Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

See other formats


fA ,'jsb 


Hi 


,s \ 






Hcraih 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribum? 


TAGZl 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Dally New spaper 

'•^2 r.- ciw ' ^ 




-M... 

• •- S' I 

. -tC* 

•* v..3*i 

• • 

■ -• • 

^'c 

• ••••• 

... ■ 

>5*^ - 

'il • L. 3 "i- 


Paris, Wednesday, August 13, 1997 


Line-Item Veto Looks Like a Paper Tiger 


By Clay Chandler 

Post Service 

WASHINGTON — In wielding his line-item veto 
for the first time, President Bill ClLon said he meam 

ctoS forgS'* 31 W ^SU>” "*» bsve 

JEEZ? Si£nal ""*** ” 

Even as Mr Clinton scratched three narrow pro- 
fws^s from balanced-budger and tax legislation he 
Signed last week, interest groups — along with the 
lawmakers and lobbyists who represent them wen* 


uum a similar rate. Tax proposals 
in {articular offer many opportunities to circumvent 
the intention of the president’s new authority. 


The conclusion drawn by many Washington 
Dudget experts was not that the line-item veto had 
abolished what Mr. Clinton called “the old game of 
slipping a provision into a massive bill in hope that no 
one will notice." Rather, the dominant view was that 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Mr. pinion’s use of his new veto powers meant 
simply that the old game would now requjre a bit 
more skill. 

"Clearly, we’ll see Congress get more sophis- 
ticated about drafting legislation" to avoid a veto, 
said Sue Thomas, an associate professor of political 
science at Georgetown University. 

• 5**U?®* groups "are going to take much greater care 
in drafting their provisions,” agreed Rick Grafmeyer, 


director for tax policy at the accounting firm of Ernst 
& Young and a former staff member on the Senate 
FinanceCoraraittee. The veto "may get rid of some of 
the pork, but the people who really want to get around 
it will be successful more likely than not" 

On the tax side, fiscal experts already are con- 
templating measures to ensure that pet proposals 
have more than 100 beneficiaries. 

That is because die line-item veto law only grants 
the president authority to eliminate tax provisions 
after they have been certified by Congress’s Joint 
Committee on Taxation as benefiting fewer than 100 
people or firms in a single year. 

On Monday, analysts suggested a number of 
strategies for getting off the Joint Committee’s hit 

See VETO, Page 6 


ha-T 


g| Germans 
",;|£ Delay Move 
•ggj On Interest 

' Bundesbank Leaves 
Benchmark Rate at 

-‘■■£38? Long-Standing 3% 

. : 

. iV.- By John Schmid 

• = - - ■ International Herutd Tribune 

"-■■is-toT - ^tANKFURT — The Bundesbank 
opted Tuesday to leave a key interest 
i ... rate unchanged, forcing investors to 

wait at least another week to find out 

whether Germany’s central bank- will 
use its power to raise rates as a tool to 
support its beleaguered currency. 

By bolding the repurchase rate steady 

— .j. _ . for another week, however, the Bnndes- 

' bank also reinforced expectations in 

• Europe’s financial markets that the days 
. : .'-~-"CvT ' of record-low German credit were com- 

ing to an end. 

■ “ le ^purchase rate, the benchmark 
‘ ,v " -7'- for the money market, has been frozen 

. ~ .""'riff for a year at 3 percent, a record low. 

The threat of an immediate interest- 
rate increase appears to have receded in 
~ ■■ ;'" l r Ji.- ■ recent days after the dollar eased off the 
eight-year peak of 1.89 Deutsche marks 
F •- last week, it hovered above 1.86 DM on 
n 0 , Tuesday. 

- ' The Bundesbank’s inaction supports 

• the view that the central hank needs 

' - ^fi-, more time, to make its case for raising 
'iv rates, a move that is bound to be on- 

“ P°P ular ^oth at home and in political 

■ * r ‘ capitals across Europe. 

In preparation for the introduction of 
. ^ - a single European currency in 1999, 

• • nations are under greater pressure than 
**J*ji-' ■■ ever to harmonize European interest 

•./ . rates and lay the groundwork for the 

■ r ■ , proposed European central bank. 

'. But in France, for example, record 
’ unemployment and a slower growth 
- .forecast than Germany’s leaves Paris 
lacking the economic and political in- 
centives to emulate German rate moves, 
a said Michael Lewis, an economist at 
V Deutsche Morgan Grenfell, 
r Nevertheless, some Bundesbank 
watchers expect the repurchase rate to 
rise incrementally to 3 JJ percent by the 
end of the year. 

"Nothing has changed,” said Joe 
Prendergast, head of global currency 
trading in London at Credit Suisse First 
Boston. 

"The threat that the Bundesbank will 
send a ti gh tening signal to the market is 
still there.” 

Speculation now centers oa the next 
meeting of the central bank’s board of 
governors, on Aug. 21, although that 
might be too short an advance time to 
prepare the ground for such a politically 
sensitive move. 

~ \a Under the presidency of Hans Tiet~ 
jp meyer, whose background in politics 
gives him stronger European sensitiv- 
ities than many of his Bundesbank col- 
• leagues, the central bank seldom makes 
interest rate decisions without weeks or 
months of careful public-relations work 
in advance. 

Another reason behind the Bondes- 





_ “Tc 


. -•! nii;. ' 




RjJl BcmecfThc Awdikd Nn 

A Jewish woman, right, peering over a partition Tuesday as Orthodox Jews prayed at the Western Wall. 
The police intervened and pushed Reform and Conservative Jews away from the revered historic area. 

Jewish Faiths Clash at Western Wall 

Extreme Orthodox Assail Those Who Allow Women to Join Prayers 


By Joel Greenberg 

New York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — Jeered by ex- 
treme Orthodox Jews, who called 
them ‘ ‘Hamas,’ ’ "terrorists’ * and 
"Christians,” about 150 Conservative 
and Reform Jewish men and women 
were shoved away from the Western 
Wall by the police after they prayed 
together, contrary to Orthodox cus- 
tom- 
ize forcible eviction of the wor- 
shipers from Judaism’s most revered 
shrine on Monday night came as thou- 
sands gathered there to mark Tishah 
b’Av. a fast day marking the tradi- 
tional anniversary of the destruction 


of, first, Solomon’s Temple and then 
Herod's Temple. 

The Western Wall is a remnant of a 
wall that surrounded the plateau on 
which Herod’s Temple stood when it 
was destroyed by the Romans in A.D. 
70. 

" This is exactly why the Temple 
was destroyed in the first place: be- 
cause people haled each other for no 
reason,” said Abigail Graetz, a Con- 
servative worshiper, weeping as she 
cited a traditional Jewish account of 
internal strife that led to the destruc- 
tion. “The wall doesn’t belong to any- 
one — this belongs to the Jewish 
people.” 

The incident was the latest con- 


frontation between Orthodox Jews and 
members of other branches of Judaism 
who have been locked in a divisive 
debate over the authority of the Or- 
thodox rabbinic establishment in Is- 
rael. 

Tensions have risen since Orthodox 
political parties made a strong show- 
ing in last year's national elections and 
won key government posts. 

A rancorous dispute has erupted in 
recent months over a bill promoted by 
the Orthodox parties that would en- 
shrine in law the sole authority of 
Orthodox rabbis to perform conver- 
sions to Judaism in Israel. 

See PRAY, Page 6 


Malaysia Curbs Spending 
As Economy Hits Shoals 


Coward by OwSagFrtm Oapwria 

KUALA LUMPUR — Battling a 
mounting trade deficit and alarmed at 
the slide of its currency, Malaysia said 
Tuesday that it would postpone some 
large public-works projects and delay 
purchases of big-ticket items such as 
aircraft and ships. 

The move would give pause to 
Malaysia’s break-neck pace of infra- 
structure building, which over the last 
few years has included the construction 
of the world’s tallest towers, a series of 


look into postponing "lumpy items.” 

The stock market fell Tuesday and 
the ringgit plummeted to its lowest level 
in three ana a half years. 'Hie Malaysian 
currency started its slide in the wake of 
the de facto devaluation of the Thai baht 
on July 2, a move that has forced coun- 
tries around the region to defend their 
currencies from speculative attacks. 

“We have to understand that negative 
reports on the region in general were 
triggered from Thailand.” said Mr. An- 
war, who also is the finance minister. 


The Dollar 


Tuesday O 4 P.U 
1-8825 
1.5787 
11&28 
6.2788 


prawinua ckwo 
1-865 
1-59 
116.175 
6.2805 



The Dow 



Tuesday dose 

pievtous daee 

-101.27 

7960-84 

. 8062.11 

1 S&P 500 | 

change 

Tuesday e 4 PM 

previous cfcm 

-10.47 

926.53 

837.00 


bank's apparent delay, several econ- ? snorts stadium in Kuala TZe ringgit has fallen 12 percent since 

omists warn, is that a hasty German rate highways an ports theThai move. The dollar hit a 42-month 

increase has the potential to backfire. Lumpui. Minister Anwar high of 2.7930 ringgit in early trading, 

Stephen King, economist m London Rornmanews agency that although it later slipped back to 2.7630. 

at HSBCJampes Capel, said the dollar Mum told Ben^news ag ^ ^ ^ tradingj ^ Kuala Lumpur 

Should the dollar riw ro 2.S0 ringgit, 

. m »m,. oroiecrs whicn we mm. ^ mLAysIJ ^ Page 12 


increase. 1 

cieat ro restore investor confidence in son* ^ ^ government would 
the mark. _ , . ~ 


Books 

Crossword. 

Opinion 

Sports 


The Intormari&t 


The- |HT on-line http:/;'.vvvvv.iht.com 


No. 35498 \ 


U.S. Is to 

Suicide Bomb Feud 

Israel and Palestinians to Tell 
What They Know About Case 


By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Sm ict 

JERUSALEM — In a first step to- 
ward resolving a dangerous dispute, the 
Israeli and Palestinian authorities have 
agreed to report all they have learned 
about the Mahane Yehuda market sui- 
cide bombing to a trilateral panel whose 
U.S. representative will be the CIA sta- 
tion chief, senior U.S. officials said 
Tuesday night 

The new mechanism was hammered 
out in a meeting late Monday between 
intelligence officials from both sides 
and refined during meetings Tuesday 
between the special U.S. envoy, De nnis 
Ross, and the Israeli and Palestinian 
leaders. 

It will effectively allow the United 
States to serve as a referee in the dispute 
that has raged since the July 30 bombing 
in a Jerusalem market about whether the 
Palestinians are doing enough to co- 
operate with Israeli demands. 

[Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright is encouraged by progress on se- 
curity arrangements, the State Depart- 
ment said Tuesday, Reuters reported 
from Washington. James Rubin, a 
spokesman, said, “Now we’re going to 
be looking for results, results, results.”] 

Before a meeting Tuesday night be- 
tween Mr. Ross and Mr. Arafat, 
however, there remained no indication 
that the Palestinians were willing to act 
as aggressively as Israel and the United 
States would like. 

Mr. Ross had been scheduled to leave 
the region Tuesday night. But the situ- 
ation remains so fragile, U.S. officials 
said, that he will stay on one more day to 
meet again with Prime Minister Ben- 
jamin Netanyahu and with the Pales- 
tinian leader. Yasser Arafat, in hopes of 
making more progress. 

‘ ‘There is a grave and urgent situation 
out there,” said a senior U.S. official, 
who said he thought that the quest for 
broader peace in the Middle East was 
still “hanging by a thread.” 


Israelis to do everything necessary to 
suppress violence and terror. 

Mr. Ross said: “We have a begin- 
ning, we have a step in the right di- 
rection, but we need to see results. ’ ’ 

It became increasingly evident Tues- 
day drat Mr. Ross was also putting pres- 
sure on the Israeli government to make a 
conciliatory gesture, but he appeared to 
have failed to persuade Mr. Netanyahu 
to show any flexibility. The U.S. envoy 
spoke elliptically about “measures that 
are not helpful and would be coun- 
terproductive,” but officials said he had 
explicitly asked Mr. Netanyahu to re- 
sume payment of millions of dollars 
owed to the Palestinians that since the 
bombing have been frozen as a punitive 
measure. 

Jordanian officials made it clear that 
See ISRAEL, Page 6 


Jospin’s Cuts 
Take Aim at 
Dassault’s 
Combat Plane 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The Rafale fighter-bomber 
built by Dassault will be the first victim 
of die Socialist government’s defense 
budget cutbacks, officials and industry 
sources said Tuesday amid reports that 
sharp defease spending cuts are in the 
works. 

The aircraft, which has just entered 
the production phase, will not be can- 


Mrs. Albright has said she will visit ’ celed. the sources said, but the French 


the region by the end of the month, but 
‘ only if progress has been made toward 
restoring cooperation between the sides. 
By creating a means for the United 
States- to act as judge instead of witness, 
the initiative could allow the admin- 
istration to make a fair judgment, while 
perhaps quelling some of the wilder 
accusations that have been flung in re- 
cent days by Israelis and Palestinians 
alike. 

Mr. Arafat has insisted that his security 
forces are doing all they can to find out 
who might have earned out the attack. 

But Mr. Netanyahu, with some 
American support, has insisted that the 
Palestinians do far more by arresting 
scores of suspected militants, including 
88 on a list that Israeli intelligence of- 
ficials have presented to their Pales- 
tinian counterparts in the past week. 

So far, that is something the Pal- 
estinians have shown little willingness 
to do, despite a commitment under the 
peace accord they have signed with the 


government is set to stretch out and 
probably scale back its plans to order 48 
Rafales worth $2.5 billion over the next 
five years from Dassault Aviation. An 
earlier order for 13 planes remains 
firm. 

Just how radically the government 
will cut back its planned purchase was 
unclear, but already Dassault shares 
have tumbled on the Paris stock market 
in a two-day drop of 8 percent, down 50 
to 1,306 on Tuesday after the govern- 
ment confirmed rumors that it was re- 
considering its options on the Rafale. 

A Defense Ministry official was 
quoted saying that “cutting back does 
not mean cutting out” — apparently an 
indication drat France intends to pro- 
ceed with at least the naval version of 
the Rafale. It is the only French war- 
plane available to equip France’s new 
aircraft carrier, the Charles de Gaulle. 

But more than just military and 

See FRANCE, Page 5 


AGENDA 

Hutu Rebels Are Said to Clash in Burundi 


PAGE TWO 

The Gulf in Mexico: Rich Versus Poor 

EUROPE ' Page5. 

Slovak Textbook Glorifies Nasi Past 


BUBANZA, Burundi (AP) — 
Fighting between rival Hutu rebels in 
northwestern Burundi has left 600 
people dead since the beginning of 
July, witnesses asserted Tuesday. 

In recent days, 13,000 Hutu have 
fled their rural homes for this trading 
town 40 kilometers (25 miles) north of 
the capital, Bujumbura, to avoid the 
fighting between the National Liber- 
ation Front and the Forces for die 


Defense of Democracy, or FDD. 

A farmer 'who arrived in a town 
nearby said many villagers were flee- 
ing the fighting because the National 
Liberation Front “will kill us if we 
don’t give them financial support” 

In Brussels, a spokesman for the 
National Council for the Defense of 
Democracy — the political wing of the 
FDD — denied that factional fighting 
caused the deaths. 


U.S.-Ghina Talk ou Jiang Visit Coes Well 


Page 10. 

- Page 10. 

Pages 8-9. 
.... Pages 18-19. 


Pages 4 and 7. 


BEIJING (WP) — The U.S. na- 
tional security adviser, Samuel Ber- 
ger, met for 90 minutes Tuesday with 
President Jiang Zemin of China to try 
to iron out differences in preparation 
for Mr. Jiang’s state visit to the United 
Stales in October. 

An administration official said the 
meeting had gone smoothly, unlike 


many high-level Chinese- American 
talks over the past four years. “The 
premise is one of improving die re- 
lationship,” he said, “as opposed to 
two years when yon sat through long 
diatribes about containment” 

Mr. Berger also met briefly Tuesday 
with Prime Minister Li Peng and For- 
eign Minister Qian Qichen. 


In die United States, the Federal Re- 
* serve Board will continue to raise m- 
. 4. lerest rates, they noted, supporting the 

See RATES, Page 5 

~~ Newsstand pri ces __ 

Andorra 10.00 FF Lebanon U 3.00C 

Antites 1250 FF Morocco Dh 

Catnemon.. . 1.600 CM Qatar. 10 -“ 


Wave of Killings Revives Fears of ‘ Third Force ’ in South Africa 

V ^ - i.i . . • ■ n. . rx . • . • -i . vT.i w a J _ 1 _ ft. .A. _ . i!_. mu j • i -ft_ _ a 


— control. He wanted the press to arrive before the 

By Suzanne Daley bodies were removed, and so the police waited. 

New York Times Service Practically everyone around here — Mr. Nka- 


unMon..i.6 WCT" ff yin-pe had gathered suspicion, tfnoi for mis rauroer, men roromers. tne 

-EE 5^2 SR morning, the women of this «g ^ ^d-and- cycle of revenge, of killing begetting killing, that 

France 10.00 FF Saucfl Arabia--- around the mud house,_ just . political discourse in KwaZulu/ 


Certainly President Nelson Mandela has made it 
clear that he has little doubt. At a funeral on Aug. 3 
for rive others who were killed here last month, he 
said the deaths proved the existence of an or- 
ganized effort to undermine South Africa’s 
fledgling democracy. 


>ss& 


$ 


France 10.00 FF saucn __ around the mud nouse, ji* » ■«. ha* long constituted political discourse in KwaZulu/ “We are not dealing here with an individual or 

Gabon. 1.100 CFA Senegal., white police tape marking tn other under Natal Province but had seemed to be abating, has just a small group of criminals.’ ’ Mr. Mandela told 

•tty 2^00LJre Span- watched, whispering softly to eac leapt up again in earnest here in recent months. - the hundreds of villagers who assembled on the 

toy Coast. 1.250 CFA Tun® 3 1Q00 nfi their hands, as the officers pick P |t is not just the violence that has attracted side of a hill to bury their dead.. 

Jo rrtfl fl m .1250 JD U At — u ' i _ « i a ftirnirw. . ... .. « .r ...v. i.^ »<iu A J..i: ^ — t:*;— i 

KuwffltZ.Z1.700 Fife U.S- Mil. (Eur.)-.-SljO 



their hands, as the omcers 

ilipsss 

in the head the , warlonJ SiflS0 

- ^ in 


attention this time, but the question of who may be 
behind iL The killings have revived fears that South 
Africa’s “third force" — a presumably white-led 
rightist group dedicated to fomenting black-on- 
black violence to prove blacks are too violent to be 
trusted with government — is still at work. 


“We are dealing with experienced political 
criminals in command of huge resources — fi- 
nances, weaponry, communications networks and 
connections at key positions,” he said. “We are 
dealing with a highly coordinated network of 
people deployed in state organs, such as the army 


and police. They are driven by the desperate at- 
tempt to arrest the democratic transformation of 
our country and turn back the clock of history.” 

Mr. Mandela promised arrests soon and called 
on members of the police end the army to turn in 
the rotten apples in their midst Appealing directly 
to members of the security forces, he asked for 
information about events leading up to the five 
killings on July 22. 

“We want to know why and who decided to 
withdraw the security forces, especially the sol- 
diers, from this area on the day of the massacre,” 
he said. 

Testimony from court cases and statements to 
See VENGEANCE, Page 6 


i 


A 







EVTERNATIONAJL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13 , 1997 

PACE TWO 



No End to Poverty / A New fry at Welfare 


Mexico’s Economic Turnaround Is Lost on the Poor 


By Anthony DePalma 

New York Tunes Sendee 


M ACU1LA, Mexico — There is no 
school in this wasted hillside vil- 
lage. no doctor, no drugstore. When 
the pump works, a central faucet 
spurts grayish water for about three hours a day, 
and Paula Hernandez and the other village wom- 
en scamper up the steep stony paths with buckets 
before it shuts off again. 

For the people of Macuila — and as many as 
one in five families throughout Mexico — in- 
comes are so low that they cannot buy enough 
food to stay healthy. Recent government boasts 
that the economy has recovered from the peso 
crisis in 1994 seem like cruel jokes. To them, the 
record-setting pace of the Mexican stock market, 
Mexico's shrinking interest rates and its vig- 
orous peso — which is actually in danger of 
becoming too strong — are meaningless. 

“A fruit and vegetable truck comes around 
only on Saturday, and what we buy depends on 
how much our men make,' ‘ Mrs. Hernandez said 
of the only market she knows. Her husband, 
Marcelo, like most men of Macuila, works in the 
lush valley below the village, earning roughly S3 
dollars a day picking beans or spraying in- 
secticide on potaro fields owned by a wealthy 
patron. 

Bur by the time Friday rolls around, all that is 
left in the adobe shack where she cooks on 
firewood for her family of four are a small bag of 
black beans, a handful of chile peppers and six 
white onions. 

The gap between rich and poor in Mexico is 
enormous, and it has widened since the peso 
devaluation. But just os large is the gap in the 
country’s economic recovery, which seems to 
have taken hold at only the highest income levels 
and skipped the all-but-forgotten places like 
Macuila. 

Echoing his government’s critics. President 
Ernesto Zedillo acknowledged last week that the 
common people had not benefited from these 
recent economic gains. Then, in one of his most 
significant efforts at social policy since talting 
office in 1994. he announced a SlSS million 
program to attack the roots of poverty, which he 
called Mexico’s “gravest shortcoming.’’ The 
country’s two-tier economy, he declared, could 
nor be allowed to continue. 

The program, called El Progresa, will try to 
break die cycle of poverty by tying together 
health, education and nutrition benefits, with 
special emphasis on women and girls. That con- 
solidated approach makes El Progresa a de- 
parture from previous government plans that 
focused on a single need. 

In its early stages the program will help 
177.416 families in parts of 10 states, paying 
families 58 a month to keep young children in 
school, with payments increasing in higher 
grades, so long as the children attend at least 85 
percent of classes. Girls will receive bigger 
scholarships than boys. By the end of the year, up 
.000 families will receive help. 


to 400 

But given the size of the problem ofpoverty i 
Mexico, critics say it is a modest effort. The 


in 

say it is a modest ettort. they 
quickly pointed out that the Mexican Revolution 
was fought to a large degree over those same 
issues of poverty, without solving much- Gen- 
erations of corruption and political interference, 
they said, have since kept any real inroads from 
being made. 

A son of the revolutionary leader Emiliano 
Zapata. Mateo Zapata Perez, told reporters last 
week: ’ * We Mexicans are not as well off as they 
say we are.” He said the new anti-poverty pro- 
gram would not be enough. 

El Progresa is being built on the ruins of the 



Iggg#. 

■* " *■" JIS^ < 


W-i 

brilh lUtumilbr^Tlir V. Ini, Tin 



r HIDALGO— 

Mexico 

.. Ctty 


Kro 

a * an 




Paertfe Ocledn. 


For the people of Macuila - and as many 
as one in five families throughout Mexico - 
incomes are so low they cannot buy enough 
/■ food to stay healthy. Paula Hernandez - 
/ ; who lives in a wooden shack with her 75- 
year-old mother; her husband, Marcelo 
Cespedes Marin, and their son, Joel, 12 - 
cannot remember the last time she was able 
to buy milk. She just hopes no one gets sick. 


NYT 


Solidarity anri-poverty program of former Pres- 
ident Carlos Salinas de Gortari, which estab- 
lished local committees and required people 
receiving assistance to put their own time, work 
or money into the public works projects. 

But Solidarity's many achievements — which 
included roads, water-filtration plants, clinics, 
and schools — were overshadowed by wide- 
spread corruption. Large amounts of funds were 
used for questionable projects like building bas- 
ketball courts and baseball diamonds. Substan- 
tial amounts of money just disappeared, and the 
Solidarity committees were widely misused for 
political organizing. 

Carlos Rojas Gutierrez, who as head of the 
Social Services Ministry oversaw Solidarity, 
said El Progresa would be different because it is 
to be administered by the states, not the central 
government.. Local people would have far great- 
er control over how it works, he said. 

If Macuila is any example, however, the vast- 
ness of Mexico’s needs will quickly dwarf the 
resources of Progresa, and die difficulty of dis- 
tributing the scarce resources could lead to 
abuse. Macuila lies in the Huasteca region of 
central Mexico, an area of nearly inaccessible 
villages hidden deep in the folds of steep, worn- 
out valleys. 

Government officials arrived in Macuila in 
December to conduct a house-by-bouse census 


of each family and its needs. Two weeks ago, the 
officials returned and told 40 of the 90 families 
living here that they were eligible for assistance, 
and began to explain how it would work. 

As part of the program, mothers who are 
enrolled will receive S12 a month to buy milk 
and other necessities to supplement their chil- 
dren’s diets. But the subsidy depends on making 
sore that the children are seen regularly by a 
doctor, a demand that is always difficult and 
sometimes impossible ro fulfill 


A 


NGELA SANCHEZ BACA is on the 
list with her husband and their three 
children. By Macuila standards they 
.are comparatively well off, in part 
because her husband, Divorcio, spent two years 
picking lettuce in California and returned in 
1993 with enough money for them to build a 
house of concrete blocks. 

But their 12-year-old son needs a hernia op- 
eration, and their daughter, Maria, 7, has a heart 
murmur that requires her to be takeD to the doctor 
in Actopan, more than five hours away, every 
month. 

“Every time she has to go. it takes a day to get 
there, a day for the visit, and a day to get back, 
and so she misses three days of school,” Mrs. 
Sanchez said. Maria, along with her brother and 
sister, is underweight, she said, because there is 


simply not enough food to go around. 

' "The doctor always yells at me and says not to 
give Maria black coffee in the morning,” Mrs. 
Sanchez said. “But milk is so expensive. When 
we can get it, we give it to the kids only by the 
teaspoon.” 

Paula Hernandez — who lives in a wooden 
shack further up the hillside with her 75-year-old 
mother; her husband, Marcelo Cespedes Marin, 
and their son JoeL 12 — cannot even remember 
the last time she was able to buy milk She just 
hopes no one gets sick. There is no aspirin in the 
house; nothing to treat frequent bouts of 
diarrhea. The only thing resembling medicine is 
a small, blue jar of Vicks Vap-o-Rub. 

“If we have to see die doctor. Marcelo first 
has to ask the patron for a loan,” she said. ‘ ‘Then 
we hope we don't have to see the doctor again 
soon.” 

For both Mrs. Hernandez and Mrs. Sanchez, 
even the modest government assistance would 
be agreai help, and they supported ihe idea of the 
women's controlling die money instead of the 
more usual custom of leaving everything to the 
men. 

But even a brief visit to the village finds seeds 
of discontent. A pregnant and clearly annoyed 
young woman, walking with a young child and 
an older woman, asked visitors why she had not 
been included on the list for assistance when she 
obviously qualified. No one had an answer. 

The poverty and desperation of Macuila seem 
a world a pan from the positive signs coining out 
of Mexico's economy. Just days before the Pro- 
gresa program was unveiled Aug. 6, Finance 
Minister Guillermo Ortiz Martinez announced 
that Mexico had so regained investor confidence 
that it could refinance S6 billion worth of loans at 
lower interest rates in the open market. 

Mr. Ortiz said 495,000 jobs had been created 
in first six months of this year. The peso, at 7.7 to 
the dollar, is thought by some analysts to have 
gotten so strong that it mig ht now be overvalued. 
The inflation rate is down to 19.7 percent from 
31 percent a year ago, contract wage increases 
often exceed the rate of inflation, direct foreign 
investment is flowing into Mexico at a brisk 
pace, and for the first time since the devaluation, 
consumer buying power has stopped declining. 

“People are not going to have their pur- 
chasing power restored by the end of this year, 
with respect to the situation before the crisis,” 
Mr. Ortiz said in an interview. “But at least real 
wages are not deteriorating anymore, and they 're 
beginning to improve. People will feel better in 
relative terms with respect to last year, but not 
quite what they were two years ago.” 

It is hard to see where that extra money is 
going, except for spending ou luxury items by 
die most wealthy Mexicans, who were never 
really hurt by the devaluation. 

“Statistics are one thing, but the practical 
reality is that Mexicans will not feel recovery' this 
year,” said Francisco Alvarado, an economist 
with the Mexican Institute of Political Studies. 

When he announced the Progresa program 
here in the state of Hidalgo. Mr. Zedillo said it 
reflected “the human face of the economy.” 

But to Marcelo Cespedes Marin, even when 
things appear to get better, Mexico’s economy _ 
can be even more heartless than before. " 

The patrones, he said, might now give five 
days work one week, but then cut back to two or 
three the next week- choosing among a surplus of 
laborers. They now pay about 53.80 for an eight- 
hour day, instead of S3.20. which is good, he 
said. But where before they gave parched work- 
ers two bottles of soda a day. they do not now, in 
effect taking back even that small raise. 

“Here," he said, standing beside his tumble- 
down shack “things don’t change.” 


SJt's 

(Jour Gull 

at The Elizabeth, 
a stylish boutique hotel 
located in the heart of 
Orchard Road, Singapore. 

In celebration of our 

4th Anniversary 

we are giving 
* free upgrades and 
* ^hagenuk CilobalHandy 
mobile phones 
when you stay 
with us between 
16 Jane to 16 December, 
at the rate of 

SSI 75 . 00 ++- per night vrith A lib 

* Conditions Apply 

For enquiries and reservations, 
please fax 

( 65 > 732 3866 

or call 

< 65 ) 739 8012 / 13 / 14 


g^hti, 

24 Mount Elizabeth, Singapore 2285 iS. 
Internet : hun://v,w-v.-.iar<iust.a>n.sp'«'.«tck 
E-mail : dizraiprtifpadfiu.nct.sg 

A member of Far East Organization 




• bnfli-in power antenna 
■ low radiation 

The Global H a nd y fay 

-hagenuk 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Fires Force Closing of Italian Coastal Route 


Paris Issues Air Pollution Warning 

PARIS (AFP) — Paris authorities warned people with 
respiratory problems to take special care Tuesday after air 
pollution reached Level 2 in a three-level scale. 

The ozone level over Paris increased amid continuing high 
temperatures and little wind, despite relatively light traffic in 
the holiday period, said Airparif, which monitors Paris air. 

On Sunday and Monday pollution reached Level 1. At 
Level 2 people with breathing problems are advised to refrain 
from stressful activities, while at Level 3 special traffic- 
reducing measures are introduced by law. 

Clean-Up of Pyramids Area Starts 

CAIRO (AFP) — Egypt on Tuesday launched the second 
phase of its project to spruce up and develop the Giza plateau, 
home to the pyramids and the sphinx. Culture Minister Faruq 
Hosni said. 

The Supreme Council of Antiquities will also open 10 ancient 
tombs on the plateau, Mr. Hosni was quoted as saying by the 
Egyptian news agency MENA 

A ring-road is to be built around the Giza plateau, illegal 
buildings on the plateau will be destroyed and camels and 
horses will be relocated. The work will last a year and will cost 
up to 35 million pounds, ($10 million), Mr. Hosni said. 

Portuguese-governed Macau on Tuesday announced a 
sharp drop in tourism coinciding with a wave of violence 
linked to gangster wars. (Reuters) 

Nearly all of Italy’s museums, an galleries and arche- 
ological sires will stay open over the Assumption Day holiday 
this weekend, the Culture Ministry said T uesday. (AFP) 


Reuters 

AMALFI, Italy — Wild forest fires 
blazed along Italy’s picturesque Amalfi 
coast Tuesday, and police temporarily 
closed the cliffside road after rock falls. 

Firefighters on land and in heli- 
copters worked all morning to douse 


flames. The blaze spread, toppling large 
rocks onto the highway. Police closed a 
15-kjJomerer (nine -mile) section be- 
tween Amalfi and Salerno for two hours 
ahead of a long holiday weekend when 
millions of people were expected to 
head for the sea. 


Iranian Leader 
Faces a Battle 
On Moderates 
In His Cabinet 


tit Ovr Sarff Fnmi OwfWaArj 

TEHRAN — The president of Iran. 
Mohammed Khatami, named a 22-men^ 
ber cabinet Tuesday, including two mod- 
erates whose selection appeared to set 
the stage for a showdown debate and 
vote in Parliament 

President Khatami, who is regarded as 
a moderate himself, sent a list of his 
nominees for approval to the 270-men} 1 : 
ber Parliament, which is dominated by 
Islamic hard-liners. 

Still reeling from the defeat of their' 
leader in the May 23 presidential race, 
che hard-liners have threatened to veep 
some of Mr. Khatami's most contro- 
versial choices. 

First on their list is Ataollah Mohajer- 
ani, a former vice president who was 
criticized for an article three years ago in 
which be called for direct talks with 
Washington despite Iran's bitter rehu 
tionship with the United States. 

Mr. Khatami nominated him to head 
the Ministry of Culture and Islamic 
Guidance, which controls newspaper^ 
magazines, television and the film in- 
dustry. 

In addition, the hard-liners want con- 
trol over foreign policy and are quite 
likely to try to block Kamal Kharom, 
Mr. Khatami's choice for foreign min- 
ister, on the ground that he has studied in 
the United States. ' 1 

A Tehran newspaper suggested that 
anyone who has lived in the United 
States was not an appropriate choice. 

If he is approved. Mr. Khairazi, the 
Iranian ambassador to the United Na- 
tions, would replace Ali Akbar Velayafi, 
who has held the Foreign Ministry po- 
sition since 1 981. 

In any case, foreign policy is largely 
controlled by the Iranian supreme leader, 
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, limiting the 
role of the minister and president 

Another contentious nominee is 
dollah Nouri, who as the interior minister ’ 
would be responsible for Mr. Khatami*^ 
expected drive to ease the social re- 
strictions that have been in force since 
the 1979 Islamic revolution. 

The government dictates what Irani- 
ans can watch on television, how women 
must dress in public and whether men 
and women can socialize. 

The clerics have kept women out of 
government 

Despite expectations, there were no 
women ministers in Mr. Khatami's pro- 
posed cabinet 1 

But newspapers have reported that a 
U.S.-educated woman, Massoumeb 
Ebtekari would be nominated to be vice 
president for environmental affairs. 

The speaker of Parliament^ Ali Akbar, 
Nateq-Noiiri, said the 270-member . 
sembiy would start debating the nom- 
inations next Tuesday and vote the fol-. 
lowing day. 

Diplomats and analysis saw his list of 
22 ministers as one of compromise on the 
politically sensitive positions of intel- 
ligence, foreign affairs and defense, but 
also as a clear signal of change in do- 
mestic policy. 

Every nomination is required to be;, 
approved by a majority of lawmakers- 
The hard-liners can veto a nominee Jure-; 
ing the president to name another can-! 
didate. 

But Mr. Khatami can appoint a care- 
taker minister of his choice for a period 
of six months. 

Mr. Khatami won die support of 20 
million voters, or 70 percent of the elec-; 
torate, in the election to replace President 
Hashemi Rafsanjani. (AP, Reuters ) 


WEATHER 


Europe 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided fay Accu Weather. Asia 



ToBT 



HVpti 

Cow IK 

H*gh 

Low* 


C/F 

Cff 

Cff 

Cff 

AFjarv* 

30/86 

13/86 » 

31(88 2170 b 

Amsfentem 

XMU 

lft«4pc 

?*75 

15/56 pc 

Ankara 

22/71 

12/53 c 

2170 

13(65 r 

Adwrei 

2S/77 

2 ! 70 pc 

2475 2088 sh 

BoicvVMtn 

26(79 

19/86 s 

27/80 21/70 s 

Belyado 

17V0 

1356 pc 

2»*4 

14157s 

B«*i 

29/84 

1V66 3 

30/86 

10*04 pc 

Brussels 

2VB4 

17 82 pc 

25/77 

16/59 pc 

BudflJHHl 

29/84 

16/61 s 

WS6 

1 8/64 s 

Copenhagen 

27/90 

18 64 s 

2H/K: 

17-82 pc 

CoeuDnISo 

30TO 

13*66 * 

31. 88 

20(68 * 

Dubs.-! 

21/70 

1*57 pc 

22/71 

1 6/59 S/1 

Edhinnn 

24/75 

I3rttsh 

23/73 

14/67C 

Ftorarce 

3086 

17 62 pc 

»91 

18/64 s 

FranHuH 

2*84 

17(82 » 

30-06 

17(62 pc 

Germs 

2SHJ4 

1*57 sh 

2*79 

1*57 pc 

MetMi*/ 

1BW4 

9/4Bpc 

17/82 

7/44 pc 

Istanbul 

2170 

iaw r 

22i7l 

17-62 Sll 

Her 

2373 

l»53pc 

2373 

13/55 pc 

LwsPainw 

27/80 

217D * 

27/80 20*66 B 

LrJvm 

27(80 

19(64 » 

29*64 

1 WM r. 

London 

27/60 

1661 pc 

2577 

16*1 pc 

Morbid 

37198 

10/84 5 

37/S8 

18/84 s 

UaftHce 

29(84 

16 H 1 s 

29/B4 

10-64 r. 

Milan 

32(89 

1 8*4 i 

J2'M 

I9nwpc 

Uoscou 

l»/6fl 

12(63 s 

13*64 

7*44 pc 

Mur«h 

26/79 

14/57 * 

26/79 

i*57 pc 

Me* 

29/84 

2271 pe 

29/04 

22/71 a 

Oslo 

2S7B 

16/61 pc 

26-77 

15/59 s 

Pans 

27/80 

14/57 pc 

2577 

1**57 s 

PragiiB 

29/84 

16*61 * 

30/00 

14/57 pc 

FteytgavA 

21.70 

15/M C 

17/02 

12(63 e 

t*3» 

23/73 

12/53 I 

22*71 

13/55 pc 

Roms 

ivk 

17182 s 

2*64 

10*04 S 



Hajuy 

Jetstream KSS3 LCSJq "" fVVXI BPM 

North America Europe Asia 

Thunderstorms and heavy Mostly eunrtv and very Sunny and hoi Item north- 
Mins mil soak northern warm to hoi in Madrid and eastern China 10 
New England and the Mar- Rome, and across most rj Manchuria and northern 
mme provinces Thuisday sourhem Europe London Korea, but I hunder storms 
and Fndgy, but Ihe rest ot and Pans will be warm with will rumble across eastern 
New England and the some sunshine Thursday Mongolia and north-central 
Northeast will be sunny ihrough Friday, but Scot- Chine ComloriaDle with 
and nice. Hot across Ihe land will have showeis some sunshine in Tokyo 
South with thunderstorms Showers are also likely in Thursday to Saturday, 
along me Gull Coast, but southern Germany, but Seating rainj are likely 
sunny ana dry In the West sunny and nice In tha along the coast ol China 
north. south or Shanghai. 



Today 


High 

Low'd* 


Cff 

Cff 

« maiv 

28/82 

13/55 i 

Sab 

30*86 

19*66 S 

Ban^luA 

32/ as 

24/75 r 

Sava 

MW7 

23(73 s 

P-UWKjtu 

2882 

24/75 r 

Calcutta 

J2/M 

25/77 r 

Chung Ma 

J1/» 

2271 r 

Cutout*. 

27/00 

25/77 r 

Henca 

33*31 

27*80 6 

HoCNMmn 

31 88 

2V-*D r 

Hong Kong 

M/88 

25/77 Ui 

btonubaa 

32/ 08 

23/73 1 

Jakarta 

3 WHO 

2271 pc 

Kaiaetn 

12/09 

26/79 pc 

K. Lumpur 

31/88 

22(71 ill 

AKnatuhi 

31/88 

22(71 pc 

Manila 

J1/B8 

73-73 c 

Nan Delhi 

34/93 

25/77 pc 

Phnom PariFi 

32(89 

23/73 r 

PteAei 

12-89 

24/75/ 

Rangoon 

30/82 

23*73 r 

Seom 

32(09 

20/68 c 

Shanghai 

30(86 

2678 ah 

sng«ip« 

30*86 

21/70 eh 

Taipei 

32/89 

2679 r 

Tokyo 

32/89 

26/79 pc 

Vtonbane 

28/84 

22*71 r 


Tomorrow 
High LowW 
OF OF . 
32*88 17*21 
29*04 1WJ5» 
Site 2A7J - 

iwi zsms 

28/82 3*75 f 
3143 tUI 5> 
SOW 22-7 T sd 
t» B 1 3*75 r 
JWI ZTiBB i 
31i« 2173i 
JYBS 25/77 C 
38*7 MiTSi 
2844 2271 pc 
32*9 SWTSpc 
31* 2271 jk 
30* SB7' P® 
294* 2373 i 
35*5 zerspc 
31* 23i73i 
■aim 24/75 Sh 

28.-82 23/73 r 

32/89 20* » 
3146 3*75 6/1- 
29/ B* 21/70 6 
32/89 25/79 V 
2V82 £2716 
29* 22/rt'Ji 


*> 


Africa 




TBG 


wwwJhotelgnide.com 

book directly - save money worldwide. 

TUG - The Hotel Guide AG, Switzerland 
Fax; + 41 41 379 09 29 E-mail: tfig@hotelguidexh 



Sl Parareburg 1086 8/48 r 

SoddiDfen 22/71 1.I/S7 pc 

amrtoug 31 * 17*2 a 

Tsitm 19*6 10*50 PC 

Th*ol 3249 20 MB pc 

Vanes 28*2 18W4 pc 

Vienna 2tfB* 17*2 a 

Warn™ 2740 14/57 * 

Zurich 2842 16*1 « 


1&61 7/4* pe 

2170 14/57 pe 
2740 16*1 r 
iayj 9/48 pc 

31* 18*4 pe 
2WB4 lewepc 
30*8 17.82 pc 
2B*B l*/57 % 
24/75 16*9 «h 


North America 


Middle East 


AtmOhab 

BmU 

Can 

Demise <a 

Jerusalem 

Luo* 

Rrwdti 


44/111 28. 82 s 
24/75 18*4 1 
33*1 1948 s 
3148 liSSs 
25/77 1243 s 
42/107 20*8 b 
44/11 1 24/75 B 


44/111 28*21 
2*75 18*4 s 
36*97 21/70 s 
31*8 12/53 * 
£3/77 13/55* 
42*107 21/70* 
*3.109 24/7SS 


Anchorage 
AUsnra 
Boston 
Ctnagpp 
(lata* 

Denver 
DatnM 
hmMu 
Ha/oton 
Loa Angelas 
Mia/n 

Legend: s-sunnv. pc-parity cloudy, c-etoudr. ffienomm whundareMriro. r-ran. sa-s/wv* Humes, 
sn-s/ww. ►*». W-WMtw, AU map*, forecast* and data provWed by ActaiWeMher. Inc. 01097 


(UgMre 
Cepe Toon 
Casablanca 
Harare 


»B4 I &61 s 
17/82 9/48 c 

28162 22*7i * 
2373 IE'S pc 


30*8 1792 s 
17*1 9I4« 
ZB/64 22171 s 
2373 USE/ pc 


Today 





Lagos 

27/00 

22*71 c 

27/80 22*71 r - 

Mpft 


Hloh 

Low W 


High 

LewW 

High 

Lower 

NnsoN 

24/75 


»79 

11/52 4- 


Cff 

Cff 

Cff 


Cff 

Cff 

Cff 

Cff 

Tuns 

airaa 

le/oi s 

30*8 

i-/e: s 

17/82 

11/5? sh 

19 /ee 

H.-OJ pc 


21(70 

9/48 e 

22*71 

13(59 pc 







21. *70 pc 

32-89 

21(70 1 

Mom rail 

19-B6 

9/48 r 

1066 

IKS eh 






24*75 

16/61 

Nassau 

32-89 

24(75 pc 

31-88 

24*75 pc 






23173 

1355 pc 

22-71 

J4I57 pc 

New York 

23*82 

21(701 

29*84 

26*08 pc 

Buenos dees 

22/71 


21.70 

a *48 r 



3* S3 

23 (71 pc 

Orlond-i 

33*91 

23/731 

33-91 

23/73 pc 




26/79 2<W8 pc 


1*571 

30*06 

13/55 pr 

PtirsmU 

41-107 

27.-00 a 

Jl/166 

27/80 1 





16(61 s 


’0*50 sh 

21*70 

13/66 pc 

Son Fran 

2V73 

13-55 a 

24/75 

14.57 pc 





1355c 



31.06 

22/71 pc 

Sm*» 

31 S9 

16.-61 s 

37,00 

14-57 pe 






24/75 pc 

34/93 

23.73 pc 

Tamo 

2171 

6/46 r 

1SV66 

9-48 pc 





235 i* 

29*04 

16/61 3 

30*06 

17*62 pc 

Vancouver 

27.-00 

14-57 pc 

2.-4/7S 

1601 PC 






3391 


32*09 

25*77 pc 

W.ishm-JWn 

32-09 

21701 

30*86 

10 66 pc 


— ■ 


1 



Oceania 


4 


Auckland 

Sydwr, 


14/57 

20/48 


12.53 

18*1 


337i 

»U8< 


A two-month trial 
subscription. 
Save up to 60 % 

Try a special, law cost 2-month trial subscription to the 
International Herald Tribune to enjoy delivery to your 
home or office every morning AND save up to 60% off 
the newsstand price. 


| COUNTRT/CURRENCT 

1 . . 

2 MONTHS 
j NEWSSTAND 
PRICE 

2 MONTHS 
OFFER 
i PRICE 

1 AUSTRIA 

ATS : 

1.4 56 ! 

650 

* BELGIUM/LUX EM 8. 

BEF : 

3.330 ■ 

1.350 

i DENMARK 

DKK , 

7 SO 

360 

1 Finland 

F1M ' 

624 ! 

310 

i F FIANCE 

FF 

520 

210 

* GERMANY 

DEM ; 

! 82 * 

72 

; GRJiAT BRITAIN 

C 1 

47 | 

22 

: HONG KONG 

HKS j 

676 | 

284 

1 ITALY 

nr 

145,600 

58.000 

1 JAPAN 

* 1 

26,000 ! 

12,150 

! MALAYSIA 

RM j 

182 ! 

101 

1 NETHERLANDS 

NLG * 

!<?s : 

7S 

. NORWAY 

NOK . 

£32 : 

390 

! Singapore 

ss 

146 

82 

j Spain 

PTAS : 

11,700 ! 

5,000 

SWEDEN 

SEK ; 

832 ; 

3S0 


SWTTZIRLAND CHF i 

USA S : 78 

"Tor other countries, please contact 


7 MONTHS DISCOUNT , 

OFFER | OFF 

PRICE ) COVER PRICE 
*50 55% 

1.350 </0% 

360 54*o 

3 1 0 so*.; 

210 60% | 

72 60% I 

22 53% 

234 57%. 

58.000 60% 

12,150 53-, i 

101 44% | 

7S ( 60*'. 

390 53% ! 

82 I 4-3% 

5,000 | £7% 

3S0 SS% 

66 60% I 

33 1 585. ■ 

TOUR NEAREST IHT OFFICE 


1 Yes. I wouH like to Mart receiving rfw International Herald Tribune 
J □ My check ii endwed (payable la the IHT) 

I Charge my- D Arnex O Diner* □ VISA □ Access □ MasterCard O Eurocard 
I For ex-US and Asicei prices oecfil cards will bo ch a rged in French Frcaics <st q/rrent rotes 

I Cord No:_ 


.Exp Dole., 


5<gnaAire.. 


| For business order*, indicate ycyr VAT No , 


Mr/Mn/Ms Family Nome:. 


First Name:. 


I 

| MoilngAcUmss , 
| City/Code- 


■ Job Tide: . 


Country 

Home 7e/No 

E-Mail Address 1 . 


.Business let No: 


1 gal this copy al ihe IHT or □ kiosk O hotel DoiHine □ other 
0 I do not wish lo receive information from ofocr corefoUy screened compa ni es 
Mai/ or fa* fp Inte mo tfonoJ Herald Tribune 


13-8-97 


l IHT VAT Number FR7873202 1 1 26) 


EUROPE, MIDDLE EAST & AFRICA 

hades ch Gaulfo 01521 NeuiDy Cede/ 

4143 93 6) 


r Cede*. France 


181 Avn Charles de Gaulfo 92J21 Neuill 
Fax. +33 1 41 43 92 10 Tel *33 1 
_ THE AMERICAS 

850 Third Avenue. New York, N Y. 10022-6275, USA 
Few +1 212 755 6785 lei [toll foee) 1-800-882-28841 
ASIA 

7/F Malaysia Bldg, 50 Gloveester Rd. Wondiai. hong Kong 
Fa*. *8572922 11 99. W. t852 2922 1171 
E-Mail: sufes*Whf-co/TT Assert aubshk&hthlcxom 


Offer valid fo> new Subscribers only HA7M j 


& 


Imprimcpar Offprint. TS rue dc CEvtmvtf. "50 IS Pam 




San 

Y *<*5 , u 

?»C 





fT 3 w^I 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1997 


KACLi 


THE AMERICAS 


PAGE 3 


Costly White House Visit 
Left Tribe Empty-Handed 

New Notch in Annals of Aggressive Fund-Raising 


By Don Van Natta Jr. 

AVi» fort Times Sen ire 


It was the tribe’s idea to contribute $100.- 
000. after a local lawyer suggested ihat a large 


panv at a WhiS w™ " imse,f in hcadv com- ficiais said. 

Alone with House lu ,ncheon. More than a year later, the tribe is still 

bi°cSmnW s L e !f CUliVes of a handftl of wairin S 10 Set good news from Washington 
airff ? was s emn s to make his about the land. 

Chance he a " d 5 his was 7 lie Cheyenne-Arapaho tribe was not the 

acres (3 300 hS ’/u of 7,500 group ar that luncheon in the Blue Room 

the ye* s) ?. orn hjs mhc 1351 .ve^ *at gave $50,000 for each guest 

than a for rai,tary use more , Executives of several big companies were 

man a centuiy ago. also there and at least twn RnrlinVmn Mnrth. 



: v " H* 

r - ••• 


^ 4 : ' 


■ ' ' ' ■■ f 3 

• •. •* - v -sraM* 

Ip..- • , ,'^ r # . 





1 




ft 4T* 


i r -TA - U S U - 

"tf«^“ 0 . rm ? ule * President Bill Clinton 
.« mtem| y ** Mr- Surveyor, chairman of 
the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma, 
described his impoverished people's 50-year 
struggle to regain their sacred and enormous- 
ly valuable land. 

- Ln an interview on the reservation near 
Concho, Oklahoma, Mr. Surveyor recalled 
that Mr. Clinton had looked him square in the 
eye and said: ‘'We'll see what we can do to 
help you." 

t « se 7ew word ? of encouragement led the 
II, 000-member tribe to keep its pledge to 
contribute Si 00.000 to the Democratic Na- 
tional Committee. 

The money was nearly 18 months of the 
tribe's bingo earnings. 

The tribe’s first political contribution, and 
the flow of other donations to an event that 
OP* fund-raiser described as an “intimate 
• i White House luncheon,” is now being crit- 
V icized by Senate Republicans investigating 
■ possible campaign finance abuses. 

Though the money was later returned, and 
the president took no action on the land, the 
Republicans call it one of the most explicit 
examples of the aggressive role the White 
House played in Democratic Party fund-rais- 
ing in 1 996. 

Unlike the slightly larger fund-raising cof- 
fee gatherings that have drawn wide attention, 
the luncheon Mr. Surveyor attended had only 
seven guests. 

*' At the coffee events, the president would 
speak broadly about a variety of issaes. 
y/hereas at the luncheon, some guests said, 
they were able to raise specific issues with the 
president. 

- Though Mr. Clinton "made no promises” 
to his tribe, Mr. Surveyor said he returned to 
the reservation, a half hour's drive west of 
Oklahoma City, so overcome with joy that he 
vyas nearly speechless. 

v Michael Copperthite, a Democratic Party 
t campaign manager and consultant, said: 
‘‘They went back to Oklahoma thinking they 
were walking among the gods.” 

' Mr. Copperthite has tried since December 
to help die tribe reclaim the land from the 
Department of Agriculture. It includes un- 
marked graves, ritual dance grounds and an 
estimated $500 million in oil and gas re- 
serves. 


also there and at least two, Burlington North- 
ern and Santa Fe Railway Co., and Fidelity 
Investments, contributed $50,000 each to the 
Democratic National Committee. 

A third company. Beneficial Corp., a fi- 
nancial services company, gave $100,000. 

Executives from all three corporations 
denied that their contributions were condi- 
tional on promises from Mr. Clinton. QUITO CUTOFF — M 

Mr. Surveyor said tbat a Democratic Party 

fund-raiser. Michael Turpin, told him a week 
before the luncheon that if the tribe con- 
tributed $100,000, it would be given an op- Cj n 

jXKTunity to voice its request directly to Mr. 

A Philadelphia businessman, Peter But- ^ 

tenwieser. has said that Terry McAuliffe. the <s uTZZZ 

Clinton-Gore finance chairman, tried to sell ?£ heF c S \ WrCT1 

him a seat at the table for the same lunch for a — c " ~.. ’ r — ^ 

$50,000 campaign contribution. NEW YORK — For 

“1 would not. under any circumstances, nearly a year. 1 8-wheel trail- 
pay $50,000, or any stipu Jared amount, to er trucks' driven by seasoned 
break- bread with President Clinton,*' Mr. truckers recruited in 
Buttenwieser wrote in a June 20. 1996, letter Michigan, have been rolling 
to Mr. McAuliffe. northward from the Mexican 

“Luncheon, yes. Luncheon for a contri- border to New York, deliv- 
bution price, nof ” ering tons of concealed co- 

Mr. McAuliffe, asked about this in an caine and marijuana and car- 
interview, said: ‘ ‘If the thousands upon thou- rying back millions of dollars 



' if 

*» s-'fil ?*;..;** 


wfc u.'- ^ ■ ■■ * .. 



| QUITO CLTOFF — Members of Ecuadoran indigenous groups blocking a road in a c ontinuing national protest against thegovernmenL 

Sweep Snares 29 Members of Mexican Drug Ring 


Michigan, have been rolling 
northward from the Mexican 
border to New York, deliv- 
ering tons of concealed co- 
caine and marijuana and car- 
rying back millions of dollars 


sands of people whom I called for money, if in illegal drug profits, 
one person misinterpreted what 1 said, then so Federal officials said the 

be it” truckers were dispatched by 

Lanny Davis, White House special coun- Mexico’s most powerful 
sel, denied that fund-raisers had established a drug trafficking syndicate, 
“financial requirement” to attend a White once beaded by the late 
House lunch. He said the president routinely Amado Cariilo Fuentes, 
listened to concerns of people attending which set out to seize a share 
luncheons and coffees at the white House. of the New York market, the 
“I would say, as a general matter, that it country's most lucrative, 
would not be surprising for the president to even when it meant en- 
tisten to a concern expressed by a visitor.” croaching on territory that 
Mr. Davis said. "The president would often was the domain of Colom- 
express sympathy or, at the very least, prom- bian drag cartels, 
ise to look into the matter raised.” On Monday, federal law 

After die tribe's contribution was reported enforcement officials put a 
last March, the Democratic National Com- crimp in the smuggling op- 
mittee quickly announced that it was return- eration by arresting 29 
ing the donation, which it said had not been people in sweeps from the 
reported to the Federal Election Commission New York region to Battle 
because of an oversight Creek, Michigan, to Al- 

Commirtee leaders said they returned die buquerque. New Mexico. In 
money because they wanted to be clear there announcing the arrests, the 
was no link between a donation and a fair federal officials provided a 
hearing on the return of tribal lands. clearer picture of the scope 


■ Clinton’s Entourage 
Tightens Its Belt 

- WASHINGTON — Even as he tar- 
geted congressional waste with his new 

- line-item veto. President Bill Clinton 
“ has been forced to use more old-fash- 

- ioned executive powers to throttle bade 
‘ on the jet-setting travel expenses of his 

own White House staff. 

As a result of a new crackdown, 
fewer aides are allowed to accompany 
Mr. Clinton on Air Force One. Other 
f aides have not been sent to out-of- 
i ■ town conferences, and the advance 
j" teams that handle the logistics of pres- 
idential visits have to cope with smal- 
lp ler staffs and less time on the ground. 
The restrictions were imposed in 
spring when it became evident that the 

White House was close to exhausting its 
L $SI4;000 annual staff travel budget by 
the Sept. 30 end of the fiscal year with- 
, out any cushion for the unexpected. 

“ We just decided we were going to 

tighten our belt and make sure we had 

enough to do everything he wanted to 
do,” said John Podesta, the deputy 
! -■ chief of staff who instituted the limits. 
The White House had enough cash to 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Congress for permission to handle the 
shortfall, an experience dial no one in 
die administration is eager to repeat. 

As it was, some Republicans took 
the news of the travel budget woes, first 
reported in U.S. News & World Re- 

C as another indication of a White 
se beset with financial problems. 
“This is not inconsistent with the way 
they spend money on other things at the 
White House,” said Ron Foreman, a 
spokesman for Jim Kolbe, die Ari- 
zonan who heads a House oversight 
panel that has been exploring soaring 
overtime costs at the write House and 
promoting new restrictions on White 
House spending on political activities. 

According to the White House press 
secretary, Michael McCuny. die Clin- 
tons have been among those concerned 
about (he ballooning entourages that 
follow them around the country. Mr. 
McCuny attributed the sizable trav- 
eling parties to “bracket creep and 
people taking seriously the inflated 
titles tbat they’ve been given.’’ 

The account under scrutiny pays for 
the travel, food and lodging of the 
policy advisers, advance aides and 


guilty in federal coun io knowingly 
accepting more than $230,000 in il- 
legal campaign contributions from 
corporate and foreign donors. Judge 
Richard Paez ordered the California 
Republican and his wife, June, to re- 
turn to coun Oci. 23 for sentencing. 

Under an agreement negotiated with 
prosecutors, Mr. Kim pleaded guilty to 
three misdemeanor violations of federal 
election law while Mrs. Kim pleaded 
guilty to two misdemeanors. Mr. Kim 
also entered guilty pleas to five felonies 
on behalf of his fund-raising arm, the 
Jay Kim far Congress Committee, bur 
he will not be held personally respon- 
sible for those crimes. 

The couple face a maximum six 
months in prison and $635,000 in 
fines, according to the plea agreement, 
and the campaign committee could be 
fined as much as $2.5 million. 

In accepting their pleas. Judge Paez 
made clear that he was not legally 
bound by the agreement. 

He warned the Kirns tbat he could 
impose a sriffer punishment against 
which they were waiving their right of 
appeal. (LAT) 


spokesmen who travel around the y /TT 

country. But it does not include over- (jUOtef ijTlQUOt& 
seas trips, the operating costs of Air ^ z 

Force One or the expenses of support Carol Browner, administra: 
personnel such as physicians and Environmental Protection Agi 
Secret Service agents. (WP) fending its plan to put pollutioi 


nav for claimed trips, he said, bur the Force One or the expenses or suppon 

» SidA. « Sied upon for un- WP, 

^ - anticipated excursions, such as visiting Secret Service agents. f 

' "on Guilty Pleas Entered 

travel 6 budget ^onctT tog M T SS- LOS ANGELES — Representaflve 
ron -l tetrenn and was forced to ask Jay Kim and tus wtfa have pleaded 


Carol Browner, administrator of the 
Environmental Protection Agency, de- 
fending its plan to put pollution data on- 
line: * “I believe in me eDd that thepublic 
can always be trusted with information. 
They are far brighter and more so- 
phisticated than, unfortunately, some in 
industry give than credit for.” (HYTl 


libel on the World Wide Web 

Columnist Retracts, but Clinton Aide Is Planning to Sue 


* By Howard Kurtz 

U ur bington Pm Service — 

; WASHINGTON -AWWteHouse 


“We don’t want a retraction,” he 
continued. “This is drivel. This is 
garbage. We intend to prove there isn ta 
shied of truth in that report 

Mr. Biumenthal and his wife, Jac- 


Away From Politics 

• A Virginia woman who said she was 

sexually harassed by officials of the 
Federal Law Enforcement Training 
Center in Brunswick, Georgia, has won 
a $672,000 verdict from a federal dis- 
trict court jury. (WP) 

• An environmental group contends 


tightened 

’ Xto comment. . . . , a ^ taKlL 

The columnist. Mat ^ The publication and retraction in just 

^WdewttXsJhisreportSm- tronaute 


operates a one-uuu “r. r*" rtSim . 24 horns — and a resumes » 
^dWideWeb.bas^fesreportS^ ^ ^ undersco, 

day on anonymous sourc - dangers of unverified gosstpwt 

Iff ? eid » Je Dffff s j** 


• The space shuttle Discovery’s as- 
tronauts took more and better pho- 
tographs of the Hale-Bopp comet using 
a new small ultraviolet telescope. fAPj 


Monday E5£t »fc conservative 

tb President Bill Clinton- *iJP9 * w ^ 0 does not claim to be a journalist. 


tb President cm ~ effectively 

abuse past that has been eftecn eiy 


se past ^ 
srea up.’ 


wiiw uuw _ - - ■ r__ 

has admitted publishing wro^S ^ 5™" 
matron in the past, such as 


C ' 0 »e S aidMon f yni« ™“^^ W onld b e 
S/h^s^oTne. ^■The re= c^- 

srory was issued in good were by Amenca Onlme, rc«^y mad^ 

based on two sources y Virion” news by publicizing .j noma) inrirfenr 


Lpi«”d »w3rfiy arrempr 

political assassination. 


• Stricter border enforcement has re- 
sulted in more deaths among illegal 
immigrants trying to cross into the 
United States from Mexico, say re- 
searchers who counted 1,185 border 
deaths from 1993 to 1996. (AP) 

• The only officer among six women 
to accuse the array’s highest-ranking 
enlisted soldier of sexual misconduct 
testified at a hearing that he proposi- 
tioned her on two occasions. (ATT) 


and exteat of the Mexican 
push into the New York re- 
gion and the pervasive role of 
the Cariilo Fuentes syndic- 
ate. 

