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INTERNATIONAL 




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The World’s Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




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London, Thursday, August 14, 1997 


2 Different Destinies Carved From Subcontinent 


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India and Pakistan 
Mark Independence 

By Kenneth J. Cooper 

Wl«Aiflgron Posr Service 

NEW DELHI — The two countries 

■ were cut from the same Asian snb- 

■ continent, clumsily freed by a European 
1 colonial power at the same tumultuous 

■ moment a half-century ago. Bat the 

■ political course of each country since 
then could hardly be more different. 

The much bigger and diverse one, 
India, has evolved into the world’s 
iargesr democracy and one of the few 

■ developing nations to sustain a mul- 
tiparty democracy ever since indepen- 
dence. A teeming India that sprawls 

■ from the snowy Himalayas to the 
steamy tropics has held 11 national 

■ elections and kept together a huge pop- 
ulation, now 950 million, despite mul- 
tiple divisions based on religion, caste, 
ethnicity and language. 

The smaller, more homogenous 
country bom of the bloody partition of 

■ British India, Pakistan, has been dom- 
inated almost from the beginning by a 
military that ruled directly for half the 
nation 's history and retained control be- 
hind the scenes at other times. It took 23 
years for Pakistan to hold its first na- 
tional election; when it did, the country 
broke apart Religion was not enough to 
keep the predominantly Muslim repub- 
lic united, and East Pakistan went ixs 

' own way as Bangladesh. 

What accounts for such a big dif- 
ference between the politics of India 
and Pakistan, two neighbors who share 
similar cultures and ethnic heritages as 
well as the same history, dating back 
thousands of years? 

It is a question being asked anew as 
. both countries prepare this week to 
look back to 1947 and celebrate the 
50th anniversary of their indepen- 
. dence, which launched the nationalist 
movements that ended the European 
colonial era in Asia and Africa. 

The best answers lie even beyond a 
cataclysmic partition, in which hun- 
dreds of thousands . of Hindus and 
Muslims were left dead along dirt 
roads and inside packed trains while 



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Mo u fTht AaudJcd Pttv 


A city worker polishing a statue of Gandhi in New Delhi on Wednes- 
day as the capital prepared to celebrate 50 years of independence. 


tens of thousands of women were ab- 
ducted and raped in a spasm of com- 
munal violence. 

India’s founders had more clearly 
conceived the nation they proposed to 
build, a secular democracy with a so- 
cial conscience, than their Pakistani 


counterparts had, and were berter or- 
ganized to accomplish their goal when 
independence arrived on Aug. 14 for 
Pakistan and Aug. 15 for India. 

“We did not sit down after inde- 
pendence io decide what kind of nation 
India would be,” Prime Minister I.K. 


Gujral said recently. “It happened 
much earlier." 

Because Hindus make up the vast 
majority of the subcontinent’s pop- 
ulation, plans by the region's Muslims 
io create a haven from Hindu dom- 
ination took shape long before inde- 
pendence. But they were so vague that 
Pakistan’s founders spent years de- 
bating whether their country would be 
a secular democracy or an Islamic re- 
public. They were also ill prepared to 
create a nation from scratch, partic- 
ularly one comprising two wings 1 ,000 
miles (1,600 kilometers) apart, hostile 
India in between. 

Kudsia Rasul, who was a member of 
the elected assembly that wrote India’s 

Reflections on the Subcontinent's 

half-century. Opinion, Page 8. 

constitution of 1950, recalled a con- 
versation she had in the early 1 940s with 
Mohammed Ali Jinn ah. leader of the 
Muslim League and Pakistan's eventual 
founding lather. Jinn ah persuaded her to 
abandon the Indian National Congress 
temporarily and join the Muslim 
League, which had called for a separate 
Muslim state that she did not support. 

“How will Pakistan be viable fi- 
nancially and otherwise?" Miss Rasul, 
88, remembered asking Jinnah. “He 
said that could be worked out later on. 
He himself was not very sure." 

Jinnah died of tuberculosis about a 
year after independence, and 
Pakistanis have often cited his un- 
timely death to explain what went 
wrong with their country. There is a 
problem with that explanation, though: 
Mohandas K. Gandhi, India’s found- 
ing father, was killed eight months 
before Jinnah died, but the assassi- 
nation did not stop what became the 
dominant Congress Party from car- 
rying out Gandhi's dream. 

With its enduring democracy, India 
stands in contrast not just to its neigh- 
bor but to nearly all former colonies in 
Asia and Africa. But with its diversity, 
which has prompted some foreign ob- 
servers to label India the most socially 
complex country in the world, have 

See ANNIVERSARY, Page 4 


Southeast Asia Collects a Hodgepodge of Arms 




mm 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Thailand recently took delivery of 
an aircraft carrier built in Spain, becoming the first 
country in Southeast Asia to operate such a warship 
and only the second in Asia, after India, to have this 
capability. 

Indonesia announced that it will buy 12 advanced 
Sukhoi Su-30 K long-range fighters from Russia and 
an undisclosed number of second-hand U-206 sub- 
marines, probably five or six, from Germany. 

In March, Malaysia will take delivery of the first of 
I two missile-armed Lekiu-class frigates from Britain, 


which military analysts say will be the most sophis- 
ticated and potent warships in the Southeast Asia. 

Singapore, meanwhile, is working with Swedish 
designers to build eight 1,000-ton missile corvettes 
that will be the region’s first “stealth" vessels able to 
avoid or minimize detection by radar, according to 
-analysts. 

These acquisitions are part of a military mod- 
ernization program in Southeast Asia that is costing 
many billions of dollars. It is intended to give the 
region greater military clout as the U.S. security 
presence becomes relatively weaker and the power of 
China increases. 

But Western military experts say that much of the 


See ARMS, Page 6 


Allies Tighten Squeeze on Karadzic 

U.S. and NATO Backers Determined to Strip Serb of His Role in Bosnia 


By Edward Cody 

Washington Post Service 

PALE, Bosnia — Moving on several 
fronts, the United States and its allies in 
■ Bosnia have tightened the squeeze on 
Radovan Karadzic, seeking with new 
determination to push the defiant Bos- 

. Ui nian Serb off the political stage. 

|f . _ The campaign has relied on a mix of 
- ’’ . political, diplomatic and military mea- 
• 1 - sores — along with the threat of arrest. 

- All are aimed at eliminating the 
former {Resident of the Bosnian Serbs as 
the decisive economic and political 
power here in the Serb Republic, the 
part of Bosnia set aside for Serbs. 

- Although indicted for war crimes and 

. out of die presidency for more than a 
year, Mr. Karadzic has remained the 
do minan t force behind the Serbs’ re- 
sistance to the Dayton peace accord that 
;* ended die country’s 1992-95 civil war. 
The escalation in pressure against 
him has been undertaken . as part of a 
push by die Clinton admimstrationto 
'■ solidify the shaky peace before the 1995 

‘f~ ■ deadline for withdrawal of the ©puu 
. U.S. troops in the NATO-led peace- 
~ keeping force in Bosnia. ■ 

■ Politically, the Vnited Slates and m- 
:■/. tematiooai organizations wonting in 
B osnia have openly and unabashedly 
thrown their weight behind Biljana 
. Plavsic, the Bosnian Serbs’ president, 

ET Newsstand Prices _ 1 

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fc Kuwai ....700 Fils 


based in Banja Luka, who is locked in a 
power struggle with Mr. Karadzic and 
his allies in the government based in 
Pale. . . 

U.S. and allied officials have ex- 
pressed hope that the more compliant 
Mrs. Plavsic can replace Mr. Karadzic 
as the Serb Republic's paramount leader 
if he is forced underground or arrested 
on die war crimes charges. 

Although herself a Serbian nation- 
alist — and the Bosnian Serbs’ vice 
president daring the war — Mrs. Plavsic 
repeatedly has pledged to U .S. and other 
foreign diplomas that she is ready to 
work within provisions- of the Dayton 
peace agreement, designed to restore at 
least a semblance of unity to the Bos- 
nian state and get its institutions work- 
ing again. 


Mrs. Plavsic, 66, a former biology 
professor, assumed office when Mr. 
Karadzic was forced to step down last 
year. 

She seemed then to be destined for a 
role as figurehead. But railing against 
black marketeering by Mr. Karadzic 
and Interior Minister Dragan Kijac, she 
unexpectedly dissolved the hard-line 
Bosnian Serbs’ Parliament and govern- 
ment July 3 and called for new elections, 
now scheduled for mid-October. 

Since then, Mrs. Plavsic has been 
expelled by Mr. Karadzic’s ruling Ser- 
bian Democratic Party. In reaction, she 
has vowed to form her own party to do 
battle against Mr. Karadzic and his fol- 
lowers in the October elections. 

See BOSNIA, Page 6 



AgatceFnar-Pnat 

Radovan Karadzic, the Bosnian 
Serb wanted on war crimes charges. 


No 35.599 


•■'V* V-r. 


Bundesbank Keeps 
Eye on the Mark 

Jailed Threat to Prop Currency 
Undercuts High-Flying Dollar 


money is being misspent on aircraft and ships that 
come in small numbers from too many different coun- 
tries, creating major maintenance and servicing prob- 
lems. 

“Unfortunately, except for Singapore, the billions 
of dollars spent by countries of ASEAN, the As- 
sociation of South East Asian Nations, to purchase 
sophisticated weaponry has not translated into com- 
petent military organizations,” said Major Dana 
Dillon, a specialist on the region in the U.S. Defense 
Department "This disorganized, inefficient and un- 
coordinated charge to acquire modem military equip- 


By John Schmid 

International Hera IJ Tribum- 

FRANKFURT — The Bundesbank 
gave a dear indication Wednesday that 
it was prepared to raise German interest 
rates to defend the value of the Deutsche 
mark and to keep inflation under con- 
trol. 

The dollar, which climbed to an 
eight-year high last week against the 
mark, cascaded lower through the day in 
the wake of the Bundesbank's implied 
threat, losing over three pfennigs at its 
lowest point. By the end of European 
dealings, it traded around 1.8350 DM. 
down from 1.8645 on Tuesday. 

“It cannot be overlooked that there 
has been a stronger rise in consumer 
prices in the last few months.” the Ger- 
man central bank wrote in its August 
monthly report. “The Bundesbank will 
orient its policy in such a way that price 
stability, which has been essentially 
achieved, can be maintained.” 

What this means is that “the Bundes- 
bank is preparing the ground for a re- 
versal in interest rates." signaling the 
end of five years of easy credit, said 
Gerhard Grebe, an economist in Frank- 
furt at Bank Julius Baer. On Tuesday, 
the Bundesbank chose to hold its key 
repurchase rate unchanged at 3 percent, 
a historic low, for a week. 

Putting the dollar under pressure was 
exactly what the Bundesbank hoped to 
achieve with its tough tone, economists 
said. With the strong sell-off of the 
dollar on Wednesday, the German au- 
thorities scored a rare success in re- 
gaining a degree of control over the 
currency with the sell-off . 

“The strategy was very successful,” 
said Eckhard Schulte, an economist in 
Frankfurt ai the Industrial Bank of Ja- 
pan. 

Still there remains a sizable gap be- 
tween European interest rates and those 
in America, and the higher U.S. rates 
buoy the dollar against the mark. Eco- 
nomic data released on Wednesday al- 
layed fears that the Federal Reserve 
Board would imminently push U.S. in- 
terest rates higher, but even without 
such a move, American overnight in- 
terest rates are about 5.5 percent, well 
above the German level. 

Observers said the Bundesbank's 
worries went beyond a shorr-term rise in 
consumer prices or fluctuations in the 
foreign-exchange market. The mark- an 
object of German national pride, could 
be subsumed into a soft euro if the 
Bundesbank fails to wring incipient in- 
flation out of Europe’s biggest econ- 
omy. 

For many Germans, already distrust- 
ful of the untested amalgamated cur- 
rency, a weak mark and creeping in- 
flation would confirm prejudices 
against the euro at the very start, econ- 
omists said. Inflation in July hit a 25- 
month high of 1 .9 percent, while import 
prices — which are sensitive to ex- 
change rates — rose to a six-year high in 
June. Such worries outweigh the export- 
boosting benefits to the German econ- 
omy that a weak mark offer. 

It is critical to act early, economists 
like Mr. Schulte said. Europe’s cur- 
rencies are due for jolts of volatility as 
key decisions are prepared early next 
year over which nations can join the 
new euro bloc. A weak marie at the 
outset of that transition could become 
even weaker if countries such as Italy 
and Spain were allowed to join a so- 
' called broad monetary union, he said. 

The mark’s decline over the past 
weeks has attracted unwelcome atten- 
tion in Germany. The weekly Die Zeit 
recently illustrated its front page with 
the mark as a moon in near-full eclipse. 
The magazine Stem went further, with a 
cover reminiscent of Salvador Dali that 
showed floppy euro coins melting over 
the sweating head of an exasperated 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl. 

See GERMANS, Page 6 


The Dollar 


New Ycrffc WjjnwJw S JPU previous cioSv 


115.655 

6.187 


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92202 926 53 


Confusion 
Abounds in 
U.S. Markets 

Good Inflation News 
Is Tempered by Wild 
Currency Gyrations 

By Erik Ipsen 

International HiralJ Tribune 

NEW YORK — Fresh signs of solid 
economic growth and lame inflation 
briefly sent U.S. bond and equity mar- 
kets higher Wednesday. But gyrations 
in the currency markets sent slock prices 
back into retreat. 

Fears that the statistics would reveal 
an inflationary spurt in economic ac- 
tivity were allayed when the govern- 
ment reported a gain of 0.6 perccrni in 
retail sales in July, in line with analysts' 
estimates. Producer-price inflation fell 
0.1 percent last month, the seventh 
monthly decline in a row. 

“The markets had been geared up for 
bad news on the inflation front, and 
instead they got just what the doctor 
ordered.” said David Ging, a bond- 
market strategist for Donaldson Lufkin 
& Jcnrene. 

By late morning in New York, 
though, that good news had been 
swamped by a rout in the value of the 
dollar — particularly against the 
Deutsche mark. At one point, the dollar 
had fallen nearly 3-7 pfennig, but by late 
in the day it had clawed back some 
ground to stand at 1 .8345 DM, a drop of 
2.8 pfennig, or 1.5 percent. 

“Last week's confidence in the dollar 
has just evaporated." said Paul 
Meggyesi. an economist at Deutsche 
Morgan Grenfell in London. 

He attributed the shift in sentiment to 
fresh rumblings Wednesday from Ger- 
many's central bank that it stood ready 
to rajse interest rates to defend its sag- 
ging currency. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
closed 32.52 points lower io 7,928.32. 
U.S. bond prices rose as the reports 

See ECONOMY, Page 12 

Jakarta Acts to Defend 
Its Tumbling Currency 

Indonesia’s central bank said 
Wednesday that it had intervened in the 
currency market after the rupiah fell 
against the dollar, and it pledged to 
continue to defend the currency. 

The intervention followed a failed 
attempt to haJl the rupiah’s slide with a 
one-point increase on most money-mar- 
ket interest rates. Page 1 1 . 


AGENDA 


Vying to Forge a World Criminal Court AJhright Sees p rogress i n Mideast Talks 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Times Ser-kv 

UNITED NATIONS. New York ~- 
For two weeks, through diplom^y s 
August doldrums, legal experts from 
scores of countries have been closeted m 
basement conference rooms here, work- 
ing hard on a blueprint for the world s 


There are wide differences of opinion 
on how crimes would be taken to the 

court, in particular whether a chief pros- 
ecutor would have the authority- to orig- 
inate cases. 

The Clinton administration backs the 
proposed court, which would be es- 
tablished by international treaty. But 
U.S. participation would require the 
consent of a Republican-controlled 


firstmternafronalCTTmmal Congress, where many international is- “The establishment of the 
The establishment o a peranan Sue s have been bogged down by the Yugoslavia tribunal and the tribunal for 

court to judge the most terno Senate Foreign Relations Committee. • Rwanda has shown that we can operate 

crimes — including . K .__ 11 c diplomats and legal experts on an international level.” said Gab- 

massacres that have „f®f^ frer . ntde _ aaree that chances that an international rielle Kirk McDonald, an American 

rot-ire the ethnic conincis 01 lc *- cul . , . unit amf>riii> frrrm a treatv irnfoe son/ino nn tho RnUrQns trihnnal in 


by all accounts the bloodiest, most war- 
ridden century in aU of history.” 

The absence of a court to deal with 
figures like Pol Pot, the Khmer Rouge 
leader whose reign of terror left more 
than a million Cambodians dead, has 
been widely noted. And the creation of 
tribunals to deal with war criminals in 
the Balkans and Rwanda has laid the 
groundwork for a more lasting forum. 

“The establishment of the 
Yugoslavia tribunal and the tribunal for 
Rwanda has shown that we can operate 
on an international level.” said Gab- 


terize the ethnic conflicts o " court will emerge from a treaty judge serving on the Balkans tribunal in 

cades — is a goal diat nas conference scheduled for next June in The Hague. She Is taking part in the 

United Naaons for half a cennuy^ Rome have improved discussions here. 

It is now within a y ea *f“ f -‘Three years ago, almost all major “We at the Yugoslavia tribunal 
reality, if the remaining trepmanons powers opposed iC* said William Pace, brought together 1 1 judges, all from 

some nations can be overcome. chairman of a coalition of human rights different systems in different countries, 

V" °J S ? C, ““2£ amflegS groups. “Now virtually aU and »= were able to toft rules of pro- 


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inc — . - T t,« and leeal groups. NOW vuiuojuj oh 

dable. Many countries jbtog MveimnenB have affirmed support. 

United States, are waiy ofa go^ ^ optimistic thai this could be the 

court with powers that crossbonaere. ^ h inJeniational organization es- 

TherC i? « l rh e °cS C vS^e on. Lblishid in this century, which has been 
what crimes me cuui« « 


discussions here. 

“We at the Yugoslavia tribunal 
brought together 11 judges, all from 
different systems in different countries, 
and we were able to draft rotes of pro- 
cedure and evidence that we believe met 
the needs of all of the systems,” said 


WASHINGTON (AFP) — The 
U.S. envoy to the Middle East, Dennis 
Ross, has achieved some progress in 
talks with Israel and the Palestinians 
on security. Secretary of State Ma- 
deleine Albright said Wednesday. 

But Mrs. Albright, who spoke by 
phone with Mr. Ross earlier, said she 
was awaiting concrete results from 
the discussions before deciding 
whether to make her first trip to the 

PAGE TWO 

Ex-Congressman Misses (he * Fun ’ 

THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

Clinton Praises Welfare Bill 

Books Page 10. 

Crossword.., Page JO. 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 18-19. 


See COURT, Page 6 


region later this month. ' ’ He has made 
headway in talks, ’ ’ Mrs. Albright said 
to reporters before a meeting with 
Foreign Minister Jose Miguel lnsulza 
of Chile. “I want to wail and see 
exactly what the talks bring in terms 
of developing a better climate in 
terms of security." she added. “I will 
make my decision based on what 7 
hear from those talks.” 

Related article, Page b. 

World Track Record 

ZURICH (API — Wilson Kip- 
kero-, a Kenyan running for Denmark, 
broke the oldest world record in track 
and field here Wednesday when he 
posted a time of one minute 41.24 
seconds in the men’s 800 meters. 

Kipketer broke the mark of 1:41 .73 
set by Sebastian Coe of Britain in 
1981. Kipketer had already equaled 
the record earlier this year. 





rwcRiVATTniw a t nrRAt n TRTRITNE. THURSDAY. AUGUST 14, 1997 



Vieiv From the Rockies / Absurdities find Glories 


An Ex- Congressman Misses the ‘Fun of Politics’ 


By Francis X. Clines 

Nen- York 7 imes Sen-ice 


M issoula. Montana 

— The sky arches 
here far more grandly 
than does the dome of 
the Capitol, and no one knows 
that better than Pat Williams, the 
Was hing ton politician come 
home. 

“I miss Congress every day,” 
said the voluntarily retired Demo- 
cratic representative, who drove 
back here through the snows of 
last winter after 18 years in the 
House. “Eveiy day I wake up, my 
eyes pop open, and I’m not in 
Congress. I miss my pals, the 
sense of accomplishment.” 

Then again, Mr. Williams has 
to laugh in his readjustment as he 
eyes a new spinning rod nestled in 
a comer of his office, wi thin cast- 
ing distance of the Clark Fork 
River that roars beyond the door- 
way. 

“I’ve learned an irony,” he 
said, “and that is you can miss 
something but be damned glad 
you're not doing it in the same 
breath.” 

For Mr. Williams, a 59-year- 
old lifelong political worker, 
there is more to going cold turkey 
outside the Beltway than working 
on his wrist flick at the riverbank 
that borders his line new perch as 
senior fellow at the University of 
Montana's Center for the Rocky 
Mountain West 
"I’m almost over what I call 
headline-jerk,” he said. “You 
know, you pick up the newspaper, 
see the headline and say, ‘Whoa, 
what am 1 going to say about 
that?' Two seconds later I realize 
I don't have to say a damned thing 
about that” 

The university has dispatched 
Mr. Williams, an amiable talker, 
into a dozen different issues and 
lecture halls. When journalism 
students asked the best way to 
interview politicians, he kept his 
reply as primal as the neighboring 
woodlands: “Keep watching 
their eyes.” 

Free now to rail at the absurdit- 
ies and hypocrisies of politics, 
Mr. Williams concedes all that 
plus “the seedy life” at the heart 
of a congressional incumbent's 
treadmill existence of eating and 
voting on the run and campaign- 
ing endlessly as a transcontinental 
"gypsy” bereft in airports and 
hotels. But he takes care to cite a 
few glories, too. even insisting 



Kurt MmsTIV IVh Yr*VTourx 


Pal Williams, who spent 18 years as a Democratic lawmaker \ savors life beyond 
the Beltway in Montana, but insists Congress is ki great for your mental health, ” 


that congressional incumbency is 
“great for your mental health.” 

“Really.” he said, bemused 
that, finally immune to voter con- 
troversy, he can claim to see vir- 
tue in Washington. Leaning back 
in his office, dressed as soft and 
tieless as a model in an L.L. Bean 
catalog, he explained: “It's good 
for your mental health because at 
the end of the day you've won or 
lost. In other words, you get to 
vote: you ' ve achieved something, 
reached an end point every day. 
And occasionally, you win.” 


T! 


HE FORMER lawmaker 
keeps this in mind as he 
works at his new aca- 
demic analyst's post in a 
pristine region that is paradox- 
ically facing some of the highest 
population-growth rates and 
political challenges in the nation. 

When he first went to Con- 
gress. Mr. Williams recalls, mem- 
bers seemed more respected. But 
later, anti-government attack pol- 
itics became the fashion, seizing 


the public's imagination right 
down to each night's final tele- 
vision jokes. “There was no in- 
ternal payoff anymore,” he said. 

Safely gone, Mr. Williams 
dares to extol working politi- 
cians. 

“Congress is filled with some 
of the best people I ever met.” he 
said. “It's difficult to be a good 
member of Congress; it requires 
craftsmanship.” 

On the other hand, out here he 
better senses how his former col- 
leagues cannot fathom the pub- 
lic's disgust on issues like cam- 
paign spending abuses. “My old 
friends tell me nothing's happen- 
ing back there on that, but I can 
see they’re missing a bigger 
point,” he said. “People aren't so 
much angry at the system as em- 
barrassed by it And that's worse, 
because people drop oul” 

He recalls the blind spots of 
incumbency. “Part of what you 
do when you’re back there is see 
to your self-preservation, and that 
muddles your thinking.” he ad- 


mitted. “Ifs inevitable that 
people come to Congress full of 
themselves, heading for a crash, ’ ' 
he said of the anti-Gingrich coup 
attempt, which made less of a 
splash here than one of the more 
splendid rainbow trout dancing 
post in the Clark Fork, where 
Lewis and Clark once explored. 

As a progressive western 
Democrat, Mr. Williams won 
some bills before his party lost the 
majority, notably the Family and 
Medical Leave Act and various 
aid measures for higher education 
and the arts. He lost his biggest 
“wilderness war,” in which he 
sought full congressional protec- 
tion of a 6,000-acre (2,430-hec- 
tarei swath of Montana. 

But he hopes he achieved 
enough safeguards in roundabout 
piecemeal measures, something 
he will be testing on site in his 
new job. He holds himself for- 
tunate to have retired from Wash- 
ington in time to face this region's 
challenge of protecting its beauty 
even as fresh settlers pour in. This 


is the academic specialty that he 
and bis colleagues share at the 
Center for the Rocky Mountain 
West 

Mr. Williams departed Wash- 
ington as deputy whip. He had 
found himself more “homesick” 
than fed up. He took with him an 
ominous impression that he prays 
will fade once he fully adjusts to a 
constituent’s perspective. 

“Tragically, the federal gov- 
ernment is less able to achieve 
great things and is less trusted in 
the doing of it,” he said. “That's 
painful, because I believe the gov- 
ernment has been a wonderful 
partner to the American 
people.” 


H: 


E IS already missing 
“the fun of politics — 
how you have to en- 
i tertain as a candidate as 
a part of your role.” He laughs 
gnmly at what he finds to be the 
ultimate entertainment in the pol- 
itics he left behind, of “con- 
demning the very government 
you run and arepart of.” 

“Criticism or the federal gov- 
ernment has begun to unravel the 
cord of trust between the Amer- 
ican people and their government 
at all levels.” he said, finding this 
particularly true at home now on 
the school-board leveL 

“I sense the unraveling more 
clearly from here,” he said. 

Yet, he is also sensing some 
mixed signs about it. 

“You can feel distrust in state 
and local government, too,” he 
said, “but people also tell me 
about two watershed events, tran- 
sitional American events, to my 
mind: the shutting down of gov- 
ernment during the budget fights 
a few years ago, and the Okla- 
homa City bombing.” 

People have been coming up to 
their former congressman to ask 
and complain about extremism. 

“History turns,” Mr. Williams 
said, “and people so want to be- 
lieve in elective government and 
the goodness of the system that — 
who knows? — Congress will 
have some second chances. ” 

Mr. Williams does not miss the 
artifice of Washington life, which 
he summarizes as the “double-knit 
haircut” sort of political culture. 

He can dismiss such burning 
Beltway questions as whether 
President Bill Clinton is moving 
to the right or the Republicans are 
movingro the left. He suspects the 
latter, but he can also go fishing. 


Burundi Interns 
Hutu in Camps 

Farmers Become the Victims 
Of Crackdown on Guerrillas 


1 



By James C. McKinley Jr. 

/Vrx York Times Sen-ice 

BURANIRO, Burundi — 
Like most people in this 
squalid patchwork of banana- 
leaf huts, Mary Rose 
Habyamberi lives in the grip 
of a double fear. She is afraid 
of the well-armed Tutsi sol- 
diers who patrol around the 
camp, keeping Hum families 
like hers under a tense 
watch. 

But she is also scared of the 
Hutu guerrillas in the hills. 


While Mr. Buyoya's com- 
manders maintain that the . 
camps were created to keep ’ 
farmers safe from attacks; 
few people who live in rhwn 
said they did so voluntarily. 
But anyone caught outside the 
camps at night is automat 
ically considered a rebel bj* 
the military. Although nonlp; 
of the camps has fences or 
guard towers, they are all well 
garrisoned with soldiers. « 1 
Buraniro is one of the . 

{ ) laces where people are afc 
owed to return to their farms 


Last fall, they raided the com- during the day. In others, the 
mune where she lived for sup- 'residents are asked to work 


plies, killing several people. 
In the mayhem of gunfire, she 
lost her 10-year-old son, 
Olivier. 

“They killed my child," 
she said. “He was fleeing and 
1 never saw him again.” 

Mrs. Habyamberi is one of 

13.000 Hum who have been 
forced off their lands by the 
Tutsi-dominated army and 
crowded into a camp around 
this trading post as part of 
President Pierre Buyoya’s 
policy to combat the Hutu 
guerrilla movement. 

Aid officials estimate that 
Burundi has at least 44 camps 
like this one, with about 

255.000 people living in 
them. 

For Mr. Buyoya, the mil- 
itary major who seized power 
in a bloodless coup a year ago, 
forcing Hum peasants into 
“regroupment” camps has 
been a successful military 
strategy, aid workers and dip- 
lomats said. 

It has robbed the guerrillas, 
known as the Front for the 
Defense of Democracy, of 
supply lines and hiding 


collectively on a single tract 
of land ala time, almost like a 
chain gang. In a few, the 
camp's inhabitants cannot 
leave at all, ostensibly be- 
cause of security problems.-- ‘ 
Marcel Nyabenda, a 50- 
year-old fattier of nine chil- 
dren, is typical of the res- 
idents at Buraniro. His farm is 
a two-hour walk away, andbf 
must be back in the camp by*6 
P.M. Even worse, the soldiers Jf 
did not allow him to go to his ^ 
farm in February, the hist 
planting time. “This time.f 
will not harvest, because f 
didn't cultivate,” he said. * 
Mr. Nyabenda said he does’ 
not dare return to his farm pea'j 
manently for fear of being mre+ 
taken as a rebel by the soldiers 
and shot. The cost to his farnflx 
has been high. Since January* 
when he and the others fronj 
his commune of Nyabiboyp 
were moved into the camp, hia 
brother, mother and fathci 
have died of typhus. ■ - 
Others, however; said tbjgJ 
were happy to have protection 


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from die guerrillas, whose tab 

__ rr _ rf tics have included filling" 

places, and has made it harder people accused of not support^ 
for them to recruit young men ing the rebellion. ‘ 'I like sta iy- * 
to their cause. ing here,” said 'AubBa $ 

‘ ‘We are obliged to regroup Ndayisenga, 20. “The rebejj}' 
people to protect them,” Mr. find us at our houses nnctdH ~ ~ 

tack us, so the soldiers askus 
to come here and protect ds?' 

From a human rights and 
humanitarian standpoint, fc®| .. 
pie into the camps js 


Buyoya, a Tutsi, said in an 
interview. “We have to put 
them somewhere where they 
can live together in security.” 
But for the people living in 


But for the people living in cing people into the camps-JS 
the camps, the internment has indefensible, diplomats ana 
been hard. Though some are UN officials said. But smog 


TRAVEL UPDATE Anti- Apartheid Painting Will Go Hoi 


Paris Lifts Warning on Pollution 

PARIS (AFP) — Paris authorities lifted a pollution alert 
Wednesday as winds helped to disperse a concentration of 
ozone over the city that had led to health warnings. 

A northwesterly wind significantly reduced levels of the 
gas one day after City Hall issued a Level 2 alert, just under the 
maximum, and urged city residents to leave their cars at home 
and use public transport. 

Level 2 pollution alerts were given Tuesday in Lyon and 
Strasbourg as well. 

Paris police bad lowered speed limits to try to curtain car 
emissions to avoid a pollution crisis and offered free parking 
in residential areas to get commuters to leave their cars there. 
Public health officials also urged the elderly, small children 
and people with respiratory problems to limit their physical 
activity during the alert 

Air France plans to improve its shuttle service by 
introducing new routes to Bordeaux and Strasbourg. (AFX) 

Torrential rain continued in Hong Kong on Wednesday, 
raising the threat of more flooding and landslides, with no 
letup in sight. (Reuters) 

The Japanese Association of Travel Agents said Wednes- 
day that it had lodged a protest with the U.S- government over 
plans to raise U.S. airport taxes. (AFP) 

Armed Man on Plane Is Charged 


By Donald McNeil Jr. 

New York Tunes Sen-ice 

JOHANNESBURG — 
Thirty-five years ago one 
Sunday morning, an uncon- 
ventional painting of the Cru- 
cifixion was hung in a little 
church near Cape Town. It 
created a furor. 

By Tcesday the artist had 
been arrested at his home. 
The police seized the painting 
and brought it before the 
Board of Censors. Calling it 
sacrilegious, the censors 


“banned” the work, making 
it illegal to display iL 

The censors were, perhaps 
deliberately, missing the 
point The painting. “Black 
Christ” was not a religious 
statement but an attack on 
apartheid. 

The artist Ronald Harris- 
on, depicted Chief Albert 
Luthuli, president of the out- 
lawed African National Con- 
gress who had been awarded 
tile Nobel Peace Prize in 
1960, as the crucified Christ 
flanked by two Roman sol- 


diers, one piercing his side 
with a spear. 

One soldier bore the face of 
Prime Minister Hendrik Ver- 
woerd. the architect of 
apartheid; the other was John 
Vorster, minister of justice. 

With the help of the Anglic- 
an Church and the Swedish 
and Dutch embassies, the pic- 
ture was rolled up in linoleum 
and smuggled to England on a 
cargo plane. It is not clear who 
now owns the painting. 

The Church of England 
plans to return it to South 


Africa, where it will probably 
be displayed later this year for 
the centenary of St. Luke’s, 
the church in Salt River where 
it was hanging when the po- 
lice came. Then it will be 
moved to St. George’s Ca- 
thedral in Cape Town. 

But the South African Na- 
tional Gallery, in Cape Town, 
may also express an interest 
in what has now become a 
work of historical impor- 
tance. 

As for Mr. Harrison, he says 
he doesn’t want a cent for iL 


now allowed to go back to 
their farms during daylight 
hours, many of them have 
missed a planting season. 

Those who have been able 
to plant can work their lands 
for only a few hours a day, 
crippling this year's harvest. 
Some said they are expecting 
less than half of their normal 
yield of yams, cassava and 
beans. 

The camp conditions are 
grim. Sanitation facilities and 
clean water are hard to find. 
People who were used to 
acres of land are living on top 
of one another. Disease is 
rampant: typhoid fever, dys- 
entery and malaria. 

And with the limited har- 
vests, malnutrition is begin- 
ning to take hold in some 
camps, aid workers said. 


Mr. Buyoya began moving 
more and more people iiflo 
the camps early this year, se- 
curity in the north and central 
regions of the country has im- 
proved markedly. The rebel- 
lion is now confined to the 
southern tip of the country, 
near Tanzania, where die 
rebels use UN refugee camp 
across the border in Tanzania 
as rear bases, diplomats said: 

Mr. Buyoya has expanded 
the mostly Tutsi army from 
17,000 to 40,000, flooding 
the main roads and byways 
with troops. Inside the camps, 
the soldiers also have started a 
propaganda campaign aimed 
at convincing farmers thS 
army is on their side. 

“What they are doing in 
the camps is really brainwash- 
ing," a UN official said. 



IrtsMwtU- 


The Associated Press 

PHILADELPHIA — A 
real-estate agent has been 
charged with carrying a flare 
gun, 19 flares and an 8-inch 



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filet knife onto a U S Airways 
flight after a flight attendant 
heard him use the word “hi- 
jack" while he waited to 
board, authorities said. 

John Thomas Kieser, 45, 
from Jacksonville Beach, 
Florida, was charged Tuesday 
with carrying dangerous 
weapons aboard an aircraft 
He was freed on $25,000 baiL 

Mr. Kieser was waiting to 
board the flight to Orlando 
Monday evening at Phil- 
adelphia International Airport 
when an off-duty flight attend- 
ant overheard him say “hi- 
jack” while talking to a wom- 
an near the gate, an FBI 
affidavit said. He denied the 
charge. Prosecutors said they 
did not know how Mr. Kieser 
had been able to pass security. 


New Altitude Alarm 
Sees Terrain Ahead 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A new kind of altitude warning 
system that might have saved the Korean Air airliner that 
crashed on a hill while trying to land in Guam is being 
installed in hundreds of airliners and may eventually be 
required on all airliners. 

The system, which looks ahead as well as down, is 
being installed by American, Alaska and United Airlines 
and Lufthansa and British Airways. 

It determines an aircraft's location, altitude and course 
from existing navigational equipment It compares that 
information with a computerized map of the world’s 
mountains and predicts the length of time before an 
impact would occur if the airliner did not reacL 

The system sounds a warning 60 seconds before prob- 
able impact and again, more simply, at 30 seconds. 

Conventional systems sometimes" fai 1 to give any warn- 
ing at alL These devices, known as ground proximity 
warning systems, became standard in the 1970s. 

But they have no ability to assess the terrain ahead of an 
airplane. Instead, they use a radar altimeter to measure the 
distance between the plane and the ground directly below 
iu They sound an alarm if the distance is closing fasL 

The problem with such systems was demonstrated by 
the crash in Guam and by two crashes in 1996. In one, an 
American Airlines jet flew into a mountain near Cali, 
Colombia. In the other, a U.S. Air Force transport car- 
rying Commerce Secretary Ronald Brown struck a hill 
while descending to the airport at Dubrovnik, Croatia. 


WEATHER 


A Li. Oh 

Sentenced l L ■ 


Europe 



Tomorrow 


High 

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12/86 


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1 

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Forecast lor Friday through Sunday, as provided by AccuWealhar. 



Heavy 

__ Snow 

North America Europe Asia 

Sunshine and sweheimg Mostly sunny end vety Lois ol sunshine, hot and 
heal is in store lor the warm to nor from Spain to humid across most of 
Southeast and rrw-AUamc southern France and Italy. Korea and Japan through 
from Atlanta to Phl/adel- but Belarus and Russia win the weekend, but gusty 
ph«a through me weekend be rather cool Soaking thunderstorms in 8ei;mg 
Tnundersttrms with heavy ram is in store tor the Friday will end the heal m 
downpouis wilt roam Balkan' region, while north- northeastern China Soak- 
across the Midwest. Cool ern Franca and mosi ol Ing rams will continue 
witn showers m the north- England will be guile com- along the central coast 
ern Rockies. Out hot and lortable with some sun- trom Shanghai on south 
dry in Oregon and Wash- shine and just a stray Steamy with showers in 
i nylon shower. Hong Kong. 


North America 


Anchorage 


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Until 


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35/95 24/75 DC 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST U, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


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* 




yEasy Come, Easy Go for Speaker Gingrich 

King of the Fund-Raisers Spends It as Fast as It Comes In — on His Image and Lawy< 


*•. i 

C-i 

1 

a 


B y Leslie Wayne 

New Kirt Times Servin' 


ve^ 1 Ne^Ti^^v. - h In ^ first six 0,01,11,5 of fo« 
y^r. Newt Gingrich, the speaker of the House raised 

3 £ ?££*£'!* 1998 rejection race 
VAlAonSf. ~ and he Promptly spent it all. 
n4te M^rfnSET^ Were “rged to donate to pro- 
none of rh^<S? Ch -ii- cooserva dve vision, virtually 
ScL 0 ! * $ , ’ 8 miiiloIX m campaign money he hi 
raisecUmce January went to anything related to the 

;^^ d, i, lhe m ° ney was spent °n lawyers and polit- 
^l c ^ultams. direct marketers and public relations. 

SLJS *"£1 re P r 5f efl£s a vast financial effort to 
Gm f nc 5 ® tmage and pay his huge legal 

mside^hi^party^ 20 ^ced attack by foes outside and 

r, l 1 ?™’. 8 5 P end j n g in the first six months was driven 
by ms ethical problems and his attempts to resurrect 
Jus leadership, said Dwight Morris, a consultant with 
me Campaign Study Group, a firm in Springfield, 
max analyzes campaign spending. 

.- Not everyone in Congress has the kinds of prob- 
lems Newt does.” 

Mr. Gingnch is no ordinary congressman, and his 
5 Dai i 1C i5?. a !f not ordinary either. He faced six-digit 
legal bills this year stemming from the House ethics 
ease against him. 

■A 9°up attempt within his party this summer promp- 
ted him to increase spending on political advisers and 


public relations consultants. And he paid dearly for a 
direct-mail campaign designed as much to* raise 
money as to gamer grass-roots support across the 
country. 



cainipaij 

Michael Shields, a spokesman. “And that's not just 
the ethics case from this year. Tt *s also over the 80 other 
ethics cases against him. Some of the legal bills came 
in before the election and some after. We have io be 
prepared to fight.” 

Mr. Gingrich’s expenses are the kind that account- 
ants typically call extraordinary. 

That means, they are unusual, one-time and not 
typical. 

For instance, at a time when members of Congress 
are only beginning to solicit donations for their 1998 
campaigns, Mr. Gingrich has already spent more in six 
months than most others will need in the two-year 
election cycle for re-election. 

In the 1996 election, an average successful member 
of Congress spent about $675,000 on a re-election 
campaign. 

That Mr. Gingrich is spending money as fast as he 
raises it also sets him apart. Most members of Con- 
gress keep a tight hold on their donations until the 
money is needed closer to Election Day. 

“Newt has spent literally everything that he has 
taken in,” said Mr. Morris of the Campaign Study 
Group. "That is extremely unusual. Most candidate's 
try to squirrel their money away.” 


ers 


Topping Mr. Gingrich’s expenses, according i 0 his 
filings with the Federal Election Commission, were 
legaf bills stemming from his ethics case. 

Mr. Gingrich was penalized S300.000 last January 
after a House ethics subcommittee found he had 
misused tax-exempt money for a politically tinged 
college course he taughL 

.Although he chose not to use campaign money to 
pay that fine, Mr. Gingrich can legally use it to pay his 
lawyers. 

Legal bills have eaten up $620,000 of the SI. 8 
million he has raised so far this year. 

Mr Gingrich had already paid lawyers’ bills of S 1 . 1 
million last year with campaign money from his 1996 
race. 

J. Randolph Evans, an Atlanta lawyer who headed 
Mr. Gingrich’s defense team in the ethics case, re- 
ceived the largest share of the money — $233,000 — 
while Ed Bethune. a Washington lawyer, was paid 
5174.000. 

"It’s for six months' work,” Mr. Bethune said. 

Mr. Evans could not be reached. 

James Holden, a Washington tax lawyer with Step- 
toe & Johnson, received $189,000 from Mr. Gingrich 
for his work on the tax aspects of the case. 

In all. the legal billsarising from the ethics case have 
been larger than the fine Mr. Gingrich received. Mr. 
Gingrich could legally use campaign donations to pay 
the fine, but he instead accepted a 5300,000 loan from 
Bob Dole, the former senator and Republican pres- 
idential candidate. 


| Clinton, in Gephardt Terrain, Hails Welfare Bill 


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By Terry M. Neal 

WusliiHfti’n Post Sen ice 


Ruth hn-m^nCThr 


president Clinton and Richard Gephardt, House minority leader, arriving back in Washington from St Louis. 

A U.S. Casualty of Mexican Drug War 

Sentenced to 10 Years, U.S. Yoga Teacher Says Conviction Was a Setup 


By Molly Moore 

Washington Post Sen-ice 



; MEXICO CITY — David Cannos is 
serving a 10-year sentence in a Mexican 
* prison on a felony drug conviction 
< ordered by a judge he never met, in a 
■jfial he never attended and with ev- 
idence that may have been falsified. 

Confronting a legal system far dif- 
ferent than anything he had ever ex- 
perienced, the U.S. citizen turned to the 
one institution he believed would help 
him: the U.S. Embassy. But this is an era 
when the U.S. and Mexican govern- 
ments are trying to show their zeal in 
fighting drug traffickers. 

- “From everything we can see, he was 
railroaded,” said a U.S. representative. 
Joe Moakley, Democrat of Massachu- 
setts; who has pursued the case of the 
onetime Boston University instructor 
convicted of possessing the illegal drug 
methamphetamine. . 

. ■ Mexican human rights officials 
)' charged that Mr. Cannos, 55, an author 
' of nutrition books and a yoga instructor 
who. according to U.S dtxruments. had 
□fever had a run-in with the law until he 
was arrested transiting through a Mexico 
City airport nearly five years ago, has 
become a victim of the two nations 


/ 1 
h 

l 


become a vihuu 

crusade against drugs. . „ 

“His human rights were violated, 
said the Reverend David Fernandez, a 
Jesuit priest who heads the Miguel 
Agustin Pro Human Rights Center and 
is familiar with the Mexican legal sys- 
tem. “And I've been absolutely astmm- 
ded at the, lack of help he s received 
from the embassy.” . . ^ 

’A U.S. Embassy official who agjeed 
to be interviewed on the condition ot 
anonymity, said, “Mr- Cannos- was 
nwaiedworse than a Mexican citizen 
would be treated for ^ "“‘JLSSS** 
'’/.although he added that, it s P°^ bl £, 
~ tta mT C annes's rights were viola®) 
tinder Mexican lew. Concmung the wn- 
hassv’s response, the official aaoea, 
"We’ve done everything humanly pos- 

“ b WhUette State 
ages its embassies from 
feign nation’s legal system, they ** 
allowed to pressure: foreign LjSg 

mens when thence o^.S. nuze^ 
are being abused. But aes F. - te( j 
that V.S.govcmxnenUccumm^c^ 

serious irregularities im of _ 

^a^fooecorepl^ 

receive adequate semcesof ** 
prater during the appeals c f_ 

‘ The Mexican attorney- 1 * 

free declined several requests to be m 


terviewed about Mr. Carmos’s case. 
Previously, officials there have told re- 
porters they stand by their investigation 
and conviction of Mr. Cannos. 

