to have found a beginning, middle and end, ’ ’ 
noted Gerald Weissman, a New York Uni- 
versity rheumatologist, in a 1991 article on 
aspirin published in Scientific American. 

Prostaglandins, which are synthesized 
from fatly acids, are manufactured in every 
cell of the body except red blood cells. They 
are key ingredients in a host of essential 
body reactions from muscle contraction to 
ovulation. But unlike other hormones such 
as insulin that are released from organs, 
prostaglandins are released when cells are 
injured or otherwise stimulated. They, in 
turn, can cause tissue damage. The dis- 
covery about prostaglandins Dr. Vane a No- 
bel Prize in Medicine in 1982 and led to an 
explosion of scientific research on aspirin. 

LIT aspirin does have its dark 
side. High doses have been 
linked to gastrointestinal ulcers 
and bleeding, and many aspirin 
users consume it in high doses: 20 percent 
of the users consume 80 percent of the drug. 

In a study involving nearly 9.000 partic- 
ipants, Lee Simon, associate professor of 
medicine at Harvard Medical School, and 
his colleagues found that 1 to 2 percent of 
aspirin users experience the worst bleeding 
complications. “It's notan inconsequential 
problem,” he said. 

Aspirin use can also be a problem for 
about 10 percent of people who have i 
asthma. Studies have found that in this ‘ 
group of asthmatics the drug can trigger 1 
attacks, may cause facial swelling and may ; 
produce polyps in the nasal passages. ; 

The challenge for researchers is to de- t 
velop preparations that retain aspirin’s be- j 
neficial effects while decreasing its com- ; 
plications. ■ 


ltr>‘ - 


BOOKS ; 

MY NAME ESCAPES ME: 

The Diary of a Retiring Actor 

By Alec Guinness. 214 pages. $23.95. 
Viking. 

Reviewed by Jonathan Yandley 

A S the agreeably self-mocking title 
of this book suggests, it is the diaty 
of a man of advanced years who is all too 
aware of their cumulative effect on body 
and mind. “Dr. Alzheimer looks as if he 
may be extending a welcome to me,” Sir 
Alec Guinness admits, and supplies the 
evidence: “Today I found myself mak- 
ing enticing cooing sounds to what I took 
to be a rather pale pigeon on the lawn 
outside my study. It turned out to be a 
knucklebone left by one of the dogs.” 
Ditto for his wife of nearly six decades, 
Merula: “Yesterday M and 1 caught 
ourselves horribly stooped, hobbling and 
shuffling about the place. Well, it was 
rather cold. We straightened ourselves 
and I suggested we should change our 
name to Mr. and Mis. Doubled-Upp. In- 
vitations could go out, ‘Mr. & Mrs. 
Doubled-Upp have pleasure in inviting 
you to bend over a cup of Royal Blend 
tea' Oh, how foolish can one get?” 
Foolish. Sir Alec is not. Now in his 
early 80s, he responds to the inconveni- 
ences and occasional indignities of old 
age with humor and composure, relishing 
life even as he acknowledges that at least 
in some respects he cannot live it as fully 
as he once did. He reveals himself here — 
as he did more than a decade ago in his 
memoir. ■ - Blessings in Disguise’ ’ — as a 
pleasure-loving if moderate man and as 
an accomplished, at times devilish, wiL 
Sir Alec says he has kept a diary for 
three decades,’ “a small, strictly private, 
almost illegible series of daily jottings” 
not meant for public inspection. This 
one, by contrast, was written at the sug- 
gestion of his publisher and is therefore 
“rather different, being fuller, quirkier 
and more haphazard and. to my regret. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

T WO big teams suffered 
defeat by small margins at 
the American Contract 
Bridge League's Summer 
Nationals in Albuquerque. 
New Mexico. 

In the second round of the 
Spingold Knockout Team 
Championship, a little- 
known foursome from the 
Washington area scored a 
stunning upset. Robert Klein. 
David Ruderman. and a mar- 
ried couple. Donna Rogall 
and John Adams, held on to 
win by 2 imps after an early 
lead of 62 had Been whittled 
away. Their victims were the 
fourth-seeded team of 
Richard Schwartz. Mark Lair, 
Paul Soloway. Bob Goldman, 
Chip Martel and Lew 
Stansby, all of whom have 


unavoidably self-revealing (because) I 
have been unable to disguise my pho- 
bias, irritations, prejudices (though the 
latter are often short-lived) and my 
childishness and frivolity.” 

Sir Alec may regret this but the reader 
will not, and in any event the diaries are 
hardly so unbuttoned as he imagines 
them to be. This is not to say that they are 
without asperity: "Peter Cook's obit- 
uaries seemed to take up more press 
coverage than would the assassination of 
the entire royal family. I asked Alan 
Bennett if he could account for it. ‘He 
was a journalist,’ he said.” 

Nor is it to say that they are not at least 
mildly ribald: “In the evening to see 
’Carrington’ at the Curzon. Enjoyed it. 
The film a touch bitty perhaps, and even- 
paced and slowish. It got a move on 
when it came to the obligatory bonking, 
all of which was taken at foe same heav- 
ing canter.” Nor. for that matter, is it to 
say that they are without their moments 
of incorrectness: “In foe evening to foe 
Theatre Royal, Haymarket to see an 
American play called ‘Burning Blue.’ 
Rather good and very well done. It is set 
aboard a fictional U.Si aircraft carrier 
and deals with tracking down the love 
that insists, these days, on speaking its 
name. But it wasn't shrilL All the actors 
were excellent, but I particularly liked 
Ian Fitzgibbon, who has a light and 
quirky touch, and the two girls. Kath- 
erine Hogarth and Helene Kvae. Some 
of foe evening was too noisy for my 
taste, but when foe decibels rose high 
they at least drowned out foe heavy 
breathing in foe audience of butch, leath- 
er-jacketed middle-aged men.” 

After a lifetime of acting. Sir Alec now 
stays on the other side of foe footlights. 
From time to time he is sent a new play or 
film script, and some of these he reads 
with pleasure and interest, but "I’m past 
it all.” This is much to his admirers’ 
regret, but foe explanation is simple and 
understandable. Acting is exhausting 


even for the young, and into the bargain 
Guinness's memory is not what it once 
was. Beyond that, his eyesight and hear- 
ing have declined, indeed in foe course of 
these diaries he is fitted for hearing aids 
for both ears: “They have minute an- 
tennae, or so I supposed them to be, as if 
belonging to dwarf Martians, but they are 
really little lavatory chains to pull foe 
things oul At foe moment everything 
sounds brittle and metallic but I’m told 
I'll get used to that. To myself I sound like 
the Ghost of Hamlet senior doing his ‘old 
mole' work in some vault.” 

In that passage as in innumerable oth- 
ers, Sir Alec reverts to Shakespeare in- 
stinctively, as a central, irreplaceable ref- 
erence point. More famous as the ultimate 
character actor than as a Shakespearean, 
Sir Alec nonetheless has acted in a broad 
range of Shakespeare’s plays and, like all 
the great actors of his day, places them at 
the center of his universe. 

U PON signs of civilization’s decay 
he is quick to comment. He rails 
against the whole range of silly, incom- 
prehensible inventions tbe technological 
world has foisted upon us, though he 
most surely loves his CD player. He finds 
comfort in music, and in art as well; be is 
a prodigious museum-goer and gallery- 
hopper who is forever tempted by paint- 
ings, whether they are for sale or not. 

But though be does more than bis 
share of gallivanting, at heart Sir Alec is 
a homebody, always drawn back to "be- 
loved wife, dear dogs, intelligent cat. 
outrageous rabbits, Himalayan molehills 
and foe tumult of country noises. ' ’ As old 
friends die off one by one — ”My small 
world threatens to be underpopulated” 
— the importance of these quiet, private 
pleasures intensifies. One can only hope 
that be is granted many more years in 
which to enjoy them. 

Jonathan Yardley is on the staff of The 
Washington Post. 


won major titles in foe last six 
months. The last four are 
reigning or former world 
champions. 

In the Women’s Knockout 
Team, the' top-seeded squad. 
Pam Wittes, Jo Ann Sprung. 
Joann Glasson. Judy Wadas. 
Sue Weinstein and Cberi 
Bjerkan, lost by 9 imps. The 
winners were Lynne Schae- 
fer, Martha Katz, Ellen 
Siebert, Peggy Kaplan, Linda 
Gordon and Leslie Paryzer. 

In both events, all foe other 
favored teams survived. 

Adams and Rogall. East- 
West on foe diagramed deal, 
have a reputation as giant 
killers. Three years ago, on a 
similar occasion, they elim- 
inated a team including So- 
loway and Goldman by an 
equally slim margin. 

The double of one no- 
trump by Adams showed a 


club suit, and his partner was 
happy to pass for penalties. 
One no-trump doubled would 
probably have failed by two 
tricks, but North went’ from 
foe frying pan into foe fire. He 
hoped to find a safe home in a 
red suit, but when the doub- 
ling ended his partner was in 
two spades doubled. 

West led the club ace and 
shifted to a diamond. South 
misguessed by playing the 
king from dummy, and foe 
defense took the' ace, the 
queen and a diamond ruff. 
East played two club winners, 
on which his partner threw 
hearts, and dummy ruffed. 

The heart ace was cashed 
and a diamond was ruffed. 
The club ten was led. and 
ruffed low by WesL Dummy 
ovemiffed with the nine, but 
West’s trumps took three of 
the last four tricks for a pen- 


alty of 800. In the replay. 
East-West failed in three 
hearts, and Adams and his 
teammates gained 14 imps. 

NORTH (D) 

♦ Q9S 

c A K J 2 
0 K J64 

* J2 


WEST 
4 A J 86 4 
■7 10 8 5 
0 Q98 7 

*A 


EAST 
« 10 
7Q973 
0 A 10 
+ KQ 9 8 7 2 


SOUTH 
* K 732 
C 64 
0 532 
4 10 6 4 3 

Both sides were vulnerable The 


bidding: 

North 

East 

South 

West 

1 N.T. 

DM. 

Pass 

pass 

Redbl. 

Pass 

2 + 

DbL 

2* 

Pass 

Pass 

DbL 

2? 

DbL 

2* 

DbL 

Pass 

Pas 

Pass 


West led the dub ace. 



Progress on Organ Transplants 


By Thomas H. Maugh II and Heather Knight 

Los Angela Times 


W ASHINGTON — Two U.S. Navy researchers 
say they have devised a way to prevent the body 
from rejecting transplants without suppressing 
foe whole immune system and leaving the re- 
cipient vulnerable to vulnerable to infections. Preliminary 
experiments on monkeys suggest that foe treatment could also 
fro? organ recipients from foe need to take anti-rejection drugs 
for foe rest of their lives, thereby greatly reducing foe cost and 
the complications of transplants, the researchers said. 

Lieutenant Commander Allan Kirk and Captain David Har- 
lan of the Naval Medical Research Institute reported at a news 
conference here that they used synthetically created antibodies 
to deactivate immune cells that would normally trigger re- 
jection of foreign organs. A monthlong treatment with the 
antibodies also prevented the body from recognizing tbe donor 
organs as foreign when treatment was stopped, they said. 

Two monkeys treated in this fashion after receiving grossly 
mismatched kidneys have survived for more than 150 days with 
no further treatment and no signs of rejection, they report in foe 
current Proceedings of foe National Academy of Sciences. 

The two navy doctors, who hope to begin trials in humans 
within a year, say foe new drugs could be in routine clinical use 
within five years. “There is no doubt that this works,” Dr. 
Kirk said. “But we have to see how they would interact with 


other drugs that would be used in transplants in humans.” ■' 
“This is quite an exciting finding” and "a very promising 
start” toward work in humans, said Dr. Hans Sollinger, a 
transplant surgeon at foe University of Wisconsin Medical 
Center who was not involved in the research. 

Currently, donated organs have to be closely matched to the 
recipient immunoIogicaJly so that they are not immediately 
rejected. Even then, patients must receive expensive anti-- 
rejection drugs for the rest of their lives. 

Those drugs suppress the entire immune system, leaving the 
patient susceptible to viral and bacterial infections. The drugs- 
themselves also produce complications. 


A T least in pan because of problems involving com*. 
patibility of donor organs, nearly 4,000 Americans' 
died in 1996 while awaiting transplants, according- 
to foe United Network for Organ Sharing. An 
estimated 50,000 are on waiting lists. .! ■ 

Tbe navy study involved a dozen monkeys and was aided by- 
a University of Wisconsin physician. Dr. Stuart J. Knecbtle, 
who transplanted grossly mismatched kidneys into all of the' 
animals. After the transplants, four received no treatment, and- 
rejected foe kidneys in five to seven days. Six received one or' 
both of the two new compounds for a short term. All even- 
tually rejected the organs. 

But the final two received a 28-day course of therapy — and ■ 
never rejected tbe organs. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Memorable 
lines 

s demer 

8 Whoop 
19 Sports org. 
based in 


14 Rock singer 
Carmen 
is City on the 
Swan river 
i7‘Whoopsr 
ia Succotash 

ingredient 


Boulder, Colo. « Dentist's prefix 



12 Ave. George V, 75008 Paris 
Reservation: 

T6L01 47 23 32 32 -Fax 01 47 23 48 26 


ao Org. with a 
secretary 
general 

21 Jeffystone Part; 
denizen 

23 Lively dances 
2S Popular middle 
name 

28 Econ. stat 
2i Taps producer 
28 Old-time actress 
May Oliver 

31 FIR 

M Brief outline 
34 Nobleman 
36 Quite limber 

41 Wee hour 

42 Best-soiling 
picture book o( 
the 70's 

43 'Excuse me' 

46 ‘Oh, both er)“ 

48 Cone-shaped 
heaters 

48 Computer 
acronym 
so Cardinal 
insignia 
Si Bar offering 
S3 Sign of affection 
» Office 

88 Long island 
town, site of rhe 
Brookhaven 
Laboratory 
80 Dickens's Mr. 

Pecksniff 
•i Mrs. Charles 
Chaptin 

82 Actress 
Verduga 
*3 Return mailer; 
Abbr. 

•4 Yodcfc's skull, 
lor arte 

88 Prank starter 

•6 Royal 

Majesty 

87 ThrHI 


1 Physics particle 

2 Dept of Labor 
division 

9 Aim, e.g. 

4 Test site 
s Toast at 
mealtime 

6 Melodic 

7 It can move a 
star 

a It can create a 

Stir 

9 Rosemary, for 
one 

fO Loser to 
Chamorro in 
1990 

11 World leader, 
1961-71 

12 Football 
Hafl-of-Famer 
Jim 

is Poolside sights 

22 Painting the 
town red 
24 ScOUt'S WOrt 

27 Pastoral sound 

28 Periods of 
mania 

30 Pulitzer 
category 

31 Vie against 
Shaq 

33 Familiar with 
as Infamous 1 972 
hurricane 

37 Like some seals 
as Not a picky 

eater 

38 green 

40 Twisted path 

43 Contended 

44 Big buildup 

45 Ham 

47 Pesky fly 
Bo Hem on a sub 
82 Program offeror 



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China airlines 


THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1997 


PAGE 11 


hBp:ftwn» a* w U lw iU Bfn/ 


Czech City 
Clears Mud 
And Hopes 

# Otrokovice ’s Factories 
Reflect a Wide Crisis 


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By Peter S. Green 

International Herald Tribune 


OTROKOVICE, Czech Republic — 
Four weeks ago, this small industrial 
city on the banks of the Morava and 
Drevnice rivers was the prosperous 
home of 20,000 people, man y em- 
ployed in tire and shoe-parts facto- 
ries. 

But after a month of floods that 
submerged large swathes of Poland, 
Eastern Germany and the Czech Re- 
public. killing more than 100 people 
and causing billions of dollars of dam- 
age, the main occupation in Otrokovice 
is cleaning up. 

The flooding here was among the 
worst in Central Europe, reaching 
nearly 4 meters (13 feet) in some parts 
of town. 

• After a moving wall of water a meter 
high covered it in only a few hours, the 
city became a lake, with some neigh- 
borhoods submerged for nearly two 
weeks. 

More than 6,500 people had to leave 
their homes and about 150 businesses 
employing 2,500 people were de- 
stroyed or severely damag ed 

All day, dump trucks loaded with 
water-logged furniture roar through 
the town, soldiers and fire fighters help 
residents clear their cellars and the 
odor of river mud hangs over neigh- 
borhoods. 

Otrokovice is hardly an isolated 
case. Throughout the region, espe- 
cially in the Czech Republic, the 
ebbing waters of this disaster are leav- 
ing behind a catastrophe, with some 
factories unlikely ever to reopen. 

Ironically, some say, this will ac- 
celerate economic restructuring, as the 
weakest of the submerged companies 
will be unable to resume prodnction. 

Across the flooded regions of Po- 
land and the Czech Republic, the dam- 
age js still being counted, but insurers 



' ■■■ ' 1 

tiili iiliP 


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nw jo&nnvi 

Workers sweeping floodwaters from the Westland gasket plant in 
Otrokovice, one of the sites striving to recover in the Czech Republic. 


say the it could hit $10 billion, and only 
a tenth of that is insured. 

With about a quarter of the Czech 
Republic underwater, economists pre- 
dicted that the flood could knock eco- 
nomic growth this year to zero from 
previous forecasts of 1 percent to 2 
percent 

Growth in Poland is expected to fall 
far less, to 5.5 percent from 5.7 per- 
cent, according to estimates from LNG 
Barings, because only about 1 percent 
of the country was flooded 

Damaged property alone could 
amount to 52 billion to S3 billion in 
Poland, said Krzysztof Rybinski at 


ING Barings in Warsaw. Damaged 
property and other losses in the Czech 
Republic could total $1.4 billion to 
$2.8 billion, according to the envir- 
onment minister, Jiri Skalieky, who 
heads the task force dealing with the 
floods. 

In the Czech Republic, damaged 
roads and rail lines affected companies 
far from the flood Skoda Auto- 
mobilova A.S., the carmaker that is the 
country's largest exporter, had to in- 
terrupt production for three days be- 
cause of minor flooding and disrupted 


See DAMAGE, Page 15 


Austerity Plan Puts Thais on Alert 

Despite Government Guarantees, Some Prefer to Keep Money at Home 


By Thomas Crampton 

Special w i he Herald Tribune 


, BANGKOK — Thai officials were 
busy assuring depositors on Wednesday 
that their money would be perfectly safe 
in the country’s commercial banks and 
finan ce companies. 

But in the narrow alleyways of 
Bangkok's bustling Chinatown, many 
people were withdrawing money from 
their accounts, snapping up dry goods, 
and paying visits to their local temples 
following the country’s agreement to 
shut 42 finance companies and raise the 
country's value-added tax. 

' Those moves and other austerity mea- 
sures will allow Thailand to qualify for 
at least $10 billion in aid from the In- 
ternational Monetary Fund, plus addi- 
tional assistance from other countries as 
Bangkok seeks to solve a financial crisis 
that came after a decade of frenetic 
growth fueled by overseas borrowing. 

Finance Minister Thanong Bidaya 
aHd the central bank governor called a 
press conference to reassure depositors. 
"The government will guarantee all de- 
positors and creditors without condi- 
tion," Mr. Thanong said • 

; Olaru Chaiprawat, president of Siam 
Commercial Bank and head of the Thai 
Bankers Association, said, "These as- 
surances should be enough to st°P 
people from worrying too much about 
their money." 

} Not everyone agreed. 
r“I am not sure if what happened 
wsaeiday is good, but 1 do know me 


auay i» suuu, «»i. \ ““ — J-. AT 

■ of bus tickets, electricity and VAT posi 

go up next week,” Sombat Jirath- nnaa 


ienprit, a lottery salesman, said sitting 
beside his tin cart at his habitual street 
corner in Bangkok’s Chinatown. 

In much of Southeast Asia, networks 
of ethnic Chinese have been a key ele- 
ment in the region’s fast economic 
growth. On Wednesday, Suwit 
Chaisam, a medicine seller, was trying 
to persuade his neighbors in Chinatown 
to remain calm. 

Mr. Suwit, who manages a shop that 
sells strength-giving traditional medi- 
cine made from fish guts and bird nests, 
spent the day sipping tea and doling out 
advice to worried acquaintances who 
dropped by or called him ou one of his 
two telephones. 

“Don’t panic,” Mr. Suwit told one 
friend who was planning to withdraw 
money from a commercial bank. His 
advice echoed comments made by the 
finance minister earlier in the day; “If 
everyone thinks like this the whole sys- 
tem will collapse.” 

His friend turned down the advice, 
preferring to keep his money at home 
rather than in the bank. “I don’t believe 
the Finance Ministry, I don’t believe the 
Bank of Thailand and I don’t believe the 
finance companies. Last month they 
said 16 finance companies were bad, 
now it is 42. What is it going to be 
tomorrow?” 

Mr. Suwit shrugged and pointed to- 
ward the door. “I did convince that old 
woman to keep 2 million baht in the 
bank,” he said. 

W hile some may have taken money 
out, there were no lines of angry de- 
positors demanding money at banks and 
finance companies still operating in 


See IMF, Page 15 


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Source: Renta* 


Hilton Sweetens Its Bid for ITT 


Battling a Strong Defense, Hotel Company Stays in the Game 


Cmptled ty Our Staff Fmm Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Hilton Hotels Corp. 
tried Wednesday to restart its stalled cam- 
paign to buy nT Corp., which owns the 
Sheraton Hotel c hain and Caesars World 
casinos, by raising its hostile offer to $70 
a share in cash and stock from $55. 

The bid amounts to $115 billion, in- 
cluding the assumption of $3.2 billion of 
IlT debt ITT tried to thwart Hilton’s 
earlier offer, valued at $10.5 billion, by 
breaking itself into three companies and 
buying back $2.1 billion of its stock. 

The new offer matches the price ITT 
said it would pay ro buy back about a 
quarter of its own stock. 

*‘I hope that you will agree, in light of 
our revised offer, that the time has come 
for us to reach a prompt agreement to 
expedite this transaction,” Stephen Bol- 
lenbach, Hil ton’s chief executive, said 
in a letter to I l'I ’s directors. 

ITT said its board would consider the 
latest offer. 

“We’ve told our clients this is clearly 
the eighth or ninth inning of what has 
been a long game,” said Jason Adar. an 
analyst at Bear, Steams & Co. “But 
we’re also telling them we’re closer to 
the end than we were a. few days ago.” 

Hilton said it could afford the higher 
price because it anticipated cost savings 
of more than $100 million a year from 


combining the companies. It also said 
the purchase would not dilute earnings. 

“It doesn’t look like they’re over- 
paying,” Mr. Adar said. “It looks like 
they're offering full value." 

Arthur Adler, a lodging analyst for 
Coopers & Lybrand, also said he 
thought Hilton would find ways to cut 
costs. “On top of that, they can always 
spin off the businesses they don't need 
or wan t,” he said. 

ITT last month announced a plan to 
split itself into a hotel and casino unit, a 
telephone-directory publishing business, 
and an operator of tech nical schools. 

When news of ITT's break-up plan 
sent its stock soaring 7 percent, many 
predicted Hilron would just let its $55-a- 
share offer expire. Mr. Bollenbach said 
at the time that ITT’s stock had risen so 
high that it did not make sense for Hilton 
to try to raise its bid He said the com- 
pany would seek to block ITT’s defense 
through the courts. 

ITT’s stock has since dropped amid 
doubts about the outlook for its 
gambling business. 

Hilton's first offer was greeted un- 
enthusiastically by ITT shareholders. 
As of late June, about 1 percent of ITT’s 
shares outstanding had been tendered to 
Hilton, according to court documents. 

ITT shares rose $1.8125 to close at 


$64.75, while Hilton’s stock fell $1 .875 
to $30,875. 

To fight Hilton, ITT has sold some 


prize assets. For example, the company 
agreed last week to sell half of its Las 


agreed last week to sell half of its Las 
Vegas Desert Inn casino and some ad- 
joining land to the financier Marvin Dav- 
is for $200 million in cash and assumed 
debt 

Earlier, ITT sold its half-interest in 
Madison Square Garden, the New York 
sports arena, for $650 million and a stake 
in a New Yor k te levision station for 
$128.8 million. ITT raised an additional 
$840 million by selling 7.5 million 
shares in the French telecommunications 
company Alcatel AJsthom SA. 

What Hilton most wants is the about 
70 upscale hotels that ITT owns or leases. 
Demand for these hotels is so high that 
owners can raise room rates to generate 
more profit witho ut ad ding overhead. 

Rand Araskog, ITT's chief executive, 
has fended off hostile offers for his 
company before, and many forecast he 
would gai n the upper hand this time. 
Now. ITT's board may have no choice 
but to relent, analysts said. 

“The board is loyal to management, 
but at some point when the numbers 
become attractive to shareholders, the 
board has to respond to that,” Mr. Adler 
said. (AP, Bloomberg. NYT) 


U.S. Warning for Japan and China 


Ctmq*kdbyOurSrt4fFmnDapaic1irs 

WASHINGTON — U.S. officials 
gave trade warnings to China and Japan 
on Wednesday, saying they would wait 
until Beijing opened its markets before 
allowing it into the World Trade Or- 
ganization and telling Tokyo its current- 
account surplus was an irritant 

Charlene Barshefsky, the United 
States' trade representative, stressed the 
automotive industry as she warned that 
Japanese companies should not “export 
their way out of their current economic 
situation." 


