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INTERNATIONAL 






Tb€ World’s Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 
R Paris, Friday, August 15, 1997 


No. 35,600 S t * 
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For India’s 50th Anniversary, Mixed Emotions 

Many Praise the Achievements of Democracy, but Decry Country’s Persistent Poverty 




By John F. Bums 

, N ™' York Times Service 

With monsoon rains 
sheeting down outside, Dawa Chand has passed many 

‘“.y* darkened tent-maker’s shop in this 
north Ii^ian vUlage. stitching bunting to flutter over 
village rooftops on the 50th anniversary of India’s 
independence at midnight on Aug, 14, 1947. 

Asbepedaled histreadle sewing machine. Mr. 

2f,n„nLT^ ldered whal century as a 

fiw country had meant to people like him, villagers 

n™° UI ?!>- for nearl y three-quarters of the coun- 
try s 970 million people. 

The question goes to the heart of India's nationhood 
sux» it was in the country’s 650.000 villages that 
Mohandas K. Gandhi, who led the independence 
straggKfound what he considered to be India's soul. 

Mr. Chand strikes a note of optimism, crediting 
free India with achieving more for people like him- 
self, an untouchable at the lowest rung of India’s 
social hierarchy, than has been acknowledged bv 
many of the country's critics. 

‘We are still backward, of course, but we are 
moving forward, and we owe this to the mahatma,” 
he said, referring to Gandhi, a champion of the 
untouchables. “Because of him, people like myself 
are making progress our fathers and grandfathers 
never imagined. ’* 


la the myriad voices that have been raised in India 
m its 50th year, there have been many like Mr. 
Chand s, full of satisfaction for what the decades of 
independence have brought. Many others have been 
ruled with doubt and recrimination. 

But perhaps the largest number of Indians have 
reacted with ambivalence, unsure of how to take the 
measure of a country so vast.' so populous and so 
averse that is has always defied attempLs to define it. 

Should Indians celebrate that their country — a 
grand tapestry of castes, languages, regions and faiths 
— has survived despite forecasts that it would splinter 

A birthday without a party. Page 10. • Pakistan 
appeals for peace. Page 4. 

once Britain' 5 controlling hand was removed? Or do 
they despair because inherenr strains have spawned 
secessionist movements and other forms of violence 
that have made India one of the most lethal places on 
earth? 

Should Indians take pride in their parliamentary 
democracy, vigorously upheld in a world where 
countries with far fewer problems have remained 
stifled by autocracy? Or should they lament the 
failures in their system, the demagogues who have 
risen to power on the votes of illiterate*' masses only to 
betray them, the politicians at every level who have 


built lives of sybaritic comfort for themselves while 
350 million Indians remain mired in poverty? 

In recent years, there has been another con undram, 
the huge gap that has emerged between the new India 
of high technology, and the old India of the bullock 
can. In Bombay, New Delhi, Calcutta, Madras and 
scores of other cities, an economy is emerging based 
on computers, rapid jet travel, air-conditioned hotels 
and mobile telephones. 

This economy's new middle class numbers in the 
tens of millions, yet exists in an uneasy symbiosis with 
an India where tens of millions of others cannot afford 
medicine when they are sick and send their children 
into the street to bang on car windows for coins. 

In weighing these contrasts, Indians are asking 
what matters "more, that a country once racked by 
famines is now feeding itself and even exporting 
grain, or the crushing levels of illiteracy, disease and 
poverty that remain India's scourge ? 

As Indians search for answers, many cannot even 
agree on what standard they should use. Should they 
compare India now to the India of 50 years ago or to 
the accomplishments of a dozen more prosperous 
Asian nations, most of which India dwarfs in com- 
plexity and size? 

These contradictions, apparent everywhere in India, 
were plainly evident in the differing altitudes toward 

See INDIA, Page 12 


B Ulldesbail k Earliest Fossilized Sign of a Strolling Homo Sap 

Bares Teeth 
At Kohl 
On Budget 

By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribun e 

FRANKFURT — It has become 
fashionable in economic circles to call 
the Bundesbank a lame duck or paper 
tiger as the German central bank ap- 
proaches die twilight of its existence. 