Mr. Carmos-’s ordeal with the Mex- 
ican authorities and the U.S. govern- 
ment, at least as he tells it, is the stuff of 
a traveler’s worst nightmare. 

In October 1992, he traveled to Brazil 
for a week of missionary work as a 
bishop at large for the San Diego branch 
of a Christian group, the Essenes. which 
sees itself as a modem-day incarnation of 
the sect credited with writing the ancient 
Dead Sea Scrolls. On his way home to 
California, while c h a ng i n g planes in 
Mexico City, Mr. Cannes was detained 
by customs officials who said they had 
found plastic bags containing a suspi- 
cions powder inside a container of Dura- 
Carb — a carbohydrate drink mix in 
powder form — and in three other cans. 

Mr. Carmos said that he was carrying 
the drink mix, but that he had never seen 
the three other cans until Mexican cus- 
toms agents showed them to him several 
hours after his arrest 

The authorities accused Mr. Carmos, 
who said he understood no Spanish, of 
carrying seven pounds of a substance 
that can be used to make a chemical 
precursor of the drugs amphetamine or 

methamphetamine. 

MrTSmios said he did not even leant 
about his trial until nearly a month after 
ii ended in January 1993. 

In the middle of it, Mexican officials 


changed the charges against him from 
carrying a chemical component of an 
illegal drug to carrying the drug 
methamphetamine itself. Mexican pros- 
ecutors said in court documents that 
they made the alteration based on better 
laboratory tests. 

But four experts in the United States 
and Mexico concluded that the tests 
either had been fabricated or were based 
on’ analyses of a substance different 
from the one for which he was charged, 
according to documents submitted to 
the court. The experts also found that 
eight laboratory tests submitted as sep- 
arate examinations were eight photo- 
copies of the same test result. 

A chemist for the U.S. Drug En- 
forcement Agency noted other irreg- 
ularities. In an internal U.S. Embassy 
memorandum dated April 8, 1994, the 
consul general's office told the public 
affairs office: “Upon review of the sen- 
tencing documents, it does seem ex- 
tremely odd that Carmos, who was de- 
tained and charged on the basis of a 
suspicions powder, would have been 
charged wim possession of a substance 
that only exists in liquid form.” 

Mr. Carmos said he believes that the 
Mexican authorities pursued his case be- 
cause of pressure from the United States 
to toughen its prosecution of drug of- 
fenders. And Mr. Moakley, the congress- 
man, said he believes the U.S. Embassy 
failed to aid Mr. Cannos because “they 
don’t want to embarrass Mexico.” 


AMERICAN 

TQPICS_ 


New York Harbor Muck 
Finds New Use as a Ping 

In New Yak Harbor, shoals of ac- 
cumulated river-borne mud threaten 
maritime commerce. The mud, which 
contains traces of heavy 
other pollutants, 

dumped at sea, but federal rules now 
prohibit that practice. Meanwhile, 
Pennsylvania has beat 

ways to seal the more than 9,000 aban- 

mines that scarthe stale s 



runoff into rivers and streams- 

Bingo! In wbai is i bemg “ 
win-win solution, harbor 

to soon begin shtppregteniud 

to Pennsylvania, where it wiU « 

SxSTwMi ash and other realenalsre 


form a sort of cement sufficiently 
stable to plug the mines for thousands 
of years. But not everyone is buying 
tins. Some environmental groups in 
Pennsylvania grumble that their state 
already takes more imported garbage 
and hazardous waste than any other. 
This solution has yet to be officially 
chosen. The New York Times notes. 

But proponents say no other option 
comes close to providing receptacles 
sufficient for the mud to be dredged for 
many years to come. This is not mu- 
nicipal waste, enthused John C ahil l, the 
New Yoik commissioner of environ- 
mental conservation: It’s a resource. 

Short Takes 

In flying, there is a sense of free- 
dom like nothing else, says Henry 
Kisor, 57, a newspaper editor who has 
piloted small planes for five years. 
Sounds like any other flying enthusiast? 
Mr. Kisor is-one of just over 70 deaf or 
hard-of-hearing private pilots with fed- 
eral certification. While they are baited 
from flights requiring a radio, that 


:ofU.S. 

airspace below 18,000 feet (5,500 me- 
ters). primarily around big-city airports, 
notes the Chicago Tribune. 

Residents of Walden, New York, 
may have laughed when Bob Wohlfeld, 
a disk jockey at a radio station in nearby 
Poughkeepsie, began using their town 
in the Catskill Mountains as the butt of 
jokes on his morning program. But no 
more. Mr. Wohlfeld portrayed Walden 
as a backwoods hollow of no redeeming 
character. The New York Times re- 
ports. Its people, he said, bold weddings 
in abandoned cars. They use discarded 
refrigerators as lawn ornaments. They 
patronize local bars that have a two- 
tooth minimum. Squirrel is a preferred 
source of protein. Folks in Walden 
stopped laughing when out-of-towners 
began repeating the jokes; they claim 
the notoriety has even sharply reduced 
real estate values. But finally, relief. Mr. 
Wohlfeld has been hired by a station 
some distance away, in Albany. 

Brian Knowlton 


ST. LOUIS, Missouri — In a steamy 
factory warehouse here. President Bill 
Clinton sat on a dais near Richard Gep- 
hardt. hometown pol and House minor- 
ity leader. Bui the physical distance 
belied a far greater political distance. 

Mr. Clinton stepped to the podium, 
declared welfare reform a success and 
chided those who had questioned 
whether the legislation would work. “I 
heard all the reasons people said it 
wouldn't work," the president said. 
“But a year later, I think we can safely 
say the debate is over.” 

What Mr. Clinton did not mention 
was that one of the chief naysayers was 
sharing the stage. And the chief naysay- 
er did not mention his opposition to the 
welfare bill. Instead, Mr. Gephardt said 
he hoped Mr. Clinton's visit marked 
“the first of what we hope will be 
many” to welfare training efforts na- 
tionwide. 

In the last year. Mr. Gephardt has 
carved a niche for himself away from a 
president whose increasingly centrist 
agenda has increased his popularity. 
The ranking House Democrat — and. 
many believe, likely presidential con- 
tender in 2000 — has opposed some of 
Mr. Clinton’s highest-profiJe initiatives, 
including the recent balanced-budget 
and tax measures, the expansion of the 
North American Free Trade Agreement 
and trading privileges for China. 

Yet it was to Mr. Gephardt’s home 
that Mr. Clinton came Tuesday to cel- 
ebrate the success of the welfare mea- 
sure Mr. Gephardt so bitterly opposed as 
cruel — a choice that left ’many ques- 
tioning the president's motives. 

The White House spokesman, Mi- 
chael McC lurry, dismissed talk of ten- 
sion between the two. “They acknowl- 
edge they have some differences on 
some issues, but they also understand 
that they’ve got a big agenda that to- 
gether they can pursue, in which the 
agreements are far more numerous than 
disagreements.” he said. 

Mr. Gephardt’s stances have posi- 
tioned him increasingly on the left in a 
party that has moved to the middle. 

In a floor speech last month, Mr. 
Gephardt attacked the budget as tax 
legislation favoring the rich and de- 
clared: “I am a Democrat I believe in 
building this economy from the bottom 
up, not the top down.” 

He said he was not alone in that 
belief: "So we in the Democratic Party 
feel strongly that people in the middle, 
people stuck on the bottom, are the 
people that we need to be dealing with’ ’ 
in the tax cut. 

But in the vote, Mr. Gephardt found 
he was the only Democratic leader in 
Congress to oppose the bipartisan 
agreement, and just one-quarter of 
House Democrats followed his lead. 

Mr. Gephardt faulted his party for not 
insisting that the budget deal do more for 
the middle class. He said as much as 80 
percent of the tax cuts should have gone 
to families and individuals making less 
than $100,000 a year. 

“1 believe we could have done more, 
and I believe the Republicans could 
have been pushed further,” he said. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Reagan Son Is Sour 
On Budget Accord 

WASHINGTON — It has been 16 
long years since Ronald Reagan and 
his Grand Old Party passed new tax 
cuts. 

So you would think that his son 
Michael would be pleased to see the 
Republicans finally picking up the 
mantle. Think again. 

Like his listeners, the San Diego 
talk radio host is doing more 
grumbling than cheering over the 
budget and tax agreement signed into 
law by President Bill Clinton last 
week. 

When Republicans charged onto 
Capitol Hill in 1995, the energized 
political right expected swift and far- 
reaching change, 

Taxes would be axed, entire gov- 
ernment agencies swept away and tax 
dollars finally made available for 
private schools. 

But when those true believers read 
the fine print of the new package, their 
faith begins to waver. 

The activists concede there are ele- 
ments of the deal they like, among 
them a new $500 a child tax credit, a 
cut in the capital gains tax and steep 
reductions in the federal deficit. But 
the list of grievances is far longer. 

“This is a major disappointment,” 
said Malcolm Forbes, the former Re- 
publican presidential candidate who 
has toured 30 states this year rallying 
the grass roots for a possible second 
run. “They junked the tax code in- 
stead of simplifying it. They have 
gurted workfare,” he said, referring 
to new mandates on welfare. “They 
missed an opportunity for major edu- 
cational reform. There are no reforms 
of Social Security, no reform of Medi- 
care. And to call this a balanced- 
budget agreement would violate truth 
in politics if there was such a 
thing." 

While much of America applauds 
bipartisan cooperation, hard-liners in 
both parties say they would have pre- 
ferred a good principled fight over the 
recent round of making nice with the 
enemy. The tension in foe Republican 
Party is more significant because lib- 
eral Democrats are reluctant to take 
on their popular president while Re- 
publicans are desperate to find a new 
leader. (WP) 

Postmaster Assailed 
On Ceremony Costs 

WASHINGTON — When Maijor- 
ie Brown became foe Atlanta post- 


master on Jan. 10, she was glowingly 
described in The Atlanta Constitution 
as a “consummate professional.” 
one of only mo women to head U.S. 
Postal Service operations in a major 
metropolitan area. 

This week, however, foe praise for 
Ms. Brown at Postal Service 
headquarters in Washington was 
somewhat muted. A report by the 
agency's newly installed inspector 
general, Karla Corcoran, confirmed 
congressional complaints that Ms. 
Brown spent 545,593 in postal funds 
for a lavish swearing-in ceremony, 
including $21,348 for a video pro- 
duction about herself. 

Representative John McHugh, Re- 
publican of New York, who is chair- 
man of foe House Postal Service sub- 
committee, said he was outraged. 

In addition to foe video, which 
chronicled Ms. Brown’s rise from be- 
ing foe daughter of a rural letter car- 
rier. foe Corcoran report said she 
spent $4,808 on a buffet luncheon for 
300 guests, $4,738 fora photographer 
and audio/visual support and postage, 
$2,405 on programs and invitations, 
$877 for gifts and SI .506 for T-shirts, 
badges and vehicle rentals. < WP) 

Retirees Doing Well 
With Inflation Aid 

WASHINGTON — Nearly half a 
million retired federal workers get 
annuities that are bigger than their 
salaries when they retired, thanks to 
the inflation-protection feature of foe 
civil service retirement system. 

According to foe General Account- 
ing Office, the iypical retiree has been 
retired 22 years and has received 26 
cost-of-living adjustments. The GAO 
says foe $40 billion spent on civil 
service retirement benefits in fiscal 
1 996 made it foe seventh largest man- 
datory federal spending program. 

But auditors say that no retiree is 
“receiving a pension that was larger 
than his or her final salary” when 
salaries are adjusted. (WP) 

Quote / Unquote 

Robert Rector, senior policy ana- 
lyst at foe conservative Heritage 
Foundation, commenting on the sharp 
decline in public assistance rolls: 

‘ ‘The old image of welfare was that it 
was like a granite mountain — you 
might be able to chisel off a few rocks 
here and there but the mountain 
would still be there. What we have 
seen is that welfare is not Like a moun- 
tain, but like a balloon; prick it and it 
will almost collapse.” ( WP) 


State Schools Draw New Crowd 

Scions of the Rich Increasingly Choose Public Universities, 
Giving Rise to a ‘Simmering Crisis’ in Educational Finance 


By Peter Passell 

New York Times Service 


NEW Y ORK — Public four-year col- 
leges and universities, long the back- 
bone of economic opportunity for mod- 
erate-income Americans, are 
increasingly serving the economic elite, 
which as a group no longer puts so high 
a premium on private education. 

The proportion of students from rich 
families sending their children to public 
universities has risen sharply in foe last 
15 years, according to data to be pub- 
lished next month by Michael McPh- 
erson of Macalaster College in St. Paul 
and Morton Schapiro of foe University 
of Southern California. The two econ- 
omists estimate that 38 percent of foe 
college freshmen from families earning 
more than $200,000 a year enrolled in 
public institutions in 1994. compared 
with 31 percent in 1980. 

Those findings are underscored by 
recent studies in Minnesota, Florida and 
Oregon showing that students in four- 
year public institutions come from 
wealthier families, on average, than 
their counterparts in private colleges 
and universities in those states. 

The gemrificatioD of public colleges 
accents what Tom Kane, an economist 
at the Kennedy School of Government 
at Harvard University, calls “foe sim- 
mering crisis” in education finance. 
And it is a crisis carrying many ques- 
tions about fairness. 

While the demand for higher edu- 
cation is widely expected to rise by a 
third in the next decade, there is little 
indication that state legislatures are pre- 
pared to come up with foe greater sub- 
sidies to support foe extra students at the 
public institutions. If across-foe-board 
tuition increases are used to fill the gap, 
Mr. McPherson argues, “foe poor will 
bear foe brunt,” because an even higher 
percentage of places in four-year public 
colleges will be filled by students whose 
parents could have paid foe full cost of 
their education. This in turn, will tighten 
’ foe financial noose on private colleges 
that depend on affluent families to pay a 
disproportionate share of foe institu- 
tion's bills. 

“Parents are buying college the way 
they buy consumer goods,” concluded 
Mr. Schapiro, co-author of the forth- 
coming "Student Aid Game.” 
“'niey’re saying to themselves, ‘Why 
pay full tuition at Stanford when you 
can get almost as good an education at 
Berkeley for one-third the price?’ ” 

Economists and educators suggest that 
the findings challenge foe underlying 
logic of the way public higher education 
is priced. With strong support from taxes, 
most public institutions charge uniform 
fees to alL But many experts argue foal 
foe pricing system unfairly burdens tax- 
payers and hard-pressed middle-income 
students alike. Tne better way, they as- 
sert, would be to charge on a sliding scale 
according to family income, long the 
approach of private colleges with strong 


commitments to equitable access. 

"The taxpayers are getting less edu- 
cation for fewer people than they could 
have with means-tested tuition 
policies.” argued James Day, a con- 
sultant on education finance. 

It has long been conventional wisdom . 
that public higher education is the way 
up for the children of low- and mod- 
erate-income families, while foe affluent 
enjoy foe perquisites of private college. 
The numbers show how much these 
demographic lines are blurring. 

One reason is foe price of private 
education. Mr. McPherson and Mr. 
Schapiro calculate that in 1992-93, fam- 
ilies with incomes exceeding $60,000 
paid an average of $ 1 1 ,600 for tuition at 
private four-year colleges, compared 
with just $3,100 at public colleges. 

Another reason is foe shrinking dif- 
ference in perceived quality between 
private and public education. And the 
consumerist approach to picking colleges 
has been validated by heavily publicized 
college rankings that factor in price as 
well as quality, giving new prominence 
to such institutions as the State Uni- 
versity of New York at Binghamton. 

Away From Politics 

• Donald Reese, 54, who killed four 
men in a 1986 robbery, was executed by 
lethal injection in foe Potosi, Missouri, 
prison, a spokesman for foe state's de- 
partment of corrections said, f Reuters) 

• A 500-pound piece of space junk in 

orbit for 1 3 years came within one and a 
half miles of an ozone-mapping satellite 
that had been dropped off by the space 
shuttle Discovery — frighteningly close 
for scientists. The rocket motor could 
have destroyed foe German-built satel- 
lite. Discovery and its crew of six were 
in no danger. (AP) 

• About 20,000 pounds of frozen 

hamburger patties sent to stores in 33 
states may be infected with E. coli bac- 
teria. according to Hudson Foods Co. of 
Rogers, Arkansas, which is recalling foe 
meat. (AP) 

• The percentage of pre-teens who 
know a friend or classmate who has 
used illegal drugs such as cocaine and 
heroin more than doubled between 1996 
and 1997, a university study said. The 
survey, sponsored by foe Commission 
on Substance Abuse Among America's 
Adolescents, found that 23.5 percent of 
12-year-olds said they knew someone 
who used such hard drugs — a 122 
percent increase from last year. (AP) 

■ Drug-makers would have to test 
whether the medicines they sell to adults 
are safe and effective for children's use 
also, under a Clinton administration pro- 
posal. Most prescription' drugs are not 
labeled for children’s use because they 
never were rested in children. (AP) 





PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HE RALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Sihanouk Calls for Peace 

King Also Says Offer to Abdicate Is Rejected 






i * ' 

x/f' 


Canpdcdhf Om SuffFnm Dupatckn 


United Nations human 
rights investigators have doc- 


PHNOM PENH — King rights investigators have doc- 
Norodom Sihanouk urged umented at Least 40 killings of 
Cambodia's leaders Wedues- Mr. Hon Scan's opponents 
day to help end the violent since his July coup that ousted 


Penh said King Sihanouk’s 
statements indicated that die 


umented at Least 40 killings of monarch had depicted to etw 
Mr. Hun Scan's opponents gage in peace efforts with the 


upheaval in their country and 
said his offer to abdicate had 
beat rejected by Second 
Prime Minister Hun Sen. 

The king released the state- 
ment after a meeting Tuesday 
with the country's top lead- 
ers, including Mr. Hun Sen, at 
his Beijing residence. 

While the king has ac- 
knowledged Mr. Hun Sen's 
rule, he has remained vague 
about supporting him. 

“Please try to the maxim- 
um of your powers ro allow 
the nation and die people to 
enjoy again peace and 
prosperity, to eradicate war, 
insecurity and violence," the 
king said in the statement. 


the former first prime min- 
ister. Prince Norodom Ranar- 
iddh, the king’s son. 

There also have been re- 
ports of widespread intimi- 


govemment despite frustra- 
tion over recent violence and 
the ouster of his son. 

“He is asking the govern- 
ment to exercise restraint,’’ 
an Asian diplomat said. 


dation of Ranariddh support- adding, “He’s not turning his 


ers outside the capital. 

Responding by fax to re- 
porters' questions, the king 
said that Mr. Hun Sen had 
turned down his offer to give 
up the throne. If the king were 


back on the government or the 
country." 

In China on Wednesday, 
Chea Sim, Cambodia's acting 
bead of state, and Mr. Hun 
Sen met with the Chinese 


to abdicate. It would have prime minister, Li Peng. 


clear political repercussions. 

King Sihanouk is highly 
regarded by Cambodians, and 
his resignation would be seen 
as an act forced upon the king 
by Mr. Hun Sen. 

Political analysts in Phnom 


Pyongyang Eases 
Bar on Seoul Talks 


Reuters 

TOKYO — North Korea, 
hinting at a softening of its 
staunch refusal to negotiate 
with South Korea, said Wed- 
nesday that it would talk to 
Seoul if it made positive 
moves to improve ties. 

The statement, an official 
excerpt of an essay -by the 
North Korean leader, Kim 
Jong D, came a day after a 
group of U.S. lawmakers 
quoted North Korean offi- 
cials as saying Pyongyang 
would never deal with the 
current Seoul government. 

“If the South Korean au- 
thorities show a positive 
change in practice, we will sit 
face to face with them any 
time, have an open-hearted 


Mr. Li urged them to respect 
King Sihanouk and to resolve 
the country's political crisis in 
a peaceful manner, according 
to the Xinhua press agency. 

Xinhua said the three met 
ar the seaside resort of 
Beidaihe. It quoted Mr. Li as 
saying, “King Sihanouk is 
loved and esteemed by the 
Cambodian people and en- 
joys high prestige abroad, so 
respecting the role and influ- 
ence of King Sihanouk will 
serve the interests of the Cam- 
bodian people." 

The meeting was the 
clearest indication to date thar 
Beijing would adopt a "busi- 
ness as usual ’ ' approach to the 
new regime in Phnom Penh. 

“Stressing that China 
would “never interfere" in 
the affairs of another country, 
Mr. Li was quoted as telling 
the delegation that Cambod- 
ia's problems “must be re- 
solved by the Cambodian 
people." (AP, Reuters, AFP ) 


Koreans Protest in Guam 

AGANA, Guam — Relatives of the victims of 
the Korean Air crash held a sit-in Wednesday at 
the Guam airport, angered by problems with re- 
turning die remains of the victims to South Korea. 
About 50 protesters, sitting at the Korean Air 
ticket counter, complained that the recovery of 
remains from the crash site was taking too long. 

The crash last week killed 226 people, and 
dozens of bodies are still in the wreckage. The 
recovery work has been hindered by the rough, 
muddy terrain and, in recent days, by heavy rain. 
The remains of 10 victims were flown back to 
Seoul early Wednesday. (AP) 

Trains Collide in Japan 

TOKYO — A passenger train, crashed into a 
stopped freight train in central Japan, injuring 43 
passengers, die police said. The passengers were 
treated for min or injuries at local hospitals. 

There were about 180 passengers aboard the 
JR Tokaido Line passenger train when it crashed 
late Tuesday, the police said. Most of the 43 



laic JLUSSUay, UlC ui hnuirMnii* V«KUWd I’m 

people injured were riding in the front two cars. A car being lifted off the tracks Wednesday after two trains collided in central Japan. 

The accident occurred at about 1 1:20 P.M. near a 

crossing in Numazu, 60 miles (100 kilometers) make stops in Hawaii on Sept. 4-5 and SepL 17- The law would authorize policemen or soldiers ; 
southwest of Tokyo. 18. The United States has agreed to issue a transit to fire on anyone committing, or believed to be 

The passenger train slammed into the rear of visa for Mr. Lee, despite China’s warning that it about to commit, a “terrorist" offense. The se- 
the freight train, which was stopped at the cross- would hurt Chinese-U.S. ties. (Reuters) curity forces would also be allowed to arrest 

ing while its driver checked an emergency signal, terrorist suspects without a warrant and to search - 

jMsienger train was en route from Mishi- NeU, TetTOT Bill in PaktStan 
ma, near Numazu, to Shizuoka, 95 miles west of ISLAMABAD — Pakistan’s National As- without a warrant. The bill calls for the death 
Tokyo. Police are investigating die cause of the sem bly passed an anti-terrorism bill on Wedues- penalty for any terrorist whose action has resulted 


make stops in Hawaii on SepL 4-5 and SepL 17- 
18. The United States has agreed to issue a transit 
visa for Mr. Lee, despite China’s warning that it 
would hurt Chinese-U.S. ties. (Reuters) 


The law would authorize policemen or soldiers 
ro fire on anyone committing, or believed to be 
about to commit, a "terrorist" offense. The se- 
curity forces would also be allowed to arrest 
terrorist suspects without a warrant and to search 


'Fa« Ta' |! «" 

FooiW" 


„ clearest jndiration to date that TaiwOntO BoOSt LatUlTieS 

4, was intended ro mark the Beijing would adopt a busi- 

5 2d anniversary of Korea’s ness as usual" approach to the TAIPEI — Taiwan announced Wednesday 
liberation from Japanese co- new regime in Phnom Penh. that President Lee Teng-hui would visit four 

lonial rale, which is Friday. “Stressing that China diplomatic allies in Central and South America 

The Stalinist state's de would “never interfere" in next month, a trip seen as the latest round in a 

facto leader called on Seoul to the affairs of another country, diplomatic tussle between Taipei and Beijing, 

abolish its National Security Mr. Li was quoted as telling Foreign Minister John Chang said Mr. Lee 
Law. under which South the delegation that Cam bod- would visit Panama, Honduras, El Salvador and 

Koreans are banned from ia’s problems "must be re- Paraguay, leaving Taipei on SepL 4 and returning 

making unauthorized trips to solved by the Cambodian Sent. 19. 

North Korea. Deoole.’’ (AP. Reuters. AFP) Fore ip" NAlixietTi/ nffimalc caiH Mr I m ui/uiM 


oreign Ministry officials said Mr. Lee would 


day giving the government sweeping new se- 
curity powers, including the right for police to 
shoot suspects on sighL The opposition Pakistan 
People’s Party, led by Benazir Bhutto, walked 
out of the assembly In protest. 

The bill, which now goes to the Senate, is an 
attempt to stop a wave of killings that has shaken 
Pakistan in the run-up to the celebration of 50 
years of independence. More than 225 people 
have been killed this year in a feud involving rival 
wings of an ethnic party in Karachi, while a 
vendetta between militan t Sunni and Shiite 
M uslim factions has cost 240 lives, mostly in 
Punjab Province. 


in a death, and a sentence of between seven years 
and life imprisonment in other cases. (Reuters 1 


For the Record 


At least eight people were killed and 12 were 
missing after a passenger feny collided with a 
cargo boat on V iemam's Red River, officials said 
in Hanoi on Wednesday. (AFP) 

C hina will require students sent overseas 
next year to post a bond of up to $6,000 to 
ensure that they return, the official Xinhua press 
agency has reported. (AP) 


The essay also said that the | _ _ | 

United States, “a party direct- ™ 

issue, must completely change ANNIVERSARY: 2 Different 1 Destinies in Subcontinent as India and Pakistan Mark Independence . 

its anachronistic Korea policy 1 


and stop hindering the inde- 
pendent and peaceful reuni- 
fication of Korea." 

While Mr. Kim called on 
Washington to sign a peace 
treaty with Pyongyang, his 


Continued from Page 1 same social problems beset 

Pakistan, which has a lower literacy 
come recurrent problems. Separatist rate, 37 percent, than India. Al- 


resentatives of the Muslim minority India might trip over its multilingual A separate Mu 
adopted an accommodating posture, tongue and fall apart Anti-Hindi first proposed 
which Miss Rasul described as: riots occurred in the south, where league's leader 


negotiation with them over essay did not mention U.S.- 
the destiny of the nation and led efforts to start formal talks 
make efforts for national re- on a permanent peace ar- 
unification hand in hand with rangement to replace the 


movements in border areas — 
Muslim-majority Jammu and Kash- 
mir, Sikh-majority Punjab and the 


though Pakistan's average income is 
higher, $465 versus $360, its econ- 


which Miss Rasul described as: 
“We have demanded Pakistan for 


riots occurred in the south, where 
ethnic Dravidians speak distinct lan- 


omy has become so overburdened to ask for anything more from the 


Muslims," and “We have no right guages from northern Aryans. Some 


culturally distinctNorlheast — have with debt and defense spending that majority community here." 


them,” said the statement, 
which was carried by the of- 
ficial press agency KCNA 
and monitored in Tokyo. 

"We will follow what at- 
titude and stand the South 
Korean authorities take and 
how they acu" it added. 

The essay, published Aug. 


armistice that ended the 
1950-53 Korean War. Prep- erupted into violence, 
aratory talks involving the Corruption has been another ma- 

U nited States, China, and jor problem plaguing Indian democ- 
North and South Korea were racy, and military-dominated Paki- 
held in New York last week stan as well. Popular disgust with 
but ended without final agree- official corruption has been one rea- 
ment. They are to resume son the moodpreceding anniversary 
SepL 15. celebrations planned in New Delhi, 

the capital, and other major cities 
has been subdued. 

“ Another reason: Democracy has 

TfVT ArTCTR T A - not met for social and 

J-l ^ -TA.U 0 1 economic progress. More than one- 


been contained through heavy- 
handed tactics that critics contend 
violated human rights. Communal 


Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has 
solicited personal donations and de- 
posits from the nation's 130 million 


protesters immolated themselves. 
The biggest threat to national unity 


Caste, the traditional ranking of did not fade until the Congress Party 


and caste conflicts periodically have citizens and from Pakistanis abroad 


erupted into violence. 


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held in New York last week 
but ended without final agree- 
ment. They are to resume 
SepL 15. 


to help keep the country solvent 

“Pakistan is in an economic 
mess," said Ayesha Jalai. a his- 
torian at Columbia University who 
grew up in Pakistan. “Pakistanis 
have a lot of thinking to do about 
how to straighten out this mess." 

Indians did the better part of their 
political thinking before indepen- 
dence. During die two decades be- 
fore independence, annual conven- 
tions of die Indian National Congress 
led by Gandhi and Jawarbalal Nehru 


third of Indians are poor, nearly half passed resolutions that shaped a con 


are illiterate. The standard of living 
remains so low that $100 a month 
rates as a middle-class salary. About 
40 percent of Indians do not have 
access to safe drinking water; 70 
percent do not have a toileL 
“After 50 years, though democ- 
racy has come to stay, it has not 
brought the benefits that was ex- 
pected of it," said S. Nijatingappa, 


sensus on creating a secular democ- 
racy. That groundwork made'it easi- 
er, after independence, for India to 
draft a final constitution in three 
years and hold its first national elec- 
tion, electing Nehru as die first prime 
minister, in 1952. 


Hindus into four main tiers and 
2,200 subcastes, did not prove much 
of an obstacle either. Bit. Ambed- 
kar, a lawyer who came from the 
subcaste known as the Untouch- 
ables, and who had a graduate de- 
gree from Columbia University, 
chaired the drafting committee and 
ushered in provisions that banned 
caste discrimination and authorized 
quotas in government employment. 
Parliament and state legislatures. 

The most divisive issue was lan- 
guage: Southerners feared what they 
called "Hindi imperialism," the 
imposition of an alien northern 
tongue as the official language. 
Ironically, many southerners 
favored die language of the departed 
colonial masters: "Hindi never, 
English ever." Gandhi endorsed 
Hindustani, a blend of Hindi and 
Pakistan's official language, Urdu. 


reached back into its pre independ- 
ence past for a solution. 

At Gandhi’s prompting, the Indian 
National Congress, the party’s pre- 
cursor. had reorganized its chapters 
around India in 1920 to conform to 
regions where major languages were 
spoken. Later, Congress promised 
mar after independence, states would 
be created along lingual lines. Al- 
though Nehru initially balked, India 
gradually redrew state boundaries on 
that basis from 1953 to 1973. In 
addition. English has continued to be 
used in central government commu- 
nications after 1 965. despite what the 
constitution says. 

The language issue has since lost 
its divisive power. 

In Karachi, the port city that 
served as Pakistan's first capita], it 
took nine tortured years to write a 
constitution, which turned out to be 


A separate Muslim homeland was" 
first proposed in 1930 by the, 
league's leader at the time, the poefc’ r 
Muhammad Iqbal, but it was not!; 
until 1940 that the membership rat - 
ified the idea. Less than a year before 
partition, Jinnah was still negoti-’ 
ating unsuccessfully with British of-; : 
ficials and Congress leaders for a ' ^ 
satisfactory alternative to guarantee" 
the rights of minority Muslims. 

“Where was the time to work out" 
all the details?" said Shaista Ikra- 
mutiah, 81. one of two known sur-" 
viving members of Pakistan's con-' 
stitutional assembly. 

The bigger problem was appor~~ 
tioument of parliamentary seats," 
East Pakistan was more populous, 
but the capital and military head- 1 
quarters were in West Pakistan.. 
“They were just not prepared to 
share power equally with East 
Pakistan,” Miss DaamuLLah re- : 
called. East Pakistanis “were in the 
majority, but economically they " 
were backward" ~ 

The first constitution, adopted in 
1956, settled both questions by fro- . 
claiming Pakistan an Islamic repub- “ 
lie and apportioning parliamentary 


TaW 

nun •- 


Surprisingly, in the aftermath of according to Ranbir Singh Ctaow- 


The first ballot resulted in a tie, just the first of three. The long delay seats equally between the eastern 


partition’s communal violence, re- 
ligion did not present a major issue 


dhari, who represented northern 
Punjab state in the assembly. Hindi 


rated northern 


another surviving member of to the 300-member constitutional won the second time by a single vote 


tiie world's nuiy newspaper 


India’s constitutional assembly. 

Nor has there been joy in Is- 
lamabad, the still unfinished capital 
of Pakistan, despite being under 
democratic rule lor nine years, the 
country’s longest stretch of freedom 
from authoritarianism. Many of the 


assembly. Miss Rasul and 30 other because a Hindustani supporter was 


Muslim members, for instance, did 
not press for continuing a British 
practice of having Muslims elect 
Muslims and Hindus elect Hindus in 
separate voting for parliamentary 
and legislative seats. Instead, rep- 


absent. Under a compromise for- 
mula, English would be the official 
language until 1965, when Hindi 
would be substituted. 

Still, for tire first decade of in- 
dependence, it looked as if a young 


considerably damaged prospects for 
democracy in the new nation. 

Besides the fundamental question 
of whether Pakistan would be a sec- 
ular democracy or an Islamic re- 
public, the 80-member constitution- 
al assembly wrestled with how to 
apportion political power between 
East Pakistan and West Pakistan. 

The Muslim League had not 
worked out either issue beforehand. 


and western wings. But by then ir; 
was too late. Five years earlier, the 
military had swept into the power ' 
vacuum and taken charge, at first ' 
working through top bureaucrats, - 
Mr. Jalai said. The military's role ' m 
grew more open in 1954 when the ” 
army's commander. General Mo; 
hammad Ayub Khan, was named ro;. 
the cabinet along with other highs-* 
ranking officers. 


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1 IVTERN ATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. AUGUST 14, 1997 



PAGE 5 




EUROPE 


By Daniel Williams 

Washington Sm i,-.- 


ion Church Regains Old Status, the Faithful Fade Away 


thodoxy by far Russia's biggest religion, 
listed as the first among equals 


ts 


f.-.i 






I 




■ft. 

: 


* 






_ MOSCOW - The newly built Christ the Savior hilPk* "I™*- Boris Yeltsin vetoed the 
Cathedral rises high over the Moscow ckvlirj^ bur h . e qu iS k, y negotiations to find a 

gleaming domes Ind IS ,ookin S *° r “ sal- 

revival of Russian Onhodoxwn^^l.^ * factory both to the Orthodox leadership, which 

• Across the country Orthodox chiUrhJ^ 0 ™ 13 ' s fe ^^ I,:,UN marketplace needs order, 

w "*' Orthodox churches, mon- and to human right* critics, who assert that limits 

would represent a step back io authoritarian rule. 
The U.S. Senate has threatened to cut off aid if 
the measure becomes law. 

While commonly portrayed as a banle be- 
tween Orthodoxy and other religions and de- 
nominations. the struggle also plays into a debate 
within the church. Participants on all sides are 
asking the same questions: How does Orthodoxy 
ca, ]Y on in the first democratic experience for it 
and Russia? What kind of Orthodoxy will be 
housed under the newly polished domes and 
whitewashed walls of its ancient churches? 

“We are now past the era of euphoria and into 
a period of a search for normalcy,” a church 
spokesman, Vsevolod Chaplin, said in an in- 
terne w at the Orthodox patriarchy's offices, 
adjacent to an old monastery. “We have said 
many times that we are not seeking to be a state 
religion. We only question wheiher every sect 
that comes to Russia should have a legal 
star us. “ 

Father Alexander Borisov, a parish priest who 
opposes the bill and favors getting along with 


other religions, countered: “We must learn to 
live for the first time in a situation of freedom. 
Whatever problems we face, looking to restrict 
the freedom of others is not the right ap- 
proach.” 


astenes. publishing houses and congregations 

Uf :s a 

fL ai ? d of church property- 

Orth^i f0raU Aese s,gns of res rored gloryf Russian 

BSSfiSsssssr"- 

,hii bUr ^i. atlendance 15 dow n. Although the Or- 

irustSToSfvofD 15 w,d ? ly parted as die most 
of ^ ss, “ 1 mstimtions, few Russians 
F[ dletf children join the cJerey and 

S d w fewer Russians "* donating money. 

That sense of spiritual decline forms the back- 
drop to an intense political battle being fought 
nere over religious rights, church officials and 
PP es ^say. The Orthodox hierarchy, led by Pat- 
riarch Alexy D. is backing a bill that would favor 
Russia s four “traditional” religions — Ortho- 
doxy, Islam. Buddhism and Judaism — and 
restrict the activities of all others, including the 
wor/a s Catholic and Protestant churches. Or- 


nsms. 

The church spokesman said that erosion of 
such enthusiasm was natural, especially given 
the mounting problems faced by Russians as they 

adapt to the competitive life that democracy and _ 

Such a divergence of views is alarming to an the free market have brought “People expected churchgoers, 
ganizaiion that has historically put a premium the church to solve all problems. Tney soon fell Close relati 

discouraged.” 


ified for tax breaks." 

It seems barely evident that the Orthodox 
Church is under threat from abroad. Recent 
surveys say 50 percent of Russians identify 
themselves as Orthodox, even if far fewer are 


organization 

on unity, some observers say. 

The schism that the patriarch fears most “is an 
internal one between the ultra-traditionalists and 
the modernists,” wrote the English-language 
Moscow Times. 

The religion bill passed overwhelmingly in the 
Duma, the lower house of Russia's Parliament, 
with the votes not only of Communists and 
nationalists who oppose the Yeltsin government 
but also of politicians who normally back Mr. 
Yeltsin. 

'Hie margin of passage seemed to reflect 
changes in the political atmosphere. Russians' 
eagerness to embrace freedom for freedom's 
sake after the fail of communism appears over. 

Father Borisov tells of a question he hears 
frequently from listeners to his weekly call-in 
radio program: “People ask why Russia needs so 
many religions. Isn’t four enough ?” 

At the beginning of the decade. Russians 
flocked to Orthodox services, religious lectures 
and exhibits of precious icons. As the officially 
atheistic Soviet Union crumbled, old and young 
alike quickly lined up for long-postponed bap- 


Church leaders perceived another threat to 
Orthodoxy: foreign missionaries. Encouraged by 
constitutional protections, representatives of nu- 
merous religions — Christian and non-Christian 
— flocked io Russia in search of converts. 

In big cities like Moscow, street-comer pros- 
elytizers added ro the cosmopolitan air. 

In small lowns, their arrival was sometimes 
welcomed, but it sometimes created resent- 
ment. 

Occasional reports of missionaries being run 
out of towns surfaced in the Russian press. 

Patriarch .Alexy has spoken darkly of the 
dangers of “ total itarian sects" and referred to 
Aum Supreme Truth, the group that attacked 
Tokyo subway riders with poison gas, as a prime 
example. 

Church officials frequently portray foreign 
proselytizers as parasites and debauchers of Rus- 
sian morals. 

“Anyone with a few bottles of vodka can sign 
up 10 people and form a church.” the spokesman 
said. “And then they immediately become qual- 


relations with public officials and the 
mayor of Moscow have benefited the church 
materially. 

For a time, the Yeltsin government awarded 
the Orthodox Church a license for tobacco im- 
ports that provided a windfall in the post-Soviet 
era. 

Christ the Savior Cathedral, a reproduction of 
a church ordered destroyed in the 1930s by 
Stalin, was built with the help of donations 
solicited by the Moscow mayor, Yuri Luzhkov. 

Dissidents who favor openness to other re- 
ligions say that by raising the foreign threat, 
church conservatives hope to prod the govern- 
ment to do what the church feels unable to — 
keep the flock faithful. 

Gleb Yakunin, a dissident Orthodox priest 
who was defrocked for political activism against 
church rules, said the church has become ac- 
customed to identification with the govern- 
ment. 

In Soviet times, the church was both per- 
secuted and officially recognized. “They want 
state protection, though this time without state 
repression." he said. 


2 Admit Guilt 
As Germans 

42 | 

Face Tainted 
Food Scare 

O m (jkW bv Our SuffFium Cujufrta 

-KONSTANZ, Germany — A German 
couple admitted in court Wednesday to 
having threatened to poison food 
products in an attempL to extort more 
than $750,000 from a Nestle subsidiary. 

The police, meanwhile, were re- 
sponding to a new extortion threat 
against another subsidiary of Nestle, a 
Swiss-based food conglomerate. 

■Products sold under the brand name 
Thorny were being inspected in 56 Ger- 
man supermarkets named in an un- 
f signed letter received at Nestle's Ger- 
man headquarters in Frankfort that said 
poisoned food had been planted four 
weeks ago. 

So far. no tampered products have 
been found. The extortionists’ demands 
baye not been made public.* 

The police suspect that the perpet- 
rator could be the same person who 
placed tubes of Thorny mustard and 
mayonnaise, which were laced with cy- 
anide, in two supertnarketsin April. 

,ln the -trial Wednesday, Maggi. a 
Nestle subsidiary, was one of three food 
companies targeted by a 39-year-oJd 
engineer who entered a guilty plea in 
Konstanz state court He faces a separate 
trial for two other cases involving failed 
attempts in March to extort $500,000 
from Kraft Jakobs Suehard and Knorr. 

His 37-year-old wife was charged only 
in the Maggi case. Prosecutors said the 
husband had demanded $500,000 from 
MPggi in two letters last winter threat- 
ening that products would be poisoned. 
The wife wrote a third letter in March, 
rajsing the demand by 500,000 Deutsche 
marks ($269,000), prosecutors said. 
'Nestle’s German unit, Deutsche 
■y Thorny GmbH, has been the target of 

Church Fears 
Low Turnout 
For Pope Visit 

Reuters 

PARIS — The turnout for Pope John 
Paul Il’s visit to Paris next week, co- 
inciding with a Roman Catholic youth 
festival, could fall far short of expec- 
tations. organizers said Wednesday. 

* ‘The No. 1 question is whether there 
'A will be as much public interest as there 
was during the Pope’s last visit, raid a 
church official, speaking on condition 
he not be identified. 

Monsignor Miche I Du bos t, chxef or- 
ganizer of the church s World Youth 
Days set for Aug. 18 to 24 in Pans, said 
at a news conference that as many as 

500.000 people might attend a papal 

Mass Aug. 24 in western Pans. 

A few days earlier, organizers said as 
many as 650,000 people wouldattcnd 
“Frankly, I have no idea. 

Du best said when pressed on what the 
turnout would be. 

Wife Paris in the gnp of .» heat wave; 
th ere j s httle evidence of a swell or 
enthusiasm for the pontiffs sixftivini to 
France, which begins Aug. 2JU Buuhe* 
is also little sign of the angry demon 
/Stratus that pfeceded hisprevrousvis- 

■^September 996. wbenthou^ 

families than expected had agrees 

house young people. ,- cted ^ 

Organizers ongmd Jy.P^fJ^ch 

600.000 "young If^^Te^sold - 

church defines as 17 to 3_ > . ^ ^ 

raid pour into Pans for 

few monthslater.t^fig^^as revise 

downward to 300,000.- nredict- 

By this week, officials were ^ aeod 

• ing that 220.000 people . 

J the festival, with several hund^h^ 

sand others expected for al 

evening event and a Mass on 
the Longchamp race course. 



Cults Show Switzerland’s ‘Hidden Side 1 


Peter BmneteivTTic AmcKH6i Aw 


A woman returning Nestle foods to a supermarket shelf in Dortmund 
after an extortionist claimed the company’s products had been poisoned. 


blackmail for the past 12 months and 
received fresh demands in a letter Mon- 
day, warning that its food products in 
stores had been poisoned. 

Authorities did not inform the public 
until Tuesday evening about the letter, 
the latest in a ‘series of blackmail at- 
tempts that only became public in April 
after poisoned food was found in stores 
in two German cities. 

After the latest blackmail attempt the 
police said they still did not know 
whether the extortion plot was the act of 
an individual or a group. 

**We have no clues," said Franz 
Winkler, a spokesman for the police in 
Frankfurt- 

The Aug. 1 1 letter also claimed that, 
four weeks ago, 23 packages of 
poisoned Nestle products had been left 
in public areas such as parks, street cars. 


buses, train stations and phone booths, 
the police said. 

The blackmailer claimed to have left 
packages in cities such as Berlin, Bre- 
men. Chemnitz, Dortmund, Dresden, 
Frankfurt, Hamburg, Cologne. Munich, 
Nuremberg, Regensburg and Stuttgart, 
thepolice said. 

The announcement sparked a nation- 
wide alert and some 10,000 people 
flooded the police with phone calls and 
another 60,000 called — but were un- 
able to get through — after an emer- 
gency number was broadcast to the pub- 
lic on Tuesday. 

The police said they considered the 
threat to be very serious and warned 
shoppers to return Nestle products 
bought since Aug. I, but stressed that 
they had found no contaminated food. 

(AP, Reuters) 


BRIEFLY 


Turkish Cypriots 
Reject UN Proposal 


kilometers (125 miles) north of Lis- 
boa (AP) 

Italian Parties Assail 


GLION, Switzerland — Rauf Den- r n.f* 

ktash. the Turkish Cypriot leader, on Immigration JTOtUy 
Wednesday rejected new UN propos- 
als aimed at fostering compromise in 
Cypriot intercommunaJ peace talks 
but will stay at the negotiating table, a 
senior Turkish official said. 


senior luiitisu wi 

Inal Batu, deputy undersecretary of 
the Turkish Foreign Ministry who is in 
this Swiss village representing the 
Ankara government, said Mr. Denk- 
tash had refused to discuss or sign the 
document presented on Tuesday at his 
meeting with the Cypriot president, 
Glafkos KJerides, and the United Na- 
tions special negotiator, Diego Cor- 
dovez. ... 