“We find them not just in 
Los Angeles and Housioq 
and Chicago but in the New 
York. City metropolitan 
area.” said Thomas Con- 
stantine. the head of the Drug 
Enforcement Administra- 
tion. 

Monday’s sweeps were 
not the first involving die 
Mexican syndicate, and law 


enforcement officials say 
that their battle with the Mex- 
ican traffickers is far from 
over. Since December, at 
least 61 other suspects have 
been arrested around the 
country. 

Federal agents have seized 
more than 1 1 tons of cocaine, 
almost 7 tons of marijuana 
and more than SI 8 million in 
drag profirs that traffickers 
failed to smuggle back into 
Mexico. Officials promised 
Monday that more arrests 
would follow. 


The arrests highlighted the 
latest strategic shift by Mex- 
ican drug barons, who have 
graduated from transporting 
cocaine and heroin for the 
Colombians to distributing 
much of die drugs them- 
selves.. 

By demanding up to half 
of what they smuggled as 
payment from the Colombi- 
ans, the Mexicans carved out 
their own markets on the 
West Coast, in the Southwest 
and in parts of the Midwest. 
Until recently, they had left 


the East to the Colombians 
and their Dominican distrib- 
utors. 

The crackdowns have hit 
the Cariilo Fuentes syndic- 
ate, the largest of four Mex- 
ican trafficking organiza- 
tions. when it” has yet to 
recover from the death of its 
leader, Amado Cariilo 
Fuentes. 42. He died early 
last month, apparently from a 
heart attack, after undergoing 
liposuction and plastic sur- 
gery at a Mexican clinic to 
alter his appearance. 


Tortured Life for Argentina Torturer 

Military Man, a Symbol of the ‘Dirty War,’ Is Often Beaten Up on Street 


By Calvin Sims 

Atrn- York Times Sen icr 

BUENOS AIRES — On 
his way to a meeting in the 
tidy Palermo district here last 
week, Jorge Oscar Ocampo 
suddenly began shouting and 
swinging at a blond, baby- 
faced man who passed him 
on the street. 

“Why don’t you tonure 
me now?” Mr. Ocampo 
yelled at the man, whom he 
recognized as Alfredo Astiz, 
a retired navy captain, who 
Mr. Ocampo said had beaten 
and rortured his wife and 
child during the military dic- 
tatorship that ruled Argen- 
tina from 1976 to 1983. 

“When I saw who it was, 
despite the fact that he was 
covering his face, I hit out at 
him but didn’t manage to 
punch him,” said Mr. 
Ocampo, a member of the 
Peronisi party, which the 
military considered an en- 
emy. “I did what every other 
good Argentine would have 
done.” 

It was the second attack 
last week against Mr. Astiz, 
who, more than any other 
military man, has come to 
symbolize Argentina's 
“dirty war” of repression, in 
which as many as 30.000 
people were killed or “dis- 
appeared’ ’ at the hands of die 
security forces. Many of the 
victims were leftist guerril- 
las, people believed to be as- 
sociated with them, or others 
critical of the government. 

Despite the military’s pub- 
lic apology last year for 
“grave errors ” committed 
during the dictatorship, Ar- 
gentina still has not re- 
covered from the hatred of 
the repression, and many 
scholars say the issue will 
remain an open sore on so- 
ciety for many decades to 
come. 

Whether because of his 
distinguishing looks or the 
disturbing crimes tbat he was 
charged with committing, Mr. 
Astiz, 46. has suffered dozens 
of assaults in recent years by 
strangers on die street or 
people who say he tortured 
them or their relatives. 

Ml military officers and 
subordinates accused of 
planning and carrying our the 
killings, tortures, and disap- 
pearances of the “ditty war” 
have been pardoned by the 
government, and many now 
walk the streets without fear 
or incident, mainly because 
few people can identify 
them. 

Mr. Astiz, whose suspec- 
ted crimes were widely re- 
ported in die press, has never 
spoken publicly about that 
era, and associates say he will 
not do so. Friends in the mil- 
itary say be lives a tortured 
existence in which he is nev- 
er at ease for fear that he will 
be recognized and assaulted- 

Early last week, a group of 
angry teenagers — shouting, 
“Murderer!” and “Son of a 
whore!” — punched, 
kicked, and spat on Mr. Astiz 
after he showed up at a disco 


in Gualeguay. in Entire Rios 
Province in die north. 

Two years ago, Alfredo 
Chavez, a former prisoner at a 
secret detention center during 
the military dictatorship, 
pummeled Mr. Astiz after 
spotting him on vacation at 
the Andean ski resort of Bar- 
iloche in southern Argentina. 

Mr. Astiz sued Mr. Chavez, 
a municipal worker, but the 
courts dismissed the case, and 


honing because of their as- 
sociation with die guerrillas. 
Though Argentina brought 
military leaders to trial in the 
mid-1980s and imprisoned a 
number of the highest gen- 
erals, it passed a law that ex- 
empted junior officials from 
prosecution for human rights 
violations, arguing that they 
were following orders they 
could not disobey. 

And in 1990, the govem- 


Navy comrades sympathize with the 
officer’s plight because they believe he 
was only following the orders of the 
junta leaders. A navy captain said: "What 
can the poor guy do now? Get plastic 
surgery and go to live in the Fiji Islands?’ 


the Barilocbe City Council 
declared the former navy cap- 
tain persona non grata. Interi- 
or Minister Carlos Corach, a 
Peronisi, said last week that 
while he did not condone the 
attacks ^gainst Mr. Astiz, be 
sympathized with die assail- 
ants and with the govern- 
ment’s not providing Mr. As- 
tiz or any other human rights 
abuser with any extra secu- 
rity. 

“Imagine you were tor- 
tured orkidnapped during the 
military dictatorship, and, 
suddenly you see your tor- 
turer or kidnapper,” Mr. 
Corach said. 

Mr. Astiz, who is known in 
Argentina as the ‘ "blond angel 
of death,” has been accused 
of infiltrating human rights 
groups and kidnapping and 
killing two French nuns and a 
Swedish-Argentine teenager 
at the infamous Navy Mech- 
anics School in Buenos Aires, 
which was a center of de- 
tention and interrogation dur- 
ing military rule. 

In 1990, a French court sen- 
tenced Mr. Astiz in absentia to 
life in prison for the 1977 slay- 
ings of Sisrer Alice Damon 
and Sister Leonie Duquet, two 
French nuns whose bodies 
washed up on a beach near 
Buenos Aires two months 
after they were taken to the j 
mechanics school for qoes- j 


SMALL LUXURY HOTELS 
OF THE WORLD 


HOTEL CHATEAU 

GRAND BARRAIL 

LAMARZELLE FtGEAC 

Discover Saint Enulion vineyards 
from an elegant I Mjcefflioy chateau. 
28 iooms. GastroDomica] Restaurant. 
Ibnakea RsenMicn- 
la Pnnc r cdl tnll free 080090 75 10 
io Germany: eal] lull (ice 0130 81 89 12 
■d ay nitaer countr? - call Belpum 
4£Z*ft27S35SJI 


LffS English 

mm books 

[w|fn to «wrd«rtf 
ILsXSI to 7*12 «toy* 
3S0,tmttttB*netacUi*tmcat»log 
■feJ: +33(0)1 39 07 01 01 
Fasc +33 (0)1 39 070077 


ment of President Carlos Saul 
Menem pardoned all military 
officers who had been jailed, 
in a calculated move to pre- 
vent the army from staging 
any more coups. 

Human rights leaders said 
Argentina was using Mr. As- 
tiz as a scapegoat for the gov- 
ernment’s failure to ad- 
equately punish those 
responsible for abuses during 
the military dictatorship. 

“These acts of violence 
are the product of die im- 
potence felt by Argentine so- 
ciety and by victims that 
sometimes leads people to 
take justice into their own 


hands,” said Martin Abregu, 
director of the Center for Le- 
gal and Social Studies, a 
-leading human rights group. 
“The government has never 
properly dealt with this issue, 
because the perpetrators 
roam free.” 

Mr. Abregu said Mr. Astiz 
was being attacked because 
he refused to maintain a low 
profile like that adopted by 
many top military leaders 
who are never seen in pub- 
lic. 

“Finally, I think it is be- 
cause he represents the vilest 
kind of human rights violator 
— a person who would gain 
the affection of his victims to 
then betray them and kill 
them,” Mr. Abregu said, re- 
ferring to the tactics Mr. As- 
tiz had used to infiltrate 
groups like the Mothers of 
the Plaza de Mayo, which is 
composed of mothers whose 
children were killed or are 
still missing. 

Mr. Astiz’s navy com- 
rades said they sympathized 
with his plight because they 
believed that he had only 
been following the orders of 
the junta leaders, none of 
whom have been maligned in 
the same way. 

A navy captain who served 
with Mr. Astiz and insisted 
on anonymity said. “We all 
say: ’What can the poor guy 
do now? Get plastic surgery 
and go to live in the Fiji Is- 
lands?’ ” 


Under the High Patronage 
of HSU. the Sovereign Prince of Monaco 


// WimfflONAL \ 

f BIENNALE \ 
ANIIPBEALEBS 


AND ART 


MOM CARLO 

International Sporting Club 
Place du Casino 

From August 1st 
to the 17th, 1997 included 

(from 4.00 p.m. to 9.00 p.m.) 





PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HF.RAT.n TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13~, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC , tS 1 

■ — ; ; "7“] U.S. Group ij[K 

At Least 135 Are Dead After Heavy Rains and Flooding in India j s Shaken 


Ol 


The Associated Press 

CHANDIGARH. India — Heavy 
rain in northern India pushed two rivers 
over their banks, flooding nearly a 
dozen villages and drowning at least 
1 35 people, according to the authorities 
and news reports on Tuesday. 

The downpour that began Monday in 
the state of Himachal Pradesh led to 
flooding on the Sutlej and Andhara 
rivers, wiping out villages and cutting 
off main roads to the area, ISO miles 


(240 kilometers) from Chandigarh, Mr. Sharma said full reports were not was Cbamba, through which the Sutlej Pr^ Trust reponed. 

capital of the adjacent Punjab state. available because rain and washed-out flows.- Ongu^ting in the glaciers of The floods aL» wm 

At least 103 people died in Chiigaon roads disrupted communication and Tibet, the Sutlej is one of the largest damonthe Andhara Riser. Mr. Sharma 

village alone, said B.D. Sharma, a made it difficult for rescue teams to rivera in the region - . If Jhe dam ruptured, he addoX 

spokesman for the Himachal Pradesh _ move in. The death toll, he said, might In iess than a day, the floods de- scores of additional villages could oe 
government. Many more were injured rise because some officials who had strayed hundreds of homes, leaving washed away. . 

as the floods washed away homes, the reached the remote mountainous area people stranded in the foothills of the Annual monsoon rams begin in June 
village temple, the school, police posts late Monday night were just checking Himalayas. Where houses once stood, each year and usually end by midl- 
and shops said Mr. Shantfa. in. cascading water carried away uprooted gust. Before Monday’s deluge, more 

The Press Trust of India news agency Several bridges were also washed trees, cooking-gas cylinders and pots than 420 people had been killed in India 
reported that at least 135 people m the away in the floods, the news agency and pans, witnesses said. Property in floods, landslides and collapsing 
area had died. reported. The worst-affected district worth $700,000 was destroyed, die homes this season. 


In less than a dav, the floods de- 
stroyed hundreds of homes, leaving 
people stranded in the foothills of the 


Press Trust reported. 

The floods also were threatening a 
dam on the Andhara River. Mr. Sharma 
said. If the dam ruptured, he added, 
scores of additional villages could be 
washed away. 

Annual monsoon rains begin in June 


New Order in Cambodia 
Seeks King’s Approval 

Ousted Prince Is Wanted on Weapons Charge 


m * 


* ' m 




Cumfrirdby Our Stuff Firm Dapuxhn 

BEIJING — Hun Sen, the Cambod- 
ian strongman, met here with King 
Norodom Sihanouk on Tuesday in a bid 
to win the king’s approval for his new 
government, while m Phnom Penh legal 
moves accelerated to arrest the king's 
ousted son. 

Mr. Hun Sen and his new first prime 
minister, Ung Huot, met King Sihanouk 
in Beijing with other Cambodian gov- 
ernment leaders at the king’s tightly 
guarded residence. 

A convoy of six cars carrying Cam- 
bodian flags swept Mr. Hun Sen and his 
delegation past waiting reporters and 
into King Sihanouk's residence. Five 
hours later they were whisked away to a 
state guest house where the delegation is 
staying. 

Officials of the Cambodian Embassy 
declined to comment on the meeting, 
but analysts have said Mr. Hun Sen. 
who ousted the first prime minister. 
Prince Norodom Rananddh. in a bloody 
July takeover, would seek the mon- 
arch's political blessing for the new 
reality in Cambodia. 


Hong Kong Returns 


In a written statement. King Sihan- 
ouk said all questions regarding the dis- 
cussions should be addressed to Mr. 
Hun Sen and Mr. Ung Huot. * ‘They will 
reply to your questions.” the statement 
said. ‘ ’For my part, I prefer, at least for 
the moment, to keep silent.” 

On Monday, King Sihanouk said he 
was ready to give up the throne if he 
could be assured Mr. Hun Sen would not 
criticize him for doing so. 

Political analysts in Phnom Penh said 
the offer to abdicate could be seen as a 
challenge to Mr. Hun Sen. who has long 
feared that the widely revered king 
would give up his throne, enter politics 
and challenge him for power. 

King Sihanouk said earlier that the 
meeting at his residence would be 
strictly private. The king has been in 
Beijing for medical treatment since Feb- 
ruary but has said he will return to 
Cambodia soon. 

In Phnom Penh, meanwhile, the di- 
rector of the capital’s military court said 
a prosecutor had issued a warrant for 
Prince Ranariddh’s arrest on charges of 
weapons smuggling. 

‘ ‘The investigating prosecutor issued 
a warrant for arrest after Parliament 
voted to suspend his immunity," said 
the director, Ney Thol. 

The National Assembly voted last 



=■= *' '■* «- v: M 

•' ' ■- - - -\ . W\ 

f ‘ -- - -.'.x. . 


■ . ... 



lit 3MI 1C 

,W W Mfe? .11 • 





■i ■■ : 

C ’ WW- 

m 




■wr» IT' me riauoiiai /vssemoiy vuiea msi 

V lemamese by r orcc Wednesday to scrip Prince Ranariddh of 

J his parliamentary immunity. 


A/tence France-Prcsse 

HONG KONG — Hong Kong has 
forcibly repatriated 80 illegal immi- 
grants from Vietnam, most of whom 
sneaked into the territory this year, a 
government spokesman said Tuesday. 

The group. 70 men, 8 women and 2 
girls, were returned by air to Hanoi on 
the 1 10th flight under the so-called or- 
derly repatriation program. 

Their repatriation brought to 11,025 
the number of people forced home un- 
der a deal made with Hanoi in Novem- 
ber 1991, when Hong Kong was still 
under British colonial rule. 

Last week, the authorities deported 
102 Vietnamese refugees, the first to be 
sent back since the July l handover of 
the territory to China. 

Hong Kong says it has been awash in 
recent months with illegal immigrants 
from Vietnam searching for jobs. The 
arrivals have renewed calls that the ter- 
ritory scrap the “port of first asylum’’ 
policy that gives refugees the right to 
land in Hong Kong. 


Mr. Hun Sen called for legal action 
against Prince Ranariddh for weapons 
smuggling after an aims shipment was 
seized at Cambodia’s main port in late 
May. The prince denied he was trying to 
smuggle the shipment into the country 
and pointed out that bis name was on the 
shipping documents. He said he was 
entitled to import the equipment for die 
use of his personal security force. 

But Mr. Hun Sen’s security officials 
said the shipment was labeled “spare 
parts,” which they said showed Prince 
Ranariddh was trying to import the 
weapons illicitly. 

Prince Ranariddh said to reporters at 
the time dial he needed the arms, in- 
cluding anti-tank weapons, to defend 
himself because Mr. Hun Sen had for- 
midable military might at hand, includ- 
ing tanks. 

Prince Ranariddh left Cambodia 
shortly before the coup and has pledged 
to organize a resistance movement in 
and outside of the country. 

(Reuters. AFP) 


luo Yx*duwVn* AwdneJ Pie-' 

IN MEMORIAM — Relatives of the 520 victims of Hie 1985 Japan Air Lines jumbo jet crash north of Tokyo, still 
the world's worst accident involving a single plane, commemorate the anniversary by floating paper lanterns. 

Guam Hill Looks Like Clouds, Pilots Say 

Korean Jet’s Path Is Tricky in Rough Weather, Investigators Are Told 


CunesMtn Our Skiff Fmv £hq\si 

AGANA. Guam — Pilots who have 
flown into the Guam airport say the 
unlit, rolling hillside where a Korean 
Air jet crashed last week can easily be 
mistaken for clouds during stormy 
weather, investigators said Tuesday. 

Federal agents have been interview- 
ing pilots familiar with Guam Inter- 
national Airport as part of the probe into 
the crash last Wednesday that killed 226 
people. 

Flight 801 slammed into the hill in a 
rainstorm, and investigators are trying 
to find out if the weather obscured the 
pilot’s view. At least one system that 
would have warned him that the plane 
was too close to the ground was not 
working. 

Gregory Feith, the top investigator 
for the National Transportation Safety 
Board, said even the most experienced 


flight crews had said they found it trick}’ 
to make night approaches over the hill- 
side in bad weather. 

“The rolling hills sometimes look 
like clouds.” he said. 

It is not yet certain whether the pilot 
was using special instrumentation to land 
the plane or was using vvhar is known as 
a visual approach, so it is too soon to say 
what impact visibility had on the crash." 

The pilot had last landed at Guam on 
July 4, investigators said, using a visual 
approach- He had seen a training video 
on the airport and should have been 
prepared for the landing, a safety board 
member, George Black, said. 

Radar data on the weather the night of 
the crash showed heavy rain, Mr. Black 
said, but not especially treacherous con- 
ditions. Neither severe turbulence nor 
wind shear were noted, he said. 

Heavy ram brought by Typhoon Win- 


nie doused Guam on Tuesday and 
slowed the collection of remains from 
die crash site. So far, 41 of the bodies 
have been identified and 12 were to be 
sent home to South Korea early 
Wednesday, an aide to the governor of 
the U.S. territory said. (AP. AFP) 

■ Seoul Checks Airports’ Systems 

South Korealauncbed safety checks at 
13 airports countrywide Tuesday follow- 
ing reports that malfunctioning warning 
systems ai the Guam airport might have 
prevented the Korean Air crash, Agence 
France -Presse reported from Seoul. 

Authorities checked radar minimum 
safe altitude warning systems at key 
airports and found them all working 
well. Transportation Ministry officials 
said. They said inspectors would also 
check glide slope systems and other 
safety-related facilities. 


THE INTERMARKET 


GENERAL 


Rebels in India Target Villages, Killing 10 


See Friday's hntermarfart 

far Unli day, & Travel Residential 
Real Eniau- and Dining Uhl 
7ij ndrcnisf nwUoef Sarah %'crahot 
on +1-1 17J 420 0326 
or fa* +44 171 120 0338 
A GREAT DEAL HAPPENS 
AT TUE I VTER MARKET 


Personals 


G & R - AS USUSAL EVERYIHNG 
fe great How ft** are at the 
tuH nay marii we tint want to tail you 
EwiytM» is Great! WE LOVE YOU! 
LOVE M and E 


SURPRISE HON AMOUR. The a* way 
to be together the day. HAPPY BIRTH- 
DAY to the pink dream, the raw gem 
with the green eyes (or whose birth I 
dank Data & Lee everyday. LQyl 


Announcements 


HcKilh ^fej gribttnc 

1HI lOflUT. UMHMm-WPCT 

SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SERVICE: 
For aieshons or tjjenes about tte deSv- 
Bty (k your newspaper, the sutus ot you 
a atwl ytiamq a stixup- 
I km. please can the foUoeing numbers. 
EUROPE, ND01E EAST AND AFRICA: 
T0U. FREE - Austria 0660 8120 BeL 

S 0800 17538 France 0KK) 437437 
any 0130 B48685 Italy 167 780040 
Luxentoug 0800 270 3 Nether lands 06 
0225158 Sweden 020 <97039 Shet- 
land 155 5757 UK C800 895965 Else- 
where f+33> 1 41439361 THE AMERI- 
CAS: USA frolt-tree/ 1-600-8822884 
Elsewhere Ml 212 7523890 ASIA: 
Hong Korn 2922 1171 Indonna 809 
1920 Japan ftoWreet 0120 464 027 
Korea 3672 0044 Malaysia 221 7055 
Philippines 895 4946 Singapore 325 
0834 Taiwan 7753456 Thailand 277 
4485 Elsewhere 1*8521 23221171 


BARBIE AS 24 

AU 13 AOUT 1997 
1 Pnx Hots TVA en dewe locale 
(baduacn cSspantts sur demands! 
Rerrjjlace les barentes anrarieus 

FRANCE {areCJen Ffl! • TVA 20.6°. 
GO. 3.76 F00* 2J1 

SC97 551 SCSP 539 

UK en 1 • TVA 17S*o (foul 8*«l 


AIL£MAGNE (zone l| DMA - TVA 15% 


ZONE 1 ■ 

G: 



GO: 

107 



ZONED- 

I: 



GO. 

U37 

SCSP: 

1.45 

ZONES 

■F: 



GO: 

103 

SCSP: 

1.43 

ZONE IV 

■F: 



SCSP: 

1.43 



ZOtSN 

■G: 



GO 

1.05 

F0O. 

O.ri) 


AUTOMOBILES 


Alfred Eacher Strew! 10 
CH-0OZ7 Zurich 
Fax: 01/302 76 30 
Tel.: 01/202 76 10 
new TAX-FREE ueed 
ALL LEADING MAKES 
Same day regtetrotton ponaibJe. 
renowatrie up to 5 years. 

Wa Mu rMMter cars wth 

totergn (tax-frecl ptafa. 


Auto Bwrtafe 

RENT AUTO DERGI FRANCE: Weekend 
FF50Q 7 days FFiSOQ Tel Parts *33 
10)1 4368 5555. Far (0)1 4353 9529. 


Auto Shipping 

SAVE ON CAR SHIPPING. AMESCQ, 
Kr&bestr 1 Antwerp Belgium Torfiom 
US Africa. Regular Ro-Ro sating. Free 
hoW. let 3202314239 Fa 232-6353 


Autos Tax Free 

TAX FREE EnnipdUS REGISTRATION 
No Travel by owner & or tor states. Utv 
lififed. Far -41 32 645 27 26 Tet 27 


TRANSC0 BELGIUM 

20 YEARS WE DELIVER 
CARS TO THE WORLD 

AI mates and mates 
Ex pat Sate s - Begstraton 
Shypng ■ reurarta 

Transco 51 Vosseschgnstr . 
2030 Afltwip, Bataan 
Tat -*32 3 542.6Z40 
Far +32 3 5425097 


25 YRS OCEANWIDE MOTORS 

wotihnde supply ot tax-dee care AUDI 
Mercedes BMW Porsche Cal Germany 
+43-211-4433930. tax 4321144 333322 


ATX WORLDWIDE TAX FREE CARS. 
Export + sWpcrw T rg ggtrai w n oliltot 
used cas ATK NV. TeirincMel 40. 2930 
Brasschaai Belgium Phone: +32 3 
6455002. Fax +32 3 3457159. ATK. 
sure 1959 


BELGIQUE en FBI -TVA 21*+ 

GO 22.61 F0D. 11XC 

SC97 34.21 SCSR 3231 

HOLLANDS I2n°2) NLOl - TVA 173% 
GO: 1328 FOB 0.832 

SC3T. 2,026 SCSP 1966 

LUXBBOURG an LUF;1 - TVA 15% 

GO 19.48 

ESPAGNE (zone Ai en PTASfl-TVA 15", 
GO: 86.12 

SC97 10345 SCSP: 107.5? 

• Usage regtemeite 


VIENNA. AUSTRIA. Tel: 713 • 3S7A 
Are you sad or womerf 7 Lonely or de- 
pressKP Are you Oespamng or suodaP 
h he lps lo talk atoifl 4. Phone. 
BEFRI0CERS in Ual corAtance Mon- 
Fa 9 30am- 1 pm and every day 630 
pm - 10 pm 


Legal Services 

DIVORCE 1-QAY CERTIFIED 
Cal or Far (714) 968-3695 Witt 16797 
Beach BtaJ >137. HurtmgKn Beach CA 
EG648 J SA • wnaj • astatnCiuTO can 

DIVORCE IN 1 DAY. No Irarel. Wnte 
Bo* 377, Sutajry UA C177B ISA Tet 
506’44J«387. Far 506'443O1B3 


THE INTERMARKET 
Continues 
on Page 7 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


IMiplrd In Orr Sx^FFmn Dispuuhn 

GAUHATI. India — Rebels shor and 
killed 10 people and burned 50 homes 
Tuesday in two attacks on the strong- 
hold of a rival group in northeastern 
India, the police said. - 

Gunmen of the Bodo Security Forces 
tied seven villagers to a tree and’ fired on 
them with automatic weapons, said Ab- 
hihjit Bora, a deputy superintendent of 
police. Six were killed, and a seventh 
victim was critically wounded in La- 
hapara, 80 kilometers (50 miles) north 
of Gauhati, capital of Assam state. 

The attackers set 50 houses on fire 
before escaping, Mr. Bora said. All the 


victims were poor farmers and fisher- 
men. A few hours later in another attack, 
the rebels shot and killed four people in 
a nearby village, the police said. 

Lahapara is a stronghold of the Bodo- 
land Liberation Tiger Front, a rebel 
group that has clashed before with the 
Bodo Security Forces. Both factions are 
fighting for independent homelands in 
Assam. Clashes between the two groups 
have killed at least 100 people in the last 
eight months. 

The attacks came 24 hours after a 
passenger train was derailed in Assam 
by a bomb set off by unidentified mil- 
itants. (AFP. API 


BRIEFLY 


By Poverty in 
North Korea 


ConfOfdbr Ovr Stag Fran Di^asclm j 

TOKYO — Members of a U.S. del- 
egation just back from North Korea 1 
described scenes of rampant poverty 
and warned that Pyongyang would not 
deal with South Korea until after 
Seoul’s presidential elections in 

December. . . . . _ . 

The delegation visited tne r amine- 
stricken North from Saturday to Mon- 
day. It was led by Representative Porter 
Goss, a Florida Republican who is 
chairman of the House Permanent Se- A 
lect Committee on Intelligence, and in- ■ 
eluded six other members of Congress. • 

Representative Nancy Pelosi, Demo- 
crat of California, said that she thought 
an earlier visit to Haiti had shown her 
• the world’s worst poverty, but that she 
found North Korea also had ‘ ‘poverty of 
the spirit,” with a population under the 
sharp control of the state. 

Calling the situation in North Korea a 
‘ ‘a tragedy, a h umanitari an failure,' ' at a 
•press conference in Tokyo, Represen- 
tative Pelosi said the trip had been “a 
bonding experience for all of us to have 
witnessed together something so alien 
to what humanity is supposed to be 
about” 

Mr. Goss warned that the leaders in 
Pyongyang ‘ ‘absolutely want nothing to 
do with the present leadership’ ' in Seoul 
and that they are “not prepared to deal m 
with South Korea until after elec- y 
dons.’-’ 

He said Pyongyang’s unwillingness 
to engage Seoul, a key goal of American 
efforts to negotiate a formal peace treaty 
on the Korean Peninsula, steins from 
anger at the refusal of the South Korean 
president, Kim Young Sam. to mourn 
the death three years ago of Kim H Sung, 
the longtime North Korean leader. 

The South Korean president, whose 
five-year term ends in February and 
who is barred by the constitution from 
seeking a second term, has since been a 
daily target of abuse from the North 
Korean official media and propaganda 
oigans. 

But it was abject daily life in North 
Korea that dominated the press con- 
ference in Tokyo, as the lawmakers 
spoke of streets plunged into darkness, 
the absence of smiles, die impossibility j, 
of communication, even with children, " 
and long lines of people waiting for 
street cars that rarely came. 

Representative Pelosi underlined the 
contrast between “hundreds of millions 
of dollars invested in monuments, while 
the rest of the city looks like a dilap- 
idated public bousing project that you ' 
would be ashamed of any place in the 
world.” 

The delegation concluded that the 
state of the economy and the famine 
situation in North Korea were extremely . 
serious, and drought and floods had 
simply highlighted the 4 ‘great failure in 
their aptitude to feed their people,” sad 
Representative Sanford Bishop, Demo- 
crat of Georgia. 

Despite repeated requests, the dek ' 
egation was not allowed to go the worst- 
hit areas and was not able to witness the 
distribution of international aid. 

Representative Jane Harman, Dano-. .. 
crat of California, said; “There is food 
for the military, there is food for die 
political elite; the only people who don't 
have food are the women, the children 
and the poor families in the coun- 
tryside.” L 

Later Tuesday, the delegation flew p 
from Tokyo to Seoul to brief Sou* 
Korean officials on its visit. On 
Wednesday, the seven were scheduled 
to meet Foreign Minister Yoo Chong Ha 
and General John Tilelli, commander of 
the 37.000 U.S. troops stationed in die 
South. 

Officials in Seoul announced Tues- 
day that South Korea would provide 
more food aid to North Korea through 
the United Nations to create an atmo- 
sphere conducive to peace talks and to 
help ease hunger in the North, officials 
here said T uesday . (AFP. Reuters) 


Get#'" 

n . -ilia!* Rt’ 


« i 


v " 


: '' r ' . 
Itar-'-r-' - 
W --4- ‘ 

TbcK* . ' 

* 

mbs:"- 
A P.:.r -■• 

UCTlsri-.'-- •' 1 


U.S. Jfl&rhu. 

3 Escapee? n[ ■ 


SA> • 

te.w.vr- ; . 

rniiz'-:-:.- 
fee.-iif.-; . 
wtw:-.:;r. ■ 
Kr.z _• 
to ecs: 
cttccl' •. 

wfez:.... 
fate. -. : 

to A c rrZ - ; 
Iwws 

ks'xi" . ‘ 
fcon-r:. •" 

'ha [set*; 

1 

keai 

feat:; 

Ifci-...'. 

7 ’ ’* • 

«fer . 5 




-AOinv 


CONFERENCES 


0doberay-30/l997 
THE AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION (ADA) 

Annual Meeting and Exhibition 
. Discover the latest information and research in the food 
and nurrinon field by attending. 

Featuring more than 75 educational sessions 
and 375 exhibiting companies. 

Far more information contact us at our mb she: WWfi eatrigbt.org: 
via E-mail at mtgsinfwfl’eatT-igtrLorg: via fax at 312-899-0008: 
or bv calling 312-899-0040, «*t- 4868. 

BOSTOH. MASSACHUSETTS, U5A 


Burma Reopens Its Schools 

RANGOON — Burma reopened nearly 39.000 schools 
Tuesday, but kept closed about 30 universities and colleges 
that the government contends are linked to student unrest. 

The reopenings involved 38.808 schools and more than 7 
million children. The schools had been closed since March 
and had been scheduled to reopen in June. 

Analysts in Rangoon said the ruling State Law and Order 
Restoration Council was afraid of protests before its ad- 
mission to the Association of South East Asian Nations last 
month. 

Some of the universities and colleges that remained 
closed, including Yangon University and Yangon Institute 
of Technology, which were cradles of last year’s unrest, 
have been shut since December 1996. (Reuters) 

Red Cross Warns on Afghanistan 

KABUL — The International Committee of the Red 
Cross said Tuesday that a flare-up in fighting in Afghanistan 
between die Islamic Taleban militia and opposition forces 
was causing the humanitarian situation to deteriorate. 

The Red Cross also criticized the authorities in op- 
position-held northern Afghanistan for denying if access to 
an estimated 3.000 prisoners of war. 

“The ongoing fighting between the northern coalition 
and the Taleban in northern .Afghanistan has prompted a 
major humanitarian alert and a marked increase in the 
emergency response of the International Committee of Lhe 
Red Cross.” the group said. The Red Cross said it had 
treated about 7.000 wounded on both sides of the front line 
in the last three months. ( Reuters t 

Mine Kills 4 Soldiers in Kashmir 

SRINAGAR, India — Four soldiers were killed by a land 
mine in the Indian stare of Kashmir on Tuesday as troops and 
paramilitary forces tightened security ahead of the country 's 


50th anniversary of independence, the police said. 

The police said four other soldiers were wounded in the 
morning blast in the district of Kupwara, bordering Pakistan 
and about 90 kilometers < 55 miles ) from Srinagar. The mine 
was detonated by remote control, the police said, adding 
that the blast “was the deadliest in this month by Kashmiri 
militants on Indian troops” in the border sector. 

There were no claims of responsibility. The attack came 
a day after Muslim separatist guerrillas exploded another 
land mine in downtown Srinagar in which two people were 
killed and four were wounded. (AFP) 

Activist Calls for China Reform 

BEIJING — As the police increased their surveillance of 
dissidents, a veteran activist issued a daring call Tuesday 
for political reform, urging China's president to lead the 
country toward full-fledged democracy. 

Qin Yongmin. who has served several terms in Chinese 
prisons for political activism, urged a series of reforms 
culminating in direct elections for China’s top government 
posts. The appeal, made in a letter to President Jiang Zemin 
that was faxed to reporters, came ahead of a major Com- 
munist Party congress in the autumn that is expected to map 
oui government policy for the millennium. 

Mr. Jiang has made it clear that he wants die congress to 
back new economic reforms, but majorpolincal reforms are 
not expected to be on the agenda. Mr. Qin urged Mr. Jiang, 
the most powerful Chinese leader since the death Feb. 1 9 of 
the paramount leader Deng Xiaoping, to produce a 
timetable for democratic change. (AP) 

VOICES^FromAsia 

Fidel Ramos, president of the Philippines, lecturing 
three presidential aspirants on one essential skill for the job: 

You have io learn how io walk inside a C- 1 30 without 
losing your balance because this is what you will use in 
traveling lo the farthest areas of our country.” (AFP) 


W-' '. 

• . • 

SSi . 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1997 



PAGE^ 


EUROPE 


School Text Glorifies Slovakia’s Role as a Nazi Puppet 


briefly 


By Peters. Green 

lilt *rtufionalHeraid Tribune 

t i®]^"^LAVA, Slovakia — One of 
the best-sellers these days in the book 

&£* ? rat f 1 lava * an openly ami- 
Semitic school textbook that glorifies 
« World War D past afa nS 
caustf* “ d diSDlisses *e Holo- 

Vijf'" P™™* by Prime Minister 
viadimir Mecjar that it would be with- 
drawn from Slovakian schools, the 
ooofc, which was subsidized by Euro- 
pean Union funds, is still available to 
as a ‘ teaching aid.” 
of Sf Posher of the book. “History 
«n nm 31,(1 * e SIov aks,” received 
„ — (about $85, 000> before its 

publication in the context of educational 

Sir cultur ^J programs funded by the 
European Union. It was written by a 
septuagenarian Catholic priest named 
Milan Dunca, who lived in exile in Italy 
after World War a 

; It was commissioned for use as a 
u-°? - text b y t * >e Education Ministry, 
which is run by Mr. Meciar’s ultrana- 
tionalist coalition partners, the Slovak 
National Party. The party’s chairman, 
Jan biota, regularly denounces Slov- 


akia s ethnic Hungarian minority as 
traitors. He has invited the radical Ser- 
bian nationalist Vojislav Seselj and the 
leader of the French far-right National 
Front. Jean-Marie Le Pen. to visit Slov- 
akia later this year. 

The ministry recently banned bilin- 
gual SIovak-H ungarian report cards in 
schools and is prosecuting a teacher who 
refused to obey that order. 

Slovakia s tiny surviving Jewish 
community is outraged by the book. 
Fero Alexander, chairman of the Central 
Utuon of Jewish Religious Communities 
in Slovakia, says it blatantly attempts to 
whitewash Slovakia’s history in World 
Warn. 

In its entry for March 17. 1942, the 
book says that Slovakia’s wartime lead- 
er, Father Jozef Tiso, "attempted to re- 
solve the Jewish question on the basis of 
Christian moral principles." It calls the 
work camps he set up for Slovakian Jews 
“the most modern and best equipped 
companies of their sort in Slovakia." In 
a bizarre note. Father Durica says Jewish 
dentists were able to give camp inmates 
gold fillings, "which at that time most 
Slovak citizens could not afford." 

The book also describes the "reset- 
tlement” and "transport" of Slovakian 


Jews to other pans of German-occupied 
Europe, but nowhere does it mention the 
Nazi death camps to which the Jews 
were transported, or that 67.000 Slov- 
akian Jews died in them. 

In another entry. Father Durica says 
that by 1942 the number of Jewish 
schools in Slovakia had grown from 24 


The book describes the 
"resettlement’ of Jews, but 
not the death camps in 
which 67,000 died. 


to 64. Ivan Kamenec, a historian, notes 
thar by then two-thirds of Slovakia's 
Jewish children had been expelled from 
state schools. 

In fact, Slovakia gave Germany 500 
Reichsmarks for each Jew it was allowed 
to deport, paid from seized Jewish prop- 
erty. "The Slovaks made the depor- 
tations to the concentration camps them- 
selves. and handed the trains to Germans 
at the border with occupied Poland.” 
Mr. Alexander said. 

“Durica maintains the view that the 


concentration camps were a paradise.’’ 
said Valerian Bystricky, a historian of 
the Slovak Academy of Sciences, who 
helped write a devastating critique of the 
book for an academic newspaper. "Thai 
is simply not the truth. The way this book 
is written is to make an apology for Tiso 
and say that he wasn't responsible for 
stripping Slovakia's Jews of their wealth 
and taking diem away to their death." 

The EU feels it was duped by the 
Slovaks and is irate that the book is still 
being officially tolerated. It warns that 
die book could damage Slovakia's 
chances of early entry to the Union. 

"If the book is used in schoolchil- 
dren's curriculum then you have to 
doubt that the government is interested 
in educating people in a democratic 
way." said Lousewies van der La an. an 
EU spokeswoman. “They have to weigh 
the short term benefit of anti-Semitic 
history books lying around versus EU 
membership. It’s their call." 

She said the EU was told to "go stuff 
it" by the Education Ministry when it 
first complained about the book. 

Slovakia was rejected last month as a 
member of the first pool of applicants for 
EU expansion, and the Union cited Slov- 
akia’s “quality of democracy." It said 


that ethnic minorities are persecuted, 
that government ministers ignore court 
rulings when it suits them, and that Mr. 
Meciar's government uses the secret ser- 
vice and police to intimidate the op- 
position. 

Father Durica was unavailable for 
comment, but the Bratislava archdiocese 
earlier this year called the book "an 
excellently written survey of the history 
of Slovakia and the Slovaks." which 
“raises the national consciousness." 

Mr. Alexander, whose mother was- 
deponed in 1944, says that more than 
anything else he is saddened by the way 
Slovakia's political establishment has 
accepted the book. He says it reflects the 
continuing problem many Slovaks have 
of separating political myth from real- 
ity. 

“There are people who rescued Jews 
during the war who won’t let you. even 
today, defame Tiso,” he said. "They 
don't square it. it exists in one mind, in 
parallel. This was the only regime that 
gave them something, and they were in 
their best years." 

"Remember that while in the rest of 
Europe there was war. in Slovakia there 
was peace," Mr. Alexander said. “ ‘Only 
67,000 Jews were schlepped away." 


German States Encourage 
Bosnian Refugees to Leave 


Reuters 

BONN — Tens of thousands of 
refugees who fled the civil war in the 
former Yugoslavia have returned home 
.as a result of pressure from cash- 
strapped German states, according to 
;offiaal data released Tuesday. 

More than one-fifth of the 323.000 
Bosnians who came to Germany during 
the three-and-a-haif-year war in the Bal- 
kans have returned, officials from 16 
state interior ministries said. 

Despite widespread international crit- 
‘icism. the states began forcibly repat- 
riating refugees late last year after efforts 
■to encourage voluntary returns failed. 
The pressure to leave or face deportation 
apparently prompted many to go home 
on their own. 

A Reuters survey of state govern- ‘ 
meats found that about 65,000 refugees 
had left Germany and that about 408 had 

U.S. Judge Extradites 
3 Escapees to Ulster 

The Associated Press 

SAN FRANCISCO — A U.S. judge 
has ordered the extradition of three na- 
tionalists who look part in a mass poison 
■break in Northern Ireland in 1983, saying 
they faced punishment for their crimes, 
not their political views or religion. 

Kevin Ant and Terence Kirby, both 
convicted of minder, and Pol Brennan, 
convicted of possessing explosives, 
sought to block extradition on die grounds 
that they would be persecuted because of 
their Roman Catholicism and nationalist 
sympathies. Such persecution is grounds 
to deny extradition under a 1985 treaty 
between the United States and Britain. 

Judge Charles Legge said Monday dial 
the men were convicted in non jury trials 
that lacked some U.S. safeguards for de- 
fendants but met basic standards of fair- 
ness. "If returned to Nonhem Ireland," 
he said, "further punishment will not be 
because of their beliefs, but because of 
the crimes which they committed.” 

• The defendants were arrested in Cali- 
fornia nearly a decade after they and 35 
others escaped in 1983 from tne Maze 
prison near Belfast. 


been forcibly deported. About half of 
those sent against their will had been 
convicted of crimes in Germany. 

"We didn’t expect to have such a big 
number until the fall," said Christoph 
Hillebrand, spokesman for Bavaria's In- 
terior Ministry. "And the actual number 
is probably quite a bit higher than the 
number we have recorded." 

Bavaria, which has been particularly 
aggressive in forcing the refugees to 
leave, said that 21.000 had returned to 
the former Yugoslavia since November. 
Bavaria has also deport ed 172 people. 

■ Germany took in about 323,000 
people during the 1992-95 Bosnian war 
— more than all the other European 
Union countries combined. 

Most Germans welcomed the 
' refugees with enthusiasm, providing 
shelter and about 1 ,000 marks ($538) per 
family per month in spending money, 
cash that many stashed away and sent to 
relatives who stayed behind in Bosnia. 

But after the fighting stopped in 1995, 
German hospitality began to fade. Ger- 
man states paying to support the 
refugees wens disappointed that only a 
handful had returned home. 

After the Dayton peace accord was 
signed in late 1995 the states said they 
could no longer afford the estimated 4 
billion marks it cost each year to support 
the refugees. The 30,000 refugees in 
Berlin cost the near-bankrupt state 500 
million marks per year. 

Most refugees chose to remain in Ger- 
many because of fears that fighting 
would break out again in the Balkans or 
because their homes there had been de- 
stroyed. Others feared poverty or said 
their home towns were now controlled 
by other ethnic groups. 

Frustrated by the refugees ’ reluctance 
to leave, last October, the states said they 
would start deporting refugees who did 
not return voluntarily, although many 
states waited until the end of winter. 

To encourage the Bosnians to return 
borne, many states offer to cover trans- 
portation and resettlement costs. "Many 
families have taken advantage of our offer 
to send an advance member of the family 
home first to examine the area they are 
planning to go to," said Ludger Hannei- 
er, spokesman for the North Rhine- West- 
phalia State Interior Ministry. 



Cbn, Bvno Ihfptirr Fmm-IVtw 

Prince Charles with his sons. Princes William, left, and Harry, at the Balmoral estate in Scotland on Tuesday. 

U.K. Royal Family Falls Out of Favor 

Over 50 % of Britons Are Disenchanted With Monarchy, Poll Shows 


Reuters 

LONDON — Support among Britons 
for the royal family has fallen below 50 
percent for the Burst time, according to a 
poll published in the Guardian news- 
paper on Tuesday. 

The poll, conducted by ICM, showed 
only 48 percent of Britons felt the coun- 
try would be worse off without the royal 
family, a fall from 70 percent three years 
ago. 

Thirty percent said the country would 
be better off without the royals, com- 
pared with just 13 percent 10 years 
ago. 

The royal family has stumbled in pub- 
lic opinion over recant years because of a 
spate of divorces andpublic admissions 
of affairs by Prince Charles, the heir to 
the throne, and his former wife. Princess 


Diana. The latest twist centers on Prin- 
cess Diana’s apparent new romance with 
Dodi al Fayed, son of the Harrods de- 
partment store owner, Mohammed al 
Fayed. 

The Guardian said die poll showed 
people aged over 65 were the only group 
to produce a clear majority that believed 
Britain would be worse off without the 
royal family. 

The poll showed growing support for 
Prince Charles, son of Queen Elizabeth, 
to succeed her as monarch, with 55 per- 
cent saying he should take the throne 
compared with 44 percent a year ago. 

Prince Charles has admitted a long- 
standing affair with Camilla Parker 
Bowles, who has now divorced her hus- 
band. 

But more than three quarters of those 


g died rejected the idea of Mrs. Parker 
owles becoming queen, the Guardian 
said. 

Around 55 percent believed that 
members of the royal family, govern- 
ment ministers and members of par- 
liament were not bound to resign if they 
were having an affair, the poll showed. 
Forty percent felt it warranted a resig- 
nation. 

Foreign Secretary Robin Cook an- 
nounced earlier this month that be was 
leaving his wife Margaret to be with 
Gaynor Regan, who has been his par- 
liamentary aide for the past five years. 

The Labour government has backed 
Mr. Cook over the decision and he has 
not resigned despite fierce criticism 
from the opposition Conservative 
Party. 


German Linked 
To Versace Suspect 
Gives Himself Up 

.LEIPZIG The former owner 
of the Miami Beach houseboat on 
which Andrew Cunanan. the sus- 
pected murderer of Gianni Versace, 
killed himself, has surrendered to 
the German authorities, officials 
said Tuesday. 

Torsten Reineck, who was want- 
ed in Germany on tax evasion and 
fraud charges, was arrested when he 
arrived in Frankfurt late Monday. 
He had been negotiating his sur- 
render for about two weeks. 

A Leipzig prosecutor. Nor ben 
Roeger,’ and Mr. Reineck’s lawyer. 
Kurt-UIIrich Mayer, both declined 
to specify where Mr. Reineck had 
arrived from. 

Mr. Reineck has been wanted 
since 1993 by Leipzig prosecutors 
on fraud and tax evasion charges 
related to a bankrupt brewery. (AP) 

Radioactive Battery 
Hits Russian Sea 

MOSCOW — Environmental ex- 
perts are examining the potential 
threat after a highly radioactive bat- 
tery fell from a helicopter into the 
sea off Russia's eastern coast, the 
Interfax news agency said Tuesday. 

The Strontium-90 battery, 
weighing 2.3 metric tons, fell from a 
helicopter into 20 meters (66 feet) of 
water on Monday, about 150 meters 
off the northern tip of Sakhalin Is- 
land. The battery was intended for 
use at a weathei station, officials 
said. The officials added that they 
were trying to establish why the 
battery fell into the sea. (AFP) 

Heavy Rains Flood 
Areas of Istanbul 

. ISTANBUL — Floods paralyzed 
low-lying parts of Istanbul on Tues- 
day and rescuers used boats to reach 
those who had been cut off by the 
rising waters, witnesses said. ■ 
“The rain came suddenly ax 
night," said a local resident, Fatrna 
Kesen, as emergency workers nav- 
igated boats across flooded streets 
toward stranded workers. "We 
were so afraid that we could not 
sleep. We are still scared.” 

Local officials said work was 
continuing on assessing the damage 
caused by the muddy water that 
inundated many city streets after 
heavy rains ihat began Sunday 
night (Reuters) 

Cyprus Peace Talks 
‘ Appear Blocked’ 

GUON, Switzerland — President 
Glavkos Klerides of Cyprus and the 
Turirish-Cypriot leader. Rauf Denk- 
tash, started a second day of UN-led 
peace talks here Tuesday. But the 
talks were largely fruitless, sources 
close to die negotiators said. 

“The discussions appear 
blocked" on issues that have tra- 
ditionally split the two communi- 
ties, a source said. 

UN-sponsored talks in July broke 
a 32-momh stalemate and ended on 
a positive note that appeared to bode 
well for the Glion follow-up. 

A UN special envoy, Diego Cor- 
dovez, is mediating the current ses- 
sion. which is scheduled to run until 
Friday and focus on legal issues 
related to a proposed new consti- 
tution. (AFP) 


FRANCE: Jospin’s Defense Budget Cuts Take Aim at Dassault’s Fighter-Bomber 

Continued from Page 1 
budget considerations lie behind the changed si§- 

. D AAkfA* Tluatr arP naff rtf a StniPple 111 



til riUJJW iVUIUOW-l MVUMI -Wj — — — — * — J 

nerger between Dassault and state-owned 
ospatiale, putting an end to the Dassault dy- 
y ’s status as an independent power in France’s 
tary-industrial complex. 

' has been a battle waged and lost by previous 

i * TKp Into Marrp.1 Ttaftsflillr. the 



pany s juuuuti <uim . — 0 — - — 

L e warplanes, had a strong constituency 
ne Gaullist leaders. Dassault’s political pat- 
£e was consolidated by his habit of hiring 
Intiai government officials after retirement 
Mb be and his son and heir, SffljtowJ 

, n >. k..u oti.mronnM the idea trial 



Europeans wanted to buy uto . Daatmhs 
mes The Rafale, for example, is France s 
Sen* equivalent of the Eurofighterbemg 
bj a cSsortum led by Bntain and Ger- 

Josoin-s government, like its conserve 
JWP wants a Dassault merger with 


Aerospatiale, a major commercial aircraft-builder, 
as a step to consolidate France’s aerospace sector 
and clear the way for alliances with British and 
German companies to create a Europe-wide de- 
fense industry, including aerospace. 

Mr. Dassault reluctantly agreed to the merger 
plan on condition that Aerospatiale was first privat- 
ized, a move acceptable to the previous French 
government but opposed by the Socialists. 

As a warning snot in its first month in office, tbe 
new government handed over secret documents to 
Belgium to help the authorities there pursue in- 
vestigations into alleged bribery cases involving 
Dassault. 

The latest move could dramatically ratchet up the 
pressure on Dassault, jeopardizing several hundred 
million dollars a year of prospective sales. 

The Rafale has a list price of $50 million, but 
Dassault buys much of the plane from two French 
state-owned companies — the engines from 
Snecma and the electronics from Tbomson-CSF. 

A showdown could be dire for Dassault because 
the government is tbe only customer so far for the 
Rafale. Export orders are unlikely unless Rafale 
goes into full service in the French Air Force. Tbe 
international competition includes the modernized 



version of the F-16 and the forthcoming F-22. 

Rafale had been singled out as tbe largest current 
weapons program by Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the 
minister of economy, finance and industry. 

"Big amounts of money are involved — around 
$400 million a year — and so we need to thor- 
oughly re-appraise the program,” Mr. Strauss- 
Kahn said last month, talking about the program to 
put Rafale into full-scale production. 

Already, France has sunk nearly $9 billion into 
Rafale in development costs, three-quarters of it 
from the French government 

But in looking for budget savings to offset ex- 
penditure on job creation, the Socialist govern- 
ment’s natural target was tbe defense budget, still 
proportionately larger in France than in other 
NATO countries. 

Defense Minister Alain Richard’s margin for 
maneuver in making cuts was hampered by the 
government’s decision to proceed with plans to end 
tbe draft and move to an all-volunteer professional 
army that can be used more easily in peacekeeping 
and other military operations outside France's bor- 
ders. 

The target for cuts therefore became the military 
procurement budget, where the government re- 
portedly hopes to save $250 million next year, 
about 2 percent of an earlier budget of $1.3 bil- 
lion. 

Mr. Dassault has pushed for the privatization of 
Thomson-CSFalong with Aerospatiale with a view 
to seeing both of them join Dassault to form a giant 
French aviation conglomerate that could be a dom- 
inant force in the whole European industry. 

In trying to force Mr. Dassault’s band, the gov- 
ennnent wants to avoid any drastic step liable to put 
people out of work, but Mr. Jospin seems even 
more averse to seeing these state-owned defense 
companies come under the control of a privately 
owned company such as Dassault. 


Do YOU IJVE IN rVoilWAY? 

Iw a Iiaiiil-ilrti\rmt siilH‘ri|rii<iii 
on die list »»f (iiiMif-alinti in (Mn »wl llrrgrii. 

' rail IN) 33 1 -1113 93<>| 

HcralbSSribunc 


.» UMunnuu , 



Subscribe to the IHT now 
And save up to 60% 
off the cover price. 


For more information, please call our Customer 
Service office nearest you. 


China 

Tel: (8610) 6502 2352. 
Fax:(8610)6502 2352. 

Japan 

Teh (813) 3201 0205. 
Fax:(813)3214 4045. 

Philippines 

Tel: (632) 895 4946. 
Fax:(632)897 6850. 

Hong Kong 

Teh (852) 2922 1171. 
Fax:(852)29221199. 

Korea 

Tel: (822) 3672 0044. 
Fax:(822)36721222. 

Singapore 

Tel: (65) 325 0835. 
Fax: (65) 325 0842. 

India 

Tel: (9122) 284 0720. 
Fax:(9122)2626167. 

Malaysia 

Tel: (603) 221 7055. 
Fax:(603)222 5361- 

Tel: (8862) 775 3456. 
Fax: (8862) 741 7863. 

Indonesia 

Teh (6221) 809 1928. 
Fax:(6221)8092679. 

Pakistan 

Tel: (9221) 568 3026. 
Fax:(9221)568 4319. 

Thailand 

Tel: (662) 277 4485. 
Fax:(662)2752066. 


Elsewhere: Tel: (852) 2922 I I71.Fax: (852) 2922 1 199. 



THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


.* r cj ij 


PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HKBAT.H TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 13, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


PLO Settles Lawsuits Over Terrorist Killing on Cruise Ship 


By Benjamin Weiser 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Nearly 12 years after 
Pales tinian terrorists killed a disabled 
passenger, Leon Klinghoffer, aboard the 
hijacked Italian cruise ship Achilie 
Laura and threw his body into the Medi- 
terranean Sea, the Palestine liberation 
Organization has agreed to settle a law- 
suit by the Klinghoffer family for an 
undisclosed sum. 

The settlement, which was approved 
last week by Judge Louis Stanton in 
federal court in Manhattan, came just 
weeks before the suit was to go to trial 
here. , . 

Both sides described the resolution as 
amicable — a strange note for the ending 


Clinton’s Veto 
Puts Spotlight 
On Tax Laws 
For Wealthy 


By Allen R. Myer 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — In using one of his 
first three line-item vetoes. President 
Bill Clinton dashed a plan by a Texas 
billionaire to avoid $80 million in capital 
gains taxes on the sale of one of his 
businesses. 

And in doing so, he highlighted the 
sort of special benefits that have long 
found their way into the nation's tax 
laws, often to the benefit of only a hand- 
fill of wealthy ax influential people. 

In this case, die president unraveled 
the plans of Harold Simmons, who has 
given more than $1 million to Repub- 
lican candidates and causes since die 
early 1980s. 

A provision in the tax bill, included at 
the behest of several members of Con- 
gress, would have granted Mr. Simmons 
something both he and 2,000 beet farm- 
ers desired: a graceful exit out of a joint 
venture deal that they had struck for the 
sole purpose of cutting Mr. Simmons's 
taxbilL 

To defer or avoid at least $80 million 
in capital gains taxes, Mr. S imm ons 
came up with a cumbersome arrange- 
ment: form a joint venture with die 
Snake River Sugar Cooperative. 

This is a group of 2,000 Oregon beet 
farmers formed for this purpose, and 
have the joint venture own the plant and 
share die profits. 

Under the tax laws, this arrangement 


of the Achilie Laura saga, one of the 
most shocking and enduring emblems of 
Middle East terrorism- The death of Mr. 
Klinghoffer, who used a wheelchair, and 
the anger and defiance of his wife in the 
face of die terrorists, struck a deep chord 
among Americans, especially m New 
York, the Klinghoffers hometown. 

A PLO official said Monday dial die 
organization had admitted no wrong- 
doing in the settlement, continuing to 
maintain that die Achilie LauTO atrarlf 
was die work of renegade members act- 
ing without the knowledge or hacking of 
die organization's leadership. 

A family spokesman. Lefty Simon, 
would say only that Mr. Klinghoffer’s 
two surviving daughters, Usa and lisa, 
co-executors of the estate of their father 


and mother, Marilyn, who died of cancer 
a year after the failing, were "pleased 
that the long-standing litigation has been 
settled amicably." 

The PLO also settled' with a New 
Jersey tour operator, bringing to an end 
litigation that also lasted nearly 12 years 
and included disputes over the PLO’s 
legal liability in the United States and 
whether Yasser Arafat, the PLO leader, 
would agree to provide a pretrial de- 
position in the case. 

The Palestinians’ permanent observer 
at die United Nations, Nasser Kidwa, 
said, "We have always said that the 
Palestine Liberation Organization bad 
nothing to do with this tragic event, and 
we maintain of course that position- I 
think both sides should feel comfortable. 


and it’s good to achieve things peace- 
fully. ” 

Some analysts said they believed die 
timing of die settlement was related to 
current tensions in the Mideast. 

"It certainly removes." said Robert 
Satloff, executive director of the Wash- 
ington Institute for Near East Policy, "a 
major thorn at a moment when for the 
first time in quite some time the focus in 
the peace process is on whether the PLO 
is doing enough to combat terrorism." 

The lawsuit was o riginally - filed by 
Marilyn Klinghoffer. The couple had 
gone on the Mediterranean cruise in part 
to celebrate their 36th wedding an- 
niversary. 

About half a dozen other American 
passengers, along with the Klinghoffers, 




I? 



■■ ■ \ ■. 

• 

ip 


MiOmUmc Amtaled Prh 

An Idaho beet farmer, Myron Huettig, front, visiting his fields Tuesday with his sons, Steven, left, and 
Douglas, wondered whether the line-item veto by President Clinton left him an option to continue farming. 


was not technically a sale, and Mr. Sim- 
mons owed no capital gains taxes, even 
though the cooperative paid him $260 
million in the deal. 

Originally, Mr. Simmons wanted to 
Sell the business. Amalgamate d Sugar 
Co., but then he would have owed die 
taxes. 

Mr. Simmons wanted to renegotiate 
the deal this year to sell the company 
directly to the fanners. 

The vetoed provision in the new tax 
law would have let him do so while 
preserving his tax break. 


The measure would have permitted 
the seller of a crop-processing plant to 
defer or, in effect, avoid capital gains 
taxes. 

The fanners also preferred to. rene- 
gotiate the deal, saying it would greatly 
lower their borrowing costs on the loan 
to buy into the joint venture. 

Although Mr. Simmons hires law- 
yers, lobbyists and accountants to cal- 
culate the tax consequences of his every 
move, his aides said Monday that they 
did not know whether a direct sale would 
yield him any more than the roughly 


VETO. Hatching Strategies to Play an Old Game With New Skill 


Continued from Page 1 

list, including: 

• Structuring corporate tax breaks so 
they benefit shareholders rather than 
firms. Mr. Clinton’s aides had targeted a 
tax break benefiting Am way Corp., but 
because the provision was tied to div- 
idends it did not make the veto list 

• Pairing large tax breaks for a hand- 
ful of beneficiaries with similar small 

- breaks spread among a large number of 
* beneficiaries. 

• Clumping tax breaks in broad, 
; catchall categories wherever possible to 
' expand the nomber of beneficiaries. 

Consider a provision vetoed by Mr. 
. Clinton that would have granted a $317 
million tax break to banks, securities 
firms and insurers doing business over- 
seas. More than 100 financial institu- 
tions would have benefited from the 
provision. But because some of die firms 
use different accounting periods than 
others, most would have claimed die 
break immediately while a handful of 
■' stragglers would not have done so until 


Mr. Grafmeyer argued that the firms 
could have stayed off the veto list had 
they made sore everyone claimed their 
benefit in the same fiscal year. 

Indeed, he contended that as many as 
three-quarters of the 79 provisions 
singled out by congressional tax analysts 
as subject to the line-item veto, could 
have kept off die veto list with similarly 
modest technical adjustments. 

On the spending side, legislative ana- 
lysts expect lawmakers to seek protec- 
tion for pet spending proposals by 
grouping diem with initiatives favored 
by the president That is because die 
line-item veto gives the president power 
to strike an entire spending item from a 
bill but does not give him authority to 
reduce the expenditure of that item by a 
specific amount 

A congressman seeking money for 
new roads or bridges in his district might 
wedge it in an environmental spending 
bill favored by die White House — 
without identifying a specific dollar 
amount for the project 

The challenge will be "finding clever 
ways to hide the porie." said Robert 


Conlon Nancarrow, Composer 
And U.S. Expatriate, Dies at 84 


By Allan Kozinn 

New York Tunes Service 

Conlon Nancarrow, an expatriate 
American composer whose frustrations 
with the limitations of live performance 
technique led him to compose almost 
exclusively for mechanical player pi- 
anos, and who was widely regarded as 
one of the few truly visionary composers 
of the century, died Sunday at his home 
in Mexico City. He was 84 years old- 

Mr. Nancarrow, who was a jazz trum- 
peter before he turned his attention to 
formal composition, was fascinated, by 
the complex relationships among com- 
peting rhythms. His best-known works, 
the more than 40 Studies for Player Pi- 
ano. dazzle the ear. with torrential fig- 
uration, thick counterpoint, colliding me- 
ters and melodies that draw on everything 
from blues and Spanish music to the 
spiky abstractions of free a tonality. 

One also hears in Mr. Nancarrow's 
music a current of dry wit, and as per- 
formers have tackled transcriptions or his 
Studies — usually in transcriptions for 
two pianos — several have pointed up 
that element, as well as a warmth that does 
not come through in Mr. Nancarrow's 
recordings of his mechanical pianos. 