The tiger, however, has begun to bare 
its teeth. 

V A pronouncement Thursday from a 
senior Bundesbank official — warning 
the Bonn government of a 10 billion 

NEWS ANALYSIS 


tens 


Deutsche mark ($5.43 billion) hole in its 
1997 budget — is the latest in a series of 
tough positions meant to remind the rest 
of Europe that the German central bank 
remains autonomous and uncompromi- 
sing in its hard-money campaign. 

Puncturing the credibility of the Bonn 
government's already-bleak budget 
forecasts, the rebuke from Klaus-Dieter 
. Kuehbacher, a Bundesbank council 
member, is certain to increase pressure 
on Chancellor Helmut Kohl, who is 
straggling with a fractious coalition, 
record unemployment and an inability 
to reshape the economy to compete in an 

era of globalization. 

Mr. Kuehbacher said the Bundesbank 
was “concerned” that growth in rax 
revenues was not keeping pace with 
economic growth. “Something must be 
done about this,” Mr. Kuehbacher said. 
■"The tax base is eroding.” 

The central bank had warned in its 
monthly report, released on Thursday, 
that tax revenue was likely to be below 
government estimates, but it did not 
quantify the shortfall. 

• [A spokesman for the Finance Min- 
istry said the government thought that 
second-half tax revenue would be high- 

See TEETH, Page 6 



Lee Berger, a South African paleontologist who described the findings, working at an ancient butchery 
site near a lagoon of the country’s coast. He believes the area to be the place of origin or modern humans. 

Ancient Trail of Footprints in Africa 

Johannesburg Scientist Describes 117, 000-Year- Old Human Record 


By John Noble Wilford 

Mete Yori Times Service 

NEW YORK — The earliest fos- 
silized footprints of an anatomically 
modem human being have been dis- 
covered in 117,000-year-old sand- 
stone on the shore of a South African 
lagoon, scientists reported Thursday. 

Fossd bones may inspire paleonto- 
logists, while a particular type of DNA 
may satisfy geneticists that they have 
traced modem Homo sapiens back to a 
certain time in Africa. But nothing is 
more evocative of human ancestors as 
living, walking people than a trail of 


NBA ’s Forbidden Dream 

Politics Block Entry of Towering North Korean 


footprints. The latest discovery is par- 
ticularly welcome in the study of hu- 
man origins because the fossil record, 
in bones or footprints, is woefully in- 
complete for the period when archaic 
Homo sapiens evolved into the modem 
species. Most paJeoanthropoIogists. 
and especially geneticists, think this 
fateful transition occurred between 
100,000 and 200,000 years ago. 

Until now, only about 30 ancestral 
human fossils from that period — ■ and 
no footprints — have been found any- 
where in the world, mostly in southern 
Africa. It is a romantic stretch, but the 
individual who left the prints might 


'/-.-to 


even have been the “African Eve," 
the one common ancestor of all living 
humans that geneticists think lived at 
about this time. 

"These footprints are traces of the 
earliest of modem people,” said Pro- 
fessor Lee Berger, who led the re- 
search team that found the prints. 

Mr. Berger, a paleoan thropologist 
at the University of Witwatersrand in 
Johannesburg, described the findings 
at the National Geographic Society in 
Washington. Articles on the research 
are being published in the September 

See FOOTPRINTS, Page 6 



I. Iln^iulnn' Vijw’- Ini 

A girl In New Delhi protesting the 50th anniversary celebrations. 


A ‘Dismal’ Mir Mission 
Ends With Safe Landing 

2 Wbbbly Cosmonauts Return to Earth 


By Daniel Williams 

W/iftfHjiton Pan Serrwe 

KOROLYOV, Russia — Two Rus- 
sian cosmonauts returned safely to 
Earth on Thursday and ended a rough 
six-month voyage aboard the Mir space 
station, whose multiple breakdowns 
threaten to cripple Russia's space pro- 
grain. 

