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INTERNATIONAL 


Y-25/b 




The World’s Daily Newspi 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


U.S. to Tighten Screws 
On Foreign Phone Firms 

Effort to Lower Long-Distance Fees 
"Too Unilateral,’ Some Europeans Cry 


By Brian Knowlton 

_ international HcraU Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Federal regula- 
tors approved a plan Thursday aimed at 
tore mg down the costs of overseas tele- 
phone calls by putting pressure on for- 
eign telecommunications carriers to 
lower the charges on completing calls 
originating in the United States. 

The move was criticized by some 
Europeans as being “too unilateral “ 
The countries most affected, however, 
would be mainly in the develops 
world, led by Mexico. China and India. 

The Federal Communications Com- 
mission, which approved the plan by 
unanimous vote, estimated that once 
foreign carriers lowered their charges 
for completing U.S. calls, Americans 
wonld save nearly $2 billion in 1 999 and 
more than $4 billion a year by 2003. 

The panel said the move would fur- 
ther the development of * ‘an open, com- 
petitive market for international ser- 
vices.” The commission chairman, 
Reed Hundt, hailed the plan as a major 
achievement that would lead to “a rad- 
ical, radical drop in prices.” 

Mr. Hundt predicted that the decision, 
which takes effect Jan. 1. would lower 
the average price of an international call 


from the United States to 20 cents a 
minute from the current 88 cents. 

The commission said the move had 
been made more urgent by the upcoming 
opening of telecommunications markets 
in the 69 member countries of the World 
Trade Organization, which includes the 
United States and accounis for 95 per- 
cent of the world telecommunications 
market. That opening. like the commis- 
sion action, is set to take effect Jan. 1. 

The order, to be phased in over five 
years, set a series of 1 ■benchmark" rates 
that the agency considers more realistic 
than the so-called settlement rates that 
U.S. phone companies now pay over- 
seas carriers to complete calls origin- 
ating in the United States. 

The benchmark targets range from 15 
cents a minute for developed countries 
to 23 cents a minute for the poores r 
countries, where operating costs are 
generally higher. 

Negotiation of lower settlement rates 
will be handled on a carri e r- Lo-carrier 
basis, said Peter Pappas, a Federal Com- 
munications Commission spokesman. 

He offered this hypothetical example: 
Under the plan. AT&T would have three 
years to reach agreement with a foreign 

See CALLS, Page 6 


For Dawn of the Euro, 
A German Storm Sign 

What Price to Pay for a Strong Currency? 


By Alan Friedman 

'■L , International Herald Tribune 

;• PARIS — Imagine. It is August 1999. 

Europe’s long-awaited single currency, 

. the euro, has finallybeen launched, by a 
group of 10 countries including not just 
. jjtalwans Germany and France, but also 
: itdy;^d3p#a! .; . 

The presence of traditionally weak- 
cturency partners such as Italy and 
Spain has confirmed financial market 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

suspicions that the emu would be a soft 
currency, orat least not as strong as the 
Deutsche mark once was. And therein 
'" J lies the rub. 

' It is August 1999 and instead of 
- spending time on the beach, currency 
traders are betting against the euro, just 
as they are betting against the mark in 
the summer of 1997. The result is a 
soaring U.S. dollar, and a great deal of 
, fretting among European politicians 
and central bankers that the euro is far 
too soft. This state of affairs is a matter 


of both European pride, and of course, 
also a potential inflation risk. 

In 1999. what might the newly 
formed European Central Bank decide 
to do? How might it seek to toughen up 
the euro and persuade financial markets 
that the euro is a world-class currency 
that will stand up to the mighty dollar? 

The new central bank 'might well de- 
cide to raise interest rates in order to 
defend the euro. But that could slow 
down economic growth, and from a rate 
that throughout the 1990s has been well 
below par when compared with the 
booming economies of Asia or the ro- 
bust American economy. Such a move 
also would produce bowls of pain from 
businesses and trade unions alike. 

This policy dilemma is precisely 
what the Bundesbank is struggling with 
in the summer of 1997 as the mark has 
weakened against a soaring U.S. dol- 
lar. 

A glimpse of what some senior Euro- 
pean policymakers are thinking came on 
Thursday, when the former European 

See EURO, Page 6 


Paris, Friday, August 8, 1997 



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NO RUNNING! — Annarita Sidoti of Italy leading the field past the stadium's video screen 
en route to victory in the 10,000 meter walk at the World Championships in Athens. Page 20. 


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. No. 3^,594 



Both the Israelis 
And Palestinians 
Hail U.S. Push 
For Peace Talks 

In a Speech, Albright Calls 
For Intense Focus on Final 
Issues to Achieve Settlement 

By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Ser vice 

JERUSALEM — Both the Israelis and the Pal- 
estinians expressed welcome Thursday for a new U.S. 
initiative aimed at pushing the two sides more swiftly 
toward peace, but they also presented rival views 
about what should receive the highest priority as pan 
of reinvigorated diplomacy. 

Predictably, Israeli and Palestinian officials alike 
suggest that the main task of the U.S. envoys sched- 
uled to arrive here this weekend should be to put 
pressure on the other side to make good on its com- 
mitments. 

But it was notable that neither Yasser Arafat, the 
Palestinian leader, nor Benjamin Netanyahu, the Is- 
raeli prime minister, recoiled — at least in public — at 
the criticism that was directed at both sides by Sec- 
retary of State Madeleine Albright, who announced 
the new plan in a speech in Washington on Wednes- 
day. 

Mr. Arafat, in particular, sounded a bit mollified 
Thursday as he sought to scale back remarks that 
appeared to suggest that the Palestinians should pre- 
pare themselves for war against the Israelis. 

**I didn't mean an armed struggle,” he told re- 
porters in Gaza. He said he had meant to praise the 
Palestinian people for wi thstandin g the harsh mea- 
sures imposed by Israel, including “collective pun- 
ishments imposed on them without them doing any- 
thing wrong.” 

Toe rancor between Israel and the Palestinians 
remains as high as it has been for years in the aftermath 
of last week’s twin suicide bombing in a Jerusalem 
market, which sent relations between the two sides 
spiraling downward. 

The Israelis, accusing the Palestinians of doing too 
little to rein in Islamic militants, have imposed on 
Palestinian-ruled areas the harshest blockade since die 
two sides reached their first peace accord in 1993, but 
the Palestinians have said they have ho intention of 

See MIDEAST, Page 6 


Tug-of-War Over Airbus Restructuring Heats Up 


By Joseph Fitchett 

ImcmaiUmal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — When Airbus complains about Boeing’s 
competitive advantages, the European manufacturer 
knows what it is talking about: More than anything 
else, industry executives say in Europe, Airbus needs 
and warns to become more like its U.S. rival. 

“When you’re number two, copy-catting is not 
always the worse strategy,” an Airbus executive said. 
What he had in mind was a European version of the 
big-bang merger that has gathered U.S. airliner-man- 
ufacturing and now a substantial military aviation 
business, into a streamlined Boeing Co. 


Not everybody accepts this idea, and the struggle 
over the future of Airbus Industrie has sharpened into 
an industrial and political showdown between Paris 
and Bonn, the latest in a series of divergences between 
the two governments about the price to be paid for 
European unity. 

The fate of Airbus could be decided this month as 
France’s Socialist government sets its industrial and 
defense policies. The speed and scope of any break- 
through depend largely on Prime Minister Lionel 
Jospin, who has cited Airbus as the most urgent of 
several overlapping issues concerning European de- 
fense-industrial integration. 

Of course, delay would not kill Airbus, which now 


has roughly 8,000 of its airliners in service around the 
world. The urgency is political, a former French 
aviation official explained, saying that “if we fiddle 
around long enough, Germany and Britain will get fed 
up waiting and look for arrangements of their own, 
France will be marginalized, and Airbus will lose its 
chance to unite European aircraft construction.” 
Opposition to radical change comes mainly from 
the aerospace industry in France, which prides itself on 
being the European leader in aviation, the only country 
that can still develop and build a modem warplane on 
its own. Many French decision-makers are reluctant to 

See AIRBUS, Page 12 




Apple Faithful Bite Bullet 

Gates the Villain Accepted as Necessary Evil 


The Dollar 


Thursday 8 4 P.M. 
1.6666 


previous dose 
1.882 


By John Markoff 

New York Times Service 

BOSTON — This year’s Boston 
Macworld Exhibition is running true to 
form: a cacophonous mix of sideshow 
hucksterism, computer geek convoca- 
tion and religious revival 

Apple Computer Inc., the quirky Cu- 
pertmo. California, computer maker, 
□as always had a huge camp following 
of devout Macintosh users whose com- 
mitment to their machine has been akin 
to religions zeal. 

Among the faithful, the pantheon of 
heroes has. long included Stephen 
Wozniak and Steve Jobs, the fathers of 
the company's Apple D and Macintosh 
technologies. . ’ . 

The villain has been the Microsoft 
chairman, Bill Gares, whose Windows 
opera ting system juggernaut has left 
ever less room for alternatives in the 
computer industry. 

But the faithful have been buffeted by 

the c o rporate and consumer decisions 
that have turned the company from a 
player to a minor player, and their re- 
ligion seems to be giving way to a new 
sense of pragmatism. , _ . 

In the sprawling World Trade Center 
here, this year, there was a widespread 


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taly- 2,600 Lira Spam 

Ivory Coast. 1 250 CFA Tunisia 

JORlan 1 250 JO U AE “ ^ 

Kuwait 700 Fils U.S. MA (Eur.).—-S120j 


conviction that the alliance with Mi- 
crosoft, announced Wednesday, was a 
necessary evil, a key to helping Apple 
revitalize itself. 

“My first reaction was, ‘Oh my God, 
it’s Microsoft!’ ” said Mary Reagan, a 
veteran Macintosh user who is a pro- 
gram manager for a Columbia Uni- 
versity research project in Palisades, 
New York. 

“But then 1 decided that it was prob- 
ably the right thing to do.” 

Her sentiments were echoed by many 
of the show-goers who strolled the 
floors listening to lively pitches being 
made by companies such as Motorola 
Corp., Umax Data Systems Inc. and 
Power Computing Corp., all of which 
make Macintosh clones. 

“My angle, is that this is good; the 
whole OS war has been a bad thing,” 
said lan Blanton, the Internet services 
administrator for the Air Force Re- 

See APPLE, Page 6 


AOENPA 

Cosmonauts Dock Manually With Mir 


Thursday dose 
8188.00 


Thursday 0 * P.M. 

951.19 


previous ch»o 


previous dose 

960.31 


PAGE TWO 

Amid Rians, Jeics and Arabs Unite 

ASIA/PACIFIC Page 4. 

Cambodia King Racks Son's Ouster 

EUROPE Page 5. 

U.S. Strives to Mend Dayton Accord 

Books Pafif 18- 

Crossword Page 11- 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 20-21. 


KOROLYOV, Russia (Reuters) — 
Two cosmonauts joined the three -man 
crew of the crippled Mir space station 
Thursday after a difficult but success- 
ful docking of their Soyuz spacecraft. 

Live television pictures showed the 
cosmonauts embracing one another in- 
side Mir after hatches between Soyuz 
and Mir were opened. 

The hatches were opened at 1830 
GMT, as scheduled. Television pic- 
tures showed the cosmonauts working 
on cables and floating inMir’s weight- 
lessness. They were securing bolts. 


clearly making final touches to the link 
between Soyuz and Mir. 

An hour and a half earlier, the Soyuz 
spacecraft docked with Mir, but the 
relief crew had to carry out the op- 
eration manually after automatic sys- 
tems developed a fault The mission's 
flight director, Vladimir Solovyov, 
said the fault had occurred when Soy- 
uz was 13 meters (40 feet) from Mir. 
“Soyuz retreated by 25 mete is, and 
then docked manually,” he said. “It 
was a technical malfunction.” 

Earlier article. Page 6. 


Teamsters and UPS Reopen Negotiations 


The Intermarket 


Pages 4 and 7. 


The IHT on-line http://www.iht.com 


WASHINGTON (Reuters) — The 
Teamsters union and United Parcel 
Service went back to the bargaining 
table Thursday but showed few signs 
that die strike crippling the nation's 
largest package delivery company 
would end soon. 

The Teamsters president, Ron 
Carey, said be would be looking for 


signs of flexibility from UPS man- 
agers. We’re making progress, I’U stay 
to the weekend, whatever is neces- 
sary,” he said. “But if it’s just a smoke 
screen, we're oui of here.” 

Mr. Carey walked out of talks with 
UPS and called a strike at midnight 
Monday after UPS refused Teamsters 
contract demands. 


Fur- Coat Sellers in China Prosper in Dog Days 


By Kevin Sullivan 

Wushingm Pen Sen-ice 

BEUING — It's Ugly, sweaty hot in the Beijing 
summer, but down on Chaowai Street everyone is 
dreaming happily of miserable Russian winters. 

In more than 100 stalls along this dusty market 
alley, merchants are hawking fur coats. Nothing but 
fur coats, except maybe for a few fur stoles and fur 
hats and fur gloves. Racks and racks and racks of 
them. Mink and rabbit and goat and dog (more onthat 
later) and fox — so many coats hong on shop fronts 
and in windows and doorways that this long, narrow 
street looks like a fur-lined tunnel. 

Almost every one of these coats will end up m 
Russia. Many of the heavy fur coa^b emauc of 
dreary Moscow winters come from this market 
S TTk merchants do their best to make Russian 
cusmmers feel welcome. Most of the srgns here are in 


Russian, almost every shop employs a Russian trans- 
lator, the corner cafd pours shots of vodka with 
breakfast. Grumpy Russian traders crowd the streets 
buying trainloads of Chinese furs. 

“The quality here is not very good. But h’s cheap, 
and it stands up better than our fabrics,” said a Russian 


Chaowai Street is in thecenterof an area known as 
the Russian Market, which sprang up in 1990 as 
relations wanned between China and the Soviet 
Union. Following the free-market impulses of 
Mikhail Gorbachev, the former Soviet president, and 
the late Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping, China began 
encouraging Russians to come shopping, and they 
flocked to buy their basic necessities. As a result, 
trade between the two countries nearly doubled in the 
past seven years, to $6.8 billion last year. 


The market, close to Beijing's embassy district, is 
full of shops and stalls selling everything from 
underwear to roller skates. The merchants say things 
like “Russian heavy industry is good, but their light 
industry is nor productive” to explain why they sell 
bras and soap and kids’ clothes and backpacks and 
jeans and toiletries to the Russians faster than they 
can restock their shelves. 

A few merchants on this alley started fur shops, 
basically on a whim. One shopkeeper, Liu Jin Shan, 
says he sells 10,000 fur coats a year, and his shop is 
just one in a crowd of more than 100. Fur man- 
ufacturers from all over China have turned this alley 
into one big factory outlet center, Beijing style. 

“TTiis is a spontaneous expansion market,” said a 
beaming Mr. Liu, whose office equipment consists of 
a phone, a calculator and a photo of Mao. “Things 

See FUR, Page 6 


Cultures Clash 
At Crash Site 
As Koreans 
Demand Dead 


by Mary Jordan 

Washington Post Service 

AGANA, Guam — The recovery of 
bodies from the wreckage of the Korean 
Air jet that crashed here has erupted into 
a clash of cultures so emotional that 
U.S. military personnel found them- 
selves Thursday forming a human chain 
to keep anguished South Koreans from 
charging the site. 

Grieving South Koreans charged that 
U.S. officials cared more about finding 
the cause of the crash than in recovering 
the bodies. 

[George Black, a U.S. National 
Transportation Safety Board member at 
the crash site in Guam, said the pilot 
appeared to have complete control of 
the jet when it hit (he hill early Wednes- 
day on the approach to the airport, The 
Associated mss reported from Agana. 
1 ‘Controlled flight into terrain is usually 
an etTor on someone's part, and it does 
have all the earmarks of controlled 
flight into terrain,” he said.] 

When some South Korean family 
members learned Thursday that the re- 
covery effort could take weeks, some 
flung themselves on the floor of the 
Pacific Star Hotel, where the victim's 
relatives are staying. 

There were 254 people on the Boeing 
747. Rescuers found 28 survivors, some 
critically burned and injured. As of 
Thursday night, 99 bodies of the more 
than 220 in the charred wreckage had 
been recovered. 

When officials told the relatives earli- 
er Thursday night that they did not know 
whether any more bodies had been re- 
covered in the last 24 hours. South 

See CRASH, Page 6 


j 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1997 



Families Bound Together / A Bombing'sWake 


Amid Ruins of Terrorism, 
Jews and Arabs Unite 


By Neil MacFarquhar 

New KinC 77m« Srrmr 


J ERUSALEM — The fruit stand that 
wrapped around the corner of Chaim Street 
and Apple Alley in Jerusalem's bustling 
produce market was a family venture, 
watched over by two Jewish brothers, their 
brother-in-law and an Arab worker who helped 
shift around the crates of whatever was in season. 
When two suicide bombers detonated their 
briefcases July 30 among the jostling shoppers, 
the four men were standing in a rough line 
outside the stall. 

The explosion ricocheted through four in- 
tersecting lives, illuminating how Jews and 
Arabs can be bound together amid the wreckage 
of terrorism, even if such ties do not bridge the 
vast gaps in their politics or status. 

Now, one of the four men who worked at the 
fruit stand is dead, and on Wednesday his family 
marked the end of shiva, the seven-day mourn- 
ing period prescribed by Jewish tradition. 

The three others were wounded, and two. a Jew 
and an Arab, lie in the same hospital, a few floors 
apart. Their families visit each other, avoiding the 
volatile ropic of politics just as they did when they 
worked together at the fruit stand. 

It will be months, perhaps years, before these 
four families come to grips with the moment 
when the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, usually so 
safely distant from their daily routines, scythed 
through the middle of their lives. 

Sammy Malka, the father of a 3-year-old son, 
had joined the business just 10 days earlier on a 
trial basis, restless to leave behind 17 years of 
driving a taxi. He was standing back-to-back with 
one bomber, rearranging a pile of watermelons, 
and was one of 13 people to die in the blast 
Nasser Hushieh, the Arab worker, was srand- 
ing near him but inside the stall, drinking coffee 


that Sammy had just made for everyone and 


waiting to see if he needed any help with the 
unwieldy melons. He now lies in the intensive 
care unit of Hadassah Hospital, breathing 
through a tube with two collapsed lungs, severe 
shrapnel and bum wounds ana two broken legs. 

Behind him stood Tiran Moshe, who had been 
supervising the stand with his brother for the last 
three years after inheriting it from their father. 
He was also drinking coffee when the bomb went 
off. He suffered severe shrapnel wounds and 
bums and lies seven floors above Mr. Hushieh in 
a plastic surgery ward. The family has not had 
the heart to tell him yet that Sammy is dead. 

The fourth man, Samson Moshe, was standing 
almost around the comer on Chaim Street, He 
needs surgery to repair a damaged ear and gets 
around on crutches. 

When Tiran Moshe’s relatives get too edgy 
waiting next to their kin at the hospital, they pop 
down to the intensive care unit to check on Mr. 
Hushieh. Occasionally there is someone else 
visiting, like the passing Israeli medic who first 
touched him crumpled on the market street The 
Arab family members also ride up in the elevator 
to check on Mr. Moshe. 

The bereaved, like the bomb, do not always 
discriminate between Jew and Arab. 

“Sure, we’re Likudniks. but this is above 
politics," said Lili Pinhasi, whose sister was 
married fo Mr. Malka. She was referring to the 
governing Likud party, which has criticized the 


previous Labor government for being too willing 
to compromise with the Palestinians. “We care 
about him being injured and lying there un- 
conscious just like we care about my brothers." 

Recriminations among the politicians outside 
does not enter the hospital wards, where 16 
victims remain, five of them in critical condition. 
• ‘ We are not extremists, ” said Raft, Mr. Malta’s 
brother. ' ‘There are good Arabs and bad Arabs, 
just like there are good Jews and bad Jews. We 
support peace and not vengeance.” 

The sound of Arabic in die intensive care 
waiting room occasionally startles others wait- 
ing, but the two families try to encourage each 
other. “Those who came to visit my son in the 


hospital, I saw them crying,” said the elder 
Hushieh. “They els 


me on the back and say 
they think he will be O.K., just as I went to see the 
Jew he worked for. His wife was crying. I was 
crying. They have to uproot these extremist 
groups. All these acts never serve the Arabs or 
the Jews." 

As the period of mourning 
ended. Mr. Malka 's relatives 
went to Sammy's grave 
Wednesday morning and then 
took the first steps toward re- 
suming their normal lives. 

Bar, the son bom to Ariela and 
Sammy Malka with the help of 
artificial insemination after 13 
years of Dying, will likely re- 
member to ask his mother 
where his father went. 

Mrs. Malka dreads the mo- 
ment of explanation. She hid 
all the family pictures in the 
back of her closet hoping he 
would forget for a while. 

But none of the families will 
ever really be able to forget 
"Do you remember, Sammy, 
when we would hear about ter- 
rorist attacks on the radio, you 
would be shaken up and think, 

‘But we are distant from all 
that.* ” Mrs. Malka cried out 
last Thursday in a spontaneous 
eulogy at the foot of her husband's grave. “But 
it's also reached us. Now that you are up there, 
protect our people from these attacks, Sammy, 
and wait for me. In my heart, I said, ‘ ‘God, let it 
be that he is seriously injured. I don't mind 
taking care of him his whole life. The main thing 
is that my son will have a father." 

Like Mis. Malka, Habib Hushieh, Nasser's 
father, had switched on the television set as soon 
as he heard about the bombing. When he saw the 
shattered watermelons, his stomach knotted. 

He could bear to visit his son just once in the 
hospital, his body covered in scabs, blood seep- 
ing into the sheets, tubes running to his nose, his 
mouth, his aims. “He was like a mountain when 
he was standing," said Mr. Hushieh, covering 
his face with his hand as tears gushed forth. “Do. 
you think I have the heart to see him laid out in 
the hospital bed this way, unable to move, unable 
to talk?’' 

Before going to work for the Moshe family in 
1991, Mr. Hushieh worked in a huge Jewish 
bakery. During the Gulf War, when Iraq sent 
Scud missiles slamming into Israel, the Jews and 
Arabs used to dive into fire bomb shelter together. 



Clashes Feared 
In Kenya as 
General Strike 
Is Prohibited 



Ritu ijj. liiuimtTb* V* WL "Dm** 



Sammy Malka and his icife* 

Ariella , at a family outing last 
year. This iceek, following his 
death in the Jerusalem suicide 
bombing. Mrs. Malka. above right, 
mourned with a friend at his grave. 


One day Mr. Hushieh walked up behind his 
fellow Arab workers and yelled "Scud Alert!" 
The bakery owner didn’t think it was funny. He 
discharged Mr. Hushieh. It took him six months 
to find the job at the Meshes' fruit stand. 


I N THE MARKET, no one ever really talked 
about politics. It can be a volatile topic 
between Arab and Jew. Besides, none of the 
four was terribly interested. Sammy Malka 
mostly Irked to talk about his son. 

It had taken so many years to get that boy, that 
he injected something about Bar into every con- 
versation. When Bar was bom. 600 guests came 
to the circumcision. At least that many showed 
up for Mr. Malka 's wake. 

Mrs. Malka is the secretary to the speaker of 
the Israeli Parliament, so most legislators paid 
their respects. The Hapoel Jerusalem soccer 
team knew Mr. Malka was a fan and came en 
masse. Some of the Arab families from the 
market also sat shiva. Most Jerusalem taxi 
drivers grew up in the same neighborhoods. One 
taking a fare to the wake pulled over to the curb, 
pinning on a skull cap as he shut off the meter. 


In ihe Mahane Yehuda market, the rusted 
shutter over the entrance to the Moshes' stall still 
holds the black-fringed death notices for Mr. 
Malta and a few other victims. A large re- 
frigerator used by a nearby meat shop under- 
going renovation has been convened into a 
shrine, the entire inside filled with stubby me- 
morial candles in tin cans. Every once in a while, 
the wicks and melting wax pool into a roaring 
conflagration that threatens to leap ont of the 
case, a startling echo of the earlier inferno. 

Most of the stalls are back in business now. A 
bearded man in a rounded black felt hat and 
knee-length frock coat approached the stand next 
to that of the Moshes, surveying the produce. 

"Did you say the Benediction of Deliver- 
ance?" the customer asked the owner, Israel 
Salach. referring to the Jewish prayer for those 
occasions when people come close to death. 
With his left knee still bandaged against the 
wounds wrought by the shrapnel, Mr. Salach 
assured the customer that he had offered a heart- 
felt payer. 

The customer nodded and rapidly changed the 
topic. - “Why are you so expensive today? How 
much did you pay the wholesaler for those 
potatoes, anyway?” The haggling was joined 
with fervor. "If we didn’t forger, it would be 
difficult to live," said Mr. Salach. 

There is no haggling at the Moshe stand. No 
one is sure when it will reopen. No one is sure 
what happens next. 

"Work will be fine. I won't have to think 
about Sammy," said his brother Rafi, a con- 
struction supervisor. "But tomorrow night. I 
will be sitting at home, and I am sure I will be 
waiting for bis phone call, waiting for him to 
drop by. I jusi don'r know what it is going to be 
like. You never think it will happen to you." 


Reuters * 

NAIROBI — The Kenyan labor min- 
ister on Thursday declared unlawful a 
national strike called for Friday by an 
alliance pressing for constitutional 
changes, and he urged the police to en- 
sure thai it was a normal working day. 

The alliance, the National Conven- 
tion Executive Council, called the gen- 
eral strike to press President Daniel arap 
Moi to institute constitutional reforms 
before elections. No date has been set 
for the polls. . . 

The labor minster, Philip Masinde, 
said he had asked the police “to take all 
measures to ensure the day passes as 
normal, to stop any activities that may 
be termed illegal.’' 




His statement appeared to set the 
Friday be 


stage for clashes Friday between sup- 
porters of the alliance and riot police 
because the strike organizers have 
called for marches to support the stop- 
page. 

At least nine people were killed on 
July 7 during clashes between the police 
and pro-reform demonstrators in 
Nairobi and other centers. It was the 
worst political violence in Kenya in 
seven years. 

The alliance seeks to scrap laws that 
give the president sweeping powers to 
crush political protests, jail dissidents 
and ban political parties. 

Mr. Moi's government has offered a 
set of “ minim al'' changes before the 
elections and a full constitntional re- 
view after the elections. 



■ Shilling Hits Record Low 

The Kenyan shilling touched an of- 
ficial * record low against the dollar 
Thursday, Reuters reported from 
Nairobi. 

The shilling fell 4.08 percent to close 
at a commercial average of 70.26 to the 
dollar, compared with a closing rate of 
67.50 Wednesday. 

The shilling has lost 18.08 percent 
against the dollar since Kenya was jol- 
ted by the International Monetary Fund 
decision a week ago to halt a $205 
million aid package, citing corruption. 


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UN Grounds Copters 
In South Lebanon 


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The Associated Press 


TYRE, Lebanon — UN peacekeep- 
ts in south-' 


ers grounded their helicopters 
em Lebanon, and the Italian prime min-! 
ister headed to Israel on Thursday after 


an Italian UN helicopter crashed in the 
Israeli-occupied south, tolling all five 


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people aboard, 
roi 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


St. Petersburg to Sell Stake in Astoria Hotel 


Chunnel Posts a Record Month 


PARIS (AFP) — High-speed train services finking London 
with Brussels and Paris through the Channel Tunnel carried a 
record number of passengers in July, while traffic on the 


On September f>. 1997 the HIT 
will publish a Sponsored Section on 

The Interactive 
Industry 


tion on 


• The convergence o! communications 
and information technologies - 

a new industry emerges. 

• Solutions to the problem of Internet 

access speed. 

• Web TN\ digital TV: the next addition 
to the interactive industry. 

• telemedicine - how does it work? 






This section coincides with the ITU's Telecom Interactive 
’97 Forum and Exhibition. For further information, 
please contact Bill Mahdcr in Paris at +33 I 41 43 93 78: 
fax: +33 l 41 43 92 13 or e-mail: supplementsfaihLcom 


THE WORLD'S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


shuttle service for cars between England and France rose 29.5 
percent from the June level Eurotunnel said Thursday. 

The Eurostar service between London and the two other 
capitals carried 651,849 passengers, an increase of 127329, 
or 24 percent, from June and 23 percent more than in July 
1996. In the first seven months of 1997, the service carried 
3,354,835 passengers. 

The Shuttle service carried 227,810 cars and 6.263 buses, 
or 234,073 vehicles, last month, taking the seven-month total 
to 1,061,260 cars and 29,981 buses. 


Btoowherii News 

ST. PETERSBURG — Russia's 
second-biggest city said Thursday that it 
planned to sell a stake in the luxury 
Hotel Astoria, which has hosted celeb- 
rities such as Isadora Duncan. H.G. 
Wells and Margaret Thatcher. 

“The Astoria is most interested in 
obtaining an investor that is experienced 


in the hotel business and wants to do 
what is best for our hotel," said Vladi- 
mir Kazachenko, the Astoria's head of 
sales and marketing. 

The city-run property fund will sell 25 
percent of OAO Hotel Complex Astoria 
on Sept. 1 7 at a closed tender. The sale is 
expected to raise almost 19.9 billion 
rubles <S3.4 million). 


)ur of the dead were Italian military 
personnel and the fifth was an Irish UN 
soldier. United Nations officers said. 

The crash occurred Wednesday night 
near a UN post in the village of Tairi, 27: 
kilometers (17 miles) southeast of Tyre. 
The United Nations Interim Force in 
Lebanon grounded its three remaining 
helicopters, also of the Italian Air Force, 
pending the results of an investigation, 
into the cause of the crash. 

Although the United Nations re- 
mained silent on what might have 
caused the crash, there was strong sus- 
picion of mechanical failure. 

Prime Minister Romano Prodi of Italy" 
was awaited in Israel for ceremonies at 
ihe Tel Aviv airport, from which the 
bodies of the Italians were to be returned, 
to Italy, his office in Rome said. 


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Flights Back to Normal in Kenya 


WEATHER 


NAIROBI (Reuters) — Air traffic controllers ended their 
work slowdown Thursday, and service returned to normal 
after five days of cancellations and delays. 

Labor Minister Philip Masinde declined to give any details 
of the agreement to end the slowdown. 

The dispute was resolved after foreign airlines and freight 
forwarders said they were increasingly concerned about 
safety at Nairobi's airport, with flights circling the Kenyan 
capital for hours waiting to land. 


Seoul Issues Typhoon Warning 


SEOUL (AFP) — The weather bureau posted a typhoon 
warning Thursday for the southern coast of South Korea as the 
storm designated Tina moved toward the outlying tourist 
island of Cheju from Japan. 

The warning said that if it stayed on course, Tina would 
brush the southern coast and Cheju on Saturday. 


This way to 



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Forecast lor Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu Weather. Asia 



Jewream 

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Valley. Thunderstorms Spain will be sunny and 
. across the Southeast very warm to hoi 


Asia 

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In Proposed Tax Cuts, a Break for Few but Headaches forManv 

BV Clive PhnnHIar 4X11(1 fnr M *i. c 1 11 ATlTl l". ^ „ 


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By Cl i ye Chandler aSS/? 1 3C ^. 11 re ?dized in capital gains. To efit more from this year's tax legislation than those 

sirate now me plan will work. The Washington with vouns children. A two-child family eamine 


Wbslunxnm Pn\i Servii f 


WASHINGTON — Now that r;ii ?°,- 1 *»«»■¥«* at Delame & Touche to 

Clinton and congressional Republicans have liaHN? 6 ho J v f the agreement woitld change the tax 
agreed to a tax cut comes the of four ***** households, 

out your share. * 5 

oio^of ^ lh ^ ides pn3C,aini themselves cham- 
ptons-of a s^pJer tax code, the compromise plan 

h?w e ¥,T 4e 0 PP 0Sit e direction. The 

f no ,; 5 9°'Pf r -? h,Id *x crediL is limited accord- 
^ , o family income. The new education tax 
credjts vary according to family income, spend- 
in S j£yf ls 21113 y«rs of schooling. 

... ?Jis legislation will add several new lines to 
lor exaci ‘y the people for whom 
everybody has been trying to make things sim- 
pler said Clint Stretch, director for tax policy at 
the Washington office of Deloitte & Touche.' an 
accounting firm. 

-Tjf R 3 ^ age. rewards two groups of taxpayers: 
middle-income families with children under 17 or 
students continuing their education beyond hieh 
school, and households that receive a substantial 
portion of their income from capital gains — profit 
trom the sale of stock, property or other assets. 

hi effect, the plan will be worth 5500 for each 
child under 17. as much as $1,500 for each college 
student in a middle-income family and as much as 


. The single guv 

No investments. 

Income: $40,000 
Tax under current law: $4,902 
Tax under agreement: $4,902 
Taxpayers without children are the big losers 
ui the compromise tax plan, whether single or 
mamed. Unless he happened to inherit more than 
J^on. bought a new home worth less than 
$500,000 or could save enough to put away some 
money in one of the new tax -deferred individual 
retirement accounts, the ‘'single guy*’ in the 
example would owe exact! v the same amount in 
taxes with or without the new tax laws. 

Married with children 
Two children, one in college, one under 17. 
No investments. 

Income: $60,000 
Tax under current law: $5,520 
Tax under agreement: $3,520 
Tax cut: $2,000 <36 percent) 

Families with college-age children stand to ben- 


family earning 
as much as S 1 1 0.000 would be eligible for a credit 
of S 1 .000. or $500 for each child, if both children 
are under 1 7. But if those rwo children happened to 
be in their first or second year of college and each 
had annual tuition and education expenses ex- 
ceeding $3,000. the family would be able to claim 
a $3,000 credit. That would substantially reduce 
the tax bite for mosr middle-income families. 

Married with more children 
Five children, two in college, three under 17. 
No investments. 

Income: $60,000 
Tax under cunenr law-: $4,328 
Tax under agreement: $1,664 
Tax cut: $2,664 (62 percent) 

Middle-income families with three or more 
children could enjoy a substantial reduction in 
their income-tax liability under the new tax pack- 
age, whether or not those children were able to take 
advantage of its tax breaks for smdents. But large 
middle-income families may be surprised to dis- 
cover that claiming the child and education credits 
for all their children may leave them subject to the 
alternative minimum tax, a levy designed primar- 
ily to ensure that upper-income households with 
many deductions pay at least some tax. 


Were it not for the alternative minimum tax. 
the large family in the example would owe no 
federal tax at all, because the new credits would 
wipe out the S4J2S they would pay under cunent 
law. But according to Deloitte & Touche, that 
family would have to pay a minimum tax of 
$1 ,664 under the new tax bill, assuming they had 
state, local, personal-property and real-estate 
taxes of S4.000. 

The power couple 

Two children, one in college, one under 17. 

$100,000 in capital gains income. 

Income: $400,000 

Tax under current law: S96.080 

Tax under agreement: S88.0080 

Tax cut: SS.CiOO (8 percent t 

Children, whether or not they are in college, 
would provide no tax benefit to upper-income 
families — households earning more than 
$110,000 a year — under the new bill. The tax 
bill does offer the prospect of considerable sav- 
ings for many high-income families, provided 
they derive a large percentage of their annual 
income from the sale of stock or other assets. In 
dollar terms, this family gets the biggest tax cut of 
the four examples. But because they pay so much 
in taxes, their cut is smaller than most of the 
others in percentage terms. 


For those middle-income families with chil- 
e - aCCOuniants ass,lme d they were paying 
$4,000 in real-estate, personal -property, state 
and local taxes. 

The agreement lowers the maximum capital- 
gains tax rate to 20 percent from 28 percent, 
retroactive to May 7. For taxpayers in ihe lowest 
tax bracket the rate falls to 10* percent from 15 
percent. 

The package also creates “backloaded" In- 
dividual Retirement Accounts. Contributions 
would not be deductible, but income could ac- 
cumulate tax free, with no tax on withdrawals for 
retirement, first-time home purchases or edu- 
cation expenses. Income limits begin at $150,000 
for couples. 

Income limits on traditional IRAs. for which 
withdrawals — but not contributions — are 
raxed, would be doubled over 10 


S 100,000 
up to 


America’s Porous Northwest Border 

Terrorists and Others Find Easy Access to US. From Canada 


years, to 

)00 per couple. Taxpayers could contribute 
$2,000 annually to traditional or “back- 
loaded" IRAs. plus up to $500 per child to new. 
education savings accounts. 

Relief for heirs, businesses and the self-em- 
ployed would include increasing the current in- 
dividual exemption over 10 years to $1 million 
from S600.000, although family-owned busi- 
nesses and farms qualify 1 for $1.3 million starting 
next year. 


By Timothy Egan 

Aen KtI Times Servu e 

BLAINE, Washington — 
The first time Ghazi Ibrahim 
Abu Mezer crossed the 
world’s longesr undefended 
border, he followed a typical 
pattern for illegal entrants at 
the far western edge of the 
boundary. He hiked into the 
Cascade Mountain woods 
from Canada last year and 
walked into the United States. 


On his second illegal entry, 
Mr. Abu Mezer, one of two 
men arrested last week in a 
New York apartment and ac- 
cused in a bombing plot, 
again strolled across the bor- 
der, the 49th parallel. On the 
third attempt, he rook a bus. 

He was apprehended on all 
three occasions, then was al- 
lowed to stay in the United 
States while appealing for 
political asylum. But the 
wonder, say officials on both 


sides of the border, is that he 
was caught at alL 

For people trying to enter 
the United States illegally 
from the north, the corridor of 
choice is across the border in 
northwestern Washington. 
Much of it is wild, porous and 
largely unmanned. 

Border Patrol figures indi- 
cate that there are more at- 
tempts at illegal entry in this 
far-westem section than at 
any other point along the 


POLITICAL NOTES 


4 


Clinton Expects to Veto 
\ Something 9 in Tax Bill 

- WASHINGTON — .After shaking hands 
with Republican leaders on a new era of 
peaceful coexistence. President Bill Clin- 
ton has laid out an agenda for the rest of the 
year that is sure to renew confrontations, 
starting with possible vetoes of special- 
interest tax breaks. 

With the budget agreement behind him. 

■ Mr. Clinton said he would tum to other 
priorities that have generated substantial 
opposition in Congress, including tighter 
campaign-finance laws and national edu- 
cation standards. And even before Congress 
returned from its summer recess, Mr. Clin- 
ton said' he expected to reject some pro- 
visions in the tax bill he signed Tuesday, 
using his newly acquired line-item veto. 

“I'm assuming that there will be 
something in there that was not agreed to by 
all of us in the budget agreement that seems 
to me to be a good candidate for it, ' ‘ he said 
Wednesday during a news conference on 
the South Lawn of the White House. 

But Mr. Clinton tried to sound concili- 
' atory, vowing not to proceed in a way that 
would be seen as an act of bad faith by 
Republican leaders. 

“I cannot use the line-item veto on any- 
thing that our negotiators agreed to let go 
through.*" he said. "I think that’s very 
important. And I want to bend over back- 
wards to make sure there's no misunder- 
standing on that.’ ’ 

. Mr. Clinton also announced lower deficit 
projections, defended the budget deal as 
critical to economic growth and pledged his 
support for revamping programs such as 
Medicare health insurance and Social Se- 
curity retirement benefits. (WPi 

Pay Up or ... Oops! IRS 
Admits 90*000 Mistakes 

WASHINGTON — In a bureaucratic 
nightmare that started with a political scan- 
dal and ended with a hidden software de- 
. feet, the Internal Revenue 1 Service has is- 
sued erroneous tax warnings to 90,000 
. Americans. 

The IRS notified taxpayers across the 
United States in recent months that they 
were subject to penalties and interest on 
back taxes for failing to file proper tax 

■ returns for their nannies and other house- 
hold employees. 


But the IRS letters — all 90.000 of them 
— were a mistake, the agency said. The 
taxpayers had already correctly followed 
IRS rules in using a new. ■‘simplified" 
form for paying taxes for their household 
employees. 

An IRS spokesman, Steve Pyrek, said the 
letters were the result of a software error in 
the agency's outdated and error-prone com- 
puters. The IRS is issuing new letters apo- 
logizing to taxpayers, Mr. Pyrek said. 

"It is inexcusable," said Senator Bob 
Kerrey. Democrat of Nebraska, a leader 
in the congressional efforts to overhaul 
the IntemafRevenue Agency. "Nobody in 
the private sector would make this mis- 
take." (JUT) 

Smokers 9 Haven on Hill 

WASHINGTON — As President Clinton 
prepares to sign an executive order this week 
severely restricting smoking in federal office 
buildings, and anti-smoking laws continue 
to roughen nationwide, one place remains a 
virtual haven for smokers: Congress. 

The House and Senate, which dictate 
their own smoking policies, would remain 
exempt from the executive order. 

‘ ‘The Capitol is one of the last bastions of 
people being allowed to smoke in public 
buildings," said Jeff Whelan, a spokesman 
for Senator Frank Lautenberg. Democrat of 
New Jersey, who is urging the Senate Rules 
Committee to restrict smoking in the Sen- 
ate. 

* ‘Smokers hang out in the hallways of the 
Senate Hart Office Building," Mr. Lauten- 
berg said, adding. ‘ ‘I can literally smell the 
smoke wafting into my office." 

The House restricted smoking in public 
areas several years ago, but members can 
permit it in their own offices. The Senate 
has not instituted a smoking policy. Law- 
makers, staff and visitors are free to light up 
in any of the three Senate office buildings or 
on the Senate side of the Capitol. (WPi 

Quote/Unquote 

President Clinton, saying how much 
he is w illin g to do to win confirmation of 
former Governor William Weld of Mas- 
sachusetts as ambassador of Mexico, de- 
spite opposition from the chairman of the 
Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Sen- 
ator Jesse Helms. Republican of North Car- 
olina: "I thought maybe I’d go down to 
Mexico and jump off those cliffs at Acap- 
ulco." (AP I 


New L.A. Police Chief Vows Change 


By Matt Lait 

Los Anedn rimes Sen ice 


■ LOS ANGELES — Vowing ro make "Lot 

Angeles the safest big city" in the United 
. A States, the police chief designee, Bernard 
Parks, says he should be judged on whether he 
‘ 1 can succeed in driving down crime. 

'Mr. Parks inherits an organization that has 
straggled in recent years to define its vision 
for fighting crime and adopr reforms aimed at 
reducing excessive force, discrimination and 
°foer police misconduct. 

. He said in an interview that he planned 1 to 
carry out numerous changes within the de- 
partment to improve the "quality °fj* rvic ** 

■ During His first few months in office. Mr. 
Parks said he planned ro: 

■ • Survey citv residents to determine vvnat 
toeir law enforcement concerns were so the 
department could better deploy its resources. 

■•Streamline the department's top com- 
»”tand structure to increase '■accountability' 
i'jpd give outlying stations more control over 
fighting crime in their neighborhoods. 

■ * Restructure the agency’s beleaguered 
“OQnuory nnd eliminate certain analysis 
w odc. such as DNA resting, which would be 
contracted out to specialists. 


• Press forward on departmental reforms, 
particularly in the areas of excessive force and 
training, that were recommended by the 
Christopher Commission following the 1991 
beating of Rodney King, the black motorist 
whose*beating by white policemen was video- 
taped and broadcast worldwide. 

For Mr Parks, who will become the de- 
partment's second black chief, the ascension 
to the top post is a vindication of sorts. 

Five years ago. Mr. Paries, 53. came within 
one vote of getting the position, losing out 10 
Willie Williams, who is also black. Many de- 
partment insiders said he had beeng? sed ^ r 
lately because the Los Angeles Police Com- 
m&sion — which was responsible for choosing 
the chief in 1992 — felt an imperative to bring 

in an outsider to shake ^ 

Although Mr. Parks and Mr. Williams tried 

to work together, ?“«Unon^.p JSf’S® 

increasinglv strained. In September 1 994 Mr. 
Williams oublidy demoted Mr. Parks from 
assistant to deputy chief, blaming him m pan 
fnr rhe slow nacc of departmental reforms. 

year. 


3.500 miles (5,600 kilome- 
ters) of the U.S. -Canadian 
border. Bur the region is so 
short of Border Patrol agents 
that in a recent week, only a 
single agent was patrolling a 
stretch of about 100 miles’of 
saltwater inlets, forest roads 
and mouotain backcountry. 

"We have a lot of wilder- 
ness here and you’re lucky if 
you can see 30 feet.” said 
Dale Brandland, the sheriff of 
Whatcom County, which bor- 
ders British Columbia. “From 
outside North America it’s 
easy to get into Canada, and 
from there it’s extremely easy 
to get into the United States in 
this section.” 

Whether this gateway be- 
tween the populous Van- 
couver area in British 
Columbia and Seattle, about 
120 miles to the south, has 
become an entry point for ter- 
rorists or organized criminals 
remains an open question, 
law-enforcement officials 
say. But because it is so easy 
to sneak across, it has de- 
veloped into something of 
smuggler's byway for people 
who have made their way to 
Canada from the Middle East. 
India and Mexico. 

For the last five years, the 
arrest rate for illegal entry at- 
tempts in this corridor has av- 
eraged nearly 4,000 annually 
— about one-fourth of all ar- 
rests on the northern border of 
the United States. But instead 
of beefing up law' enforce- 
ment along this section, the 
Border Patrol has reduced its 
staff here, sending agents to 
the southern bolder, where 
more than 1.5 million people 
a year are apprehended. 

■‘Apparently it’s going to 
take a major disaster to get 
anyone to pay attention to this 
border," Mr. Brandland 
said. 

On the Canadian side, the 
authorities have similar com- 
plaints. 

“It’s gotten to a point 
where it really scares me," 
said Sergeant Glen Rockwell 
of the Royal Canadian Moun- 
ted Police border unit “It is 
so easy to get into Canada. 
And once you ’re in, we cannot 
keep track of people." 

Mr. Rockwell said that Mr. 
Abu Mezer’s odyssey 
through North America was 
not untypical. Mr. Abu Mezer 
arrived in Canada in 1993, 
seeking refugee status and 
listing "his nationality as Pal- 
estinian. From Toronto he 
went west to the Vancouver 
area, and from there made his 
numerous attempts to enter 
the United States. 

After the first two arresrs of 
Mr. Abu Mezer for illegal 
entry, he was returned to 
Canada. 

.After Mr. Abu Mezer’s 
third arrest, earlier this year, 
Canada refused to accept him. 
Soon thereafter he applied for 
political asylum in the United 
States, saying he was falsely 
accused of terrorism by Is- 
rael. He dropped the request a 
few months ago. after prom- 
ising ro voluntarily leave the 
United States by Aug. 23. 

Mr. Abu Mezer, and a 
second suspect, Lafi Khalil, 
were wounded in a police raid 
last Thursday. New York's 
mayor, Rudolph Giuliani, was 
harshly critical of immigration 
officials for allowing Mr- Abu 
Mezer to stay in the country. 



ti.n.f.Thr A* "ufl Pi.-‘ 

TORONTO FIRE — A bystander helping a victim with an oxygen mask after smoke from a railyard fire 
engulfed two of the city's subway trains. Dozens of people were evacuated, but there were no serious injuries. 

A High Penalty for Home- Wrecking 

North Carolina Jury Awards $1 Million in Damages to Jilted Spouse 


By Jon Jeter 

Washnigien Post Service 


A jury has awarded $1 million in 
damages to a North Carolina woman 
who sued her husband's mistress for 
breaking up their 19-year marriage. 

With their judgment, jurors essen- 
tially agreed with Dorothy Huielmyer. 
40, the Jilted spouse, who contended that 
her husband was enticed into an affair by 
his secretary , Margie Cox. 

James Hutelmyer, an insurance-com- 
pany executive, divorced his wife this 
year and subsequently married Ms. Cox, 
who is now known as Margie Hutelmy- 
er. 

Margie Hutelmyer acknowledged that 
an affair between the two began in 1 994, 
said Dorothy Hutelmyer 's attorney. 
James Walker. James Hutelmyer moved 
out of the family home last year, he 


added. The couple, who have three chil- 
dren, were well known in the small 
North Carolina town of Burlington 
where they lived, about 20 miles~t32 
kilometers) east of Greensboro. 

Jurors deliberated for less than three 
hours before awarding Dorothy 
Hutelmyer S500.000 in compensatory 
damages and another $500,000 in pu- 
nitive damages. 

"! think the people in our community 
are saying with this verdict that families 
are important," Mr. Walker said. "We 
just recognize down here rhat we want to 
preserve the family.” 

Wayne Abernathy. Margie Hutelmy- 
er’s attorney, declined to comment ex- 
cept to say he would appeal the judg- 
ment. Dorothy Hutelmyer’s lawsuit is 
the result of an old, seldom-used pro- 
vision contained in North Carolina law. 
which prov ides a spouse legal recourse if 


a third party disrupts the marriage’s in- 
timacy. most typically through adultery. 

In a similar case this year, a jury 
awarded S86.000 to a woman whose 
husband left her for another woman. But 
a SI million verdict was thought to be 
unprecedented. 

"We see cases like this, oh, one eveiy 
rwo or three years usually," said Shirley 
Lane, a courihouse clerk "Bur I have a 
feeling we're going to have a run on 
them now." 

During the seven-day trial, witnesses 
described Margie Hutelmyer as a "mat- 
ronly" woman who changed suddenly 
after her own marriage broke up in 1991. 
She began wearing makeup and shorter 
skirts. Mr. Walker said, and co-workers 
noticed that she and her boss were 
spending an increasing amount of time 
together, both alone in his office and on 
business trips. 


Away From Politics 

• A Wisconsin company says it has cloned a Holstein 

calf, bom six months ago. ABS Global Inc. of DeForest 
said it had developed * ‘technology for cloning dairy cattle 
and beef cattle." (Reuters) 

• A U.S. Border Patrol agent was arrested in San Diego 

county, California, with more than 500 pounds of 
marijuana in his patrol vehicle. (LAT i 

• Residents of 47 states are being warned not to eat 

certain types of freshwater fish as states find pollution in 
more lakes and rivers. There are nearly 2,200 such 
advisories in effect nationwide, the Environmental Pro- 
tection Agency said, an all-time high. (AP) 

• The caretaker whose call led police to the houseboat 

where the suspected multiple killer Andrew Cun an an was 
hiding will get an additional $45,000 in reward money. 
The Miami Herald has reported. (AP i 

• The American Bar Association has failed to take a 

position on doctor-assisted suicide, endorsing instead a 
resolution that suggests the issue is best decided by 
individual state legislatures. (H7*J 

• A hearing in the Oklahoma City bombing case 

against Terry Nichols was delayed until Aug. 13 because 
the main prosecutor was unable to attend because of the 
suicide of a colleague. f AP) 

• The space shuttle Discovery blasted into orbit with six 

astronauts aboard on a mission to study Earth's ozone 
layer and test a robotic arm designed for a future space 
station. f AP) 


Teen Drug Use Declines 
But More Trying Heroin 


Los Angeles Times Sen ice 

WASHINGTON — While 
overall illicit drug use by U.S. 
adolescents declined last year 
for the first time since 1992. 
the bright picture was marred 
by several factors, including 
more first-time heroin use 
among teens and increased 
usage of hallucinogens. 

The secretary for Health 
and Human Services, Donna 
Shalala. whose Department 
reached the conclusion in its 
National Household Drug 
Survey, said drug use by all 
Americans was "still unac- 
ceptably high." 

The percentage of teens re- 
porting use of hallucinogens 
has nearly doubled in the past 
two years, according to the 
survey. In 1996. 2 percent of 
teens reported using the drugs, 
up from 1.1 percent in 1994 
and 1.7 percent in 1995. 

Among all Americans, 
141.000 tried heroin for the 
first time in 1995. First-time 
heroin use has been increas- 
ing substantially, rising from 


40,000 new users in 1992. 
Overall use of marijuana, 
heroin, tobacco and alcohol 
by Americans was largely un- 
changed, the report found 



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DEATH NOTICE 


DYSON 

On 3 August 1997. in a tragic accident m 
Enghni Peter Dym aged 39. zn Ausntan 
working is Managing Director of the Tctiry 
Group s cnapaoj in Pofewd Mr. Draan also 
waked for Toler in Ausmfia and in die Ilk 
His warmth, good humour, and zest fa life 
will be long remembered and he will be 
gratlr missed bj* hb many friends and 
rcOeagusaiTeiky. 

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North Gtcenfoni Middlesex 


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THE WOm.n‘SD*IIN NEWSPAPER 






PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1997 




.. 

Mir CterfaSApmce Frjncc-Prrrc 

HONG KONG HOMELESS — Protesters on Thursday urging Tung Chee-hwa, the region's chief executive, 
to step up construction of new housing and help those who live in squatter encampments move out. 


Undiplomatic Slip Down Under 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

AW York Times Service 

BROOME, Australia — The public 
disclosure of an Aust ralian document is 
causing new strains in Australia's dif- 
ficult relations with its Pacific neigh- 
bors and has embarrassed the govern- 
ment. 

The document, which was written for 
a member of the Australian cabinet and 
includes blunt assessments of other 
countries* leaders, was left at a regis- 
tration desk in the Hilton Hotel in Cairns 
on July 11, during a meeting of the 
South Pacific Forum, a partnership of 
Australia and New Zealand and 14 
smaller South Pacific nations. 

Ir was spotted by a Reuters corre- 
spondent, Terry Friel. 

The document, prepared for Aus- 
tralia’s federal treasurer, Peter Costello, 
who led his country's delegation, crit- 
icized economic management of several 
countries in the region, suggesting that 
corruption is not only rampant but re- 
tarding economic growth. 

It also made candid assessments of 


leaders and their foibles. Winston 
Peters, deputy prime minister and treas- 
urer of New Zealand, is depicted as "a 
loose cannon’ 1 and an “opportunist. *' 
Also, he “can be a prickly nationalist 
with an eye ro popular causes and would 
nor be above exploiting New Zealand 
sensitivities toward Australia if it served 
his purpose.” 

Further, he “enjoys late hours in 
nightclubs.” 

A passage about Sir Geoffrey Henry, 
prime minister of the Cook Islands, 
says, “He has been drinking heavily as 
the pressure of the economic crisis has 
mounted." 

The Australian Financial Review has 
put the text on the Internet at 
www.afr.com.au. 

Mr. Peters, the New Zealander, dis- 
missed the Australian assessment as the 
work of “an ignoranr bureaucrat. 1 ' 

Sir Geoffrey said he was “surprised 
and bewildered 1 ’ by the reports that he 
was drinking heavily. 

Reaction from other leaders has been 
angrier. Acting President Ruben Za- 
ckhiras of the Marshall Islands, which 


Seoul Blames North for Delay in Talks 


CinfvMb} Our Stiff Fnrni Disporrhrs 

SEOUL — South Korea 
blamed Pyongyang on Thurs- 
day for die lack of progress in 
the four-nation talks, citing 
North Korea's demands that 
U.S. troops be withdrawn 
from South Korea and that a 
bilateral peace deal be signed 
with Washington. 


Officials in Seoul said the 
North's demands were likely 
to force the United States, 
China and the two Koreas to 
have another round of “talks 
about talks” after their cur- 
rent negotiating session in 
New York. 

“The fact the four nations 
met means that we have 


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THL WORLD'S [MID NEWSPVPhH 


opened a new process,” said 
Lee Kyu Hyung, a Foreign 
Ministry spokesman, adding 
he was not discouraged by the 
North's move. 

North Korea added another 
demand Thursday, saying 
that unless South Korea and 
the United States canceled 
scheduled war games, the 
talks would founder. 

“If they truly want to es- 
tablish a new' peace mech- 
anism on the Korean Penin- 
sula they must, above all, stop 
military exercises aimed at 
their dialogue partner in the 
talks,'’ said Choe Han Chun, 
a counselor at the North 
Korean Embassy in Beijing. 

He said that if the “pro- 
vocative war exercises" 
against North Korea went 
ahead, the United States and 
South Korea would “be re- 
sponsible for all the con- 
sequences.’’ 