The Japanese economy is suffering 
from weak consumer spending, limiting 
appetites for foreign cars, analysts said. 
They added that the Big Three U.S. auto- 


consumer spending, limiting 
for foreign cars, analysts said. 


Chinatown. This was not, however, a 
vote of confidence for the government 
“IMA, IMF or whatever. I don’t 
know if it will help, but how could the 
government let the economy keep get- 
ting worse for two years?” said Kitti 
Chaicharoen, a shop manager who sells 
cashew nuts and dried mushrooms. 

News of the increase in the value- 
added tax was a windfall to some store 
owners. * ‘So many people are buying our 
stocks that we only sell to old customers 
and in small amounts,” Vipawadi Lim- 
prana, whose family runs a dry goods 
shop, said. “We need to keep good re- 
lations, even if the economy goes bad.” 
Miss Vipawadi, 30, said the gov- 
ernment announcement caused more 
panic among friends her age than their 
parents. 


makers seemed to be putting pressure on 
Washington to limit the growth of Jap- 
anese car sales in the United States. 

“Vehicle sales into Japan are down 
very sharply, exacerbating the trends we 
already see in their surplus.” Ms. 
Barshefsky said. The United States, 
would raise these concerns with Japan in 
consultations over a 1995 agreement 
between the countries on automobiles, 
she said. The consultations she referred 
to were scheduled for September, the 
analysts said. 

Automobile importers said their sales 


in Japan fell for the fourth consecutive 
month in July. Imports into Japan totaled 
31,354 vehicles for the month, down 
25.6 percent from July 1996, the Japan 
Automobile Importers Association said. 
Excluding vehicles made by Japanese 
carmakers overseas, sales fell 1 8 percent, 
to 27,573 units, and sales of U.S.-made 
cars dropped 34 percent, to 10,269. 

Increased taxes, a strong dollar and 
stiff competition have eroded foreign 
exporters ^ market share even as Japanese 
automakers have steadily increased their 
overseas sales. Foreign automakers now 
hold just over 7 percent of the Japanese 
market, down from a peak of almost 9 
percent at the end of last year. 

Cars are not the only area in which 
Japan has a growing trade advantage. 
Japan said Wednesday that its trade sur- 
plus rose 1 26.4 percent imhe first 20 days 
of July from a year earlier, to 480.569 
billion yen l$4.05 billion), because of 
increased automobile and electronics ex- 
ports to Europe and the United States. 

Taro Aso, director-general of Japan’s 
economic planning agency, who is cur- 
rently visiting the United States, asked 
American officials for "understand- 
ing." He said Japan's trade suiplus 
would continue to nse in part because of 
weak consumer spending at home 


caused by a sales tax increase, but that it 
would decline in the long run. 

In T okyo, however, Lawrence Green- 
wood, economic minister-counselor at 
the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo, said the 
United States had believed Japan's cur- 
rent account surplus would continue to 
rise into next year and that it would be 
“a matter of concern.” If the numbers 
worsen, be said, * ‘and we fear they may, 
that creates an environment in which 
trade and market access problems” 
could become “serious irritants be- 
tween our two countries and trade prob- 
lems are more likely to explode.” 

In her speech in Washington. Ms. 
Barshefsky was frosty toward China. 
Beijing, she said, needed to make a 
“very, very good" offer on market ac- 
cess before its application for mem- 
bership in the WTO could be approved. 
Die United States can effectively block 
China from joining the trade group. 

Ms. Barshefsky added that there was 
“no time-frame test" as to when China 
should be accepted into the WTO. 

Ms. Barshefsky said that in recent 
negotiations in Geneva, progress had 
been made in a few areas. Bur China had 
failed to make a comprehensive offer, 
“which was disappointing,” she 
said. (Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


Dollar: Bonn Sees No Need to Intervene 


CampOedlrrOtrSarBFwmDtspiacha 

NEW YORK — The dollar continued 
its climb against the Deutsche mark 
Wednesday after the German govern- 
ment said there was no need for in- 
tervention in the markets to contain its 


“When we grew up, the economy 
as good and we could buy things. Now 


was good and we couldbuy things. Now 
my friends stay at home and do less 
leisure time shopping. 

Miss Vipawadi said none of her 
friends had money in the finance 
companies shut down on Tuesday, but 
that they had all quit playing the stock 
market 

“Chinese people are conservative 
with their money,” she said. “IT would 
never be put in a small finance com- 
pany-” . . 

Around the comer m the incense- 
filled Neng Noi Yee temple, a monk 
wearing saffron robes said that since the 
economy soured last year many more 
people had come to make offerings and 
venerate images of Buddha. 


nse. 

Peter Hausmann, a government 
spokesman, said Wednesday that the 
dollar's rise had been partly a result of 
speculation and that Bonn stood by a 
statement made at a ministerial meeting 
July 16 that the do liar-mark rate should 
not be given undue importance. 

“The dollar’s recent strength is due to 
strong speculative impulses,” Mr. 
Hausmann said at a news conference. 
“The government sees no reason to 
change its stance.” 

No sign of central bank intervention 
has been seen from Germany or else- 
where despite an upswing that at one 
point took the dollar past 1.89 Deutsche 
marks, its highest level since 1989. 

Meanwhile. Fred Beigsten, a U.S. 
economist, warned that the dollar could 
fall sharply when long-term economic 


fundamentals began dictating the di- 
rection of the currency. 

“When the chum comes, it will prob- 
ably be pretty sharp,” Mr. Bergsten, 
director of the Washington-based In- 
stitute for International Economics, said 
while attending an Asia-Pacific Eco- 
nomic Cooperation forum conference in 
Singapore. 

He said it was difficult to predict 
when the dollar would start tumbling. 

While Germany's finance minister, 
Theo Waigel, and the Bundesbank’s 
president, Hans Tieimeyer, have in re- 
cent weeks said they were unhappy with 
the dollar’s gains, the Bundesbank has 
done no more than indicate it could begin 
to nudge market interest rates higher. 

But traders and analysts say that 
would not be enough to keep the mark 
from failing against the dollar. While 
worries about European monetary union 
are hobbling the mark, the dollar is 
gaining because of the strong U.S. econ- 


has nor held any special discussions on 
the subject of the dollar’s value against 
the mark recently, Mr. Hausmann, the 
government spokesman, said. 

A Finance Ministry spokeswoman 
said little bad changed since the Feb- 


ruary meeting in Berlin of finance min- 
isters from the Group of Seven major 


omy and expectations of a possible in- 
crease in U.S. interest rates, they said. 


Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s cabinet 


isters from the Group of Seven major 
industrialized nations. 

At that meeting, when the dollar had 
rebounded to about 1.65 DM from 1.35 
DM two years ago, the ministers said the 
correction of the dollar’s previous 
weakness was largely complete and that 
the dollar’s value should reflect eco- 
nomic fundamentals. 

The ministers never mentioned par- 
ticular measures or dollar levels, the 
spokeswoman said. 

Last month, Mr. Waigel and Mr. Tiet- 
meyer said they thought the dollar's rise 
had been overdone when it topped 1.80 
DM. In late trading Wednesday, the 
dollar rose to 1.8820 DM from 1.8797 
DM the day before. 

Mr. Waigel hinted at the time that 
there could be G-7 central bank into 1 - 


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He said the commission’s 
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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, AUGUST 7,1997 




THE AMERICAS 




3Q-Year T-Bond Yield 



— ? 750 — 


— - - •? m — 


■■ 130 



"T.Tirjnr »-i 1,0 




MAM 

1997 






Source; Btoomba^ Reuters ** ita?maiatjiHa^ 

Very briefly: . 

Cabletron Appoints New CEO 

ROCHESTER, New Hampshire (Bloomberg.) — Cabletron 
Systems Inc. said Wednesday that Robert Levine, its co- 
founder and chief executive, would resign from the maker of 
networking equipment in December and would be succeeded 
by Don Reed, an executive at Nynex Corp. 

Mr. Levine, 39, created the company In 1983 with Craig 
Benson, 42, the company’s chairman and chief operating 
officer, wbo will remain with the com pany . Mr. Benson will 
focus on strategic issues, Cabletron said, while Mr. Reed will 
handle the company’s daily operations. 

Semiconductor Sales Climb 7.5% 

SAN JOSE, California (Bloomberg) — Global sales of 
semiconductors rose 7.5 percent in June to $ 11 .39 billion from 
the year-earlier month. 

Chip sales rose from the year-earlier level of $10.6 billion, 
the Semiconductor Industry Association said in its monthly 
report on the chip market's strength. 

The largest increase occurred in the Americas, where 
semiconductor sales in June rose 14 percent to 53.83 billion 
from $3.35 billion a year earlier. 

June sales in the Asia-Pacific region rose 9.3 percent, to 
52.45 billion from $2.24 billion. 

• S Unstone Hotel Investors Inc., a real-estate investment trust, 
plans to buy Kahler Realty Corp. from Westbrook Partners 
LLC for $322 million in cash, stock and assumed debt. 

• Gannett Co. plans to buy New Jersey Press Inc, which 
publishes the Asbury Park Press and The Home News & 
Tribune, adding the two papers to its current 89 dailies around 
the United States. The price was not disclosed. 

• TRW Inc plans to spend as much as $4 billion on ac- 

quisitions, possibly in automotive electronics and telecom- 
munications, to try to double its sales and market cap- 
italization in seven years. ap, Bloomberg 


A New MGM Release: Shares 


CarvBaitiy Our SaffPmet Dapaa&j 

SANTA MONICA, California 
— Lacking major films to bring in 
money, Metro-Go Id wyn-Mayer 
Inc. is aiming to the public. 

MGM announced plans Tues- 
day for an initial public stock of- 
fering to help it extendits legacy as 
one of Hollywood's oldest and 
most enduring film studios. 

MGM did not disclose the num- 
ber of shares it planned to offer, 
nor did it name an underwriter. But 
it said it expected to register for the 
sale with the U.S. Securities and 
Exchange Commission as soon as 
possible. 

The offering was widely 
rumored to be in the $250 million 
range, representing a 12 percent 
stake in the company. 

MGM, formed in 1924, has pro- 
duced classic movies such as 
“Gone With the Wind” and “The 
Wizard of Oz.” Recent hits in- 
clude “The Birdcage'’ and the 
James Bond thriller 

“Goldeneye.” 


In the early 1990s, the studio fell 
on hard times under the ownership 
of the Italian financier, Giancarlo 
ParrettL, and was eventually taken 
over by the French bank Credit 
Lyonnais SA. 

In October, a partnership be- 
tween Tracinda Corp., controlled 
by the billionaire investor Kirk 
Kerkorian, and Seven Network 
X ffH of Australia acquired MGM 
for $1.3 billion. 

In early July, the new owners 
completed a $573 million acqui- 
sition of Orion Corp. and Goldwyn 
Entertainment Co., adding to 
MGM's large film library and its 
slate of movies in production. 

But MGM is short on cash. 
“They’ve hqH a large hole in their 
release schedule and having a 
large bole in your release schedule 
doesn't stop you from having to 
pay salaries,” said David Davis, 
an analyst with the brokerage Hou- 
lihan, Lokey, Howard & Zukin. 
“It stopped the momentum of a 
company that was on a nice streak 


of successful films.” The stock 
offering wtil be an important step 
toward restoring MGM’s vitality, 
said Arthur Rockwell, a film-in- 
dustry analyst for Yaeger Capital 
Markets in Los Angeles. 

“You’ve got good manage- 
ment. good assets and good back- 
ing,” he said. “This is not your 


little independent movie company 
going public. I just don’t see them 
having tremble raising the 
money.” 

The timing of MGM’s IPO 
comes while the stock market is 
surging and the studio has two 
upcoming films expected to do 
well: “Red Comer,” a thriller 
starring Richard Gere set for re- 
lease in November, and “Tomor- 
row Never Dies,” the latest James 
Bond film, slated for December. 

Major studios generally try to 
release a dozen or so films a year, 
which can cost up to $1 billion 
when production costs, marketing 
and other expenses are tallied. 

(AP, Reuters) 


PG&E Buys New England Plants 


GmfiMbyOw-S^FnmDhpcBrltn 

BOSTON — New England Elec- 
tric System said Wednesday it 
would sell 18 power generating 
plants to San Francisco-based 
PG&E Corp. for $1.59 billion. 

The purchase would be the largest 
cross-country acquisition of power- 
generating facilities yet to result 
from electricity deregulation. 

It includes almost all of the New 
England company's nonnuclear 
generating assets — including 15 
hydroelectric plants and three 
fossil-fuel burning plants — and 


puts PG&E into a small group of 
electric utilities that are pushing to 
become national power suppliers. 

PG&E said its bid defeated 25 
competitors including North Car- 
olina-based Duke Power Corp. and 
Atlanta-based Southern Co. PG&E 
paid a 44.5 percent premium to the 
plants’ $ 1.1 billion book value. 

The purchase gives PG&E an 
edge in the competition to cash in on 
electric deregulation in New Eng- 
land, where Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire and Rhode Island are 
among the first U.S. states to elim- 


Stocks Post a Record 
Amid Profit Optimism 


» /V • 


mate electricity monopolies and 
open their power markets. 

Massachusetts is deregulating 
electricity sales. It expects to let 
consumers start choosing then- 
power suppliers next year. As pan 
of this restructuring, the state told 
New England Electric to sell the 
plants it operates. 

PG&E owns San Francisco- 
based Pacific Gas & Electric Co., 
the U:S. utility with foe most cus- 
tomers. In foe past year, PG&E has 
expanded in foe United States and in 
Australia. (AP. Bloomberg ) 


Compiled by Otr Staff Frm Ditptsdtes 

NEW YORK — Stocks nose to 
another record Wednesday on op- 
timism for growing corporate 
profits amid a healthy economy. 

“The U.S. economy is in remark- 
able shape, and the news just gets 
better every day,” said Michelle 
dayman, general partner at New 
Amsterdam Partners LP. 

“We have good economic 
growth, low inflati on and earnings 
which exceed people's expecta- 
tions.” 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age gained 71.77 points to close ai 
8,259.31. Its previous record close 
was 8,254.89, set July 30. 

The Nasdaq Composite Index 
rose 8.83 points to 1,630.36. The 
Standard & Poor's 500 Index 
gained 7.95 to 96032. 

Bonds rose for the first time in 
four days after the Treasury sold 
S 12 billion of 10 -year notes and a 
Federal Reserve report suggested 
foe economy was growing with 
little inflation. 

The Treasury’s sale was foe 
second part of the government's 
three-part. $38 billion quarterly 
debt auctions. The government will 
sell $10 billion of 30-year bonds 
Thursday. 

“We are two-thirds of the way 
through, and people already are 
breathing a sigh of relief,” said Ben 
Mayer, a manager at AMR Invest- 
ments in Fort Worth, Texas. 

The 30-year Treasury bond rose 5/ 
32, to 101 30/32, pushing foe yield 
down one basis point, to 6.48 per- 
cent The Fed said foe economy was 
expanding at a moderate pace with 
stable pices. The central bank's so- 
called beige book, a periodic survey 
of economic conditions, will serve as 
a centerpiece for discussion when 
policymakers meet Aug. 19. 


“It’s obviously beige book” tha^ 
gave bonds a late boost said Marco 
Frustaci, a government bond tradeG 
at Daiwa Securities America Inc.) 
“There was a lot of anxiety goin^ 
into it that it would show some 
pricing pressure.” 

Investors read the report for more 
clues to whether the Fed needed ta‘ 

US. STOCKS : 

raise interest rates before foe end of 
the year to cool foe economy ana 
limi t inflation, which erodes bonds ; 
value over time. ' jr 

“It just doesn’t seem that the red 
needs to tighten to fight inflation; 
quite yet,'" said Denny Niedring- 
hans of Southwest Bank of Sl, 
Louis in Clayton, Missouri. ! 

Bank stocks advanced after Ar-> 
four Soter, an analyst at Morgan 
Stanley, Dean Witter, Discover &; 

Co., raised his 12-month price tar-* 
get for Citicorp, BankAmerica and 
Chase Manhattan. Citicorp, Chase? 
and BankAmerica climbed. 

Apple Computer, foe most active) 
issue in U.S. markets, soared after 
Microsoft bought a $150 milli on) 
stake in the computer maker. ) 
IBM rose 1% to 107%. ; 

"There’s so much power in the) 
technology group that it has over-) 
powered all forces of reason,” said- 
Edward Laux of ABN-AMRO.’ 
Chicago Corp. “Technology is lift - 1 # 
mg all the ships.” • 

La-Z-Boy declined after foe fur-! 
niture company said net income for) 
its first quarter, which ended July- 
26, fell to 10 cents a share from 25) 
cents a share a year earlier. ) 

Ingersoli-Rand edged down 5/16; 
to 65 9/16 afterits board approved a: 
3-for-2 split of the company's 108.7) 
million common shares. ■ 

(Bloomberg, AFJ! 


DOLLAR: Its Rise Against the Deutsche Mark Continues ns Germany Sees No Need to Intervene 


Continued from Page II 

vention by saying that Germany was 
in contact with its Group of Seven 
partners, but this has not been fol- 
lowed up by any coordinated action 
to stem the dollar's rise. Only a 
decision by the Bundesbank to tight- 
en German interest rates could 
change foe trend, analysts said. 

Senior officials at the Bundes- 
bank have hinted recently that they 
might switch from a fixed repur- 
chase rate to a variable rate to tty to 
offer support to foe mark. 


The chief economist at foe bank, 
Otmar Issing, said Monday that foe 
“trend” of import prices was “go- 
ing in the wrong direction” and 
risked baving * ‘a contagious effect” 
on German inflation. 

Against other major currencies, 
foe dollar slipped to 1 18.70 yen iq 4 
P.M. trading from 1 19.25 yen the day 
before. It rose to 63505 French 
francs from 6.3465 francs but fell to 
13325 Swiss francs from 13350 
francs. The pound fell to $1.6022 
from $1.6245. 

The dollar slumped against foe 


yen amid concern that trade tension 
between the United States and Japan 
may flare up. The U.S. trade rep- 
resentative, Charlene Barshefsky, 
fanned that concern by warning Ja- 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE ~ 

pan on Wednesday not to try to 
export its way out of recession. 

Analysts said the pound fell as 
market sentiment shifted in favor of 
the Bank of England leaving its base 
interest rate unchanged at 6.75 per- 
cent after its two-day policy meet- 


ing, which ends Thursday. 

Analysts said signs that foe Ger- 
man economy was still weak may 
keep the Bundesbank from increas- 
ing interest rates. 

An employment report released 
Wednesday showed joblessness rose 
by a laiger-than-expected 17,000 in 
July. An increase in interest rates 
could choke the economy by making 
it more expensive for companies and 
consumers to borrow money. 

“I don’t think you'll see the 
Bundesbank soon raising rates with 
such high unemployment and other 


structural problems,” said Dave; 
Moline, a currency trader at Norwesti 
Bank in Minneapolis. “There’s a) 
hell of a bull market for foe dollar; 
against the mark and other European! 
currencies.” ! 

The weak mark — it has fallen 1 7; 
percent against the dollar so far this! 
year ; — makes imports to Germany! 
more expensive and can fuel in-* 
flation. still, a weak mark helps the! 
export sector that has been socruciaT 
to Germany's nascent recovery- 
from a five-year economic slump/* 
(Reuters, AFP, BJoombergl 


|] r it;ltI1 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Wednesday’s 4 PJL Close 

The top 300 most active shares 
up to the dosing on Wal Sheet. 

The Associated Pms. 

Stock Sam fflgh Lskd ago 


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Owo Him Lav La* Ckf- 

tadw B141-75 827447 8I5&9S 8257J1 +71.7? 

Tram 297242 301059 298940 300915 +18.14 

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Standard & Poors 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


5 Industrials U2337TU342111UM 
? Transp. 590-06 68100 6873)1 

z Utilities 20126 200.95 210.10 

to Finance 11117 110.79 111.88 

ft SP 500 95773 94809 9S429 

>ft 5P100 93465 92479 929.89 


477 M 491 JO 477410 +4M 

631.08 42144 630.13 +4M 

«1J3 44BS1 451-03 +277 

294.40 29063 2«4JU +2X4 

441X3 454J1 440.98 +447 


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lOunmiEs 
10 Industrials 


Trading Activity 


23577 JCTb 95VK96l*M 

1307 31*4 WV» 31 Vft 

776? Mft 5M 5*4 

7182 lift lltftlUfti 

C770 24to 23*4 24V4 

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Aug. 6, 1997 

High Law Latoi Chge OpH 

Grains 

CORN (CBOT) 

MOO bu mlntnum- ca«t per bwM 
Sap 97 29714 253*6 259ft, +4*6 57J03 

Due 97 263 16 25816 2S2 +4*4 154215 

Mar 78 770*4 264V, 249*4 +414 32.742 

May 98 274*4 268 274 +4V> 7,158 

JotW 277 273V* 276 +4 11.962 

Sop 98 2971ft undL 1J45 

Doc 98 264 261 263 +2*4 4*130 

EsL xdia MA Tueft soles 78.1 92 
Tun open M 36UI1 & off 2.119 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

1 00 tan*, dolors per too 
Aug 97 242J0 238X0 261.00 +220 11.900 
SvV7 235-70 232-30 2353» +2.70 20213 
00 97 22080 215-50 21900 +4J0 15651 

OK 97 Z1SJOO 20990 21401 +4.10 39^99 
Jan 98 Z12J0 20930 211 JO +3J0 4917 

Mar 98 21030 207-00 20830 +250 (1017 

EsL solas NA Tim vales 1 73«2 
Trn Open W 107.084 at* 650 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 

60000 lto- cants par lb 

Aug 77 22.03 7TJ3 21.98 +030 3,765 

Sep 77 22-27 2156 2222 +038 3B733 

Od 77 22X0 2100 2227 +6127 14726 

OK 97 22.78 2234 2277 +0.43 42.977 

Jon 98 2250 2260 2278 +0.29 

Mot 98 23JD 22JB5 2215 +030 A716 

EsL sales NA Tim sales 19585 
Tm open toil 97X87. OH 329 

SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

4000 ba nMmuai- conh par basbel 
Aug 97 77» 762 770 +7 12,770 

Sep 77 482 667V4 681 +13 17.177 

Nov 97 653 63299 651 +16tft 75X42 

Jon 98 6551ft 635 654 +14V4 14934 

Mar 78 663 650 662 ‘13V, 4100 

EsL sates NA Tun soles 46930 
Tm opun M 130277, oil 1337 

WHEAT (CBOT) 

4000 bumMmum- cents per busM 


High LOW Lutes) Chgo Opm) 


High Law Latest Chge OpM 


High Law Latest Chge Optnr 


oranoe juice aicrm ______ _ 

l&an lbs.- ants per b IO-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT1F) Mar 98 9336 W33 9386 +6.08 51135 

Sep 77 76.05 75J0 75X0 +045 16095 FFSOOOOO - pis 01100 pet Jun9fi 944*9 93.96 94.08 +008 414*25 

Not 77 78.00 77.15 77J5 +065 SS33 Sep 97 129X8 128.96 127X8 +028 171,273 Sep 98 9431 944*9 900 +006 342*1 

Jan9B 814*0 8030 80.45 +035 4116 Dec 77 9636 984)0 9842 +034 11X52 Due 98 94J9 9419 9428 +603 2680 

Ato98 83.90 8X40 83J» +070 1726 Mdr9B 9750 97J8 7732 +024 0 Mar 99 9427 9416 9425 +04*1 11332 

EsL JrtesNATm sate 24*27 Est. sates? 177,713 . EsL sates: 54752. Prw. sates: 66524 

Tim open hfl 32X31, 1 ^ 18 Open InL: 181725 ah 11152. Pi»v. open ML: 376735 up 1274 


Doc 77 93JS8 93X8 93J7 +0.05 90454 

Mar 98 934M 9173 9386 +008 51135 

J u*l 98 944*9 7196 «44» +DJB 4U0& 


EsL scon NA Tueft sales 1027 
Tim open hd 32X31, up 18 


Mar 99 9427 9416 9425 +04*1 11332, 

EsL ftotav 56752. Prw. sates: 66S4 
Prev. open M^ 376735 Up 1274 


Metals 

GOLD (NCMX) 

100 tray oz.- dolon per ho* «b. 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE) 


1TL2Q0 rafllon - pts of lOOjid 
Sop 77 135.77 13473 13572 


Industrials 

+057 10UM9 COTTON 1CNCTN) 


Aua W mm 31090 -IM 1 rn D*=97 107.92 WX0 107.97 +053 1939 50000 Ib6- cents per lb. 

3204*0 31600.^020 -120 US (, T . N.T. IO &43 +051106788 00 97 7550 7445 75XJ +060 11.290 

<§97 32120 319.70 320X0 -3.10 16246 W- sates: 74J(7.PmL ste^i 19MS WJS 75 A +670 

Dec 77 32480 32150 32250 -110 114751 Pte*. open M: 106788 off 35 J*™ J5A2 7665 +672 10843 

Fata 98 32630 32400 324X0 -120 112B UTOM-MONTH (CMERJ ^ ^ wxa toxj lST 

Apr 98 328-00 32660 32660 -2-20 &480 O mOBorv pliof 100 pcL 77X0 77X0 77X0 +0X2 1X38 

Jun 98 32950 328.90 328.90 -130 7X76 Aug 97 9455 9635 9435 untfk. 20302 EsI. sales N A Tim sates 4565 


Aug 98 33130 4 

Qd«8 33350 -1 

EsL sates 1&000 Tim cates 46250 
Tim Open W 197.799, up 9,775 


33130 -120 1111 SnpT? 0635 963« 9434 WK3l 11754 Tim open tall 76554 off 4 

33350 -120 109 Oct 97 0632 9431 9432 unch. 6142 

das 46250 Est. sides NA Tim soles 4812 HEATING OIL DIMER} 

1 9,775 Tm open hit 4453418* 998 41000 goL cents per gal 

Sep 77 5830 56.90 : 

CMX) EURODOLLARS (CMER} OcJ77 58.90 5750 ! 