In recent years. Mr. Nancarrow's mu- 
sic has had many champions. The com- 
poser Gyorgy Ligeti, writing in the mid- 
1980s, described Mr. Nancarrow's music 
as “so utterly original, enjoyable, con- 
structive and at the same time emotion- 
al," and added that he considered it “the 
best music by any living composer." 

Among pianists, Robert Miller and 
Joanna MacGregor have recorded several 


of die studies, Ursula Oppens was the 
dedicatee of Mr. -Nancarrow's recent 
“Three Canons for Ursula" and Yvar 
Mikhashoff published both two-piano 
and chamber orchestra arrangements of 
some the player piano works. Continuum, 
a New York new music ensemble, de- 
voted a full concert and a recording to Mr. 
Nancarrow's orchestral and chamber 
works in 1986. And he was included in 
die New York Philharmonic's "Amer- 
ican Eccentrics" series in 1994. 

Mr. Nancarrow’s earliest mature 
works, mostly for chamber ensembles, 
date back to the 1930s. and virtually all 
of them have been revived in recent 
years. Yet, it was not until the late 1960s, 
when John Cage used some of the Stud- 
ies in a score of Merce Cunningham's 
“Crises," that Mr. Nancarrow's music 
began to attract attention. In 1969, 
Columbia Records released a recording 
of a dozen of the Studies, and in 1975. 
the composer Peter Garland began pub- 
lishing scares of the Studies in Sound- 
ings. an influential new music journal. 

Mr. Nancarrow was bom in Tex- 
arkana, Arkansas, and undertook his 
musical studies at the Cincinnati Col- 
lege-Conservatory of Music from 1929 
to 1932. In 1936. he went to Spain to 
fight against Franco with the Abraham 
Lincoln Brigade, and upon his return to 
the United Stales, in 1939, he became 
involved in the growing new music 
scene in New York, both as a composer 
and as a critic for the magazine Modem 
Music. But when the government re- 
fused to renew his passport in 1940 
because of his outspoken Socialist 
views, he moved to Mexico Ciry. and 


Uganda AIDS Toll 
Exceeds 460,000 

Agcnce Frunce-Prrssr 

KAMPALA, Uganda — AIDS 
has killed 460.758 people in 
Uganda over the past nine years, the 
official New Vision newspaper re- 
ported Tuesday. 

The death toll amounts to almost 
.85 percent of the total number of 
people diagnosed with acquired im- 
mune deficiency syndrome, which 
stands at 546,173, Elizabeth 
Madras, manager of the national 
program to combat sexually trans- 
mitted diseases, told the newspa- 
per. 

About 1.5 million Ugandans are 
infected with the virus that causes 
AIDS, the report said, although pro- 
jections have put the figure at well 
over 2 million people. 

The country's total population is 
19 million. 

By 1998, New Vision reported, 
an additional 693,600 women be- 
tween the ages of 20 and 49 will 
become infected and 83,993 women 
in the age group will develop full- 
blown AIDS — up from 55,584 in 
1993. 

Among men in die same age 
bracket, 642,600 will become 
newly infected, up from 529,200 in 
1993. 


he became a Mexican citizen in 1956. 

Until 1981, when he returned to hear 
some of his music performed at a new 
music festival in San Francisco, he re- 
turned to the United States only once, to 
obtain a machine for cutting his own 
piano rolls — the long paper strips that 
drive player pianos — in 1947. 


$260 million that the Oregon fanners 
had paid him for forming the joint ven- 
ture. 

Now, Snake River and the National 
Council of Farmer Cooperatives are 
pondering whether to challenge the veto 
in court, an action Mr. Simmons has 
pledged to support 

“This is a vendetta against Harold 
Simmons, and that's sad," said Allan 
Iipman, president of Snake River. 

* ‘They tried to shoot Harold Simmons 
and instead they shot our 2,000 grow- 

- - M 

ers. 


Reischauer, a framer Congressional 
Budget Office director. "The idea will 
be to mix your pork into a dish that has 
other ingredients — or even better, put it 
into a dish that is of great interest to the 
president" 

Stan Coilender, a fiscal policy expert 
with Burson-Marstellar, said that the 
strategy had its drawbacks. “As soon as 
yon become less specific and call for a 
lump sum instead of specific line items, 
you give the department — and therefore 
president — a lot more discretion about 
how the money gets spent" 

For that reason, Mr. Coilender argued, 
many lawmakers will resort to politics 
instead of legislative sleight of hand to 
protect their favorite proposals. 

"The best insulation for line item veto 
is White House concurrence,” he said. 

In lobbying for the line-item veto, Mr. 
Clinton often cited his use of a similar 
authority as governor of Arkansas. 

But Douglas Holtz-Eafan, an eco- 
nomics professor at Syracuse Uni- 
versity, said the use of the line-item veto 
at die state level had been of little benefit 
in maintaining fiscal discipline. 



TV Wriitel IW 


Harold Simmons, target of the veto. 


sued Crown Travel, the tour operator, 
and the ship's owner, Laura lines, in 
1985. Judge Stanton dismissed the suits 
against the tour operator, while Laura 
Lines reached an out-of-court settle- 
ment. 

The Klinghoffers were the only vic- 
tims of the hijacking to sue the PLO, 
while Crown filed .its own lawsuit 
a gains t tfae o rganizati on 

The PLO argued unsuccessfully that it 
was a sovereign state and could not be 
sued in the United States. It also resisted 
the plaintiffs’ attempts to require Mr. 
Arafat to give a deposition, until the 
judge ordered that he do so. While the 
PLO leader never did give a deposition, 
lawyers did question several organiza- 
tion officials. 


ISRAEL: 

Bomb Feud Defused 

Continued from Page 1 

Mr. Netanyahu would hear the same 
message on Wednesday,, when he is 
scheduled to meet with King Hussein in 
the Jordanian port city of Aqaba. The 
session that will mark his first meeting 
with an Arab head of state since the 
suicide bombing sent Israeli-Palestinian 
relations into a downward spiral 

The sanctions have caused alarm 
across the Arab world because they have 
left the Pales tinian Authority unable to 
pay most of its employees their monthly 
salaries. In the West Bank town of 
Nablus, some 10,000 Palestinians 

d^mnns fr atod Tnesday agains t what they 
called American and Israeli pressures. 
U.S. offi cials also have expressed in- 
creasing concern that Israel’s use of the 
economic weapon could ultimately 
backfire. 

Much of the money that is being with- 
held is normally used by the Palestinian 
Authority to pay the police officers and 
other security personnel whom Israel is 
now asking to cany out a security crack- 
down. But Mr. Netanyahu’s commu- 
nications director, David Bar-IUan, 
noted that some Palestinian officers 
have been implicated in attacks against 
Israelis, and rhat Israel baa issued an 
arrest warrant for Ghazi Jabali, the head 
of the Palestinian police. 

"It’s a little ludicrous for us to pay the 
salaries to pay the very same force that's 
mounted terrorist attacks against us, and 
has shown no change in this policy." 
Mr. Bar-Illan said 

The main purpose of the Tuesday ses- 
sions, UJS. officials said, was for Mr. 
Ross to brief the two leaders on the 
progress made during the late night meet- 
ing on Monday that brought together 
high-level officials representing Israeli. 
Palestinian and U.S. intelligence. 

PRAY: 

Clash in Jerusalem, 

Continued from Page 1 . 

The bill is intended to counter legal 
challenges by the small Conservative 
and Reform movements. They made 
their latest gain last week when the Is- 
raeli Supreme Court ruled that a Reform 
woman should be allowed to serve on a 
local religious council over Orthodox 
objections. 

■ Strife at Holy Muslim Site 

Dozens of Jewish demonstrators were 
stopped by the police Tuesday from 
breaking into the holiest Muslim site in 
Jerusalem to pray. The Associated Press 
reported from Jerusalem. 

Seventeen were arrested 

About 50 demonstrators blocked 
Arabs from entering the Haram al Sharif 
— or Noble Enclosure — the site of the 
Dome of the Rock and Al Aqsa 
mosques. 

The compound is revered by Jews as 
the Temple Mount, site of die First and 
Second Jewish Temples. 


BRIEFLY 


Sudan President 
Urges Cease-Fire 

PRETORIA — President Omar 
Hassan Ahmad Bashir of Sudan 
called Tuesday for a cease-fire in 
the 14-year civil war with separatist 
rebels of the People’s Liberation 
Army in the south. 

"We believe that the war should 
come to an end In this respect we 
have requested a cease-fire with the 
faction of Dr. John Garang," Gen- 
eral Bashir said at a press confer- 
ence after talks with President Nel- 
son Mandela of South Africa. 

General Bashir's visit was re- 
quested by Mr. Mandela and is tak- 
ing place against die background of 
an African peace initiative under the 
Intergovernmental Authority on 
Development. ( Reuters ) 

Kenya Reformers 
Call 10-Day Truce 

NAIROBI — Advocates of legal 
reforms in Kenya said Tuesday that 
they were putting ou hold anti-gov- 
ernment rallies and demonstrations 
to give religious leaders time to 
mediate between them and the rul- 
ing party. 

The announcement by an alliance 
of opposition leaders, lawyers and 
human rights groups came after 
Christian and Muslim leaders ap- 
peared to have distanced them- 
selves from violence on Friday, 
which left five people dead- and 
shops looted during a one-day gen- 
eral strike called by reformists. 

A statement from the reformist 
alliance, the National Convention 
Assembly, said the suspension 
would last for 10 days. (AP) 

Police Hunt 380 
After Mass Escape 

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — 
The police on Tuesday searched for 
hundreds of prisoners who escaped 
from jail in northwestern Honduras 
following a prison riot 

An estimated 380 prisoners were 
on the loose after breaking out of a 
prison late Monday near the town of 
Santa Barbara, 110 miles (180 ki- 
lometers) northwest of Teguci- 
galpa. the capital, the police said. 

Inmates angr y at poor conditions 
and a slow judicial system threw 
rocks at the guards and set fire to the 
jail before breaking out One pris- 
oner was killed during the melee, 
although tiie police had no details 
about bow he died. All 482 pris- 
oners escaped but about 100 were 
later caponed. The Santa Barbara 
prison had space for 100 prisoners 
but was home to nearly five tunes 
that many. (Reuters) 

Deadly Peru Snow 

LIMA — A blizzard in the Andes 
has killed six children and trapped 
hundreds of people on a highway for 
days. Drivers who managed to cross 
the deep snow and reach a nearby 
town said the children, 2 to 3 years 
old, died in the cold near Negro 
Mayo, 290 miles (465 kilometers) 
southeast of Lima. 

The stoma began Thursday, trap- . 
ping 10 buses with about 500 pas- 
sengers, said regional civil defense 
chief, Luis Beltran. Stranded at an 
altitude of 10,000 feet, passengers 
were hugging each other for 
warmth, and they desperately 
needed food and warm clothing, ac- 
cording to radio reports, (AP) 

For the Record 

An armed group attacked a 
minibus that refused to stop at a 
road barricade, killing two people in 
the latest violence in Algeria, hos- 
pital sources said Tuesday. (AP) 


VENGEANCE: South African Killings Revive Third Force 9 Fear 


Continued from Page 1 

the Truth and Reconciliation Commis- 
sion — which is investigating apartheid- 
era atrocities — have provided a picture 
of past third- force activity in KwaZulu/ 
Natal, in which the former National 
Party government instigated black-on- 
black violence. 

National Party officials have admitted 
that there was a slush fund, authorized at 
cabinet level, to support the ANC's 
archenemy in the province, the Zulu- 
based Inkatha Freedom Party, led by 
Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi. And po- 
lice officers have testified that when they 
supplied weapons and other support to 
Inkatha members bent on assassinating 
ANC activists, they were following or- 
ders from top government ministers. 

No evidence of more recent third- 
force activities has been made public. 
But many experts who closely follow 
KwaZulu politics said they believed that 
remnants of such a force survive, even 
though apartheid was dismantled in the 
early 1990s and such activities are no 
longer sanctioned by the national gov- 
ernment or the National Party. These 
experts point to gunrunning and para- 
military training in the province that 
continues unhindered by the security 
forces. 

"Either they are grossly incompetent 
or key members of both the police and 
the army are continuing their well-es- 
tablished destabilization strategies.” 
said Mary De Haas, a social anthro- 
pologist at the University of Natal who 
publishes a bimonthly newsletter on 
political violence in the province. Ms. 
De Haas says she believes the latter. 

But even those who think a hidden 
hand is at work stoking violence in 
KwaZulu said, there were many un- 


answered questions: How highly placed 
are tiie leaders of this force? Is it sup- 
ported by outside money? And does it 
extend beyond clusters of police and army 
officers who still hope that enough black- 
on-black violence will persuade South 
Africa to vote for a return of white rule? 

Certainly the residents in the pictur- 
esque villages pf this area — most of 
whom were far too terrified to give their 
names to a reporter — believe they are 
caught up in a larger game backed by 
white extremists. In the last few weeks, 
they say. they have been going to bed 
early, switching off lights and turning 
off their radios so that the killers cannot 
find their huts in the dark. 

The problems in Magoda and other 
villages that surround Richmond, a town 
about 40 miles (65 kilometers) south of 
Pietermaritzburg, began four months 
ago when the ANC held a press con- 
ference concerning the expulsion of Mr. 
Nkabinde from the party. ANC officials 
said they had proof that he had been a 
police spy under the former government 
and was still operating as one. 

Mr. Nkabinde. who was the chairman 
of the ANC in the Pietermaritzburg area 
when he was expelled, denied the 
charges and attributed his expulsion to 
rivals within the party. 

Within days the violence began. The 
first to die, the deputy mayor of Rich- 
mond. Rodney van der Byl, was gunned 
down outside his house. When Mr. Nka- 
binde. a former mayor of Richmond, was 
ejected from the ANC, all five members 
of the Richmond town council resigned in 
a show of support. Only the current may- 
or, now under 24-hou r-a-day protection, 
and Mr. van der Byl did not join them. 

Last month, with hundreds of extra 
soldiers deployed in the area, new local 
elections were held. Residents say that 


Mr. Nkabinde, who had joined the Na- 
tional Consultative Forum — a new 
political party headed by another ex- 
pelled ANC member, Bantu Holomisa 
— made many threats to local villagers, 
telling them they would be failed if they 
did not vote for him. Despite this, the 
ANC won four of the five council seats. 
Mr. Nkabinde won only about 40 votes 
in his own district. 

Less than 24 hours after the results 
were announced on July 21, two of die 
newly elected council members and 
three other ANC activists were dragged 
from their homes and riddled with bul- 
lets. Army units patrolling the area had 
been called off that night. And man y 
local residents said Mr. Nkabinde was 
seen riding into the area in a police van 
just hours before the killings. 

Then, the following week, two of his 
supporters were shot and wounded. And 
on Aug. 1. Mr. Nkabinde’s right-hand 
man, Msouthem Zondi, 34, who was 
widely rumored to be about to defect to 
the ANC, was shot in his house in Ma- 
goda. His girlfriend, Phumzile Mxele. an 
open supporter of the ANC, was also 
killed. 

Outside the mud hut the following 
morning, Mr. Nkabinde told reporters 
that he was being framed and that his 
supporters were being picked off. 

"I don’t want to rake a contribution 
to what is going on in the area," he said, 
“but this looks like it is calculated to 
target the leadership of the National 
Consultative Forum." 

He said that a witness had identified 
an ANC member as the killer, but that 
the witness was in hiding. He com- 

E lained that the Special Investigative 
init. the national police force that in- 
vestigated the six previous homicides, 
had not come to the scene. 










ft 




' Jr -% 


' J. . ■ " 

1 '•%„ 


% 






Iw 


dpt 








i 

v.i.- r 

M 

- : 5 


•Kf' 




* 


4 



MKl 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13- 1997 


PAGE 7 


A Q Jl i THE INTERMARKET 


^ +44 171420 0348 


b lNTL FRANCHISES $ 


JUST PUBLISHED 

International Herald Tribune's 
international Franchise Guide 

J325™"* FRANCHISE 

•A»WMiwr OPPORTUNTTIES 

r,,;;.; '■ «nimr gunti- IO intern uliwijl fram /iiMri". 

r u p* ltM ^^ pmlilifi on din unrldV leadim; inurfiMliuikil 
rrdnthi?nr-. 1 >(i I S$34-.05 4 iij.>piru 4 

fKl tuidr P.0. Fkn IM Oakland. LA *M«»L UIl limn <W \ is, 

, 'r. *■ FAjiir. 1 hiir & W« j! Sinialur*-).’ 

r _w .. I h i* MWTl or Fav: (aW) .>17-32 47 

•*"■ H »urrrlinnkw ninhlinlLlKI Wrlnilte . fra n ■ -h i :-t- in I l.mm 

lieralb^i^&lEribunc 


nmtnmiu %n*h»f 


the intermarket 

Starts 
on Page 4 


HEADERS ARE ADVISED 

ffraf t/tg international 
Herald Tribune cannot be 
•»e/a responsible for loss or 
damages incurred as a 
result of transactions stem- 
ming from advertisements 
which appear in our 
paper. It is therefore rec- 
ommended that readers 
make appropriate inquir- 
ies before sending any 
money or entering into 
any binding commitments. 


‘Import/Export 


mm inc . 

LARGE GRADER OF USED CLOTHING 

Foe Yjrmeri - men • chidren 
PREMIUM S DOMESTIC QUALITY 
DENIM JEANS & DENM JACKETS 
Expel txq tales utoh totes toes 
AFRICA ASA EUROPE MID-EAST 
CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA 
Tel 71&-340-227B Fto.7lfrM2.358 US 


BUYING OUTLET FOR THE LARGEST 
Trading Companies Branded S Luxury 
good; Fragtances/tosmwcs waiefcs. 
pens ctmarrare. avail, napdbags 
cpHcal names sunglasses me cigars 
Gucci Tag Httiei Caraer Wedgewood. 
Swawski Hnend. Ferraaamo. Prada. 
Hermes, sic. Please caMix- TRADING 
DESK Tel USA +1-212-007-0973 Fax 
USA tI- 212-S07-90S8 AH calls Ireaed 
v.nn ramos? corfutott 


CASKETS 

American Casket far export 
Become a represmawe 
For riomation tar n the US 
IB03J 9264690 


OFFER; U R E A - « 

1 mb MT. USS l3a-1IT ClF payable 
,-DySUC Far 10 LOI. ♦ P.0-F.D 
.411 371 71 0B. 


COMMERCIAL 
REAL ESTATE 


A 


SPAIN 

Nevvlv refurbished office 
bin Id inc for sale. Futrncirola. 
Cosla del Sol, Spain. TUT si.m. 
tullv air-conditioned, earth 
furnished, central leltphonc 
$vsh*ni, central alarm svstein. 
excellentlv situakd Wroild -nil 
multinational companv and. er 
mulb-ofttce sttup. 

Price; USS 350,000. 

Tel: +34 5 280 8010 
Fax: +3452808143 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
mmwmsspORTs 

BanWigJktxoiaiting-Secrelanal 
‘/a RegKlranon-lniw;»tg 
Ma+Prins-Fax Services Vi'urthnd? 

Aston Corporate Trustees 

19 Peel Rod. Douglas, tele of Man 
Teh +44 (0) 1624 626591 
Fat +44 (0) 1624 62S126 

London 

Tet +44 (0) 171 233 1302 
Far +44 (0) 171 233 1519 

E Mail: astonfenterprise.net 

umwastoiHomdemonxojik 


USA OPPORTUNITY 

Enter an exciting patl ot me 
transportation business m ihe U.S.A. 
Always profitable, wre fed closed to 
the new product devetopmem process at 
ok of toe Big Three van and Ini* *n- 
gore We are cmasertfe in then lop 10 
in bom quality am votire Ou wJustry 
is consottating-btf tows ran Pe no new 
smarts when me market expiries aqam 
lira'll explain wfivi 1 2 J©T. audited 
sJatemerts Powerful management team 
»i stay up to 18 months. ’intematrorBi 
possiwies 

Box 361, International Herald Trfixme 
B50 ThW Ava. HY„ N-Y. 10022 USA 
Far 1-709*763-9819 


CYBERSPACES GOTCHI PET Games. 
&mpl jii^mert (ram-rtCG. Please fax. 
■J49) 0I71-WB54 w 852-3262040 


DOMINICAN CIGARS. 5 styles, hand 
-oiled, volume purchases only 
TtWar. USfcSM-474-306? ' 


EXPORT FAMOUS BRANDS 

J.S supermarket & consumw quods 

BilWiS in stock Fax 972 3 6817883 


JVI 501 'S. Used and New Quality 
eans Hired iron the USA. Honest and 
Refitfe Fax 50M2W749 USA 


SMALL ARMS AIIMUNmONMUTARY 

'tajipmem and supplies, bluest prices 
wgn a onl y. PAX USA ^954474-3666 

TAMAGOTCHI TOY IPifPy 4 Orosairi 
100.000-1 000000 units Low pnee 
Fax 71+6734235 USA 


USED LEVI 501 JEANS - AH colors & 
grades For pnee 6st FAX. 601-561-3849 
USA RECYOEWEAB 


Business Opportunities 


FINANCE AVAILABLE POR 
• LETTERS OF CREDIT 
' STANDBY LETTERS OF CREDIT 
• FINANCIAL GUARANTEES 
• PROOF OF FUfDS 
■ WVE5TMENT LOANS 
Fax acplicacns onty tn+90 362 22682?! 


FOR SALE-TIRE POWDER KING 
Equipment, u cxT relmenes. 7 drilling 
nos gold situations, power generators. 

ptiffl TPdacws Ol fete 9 » tones 
& casites Also gam U S. OJ snuatw 
Reply Fax I502i 38&-9BM USA 
Aitennor, Mitcfte* 

“are YOU WTERESTED IN MAKING a“ 

mode* inxMimwl and Residing IMW 
ttSA 9 For mere rtformanext Hay s hm 
p C. Attorneys Wtp'.'.ww^.iWW? 
ana/ me cZtjnQJ* ■ 1 ^ < ^ 3C33 


USAAJX ffiALTH FOOD BanitocWr 
seekng iratswg and ntamdadimg 
stances 'ath nr.a? Contarws s«i 
es&stxO r-tmecdl atti rcisuner 
• rpteea mxtets. We die; an 
Wematcnaily tatwn D<i Prod® rate 
vrtely tiom hwn arptes. and cfessfcd 
as a Fcod Sdppemert Acsstns . 
Stixressart 9 erqoys a STOtj priud 
bertm. servfig an aome mrtd ruche 
marks 'rih sgraean 9 ?wlh jrespaos 
Reasjuscnlaxmmter 44 1 2M 338857 
a E-ma * address, fiachrtnoeta « 
visa ou nomePMs omhe internet tab •’ 
\m noa a'rHmromcieods.'aTiome tarn 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


Save To 85 % On 
International Calls! 

The Original 

kallback 


Call To The U.S. From: 

Germany 

$0.31 

U.K. 

S0.19 

Japan 

50.38 

Hong Kong 

$0.46 



AT&T fnb«T Optic Networks • 24-Hour Customer Service 
UemittP S Second Billing - Ideal lor Home. Otlice, 
Hotels end CeU Ptionis 


'Callers get dependable, high-quality service" 


Agents Wanted 
Call 1 -206-376-2861 


Tel: 1.206.599.1991 • Fax: 1.206.599.1981 

417 Second Avenue West • Seattle, WA 08119 USA 
www kaiibeck.com • Email: lnfoekaiiback.com 


LOWEST INT'L PHONE IMES! 


To 79% • No Signup or Monthly Fees 
ex or Cellular • Call for All Our New Rates 


Savings Up 
y Phone, Fa 

No Confusing Bills 
Check Out Our Hates To U.S.A. From: 


Any Phone 

24 Hr. Personal Service 


France 32c 

Germany .33c 

Switzerland .36c 

UK -25c 

Hong Kong .44c 

Italy 45c 

Netherlands -39c 

Japan .37$ 

Canada 25c 

Spain 60c 

Belgium 55c 

Austria 50p 

Visit ourWeb Site 
HTTP:// IYPN.com/KallMart 
475 Hwy. A1A. 

Satellite Beach FL 32952 USA 
E-maik 7572S.1743 dcompusenexoni 


Singapore J34c 

Philippines 76c 

Indonesia .Si. 03 

Thailand S1.02 

Taiwan 66c 

®s sSs#* 



PRICE • OUALITV - SERVICE 


Tel: 1-407-777-4222 

Fax: 1-407-777-6411 UmsOpb^ws. 


2S^ Commissioo! Agnh felime! 

Enter ExL 112 (fusion Haynes] wfien you caS 


YOUR OWN C0IFANY IN 
SM2ERLAND 
ZURiCH-ZiJGl'JZERH 

C0NF1DESA 

Baarcraras^ 36 Ofo309 ZUG 
71 -41 i: -11 32EB Fi -41 41 71CHW9 


U.S. auiinessw-Ausn] vnding Geoe .3 
ifiimg 3 SkiT « Wir.f Snops. LT.cte- 
arip*s rcodtjaw StiwnreKh Assoc 
•USA. 314 : 5 ; . 301 - 52+8247 


VISITING PROFESSOR, rae -sctr-onuni- 
::;5+:*cu5 :«■+ US Unnreraly 
=-ra ->?s:?Tir<jnia»aT 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

READY MADE COi. FLU ADMW 
TRADE DOCUieiTS AM) 1C 
BAf«WG & ACCOUNTING 
CHINA BUSINESS SERVICES 

Conted StaBa Ho for romertae 
serves & company mdut 
MACS LTD. Rear 1100, AIMm Plaza 
' 2-i Grarmle Road 1ST. Kwrtoon 
Hong Kong e-mait iBts&Wiiiper.nel 
Tel: K2J7241223 Fa* 27224373 • 


WEti KNOWN FRENCH 

•COUTURE HOUSE* 

seeks earners to meest as erjnty 
capital kt ordet to develop « tag 
acandte g mlemalefBl business 
Fa» detais » r33 W 44 t" 5C 70 


2nd PASSPORTS Driving LcencfiS ■ 
Degreifs.' , -a , ™utiage PassronsiS«iei 
Bank 4rttJu>ft. GM. p 0 
Atbens 16610. Gitect. Fa* 8962152. 
imp. ‘n ‘. vo ram 

INT’L SOCIETY OF FINANCIERS 

rn iiCK fcr lading ot tortSCQ «r 

SLR ^SSrW 


WCROBREW PUB FOR SALE. Sur- 
ccssful and weU estabtshed American 
rmertoee put' in Setting. FW ttetarts 
03(030 Fax NO (BBJOl b 4?r 'te* 

Errai agworlgdusctwiicn 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES. For tee to- 
chura or at«e Tet uwfcn 44 JW 
1224 Fax: 44 10 i 748 65o&63.'b 
wnrjpptetonotJi* 


SJL IN BRUSSELS kBtog forar, prJ- 
4a We bosness ptyosieo >&?&»■■ 
estate compariyi Please can 
-3226461114 


HAWAB IK manjaciunng Ca S79K 5 
3 bBdioom home t acre S4OTK Tf ’ 
8G&23M38 of 8KF2356345 


UNSECURED VBA CARD AVA1ABLE 
to anyone Dk 2 UA ratimin S3& 
For free mlonnafioft please ra* 
432S0S23.415 


Telecommunications 


CTl - International 

Kr£z? 2 L Prspaa Car* 
Ecrener; Cwiittie Pnci-vg 
>' 5 u ? , -5Lr6243 ra* -BCfiCTu- 
3:22 OW Zaprzi Trail SiAe 6 H). 
•/.imayw Deware 159R61K. USA 


Business Travel 


IstlBusIness Class Fi^quen Travelers 
Wartterie Up to 50*. oft No cw*cre. 
no resinciiorvs Imperwr Canada Tel 
1-514-341-7227 rax. 1-51+341-7993 
e-mail addresa imperial^ login net 
littp JAvww.log rutet/lmperial 


Business Networking 


rOUR U.SJSWSS EXPANSION NOW! 

R^fS eiecuir.es 'leal & travel lo :ou 
ric trow iee Success-tee* Free info t 
itu far C 4ier » U S P - 4 i : 7t3;«*7 


Capital Wanted 


Business Services 


GENEVA 

SWITZERLAND 

Full S&YK 2 

is our Business 

■ henawial law m taxes 
’ Va*o» tetepfiene tetei ano 
letecopier setvees 

• Trare*axn and swaarai serveas 

• Miratirv *fltcJatr:n and 
*tror*arare 3 ) of Swiss and fctetin 
arr^ataes 

' Fumslwi effees and ctrteraft* 
nzrs *o: tfeJv -f morewy refflat 

Fun c^rtoence ano Jsnenjn assned. 

BUSINESS ADVISORY 
SERVICES SA 

7 Rue Muzv 1207 GENEVA 
Tel 7£ 15 :fl The 413222. Fax 786 C6 44 


2ND PASSPORTS. Visa tree Itavel « 
tanking back door to Spam * EU 
Aaerfc are wftome Tet 972 50383135 
Fax 572 4 9S43236 or E-rraf 
nfajspcrtSiasspw ofl-» 


R IS SIAN BUSINESS Visas Including 
multi-entry plus aT other travel services 
va of Dwnw.'n Ubsc* effee Tet +44 
10,113 232 0262 Fa* (6itl3 232 CC 2 B 


VENNA ■ OFFICE - SERVICE, life 3d 
as tout ctfke • secretanal • telephone - 
!i> service Mrs KciCf-' Tel M43-1- 
718-66-133 -» K»T-T1«e« 


HAILING USTS t. Berger l Company 
European business and consumer dau 
Tel 44 1352262956 Fax 44 1312257901 

YOUfi 0FFTCE W LONDON _ _ 

Bend Steel • Mail Phone r®- 
Tet 44 in ZSO SOW Fax 171 499 7517 


PUB BREWERY CHINA 
ktsn ccmpaiy seeing partners m // in 
Clwa HQh tetiTR and great paeniial 
is ajpansw. Mm mestmem £40.000. 
max £480000 Fax. -M iOOSI 5220424 
fra detais Prtncipete Onty 


SYnSS COMPANY SEEKS investment 

partner ror USS 1 2M. Acs rty rslaies lo 
okeadr exempt mtemamnaly paenled 
extraacn systems ot actrre ngretMiKS 
«tfi e»:elteri potente/ tor cosmac. nu- 
tritional and pfiarmaceuucai appKauons. 
Please corsaa CERATECH Fax *41 22 
819 1900 


ENTREPRENEUR SEEKS abew FFl 2M 
captoi jo buy ccmpany assas valued a 
FF5U Siiistenoal ret ran or iwestmeffl 
Reb . wholesale etecmcal appiences. 
Tel +33 10)6 Ji 03 37 72 Fax +33 
(OR 4;. 40 94 bi 


Capital Available 


CAPITAL C0RP. 

M & A 

Corporate financing 
vennie Capial 
IWorttwJei 

Tel: 001-407-248-0360 
Fax: 001-407-248-0037 USA 


FUM>S AVAILABLE 
Fur iwesjmemi Programs 
Prod rt Funds Avatacte 
Thtouri Account Hoidets a 
Sevan US 4 European Baiks 
{ 212 ) 7584242 Fax: (212) 758-1221 
wwwjofirHBmevxdn 
Attorneys* DnWis Wirt 
375 Park Ave . NY. NY 1fji52 IJSA 


BROKERS 

Dn your wm tradmq transactions 
You pwde fenL ^laramee. ns «i 
pnwde bank wdHiw rt funds in you 
name. For nominal teasxa cos* 
Far 44 (0)171 470 7113 




BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


AML 


The Mark qf Service 

atfifia 

MANAGEMENT LTD 

(International 

Corporate C- Trust) 
Contact 

Tom- Gould / Alain Albeit 
Tel/Fax: 

+ +UO) l62-i6lW.nr/6l6006 

E-fiaiIatdei3*enrerprise net 


Do you bow llw bed wey to a*oid 
ponisfimertf for speexfng? 

^ TryqRBJ „ 

The BEL undrtectable nodar/teser 
cidecter gives you the most 
ihemive protection availfMe. 
more inkmotiem cokUcI ux 
. Rhoim 0049 - 4921 -24555 
1 Fax:0049 - 4921-24590 — 1 


corni 


If whj need to find out some secrets- 
hew you ever thought of bogs or 
hKMBn cameras^ We supply 


everything for inves... 
and cfoservahon 
fru more information contort us: 

. Phono: 0049 • 4921 - 32M6 or 
L. Fax: 0049 ■ 4921 - 20742 _I 


INVESTORS 

Are you mtereaea In a return of invest- 
ments ol 24% net in three years, 
guaranteed. 

investment quota minimum US-S2G.O0Q - 
Into P.O. Box 431. 

CH -6048 Horw/Switzerland 

internet HTTP^WWW.VANDERBILT- 
INVEST.COM 


EMPIRE STATE BINUXNG 
ADDRBS 

Gain instant credibility. 
EataUten a NY presenca in 
the worttra best -known 
bonding. Mall received, phone 
anwrenng. conference 
room, furnished mini-offices 
EMMEBTXTEaFFKEmWCEi 
TEL2t2-73M072 • FAX: 21268+1135 


LEASE SCASHS 
FOR YOUR INVESTWEKTS 

WE DEPOSIT CASH INTO YOUR 
ACCOUNT OR ARRANGE L<C 
IN YOUR FAVOUR 

PINNACLE CREDIT (CANADA) 
Tet (416) £01-2270 
Far (416) 601-2280 

BRClKERSIAGENTS wanted 
HIGH COMMISSIONS PAID 


ANGLO AUIl'CkN CHOIIP 
PLC 


PROJECT FNANCE 
VENTURE CAPITAL 
GLOBAL COVERAGE 
NO MAXIMUM 
BROKERS WELCOME 
For Cwporaie Brochure and 
namabon pack 
Tet +44 1924 201 365 
Far *44 1324 2Dl 377 

You are wtome lo vtsa us. 


GLOBAL PROJECT FUNDING VEN- 
TURE CAPITAL-JOINT VENTURES- 
PfiOJECT FINANCING 


Vumn 


Tel: +44 113 2727 550 Fax: +44 113 
2727 560 Fas are nrt retjueaed prior © 
an ofe ol funding being made 


COMMERCIAL FUNDING AVAILABLE 
Busmass finance ' Venture Capsai 
WodthrOe * Brokers netome 


ETHIC WYESTIENTS LTD 
FAX »44 (D.H15 942 7846 


PRIVATE TRUST FUNDS 
avast* tor reflnan® 
o r trotting c apital ter 
commeroai cans 
No itofiwn fees 
ft* rformalion FAX 
011-40+633-3647 USA. 


PROJECT CAPITAL 
Atafebte tor Rent 
Mtafanum US5 5m 
ModmuxiUSS 10m 
Rena costs vary *»n 
Period money raqurad 
Fax 44 (0)171 470 7205 


CQMMEROAUBUSINESS FINANCE 
Bvaltebte tot any viable protects wrid- 
unde. Fax bnel synapse in ErcOsfi (o 
Corpraate Advances. (+ 144 - 1273 - 621 300. 


INCORPORATE 


IN THE 


rSKCEv 

',1899/ 


U.S.A. 


! Protect Your Personal AsMU 

I • tncoooraie r. any sure uiouang 
I OeHa*are ‘veveda & Wycm-ng 
] ■ LLC 5 c.- :«j LiAWv Companies] 
■ ■ n as krte as 4fl nars 

Corporate Agents. Inc. 

I Ft. .’03i95fr7bTB 
Ccr^rjSar.e GC inC 
rrr .va-A SSM-ara com 



■THE GOLD MACHINE' 

'na n Gi; ■ 

s»- rj3-: 3->3C r-ramne rr, metiers of 
iViC M PfgCCLS UETsiS 
voe^- 8 icrve ana *e« w. saws 
:• sjie+tsastfSsyEJsSnti^m 

sm-v irz transsr «i awaje ai 
u5« YC Yl-t-un sa-rg capo' -9S4TW 

KEMA KMOS&IT SY5TIMS 

DC IHT 33 

, RukiK-OiatC^ff. 20. ffiTKl EKttma GenMw . 
^TeLiwsfiiTa.jaaM Pu.»*ssm-Ear_i 



mtt nm\ 

...then 

Amcfici s leading product 
development company Is interested 

{INTERNATIONAL PRODUCT OES(GN| 
1 Harlay Street, London WIN IDA 


+44 (0)171 *436*1127 


LIECHTENSTEIN & WORLDWIDE 
OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

•COtSar rD^VSgfs ■ WtUKE 

• f.WWGf?.E ? .'T AND ATCOUNWO 

• INTERNATIONAL TA>- ifGAL AfvD TfiUST 
SE%CS «3WK RTROODCTONS 

• ASSET r+jrfCTOh' • WOE SLPPC-WT 

• 7cl=F+ONf A‘JD MAIL rOfiiVARDtf/G 
riee Bioiha^e availzole in Er.gr«h 

GeTi£/i 3-ia 

Intercompany 
Management 
P.O. Box 4431 
6304 ZUfl - SurKzeHand 
Fax *+41 -41 -7105064 
e-mafl tc@ 1 rten»mpanvxh 
hg(X j /»rew J n tei co m pa ny 



• e 


PROJECT FINANCING 

Verauie Capteal - joid Ventures • 
(to Ma>inun - Brokers Protected 

R.J.L INTERNATIONAL 
Tel: 001-242-363-1649 
Fax: 001 - 71 6-779-B200 


UNLfliTTED CAPITAL FOR PROJECTS 
FUKDBtG AGAWST BG'e. SLCs 
Min. S 10 MU Ion USD. No Max. 

international Funrfing Services. Inc. 
Tea 1-904-2KM64C USA 
Fax. 1-904 28M&17 USA 
Web fi-avriiorg 
E-UaJ- hmOogSiserg 


-■IMED1ATE & UNLIMITED “ 
C^xlal svailatte tor 
All busness projects' 

MIN US SI mdmo max 
tnti Br^mess ConsuHrg 
017. 397-7430 (US. FAX) 
KIpnwvsiJrteXRcaicom iwemai 


VENTURE CAPITAL 
Ifin USS 3m From Prtndpel 
Start 14 m, dwtopment etc 
Nev Pool Avdabla July 
Far +44 (0)171 470 7158 
Attic Corporate Finance Director 


PROJECT CAPITAL * LOAN FUNDS 
available this quarter Min USD S 2 M 
Fax +1 80? 686 7056 K COC. tta Fund 
Managed $ invesowm Eantero 


LETTERS OF CREDIT 
available 

FAX -44 101171 373 4558 


Financial Services 


WORLD WIDE FINANCING 

‘CommarctaJ Mortgages 
•Venture Capita 
•Stock Loans 
- ’Pnpct Funding 
tatters ol Croat 
•Accounts RBCsfirabte Financing 
■Private Pbeanert 
•Pitofc Sheds 

Tel: (212) 758-4242 
Fax: (212) 758-1221 

Broiler's Welcome 

375 Pal Ave.. NY NY 10152 USA 
Kwtcito-taxneycorti 
Refuntawe Hewier 
Somannes Required 


YIMlIil 

CAPITAL WANTED 
US$20,000,000. 

NAPOLEON FRENCH CHEESE 
FRENCH WINERY PRO DECT 
MADE IN CHINA SINCE 199.3 

BEIJING NIMH FOOD CO. LTD. 
GSELS. SIFONI GILLES 

120 Chomin du (hr' 

83300 (Yar) Dras^ui^nan, FRANCE 


J The Blueprint on 
How to Legally 
Avoid Taxes" 

From the words of US 
State Senator Moynihan 


For FREE information pack 
telephone, fax or write to: 
Scope EnrernationalLtcf 
Box 6728. 

Fonsiside House, Rowlands 
Castle. Hants. P09 6 EE. UK 


Tel: +44 1705 631751 
(UK: 01705 631751) 
Fax: +44 1705 631322 
(UK: 01705 631322) 


OFFSHORE BANK 


with correspondent relationship. 

Class A commercial license. 
Immediate delivery. US $60,000. 

Nassau. Bahamas 
T eL (242) 394-7080 Far. (242) 394-7082 
Acents Wanted Worldwide 


FUNDING PROBLEMS? 


lor 

SOLUTIONS 

Contact 


BANCOR 

OF ASIA 

Baittabto guarantees to secure taring 
tor vette projects: 

VENTURE CAPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 

Lena term a-Jiera: 
Surxwo Oiflrarwes 

Far (S32) «W»2M 
TaL- (632) 894-5358 

iConmesinn earned only ijpon Funtftogj 
Brokers Cwwwsen Assurert 


AVIATION 


GtlLFSTREflM V 

■ •Green Delivei^ 1 Position 
* Available March, ioos 
•C ompletion Contraa to 
Buyers 

Specifications Nov. 1^7 

TEL: 516-271-0095 
FAX: 516-351-8479 
Email: welsch@msn.com 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


WORLD TRENDS; 

If \.'u ttjffl the \ei\ K.-S in.-kiL-r 
con'vnli'.mri imdliHerxe 
G-'OlJO: 

THE SPECIAL OFFICE 
UK Faac 01608 650 540 

v, pnr-pjtin'ii ik- c/uipe 
Ihji v.-.u ^-.njld li-jrn ihe Lfl* 


SHARES FOR SALE m UK Telecom 
Sohv,aie^Haid*aie company Estimated 
timer 1997.1998 £ 4 ? M Gross profit 
Ei2 M Issued tufty pod shares £2.4 M 
Blue Chto company' completed contrad 
2nd neat accomptetmwnt 25°. shares 
availrtte Funhei oecafe tei Sean Mur- 
ray « 1425 471 K 6 or 44 802 253 905 


Diamonds 


ROUGH DIAMONDS We wll pay rostant 
cash tor gem quatey. African ongn 
rotrane only rax 954 474-3866 USA 


Serviced Offices 


FINANCIAL GUARANTEES 

rnsiwk* ' Rerarawe nackea 
^ranees la quaiAed 
business proiecfe 
Tel 561-993-3222 
Fat 561-993-3226 USA 
ntmhcflTpCwridnrtafl net 


Comprehensive Investment Services 

Westminster Secunt.es Corporation 
Michael wolloch 212 - 489-2590 Fa*. 
212-480-2549 ror.tf ftestminsier-sec com 
EmaJ nwroitoTiftiwstTmister-sec'ayD 


Financial Investments 


TOP 1 NVESTUENT • indef+nderaiy !+ 
ranrea movie (productron budgei only 
USS 6 mi km • cost over-runs l 3 Cluiri 
rn stairarq George Bums rr, he tirst ■ af- 
ter Me iitrfi C>toere«tn:to 9 y «i aeae 
a conwner-gerttari Gauge Brans Ai- 
leady meda response 6 the wro r;es- 
to rs only dream attote" A lamc'us dead 
film star coming bad to star in toe IvS- 
sva rtter -fe movie made m toe tatonr 
ot filmmaking flak calculated br^ncai 
parDCfanon. (rnranun uSS^o.oro. same 
profit paimpaton as by actors and pro- 
ducers itep interest plus mimmum $ 3 id 
i raum on investment tvdiun a yea r "!l 
Hjti. miemaiionaf Fa* Germany 
43-7531 ■? 15581 or Fa* USA 901-MS- 
946-3779 


INVESTOR ANUOR PARTNER neeori 
lor a grov.ing urepje conpany.lacK'ty in 
Athens - Greece Only senous offers 
above S29D.OOO «HI be considered 
Speak anti ou e*ecutne team or 
Eractfiw DirecJor Mr fifcscsartts al 
3-01 -55557791 Atr»nsr Our successtut 
past guarantees a successful kJure 1 


OUTSTANDING IBIZA (Spanish 
Baieancs) prepetty ■ Good beam Seek 
firencHl investor +44 lO) I7f 229 523? 


YOUR OFFICE IN PARIS 

fs ready when you need it. 
even lor a ancle d hours. 

■ Fuky tunctonal modam ofices 
and conference rooms to renr tvy toe 
how. day month etc . 

■ You tactical v permanera base 

* Prestige ma*nfl arriess An ser.xes 
B'B E“ 

91, Fg St-Honow ^008 Parts 

TeG33 (0)144713636. FaxIOn 42661560 


COMMERCIAL 
& INVESTMENT 
PROPERTIES 


Offices for Rent 


NEW YORK OFFICE SUBLET 
Two tumsned offices. 4tth How. ^eat 
.tes-.s, 24 ficu tun serwe butoing 
Lexmoon Ave £ 42nd Shared confer- 
erte 'lOornlaii/XertK. 2t2+&0^06E- 


Sales 


6th, CLOSE CHAMPS ELYSEES 

and roe Fg Si Hcnae. kn sate « 19th 
cers rtaussnwn slyfe rturacter buung 
OFFICES or HIGH CLASS apartment to 
be rafted (presently HIM as offices). 
About 3C0 sam per (ever. Panel sate 
pos&Ole VERY GOOD OPPOTTUNin 
Ccoaa c«>« brio on 
Fa* + 33 ( 0)5 56 2D 01 69 
Tel +33 10)6 07 65 65 19 


Businesses For Sale 


FOR SALE: 15 YEAR OLD OFFSHORE 
company (isle ot Man) Clean status 
puce or. apttcauon Wine io Bat 3®. 
IHT.. 63 Laid Acre UMort IYC2E 9JH. 



GENERAL 


Wl - - 

ILS.NET LEASES 

Safe 1025 tees MfiCfe- 

'.Yakswm s WiravOtae. many Otoe'S 

^ MO 5 ; Yiaos 

uaYNARD-RICH PR0P5iTlES-MlAHl 
30^^6-7162 FAX 3D5«S-268l 
RICHS19577 “ACL COM 

SIGHTSEEING ITALY_ 

7 <T 0 vt-ar? ago 

Celebrated July 2 


Spain 

' ^ 

COSTA BRAVA t SEA FRONT, ifegnfr 

Real Estate 
for Sale 

earn tatfV vife ri tw» US'* ^ 
dart w*NPn« t !! B 2“2 
Llorer and Tossa de Lfar sah 

WO. FK 1^3 sqm. Witj area 

oonatfc ran (B^ 1 2 * 3-311 - 


EAST 

• Jd arey- 

prtWtfi 1 Csnw ■**? 3r,4B 

or P»s«*3>5 W ^ 

French Provinces 

i ihe nstttoc center top! 

*jripi . srace Sifi ] S4 Ir,es " 

Sfs.SO ^ ^ ! - 1 - - ^ ““ 

1 


Paris Area Furnished 


o rn/ri 



iileel £Ecmr«)sen auso-5 DMiotb 
Ouatf 1 / aw SHvre assured 
TOADY TO HOVE IN 
+el -33fl]l 4312960(1 F® W 43129808 


AGENCE CHAMPS ELYSEES 

5pKdkSts 

Furohed sanwrasjflwf^s"^ 
a uriuroiried. leartnal seas. 

Td* +33 1011 42 25 32 25 

Fac+33 (uri 45 63 37 09 


iBh nea Passy. chanting etegari 5- 

SETSS- as 

quel ^rden 0 «w (O ' 1 4 ** 795 “ 


CAPfTALE ' PARTNERS 
Handpcked quaNy apattmenis. 
as sizes Pats and Mints. 
Tel: *33 (0/1 42 S3 35 SO 
Fac +33 (0)1 « 58 35 61 
Kfe you best 


Paris Aries Unfurnished 


ITih. IN BEAUTIFUL TOWNHOUSE, 
son/. 3 d foot nO sfn. 6 wg x stxa 
dnng. teessing. i bedroom lichen ca- 
ble n Single persorVc&cte Fiee l Aug 
FFI2K + F2W Key rrwfl' fttthW) * 2 
merths deposft Tel -.13 toji 46225562 


6 th. BD UALESHERBES. 7 ROMS. 
140 sqm. qua bngM. classic Pans 
braiding. Jw asnmssen lOji 4(C3 M34 


Switzerland 


GENEVA, LUXURY FURNISHED apart- 
mere. Fran studios to 4 bedrooms. Tet 
i41 22 735 6320 Fai -41 22 736 3571 


Real Estate Services 




YOU OWN A PROPERTY M FRANCE 
0 u sawss nw in you abssnn- 
MBtofenance. deatftg. ^rdamng, repairs 
fctouHp rf bib. wremniett laxes-eK 
PL&SE DO MT HESITATE TO 
CONTACT US KJR MORE DETA3.S 
FAX +33 (M 50 85 94 34 
Tah +33 (0)4 50 95 35 35 
7 Domane de Crerti F-74160 Bussey 


Residence Hotels 


QJjp nv IE RBIMPS H.TffJS 

Hlgft class rooms & suites 
Daly, wetty & nrnttf tales Pata 
Trt+S) (0)1-44133333. Fn(0)i>422S048B 


Employment 


Executive Positions Available 


NTEWiATKINAL firandal Services 
Grout seeks Financial Otfcffl. preferably 
Sautri Atom tes«}. DttMEmij&i 
spshng. Opportune to rare), Africa. 
Eracpe, usa ■ tot toe tiuN man or 
soman. Quafiftatons arid CV. vi 
reflect saery package Aoe own. 
Please reply r> Bcv No 354. iKT 
63 Long Acre. Loricrt WC2E SJH. UK 


Executives Available 


EXECUTIVE WITH EXTENSIVE manage- 
rial experience m industry and com- 
merce isumost (trance and rartea- 
rq Fluent m English. Rcmnan and 
Heteerr Seeks fitaaSe postm Tel 972 
9 75738®. 


k LvmtMrMvu.AW .a 

Hfralb^s^enbunc 

TUT >XORmVDM» NEftSPtfEH 

PLANNING TO RUN A CLASSIFIED AD? 

Place your Ad quickly and easily, aanfcrt your nearerf IHT office 
or representative with your tod. You will be informed w Ihe oast 
immediately, and once payment is made your pd will appear 
within 48 hours. All major Credit Cards Accepted. 


EUROPE 

FRANCE MQ: fora, 

U {Cil)4li395S5 
Few. 101) 41 43*3 ?0 
E-maJ GaisiW&li! com 

GBMANY. AUSWA & OflRAL 
BSOH: FraiUm. 

TA 1069)0712500 
Fox |0 g®1 9+125020 

UMIH) Q4GDOM: Lxidoa, 
ti 10171)8584305 
262009 

Fax (0171) 540 2254 


EUROPE 

swnanANfcpJy. 

V (071)728 »21 
Fox. » 21 | 728 3091 

NORTH AWHOCA 
hew yowl 

U. 1212) 752-3890 
Wfrw (800)572-7213 
Fax. (2121755 8785 

AS1A/PAOHC 

HONGKONG; 

W 1052) 2922-1 188 
%fc» 61170 IH7HX 
Fox 1852)2922.1190 






PAGE 8 


WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 13. 1997 



EDITORIALS /OPINION 


r\ f 


Ueralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



li m IMIUI WITH TWIT NEW > I IKK T1MI.S \>D TIIE " VSIII'l.Tn' POST 


Sribltnc iy e xt an India for All, Tolerant and Uncorrupt 

TIIE W vsiHNf.Tnx post •/ Arim'p and diversity we have so t 


I .»-*«• 


Right About Bosnia 


Bill Clinton is showing a noticeably 
more energetic Bosnia policy. His 
latest step was the dispatch of the man 
who negotiated the Dayton peace ac- 
cords. Richard Holbrooke, to boost a 
process that the administradon had let 
slide. It remains a steep uphill climb to 
Dayton’s goal of preserving Bosnia at 
least in outline as a multinational state. 
The effort remains burdened with un- 
necessary recurrent assertions that U.S. 
peacekeepers will be withdrawn from 
the ground neat summer no matter 
what. But the Holbrooke mission gave 
a taste of the results a concerted NATO 
application to Dayton might yet bring. 

The Bosnian Serb separatist leader 
and accused w’ar criminal, Radovan 
Karadzic, had promised a year ago to 
give up the presidency of his rump 
territory and disappear from public 
life. In recent months he has flaunted 
his defiance of those promises. His 
patrons, including Serbian President 
Slobodan Milosevic, have now newly 
undertaken to deliver him to political 
retreat. The economic sanctions still 
applied to the Balkan parties presum- 
ably had an influence on this under- 
taking. Perhaps the progressively more 
explicit U.S. warnings that NATO 
peacekeepers would arrest Mr. Karad- 
zic also figured. His departure from 
public life would remove the Bosnian 


Good for Lugar 


Well, hallelujah for Richard Lugar. 
In the tiff over the nomination of Wil- 
liam Weld to be ambassador to Mex- 


ico. the Indiana Republican is giving 
Senate Foreign Relations Committee 


Senate Foreign Relations Committee 
Chairman Jesre Helms a little swallow 
of his own medicine. Senator Helms, 
opposing the nomination for his own 
unstated reasons, has not seen fit to 
permit committee hearings on it. Sen- 
ator Lugar. chairman of the Agricul- 
ture Committee, now suggests that he 
will take some comparably arbitrary 
action bearing on the interests of to- 
bacco farmers from Mr. Helms's North 
Carolina when the Senate reviews the 
tobacco settlement next month. 

Much is being said about what 
seized the mild-mannered Dick Lugar 
and catapulted him into what he con- 
fessed was an "uncharacteristic" re- 
sponse to Mr. Helms. Their views on 
issues differ. Relations between them 
have been prickly at least since Mr. 
Helms asserted his seniority to take the 
top Republican seat on Foreign Re- 
lations away from the eminently qual- 
ified Mr. Lugar. 

But what Mr. Lugar has made cen- 
tral is not ideology or politics or policy 
but the simple civility of the Senate. 


Mr. Weld may or may not be the right 
person for Mexico; he has his own 


person for Mexico; he has his own 
agenda. But Mr. Lugar is not demand- 
ing that the nomination be approved. 


only that it be heard and voted on so 
that the decision is made by a Senate 
conforming to regular procedures as- 
suring collective inquiry and judgment 
and not by one person acting on in- 
clinations he has not deigned to put 
before his peers. 

“It is not only unfair but it seems to 
be unacceptable." Mr. Lugar said, 
“for one chairman to say. ’In my com- 
mittee. I ll be a dictator. I simply will 
stop the music ... and anticipate in 
every other committee others will not 
do this, and therefore I will retain an 
advantage by being unilaterally dif- 
ficult.’ ’’ Mr. Helms prevails in these 
showdowns, Mr. Lugar indicated, by 
being the “most adamant and the most 
constant" in opposition even while 
most people “try to work things out 
because we want to see things happen 
of a constructive nature. 

The Clinton administration has 
taken another approach, accepting Mr. 
Helms as a worthy or at least unavoid- 
able interlocutor and. in the case of 
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, 
conducting a labored public courtship. 
There may be a minimal vote-counting 
excuse for this exercise. We are not 
sure. There is no doubt about the merit 
or usefulness of what Mr. Lugar is 
doing, on the other hand. He is standing 
up to a pampered bully. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Kennedys Deflating 


John Kennedy Jr.’s reference to his 
cousins Joseph and Michael as '‘poster 
boys for bad behavior” in the latest 
issue of George magazine is a trans- 
parent marketing ploy, but it may fur- 
ther the fracturing of an unhealthy pub- 
lic fantasy. In a nation of small, 
scattered family units, the idea of be- 
longing to a close-knit clan that always 
sticks together has great appeal. It was 
also one of the reasons the Kennedys 
continued to fascinate. John Ken- 
nedy's little essay is another sign of the 
end of the Kennedys as an entitled 
political class. Members of the third 
generation, like Representative Joseph 
Kennedy 2d in his faltering bid for the 
Massachusetts governorship, will have 
to be judged on the content of what 
they write and say. rather than as pack- 
ages of money and genes. 

But John Kennedy’s critique of his 
cousins is not likely to put much of a 
glow on his own image as an editorial 
stylist and thinker. He writes in a vapid 
and chatty voice about the perpetual 
tension between the desire to fit into 


conventional norms and the yearning to 
express "the essence of our true self — 


express the essence of our true self — 
one that's ruled by passion and in- 
stinct.” Two members of his family, he 
confesses, have been chasing "an 
idealized alternative to their” life.” 
Joseph Kennedy “left behind an em- 
bittered wife," while his brother Mi- 
chael. "in what looked to be a hedge 
against mortality, fell in love with youth 
and surrendered his judgment in the 
process.” Perhaps, he suggests care- 
fully. "they should have known bet- 
ter. ' ' This is the kind of fuzzy verbiage 


they teach you in congressman school. 

Joseph Kennedy was not con- 
demned. as the essay claims, for merely 
"gening a divorce." He has been crit- 
icized for having his first marriage, by 
which he had two children, annulled 
by the Catholic Church in order to be 
able to marry again in a religious cer- 
emony. That looks like less a dance 
with the demons of the howling id 
than a politically astute attempt to have 
things both ways. As to cousin Mi- 
chael’s "hedge against mortality,” 
John Kennedy should leant to call 
sleeping with the baby-sitter sleeping 
with the baby-sitter. 

It may be unfair to analyze Mr. 
Kennedy’s essay as if he actually 
meant to say something in writing iL 
The fact that he has attached a picture 
of himself in a discreetly lighted state 
of nudity suggests that the editor of 
George does not regard his prose as 
much of a draw. 

The myth of the Kennedy family had. 
an enormous impact on an entire Amer- 
ican age. It would be something for 
John F. Kennedy's son to decide, in 
print, that even family loyalty is limited 
by a public responsibility to draw a line 
between right and wrong. That, 
however, is not the tenor of this sopho- 
moric essay. This essay is about 
someone’s fiunch that the naked pic- 
ture. plus a little die at the already 
reeling cousins, would stir up a vig- 
orous August buzz. That may be sales- 
manship, but we hope it is not an ex- 
ample of Mr. Kennedy’s most profound 
thoughrs about his family heritage. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


*7* IVrtHMTKiWfjf « 1 

iieralks^-enbunc 


ESTABLISHED I let ? 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Chairmen 

KATHARINE P. D ARROW. Vice Ch.iiriiwn 


RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher A Chief Execuine 
MICHAEL GETTER. Eui-uttw Editor 


• WALTER WELLS. Manugin c Edit.* • PAUL HORVTTZ, Depur\ Managing Editor 
1 KATHERINE KNORR and CHARLES MTTCHELMORE. Deputy Editors • SAMUEL ABT and 
CARL GEWTRTZ. Assneune Ednivs ■ ROBERT J. DONAHUE fiifhw ufihe Editorial Paget 
• JONATHAN GAGE, Business uiht Finaih e Editor 
• RENE BONDY. Deputy PiiMishcr 

• J.AME5 McLEOD. AJtcrrisiiu; Dinitor • DIDIER BRUN. Cirenkihon Diieetnr 
Direr intr dc la Publication Riclkinl McCleun 


InitfruiuHUl Hurald TnKine. 1KI Avenue Charies-de-GauIle. 92521 Neuilly-sur-Seine. France. 
Td.: ■ i i H.J.VOAL Fax: Suf*cnf«nns. 1 1 ■ 41.43.91 10. .AhwirsirK. • I • 41.4? m’ 12: New*. < 1 1 
Imemei jl hnjrJ/tttttt jhUim E-Mail. ihKa ihLcom 


F. Ju -tU" tin ty, hthiRl. iuhlu il : Car.terhiry R,l . Stngjp.yc Tei 2-7&T Fj.ritifl2~4-2hU 

\lr.s On Amu tt-ij 0 XmwriW. ?» R.l . II, in K.nr Tel A52-2922- //-"W Fur 

w*i MytStwuin. T kt'der Fmdmlxr l*,tP}2} FnnijunW Td ■‘■JQfiflWTJftu* Fut -WtiOT/iWJfl 
Pr.-< {'.< Rfu Uunl .Air . AVii V.W .VI' UV22 Tel i2I2i “J’/W Fjr “55 -VN’e 

I. K V:.‘7niii' Office ft.i Long Ane. Lnntton Ul2 7W.|/ 7 / i.VO-WC ha \ • l r h 240-225 J 
5 .1 i ,i:i i apitol J, 1 2\H ijmuF. KCS Nuiuenr B 7J202II26. Commission Puntitue So. 0JJJ7 
Imenuni-'iylHi’MTnhuiie Ml nshi* ram til J5S\ > i.'2 



N EW DELHI — At the 50th an- 
niversary of India's independence. 
I can hear the Father of the Nation. 
Mahatma Gandhi, whose ambition was 
to "wipe every tear from every eye.” 
asking us the question: “Are things 
better for our people than before?" 

We can report to him that we have 
made tremendous progress since in- 


Serbs' loudest separatist voice, this at a 
time when the comparably nationalist 
but more Dayton-minded Biljana 
Plavsic is available as an alternative 
leader. The possibility of his delivery 
to a war crimes trial in The Hague 
should not be abandoned. 

The Holbrooke mission produced 
agreement on the stubborn issue of 
allotting ambassadors by ethnic her- 
itage. and it otherwise sought to enlist 
the parries more vigorously in their 
Dayton commitments. New American 
faces in key NATO positions are to 
carry on the effort- 

Currently in Bosnia, the Clinton ad- 
ministration is making -two hard 
choices. The first is to re-engage with 
the Dayton accords, rather than drift 
away: the idea is to reinforce Dayton's 
ambitious purpose of preserving the 
framework of a united as distinguished 
from an ethnically partitioned Bosnia. 
The second choice is to reaffirm as 
partners in this enterprise Serbia and 
Croatia. Both, and especially their lead- 
ers, carry a heavy responsibility for Bos- 
nia 's current distress. Bur both countries 
and leaderships also have strong reason 
to make themselves part of NATO’s 
solution of the Bosnia problem. These 
decisions amount to a judgment call, but 
in our view the right one. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


By K.R. Narayanan 

The writer is president of India. 


dependence — in food, where we are 
self-sufficient, in education and in the 
health of the people. 

India has also become a considerable 
economic and scientific-technological 
power in the world. 