"But the negotiations will contin- 
ue,” Mr. Batu said. 

Mr. Cordovez. chairing the five- 
day session that ends Saturday, had 
earlier presented Mr. Denkmh and 
Mr Klerides with an amended version 
of proposals he had presented at July’s 
inconclusive first round of Cyprus 
mlks in New York. (Reuters) 

Bus-Truck Collision 
Kills 8 in France 

BORDEAUX — A bus carrying a 
Portuguese folk ensemble rammed into 
a track in southwestern France on 
Wednesday, killing at least eightpeople 
and injuring 24 others, the police said. 

The accident took place just after 
midnight when the bus, with 42 people 
aboard, crashed into the rear of a truck 
loaded with com that was tunung onto 
the RN 10 highway between Bayonne 
and Bordeaux, police said. The m- 
jured included the driver of the truck. 
J Neither vehicle appeared to have 
been traveling at excessive speed. Po- 
lice have launched an investigation to 

deremiine the cause of crash. 

The bus was returning from _ , 
villa-e of Saint-GOIis-Waas m Bei- 
gium^following a WB-VpJg 
!Uce to the town of Aguedh, 200 


ROME — Opposition parties on 
Wednesday blasted the government’s 
border control policies and demanded 
a crackdown on illegal immigration 
following a spate of violent incidents 
involving foreigners. 

The separatist Northern League 
said people entering Italy without 
proper permits should be sent to work 
camps, while the hard-right National 
Alliance urged swift repatriation for 
all illegal entrants. 

Running battles earlier this week 
between rival North African drug clans 
erupted in the northern city of Padua. 
Recent sex attacks at the Adriatic re- 
sort of Rimini allegedly involving Af- 
ricans and the growing problem of 
Albanian drug and prostitution rackets 
have added to the- tension. ( Reuters } 

British Army Growls 
Over Attack on Hat 

LONDON — Worn since the Na- 
poleonic Wars and still loved by tour- 
ists who.crowd to see the changing of 
the guard at Buckingham Palace, the 
British Army’s towering bearskin hat 
may be about to meet its Waterloo. 

The Ministry of Defense said 
Wednesday that it had ordered a search 
for synthetic alternatives to bearskin, 
because of its concern fra: the welfare 
of the Ca nadian brown bear. Bearskin 
hat lovers countered that only skins 
from culled bears are used. 

A senior officer said his regiment 
would fight any move io replace the 
bearskin. 

“I am not sure exactly what the 
problem is,’’ said General Sir Willie 
Rous of the Coldstream Guards. “The 
bearskin is available, and the animals 
are nor endangered, indeed they are 
culled. The bearskin is genuine and it 
is traditional.” (AP) 


Sew York Times Service 

GENEVA — Nearly 1.000 people 
gathered in a picturesque Alpine valley 
this week to celebrate a movemem that 
advocates cloning to promote human 
happiness. 

The Swiss-based movement follows 
the teachings of a 50-ish Frenchman 
who goes by the name Rael and who 
rays he has been visited by creatures 
from another planet. Rael believes that, 
like characters in the Hollywood movie 
"Contact." extraterrestrials are linked 
to people on Earth. 

The movement grabbed headlines in 
June by offering human cloning ser- 
vices, urging those who were interested 
to write to its Geneva post-office box. 

Rael claims to have been contacted in 
1973 by almond-eyed aliens who cre- 
ated mankind in laboratories and who 
will return to Earth one day. 

The Raelian movement, which says it 
has 35.000 members in 85 countries, is 
“quite strong” in Switzerland, said Bri- 
gitte Boisellier, the movement’s 
spokesman. 

“The Swiss are tolerant," raid Miss 
Boisellier, a chemist, explaining that the 
group feels more comfortable meeting 
here than in France. "They have respect 
for beliefs." 

Although Switzerland is dominated 


by the Protestant and Roman Catholic 
religions, its longtime history of tol- 
erance has made it fertile ground for a 
number of unusual faiths. 

But recently, the phenomenon has 
grown, at a time when Switzerland, with 
one of the world's best-educated and 
wealthiest populations, is undergoing its 
worst economic downturn since World 
War H and is being buffeted by charges 
about its conduct during the war that 
have tarnished its national mythology. 

The Swiss involvement in religious 
sects was spotlighted in 1994 by the 
deaths of 48 members of the Order of the 
Solar Temple. Swiss professors who 
have studied sects estimate that there are 
90 to 120 such groups in the Geneva area 
alone. “There are only a small number 
of people belonging to all these sects — 
it's probably not even 1 percent of the 
population," said Roland Campiche, an 
expert in the subject at a center in 
Lausanne for religious studies. “ But it is 
a very significant phenomenon.” 

The Swiss, in contrast to their often 
dour exterior, “need to be a little bit 
crazy," said Georg Schmid, a professor 
who also operates a sect information 
center in Zurich. “We have a hidden 
side. We often live this out in our re- 
ligion. It’s our relief and our escape." 

The Swiss fascination with nontra- 


ditional beliefs could be seen at a recent 
fair in Geneva [hat featured 22 Euro- 
pean psychics. 

More rhan 8,000 people , up 25 per- 
cent from last year, showed up for 
seances during the 10-day fair. Hun- 
dreds had to be turned away, said the 
organizer, Claudio Allessi. who attrib- 
uted the heightened interest to economic 
uncertainty. "Many are asking whether 
they will lose their jobs," he said. 

Growing disaffection with estab- 
lished churches also has driven people 
to alternatives, said Philippe Borgeaud, 
a professor of religious history at 
Geneva University. 

“People have an appetite to believe 
something," he said. “But the sects 
don't only provide spirituality, they 
give a power or importance to people 
who are lacking it." 

Concern over sect influence promp- 
ted Geneva's government this year to 
examine possible legal safeguards 
against abuses. 

"The Solar Temple was a wake-up 
call for us," said Francois Bellanger, a 
lawyer who was appointed to draw up a 
lengthy list of proposed measures this 
spring. His recommendations, however, 
“deal only with illegal acts" that might 
be committed, he said. "Who has the 
right to judge what people believe?" 





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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERAL D TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AU GUST 14, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


U.S. Envoy Fails to Get 
Clear Result in Mideast 

Ross Sees Some Progress on Security 



By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Service 


JERUSALEM — An American spe- 
cial envoy wound up his emergency 
mission to the Middle East on Wednes- 
day night with no clear indication of 
whether he had succeeded in persuading 
the Israelis and Palestinians to begin 
making gestures that would allow both 
sides to pull back from a precipice in 
their partnership. 

The envoy, Dennis Ross, said he be- 
lieved he bad begun to revive security 
cooperation between the two sides after 
trust between them collapsed in the re- 
criminations that followed a suicide 
bombing two weeks ago in a Jerusalem 
market. 

At a minimum. Mr. Ross said, he had 
succeeded in preventing “further de- 
terioration” in the ties between the 
peace partners. He said that Secretary of 
State Madeleine Albright would soon 
make her Hrst trip to the region, and that 
he was returning to Washington to report 
progress made on the security cooper- 
ation on which Mrs. Aibright has con- 
ditioned her visit 

But despite American urgings, the 
Palestinians have yet to take any of the 
concrete steps to crack down on Islamic 
militants that Israel has demanded in the 
aftermath of the July 30 attack, which 
killed 14 people and the two bombers. 
And despite American complaints, Is- 
rael has refused to back away from its 
decision to withhold millions of dollars 
owed to the Palestinians until the other 
side begins to heed its demands. 

“We have to remember that we’re 
dealing with issues of dignity on both 


Luther Allison, 57, 
Blues Guitarist Who 
Drew Rockers, Dies 

The As si Aimed Press 

MADISON , Wisconsin — Luther Al- 
lison, 57, the bluesman whose stage en- 
ergy and blistering guitar playing at- 
tracted three decades of rock and roll 
fans, died Tuesday. 

Mr. Allison was diagnosed with lung 
cancer and brain tumors in July while in 
Madison, where he had a summer home. 

He spent most of his career in Chicago 
playing with such fellow blues artists as 
Freddie King, Magic Sam and Otis 
Rush, said Bruce Iglauer, president of 
Alligator Records & Artist Manage- 
ment, Mr. Allison's record labeL 

Mr. Allison's guitar playing drew na- 
tional attention in concerts in 1969 and 
1970 and lured rock fans to the blues. 

His first recording, “Love Me Mama,” 
in 1969, is considered a blues classic. His 
most recent albums were “Blue Streak” 
and “Reckless,” which showcased his 
skills on slide and acoustic guitar. 

He played with almost every major 
blues figure since the late 1960s. He 
moved to Paris in the 1980s and became 
a popular performer in Europe, and only 
resumed touring in the United States 
after signing with Alligator in 1994. 

Luigi Mennini, 86, Ex-Banker 
Was Tied to Vatican Scandals 

VATICAN CITY (AFP) — Luigi 
Mennini, 86, a former head of the Vat- 
ican banking arm the Institute for Re- 
ligious Works, died Monday, according 
to a Vatican source. 

Mr. Mennini was implicated in the 
financial scandals surrounding the fail- 
ure of a bank beaded by Michele Sin dona 
in 1974 and the bankruptcy of the Banco 
Ambrosiano, headed by Roberto Calvi, 
in 1982. Mr. Calvi was found hanged 
under a Loudon bridge that June. The 
Vatican institute, then led by an Amer- 
ican archbishop, had big investments in 
Banco Ambrosiano. Mr. Mennini was 
convicted on charges related to the fail- 
ure, but the conviction was overturned. 


sides,” said a senior U.S. official, 
added that it might be several days be- 
fore it became clear whether either side 
would budge from what have been in- 
tractable positions. In leaving Israel 
Wednesday night, Mr. Ross seemed to 
cite as the main success of his mission 
the agreement by the Israelis and Pal- 
estinians to report all information they 
gather about the bombing to a panel 
whose U.S. representative will be the 
CIA station chief in Tel Aviv. 

That three-way panel, which is to 
meet regularly to review intelligence 
gathered and actions taken by both sides, 
will allow the United States to monitor 
the extent to which both sides are mak- 
ing good on their commitments. In an 
apparent reference to the panel, whose 
other members will include high-level 
Israeli and Palestinian intelligence of- 
ficials, Mr. Ross said: “I azn concluding 
this trip with die belief that we have 
begun to establish the security relation- 
ship.” But the mood in the region oth- 
erwise remained mostly grim. 

A meeting in the Jordanian port of 
Aqaba between King Hussein and Prime 
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel 
also yielded little progress. Afterward, the 
king issued repeated warnings that re- 
lations between Israel and the Palestinians 
had readied “a dangerous moment.'' 

Everyone interested in preserving the 
peace must now carry out “whatever 
means possible to prevent further blood- 
shed and destruction, by one side, on all 
sides, everywhere.” the king said. 
“Otherwise, we cannot predict what the 
future will bring, except disaster.” 

Throughout his mission, Mr. Ross 
pressed the Palestinians to do more to 
put pressure on Islamic militants in the 
West Bank and Gaza while urging Israel 
to begin easing the punitive measures it 
has imposed on its peace partner. But the 
two sides seem to be still at an impasse 
over which should act first, and whether 
inducements offered to the Palestinians 
should be broader than the resumption of 
payment of millions of dollars owed to 
them by Israel, the only real reward that 
Israel has offered. 

As the tax and customs revenues col- 
lected by Israel but owed to the Pal- 
estinians continue to accumulate, about 
S40 million that should have been 
handed over now lies in a Tel Aviv bank 
account, in a violation of peace accords 
signed by the two parties. 

The suspension of those payments, 
which account for the majority of the 
Palestinian budget, has forced the Pal- 
estinian Authority to withhold paychecks 
from most of its 80,000 employees and to 
borrow heavily from local banks. 

At a news conference in Aqaba that 
followed his meeting with King Hus- 
sein, Mr. Netanyahu insisted that Is- 
rael’s use of the economic weapons was 
“not designed to encumber or discom- 
fort the population.” 

But he made clear that he wanted to 
see Y asser Arafat, the Palestinian leader, 
make the first move in heeding Israeli 
demands before his own government 
will begin to ease its pressure. 

“What we would like to see is the 
fulfillment of the commitment to battle 
the terrorists, and as we see action, any 
action taken in that direction, we shall 
adjust and change our measures,” Mr. 
Netanyahu said. 

The prime minister’s refusal to ease 
the sanctions has infuriated Mr. Arafat 
and his advisers, who say that since the 
identity of the two bombers has still not 
been determined, there is no reason that 
the Palestinian Authority should be held 
culpable. 

■ Israel Demolishes Homes 

Israel on Wednesday demolished nine 
Arab homes in East Jerusalem and in the 
West Bank that it said bad been built 
illegally. Israeli spokesmen said, Reu- 
ters reported from Jerusalem. 

Five homes were destroyed in East 
Jerusalem, and a spokesman for Israel's 
West Bank occupation authorities said 
four homes were wrecked in the Beth- 
lehem area. 


BOSNIA: Allies Tighten Squeeze on Serb 


Continued from Page 1 

Mrs. Plavsic has won applause in sev- 
eral rallies for her attacks on corruption, 
raising the hopes of foreign officials in 
Sarajevo, the Bosnian capital northwest 
of here. 

But the level of her popular support 
remains untested beyond Banja Luka, in 
the Serb Republic's northwestern wing. 

In addition, she controls few if any of 
the traditional levers of power, such as 
security forces and taxation. 

The Serbian Parliament in Pale, 
meanwhile, has challenged the legality 
of her dissolution order before the Serb 
Republic’s Constitutional Court. 

The Pale-based court, which delib- 
erated Tuesday and Wednesday, was 
expected to rule against Mrs. Plavsic 
later this week. 

It has been described by foreign and 
Bosnian officials as an instrument of Mr. 
Karadzic and his ally, Momcilo Krajs- 
nik, the Serbs’ representative on Bos- 
nia’s collective presidency of three eth- 
nic groups. 

Even before the ruling, international 
organizations have sought to impugn its 
validity. 

The Office of the High Represen- 
tative, the international agency assigned 
to oversee civilian aspects of die Dayton 
agreement, issued a legal-sounding 
statement Tuesday that concluded: 
“Neither the government nor the Con- 
stitutional Court can suspend the im- 
plementation of that decision.” 

“We cannot conceive of a decision 
which disagrees with a legal opinion of 
this kind.” Simon Hazelock. the high 


representative's spokesman, said to re- 
porters at a briefing Wednesday in Pale, 
only a short distance from the court’s 
headquarters. 

Soldiers from the 35,000-strong 
NATO-led Stabilization Force, mean- 
while. for the first time have begun reg- 
ular inspections of the Serb Republic’s 
specialist police. 

The force commander. General Eric 
Shinseki of the United States, issued a 
new order Friday saying Che special po- 
lice must be controlled, either as soldiers 
by peacekeeping forces or as police by 
the United Nations International Police 
Task Force. 

The blue-uniformed paramilitary po- 
lice. estimated to number more than 
2,000, have been the outer wall of pro- 
tection for Mr. Karadzic, equipped with 
light artillery and armored vehicles. 

One unit, so far uninspected, has long 
guarded the entranceway to his villa in a 
valley just outside this former ski re- 
sort 

Bringing them under international 
control — implying restrictions on their 
weaponry, numbers and movements — 
would severely increase Mr. Karadzic’s 
vulnerability to arrest on the war crimes 
charges and limit his ability to move 
about. 

Alex Ivanko, spokesman for the 
United Nations police monitoring force, 
said General Shinseki bad urged Bos- 
nian Serb authorities to begin negoti- 
ations next week with a view to re- 
organizing all Serbian police along lines 
specified in the peace agreement 

The Serb Republic has rejected this 
step until now. 


Ui Jlnlpf \jpnrr FfiUW’-ftrwr 

Prime Minister Netanyahu reviewing an honor guard Wednesday in Aqaba before meeting with King Hussein. 

PLO Told to Shut U.S. Office, For Now 

Expiration of Law Suspends Operations at Mission in Washington 


By Steven Lee Myers 

Net\ York Tunes Service 


WASHINGTON — Even as President 
Bill Clinton's special envoy pressed his 
efforts in Jerusalem to revive negoti- 
ations between the Israelis and Pales- 
tinians, the Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization has officially wrapped up work 
at its small, tidy office on K Street. 

Because Congress left for its August 
recess without extending a law that had 
allowed the United States to have dip- 
lomatic contacts with the PLO, the State 
Department ordered the office and its 
staff of eight to suspend operations, ef- 
fective at midnight Tuesday night 

While the American envoy, Dennis 
Ross, will be able to continue his con- 
tacts with Palestinian officials — in- 
cluding the Palestinian leader. Yasser 
Arafat — the order effectively shuts 
down the only official Palestinian pres- 
ence in Washington. 

It is a largely symbolic step, but a 
potent one. The Palestinians may not 
actually have to bolt the door, at least for 
now, administration officials said. 

But as of Wednesday, the office’s 
staff could no longer legally conduct 
business in the United States, use its 
letterhead or even answer the phone. 

In practical terms, however, members 
of the office could find ways to continue 
promoting their interests informally. 

At a moment the Clinton adminis- 
tration considers critical to restarting the 
peace process, the suspension prompted 
sharp criticism from Palestinians and 
sent administration officials scrambling 
to keep any diplomatic damage from 


spilling over to the peace negotiations. 

“It doesn’t make any sense; it’s reck- 
less,” Hasan Abdel Rahman, the chief 
representative of the Palestinians, said 
Tuesday evening. “I don't see how this 
can serve the interests of the United 
States or the peace process or Israel. ' ’ 

The suspension coincided with the 
expiration of a law — passed after peace 
accords between Israel and the Pales- 
tinians were reached in Oslo in 1993 — 
that allowed the United States to es- 
tablish contacts with and give aid to the 
Palestinian Authority. 

The law allowed Mr. Clinton to waive 
a web of legal restrictions forbidding 
contact because, by law. the PLO re- 
mains a terrorist organization. 

The administration sought to extend 
the law but waited until the end of July, 
aides on Capitol Hill said. Then came the 
suicide bombings in Jerusalem on July 30. 
eliminating any possibility that the ad- 
ministration would be able to rally sup- 
port Several congressional aides, speak- 
ing on condition of anonymity, said the 
administration did not fight more aggress- 
ively to extend the law because the pres- 
ident could not have certified, as required 
by the law now expired, that the Pal- 
estinian leaders were in compliance with 
the peace accords, notably the require- 
ment for full cooperation on security. . 

At the very least, the suspension will 
last into September when Congress re- 
convenes, but there appears to be rising 
sentiment against the Palestinians in the 
House and the Senate, raising the pos- 
sibility of further restrictions. 

Representative Jim Saxton, a New 
Jersey Republican who has sponsored 


legislation to suspend aid to the Pal- 
estinian Authority for three months, said 
the lapsing of the law sent a message 
“that we, collectively as a country, are 
dissatisfied with the progress the Pal- 
estinian Authority has made.” 

The administration, waxy of further 
complicating the peace process, played 
down the effects of the law's expiration. 
It emphasized, for example, that the dip- 
lomatic shuttling would continue and 
that the bulk of S75 million in U.S. aid to 
Palestinians would not be affected since 
it does not flow directly through the 
Palestinian Authority. 

Said Hamad, the PLO's senior deputy 
chief in Washington, expressed frustra- 
tion that Israel did not receive similar 
punishment when, in Palestinian eyes, it 
had violated the peace accords. Mr. Ha- 
mad said the office would remain open, 
if only nominally, during the recess and 
resume work fully afterward. 

It was not clear Tuesday how far the 
administration would go to enforce the 
legal restrictions, which bar “the es- 
tablishment or maintenance of an office 
or other facility for the purpose of fur- 
thering the interests of the PLO at the 
direction of, or with funds provided by, 
the PLO,” according to a letter the State 
Department sent to Mr. Abdel Rahman. 

The State . Department spokesman, . 
James Rubin, suggested Tuesday that 
the suspension would close the PLO’s 
office more in spirit, but that it would 
nevertheless have an effecL 

“The fact that they are suspended 
from calling themselves the PLO Wash- 
ington office, I suspect, means a lot to 
them,” he said. 


ARMS: A Hodgepodge of Weapons Builds Up in Sou theast Asia 


Continued from Page 1 

ment is not an arms race to counter an 
external threat, but an arms rush to pos- 
sess the newest weapons.” 

A recent study of Southeast Asia's 
naval buildup by the International In- 
stitute of Strategic Studies in London 
concluded that although bilateral mil- 
itary cooperation had increased in the 
1990s, naval development programs by 
countries in the region remained essen- 
tially national projects. 

“Mainly because of persistent mutual 
distrust and the lack of common threat 
perceptions, there has been no attempt to 
coordinate procurement policy, build 
complementary force structures or es- 
tablish a regional force that could deter 
Beijing's interference in the South 
China Sea.” the institute said. “Indeed, 
the naval buildup may well intensify 
national rivalries in the region.” 

The institute noted that effective and 
comprehensive naval defenses required 
well trained, highly motivated person- 
nel, efficient logistics, a comprehensive 
doctrine, inter-service cooperation and 
high readiness levels. “Most Southeast 
Asian navies still lack many of these 
prerequisites.” it added. 

Paul Dibb, a former seoior official in 
die Australian defense department who 


now heads the Strategic and Defense 
Studies Center at the Australian Na- 
tional University in Canberra, said that 
in Southeast Asia, apart from Singapore, 
military maintenance was quite deficient 
and he doubted that many planes or 
warships could operate in a crisis for 
more than a few days. 

“Already, ships and aircraft are op- 
erating with one or more combat systems 
or sensors not operational,” he said. 
“There is a poor capacity to respond 
effectively to a sudden incident and the 
serviceability of combat platforms be- 
yond two or three days of real operations 
is in doubt” 

Mr. Dibb said this situation would 
probably not improve much because the 
growth in demand in Southeast Asia for 
skilled technicians in the commercial 
sector would drive up civilian wage 
levels in competition with the military. 

Some Southeast Asian analysts and 
military planners have also expressed 
concern about the region's reliance on a 
growing number of arms suppliers and 
its failure to develop closer multilateral 
security ties. 

Panitan Watmnayagom, director of 
the defense studies program at Chu- 
Ialongkom University in Bangkok, said 
that diversifying the supply of weapons 
had serious drawbacks for the region. 


“The strategy can pose logistic, main- 
tenance and training difficulties because 
of differences in the types of equipment 
from various sources,” he said. 

In a recent policy statement. Indone- 
sia said that China would become “the 
preeminent country in the region, both 
economically and "militarily” and that 
Beijing's claims in the South China Sea 
could cause conflict with other claimant 
countries. “Although ASEAN was not 
originally intended to be a joint security 
organization, current conditions encour- 
age the expansion of ASEAN cooper- 
ation to include a security dimension,” 
Indonesia's Defense Ministry said. 

Writing in the latest issue of Para- 
meters. the professional journal of the 
U.S. Army War College, Major Dillon, 
desk officer for Southeast Asia in the 
office of the U.S. Deputy Undersec- 
retary of the Army for international af- 
fairs. said that rapid economic growth in 
the region was yielding vastly increased 
revenue to buy arms. 

“However, civilian government lead- 
ers use political criteria to make equip- 
ment purchases,” be said. “Big-ticket 
items, such as ships and airplanes, are 
the currency of international security 
prestige, but they do not necessarily rep- 
resent an upgrade in military capabil- 
ity." 


briefly 


Police and Rioters ; 
Clash in Lusaka f 

LUSAKA, Zambia — Police* 
opened fire with live ammunition- 
and tear gas to disperse rioters in« 
central Lusaka on Wednesday. AS; 
least five people collapsed, suffer - -l 
ing from injuries and the effects oft! 
te ar gas, witnesses said. ; 

A police spokesman said polices 
headquarters received preliminary* 
reports that three police officers; 
were injured and one civilian was> 
seriously wounded in the clashes. ^ 

. He said 66 rioters were arrested: ; 

Rioting erupted after the police- 
moved in overnight to shut down* 
unauthorized market stalls. (AP ) * 

24 Villagers Slain ^ 
In Algeria Attack 

ALGIERS — An aimed grot 
surrounded a village in northern A. 
geria, slit the throats of 24 peopled 
and shot and wounded 10 others £ 
who cried to flee, hospital officials'" 
said Wednesday. Z 

The massacre happened early; 
Tuesday in Hraouate, about 120 kt- - 
Iomerers (75 miles) south of Al-T 
giers. raising tire number of people; 
killed in the region to 1 1 0 in the past ■* 

10 days, said the officials, who re-£ 
fused to be named. (AP ) ; 

Argentina to Get 
Special U.S. Status : 

WASHINGTON — Secretary of! 
State Madeleine Albright indicated ; 
Wednesday that the United States *• 
was likely to grant Argentina what 7 
she called “symbolic” status as a~ 
major non-NATO ally. 1 

“The announcement has not yet'? 
been made but we do wish to rec- - 
agnize Argentina's role,” Mrs. Al- Z\ 
bright said during a meeting with; 
the Foreign Minister Jose Miguel r 
Insulza of Chile. C; 

The designation would put Ar- ; 
gentina in the same category as Is- 
raeL, Egypt, Japan, South Korea and ” 
Jordan, and would allow the country £ 
to buy on a priority basis certain* 
excess defense items. (Reuters) Z 


GERMANS: !« 

Concern About Mark : . 

Continued from Page 1 : 

When the Bundesbank does deckle (b 
unsheathe its inrerest-rate weapon, 
however, it is expected to justify trie 
move with the argument that a strong; 
inflation-free mark contributes “to $ 
strong euro. ■ 

In its latest report, the Bundesbank 
repeated its recent warnings on the Ger- 
man currency, serving notice that It 
would “closely follow” the mark^i 
movements "with a view to the risks 
presented for price stability.” * 

The mark has “clearly weakened fur- 
ther” against the dollar since the start of 
the year, prompting German's central 
bankers to give “special importance” (p 
exchange rates, it said. *! 

The dollar has gained over 20 percent 
against the mark this year to stand abotp 
39 percent above its all-time low twq 
years ago of 1.3450 marks. Z-. 

Theoretically, the Bundesbank could 
begin ratcheting lending rates higher at 
the next meeting of its governing boam ft- 
on Aug. 21. *'■ r 

That is unlikely, particularly since die 
dollar appears to have been tamed fort® 
time being, analysts said. To prevent 
upsetting Germany’s European neig& 
bors, the Bundesbank is expected to wap 
until September or October, Mr. GreW 
said. Z 

The economies in France and Italy aiJB 
significantly weaker than the German 
economy, said Rainer Marian, econd^ 
mist in Zurich at Credit Suisse. 7 - 

Monetary union could suffer another 
blow, the central bank warned, if Ger- 
man deficits overshoot Europe’s fiscal 
benchmarks. Z\ 

It warned that the Bonn government^* 
1997 revenue from taxes probably 
would be even lower than the govern- _ 
ment’s last official estimates published ft 
in May, which already were dismal. - 
An Emnid Institute opinion poll re- 
leased Wednesday found voters wei£ 
losing confidence in Mr. Kohl's ability 
to resolve economic problems, and for 
the first time voters no longer viewed hrs 
party, the Christian Democratic Union,- 
as the most competent party on business 
issues. 


After Numerous Breakdowns on Mir, 

2 Cosmonauts Pack for Journey Home 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Two Russian cos- 
monauts spent their last full day 
aboard the Mir space station Wednes- 
day packing for home, winding up the 
most troublesome stint in Mir’s ] 1- 
year history. 

Vasili Tsibliyev and Alexander 
Lazutkin will head back to Earth on 
Thursday after six months of cosmic 
misfortune on the orbiting station. 

"Their whole mission has been like 
one big problem,” said Olga Kozer- 
enko, chief of the psychological sup- 
port team at the Russian Mission Con- 
trol center near Moscow. 

Miss Kozerenko said the crew had 
made Herculean efforts to keep the 
station running during a series of 
breakdowns, sometimes working 15 
hours a day. 

“Tsibliyev and Lazutkin have been 
over-tired,- literally exhausted by all 
those accidents, and a weary person 
can make a mistake.” she said to the 
Itar-Tass news agency. 


Yet another source of trouble may 
burden the station's new crew. 

On Wednesday, the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration said 
Mir’s water supply may run out in six 
io eight weeks if its humidity recyc- 
ling system remains unusable. 

According to Viktor Blagov, 
deputy chief of Russian' Mission Con- 
trol, the space station now has enough 
drinking water to last until Ocl 7 or 
10 . 

The space shuttle Atlantis is due to 
bring water when it arrives in late 
September. 

In addition, a Russian cargo ship 
canying water is scheduled to blast off 
for the space station on Oct. 1. he 
said. 

Normally, humidity aboard Mir is 
condensed and recycled into drinking 
water. 

But antifreeze fumes from months- 
old leaks in the cooling system may 
have contaminated the recycled water, 
Mr. Blagov said. 


COURT: Birthing Pains for World Tribunal 


Continued from Page 1 

Ms. McDonald, a civil rights lawyer and 
former federal judge in Texas. The 
tribunal juggled common law, civil law 
and military justice systems, she said. 

“We basically created an internation- 
al code of criminal procedure,’ ’ she said. 
“I think we have been able to conduct a 
fair trial in an international setting.” The 
only flaw in the system, she added, is 
that the present tribunals lack the power 
to order or make arrests, slowing the 
judicial process considerably. 

David Scheffer, who Iasi week was 
sworn in as the administration's special 
envoy dealing with war crimes, said 
Tuesday that the United States had three 
major areas of concern: how cases get to 
the court, whether or when international 
law would complement or supersede na- 
tional systems and how the court’s pro- 
cedures are defined. 

Washington wants the Security Coun- 
cil to be the arbiter of what cases would go 
(o the international court, a view at odds 
wi* nearly all other countries. Europeans 
and some Latin American nations would 
give prosecutors wide latitude in bringing 


cases. Other nations, especially in Asi 
want governments to have some contn 
over all stages of the court's activities. 

“You cannot have a system that tri< 
to end-nin the Security Council," M 
Scheffer said Tuesday. 

In the developing world, U.S. insis 
ence on Security Council jurisdictic 
raises fears that Washington would ut 
its influence to choose which cases 
would allow the court to hear. H 
United States and the other permanei 
Council members — Britain. Chin 
France and Russia — could use die 
veto to limit jurisdiction. 

The international cri minal cou 
could be used to harass nations of tf 
south." said Connie Ngondi, executiv 
director of Kenya’s branch of the Ii 
temationai Commission of Jurists. Moi 
day. She said there was also apprehensio 
that an international criminal court woul 
have too much power to intrude in 
country s internal affaire. 

. T*\ e United States says the court 
jurisdiction should be limited to cases < 
genocide, crimes against humanity an 
war enmes, with sexual assault built int 
the definitions. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, AUGUST 14. 1997 


PACE 7 



Athenee Palace Bucharest Hilton, October 29-30, 1 997 


Romania is increasingly attracting the attention of the international investment 
community. To assess future investment potential and to highlight the reforms Romania 
is put tin g in place in a bid to position itself as one of the more exciting investment 
opportunities in the world, the International Herald Tribune will convene a major 

investment summit in Bucharest on October 29-30, 1997. 

President Emil Constantinescu will give the opening keynote address of the Romania 
Investment Summit. He will also host a special dinner for speakers, delegates and guests 

on the evening of October 29 at Cotroceni Palace. 

The fact that President Constantinescu has agreed to support this summit as an integral 
part of the Romanian government’s efforts to attract foreign investment is a measure 

of the importance of the summit. 


Summit Sponsors 



A 1 ITOMOBILE ROMANIA S.A. 


ING fitfiRARTNGS 




ROMANIAN DEVELOPMENT AGENCY 



SCHNECKER van WYK & PEARSON 



Corporate Sponsors 




ROMANIA 


a mi 

Aim 


L 


CKH EE D 


MARTI 










PAGES 


Hmlfc 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NkW YORK TIMES AVD THE WA.SHINr.Tl IIS TONI 


No to the Pentagon 


In 1991, the Vietnam Veterans of 
America Foundation opened a shop in 
Phnom Penh to make and fit artificial 
limbs for Cambodians. The veterans, 
who had always considered land mines 
just one more weapon of war, began to 
see their special cruelty. 

“Every other weapon got put away 
after the war," says Bobby Muller, the 
group's president. “But land mines 
were still causing horribly debilitating 
and -painful injuries. And the victims 
were the poorest of the poor. Many 
knew the area where they were gath- 
ering firewood was mined, but they 
bad no choice." 

Now the group is one of the leaders 
of the American effort to ban land 
mines, which kill or injure 2,000 
people around the world evety month, 
the majority of them civilians, many 
of [hem children. 

In the next few days. President Bill 
Clinton will decide if Washington 
should support the ban. Final nego- 
tiations on a treaty to bar the pro- 
duction, stockpiling and export of 
these mines will go forward in Canada 
□ext month. The president should 
make sure that Washington is there. 

So far, nearly 100 nations have 
endorsed a draft treaty. The ban also 
has wide bipartisan support in the 
United States, ranging from the 
Quakers to a retired general, Norman 
Schwarzkopf. Sixty senators. Includ- 
ing every member of the Senate who 
saw combat in Vietnam, have endorsed 
a near total ban. 


Unfortunately, the consensus does, 
not yet include Mr. Clinton. He has so 
far been guided by the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, who argue that land mines are 
necessary to protect American sol- 
diers. The evidence says otherwise. 

Land mines are the poor man's 
weapon, offering no advantage to the 
high-tech American miliary. They 
were the principal cause of casualties 
in Vietnam, killing or maiming nearly 
65.000 American soldiers. The 
Pentagon's own studies show tliat 
nearly 90 perceni of the mines in- 
volved were made in America or from 
captured American pans. 

Pentagon officials say they oppose & 
ban because they want to be able tc- 
continue using "smart," self-destruct- 
ing mines, technology that America 
dominates. Bui allowing the United 
States to keep making land mines would 
close off any possibility that other na- 
tions would stop making theirs. 

Mr. Clinton has endorsed some use- 
ful measures, such as extending a mor- 
atorium on American exports of land 
mines. Bui he has also concentrated 
American efforts on a UN Conference 
on Disarmament that has made no sig- 
nificant progress and by now seem? 
little more than a stalling mechanism. 

It is embarrassing to see the United 
States equivocating over this issue in- 
stead of strongly supporting a land 
mine ban. To do so. Mr. Clinton must 
first look beyond the narrow and mis- 
taken advice of rhe Pentagon. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Angolan Showdown 


What is most painful about Angola, 
which may be about to fall into a new 
bout of civil war, is that the United 
Nations and key governments went to 
such great lengths there to bring relief 
and peace. Angola was the scene of one 
of the classic Cold War power 
struggles. In rime, two successive 
peace accords were hatched: the United 
Nations patiently tried to enforce the 
second with its largest and most e.\- 
- . nsive peacekeeping force ever. 

There ■veic flaws in tin- peaceseek- 
ing effort, but it was a worthy one. It 
will be a bitter blow — and not just to 
one sad, tom African nation — if the 
effort is finally seen as a failure. It will 
be taken as a warning against friendly 
international interventions in local 
conflicts elsewhere. 

If it happens, however, there will not 
be much argument about what went 
wrong in this phase. The bulk of the 
responsibility will fall on the Angolan 
faction led by Jonas Savimbi. Not that 
his arch-rival over the decades. Pres- 
ident Jose Eduardo dos Santos, does 
not deserve a share of the blame, es- 
pecially now if he launches the son 
of premature attack that could destroy 
the lingering possibilities of a political 
rescue operation. 

But Mr. Savimbi, who was once the 
United Slates' and apartheid South 
Africa’sman in Cold War Luanda, has 
“earned the largest share of the blame. 


He lost the (fair) 1992 elections and 
kept fighting. He then signed new 
peace accords that obligated him tr 
demobilize his armed forces, let go of 
the diamond fields, allow the govern- 
ment to administer the country and 
convert his armed movement into a 
peaceful opposition part)'. Although he 
was offered substantial protections and 
privileges, he has honored these cru- 
cial obligations mosiiv in the breach. 

Mr. Savimbi had i long lifeline t< 
then Zai.e*'. Mobutu %e-w Seku. It wu ■ 
the latter's demise that upset the fragile 
balance within Angola, creating the 
current crisis. The wily Mr. Savimb: 
has so far survived by using his hold on 
Angola's rich diamond fields to defy 
international fuel-and-arms sanction- 
and to buy friends and turned eyes 
elsewhere in Africa. 

He faces now. however, a last gasp 
of international diplomacy. Few would 
expect a UN peacekeeping force, ac- _ 
tually an observer force, that is on the 
way out to reverse course and to stay'.' 
But the secretary-general's represen- 
tative is about to deliver to the Security 
Council a report that is expected tc 
isolate Jonas Savimbi politically anc 
leave him exposed to broader sanctions 
— and to government attack. Mr. 
Savimbi has been talking tough. It 
seems that the United Nations is about 
to call his bluff. 

— THE a AS Hi NO TON Pt>ST 


A PLO Gesture 


On Ocl 7, 1985, four Palestinian 
gunmen hijacked the Italian cruise ship 
Achille Laura as it steamed off the 
Egyptian coast with 400 people on 
board. When the terrorists received no 
response to their demands, they ex- 
ecuted Leon Klinghoffer. a 69-year-old 
Jewish passenger from New York City. 
The youngest of the hijackers shot Mr. 
Klinghoffer in the head and back as the 
American, who had suffered two earli- 
er strokes, sat in his wheelchair. Mr. 
Klinghoffer and his wheelchair were 
then shoved into the sea. 

The killing was one of the cruelestof 
the hijacking era, and it was difficult to 
imagine that the Klinghoffer family 
could find anything but anguish in the 
incident. It was therefore surprising 
and gratifying to learn that last week 
the Palestine Liberation Organization 
reached a financial settlement with Mr. 
Klinghoffer’s two daughters, whose 
mother, now dead, bad sued the PLO 
for causing his death. The undisclosed 
payment cannot make up for the loss of 
Mr. Klinghoffer’s life, but it at least 
suggests during troubled times in the 
Middle East that the PLO can be 
brought to account, at least partially. 

Although other targets of terrorist 
groups have sued their attackers, the 
Klinghoffer case may be the first 
where the organization considered re- 
sponsible for an attack gave money to 


victims or their families. The PLO has 
not apologized for Mr. Klinghoffer’s 
death, maintaining that the hijacking 
was carried out by a rogue group, it 
seems likely that, in ruling, the PLO 
wished to win international goodwill 
and avoid the publicity of a mal thai 
would have explored its links with that 
group, the Palestine Liberation Front. 
PLO officials were probably alsc 
aware that they might not be able u. 
avoid paying any court-ordered dam- 
ages to the Khnghoffers because the 
United Sates is a major donor to the 
Palestinian Authority. 

Unfortunately, the prosecution of 
the Achille Lauro hijackers is incom- 
plete. The four hijackers were con- 
victed by Italy in 1986, but two es- 
caped from prison. One was caught anc. 
returned. Abu I Abbas, ihe mustenninc 
of the hijacking, was captured by Italy 
shortly after the crime but was released 
despite Washington's pleas that he be 
held for trial. Instead he was convicted 
in absentia. He was last seen in 1 996 ir. 
Gaza when he attended a meeting of 
the Palestine National Council, but hs 
may live elsewhere, possibly in Iraq. 

The Klinghoffer family can still 
hope for full justice, but they can take 
some solace in knowing that the PLC 
implicitly acknowledged its responsi- 
bility by settling their suit. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 



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Yes, Celebrate Fifty Years of Indian Democracy 


N EW DELHI — When Britain 
handed sovereignty over Hong 
Kong back to China last month, Chinese 
at home and abroad felt a surge of pride 
and patriotic emotion. On the 50th an- 
niversary of independence, Indians 
have more ambivalent feelings, reflect- 
ing what they see as their country’s 
somewhat ambiguous record. Pride in 
what has been gained is tempered by 
thoughts of what might have been. 

India today is a source of exotica and 
disasters for the international media — 
Salman Rushdie, Vikram Seth and Ar- 
undhati Roy alongside earthquakes, 
plagues and dowry deaths. Contradic- 
tory images abound. 

India is a land of handsome and rich 
princes and maharajas. Indians are 
heirs to an ancient civilization that em- 
phasizes self-sacrificing asceticism, 
spiritualism and a stable family life. 
India is fttU of beggars, child brides, 
bride burners, hustlers, corrupt offi- 
cials and self-serving politicians. 

What is the record of independence 
50 years on? Are the midnight’s chil- 
dren of Mr. Rushdie joyous and ful- 
filled, or have ihev been overwhelmed 
>verty and melancholy? 
lia has survived intact. Its territ- 
orial integrity and political indepen- 
dence face no serious threat. The dis- 
tinctive formula for maintain ing unity in 
diversity has been reasonably success- 
ful. The three major principles of the 
constitution — democracy, federalism 
and secularism — ensure that diversity 
is accommodated and the ceaseless 


by fi 


By Ramesb Thakur 

This is the first of two articles. 

struggle for political power and social 
mobility is channeled through legiti- 
mate processes and structures. 

The competing pulls of ethnic as- 
sertion and national integration have 
been reconciled in a complex yet ad- 
aptable system of power sharing and 
devolution. The widening circle of 
democratic participation under univer- 
sal adult suffrage has brought large 
numbers of previously excluded social 
groups into mainstream politics. 

India has not received sufficient 
credit for the good things it has done. Its 

India has not received 
sufficient credit for the 
good things it has done . 

democracy has been taken for granted. 
So has its nuclear self-restraint and its 
policy of not exporting arms. 

Its seemingly chaotic democracy is 
thriving. This is no small achievement, 
since liberalism emphasizes individual 
rights, while Hinduism and Islam put 
the community above individuals. De- 
mocracy is predicated on the essential 
equality of citizenship, yet the Hindu 
social order is built around the notion 
of human beings divided into funda- 
mentally unequal castes. 


With a tradition of deference to au- 
thority. a social order based on hier- 
archical status and hereditary distri- 
bution of functions, and a population 
characterized by poverty, illiteracy and 
fatalism. India should have succumbed 
to authoritarian rule long ago. The 
ruddy good health of democratic in- 
stitutions confounds the skeptics. 

The British were good tutors. They 
created bureaucratic structures — civil 
service, judiciary , police and military 
— underpinned' by an ideology that 
legitimated the role* of sate authority in 
maintaining social order through pre- 
scribed procedures and the rule of law. 
They introduced, instilled and progres- 
sively expanded the principles and in- 
stitutions of represenative government 
And they incorporated progressively 
increasing numbers of "natives” into 
the offices of government 

India has mostly maintained its polit- 
ical freedom. There have been no un- 
checked Public Security- Ministry, no 
street committees, no network of forced 
labor camps, no destruction oflibraries 
and universities, and no persecution of 
whole groups of people because they 
were intellectuals or had relatives who 
had once been landlords. 

The one great exception was the 
period of emergency rule from 1975 to 
1977 under Prime Minister Indira 
Gandhi, when a blanket of repression 
was cast over rndia. Yet in being care- 
ful throughout the emergency to justify 
her actions w ithin the framew ork of the 
constitution. Mrs. Gandhi demon- 


strated the extent to which the rule of 
law had been embedded as a constraint 
on arbitrary- government. 

In voting her out in 1977, Indians 
showed that while diey can put up with 
much economic injustice, they donot 
Tolerate tyranny. In accepting defeat 
gracefully, Mrs. Gandhi confirmed that 
the norms of democratic transition had 
been ingrained at the highest levels. 

By contesting and winning the 1980 
general election, she further showed a 
willingness to use constitutional chan- 
nels for regaining power. 

The persistence of poverty has cer- 
tainly undermined popular faith in the 
effectiveness of democratic govern- 
ment. Y et the failures are those of lead- 
ership. not regime. In an authoritarian 
system, the people could not be guar- 
anteed that concentrated and unfettered 
authority would be used lo pursue na- 
tional well-being and not private gain. 

Indians value their democracy. It is a 
system that has withstood decades of 
social, political and religious volatility. 
Votes of no confidence, political as- 
sassinations, terrorism, sectarian kill- 
ings. earthquakes and the plague r — 
India and its system of represenative 
government have survived them all. 


- , | 1 ' ’ 


The writer, who was born in India, 
heads the Peace Research Center at 
the Australian National University in 
Canberra and is author of “The Gov- 
ernment and Politics of India." He 
contributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


For Pakistan and India , Reconciliation Is Long Overdue 


P ARIS — In these 50 years. 