South Korea and the 
United States announced 
plans Monday for [ I days of 
joint military exercises in 
South Korea. The games are 


scheduled to begin Aug. 18. 

The four countries have ten- 
tatively agreed to ay to set an 
agenda for full peace talks by 
Friday, but Mr. Lee said Seoul 
and Washington would not ac- 
cept Pyongyang's demands 
fora withdrawal of U.S. troops 
and a bilateral deal. 

“I would not rule out a 
breakthrough, but it is quite 
unlikely,” Mr. Lee said when 
asked if the four nations could 
set an agenda this week. 

The four parties- selected 
Kuala Lumpur, Singapore. 
New York and Geneva as the 
fourpossible cities for holding 
the formal talks aimed at a 
Korean peace treaty. A South 
Korean official said the four 
cities were selected because 
Beijing seemed to favor 
Pyongyang’s suggestion that 
the talks be held in neutral 
countries. 

Regarding the timing of the 
peace** talks. South Korea had 
proposed that the peace talks 
take place within four weeks, 
while the North suggested six 
weeks. i Reuters. AFP ) 


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Cambodia King Backs Son s Ouster 

Royal Reversal Deals BUm to Exiled Supporters of Prince 


w 

<j< 


heads the economic forum, noted 
“shock and dismay among forum coun- 
tries" and spoke of “damage to Aus- 
tralia’s standing in the forum commu- 
nity.” 

The Fiji prime minister, Sitiveni 
Rabuka, called the briefing document a 
“show of disrespect.” 

Most governments make confidential 
evaluations of their main interlocutors, 
but these are usually kept secret. 

Ia Australia, the evaluation task has 
been assigned to a small group of in- 
telligence analysts in the Office of Na- 
tional Assessments, which reports di- 
rectly to the prime minister and the 
cabinet 

Their documents, including the one 
left on the Hilton desk, are marked “For 
Australian Eyes Only,” the top security 
classification. 

Mr. Costello, in a television inter- 
view, acknowledged holes in the se- 
curity arrangements at the Cairns con- 
ference. 

His department has opened an in- 
vestigation. he said, and would consider 
appropriate action. 


Cymptled ty Our Sufi Front Diijwhn 

PHNOM PENH — King Norodom 
Sihanouk effectively endorsed the re- 
placement of his son as first prime min- 
ister of Cambodia, reversing his earlier 
opposition to the final step in Second 
Prime Minister Hun Sen's bloody 
takeover of the government. 

Foreign Minister Ung Huot. elected 
the new first prime minister Wednesday 
by the remnants of the National As- 
sembly, was formally installed Thurs- 
day following the king's agreement to 
allow the acting head of stare, Chea Sim, 
to issue a coveted decree of appoint- 
ment. 

“I have received Your Excellency’s 
letter of Aug. 6 .1997,” King Sihanouk 
wrote to Chea Sim from Beijing, where 
he is undergoing medical treatment. “I 
wish to express my deepest thanks and 
wish to inform you about the request for 
a decree to appoint a new first prime 
minister. If Your Excellency thinks that 
it should be done you can sign the de- 
cree.” 

The elevation of Mr. Ung Huot, who 
has been expelled from Prince Ranar- 
iddh's party for usurping the prince's 
role, is widely viewed as an attempt by 
Mr. Hun Sen to maintain an illusion of 
power sharing. 

The U.S. State Department said that 
“in die current atmosphere of intim- 
idation in Cambodia, we do not believe 
yesterday’s vote was democratic.” ■ 


The king's action dealt a blow to 
supporters of Prince Ranariddh, who 
fled into exile after Mr. Hun Sen un- 
sealed him in a widely condemned coup 
that began July 5. Prince Ranariddh's 
partisans have called the legislative ac- 
tion illegal, noting that key royalist law- 
makers had fled Mr. Hun Sen’s takeover 
in fear of their lives. 

King Sihanouk, who previously had 
said he still recognized his son as the 
elected co-prime minister, has been 
powerless to cope with the coup. 

He said last month that while he was 
fond of Mr. Ung Huot. he could not 
recognize him as first prime minister, 
given foot he would have to be elected 
by a parliament with doubtful legit- 
imacy and freedom, and would not sign 
any decrees legi timiz ing his appoint- 
ment. 

King Sihanouk has in the past al- 
lowed acting heads of state (o sign con- 
troversial decrees, making a point of not 
obstructing the workings of govern- 
ment. 

Mr. Ung Huot said his appointment 
was democratic, as more than two thirds 
of the House elected him. 

He said he, Mr. Hun Sen and Chea 
Sim — who is also the top official of Mr. 
Hun Sen's formerly Communist Cam- 
bodian People’s Party — would travel to 
Beijing on Monday for an audience with 
King Sihanouk on Tuesday. 

“We are going to pay our respects to 


BRIEFLY 


the king with the provision that the first 
prime minister should be presented to 
His Majesty the King," Mr. Ung Huot 
said. “The fact that His Majesty is ac- 
cepting our delegation means that he is 

blessing us." . i . * 

In Tokyo the second vice-president of 
the Cambodian parliament said he did 
not approve of its election of Mr. Ung 
Huot to replace the prince. 

“A session of the National Assembly 
under the threat of weapons to me is not 
valid," Son Soubert said in a lecture in 
Tokyo. "1 do not agree with die ap- 
pointment of the new prime minister. 

Army units loyal to iVlr. Hun Sen were 
preparing an offensive Thursday against 
opposition troops controlling a zone m 
the northwest The soldiers were being 
deployed by helicopter to the town of 
Samrong, where they will prepare for a 
push to O’Smach near the Thai border, 
said Colonel Uy Sopheap. who com- 
mands government forces in Siem Reap, 
225 kilometers 1 140 miles) northwest of 
Phnom Penh. 

Whether forces loyal to Prince Ranar- 
iddh can keep fighting Mr. Hun Sen will 
depend upon whether they can capture 
ana hold onto territory in die northwest. 
The fighting is expected to escalate as 
troth sides attempt to grab as much ter- 
ritory as possible before monsoons in- 
tensify and end military operations for a 
few months. 

( AP . AFP, Reuters) 


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Congress Party Pokes at Reform 

CALCUTTA — Senior leaders of India's Congress (I) 
Party, the power behind the country's governing minority 
coalition, attacked the government's economic policies 
Thursday. 

“It's time to go back to the old Neruvian model of the 
mixed economy! albeit with some minor changes,” said 
Priya Ran j an Das Munshi, a former national commerce 
minister and a leading member of a Congress committee 
examining economic policies. 

“In the last general elections the Congress were routed,” 
he said on arrival hens for a three-day national Congress 
Party convention. “One of the reasons was this policy of 
economic liberalization. It's high time we think of other ■ 
policies.” 

India's economic reforms were begun in 1991 by die 
previous Congress government, which was toppled last 
year. The coalition's current finance minister has pledged 
to continue those reforms. (AFP) 

18th Landslide Victim Is Found 

THREDBO, Australia — Rescuers recovered Thursday 
the body of the last known victim from a landslide that 
killed 18 people a week ago. 

The 18th body was unearthed from the rubble of two ski 
lodges. The landslide killed 1 1 men and seven women. 
There was only one survivor. 

The ski resort plans to turn the massive landslide scar into 
a park with a memorial to the 18 dead, according to the 
managing director of Thredbo Alpine Village. David Os- 
bom. (Reuters) 

China Scholar Urges Democracy 

BEIJING — A Chinese academic has called for West- 
ern-style democratic changes before a crucial Communist 
Party congress. 

Shang Dewen, a Beijing University economics pro- 
fessor, said Thursday he had sent a copy of his blueprint for 
democracy to the Communist Party leader. Jiang Zemin, 
urging the introduction of direct elections for state pres- 
ident and for provincial governors. 

"Politically, we have adopted the Stalin model," Mr. 
Shang said. “Economically, we have adopted the U.S. 
model. The two contradict each other.” ( Reuters ) 

Korean Party Shifts Top Posts 

SEOUL — The governing New Korea Party announced 



B'V- 


EmmansH Pomnd/Apnor France -Prenc 

KABUL SIEGE — An Afghan boy shouldering an 
assault rifle Thursday. Opposition forces have 
mustered around the Taleban-heid Afghan capital. 

Pakistan Police Guard Mosques 

ISLAMABAD — Police tightened security in Lahore on 
Thursday after 13 people were killed in two attacks on 
mosques in the central Punjab Province, further height- 
ening ethnic tension that has already claimed about 150 
lives this year. 

The police stepped up street patrols and deployed two 
commandos at each of the 600 mosques in Lahore, capital 
of Punjab, expanding security cover previously provided to • 
about 200 mosques. (AFP) 


a reshuffle of top posts Thursday, following the choice last rn j n I 

month of Lee Hoi Chang as its candidate for the Dec. IS rOT tflG MxGCOTu 


presidential election. 

A party spokesman, Lee Yoou Sung, who lost his post in 
the realignment, said President Kim Young Sam had agreed 
to the changes after they were suggested by Mr. Lee m the 
interest of party “solidarity and reconciliation.” 

Mr. Kim named Kang Sae Jam as secretary-general, 
replacing Park Kwan Yong. Lee Hae Koo becomes chief 
policymaker and Kang Jae Sup parliamentary floor lead- 
er. f AFP) 


Hong Kong authorities deported 102 Vietnamese mi- 
grants Thursday, the. first to be sent back since the July 1 
handover of the territory’ to China. (AFP) 

A total of 1,77 3 people died in separatist violence in the 
northern Indian state of Kashmir during the 10 months to 
June, Parliament was told. Of that total. 873 were civilians, 
138 Indian soldiers and 762 Muslim rebels (AFP) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1997 


' ,,U * 


EUROPE 


PAGE 5 


Can U.S. Fix the Dayton Accord? 

brooke Hopes to Bolster Bosnia’s Three-Man Presidency 

6 v Fnm Da/Mrfr, 

SARAJEVO. Bosoia-Herzeeovinfl resL resislin g »- this week that Mr. Holbrooke would ask 

. Pursuing his Dush tn Kw»*u SI? responded with a harassment Slobodan Milosevic, president of the 


C ^*MbyOirSu^Fi^Daputrhr, 

SARAJEVO. Bosnia He™*./ mo 4 n S kiIIed resisting ar- 
— Pursuing his push to h JJ? e80v |P a rcst Serb& res P° nded with a harassment 
obstacles to p^ P e n bJ^b-1^ *« damaged pro™™"- 

Holbrooke. rCTiV Bosnja ’ Richard lon 8 in g to international or**arizations 

atte n &^ y S toX^r b l 1 S “ d »°- ded ™° 

the three-man presidracv^ „ the wartime lead- 

Mr. Holbrooke ciS' n ,,i, - - , ■ Radovan Karadzic, stUI controls the 
stitntions KT 1 in - The Serbian *«\t of Bos- 

Dayton peace acSTij £5 ?£ f 1 ® has Iwl « been indicted bv the 

meeting with ^ ^ j" te ™H«onaI Cnminal Tribunal for 


xvayron peace accord and said before 
meeting w«h the three — Alija Izetbe- 

CW’ a Kresimir Zubak, a 

M ‘7 nd, ° Krajisnik, a Bos- 
thf 11 he would encourage 

them “to work better.” 

*. first time in three weeks 

A S lhe Se i b member of the presidency 
V 5®? .attended such a gathering. The 
meeting was held in Lukavica, a Sa- 
^[f, vo i suburb in Bosnian Serb-con- 
trolled territory. 

. M 1 - Holbrooke met earlier Thursday 






l v ir|- 

ilir 




r — * I lUUHOi 1U1 

me iormer Yugoslavia in The Ha°ue, 
for genocide and crimes against hu- 
manity. His continued freedom is seen 
as a major obstacle to reconciliation in 
Bosnia. 

Mr. Karadzic has been involved in a 
senes of political attacks on Biljana 
Plavsic, his rival, the Bosnian Serb pres- 
ident Poor weather prevented Mr. Hol- 
brooke from flying to Banja Luka on 
Thursday to meet Mrs. Plavsic, accord- 


in thp'n^K ■ ^ . Thursda y mg to Milka Tosic. the Bosnian pres- 
°f TuzJawith two ■ Idem's spokeswoman. The talks were 
commanders whose roles would be cen- rescheduled for Friday 

iml fO anti « M m ■ > * " 


to any concerted effort by the 
NATO-led peace force to arrest indicted 
war crimes suspects and turn them over 
to the UN war crimes tribunal in The 
Hague. 

Details of the talks with General John 

ShalikashviH, chairman of the U.S 
Joint Chiefs of Staff, and General Wes- 
ley Clark, NATO’s supreme militar y 
commander, were not released. 

After meeting with Mr. Holbrooke on 
Wednesday, Haris Silajdzic, co-chair- 
man of the Bosnian government, told 
Bosnian state television that die U.S. 
envoy's priority was to apply “still un- 
seen pressure on the Serbs to hand 
over indicted war crimes suspects. 

British peacekeepers arrested one 
Bosnian Serb war crimes suspect last 


Mrs. Plavsic, who on July 3 dissolved 
the Parliament dominated by Mr. 
Karadzic's supporters , has set elections 
for OclIO to 12, according to media 
reports Thursday. 

She had originally scheduled the 
elections for Sept. 1, but they were 
postponed to allow more time to pre- 
pare. 

This week’s visit was the first since 
Mr. Holbrooke came out of retirement 
from the U.S. State Department last year 


this week that Mr. Holbrooke would ask 
Slobodan Milosevic, president of the 
former Yugoslavia, to hand over Mr. 
Karadzic to The Hague tribunal, a claim 
that could not be confirmed. 

Mr. Milosevic is held by many to 
have instigated the wars in the former 
Yugoslavia and is widely believed to 
retain considerable control over many 
influential figures in Republika 
Srpska. 

Mr. Holbrooke, who brokered Bos- 
nia’s Dayton peace accords, which 
ended the former Yugoslav republic’s 
conflict in 1995, was in Croatia on. 
Wednesday for talks with Mr. Izeibe- 
govic and Franjo Tudjman, respectively 
the Bosnian Muslim and Croatian lead- 
ers. 

Officials reported that some progress 
had been made on issues that had in 
recent months stalled the peace process 
aimed at reconciling Bosnia's Muslim, 
Croatian and Serbian communities. 

In a statement released after the meet- 
ing, Mr. Holbrooke said that the two 
leaders had agreed to resolve differ- 
ences over drawing up a list of dip- 
lomats to represent Bosnia abroad. 

Disagreement between Bosnia’s 
Croats and Muslims and their wartime 
rivals, the Serbs, have stymied diplo- 
matic appointments, one of several key 
issues identified as essential for stitch- 
ing postwar Bosnia back together. 

Questioned on recent criticisms by 


to force Mr. Karadzic from public of- .U.S. officials of the performance of 
nee, a feat he managed using similar Carlos Westendoip, Bosnia's senior in- 
shuttle diplomacy between leaders in temational mediator. Mr. Holbrooke 
Serbia, Bosnia and Croatia. He was stressed that “his success is essential for 
formerly the U.S. assistant secretary of American policy interests, and Amer- 
state - ican support is essential for his suc- 

A Belgrade daily newspaper reported cess. ’ ' (AP, AFP ) 



h^hira I fa-stir •’ VpiKr Frann^-lVi 

Richard Holbrooke starting the second leg of his Balkan peace tour. 


Tuscany Guards Medieval Landscape Against Hucksters 


By Celestine Bohlen 

Nn’ York Tunes Service 

FLORENCE — The ocher hills, 
patchwoik vineyards and olive groves 
of Tuscany, lorded over by medieval 
towns and elegant villas shielded by 
clumps of pine, are probably among the 
most familiar of the world's backdrops, 
used to felicitous effect in Renaissance 
paintings. 19th-centuiy novels and in- 
numerable Italian movies. 

But as background in advertisements 
for crackers, Japanese cars, pantyhose, 
toilet paper and even a bidet artistically 
placed here in Piazza della Signoria? 

That, in the view of Tuscany's re- 
gional officials, is taking familiarity too 
far. So now Tuscany is striking back, 
with a proposal to effectively copyright 
the region’s natural landscape. Local • 
officials, aware that such a notion could 
never have the force of law. hesitate to 
use words like copyright, license or 
trademark. But they are serious about 
trying to stop non-Tuscan brand names 
from flitting across Tuscan scenes. 

“We are simply hying not to let our 
landscape be trivialized by ugly ad- 
vertising/’ said V annin g Chiti, pres- 
ident of the Tuscan region. 

For centuries, Tuscans have been 
fiercely protective of a countryside that 


is a harmonious blend of manmade and 
natural beauty. 

“We feel that our landscape and cul- 
tural heritage are the oil of Tuscany," 
Mr. Chiti said. "People have worked 
nature for centuries, so it is up to us not 
to destroy it." 

But there are always threats, like a 
3 80,000- wait power line, strung across 
giant orange and white pylons feet 70 
meters (220 feet) high, that recently 
sprang across the hills to the southeast 
of Florence like a huge ski lift. 

Aghast at the prospect of losing views 
that had remained virtually untouched 
since the Renaissance, neighbors moun- 
ted a vigorous campaign, joined by his- 
torical societies and consumer groups. 

The protesters insisted that they had 
nothing against progress or the benefits 
of electricity. But in a country where 
eagle-eyed state inspectors are ready to 
swoop down with fines and denunci- 
ations for the slightest alteration to his- 
toric and artistic monuments, it seemed 
ludicrous that the state should delib- 
erately bring ugliness to one of Italy’s 
most precious spots. 

"These are the hills of Florence/’ 
said Mario Bqjola, a 70-year-old retired 
business consultant who headed the 
area’s anti-pylon committee. “They are 
a legacy for all humanity." 


Italy's state-owned power company, 
ENEL, recently agreed to suspend fur- 
ther work, until November while it stud- 
ies burying the line. The company also 
promised to relocate three of the most 
offensive pylons (including one on the 
doorstep of a 15th-century villa) and to 
consider repainting the giant eyesores a 
more esthetically acceptable shade of 
green. 

At a time when ibe marketing of 
Tuscany, its image and its products, is 
enjoying a boom overseas — partic- 
ularly in New York, where a Tuscan 
emporium is to open in Rockefeller 
Center soon — the region is more sen- 
sitive than ever to the preservation and 
protection of its natural assets. 

At last count, the region in the heart of I 
Italy, which encompasses the cities of I 
Florence. Siena and Pisa, was drawing 
32 million tourists a year, and was cited 
in recent surveys as one of the world's 
most desirable places to live. 

The main target of a new regional 
law, now under review, is the protection 
of Tuscany's agricultural products — its 
olive oils, its cheeses and its wines, 
which include the Chianti region. To 
protect Tuscan producers, the region is 
proposing its own voluntary “Made in 
Tuscany ’’ trademark that would guar- 
antee the quality it wants to maintain. 


But the other aim is to weed out those 
products — agricultural and other — 
that try to associate and sell themselves 
with images of Tuscany. 

"There are so many ads that give the 
impression that the products they are 
promoting are Tuscan when they are 
not." Mr. Chiti said. "That makes it 
false advertising." 

Laying claim to a landscape, however 
characteristic, is a virtual legal im- 
possibility, as Tuscan legislators are 
well aware. But they want to open up the 
idea for discussion, and maybe even- 
tually for remuneration. 

"We would like to ensure that if 
Tuscan landscape is used, that it be 


credited,” Mr. Chiti said. “You would 
have to specify that you are looking at a 
Tuscan countryside, because we feel 
this would have positive implications 
for the region. For example, a con- 
tribution could be given that could be 
put in a fund for the protection of the 
landscape and monuments." 

Predictably, the regioh’sproposal has 
been met with outrage and scorn from 
advertisers and photographers. 

“If ad agencies choose to make their 
advertisements in Tuscany, they do it 
because it is a very beautiful region that 
no one has succeeded in ruining," 
Oiiviero Toscani, the celebrated image- 
maker for Benetton. 


Evacuees 
Return to 
Most Oder 
Flood Areas 


CmftJrd frv Our Stuff Firm bojnrhn 

FRANKFURT AN DER ODER, 
Germany — Evacuees from all but three 
towns in the southern region of Ger- 
many's flooded Oder River were al- 
lowed to return to their homes Thurs- 
day, as water levels continued to drop. 

But further downstream in the Oder- 
bruch plain, the situation remained se- 
rious enough to keep residents camped 
in temporary quarters. 

Throughout the flooded region, water* 
levels were retreating at a rate of one 
centimeter (half an inch) per hour. 

Still, 2,000 soldiers and 40 heli- 
copters remained on alert for possible 
breaks along the 160-kilometer (100- 
mile) stretch of the sodden dike. 

The state of alarm in the lower river 
region remained at the highest level and 
was not expected to change until Sun- 
day or Monday at the earliest 

But on Thursday, officials lifted the 
severe flood alarm along a southern 
stretch of the Oder River in the region 
between Frankfurt an der Oder and 
Ratzdorf. a village about 1 15 kilometers 
upriver where the Oder and Neisse 
rivers intersect 

While the easing of the alarm level 
meant that the danger of imminent ca- 
tastrophe had passed, residents were 
advised to remain on alert 

Ratzdorf, one of the first towns to 
flood, was free of sandbags. Manfred 
Kofferschlaeger, a state Interior Min- 
istry spokesman, said the 20,000 sand- 
bags that had been used there were 
moved north to the still-threatened 
Oderbruch region. 

As the flood waters continue to go 
down slowly but steadily, attention was 
being turned to the efforts it will take to 
make the area livable again. Brand- 
enburg state announced a program that 
will put up to 3,000 of the region’s 
unemployed to work cleaning up the 
mess. 

In the next couple of days, many of 
the 10,900 soldiers brought In for the 
emergency will leave the flooded re- 
gion, but others will remain to help 
remove mud and debris. 

The German government has set 
aside 500 million Deutsche marks ($270 
million) to pay for the flood damage. 
Some is going directly to the victims, 
some to regional authorities and some in 
the form of aid to help rebuild the region 
economically. (AP. AFP ) 



Yeltsin Plans ‘Uneasy’ Chechen Talks 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — President Boris 
Yeltsin will meet Aslan Maskhadov, the 
Chechen leader, in Moscow within a 
week to try to resolve political differ- 
ences with the breakaway republic, a 
Russian official reported Thursday. 

Ivan Rybkin, secretajy of Russia’s 
Security Council, traveled to Grozny, 
the capital of Chechnya, to talk with the 
first deputy .prime minister, Movladi 
Udugov, about the top-level meeting, 
Russian news services said. 

Chechnya, which fought a two-year 
war against a Russian milnaiy offen- 
sive, regards itself now as an independ- 
ent state. The Kremlin has insisted it 
will not grant Chechnya formal inde- 


pendence, but a compromise might 
provide it with broad autonomy. 

"This is going to be an uneasy talk,” 
Mr. Yeltsin's press secretary, Sergei 
Yastrzhembsky, said of the planned 
meeting. Many of the agreements 
signed by the two sides to end the fight- 
ing “are* not working,” he added. 

The press spokesman said Mr. 
Yeltsin intended to discuss a possible 
power-sharing agreement between 
Moscow and the Chechen governments. 
But Chechnya does not favor an accord 
like those Moscow has signed with oth- 
er Russian regions. 

Mr. Maskhadov announced that 
Chechnya was taking new steps away 
from Russian control, switching, for ex- 


ample, to its own language, passports 
ana vehicle license plates. 

He said Chechnya would open an 
embassy in Moscow. 

Mr. Rybkin, in turn, dismissed Mr. 
Maskhadov’s ideas, saying the sides 
could proceed only on the basis of a 
peace treaty signed this year. Thai left 
Chechnya's political status undecided. 

Mr. Rybkin promised that Moscow 
would invest 770 billion rubles ($133 
million) to restore Chechnya’s war-dev- 
astated economy, the news agency In- 
terfax said. Chechnya is insisting on 
receiving up to twice that amount. 

Mr. Rybkin also plans to discuss a 
pipeline to deliver oil from Azerbaijan 
to the Black Sea. 


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German Police Seize Neo-Nazi 

HALLE. Germany — A neo-Nazi convicted for a 1992 
nine^bii^nSe Halle train station was attested again 
after police officers found an arsenal of bombs and weapons 

^ose name was not relied, was 
arrested after a raid on his apartment Wednesday, said 

a W. (2.2 

1 j PS? (innnnwder 50 kilograms of military flares, 

" E^eraJ time-delayedftises. apisiol and ammunition as «eU 

“fiK l^raS.^u.ad damage ba.no juries 

when it went off. 

Ex- Vichy Aide Must Yield Papers 

BORDEAUX- A 

rsiSsS* 

“V' "JffiESKS !S 5 ?B 

die country and must mfo must mm in 

wishes to leave Pans, where teliv®- ™ 

Pericles’s Resting Place Found. 

ATHENS - ^ u ^, a /SoS°ha°ve dtravered a 
and meticulous p^cle/and ihe golden age of 

cemetery dating back to re 

Athens. I — - — - 


“For Athens and its history, it is one of the most 
important finds so far, at least in the post- World War D 
period," said Yannis Tsedakis, director of antiquities at the 
Culture Ministry. He said archeologists had discovered 
parts of the Demosion Sima, a cemetery dating from the 5th ■ 
century B.C. and thought to be the possible resting place of 
such statesmen as Pericles, Solon and Lycourgos. (API 

Paisley Insists on Separate Talks 

LONDON — A Northern Ireland unionist leader on 
Thursday demanded separate peace talks for all Protestants, 
saying he would not sit down at a negotiating table with the 
IRA’s political wing, Sinn Fein. ■ 

Asserting that the peace process was “dead in the wa- 
ter,” Ian Paisley, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party, 
put forward an alternative structure for talks at a meeting in 
London with the British Northern Ireland secretaiy, Mar- 
jorie (Mo) Mowlam. Afterward, he said his plan * ’would not 
force any member to sit down with IRA people." 

Mr Paisley said the government would be “digging its 
own grave” if it failed to change the all-party structure of 
the talks, due to start on Sept. 15. (AFP) 

For the Record 

A Spaniard suspected of being the intelligence chier of 
the Basque guerrilla group ETA, Igor Urratarazu Ganjo, 
bar been detained after a car chase in Albi m southern 
France, the Paris police said. (Reuters) 

Italy's largest trade union, CGIL. reported an anomaly 
in the country’s pension accounts, saying that payments 
were being made to 1.55 million men over the age ; of 75, 
while the mosi recent census showed there were only 1.39 
million Italian men in this age group. ( Rearers ) 






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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TREBUNE, FRI DAY, AUGUST 8, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


Space ‘Repairmen 5 
Make Mir House Call 

And New Woes Greet Cosmonauts 




•..'■..•V 'r. • . . 

tier'. ***-.• '*i-~ v ’ ‘ 


■ 

■' 


The Assiviated Press 

MOSCOW — A replacement crew 
arrived at die Mir space station Thursday 
and docked, bringing the promise of 
relief to beleaguered cosmonauts and 
repairs to their battered craft- 

But joy over the successful docking 
was tempered by more bad news about 
Mir: Russia's Mission Control said a 
faulty oxygen generator cannot be fixed 
until a new part arrives this fall. 

Just after 1900 GMT. a Soyuz TM-26 


eventual success were good, said a Mis- 
sion Control spokesman, Valeri 
Lyndin. 

If more such efforts fail, the crew can 
still continue using oxygen “candles,” 
or ■'•mini sters — cylindrical containers 
that convert solid fuel into oxygen when 
ignited. They can generate enough air to 
take die crew into mid- or late October. 

But Mr. Lyndin said the needed re- 
placement part — a new pipe connecting 
the oxygen generator with the air intake 


spacecraft carrying the cosmonauts — should take care of the problem. It 


Anatoli Solovyov and Pavel Vinogradov 
locked onto one of Mir's docking bays, 
completing a two-day journey 1 from the 
Baikonur Cosmodrome in Central 
Asia. 

At Mission Control near Moscow, 
flight controllers and top space officials 
burst into applause after one of the con- 
trollers confirmed the docking with the 
announcement: "Contact registered.” 

Although the cosmonauts have 


will be sent up with the U.S. space 
shuttle Atlantis, scheduled to blast off in 
late September. 

Kathleen Maliga, a spokeswoman for 
NASA at the Russian space center, said, 
however, that the Russians hadn't yet 
asked the U.S. space agency to fly the 
needed part up on the shuttle. 

Russian officials bad said they ex- 
pected the generator to be fixed in the 
next few days. But the crew — the 


stressed that they intend to continue the cosmonauts Vasili TsibLiyev and Alex- 
station's scientific research, their most ander Lazutkin and the U.S. astronaut 


important role will be as repairmen en- 
trusted with bringing the limping station 
back to full power. 

The delay in the oxygen generation 
repair added another chore to their lisL 

Russian officials stressed that the new 
complication did not leave the crew in a 
dangerous situation, since there is 
enough air to last at least another two and 
a half months. 

But it was another aggravation on a 


ander Lazutkin and the U.S. astronaut 
Michael Foaie — discovered flaws in the 
pipe during an inspection Thursday. 

The piping had been in place since the 
Mir's inception 11 years ago and had 
outlived its anticipated service time, but 
Mr. Lyndin said its breakdown was not 
anticipated and a replacement part was 
not at hand. 

The malfunction only adds to a grow- 
ing list of woes experienced by the cur- 
rent crew, which has endured a string of 



Cn* Buamde/AgaKC Fnntc-ftc« 

RACK IN BUSINESS — A triumphant Hugo Banzer and his wife, Yolanda, waving in 
La Paz after he was sworn in as president, 19 years after he was deposed as dictator. 


day that should have brought nothing but breakdowns and the worst accident in 
good news to Mir's weary Russian- Mir's history, when a cargo ship 
American crew and their Earth-bound rammed into the hull on June 25. 
controllers. A preliminary step toward vital re- 

After learning about the delay in re- pairs comes Aug. 15, when the current 
starting the generator, the current crew crew takes a Soyuz capsule around die 
tried to restart a second generator, also station to inspect damage done to the 
shut down due to the Mir's recent power hull of the Spektr module when the cargo 


outages. It did not work, but chances of ship rammed it 


june 25 ^ ship CRASH: Koreans Want Bodies as Experts Seek Clues 


Continued from Page 1 

Korean reporters and family members lashed out at 
the safety board, which has control over the crash 
site. Others dropped to the ground and wept in front 
of the wreckage when they were held back from 
going any closer to the site. 

In South Korea, enormous importance is at- 


T7 , T TT?/"Y_ n , rj. # /-> u A • • In South Korea, enormous importance is at- finding the body,” said Go Jong U, a Korean who 

JPj U HU* nates LHleTnina COUtU Arise in yy tached to respect for the dead and the honoring of lost his brother on Flight 801 . Instead, Mr. Go said, 


Continued from Page 1 

Commission president. Jacques Delors, 
suggested that a small increase in German 
interest rates could help to strengthen 
European currencies against the dollar 
ahead of European monetary union. 

While admitting that such a move 
would be bad for European business, Mr. 
Delors, writing in the French magazine Le 
Nouvel Observateur. noted that * 'it would 
on the other hand be positive to not have 
an excessive weakening of European cur- 
rencies on the eve of the final decisions 
about the launching of the euro.” 

A more clinical, perhaps wishful, as- 
sessment was offered Thursday by 
Prime Minister Romano Prodi of Italy, 
who was quoted in the Italian press as 
saying he was convinced that the 
Bundesbank would not raise German 
interest rates to defend the mark. 

Mr. Prodi said a German interest rate 
increase was not ‘ 'economically and po- 


once the euro is launched in 1999. Mr. 
Mortimer-Lee suggested that the future 
European central bank may seek to gain 
credibility by raising rates. “Our main 
conclusion," the Paribas economist 
wrote, "is that euro rates are likely to be 
well above current German rates.” 

One thing remains clear, both amid 
the present market suspense over the 
Bundesbank's next move and poten- 
tially after the launch of the euro in 1999: 


remains. the safety board cared i 

Even thongh the plane involved was South recovering the plane's f 
Korean and most passengers were South Korean, Another angry man in 
the safety board is leading the investigation because “If this crash occurred 
the accident occuned on U.S. territory. would have been return 

U.S. officials say the condition of the remaining and Korean system is di 
bodies is so poor that identification could take Language barriers ha' 
weeks. They find themselves trying to explain their standings between Sout 
task without wanting to use graphic language to American investigators. 


the present market suspense over the offend or upset mourning family members. 
Bundesbank's next move and poten- Some of the victims were so badly burned and 
dally after the launch of the euro in 1999: dismembered that rescuers who have found body 
An interest rate increase at a time of parts are not sure if they are the remains of one 
fragile economic recovery and high un- person or those of many, 
employment might prove effective in "We are well aware of the emotion and sen- 
defending die currency in question, but sitivity,” Admiral Martin Janczak told the grieving 
its overall economic consequences South Koreans, adding, "We are doing all we can 
would be decidedly negative — for Ger- to preserve the remains.” 
many, for France, for Italy, and for most Mr. Black also told the South Korean families 
other European economies, and reporters that his investigators’ efforts to Find 

Some analysts don’t even think a rate the cause of the crash in no way delayed the 
increase will suffice. "My own feel- recovery effort. He said there were so many pho- 
ing," said Mr. Jessop of Nikko Secu- tographs of the site that there was no reason for 


defending die currency in question, but 
its overall economic consequences 
would be decidedly negative — for Ger- 
many, for France, for Italy, and for most 
other European economies. 

Some analysts don’t even think a rate 
increase will suffice. "My own feel- 
ing," said Mr. Jessop of Nikko Secu- 


To try to combat that, safety board officials are 
briefing family members through translators and 
explaining the difficulties. 

The board asked family members to write down 
descriptions of their relatives. 

As South Korean men and women sat in the 
lobby writing descriptions such as the location of 
birthmarks, the number of gold fillings, if any, as 
well as the height and weight of relatives on the 
plane, translators rewrote each page into English 
for the forensic experts. 


rities, "is that whether die Bundesbank investigators to stall body recovery, 
raises rates or not, the mark will continue "We are not keeping the bodi< 


When one young bilingual translator picked up a 
page with five names and descriptions on it, sne 
gasped. The person who filled out me paper had lost 
ive members. 


"If I really thought about what is on this page, I 
couldn't do this." said Mary Kim, 20, a Guam 
student trying to help people through this tragedy. 


increase was not "economically and po- raises rates or not, the mark will continue "We are not keeping the bodies from being "If I really thought about what is on tixisj 
iiticaily possible” at a time when Ger- to weaken. That is because of fears of a removed,” he declared. couldn't do this." said Mary Kim, 20, a 

many's unemployment level is above 1 1 soft single currency. ” But 1 2 South Korean family members leading a student trying to help people through this era 

percent ^ ^ 

The views of Mr. Delors and Mr. ~ ~ ~ ~ — - _ 

warning that a future European central MIDEAST: Palestinians and Israelis Welcome U.S. Push for Intense Talks 

bank might find itself forced to raise J 


interest rates in order to ensure cred- 
ibility for the euro in financial markets. 

The dollar weakened against the mark 
Thursday in New York, moving to 
1.8686 DM from 1.8820 DM, on the 
expectation that the Bundesbank is pre- 
paring to raise German rates to defend 
the mark and signal its own indepen- 
dence in the run-up to monetary union. 
The mark was also helped by rumors that 
the German central bank might be 


quietly intervening in currency markets murder.” 


Continued from Page 1 

heeding an Israeli ultimatum to mount a wide- 
scale security roundup. 

An official of Mr. Arafat's faction within the 
Palestinian Liberation Organization told report- 
ers in Gaza thar the group was beginning to 
recruit on all levels and was "on utmost 
struggle readiness." A spokesman for Mr. Net- 
anyahu accused Mr. Arafat once again of hav- 
ing incited the Palestinians "for violence and 


by selling dollars to prop up the mark. 

Looking ahead, if Europe's policy- 
makers indeed find themselves wres- 
tling with the idea of an interest rate 
increase to defend a weak euro in 1999 
they may have to face a situation in 
which their economy cannot easily stand 
such a move. Average European growth 
could be still in the range of 1.5 percent 
to 2.5 percent a year, the same band that 
characterized growth during much of the 
1990s. Exports may be doing well be- 
cause of the euro's weakness. But econ- 
omists say that unemployment in 1999, 
while below its record levels, is still 
likely to stand at about 10 percent. 

Against this backdrop, raising euro in- 
terest rates could pose the same quandary 
it does today for the Bundesbank. 

In the end there may be much rhetoric 
from political leaders, who ore likely to 
have an indirect but substantial influence 
on the new European central bank. So 
despite the risks of damaging economic 
growth, the new central bank might well 
decide to raise interest rates in this hy- 
pothetical scenario in August 1999. 

The most likely result would be that 
Europe's battered investors and busi- 
nessmen would slow down investment, 
while households would find the cost of 
money too high and would buy fewer 
cars and other consumer durables. Put 
simply, confidence could flag, and 
Europe's single currency area could be- 
gin to slide from modest growth toward 
recession in the year 2000. 

This is admittedly a pessimistic sce- 
nario, but unfortunately, in the view of 
several economists, one that is all too 
plausible. 

"it is quite possible." noted Julian 
Jessop. an economist at Nikko Securities 
in London, “that in the early days of the 
single currency, the European central 
bank could be forced to raise rates in 
order to defend a weak euro. The market 
is already starting to get worried about 
these risks and the Deutsche mark is 
weakening accordingly." 

Paul Mortimer-Lee, an economist at 
Paribas in London, released a study this 
week forecasting higher interest rates 


Still, the words of praise from both sides for 
the American decision to renew a moribund 
peace effort appeared to offer a measure of hope 
For the U.S. missions scheduled to begin on 
Saturday, when a delegation headed by Dennis 
Ross, the American special mediator, arrives 
here for the first time in six months. 

Mrs. Albright, who unlike most of her recent 
predecessors has kept the Middle East at arm's 
length, is expected to follow Mr. Ross by 
month's end in her first visit to the region since 
she became secretary of state. 

The new American plan amounts to an im- 
portant shift in policy because the United States 
has said it will urge die Israelis and Palestinians 
to negotiate more quickly on the enormous 
issues that must be addressed in a settlement. 

The idea of accelerating the quest for a final 
accord was first broached in April by Mr. Net- 
anyahu, and his office issued a statement Thurs- 


Bank town of Ramallah: "For the first time, we 
see there is an American intention to solve the 
crisis on a high level." 

In an interview published in the Israeli news- 
paper Yediot Aharonot. Mr. Arafat held out 
hope that the American mission might include a 
harder line against the Israelis, saying chat "the 
signals we’ve heard from Washington suggest 
that there are many who are sick and tired of the 
Netanyahu policies." 

The two attackers in last week's suicide 
bombing have still not been identified, but the 
Israelis say the operation could have been car- 
ried out only with help from Palestinian ter- 
ritory. 

An account by the pro-Islamic press agency 
A 1 Quds said that the men, members of the 
Hamas organization, were from a refugee camp 
in Lebanon. 

In the meantime. Israel is also facing mount- 
ing tensions in southern Lebanon, where its own 
forces and rival Hezbollah guerrillas have 
battled with increasing ferocity this week. 


full cooperation with the Israelis. 

Both Mrs. Albright and President Bill Clin- 
ton, in remarks at a press conference, made clear 
that no progress could be made without first 
assuring security in the region. 

“Until the parties trusfeach other and until 
the Israelis believe that the Palestinian Au- 
thority is making 100 percent effort, which is 
different from 1 00 percent results, but is making 
100 percent effort on security, it is impossible 
for peace to proceed,’ ’ Mr. Clinton said. 

Speaking of Palestinian militants who have 
set off bombs to derail peace. Mr. Clinton said: 
"It is imperative that Mr. Arafat understand that 
those people are not his friends either. Those 
people do not want a peace." 

Prime Minister Netanyahu was also the target 
of more veiled criticism. Mrs. Albright listed 
some of Mr. Arafat's complaints against the 
Israelis, including "senJemenr activity, con- 
struction at Har Homa and confiscation of 
land.” 

Israel's decision earlier this year to proceed 


A total of 13 people have died in a series of with a housing project for Jews at Har Homa, in 


attacks that included an Israeli commando raid 
that killed five Hezbollah Fighters Monday. 

■ Crucial Steps for a Settlement 

Steven Er longer of The New York Times re- 
ported from Washington: 

The issues facing Arabs and Israelis in a final 
settlement are the most complicated and bitter. 


day that praised Mrs. Allwight’s speech as *‘se- They go to the heart of whether the Palestinians 
nous and well thought out." will actually have a state, where its future 

The prime minister's office also said it had borders would be, and whether the two sides can 
"expressed satisfaction" at the emphasis given resolve competing claims to Jerusalem, 
by Mrs. Albright to what it called "the need for Under the steps that Mrs. Albright outlined 
the Palestinian Authority to fight terrorism.” Wednesday, Washington would first insist that 
Han an Asftrawi, a top official of the Pal- the Palestinian Authority and Mr. Arafat move 
estinian Authority, told reporters in the West sharply against terrorism. This would include 


largely Arab East Jerusalem, was a major factor 
in the deterioration of relations between Mr. 
Arafat and Mr. Netanyahu. 

So-called final status talks opened ceremo- 
nially in May 1996. jusr before Mr. Netanyahu 
was elected prime minister on a platform of 
tough security following a spate of suicide 
bombings. The talks have never reopened. 

"If the parties have a clear mutual and fa- 
vorable sense of the ultimate direction of ne- 
gotiation. it will be easier for them to overcome 
setbacks and avoid distractions along the way,” 
Mrs. Albright said. 

"This will require accelerating permanent 
status negotiations. Today this step is urgent 
and important." 


CALLS: 'Unilateral" Pressure 


Continued from Page 1 

carrier — say, the Pakistani 
phone company — for it to 
lower its rates to 19 cents a 
minute. If AT&T complains 
that Pakistan has refused to do 
so, the commission would or- 
der all U.S. carriers to pay the 
Pakistanis no more than 19 
cents. 

"What if Pakistan then 


company, who asked not to be 
named, criticized the move, 
saying, “The risk of unilateral 
action” was angering smaller 
countries and would kill off 
“any cbance of resol ving this 
on a multilateral basis." 

The International Tele- 
communications Union has 

been working for years to 
move its members toward 
lower settlement rates. A 


"What if Pakistan then tower - 

savs 'We’re not going to spokesman, who asked not to 
complete your calls?’ "Mr. be identrfjed. ejJWtta U.S. 
Pappas asked, "That’s a the- move a bit unilateral. 
oSS possibility — but I Mr. Pappas said that pro- 
think it's unScely/’ gross .under the_ mternaticmal 


A spokesman for the com- 
mission said that high charges 
by foreign carriers — in some 
cases twice or more the U.S. 
levels — * ‘are huge subsidies, 
and countries c^ n use them to 
enter the U.S. market on 
terms disadvantageous to 

U.S. carriers ” after the WTO 
market opening takes effect, 

U.S. phone carriers now run 
an aggregate yearly deficit 
with carriers in many coun- 
tries, mainly those with state- 
run monopoly telecommuni- 
cations companies, that charge 
higher settlement rates. 

That total deficit rose to 
$5.4 billion last year from 
$3.0 billion in 1990, reflect- 
ing not only high settlement 
rates but an increase in the 
volume of c alls and the pres- 
ence of a growing immigrant 
population in the United 


taxes that makes frequent through 


move a dii unilateral. 

Mr. Pappas said that pro- 
gress under the international 
group’s approach had been 
"pretty slow and pretty inad- 
equate.” Though rates have 
Mien, the U.S. aggregate def- 
icit has risen because of rising 
volume. 

The negotiating process is 
unlikely to be entirely smooth, 
and court challenges are pos- 
sible. said Robert Rosenberg, 
president of the Insight Re- 
search Corp., a telecommu- 
nications research firm. 

"Good luck to the FCC if 
they can do it by themselves, 
outside of the ITU,” he said. 

Bnt another FCC spokes- 
man said other countries 
would ultimately have little 
choice but to reach agreement 
with U.S. carriers. If they 
balked at lowering rates and 
actually cut off service to the 
United States, the U.S. car- 
riers could easily reroute calls 


THE''’ 




protest group against the slow U.S. recovery effort 
said they believed more could be done to release the 
bodies quickly. 

They also said they resented not being able to 
walk on the wreckage grounds and not having 
Koreans involved in toe inquiry. 

"In our tradition, first priority would be given to 


overseas calls. 

At the top of the list is 
Mexico, with which U.S. car- 
riers run a yearly deficit of 
$876 million. The long-dis- 
tance phone market there was 
opened to competition in re- 
cent years. Telmex, toe 


through third countries, 
meaning the foreign carriers 
would lose considerable 
sources of income. 

Once rates are lowered, 
U.S. carriers are not legally 
compelled to lower their cus- 
tomers' charges by equivalent 
amounts, Mr. Pappas said. 


former state monopoly and But he added that competi- 
stiU toe largest provider, had tion, and monitoring by the 


toe safety board cared more about such things as 
recovering toe plane's flight recorders. 

Another angry man in toe protest group shouted: 
“If this crash occurred in Korea, all toe bodies 
would have been returned by now! The American 
and Korean sysrem is different!” 

Language barriers have compounded misunder- 
standings between South Korean families and toe 


no comment, nor did govern- 
ment spokesmen. 

Second on toe list is China, 
at $237 million, followed by 
India, at $210 million. ' 

Germany, at 18th, is toe 
European country highest on 
toe list, with a $78 milli on 
deficit. Italy is 20th, at $71 
million, and Britain is 2 2d. at 
$64 million. 

European countries gener- 
ally have lowered their set- 
tlement rates in recent years, 
as part of a trend toward pri- 


commission. would be expec- 
ted to result in lower prices. 

The commission left open 
the door to suspend parts or its 
order if satisfactory multilat- 
eral solutions were found to 
toe problem. "We are still 
eager for a multilateral solu- 
tion.” Mr. Pappas said. The 
commission did not stipulate 
what such satisfactory solu- 
tions would entaiL 

By lowering the amounts 
foreign carriers can charge to 
complete calls from the 


S RES!u= 




Kite 


vatization and the opening of United States, some special- 
markets, and the British and ists noted, toe foreign cornpa- 
French rates are now lower nies will lose revenues that, in 
than toe benchmark rates the the case of some poor coun- 


FCC set Thursday. The rate 
charged by France Telecom, 
for example, has been 13.7 


tries, are now used either to 
develop domestic telecom- 
munications systems or to 


cents since January, below subsidize local calls. 


toe 15-cent rate set Thursday 
by toe commission for de- 
veloped countries. 

But some Europeans called 


How they would do so after 
losing those revenues, “is an 
interesting question.” Mr. 
Pappas said. But he added 


Res! ESI:': 

tot fe 


on the United Stales to seek a that toe commission was 
broader solution involving phasing in toe changes over 


the International Telecom- 
munications Union, a United 
Nations-chartered entity. 

A spokesman for one Euro- 
pean telecommunications 


periods of from one year, for 
developed countries, to five 
years, for toe least-developed 
countries, "to give countries 
time to adjust to this." 


APPLE: Faithful Bite Bullet 


FUR: Russians Flock to Chinese Market to Buy Coats , Even Dog-Hair Ones 


Continued from Page 1 

have opened up in China, and this is all about 
fair Trading and mutual needs." 

It is also about price and the cost of labor, 
which are helping China to become the world’s 
major producer of inexpensive clothing. In the 
Chinese countryside, where the furs are sewn, 
factory workers often earn well under $100 a 
month, so the fur coats on Chaowai Street are 
remarkably cheap. Some sell for as little as S40. 
While the better-quality full-length minks go 
for S 1 .200 or more, it is still a small fraction of 
what the same coat would cost in Europe or the 
United States. 

"Triple." said Tadcusz Liminski, a burly 
Russian trader drinking shots of vodka and 
smoking Marlboros one morning at an outdoor 
Russian caff. when asked how much coals 
bought here sell for in his native Lithuania. 


Mr. Liminski said he flies to Beijing “every 
three weeks" to stock up. “Many. many, many." 
he explained, when asked how many furs traders 
bring home. Then Mr. Liminski growled and 
threw his empty cigarette pack at a caff worker 
who hod turned the stereo up loo loud. 

It is hard to imagine the Chaowai Street market 
existing in the United States, where fur coals have 
fallen out of fashion in the face of protests by 
animal rightists. But in bustling Beijing, where 
the free market is booming and happily chaotic, 
everyone is too busy nuking money to worry 
about the animals. No one has ever tossed red 
paint on the furs on Chaowai Street — although 
people here know it happens elsewhere. 

“We've heard that. ’ Mr. Liu said. "Bui 
these animals are raised for their fiir. Amer icans 
ear beef, don’t they? You kill those big animals 
for food: we kill these little minks for fur. 
What’s the difference?" 


Mr. Liu also said that some of the mink pelts 
made into coals at Chinese factories are im- 
ported from the United States. The dog fins, 
though, are all from China. Every stall along the 
street has coals made of fairly coarse fiir. a 
grayish blend that looks suspiciously like Ger- 
man shepherd. Which it is. 

Zhuang De ^ ue, a merchant, said the dogs are 
raised on farms: their fur is used for coats and 
their meat for food. Mr. Zhuang looks slightly 
puzzled that foreigners might find this distaste- 
ful. 'll s just like a poultry farm." he said. 

In midsummer on Chaowai Street, the tem- 
pera fu re hovers close to I Ort degrees Fahrenheit 
<38 centigrade). 

Du finzhi is sweltering in the furry doorway 
of his shop, waiting for a customer. He is 
confident. He knows that nature is on his side. 

Russia is very cold.' ' Mr. Du said. "You can’t 
survive in Russia without fur.” 


Continued from Page 1 

search Laboratory at 
Hanscomb Air Force Base in 
Massachusetts, using com- 
puterese for "operating sys- 
tem" — toe product at the 
heart of toe Microsoft-Apple 
rivalry. 

Macintosh software 
companies also seemed to be 
pleased with any new Apple 
strategy that promised to in- 
spire confidence in buyers. 
These buyers have deserted 
the Macintosh in droves in 
recent years, as distinctions 
between toe Macintosh and 
Windows operating systems 
have become Jess discern- 
ible. 

* 'The vendors are very 
happy by the clear focus," 
said Patrick McGovern, toe 
chairman of toe International 
Data Group, toe parent com- 
pany for the exhibition spon- 
sor. "This is a survivable 
strategy." 

■ Aimed at Regulators? 

Analysts said that the al- 
liance between Apple and 
Microsoft could be viewed as 
an attempt by the latter com- 
pany to deflect regulators' 
scrutiny of its market dom- 
inance, AFX News reported 
from New York. 

Microsoft would be saving 
a non threatening rival, and 
the deal is unlikely to be 
blocked given the size, struc- 
ture and significance com- 
pared with other recent Mi- 
crosoft deals. 

Some analysts said the plan 
masterminded by Steve Jobs, 
the Apple co-founder, simply 
"buys time" for Apple o’r 
possibly paves the way in the 
longer-term for it to back 
away from the corporate 
desktop operating systems 
market and into a vehicle to 
create a new niche in low-cosi 
consumer computing 

products. 

Wall Street seemed to like 
the arrangement. Apple's 
stock rose $6.5625 a share on 
Wednesday and was up 
$2.9375 more on Thursday, 
trading at 29.25 in the after- 
noon. That represents a 48 


percent gain on news of the 
deal. 

Mr. Jobs said the deal ends 
the era of Microsoft’s being I 
viewed as the enemy because 
Apple has to "give up" in 
some aspects in order to re- 
gain its health. 

"We want to let go of this 
notion thar for Apple to win, 
Microsoft has to lose," Mr. 
Jobs was quoted as saying. 
"We'd better treat Microsoft 
with a little gratitude." 

Still. The Associated Press 
reported, to many die-hard 
Macintosh fans, the auditor- 
ium scene where the news 
broke seemed an eerie remind- 
er of Apple 's famous 7V ad: a 
Big Brother-like figure on the 
overhead screen droning on 
about the Brave New Woiid of 0 
technology to a crowd power- 
less to break free. 

Bui this was not the Super 
Bowl commercial that 
launched the Mac computer 
in J9S4. The man on the over- 
head screen was Mr. Gates. 
Apple's archenemy, intro- 
duced by Mr. Jobs as Apple's 
new ally. The boos and hisses 
that followed were under- 
standable. 

“The people don’t look at it 
from a business standpoint." 
said Jan Tatousek. sales man- 
ager for a Czech company that 
sells Macs. "They look' at it 
from an emotional point of 
view — like shaking hands 
with the enemy." 

Ironically, Apple is expee- 0 
ted to rehire the advertising 
agency responsible for the 
1984 ad. The company is ex- 
pected to announce on Friday 
that it has hired TBWA Chiat / 
Day for its domestic adver- 
tising account, according to 
an executive familiar with the 
matter. 

The Orwellian-styie 1984 
commercial showed a woman 
shattering a mammoth tele- 
vision screen that carried the 
gray image of a Big Brother- 
like speaker who had a spell- 
bound audience. 

• < 1/ ft cr recent technology or- ^ 
tides: 

hrip:-.’\v\c\yihtci>nt:lHT' 

nx'w 


5® 


... 

'•f. 