Vasili Tsibliyev and Alexander 
Lazutkin parachuted to Earth aboard a 
Soyuz space capsule. They landed at 
aboui 4:20 P.M. Moscow time in 
Kazakstan, a former Soviet republic 
from where Russian space probes are 
launched and on whose desert expanse 
manned missions end. 

Russian television showed both cos- 
monauts being carried by soldiers and 
technicians from the capsule. Space 
travelers are usually wobbly after 
spending a long time in weightless con- 
ditions. 

“Satisfactory," said the mission doc- 
tor, Igor Goncharev, upon taking Mr. 
Tsibbyev's pulse. 

"Alive!” said Mr. Tsibliyev, with a 
smile. "I'm happy to be on Earth.” 

Mr. Lazutkin appeared somewhat 
more tired. The two embraced after put- 
ting their feet on Earth. 

Ground controllers and engineers at 
Mission Control at Korolyov, near 
Moscow, burst into applause at the 
news. 

But the return of the cosmonauts is far 
from the end of their ordeal. They will 
now be queried on their role in various 
mishaps, in particular,, a June 25 col- 
lision with a cargo craft that punched a 
hole in Spektr, one of Mir’s six modular 
chambers. 

The collision was the low point in a 
mission — one which the Itar-Tass 
press agency said set a “dismal record’ ’ 
tor mishaps. Mr. Tsibliyev and Mr. 
Lazutkin have bequeathed numerous re- 
pairs to the crew still on board: the 
replacement cosmonauts, Anatoli So- 
lovyev and Pavel Vinogradov, who ar- 
rived last week, and the U.S. astronaut 


— — double take, but others have grown used 

By David Nakamura t0 ri, who steps onto a srair- 

Washington Post Service master designed for someone two feet 

■ KANATA, Ontario— Tbe gKnvjUj month, Ri, 27, has 

SZ^'uon for 7U0'] Michel 

Ri,” announces the lettering on the door that ^ ^native North Korea to the 
"X until tite van stops at the™™ 9 


wenes to ms ruu neignu «w«mized bv the "Guinness coos oi 

Inside the club, some patrons do a recogn M ^ world’s tallest 

huZS become tetatAsian 

Newsstand Prices tn iiaer nlaver ever in the NBA. 


_ Newsstand Prices and tallest player ever in tne nba. 

Andorra 10.00 FF Lebanon. LL3,00C $0 far, however, no ^ team has 

Antites 12.50 FF Morocco officially expressed 

Cameroon... 1.600 CFA Qatar....-...-.10.t»QR primarily ^ 

Eovot ce 5.50 Reunion 12^0 FF Treasury departments ruled in 

JSJLr T foo 7? Saudi Arabia.-...- 10 SR ^gRj would violate the country s 

Gabon.rZi.100 CFA Senegal i.ioo CFA tS|-with-the-enemy law, which 

taly. 1&0 L«s Spain prohibits U.S. companies from doing 

hwv Coast. 1250 CFA Tunisia ’tJLtE business with North Korea. 

JmL _..i. 250 JD UAE --r"; b Still. tie people at die spoils raan- 

Kuwa# 700 FHs u.s. Ma. (Eur. ) Si -20 ] ent comoanv that is financing Ri s 

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Europe Cuts Vacation Short 

Monthlong Break Is Latest Victim of Global Market 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Times Servlre 

TURIN — Paolo Viberti, who joined 
Fiat in 1979, used to get all of August 
off. 

The Italian automaker simply shut its 
big Mirafiori plant, on the edge of this 
northern Italian industrial city. Last 
year, though, it kept the plant open to 
retool for a new sedan, the Marea, and 
Mr. Viberti, 40, a logistics specialist, 
got just two weeks off. This August is a 
little better. Even though the plant is 
partly open, he will be off three weeks. 

Mr. Viberti and his colleagues at Fiat 
are not the only ones finding themselves 


on the job during at least some of the dog 
days of August. All across Europe, there 
are signs that the Continent's once-sa- 
cred long summer shutdown is gradu- 
ally going the way of homemade pasta 
and wine in the lunch pail. 