India and Pakistan have 
fought three wars. As a result of 
the last one, Pakistan lost half 
its territory, which became 
Bangladesh in 1971. Both deny 
it. but both ore understood to 
possess nuclear weapons, and 
thus they could destroy each 
other in a fourth confrontation. 

Literacy rates in both coun- 
tries are dismally low. Military 
budgets are absurdly high. The 
leaderships have maintained a 
climate of mutual suspicion 
and hatred for populist ends. 

While ine tigers in the Far 
East have made big economic 
strides, thus contributing to the 
well-being of their peoples, a 
vast majority in the subcon- 
tinent languishes in extreme 
poverty and conditions of 
gross social injustice. This is 
inexcusable in a part of the 
world with such vast intellec- 
tual and natural resources. 

From a - historical perspec- 
tive, 50 years is a Mink, too 
shon a lime for us to despair 
over lost chances of reunifi- 
cation, or at least durable re- 
conciliation before long. 

Yet it is a tragedy that nearly 
three general tons have suffered 
the consequences of an unnat- 
ural partition, not to mention 


By Zafar Masud 


the many who perished in com- 
munal riots in 1947. Deprived 
of minimum education and ma- 
nipulated by state propaganda, 
the subcontinent's people have 
been vulnerable to extremist 
influences of all sorts. 

The failure -to reconcile is 
closely linked to the failure of 
democracy in Pakistan. 

If India has, despite its many 
problems, managed to say on 
course with democracy, that is 
so because it has from the start 
assumed, constitutionally, its 
ethnic, religious and language 
diversity. India is largely 
Hindu, yet it today has a bigger 
Muslim population than its 
boastful neighbor, and, to its 
credit, has remained adam- 
antly secular. 

Pakistan, on the other hand, 
decided to rum its back on its 
South Asian historical and cul- 
tural heriage, and looked in- 
stead to Central Asia and 
Middle East in the quest for an 
identity. It encouraged intol- 
erance, passing, for example, a 
parliamentary act to outlaw a 
religious minority, the Ah- 
madis. It also chose to retain a 
feudal system. 

Democracy in Pakistan 


ground to a halt in 1955. only- 
seven years after indepen- 
dence, with a bureaucratic 
coup d'etat in which a half- 
demented governor-general. 
Ghulam Mohammad, dis- 
missed legitimate civilian rule 
and invited the army to par- 
ticipate in government Not 
surprisingly, five years later 
martial law- was imposed. 

So Pakistan has lived under 
direct or indirect military rule 
for most of its 50 years. 

The exactions ’ by India’s 
paramilitary forces in its Hi- 
malayan sate of Jammu and 
Kashmir are undeniable, but 
Pakistan's politicians, egged on 
by the generals, have kept the 
Kashmir issue alive and presen- 
ted India as an enemy to the 
largely illiterate people in order 
to justify' their hold on power. 

It was no accident that the 
two countries enjoyed relative- 
ly 'warmer relations in the 
midst of the Afghan war. 
Pakistan’s dicator. Zia ul- 
Haq, went ro watch a cricket 
match in India: the Indian 
prime minister, Rajiv Gandhi, 
visited Pakisran. That token at- 
tempt at reconciliation was 
possible because, with the 


flames of war licking Paki- 
stan's western border and the 
Soviet Union in the convenient 
role of enemy , the generals had 
little need of Kashmir or an- 
imosity with India. 

With Moscow's withdrawal 
from Afghanistan in 1989. the 
"crickef diplomacy" evapor- 
ated. General Zia and Rajiv 
Gandhi both died Pakistan’s 
army was once again in des- 
perate need of the handy Kash- 
mir conflict. Under pressure 
from the generals, the keynotes 
of Prime Minister Benazir 
Bhutto’s foreign policy from 
19SS to 1990 and 1993 to 1996 
periods were Kashmir and. be- 
lieve it or not. the lot of ihe 
Muslims in Bosnia. 

Miss Bhutto, like her father 
in rhe early ’70s. devoted much 
of her energy to whipping up 
public fury against India. Con- 
vinced of the success of a covert 
operation by the army's secret 
service, she promised an ex- 
cited crowd in 1 994: “Kashmir 
will be ours in a few weeks.” 

With the collapse of the So- 
viet empire. Washington has 
lost interest in Lhe region. It has 
stopped finam ml and military 
aid to Pakistan, which now is 
sinking deeper into the morass 
of religious extremism. 


The subcontinent is still 
strategically important, but the 
Cold War alliances are mean- 
ingless today. India is mending 
fences with China. Pakistan * 
should give up pretending it is 
a colonial power, renounce its ' 
quixotic military adventure in 
Afghanistan in the form of mil- 
itary and diplomatic support to* ^ 
the Taleban, and realistically 
link up with South Asia. 

Prime Minister Nawaz 
Sharif has grass-roots support: ' 
He has come to power after ‘ 
free elections; he is, for once, 
neither a feudal lord nor a gen- 1 
era I. In curtailing the presi- ' 
dent’s arbitrary powers to dis- 1 
miss the government and ; 
dissolve the National As- ‘ 
sembly. he has shown that he is , 
willing ro take risks. 

His Indian counterpart. In- ; 
der Kumar Gujral, is his match 
in political realism. The two . 
leaders know in their hearts 
that reconciliation betweenrtrF-f 
dia and Pakistan is inevitable. - 

The goal should be a South 
Asian Union on the European 
model. 


The writer, a Pakistani jour- 
nalist based in Paris, contrib- 
uted this article to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


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Imperial Balance Sheet: Epic Partition and Colossal Carnage 


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L ONDON — Fifty years 
ago. at the midnight hour 
introducing Aug 15, 1947. 
more than 300 years of British 
rule in India came to an end. 
With the creation of the inde- 
pendent nations of India and 
Pakistan. 80 percent of the sub- 
jects of the British Empire 
gained their freedom. 

This remains one of the most 
awesome and complex transfers 
of power in history. 

It seemed proof positive to 
many that the empire was being 
dismantled in an orderly and lib- 
eral fashion. Contemporary 
opinion was a Invest entirely fa- 
vorable. The British were com- 
plimented for their patience and 
skill in supervising so moment- 
ous an event — especially tor 
their role in the peaceful creation 
of two vigorous, democratically 
constituted nations tales. 

Praise was heaped upon the 
last viceroy, Lord Moumbarten. 
and Clement Aulee’s Labour 
government basked in bis re- 
flected glory. 

Half a century later, it is im- 
possible on almost every count 
to identify with those smug and 
self-congratulatory perceptions 
and claims. For one thing, the 
empire did not immediately and 
meekly roll over and die. 

The 1945-1951 Labour gov- 
ernment took its imperial re- 
sponsibilities seriously, pump- 
ing unprecedented quantities of 
investment and aid into the 
colonies, rapidly expanding the 
colonial services and even toy- 
ing wirh the idea of appropri- 
ating part of Libya into the em- 
pire's defense system. 

Britain’s trade with the em- 
pire and the Commonwealth 
reached new heights, and large 
numbers of British citizens fol- 
lowed the flag and emigrated — 
a substantial proportion of them 
settiina in the Rnodesias. 


By Denis Judd 


Herl 


g tn i 
hen 


Morrison, deputy 


Letters mit'uJti/ for publi- 
■ olion should be addressed 
"Letters to tlic F.tliior" and 
contain the writer's signature, 
lumie and full address. Letters 
should be brie) .wJ arc subject 
to editing. We mmol be re- 
sponsible for the return of imi- 
soltt 'lied manuscripts. 


leader of the Labour Party, 
spoke of the government as be- 
ing "great friends of the jolly 
old empire." 

When the aging imperial li- 
on. Winston Churchill, was re- 
turned to 10 Downing Street in 
1951. a determined imperial 
holding operation was imme- 
diately embarked upon, most 
notably the moves to establish 
compliant federations in the 
British Caribbean. Central 
Africa and Malaysia. 

□ 

Neither India nor Pakistan 
hits lived up to early promise as a 
Westminster-type democracy. 

The clumsily fashioned co- 
alition of Muslim provinces and 
groups that had been consti- 
tuted as East and West Pakistan 
soon began to dissolve, as re- 
gional and political interests 
proved more potent than a com- 
mon religious identity. 

The secession of Bangladesh 
in 1971 was the second partition 
in the subcontinent within a 
quarter of a century. In both 
Bangladesh and Pakistan. West- 
ern democratic forms were only 
fitfully observed, and bouts of 
military rule and accusations of 
institutionalized corruption be- 
came commonplace. 

India's post-independence 
history seems at first sight more 
clearly to have fulfilled the 
hopes of August 1947. Sate-led 
economic growth, the rule of 
law*, regular parliamentary elec- 
tions. ihe assault on underpriv- 
ilege. a redrawing of some pro- 
vincial borders on linguistic 
lines, and a serious and thought- 
ful contribution to the function- 
ing of the United Nations, of the 
Commonwealth and of the in- 
ternational community were 
each admirable achievements. 

Yet there has also been much 
amiss. Despite the touting of the 
ideal of India os "the world's 
largest democracy." there is 
something in the judgment that 
the country is only briefly and 
truly democratic every tew 

years during parliamentary 
elections. Arguably, for much 
Of the rest of the rime India 
lurches between high-minded 
public service and anarchy, be- 


tween endemic corruption and 
noble purposes. 

Prime ministers have acted as 
arbitrarily as any British vice- 
roy, setting aside unwelcome 
provincial election results in 
Kerala, for example, and ignor- 
ing minority grievances at will. 

Two prime ministers. Indira 
Gandhi and her son Rajiv, both 
members of the ruling Nehru 
dynasty, have been assassinated 
while in of office. 

□ 

The British claim that the 
1947 transfer of power was a 
singular success now seems 
vulnerable to criticism. 

It is true that Mountbanen 
brought the main ponies and 
constituencies to an agreed 
solution: partition of the". sub- 
continent into two religious 
homelands and in corporal ion of 
the Princely Sates into either 
India or Pakistan. 

There is no doubt that he had 
enormous powers of persuasion 
and was able to exercise his 
considerable charm over the 
main Indian proagonists in 
the drama, . certainly over 
Nehru, Gandhi, Liaquat Ali 
Khan, most of the princes and, 
for much of the time. Jinnah. 
leader of the Muslim League. 
He was clear and collected in 
negotiation, firm in his resolve 
and able, finally, to wring 
agreement even out of the in- 
transigent Jinnah. 

The viceroy, however, was a 
complex man, vain and self- 
serving. Two members of his 
entourage had the sole task of 
collecting every press clipping 
and photograph relating to his 
whirlwind J 25 days as viceroy. 

He c«»uld not bear to be w ith- 
out company, even when he was 
ill. He seemed never to read a 
book, although he often labored 
late into the night writing a slim 
volume detailing ihe hisiorv of 
Ihe Mountbullen family. 

His desire to be unquestion- 
ably in control sometimes led 
him to cut corners. He once ad- 
mitted io his iwo senior private 
secretaries: "1 know what vn U 
are thinking. ■ Waved fhis pre- 
decessor as viceroy | wouldn't 
have done this.* but" 1 win.-- 


In one crucial maner his con- 
duct had tragic consequences. 

The new frontier between In- 
dia and Pakistan \\ as delineated 
at breakneck speed by a com- 
mission headed by a British 
judge. Sir Cyril Radcliffe. The 
demarcation in the Punjab was 
of particular concern in view of 
the sources of vital water sup- 
plies. At the last minute. Mount- 
batten delayed issuing the report 
and then adjusted the Punjab 
frontier in India’s favor. 

Why did he do this? Sir lan 
Scott, now 88 and then his 
depuiy private secretary, be- 
lieves that the viceroy "showed 
the final boundary recommen- 
dation to Nehru, who objected lo 
the Punjab line ... which Mount- 
batten then adjusted.” Did that 
dubious accommodation, in 
some almost perverse way. owe 
something to Nehru's passion- 
ale relationship with Lady 
Mountbanen? It seems likely. ' 

The deal set the seal on )in- 
nah’s dislike of Mountbanen 
and strengthened him in his re- 
fusal to let him become the first 
governor general of Pakistan, as 


he was to become for India.! 
This almost certainly led to far) 
higher casualties in the com-i 
munal massacres, especially in! 
the Punjab, since as governor- 
general of both new sates. Ian- 
Scon believes. Mountbanen | 
would have "controlled thej 
British troops in the force es-l 
tablished to supervise the pro-' 
gress of the refugees," and that' 
would have led to a far firmer! 
intervention in the mayhem. ! 

As it was, up to a million; 
former British subjects were; 
slaughtered in the mass migra- i 
lions. It was a wretched legacy ' 
for an imperial regime that had t 
prided itself on its capacity toj 
maintain civil order. It is also an ; 
awkward reminder of the; 
loibles of great men and of the ; 
fallibility of both personal and- 
national myth-making. ■ 

The writer is a historian t 
whose latest book is " Empire : j 
The British Imperial Expert- \ 
cnee Front 1765 to the ; 
Present." He contributed this | 
comment to the International i 
Herald Tribune. ! 


w 



I t 

N*' L 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Anarchists’ Day 

NEW YORK — Anarchists in 
this city have arranged to cel- 
ebrate the assassination of Sen- 
or Canovas t»n Monday next 
[Aug. I6|. There will be a meet- 
ing with speeches of the familiar 
kind, and the celebrants promise 
themselves a great day. Johann 
Most, the notorious Anarchist 
leader, has expressed his sat- 
isfaction at the evident growth 
of Anarchism in Europe. 

1922: ‘White Dictator’ 

PARIS — Reports from Vla- 
divostok suite that the Zemsky 
Sc.ibor ii| the Maritime Province 
has elected General Diterichs 
Dictator of the Russian Far 
East, where the Soviet Govern- 
ment is nut recognised. The As- 
sembly had been elecred on a 
class anil professional basis, all 
parties being admitted except 
the Socialists. The Sobor de- 
cided thui a dictator wa> nec- 


essary in view of the red menace ( 
and the imminent departure of j 
the Japanese troops. Generali 
Diterichs, who has been in com- i 
maud of the troops at Vladivos- ■ 
tok. hopes to be able to extend ■ 
the anti-Soviet regime gradu-j - 
ally westward. j" 

1947: India Celebrates | 

NEW DELHI — India is cel- j 
ebrating the last few hours of, 
nearly a century of British rule. [ 
Viceroy Viscount Louis- 
Mountbanen will read the; 
King’s message before the Con- j 
stituent Assembly announcing j 
the transfer of power and the ! 
birth of two new Dominions — [ 
the Hindu sate of India and \ 
the Moslem Pakistan. The two j 
new Dominions officially come ; 
into being at the stroke of mid- ! 
night tomorrow [Aug. 15]. and : m 
400,000,000 people — about 
one-fifth of the world's pop- ! 
ulation — become free to guide ; 
their own destinies. J 







Itl 1 1 


(J U] 


()( 'h 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBU NE, THURSDAY AUGUST 14, 1997 

OPINION /LETTERS 


PAGE 9 


4 i a 


Watch Lugar Try to Save 
American Foreign Policy 

By Jim Hoagland 

~Z SeQalor take from a Republican Senate 
J_*„ Kl( ? jaid stiffen no il- leadership that clearly does not 


^c»s about tbe likely outcome 
of his battle with Jesse Helms over 
William Weld’s ambassadorial 
nomination. Even Mr. Lugar 
doubts that Mr. Weld will makeit 
to Mexico City. 

! “There are so many ways to 


leadership that clearly does not 
share or respect his internation- 
alist agenda and experience. The 
clearest and strongest voice to 
back expansion of the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization on the 
Republican side of the aisle, Mr. 
Lugar was pointedly lefr off the 


deflect an actual vote ifwe do get a prestigious Senate NATO Ob- 
fleanng on the nomination,” Mr. server Group recently named by 

t liinr bilfl nu .Ie .1 ■ ■- . J 


l I* j 


Lugar told me in his Senate office. 
■‘When you think about all the 
Ways it can be blocked, you can’t 
A be optimistic. But 1 take die con- 
* stitution seriously. There should 
be a hearing and a disposition.” 

’ Why does the Indiana Repub- 
lican go to the mat with Senator 
Reims in a probable lost cause? 
In part because of Mr. Lngar’s 
concern about good government. 
Re says Mr. Helms’s threat to 
deny the liberal . Massachusetts 
Republican a hearing by the 
$enate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee sabotages tbe Senate's 
advise and consent function. 

; But the skirmish over Mr. Weld 
is also part of what may develop 
mto die finest moment in a dis- 
tinguished career on Capitol HilL 
The Helms fight is only one point 
0f attack in a broad campaign by 
Mr. Lugar to defend an embattled 
14 internationalist agenda within his 


, • , / 1 , fa internationalist agenda within h 

s > H'Lrrh, Vi * party and the U.S. Senate. 

U£(f ; : * “I know everyone is sayii 


i Know everyone is saying 
that fewer members of Congress 
are interested in foreign affairs,” 
Mr. Lugar said. “But I don't rihinlr 
R has to stay this way. Those of us 
who have the interest and the stay- 
ing power to get some things done 
Can change this.” 

- Midway through his fourth six- 
year tom and contemplating what 
$iay be his last re-election cam- 
paign in Indiana in 2000, Mr. 
Lugar is consciously looking ahead 
at “a nine-year block of time.” 

; The fight over Mr. Weld is a 

small part of his campai gn tn nnrin 

. the damage done by Mr. Helms’s 
vindictive, narrow and ideolog- 
ically biased Handling of die For- 
eign Relations Committee. 

! Mr. Lugar is the natural Re- 
tt publican leader on foreign policy 
e and had previously served as com- 
mittee chairman. But when the 
Republicans took the Senate back 
in 1994, Mr. Helms asserted his 
seniority rights and took the chair 
away from Mr. Lugar. 

■ That was only one of a number 
of slaps that Mr. Lugar has had to 


Che majority leader, Trent Lott. 

“Yes, I was surprised not to be 
pnt on the group,” Mr. Lugar said. 
“The leads' told me be already 
knew what I thought on the issue. J 
don’t question that But there is 
going to be a very serious, very 
difficult debate in the Senate on 
NATO ratification, and we need to 
get to work on it now." 

The mood that Mr. Lugar con- 
fronts is described in a study re- 
leased this week by Washington’s 
Henry L. Stunson Center, which 
concluded that “the Republican- 
led Senate is highly suspicious of 
diplomacy in general.” It added, 
“Never in the modem era [have] 
the Senate Republican leadership 
and key committee chairmen pos- 
sessed so little personal experi- 
ence in world affairs.” 

What is a reasonable legislator 
to do in such circumstances? Un- 
daunted, Mr. Lugar set out to re- 
cruit open-minded Republicans to 
join him on the Foreign Relations 
Committee, which was generally 
shunned after the 1994 midterm 
elections. And be has used the 
Agriculture Committee, which he 
heads, to focus attention on areas 
like Africa, neglected by Mr. 
Helms since the disappearance of 
the white supremacist regimes of 
Rhodesia ana South Africa. 

During die Senate recess in Au- 
gust, Mr. Lugar is traveling in 
Europe to take chi what be sees as 
European prejudice and protec- 
tionism on agriculture. Biotech- 
nology will enable U.S. agricul- 
ture to make the breakthroughs 
needed to feed a world that will 
double its population in the next 
few decades, Mr. Lugar said. “But 
we have to get die trading system 
right and agricultural subsidies 
eliminated to make this happen.” 

That battle, and others in which 
Mr. Lugar is engaged, will con- 
tinue long after the William Weld 
flap is over. This is an opening 
beu in a fight over the. American 
agenda abroad. 

The Washington Post. 


MUNGOOTA SLHKOJDj 

PEACE PROCESS 1 




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*6W/N0*u ^ 

ifaecdulp 

JUST MOVE . 

unu ftsw. 





LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


On India’s Social Values 

Regarding "Inherited Social 
Values May Be Stalling India" 
( Opinion . Aug. II) by William 
PM: 

Mr. Pfa ff has hit the nail on 
the head. The pluralistic and tol- 
erant ethos of Hinduism has 
helped Indians, even those 
who are uneducated, to make 
a success of democracy. 

On the other hand, the Hindu 
accent on reaching Nirvana, or 
salvation, without worrying too 
much about those around you, re- 
sults in withdrawal from social 
responsibility. 

This is why there is so much 
tolerance of public irresponsibility , 
and why people's homes are often 
clean while the streets are dirty. 

Buddha and later the Sikb guru 
Nanak tried to inculcate Indians 
with the concept of social respon- 
sibility. but with limited success. 
The 19th century reformers tried to 
incotporate in their writings Chris- 
tian values of social responsibility. 


Post-independence. Western-style 
socialism did not help, because it 
allowed the masses to feel absolved 
of social responsibility as the state 
took on a more active role. 

Children's spiritual education 
is dependent on parents. Cur- 
rently, there is debate in India 
about whether Western secular- 
ism, which prohibits even reform- 
ist spiritual education in schools, 
is the correct recipe for an India in 
need of social reform. 

Nevertheless, India's political 
and economic recovery in the past 
100 years is helping to usher in 
reform of social values — though 
it may take place at a Hindu pace. 

NARENDRA SINGH. 

Sariia. India. 

Gearing Up Superstition 

Regarding “Why People Beliew 
Weird Things" (Books. Aug. Hi: 

Yes, it certainly is amusing, as 
the book review by Richard Bern- 
stein points out, to believe in * ‘as- 
trological birth control.” And 


bow silly it is. he reminds us, 
to believe in life after death, 
creationism and clairvoyance. 
How wacky to think that there's 
something to the stars, that there’s 
more here than meets the eye. 

Now that I have read this clear- 
headed article about such 
hilarious superstitions, I feel a 
great weight has been lifted. X was 
beginning to believe that maybe 
— just maybe — the experiences 
of Mother Teresa, Mahatma 
Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., 
Lao Tzu, Sl Francis, Jesus Christ, 
Mohammed, Buddha and Krishna 
(to name a few) were more than 
mere superstition. I’m glad this 
has been cleared up. 

Perhaps at the time of his death, 
Mr. Bernstein can have a friend 
read aloud from “Popular Mech- 
anics” or the International Herald 
Tribune's business section. As for 
me, at the time of my passing I will 
meditate and pray as I join die 
happy fools on the other side. 

MICHAEL GLOVER. 

Utrecht, Netherlands. 


Give Couples the Option 
To Work at Marriage 


By Amitai Etzioni 


W ASHINGTON — Your lo- 
cal ice-cream parlor, after 
selling only ice cream for years, 
suddenly starts offering frozen 
yogurt as well. Is this an impos- 
ition on customers, who are now 
“required” tomakea choice? Are 
they being “coerced to think"? 

This is the way some critics 
have characterized a new Louisi- 
ana law that, as of Friday, will 
allow couples to choose between 
the standard “no-fault” marriage 
and a “covenant” marriage. 

Couples choosing a covenant 
marriage pledge io enter matri- 

MEANWHILE 

mony only after serious deliber- 
ations. They agree to try to resolve 
potential marital conflicts through 
counseling if either spouse re- 
quests it and to seek divorce only 
by a mutually agreed upon two- 
year separation or under a limited 
set of circumstances, such as adul- 
tery, abuse, imprisonment for a 
felony or abandonment. 

The law also allows married 
couples to recast their commit- 
ment as a covenant marriage. 

Basically, the new Louisiana 
law provides couples with a 
ready-made contract that be- 
comes enforceable by tbe state 
once it is entered into freely. In 
effect, Louisiana is providing a 
new form of prenuptial agree- 
ment, focused on how to make 
divorce less likely. 

The Louisiana Legislature has 
come under criticism for this ima- 
ginative act Some critics have 
said that the law imposes new 
constraints on marrying couples 
because they are forced to make a 
choice between die old no-fault 
and the new covenant marriage. 

The feminist writer Katha Pol 
litt has characterized die law as 
“forcing" couples to make a 
choice. Margaret Carlson of Time 
magazine even suggested that the 
choice was “theoretical' ’ because 
couples would no longer dare 
choose what she calls Marriage 
Lite over Marriage Plus. 

Most people would agree that 
allowing individuals to make 
choices is the exact opposite of 
coercion. Indeed, the Louisiana 
legislation provides a model of 
how a stale can foster what it 
considers a virtue — in this case, 
stronger marriages — by giving 
people the opportunity to be vir- 


tuous, but not penalizing them if 
they choose not to. 

A state may favor some types 
of behavior over others, but it 
should promote these by giving 
people expanded options, rather 
than forcing them to behave in a 
preordained manner. 

We are all better off if those 
who tie the knot are prepared for 
the commitment. Yes. divorce is 
sometimes called for. But most 
divorces are damaging, painful 
and costly for ail involved. 

Moreover, studies show that 
about 20 percent of those who avail 
themselves of premarital counsel- 
ing decide not to marry, perhaps 
sparing themselves from a bad 
marriage and a messy divorce. 

Some critics of the Louisiana 
law have argued that slowing 
down divorce is poor public policy 
because children are better off 
when feuding couples break up. 

Yet at issue here are not phys- 
ically or psychologically abusive 
marriages, because these can be 
dissolved without undue diffi- 
culty under the new law. 

But for two people who 
are simply discontent, a divorce 
will be delayed for at least 
two years rather than the standard 
six months. This time could 
give the couple a chance to 
work things out. 

The issue is not whether divorce 
laws should be tailored for the 
small percentage of marriages that 
are seriously abusive, but whether 
the legal system now makes di- 
vorce too easy or too difficult 

To put it differently, should 
only '‘disposable” marriages be 
available to couples — or should 
there also be an option that en- 
courages them to work harder at 
sustaining their marriages? 

Far from joining with those 
who would abolish no-fault 
divorce and replace it with vows 
that severely restrict divorce, 
Louisiana has lefr the choice 
completely to the couples. 

Tbe fact that some critics object 
to this modest, moderate step 
speaks to what is wrong in our 
divorce-prone culture. 

Mr. Etzioni. the founder and 
director of the Communitarian 
Network, is aulhor of "The New 
Golden Rule: Community and 
Morality in a Democratic Soci- 
ety." He contributed this comment 
to The New York Times. 


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PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1997 


HEALTH/SCIENCE 


Lonely Route: Men With Breast Cancer 


By Karen Hsu 

New York Times Service 



EW YORK — Six years ago. 
Bob Stafford of Teegarden, 
Indiana, was buying a car. 
He joked to the salesman that 
he should be able to pay for the sky-blue 
Chevrolet Corsica before he died of 
cancer. 

What kind of cancer, the salesman 
asked. 

Breast cancer, Mr. Stafford said. 

“Only women get breast cancer,” 
the salesman said, his face inches from 
Mr. Stafford’s. 

“That’s great news because my doc- 
r says I’m dying from it,” he replied- 


s repuea 
predicted 


tor says I’m dying 
(Two years ago, his doctor pr 
that he would be dead in a year, said Mr. 
Stafford, who is not sure what the prog- 
nosis is now). 

Then the salesman looked alarmed- 


He showed Mr. Stafford a lump the size 
of his little finger on his own chest. (It 
eventually turned out to be only fatty 
tissue.) 

Mr. Stafford, whose cancer was dia- 
gnosed in 1988, when he was 36, said he 
frequently had encounters like that 
Breast cancer, with its nationwide pink 
ribbon campaign, is usually regarded as 
a women's disease, even though about 
300 men die from it every year. Breast 
cancer is diagnosed in about 1,400 men 
in the United States each year. One 
hundred times as many women suffer 
and die from the disease. 

Physiologically, the disease is the 
same in men and women. A man’s 
breast is similar to a preadolescent 
girl's. And in men, breast cancer is 
diagnosed and treated the same way it is 
in women. Mammograms and biopsies 
are used for diagnoses, said Dr. Robert 
DiPaoLa, assistant professor of medical 


New Gentler Biopsy 

Alternative to Aggressive Surgery 


By Abigail Zuger 

New York Times Service 



EW YORK — Breast sur- 
geons at several hospitals are 
perfecting a new technique 
that can spare many women 
with newly diagnosed breast cancer the 
pain and complications of a major sur- 
gical procedure. 

The new technique, sentinel node 
biopsy, is replacing a routine part of 
breast cancer surgery called axillary dis- 
section, in which surgeons remove a 
cluster of lymph nodes in the armpit 
near the affected breast and examine 
each of them under a microscope. These 
lymph nodes are the first destination for 
cancer cells spreading from the breast. If 
any contain cancer, the chances of a 
woman’s survival are sharply reduced, 
and she becomes a candidate for ag- 
gressive anti-cancer treatment 

Sentinel node biopsy is a simpler 
procedure than axillary dissection; it 
takes less than an hour and is often done 
on an outpatient basis. To do it, doctors 
identify the first lymph node that cancer 
cells would reach within the cluster of 
pea-sized nodes under the aim. and only 
that one. the sentinel node, is removed 
for microscopic examination. The sen- 
tinel node’s status seems to predict ac- 
curately whether the other nodes under 
the arm will be free of cancer. 

Dr. Hiram S. Cody 3d, a breast sur- 


geon at Memorial Sloan Kettering Can- 
cer Center in New York City, said that 
among 60 women at his hospital with 
small breast tumors, a negative sentinel 
node test meant, with 99 percent ac- 
curacy, that tbe other nodes would also 
be free of cancer. Dr. Cody’s group is 
offering women with small tumors the 
option of forgoing axillary dissection en- 
tirely in favor of tbe simpler procedure. 

The procedure was developed several 
years ago by Dr. Armando E. Ginliano 
of die John Wayne Cancer Institute in 
Santa Monica, California. He reported in 
the June issue of Tbe Journal or Clinical 
Oncology that among 100 women with 
small tumors, the sentinel node pre- 
dicted the status of the other nodes under 
the arm 100 percent of the time. 

A sentinel node biopsy spares women 
the frequent side effects of axillary dis- 
section: swelling, numbness and 
tingling in die arm and pain and stiffness 
in the arm and shoulder. The sentinel 
□ode biopsy has none of these com- 
plications. Dr. Giuliano said. 

Dr. Cody said the sentinel node 
biopsy seemed less accurate in women 
with larger breast tumors. In a minority 
of cases, die cancer cells are not found in 
the sentinel node until the laboratory 
analysis several days after the procedure, 
and women must return to the hospital 
for a second operation. But for most 
women with early breast cancer, it offers 
a way to avoid aggressive surgery. 


oncology at the Cancer Institute of New 
Jersey, and mastectomies and drug ther- 
apies are used for treatment. 

But in many ways, breast cancer for 
men is not tbe same- Because breast 
cancer makes up only 0.2 percent of all 
male cancers, many men do not know 
that they can develop breast cancer, so 
they do not monitor themselves for 
signs of the disease as women have been 
encouraged to do. (More than a quarter 
of women with cancer have breast can- 
cer.) 

Because breast cancer is so rare in 
men, it is sometimes overlooked. Some 
doctors dismiss die lumps because they, 
too, do not associate breast cancer with 
men, Mr. Stafford said. He added that he 
had once encountered a radiologist who 
told him that mammograms could not be 
used for men. 

Delays in diagnoses mean that breast 
cancer in men is usually discovered at a 
later stage, said Dr. william Burak of 
the Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital 
and Research Institute at Ohio State 
University in Columbus, Ohio. And that 
means a lower survival rate, he said. 

Many men have trouble adjusting to a 
diagnosis of breast cancer because it 
does not fit their self-image. Some men 
say they feel feminine and get embar- 
rassed, said Joan Fromewick. a psy- 
chotherapist in New York City who 
deals with patients suffering from ill- 
ness or loss. 

“Men think they have chests, not 
breasts,” she said. “They don’t asso- 
ciate nipples with breasts. Women are 
very prepared to worry about breast 
cancer as part of being a woman. 

After men with breast cancer come to 
nips with the reality of the disease, they 
find that everything is oriented toward 
women. For example, mammography 
waiting rooms, where patients sit in 
flimsy disposable robes, are for women 
only, said Joanne Lester, a nurse prac- 
titioner who works with Dr. Burak. Men 
who get mammograms are scheduled 
early in the morning or at the end of the 
day, when no women are around, Mr. 
Stafford said. 

Because the disease is rare among 
men, there are no support groups just for 
men, Mr. Stafford said. Meetings of 
existing support groups are only for 
women or revolve around women's 
concerns. 

For Norm Rich, 62, of Long Grove, 
Dlinois, one support group meeting was 
enoagh. People talked about issues like 
breast reconstruction, which most men 
do not need. 

“I said to myself, I don’t need this,” 
Mr. Rich said. “My wife is my support 
group.” 

Mr. Stafford started a Web site on 
male breast cancer to share information. 


and he set up a list of people who receive 
information by e-mail. There are now 40 
people on the List. 

Through a friend, Mr. Rich became 
involved in a breast cancer organization 
called Y-ME, which puts him in touch 
with men with breast cancer who want 
to talk to survivors. Mr. Rich said that he 
had talked to about 25 people in the last 
three years but that the calls were be- 
coming more frequent. 

“There are more coming out of the 
closet and saying it is a male disease,” 
he said. “They just want to know if they 
can survive this. Sometimes, if it is at a 
serious stage, I might refer them to a 
cancer center where they see male 
breast cancer patients more often.” 

Many of the questions Mr. Stafford 
gets revolve around treatment, he said. 
Tbe questions include “What does the 
medication do?” and “How sick am I 
going to get?" 

Mr. Stafford’s Web site address is 
http://interacLwithus.com/interact/mbc. 



in? 




-c 


Sieve Kjgen/The Mew Yufk Time 

Bob Stafford has set up a Web site for men who have breast cancer. .* 


BOOKS 


THE CHIN KISS KING 

By Ana Veciana-Suare r. 311 pages. $24. 
Farrar. Straus & Giroux. 

Reviewed by Richard Bernstein 

T HE smell of honeysuckle creeps in- 
to Cuca's room on the morning of 
Leap Day 1992, bringing with it a deep 
though unexplained melancholy. Cuca, 
who is “old and useful and smart,” has 
never seen honeysuckle in Miami, 
where she lives near her daughter, Ad- 
ela, and Adela’s daughter, Maribel, who 
is about to give birth. 

So the smell of honeysuckle comes as 
an olfactory signal of exile in Ana Vec- 
i an a- Suarez’s wise and touching story 
of three women from Cuba facing the 
heartbreak and frustration of a biolo- 
gical accidenL 

Exile is a natural theme, given the 
Cuban origins of Cuca, Adela and Mari- 
bel, each of them representing a dif- 
ferent generation and a different style of 
living, but, in fact. Veciana-Suarez 
treats that theme as a kind of background 
music providing folkloric richness to a 
story that could be set among any people 
anywhere. Tbe deeper themes of “The 
Chin Kiss King” are love and loss, 
betrayal and grief, the impossibility of 
consolation when life and suffering 
seem to be of the same cloth. 

This is the first novel by Veciana- 
Suarez, who writes a column for The 
Miami Herald, and it is piquant and 
aromatic, written with a spirited sense of 
inner worlds and human foibles. Early 
on, especially. Veciana-Suarez’s interi- 
or dialogues tend slightly toward pre- 
ciousness and a narrative fragmentation 
that seems derivative, like a work for a 
college writing seminar. 

But very soon her three main char- 
acters and several subsidiary ones take 
on distinctive shapes, and as we plunge 
into her story's central episode, the writ- 
ing becomes sure and strong. By the 
end, she has a firm grip on the prickly 
individuality of her characters or the 
mysteriousness of their fate. 


“You have everything, God,” Mari- 
bel ponders silently midway through 
Veciana-Suarez’s story. “You have 
bread and wine, the smells of a kitchen, 
the colors of all the flowers, the sky, the 
sun, the moon, the planets and the galax- 
ies and everything beyond. Why do you 
want my baby, too?" 

The baby that prompts Maribel’ s 
theological ruminations is bom on the 
opening day of * ‘The Chin Kiss King,” 
Feb. 29, 1992, when Cuca is sniffing 
that inexplicable honeysuckle and com- 
muning with her dead husband while 
Adela plays Lotto at the neighborhood 
bodega. 

The baby, whom Maribel eventually 
names Victor Eduardo, is bora with an 
extra chromosome, a problem that 
Maribel. dazed by the commotion of 
giving birth, fails to grasp even though 
she bears snatches of doctor talk in the 
air “severe mental retardation, heart 
defects ...” 

When Maribel does realize that God 
or nature or whatever it is out there has 
played her and Victor Eduardo a nasty 
pick, it is as if “she was being dropped 
into a lightless, bottomless pit with cold 
wails and slimy bugs and putrid smells 
and water that dripped, dripped, 
dripped." 

T HE rest of “The Chin Kiss King” 
follows from Victor Eduardo's af- 
fliction, with Veciana-Suarez using it 
the way Albert Camus used the plague: 
to delineate moral choices and aspects 
of character in the face of disaster. As 
we live through Maribel’s gropings for 
meaning, the people in her Ufe reveal 
themselves. 

Cuca, who knows that Maribel views 
her as “ignorant, backward, foolishly 
romantic.'' knows loss firsthand, hav- 
ing lost three children to disease before 
one, Adela, survived. She talks to the 
dead, her husband especially but also 
her mother, known as Mama Cieofe, 
who reminds her that “the life you lead, 
that we all once led, is like exile.” 
Adela, a former beautician who is 


having an affair with the husband of the 
owner of tbe bodega where she buys her 
Lotto tickets, is a female equivalent to 
most of tbe men in this story: selfish. 

f ileasure-loving, looking for the quick 
ix. 

Then there are the men, Carlos, Ad- 
ela’s lover, who is the butcher at her 
friend Fefa’s store, and Eduardo, the 
absent father of Victor Eduardo, who is 
“handsome in a frivolous sort of way, 
like a flourish or a curlicue on the swirl 
of a Rococo column.” 

And there are the dead men as well, 
especially Miguel, the father whom 
Maribel adores and idealizes, not be- 
cause he was such a great hombre but 
because he left when she was a little girl 
and then died, thereby becoming a 
fantasy figure in contrast to her mother, 
who remained behind. 

In this small world. Veciana-Suarez 
has set a kind of female bonding story, 
one in which the three generations of 
Cuca, Adela and Maribel unite in their 
love for Maribel’s stricken infant, 
though each rises to die moral occasion 
in her own way — Cuca as an act of 
philosophical resignation, Adela as a 
willed sacrifice and Maribel with the 
blind, instinctual impulse of a mother's 
love. 

Men in this story fail both practically 
and morally, which seems less a fem- 
inist cri de coeur by Veciana-Suarez 
than her sad reflection on the real world 
these days. 

Lest this seem to be a depressing tale, 
ir must be said that Veciana-Suarez ’s 
spirited storytelling style invests “The 
Chin Kiss King”- with a buoyancy that 
keeps it from sinking into gloom. Her 
characters are too earthy, too blunt and 
too brave to be overcome by their dis- 
mal situation. And tbe chorus of the 
dead speaking from long-ago Cuba, 
their thoughts passed through the me- 
dium of Cuca, have a refreshing, good- 
humored candor. 


Richard Bernstein is on the staff of 
The New York Times. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

F OUR Polish stars. Adam 
Zmudzinski, Marek Szy- 
manowski, Marcin Les- 
niewski and Cezary Balicki. 
won the Spingold Knockout 
Team Championship in Al- 
buquerque, New Mexico. 

Teamed with them were 
Tipton Golias, who sponsored 
the visitors, and Grant Baze, 
who captained the squad. 

In the final, they won by 36 
imps against James Cayne. 
Mark Feldman and Alan 
Son tag of Manhattan; Chuck 
Burger of West Bloomfield, 
Michigan; Mike Passe 11 of 
Dallas, and Michael Seamon 
of Miami Beach, after trailing 
in the first half of the match. 


The Cayne team has a strange 
streak: it has been second in 
three consecutive national 

The PoUstMuaigin of vic- 
tory would have been wider 
but for a disaster on the 
diagramed deal near die end 
of tbe match. Seamon and 
PasselL, North and South, 
were desperate to gain ground 
and bid to a virtually hopeless 
six hearts. 

The opening one club bid 
had silenced Zmu dzinski as 
East, but he could not resist 
doubling six hearts. This was 
apparently a Lighmer double, 
asking for a club lead, so 
Balicki as West obliged by 
leading that suit 

Passell had redoubled, 
which is mathematically sen- 


sible when a slam is doubled, 
and now took full advantage 
of his opportunity. He fin- 
essed the club nine, forcing 
the ace. and ruffed. He could 
now draw trumps ending in 
dummy and discard three 
losers on club winners. 

The lead of any other suit 
would probably have defeated 
the slam. South's only legit- 
imate hope, would have been 
to ruff out the club ace and find 
the ten falling conveniently. 
But as the cards lie. the lead of 
the club nine from dummy 
might have tricked East into a 
fatal play of the ace. 

The contract in the other 
room was a normal fair hearts, 
and the Cayne ream gained 16 
imps when it could have lost 
15 with a different lead. 


NORTH lO) 
*8 75 
O K Q3 

*KQ J9 


WEST 
* K3 
VJ8 

•> 10 863 3 
A 107 5 4 


EAST 

* O J 94 
C — 

* A Q 3 7 

* A 6632 

SOUTH 
* A 10 6 2 
C> a 10976543 
«■ 9 


Both sWes were vulnerable. The 


bidding: 

North 

East 

South 

West 

1* 

Pass 

I ? 

Pass 

1 N-T. 

Pass 

2 « 

Pass 

21? 

Pass 

3<? 

Pass 

4* 

Pass 

4 * 

Pass 

S7 

Pass 

SO 

Pass 

Pass 

DHL 

RedbL 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 



West led the dub four. 



How to Rate a Female Chimp 


By Natalie Angier 

New York. Tunes Service 



EW YORK — Much to the 
surprise of primatologists, a 
dominant female chimpan- 
zee turns out to be a lot Like 
Alan Greenspan, the all-mighty czar of 
the Federal Reserve. 

He clears his throat, and stock mar- 
kets tumble. She twitches an ear, and her 
underlings tremble. He controls the 
economy without so much as passing a 
law. She affects her group’s fecundity' 
without so much as raising a paw. 

Both man arid ape offer proof that you 
don't have to speak much, you don’t 
even have to cany a big stick, and still 
you can rule the world. 

Scientists have discovered that fe- 
male chimpanzees, long believed to 
have little or no interest in pulling rank 
on each other, in fact form subtle social 
hierarchies that profoundly influence 
the fate and fertility of every female in 
the group. 

Working in the Gombe National Park 
of Tanzani a with Jane Goodall. Anne 
Pusey and Jennifer Williams of the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota have determined 
that female chimpanzees differ far more 
in their individual ability to bear and 
rear offspring than anybody had sus- 
pected, and that one of the biggest 
factors influencing a female’s repro- 
ductive prowess is her social status. 

The babies of a high-ranking female 
are much likelier to survive to inde- 
pendence than are the offspring of a 
subordinate chimpanzee, and the 
daughters of a dominant mother reach 
sexual maturity four years earlier than 
those of a low-ranking female, a spec- 
tacular advantage that can transform a 
dominant family into a dynastic one. 

But for all the discrepancies in pros- 
pects that are tied to social status, female 
chimpanzees appear indifferent to dis- 
plays of power. They do not brandish 
fallen branches or kick over oil drums, 
as a male will to flaunt his status. They 
rarely fight with each other, and when 
they do. it is hard to tell who won. 

They are not big socializes, spending 
most of their time alone in the forest 
with their dependent young. Should a 
female encounter a male from her 
group, she will make the appropriate 
noises of subordination, giving off a 
little hiui-hnn-hnn sound called a pant- 
grunt, as a low-ranking male will in the 
presence of a dominant male. But when 
two females meet, they often ignore 
each other. 

“The big surprise here is that dom- 
inance rank is so subtle as to be nonex- 
istent. yet it has huge impact on re- 
productive success,” said Ms. 
Williams, who is working on her doc- 
toral dissertatioo. 

The findings of the study appear in the 


current issue of the journal Science. 

“People had emphasized the impor- 
tance of rank among male chimpanzees, 
because it was so easy to see,” said Dr. 
Craig Packer of the University of Min- 
nesota. who did not contribute to the 
chimpanzee study but is familiar with it. 
“The females looked like the nebbishes 
of the woods.” 

When Dr. Pusey and her colleagues 
began analyzing chimpanzee behavior- 
al patterns’ more carefully, they found 
that beneath tbe females' apparently 
distracted exteriors skulked true polit- 
ical animals. 

Using data from the renowned 
Gombe chimpanzee field study that Dr. 
Goodall began in 1960, the scientists 
assessed dominance by looking at all 
pant-grunts exchanged in a group of 10 
females from 1970 through 1992. 

They found that while pant-grunting 
is not an inevitable feature of female 
greeting, when it did occur between a 
given pair, it was always in the same 


’ The surprise is that 
rank is so subtle, yet it 
has huge impact on 
reproductive success. ' 


direction: if female A pant-grunted to 
female B one day. A would pant-grunt 
to B the following year. By considering 
this vocalization, the researchers found 
that the females aligned themselves into 
a fairly stable hierarchy of low-, middle- 
and high-ranking apes. 