'Me** 






•■ ■ */■•• ' .. ••/'x. w w • . V ;'"V / V 


HOLIDAYS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIPLINE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 8. 1997 






PAGE 7 




-ViV: > 


hotels 


!*.;_• • V 


iX ^ 




«sKV^:-^-- -- 


fe - • 

■- 




|/+si*L ■*• 


$fer^vv : 




8 fe ^- 7 

****?' 


•:•. .-: -A*.- 


‘.HOTEL ^II>IL>{CE :HZmj I'V'*' 

Between the Seine and the Fahtheon in the heart of The Latin quarter 
Charming room? and apiartment? giving onto the square 
Iviul-Laiiqevm. fejuipped with litchenette [ideal tor long slay si 

• Ratei rrem 9 i'ii.i FF to IJft) FF per dat 

-.MIRAGE DISCOUNTS FOR HERALD TWBUM READER 5 - 




Ri>: v, 

[i. n 

700 FF 
1.S00FF 
3,000 FF 


R.V.: 
Al CL i~ 

600 FF 
L600FF 
tyjOO FF 

iJ Ri’miV 1 


Ar ,f?-:e\ 
It i 

900 FF 
2.400 FF 
■1.200 FF 


Ar *FTME si 
At 

SOOFF 
2.100 FF 
J.Mta FF 


Hfi ,r i IV Mr rr«; js nrlr 


50, r. des Benuidins. , mW 5 Paris - Tel: ++53t0l 1 44 4] 31 Sl-Fau -»33lih 1 4b 33 93 22 
i M. RER St XDchei Notre Dame> • Parking nearby. ; 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


THE INTERMARKET 
Starts 
on Page 4 


Residence Hotels 


(H.jnfl nr.p ram/ro s eIiy skkx 

High class rooms & suites 
Daflv. i monthly rates Pans, 
TeM 3 10)1-44133223 FaxiOn -42250488 


Bed & Breakfasts 

MANHATTAN LODGINGS. NYC. Short 
star luxury apartments, supenw B 8 B 
registry many locations. 
Tel 21M75-2090 Fax. 212-477-0420. 
E-UaH iriodnenhatlanlDdgingscom 


Housing Exchange 


PAMS - NEW YORK Luniy furnished 1 
bedroom apartment m 4th area, lor 
equlvalert n New Yon. Cay From Sept. 
mss Beubte. Tel Lon +& W395539 


• Le salon de l'Hotel des Marronniers *** 
21 , rue lacot* ■ 7500 ft PARIS 
Tel: 33 ( 0 ) 1 43 253060 Fax: 33 ( 0 } 1 40 4 b fl 3 5 b 
And very dose by. under the same management 

• l/H&tel des Deux Continents *** 

25, rue la cob -75006 PARIS 
Tel: 33 (U) 1 43 267246 Fax: 33 10) I 4.’ 25 6/ SO 

• L'Hfitel de Seine *** 

52, rue de Seine - 7500ft PARIS 
Tel: 33 (0) 1 46 34 22 SO Fax: 33 (O) 1 4ft 34 U4 /4 

three charming little hotels 

IN THE HEART OF THE ANIMATION 
OF SAINT GERMA1N-DES-PRES. _ 


Lebanon 


HOTEL AL BUSTAN. East ol Beirut. 
5 star detoe Exceptional tocaton. secu- 
rity. comfort tme cuisine conventions, 
business services, satefile TV. 18 min 
transfer bom airport free WELL Far 
1960 4-972439 • l-33l |0|1-17200007 


BREATHTAKING VIEW OF NEW YORK. 
?0 tt. glass waB: Central Park & City 
l uxur iously tumshed: pane, lax. cable. 
For business musician or honeymoon 


couple 1 btoch to Carnegie Hal 2 to 
Lrttenran, 5 io Lincoln Center. Muse- 
ums. Theaters. Weekly. UortWy 3 day 
weekends Iminunumi or long term. 
TeL 212-262-1561. Fax. 71B-884-4142 


Holiday Rentals 


French Riviera 


CANNES (06) 

100 METERS CROISETTE 
in a very l*?i class restate 
RENTALS- ww apanmerts. h* 
eqdtped bom 2 -room to 5-room duplex 
Air corettortig, PA phone. 
24-how reception, room-service 

SPECIAL OFFER: 

August iSkr II September 24th 
PAYS DAYS = STAY 7 DAYS 
In august starling from 
FF4.750 (instead pi FFffiOi 
m Seta. FF3J50 instead ol FF4.530) 
Ask for INFORMATION 
C1TADINES ’CANNES CROBETTE', 
87 rue d'AnUbes. 06400 CANNES 
Td *33 (04) 9306 2777 Fax 9368 3084 


Caribbean 


ST. BAHTHELEMY, F.W.I— OVER 200 
PRIVATE VACATION VILLAS - beach- 
front io noted? won pools Ou agents 
have inspeded afi viHas personally For 
reservauns on St Baris. Sl Uartm. An- 
gufe. BatedK MuSNque. Bw ’*9* >s- 
iands can wimcO'-'Sibarth - u s. 
(40i|B4?-8012>laj' 847-6290. from 
FRANCE 1)5 30 16 20 ■ ENGLAND 0 
-Kfrfi9-6318 


Paris & Suburbs 


NY LOFT STYLE, cert* d Parts 2 bed- 
moms 2 bate, modem wchen. ii4*» 
top floors, great light, garage, bepvua. 
aoayrm Fax +33 (OH 42 96 18 Bi 


RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE 


Real Estate Services 








YOU OWN A PROPERTY W FRANCE 1 
Ow ser.icas anw in your absent? 
Wamtenance. cteanng ganttbng, ropars 
folovMjp of bis, government tares. .at 

fu&se do Not imigio 

CONTACT us for MORE DETAILS 

FAX *33 (0)4 50 95 94 34 
Tel; *33 (0)4 50 95 35 35 
7 Domare rte Cre-.m F-74160 Bossey 


Real Estate 
for Sale 

Rea l Estate Investments 

BELIZE - INVESTORS/DEVELOPERS: 
300 - acres WOO K w Ca*b«n Sa 
9000 ft on beauiWSilBe Tbm 12 .M 0 
ft d canal Irorta^? M*c *2"; 
ipfenhone arri efeddesy to trad- ATStnp 
3^9 uE ^Mfloncash 
Cae (M2i BSMCW USA 

EAST AFRICA - toaM 

Ltd company Consderade dewj™? 

portal Conparr.' 

pr sharenctfnci l» sale Contact Bryan 
Fax 6 M 1 - 315 HB 


^ Bahamas 


PRIVATE SLAW JN 
TAX HAVEIWAHAMAS 

On m spHrvJd end & sea PB* 

marram ^ 

too pwrt 6 * ^ 


Canbbean 

TA X FREE ST. BAFTTHELEMTlte^ 
IS Miji irc/rt property 4 be *°p‘?L, 


trench Ribera 

bpw"“SLSSI! , S.S 

' **• 4 "SSTSo?" ’Mrt^rassO'® 0 - 


FRENCH RIVIERA 

at 500 m attude 
pin<=j> to Italian bon& 

EXCEPTIONAL LOCATION 

FACING SOUTH 

OLD FARM HOUSE 

Ertreiy renovated iM sc m 
♦ 50 ayn stiaMe for rentr.afen. 
2 ha core trees fruit trees 
vreyards spring Mourten 
landsccpe and h rests 
FF 27K.0X 

Tel: +33 (0)4 93 04 42 16 


BEAR CAWCS - GmMbim fe Viera' 

ir. ptehosus esaie ,^£r 

house m perfect cafflcr, la^e terrog 
3 bedrooms 2 baths * guests haae 
rthiwchenece suS5 art W; 
room aSv sqm landsc^ied gardea 
Access pool and chib house. Askmg 
FFS3A Tet *33 93 75 24 5 


5 mine NICE AIRPORT StLTJgw 
Fraich banker omwr sells hstunous 
4-room » sq.m W + 300 sq.m, sur- 
roundmq exoric garden 2 Whs, toge 
Ztvti W cdlar, 2 gwfl»- 

F17M TeF *33 I0t4 93 07 50 At 
Av abbte NOW QU£T LOVELY P-A C^ ^ 

Fre nch Provinces 

NORTH CHAHENTC 
De® n rural France, 2*^ 
hS iron Pans on the TGV Sijsaraiai 
Manor House fuHy 
Airerkan n t^nart 

®s 

tera avafeb* ndtEirci truffe orctara 
Brochure maBaWa on tequ^ 

TeL own«+33 

(0)545318473 home Fax (01545318737 


PERI GO RD, LOVELY STONE HOUSEhi 
t2th cert vitage. 3eams Jjrepl^^'- 
vi F375.000 ief -33'0)1 43253S?< 


Great Britain 

HOMESEARCH LONDON Let us 
searef lor you We find homes • flats 
io buy and rent ana provide corporate 
relDcai-or. services For i^'vid*^ 
and tonpames Tsl. r44 171 838 
1066 Fw- 41 171 838 1077 
nap. v.avs resr^eseaiduauLbam 


Ireland 

BRAY CO wmOYMRELAND - Tmdh 
vyaTr, tit aerr-deecned d:ud’? jmrt- 
ed reis-ce rtis V--- r-tuarea i Wks 
■—t -la^i p,T.-s3 r.’Hi Acommcda- 
- r-. r - ■ l b«SK3 spi- 

rei cars. : aram i sto? sum a'- 
-- r- rrrda" ^rwawras 

jk“ : w» W 


FLORENCE (Sin Gereole). BWderfijt 
yr- -uf v-ffla I Mam? surrour<S£d Cv 
vaev art zrd seas sees on te ItiUs ol 

Chars »rs vrffc an exceptional ‘-i«t ™ 
1,‘rsaajio Caste AJai K! sqra burid- 
r=s 5 3D0 sqm. s t.to 1 arm cewre 
afstould be tui\ restored, pus 3 ha rt 
Tand Hstctiail descriptior. m G^Letw 
Ctendirt Cardtri Le vifle 4 nrenze 
,15571. By Otf'sater erty D twc» n- 
lerested patties UW inniai enquiyj w 
CA5ELLAPJ 8UADIGE 331 Vcereafkafy 

ROUE-COUSEUM. Apartment wlh ex- 
ceptfcral and unique vn on Coteam 
Antique buidirg- Living, rfning. t bed- 
rooms, 2 bans. ofta. Wche amniM yl 
and aasrarsd by fanuus Bitirted. at 
z& diSa led. Fax -35 iGii 47 0- <2 61 

(SOLE TRElim: VILLA. EreairtaWtg 

■ -jiyiij crystal deer watM- 5 mm. ■ » 
beach. 1000 sq m p«e fo»W I ™- 
■mshed. 3v owner. U BiO million. 
Tet fax -43 n) 470 96 75 

TRlBOGNA-GENOA 5raom apart mem 
(on 2nd flew) Rity 
1 acre rt ferd Tet 516-261-0350 USA. 

Paris and Suburbs 


8th, CLOSE CHAMPS ELYS^ 


The best location 

in thB heart of Parts HOTELS 
Two channing hotels JPJR 

located between C£X3/ ' 

die Louvre Museum end 
Place de la Concorde 


C L£S CBEALIX LOQIS 

els — assaafeb»s 
& 4 RIS or) Wm-L 


NAOUSSA PAROS CYCLADES 

ocnvienly restDreo^j 
£00 sa m grouKl A 13 8°* 

USS2BO.OOO. Cortat C. Cusdi 

Nea&a a,w A®^*4 «nqo2. 
Tel- 4 ») 0284 51006. Fax: 0284 51902- 


s UP > 
TO 45% 
.DISCOUNT/ 


Hospitality Elegance , Comfort 


Hotel Louvre St Romain I 

5-7 ore Sa-nt-Roch. 

75QC*’ Parts 

Ter 01 42 6031.70- Fax 01.42 &J lO.crf 
» 54 finely sorc-inted topms a:i w,m 
rrartie CEtnrooms. cate TV. 
rri-tars. m-rootr sale, nardrys-v 


Hotel du Continent 

20 rue Mcn-Tratc-' 

75K’ Par s 

01 .42.' j 7* li • Fa> 01 42.61 52.2* 
•23retinec ‘.-.t air-ccnciccr.eq. 
recsr'v rsmy.mied -::ms featumg 
cat s Tv. ir.imoc's. safe. naird'yEts. 


T.H.T. Readers Special Package I 

“SUMMER in Paris'* 

Special Rate: 5"0 FF for r^o pers one nighi Jli included 
Special Packages on Request 1 fhr a minimum of two nights su> » 
(Summer Rates' includes Anicncan BuCr'et bnsiidasi and all taxes i 
Valid rrom 2” June io .41 Auri« l l>, “ 

All major Credit CiirtU Accepted. 


: PARTS 

; LES SUITES SAINT-HONORE 

★ ★★★ 

13, rue D'Aguesseau. 75008 Paris 
1 j liS i of! the Ftiirhiiirp Saint- •ih uv-u«t/ TUt E!^t * Pal* ^ 

■ A Tl-XIRV APARTMENT HOTEL RESIDENCE 

! verx e«!uVue. located in one of the niost pre^tieiou. ne.^h- 

i bourhood.*- Faubourg Saint- Honore and Cnjmp '^' > 

' Thirteen personalized large upannients up lu f 1 

1 ^noleieix reared in 1^2wiihtulh equipped ku«. her o. 1.- 

■ SiEffiS* a. «*« - one or W o bedo^onr.. on, or mo 

. marble bathroom^ and vome with stuatev 

: Ideal lor both familv holidays and bu<tne-> «.up>- a perte^. 

"pied-a-terre". . 

; Ah hotel >enkes. Dailv matd service. Air cMuhn.-nmiig 
1 UndererounJ parking. Complete «curnj. 

t For mt-mum ** i ^ Il ;h f "‘ 

+33 iOt 1 42 66 35 70 *33 rO»l 44 a»l_163. . 


YOU DESERVE 
A BREAK 
FROM THE ORDINARY 




Facing Mont-Blanc • 
10 km from Geneva 
The innkeeper awaits you 
Tel; 04 50 41 54 07 
Fax: 04 50 41 90 61 


OCT. ■ NOV. ELEGANT TOWNHOUSE 
m ceteflrity studded, secure environment 
trim gym. pod. ttrais ■ at Jn arte 
Mata • 25 betfooms. 310-559-2161 


auberge I 

DU VIEUX VILLAGE I 
D AUBRES (NYONS) ! 

f.,i.- • ?n-l---:icAl r: aiK»p***Wc - i?i*r 
; 2 tar<2 »6>r:’a! Tr * FT wr r-?rr.'ri 

sv.^.sf.'.i’iCircoL t* 

Td -S3 7? 2o 12 6^ 

Fa\ -S" K'r-l 75 2o >> 10 — 


NIGHTLIFE 


**NN Logis de France 
Tennis - Heated Swimming Pool 
Equestrian Center 
24550 VtllefraiH’he-du Pertfiprd 
Tel: +33 10)5 53 29 95 94 
Fax: +33 0)5 53 28 42 96 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL DISCOUNT TRAVEL 


. 79 - FEUCHEROLLES ■ 

15 kllHS PARS LA D EFENS E 
17th cenL HOUSE, LISTED 
By owner USS695.000 
Tel: *33 (0)1 30 54 53 98 

PARS-CITE DE LA UUSIQUE charmrtg 
2/3-raom Rat. luay renovaed, double tu- 
rn - bertoon. 'psrqiHt*. fkepteces. hflft 
caings Guartfian. cellar, ready lomM; 
m TOO.'30C. TetfFsx "33 tO)t 42021367 

ILE ST LOWS Otmer sefeTert 90 sqm.. 
50 sqjn fr.-mq. 1 berioom. ®i teem- 
suri Tsl 33 (Oil 43266365 t 068 0310322 

PLACE des VOSGES ICO sgrn 3rd Gcc» 
. )Si iflfr rtni telling fully jewa red 
hK? :! 3 tf toigs Dr.-n^r (On —7?. c372 


Switzerland 


□ LAKE GENEVA &AUjS 

Sale to taragrare anwrzfifl 
our spaciamy sine* 1975 

Atnacfivs prapemas, wBricoWng vjws 
1 w 5 bertoon*. fcom SFr 200400. 
REVACSA 

52, Uombrttoit CH-1211 GENEVA 2 
Td 4122-734 15 40 Fax 734 12 20 

VKiARS-OLLOtfc bnnwWa safe^br, 
2 bain, idichenetie. living rmnvj rntow 
pool 300.000 SF Monaco. 37793500933 


USA Residential 

FORT LAUDERDALE. FLORIDA 
Exclusive vnaertrorn mum «A 
lest of water hortage. 100 lort yachts 
arcoflinodaied, horffl has aH me ameix- 
EMpreduced to US56.0W) 
CaO Maty Bucd. ^ent RE'MAX Partners 
954-396-5977 USA or E-mail, 
rteuccieite heinei 

tOYORKCmUp^^adeRT 
rsshed snrio for sale 24 Iv rtoofman. 
569000 Fax. +41-22-908 0259 


RHTHOUSE WTCRNATKINAL 
No 1 1n Holland 

tor iseml) furnished houses/Kae. 
Tel- 31^6448751 Fax: 31-206465909 
NTtoven ia-21. 1083 Am Amsterdam 


London 


SHORT STAY APARTUENTS 
Luxuy 5 star howl apartmerts n Malda 
Vale, nth extensive health chdb and 
swnrming pool, central gartan andar 
oaitoig To to from i day to 3mmtna 
CaB PBza Estates 44 (0H»i 372 0057 


Paris Area Furnished 


‘hmlaca'aH comhfl traner FFi I5w 

SSi«W®»« 


hohernders INTO 

1015 BH Amsierdam Tel 

Fax. 63922 B 2 E-maii«ns*a©hb rt 



rz n PaBo efi Siena 

FT Be part ot' the only Hue 
■AL Pafioinlbily. 

Witness this Medieval 
horse race that began 
700 years ago. 

Celebrated Iidy 2 and August 16 
Information & bdets-pnvate halamy newmg 
Tel (39)577-286671 Fax 1391577-287591 ^ 


ideal ecconmodatloir studkrf brtoonB 
QueBy and senncBBnrred 

READY to move « 

Tel +33(0)1 43129800 Fax (0)1 43129808 

READY TO MOVE M - BeaiiMy dem- 
rated, 3 bedroom, 2 U2 txah A Av Mom 
taigne near Hotel Pfaa Afoenee. Tel: 
212638-2286 USA S5600to*inth US. 

PARIS STUDia 19 ttd Beaumarehfc 
28 sq.m modem kitchenette. hw« 
FF4500fircrth. Purchase also posstore 
Tet & Fax ++41 62 849 13 15 

16th. near Passy, channing. etegart 5; 
room fto. IX s^m., sumy. btorYon 
qu ia gaalflti Owier +X (OP 45279573 

PARIS LEFT BANK ■ 1 befroom span- 

ansnsm 

Paris Area Unfurnished 


LUXURY APARTMENTS 

To W. retailor conpany roprsssneavBS 
8th - mil AREAS 

APEN INTERNATIONAL 

lira Joan Ben net 433 (0)1 S3 31 10 20 


17th. IN BEAUTIFUL TOWNHOUSE, 
sumy. 3rd Boor. 110 sqm. IMng X sqm. 
drift], diwring, i bedroom, ktetere ca- 
Die tv State P«onA« 4 lte.RwiAu 8 

FF 12 K + R5K key + 2 

norths deposl Tel +33 m 4622382 


V PARIS 
SQUARE AVENUE F0CH 

(private brie] 

IN HISTORICAL TOWNHOUSE 

luxurious renovation, 3 apartments: 

120, 160& 300 sq.m. 

Td + 33 (OH 44 55 50 00 
Sc + 33 10] 1 42 60 55 9lJ 


U.S.A. 



cfptEMBE R 16, 1981 

brookwood manor 

Classically Hegarrt Manor H omo 
Pareal 62lO(<Si«ito«WBeW“"*5fc 

ItA - ll(M av m «to 11 W*j 8 M* 

anondw npposlwiktenairb* BHon»nhO'» 

nomeorBsperaWsi 

SUGGESTED OPENING BID! *796,000 

For Brochae 4 Temw ol Sale: 
( 800 ) 516-0015 


RUE DE LUNNERSTO 
BOSQUET (7th) 

67 moms h beauBU Ireestoiw txASng. 

Supab manmert. entirely ratom. 

3rd floor. Large reewton- ato* ' w91 9' 
dnta room. 4 bedrooms. 3 bathrooms. 

Rant FF 31375 rxriucSng awges 
AGPRAMCE T* +33 (OH 49 03 43 02 


8th, BD MALESHERBES, 7 ROWS. 
140 sam.. qinet. brflW. cIbhk Fj*w 
buUng. ton canrtssioiv (0)1 4023 9434 

ON THE LUXEMBOURG (Bth) ■ 

PARIS IIARAIS. modem ajwinunt 2 
moms. diTOtec. 66 Kl-n^ YJSS S' 
F70OO + charges. Tet 10)3 2252 sasr 


Switzerland 

GENEVA, LUXURY FURHSffiD apart- 
meres. From shriKjo \^"SS?J& 
+41 22 735 6320 Fat +41 22 736 2671 



H Bv:220 Fn 
Orchestra : SfiO Frs 
Domar/Skow : 750 Fes 
AC tnxM itfaded 

lease George V • Paris 8 
TeL 01 47 23 32 32 
Fu 01 47 23 48 2b 


FRANCE 





lean -Pierre HANNEOIUN || 

Lawyer In Grasse j 

1 & 3. me des Freres-Olhrier, ^ttbes ( | 

Tel.: 33 (0)4 93 34 40 90 - Fax: |0»4 93 34 08 80 

at TRIBUNAL DE GRANDE INSTANCEof GRASSE j 

«! September 11 rfi. 1997 at 9:00am 

ON THE FRENCH RIVIERA 

GUARDIAN and VIDEO SURVEILLANU: 

■bhsmp 

■ Large high class villa ailed ‘MATCHOTTE'. hamioiiiousK 
He^rated built on 3 levels with dining room, livings, bed 
pS£ ^baihrSoms. hair salon, sauna. Jacuzzi, massage room. 

'.SranS*!]. of good ending called 'VIREVENT' composed 
of several apartments for guests and pereonn 

aasg® 1 -"* ^ 

two studios. 'TTvo outdoor swimming pools. 

Vast landscaped pad. of about lb.3« sqm. *tih cascades, 
gazebo and amphitheater. 

In CANNES (Alpes-Maridmesl. SUPER CAN NK residence. 

4 bd de mbsSrotoire and 6. av. des Pharaons. 

STARTING PRICE FF 192,000,000. 

(ahundred and ninety two million French Francs) 
INFORMATION. VISITS «^DEPJKH. 

contact MnUnr |.-P 1 HANNEQUI^__ == ^ ^^^ 

NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS, i 
we«k io 1 yea ' G+eai Locations '.all 
Pal/Ctequt 212-448-9223. Far 212- 
448-9226 E-Mai- athcunawieacfcum 


BEVBILY HILLS - BeantoHv temehert 
apartmenL rearfy to move in - 3 b«- 
rooms, big tenare, pBiaamlc «««. a» 
Stun. Hnesl txtodirig in town ■ 24 tuir 
Becurty. v&let parting, pool l exercsB 
non Hsrt Lonffshon term, wnmum 3 
rmnta. Perfect ft erecutees TaL fete 
433 (Oil 474543K. Fax I0J1 474557B5 


Real Estate Wanted/Exchange 


PROVENCAL HOUSE, pool sea 
mbs. madwal vtoage Use rt twse ft 
pan* u be agreed in e+change ft M 
n London Tel -44 <0, l8t 566 W9 


* - • • 
«• ?£.' ' 


***• ‘ 
--iuO'-r 


general__ 

Mminp Hiun Sw j 1 U«dmf 

,,, ‘ LVi ITJ BOftSM 


Personate 


P£TR0, 

* FORGWE you. 
please COKE 


tor 1 , 1W5 ansoffiL DB- 


Announcements 


THE EDUCATION A WELFARE oi 'sen*- 
nenans & pnasts. K 7^*^® “ 
irroo mm w wU towu 
on tetp twae railto aw»9j 
a isati Roman Ctfont OwmiPw 

aiK^art- ^ HnST 

Health of me Northern Uanane bams, 
emait maWodiOliecnmLHirn 


FUROPE 

s. 

■u«S?Sss 


xinBixrs n\ip- ■ 

planning to runa ClASSIFKa ^SgiHawwcA 

u H» ra 


fo.1" 


wail in 


■tfjgsi 




Ufl H4 AMERICA 

■ffisSS 

^*28485 

AStAPAQHC 

^1852} 2«2-l 190. 


TSSWa«S 

-^pOJtBWJNB: Sangopore, 

5c 325 0042 

2B74CWSft 


BAREMEAS24 

AU 8 A0UT 1997 

Prtx Here TVA en dew» kxab 
ftaducaon rtsptrt* ai demaw) 
aempiace tes baiwna artensure 

FRANCE (zone C) an 

&S 

■tf-TST'TIS 03 m 

ALLEMAKiE (ZfflTB I) DtW - TVA 
ZONE I ■ G : 

GO IDT 

im 5C5P 1.(5 

•V-'b «PW 

zoeir-F: 

SCSP 1.43 

■y^Ji m w 


FOO: D.70 


BELGIQUE er FW - TVAJt^ 

Aft Z2 jB4 FOO 1 HI* 

SCS7 34.96 SGSP. 33.14 

HOUANDE (zonal MS M WA 175% 
GO 1326 FDD 0^ 

SC97 2043 SCSP 1383 

LUXEMBOURG en UFA *.WA 15^ 

GO- 19.48 

ESPAGNE (zpne A) CT PTA&VTVA 16% 
SCB7 SCSP: 1W59 


limlb^^Enbune 

mliWfjB l B Wjg 

SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SERVICE: 
For quesfions ot queries about mpeet- 
Bry ol you rawsoaper. the status of f*l 
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PAGE 8 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 199; 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 




Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Pt BLISHED WITH THE !WW YORK TIMES %N1» TIIE 'USIIMTOS POST 


A Palestinian State 


Sribunc Human Responsibilities Along With the Rights 

i ti.e wv»,.i>cTON post / ^ , individual and CO 


Madeleine AJbright came up to the 
brink of a policy breakthrough on 
Wednesday in her first major speech 
on the Middle East, and faltered. As a 
result, prospects of escaping the cur- 
rent mutual "crisis of confidence” be- 
tween Israelis and Palestinians remain 
more clouded than they have to be. 

The secretary of state was on the 
mark in demanding, with Israeli leader 
Benjamin Netanyahu, that Palestinian 
leader Yasser Arafat put 100 percent 
effort into deterring and punishing ter- 
rorism. She repudiated the cynical Pal- 
estinian tactic of conditioning security 
cooperation with the Israelis on Israeli 
political concessions. 

Mrs. Albright went on to make the 
necessary and now familiar American 
foliow-on demand that Israel stop act- 
ing unilaterally to preempt issues 
meant to be bargained. Her words here 
were carefully framed to spare any 
suggestion of condoning "moral 
equivalence” between the Palestin- 
ians’ weakness for violence and Is- 
rael’s political preemptions. But it is 
plain mat these preemptions — es- 
pecially the high-profile construction 
of Jewish housing on Arab-contested 
land in Jerusalem — undercut those 
Palestinians who seek whai they warn 
by honest, hard negotiation. 

So far so good. A lough line on 
Palestinian terrorism. Some attention 
to Israel’s political conduct. At this 
point in her Press Club speech, Mrs. 
AJbright seemed to be reaching for 
new ground. She started extolling the 
benefits of increasing confidence 
"about where the negotiating process 
is leading and what the outcome of 
permanent-status talks might be.” She 
added that "if the parties have a clear, 
mutual and favorable sense of the ul- 
timate direction of negotiation.” 
things would go better. But she stopped 
there, leaving unfilled and unexamined 
a longtime void in American policy: 


the reluctance of the United States to 
State its own view of what the object of 
the negotiation ought to be. 

Everyone knows the Israeli goal: It 
is a secure peace, and of course the 
United States supports iL Everyone 
also knows the Palestinian goal: It is 
statehood, and the United States hes- 
itates to support it. even to name it, 
even though Israeli public support (al- 
though not matched by the current 
Likud government! is evident and 
ample and strong enough on past 
showing to survive what Mrs. Albright 
called the "vultures of violence.” 

-Die Clinton administration takes 
cover behind a professed desire not to 
"impose” substantive terms on the 
Mideast parties — to center the Amer- 
ican role on facilitating a diplomatic 
process. But this is the late 20th cenruiy, 
long past die rime when anyone could 
pretend that Palestinians have no right- 
ful claim to political self-determination. 
For the United States not to recognize 
this Palestinian claim is to encourage 
the Israeli government to stick to an 
annexationist, no-state position. 

An American expression of favor 
for a demilitarized Palestinian rump 
state in the West Bank and Gaza is the 
single new element that would most 
brighten the prospects of Mideast bar- 
gaining. That would leave to be ne- 
gotiated the crucial conditions — bor- 
ders, arms, capital, refugees, water, 
etc. — that would make die consum- 
mation of statehood not only minim- 
ally fair for Palestinians but as safe as 
possible for Israelis as well. 

Instead, the State Department's 
most frequent Middle East flyer. Den- 
nis Ross, is to go out to the region this 
week to deal primarily with security' 
issues. With "some progress" on 
these issues, Mrs. Albright herself may 
go by the end of the month. But what 
further policy will she take with her? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Part-Timers on Strike 


To listen to the Teamsters union, its 
strike of United Parcel Service, idling 
185,000 workers, is a battle on behalf 
of part-time workers who have been 
shoved into "throwaway” jobs not 
only at UPS but all across America. To 
listen to UPS, its part-time workers are 
a business necessity that allows it to 
compete against nonunion rivals. Out- 
siders to this struggle may want to root 
for the union both on the merits of its 
position and because organized labor 
can ill afford another conspicuous de- 
feat But what is right for pan-time 
workers at UPS says little about what is 
right anywhere else. 

Almost 60 percent of United Par- 
cel’s workers are part-timers, more 
than triple the national average. These 
part-timers probably account for about 
30 percent of total hours worked at 
UPS. The company argues that the 
nature of the package delivery business 
— which involves sorting, loading and 
unloading at small centers during 
short, rigid time slots — requires the 
use of part-timers. 

What sets UPS apart from most em- 
ployers is that its part-timers are un- 
ionized and are paid medical and other 
fringe benefits nearly as good as those 
provided full-time employees. But, un- 
like most other employers, LIPS pays 
its part-timers much lower wages than 
its full-time workers, about half as 
much per hour. 

The union points out that thousands 
of its "part-time” members are ac- 
tually putting in more than 30 hours a 
week. That means that they perform 
nearly full-time work for only part- 
time pay. The company can surely 
afford, the union says, to gather up 
these part-time slots into full-time po- 
sitions. restoring the dignity and mor- 
ale of its employees. 


Ron Carey, the Teamsters president, 
asserts correctly that pan- lime work at 
UPS is expanding rapidly. He says his 
members want full-time work, even if 
the elevated wage costs that go along 
with it lead UPS to cut back on new 
hires. Mr. Carey is thus reinforcing or- 
ganized labor's important role in stand- 
ing behind its lowest-paid members. 
That role, and organized labor's pos- 
itive impact on workplace productivity, 
is threatened by the diminishing pres- 
ence of unions ’in the privaie sector. 

But union spokesmen are off track 
when they link UPS practices to the 
rest of the economy. Part-time work 
has not been increasing very much in 
American business, despite anecdotes 
to the contrary. 

In the past 25 years, the percentage 
of women workers engaged in part- 
time work has hovered at around 25 
percent Among men the rate has risen, 
mostly during soft economic times 
when companies reduce their full-time 
staff, but the increase in the past 25 
years has been only from about 8 per- 
cent to 12 percent. 

Most important, the vast majority of 
part-timers — three-quarters of the 
women and half the men — say they do 
not want full-time jobs. They are busy 
in school, raising young children or 
caring for disabled parents. 

The Teamsters union, perhaps eager 
to deflect attention from criminal in- 
vestigations into the financing of Mr. 
Carey's recent re-election, has taken a 
risky gamble to fight a hiring practice 
that LIPS says it will not cut back. But 
whether the union sticks by its demands 
on hiring part-time workers, or sac- 
rifices rhem in exchange for other de- 
mands. holds little significance for the 
economy or for most other companies. 

— THE ;V£U - YORK TIMES 


Other Comment 


Bad for Latin Americans 

For 20 years the United States 
wisely banned sales of sophisticated 
U.S. weaponry to Latin America, But 
with their international markets shrink- 
ing. U.S. military contractors inevit- 
ably looked south and saw willing cus- 
tomers. The Clinton administration, 
caving in under their pressure, reversed 
the ban last week. 

The administration has said it will 
consider all such sales on a case-by- 
case basis. But even Solomon would be 
hard-pressed to ensure that freer access 


to the most advanced weaponry’ in the 
world won’t create regional instability'. 

Latin America's citizens largely ex- 
ist under dismal economic conditions. 
Every multiiniilion -dollar tank, mis- 
sile or F-16 fighter jet will be pur- 
chased at the expense of legions of 
poor people struggling to keep them- 
selves and their children healthy. 

Helping Latin America modernize 
its weaponry rather than its economies 
will only worsen many problems. The 
region needs roads and schools and 
jobs, not deadly toys for its generals. 

— Los Angeles Times. 


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P ARIS — A new intercontinental 
dispute is building up on the basic 
principles of human rights, not only 
now they are applied but who is to 
define them. The context of the ar- 
gument has shifted. 

It isn't the clash of civilizations that 
Harvard's Samuel Huntington predicts, 
but another version of the long-running 
North-South argument, sharpened by 
the effects of globalized economics. 

It is part of new ways of looking at 
the world that have emerged with the 
changes of the last decade or so — end 
of the Cold War, emerging tigers, 
spread of markets, strengthened re- 
gional institutions. 

Malaysia's Prime Minister Mahathir 
bin Mohamad led the latest attack with 
his demand during a recent meeting of 
ASEAN countries, Europeans and oth- 
ers for a review of the UN Declaration 
on Human Rights, adopted in 1948. He 
has long criticized what he calls the 
attempt to impose “Western values" 
incompatible with Asian cultures. 

But this time he shifted ground, ar- 
guing that the United Nations docu- 
ment was "formulated by superpowers 
which did not understand the needs of 
poor countries.” His foreign minister 
told the meeting that in a multiethnic 
country like Malaysia "sometimes if 


By Flora Lewis 


too much freedom is exercised, de- 
mocracy could be destroyed." 

They were particularly angered by 
the Thai financial crisis, which 
weakened the currencies of several 
ASEAN countries and which they 
blamed on Western speculators out to 
destroy their economies. 

That is nonsense. Their bubble eco- 
nomies are catching up with them. 
Their success in attracting investment 
and penetrating foreign markets leaves 
them no longer shielded at the margins 
of the fluid financial world. 

But it is true that when the dec- 
laration was signed, the United Nations 
had less than a third of its present 
membership, mostly from Europe and 
Latin America, because decolonization 
was only beginning. Further, for much 
of the Cold War die declaration was 
taken as more of a pious wish than an 
international policy requirement 

It took some 15 years for the 1975 
Helsinki human rights provisions to be 
accepted by all the European and North 
American signatories as making how 
countries treat their own citizens a 
proper subject for international con- 
cern. The United States drew a sharp 


distinction between "totalitarian" and 

‘‘authoritarian’ 7 violations, in order to mnniiy needs that the urtpe 

make sore *at the fight against com- ket may jS^ ofdi scussion ^ dnifi- 
numum had priority. Alter a year oioi&w»» 

Now the campaign has become less mg, ^e frieracnon Coun P 

selective and more insistent. U.S. Sec- posed adding a Universal Declaration 
retary of State Madeleine Albright said of Human Responsibilities, alongside 
America would be “relentless” in op- and reaffirming the '? ec S 3 * 1 * 
hosing any attempts to dilute the UN rights, to be adopts by the umtea 
declaration, which she considers not Nations. The council is composed 
Western values but universal values of former heads of government, repre- 
respect for the individual- sen ting all continents. They have a 

Britain’s Labour government has utopian ambition but they are all ex- 
come out with a much strengthened perienced, practical politicians, 
policy, promising ro support sanctions Laws and conventions alone, they 
against abuses of human rights, re- point out. are not enough to “foster a 
fusing to supply weapons or equipment better social order,” so they want the 
to be used for domestic repression, and goal spelled oul There are 19 brief 
calling for a permanent international articles and a preamble, setting out the 
criminal court. Foreign Secretary golden rule and the need for truth and 

Robin Cook said, "If every country fairness in relations among states, parts 
is a member of an international com- of society, men and w omen. 
m unity, then it is reasonable to require They hope to stir support among 

every government to abide by the rales governments, civil groups and the 
of membership,’ ’ as set out in the 1948 broad public so that the declaration can 
declaration. be put on the UN agenda next year. 

‘‘Ri ghts bring with them responsi- It won’t change the world overnight, 
bilities." he said. “The right to enjoy but it is a valuable oew idea to give 
our freedoms comes with the obligation farther legitimacy to aspirations com- 
to support the hitman rights of others." mon to all peoples, all religions. It is a 
There is a new emphasis on respon- reflection of a world that is truly eftan- 
sibilities, and that is where eventually a ging. not only for the worse, 
consensus may be built to balance die & Flout Lews. 


Water for These Fish: The Minds and Hearts of Palestinians 


T EL AVIV — As a very 
young person 1 was member 
of Irgun. then the most extreme 
underground organization in 
Palestine. It was officially clas- 
sified by the British adminis- 
tration as a terrorist group. Ir- 
gun put bombs in the Arab 
markets of Jaffa and Haifa, in 
retaliation for Arab attacks on 
Jews. (After several years I 
came to the conclusion that 
there must be better ways ro 
resolve the conflict.) 

As a terrorist I was keenly 
aware of the importance of pub- 
lic support. 

When my “section” came to 
my room for pistol practice, my 
neighbors must have sensed 
that something unusual was tak- 
ing place. When my "com- 
pany ' assembled at night in a 
darkened school building, the 
principal and janitor at least 
must have been accomplices. 
Neighbors in the surrounding 
streets must have noticed sus- 
picious movements. 

When I threw leaflets into the 
air over the heads of a cinema 
crowd, and a Jewish policeman 
noticed me. he did not turn me 
over to his British superiors, 
which saved me from arrest and 
torture. 

To be effective, an under- 
ground organization needs a 
stream of money and informa- 
tion. new recruits, priming fa- 
cilities, secret medical help for 
the wounded, transportation, 
places to hide, and — more than 
anything else — the readiness 
of the surrounding population 
not to give its members away. 
Many, many people must give it 
at best tacit support. 

Mao Zedong described the 
situation perfectly in his dictum 
that the guerrilla fighter is like a 
fish in the water, the water being 
the general population. Without 
the water, the fish dies. 

The only way to put an end to 
a terrorist campaign is to isolate 


By Uri Avnery 


terrorists. The real battle is for 
the minds of (he people. 

Military men and stupid 
politicians very often believe 
that the best way to isolate ter- 
rorists is collective punishmenL 
That is the wisdom of the pla- 
toon leader in the army, who 
punishes the whole platoon for 
the misdeeds of one soldier, 
hoping that the angry men will 
discipline their erring comrade. 

When applied to a whole 
people, this principle generally 
achieves the opposite. The 
angry population does not 
blame the terrorists but the 
hated regime, which ordered the 
punishmenL The intensified cli- 
mate of hatred and despair plays 
info fbe hands of the terrorists. 
More water for the fish. 

After the signing of the Oslo 
agreement on the White House 
lawn, a great upsurge of op- 
timism turned the Palestinian 
population in the occupied ter- 
ritories against terrorism. Ha- 
mas and Jihad did not disap- 
pear, but they realized that any 
extreme action would cut them 
off from the vast majority of the 
Palestinian people. For nearly 
a year there was no significant 
terrorist act. 

Later, when application of 
many parts of the agreement 
was postponed by Israel, and 
even Yitzhak Rabin declared 
that “there are no sacred dates,” 
the climate began to change. 

Early last year, when the Is- 
raeli secret service killed a 
Hamas terrorist with a tele- 
phone bomb in the middle of 
liberated Gaza, Palestinian an- 
ger allowed Hamas to resume 
activity. The result was three 
suicide bombings, which killed 
scores of Israelis. 

The situation now is far 
worse. The decision to build a 
new Jewish settlement in middle 
of the Palestinian population of 


the East Jexnsalem-Bethlehem 
area is felt by practically a H Pal- 
estinians as an intolerable pro- 
vocation. The announcement 
that another settlement is going 
to be put up in Ras al Araud, in a 
densely populated Arab area a 
few hundred meters from the 
Islamic holy places in Jerusa- 
lem. is being viewed by Pal- 
estinians as an act of war. 

In this atmosphere, public 
opposition to terrorism shrinks. 

The Netanyahu government 
reacted with classic measures: 
more collective punishment 


Not only the usual “closure,” 
cutting all Palestinians in the 
liberated and occupied territo- 
ries off from Arab Jerusalem 
and their working places in Is- 
rael, but also blockading each 
town and village in the liberated 
Palestinian areas separately, cut- 
ting them off from each other. 

The intended result: econom- 
ic catastrophe, widespread hun- 
ger and malnutrition for children 
and adults, and a breakdown of 
Palestinian authority. One has to 
be naive to think that this will 
isolate the terrorists and sow in 
the hearts of Palestinians a love 
of Israel and Zionism. 


The Water, Alas, Is Being Polluted 


N EW YORK — “Oh Allah. 

destroy America, for she is 
ruled by Zionist Jews ... Allah 
will paint the White House black 
... Allah will take revenge on the 
colonialist settlers who are sons 
of monkeys and pigs.” 

That prayer was delivered in 
the mosque on Jerusalem's 
Temple Mount by Yasser Ara- 
fat’s handpicked mufti, the 
chief Islamic cleric of the city. 
It got a drop of attention in the 
ocean of Western press cov- 
erage about Israel and the Pal- 
estinians. 

The same amount of atten- 
tion has been the general West- 
ern news judgment about other 
specimens in the unending anti- 
Jewish propaganda emitted by 
Palestinian officials and clerics 
and distributed by Palestinian 
radio and journalism. 

Mostly, the Western press has 
paid no attention at all to in- 
numerable attacks by Palestin- 
ians against the odious religion, 
nature and criminality of Jews. 
Western news people appar- 
ently have heard so much of this 
hate-spewing that some of them 


Gates to the Rescue , as It Were 


S AN MATEO. California 
— Formerly a contender 
but lately on the ropes, Apple 
Computer had to do something 
to reassure customers and in- 
vestors that things are improv- 
ing for the personal computer 
pioneer. The big push came on 
Wednesday when Steve Jobs, 
once and future chairman, an- 
nounced an almost entirely 
new board of directors and a 
strategic Si 50 million invest- 
ment by Microsoft. This is 
good news for Apple. 

The biggest news went al- 
most unnoticed. A. C. Mark- 
kula Jr., a co-founder of Apple 
and its largest shareholder, 
left the board after 21 years. 
Thai is good because he was 
the kingmaker who hired chief 
executive officers too quickly, 
then fired them roo slowly. 

John Sculley, Michael 
Spindler and Gilbert Amelio 
were all CEOs who counted 
on Mr. Markkula’s reluctance 
to give bad news as an excuse 
to overstay and overspend 
their welcomes. 

Apple’ $ revamped board has 
a decidedly different feel. New 
members, in addition to Mr. 
Jobs, include William Camp- 
bell, a former Apple executive 
and now chief executive of In- 
tuit, and Jerome York, former 
chief financial officer of IBM 
and Chrysler. That should re- 
assure Wall Street 

The addition of Lawrence 
Ellison, chairman of Oracle, 
lo the board should reassure 
Mr. Jobs. After all, they are 
besi friends. 

Mr. Ellison, on outspoken 

Other technology articles: 

ww\\ , .iht.coni!lHTlTECHi 


By Robert X. Cringe lv 


billionaire who has pretended 
in the past that he was in- 
terested in running Apple, is 
obsessed with Microsoft’s 
chairman. Bill Gates, and can 
be counted on to push Apple 
in whatever direction Mr. 
Gates least wants it to go. 

But what about this Infu- 
sion of money that doesn’t 
even give Microsoft voting 
powers? Well, it is far from 
charity. Microsoft needs 
Apple to have a pulse to show 
the Federal Trade Commis- 
sion and the Justice Depart- 
ment that there is still some 
competition in the desktop op- 
erating system business. 

If Apple were to fail. Mi- 
crosoft would pay far more in 
legal and regulatory costs 
fighting off antitrust actions 
than it would gain from in- 
creasing its share of the mar- 
ket for desktop operating sys- 
tems from 85 to 92 percent. 

Microsoft absolutely needs 
a healthy (but not too healthy) 
and independent Apple, and 
would pay far more than S 150 
million to make that happen. 

But wait, there is more! 
With its share of the market 
for Macintosh word pro- 
cessing and spreadsheei soft- 
ware hovering just under 100 
percent. Microsoft actually 
makes more profit (about $75 
per computer) than Apple 
does from every Macintosh or 
Macintosh clone that is sold. 
Remember that lately Apple 
has been losing money on all 
the Macs it sells. 

"Microsoft has a lock on the 
Mac office application mar- 


ket,’ ’ says Ann Stephens, pres- 
ident of PC Data, a marker 
research firm based in Res ton, 
Virginia “The lack of com- 
petition allows them to charge 
higher prices than they can for 
Windows products, and the 
Macintosh products don’t have 
to be updated as often. Mi- 
crosoft would have to be crazy 
to let that business go under.” 

The clear loser is Netscape 
Communications, which for- 
merly had some strategic 
cachet with Apple. Netscape's 
Navigator browser, which had 
been pan of the Apple Internet 
Connection kit, will now be 
replaced by Microsoft's Inter- 
net Explorer browser. 

But these preference deals 
happen all the rime in the PC 
business and mean little in the 
long run. Netscape can buy 
back its old relationship with 
Apple at any time. 

Steve Jobs and Apple have 
many more moves to make 
before the company’s future is 
secure, but the market likes 
Microsoft's commitment to 
the Mac. On news of Wednes- 
day's investment. Apple share 
prices rose by 30 percent. 

The angry reaction at the 
trade conference of Apple 
customers in Boston, where 
Mr. Jobs made the announce- 
ment. is in line with the con- 
ventional wisdom that what is 
bad for Apple is good for Mi- 
crosoft. But that is wrong. In 
this case, maybe Bill Gates 
isn’t Big Brother after all. 

Mr Cringe ly writes a 
weekly column on SHU on l al- 
ley for the PBS Wch site. He 
ctmtnhuted this comment tn 
The New York Times. 


By A. M. Rosenthal 


became professionally disabled 
and spiritually uncaring. 

When they do pay some at- 
tention to a particular anti-Jew- 
ish nastiness, it is usually as if it 
were some isolated incident. It 
is nor put into its essential con- 
text: a deliberate campaign by 
Mr. Arafat and his Palestinian 
Authority to dehumanize the 
Jews with whom they are sup- 
posed to want peace. 

At that, the press has a better 
record than the renowned world 
leaders who were so keen on the 
Oslo agreement that was sup- 
posed to bring the peace — like 
Presidents Bill Clinton, Boris 
Yeltsin and Jacques Chirac, and 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl. 

They say nothing about the 
anti- Jewish campaign. Of 

course not — they would have to 
point out that this kind of pro- 
paganda was considered incite- 
ment to violence in the Oslo and 
Hebron agreements, and that 
Mr. Arafat made international 
commitments against it — often. 
Prime Minister Tony Blair? 

I am not dealing again only 
with Mr. Arafat's incitement to 
terrorism. His anointment of 
Hamas as a “patriotic” orga- 
nization, his glorification of ter- 
rorists as martyrs, his failure to 
disarm terrorists and his "jihad, 
jihad, jihad” chants are all on 
the record. The litany of his vi- 
olation of agreements against 
terrorism and hostile propa- 
ganda is so loud that it embar- 
rasses even the State Depart- 
ment, which has been white- 
washing him throughout the 
Bush/Baker and Clinton admin- 
istrations. 1 have in mind another 
enterprise under Arafai manage- 
ment just as dangerous. 

Americans who admire him 
may nor like to think about it. 
but the entire campaign of Jew 
batted is carried out with Arafat 
permission to Arafat officials 


and through Arafat government 
machinery. 

It is the Arafat information 
minister who congratulates "all 
the holy martyrs” who died try- 
ing to destroy Jewish settle- 
ments. 

It is the Arafat representative 
at the UN Human Rights Com- 
mission who says Jews infected 
300 Arab children with the 
AIDS virus. It is his Culture 
Ministry that issues press re- 
leases accusing Israel of germ 
warfare. 

Only the spilling of Israeli 
blood will teach Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu a lesson. 
The enemy has no mercy, hearts 
of stone, "they are not human 
beings and one cannot compare 
them to people: they are like 
animals" — from the Arafat 
Palestinian radio. 

"The dogs have settled in 
you, Jerusalem” is one of the 
pleasanter lines in a poem the 
Arafat radio broadcast during 
the intifada and repeated in 
May. And we have the Arafat 
deputy minister of health who 
said that in an “organized con- 
spiracy” by Israeli defense 
forces. Israel was distributing 
food with material that causes 
cancer and impotence. 

And so sickeningly on and 
on — with brief time-outs for 
teary Arafat visits to the White 
House. If the United States does 
not persuade him to plug his 
sewer of hate, peace will be- 
come not a possibility but a 
miracle. 

But no — from the officially 
directed mouth of Nicholas 
Bums, the State Department 
spokesman, only a few months 
ago. came the appraisal that the 
Palestinians had met their com- 1 
mitmenis lo Oslo, have officials 
who cooperate with Israel and 
the United States, and what is 
more are “led by a man who has 
made a fundamental commit- 
ment to peace.” 

The .Vfii K«r<t Times 


I f ' 


* : ? i * 


In practice, this is a recipe for 
more terrorism, leading to more 
countermeasures and an even- 
tual bloodbath. 

One wonders about the in- 
activity of the Americans. Only 
they can break the vicious 
circle. A major outbreak of vi- 
olence, led by religious fanatics 
on both sides, could bring a 
political disaster, creating chaos 
and worse in the whole region. 

The writer is a leader of the 
Israeli peace movement Cush 
Shalom. He contributed this 
comment to the international 
Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Forest Fire 

PARIS — The fire in the Forest 
of Fontainebleau, one of the 
most destructive on record since 
1725. has not yet been extin- 
guished. Time after lime have 
the flames broken out afresh 
and in spite of all efforts another 
small portion of woodland has 
been reduced to cinders. Fires 
have been frequent in the Forest 
of Fontainebleau from very 
early times. Tn the Middle Ages, 
the Kings of France issued de- 
crees forbidding the lighting of 
Fires in no matter what part of 
the foresr under penafry of cor- 
poral punishment. 

1922: German Sales 

PARIS — Alleging that the li- 
quidation of sequestrated Ger- 
man property in France has been 
carried out unfairly, the German 
Government intends to ask the 
Reparation Commission not 
only to exert its authority over 


future payments, but also to re- 
view all sales effected to date. 
German officials also complain 
that values have been depreci- 
ated at sales, and that France 
recently decided to give secrecy 
to liquidation proceedings. 

1947: Attlee’s Plan ^ 

LONDON — The Labor gov- 
ernment, condemned by the 
Conservative opposition for 
producing "a series of expedi- 
ents to take the place of a plan 
and facing hard criticism from 
its own party ranks, won a vote 
of approval in the House of 
Commons for its emergency 
economic program. Die Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer said the 
United States' dollar loan prob- 
ably will be exhausted before 
the end of this year and the gov- 
ernment may seek emergency _ 
credits from the International 9 
Monetary Fund to help close a 
L40.000.CKXl foreign Lfade def- 
icir which Britain faces. 


.KJvuj'in.j 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1997 


PAGE 9 


OPINION/LETTERS 


Budget Deal Smacks 
Of Dishonest Policy 

By Robert J. Samuelson 

w V KINGTON — All the Medicare? Everyone acrees fhet 

ed I balariced Celebial ' need 10 be overhauled fo antici^ 

fhar del^ ^u^ 8 ! 1 W 0 *" 1 «e baby boom's retirement, 
nat delays a^Janced budget. But Mr. Clinton and Confess 

icWS J?? 7 ’ ** bud S eI def- avoided hard choices. The Senate 
So billLn »?SS d h?!' hel T n ■ budgel included two desirable 
would ti d ,? 10 ?' ,0n ' Thal - chan * es & Medicare: a gradual 
.„ 0 d , “ * ess *an 3 percent or rise in the eligibility aee from 65 


W 


annual federal spending. With 
modest spending cuts. Congress 
and President Bill Clinton could 


to 67 and higher premiums for 
wealthier recipients. Ii*s easy to 
justify both. Medicare is u transfer 


probably grow 

next three years To between S60 
btllion and $90 billion. 

The deficits expand because, 
compared with present policies, 
the budget agreement cuts taxes 
and adds significant new spend- 
ing. The balanced budget that 
theoretically occurs in 2002 op- 
timistically assumes that Congress 
will make future spending cuts. 

The whole exercise exhibits an 
enormous contempt for the pub- 

The happy talk is 
wishful thinking 
packaged for public 
consumption . 


for Qoi r ^ J bUt3gel from lhe P° c,rer y° un S w rich- 

ly, Instead, budget defictts er elderly. Whv shouldnT thev 
will orobablv ornw f or the pay more? But the final budget 

dropped both Senate proposals. 

The central virtue of a balanced 
budget is discipline. It compels 
politicians to choose between 
higher taxes and lower spending. 
Both Republicans and Democrat? 
disdain such discipline. 

The only major effort to limit 
spending in the budget involves 
lower Medicare reimbursement 
rates for doctors, hospitals and 
managed-care groups. This 
accounts for most of the S 1 1 5 
billion of Medicare sav mas 
between 1998 and 2002. But 
these "savings" merely slow the 
program's growth. 

In the cheery view of White 
House aides and congressional 
leaders, their foray inio bipartis- 
anship creates the'climate for fa- 
cing the long-term issues of Medi- 
care and Social Security. 

Well, it could happen. A 
balanced budget could arrive 
even earlierthan 2002 if Congress 
makes future spending cuts or 
has more luck uax revenues 
exceed projections or health 
spending slows i. 

But the happy talk is mostly 
wishful thinking packaged for 
public consumption. One obvious 
obstacle io a balanced budget 
could be a recession. Although the 
economy now seems strong, an 
expansion that lasts until 2002 — 
11 years — would become the 
longest in U.S. history. 

As for the new bipartisanship, it 
is superficial. Each side merely 
embraced its fondest tax-cut or 
spending projects. There was no 
genuine meeting of minds that 
might herald a consensus on So- 
cial Security and Medicare. In 
1995 and 1996. Mr. Clinton 
savagely attacked Republicans 
for their Medicare proposals. 
There is no climate of trust. 

What we Americans, gor last 
w eek was. good theater and bad 
policy. When tax rime arrives, 
people will see the law's complex- 
ity and realize that many of them 
don’t quality- for new tax breaks. 

Some new. programs, will 
deliver less than promised. White 
House aides boast that the 
children’s health insurance will 
cover "up to 5 million." but the 
Congressional Budgel Office puts 
the added coverage at less than 
half that figure. 

“Honesty may not be the best 
policy." Richard Nixon once 
said,’"but it is worth trying once 
in a while." On the budger. this 
Congress and this president 
decided otherwise. 

.Vrn-MltVl' 


Dtp you s&z-nwttLGATES 
is tm£ world's ■richest person . 

WITH A WORTH OF EHUAW 



DO you REALIZE _ IF Vfe EARNED A 
HOW MUCH MILLION' DOLLARS 
A YEAS... 

WOULD 
^ TAKE- 
US... 


0H4JON 
IS?? v, 



W> CEimiRfESTo 

""EARN THAT AMOUNT 

OF MObJEY// 



I MEW THERE. 
WAS A GOOD 

'Reason why 

.more p^opl-e. 
CHOOSE 
■oSE 0/LUONAlRES 



Arab- Americans Sense 
Less Collective Blame 


By Clyde Haberman 


lie's intelligence and integrity. To 
describe it as a balanced- budget 
deal violates normal — normal. 
dV»t is. for most people — notions 
of honesty and candor. The bi- 
partisan deceit presumes that 
so many people will benefit from 
the deal’s various handouts that 
the public can be gulled into be- 
lieving almost anything. 

A lack of integrity is not the 
budger agreement's only failing. 

TTie oiher defects start with 
economic policy. This is the 
wrong time to stimulate the econ- 
omy with higher deficits. The 
United States is in the seventh 
year of a business expansion. Un- 
employment hovers around 5 per- 
cent. Why risk higher inflation by 
injecting more purchasing power 
into the economy through tax cuts 
and greater spending? " 

Next, consider tax policy itself. 
The new tax bill drowns the in- 
come-tax system in added com- 
plexity. There will be five special 
rates on capital gains (28, 20. 18. 
1 0 and 8 percent). The bill creates 
at least three types of new tax-free 
savings accounts. The college tax 
breaks come in two versions: a 
maximum $1,500 credit for the 
first two years and a $ 1 ,000 credit 
for later years. 

.. “It's very complicated even 
for average taxpayers," said 
Gregory Jcnner. head of national 
lax policy for the accounting firm 
Coopers & Lybrand. 

Most new tax breaks have dif- 
ferent income limits and 
phaseouts. The child credit phases 
out for single parents with S/5,000 
and coupfes with Si 10.000; the 
college tax credits phase out for 
single taxpayers with $40,000 and 
couples with $80,000. Mr. Jenner 
expects taxpayer errors to rise. 
What about Social Security and 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Oil the Middle East 

The aftermath of bombing in 
the Jerusalem market has put pres- 
sure on Yasser Arafat to prevent 
terrorist attacks. 

But when Yitzhak Rabin 
headed the Israeli government, 
terrorist attacks were also preval- 
ent. If Mr. Arafat could have pre- 
vented such attacks from taking 
place, surely he would have done 
so while Mr. Rabin was in power 
and the- Palestinians had the 
greatest hopes for their own state. 

The current Israeli government 
should acknowledge that perhaps 
Mr. .Arafat does not have the 
power to prevent terrorism. The 
Palestinian leader does not enjoy 
the luxury of an Israeli-styie se- 
curity network. The Palestinian 
Authority does not possess die 
infrastructure of a state; at most it 
is reminiscent of a municipality. 