These achievements are not only 
substantial in themselves, they also 
have all taken place within the frame- 
work of democracy and through peace- 
ful means. India can justly take pride in 
its democracy, which, I dare say, is the 
largest and most vibrant in the world. 

It is also a democracy in which sec- 
ularism and equal reverence for all 
religions and faiths are enshrined in the 
constitution. 

The challenges ahead, however, are 
no less great than our past achieve- 


ments. Gandhiji used to say that "true 
democracy is what promotes the wel- 
fare of the people.” We have, there- 
fore. the obligation 50 years on to direct 
all of our efforts to the task of abol- 
ishing poverty, ignorance and disease. 

Certainly, the'economic reforms of 
recent years have produced a new dy- 
namism in India, m the midst of these 
reforms, however, we must not neglect 
the special problems of the masses and 
the disadvantaged sections of society’. 

It is imperative char we provide for 
them effective social and economic 
support. The Scheduled Castes and 
Tnbes. the backward classes, minor- 
ities. women (who alone constitute half 
of our population) and the poor of our 
society most be made to feel the benefits 


j — 

of participation and empowermem. 
Tftat the nation has found a c 


sensus for its highest office in someone 
like me from the grass roots of our 
society, grown up in the dust and heat 


of this sacred land, is symbolic of the 
fact that the concerns of the common 
man have now moved to center stage. 

Beyond this there is a more encom- 
passing task. India has had the unique 
honor of demonstrating to the world 
that man does not live by bread alone. 
Cultural, moral and spiritual values 
have always been the fundamental un- 
derpinnings of our society. 

And it is precisely here that India’s 
greatest challenge now arises — from 
The weakening of this moral and spir- 
itual fiber in our public life. The evils of 
communalism. casteism. violence and. 
especially, corruption bedevil Indian 
society today. 

On Jan. 26. 1948. just a few days 
before his martyrdom. Gandhiji held a 
prayer meeting" at which he addressed 
"the demon of corruption." "Indif- 
ference in such matters is criminal.” he 
told his listeners. 

Since Gandhiji uttered those proph- 
etic and cautionary words, corruption 
has not lessened but become wide- 
spread Violence has surfaced in almost 
every walk of life. The values of tol- 


erance and diversity we have so cher- 
ished are eroded at an alarming rate. 

In this situation, elders and leaders 
must put aside political advantage and 
set examples for our youth, today nearly 
60 percent of the population. If we fail to 
do so. they w ill surely become cynical 
about their own lives and callous about 
the future of the nation. The destiny of 
India lies in their hands. And their hands 
are shaped by our example. 

Throughout its history, India has had 
a world ’vision. Our sages and seers 
have always thought in terms of the 
happiness of the whole of humanity. 
Jawaharlal Nehru designed a foreign 
policv for India with a global outlook. 
Clearly, India has a message to offer 
the world — a message of democracy, 
of tolerance and spirituality. 

My one goal, my one prayer as In- 
dia's president, is that this land of many 
faiths and languages, this land of com- 
posite cultures, may add prosperity for 
all to its profile. Then we will have 
attained the greatness envisioned at our 
independence. 

Los Angeles Times Symliiuie 


The Simple Truth: Hun Sen and Cronies Are Brutal Outlaws 


N EW YORK — As coups 
go. what happened in Cam- 


go. what happened in Cam- 
bodia last month was quite 
straightforward. After the in ter - 


By Stephen J. Morris 


national community spent S3 
billion, and members of the As- 


biiiion. and members of the As- 
sociation of South East Asian 
Nations spent a lot of their time 
and energy, one Cambodian 
faction tore up the agreements it 
had solemnly signed. 

That faction is the Cambod- 
ian People’s Party, which is led 
by Second Prime Minister Hun 
Sen. It was originally installed 
in power in Phnom Penh in 
1979 by the Vietnamese inva- 
sion that ousted Pol Pot's 
Khmer Rouge regime. For 
much of its existence, it was 
avowedly Communist. 

The reasons given by Hun 
Sen for his early July coup — 
that First Prime Minister Noro- 
dom Ranariddh and his royalist 
party supporters had smuggled 


140 Khmer Rouge troops into 
Phnom Penh in preparation for 
their own coup, and that the 
prince was negotiating illegally 
with the Khmer Rouge — are 
laughable. 

No evidence has emerged 
that Prince Ranariddh smug- 
gled any Khmer Rouge soldiers 
Into the city. United Nations 
human rights workers who vis- 
ited Hun Sen’s detention 
camps, where military prison- 
ers were held after the fighting 
in Phnom Penh, found no 
Khmer Rouge there. 

Moreover Hun Sen as well 
as the prince had been nego- 
tiating publicly with the Khmer 
Rouge for years. 

This leads to another impor- 
tant point about Hun Sen. He is 
an unrepentant former member 
of the Khmer Rouge Commu- 


nist movement, although one 
who broke with Pol Pot and fled 
to Vietnam. In recent years he 
has successfully sought the de- 
fection of far more Khmer 
Rouge leaders and soldiers than 
Prince Ranariddh has. 

In the last year, six former 
members of Pol Pot's Central 
Committee have defected to 
Hun Sen’s side, along with 
thousands of their troops. They 
have been integrated into the 
command structure of the Cam- 
bodian People's Party. Only- 
one comparably senior Khmer 
Rouge figure has defected and 
aligned with Prince Ranar- 
iddh's party. That is why during 
the coup the only Khmer Rouge 
in Phnom Penh were those al- 
lied with Hun Sen. 

The business activities of two 
Cambodian tycoons — Theng 


Bunina and Meng Rethy, whom 
U.S. and other foreign law en- 
forcement agencies allege are 
large-scale drug traffickers — 
are'" protected by Hun Sen. In 
return, these businessmen lavish 
gifts on the Cambodian leader 
and fund his political activities. 
Mr. Bunina has openly admitted 
that he bankrolled the July coup 
with SI million in gold. 

Several ASEAN countries 
regard the problem of drug traf- 
ficking so seriously that they 
execute visitors caught smug- 
gling heroin. Thus it is difficult 
to understand why ASEAN 
might eventually accept into its 
ranks a Cambodian regime that 
protects the safe transit of 
Southeast Asian heroin for 
global distribution. 

Recently Hun Sen has insul- 
ted .ASEAN several times. First, 
by launching the coup that tore 
to shreds the 1991 Paris peace 


agreements on Cambodia that 
ASEAN members worked hard 
to achieve. Second, by treating 
rudely three ASEAN foreign 
ministers whom the group has 
appointed as mediators to ny to 
resolve the Cambodian conflict, 
on their first visit to Phnom 
Penh last month. Third, by- 
backtracking on his stated po- 
sition on Prince Ranariddh's 
right to return to Cambodia. 

ASEAN should recognize 
Hun Sen for what he is - — not a 
temperamental and misundei^ 
stood child who can be reformed 
with "constructive engage- 
ment.’' but a brutal thug who 
must be prevented from carry- 
ing on his illegal activities. 


The writer, an associate re- 
search scholar at the East Asian 
Institute at Columbia Uni- 
versity. contributed this com- 
ment to the Herald Tribune. 


In an Era of Corruption, Cleaning Up Is Everyone’s Business ; 4 ,» 


'ADRID — "Don't be a 
.thief, don’t be a liar, don’t 


By Antonio Garrignes Walker 


be lazy." Under that Inca say- 
ing (" Ama sua. ama llulla, ama 
queila”). the eighth Interna- 
tional Anti-Corruption Confer- 
ence is to be held in Lima from 
Sept. 7 to II . The previous con- 
ferences (the last in Beijing) 
passed almost unnoticed. This 
should not happen again. No 
more time should be lost. 

Corruption has become one 
of the most worrying and dan- 
gerous problems confronting 
humanity at the beginning of an 
irreversible and as yet uncon- 
trolled economic and cultural 
globalization. It is a problem 
seriously affecting the credib- 
ility of the entire system. 

Strange how the minute the 
Berlin Wall fell, corruption 
seemed to mushroom in all 
countries and at all levels. Its 
spread can appear to be con- 
comitant with the slow agony 
and death of Marxism in the last 
few decades. Indeed, it has be- 
come associated in people's 
minds with the victory of ‘‘lib- 
eral’’ economic systems. 


The saddest spectable has 
been given (by deed or omis- 
sion) by some of the political 
and economic elites of the most 
democratic ’ nations. Japan. 
Europe as a whole and North 
America have displayed a 
seemingly endless array of fi- 
nancial and business scandals. 

These countries’ conduct in 
less developed countries 
reaches intolerable levels of hy- 
pocrisy and double moral stan- 
dards. In many countries (Ger- 
many and Japan among therm, 
despite resolutions of the 
United Nations on the matter 
and despite the efforts of the 
OECD, not only are bribery and 
the payment of illegal commis- 
sions or compensations in for- 
eign countries not penalized, 
but they receive favorable tax 
treatment as an efficient way to 
increase the trade. 

James Wolfensohn. presi- 
dent of the World Bank, has 
insisted that the cancer of cor- 
ruption diverts resources from 
the poor to the rich, increases 


the cost of running businesses, 
distorts public expenditures and 
deters foreign investors. 

To that should be added the 
existence of 91 tax havens and 
countless avenues for launder- 
ing dirty money without dif- 
ficulty or risk. Sometimes one 
has the feeling that the world is 
an enormous casino controlled 
by gangsters and speculators. 

A procedure for ethical re- 
generation must be launched. 
Blind worship of economics, 
consumerism, the decline of 
spiritual values, fierce compe- 
tition, a feeling of permanent 
insecurity - , and fear of ever 
more accelerated change have 
made pragmatism the basic 
philosophy, ai the cost of hon- 
esty and solidarity. This favors 
decisions that encourage ag- 
gressive or even violent beha- 
vior to achieve one’s own ends 
or defend one's interests. 

Ethics is not a question of 
morals or religion only. It is also 
a required condition for effi- 
ciency of political democracy 


Something Wrong With My Eyes 


H ARTFORD, Connecticut 
— Maybe it’s mv wearv 


A 1 — Maybe it’s my weary 
old peepers, but I never seem 
to see things. 

They cut the gasoline tax 
and I don’t see the price go 
down. Instead the price goes 
up. No matter what happens 
the price goes up. and no mat- 
ter what happens the price 
never goes down. 

Cola weather? It drives up 
the price. Hot weather? It 
drives up the price. Cm taxes? 
They raise the price to pay for 
the change. When there is an 
international crisis, ihev run 


By Denis Hor»an 


dividend is. We pumped tril- 
lions into defense when there 
was someone to defend 
against, but I don’t see where 
there's a need io pump tril- 
lions more into gigantic sub- 
marines and monster bombers 
with no know able use and into 
militarv alliances with no 


known purpose anymore. We 
could have hoped that some of 


up the price of oil in anxiety; 
when the crisis goes awav. the 


when the crisis goes away, the 
price stays up. When we are in 
oil glut, the price goes up in- 
stead of down. 

Everywhere, big companies 
lay off half the work - force, 
wrecking the lives of thou- 
sands of employees, and I 
don't see where anyone's bet- 
ter off for it except for a few 
bosses. Not the customers. Not 
the public. Surely nor those 
laid off nor those left behind. 

They say I should see that 
the stockholders are better off, 
but what I see is that they get a 
quarter or 50 cents more in 
dividends, a small increase in 
stock price. And for that 
people's lives are destroyed, 
sen' ice is gutted, products and 
reputations are diminished. So 
someone can make pennies 
and executives can make mil- 
lions. Fortunately, there is at 
least a Hereafter where that 
will be redressed. 

The Cold War is over and 
I don't see where the peace 


could have hoped that some of 
the savings might show up in 
helping neglected comers of 
the society, but I don’t see it. 

They cut the raxes of the 
wealthy, telling us that's good 
for us all, and I don't see 
where that helps anyone but 
the wealthy. They say that we 
will all benefit when the rich 
get around to trickling it down 
to us later, but I never see that 
happening. We forever await 
the grace of the privileged 
without ever much getting it. 

Meantime, we can see quite 
clearly that there is less for 
support efforts for those who 
need them. 

Companies cut services 
while making bloated profits, 
and no one sees any of that 
coming back to the sap cus- 
tomer paying new fees and 
higher p’rices and gerring 
poorer products and less sup- 
port than ever before. 

I don't see that those ef- 
ficiencies very often benefit 
the people paying the bill. Em- 
ployee rolls are skinnied up 
and replaced with part-timers 
and temps and others on the 
cheap — but when was the last 


time the savings showed up on 
the price tag? I don't see it 
happening very often. 

We are told we will save 
money by not helping those 
who need help, and people ac- 
tually will be better off for 
being poorer, but I don’t see 
either happening. Do you have 
more money in your pocket 
because they’ve "whittled the 
welfare funds? I don'r. Maybe 
w-hen we finally get it we’ll 
spend it on cheaper gas. 

Do you see all those jobs 
that don’t exist being filled by 
people who were straight-aim- 
ing away jobs in favor of keep- 
ing the peanuts they get from 
the dole? Neither do 1. What 
I think I see is a mood where 
people of no wealth become 
people of no value and. there- 
after, are invisible. Unseen. 

To thundering self-praise, 
they tell us they've balanced 
the national budget w-hich will 
make things better while, at 
the same lime, spreading such 
tax advantages and college aid 
and various bits of boodle as 
to turn this into the Promised 
Land. Great. But maybe the 
promises are so seldom kept 


and correct operation of the 
market economy. 

If we allow corruption to be- 
come institutionalized, the col- 
lapse of democratic capitalism 
and liberalism will be inevit- 
able. We have to raise the level 
of demands as regards both 
democratic quality and the 
transparency of the’ market. 

The very concept of liber- 
alism to this day remains too 
often misunderstood. It needs to 
be explained again in at least 
two crucial respects. 

Far from idolizing the market 
or demonizing all forms of pub- 
lic intervention, liberalism is at 
bonom inspired by a will to 
optimize the use of society's 
ressources. and therefore to fa- 
cilitate nor only the creation but 
also the indispensable diffusion 
of wealth. 

Intrinsically hostile to all 
forms of concentration of eco- 
nomic power, whether public or 
private, it is our antidote to the 
kind of "savage capitalism” 
often decried today, which dis- 
torts fair market "rules to the 
benefit of the more pow erful. 

In addition, contrary to fash- 
ionable arguments, liberalism is 
not only or mainly an economic 
theory. It is more concerned 
with being than with having, 
and grants a decisive signifi- 
cance to ethical values, without 
which the system becomes de- 
based and collapses. 

Not one of the great liberal 
thinkers (Adam Smith and 
Friedrich von Hayek, in par- 
ticular) has failed to stress this 
idea. As the late Austrian eco- 
nomist Wilhelm von Ropke put 
iL "The truly decisive things are 
those beyond supply and de- 
mand. those on which meaning, 
dignity and the interior plen- 
itude of existence depend.” 

AH this will have to figure in 
the discussions of the anti-cor- 


ruption conference, where the 
main theme will correctly em- 
phasize the need for establish- 
ing collaboration between the 
state and civil society'. We all 
have to be concerned, and we all 
have to react. f 


The writer, a senior patjper 
an international law firm. 


in an international law firm, 
contributed This comment tc\thc 
International Herald Tribute. 


Influence Peddling 


W ASHINGTON has 
come a sewer of poli 


YV come a sewer of political 
influence peddling. 1 

The swamp can be drairtd, 
the sewer dredged, through [he 
establishment of a truly disin- 
guished commission, appointed 
jointly by the president and Con- 
gress, presided over by foraer 
presidents, amply funded aid 
granted the kind of extraodir 
nary powers needed properly to 
address the most corrosjve 
threat to American demoerxy 
since legally sanctioned racial 
segregation was ended. J 
For rhe bottom line of tie 
fund-raising undertaken by HU 
Clinton and Bob Dole, and ^ie 
vast majority of Congress, is a 
systemic corruption and perva- 
sion of the electoral process.; 

In today’s political market- 
place. major corporations, as 
well as organized labor a|d 
trade associations (not to spak 
of interested foreigners), ri- 
ulariy bundle hundreds of thai- 
sands. even millions, of doliis 
in campaign cash to pass onro 
presidential and congressional 
candidates simply to get a hew- 
ing in Washington. I 

Those who don’t have su© 
means increasingly are shut c?.t 
of the political process. 

— Carl Bernstein, writing 
in the Los Angeles Times. 


=:r- ■ 
i Hr 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AG1 


1897: Resisting Bullets 


that you will pardon the squint 
as I keep on the lookout for the 
ihing io happen. 

From the left and from the 
right costly pledges of change 


NEW YORK — Tn the presence 
of officers of the United States 
army. M. Casimer Zegler, 
wrapped up in five layers of his 
bullet-proof cloth, was fired at 
at short range with a Krag -Jor- 
gensen rifle, which has been 
adopted by the U.S. Govern- 
ment. The bullet made a dull 
thud and flattened out like putty. 
Army circles are much inter- 
ested by this experiment, and M. 
Zegler is elated at the fact that 
his cloth withstood the tesL 


resisted all entreaties, saying 1? 
had important work to do ad 
that the responsibility was td> 
great to leave to anyone else.] 
To-night Ireland feels keens 
the loss of the man whom mare 
regard as the greatest Irishma 
of the hour. i 


1947: "Great Leader’ ' 


1922: Griffith Dies 


fly only to produce more of 
the same, helping mostly and 


the same, helping mostly and 
only those already with ad- 
vantage and authority. 

They tell us we will see h 
get better. Someday. Mavbe 
1 need new glasses. 


Thr H.mh <>./ C. w i tut 


DUBLIN — Arthur Griffith. 
President of the Dail Eireann 
and father of the Irish Free 
State, died this morning [Aug. 
13] from cerebral hemorrhage 
at fifty-five years of age. "He 
died a martyr to duty,"'"said his 
physician. "For a long time we 
have been trying (o persuade 
him to go to the seaside, but he 


KARACHI — The Pakistan 
Constituent Assembly adoptee 
a resolution that Mohammed 
AJi Jinnah. president of the As? 
semblv and Governor General 
Designate of Pakistan, be a<ig 
dressed as "Quaid-E-Azarrt 
Mohammed Ali Jinnah, Gov-j 
emor General of Pakistan .! ’[ 
over strong protests of the Con4 
gress party members. The form! 
of address, which was literally} 
interpreted as "great leader." isj 



to be used in all official doc- - } 


iv us uacu ui an umciai aoc-i ^ 
uments. Die Moslems contend] ® 
that it is a form of address, while! 


that it is a form of address, while! 
the Congress men look upon it, 
as the conferring of a title. _ j 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 



PAGE 9 


Everyone Is Jockeying to Win 

gh- Stakes Caspian Derby 

By Daniel Yergin and Thane Gustafson 


c w™e“ D “ d srs A ^T B 

power around ihe region, a number of 


~ ^ . ^ m me oil industry 7 

Se 2 region * where Eurow 
Germ^i Asia and ihe Middle East meSL 



km 


■OlMIies 


w JJjf J^p 0n ’ s / ner ?y reserves are 
^ ons «* dollars; developing 
Jhftri will cost an estimated $50 billion 
or more over the next decade. 

Derbv u huse - ^ Caspian 

Derby is a feverish amalgam of com- 
petition, collaboration and political and 

S2?“ wra fg«ng. The outcome will 
be critical to global economic growth in 

5*“ - and to the political 

, jjnjobdaucin independent states 
Aof the former Soviet Union, relations 
* between Russia and the West and the 
joleof tan } n die region’s economy, 
ine Caspian may hold oil and eas 

S*Sl eS 4 econd onI y to those of the 
Middle East. Conservative estimates 
run as high as 100 billion barrels or more 
Ti a ™* times the reserves of 
Alaska. That amount could increase as 
exploration moves into deeper waters 
By as early as 20 10 the Caspian could 
produce as much oil as the North Sea 
does today, making it one of the world’s 
mam production centers. 

This will take pressure off the global 
market. By that time, the world could be 
consuming 30 percent more oil than it is 
today, with much of the increase in 
demand coming from Asia. 

The Caspian region also holds 
the potential of becoming a crucial 
supplier of the natural gas that Asia 
T - - ' t wdiy needs to meet its growing electric 
jl power requirements. 

Azerbaijan, Kazakstan and Turk- 
— i menistan look like the big winners — 

Azerbaijan and Kazakstan with the lion’s 
“ ' share of oil, Kazakstan and Turkmenistan 
with well over half the gas. Russia and 
.■ S- appear to have only minor reserves 

• in their comers of the Caspian. 

- Chevron is already shipping oil by 
■•y rail from Kazakszan through Russia zo- 

ward markets in Europe. Oil from 


If there is a lesson from 
the Caspian Derby , it is 
that the more players 
and the more oil and 
gjts pipelines, the better. 




-V . 1 


.-n 


laijan’s new offshore fields is ex- 
pected to reach the shores of the Black 
Sea!, 'via a pipeline through Chechnya, 
for shipment to Europe later this year. 

This treasure of the Caspian is a treas- 
ure rediscovered. In 1873. Robert No- 
bel, brother of Alfred Nobel, who en- 
doved the Nobel prize, headed south 
from Sl Petersburg !o what is today 
Azerbaijan. He-was looking for walnut 
trees, whose wood was used to make 
rifb stocks for the czar’s army. Instead, 
in Baku, on die shores of the Caspian, he 
foind that local people had already es- 
tablished a primitive oil industry. 

Hie Nobels built up the region's lead- 
ing oil company. At the end of the 19th 
ceitury, Baku was the world’s number 
on: source of oiL 

1 Until the middle of the 20th century it 
renamed the largest European supplier. 
Afer World War n, output declined, 
ad Soviet oilmen turned their attention 
tothe Urals and then to West Siberia. 

. As recently as the early 1990s, many 
Vestem companies feared that inyest- 
ireot in the Caspian region was too risky. 
Te new independent countries of the 
f oner Soviet Union were shaky at best, 
nil were ruled by former Communists. 
Tere were numerous ethnic conflicts in 
tfc region, particularly between 
Aerbaijan and neighboring Armenia. 

The region is hardly stable now, but 
th- situation has improved enough 
jc encourage investment Russia is 
■cming back but in a different way. 
ar Russian companies promote their 
irerests in the Caspian area. 

There are cease-fires in Chechnya 


them are embracing the free market and 
Hying ro attract Western investment. 

Azerbaijan's president, Hevdar Ali- 
yev, got a warm welcome in Washington 
last week. Mr. Aliyev, the longtime Sec- 
retary of Azerbaijan’s Communist Pam’, 
talked to American business leaders 
about his conversion to free markets. 

Mr. Aliyev has played a skillful hand, 
using oil to strengthen his country's 
bargaining position against Russia ‘by 
inviting two dozen foreign companies 
and governments — Russian. .Amer- 
ican, British, French and Turkish, 
among others — to develop the oil 
wealth off his country’s shores. 

_ President Nursultan Nazarbayev of 
Kazakstan, meanwhile, has welcomed 
Chinese as well as Western investment 
in Kazakstan's oil development. 

Yet the risks to Caspian oil devel- 
opment remain considerable. The key is 
transportation — that is. pipelines. At 
least half a dozen projects are under way 
or well along in the planning stages. 

Every single pipeline in the works 
must cross more than one border, 
and every one involves a delicate 
geopolitical balance. 

For example, there is intense rivalry 
between Russia and Turkey over the 
route of the main pipeline that will cany 
Azerbaijani oil to world markets. If it 
cuts through Russia, to a Black Sea port 
for shipment by cankers through the 
Bosporus, the Russians will increase 
their leverage in the Caspian region and 
Russian companies will profit. 

If the pipeline crosses Georgia and 
then cuts south across Turkey to the 
Mediterranean, it would be an economic 
boon to Turkey. 

‘ The sources of instability that 
scared off oil companies in the early 
1990s are still threats. The conflict 
between Armenia and Azerbaijan 
remains unresolved. Renewed fighting 
could jeopardize the Azerbaijani 
pipeline projects. 

If fighting breaks out a gain in 
Chechnya, just north of Azerbaijan, an 
important transportation route from the 
Caspian could be threatened. There is 
also inherent tension between 
Azerbaijan and Iran. About as many 
Azerbaijanis live in Iran as in 
Azerbaijan. Most are Shiite Muslims, but 
Mr. Aliyev has reaffirmed the country’s 
commitment to secularism. That puts it at 
odds with Iran's Shiite fundamentalists. 

Russia casts a large shadow on 
the region, as some fear it may try ro 
reclaim control. The legal status of the 
Caspian Sea is still unsettled. But the 
current government in Moscow is show- 
ing more interest in ihe best business 
deals than in geopolitical hegemony. 

The United States has sought to cast 
itself in what the deputy secretary of 
state. Strobe Talbott, recently called the 
role of the “honest broker,” helping to 
solve regional conflicts and building 
institutions of a market economy. 

The Caspian development is off to a 
much more promising start than might 
have been expected even two or three 
years ago. Multinational involvement in 
projects, including Russian and Turkish 
companies, will be critical to stability, 
especially on the main pipeline that will 
transport Azerbaijani oil. 

Already Lukoil, the leading new Rus- 
sian oil giant, is an important player in 
the Caspian region, along with other 
Russian companies. 

Indeed, if there is any lesson so far 
from the Caspian Derby, it is that the 
more players and the more oil and gas 
pipelines, the better. 

This makes it less likely that political 
interests will overplay their hands. 

Mr. Yergin is president and Mr. Gust- 
afson is director of Cambridge Energy 
Research Associates, an oil research 
and consulting firm. They conrributed 
this comment to The New' York Times. 



Lot teoSmfc® 


Diana tries to draw attention to tiie horror of land mines. 


Watching the Vietnam War 
Left Questions and Guilt 


By Richard Cohen 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A Pioneer of African Music 

Regarding "Fela. Pioneer of 
‘Afrobeat.’ Dies at 55" /Mug. -/); 

Fela Anikulapo-Kuti continued an es- 
tablished family tradition both in music 
and in social activism. 

His father, the Reverend Israel Oludo- 
tun Ransome-Kuri, was a prominent edu- 
cator and churchman, best remembered 
for confronting colonial authorities to 
improve education. He founded the Ni- 
geria Union of Teachers and serv ed as its 
president from 1931 to 1955! 

Fela’s paternal grandfather, the Rev- 
erend Canon Josfah Jessie Ransome- 
Kuri, was known as the “singer min- 
ister” of Nigeria. He composed and 
sang traditional songs , some of which 
were recorded for the gramophone. 

Fela’s paternal great-grandfather. 
Likoye Kuti. was a staunch heathen and 
the town musician. 

Fela’s mother. Funmilayo Ransome- 
Kuti. was an active crusader for the 
rights of Nigerian women, and had a 
great influence on Fela. 

People in the Abeokuta area of Ni- 
geria who knew the family would say 
that Fela was cur from the same cloth. 

RAYMOND J. SMYKE. 

Morges, Switzerland. 

The death of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti has 
left a vacuum in the music world , but his 
legacy lives on. I remember the great 
saxophonist, thrilling trill er and hon- 
orary politician well. I was only three 
years old in 1978 when 1 accompanied 
my father to my first concert: Fela’s. 

His shows were characterized by 
preludes that he called "yapping ses- 
sions.” During these preludes, which 
often lasred for half an hour, he would 
satirize Africa's sociopolitical struc- 
tures. sniping at the military juntas that 
had emptied nations' coffers. He didn’t 
spare the acquiescent civilian elite, 
accusing it of playing the srooge. 

By the time Fela decided to get 
down to the business of playing music, 
the audience would call for more 
“yapping.” 

The politically gagged and socially 
downtrodden Nigerians found their 
voices in Fela. 

UDUAK BASSEY. 

Prague. 

Against Olympics in Athens 

After the failed Athens candidacy for 
1996, it is hard to justify the huge funds 
that will be directed at campaigning to 
hold die Olympic Games there in 2004. 
In addition to draining other areas of the 
country of money for necessary proj- 
ects, there are many reasons against 
holding the Olympics in Athens. 

Athens is one of the most polluted 
European capitals, especially in . the 
summer, when the Olympics would take 
place. How will thousands of athletes be 
able to compete in such conditions? 


> *• 




• *%:<■ 


1997 

Summits a 
Conferences 


As an extension of the news and 
commentary the Internationa! Herald 
Tribune brings to its readers, the 
newspaper has a successful and highly- 
” pec ted worldwide summit and 
onfe ence program that Focuses on 
” »» d ^ ““ 



Korea Summit 

September 10-11 

World Water: 

Financing for the Future 

September 30-0ctober 1 

Romania Investment Summit 

October 29-30 

Oil a Money Conference 

November 18-19 

Southern Africa Trade 
a Investment Summit 

November 18-19 


For further information on any of these events, 
please contact Brenda Erdmann Hageity, 
International Herald Tribune, 63 Long Acre. 
London WC2E 9JH. 

Tel. (44 171) 420 0307 Fax: ^ I71 ^ 836 0717 
E-mail: bhagerty@iht.com 


Seoul 


Istanbul 


Bucharest 


London 


Gaborone 



The state of transportation in the 
city is tragic, and prospects of improve- 
ment are dismal. Athens still lacks a 
modem airport. A new aiipon is 
planned, but probably won’t be ready 
for another decade. 

Greece's effort to host the Olympics 
is doomed. Why drag the country into 
vet another disappointment? 

PANAYIOnS K. DIMOPOULOS. 

Athens. 

On Sweden and Refugees 

Jesha Shapir (Lerters. Aug. 7) wrote 
that Sweden never expelled a single 
refugee who “made it across the bor- 
der” during World War n. 

But in the first years of the 
war, Swedish authorities refused to con- 
sider Jewish refugees from Norway 
as political refugees, and many were 
ruraed back. 

Even the representatives in Sweden 
of the Norwegian exile government 
failed to help them. 

These events unfortunately discour- 
aged many Norwegian Jews from even 
attempting an escape to Sweden before 
it was too late. 

ESPEN H. KOHT. 

Cambridge. England. 


Letters intended for publication 
should he addressed "Letters 10 the Ed- 
itor" and contain the writer s signature, 
name and fnl! address. Letters should be 
brief and are subject 10 editing. We can- 
not be responsible for the return of un- 
solicited manuscripts. 


W ASHINGTON — I have just read 
‘ ‘The Nightingale’s Song. ” a ter- 
rific but deeply disturbing book by 
Robert Timberg of The Baltimore Sun. 
It chronicles the lives of five famous 
U.S. Naval Academy graduates — John 
McCain, Oliver North, James Webb, 
Robert McFarlane and John Poindexter 
— who are also Vietnam veterans. 

I was late to this book, two years and 
countless admiring blurbs late, and even 

MEANWHILE 

then I read it slowly, savoring it, 
hoping chat when I lei it go I would 
understand what I no longer understand: 
How I feel about die men who fought 
the war in Vietnam. 

I did nor fight. I went into the Na- 
tional Guard and then into the regular 
army for six months. 1 was trained as a 
combat engineer, a builder of floating 
bridges. I was on active duty when the 
Gulf of Tonkin incident occurred. We 
all feared being held in die army, but a 
month later I was released and sent back 
co where it was safe. 

I hated the war. 1 did not think we had 
any business fighting it. I did not believe 
that if Vietnam fell to the commies its 
neighbors would necessarily topple like 
dominoes. But neither did I believe that 
die Vietcong or the North Vietnamese 
were some sort of folksinging agrarian 
reformers. I bated ihe people who lauded 
the Communists nearly as much as I 
bated the people who lauded the war. 

After active duty, I went back 10 col- 
lege. 1 roomed with roaches in New 
York, in awful apartments where the 
bathtub was in the kitchen and the toilet 
out in the hallway. I was poor in a stu- 
dentish sort of way — sometimes lonely, 
sometimes heartbroken and always in 
dumb terror of the future — but I was 
having, I now insist, a marvelous time. 

Now this book has made me recall 
that era. While 1 was home safe, these 
guys and hundreds of thousands of 
others were fighting. 

Some of them were brave beyond 
comprehension. Mr. McCain was shot 
down over Vietnam, captured, tortured, 
kept in solitary, brutalized, tortured, 
beaten, tortured, tortured- For a long 
time, he lived in the close suburbs of 
death, and yet he refused to accept an 
offer of freedom that was made because 
his father was an important admiral. 

I was at a dinner party fairly recently, 
seared one chair down from a retired 
general. We chatted and, naturally, we 
talked about the military and its treat- 
ment by the press. Pretty good, I said. 
Not so, he maintained. 

Much better than in the Vietnam 


era, I said. And bv the way, where 
were you bark then? 

Hanoi. 

The woman between us looked 
stricken. She realized at once. He had 
been a prisoner of war. He had been 
starved, he said, and even today he is 
still blini in spots. He tried to make light 
of it. No big deal. Larer, I played that 
conversation over and over in my head. 
I felt diminished by him — lucky, too. 
What had I done? Nothing. 

Mr. Timberg doesn't much like 
people like me, people who were going 
to college, supposedly smoking dope 
and making love, and not going out on 
patrol, being shot ai or killed or watch- 
ing others being shot at or killed. This is 
what his five Naval Academy alumni 
were doing, some with a coolness and 
bravery that is as alien to me as some 
primitive tribe's strange ritual. 

Could I be as brave? I don’t 
know. What I do know is that the 
sense of something lacking doesn't 
diminish over time. 

Men measure themselves against 
combat: How will I react? 

The men who know have it ail over 
the men who don't. They share a secret, 
like the guys who were the first to have 
sex. They know something primal, about 

All that remains , for 
those of us who merely 
watched, is a silent guilt 
that ice did nothing 
either way. 

manhood itself. It is silly, and women 
may laugh, but it is true nonetheless. 

All these years later. I still think 
the war was a tragic mistake. I mourn 
the dead, but I grieve more for the still- 
and-always-woonded — like the kid 
I saw back then at Walter Reed Army 
Hospital in Baltimore. Laughing, he 
opened his bathrobe to me to show 
that he had lost his genitals in battle. 
What for? I wondered then. 

What for? I wonder now. 
Communism is gone, fonner prison- 
ers of war return to Hanoi as tourists, and 
American businessmen are setting up 
shop where some of them once fought. 
The proclaimed reasons for the war now 
seem downright daffy. All that is left is 
courage and sacrifice — the fierce prin- 
ciples of the war resisters, the awesome 
courage of the warriors and, for those of 
us who merely watched, a silent guilt 
that we did nothing either way. 

The Washington Post. 


o see 


Organization tor Security and Co-operation In Europe 

Mission to the Republic of Croatia 


The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe lOSCEl is a pan-European security organization whose 55 
participating States span the geographical area from Vancouver to Vladivostok. As a regional arrangement under Chapter VIII 
of the Charter of the L'nited Nations, the OSCE has been established as a primary instrument in the OSCE region for early 
warning, conflict prevention and crisis management in Europe. It has deployed Missions in several countries in the OSCE 
area, one in Croatia whose operation is now to be enlarged. 

To manage and support the enhanced operation in Croatia, the Mission Headquarters in Zagreb are looking for candidates to 
fill the following posts: 

Senior Secretary (Vacancy No. 25/97) 

who will provide secretarial and administrative support to the Head of Mission. Candidates must have a secondary 
school education supplemented by secretarial training, and at least five years of secretarial and/or administrative 
experience. Good drafting ability in English, and knowledge of Word for Windows and Excel important 

Chief, Administration and Support (Vacancy No. 26/97) 

who will direct and manage the Department of Administration and Support of the Mission in support of the 
Headquarters and Field Offices activities and will serve as the principal adviser to the Head of Mission on all 
administrative, personnel, budgetary, financial and legal matters, as well as on transport procurement, and information 
systems. Candidates must have an advanced university degree in Management, Administration, Finance, Transport 
Personnel and related Field, and at least ten years of professional experience in a national Government, a large 
commercial company or in an international organization, three of which at a senior management level. 

Finance Officer (Vacancy No. 27/97) 

who will manage the financial operation or the Mission including budget accounting control, claims examination and 
cash management Candidates must have a university degree in Accounting, Finance, Business Administration or 
certification from a recognized professional accountancy institution such as CPA or CA, and at least six years of 
professional experience in accounting, finance or budget 

Personnel Officer (Vacancy No. 28/9 7 ) 

who will be responsible for the administration of Seconded ana Local staff members of the Mission. Candidates must 
have a university degree in Personnel or Human Resources Management, Sociology, Psychology, Public or Business 
Administration or other related field, and at least six years professional experience in personnel management including 
experience in entitlements administration, personnel services and recruitment 

Communications Officer (Vacancy No. 29/97) 

who will be responsible for the build-up of a communications network, the support, maintenance, repair and 
replacement of all communications equipment the allocation and division of communication systems, and the 
negotiation with government authorities on frequency allocation and with other organi 2 ations‘on communication 
matters. Candidates must have a university degree in telecommunications engineering, electricatielectranic engineering, 
computer science or other related field lan advanced technical education in communications and extensive military 
communications background may substitute for a university degree), and at least six years of relevant professional 
experience and demonstrated expertise in setting up a communications network. 

Maintenance/ Supply Officer (Vacancy No. 30/97) 

who will be responsible for matters relating to maintenanca'supply and transport. Candidates must have a university 
degree in Business administration, commerce, a technical or a related field, and at least six years of professional 
experience in inventory and warehouse management, vehicle fleet operation and transport 

Logistics Officer (Vacancy No. 31/97) 

who will manage the Logistics Section and advise on all logistics and procurement matters. Candidates must have a 
university degree in Business Administration, Commerce, Management or other related field and at least six years ot 
professional experience in logistics, procurement, mission management or other related field. 

Contracts will be for a fixed-term period until 31 December 1998 but may be extended subject to the extension of the 
Mission's mandate. 

Monthly remuneration, subject to social security deduction, for the various posts are: Chief Administration and Support USD 6,091, 
Senior Secretary USD 2,570 and all other posts (Vacancies 27 to 31 ) USD 4,344. Social benefits will include participation in the Van 
Breda medical insurance scheme and in the OSCE's Provident Fund. The allowances and benefits in general available to 
Internationally recruited staff members include payment of travel expenses upon initial appointment and on separation from service 
for themselves, their spouse and dependent children: removal of household effects; assignment grant; home leave; and 
education/child allowance in respect of dependent children. Education allowances for university studies are not offered by the 
OSCE. 

Applications - accompanied by a detailed curriculum vitae * should be submitted no later than 21 August 1997 and addressed to: 

The Personnel Officer 

Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe 
Kamtner Ring 5-7 
1010 Vienna, Austria 
or by fax No. +43 1 5 J 4 36 96 
(Applicants should quote the Vacancy Number) 

PLEA5E BROWSE OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION 

http:Wwww.osceprag.cz 


1 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1997 
PAGE 10 


STAGE/ENTER TAINMENT 






.. . , 

I f MV v * .. 







■ r* 

»t* —it 

•-*V *> 



►»-. • c f — 

>*'«.*•. a— 

y&Si; v * 


Return of Butley 
In ‘Life Support’ 



* 


L ONDON — The old firm is back in 
business again: Messrs Bates. Gray 
and Pinter, purveyors of midlife 
crises to the gentry, no breakdown 
too great or small, depression and alco- 
holism also considered at no extra charge, 
menopausal male customers preferred, mis- 
tresses also acceptable if under stress. 

I am not entirely convinced that a steamy 
August in die cavernous Aldwych Theatre 
is the best way to welcome Simon Gray's 
new “Life Support,” but the good news is 


By Sheridan Morley 

lrSrrr.if.onjl Herald Tribune 






Stud GoUenhetslHT 


Beyond ‘Macabre, ’ Call It ‘Morose 


LONDON THEATER 


By George W. Loomis 


S ALZBURG — As artistic di- 
rector of the Salzburg Fes- 
tival. Gerard Mortier works 
hard to placate the conserva- 
tive old guard, but he is undoubtedly 
happiest when a new work is the 
centerpiece of his offerings, even — 
or perhaps especially — when tinged 
by scandal. Back in 1992 the team of 
Peter Sellars and Esa-Pekka Salonen 
made the headlines with Messiaen’s 
“Sr. Francois d’Assise.” This year 
the director and conductor returned 
for Gyorgy Ligeti's grandly farcical 
near-tragedy, “Le Grand Macabre.” 

From appearances, matters went 
smoothly up to and including the 
premiere, when Ligeti and Sellars 
shared the applause of an enthusiastic 
audience. The composer, however, 
quickly confirmed rumors that he was 
anything but happy with Sellars’s 
work. He complained to the magazine 
Der Spiegel that his opera, first seen in 
1978 and in nearly 20 European pro- 
ductions since, had been “falsified" 
and he himself "deceived." 

Not that a composer’s stamp of 
approval is a litmus test of artistic 
excellence, least of all in Mortier’s 
Salzburg, where the new and different 
are highly esteemed. But this com- 
poser had a point. 

‘ ‘Le Grand Macabre’ ' may have its 
peculiarities, yet its treatment of no 
less a subject than the impending de- 
mise of the world has, at the very least, 
dramatic shape: People gbrd up for an 
event that does not occur, then gradu- 
ally realize that life goes on. An op- 


portunity for theatrical tension is there, 
but it was tost on Sellars, who placed 
the work — one surmised from the 
technological constructs of George 
Tsypin's unit set and a stage strewn, at 
the outset with corpses — in the af- 
termath of nuclear disaster. Sellars's 
morose approach lent a feeling of re- 
dundancy to the proceedings, to say die 
least, while the opera's bizarre humor 
vanished without a trace after die sado- 
masochism of the second scene. 

Yet Ligeti’s hyperactive score 
proved tp be consistently engaging — 
and often entertaining, given its auto- 
mobile horns, ringing doorbells and 
other commonplace touches. It found 
ideal champions in Salonen and the 
Philharmonia Orchestra, and in a bril- 
liant cast that included Graham Clark. 
Willard White, lard van Nes, Frode 
Olsen, SibylJe Ehlert and Derek Lee 
Ragin. 

Traditionalists no doabt appreciated 
the presence of five Mozart operas in 
the repertory this summer, but there 
was notan Italian comedy or — among 
the three I saw — a conventional stag- 
ing among them. “Mitridate” (the 
work of a 14-year-old) was treated to a 
new production by Jonathan Miller 
and “Lucio Silla” (written two years 
later) returned in Peter Mussbach’s 
staging. The latter was a sorry affair 
that played loose with opera's dra- 
matic structure by keeping characters 
on stage whether called for or not. 

Mussbach's ideas for staging arias 
included having other characters do 


steady voice as the Roman Senator 
Cecilio, and Elzbieta Szmytka, clad in 
“distressed” jeans as the patrician. 
Cinna, consistently met the challenges 
of Mozart’s demanding vocal w ritin g. 

“The Abduction From the 
Seraglio” fared better in Francois 
Abou Salem’s new staging, which 
foisted an updated West Bank, sce- 
nario on Mozart's rescue tale bur re- 
mained essentially faithful to its spirit. 
Salem, however, made too much of a 
(passably) good thing by padding die 
spoken dialogue with passages in Ar- 
abic; more troublesome were inter- 
polated Middle Eastern dances that 
had nothing to do with Mozart (.though 
time could not be found for die lead 
tenor's third aria). It weighed heavily 
on die sweep of Mozart’s drama, and 
conductor Marc Minkowski's tenden- 
cy to relax tempos within numbers 
didn't help. But the singing was first 
rate, led by Christine Schaefer’s res- 
olute Konstanze and boasting two tine 
tenors (Paul Groves and Andreas 
Conrad). Malin Hartelius was an en- 
ergetic, gritty' Blonde, Franz Hawlara 
an uncommonly tierce Osmin. 


T HE most enjoyable Mozart 
staging had the least prom- 
ising premise. Achim Frey- 
er’s idea of playing “The 
Magic Flute” with circus clowns 
would seem a sure way to trivialize 
Mozart’s late work. But, truth be told, 
the most enjoyable productions of this 
opera are those that don’t take it too 
seriously. The sight of familiar circus 
gags cropping up where you least 
expect them supplied ready laughs, 
and thanks to the powers of magic. 


something superfluous like meander- 
ing about a huge staircase. Svlvain 


mg about a huge staircase. Sylvain 
Cambreling led a vibrant performance, 
but only Susan Graham, in smooth. 


Pamina and Tamino underwent their 
trial-by-fire in stocking feet 

Christoph von Doha any i’s hand- 
some reading with the Vienna Phil- 
harmonic supplied a firm anchor for 
Freyer’s fanciful approach. Sylvia 
McNair was a disarmingly simple, 
almost too cool Pamina, but Michael 
Schade was an anient, vocally poised 
Tamino. Natalie Dessay sang the 
Queen of the Night with fire; Robert 
Lloyd, though clad in ringmaster’s 
garb at the end, was a noble Sarastro. 

Herbert Wernicke’s powerful pro- 
duction of Mussorgsky’s “Boris 
Godunov” returned with, cot doctor 
Valery Gergiev in his Salzburg debut 
and several singers from his Maiy- 
insky Theater of St. Petersburg among 
the principals. Vladimir Vaneyev, who 
took over the title role after ill health 
forced Samuel Ramey to cancel his 
summer engagements, seemed bom to 
play the title role. Portraits of Russian 
rulers past and present lined the huge 
stage of the Grosses Festspielhaus, and 
Vaneyev fined right in, notonly giving 
a gripping portrayal of the tortured 
monarch, but at times looking remark- 
ably like Boris Yeltsin to boot. 

Salzburg’s treatment of “Boris" 
includes both the St. Basil's scene 
from the composer’s initial version of 
the opera and the Kromi Forest scene 
from his second. Not generally a good 
idea, but Gergiev's performance un- 
folded with such logic and he exacted 
orchestral playing of such distinction 
— again the Vienna Philharmonic — 
that one was grateful for every note. 


that Gray is back at the very* top of his genre will he 
wonderfully irritable form with a no-in- to play in the 
termission 90-minme parable about male score, and 1 
incompetence and female endurance under mind? Mayb 
impossible conditions. ways one of i 

The curious thing this time about Gray's is also the 
elegy is that in narrative form it resembles an plause" and ' 
eerie short story by an unholy mix of Roald Birdie" and 
Dahl and Tennessee Wil- 
liams. A spectacularly in- _ 
effectual travel writer finds fid teS , Gray and 
himself in some poverty- _ 7 ? 

stricken South American Pinter are OaCfi. 
hellhole, where his wife is . . 

bring held ai gunpoint by a and at- the tOV 

soldier about to urinate over _ i 


her. For reasons only clear of their f 07171. 
at the close, he is in fact J J 


trying to save her life. We 
now have a wife in a coma (' 


now have a wife in a coma (Georgina Hale, 
supremely touching even in almost total 

J iaralysis) and a bnsband, Gray’s usual apo- 
ogy for a man, in more than usual guilt. 

Alan Bates is also at the very ton of his 
form: The man he first played for Gray as 


like rages, the determination to say the 
worst of himself quickly enough to disarm 
anyone else about to point it out, ail this is 
vintage Butley. 'Sure there are one or two 
surprises here, but essentially "Life Sup- 
port” cakes us back to familiar territory as 
mapped out by Harold Pinter. Gray s near 
lifelong stage manager and the director who 
best understands his curious, hilarious, mel- 
ancholic. contradictory stage nature. "Life 
Support” is the triumph of human obser- 
vation that “Art" only pretends to be. 

Of all die great postwar Broadway com- 
posers. and there are probably barely a 
dozen, Charles Strouseremains perhaps the 
most mysterious. Talk about a Stephen 
Sondheim score, or a Jerry Herman, or even 
a John Kander. and most addicts of the 
genre will hear something familiar starting 
to play in their heads. Talk about a Strouse 
score, and what comes immediately to 
mind? Maybe “Annie.” which is in some 
ways one of his least distinguished. For this 
is also the man who composed, "Ap- 
plause” and “Golden Boy" and "Bye Bye 
Birdie" and “Dance a Little Closer" and 
perhaps most impressively 
of all "Rags.” which we 
ray and have y et to see in this coun- 

1 7 Uy - 

e back. Yet precisely because 
each of his scores has been 
e tOV s0 discrete* . so self-coji- 
JT tained, so unlik e any of his 

77171: others, it is oddly difficult 

to come to any real con- 
clusions about his place in 
the American musical theater. Now, at the 
Jermyn Street Theatre, we have a song-by- 
song anthology of Strouse called ‘ 'A Lot of 
Living,” which, though it could do with 
some rather more considered scripting and 
staging, affords an interesting overview of a 


Butley. the teacher who can bear anything man who wrote with such varied Lyricists as 


except teaching is now the travel writer who 
can bear anything except traveling and writ- 
ing. His bedside guilt ranges over mis- 
tresses, importunate theatrical brothers 
(Nicholas Grace, characteristically superb 


Alan Jay Lemer, Sammy Cahn, Martin 
flwmin and Richard Maltby. 

In one sense Strouse is a classicist In - 
another, he seems to write whatever any “ 
lyricist or producer wants him to write 


7 « \i 


in an underwritten and undeveloped role) without any very notable personal style, and 
and all the dark detritus that the Bates the anthology seems oddly inclined to de- 
character (now called J.G., but it doesn’t vote as much time and energy if not more ro 
take long to work out that he’s still Butley the scores that really didn't quite work as to 


underneath a thin veil of journalism) has 
carried around with him like a suitcase for 


20 years. 

So much of Bates, so much of Gray, now 
seems wrapped around the character of this 
man that every time we meet him on stage 
seems like iiist one more chapter in the 


those that did. 

But Bonnie Langford, who like her only ’ 
real rival over here. Elaine Paige, has a habit 
of surprising us just when we were about to ’ 
give up hope, drives this hodgepodge evea- - 
ing with real verve and stardom, while Dave 
Willetts does a memorable sequence pf 


George W. Loomis is a Sr. Peters- 
burg-based writer on music. 


seems like just one more chapter in the Willetts does a memorable sequence pf 
ongoing saga of his devastated life. If you “Rags" and a wonderful reminder of "All 
have never" encountered him before, you American.” About the rest of the cast aid 
may as well stair from here; all the self- the choreography, we had better just noje 
loathing, the desperate jokiness, the child- that they will doubtless improve. 


BOOKS 


NOTORIOUS: 

The Life 

of Ingrid Bergman 

By Donald Spoto. 474 pages. 
$2750. HarperCoUins. 
Reviewed by 
Graham McCann 


S OME stars achieve no- 
toriety, while others, such 


O toriety, while others, such 
as Ingrid Bergman, have no- 
toriety thrust upon them. In 
1949, when the news that she 
had "abandoned” her hus- 
band and daughter for the 
Italian director Roberto Ros- 
sellini was reported, the 
American public fell out of 
love with Ingrid Bergman in 
the most sudden and dramatic 
fashion. 

From being treated like a 
saint she came to be regarded 
as a sinner, the young woman 
from Europe who a few short 
years before had been hailed 
as charmingly guileless, “as 
unspoiled as a fresh Swedish 
snowfall.” was now’ de- 
nounced as “a stench in the 
nostrils of decent people,' ’ at- 
tacked by tbe Roman Catholic 
Church for having "openly 
and brazenly flouted the laws 
of God," and accused on the 
floor of the Senate of being 
“an apostle of degradation." 


It was quite a time. It was 
quite a story. 

Donald Spoto — Berg- 
man’s latest and most distin- 
guished biographer — tells it 
rather well. In “Notorious" 
he has, in fact, written two 
biographies: One concerns 
the person: the other concerns 
the persona. 

The person was talented, 
complex and understandably 
fallible: Orphaned by the age 
of 13, she sought both love 
and security, and discovered 
early on that the capture of 
one rarely satisfies the crav- 
ing for the other. She married 
a man whom she respected. 
Petter Lindstrom. but had pas- 
sionate affairs with men 
whom she loved (such as the 
war photographer Robert 
Capa, musician Larry Adler 
and director Victor Fleming). 

The persona was seduct- 
ively sweet, simple and 
saintly: She could play bad 
women (Clio in “Saratoga 
Trunk"), good women (lisa 
in “Casablanca”) and wom- 
en who were a little of both 
(Alicia in "Notorious") — it 
mattered little to her huge and 
adoring audience, for whom 


1949. however, die gap be- 
tween the person and the per- 
sona was revealed for all to 
see, and her erstwhile ad- 
mirers’ consequent sense of 
betrayal was profound. 

“Nobody," complained 
Bergman, “could have lived 
up to that unreal image people 
had created of me.” But Hol- 
lywood, and what must have 
seemed to Bergman like most 
of the rest of America, had 
expected her to do just that, 
and it wok seven long years, 
and an award- winning perfor- 
mance in “Anastasia,” be- 
fore the fallen star was for- 
given. "America,” notes 
Spoto. "liked nothing so 
much as the grand gesture of 
forgiving a sinner who had, it 
was felt, done time enough in 
penitential garb.” Her old 
audience, he adds, “fell in 
love with her all over again,’ 1 
and her old colleagues, who 
had abandoned her so cal- 
lously, now welcomed her 
warmly back into the fold. 


David O. Selznick, after the 
solemn recitation of his new 
employee’s “faults" — eye- 
brows too thick, nose too long, 
mouth too full, height too 
great, name “too Genian" — 
was taken aback when she had 


Berlin ‘Giovanni : Cool , but Tasteless 


the temerity to reply that he 
would have to either accept 
her as she was or allow her to 
return straight home to Stock- 
holm). And he is equally good 
on the underappreciated intel- 
ligence that informed the art 
(in one seduction scene, for 
example, she exploited the 
voyeuristic scrutiny of the 
close-up by dilating her nos- 
trils momentarily to signal the 
feelings that were stirring 
within). 

He is Jess illuminating 
when discussing the nature of 
the relationship between the 
life and the art, but, given the 
contradictory nature of his 
subject’s own attitude to this 
question, this is hardly sur- 
prising. Here, after all, was a 
woman who appeared mys- 
tified by the off-screen aloof- 
ness of her on-screen lovers 
(she complained, for in- 
stance, that she “never really 
knew” Humphrey Bogan, 
and that she ‘ ‘never got to be a 
close friend" to Gary 
Cooper), and yet she was 
genuinely incredulous when 
her fans mistook her screen 
image for her authentic self. 

“Ingrid,” Alfred Hitch- 
cock once exclaimed, “it’s 
only a movie.” It was. and 
remains, a refreshingly sen- 
sible observation, although, 
after reading this resound- 
ingly well-intentioned biog- 
raphy, one wonders if it might 
have been better addressed to 
the credulous audience than 
to the complicated star. 


B UT one wonders to what 
extent such sentiments 


an air of simple goodness 
forever framed her features 


forever framed her features 
like a wimple around a nun. In 


were reciprocated. "This is a 
strange love affair," her char- 
acter in “Notorious” says. 


adding that the strangeness 
came from “the fact that you 


BEST SELLERS 


New Yurt Tims 

Thjilisi is bused on reports from more 
than 2.000 bookstores throughi*ir the 
United States. Weeks m I in are not 
nciv&Mnh consecutive. 


TSK L*t’ 

M i 

1 UNNATURAL 

EXPOSURE, by Patricia 
Cornwell l 

2 SPECIAL DELIVERY, 

hv Danielle Sled- 2 

3 COLD MOUNTAIN, by 

Charles Frazier 5 

4 PLUM ISLAND, to 

Nelson DeMille 3 

5 THE PARTNER, by /ofoi 

Grisham — 6 

6 FAT TUESDAY, by 

Sandra Brown 4 

7 THE NOTEBOOK, by 

Nicholas Snarl* 7 

8 DECEPTION ON HIS 

MIND. by Elirabcih 

Cence 8 

<» up Island, by a™* 

Ri»ers. - in 

10 POWER OF A WOMAN, 

by Barbara Taylnr 
Bradford ._ . 9 

11 LONDON, by Eduard 

Rulherfurd.. . " II 

12 CHASING CEZANNE Rser 

Mavfc 12 

13 IF THIS WORLD WERE 

MINE, by E. Lvnn Hams 14 

14 FATAL TERRAIN, by 

Dale Braun. 15 

15 THE MAZE, tn Cuherine 

CiMjlwr.. * 13 


2 INTO THIN AIR. by Jew 

Krakauer 2 

3 THE PERFECT STORM, 

by Sebastian longer 3 

4 The BIBLE CODE, by 

Michael Drosnui .". 4 

5 MIDNIGHT IN THE 

GARDEN OF GOOD AND 
EML. by lohn Bercndi 6 

6 CONVERSATIONS 

WITH GOD: Book I. bv 
Neale Donald Walsch 7 

7 BRAIN DROPPINGS, by 

Georj* Carlin.- 5 

8 THE GIFT OF FEAR, by 

Gavin de Becker 9 

9 THE MILLIONAIRE 

NEXT DOOR, by Thomas 
J. Stanley and William D. 
Danko _... 8 

10 MARTHA STEWART - 

JUST DESSERTS, by 
Jerry Oppenbeimcr..- 1 1 

11 JUST AS I AM. by Billy 

Graham |t) 

12 CONVERSATIONS 

WITH GOD- Book 2. by 
Neale Donald Waisch 12 

13 THE DAY AFTER 

ROSWELL by Philip J. 
Corso - 

14 UNDERBOSS, by Peter 

Maas - 13 

15 INTO THE STORM. bi- 

Tom Clancy. .-. 15 


came from “the fact that you 
don’t love me.” In 1956, 
Bergman, having seen herself 
go in the eyes of the public 
from saint to sinner and back 
again in tbe course of a single 
decade, must have been temp- 
ted to say something very 
similar. 

Spoto recounts the whole 
sorry saga — and, indeed, the 
rest of Bergman’s unconven- 
tional and intriguing life story 
— with die assiduous atten- 
tion to detail of the °ood bi- 
ographer and die gallant crit- 
ical passion of the know- 
ledgeable fan. He is good on 
the doughty spirit that in- 
formed tbe life (die producer 


B 


By Paul Moor 

International Herald Tribune 


ERLEN — Da Ponte and Moz- 
art subtitled their essentially 
tragic “Don Giovanni” a 
dranuna giocosa. and that ad- 


jective translates -as “jocose, jocular, 
humorous, facetious " You can call 


humorous, facetious " You can call 
“Don Giovanni’ ' all kinds of things, but 
it does not deseiye the epithets most 
applicable to its most recent production 
here: primitive, juvenile, shrill. 

Ada far-out and (another Neudeutsch 
neologism.) cool. That starts with its ven- 
ue: the E-Werk. a warehouse-like space 
in a disused industrial plant, customarily 
associated with rayes. 

Christoph Hagel, hitherto little known 
as conductor of his Hans von Buelow 
Chamber Orchestra (this event’s produ- 
cer ), conceived this idea. He sold it, as her 
first operatic production, to Katharina 
Thai bach, who since Germany’s 1989 
reunification has established herself as an 
impressive acting and directing talent. 

An ominously pounding electronic 


rock beat assaulted the gathering audi- 
ence. Hagel’ s downbeat from the po- 
dium unleashed some ear-splitting 
prerecorded techno-rock — but after 
that, except for a few further interstitial 
explosions, Mozart’s score mercifully 
remained almost intact. 

Mozart can indeed survive anachron- 
istic innovation; the British director 
John Dew (executive director of theater 
and opera in Dortmund) conclusively 
proved that in three brilliant Leipzig 
Opera productions. But nor even “Don 
Giovanni” can survive what boils down 
to a deficit of general intelligence, taste 
and musical culture. 

During the overture, three scruffy 
young louts spray on the upstage brick 
wall the key word “SEX.* f Giovanni’s 
sidekick. Leporello. utilizes a moment 
alone in an upstage comer to urinate. One 
seedy young drunk bolts out of Masetto 
and Zerlina's wedding festivities (where 
naturally cocaine gets snorted) to vomit 
flamboyantly . into one of many rusty 
barrels littering the acting area. 

Some recitatives gor not sung but 


rapped. Several sight gags drew appre- 
ciative laughs: Elvira's crash-helmeed 
arrival on a bicycle she pumps up wfjje 
singing. Giovanni’s enticing Zerhna iyo 
the sidecar of his motorcycle or croonog 
his mandolin serenade into a public tee- 
phone, errant Zerlina's explicitly Sm 
invitation to Masetto to beat her. ’ !•; 

Hagel smoothly defends this operajc 
dog's breakfast (which incoraprehe^ 
ibly shuttles between German and Itai- 
an) on the grounds that he wanted p" 
attract young people. Uh-huh — ink 
country whore scores of regional opea 1 
companies not only revive such stare 1 
classics regularly but also successful ; 
attract young hordes with easily affor£ ’ 
able discount tickets? j 

Lars Fosser (Giovanni.), Holger Gi» ' 
berding (Masetto), Robert Gierlao 
(Leporello), Martina Jankova (Zeriini, , 
Andreas Karasiak (Don Ottavio), Vlad-; 
rair Pankratov (Comraendatore). Std--; 
anie Smits (Donna Anna) and Ulrij? 
Sonntag (Donna Elvira) deserved a bfr • 
ter framework for their considerate 
singing and acting talents. ' !" 


*«? a 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1 1956 EMs song 
• •101957 
EMssong 
i« Personal prefix 
is 'Danas* 
matriarch 


«• He sang about 
Alice 


17 Somewhat, 

*- musically 
ft Ray's male 
liPartofN.B. 
•01962 EMs song 


Venture Capital Wanted: USS20 mfflJon 
Napoteon French Cheete, French winery 
product. Made in Chha srice 1 993. 


Graham McCann, whose 
latest book is “Cary Grant: A 
Class Apart, " wrote this for 
The Washington Post. 


NONFICTION 
ANGELA S .ASHES, by 
Frank McCoun .’. I 


ADVICE, HOW-TO 
AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 MIRACLES CURES, by 

Iran Coper 1 

2 SIMPLE ABUNDANCE. 

by Sarah Ban Bicathiuck 2 

3 tfEN ARE FROM 

MARS. WOMEN ARE 
FROM VENUS, by Jehn 
Gray...— 3 

4 MARS AND VENUS ON 

A DATE by John Gray.. 4 


Living in the U.S.? 