The change largely reflects the grow- 
ing emergence of European companies 
as multinational players. Prodded by rhe 
year-round realities of the global econ- 
omy, many of these companies are find- 
ing that they must keep their offices and 
factories operating at all times, even 
though it may often be at a slower pace. 
It is just one of the changes that compa- 

See EUROPE, Page 6 


Michael Foale, who has been on Mir for 
three months. 

They will try to repair Mir's crippled 
power system and a malfunctioning 
oxygen generator. The three are also 
making do with stored drinking water 
because of fears that a water-producing 
system is contaminated by anti-freeze. 

"I hope that everything bad will 
leave with us,” Mr. Tsibliyev said be- 
fore the Soyuz detached itself from Mir 
on its way to re-entry. 

At the last minute, ground controllers 
decided to cancel an inspection trip by 
Soyuz around Mir to survey and pho- 
tograph exterior damage. Russian tele- 
vision reported that the decision was 
made because of fears of another col- 
lision. At one point, when discussing 

See MIR, Page 6 


French Order 
DNA Sweep 
In Fatal Rape 


By Anne Swardson 

Washington Pan Service 

PARIS — The entire young male 
population of a village in northwestern 
France will undergo genetic testing in 
an attempt to find the person who raped 
and killed a teenage British girl, an 
appeals court ruled Thursday. 

Systematic DNA testing — as op- 
posed to testing of specific suspects — 
is highly unusual in most of the world 
and has never been done on this scale in 
France. Civil liberties groups here 
called it a “dangerous precedent.” It is 
becoming more common in Britain, 
where it has led to arrests in several 
high-profile crimes. 

The decision by an appeals court in 
Rennes was in response to a suit filed by 
the victim’s parents. The court ruled that 
all males between the ages of 15 and 35 
be tested, and it replaced the magistrate 
investigating the case. The decision 
came after a long campaign by the girl’s 
parents and after heavy diplomatic pres- 
sure from the British government. 

Thirteen -year-old Caroline Dickinson 
was raped and strangled July IS, 1996, 
while sleeping in a youth hostel in the 
village of Pleine-Fougeres in Brittany. 
She was on a school trip with 39 class- 
mates and was sharing a room with four 
other girls, none of whom awakened. 

Hours later, the police arrested a local 
vagrant, Patrice Pile, who had a history 
of sex offenses. He confessed, and the 
magistrate declared the case was solved. 
Two weeks larer, DNA tests showed 
that Mr. Pade could not have been the 
assailant and he was released. There has 

See DNA, Page 6 


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AGENDA 

Oklahoma Bomber Is Sentenced to Death 

DENVER tReulers) Timothy Me- Books pegT*. 

Veigh was formally sentenced to death , 

Thursday for the 1 995 bombing in Okla- Crossword....... — ... — .. — .. Page 1 1, 

homa City that killed 168 people. Opinion Pages 8-9. 

U.S. District Court Judge Richaid s m Pages 20-2 L 

Matsch then ordered the 29-year-old _ _ 

Gulf War veteran executed by lethal in- The /nonmarket Page 7. 

jection, but did not set a date. That will be 
imposed by the U.S. Attorney General. 


1 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. AUGUST 15. 1997 

PJ/1FTWT) 




Less Wild and Wholly / Urbanization Amid the Vastness 


Alaska, the ‘ Last Frontier?’ Today That Seems a Half-Baked Idea 


By Carey Goldberg 

New York Time: S» - n ice 


B ARROW, Alaska — Board “the Last Great Air- 
line" to the state where license plates extol “the 
Last Frontier" and the Iditarod sled dogs run “the 
Last Great Race," and the suspicion cannot but 
swell that the one-million-plus tourists who visit Alaska each 
vear may be witnesses to "the Last Great Snow Job. 

After all. in this state that perpetuates the image of being 
populated by old “sourdough” cabin-dwellers and bush- 
whackers. fully half the population of more than 600.000 
now lives in metropolitan Anchorage, where in most ways 
they might just as well be living in Minneapolis or Buffalo. 
Nearly three-fourths of all Alaskans live in urban areas. 