If Benjamin Netanyahu's gov- 
ernment does not want an Islamic 
"terrorist state" on its doorstep, 
then it should abstain from the 
drastic measures it has adopted in 
recent days. Placing Palestinian 
towns under siege will only fuel 
further violence and resentment. 
And this will only further mar- 
ginalize Mr. Aral at 

If Israel wants a partner in a 
lasting peace settlement, it should 
pursue a policy of inclusion rather 
than one of exclusion. 

M. DERHALLY. 

London. 

A scan of the "In Our Pages. 
100. 75 and 50 Years Ago" items 
in your newspaper shows that 
events in rhe region have changed 
little in the past 50 years. The 
situation has been reversed, 
however; Now, the terrorists are 


Palestinians fighting what they 
perceive to be oppression by Is- 
rael. In 1947. the terrorists were 
the Jews fighting for (heir own 
state in what was" then Palestine. 

Over these 50 years, many of the 
people who had participated in ter- 
rorist acts against Palestine while 
fighting for a Jewish homeland 
became influential members of the 
Israeli government. 

It does seem rather hypocritical 
for the government of a country 
that was" founded, at least in pan, 
on terrorist nets to be so vehe- 
mently against another group us- 
ing terrorism to further its own 
political aims. The bottom line is 
that either all violence and tenor 
should be soundly condemned, or 
it should simply be accepted as yet 
another means to political ends. 

LYLE W. BATEMAN. 

Lagos. Nigeria. 

Regarding “ Hostages Killed" 
tin Our Pages 100 . 75 and 50 
Years Ago. July 5 / )■ 

The item described how 50 
years ago Israeli terrorists killed 
two British soldiers they had 
rakea hosrase. 

During trips to Palestine in 1 948 
and 1950. 1 observed how effec- 
tive the terror and mayhem created 
by the Stem Gang and Irgun had 
been in affecting British policy. 

Crowning the terrorists’ efforts 
was the bombing in July 1946 of 
the King David Hotel, which 
boused British government offices, 
where 91 people died. It seems to 
have faded from the memory of 
those who are appraising the 
present Arab-Israeli struggle. In the 
end, the British left Palestine. 

Is it any wonder that some 
Arabs are using the same strategy 
as Israelis used 50 years ago to 


drive Israel from the Left Bank? 
This is history repeating itself. 

DHAS G. MUKERJ 1 . 

St. Raphael. France. 

Regarding “To Prevent Further 
Bloodshed. Create a Palestinian 
State" t Opinion. Aug. 2i hy 
Moshe Ma'oz: 

There are only two solutions to 
prevent further bloodshed. One. as 
stared by Mr. Ma'oz. is the creation 
of a Palestinian state on the West 
Bank and Gaza Strip with links to a 
capital near East Jerusalem. 

But Mr. Ma'oz's plan would not 
bring peace: With a Palestinian 
stare" split in two. its citizens would 
have to cross Israeli territory to go 
from one area to another. Hamas 
would not stop terrorist attacks, for 
the situation would be similar to 
the current one. 

The more drastic alternative 
would be for Israel and Egypt 
to give pan of their land along 
the Sinai coast for kibbutz-type 
towns in an independent Pales- 
tinian state. 

Palestinians, instead of going to 
work in Israel, could work for 
themselves, building rheir state. 
Israel, which would have reduced 
military expenses, could pay the 
Palestinians as a sign of goodwill. 
The Arab countries could make 
the main financial contribution, 
together with rhe United States 
and the European Union; it is in 
their interest to maintain a role in 
the Middle East. 

It should be expected that the 
world would condemn Israel for 
displacing an entire community. 
But Israel’s answer should be. 
"Our citizens are the ones in con- 
tinuous danger, not yours." 

EDUARDO SCHAMESOHN. 

Anne masse. France. 


N EW YORK — Maybe we 
have all done some growing 
up, Hamed Nabawy said. 

Maybe we are a Little less quick 
these days to point accusing fin- 
gers at an entire ethnic or religious 
group when something bad hap- 
pens — a supposed plot to blow 
up pans of New York City, for 
instance. 

Maybe, repeated Mr. Nabawy. 
A naturalized American from 
Egypt, he owns the Fertile Cres- 
cent grocery store on Atlantic Av- 
enue? near downtown Brooklyn. 

He wasn’t 100 percent sold on 
the idea that Arab-Americans 

MEANWHILE 

need not worry about being 
collectively blamed after an in- 
cident like’ rhe arrest last week, 
not fax from his store, of two Pal- 
estinians accused of plotting 
suicide bombings. 

Indeed, he said, several people 
walking along his stretch of At- 
lantic Avenue, a few yards from 
the Farouq mosque, have' 
muttered something to the effect 
that all Arabs are terrorists. 

But with the passage of a few 
days, he has found ihaf the level of 
verbal violence is much lower 
than it was. say, after the World 
Trade Center bombing in 1 993, or 
even after incidents that had no 
known Middle Eastern connec- 
tion at all. like the Oklahoma City' 
bombing or the explosion that 
brought down Trans World Air- 
lines Flight 800 last year. 

"Thank God. it is much bet- 
ter." Mr. Nabawy said. "Maybe 
we have leamed’firom mistakes. 
Thank God. how rhe media 
handled it is much better than after 
the World Trade Center. And it 
was good for the mayor to say 
what he did. that you should nor 
judge all members of a group." 
Mayor Rudolph Giuliani was 
speaking last Friday at a press 
conference on the arrests. 

That does not mean Mr. 
Nabawy is without grievances. 

"Take this," he said. “They 
say that the police deserve all 
the credit for catching these two. 
Who called the police? They 
do not mention that he was a 
Muslim and he was from the 
Middle East, too." 

Still. Mr. Nabawy is not alone 
in sensing that the climate 
has somewhat improved for 
Muslims in general and for Arabs 
in particular. 

M. T. Mehdi. president of the 
New York- based Arab- American 
Relations Committee, said his 
group had received 150 “nasty 
phone calls" right after rhe Trade 
Center bombing, but only seven in 
die days since the Brooklyn ar- 
rests and the latest Palestinian sui- 
cide bombing in Jerusalem. 

"It was a really tough period 
for our people in 1993," Mr. 
Mehdi said. "Nowadays, the 
authorities are more restrained 
and the news media is more 
seasoned. An open society has 
the ability to mature." 


Sam Hu&seini, a spokesman for 
the American- Arab Anti-Dis- 
crimination Committee in Wash- 
ington.' suggested that "maybe 
some lessons were learned” after 
Oklahoma City and Flight 800. 

The still-unresolved TWA 
crash prompted immediate 
assumptions that it must have 
been a terrorist act: this column 
jumped the same gun. 

After the Oklahoma ordeal, 
there were countless unfocused 
accusations, all baseless, that it 
must have been the work of Arabs 
or other Middle Easterners- 
"There may still be a legacy of 
Oklahoma and TWA that shows 
people that they need to be care- 
ful," Mr. Husseini said. 

All the same, his committee 
said there was continued fallout 
from the earlier incidents. It has 
collected statements from Amer- 
icans with family roots in the 
Middle East who' assert that in 
the year since Right 800 went 
down, they have been subjected 
to discriminatory searches and 
questioning at airports solely 
because of then names. 

To cite an example. John As- 
sadi. an immigration lawyer in 
Manhattan, said that a security 
agent representing Continental 
Airlines asked him the origin 
of his name as he was about to 
board a flight from Milan to 
Newark. New Jersey, in June. 
Mr. Assadi '$ family comes from 
Iran, but he is an American, born 
in Pittsburgh. 

Mr. Assadi said he refused to 
answer, telling the agent that he 

‘ There may still be a 
legacy of Oklahoma 
and TffA that shows 
people that they 
need to be careful / 

considered the question illegal. 
Then the agent "made a comment 
that people with Arab-sounding 
names could have received dan- 
gerous gifts." the lawyer said. 

A Continental Airlines spokes- 
man in Houston declined to com- 
ment on the incident. 

Mr. Assadi noted that in the end 
he was allowed to board without 
answering the question. But not 
until three Italian policemen had 
intervened in his behalf. 

• * 1 asked how they w ould like it 
if they came to the U.S. and were 
asked' if they were Mafia because 
of their names." he said. 

Mr. Husseini acknowledged 
that arguments like that could be 
weakened by the arrests of lhe 
Palestinians on Fourth Avenue in 
Brooklyn last Thursday. 

Referring to the rush to 
judgment after Oklahoma City 
and TWA. he said: "There’s been 
a certain reservoir of goodwill 
since ihen. I'm concerned that 
this new business may take away 
that goodwill.” 

The i \Vn )Wl Times. 


Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 

and Saturdays are 


INTER MARKET 


days. 


The IHT’s Intermarket regularly features two pages of classified advertising for the Mowing categories: 

<nwnAY Recruitment. Education, Secretarial, Internet Services. 

ISsnAY Business Opportunities, Franchises, Commercial Real Estate, 

,NESD TeWommudcations, Automotive, Entertainment, 
mm ay Holidays Travel. Residential Real Estate, Dining Out. 

^s. Friendships. International Meeting Point, Nannies & Domestics.. 

. ^ 1 « n. ' -L ll' l-»r 4.4 ‘tn-t A9.I 





THE WORLD’S DAIIY NEWSPAPER 
















PAGE 10 


High Living: In the Iceman’s Tracks 


By Brenda Fowler 

Y ERNAGT. Italy - In 1991 the Schnals 
VaUey in Italy, in the far northern province 
of South Tyrol, was the site of one of the 
century’s most sensational archaeological 
discoveries. Two German tourists hiking along the 
mountainous border with Austria stumbled upon a 
oleak scene of death: A body, lying face down, was 
melting out of a deep bed of ice. 

The body was recovered, and an archaeologist who 
w as summoned to examine the strange tools found 
with it announced that they were several millennia old- 
Radiocarbon dating of the Iceman, as he was quickly 
named, placed him at around 3300 B.C., a time when 
Europe was inhabited by simple farmers, Egypt was on 
the brink of building its pyramids, and writing had just 
begun in Mesopotamia. Archaeologists have con- 
cluded that the Iceman, or Otzi, as Tyroleans named 
him. for the nearby OtziaJ, probably made his home in 
or around the Schnals Valley, and they have spent the 
last several years scouring the region for traces of that 
prehistoric life. 

The forests are more porous than they were 5,000 
years ago and the bear and chamois the iceman prob- 
ably stalked have been hunted out, but the sparsely 
inhabited valley offers some of the loveliest h ikin g in 
the Italian Alps. There are well-marked and well- 
maintained trails for every level of ability. Guides are 
available but not really necessary unless you plan to 
ascend some of the more difficult peaks, which can 
involve dangerous glacier crossings. 

A Prihistoric Highway 

Last summer I returned to the valley to hike the trail 
the Iceman himself almost certainly took to get from 
the Schnals Valley across the Tisenjoch pass to the 
high pastures on the Austrian side, where he may have 
watched over herds of sheep or cows. In the last several 
years archaeologists have found stone tools along 
extensions of this route that suggest the trail was 
nothing less than a prehistoric highway. 

The trail begins at Vemagt, a typical South Tyrolean 
village of stucco and wooden houses whose balconies 
burst with geraniums in summer. Until the end of 
World War L South Tyrol was pan of the Austro- 
Hungarian Empire, ana the local language (.German 


rather than Italian;, food, architecture and customs sail 
seem more Influenced by Austrian Tyrol than Rome. 

Compared to the more leisurely hikes between 
Schnals Valley villages like Kanhaus and Unser Frau, 
the going is fairly strenuous. But anyone who is fit 
should be able to hike up 3,900 feet ( 1 , 1 80 meters) and 
approximately three miles to the Similaun Hutte, a 
rustic lodge built on a pass at about 9,900 feet, where 
hikers can buy a good simple meal and spend the night 
in dormitory-style rooms. 

One way to avoid the altitude sickness that com- 
monly strikes people who are not used to such heights 
is to take plenty of liquids before leaving and to keep 
drinking water along the way, even when you are not 
thirsty. Also, start at the slowest pace you can stand. In 
addition to a few flasks of water, picnic lunch, rain gear 
and an extra sweater, my hiking partner and I carried 
one of the detailed mans of the region that are available 
at any shop in the valley. 

above it AM. As the trail rises above Vemagt and its 
little dammed lake, the imposing backbone offoe Alps 
comes into view. About two hours out of Vemagt, and 
well past the tree line, the marked path begins to veer 
off steeply ro the northeast toward the Similaun lodge 
on a trail that was constructed earlier this century. 

On earlier visits to the region I had followed this 
clearly marked and wide route, the most demanding 
section of die hike, straight to the lodge, which is still 
about an hour away at a steady pace. From the lodge, I 
had .token another trail along the spectacular ridge that 
serves as the Austrian-1 talian border and leads right past 
the site of the Iceman discovery on the way to the nearby 
F inail Peak. After the initial 10-minute climb up onto 
the ridge behind the lodge, this relatively flat trail bumps 
along through the monochrome boulders and rocks that 
are essentially the crumbling edge of the .Alps. 

But last summer, when we were two hours out of 
Vemagt, my companion, who is an experienced moun- 
taineer, suggested we veer off from the trail to the 
lodge, and just follow our — or at least his — instincts 
right up to the spot where the Iceman had died. Both of 
us had previously been at the site, which is on the pass 
known locally as the Tisenjoch. 

Instead of heading for the area right beneath the 
pass, where the rocks looked unstable, we decided to 
stick close to a small glacial side moraine of larger 
boulders just to the right of the pass. 

At first the going was fairly smooth, but we soon 



- •sf&wDjA* 


found that we really had to use. our hands. Looking up, 
I could see only an endless jumble of immense red and 
gray rocks and boulders and, above that, the blazing sun 
in a' cerulean sky. After perhaps 20 minutes of steady, 
heart-pounding climbing, we reached the ridge. It was 
tremendous fun, but I couldn't imagine the Iceman 
doing it with his wooden backpack, quiver full of 
arrows, bow, ax and birch-baric containers. When I told 
one of the glaciologists who works on the project about 
it, he laughed. “He must have known those boulders 
like the back of his hand and probably didn’t have to 
take his hands out of his pockets,” he said. 

About 100 yards away from where we emerged on 
the ridge we noticed a rather large monument to die 
Iceman, which says that the mummy was discovered 
about 75 yards to the northeast. The archaeologists who 
explored the site marked the exact boulder on which he 
died with a red spot of paint, bnt it is always buried 
under several feet of snow. The researchers guess that 
the Iceman's head and shoulders had been exposed for 
less than a week when they were spotted by the German 
hikers. Just two days after the discovery, and even 
before the body could be recovered, several inches of 
new snow fell on the site and buried him again. 

The snow has not been as shallow since then, which 
underscores the remarkable coincidence of his dis- 
covery on that warm September day in 1991. 

Though some people hike up expressly because of 
the Iceman, the Similaun lodge has traditionally 
served as a rest stop for hikers and climbers making 
assaults on the surrounding peaks. One of the most 
popular routes is up the 1 l,SOO-foot Similaun, the fin- 
shaped peak just to the east of the lodge. The hike, not 
for the inexperienced, involves crossing another sec- 
tion of the Niederjochfemer glacier, which requires a 
rope, ice pick and crampons. 

W E can be fairly sure that the Iceman himself 
never set foot on the Similaun or any other 
Alpine peak. Though prehistoric and his- 
toric Alpine inhabitants have left their marks — in the 
form of petroglyphs and ritual artifacts — throughout 
the mountains, the peaks themselves seem to have 
been off limits. Possessing summits has become one of 
the West's favorite leisure activities. But the Iceman's 
last hike was most likely a business trip. 


Iceman, wrote this for The New York Times. 





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On the Banks of the Tweed, Sir Walter Scott’s Dream Home 


By Gloria Goldreich 

M ELROSE, Scotland — The energetic young 
agent at the Scottish Tourist Board in Edinburgh 
was regretful. There were no longer organized 
tours to Abbotsford House. She tried valiantly 
to divert us with alternatives — Stirling Castle, perhaps, or a 
day trip to Anan. But we were insistent. We had come to 
Scotland, in early spring, to visit Abbotsford, Sir Walter 
Scott’s estate in the Border Country. We wanted to see the 
desk at which Sir Walter had written * Tvanhoe” and to stroll 
along the banks of the Tweed, his “shining river.” 

It was determined, at last, that we could reach Abbotsford 
by taking a bus either to Melrose or Galashiels. (Since our 
visit, the bus has added a stop at the village of Tweedbank, just 
half a mile from Abbotsford.) We decided on Melrose be- 
cause of its historic connection to Abbotsford, which had been 
known as Cartley Hall, and then dubbed Clarty Hole (at the 
rime “clarty'' meant dirty or muddy), when Sir Walter 
purchased the small farmhouse and its 1 10 acres (45 hectares) 
of land in 18 1 1. He soon renamed it for the monks of Melrose 
Abbey who forded the river just below the house in the days 
when they owned die land. 

Setting off on our journey the next morning, we headed for 
the Edinburgh central bus station in St. Andrew's Square, 
where we paid $12 for “day return” tickets. We settled back 
for our ride southward through the legendary Lothian coun- 
tryside, Scon’s “land of brown heath and shaggy wood — 
land of the mountains and the flood. ” 

THR country road TO ABBOTSFORD We were almost 
sony to reach Melrose, a pleasant market town with its share 
of welcoming pubs, wide-windowed shops, charming cot- 
tages with mullioned windows and sloping roofs and, of 
course, grim and majestic Melrose Abbey. An accommod- 
ating woman at the tourist office drew us a map to the rural 
road leading to Abbotsford. She also directed us to a nearby 
mill outlet shop where we purchased sweaters, plaid tam-o'- 
shaniers and scarves at prices well below those charged in 
Edinburgh. 

We made our way down the main thoroughfare, turned at a 
small church onto a wide, unpaved country road and found 
ourselves in a dreamy. Brigadoon-like landscape. The path, 
dappled with sunlight at that noon hour, was bordered by 
waving wands of goldenrod. clumps of bluebells, thicknesses 
of heather and rainbow-hued. sky-reaching hollyhocks. We 
walked for three miles, passing working farms, the occasional 
tractor and a small boy who sat on a tree stump cradling a 
lamb, before we saw the gray turrets of Abbotsford rising 
above the gentle Eildon hills. * 

We rewarded ourselves with a sandwich lunch in the 
manor’s attractive tearoom, once its entrance lodge, where a 
plastic bust of Sir Walter stood on the counter beside a 
covered dish of scones. The tearoom and the Abbotsford gift 
shop are supervised bv Patricia Maxwell Scott and Dame Jean 
Maxwell Scon. Sir Walter’s great-great-great-granddaugh- 
ters who still live at the house. 



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The turrets and rowers of Abbotsford, in the Lothian countryside, a 90-minute bus ride from Edinburgh. 


Fortified by strong cups of tea and delicious slices of 
Selkirk bannock, a golden loaf encrusted with currents and 
peel, we entered the house. Our guide peppered her talk with 
references to the author’s novels, poems and histories. The 
original farmhouse, she told us. was gradually demolished 
beginning in 1822 and the stately mansion rose on its site. Sir 
Walter, with his passion for land, expanded the estate to 1 .400 
acres and planted trees along the River Tweed. 

She led us into his book-lined study where we gazed 
reverently at the writing desk with the two secret drawers in 
which the love letters he wrote to his wife, Margaret Charlotte 
Charpentier. were concealed. A portrait of Rob Roy stares 
vigilantly down at visitors. Sir Walter was not content to 
simply chronicle history: he surrounded himself with relics of 
great events. 

A small turret room, known affectionately as the “speak- 
of-it.” adjoins the study: within its narrow confines Sir 
Walter would consult on matters of discipline with his two 
sons and two daughters. “Come in here and we’ll speak of 


it.” he would say. Today the room contains a bronze death 
mask of the writer, his expression more sad than stem. 

Our next stop was the library, with its richly molded ceiling 
and its collection of 9,000 volumes, many of them leather 
bound and stamped in gilt, showing signs of having been 
handled often and gently. Several tomes dealing with witch- 
craft and demonology give a hint of the dark side of the 
writer’s imagining. 

IRS.T editions of “The Lady of the Lake” and “The 
Hr Lay of the Last Minstrel” rest in two glass cases. The 


■ original manuscripts (just a portion of the latter;, our 
guide tola us with ill-concealed regret, are in the collection of 
the Morgan Library in Manhattan. Sir William Allan’s por- 


trait of the writer's eldest son. Walter, the second baronet, in 
a dramatic hussar’s uniform, hangs above the marble fire- 
place. In this room, there is a curious and eclectic collection of 
historic treasures. Rob Roy’s purse is on display, along with a 
lock of Prince Charlie's hair. Helen MacGregor’s brooch and 


Robert Burns’s own tumbler, etched with verses. C.M. Har- 
die's intricately detailed painting ofihe meeting of Scott and 
Bums in 1787 at Science House in Edinburgh hangs on the 
wall, and a bust of Sir Walter Scott directs its gaze at those 
who linger to study odd bits of memorabilia. 

The drawing room, its walls hung with Chinese hand- 
painted paper, the colorful mandarin figures still vivid, is 
dominated by. Sir Henry Raeburn’s portrait of Sir Walter, 
seated, with his treasured bull mastiff. Camp, at his feet and 
his greyhound, Percy, at his side. (Dogs were important 
members of foe household: deceased pets have their own neat 
cemetery on foe grounds.) Here too is the Portuguese ebony 
rolltop desk and marching chair, a gift from King George IV. 
who visited Scotland in 1822 and, upon being introduced to 
foe writer, said, “Sir Walter Scott, foe man in Scotland I most 
wish to see.” In a glass case is a silver urn, a gift from Lord 
Byron, containing bones found in Athens in 18 1 1 , the year Sir 
. Walter took title to Abbotsford. An odd housewarming gift, 
but the author of “Don Juan" must have known what would 
truly please the author of * Tvanhoe. “ 

Wiaponsof Old 

In foe armory, its ocher-colored walls hung with weapons 
ranging from muskets to sabers, foe author's fascination wjrh 
instruments of death, war and violence fully reveals itself. 
Rob Roy’s broadsword and his dirk, foe double-barreled 
carbine shouldered by Andreas Hoffer, the Tyrolese patriot 
(proving that Sir Walter’s passion for weapons was not 
Limited to foe arms of Scotland). Bonnie Dundee's pistol. Sir 
Walter’s own blunderbuss, yeomanry sword and pistol, as 
well as an old double-barreled flint lock gun (his weapon of 
choice on bunting forays; are on view. More incongruous in 
this martini collection of a humane man of letters are in- 
struments of torture — several pairs of thumb screws, battle 
axes, executioners' swords. 

The guide told us that the armory remains exactly as Sir 
Walter arranged it. He was obsessive about Abbotsford and its 
contents. When threatened with personal bankruptcy in 1 826. 
because of mismanagement by his publishers, he labored 
assiduously to pay off his debts so that he might maintain the 
house and the estate. 

The last room we visited was foe dining room. Its polished 
oak table is set in perpetuity with Sir Walter's elegant 
Coalport dinner service. Its long windows overlook the 
verdant lawn, sloping downward to foe River Tweed. Ji was in 
this room, on a conch placed near foe window, that Sir Walter 
Scott died, after a long illness, on Sept. 21. 1832. His son-in- 
law and biographer, J.G. Lockhart, wrote: “It was a beautiful 
day — so warm that every window was wide open — and so 
perfectly still that the sound of all others most delicious to his 
ear, the gentle ripple of the Tweed over its pebbles, was 
distinctly audible. We too heard the gentle ripple of the 
Tweed and watched as swaths of sunlight cast their brightness 
across the lawn. 

Gloria Goldreich. a novelist and essayist, wrote this for The 
New York Times. 



DINING 


Grand Old Restaurant Gets Great New Chef 


By Patricia Wells 

Irutmjuniuii Herald Tntmiif 


P ARIS — Mark my words: 
This may be foe first, but not 
foe last time you'll hear the 
name Frederic Anton. One of 
a group of modest, hard-working, ex- 
ceptionally well-trained chefs un- 
leashed one year ago when Joel 
Robuchon closed his restaurant doors, 
Anton took over foe helm of the il- 
lustrious Pre Catelan in the Bois de 
Boulogne several months ago. 

As a Robuchon acolyte, Anton was 
responsible for ordering — then ac- 
cepting or rejecting — every leaf of 
lettuce, every grain of caviar, every 
squiggling langoustine that entered the 
kitchen. A perfect dish, as any cook 
knows, begins with absolutely fresh, 
flawless ingredients. In foe kitchens of 
foe Pre Catelan, Anton remarkably il- 
lustrates all he learned in the school of 


foe master, then adds his own uncanny 
ability to nudge ingredients, create 
combinations foot sing on foe palate 
and, most of all, satisfy. 

Like any good chef, his solid culin- 
ary foundation serves simply as a back- 
drop. He stays within veiy traditional 
classical parameters, all foe while play- 
ing his own distinct tune. 

Rarely does a French chef get the 
point of risotto, hut Anton understands it 
it the way only a pro can: One bite of his 
smooth, alabaster creamy risotto layered 
with parchment-thin slices of fresh 
white summer truffles, Parmesan and 
powerfully intense tiny fresh gimlle 
mushrooms and you almost do not want 
to continue. For a second bite means 
you'll be on your way to finishing this 
ingenious, ephemeral dish, a meal all on 
ns own. The texture, flavor, aroma and 
essence of each ingredient shines 
through, yet each plays an essential note 
in a minor culinary symphony. 


Every dish follows a repeated theme: 
The star ingredient is flanked by an 
enhancing vegetable and herb. So 
sparking fresh sea bass is teamed up 
with a fennel mousse and a vinaigrette 
perfumed with anise. Fresh farm pi- 
geon finds a home with creamy fava 
beans and artichokes stewed in herbs 
and fruity olive ofl. Miniature summer 
vegetables — tomatoes, zucchini, 
onions and eggplant — are stuffed with 
a mixture of minced lamb, curry and 
cumin, making for a dish where the fat 
fixes foe flavor but does not leave one 
logy or laden. 

A dmittedly, desserts rarely 
send me into fits of ecstasy, but 
Anton manages to charm once 
again, with such bnlliahtly satisfying 
combinations as warm cherries, tiny 
caramelized waffles and bergamot ice 
cream; caramelized pears, fresh figs 
and cinnamon-rich fig compote; and 


crusty gal cites, rhubarb marmalade and 
chicoiy ice cream. 

Dining indoors or out, this grand 
tum-of-the-ceniuiy restaurant is meant 
to offer a great experience. French 
style. Prices follow suit, though the 
well-priced 295-franc ($47) weekd.iv 
lunch menu will allow diners to get u 
glimpse of the chef syoung genius. The 
wine list is long and elaborate, and the re 
is a bevy of young, enthusiastic wine 
stewards to steer you toward a wine to 
fit your palate and your pockerbook. 

Le Pre Catelan. Route dc Surest tes 
Bois de Boulogne. Paris 16; tel 01-44 
14-41 -J4; fax: 01-45-24-43-25. Closed 
Sunday evening and Monday. Credit 
cards: American Express. Diners Club 
Eurocard. MasterCard, Visa, ^-tnl ' 
lunch menu (355 including 
Menus at 5*0 and 7 SO francs 4 / 

erne . 5,5 m rn franc! 

including sendee hut not wine. ’ 


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PAGE 11 



Angler Dives Into Deep Water 


By James Gorman 

fa 1 for* 77w« Sfn-irr 




N a trip to Florida this winter 
I discovered a troubling con- 
flict in my relationship with 
the underwater world. One 
way or another, the water and what lives 
in it has always been a source of pleasure 
and fascination for me. I've fished since 
I was a child, in ponds, lakes, streams 
and drainage ditches. I’m sure when I 
was very young I fished in poddies. On 
summer vacations at the Connecticut 
shore, I went crabbing and dragged a 
small hand seine with my cousins, catch- 
ing dogfish, sea horses and minnows. 

I love swamps with a passion. My 
wife and I spent part of our honeymoon 
visiting the Okefenokee. And a few 
years ago I traveled from Australia to 
Antarctica and then across the Pacific to 
Chile on an icebreaker, which gave me a 
chance to encounter the ocean in its 
liquid and frozen states. On that trip 1 
watched divers go beneath the Antarctic 
ice. Desperate to gain that sort of pas- 
sage to the world beneath the water’s 
surface, J learned to scuba dive. 

to sic ok notto sbc Fishing is a kind 
of exploration, but it is conducted by 
instinct, by feel, by trial and error. Part of 
the excitement comes from the way the 
surface of the water blocks, or at least 
hinders, vision. When I fish for trout, 
wading in a stream or river, it is usually 
with a fly, often one that floats on the 
surface of the water. I imagine the pres- 
ence of fish under the surface and place 
the fly near a spot where a fish might be. 
When the imagined fish turns real and 


strikes, if is an elemental antiphony, like 
the completion of a prayer. 

My first chance to get a good look at 
life in the water was on a trip to Bonaire, 
an island near Venezuela that has a pro- 
tected reef and runs a thriving business 
for divers. The water was clear and 
warm, and full of ail the creatures a diver 
wants to see — moray eels and oc- 
topuses. barracudas anti parrotfish. At 
night, with the dark water around me, I 
swam next to a silver tarpon as long as I 
am talL I felt like a bird-watcher who had 
learned to fly, a privileged guest with a 
license to look beneath the surface. 

Since then I have made a few other 
dives, and I keep fishing. But until this 
past winter I had never put my two ways 
of exploring the water together. 


AST January my family and 1 went 
teys. We 


L fo the Florida Keys. We went fish- 
ing one afternoon on the reef and 
caught a lot of fish — blue runners, 
grunts, hogfish, porgies, yellowtail snap- 
per. We threw most of them back, keep- 
ing only enough for dinner. Part of me 
fun was that you could glimpse the fish. 
'The wafer was a reflective but not 
opaque barrier, and we looked for flashes 
of light and color under the surface. We 
would toss a baited hook in that spot and 
wait for the strike and the bent rod. 

The next day I took my 12-year-old 
daughter on her first dive. We saw 
sharks. lobsters, an enormous ray that 
flew up from its bed in the sand, and 
many nsh, including the very same sort 
we had been catching the day before. 
They were swimming peacefully, and I 
imagined what the scene would be if one 
of them bit on a hook and began thrash- 


MOVIE GUIDE 


Star Maps 

Directed frv Miguel Arteta. 
US. 

When 18-year-old Carlos 
(Douglas Spain) returns to Los 
Angeles from Mexico at die 
stan of "Star Maps," Miguel 
Arteta ’s enveloping, sharply 
etched first feature, he has the 
baby-faced naivete to imagine 
himself an overnight star. Like 
Joe Buck of "Midnight Cow- 
boy." which Arteta con- 
sciously evokes with his hero’s 
first bus ride, Carlos thinks 
charm and a can-do attitude are 
enough to get him anywhere. 
Dazzled by daydreams of Hol- 
lywood, Carlos feels boyishly 
invincible. He doesn’t even 
mind the fact that a like- 

« minded fool can be found on 
every corner 1 . They are quite 
literally on comers, since Ar- 
reta imagines a network of 
vounc male prostitutes work- 
ing Lbs Angeles streets. In a 
racket partly overseen by Pepe 
(Efrain Figueroa). Carlos's 
petty hoodlum of a father, 
teenage boys peddle maps to 
movie stars’ houses as a front 
for sellins themselves. Virtu- 


ally all 'tire characters here are 
kidding themselves, and the 
collective effect of their self- 
deceptions gives die film’s 
California culture a satirical 
sting. ‘‘Star Maps," a small, 
knowing film with an acerbic 
overview, tells how Carlos 
finds the truth about himself in 
the fallout from other people's 
lies. It introduces Arteta as a 
filmmaker witha credible style 
and a flair for caustic story- 
telling. (Janet Maslin.NYT) 

Wedding Bell Bmies 

Directed bv Dana Lustig. 

U.S. 

The best to be said for "Wed- 
ding Bell Blues" is that it’s cm 
a par with leafing through 
dusty back issues of Cosmo- 
politan on a lonely night As 
three unhappily single women 
(played by Illeana Douglas. 
Paulina Porizkova and Julie 
Warner) strike out in search of 
quickie nuptials, the film 
manages to use face crea m , 
leg shaving, talk of mastur- 
bation and words like "colon- 
ic" to draw would-be laughs. 
The opening credits are ac- 


companied by a pregnancy- 
test montage. Meanwhile, 
fashion hints and halfhearted 
feminism try to give this 
creaky and formulaic material 
more edge. The three heroines 
even go to Las Vegas for a 
madcap adventure, as they 
meet new men, catch Debbie 
Reynolds’s nightclub act and. 
in one case, encounter an Elvis 
imitator who croons at a wed- 
ding chapel. Beyond the wise- 
cracking appeal of Douglas 
even in feeble material and the 
enjoyably glamorous pres- 
ence of Porizkova, the film 
has only one newish twist: Its 
three heroines wish to many 
only in self-defense, so their 
relatives will stop nagging. 
The film mixes girlfriendly 
camaraderie with a glum, 
kvetchy tone. Every now and 
then it denies its retro roots by 
taking on a real feminist issue 
(pregnancy and abortion) or 
by half-humorously proclaim- 
ing its principles. "I mean,” 
quips Douglas’s character, 
"isn't this what all my sisters 
were fighting for in the ’60s?" 
No. (Janet Maslin , NYT i 


Picture Perfect 

Directed by Glenn Gordon 
Caron. U.S'. 

As a good girl trying to be bad. 
Jennifer Aniston attempts to 
tweak out from her cutesy role 
in -‘‘Friends." Naturally, she 
never gets that bad! She's an 
appealing performer, and the 
movie — a romantic comedy 
full of mix-ups — is mod- 
erately watcbable. Aniston is 
Kate, an advertising executive 
who gets a promotion based on 
a lie. When her best friend 
Darcy (Dleana Douglas) in- 
forms the boss that Kate’s en- 
gaged to a music yideo di- 
rector called Nick (Jay Mohr), 
it * impresses Mr. Mercer 
enough to give Kate a juicy 
account Unfortunately, Nick 
— a sweet guy who videotapes 
weddings — has no idea of 
this "betrothal." This is an- 
other of those movies in which 
mismatched partners eventu- 
ally straighten themselves out; 
seen one. seen ’em alL But 
Aniston is sweet enough to 
make things bearable. And 
that’s the point of this exercise, 
right? ( Desson Howe. WP) 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

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EMBASSY SERVICE 

Furnished /Unfurnished Rentals 


YOlfft REAL ESTATE 

AGENT iN PARIS 

Tefc 4720 3005 


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Gritty, Not Pretty, but What a City 


By Dirk Johnson 

AVm 1 fori Times Sendee 


Saw G.'UoVmp/lHT 


ing about and trying to swim deeper as 
the line pulled it up toward the air. 

That was the moment of dissonance. It 
was not a great surprise that fish did not 
like being caught. The dissonance had 
more to do with the difference between 
the two underwater worlds I had con- 
structed, one by imagining and the other 
by seeing — a veiled realm that I could 
probe and search with bait or lure, or a 
richly colored, vividly alive community 
suddenly open to my eyes. 

Hooked on Fishing 

Fishing may be a legitimate way to 
obtain dinner. Or, when fish are released 
after being caught, fis hing may be the 
least bloody of blood sports. But it is a 
crude way to look into another place, 
blind by design. To the diver, all knowl- 
edge is good; anything that can be seen 
should be seen. The angler wants to 
leave some mysteries. The diver is a 
realist, the angler a romantic. 

My problem is how to be both. And 
my solution to the problem is. I’m sorry 
to say, based on a willful refusal to 
choose one way or the other. 

My plan is that I won’t dive in my 
favorite trout streams and I won’t fish on 
coral reefs. That way I can be a friendly 
watcher of parrotfish and moray eels and 
a distant predator of brook trout. I have 
hopes that my lack of integrity will go 
unpunished. If, as is suggested in "A 
River Runs Through It," Norman 
Maclean’s ode to family, trout fishing 
and Montana, God is not only a fish- 
erman but a dry-fly fisherman, I should 
be in good shape. But if, by some chance, 
God is a fish. I’m in very deep water. 


C HICAGO — This Midwestern 
behemoth is a city that seems 
eternally ai work; building, 
shaping, dealing. But in sum- 
mer, Chicago is at play. Sunbaihers on 
the Oak Street Beach and sailboats on 
Lake Michigan, baseball at Wrigley 
Field and iced tea at Rush Sheer outdoor 
caffcs. Chicago rhese days seems one 
long celebration, a time for survivors of 
the famously brutal winters to cherish 
the loveliness, and liberation, of sum- 
mertime in the city. 

The mood of this traditionally blunr, 
no-nonsense capital of Middle America is 
positively giddy at the moment Crime 
has fallen. The economy is booming. New 
town houses and shops are transforming 
old neighborhoods. Growing numbers of 
suburbanites have been returning to shop 
and play, and even to live. 

Events during the month of August 
range from outdoor jazz and the annual 
Ravinia music festival to theater and an, 
both indoors and out. 

Bebop by the Lake 

The Chicago Jazz Festival, a cele- 
bration from Aug. 28 to 3 1 in Grant Park 
alongside Lake Michigan, will feature 
Betty Carter, the bebop singer, as well as 
Clarence (Garemouth) Brown and his 
Big Band, and the Joe Henderson Quar- 
tet. among many others. Seats go fast, so 
take a chair or a blanket to spread on the 
grass. Performances are Aus. 28, 6 to 10 
P.M.; Aug. 29. 5 to 10 P.M. ? “and Aug. 30 
and 31, noon to 10 P.M. Admission is 
free. 

One of the top acts (literally) at the 
Chicago Air ana Water Show, an ex- 
hibition of daring over Lake Michigan 
on Aug. 23 and 24, will be the U.S. Air 
Force Thunderbirds, precision-forma- 
tion fighter pilots commanding F-16 
Fighting Falcons. The beaches at Oak 
Street or North Avenue are good places 
to watch. Exhibitions by trick water- 
skiers start at 9 A.M. The air show begins 
at II A.M., with the Thunderbirds per- 
forming at 3 P.M. 

The Gold Coast Art Fair on Friday, 
Saturday and Sunday, on the sidewalks 
jusr northwest of downtown, features the 
works of about 300 artists, mostly paint- 
ings and sculpture. 

The fair is centered on the intersection 
of Erie and Wells, in the city’s River 
North area. 

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra is 
presenting a series of open-air evening 
performances this weekend at Ravinia. 
(847) 266-5100, in suburban Highland 



PjuI M«.ihJclh l.-f The ^ 14 L TiTOl*'. 

Summer's many pleasures in Chicago include cafe -sitting on Rush Street.'* 


Park. A Metra "Ravinia Park Special" 
train leaves Madison and Canal Streets at 
5:50 and arrives at Ravinia's gate at 6:30 
P.M. (54 round trip.). The orchestra will 
present the works of Beethoven, Schu- 
bert, Brahms. Verdi and Mahler, among 
others. Other performers at Ravinia in- 
clude the flutist James Galway with the 
Ravinia Festival Orchestra on Aug. 14 
and the Joffrey Ballet of Chicago on 
Aug. 27 to 30. Tickets, S8 to $40. 

The Sieppenwolf Theatre Company, 
with its reputation for visceral, highly 
charged works, and alumni that include 
John Malkovich, Joan Allen and Gary 
Sinise. will present “A Fair Country,” 
by Jon Robin Baitz, about a family in 
South Africa, through Aug. 24. Perfor- 
mances are at the Steppenwolf Theatre, 
1650 North Halsfed Streer, (312) 335- 
1650. Tickets, $24.50 to $36.50. 

A COLLECTION of sculpture 
from India, the Himalayas and 
Southeast Asia will be displayed 
at the Art Institute of Chicago through 
Ocl 26. The sculptures are chiseled from 
sandstone, as well as delicately crafted in 
bronze, copper, silver and gold. They 
include images of the gods Shiva and 
Vishnu and an elegant seated India (the 
Vedic god of the heavens who hurls thun- 
derbolts). They are on loan from the 
collection of Chicagoans Marilynn Als- 
dorf and her late husband, James. The 
museum has one of the world's largest 
collections of Impressionist art, among 
other treasures. Suggested admission $7; 
free Tuesday. Open Monday to Friday 
10:30 AJM. to 4:30 P.M., until 8 P.M. on 
Tuesday; 10 AM. to 5 P~M Saturday, 
noon to 5 Sunday. 


The best place for shopping and’ 
people-watching is along North 
Michigan Avenue, a stretch tbat includes' 
the grand old limestone Water Tower, 
the only major building downtown to 
escape the Chicago Fire of 1 87 1 . A mile 
or so to the south, noisy El trains circle 
the famous Loop, still a bustling com- 
mercial district, a place where ordinary 
Chicagoans tend to do their shopping, 
rather than on the expensive North 
Michigan Avenue. 

TALLEST BUILDING IN AMERICA Just 
west of the Ei tracks is the nation '$ tallest 
building, the 1 10-siory Sears Tower. An 
observation deck on the 103d floor is 
open daily, 9 A.M. to 11 P.M. Ad- 
mission is 56.75. The entrance is on 
Jackson Boulevard between Wacker 
Drive and Franklin Street. 

The Chicago Architecture Founda- 
tion, (312) 922-3432, offers excellent 
architecture tours, by foot, bus, bike or 
riverboat, for 510 to S25. Sites include 
the Frank Lloyd Wright home at 951 
Chicago Avenue in the suburb of Oak 
Park; the dramatic Wrigley Building at 
the river bridge on Michigan Avenue, 
and the Carson Pirie Scott Department 
Store at State and Madison streets. 

The Field Museum is a stately Geor- 
gian marble building displaying 23 
Egyptian mummies, among other arti- 
facts; visitors descend into a full-size 
copy of a mastaba, or burial chamber, to 
reach the mummies. Through Sept. 1. 
the Dinosaur Families exhibit features 
bones from the Titanosaurus and Majun- 
gasaurus, discovered recently in Mad- 
agascar. and a soaring dinosaur robot 
that roars like the real thing. 


ARTS GUIDE 


AUSTRIA 


Vienna 

Bank Austria Kunstforum, tal: 
(7) 71101-5737, open daily. Con- 
tlnulngfib Aug. 17: “Warhol, 
Beuys, Bruce Nauman. Gerhard 
Richter." ISO German and Amer- 
ican works of the 1960s and 70®. 


BELGIUM 


Brussels 

Palais dee Beaux-Arta, tel: (2) 
507-8466, dosed Mondays. Con- 
ti nulng/To Aug. 17: “Alberto 
Burrl." 100 works using tom sack- 
ing, tar, burnt wood and plastic by 
the Italian artist (191 5-1 095). 


BRITAIN 


Caubrhme 

Fitzwilliam Museum, tel: (1223) 
332-900, dosed Mondays. To Nov. 
30: "William Blake: The Marriage 
of Heaven and Hell." This exhib- 
ition is based around the satirical 
attack by William Blake on the 
18th-century Swedish philoso- 
pher, Emmanuel Swedenborg. 
The book has been dismembered 
and can thus be displayed in its 
entirety. 

Edinburgh 

National Gallery of Scotland, tel: 
{131 ) 332-2266, open dally. To Oct 
19: 'The Portrait of a Lady: Sar- 
gent and Lady Agnew." More than 
35 works by John Singer Sargent 
(1856-1925) and his contempor- 
aries, such as Millais and Whistler. 
The portrait ol Lady Agnew of 
Lochnaw is the centerpiece ol the 
exhibition. 

London 

British Museum, tel: (171) 323: 
8525, open dally. To Aug. 31: "Im- 
ages of Kyoto and Osaka In 1 9th- 
Century Japanese Prints. Paint- 
ings and Illustrated Books/' 
Hiroshige's views of Kyoto and 
Osaka often borrowed composi- 
tions from the illustrated gaz- 
etteers of the two cities. He thus 
established a new vision tor de- 
picting the two cities which in turn 
was emulated by other print artists 
of Japan. 

National Gallery, tel: (171) 747- 
2865, open daily. Continmng/To 
Sept 7: "Cranach: a Closer Look." 
Eleven paintings that coverthe be- 
ginning of Lucas Cranach the Eld- 
er’s appointment as a court painter 
to the Electors of Saxony in 1 505 to 
his last years as a political prisoner 
of Emperor Charles V. Continu- 
ing/ To Sept 28: “Seurat and the 
Bathers," Traces how Seurat 
(1859-1891) prepared himself 
over the course of a year to pro- 
duce "Bathers at Asnleres," a 
painting that tantalized and trou- 
bled critics of the time. 

Royal Academy of Arts, tel: (171) 
439-7438. open daily. Continu- 
ing/ To Sept. 28: “Hiroshige: Im- 
ages of Mist, Rain, Moon and 
Snow." More than ha contempor- 
aries, Hiroshige (1797-1858) ex- 
plored atmospheric landscape and 
his prints of peasants in the mist, of 
travelers in the snow and of moonlit 
landscapes give a vivid picture of 
19th-century Japanese society. 

■ FRANCE 

Lille 

Palais das Beaux-Arts, tel: 03- 
20-06-78-17, dosed Tuesdays. To 
Aug. 30: "Dessins d'itaile." More 
than 120 drawings dating from the . 



1 Mr 




Emile Bernard's “ Iron Bridges. Asnieres " can be seen 
in the “Seurat and the Bathers” exhibition in London. 


15th to the 18th century. Features 
stucties, landscapes, portraits, ar- 
chitectural drawings and veduias by 
Botticelli. Filippino Lippi, Raphael, 
Titian and Guardi. 

Paris 

Centre Georges Pompidou, tel: 
01 -44-78-1 2-33, closed Tuesdays. 
Continuing^ To Sept 29: "Made In 
France: 1947-1997." Documents 
French artistic creation in painting, 
sculpture, drawing, photography 
and video over the last 50 years. 
Continuing^ To Sept. 29: 
“Fernand Leger." More than 200 
paintings and drawings of contem- 
porary subjects by the French artist 
(1881-1955). 

Institut du Monde Arabe, tel: 01- 
40-51-38-36, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/To Aug. 31 : "Soudan: 
Royaumes sur le Nil." Documents 
archaeological finds from Sudan. 

■ Gl.MAMT 

Cologne 

Wallraf-flrchartz-Museum, tel: 
(221) 221-2372, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing' To Sept 14: “L'Art 
Gourmand: Stilleben fur Auge, 
Kochkunfif und Gourmets von 
Ae risen bis Van Gogh." Still lifes 
for connoisseurs and gourmets: 30 
works by European artists dating 
back to ihe 16 th century. 

Dusseldohf 

Kunstsammtung Nordrhein- 
Westfalen, tel: (211) 8381-0. To 
Aug. 10: "Barnett Newman: Paint- 
ings, Sculptures and Drawings." 
Works by the American artist 
(1905-1970), a founder of New 
York Abstract Expressionism. 


er (bom 1938) best known for his 
upside-down heads and figures. 

■ PORTUGAL ~ ~ 

Lisbon 

Centro Cultural de Belem, tel: (1 ) 
301-9606, open daily. To Aug. 31: 
“Francis Picabia: Antologia." After 
a short post-impressionist period, 
the French painter (1879-1953) 
became an active memberof Da da 
In Paris, the nihilistic movement 
that opened the way for Surreal- 
ism. 

B SWITZERLAND 

Basel 

Kunstmuseum, tel: (61) 271- 
0445, dosed Mondays. To Sepi. 7: 
“Hans Holbein dJ. : Die Druck- 
graphik im Kuptersdchkahineit 
Basel." Around the mid-ISth cen- 
tury, Basel developed into a book- 
printing center and later attracted 

artists such as Hans Holbein the 
' Younger. The show offers an over- 
view of Holbein's woodblocks and 
copperplate prints designed for 
books. 

Geneva 

Musee Rath, tel: (22) 310-5270, 
dosed Mondays. Continuing/ To 
SspL 7: “Balthasar Burkhard: 
Efoge da I’Ombre. 1 ' The exhibition 


traces Butkhards evolution, from 
the large ieal\stc cnctcgraons of 
the 1960s. to h.s fracmer.tary ex- 
ploration ol the human pcay. the 
Japanese inliuence and me recent 
photographs of animals. 

1 UNITED S TATES 

LOS ANO EXES 

Loa Angeles County Museum of 
Art, tel: (213) 85 7-6000. closed. 
Mondays. To Oct. 13: "Charles 
Renn/e Mackintosh." Explores the' 
output of the Scottish architect and 
designer (1666- 1 928) with 200 ar- 
chitectural drawings, furniture. 
decorative arts, architectural mod- 
els and watercolors. 

New York 

Museum of Modern Art, tel: (21 2) 
708-9400, dosed Wednesdays. To. 
Sept. 2; "Paris: The 1890s.' 1 Prints 
created in the last decade of the 
191h century by Bonnard. Maurice' 
Denis, Renoir, Signac. Toulouse- 
Lautrec and Vuillard, as well as. 
advertising posters, political jour- 
nals and theater programs 

Pittsburgh 

Frick Art Museum, tel: (412) 371- 
0600. dosed Mondays. To Oct. 19: 
"Plains Indian Drawings, 1865- 
1935: Pages from a Visual His- 
tory." Examines late 19th- and 
early 20th-century Native Americ- 
an ledger drawings, i.e. drawings 
created at the time the Rams In- 
dians were fighting the military and 
the white settlers. 

Washington 

Freer Gallery of Art, tel: (202} 
357-4880. open daily. Opened on 
Aug, 2 and continuing indefinitely: 
"Shades of Blue and Green: 
Chinese Celadon Ceramics." 
More than 40 glazed stoneware 
vessels, made in China between 
200 B.C. and the last irrpenal dy- 
nasty. document the use of the 
gray-green glaze known m the 
West as celadon. 

CLOSING SOON 

Aug. 10: “229th Royal Academy 
Summer Exhibition 1997.'* Royal. 
Academy, London. 

Aug: 10: "Donald Judd: Escultura. 

M oblliario, Gravure." Centro Cul- 
tural de Belem, Lisbon. 

Aug. 10; 'The Spirit of Ancient 
Peru.'' M.H. de Young Memorial 
Museum, San Francisco. 


ISRAEL 


JERUSALEM 

The Israel Museum, tel: (2) 6709- 
S1 1. open daily. Contimrfngfib 
Sept 6: “The Ingenious Machine 
of Nature: Four Centuries of Art 
and Anatomy." Traces the efforts 
of anatomists and artists, such as 
Leonardo and Rubens, who ex- 
plored the human body. 


ITALY 


BOLOONA 

Galleria d’Artie Modems, tel; (51) 
50-28-59, dosed Mondays. To 
Sept 7: "Baselitz." Works by the 
German Neo-Expressionlsl paint- 


Visiting New York City? 

Distinguished 509 room hotel overlooking 
Gramercy Park. Excellent Restaurant, 
Cocktail Lounge. Piano Bar and Room 
Service, Multi-lingual staff. Minutes to 
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Banquet and Meeting Facilities. 

Singles $135-140 • Doubles $145 
Suites $180 & Up 

Gramercy Park Hotel 

21st bireel & texingion Ave. 

New York. New York 1 0010 
212-475-4320 
Fax: 212-505-0535 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST &, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


AIRBUS: Following Boeing Deal, Tug-of ■ War Over Restructuring European Aviation Takes onaNew Urgency 


Continued from Page 1 

hand over their independence and in- 
dustrial capabilities to a European ven- 
ture. 

“Jr’s short-sighted French thinking," 
said a French source close to Airbus. 
“Airbus is going to change, but it will be 
for die worse for everyone if France 
doesn’t join it in time to help lead.” 
Deadlock could throw into doubt the 
conventional wisdom that France is the 
natural partner for Germany in defense 
matters. British companies, increasingly 
nimble players in the military sphere, 
have staked setting des with their Ger- 
man counterparts. 

On the other hand, success by these 
three countries in restructuring Airbus 
would supply a big piece in the puzzling 
problem of consolidating European de- 
fense industries. These countries are the 
main Airbus partners and, not coincid- 
entally, the only major European 
weapons manufacturers. A fracture 
among them would dim prospects for a 
streamlined, cross-border defense in- 
dustrial base. 

A three-way tug of war has been going 
on behind the scenes in ministries and 
boardrooms for months, but the question 
of whether and how much Airbus In- 
dustrie needs to change suddenly ac- 
quired new urgency early this summer 
when Boeing acquired McDonnell 
Douglas Corp. 

The new company will be a giant — 
worth $60 billion, compared with the 
estimated $20 billion value of Airbus 
Industrie. As the sole U.S. producer of 
airliners, it will have special clout with 
customers and suppliers. 

Its big new military side means that 
Boeing also will get the advantages of an 
overlapping technological base in which 
parts and processes can be swapped and 
shared. Additionally, the U.S. company i 
will be better balanced to ride out the 
often-opposing business cycles in ci- 
vilian and military aircraft orders. 

To let the new company do business in : 
Europe, the European Union wrung | 
some concessions out of Boeing, but a 1 
French official admitted privately that < 
these restraints amount to “a breathing < 
space,” not a long-term solution for < 
Airbus. < 

It is ironic that this challenge should , 
arise so quickly for Airbus Industrie. < 
long held out as a model of European j 
cooperation. 

The challenge was encapsulated in : 
comments last weekend by Juergen t 
Schrempp, head of Daimler-Benz AG. I 
the German partner in Airbus. Mr. i 
Schrempp said that Boeing's moves did : 
not change the rules or distort com- « 
petition. But Boeing's quantum leap in- : 
tensified the pressures on Airbus to re- i 
structure itself as a real company. | 



cision-making cycle at Airbus, which for a merger with Dassault, builder of 
insiders say has often suffered from sys- France’s Mirage warplanes, 
tematic second-guessing by the own- Many analysts concluded that his 
ere. agenda, apparently with government 

As one source explained. ‘ ‘Every time backing, was to regroup the French avi- 
Airhus comes up with a commercial plan ation industry sg that France had a whip 
or an engineering proposal, each owner band in any pan-European amnge- 
company refuses to sign off on if unci/ meats. Aiarmed by this prospect, ontaro 


* ' i - 


Tho Rise of Airbus j 


World jet-afriiner market. 


company refuses to sign on on it unnr menu., nuu 
the idea has been checked by its own and Germai 
marketing or design team. ’ * restructurin 

In the prospective new Airbus, the year to win 
current partners would function as share- But Mr. 

holders, who would hold Airbus man- sleeve, and 


and Germany insisted on a timetable for 
restructuring Airbus and seemed late last 
year to win grudging assent from Paris. 

But Mr. Mkhot had a card up his 
sleeve, and just ahead of the Pans air 



agement responsible for results without show this spring he stunned his foreign 
interfering in every business decision. partners by announcing that Aerospatiale 
Rather than turn to governments for had no intention of handing oyer its plants 
subsidies, the company could fund ma- or design teams to a reorganized Airbus, 
jor projects by borrowing money from British and German exasperation was 
bants or going to the stock market If shared by many French officials and 


other airlines and countries around the 
world could invest they would have an 
extra incentive to buy Airbus planes. 


executives. As a French industrialist in a 
rival company pointed out “trying to 
keep our design teams and production 


Change along these lines, however capacity out would mean that Britain and 


rational-sounding, would be wrenching 
for Airbus' owners. 

Not only would it affect the sensitive 


Germany run the place and hire all the 
new teams they want while Aerospa- 
tiale’s assets wither on die vine until 


defense sector, but it also would require French taxpayers get fed up paying for 
downsizing, some symbolic and some them." 


Roughly half of Aerospatiale’s cur- 
rent business, for example, would pre- 
sumably be shifted from French state 
ownership to a European venture. Some 


But in the view of most French spe- 
cialists. Airbus offers the last best hope 
for easing France out of its policies of 
national independence in aviation, in- 
cluding military aircraft, a tradition that 


Aerospatiale workers would lose their survives in the refusal of Dassault to join 




jobs: Aerospatiale management would 
lose a lot of turf. 