Now printed in New York 
for same day 
delivery in key cities. 

To subscribe, call 

1 - 800-882 2884 

‘T'fr ik iNrEHAvnusii » f 

IleralOs^Mknbune 


3S Dedicatory 
phrase 
>« Equals 

aa -utile ' 

(1961 Elvis 
song) 

S9 Man of La 
Mancha 

32 Sleuthing dog 
32 Room at the tap 
34 Health dub 
37 1956 B vis song 
41 Trouser half 
43 Hotel posting 

43 In apple-pie 
order 

44 Attuned 

•tt 1969 Etas 

movie 

47 Yal low-fever 
mosquito 
so Carpet cleaner, 
for short 

«i 1956 Etas song 
S3 Mideast's Gulf 
of 

ae Lightened one's 
bllltata 
eo Official 
proceedings 
62 VHS alternative 
et Actor 
WDRsmson 
•« Sting operation 
esEMs's middle 
name 

S3 1964 Elvis song 
ST 1976 Elvis song 


THE WORLD’S D\HY NEWSPAPER . 


Beijing Xkidi Food Co. Lid., GSELS 
Stfoni Gates, 120 Chemin du Gue, 
83300 (Var) Dragulgnan, FRANCE. 


1 Short swim 

2 What the nose 
knows 

3 "Treal Me ■ 

(1957 Ehns 
song) 

4 Harbor alert 

s Brat 

• Actress 
Verdugo 


7 Advanced Eng. 
degree 

B Pebbles ’ 8 pot 
• Pro votes 

10 Full -width 
headline 

11 Wear away 

12 Take in or let 
out 

13 Crowd noises 
2 iShoshonean 

32 Significant time 
n Satirical Mort 
as Words of 

understanding 
27D8ddy deer 
at Pitch 
23 Charger 
ao Hellenic vowels 
at Beat ending 
aaCommedia 

dell' 

M Suffix with hip 
as Font baked in 
wine 

33 Countertenor 

33 Long lock 
3S Airplane 

compartment 
40 “Puppet— — 
string* (1965 
EMssong) 

44 Ed Wynn's son 
«e Dungeons & 
Dragons locale 
4SF.D.R.'S 
predecessor 

«7 Addis 

44 Cain vis-3-vis 

aw 

46 Because of 
ee Snake spit 
82 Annapolis inits. 

S3 Prot 

denomination 

34 Ratten 

as Scout recitation 
38 Stacking 
shade 



' 5 * 5 Ei«Yi 


Puola br MohM S»«M*H 


© /Vev York Times/Edited by fflU Shorts 


Solution to Puzzle of Aug. 12 


s» 'Flaming * 

(I960 Elvis 
movla) 

•i Likely 


□anci sana nnaaa 
naan mama snaas 
□QanHnHcaaciaaEaaa 
□BQaaa ana aaaa 

0000 00H 

□ananHasaananaa 
gna ana aasmaa 
gBaaa enns aaaaa 
QQQaan ana aaa 
QDHGjaHQczjnaaciniao 

r,mm aacja 

□□□a acia aaaaas 
gngagQaaiiHHHaaa 
SHBRH Qasa aaaa 

HHaaa aroroa aaaa 


'Pic** vaa 




KYOCERA bytes 


MttalhJSKiSribiror. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 



KyocERa 


YASWC* KC 400 mClTAL CMCJU 




WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1997 



PAGE 11 


EPS Strike Points Up 
Weakness of Unions 

Groups Fail to Pull New Members 


By Frank Swoboda 

Washington Post Service 








WASHINGTON — The Teamsters 
union s strike against United Parcel 
Service of America Inc. underscores a 
fundamental problem vexing today's 
labor unions: their inability to attract 
new members. 

For decades, UPS has been a major 
uiuon employer, all but invi ting the 
Teamsters to organize its employees. 
And for decades, UPS dominated the 
nation’s package-delivery system with 
little competition. 

But that was before the advent in the 
1980s of nonunion rivals such as Fed- 
eral Express Coro., DHL Airways Inc. 
and RPS Inc., which have lower labor 
costs iand more flexibility to hire part- 
time workers with few restrictive work 
rules] The Teamsters and other unions 
have failed to organize workers at these 
comnanies. 

UJS ““i 5 * nec ds the same work- 
plac^flexibility from the Teamsters as its 
nonmion competitors enjoy, which the 
unioj disputes, citing die company’s 
contpued dominance with a hold on 
abon 80 percent of the parcel delivery 


I -- 

et Andrew Stem, president of the 
int Service *■— 1 
a! I lion, calls 


« - j i/i Uiv 

mihpnt Service Employees Internation- 
UPS “the Microsoft of 


the package delivery system." 

dw issues underlying the 
UPS strike differ from other labor dis- 
putes, the basic problem facing labor 
unions is that union membership has 
remained static in recent decades, giv- 
ing union employers an increasing 
number of nonunion competitors. 

In a wide range of industries such as 
meatpacking, construction, autos and 
trucking, unions are being forced to 
grant contract concessions to union em- 
ployers to match the lower labor costs of 
nonunion and international rivals 

For example, the growing number of 
nonunion "transplants’ ’ in die auto in- 
dustry — carmakers such as Honda Mo- 
tor Co., Toyota Motor Coro, and Bay- 
eriscbe Motoren Werke AG, as well as 
the expanding base of nonunion sup- 
pliers — has ca — J **■- J * - 
Workers union u 

to preserve jobs. 

unsuccessful efforts to organize foreign 
carmakers and their suppliers. 

Contract concessions in the meat- 
packing industry were widespread in 
the 1980s with the entry of low-cost, 
nonunion companies that “de-skilled” 
the work and drove wages to single- 
digit hourly levels. 

hi 195S, when the American Fed- 
eration of Labor merged with die Con- 



— Mart, foaftoty/nc Aiaociaicil Pm 

Rescue workers inspecting a UPS tractor-trailer that turned over in Nashville, Tennessee. The truck's 
driver, who was killed in the crash, was a company manager who was filling in during the strike. 


grass of Industrial Organizations, the 
federation represented 12.6 million 
members. Forty years later, the AFL- 
CfO represents barely more than 13 
million members. As a percentage of the 
nation’s work force, union membership 


has declined from about 35 percent after 
World War H to a little more than 14 
percent and barely more than 10 percent 
of che private-sector work force. 

Richard Hard, a professor of indus- 
trial and labor relations at Cornell Uni- 


versity, said the Teamsters strike 
against UPS highlights the HiWmna 
facing organized labor. 

‘‘If unions can’t organize a market. 

See UPS, Page 12 


tel Gears Up for Manufacturing Challenge of Switching Chips 


-*-f - • 




as*'.-. 


■l ry 


, J 


■ Reuters 

B(JNN — Intel Corp. is facing one of 
the toughest challenges to its dominance 
of fhjworid’s $27 billion computer chip 
jtry, and it comes not from rivals on 
the rise but from within the giant itself. 

: company is gearing up for a huge 
chaifee to a new manufacturing process 
)tild produce tens of millions of 
two, three and eventually four 
faster than the chips in today's 
filing personal computers, 
good start would give Intel critical 
images in volume, pricing and per- 
f enhance, but a slip-up would leave an 


opening for high-speed chips recently 
released by Advanced Micro Devices 
Inc. and Cyrix Corp., analysts said. 

Intel, which reported second-quarter 
net income of $1.6 billion on sales of 
$6.4 billion, acknowledges that a 
smooth process change is vital. By the 
end of the year, the 0.25 micron process, 
which demands tolerances 400 times 
thinner than a human hair, will account 
for 40 percent of its output, and for 70 
percent by the end of 1998. 

Hie transition must go quickly so that 
Intel can produce millions of high-speed 
chips right away. If it slips, PC demand 


could slacken as buyers wait for faster 
chips — or worse. AMD and Cyrix 
could step in to supply PC makers des- 
perate to get the fastest chips available. 

The competition will not slacken 
either. AMD is set to roll out a 0.25 
micron process of its own six months 
after Intel’s offering. 

To hit volume production from the 
start, Intel plans to launch its new mi- 
cron process in not one chip factory as it 
has in the past, bar in four ar the same 
time. To ensure that all begin on time, 
the company has given control to a 
single team of engineers. 


Analysts expect Intel to succeed, de- 
spite the challenges. ‘ ’One fab could fall 
behind, but it’s unlikely a U would have 
problems,” said Joe D’Elia. an analyst 
at Dataquest Inc. in London, using the 
industtyjaigoa for chip factory. ‘‘They 
have a very good track record.’ ’ 

■ Intel Fires Back at DEC 

Intel filed suit Tuesday against Dig- 
ital Equipment Corp. accusing the com- 
pany of violating 14 of Intel’s chip 
patents, the latest salvo in a legal battle 
between the two companies. Bloomberg 
News reported from Santa Clara, Cali- 


fornia. Intel claimed that the alleged 
patent violations covered a range of 
technologies, including the design of 
microprocessors, the manufacture of 
semiconductors and the coding of 
video. Digital Equipment sued Intel on 
May 12, charging that Intel violated 10 
Digital patents. 

Intel shares closed Tuesday in New 
York at $953125, down 81.25 cents, 
dtal Equipment shares closed at 
>.875, down $1.0625. 


Recent technology articles: 
www.ihi.comJimiTECHI 


Thai Vows 
To Revamp 
Cabinet in 
Baht Crisis 


Camp&db? Ota Stag Fm Dispatctet 

BANGKOK — With the country’s 
economy in tatters, Thailand’s interior 
minister on Tuesday promised a cabinet 
overhaul in a bid to win back public 
support for the government 

*The government is aware of the 
public sentiment and the demand for 
change,” Snob Thien thong said in a 
radio interview. “A cabinet reshuffle 
will be mad e in response to the de- 
mand.” 

The government most impose tough 
austerity measures in exchange for $16 
billion in loan pledges it received Mon- 
day from the International Monetary 
Fund and six Asian countries to help 
revive its economy. 

The cabinet is scheduled to discuss 
the details of cutting from $1.6 billion to 
$2.3 billion from the budget at its 
weekly meeting next Tuesday, officials 
said. A rise in the value-added tax of 3 
percentage points is due to take effect 
Saturday. 

Bu t the process of hammering out the 
terms of the loan has only just begun, 
analysts said, and was likely to involve 
more than tax increases and budget cuts. 

The belt-tightening is expected to 
deepen public anger at the adminis- 
tration of Prime Minister Chaovalit 
Yongchaiyut, who was elected in 
November after promising to cure the 
nation's economic ills. Calls for Mr. 
Chaovalit’s resignation are already 
building. 

The prime minister himself appeared 
Tuesday to endorse a cabinet revamp- 
ing. “If it’s not the people’s wish, no 
one can stay on,” Mr. Chaovalit was 
quoted as saying in The Nation, an 
English-language newspaper. 

The government was expected to sign 
the INC 7 loan agreement on Aug. 21. 
Any personnel changes would come 
after >nat analysts said. 

The impact of austerity measures is 
likely to be felt by rich and poor alike, 
adding to political tensions and a grow- 
ing sense that Mr. Chaovalit is not up to 
leading the country through its worst 
economic crisis in decades, analysts ad- 
ded. (AP, AFP, Reuters) 


IEDIA MARKETS 


SS 


Toubled Start of a Pan-Latin Tabloid 


By Calvin Sims 

New York Times Service 


spected journalists. “I’ve never seen a 

■or 


z’* «■ 


cAi-. ■ 


•*'.£7 •• '.J -1 


*>• 


4v- — 

■y-r. 



BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — ] 
ifore the first copies of Tierapos 
[undo hit the newsstand last year, the 
I ashy, Spanish-language newspaper that 
i linked to the Unification Church of the 
, teverend Sun Mynng Moon was malting 
headlines of its own. 

• At the newspaper's gala inaugura- 
tion, former President George Bush 
^/called Mr. Moon a “visionary” for cre- 
- - . gating Tiempos del Mundo, or Times of 
/ the World, an 80-page tabloid that its 
■ } backers said would be distributed by 
satellite to almost every country in 

• North and South America. 

: But critics denounced Tierapos del 

Mando as just another vehicle for the 

• Unification Church to proselytize in 

Latin America, where the Korean-based 

sect has invested hundreds of millions 
;■ of dollars in real estate, hotels, banks 
: and other businesses. 

Now, nine months after its introduc- 
tion and after spending $10 million in 
stait-up costs, Tiempos del Mundo is 
struggling to get off the ground, 
burdened by logistical problems ana by 
its association with Mr. Moon s church, 
Which is viewed with skepticism in Lat- 
ij in America. Its proprietors claim a cir- 
T culation of 5,000 in Buenos Aires and 
<000 around the rest of the cootmenu 
bur those figures are unaudited. 

1 ‘ ‘Tiempos del Mundo is insignificant 
as far as the newspaper maricet is con- 
cerned here in Buenos Aires. # saidPepe 

Etiaschev, one of Argentina s most re- 


even talking about it It’s very clear to 
everyone that this paper is a Mooney 
outlet, and no one here has forgotten that 
in the name of anti-Communism, his 
church supported the military dictat- 
orships of 1980s.” 

While media experts believe the mar- 
ket is ripe for Spanish-language pub- 
lications like Tiempos del Mundo that 
exploit growing economic, political and 
cultural links between countries in the 
hemisphere, Mr. Moon’s publication 
seems far from reaching its ambitious 
goal of publishing daily local editions in 
every country of die Americas from 
Canada to Chile. 

But the paper’s front page reflects its 
larger ambitions. 

Tiempos del Mundo typically has one 
main story with a banner head, a large 
photo, and five or six lines of type 
summarizing the story. Above and be- 
low the lead story are headlines from 
around the region and to the left is a 
digest of sports, business, aits and tech- 
nology reports from various countries. 

The newspaper, which is edited in 
Buenos Aires and distributed in 17 
countries, is currently primed only 
weekly. 

There has been little advertising — 
most of what there is comes from local 
businesses. 

Meanwhile, other regional publica- 
tions oriented toward Latin America 
have been relatively successful in cap- 
turing large readerships and advertising 
dollars, including Newsweek in Span- 


ish, an expanded Reader's Digest in 
Spanish and Wall Street Journal Las 
Americas. 

Started in 1994, The Wall Street Jour- 
nal Las Americas publishes two pages 
in Spanish or Portuguese inside the 
business sections of 20 leading Latin 
American papers and has a total cir- 
culation of 2.5 million. 



tioa 
about 

In addition, Latin America has seen 
an explosion in the number of 24-bour 
Spanish news services. Among the lead- 
ing players in the television news mar- 
ket are CNN en Espanol, Eco, a sub- 
sidiary of Mexico’s Televisa Group, and 
Telenoticias. which is owned by CBS. 

Establishing a pan-American news- 
paper with a common voice and identity 
will not be easy, mainly because Latin 
America is not a Spanish-speaking 
monolith but a mosaic of distinct coun- 
tries, each with its own culture, na- 
tionalistic fervor and journalistic 
tastes. 

Beyond those questions, concerns 
about the paper's ownership persist. 
“Certainly there is a market for hemi- 
spheric publications like Tiempos del 
Mundo, but what concerns me and many 
readers the most is whether this is a 
legitimate journalistic operation or a 
proselytizing instrument of Reverend 
Moon’s sect,” said Rosenthal Calmon 
Alves, a professor of journalism at the 
University of Texas. 

See PAPER, Page 15 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 

* 



'J 




VI 


Aug. 12 

* ‘is luu oao S» m t*n* & us; 

ssasgsrf 3 - a a- 

>.w - “J jJS um mn umi&m iiw mm 

liJB — 25 »m *J« ““tf nwrtttflj — 

1 S 7 . 1 J 1 £2 Sn — «*s am um lira UDQ® ns, 

Jill® M82* ££ )jn ig| Jfffis ]U IJB IKS «■ mu 

62,8 am um in* snn* tea sws* 

W tin MS® 3*2 — 'SS 3 IK *E — BX V» 

lUM IK 53 ** MW6‘ [W35 «■ — UK * 

Tamrta IJW t® Bflno* 6777! JUS* — UtW' USO flWS* 

tEET - iW a81!4 “2 its enn urn mss mi »ns 

- SS iS^aSSSSSiw ^ mu nm 

■ ‘VnnsunWHte not uuotnt NJL: not ora#** 

o: To bur one poor** D 

Othef Dollar Values 

(tot CintM 

o.w S5* 

rteMimS 13S01 SS 
il M ii p udi 1 3.101 H otQT 

SLtS ;» 
teas' is ww** 

Tv ■ 

forward Rates 

moot »+* 11539 11*13 nut 

•ftnKf ljtfio ,J2Q0 1S1« 1J0W 

!S?1 ij»* 

Apttflf ^ , jsrj2 1 .85A3 

iSSSSS: iw* 


Libid-Ubor Rates 

■ Swiss Preach 

Drier Fame SMkv V«w £CU 

i-mcrntb 50 ,-S* 5W-3W 1W-1»U 7-7W 3Vi»-3V* »» >• 
jHjwtff! srk-svu 3»-3» ir*-rr» 7 Y>-ta sis-w 
frmoTTth SV>-6 in-1<Mi 7V»-7V* W-3Vi 

S*a-6¥o 3VW-31* lUs-iar* Vo-Th jeit-SV* JTiS-OW 

SoarceS: Reuters. UoydsBcriL 

Rates sppflcotte to tnteiban* deposits Of SI mJWwi mtrOnum (ar&tvtnlenn. 


w» 

390-9S 
7.7J33 
19157 
35.71 
261 5- 00 
0.7003 
33325 

DJ0» 

2.763 


CBmecT 
MOL P«S« 
K.ZMtand* 
Nsnr.srrw 

Prishrtrty 

pnttssoMe 

murrite 

Sins- ® 


PMS 

7.793 

1NAJ9 

7^559 

XM 

X47 

78033 

5800.00 

335 

16 C 32 


QHRBCy 

S.Afr.nnd 

S.K4T.WW 

S*Rd.hnna 

TombS 

Tbabctot 

TurtfchBra 

UAE(Hfhw 

VMbM*- 


Wl 

Aj6655 

89450 

85038 

2872 

3130 

162950. 

3571 

494.75 


9 MBT Cvntocr 


3WST ***** 

11529 11*83 HOI 


Key Money Rates 

Untied SW«s 
■Dacnoalnrts 
Prime reto 
Frimtfu* 

90-dor CDs dectes 
is»*rCPM«n 
3 oofllti TrMsnry MS 

1- fcor itanr wb 

2- ym Ttcosonr HI 
5-»wrTr««swyscto 
7^NrTmsmf nol* 

10-ftor TlHSSir note 

TraosniY Head 
M#n*Lrae*3Wnr«* 

JdPW 

DiMseat nde 
Cri m*i*r 

lHnurtb nMtaBk 
XnonMihMonfc 
64nana hterboak 
10-r*m Goirt bead 

German 
UHHlMrt rule 
CeOmetnr 
1-BMtt Martoo* 

3- meatt) Mtrtmk 
MUktotoit 
KMTWBaBd 


Oon Prrt 

5JX SM 
8Vl 8U 
SO* 5W 
552 553 

5L49 5J1 
5.18 116 

SJT 5J5 
S3 6 196 
6.79 120 
625 126 

635 63d 

657 664 

5.13 SL>3 


050 050 

0X2 tUl 
049 0l49 

055 056 
053 058 

137 136 

450 450 

308 118 

177 177 

316 336 

336 136 
190 5.94 


Britain 

But MM rat* 

Ctfneoer 

IMUmMi 

HMfttt WeriHak 

G 4 Baamta»eiftmk 

lOneorGat 

France 

fntoneofien ran 
Cri aowey 
l-nento Ucrtari 
3-wudti totertnok 
44wtta tatnaori 
iHht oat 


700 7.00 

7M 100 
7J30 7Vb 
7Vn m 
7» Tie 
708 7.10 


110 

3V» 

3tt 

3V» 

559 


110 
3 V, 
31* 
3Vk 
3ft* 
NA 


Sovm; /infers. BUomben. MentU 
Lynch. Bank at Tokyo- Mitsubishi. 
Can m t aj ipebOedeirmds. 


Gold 


AM. PM. Qr'ri 


Zorich 32755 32650 

LHrten 32750 326.15 -155 

New York 33250 331® -J-« 

US. doaaa per ounce. London official 

fixings Zurich oao New York 

and demy Prices New York 
tDeCJ 

Source: Hahns. 


Gl oLal Private Banking 


ATTRACT NEW CLIENTS 


BY SERVING PRESENT CLIENTS 
EXCEPTIONALLY WELL. 



S’alimuJ llook ,/.\W 1 „rt 
fS wl**r) S .1. ■ I WlhTI 


Exceptional service demands personal 
attention as well as genuine concern for the 
financial well-being of our clients. And so we run 
our bank according to one fundamental principle: 
to protect our clients’ capital as we safeguard 
its purchasing power 

It is a simple principle upon which we base 
our brand of financial conservatism: private 
banking built upon rigor, discipline and prudence. Tbis 
sophisticated conservatism, vigorously pursued, has created 
a global private bank of exceptional stability, capable 
of weathering the roughest storms. 

Indeed, Republic’s capitalization ratio, 
on a risk adjusted basis, is two times as great 
as that required by the world's international 
banking regulators. 

To our way of thinking, it is security as 
well as return that we must ensure each day. 

And in the process, to provide a unique quality 

Far/J U.v,tquarf.‘r* 

{• 1 . 1 “ JJ* i* Rvpul’lif iV.ilii.ul «/ 

service, un derstand 1 ng ana discretion. ™ .w >,«t. 


Republic National Bank of New York” 

Strength. Security. Service. 

A Sjfrj iUiif, ' M iv \.irL' ’ Iviinj ' 1^ii,Jt>n ' ' ISriml * ILvrl. Mill. * Hik-ii.v Ain. * C.iriiuii IkLiiiL * l .'jviifi jet'll * Oiitralljr 

Oiu-riKy ■ llmiv K.-ntf " JjL-jrl.i ‘ 1 jw Aiiti-Kv ‘ Ijifjih* ‘ l.u\i*iilli.mrj " Mjililj " Mniti'Citv ' Mi.imi ■ MiLll ’ M.'iili- * M.'nU*' 
Munln jl " * Na.^m * I 'ii 1 1 - ' I', -rlli * 1’nnlJ \L'l I :>li- " Kii- J«- ldn>-ii,> * * Sill{j|U>r,. ' Syilin-y * l".ii|H i ‘ I. ■!>■.> ■ l..r..ii|.> ’ /nri.li 



PAGE 12 


The Dow 


30-Year T-Borid Yield 



> 6.40 


— ; 130 -- 


^ " 120 



m ' r~ A - * 1,0 “ST" A ■ m' J J' 

1997 19®7 


*. . vC s ■ %. 

yvs rf •*•••*;. 

In -S , |.«»I II HTl W n > WM i ..nm » »* 

4«ySE • .gag-tog.-.; 


. '-'Class' "'*4 

■ steces- : 


}576.2f : 1506.78' 


Tgimtfto -T VtggfKfewc^ 
S8o Pwrto ... • Sowspa r -7 
«e3ticoCfty Sstea . ' ? 
. Btiemos A^fl$tofervai"'-7" 


eamso WL8ai 
jrtaasflD tasog-si 


l general 561542 ...5W3.J1 * 


Source : Bloomberg, Reuters 


Very briefly : 

Court Orders Sears to Back Off 


CHICAGO (Bloomberg) — Montgomery Ward Holding 
Corp. said Tuesday the Bankruptcy Court in Delaware granted 
a temporary restraining order forbidding Sears, Roebuck & Co. 
from trying to persuade employees to leave Ward for Sears. 

Montgomery Ward, which filed for Chapter 1 1 bankruptcy 
protection last month, sought die order after learning of a plan 
outlining Sears’s recruiting practices, which urged employees 
to be “predatory about people.” 

“Remember, the taking of their people accomplishes two 
things: makes it even harder on them to do business and assists 
us with the constantly challenging hiring situation,” read an 
electronic-mail message given to Montgomery Ward from an 
unnamed Sears employee. 


Microsoft Enters Smart-Card Arena 


• The Quantum group of investment funds, managed by 
George Soros, the U.S. financier, has acquired a 14 percent 
stake, or shares worth S 13 million, in Net Holding, Turkey’s 
largest tourism' concern. 


• HFS Inc. has formed a S232 million joint venture, to be 
called NRT Inc., with financier Leon Black to buy residential 
brokerage firms and convert them to one of HFS’s Coldwell 
Banker, Century 21 or ERA franchises. AP. Bloomberg 


AMEX 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 mastocfiw shores 
up to the dosing on Wall Street. 

The Associated Press. 


HVi Lot U*tf Orjp 


Hfek 

Lou 

Luted 

Oo» 

If* 

19ft 

19ft 

-« 

5V. 

5 

5r* 

••/* 

SS 

r 

20ft 

22 

4* 

» 

M 

14V 


13 

12ft 

17ft 

-•“ 

4 

3ft 

» 

-ft 

16V» 

161* 

164 

-ft 

11 

10ft 

10ft. 

-ft 

1* 

I4to» 

I5>to 

-V* 

vs 

23ft 

2* 


no* 

IT** 

lift* 


4*. 


41* 

-ft 

151 

,8 

18 

-Ift 

,5* 

15 

15 

-ft 

ito 

Jft 

3ft 

_ 

TV. 

7ft 

7*. 

■h 

11 

Ift 

Ift 

-w 

5tto 

(ft 

4to» 


Ito 

2ft 

7* 

-h 

22to 

20V* 

ZT* 

■in 

II 

15ft 

IQto* 

-4* 

11 

lift 

18*1 


IS* 


14ft 

•1* 

TO 

*ft 

»'.V 

-ft 

IT* 

12ft 

12ft 

-ft 

to 

»* 

V. 

-ft 

tv. 

7 to* 

7ft 


M 

1ft 

3ft 

•S 

Ito* 

ift 

Ift 


IV* 

IV. 

IV* 


41* 

4ft 

tel 

•i 

17V. 

Ift* 

17 

•A 

7* 

2ft 

2ft 

-ft 

1* 

7ft* 

8>. 

-V* 

21 

19ft 

Sto 

-ft 

25V* 

25ft 

2Sto* 

-ft 

43to 

0ft 

41ft 

-ft 

43 

4ft 

4ft 


6 

5ft* 

Wft 

•ft 

ITS 

17to 

27ft 

•ft 

12ft 

lift 

12ft 

-'* 

If* 

Hft 

10ft 

-ft 

n 

V. 

ft 


S4 

5ft 

Sft 

•ft 

E 

J3*» 

III* 

-ft 

Bto 

21V. 

21*. 

•v. 

Sri 

8'6 

h 

'r 

<U 

6ft 

4ft 

■ft 

17* 

l*V> 


-ft 

57H 

Mft* 

5 rim 

-*■ 

m> 

21 

28ft 

•ft 


2ft 

Ti 


1,1* 

111* 

lift 

ft 

J*+ 

24 

26 

-ft 

241* 

74 

74 V. 

•»s 

Ps 

K 

lift 

■ft 

91* 

** 

•V 

•1 

n 

22 v, 

2211 

-to 

liri 

14ft 

24ft 

-ft 

12ft 

1? 

12 

-ft 

W* 

17ft 

l/to* 

-ft 


7ft. 

8 

-to 

4to 

4ft 

4ft 

■to 

Iri 

Ift 

Ift 

•ft 

ICS 

If.. 

lift 

•ft 

lift 

15ft 

15ft 

-ft 

6to 

ift 

*M 

•ft 

n 

rw 

IV 

-ft 

74 

Jft 

Jft 

-ft 

1 

to 

IV. 

-v. 



n n. 

m s>. 


s* a** 
to ik* 


llto ll*r 

5*1 Stt 


2Tft *• 

I9ri -to 


1*1 J« 

15ft IW 
* It 


*'•1 

5ft 

Sri 

-ft 

lift 

ink 

lift 

to 

<to 

A 

4H 

_ 

1 

■to 

8ri 

■to 

II 

Mto 

18V. 

_ 

lift 

3»t 

35 to 

-vt 


11* 

1ft 


to 

to 


6ft 

6ft 

4 Vs 

_ 

»%* 

9to 

91 


4to 

sto 

ito 


Uto 

14to 

14ft 

• VS 

lift 

lift 

lift 


13ft 

I2to 

I2to 

•Vi 

IWl 

l( 

llri 

_ 

rv 

7 

? 


vs 

T* 

»Y* 

-v« 

n> 

Ito 

W* 


Jft. 

1ft 

2ft 

•H 

381* 

30 

30 


Ife 

ito 

Ito 


9h 

9ft 

9to 


6to 

M 

i 1 * 

• vw 

48 

4/ft 

0ft 

-*• 

23ft 

Sto 

22ri 

*«k 

!SJ» 

18 

11 

_ 

38ft 

19ft 

19*1 

vfi 

Ift 

,to 

Ift 

• i* 

11 

17k 

Uto 


1. 

ft 

ft 

-v» 

4to 

4k 

4to 

_ 

/to 

*to 

/ 

•\i 

18 

ITri 

i/to 


5to 

5 ft 

n 

-w 

ZJto 

23to 

231* 

_ 

Ift 

Iri 

Ito 

■Vk 

«to 

IT* 

,3* 

_ 

Uto 

19 

1» 

•% 

S', 

5* 

VV 

-Ifc 

7 

Ito 

1*1 

•Vk 

5 

4ft 

4S 

•Vi 

8 

7ft 

ft 


I 2 v, 

12ft 

13V, 

•-k 

ift 

4k 

ift 

• 1* 

JVs 

26ft 

24to 


Ito 

Ito 

111 

Am 

Ito 

1ft 

1ft 


lift 

14ft 

!*». 

•'1 

12 

11 

nto 


1ft 

Ito 

ito 

_ 

3k 

ito 

ito 

Vi 

75ft 

las 

:<-» 

•Vm 

■to 

/ft 

/to 


7ri 

Tn 

/to 


to. 

ft 

to 


/to 

6ri 

•to 

-»• 

it* 

Sk 

5ft 

•n 

I9to. 

19ft 

lift 

-Y» 

ft 

■5 

ft 

_ 

Hit 

lift 

lift 


Sri 

5 

Sto 

• Mi 

Ur. 

iBto 

in* 

h 

Jri 

1ft 

ift 


14 

IM 

IT* 


1/ft 

ITri 

»/to 


2/ft 

2/ft 

2/to 


I2'V 

12ft 

U<* 

•H 

2 s. 

/IS 

T m 


7ft 

2 

2to 


ft 

to. 

ft 


7>h 

2ft 

2ft 


kto 

»<• 

6>t 


7ft 

Ift 

Ift 

• 

94 fti 

*2+0 

925* 

•1«k 

*l«k 

60to 

48V, 

■vw 

Tito 

24k 

25to 

-•A 


S'* 5. 

v*. 
s«. s« 


/» tri 
44'. n . 

s» j* 
ii i«* 
IW >+-. 


14-1 14V, 

IV. IJ.-. 

m. >s». 
n-» n 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRI BUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


I’ii< 


— ; Retail -Sales Surprise 

Strong Sales Enrich 2 Retailers Sends g toc ks Lower : % 


liuernaUiKBl He/aU Trtmnc 


CitnpSed by Our Staff From O Upx i rj 

Two big U.S. retailers reported 
strong second-quarter earnings 
gains Tuesday, lifted by increased 
sales and inventory-control mea- 
sures that helped contain costs. 

Wed-Man Stores Inc. said net 
profit rose 13 percent against its 
second quarter m 1996 as sales and 
profits increased ax each of its retail 
chains, including its Sam’s Club 
warehouse stores and the fl agship 
Wal-Mart discount chain. 

Net profit rose 24petceat at J.C. 
Penney Co. over the like quarter 
last year as the mass-merchandise 
retaUer and drugstore operator cut 
costs and pared inventories. 

Wal-Mart, the world’s biggest 
retail chain, said net income rose to 
$795 million in die quarter through 
July. Earnings were lifted by im- 
proved margins and lower invent- 
ories, which fell $300 million in 
the United States even as sales rose 
1 1 percent, to $2839 billion. 

Wal-Mart has been paring costs 
and adding more supercenters. 


which combine discount and gro- 
cery stores, to revive its earnin gs 
growth following some of the 
worst results in its history. 

“Wal-Mart keeps making im- 
provements on what they began 
year,’ ’ said Joseph Ronning of 
Brown Brothers Hardman. 

Operating profit at its Wal-Mart 
discount store division, which op- 
erates 2318 stores, rose 20 percent, 
to $1.52 billion, on a 12 percent 
increase in sales, to $20.4 billion. 
At the Sam’s Cub warehouse 
stores, operating profit rose 11 per- 
cent, to $224 million, as sales 
climbed 3 percent to $5.12 billion. 

The company’s international di- 
vision bad ao operating profit of 
$27 million, following a loss of 
$10 million in the second quarter 
of 1996. International sales rose 29 
percent, to $1 .46 billion. 

J.C. Penney, which posted a net 
profit of $115 million for the 
quarter, said it was able to lift its 
margins by clearing out clothes 
that did not sell in the spring with- 


out having to slash prices. If also 
cut costs elsewhere, trimming 
selling, general and administrative 
costs to 25.8 percent of sales from 
26.6 percent a year eariier. 

“They managed to do a very 
good job of holding down ex- 
penses,” Mr. Ronning said. 

Sales in the quarter ended July 
26 rose 41 percent, to $6.65 billion, 
due to the addition of the Eckerd 
drugstore chain. Sales in stores 
open at least a year rose 2 percent. 

“J.C. Penney is in a position to 
take advantage of the positive eco- 
nomic and consumer environ- 
ment,” Chief Executive James 
Oesteireicher said. “We are com- 
mitted to accelerating our ongoing 
expense-reduction programs and 
lowering our expense-to- sales ra- 
tios, and improving our operating 
performance.” 

Wal-Mart shares closed 62-50 
cents lower at $35,375. Shares in 
J.C. Penney were up $2.1875, at 
$60.3125. 

(Bloomberg, AFX, Bridge News) 


CanfuteJlr. Oar Sag Fran Dufartn 

NEW YORK — Stocks fell more 


than 100 points Tuesday after an 
unexpectedly strong retail sales re- 
port renewed concern that the econ- 
omy may be growing strong enough 
to spur the Federal Reserve Board 
to raise interest rates. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed at 7,960.84, down 
101.27. Advancing issues outpaced 
cWlfning ones by a 14-to-I3 ratio 
on the New York Stock Exchange. 

Broader market measures also 
ended lower. The Standard & 
Poor's 500-stock index closed at 
92633, down 10.47, and the Nas- 
daq Composite Index, which is 
dominated by technology shares, 
gave up a 14-point gain to end at 
137634, down 1030. 

Banks such as Banc One, whose 
credit card business could suffer if 
rising rues choke demand for loans, 
helped lead the decline on the Big 
Board. 

UR Red book Research said re- 
tail sales climbed a robust 0.9 per- 
cent in the month to date from the 
same period in July. The report 
comes as investors await the release 
Wednesday of the government’s es- 
timate of July retail sales for clues 
on where interest rates are headed. 

“This raises concern about to- 
morrow’s retail sales report,” said 
Philip Orlando, chief investment 
officer at Value Line Asset Man- 
agement in New York. 

The government also reports on 
wholesale prices Wednesday, and 
consumer prices on Thursday. 

“Trading is choppy today, be- 
cause people are waiting to see what 
happens,” said Jon Hickman, a 
money manager with Wells Capital 
Management of San Francisco. 
“People want to see that the in- 
flation numbers are in check.” 


UPS: Strike Bares Problems of Unions in Finding Members 


Continued from Page 11 


then their bargaining power is lim- 
ited,” he said. At the same time, Mr. 
Hurd said, unions ‘ ‘are not powerful 
enough now in many markets to 
effectively demonstrate to nonunion 
workers that it's desirable to join a 
union." 

■ Labor Secretary Optimistic 

While the Teamsters and UPS ap- 
peared to be digging in for a long 
strike, die U.S. labor secretary, 
Alexis Herman, expressed optimism 
Tuesday that she could get both sides 
to return to the bar gaining table. The 


Associated Press reported. 

Ms. Herman said she expected 
positive developments in the stand- 
off when she speaks to leaders of the 
company and the union Tuesday dr 
Wednesday. 

“They both recognize there is 
much at stake for the workers, for 
the company and for the American 
people,* Ms. Herman said. 

With no talks scheduled toward 
ending the nine-day-old work stop- 
page, UPS promoted its contract 
proposal to the public Tuesday. The 
company took out full-page news- 


paper ads to explain its position and 
defend its proposal to create a new 


pension fund. It also began threat- 
ening that the loss of business due to 
the work stoppage would force 
15,000 layoffs. 

The Teamsters dismissed the 
threat as a bargaining ploy. 

In other developments, a United 
Parcel Service truck plunged off a 
Tennessee highway ramp Monday, 
killing a manager substituting for 
striking drivers. And police in Miami 
said they arrested four suspects and 
were searching for two others in con- 
nection with the nonfatal stabbing of 
a UPS driver who crossed the picket 
line Thursday. Two of those arrested 
were striking workers. 


The yield on the benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond was at 6.67 
percent, up from 6.64 percent Tues- 
day. The. price, which moves op- 
posite to the yield, was down 16/32 
at 96 4/32. 

Earlier, the yield fell as low as 


i •>* il * 

f } ii • 

r. 


*1* ,4 < 

b fi "' 

w 1 


638 percent after reports on pro- 
ductivity, retail sales and manufac- 
turing suggested that the economy 

• - I ! — I a 


is growing with little inflation. 

Higher inflation and interest 
rates erode die value of stocks and 
bonds. Higher rates also raise die 
cost of borrowing for companies 
and consumers, and rend to slow the 
economy. ! 

AT&T, which declined, was a - 
volume leader on the Big Board.^ 
The Limited, which rose, also was 


U.S. STOCKS 


heavily traded. Among active is- 
sues, Amgen tumbled after the bio- 
technology company said it expec- 
ted sales of. its best-selling drug, 
Epogen. to slow in the second 
half. 

Quick & Reilly Group, shares 
were sharply higher. The stock has 
gained 22 percent since a news re- 
port Monday that the discount 
brokerage is soliciting bids. 

Eastman Kodak fell after Chief 
Executive George Fisher said the 


NrH 


photography company could post 
per-share earnings growth- of 10 


REDMOND, Washington (Bloomberg) — Microsoft Corp. 
on Tuesday released software used to develop so-called smart 
cards that will work with the Windows software, in a push by 
the software maker into the market for on-line commerce. 

Microsoft is competing in the smart-card market with 
companies such as Sun Microsystems Inc., which is offering 
rival technology based on its Java programming language. 

Smart cards contain a microchip that stores information 
electronically so that they can be used for banking or phone 
calls. 


MALAYSIA: Government Slashes Spending as Economic Troubles Mount 


Continued from Page 1 


it would be the lowest level for the 
Malaysian currency since being 
floated in 1973, dealers said. 

Defending the ringgit has proved 
costly for Kuala Lumpur and Prime 
Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad 
said last week that the government 
would not defend the currency fur- 
ther. The ringgit fell 2 percent on 
Friday alone, following the prime 
minister's comments. 

At the top of the list of the coun- 
try’s concerns is the current-account 
deficit, one of the highest in the 


region when measured as a percent- 
age of the economy. Malaysia fueled 
expectations its current-account def- 
icit would widen this year when the 
government announced last week it 


racked up a 2.8 billion-ringgit 
($1.02 billion) merchandise, trade 


($1.02 billion) merchandise, trade 
deficit in June. That was the biggest 
trade deficit in at least 17 years. 

Mr. Anwar’s remarks on redu- 
cing imports “will calm the market 
down a bit,” said Manmindar 
Singh, regional economist at 
Nomura Singapore. “If they don’t 
do something about imports now, 
the current-account deficit is just 


going to balloon.” 

Much of June's merchandise 
trade deficit was made up of imports 
of ships and commercial aircraft. 
Because planes and large ships, such 
as gas and oil tankers, cost so much, 
they tend to increase Malaysia's 
monthly trade deficits. 

{Reuters, Bloomberg) 

■ Dollar Stays Broadly Firm 


The dollar was mostly Firm against 
other major currencies in late trading 
on Tuesday as the market remained 
calm, buoyed by the Bundesbank's 
decision to maintain a key rate un- 


changed, Agence France-Presse re- 
ported from New York. 

The dollar was quoted at 1 16.280 
yen, up from 1 16. 175 Monday, and 
at 1.8625 Deutsche marks, down 
from 1.8650 DM. 

The dollar was also at 6.2788 
French francs, down from 6.2805 
francs, and at 13255 Swiss francs, 
down from 1.5273 francs. The 
pound fell to $13787 from 
SI 3900. 

The Bundesbank on Tuesday left 
a key interest rate unchanged at 3 
percent, signaling an unwillingness 
to defend its currency. 


per-share earnings growth; of 10 
percent a year as sales increase in 
emerging markets such as Chin a. 

Computer-related stocks were 
rising, recouping sharp ' losses 
suffered in the last several trading 
sessions. On die Big Board, IBM, 
Digital Equipment and Hewlett- 
Packard were higher. In Nasdaq 
trading, Intel and Dell Computer 
were up. 

Drug stocks were down for a 
second day after Morgan Stanley 
reduced its recommendationon the 
sector. Pfizer. Merck and Bristol 
Myers-Squibb were lower. 

Deere & Co. shares were tower. 
The company said Tuesday its 
third-quarter profit jumped 24 per- 
cent. to $253 million, on arong 
demand for farm equipment. _ 

Estee Lauder Cos. shares were 
higher. The cosmetics maker said 
rising sales lifted fourth-quarter net 
income 34 percent to $36.7 milioa, 
beating estimates. 

Foundation Health Sysems 
shares fell. The company posfed a 
second-quarter loss of $200. 1 pul- 
lion. compared with a year-eadier 
profit, reflecting charges relate# to 
the April merger that created ,the 
company. (Bloomberg. IP) 






HI IV 


1 1 U':-v- 


I0BLL'-' 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Daw Jones 


Most Actives 

NYSE 


Aug. 12, 1997 

JA^i Low Lotos) Chpe Opfeit 


Low Lotos! Otqa Opln! 


HhjTi Low Lotos! Chge Oplrt 


High Low Lnfes! Chge Uni 


loam B07S-12 8095.56 7948.99 796(184 -1QU7 
Tim 294 L« »48*1 791133 791144 -XL32 
Utl 2313/ 3309 73115 232.43 007 

Canp 2497.10 25042 346605 74606 -2157 


Standard & Poors 


Industrials 1105.291089.56110134 1090.31 


6/6,52 66182 671.84 66802 
199.67 196.72 19959 199.07 
10753 105.98 10740 105.70 
938.50 925.39 937.00 925-79 
91245 89847 91049 89949 


v* wn 
■3571 55H 
S3247 4m 
73971 40M 
69930 6116 
62504 31Vi 
£7120 46t* 
47*46 596 
47271 35to 
45TOJ 9SW 
44*40 36ri 
47880 61 
*0134 73ft 

3*115 3716 
37943 74H 
37645 47to» 


4944 sm 
4Wi am 
57to 57 TV * 
«wi 
32V» 3?v* 
451* <54* 
53V, 5HU 
33*1 34 

«3V> 93* 

357* 3W 


a** 7216 
5** 35>» 
73** 739* 
45»» 4511 


Grains 

CORN CCBOT) 

6,000 bu mBumwn- cenls parbiniM 
Sep 97 761 25HV 261*. +12 47.954 

Dec 97 2651. 256'V 7WL +12 149.989 

Mar 9* 774'+ 764*7 774'i +17 3*714 

Mar 9* 278* 270 778*1 +17 1056 

Jul 9* 7*1 V. 27414 781’. +1? 11473 

S*p«* 271 ‘i 2*9VV 27VV +12 1-64* 

Dec 9* Z74V: 2*9>.V 774<i .12 5J*5 

EsL safes 30000 Man safes 57.995 
Mars ap*«i Ini 261.655. ofl 15 


Jim 98 94.13 9408 9409 -001 41(73 
Sep 98 9428 9423 9424 -0.01 3W7 


ORANGE JUICE (NCnO 18-VHAR FRENCH SOV. BONDS (MAT1F) Jim 98 94-13 9408 9409 -001 4X73 

15.000 tbs.- carts per b. FF500000 ptooflOOpct Sep98 9428 9473 9424 -0.01 39J9 

Sep 97 8725 7820 *120 -0+0 I5J38 5«p97 179.78 I29J8 12967 + OTB 171J99 Oec98 9437 9434 «4J4 Unch. 7800 

Nov 97 8400 8050 8110 4L80 10301 Dec *7 98.70 9* 38 «850+aJ2 11.7*4 p.i ?+-*M Pnw -*1^91 

Jan 98 85.90 8150 8S4D <L6G 4,763 Ma9g 97.78 97.78 9798 . 037 0 £^5*3*1 MAM 

Mar 98 0*5 8520 87 90 -0.95 31125 Esl.ictos: 111.281 Pmv. open Ini, 379.600 up 4841 

Est sates NJL Mans sales 9381 Open mt j 101683 up 1336. . . . ■ I " — 


Prev. open IW-- 179.400 up 4841 


Esl sates NJL .Mans sales 9381 
Mars open int 34834 up 1,799 


Metals 

BOLD (NCAUO 
100 Iro, ol- dodos per Ir*<c. 
Aug 97 37/60 37600 326 JO 
Sep 97 12760 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (LUTEI 
ITLTOOmMon phoflOOpd 


industrials 
COTTON 2 mcno 
5UX» Bn-- cents per lb 


Sep 97 135.85 135JO 13654 +0.14 100260 Oct 97 7495 7420 7479 +1.08 10» 


Dec 97 N.T. N.T. 107.78 +0.14 

Aug 97 37760 37600 326 JO -150 484 "T. 

Sop 77 127 60 -1-50 2 EsT- safes; 31.341. Prev. sales: 6ZJTS 

□a 97 33020 37680 37E20 -160 15J06 ^ 

Dec 97 33720 328J0 33080 -1 70114326 UBOR l-MONTH ICMER) 

Feb 98 33400 332.10 332.70 -120 12*06 

Apr 98 33560 33450 33470 -120 5.316 *90*2 ’*34 9424 9434 undl. 9.147 


48725 48038 48076 -445 

61 723 40767 MBJ9 525 

4<US 439JB 440.09 -490 

79463 79041 79065 -094 

45125 443.7? 44194 -5.12 


Nasdaq 

fSeSrn* 


774982 S3W 
13*77* IWA 


Nasdaq 


HU* Kjbvt ■ — , Ch* 

1601.15 1576.19 157691 -1853 

17*3 49 124920 1749-00 159 

1/15.07 17043* 1705J4 174 


7050.94 703172 703394 
107293 101417 101495 


13*77* 191* 
137185 4M* 
116413 9*H 
9211* 2<fe 
*546* Wt 
7 BB M 
69396 13M» 
68283 *6* 
6*151 77 
*3555 Sto 
63017 344* 
61907 56V* 
*0116 17V* 
53167 9IH 


40*6 5DV. 
1W II** 
44 Vt 45 

95 95V* 
71ft 23J> 
76VT TV* 
I8*t JJ>* 
135*6*1 IS** 
Mt Ston 
74U 74>* 
■ (to 
33** Mto 
54H 54V* 
109. ITto 
98to 904* 


SOYBEAN MEAL ICBOT1 

100 fens- (Man per Ian 

Aug 97 25300 748J0 25060 +0*0 9,701 

Sep 97 22*50 22050 222-40 -070 22.151 

00 97 1WS) 201.10 704-30 -2491 1*947 

Dec 97 205JJO I98J0 19930 -190 39545 

Jan 98 201 J» 19520 195-40 -3.10 4276 

Mar 98 19900 19250 19250 -350 8193 

EsL sdes 20000 Mars safes 11979 

Maw* open Ini 1 0*706, off 2B7 


Dec 97 7495 7476 7478 +1.02 *LO 

Maria 76J2 7550 76.15 +1XS ll.W 

MOTfS 7 6.75 76.16 76.73 +MB 3 M 

*8 99 7755 7A85 7753 +1 03 251 

EsI. Mias NA Man* sales 13,133 
Mars open liri 7757a up 1.438 


Jun 98 336.90 -1 

Aug 9g 3J9J0 -2 

0,3 98 34150 -2 

EsL sates 27,000 Man sate* 34280 
Mans open at 1975*5. off 1970 


336.90 -1.90 7542 9433 9432 9432 unch. 11524 

09 JO -200 3.111 Od07 9*30 942* 9428 unch. 6571 

34150 -2.00 109 Esi. sales NA Mans sales 3M0 

ate* 34280 Mars open Inf 4A83& up 1562 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT1 
60000 Bis- ccnfs per fc 

Aug 97 12.10 21.72 22JJ9 +0 47 996 

Sep 97 22 25 2750 22.19 t051 20.B2I 

Od 97 2242 2199 72-3* +047 14.119 

Dec 97 2258 22.10 2262 +051 44106 

/an 98 2297 2248 7291 *054 7310 

Mar 98 71.70 2795 2111 +053 4840 

EsL sales 17500 Nlen safes 12.477 
Mans open M 100570. up 2.964 


™0MK*n& t piraL ,am *°9*7 9425 9424 9425 lOA JMO FebPfl 5»ij J755 SIT? +059 MJ7 

Aug 97 105 10 10X70 104.70 -050 2+409 Sep97 «424 9422 9427 inch. 511.924 Mo, 98 5750 57.10 5731 +054 7,269 

Sep 97 10550 10X60 104*5 035 71.001 OU97 9415 9*12 9412 With 1030 p., 

Od97 10470 10170 10435 035 1.748 9403 «99 9X99 unch «X0» 

Nov 97 10130 0X0 1373 Mbt 98 9X94 9389 9189 001 334753 Mows open IM IJ&540. >p773 ' 


EURODOLLARS (CMERJ 
SI mUBon-pts d 100 pcL 
Aug 97 9425 9424 S 


X «J8 unS.' 63?J HEATING OIL WMEIO 

. .. 42.000 gal certs per gal 

4 Man's sales 1460 Sep 97 5535 5430 55.10 +074 3750 

x 48515. up 15*2 Od 97 56 00 5530 55.96 +054 795?. 

Nov 97 5685 56.10 56.7* +064 IRKi 

ARS (CMERJ Dec 97 5756 5690 5756 +OA4 3Q.Su 

^’“PCL „ _ Jn98 58.11 5755 5*11 +0.64 15526 

? JM63 Fehffl S93S J755 58JJ +459 Mail 


Dec 97 10115 101A0 10255 030 8360 S’™ 001 OT.934 


645.95 64304 64121 


Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 
10 U titties 
10 industrials 


104.19 10428 
J0I59 10)58 
10659 106.88 


VaL HM Lew Lsfe 

S8846 MA* n*a 92to 

331,1 « ** 
■34S 7®* 1 27to 27 

7437 12 II life 

6753 Sto 5V* 54* 
6417 Wfc to to 
6496 31to 3D** 30+1 
6130 N*» 111* Il<** 

5754 4« 4 49* 

5385 J8to JO 30 


SOYBEANS (CBOTJ 

5000 bu mnimunv amts pet bmAei 

Aug 97 748 724'+ 7434, +20 7314 

Sap 97 656 640 * 474. +4U 15724 

NOV 97 621 607 Alt'- 7 +lto /A0OO 

Jan 98 625 613 6l6to +?to 1*018 

Mar 98 633to 622to 6251+ +U 5*08 

Est sates 44000 Mans sates 36.978 

Mam open ail 129538 up 1.616 


Janoe 1(045 035 670 ^ep 98 93 73 91*8 9359 0J1 2290*5 UGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMERJ 

Feb 98 10100 10100 101 80 0.2Q 585 Dec 98 91*2 9157 9X58 -001 18*180 MJ00ML- donors per ML 

Mar 98 10130 100*0 101 .25 005 2379 Mar 99 9340 9355 9156 001 135024 Sep 97 2002 19*8 19.99 +0.30 77,266 

Aprt8 10050 unch. 400 9156 9151 9357 001 1023J7 Od97 J0.I9 19 3* 20.17 +029 72.332 

HWBiaHWmvfeMtl Sep 99 7353 9X48 9149 0.01 84566 Nav97 20 25 199* 2035 *027 AL175 

i 4 J? Dec 99 9146 9X41 9342 0.01 71351 Dec 97 2038 2001 2038 *035 51.294 

Man* open .rt4U3A 1*442 EsI. sdes NA Mam safes 380195 Jm98 20.28 20.15 2038 +433 2&880 

SILVER fNCMM Mom open hi 2824477. off 4403 Frt98 XX 28 303 0 2029 0>5 Uqtf 


SILVER 7NCMX) 

5300 hut ca .- cents per troy oz, 

Aug 97 441.40 -1.40 


BRITISH POUND (CMERJ 


5ep97 44450 moo 44X50 150 $1,642 £ aS< *> _ 

Od 97 446.20 -1 50 78 Sop 97 15918 15774 75754 -0(28 SI. *30 

Dec 97 451.00 44450 449.00 -150 20535 Dec** 1-5771) 15*76 15700 0128 1.008 


Dec 97 2038 2001 2038 +035 51.294 

Jon 98 20.28 20.15 2038 +033 2&880 

Frt>98 2029 3030 2029 -0J5 14<W 

EsL saJes N A Manx sides 66X30 
Mans open IrrI 430070 cfl <109 


Trading Activity 


Nasdaq 


asm need 

Declined 

lindniqed 
Idol Issues 
MswWgitf 
Ke» Lows 


1256 1377 
1489 1480 
517 536 
34U3 3307 


TaM issues 
NewHJtw 
New Lows 


1941 1792 

1371 22*7 

3132 1703 

S444 5762 

ICO 144 

<7 65 


WHEAT CCBOT) 

5000 bu minim um- cenfs per bushel 

Sep 97 373 160": 361 -2to 11701 

Dec 97 3»8 376 37611 - 2 li 51.111 

Mar 98 397 386 386 1 -3 ISI61 

May 98 37611 389 389 1'. 1^74 

EsI sates 30000 Mam sales 20 589 

Mars open kH 105412. off 456 


Jm 98 450*0 -IJ0 30 **w*8 15*42 .0128 

Mot 78 45540 45250 455.40 -150 1CU56 Est. sates NA Mam safes &*45 
May 98 4»40 45750 459 40 -1J0 2.98* Mom open tel 52AJ7. up 1.010 
Jul 98 46140 -1 50 2.160 

ESI. sdn 11000 Man sales 9.490 CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMERJ 

Mam open Ini 9117A on 450 100,000 Honors. S per Cdn dtr 


NATURAL SAS (NMER1 
10000 mm bhrs, 5 per mm btu 
Sep 97 2604 24 SS 2M5 -0.771 47.(80 

Ocl 97 2593 14S5 2478 0.100 34684 

No* 97 2559 2555 2573 0077 112*9 

Dec 97 2745 2*70 2*84 0.061 18972 

Jan 98 2780 2690 2700 0057 14788 

Feb 98 2<oo 2540 2540 0OM 14,209 


h .. * 


Esl. sales 11000 Altoffs sales CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMERJ Jan 98 2780 2490 2700 4 

Mom opened 91176, on 450 1O0MO dollars. S per Cdn dtr FebOB 2600 7540 2540 4 

PLATINUM (NMER) Dec 97 .7735 .7315 727a -00001 ^AOO? Est sales N A Mom sales 6A934 

WHIRR "UR* -^«> -nio 72M. 00002 *S "P-n ml 21 7554. up 2745 

Od 97 440J0 4JJJ0 4X500 7.00 11549 EsI sates N.A Mom soles 8^27 uuicAncn r .cm , uc ruuca 

Jan 98 J2850 42450 42550 -700 2585 Atom open lid 57 111 up2?ll ^5 AS0U, J E <N " ER 


50 Iray at - dofcis per hoy at 
Od 97 440 JO 43300 435 C 


/Market Sales 


Advanced 
Oecnnctf 
Unchaaged 
Tom issues 

He* 

New Lows 


m m 

111 IN 

129 734 

a n 


NYSE 
Amex 
Nasdaq 
In rmirkxB. 


* 70.70 57654 

2494 3019 

57A78 61197 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMERJ 
40000 «« .- cents pec lb 

» 97 6610 45^45 65 77 +0.07 

97 6950 6910 6955 030 

Dec 97 71.95 7142 71 77 012 

7147 7280 7130 0 05 
APT 98 14 85 74-30 74 77 0.07 

Jim 98 7150 71JO 7150 i007 

EsI. sates 15.352 Mans safes 11945 
Mam open nd 101041, off 2768 


Apr 98 422 00 <20.00 42000 

EsI safes N A Atom sates 510 
Mam open ml 1*847. off >r 
Ouse 

LONDON METALS OMEJ 
DaBors per metric ton 
Alwsfewm (High Grade) 


GERMAN MARK (CMERJ 
J 25000 mark \ 5 per mak 


UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 

<2000 gal, ends per 9 al 

Sep 97 . 6330 61 JO *3.71 +124 38;21l 

Ocl •».’ 59.75 S8.ro 5902 +153 71*73 


Pnitous Sep? ; . SS 1 1*22* SSr Sj7 55 5747 +JU 9^1 Jb 

Dec 97 5423 S395 540* 0 001! 1 «( 2'^' 5?" 5 I !: JSJ Wt 

AAOfVB -&439 0MI11 1 me 5470 ® 57 * ■!? 


EsI soles NA Marrs safes 310*7 


5439 00011 l 30 IU mm »i.»+ 

•VT. , " , -“ 5 Feb 98 57.92 57.75 57.9J +1.07 1293 


5poi 171200 171100 1756.00 J 757 00 Mans open mill 9. 1 77. off irs 

Forward 1715 00 1 71600 1747 00 1 748 00 

capper Cathodes (High Grade) JAPANESE YEN (CMERJ 

Spot 227830 228150 731100 231430 115 mUHon yen. S per 100 ven 


Dividends 

Company 


Per Amt Rec Pnjr 


Per Air! Rec Pay 


IRREGULAR 

UbAn-ShnCra - .33 8-22 10-6 


STOCK SPLIT 
Anchor Find 3 lor 2 spit. 


Daniel Ind 
Delta & Pine 
Dow Carp 
ForifeSecur 


Oriental Find 5 for 4 splB. 
Telecom Argentina 2 far 1 spCrt. 
twin City Bncp 3 tor2 split. 


Gamma Biological 
Inco Opparlfd 2000 
Kansas Gty PU. 


NeMSanAary 
Nttmstn Pub Sec 
Panamer Sever 
Perm Engine A 
Precision Cost 
RUCnrp 
Research Inc 
Senior Hi Inco PI 


INCREASED 

IncDOpport M .05 8-18 8-29 

Liberty AIIStrEq Q IS 8-22 10-6 


INITIAL 

Debt Strategies .1241 8-18 8-38 

Oriental Find n _ .I2s 9-30 10-tS 


Sunbeam Corn O 51 9-1 9-15 

Tour Mur* CA HM M 057 B-1B 8-28 


O JJ45 94 9-29 
Q .03 8-31 9-12 

Q .17 B-29 9-15 
M 361 8-25 9-15 
Q 325 100 10-51 
M 3529 818 8-29 
Q 405 828 9-19 
O .08 8-22 810 
□ 23 815 81 

Q 3525 9-15 9-29 
O .10 815 10-7 

O 36 9-5 183 

Q .15 9-30 1815 
Q 37 829 181 
M .0752 818 829 
O 31 9-1 9-15 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMERJ 
50300 Bn.- cents per Bl 
A ug 97 8025 7935 W.47 -IJ7 

Sep 97 7955 78.97 78.97 -150 

00 97 80 10 7955 7955 -150 

Nov 97 1120 8077 80 72 150 

Jan 98 11.75 90.70 80.70 -150 

Mar9B 0095 8045 80-50 -J 45 
EsL sates 1420 Mars soles 1918 
Msm open Pd 7X856. off 115 


Forward 2261.00 7262 00 238700 728800 Sep 97 8*92 BeiO 862] 00033 71813 

5pof 5B2"r 5«31 59400 59*30 WferW 8903 BSW, Js5»."oSh 7 i +U 

Fun-an. 39800 599 00 6091. *m+ Es l. ^ N . A Mem rates 7A588 

6*30 00 *63500 *81000 681530 M ^ 


Mar 98 5847 +132 4500 

Apr98 61 17 +1.« 2-044 

EsL rates N A Mans sales 2X419 
Mam open ini 98. 799 c4f 719 


Dec 97 8794 .8725 8737 0003* 1272 GASOIL APE) 

Mnr98 8903 88S6 385* -0 0037 414 U.S dotlare per metric ton • lent 01100 Ions . 

EsI. sates N.A Mem rates 78,568 Sep’' 171^5 170.00 J7H7S +100 72419 

Atom open fell 7i 504, cvf 1533 OcJ97 17330 17700 J 72.75 +1.75 11.581 


Farwjrd *72900 *74000 691000 *91500 SWISS FRANC (CMERJ Dee 97 

asss ssss ffiTa’lTfflaB Bl 


5*4*0:000* 2.293 

Mar 98 A708 .6707 6716 00006 1.050 


HOG5-LM (CMER) 

40300 tos. ■ cents per B. 