Where men were once said to outnumber women 1 0 to 1 . 
and their backwoods weirdness inspired the saying that 
“the odds are good but the goods are odd." the ratio is now- 
closer to 109 men to 100 women. 

Eskimo villagers watch 28 channels of satellite tele- 
vision and take courses by Internet. Hunters tracking moose 
deep into the interior call their wives on their cellular 
phones to boast from the campfire. Drive-through espresso 
stands dot highways where the only other sight is eye- 
straining plains leading to white-meringue mountains. 

In a time when a bush pilot can buy designer mustard at 
a settlement store in the desolate north. Alaskans are 
struggling with a question that puts in doubt the state's very 
identity: Can “the Last Frontier” still be considered a 
frontier at all? 

The answer, as gleaned from two dozen Alaskans asked 
recently in places from Barrow to the Aleutians, seems to be 
mainly, ” Yes, but.” — with a loud undercurrent of "No, 
get over it.' ' 

For all the shrinkage of the world, nearly all those 
interviewed said that living in Alaska remained deeply 
different from living "outside.” 

“I've worked in every area of the state — the Aleutian 
chain, McGrath. Barrow, the Kingscreek Mine — and we 
have the same conveniences you have outside now. which 
wasn't true 10 years ago," said Steven Johnson, the man- 
ager and cook at an outpost hotel in Nuiqsut. a native village 
in the North Slope Borough. But still. Mr. Johnson saici. 
"It's different here. I think ‘frontier' might be closer to a 
state of mind.’’ 

A grow ing school of thought argues not only that Alaska 
is no longer a frontier, but also that the state would do well 
to move past its frontier mythology altogether. The time is 
gone, the argument goes, when untouched land was seen as 
a challenge to be conquered, and now the world is moving 
toward an ethic that the land must instead be preserved. If 
there is a. central conflict underlying much of Alaskan 
politics today, it is this question of frontier versus park, of 
whether various chunks of Alaska's natural bounty should 
be developed or protected 

“What has happened to Alaska in the last 30 or 40 years 
is that it has gone from being the last frontier to the last 
wilderness," said Stephen Hay cox. a professor of history at 
the University of Alaska at Anchorage. “Frontier in the 
national psyche means economic development, and that is 
no longer seen as the unquestioned future.” 

In a recent essay. John Haines, one of .Alaska's most 
respected writers, condemned "this industrial maggot bur- 
rowing into the ’last frontier’ as if a people could not rest 
and thrive if that American mirage, the frontier, ceased' to 
exist. But it is already disappearing, exists perhaps now as 
a kind of tinted vacationland, an immense outdoor theat- 
er. 

“And I believe." Mr. Haines wrote, “we will leant to 
five with its absence or perish, as a nation, as a people." 

It is enough to make residents wonder, more than a 
century after the historian Frederick Jackson Turner first 


A A -% 



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lamented the end of the American frontier, whether Amer- 
ica has truly come to the end of the road. 

Even the most gung-ho frontier boosters admit that 
Alaska is no longer the kind of wild and woolly place it was 
when the gold miners rushed in 100 years ago. or when the 
military swarmed in 50 years ago. or even when the pipeline 
and highway builders invaded in the 1970s. 

On the other hand, even if it is not the frontier it once was. 
it still has space, space, space, residents said, and that 
vastness places its stamp deep on the state's psyche. 

Alaska, which makes up 16 percent of the United States' 
land mass, is so sparsely populated that it averages just 1 
person per square mile, compared with 75 people per square 
mile nationally, according to the Alaska Population Over- 
view put out by the state Department of Labor. And that 
space, many say. translates into a sense of opportunity that 
does hark back to the fortune-seeking of the pioneer days. 

Asked if Alaska was still a frontier. Governor Tony 
Knowles, a Democrat whose election platform included a 
pledge to consign the still-common “honey bucket." or 
outhouse, to the museum, responded at first with a knee- 
jerk, ”Oh. sure.” 