“There are jobs involved and, even 
worse, egos, particularly in France,” a 
German official said. But a growing 
number of people at Daimler and BAe 
see the move as the best hope of long- 
term survival. 

Although Airbus has been weighing 


European multinational warplane pro- 
grams and successful insistence that 
France build its own. 

Tbe latest of those, the Rafale, may 
see its French government support 
shrink, and it seems unlikely that France 
will feel it can afford to build another 
new plane on its own. 

France's strategy, many analysts say. 


sustain the European venture. In other 
words. Airbus can survive competitively 
only if it becomes the core of the aviation 
industry in Europe. 

It has a long way to go. 

To start with. Airbus Industrie is not a 
real company, it is a consortium sup- 
ported by four European countries 
whose aircraft-builders have stakes in ic 
Germany's Daimler-Benz (37.9 per- 
cent), France's Aerospatiale (37.9 per- 
cent). British Aerospace PLC (20 per- 
cent) and Spain's Construcciones 
Aeronaut icas SA (4.2 percent). Major 
decisions about Airbus require unan- 
imity among the partners. 

Airbus itself has a small central man- 
agement, but the four owner-companies 
basically handle the manufacturing and 
have never pooled their industrial assets, 
not even their Airbus -dedicated oper- 
ations. Instead, each company builds 
some pan of each Airbus — for ex- 
ample, British Aerospace turns out the 
wings — and then sends the finished 
product to the Airbus assembly facility 


share of Airbus sales, so instead of a some time, management has ordered a 
central accounting based on actual costs, blackout on public discussion of its op- 
the figures are separate calculations tions, apparently because of political 
within each company's own books, sensitivities among the owners. 

None of them bad even publicly dis- But an Airbus executive, speaking on 
closed a figure for its net profit or loss condition of anonymity, confirmed that 
from Airbus until Daimler did in May. Airbus management and most of its part- 
Airbus has its own small design team ners want the venture to become a stand- 
ard commercial staff, and tbe constitu- alone company and branch out into de- 
em companies retain their own capa- tense projects, probably starting with a 
bill ties m engineering and marketing large military transportplane. 
since all four of them in their overall Already, agreement on a British-Ger- 
aviaiion businesses are operating as po- man blueprint appeared tantalizingly 
tential rivals. close last year, but it slipped away when 

If the European companies, taking France balked, apparently uuder pres- 
their cue from U.S. developments, sure from protectionist-minded 
merged their Airbus-related parts into a aerospace executives and trade unions, 
single, stand-alone company, the new Now, Mr. Jospin might be able to 
venture would eliminate duplication — override these powerful lobbies, selling 
and pocket savings perhaps amounting the idea of a stronger Airbus as a way of 
to 5 billion French francs ($800 million) fighting Boeing and resisting U.S. he- 
a year, according to a source familiar gemony in a high-tech industry. But it 
with Airbus operations. would be a hard sell, given the history of 

That gain, roughly 10 percent of Air- Airbus negotiations, 
bus’s annual sales, would be in the same Last fall, the French government ap- 

range as the economies that Boeing ap- pointed a new Aerospatiale head, Yves 


changes in its business organization for should be to move now on Airbus in time 
some time, management has ordered a to capture a prime position in a venture 


blackout on public discussion of its op- drawing on resources throughout 
tions, apparently because of political Europe. 

sensitivities among the owners. As an incentive, the three other 

But an Airbus executive, speaking on companies appear to be easing their ob- 
condition of anonymity, confirmed that jections to seeing a state-owned partner 


handle France's interest in a publicly 
held Airbus company. Earlier, it had 
been assumed that Aerospatiale would 
be privatized in conjunction with an 
Airbus reorganization, but the Socialists 
said after taking office in June that they 
want to preserve a government role in 
the defense industries. 

The bortom line for Britain and Ger- 
many, industry and government sources 
said, is that Aerospatiale, privatized or 
not, must put enough of its manufac- 
turing capability and engineering know- 


the idea of a stronger Airbus as a way of bow into the venture for the prospective 


fighting Boeing and resisting U.S. he- 


would be a hard sell, given the history of 
Airbus negotiations. 

Last fall, the French government ap- 
pointed a new Aerospatiale head, Yves 


To square off with the new Boeing, he operated by Aerospatiale in Toulouse, parently expects from its takeover of Michot, a company veteran. He quickly 


said. Airbus would have to turn to in- 
vestors because governments would not 
be able to supply enough subsidies to 


France, or the one run by Daimler in 
Hamburg. 

Each company is paid its pro-rated 


McDonnell Douglas. 

Another important benefit would be a 
streamlined, perhaps accelerated de- 


multinational to be the natural focus for 
future European aviation. 

Without that transformation of Air- 
bus, Germany could reconsider its long- 
standing assumption that Aerospatiale is 
its natural prime defense-industrial part- 
ner. Already, German missile and sarel- 


made it plain that he had no intention of tite alliances have been shifted away 


letting Airbus swallow up half of his 
company, concentrating instead on plans 


from Aeros 
French rive 


briefly 


50 Reported Dead 
In Iraqi Rail Crash 

BAGHDAD— A passenger train 
has crashed into a freight tram in 
southern Iraq, killing and injuring 
many passengers, a Baghdad news- 
paper said Thursday. 

An official confirmed the acci- 
dent and said that about 50 people 
had been killed and 150 injured. 

The passengertrain was bound to 
Basra, in the south, when it collided 
with the freight train, which had 
stopped after a mechanical break- 
down but had not reported it 
The incident occurred last week 
near Simawa, 300 kilometers (210 
miles) south of Baghdad. f AP ) 

Swiss Rebuff Plea 
On Mobutu’s Villa 

BERN — Switzerland has rejec- 
ted an appeal by Mobutu Sese Seko, 
the deposed president of Zaire, now 
the Democratic Republic of Congo, 
against the seizure of one of his 
v illas and is considering a request to 
freeze assets link ed to his associ- 
ates. 

The Swiss Federal Tribunal 
threw out Mr. Mobutu's claim that 
the confiscation of his property in a 
small village overlooking Lake 
Geneva and blocking of other assets 
was unlawful. 

■Villa les Miguettes has been 
sealed since May 17. (AP} 

China Missile Issue 
Troubling to U.S. 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States voiced deep concern on 
Thursday over reports that China 
has supplied ballistic missiles to 
Pakistan, but said it planned no ac- 
tion at present. 

“We are deeply concerned and 
have been deeply disturbed by 
many reports we have been Seeing 
about the possible transfer of M- 1 1 
missiles to Pakistan,” a State De- 
partment spokesman, Jamie Rubin, 
said at a bnefing. ( Reuters \ 

Cargo Transport 
Crashes at Miami 

MIAMI — A DC-8 cargo plane 
with four people aboard crashed in 
flames Thursday as it was taking off 
from the Miami International Air- 
port. 

Officials presumed the four Fine 
Air crew members were dead. (API 




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FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1997 


PAGE 13 



Science Takes Center Stage in Two Big Deals 


Du Pont Buys Into Biotech Friendly Bid for Fisher Prevails 


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PICKET-LINE SCUFFLE - A United Parcel sSriT^SE 
^bt, directing a UPS truck through striking workers in Warwick, 
Rhode Island, as pohce attempted to control the crowd. The Team- 
sters union and management resumed negotiations Thursday to end 
me tour-day-old strike. Meanwhile, the package-delivery company 
said traffic from the United States to Europe was down 60 percent 


GreftiM tw CV Suff Fnwn luifutchn 

DES MOINES, Iowa — Du Pont Co. 
plans to spend $1.7 billioD to buy a 20 
percent stake in Pioneer Hi-fired In- 
ternationa] Inc., the world's largest 
seed -com company, in an aggressive 
push into genetically engineered agri- 
culture, the companies announced 
Thursday. 

Du Pont will buy the stock for $104 a 
share and get two of the 15 seats on 
Pioneer's board. Pioneer said it would 
use proceeds from the sale to buy back 
its own stock. 

The announcement comes as Pioneer 
is facing increased competition in an 
industry that is being transformed by 
advances in biotechnology. 

John Krol, president of Du Pont, 
which is based in W ilming ton, 
Delaware, said the agreement would 
combine the companies' expertise and 
strengths “to create a new generation of 
products for agriculmre. ” 

The companies will form a joint ven- 
ture called Optimum Quality G rains . 
They said they would integrate Du 
Pom's strengths in materials sciences 
and biotechnology with Pioneer's glob- 
al strength in com and oilseed genetics 
to create a new generation of products 
for agriculture. 

"A revolution is under way in im- 
proving crop genetics, which has the 
potential to benefit everyone,’* said 
Charles Johnson, chairman of Pioneer. 

“This venture will be a catalyst for 
that revolution and will create a premier 


plant-sciences program.’’ he said. 

Pioneer had 44 percent of the world- 
wide seed-corn market in 1996, down 
from 45 percent a year earlier. The 
company and its rivals are aggressively 
developing and marketing new gener- 
ations of seeds with built-in resistance 
to herbicides and pests. 

The new seeds are hitting the market as 
U.S. farmers are being freed from plant- 
ing restrictions, and nations around the 
world are seeking to increase production 
to meet rising demand for feed grains. 

Pioneer's shares soared $13.5625 to 
close at $90. 1 25 on the New York Slock 
Exchange. Du Pont stock rose 31.25 
cents, to $69.0625. 

Du Pont said it expected to take a one- 
time chaige of less than $1 billion to 
write off research and development ac- 
tivities that would be duplicated by the 
alliance. 

Pioneer had net income of $223 mil- 
lion on revenue of $1.7 billion in the 
year ended Aug. 31, 19%. In the first 
three quarters of its current financial 
year. Pioneer earned $285 million on 
$1.6 billion in sales. 

Du Pont said it would finance the 
Pioneer stake with cash and debt. 

Du Pont and Pioneer said they 
planned to invest a total of more than 
$400 million in agricultural research 
next year. 

The alliance would create one of the 
world's largest private agricultural re- 
search and development collaborations, 
the companies said: (AP. AFX J 


Bltxrnibcrg News 

HAMPTON, New Hampshire — An 


investor group led by Thomas H. Lee 
Cos. agreed Thursday to buy Fisher 


Scientific International Inc. for $1 .4 bil- 
lion. thwarting an unsolicited offer of $1 
billion by Bass Group. 

Fisher Scientific, which makes test 
tubes, rubber gloves, beakers and other 
scientific equipment, agreed to the 
friendly offer by investors including 
Lee. a Boston-based buyout specialist, 
as well as DU Merchant Banking Part- 
ners and Chase Capital Partners. 

“Ultimately this is what would’ve 


Fisher Scientific’s shares elect to re- 
ceive stock, the company will assign it 
proportionately and offer cash for any 
shares not converted to stock in the new 


company. 

“Our board conducted an extensive 


process for the purpose of developing ; 
favorable financial alternative for th 


Fisher stockholders,” Paul Montrone. 
president and chief executive at Fisher, 
said. “This transaction allows stock- 
holders to receive cash for most of their 
shares at a very attractive price.” 
Completion of the deal is subject. 


happened to the company, but the 
Basses forced them to enter the market a 


Basses forced them to enter me market a 
few years before they would’ve liked 
to.' ' said John Raitt, a partner at Chica- 
go’s Harris Associates, a large share- 
holder in Fisher. 

Fisher sought a friendly suitor after 
Bass Group, based in Fort Worth, 
Texas, offered to do a leveraged re- 
capitalization of the company for $1 
billion, or $48 a share, to increase share- 
holder value. 

“We are extremely pleased to be in 
partnership with the Fisher manage- 
ment." a statement from Lee said. 

Under terms of the agreement, in- 
vestors can receive either $51 a share in 
cash or stock in the new company. Lee 
expects to pay cash for 97 percent of the 
shares, with the rest accounting for 
about 10 percent of the stock in the 
recapitalized company. 

If holders of more than 3 percent of 


among other things, to stockholder ap- 
proval at a special meeting to be held by 
December. 


A spokesman for Bass Group, which 
owns 10.6 percent of Fisher through 
Trinity 1 Fund LP, said the company 
would not comment pending closer 
study of the proposaL 

Fisher's shares fell $1.4375 to close 
at $49.4375. 

The company also announced that its 
net income in the second quarter rose 14 
percent, to $9.6 million. The earnings 
were below some analysts' expecta- 
tions. 

Excluding $3.8 million of nonrecur- 
ring charges, the company said, net in- 
come would have been $13.4 million. 

Sales rose 2 percent, to $542.6 mil- 
lion. 

Lee is a Boston-based private equity 
concern focused on identifying ana ac- 
quiring ownership positions in growth 
companies. 


What Will Li Do With Jardine Stake? Investors Bid Up Its Hongkong Land Unit 


By Philip Segal 

Special u> the Herald Tribune 


HONG KONG — What does Li Ka- 
shing want from the biggest remaining 
symbol of colonial rule in Hong Kong, 
Jardine Matheson Holdings Ltd.? Almost 
certainly more than be already has. 

He has a reputation as Hong Kong’s 
smartest, most aggressive tycoon and is 
not a man known for telling lies, but it is 
a challenge to find anyone in the market 
who believes his spokesman’s assertion 
that he has made nothing more than a 
“friendly” investment in the $12 bil- 
lion Jardine Matheson empire. 

Mr. Li’s Cheung Kong (Holdings) 


Ltd. and its Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. 
unit have built a 3.03 percent stake in 
Jardine and a 3.06 per cent stake in 
Hongkong Land Holdings Ltd.. Jardine’s 
Singapore-listed real-estate subsidiary. 

Investors are convinced there are more 
acquisitions to crane: Stock in Hongkong 
Land has risen 34 percent this week, 
closing Thursday at 3.42 Hong Kong 
dollars (34 U.S. cents), up 0.02. 

Jardine Matheson stock, meanwhile, 
fell 15 cents Thursday but has still risen 
14 percent this week. 

A lull-blown takeover of Jardine 
Matheson, which analysis said was un- 
likely, would be the biggest ever seen in 
Hong Kong. Not only does Jardine have a 


complicated series of interlocking share 
agreements designed to thwart takeovers, 
but it is far from dear that Mr. Li would 
want all of the company's assets. 

“It would be a long haul to do it, 
unless they've got aclear breakup plan to 

S with buyers all lined up," said 
cm, head of Hong Kong re- 
HSBC James Capel Asia Ltd. 
But many also are skeptical of the 
notion that Mr. Li is angling simply for 
the prime real estate he could get by 
acquiring control of Hongkong Land, 
wMcb owns about 40 percent of the best 
office space in Hong Kong’s central 
financial district They say be might 
have zeroed in on Hongkong Land be- 


cause it is the part of the Jardine empire 
that is least under the voting sway of the 
Keswick family, the descendants of 
William Jardine who still control much 
of the company. 

In addition, now that Hongkong 
Land's price has soared, Mr. Li would no 
longer be getting as much of a discount 
to its net asset value, Chris Wilmot, an 
analyst at Indosuez W.L Carr, said. 


“Is that going to provide him with 
enough upside?” Mr. Wilmot asked. 


WALL STREET WATCH 


Greenspan Opposes Plan on Derivatives 


“I’m questioning whether the goal of 
this is only Hongkong Land. I can’t see 
which buildings of Hongkong Land are 
that lucrative." 

Hongkong Land's real estate still 
dominates the top of the office market 
here, but the business and real-estate 
landscape has changed greatly since Mr. 
Li teamed up with two other tycoons in 
the late 1980s in an unsuccessful bid to 


take over Hongkong Land. For evidence, 
look no further than the most expensive 
property in the territory, Hongkong 
Land’s set of four office towers known 
as Exchange Square. Built on reclaimed 
land, these boast the best views of the 
harbor and charge the highest rents. 

Soon, though, all those stunning 
views will be blocked. More of Hong 
Kong’s harbor is now being reclaimed in 
front of Exchange Square, and although 
Hongkong Land bid last year for the 
right to develop the new $5 billion prop- 
erty, it lost to a consortium of companies 
allied with the Bank of China. 

Given Jaidine’s rocky relations with 
the Chinese government over the years 


— the company was the original opium 
trader in China and supported Britain’s 

1. .V. i- • V* T/ 


democratic reforms in Hong Kong this 
decade — its chances of more prime 
tenders were hardly assured. Mr. Li also 


may have his eye on those franchises 
that could wotk well with his businesses 
in China, analysts said, such as the Col- 
liers Jardine real-estate agents. Gammon 
Construction and two Jardine Schindler 
elevator operations on the mainland. 

The political question raised this 
week, which no one seems ready or able 
to answer yet, is: Would Mr. Li sell his 
Jardine shares to a Beijing-controlled 
company as part of an arrangement with 
China that might provide Beijing with a 
seal on the British company's board? 

"I don't think they have to take over 
something to please China,” K.Y. Ng, an 
analyst with UBS Securities, said. “Che- 
ung Kong and Hutchison have their own 
shareholders to worry about." 

Still, it is worth remembering that it 
was Mr. Li who built a high-rise build- 
ing for the Chinese Foreign Ministry in 
Hong Kong this year, free of charge. 


N EW YORK — Alan Green- 
span, the Federal Reserve 
Board chairman, has come 
out against proposed ac- 
counting rules that would change the 
way companies account for derivatives 
and possibly discourage some from 
using them. Mr. Greenspan's oppo- 
sition to the proposal now being draf- 
ted by die Financial Accounting Stan- 
dards Board came in a detailed letter. 

He argued that current accounting 
rales should basically be retained, pos- 
sibly supplemented by some additional 
disclosures that would not affect fi- 
nancial statements. 

Derivatives — including futures, 
options, swaps and a range of other 
financial products “derived” from un- 
derlying securities — can be used by 
companies to reduce exposure to cer- 
tain risks. The accounting board had 
been deliberating on this matter for 
years, but the project became pressing 
after some companies, including 
Procter & Gamble Co. and Gibson 
Greetings Inc., disclosed huge losses 
related to derivatives transactions. 

Mr. Greenspan’s letter was sent July 
31 the same day that executives of 
major banks and other companies 
asked the accounting board to delay any 
action and indicated that theywouldgo 

day and disclosed Wednesday. 


By Floyd Norris 

New York Tunes Service 


Mr. Greenspan’s arguments could 
provide crucial support for an effort to 
get Congress to block the rule. But such 
a H umiliati on of the accounting board, 
following the board’s decision in 1994 
to back down from issuing a rule that 
would have forced companies to treat 
the value of stock options as an ex- 
pense, could be fatal to the board, said 
an accountant who spoke on condition 
that he not be identified. 

The board is a private- industry 
group, but its authority comes from a 


Some banks and 
companies want to take 
the issue to Congress. 


requirement by the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission that companies 
abide by the board’s pronouncements. 

Mr. Greenspan said in his letter that 
“major companies in a number of in- 
dustries that use derivatives' ’ had "ex- 
pressed serious concern” that the 
board’s planned approach “would not 
improve the financial reporting of de- 
rivatives activities and would cons tram 
prudent risk-management practices.” 

The beard’s proposal, which is in the 
final drafting stage, is to be released 
soon. The board plans to accept com- 
ments for 45 days thereafter and then to 
issue it this year, possibly with amend- 
ments based on the comments. Mr. 
Greenspan supported a request by ma- 


jor banks that the board delay action 
and hold another round of hearings. 

The proposed rule would require 
companies that use derivatives to list 
the derivatives’ value on their balance 
sheets, where they are seldom shown 
now, and to adjust their value to reflect 
changes in market value. That is 
strongly opposed by banks, which have 
resisted efforts to force market values 
into accounts. 

In 1992 the Federal Reserve, which 
regulates bank holding companies, 
asked the board to water down a pro- 
posed accounting standard that re- 
quired many banks to report profits or 
losses when some bonds in their port- 
folios rose or fell in value. That echoed 
the position of many banks, but it did 
not prevail; the accounting standard 
was issued in 1993. 

Edmund Jenkins, the accounting 
board's chairman, said Mr. Green- 
span’s letter would be considered and a 
response sent next week. 

Michael Sutton, chief accountant at 
the Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion, declined to comment. Last week, 
when the letter signed by the major 
banks was, released, Mr. Sutton sup- 
ported the accounting standards board. 

‘ ‘Financial markets demand transpar- 
ency,” he said. “Having billions of 
dollars of derivative transactions un- 
accounted for creates an intolerable risk 
for investors. After 10 years of public 
debate, 1 believe that the board has ar- 
rived at a reasonable proposaL It is time 
to bring this process to a conclusion.” 


Republic new york corporation 


ISSUES IOO YEAR 
SUBORDINATED DEBENTURES. 



BEAR 

STEARNS 







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fhe offering » made only by the I’rosfxMits Supplement and the related Prosjuxius. 


New Issue 


$250,000,000 




Republic New York Corporation 


fliPBENCY & INTEREST BATES 


720% Subordinated Debentures due 2097 

Ininest | lovable January I* and July 15 


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Source.- Bloomberg. Reuters 


Internuianl Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 

GE to Trim Stake in Paine Webber 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — General Electric Co.’s Cap- 
ital Services unit said Thursday it would cut its stake in 
Paine Webber Group Inc. by 28 percent through the sale of 6 
million shares back to the brokerage. 

The price was not disclosed, but the shares were valued at 
about $244 million at current market prices. 

The move will cut GE Capital’s holding to 15.S million 
shares, from 2 1 .5 million, leaving it with a 23 percent stake in 
PaineWebber on a fully diluted basis. 

GE acquired die shares when it sold some assets and busi- 
nesses of Kidder, Peabody & Co. to PaineWebber in 1994. 

Publishing Buoys Thomson Profit 

TORONTO (Bloomberg) — Thomson Corp.'s second- 
quarter earnings climbed 2 1 percent on stronger performances 
by its newspaper, electronic and academic publishing and 
travel units. 

Thomson also said Gordon Paul resigned as president of the 
publishing unit. He had wanted to become president and chief 
executive of the parent company, said Nigel Harrison, a 
Thomson spokesman. Richard Harrington, president of the 
newspaper unit, is to move into those posts in January. 

Thomson's profit before gains rose to $85 million from $70 
million in the year-earlier period. 

Revenue rose to $2.13 billion from $1.75 billion. 

• Newcourt Credit Group agreed to buy rival Commcorp 
Financial Services Inc. for 361 million Canadian dollars 
($260.2 million) in cash and stock to make it North America’s 
fifth- largest asset-based financing company. 

• Wachovia Corp. plunged into Florida's banking market 

with an agreement Thursday to buy First United Bancorp, of 
Boca Raton, Florida, for $222 million. Bloomberg, ap 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 

Columbia/ HCA ’s New Face 

Facing Inquiry, Health-Care Firm Revamps Its Practices 


By Kurt Eichenwald 

/V w York Times Service . 

NEW YORK — Columbia/ 
HCA Healthcare Corp.. respond- 
ing to a wide-ranging criminal in- 
vestigation, plans to drastically al- 
ter or abandon many of the 
business, practices (hat helped 
make it the world’s largest health- 
care company and a leading ad- 
vocate of medical care for profit. 

The changes, described m com- 
pany documents obtained by The 
New York Times, represent a 
strong break with Columbia's past. 
They address virtually every 
policy and practice that has at- 
tracted the interest of federal in- 
vestigators or drawn public crit- 
icism in recent months. 

[Columbia disclosed the plan 
Thursday and said it would im- 
plement the changes. The Asso- 
ciated Press reported. 

[The company, however, denied 
the plan represented an acknowl- 
edgment or wrongdoing. 

[“Absolutely not It shouldn't 
be construed to say that at all," 
said Victor Campbell, head of in- 
vestor relations for Columbia.] 

Parts of the plan were said to 
have been presented Wednesday 
by lawyers for Columbia to Justice 
Department officials involved in 
the investigation of the company. 

According to the documents, the 
plan would involve “a total 
change in the culture'* of 
Columbia. The company would 
take the following steps: 

• Sell its home health-care busi- 


ness, which along with Columbia’s 
hospitals is being examined for its 
expense-reporting practices. 

• Eliminate all cash-bonus pro- 
grams, which were designed to en- 
courage employees to meet finan- 
cial targets and other goals. 

• Adopt programs to ensure that 
employees comply with all laws 
and regulations and significantly 
increase its enforcement staff. 

• Abandon its practice of selling 
interests in hospitals to its doctors 
and buy out doctors who already 
hold such investments. 

Some changes address even 
small details of the company’s cul- 
ture. For example, according to the 

The changes address 
virtually every area 
cited by critics or 
federal investigators. 

documents, Columbia will elimin- 
ate the * 1 scorecards"’ that have been 
distributed annually to employees, 
setting out precise amounts of rev- 
enue in various categories that 
Columbia's senior executives want 
hospital managers to obtain. That 
change is part of an effort to end the 
company's “short-term profit ori- 
entation,** the documents say. 

Columbia also would open its 
files to federal law-enforcement 
agents, giving the government ac- 
cess to data on compliance pro- 
grams as well as to reports of ex- 
penses filed to the government. 


laboratory billing records and other 
documents that are at the center of 
the growing criminal investigation. 
The company has been fighting 
government efforts to obtain some 
of those documents. 

Columbia also plans to inform 
the federal Medicare program of all 
differences between reports of ex- 
penses it submits to the government 
for reimbursement and other cost 
reports it maintains for accounting 
reasons. Discrepancies between 
those two sets of reports are being 
used as possible evidence of fraud 
in the criminal investigation. 

The plan also calls for Columbia 
to grant broad powers to outside 
lawyers and accountants, who 
would investigate its practices, re- 
commend policies and work to re- 
solve the government inquiries. 

Less than two weeks ago. Dr. 
Thomas Frist Jr. was named chair- 
man and chief executive of the em- 
battled company, replacing Richard 
Scott, Columbia's founder. 

Health-care specialists de- 
scribed the plan as symbolic of a 
new era for the company, which 
under Mr. Scott developed a repu- 
tation in just nine years as one ofthe 
most aggressive — and profitable 
— companies in the business. 

“The extent of these reforms, I 
think, is a measure of the serious- 
ness of the problems that the com- 
pany has gotten itself into,' ’ said Dr. 
Arnold Reiman, former editor of 
The New England Journal of Medi- 
cine. “We are going to see a softer 
company that is not going to make 
as much money as it did before. ’’ 


Bond-Price Tumble 
Drags Down Stocks 


GmfKMtrr CAv SkffFrom DajmArhes 

NEW YORK — Stocks fell 
Thursday, dragged down by bond 
prices after a Treasury bond auction 
railed to entice buyers. 

Citicorp and other banks, whose 
profits are tied to interest rates, 
paced the decline. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age, which closed ai a record 
Wednesday, had traded higher for 
much of die day. 

Ttaders said that without fresh 
economic statistics, and with many 
investors on vacation, the market 
would lack direction. 

The industrial average closed 
7131 points lower, at 8,188.00. 

The Standard & Poor's 500 Index 
fell 9.13 to 951.19, and the Nasdaq 
Composite Index declined 6.27 to 
1,624.17 after seven consecutive 
gains. 

Bond prices tumbled as Wall 
Street securities firms struggled to 
fire! buyers for the $10 billion of 30- 
year bonds the Treasury sold 
Wednesday. The benchmark 30-year 
Treasury bond fell 20/32 to 101 9/32, 
lifting the yield to 633 percent from 
6.48 percent Wednesday. 

“It’s a distribution problem,” 
said Robert McCool, a bond trader at 
First Chicago Capital Markets, one 
of the 39 primary dealers required to 
bid at Treasury debt sales. Investors 
“weren’t reafly interested” in the 
bonds, Mr. McCool said. Now, se- 
curities firms “all appear to be sit- 
ting on a lot of paper.” 

Citicorp. BankAmerica and 
Chase Manhattan declined. 

Some traders said the market had 
got a brief boost from relief that the 
government’s quarterly sales were 


Fear of Bundesbank Halts Dollar Juggernaut 


CrmpiMtvOiirSk^FnfnOafliarkn 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against the Deutsche mark Thursday 
for the first time in six days amid 
concern that the Bundesbank might 
sell dollars to prop up the belea- 
guered German currency. 

The pound, meanwhile, slumped 
against both the mark and the dollar 
after the Bank of England indicated 
the interest-rate increase it an- 
nounced Thursday was likely to be 
its last for some time. 

Speculation that the Bundesbank 
may sell dollars to support the mark 
mounted as the dollar came within 
reach of Wednesday’s eight-year 
high during Asian trading. 


“Concern about intervention is 
there,” said Mark' Gargano, man- 
aging director of foreign exchange 
at First Union Corp. in Charlotte, 
North Carolina. “There was 
thought the Bundesbank may sell 
dollars above 1 .88 marks. With the 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE^ 

dollar at these levels, the market is 
going to get nervous.” 

The dollar was quoted at 1 .8686 
DM in late trading, down from 
1 .8820 DM the day before. It also 
fell to 118.455 yen from 118.700 
yen, to 1.5301 Swiss francs from 
13325 francs and to 6.3028 French 


francs from 6.3505 francs. The 
pound was quoted at S 13900, down 
from SI. 6022. 

A sharp decline in the Bundes- 
bank’s foreign-currency reserve 
levels at die end of July aroused 
market suspicion that the central 
bank may nave been quietly inter- 
vening in currency markets to sup- 
port the mark. 

The reserves, held mainly in dol- 
lars, came to 118.8 billion DM 
($63.1 billion) in the week ended 
June 7 and fell slowly to 116.6 bil- 
lion DM by July 23. But the decline 
then accelerated, with the total drop- 
ping by 1.2 billion DM over the next 
eight days. The central bank said the 


drop had been due mainly to “trans- 
actions in which previous inflows of 
foreign currency from outside the 
market were disposed of.” 

Also weighing on the dollar was 
concern the Bundesbank might raise 
interest rates from historic lows. 

Even so. many expect the dollar 
to resume its rise. 

“We're very bullish on the dol- 
lar.” said Chris Iggo, currency 
strategist at Barclays Bank. “The 
U.S. economy is in much better 
shape, and rates in the U.S. are more 
likely to go up than rates in Ger- 
many.” Mr. Iggo said the dollar 
may reach 1.90 DM within two 
weeks. ( Bloomberg. Reuters ) 


over *'We have the refunding be- 
hind us; that should help investor 
confidence,” said Ken Fan, a gov- 

enunent-bond trader at Panbas. 

Royal Dutch Petroleum led oil 
shares lower as analysts cut earn- 
ings forecasts after the company re- 
ported lower-Chan expected second- 
quarter profit Its American depos- 
itary receipts fell 2 1/16 to 55 A 

Chevron declined 2 3/16 to 78. 

Compaq Computer rose 3 Vs to 62 
after the computer maker was raised 

U.S. STOCKS 

to “recommended list' ’ from buy^ 
by an analyst at Donaldson Lufkin & 
Jenrette Securities. Intel rose. 

Microsoft ipse Vi to 143 15/16 a 
Hay after agreeing to mak e a $150 
million investment in Apple Com- 
puter. Caterpillar rose after Merrill 
Lynch analyst James McCann 
raised his rating on the company to 
“accumulate.” 

National Semiconductor gained 
after it was raised to “buy” from 
* ‘outperform. ' ’ 

Security First Network Bank ad- 
vanced 2% to 11% after the Internet 
banking services company said it 
had reached agreements to license 
its technology to some of the 
biggest U.S. banks, including 
Citicorp. 

Wet Seal plunged 6 1 1/16 to 20 
after the clothing retailer said it 
expected quarterly profit to fall 
short of estimates. 

Ciena declined 4 13/16 to 49% 
after the phone-equipment maker 
warned of slower sales growth the 
next two quarters. 

I spat International rose from its 
$27 offer price on its first day of 
trading. The Amsterdam-based 
steelmaker -sold 25 million shares 
for $675 million in an initial public 
offering. 

Sieel declined 414 to 11 after the 
Omaha-based provider of tele- 
phone customer service and sales 
for other companies reported 
second-quarter results that met ex- 
pectations, but the stock was down- 
graded by Merrill Lynch. 

Ethan Allen Interiors climbed 6 
15/16 to 61 1 1/16 after the furniture 
maker reported stronger-than-ex- 
pected earnings and announced a 2- 
for-1 stock split late Wednesday. 
Ethan Allen is based in Danbury, 
Connecticut 

Heilig-Meyers fell after the 
home-furnishings retailer warned 
that earnings for its second quarter, 
ending Aug. 31, would be pressured 
by weak sales in June and July. 

(Bloomberg. API 


it" 


fir*' ! ' 


: I III' 


Pi U 


WJ.fi 


fS-TS* if. 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursday's 4 P.M. Close — 

riw top 300 most odive shares 
up (0 Itie dosing on Wall Street. 

The Associated Press. 


mg* low mat am* Indexes 


tea 

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Lm 

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Dow Jones 

DM* man LM um CM. 

Indus 6104-9-1 BBRM BUI.03 OIMUM -71 J I 

TiM 301144 3B2U4 2990J7 2994.55 -14.70 

un 23*47 23442 73245 237.09 -1.15 

Cl»p Mia 2557 A0 2528.19 252946 -17.93 

Standard & Poors 


Industrials 1133.anW.571T30.76 I125JB 
Tramp. £90.17 6B49S 68903 687.40 

Unities • 20134 199.06 200.94 199.97 

Finance 110.68 109.13 110.46 I0&65 

SP500 96243 94945 96032 953.72 

SP100 941.42 92643 938S8 931.17 

NYSE 

MM Low Uul Oft. 
CanposOB 49081 49245 49242 -448 

Mutual 432.57 625.09 62547 -444 

Tump. 45172 449 JR 450.15 -146 

W 294.71 791.73 291.84 -2-10 

final** 44274 454J6 45470 -440 


Nasdaq 


^ Dow Jones Bond 


M Bonds 
launinies 
10 Industrials 


Trading Activity 


Advanced 
Detuned 
UncmnoM 
Total Mura 

NewM&tt 

Nee L*n 


Advanced 

Dodnsd 
Uncnangad 
TaMissiK 
Non Highs 
Now Lows 


17«4 1171 
1583 994 
£5* 550 
3381 3415 
JB> 785 


771 330 

214 745 

179 179 

734 754 

45 <J 

6 10 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


VML MM 

11*287 2Tft 
111422 63 
110909 401ft 
88045 405V 
81721 S51v 
54480 35V5 
56478 27-9 
53977 709V 
*8059 10116 
*6478 7OTV 
45739 48U 
45418 26*» 
44025 45ft 
43873 lift 
41237 1 03*1 


Law Lad 
28ft 28*. 

S ift «>V 
t« JO'-. 
57*V SBft 
50ft 50* • 
33 ft a ft 
21 U V 21ft 
48ft OH 
94V 9*V 
28 TSVi 
46ft 47ft 
76 2«4, 
44V *411 
IBft 10 I 
99ft 99V 


Nasdaq 

SB? 


m tsg 

173840 177841 1732.03 
173R2B 1 71)940 172143 
2082.19 206944 2071.85 
1039.96 102940 103016 


65489 65143 452.07 -l.W 


PiertiMi Todor 

One Naan 

10149 10146 

102L04 100.96 

106J4 106.96 


VOL MM LOW 

316411 1W 7811 : 

1*4411 101 ft loo'll 
176093 57ft 48V 

106900 57** 54ft 

IIBSJ* 5'l Sft 

87219 10ft ew 

48378 50ft 48*1 

66117 81 TB'-a 

41593 7*41 I7V9 I 

60195 S3ft Sift 

58159 8*ft 17ft 

544*8 ftft 97ft 

54941 J»ft 35V 

53187 1» 33ft 

51101 58ft 56V 


v*L NM Law Lon 

35701 9tf* Or, 95ft 

18407 I ft v, 

121*3 171V 10ft ll'lb 


6203 11** ll'ft lift 


Aug. 7, 1997 

High Low Luted CJige OpM 

Grains 

CORN (CBOT1 

5LOOO bu minimum- cents per bvstwl 
Sep 07 259 249ft 250 -9 53J77 

Dec 97 261ft 252 253 -Sft 152,182 

Mur 90 269ft 260ft 261 -8ft 31624 

May 98 249ft 265 265ft -7ft 7AJ2 

Jul 98 275 247 748 -7ft 0691 

Sep 98 260 259 2» -3ft 1.41B 

Dec 90 242 259 260* -3ft 1909 

Eli. sales 56000 Waft sales S5M2 
Weds open inf 26c.n2.afl 2.103 

SOYBEAN MEAL ICBOT) 

100 ions- dollars per Ion 

Aug97 26050 25450 254.00 -6J0 11X11 4 

Sep 97 234 HO 23900 239,40 -5J0 21,009 

Od 97 71800 21A00 21480 -510 1S571 

Dec 97 21400 207250 70850 550 40013 

Jan 98 208.20 70530 20580 -6-20 5902 

Mar 98 206 00 20280 20350 -5.90 7,914 

BU sates )5DD0Mr<rsKiJf* 140)1 
Wed's open Hit 107.741. up 657 

SOYBEAN OIL ICBOT] 


High Low Latest Chpe OpM 


High Low Lutes! Chge OpM 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 


High Law Latest Chge Optet 
Dec 97 9161 9351 9153 -0.04 891929 


ORANGE JUICE INCTN] 10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. B0ND5 (MATIF) Dec 97 9161 9151 9353 -0.04 89.929 

15800 IBs.- cents per Ih. FFSOtUm-pbof lOOpd Mor90 9192 9184 91RS —am 51.066 

Sep97 7685 7550 7685 +G6S 1M74 Sep 97 13956 12950 12984 -IL14 172866 Jim 90 94.15 9407 9409 +0JJ1 40413 

Not, 77 78.90 77.75 7835 *050 8.003 Dec 97 98M 98.18 9838 -114 1189 Sap 98 9437 9430 9433 *-003 34725 

Jan 90 8185 8080 8105 ‘*050 4.156 Mar 98 9772 97.72 9768—0.14 0 Dec 98 9437 9438 9431 +003 25869 

Mar 98 8455 8170 8410 +030 1784 Eri. sales: 157,738. Mar 99 9432 9436 9438 +003 14487 

Est. sdes NA Weds sates 1.739 Open WL- 184225 up UOG Est. sates: 55.128. Prev-Mfles: 55820 

Weds open M 32507. up 76 Prev. open InL: 371502 off &233 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BONO OJFFE) 

ITLTOOmlBon-ptsollOOpcl 


Dec 90 9437 9438 9431 +083 25869 

Mar 99 9432 9436 9438 +083 14487 

Est. sales: 55,128. Prev.Mfles. 55829 
Ptey. open InL: 371502 Off 5333 


Uptair iil vua rwntoa - ptsof luu pci 

satniMCMn ™ eralS Sep 97 136.19 1 3540 13584 — i 

Dec 97 10834 10787 10784 -1 

mSo*K“3Sa +330 795 -±'11™” 

Sep 97 1 77^1 . fn 2 Mes: 191610: Piev. sales: 332381 

Od 97 32470 320-00 32170 +130 15J00 Prev. open iidj 280888 im 1838 
Dec 97 327 DO 322.10 32580 +130 1ISJ29 

Feb 98 327.90 325.00 32,80 +120 12806 UBOR I -MONTH (CMER) 


Sap 97 136.19 13580 13584 -0.08 101447 rnTTON 9 fNCTM 
Dec 97 10834 10787 10784 -0.13 4748 


Industrials 


50800 HKL-centa perfe. 

0097 7140 73.90 7431 -1.12 11863 

Dec 97 7589 7400 7440 -1.00 42 aJI 

Mar 98 7650 7580 7542 -0.93 11950 

May 90 7780 7680 7630 -0.95 1765 

Jul 98 7780 7650 7683 -0.97 1841 


0*19 lm rf. 10JM7 ES. sate* fLA. Wids 12WW9 

Jun98 33280 33080 332.00 +110 7847 ? u 9’7 «435 0434 9435 uncfL 19867 wetfs aaen H 7124L afl 313 

Aug 98 33430 -110 1111 Sep” 9435 9434 9434 undL ia372 

Od«H 33650 +380 109 ’A33 9432 9432 imch. 5556 HEATING OIL (NMERJ 

Esr satej 38800 WWh soles 21,175 Est. sates 4315 We«f» sates 1929 42800 gaL cunts per gal 

Wed's open Inl 190314 up 517 Weih open In! 44411 up 189 Sep97 57.15 K80 55J0 


HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 
25800 bs.- cents per Rl 


EURODOLLARS (CMER) 
si miMon-pts at 10a pa. 


*0.000 bs- cents per fc 




SepV7 

108.90 

106X0 

ioa.ro 

+ 1.90 

21821 

Aug 07 

2285 

2183 

2184 

845 

X053 

Od 97 

107.10 

10680 

106.00 

+ 1.70 

1X9* 

Sep 07 

2X24 

2167 

21.74 

850 

24201 

Nov 97 

106.10 

106.10 

106.10 

+ 1.70 

1X73 

Od 07 

22X5 

2186 

21.86 

8X2 

1*006 

Dec 07 

105.75 10*50 105.40 

+1.60 

8804 

Dec 07 

2X74 

21.05 

7X32 

8A3 

4X167 

Jan 98 



10*80 

+ 1J0 

656 

Jun08 

2X60 

2X32 

2X35 

8X5 

6.742 

Fob 98 



10*00 

+ 1X0 

616 

Mdr 08 

22.05 

22.75 

2X78 

84/ 

*780 

Mur 08 

10X40 

10X20 

10X» 

+ 1.40 

X37T 

Esl sates 1X000 Wed? sates 1*654 


Apr 98 

101.70 

10180 

107*0 

+ 140 

400 


S 97 57.15 5580 55J0 -188 42,108 

97 5785 5680 5615 -UB 36514 

No* 97 5L30 5670 57.70 -053 17858 

Dee 97 58.95 57J5 57.75 -1.13 20044 

Jon 98 5945 5B45 58J0 -038 14092 


iNA. weds sates 25W7 


Weds open hr 07.350. off TJ0 

SOYBEANS ICBOT) 

5000 bu mmlnuiro- conls per bushel 
Aug 97 770 742 745ft -23ft 

Sep 97 679 657ft 660 -Wft 

NOV 07 648 626 678ft -21ft 

Jan 08 647ft 631 632ft -20ft 

Mar 08 651 63« 641ft -20 

Est. iOles 44000 WctfS sates 44427 
Wed*, open ml 131255 up 28 

WHEAT ICBOT) 

5000 bu minimum- cants per bushel 






Sep 07 

367 

358 

363U 

+ 1 

37,370 





Dec 07 

382 

377? 

377ft 

+ ft 


Nasdaq 




Mar *8 
May 08 

391 

301 

30 u 

388', 

288 

»ft 

+2 

1*695 

IJ01 





Eri sates 7*000 Vltafs sates 2X583 









UiiJiuinpaJ 


.•Id 

1*lt 







Toni ewes 


5 Ni 








New Un 


IJj 

J 57 


Livestock 



rtrtailcet Sales 




CATTLE ICMER) 

JO -000 lbs.- cants per lb 








Aufl 97 

66 80 

6X80 

65X7 

JL70 






Od 97 

70-17 

60 4S 

69.47 

■0X7 

5X314 





Dec 07 

7310 

71 47 

71.57 

-027 


NYSE 

SJ7.1I 


695.1 7 

Feb 98 

73 6? 

7100 

7307 

■0 37 

iam 





Am-w 

7*85 

7**5 

7*60 

■0.15 

*277 

Nasdaq 

65846 


780J5 

Jun 98 

7162 

71X5 

7145 

-0 35 

2^880 


Dividends 

Company Per Amt Roc Pay 

IRREGULAR 

Enerts SA ADR - .2395 B-22 — 

James River . .15 9-16 9-30 

Mission W Prop _ i30 B-28 10-21 

W«Ram Coal Seam .8727 8-14 8-29 

STOCK SPLIT 

Adobe Systems 1 share oT Step el Systems 
(brewery 300 stares held. 

Global Payment 2 (or 1 split. 

Pnpereoll Rand 3 lor2 sput. 

Interim Sues 2 far 1 split. 

PtutarCorp5 forJspW. 

INCREASED 

Engeltard Ca>p Q -10 9-15 9-30 

IPL Energy B O 545 8-23 9-1 

Ingetwstl Rand Q 425 B-19 9-2 

INITIAL 

Higlmay Holdings . .013 9-2 (0-3 

REGULAR 

AdmericaSecs O 8-29 9 30 

BJkB mod Inv 2009 M 875 B-1S 8-29 

Hancock Pal Prd* M .0583 8- IS 8-29 

HtmnaJWA, Q .105 8-18 9-1? 


Interro Fm 
Intrav Inc 
Mocericti Co 
Matoraia Inc 
Newell Co 
Painewebber Grp 
Peoples Energy 

P rcmarl Inti 
ReROfite G«p HW 
Robinson Nuqeni 
Setectire Insbr 
Sebgmun dual 
SeHIgman Sd 

S ) here DnAe 

nifuceSrc 


Urban Stag 
VA Beach Fedl 
Voroqcur Ai 


VoyoqeurCa 
VoyogeurFL. 
Voyoqour Mum 
Vayaqeur Mn ll, 
VoyoqcurMitUl. 
Wynns Inti 


Per Amt Rec Pay 

0 IS 8-20 9-3 

□ .125 8-29 9-15 

O 41 8-18 9-9 

□ .13 9 -16 10-15 

a .16 8-M 9-3 

a .15 9-4 10-3 
0 .47 9-22 10-15 

a 89 9-15 10-3 
a 08 9-15 10-1 

□ .03 8-14 8-28 

O 48 8-15 9-2 

tA .0702 415 8-27 
M XU 8-15 8-27 
O .CM 8-18 8-29 
Q .03 8-14 8-30 
0 JO 75 8-20 9-5 

O .05 B-15 8-29 
M 3)643 8-15 B-28 

M 0612 8 -15 B 28 
K .063 8-15 8-2 8 
7.9 .0775 B IS B-2B 
M .068 8-15 8-28 
M .063 8-15 B-2B 
Q 08 9-5 9-30 


n-annuat b-appnuiawle amoairr per 
share/ AD R; g-payable m Canadian tands,- 
atHBKMilWy; 9 -quart arty , - v-sem, -annual 


Stock Tobies Explained 

Salas Homes me untrfSdaL Yearly fugte and kms lefled the otanous 53 weeks, plus the awren l 
weefLbutnonhelateatrocanqdcv. WbeteaspBorsteci.diuMgJnicgnountingM2Sperecn;ormore 
has been paid. Vie yean liigh-ICMianoe aid dMdend are stawi far the new stodaaniy. Untess 
oVientae noted, roses at dwdends are annual dbbwsemenls based on me total declaration, 
a - dividend aba estra Is). B - annual rate of dhridena plus slack dividend, e - Hqindaling 
dividend, cc -PE csceeds 99. dd- called, d • new yearly law, dd - loss in the Iasi 12 months. 
• - dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 months, f - annual rale, increased an last 
declaration, g • dividend in Canadian fund* subject to 15°l mm -residence Fat. i - dividend 
declared alter split- up or stack dhridend. j - dividend paid Ihb year, omitted, deterred, or no 
action taken at latest dividend mealing, k - dividend declared or paid this year, an 
accumulative issue witti dividends in arrears, m- annual rate, reduced on last declaration 
n - now issue in the past 52 weeks. The high-Jow range begins with the start ut trading, 
nd • next day den very, p . aur>at dividend, annual rate unknown. P/E - price-earnings ratio, 
q -dasad-endmutua I fund, r- dividend declared ot paid m preceding 12 mourns, plus stoct- 
dwidencL s - stock spht. Dividend begins with dale of spin, sis . soles, f - diwoend paid in 
stock m preceding 1 2 months, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or M-dlstnbuhon date 
u - new yearly high. v- trading halted, w-in bankruptcy!* receivership or being reamanued 
under the Bankruptcy Ad. or securities assumed by such companies, wd - when distributed. 
wi - when issued/ ww - with warrants a ^c^Dftdend or cc-nghls. n5s - c*-dislnbutfon. 
xw - wiitaut warrants, y- ex-dividend and sates in tun. ytd - yield i - sales m lull. 


Esi sates 15436 Weds sates 16107 
Weds open Irt 10547a up «S2 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

50.000 lbs.- amis per ft. 

Aug 97 01 8030 80.37 -0.15 

Sep 97 BOAS 00.10 88 20 unde 

Od 97 0120 80.57 B0 7S -0.10 

t*M 07 82 35 8145 81.00 undL 

Jan 98 8240 8170 11.70 -OK 

Mar 98 8180 8145 01 JO -0 10 

Ext. sates 1076 Weds sales 4.225 
Wta*S opal bit 26567. lip 377 

HOGS-LMI ICMER) 

40.000 lbs -ranis per* 

Aug 97 8085 Bail sots -are 

Od 07 73 70 7235 7X00 *030 

Dec 97 6930 6867 69 70 +0.75 

Feb 98 6760 67.10 67^0 +0.15 

Apr 98 63A7 6327 6132 +005 

EsL sates 7.742 Wed* sates 70377 
Wed*, upon Int 37.103. idt 1.315 

PORK BELLIES ICMER) 

40000 ibk- crab per Ul 
A uu 97 8780 84.90 84.90 -100 

Feb 90 76.17 7100 7520 . 005 

Mai 00 7560 7175 7407 -010 

E»l. sdtes 1474 Weds sates 2025 
VVwTs upon w 5A44. all 207 


Food 

COCOA (NCSE) 

ID mclrlc tons- J per ton 

SCO 07 1470 1445 1460 *2 10.387 

Dec 07 1511 1490 1504 imdi. 16.0*1 

Mar 08 1 543 1558 1538 unch 26*73 

Mm 09 1559 ISM 1558 undL 12046 

XlM 1582 ISrO ISM • J I.S»I 

Sep 98 1604 1590 1601 -7 X759 

Ed. sates 1M90 Weds sates 1X360 
fteds open Int 10L J/c «p 551 

COFFEE CCNCSEl 
3U00 - cents poc m 

sSw 200 75 19950 2* 00 .*« 8.97J 

£<97 177.00 16800 176» .600 4*47 

Mjjj-vg 155.00 14900 15100 X4J8 

SSw 15000 14440 148 00 .150 l.0«4 

ISS 14000 142 SO .7*5 754 

Est sates 7.955 Wads 
w«n open «1 21JI0. off 100 

SUCARWORLD U 090^) 

SS? B *r.S? h K? MJ« ^HA-0 

Ukn VB 1103 1147 tl 79 4*07 50.115 

mSm W 11« * ,,r ,41ID 

37* U ” II « ' lil ■ 00 ' 

Est. sates 2X"» “‘T'iS 575 

Wrds open ln» l*S-*“A W UJ ” 


Est. sates 7jm Wed's sates SjOP> 
Wed-s open M 4X065. OH 173 


™n» 9368 nu io. S gg-” ™ ^ ^ 

SS SS SSI S %% It SS II ns 


SILVER (NCMX) Est *ote»4iat«2 Weds sdes 280J22 

& 0 <n liny o*.- canti per hoy ce. Wods open lid 2.753^252 up 5J30 

Aug 97 436.10 +4.40 

Sep 97 439.00 43180 437 JO +440 54893 BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

Od 97 441.10 +420 78 62JOO pounds. % per pound 

Dec 07 J45J0 437 JO 44X90 .430 18J93 Sep*7 1J022 IJ7S6 IJ858 -0126 51447 

Jan 08 445J0 +430 20 Dec 97 l.nsa 1J60O U800 -8124 806 

Mar 98 45180 44880 450.10 +4.30 11222 IJ”0 1J6» 1J742 -8124 209 


D« 77 20.74 2038 2040 -018 49838 

Jan 98 2040 2035 2037 -016 27J61 

Feb 98 2064 2035 20J2 +003 1X525 

Esl sates N A. Wed* sates 9X885 

Wotfs open kit -0X779 


May* 454.10 45X50 454.10 +430 2.978 Est. sates 16356 Weds sdes 20077 

Jul 98 458.10 45580 458.10 +4.30 116? VWhTs open Dll 5X 547. up X938 


££ NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

SjS lOaoa mm bhrs. s per mm btu 
w sep97 2-515 1345 2450 


Esl sates 1 3800 Wed's sates i> 1 73 
Wwfs open Ini 0X801 ofl 493 


PLATINUM (NMER) 

50 Irov OT-- doflais per tar a*. 


r-, Tn i m i,r, u Ir, 1 7[^im Sep ^ 2-515 2345 2450 +04)90 4*055 

D<197 --“0 2355 2460 +0.104 20013 

VWhrs qxn Ini 5X 547. up X938 Nov 97 1370 2470 2-530 +0074 1*33) 

CANADIAN DQi r no irMCOi 2^8 2-550 2620 +0865 1*932 

i M, !S W7 ° Xtaa 2640 +0870 17,755 

*** 1550 2J15 +0055 12002 

Sep 97 .7229 .7718 .7220-00006 4&213 Pd mIm u a uiw#. enu. jinn 

Dec 97 7267 7252 7253-0.0006 1340 


mi iiut is.- aanais per irar w. '+JJ -v.ifj-jo uw iiu^, .1 im J , 

00 97 43780 42680 43160 .160 11.987 Mat* 7286 7280 .7280 08006 633 “*«rsopen un 1W.IU7. Ott 2 

■l® 1 ?? I?® 1 ?! ^1549 ^JS *1-80 2J0I Esl. sates *424 WetTs sales 11 J94 UNLEadfd racdi ihc im 


GERMAN MARK ICMER) 
125800 marks, s per mark 


Apr98 419.00 41150 41610 +1.60 408 total's Open bit 40.434 up 1589 

Esl. sales NA Wed's sales 2637 

ftvtfs open bit t*8« GERMAN MARK ICMER) 

125800 marks, s per mark 

Owe Previous Sep 97 J372 ADS 8367+03040 127050 

LONDON METALS (LME) Dec 97 5401 Ate 8 J398 +0.0040 1408 

Dorian par metric ten Mur 90 3429 A*03 A429+08040 844 

At a ta n um (Higb Grwte) Est. sales 27313 Wtafs sates 26426 

Spot 1784ft 1788ft 1742ft 1744ft weds open Int 131^00. oft 1399 

Foraard 176880 1769.00 1736 00 173780 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

231080 125 mNIcn yen I per 100 yen 

Fenrard 73798 0 2330.00 2287.00 228800 Sap 97 8532 .8446 8486+08016 0*412 


UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 

>7.000 goL cents per gal 
Sep 07 46-50 63.75 6*40 -186 45*173 

Da 07 6l.ts 9985 60.10 -064 1*824 

tav97 5885 58.00 58.10 -463 &602 


Previous Sep97 J372 ADS J367+08040 I27J50 Dec 97 SU0 5775 5775 Sje 5™ 

Dec 97 W01 Ate8 8398+0.0040 1400 ffl.10 57 75 S75 Jn 771? 