The scientists then mapped out the 
reproductive histories of the 1 0 females, 
a difficult task for a long-lived and slow- 
breeding species like the chimpanzee. In 
their analysis, they counted as a success 
any offspring that survived to 5. the age 
of weaning. The group variability in 
fruitfulness proved significant. 

Several of the low r -ranking females 
had many pregnancies and births, but 
then lost most or all their infants, either 
to predation, poor nutrition, illness, ac- 
cidenr. infanticide or causes unknown. 
By contrast, the highest-ranking female 
of the group. Fifi. is also the most suc- 
cessful mother. 

Now 38, Fifi has not lost a single one 
of her seven offspring. Five already are 
independent — including two sons in 
their 20s, a 1 6- year-old daughter who is 
herself a mother and a 1 2-year-old 
daughter who is pregnant — while the 
youngest two are on the cusp of wean- 
ing. The average age of reproductive 
maturity for a chimpanzee is 13. but the 
daughters of high-ranking females 
began breeding as young as 9. 

The scientists do not yet know what 


distinguishes a high-ranking female 
from a subordinate, or why the offspring 
of dominant females fare better than 
those of the lowly. Dominant females 
are not any bigger or fleshier than their 
underlings, nor are they more overtly f 1 
aggressive. High-rankers tend to 
somewhat older than subordinates, and a 
few females manage to gain in stature as 
they age, but most stay put on the social 
pyramid no matter how long they live. j 
The scientists suspect that dominant 
females exert their pre-eminence ii| 
their choice of feeding terrains. Each 
female has her own turf that she forages 
through every day, and the dominants 
could be monopolizing the spots where 
the food is particularly nutritious. : 

In addition, because feeding ranges 
overlap, the researchers theorize dial 
should two females bump into each othJ 
er while foraging, the high-status fej 
male gets first dibs on any good fruits or 
nuts that may be around. | 

“One thing we’re trying to look aj 
now is whether dominant females have a 
more steady body size,” said Ms. Wll-j 
Hams. “It could be that they don’t lose - 
weight in poor times.” Fluctuations in 
body weight could affect fertility, lacta-; 
tion and the ability to fend off disease, i 
The scientists propose that a female’s 
social rank is determined fairly early iri 
life. Some daughters stay in their natal 
home, and may inherit their station front 
their mother. More often, a young fe- 
male will emigrate from her birthplace 
and join another group.* J 

It is during those early months of 
integration that a female makes het 
greatest effort to seek high status and is« 
likeliest to engage other females in 
fights, or at least eamesL cacophonous 
discussions. After a while, a female ap-; 
pears to learn her place and from then on 
will grunt or be grunted at accordingly.- 


\ol 

(hi 





ATHLEEN KERR, a re-j 
searcher .and therapist at the! 
Georgetown Family Center; 
in Washington, has also been, 
analyzing ihe Gombe data on female^ 
chimps as part of an effort to understand; 
mother- infant relationships. In her ob-^ 
servations. the chimpanzee mothers; 
most adept at rearing young tend to bej 
‘ 'very relaxed but conscientious. ” They.’ 
are vigilant yet calm, staying watchful; m 
for danger while encouraging their 
young to explore their surroundings. ! 

In comparison, the mothers with; 
comparatively low success at raising! 
babies to maturity “tend to be res trie-', 
tive and overprotective of their off-| 
spring,” she said, “which translates in-’ 
to the offspring being less confidenr and,’ 
exploratory, and more restricted in their 
approach to the world.” 1 

It’s an old story: the strong get; 
stronger, while the weak get weaker — ; 
if they don ’t get eaten first. < 


i » 
t 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

t Whey-faced 
« Popular snack 
10 Durable 
transports, tor 
short 

14 Proposal 
defeated In 
1982 


is How some 
coffee Is served 
to Administer 
17 O.K. 

f* cava 

20 Outcasts 
si Indiana: 
Hoosier :: 
Nevada : 


EMBASSY SERVICE 

Furnished/ Unfurnished Rentals 


YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT M PARIS 
Tel: 433 ( 0)14720 3005 


23 Inca fortunes 

24 Kyrgyz city 

26 Most basic 

27 61 -Across, for 
example 

sa They may be 
seeded 

30 More than 
tubby 

31 Automatic start 

33 East 

39 1989 Jack 
Lemmon film 

ae Epitome of 
sharpness 
ae Prone 

42 Swear by. with 
"on" 

43 Dump 

45 Monomaniac. 

informally 
47 McCurry. to 
Clinton 

40 S-Down. for 
example 

B2 Office staple 
54 London theater 

Old 

se N.BA's Nick 

Van 

56 Pul UP 
56 Shock 
ea British title 
aiOK 
ea Ust under 

»4 Take ol 

absence 
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ae Forswear 
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response 
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13 Like 
propaganda 

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play in two parts 

29 'Comprende’- 
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si Merges 
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a* - Death' 

(Grieg work) 

02 Point, in 
taw 



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^ M. 2. 

Solution to Puzzle of Aug. 13 . 


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*>> 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 14k 1997 


PAGE 11 


^ to Our firm, Dapatkn 

s®ftassa2sfe 

5 1 »« » taSS&S?. 

" recort - s <™ 
SJ!* con >Pames applied for licenses 
jSd IWW f0mMt- “ Sony s P° kesman 

f t ti*e three companies were 

•seeking to certify their own DVD-RaM 
.fcrraat m Europe, capable of recording 
,J-0 gigabytes of information on each 
rSide of a 12-centimeter optical disk. 

Tbe move dealt another blow to the 
10-company consortium that has 
struggled to agree on common standards 
■for DVDs. It also raises the possibility 
of a battle similar to the one between the 
Beta and VHS videocassette recorder 
formats — a fight Sony ultimately lost. 


s and HP to Make Own Format for Digital Videodisks 


- V? Sony and Philips had orig- 
inally developed a DVD format but re- 
luctantly abandoned it to join the con- 
sortium on common standards. 

Identical in appearance to music 
compact disks, DVDs can store far more 
information. Current DVD players, 
whether hooked to- a television to view 


Forum, includes Sony’s biggest rivals, 
such as Toshiba Corp, and Matsushita 
Electric Industrial Co. 

Sony's new disk is the same size as 


ufac hirers to be bound hand and foot by 
only one standard, 1 * he said. Competition 


should be like that in floppy disks, he 
standards. ~< 


said, which had many si 


’Con- 


movies or to a computer for games, are 


for playback only. DVD machines that 
also can record are expected later this 
year. 

Sony, a member of the consortium, 
will continue to make playback-only 
DVDs under the common standard but 
will break with the group when the 
companies begin making recordable 
disks. 

“Sony simply followed its policy of 
developing new technology, and the op- 
tical disks are no exception.” a spokes- 
man for the company said. 

The consortium, known as the DVD 


This alliance is the latest salvo in the battle for control 
of the market for next-generation storage devices, 
which will probably be worth over $6 billion a year. 


the one developed by the group but has 
15 percent more storage capacity. The 
two formats are not compatible because 
recording methods differ. 

Sony says its format will make it 
easier to play disks designed for play- 
back-only machines on the machines 
that are able to record. 

Hiroshi TaJcada, an analyst at BZW 
Securities (Japan) Ltd., applauded 
Sony’s move. “It was strange for man- 


- a t» 




fj 




?• • 


.V: 


K 


--.i 


'4 




Nokia Bets 


On Mobile 


Telephones 

; Finnish Firm Moves 
To Outflank Motorola 


By Youssef M. Ibr ahim 
Net i’ York Times Service 


ELSINKI — About five 
'ears ago, Nokia Group 



IT 

I I hatched a telecommunica- 
JL. -A-tions project with the code 
name “Responder” and formed a se- 
cretive unit to carry ir out. Some 25 
.researchers, managers and scientists 
gathered discreetly in Tampere, a bas- 
„tion of high-technology research in 
' Finland, and were given this broad 
4 mission: “Look attfae next challenge” 
in tapping the exploding world of 
wireless communications. 

That challenge, they decided, was to 
combine Internet, compiler and phone 
technologies to produce a portable ma- 
chine that could use all of them. When 
presented with Ae idea. Nokia’s top 
, management pressed their engineers to 
."move. t quickly to outflank the com- 
pany ’Vtwo gi^ competitors. Motorola 
1 Inc. of the United States and Ericsson 
, AB of Sweden. And sure enough, the 
' Nokia 9000, or Communicator, will hit 
! American stores this fall. 

It is a risky move. For with mobile 
phones everywhere, only the most in- 
novative ones will turn a decent profit, 
; but it fits Nokia’s aggressive strategy. 

The company has not only trans- 
formed the portable phone— with five 
factories around the globe turning out 
some 1 .5 million phones a month, it is 
' the world’s No. 2 producer, after Mo- 
torola — but has also transformed 
iiself from an old-line paper company 
into a leading technology company. 

Along the way. it has also helped 
^transform the Finnish economy. 

“W'e used to have two clusters of 
strength in the Finnish economy: 
Wood and paper, and metals. Now we 
have a third: it’s called Nokia,” said 
Kuit Northman, chainnan of Helsinki 
[Telephone Co., a private telecommu- 
nications company that is a big client 
of Nokia, ... , _ 

1 Though its population is only 5 mil- 
lion. Finland is by all accounts the 
"world’s most wired country, with a 
highly educated and technologically 
sawy population. . — 

; Nokia, with an ever-growing staff or 
34,000 scientists, researchers, 
salespeople and other employees m 45 
, countries — 6,000 of whan joined last 
vear alone — is rapidly joimng the 
ranks of international household names 

like Sony Corp. and Microsoft Coro. 

Inside Nokia House, the new Hel- 
sinki headquarters, a growing sensjot 
confidence is palpable This ecolo- 
gically sensitive" building, an arc“' 
tectural marvel set on the shore °f the 

Baltic Sea, is 
- glass plates flooding 
i atriums and offices with the tight of 


Nokia's Latest Gadget 



The Nokia 9000's Features 


• Portable phone 

• Internet access 

• Built-in World Wide Web 
browser 

■ Calculator and clock 

• Can send e-mail and faxes 

■ Stores notes and addresses 

■ Connects to computers and 
printers through a built-in 
infrared link 

• Works for 120 minutes 
continuously or 30 hours 

. on stanc&y 


Share of 1996 worldwide 
cellular phone shipments 


Source: Ostaquesr vta Nokia 



KYT 


Finland's long summer days. 

As the Communicator project pro- 
gressed. the focus became to create, 
essentially, tile world’s first movable, 
pocket-sized office. The device would 
allow conference calls, receive and 
send faxes, handle e-mail and cruise 
tire Internet — all from a moving car, 
train or sidewalk cafe. It would, says 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


Ytjo Neuvo, senior vice president for 
product creation, ‘‘turn one-plus-one 
into more than two,” which he calls a 
creed of Nokia’s corporate culture. 

The culture must work. Revenues hit 
$8.5 billion last year, and Nokia's share 
price went from 166 Finnish imikkaa 
($29.84) in January 1996 to 307 a year 
later, and finished Wednesday at 465. 

If is an article of faith in Finland that 
by 2002 well over half the world’s 
data, voice and Images will travel 
without wires, which is why Nokia is 
heavily focused on what its vice pres- 
ident for communications, Arva 
Suominen, calls, the manufacture of 
“mobile phones and evejytbing you 
have in between.” 

Long gone are the days when Nokia 
was known for its paper-processing 
mills nestled by the Nokia River. 
Nokia executives calculate that by 
2000 the world will have 500 million 
mobile phones, up from 135 million 
today. And 60 percent of them, they 
predict, will use a technology sup- 


Asia. Latin America and the Middle 
East will ensure growth well into the 
next century. 

“Our objective is to continue to 
grow annually by 25 to 35 percent a 
year," says Pii Kotilainen, vice pres- 
ident for human resources, and Nokia 
employees have a clear incentive to 
meet those targets. Every worker gets 
a bonus of 5 percent of salary if profit 
growth beats 35 percent, and some 
2,000 top executives also get lucrative 
stock options. 

Such growth, though, is by no 
means guaranteed. Luke Szymczak, a 
telecommunications analyst aL 
Prudential Securities in New York, 
agrees that “if you looked at Nokia 10 
years ago, you would have never pre- 
dicted they’d be where they are 
today.” But he cautions that the com- 
pany may be putting too many eggs in 
one basket “I mean 55 percent of their 
mix is into handsets. This is a very 
favorable thing right now , but could be 
a risk sometime in the future.” 

For one thing, Mr. Szymczak says. 
Motorola is catching up quickly in 
Nokia’s specialty, "smart mobile 
phones. And other analysts note that 
many other companies, like Phillips 
Electronics NV, Lucent Technologies 
Inc. and Sony, are also set to produce 
mobile phones. The risk is that what 
happened with color televisions could 
happen to portable phones — with 
rising volumes but falling profits 


on 


each phone, 
i Nokia 


for Mobile Communications. 

Nokia’s upbeat mood is enhanced 
by a widely shared conviction among 
its executives that new markets in 


To Nokia executives, the immediate 
risk lies in failing to meet demand for 
smart phones like the Communicator, 
those with added features that they 
believe consumers will pay more for. 


rUPBENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


Aug. 13 Libid-Ubor Rates 


Aug. 13 


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sinners have ultimately chosen the best.' ’ 
be said. 

The consortium was formed partly 
with the intention of avoiding a repeat of 
the battle between the Beta and VHS 
standards for videocassette recorders. 
Sony alone backed Beta and suffered a 
costly defeat when it was forced to aban- 
don it because of a dearth of movies. 

From the consortium's beginning, the 
members have squabbled over technical 


standards, patent ownership and how to 
divide royalties. 

In April, for example. Sony. Philips 
and Pioneer Electronic Corp. decided to 
start licensing DVD patents to other 
manufacturers by themselves, contra- 
vening a plan by the consortium to grant 
patents as a group. 

Philips said its venture with Sony and 
Hewlett-Packard was limited to record- 
able DVD technology for personal com- 
puters. It emphasized that it would stick 
to already-agreed formats for nonre- 
cording home video and audio tech- 
nology, the subject of a 10-company 
agreement on the use of DVDs for home 
entertainment purposes. 


Philips said the current question 
could not be compared to the Beta-vs.- 
VHS video-player battle of the 1980s 
because the rift involves only data stor- 
age for computers that can be rewritten^ 
and the standard for movies and audio 


“Philips and Sony backed the wrong 
y in the vit‘ 


pony in the videocassene market,” said 
Rob Friedman, senior vice president at 
Franklin Mutual Advisers. "They wer- 
en't a marketing power then. This is a 
marketing gamble for them.” 


remains intact. 

Still, analysts said, it was the latest 
sal vo in a battle for control of the market 
for next-generation storage devices, 
which will probably exceed the current 
$6 billion a year market for CD-ROM 
players. 

The Sony-Motsushita split could also 
provide an opening for a competing 
computer storage system developed by 
Fujitsu Ltd., Japan’s second-largest 
computer maker. 

' ‘It'll cause confusion among con- 
sumers and that could hamper the 
spread of these products,” said Hiroshi 
Takeda, industry analyst at BZW Se- 
curities. (AP. Bloomberg) 


Indonesia Moves to Defend Rupiah 

Central Bank Intervenes and Raises Rates to Arrest Slide 


CanfUtti K Oia Suff From QupaL-bn 

JAKARTA — Bank Indonesia, the 
central bank, said Wednesday that it had 
intervened in the currency market after 
the rupiah fell 1.7 percent against the 
dollar, and it pledged to continue to 
defend the currency. 

The intervention followed a failed 
attempt to halt the rupiah's slide with an 
interest-rate increase of one percentage 
point on most money-market rates. 

The rupiah breached the lower limit 
of its permitted trading band against the 
dollar, and the U.S. currency closed at 
2,650 rupiah, up from 2,615 the pre- 
vious day. 

“We will intervene as necessary as 
long as it takes to return stability to the 
currency market,” said Wahyu Sindu. 
the deputy head of Bank Indonesia's 
foreign-exchange department. 

He said he did not know the extent of 
the intervention or whether it would 
continue. 

Dealers attributed the slide to fallout 
from the lingering weakness of other 
regional currencies and to a local news- 
paper report quoting an economist as 
saying Bank Indonesia should allow the 
rupiah to find its own level. - 

Sjahrir, an economist and brokerage 
owner, was quoted in Kompas as saying 
the market would ultimately decide a 
fair value for the rupiah. 

“According to me, just let the rupiah 
fan to 2,700 or 2,800” to the dollar, Mr. 
Sjahrir was quoted as saying. “The cen- 


tral bank does not have to do any- 
thing.'’ 

Once speculators realize that the cen- 
tral bank hasn't done anything, he said, 
the dollar will already be overvalued. 

Bank Indonesia's Mr. Sindu denied 
reports that the bank was about to widen 
its intervention band, which would al- 
low the rupiah to weaken further. 

The central bank's sale of dollars for 
rupiah fueled a brief rally. 

“They’d lose too much credibility if 
they didn't intervene” after the rupiah 
breached the band, said Sani Hamid, a 
currency analyst at MMS International 
in Singapore. 

Mr. Hamid said he did not expect the 
bank to risk depleting its foreign-ex- 
change reserves to defend the currency 


and said he expected the rupiah to weak- 
Jiah received a brief lift after 


en. The rupis 
the central bank raised interest rates for 
central bank certificates of all maturities 
by 100 basis points. 

The Jakarta Stock Marker Composite 
Index fell 4.34 points, or 0.66 percent, to 
658.60, as 80 stocks fell and 48 rose. 

“High rates will trigger a banking 
crisis, and there will likely be a run on 
banks, and- for businesses, the rate of 
bankruptcy will rise,” said Michael 


Lim, the head of the treasury department 
tank. 


at Standard Chartered B: 

Higher interest rates ratchet up cor- 
porate borrowing costs, inhibiting in- 
vestment and slowing growth. 

Analysts said the move to raise rates. 


which followed a 50- basis-point cur in 
rates on terms longer than one week on 
Friday, was inevitable in the face of the 
rupiah's slide and could be a prelude to 
the removal of the intervention band. 

Indonesia's booming economy has 
been hurt by a weakening currency and 
a falling stock market in the run-up to 
this weekend’s 5 2d anniversary of the 
country’s independence. 

President Suharto plans to deliver a 
suite -of- the -nation address Saturday, 
the eve of its independence day, but 
analysts said they did not expect him to 
refer to the economy’s troubles. Also 
worrisome was the prospect of an ex- 
tended drought this year because of El 
Nino, the name given to a warm water 
current that disturbs weather patterns in 
Pacific Rim nations and is likely to peak 
in December. 

Still, economists say, the celebrations 
Sunday should be an occasion to mark 
the strides Indonesia's economy has 
made since independence in 1945. 

“Indonesia has achieved extraordi- 
nary success.” said Frans Seda, an 
economist and former cabinet minister, 
noting that the country’s per-capita in- 
come had risen in the past three decades 
to above $1,000 from $50. • 

Economic growth has clipped along 
at 7 percenr or more a year for the past 
decade, and the government has pro- 
jected growth of 7.1 percent for the 
current fiscal year. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP) 


Huizenga Cries Foul on Lawsuits 


By Robyn Meredith 

New York Times Service 


DETROIT — A vicious legal fight 
between Wayne Huizenga’s Republic 
Industries Inc. and two Japanese auto- 


makers is proving that few problems can 
> deadly to a stock as the uncertainty 


beast 

created by big lawsuits. 

Republic’s stock closed Tuesday at 
$23.4375, having lost nearly half its 
value since reaching a high of $42.75 on 
Jan. 23. On Wednesday, it slipped a 
further 6.25 cents, to end at $23,375. 

This precipitous drop in a rising mar- 
ket is particularly serious fra Republic, 
which has an expansion strategy of us- 
ing its stock to buy up other busi- 
nesses. 

Republic blames the stock slide on 
Toyota Motor Corp. and Honda Motor 
Co. — which have sued Republic to 
block it from buying some of their deal- 
erships. 

“they are deliberately trying to hurt 
the stock.” Mr. Huizenga said in an 
interview Tuesday. 

“I think they know they can't stop us, 
but 1 think they are just trying to slow us 
down.” 

The automakers denied they were de- 


liberately trying to h tin Republic's 
stock and said their lawsuits were in- 
tended to force Republic to comply with 
their rules limiting the rapid acquisition 
of dealerships. 

‘ 'There’s not one shred of truth to his 
allegation,” said James Press, senior 
vice president of Toyota Motor Sales 
U.S. A. Inc. “When they disregard our 
policies, what other choice do we 
have?” 

Both Toyota and Honda have allowed 
Republic to buy some dealerships, but 
have sought to limit the number it can 
buy quickly. 

An Gamer, a Honda spokesman, said 
his company's suit had nothing to do 
with Republic's stock price. “Our in- 
tent is to protect the Honda brand name 
and the Honda image.” he said. “The 
only way to challenge them is in 
court.” 

Wall Street analysts agreed that the 
lawsuits have hurt investor confidence 
in Republic, though opinion is divided 
on the extent to which the automakers 
have used the courts as a tool in their 
commercial fight with Mr. Huizenga *s 
company. 

Since the winter. Republic has agreed 
to buy 153 dealerships belonging to 


various automakers, becoming the 
largest U.S. owner of car dealerships. 
Nearly all the transactions have been 
paid for with Republic stock. 

But the decline in the stock's value 
means that nearly iwice as many shares 
are now required for comparably valued 
deals. In Republic's view, that shows 
that the filing of lawsuits can sometimes 
do as much damage as the eventual 
rulings do. 

“It has had a definite effect on our 
stock,” said Mr. Huizenga, who ac- 
knowledged that buying dealerships 
had become more costly. “It is ex- 
pensive. but we are still going forward 
because we have a strategy and a 
plan.” 

The major U.S. automakers have not 


raised significant objections to Repub- 

ey ha\ 


lie’s series of deals because they have 
been trying to thin their own ranks of 
dealers, and Republic's consolidation 
plans align with their interests. 

Some have even taken a page from 
Republic’s playbook: Ford Motor Co. 
has begun to consolidate its dealerships 
in Indianapolis and Salt Lake City by 
investing with local dealers there to 
form groups that will close the weakest 
outlets. 


Strong Profit 
Lifts Applied 
Materia] Stock 


Bloomberg News 

SANTA CLARA, Califor- 
nia — Shares of Applied Ma- 
terials Inc. rose $9.1875 to 
$99.4375 Wednesday after 
the world’s top provider of 
chipmaking equipment re- 
potted third-quarter net profit 
that exceeded analysts’ ex- 
pectations. 

A one-time gain of $80 mil- 
lion related to a litigation set- 
tlement with Novellas Sys- 
tems Inc. helped lift earnings 
to$186.6 million in the quarter 
ended July 27 from $169.1 
million a year earlier, the com- 
pany said. Sales slipped to 
$1.06 billion frwn $1.12 bil- 
lion, but were 17 percent 
above the previous quarter’s. 

Shares in Micron Technol- 
ogy Inc. plunged $7,625 to 
$42.50 after analysts warned 
that falling prices for memory 
chips used in personal com- 
puters would hurt the chip- 
maker’s earnings. 




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PAGE 12 





aw 

^ H 


Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


I Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: . 

Lucent to Take a Charge for Oetel 

MURRAY HIU„ New Jersey (Bloomberg) — Lucent Tech- 
nologies Inc. said Wednesday that it expected to take a $950 
milli on charge in its fourth quarter related to its $1.8 billion 
purchase of the voice-mail company Octel Communications 
Cocp. The charge, about $1.47 a share, will res air in a loss. 

In a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. Lucent 
said the charge was related to “in process" research and 
development. Lucent said the charge probably would come 
when the acquisition was completed, which is expected to be 
in die quarter ending Sept. 30. Analysts had predicted a 50 
cents-per-share gain for the quarter. 

• United Parcel Service of America Inc has declared efforts 
to end the 10-day-old strike by Teamsters union to be at an 
impasse, even as Labor Secretary Alexis Herman sought to ger 
talks restarted. No negotiations are scheduled. 

• Chrysler Corp. said prices for 1998 vehicles would average 
0.6 percent less than those for equivalent 1997 models. 

• Seagram C o-'s fourth-quarter profit before gains rose to $48 
million from $22 million m the like quarter last year, led by its 
entertainment and drinks businesses. Sales rose 5 percent, to 
S3.02 billion. An after-tax gain from the $1.39 billion sale of 
half of its stake in Time Warner Lac. resulted in net income of 
S 148 million, up from $89 million the previous year. 

• Dillard's Inc posted a 12 percent increase in net profit, to 
$44.3 million, for the retailer's second quarter as sales rose 8 
percent, to $1.45 billion. 

• Wang Laboratories Inc's fourth-quarter net profit rose 51 
percent, to $12.4 million, over the fourth quarter of 1996. 
Sales increased 36 percent, to $338 million, on new business 
in network management and desktop computing. 

• Columbia/HC A Healthcare Corp. was formally declared 
a target for criminal investigation by federal prosecutors 
examining whether the top U.S. hospital chain had defrauded 

the federal government. Bloomberg. Reuters. AP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIB UNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 

Doctors Sell Their Imprimatur 

American Medical Association Endorses Sunbeam line 


k H**"? 


Turmoil in the Markets 
Pulls the Dollar Lower 


By Glenn Collins 

Se w York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The American 
Medical Association, the largest 
physicians group in the United 
States, has agreed for the first time 
to allow its name to be used in 
endorsing a line of products in 
return for potentially millions of 
dollars. 

The products, made by Sun- 
beam Corp.. will be introduced 
with the association's seal late this 
year and will include blood-pres- 
sure monitors, heating pads, ther- 
mometers, humidifiers and vapor- 
izers. 

Royalty payments from Sun- 
beam will provide the 150-year- 
old medical association more 
money for health, educational and 
research programs covering 
smoking, family violence, wom- 
en's health and other health top- 
ics. 

Larry Jellen, the association’s 
vice president for marketing, said 
die fees would not be used for the 
organization's day-to-day ex- 
penses. 

The terms of the royalty ar- 
rangement, announced Tuesday, 
were not disclosed. 

The deal with Sunbeam comes 
at a time when physicians' in- 
comes are rising less rapidly be- 
cause of managed-care programs 
but dues have nor fallen. The as- 
sociation, whose 300,000 mem- 


bers pay an average of $425 a year 
in dues, has financed educational 
and research programs at about 
$25 million a year, according to an 
executive with knowledge of its 
finances. 

Critics said the arrangement 
with Sun beam could erode con- 
fidence in die nation's highest- 
profile medical association. 

“I think it is very treacherous 
for nonprofit groups in general, 
and health organizations in par- 
ticular, to sell their names to cor- 
porations,'' said Michael Jacob- 
son, executive director of the 
On Tw for Science in the Public 
Interest, a consumer advocacy 
group. 

"It immediately sets up a con- 
flict of interest, “he added. "Inthe 
future, bow can the AMA evaluate 
any Sunbeam product and warn 
the public if they are defective? Or 
what if they are good products but 
twice as expensive as those made 
by other companies?" 

But the medical association is 
hardly alone. The alliance “is part 
of an increasing trend toward the 
endorsement of product lines by 
medical and specialty organiza- 
tions," said Viren Mehta, a health 
care industry analyst with Mehta 
&Isaly. 

The American Cancer Society, 
for example, has endorsed Florida 
orange juice, and the American 
Dental Association has endorsed 
Crest toothpaste and at least 1,300 


other products from 350 manu- 
facturers with its ADA Seal of 
Acceptance. 

The American Heart Associ- 
ation and the American Diabetes 
Association worked with Camp- 
bell Soup Co. last September to 
develop a line of mail-order meals, 
called "Intelligent Quisine," that 
are intended to combat high blood 
pressure, high cholesterol and dia- 


The Sunbeam deal “is the first 
time we've ever agreed to an on- 
going working relationship with a 
major company manufacturing a 
full home-health-care product 
line," Mr. Jellen said, noting that 
the medical association had pre- 
viously put its name on a line of 
first-aid kits made by a private- 
label manufacturer. 

In addition, last year, for the first 
time, the association distributed a 
million copies of a catalogue, 
“Tools for Healthy Living," but 
the products offered for sale in it 
did not cany the AMA seal, and 
there was no advisory arrangement 
with the manufacturers. 

Sunbeam is best known for 
household products like blenders 
and for its chief executive, Albert 
Dunlap, who has shaxply downs- 
ized companies be has headed. Mr. 
Dunlap announced last year that 
half of the 12,000 Sunbeam em- 
ployees would be let go in the 
biggest restructuring in the com- 
pany's 101-year history. 


CcBfabdtrcOurSi&Fmn Dojuicha 

NEW YORK — The dollar was 
lower against other major currencies 
Wednesday in response to turbu- 
lence in bond and stock markets. 

Rob Hayward, a Bank of Amer- 
ica economist, said there appeared 
to be no fundamental explanation 
for the drop in U.S asset prices, 
given that producer-price data re- 
leased Wednesday were unambigu- 
ously good and retail sales had giv- 
en no cause for alarm. 

In 4 P .M. trading, the dollar fell 
to 115.655 yen from 116.280 yen 
Tuesday and to 1.8345 Deutsche 
marks from 1.8625 DM. It also 
dropped to 1.5115 Swiss francs 
from 1.5255 francs and to 6.1870 
French francs from 6.2788 francs. 

The pound was at $1.5835, up 
from SI .5787. 

Mr. Hayward said the U.S. data, 
showing a steady pickup in activity 
along with stable inflationary pres- 
sures, were likely to be positive for 
the dollar in the longer run. 

“Although it seems as if asset 
prices are determining dollar move- 
ments in the short run, with at least 
one further rate rise likely, the dol- 
lar should be well underpinned in 
the longer run," he said. 

The mark got support from a 
change of emphasis in the Bundes- 
bank monthly report Wednesday, 
he added. 

“The D- mark has clearly 
weakened further since the start of 
the year, particularly against the 
U.S. dollar," the report said. “The 
Bundesbank will continue to closely 


follow exchange-rate developments 
and their risks to stability." 

"The market’s still very bear- 
ish," said Stephen Flanagan, senior 
dealer at Credit Agricole Indosuez. 
in the aftermath of the Bundesbank 
report. The report warned of the 
inflation risks from current foreign^ 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

exchange levels, he said, noting a 
rise in German consumer prices in 
recent months. 

"Prevailing sentiments seem to 
be influenced more by events out of 
Germany” than by U.S. funda-{^ 
mentals, he said. 

The International Monetary 
Fund said the strong yen was jus- 
tified by Japan’s robust fundament- 
als. and it said Tokyo should not 
raise short-term interest rates so as* 
to give its economic revival a 
chance to take hold. 

“Directors believed that the cur-; 
rent easy stance of monetary policy 
should be maintained for the time, 
being,’ ’ the Fund’s executive board- 
said in its annual review of the! 
Japanese economy, “but that it, 
would likely be desirable to begin; 
tightening later in the year. ” 

The Fund, whose comments 
were released after Washington: 
criticized Tokyo for not opening,’ 
markets up quickly enough, said 
there was a risk that trading partners go 
could retaliate if Japan's current! ™ 
account surplus rose and looked set; 
to stay high. _ 

(AFX, Reuters. Market News)', 






ECONOMY: A Wild Day for Markets as Joy Over Inflation News Is Tempered by Currency Gyrations \ 


Continued from Page 1 

eased inflati on concerns. The 
benchmark 30-year Treasury bond 
climbed 17/32 to 96 20/32, taking 
the yield down to 6.63 percent from 
6.67percenL 

“Only last week people were sit- 
ting around saying mat the Bundes- 
bank couldn't really do anything to 
save the Deutsche mark,” Mr. 
Megyessi said. 

The fresh evidence that U.S. in- 
flation remains subdued, at the very 
most, also undercut the dollar. Ana- 
lysts said that, given die good news 
on prices, the Federal Reserve Board 
probably will hold off any increase 
in U.S. interest races. Higher bor- 
rowing costs would cool off die 
economy but at the same time make 
it more attractive to hold dollars, 
buoying the U.S. currency. 


What surprised and disconcerted 
many observers was the speed and 
force with which the dollar s demise 
slammed into U.S. stock prices. 

The turbulence in the U.S. mar- 
kets spilled over into the European 
markets, which posted sharp losses 
on the dollar’s decline. 

The FTSE-100 share index in 
London declined 72.20 points to 
5.003.60. The CAC-40 index in 
France fell 74.53 points to 2,924.04. 
Germany’s DAX index fell 84.61 
points to 4,278.48. 

Analysts characterized the dol- 
lar’s impact as unusual and sug- 
gested mat it reflected investors 
grown increasingly jittery and jaded 
over the longevity of what remained 
a near-perfect state of economic af- 
fairs in America. Mr. Ging said the 
sell-off in bonds that began on the 
first of the month with reports of 


stronger-than-expec ted gains in em- 
ployment and with some indications 
of building price pressures would be 
hard to stop. 

The consensus forecast continues 
to signal one and perhaps even two 
quarter-point rises in interest rates 
by the Federal Reserve before year- 
end as the economy regains the 
speed it lost in the spring. Econ- 
omists predict that the economy will 
expand at a rate of around 3.5 per- 
cent in the final half of the year, a 
prediction fortified by the July retail 
sales figures. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index 
declined 4.5 1 points to 922.02. The 
Nasdaq Composite Index rose 7.16 
to 1,583.40. 

Micron Technology, the most ac- 
tive issue, plunged 716 to 42-% after a 
Merrill Lynch analyst downgraded 
the semiconductor company to near- 


term “neutral" from near-term "ac- 
cumulate.” 

General Electric rose 9/16 to 66% 
after Goldman, Sachs & Co. rein- 
stated it to the securities firm's re- 
commended list, Bloomberg News 
reported. 

Drug stocks fell: Merck dropped 

tiS. STOCKS 

1 to 92%. Eli Lilly and Schering- 
Plough also dropped. 

"Investors are looking for an ex- 
cuse to sell.” said Jami Rubin, drug 
analyst with Schroder & Co. * 'These 
stocks have done so well. The fun- 
damentals are still fine.*’ 

Bond investors fear inflation, 
which eats into the returns of fixed- 
income investments. Financial 
companies such as banks benefit 
when interest rates fall, as they reap 


higher profits on their loans, while, 
securities firms make more money; 
on trading. 

Citicorp, BankAmerica and. 
Chase Manhattan gained. ; 

FMC and Harsco fell after a report* 
that General Dynamics had bid $1 : 
billion to buy United Defense; FMC; 
and Harsco own United Defense. ■ 
Reel Financial Group climbed on, 1 
news that the Boston-based bank; 
holding company was close to an! 
agreement to buy Columbia Man-; - 
agement Co. for $500 million to- 
5600 million in cash. i ” 

CompUSA gained 1% to 29%| 
after the computer retailer reported; 
net income of 24 cents a share, 4i 
cents ahead of estimates. Versatility* 
fell after the software company said, 
it saw first-quarter earnings per 
share of 6 cents, a penny below 
analysts' estimates. 


i r ‘“ ' ■ 

i v - ■ ' 


WORLD *7'» K 


Wednesds t 4:7 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTER NATIONAL FUTURES 


Wednesday’s 2 PJL 

The top 300 most active shares. 

The Assoc&Bd Press. 

I Sate HW Law a* 

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Indexes 
Dow Jones 


Most Actives 


Indus *30772 KMUl 7879 M 795550 -SJ4 

Trans 2925519 2779.46 190 U 0 29ZL41 +757 

un mos mn 23059 ma .uo 

Coo* 248685 248658 244M0 244U5 -041 


_ Standard & Poors 


Mm Tedoy 

H*» Lew On IPJL 

Industrials IV 1tU41(MU4 1WI M 1085.14 
Tronsp. 675.81 £6847 669.23 664.85 

UtStt« 20077 199-OS 19972 197.BS 

Finance 10872 10557 10574 106.07 

SP500 942.99 92556 92653 92272 

5Pioo mm WjO pootj jm.iv 


■96 LOW 2P.M. 

46*73 47642 47945 

& m sss 

19152 SUM 28605 

44950 44131 446U 41.14 


Nasdaq 

Bfir 


Nasdaq 


15*690 1571 71 157933 +19* 

126298 124937 1232.78 +364 

r 71654 r«749 14975* -7J3 

1705M 149332 109740 062 


2P4H. O* 
640.14 09* 


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6484 338k 

% 
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40364 399k 

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94915 99k 


56317 35 
54771 54ft 
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52 53k + ft 

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91* 93 -k 

58 58ft +2ft 

107k 104* +*k 

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56* 57k ft 


Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 
10 LtfflHes 
10 Industrie*! 


10470 104.12 

10)^9 101^6 

10670 10658 


5664 1 93ft 91ft 92k +ft 

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Trading Activity 


Nasdaq 

Mww Pite. 


TaHlriua 

ssstss 




s s 

152 ISO 

^ % 

5 12 


DhrhleiKls 

Compony Par Amt Roc Par 

(MECOtAR 

Arizona Laid litas . 25 9-1 9-1 S 

INCREASED 

Buckeye Portnoi* 0 JU B-22 8-29 

Thao Rhren Q .10 9-12 KM 

Tompkins Couttfr Q 32 9-1 9-15 


REGULAR 

0 -075 


Airborne Freigtit 
AnBMrffe 
AmartJS Life HM 
Arbor Pmp 
BSSSysterra 
BrWgtwd Foods 
Cherokee Inc 
Chesapeake Com 
OtyHokflrw 
Crown Crafe 

Coble Cora - ... 

OaonsS Moore Q J13 

Equity Inco AT&T. M 733 

Executive Risk Q SO. 


8- 26 9-9 

9- 22 10-6 

8- 15 B-29 

9- 30 11-15 
M2 10-3 

M HM 
8-15 8-29 
10-lS 11-14 
9-1 9-15 
9-9 9-23 

8- 18 9-9 

9- 22 106 

8- IS 9-1 

9- 15 MO 


Advanad 

BnSongco 

TCSBltaUe* 

KS&K? 

Maricet Safes 


NY5E 

Anm 

Nasdaq 

InmSOons. 


Company 

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Fal WV Bancorp 
HastkijjsMfg 
IndMWKJeficoSq 
Intt Sapor 
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MefrisCo* 

MbmAUnlno 

Ponom Bev 
ProwedStHI 
PrwJrrtllnreWA 
Prudnfl IrdSd Br 
Prudntl IrrHBdC 
Pmdntl IrdfBdZ. 
Pubfc Shxaoe 
PubStaaoeX 
Sao bWHd Corp 
SeoansnCo 
SlbnMOBcncom 
StndogcGIblnco 
Waste Mngmnt 


S7458 600J3 

2A69 3i78 

S93M 637M 


Q .175 8-29 
O JO 9-1 
Q .10 8-28 
M .115 8-21 
Q 25 8-22 
Q .02 9-19 

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O -53 B-22 
QJ352S 9-15 
M JOS 8-22 
M JB2 8-18 
M M7 8-18 
M M7 6-1B 
M A53 8-1B 
Q J4 9J0 

a JB 9U0 

0 J5 9-19 
Q .165 9-2 

Q .125 8-13 
M JJ92 8-22 
Q .17 9-17 


« hanf AOfb y ^ wyn o id t» Cw a W i fmtOx 

in n iiin Wy. n mt an ni. i nnd n— id 


Stock Tables Exphnned 

Sales figums an unoflidaL Yearty highs and lows refloat the previous 52 weeks plus the 
current week, but imtnie latesttnuMig day. Wlme a spflt or slack OMdend ameuntfno to 25 
percent or mom has been pad. Hie yeas high-tow irnipeand dividend ora shown farVie new 
stocks only. Unfeasafflewise noted rates of (Mdendsm annual dbbonetnnb baaed on 
the West dedonrtfon. 

a - ifivMeiKt also extra W-b- annual rate of tSvWmd phn stack Addend, c - Bquidaflns 
dMdend. oe- PE onaeacCi 9Rdd - cuftodL tf - oenr nraifT Wr. dd - lass In Hie (asT 12 moaffis. 
e - AMend dadated or pdd In preceding 12 months, f - annual rate. Incnasad on last 
dedaratkm. g - dMdend in Canodlan funds, subfect to 15% nan-ftsldenca tax. i - dMdend 
de do red after spBt-up or slock dhddmd.l-aivl<lendpaMltiteir«oconime<l<ie f»i ie O . or no 
action token at West dMdend meeting, k - ifivfdend dedared or paid ttn year, an 
ocarmutaKve boue Mtti dividends in mean, n -annaal ratfc reduced on tad deda ration, 
n - new tasus to the past SZ weeks. The higMow range begins wflh the stmt of trading, 
nd • next day dehery. p- HIU dMdend, annual rate unknown. P/6 - priCt-Mmings ratio, 
q - dased-end mutua i fund, r - dividend dsdmed ot paid in preceding 1 2 months, plus stock 
dMdend. s - stock spDL OniUMcid begins with dam of spO-rts- sales, t- dMdend paid In 
stuck bi piececfing 12 moalti& estimated awh iraioe on ai-AMend or ex-Wstribuftan date, 
o - now yearfy Mgb. v-trailng traBed-id- in bankruptcy or receNttsblpor bring reorganized 
underttw Bankruptcy Act or Doartffios assumed by such awTBxmies.wd-wfiendi5li1buted. 
wt - When issued/ war - with warrants, z - n-dMdend or ax-rights. sHa - ex -datrl button, 
nr - wtttwwt warrants, f- ex-iMderut and sates m futL lU - yieW. z - sales la M. 


Aug. 13, 1997 

Klgti Lon Lolad Chge Opbit 

Grains 

CORN COOT} 

&000 bu maWmum- cents por btnhei 


273 

261k 

261k 

undL 

4X775 

276k 

246 

9/jLU> 

+1* 151849 

284 Ki 

273 

27316 

-k 

3X472 

286k 

27V 

279 

+* 

X298 

291 W 

281 

281k 

-u 

1X889 

271 Vi 

264 

264 

-TVs 

1889 

2 n 

264 

2ASV6 

•9 

7A» 


56k 57k 


'ISJvsS ^1 

48 4«ft .1 
900 JW +«k 
2«k 17 ft +k 
43k 44ft -ft 
134k 135ft ft 
7M8 79k 4lk 
34ft 341k 
Min Jn 
73k 74ft +ft 
34ft 34ft +ft 

k * +vv 

46k 48ft .ft 
12k Ok +!k 


EsL aaks NA Tun sain Z2J13 

Tun open H 264781 . up a 1 2* 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

M90 tens- doflan per Ian 

Aug 97 2S550 25000 25500 +440 4130 

Sap 97 7X7 JO 22100 2Z7-S0 +5.10 23061 
Oct 77 20800 SUM 207-50 +12D 15184 

Dec 97 2(000 17750 20100 +1J0 44575 
Jan 78 19900 19450 19700 +140 6J07 

Mar 78 17500 17250 17400 +150 4288 

E». raws NA.Tun Mks 26JS8 
Tun open M 107.714 up 1008 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOTJ 
eOOOO 8>v canti per lb 

Aug 77 2200 21.80 21.71 OL18 840 

Sep»7 22.13 Z148 2202 0.17 24543 

Oa 97 22-37 2206 22.17 6.17 I&386 

Dec 77 2259 2235 2250 0.12 45781 

Jon 98 2275 22-58 2248 -0.13 7MS 

Mar 78 2305 2192 2302 4.16 <903 

Est. Mks NJL Tim sahs 14643 
Tun apn M 104387. afll D 

SOYBEANS CCB0T1 

4000 bu mWmwn- cznle per bwstwl 

Aog 97 780 74S 780 +36* 7063 

Sap 97 662* 642 660 +11* 15638 

No. 77 618k 60S 617 +5k 790x9 

Jon 98 623 409k 619V) +3 16378 

Mar 98 630k 619 628* +3 4774 

Est SMBS NJL Tim sates 4 IBS 

Tunopan Int 132*439, up 3,901 

WHEAT fcaOD 

5.000 bu raManmv carts pv bushai 

Sap 77 364 355k 360 1 24729 

Dec 77 379* 371 377 +k 54.171 

Marts 390 38l» 3B7V* +3 14464 

May 78 392 385k 392 +3 L492 

Est. saws NJL Tun sofas 34307 

Tun open Inf 10421 4 oil 177 


Livestock 

CATTLE COMER] 

44000 ftt.- cants per lb. 

Aug 97 6652 66JU 6432 +060 

Od 97 67.77 6767 67.87 +032 

Dk 97 7125 71.70 7235 +057 

Feb 98 7350 7X30 73JB0 +050 

Apr 78 75.15 7472 7415 +037 

Junta 73.10 n AS 7110 *440 

Eat solas NJL Tun solas 17.112 
Tun open M 97.871 , off 1570 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMEIO 
50000 ks.- cards par lb. 