Aug 97 8020 79 72 79.87 357 

Od 97 7220 77 *5 7205 <020 

Dec 97 6870 *825 6037 JJ 10 

Feb 98 6727 &*90 6717 ,027 

Ape 98 6360 *110 6117 . 0.15 

ESI. safes 7,425 Mans soles 7.5*4 
Mom upon ml 34 29i off 1.212 


Zinc (Spedu HMCttoM) 

Spot 1*7800 163 100 171800 171300 Z*" J. - 6nl7 , f 

Forward 1500 DO 1501 00 154/00 154600 eSLSafeS N A. Mom sales 14208 

Mam open ml 5*611 afl 2971 
High Low Oase Owe Opfel 


NOT 97 1 74.50 1 7175 1 74J0 >1 50 6,570 

Dec 97 175.75 175.00 17630 .1-50 11459 
Jan 98 17*00 17550 17620 .120 7.(74 

Fe098 NT NT. 17630 .150 SL136 

Mar 98 N.T NT 17175 » 1.50 2438 

Est. rates: 76321 . Pm rales JASSO 1 
Prev. open ed.: 81931 off 2804 


MEXJCAN PESO (CMERJ 
500300 pesos, s per peso 


Financial sop 97 itobo .i7*» i2i*s, 

US T BILLS (CMERJ Dec 97 .12740 IJMo >?232 . 

SI mllkm- pH of 100 pel Mo< 98 11830 1^27 1827 

Sop 97 9458 9406 9407 <001 6.971 c. ... . 5- . 

Dec 97 94.71 9470 *4 TO 301 2472 ^ 

Mordfl 9+ <41 unch *72 * tanoro " nl 44J4A “P 505 


BRENT OIL (IPE) 

U.S doUors per barrel - loll o! I3W barrels 


irain isiSr...,. Sep 97 180* 1855 1805 -a 77 39.W7 

cSw 7^0 ' 00,7 18 95 18*8 1893 +C. 1 B to. Ml 

AtoaW lMB Wo * 9, t*04 1885 1904 +0.15 14.768 

MOT98 11830 1IOT7 1182. . 0015* 1155 Doc97 19 m IS 91 16 15 ,0 14 19.MJ 


Tour Muni NY HU M .061 8-78 8-28 


AT PtasKsg 
Apex Muni Fd 
Basseft Fumrture 
Beckman In strum 
Chortwefl Re 
Carparalc HI Yld 
Corporate HiYM IL 


REGULAR 

a 345 8-15 9.3 

M .0533 818 8-2B 
e O 20 822 9-2 

m Q IS 8-22 9-11 

O 04 8-19 9-2 

M .1141 8-18 8-29 
IL M .1047 8-18 8-29 


Total Syst 
Vance bonders E* 
WOtis Corrocn 
WarWwd DOrrsI 
WartMnqtonF 


Q 0112 9-23 IO-1 
0 05 9-1? 9-30 

b 167 9 5 100 

M 3849 8-18 8 29 
Q 32S 9 26 10-31 


a-amrat b-appraxJart* cunetml per 
shore/ ADR: g-perabfe to Cceortoin hradi; 
w-maalMy; »g u r i rterlr ; mfe — m 


PORK BELUES (CMERJ 
taoaoan.- cents p«n» 

Aug 97 82 85 806 5 87 70 .107 

Fob 98 74.75 7X45 74*5 >0*2 

Mar 98 7420 73«0 7420 .072 

EsL sales 1289 Mom safes 1.851 
MoascwrflteJATXAall 101 


EsI wtoesNA MOrrs safes 817 
Mom open bd 103*5 up 285 


5 YR TREASURY (CJBOT) 


HSRHPI S7ERUNG ILIFFE1 
L50O000 pK of I OO pci 

V. 79 41 7b tilt — O 03 117.240 
wuT.2 2*7 >263 -004 121780 

Mat 98 97** 92*0 97*1 41 IU Ofl 17 r 


«ov?7 1904 18 85 19 04 +0.15 14,768 

Dec97 19 10 18 97 19 15 +0 14 19.092 

Jan98 19.13 1900 19.19 >014 14030 

F#b98 19.05 19 04 19 12 * 0.12 6.924 

EsI sales.- 39.173 Prev safes 31.257 
Prev open ml • 170520 art IJ9* 


Stock Indexes 


^ lO^fe 5 ' ^ 04 XW^43 Junto? 9?**92M?2Ji 0 04 S SP COMP INDEX (CMERJ 

(tec 97 1 Os-31 106-15 10*- IS .01 11A*J v*a J, 7, ‘A ?04 6„IW 500,indcs 


lfec97 10*41 106-15 106-15 
EsI. safes 53300 Mem", rates 44381 
Mom open ml 27X107. off 5,494 




Stock Tables Explained 

Safes flgun are unoffidaL Yearty hrghs and lours retted tt» preview; 52 weefcs phn (he curmd 
week trjlnal life lax-sl IrotSngaay.VVhCTO a spBor-JodiiSviacndomourtlng to 25 percent or more 
has been paid the years high-tow range and dvidend ore Shawn lor, me new siodu only. Untna 
uthorwoc noted rates at «ndends me annual fSsbwsemcnb based on ff* Uni rtcctoroiton. 
a - dnndcnd obo extra (s). b - annual rate of (Svidcnd ptws stock dividend, c - bquidaling 
dividend ec - PE ereeods W.dd ■ called, d - new poorly low. dd - toss hr trie hrsr 77 imnffrs. 
• - dimdond declared or pant m preceding 17 month*. I - annual rale, increased on Iasi 
cJecln ration, g - dividend In Canadian funds, subject to 1 5*5. nan residence lax. t - dividend 
declared offer spa up ar slock (Svntend. 1 - thvidend paid IMS year. amirhxL dclemmorno 
action token ai lotosl Ovidend nfertuig. k - dividena declared or paid this year, an 
accumulative issue with dividends m arrears, m - aimvot ralo. reduced on Jasl decJOrnlon. 
n - new issue m Ihc pasl 5? weeks. The high-law range begins with me start of Ira drag 
nd - nml day delivery, p - indial dividend, annual rale unknown. P/E - pnee comings rain 
q - dosed end mutual hind, r - dividend declared or paid in preceding 12 monihs. plus slock 
dividend, s ■ stock ‘-pis. Dividend begins urffti dote of splri. sis - sates. I - dtvtoend paid in 
stuck in preceding 17 monSt^ estimated cash value an ex itendend or c« disin&uinn dale 
v - new yearly high, v - trading Mltcd. ai - in bankruptcy ot iccnvmJBpoc being reorgani/i?!! 

under the Bankruptcy ACL of securities assumed by such congrames. wd- when dismbulcd 
wt . wln-n issued/ ww - with warrants. * - ei dhrtdcnd or cn-ri^ils. Xdis ■ cx dislnbulton 
nr - wilhaul warrants, y- a dividend ond soles ai fuJL ltd - yield, z - soles in tut 


Food 

COCOA ffl (3 El 


tim US* *5S?i. (00 pci ST 

Sep 97 1094* 108-72 108 73 OJ 3*4,747 1- MONTH EUROMARK ILlFPEt 

Dri-97 108-28 108 1 : 108-13 04 XA023 DM1 SmSmT |Erf7<Mp.| 

Mar98 10843 04 1.383 Auq 9? Hi N.T. -J* 73 U 

EsI sder, 84 700 Mom rates 7*I7V Sep97 96*8 ««*» tntJ ■ 

Mam open ml 40*1 *3, up Levs Oct 97 k, » vt, yr 9* W Ui 


ms - 1 pet ton 
1523 1488 

1492 

4 

IL40 

1541 

1517 

ISI* 

•71 

jr.ftPo 

15/2 

,544 

1544 

76 

7 VI 46 

158/ 

1567 

15*7 

•76 

1X305 

140/ 

1582 

1582 

■76 

2,147 



16413 

76 

2771 


Mam VO7 20 t+vJ. U n 

EsI sides N A. Mum rates 663JS 
Mon 1 open In) {93.S87. up 1902 


Jul 98 1607 1587 15*7 

Sep 98 l«U 

ESI sdes 1*357 Mens ndes 10697 
Mars open inf 101254. up wi 


COFFEE C (NCSE1 
37500 fes cents Per 8 ) 

Sep 97 70400 185 JO 188 XI ills '012 

rw 9 / 18/75 1*500 16850 6 75 768/ 

Mm 98 15* 50 14900 14995 480 1596 


US TREASURY BONDS ICBOT) 
l* pd SI 00300 pis A 37nds oi [no pci) 
Sep«7 113 10 117 14 117 IS 09 
Dec 97 11279 11202 11703 09 

Mar 98 11707 111 25 HI 75 09 

Jun« III 11 09 

F si rates 180300 Mans rates 331 1 1 1 
Man-, open mi 6HLWO. all 70.7*.’ 


m pH of too pel FTSE 100ILIFFE) 

H' m. -7*73 unch 1.013 05 per u vfe»p o.nl 

9**8 9*** toi* 7 >001 380430 2°° ,, 5?®?° T’WO 50*20 .186 7I.J+1 

■*■*> 9*» 9*« U«n lun B*” 509 ? 0 51770 . iaa ^ 

9*54 la V*5I Unch 29 r.9*5 Mar98 N.T Nr SI 77 0 .lag 11 , 


009/ v*N| V* 59 96 SO Unen 1*03 Evii s| i, s S 50970 5127 0 .180 a.j[* 

D«9/ 9*54 9*50 v* 51 Unch 79?. 9*5 Mnr** N.T N T SI/70 . 180 

“A39 9*40 Unch 7? 4. *35 EsL sates ra*ia Prev sates llju 

09 524.599 Sep98 9*03 9 S iJ ^3! ion ISL40S Pm ' 0PCT,,n, ”■*""« n* 

09 7.IJ9 J“"99 45 39 95 J5 95 3/ .002 a9.W 

1 EsI sales 13* 64b Pm rates Mo 10/ Sep 9/ 307*0 jwn rr 

PlOTupimM 1*51118 up 4.994 SSaj Silo S ‘22 71 


May 98 14950 14440 14440 4 35 1393 

Jul 98 (4530 13940 I2v-l0 435 /« 

EsI spies 8-540 Mam safes 7.937 

Mans open in* JUlk “P 1 n 

SUGAR WORLD 11 CNCS6) 

sEsr^n^Kr »" op? ioi+to 

Mar 08 IJ 80 11/4 !'/•' £« 

May98 II H U-70 |J 15 001 IX " 

Jldyg 11*5 11 S» 11 *3 002 7.414 

r si rates /.MB Mter.raki IX/4J 
Mansepm Ini 189 . 252 . oH 1.180 


LONG GILT (LIFFE7 


i-month pi bor imatifi 

FF5 RaPKHi pHallOOpcI 


P°-?y S' 8 32jhh.ul IB) (Hi Sep 9/ 9*51 9*49 9*MI Uren *&04« 

)y7/ *J4 *8 * *4 03 (14 ua 041 17*103 Decvz 9*1* 9* j| «*J7 ngi 417** 

Cte. 97 113 311137/111 7/ 001 9.998 Ma.98 **2. 9* J| v*27 tl'S? 


WO 2998 0 30lii 1 200 Sire 
Oer«7 3051 0 M SJO 30380 > 20 0 a+g 
E-.l spies v.gj* ‘ 

Ofssiml *8.8/7 off 18 


k-J ■+*- 31. 715 !>■-» rates 10*905 
Put often *0 I8*|0| or I *781 


■7*27 007 jau*3 

Jun 98 9* I* »r 1 1 if. | j g 21/83 

W« «60J 9598 9<« Ogj j|.™ 

L-.I rates 3/./3* 

SJ|n-n Mil 7e«07l -Hi 1575 


GERMAN GOV. BUND IUFFEI 
n«75oooo pis ion,. 1 


Commodity Indexes 


sep*/ Win loi m rat w . 01534 * 15 * i^month eurolhuhissf, 

Usv/ . 0,06 , 0.00 . 0 . 0 / . 0.5 18 . 41 . ,,, f ^“p^'X ' 

Mn .98 NT Nl 100 74 .UI 5 S. w a, p-, 7 | *J ,« ^ 


Moody's 
P.-uiiv 
D J Fnhire> 
CRB 


1-SW9U ^ 
l«77.?0 W 


1 -4 scries 100.70*1 Pmr rate-s 715.055 
Ph-v >l(teillnl TILLS*/ nil 7.7*5 


P.+ 97 9 3 53 4 3 40 V.l '4> 

Mar to* 93*1 9107 


:s5s 




> 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1997 

EUROPE 


PAGE 13 








Swedbank 
To Acquire 
Stake in 
New Bank 


CaBtpOedby Gw SuffFivm Objubt/w 

STOCKHOLM — Swed- 
bank , AB said Tuesday it 
planned to buy up to 12.5 per- 
cent of the shares in HSB Bank, 
a new Swedish bank that has not 
yet opened for business, as part 
of the continued restructuring 
of the Swedish banking sector. 

Swedbank, the second- larg^t 
bank by assets in Sweden, will 
boy an initial 9.1 percent as part 
of a share issue, spending 52 
million kronor ($6.54 million). 
It also has an option to buy an ■ 
additional 3.4 percent 

HSB Bank, which is a di- 
vision of Swedish housing as- 
sociation HSB Sverige, received 
a state banking charter in July. 

The two banks will cooperate 
on clearing, technical opera- 
tions, fund operations and first 
mortgages. 

The deal is the latest shuffle 
in the Swedish banking sector as 
banks prepare for international 
competition before the start of 
Europe’s economic and mon- 
etary union on Jan. 1, 1999. 

Swedbank is in the process of 
merging with Swedish rival Fo- 
ereningsbanken AB to Foeren- 
ingsSparbanken. Early this year 
H an delsbanken bought the 
mortgage lender Stadshypotek 
for 22.9 billion kronor. 

( Bloomberg . Reuters) 

■ SE Banken Profit Sinks 

SkandinavisJca Enskilda 
Banken AB reported a 9 percent 
drop in second-quarter profit as 
Sweden's third-largest bank 
made less money on trading fi- 
nancial instruments such as 
bonds, Bloomberg News re- 
ported. 

SE Banken’s net fell to 817 
million kronor, below analysts’ 
expectations of 1.07 billion 
kronor. Trading operations 
made less money “because of 
lower risk levels in the bank’s 
bond portfolios, as wdl as in- 
terest-rate changes in some for- 
eign currencies,” the bank said. 


Prices Drop in France for 2d Straight Month 


G»*piW by Our SuffFnw Dupui, /*, 

PARIS — Consumer prices fell 
0.2 percent in France in July, leav- 
es year-on-year inflation steady at 
1.0 percent, just above the 40-year 
low registered in April and May 
statistics released Tuesday showed.' 

the figures from the national stat- 
istics institute INSEE indicate that a 
sluggish economy is keeping 
companies from raising prices. 

“It’s just too early m the eco- 
nomic cycle for producers and re- 
tailers to be able to charge higher 
pnces and survive,” said Phyllis 
Reed, a London- based European 
bond strategist at BZW. “Consumer 
confidence is so low and unemploy- 
iiOTisohigh that people just can’t 
afford higher prices. Plus, strong 
domestic and global competition are 
keeping the lid firmly on prices.” 

The drop in July was the second 
consecutive monthly price decline 
and the biggest monthly fall in 
French consumer prices since Au- 


gust 1 996, when the CPI dropped by 
0.3 percent. 

Price declines were led by clothes 
and manufactured goods as retailers 
held summer sales hoping to spark 
demand amid a torpid economic re- 
covery and record-high unemploy- 
ment 

Companies are finding it hard to 
sell their goods, much less raise 
prices, amid the weak demand in 
France and elsewhere. Carmakers 
are having a particularly hard time. 
New-car registrations fell almost 10 
percent in July . the ninth consecutive 
monthly decline. PSA Peugeot Cit- 
roen and Renault SA are suffering 
after the end in September of a gov- 
ernment subsidy to car buyers. 

Among the reasons for stagnant 
prices is a record-high unemploy- 
ment rate of 12.6 percent, which is 
not expected to improve until the 
end of 1998. Almost 3.2 million 
people are currently registered as 
looking for work, eliminating sig- 


nificant spending power from the 
economy. French household con- 
sumption of manufactured, goods 
fell 2.9 percenr in June from May. 

The government is struggling to 
finance job-creation programs while 
at the same time cutting its budget 
deficit to meet the requirements to 
join a single European currency. 

French ministries received letters 
from Prime Minister Lionel Jospin 
on Tuesday telling them their spend- 
ing limits for 1998. French news- 
papers suggested the budgetary bal- 
ancing act would be pulled off with 
the help of a cocktail of savings 
measures, spending reallocations 
and one-off payments from state- 
owned companies. A previously an- 
nounced corporate tax increase and 
the rising dollar, if it maintains its 
gains, would also support the gov- 
ernment’s efforts. 

The government has been keep- 
ing tight-lipped on the ministry-by- 
ministry spending decisions that 


Mr. Jospin wrapped up Friday. But 
published reports suggest the gov- 
ernment could tap the state-owned 
utility EDF-GDF for extra funds. 

The financial daily L'Agefi said 
Tuesday that lhe government bad 
decided to use about 30 billion 
francs ($4.77 billion) from EDF's 
accounts to help plug the hole in 
next year's budget. 

I Bloomberg, Reuters) 

I U.K. Inflation Hits 3.3% 

The headline rate of inflation in 
Britain leapt almost to a two-year 
high of 3.3 percent in July from 2.9 
percent in June, official figures 
showed Tuesday, Reuters reported 
from London. 

The Office for National Statistics 
said the underlying rate of inflation, 
which excludes volatile mortgage 
payments, also jumped It reached 
3.0 percent in July from 2.7 percent 
in June, well above the govern- 
ment's 2.5 percent. 


New Investor Lifts Karstadt’s Stock 


C**3fxlrd by Our Staff Firm DUjxorhn 

ESSEN, Germany — Kars tad t 
AG’s shares soared Tuesday amid 
optimism that Germany’s second- 
largest retailer would reorganize 
more quickly following the pur- 
chase of a 20.3 percent stake in the 
company by Schickedanz Group, a 
mail-order retailer. 

Deutsche Bank AG and Com- 
merzbank AG said after die close of 
trading Monday that they had sold 
their stakes to Schickedanz for a 
reported 1.2 billion Deutsche marks 
($645.9 million). 

Karstadt, which owns mail order 
and travel agencies as well as the 
Karstadt and Hertie department 


store chains, said it would begin a 
“strategic alliance” with Schicke- 
danz, a move analysts said would 
enable the retailer to speed reor- 
ganization efforts. 

Like other retailers, Karstadt has 
sought to cut costs and improve prof- 
itability to counter a five-year slump 
in the German retail industry. 

“Schickedanz is a very strong 
partner, and one can expect that 
Karstadt’s reorganization will be bel- 
ter, faster, and more complete,” said 
Joerg Christians, analyst at Trinkaus 
Capita] Management in Dusseldorf. 

Schickedanz. a closely held hold- 
ing company with retail, mail-order, 
real estate and banking businesses. 


reported a pretax profit of 190 mil- 
lion DM for the 1997 financial year, 
up 46 percent from the previous 
financial year. 

In an interview with the German 
television station ZDF, Karstadt ’s 
chairman, Walter Deuss, said he 
foresaw a “whole series” of pos- 
sible synergies from a cooperation 
with Schickedanz, including “for- 
eign sales and purchasing” and In- 
ternet sales services already de- 
veloped by Karstadl’s Neckermann 
direct-mailing unit. 

Karstadt shares, which rose to a 
record 740 DM, closed Tuesday in 
Frankfurt at 711.50 DM. up 13.5. 

( Bloomberg , AFX, Reuters ) 


BHW Drops Plans With Postbank 


CoayMtdbyOyrSt^Fnm Uu/gatka 

HAMELN, Germany — Property 
finance group BHW Holding AG 
said Tuesday it had dropped plans to 
buy a stake in Deutsche Postbank 
AG because of unacceptable de- 
mands made by the bank, which is to 
be privatized soon. 

BHW, which has long said it 
wanted close cooperation with Ger- 
many's largest saving bank, said 


Postbank had changed the terms of 
the link-up to such an extent that it 
no longer made economic sense. 

BHW said Postbank wanted a si- 
lent partner, and such terms were 
“unacceptable." BHW's chief ex- 
ecutive. Bernhard Wagner, said, 
“The matter is over for us.” Post- 
bank said it regretted the decision. 

The companies had been drawing 
up plans for two years, and Mr. 


Wagner said BHW would invest 
elsewhere if a decision were not 
made this year. 

BHW also said it had sold its 
remaining 10 percent stake in DSL 
Holding AG, which owns 48 percent 
of DSL Bank, because “it no longer 
fulfills a strategic role, and the cur- 
rent state of the financial markets 
offer good conditions for the sale." 

( Reuters . AFX) 


DeBeers Profit 
Loses Some 
Of Its Glitter 

Our Stiff Firm Oigurfes 

JOHANNESBURG — De 
Beers/Centenary AG, rhe 
world's largest diamond pro- 
ducer. said Tuesday that first- 
half earnings rose 5 percent. 

De Beers/Centenary’s net in- 
come rose toS507 million in the 
six months to June 30 from 
$482 million a year earlier. 

The results included a one- 
time gain of S75 million from 
the sale of part of De Beers’ 
stake in JCI Ltd., minus a pro- 
vision for an expected loss on 
the sale of its stake in Lonrho 
PLC. If those factors were in- 
cluded, earnings were down 10 
percent, at $432 million. 

De Beers’ diamond account 
— profit from trading and 
selling diamonds — increased 
14 percent, to $510 million. 

De Beers also said Chairman 
Julian Ogilvie Thompson would 
step down to be deputy chair- 
man and to become chairman at 
Anglo American Carp, of South 
Africa. The current deputy 
chairman. Nicky Oppenheimer. 
will take over as DeBeers chair- 
man. ( Reuters . Bloomberg) 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong "Stop apore Tokyo 

"*"9 *eng - .Strans.Tnnes NRckei 225 


17000 

2275 

22003 

16000 • / 

2200b 

21000 

15000 jLflf 

2125 \ 

20000 

14000 - ft 

2050 

19000 

13000V J 

1975 * -Hu 

18000 

1Z0 ® M AM J J A 

1900 M A M" j J A 

•17000 



1997 


M AM J J A 
1997 


Exchange Index Tuesday Prav. % 

Ctese Close Change} 
HongKong .Bang-Seng . 16,460.47 -0.47 


Singapore 

StrateTSTJes^.;; 

i \mMr4M 

Sydney 

JMf Ofsfimates. ... • > 

: 2£5<L58 . 2^67-25 4^3 

Tokyo 

.N3*et'225; = ••••• 

19JW9.t1 18.824.-IS +1.46 

KuataUanpu 

rCOtt^osfe 

eS72S 902. U ■ «0 54 

Bangkok 

SET- •• 

Closed 632.25 

“Seoul •_ “ • 

: 'Coi^K^tea-kujex"" 

.76192 -765.07.“.' -0^5 

Taipei ; ■ ■ 

Skiok>teik9t Irafex &m.74 S.8&7.27 #SQ 

Manila ' ' . 

•FS e/-V'£?xr 

'^53&40. 2,572.43 -144 

Jakarta 

totripo^te frufex - 

66ZS6 e581T, +0.7S 

Wefflngfon 

■ftGSe-40;; - 

- 2)499.80 • -2,508.40 - -0^4 

Bombay 

Sensjthm In06X . 

4.425JJ3 4,481.80 -1^8 

Source: Tetekurs 


lnumaiH<ro] Hnakl Tribune 

Very briefly: 


■ Thyssen Stahl AG and Fried. Krupp AG Hoesch-Krupp 
received clearance from the European Commission for the 
merger of their quality flat-steel divisions. Thyssen Stahl will 
take 60 percent and Krupp will take 40 percent. 

• Henkel KGaA. Germany’s specialty chemicals group, pos- 
ted pretax profit of 438 million Deutsche matks (5235.7 
mill ion ) in the first half of 1 997 . up 1 0 percent from a year ago, 
due in pan to the weakness of the mark. Group sales rose 22 
percent, to 9.78 billion DM. 

• AssiDomaeu. the Swedish forestry group, posted a 30 
percent drop in pretax profit in the first" half of the year, to 859 
million kronor ($107.3 million], and management cited un- 
certainty in the pulp market. 

■ Tele Danmark A/S, a majority state-owned Danish tele- 
communications company, bought 20.8 percent of the Czech 
mobile phone service company Ceske Radiokomunikace for 
385 million kroner ($54.4 million). 

• Empresa Nacional de Celulosas SA, Spain's largest pro- 
ducer of pulp, reported a profit of 207 million pesetas ($1.3 
million) in the second quarter but posted a loss of 490 million 
pesetas for the first six months. The company had recorded a 
loss of 2.3 billion pesetas in the first half of 1996. 

• NCL Holding ASA. the parent of Norwegian Cruise Line 
Ltd., said it bought the cruise ship AIDA for $ 1 80 million from 
an undisclosed seller. 

• General Accident PLC, the British insurer, reported op- 
eratingprofit of £260 million ($41 1 .3 million) for the first half 
of 1 997, up from £193 million for the same period of 1996. 

• Sandvik AB. a Swedish maker of industrial tools and steel 
products, reported a fall in first-half net profit to 1 .41 billion 
($176 million) from 1.77 billion kronor in the first half of 

1996. Bloomberg. Reuters. AFP 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


- « 

: 

i . 


i 

j Thesday, Aug- 1 2 

l‘ Prfcwfli toad euronotes. 


Tdekwt 


Law Ctau Pm. 


sterdam 



AEX.mtox.mM 

PlWtMKVA*7 






. lew 

.... FDourfas 
[NG Group 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 

5§;iSS"* 
f ffigSi 




HJgfi Low Go** Pm. 
Deutsche Book 119-80 11840 119.70 11740 
Dent Tefctaun CUD 4205 4245 4270 
DmdncrBuk KU» BU0 KUO 81 SO 

Pimentos 342 332 339 329.10 

pRHnhKNM 181.36 159.50 161 JO 155 

Fried- Kropp 347 337 343J0 328 

Gebe 11150 11150 11440 11X40 

155 153 15450 151 

105 10X90 10450 10050 
4SS 455 450 462 

8950 8770 8900 0880 
MSp M30 BX50 833 
Tih 701 711.50 m 
102 9830 9930 K O 
1410 1390 1398 1387 

3440 3540 3470 3410 
5« 547 548 546 

8H? 854 OS &S5> 

™ 

Munch RuechR 6650 MM 66S0 MM 


High Low Oom Pm. 

SA Breweries 147 14 575 145 145 

Snwonm 4050 3975 39-75 3975 

Safflfl 59.75 59 59-75 S9 

SBIC 22075 220 2» 220 

Tiger Oats 80 7875 78.75 78-3) 


Kuala Lumpur owgg jwas 


High low Om Pm. 


High Low Oom Pro*. 


High Law Oom Pm. 


(ridUtfifies 
Vandame Units 
Vodafone 
Whflbiead 
VWtaTBHrigs 
Wohefcy 
WPP Group 
Zeneca 


B? 


707 

7.10 

7.10 


5 

112 

5.10 

119 

4.92 

114 

Paris 

872 

X35 

Xt9 


151 

IS) 

3-53 

Acar 

4.95 

5 

495 

AGP 

277 

XB1 

Ml 

AirUgulde 


19.75 19 JO 1948 1945 



flreumag 
RWE 
SAP pH 
Sdiering 
SGL Orton 
Siemens 

ssar 

ver 

V6W 


566 554 565 54530 

8340 K 5335 M 
437 432 437 438 3) 

209.55 207 207.70 20850 

25230 24930 75230 25} 

12470 12450 12X75 12520 
1400 1400 MOB 1585 

882 875 875 878 

43520 425-3) 43520 424 

109J0 109 109 109-50 

577 575 574 585 

794 789 789 7B9 

JOT 7319 7351 1325 


AMMBHdgs 

Gating 

Mai Banking 
Mol MH SUpP 
Petrosa Gas 
Pnohm 
PabOcBk 
Renting 
Resorts Worid 
Rothmans PM 

Tenqqa 
UM Engineers 
1TL 


1150 

1070 

22 

5.55 

9 

945 

348 

X* 

72S 

2X70 

JJS 

840 

940 

1X90 

720 


1140 11.70 
1030 1040 
2130 22 

4.90 X4Q 
8-75 9 

9.15 9.15 

344 340 

320 340 

7.10 735 

2150 2150 
750 7J0 

845 170 

9 945 

1530 IlflO 
420 720 


11.90 
1040 
2120 
620 
840 
940 
3 M 
136 
7.1B 
2150 
720 
820 
935 
1540 
440 


Madrid 

Acerinox 

ACESA 

Agues Btnction 


Balsa tadae 59749 
Previous: 595-46 


AknMAMtr 

Am-UAP 

Banentre 

BIC 

BNP 

Crawl Phis 


Helsinki hex 


EnsoA 
Huhhsnakil 
Kvnira 
Kesha 
Marita A 
MebaB _ 
Mefco-SatoB 
Neste 
Nokia A 
Orion- Yhtrmoe 
Outokumpu A 


Market Closed “gF 5, 


52 

2 * 

SI 

76 

2320 

188 

5140 

150 

47540 

199 

10430 

14340 

B440 


362936 

previous: 368844 

5040 5140 50 

238 240 Z38 

4930 J930 50 

75 76 7540 

’us ’m 2 

*» «8 

469 469 

197 190.90 
J0» JOS 
13940 14X40 138.10 
85J0 8540 85 


145 

467 

195 

1053D 


X\:.~ 


The stock market in 
Bangkok was dosed Tuesday 
! for a holiday. 

Bombay 

1555 107 153&251542S 

509 489.75 492 50123 

111 105 10425 10740 

58225 565 57425 578 

290.75 28240 285 28125 

Sj! 37X75 37540 3J1-25 
M7 3Z3J5 327 33450 

2X50 23-5 2435 

37040 37140 38140 


Hong Kong 


Hua* Sea* 1638X41 

nwriaoKlMOLff 


■ fa™ 

6EB 


945 

Asia 3130 
Pacific 1440 


8£°pX ££ 

§5 H? S 

HangLungDev 1530 
HanflSengBk 
HaMOfsan (nv 


- 


'-ai-' 


Brussels 

AlmanH 
florco Ind 
BBL 
CBS? 

•atari , 
MhoizeLtan 
Elechooei 

Efcctajflno 

RsflsAG 

Geraert 

cai. 

OmBonwe 

Kretfettonk 

iMoteo 

Kg 

Sotay 


14800 

7450 

9300 

3385 

18175 
1910 
771® 
3 WO 

rew 

3400 

an 

14W 

15325 

14325 

4930 

10750 

3510 

21450 

14825 

127900 


BEUMWHC24S1.9S 

Previous: 242*57 

16^ 16gg Wg 

7500 7590 79M 

9150 m m* 

32M 3330 3335 

17958 18000 17700 
1870 «» 18“ 
7690 7700 7640 

3575 3585 3570 

s as i 
a a .3 

14950 14975 14875 

<91 <s a 

2102 s w® ?5SS 

14700 18750 14700 
125000 127000 12M0 


Henderson UJ 
HKOWmGbs 
HKEI edrie 
HKTdecoroW 

K 

>Dw 


111 
&60 
7240 
16^ 
31 JO 

J9^ 

443 

275 

82 

76.70 


9 9.15 
3040 31-10 


SujoLoreiCa 

ahOwoPKt 

SwiroPKA 

Wharf 

mo*** 


BHdg jug 
20.8$ 
5840 
242 
US 
103 
440 
S 40 
745 
72 
32® 
1855 


_ ’3 

i4 f si 

2475 27.-® 9490 
U-50 4X60 64 

5140 5140 51^ 
45 4SS& 4630 
9 JO 9.40 9A5 

JS5 S 

us &w u; 
A9J5 7075 7140 
16^0 1660 16-60 
3030 3070 30M 
ieJ0 W 19-20 
4*7 470 4-67 

m 273 m 

7875 T930 7940 
2570 26 2645 

2050 :*B5 2XS1 
2030 mso 2X00 
56J5 56JS 5740 
233 2J8 2J90 

179 131 

W5 100 
&m 445 
790 8 

7.45 7J0 

»J5 6975 
32.10 33L7S 3270 
UJD 1835 1X95 


131 

102 

430 

XI5 

745 

71 


Copenhagen "tCSSSfi 

w W 394 393 

S I 

940 9» S3 


Jakarta 

AsfraM. 
8kJnm«Jen 
Bk Negara 
GotJanoCwn 

lndo<*i»*o 

ln**f 

gompoamaHM 

SoowGregi. 

reHaraon*®' 


eowgotf t ltataejg-W 

Iwta: <58.17 

8200 rm 7950 7750 
1450 ISO 1625 
1425 1375 1425 1400 
TOO 8600 9100 8425 

3«g 3825 3925 3825 

Jim «o 25 sw 

7150 69M 7M0 JW 

g^qi 7350 W W 82S0 
TO 3750 3825 ?7S 
^ 3550 3800 3675 


London 

Abbey Nall 
ABeaDamecq 
AaaDan Water 
Argos 
AmoG,„ 

Assoc Brl 
BAA 
Baidan 
Bass 
BAT lad 
BankScaOasl 
SfceOrcte 
BOC Group 11» 

Boob 7.97 

SS& iS 

Bril Land 4.U 

BrSPeftn 9.13 

BrilTetecan ££ 

BTR 2JO 

BunoahCastral 11^ 

C^WiUss 

Canunl Uidoa 748 

EMI Group XB8 

R^mSitoiol 141 

Gent Accident 9 JO 

^ >d 

Gkmweaom 1X92 

GronailnGp 870 

Grand Met X97 

GRE „ 1» 

GreenallsGp 443 

Gainoess 5.91 

tfo 

2X49 
11.11 
4 

742 
249 
947 
2.87 
445 
731 
119 

5 lW 
5.03 
1X90 
240 
545 
MD 
&13 
332 
2-18 
434 
7.90 
145 
. tpo. 

Pram*rfrro» wo 
PnxfertW 638 

RaShockGO 
Rank Group 
(«c«t Otter 
RaficmS 

RentnBllnjflal 
Reuters Hrfgs 
Ream 
RTZ 


FT-SE 116: 5*7540 
Prntoos: 5031 30 

838 
448 
741 
441 
1JB 
541 
547 
7432 


&J6 

130 

U2 

476 

45S 

4.64 

7A5 

775 

7.78 

639 

6J6 

679 

Ifll 

146 

1.49 

556 

547 

5M 

588 

573 

5flS 


SI 
Baneste 
Bnsfldrtef 
Ben Centro Ifisp 
Bco Popular 
Bco Santander 
CEPSA 
Contaente 
CwgMtpfre 

FECSA 
Gas Natural 
fbentrofa 
Ptyca 

Rapsfil _ 
Sevlflana Elec 
TMaattefD 
Tetehmica 
UriooFeoosa 
iMenc Content 


77990 

77550 

27700 

27720 

Canefour 

IBIS 

1KU5 

1810 

1800 

Casino 

5850 

5780 

5810 

5840 

ca= 

8040 

THU 

noou 

8000 

Getatom 


4195 

4225 

4210 


1450 

1435 

1435 

1440 

CLF-Deada Fran 

7650 

7560 

7630 

7540 

Credd Agrioote 

5890 

58M) 

5890 

5850 

Danone_ 

35000 

347711 

348411 

34800 

Eff-AquIUne 

4410 

4325 

<125 


ErtetnioBS 

4750 

3375 

4715 

3330 

4740 

3350 

4720 

3330 

Eunufisney 

Eunrtunnd 

8750 

8600 

8700 

8540 

Gen. Emit 

3275 

32411 

3275 

3205 

Hmras 

12W 

1275 

1290 

1290 

Imetal 

6700 

661K1 

671111 

6540 

Laftuge 

1830 

%% 

1840 

7900 

1855 

3015 

7855 

2985 

Legnma 

LOwd 

6740 

6260 

6220 

LVfAH 

1425 

1415 

1425 

1415 

iVtictieSnB 

7800 

7750 


7740 

Peribns A 

4160 

4125 

4150 

4140 

Pernod Kami 

1240 

1230 

1240 

1240 

Peufleol.OI 

2785 

2750 

2775 

27/5 

PlnouB-Wnl 

Ptontreks 


999 

21690 

962 

848 

42040 

748 

510 

28650 

1120 

4036 

28340 

33730 

780 

975 

578 


CAC40: 299847 
Pravtaas: 291X44 

971 988 974 

21340 21640 212 

940 957 950 

839 841 842 

4I4J0 417.90 41X80 
743 748 748 

492 503 508 

27940 28X50 28X50 
1106 1118 1115 

3J06 4000 3769 

27X10 28040 27X20 
33X10 33440 335 

. 673 674 688 

962 ft* 970 

562 563 562 


EtedrchaB 

Ericsson B 

HrreiesB 

Incentive A 

Investor B 

MoOaB 

NonSHtrLen 

PhannAiptotin 

SandvBcB 

Scania B 

SCAB 

5-E BaakenA 
Slanilla Fora 
Stansta B 
5KFB 

Sparttunken A 
5toraA 
Sv Handies A 
Volvo B 


611 

370 

330 

755 

473 

302 

289 

291 

265 

217 

196 

100 

349 

345 

223 

194 

14340 

275 

23040 


601 609 

36140 364 

326 327 

730 7S5 

418 471 

291 29740 
7B3 284 


287 

259 

214 

192 

94 

340 


269 

261 

215 

196 

96 

347 


336 34040 
22040 223 

186 192 

140 14X50 
2 Si 268 40 
229 230 


607 

36640 

325 

731 

419 

290 

384 

288 

25740 

21640 

191 

9840 

339 

34340 

220 

188 

13840 

272 

228 


999 

945 

952 

941 

687 

67S 

480 

477 

829 

815 

829 

811 

9 

875 

885 

890 

770 

7JB 

7.15 

7.15 

740 

734 

740 

735 

399.90 

395 397.30 394.10 

855 

838 

842 

838 


440 433J0 43740 436-80 
1185 1171 1173 1185 
MJ6 2375 2402 2402 

1529 1505 1523 1514 

376 366 372.20 358 

46140 45530 45640 457-50 
31540 311.10 314 31X50 

748 717 739 716 


851 

840 

847 

841 

5.27 

5 

507 

499 

22 

AM 

447 

4J0 

452 

440 

448 

448 


11.44 1144 
743 746 

340 140 

1571 1531 
677 

Z52 
643 
X92 
441 
170 
344 
148 
11 JO 1179 
17B 17B 

543 590 

6-15 6.15 

449 


528 

X61 

513 

9.12 

481 

1.74 

198 

2 


7J9 

6.15 
X40 
6.13 
472 
575 
676 

7.15 
1.79 


7.43 

637 

X43 

616 

485 

543 

627 

771 

141 


9.43 9^7 

192 1M 
7233 1270 
1X66 1177 
‘ X15 

X91 
199 
460 
548 
641 


:HJ6gs 

ia 

[rap! Tobacco 


X12 
548 
2» 

456 
541 

633 

6.04 607 

2X33 2X53 
10.93 11.11 


LoO___ 

Land Sec 
Losido 

Legal GgOGp 
LhtyrUT^BGp 
Lucas Varity 
MreteSpracw 

fWi Power 

Named 

KeQ 

NonvWi Union 
Onmge 
PXO 
Peanatn 


195 

7J4 

251 

«3 

175 

455 

755 

110 

571 

496 


198 

739 

255 

952 

277 

458 

s 

IS 


1345 11« 
244 2-48 


S 343 3 (ISO 

-CaWtqgB H m «5 «§ 

Codon Pore jyg 378 377 

SIX™ ® 1 S | 

mm tts s 

— § 3 % 2! 


TeuDaanAB 

TiwBaBIca 

UttidannahA 


Frankfurt prSSbSS 

.^0. Il» 


u nk. 31 JD 3125 3235 

Ari9^m^ 262J0 258 

JiSdiS 

ass j 

’Si s, as 3 is ,70 s 


Rojai 1 Bit 5atl 

^XSonAfl 


AMfiB 1810 

UttB 233Jt 

AamoHdg 

5*1“ ’SIS 

f* Better g-W 
BASF 71 70 

BiaerHypoBk ti65 

Bor-Wnwabooh 

1445 

i Catena 18(40 
.nenltat* 
DahHerBeaz 14950 

5SSa 10330 


J£Jg f 

9 Sis 

MM 1443 MJS 
17V « 


SB” - 

De Be«. 
swAsiton 
SiNaflBk 
Genur 

£etWHMS 

liwweCat' 

LBtert»™J* 

tSEESS- 

MinMto 

NtanP* 

MAdatr 

KandlW 

Rusl Ptatmunt 


Sjs Sso 3Uo 

1® wS 1075 1060 

w s ss as 

cc ji35 36J5 2475 
125 3.15 3.rt U9 

uK 43.75 6150 6175 
TW 37775 376 372 

,«S ifi 144 143 

to™ 18 ^ JJS 

W75 98 9775 963 

1925 1970 19.10 19 

m I n 9X50 9940 99^ 
gjK 6A.W 4695 47 

6&25 67.75 A7.K 
gg 8475 8450 84 


SMBhunr 

Sdtradcty 
SootNewaafle 
Scar Power 
Securtar 

Shdl Tmn5D k 

InSNephew 

SrafltiKBK 

iSSSSer 

T«oo 

TtatnesWtritf 
31 Group 
T) GniuP 
Tocfltens 

IWtevw 

UKl Assurance 
UBNews 


847 

352 

978 

116 

547 

132 

6J0 

193 

1078 

11.48 

159 
6J0 
i62 
198 
4J6 
19. 
7J0 
449 
342 
■ 845 
452 
1155 
1.77 
1X23 
XB1 
452 

1§!W 

417 

427 

8 

499 


1970 

475 

695 


532 

834 

8.03 

118 

2M 

623 

742 

146 

773 

545 

618 

742 

140 

9M 

104 

5^ 

128 

645 

XU 


534 

i 

i 

132 

778 

540 

625, 

830 

Xffl 

978 

306 

683 

230 

672 

IBS 


1X60 1067 
1X86 !!■» 


154 

623 

i* 

185 

436 


1845 1885 
740 746 


442 

285 

874 

440 


)IM 1179 

174 l.g 

ii.i8 n-fS 

X6B X7I 


446 

658 


670 


1037 10J 
410 4.16 

s a 

J! m 

132 


60 9 

4 60 4.71 

668 691 


1175 

784 

347 
15.10 
645 
151 
610 
889 
481 
149 
X85 
172 

11.14 

1J9 

5.94 

622 

484 

744 

617 

348 
di» 
473 
578 
625 
777 
179 
944 
3«t6 
1237 
1288 

X14 

586 

jm 

456 

588 

636 

6B4-. 

2240 

1088 

X95 

735 

148 

943 

xbo 

454 

1M 

£92 

■a 

535 

80S 

a 

a 

183 

734 

534 

616 

782 

146 

9.72 

111 

574 

230 

673 

X92 

1X63 

1175 

234 

630 

532 

3^ 

438 

1845 

742 

AAi 

284 

837 

440 

1188 

174 

1145 

X69 

450 

653 

1048 

412 

4)6 

794 

493 

610 

33) 

1901 

460 

672 


Manila 

Anita B 
Awia Land 
Bk PhSp Is) 
C&P Homes 
Marita EtecA 
Metro Bank 
Petton 
PQBre* 

PM Lang DU 
San Miguel B 
SM Prime Hdg 


17.75 

150 

970 

8650 

520 

580 

220 

865 

59 

8 


PSE tedet 253S4Q 
PlHHPK 257X43 

1760 1760 1760 
I960 19iB 1975 
145 147 ISO 

940 930 P.40 

86 87 JO 

515 520 

580 580 

210 221 

855 900 

57 5760 61 

760 7.70 760 


8650 

505 

560 

2)0 

845 


Rnnouil 

Rad 
Ph- Poulenc A 
Sremfi 
Schneider 
SEB 

SGS Thomson 
Sir Generate 
Sodradia 
StGoOah 
Sura (Del 
Suez Lyon Eau 



2694 

2274 

168 

1653 

2S3 

638 

34860 

1032 

571 

823 

3088 

925 

15J90 

655 

730 

158 

610 

115 

378 


2655 2694 2669 

2245 2255 2251 

164 16B 16450 

1595 1620 1647 

247.10 25170 2eMfl 
619 628 6S8 

34X50 347 345 

990 1009 1035 
566 569 567 

812 819 815 

2931 2939 2955 

915 918 916 

1565 1565 1585 
642 644 448 

720 7® 726 

1551® 15530 15590 
596 600 998 

11X50 114": 1147®' 
373 375-30 374 


Sydney 

Amcor 
ANZ Effing 
BHP 
Baal 

SmmftJes Ind. 
C8A 

CCAmatfl 
Cotes Myer 
Cofltalro 
CSR 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Rd 
ICIAustrala 
Lend Lease 
MiMHdps 
Hal Aust Bank 
NatMutudHdg 
MewsCwp 
Padfic Dunlap 
Pioneer Inti 
Put) Broadens! 
Rfarndo 
SI George Bank 
WMC 

Westpac Bking 
WoodstaePef 
Wbahrertfts 


Afl OrAaries: 265X50 
Prevta«:2M7J8 


835 

877 

830 

827 

iojn 

9.93 

9.96 

1X19 

1778 

1898 

1732 

17JM 

3.96 

187 

XB9 

192 

27J90 

2775 

2730 

27 79 

1674 

1633 

1837 

1645 

ISflO 

1540 

1540 

1575 

6.sa 

644 

646 

859 

690 

876 

877 

889 

814 

498 

502 

51? 


238 

1.97 

X59 

2 

244 

1.96 

1375 

1X80 

13J93 

1110 

2950 

2890 

29.02 

29-41 

1J0 

1.76 

177 

1.77 

19J8 

19.07 

19.10 

1979 

115 

2-09 

X10 

210 

898 

SflS 

588 

592 

341 

157 

340 

X57 

486 

466 

875 

484 

807 

7.97 

806 

804 

25.40 

2170 

2130 

2177 

870 

854 

854 

865 

7fll 

741 

742 

7.39 

855 

833 

833 

848 

1170 

I7fl6 

11 JOB 

7770 

432 

475 

430 

428 


The Trib Index 


Prices as ot 3.-00 PM. Now York me. 


Jan 7. 1902 m tOO. 

Level 

Change 

Kichange 

year to date 
% change 

World Index 

176.70 

-0.03 

-0.02 

+18.48 

Regional Indexes 
Asia/Pacthc 

129.97 

-0.04 

-0.03 

+5.30 

Europe 

186.78 

+0.57 

+0.31 

+15.87 

N. America 

206.46 

-0.60 

-0.43 

+27.52 

S. America 

171.69 

+0.21 

+0.12 

+50.04 

Industrial Indexes 
Capital goods 

227.86 

-0.32 

-0.14 

+33.31 

Consumer goods 

189.87 

-1.03 

-0.54 

+17.62 

Energy 

200 .20 

+128 

+0.64 

+1727 

Finance 

134.91 

+0.13 

+0.10 

+ 15.84 

Mrscelianeous 

Jflfi.63 

-0.3? 

-0.16 

+17.21 

Raw Materials 

195. IS 

+1.87 

+0.97 

+11.27 

Sendee 

167.11 

+0.08 

+0.05 

+21.69 

UtjDties 

16829 

+0.13 

+0.08 

+17 31 


The tmamasonal HeraW Tribune iVorfef Stock Indto O trocto itw US Mtarvahiesol 
3S0 KKomatfonsSy mvostaOta stocks >rcxn 25 countries For rrKye^jrmBOon. a two 
bookkn is available by rrmng to The Tub MatlBI Avenue Charles da GauSe. 

92S21 Newty C&tex. Fiance. Compoed by Btocmbarg News. 


High Low dose Pm. 


High Low Qmc Pm. 


Mexico 

Alfa A ' 
BonacdB 
CemeaCPO 
CBntC 

Emp Modem 

GpoCMoAl 

GpoFBcomer 

GpoFfalnbeisa 

KfitaartMB* 

TetavbaCPO 

TeUAcsL 


6500 

2475 
4X10 
14.04 
4X90 
61 TO 
X62 
36JB 
37.00 
T35.10 
2X95 


Botea Mac 5B55J6 
Prevtaus: 504365 

6440 6450 64J0 
2X90 2 405 2X70 
4145 4165 41 J)0 
1X92 1196 1190 

42-55 4X70 4Z45 
6IJ0 6160 61-80 
ISO 160 150 

3575 3575 3665 
3675 3675 
13100 135.00 1313)0 
2XS5 2060 2X55 


S5o Paulo 


Milan 

AfeonzoAssfc 
Bco Cooun Itol 
Bco Rdeuron 
Bead Roma 
Benetton 
CredDattatana 
Idls 

General Assfc: 

I Ml 
INA 

Hfe-. 




BL. 

SPaok Torino 

Tdecam^ 


MlBT^gaeMWMO 

previous: 1437560 

15300 14925 ISO? 

43M 4125 4295 4110 

5675 5550 SfflO 5560 

1600 1582 1590 1577 

24750 24)8® 36600 26050 
3500 3410 3495 3415 

SOT 8385 654: 8305 

10475 10315 10425 102j» 
59 20 5825 5845 5800 

36600 35350 36600 35100 
16840 16620 16720 1MSB 
2605 USD 26M 
5325 53W 5260 

_ 7700 8200 7775 

11505 11420 11465 11485 
1139 1129 1134 1131 

650 626 640 635 

2630 2OT 26M M00 

4850 4720 4850 4700 

14950 U« 148® I473C 
2)350 21000 21000 J8H0 
13S55 13255 13440 13390 
11165 11010 HIM 10900 
6170 6055 6100 6065 


2455 

5410 

B2D® 



,10 moo 

3640 3440 
11J7 11J15 
148JM 147 J10 
195JM 19499 
16X01 16199 
347 JO 340.01 
39 JO 3900 
1177 1106 
2800 27700 


Taipei 

Cathay LBe Ins 
Cheng Hwi B*. 
□tiaoTung Bk 
Ctuna Devetucal 
China Sted 
FhSI Bank 
Fotmaw PtasSc 
HuaHanBk 
W) Coran Bk 
Nan V0 Plastics 
SWnKongUfe 
Taiwan Sean 
Tatwig „ 
UWNUaoBec 
Utd World Chin 


Stecfc Mrefcet tad«C 980774 
Prevtam 989777 


156 150 
119 116J0 
74-50 7X50 
127 121 


150 153 

117 117-50 
73 7350 
121 126.81 


32JP 31 JO 31-80 7\50 

119 JO 116 118 117.50 

66 64 64 65.50 

127-50 123 123 125 -SO 

59 57J0 57-58 58 

75.50 73 73J0 74.58 

107 JO 100 10X50 105 

154 147 153 

48 47 47 A0 

13! 126 127.50 


67 64-50 64.50 


151 

47 

1ST 

65 


Mosul Fmtom 
Mitsui Trad 
MurataMfa 
NEC 

N*ko5eC 

Nikon 

NWendu 

ssssr 

Nippon Steel 
Nbsm Motor 
NKK 

Nomura Sec 
NTT , 

NTT Data 

Ok Paper 

Osaka Gas 

Ricoh 

Ronat _ 

SdairaBk 

5ratk>o 

San wo Ban* 

Sanyo EIk 

Sean 

SeOtuRwy 

SetoutChem 

SeUsul Moose 

Seven-Eleven 

Sharp 

SMiokuElPwr 
Shteriru 
Shm-etsuCh 
Shlseida 
SirirooknBk 
Softbank 


7470 

1410 

1450 

1400 

688 

665 

688 

679 

sao 

5420 

549® 

5370 

1570 

1540 

1560 

1530 

2310 

2250 

2260 

2280 

634 

602 

625 

595 

11100 

10800 

10900 

10400 

778 

771 

771 

77B 

533 

SB? 

512 

SOS 

307 

301 

306 

300 


Tokyo 


Seoul 

Doom 

Daewoo Heavy 

arcs?* 

Korea El Pvtr 
Korea Each Bk 
LGSanknft 
MxmglronSI 
Samsung DWny 
Samsung Elec 
ShMianBate. 
SKTetaam 


Cowpedte Mae 76X91 
Previous: 76X87 

99900 97000 99000 97400 
B2MI 8350 8350 

22200 21600 7I7W 21800 
74400 13500 13500 137W 
Z7200 26400 26500 2720E 
5830 5670 5680 5830 

47700 .mm 47600 48000 
47980 «a00 A14D0 61400 
49100 48000 48400 40000 
73100 71700 72500 71900 
9750 9600 96ST1 9670 

419000 490000 495000 490000 


Montreal 


Bee Mob Com 
Ciln Tire A 
CdntffSA 
aRmjvc 
Gaz Metre 
Gt-Wnt meat 
Inmfta 
hnestanGip 
LobiawCos 
Nall Bk Canada 

KnS 

rWWnln 
fltiebeaf B 
S«ss CraimB 
Royal Bk Ohs 


latas MntelrataE PW.1T 

PnfteOB 367X79 


SOM 5014 
27 AS 2740 
3«30 39J5 
44 46 

1X85 IBM 
3360 33ta 
41-40 41.10 
37 37 

2X65 2065 
171* 17.10 
38U 3740 
37M 3TA 
27Vi 37 JS 
N.T. N.T. 
64.95 6460 


50*4 9 

27 Ml VM 
39 JO 79.15 
44 MM 
IB JO 1870 
3360 3314 

4U5 41 

37 3670 
2X65 2X70 
17.15 17J0 
»4 3W 
3765 gta 
27 JS 27 i A 
N.T. KUO 
6465 6465 


Oslo 

AJm»A 


OBX Mao 72X11 
Prows: 71540 


Den nonfat Bk 
Bkem 
HofalundA 
KvoerrwAsa 
NaiskHyteP, 
NoratefStatgA 
NycoroedA 
ChUaAuA 
Pr4taiG«S*c 
lAetfcnA 


Tromocean Ofi 
Storebrand Ajo 


148 
206 
27 JO 
32-50 

157 
47 

40 

418 

298 

16150 

559 

432 

158 
135 
633 

50 


139 
200 
26.90 
32 JO 
IS2 
46-50 
473 JO 
413 
291 
163 
553 
42S 
156 
132 
623 
48J0 


141 150 

206 199-50 
27 26.70 
3130 3X20 
154 154 

46JD 47 
479 467 

416 41X50 
296 291 

16150 16450 
S» SB 
427 <32 

158 155 

137 134 

623 610 

50 *70 


Singapore 

Asia Poc Brew 5.75 

GerehaiPac 560 

Off Ones 1 2 

Cycle Carriage IlflO 

OsHy Form H* 071 

DBS foreign 17-60 

DBSLana 45S 

Frasa & Heme 9.95 

UK Land* 3J2 

JontMolhan* 8 

Jonisirategic' 4io 

KeppdA 510 

KendBoik 176 

KeppelFete 480 

KmpdLiind 4J2 

OCECfaretai 14 

OS Union BkF 840 

ParimtyHdgi 53s 

Serohmang &60 

Sng Air foreign 1X50 

Sing Land 775 

Stag PrmF 2 630 

Stag Tech hrt 174 

SinqTetecorwn 158 

TsOieBra* 177 

UMMushW UK 

UtdOSraBkF 1410 

WlngTdHdgs 3fl2 

":m US (fates. 


Shads Tome 189X46 
PRvtMKlflmd 

540 545 460 
510 510 5 AS 

17.73 J1.70 77J0 
IlflO IlflO 11J0 
(SJS X90 0J8 

I7£8 1741 17.10 
AM 442 4-® 

9fl5 945 9fl5 
3J0 X22 118 

755 8 7flS 

m m m 
590 SM 595 
368 , 170 X70 

456 456 478 
406 412 416 

1160 1190 1360 
860 860 BJ5 
6J5 6J5 6J5 

' t50 555 550 

IlflO 1X10 1160 
7 7.15 6JS 
2560 2550 2580 
170 377 X70 

ISO 243 240 

176 X76 2.74 
U» Ufl JJB 
1X90 1190 1180 
3J4 3fl0 172 


INIpponMr 

ssu, 

Awtii Otero 

AsaMGtaS 

BLT<*yoMltyi 

BkYakahanta 

BitaBotonc 

Cation _ 

ChubuElec 

QiugekuEtsc 

DnJ Nfap Print 

Dato 

DoHcUKang 

DohraBin. 
ft»W House 
DtfvaSK 
DOI 
Denso 

EastJoiwnRy 
Ebol 
Fanuc 
FuiiBarik 
iPriota 


NHHI22S; 19099.11 
PrevtaW 18824.18 

1070 HMD HOT 1040 
707 692 700 691 

3490 3400 3400 3d90 

870 8S9 865 BH 

(JO 601 620 590 

1050 lft^ 1050 1050 

J3M 222B 22» ZW 

555 540 543 550 

2760 2710 2720 2700 
3550 3®0 3520 345® 

2K8 20» 2030 2M0 

1970 1950 1950 196S 

2760 2738 2756 2720 

870 850 W 889 

1480 1450 1430 1«0 

37 579 580 5» 

1340 1330 1330 1330 
784 770 776 755 

?W0a 68»r 6S30n 6710a 
2750 2690 27?0 2680 

54900 S5® 54ffia OTDo 
J470 2380 2430 2380 

4960 4860 4fiffl 4K3 

1550 1520 1520 ISO 


Sumitomo 
Sumitomo Bk 
SumdChem 
Sumitomo Elec 
SumHMeU 
Sura* Trad 
TafeteJ Ritarat 
TukedaChem 
TDK 

TohohuEIPvir 
Total Bonk 
Tufcio Murine 
TokyoElPwr 
Tokyo Eltclmn 

Tokyo Go* 

Tokyo Corp. 

Tonen 

Toppan Print 

TenvM 

Toshiba 

Tostem 

ToyoTrod 

ToyctoAWor 

Yatnanoudii 

a.- * WCt Oj j 1300 


765 744 750 732 

194 189 193 1» 

1710 1670 1700 1670 

1190b 1160b imit 1150b 

5120b 5000b 5050b 4960b 

602 392 593 5B6 

771 267 270 269 

IfflJfl 1798 1798 1738 

13900 13900 13900 13900 

714 700 700 6*0 

4290 4210 4240 4200 

1430 )410 1420 >600 

435 415 419 434 

SESfl 8200 8500 8130 

SSSO M30 S430 5350 

973 W9 973 942 

1170 1150 1170 1150 

8990 8860 B990 8860 

1360 1320 1340 1320 

•im 1920 1930 1930 

595 575 588 571 

3250 3210 3540 3180 

2080 2000 2060 1970 

1250 1320 1350 1210 

6070 6930 6020 60M 

11700 11500 11600 11400 

' 1020 1010 


Moore 

Newbridge Nel 
Naratdalnc 
Norcen Energy 

Ntiem Teteawn 

Nowo 

One* 

Poncdn Pe»n 

PehuCdo 

Placer Dome 

PaaPetlm 

Potath Sosk 

Renaissance 

RtoAjgoai 

Rogers CmlelB 

SeagnmCO 

ShmCdoA 

Sunaor 

TahsmanEny 

TechB 

Tetegtobe 

Telus 

Thomson 

Torttom Bank 

TiansaHn 

TroraCdo Pipe 

Titnmk Rnl 

TrtrecHnlm 

TVXGold 

Westerns! Eny 

Weston 


3X15 29 90 
6160 61H 

30.10 29 JO 
3X 8 5 ?1 49 
144.90 142-55 
1190 IlflO 
3X15 3X10 

26W 26 

16** 16.10 
2570 24*4 

14 13** 

105 10475 

37.10 3X55 
3Jt» 35 

29 2BflO 
5045 4945 
2X85 1X55 
AS 444 5 
45Vj 4455 
2X15 3 

50 V> SO 
2480 2640 
34 33*» 

4X95 4X55 
1740 1770 
27X5 27.15 
69ta 69 
3X70 3X15 
6*4 635 

17.10 26fl0 

1D0 97 


29.95 30 

6X95 6120 
29A5 3D 

33flS 3170 

144 142 

HAS IlflO 
3X15 3X30 
2fJ0 26** 
2645 26.10 
24.90 25.35 
13fl0 1180 
105 104** 

35.95 3778 

35 35 

2X80 2X90 
49-55 5040 
23** 2X85 
4445 4445 
44J85 4440 
2X10 27A5 
SOte 50to 
2LtB 2M 
3190 34.1 C 
4255 4X60 
17J5 17»4 

Z7J5 27.15 
49J5 69 

3X55 3270 
6.70 6fl0 
Z7 27.10 
99 99 


1040 

1900 

425 

197» 

276 

1150 

X50 

3610 

9710 

1980 

7050 

1520 

2260 

7320 

290 

624 

1140 

1830 

780 

720 

2480 

945 

3170 

2940 


102# 

1860 

419 

1940 

270 

1130 

3018 

1530 

9560 

I960 

HOT 

1460 

2Z» 

7030 

■MJ 

418 

1110 

1708 

775 

713 

2410 

918 

3070 


1870 1870 

422 421 

1940 1950 

273 268 

1150 1160 

3030 3010 

3590 34« 

9660 9550 

1970 1920 
>040 HDD 
1500 1450 

2240 2240 

7258 

2B8 WO 
623 620 

IldO in® 
1810 IBM 
788 770 

715 710 

2430 2460 

945 974 

3120 3140 

2880 2940 2860 


Vienna atomhc i«2M7 

Previous: 142X59 

BoeMef-Udderi 10471020301011 M 1025 

Cimfllonsl Pfai 60070 585 588 59X95 

EA-Gawrati 3209 312® 3209 3190 

EVN 1627 50 1603 16131614.90 

FtoQhotenWlan 532 523J0 577 574.30 

MS 1825179420 1798 1796 

OestEtektriz B80 874 87450 B77 

VA State 58950 57550 581 57350 

VATedl 25S3 2505 2528 2505 

Wtenertmrg Boo 270255 26H.10 2687 2675 


Wellington NzsE^iidggMo 

AhNZeaW B **3 4 -S 

Brierlylnvl TJB IJ7 1^ 1J7 

Carter Htetort XS1 347 348 151 

FteWlOiBhlg 434 4M 4M 4M 

FWchChEny • «5 546 5A1 5£ 

Retch Ch Feral 1.97 I.K I* !■« 

RtidiOi Paper 3J8 332 3S W9 

Uon Haitian 3.98 3.94 3.94 IM 

Telecom NZ UD 751 754 758 

wason Horton 11.95 1IJ5 H.95 11.95 


Stockholm 


SZ 16 iratac 362X59 
Pnwin;36)5Ja 


AGAB 

ABBA 

AsteDooat 

Astra A 

AflasCaoatA 

AUtolh 


11150 109 11X50 11X50 

119 116 119 1^5 

M m 240 233 

144S) 13650 IS. l A 
353 247 JO 253 247 

28950 387 18950 28750 


HochfaifliBk 

tfitadd 

Honda Motor 

IBJ 

(HI 

Ihxhu 

OchVokado 

JAL 

Japan Tobacco 
Jvseo ' 

Kafima 

KtansalBec 

Kao 

teurasaki Hvy 
Kawn Steel 
KMdWppRy ' 
Kirin Brewery 
Kobe State 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 

ScB 

Mowbete 
Monti 
Matsu Comm 
Matsu Elec bid 
Matsu Elec Wk 
NUlwbUu 
MteteHshldt 

MtaUhHilEI 

Mitsubishi Ed 

MihoboWHvy 

NHsuMIM 

MttuttasNTr 

Mitsui 


4770 

1630 

1120 

1300 

3670 

1730 


» 47W 4560 

1590 1610 1580 

noo ms m 

1270 1280 1280 

358} 3600 3610 
1700 1720 1690 


37B 

370 

376 

371 

514 

SOI 

514 

510 

4733 

4470 

4/10 

6630 

483 

475 

475 

477 

9440a 

9390a 

9420a 

9320a 

3430 

TWO 

3400 

3300 

SMI 

SSA 

570 

545 

2200 

JUKI 

220l» 

21/0 

1760 

1720 

1730 

1/10 

477 

46$ 

477 

466 

.117 

298 

304 

290 

607 

678 

679 

477 

1040 

1(170 

1070 

1020 

174 

m 

177 

16/ 

R73 

U05 

B19 

803 

494 

473 

486 

470 

9020 

8BW 

9000 

8810 

7 m 

I960 

IW0 

1M0 

$60 

1948 

590 

554 

444 

433 

438 

d!& 

1940 

1910 

1970 

1900 

4640 

4590 

4430 

4540 

7400 


7380 

rjto 

1350 

1340 

1-140 

1330 

1340 

300 

1270 

790 

m 

1740 

286 

99(1 

SM 

590 

575 

1460 

1410 

14.90 

151911 

818 

812 

814 

817 

450 

636 

443 

43r 

1760 

1710 

1770 

I6W 

ion 

1070 

1070 

HIM) 


Toronto 

AMMCons. 