Mur 90 -5*29 A«3 A429+08040 844 Feb 00 5830 5830 lijD |£o 


Est. sates 27313 totafs sates 26826 


Mar 08 58.80 5880 5880 +087 4805 
Apr 08 6180 6180 6165 .052 1,300 

Esl. sates NJL totetfs sates 33336 
Wetfs upon frit «6J72 


i«/.nu jjuaw Sap Yi 8SH .8446 8486+08014 8*412 BRENT OIL OPE) 

ffis sss ss ^ 


Fomnnd 617.00 61880 60*00 60580 £*. sales Ie830 Weds sates 26810 

Spot 7140.00 715000 7D8000 7090 00 “P®' 1 w “P *966 

Fojwart 724080 725080 718580 719500 SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

* §ss %5 m £’3‘m is 


10.23 1880 18.90 -030 51812 

1935 1980 10.10 —0.20 57652 

1082 10.17 19.19 -0.19 1*792 

1964 1930 1930 -0.14 19.708 

l«61 1030 10JU -aiS 1*542 

19.40 1937 1934 -015 *050 

19.26 10-24 10.16 — 0Ll6 2,665 


One (Sperta High Grade) ^ ^ EsL sates: 45807 Prev. rales : *5322 

Spot 164580 164800 1620.00 162580 I?™ 4606+08008 1859 Prev. open W- 1 7*657 up X818 

Forward 153980 1S40 00 152X00 153X00 Ell. sates 12J7B Wtafs sates 11205 

mods upon M *2758 DH 1.707 GASOIL OPE) 


High Law Qose Chgo 


Financial 

US T BILLS (CMER) 

SI ndUon-ptsol lOOpd 
Sen 07 9*80 9*87 9*81 


MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 
500000 pesos. S per peso 
Sep 97 .12700 .IZjab .124 


GASOIL OPE) 

UX doOonpwmrtte ton -tots ol 100 tons 
Aug 97 17480 17X00 17780 — 2JS Iski 
S ep 07 17580 173 7J 174 00 -175 Z12M 


Sep 97 .12700 .12580 .12607 -.00426 2*009 Od97 177.00 17335 1 7680 -X75 lOMa 

Dec 07 12260 I2IM .12170 -.00*26 1X414 Nov’T 17880 176X5 177X5 -175 SjS 

Mar 98 .11855 .11740 11772 -.00426 5.141 Dec 97 170X5 1 77 A) 178X0 -2J0 


Sen 07 04*8 9487 9 Ajn ima Est. sales 7870 toietfs sates SU39 

d£» 7 9476 801 S Vtah open kto 4*731. up X444 

' a01 105 3-MONTH STE RUNG (UFFEj 


wimSS^jTiS £500800 -Pftol 100 pd Prav. open ln» : 8*865 up 1877 ' " 

WOOS open Int 7.97* Ofl 44 5+p97 92 81 9 tt» 92JD +088 J2R004 Z. 

3YR TREASURY ICBOT) Ma r « Sl*9 ^O 15 107 760 , Drnu . StOCk Indexes ' 

Sl00^)Opi1n>ph&Miri&of lOOpa Jlin^s 93.74 93 93 72 +o'|A mm 9 SP COMP INDEX (CMER) 

107-19 10740 107-01 -06 316,543 Seotf <n tr rn*i 92.7 a iQu cj*w 

,04 ' 50 “ m 11,1,0 t*** ^^3 W** +0.14 4&.5C3 rZVr 9/0^ ■ a80 

52aft»T5SSft.a ,,? SSS %£ S8 ±li 48 til? 

aw .® > sawaass^ir 


ten«B 17950 17BJD 17980 -100 
FebW 17880 17880 178.75 -145 V,» 
MorOS 17650 176X5 17680 -1.75 xi« 
Eri. sides: 12817. Prev. sates 1*395 
Pm. open Int: 8*865 up 1877 


9tock Indexes 


Esl Mites 4*800 Weds sates 79,«l» 
Wed-- open Ini 237.65* ofl J»l*i 


1IVDTDClElinVn.ini*. UJI rTCT.TOm: a 

Sirassi ioo pa pw c,H,,, w - : ^ up 144 

SSSSwS 3 


FTSE lOO(LIFFE) 
E35 per Index point 


31 , “' 31 07 ,,a79 Aw3W 06 60 96 TO -0.02 1.042 +760 7X0J 4 

ESI ■K rtOT-5J7iWea , s Mte-. 5*773 S*p07 0665 9667 9643 -081 259834 51608 509SO 51V10 +77.0 

Weds open *1140*077. up Ml 4 Od 97 «*J O 94.56 94S7 .001 )3k2U , " NT NT *2358 +788 


US TREASURY BONDS (CMT) 

PHAMndsutlOOpdJ -hm »8 9*19 96 10 0*16 +002 TOl.lis 

SKm iliSS 11+07 17 52 * 2*6 ScpW «« 9580 9596 +082 14 X 370 

!!ts ,,M * "l* 17 49895 Doc 98 95 74 05 65 05 72 + 0.03 140303 y 700 D«I vxtev point 


UO0/ V&J,/ wool 3+ft.TJ _ _ . 751 

Pf*?! *0* 9444 «88 +0 01 M1743 ** U * e ' M 7*»i . Prev sates 76870 

Mm 98 9430 9*41 0636 +002 7651 54 P»». open tel.: 107.195 up 1807 


MnrOB 11488 11H8 113., 9 
**"0« M3-0* 


Esl. salm 425,000 toted? vde? m 6+-i 
Weds open ml tO».f 19, up S367 

GILT IUFFE) 

SSof ‘ MnOicH 100 pd 


17 31882 «ter09 0SSS 954* 0SX2 M02 10*757 {w j MB9 00 305*80 3069.00 +240 28.»< 

17 1133 J«n09 05 35 0SX7 0SJ3 +003 6S83B M97 001064 50 3077 Jo >240 SI?? 


Ell. sales 22*441. Pnn, sates 300.033 
Prev open Nil 1,67*105 up *606 


I-MONTH P> BOR (MATIF) 


^97 ndsSSaHBSSjjjg : 15 ^ 

Esl sale? 11053 970 

Open ml 71J72 up 468. 


Isa sSsiSf srrfWM.s.sM* — 

SS 3^:22 BB Commodity Indexes 

Pn-v 0pm ii^,, up 7 4 1 7 Jun96 W.I3 Vd03 9^.10 *ll€3 3SJ41 q™ n 

GERMAN MV . BUND (UFFE. ^ !!L VL " *“ ’ ** 2^* >.5M^ 

DM750.000. pis 5 IMod FFE * Routers |.m'» J- 

Dk« Sn« 2!^“« -•««« Open 0* 771913 up I.W Pp J B FU,UnM ISljS '' 

Erf votes'"'^™ ft* 101 ” H, -° l UW 3-M0NTH EUROURA OJFFE) Sources Mow 4 

PmLL * 0| «- 77X381 ITL I mUnon pis or 100 pot ,ar?K! 1 A ^ e ^atcap lv . s. 1 , 

6P«.nl +®0-®8 up 1,438 * Sep 07 0X74 03 18 0J2O -8 01 Mud 


Reuters 
OJ. Futures 
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ITL I m«»n prior too pet r+rTct.. 

Sra07 017 4 03 18 93 20 -8 01 107868 


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Britain Raises Rate 
To 7% but Warns 
Of End to Tightening 


By Erik Ipsen 

Jntemaiionul He-eld Tribun e 

The Bank of England raised its 
officia 1 interest rate a quarter-point 
Jtor the fourth consecutive month 
Percent, but tbe cen- 
tral bank delivered a strong hint that 
this would be die last tightening for 
some tune. 

The news pushed the dollar lower 
against the Deutsche mark, trigger- 
ing a sell-off in the pound, which 
normally would have strengthened 
after a rate rise. 

Traders quickly Fastened onto a 
statement from tbe Bank of England, 
which said that after four quarter- 
point rate increases in as many 
months, die cost of borrowing, at 7 
percent, was consistent with the 
government's desire to slow the 
economy to meet its medium-term 


Bribe Inquiry 
In Austria Cites 
Unit ofRadex 


Reuters 

• VIENNA — The state pros- 
ecutor said Thursday he was in- 
vestigating allegations that a 
subsidiary of the industrial con- 
glomerate Radex-Heraklith In- 
dus triebeteiligungs AG bad paid 
millions of dollars in kickbacks 
to customers in the 1980s. 

The prosecutor, Erich 
Mueller, said the inquiry in- 
volved the Austrian company 
Veitscb-Radex AG, a maker Of 
refractory products that was ab- 
sorbed into Radex in the early 
1990s. 

Mr. Mueller said that what 
appeared to be bribes had been 
paid all over tbe world but that 
the investigation was concen- 
trating on Italy, Belgium and 
Portugal. A spokesman for 
Radex, a maker of fireproof ma- 
terials. said the company was 
formulating a response to the 
allegations. 


inflation target of 2.5 percent. 

. seem to be suggesting that 

interest rates have now reached their 
peak a bit sooner than manv people 
had expected,” said Keith Edmonds, 
chief analyst at IBJ International in 
London. * 'That means that the pound 
no longer has the promise of future 
interest- rate hikes to support it.” 

Britain’s monetary policy com- 
mittee acknowledged that the strong 
pound was putting severe pressure 
on exporters but said this was 
largely due to factors outside the 
control of British policymakers. 

As die prospect of further British 
rate increases vanished, the British 
currency plunged against the 
Deutsche mark on Thursday before 
settling at 2.97 1 1 DM, down 3 pfen- 
nig by the end of the day. The mark 
also turned the tables on the dollar 
which fell to 1.8812 DM from 

I . 8873 DM in European trading. 

In the face of an accelerating 
slump in the value of the mark 
against tbe dollar, many speculators 
recently began to bet that the 
Bundesbank would soon raise in- 
terest rates to defend its currency. 

‘‘Certainly there is no economic 
justification for a rise in German 
interest rates,” said Jeremy Stretch, 
currency strategist with NatWest 
Markets, pointing to the rise in Ger- 
man unemployment last month to 

II. 4 percent 

But, he added, “the sharpness of 
the decline has made the Bundes- 
bank nervous.” 

“I think that people now feel that 
even if the interest-rate cycle mrns it 
will not be the end of the world,” 
said Bal Sindhu, equity' strategist at 
Dresdner Klein wort Benson. In- 
stead, investors increasingly expect 
little more than token increases in 
borrowing costs ran ging , between a 
quarter percentage point and a half 
parentage point 

In Britain, the problem is the op- 
posite: how to slow the economy 
without raising the currency. The 25 
percent jump in the trade- weighted 
value of the pound since the be- 
ginning of the year is a major factor 
behind a widely anticipated cooling 
of Britain’s economy next year to a 
growth race of around 2.25 percent 
compared with an average forecast 
of 3.25 percent for 1997. 


Investor AB’s Profit Plunges 

Performances at Major Holdings Undermine Results 


fiy CHr Soft fmm Dunorkn 

STOCKHOLM— The Swedish 
holding group Investor AB, the 
hub of the powerful Wallenberg 
family’s financial empire that 
manages many of the biggesi 
Swedish companies, posted an 86 
percent fall in net profit in the first 
half of the year, the group said 
Thursday. 

The group reported a net profit 
of 1 .56 billion kronor ($192.9 mil- 
lion). down from 11.48 billion 
kronor a year ago. 

The first-half profit in 1996 had 
included a 1 2.4 biliion-kronorcap- 
ital gain from the sale of shares in 
the Swedish truck and bus man- 
ufacturer Scania AB. 

Tbe company said its net asset 
value on Aug. 4 totaled 99.2 billion 
kroQor, or 496 kronor per share. 

“If you look at their portfolio, 
neither Scania or Astra performed 
as well as tbe market, and they are 
their two main holdings,” said 
Karl-Johan Bonnevier, an analyst 
at Dresdner Kleiowort Benson. 
'‘Astra has problems keeping their 
R&D pipeline flowing like many 
drugs companies but we aren't 
calling a day on Astra yet.” 

Investor’s shares rose 2 kronor 
to close at 427 kronor. 


“The stock market has been 
very strong in the first half.” In- 
vestor said. ”Our main operation 
wi U continue to be being an active, 
long-term owner in large Swedish 
companies.” 

Investor’s first-half earnings 
were helped by an operating profit 
of 27 million kronor in Saab AB, 
its wholly owned aircraft unit 
Saab posted a loss of 83 million 
kronor in the same period last 
year. 

Bin Saab Automobile AB, 
which Investor co-owns with Gen- 
eral Motors Corp., posted a pretax 

loss of 600 million kronor in the 
first half. 

In April, investor’s new chair- 
man, Percy Bamevik, said he 
would start demanding more from 
the companies it invests in. 

Mr. Barnevik’s reign as pres- 
ident of ABB Asea Brown Boveri 
Ltd., a Swedish-Swiss engineering 
company, was characterized by se- 
lective acquisitions and aggressive 
cost restructuring, analysts said. 

“He could be a catalyst for that 
kind of thing happening 
throughout the group.” Mr. Bon- 
nevier said.. 

ABB said first-half net rose a 
less- th an-expec ted 2 percent, to 


$657 million, as sluggish Euro- 
pean sales offset rising demand in 
emerging markets, and as a 
strengthening U.S. currency 
eroded earnings. 

ABB said full-year profit would 
"at least” match profit last year of 
51 .23 billion. 

In other earnings: 

• Schering AG. the largest 
maker of oral contraceptives, said 
sales and profit in the 1997 first 
half surged because of higher 
volume sales of gynecological 
products and its popular multiple 
sclerosis drug. Pretax profit 
climbed 20 percent, to 498 million 
Deutsche marks ($264.6 million). 

Schering said it expected an in- 
crease in profit of up to 20 percent 
for the year, in part due to the weak 
mark, helping to lift the value of 
foreign sales. 

• Zeneca Group PLC said first- 
half pretax profit rose 10 percent, 
to £669 million ($1.07 billion), on 
strong growth in new and estab- 
lished drugs, although this was off- 
set by currency fluctuations, listed 
higher costs and currency would 
dampen profit in the second half. 

Sales in the period dropped 6 
percent, to £2.75 billion. 

(Bloomberg. AFP. AFX) 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfort wC,.;;. . 

r: :: EfSE 100 Index ’ ’ CA 040 • ; ■ : ! 
5200 • '3250 

: '5K» ---j-f ( 3100- — 

. 4800 ,ir 2950 
‘ 4600 - MfV 2®)Q 

1 «00 A/- - - ; 2650 f 

MAM JJ AC 423,1 M AM J JA ; AM J 

1 9I7 1997 ? 1997 

...... 72 ' 

^m8tecte\v=:^XcV , jWSMfTJ 




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Source: Telekurs 




InlonMriurul Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


Gazprom Seeks to Tighten Control 


Reiners 

MOSCOW — RAO Gazprom, 
the Russian natural-gas monopoly, 
said Thursday that it would assert 
control over tbe flow of gas from 
Central Asia. 

Gazprom’s chief executive, Rem 
Vyakhirev, said the world’s largest 
gas company would not let Kazak- 
stan export gas through Russian 
pipelines, which Gazprom controls. 

Mr. Vyakhirev also said 
Gazprom would create a venture 
with Turkmenistan to export that 
country’s gas. but he spoke only of 
sales co cash-poor customers in the 
former Soviet republics, not of ex- 
ports to Europe. 

The move appeared to anger Pres- 
ident Saparmurad Niyazov of Turk- 
menistan, who suggested he had 
been locked into a deal that would 
keep his country, which has rich 


natural -gas reserves, out of export 
markets controlled by Gazprom. 

Mr. Niyazov said that in talks 
Wednesday with Prime Minister 
Viktor Chernomyrdin of Russia and 
Mr. Vyakhirev, he had “felt the 
smell of old Soviet ambitions, when 
they said, ‘O.K.. we can do without 
your gas.* ” 

Separately, Mr. Vyakhirev said 
he did not “know of any markets 
from which Turkmenistan has been 
crowded out.” 

Analysts say Gazprom fears it 
will be challenged by energy-rich 
former Soviet republics. Turk- 
menistan, for its pan, is involved in 
plans for two large pipelines that 
could cut into Gazprom's supplies 
to Europe. 

The sparks from the two energy 
powerhouses came after the United 
States said last month that it would 


not oppose plans to build a $1.6 
billion pipeline to cany Turkmen 
gas across Iran to Turkey and even- 
tually to Europe. 

Gazprom, ibe world’s largest gas 
producer, meets 60 percent of 
Europe's gas-impon needs and sits 
on an estimated 34.5 percent of the 
world's gas reserves. 

But the company is underpressure 
on two fronts. Russia’s neighbors in 
the former Soviet Union, whose gas 
industries Gazprom controlled when 
it was a ministry, are seeking to sell 
their own gas to the West and to Asia. 
Meanwhile, reform-minded cabinet 
members in Moscow want compe- 
tition in Russia’s domestic gas in- 
dustry for Gazprom, which accounts 
for nearly all the country's gas output 
and has extensive control over the 
transportation of gas supplies in and 
out of Russia. 


• President Boris Yeltsin agreed to order a halt to Russian oil 
companies' participation in a Caspian Sea joint venture wittr 
Azerbaijan. Turkmenistan, which also claims ownership of 
the oil in question, bad asked Mr. Yeltsin to intervene. 

• Metsa-Serla Oy and Rauma Oy, Finnish forest-products 
companies, reported strong second-quarter earnings, a sign that 
the industry is recovering. Metsa-Serla ’s net profit leaped to 41 1 
million markkas ($73.2 million) from 86 million markkaa, 
while Rauma’s profit rose 22 percent, to 1 16 million markkaa. 

• The European Commission confirmed that it had reached 
an accord with the United States that would end restrictions on 
exports of Italian silk scarves and some other European textile 
goods; the EU had threatened to take the dispute to the World 
Trade Organization. 

• Tbe European Commission said it would stick to its 
demand that Volkswagen AG repay illegal subsidies granted 
by the state of Saxony; press reports said VW would have to 
repay about 85 million Deutsche marks ($45 million) of the 
142 million DM it had been given by Saxony. 

• Lagardere SCA was told by the French broadcasting reg- 
ulator that its radio stations had exceeded the legal limit for 
potential audience size since Lagardere merged two subsidiaries. 
The company, which grouped its Skyrock and Chante France 
stations with its Europe 1, Europe 2 and RFM stations, may soon 
have to sell a station, the financial daily La Tribune said. 

• BHF-Bank AG agreed to pay 395.600 Deutsche marks 
($209,000) in connection with charges it had violated fair- 
market practices in determining a settlement price for stock 
options in Allianz AG. 

• Renault's deputy managing director, Carlos Ghosn, said the 
company wanted to reorganize its arrangements with sup- 
pliers to cut costs and return to growth. The French carmaker 
aims to cut purchasing costs by $2 billion by 2000. 

Bloomberg. Reuters. AFX 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Thursday Aug. 7 

Prices in local currencies. 
Telekurs 

High Lpw caw* Piwv. 


Amsterdam 


A8N-AMRC 

Aegon 
Ahold 
AKsj Nobet 
BoonCa 
Bats WesscYB 
CSMcro _ 
Oondscfie Pel 
DSM 
Elsevier 
ForifeAmev 
Getnmfcs 
G-Bmccva 

ffisr 

HoogotWH evo 

HurfDauWK 

ING Group 

XLM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

NetfloydGp 
Nutrido 
OreGrinfsi 
P hips Elec 


^ ... Hdg 

ftobeco 
Rodamco 
Rofinco 
Rorento 


... jem 

VendexM 

VNU 

Woven Klcvo 


51.40 

158 

aso 

35050 

15190 

OM 

11090 

124 

217X0 

3470 

9SJ0 

7*40 

6*80 

116.90 
331.50 
136J0 

9*80 

10280 

80.20 

50.90 
85 
68 

359 
UiJD 
17220 
12980 
94 
213.70 
65 
715J0 
119-50 
123 JO 
487 
11510 
4980 
284 


49-50 SIX 
15540 157*0 
6QJ0 6330 
34280 34970 
15180 15*20 
42 4260 
110 11380 
115 119 

21380 21*80 
3520 3520 

92 95 
7080 7370 

64 6*70 
115 T16JD 
324 33140 
13060 131.10 

93 9*50 
100-40 102-50 

7880 7970 
47-70 50.10 
S3JD 85 
67 68 

356 357.10 
263 24540 
170 17280 
121.50 12140 
90 91 

2TZ40 21370 
6*30 6*90 
215J» 21550 
11970 11970 
11*20 1)770 
JB2J0 48680 
173 71*90 
47*0 48 

263-50 28270 


4870 

15*40 

6050 

34170 

149.10 

4780 

111 

120J0 

21230 

3750 

9170 

7040 

6380 

11370 

32580 

13280 

93 
9980 
79.90 
4770 
8250 

67 

E650 

26350 

168*0 

120 

94 

6*70 

21370 

71950 

12020 

47890 

11130 

49 

27*10 


High Low Close Pi**. 
Deutsche Bank 120.10 7 1970 11975 11670 

Deut Telekom 4380 4370 4345 4225 

Drainer Bank 8080 79*0 WJ0 7265 

Resaws 3U 325 333 330 

RWMiWltad 150.90 14650 14650 U9 

Fried. JCrupp 22*50 320 324 374 

112 11170 11170 ill 
154 153.10 15210 155 

106 10150 10350 10150 
455 455 455 455 

8750 8*10 87 8*30 

8685 8*35 865Q 8550 
70B50 693 70S 679 

707 105 70550 101 

WJ5 1420 1430 1325 

3*40 3590 3*02 3593 
548 546 54*60 549 

885 879 883 879150 

Mek)Hgese«xhott433D 4205 43.18 4080 
Metro 97S0 WTO 97M 9*25 

Munch RuecfcR 7010 6950 69SS 6885 


Gehe 
HekMbgZnt 
Henke) pM 
HEW 
HocMief 
Hoerfat 
Knretatt 

Lrtmeyer 

Unde 

LufltignM 

MAN 

Mamsaann 


High Low dose Pro*. 

SA Breweries 151 1025 14575 14875 

SnOlKDr 40 3975 3975 3975 

Scsd 5950 5875 5875 5875 

sate 21990 219 279 219 

TiperOa& 80 79 80 00 


Kuala Lumpur 


High Low Oosa Pro*. 


High Lm Close Prev. 


High Low dose Prev. 


UtdUt&ties 

VenooroeLnuts 

Vodntone 

WhflhfEOd 

WIBouts Kdgs 
WotseUsv 

WPP Group 

Zeneca 


*93 7.1! *95 

_ . *47 *49 *54 

118 3.12 518 113 

857 8-41 849 *49 

375 375 iU 128 

*87 *67 *83 *60 

2*6 248 

70-46 2053 


7.1 S 
*57 


269 265 

2055 1995 


AMMBHdgs 
Genfiag 
Mol Banking 
Md tan Ship F 
Petron csGos 
Prcdm 
PnhficBk 
Romm 
R esotsWorW 
i PM 


Rrewsug 
RWE 
SAPl 


SGL . 
Siemens 
Springer lAxrf) 
Suedadser 

ar 

VEW 

VbtiLvwgen 


583 57550 SO STD 
87.10 86 8*90 8250 

442 43670 43950 42750 
710.90 20875 20950 209*0 
24450 243 244 244 

12870 12575 12870 12180 
1625 1548 1548 1630 

3fC 879 880 682 

41850 415 41750 409 

113 112 11260 10970 

S76 575 575 577 

796 79250 79350 771 

1373 1357 >2» 130 


Sine Draft* 
Telekom Mol 
Teaqaa 
UWEnC 
YTL 


12*1 

11 

1050 

346 

376 

7.95 

2*30 

7.90 

9*0 

9-BO 

1770 

770 


12 1230 
1040 1060 
2250 2240 

*» ^9 
1030 1030 
356 358 

370 374 

755 775 

2370 2370 
750 750 

850 9 

950 W0 
16 1670 
*85 7 


1350 

11 

2290 

*30 

870 

1050 

342 

378 

745 

2*20 

750 

970 

975 

1770 

775 


Madrid 

AcrataB 

ACESA 

AguoaBiacaton 


Bobu iariix: 60293 


88V 

fyi iv* cfn 

Bonttnier 

S CenhuHlsp 
Pepulra 
BcuSariraxier 
CEPSA 
Orfnente 
Crap MijAe 


London 


FME 748:4887*0 
PtuMouk 582*20 


Abbey I 
AlfledC 


/Non 

I Domecq 
AngOan Wtater 

»... 

AtsocBrf 

BAA 
Boidoys 


Bangkok 




Bombay 

Hindus! Petbn 
buf Dev 8k 
ITC 

MAanogo' Tet 
Refiraicelnd 
Stale B k Indio 
Steel AuWwrdV 
Tata Eng Loco 


SET tadac 63874 
PimtOBK 63572 

718 230 2K 

228 23? 240 

mm 3175 32 

798 398 400 

624 632 632 

m 131 im 

42 44 4*75 

4750 50L» 42H 

137 150 147 

129 130 134 


sma 38 tadec 4447.86 
Pitrioas: 452281 

924 880 _8?0 9M75 

1575 1541 1554753950 

546 509.75 51075 54175 
710 10575 10850 TtH 
583 57158 574 OT 

30*25 28575 28775 3K 

2337S 326 327 33 2 -25 

KJO 2450 2450 2475 
397 378 37850 396SJ 


Helsinki 

EnsoA 

HohtDinakJI 

Kemiro 

Kesko 

Merita A 

MetraB _ 

Mtfco-SraMB 

Neste 

NoktaA 

Orion- Yhtymae 

OulokurapuA 

UPMKynroeae 


HEX Sewn* tadtt: 30546 
Prewsuv itMJS 

5070 4950 50-20 48M 
246 242 244 M2 

52 5150 51.70 51J0 
77 7650 77 7*60 

24 23-30 24 2370 

18890 18750 18890 18850 
49 4850 49 4820 

138 737 138 13650 

497 488 472 48770 

M2 300 200 201 

70650 105.70 70670 7M*0 
137 134 13*60 13140 

87 JO 8*70 8670 8*50 


863 

4*4 

7.90 

650 

151 

557 

550 

1*65 

852 

ST7 

*53 

*23 

1172 

815 

354 

14*2 

*47 

253 

*07 

9.19 

*87 

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157 


Hong Kong 


Bk East Asm 
C nthayPodSc 


CKl 

ChtaLMd 

□ScpSae 

OaoHengBk 

iPodllc. 




Brussels 


Almone 
Bam tad 
BBC 
CBR 

Cotruyt lt 

OefatoUOfl 

Etadrooei 

Efedroftm 

Forth AG 

Gevaert 

GBL 

CwBanqoc 

KTO<Se*ra* 

Tltaiin finn 

rcHViuu 
Pwrertta 


Sec Gent 
Sotejy 
Traoebef 
UCB 




Copenhagen 


IS ™ 'ffl ™ 

9180 9050 9130 9060 

3400 3295 3330 3370 

IS 'is ’fSS ’SS 

i k S8 

s ss s a 

JS 55 iSS urn 

ilifflilli 
X iSS ig ig 
JB rS 2^ a 

14750 U775 MM 
130100 128000 130000128000 




1070 
TUO 
15*0 
98 
2750 
4*80 
5150 
A20 
9-90 
1*20 
107 
9.15 
7750 
1625 
3150 
19J0 
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274 
8*25 
27 JO 


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Htmatsonbnr 
HendereenU 
HKCWnoGos 
HKEledric 
HKTtteMmn 

HsScwgs ** 

HuttssonWh 

TWO 

^WDe, "I 

Oriental Press 
Pant Oriental 
SHJC Props 

SwnTAHd9l 

Slna Land Co. 

Sd? China Post 
Store Px A 
WtwfHdos 
Wheelock 


3.03 

ITS 

10750 

AX 

855 

8 

77 

3570 

3020 


Haag Seng: 1647377 
PreS* 16541*0 
950 9.90 950 

30J0 3890 3080 
1130 1*75 1* 

93 9*75 92 

27 JO 27*5 mb 
4350 4450 4170 
OX 5075 4880 

4470 ^ 

9*5 9J5 940 

15J0 1550 )S» 

102-50 10350 10*50 
895 8L95 905 

7575 7650 7*25 
16 1*25 16 

3070 3140 3050 
1975 19*0 19^ 

444 4*8 *80 

270 372 

81 81 81.25 

27.10 27 JO &60 
M.cn 2050 3080 
2060 70*5 

5650 57J5 5*25 
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7750 7175 
34 3*60 3370 
19.70 19J0 19.70 


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BankScnaand 
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BOC Group 
Boots 
BPBtari 
BritAensp 
BrtAuwoys 
BG 

Bril Load 
BrflPrttat 
B51 syB 
Brt Steel 
BidTdecora 
BTH ... 

Bramah CceM 1158 

Burton Gp 132 

Cable 9/bekss *09 

CndtaaySdiw *2S 

CrahonCram SJQ 

Ceram Union 7.17 

*17 
329 

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EMI Group 575 

Eneror Group *27 

EiderortseM 7J2 

Fran Colored 1J0 

GwriAcdded 9*9 

G EC *05 

GAN 11J9 

Gkno Wdcomt 13-45 
GraxrtoGp 830 

GrraMMta 
GRE 

GreeradsGp 
Gutaness 
GUS 


unn wwi 
Compass Gp 
Court* Ids 


2-88 

1J3 

103 

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750 


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442 
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11.08 
357 
770 
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106 

4*0 

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CortjOeftjB 

Codon Fore 

Drawee 

DenDomieBl 

CWSuewlhfgB 

D/S 1912 B 

FLSindB 

KohLuflnaune 

NwNortMiB 

SophusBerB 

TwDamakB 

IrwBrfa 

UaosmSCT* A 


390 

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1033-50 

S5 

724 

435500 


381 390 ® 

365 366 344 

970 1000 lW 

3» » 22 

710 710 7*9 

<250»*££*2S 


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BklntllndOB 

BkNegrep 

Godeng&mn 

Imtaceuwil 

Inddood 

tad wd .... 

SonpoonaKM 

SanenGirfk 

Tetakonuimbn 


IB' B 3 i 

1400 1325 1150 WOO 
9175 8825 88» 9350 

4100 3925 *00 4100 

N.T. RT- 

7900 7550 7600 7TO 

8450 8225 8325 8450 
4300 4025 4025 £#0 

3900 J730 3833 TWO 


250 

72B 

7*1 

977 

400 

430 

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240 W SO 

710 722 7» 

ns 725 778 

971 9»9*g 

■B 3S B 

411 A” 


Johannesburg * jgj 

.... «« m UHt Rrtl< 


Angiw**""-" 

SISSm! 

anioAff ™ 


Frankfurt 

NMfl 


*■* 


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Altana 185^ 

Bk Berth 
BASF 

Bayer Hypo Bk 7380 

BcyVerransSank 96.70 

Barer 7710 

fern* il 8B50 

Bewc 41 8S 

BMW ISM 

Crag coom TJ 

Conreenoani 63*5 

OslnlerEcnr 
Deginsa 


ISO 

1C3J3 


1855 1855 T ff£ 

J If 4 

SS II 

II S3 B 

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AVMIN 

Bartow 

CGSmrfT 

DeB«5 

Driefeid«» 

Pst Nad Bk 

Genera 

GFSA 

hnperU HjtaS 
tagwe&Kl 

Liberty 

LrtertyLJta 

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Mtaracn 

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Rn»b»on«6p 

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263 

H7 

210 

12 

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250 245*0 267 

iS’SS 2 15 

S £» »B5 2585 
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S 3150 3250 WJ 
3050 3825 3850 3*50 
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97 97 97 


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381 

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mm B250 8325 8175 


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tatpITobocco 
Ktagflaw 
LDifcroJre 
Lund See 

Lnsnw ■ — 

LegdGeniGfp *60 
L^sTSBGp 7*5 
LunnVraily 
Marts Spacer 
MEPC 

Hatxnoi 
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NuSVtet 
Nod .. 
KrawdilMon 
Oronge 
PW 
Pearson 
PBktagtao 
PmrenSai , 

Premier Fanel 
PrudradU 

RnUnjcKGp 
fcakCmp 
RecMICcta 

Retfond 

ReutartHdgs 
Hfflom 
SMC Group 

r^^SuiAO SM 
5oSoy 199 

SdMhwr 

SariNnKstafe 
Sent Power 

SrremTreiri 
SMlTumspC 

Nephew 
SniTfiKEne 
Srofltetad 
Stann Bee 

Stage <nnrt» 

Stand Charts 
Taiei Lyta 
lacs 

Taames Water 
31 Group 
TlGraop 
Torokins 
Unflwer 
UM Assurance 
UMNewS 


ZCB 

6 

*98 

1198 

ISO 

5-55 

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7J4 

3JI 

111 

6*4 

757 

1*5 

734 

5.10 

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7.99 

349 

1031 

112 

*17 

225 

*94 

105 

1075 

256 

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*45 

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7-C 

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2B4 

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1128 

174 

1202 

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1085 

415 

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1914 

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*30 

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525 

5*5 

1130 

8*2 

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429 

409 

11*3 

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1380 

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1*3 

168 

186 

1088 

128 

525 

6B3 

*87 

685 

687 

113 

557 

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7.14 

177 

926 

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1150 

1118 

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589 

273 
423 
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10*0 

378 

718 

252 

938 

183 

4*5 

757 

776 

591 

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1352 

252 

532 

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783 

332 

287 

601 

775 

136 

786 

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3*0 

987 

285 

585 

2.18 

683 

280 

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10.10 

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274 
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435 

773 

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18*4 

450 

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855 8*5 

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786 785 

M7 *36 

151 1*6 

537 532 

476 471 

1*50 1107 
852 8*5 

5.13 507 

*47 *43 

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11*9 11*7 

8.11 785 

152 142 

14*1 1190 
6X5 6X1 

2*8 2*3 

*06 604 

9.12 889 

*80 *71 

1*8 1*5 

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195 187 

1105 1082 
159 139 

609 599 

690 6.1 D 
492 502 

7.13 684 

*09 *11 
129 113 

*07 598 

469 *60 

468 470 

634 633 

738 706 

139 1.77 

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195 380 

1188 11*0 
1331 1134 

805 831 

498 495 

306 194 

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497 488 

631 635 

603 *86 

2233 2110 
1183 10X5 
383 380 
7.18 785 

253 157 

9*7 939 

188 285 

*56 *52 

797 7*5 

108 197 

498 590 

*98 4*5 

1197 11# 
256 255 

539 424 

8*6 838 

3 

206 310 
*40 631 
735 7*4 

1*3 137 

730 7X6 

506 584 

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7.93 7-70 

3*0 3*7 

1033 990 
387 286 

488 *33 

123 118 

*93 6M 
304 280 
1071 >086 
235 239 
SJ2 4*7 
10.26 10.12 
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190 395 

4*1 *35 

18*5 1833 
7*6 7.17 
440 434 

282 276 

840 875 

459 *76 

1172 11 

1.73 133 

1281 I? 
B32 831 

450 4*5 

6*4 6*1 

1077 1039 

4.12 <86 

432 439 

785 7.rt 
*61 6-2 
4« J?? 

120 113 

19.12 10*0 

455 457 

*85 *85 


ECSA 

GasNafuror 

tbariroia 

Pr>en 

Repsoi 

SeMBanaEkC 

Tabocataro 

Telefonica 

UntaaFenaro 

IMBicCOnenr 



Prevton; 

59986 

28500 

27880 

28080 

77970 

7M 

7785 

1715 

1830 

5930 

5810 

5860 

5930 

8280 

8170 

8210 

8200 

4330 

4195 

4285 

4175 

1475 

1450 

1455 

1470 

7B10 

7620 

7700 

7550 

5960 

5850 

5900 

5860 

36500 

35790 

36000 

35500 

4505 

4430 

4430 

4400 

4830 

4695 

4710 

4650 

3400 

3265 

3395 

3340 

5750 

8420 

8450 

8530 

3270 

3180 

3200 

3195 

1325 

1290 

1300 

1195 

4970 

4790 

6790 

4920 

1875 

1810 

1860 

1850 

3050 

2965 

3010 

29SS 

6440 

6320 

6350 

6420 

1450 

1405 

1405 

1425 

7950 

7BOO 

7860 

7770 

4195 

4135 

4190 

4155 

1250 

1230 

1240 

1240 

2760 

2725 

2760 

2710 


Manila 

AyotaB 
Arotauxrt 
BkPftaipW 
CAP Homes 
Mania EtacA 
MeftaBar* 
Petroa 
PClBank 
PhB Long Dirt 
San MigoeJ B 
SM Prime Hdg 


PSEtadee 247081 
Piwtoas: 249479 


1125 

18 

IB 

1825 

71*0 

21 

21.25 

2125 

155 

152 

152 

152 

1025 

10 

1025 

10*0 

87 

B6J0 

87 

88*0 

560 

550 

555 

560 

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6.10 

6-20 

620 

224 

220 

220 

220 

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920 

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945 

64*0 

64 

64 

64*0 

8*0 

8 

8.10 

8*0 


Paris 


Ac Qn 
AGP 

AJrUqutae 

AtaewAisth 

AjdUAP 

Bancoiro 

BlC 

BNP 

C oncl Pl us 
COfTTfoUT. 

Casino 

CCF 

CeWem 

DiristoiDtor 

CLf-Daia Fnm 

Credd Aijncaie 

Danone 

EH^nUtalne 

ErittaniaBS 

Euroribneu • 

Eurohxvtei 

GeftEoux 

Haws 

taietai 

Lafarge 

iMfCOd 

LtJwi 

LVMH 

MkMnB 

Porta A 

Pernod Rica ni 

PeogeolCit 

PlnouB-Print 

Promrafes 

RerouH 

Rexel 

Rh-PouleiKA 

Sraxjfi 

Scrinerder 

SEB 

SOS Thomson 
5le Generate 
Sodexho 
SlGobata 
Sun (Gel 
Suez Lyon Eoux 


TfiomsanCSF 

Total B 
Udnor 
Valeo 



CAC-40: 305634 
Prcriouv 3037*9 

1029 

975 

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950 

218 

214 

216.30 

215*0 

972 

960 

964 

9S2 

887 

870 

874 

074 

419 

407*0 

418 

40640 

788 

735 

747 

720 

S43 

524 

528 

524 

297 

190 

293 

290 

1147 

1115 

1135 

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4079 

4031 

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286.60 

281 JO 

283 

284*0 

341*0 

325*0 

34130 

122 

724 

703 

705 

714 

980 

969 

969 

977 

598 

580 

581 

590 

1260 

1160 

1260 

1360 

973 

950 

950 

963 

707 

687 

70? 

693 

855 

835 

840 

836 

8.90 

8.70 

8.90 

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725 

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735 

772 

746 

750 

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40030 

400*0 

402*0 

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843 

450*0 

435*0 

448-40 

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1264 

1203 

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2492 

2435 

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1580 

1525 

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394 

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m 

390 

465 

457*0 

460*0 

455 

311 

304 

306*0 

306 

722 

691 

717 

704 

2756 

2710 

2740 

2729 

2372 

2147 

2353 

2345 

173*0 

170.60 

17170 

171*0 

1688 

1645 

1679 

1650 

261.10 

25730 

25530 

2W70 

654 

642 

648 

639 

351 

347 

348 

347 

1039 

1003 

1020 

1016 

583 

571 

571 

579 

823 

908 

818 

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3100 

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910 

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677 

665 

667 

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159*0 

646 

678 

638 

636 

119*0 

115.10 

115.10 

117 

390 

376 

37*50 

384 


Electrolux B 

Ericsson B 

Homes B 

taontoe A 

Ia»«rDrB 

MaOoB 

NordbankM 

Priarmrilprotwi 

SoncMkB 

Scraria B 

SCAB 

S-EBmAenA 
Stand ia Fore 
Skmvsta B 
SKFB 

Spmticnken A 
StaraA 
SvHanckesA 
VfahtaB 


628 

610 

618 

611 

375*0 

369 

371*0 

3*9 

335*0 

328 

329 

328 

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680 

690 

675 

431-50 

126 

4 77 

425 

301*0 

289 

298 

291 

280 

267 

277 

267 

301 

293 

299 

301 

256 

246 

255 

248 

225 

220 

220 

223 

188 

185 

186*0 

IBS 

96 

90 

96*0 

90*0 

330 310*0 

328 

317*0 

344 

338 

344 

338 

225 

220 

223 

219 

186 177*0 

185 

178 

140 138*0 

138*0 

138 

271 

251 

269 

253 

229J0 

715 

319 

22? 


Mexico 

Ala A 
EanocoB 
CenwCPO 
C3raC 

ErapModana 

Gpo Carso A) 

GpoFBcraiWt 

Gpo Fir Inbraso 

idraoaartMn 

TetarisaCPO 

THMexL 


6*00 

25*0 

4330 

1460 

4*20 

6450 

191 

7770 

33*5 

12750 

21.90 


Baba Mbc 5180*4 
Plural* 521289 

6400 6430 64*0 
2425 2450 2590 
42*0 4270 4275 
1434 1*28 1450 
4450 4460 4570 
62*0 6150 6230 
7*0 3*8 153 

37.10 3770 37.10 
3770 37.70 38-10 
12780 12750 12650 
2155 21*0 21*5 


Sao Paulo Brta^lgWJ 


Milan 

Alcorna Asdc 

BcoCamntta! 

BaBdetwran 

Ben 6 Roma 

B enetto n 

Cirafita HoCano 

EtEsrai 

ENI 

Fiat 

GefleroiAssic 

m 

IMA 


Merflebmeo 

Mortedison 

Oiretf 

Pa/nxrtd 

HreH 

has 

Roto Banco 
5 Paata Torino 
Tefecnm ftafia 
TIM 


MIB 

15600 

<220 

6120 

1705 

27900 

3605 

8840 

10980 

6175 

37400 

17880 

2700 

5650 

8255 

12020 

1198 

669 

2695 

SIX 

15400 

22350 

14505 

11765 

643S 


15105 

4045 

5650 

1650 

76900 

3SHS 

8370 

10650 

5995 

36150 

IS 

£3 

HOC 

uto 

640 

2615 

4985. 

14900 

20300 

13710 

I14TO 

6200 


I 

1449188 

15250 14710 
4105 3965 

5650 5810 

1625 1680 

26900 77450 
3600 3500 

8400 BOS 
10650 10725 
6005 5950 

36450 35800 
17000 17010 
264S 2600 

5465 5470 

fflSO BCB5 
12000 11740 
1173 1178 
640 642 

2620 2600 
5045 5000 

14900 15145 
20300 20200 
14400 13800 
17540 11300 
6215 6270 


BrodescoPfd 
BrafunaPM 
Crania PW 
CESPPW 
Copal 
Efctrobras 
itaubaneoPM 
Ugftl Servians 

ffisPta 

mum is rra 

FtaufisJo Lw 

SU Kodanar 

SomaCrur 

TeteUrmPfd 

Tetetolq 

Tefcrj 

TetespPM 

Unibonaj 

UsirotaPfd 

CVRD PM 


11*0 

82101 

58.99 

80*0 

1800 

578.00 
67&00 
537JD 

469.00 
31100 
2)0.00 

3*50 

1170 

15*50 

197*0 

1901 


3980 

1?J0 

2980 


11.15 1180 
82280 82100 
5780 57.950 
7880 7980 
1780 1780 
55780 57180 
65080 67080 
S3780 537,00 
46080 46980 
30380309.990 
20980 71000 
36*8 36*9 
11*0 11.70 

15380 15470 
19550 197*0 
77100 173X0 
34400 351.00 
3*50 3850 
1215 12.15 
3&30 2850 


1135 

82380 

58.70 

7980 

17.990 

56880 


80 

47280 

30880 

210.99 
3620 
11*0 

15*50 

20080 

175X10 

350.99 
3989 
1279 
2980 


Sydney 

A8 Qnfirerts: Z717J8 
Preview: 2727.10 


8*0 

830 

8J7 

846 

ANZBUng 

10*7 

104S 

10-18 

10*5 

BHP 

17.97 

17*4 

1/44 

17.99 


4.17 

612 

417 

4)0 


29*0 

2805 

29.11 

2798 

CBA 

16*8 

16*6 

16*7 

16*5 

CCAraaB 

16*6 


1418 

1641 


6*7 

6*8 

492 

490 


7*1 

68/ 

6*9 

7*8 

C5R 

528 

522 

52/ 

523 


2*9 

7*5 

2*/ 

2*7 


2*5 

I.W 

3M 1 

7.06 

ICI Australia 

13*3 

1328 

13*0 

1328 


30JO 

29*5 

29.90 

3030 

MIMHdgs 
Nat AuV Bank 

1*9 

19*8 

1*5 

19*3 

1*7 

19*6 

1*9 

19*6 

Nat Mutual Hdg 

221 

2.17 

2.18 

2.20 


6.15 

404 

6X16 

411) 

Pacific Dunlop 

3*5 

3*9 

461 

3.63 

Pioneer WI 

5*4 

4.95 

503 

S 


8*6 

830 

8.40 

840 


2110 

20*3 

20*5 

20*0 

SI George Bank 

8*3 

873 

8.73 

8BS 

WMC 

7.75 

7*5 

/*5 

7*7 

S53S 8 

8*2 
11 40 

8*9 

7125 

8*5 

11*5 

853 
11J 7 

Woohrota 

4JS 

428 

434 

438 

Taipei 

Stock MretttadBB 9840*8 
Previous: 9061*7 


151 

148 

151 

148 

Chong HwoBk 
□rtooTungBk 

119 

72*0 

116 

72 

1)6 

72 

117 

72*0 


134 

130 

130 

13l 

OrituStoei 

30*0 

30 

3020 

30 


no 

11450 

117 

116*0 


65*0 

*4 

64J0 

6450 


127*0 

125 

125*0 

125 


64 

62 

63 

6150 


74*0 

73 

73 

73 

5hin Kong Life 

105 

156 

1111 

150 

105 

757 

101 

753 

Tatung 

47*0 

140 

47 

133 

47.10 

134 

47.10 

137 

Utd World Chin 

65 

63 

63*0 

6450 


The Trib Index 


Prices as vt 3:00 PM. New York toie. 


1 


Jan j. 1902 = too 

Level 

Change 

% change 

year to date 
la change 

World Index 

180 43 

+0 73 

+0.41 

+21.02 

Regional hi denes 
AsaVaafrc 

130.83 

-0.19 

-0.15 

+6.00 

Europe 

190.19 

+3.02 

+1.61 

+17.98 

N. America 

213.42 

-1.20 

-0.56 

+31.81 

S. America 

175.68 

-0.27 

-0.15 

+53.53 

Industrial Indexes 

Capital goods 

234.18 

+0.62 

+0.27 

+37.01 

Consumer goods 

196.71 

-0-20 

-0.10 

+21.85 

Energy 

20329 

-0.98 

-0.48 

+19.08 

Finance 

136.13 

+1.99 

+1.48 

+16-89 

Miscellaneous 

196.13 

+3.30 

+1.71 

+2123 

Raw Materials 

198.04 

+1.SO 

*0.93 

+ TJ.7S 

Service 

170.31 

+0.45 

+0.26 

+24.02 

UtMes 

171.08 

*2.05 

+1.21 

+1955 


The totemabomt HBrBklTnBiine World Stock index C tracks the U S doner values ol 
2$0 t/mmuvooBBy mvettaUe stocks tram 25 cauntmu. For more information, a fnw 
booklet a amiable by wrong to The Trib Index, ifli Avenue Charles t» Gaioe. 

925P1 NeufyCedex. France. Compied by Btoomberg News. 


Seoul 

Odomi 

ttaewoo Heavy 
Hyundai Eng. 
Kio Melon 

Koto FI Pot 
K orea Exert Bk 
LGSbidcdii 
P ahang Inn Si 
Samsung Dfcicy 
SamsungElec 
ShtahcmBonk 
SKTHK90I 


Ca^oslte Wax: 74*35 
Piwbn74S*5 
97000 95700 95900 97000 
B140 7980 80» 8050 

71300 20600 20600 21100 
13700 13000 13000 13900 
26800 26tfO 26800 26500 
5650 5480 5570 5570 
49000 46000 46100 47500 
5WOO 58200 589W S8500 
46000 45100 45700 45500 
69900 68800 69500 69300 
9600 9500 9500 9450 

463000 450500 463000 463000 


Montreal 

Bee Mob Can 
Cdn77reA 
.CdnUUA 
CT fall Sue 
Gal Metro 
G*WertUfcco 
lua Boo 
tavestandp 
LcbtowCos 
SaS 3k Canada 
PcwraCrap 
Power fim 
OoeheoarB . 
RogeoCraranB 
ftqalUCda 


ladartlobtodtt 37*6.12 
Preriausi 3739.13 


4991 

49 J0 

4 W 

27.90 

2735 

27.90 

38.95 

38.95 

38.95 

44<6 

44* 

441* 

18*5 

i&ro 

18*0 

34 

31 

34 

42.10 

4ito 

41*5 

37*5 

36*5 

37*5 

2130 

20*0 

21 JO 

18.15 

IS 

18*5 

39 to 

»*s 

m 

38V5 

38*0 

38fe 

27.15 

27*5 

27.10 

10*0 

10*5 

10*0 

m 

67 JO 

67*5 


Oslo 

AkerA 

OU6WWM 

DenwskaBk 

Eton 

Hafihnd A 

KwenwAso 

Hank Hydro 

HartkeskagA 

NycareedA 

OrttaAsaA 

PtmGeeSve 

SoqoPerimA 

SdAsted 

TroaucomOfi 

Storebrand Asa 


g 8X rades 722*3 

PnviBaS! 716-30 


155 148 

205 200 

77 90 27 JO 
3170 3280 

156 15150 

46 45 


459 

41*50 

295 

16850 

570 

462 

161 

138 

630 


450 

410 

287 

166 

554 

444 

157 

135 

630 


154 146*0 
202 200 
27 JO 77*0 
323) 33 

155*0 154 

45*0 46 

456 446 

411 413 


Singapore 

ArtoPDcBrew 
CeretxxPoc 
GlyDeith 
CrdeCorrioge 
DtrtyFramH* 1 
DBS foreign 
DBS Land 
FrasariNeave 
UK Land* 

Jortf Mntftesn ' 

Jard Strategic' 

KeppdA 

Ketrad Bank 

Kepprfftfe 

Keaad Land 

OCBCfareirai 

OS Onion BkF 

Partway Hdgs 

Semhawaig 

Sag Mr foreign 

SmgLsmd 

SingPressF 

SngTecti Ind 

StagTetacamra 

Tat Lm Bank 

Utdidduatai 

UMDSaBkF 

WtagTaiHrigs 

’.in dMors. 


Stroih Toses: 195124 
Prevton: 1958*2 


5A5 5*0 

5.85 555 
12.70 12J0 
12.90 12*0 
0.99 0.91 
1KB0 1750 
4*8 4*0 

10JO 9.90 
3*6 3J0 

125 785 

478 470 

670 5.95 
3.78 in 
i 10 5 

*36 4JQ 
1430 13*8 
9 8.25 

6*0 *25 

*70 6*0 

13 12*0 
7*5 770 

28*0 2*70 

iro in 

2*6 754 

184 2.78 

189 104 

1570 1410 
354 100 


5B5 580 

555 555 
1U0 12*0 
1150 12.90 
0-92 182 

18.10 1880 
4*6 454 

990 1070 
147 140 

8.10 875 
470 4J0 

*05 670 

170 3.74 

5 496 
430 4-34 

1170 14*0 
B4S 9 
675 6*5 

6*0 *70 

1250 13 

770 7*0 

2770 2880 
174 3 SB 

255 256 
278 178 

187 189 

14*0 1570 
382 386 


Stockholm 


4BJ0 48J0 


148*0 161*8 



r reran 3: ■ 

565 

554 

AGAB 

HO 

107*0 109*0 

458 

440 

ABBA 

1 1150 

108 H? 

157 

156 

AslDornon 

241 

232 240 

137 

. IB 

Astra A 

153*0 

175 152 50 

630 

625 

AttasCopceA 

7S0 

240 247 

4850 

48.70 

Aatatar 

296 

293 295 


* 





237 

IS? 

24) 


Tokyo 

Afrranato . 

AB Nippon Air 

Ariwur 

AstfuBor* 

AsaNChem 

Bk Tokyo M tea 

BkYakeharoO 

Bridgestone 

C (Wen 

OsubuEtac 

OiugobiEtac 

Dai Nlpp Print 
DaW 

DoMdiKBig 
Dam Bank 
Dcrtwa House 
Dawn Sec 
DOI 
Demo 

EaslJoproiHy 

Eisat 

Rnuc 

RiBBank 

FuS Photo 

Fu|Bsu 

HodtaurtBfc 

Hitodii 

Honda Motor 

IBJ 

im 

Orxhu 

ito-Yokodo 

JAL 

Japan Tobacco 
JUSCD 

KoPno 

KansaiEfoc 

Kao 

KswaKrtlHvy 
Kawa Steel 
MrtiMppRy 
KJrr Brevresy 
Kobe Sled 
Kcroabu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 

[®" EK 

Maraboni 

Mann 

MatHiComm 

Matsu Elec )nd 
Matsu Elec m 
Mitsubishi 
Mitsubishi Ch 
MirsuhKHEi 
MBwbKhlEst 
MdwbisM Huy 
muitHtHUot 
MilsuthsM Tr 
Mitsui 


Hite 22*1947585 
Previous; 1970107 


lOCta 

1060 

1060 

1040 

715 

705 

706 

/IR 

3510 

34 Hi 

34911 

3530 

967 

85V 

865 

860 

620 

596 

597 

615 

1050 

KUO 

1040 

rasr 

7790 

22W 

7780 

2260 

W 

MB 

558 

558 

2870 

7800 

7840 

2810 

3660 

3590 

3600 

3590 

7040 

7020 

JUKI 

2040 

1980 

1970 

1990 

IV8D 

2800 

2750 

2760 

2/60 

880 

845 

851 

876 

1540 

1490 

1500 

1570 

4 W 

5« 

580 

5/3 

13/0 

ruu 

i:c<u 

IJ50 

7K8 

750 

760 

788 

79000 

7770a 

7770O 

77Km 

7780 

7700 

2770 

7780 

52800 

52711a 

5250a 

5190a 

7520 

7490 

2500 

2500 

5460 

V40 

5300 

5360 

15«0 

1510 

1520 

1510 

4800 

4660 

4730 

4840 

im 

1660 

16/0 

1/10 

1120 

1110 

1110 

1110 

1330 

1750 

raw 

1340 

3840 

VM 

36S0 

3790 

1710 

1680 

1680 

1660 

383 

378 

tao 

3ffl 

Sit 

535 

575 

539 

6750 

6700 

67.50 

6680 

498 

4/1 

4/5 

49/ 

9430a 

9350a 

9400a 

9340a 

3420 

3360 

33M 

3350 

580 

560 

W) 

576 

2250 

2710 

7740 

2240 

1790 

1760 

1/80 

1/91) 

4M 

475 

476 

480 

370 

310 

31.6 

312 

683 

680 

6S2 

681 

1080 

1050 

1050 

1080 

181 

1/6 

175 

187 

810 

781 

798 

870 

495 

480 

481 

.500 

9790 

94M) 

9530 

9800 

1990 

1970 

1980 

1980 

587 

540 

5/0 

534 

459 

453 

455 

456 

1970 

1900 

I960 

1870 

4840 

4770 


4800 

7460 

7430 

7440 

2420 

1430 

1370 

raw 

1410 

1740 

1240 

1760 

17*0 

306 

795 

297 

304 

617 

595 

605 

612 

1641) 

1590 

1670 

1640 

817 

806 

Blit 

81/ 

650 

631 

636 

629 

1/10 

1660 

1/00 

IriW 

IliO 

UNO 

1110 

1110 


Mitsui Furiosn 
Mitsui Trust 
MurotaMfg 
NEC 
Nton • 

NBUusSec 

Nintendo 

sssssr 

Nippon Steel 
Ntoon Metre 
NKK 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 

NTT Data 

OfFkioer 

Osaka Gas 

Ricrai 

Rohm 

SakunsBk 

Saikyo 

San ua Bank 

Sanyo Elec 

Secran 

SetauRwy 

SetastriChem 

Sekisui House 

Seven-Eleven 

Sharp 

ShfluHuElPWT 

Shknini 

SWn-etsuCh 

Shiseklo 

Shizuoka Bk 

5cflbank 

^mhwno 
Sumitomo Bk 
Sumnou m 
Swirtfcnno Elec 
SumH Metal 
Sumfl Trosl 
TafchoPharm 
TakedoChem 
TDK 

TohokuEIPwr 
Toko Bank 
Takta Marine 
Tokyo E/Pwr 
Tokyo Electron 
Tokyo Gas 

Tokyo Gup 

Tonen 

ToppanPnrrt 

Toraylnd 

Toshiba 

Tosiem 

Toyo Trust 

Toyota Motor 

YrimaiKHKN 

BirWbistMB 


High 

Law 

Owe 

Prev. 