Aug 97 80.75 7940 8057 +1.1S 

Sep 97 80-35 7430 8030 +U2 

Oa 97 81-05 7760 8087 +132 

1*0.97 8X05 8070 81.90 +1.17 

Jm9B 22- ID 8075 8IJ0 +130 

Mar 98 8IJ0 8060 8150 +100 

Ed. sales NJL Tun sedas 7641 
TUn open W 236S4 off 301 

H06S4jM CCMER1 
jnrmn mt. awrig war p> 

A**97 7765 79.13 7700 467 

Oef 97 7155 717S 71.77 007 

Dec 97 6405 68.15 6&70 +032 

Fab 78 67.72 S7O0 S7J2 +055 

Apr 98 6X40 6410 6130 +012 

Esl rates NJL Tbn sola 4467 
Tun men bit 34007. up 12 

PORK BELLIES (CMEIO 
44m0lbs.- cents per lb. 

Aog 97 8X90 S16S 8490 +170 

Feb 98 7420 7300 7300 -065 

Mar 90 7400 72.90 TIM 660 

Est sated NJL Tran sales 977 
Tters opwi lot 448 u ad 2S5 


Food 

COCOA (HCSE) 

10 BaMctora- S par ton 
Sep 97 1505 1493 1500 +« 14907 

Dec 97 1532 1520 1526 +11 32974 

Mar 90 1561 1550 1557 +13 24515 

May 98 1579 1577 1579 +17 12011 

MR 1572 1572 1572 +10 2060 

Sep 78 1607 1607 1607 +4 1721 

EsL sales HA Tun sotes 14934 
Tunopan bd lOUTi, off 1683 

COFFEE C (HCSE] 

37600 *4- cam par to. 

Sap 97 18860 17760 18X10 -4IO 4982 

Dec 97 18360 15100 16560 -100 4017 

ftffVS 15060 14400 14960 465 3689 

May 98 14560 14400 14430 4.10 1,123 

JW 48 1M7J50 13747 14060 +460 784 

EM. sates N A Tun aates 8J«3 

TUn open W 20877. eN 331 

SUSARWORU7 1 1 PKSE] 

112600 tee.- cents parte. 

Od77 H68 1161 1169 462 100474 

Mraffi 1164 1168 11.75 402 59,702 

Mayra 1162 T1J0 TL73 -407 1X397 

Jul98 1168 1167 1162 461 7638 

CatenNATwi sain 760 
TWs open bd 187J7M off XTB8 


t*gh Lew Letesi Oige Cpinl 

ORANGE JUKE CNCTN) 

ixaxjtos.- certs per &. 

Sap 77 8130 7900 7965 -IIS 14916 

NOV 97 8125 8100 8123 .1.90 13658 

Jan 98 8540 8X55 8183 -160 5.0K 

Mar 98 87 J5 8410 E445 .145 1229 

EsL sates NA Tun soles 962s 
Tun open ini 1S.3F7, up 373 

Metals 

GOLD CNCM7Q 
lOOlrayOE.- dollars per hoy ez. 

Aug 77 33880 32760 3T3.L0 -123 756 

S 97 32763 uodL 3 

97 33160 32400 32X31 4J0 lir5 

Dec 97 33120 32970 33460 420 11X060 
Feb 98 33500 32260 33300 + 030 126k 
Apr 98 33650 33450 33450 +160 4323 

Jun9B 33430 33410 33410 -060 7332 

Aug 98 32960 uncA I'll 

Od 98 34150 undi 109 

EstsMasNA Tues sates 30.069 
Tues open W1 96624 off 680 

HI GRADE COPPER (NCM70 
2X000 On.- cents per te. 

AUg 77 11X00 10440 10X00 +030 2.277 

Sep 97 11560 10425 10X1S +0-3D 20691 

Od 77 1D5J0 10465 104&S +03D 1753 

NO* 77 10460 10X55 10X55 *0.25 1680 

Dec 97 r«60 I02J0 10X10 +025 4*43 

Jan 98 103-20 10265 102.65 +QJ0 671 
Feb 98 10260 10150 101.90 +0.10 604 

Mot 98 1IC60 101.10 10160 +005 268? 

Apr 96 10150 10050 10050 uoeh. 400 
EsL sales N.A. Ton sate* 1980 
Tun open int 4X477. up 43 

SILVER (NCMX) 

SOaOtreyoc- canls per froyoc. 

Aug 77 441 A uneh 

Sep 77 45450 44260 44960 +650 49689 

Od 97 44430 unch. 78 

Dec 97 46200 44960 4S4SQ +550 21.285 
Jan 98 45040 unch. 30 

Mar98 46660 45400 467.00 +660 10658 
May 98 46260 46260 46260 +260 X023 

Jiri9B 46X40 imen 2160 

EsL sales NJL Tun sales 1X265 
Tun open bir V2J2& o« W8 

PLATIMUM MMER7 
SOlroyca.- daSars per troy az. 

00 97 43750 47800 43150 -350 11666 

Jtsi9B 42460 42160 42400 -150 2583 

Apr 98 421.00 42I6D 421.00 +100 414 

Ear. stem NJL Tun sates 1649 
Tun open bd 1466X up 1 a 

CkO0 pmtffcXJS 

LONDON METALS (LME> 

Dtekrs per meMc Ion 
Ateadaun OflBb Grade) 

Spot 1677.00 167900 1712.00 171360 

Forworn 169500 169400 171X08 I714D0 

Capper Cathodes Otlgb Gndel 
Spci 730400 231000 227X00 228100 

Fanaont 229060 2292.00 226100 226260 

Uad 

Spot 590k 591 » 5B2k 563k 

Forward 10660 60760 59860 59900 

Spot 648X00 649X60 663060 663560 

Forward 659860 6407 00 6719.00 674060 

Tbr 

Sped 5310.00 532000 S37060 538060 

Forwtrt 536000 537000 547000 547560 

Ztec (Spectat Htab Grade) 

Spot 158860 159100 1628.00 1631.00 

Forward 148X00 148660 1500 00 1501.00 

High Law aosc Ch<w Optm 

Financial 
US TRILLS (CMEIO 
SI rnlBort- ph onoo pd. 

Sep 97 9491 9466 9489 +002 7604 
Dec 97 9460 9467 94.75 +005 TAM 
Mar 98 9460 inch 698 

ELM. stem N A Tun sates 355 
T*n open M IMA. UP 83 

S YR TREASURY (CBOT) 

Sioaoooprln-Db A64thsct 10o pd 

Sap 97 10&-55 106-18 106-41 +13 208.723 

DBC97 106-34 106-04 106-23 + 07 14648 

EsL sates NA TUn sales 4x*7B 

Tim open lid 22X170. up 2563 

ID YR TREASURY (CBOT) 

T1 00600 prin- pts A 32nds aMQD pci 
Sep 97 109-09 100-13 106-30 + 07 359.455 

Dee 77 108 30 106-03 108-19 . 06 40636 

Me* 98 106473 undl 1671 

EsL sales NA Tim sain 

Tun open Ini 402.162. aR XOI I 

IIS TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 

<8 pd-SI00600pts & 32nd, or loo Ktl 
Sep 97 11X19 111-31 112-28 + 13 51X717 

Dec «7 11X06 111-18 112-17 + 14 5X773 
Mar 98 11701 ID-13 11207 + 08 31663 . 

111-13 undk 2.138 
EsL rales NA Tim sain 404.019 
Tun open bu 610364 te( 4994 

LONG GILT (LlFFE) 

CS0600 - pis & 32nds of rOQ pci 

SapW 1)4-3) 1)44 K 1)4-1) -41.13 144 775 i 
Dk 97 N.T. N T 1IX» ] 

Ert- series: 77659. Plw. soles: 5S649 
Pm. open bd.; 17B.7S4 efl 4^54 ! 

S55£K!i, cav - BU "° nJFFE) I 

□AUSQ600 ■ pta of 100 pd 
Sep 97 102-22 101.72 101.91 —0.31 245644 
0*2 18131 Iff) DO 10108 — a. 31 18612 ] 

Mar 98 N.T. N.T. 10025 — OJi i bi cca | 

EsL sates: 300*5. Pm. sales 1 7DJ56 i 

Pm. open Nil-- 283656 up 2.215 j 


1*3 h Loo Latesl Oige Opim 

10- YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FF3MLOOO - pis ai 100 pd 

i Sep 97 129 7D 127.18 129T6— 036 171.138 

I Dec 97 9846 7X30 9BJ4-0J4 11666 

: /Aar 98 9?J2 9782 97.64 -031 0 

* Est. rales: 14Q.2J4 

Open int.: 1836W Oft 679. 

. ITAUAN GOVERNMENT BOND CUFFE) 

DL TOOmSoicn -pis of 1(0 Pd 
Sep 97 13X93 13S 07 13523 -0-77 1G4341 
Dec 97 107 SO 10T50 10740 -062 5092 

Mar 98 NLT. NT. 107.96 — 0B2 
! EsL sales. 63. W0. Pra*. sales: 50613 
: epen W- 109633 up 4 677 

) LIBOR 1-M0NTH ICMER) 

S3 million- PCs at 100 pd. 

, Aug 97 9435 94JQ 9435 +061 1X727 

, Sep 97 9iJ5 9431 9434 +061 11.938 

Od 97 9432 94Z7 7430 +001 4748 

' Est. sales NJL Tun sales 1.491 
Tun open Ini 49.794 up 959 

EURODOLLARS (CMERI 
SI million -pis ot 100 pd 
Aug97 9426 9473 9435 unch. 1X755 
Sep 97 9427 9421 9435 +062 S07.B96 

Od 97 94.18 9410 9414 +0.02 3^ 

Dec 97 9411 9196 9406 +066 483359 

Mar 98 9402 936a *197 +067 33X489 

junta n 97 9X74 9386 +067 271558 

Sap 98 9361 9164 93 75 - 06 6 226416 

Dec 98 9170 9X57 93*4 +066 18X909 

Mar 99 9368 9351 91*7 +066 13X866 

■lun 99 9164 9147 "158 +066 102632 

Sep 99 9340 93 44 °3S5 +0.06 8X387 

Dec 99 9153 9137 93.45 +003 71215 

Est. sales HA. Tun safes 32*777 
Tun open ml 2011,881. on 8636 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

6X500 pounds. S per pound 

Sep 97 1JB4B 15r»90 16840+0.0086 52.765 

Dec 97 16780 16630 16780+00080 1629 

Mar 98 16590 16500-00052 209 

EsI. sales No. Tun sales X473 

Tun open ml 54002. up MSS 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

100600 dteku-bSperCdn. dtr 

Sep 97 72)9 .7183 92+00001 51.651 

Dec 97 72441 .7220 .7224-0 0007 4529 

MOT 98 .7789 .7749 7249 0 0005 669 

Est sates na Tun sates 7.982 

Tun epen mi 57.100, ett 12 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

1 2X000 maiVs. S per mart 

Sep 97 5482 6370 6460 +00086 )1X48) 

Dec 97 .5515 6410 6494+00088 1850 

Mar 98 6540 6494 6S31 +0 0092 1.005 

Est sales NA Toes sates 20.930 

Tun open mi i20A(lup 1.266 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

126 mNMn vert S per 100 yon 

Sep 97 6713 8605 8687+06064 7X674 

Dec 97 .B830 8747 6812 +0.0075 2J6S 

Mar 98 6925 .8915 .8915+0.0059 412 

EsL sates NA Tun rates 14651 

lues open Ini 71356. att 1148 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

12X000 tames. S per Uunc 

Sep 97 6673 .6570 4641+0 0064 51273 

DK «7 .6745 6671 6709+011063 1351 

Mar 98 .6716 Iflldl. 1.065 

Ed. sales NA Tim sales 9.769 

Tun open bit 5X799. at) 35 

MEXICAN PESO (CMEIO 

50X000 pesos, S per peso 

Sep 97 12700 .12610 .12697+60227 21S» 

Dec 97 .12255 .12180 1ZM7+.00177 11886 

Mar 98 .11850 .11835 .11850+ 00156 X1S3 

EsL rales NA Tun soles 1714 

Tun open tell 44469, up 125 

3-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 

£50X000 - Pt5 oMOO pd 

Sep 97 92.78 92.75 9276 -062 111367 
Dk 97 9266 92 60 9262 -0.03 127604 
Mar 98 9264 9258 97J9 —0 04 9&3ol 

Jun 98 9265 92.58 92.60 —004 6&88S 

Sep 98 93 68 9261 92.62 -004 5X119 

Doc 98 92.77 77.66 9)66 -004 ^6)61 

Mar 99 76 9?n> 92 71 —0 03 37.974 

ESI. sales. 109.483. Pro, sales. 11X3*7 
Prov apm mi : 624325 or* 1. 778 

3-MONTH EUROMARK (UFFE) 

□Ml ml Ran pis of 100 pel 
?"8’ 7 *LT. NT. ft 70 —0.03 iTi 

Sop97 96.65 9*61 9663 —062 263455 

OOW NT N.T 96.57 —062 LTD 

2?” Si 6 !*- 41 9444 —064 794./7B 

Mar «8 96 J4 96 76 96 31 —0 05 281796 
*9 14 *9 03 9609 —0.07 201520 
Sep 98 9X93 9X&S 9588 —0 08 1 51594 

Dec *8 95 69 9567 9565 ^07 

MarW 95 SO 9543 9*46 -006 I52S 

Jun 99 9ij, 9 =0.05 71.™ , 

ESI, rales- 378.931 Prov. rates. 250.756 1 

1.676 268 up UI7> j 

XMONTH PIBOR (MATIF) 1 

FF5 mllHon - piste l‘» pci 

Sep 97 ft 51 ft 47 96^48 _ nm +6.779 

Dec 97 ft 3I 9*27 9*28 -OU SltSi ‘ 

Marft ft2. 9615 96 17 

J« n » JAIO 96 03 ft 04— 068 25474 P 

Scaft 9S97 96.90 95 90 -009 SS4 

EsI sales- *9.o%9 

Opan M 26*312 aH 1.70*. 

3-MONTH EURO LIKA (UFFE 1 

ITL 1 m Ilian - pH of 100 pd 

SCS97 9X22 9X18 9120 -007 102^66 

Dec 97 *)i) 9)46 9151 —run 9*0+8 

Mar 98 9283 9177 *381 -005 Sian 


High Low Latest Qige OpM- 

Jun98 94.10 9463 9467 -066 «j£fr 

Sep 98 9426 94.18 9421 -008 3X304 

Dec 96 94J6 9428 9*31 -068 2X09* 

EsL soles: 49,931 Pro*, safes: 31597 
Piev.opwi hO: 38X758 up 1034 

Industrials 

COTTON 2 CNCTN) 

5X000 fes.- cents per lb. 

Od 97 7468 74 AS 7485 +066 1X280 

Dec 97 7X93 7X50 7X85 +067 41283 

Mat9S 7X15 7X82 74.15 undl 11886 

MOV 98 7685 7489 7485 -0.10 4053 

Jut 98 77-38 77.15 7730 -063 1987 

Erf. soles N A TuK rates 1O410 
Turn open Int 7X25X up 3B6 — 

KEATING OILCNMRR) 

42600 got cenh per gal 
Sep 97 54.10 5X73 5X85 +<L75 3X753 

Od97 5485 5585 5485 +089 314*4 

No* 97 5785 5480 5780 +084 1X102 ^ 

Dec 97 5B80 5715 58.10 +084 19899 M) 

Jan 98 5960 57.90 58.90 +0J9 1X480 ▼ 

Feb 98 5865 58.10 S86S +044 8644 

Mar 98 5780 5735 5785 +X14 7,228 

EsI. sale* NA Tun soles 25649 “ ' 

Tun open Ini 147,336. off 1,224 ", 

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 

1600 DDL- dollars per MA 

5ep97 M3S 19J5 2014 +017 7X0g, 

Od 97 2088 19.98 20J7 +080 7X971 

Nov 97 2080 2068 2085 +OJ0 40147 

Dec 97 208 5 20.12 2080 +0.27 49,945 

Jan 98 7082 20 7 J 20J0 +OX3 29J65 

Feb 98 20.29 2029 2029 +0.01 1X64F 

Esl. rates NA Tun rates 70845 r. 

Tun open lid 44X088. up 1,1 18 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

10600 mm blu**. S par nan bfu 
5«P 97 1490 1405 1440 -0615 4X447 

Od 97 2810 1420 2870 -0608 34130 

Nov 97 1600 2-520 2-SffO -0013 15+443 

Dec 97 2.705 1640 1640 -0604 19^47 

Jan 98 1710 1650 2895 -0.001 1X938 

Feb 98 2860 2805 2845 undi. 11706 

EsI soles N A Tun rales aX93a 
Tunopan Ini 71X587, od 1047 _ 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 7 

42600 got cards porgni 

Sap 97 65.95 62 90 6585 +1-84 37.133 JL 

Od97 6080 5960 60.40 +0.78 21676 W 

Nov 97 5880 5785 5880 +0J8 9.S5 

Dec 9 7 5760 56.95 57.75 +068 9,6i5 

Jan ft 5760 5760 5770 +6.78 X830 

F<* 98 57.92 undL 1508 

Mar 98 SB. 20 MID 5X20 -077 X673 

Apr 98 61.12 undL 1159 

EsI rales NA Tun safes 32,285 
T lie s c*w )nt 99697. up 1698 _ 

GASOIL (IPE) 7 

U.S. dollars per maftic km • lots at 100 tons Z> 

Sep 97 17X75 16980 17060 —a 75 2X585 

Od 97 17280 17180 17100 —0.75 12.999 

No* J7 17400 17X25 17X75 -075 X578 

Dec 97 17X25 17X75 1 7X25 —0.75 11504 
Jan 98 17X00 17X75 17575 -0.75 
Fob ft NT N.T. 17X25 -0.75 il3d 
Mar 98 17460 17*00 17X75 UndL 1438 

Erf. sales- 7800 Prev. rales 6X721 "1 

Pro*, opon inf-- 80020 oH 191 1 

Stock tndexes 

SP COMP INDEX (CMER) V 

SODrMw 

5ep«7 941.00 916.00 93100 +X3S lBXlJ* 

Dec 97 95060 92680 ML25 +4J0 769 L 

Morris 94845 undL 28 f* 

EsL sales NA Tun rales 6X344 
Tun open Iru l«x6S& up 1071 

FT5E 108 (UFFE) 
aSnormdnptenl 


Araslerdaf 


Sop 97 51010 507X0 50706 -956 71.803 JOO 

Dee 97 51280 51286 508X0 -958 W 

Mar 98 N.T N.T 51336 -9X0 231 

EsL stees: 1X485 Pne. sales: 98W +1 

Pro*, apon ha.- 7X322 on a) 

. j 

CAC 40 (MATIF) 

F F200 per H4a ptenl 

Aug 97 79B95 29180 29246—8)0 7 cctc 

Sep97 2991S 29280 39328—81.0 SflTD 

Dec97 30066 300X0 79570 —816 978 

EsI. sates: 23.2ft 
Open InL- 60,749 off 128 

Commodity Indexes 

Close PmtouT 

Moody's NA 186480 

1.90X60 1,91160 

DJ. Futures 150.17 15088 

24X26 243.1D 

A 3 ’ 01 ***' Press. Lantfotr 
i nnF monad Futures Exchange, inn 
Petroleum Exchange. 


See our 
Friendships 
•■very Saturday 
in Thi* Inti-rmarkct 


\&£b 



i 


v.vT 


Nk' 

•ft 

- :3? 

Nf-' 

*?Kf 




nai 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST H, 1997 


PAGE 13 


EUROPE 


& ILK. Joblessness Hits 

17-Year Low at 5.5%; 
Hate Rises on Hold 




~ Cdtwxkdty Our Staff FtzmDvt^^ 

“ Unemployment in 
Bniain fell more than expected in 
My, pul/mg the jobless rate down to 
pe^wnt, the lowest in 17 years 
&pm 5.7 percent in June, official 
figures showed Wednesday. 

_ The Office for National Statistics 
fUso Mid growth in average earn- 
^gs, an important barometer of fu- 
ture inflationary trends, remained 
.jsteady m June at 4.25 percent. 

• Meanwhile, the Bank of England 
officially declared British interest 
dales on hold. 

'.In its quarterly inflation report, 
the central bank announced a pause 


pfcS 








Wr-iv- 



~ - l 










. > 


Scottish Bank 
Plans to Buy 
£ Mortgage Firm 

Cn>¥*Jrtf by Clur Sttff From bxspui. hry 

LONDON — Royal Bank of 
Scotland PLC said Wednesday 

?. that it would buy Birmin gham 

Midshires Building Society for 
as much as £630 million 
[; ($994.3 million 1 to double its 
mortgage assets and extend its 
. branch network into England. 

Die final price will be based 
L on Bir mingham Midshires' 
profits for the year ending June 

• 30. 1998. If a pricing formula 
‘agreed by the two companies 
pushed the value below a ram- 
i' iraum of £605 million, either 

party could cancel the deal. 

The deal would mean that 
r Birmingham Midshires would 
^ be dissolved as a home buildin g 
■society — owned by its mem- 
Lbers — and incorporated into 
-the bank. 

- The Royal Bank of Scotland, 
|‘! based in Edinburgh, could be- 
come Britain's I Otb- largest 
mortgage lender, handling prop- 
‘‘erty mortgages worth £12 bU- 

• lion; doubling its mortgage 

. business and adding savings de- 
I positom and a million custom- 
1 ere. (Bloomberg, AP) 


in the current round of rate increases 
so that it could assess where the key 
risks for inflation lay. 

After four quarter-point rises i n as 
many months, it said that the next 
move in rates would not necessarily 
be upward. 

The bank's announcement came 
after news that the number of people 
out of work had fallen by a larger- 
than-expected 49,800 in July to 1.55 
million, the lowest level since 
September 1980. 

Die figures gained from a fall in 
the number of students forced to 
take up benefits after leaving full- 
time education. 

Baroness Blacksione, education 
and employment minister, wel- 
comed the data but warned that job 
prospects for young people re- 
mained insecure. 

“This July, the flow of people 
onto the unemployment count is sig- 
nificantly lower than a year ago, 
indicating that young people may be 
finding it easier to get jobs," Bar- 
oness Blacks tone said. 

“However, long-term youth un- 
employment remains a problem. 
One in five people unemployed for 
six months or more is under 25.“ 

The ministry also said long-term 
unemployment “continues to fall 
faster than the total." but with al- 
most one in five claimants having 
been unemployed for two years or 
longer, it said, long-term unemploy- 
ment remained high by historical 
standards. 

Die Bank of England, mean- 
while, said that monetary policy had 
reached “a position aL which it 
should be possible to pause" to as- 
sess the “direction in which the 
inflation risks are likely to mate- 
rialize." 

The bank’s chief economist, 
Mervyn King, added that it would be 
wrong to assume that rates would 
resume their upward path after the 
pause. 

“I don’t think you can come to ' 
that conclusion," he said. “We 
have not decided that the next move 
in interest rates would be upward.” 

The Bank of England hinted last 
week that interest rates might have 
peaked after their latest quarter- 
point increase, to 7 percent 

(Reuters. AFP) 


Europeans Await 
Free Calls With Ads 


Reims 

BONN — Thousands of Euro- 
peans. accustomed to paying 
some of the world's highest tele- 
phone bills, could soon benefit 
when new phone companies be- 
gin to offer free phone calls. 

But '.here is a price to pay: 
callers will be subjected 10 ad- 
vertising spots before and at reg- 
ular intervals during their calls in 
exchange for the service. 

The latest free call project was 
announced in Germany on 
Wednesday, but there are also ser- 
vices in Italy and Sweden, where 
Gratistetefon, or Free Telephone, 
has attracted thousands of users 
since its launch last year. 

The novelty is likely to be a 
small taste of things 10 come when 
European telecomm uni cations 
markets are thrown open to com- 
petition in January and consumers 
are given choice of service. 


“There are lots of ideas that 
could be tested, and we are eagerly 
awaiting the response to them,’’ 
Ulf Bohla, chairman of the Ger- 
man phone company Q.Tel.O., 
said at a news conference unveil- 
ing its free phone project 

O.Tel.O., the joint venture of 
Germany's two largest utilities, 
Veba AG and RWE AG. will be- 
gin offering free phone calls to 
5,000 people in the German cap- 
ital in October in a service called 
“O.Tel.O-Spotline“. 

When placing a call, a shon 
advertising message is transmit- 
ted before the call is completed, 
and at regular intervals during the 
call, around every 2-3 minutes in 
most cases. 

In Italy. Promotion System 
Phone service run by Paolo 
Balestri, a Tuscan entrepreneur, 
was offering free phone trials in 
three northern Italian towns. 


Hoechst Sees 
Lower 5 97 Net 
As lst-Half 

Profit Skids 


Swiss Bank Corp. Reports 
84 % Rise in lst-Half Profit 


Canpdrd b r CW Skiff From Dupatcbri 

ZURICH — Swiss B ank Corp. 
reported an 84 percent increase m 
first-half profit Wednesday — the 
best of a bumper crop of results for 
Switzerland's big three banks. 

Net profit in the first six months of 
the year was 1.33 billion Swiss 
francs ($87 ] .2 million), up from 732 
million Swiss francs in the com- 
parable period in 1996. The bank 
said it expected lull-year net profit to 
“comfortably exceed" 1.7 billion 
francs, although it expected earnings 


growth 10 slow in the second half. 

For the first tune, SBC Warburg, 
the company's London-based in- 
vestment banking division, accoun- 
ted for more profit than any other 
division. SBC Warburg's net profit 
rose 60 percent, to 691 million 
francs. Profit ar SBC's private bank- 
ing unit rose 36 percent, to 653 
million francs, the bank said. 

SBC said its 1996 reorganization 
of its Swiss operations, ro counter 
rising credit-risk provisions, helped 
raise profit. (AP. Bloomberg) 


Cm!»ii|, 1 /<i, Su3 F>"nt Divua bn 

FRANKFURT — Hoechst AG, 
Germany's largest chemicals and 
pharmaccuucals maker, said 
Wednesday that its net profit fell 54 
percent and predicted that its 1997 
profit would be lower than in J 996, 
when the company benefited from 
extraordinary income from sales of 
operations. ' 

Net profit for the first six months 
fell to 1.01 billion Deutsche marks 
($540 million) from 2.21 billion DM 
a year earlier. Sales totaled 27.89 
billion DM, compared with 26.09 
billion DM in the like period of 
1996. 

Operating profit in the period fell 
to 2.27 billion DM from 2.77 billion 
DM. 

More than half of the growth in 
operating profit in the first half came 
from the current strength of the dol- 
lar. KJaus-Juergen Schmieder, chief 
financial officer, said 

For the year, the company said 
sales would decline markedly be- 
cause of spin-offs, as its specialty- 
chemicals business was due to be 
spun off to Cl an ant and its polypro- 
pylene business to Targor. 

Hoechst. like other big German 
chemical makers, has reorganized to 
concentrate on core businesses, 
while shifting its focus abroad. It 
thus benefited from on economic 
upswing outside Germany. 

Shares in Hoechst fell 1.2 per- 
cent. or 1.50 DM, to close at 81. 

“We are positive on Hoechst," 
said Murat (Jguz, a fund manager at 
Ceros VermoegensverwaJiung 
GmbH in Frankfurt. 

tAFX. Bloomberg) 



. FranWfrrt 
■OAX" 

■ London ■ Paris . 

• FTSE 100 Index- CAC40 . : 

4500 - 

-- 5200 

3250 - 

m 

■J 5000 

’ Jl/ ' 3100 A'' 

3900 - 

/- 4800 

xf - 2950 ■ 

3600 

• 4600 N 

* -2800- --y. 

m^w 

m l\.J 


3000 M AM 
1997 

j j A «M V AM 
1997 

J J A M AM J J A' 

1997 

Exchange;;.. 

. /Index .. 

■Wednesday Prav. ; 

C&ae ■ ■ Close Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

935.76 . . 976.40 . -4-36. 

Brussok 

BEL-20 

M99.10' 2,451^. 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

4^78.43 .4,363.09 -t.94 

Copenhagen Stock Ma/Scef 

B3&23 SSt.44 ■ +0.13 

Helsinki ; 

HEX General . 

3,600.85 3,629.36 .-0,79 

Osfn 

OSX 

70&i0 720.11 ...rW : 

London - . 

FTSElOO 

5,001.00 5.075.8Q r-1^47. 

Madrid 

Stock exchange ' 

S9&S7 SS6M: ■ -0,72 

Milan 

MBTEL 

14398 14600* ^3$ 

Paris 

' CAC 40 

2324.04 2398^7, -2.49 

Stockholm 

SX 16 

3^28.44 3,623-59 '-Syea 

Vienna 

ATX 

1,408.14 1,425.47 -1 '32: 

Zurich 

SPf 

3)640.95 3.71^35 -155 

Source- Telekurs 


lnh.-n.jt). <n J HcijWTnhumr 


Very briefly: 


Head of Russia’s Privatization Panel Quits 


CanpBtd b* Car Staff From Duparrbn 

MOSCOW — The head of Rus- 
sia’s economic privatization pro- 
gram, Alfred Kokh, resigned 
Wednesday as chairman of the Stale 
Property Committee following his 
denunciation for having presided 
over a series of controversial sales 
of enteiprises by auction. 

Mr. Kokh was replaced by Max- 
im Boiko, another ally of the eco- 


nomic policy chief, Anatoli 
Chubais. 

Mr. Kokh's spokesman, Viktoria 
Vergelskaya, said the resignation 
was not linked to the privatization 
controversies, stressing that Mr. 
Kokh “had long wanted to leave 
government service but was not al- 
lowed to go." 

Mr. Kokh has presided over a 
particularly stormy phase of Rus- 


sia’s sale of enterprises to private 
citizens, and he was singled out for 
criticism recently by Prime Minister 
Viktor Chernomyrdin. 

Die biggest deal yet, the sale last 
month of a quarter of the big tele- 
communications company Svyazin- 
vest, provoked an outciy in press 
and broadcasting outlets controlled 
by business circles linked to the 
losing consortium. (AFP, Reuters ) 


• Italian producer prices in June rose 1 .6 percent from a year 
earlier, the fastest pace at which consumer prices have risen on 
an annual basis in more than a year. The annual rate recorded 
in May was 1 . 1 percent. 

• Axa-UAP, bom from the merger this year of Axa SA and 
UAP SA, posted first-half revenue of 185.8 billion French 
francs ($29.59 billion), up 12.7 percent from a year earlier, 
largely on strong comings at its foreign operations. 

• Renault had second-quarter sales of 52.48 billion francs, up 
9.5 percent from a year earlier, as improving car sales in 
Britain, Italy and Spain countered shrinking sales at home. 

• LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton SA's second- 
quarter sales came to 10.73 billion francs, up 55 percent from 
a year earlier, as acquisitions and the strong dollar helped sales 
of luxury items. 

• Michelin SCA, Europe's largest tiremaker. said second- 
quarter sales rose 12.6 percent from a year earlier, to 20.05 
billion francs; it said the strong dollar had spurred sales in its 
U.S. units. 

• Scandinavian Airlines System's second-quarter pretax 
profit rose 59 percent from a year earlier, surpassing ex- 
pectations, to 1.38 billion Swedish kronor ($172.4 million) a& 
strong traffic helped lift it out of a slump that produced a loss 
in the first quarter. 

• Energy Group PLC said first-quarter operating profit fell 2 
percent, to £96 million ($151.5 million), as cuts in trans- 
mission revenue were not offset by a rise in profit from 
electricity and coal sales. 

• The European Commission is investigating KL.M Royal 
Dutch Airlines for allegedly trying to limit competition on the 
Amsterdam- London route, the Dutch daily Trouw said. 

• Merita Oy, Finland's largest bank, said second-quarter 

profit more than doubled as bad-debt charges fell. Net income 
rose to 8 1 6 million markkaa (S 1 46.7 million ) from 393 million 
markkaa a year earlier. bu • umbers, afx. afp. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


• '7 

••y 


Wednesday, Aug. 13 

' focal currencies. 

Tefekura 

High Law C la** Pm. 




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Amsterdam 


ABN-AMRO 

Aegon 

Ahold 

iUzoJfctef 

BoonCo. 

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FnstMwsMatf Ml JO 15X50 140 Ml JO 

Fried- Kropp 345 36150 365 34150 

Get* 114.90 11359 11X50 0440 

HekMbgZmt 155 154 155 15450 

Henkel ptd 10650 102 10640 10450 

HEW 4S5 455 45S 440 

HodtfW W 8930 91 89.30 

Hoechst BUD J M-5° 

oarfodt m an m 7050 

Lrirntycr <WJ» 97 9850 9950 

Unde 1400 1383 1395 1398 

Lufthansa 3455 35.90 36.15 3620 

MAN 54550 54350 548 

Mannesman B65 849 tel 8SS 

MeDnBgesefhehoft 42.10 4! 4IJS 4270 

96 96 9680 

MunChRueckR *520 6470 M 75 6650 

Preierog .561 555 55530 565 

3SU. *£ M A "1 

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99 JO 9180 « 99JB Spf jnq3 IAmO 1570 ISA) 1570 1600 

7140 6750 »50 7350 875 863 864 575 

4X70 4850 4X80 5X» TSwsaai 434 428 42850 435.20 

10080 107.40 lIJMS 109 

VEW V5 575 573 574 

784 778 780 789 

1344 1325 1325 1351 


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Kuala Lumpur CMiMHemii 

K Previous: B97.25 


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2*2 2.73 174 1*1 

1944 1875 18J4 1947 


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4840 4470 4820 4850 
15490 U7 JO 149 15420 

6040 5470 55 5870 

MJ 330 33030 346 

142J0 136J0 13650 143.10 
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106 10370 105 10850 

11440 108.7S 10950 114J0 
21040 201 201 211 

33,80 3170 33L70 33.9B 
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72.90 JtJO 7070 7130 
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11480 10870 11070 11410 
33150 32250 32250 331 


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2240 

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158 

342 

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1170 1270 
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350 354 
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775 750 

2348 25 
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5170 4950 51 5150 

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AhbcyNotl 8J2 

Afflerf Danecq 4.92 

AngteiWBtor 775 

Amos 643 

AsOa Group 152 

Assoc &r Foods £47 

BAA 
Barclays 
Bass 
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BOC Croup 
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Previews: 50758S 


224 

240 226 
31 3X50 
406 408 


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BSkyB 
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BTR 


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578 

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CCF 

Cetefem 

ChtHfanDtor 

CLF-Deifia Finn 


CAG/ik 292AM 
plWtOK: 299857 

986 ' 967 971 9W 

TU~r\5JV~T\7 2MJ0 

948 933 936 957 

830 810 810 841 

4UA0 40 9 41IJ0 417.90 
746 732 740 7« 

SOO 481 486 503 

281.70 272.70 279 JO 28350 
1105 1001 1093 ins 

3997 3916 391* 4000 

284 279/0 280 28058 

330 317.10 326 334/0 

679 667 670 674 

968 944 948 9tB 

574 551 5tf 563 


CredB Aaricato 1265.10 12651I&5.10126&J0 


PSE fades: 2527/8 
Prwious: 2535/0 


949 925 932 9S2 

677 o53 o58 680 

855 820 021 829 

8LB0 BJ0 850 8J5 

7.10 495 7.10 7.15 

734 712 722 740 

397.90 38540 38/20 397 JC 
B68 854 862 842 

43X90 424/0 424-fiJ 437/0 
1180 1138 1151 1173 

2409 2330 2334 2402 

1508 T4S5 I4MI 1523 
371 358-30 364 37X20 

45/80 446 44850 4563Q 

313 305.10 30520 314 

737 715 719 .739 

2750 2*40 2699 2694 

2244 2181 2192 2255 

170 161.10 164/0 16B 

1625 1581 1625 1628 


Mens A 246.70 23920 240.20 251 JO 



High 1 

Um 

am 

Prmr. 

Airhriw 

, 293 

285 

28150 

289 JO 

Electrolux B 

625' 

603 

613 

609 1 

Ericsson B 

366 

355J0 

356 

364 

Heape&B .. 

32X58 31 7 JO 

.-*1* 

327 

tncenltue A 

765 

745 

763 

755 

tmrftlbr B . 

427' 

' 415 

417 

421 

MoDaB 

303 

294 

297 

297 30 

Nardbankcn 

2BQ 

270 

270 

204 

PhtmVpIcfn 

28950 

275 

277 

289 

Sandvft B 

258 

250 

253 

261 

Scania B 

218 

212 21/50 

215 

SCAB 

198 

192 

192J0 

T96 

S-E Bantam A 

95 

89 

90 

96 

SkoruSaFare 

345 

333 

33 3 

347 

SkansJtaB 

339 

335 

335 

340J0 

SKFB 

229 

220 

222 

223 

Sparb oaken A 

191 

185 

187 

192 

SloraA 

1/5 

141 

141 

143-50 

SvHandesA 

767 263 JO 

26450 

26X50 

VohoB 

232 

226 

228 

230 


Danone 
Ett-Aauriatoe 
Eifdanto BS 
Euiwfisiie* 
Eunrtur»d 
GereEaux 
Havas 
bnetal 
Lafan» 
Legrond 
L-Oreal 


Ayala B 
Ayala Land 
BkPtriBpbl 
C&P Homes 
Mania EtocA 
Metro Bank 
RriWw 

PaBonk 
Pali Long DM 
SanMIgudB 
SMPrOnrHdg 


1725 

17 

17 

17 JO 

2X25 

1925 

1925 

19-50 

146 

144 

145 

147 

9.70 

9-30 

9J0 

9 JO 

B5J0 

8X50 

8X50 

86 

SIS 

500 

ae 

515 

AM 

5 JO 

5.70 

5*0 

216 

210 

210 

210 

880 

850 

875 

855 

57 JO 

56-50 

57 

5750 

7*0 

7/0 

7J0 

720 



Mexico 

Ada A 
BanacdB 
CematCPa 
OfroC 

Emp Atafcma 
GpaCaruj A1 
GpoFBOWW 
Goo Fto Inbursi 
Kenti Clark Max 
TekvoaCPO 
TelMexL 


6650 
2195 
4100 
1/10 
4135 
61 20 
3/2 
344® 
37 JO 
13*00 
20.60 


Ba&alMfcoeStlOJO 
Prevmn: 500L8> 

65/0 65.90 65-00 
23-30 2X30 2175 
41/0 41J5 41J0 
1X90 1400 1X98 
42-00 4X60 42S5 
59-50 59_50 60.10 
154 X54 350 

35.90 35.90 3M10 
36/S 36.45 3*35 
13180 I3X®8 13/10 
20.15 2H5 2025 


638 600 «03 *20 

344 33520 338 347 

1009 991 992 1009 

562 547 555 SM 

815 796 802 819 

2929 2875 2900 2939 

913 887 892 918 

1535 1525 1S25 15/5 
1 Earn 444 i !0 627 4J4 

_ 726 711 718 720 

iCSF 15&40 150 JO 151 155.20 

Total B 604 582 586 600 

lldnar 11X30 108.19 111/0 114/0 

Valeo 37X10 363 36X30 37530 


Sao Paulo 


Sydney 

Amav 
ANZ BUng 
BHP 
Band 

Bromines tnd. 
C8A 

CCAmatfl 
Dries Myer 
Comafca 
CSR 

Fasten Brew 
Good mem FW 
IQ Austro Ha 
Lend Lease 
MlMHdqs 
Nat AafaBank 
Nat Mutwri Hdg 
NemCatp 
Padflc Dunlop 
PkmeerlnM 
Pub Broadcast 
raaTmlo 
Si George Bank 
WMC 

W^tpacSking 

woodsidePet 


AB OnOmnes: 2623/0 
Preview: 2650 JO 


B26 

X1B 

824 

130 

10*3 

9.70 

10 

99e 

17.16 

14.78 

17.13 

17*2 

3*6 

178 

3*4 

189 

27 

26J9 

2621 

2730 

7/40 

1407 

1628 

1427 

15-30 

14*0 

14*5 

15/0 

6/1 

628 

6-40 

6/6 

625 

6.45 

4/2 

6.77 

5 

Z90 

*96 

5*2 

2J9 

2-56 

2*7 

2J9 

2 

1.96 

1.97 

2 

12*9 

1X26 

12*4 

13*3 

28*1 

2X50 

2BJ6 

29*! 

1.75 

1.71 

122 

1.77 

18*8 

18/8 

18*5 

19.10 

X09 

206 

2*8 

X1Q 

*90 

5*2 

5*5 

A 88 

157 

3/3 

157 

160 

4.77 

4/4 

*74 

Z75 

8*3 

7*4 

7-90 

8*6 

2120 

21 

21.17 

21 JO 

8/9 

8J0 

838 

8J4 

7/8 

7 39 

7/1 

7/? 

830 

X14 

8.19 

833 

11 

10*5 

11 

11*8 

435 

Z12 

*16 

4J0 


The Trib Index 

Prices as oi3 00 PM Now Yoneome 1 

Jan 1, 1992 s 10O. 

Lewd 

Change 

% change 

year todfuo 1 

World Index 

.. 175.B6 

. .:0.af. 


+17.92 

Regional Indexes 


• 



Asia/Pacific 

130.99 

+ 1.02 

*0.78 

+6.12 

Europe 

185.07 

-1.71 

-0.92 

+14.87 

N. America 

205.71 

-0 75 

-0.36 

+27.05 

S. America 

170.54 

-1.15 

-0.57 

+49.03 

Industrial Indexes 





Capital goods 

228.35 

+0.49 

+0.22 

+33.60 

Consumer goods 

188.70 

-1.17 

-0.62 

+16.89 

Energy 

197.62 

-2.58 

-1.29 

+15.76 

Finance 

134.86 

-0.05 

-0.04 

+15.80 

Miscellaneous 

190.88 

+ 1.25 

+0.66 

+17.99 

Raw Materials 

193.82 

-1.33 

-0.68 

+10.51 

Service 

166.49 

-0.62 

-0.37 

+21 .24 

UtriHies 

167.44 

-0.85 

-0.51 

+16.72 

The tmaMBBOna) Herald Tribune World Stock rndexO tracks the US. dollar vaiutta of 

230 vrtemanonaitv mvasmbte stocks from 35 connotes. For more mlormadon. a tree 

booklet is available by writing to The Trlb Index. 1 SI Avenue Charles Ue GauSe. 

92SS1 NeiMBy Cade x. France. 


Compdao by Bloomberg Naurs j 

High 

Low Close 

Prev. 

High Lew 

Ome Pnv. 


Taipei 


B rndes coPM 
Brotmui Pfd 
CenrigPW 
CE5PPM 
CWS. 


Milan 


Bcamum 


2X52 

iwa 

s 

Z77 

,1 

2.15 
627 
720 
1.51 
727 
SM 
627 
826 
148 

M» 

MS 

5X3 

229 

625 

£88 

10/6 

11.15 
£59 
427 
530 
195 
434 

18.93 

7/9 

4/5 

3 

8/0 

430 

1123 

1.76 

1122 

82V 

448 

620 

1037 

417 

426 

7.93 
498 
6.10 
321 

19.19 

471 

6.94 


IT 

General Asuc 

IMt 

INA 

Metfiofali™ 


gL 

SPoSlStob 
Tdean Hota 
TIM 


w,,Te S5Sss]sas 

5290 ^ ’SS 'S 

5495 S52S 5S» 
1550 1557 1590 

* SOM 26300 26600 

3545 3435 3540 3495 

8450 8290 *300 , 8440 
10580 10150 1MW 1M25 
5845 5W 5705 5845 

37100 36050 36650 36600 
16930 16400 16400 16720 
2650 2690 ans 263 

5425 »• 5315 S3* 

8090 7815 7880 ,8200 

11650 11260 11350 11465 
lit? 1115 1134 
645 653 640 

2585 2590 MM 

4870 4760 473S 4850 

15050 14650 14795 14850 

Z1700 207® 20800 210M 
13700 13025 13405 134* 
11175 10915 10940 111M 
6185 5975 6010 6100 


l PM 

UgMSentdai 

pSS^sPId 

PaulfataLin 

Sid Nodonal 

Sauza Cruz . 

TeWinuPM 

Tetamlg 

Tetol 

TetospPM 


5670 

1600 


1141 

672 

2630 


Usiminas PM 
CVRD PM 


11/0 1120 11 JO 
815-00 81/50 81/99 
5630 5630 5532 
82.00 79.9? 81.00 
1720 17 A:. 17-90 

550.00 520.00 539-00 
59X0 0 650.00 65000 
522-K: 52X08 522-00 
44503 344-01 4*401 

310.00 305-00 m© 

209.00 20X01 207.00 
3630 3M» 3630 
lljn 1X99 11.00 

148.00 14200 145S8 
19330 19100 19241 

160*9)157.990 16X00 
340*0 338*0341.980 
39/9 39/9 39/90 
11/1 1 1 -30 11-30 
2B.15 2720 27.95 


105 

smoo 

5530 

7X99 

1720 

539*0 

655*0 

515*0 

4*9*0 

304*0 

209*0 

3620 

1X99 

14X88’ 

194*0 

160*0 

34X01 

3930 

1130 

27.91 


Cathay Ufa Ins 
ChangHwoBk 
ChfcoTunflB* 
China Dewetpml 
atloa 5/eel 
RreiBank 
Formosa PlaslK 
Hua Nan Eft. 