HEATING OIL (NMER7 ->■ 

41000 gaL cents per gal m. 

Sap 97 5830 56.90 5750 -152 41108 

Od97 58.90 5750 57.70 -1.12 26514. 


HI GRADE COPPER MCMX) EURODOLLARS (CMER) Od77 58.90 5750 57.70 -M2 265V4. 

26000 lbs. -cents per B>. 51 mflllon-pts of 100 pCL New 97 5935 SB30 5850 -082 17558. 

Aug 97 106-70 10610 10630 -150 1781 Aug 97 9438 94Z7 9627 unch. 21.197 D«97 5935 58.90 58.90 -0.97 20.0C6 

Sep 97 107X0 106X0 10630 -1.00 21394 Sep 97 9636 9625 9435 unch 521714 Jan 98 59.90 5930 59X5 -0.67 1 4892' 

Od 97 105.70 10630 10530 -035 1X87 OU97 9617 9417 94.17 unch 1717 Feta 98 59.90 9*30 S93S -057 7X23 

Mov 97 104X0 10640 104X0 -1.00 1,369 Dec 97 9409 94.06 94X9 +001 459X75 Mw98 58X0 58.00 5830 -0X2 7J52' 

Dec 77 10435 10170 703X0 -0.95 7X30 Mar98 9401 9197 9600 +0.07 336X80 EsI. soles N A Tim sales 28X86 

Jan 98 1Q3 JO -0.90 456 Jun 98 91*0 9184 93X9 -OsS:? 27X340 147J0t^Z356 

Fob 98 102JO -0X0 616 Sop 98 918? 9176 93X0 +4L0] 212X89 iwsupMi i« on 4 J4 1 . 

Mar 98 1D230 I01J0 101X0 -035 2X57 Dec 96 9331 93X5 93X9 +0X1 164062 1 nercr raimc muni 


■nun iiu-w iui-ju iuijw -u-rs uzi i ++ijii iowu ucht swFrr rbiinp njupoi 

Apr 98 101.70 101X0 101.00 4J.70 398 Mar 9* 93X9 93X5 93X8 +0X1 177X72 , g , f, <WMEH> 

E&GBSSV" «« » SS a» 3S «xi5 Br-ffSTa- « «B 


SILVERINCM* alsNATu^es^lll 4001 “ UxO SS S2 55 

sxsesL^mm. &wwauwas ss %% ^ 

W9 ” 431.70 * 2-00 Rrt) 9B 70 7b MW 

fepw WJW 43050 43X30 *140 55U79 BRITISH POUND (CMER) L 

Od97 43630 +1X0 78 62X00 pounds. 1 par pound 

Dec 97 44150 437X0 439X0 +188 18X03 Sep 97 1X230 1X894 lXtete -X222 48578 I ire’s open Ini 433.779. up 1.149 

Jon 98 44130 +1X0 20 D« 97 1JW0 1XB5D 1X920 -X228 572 

Mar 98 448X0 445XO 465.80 +180 1IL23I Mar 98 1X090 unch 209 NATURAL GAS (NME ID 

K * 449S3 +ijo 1978 EsL sales NA Tim sales &440 10X00 mm bnrs. S per mm blu 

45100 ‘1X0 1161 TW^M49X«.^312 2X10 2340 2350 

EsI. sates 9,000 Tim sates 2&809 ^ ^ 

Tim open Irt 96291 up 2X85 CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) fES 


Dee 97 20.96 2060 2066 -022 49X30 

Jon 98 20X2 20x3 2065 -078 27X6 £ 

Feta 98 20.7a 20X5 20.W -0.18 11575 

EsI. sales N A Tim sates 125X70 


fatal Issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


Dividends 

convany 


a. Nasdaq 

IH0 1619 „ , , 

Mft Iftftj AOVDDCea 

£S Detlftieo 

MS WJ tSETSE 

10 ’■ K£(£? 

Market Sales 

Ctese l*r^v. 

329 325 

244 2SS 

JS IS NYSE 

63 54 Arne* 

10 7 Nasdaq 

tnmSSons. 


Mom tom 

1760 2786 

*494 im 

2008 1680 

5342 5788 

191 329 

57 61 


57021 645X6 

24.10 31.11 

7ISX9 731X7 


Sep 97 

363 

35316 

363 

+9*6 

44148 

Dec 97 

378 

367ft 

378 

+9*6 

44626 

Mv98 

388V4 

378ft 

388 

+9!y 

11413 

May 98 

386 

381 

386 

+7 

1X10 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 
10OQ00daUan.SiterCdn.dk 


10X00 mm bnrs. s per mm blu - . 

Sep 97 2410 2340 2350 -0.024 44X56 

Oct 97 2410 2 345 2JS5 -07126 28.0V3 

No»97 2510 14S0 1460 -0.016 U33V 

Dec 97 2x00 2X50 2X50 4.026 16.932 


PLATINUM (NMER) 5ep97 -7262 .7225 .7226 4 0(05 41X42 £^2 ? HSS ^ 'S'KI 

50 bay at.- daflan per hof az. DOC 97 . 7296 7258 .7362 4JH03 1145 Li0S 1460 2 -' WC -0-W 1 UC0 2- 

Od 97 439X0 424X0 431.00 -18.60 11.987 Mar 98 .7307 .7295 .7398 4X025 628 Est. sales N A Tim sales 71,663 

iwW 43000 61900 421X0 -*8.10 2X01 Es). sales HA Tuffs sates 2,604 Tuirsapentnt 198.104. up 5*920 *+- 

Apr 98 426JH 414J0 416X0 -1B.10 408 Tim open W 45X45, up 121 

Est sates NA Twrs sales 3.710 UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER* 

Tim open Ml 4X96, Up 166 GERMAN MARK (CMER) 424M gaL cents par gal 

125X00 worts. J per mark S« 97 67X0 65.TO 66.05 -1JB 45373’ 

Close Previous 5ep97 X352 -5303 X326 4X010 1X0V8 00 97 6210 60X0 cflOO 4J7 16X74 

LONDON METAL5 (LME) Dec 97 X382 X343 J357 44010 1208 Nov 9 7 59X0 58.75 5900 4X7 

Dalian per metric tan Mar98 X398 unch 675 Dec 97 so 70 5830 5845 4X2 9.089 

AliMsum (High Cnde) Est. solas N A Turs sates 30X74 ™SS S8JS 58. 40 442 7.712 

Spot 1742to I744to 17251ft 17261ft Tun open ini 134 MB. oft 400 SB-M 58X0 58x0 4.49 1.960 

Krmrt 173600 1737X0 1722.00 1723X0 ^ 99X0 5950 »X0 404 6005 

capper cathodes (HMi Grade) Japanese yen (Cmeri a,x98 6t.94 unch. 1.3(h) 


Per Amt Rec Pot 


sftft -nft S 
lft to n, -n 

6*i 6to s*ft *n 

Hit 17 ilia +n 

IM 15 ISVft +to 


I6*ft iSto 

rn 2 

Aft Tft 
is* in 
n **» 

1W tob 
toft »ft 
47VI 4Bi 
47ift 46to 
Vtoft IN 
6 5*. 

79ft IStft 

H Pl 
ISft I5>to 
llftft lllft 
n im 

Wft »V» 

Uft uw 
ift in 
Utoft Vft 
XP-. jn> 
lift teto 
itoft P« 


Hft IVft 
4*ft 4*h 
PI 7)1 
Tftft Aft 
33 Sto 
II 121ft 
1*1 lift 
Wft S=ft 

w.ft x 

Mi JBift 
Aft Aft 
ut rsft 
77* 6ft 

12 % ir-* 

17 lift 
Wft 24 
Tft 7ft 
Tft 7V, 
Aft ito 
1IU 17>ft 
HM 9ft 
Mft 2 n 
W* Sift 
4to 
l« lift 


lift +to 
81 +ft 
Jft +*% 

15Vi 

Pi 

9% »'% 

ft -to 
eon ‘ft 

479k »to* 
lft 

5ft +VW 
ito* +1M 


lto -to 
M*i ‘ft 
nti -to 
nft «ft 


lto -to 
4to 

n «*t 
ift 

32ft -ft 
17ft +to 
lft -ft 
Sft -to 
Jlto -ft 

A* -Jft 


17ft -ft 
16ft *ft 
fcto -to 


lfftft »ft 
9ftk -ft 
Mft -H 

sm •*% 

4to -)ft 
IM ‘ft 


Wk 25ft 
IV* lto 
21H DM 
lift 12ft 
ft A 
lto lto 
Uto UK 
9ft e 
10 HI 

lft .BL 

23U 22ft 
W 38ft 
eft A* 
lto lft 
16*1 It 
lift Uft 

2 M an 
uto leu 
m In 

Mft Mft 
15ft lift 
7*1 7 

Uft lAto 
17ft 17ft 
17ft 17 
Mft 22ft 


Tft HI 
IZftk I TVk 
198% Uft 

a Vi 
Sto 5ft 
lto Ito 
ift S 
Tft 7 
3ft 2ft 
Wto into 
Mft 30ft 
ift St 
iTto uw 

k si 

6ft Cft 
.ft to 
lto lft 
Uft Uto 

n8 ISf 

Uto lift 
ito on 
nft n 

ISto 15to 
W Uto 

ITto I6A 


Tft ‘to 

n* -to 

13 

to 

ift +to 
lift ‘to 

9 -ft 

10 
Jft 

Uto -to 
24ft *lft 

is 

ut 

IM ‘to 
ISM +A 
Sft -to 
Vito -ft 
Mft <ft 

e 1 * a 

7ft -A 
Uto ‘ft 
lift 

17ft ‘ft 
Mft »to 


Tto >to 
lAto +»% 
19ft -to 
77ft -ft 
Sto -to 


12ft -to 
31ft •* 
31ft ‘1» 
6ft ‘ft 
ft 

- 

16to -h 
12ft +ft 
m% -to 
ito »to 
n ft 

Uh •* 
« ‘to 

iTto ‘to 
IBS ‘A 
IM 


IRREGULAR 

Autoliv Inc ADR b .11 

BAT. Indusl b .4092 

Elhff System Lid - .05 

GtauWeBcoOM b X138 

Sabine Roamlty _ .1516 

STOCK spur 
Mer3nyGeneixd2 for I spflL 
SmlMcane Bch A 2 for 1 spltt. 
Unihnde Corp 2 tor 1 spR. 

INCREASED 

Anted Cap Carp IL ° -47 

Lawson Prod O .14 

NowAroe-HOlnco M JM2S 

SabtesU Banan _ .08 


11-6 12-4 
-15 1-15 
9-7 9-22 
8-15 10-14 
8-15 8-29 


9-19 9-30 
940 10-17 
8-13 B-29 
8-13 8-28 


Company Par Ami Rec Pay 

M .0535 8-15 9-2 

Q .33 9-15 10-1 

Q .125 8-15 9-5 

General Moton a Q -25 8-14 9-1K 
O JO 8-15 9-5 

O X3 8-15 8-26 

Insured Man! Inca M 464 8-14 8 ?9 


Company 

CatoniollnvGrd 
COceerl 
Diefioldlnc 
General Motors H, 
HictoryTeeh 
Home Praps 


AbamsanHF, 

AS Amer Term Tr 
AppVedPwrA 
BfcAnreradipt A 
BkAmeradJpt B 
Branford Sms 
OPSCO lnc 
CMI Comsat A 


O XL 8-12 
M JM5 8-14 
Q -03 B-18 

- XI 25 8-15 

_ 1X0 8-15 
0 JO 84 
0 -S3 8-18 

- .01 8-15 
O M 8-14 
M 078 8-15 


liwGrdMaifl 
Lite fie 
MngdHiYld 
McDermott 
Nobel Insur 

SS^i 

Stepan Ca 
SunAmertea Inc 
2002 Target Term 
TNP 
Tretwrick 
Unfcourer 
WotfelndA. 
WWohan Lumber 
TCtraCora 
ZiegterCoal 


M .075 B-14 B-29 
D .13 9-3 9-24 

M .105 8-14 B-29 
Q .05 9-15 10-1. 
O .05 B-13 8-27 
Q .11 10-10 10-31 
a .15 8-30 9-19 
O -09 8-29 9-15 
O X7 9-30 10-17 
a .125 029 9-15 
O .10 B-11 8-10 
M J)71B 8-14 8-29 
a X45 8-28 9-15 
Q M 9-15 9-30 
Q 30 8-25 9-10 
Q .0775 9-2 9-16 

Q -07 9-2 10-1 

Q -20 8-15 B-29 

a .075 9-12 10-3 


EsL sates NA Tim sates 22X90 
Tim open tad 106874. ah 365 


Livestock 
CATTLE (CMER) 

40000 Rn,- ants ocr b. 

Aua 97 66-75 6612 54X7 +0.16 14828 

Od97 7087 69X5 7080 +0X0 52831 

Dee 97 7280 7137 7IXS +027 2H560 

Feb 98 73X0 72J7 7X45 +0X0 10052 

Apr 98 74.90 7640 J4.7S +OI5 1*71 

Jun 98 71 JO 7130 71X0 +017 2X66 

Est sates 14528 Twrs sales 15X57 
Turn open tail 10466A aft 2x24 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

50000 lbs.- cents per Bl 
A ug 97 8070 90-07 8052 +030 7X45 

5*0 97 8030 79X0 8020 -005 1745 

Oct 97 8092 BOOS 8085 +030 41*5 

No* 97 81.90 8135 81X0 +0.12 3X65 

Jan 98 8230 81X5 82.02 +005 1X38 

Mar 98 81.77 81.10 81XP -005 865 

Est sales 4315 Tim sates 3X68 
Tuas open tot 241 W. off 271 

HQGS-Lwto (CMER) 

40,000 bl- LBib DOT lb. 

Aug 97 80X0 7990 80X5 -0X0 7X52 

Oct 97 73X0 72x2 72» -132 18,920 

Dec 97 69X0 68X5 68.95 -0.72 4366 

Feb 98 67 JD <7X0 6735 4X7 23*3 

Apr 98 6170 62.93 6337 4.90 1X&S 

EsL sales 4371 Tim sem 10X02 
Turs open tad 38X11 oH 21 

PORK BELLIES (CMER* 

40000 las- aants par b. 

Aug 97 eaxo 85X5 87.40 +137 1124 

Feb 98 7590 7420 75.15 4X0 3X95 

Mar 98 7S30 7410 7507 -0X2 93 

Est cates 1742 Tun sates 2365 
Turs apan W 1751 off 289 


.7296 7258 .7362-00033 3.145 

.7307 .7295 .7298 4X025 628 


Poe 98 2X05 14s0 2460 4X31 120O7_ 

Est. sales N A Tim sates 71,663 

Tun open tnt 198. 104. up SiTJO *+- 


Close Previous 

LONDON METALS (LME) 

Dalian per metric ton 
Almtmi (High CraOe) 

5pol 174314 1744ft 1725ft 1726ft 

FteWted 1736X0 1737X0 1 722.00 1723.00 
Clipper Cathodes (High Grade) 


capper Cathodes Ofigh Grade) JAPANESE YEN (CMER) Apr98 61.94 unch. 1.300 

SK-SS 2SSS 23,100 1 2X ntflhon yon. S per 100 yen EU. safes NA Tuers sales 24784 

FteWted 2287.00 2288X0 228200 228400 Sep 97 .8488 .8405 X471+0X041 79X32 Tim open W 96.571 up 661 

vJS 1 cnrnfl ™ Dec 97 .8600 .8519 XSB4+D.0044 1.985 

g ? . “J- 00 0 59000 Mar 98 X454 unch. 413 BRENT OIL (I PE) 

Faranmi 604.00 605X0 600X0 60900 £sr. sales NA Tim sales 21 167 U.S doUm per barrel - tals of U*» bairots 

a* "SS 5SS 2S” !S.!S !S Its SS" 

ftrwwo 7185X0 7195X0 7220 00 7230X0 SWISS FRANC (CMER) Wov97 14.63 1933 1438 -0.33 14421" 

Sort 4y v;« xi SS4SX0 SSMK cn.no 125X00 (tones, Spur tame Dk97 19.70 19 41 19X6 -0.19 IB. 721 ] 

Snrord MMXO K90XO ISnrn S'* 97 X™ 4555+0X003 62X71 j 9** 9*4 19X5 -418 UlW 

ffiXeaHtocS!, 5570 00 558000 Dec 97 X6i5 X602 X617 4X007 2,225 g** 0 !*-M I "38 1939 -417 6.J55 ' 

spol lljc^ iSxO 1583X0 1588X0 ? 0,W 6686 unch 1X59 WX8 1936 1932 -417 ^ 

ForwW 1522X0 1523X0 1496 00 1497x0 Est. SOWS NX. Tl>6S Sales, 17.189 Est. sten.-45300 Prev. sides ■ 48X45 

Tun open (rd 64465. UP 733 Pm . open mi- 1 72334 eH 2.954 

Htgtl Low Ctoso Oige Opto) „„„ GASOIL (1PE) 

— ^^NPESQ^ER) U8«tar»pernteWclon-latoDll«llons 

Phwnnl.l 500000 POOT1.S per Aug_9_7 17750 17435 I7S35 -100 16.905 


U.S daUm per barrel - lals of 1X00 barrets 
Sep 97 1930 1910 1930 -032 51831.. 

MW 19X4 19.18 1930 -424 51640 

Nov97 19.63 1931 1938 -OJ3 14421" 

DK97 19.70 1941 19X6 -0.19 1B.721 ' 


Pinanelal awMiwi posot s per peso 

Us T Hills rriupm^ 1C,a Sep 97 .12670 .12630 .12670, 

S PJJiy j J 6 ” 8 ?- - Doc 97 .12235 .12202 .12230* 

r., n-. Mar 98 .11832 .11812 .118251 

Decw S*J 7 W77 ^ Est. iotas NA Tims sates 4527 

tow ^ Tun DPMI Ml 41387. Off 312 

T^S^ N MiiISP.m > M^ 4S 1-MOMTH STERLING (UFPE1 

TimaponMBX18upl8i esmiMO - nts at lDdod 


Dec 97 X645 X602 4617 4X007 2,225 !^-5S I9J8 1939 -417 6.J55 ' 

Mar 98 -6686 unch 1X59 «“■« '9X8 l«3e 1932 -417 

Est. satas NA. Tun stem 12.189 Est. san.-45300 Prev. sides ■ 48X45 

Tun open (rd 64465. UR 732 Pm. open mr_ 1 72339 oil 2.954 

GASOIL DPE) 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) U i dtekn per reerdc Ian - lab te 100 Ions 

I2T-SO 17435 1 7535 -100 It. 90S 


S YR TREASURY (CBOT) S 

1104000 Eton- pts A 641tK 01 100 pci SS 

Sep 97 107-12 10740 107-10 + 06 224739 Jun 

Dec 97 106-60 106-52 106-a + M 4981 &£ 


Sep 97 .12670 .12630 -12670+X03I9 30656 Sep 97 178.75 77600 17475 -1.00 14705 

Doc 97 .12235 .12203 .12230 + 00284 13X21 Oct 97 17900 i r1x 17B.75 -450 [4211 

Mar VB .11832 .11812 .11825 + 00298 5,144 Nov 97 18035 I785X 1BDOO -100 4813 

Est. lotos NA Tiros lain 4527 Doc 97 18135 179.75 181.00 Unch UTSS' 

Tunapan Ini 4I3B7, an 312 ton 98 IBI30 180X0 IB 1.00 uivfln 7.711 

iSS-52 ,B0 -°° ' azi &,a| 

1-MONTH STERLING (UFFE1 Mar 98 178 00 178X0 177.75 +0 25 1435' 

004000 - phte 100 pd Est. sales: >4300. Pm. sales IS:* 

P2£E K-2 S-S S-2 Pm.ep*nh*:84.9aa 110203 ■ 


EsL sates N A Tim softs 79.309 
Tun open Ini 232352. up 2.132 


1-MONTH STERLING (UFFE1 
£504000 pts oil 00 pd 
Sap 97 9173 9169 9172 +403 130.361 

Dec 97 9157 9230 9155 +0X5 144172 

Mar 99 9236 92X9 9154 +OXS 104902 

06 234739 Jun 98 9? 58 9153 9236 +OX4 74094 

OS 9,981 Sep 98 91X3 92JST 9261 +0 0J 51901 


Stock Indexes 

SP COMP INDEX (CMER) 


SnWADRi p-poyo bt e tatmiAntnta,- 
■ nmnl l U y; q-q u url er t» s-smt-oanute 


Slock Tables Expfadned 

Scries figuras cee imatBdaL Yecaty highs aid taws teBea the previous 53 weeks plus the current 
week, but nattheJalestiioiftig day. Where a spOi^dirtdhddend amounting to 25 percent or more 
has been paid die yean high-bw lange end (Mdend are shown far the new stacks ariy. Unless 
othenMsa noted rates of dhridanda (he annual dVsbm se nienfa based nn Die latest dedanrfnn. 
o - dhrfctend also esdre (s). b - annual into at dMdend plus stock dividend, c- hqu (dating 
dMdend. cc - PE exceeds 99x5d- coded, d- new yearly low. rid -toss In tt»e last 12 rnontftv 
e - dMdend declared or paid in preceding 12 months. I • annual rate, increased an last 
dedaratioii. g - dividend In CanaiSan funds subfect to 15% non-rasUenoe fax. I - dividend 
declared after spH-up or stack dividend. | - dMdend paid this year, omitted deferred, or no 
action token at latest dividend meeting, k - dMdend dodorad or paid this year, an 
aeoimulothre tesue with dividends in arrears m- annual rate, reduced on taut de clara tion, 
a - new issue in itw post 52 weeks. The btgh-taw range begtos with the stort of trading, 
ad - not day deDvery. p - iniKal dividend, annual roto unknown. P/E - priec-eartiings ratio, 
q -dosed-end mutual fun d.r>(5vtdendclecto red orpa id in preceding 12 months plus stock 
dividend, s - stock spliL Dividend begins with date of spB. sis - solas t - tSvidend paid hi 
Stock rn preotefing 12 months esttanoled cash yahre on ex DMdend or ex -dislributicMi date. 
u> new yearly high, v-trading hatted- vl.bi bankruptcy or receiversMpor being raorga riled 
under the Bankruptcy Ad or securities assumed by such companies wd ■ when distributed, 
wf - when Issued? ww - wBh we ran d s i - ex -dividend or ex -rights iris - ex -distribution, 
nr- without warrants y- ex -dMdend and soles InfulLyW- yield, x-saksbifuL 


Food 

cocoa (NCSE) 

10 metric tons- S portal 
Sep 97 1488 149 149 -25 71,100 

Due 97 1536 1503 1504 -25 14338 

Mar 98 1565 1538 IS3S -25 2S337 

May 98 1585 159 159 -25 11X11 

Jut M 1598 1577 1578 -25 1331 

Sep 98 1599 1599 1599 24 3.743 

Est. sates 11359 Tim solas 7.979 

Tubs open tad 104825. off 174 
COFFEE C (NCSE) 

£j^%6.90 fia75 20035 -23S 9J40 

DOC 77 177X5 16630 17015 -4X5 47 38 

Mar 98 158X0 15425 15105 -420 1365 

May 98 15400 14330 14430 -4X0 1x93 

JW9B 144X0 140115 14405 -3.93 783 

Elt 7C0M 4W9 TUCTS stem 4122 
Taos open tot 21X14 up 415 

SWCARWORLO 11 (NCSE) 

ar^srusr m* *004 mx 

Mgr 99 11X2 1174 11-80 +0X3 59.188 

May 98 1175 11J0 ll^S rfU 115» 

Jul« 11XS 11^8 HA* M* 7 

Est. steal 11 J» Tubs sata 11633 

Tvet open tad 194X84 up 941 


Dee M 9168 92X3 91 67 +0X5 44306 SOOshutev 

Mar 99 92.73 92x8 927t +0X4 41.719 Sep+7 96s90 9S170 965.10 +840 177 51* ' 

II yb tdemiiov JunW 71.73 nn 92.72 +0X3 31634 DK97 975X0 964 1 0 97240 ‘5.75 Sflji' 

SaBBWlSffi.--. EsL Idles: 82X*a Prn sates- 76342 Mar98 93600 986.00 986X0 +8 70 2. M2. 