1450 

1410 

1430 

1430 

695 

668 

471 

693 

5370 

5300 

MU0 

53U) 

1660 

1610 

I6J0 

1660 

2420 

2290 

2360 

2?ro 

650 

615 

617 

634 

11500 

moo 

11200 

11300 

773 

760 

751 

757 

523 

510 

511 

SIS 

318 

311 

311 

315 

7 » 

740 

750 

«B 

701 

195 

197 

20/ 

1700 

1670 

1/00 

1680 

1210b 

HIM 

1180b 

1210b 

5200b 

5100b 

5160b 

5100b 

417 

604 

610 

634 

285 

280 

280 

781 

I860 

1790 

IHbl! 

1790 

15000 

14700 

14/00 

146UU 

74< 

731) 

735 

718 

<370 

4200 

4310 

<370 

1660 

1630 

1640 

1630 

454 

432 

435 

460 

8750 

8610 

8&SO 

B710 

5700 

5410 

5620 

5700 

977 

934 

953 

978 

1180 

1150 

1160 

11611 

9250 

9100 

9200 

9250 

1420 

1360 

1380 

1430 

1950 

1930 

J9J0 

1KW 

593 

570 

5/0 

600 

3770 

3210 

3710 

3200 

2030 

2000 

2030 

1990 

1290 

1250 

12/0 

1280 

4360 

6110 

63S0 

4040 

12200 

11900 

12100 

11900 

1070 

1050 

1050 

1060 

1890 

1840 

18/0 

I860 

461 

448 

452 

460 

1970 

r?40 

TVS! 

1950 

285 

276 

276 

780 

1120 

1100 

iioo 

1080 

3120 

3070 

3090 

3110 

3560 

3470 

3490 

3550 

10100 

9800 

9900 

9990 

1990 

I960 

1960 

1990 

1070 

1040 

1040 

1060 

1480 

1440 

1440 

1461) 

2 260 

7240 

2ZS0 

2760 

7460 

7270 

7370 

7300 

793 

790 

290 

292 


630 

635 

650 

1180 

1120 

1150 

I1B0 

TWO 

1870 

1880 

IS80 

785 

773 

/B0 

/// 

745 

718 

723 

745 

TOO 

7470 

7570 

JSM 

923 

914 

9)9 

9)8 

3300 

3200 

3750 

3260 

3070 

3010 

3010 

30/1) 


Moore 

Newbridge Ne# 
NarandOKie 
Norcen Energy 
Nthem Telecocn 
Nava 
One* 

PancrinPetlm 

RettaCda 

PtareTDonw 

PocoPdlm 

Potash Sort 

Renaissance 

Rto Algom 

Rogorr Cartel B 

SeoaromCo 

SheBCda A 

Suncra 

Taflanan Eny 

TeckB 

Tetoglabe 

Tetus 

Thomson 

TnDom Bank 

TronsaUa 

TiansCda Pipe 

Trimort Fbil 

TrOec Hahn 

TVXGoid 

tWstaoortEuy 

Weston 


High 

LOW 

Close 

Prtv. 

30.90 

30*6 

MBS 

30*0 

45.70 

63U 

63*0 

64*5 

3035 

29*0 

30.10 

30.15 

33.95 

33.15 

33*5 

33-40 

145J0 144*0 144.95 

I43t 

1115 

12*5 

12.10 

12.10 

32*0 

32 

32>4 

32-45 

27.10 

26*0 

27*5 

26*0 

26* 

25*5 

26W 

26** 

24 

2140 

23*0 

TAM 

14 

I3A5 

13*5 

I3L/II 

Utah 105J0 

106.10 

111591 

37 JS 

36.70 

37*5 

36*5 

35-40 

3490 

35.10 

34W 

30 

78V 

30 

28** 

52J0 

54JS0 

43J0 

5245 

521* 

23.90 

24 M 

2415 

<6* 

4SVy 

46.10 

45.10 

45 

441)5 

44*5 

4485 

78 

2/A5 

271* 

2/1* 

52 

AUS 

STM 

511* 

27 JO 

3S 

27 ■* 

76*0 

35.70 

35-45 

35J0 

45J0 

4445 

44*5 

4470 

17.70 

27*5 

1/-J5 

17.70 

17-10 

2735 

27*5 

Z7J5 

70H 

69 JO 

70% 

6920 

33w 

31)0 

3115 

3310 

Ur. 

6.15 

6U 

6.10 

27 J 5 

2/.I5 

27.15 

lte 

100 

98 

100 

98 


Vienna 

BoH6er-iMdeb 

CiedbmrtPfd 

EA4taneral 

EVN 

Fkxjhafen Wton 
OMV 

OestEIMriz 
VA Stahl 
VATedi 
Wienertretg Bou 



ATX tadec 1465*0 


Piwriem: 1448*b 

1043 

1020 

1025 

1028 

633 

595 

600 

619 

3290 

3240 

3290 

3200 

1640 

1609 

1630 

1623 


542 526*0 54DJ5 528*0 
18431802*0 1840 1800 
883 874 880 874 
626 603 618*5 S96 
2640 2584 2S» 2592 
2757 2725 Z742 2728 


PmtMf:2sa271 


Toronto 

AUUCoro. 
Alberta Energy 
Alcoa Ah«n 
Anderson Eiqil 
SkMradreal 
Bk Nova Sadia 
BanidGold 

B^ekKwnm ■ 
Btochem Pham 
BoMwnderB 
BrosmnA 
Cornea) 

QBC 

Cdn Natl Krai 

CdoNalRin 

OftiOoadPH 

CdnPocriic 

Cratdnco 

Dofosro 

Domtar 

Donohue A 

DePorriCda A 
Edper Group 
EuroNwMng 
Fakta Rnl 
Fakonbridge 
FWdierCludlA 
Franca Nevada 
Gulf Gda Res 
ImfieriolOfl 
inoo 

Cb SBT 

Loewen Group 
MaaiuBBldl 
Magna biBA 
MearatK* 



4*1 

4*0 

4*0 

440 

1*0 

1J9 

1J9 

1J9 

3.75 

3*8 

3J0 

172 

40 

44) 

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.... U££i . 


Usfc 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1997 




ASIA/PACIFIC 




ri nr l 


Japanese Contractors Bulldozed by Debt 


By Miki Tanikawa 

Special io the Herald Tribune 

bali^T? ~ W*" Jokai Kogyo Co., filed for 
foMiTXSi? f 3 * y “July, it was bad news not just 
f ■ u ? n ^ edl . Iors ; subcontractors and investors but 
■ j, ® e nure Japanese conjunction sector, an 
mdus&y that accounts for nearly I7percemofthe 

wScS econoray ^ employs 1 0 percent of Its 

^general contractor fo^ with 510 billion 
J? 1 } Pr**® billion) in debts wheD its main lender 
Hokkaido Takushoku Bank, decided it would no 
longer sustain die company, which had over- 
extended its business on various real-estate proj- 
ects during the country’s overheated “bubble 
economy" of the late 1980s. 

But Tokai Kogyo's is hardly an isolated case 
inere are about 50 general contractors that form a 
second tier of the Japanese industry, below the top 
lour of Kajima Corp., Taisei Corp.', Shimizu Corp. 
and Obayashi Corp., and analysts say manv of 
these secondary players face severe financial 
strains. 

.Tada Corp., for example, whose apartment- 
house business has deteriorated rapidly, sought 
co urt p rotection from creditors July 30 as it 
determined that it could no longer expect help 
from its lenders. 

Mitsnhiro Sasajiraa, a senior researcher at Nikko 
Research Center, said construction companies* bad 
debt was a potential risk to the entire financial 
community. Unlike the problem of nonperforrning 
assets of Japan’s housing lenders, which received 


w ide and highly politicized attention, die extent of 
the construction industry's plight has been slow to 
take hold with the public. 

It is the fact that the depth of the problem 
cannot be fathomed that poses such a threat." Mr. 
basajima said. 

Japan's construction industry suffered severely 
collapse of the economic bubble in die 
early 1990s. as private-sector orders rumbled from 
a peak level of 20 trillion yen a year to just over 1 1 
trillion yen in 1996 for the top 50 general con- 
traetcys. This led to cutthroat competition for the 
dwindling volume of business, slashing the prices 
the builders could command by as much as half. 

"An increasing number of construction 
companies today accept orders that are doomed io 
post red ink." said Mikio Kunisawa. senior man- 
aging director at Nishimatsu Construction Co. He 
said the companies accepted the work only be- 
cause they did not want to leave their employees 
and equipment idle. 

Moreover, as earnings dwindle, builders are 
having to service massive debts incurred d urine 
the real-estate boom. 

According to Teikoku Databank, a credit-re- 
search organization based in Tokyo, the top 118 
construction companies have interest obligations 
on a total of 10.3 trillion yen in debt and are owed 
5.5 trillion yen for completed projects. 

This large amount of receivables outstanding 
also is the fault, at least in part, of the construction 
companies themselves. 

At the height of the building boom, big con- 
tractors aggressively sought orders in a practice 


called zmhu. or "order crearing." Companies 
seeking orders frequently offered to procure 
hard-to-obtain land and even agreed to provide 
loan guarantees to banks for customers with 
insufficient collateral. Extravagant projects in- 
cluding mansions, golf courses and resorts were 
started, but the end of the bubble economy abor- 
ted many of them, leaving the construction 
companies responsible for the costs. 

Japan's Research Institute of Construction and 
Economy, a private group, has estimated the loan 
guarantees carried by the 53 construction compa- 
nies on die first section of the Tokyo Stock 
Exchange at a total of 2.7 trillion yen. Some in the 
industry also have said that, in addition to the 
guaranteed loans, construction companies made 
many secret guarantees to potential customers 
that did nor show up in their official reports. 

Mark Brown, a senior analyst at BZW Se- 
curities Ltd., said the balance sheers of con- 
struction companies were highly interest-raie- 
sensitive. He said Japan's record low interest 
rates were the only reason there had not been a 
major crisis in the industry already and that one 
could quickly develop when rates began to rise. 

Aggravating the problem is the fact that the 
government plans to trim public-works spending 
by 1 5 percent between 1 998 and 2000. reducing a 
major source of revenue for the construction 
industry. 

The companies in trouble "can do nothing by 
themselves." said Masatoshi Shioiri. a construc- 
tion analyst ai Smith Barney International Ltd. 
"They are at the complete mercy of the bank." 



Net Slumps 
At Samsung 


Bloomberg Wens' 

SEOUL — Samsung Elec- 
tronics Co., the world’s largest 
memory-chip manufacturer, 
said Thursday its profit 
tumbled in the first half of the 
year because of plunging 
semiconductor prices. 

Sales in the six months rose 
3 percent from a year earlier, 
to 9 trillion won ($10.1 bil- 
lion), but net profit "fell 
sharply." Choi Hyung Joon, a 
senior Samsung accountant, 
said. Profit figures are to be 
released next Thursday. 

Whatever the figure — and 
analysts have forecast about a 
78 percent drop in first-half 
earnings because of tumbling 
prices for 16-megabit dynam- 
ic random-access memory 
chip — the performance was 
still better than that of last 
year's second half, when Sam- 
sung lost 289.2 billion won. 

"The worst for the D- 
RAM market is over,” Noh 
Keun Hwan, an analyst at 
Tong Yang Securities, said. 

He predicted that Sam- 
sung’s 1997 net profit would 
rise at least 50 percent from 
last year's depressed level of 
164.2 billion won. 


•• • • • Tokyo •/. 

BanqSeog-; ■ T. 

17000 2275 — 22000— ----- -. 

; 16000 4 —' 2200* j 21000 ■ 

15000 jfh-:. 2125 t~T .' 20000 — jriPYt-: 

: 14000— -Jl- — 2050 w.— V 19000— J— — ) 
/ 13000 Vi 1975 — — Hit --iboooW- ; 


12000 M a M J J t A' • 1900 M AM j 77T 17000 


M AM J J A : 
; 1997 1997 1997 

- Index- Thursday." ?m. /v ?' 

■ -• V. - - -.\y - ,CtoB6 . aoas, '-tmm 


H^ftong - Hangt-Seng . _ . 16,673427 , t%5ffcl6b'&s 

.Sftigapore^’'- 1^S8.6?:^ 


••itftfiW-?' v v -sErl.' , *7 'y-; mm- 

Seoul . ; v rpwositskictex- ; ' 745.35 r>45^-;v^p,o 


. pse. • ; • 7 -ijHttSr; 


i WeUtngton. NZS&40 :: • .. 2,539.74 - 2,532.7 1".^ 


Source; Tetekurs 


Iwomiimm] HenU TnNinc 


For investment information 

Read flf S MONEY RSPOKT every Saturday in the IHT. 




I Real Estate’s Bouyancy 
Keeps Swire on Track 




t 


* % 




i ' 4 

T^ y : 


Ctmydtd tn OiB Staff Fntn Dupmchn 

HONG KONG — Swire 
Pacific Ltd. said Thursday 
that its first-half profit rose 
8.5 percent as real estate-re- 
lated gains overcame weak- 
ness in its other operations. 

Swire Pacific reprated net 
profit of 3.32 billion dollars 
($428.9 million) for the first 
six months, up from 3.06 bil- 
lion dollars a year ago. 

Operating profit rose 44 
percent, to 5.10 billion dol- 
lars. Sales fell 43 percent, to 
13.28 billion dollars. 

The profit figure fell short 
of many analysts’ forecasts of 
a rise in net profit closer to 1 2 ' 
percent. 

The results also showed 
that the company's bottling, 
airline and trading businesses 
struggled in the first half, un- 
derscoring die conglomer- . 
ate’s growing reliance on its 
Hong Kong real estate busi- 
ness and its difficulty expand- 
ing in. China, where it bottles 
Coca-Cola. 

Both developments cast 
doubt over future profit for 
the company and helped trig- 
ger the biggest slide m Swire 


stock in almost two months. 

The share dropped 4.3 per- 
cent. to 71.75 dollars, on 
Thursday. 

‘ ‘It’s not so much the head- 
line figure as the split busi- 
nesses that has people wor- 
ried." said Mark Simpson, 
head of research at Schroder 
Securities Asia Ltd. “It's all 
property." 

Sale of development prop- 
erties rose to 3.07 billion dol- 
lars in the first half from 59 
million dollars a year ago. 

"The property division ex- 
pects further enhancement of 
profits in the second half-year 
as a result of sales of res- 
idential development proper- 
ties and growth in net rental 
income," the company said. 

Swire, whose Cathay Pa- 
cific Airways Ltd. said 
Wednesday that first-half 
profit fell 35 percent, used to 
say its business was a three- 
legged stool built on aviation, 
industries and trading, and 
property. Now. however. 60 
percent its earnings come 
from its property interests, ac- 
cording to company docu- 
ments. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Bondholders Spare Alphatec 

CatytMt* Our Staff Fnvn DuputfKs 

BANGKOK — Winning a reprieve from creditors. Al- 
phatec Electronics PCL announced Thursday that holders of 
its convertible bonds had voted not to declare the memory- 
chip maker in default. 

Alphatec, the flagship of Thailand's hopes to create a Jugh- 
technology manufacturing sector, has been rocked by the 
Kl discovery that at least 4.1 billion baht (.$136 million) of its 
7 reported profits had been falsified over the past three years. 
The company owes $43.7 million on convertible Eurobonds 
sold in 1994. In late June, bondholders tried to exercise put 
options that allowed them to sell back to the company all but 
$70,000 of the bonds two years before maturity. 

The company failed to pay the debt, raising the prospea ot 
a default One month earlier, the company failed to repay a 834 

million bank loan. , , . . . . , 

Cham Uswacboke, the company s founder and president, 
resigned two weeks ago, after Price Waterhouse uncovered 

discrepancies during an audit. 

Analysis said Thursday the bondholders decision appeared 
to reflect a reluctance among foreign creditors of Thai compa- 
nies to declare defaults. (Bloomberg, Art 

Very brief lys 

- The International Monetary Fund’s representative in 
Vietnam, Michael Bell, called for "more rapid and more 
comprehensive” reform efforts after foreign direct mvest- 
mentprojects licensed in the first j. six months rof this year fell 
percent from a year earlier and 35 percent from 1995. 

• Gentins Bhd., which has interests in gambling, real estate 
Ld mwlr generation, said its JtoMU »« profit fell 2 
percent, to 291 .9 million ringgit ($110 million). 

jeffisisirssssssasss! 

. Carter Holt Harvey had profit of 49 million New Zealand 
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le Groupe Generali en cbiffres 


101 compagnies il'assi trances opeiwit Anns 

50Pa\s ii 

61 societes financieivs. inmiobilieres 

et agricoles consotid&s { 

126 societes contmlees tiireises non iwrf lees | 

18.400 millions cl'Ecu de primes ) 

(+10. "V snr Itmnee 1995 1 J 

59-200 millions if Eat de provisions techniques f 

64.200 millions d'Eat de placements 

758 millions d'Eat de benefice consolide £ 

40.000 professionnels de l\ assurance 

ait senice de la clientele. * 


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le Gtrxtpe Generali renfbrve sa position surletnatvhe Mematkmcd 
primes: 1S400 mSSons if Ecu, b&nefice: 758 mOtions d*Eeu 

L'activite du Groupe 

En 1996. les Assicurazioni Generali ont renforce leur presence dans les differents ter- 
ritoires d actiWte. politique coherente avec les principes directeurs suivis ces der- 
nieres annees. 

En Italie. avec l'acquisition du groupe Prime, dote d’un reseau de conseillers speciali- 
ses dans la distribution de prod u its financiers ei de prevoyance. les porentialites sur le 
marche de lepargne ont ete developpees. 

I'ne autre demarche visani a repondre at lx besoins en matiere financiere et de pre- 
voyance Je la clientele sera initiee avec ia constitution d une banque telematique. qui 
operera comme soutien aux reseaux de venre sur rout le ierritoiie national. De nou- 
veaux accords de collaboration ont ete condus avec des Eiablissements de credit qui, 
s’j/ouunt aux ententes deja en cours avec les banques de premiere importance, ont 
a ecru la capacite de distribution de la Compagnie et du Groupe 
En France. Kune des compagnies entierement controlee. a cede les participations dete- 
nues dans le capital d’Axa. qui ne representaient plus un interet strategique. realisant 
ainsi une plus-value iniponanie qui sera utilisee dans les plans de developpement du 
Groupe au niveau international. 

Sur le marche transalpin, la rationalisation des structures operationnelles des differentes 
compagnies s’est poursuivie et la fusion par absorption de La France 
IARD par La Concorde a ete enterinee. 

Une importante acquisition a ete finalisee dans les premiers 
rnois de 1’annee en Israel, avec J entree dans le Groupe 
Generali de la compagnie Migdal. societe leader du 
marche, qui controle quatre autres compagnies d'as- 
surance. 

En Autriche, n’avani pas pu participer a la privati- 
sation de Creditanstalt, un accord a ete signe par 
EA-Generali avec les trois plus imponantes 
banques regionales. Cet accord prevoit la 
souscription d'une part de leur capital et la 
commercialisation des produits d 'assurance er 
des sendees financiers du Groupe. Une autre 
initiative dans le secreur bancaire d 'assurance 
est ce lie menee au Bresil. en collaboration 
' d avec Banco Sudameris. pour la constitution 
w d’une society qui operera dans la branche vie 
'•* er les fonds de recraite et distribues par les 
guichets du Banco. 

Par ailleurs. la Maison Mere er le Groupe ont 
poursuivi la politique d'expansion progressive 
dans les cerritoires qui offrent de bonnes pers- 
pectives de developpement en assurance: aux 
implamations dans les Pays du centre er de 1‘esr de 
l’Europe et en Extreme-Orient se sont ajoutees deux 
nouv’elles societes dont une en Slovenie au cours de 
l'annee 1996 et 1‘autre au debut de l'annee courante, dans 
la Repubhque SJovaque. tandis qu a Pekin un bureau de 
representation a ete ouven. fonnalite preliminaire pour obtenir 
J'autorisation d’exercer 1‘aaivite d'assurance en Chine. 

En France, ou le Groupe opere dans la branche vie au travers de trois filiales. les primes 
se sont elev£es a 2.127 ntillions d’Ecu. Dans les branches dommages. un volume de 
primes de 1.771 millions d’Ecu a ete obtenu au travers des sept societes controlees. 

Les resultats de la Maison Mere 

L'assemblee des actionnaires des Assicurazioni Generali S.p.a., Maison Mere du Grou- 
pe Generali, riunie a Trieste le 28 juin dernier, a approuve le bilan 1996. qui s'est 
cloture avec un benefice net de 27-i millions d'Ecu (237.7 millions en 1995), et la dis- 
tribution d’un dividende de 375 Lires par action (+10°o, compte tenu de l'augmenta- 
tion de capital realise© en 1996); le dividende. qui comprend le credit d'impot est de 
585.9 lires. En confirmation de la politique traditionnelle de consolidation patrimo- 
niale. les actionnaires de la Compagnie ont decide de placer dans la reserve excep- 
tionnelle 85 millions d'Ecu preleves du benefice. 

Le Conseii d'Administration, reuni apres I’assemblee. a confirme comme President 
Antoine Bemheim. Vice-president et Administrateur Delegue Gianfranco Gutt> J et Vice- 
president Francesco Cingano. 


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(ib'Ol'PK 

GENERALI 


Outre I'ltalie. le Groupe Generali opere en Afrique du Sud. Allemagne, 
Argentine, Australie. Autriche. Belgique, au Bresil, Canada, en Colombie. 
au Danemark, en Egypte. aux Emirats .Arabes Unis, en Equateur, Espagne. 
aux Elats-Unis, en France, a Gibraltar, en Grande Bretagne. Grace, au Gua- 
temala. a Guemesey. Hong Kong, en Hongrie. aux lies Merges, en Irlan- 
de. Israel, au Japon. Jersey, Liban. Liechtenstein. Luxembourg, i Malte. au 
Maroc. Mexique, Nigeria, aux Pays- Bus. a Panama, au Perou. en Pologne. 
au Portugal, en -R£puhlique Tcheque. Republique de Salnt-Marin. en Rou- 
manie, a Sin ga pour, en Republique de Sloi’aquie. Slovenie. Suisse, Tunisie. 
Turquie. 

Direction Centrale a Trieste (Italie) 

Le Groupe Generali opera en France au travels de: Generali Vie (France). 
Generali France assurances. Compagnie Continentale d‘ Assurances. La Fede- 
ration Contineniale, La France Vie. LTquiie. Lutece assurances. Europeenne 
de Protection Juridique, Europ Assistance. 


http:. ! wwu'.generj Ii.com 







ENTEJRNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1997 


! THE UNIVERSAL DONOR 

1 By Craig Nova. 250 pages. $23. 

* Houghton Mifflin Co. 

’ Reviewed by 

• Christopher Lehmann-Haupt 

N EAR the opening of Craig Nova's 
harrowing new thriller, “The Lfni- 
• versa! Donor,*' Virginia Lee, a zoolo- 
; gist woriring in a Los Angeles lab with 
i venomous reptiles, is inadvertently bit- 
* ten by an exotic, highly poisonous snake 
! from New Guinea. Coolly, she removes 
■ two vials of anti-venom from the lab's 
1 refrigerator and goes our to the parking 
■ lot to drive to the hospital, which is only 
\ minutes away. 

She takes the freeway, figuring she 
■ about an hour to get help. As she 
I begins to have difficulty swallowing, 
■ she finds herself in a traffic jam. Inching 
! her way forward, she takes off her 
■ pantyhose to make a tourniquet for her 
* arm, to slow the spread of the venom. 

Even the exit ramp is jammed, but 
' eventually she pulls into the hospital 
•’ parking Jot, where she notices a graffito 
' that says: “Yo gonna die. Soon.” She 
makes it into the emergency room and 
' calls out for the attending doctor, Teny 
McKechnie, whom she apparently 
knows intimately. 

But her troubles have just begun. As 
Terry discovers when he begins to treat 
her, not only is the snake that has bitten 
her of a little-known species, but Vuginia 
is allergic to horses — bad news, because 
anti-venom is made from horse serum. 

What's more, her blood is such a rare 
type that she can't receive a transfusion 
• even from Terry, who happens to be a 
universal donor. So Virginia is about to 
undergo an ordeal that could well lead to 
her death. 

As she slips toward unconsciousness, 
she recalls how she first met Terry. As a 
graduate zoology student at Berkeley 
she had been living with a man so up- 
tight that sex with him was like “a very 


BOOKS 

polite Ping-Pong game.” When she got 
in a traffic accident with another man. 
who “thought he was above rules and 
regulations,” she found herself attrac- 
ted to him, until Che police broke down 
his door to arrest him for some crime. 

Having presumably learned from her 
flirtation with evil, she made up her 
mind to abandon “vanity and sentiment- 
ality" and marry Rick Bartlett, a ‘ tall 
and ugly" but “dependable” derma- 
tologist, But shortly before their wed- 
ding, Rick takes her sailing with Terry, 
an old friend from medical school. 

Virginia and Terry are so attracted to 
each other that only days after the wed- 
ding they start sleeping with each other. 
So the snake that bites Virginia is sym- 
bolic as well as liferal. And as Rick 
points out when he tries to confront 
Teny for betraying him, maybe Vir- 
ginia’s accident with the snake was no 
accident at all. 

Like Virginia (and so many of Nova's 
other fictional characters!, Terry is fas- 
cinated by the criminal. Part of his rea- 
son for becoming a doctor was to un- 
derstand the difference between good 
and evil. This is also what has landed 
him in the emergency room, where he 
nightly witnesses the violence of Los 
Angeles. 

And a criminal will hold the key to 
Virginia's recovery. Someone who has 
terrorized the emergency room will turn 
out to be the only known person with the 
same rare blood type as hers. 

As Nova's epigraph from the Book of 
Job sums up the novel’s lesson, re- 
ferring to God, “He discovered! deep 
things out of the darkness, and bringeth 
out to light the shadow of death.” 

The plot of “The Universal Donor” 
moves at breakneck velocity and is as 
skilled a piece of storytelling as Nova 
has yet pulled off in the nine novels he 
has written to date. (Among the earlier 
ones are “The Geek,” “The Congress- 
man's Daughter," “Trombone" and 
“TTie Book of Dreams."! Yet Nova’s 


BRIDGE 


writing here is, as always, almost heavy- 
handedly literary. Los Angeles, with its 
riots and violence, is meant to stand for 
an age “composed of nothing but 
doubt" when all one can hope for is 
“the attempt to try to stand up to 
chaos." 

A breakwater that Virginia and her 
fiance sail near shortly before entering 
their protective marriage, “looked like a 
rampart built in anticipation of the on- 
slaught of some unseen thing.” The 
foam of the waves breaking against it 
“was as white as a wedding dress." 

In spots Nova’s prose can become too 
portentous, as when he writes of Vir- 
ginia’s sighting of Terry at her wedding 
that “it was with the sensation of being 
close to the cool implacable power that 
was at the heart of the events that con- 
fined human beings: it was palpable 
enough to have the cool touch of the 
breeze that blew around her." 

B UT elsewhere the literary games 
Nova plays are entertaining, as 
when Vir ginia returns home after re- 
flecting on her earlier lover's Ping-Pong 
sexual habits, only to discover that he 
has just bought them a Ping-Pong table. 

Or when a dying air force veteran tells 
Terry how when he was a prisoner of the 
Germans during World War II he fell in 
love with the woman named Flora with 
whom he was exchanging coded in- 
formation by mail, only to discover 
when he got home that Flora was a 
former Princeton classmate. 

The point is that “The Universal 
Donor’ works well as both a thriller and 
a literary artifice. And if at times its plot 
grows too contrived, the worst thing chat 
you can say is that at certain crucial 
moments a story that has gripped you 
completely rums back into a novel that 
you find yourself reading with enjoy- 
ment. 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt is on 
the staff of The Ncvi • York Times. 


Royal Dutch/Shell Results Fall Short 


C<*nplaitr?Ottr Stag Fkw DupjBlrt 

LONDON — Royal Dutch/Shell 
Group posted weaker-than -expected 
second-quarter profit Thursday as de- 
clines in chemicals profits, oil prices 
and natural-gas output undercut a surge 
in the refining business. 

The oil company said net profit fell to 
£1.07 billion ($1.71 billion) from £1.18 
billion a year earlier. On a current-cost 
basis, which values oil inventories at 
current market prices, profit feil to £1.18 

billion from £1-19 billion. 

Revenue was £25.57 billion in the 
latest quarter, down from £27.40 billion 
a year earlier. 

Royal Dutch/Shell said the recent rise 
in the pound bad dragged down profit 
because overseas earnings shrank when 
earnings in other currencies were con- 
verted back into pounds. Like other big 
oil companies. Royal Dutch/Shell said it 
suffered from lower crude-oil prices this 
spring, but it made up part of the dif- 
ference by producing more oil. 


Royal Dutch/Shell said earnings were 
lower in its chemicals operations, where 
a strong performance in the United 
Stales -was more than offset by sluggish 
business elsewhere. 

Shares of .Shell Transportation & 
Trading Co., which owns 40 percent of 
the group, fell 3.6 percent, or 17 pence, 
to close at 459 in London. 

In Amsterdam, Royal Dutch Petro- 
leum Co., whose shares reflect 60 per- 
cent of the group, closed with a loss of 
1.9 percent, or 2.30 guilders, at 1 17.90 
(555.62). 

' ‘They were a quite disappointing set 
of figures," said Jurjen Lunshof. an 
analyst at Credit Lyonnais Securities, 
who cut his full-year earnings forecast. 

The lackluster results contrasted with 
figures from rivals such as British Pet- 
roleum PL C and major U.S. oil compa- 
nies, which reported surprisingly strong 
earnings for the latest quarter and said 
cost-cutting moves had offset weak 
market conditions. 


In London, Chairman Mark Moody- 

Stuart of Shell blamed the P°° r rcS f u J? 
on the chemicals unit, toe s trength of die 
Ind and a charge of £1 10 million for 
Carrying costs of petroleum ^ventones. 
He said the company was making pro- 
cess toward streamlining all its op- 
erations, especially in petroleum refin- 

mS S^arate^ U ^he German utility VEB A 
AG said it expected its full-year Min- 
ings to rise- at least as much as lls first- 
haif results after it reported double-digit 
namin gs growth for the six months. _ 
The company said the earnings in- 
crease had been driven by growth in its 
oil unit, VEBA pel. and in its trading, 
transport and services businesses. 

VEBA's group net profit in the first 
six months of 1997 was 1.01 billion 
Deutsche marks (S536.7 million), up 
from 896 million DM a year earlier. ■ 
Revenue rose 8.5 percent, to 39.71 
billion DM. 

(AP. AFX. Reuters. Bloomberg) 


Pound Flattens Reed Elsevier’s Profit 


Owfilrd hr Our Sirf Frrvx Daf*achn 

LONDON — Reed Elsevier PLC, a 
British-Dutch publishing concern, an- 
nounced a nearly flat first-half profit 
Thursday and said the strength of the 
pound and a slowdown at its U.S. pub- 
lishing unit had weighed on earnings. 

The company said pretax profit for 
the six months was £419 milli on 
($670.1 million), compared with £416 
million a year earlier. It said currency 
movements had cut its earnings by £36 
million. 

Nigel Stapleton, the company's co- 
chairman. said the second-half impact 
was likely to be similar if the pound 
stayed near its current high level. If 
exchange rates in the first half had re- 


mained constant, profit would have ris- 
en 10 percent, the company said. 

Sales fell I' percent, to £1.66 billion, 
but would have risen 6 percent at con- 
stant exchange rates, the company said. 

The company said it remained “pos- 
itive" about prospects for the rest of 
1997 and the longer term, adding that it 
was prepared to continue its strategy of 
expansion and acquisition. 

Reed Elsevier said it was prepared to 
spend a further S2 billion on acqui- 
sitions after committing around 51 bil- 
lion so far in 1997. 

Stock in Reed International PLC. the 
British arm, fell 7 percent, to close at 
633 pence, while in the Netherlands, 
Elsevier NV's shares fell 6. percent, to 


close at 35.20 guilders ($16.66). 

Analysts said they were disappointed 
by a slowdown in the company's U.S. 
publishing unit. Operating profit at 
Reed Travel Group fell 21 percent as 
revenue declined 6 percent. 

“There is no question that their U.S. 
publishing division has done worse than 
expected,” said Nigel Cobby, executive 
director of research at Morgan Stanley 
& Co. “We are also a bit disappointed 
with the results, even allowing for cur- 
rency." 

Almost two-thirds of Reed Elsevier's 
profit is earned in dollars, Dutch guild- 
ers, Swiss francs or French francs, but 
results are calculated in pounds. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg, AFX) 


By Alan Truscott 

T HE final of the Women’s 
Knockout Team Champi- 
onship began recently at die 
American Contract Bridge 
League’s Summer Nationals 
in Albuquerque, New Mex- 
ico, with trams captained by 
Jill Meyers of Santa Monica. 
California, and Kathie Wei- 
Sender of Nashville, Tennes- 
see, fi ghtin g for the title. 

In the semifinal stage, the 
Meyers team, won easily by 
112 imps against Jo Morse of 
Palm Beach Gardens, Flor- 
ida, and her team. 

The other se mifinal was 
hard fought. Wei-Sender, 
came from behind to win by 
13 against Rozanne Pollack 


of Warren, New Jersey, and 
her team. 

All the favored teams sur- 
vived in the Spingold Knock- 
out Team Championship. The 
Nickell team was trying for a 
record fifth straight victory. 

Mark Gordon of Purchase. 
New York, played in his first 
Spingold with a New York 
squad and reached the round 
of 16 before losing to Glenn 
Eisenstein of Parsippany. 
New Jersey. His partner, Rick 
Zucker of Sleepy Hollow, 
New York, brought home a 
shaky game contract on the 
diagramed deal with the help 
of a subtle defensive error. 

’ West led the spade ten 
against four hearts, and 
South, hoping it was not a 
singleton, ducked in dummy. 


NYSE 

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East won with the queen 
and returned the heart three, 
attempting to cut down ruffs 
in the dummy. South played 
low and West played the 
nine. 

The ten won, and South 
cashed the spade ace and two 
club winners. He then led a 
club, and East ruffed with the 
queen. South overruffed, 
ruffed a spade and led a dia- 
mond. 

East took the ace, and 
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the heart five and make his 
game. 

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heart nine. South would have 
had to judge to ruff with the 
jack. 

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been defeated if East had re- 


in* M# uw Lstei am* I 


turned the heart king at the 
second trick, by no means an 
obvious play. 


NORTH 

* A5 
9 107 

* J 63 

+ AK9842 


WEST 

* 10 4 

093 

0 10 S 6 5 2 

* Q J 10 5 


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0 A J8652 
9K4 

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The bidding: 
East South 

West 

North 

1 * 

29 

Pass 

3* 

Pass 

39 

Pass 

49 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 



West led the spade ten. 


Rank Rates Itself a Buy as Earnings Fall 


C.wiJlIfJ M Ollf SufFir** IhjpA foi 

LONDON — Rank Group PLC said 
Thursday that its first-half pretax profit 
fell 4 1 percent and that it would increase 
its share-repurchase program. 

Pretax profit at the leisure company 
that owns the Hard Rock Cafe chain was 
£85 million (SI 36.1 million), compared 
with £144 million a year earlier. The 
figure included a one-time charge of £2 
million to account for losses on asset 
sales. Revenue rose to £853 million 
from £8 17 million. 

Rank said exchange-rate movements 
had hurt earnings and could continue to 
do so for the full year. The company's 
shares fell 28 pence, or 7.6 percent, to 
close at 340. 


“It’s disappointing, particularly from 
the film and television end," Paul Slat- 
tery. an analyst with Dresdner Klein- 
won Benson, said. 

Rank said it would buy back as much 
as 10 percent of its shares, with a market 
value of about £3 10 million, rather than 
the £250 million buyback initially 
planned. It also announced a £100 mil- 
lion joint venture with British Land Co., 
which will buy leisure properties thar 
will be leased back to Rank. The number 
of properties to be bought and the pay- 
ments have yet to be determined. 

In other earnings news: 

• Barclays Bank PLC reported half- 
year pretax profit of £1.27 billion, fiat 
from the year-earlier period. But un- 


derlying operating profit rose 1 1 per- 
cent, to £1 .33 billion. 

The banking company listed an ex- 
ceptional charge of £105 million it said 
was due to tax changes announced by 
the government in July and said it would 
expand its share-buyback program to 
£700 million from £500 million . 

• Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance 
Group PLC said second-quarter pretax 
profit rose 1 1 percent, to £556 million, 
raised by a strong performance in Bri- 
tain and improvement in its U.S. busi- 
ness. Trading profit for the group, which 
was framed last year, rose to £501 mil- 
lion despite the effects of the pound’s 
recent strength. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters, AFX) 


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ESTERNaTIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1997 


veriisement HiltKIirtUMriUi. runwj August 7, 1997 

available on Internet: http://www.iht.com/IHT/FUN/funds.htrtil 


Quotations supplied by fund groups to Mferapal Paris (tot: 33-1 40 28 09 to) se rvi ce SDOnSOTBd bv 

POT information on how to fist your fund, fax Katy Houri at(33-1) 41 43 92 12 or &*nafl : funds^fritcom _ * 

To receive tree dally quotations for your funds by Enmafl : suserfbe at e-ftmds©ihLcom IXIQIvlA 




S 137S5Z 

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m SMI Quari UnletaoDril SF 133155 

m Sums From: CyitwSFd SF 1101.68 

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World Roundup 


S Players Acquitted 
Of Match-Fixing 

soccer Three players, Bruce 
Grobbelaar, John Fashanu and 
H ans Segers, and the Malaysian 
businessman Heng Suan Lim were 
acquitted by a jury Thursday on two 
of three counts of match-fixing. 

The jury will on Friday consider 
the final count, which involves only 
Grobbelaar. 

The verdicts came on the 45th 
day of the long-running trial in 
which Grobbelaar, who played for 
Liverpool and Southampton, and 
eix- Wimbledon keeper Segers had 
been accused of receiving money to 
let in goals. 

The prosecution alleged that Lim 
was the British end of a Far Eastern 
gambling syndicate and that he and 
Fashanu, a former Wimbledon for- 
ward, had passed cash to the two 
goalkeepers. 

All four men pleaded innocent to 
charges of conspiring to give or 
receive money to influence the re- 
sults of games between 1991 and 
’94. ( Reuters ) 

Sakic Accepts N.Y* Offer 

ice HOCKEY The New York 
Rangers said they have signed cen- 
ter Joe Sakic to an offer sheet 

It was reported that the Rangers 
bad offered Sakic, who played for 
the Colorado Avalanche last sea- 
son, a three-year deal worth S21 
million with $15 million of it up 
front as a signing bonus. 

The Avalanche have a week to 
match the offer. If they do not, the 
Rangers will have to give the Ava- 
lanche five first-round picks. (AP) 



Mark Taylor hitting a ball 
from England's Ben HoUioake. 

Australia Dominates 

cricket Australia dominated 
the opening day of the fifth test 
against England on Thursday in 
Nottingham, making 302 runs for 
the loss of just three wickets. 

Openers Mark Taylor (76) and 
Matthew Elliott (69) put on 1 17 for 
the first wicket. Greg Blewett 
scored 50 and Mark Waugh fin- 
ished the day on 60 not oul 

England's wicket takers in- 
cluded 19-year-old Ben Hollioake, 
who was making his test debut, as 
was his older brother Adam. 

(Reuters) 


Johnson 
Defends 
His Title 
In Hurdles 


By Ian Thomsen 

huemmtuwt Herald Tribune 

ATHENS — Quietly, Allen 
. Johnson has become one of the 
planet's most dependable athletes. 
The 26-y ear-old Olympic champion 
from the United States defended his 
world title in the 1 10-meter hurdles 
in 1X93 seconds on Thursday. 

It was a happy result for both 
Johnson and the British silver 
medalist, Colin Jackson. Johnson's 
time was 2 one-hundredths of a 
second outside Jackson's 1993 

Woiip Atmiitics 

world record, a mark that the Amer- 
ican seems certain to overtake even- 
tually. No world records have been 
set this week, but Johnson was 
pleased to have run the world’s best 
time this year, equaling the fifth- 
f as test in history. 

Jackson was trailing by the third 
hurdle, but he ran a clean race. His 
tune of 13.05 seconds, his best this 
year, was a sign that the former 
world champion was at last recov- 
ering from knee problems that have 
plagued him (he last two years. Igof 
Kovac of Slovakia was third in 
13.18 seconds. 

After a full house two nights in a 
row, die Olympic Stadium wasn't 
quite half full But on this sixth day 
of the World Championships, the 
program was bogged down with two 
walks and plenty of dead time. 

Things will only get worse if the 
IAAF turns these nine-day cham- 
pionships into a 13-day meet at 
Seville in 1999, as has been dis- 
cussed. If you go to that compe- 
tition, take a good book. 

In the 50-kilometer walk, the 
Olympic champion Robert 
Korzeniowsky of Poland won in 
three hours, 44 minutes, 46 seconds, 
breaking free from the silver- 
medalist, Jesus Garcia of Spain, 
with 6 kilometers to go in the sear- 
ing morning heat 

Annarita Sidoti of Italy won the 
10,000-meter walk — 25 murder- 
ously-disciplined laps around the 
stadium crack — in 42 minutes, 
55.49 seconds. “This medal is for 



Mndid l.i p-tw/ Thf Amwuknl Pirn 

Anarita Sidoti of Italy celebrating victory in the 25-kilometer walk. 


Rossella Giordano," she said of her 
teammate. “She was supposed to 
compete here but didn’t feel in 
shape and so I replaced her. 

Rossella Giordano must feel like 
Wally Pipp, though that probably 
wouldn’t mean anything to her. 


Beatrice Faumuina of New Zea- 
land became the world discus cham- 
pion with a throw of 66.82 meters, 
while the Olympic shot put cham- 
pion, Astrid Kumbemuss of Ger- 
many, defended her title with a 
heave of 20.7 1 meters. 


The Race Against Drugs 

Does Anyone Care if the Athletes All Cheat? 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Hero id Tribune 


A THENS — It was a bit like asking the 
Pope about premarital sex, but I posed 
the question anyway. Could he imag- 
ine the day when performance-enhancing 
drugs will be legalized for athletes? 

“No, I don’t think so," said Dr. Arne 
Ljungqvist, the 66-year-old Swede who over- 
sees track and field's ev er-con trovers ial wax 
on drugs. “Being a doctor, this is for me very 
easy. Medical ethics tell me that drugs are 
intended for the prevention and cure of dis- 
ease. They are not to be taken by healthy 
people. Drugs are not intended for this use. It 
is fundamentally wrong." 

Especially when the drugs themselves are 
harmful. 

He was speaking shortly after the an- 
nouncement Thursday of three positive drug 
tests by athletes at the 6th IAAF World Cham- 
pionships. Dr. Ljungqvist, chairman of the 
IAAF medical and doping commissions, held 
up these results as proof that drug users in 
track and field were being apprehended. 

Yes, but the illegal samples had been cap- 
tured from athletes of little public influence. 
Since the 19SS Olympics, few renowned run- 
ners have tested positive. 

I felt almost guilty raising innuendo with Dr. 
Ljungqvist, but there is a feeling that the 
corporations who sponsor the main Olympic 
sports have no interest in having their re- 
lationship besmirched by positive drug tests. 
We have all seen how quickly such sponsors 
drop stars who become involved in scandal. 

So, it stands to reason, they would have no 
interest in sponsoring the Olympics if the 
athletes most responsible for promoting soft 
drinks and color film were turning out to be 
drug cheats on a regular basis. 

Dr. Ljungqvist said he had heard rumors of 
athletes whose positive drug tests bad been 
covered up. supposedly to protect the sport 
“I bate these types of unsupported ru- 
mors, " he said. “Give me the evidence and I 
will acL I promise you." 

The biggest complication is the public’s 
amb ivalence. Fans don’t want to hear about 
drag tests. American football players are bigger 
and more explosive than ever, but the public 
has not demanded an improved drag-testing 
program. Hie audience of millions of Amer- 
icans who have turned gymnastics and figure 
skating into major sports, watch those little 
girls compete without knowing, or wanting to 
know, tiie tortures some of them go through — 
the growth-stunting, the drags, as well as die 
endless, numbing hours of practice. 

There have been many acceptable improve- 
ments in the science of sports training. But 
there are the other more secretive means — the 
steroid injections that resulted in die Ben John- 
son scandal nine years ago, for example. 

Naturally produced mugs such as human 
growth hormone or erythropoietin (EPO) are. 


Shot Put Champion 
Fails Doping Test 

Reuters 

ATHEN S — World shot put champion 
Aleksandr Bagach was stripped of his 
gold medal Thursday and lost $60,000 m 
prize money after testing positive for the 
stimulant ephedrine. 

The American John Godina, the de- 
fending champion, was promoted from 
second to first 

The French men’s 400 meters hurdler 
Pascal Maran and women’s triple jumper 
Oxana Zelinskaya of Kazaksta n also 
tested positive for ephedrine. Their re- 
sults were also canceled. 

Following changes In IAAF rules last 
week, none of the trio will be suspen- 
ded. 


Dr. Ljungqvist admitted, difficult for tests to 
register at levels that would stand up in court 
It is because the courts are encroaching on the 
fiefdom of global federations that the IAAF 
was forced last week to take the backward step 
of halving penalties for major first-time of- 
fenses, to a maximum suspension of two years.; 
Repeat offenders will stilt be banned for Life. 


le athletes, who make all kinds of phys- 
ical and emotional sacrifices, are willing to 
risk the ultimate sacrifice. 

“I realize the problem — I think we all do 
— the incompatibility there is," Dr. Ljun- 
gqvist said. He meant the incompatibility be- 
tween the ambition to achieve new standards 
of excellence and the standards of morality 
which should never be violated. Sponsors love 
the Olympics because Olympians appear to 
satisfy both sides of the equation. The doctor, 
however, preferred to discuss only the facts. 

“We know in our sport that last year there 
were 1.745 samples conducted on elite track-, 
and-field athletes around the world, with very 
few positives," he said “Others claim that,, 
because we find a few drag users, our sport is 
filled with drugs. There is no hard data to; 
support that view." 

Bur there are clues. Dr. Ljungqvist said be 
has heard talk that some former East German, 
athletes are considering lawsuits against the 
officials and coaches who supplied than with 
dangerous performance-enhancing drugs. It is . 
also not beyond reason that someday a famous 
athlete, a role model of healthy achievement, 
might be fall to the tumors, heart problems and 
other decay that can accompany the use of 
hormones or steroids. Just as Rock Hudson's, 
death promoted awareness of AIDS, so would . 
we would be forced to pay attention to the- 
destructive pressures of sport. May it never 
come to that 


Lima’s Sporting Cristal Eyes the Libertadores Cup 


Reuters 

LIMA — Peru’s Sporting Cristal 
needs one more miracle after it was able 
only to draw, 0-0, against Brazil’s 
Cruzeiro in the first leg of the final of 
South America’s premier club compe- 
tition, the Libertadores Cup. 

Cristal harried from the outset, with 
strikers Julinho and Bonnet running 

World Soccer 

tirelessly, but could not make headway 
against the Brazilian club’s cool de- 
fense. 

Cruzeiro coped easily with Cristal’ s 
high-ball approach. 

The Peruvians held most of the pos- 
session but missed the punch of Pnnce 
Araoako of Ghana and local goal-scor- 
ing hero Julio Rivera, their suspended 
stars. 


Urged on by a 45,000- strong ca- 
pacity crowd at Lima’s National Sta- 
dium, the Peruvians came close to se- 
curing a crucial home lead in a last- 
minute goalmouth scramble. 

Cruzeiro attacked rarely but still cre- 
ated most of the best chances with fast 
breakaways, forcing several dramatic 
one-on-one saves from Julio Cesar 
Balerio, Cristal’s goalkeeper. 

Cristal was the first Peruvian team to 
reach the final for 25 years. That was in 
1972 when another Lima club. Uni- 
versitario, lost to Independiente of Ar- 
gentina. 

No Peruvian club has won the com- 
petition in its 38-year-history. 
Venezuela and Bolivia are the only oth- 
er countries never to have claimed the 
trophy. 

Cruzeiro, which was playing in the 
final for the third time, last reached this 


stage in 1976, when it won. The Brazili- 
ans will miss their powerful forward 
Cleisson in next Wednesday’s return 
match in Brazil. 

Cleisson was sent off for a clumsy 
foul in the game’s dying minutes. 

The winner of the Libertadores Cup 
will represent South America in the 
Intercontinental Cup against Ger- 
many’s Borussia Dortmund, winners of 
the European Cup. 

Germany Dortmund hammered Co- 
logne, 3-0, to move into second place in 
the Bundesliga. Juergen Kohler, Heiko 
Herrlich and Joerg Heinrich scored the 
Dortmund goals. 

Dortmund is two points behind Kais- 
erslautern which topped the league with 
a 1-0 victory against Hertha Berlin, an- 
other newly -promoted team. 

Kaiserslautern, which opened the 
season by beating champions Bayern 


Munich, beat Hertha with a 74th-minute 
goal by Olaf Mar sc hall. 

■ Argentine Strike Ends 

The 15-day-old strike by Argentine 
professional soccer players ended 
Wednesday after a judge allowed six 
players at the troubled side, Deportivo 
Espanol, to move to other teams, Reu- 
ters reported from Buenos Aires. 

After Judge Juan Garibotto's decision 
to accept the guarantees for the six play- 
ers offered by the Argentine Football 
Association, Juan Sune, an official rep- 
resenting the professional players un- 
ion, said, “There will be football." 

Judge Garibono had previously ruled 
that the six Deportivo players were as- 
sets owned by the heavily indebted club, 
so they could not move until all cred- 
itors had been paid — even though their 
contracts had expired on June 30. 



Thr Amuial Pwv. 

Cruzeiro’s Marcelo, left, struggling 
with Cristal's Manuel Marengo. 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 



EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Baltimore 

70 

40 

636 

— . 

New Yak 

65 

46 

.586 

5W 

Boston 

55 

59 

M2 

17 

Toronto 

53 

58 

477 

ITVi 

Detroit 

52 

59 

.468 

18(5 


CENTRAL DIVISION 



Clevetond 

57 

51 

538 

— 

Milwaukee 

55 

56 

-495 

3'A 

Chicago 

54 

57 

-486 

4M 

Minnesota 

SO 

62 

-446 

9 

Kansas aty 

47 

63 

427 

n 


w&srnvistaN 



Anaheim 

65 

49 

570 

— 

Seattle 

63 

49 

563 

i 

Testas 

52 

60 

464 

12 

Oakland 

44 

71 

583 

21 H 

HMKHimmWH 



east DrvKton 




w 

L 

Pci. 

GB 

Aflanto 

72 

43 

536 

_ 

Florida 

66 

46 

589 

4V> 

New Yolk 

63 

49 

563 

7Vi 

Montreal 

58 

53 

573 

12 

Philadelphia 37 

74 

533 

33 


CENTRAL cm EUCM 



Houston 

61 

53 

535 

— 

Ptttsbuigh 

56 

58 

491 

5 

St Louts 

52 

61 

460 

816 

Onchmatl 

47 

64 

423 

1TA 

Chicoga 

45 

60 

-395 

Id 


WEST DIV1SKIH 



San Francisco 64 

SO 

561 



Las Angles 61 

52 

540 

Tn 

San Diego 

54 

59 

A/8 

9'a 

Colorado 

54 

61 

A70 

IQ'6 

WnmBPAY'S IlNISCtlMt 



AMERICAN LEABUe 


MBwwriwe 

280 

801 102—6 

11 2 

Anatorim 

too 

104 02k— fi 

9 4 


E ktred, Adamson 16}. Wtckmon (6), VIHone 
IB* ami Mcttwny; Watson, Hosepawa 17). 
Horn (71. James (8). Cadaret (91. Porchml (9) 
and K muter. W— Watson. 10-6. L— EWred, 
11-11. S* — Percivor (IB). HR— Anaheim. 
PhfflinsCTl 

Boston 002 120 000-5 7 0 

Minnesota 000 020 000-2 7 0 

Wakefield. Lucy (81. B. Henry (8) and 
Hoitmerp RabMsMv fv-ftodrigue? lit am) 
Steinboch. W— Wrwefletd 6-11 
L — Robertson. 7-1Q. Sv — B Henry (5). 

demand 002 000 100-3 13 a 

Toronto 100 020 12 *— s M 0 

Jr.WrigBL A. Lopez (7) and S. Alomar; 
Hentqen, Plesoe (8J. Crabtree (81. Quantnti 
(B). Escobar (9] and B Santiago 
W— Henlgen, 12-7. C-A. Lopez, 

5v — Escobar (71, HRs— Toronto, Cniz Jr (151, 
Cottar (16). Sn, Green HO. 


Detroit 201 100 000-4 11 0 

Kansas dly 202 IN 00s-5 10 0 

Moflhfetr Sager Qi. Micsli (8) and 
Watbett. Casanova (8); Rosado. Carrasco 
(8), J. Montgomery (91 and MLSweeney. 
W— Rosado. 8-8. L — Sager. 2-4. Sv-J. 
MmTfgantery (7). HRs — Defratt Fryman (17?. 
Kansas City. J. Befl (19). 

NmYqt* OH 002 800-2 11 0 

Turns IN 002 03*—* 10 1 

Pettttte. Medr (8). Lloyd (8) and GiranlL 
D .Oliver. Patterson (7), Wettetand (9) retd I. 
Rodriguez. W— D. Oflwr. B-10. L-PettWa 
13-7. HRs — Now York. T. Martina (37), 
Curtis (8). 

Chicago 1M 010 080-2 7 1 

Oakland 001 001 IB*— 3 II 0 

NWQ/ra MtElroy (8), Simas fffl, T. QkHUo 

(8) and Fabregaft' Haynes. Groom (6), 

TJJItathews (7), Tartar (9) and Moyne, 

Molina (9). W— 1 TJJItathewft 2-1. 

L — Naramv 8-10. Sv— Tayfor (30. 

HR— Chicago. Durham (8). 

Baltimore 200 BOO 010 01—4 13 0 

Seattle ooo on ooo on— 3 10 ■ , 

(t ( kintngsliErtctaon, Rhodes (8). A. Benitez 
HU. MIBi (10). Orosco (10). RJAyeis Oil and 
Webster Moyer; Ayala (7). Chariton (7). 
TtmSn (8), Stacurnb (10) and Da.W0san. 
W — Orosco, 4-3. L— Stacurnb, 0-6. Sv— R. 
Myero (32). HR»— Bcitlrnore. By-Andenon 
(12). Seaftta, Sorrento (22). 

NATIONAL LEAOUE 

Son Francisco 010 023 100-7 10 ■ 

Cbtcngo 020 HI 001—4 8 1 

Rapp. D. Henry (6). R. Hernandez (B). 
Beck (9) end B. Johnson; MuthoOand, 
BattenfMd 16). R. Tolls (81. Rafts (9) and 
Houston. W— Rapp. S-6 L — MirihaUond. 6 
12. HRs— San Franctsca M. Leeds (9). G.HItl 

(9) . Qvcoga. One (61. 

San Diego 012 OH 200-6 7 0 

Ctaetomf 001 002 000-3 8 2 

J. Hamilton. Tl.WomeB <B). Hoffman I9l 
and Flaherty: Marcher. Belinda (7). R. Lewis 
(7). Burba (9) aid TauDensee. W — J. 
Hamilton. 10-3. L— Belinda. 1-3. 
Sv— Huffman (261. HRs— San Diego. S. 
Finley Cl jL Cnminiti (13). 