Inti Comm Bk 
Nan Ya Ptostics 
SUn Kong Life 
TatennSeaii 
Tatura 

Ufa ACcro Elec 
UM World Chin 


151 

118 

74 

12330 

32.10 

11830 

6430 

12430 

58 

74 

10430 


147 147 

115 115 

72 72 
120 120 

37.10 35.10 
115 11538 
63 62 

118 11930 
56 56 

73 7250 


ISO 

117 
73 

121 

31*0 

118 
64 
123 

5730 

7X50 


98 98 10330 

154 14230 14230 153 


Seoul 

Damn 

Daewoo Heavy 
HyumWEng. 
Kto Moure 
Korea El Pwr 
Korea ExhBk 
LG San «jn 
PohonglranSI 
SankwngDWoy 

SamsunaEfac 
SMntranBank 
5K Telecore 


Gaapn/fa lailn: 74233 
Prams: 76292 

100000 96000 97500 99000 
835® 8130 8130 8350 

22000 21500 21500 21710 
13900 13500 1350P 13500 
2*900 2*300 26800 2*500 
5710 5570 5610 5680 

4500 47300 48700 47600 
62900 61400 61900 61400 
49200 48200 48800 48400 
75500 72700 74700 72500 
9700 9510 9510 9650 

504000 499000 503000 495000 


Singapore 


Montreal 

Bee Mo* Com 
Oto Tire A 
C/hUfiJA 
CTFWISk 
G aiMetio 
C4- West Uctt 
ImotcO . 
MeestareGrp 

UMawCOG 
NaBk Canada 

SSS! 

Ouebeaa’B 

RngeaConffiB 

bfglBkCda 


fedBfaidsWfa: 341*0 

Prawns-' 147*20 

50.10 5OJ0 
2720 m 
39to 39 JB 
43U 44 

’1 SjS 

2016 20.10 

,7 - W JlZ 

38V5 Wtt 
37V 37/5 
27 JO 27U 
]0i5 10*0 
6135 64 


Asia Poe Brew 
Confess Poc 
CifyDevtts 


51 50.10 
27 JO 27.10 
m 39.15 
4U0 

m 18 JS 

m a 

41/5 40*5 
36 M. 3 6Vl 
20/5 

l» 1 W 
38.95 3430 
3 7/5 37M 
27/0 27 JO 
10W 10/5 
643S 63 



Oslo 


AkerA 


0BXfadnc7n23 
Piwlons! 738.11 


OennarsteSfc 
Btesi ,, 
HabhmdA 

KroertwAsn 

NoisteSkooA 
NtnomedA 
Orkla Am A 
PgSfaiGeoSvc 
' iPeHm A 


TnmsocaiitOT 

SoreferandAsa 


IS 

1 

154 

46 

480 

418 

298 

14230 

558 

<31 

00 

51 


135 1» 

200 202 
26-10 TAX 
37 3IJ0 
1* 149 

45 £ 

475 478 

411 411 

249 295 

157 1993Q 
S50 555 

418 425 

152 F52 

130 13] 

620 620 
49-50 49*0 


141 
206 
27 
32JD 
154 
46*0 
479 
416 
296 
163 JO 
559 
427 
158 
132 
610 
50 


jAIrf.. 

Sag Land 
Sing Press F 
Sng Tech lad 

SutoTefaomm 
Tat Lee Bank 
Utd Industrial 
UtdOSeaBkF 

MngToiHdgj 

•tinUStWK. 


SM 5/5 
X10 X10 
11J0 1120 
11/0 IIJO 
0.92 ft.90 
17/0 17/0 
4/2 455 
8.90 9J5 

326 322 
7*5 8 

4*8 4*0 
525 190 

170 320 
4J2 456 
412 412 
1360 13.90 
BJ5 8/0 
6/5 625 

6J5 645 
1X40 12.10 
7.10 7.15 

2X4) 2640 
320 3.72 

150 7-54 
224 226 

1*7 1*8 

1320 13*0 
ISO 3*0 


Stockholm sxuudacasKM 

Previous: 362X59 

AGAB 11040 10940 10940 11040 

ms& m 11640 V7M 119 

AStlDwwn 249 239 34450 240 

Astro A 140 13440 13450 M2 

AttosCfifKOA 26140 248 255 253 


Tokyo 

Aunamria . 

An Nippon Air 

Arrowy 
Asa hi Bank 
Awhiawn 
AseM Glass 
Bk Tokyo Mkw 
BkYoiuriiama 
BridgafloiB 
Canon 
Cbubu Elec 

SKiS 

Date „ 
fSjsj-ldil Kong 
DaiwaBaik 
Dawn House 
Darin Sec 
DDJ 
Denso 

ftsf Japan R» 

Efcm 

Fanuc 

FuBBank 

Fafi Photo 

Fulfau 

HocMunlBk 

Hitachi 

Hondo Mrior 

IBJ 

1H1 

Uochu 

tto-Yekndo 

JAL 

Japan Tobacco 

jysai 

Koetno 

KonsalEfac 

Kao 

KnwwtUHvy 
Knm Steel 
KfaMMppRf 
KWn Brewery 
Kobe Steel 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kwcere 

KtoshuEiw 

LTCB 

Marubeni 

Manri 

MotSU 0»n 

Matsu Bee Ind 

Matsu Bee Wk 

MbsubfaM 

MltsiAhtdOi 

MDuibisIriEl 

MtobgMEto 

B* 11, 


47*0 

AJ. gl 

46/0 

47/0 

129-50 

119 

120 

127J0 

65 JO 

63J0 

6150 

xa xn 


NOftfii 225: 1900XM 


Prwtous: 19099.11 

1080 

1030 

1070 

1070 

499 

3480 

690 

3420 

690 

3470 


866 

859 

862 

BAS 

627 

600 

621 

620 

1040 

1010 

1010 

1050 

2270 

2210 

2270 

2220 

531 

SI6 

527 

543 

1760 

2490 

2730 

Z720 

3600 

3490 

5«n 

3520 

2040 

2020 

2040 

MM 

1960 

1930 

1950 

1» 

2750 

2720 

2730 

2750 

870 

B46 

8® 

059 

1470 

1440 

1450 

1480 

590 

565 

5B4 

500 

1340 

1330 

1330 

1330 

771 

753 

760 

774 

7100a 

6870d 

7050a 

6830a 

27OT 

2650 

2750 

2720 

5390a 

S350O 

5350a 

5440a 

2520 

2470 

2480 

2430 

5050 

4860 

4970 

4060 

1550 

1500 

1520 

1520 

4720 

4450 

4670 

4700 

1660 

1610 

1650 

1610 

TO 

1118 

1120 

1120 

1290 

1250 

1260 

1280 

3600 

3580 

3650 

3600 

1740 

16W 

1740 

1730 

378 

360 

365 

376 

519 

510 

513 

514 

6710 

6620 

6620 

4710 

480 

460 

472 

475 

9420a 

9350a 

9370a 

9420a 

340 

3350 

3350 

3400 

590 

560 

583 

570 

2200 

2180 

2190 

2200 

1760 

1720 

174} 

1730 

473 

466 

467 

477 

306 

300 

305 

304 

679 

674 

478 

479 

1010 

980 

999 

1020 

17S 

170 

175 

173 

B04 

783 

786 

819 

4S6 

m 

476 

m 

9100 

0940 

9070 

9000 

1970 

1960 

1970 

1960 

554 

541 

550 

550 

444 

427 

438 

438 

1920 

1840 

1860 

1920 

4600 

4530 

jutjn 

4638 

2390 

2360 

2300 

2300 

1360 

1340 

1340 

1340 

1320 

1290 

1300 

1320 

300 

290 

296 

294 

596 

583 

593 

sn 

1700 

1640 

1690 

1650 

815 

799 

912 

814 

665 

643 

657 

643 

1730 

1690 

1720 

1720 

1000 

1060 

1070 

1070 


Mitsui Fudbsn 
MUsuiTrayt 

MurantMb; 

NEC 

Nikon 

NftkoSec 

Nintendo 

Nippon Steel 
NKsan Motor 
NKK 

Nam wa Sec 
NTT 

NTT Data 

Op Paper 

Osaka Gas 

Ricoh 

Rohm 

SatouaBk 

Sankyo 

Samre Bar* 

Sanya Elec 

Secom 

SeAwRw 

Stldsui Chcm 

Sekrnd House 

Seunn-Eleuen 

Sharp 

Shikoku El Pwr 

Shimizu 

5h>n-utsuCh 

Shiselda 

Shizuoka Bk 

Softbank 

Sony 

Sumflarao 
Sumitomo Bk 
SumHChem 
Sumdorao Elec 
Suma Metre 
SunritTrust 
Taisho Pharm 
TakedaChem 
TDK 

Tohoku El Pwr 
Tokfli Bank 
Taklo Marine 
Tokyo El Pwr 
Tokyo Electron 
Tokyo Gas 
TakyuGorp. 
Tonen 

ToppanPiW 
rind 


Tostem 
Toyo Trust 
Toyota Motor 

Yanunourtil 


1510 

730 

5700 

1590 

2360 

628 

10800 

742 

52* 

312 

766 

198 

1720 

1200b 

52706 

590 

271 

1800 

14000 

720 

4220 

1670 

440 

8*S0 

5J8» 

966 

1170 

9030 

1340 

1940 

605 

3370 

2070 

1240 

6010 

11600 

1030 

1900 

448 

1940 

276 

1190 

3110 

3620 

ms 

rm 

1040 

1540 

2240 

7320 

287 

617 

1170 

1820 

787 

718 

2400 

95B 

3140 

2940 


1440 

675 

5520 

1540 

2210 

602 

10600 

751 

512 

3&S 

745 

194 

1660 

1170b 

Slot® 

SOI 

268 

1770 

14000 

703 

4060 

1600 

417 

8460 

5300 

951 

1140 

8970 

1320 

1930 

577 

3220 

2030 

1200 

5800 

11300 

1000 

I860 

420 

1920 

270 

1140 

3000 

3570 

9560 

1940 

10M 

1490 

2220 

7110 

281 

606 

1120 

1790 

774 

710 

1330 

930 

3090 

2890 


1490 1450 
725 688 

•5700 5490 
1590 1560 
* 2320 2260 
628 625 

10800 10900 
752 771 

525 512 

3i? m 

757 750 

196 193 

1/70 1700 

1200b U90h 
5270b 5050b 
585 593 

271 270 

1780 1790 

14000 13900 
715 700 

*130 4240 

[620 1670 

436 419 

B640 8S®5 

5300 5430 

962 973 

1160 1174J 

am 89M 

1330 1340 

1940 1930 

tD I 588 
3320 3 M) 

2050 2080 

1220 1250 

5900 6020 

11400 I16O0 
lDio loss 
1090 1870 

443 422 

1930 1940 

274 273 

1160 1150 

^ SS 

9730 %tO 
I960 1970 

1040 1040 
1530 1500 

2220 2240 

7320 7190 

285 288 

610 623 

1130 1140 

1900 1810 

782 788 

717 715 

2370 2430 

952 945 

3100 3120 
2920 2940 


Newbridge Me! 
Norando Inc 
Nortai Energy 
Nttiem Tetecwn 
Nova 
Onex 

Panciln Petlm 
Pi-lro Cda 
Placer Dome 
Poco Petlm 
Potash Sask 
Renaissance 
HtoAtgora 
Rogers CanW B 
Seagram Co 
ShelCdaA 
5una» 
TaBsnanEny 
Techfi 
Tetegbbe 
Tebn 
Thomson 
TarOom Bank 
TiaosoHa 
TmnsCda Pipe 
Trimark FW 
Trtrec Hahn 
TVXGaid 
Wesfcrant Eny 
Weston 


6X05 60,35 
29*0 291* 

3190 3155 
143 13891 
11.90 11/0 
32/5 32 

261* 2619 

2/65 251* 

25.15 UM 
14 13** 

105V* 104-30 
3519 3/10 
3S 34*4 
29 2819 

4920 46/5 
Z3V9 22*5 
4419 43W 

44.55 42 

28 IA 27*5 
50 49M 

26*0 26 to 

34.10 3155 
43W 48-90 
17/5 17 

27Vi 27.15 
69 64*9 

3219 32JO 
7.38 6.70 

27*5 26*5 
100 96 


61/5 42-30 
2919 29*0 
33*0 3X65 
1 39 JO U2J5 
11 JO 11*0 
32J0 3219 

26 JO 26V* 
2*35 3*40 
25.10 24*0 
13*0 139« 

lOSVi 104/0 
34*0 35.60 
344 3/95 
28 Vy 28*0 
4816 4» 

22.90 2X65 
43M ASIA 
«3/5 4/35 
28,20 20 
50 SXffi 

94 5S 9A si 
3X55 3X80 
4119 41« 
17.15 17J0 
2720 27VA 
65W 6819 

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1923 

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1998 

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2100 2220 

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415 417 

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t 





PAGE 14 


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on Page 16 


\SZ£> 



























\ !A . 


■4, 

1 ift / 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Tokyo and Seoul Companies Get Help With Debt 

$1 Billion for Korean Banks Mitsui Construction to Get Bailout 

Comled by Our SuS F™ _ _ 


CoipiJat by Our Suff Fnm Dupocba p i n 

SEOUL Th*» ront. -i j , . oant, t-onunercial Bank of Korea, Korea 

taJt 


nk of Korea, Korea am^tyarsvffFmaapixha orders for construction wont by the 50 largest 

. Seoul Bank. Korea TOKYO — Mitsui Construction Co- ar- builders peaked at 20 trillion yen a year in the 
inhan Bank. ranged a bailout from other units of the Mitsui early 1990s but fell to 11 trillion yen last 

ed in addition to the keiretsu. at least temporarily brightening die year. Mitsui's obligations total about 90 
“permits for rights outlook for the Japanese building industry, times its expected pretax profit of 55 billion 

if mW nn □.«!/ I iJ %JZ rr,,.', Tmrt Donl'ino vpm f irw lltf l»wir ft# . 1 . inno 


ally because afWdS^boT™' £SST? loans . « >nnits for rights outlook for the Japanese building industry. 

The step was taken aTthe Mnktrv of “ “ su) ^.? f Oites on loan-loss Sakura Bank Ltd., Mitsui Trust Bankinj 

Financed Economy £dfc ^ Co.. Mitsui Life Insurance Co. and Mitsu 

ering steps to strengthen the financial stmc ma t P ' un , g /l sa, - d . Ae government would Marine Fire Insurance Co. will provide at 
hire of banks saddled with badloans eariJ rvS. deC1S,0n ° n **“ measures b Y unspecified amount of aid to the builder 

"The government has been mn«irinin<. r ' • .. spokesmen said, and further cooperation u 

steps intended to improve the basic finanriJ ha 3? especially Korea First Bank ’ the form of increased orders is expected from 

structure of the banks * * Chuns EuMV^ strained since Hanbo the Mitsui Fudosan Co. real-estate unit that is 

L m^’^hS^k«Z. E sS± 8 ' ^“PWMbaDtapnn i January and a series *e bigges. shareholder in Mitsui Ccmstmc 
Hesaid2emm?hSbSS^n liahf Af a , 1 oth « ma J° r COB ^ ora ~ «<*>> iSto a 15.6 percent stake, 

moves b v international SSL™*™ 25?* 10051 recentl y al Kia Group in early Mitsui Construction will attempt to cut it 


UU UVAHV IU1 UK UUUUiU^ — 1 (/IbUZA [J1U1ILU1 UllIlUU 

Sakura Bank Ltd., Mitsui Trust Banking yen for die year through March 1998. “We 
Co., Mitsui Life Insurance Co. and Mitsui overdid it,” said Takesaio Sano, a spokes- 
Marine Fire Insurance Co. will provide an man for the company, 
unspecified amount of aid to the builder. Stock-market investors, troubled by the 
spokesmen said, and further cooperation in failure of two large builders last month and 

fATTn r\f ic OTrWtwi frrtlH WniTlfid tTlAf TTlOrf* CAiiW fnllmit maUAivtail 


moves by international credit- rating con 
nies to downgrade some local banks that 


Mitsui Construction will attempt to cut its mark Nikkei 225 index ret 
debt by 74 billion yen ($6383 million) over losses it suffered earlier 

. L. TL. ” -.1 - Wmim A Al . _ 


nies to downgrade some local banks that had K , uem ny m mwon yen imh j munou, ova 

3S-53S». a-sM-araMSK sesssfr- 


worried that more could follow, welcomed 
the news with purchases of shares in the 
construction sector. 

The buying also helped Tokyo’s bench- 
mark Nikkei 225 index recoup most of the 
losses it suffered earlier Wednesday. It 


^ been T & ymg to be banks under review for further downgrades, 
country. It joined the Moon Hung Hoo, a treasury offish at 

fof fe, DOI ^ C Devel °P menI Korea Exchange Bank. saidSouth Korean 

^ were «, sell bond, wbh mo- 


wwt/i uj uiuivu _t wu (irrv^UN/ iu^vh/ uuuw MMUivouajf, JLl 

three years. The company currently owes closed down 0.47 percent at 19.008.60. 
about 289 billion yen in debt and is liable for “The news visibly galvanized sentiment 

an additional 204 billion yen in loan guar- toward the construction sector, and shon- 
r°°r s Lorp., which, along with. Moody’s an Lees to developers. covering emerged immediately, reversing 

investors Service Inc., has several of the Over the next three years, the builder plans the weak tone seen in early trading,” a 
oanks under review for further downgrades, to shed 400 of the 4,400 employees it had in broker said. “Buying here then spilled over 
Moon Hung Hoo, a treasury official at March. It also said it woula slim down un- to other financial-sector issues such as banks 
Korea Exchange Bank, said South Korean profitable operations and sell assets owned and property developers, sending the broader 
banks were unable to sell bonds with ma- by the company and its affiliates . By talring market into positive territory temporarily.” 

Qin&CS of mOfC ^ Vf*Ar rhf> milfl. rko efaw •'# (lAAAe mull * AAmrvlTlw Rlirfhie ch/vrt_rr\«^e.'nn 


X — — « vwwwmivvi, O, yi 

the world’s 29 richest nations. 

A central bank spokesman said the loans 
would be for one month at a rate of 0.25 
percentage point above the London interbank 

n iLIaL .... _ - ■ ■ m 


. — — — mmmmm UIV liyiAJtJ OIM IW Mi j 1 I IQlfc..!, J UitV i i l ^, 

tiinnes of more than a year because the coun- the steps, it hopes to post a parent-company 
try s financial problems had left investors current profit of 10 billion yen for the year 
unwilling to shoulder a longer-term risk. ending March 3 1 . 2000. 

After Kia, investor interest is still Japan’s construction industry is suffering 


UAi 3U.JA, Kg uup^o Uf puai II pot tui~vuu ipouj But this short-covering, or buying of shares 

current profit of 10 billion yen for the year to cover previous sales of borrowed stock, 
ending March 31, 2000. will run out of steam unless bold measures to 

Japan ‘s construction industry is suffering revive the property market are implemented, 
from huge bad -debt problems, a legacy of the a broker said. (Reuters. Bloomberg. 


nffMwL ni» — j.n — ~ — r — ^ u,Y » lur uuercst is suu japan s construction industry is sunenng n 

S™ Sdi u y JS ^ OUl u 5 - 33 dormant ’ from huge bad-debt problems, Vlegacy of tof a 

percent for dollars. The banks are Cho Hung (Bridge New, s. AFP. Bloomberg ) financial bubble of the 1980s. Private-sector 


AFP. AFX. Bridge News j 


; • 1! .! 

! l. 


;■ ..Ml, 

J - U 


i : Singapore CD Firm 

§ Accused of Piracy 

■-•i. Carftlrd try Our Su&From DapjKica 

SINGAPORE — A computer piracy watchdog organi- 
zation accused a top Singapore compact disk maker on 
V Wednesday of being a major player in the Southeast Asian 

•: illegal software business. 

The company, SM Summit Holdings Ltd., denied the 
l gi. charge brought by the Business Software Alliance on behalf of 

Microsoft Coip., Adobe Systems Inc. and Autodesk Inc. that a 
unit of SM Summit may have been making counterfeit soft- 
ware. 

— The three U.S. companies have filed a civil lawsuit against 

SM Summit, acting through the Business Software Alliance, a 
group of software companies that fights intellectual property 
.7 violations. 

Microsoft said Singapore police raided the SM Summit unit 
after a former employee tipped off the alliance. The software 
group offers a 20,000 Singapore dollar ($13300) reward to 
. ^ £ any informant who provides details that lead to convictions in 
‘ software-violation suits. 

f]|f SM S ummi t said it was “irreparably damaged” by 

Wednesday’s accusation, adding that a statement from the 
Business Software Alliance “convicts” it without evidence. 

KJC Teo, director of Summit, said he was prepared to go to 
^ court to challenge the charges and was consulting lawyers.' 

A S ummi t lawyer said die company wait to court on 


PAGE 15 


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ore- .Tokyo ■ 
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PtW. . ■ 


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; '1^482^3 *8&SSA% +0^ -} 

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tr: ■■ ■a.saso^ ri.pi- 

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China Expands Study 
Of Zinc-Market Losses 


Rntp/Hmlm 

An agent examining disks from the Singapore raid. 

Wednesday to seek clarification on the search warrant granted 
to the allianc e that allowed the raid by detectives and experts 
from the alliance and the three American companies. 

He said Summit believed there was some irregularity in 
bow the search warrant was obtained, but he declined to 
comment further. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Conpdot tv Oar Sa&F*om Dofwbn 

BEUlNG — China's State 
Council, the country's cab- 
inet, is extending its inves- 
tigation into potentially huge 
losses by Chinese companies 
trading zinc on the London 
Metal Exchange. 

Smelters under the control 
of China National Nonferrous 
Metals Industry Corp. may 
also reduce hedging activity 
on the London Metal Ex- 
change after an order to tight- 
en control over their futures 
trading divisions, industry 
sources in China said 
The company's move was 
aimed at stopping smelters 
from running losses because 
they had too many short po- 
sitions to hedge their metals 
production, the sources said 
Last month, a Chinese gov- 
ernment publication said sev- 
eral zinc producers, including 


the second-largest, Zhuzho u 
Zinc Smelter, faced “great 
losses” after betting this year 
that zinc pices would fall. In- 
stead, prices soared to seven- 
year highs. Wang Chenyin, di- 
rector for planning at China’s 
biggest zinc smelter, Huludao 
7.inc Industry Co., said 
Zhuzhou may have sold short 
as much as 400,000 tons of toe 
metal it did not own, a move 
that is based on an expectation 
that prices will falL 

He alleged that foreign 
companies were supporting 
market prices to “squeeze 
China. ” 

Executives of top one pro- 
ducers declined to comment 
on toe extent of Zhuzhou 's 
losses or the progress of the 
investigation, but analysts es- 
timated a potential loss of as 
much as $200 million. 

(Bloomberg. Bridge News) 


!‘.^W233; ;■ 632.25 • ■ +0.08 
<257 


" 4370.13 4,4^03- -La4 

Source 1 Tefekuts IwcMuuinul HcnVJ TnWnft; 

Very briefly; 

• Kia Motors Corp. said its new passenger car, the Sephia □. 
had record one-day sales of 11386 units in its showroom 
debut Tuesday. 

• China’s Stale Statistics Bureau said retail prices in 36 major 
cities rose 0.6 percent in July from a year earlier. The 
consumer price index, which includes utilities and services, 
was up 2.7 percent in toe 12 months. 

• Chinese officials sharply raised their forecasts for the 
booming mobile-phone market, saying the country should 
have more than 30 million users by 2000. 

• China’s actual foreign investment rose 8.9 percent from a 
year earlier, to $24.3 billion, in the first seven months of 1 997; 
toe rate of expansion was down from toe 1996 full-year 
growth of 12.2 percent. 

• Infrastructure Trust of Australia Ltd., which buys stakes in 
highways, utilities and telecommunications, reported net profit 
after six months' trading of 27.9 million Australian dollars ($21 
million), nearly double what it forecast in its prospectus. 

• Commonwealth Bank of Australia announced after-tax 
profit for toe year ended June 30 of 1 .08 billion dollars, down 
4 percent from the (ike period in 1996. 

• Carter Holt Harvey Ltd. predicted its profit in the rest of 
1997 would improve from its first-quarter earnings of 49 
million New Zealand dollars ($31 million). 

• Indonesia, which exported $66.2 million of gray un- 
bleached cotton fabric to the European Union in 1996, pro- 
tested toe European Commission’s reopening of a dumping 
case involving trade in the fabric. 

• Shangri-La Asia Ltd., the luxury-hotel operator controlled 
by toe Malaysian businessman Robert Kuok, sold 1 .2 billion 
Hong Kong dollars ($155.2 million) of new shares to finance 
its purchase of a hotel-management company from its unlisted 
parent 

• Henderson Land Development Ltd. denied it planned to 

buy a controlling interest in toe J airline group; Li Ka-shing, its 
owner, has built up about a 3 percent stake in two Jardine 
Companies. Bridge New. r. AFP. Bloomberg. AP 


Canberra Cheers Growth Go-Ahead 


CmmMtrOirSt&Fwnjroicbes 

SYDNEY — Prime Minister John Howard 
enthusiastically endorsed advice Wednesday 
from the central bark toat said Australia could 
safely accelerate its growth rate to reduce 
chronic unemploymeot. 

The governor of the Reserve Bank of Aus- 
tralia, Ian Macfaiiane, said late Tuesday that 
Australia could safely exceed a growth rate of 
4-5 percent a year without breaching the cen- 
tral b ank ’s- inflation target of 2 percent to 3 


teal b ank ’s- inflation target of 2 percent to 3 

percent. ... . 

. But Mr. Macfariane warned that while in- 
creased growth would lead to a substantial 
reduction in the unemployment rate, it also 
, meant that employees would have to accept 
vf mare work flexibility and less leisure. 

Mr. Macfariane also raised the prospect of 
another cut in interest rates — the sixth in a 
year — by saying that a sustained low rate of 
inflation would allow toe Reserve Bank to run 
a more lenient monetary policy. . 

• T m very encouraged by toeremarks of toe 
Reserve Bank governor for their significance 
in relation to unemployment,” Mr. Howard 
said. “I said sane time ago that we needed to 
get the economy running at over 4 percent to 
start getting unemployment down.” 

The government is responsible fa increas- 
ing growth, Mr. Macfariane said, not toe 

central bank. . . 

“Whatever our growth potential is, mon- 


etary policy will have liaie to do with it, 
compared with other facias,” he told the 
Australian Institute of Company Directors. 
That may include reforming toe tax system, 
fostering competition and encouraging busi- , 
nesses to take on staff. 

Economists have advised toe government 
that the economy must grow at more than 4 
percent to significantly reduce unemploy- 
ment, which has hovered around 83 percent 
for most of toe past year. Bat fears of inflation 

have led to limits on the growth rate in recent 
years. The government forecast growth of 
3.75 percent for toe year ending next June, a 
slight increase on toe average fa toe past six 
years of around 33 percent. 

Mr. Howard spoke after a two-day cabinet 
meeting on possible remedies for unemploy- 
ment. 

“The outlook for growth is very strong, 
he said. “Some of it has arrived, there ? s no 
question of waiting for it. We have very strong 
business investment, we have an enormous 
potential and actual business investment be- 
ing undertaken in toe mining sector.” 

Separately, Mr. Howard promised a com- 
plete overhaul of Australia’s tax system after 
being warned of a looming tax revolt by the 
states. He said a special meeting of state 
premiers would discuss federal-state financial 
relations and tax reform. 

(AFP. Bloomberg, Reuters) 


♦ CD-ROMs Lift LG Electronics 


Cenq&d by Ow Staff Finn Dispoicia 

SEOUL — LG Electronics 
Co., South Korea's largest 
home-appliance maker, said 
Wednesday that first-half net 
profit rose almost 40 percent, 
to 109.6 billion won ($122 
milli on) — topping its own 
forecasts — because of rising 
sales of CD-ROM drives and 
cost cuts. 

Sales rose almost 20 per- 
cent from the first half of 
1 996, to4.4lrillion won, driv- 
en by a 24 percent increase in 
exports to Asian countries, 
according to Kim Sung Hynn 
of LG’s investor relations ac- 
*ipartmenL . . 

▼ The stronger result in the 
first half of the year also re- 
flected brisk sales in honte 
appliances including air con- 
■ dttioners and video cassette 

ntooniers, a spokesroansmd. 

“The better-than-expectefl 

performance was also anno- 
uied to the restructiinng w 
production lines, which lodto 
a considerable ent in opff- 
ating costs,” Lee Jung Kyu, 

an LG spokesman, smd. 

. Total sales of 

drives surged 1 M percent 

the period, shifting ^ 

tor’s chronic loss to a P ro 

♦“tTsoid its 1997 sal* 
would exceed ns forecast of 9 
trillion woo. 


Separately Daewoo Elec- banks to commit as much as 4 
separately, o-iihon won for an uncom- 

^“^firf^ljecaSe 1 ofa pleted steel plant that would 
for- need a further 2 trillion won to 
greater- than complete construction, 
eign^cbange loss. T& e announcement came 

Profit m toe fost sk oQe after toe failure of a 

“^’^rT^cSttoM third and final attempt to sell 
said, slipped 7 p»cent Hanbo at public auction, 

billion won because of a f "JJL First Bank, Hanbo’s 


billion won. 

“Earnings were a little De- 
low expectations, but they 

will signffi^ntlyj^of” 


mime creditor, said Tuesday 
tbai toe company wonld be 
sold through private negoti- 
ations. 

POSCO said its credit rat- 


wro sta- POS^U said lis cram nu- 
ll* latter half, wonld be lowered if it 

bilizedcuirency ^boOTu^ more than 2 trillion won 
overseas sales, & Hanbo, a move that it sard 

a deputy general manner make it difficult to 

won, up 9.1 percent from a ^ 

year earlier. 

14.9pac^whde^^c 

of the caa ^g^ om ber$, AFP) 

■ POSCO’s Bid Stands Mg 

PnhanB Iron & Steei Co., 

toe world’s ™ 

steel producer, said it wouJfl 

£1?! 

POSCaa -become in- i^ograi n*wooi8Dii | *!itf 




ADVERTISEMENT 


MARKS & SPENCER PLC 

(CPRs) 

The undersigned announces ihel as 
from 19 August, 1997 at Kas- 
Associatie N.V„ Spuistraal 172, 
Amsterdam, div. epn. do. 51 of the 
(DR's Marks & fencer pic. will 
be payable with Dfls. 8^1 per CDR. 
repr. 25 shares (re foal dividend for 
the year ending 31.03.97; of 9,7p per 
share) Tax-credii Pst- 0,605 “Dili 
£05 per CDR. 

Noo-resdoils of The Uni ted K i n gd om 
can only claim this lax credit when 
the relevant lax treaty meets this 
balky. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam, August II, 1997 


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COMPANY 

(CPBa 

The Board of Direaora of tagwott- 
Rud has announced (hal shareholders, 
who will be reeistavd in the bool* of the 
Company on 19 August 1997 will be 
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COMPANY RLV- 
Amsterdam, August 11. 1996 


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PACE 18 



Petr Korda returning tbe ten- 
nis ball to Jan-Michael Gambil. 

Courier Falls 

tennis Brett Steven upset Jim 
Courier, 6-2, 6-2, in the second 
round of the Pilot Pen International 
in New Haven, Connecticut. 

Yevgeni Kafelnikov of Russia, 
the No. 1 seed. No. 3 Petr Korda of 
the Czech Republic, No. 7 Tim Hen- 
man of Britain and Sargis Sargsian 
of Armenia all won Tuesday. 

■ Clenn Weiner, playing in just 
his second ATP match, upset 1 5 th- 
seeded Thomas Johansson of 
Sweden, 6-7 (6-7), 7-5, 6-4, in the 
first round of the RCA Champi- 
onships in Indianapolis. (AP) 

Japanese Select Osaka 

OLYMPICS Japan's Olympic of- 
ficials on Wednesday picked Osaka, 
the commercial hub of western Ja- 
pan, as the nation's candidate to 
stage the 2008 Summer Olympics. 
Osaka gained 29 votes. Its lone 
rival. Yokohama, garnered 17. (AP) 

Phillips Is Charged 

baseball Tony Phillips, the 
Anaheim Angels outfielder, was 
charged in California with felony 
possession of cocaine, and the team 
said he would not return to the lineup 
until he met with doctors represent- 
ing baseball and the players’ union. 
Phillips was arrested Sunday by 
Anaheim police, who said he bought 
a small quantity of cocaine. (API 

Wolves May Lose Garnett 

basketball Kevin Garnett, the 
All-Star forward, will leave the 
Minnesota Timberwolves after this 
season, his agent said, because the 
team revealed that the player had 
turned down a six-year, $103 mil- 
lion offer. 

“It’s unfortunate that the Tim- 
berwolves have not honored their 
word to keep all contract negoti- 
ations strictly confidential," said the 
agent, Eric Fleisher. “Consequently, 
Kevin Garnett will not re-sign with 
the club after next season. ” 

Wolves officials denied breach- 
ing an agreement. Glen Taylor, the 
team owner who disclosed the con- 
tract offer to the press, said Fleisher 
was seeking a six-year contract 
worth at least $ 1 32 million. [AP I 

India and Sri Lanka Draw 

cricket Mohammed Azhamd- 
din hit his 19th test century as India 
drew the second and final test 
against Sri Lanka in Colombo on 
Wednesday. The first test was also 
drawn. 

India, set 373 runs to win, never 
attempted to reach the target and 
finished on 281 for five with 
Azharuddin 108 notour. (Reuters) 


^ iCeralbSSribune 

Sports 

Defender In a Defensive Mode 

Mark Brooks, 1996 PGA Champ, Is Back After a Grim Year 


By Clifton Brown 

Ne w fork Tunes Ser\- i>r 

N EW YORK — The defending 
PGA champion has not won a 
tour event in 12 months. 

He missed the cut at the Masters. He 
missed the cut at the U.S. Open. He 
missed the cut at the British Open. 

He has managed just one top- 10 fin- 
ish in 23 tournaments this year. 

When Mark Brooks steps onto the 
first tee Thursday at the Winged Foot 

PGA Golf 

Golf Club in Mamaroneck, New York, 
to defend his Professional Golfers’ As- 
sociation title, it will continue his quest 
to recapture the swing and the con- 
fidence that led him to the pinnacle of 
his career last August. Since winning his 
first major at age 36, Brooks has found 
life at the top to be almost as difficult as 
getting there. 

“It’s been a long year.” Brooks, a 
native of Fort Worth, Texas, said in a 
recent interview. “The PGA seems like 
it was two years ago. I’m playing with 
probably as little confidence as I’ve 
played with in several years. People ask, 
‘How could that be?’ Well, if you go out 
there and hit enough funny- looking 
shots, it will destroy your confidence in 
a hurry.” 

Brooks, who has seven career vic- 
tories. including three last year, expects 
to win again. He has been too good for 
too long to believe otherwise. 

But be has been troubled by a swing 
flaw since late last year that has sent 
many of his tee shots slicing to the right. 
At 5 feet 9 inches and 1 50 pounds ( 1 .75 
meters and 68 kilograms). Brooks has 
never been one of me game's long hit- 
ters. so when he loses accuracy, it means 
trouble. 

Much of his time at tournaments has 
been spent on the driving range, trying 
to feel comfortable again off the tee. But 
it is difficult to compete with the 


Gothenburg 
Crushes Costly 
Rangers, 3-0 


CtnythJ hr Omr Stiff Fir m Pupalm 

The Glasgow Rangers expensive 
team of international stars made a miser- 
able stan to this season’s European Cup 
Wednesday, when it losr, 3-0, in 
Gothenburg in ftte finst leg of the pre- 
liminary round. 

The Rangers goalkeeper, Andy 
Goram. was helpless against scorching 
long-range shot from Stefan Petiersson 
in the 55th. Three minutes later Goram 

European Soccer 

reached a shot by Per Karlsson but the 
ball had already crossed the line, and 
with two minutes to play substitute 
Peter Eriksson ran onto a through pass 
and drove die ball past Goram. 

In Slovakia, Kosice beat Spartak 
Moscow, 2-1. Jozef Kozlej and Ivan 
Kozak scored for the borne team. Sergei 
Dmitri yev replied for the Russians. 

In Bucharest. Steaua scored twice in 
the last 19 minutes to beat Paris St 
Germain, 3-2. 

Casino Salzburg and Sparta Prague 
drew, 0-0, in Salzburg and Betar Je- 
rusalem drew, 0-0, at home. 

On Tuesday, Hajduk Split and PAOK 
Salonika came from behind to win in the 
first leg of the UEFA Cup second qual- 
ifying round. Mass Tarr scored in the 
last minute to give Hajduk Split of Croa- 
tia a 3-2 victory over Malmo of Sweden 
on Tuesday after being 0-2 down. 

Malmo led for most of the match with 
goals by Jonas Wiimola in the 1 Itb 
minute and NikJas Gudmundsson in the 


world's top golfers when tinkering with 
a swing. 

‘‘The hard part is to keep playing 
while trying to make adjustments,” he 
said. “To do n out here, you have to 
swallow your pride. You know you may 
not play that well, but you go ahead to 
die tournament and do your best” 

After winning the PGA last year at 
Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, Brooks saw demands on his time 
grow like never before. He became a 
bigger attraction for tournament spon- 
sors, and Brooks decided to capitalize, 
adding some events to his calendar in 
November and December. 

Now he admits he may have over- 
done iL 

“1 played more golf at the end of last 
year than I probably should have,” he 

‘I didirt know if I’d win a 
major or not, but I knew 
I’d have my chances/ 

said. * ‘I was stressed out and tired at the 
beginning of the year.” 

While Brooks has begun to play bet- 
ter in recent weeks, it may be too late for 
him to make the Ryder Cup team. The 
top 10 players in Ryder Cup point stand- 
ings after the PGA automatically make 
the team that will compete against the 
European squad next month in Spain. 

Tom Kite, the U.S. team captain, will 
add two captain's picks to the 10 auto- 
matic picks. But Brooks has fallen out of 
the top 10 in points standings, and he 
said he did not believe Kite would select 
him. 

“I don’t think he will,” said Brooks, 
who played on the *95 Ryder Cup team. 
“It’s a tough question, but I’d say prob- 
ably not.” 

So Brooks has turned his attention to 
regaining the form that made him a 
champion. He was never better than at 
last year's PGA, when he came from 



Kravc-t'rr-.'V 


Zdenek Svoboda of Sparta Prague, right, tackling Laszlo Klausz of 
Salzburg in a European Cup match in Salzburg. The game ended 0-0. 


60th. Hajduk, always on the offensive, 
scored three goals in 13 minutes from 
Josip Skofco, Qce Sedloski and Tarr. 
who scored in the 90th minute. 

Salonika of Greece also came from 
behind to beat Spartak Tmava of Slov- 
akia. 5-3. Spartak scored three goals 
between the 22d and 28th minutes. But 
the score was 3-3 by halftime after 
Spyros Marangos scored twice for 
Salonika, adding to a penalty by 
Theodores Zagorakis in the 3 J si. Costas 
Frantzeskos and Persi Olivares struck in 
the second half. 

French teams moved closer to a 
sweep of the three final-round matchups 


in the Interroio Cup. The winners will 
qualify for the next round of the UEFA 
Cup. 

Auxerre of France drew its first leg. 
0-0. in Germany against Duisburg. 

Pascal Baills scored an own goal and 
was later sent off as Montpellier lost at 
home to Lyon. 

Prince Daye came as a halftime sub- 
stitute for Baslia of France in HaJmsiad. 
Sweden, and scored a minute later to 
give Lbe Corsican ream a 1-0 victory. 

• John Barnes ended his 10-year as- 
sociation with Liverpool on Wednesday 
when he joined Newcastle United on a 
free transfer. (AP, Reuters. AFP ) 


THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1997. 


behind to win a pressure-packed tour- 
nament beating Kenny Perry on tbe Jirsi 
hole of a sudden-death playoff. With 
most of Lbe Valhalla gallery cheering for 
Perry, a Kentucky native. Brooks 
showed his toughness. 

Trailing by one stroke through 71 
boles. Brooks needed a birdie at No. 1 8 
to force the playoff. He got iL Then 
Brooks made par on the first extra hole, 
while Perry faltered with a bogey. The 
PGA championship belonged to 
Brooks, and his long quest to win a 
major had finally ended. 

“I didn't know if I'd win a major or 
not, but I knew I'd have my chances, 
especially anywhere except Augusta,” 
he said. “I’ve never been a long, high 
ball hitter, so some courses, although 
they’re great courses, don't suit my 
game. 

“I know some guys tee it up every 
week to win. I’d certainly like to win 
every week, but I don’t have enough 
talent just to go out there with my C 
game and win. My C game puts me on 
an airplane on Friday. 1 need my A 
game, and I haven't had it much this 
year.” 

But Brooks looks at Winged Foot as a 
place where he can win. 

“1 know at Winged Foot you’ve got 
ro be in the fairway, and ’after that, 
you’ve got to do everything else pretty 
well, too.” Brooks said. “It’s a long 
golf course, but it’s long for everybody. 
You can bounce a bail into a lot of the 
greens. So I don’t feel I go into a golf 
course like Winged Foot at a disad- 
vantage.” 

■ 2001 PGA Tourney to Atlanta 

The PGA Championship in 2001 will 
be played at the Atlanta Athletic Club's 
Highland Course, The .Associated Press 
reported Wednesday, quoting the At- 
lanta Journal-Constitution. 

The tournament will come 20 years 
after the Athletic Club’s last PGA 
Championship in 1981. 



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ELEVATED HAZARD — Fred Couples, left, and Jay Haas studying an - 
elm tree overhanging the second green at the Winged Foot Golf Club in 
Mamaroneck. New York, where the PGA championship opens Thursday/ 


Avalanche Keep Sakic 
j To Adorn New Arena 


iCOREBO ARB 


llAJMLuiaS'it: «*:•= 


C-"T»W V Our S14 r Fim DjvwuM 

The Colorado Avalanche found the 
best strategy' to match the New York 
Rangers' $21 million offer to Joe Sakic: 
Build a S165 million arena. 

And on Wednesday, the Ascent En- 
tertainment Group, which owns the Col- 
orado Avalanche of the National 
Hockey League, announced it would 
match the New York Rangers* offer 
sheet of S2l million, including a $15 
million signing bonus, and keep the 28- 
year-old center in Denver. 

Charlie Lyons, the Ascent chairman 
and chief executive officer, made the 
announcement at a news conference to 
sign an agreement with the city to build a 
sports complex in downtown Denver, the 
$ 160 million Pepsi Center, which will be 
home ro the Avalanche and the Denver 
Nuggets of the National Basketball As- 
sociation. which .Ascent also owns. 

According to reports in local news- 
papers Wednesday. Ascent has signed 
two other deals. Liberty Media Corp., a 
subsidiary of the cable television giant 
Tele-Communications Inc., will invest 
$15 million in the arena. FOX Sports 
Rocky Mountain, a partnership between 
Liberty Media and The News Corp., 
signed a $100 million seven-year re- 
gional television agreement for ihe Ava- 
lanche and the Nuggets. 

A new home for both teams has been 
planned for several years. Bur only this 
week did the city and Ascent clear the 
final hurdle by agreeing to let the Nug- 
gets out of their lease at McNichols 
Arena for $15.5 million to be paid over 
25 years. 

Now, the 1996 Stanley Cup cham- 


pion Avalanche is assured of future rev-, 
enue from a five-story sports palace" 
with 95 luxury boxes and 1,850 club, 
seals, one that will join the Colorado-’ 
Rockies' phenomenally successful^ 
Coors Field for the 1999-2000 season:;- 
The potential cash flow from the; 
privately financed Pepsi Center dwarfs'- 
what Ascenr gers from its Avalanche 
and Nuggets leases at McNichols^ 
which has IS luxury suites — "the 
Yugo of suites,” said Paul Jacobsen, an- 
Ascent spokesman, and no club seats. 

"Once we get into the new building, 
these teams will transform to cash-flow^ 
positive businesses from teams with op- 
erating losses,” said Jacobsen, who did 
not deny that the teams lost as much as a 
combined $8 million last season. •>' , 
The new facility will improve As" | 
cent’ s anemic bottom line. Last year, the • 
company lost $36 million on revenues, 
of $25S million. For the three month? 
ending March 31, Ascent lost another 
$17.6 million. (AP. NYL) 

■ Grafton Move Under a Cloud *■ 

Chris Gratton of the Tampa Bay Light- 
ning has signed a $16.5 million offer 
sheet with the Philadelphia Flyers, but 
the Chicago Blackhawks say they struck 
a deal for the free agent. The Associated 
Press reported from Toronto. - 

The National Hockey League said 
Wednesday that it was investigating the 
matter involving the 22-year-old ceniec. 