Alberta Energy 
Alcan Alum 
Andersen E«jti 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Nova Scoria 
BtfridtGaH 
BCE 

BCTetocnwn 
Btechem Ptiann 
BorabardierB 
Canseco 
C1BC 

CdnNatltafl 

CdnNatRes 

CdnOcddPel 

Gdn Pacific 

Comma 

Datum 

Dorntar 

DonohueA 

DuftnfCdoA 

EuroNevMng 

FaifhaFhll 

FdambUge 

fHaierOinflA 

Franco Nevada 

GuHCdaRes 

Imperial 0(1 

Inco 

ises' 

Laewen Grow 
MocmaBfil 
Ma gnu to BA 
Meftnwi 


TSE ledusWateKBl-EI 


PtWtoes: *84037 

7615 

25.70 

25 JO 

26 

‘wan 

MM 

37.95 


933 

5J 

93 

52.95 

1845 

1X35 

1X40 

IIL40 

57 JO 

57.40 

5 rn 

303 

49 MJ 

65.15 

65 lr 

65.10 

.3730 

37U 

.w 

33 

4160 

41.20 

4111 

41 JO 

3905 

34.80 

14.90 

35.1(1 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.l. 

2/M 

33. TO 

37.70 

37.95 

'SUV 

5W 

5315 

5X65 

5X40 

39.15 

2P* 

3X90 

3X85 

7X40 

tflti 

49.90 

6833 

37A5 

37.35 

3745 

3130 

3660 

3614 

3640 

3630 

41 

m 

41 

m 

3810 

37.70 

37.70 

3795 

nio 

79 90 

29.95 

29.90 

11.95 

nno 

1185 

12 

1405 

34 

3485 

34 

3715 

32.30 

37 JO 

33U 

7X45 

211* 

73.70 

42te 

389 

387 

387 

389 

79 

7780 

78.10 

TABS 

XM 

74 

24.70 

7610 

32 W 

Site 

37.10 

6441 

1U.05 

985 

10 

10 

7SJ5 

75 

7610 

7540 

41(4 

4X90 

4XVS 

41U 

9160 

.909} 

5X90 

5114 

71to 

2115 

21.40 

7185 

47 

45 

45>4 

4660 

Mil 

1845 

t#.Vi 

1640 

891* 

Mi 05 

88M 

87.90 

1180 

12-55 

1260 

Uto 


Zurich 


ABBB 
AdeCCOB 
AlmumeR 
Ares- Scram B 
AMR 


SPI imtat 371X35 
Pretktos: 3715.18 


sHdgB 
oisflHd 


BatorseHdqR 

BKVbton 

ObaipecCtem 

OarionlR 

Cid Suisse GpR 

EtaWrowariB 

Ems-Chemta 

Ueddensl LB B 
NestlS R 
Navartb R 
Oofikn BuehR 
FarpesaHUB 
PhwmVlsnB 
RJdiamtnlA 
PirellPC 
Itoctw Hdg PC 
SBC R 
Schindler PC 
SGSB 
SMHB 
Sutzer R 
Suks Reins R 

Swissair R 
UBSB 
Winterthur R 
ZntkStAssurR 


2342 

562 

1438 

2700 

870 

7315 

4100 

1242 


2312 

550 

1407 1438 1405 

m 1 . 2680 2600 

070 070 870 

2245 7300 2260 

4030 4050 4035 

1215 1233 1240 


2312 2320 
548 548 


I4L75 136.75 137.75 14X75 
1078 1065 1065 i860 
205 19550 703J0 205 


538 

537 

538 

537 

6500 

6768 

6770 

4/W 

4870 

4775 

4UU0 

4800 

1375 

1305 

132$ 

1360 

997 

591 

$0/ 

593 

1990 

1974 

1924 

1936 

2347 

2305 

2315 

2311 

164.7$ 

149.75 

161J0 

150 

1970 

1950 

1950 

1950 

975 

96A 

974 

9/4 

7275 

mo 

rm 

2200 

344 

338 

343 

341 

14425 

14040 

14140 

14305 

•Cl AO 41450 

417 

415 

1930 

1875 

1910 

1894 

3085 

3040 

3070 

3050 

906 

%tl 

901 

896 

1211 

lino 

raw 

11/7 

2265 

2225 

29X5 

731/ 

7010 

1985 

1994 

1983 

1649 

1473 

1630 

lt<34 

1514 

1417 

1504 

149/ 

647 

419 

620 

6H 


r-. : 

































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 'WEDNESDAY. AUGUST IS, 1997 


PAGE 15 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


^ /Vp 




Suppliers Get a Bailout 

f ii-t Seoul Offers $1 Billion Aid to Keep Businesses Afloat 




”f!\‘ C< »W to 0 *r Stuff FnmtBapjtiin 

. SEOUL — The government 
t softened its stance Tuesday against 
financial aid to contractors of the 
r % ailing Kia Group and offered a 1 
trillion-won ($ 1.1 billion) bailout 
V ,V; ^ package aimed at preventing a spate 
of business failures. 

The government decided to issue 
i % special credit-guarantee papers to 
;}*!?. primary parts suppliers of the com- 
pany's two auto units, Kia Motors 
'• Corp. and Asia Motors Co., a Finance 

• i : j, . and Economy Ministry official said. 

Each company would get up to 
v£,j v 500 million won worth of credir- 
guarantee papers, which can be con- 
J : verted into cash, the official said. 

{ Jk The decision, which would affect 
“some 260 companies, came at a meet- 
Pk ■ ing of bankers and economic officials 

* headed by Kang Man Soo, the deputy 

finance and economy minister. 

' “If necessary, further aid will be 
^ , t provided.’ " Mr. Kang was quoted as 
-7“ ; saying. But Mr. Kang did not men- 
- ; lion any direct aid to Kia, the coun- 

_-,f ' | try's eighth-largest conglomerate 

>;* i third- largest automaker, whose 

; ; tj: creditor banks put it under ami- 

1 bankruptcy protection July 15 to 
avert insolvency. 

^ ’ The government last week open ly 

' rejected calls for help to Kia’s sub- 
‘ contractors, prompting a wave of 
' rallies in which union groups have 

^ i threatened to stage a general strike. 

• Kia welcomed the government’s 
' -■* ; decision as “a step forward," say- 

• j ihg it would help 1 ‘our subcontract- 
1 * flf ors ease a financial crunch.” 

'a 1 “Bur the subcontractors need 

r -t ’ * more and substantial help to avert 


:i Ou'J 
■f . I 
' 'hear. 


" '•'■‘■"of 


24 Chaebol Cited 
Over Huge Loans 

Bridge Avift 

SEOUL — Twenty-four of 
South Korea’s top 30 conglom- 
erates have made loans to sub- 
sidiaries in excess of the parent 
company’s capital, the Fair 
Trade Commission said Tues- 
day. 

The commission said the 
conglomerates, or ihaehut, 
would have to end that practice 
by March 3 1.1 998. or face fines 
of 10 percent of their outstand- 
ing loans to the subsidiaries. 

It estimated that 6.7 trillion 
won ($7.49 billion) in loans to 
subsidiaries exceeded the chae- 
bols’ capital. 

Hyundai Corp. registered the 
largest amount in debt guar- 
antees with 4.4 trillion won, fol- 
lowed by Daewoo Corp. at 3.7 
trillion won and Kia Group at 
2.8 trillion won. the commis- 
sion said. 


their insolvencies." a Kia spokes- 
man said. 

The subcontractors have warned 
of mass collapse, complaining they 
cannot discount or obtain payment 
against commercial bills issued by 
the auto-making group. 

On Tuesday. 3,000 workers from 
Kia’s subcontractors rallied in 
Changwon. demanding that Pres- 


ident Kim Young Sam approve 
emergency survival loans. 

"They have just thrown us a bis- 
cuit." the subcontractors said in a 
published statement. “The govern- 
ment really has no intention of help- 
ing us. so we will go ahead with our 
protests." 

Smce July 15. about 10 of Kia's 
major subcontractors have gone 
bankrupt, but creditor banks have 
refused to extend 5210 million life- 
line loans to the group, demanding 
all Kia directors step down first. 

As of Tuesday, the total value of 
promissory notes that Kia Motors 
and Asia Motors have failed to hon- 
or was estimated at $56 million. 

Separately, Kia Motors posted a 
record loss for the first half as a 
program to offer customers interest- 
free financing to raise sluggish sales 
cur into earnings. A Kia Motors ex- 
ecutive said the preliminary net loss 
in the six months ended in June 
widened 258 percent from a year 
ago. to 36.9 billion wort. 

Slowing domestic vehicle sales 
and plans by two rival companies to 
stan making passenger cars within 
the next year are likely to keep Kia 
in a loss. The company offered in- 
terest-free credit to customers on 
some cars, reducing its revenue 
from interest payments. But the pro- 
motions helped’ lift Kia’s first-half 
sales by U.S percent. 

"Kia is choosing to hold onto 
market share by raising incentives. " 
said Lee Jong Seung, an analyst at 
Dai wa Securities Co. "That, in" turn, 
is eating up its profits." 

(AFP, Bloomberg) 


Hanbo Steel’s Creditors Set Private Sale 


Compiled tn Our Sniff Fnwi Dojwtrftn 

SEOUL — Hanbo Steel Co., the 
company at the center of South 
Korea’s biggest bankruptcy in a de- 
cade, will be sold privately after the 
third failed attempt at a public auc- 
tion, creditors and government of- 
ficials said Tuesday. 

• 4 ‘The third and final round closed 
this afternoon with again no bidders 
showing up,' ’ said Na Ryung Rok, a 
spokesman for Korea First Bank, 
Hanbo's prime creditor. 

Interested parties are required to 
submit their bids by Aug. 2 1 for the 
private sale of Hanbo, Mr. Na said, 
adding that creditors would seek die 
liquidation of all Hanbo's assets and 


debts, if their plan to sell Hanbo 
Steel as a whole through private 
negotiations failed. 

A piecemeal sale of Hanbo assets 
would revive a bid by Pohang Iron & 
Steel Co., the world's second- 
largest steel maker. Posco, as it is 
known, already offered 2 trillion 
won ($2.24 billion) together with 
Dongkuk Steel Mill Co. to buy 
Hanbo's businesses 

The joinr bid was rejected by 
Hanbo creditors, who estimate the 
value of Hanbo Steel ’s uncompleted 
main steel plant at around 4 trillion 
won. An additional 2 trillion won is 
needed to complete the plant. 

But an executive of Korea First 


Bank said Tuesday that the Posco- 
Dongkuk bid was “the most prom- 
ising.” 

Hanbo Steel’s parent, Hanbo 
Group, collapsed in January under 
$6 billion of debt, which it could not 
repay. Its chairman and several 
bankers and politicians are serving 
jail terms for their part in the biggest 
bribes-for-loans scandal in more 
than a decade. 

Posco said that its joint bid with 
Dongkuk was aimed at resuming 
production at Hanbo’s facilities at 
an early date in an effort to minimize 
the impact of Hanbo’s failure on the 
nation's steel industry and overall 
economy. ( Bloomberg , AFP) 


Philippine Currency 
Regains Its Footing 


(‘.•gain /fr. A** Fo«ii Dt/unto-* 

MANILA — Yields on Phil- 
ippine Treasury' bills fell Tues- 
day, reflecting moves in key bank 
lending rates'and indicating that 
the country’s currency crisis is 
receding, analysts and govern- 
ment officials said on Tuesday- 

Investors swamped the treasury 
with bids totaling 9.5 billion pesos 
(5335.7 million), or almost 10 
times the offering size. 

The Bureau of Treasury said it 
sold 500 million pesos of 35-day 
bills at an average yield of 13 
percent, down from 17.5 percent a 
week ago. For the 42-day bill, also 
a 500-million peso offer, tile yield 
fell to 13 percent from 17.7 per- 
cent. 

Garidod Valdehuesa. the nation- 
al treasurer, said falling interest 
rates on the bellwether 9 1 -day bill 
signaled that the debt market was 
returning to normal and thar in- 
terest rates were stabilizing. 

Banks use the 91 -day bill to set 
commercial lending rates. 

Interest rates had climbed as the 
central bank sought to defend the 
peso by raising its overnight bor- 
rowing rate as high as 32 percent in 
July. The central bank was forced 
to devalue the currency July 1 1 and 
has since brought the overnight 
rate down to IS’percem. 

Investors expect the overnight 
rate to be cut further this week. 
The dollar has stabilized near 
28.50 pesos, about 8 percent 
stronger than before the peso’s 
devaluation. 

In another sign of increasing 
confidence in the peso, Merrill 
Lynch told investors Tuesday to 
hold on to their long-term peso 
investments, saying that the Phil- 
ippine currency w-as one of the 
few Southeast Asian currencies 


the investment house would re- 
commend. 

In its latest assessment of the 
Philippine economy. Merrill 
Lynch said the peso would be 
stable for the remaining months of 
1997. The fundamentals in the 
Philippines remained solid, but 
policy would probably need to 
remain tight to contain inflation 
and restore market confidence. 
Merrill Lynch wrote. 

f Bloumherg . Bridge News i 

■ Singapore Dollar Slumps 

The Singapore dollar's sudden 
drop through a key support level 
Tuesday weighed heavily on oth- 
er Southeast .Asian currencies, 
triggering fresh buying of the U.S. 
dollar across the board, Reuters 
reported from Singapore. 

The U.S. unit rose above the 
psychologically important level 
of 1 .50 Singapore dollars in early 
trading and then rose to a 37- 
month high of 1.5140 dollars be- 
fore slipping a little. 

Dealers anributed much of the 
movement to comments by an of- 
ficial of the Monetary Authority' of 
Singapore that the Singapore dol- 
lar’s level was appropriate to what 
was happening in the market. 

The Indonesian rupiah re- 
mained weak after coming under 
early pressure due to the weak- 
ness of the Malaysian ringgit and 
Singapore dollar. 

.Analysts said the central bank's 
move to cut short-teim interest 
rates on Friday sent a signal to the 
market that it was not prepared to 
defend the rupiah at the expense 
of economic growth. 

The Thai baht continued to 
look weak, but trading in the cur- 
rency was subdued with the Thai 
market closed for a holiday. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt'. U 

DAX n 

4500 • 53 

42M tT-. SOI 

3900- - 4- 48 

3600 — • 48 

mW- 441 

3500 j“a ■ 43 

1997 

Exchange ... : -index:.. 


London 
FTS£ 100 Index 

.5200 

■ 5000 / 

4800 'Hr 

■ 4600 mV — 

440° A-/ - 

■ W0 


M AM J J A 
1997 


Paris 

CAC40 

3250 

3100 jT- 

2950 Ap- 

2900 —.-,1 — 


^m-a-mTTTa 

1997 


Amsterdam 

Brussels 

Frankfurt 


Helsinki ■’ 
Os to 
London 
Bedrid ; ~ 
Milan ... . * 
Paris . 
Stockholm 

Vienna 
Zurich 

Source: Telekurs 


. AE* . ... 

BEL-20 ' ; :j. . 
.PAX . 1 

" Stock Mark^. . 1 
HEX General 
OBX = 

FTSE 10E : 

Stock Exchange 

mbtel- .■ 

~ r CAC AO C' •" T 

sxie . ... 

ATX . • 

SPf 


■ Tubs . Prsv. % 

1 .Ctofie ■ ■ ■ • Uoeo Change 
’ 97M0 . .9734X7 +0.5S 

=2ASt,9$. 2,42057 +1.30 
. 4J634» .4,33013 +0.59 
631-44. ' 633.16 -0.27 

3,629,36 3,60054 +0.80 
■720.11 715*0 . : *460 

.. 5,075^0 5,031,00 +0.63 
396J6 4- ■ 594.61 -+9-38 

14600 14375 • +1.57 

; 2^57^2^3144 +&5T 

3,623.59 3,615433 +0.21 

1^425.47 1,425.59 -0.01 ’ 
..3.7134S 3,715.18 -0.05 

Inumiu-wti! HcralJ Tribune 


Very briefly: 

• Hong Kong's property stocks led the blue-chip Hang Seng 
index 0.47 percent lower after rwo major banks raised their 
mortgage rates, prompting fears of a slump in housing demand, 
but analysts said the rise would not hurt property prices. 

• The Hong Kong government spent SI billion of its reserves 
fending off speculative attacks against its currency in July. 

• Thanh My Lacquerware Cooperative, based in Ho Chi 
Minh City, has received permission to sell 30 percent of its 
shares to foreign investors, making it the first nonbank in 
Vietnam authorized to do so. 

• Omni Industries Ltd., which supplies components and 
plastic parts for computers and computer peripherals, said first- 
half profit rose 23 percent to 4.4 million Singapore dollars 
(S2.9 million) as contract manufacturing sales rose. 

•Singapore's manufacturing sector posted annual growth of 
3.2 percent in April-June after three straight quarters of 
decline, fueling hopes of an economic recovery. The rally took 
gross domestic product growth to 7.8 percent in the second 
quarter, up from 4. 1 percent in the first. AFP. Bhxmtvrg. fteuic n 


South Korea Wants WTO Ruling on Chip Wrangle 


Bl-Joniberg Sews 

SEOUL — South Korea said Tuesday it 
would ask the World Trade Organization to 
rule on a dispute with the Unitea States about 
the pricing of Korean computer chip exports. 

TT\e trade group is already arbitrating a 
dispute between the two nations over the 
price of Korean television exports. 

*‘We will officially file a complainr to the 


WTO on Aug. 13 in Geneva," said Kim 
Kyung Han, an official at the Ministry of 
Trade, Industry and Energy. 

Under WTO procedures, South Korean 
and U.S. officials will hold the first meeting 
within a month. If they fail to reach agreement 
after two meetings, Korea will request a panel 
made up of WTO members to review the case 
over a six-month period, Mr. Kim said. 


The U.S. Commerce Department accused 
Korean chip exporters of selling their 
products in the United Stares at below-mar- 
ket prices, a process known as dumping. 

The department had rejected an appeal by 
Hyundai Electronics Industries Co. and LG 
Semicon Co. to reconsider the decision, 
which could lead to anti-dumping sur- 
charges. 


RAPER: A Pan-Latin Tabloid 


Continued from Page 11 

"That’s the biggest 
obstacle this paper will have 
to overcome," the professor 
said. "I get scared when I 
hear that Reverend Moon is 
involved." 

The paper’s editors main- 
tain that Mr. Moon, who has 
suggested in his religious 
teachings that he is the Mes- 
siah, has absolutely no influ- 
ence in the publication’s ed- 
itorial content and that his 
investment and civic activi- 
ties are independent from his 
spiritual leadership. 

**We have absolute free- 
Jg dom to pursue whatever story 
• we please, and there will nev- 
er be any intervention from 
Moon or the Church," said 
Jose Cardinale, the paper’s 
editor-in-chief. "If we didn't 
have such freedom, we 
couldn't have convinced so 
many well established jour- 
nalists to come and work for 
us." 

But critics have expressed 
concern that the. church's 
connection with big business 
would give the church undue 
influence in Latin America. 

Tiempos del Mundo is 


Escorts & Guides 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

WORLDWIDE 

mEracsTSTjcwgra^ 

BEAl/HRS. 4 

SECRETARIES, JUR HOSTESSES 4 
MODELS + 

available as wm SffS, 

BY APPOINTXEHT (EXCEPT LONDON) 

Eacat Agw*1 Cwft Cw* 6 VWram® 

LONDON ++44(0) 

0171 589 5237 


• WTERNATIONAlMP 

(US RBqaertJi&fm K 
Wortf s Rj«TmiS Ba4,s 71^? 

Je&ZSSs 


published by News World 
Communications Inc., which 
owns The W ashington Times, 
a conservative daily, die 
Spanish-language Noticias 
del Mundo of New York and 
the evening newspaper Ulti- 
mas Noticias of Montevideo, 
Uruguay. News World Com- 
munications hie. is controlled 
by a board that has dose ties 
to Mr. Moon. | 

[William Giles, a former 
editor of The Detroit News, 
has been named managing 
editor of The Washington 
Times, the Associated Press 
reported. The newspaper an- 
nounced Monday that Mr. 
Giles would replace 15-year 
Times veteran Josette Shiner, 
who is leaving to become 
president and CEO of Em- 
power America, a conserva- 
tive policy organization.] 
Tiempos del Mundo ex- 
pects to be publishing daily 
local editions in every coun- 
try of the hemisphere by the 
end of the year. It aims at a 
circulation of 200,000 to 
500,000 within five years. 

"We want to be to Latin 
American what USA Today 
is to the United States," Mr. 
Cardinale said. 


THE ROYAL PLATMUH SERVICE 
EXCLUSIVE TOP FASHION MO 0 &S 


ATLANTIC 

LONDON PARIS NEW YORK 

+44410)7000 77 M 11/22/33 
USA: 212 785 1919 
UMOaMtrxom 
WORLDWIDE ESCORT SERVICE 

SWjT2HtANI>GBUIAHY-BELfflUM 

■H3V2M27 28 27 

Zuricb-Gmrt^Si50+8cT»- 


BriBMlfrAntwrp + A: WsfHB 

LONDON; (0)171-378 6806 


ensues Escort 


-Credit Cards 


BLACK BEAUTY ESCORT SEFMCE 
Etfhsve Beam 5fata ted i 
London & Heeaw. 0181 ® 622 & 1 .CbiS 


Peter Catranls L 

Pwtescnal Truer ■ 
Ftre,&FuLim Spreads J 

Man in 
Fxksi 

H.«l> r TOM) 7H> 

IU3IWW 
.VZraoi C 8 UWITO 
Span fcOTIOir 
Svmiad WPrj} 
L>«K(l&g 4 w ORDiWfc.'C 


SUPERIOR 

OUTSTANDING 

EXCEPTIONAL 

FREE 

COMMISSION 

COMMISSION 


Swteeno" Managed accouhj 
A/U lrs<* (or All Major Ua rltgis 
Execution Fere* or rutu'Ot 
Treeing Sofmaru t Pnce Data 
Spot FX 2-5 Pip Pnce SpreeOs 
Ftmres S12-S36 Per Rcune-Tum 


Mom f!TOb«n 

Fa nr WKWEW 

, vnwKC. 

Lmrabvrt 

Fm eed Wiiia 1 : 

knfrn Wn(5» 


nsooisao fcrf oaniicisu temri SDMM£ 

(SWK CmwOSWHClW? Grwttr. MWiM* 
177 HWIIC U i I 67 SW 3 kp* IHUUK-V 

MWWfi Hai"> ‘WWTMI StMt*k WC3*57 

fjfOlO)?: Swjwr SO.U 3 E 5 UI SApw 


Do you live in Austria, 
Belgium, Luxembourg 
or Sweden ? 

For information about subscribing call: 

Austria 01 891 363 830 
Belgium 0800 17538 (toll-free) 
Luxembourg 0800 2703 (toll-free) 

Sweden 020 797039 (toll-free). 

licralb^Snbunc 

THE TO It UTS D.V1U NE^S PIPER 


VENUS IN FURS 

24HR WORLDWDE ESCORT SERVICE 

LONDON 0171 362 7000 
Ai ca*. Mwra twotoigs wkane 


HHDTS HIGH BOCaVWENNA-PARlS 
COTE D'AZUR^UWCH’GENPMUNJCH 

Inemabnal Esau J Trawl Santa 
Veraa ++43-1-5354104 aB ere* carts 


■GUYS & DOLLS ESCORT SBM& 
»tfjWM^ALn0M30NWiraS 

CGTE D'A2UR5CAI®NAV1A"BJPCPE 
7 ft +39 (d) 335 09 0438 Cnsfl Cads 


AMBIANCE 20® ^ , 
Escort Sevica CredB 
London 01713768636 H.T. 2122*3236 


Do YOU LIVE IN 

Denmark^ 

For a hand-delivered subscription on the day 

uiir-ntinn 5n iTiaior Danish Clt2^5, 


BSSs.s®5 -e, 

MafeTW. V call 00 33 1 -fl43 9361 

2 Ue tar safectcn. 0ret» c»ris acesjsea call l 

H .Mie > 


Kdqirs 1-212-765-7896 
USA & WORLDWIDE 


AHQEUQllE 6 

SinpV TIM 8esl Beat Swta 

tflftffln 24 hts 01*1 586 M5S 



^Jo RLD’S 


— — EVROCOHTACT INTL 

Top local S travel sendee wortdwWe 
PARB*STOCKK)LM‘GEMEVA , ZURtCH 
RWERA’BRUSSELSlONDONTflENNA 
GERMANY & MIAMI 
Scon Satvicg V em M3-1-212 OCt 

CHELSEA ESCORT SERVICE 
51 Beauchmp Macs, London SW1 
T«t 0171-694 6S13 

|DLAN0MD0aS*+39|l?33SJDMM‘ 

• RRST CLASS LADIES FOR EUTE * 

• ALL ITALY ROME PARIS RIVIERA * 

• Trawl Compani on Sewice wrtwtie • 

exotic, AUDRwa sdphbucated" 

Pwtfe Esoort Agency, New Yart 
212^79-3375 

■GBEVA * GIHGB1 ' PARIS* 

Escort Service 

T et (£2 ^ 731 80 81 

LONDON; SOPHIE Classical Blonde 
BeauiW MBue Escort Seivtce 
Efeaga compgrtm W tS56 53fi 885 

“* HADfflD HARWNY - 
TOP CLASS Escort Service. 
life 34-1-38635.B8 or 906.61.ffi 64 

MCKY Chariaide. Beaultul 
Prtvae Escort Sente to™#" 

Cal 0171 792 0 881 or 0171 259 323 

N/COLE VEPY PRETTY AHD SHAPBY" 
Young Blond. Prtwte Escort Sawtce 
Lcndonra. 0410 7B9 253 

'buherfues ihternational" 
SUPERIOR ESCORT SERVICE 
L QIC0N OFFICE 0171 341 9653 

VALENTINES KTERNATOHAL 

VIP Escort Santa phOWt 10 viewcafBai 

Larion offto OT 8*5 M05 al tans 

Trankfurt a areT 

Mara's Escort Agency 
Please cal 0 68 - 597 66 66 

• ZURICH ’ CAROUHE ‘ 

Escort Se«w 

T* 01 / 261 49.47 


DO YOU LIVE IN 


•Wit 


^ • Subscribe and SAVE up to 60% 
ofF the cover price. 

• Also available: PAY MONTHLY 
by easy, low cost, 

EARLY MORNING DELIVERY TO YOUR HOME OR OFFICE. 

A cosmopolitan, comprehensive and concise newspaper delivered every day to your home or office. 

In and around most of Petra the International HeraldTribune offers early morning hand delivery on the day 
of publication, Monday through Saturday. And, because it is primed in Paris,Toulouse and Marseille, it can be 
sent by post to arrive on the same day in most of France at no extra cost 
The resuft? 

Unique coverage of the world you live in, brought to you as it changes — daily. 

For more information about easy ordering and availability of hand delivery 
call our Subscriber Customer Service Unit: 

Toll free: 0800 437 437 
or Fax: 01 41 43 92 10. 




Q YES, I'd like to subscribe and have my bank account 
.<fe ^ . h M ^ byFFI6L 

Please start my subscription and send me a bank 
form to arrange my payment. 



□ YES, I'd like to subscribe and pay for the following 
term: 

Q 12 months {+ 2 months free): FF 1,950 
(Saving off cover price : 46%) 

□ Special, 2-month trial subscription: FF2 1 0 
(Saving off cover price: 60%) 

□ My check is enclosed (payable to the IHT) 

□ Please charge my: 

□Access QAmex □Diners 

□ Eurocard □ MasterCard QVlsa 

Credit card charges will be made in French Francs at 
current exchange rates. 

Card Nl“ i _ Exp.: 

Signature: — — . . — 

□ Please start delivery and send invoice. 


Family Name: — 

First Name: 

JobTide: 

Mailing Address: □ Home □ Business 


Postal Code: — 

City:- 

Tel: Fax: 

E-Mail Address: — 

Your VAT N* (Business orders only) 

(IHT VAT N 1 747 320 211 16) ' 

1 got this copy of the IHT acD kiosk □ hotel □ airline □ other 
□ 1 do not wish to receive information from other carefully 
screened companies. 13-8-97 

This offer expires on December 3 1, 1 997 
and is AVAILABLE FOR NEW SUBSCRIBERS ONLY. 

Return your completed coupon to: 
Subscriptions Director, International HeraldTribune. 
181 , Avenue Charles-de-Gaulie, 92521 Neuilly Cedex. 
Fax: 0 1 4 1 43 92 1 0 E-Mail: subs@iht.com fr i a 
















































































































' jj\ ,yt 


wcc* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, ^TDNESDAY, AUGUST 13. 199; 


PAGE 17 


Advertisement 

available on 


USU-X3H 

JP 


E. 


JSL 


■ P 

DM 2§lj+ 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS August i z, 1997 

Internet: http://www.iht.conv<^^^^^^^ 


duotrion. .upplM by lunU P-n. 

lwintomwlk>nonhowtoBstyovirfund.faxKatyHouriatC33^)^«^^^^ U!0n ^ (\IQK1/V 

To Moave free dtfv Quotations fervour funds by E-mail :suaerQ» a* »■«**«» 

To receive n*e aaiy quotations tor your ^ ^ _ r *» I 2 SS5ttgSSW» w I isS.3 


v iiiu® 

LI 139M700 

in n 

ftii 


SP w W M 5 



■ AJtiS KITC ArbHrnuc Fd ' 

v OKWWflWii/UWmioeFa I 'Vwtt 

■ m^GSmiw Funa * 

a TheSocona Artos Arottrow s 1075J3+ 

^M^SMaV * 4*132 

jj-Frt FF 3MU7 


m Slnttad Ijmwnmiv Fa 5 I Mis* 

M3 FEPRIER LULUN GROUP 
ft FLTiuUaun 5 MIS? 

» FL Tiuh LMirromns SF Mb 

BU FIDELITY INVESTMENT 
TH.«jJ3 25\aii» , 

3 New Europe Fund S 7571 

a YWHFuna S 1*473 

a For Eoa Fund S £JU 

3 Orlml Fund S 1 WJT 

a Giooqi Sfwciihi Fund 1 70-50 i 

a Spoor* Crfowm Funa s O’l* 

•M RNANSA GROUP (Fat S4 3 244-UMt 

Tj^^Wress'^V w 

n* Ty VkuHiam Hwitaf Fund i 105* 

FLEMING FUND MANAGE UEKT 
LUXEMBOURG IT* ' 153 M 1011 
the cas is fund silav 
w Inirmctnnoi Eauttf Fund i liter 

MB FOKUS BANK JLVIPRBier 47-72*12 01 II 
it Fr»ul Inn Grantti Fd ( 137 

Mf FOREIGN A COLONIAL EMERG MKTS LTD 

T« : l London in 6a>l3* 

J ArooiHiMan uiwilGa Sica. § BUS 

d Bi&hFon in*m* Co Slcav 5 50..* 

it CMonotan imetl Co Slav 
i Indian Co Stay „ 

a Low Amor Eons YWd Fa J 104024 

Amenam invest Co a lAW 

or macisim 
IT PoruMCn InvrU Co Slcav 
a Poliui intaa Co Scav 
g Totewi mn Co 
a GH Em MUt mt Co Sta> 
at Ruum invesInKin Co 
071 FORMULA GROUP , , 

a Formula Fund nv S 11*05 

IM FRIED BERG MULTI-SECTOR FUNDS 

TMlUlMTla-llIUFta (flOlM-4573 

■> fiwoem Cunencr » jWJ3 

v Fneaewg Rwm meama S .wap 

s Emiszax my 

it FiMOfeorg GIoooiDbo Fd LM I IJ3i« 
Dl FUND MARKETING GROUP IBID) 

P.0 Box MOl . Hamilton, fiemmaa 

n FMG GtoorJ ®<jn) * £■'* 

in FMG N. Amor ISOJun) S 1S.I0 

m FMG Europe CSOJuni DM 2336 

m FMGEMGMkT Odium S J?M 

m FMGQHOJMU S 1B.W 

it* fmg Ftaw nojim S ll'S 

a Gtobgi Ouol Growth Fd f «BS 

in Tim Russian Fodarei OOJun) s 3SJ8 

: 5s&'Sp Ufl 

a Acodo USA Fund S i20^3t 

a Acocw uSa Grouw Fima s 

w CrasMUoa Cap Ml Uo 
a Lire ImflHimtms A ua 
e SdubDIuca I nli 140 s14,, iK J S 

b infMOOUFund LM J 

IT Tne Pours group Inti Ud II7A71£dE 
— tn GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS I FAX KHB 
Tet 153 1 47* 71B&'FOK 3S3 1 *7*0570 _ 

imSLau i « 

esanaikiM*M M 


OH ITALFORTUNE INTL FUNDS „ ___ 

i- dljss AiAnwGreaW Wr UJ W 357 00 

5 class B iGtomi Eauiiyi I '*£ 

a rtu-tf icionai Bonai S ' TY 

“ OOM D lt«u Bond' Ecu 11.17 

0W JAMES RIVER CAPITAL COUP 
» rjesom-itc lAugAFvi I ■‘**■55 

* III WWUO.LAUfl 86111 J J5n5n 

: b»® ss 

4 ""tJ' i !f2 

a jF Grotai Crow Tr 5 l«« 

a JF MOOB KonR'iuil * Jfl: 

a jFjapan5m.CoTi » ffigl-ffi 

5 jF JownTnel v . ,, 4 S“ 

a jt LvumsaTiw s j{“ 

J j£ Pads: Ins Tr S 

i iFThOMWI T'"' 1 5 

OK JULJUS BAER GROUP 
j Bamama |L 

j caw ?£ 

3 EauiMBrEurop* ';E HgS 

3 srocuar JE 

a 5 eBsuxir S| iKS 

i uouioom _ - * 

a EuroS Bond PulVJ 
a Doiiflf Bond Funo 
a Avsns Bona FuftJ 
3 Srrtw Bond Funa 
j DM Bona FuM 


?AiUDLUI DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
3 Doss A CS 

a CbBrl c 

s sag i 

DEUTSCHE **ARA PORTFOLIO 
a DOB 4 

&UPO?EAN BOND POfiTFOUO 
3 DM 

lu^&BOND PORTFOLIO 8J|o 

5 SSK I 

3 fasti * 

poundsteruno portfouo • 


m PnemterGtMi YuNdPlp 
m Prenie GiaDcl Be Fd 
m Promki Tool Mi ni Fd 
IO PRIMED FUNDS 

m PtBpoo GWflJ Fd 

•n Pronto Sene' Fund 


i rxna 
s leis.w 
S 1177 n 


: jgsu 

YElfpORTFOLJ 0 V IM ft gSoTeS 


■n Pronto Sene' Fund * ... *~ 

PRIVATE 03 CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL LTD 

i (sarusiFEiu. flg 

J P’jnm H^biric. OWAAFd J .‘IS 

a Putnam inn Func > ^ 

r!MaSB["7 , "| His 

: SBDSs-®? ,NV - ugS 

n Guantuir irjusoun f 

n Qvomm »mnv Fund S 

* Ovajot mn Fwa N.V. | Sffi 

» CuoiaFuaaN V S MSB 

14*R|GEHT^FTIUD MANAGEMENT^LTD 

l aaSSS-TM-NR i 


3 US SkO Fund 
; PoCtiC SUSkl Fund 
3 SwasSiKi Fund 
j SaedalSulwMoa 
s Jason st«» Funa 
c Gormpn sijcx Fund 
j SpujaiGwimn SSach 
s S*«m. Pone Cnui 


AS IS 9 L» 
SF 1 -laOt 


SF 113.11 
f 1071500 
DM 710 II 

«» X 
eS w 

C 1324.17 

SF 1115 
Ah U0l3 


fSESg 


*ORI ruLM v 

M*A y 

ffjGRENCT BOND PTFL 


At SECURITIES PTFL 


i uT ri 

S17A72S06E 


GtnMa tstil 7JSS5* 

1 Gafkw5.A. 

■u Sconiui Wona Fund 
MS GENESEE FUND LM 
it |A1 Gonesao Eoate 


S IUI 

I 1717302 


Fa FronorB 
FaGennanY 


it |AJ Gonesoo Eagle S 3 > 1 JB 

— 171 GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 

■FAX: U^-KSOO. UKlCcmnsfljAaKUOl 
INTERNET SITE Ht|I^WwiMddiaa«niUiaa 

OFFSHORE FUNDS . 

1 1 Amal y.DougKJV 01 Mon 331624-63 4037 
It GAM t SpKiaiBana J >*7 2 > 

IT GAM AlUlYIttW Fd s UAOO 

w GAM Amnrogo } 

m GAM ASIAN S 

. GAM A tkm Dpv Mkls S 

ft GAMAuarono S 

■t GAM Bona I t 'Fffj 

» GAM Bona DM DM 14 * 0 ' 

it GAMBaiaSF SF [7055 

■ GAM Band USSCiQ * 

■ GAM Bond USI SpodW 5 731.40 

ft GAM Brasilia j 'J™ 

■t DAM Caijw *u predawn Inc s 122 . 7 ? 

, GAMCGFFInC } IJ {1 

it GAM CroSVManrel J >« 15 J 

ft GAMOiwtfiy * » -i 4 

c gam Dollar and kmmanonai 1 I il.J* 

it GAM EOS) Ain } ?«■« 


S “S 

0 Swnlno Cntli Fund C 1324.17 

j pauar tosn Fima s 

j FreiKii Franc Cosn ff 

5 asKisaaUft 25 

S iljKi« B Fd 2 loUff 

a j.b SfttohnEauityFd Sov ji7 85 

m J.B Donor Pool 5 

f Euro-Pool _ DM 

■ il-SSE 4 4l 

ft JB SmodiUT Bona Fd Son luvaj 

1 } B Donor fUSDi Band Fd J ]i£“ 

0 JB Eure Snon Ton* Fd DM l».i5 

3 j G Gorman EquBY Fd DM 130M 

a J.B irm EquIIV Fd S JMK 

a j B fmoil IIU Ep Fd J ]S-?i 

3 J.B DdMUi Bono p! DU> 

3 JJ mrematlww Bond Fd DAK 17S25 

0 W KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 
cn Furman Son Dualln Td 3S3 1 670 7073 
m NerAUa HOKund* J 

fsaemr i, ^ ri, ita 

OW LEHMAN BROTJIEBS I I.W7 
a Lnronan Cur Aa«. AB I 

3 MuHiStramOY Fall NV B J 14.12 

a Munt-snniiiflY Fo ikva > JfA* 

3 Muln-SiraieovFaNVA I 5*3 

3 MtW-SnBMgf Fo NV B 1 'S3* 

a Pren*r Futupb Aav AB 1 I5.W 

IN UBERALBAS. FUNDS 
TM : SS11 2'2 4071 Fen : SS71 712 7M0 
3 AM.S.F Funa } 

a FILM i Fund S JJ3IW 


a CUM & a 

Hi MERRILL LYNCH INC FORTFDUO 

\ §jj|p I iijS 

riiliTTi 

i^pmior; I” 

rSbarnS 


m Ett&rnfirKoTiger Fd 
in Eantm Euros* Vaa** _ 
w Global Emorwie mine Fd 
m GdUcn Tiger Fund 
■t Npa sene Groiff in Fe 
or Pacific Altarage Co 
n Paotie JUtntoje Co Ud 
* Peowi Etw =yr lbybt. Dew 
it SbstntFfrc Sj«lCT >K_ 

ft Rmnrr.lTCLiiLraffloomFd 

■ tregonr Moqnul Fd !AE 
t* Pogonr RbC'IK 
e Receni SdJm aiij ta 


c Began Scum; auoto 
• RocentSti LviaB Ffl 
r> RagomutciraFC 
n RvMlo-.D«l rvn 2 
n Tanon Artilrago 
3 Uneenai AuTaifttm Seri 


n Tnan ArFilrsM S 

3 Undorwi AuTaiMm Seri I 

m L'ndtfWM Amots^ A truo i 

m Undemtued An RutiU Fa S 

unamWuea AaMcSarl 5 

a Urnonaitrao Prop fa 1 s 

? K?1^ f 

d UYIMB i iger .nr COU 3 1 

147 RE1G GLOBAL FUND 
it Raid Giebdl Fund Plat 
it Raifl Gucci Fund Ecus Ecu 

— 131 REPUBUC FUNDS IFAXI2SQ* 
m Rtp 6 mem Mui rd 

0 Rep 3l Ait All Fd-CDrr HfMA 
rr R 4 sG 3 auoi Aflossdon Fe 


Pat 117539 
Ecu U« 0 I 0 





sf im.ii 

i ra 

n.77 
I 117J4Z 
s w55 

S 144.11 1 
5 132.75 

ms 



3 [fterol HoSgeMM Fd 4 i«D »7 

III UPPO INVESTMENTS 

T IDR 1 Money Martial Fd * <443 

» Biaonetinn Omni Fa S 4 T.to 

102 LLOY D GEORGE MN 8 MT (M 2 J 784 S 4 SD 
■ LD Amen nd Fund S „ag 

• lG AB km SmaUw lm Fa S 2 < 5 in 

it LG IndU Fund ijd S >'« 

• lG 9 orea Fund Pie 5 SJ31 

L"^Al^MS H * MA5 ^ 1407 

*BBSM*Ea® B Tr SS 

&tmvSBiyE^Riu N .£ 

• VST™ FF Sis 

j p.i ruled Unarwe Gireuna £ 1 MB 

a GormonY *■ Ausmo D» maw 

3 Soullftm Europe SF 714.63 

a SamSnam SF 22»4iy 

DBLJFlE » LTD (CU 

3 Muneunency _ * “SI 

a D now MK»!ni Term | 

a 3 jssS"" v ^ 

1 KM OM fi 

s sigsr ^ H 

; aswaste* 4 ^ 

a SfttiMuftfcwrefKY SF 

j irfr 21 % 

S C fMw _ FF 

s fissssfflsa- E i S 

0 Concdim Donor « ^07 

a Dinai Fionn MuM H 20^ 

c iftiso Franc DMd POY SF Ji^* 

j Mediterranean Cmt SF 1343 

2 cSuSJmwtSnod Torni DM 

3 Bo«K.Can v_CH F-D gwaul SF 1I-*J 

a MfC.i Durr PntnDaimg 5 F 73 * 

3 NLC-Multicwr Dir FI l" 1 -* 

103 LDfABAPDOOItRIN VEST 

0 PcJtn Bloc Bond Rina * ] 0 J 1 

3 SiradiBf EutodWn Cop* DM 

• BIT vJ .H 

2 iSSSSJlfiSSTund ss l&S 

5 ^^^ NTERPBISE n L Yo 61.35 

IBS MAGNUM FUNDS ■KftftULiO 

: 1 Ss 

■r .".agrorm Fund 
w iVagnum 6 <o«»i E<L 
m Magnum IC bEa 


i luHs 

\ \m 

1 1M1B.94 
l 2 H 27 I 
V 100097 


» GJ1M |mrrg Mkrt MliFFd i 

a GAM Fronce FF 1»*J6 

it GAMGAMCO * 

• GAM HighYeld S 217J3 

it GAM Ftand KM 1 Q „ I *112 

ft GAM HiWeBTiena Fame S 57JI 

w GAMJanon J ' *3g 

• OMILarengsdlK,, 

• GAM MIB-Europu DM DM 1711 

ft GAM Mm-Eumpe USS 5 70*M 

a GAM MUfli ul DM DM |7.^ 

• GAM MuW U.S USS s 7tl7 

*. GAM Pocrfic S '0”- f 

■ QAM Pm Europn SF 74.11 

ft ^^ raBetr n 

ft GAM SFSpSal Band SF 1™^] 

J Wi 

m GAM Ttodlng DM DM 200.79 

vp GAM Tmdna USS S 24934 

5^Sii?fa a “j 

. GAMT^ugiiusna | lg-2 

ft GAM UnTtunal USS S 

• GAM nwidftUM J 

• GAMon m ... \ 

u CAMlH WMSBintuS r - 

ft GSAMCHFQurpotlni -’F 

ft SSsS^Kne S 


i 33&40 

S 317 1W 
4*735 
73419 
I 1572.99 
SF 13899 
t Siam 
DM 10209 
*■ 11117 


SF 477 Jb 
FF 73955 


srssst % \ 



x IS 

Mt Sr 33300 

-D UCITS 

ll*fttlJ 53 -l-*TffiB )70 


DM 1233* 

S5 S 

E I 


meg** 

5 saw 

•3 GAM iruamawxai u 
a GAM MOfiCficnW 0 
3 GAM Jama Loydl 
a GAM NormAipergo 
s Sam Alan Capua . 
a gam ppaac Bmrn B 
„ GAM Paaflc B^n 3 
3 GAMertcaCcOW 


123 MULJ1 MANAGER I LV. 

rn uganeM EauaiM J bh 

a. gmSrgmg Maltim * 23W 

m hSSo®* i 179* 

122 NAM FOREX MANAGEMENT 

ft NAM Mum M0R4 SF HUB 

124 NICHOLAS- APPLEGATE CAPrTALMGT 

- PUA yraT OacnruWM Cl A S 1BU» 

% KA'Jmo^Sng.aB l IM-?* 

ICU8 

^h^ar^d^^ent 

DW SOJLOGt 

ifift fSSSt 

DU 14150. 
iUERNSlY) LTO 
L 9 354 


205WE 

« RKJKaun FiAiroi irt 5 (VS life 

■t Picncawl Ooeor. B Inc J ! ] 22 77ft 
>. Ricrtcoun Qppait L me ; J!?? Ui 

» Rkimbwi Cpsen S ine s 1I74J1E 

f&XSb mM ¥ a b* 


128 OLYMPIA CAPITALIHTLINC^ 
wuuem House. HamilBn HM 1 1 , Bennada 
TM 331 242 -IDIBFai 33 l 295-7305 
. AJS A/Wanm Fund | J 

it ais vrandnAM Fund f ' 

■ FiredMiry Group j * 

: SffSC | 1 

ft wlncn. Frontier _ S 3 


ft Wlncn." Hldg inH Modljon 

: sxxiSnlf 


FF 204.TB 
sf iara 
5F 1149 


S 10-21 

S 11.13 

Van 120350 


3 GAMonca LCPIBft 

sis® 


S* II 




_ .. ecu Fund .. 

■ TAcgnum Tie» Groftm 
ft vagnum US Fqg»'T 

v ARailnaOimi rd 
DLfi LapM rjwfl 

r ISSKR^WH 

; aasgSi 

ft MnUlQmidB 


'll 

i n S!SS{^ ,,KW, p^ 

: ssr» fig 
; EGaEKr ‘ sais 

13d OPTIGESnDN PARIS , 

CROUPE MARTIN MAUREL 
it oartaeWGlIJl FO-R®dinc_ DM 231590 
h opogast G«l FG-Ssup F- PJJ SV75 I 
k OpUflBSl GW Ftf-lntl Eo Sue DM 11*323 

5 SS^unimsUd g 

p . xniE U 

: sss^-s- I IE 

1 1 25 ^ 

* ifiePSiilniiro Fd LW S 1 *- 73 

^(BisMr^Tr as 

: gsgesrisn,i 1 ^ 

M®® F t5^3»S41 

r^*swFd | isas 

s ssssas^rFd f 

s a»f5K£m ! Si 

1 5 S35BSM& d iSX 


l ^S.^dlNLGjA R IgA 

| $2 

* RG Money PtJsFd IN L« B lg-“ 
a RG Money P US FfllCHrl SF « W 
3 RG MonotPi'J* Fd lUSpJ | 101*5 

3 RG fewaUus Fa ICHR SF ».w 
3 RG fcna Plus Fd USD) J .IWM 

0 RG Band Plus Fd 'BEF5 100700 

Mate Raneco see ftir m oraam Stoctii 
IH ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 

Far «T71 2*03070 w 

» AwboSm H dlWIKS Fd s *475 

I iWS 
t un 

7 iSfffflnl SgtHF SF 10g3 
S SStoBTSaroanreiLlS* "s moo 

if ^ 

0 Prloand Fo HY Emar MWi S 
r prinana Fund Ecu Ecu 5L7T1 

B Pnenowr^aE™* ^ 
ADMJnStERED FUN DS 

r'SSrJS 8 ' ^ n§| 

5 reWnGrmutn | 13S.WU 



SMB«vr lines 5 A 
USBandphro 
ViOWre Anane 


111 SANTANDER HEW WORLD INV. 
m Emergno mm ajrfil | 

Z gSES?Wi£ jnd L 

lucaaftniMAViau ENSKILDA BANKER 




SF 278 J* 20 y 

SF 4S2.W0Y 


IMiIbP 


149 RWTTHEW INTERN AT104WL MOT 


Mt 

i^vii 




HF) SF 1115*Oy 







BBWIBBarTW 




HDS UNITED 


Srii 1779231 


EUNYESTRIHDS 


OflUIUMLTD 


S l^g 


SSSSSmSSis. 


?sr i 
«®^a E,,TMOiH, * pu: iaa 

9MCDC INTERNATIONA 1 pF J0373iE 

isgferLA»««« LT ° 

^AHLttSw^ 


c kill 00 

DM 16.1300 

3 i 

5 7 ^ 

I i*ES3 

Y S9J0W0 

Y 4340000 


i ' BJ5 m 


tSSSSpi'w^ff ^™ 9liartr 


Gall or 


.*■*** -S 

. v?: ?>* 


NOKIA 

9000 



























































PAGE 18 


llcraliSz^eribuuc 

Sports 


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1997; 


World Roundup 


Insults in Athens 

Olympics Theodoras Pangalos, 
the Greek foreign minis ter, has 
charged that Primo Nebiolo. the 
president of the LAAF. “violated 
the basic rule of athletics by mixing 


“In sport you can be as fanatic as 
you want, while fanatics are always 
wrong when it comes to politics,” 
Pangalos said 

Athens is one of five cities com- 
peting to hold the 2004 Olympics. 
One of the others is Rome, which 
Nebiolo supports. In an interview 
broadcast Tuesday, Nebiolo said 
Greece was too unstable to hold the 
2004 Olympics. 

“You have economic and polit- 
ical problems," he said. He de- 
scribed organizers of the world 
championships as “mediocre men” 
and said Greece had the “bad luck 
not to find the proper people. " 

Nebiolo said Greeks were 
“crazy” for trying to turn the bid 
far the 2004 Games into a national 
issue. “We Italians deal with the 
Olympics with great self-control, 
great attention and a sense of re- 
sponsibility.” (AP) 

Muilin Traded to Pacers 

BASKETBALL Chris Muilin 
joined the Indiana Pacers on Tues- 
day, leaving the Golden State War- 
riors and bringing his soft shot and 
outstanding passing game to a team 
coached by Larry Bird, a former 
Olympic teammate. 

The five-time All Star, whose 
dozen years in die NBA have been 
marred by injuries, was traded from 
Golden State to the Pacers for Erick 
Dampier and Duane Ferrell 

Muliin. 34. a forward, had one 
year remaining on his contract 

Dampier. a center, averaged S.l 
points and 4.1 rebounds in 72 
games as a rookie last season. 

Ferrell, a 32-year-old forward, 
has been in the league nine seasons. 
He started 1 8 of 62 games last sea- 
son, averaging 6.4 points. (AP) 

Agassi Ends Drought 

tennis Andre Agassi overcame 
a three-game deficit in the final set 
to beat David e Sanguinetti of 
Spain, 6-2, 4-6, 64, in the first 
round of the $1 million RCA 
Championships in Indianapolis. 

It was Agassi's first victoty since 
April. He had lost in the first round 
in three straight tournaments and 
watched as his ranking slipped to 
74th. (AP) 



The A-souaicd Prow 


Andre Agassi returning serve 
on his way to a rare victory. 

Sri Lanka Scores Rapidly 

CRICKET Sanath Jayasuriya of 
Sri Lanka lashed 199 runs Tuesday 
and Aravinda de Silva made his 
second hundred of the match as Sri 
Lanka flayed India's bowling on 
the forth day of the second and final 
test in Colombo. 

The pair put on a record 218 for 
the third wicket as Sri Lanka raced 
from its overnight total of 77 runs 
for one wicket to 415 for seven 
declared in its second innings. 

India, needing io score 373 to 
win the match and the short series, 
was 49 without loss at the 
close. (Reuters) 


The Trials of Soccer: 
High-Tech and Legal 

Of ‘Virtual’ TV and Match Fixing 


By Rob Hughes 

jMirrmarienal Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — We live in a tech- 
nological world and sport is often 
the release from that — the inter- 
reaction between the spectator and the 
efforts, in flesh and blood, of the players. 

Why compromise that? Why attempt, 
in a successful global sport such as 
soccer, to load the game with gadgetry 

World Soccer 

and gimmickry that undermines what 
the eye sees and the spirit communic- 
ates? 

Starting Monday, Sky TV, the satel- 
lite-television broadcaster that shows 
English soccer on its sports channel, 
added a new toy to its coverage. It is 
called Virtual Replay. 

Developed from military technology 
— Israeli missile-tracking systems — it 
turns human action into computer an- 
imation. In the hands of Andy Gray, a 
television analyst who used to be a 
robust center-forward, it becomes an- 
other tool with which to analyze those 
debatable, split-second pieces of action 
and arbitration. 

It is a history machine too, for Sky 
believes the computer simulation has 
confirmed that England's vital goal in the 
1 966 World Cup Final against Germany 
ought never to have been allowed. The 
ball struck the bar, came down, but, the 
computer says, did not cross the line. 

Heaven help the English; 1966 was 
the only major triumph in their long 
soccer history. Heaven help the referee 
who has only one pair of eyes, one angle 
of judgment, one blink of an eye to 
assess and rule. 

Already, we have this new techno- 
logical toy taking apart the movements 
of individuals, tracking and measuring 
speeds and distances, pillorying the ref- 
eree when technology catches him out. 
It is soccer, but not as we know it 
Gray, and his like across soccer's 200 
national boundaries, are entitled to play 
with their expensive toys. FIFA, whose 
president Joao Havelange warmed to Ja- 
pan's proposal for “Virtual Reality” sta- 
dia at the 2002 World Cup (possibly 
because it would generate more real 
money), may lack the will or the authority 
to block the advance of high-tech. 

But our world is unreal enough. If we 
crave computer games, let those who 
want them play them on their personal 
computers. If what attracts us is the 
moving ball, moving players and im- 
passioned crowds, this development is 
as welcome as static interference with 


the pictures. 

Sky is good at what it does, pur- 
chasing exclusive rights to sports, 
which provides the air time that ter- 
restrial channels never did. That gives it 
the scope to analyze and re-anaiyze 
events. The channel is also probably 
right in assuming the modem generation 
is switched on by the buzz of new tech- 
nology. Indeed, television's game is 
building greater audience figures, 
selling more satellite dishes. 

But soccer's aim ought to be pro- 
tecting its traditions, which evolved 
over a century. New technology adds a 
hypnotic dimension, but corrupts the 
game’s enduring appeal 



m. 


Grobbelaar, Fashanu, Segers and Lim. 

After two trials, lasting a total of 17 
weeks and costing the British taxpayer 
about£12 million ($1 9 million), the jury 
found goalkeepers Bruce Grobbelaar 
and Hans Segers, center- forward John 
Fashanu and a Malaysian accountant, 
Heng Suan Lim, not guilty of match 
fixing. 

The jurors could not have done oth- 
erwise. The charges were virtually im- 
provable, and highly improbable, and a 
stain on die credibility of the game. 

It never seemed passible that the ac- 
cused had fixed not only the results, but 
the specific scores of English Premi- 
ership matches for the benefit of betting 
cartels in the Far East 

What was disturbing, and remains so, 
was the inadequate explanation of the 
movement of hundreds of thousands of 
pounds between those accused and 
secret bank accounts in Switzerland that 
some of them held. 

At the core of the trials was die testi- 
mony of Chris Vincent, a former friend 
and aggrieved failed business partner of 
Grobbelaar. The two had tried to launch 
a hopelessly ambitious game park busi- 
ness in Zimbabwe, and Vincent had sub- 
sequently persuaded The Sun, a tabloid 
newspaper, to “set up” Grobbelaar. 

The scam was for Vincent to offer 
Grobbelaar £2,000 to throw a match. 
The newspaper surreptitiously video- 
taped the meeting of the goalie and the 
bankrupted Zimbabwe businessman, 
and when Grobbelaar walked off with 
the cash, exposed him. 

Grobbelaar always insisted he took 
the money as a double sting against 
Vincent The jury was uncertain, the 
judge directed them to acquit, and no 
doubt the affair will be aired in some 
future libel court. 


a - **4°*: ' -« 

r; t >, 

' - S’- 

■ v t 


flmWt/Rrm ere 

Radovan Hromadko of Jablonec, left, trying to escape the clutches of Hinur Birgisson of Orebro on Tuesday. ^ \ 


.« *n -- ™ Ht. .. J»*i 

( 


*725;. v 


Ip * 

Mi* . ? 


Meanwhile, nobody wins. The Inland 
Revenue, which gathers taxes in Britain, 
is on the tail of Fashanu and Segers 
following the claims during the trials of 
the mouey they allegedly amassed and 
failed to declare. 

Fashanu. these days an entrepreneur, 
had been denied legal aid that the others 
got He had chosen throughout to stay 
silent, to answer nothing, but had hired 
defense counsel to the sum of 
£650,000. 

The judge refused counsel's plea for 
this and other losses, saying that 
Fashanu had brought suspicion on him- 
self by paying money from the Far East 
into three bank accounts held in dif- 
ferent names. 

The dear old English Football As- 
sociation now announces an assessment 
of its rules on betting and forecasting to 
ensure that what was unproven doesn’t 
occur in the future. 

The police hypothesis was fragile. 
And the lawyers had red faces when the 
jury pointed out that the evidence 
presented to them omitted eight words 
spoken by Vincent to Grobbelaar the 
night of the video sting. 

“I don’t have a jacket,” Vincent said, 
handing over the £2,000, “you cany 
this." 

“Alert, as ever, Mr. Foreman! ” com- 
mented the judge. “It seems you have 
found something nobody else has." 

The newspaper, the police, the pros- 
ecutors, it also seems, were looking for 
something that wasn't there. 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London 


Bruges Makes Fast Start ; 
In Its UEFA Cup Opener f 


Reuters 

Club Bruges of Belgium scored five 
first- ha If goals, three of them by Lorenzo 
Staelens, to win. 5-3 away, to HIT Gorica 
of Slovenia in the UEFA Cup second 
preliminary round, first leg on Tuesday. 
Milan Osierc replied with a second-half 
hat-trick for Gorica. 

Gen Claessens started the scoring 
after 1 1 minutes. Staelens scored with a 
penalty two minutes later. He added his 

European Soccer 

his second in the 21st minute. Claessens 
scored again five minutes later, and 
Staelens completed his hat-trick with 
penalty two minutes before die break. 

Rotor Volgograd scored twice in the 
last 15 minutes Tuesday to beat visiting 
Odra Wodzislaw of Poland, 2-0. Vladi- 
mir Nidergauz gave the Russian team 
the lead after 75 minutes and Oleg 
Veretennikov scored a second goal in 
the dying seconds. 