FlVV. Open Inti 665747 up 4410 

SSto ig^iSSiSK +£ 1 -MONTH EIIROMARK (UFFE* Tim open 01.18*5.1 up 2» 

zrr 3 . " MKI . urKii - 771 OMlmUSon- teste lOOpet 

^ !■«”_«*!? 64370 Aug 97 96.72 9*72 9ft72 +0XJ 1X47 CAC 40 EMAT1F* ' 

Tim open Ini 401X61 off 4J49 5ep«7 96.64 9638 96X4 +0X4 263X28 FF200 Ctatoder aotal 

US TREA5URV BONDS (CBOn ^97 91.48 94M 96X7 ToX7 304MS SSS SSS- 0304500 »504 

SSw" S'?? 01 100 P 01 Mar 98 9636 9673 9634 +0.09 361348 D«97 JO^MlSoiOrtw 

SS liiS JltiS 1J*-? 5 ♦ 96 522.189 JunW 9+.I6 96X2 96.14 +0.10 197345 ^ 301330301150 337830 +56X 970 

Ntam Utnc • Or, 44628 ^p98 9S9S «5X0 9593 -010 137X86 §?• sal ” '*!*' . 

McrVB 114X5 11130 113 30 unch. 31X47 Dec98 9S6« 9535 9S69 +411 141X07 Op«i ml ■ 74*04 off 144. , 

Junw 113-1B unch. 3.139 Mar 99 9530 9SJ6 95X9 +410 107X43 

EsI talas N A Tim sates 784216 Jun 99 9SJ1 95-16 95J0 *411 67.907 -7 

Tim apa> tot 606382. oh 8 Est steal. 293X57 Pm. sales. 301830 Commodftv IrKteXeS 

LONG GILT (UFFE) Pm. open lnt_- 1X24409 off 1967 ___ ' 

Sop™ fM-25^ft?44 , Mj l s? „ 3-MONTH PIBOR (MATIR Moody'S I 553 JO 15M7n 

cS »7 tot *2-J2 171575 FF5 rental -ptsanaa pet fiSrtm jSSS . Sff-JS 

eZZL* 5* n t? ** J1 9MT TUB 1 0X4 7*4* D-LFlrturcs 

Er-”"- Pm- Mtetk Tl.lP Ok 97 9429 96.14 9637 +006 17,150 CRB Ij'-S 

Pm. Oiwn M : 1S1033 off 2304 Mar 98 96. IB 9604 96.(6 +407 29X4JI , . 07 24338 

Jun 90 96 07 95-93 96J1S + 0X7 14X17 , ^^ s l^ , ?S’^ ssac l! ae d p t7SS. London 

s»“;s uFm '°- 07 34M . in * -' 


□Ml itelSan - teste 100 pet 

Auo97 9672 96 72 96.72 +0X1 1.047 CAC40EMATIF1 

Sep 97 9664 9638 96X4 +0X4 261078 FF200 D+rlnd+r re 


Esl solas N A Tub's sates 284216 
Tim apan tot 606381 OH 8 


71,83 

Pfwr. open hv) : 18X033 off 2*fiW 


Commodfty Inctaxes 


Moody's 

Reuteri 

DJ. Futures 


Previous 

1.558.70 
l,918.«0 . 
ISI.W- 
24338. 




8Sw^ , Jm?pS ,f,,b ^ «* * 

Sep 97 1 02,10 1 01 30 iff? ru ESI sates: 96.794 

<«*«■« 1«5l :S5 J uS OPW, tat.: 2712240H 1536 

EsI softs- „ M 4 N pL 100 ^ + 0 ' 33 1-MONTH EUROURA (UFFE) 

ITLImaSm pisaf lOOpet 
H1BV op+fllnt- 279X50 UP 1,797 0*97 91 79 9TI6 9 




S« - ** inir 

Residential Real Estate •' 


11 L 1 mwon ■ pum iwjjo i r . . - . _ _ 

50P97 9122 9116 9121 + 0 X 11 14798 | ^niiav in Thi: IntfiTnurkpr " 


O J C'' 


Wj* ViS/a 



&££* 


( 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1997 


titrif) 


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PAGE 13 


Prudential 
Posts Gain 
Amid U.K. 

Recovery 

GxxMbyQ&S^FrvmPupuKlia 

\ LONDON — Prudential 
Coi P-» the largest life insurance 
company in Britain, said 
Wednesday that its first-half 
■ operating profit rose 5 percent, 
‘to £442 million ($7193 mil- 
f lion) as domestic sales of in- 
surance, pensions and invest- 

- meat products rose. 

But the company also an- 
nounced a steep rise in pro- 
1 visions to cover the costs of its 
review into pension missel ling 
'in the late 1980s and early 
1990s. * 

p Prudential said provisions 
would rise to £450 million from 
1 £240 million, but added that it 
‘ had made huge progress in the 
review over the past two 
’ months. 

- Britain* stop financial watch- 
dog, the Securities and Invest- 
ments Board, began the review 
three years ago after it emerged 
that the financial services in- 
1 dustry might have wrongly ad- 

. ' vised hundreds of thousands of 
h people to take out personal pen- 
sions that were less valuable 
than the corporate pension 
plans they already belonged to. 

Shares in Prudential closed 
•■vp 8 pence, at 614 pence. Ana- 
r lysts said investors were re- 
lieved that the full extent of the 
charges was known. 

The company’s pretax profit 
■rose to £645 million from £361 
million. The operating profit 
excludes movements in the in- 
surer’s investment portfolio. 

Prudential said British sales 
of insurance, pensions and in- 
vestment products were on the 
rise after several sluggish years 
as the economy gained steam. 
British profits rose 16 percent, 
to £197 million. 

Jackson National Life, Pru- 
dential's U.S. business, saw 
_ profit rise 15 percent, to £176 

- million. The unit has diversified 
products and distribution meth- 
ods, Prudential said. 

( Reuters . AFX, Bloomberg) 


German Joblessness Hits a Postwar High 


Ct » VMbOwtoflFfBotDufacin 

WREMBERG - Germany’s 
unadjusted jobless rate rose- to a 
postwar high of 1 1.4 percent in July 
from 1 1 percent in June amid a con- 
tinued slump in Eastern Germany’s 
construction industry, the Federal 
Labor Office said Wednesday. 

About 435 million people were 
out of work in the country last month 
an rocrease of 132,000 from June. ’ 

When adjusted for seasonal vari- 
ations. unemployment rose by 17,000 
in July, which was more than econ- 
omists had expected. The seasonally 
adjusted unemployment rate rose to 
113 percent from 1 14 percent. 

Most of the jobs lost were in the 
former East Germany, where con- 
struction work continued to taper 
off. Unemployment in the East rose 
by 27,000 in July, and the jobless 
rate rose to 18.1 percent. 

On the other hand. Western Ger- 


many’s job market stabilized be- 
cause of exports. Unemployment 
‘ ‘ seems to have hit bottom” in West- 
ern Germany, the country 's econom- 
ic engine, where seasonally adjusted 
joblessness declined by 10,000 in 
July, said Ber nhar d Jagoda, the of- 
fice’s president. But he said there 
was a sharpening divide between 
Eastern and Western Germany. 

“In the jobs market, growth is 
divergent," Mr. Jagoda said. ‘ ‘There 
is an increasing discrepancy between 
West and East German states.” 

The overall rise in unemployment 
was due mainly to the summer va- 
cation season, when companies let 
workers go and are slow to hire and 
smaller ones often close, Mr. Jagoda 
said. But he said the situation in the 
East could worsen more if the gov- 
ernment failed to get economic 
changes on track, including tax re- 
form and a cut in overtime. 


Chancellor Helmut Kohl's 
ikesman, Peter Hausmann, called 
ie job-market situation “unsatis- 
factory.” 

The labor office said domestic 
demand remained weak, while for- 
eign demand and the weakening of 
the mark had fed an expansion in the 
manufacturing industry. 

The construction minister, Klaus 
Toepfer, said contracts signed under 
a program that had brought thousands 
of workers from Eastern Europe to 
Germany had to be allowed to run out 
as soon as possible. 

“While we fully understand the 
economic situation of our East 
European neighbors, the critical 
state of Germany's own building 
sector makes this course of action 
unavoidable,” Mr. Toepfer said. 

Mr. Jagoda said he was still ex- 
pecting unemployment to average 
4.3 million in 1997. 


Separately, the Spanish Labor 
Ministry said its measure of the un- 
employment rate, one of two such 
measurements used in Spain, fell to 
a 16-year low of 1230 percent in 
July from 13.06 percent in June. It 
was the first tune since 1981 that the 
rate had fallen below 13 percent. 

The number of jobless people fell 
by 82,694 in July from June to stand 
at 2.009.000. 

In France, meanwhile, demand 
for local manufactured goods in the 
second quarter increased at a sus- 
tained pace in all industrial sectors 
and should continue to rise at the 
same rate in the third quarter, the 
national statistics institute. INSEE, 
said in its tjuarterly survey of busi- 
ness conditions in industry. 

INSEE also said confidence re- 
garding foreign demand had reached 
a level close to its historic high. 

f AP, Reuters, AFP, Bloomberg) 


Britain Fares Well in Europe’s Profit Parade 

London Shares Surge to a Record Restructuring Costly for Electrolux 


CcmfUni tn Our Staff Fnm Dupa/dta 

LONDON — The FTSE 100 in- 
dex of leading shares hit a milestone 
on Wednesday as solid corporate 
results and a weak pound drew buy- 
ers back into stocks, even as the 
Bank of England contemplated an 
interes t rate increase. 

The FTSE 100 closed at a record 
5,026.20, up 1.32 percent. 

Better- than -expected earnings 

from banks, insurers and other 
companies offset the prospect of an- 
other interest-rate increase. 

While the pound plunged against 
the dollar, it has risen about 5 per- 
cent in the past eight months. A 
strong pound tends to hurt export- 
ers. 

GKN PLC, Standard Chartered 
PLC. Cadbury Schweppes PLC, 
Woolwich PLC, Prudential Corp. 
and Commercial Union PLC all re- 
leased earnings reports that were in 
line with or better than forecasts. 

“It’s a very good day on die cor- 
porate front," said Christian Si- 
mond, a fund adviser at Julius Baer 
Investments Ltd. in London. “Earn- 
ings were better than expected even 
with the strength of the pound.” 

GKN chalked op one of the 
biggest gains on the FTSE 100 after 
the maker of military helicopters 


and auto parts posted a 23 percent 
rise in first-half profit, to £137 mil- 
lion ($222.6 million), as all its major 
businesses grew. Sales were down 
2.3 percent, at £1.69 billion. 

“They are managing their busi- 
ness in a difficult environment very 
well,” said Nigel Cobby, an ex- 
ecutive director at Morgan Stanley. 
Dean Winer, Discover & Co. * ‘They 
seem to be controlling their costs 
very well.” 

The shares surged 73 pence, or 
6.7 percent, to 1.135 pence. 

Standard Chartered, the London- 
based bank with a large Asia-Pacific 
ice, on Wednesday reported 
i-half pre-tax profits of £435 mil- 
lion, down from £448 million a year 
ago. But the year-earlier figure in- 
cluded £46 million in exceptional 
gains. 

Standard Chartered shares closed 
30 pence higher at 1,038 pence. 

Cadbury Schweppes posted a 2 
percent increase in its half year 
profit, to £236 million, as sales fell 
18 percent, to £1.88 billion: Chief 
Executive John Sunderland said the 
group had made a good start to its 
second half. 

Cadbury shares were 23 pence 
higher at 609 pence. 

(Reuters, AFP, Bloomberg ) 


Gwnptlnl by Our Sufi From Ditpachn 

Electrolux AB. Europe’s largest 
household-appliance maker, posted 
a net loss for the second quarter 
Wednesday as strong sales in 
Europe failed to make up for a 
massive charge for a two-year re- 
structuring. 

Electrolux said the loss for the 
three months was 398 million 
Swedish kronor ($49.4 million), 
compared with a profit of 951 mil- 
lion kronor in the corresponding 
period last year. 

Electrolux said earlier this year it 
would spend 23 billion kronor shut- 
ting 25 plants and 50 warehouses and 
cut 12,000 jobs, or 1 1 percent of its 
work force, in the next two years to 
boost profit The 1997 results include 
the charge but exclude profit from 
the operations of an aluminum unit 
That profit was given to shareholders 
as an extraordinary dividend. 

Electrolux’s shares fell 2 kronor 
to 613 kronor in Stockholm. 

In other earnings news: 

• Norway’s two biggest banks, 
buoyed by the country’s stroi 
economy, booked higher first-1 
1997 profits. Den norske Bank, the 
country’s largest bank, said oper- 
ating profit before loan losses rose 
5.6 percent, to 1.34 billion kroner 


($173.3 million). Christiania Bank 
og Kreditkasse, the country’s No. 2 
bank, said its operating profit before 
loan losses was up 7.4 percent, at 
1.05 billion kroner. 

• BfC Bank AG, the German 
unit of Credit Lyonnais SA, said 
operating profit jumped 70 percent, 
to 159 million Deutsche marks 
($84.6 million), on rising net in- 
terest and commission income. 

• Hochtief AG, one of Ger- 
many's biggest construction compa- 
nies, reported a 6.9 percent rise in 
fust-hafr output, to 5.88 billion DM, 
as a 26.7 percent surge in foreign 
demand made up for a 6.2 percent 
decline in the domestic market. 

• Repsol SA, Spain's largest en- 
ergy company, said profit in the first 
half was little changed at 61.63 bil- 
lion pesetas ($387.9 million). De- 
spite widespread expectations of a 
loss, the company was helped by an 
increase in income from erode oil 
sales. Profit for the same period last 
year totaled 61 .45 billion pesetas. 

• Hoogovens NV posted a 40 
percent increase in first-half net 
profit, to 1 94 million guilders (S9 1 .6 
million), and said full-year results 
should also show a strong increase 
on strong sales. 

(Bloomberg. AFX. Reuters ) 


Investor’s Europe 


4500 v 5200— i 3250 

/ — : 5000 — flOO- - 

3900 -J— t 4800— 1 2950 - 

3600- — At-— 4600 -MV L Jk ^ 


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1997 1997 1997 

» - 1- : : * * v » 5% .w.m ^ 



source: Telekurs 


ImcniaiHHtaJ Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


• Adidas AG’s first-half profit rose 29 percent, to 238 million 
Deutsche marks ($126.5 million), as a global marketing 
campaign lifted sales of sports shoes and clothing. Sales rose 
40 percent, to 3.14 billion DM. 

• Frankfurt stock-exchange supervisors shelved an inves- 
tigation after BHF-Bank AG offered 10 pay 365,600 DM in 
compensation and an unspecified amount in costs in a case 
involving alleged price manipulation concerning options on 
Allianz AG shares. 

• Alitalia SpA shares rose 13 percent, to 1 ,103 lire (60 cents), 
apparently on hopes that the flag carrier would form a part- 
nership with KLM Royal Dutch Airlines NV. 

• Aer Lingus, Ireland's state-owned airline, will buy four 
Airbus Industrie A321 aircraft valued at $220 milli on 10 
expand its capacity on the route between London and Dublin. 

• Diligentia AB, a Swedish real-estate investment company, 
offered to pay 1.03 billion kronor ($128 million) in stock to 
acquire Hufvudstaden International AB, a Sweden-based 
international real-estate investor that is being spun off by 
Fastighets AB Hufvudstaden. 

• New Africa Investments LtcL, a South African bolding 
company, agreed to buy Independent Newspapers Holdings 
Ltd.’s 42.5 percent stake in the Sowetan, lifting its stake in 
South Africa's largest-circulation daily to 95 percent. New 
Africa said the price valued the paper at 150 million rand 
($32.2 million). 

• Metsa-Serla Oy , a Finnish paper company, plans to raise its 
fine-paper prices by an average of 10 percent at the beginning 
of September. The company said the increases would be 
sharpest in France and Germany, while the strong pound 
would help keep prices stable in Britain. 

• L'Oreal SA’s first-half sales rose 1 3 percent, to 34.02 billion 

French francs ($5.36 billion). Bluombcrg. AFX. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Wednesday, Aug. 6 

- Prteesln locohurrendes. 

Tetekurs 

High Lorn Close Prw. 


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585 589 
492 492 

1347 1363 
245 263 

5J0 £23 

015 836 
764 765 

119 3J2 

2 .1® 2.W 

£25 432 

7J5 750 

1J6 157 

782 786 

499 5 

685 £14 

759 7JB 
364 168 

982 9X 
285 2M 
£10 £» 
2.15 118 

663 £84 

268 3M 
95B 10W 
2J7 Ifl 
£42 £51 

982 10-10 
£08 £20 
190 3.91 
433 434 

1755 1138 

7.18 7J1 

425 434 
253 253 

835 836 

459 452 

1993 11.16 
152 154 

1185 1187 
885 120 
442 452 

£55 £60 

1083 1038 
404 4ffif 

426 428 

755 755 

457 459 

557 555 
387 113 
1S3S 1866 
453 452 
685 £56 


860 

440 

757 

£27 

143 

£18 

£82 

1Z80 

845 

£09 

440 

197 

11J7 

751 

341 

1367 

6JT 

239 

£02 

862 

460 

166 

41B 

186 

1067 

130 

£95 

586 

48S 

£91 

689 

3.15 
6 

463 

566 

£19 

784 

154 

939 

362 
1085 
1126 
833 
£91 
192 
434 
£85 
£27 
£75 

2167 

1033 

179 

7.13 

266 

937 

283 

453 

734 

165 

589 

495 

1134 

239 

537 

837 

739 

332 

289 

630 

742 

135 

7.15 
5 

£06 

750 

336 

982 

286 

£11 

117 

662 

250 

980 

237 

642 

9.92 

£10 

363 
438 

17.95 

750 

424 

257 

850 

458 

1095 

152 

1188 

887 

446 

669 

1088 

488 

420 

782 

460 

561 

112 

1843 

450 

685 


Madrid 

Acenrxa 

ACE5A 

Aguos Bcutelon 

Anjentmta 

BBV 

BoiKato 

Bonktahr 

Boa Centro VTop 

BCD Popular 

Bco Santander 

CEPSA 

Conrinente 

FECSA 
Gas Natural 
Ibfrtrota 
Piyai 
Bepsd 

SevOang Elec 
Tabaadera 
Telelonica 
UnkmFenosa 
Votenc Cement 


Bebaledak: 99261 
Pravtoes; S8£S6 


27970 

27520 

27970 

27530 

1825 

1795 

1B20 

1800 

5940 

5740 

5930 

5750 

8200 

8000 

8200 

B040 

4175 

3900 

4175 

3905 

1470 

1425 

1470 

1440 

jm 

75?0 

7550 

7540 

5890 

5790 

5840 

5700 

35500 

34780 

35500 

:wms 

4400 

4285 

4400 

4285 

4690 

4550 

4650 

4400 

3400 

3200 

3340 

3200 

8530 

8220 

8530 

8370 

3195 

3075 

2195 

3075 

1295 

1250 

1295 

1265 

6950 

6800 

6920 

6860 

1855 

1810 

1850 

1815 

3025 

2925 

2955 

2985 

6420 

4220 

4420 

6210 

1425 

1405 

1425 

1425 

7840 

7640 

7770 

7750 

4155 

4065 

4155 

4065 

1240 

1225 

1240 

1235 

2715 

2640 

2710 

2610 


Manila 

Ayala B 
Ayala Land 
Bt PtiEp bll 
C&P Hanes 
MardaEtocA 
Metro Bade 
Ptiran 
POBank 
PH Lang DM 
Son Miguel B 
SM Prime Hdg 


PSE Met: 269479 
PrevfaeK 2676J0 


1825 

18 

■ 1835 

1835 

21J5 

21J5 

2IJS 

21® 

154 

151 

152 

151 

1075 

10JS 

I860 

10 

89 

B660 

88® 


565 

555 

560 

566 

£30 

£20 

£20 

£20 

224 

220 

220 

224 

945 

940 

945 

945 

65 

64® 

44® 

64 

840 

830 

8® 

8J0 


Mexico 


Alfa A 
Banned B 
Cemex CPO 
CHraC 

ErapModema 
GpoCarsoAl 
GpoF Banner 
Gin Fbi Infauna 
KbnbOakMai 
Televisa CPO 
TalMexL 


2410 

63.10 

1440 

4430 

6280 

199 

3731 

3830 

12850 

2150 


Beta fades: 522492 
Prawns: 51 8342 

6340 6430 6160 
25^i 2580 25.15 
4115 4265 4245 
1410 1433 .14.14 
42.15 4430 42J5 
42.00 blJSi 42JO 
171 190 190 

37.10 37.10 3730 

3755.38.10 37.9C 
12260 127 JO 12120 

2145 2165 2165 


Milan 

AfleanzaAszJc 

Sea Coma Hal 

Bca Fadeurara 

Bee dl Roma 

Beneinn 

Owflolfafacmo 

Edison 

ENI 

Fiat 

GenenfiAak 

IMI 

INA 

nafaos 

M eSnd 

Metfofaanco 

Moatetfison 

Oflvrttl 


PM8 
HAS 

Roto Bona 
5 Puota Torino 
TeiecrenNaEa 
TW 


U850 


1710 

27450 

3515 

8475 

10750 

5975 

35800 

17100 

2610 

5430 

8060 

11740 

1181 

669 

2610 

50® 

15145 

20650 

13850 

11300 

6220 


14410 

3825 

5700 

1630 

76600 

3300 

8350 

10305 

5855 

34250 

16655 

2570 

5300 

7820 

11190 

1123 

633 

2485 

4780 

14580 

20100 

13150 

10630 

6045 


Montreal 
Bee Mob Com 

CdnTircA 

Oil USA 

CTRrISk 

Gaz Motto 

Gt-WestUfaca 

I—™ 

imnstanGip 

LaWowCtts 

NattU Canada 

Power On 

PnovFkii 

QuebecorB 

EtogenCommB 

Royal BkCda 


Oslo 

AkerA 


DennaakeBk 

EOern 

HafskOHlA 

KtaemerAta 

Norsk Hydro 

NookeStogA 

NyoamadA 

OtWoAsoa 

Petal GeaSK 

SagaPeRnA 

SsS^isted 

Traw o ceunOB 

Storebrand Asa 


147 

200 

28 

3330 

157 

46 

447 

413 


154 

4560 


162 

554 

44] 

159 

136 

OS 

fBJO 


Paris 


CAC40: 383739 
Previous: 2984.10 

Accor 

9® 

933 

9® 

945 

AGF 

71 £40 

?iaio 

215® 

215® 

AirUonde 
Aladd Atari 

953 

874 

931 

833 

952 

874 

941 

845 

Aan-UAP 

407 

399® 

406® 

403® 


Kl 

745 

770 

775 

BIC 

530 

511 

524 

516 

BNP 

291 

249® 

290 

275 

Canal Phra 

1138 

1090 

1123 

11® 


4084 

3980 

4033 

3996 


284 

28330 

784® 

286 

CCF 

32£90 

307.10 

322 

307® 

Cetefeai 

714 

700 

714 

701 

Ovarian Dior 

9B3 

962 

977 

952 

Q-F-Dcr-. Fran 

591 

580 

590 

587 

Cred9 Agitate 

1260 

12® 

12® 

12® 

Danone 

964 

K.I 

963 

954 

EK-Aip«Mne 

704 

670 

m 

673 

ErktantaBS 

846 

833 

836 

843 

Eurodlsnm 

870 

735 

8J0 

7.15 

835 

7J5 

B® 

735 


742 

724 

741 

7® 


406 

398® 

402® 

407 



B35 

843 

846 


438 

41940 

438 

422® 

Lsgnmd 

Ltfietd 

12® 

1171 

1238 

1195 

2434 

2378 

2418 

2385 

LVMH 

1568 

1514 

155V 

1535 

MdreknB 

391.90 

36540 

390 

380® 



435 

455 

44230 


E) 

302 

306 

306® 

Peugeot 01 

■rl 

688 

7U4 

690 

PbuuH-Print 


2703 

2729 

2/H. 


2385 

2333 

Btt 

2359 



167® 

ITT M 

170 

Rexel , 

1659 

1620 

16® 

1650 

Rh-Pouten: A 

HI 

255® 

299® 

■ J 


: J 

613 

639 

Kill 


■tit 

342® 

Ml 

341® 

SEB 

1025 

1010 

1016 

1015 



4/5 

579 

5/9 

Sto Generate 

817 

793 

ms 

KJ 


3120 

2953 

3090 

2999 

StGaboln 

■B. 