St. Leals ON 002 000—3 11 1 

AtkMa DM 012 Ml— 4 7 1 

An. Bones. Fossas (B). Peftanefc (91 and 
DlWkw GJMdddn, Cottier (7). Wohlers 19) 
and Edd-Perw. W-Wohlers. 3-4. L- 
Pettavsek, 4-5. HR— Atlanta Bautista (3). 
Houston 011 100 108-4 9 l 

PWtadUpfitc 401 Ml Hi— 6 8 2 
R.Goroa Lima (5). J. Cabrera (7) and 
Animus, Stephenson. Spradlin (BL BotWfco 
(9) ana UcberitiaL W— Stephenson, 6-5 
L— R. Garda 4-8. Sv — BottaUca 171). 
HRs— Philadelphia Rolen (16), Lieberthal 
(161. Barron (I l. 

Colorado 900 ill 100-4 12 0 

New York OH 0M 800—0 a a 

Thomson and Manwartng; MKehL 
Crawford (7) and Hundley. W— Thomson. 4- 


6 L— Mltekl 5-8. HR— Colorado. Burks (191 
Los Angolas OH 003 000-3 8 0 
Montreal . 300 Of? Hi— 7 10 0 
Peek, Guthrie (6). Drerfott (81 and Piazza 
Hcrmanson M. Valdes (61, D. Veres (Bl and 
Widget. W— Hetmonson. 6-5. L — Pork. 10-6. 
HRs— Los Angefes. Gagne (81. Montreal, H. 
Rodriguez C33). 

Florida 442 010 010-12 18 1 

Pittsburgh ooo Ml 020-3 10 1 

KJ .Brown, F. Heredia IB) and C Johnson; 
Looted. Ruebei H). P.Wagner (4). Sodowsky 
(7). Christiansen (9) and Kendall, OS* (71. 
W — KJ .Brawn. 10-5- L— Loaiza, 8-8. 

HRs— Florida, Afou (15). C Johnson (14). 

Japanese Leagues 
aafruiLUMOi 



W 

L 

T 

Pet 

-GB 

Yakut! 

54 

35 

1 

407 

— 

Yakohcma 

46 

40 

0 

535 

«W 

Hiroshima 

43 

44 

0 

494 

10 

Chunfchi 

43 

49 

0 

467 

12*5 

Hmahin 

41 

47 

1 

Mb 

12V; 

Yomturi 

39 

51 

0 

433 

15% 

. PAanauoui 




W 

L 

T 

Pd 

.GB 

Orts 

J 9 

32 

3 

405 

— 

Sefiw 

47 

40 

2 

540 

5 

Date* 

4S 

45 

0 

500 

8'*. 

Nippon Ham 

43 

49 

1 

467 

lit y 

Lotte 

38 

45 

2 

458 

12 

Kintetsu 

39 

50 

2 

438 

14 


THURSDAY'S I 

CENTRAL LEAOUE 
Yokohama & Honshin 3 
QiurdcN 6. Hiroshima 2 

pacific league 
O rtx 6. Ootei 4 
Unttftu & Sefbu 3 
Lotte* Nippon Ham 5 


CRICKET 


■NOLAND VS. AUSTRALIA 
FIFTH TEST. 1ST DAT 

Australia: 302-3 


■ WMM i ■iihuioi hh 

VH. Wolfsburg 1, Hamburger SV 1 
FC Kafccrridolem I. Hertha BSC Berhn 0 
Bannslo Dortmund ft Fc Cologne a 
Borussia Moenctumgl. I. Bayern Munich i 
stand nr cuh FC Kotserstaotem 6 pouns. 
Borussia Dortmund * Karisrvher SC 4 VfL 
WoHshurgA Fc Cologne a Boyer Leverkusen 
1 Msv Duetto irj 1 VfL Bochum 1 Arminia 
BieMeM 1 SchaikeQz 3: 1 860 Munich 2, Ham- 
twraer SV 2. Meendtengladbach ft- Hertha 
BSC Beriin 1, VfB Stuttgart !• Honso Rostock 
1, Werder Bremen I. Bayern Murech t 


HttBHCH HBST DfWMOM 

Rennes 0. Lyon 3 

unrnuousa* 

FWAL.fiRSTI.Ea 

Snorting Cristal (Peru) a Cruzeiro (Brazil! 0 

WnUKXTlOMAL FMEMQLT 

Jamaica I, Colombia 0 


TRACK & FIELD 


Would Championships 

MEN 

S OHM WALK 

FHAL 

1. Robert Koerentowski, Poland, 3 hours, 44 
minutes. 46 seconds; Z Jesus Garcia Angel 
Span 3:4459: 1 Miguel Rodriguez Angel 
Mexico. 3*48:30: A Oleg Ishutkin. Russia. 
3:5004,- St Tomasz Liprec. Poland. 350.14.-6. 
Furoto Imomvra. Japan 3M77; 7. Sytnm 
Cairdron, Froncc.351.17. & Arturo DiMczza 
Italy. 3:51:31 9. Vatmttn Konancn. Finland. 
3534ft 1ft Aleksey Voyevodin, Russia. 
£5438.- It. Rene Filler, Franca £55:04 II 
Sergey Koreoonov. Kazakstan. 356:19: II 
Craig Barrett New Zealand. 3:563ft 14, Gio- 
vanni Punted R. Holy, 357:38: 15, Nikolay 
MafiuUiin, Russia. 35&I& 16. Axel Noack. 
Germany, 3^29: 1 7. Hector Morena Colom- 
bia 3:59:33; 18. Stefan MaRk. Slovak Rcpub- 
Sc 35951 19, Ruben ArAada Mexico. 
4&4:17; 2ft Zoltan Czukar, Hungary. 4.-05:09; 
21, Santiago Perez. Spain, 4:05:25.- 22. Dmitry 
Savayton. Bdara^ 4.-05-35, 2ft Julio Urias, 
Guatemala. 4307:1ft 24. Peter Zanncr, Ger- 
mony, 44J7J8: 25. Chrtsloo he Cousin, France. 
tSXM: 2 0. Milas Hoiusa Czech Republic 
4KWJ8.- 27. Jose Mogolhoe% Portugal 
4:1 WO: 2ft Oraao Pomonzv Holy, *1 l.-Oft 29. 
Christos Karaq iorg os. Greece, zjchb: Zhao 
Yangstwirg. China, did not finish.- Tun B e w ell 
Canada did nor brush Viktor Ginka Belarus, 
did not finish: Jaime Barrosa Spain, tfid not 
fintelk- Bo Gustatssaa Sweden, did not rmsft 
German Sanchez. Mexico. DO; Dirk Nicque, 
BetghHiti DO: Andrew Hermann. United 
SJrrte& Da- Jncrit MuBer, Poland, Da - Ro- 
man Mituek. Slovak Repubfic DQ,- Aleksan- 
dar Rakovta. Yugoslavia. DQ Peter Tichy. 
Slovak Republic. DO: Thomas W08s lab. Ger- 
men* DO. 

aoo Miras 

SEMFMALS 

HEAT 1— I, Ckwdmel Da Sftva. Brazil, 
2BJ5 seconds; 2 Ivan Gama Cuba 2039 : 1 
Georglm Panayiotopoijios. Greece. 30JCk A 
Obadelo Thompson. Barbados, 2046: ft 
Sergei O movBcIl UpudIjic, 2051: a Kevin ut- 
fte. U. 5- 7057,- 7, Julian OalOtnq, Bnhan. 
THAI; ft Carl W Gats, Argentina. 21 A4. 

HEAT2— I. Ato BoWoa Trrnidad. J0J» 2 
Frankie Fredericks. Namibia Taut ft Jon 
Drammand. U5- 2059; 4 Patrick Stevens, 
Belgtom. 2041 ft Tray Douglas, Bermuda 
304ft ft Donato Walken Britan, 30 a 1: 7. 


De(l A lift Nigeria 20.7a- ft Chris Donaldson, 
New Zealand. 30.92. 

Finl 4 bt eodi heat qualify tor finoi 

■ i o Mira mnDuts 

nun 

I. ASen Johnson Uft. 12.93 seconds; 2, 
Cofln Jackson Bnkjuv 13.05; ft Igor Kovac. 
Slovakia. 13.18; 4 Ftorian Schwa rthoft Ger- 
many, l3Jft ft Don Ph8ibert, Franc®, 13J6: ft 
Terry Reese. 1330; 7, Mark Clear, U ft, 
1 33ft- Artur Kohutek. Poland, did not start. 


aUMJFKD for final 
1, Joanna Stone, Austrofta 67.73 meters; ft 
Trine Hatlastod. Norway. 66.1ft 1 Kefl 
Rontanen Finlnnl 644ft- 4 MAaeia Ing- 
berg, FlntaruL 6392; ft Mbefa Manfanl- 
Tzefia, Greece. 63506. Sonia Btsset Cuba 
634ft 7, Tanta Daraaske. Germany, 6350: ft 
Fefida Tlea Romania 63.06. 9, Rita Ro 
manauukaha. Uthuanta, 6250; lft Tatyana 
ShOwienka Russia 61.7ft II. OkMno 
Ovchinnikova Russia 615& lft Osldifis 
Menendez. Cuba 60JMt 


QUAUREO FOR FINAL 

1, Chroma A)un*ra Nigeria 7j01 meters Z 
Heike DredisieL Germany, 650:3. Uudmila 
Galkina Russia 6.7ft 4 Sharon Jaklafsky. 
Natherfmids. 6.7ft- ft Fiona May. holy. 6.7ft- ft 
Susan Tledtke-Greene. Germany. 6.77.7. Vrc- 
toriyo Vcrshaitoa Ukraine 65ftft Erika Jo- 
hansson. Sweden, 654 9, Magdalena Khris- 
lova Bulgaria 653; lft Jackie Joynor- 
Kersee, Unhcd States, 6 Ai li, NUdXanttuw, 
Greece 65ft 

BKCOS 

FWAL 

I, Beatrice Faumuina New Zealand 6ft8ft- 
Z E*na Zvereva Belonrs. 65.9ft ft Nototyo 
Sadova Russia 65.14 4 Larisa Kaiatfcevksi. 
Russia 63-02; ft Irina Yafdwnka Beksnn, 
635ft ft Teresa Machado. Portugal 67.0ft j, 
Stella TsOaima Greece 61.92- a Aanesc 
MafTers. Italy, 614ft 9. Loan ZhHL China 
60 62; IftNICMetoGrasu. Romania 60.14- 1 1. 
Arena Sodwtorg, Sweden. SBXb 'ft Lha 
Vizaniart AusfrnUa 57-56. 

SHOT PVT 
FINAL 

1, Astrid Kumbemna Germany. JftTi me- 
len- ft vita Pavfystv Ukraine. 3DMi ft 
Stephanie Starp. Germany. 19-22.- 4 Huang 
ZMhana China i9.lft-ftConnlePricc-Smlta 
(J5. 19.00s 6. U Metsu, Cluna 186ft 7. Na- 
dine Kleinert. Garmon* I84ft- & Krystyne 
DanBczyk. Poland. 175ft- 9. Sveria Mltkova 
Balgaria 17.3ft- laswitana Krtvetyava Rus- 
sta. 1 7-34 1 1. Vtrievta Aflhhause, U5- 16.9ft- 
lft Tressa Thompson. U-5- 144ft 
TO KM WALK 
FINAL 

1. Annartta Sidoti Italy. « minutes. 5549 
seconds; 1 OSmpiaita (wrerea Russia 
43:0763: ft Oipa Kardap0lt««a. Bo torus. 
43 JO 30: 4 Vatatfind TsyDutskaya Belarus. 


4349.24 ft Lhj Hongyv, CWna 43565ft- ft 
Erica Alfrfafl, Italy. <359.71 7, Anita Szeben- 
szky, Hungary. 4414J4; & Gu Yon, CWna 
44:2417; 9. Anita Licpina Latvia 4ftH56; 
lft Yelena Niknkiyeva Russia 45111 ,9ft ti, 
Elisabetta Penone. I tarty. 45:1654 lft Maria 
Urbanik - Rosra Hungary, 45:3657; 13. Wang 
Ycm, China 4t-3t5ft )4 Svetlana Tolstaya 
Kazokhstaa 47d»51; lft Yuta Mitsamori, 
Japaa 47J4J2: Beats Gunmefl, Germany, 
did not finish- Irina Staifcina Russia DO; 
Maya Samnava Karakhstan. DQ,- Olga Pan- 
fyarova Russia DO. 

aMMiraa 

SEMFWALS 

HEAT 1— 1. Inger MBer. U5. 2259 sec- 
onds; ft Zhanna Ptahrasevich. Ukraine, 225ft- 
ft Marina Tromtantava Russia 225R 4 
Meflndo Gatnsfard-Taytar, AustraDa fttTtk 
ft Mericne Frazer. Jamaica 23.81. ft JuBet 
Campbell Jamakn. 22.94- 7. Lto Xtaomd. 
China 33JXt Marie Jose Perec France (3d 
notsiarl. 

HEAT 2 — l.McrietroOrtcY, Jamaica 2ft2&. 
ft Susanthlka Jayasinghe. Sri Lanka 723X 3. 
Sytvknvw Felix. Franca. 2257; 4 Yfekoferina 
Lashchava Russia 2259) ft Etaterini Koffa 
Greece. 22.71k ft Sundra Feagla U5- 22.92; 
7. Jufiet Crthbea Joroica 23.0ft- Petta Pen- 
dareva Birigarta. dkf not start. 

First 4 in each boat gwrtify tor final 
•ore sums 
samtALs 

isat 1 — 1. Maria Mutoia AAo z a mlrtg ue. 1 
minute. 5749 seconds; ft Ye4e no Afanasyeva 

Russia 159.05; 3. Slefla Jong mans. Nother- 
lands. )59j®:4JoeftoawftU5.»5I>J4-i 
Luciano Mendes. Brazil l-594ft ft Yelena 
Bazherika Ukraine. 23S52 7. Hasna Ben 
Hassl Morocco. 103.70; e. Mnkjorrota Rydz, 
Palana 3-05-00. 

. 25!" Jr ’■ Ann Fedofio Otrirat Cuba 
1 5957; ft Letfllo Vrlesde. Surinam 15952; ft 
Ludmila Fwmanava Czech Repubfic. 
I59JH,- 4 Tort HodgUneon. New Zealand. 
MQJS; ft Natotya Dukhnova Belarus. 
22? ™ \ Nouna BenWa-Meroli Algeria 
2®1 J)& 7. PelioStrastUkiua Bulgaria 28)1 44- 
Uubav Tsyma Russia (M not tinUL 
R«t 4 in each beat quanty for firert 
s.oooMnnts 

SENIFTNALS 

»— ». Gabrseia Szaba Romania 15 
““"Ra ft Pauta RadcWe. 

Hirovama Japaa 

5 0bwt0 Bfu, * e t 1 wy. isa9Ja- s. 
Ar«ccrt vUortuj, Ethiopia IS:20J7 ; ft WUi U 
7 - Hlckmaa US- 

Holle ' Nor *rev- 1532.1ft 
Australia 1 5-36.16,- id Ye- 
te^opriiava Bwsfa. is 37.19. 11. Adriana 
fwrwiidez. Mexico. lSvzus. lft Metody 
11 Mortina 

l 4, Volcne ''oooltan. Jre- 

liaSim it 5 5 °" rt Gcb, *« l0| iirt. EiMopta, 
w - Laurancc Duqucnoy, France. 


l&JMJlft 18. Justtne Nahimana Burundi 
173tJ7; 19, Habtemariam Hebtat Ertfrea 
I8C265Q: 70, 2oBa Altov, Toga )&344ft 71. 
Martha Porto banco, Nicaragua 19:0844 
Maysa Matrooa Iraq, did not start; Etana 
Meyer, South Africa did not start. 

HEAT B— 1, Fernanda Rlbetaa Portugal 
1537.30; ft Lhi Jkrayina China I559J28; ft 
Lydh) Cheramel Kenya 150250; 4 Merima 
Denboba Ethiopia 153251; 5. Noota Tata- 
hashi Japaa 153235; ft Yuta Kawakaml 
Japan. 1532. 71; 7. Scrto CKSuliivaa Irekma 
1&40JB;& Stela Olteofiii. Romania 15:40 8&- 
9, ORvera Jevttc. Yugoslavia 1543.7ft m 
Chrtsouta takavaa Greece. 1551.14 1 1. 
ResWuta Joseph. Tanzania 155532; 12. 
Amy Rudolph, US. 1630.87; lft Una En- 
gfisft. Ireland, 14-0759. (ft Jrtena Cheinova 
Latvia 163751- 15. Helena Javamft, Slove- 
nia 16383^ Kristina Fonsear-Woftetei 
Germany, did nut Hntstv Anne Hare. New 
Zeaiand. did no! fihfcft Carol Howe. Cara ita. 
(M not start Amremcri Sondefl did not start. 

Flrsl 6 to each beat pros 3 tastes! to final 

Medals Table 


Nation 

G 

s 

B 

Tala 

12 

United Skrtes 

5 

2 

5 

Germany 

3 

1 

2 

6 

Kenya 

2 

2 

1 

5 

Cuba 

2 

0 

0 


Czech Republic 

2 

a 

a 


Poland 

1 

t 

a 


Portugal 

1 

l 

0 

2 

Sou Til Africa 

1 

i 

0 


Aushata 

1 

0 

l 


Mexico 

1 

a 

l 


Morocco 

1 

0 

t 


Ethiopia 

J 

0 

0 


France 

1 

0 

0 


Holy 

1 

0 

Q 


New Zoc’-uncj 

t 

0 

0 


Ukraine 

0 

3 

1 

A 

Britain 

a 

3 

0 


Russia 

a 

2 

3 


spam 

a 

2 



Bcianre 

0 

1 

2 


Canada 

0 

1 

0 


FHond 

0 

1 

0 


Jamaica 

0 

1 

0 


Romania 

0 

1 

a 


Uganda 

0 

t 

0 


Bahamas 

0 




Greece 

0 

0 

1 

t 

Japan 

0 

0 

1 

Lithuania 

0 

0 

1 

i 

5tovokio 

a 

a 


Switzerland 

0 

0 

1 

i 

| TRANSITIONS | 


LHP Mark Hatewner has deaiwJ woWwsond 

has been outnghled lo Tacoma. 

Texas— P ut RHP John Burkett M 'S-0oy 
disabled list retroadlw to August 5- 0p- 
I kmed RHP Jose AJberro to Oktohomo City, 
aa. Bought contract at LHP Scott BaBesttom 
Dktahoma City. 

Toronto — R ecoiled RHP U* Awta|or 
tram Svro-3ise. IL Optioned LHP Omar Dad 
la Syracuse. 

NATIOHALLEAaUe 

Colorado— A cquired C Creighten 
Gubanicft tram Milwaukee Breweft to com- 
ptete enrfler hade and assigned trim to Col- 
orado Springs, PCL 

BASKETBALL 

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCWIION 

NEW Jersey— 5igned F David Benoit 

OR LAN DO- Signed G Gerald WBOns. 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAOUE 

NFL-Susoended Baltimore Ravens RB 
Bam AAarris tor first 4 games tor vfalafM 
leagues substance abuse policy. 

Atlanta— signed C Adam SrimJbar to 3- . 
year contract. 

Baltimore— C kbmed DL Craig NaWSky 
oft waivers tram New Olteans. 

CHKACO-Signed S Vince BoA Ttarmd F 
Eddie Howard. 

Cincinnati— R elciBed DL Artie Sartta and 
FB Jeff Cothran. 

DALLAS- Fined epoch Barry 
S75.000 tor his arrest on gun dtoige. 

Denver— A nnounced retirement o# WB I 
MOeShernud. 

BREEN BAY— Signed TE Reggie Johnson. 
Waived 5 Sean Boyd. DE E Start Fortune. WR 
Eric Matthews and LB Kevin Jefferson. 

Indianapolis— W aived LB Booker PirteS, 

New YORK- Announced DL C.W. Esfcsfc • 
leaving trabilnq camp to return * Wes 
Point. 

TAMPA bay— R eleased CB Rashid Gayle. 


AI4EWCAN LEAGUE 

Seattle -Recalled OF Raul Ibanez irons 
Tocoma. PCL. Put OF Rob Duceyon 15- day 
disabled hetrotraactive to Aug. 3. Announced 


NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 

BUFFALO— Slgnud RW Dbutafi Wald to tlHlf- 
Hyear canlracL 

calcaRT— P e-signcd G Dwayne Rotoson- 
Signed C Eric Landry. 

Chicago— Signed C Todd While. Signed 
LW Petri Vans. 

los AHGEua— Re-signed C Yoiuc P«- 
reault lo 2-year contract. 

hash vi lle— N amed BartyTrobcuacriand 
Paul Gatdnef assistant coach. 

n.y. rangers— A greed lo terms rath L * 
Dorreti Lortgdm Signed C Joe Sakic to 0" 
oner sneet. Signed LW Mita Petoso. 

phoenui— S igned Rw Martin Slmord » I- 
yeorcontrnct. 

Vancouver — s igned G Arhus Hbe. 

ttUHC 

NEnramu— D ismissed sophomort W" 
J JL Edwards and redshirt freshman DE end 
George Guidry! rom the footbes team lor dis- 
ciplinary memift 









_ UCE.1 


lilt: 



hr-.- 







h~‘^ = 



v* . L , 






, ' ■ ,,f irnr l ;. : 

J \ ; 

1 ? */ 




If 


I 


* 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBITVE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1997 



PAGE 21 


SPORTS 


Formula One Adieu: 
Renault on Last Lap 

Can Peugeot Race Into the Gap? 


By Brad Spurgeon 


IfihrriHjriiwiil HetuIJ Tribune 


P ™1 A dn ^ er *s only the most 
visible part of a Formula One 
team. Behind him are the mech- 
? e Kf makers car con- 

SSSm“ driv “ by en ® lne 

as . driv ^ s com e and go and in 
between dance between teams, so too do 

die engine makers. This season marks 
^ i?- n £ f f rewelJ of one of the best- 
established and most successful, 
Renault, while Peugeot, a relative new- 
comer is still struggling to make its 
mark. But the rivalry between the two 
French manufacturers means that 
Renault's retirement from Formula One 
is not entirely what it seems. 

As this Sunday's Grand Prix of Hun- 
gary carries the season well into its 
second half, Peugeot is still chasing its 
first victory, while Renault's chances of 
saying adieu with its sLxth constructors’ 
title are -beginning to fade. The two 
drivers in the Williams-Renault team 
trail the total of the Ferrari rivals by nine 
points. The Benetton team, also powered 
by Renault, lies third, a further 16 points 
back and unlikely to catch Ferrari. 

Two weeks ago a Jordan-Peugeot 
driven by Giancarlo Fisichella. a young 
Italian, led the German race, until it was 
passed by a Renault-powered Benetton 
driven by Gerhard BergeT. the veteran 
Austrian. The Jordan then blew a tire, 
and dropped out. 

Berger gave Renault its second vic- 
tory in a row, sixth of the year and 91 st 
since it started in Formula One in July 
1977. Only Ferrari and Ford engines 
have more victories, with III and 174 
respectively. Ford celebrated its 30th 
anniversary in the sport in June, while 
Ferrari has been racing since the modem 
championship era began in 1950. 

In June 1996 when Renault announced 
its forthcoming withdrawal, it said its last 
goal was to win a total of 100 Grand prix. 
For that, it needed to win 20 of the 25 
remaining races. With only seven races 
left, Renault can no longer do it. 

"The 1997 season is a lot more dif- 
ficult than we had imagined." said Jean- 
Jacques Delamwiere, Renault Sport’s 
spokesperson. He said that winning an- 
other title has now become “more im- 
portant than the 100 victories." 

The German race showed just how 
competitive things have become for en- 
gine manufacturers. The top five fin- 
ishers ail used different engines: 
Renault, Ferrari, Mercedes. Mugen- 
Honda and Peugeot. A Ford and a 
Yamaha also finished. The eighth con- 
tender, the privately-built Hart, did 
not. 

Peugeot has faced an up-hill battle 
since it entered Formula One with 
McLaren in 1994. That year it achieved 
eight podium finishes, but never won. 
McLaren, which had been the dominant 
team in the 1980s. then broke its con- 
tract to sign with Mercedes, and Peugeot 
signed for three years with the small 
Jordan team. 

The Peugeot is now considered the 
most powerful engine in Formula One. 


Peugeot was close to quining this year. 
Then Alain Prost. the four-time world 
champion, persuaded it to join him in a 
so-called all-French team. Lasi Febru- 
ary Prost bought the dying Ligier team 
(powered by Mugen-Honda engines!, 
and signed a partnership with Peugeot 
that will run from 1998 to 2000. 

This team, says Jacques Cal vet. Pres- 
ident of Peugeot SA. will have what it 
takes to win a title next year. He said, 
however, that the goal was to be world 
champions, "within the three years of 
our first collaboration with Prost." 

This season the Prost team lies fifth in 
the constructors’ table, behind Ferrari. 
Williams. Benetton and McLaren — 
who between them have won half the 
constructors’ titles since 1950. 

In January . when news leaked out that 
Peugeot would sign wirh Prost. Renault 
announced that it would still supply 
engines to Formula one, bur under an- 
other name — Mecachrome — and at a 
price. 

“For 20 years Renault Sport was 
what you call a cost cenier." said 
Delaruwiere. —So if Renault Sport 
wants to continue to survive, then it’s 
going ro have to make money, just like 
any commercial subsidiary of 
Renault." 

Mecachrome — a French company 
that has assembled the Renault engines 



After Move, 
The Marlins 
Unload on 


Pittsburgh 


The Asst* ijicd Prea 

On the day Jim Leyland moved back 
to Pittsburgh, the Eorida Marlins gave 
their new manager another reason to 
love the town. 

Moisei Alou and Charles Johnson 
drove in four runs each, and Florida 


Nl Roundup 


Smcii SJbarler'^jnaLr Fran-c-Pir-.c 

Atlanta coach Pat Corrales, left, holding back the manager, Bobby Cox, after Cox was thrown out of the game by 
Ed Monagru. right, in the sixth inning for disputing a call. The plate umpire, Tom Hallion, restrained Monagni. 


Mariners 9 Firemen Coming Up Dry 


Tor us it’s important to 
show our own technology 
and to make it win 
against the other top 
constructors. We’re not 
in Formula One to beat 
Renault. We’re in 
Formula One to become 
world champion.’ 


Tile * \Si*rin/i'd Press 

A week after sacrificing Jose Cruz Jr. 
and two top prospects in a desperate bid 
to solve their longtime bullpen prob- 
lems. the Seattle Mariners appear to 
have only compounded their relief- 
pirebing woes. 

The Mariners received two pitchers. 
Mike Timlin and Paul Spoljaric, from 
the Blue Jays for the 23- year-old out- 
fielder. On Wednesday night, hours 


AL Roundup 


UHVDV “ “ 

But it takes more than raw power on the 
?. Enei 


straight to win a race. Engines must 
deliver high-performance in all track 
situations — flexibility has beep one of 
the Renault’s biggest assets. And they 
must marry well with the chassis. 

After three disappointing seasons, 


for 20 years — will buy the license to the 
engine and rent it and its technicians to 
teams for about 100 million francs (SI 6 
million) a season. Renault technicians 
will in turn be rented to Mecachrome. 

It is customary for an engine con- 
structor to offer free engines to top 
teams, as Renault does to Benetton and 
Williams, in the hope of obtaining vic- 
tories and the publicity that goes with 
them. Weaker teams usually have to pay 
for their engines. 

Victory in Formula One gives an en- 
gine manufacturer a prestigious image 
in the marketplace, and as Cal vet said, it 
also helps the company by providing a 
“motivation of the technicians, engi- 
neers, and workers.” 

But not even the best engine may 
artracT top teains if they have to pay for 
it. While Williams has been unable to 
find another engine supplier and has 
signed with Mecachrome for two years, 
Benetton is sdll negotiating with Meca- 
chrome, and has been in contact with 
other engine manufacturers. 

’ Is Peugeot pleased to see the Renault 
name disappearing jat the end of the 
season? “For us it’s important to show 
our own technology and to make it win 


after Cruz starred in his first home game 
for Toronto, Timlin blew his first save 
opportunity for Seattle. Meanwhile, 
Heathcliff Slocumb — acquired from the 
Red Sox for catcher Jason Varitek a nd 
pitcher Derek Lowe — gave up Brady 
Anderson's Ilth-inning homer in the 
Mariners' 4-3 loss to visiting Baltimore. 

Anderson homered on a 3-2 pitch for 
his 1 1 rh blasi of the season and his 500th 
RBI in 10 seasons with Baltimore. 

"I've never hit him real well." An- 
derson said of Slocumb. "I've never hit 
the ball that hard off him in my career." 


Randy Myers pitched the 11 th for his 
32d save after Jesse Orosco (4-3 1 got a 
pinch-hiner, Mike Blowers, to ground 
out with two on in the 10th. 

Seattle took a 3-2 lead in the sixth on 
Paul Sorrento’s three-run homer, a 
towering shot into the third deck in right 
Field off Scott Erickson. 

Bhm Jays 6, Indians 3 Cruz hit his 
third home run in six games with 
Toronto and made a key defensive play 
in the Blue Jays’ victory over Clev- 
eland. 

"Cruz has only been here five days 
and he’s already made a lot of good 
friends on this club." said Shawn 
Green, who also homered for Toronto. 
"I guess at the same time he’s making a 
lot of enemies on the other side." 

Cruz hit his 15th home run — a solo 
shot to right — with one out in the 
seventh off Albie Lopez to break a 3-3 


tie. "All the guys were telling me Lopez 
throws hard, fastball, fastball, fastball." 


Cruz said. "I got ahead, looked for my 
pitch, and got it. 

"I’m beginning to feel relaxed here. 
I’ll be able to sleep in the same bed for a 


against the other top constructors,” said 
Jean-Claude Lefebvre, Peugeot’s 


spokesperspn. “We’re not in Formula 
One to beat Renault. We’re in Formula 
One to become world champion." 


Cowboys Fine Coach $75,000 


The Aiiin/itWi/ Pres* 

AUSTIN. Texas — Barry Switzer 
was fined $75,000 by rhe Dallas Cow- 
boys’ owner. Jeny Jones, who said 
his’ coach’s arrest on a gun charge 
brought “pain and embarrassment” 
to a team trying to repair its image. 

The fine was the largest ever im- 
posed on an NFL coach. “It’s a se- 
rious and significant fine," Jones said 
Wednesday. “I made the fine what I 
made it because of his role as a coach. 
It would have been different if he 
were a player." Jones said Switzer's 
job was not in jeopardy. 

Switzer was arrested Monday for 
carrying a loaded, unlicensed .38- 
caliber pistol in his luggage at Dallas- 


Fort Worth International Airport. 

The fine is to be donated to the 
families of firefighters and police of- 
ficers killed in the line of duty. 


Paternity Suit Hits Williams 


The longtime girlfriend of Erik 
Williams has sued the Dallas Cow- 
boys’ offensive lineman, claiming he 
is the father of her newborn son. ac- 
cording to the Fort Worth Star-Tele- 
gram. The Associated Press reported. 

Cassius Sbakembe Williams was 
bom to Shelley West. 24, on July 9. 

According to the report. Williams’s 
attorney. Peter Ginsberg, said the 
player was uncertain as to whether he 
fathered the child. 


week. J've been hanging out with 
Shawn Green and Alex Gonzalez and 
they're about my age and we have a lot 
in common.” 

In the eighth. Cruz charged Sandy 
Alomar's single to left and made a per- 
fect throw to the plate to easily cut down 
David Justice. 

Hangars 6, Yankees 2 Mike Simms 
singled in the go-ahead run in the sixth 
inning and added a sacrifice fly in the 
eighth as Texas beat visiting New York. 
Will Clark batted in his 1 ,000th run with 
a sacrifice fly in rhe eighth for the 
Rangers. 

Athletics 3, White Sox 2 In Oakland, 
Rafael Boiunigal hit a tiehreaking rwo- 
out single in the seventh as the Athletics 
beat Chicago for just their second vic- 
tory in II games. Chicago’s Ray 
Durham, who was 4-for-5, led off the 
game with a home run. 

Angels 8, Brewers 6 In Anaheim. Jack 
Howell hit a two-run double in the sixth 
inning and Tony Phillips homered to 
help the Angels to their ninth victory in 
1 1 games. 

Allen Watson (10-6) won for the 
ninth time in 1 2 decisions. 

Royals 5, Tigers 4 In Kansas City. 
Jose Rosado won lor the first time in 
nearly two months and Jay Bell 
homered. 

Rosado, who was the winning pitcher 
in this year’s All-Star game, gave up 
four runs and nine hits in the first four 
innings, but retired the next 12 to earn 
his first victory since bearing Houston 
od June 16. 

Jeff Montgomery got the final three 
outs for his seventh save. Montgomery 
has retired 30 straight hitters, three shy 
of the club record set by Steve Busby in 
1974. 

Rad Sox 5, Twin* 2 Tim Wakefield, 
pitching on two days rest, struck out 
seven and didn’t allow a walk in seven 
innings as Boston won in Minneapolis. 

Wakefield, who allowed seven hits, 
replaced the scheduled starter, Steve 
Avery, who was sidelined with a stiff 
neck. 


scored four runs in each of the first wo 
innings Wednesday night as the Marlins 
routed the Pirates 12-3. 

"It was one of those nights where 
everything we hit hard fell in and 
eveiything we didn’t hit hard fell in, 
too.” said Leyland. who managed the 
Pirates from 1986 to last year. 

Leyland moved his family back to 
Pittsburgh earlier Wednesday. The 52- 
year-old skipper will live there during 
the offseason. 

Leyland still has noi lost a game in 
Three Rivers Stadium since leaving the 
Pirares. The Marlins are 4-0 in Pitts- 
burgh. ourscoring the Pirates 31-8, and 
are 5-1 overall against them. 

Kevin Brown pitched six-hit ball over 
seven innings in Florida’s fourth con- 
secutive victory' and eighth in nine 
games. 

Giants 7, Cubs 4 Pat Rapp won his 
first game for San Francisco as the Gi- 
ants won in Chicago. 

Glenallen Hill and Marie Lewis hit solo 
homers, and Rich Aurilia and Jeff Kent 
each drove in two runs for the Giants, 
who won their the fourth straight game. 

It was Rapp's second start since he 
was acquired July IS from Florida. He 
strained a muscle on his left side in his 
first start July 19 and was placed on the 
disabled list. 

Braves 4. Cardinals 3 In Atlanta, 
pinch-hiner Danny Bautista homered 
leading off the ninth inning to lift the 
Braves to a victory over St. Louis. 

The Braves tied it at 3-3 in the sixth on 
consecutive two-out hits off St. Louis’s 
starter. Andy Benes. Jeff Blauser and 
Chipper Jones hit singles, and Fred Mc- 
Griff followed with a two-run double. 

■ Expos 7 , Dodgers 3 In Montreal. 
Henry Rodriguez hit a three-run homer 
in a four-run fifth inning as the Expos 
beat Los Angeles. 

The Expos' starter. Dustin Herman- 
son, matched a career high with nine 
strikeouts. He allowed five hits and 
walked five in 5-/- innings as the Expos 
gained their sixth victory in nine games. 

Phillies 6. Astros 4 In Philadelphia. 
Mike Lieberthal hit a three-run homer, 
and rookies Scott Rolen and Tony Bar- 
ron hit solo shots for the Phillies. The 
Phillies have won seven of nine, making 
them 12-10 in their lasr 22 games. The 
Astros have lost three straight but are 
20-8 in their last 28 games. 

Rockies 4, Mets o In New York. Col- 
orado rookie John Thomson pitched a 
four-hitter for his first major league 
shutout and drove in a run. Thomson 
allowed only two runners to reach 
second base in his second complete 
game in 17 starts. 

Padres 6, Reds 3 In Cincinnati. Craig 
Shipley doubled to break a seventh-in- 
ning tie, and Joey Hamilton won his sixth 
consecutive decision for San Diego. The 
Padres remained 9^ games behind San 
Francisco in the NL West after winning 
for only rhe second time in eight games. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



*B0Vi 7HATMJ5TA SEEN ‘RmlT&S- 
I ttHiV EVEN GET A CHAIR THIS TIME! 


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Tu advertise Hjntuct Sanili ^«*r*h'i 
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PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1997 


POSTCARD 


A Wild Choose Chase 


geese — up, up and away. 

“I got w touch with the 

American Border Collie As- 

E AST NORWALK, Con- sociation. and when I told 
necdcut — “Way to them what I wanted the dogs 
me!" Jim Weyland. the su- for, they thought I was 
perinrendent of the Shore- crazy.” Marries said. But 
haven Golf Club, said finnly they referred him to Barbara 
to his border collie, Skip, as Ligon, in Shipman, Virginia, 
they rode on a golf cart to- Ligon was dubious, too. 
ward a pond on the course. But she sold Marcks a 2-ytear- 
That command sent the black old dog named Tac. along 
and white dog racing off the with a training video that in- 
cart and after a gaggle of 20 eludes the herding com- 
Canada geese near the 18th mands. Within a year, Marcks 
fairway. said, all the geese were gone. 

In seconds, the geese. At least from Fairview. 
screeching in unison, dived Unfortunately for golfers at 

into the water as Skip circled the nearby Tamarack Country 
the pond counterclockwise (as Club, most of Fairview 's 
the command “way to me” geese simply moved one golf 
told him to do, in border coliie course over. Thai practically 
speak). Skip plunged in to forced Tamarack to get a bor- 
pursue the geese, which even- der collie, which within a year 
tually took flight and headed chased away 500 geese, 
for Long Island Sound. pi 

For years. Canada geese LJ . 

have made a mess of fairways Word of the effectiveness 
at Shorehaven. a private club, of the border collies spread, 
which, with its coastline, four and scores of golf course su- 
ponds and marsh, is nirvana perm ten dents began calling 
for the birds. Oblivious to ir- Ligon. “I guess I’ve sold 
ate golfers, they have refused about 150 border collies to 
to move, even when golf balls golf clubs,’ ' Ligon said, 
whistled among them. She says that chasing the 

But the ubiquitous Canada . geese away is far more hu- 
geese have met their Waterloo mane than permitting hunters 
in border collies (and some to shoot them or trap them, 
other dogs). Where noise- measures that are permitted in 
makers, scarecrows, plastic some states. But the geese 
swans and multicolor flags don't always go peacefiSly. 
have failed, the border collie, a Laura Henze, an official of 
highly intelligent dog that can the Agriculture Department’s 
run like a deer, has succeeded Animal Damage Control 
beyond the wildest dreams of Agency in Ambers t. Mas- 
course superintendents. sachusetts, said that, contrary 

p, to popular belief, Canada 

L-* geese can be aggressive, par- 

The great goose chase ocularly after their goslings 
began in 1992, when Richard hatch in early summer. 
Marcks, the superintendent at “They can beat you with 
the Fairview Country Club in their wings or bite you.” 
Greenwich. Connecticut, de- Henze said. “And I've heard 
cided to find out if bonier of a few instances where the 
collies, which he had seen geese have attacked dogs in 
herding cattle in Monmouth ponds and drowned them.” 
County. New Jersey, when he Fortunately, however, such 

was younger, would herd attacks appear rare. 


By Jack Cavanaugh 

Nw York Times Service 



Sensual, Tender, Unrequited: The Art of Love 


By Alan Riding 

Sen 1 K«r* Times Service 


P ARIS — It is a catchy idea, 
perhaps too catchy for some cu- 
rators. but why not an an exhibition 
dedicated to love? And where bet- 
ter to hold it than Paris? After alL 
theme shows are in vogue and noth- 
ing has greater popular appeal than 
love. (All right, sex does, but the 
Georges Pompidou Center’s 
“Feminm-Masculin” covered that 
more chan a year ago.) 

So, through Nov. 2, an exhib- 
ition called “Amours" — note the 
plural — is presenting about 100 
paintings, drawings, sculptures, 
photographs and video works at die 
Cartier Foundation for Contempor- 
ary Art on Boulevard Raspail. If its 
purpose is to draw crowds, it is 
succeeding; if its purpose is to ex- 
plain love, well, perhaps the point 
is that love, defies logic. 

A small show on such a vast 
subject is, of course, bound to be 
risky. How can 100 artworks cover 
a topic that has fascinated artists 
through the ages? And how should 
the pieces be chosen? It may help 
that love favors a figurative form in 
an, yet it still comes in every color 
— sexual, tender, unrequited, re- 
ligious, violent, maternal, platonic, 
lustful, sensual and more. 

In this case, the show sets out to 
demonstrate that love in art has 
been around for a while. Pieces on 
display include a softly carved 
mouth, a fragment from an Egyp- 
tian statue from 1 350 B.C.; an erot- 
ic Roman statue of Satyr and 
Nymph from the second century 
A.D.; a 13th-century tomb known 
as “The Good Marriage," which 
shows two recumbent figures, with 
the woman turning gently roward 
the man; a 15th-century German 
religious polychrome woodcut, and 
several Renaissance drawings. 

Yet, surprisingly, if love — not 
infatuation with beauty, not sexual 
passion, but love — is to be defined 
as an intense emotional attachment 
between two people, this is rarely 
portrayed in art until the late 19th 
century. 


Before then, art cheerfully 
showed naked bodies, sensuous 
women and erotic scenes, but out- 
side religious art the notion of love 
seemed elusive. Even in "The 
Kiss," Brancusi’s 1908 sculpture, 
which is in this show, form seems 
to overwhelm feeling. 

It is perhaps for this reason, then, 
that the Cartier Foundation’s chief 
curator, Herve Chandes, has 
chosen to emphasize photography, 
cinema and video as modem art 
forms that fully exploit human 
emotions. Henri Cartier-Bresson’s 
1934 photograph of an entwined 
couple in Mexico, for example, 
shows love as it can be understood 
today. 

Chandes has also commissioned 
several works, including “Love, 
Lies and the Weather,” a 50- 
minure film by Andre Labarthe, 
who has woven Together extracts 
from movies by many great di- 
rectors — Jean Renoir, Alfred 
Hitchcock, Ingmar Bergman. 
Luchino Visconti, Francois 
Truffaut and Alain Resnais among 
them — as a way of illustrating 
love in its multiple forms. 

“This is a very strange love af- 
fair." Ingrid Bergman tells Cary 
Grant in Hitchcock’s 1946 spy 
movie, ‘ ‘Notorious. 

"Why?" he asks. 

“Maybe the fact you don’t love 
me," she replies. 

Among a half-dozen short 
videos commissioned for the show. 
“Gate Four” by Andre Bonzel, a 
French filmmaker, is the most 
poignant Everyone arriving at an 
airport after a long flight has seen 
fellow passengers engulfed by ex- 
cited family members, friends, 
children and dogs. Bonzel. 
however, has picked out individu- 
als who are being met by the one 
they love. Shown in slow motion, 
the hugs, kisses, looks, touches and 
tears speak volumes. 

The lobby of the Cartier Foun- 
dation's ultramodern glass-and- 
steel headquarters is dominated by 
Gary Hill’s 1992 black-and-white 
video installation, “Suspension of 
Disbelief (for Marine),’ ‘ compris- 


Pk i L Lw 'FmnU: mi LjU rr 

Royal comb from Benin in the "Amours” exhibition in Paris. 


ing a horizontal line of 30 tele- 
vision monitors along which ap- 
pear flashes of a naked man and a 
naked woman. One moment the 
bodies are seen separately, the next 
moment they are intertwined, yet 
they always seem at ease with each 
other. 

Douglas Gordon, the 31 -year- 
old Scottish video artist who won 
last year's Turner Prize, illustrates 
the two sides of love in a cap- 
tivating color installation called 


“A Divided Self I and H." On two 
screens placed side by side, a hand 
is seen to be trying to hold down an 
arm on the crumpled sheet of abed. 
On one screen, it appears that a man 
is holding down a woman’s arm: on 
the other" the roles are reversed. 

Among still photographs, the 
face of a woman tattooed on a 
man ‘s back by an anonymous artist 
was chosen for the show’s poster. 
Ernest James Bellocq’s 1912 “Un- 
titled" shows a smiling, bare-ches- 


red prostitute from Ne«' Orleans 
wbo seems happy with life. 

In contrast, “Phenomenon of 
Ecstasy,” Brassafs 1932 image i ot 
a woman lying on a bed with her 
eves closed and month slightly 
open, exudes sensuality. More re- 
strained are Robert Mapple- 
thorpe’s "Unmade Bed and 
“Charley and Jim.” 

Bur the discovery of the show, at 
least for French followers of con- 
temporary art, is Francesca Wood- 
man, an American model turned 
photographer who committed sui- ‘ 
cide in 1981 at age 23. While her 
five autobiographical works in 
“ Amo urs” seem at first sight un- 
related to the theme, her vulner- 
ability and loneliness come across 
as a cry for love. 

StiR, as evocations of the tran- 
quillity and tenderness of love, two 
works in the show stand out Pi- 
casso’s “Nude Man Gazing Upon 
His Sleeping Partner” shows the 
man on a bed with his beloved, her 
arms raised above her head as an 
expression of her inner feeling of 
security. Only the man's body is 
painted, yet it’is the sketched figure 
of the woman that draws the eye. 

Seydou Keita, a much acclaimed 
portrait artist from Mali, has also 
captured love at peace w’ich itself in 
a black-and-white photograph of 
an African couple relaxing on a 
carpet in the desert. The man. 
dressed in white, ties behind the 
woman, looking down at her, his 
hand resting gently on her 
shoulder, the woman, dressed in a 
dark, rich costume, a long necklace 
drooping lazily onto a cushion, . 
looks calmly at the camera. ' 

The exhibition does. not exhaust 
the subject, but probably no show 
can. “On the theme of love, the 
combined collections of the 
Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum, 
the Hermitage and the Vatican 
would not suffice,” Philippe Da- 
gen, Le Monde’s art critic, noted. 
Still, at the end of a visit, Chandes’ 
choice of the title “.Amours” 
makes sense: It is easier to show the 
many symptoms of love than it is to 
define love itself. 


MOVIEMAKING 


PEOPLE 


Kubrick Team Keeps Ultraquiet on the Set 



Ene BaMsuI/Thc New YftLTmei 


Pinewood Studios outside London, where nobody’s talk- 
ing about Kubrick's new film, "Eyes Wide Shut*' 


By Sarah Lyall 

Nev tVifjt Tunes Service 

L ondon -- No one, « 
seems, wants to talk about 
Stanley Kubrick's forthcom- 
ing film, “Eyes Wide Shut." 

Not Warner Brothers, which 
is producing it Not Nicole 
Kidman and Tom Cruise, 
who are stoning in it. And not 
the security guard at Pine- 
wood Studios outside Lon- 
don, where “Eyes Wide 
Shut" finally wrapped on 
Tuesday. 

"I’ve been instructed not 
to let you in," the guard said 
curtly to a reporter and a pho- 
tographer the other day, flatly 
refusing to say anything 
about anything. 

Perhaps it's not the Man- 
hattan Project, but "Eyes 
Wide Shut," which began 
filming in November, is 
wrapped in a level of security 
that would not be inappro- 
priate for a top-secret scientif- 
ic conclave. 

Kubrick's first movie since 
“Full Metal Jacket” was released 10 
years ago, “Eyes Wide Shut" is known 
to be a psychosexual thriller starring 
Kidman and Cruise, who may or may 
not be playing a pair of married psy- 
chiatrists. 

What pise? It is known that Harvey 
Keitel was in the film (possibly playing 
a patienr of (he psychiatrists played by 
Kidman and Cruise) until he dropped 
out because of a commitment to play 
Elvis Presley in “Graceland," and that 
he was replaced by Sidney Pollack, for- 
cing the reshooting of his scenes. 

It is known that Jennifer Jason Leigh 
is also in the film, possibly playing the 
wife of Pollack’s character, who herself 
may or may not be playing another 
patient treated by the psychiatrists. 

“I know that it's a story of sexual 
obsession and jealousy,” said someone 
connected with the film who insisted 
that her name not be used because, she 
said, she did not want to upset the ex- 


tremely secretive Kubrick. “But that’s 
as much as I know. I don't know exactly 
whar that means. I haven't read the 
script, and I don’t know anyone who’s 
read the script except the people actually 
making tbe movie. This all just in- 
creases my excitement at seeing the 
movie when it comes in, whenever that 
is.” 

In other words, your guess is as good 
as anyone else's (although a young 
movie memorabilia salesman in Texas 
says he has a copy of the script and has 
threatened to publish it on the Inter- 
net). 

Meanwhile, reports in British news- 
papers, where entertainment reporters 
have been eagerly repeating even the 
wispiest snippet of information, have 
ranged from the alarming (Cruise has 
forbidden anyone on the set to look at 
him. even when he is just walking 
around); to the amusing (in one scene. 
Cruise wears a dress); to tbe topical 


(Kidman's character is ad- 
dicted to heroin, and die 
movie is about how Cruise 
helps her overcome her ad- 
diction). 

It is hard to know what, if 
anything, is true. “I'm sure 
that every conceivable rumor 
has been printed in the British 
press, bur none of them have 
got it yet,” said the woman 
who did not want to upset 
Kubrick. Kidman and Cruise 
have been told not to discuss 
the script, the film or the di- 
rector. and have reportedly 
been ordered not to remove 
the script from Che set. 

If there is one thing that is 
certain, it is that the notori- 
ously reclusive and demand- 
ing Kubrick — whose pre- 
vious films include “Dr. 
Scrangelove," “A Clock- 
work Orange," "2001: A 
Space Odyssey” and “The 
Shining” — is spending an 
awfully long time making this 
film. 

“The Shining" took an es- 
timated 200 days to shoot, 
according to production charts kept by 
Variety, the entertainment industry 
trade paper. Filming for “Eyes Wide 
Shut” began late last year (probably in 
November, but Warner Brothers would 
not say) and until Tuesday was still 
grinding on, with Kubrick reportedly 
requiring dozens of takes for some 
scenes. Up until the end, people working 
for Cruise and Kidman said they did not 
know the stars' schedules or when they 
would be free to go on to new projects. 

All the secrecy has proved highly 
entertaining to the various film crews at 
Pinewood. where “Tomorrow Never 
Dies." the new James Bond film, is in 
production, among other things. 

“I know absolutely nothing about 
it.’ ' said a stagehand from the Bond film 
while slipping out to buy a pack of gum 
the other day. “ft’s a Kubrick produc- 
tion, isn’t it? I think he does this just to 
rouse interest that may not be there 
otherwise." 


I T had the ring of classic Kurt 
Vonnegut, a bit of advice for college 
graduates; “Ladies and gentlemen of 
me class of 1997; Wear sunscreen,” it 
began. The essay went everywhere by 
computer, from e-mail to on-line dis- 
cussion group, even to the novelist's 
wife, who loved it. Except for one tiring 
— Vonnegut never wTote it and never 
delivered it as a commencement ad- 
dress. The piece was actually a June 1 
column for the Chicago Tribune by 
Mary Schmich. How it got attributed to 
Vonnegut, 74, the author of “Cat’s 
Cradle" and many other highly re- 
garded novels, remains a mystery. Von- 
negut learned of the work’s existence 
when his agent told him a magazine 
wanted to reprint the speech he gave at 
MIT. “I thought about it and said I 
didn’t think I gave any talk like that, but 
I wished I had," he said. “I finally 
realized a hoax was going on.” The 
column contained these pearls: "Dance, 
even if you have nowhere to do it but 
your living room," and, “Remember 
compliments you receive. Forget the 
insults. If you succeed in doing this, tell 
me how.” Vonnegut’s wife, the pho- 
tographer JiU Krementz, got it by e- 
maii, and sent it to friends and family. 
“She thought it was wonderful, one of 
the cleverest things I had ever done," 
Vonnegut said in a telephone interview 
from fus home on Long Island, New 
York. Schmich, meanwhile, has been 
inundated with calls and e-mail from 
across the country and 
Europe. She tried to trace 
whar happened. Two friends 
she sent the column to swore 
they did not pass it on. Put- 
ting Vonnegut’s name on her 
writing, Schmich wrote in a 
later column, “would be like 
sticking a Calvin Klein label 
on a pair of Knurr jeans. ’ ’ 

□ 

U.S. scientists have built a 
computer that has created 
“new" works by Mozart, 

Beethoven and a host of oth- 
er composers, the magazine 
New Scientist reports. The 
first piece to be heard in pub- 
lic was a symphony titled 
“Mozart’s 42” — Mozart 
wrote only 41 — performed 


by a college orchestra of the University 
of California at Santa Cruz. Tbe pro- 
gram, called Experiments in Musical 
Intelligence, has also produced “new” 
music by Bach, Brahms, Chopin and 
Rachmaninoff, said David Cope, a 
composer and computer expert who in- 
vented the process. Critics have said that 
the music, while impressive, sounds tike 
the efforts of lesser composers trying to 
emulate the great masters. But Cope 
says it outclasses the work of Antonio 
Salieri, Mozart's great rival: * ‘This mu- 
sic is better than that." 

□ 

A vast majority of Britons oppose the 
prospect of Camilla Parker Bowles 
becoming queen if she marries Prince 
Charles, according to a public opinion 
poll. Only one in 10 people surveyed by 
the pollster NOP said that Parker 
Bowles should become queen if Charles 
ascends to the throne. But 36 percent 
said that Charles. 48. who last year 
divorced Princess Diana, should many' 
Parker Bowles, 50. whenever he wanted 
— as long as he gave up the right to 
become king — while 32 percent said he 
could maiTy her and be king as long as 
she were noi made queen. 

□ 

Is Barbra Streisand marrying her 
beau James Brolin in a day or two? 
USA Today reports that the wedding is 
rumored for this weekend at Block Is- 



Albew Fcndn/TlK AmmumiI Pn* 


SLY MAN — Sylvester Stallone 
and his wife, Jennifer Flavin, at . 
the premiere of his movie “Cop ’ 
Land,” in which he plays a sheriff. 

land, a Rhode Island resort. ‘ *1 certainly 
know that they plan to marry, but I don’t 
think that specific plans have been set,” 
said Streisand’s publicist. 

□ 

Tupac Shakur’s mother. 
Afeni Shakur, bad trouble 
controlling her anger during a 
court session over who will 
get money from the slain rap- 
per’s estate. William Gar- 
land, Shakur 's father, testi- 
fied in a Los Angeles court 
that his son gave him a pho- 
tograph signed * ‘7 o Pops, tell % 
my family to come see me.” f ? 
Afeni Shakur claims that Gar- 
land didn't see his son for IS 
years and does not deserve 
any part of the estate. Shakur 
died Sept. 15, five days after 
being shot in Las Vegas. The 
nonjury trial is to resume next 
month.’ 


World Youth Forum, 50 Years On 

hncniuticna! Herald Tribune 

A LUMNI of the Herald Tribune World Youth Forum 
were gathering in New York on Thursday to mark the 
50th anniversary of the program, which brought young 
people from around the world to the United States in 
conjunction with the Marshall Plan. 

Twice a year from 1947 to 1966. the New York Herald 
Tribune — ihe predecessor of the International Herald 
Tribune — sent promising youth to meet with Americans, 
especially in business and politics. The program con- 
tinued until 1972. with aid from other organizations. 

Alumni expected to arrend the anniversary celebration, 
being held at Sl Bartholomew’s Church, "include John 
Goulden, Britain's ambassador to NATO, and Jayantha 
Dhanapala. Sri Lanka's ambassador to the United States, 
said Daniela Yaffe Zidon of the organizing committee. 



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tor rtw country wu an; calling fom 

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EUROPE 

Austria *o , 

022 - 903-011 

Belghnna 

u-awKiaa-10 

F nun .. 

3-BDG-95HW11 

Germany 

. .0130-0010 

Greece* 

WHOft-1311 

Irelandc 

1-800-550-080 

Italy* 

172-1011 

HBttiertemts* . 

0600-022-9111 

Russia* * (Maura) » 

. 756-5042 

Spain 

900-99-00-11 

Sweden 

020-795-611 

Switzerland* 

8800-89-0011 

United Kingdom*. . 

0500-89-0011 


0800-89-0011 

MIDDLE EAST 

Egypt* (Cairo)*. 

510-0288 

Israel 

177-100-2727 

Saudi Arabia* 

1-800-18 

AFRICA 

Ghana 

0191 

South Africa 

0-800-99-0123 


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