Another Russian team, Alania Vladi- 
kavkaz, also won ar home, beating 
Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk of Ukraine, 2- 1 . 
Alexander Palyanitsa gave the visitors 
an early lead. Raimondas Zhutau tas and 
Mikhail Ashvetia replied for 
Vladikavkaz. 

In Trabzon, Turkey, Trabzonspor beat 


Dundee United, 1-0. Harm Mandirali 
scored the only goal with a penalty after ’’ 
Stewart McKiirrmie fouled Kazim Nas/ 

In Minsk, Dialo Mamadu scored • 
twice as Lillestrom of Norway beat Dy J ' 
namo, 2-0. In Jablonec in the Czech’-* 
Republic, the home team drew, 2-1, " 
with Orebro of Sweden. In Vienna, Rap- 
id thrashed Czechs Boby Brno, 6-1. . •* 

ALBANIA Tirana was awarded foe 
league title Tuesday after rivd Flamurtari ; 
was docked four points, fined 100,000 
leks (approximately $600) and bad two * 
coaches suspended for two years. 

Flamurtari walked off the pitch 15. 
minutes into the second half of its de-" 
cisive and politically-charged match 
Sunday after being refused a penalty*; 
with Tirana leading, 1-0. Police inter- 
vened at foe maten when Flamurtari 
supporters smashed windows and seats 
in Tirana’s Qemal Stafa stadium. 

Flamurtari, which is based in the' 
southern port city of Vlore, was two - 
points ahead of Tirana before foe match. ' 
The Albanian federation gave Tirana a - 
2-0 victory for its 17fo title. 

The championship was suspended id;' 
February because of civil unrest It re-’* 
sumed 1 0 days ago in a six-team playoff 
after the government guaranteed secu- • 
rity in four stadiums chosen to hold* 
matches. 


In Dog Days, PGA Championship Plays for Some Respect 


By Chris Hodenfield 

/VfH' York Junes Service 

TL TEW YORK — The PGA Cham- 
l^kl pionship is more like the work- 
X l ing stiff’s major, a grinding af- 
fair played out in some August steam 
vat By its end, the players often look 
like foe dazed and drenched survivors of 
a boiler accident 

The Professional Golfers' Associ- 
ation of America bitterly resents having 
its lodestar event being thought of as the 
Dog Days Special. 

Its members have heard enough of foe 
cracks about some of their inexplicable 
course selections. That is probably the 
chief reason they are staging the 79tb 
running of the championship, beginning 
Thursday, at Winged Foot Golf Course 
in Mamanoneck, New York — a gold- 
embossed, spats-and-cane, ermines- 
and -pearls prestigious address. The 
course has staged, after all, four U.S. 
Opens. Can we have some respect, 
please? 

The PGA of America is still trying to 
live down its 1987 championship, 
which was staged for no sensible reason 
in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, at the 
national headquarters. 


The weather was a mighty lobster pot, 
and attendance was virtually nil. The 
rough was insane, and foe tortured 
greens all died and turned into what foe 
writer Dan Jenkins described as “80 
percent dirt, 10 percent wire and 10 
percent herpes. ’ * To add a final touch of 
class, the main scoreboard was attended 
to by a woman in a lime-green bikini. 

The final duel between Lanny 
Wadkins and the winner, Larry Nelson, 
is remembered by some, but the event as 
a whole lived on as the sad symbol of 
what the PGA Championship had be- 
come. It seemed that real-estate deals, or 
at least commercial interests, were call- 
ing the shots. Why else would they go, 
two years later, to foe undistinguished 
Kemper Lakes in Chicago? 

If this is too much experimentation, 
that is to be expected. The PGA of 
America is an organization of course 
pros, and sometimes It takes serious 
measures to move those cuffless tan- 
gerine slacks off the floor. 

But before anyone gets snide, they 
should remember rhat being the cham- 
pionship of course pros was not an in- 
significant matter in the days when even 
such stars as Sam Snead, Byron Nelson 
and Ben Hogan were working club pros 


who reported for duty in the shop. 

By foe mid-1950s, the modem tour 
pro had elbowed aside the club pro, but 
the old lesson-givers were still thick at 
the PGA Championship until only two 
years ago, when foeir number in the 
field was reduced from 40 to 25. 

This change allowed space for more 
ranked international players, giving the 
event what amounts to foe strongest 
field of foe year, certainly stronger than 
the Masters lineup, which is intention- 
ally a small, elite field padded by every 
past winner still ambulatory. 

“ Only a handful of the 25 club pros 
usually contends in a PGA,” said Mark 
Brooks, the 1 996 PGA winner, "but the 
U.S. Open usually has 50 to 60 almost 
complete unknowns. And the British 
Open has more than a handful of un- 
knowns.” 

The PGA Championship is the major 
most Likely to be won by the player who 
wins only one major in his life. But there 
are a lot of medals in the hands of repeat 
winners, including Walter Hagen (five). 
Jack Nicklaus (five) and Snead (three). 

For all the efforts to improve the PGA 
Championship, nothing takes the place 
of a good rousing finish, and nobody 
ever complained about the event being 


some late-season slacker when there 
was a great battle at hand. Paul 
Azinger's playoff defeat of Greg Nor- 
man in 1993 at Inverness was good, 
gripping stuff, and Bob Tway’s holed 
bunker shot at foe final hole that de- 
feated Norman in 1986, also at In- 
verness, was a miracle finish. 

Then there was John Daly's shocking 
victory in 1991 at Crooked Stick, in 
Carmel, Indiana, where, as foe ninth 
alternate, he arrived at the course only 
hours before his tee time and dominated 
everyone without even having played a 
practice round. 

So though foe PGA has nothing to be 
ashamed of, some critics would Tike to 
take this most changeable of majors and 
somehow change it again. 

Shall we, for instance, move it to 
May? The PGA was held in late spring 
between 1948 and 1952. In 1971 or- 
ganizers tried February for a Florida 
staging, and in 1 936, in Pinehursti North 
Carolina, the pros played in November. 

As brutal as it seems, the PGA will 
probably stay in August. Lanny 
Wadkins, the 1977 PGA champion, 
points out that the date adds to the drama 
in Ryder Cup years. “On ray team in '95, 

I had two guys change on die team on the 


last day of foe PGA,” said Wadkins;'* 
who was foe U.S. captain dial year." • * 

Also, it is not inconceivable that - 
someday someone will try to close out a 
Grand Slam at the PGA. For that starry- 
eyed hope alone they would keep this • 
the final major of foe year. . 

But while foe PGA of America gets' >W.. 
this nice end-of-season attention with h ' 
these two events, the most important 
interest to keep it in August is television^ 
After all, it was pressure from television 
that forced upon the PGA the single 
most cataclysmic change in its history, 
when in 1958 it was changed from a 
match-play event to stroke play. 

While other major golf events like foe? 
North & South and the Western Open* 
have slipped in importance, foe PGA; 
Championship has remained a major, a& 
it has been since 1916. After going ter 
Sahalee Country Club next year, where 
it will be played at the doorstop of 
Microsoft in Redmond, Washington, i£ 
will move on to a series of other ven- 
erable locations that have been sane-; 
lifted by U.S. Open experience. ' x 

The PGA Championship has been* tL 
restored to a position of respect, which s! 
all the club pros wanted in the first- 
place. 


Scoreboard 


Major Leaque Swhbbws 

AMU CAM HAMM 

EAST DIVISION 



W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Baltimore 

72 

4) 

.637 

— 

New York 

69 

47 

395 

4ft 

Boston 

58 

61 

487 

17 

Toronto 

56 

40 

■4H3 

17ft 

Detroit 

55 

41 

jttA 

18ft 

CENTRAL DIVISION 



Cleveland 

58 

55 

313 

— 

Chicago 

56 

59 

487 

3 

Milwaukee 

56 

40 

.483 

3!4 

Minnesota 

51 

46 

-436 

9 

Kansas atv 

48 

66 

A2I 

10ft 


WEST DIVISION 



Anaheim 

66 

51 

364 

— 

Seattle 

64 

51 

364 

— 

Texas 

56 

47 

ATS 

(Oft 

Oakland 

47 

72 

395 

20 

HAnOKAL UAOUfl 



EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pd. 

GB 

AtVuriQ 

75 

45 

325 

— 

Florida 

68 

49 

381 

5ft 

New York 

65 

52 

356 

8-6 

Montreal 

40 

S6 

317 

13 

Philadelphia 

40 

75 

348 

32'/, 

CENTRAL otvniON 



Houston 

64 

SS 

338 

— 

Pittsburgh 

57 

61 

483 

6 ft 

St Louis 

53 

64 

453 

10 

Cincinnati 

51 

65 

440 

lift 

Chicago 

47 

75 

395 

17 


WEST DIVISION 



San Francisco 

M 

53 

355 

— 

Los Angeles 

64 

54 

342 

IV. 

Cotorodo 

57 

6? 

.479 

9 

San Diego 

56 

62 

475 

9V. 


MONDAY'S UNKSCOCU 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Texas 030 300 MM 

Boston 101 100 000-3 


D-OUvef and Leyrits WakefeU 
Brandenburg (5), Mahay (7), Lucy 19) and 
Hasetman. W— D. ORrer, 9-10. 
L— Wakefletd, 6-14. HRs— Texas. GS (51. 
Boston. Jh-Voteidbi (13). 

Detroit 010 000 001—2 10 2 

Taranto 002 002 Oft— 8 II 0 

Jarvis. GcdHard (6), MksB (7), M. Myers (B1 
and Casanova; Htodgen. Andufar(9) and B. 
Santiago. W— Henlgen, 13-7. L-Jorvts. 0-2. 
HRs— Detroit Higglnson (211. Ta.Ch»k (27). 
Toronto. Carter (17), C Oetgoda (75). B. 
SorttogoCV}. 

H«N Yam 004 301 003—11 21 B 

Minnesota 000 NO 000-0 S 0 

Peffltte. Medr (9) and Girardt Robertson. 
Fr.Rodriguez (4), Guardado (9) and 
Stetnbach. □. Miner (71. W— Peffitte. 14-7. 
L — Robertson. 7-11. HR— New York. T. 
Martinez (381. 

MOacndcao MI 000 000—1 4 a 

Seattle 004 025 00—11 14 O 

Etted. Mfcuraca (6), VWone (7), Do. Jones 
(B) and Mntheny: Moyer, B. Wells (8) and 
Oa.WHsan. W— Moyer. 12-4. L—E Idled, ti- 
ll. HR— Seattle. Buhner 177). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Florida Ml 0M 000—1 S 1 

Atlanta 0M Ml Ml— 2 4 0 

KJ. Brown. F. Heredia (8). Powefl (9) and 
C. Johnson; GModdux. Wohlers (9) and 
Edd.Perez, J. Lopez (7). W-Wohlers. 4-4. 
L— F.Herodro.4.7. 

Houston 212 030 000—0 11 O 

New York 020 0M 001—2 li 3 

P .Garcia. Magnanle (B! and Au&mus; 
Ham recti, Crawford (5), Rajas (8). 
McMictwnH (9) and HunrSey. Pratt (9). 
W — R. Garcia. 5-8. L — Hamath. 0-1. 
HRs— Houston. Bagwell 132). New York. 
Hundley (25), Everett (12). 

Chicago ooo ooe 010— I 4 o 

Las Angeles 1M 1M OOx— 2 7 1 

Batista. F too ho (8) and Senate Par* and 
Plana W— Park, 11-6. L— Batista. 0-1 
HR— Chicago# D. Hansen (7). 

Montreal OM 003 300-4 12 0 


San Diego 010 0M 101—3 7 O 

Hermanson. Tetfond (7) and Widgeg 
J. Hamilton. □. Veras (7). Bergman IB) and 
Flaherty. W— Hermanson. 7-5. L— J. 
Ham atari. 104. HRs — Montreal Sega) (13). 
H. Rodriguez CM), V. Guerrero (7). San Diego. 
Camlntti (14). Joyner (10), Flaherty (7). 
Ondatra 4» rn 000-7 13 2 

Sm Francisco OM 0M 301—4 5 I 
Mercfceb Suffivan (8) and J. Often Ranv 
D. Darwin (2). Poole 18). D. Henry 19) and B. 
Johnson. W— Merohet S-B. L— Rapp. S-7. 
HRs — Cincinnati O. Sanders (5). Stynes (29# 
J. OAver(12). 5an Francisco. Kent (73). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Avg. 
FT homos ChW 101 36B 77 129 .351 

Ramirez Oe 105 384 62 130 J33/ 

waarklex 104 379 55 177 JOS 

MVavgtm Bos 98 3o« 48 122 J33 

S Alomar Qe 91 330 44 110 .333 

ONeANYY 1)0 407 73 135 332 

BeWUGams NYY 84 334 71 109 334 

EMaiKnez Sea 117 411 83 134 324 

Cora Sea IT0 435 82 141 324 

Justice Cte 94 339 54 UK, 322 

RUNS— Garcia parra. Boston. 91; 
KnahtauctL Minnesota. 91; Griffey Jr. Seattle. 
8& Jeter, New Yorfc, 8£ E. Martinet, Seattle. 
83: Cora. Seattle^ Os ToQorfc. Detroit 79. 

RBI— r. Martinez. New yiurtu toft Griffey 
Jr. Seattle. 107,- Salmon. Anaheim 9& F. 
Thomas. CMoaoa.91 0. Tfea. New Voi*. B9-, 
J. uGoruotez. Texas. 8ft ToCJatft. Detroit. 8S. 

HITS— Gardapana. Boston. 153: Jctec 
NewYort. 141; Greer. Tesos. 141; I. Rodriguez. 
Texas, 141; Cara. Seattle Ml; G. Anderson, 
Anaheim 134; Q. NeUL New Yoit 135. 

DOUBLES— JBVotentm. Boston. 36: 
TnWa Milwaukee. 25; a «Nll New Yd* 34; 
Cora Seattle. 33. A. Rodriguez, Seattle. 3ft 
Garooparm Boston 31: Ramirez. Clew. 30. 

TRIPLES — Gorr joparm . Boston. 9; 
Knobhwcn. Minnesota 9 Jeter, New Yurt. 7; 
Aliud. Anaheim, j; Daman, Kansas City. 6t 


BumKz, Milwaukee. 6; Ottoman. Kansas 
City, it VizqueL Cleveland 6 ; B. y Anderson 
BaHmore. 4. 

HOME RUNS— T. Martinez, New YoiK 3ft 
Griffey Jo Seattle 3ft McGwire, Oakkmd 34 
Thome, devetamt 3ft TaOar*. Detroit, 27; 
Buhnes Seattle. Z7iM Vaughn Baton. 2ft F. 
Thomas, Chicago. 2ft J. uGanialez. Tex. 2ft 
STOLEN BASES— a LHunhrr, Detroit 5ft 
Nbum. Toronto, 47; Kaobtoudi Minnesota 
**i T Goodwin, Texas. 4ft Vtzqvel Cleveland 
31: Dartiam. Chicago, 25; ARoditguez, 
Seattle. 22. 

PITCHING n3 Dedstom} — RaJohnsan, 
Seattto 16-1 *42. 2J£ Clemens. Tanma 17- 
4. Bill 14ft Miasm BaMmore. 13-4. .745. 
3.1ft Moyer, Seattle, 12-4, -750. 4.12; Dicfcsaa 
Anaheim 1J-4 -731 3.8ft fiorfte. Minnesota 
16-ft .727, 3L2ft Erickson, BaUmore. 13-5. 
322. 152; D. Weds. New York. 13- 5. 322. 
334. 

STRIKEOUTS— ‘RaJotason, Seattle, 243; 
COne New Y0ffc 207; Ctanenfc Toronto 20ft 
Mussina. Bathroom 15ft C Finley. Anaheim. 
14ft Appier, Kansas City, 145.- Fassem 
Seattle. 135. 

SAVES— M. Rtvera. New York, 3ft 
RaMpen. Sattnom 34 R. Hernandez; 
Oncnga 27; Wenetand. Texas. 25. Tajones. 
DetraR. ZX DoJones. MRwaukee, 2ft Taylor, 
Oatdand?!. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Axg. 
LWaflujrCol 114 427 106 164 384 

GwymSD 110 439 68 168 383 

Piazza LA 110 395 70 140 354 

Lofton Afl 82 343 42 117 341 

Joyner SD 97 340 48 IIS 338 

MaGraceChC 109 397 57 129 325 

Lanldord SIL 90 325 42 105 323 

GatanagaftX "3 441 84 141 320 

AJfenzaNYM IM 354 54 113 J 16 

Blausar Ah 115 395 69 125 316 

RUNS— L. Walker. Cotorodo. 10ft Stggio. 
Houston, 103j Gdknoga Colorado. 8& 
Bands, Son Francisco. B&i BdQwefl. Houston. 
81 E. cYbung, Cotorodo, 7ft Mwdeti. Las 


Angeles, 7ft 

RBI— Gatarraga Cotorodo, 10ft BagweiL 
Houston. 104; L Walker. Colorado. 97; Gwynn. 
San Diego. 9ft Ch 'ones. ABartta 94 Kent 
San Fnmdsea 91; Bichette, Cotorodo, 87. 

HITS— Gwyna Sen Diego, T6& {_ Walker. 
Colorado, 164,- Brggkv Houston 147; 
Gakmugn Colorado. 141; ChJane& Atlanta. 
14ft Piazza Los Angeles, 14ft MondesL Las 
Angeles. 138. 

DOUBLES— Grudzielanek. Montreal 4ft 
L Walker. Colorado, 35: Lonsmq, Montreal 
3* Morondhti PhflodcJpHa, 34 BonOa 
Florida 31- Gwynn. San Dfcga 3ft ChJones. 
Atbn)a3l. 

TRIPLES— DeSMdda St. Louis, lft W. 
Guerrero. Los Angeles, ft Womack, 
Pfttsbaigh ft Panda Pitlstwoti. ft 
DSandere. QndnnatL 7; Daulton, Florida, 7; 
Tucker, Atlanta, ft Ec Young. Colorado, ft 1_ 
Johnson Chicago, ft 

HOME RUNS— L. Wotter. Cotorodo, 3s.- 
Bogvrett Houston, 3Z Go farrago, Cotorodo 
30: CezsMa Colorado 2ft Bonds. San 
Fitmdsca 2&- Mondesi Los Angeles. 25; 
P ram. Los Angctea 25; Hundley, New York. 
2ft Sou, Chicago. 25. 

STOLEN BASES— O. Sanders. Clndnnaft. 
55; Womack. Pittsburgh. 44- D. eShMds. SI. 
Louis. 38; EcYoung, Cotorodo 32; Henderson. 
San Diego 29; McCrackea Cotorodo 2ft O. 
Vera San Diega2&L Walker, Colorado 2ft 
Dunstoo Chicago 25. 

PITCHING 03 Decisions) — Mangle, 
AHarda 16-ft 389. 238: KNe. Houston. 16-1 
34ft 231; GMaddux. AParda 15-1 .831 231; 
Ezra San Ftoncisos 14-4 .778, 331; P. 
JMartlnez, Monheal 14-5 J37. 13ft J. 
HnmMoa Son Diego 10-4 .714. 4.1ft 
Gardner. San Frandsca 12-5. .706, 330. 

STRIKEOUTS— SchWng, PtrHadelphta. 
23ft P. JMcrtVwft MortreoL 307; Noma Los 
Angetoo 17ft- K. JBrowa Fiorkto. 164- Smoltz. 
Atlanta 161 AIBenes. ST. Loote 16a K0a 
Houston, 158. 

SAVES— Beck, San Fnmasca 3 3; Non. 
Ftorida 2ft JaFnotco. New Yort, 2ft 


Hoffman. San Dioga 2ft WoNera Atlanta. 28; Alania VtodOiavkaz ft D. Dnlpropetravsfc T 
ToWorreH. Las Angeles. 27; , Edm1ey. SL HIT Ganca 3. Club Bruges 5 


Japanese Leagues 



w 

L 

T 

Pd. 

GB 

Yakulf 

56 

37 

1 

302 

_ 

Yokohama 

48 

42 



333 

63 

Hiroshima 

45 

46 



395 

103 

Omni chi 

46 

50 



47V 

1)3 

Honshln 

43 

49 

1 

367 

123 

Yomiurl 

40 

54 

— 

.426 

163 

ManCUAOUf 




w 

L 

T 

Pd. 

GB 

Orta 

49 

36 

3 

376 


Settxi 

49 

41 

7 

344 

23 

Da lei 

47 

47 


300 

63 

Nippon Ham 

45 

50 

1 

374 

9.0 

Lane 

41 

46 

2 

371 

9-0 

Kintetsu 

41 

57 

7 

341 

123 


lUUDAT'l XUUlTt 

CENTRAL LEAGUE 
Honshln 11. YokuT4 
Yokohaina 5. ntuntcM A 
Yomhiri ft Hiroshima 0 

PACIFIC LEAGUE 
Kintetsu ft Orb 4 
Scibu 5. Date! 7 
Nippon Ham ft Lofted. 


HFL Pbeseasow 

Pittsburgh 4ft Philadelphia 26. 


UBMCUt* 

accow PftELIMNAAT ROUND. HRST-LEO 
Jablonec I. Orebro I 
Oirorna Minsk a LIBestrom ? 


Rotor Voigogrod ft Odra Wodztoiaw 0 
Trabzonspor I, Dundee United 0 
PACK ft Spartak Tmava 3 

mzimw pifMwt miwz 

Arsenal ft Coven by 0 


TUESDAV. IN COLOMBO 

Sri Lanka: 332 and 415-7 
India: 375 and 494) 


MCnOHM. LEAGUE 

ATLANTA —Put INF Kettfl LtKkhttT OH 15- 
day dbabted lisL retroactive to Aug. 6. Re- 
called INF Ed Giovurwta from Richtnond. il 

CINCINHati —Signed RHP Stan Befaida to 
2-yMrcontrocl extension. 

NEW TOOK -Tiadod RHP Mark Clark lo 
Chicago Cubs as part ol Aug. 8 hade. Ac- 
tivated INF Manny Alexander from 15 -day 
disabled M and designated him for assign- 
ment. 

SAN DIEM— Bought contract of RHP Paul 
Mention 

San kra uavro -Activated LHP Terry 
MUtooaond. Optioned OF Manrln Benara lo 
Phoenht PCLeague. 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 
SEATTLE -Signed F Aaron wnilatm lo 1- 
yeor itonbwf. 


KATKMAJ. FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

ATLANTA — Released P BiU Kushner ana 
CBDcretGner. 

CAMLiHA —Waived WR Maurice Slolgy 


° l ^{* l, *^Tf 7 Re,eos ® tf DB Jooeiyn Borgel- 
to. FB Darrell Medley and WR Geray Simon.' 

CREEK Say— W aived CB Cart Greenwood. 
INOWNAPOUS-Slgried OL Garirr 
PatwaLSiqned OT Torik Gterm to S-yenram*- 
troef. Signed FB Roosevelt Potts. 

“■ ^aGLAND-Put WR Michael Drittein 
on injured resenra 

r CB Jason Sehora FB 

c nones wuylo multiyeorczmtractftRefeased 
WR Aitimzo Browning. T Alan K&i6 LB Juan 

Ksrss.:' 

Stored retow. Put D£ CW. Estes on the 
rmwrvwmfttory i^t 

Lance Brown. LB* 

PB Ezra , 

Butler, DE Terry Grooms.' 

P K Don Mwestri- ' - > 

£=aKaaaas».^ 

ssssa’BfsasB.* 

HOCKEY 

National hockey irA m y 

SsS2Sr=B= 

lCW ,n,d C W*- ond D 

otto D MattioTotriund. amtroC *' 

couki 

*££ Poundotkm'e^ ' . 

*SSE3i 7 Jr JS» m « re; C> 

“O'-MWmSSL * S ?eor “ ,rtl ^««mugh . 











fefc££l 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, august 13, 1997 


Is Sanders 




% 


. '’T.r 




' 


.-'"S 

I; 

" 


■JB 




L ^3fl : 

■ r ?> am. ■ 

: 

'. i -*»d ■ 

■-Ta.fc. 

/'fiXi 

: ‘-W » 


: Ui 1 
~-'^i t 


;":S3E 

- 


its final game in September, even 
thongh his contract allows him to leave 
once the team is mathematically elim- 
inated. 

• In turn, Cincinnati has told Sanders he 
rim play in the Cowboys' four regular- 
season games that conflict with the base- 
tall schedule, Bowden said Monday. 

! Bowden said Sanders wanted to fin- 
ish the baseball season partly because he 
vfas chasing the National League and 
major-league stolen-base title, and be- 
cause Sanders feels this has been his 
best baseball season. 

Sanders has stolen 55 bases, 1 1 more 
than his closest rival in the National 
. League. Brian Hunter leads the Amer- 
ican League with 56 steals. 

The Cowboys open their season Aug. 
it 31 in Pittsburgh. The team's owner, 
[|f ferry Jones, has long said that Sanders 
would be there, even though the Reds 
play at Minnesota that day. 

* 'He’ll play in all the Cowboys games 
and he'll finish the season with us,*’ 
Bowden said. “Deion and I have talked 
about that, and he’s going to play both 
spores. ” Bowden declined to say wheth- 
er Sanders would be allowed extra days 
off to practice with the football team. 

Sanders’ two-sport career received a 
scare recently when he was diagnosed 
with a bulging disk in his back. The 
problem forced him to sit out Sunday's 
baseball game — but he returned Mon- 
day night and hit a home run on the 
game’s first pitch. 

■ L ‘i The Reds are 1 1 Vi games behind the 
. J Houston Astros in the NL Central di- 
-f. vision. 

■ The Steel Curtain lives Again 

jfc . Welcome back, Blitzburgh. 

T -'T Pittsburgh's reinvigorated defense 
accounted for three touchdowns in the 
Steelers' 42-26 exhibition victory over 

; ^ the Philadelphia Eagles on Monday 

I night. The Associated Press reported 
' from Pittsburgh. 

" !- • The Steelers losr defensive stars Rod 
.: .:| Woodson and Chad Brown among 10 

. ! departing players during a tumultuous 

• H*Ae' offseason., but the only devastation 
zr.y . t & Monday was experienced by a confused 
mi fc Eagles' offense that still hasn't settled 
’visb*' on a quarterback — or on a way to 
[ combat the Steelers' ever-varying 
blitzes. 

“We wanted to leave an impression 
•?.t on them,” said safely Dairen Perry, 
whose 29-yard return after interesting 
a pass from Ty Detroer Jed to Pitts- 
[• burgh’s second touchdown. “The 
-• •. coaches wanted us to put the pressure 
rj. on. I don't know if they knew where we 
were coming from at times, and that led 
to some bad decisions.'' ■ 

The Steelers forced three first-half 
turnovers that resulted in scores and 
pardally blocked two punts. 

They also sacked Rodney Peete.Det- 
.. * - Winer and Bobby Hoying five times. 


PAGE 19 


SPORTS 


T'S, *A Cowboy or 
lsCak A Red’He’U 
Tackle Both 


| ' The Associated Press 

I DALLAS — Bad back and all. Deion 
Sanders plans to be in a Dallas Cowboys 
uniform on Sundays and in a Cincinnati 
Reds uniform the other six days of the 
week until the end of the baseball sea- 
son. 

) The Dallas Morning News reported 
Tuesday that Sanders had told the Reds’ 
r'C. V . Agsneral manager, Jim Bowden, that he 
.I' : 'fc »• ^woold be with the baseball team through 

’ - final S,lTk> in 



Arms Control Fails 
In Professional Sports 


- Vuih-fr"' 

The Braves' Michael Tucker sliding home safely as the Marlins' catcher, Charles Johnson, reached for the throw. 

Braves Glad to Be Rid of the Marlins 


The Associated Press 

After he crossed the plate, Ryan 
Klesko didn't seem anxious to cross 
paths with the Florida Marlins anytime 
soon. 

“Hell, no,” Klesko replied when 
asked if he was upset that the Atlanta 
Braves and Florida bad played their 
final regular-season game of the year 
Monday night “We wanted to get them 
out of here with a win. Now, we don't 
have to see them again until the play- 
offs.” 

Klesko scored on Danny Bautista's 
bases-loaded sacrifice fly in the bottom 
of the ninth as the Braves defeated the 
Marlins, 2-1, in the finale of their foor- 
game NL East showdown series. 

The Marlins won 8 of 1 2 games from 
Adanta this year, but after the two teams 
split this series. Adanta was 5 Vi games 
ahead of the Marlins in the NL East The 
Marlins, however, are in position for a 
wild-card place in the playoffs, so this 


series may have served as a preview of 
October. Indeed, die reams generated 
playoff-intensity action with Four tight 
games. 

With the score tied 1-1 in the ninth, 
Felix Heredia walked Klesko, who was 
leading off. Mark Lemke then sacri- 

NL Roundup 

ficed. Javy Lopez was walked inten- 
tionally, and Jay Powell came on to 
pitch, prompdy walking Tony Graf- 
fanino to load the bases. Bautista flied to 
the right fielder, Gary Sheffield, whose 
throw to the plate was high. 

Greg Maddux allowed only five hits 
and one run in eight innings, but he 
didn’t figure in the decision. Mark 
Wohlers picked up the victory. 

Dodgers 2 , Cubs 1 Chan Ho Park, 
coming off the worst outing of his ca- 
reer, pitched a four-hitter for Los 
Angeles and his first complete game. 


Park (l 1-6 1 struck out seven and 
walked one in his 33d start. 

Expos 6, Padres 3 A Montreal rookie, 
Vladimir Guerrero, hit a towering two- 
run homer in the sixth inning to snap a 1 - 
1 lie at San Diego. 

Henry Rodriguez hit a three-run homer 
off Joey Hamilton MO-4), and David 
Segui hit a solo shot for the Expos. 

Reds 7, Giants 4 Kent Mercker 
pitched seven strong innings and Deion 
Sanders. Chris Stynes and Joe Oliver 
homered as Cincinnati won its third 
straight game at San Francisco. 

Astros a. Mots 3 Jeff Bagwell, whose 
support helped Pete Hamisch come 
back to baseball from a bout with de- 
pression. homered and doubled off bis 
friend as Houston won in New York. 

Hamisch (0-1) struggled in his 
second start since returning from the 
illness that had sidelined ~him since 
opening day. He allowed eight runs and 
10 hits in only AVs innings. 


5 Hits Nail Down a Yankee Left Fielder’s Job 


The Associated Press 

Chad Curtis made the New York 
manager’s decision easy. 

His status once in doubt with Tun 


Raines returning from a hamstring in- 
jury, Curtis sealed his spo 
kees* every-day. left fiel 


tastheYan- 
elder Monday 
night with a career-best five hits in ah 
1 1-0 victory at Minnesota. 

“That’s obviously whatlwant,” said 
Curtis, who has filled in for Bemie 
Williams and Raines since coming over 

AL Roundup 

from Cleveland in a June 9 trade. “I 
want to play every day and be part of a 
winning team.” 

Curtis is 10-for-16 in his last three 
games and has seven straight hits, in- 
cluding his first career grand slam Sun- 
day in the Yankees’ 9-6 victory over the 
Twins. He is hitting .318 with seven 
homers in 52 games with New York 
after hitring .206 in 22 games with die 
Indians. 


“He’s been an unbelievable pickup 
for us,” said Andy Petrine, who allowed 
five hits in eight innings. “The guy will 
run through a wall in the outfield for 
you. He’s been great. Nobody expected 
this .*’ 

Tino Martinez hit his major league- 
leading 38th homer, the most by a Yan- 
kees first baseman since Lou Gehrig hit 
49 in 1936. The three-run shot gave 
New York a 7-0 lead in the fourth. 

The Yankees, who had a season-high 
21 hits, moved within AVi games of first- 
place Baltimore in the AL East 

Mariners 11, Brewers 1 Jamie Moyer 
limited Milwaukee to three hits in seven 
innings and Jay Buhner drove in four 
runs as Seatde routed the visiting Brew- 
ers to move into a first-place tie with 
Anaheim in the American League 
West. 

Buhner's 27th homer, a three-run 
shot, capped a five-run sixth inning that 
gave Seattle an 11-1 lead. Dan Wilson 
went 3-for-5 with three runs batted in, 
Ken Griffey Jr. was 3-fbr-4 with two 


runs batted in, and Alex Rodriguez, who 
started the game in a 2-for-24 slump, 
went 2-for-5 with two runs batted in. 

Blue Jays 8, Tigers 2 Pat Hentgen 
pitched eight strong innings and Benito 
Santiago hit a grand slam as Toronto 
routed visiting Detroit. 

Hentgen f 13-7) allowed seven hits, 
struck our two and walked one in win- 
ning his fourth straight decision. The 
right-hander, who leads the American 
League with eight complete games, is 6- 
0 against the Tigers the past two sea- 
sons. 

Joe Carter and Carlos Delgado hit 
consecutive homers in the sixth, and 
Santiago hit the sixth grand slam of his 
career in the eighth. 

Rangers 8, Red Sox 3 BenjJ Gil hit a 
three-run homer for his first hit in Fen- 
way Park, then added two singles to lead 
Texas past Boston. 

Gil struck out in the first inning to 
drop to 0-for-21 lifetime in Boston and 
bad just three hits in his previous 17 
games before homering in die fourth. 


By Mike Freeman 

iVru York Times Service 


W HEN THE Dallas Cowboys’ 
coach. Barry Switzer, was 
found carrying a handgun in his 
luggage at an airpon'last week, a day after 
Allen Iverson, the Philadelphia 7 tiers’ 
guard, was found with a gun in Iris car, it 
underscored a problem that professional 
sports have been powerless to solve. 

“I admit it’s impossible to keep track 
of even' guy,” said Art Model), who 
owns the Baltimore Ravens of the Na- 
tional Football League. “We can’t go 
barreling through every piece of luggage 
and go through everyone’s locker. Some 
players are just going to have them, and 
there is very little we can do about it-“ 
Judging by the number of incidents 
involving guns and athletes, it seems 
that more players do have diem. 

The NFL is the only U.S. major sports 
league that has a specific and formal gun 
policy. Players, ream staff members and 
league employees are forbidden to pos- 
sess handguns while on league business. 

The Cowboys' owner, Jerry Jones, 
fined Switzer 575,000. The league said 
the punishment was sufficient and 
would impose no farther penalty. 

The National Basketball Association 
discusses the dangers of guns with rook- 
ies, said Bill Hunter, the executive di- 
rector of the NBA Players Association. 

The NBA had no comment on Iver- 
son. although Pat Croce, the owner of die 
76ers. and Larry Brown, the coach, were 
critical of Iverson and said players 
needed to accept the responsibility as 
role models in light of the millions of 
dollars they receive. 

The NFL rules may be strict, bur are 
they effective? Some players and agents 
say it is difficult to enforce the rules 
because teams have no easy way of 
finding out if players have guns. 

So players carry weapons into locker 
rooms or keep them in cars parked on 
ream property or take diem to nightclubs, 
often ignoring the rules because they 
know there is a good chance they will not 
get caught and they feel the need for 
protection is greater than die risk. 

“If a player is crazy enough ro try and 
sneak a gun through an airport and break 
all kinds of real laws that could land diem 
in prison.” said Kent Graham, the Ari- 
zona Cardinals quarterback, who said he 
does not own a gun, ‘ ‘then he's not going 
to be thinking about some NFL rule.” 

Michael Brooks, a linebacker who 
was with the New York Giants from 
1993-95, kept a registered small-caliber 
handgun in a duffel bag in his locker at 
Giants Stadium at various points; it is 
unclear where the gun was registered. 

Why did Brooks, who came to the 
Giants from the Denver Broncos as a 
free agent, keep a gun in his locker? 
According to teammates. Brooks said 
he was concerned about a hostile re- 
ception from veteran Giants players 
when he came to the team. 

Brooks never intended to shoot any- 
one, they said, but wanted ro be able to 
scare someone by showing the gun. 

Brooks, who is no longer in the NFL, 
could not be reached for comment 
In the 1995 season another defensive 
player — who is uo longer with the 
Giants — kept a gun in a bag in his locker. 
Once, be even showed it to a reporter 
outside the locker room after a game. 

“I cany a gun everywhere I can for 
protection,” the player said. 

Last season, an offensive player, no 
longer with the Giants, admitted he of- 
ten carried a gnu whenever he went out 
in public as a form of protection. 


“I have no knowledge of that,” said 
George Young, the Giants General Man- 
ager. “Once in a while we found out a 
guy had a gun. One guy who had a 
registered one really didn't know the law 
and that he had to register the gun in this 
stale. The few rimes a guy did have a gun, 
we handled things confidentially.” 

Last December, the Dallas police 
searched the home of Erik Williams, the 
Cowboys offensive tackle, because of a 
rape allegation against him that was 
later recanted. The police found a stash 
of weapons right out of an action movie. 
According to a police inventory, in Wil- 
liams's house was an Astra .44-caliber 
revolver with six live rounds, a Glock 
.40-caliber semiautomatic pistol with 
15- rounds of ammunition and a 
bolstered Bererta 9-millimeter semi- 
automatic pistol with 15 rounds. 

IHE NUMBER of players — from 
all sports — involved in gun- 
re laied incidents seems to be 
growing. 

The basketball player J.R. Reid was 
detained at the San Antonio Interna- 
tional Airport in 1995 after a gun was 
found in his cany-on luggage. Reid — 
like Switzer — told the police he had 
forgotten that the gun was in his bag. 

In 1993, Jeff Aim. a Houston Oiler, 
shot and killed himself after a friend 
who was in a car Aim was driving was 
killed in a drunken driving accident. 

When linebacker Broderick Thomas 
was arrested in 1995 for carrying a gun 
into an airport, he became the fourth 
Minnesota Vikings player in four years 
arrested for firearms possession. 

Stu Weinstein, the director of se- 
curity for the Miami Dolphins, said Bri- 
an Sochia. a former Dolphins defensive 
lineman, was such a gun fanatic that ' 'he 
made his own bullets.” 

At the other end of the spectrum is the 
National Hockey League, whose players 
do not share the infatuation with guns, 
perhaps because many of them are from 
Canada or Scandinavia where handguns 
are not a big pan of the culture. 

Why would a player risk suspension 
or an encounter with law enforcement 
officials? Players and others say there 
are two reasons for canying weapons. 

The first is cultural. Many players — 
and coaches — are from rough city 
neighborhoods or rural farm towns where 
guns were part of their upbringing. 

Bryan Cox. the Chicago Bears line- 
backer who said he owns seven guns, 
said, “Where I'm from in East Sl 
L ouis, a gun was like a credit card; you 
didn't leave home without it.” 

Wesley Walls, the Carolina Panthers 
tight end, says he grew up hunting in the 
woods of Mississippi and that shooting . 
a gun was part of everyday life. 

The second reason many players say 
they cany weapons is protection. In the 
NFL and the NBA, in particular, players 
are sometimes targets because of their 
size and status. People may pick a fight 
so they can brag that they punched 
Charles Barkley. 

* ‘Let’s face it,” said Drew Rosenhaus, 
an agent who represents about 60 ath- 
letes, including Brian Blades, the Seattle 
wide receiver, who in 1995 accidentally 
shot and killed his cousin, “athletes in 
many instances have reasons to own 
guns, perhaps many more reasons than 
the average person' Because they often 
have a lot of money and may be a target 
for robbery. They sometimes are the 
subject of jealousy or infatuation or nuis- 
ance more than the ordinary person. And 
in many instances a gun can be useful for 
self-defense and for protection.” 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




ITS COOL AWb LOLLING 
AND raSfBC T fr«SL£EP. 


IT ALMOST T IF'KW Dttft 


LETS ONE 

FCCSEr HE 
WAS A HEWS 

FURCCW roe 

A 0JNWWE.1 


uKEtruses 
PUEKW OF 
SDOMONTtt 
nook, Buss? 


*Td uke even ip you dtonT have any ttcuBif 



Unom imtbrMH, 
Htar«iitt(gmvfw 
tvttfeisyMML 



LCLUHG 


TTT 

in 

T+mtSSF" 


•TALNS 


TXT! 

lD 

NUPW0T 

L_ 

U- ILL 


L_ 

u U 

ID 


Admit; 



Jutto OCTET CWWL PUSH RHQHY 
■ pwikw* - viBL 


Recruitment 

Appears every Monday 
in The IntennarkeL 
To advertise contact Nina Niefc 
in our London office: 

Tel.: +44 171 4200325 
Fax: +44 1 714200338 
oryonr nearest IHT office 

or representative. 











PAGE 20 


JGVTEKIVATI01XAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1991 


OBSERVER 


But Who Needs It? 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — The oavy 
has paid $2.4 billion for a 
new submarine called Sea- 
wolf. It's a dilly. At that price, 
of course, it ought to be a 
dilly, but you don't always 
get your money's worth when 


the Pentagon does your shop- 
>1\ 


ping. Y ou^probably remem- 


ber the $600 toilet seat it 
bought for its airplanes. 

But that was in the Age of 
Reagan when we were strug- 
gling to save the world from 
communism. The Reagan 
strategy, we were told, was to 
lure the Russians into a spend- 
ing competition, then break 
their spirit by showing they 
couldn't hope to keep up. 

It’s band to imagine the 
shock that must .have run 
through the Kremlin when 
they heard we were challen- 
ging them to match a S60Q 
toilet seat 

You can almost hear some- 
body saying, “Ach, Com- 
rades, we had better knock 
down the Berlin Wall before 
they hit us with a S2.000 toi- 
let-paper dispenser." 

I know: Russians don't say 
“Ach." Germans do. At least 
they did when they realized 
that Errol Flynn had single- 
handedly whipped the Wehr- 
macht at Culver City. Those 
were the days, eh? 




Which raises the question 
of why, with the Nazis and the 
Red Russians behind us, we 
need a new submarine at $2.4 
billion. The answer is: Cuba. 

Until now its insolent 
Communist dictator, Fidel 
Castro, has been impregnable 
behind his mighty sugar cane 
and highly skilled baseball 
players. With Seawolf lurk- 
ing somewhere between 
Miami Beach and Havana, 


Castro will at last know what 
fear is. 

Imagine a full-scale attack 
by Seawolf armed not with 
nuclear missiles but with 
George Stcinbrenner, Peter 
Angelos and their fellow 
team owners. Fighting their 
way ashore and filling the 
ni gh t with mulrimillion-dol- 
lar contracts, by dawn they 
could leave Castro stripped of 
his best shortstops, pitchers 
and utility infielders. 

Hah! Let's see then if he 
doesn’t come crawling to us 
for season tickets in the good 
seats right behind third base! 

□ 

China. I hear somebody say 
“China." Yes, China is lull 
of Reds, all right Even more 
Reds than there used to be in 
Russia. Our Seawolf will en- 
courage them to toe the line, 
won’t it? Isn’t it well worth 
52.4 billion to have these 
Reds cringing before us? 

On to the National Endow- 
ment for the Arts. Whenever a 
magnificent weapon like the 
Seawolf appears somebody is 
always going to whine about 
how much we spend on war 
goods when there is no war. 

It's true that compared 
with the Seawolf s $2.4 bil- 
lion the budget request for the 
arts endowment is approxi- 
mately $1 .99. It’s true that the 
House of Representatives 
would like to give it nothing 
at all, then use the Seawolf to 
blow up Jane Alexander. 

The truth of the Seawolf 
matter seems to be that not 
even the Navy wants it. It’s 
Congress that wants it because 
it makes jobs. The old name 
for this was “boondoggle." 

Why not sell a few in the 
private sector? According to 
Forbes magazine. Bill Gates 
could buy 10 and still have 
SI 2 billion Jeff over. 

New York Times Service 


Stallone, at 50, Forges a Kinder, Gentler Image 


By Trip Gabriel 

Sen- Y</rk Times Service 




M IAMI — Like almost all movie stars, 
Sylvester Stallone has an identity that 


is cemented in the public mind — in his 
case, a hero of rippling physique who can re- 
pulse light rocket attacks before breakfast. 

Fans generally don’t want their heroes, 
fantasy lovers or favorite cut-ups to meta- 
morphose into different types, and most 
stars don’t have the versatility to pull it off 
anyway. But whar happens when a star's 
tried-and-true persona starts to fail? 

In recent years, Stallone has turned out a 
string of action movies — “The Special- 
ist,” “Assassins," “Judge Dredd and 
“Daylight" — that died at the box office 
and, more gravely, failed to stir viewers' 
passions. Very few moviegoers talked up 
these films the day after — if, indeed, they 
remembered them at alt. 

“I. always thought he was a terrific actor 
who's made some bad choices," said Har- 
vey Weinstein, co-chairman of Miramax 
Films, the company known for actor-driven 
dramas like “The English Patient." 


Now, Miramax is producing the movie 
iwillgive' 


that Stallone hopes will give him a new lease 
on life, “Cop Land,” a modestly budgeted 
police drama. In it, he is cast against type and 
supported by such actors-with-a-capital-A 
as Robert De Niro and Harvey Keitel. 

Stallone, speaking one day recently in his 
grand home here, described “Cop Land," 
for which he gave up his usual $20 million 
fee and' agreed to work for scale, as “a 
cleansing and a purging, and a reawakening 
of my interest in making movies." 

He is hoping for a trip to the independent- 
film well that proved so rejuvenating for 
Bruce Willis ana John Travolta, who starred 
in Quentin Tarantino’s ‘ ‘Pulp Fiction,*' also 
a Miramax production. 

Instead of portraying a one-man avenging 
army, Stallone, 50, plays Freddy Heflin, the 
meek, hearing-impaired sheriff of Garrison, 
a small town in New Jersey. Garrison is 
populated by commuting New York City 
police officers, whom Heflin idolizes until 
he learns that they are corrupt; then he must 
chose between protecting the bullying cops 
and enforcing the law. 

As a sign of his willingness to break with 
the past. Stallone even laid off pumping iron — the method 
he had used for years to hone his hypermasculine Image — 
and packed on 39 pounds (18 kilograms). 

"Sly when he’s lean has such a heroic visage, and I didn't 



American face. I. knew when ! went back 
and looked at ‘Rocky.* T was looking at a 
real face that embodied and felt like it came 
from the world” 

“Rocky” seems a kind of touchstone to 
all involved with “Cop Land,” not because 
of any plot similarities but because of Stal- 
lone's soulful portrayal of a bull-necked 
underdog in the 1 976 classic, which won the 
Oscar for best picture. 

The director of "Cop Land, " and the star 
himself, aime d for a quiet, understated per- 
formance meant to recall the struggling out- 
sider of 20 years ago rather than the tri- 
umphant Stallone of the “Rambo” and 
“Cobra” period in the 1980s. 

"Cop Land” is not the first film in which 
Stallone has tried to revise his image and 


broaden his range! but he is hoping it will be 
jccessfiil 


more successmt chan earlier stabs. In 1984 
he sang country tunes with Dolly Parton in 
“Rhinestone,” and not even the most die- 
hard fans of the Grand Ole Opry asked for 
"Rhinestone n.” In 1991 he tried comedy 
in "Stop! Or My Mom Will Shoot,” a film 
he later called "horrible on every level.” 

After each failed venture imo a new 
genre, he quickly returned to action roles. In 
the '90s, however, even those movies have 
been largely disappointments. His latest, 
— " jht,” a conventional disaster epic set 
ic tunnel, cost $90 million but didn’t 






Mr 


ma 


come close to earning that much back when 
it was released in December. (Some of the 
loss was made up in foreign markets, where 
Stallone as he-man is still popular.) 

American audiences have wearied of ac- 
tion heroes whose prowess is based on their 
physique, said Alan Marshall, a producer of 
“Cliffhanger," the 1993 movie that is Stal- 
lone’s one successful action role in recent 
years. In their place have risen heroes played . 
by the likes of Travolta, Nicolas Cage and ’ 
Tommy Lee Jones, who rely on quirky ■ 
characterizations rather than blunt force. 

“I hate to use the word intelligence, bat 
there is. I think, a move toward people who ; 
have more than a few lines to deliver each 
time.” Marshall said. 

Still. Stallone's commitment to a new 


tv. 





llisiiru 

Sylvester Stallone, who put on 39 pounds to play a sheriff in "Cop Land. - * 


image goes only so far. He quickly shed the * 
pLand” 


want that,” said James Mangold, 33, the writer and director 
of "Cop Land." 

“I wanted to shoot a close-up of his face and feel Lays 
potato chips, feel McDonald's. I wanted to feel a normal 


weight he gained for “Cop Land” and has ' 
resumed working out three days a week in 
his two home gyms. 

Nor does he intend to abandon action roles for good. His 
most serious future project seems to be — of all things — 
"Rambo 4.” in which he will battle right-wing militias in a 
story inspired by the Oklahoma City bombing. 




POSTCARD 

PEOPLE 




Gone but Still Provocative 


By William Drozdiak 

Wusiiinfion Post Sen ice 


g ERLCN — When Marlene Dietrich was 


laid to rest five years ago near a clump of 
' Sn 


birch trees in Berlin's Siubenrauchstrasse 
cemetery, there was good reason to believe 
that she would finally escape the dutches of 
controversy that dogged her for much of an 
eventful life that spanned nine decades. 

The blond film diva was extoLIed around 
the world for her smoky voice, sultry sen- 
suality and fervent political opposition to the 
Nazis. But her image at home was much more 
murky because Germans could never resolve 
a fierce debate over whether their greatest 
movie actress was a traitor or a patriot 

During a concert tour of her native land in 
I960. Dietrich was subjected to bomb threats 
and hostile editorials excoriating her support 
for the Allied cause during World War IL 
Angry with her reception, Dietrich severed all 
ties to Germany and lived as a recluse in Paris. 
But after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, 
she had a change of heart and told relatives she 
wanted to be buried near her mother here. 

When Dietrich’s corpse was flown home 
three years later, she was given a funeral 
worthy of a state heroine. Her grave became a 
popular gathering site and it seemed her re- 
conciliation with a reunited and democratic 
Germany would finally be complete. 

Bur ancient animosities have flared up 
again. Several neighborhoods in Berlin have 
become embroiled in a squabble over how to 
commemorate Dieuich. who went to Hol- 
lywood in 1930, became an American citizen 



Dietrich performing in Berlin in 1960. 


and shocked many compatriots by entertain- 
R the 


ing U.S. troops during tne war. 

First came a proposal by the council of the 
Schoeueberg district, where Dietrich was 
bom and buried, to change the name of a street 
or square in her honor. But when a council 
member, Hanns Leske, suggested renaming 
Kaiser Wilhelm Square because it is located 
near the house where she was bora, the choice 
resurrected a lot of hostility. 

Residents besieged the council with angry 
letters and phone calls. They complained it 
was shameful to dispatch the old kaiser into 
oblivion for the sake of a woman who not only 
jilted her homeland but happily cavorted in 
front of enemy troops. Dietnch performed in 
more than 500 shows for American troops 
overseas, and later described it as having been 


“the only important thing that I've done.” 

As the debate dragged on. the neighboring 
Tierganen district announced it was launch- 
ing its own plan to name a square after Diet- 
rich near historic Potsdamer Platz, the once 
and future heart of what will again be the 
German capital. 

Now a third proposal to honor Dietrich has 
entered the race. The Berlin film producer 
Artur Brauner and another famous fimigrfi, the 
Vienna-born director Billy Wilder, are so- 
liciting support from elite members of the 
German ana American film industries to build 
a Dietrich memorial across the street from the 
planned U.S. Embassy, which will be erected 
soon near the Brandenburg Gate. 

“She helped to end the war and did a lot for 
Germany, so I think she really deserves to 
have a place in Berlin where people can 
remember her for whar she did and what she 
stood for," Brauner said. "It’s a mark of 
respect for a wonderful actress and a German 
who remained morally impeccable through- 
out the Third Reich. ' ’ 


T WO .Americans — the choreo- 
grapher Mark Morris 'and the 
fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi — 
combined to provide the Royal Opera 
Covent Garden with a sensational 
comeback at the Edinburgh interna- 
tional festival. Monis, 40, the * ‘enfant 
terrible*’ of dance, bought his talent 
for fun and extravagance to an 18th- 
cenrury French opera-baliei and- 
turned it into a riot of color that is 
likely to prove the hit of the three- 
week festival With Mizrahi 35, 
designing the costumes for Jean- 
jphiuppe Rameau's "Platee,” the 
pair transformed the stage into a giant 
glass terrarium populated by dancing 
frogs, exotic birds, copulating terra- 
pins and slithering snakes. Moms was 
making his debut as a director with the 
prestigious Royal Opera, which re- 
turned to the Edinburgh festival Mon- 
day for the fust time since 1961. 

* * Platee. ’ ’ an amalgam of song, dance 
and spectacle, was originally created 
for die French court at Versailles in 
1745. The story features a cast of 
Greek gods who play a trick on a 
spectacularly ugly amphibian who 
lives in a swamp. 

□ 

Three months after separating, 
Donald Trump and Marla Maples 
have begun divorce proceedings. 
They “look forward to a postmaritai 
amicable relationship in which they 
will continue to act as co-parents of 
their daughter, Tiffany," Trump said 
in a six-tine statement. But how am- 
icable will it be? In an attempt to 
increase the size of her divorce set- 
tlement, Maples has reportedly hired 
the lawyer who represented Tramp’s 
first wife, Ivana, when that marriage 
split up. Trump and Maples have a 



Iran’s Culmre Ministry has barred 
filmmakers from letting their films be - 
screened abroad without permission -m 
after several Iranian movies were 7 
shown at the Jerusalem film festival 
the press reported Tuesday. Four 
award-winning films by the Iranian 
cinema pioneer Mohsen Makhmal- 
baf — "Gabbeh,” “A Moment of 
Innocence," “Time of Love" and 
“Salaam Cinema" — were shown 
Iasi month in Jerusalem. The ministry 
denounced the Israeli showing a s a _-f 
‘ ‘pernicious act aimed at attacking the ‘ 1 
image of the Islamic Republic." The 
filmmaker said the screening created 
cultural dialogue between nations. . - . 


□ 


Su-m R^naTV Prr" 

HAIL TO THE CHIEF SIBLING — Roger Clinton, the president's 
brother, singing with his band at the San Mateo Fair in California. 


prenuptial agreement that is said to 
limit ne 


ter settlement to about $2.5 mil- 
lion. Trump is worth an estimated 
52.5 billion. His lawyers said they had 
taken the case to court because 
Maples did not want to play by the 
prenuptial rules. Tramp, 50. and 
Maples, 31, were married in 1993. 

□ 

The actor Christian Slater was ar- 
rested after he allegedly bit a man in the 
stomach and then scuffle 


as a rowdy Los Angeles party turned 
into a brawl. Slater. 27. was booked for 
assault with a deadly weapon and bat- 
tery, the police said. A local television 
station reported that Slater allegedly 
was abusrve to his girlfriend as the 
party was ending and assaulted a third 
person who stepped in to help. Slater 
was examined at a hospital before he 
was taken to jail, a- police detective 
said, adding. “He ‘s in fine condition. ” 
Slater, whose film credits include 
“Broken Arrow,” "Interview With a 
Vampire," “Untamed Heart.” and 
“Murder in the First,” was arrested 
three years ago at a New York airport 
for carrying a pistol in his luggage. He 
spent 10 days in jail. 


Wednesday. No bail was set. he was 
freed Thursday and a federal mag- 
istrate ordered him to stop trying to 
contact Chelsea. The magistrate set a 
court date in Washington for Monday. 
Zelenkov’s27th birthday. But the day 
he was freed, Zelenkov was arrested 
for driving with a suspended license 
and jailed m New Jersey on S500 bail. 
He was still there when his court date 
came up. a courr spokeswoman said. 


□ 


□ 


led with officers 


A man accused of trying to contact 
Chelsea Clinton and storing an un- 
licensed semiautomatic weapon and 
ammunition near the White House 
missed his court date — because he 
was already in jail on a separate 
charge. Vladimir Zelenkov was ar- 
rested on the weapons charge last 


At least 10,000 people turned out in 
Lagos to pay tribute to the late Ni- 
gerian musician Fela Anikulapo- 
Kuti. "We will all miss you. Fela. we 
will all miss you, because you fought 
for social justice," said Bayo Mar- 
tins. one of Nigeria’s leading drum- 
mers. as he moved past the plain glass 
casket containing Fela’s body. Fela. 
an outspoken critic of his govern- 
ment, died of heart failure related to 
AIDS on Aug. 2 at the age of 5S. He 
was due to be buried in the working- 
class Ikeja district of Lagos, where he 
had lived. 


Alexander Korzhakov, who spent 
a decade as Boris Yeltsin’s powerful; 
bodyguard before a bitter break-up a 
year ago, said Tuesday that his abbot . 
to be released memoirs painted the 
Russian president in his true colors 
and that he would go to court to prove 
it if necessary. Excerpts of the mem- 
oirs, published recently by the Sunday' 
Times of London, portray Yeltsin as 
"lurching through crises, glass irf 
hand." In one incident, xhe excerpts 
say, Yeltsin’s wife Naina roused?^ 
Korzhakov to tell him that Yeltsin W 
* ‘ has fallen and wet himself ’ and thar 
she feared he had had a heart attack. 
This was aboard an aircraft en route to 
Ireland, where Yeltsin failed to getoff 
the plane to greet Prime Minister- 
Albert Reynolds during a 1994 srop-; 
over. Korzhakov has said Yeltsin may 
have suffered a stroke; he implied 
Tuesday that it was brought on by 
alcohol. "He was ill on the plane, bur 
this illness was preceded by. 
something," Korzhakov told a 
packed Moscow news conference at 
which he held up the jacket of “Boris 
Yeltsin: From Dawn Till Dusk” but 
not the book itself. "I agree to prove 
everything in the courCai open ses- 
sions,” said Korzhakov, who holds ^ 
the rank of general in Russia’s se- 
curiry police. “I will bring there any- 
thing I want — tapes, computer disks 
— eveiything I have got left from my 
previous life." The Kremlin dis- 
misses Korzhakov’s remarks as those 
of an embittered ex-employee, not 
worth paying attention to. 



Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling home or to other countries really easy. 
Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country you're 
calling from and you’ll get the clearest connections 
home. And be sure to charge your calls on your AT&T 
Calling Card. It'll help you avoid outrageous phone 
charges on your hotel bill and save you beaucoup de francs 
(up to 60%*). Check the list for AT&T Access Numbers. 


AT&T Access Numbers 


K 2 S ?55 & 


nn boo bW uti irtfF 

raori* 


Steps 10 follow for «tsj 
calling worldwide: 


l.juM di.il ihe AT&T Aece* Numlvr 
lor iIk uvunrn '.ou an? cnlllnc fee 11 


2 Dial ihe phone nunfer wi'iv c-illiug 
y I Uul lilt cjllmfi c.inf rainlvr Itstal 


, in at uiuriunh.' 


EUROPE 

Austria*?. 

022-903 -Oil 

BslBlam* 

0-800-100-10 

Francs .... 

0-a 08-99-0011 

Germany 

. 0130-0010 

Greece* . 

DO-BOQ-1311 

Ireland^ . 

1-800-500-000 

Itatf* . 

172*1011 

Netherlands* 

JM1Q-022-9111 

Russia *a(Moicw)» . 

. . .755-5042 

Spain 

900*99*80-11 

Sweden 

Q2D-7SS-G11 

Switzerland* 

.0880-89*8811 

United Kingdom* . . . 

..0500*89-0011 


0800-89-0811 

MIDDLE EAST 

£gypt*(Calra)' 

510-0200 

Israel . . 

177-100-2727 

Saudi Arabia* 

... 1-800-10 

AFRICA 

Ghana . 

0191 

South Africa 

9-8B049-D123 


Southeast W;? 


atariaS..-.* 
comr. z jj • 
©doth 
opbilii-. 

. M6r._ 

fctlfil v..; ; 
©tod!-:-..- . 

BBIEv.j*--.'. 

“Mire:. V.. 

-■ - 






Sihcu.r: 

^ k- .:: • 


Jkcanir:.;; 

A : • 

f *C-- 

i&v ■ 


Can finiJ dtt 'umtxr for droiaamp ion re cdbna (mm: yusrwkjai-uperjiurfiv 

AT&T Dlrecl" Serna-, or tuu uur Web *kr IL http :/, i »»Ti.ait .corartrai e ler 


in the springtime. 


•'■I' L-ir-Kin .c.ipCTiCi.'Urr- *’l!ti pn-in)* ointurwi maH I ^ <an»r\.-- eitil ' • * ■* ■‘Vbm l- '*■! n.-i -*■ w, Vurffji't tard tiVf'fafi.'diUTohi.'l-iflfllbh-flK t > mV-imhi l’Wi Ural -anRC nnrh:1iisM<*lir»rJe(^iJtO(:iii»«i - «.rN|Jiirp J. httv •< 
. 1.1. w- dnir-lf* ■“'W ii.lilv- ( *HP !*<! vhich ’«u « wllnu fr-M-Whl lamsi „vu ir t- ^ J-i.-,--. ; ,-S. : ■ -id. r *rjnt.- .t-OBt-irn -ik>Cini>Ki>d joiii..ii>-l\t[ibi>.^»ilin-^lcW;) l A 4 ,j., l il w <i n ii,!p ....1.1,1 ,^|l- 

tv; iiHj.-.i.iijll sr I Him al! vim- n VrJar — t • FoMt plw>*- o <n •>; ; V .V ^ J-.; — .*J.-I : r ... .r. ruinr* jraiijSilr. Infill*. I i«jI ci.np-r7TT*rti Jimiu' <!* <_dl » iiUramjl dur,.— . ,n<l. ta*«k Mwu nrJ.MiMJt 

1 ijn, Cl « !'k A >r-..iiimnvri-i*. In-Lutl I Ntrji C l-l ; M]qTM.\'.- :W0'- i l-i-'l'.f 








Vii