877 

■ 1 

889 

SuejfCte) 

■ci 

15JB5 

■a 

1535 

Suer Lyon Eaux 
Svamaba 

670 

760 

16040 

646 

752 

157® 

664 

755 

159® 

656 

759 

158® 

Total B 

443 

598 

636 

604 


117® 

115® 

117 

117® 

Volvo 

38&J0 

380 

384 

382.90 


MIBTtanafic*: 14691 60 
Previoas: 14324M 


14710 1«M 
3965 3870 

5810 SCT 
1680 16 72 

27450 26800 
3500 3305 
8435 TOO 

5950 5880 

35800 34300 
17010 16810 
2600 2565 

5 420 5325 

8025 7845 
11740 11345 
1178 1121 
642 645 

2600 2510 
5000 4785 
15145 14525 
20200 20150 
13800 13405 
11300 10970 
£220 6065 


ST 




7939 

18J9 


545L01 

472JB 


11J6 
81 £00 
sun 

78J0 

1800 

53£00 

61800 


21201 
36-50 
1130 
15120 
197 J» 
17730 
35ia» 
39 JO 
12J0 
29 JO 


29100 

209.99 

3530 

11.15 

145J0 

18530 

16730 

34200 

39-00 

1210 

2730 


Seoul 


Damm 

Daewoa Heavy 

M Eng. 

n 

Korea El Pw 
Korea Esdl Bk 
LG Semlcna 
PoftanglronSl 
Samsung Disfay 
SoannaElec 
Slrintaiefank 
SKTHecoa 


Curepesite iodBic74£45 
PlM8M: 74836 

97900 96000 97000 96000 
8170 2900 8050 7840 

21200 20000 21 IS! 20700 
13500 12900 12900 14000 
2m 26200 26500 26300 
5600 £500 5570 5570 
4758U 45000 47500 45100 
58SD0 57600 58500 58200 
45700 45000 45500 45400 
69900 68500 69300 69000 
9500 9450 9450 9450 
463000 458000 463000 458000 


Singapore strata Tines: 19S8 l 62 
Prevfans: 1951J1 


IfldBfmt tatee 373M1 

Previous: 773CL64 

49 49 49 49 

28 2» m 27% 

3930 3WJ 3» $ 

44 43-90 4190 44 

1835 1870 1835 1W 
3195 33M 3195 34 

4115 41 JO 4115 4H6 

37.10 3635 36» ®45 
2135 20J0 2) 2035 

17.90 17J0 17J0 17JJ 
39 3M 39 
38M 381* 38,35 »I0 

271* ».15 27.15 VM 
1(M KM 1IM 1W» 
6714 66.20 6735 6£1S 



HKLreid* 
JaidMirihesn* 
Jam Strategic 1 

KeppelA 
KeppefBank 
KepprfFWs 
I Land 


OS Union BkF 
PatwayHdgt 


14 1» 14 2M J8 

2730 2730 *7“ 
■wan 33 3330 
154 15630 
46 4£50 

443 441 

400 413 3W 

as 280 288 380 

160 16130 158 

553 SH SO 

430 440 424 

153 156 15330 

128 132 129 

630 625 625 

4830 46.73 4830 


SlngAbL. 

Sing Loral 
SngPieaF 
SfaigTecblnd 
SbiaTeteamm 
Taf Lee Bank 
UUIndurfriai 
UHOSaBkF 
WfagTalHdgs 
'toUSiMux. 


5J0 

5® 

5® 

5® 

535 

545 

535 

£60 

13 

12® 

12® 

13 

13 

12® 

12® 

1110 

1j04 

0.95 

132 

0.94 

IB® 

17® 

18® 

1&30 

4® 

4® 

434 

452 

10® 

9.90 

1030 

9® 

154 

106 

140 

112 

8® 

7.90 

835 

7® 

444 

412 

4® 

412 

£30 

£20 

£20 

£25 

3® 

170 

3J4 

174 

4® 

494 

496 

492 

436 

4® 

434 

430 

1450 

14® 

14® 

14® 

9® 

e.95 

9 

9J0 

6® 

£40 

£45 

6® 

£75 

£70 

£70 

4® 

13® 

13 

13 

13® 

7® 

7® 

7® 

7 

28® 

27® 

28® 

27® 

180 

170 

3® 

170 

2® 

235 

236 

2® 

2J9 

178 

2J8 

2J9 

1.11 

1® 

i m 

1.10 

1530 

1470 

1120 

1470 

1® 

182 

186 

386 


AGAB 

ABBA 

AsNDomai 

Astra A 

AflasCopcoA 

Aidoftr 


EledrohnB 
Ericsson B 
Henries B 

lnc«nHwA 

bnrmtur 8 

AAoDaB 

Nardbaikeii 

PbanwUpfafui 

Sondv£ 6 

ScaiiaB 

SCAB 

5-EBatkenA 

SkandtaFare 

5kanskuB 

SKFB 

SpabankenA 
Store A 
Su Handles A 
Volvo B 


633 

604 

611 

615 

371 

360 

369 3S&® 

334 

327 

328 

332® 

675 

• «5» 

-675 

648 

426 

422 

425 

421 

292 

274 

291 

275® 

268 

261 

267 

261 

302® 

298 

30! 

301 

251® 

238 

248 

239 

225 

222® 

223 

223® 

186 

183 

IBS 

184 

90® 

88 

90® 

0 

318 

313 317® 

315 

340® 

336 

338 339® 

220 

215 

219 

213 

180 

176 

T7B 

1® 

138 

132 

138 

132® 

253 249® 

253 

250 

223 

216 

222 215® 


sso Paulo 


11J6 1130 
823-00 81Q01 
57 JO 56.60 

79.00 77.99 
18.10 18J0 

551.00 53800 
•mffil 62500 
54000 53900 
47200 46100 
30300 300.00 
21200 21000 
3£5B 34J0 
1130 11.10 

151.ro 14700 
19510 18500 
17700 169-50 
35000 30-00 

39.00 3900 
12JO 1201 
2&70 28.10 


Sydney 


AlOrtinarias: 2727.10 
PrWtoas: 270749 

Anar 

832 

844 

846 

846 

ANZ Biting 

1072 

1032 

10® 

10® 

BHP 

1836 

17.90 

17.99 

1/3/ 


411 

4 

410 

401 


78.05 

27® 

V.W 

27® 

CBA 

1636 

1639 

1645 

1642 

CCAmaH 

16® 

1£10 

1643 

I£IB 


6.91 

£80 

£90 

£78 


7® 

7 

7JW 

/lk» 

CSR 

£24 

539 

5.23 

£1/ 


1M 

234 

23/ 

2® 


236 

233 

336 

2.06 

ICI Australia 

13J8 

1112 

1128 

1331 


30® 

30 

30® 

3035 

MlMHdgs 

1® 

19® 

131 

1942 

1® 

19® 

1® 

1944 

Nal Mutual Hdg 

233 

2.19 

233 

232 


£12 

634 

£1(1 

£05 

Pacific Dunlop 

163 

3® 

163 

161 


5 

484 

5 

43V 


8® 

833 

8® 

834 

Rio TWO 

2080 

20® 

2030 

20-48 

SIGeageBonfe 

839 

832 


836 

UVMC 

7J0 

7® 

747 


Westeac Bking 
WooasfdePet 

8® 

1145 

543 

11J1 

852 

1137 

843 

1135 

Wootaorths 

430 

423 

438 

426 

Taipei 

Stack Marita tadec 9861® 
Previous: 991 9-68 

OdboyLitolm 

1® 

148 

148 

1® 

Oiorn_Hwa8k 

120 

72® 

116 

71® 

117 

77® 

117 

74® 


135 

130 

131 

133® 

OiiwSiuH 

30® 

3D 

30 


Find Bank 

119® 

116 

116® 

117® 


66 

64® 

64® 

65 


129 

125 

125 

126 

(nil Comm Bk 

64 

63 

61® 

63 

1 

j 

i 

J 

74 

73 

n 

73® 

SUn Kang Lite 

106 

1® 

100® 

153 

101 

153 

104 

m 

Tatung _ 
Did Man Bee 

48J0 

140 

47 

135 

47.10 

137 

47 

138® 


65 

64 

64® 



Tokyo 


StOCkhOlm S XJ6 fad«E 361|JB 

PityfausilsSBkis 


10830 107 106 107 JO 

11) 107 JO 110J0 107 

237 230 237 231 

1S2 14850 152 149 JO 

245 231 241 233 

295 290 295 28? 



Nkkei 225: 17702J7 


Previous: 1951445 

1070 

1040 

10® 

1070 

m 

701 

718 

70S 

35® 

3500 

3430 

3580 

DAO 

835 

AM 

838 

615 

600 

615 

6UU 

1060 

1040 

1050 

10® 

2260 

21® 

22® 

21® 

565 

556 

558 

565 

2810 

27® 

2810 

2770 

3610 

3490 

3590 

!KSfi 

xwu 

2020 

2040 

20® 

1990 

19® 

19® 

1990 

27® 

7m 

7/M 

2710 

885 

858 

826 

890 

190 

1440 

1420 

14® 

.VJ 

4® 

5/3 

560 

13® 

134(1 

13® 

13® 

792 

m 

M 

790 

77808 

nm 

77OT 

7660a 

2790 

27® 

2780 

78011 

5210a 

*1®a 

MVUa 

5140a 

2520 

2490 

2400 

7418* 

5370 

5010 

53® 

5090 

153(1 

1440 

1510 

MS# 

4840 

4/00 

48® 

4770 

1710 

1650 

1/18 

I/U0 

1120 

1110 

1110 

1130 

1340 

1310 

1348 

1330 

:uwi 

36® 

3790 


16® 

1590 

16® 

1580 

390 

.181 

388 

.191 

539 

STS 

539 

529 

6m 

6520 

6680 

455) 

49V 

m 

497 

497 

93611a 

VMM 

9340a 

V26Ufl 

zm 

326(1 

3350 

3350 

579 

SM 

5/6 

563 

22® 

2230 

7740 

22® 

1790 

1720 

1790 

1720 

480 

470 

480 

471 

320 

311 

312 

324 

681 

on 

Ml 

683 

turn 

10® 

mm 

10/0 

IH4 

1/9 

if» 

W-i 

870 

805 

830 

En 

5D0 

480 

400 

492 

TWO 

M50 

9000 

9600 

19911 

19® 

I960 


535 

509 

534 


4W 

412 

456 

452 

IWl 

1830 

1870 

1900 

4800 

4640 

4800 

4810 

2450 

Ha 

2420 

2410 

14M 

1410 

mi 

12® 

1230 

12® 

1720 

305 

300 

304 

:km 

620 

606 

617 

616 

1640 

15® 

1640 

life; 

825 

808 

81/ 

824 

430 

623 

609 

6® 

16® 

1590 

16® 

1610 

1110 

1088 

>110 

10W 


The Trib Index 


Pncss as Ol SCO P M New York tone 


Jan 1. 1993-100 

Lewi 

Change 

% change 

veer in dele 

Work! Index 

179.76 

+2.10 

+1.18 

% change 
+20.53 

Regional indeaea 

Asta/Pacdic 

131.02 

*2.86 

+223 

+6.1# 

Europe 

187.17 

+1.69 

♦0.91 

+16.11 

N. America 

214.62 

+1.59 

+0.75 

*32.56 

S. America 

175.95 

+385 

+224 

+53.76 

Industrial lrnhixas 

Capital goods • 

233.56 

+i45 

+106 

+36.65 

Consumer goods 

196.91 

+0.94 

+0.48 

+21.98 

Energy 

204.27 

+3.81 

+1.90 

+19.66 

Finance 

134.14 

+2.33 

+1.77 

+15.18 

Miscellaneous 

192.63 

+3.19 

+1.68 

+19.19 

Raw Materials 

194.24 

+151 

+0.99 

+10.75 

Service 

169.86 

+2.18 

+1.30 

+23.70 

Utilities 

169.03 

+2.94 

♦1.77 

+17.82 


The International Herald Tnbune Workt Stock Mo* O tracks the U.& Mtttr values of 
330 mtamoBonaBy oKBstaMa stocks from 35 cetanes For more mtormation. a free 
booklet s available by uniting to 77w Tnb Index, 181 Avenue Charles tie GauSa. 

92521 Neuttty Cedax. France. Compter/ by Bloomberg Naurs. 


Mitsui Fvdosn 

Mitsui Trust 

MurotoMlg 

NEC 

Nikon 

NlkkoSec 

Nfatendo 

Kssr 

isasr 

NKK 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 

NTT Data 
Op Paper 
OsAaGas 
RJooli 
Rohra 
Sokura Bk 
5aokyo 
Sanwa Bank 

SanynEfac 

Seam 

SetouRwy 

Sekraidwni 

Sekkail House 

Sewn- Eleven 

Sharp 

ShJluAu El Pwr 

Shimizu 

Shin-efcuCb 

Shiseido 

SMnnka Bk 

Saflboi* 

Sony 

Sumfiomo 

SinstamaBk 

SumBChem 

Suatamo Elec 

Sand Meta 

S umttT nnl 

Twin Phnrai 

TakEdaChen 

TDK 

Tohoku EiPwr 
Total Breik 
Tokto Marine 
Tokyo El Pm 
Tokyo Eleckgn 
Tokyo Gas 
TokyuCotiL 
Tenai 

TowanPrirt 
Toroy Ind 
TosMw 

Tostem 
ToyoTiusI 
Toyota Motor 
Yamanoudii 
tr.xWb:xlM0 


Higb 

Low 

Close 

1430 

1370 

14® 

693 

665 

693 

53® 

52® 

S3® 

1670 

1610 

16® 

2770 

21® 

2270 

637 

620 

634 

114® 

112® 

113® 


/SI 

757 


ill 

515 


312 

315 


726 

738 

209 

204 

207 

1690 

16® 

16® 

121® 

1160b 

121® 

5140b 

5060b 

510® 

628 

Hi 

624 

2B5 


285 

17® 

1730 

1790 

148® 

146® 

146® 

733 

693 

718 

4370 

41 » 

4370 

16® 

15® 

1630 

465 

453 

4® 

8710 

mm 

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Nomura 
Faces New 
Penalties 


OBWtoOivSmffFnmiD hm to 

m TOKYO — Nomura Secu- 
rities Co. and Daj-Ichi K&ugyo 
Bank Ltd. suspended some of 
their operations Wednesday as 
the government’s penalties for 
paying off a gangster went into 
effect 

But die bad news did not end 
there for the brokerage concern. 
The Japan Securities Dealers 
Association decided to impose a 
penalty of 100 million yen 
($844,000) on Nomura for il- 
legal payoffs to a corporate rack- 
eteer, according to association 
sources. 

. The Tokyo Stock Exchange 
also is expected to fine Nomura 
100 million yen, the highestpen- 
alty imposed by the exchange. 
Both the trade group and the 
exchange are due to announce 
the p unishme nt Friday. 

Under terms of the punish- 
ment by the Finance Minis try, 
Dai-Icln Kangyo Bank is barred 
for five months from seeking 
new companies to lend to and 
from selling government bonds. 
Nomura is suspended for five 
months from trading stocks on 
its own account and from B elling 
new bonds issued by rmrional 
and local governments. 

The ministry also barred 
Nomura from all stock trading 
at its domestic branches for a 
week starting Wednesday. 
Nomura's head office is to be 
barred from stock and futures 
trading for a month. 

Separately. Dai-Ichi Kangyo 
Bank said two employees had 
resigned after being indicted on 
charges of paying off a gang- 
ster. Michiyoshi Kusashima 
and Takushi Manabe resigned 
from the general affairs depart- 
ment last month, a Dai-Ichi 
Kangyo spokesman said. 

(Bridge News. Bloomberg ) 


New Dickson Deals Focus Growth in Asia 


Investor’s Asia 




by Oar Stuff Fwm bupatrba 

HONG KONG — Dickson Con- 
cepts (International) Ltd. said 
Wedaesday it had signed long-term 
deals to operate Brooks Brothers 
stores and market Coach leather 
goods in Asia. 

Dfoks<» which recently took 
control of the New York luxury re- 
tailer Barney’s Inc., signed a 10- 
ted wtfa Marks & Spencer 
rix. of Britain giving it exclusive 
nghts to operate Brooks Brothers 
stores m Southeast Asia. In a sep- 
arate deal with Sarah Lee Coro, of 
the United States, Dickson signed a 
conn-act to distribute Coach 
products, also in Southeast Asia. 

Dickson Poon, the company’s 
founder and chairman, said the re- 
tailer had also reached an under- 
standing with Ferrari SpA to de- 
velop retail concepts'* for the 
Italian carmaker. Dickson Poon 

Mr. Poon, 41, is credited with 
using a formula of sex, glamour and ventures. 

fon to turn around London’s ailin g “We will re main in a net cash 
Nichols PLC after buying it position after the transactions,” he 
10 ‘ refused to say how said. Mr. Poon added Dickson 's 

much the company spent on its latest original forecast of double-digit 

Tobacco Firm Suspends Sales, 
Citing Australia’s Tax Shift 


Bloomberg Neivs 

SYDNEY — W.D. & H.O. Wills 
Holdings Ltd. said Wednesday it 
had suspended sales of its products 
as well as trading in its shares for 
two days amid concern that the Aus- 
tralian tobacco industry may have to 
pay an additional 500 milli on dol- 
lars ($370.6 million) in federal tax. 

The federal government assumed 
control of all tobacco-tax collection 
Wednesday, a day after Australia's 
High Court ruled state government 
taxes on tobacco unconstitutional. 

The extra federal tax, designed to 
offset the loss of revenue from the 
states, will actually cause the in- 
dustry to pay an additional 500 mil- 
lion dollars a year. Wills said. 

Tobacco companies paid about 
4.3 billion dollars in Australian state 


i &: IMF: In Thailand, Many Vfhrry About Austerity Measures 

Continued from Page 11 given by an individual country and amount of the whole financial ] 


“Coming to the temple calms 
people's hearts in times of trouble.’ ’ 
the monk said. 

■ Japan to Lead Bailout 

Japan said Wednesday it was 
ready to play a leading role along- 
side the International Monetary 
Fund in a rescue package for Thai- 
land. Reuters reported from Tokyo. 

A senior Finance Ministry offi- 
cial said Tokyo’s contribution to the 
package would be by for the most 


given by an individual country and 
would likely amount to a little undo- 
half the total amount provided the 
INF and mostly Asian countries. 

“Given the magnitude of rela- 
tions between Japan and Thailand, it 
is natural for Japan to extend the 
largest amount of financial help to 
the country,’ ’ the official said. 

Officials declined to say exactly 
how much Tokyo’s contribution 
wouldbe, but one said “Chances are 
high that Japan’s contribution will 
equal float of the IMF.” 

Ministry officials said floe total 


amount of the whole financial pack- 
age would not be for from the $12 
billion to S15 billion in loans Thai- 
land is seeking. 

Japanese officials have said the 
Asian Development Bank and mem- 
bers of the Association of Sonth 
East Asian Nations were likely to 
take part in the rescue effort, but that 
the bulk of financial support would 
come from the IMF and Japan. 

They said Tokyo’s contribution 
would be almost totally in the form 
of untied loans through the Export- 
Import Bank of Japan. 


growth in operating profits and 
earnings this year still stood. 

Under the latest agreements, the 
Hong Kong retailer — which 
already has the. rights to retail 
products from Polo to Rolex, Her- 
mes, and Bnlgari — plans to open 
100 additional shops throughout 
Southeast Asia in the current fi- 
nancial year. That will give the com- 
pany an international network of 
more than 350 shops. 

Dickson Concepts also said it 
would “launch Coach in China and 
explore further expansion opportu- 
nities in Malaysia, Thailand and In- 
donesia.” 

Coach offers a range of quality 
leather goods for men and women, 
and recently launched a new 
menswear line. Worldwide sales of 
Coach merchandise in 19% ex- 
ceeded $500 million, Dickson Con- 
cepts said. 

Dickson Concepts also said it 
would launch 18 Polo Jeans Co. 
shops throughout Asia the region by 
the end of this fiscal year. 

Mr. Poon said the company 
planned to open at least 20 Brooks 


Brothers franchises, adding that the 
first stores would be selling the 
chain’s signature button-down col- 
lars and American-cut suits next 
year. 

Joseph Gromek, the president of 
Brooks Brothers, said toe company 
picked Dickson based on its “retail 
experience with prestige brands and 
expertise with real estate.” 

Although Dickson’s concepts for 
toe Ferrari deal are still at a pre- 
liminary stage, toe company said it 
intended to launch toe finished 
products at flagship stores in New 
York, London, Tokyo, and Hong 
Kong. 

The announcements came after 
toe Hong Kong market closed 
Wednesday. Dickson shares have 
gained 10 percent this week, closing 
Wednesday at 29.60 Hong Kong 
dollars ($3.82), up 95 cents. 

Earlier this month, Dickson Con- 
cepts took control of 51 percent of 
Barney’s, paying $78 million for an 
equity stake. Dickson also agreed to 
provide $127 million in new financ- 
ing for the company. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters) 


and federal taxes last year. 

“You don’t take the steps that we 
have taken very lightly,” Stuart Sil- 
ver, a spokesman for Wills, said. 
“What we are saying is we need cer- 
tainty” about tax payments, he said. 

Peter Costello, Australia's treas- 
urer, said the government would 
raise its charges on tobacco to 25 1 .27 
dollars a kilogram, an increase of 
167 dollars. States imposed fran- 
chise licensing fees based on the 
value of the product- sold. 

The rise in the federal tax, 
however, more than offsets toe loss 
in revenue to the states. The gov- 
ernment said tobacco companies 
would be refunded toe difference, 
but Mr. Silver said state govern- 
ments had indicated they would 
keep the extra funds. 


Turkmenistan to Sell 
Rights to Caspian Oil 

Reuters 

ASHKHABAD, Turkmenistan — The government plans to seek 
bids internationally for rights to explore and develop Turkmenistan’s 
oil and gas reserves on tire Caspian Sea shelf, including the disputed 
Kyapaz oil field, a Turkmen official said Wednesday. 

The official, from the ministry responsible for toe oil and gas 
industry and for mineral resources, asked not to be identified but said 
the tender would be announced and held in the next few days in 
Houston. 

Data from Western Atlas International, a U.S.-based geophysical 


company, estimated T urkroenis tan's reserves on the Caspian Sea shelf 
at 22.2 billion barrels (3 billion tons) of crude oil and 4.5 trillion cubic 
meters (5.85 trillion cubic yards) of natural gas. 

The official said the riaia from Western Atlas, which conducted 
seismic exploration, had already been purchased by Shell Oil Co., the 


“Foreign companies will be offered cooperation in developing 
Turkmen fields, including the one known as Kyapaz which wholly 
belongs to Turkmenistan,” the official said. 

Kyapaz has become an object of discord in Turkmenistan's relations 
with Russia and Azerbaijan. On July 4, Azerbaijan’s state oil com- 
pany, SOCAR, signed a $1 billion preliminary agreement with AO 
Rosneft, the Russian state oil company, and with toe largest oil 
company in Russia, RAO Lukoil Holding, to develop the Kyapaz field, 
which is estimated to hold more than 50 million ions of erode oil. 

The field lies in the southern part of the Caspian and is claimed by 
both Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan. 

On July 5, Turkmenistan’s Foreign Ministry issued a strong protest 
over the Kyapaz deal. Later, the government sent Azerbaijan a 
message on toe “inadmissibility of undertaking any practical work" 
on toe Kyapaz and nearby Chirag oil fields. 

Turkmenistan's president, Saparmurat Niyazov, said last month he 
hoped President Boris Yeltsin of Russia would nullify the July 4 
agreement with Azerbaijan. 

Russia's deputy prime minister, Valery Serov, has called toe 
Russian- Azeri deal a misunderstanding, and last week, Rosneft an- 
nounced it was polling out of the deal, although Lukoil said it still 
would fulfill the agreement with SOCAR. 



■ V- - r r~--i > Sfrrffrwr: '**T ‘If I 

ter- 


Source: Tsfekurs 




IiuenutJiwal Herald Tribune 


■ Japan’s domestic personal-computer shipments rose just 4 
percent in the second quarter from a year earlier, to 1.7 milli on 
units, compared with a 1 3 percent rise, to 236 million units, in toe 
first quarter. Analysts said a rise in the national sales tax and a 
switch by manufacturers to more costly models were to blame. 

• The Japan Automobile Importers Association said sales 
of imported vehicles, excluding ones made by Japanese 
carmakers overseas, fell 18 percent in July, to 27,573 units. 
Sales of German cars dropped 18 percent, to 14.134, while 
sales of U.S. cars dropped 34 percent, to 10,269. 

• Nikon Corp., Canon Inc. and other Japanese manufac- 
turers of equipment used to. make computer chips said they 
would expand production of chip- making machines called 
steppers to meet growing demand. 

• China expects to complete its ambitious effort to transform 
about 90 percent of its 350,000 mostly small-scale state-owned 
companies by the end of the century, government economists 
say; restructuring small enterprises involves such measures as 
sell-offs, leasing, mergers and bankruptcy actions. 

• PT Indosat, Indonesia’s main international phone company, 
said first-half profit rose 1 6 percent, to 27 1 .6 billion rupiah ($103.9 
milli on), as sales rose 17 percent, to 679.9 billion rupiah. 

• The Philippines 1 central bank is cutting its overnight bor- 
rowing rate to 18 percent from 20 percent, its lowest since the 
region’s currency instability began last month. 

Bloomberg, Reuters. AFP 


Fleet Problems Hit Cathay’s Net 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. posted a 35 
percent drop in fust-half net profit Wednesday, pulled down 
by the temporary grounding of its Airbus fleet, a slump in 
sammer traffic and currency instability. 

Profit fell to 1 .07 billion Hong Kong dollars ($136.2 million) 
from 1 ,65 billion dollars a year earlier, when the figure included 
an exceptional gain of 541 millfondollm. Operating profit fell 
to 1.13 billion dollars from 1.17 billion dollars, but revenue 
rose to 15.78 billion dollars from 15.16 billion dollars. 

“Currency fluctuations, a weak summer travel market and 
the brief suspension of A33G-300 operations created a number 
of obstacles for the airline,” its chairman, Peter Sutch. said. 
Cathay Pacific suspended service on its 1 1 A330-300s in late 
May and early June after several in-flight engine shutdowns. 


DAMAGE: After Flood, Mud 


Continued from Page II 

parts deliveries. 

Steel mills ran out of raw 
materials and their yards were 
filled with railway cars frill of 
. undelivered steel 
ft Mr. Rybinski estimated the 
damage at $2 billion to $3 
billion in Poland. But the big- 
ger danger, he said, was toe 
government's plan to borrow 
up to 2 J billion zloty ($720 
million) from toe National 
Bank. 