Gratton signed an offer sheet with the 
Flyers on Tuesday. Tampa Bay has u 
week to match the offer, but Pat Morris, # 
Gratton’s agent, said Tampa Bay wap * 
trying to trade his clienL 




[DENNIS THr 


Li 


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After 3 Estranged Years , Capriati Feels Like ‘Old Me’ on Toronto Court 


. By Robin Finn 

New Yvrk Times Service 

TORONTO — This time she has a 
new dog, a new house and a new at- 
titude. Can a new career or a mature 
variation on the almost forgotten one 
that made her a baby-faced star, fol- 
low? 

Rejuvenated by a first-round victory 
Tuesday at the du Maurier Open. Jen- 
nifer Capriati predicted that she and 
tennis may yet strike up a meaningful 
relationship after three years of false 
starts and estrangements. 

“I felt a little bit of the old me out 
there, and ( wanted to put it all to- 
gether,” the 2 f -year-old Capriati said 
after her 6-4, 6-3 victory against 41st- 
ranked Silvia Farina of Italy. 

“My legs were shaking, but it was a 
good kind of nervous energy because 
when I looked around the court, I real- 
ized I wanted to be there,” she said. 

Like a swimmer testing the deep water 
one toe at a time, Capriati continues to 
make a tentative return to tennis, die spoit 
she transformed into her own personal 
drowning pool after failing to live up to 
expectations, her own included, about 
just what constitutes a successful follow- 
up act to a successful phenomenon. 

‘ ‘I felt like I was only good if I won, 
like I was a loser if I lost, and I bad this 
big problem in separating the two/ ’ said 



Mrikr Hliki -ll-tjl— r* 


Jennifer Capriati belting a serve in the first round of the Canadian Open. 


Capriati, who went from being a person 
she didn’t much like to a person she 
didn't even know. 

Instead of finding her best encore fra a 
career that began with a bang at 13 only 
to fizzle shortly after she won an 


Olympic gold medal ai 1 6, Capriati tuned 
oul dropped out and did the equivalent of 
biting the hand that fed and bred her. 

She turned her back on tennis, which 
had appointed her Chris Even’s heir 
apparent without consulting her. and 


took her revenge by impersonating a 
juvenile deiinqucnL 

Her abdication had consequences, in- 
cluding a court-ordered stint in drug 
rehabilitation, and for a time, Capriati 
was convinced that she would never 
play tennis again. 

“Once you walk away front 
something, the longer you’re away, the 
harder it is to believe you can go back to 
iL and my time away from tennis went on 
way longer than I ever thought it would,” 
said Capriati, who hadn't played a match 
on the Corel Women's Tennis Asso- 
ciation Tour since spraining her right 
ankle in May after a first-round loss to 
Chanda Rubin at the Italian Open. 

“But I've seen both sides now. And 
eventually l realized 1 still wanted lo he 
the best 1 can be.” she said. “ Now I 
know that everything doesn't have to be 
great only if I win. That's what I didn't 
know then.” 

Capriati's mother. Denise, said that 
what she and her former husband, 
Stefano, didn’t know then was that their 
daughter’s love for the game, and for 
people, would be eroded by the demands 
of her celebrity and by her conviction 
that she was a failure unless she won. 

‘ The excitement, the endorsements, 
the money, the prestige, ihe pride,” 
Denise said. “There it al l is,, and you get 
caught up in it. and you're not thinking 
of what your child is missing, and if Lhis 


is what's best for them. I believe in my 
heart that she did love tennis, and still 
does, but l did beat myself up later for 
not slopping things from getting so out 
of hand back then. 

"Meanwhile, Jennifer was trying io 
be everybody’s perfect everything, and 
when you do thaL you lose yourself, 
lose your identity, and that's what she 
went through. She went from being 
happy to being sad and fearful and. as a 
parent, 1 felt plenty of guilt and shame 
for the role I played in that.” 

In essence, Capriati tried to erase her 
identity. Eventually, she decided she 
wanted it back because she thought her 
"task in tennis was not done yet.” but 
her attempts to reinvent herself on the 
court were more traumatizing than 
therapeutic. 

Three appearances in three Grand 
Slams — the 1996 French Open, the 
1 996 U.S. Open and the 1997 Australian 
Open — produced three first-round 
losses, just the wrong sort of sequel to 
the first-round U.S. Open loss in 1993 
that provoked her to stuff her racquets in 
the garbage. The same courts where she 
had made history as a 14-year-old semi- 
finalist suddenly felt ton big for her to 
handle. 

“I thought I had to be perfect to come 
back, but [ don’t anymore," Capriati 
said. “Last year at the French Open. 1 
was a mess, and al the U.S. Open, I was 


so afraid just of being out there that I 
didn’t want to advance. I was like a 
scared cat, and 1 m not saying J 'm going 
to play like a lion this year, but I'm going 
to hold my head a little higher because 
I’m not fighting myself anymore. 

"Until now. I’ve been so indecisive 
about everything. Could I get through 
Jde without playing tennis anymore? 
Yes, I could probably do iL but why? 
Wbat ’s tbe point of not trying — it’s such s 
a waste. I've had all my time to mourn K ' 
whar s been lost and feel guilty about 
things and think it through. Now it’s time 
to move on. While there’s still time.” 

Capriati’s father does not seem to 
think it was his responsibility to protect 
his daughter “from the inevitable.” 
"Whatever she does, she does intens- 
ive, even if it’s something that may be 
bad for her.” Stefano Capriati said. He 
is also certain that she "was destined to 
play great tennis." 

■ Seles Advances to 3d Round 

Monica Seles, the lop seed in the du 
Maurier Open, competed just two days 
after winning a tournament in Los 
Angeles, and advanced to the third ^ 
round with a 6-2. 6-4 victory over Asa 
Carlsson oi Sweden, The Associated 
Press reported. ; 

Seles will play No. 16 Sabine Ai>- 
pelmans of Belgium, who beat France's 
Alexandra Fusat. 6-3, 6-3. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 199; 


PAGE 19 


'n White Sox 


SPORTS 


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Keep Heat 
On Indians 

Chicago Shrugs Off 
toss of Pitchers and 
Beats Anaheim, 8-5 

* The Associated Press 

■; Before the White Sox traded three 
quality pitchers to San Francisco last 
week, the team’s chairman, Jerry Re- 
iQsdori said anyone who thought Chica- 
co old catch Cleveland was crazy. 
Bnt the White Sox beat Anaheim, 8 - 
5 ; Tuesday and continues to cling on in 
the American League Central. Chicago, 


AL Kouhoup 


- — -,. 1 
,\tl. » 


I 


v?bich was 3 Vi games back when the 
ctade was made, is three games behind 
Cleveland with six weeks left. 

; “We’re not done. We believe in 
ourselves,” said Jamie Navarro (9-10), 
who allowed seven hits in seven innings 
for his 100 th career victory, just his third 
since the All-Star break. 

! “We’ve got to have a good home 
stand. We’ve got a chance to catch 
Cleveland. What Jerry says or what they 
do with the team is their problem. We 
can’t worry about Wilson Alvarez, 
Robert Hernandez, Danny Darwin and 
[Harold Baines because they’re gone," 
Navarro said. 

Albert Belle, who had not hit a home 
ran since July 18. hit two. His second 
and 23d of the season was a two-run shot 
dipping a three-run seventh innin g 
■ Bwm uar* s, Mariner* 3 Milwaukee 
also beat its AL West foes to keep up an 
unexpected challenge in the AL Central. 
The rookie Steve Woodard, who took a 
pounding from Seattle early this month, 
won despite conceding Ken Griffey’s 
37th home run. 

.' Woodard was tagged for six runs in 
two innings by the Mariners in a J4-4 
loss in Milwaukee on Aug. 2. 

'. Mike Malheny. Milwaukee’s No. 9 
bitter, hit a three-run homer in die 
second. 

. “We needed somebody to pick ns 
up," Matheny said. “We’ve been hav- 
ing a rough time on the West Coast for 
some reason. Maybe (his will be a spark 
to get us going to do something good. ” 



Faith in Odds Fails 
Braves’ Neagle in 9th 


\nlhi<m llnhiUV*- L~« 


Damion Easley of Detroit colliding with the Cleveland catcher Pat Borders in a game the Indians won, 7-4. 

Indian* 7, Tiger* 4 In Cleveland, 

Manny Ramirez hit his 18th homer in a 
three-run fourth as the Indians won for 
only the ninth time in 26 games. 

David Justice was 3 for 3, including a 
two-run double in the first, improving to 
11 for 18 with three homers in five 
games. 

Rangors 12 , Red Sox 2 Texas routed 
Boston at Fenway Park for the second 
consecutive game, scoring 10 runs in the 
first four innings. 

Bobby Witt pitched his third complete 
game and the Rangers’ second straight 
as Texas collected 17 hits and improved 
to 5-0 at Fenway Park this season. 

Royals 6, Yankees 4 Dean Palmer 
homered and drove in four runs as Kan- 
sas City won in New York. 

Palmer, who is 10 for 2 1 with runners 
in scoring position and has batted in 16 
runs in 1 8 games since coming over in a 
trade with Texas, singled home a run in 
the fourth, opened the sixth with his 
1 7th homer and hit a go-ahead, two-run 
double in the seventh. 


Ork>k>* 8, athletics o In Baltimore. 
Scott Erickson pitched a three-hitter and 
Rafael Palmeiro bad three hits, includ- 
ing a three-run homer for the Orioles. 

Palmeiro's 24th home run high- 
lighted a four-run first inning that boos- 
ted Baltimore to its 12th victory in 15 
games. Oakland has lost 11 of 16. 

Both benches emptied in the bottom 
of the eighth after the Oakland pitcher 
Dane Johnson threw a pitch behind Jeff 
Reboulet, who voiced nis displeasure to 
the catcher Brent Mayne. No punches 
were thrown, but Reboulet and Mayne 
were thrown out of the game. 

Bhw Jay* 9, Twin* i In Toronto, Ro- 
ger Clemens became baseball '$ first 1 8- 
game winner this season as he lowered 
his earned tun average to 1 .66, best in 
the majors. 

Clemens (18-4) struck out 13, al- 
lowed eight hits and walked one in his 
eighth complete game, tied with a team- 
mate, Pat Hentgen, for most in the AL. 

Jacob Brumfield, who entered the 
game after Otis Nixon was traded to Los 


Angeles, and Jose Cruz Jr. each hit two- 
run homers. 

■ Rex Barney Is Found Dead 

Rex Barney, 72, who pitched a no- 
hitter for the 1948 Brooklyn Dodgers 
and enjoyed widespread popularity as 
the Baltimore Orioles' longtime public 
address announcer, was found dead at 
his home Tuesday, The Associated 
Press reported from Baltimore. 

Barney, a right-hander from Omaha. 
Nebraska, pitched for the Dodgers in six 
seasons before retiring in 1950 at age 
25. 

Few pitchers threw harder, but 
Barney’s problem was getting the ball 
over the plate. He finished with 410 
walks and 336 strikeouts. He was 35-3 1 
with a 4.34 earned run average in 155 
career games. He was 0-2 in the World 
Series, losing games in both 1947 and 
1949. 

Barney gained popularity after be- 
coming the Orioles’ public address an- 
nouncer in the 1970s. 


The dissociated Press 

Denny Neagle was certain the Atlanta 
Braves would hold a ninth-inning lead, 
and for good reason. He had never seen 
them blow one. 

The Pittsburgh Pirates wrecked his 
bid lo become the first 17-game winner 
in the NL, however, rallying for four 
runs in the ninth against Mark Wohlers 
for a 5-2 victory Tuesday night in At- 
lanta. 

Atlanta had won 61 straight games 
this season when leading after the 

NL BoUNbifP 

eighth, and was 133-0 in those spots 
since May 3. 1996. 

“I was very confident,” said Neagle, 
traded from the Pirates to Atlanta last 
August. “With a closer as dominant as 
Wohlers, you have to feel good. He just 
didn’t have it tonight.” 

“It got ugly,’" said Wohlers, who was 
trying for his’ 100th career save. "I got 
the first guy out. but after that it was all 
downhill. Obviously, my control wasn't 
there.” 

Wohlers took over ro start the ninth 
with a 2-1 lead and struck out the first 
barter. Jason Kendall followed with a 
single and stole second, barely beating 
the throw. 

“From my point of view, it looked 
like Jason Kendall was out,” Neagle 
said. "The throw was right on the 
money. If he*s called out, Sen you’ve 
got a totally different situation: two out 
and nobody on.” 

Wohlers walked the next two hitters. 
Dale Sveum and pinch-hiner Mark 
Smith. Ward followed with a single that 
almost knocked over Wohlers. 

“With the bases loaded, he had to 
come right at me," Ward said. "I 
guessed right, got lucky, got the meat of 
the bat on the ball. I've been hitting a lot 
of line drives lately.” 

Padre* s. Expos 4 Rickey Henderson 
hit the 250th home run of his career as 
San Diego beat visiting Montreal. 

Henderson is drawing interest from 
several American League contenders, 
and a trade could come this week. 

He went 3-for-5 as he started in right 
field for the fourth straight game in 
place of Tony Gwynn, out since having 
a kidney stone surgically removed. 

Phillies 5, Rockies O Matt Beech 


stopped his streak of 22 straight starts 
without a victory, pitching Philadelphia 
past Colorado at Coors Field. 

Beech (1-7) was winless since beat- 
ing Atlanta in his first big league start on 
Aug. 8, 1996. He had made 15 starts this 
season without a victory. 

Beech retired the first 13 Rockies and 
allowed just four hits in seven innings. 

Astro* 13, Marlins 2 Back in mid- 
June, Houston manager Larry Dierker 
said he would pick his lineups based on 
defense and pitching, and not focus so 
much on hitting. Even so, Astros barters 
haven’t been doing too badly. 

The National League Central leaders 
opened an 1 1-game homes Land — their 
longest of the season — with another 
high-scoring effort, increasing their run 
total to 40 in four games. Tim Bogar and 
Chuckie Carr nomered and James 
Mouton drove in three runs. 

Cardinal* 5, Mato 2 Mark McGwire 
broke out of a 3-for-35 slump with a solo 
homer and a two-run double, as Sl 
L ouis beat visiting New York. 

McGwire hit his second home run 
since being traded from Oakland on July 
31. 

He doubled his next time up in the 
fifth inning. 

Cardinals catcher Tom Pagnozzi. 
sidelined since April 29. homered in his 
first at-bat since coming off the disabled 
list. 

Cub* 4, Dod g er* 2 Jose Hernandez, 
playing because shortstop Shawon 
Dunston was injured, hit a two-run 
homer in the seventh inning off Hideo 
Nomo that lifted Chicago to victory in 
Los Angeles. 

The Cubs stopped their nine-game 
road losing streak. 

The Dodgers had won six in a row at 
home. 

Dunston jammed his right 'shoulder 
making a diving play on Brett Butler's 
grounder in the fifth, and Hernandez 
entered in the sixth. 

Giants 7, Rod* 3 Pitching at home in 
San Francisco for the first time, Wilson 
Alvarez struck oui nine and drove in a 
run with his first major league hit to beat 
Cincinnati. 

Alvarez won in his third start since 
being traded from the Chicago White 
Sox July 31. 

Barry Bonds broke an 0-for-17 skid 
with a double for the Giants. 


• :r: 2*: 

■ • - . rj-r.iL. 
.--’rjBii 

-- 


Scoreboard 


■ .Zifs 
, S-i sai 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 


muhcuiumii 

CAST DIVBIOH 

: wbHj'v.. . w - l Pa. gb 

■ ■■■ Bdttwe 73 41 .640 - 

rrit us, itewYo* tf) 48 sn s* 

ill. : i Taranto 57 50 -487 17W 

Boston 58 62 483 18 

■ - :d£ : Ddtrott - 55 62 470 19» 

. - camiALnvraioN 

T-. V.’: riewtand s 9 55 JIB — 

Chicago 57 59 491 3 

Milwaukee 57 a 4? M 


Chicago 

48 72 

WESTDIVBKNI 

MO 

17 

Sort Francisco 

67 

53 

-558 

— 

Las Angeles 

64 

55 

538 

TO 

San Diego 

57 

62 

.479 

916 

Cbiorado 

57 

63 

.475 

10 


£ . Minnesota 


51 67 432 10 


Kansas Cffy 

49 

66 

■426 

TOW 


WCSTDriftSiON 



Anaheim 

66 

52 

559 

— 

Seattle 

66 

S2 

559 

— 

Toros 

57 

62 

479 

9W 

EBttaml 

47 

73 

592 

20 


unomuuMi 

EAST DTWiON 


- 7% 

W 

L 

Pet 

. • Manta 

75 

46 

420 

. Ftorida 

68 

50 

576 

. ' NOw York 

65 

53 

551 

. -Jf' Montreal 

60 

57 

513 

PJflodekthia 

41 

75 

453 


Houston 
LPNWxxtfi 
r5L Loafs 
GhcknoX 


CENTRAL DIVISION 


65 

55 

542 

58 

67 

487 

54 

64 

457 


GB 


5V4 

8V> 


616 


lamn 

' AMERICAN LEAQUC 

031 000 SOI— 5 7 0 

ooi ooi loo— a « i 

Woodard. Wktonan CBJ, DaJanes (9) and 
Mattteny; Fassera Tuidln (8) and Mmzano. 
W— Woodard 3-1. L — Fosse/u 11-7. 
Sv — DoJones 04). HRg-MBw. Mattfcny 
(4). Seat. Griffey Jr 07). R- Davis (17). 
Tens 225 100 200-12 17 0 

Baste* 000 010 100-2 ID 2 

Witt and I. Rodrigues Set* Wasdta O). 
Lacy (8) and Hatteberg. W— ^ Wilt 11-& 
L— Sate. 11-9. HR— Tens. 1. Rodriguez 03- 
Minnesota 001 800 MO-t 0 0 

Toronto 014 300 01S-9 11 1 

Bowers. SwtndeH (3). Trombley (5). 
TraMflter (7) aid SfeJnbacto O- MDfer (7); 
Clemens and OBrten. W-Oemens. 184. 
L— Bowers. O-Z HRs — Toronto. Brumfield 
(2). Cm Jr fl6). SiLGreen 05). 

Oddand ooo 00Q 000—0 3 0 

Safftorere 410 0?) 11 1 

C-Reye* Johnstone 15). D. Johnson (7) 
and Mama Motor (8); Erickson and 
Webstar. W— Erickson, 14-S. L-C. Reyes. 3- 
4. HR— Baltimore, R. Palmeiro 04). 
Anaheim 000 002 201-6 9 1 

Chicago 010 003 31s— • 13 1 

nij... u.mwiui 771 rVi.Mav (71. 


James (8) and TrLGreene; Navarro, T. 
Cnsrtto (8) and Fabregas. W— Navarra. 9-10. 
L— Dickson 11-5 $*— T. Cusfflto 01- 
HRs— Ctocoga Bede 2 (23). 

Koalas Off 000 201 201-6 12 0 

Mew York 100 021 000-4 11 0 

Rosado. MLPerez (6). Coston (7). Ofson 
(8). J. Montgomery (95 and MLSweenay: 
Cana Nelson C7), Storton (91. Mecir (9) and 
Ginntfl. W-MLPerez. 2-0. L — Cone. 12-6. 
Sv— J. Montgomery (8). HRs— Kansas aty. 
POkner (17). Now York, Be. WH tans (15] . 
Detroit 002 D20 000-4 * 0 

C lenlauS 201 301 7 73 0 

Keogla Sager (4). M. Myers [6), Galllarri 
(A.ToJanes (® and Gasanaws Jr.WrighL A. 
Lopez W. Plonk (6). ML Jackson (ffl, 
Assenmocher {©. Mesa (9) and Borders. 
W— Plunk, «- L— Keogle. 0-Z Sv— Mesa 
(5). HRs— Qevelanct Ranlrez (18). T. 
Fernandez (7). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

002 100 000-3 B 4 

003 (00 28»— 7 9 1 
Tomka SiriSvon (5). P. AJIriarttnez (6). F. 

EJtodriguaz (8) and JjOGvet Toubensae (8); 
Alvarez, R. Hernandez (8) and BenyNU. 
W — Alvarez 2-1. L— Tomka 7-4. Sv-R. 
Hemaidei (I). 

New York 000 100 100-3 9 0 

SL Louis 020 120 Ota-5 I • 

Mlkfe WendeO (7) and Hundteyj 
AaBene* Fossas (7). C. King (7). Eckeistay 
(9) and PagnazzL W— AivBone*. 8-6. 
L-MBcki. 5-9. Sv— Eckeretay (20. 
HRs— New York. Hundley (36). St Louis, 
McGwire CD, Pngnanl 0). 


000 100 100-2 6 1 
Houston 004 301 23s— 13 14 1 

AleStot Staidhr IS), Cook (7). Vosbeig IB) 
and C. Johnson; Hampton. R. Springer (8), J. 
Cobrern (9) and Ausmus. W — Hampton, 10- 
7. L-A. Lritar, 8-9. HRs— Houston. Bogar 
(4), Can (2J- 

Ptttaburgb 000 100 004— 6 9 0 

Attala M0 100 100—2 8 2 

Loaba Rincon (7), Sodowsky (SO. LofceUe 
(9) and Kendalk Neagl* C Foe (to. Embree 
C8], Cother (8). Wohtore (9). Ugtenberg (9) 
and J. Lopez- W— Sadowsky. 2-2. 
L— Wohlecs. 4-S. 5V— IjVrn i r 09J. 

HR— Ptttstxjigh, E. WiUtans O). 
PWMetohto 318 000 180-6 10 0 

Catorode 000 000 080-0 5 1 

Beads Brewer (HI. SprodBn 19) and 
Uabtffflefr Thomson Hoboes (7). M. Munaz 
(V) and Mamming. W— Beech, 1-7. 
L.— Thomsoiv 4-7. 

Moatred 020 000 200-4 « I 

Sa Diego 010 200 30K-6 9 1 

BoOnger, DeHart (7], D. Veres (7) and 
Wldger; Menhait Cunnane (7). Bocfd1er(7}. 
Hoffman (H) and Flaherty. W—Bodlttet, 3-S. 
L— DeHart O-l. Sv— Hoffman Of). 
HRs— Montreal GrodzManek (3). San 
Diego. Henderson (6). 

Chicago 000 IN 300-4 9 0 

Las Angeles 000 010 100-2 10 1 

MJCknfc. Pattwson (7). Ptactotta (7). T. 
Adam (9) and Servo*. Noma Radinsky (TV 
Qsura (8), Guthrie (9) and Ptazza- W-M. 
aortu 9-7. L — Noma 1 1-9. 5v-T. Adams (9). 
HR— Chicago; J. Hemcndaz is). 


Japanese Leagues 


anuuuoK 



W 

L 

T 

PcL 

GB 

Yakutt 

57 

37 

1 

506 



Yokohama 

49 

42 

— 

538 

6-5 

Hiroshima 

46 

46 

— 

500 

10.0 

Chuttctt 

46 

51 

— 

474 

125 

Honshln 

43 

M 

1 

467 

135 

Yomiurl 

40 

*a 

55 — 

KliMW 

421 

175 


w 

L 

T 

Pet 

GB 

Oil* 

50 

36 

3 

58) 

— 

Se feu 

50 

41 

2 

549 

15 

Daiei 

47 

48 



495 

75 

Nippon Ham 

46 

50 

1 

479 

9jD 

Lotte 

41 

47 

2 

466 

105 

Kfarietsu 

41 

53 

2 

436 

134 


ntMumimit 

CENTRAL LEAGUE 
Yduilt i. Honshln 2 
Yokohama 4. Chunldvi 2 
Hiroshima 7. Yomlurl 3 

PAOFIC LEAGUE 
Orix 6, Kinlet&u 2 
Setau 5, Da iei 2 
Nippon Ham 4. Latte l 


BBOOW) PREUnNARV MMINa. FAST LEG 

JaWonec I, Orebro 1 
Dynamo Minsk a UUestmn 2 


HIT Gotten 3. Club Bruges 5 
Rotor Voigog rod 2, Odrti Wodztalow 0 
Alania Vladikavkaz 2. D. Dnipropeirovsk ) 
Trnbzanspor 1, Dundee United 0 
PAOK Salonika 5. Spartak Tmava 3 
Rapid Vienna A Boby Brno l 
Grasshoppers 3, Brann Bergen 0 
Anderiedit Z VorskJa Poltava 0 
Helsingborg (l Ferencvoms I 
Neudvrtel Xamax 3. Viking Shnanger 0 
Apollon Limassol a Excekior Muscron 
Hg]duk SpDI 1 Mahno FF 2 
Vejlea Hapod Petah Tlkvah 0 
Lf/pest 0 Aarhus 0 
Tlrei Innsbruck 2. Cettic l 
KR Reykjavik ft OFI Irokflon 0 
Second tag notebas to be played Aug. 26. 
nnsroiocw 
FINALS, WIST LEG 
Halmstodft Basttal 
Dutaburg ft Auxerre 0 
Montpefflera Lyonl 
Wtonen qualify fer UEFA cap. 

Second leg deciders to be pkqred Aug. 26. 

HHUSONFtlWblT 

Benficn ft Lazio 1 


CRICKET 


BHHAVS-WLAMKA 
SCCOMDTEST 
WEDNESDAY. M COLOMBO 
5ri Lanka: 332 and 415-7 
India: 375 and 281- 5 
Match doctored a draw- 


TRANSITIONS 


AtaEMCAN LEAGUE 

ANAHEIM -Signed RHPs Mkfruri Brunet 
and Steve Green. C Robert Garrick and SS 
Steve Ahlers lo minor-] eogue contracts. 

BOSTON— Signed H HP Chris BoSiOto minor- 
league centred. Put OF Shane Mock on 15- 
day disabled list i ctt uuU lve to Aug. 7. Re- 
caltod OF Jose Makrve from Pawtucket IL 
CLEVE LAND— Activated LHP Brian Ander- 
son from 15- day disabled list and optioned 
him to Buffalo. AA. 

DETROIT —Recoiled RHP Greg Keogte 
fromToledalL-PwtOF Mehrln Nieves on 15- 
doy disabled list retroodreeto Aug. 4. 

new York— Activated OF Tim Rainas from 
I S-Oay dfsaWed Designated OF-DH Pete 
Incavlgha for assignment. Moved P Joke 
Robbins. P Dave Duder* and OF James 
Rowsan from Green&bom, SAL to Tampa 
FSL ond P Tony Armas. P Croig Ding man P 
Oswalds Moirena and OF Derek Shumpert 
from Tampa to Greensboro. 

TEXAS— Traded LHP Ed Vosberg to FJctt- 
da Marlins for RHP Rick Hettng- 
Toeoirra —Traded OF Ofc Nmn to Los 
Angeks Dodgers ferC Bobby Cripp* Readed 
OF Shannon Stewart from Syrocusa IL 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 

los anoeles -Designated OF Eric An- 
thony for assignment 
PITTSBURGH -Optioned INF Mark John- 
son to Ctoganr. PCI_ Senl RHP John Ericks re 
Calgary on rehab assignment. 


Sam from cisco —Signed OF Dan McKinley 
to 1998 minor league contract. 

UBUTMU 

NATKMAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 
golden state -Traded F Chris Mutkn to 
Indlano far C Erick Dampter and F Duane 
FerreU. 

Miami -Acquired C Duane Cans well from 
Sacramento Kings tor G Gary Grant C Matt 
Fbh and conditional second-round draft pick 
In 1998. 

Toronto —Named Bob Kloppenburg as- 
sistant coach. 


WAnOMAL FOOT B ALL LEAGUE 

Buffalo —Released LB Mark Maddox 
and DL Mark Gunn. 

Chicago —Signed DT Mart Sptadler. Re- 
teased WR Haywood Jeffires. 

KANSAS -Waived WR Tydus Wkians, OT 
Leslfe RalHta P Nir* GaBery and F8 5bowrT 
Wallen. 

MINNESOTA -Released RB James Stew- 
art, S Marked Madda, OL Kevin Ned and LB 
JoshWBoox. 

neworleans— Waived CB Forey Duckett 
WR Marvin Bogley. DE Michael Latttnwre, T 
Leonard Ray Jr, DE Comefl Thome* T 
TasheWBUama. 

n.Y. jets— Termtoafed Ihe contract of DE 
Marvin Washington. 


NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 
N.Y. rangers— Agreed to terms with D 
Doug Lid star. Released F David Oflver. 

pinsBURGH -Acquired rights to D Jirl Sle- 
grfrom Edmonton (Men tor 1998 trtrd-round 
draft pick. 



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contact Christdfc Forester 
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TeL: +44 1 71 4300329 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1997 


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PAGE 20 


ART BUCHWALD 


Last of the Islanders 



!/§>> 
BuchwaJd 


M ARTHA’S VINE- 
YARD, Massachusetts 
— The rule on Martha's 
Vineyard is that anyone who 
comes here wants to be the 
last person to settle on the 
island. 

All visitors feel that they 
were the ones who discovered 
it, and they hate the thought 
that someone 
may buy or rent 
a place after 
they do. 

This was the 
case with Mal- 
colm Trust- 
worthy who set 
foot on the is- 
land on July 27. 

1997. As he 
drove off the ferry Malcolm 
told the ferry director. “I don't 
want any more people coming 
here. If anybody tries to land, 
push their cars into the sea. 

During an ordinary season 
this would not be a problem. 
But since the president was 
expected this summer, it was 
difficult for Malcolm to be the 
last person to arrive. 

A group of island leaders 
went to see him at his new 
million-dollar house over- 
looking the Atlantic Ocean 
and said, ‘We are aware that 
you would like to be the last 
person to settle on the Vine- 
yard, but President Clinton is 
coming, and since he is pres- 


ident of the United States and 
holds the title of ‘Last Person 
Wherever He Puts His Foot,’ 
you are going to have to take 
one step back for him. 

“No way,” Malcolm said. 
“If I allow the Clintons to 
come on the island, then a Jot 
of other people, including big 
donors to the Democratic 
Party, will want to come on 
land, and then the Republi- 
cans will insist that their con- 
tributors be the last people to 
come.” 

The White House was con- 
cerned. Finally they sent the 
Secretary of State to reason 
with Malcolm. She explained 
to him that if President Clinton 
was not permitted to be the last 
person on Martha’s Vineyard, 
the prestige of the United 
Slates would sink to a new low 
in the world community. 

She said, “You can keep 
your million-dollar home ana 
your private beach privileges 
and your membership in the 
yacht club. All we want is for 
you to give up your title.’* 


From Ex- Yugoslavia, a Rare Voice of Reason 


By Jane Perlez 

JtfrH- York limes Service 


□ 


The 51st Contestant 


The Associated Press 

ATLANTIC CITY. New 
Jersey — For the fust time 
since 1989, a Miss Washing- 
ton D.C. will join contestants 
from the 50 states on the Miss 
America Pageant runway in 
September. The Washington 
pageant lost its franchise sev- 
en years ago after accusations 
of misuse of funds, bur a new 
group has now taken over the 
district's pageant. 


Malcolm told her, “Let the 
president go to Nantucket or 
Block Island or Far Rock- 
away. I discovered Martha's 
Vineyard, and it's my secret 
Where is it written in the Con- 
stitution that the president can 
claim discovery of an island 
that other people found 
first?’* 

She responded. “Suppose 
we gram you the right to be the 
last person to land on Martha's 
Vineyard, and then out of the 
goodness of your heart you 
permit the Clintons to come 
here, providing they agree not 
to make it a permanent thing? 
Will you go for that?.” 

Malcolm said, “I will, 
providing he doesn’t hold a 
press conference and tell 
everyone in the United States 
that they're welcome 10 come 
here any time.” 


B UDVAR, Montenegro — 
Even before the conflict in the 
former Yugoslavia tore his country 
apart, Aleksandar Tisma had writ- 
ten three of the bleakest yet most 
stirring novels to come from the 
Balkans. 

In one, “Kapo,” a Jewish Croa- 
tian prisoner in Auschwitz who be- 
came a sadistic Camp c ommandan t 
searches many years later for one of 
the women he tortured. In another, 
* ‘The Use of Man,” the characters 
range from a half- Jewish prostitute 
in a Nazi bordello in Tisma’s 
hometown, Novi Sad in northern 
Serbia, to a Nazi collaborator who 
joins the Yugoslav Partisans. 

Tisma, 72, whose novel "The 
Book of Blam” is to be published 
in English next year, is regarded 
internationally as a rare voice of 
reason in the rump Yugoslavia's 
depleted cultural scene, a writer 
whose despairing fiction about the 
Holocaust echoes his deep gloom 
about the future of Serbia. 

His novels, short stories and non- 
fiction cany the message that almost 
every human is capable of terrible 
deeds. The war in Yugoslavia and 
its sullen aftermath serve as con- 


temporary illustration, he says. 


lere are no ordinary people; 
every man, especially male, is a 
criminal,’' Tisma said in an in- 
terview at a summer arts festival on 
the Adriatic Sea. “It is incredible 
what people are willing to do, their 
imagination and fascination with 
the honor they can do. There are 
civilized people and less civilized 
people. Here in the Balkans, people 
aon t belong to the civilized but to 
the less civilized.” 

A conversation with Tisma, who 
spent most of the recent Balkan war 
in France (“Very selfish of me but 
I had had enough of the nationalist 
euphoria”), is almost as dark as his 
writing. Yet he is one of the few 
creative people left in Serbia will- 
ing to address questions of guilt, 
redemption, courage and respon- 
sibility. 


In July the French gov- 
ernment decorated him as 
a Commander of the Na- 
tional Order of Merit, the 
first honor given to a 
Yugoslav by the French in 
seven years. 

Tisma is convinced that 
Serbia is doomed to iso- 
lation and decay for the 
next 50 years, in part be- 
cause politicians who led 
the war are still in power. 

The opposition is tainted, 
too, he said. Almost every- 
one, he argues, carries 
guilt they are unable to ex- 
piate. The extensive use of 
paramilitary organiza- 
tions, which were given 
authority but no respon- 
sibility, makes the ac- 
counting of crimes ail the 
more difficult. 

“A Yugoslav soldier 
who was in Croatia told 
me about the time his army 
unit occupied a Croatian 
village,” Tisma recoun- 
ted. “He said: ‘We occu- 
pied; then came these 
young men with caps and 
guns, the paramilitary. 

They shot 40 people and 
threw the bodies in the 
lake.’ The soldier — now a 
guard at an art gallery — 
was very upset. These are 
incredible crimes which 
have to be explained.” Tisma 
comes from the most diverse part of 
Yugoslavia. Vojvodina, which be- 
fore World War I was part of Hun- 
gary. Like the Yugoslav writer 
Danilo Kis, who came from Vo- 
jvodina and died in Paris in 1989, 
Tisma is of mixed origin: His moth- 
er was a Hungarian Jew and his 
father a Serb, a background that 
made him very much a Yugoslav. 

He grew up in Novi Sad. one of 
the most cosmopolitan of Yugoslav 
cities, and graduated from the uni- 
versity there in 1942. He served in 
the Yugoslav Army in the last vear 
of World WarIL 

His novel “Kapo." which takes 
place in Banja Luka, a town from 



ily so easily became part 
of the machinery of death 
and terror. 

He said the lesson of- 
Waldheim’s story, which, 
became public when he 
decided to run for chan- 
cellor of Austria, was: “If 
you do your duty, you can 
become a big man. He be- 
came the grandfather of 
humanity. ” Tisma added: 
“I’m not cynicaL It's' 
true. If he hadn’t wanted 
to be chancellor of Aus- 
tria, maybe he would be in 
Albania today saying: 
‘Peace, peace.’ ” 

He blames not only na- 
tionalist Serbs for the con- 
flict in the Balkans but 
also the Communist ad- 
ministration that pre- 
ceded diem and from 
which they came. Com- 
munism in Yugoslavia 
was so comfortable, he 
said, that it did not inspire 
the loathing that existed 
elsewhere in Easton 
Europe. Thus there was 
less incentive to overturn 
the Communists, and 
Slobodan Milosevic, a 







fi 


v>.w 

......... 


tl- • »• 

* : ‘ 


Communist Party appor- 
tion alist, 


H-ja fjrirfnir V, Yari. Taar 

Aleksandar Tisma, whose writing addresses questions of guilt and redemption 


which Croats and Muslims were 
expelled during the war and which 
is now the center of Bosnia’s Serb- 
held sector, is based on the true 
story of a Croatian Jew who turned 
torturer to survive. Tisma found the 
threads of his story about VRko 
Lamian. the protagonist, in a Ger- 
man book that detailed the testi- 
mony of Nazi commandants at the 
Auschwitz chemical factory. 

Saying that people are ail Kapos, 
Tisma declared: ‘‘What is the ar- 
gument for cowards, which we all 
are? That if I don't do it, another 
will." Tisma likes to relate the sto- 
ry' of a rare exception, a German 
soldier in Serbia. Jozef Schulz, 
who refused to shoot civilians lined 


up for execution. Immediately, ac- 
cording to photographs Tisma has 
studied. Schulz was transferred 
from the firing squad to the line of 
victims. 

“Schulz must be almost a saint; 
that is a very, very rare decision.” 
he said. 

During the last 10 years, feeling 
he was losing his edge for fiction 
writing, Tisma has turned to short 
nonfiction pieces or what he calls 
feuilletons. For one of his most 
successful, he used the documents 
on Kurt Waldheim, the former 
United Nations secretary general, 
who served in the German Army in 
Serbia, to show how an educated 
young man from a bourgeois fam- 


atchik turned nation: 
remains in control. 

Indeed, Tisma said, he 
feels as if he is in a time 
warp. In the early 1950s, grim days 
when Josip Broz Tito was busy 
imposing nis Communist govern- 
ment and Yugoslavs were forbids 
den to go abroad and earn hard 
currency, he felt imprisoned. He 
feels that way again, a particularly 
poignant emotion in Novi Sad, with 
its grand but little-used synagogue, 
faded church domes and the down- 
at-beel but once splendid buildings 
of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. 

“We have become a hole, a 
cave, and this cave we have to stay 
in until this new generation 
comes,” he said. “Once I could 
compare Novi Sad to the world. 
Now I couldn’t compare it to any- 
thing. It is out of the world.” 



PEOPLE 


JS a wedding in the stars? Speculation in- 


creased Wednesday with the news that 


Speci 
the t 


U2 GOES TO POLAND — Bono, lead singer of the 
rock group U2, performing at a concert in Warsaw. 


Princess Diana had visited a clairvoyant with 
her new sweetheart, Dodi al Fayed. The Sun, 
Britain's top-selling tabloid, said the couple 
flew by helicopter from London to Chester- 
field, northern England, to see Rita Rogers, a 
psychic and long-standing confidante of the 
princess. The Daily Mail said the helicopter 
belonged to Harrods, the London department 
store owned by Dodi’s father, Mohamed al 
Fayed. The Sun said Rogers charged £35 
($55) an hour for services that included speak- 
ing to clients’ dead relatives. One witness who 
saw the couple emerge from the psychic’s 
home was quoted as saying, “Di was grinning 
all over her face and looked like she had had 
good news." Interest in Diana’s love life has 
skyrocketed since the publication Sunday of 
fuzzy pictures that appeared to show her em- 
bracing Dodi. The tabloids have even begun 
talking about a winter wedding, a year after 
Diana’s divorce from Prince Charles, the 
heir to the throne. The Saudi businessman 
Adnan Khashoggi, Dodi’s uncle, did nothing 
to discourage such talk when he told a Lon- 
don-based Arabic newspaper, “We welcome 
Princess Diana into our family.” 


Hugo Boss, a leading German designer, 
tailored the brown and black uniforms of 
Hitler’s Nazi elite during World War II, the 
Austrian current affairs magazine Profii re- 
in its latest edition. The German men's 


port^ 

fashion house, the majority owned by Italy's 


Marzotto group, said that the report was prob- 
ably accurate. "Our archives don't go back to 
that rime but we suspect that Hugo Boss really 


did produce these uniforms.” a spokeswoman 
told I " “ 


g 


Reuters. Proftl alleged that Boss, who 
died in 1948. manufactured uniforms for the 
German SS, the Storm Troopers, the Hitler 
Youth and the Wehrmacht, and used French 
risoners of war and Polish inmates from 
erman death camps to make the clothes. “Of 
course my father was a member of the Nazi 
Party, but who wasn’t at that lime?" Boss's 
son, Siegfried Boss, 82, told the magazine. 
Hugo Boss AG was floated in 1985 and the 
majority stake was sold to Marzotto in 1991. 
The firm expects sales of 1.05 billion 
Deutsche marks ($563 million ) this year. 


□ 


Prowlers broke into the graveyard chapel in 
northern Italy where Gianni Versace's ashes 
are kept, the mayor of the small town of 


Moltrasio said Wednesday. Mayor Celestino 
Villa said the intruders got into the cemetery 
Saturday night and forced the padlock on the 
chapel door but fled when an alarm went off. 
Nothing was damaged or stolen, he said. 
Versace, one of the world’s leading fashion 
designers, was shot to death outside his Miami 
Beach residence on July 15. A funeral was 
held in Italy, and his ashes have been tem- 
porarily stored at the Moltrasio chapel, which 
belongs to a local family, until a special site 
can be prepared for them. 

□ 

A dispute over the artistic merits of the 
Salzburg music festival has broken out be- 
tween the event’s innovative artistic director 
and the governor of the Salzburg region. 
*’ We’re offering very' little to friends of the 
classical festival," the governor, Franz 
S'chausberger, told the weekly News in an 
interview published Wednesday. Criticizing 
the modem tastes of the director, Gerard 
Mortier, he called for a "program easier to 
digest” that “corresponds more to comfort- 
able public taste.” adding that he had to take 
into account the economic well-being of the 
region. Mortier, a Belgian who has spent six 


years modernizing the festival, replied . on 
radio by accusing Schausberger of “talking A 

nhnut cnmprhino he knows nothin? nhnnt ” * 


M"- 

ji-r : 


ir--: 


!»'• ~ 


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about something he knows nothing about 
He said that tickets to modem works he staged 
this season had sold extremely well, adding, 
“I would never have the gall to give advketo 
the provincial governor on questions of hy- 
droeJectrics or the motorways.” , 


□ 


Two men accused of threatening to put 


nude photographs of the supermodei'EUe 
ihersoo on 


Macphersoo on the Internet pleaded not 
guilty in Los Angeles to attempted extortion 
Michael Mishler, 29, and William Holt, 26, 
allegedly sent threatening letters to Macph- 
erson demanding $80,000 to keep the pictures 
off the Internet. Prosecutors say Mishler stole 
the pictures from the model’s home. 


3 


FF.A-’v. 
fasfcrr 
the Er:. 

DEiT 1 

' Thr::;. 
flSL^L" 


□ 


A pony, a donkey, 15 dogs and 12 cals 


>gs a 

escaped from Brigitte Bardot’s home io 
Saint-Tropez but were recaptured, firemen m, 
the French Riviera resort said Wednesday.; 
The former film star, who runs a foundation 
for abandoned animals, had adopted the an-i 
imals and looks after them on her property.' 1 



Every country has its own AT&T .Access Number which 


makes calling home and to other countries really easy. 


Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country you’re 


calling from and you’ll get the clearest connections 


home. And be sure to charge your calls on your 
AT&T Calling Card. It’ll help you avoid outrageous 
phone charges on your hotel bill and save you up to 
60/a* So when in Rome (or anywhere else for that 
matter) do as many business travelers do. Use AT&T. 
Check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 


do as the 172-lOITs do. 


Steps 10 follow for easy caQrng worldwide 

l.JiM dial the AT&T .toss Number for the country you 
ore calling from. 

I Dial the phone number you're calling. 

3 . (Hal the calling card number listed above \TMir name. 



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AT&T Access 

Numbers 


EUROPE 


Sweden 

020-795-611 

Austria . 

Belgium* 

Czech Republic* .. . 

Franca 

Germany 

Greece* . . .. 

Irelandci 

Italy* 

022-903-011 
..0-600-100-10 
. 00-42-000-101 
0-800-90-0011 
0130-0010 
00-800-1311 
. 1 -800-550-0 B0 

172-1011 

Switzerland* 

United Kingdom * 

. 0800-89-0011 
. .0500-89-0011 
0808-89-0011 

MIDDLE EAST 


EBVPl*(Cain»r 

Israel 

Saudi Arabia-:- 

.510-0208 

177-100-2727 

1-800-10 

Netherlands* 

0800-022-9111 

AFRICA 


Russia **(Moscoar|» 

Spain 

755-5042 

.90040-00-11 

Ghana 

South Africa 

. . 0191 
0-800-99-0123 


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