Along with a billion zloty 
in European Union aid, Mr. 


efforts to bring inflation un- 
der 10 percent this year. ING 
B aring s predicts that annual 
inflation will be 14.5 percent 
in December. 

The stock markets were 
also affected. In Poland, toe 
index of NIF’s, privatization 

b funds holding mostly small 
and medium sized compa- 
nies, fell 10 percent since the 
floods, and the insurer Warta 
saw its value drop from 45 
zloty a share to 37 before re- 
covering slightly. 

Fritz -Schweiger, head of 
research at Investment Bank 
Austria in Vienna, said many 
companies might be fatally 
weakened, especially in the 
Czech Republic. 

“Investors should realize 
that when the companies 
show results for toe flood 
period, toe effects will be 
seen in the market,” he said. 

Wood & Co., a Czech 
brokerage house, has down- 
graded the country’s largest 
_ bank, Komercni Banka to a 
■ s' *11; because of its massive 
exposure to -flood-damaged 
companies, especially small 
and medium enterprises. _ 

It is toe small and medium- 
sized businesses, many of 
them privatized through the 
Czechs' cashless coupon sys- 
tem, that are suffering fo e 
most. These companies have 
little access to toe credit and 
to marketing and financial ex- 
pertise available to rivals. 

“The companies which 
have a majority owner who 
has been restructuring 
company will survive,’ said 
■ ft.yiatStnir Jaros, chief of re* 
• c search at Wood & Co. 

■ “The co mp anies that are 
basically around for just tak* 
mg money away from them 
wffl not recover, because 


there are no owners or man- 
agers with the incentive to 
restructure. It’s a pity. 

“The floods will acceler- 
ate toe restructuring process 
but the flip side is that they 
will take down companies 
that shouldn't go down.” 

In Otrokovice, the floods 
threw the differences into 
sharp relief. 

Barum, Otrokovice ’s tire 
factory, is looking good. 
Privatized as a joint venture 
with Continental Tire AG of 
Germany, it shows few signs 
of the floods that submerged 
power systems and covered 
toe plant floor in 20 centi- 
meters (eight inches) of wa- 
ter. 

Only the out-of-order el- 
evators and extension cords 
snaking across toe ground 
floor of the main administra- 
tive building give a hint of toe 

trouble. 

Eighteen days after the 
flood hit, Barum was back in 
foil production, and the man- 
aging director, Petr Pravec, 
said the company expected to 
hit its 1997 production targets 
of 6.5 million tires. 

Flood-related losses could 
be as low as a billion koruny, 
Mr. Pravec stud, and nearly 
all will be covered by insur- 

^Mr. Pravec credited toe 
joint venture with Continen- 
tal fix: bis company's surviv- 
al. Barton took on no debt 
and strong, business-minded 
owners were prepared to in- 
vest for long-term profits. 

But just across the Dre- 
vnice, the former shoe works 
is a stinking, sodden wreck, 
with tittle nope of -ever re- 
suming foil production. 

The shoe factory showea 
the weakness of Czech-styie 

privatization Built 70 years 
aao to supply the nearby Bata 

shoe plants, it was reprivat- 
ized in the early 1990s. 
Coupon holders had no cash 
to invest in it, and they tamed 

it intoaholdins company toat 

managed the decrepit indus- 
trial park and sold off the in- 
dividual workshops to entre- 

pf T^ 1 pian looked good on 

s^tssrtS 

meir tills to the holding com- 
pany. 


AnnatU, Tense 
In Europe, Gets 
ALiftinAsia 

Compiled by Oar Sufi Firm Dupa xhe s 

SYDNEY — Coca- 
Cola Amatil Ltd. said 
Wednesday that its first- 
half sales growth in 
Europe was below ex- 
pectations and warned 
that floods ravaging parts 
of the Continent could 
hurt second-half results. 

But the company said 
its latest acquisition, in 
toe Philippines, had 
raised its net profit by 40 
milli on Australian dol- 
lars ($29.6 million). 

Excluding rarningfi in 
toe Philippines, Coca- 
Cola Amatil, which is 33 
percent owned by the 
U.S.-based Coca-Cola 
Co., had net profit for toe 
first six months of 58.1 
million dollars, in line 
with analysts’ forecasts. 

Bnt net pro fit jumped 
to 98.1 million dollars 
with toe inclusion of 
three months ’ results 

from CocarCola Bottlers 
Philippines Inc., ac- 
quired in a 3.4 billion dol- 
lar share swap with San 
Miguel Corp. m April 

AmatiTs six-month 
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ARRANGED B Y 

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Union Bank of Switzerland 


CO-ARRANGERS 

ANZ Investment Bank 
Banque Nationale de Paris 
Dresdner Bank Luxembourg SA. 

The Sumitomo Bank, Limited 


Arab Bank pic 
Banque Paribas OBU 
Riyad Bank 


LEAD MANAGERS 

A1 Bank A1 Saudi A1 Fransi Banca Commerdale Italians, London Branch 

Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SPA, London Branch Bayerische Landesbank Girozentrale 
The Dai-Ichi Kang yo Bank, Limited Deutsche Girozentrale International S.A. 

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MANAGER 
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CO-MAN AGERS 

The Arab Investment Company S.A.A. Banca Nazionale del Lavoro S.pA^ London Branch 
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The Fuji Bank, limited The Industrial Bank of Japan, Limited 

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AGENT 


Deutsche Bank Luxembourg S~A~ 


JuJy 1997 



























































































































































































V- . * / 
- - ■ -vy 



PAGE 18 


Agassi Crushed 

tenhis Andre Agassi, the two- 
dme defending champion, was 
crushed by Gustavo Kuerten in the 
first round of the ATP Champion- 
ship in Mason. Ohio, on Tuesday. 

Kuerten, who this week became 
the first Brazilian to crack the ATP 
Tour's Top 10, needed only 46 
minutes to beat Agassi, 6-3, 6-1. 

“It was easier than I expected,” 
said Kuerten, whose only tourna- 
ment victory was the French Open. 

Agassi said: “I'm not picking up 
the ball as quickly. I feel like a 
different player. I don’t have a good 
sense for the match.” 

“T don’t need to be out there, but 
it is something I am choosing to 
fight/ ’ he said. “Why? Sometimes 
I’m not sure. I want to turn things 
around." 

Trailing 0-5 in the second set. 
Agassi served two aces to save the 
game. “I was just try ing to save a 6- 
0 beating,” he said. “The match 
was well out of my hands by 
then.” (AP ) 

Sanchez Beals the Heat 

tennis Arantxa Sanchez Vi- 
cario of Spain beat Naoko 
Sawamatsu of Japan. 6-2, 7-6 (7-41, 
on Tuesday in the first round of the 
Acura Classic as temperatures 
reached 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40 
centigrade) at Manhattan Beach, 
California. 

Anke Huber of Germany, play- 
ing in cool evening breezes', routed 
16-year-old Anna Koumikova, 6-0. 
6-1. in 41 minutes. 

In the last match of the night. local 
favorite Venus Williams beat Ann 
Grossman, 6-0. 6-3. in 53 minutes. 

Koumikova crumbled in her first 
tour event since Wimbledon, where 
she beat Huber in three sets en route 
to the semifinals. {AP) 



San Mui-.<vKh/Rralcr< 

Arantxa Sanchez Vicario in at 
the Acura Classic. She and 
Martina Hingis fell to Rika 
Hiraki and Naoka Kijimuta. 

Ryder Cup Hopeful Hurt 

golf Miguel Martin's hopes of a 
Ryder Cup debut fell on Wednes- 
day when he learned he would be 
out of golf for a minimum six 
weeks after an operation on his 
wrist. Martin, a Spaniard, is eighth 
in the Ryder Cup points table. The 
top 10 on Aug. 31 gain automatic 
selection to face the United 
Slates. < Reuters) 

Skaardal Retiring 

skiing Atle Skaardal of Nor- 
way. 31. the Super-G world cham- 
pion. is retiring because of a knee 
injury, a Norwegian news agency 
said Wednesday. (Reuters) 


^ JUralbSCSribunt. 

Sports 


African Men Dominate on the Running Track 

Guerrouj Claims 1,500 Crown 



Irfm |Vren ; Aprnir Fraru-i— !Vr%-«- 

Wilson Bort Klpketer raising his arms as he beats fellow Kenyans Moses Kiptanui, right, and Bernard Barmasai. 

Kenyan Trio Sweeps Steeplechase 


C&rplkd try Otr Stag From Druxmtoes 

ATHENS — Kenya on Wednesday 
scored the first national sweep ever in 
the World Championship 3,000 meters 
steeplechase. Wilson Boit Kipketer, 
Moses Kiptanui and Bernard Barmasai 
left Saad A smari of Saudi Arabia behind 
with 200 meters to go and then fought 
out a private battle for the medals. 

Kiptanui, the three-time champion, 
led down the home stretch but Boit 
Kipketer produced the fastest finishing 
kick and burst into first place in the Last 
few strides. Barmasai also finished fast 
but came in third, in die same time as 
Kiptanui. 

Boit Kipketer’s gold-medal time was 
8 minutes. 5.84 seconds, and his two 
countryman crossed die line in 
8:06.04. 

The Kenyans had won the gold and 
silver in each of the last three world 
championships, but this was die fust 
time they had won all three medals. 

Haile Gebreselassie of Ethiopia, the 
world-record holder in the 10,000 me- 
ters — and the defending world and 
Olympic champion — helped the Af- 
ricans dominate the men’s track events 
when he brushed aside his rivals with a 
lap to go, winning in 27 minutes. 24.58 
seconds. 

Paul Tergal of Kenya gave chase and 


finished just over one second behind. 
Salah Hissou of Morocco, a former 
world-record holder, completed the Af- 
rican sweep of the medals, finishing 
third, three seconds further back. Tergat 
and Hissou also finished second and 
third to Gebreselassie in Atlanta last 
year. 

Javier Sotomayor of Cuba won the 
high jump. Sotomayor, who also won 
the tide in 1 993, was the only jumper to 
clear 2 meters. 37 centimeters (7.7 feet). 
Artur Partyka, the Olympic silver 
medalist from Poland, won the silver 
once more clearing 2 meters, 35 cen- 
timeters. Tun Forsyth of Australia was 
third 

Tomas Dvorak of the Czech Republic 
won the gold medal in the decathlon, as 
Eduard Hamalainen of Finland took the 
silver and Frank Busemann of Germany 
won the bronze. 

Wilson Kipketer, a Kenyan who now 
runs for Denmark (not to be confused 
with Wilson Boit Kipketer). eased into 
the final of the 800 meters while his 
rivals scrambled for places. 

Kipketer breezed from last to first in a 
40-meter burst jnst before the bell and 
won in 1 minute, 46.14 seconds. South 
Africa’s Olympic silver medalist, 
Hezekiel Sepeng, didn't make the fi- 
nals, getting caught in the rush to the 


line and finishing next to last. 

In the mens' 200 meters semifinal, 
Frankie Fredericks of Namibia, the 
Olympic silver medalist, ran the fastest 
time in the world this year while en- 
gaging in a staring contest with Aco 
Boldon of Trinidad and Tobago, who 
won the bronze in Atlanta. 

As the two sprinted down the fin- 
ishing straighL Fredericks turned his 
head to the left to stare at Boldon and 
then turned back to face the front. Then 
Boldon returned the favor. A few meters 
further. Boldon stared at the Namibian 
again, but by the time Fredericks re- 
turned the glance Boldon was looking 
straight ahead again. 

In the second round of the women's 
200 meters, the veteran Merlene Ottey 
of Jamaica, who has won a record 13 
world-championship medals, cruised 
into the semifinal by winning her heat in 
22.65. 

The Olympic champion. Marie-Jose 
Perec of. France, also won her heat in 
22.69 while Susanthika Jayasinghe of 
Sri Lanka raced into the last 16 in 22.47 
seconds. 

In the 1 10-meter hurdles, the world- 
record holder, Colin Jackson, edged the 
defending titleisr and Olympic cham- 
pion Allen Johnson to make die final as 
the fastest qualifier. (AP. Reuters) 


By Ian Thomsen 

Imernatiuruit Herald Tribune 

A THENS — The three and three- 
quarter laps were the culmin- 
ation of a larger race that had 
been running for two years. Afterward 
the champion, the former champion, 
had the look of someone who had lost 
more than a race. Indeed he had. 

Noureddine Morceli of Algeria was 
standing with a friend in the stadium 
basement, waiting to hear whether he 
would have to endure the further in- 

Wobld Athletics 

dignity of a random drug test, when 
Hicham GueiTouj came in smiling. He 
wore a red Moroccan flag tied around 
his waist in a skin after beating Morceli 
to the world championship 1 ,500 meters 
in 3 minutes 35.83 seconds. Morceli 
looked over his shoulder and Guerrouj 's 
smile vanished out of deference, be- 
cause there was much respect between 
them over the last year especially, and 
almost as much understanding. 

“It was just too difficult for me,” said 
Morceli, with an expression that pleaded 
for sympathy. “I was too tired.” 

Morceli, 27, and Guerrouj, who is five 
years his junior, and looks even younger 
than that, are the two fastest 1,500 meter 
runners in history. Morceli holds the 
1,500 meters world record of 3 minutes 
27.37 seconds, and he was once un- 
questionably the world's finest runner, 
die winner of three consecutive world 
championships, from 1991 to 1995. 

But it has been two years since Mor- 
celi ran one of his best times, and his 
decline began with the emergence of 
Guerrouj, who was his runner-up at the 
world championships two years ago. 

By the time they met last August in 
Atlanta, the Moroccan had become a 
serious threat to prevent Morceli from 
winning his first Olympic gold medal. 
In Atlanta, Guerrouj was moving past 
him as they approached the bell when 
Morceli veered outside slightly, hoping 
to force his rival onto a wider path 
around the rum. There was a tangle of 
their feet Guerrouj tumbled and Mor- 
celi. bleeding where the Moroccan 
spiked him, ran home to win in 3 
minutes 35.78 seconds — almost five 
seconds ahead of Guerrouj. who 
hobbled in last. 

It was clearly an accident, the Mo- 
roccans have always maintained, Guer- 
rouj was then carried our of the Atlanta ■ 
stadium sobbing by his coaches and 
teammates. At that moment those who 
watched him overreacting to the defeat 
wondered whether he would ever be 
able to challenge Morceli again. At that 
moment, a cell phone rang and the voice 
Guerrouj heard was that of King Hass an 


Havelange Threatens to Expel Brazil From World Cup 


Reuters 

Joao Havelange, the president of 
FIFA, threatened on Wednesday to ex- 
pel Brazil from world soccer’s gov- 
erning body — and from the World Cup 
— if a bill drawn up by Pele, the coun- 
try' sports minister, becomes law. 

Pele's bill, presented to President 
Fernando Henrique Cardoso on Tues- 
day, proposes incentives for clubs that 
become publicly traded companies, 
making soccer club directors more ac- 
countable and turning all players into 
free agents within two years. 

It also proposes taking control of dis- 
ciplinary tribunals and refereeing away 
from the Brazilian Football Confeder- 
atio n in favor of independent bodies. 

“FIFA statutes say that referees have 
to be subordinated to the national as- 
sociations, just as do disciplinary 
tribunals,” said Havelange, a Brazilian. 

“If this bill is approved, there will be 


no alternative. The FIFA committees 
will have a meeting and expel Brazil, 
who will nor be able to take pan in the 
World Cup as a resulL” 

“It’s strange that the ministry should 
turn against an institution that is being 
run in an efficient and modem way,” he 
said. 

The president of the Brazilian soccer 
federation is Havelange's son-in-law 
Ricardo Teixeira, who has been crit- 
icized in Brazil. 

In June, Teixeira reinstated two clubs 
— Fluminense and Bragantino — 
which had been relegated from the first 
division of die national championship 
last year. As a result the bloated tour- 
nament now has 26 teams. Teixeira also 
reinstated Atletico Paranaense, which 
was suspended for a year in May in the 
woke of a corruption scandal. 

Pele and Havelange have beea at log- 
gerheads before, in 1993 when the le- 


gendary former player said that cor- 
ruption existed within the CBF. 

The conflict may be solved by the 
inertia of the Brazilian Congress. 

Bills, which have to negotiate a huge 
number of commi ttees. can take years to 
get through the legislature. 

Imports Cost English 

The influx of expensive foreign stare 
pushed English soccer into the red to the 
tune of almost £100 million ($162 mil- 
lion) in the 1995-96 season, according 
to a study released on Wednesday. 

Income for the 92 professional clubs 
rose more than 10 percent to £517 mil- 
lion in the season before lasL account- 
ancy firm Deloittc & Touche said. But 
pretax losses climbed to £98.2 million 
as wages rose and transfer money 
flowed abroad. 

“English football is financing a fair 


slug of football in Italy and other coun- 
tries,” said Gerry Boon, head of Deloitte 
«& Touche’s soccer industry ream. 

Clubs spent £93 million on overseas 
players in 1995-96. treble the amount 
the previous year. The report estimated 
that two-thirds of revenue went to the 20 
clubs in the elite Premier League. 

Boon forecast “some pretty hor- 
rendous balance sheets over the next 
couple of years” as lower division clubs 
pay high wages and transfer fees to keep 
up with the Premier League. 

Leverkusen Loses 

Bayer Leverkusen, runners-up in the 
German championship last season, beat 
Bochum. 3-2, on Tuesday in its second 
game of the season. 

Careten Ramelow scored the winning 
goal for Leverkusen in the 85th- 
minute. 


U of Morocco. Guerrouj said almost 
nothing in response. The coaches coiflti 
see the tears stopping, his face drawn 

into a stare. . , . . 

“His Majesty explained that it w as 
not the end of the world, that all of the 
Moroccan country consider El Guerrouj/ J 
to be the winner of the race,” DaoUgi- 
said. “We didn’t expect this. We knew 
all the Moroccans were destroyed. Bqt 
this is the experience of a king. ’ ’ ” . 

Said Guerrouj: “Another El Guerrouj 
was born at that time. There is no sim- 
ilarity between the El Guerrouj before 
this telephone call and the El Guerrouj 
after.” t 

Within a week Guerrouj was back .On 
his feet, winning races again in Euroj^. 

He beat Morceli in both of their ensuing 
meetings. This year Guerrouj set Wo 
world indoor records and ran the three 
fastest tunes in the world outdoors. 

The 1,500 meters final Wednesday 
seemed to get away from Morceli ap- 
t icli mac ti call y. his title stripped beyorijl 
his influence. They were side by sid^ju 
the start, but Guerrouj, wanting to avia# 
any further jostling, sped away in front. W 
of Morceli. With 600 meters to go ©ey 
champion -to -be began to pull awaj. 
Next Ferritin Cacho of Spain overtook. 
Morceli for the silver medal. Morceli 
was beaten to the bronze medal by; ft 
one- hundredths of a second, as Re^s 
Estevez of Spain in a time of 3 minutes 
37.26 seconds put one last dagger ijitp 
Caesar's back. As Morceli crossed ifye 
finish line in a daze. he almost ranoyer 
Guerrouj. who was on his knees, kissing 
the ground. 

“It was too difficult for him,” Ali 
Morceli, the former champion’s brotti&r 
and coach, said. He explained that their 
older brother, Abdel Kadar, 37, the fa- 
ther of three children, had been killed' in 
a car accident in Algeria two weeks agp. 
Morceli had left his training camp iji 
Davos, Switzerland, to attend the ftt- 
nerai. There were reports that he then hah 
difficulty leaving the country because of 
the political problems in Algeria. ^ JL 
When they had seen each other ait# ™ 
the race, Guerrouj, the boy who cried 
last summer, had stopped his celebra- 
tions out of respect to the champion's 
loss. But then there was the matter of tile 
anthem and the flag, and the man wjio 
has climbed to the top of the medal stand 
could not help himself. The man cried 
again. 

Record Score 
By Sri Lanka u 

Reuters ** 1 

COLOMBO — Sri Lanka brokd^ 
the record for the highest innings” 
total in test cricket Wednesday ori”- 
the final day of the first lest against,, 

India. The match ended ip a draw. ' 

Sri Lanka finished on 952 runs' * 
for six wickets in its first inningsr' 
beating England's 903 for seven., 
against Australia at the Oval iff 
London 59 years ago. __ j 

Sri Lanka broke the record dur-V . 
ing the final session of a match iff ' 9 
which just 14 wickets fell over five . 
days. But the day was a personal’ - 
disappointment for Sanath Jayar.- 
suriya, who added just 14 runs* 
Wednesday and was out for 340, 35- 
runs short of Brian Lara's record 
test score. 

Jayasuriya’s marathon 578-bali 

innings lasted 799 minutes and ini 

eluded 36 fours and two sixes'. Ifwas 
the founh-highest innings in tests 
after Lara's 375, Garry Sobers’s365 
and Len Hutton's 364. 

Jayasuriya's dismissal followed 
ihai of his long-standing partner; 

Roshan Mahanama, for 225 in thd 
previous over. The pair put on 576. a 
record for a wicket in test cricket 


IK 


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1997 (fij • 


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Scoreboard 


Major League St an dings 

umowiuoat 

East ot vision 



W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

BaHimore 

69 

4Q 

A33 

— 

New Yorif 

65 

45 

.591 

4 y, 

Boston 

54 

59 

J7B 

17 

Detroit 

52 

58 

473 

ITS 

Toronto 

52 

58 

*73 

17S 

CENTRAL DtVtSrON 



Cleveland 

57 

50 

-S33 

— 

MRyraukee 

55 

55 

500 

T-j 

Ctacago 

54 

56 

.491 

41, 

Minnesota 

50 

01 

ftSO 

9 

Kansas City 

46 

63 

.422 

12 

WEST DIVISION 



Seattle 

63 

JH 

.568 

— 

Anaheim 

64 

49 

.566 

— 

Taos 

51 

60 

<459 

12 

Oakland 

43 

71 

377 

21 S 

MAnONAL LIAOUI 

East division 



w 

L 

Pel. 

GB 

Alton ta 

71 

43 

633 

— 

Florida 

65 

46 

686 

4S 

New York 

63 

48 

368 

4S 

Montreal 

57 

S3 

JIB 

12 


J27 

33 

Housian 

61 

52 

J40 

— 

Pittsburgh 

56 

57 

.496 

5 

Si. Louis 

S3 

60 

Mi 

8”, 

dnetanon 

47 

63 

.427 

l*% 

Chicago 

45 

68 

J98 

16 


WEST DIVISION 



San Frandsca 63 

50 

J5B 

— 

Las An gales 

61 

51 

-345 

IS 

San Diego 

53 

59 

*73 

9S 

Coloroda 

53 

61 

.465 

!0S 


TUMMY'S UN ESC OHS 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Toronto 004 200 200-0 11 0 

Minne s ota 200 000 (JIB— 3 8 3 

Person. Crabtree 18), QuenfriB (9) cud 
O'Brien: TraMilter, Ritchie (31 and G. Myers. 
W-Penon, 5-7. L— Tra.Mffler, 0-2 
HRs— Toroda Cn« Jr. 041. Minnesota, 
Beefcer(91. 

aewtand 101 010 010—4 9 0 

Detroit OH 101 11*-* B 2 

Juden. Plunk (4). Joanne (0). Shuey (8). 
Assenmocher (8). Mesa IB) and Banterc. 5. 
Alomar (8): Ju. Thompson Brocafl (71, 
ToJonas (8) and Walbeck- 
W — Ju.Thompsan 10-B. L— Plunk, 31 
Sv—ToJones 02). HRs— Clowland. 

Ramirez (16). Detroit Nevtn (5). 

cbfcwro no 200 ooo—3 a i 


Oakland 000 000 000-0 7 1 

Draftek. N. Cruz [8), T. CostfBo (81, Kn refiner 
(9) and Fabregcfi; Karsor. D. Johnson (ffl. 
MoMer IS) and Moyna W— Onrbek. 8-7. 
L— Kareay. 3-)2. Sv— Xarctner (2). 

HR— OKnga Ventura CD. 

New York 300 000 010-4 9 I 

Kansas aty 100 000 000— l n o 

KruRogen. Mendoza (6). Stanton (8), M. 
Rivera (9) and Girardb Appier. Wteenant 
(8). Olson (8) and MLSwefeney. 

W — Kn. Rogers 5-4. L — Appier 6-10. 

Beslan 018 401 120-17 24 0 

T«as 010 000 000—1 s O 

Gorton, Locv (7), Wosjfln (8), Corel (9) and 
Hoitobero. McKee* (71: Aibems WhItesMe 
0), Vos berg (51, Sturtze (8). Weitdond (9) 
and I. Rodriguez, leyritz (7). W— Gordon, 6-9. 
L. — AHwrro. 0-3. HRs— Boston GanJoparm 
CKO, COrdero (14), OLeary 2 Ol). Texas. 
F.Tcdta O). 

MMraok M 001 102 100-5 11 O 

Aitabaiin 290 031 Odx-i B 1 

Rorie. Adamson (6i. Do Jones (8) and 
Motherly, Levis (8); Dickson, P. Harris (6). 
Holtz (7). James (81. Perdvai (8) and 
T d. Greene. MV— Dickson, ll-4.LJ-Flarte.2-3. 
Sv — Perdvai (171. HRs — Milwaukee, Ntbsan 
2 (20). Bumftz (21). 

aaWmare 101 001 000-3 9 I 

Saattte 030 000 Ml— 4 S I 

Key. AMs (6). Orosco (7). TtMathews (7) 
and HoBes. Webster (8): Ofivqres, SpaQaric 
(6L Chartkin (9) and Oa.W8son. 

W— Charlton. 3-7. L— TeJWaJbews. 2-2. 
HRs— Seattle. Da.W8son (9). RJ3cvtt (16). 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 

A Hants 200 000 200—4 6 1 

Pittsburgh 100 400 Mx-5 8 1 

Gkrvlne, C Fax (8) and J. Lopez: Schmidt 
Rincon (8), LoiseBc i9) and Kcndafl. 
W— Schmidt 7-A. L— CHavine. HtA. 

Sv — Lotsede (18). HRs — Atlanta J. Lopez 
118). Pittsburgh. Kendall (5). J. GulHen (101. 
SanDtege 010 110 000-3 8 o 

Qncmati 383 000 01 x— 7 12 1 

Hitchcock. Curmane (4), Bniske (6), 

Botfitter (7), Hoftnun (8) and Rahetfy: 

Ftanilngec, Sullivan (6). Show (9) and J. 
Q)rrer. W— Remlngcr, 4-4. L— Hitchcock. 7- 

7. HRs— San Dtega Joyner (9). anclnnatl 
Edu.Pete <81. R. Sonden H31. 

Houston ON 110 0HM( 8 • 

Florida 022 000 002-6 11 0 

Kile. R. Springer (81. B. Wagner (9) and 
Ginebta, Ausmus (9): Saunders. Hdling (51. 
S tender (7), Men (9) and C Johnson. 
W— Nen, 8-2. L— B. Wagner. 7-4. 
HRs— Housian, Gatterrcz CD. Florida 
C Johnson (13). 


LaiAngates 300 010 000 1—5 9 0 
Montred 000 001 201 0-4 11 I 

Astada. Radinsky (7), Hall IS), To.Worred 
19) end Piazza MiJahrcoa TeManl (5), 
DeHart (6). Mine IB), Urttina (1(0 and 
Wldfler. Fletcher 00). W— TaWoneK 2-3. 
L— Urbina 3-& HRs — Las Angdes. Ptana 2 
(24). Montreal Fletcher (13). 

San Francisco 000 IN 133-8 II 0 

Chicago ON 110 000-2 S 0 

DDcrorin, Tavrnez (7). R. Hemandea (9) 
and BerryMb Foster, R-Tafis (7), T. Adams 
(7). Patterson (8), Wendall (8). TeJemooo (9) 
and Servais. W— Tavnrez. 4-3. L— Patterson, 
1-5. HR— Oacaea Du red an (8). 

Colorado ON 000 031—4 13 2 

PMtodXp hi a 0)0 BO) 000-2 7 I 

R^afley. Holmes M). Dipata (8) and 
JoReea ScttHOng, Brewer (7). SpradHn (8). 
BattuBao (8), Games 19) and Lieberthal. 
W— Holmes. 4-2. L-BaltaUca 2-4. 

Sv — Dipato (4>. HR — Philadelphia 

Lieberthal (15). 

SL Laris ON MO 101 0—4 10 2 

HewYnrt 110 IN 001 1-S 7 1 

Morris, Eckereley (9). Fossas (9J. 
Frascatoce (101 and DHeUca Hambch. 
Acevedo (7). McMkhari (8). JoJFranCD DO). 
Lkflo (10) and Hundley. Pratt DO). W— Udte 
5-1. L— Fossas. 1-4. 

Japanese Leaoues 


Yakult 

Yokohama 

Htrastiima 

Hanshin 

CtnndcW 

Yomiurt 


OBf LANKA VS. tNMA 
TOST TEST MATCH. FINAL DAY 

India: 537-8 declared 
Sri Lanka: 9S2 -6 
The match ended hi a draw. 


W L T Pet .GB 

54 35 1 406 — 

45 40 0 529 7 

43 43 0 5N y-r 

41 46 I .472 12 

42 49 0 M2 13 

39 51 0 .433 IS 1 * 


W L T Pet .GB 
Orb 48 32 3 596 - 

Seitw 47 39 2 545 4 

□ale! 45 44 0 506 TV, 

Nippon Han 43 48 I 473 Iffi 

Lone 37 43 2 .453 12 

Kintetsu 38 50 t 433 14 

WEDNESDAY'S HSULW 
CENTRAL LEAGUE 
Yomlurl 5. Yokirtt 3 
Yokohama 3. Hanshin 1 
Hbostihna S, QnrnicM 4 

PACtHC LEASUE 

Ortri Dale) > 

Seftu a Kmtetsu 5 
Lotte 5, Nippon Ham 1 


Dvisberg ). Sctia&e 0 
Bayer Leverkusen a Bochum 2 
ArmWa BWefetdZ WB Stuttgart 1 
1B60 Munkh 1 Kartsrohe 2 
Werder Bremen 1. Rostock I 
•TAMDtNOSi Karlsruhe 4 points; Cologne 3, 
WMfsburo 3. Kriserskwlem 3. Dihsberq 1 
Bayer Leverkusen 3. Bocftum 3. Schabc 3. 
Arminia Biele(eM3i'l8MMu<Kh£-Hamburg 
1. Moenchengladboeii 1. Hertha Berlin 1. 
Bonrsskr Dortmund I, Stuttgart 1, Rostock 1, 
Werder Bremen 1; Bayern Munich 0. 


World Championships 


QUALIFIED FOR FMAL 
1, Yoeivis Quesada Cuba 1757 meters: 2. 
Jonathan Edwards. Britain. I75B: 3. Kenny 
Hairbon. United Slates. 17.1 1; 4. Abecer (Ji- 
nrtia Cuba 1 7.1 1,-5, Andrew Owirsu. Ghana 
17.05. 6. Christos Me le login u. Greece. 17JU. 
7. Jerome Romaln. Domkika. 17.03.- a Serge 
Hetaa France. 17.01; 7, Charles Frtedek. Ger- 
many. 16.98; la Armen Marttrosynn. Arme- 
nia 16.9&- II Deras Kapustin. Russia 
16.96(12 Brian Weil man, Bermuda 16.44. 

noMfini>«ni»u» 

SEH1FMALS 

HEAT 1 — I. Colin Jacksaa Britain, 1 354.- 2. 
Aden Johnson. US, 1131; 3. Igor Kavac. 
Skwakla (354 4. Tetry Reesa U5« 13 45,- 5. 
Robin Konring. Helhetfcnds. 1351; L Vincent 
Ctarica Franca 1 351- 7. Andrei Klsiykh. Rus- 
sia 13 7& 7 Fatt Foizec Germany. 14 06. 

ISAT2— t. Flarian Sctwiartholt Germany, 
13429; 2. Dan Philibert Franca I3Jtti Mar* 
Cmar, U5- I35i 4, Artur Kohutc*. Poland. 
1359: i Kyle Vanda-Kuyft. AustBSa 1349; 


6. Tony Jarrell Britain. 135a 7, Jonathan 
Nsenga. Belgium. 135ft' Anier Garda Cuba 
did not start . 

Hist 9 hi each heat qualify for flno) 

*00 METERS 

SEMIFINALS 

HEAT 1— I. Patrick Kondtoltah. Kenya 
145JJ7 (Q): 2. NortterlD Tdlez. Cuba 1.4557 
(Ol;l Vebjatm RadaL Nonway. 1:4541 (Q). 
4. Mark Everett. United States. 1:45.94 (Q); & 
Adem Hedrft Algeria 1:46 JWt 6. Mohamcd 
Yogoub. Sudan 1:4659; 7. Benlounes 
Lahkiu. Morocco. 1.46 42; ft Panagiotts 
Straubakos. Greece. 1:4641. 

HEAT 2 — 1, Wilson k'ipkelcr, Denmark. 
146.14 (Q): Z Rich Kcnah, Unik-d Staten 
1:4657 (□>; 3. Patrick Nduren, Kenya 1 :465d 
(Q): 4 Marka Kocrs. Ncihcrtands. 1:4062 
IQ); ft Kennedy Osh, Ghana 1 -46.77 &. An- 
dre Bucher. Switzerland. 1 :464ft- 7. Hezekiel 
Sepeng. South Africa l:47.(Kr ft Tar Oede- 
goard Oevtnd. Norway. 1:47.83. 

First 4 hi eoefi beat guaHy far final 
■BOH JUMP 
FINAL 

I. Javier Satamavor. Cuba 257 melen. 2. 
Artur Partyka Palana 25ft l Tim Forsyth, 
Australia 25ft 4 eqauL S lei nor Hacn. Nor- 
way, 252; 4 equal Dalian Grant Britain, 2 32. 
ft LombrosPaoakosRK. Greece. 752; 7, Kon- 
stantin Mahrsevic/L Israel & Loe Jin- 
lack. South Korea 259: 9. Martin Buss, Or 
many. 3.2ft 10. enmar Maya Colombia 2.29. 
II, Serqa Kllugln. Russia 2.2ft 12. Jan 
Jcmka Czech RepubEt 355. 

I. BOO METERS 
FINAL 

1, Hicham EIGuctTwl. Moracca 355.83; 2- 
Form In Cocha Spaia 35651- 1 Reyes Es- 
tevez, Spain 1375ft- ft Noureddine MorcHL 
Algeria 33737; ft AH Hokimi. Tunisia 
3-3751r ft MnhatiH-d Sukrimaa Qatar. 
33753; 7, Graham Hood. Canada 33755. ft 
Robert Andersen, Denmark. 3:376ft •>. John 
MayaduBmata. 35847, 10. Rudiger S(cn ret 
Germany. 3:388% II, Laban Rohch. Kenya 
14157; 12, Nadir Bosch. France. 3 4855. 

9,000 Dim flBHIOIAM 
FINAL 

1, W3san Bait Klnturicr. Kenya B.05 84. 2. 
Ma9CS KrplamiL Kenya 8.0604. ft Bernard 
BarmasaL Kenya 8HMJU 4 Saad Ai A-imon, 
Saudi Arab* 8:13.87; s. HuJwm 
Boaoamche, Monreca 8.14,04 ft Mart 
Croghan, Ui, TU-Dft 7, Jim tawr Nor 
way, B: 1 4805 ft Angelo Carosi Italy. 8.16 01. 
9. Marti 03 tenders. Germany. 8 IB 49. la 
Brantar Bwtomi /morocco, B:T3JU ij El Ar- 
bi Kmtabs Meraccn. 9:29 43; I Z Florin lon«. 
cu. Romania 859*7 


10,000 METERS 
FINAL 

<■ Haile Gebrsetlassta Etampla 273458; 
2 Paul Tergal Kenya 27.25.62 1 Salah 
Hissou. Moracca 77-28.67. 4 Paul Koech. 
Konya 27-5059; ft Asscta Mezcgebu. 
Elhtapia 27-5238 ft Domingos Casha Por- 
tugaL 273652; 7. Ha We Jtfar, Ethiopia 
2400 5V; 8. Julio Rot. Spoui 28:074ft- 9, Ste- 
tana Bcddink Italy. 28:11.^7: 10. Darren WM- 
son. Australia 28:20 16; 11. Kamlel Moose, 
Nottiofionds. 283350; 12. Dominic KlruL 
Kenya 2838.13; 13, AMcirahim Zitauna 
Moracca 2839.09. 14 Hendrick Ramoata. 
South Africa 28-53 48 15. Tendril Chlminma 
Zimbabwe. 28553ft 16. Careten Ekh, Ger- 
many, 2859.34: 17. Sold Berloui Moracca 
7932.0ft l& Jose Ramos. Portugal, 2ft494ft 
Toshtaan Toko oka Japan, did nal start Mo- 
hammed Maurtnl. Belgium, did not start. 

DBCATHALON 
110 METER HURDLES 

heat 1— 1. Prodromos Karidzagkw, 
Greece. 14.47; 2. Philipp Huber. Smilzertand. 
14 65; 1 Elkl N00L EsWnia 14 6ft- 4, Codrtc 
Lopt-z, France. 14.7ft ft Plerrr.-A vial France, 
14 81 4, Mono Anibol PortunoL 1558. 

HEAT 2 — 1. Ramil Ganircv, (Jzbakislaa 
(454. 2 Marcel Dost Netherlands. 14.49: 1 
indroh Kaseorg. Estonia )4 4ft ft 5 Men 
Schmid. Germany. 1 4.4ft ft Bentamma Pose- 
rtna italy. 1456. ft .Michael Smith. Cmoda 
«45& Scbasllan Chmnra Poland, did ml 
start. 

HEAT 3— I. Roman v-orte Czech Repub- 
lic. 1432; 7. Jagon Homes. Auslrada 145ft 3. 
Lev Lobodia Russia 1458 4 Klaus Isdum- 
niw. Germany. 5. Javier BenH Spaia 

l4Se; a Oten VereWfilliw, urbekiston. 1559: 
Setattien Lcvica Franca did no! start. 

'■ Busemann, Germany. 

2 Tomcs Dvorak. ClMl PepuOUC, 
IJ-6I.1 Eduard Hamofalnen. Fmtana 1174 
t V* 61 "' Houslaa Bartados. 13.92; ft Chris 
Uortod States. 14 04; t. Steve Fritz. 
United Stales. 1408: 7. Roherl ZntcIlL Czech 
Republic. DNF. 

orscus 

Group 1- I. Chris Hutfms. Untied Slates, 
meter..- 1 japan names. Australia 
, 3, rJ.?, m0 ? DwottjK Cz«h Republic. 

45. 1 ft ft Philipp Huber. Switzerland, 4458 ft 
Prodromos kwklzunlou. Greece. J4.46. ft Ste- 
ron 1 4Chnint Germany. 44. J& 7. Mono AnibaL 

n^hiH- 90 .! 01 Ron,Bn Czech Pa 

PbbiK, 4352; v. Javier BeneL Spam 43 JU 10. 
ViaL France. 4336. 1 1. indrr* Kate- 
,iCed « Lapez. Franca 
m ^ Uzbekistan. 

Ift Vidor Houston Bariiodos. 3354. 


Group 2 — 

1, Eduajd Hamalainen. Finland, 5054 2, 
Steve Fritz, United States. 48 88-1 Klaus 
txkenmeiar. German y. 475* 4 Michael 
Smith, Canada 475Q s. Ramil Garayev, 
UzboWslwi 46.04 ft Robert Zmeflfc, Czech Re- 
pubfle 45.72 7. Lev Lnbodln. Russia 44.78 8 
Erki Noot Estonia 435a 9, Frank Busemann 
Germany. 4256. 18 Maicel Dost Nettie rianrtk 
4242 1 1. Beniamino Posertaa Italy. 3842. 
POLE VAULT 

GROUP A — 1 oqual Tomas Dvorak. Czech 
Republic SXM moters. 910 points. 1 eaual 
Phfflpp Huber, Swftzertand. S.Oa -Jia I eaual 
Stefan Schmid. Germany. 5.08 91tt ft indrek 
Kascarg. Estonia, 49a 880; ft Pierre Alexan- 
dre Vkrt Franca 4.8a 6. Prorframos (to- 

iWzogtou. Greece, ftaa 849! 7 equal. Mono 
Anibol. Portugal 4*a 770, 7 equoL Chns 
Hutflns, U3. 45a 79a 9. Cedric Lopez. 
Franca *M. 79a la Javier Benet Spain. 
458 760; 11, Oleg Veretelnikov, Uzbekistan, 
4.4a 731: II Roman Sebrte. Czech Republic. 
45a 673; 11 Victor Houston. Barbados 35a 
482 Jagan Homes. Australia, did nat finish. 
4AVEUN 

GROUP A— I. KJaus lsek.enrru.-ter, Ger- 
many. 6554 meters. 826 points. Z Michael 
SmHh, Canada 6558 822 1 Sieve Fntz, U S„ 
655ft 817. 4, Cedric Lopez. Franca 64.88 
8125, Ronton Sebrte, Czech Republic, 64.7ft 
810: ft Fran* Busemann, Germany. 6392 
7V7: 7. Victor Houston. Barbados, 62.18 769; 

8. Oleg Veretelnikov. Uzbekistan 6058 74Z 

9, Eduard Hamalainen. Finland. S9 82 735- 
la Javier Benet Spain 55 92. 877; 1 1, Mario 
Antbal Portugal. 517a 64* 12 Marcel DasL 
Ncthertands. 5 188 415. 

GROUP B— I. Tomas Dvorak. Czech Re- 
public 70 34 69ft J, Sirfan Schmid. Get- 
numv. 67.4ft 851. 1 Erkl N00L Estonia. 6S84 
82ft- 4, Indict k aseorg, Estanta. 6354 788- 5. 
Philipp Huber, Surttzertand. 58.73. 711: ft 
Ramfl Oamre y. Uzbekistan 5f 14, 665- 7. 
Prodromos KortcJzIglQu. Greece 5444,0628 
Pierre- Absandre Vial. France 53.78 644; 
Chris Hutflns. (J.S- no mark recorded. 
t.UO METERS 

HEAT 1 — I, Indrek Kascarg, Estonia. 
4-50 83 minutes. 80b points. 2 Philipp Huber. 
Switzerland. 430.98 80S: 3. 0kg Veretal. 
nikav. Uzbekistan, 4;2S5(L 77X ft Cedric 
Lopez. France. 435.7ft 771; 5. Victor Hous- 
ton Barbados. 4J25a 730: ft Javier Benet 
Spam. 453.65, 751. 7. Marcel Dost Nether, 
lands, 4-56 08 701; 8 Mario AnibaL Portugal 
4 37 Aft 6KL 9. Pierre. Alcsritadre VtaL France. 
4:4259, 66ft 10. Prodromos Kariuzoalau. 
Greece. 4:58 4ft 5*7.- Chr« Huffins. u.S. did 
nal shirt. 


HEAT 2— 1. Fran) Busemann Gerrm^iy, 
4:29.27, 749 : 1 Steve Fritz, U.S- 4:31.1* 237; 

3. Tomas Dvorak. Czech Repubfic. 4-55*8 
Tift ft RamR Ganiyev, Uzbekistan, 4:36.78 
701; ft Eduard HamataJnan Finland. 4 J7.18 
<■99: ft Roman Sebrte, Czech RepiJWt 
4:40 Jl. 678 7, Klaus Isefcmmeier, Gemjany, 

4 >1254, *64. 8 Erki N00L Estonia 44^8 
*62- 9, Stefan Sch^lhLGef^lan^ 4:435a A68 
18 Michael Smith. Canada 454-99. 5S9.-«- 
FINAL ST4MHNOS: |, Tomas OvtVBK 
Czech Republic, 8837 points; 2 Eduard 
Hamotalnen. Finland. 873ft 2 Frank Buse- 
mann. Germany. 8652 ft Sieve Frttz, U5- 
846ft 5, Ramil Ganiyev. Uzbekistan 844ft ft 
Erfu NoaL Estonia 841ft- 7. Staton Schmid. 

Germany. 8360: & Mktad Smflh, ConoSc 
8307:9. Roman Sebrte, Czech RepubSc.8Z3i; 
to. r laus Isckenmeiec Germany, 819a 

WOMU 

«oo Him mmDUH 

SEMIFINALS— ‘ " 

HEAT 1— 1, Kim Batten United Stated)?.. 

53 67 ra}.- 2 Tatyana Terashchuta Ukraine. 

54 02 lO); 3. Debbie Parris. Jamotca. Wl 
fG); ft Susan Smith. Ireland 54.72 (QL & 
Yekaterina Bakhvalova Russia 55.02 ft 3p- 
v« Rieger. Germany, SS58 1 7. Kartetw 
Haughron, Jamaica 5551 8 Mirion Akmsa 
Spain, 55*9. 

H6AT s— 1, Nezha BMouane. Moracca 
53 A8- 1 Oeon Herron ing s, Jamaica 53.82 2 
Tonjo Buford-BoUey, U5. 54ft8 ft Amttaa 
Blacken. Barbados. 5ft74; 5. Gudrvn Amor 
dottir. Iceland, 54 .91 ft Anna Knonz. Russia 
SS38 7. EsterGoossens, Ncthertands, 5ET7; 

Salty Gunnell Britain did not start. 


BASEBALL 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

TfxAs-aaimed RHP Terry Oar* oft 
waivers from Cleveland. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE j jL. 

Arizona— N amed Dwayno Murphy coarti “ 
of Grand Canyon Rodent AFL r 

cinaNKATi-OpIlonod RHP Giovanni Cor- 
rare 1o Indianapolis, aa. Acfivntad C Braol 
Fontyco from 1 S-dny dka bled fat j 
".v. Mm-Activalod RHP Pete Hamisch 
tram to-day disabled fat. Cpftorwd EUP 
Toko shi Kasbivrada to Nortaft, IU 
Sa* dieco— Activated IF Terry Shumperi 
from disabled lisz ana retaased Nm. 






% Sp-- 






• Nr. '* 5 


- ^ 












ticii 


PAGE 19 


SPORTS 




er Die’ *f an t They Just Say, I’m Sorry? 

Big Athletes Take Everything but the Responsibility 




iff 


a 


n> 


::>K 


By Michael Wilbon 

Washington Past Service 


: "% 


• ■' :<jt 

>0'? r 

" r 

- • i 


I am looking for the kind of per- 
formance that has become so rare it’s 
virtually obsolete. Nobody seems to be 
able to- pull it off nowadays, not in 
basketball, football, baseball, hockey 
you name iL Thing is, yon don’t have to 
;be particularly fest or strong or tall to do 
i£ Von don’t need a quick first step or 
‘great dexterity. 

. Whatl’m waiting for is a high-profile 
affefcte to take full responsibility for his 
. Actions. I want to see somebody who has 


up royally face his adoring, 
ublic and say unconditionally: 


raying put 

,, Hey, I’m sorry. I goofed up. It was a 
stupid, bonehead dung to do. It was 
; nobody’s fault but mine , I ought to 
'Jcqpw better and I can’t afford to do that 
etyer again." 

J Since regular workaday folk with few 
'athletic skills have to do this sort of 
reckoning pretty routinely, there must 
‘be some inverse correlation between 
jpck status and accountability. The big- 
ijfcr the star, the less responsible be has 
iq be for his own insensitive/offensive/ 
■diriyAiTesponsibl^crimiiial behavior. . 
v .Surely, you recognize the pattern by 
now. The misbehaving is almost always 
^followed by a period of seclusion where 
‘die offending party cannot be readied to 
(Comment Except, of course, by Nike or 
;Reebok or anybody offering an endorse- 
B^liicnt deal, in which case he can be 
V i'eacbed on any one of three cell phones 
pr any one of five pagers. 

" ' Seclusion is followed by Intense Spin 
Control, at which time the offen ding 
party’s agent/lawyer/PR person/person- 
S&'assistanf/Bobo hands out a statement 
athlete hasn’t even seen (and some- 
times can’t even read) that says if it 
r^eren’t for the media, LeRoy wouldn’t 
3ptve slapped his girlfriend down a flight 
*df stairs. Spin Control is usually fol- 
lowed by Removal, as in, “My seven 
jjrng suspensions are in the past, man, I 
.ohly want to talk about football.” 

And all this leads me to Coach Barry 
( $witzer of the Dallas Cowboys. 

.,.As sports apologies go, Switzer’s gets 
A-minus. He did immediately own up 
to carrying a handgun through D allas 

? j f i. / ) l Off : -Fprt Worth Airport security, which 

-i ■ * / rif ItflUrW; bis anesLHe did go into great 

■■■■ detail to explain how be had tried to get 
gun out of sight of the children who 
#ere visiting his house, had put it in his 
tgfcvel bag and forgot it was there until 
iSie bells and whistles went off in die 
jiiport. But then, Switzer said: “There’s 
,i# need to talk about the details here. I 
Skid we’ll talk about football.’ ’ 

■‘.'Huh? 


Football? 

Excuse me, homey, but the coach of 
the most troubled team in pro sports is 
arrested and he wants us to ask him about 
Ae status of the long snapper? No. Barry, 
I v^t to know what’s on your mind in 
light of the fact dial your owner, Jerry 
Jones, has hired a forma - FBI man, in- 
stalled surveillance cameras in players’ 
rooms and banned them from a certain 
restaurant all in the name of cleaning up 
the franchise, only to have die coach 
escorted out of one of die world's busiest 
airports by two uniformed cops? 

But, hey, you know, that would take a 
level of personal responsibility that just 

VANTAGE POINT 


.. J -Tj. 
■ 

V** 

- m; 

- ■-**: 

: 

' 


•: s-. 


isn’t acceptable in the world of sports 
right now. 

Don’t worry, Barry, you’re not by 
yourself in this. After letting a friend 
drive his Mercedes at 93 miles an hour 
in a 65 zone, Allen Iverson, through bis 
lawyers, put out a statement Tuesday 
that read in part, "Unfortunately, the 
pressure to be first with a story in- 
volving a celebrity sometimes leads the 
press to inaccurately and incompletely 
report the nature of the incident and the 
true character of the celebrity involved 
in the incident” 

Celebrity? True character? Bill 
Cosby’s a celebrity. Allen Iverson, the 
Philadelphia 76ers guard arrested Sun- 
day ana charged with possession of 
marijuana and a concealed weapon, is 
one more jail visit from becoming no- 
torious. There is a difference. And maybe 
it’s just me, but when you say “true 


character" I tend to think of, say, Arthur 
Ashe, not some 22-year-old know-it-all. 
I guess there’s some spin doctor out there 
who wants us also to trust in the "true 
character" of Terry Allen, die Wash- 
ington Redskins running back, who got 
behind the wheel of his Ferrari and drove 
1 25 miles an hour or so. He, too, showed 
up at preseason camp and just wanted to 
talk “about football." 

The half-baked apologies often talk 
about "an incident” or "allowing my- 
self to be involved” like somebody put 
a gun to their heads and said, "Dnve 
125 or I’ll kill you!!” Like it was some 
out-of-body experience and they were 
on the sideline watching helplessly. 

Lawrence Phillips, once of the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, now with the Sl 
L ouis Rams, had it down pat He drags a 
woman down a stairwell, then says, "The 
unfortunate incident is behind me." 

Robbie Alomar, the Baltimore Ori- 
oles' second baseman, was saying “The 
incident is behind me" long before John 
Hirsbbeck’s face was dry. 

Mike Tyson set a new low by com- 
mitting an undeniable act and still trying 
to spin his way out three days lata by 
reading an apology he reportedly didn’t 
write, mentioning all of the revenue 
sources — the state of Nevada, the 
network, the casinos, his promoter. Don 
King — before getting to the person 
whose ear he bit off. 

It’s amazing that you’d have so many 
great athletes with world-class talents, 
big muscles but not enough guts to issue a 
genuine apology. Is it written somewhere 
that being a high-profile athlete means 
never having to say, “I’m sorry." 



tljll * jmpl-'fb Villi'- i nin^-pir**- 

The Tigers’ catcher. Matt Waibeck, sliding past the Indians* catcher, Pat Borders, to score at Tiger Stadium. 

Red Sox Mow Down the Rangers, 17-1 

O’Leary Homers Twice as Texas Endures 24-Hit Boston Onslaught 


; 


: in * drum ft!! ' 


-• .IV 


Inverson Faces Lesser Charge 


Washington Post Service 

A firearms charge fa which the 
Virginia State Police arrested the bas- 
ketball star Allen Iverson of the Phil- 
adelphia 76ers will be changed to die 
lesser charge of carrying a concealed 
weapon, a prosecutor said. 

Iverson was arrested early Sunday 
morning after a state trooper stopped 
him in a speeding 1996 Mercedes- 
Benz. He was a passenger in the car, 
which smelled of marijuana, the of- 
ficer said. Iverson was arrested for 
possession of one marijuana cigarette 
and for being in possession of a hand- 
gun while in possession of a con- 
trolled substance. 

A state police spokesman said Sun- 
day that the original gun charge would 
be dropped because it requires pos- 


session of one pound of marijuana to 
be applicable. 

The new charge was filed, accord- 
ing to the prosecutor, Linwood 
Gregory, after records indicated that 
Iverson did not have a concealed- 
weapons permit for the state. The con- 
cealed-weapons charge is punishable 
by up to a year in jail and a $2,500 
fine. One of Iverson's attorneys, Tom 
Shuttleworth, has said that Iverson's 
gun was registered. Iverson has said 
that he carries the gun for personal 
protection. 

Iverson's attorneys issued a state- 
ment saying their client would plead 
not guilty to the charges. 

They said that “he allowed himself 
to be in a situation that reflects poorly 
on his judgment.” 


• :c:eai 


Ravens’ Morris Suspended for Substance Abuse 



•”"V 


The Associated Press 

Bam Morris of the Baltimore Ravens 
was suspended by the National Football 
League Wednesday for the first four 
games of the season for his second vi- 
tiation of the league’s substance abuse 
policy. 

‘Morris reportedly had told team- 
mates be bad failed a drug test several 
months ago and learned this week he 
bad lost his appeal. 

The league and team said the24-year- 
ofii running back is eligible to return 
SepL 22, the day after the Ravens’ 
fourth gameJHis first game would be 
SepL 28 against San Diego. 

. .“I ain’t got nothing to say about iL ’ 
i Moms, 24, told the Baltimore Son after 


practice on Tuesday afternoon. “It’s a 
long stay.” 

The paper quoted a league source as 
saying: "We know for sure there has 
been a violation for alcohol. It was found 
in his blood. We’re not certain if any 
drugs were involved.” Ravens’ officials 
declined to comment on the reports. 

Moris, a 6-foot (1.8 meter), 240- 
pound (109 kilogram) back, has been ra- 
the National Football League’s sub- 
stance-abuse program since a drug-re- 
lated suspension before last season. He 
was arrested in his native Texas in the 
summer of 1996 when policemen found 
six pounds of marijuana in the trunk of 
his car. He pleaded guilty on June 27, 
1996, to possession of marijuana in a 


plea bargain undo which a charge of 
cocaine possession was dropped. 

Morris was fined $7,000 and sen- 
tenced to 200 hours of community ser- 
vice and six years of probation. His 
record would have been cleared if he had 
completed the probation successfully. 

The Pittsburgh Steelers waived Mor- 
ris in July 1996 after the conviction. 

0* After a nervous oighL John El way 
and the Denver Broncos got the medical 
report they were hoping to hear. Al- 
though Elway had ruptured a tendon in 
his throwing arm, doctors said he could 
begin throwing in a few days. The 37- 
year-old quarterback is likely to be 
ready for the season opener on Aug. 
31. 


The Associated Press 

The uppa deck in right field at the 
Ballpark in Arlington, Texas, seems to 
loom ova the field, beckoning to left- 
handed hitlers. Troy O’Leary of the 
Boston Red Sox answered its call twice 
Tuesday night. 

O’Leary became only the second 
player to hit two homers in one game 

Baseball Roundup 

into the right-field porch at the 4-year- 
old stadium as the Boston Red Sox 
pounded out a season-high 24 hits and 
clobbered the Texas Rangers. 17-1. 

O’Leary’s pair of homos were only a 
small part of the offensive onslaught by 
Boston. Nomar Garcia parra went 4-for-7 
with a homer and two doubles, Wil Cor- 
dero highlighted an eight-run third in- 
ning with a three-run homer, O’Leary 
had acarea-high four hits with three runs 
batted in, and John Valentin, Mo Vaughn 
and Jeff Frye all had three hits to give the 
Red Sox a two-game series sweep. 

The Red Sox improved their team 
batting average to .299, best in the ma- 
jors. Texas lost for the seventh time in 
eight games. 

“You just think. *How can I go 
through this game with the least em- 
barrassment possible,' ” said Johnny 
Oates, the Rangers' manager. 

Boston had 24 hits, the most in the 
American League this season and a re- 
cord for the most by a Texas opponent in 
a nine-inning game. 

The Red Sox scored 18 runs on July 
14 against Detroit, the most in the 
league this season. 

Yankees 4, Royals t In Kansas City, 
Kenny Rogers made his first start in 
seven weeks and allowed only one run 
in five innin gs as New York won for the 
seventh time in eight games. 

Rogers (5-4), the $20 million pitcher 
who was banished to the bullpen after an 
ineffective start on June 15, gave up six 
■hits and one run in five innings, striking 
out two and walking two. 

Angola 6, Bmwtn 5 In Anaheim, 
Dave Hollins had three runs batted in — 
two on a tie-breaking two-run double in 
the fifth inning — as Anaheim won for 
the eighth time in 10 games. 

Milwaukee’s Dave Nilsson led off 


the fourth and sixth innings with home 
runs to increase his season total to 20, 
and Jeromy Bumitz followed Nilsson's 
second homer with his 2 1 st to trim Ana- 
heim’s lead to 5-4. Bumitz has homered 
in five straight games. 

Mariners 4, Orioles 3 In Seattle, RllSS 
Davis homered over the center-field 
fence leading off the ninth inning for the 
victory. It was the fourth time this sea- 
son that Davis batted in the game-win- 
ning run in the ninth. His 16th homer 
came on the first pitch from Terry Math- 
ews. Baltimore's fourth pitcher. 

Tigers 6, Indians 4 In DetroiL Justin 
Thompson pitched six innings and Phil 
Nevin homered to lead Detroit past 
Cleveland. Thompson gave up three 
runs on six hits with three walks and 
three strikeouts. Cleveland's Manny 
Ramirez hit a solo home run in the fifth, 
but Thompson stranded five Indians in 
scoring position. 

Blue Jays 8, Twins 3 Ed Sprague had 
two hits and Jose Cruz Jr. hit his 14th 
home run as Toronto won in Minnesota. 
Sprague finished 2-for-5. including a 
two-run single in the fourth that tied it at 
2-2. Cruz hit a two-run homer in die 
seventh — his second in five games since 
being acquired from Seattle on July 31. 

white Sox 3, Athletics o Robin Ven- 
tura homered and doubled to back seven 
shutout innings from Doug Drabek in 
Oakland. Drabek. winning consecutive 
starts for the first time since May 27, 
walked one and struck our three to help 
Chicago break a three-game losing 
streak. 

Chicago has won nine straight ova 
Oakland dating from last season. 

Ventura opened Chicago's scoring 
with his second home run since re- 
turning from ankle surgery, a leadoff 
shot in the second. 

In National League games: 

Dodgers 5, Expos 4 Mike Piazza, who 
had gone 1 -for- 1 3 ova the weekend, hit 
two home runs as Los Angeles won in 
Montreal. The All-Star catcher homered 
leading off the 10th inning — his second 
home run of the game and 24th of the 
season — to give the visiting Dodgas 
their eighth victory in 10 games. He 
made it look easy against the Expos’ 
closer, Ugueth Urbina, blasting an 0-2 
pitch over the fence in left-center. 


Piazza hit a three-run homer in the first 
inning, spoiling the National League de- 
but of Canadian native Mike Johnson. 

Todd Worrell, who allowed a game- 
tying home run to Darrin Fletcher in the 
ninth, pitched two innings for the victory. 
Worrell has blown his last two save op- 
portunities. and seven of 34 this season. 

"We battled back, but Piazza was a 
one-man wrecking crew," said Fletch- 
er. the Expos' carcher. 

Mats 5, Cardinals 4 In New York, 
Edgardo Alfonzo hit a bases-loaded sac- 
rifice fly in the 1 0th inning to give the 
Mets their 34th comeback victory of the 
year. 

Lance Johnson led off in the 10th with 
a single, and Bernard Gilkey. attempting 
to sacrifice, made it to base on a throwing 
error by the Cardinals' catcher, Mike 
Difelice. A bunt by John Olerud turned 
into a single when the third baseman, 
Gary Gaetti, fell on wet grass. After Alex 
Ochoa grounded into a fielder's choice, 
Alfonzo followed with a fly ball to right 
field. Cory Lidle got the victory. striking 
out Gary Gaetti with two on in the 10th 
after a long rain delay.The Mets have 
won seven straight at home. 

Rockies 4, Phillies 2 In Philadelphia, 
Eric Young's two-out run- scoring 
double in the eighth inning capped a 
three-run rally as Colorado ended a 
three-game losing streak. 

The Phillies' starter. Cun Schilling, 
pitched six shutout innings, striking out 
1 2 to tie Seattle’s Randy Johnson for the 
major league lead with" 224. 

Giants i, Cubs 2 Bill Mueller broke a 
2-2 tie in the eighth with a iwo-out, 
bases-loaded triple to give San Fran- 
cisco victory in Chicago. 

Marlins fi, Astros 5 In Miami. Moises 
AIou’s bases-loaded two- run single 
with one our in ihe ninth inning lifted 
Florida over Houston. 

Pirates 5, Braves 4 In Pittsburgh. 
Jason Kendall and Jose Guillen 
homered in a four-run fourth inning and 
Jason Schmidt, traded by Atlanta a year 
ago this month, beat his old team for the 
first time. 

nods 7, Padres 3 In Cincinnati, 
Eduardo Perez and Reggie Sanders 
homered off Staling Hitchcock as Cin- 
cinnati handed San Diego its sixth loss 
in seven games. 


! DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 





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contact Chrwtelle Forestier 
in our London office: 

Tel,: +44 171 420 0329 
Fmc+ 44171 420 0338 
or your nearest IHT office 
or repreeentalivp- 


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PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 199; 


ART BUCHWALD 


Driving Me Crazy 


Richard Davis and His Companion, B. Fiddle 


Bucbwald 


M ARTHA'S VINE- 
YARD, Massachusetts 
— At a congressional bear- 
ing, Ricardo Martinez, head 
of the National Highway 
Traffic Safety Administra- 
tion, testified that aggressive 
behavior caused 
by bad tempers 
was responsible 
for thousands 
of automobile 
accidents each 
year. 

By sheer co- 
incidence I have 
been witness to 
many of these 
angry displays and I can con- 
firm that Martinez is 'not just 
whistling “Dixie." 

I discovered that the most 
ill-tempered drivers in the na- 
tion are on the roads in and 
out of New York City. 


For some reason a person 
who lives in New Jersey or 
Long Island or Westchester, 
and works in Manhattan, is 
filled with tremendous rage 
that can only be released 
when that person backs ont of 
his driveway. 

Some of the anger comes 
from a domestic spat the night 
before or a business deal he 
knows will go sour as soon as 
he arrives at his office or any- 
thing his mother said to him 

German Population 
Surpasses 82 Million 

The Assuridted Press 

WIESBADEN, Germany 
— The population of reunited 
Germany has for the first time 
topped 82 million, the federal 
statistics office said. 

As of Dec. 31. the pop- 
ulation was 82,012,000, the 
office said, with 282,000 
more people moving into 
Germany than leaving. 


on the phone in the morning. 

His sole way of dealing 
with his anger is through his 
car. He achieves tins by tail- 
gating another car, swerving 
Into its lane or passing the 
vehicle on the right 

Automobile tempo: tan- 
trums are accompanied by 
loud bom blowing and the 
driver making obscene ges- 
tures to another vehicle that he 
believes has done him wrong. 


Gasoline doesn't drive 
New York area automobiles, 
rage does. Only after the foul- 
tempered man behind the 
wheel has cut off a dozen cars 
does be feel ready to face the 
day. Returning home is no 
better because by then the 
driver is tired and has lost his 
zest to completely total other 
cars on the road. 

I know that the mail from 
residents of New Jersey, 
Long Island and Westchester 
will flood in accusing me of 
exaggerating. I don't wish to 
tar everyone with the same 
brush. Of all the drivers I have 
observed in the New York 
area, only 95 per cent of them 
lose their tempers and act like 
maniacs. The rest are just like 
you and me. 


I don’t have time to go city 
by city detailing what anger is 
doing to our driving patterns, 
but f would be remiss if I did 
not mention Boston — 
known as the "Me First” 
capital of stock-car racing. 

For reasons that probably 
stem from the days of the Bos- 
ton Tea Party, when Boston’s 
drivers are tooling around 
they would rather make war 
than love. You mustn't be too 
hard on them. Anybody who 
loves the Red Sox can't be 
faulted if he always feels like 
smashing into the rear of the 
car in front of him. 


By Mike Zwerin 

Iniernulunal Herald Trihme 

P ARIS — A panel of researchers retained 
by Ircam, Pierre Boulez's avant-garde 
music laboratory at the Pompidou Center, 
wanted to know how Richard Davis related 
to improvisation. What were the musical, 
sociological and psychological processes 
involved — before, during and after? 

Along with a slew of others, Davis came 
over to Paris to answer their questions. For 
this they were paid. Another time he came 
over, he was paid considerably less to play 
"inter galactic music” from the planet Sat- 
urn with Sun Ra’s Solar Arkestra. 

Davis is a compleat musician who has 
played die bass with just about every name 
that counts in our solar system. A partial list 
in no particular order — Leonard Bernstein, 

Lucky Thompson, Bruce Springsteen, Chet 
Baker, Barbra Streisand, Janis Ian, Igor 
Stravinsky, Benny Goodman, Benny Go Ison, 

Eric Dolphy (the legendary album “Out to 
Lunch”), Gunther Schuller, Sarah Vaughan, 

Leopold Stokowski, Van Morrison. Roland 
Kirk, Stan Getz and so on and on. 

Now 67, he has been teaching classical £ 
bass at the University of Wisconsin in 
Madison for. 20 years. His reputation was 
such that the school awarded him tenure 
before they hired him. 

He has' accompanied the opera singers 
Cathy Berberian. Robert Merrill and Anna 
Moffo. He loves listening to opera and he 
played the album he made with Moffo, with I 
Stokowski conducting, for the better part of 1 
a yean “My girlfriend said, ‘Aren't you 
tired of that record?’ I said, ‘No.’ ” 

After Davis took part in a performance of . i rw 

Stravinsky’s ballet "Pulcinella” in Boston Davis is a compleat musician who has played the bass with everyone under the sun. 



with the composer conducting, the maestro 
put his hand on Davis's shoulder while stopping to ac- 
knowledge applause: "I was the only black guy in the 
orchestra and. you know, be was into jazz. It was like he was 
telling me, ‘I’m glad to see you here.’ ” 


time-keeping instrument, "I heard Richard Davis do that a 


long rime ago.” 
Oh yes, about 


Oh yes, about tenure. Davis used to be active breeding 
horses. While helping a woman he knew train her thor- 


‘I want this job to be secure right now,’ 

I said. They said: ‘In thar case, bring us 10 ! 
letters from your peers. ’ So I got letters from ; 
Bernstein, Stokowski, Janis Ian, Gunther-. 
Schuller and some others, and they gave me " ! 
tenure. I was too dumb to know that was I 
impossible.” 

Sitting on the empty terrace of a cafe m Les • 
Halles in the morning, he recounts a short 
history of the classical bass. It seems that an 
Italian virtuoso named Dragonetti had an 
enormous influence on Beethoven. Accord- 
ing to Davis, after hearing Dragonetti, Beeth- 
oven exclaimed: “Damn! I didn’t know that 
stuff was happening on the bass.' 1 

Beethoven's bass parts grew much more 
difficult. A new fingering system was de- 
veloped and a lower string was added to 
allow musicians to play them. 

The fust rime Davis tried to play Beetho- 
ven's Ninth Symphony, he was 17 and, *‘I 
couldn’t cut it, man. There were notes run- 
ning all over the place. That failure was 
always in my head after that.” He practiced 
difficult excerpts faster and faster until they 
were faster than real rime. He memorized 
them. Wake him in the middle of the night 
and he could play Beethoven’s Ninth. 

Bernstein asked Davis to join the New 
York P hilhar monic on a permanent basis, but 
he wasn’t interested. He preferred challenge 
— everything mixed up, from advertising 
jingles to Brother Jack McDuff. He did play 
with Bernstein for a season, however, and 
during that time, ‘To and behold, the Ninth 
was scheduled.” To be finally able to play it 
with confidence and finesse was, Davis says. 

“a redemption for me.” 

Davis has recently joined the generation 
iTimiiaiiRw of musicians whose children have grown up; I 
nder the sun. he is free to travel about and play music 
again. Oddly enough, one of the biggest 
challenges is just getting out of Madison on an airplane with 
a baggage compartment big enough to hold a molded hard- 
shell bass case. In the old days before the rows and the seats 
became too narrow, you could buy another ticket and put the 


Davis was in Paris last week to record a jazz album for a oughbreds on her farm in Connecticut, he mentioned to her instrument on the seat next to you — Davis would have the 


small French label at the Due des Lombards, an nnpre- that he had an offer to teach out in Wisconsin — “someplace 
tenuous jazz club with good acoustics where musicians like called Madison.” In the next room working on his computer. 


to hang oul He has a crisp, clear and efficient Midwestern 
manner. Although he knows his own strength, there is not a 
trace of excess ego. The way he related to the musicians 
during the session was exceptional and revealing. He was 
smiling bur in charge; demanding but supportive. 

Once, during an interview, the father-figure role-model 
bassist Ray Brown said that while it was true that Scotry 
LaFaro (with Bill Evans) deserved a lot of the credit he gets 
for transforming the jazz bass into a contrapuntal as well as 


ber husband interjected: “Ask them for tenure.” 

Davis did not Icnow what that meant. “That’s how naive I 
was back then,” he says now. “She said that it means they 
can't fire you. That sounded good to me. So during my 


ticket made our in the name of “B. Fiddle.” 

The recently founded Richard Davis Foundation educates 
disadvantaged young bassists. A 3-year-old boy plays a half- 
size cello strung like a bass, for example. Every Sunday, four 
or five youngsters come to Davis’s house in Madison for 
lessons. And once a year, on Easter weekend, more than 80 


interview I asked them for tenure. They said I'd have ro wait students arrive from ail around the Midwest for master 
years until I proved my worth. I told them that I was already classes and workshops. The foundation is nonprofit and tax- 
on rhe number one list in the number one proving ground, exempt,- which means . . . and Davis leans into the mi- 
New York, and I didn't see why I had to be tested all over crophone for emphasis: “Send money!" (1-608-255-6666, 


again in Madison, Wisconsin. 


or fax 1-608-255-5524). 


PEOPLE 


O NE after another they clumsily slid 
to the microphone in loafers, 
sweats ocks and bow ties, their faces 
contorted as they shrieked through 
crooked front teeth: “Hey laaaaaaady!” 
A flock of Jerry Lewis look-alikes 
lined up inside a CBS Television City 
studio in Los Angeles to audition for a 
featured spot on the 32d annual Mus- 
cular Dystrophy Association telethon. 
“It would be a dream come true to be on 
the show," said Loren Lester, an im- 
personator from the San Fernando Val- 
ley. “ft was such a huge part of my 
childhood." Lewis is host of the live, 
21-hour telethon held yearly on Labor 
Day weekend. Last year’s show, 
watched by 70 million people, raised 
$49.1 million for the fight against neur- 
omuscular diseases. Four look-alike 
winners will be chosen after producers 
review videotapes of the auditions. 
Clips will be aired during the telethon. 

□ 

Donna Hanover says the only reason 
she's not campaigning for her husband. 
Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, is so that 


people won't think she’s a pipeline to 
City Hall. “I have discovered, being 
first lady of New York City, that many 
people want me to intercede for them 
with the mayor,” Hanover said in an 
interview with the gossip columnist Liz 
Smith, published in the New York Post 
“I decided it would be better for me to 
choose my own focus, which is not 

E jlitical." It was the first full interview 
anover had given since a Vanity Fair 
article saying Giuliani was having an 
affair with a top aide, Cristyne 
Lategano. Hanover. 47, did not address 
that allegation in the interview with 
Smith, with whom she works on a morn- 
ing news show on the city’s Fox net- 
work affiliate. 


Garth Brooks is giving a free outdoor 
concert in Central Park oh Thursday 
night, and the buzz has it that a million 
people will attend. Arriving to prepare 
for the gig, the country music superstar 

S led a crystal apple from Mayor 
Iph Giuliani and was presented 
with a proclamation declaring “Garth 


Brooks Day.” Billy Joel and other sur- 
prise guests are expected to perform at 
tile concert. And how will New York 
respond to Brooks's brand of top-selling 
country hits, like “Friends in Low 
Places'*? Brooks isn't worried. “We'll 
do our best to hopefully make it 
something worth remembering," he 
said. 


Jane Smiley may like the writing life 
more than she does the teaching life. 
The Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist has 
not decided whether she will return to 
Iowa State University after a leave of 
absence. “We certainly want to keep 
her as part of our faculty, ’ ’ said Thomas 
Kent, chairman of the university's Eng- 
lish department When Smiley took an 
unpaid leave of absence a year ago, her 
husband, Steven Mortensen, said she 
was considering giving up teaching to 
focus on writing and raising horses at a 
California ranch. Smiley, whose 
Pulitzer winner, “A Thousand Acres," 
is being turned into a movie due out later 
this year, declined to comment about her 


academic future. She is listed as a “Lib- 
eral Arts and Sciences Artist in Res- 
idence” at the university. 


A Rolls-Royce convertible will 
whisk Princess Cristina of Spain and 
the Basque handball star Inakf Urd- 
angarin from the cathedral to the palace 
when they wed in Barcelona on Oct. 4. 
Organizers said that the route taken by 
the 31 -year-old princess and her 29- 
year-old groom would be lined with 
barriers bearing Barcelona’s coat of 
arms — a decision that resolves con- 
siderable controversy. The original logo 
created for the wedding, a design rep- 
resenting a handball surrounded by four 
roses and reminiscent of the Olympic 
logo, had to be changed because the 
royal family found it too sporty — even 
though Urdangarin and the princess, the 
second daughter of King Juan Carlos, 
met at last year's Olympic Games in 
Atlanta. The wedding route will also 
feature a banner with the word “hap- 
piness” written in three languages — 
Spanish, Catalan and Basque. 



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the country you're calling from and you'll get the 
clearest connections home. And be sure to charge 


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are cjllinjji from. 

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5. Dial the calling caid number listed above your name. 


836 800 6JSO 1111 

TBWT* 


EUROPE Sweden G 

Austria ... 022-903-011 Switzerland* 08 

Belglem* 0-800-100-10 Untied Kingdom* 051 

Creed RepflWteA no-oz-mm-iffi ou 

France ■ 0-880-99-0011 middle "east “ 

Germany 0130-0018 =,V C 7iroi. " 5 ■“ — 

Greece* . . 00-800-1311 gffjf (Cairo) * 

Sir irSSB 

Netherlands* ... MOO-022 -9111 . _ AFRICA " 

Russia • a( Moscow) * 7SS-5M2 Ghana 

Spam 900 - 99 - 00-11 South Alnca QSI 

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510-0200 

177-100-2727 

1 - 000-10 


0191 

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