Then Mr. Knowles, like so many others, paused to 
qualify. Travel is so much easier, he said, and the state's 
population has grown so much that Alaska does not seem as 
remote as it once did. 

Still, the governor contended, the state retains abundanr 
wilderness, and "is also the frontier in the symbolic sense, 
in the way that frontiers are made of opportunity' and hope, 
and people look to Alaska in that regard." 

As Susan Fison, an .Anchorage statistician, described the 
feel of Alaska: "It’s not all set and pat and cast in concrete. 
Yod can make a real difference here." 

Mr. Haycox agreed that the state remained a frontier only- 
in the extra edge it offered, the dynamic sense of added 
opportunity that its newness and the sparseness of its 


Drive-through espresso stands that dot highicays 
are just one sign that modern conveniences and 
tastes hare found their way into Alaska's 
wilderness. Half the population of more than 
600*000 now lives in metropolitan . 4nchorage . 

population offered, the sense that if a person wanted to do 
something all he had to do was get up and do it. 

Otherwise, he said, he likes to joke that if you subtract all 
the .Alaskans living in cities and large towns, and also 
subtract the 85,000 Alaskan natives who do spend time out 
in the bush, "you come up with about 250 people actually- 
hewing their own wood and building cabins." 

And “the three-fourths of the population which do live in 
urban areas work in steel-framed, glass-fronted buildings 
with indoor-outdoor carpet.” he said, “and drive home 
over asphalt streets to platted subdivisions with unruly 
grass and unruly children just like people everywhere else 
in the country.” 


O 


F COURSE, that is the view from Anchorage. In 
more remore spots, residents who were asked 
whether Alaska remained a frontier tended to 
speak not of abstract spirit but of concrete ge- 
ography, as in, “Well, it is here.” 

"On the Aleutian island of Unalaska. Mayor Frank Kelty 
noted that the rough Bering Sea fishing life had long 
attracted people escaping from unsavory pasrs “outside'’ 
to a place where all that manered was whether a person 
could do the work. 

Mr. Kelty recalled one mysterious man who paced the 
shore for months, undisturbed by local residents, until he 
finally disappeared: people assumed he had finally caught 
his submarine, the mayor said. 


And in Barrow . the northernmost town in the United 
States, the owner of 3 Mexican restaurani, Fran Tate, 
described the logistical problems involved in trans- 
porting lettuce and tomatoes for her “tacos on the 
tundra” ’ when the temperature was 20 degrees below 
zero Fahrenheit t minus 28 degrees centigrade). 

“It takes a different breed of cat to survive, ’ Ms. 
Tate said. “You can t be a sissy up here. You can't 
even gel a quarter-inch screw when you want it. You 
have to ride to Fairbanks to get it.” Fairbanks is 540 
miles <875 kilometers) to the southeast- 
er a plane near Gates of the Arctic National Park, 
Tom Stout, a helicopter pi lor who has explored some of 
the farthest comers of the state, noted die continued 
prevalence of out-in-the-field occupations like oil 
drilling and bush piloting that gave workers a sense of 
being at nature's mercy. 

But the main difference between today and the old 
frontier. Mr. Stout said, is that technology has reached 
the point that “if you've got enough money, you can 
conquer any point anywhere. ' ' 

Even in Anchorage, residents said, moose often 
wander into backyards, salmon cram the streams and 
residents never forget that it is only a few minutes from 
downtown to great stretches of unpeopled territory- 
“People say, 'The good thing about Anchorage is 
that it’s so close to Alaska.’ ’’ said Ms. Fison. “The 
reason we can be called a frontier is that so much of the 
land is really in its natural state. We’re surrounded by 
all this land that has never and will not be de- 
veloped.” ' 

As for the land that can be developed, she said, the 
business horizons seem so open despite the state econ- 
omy's slow growth rate that a friend who hopes to 
develop Alaska's first outlet mall calls it “the last 
retailing frontier.” 

Also frontier-like, residents noted, is Alaska’s 
! ingerm e attraction among the adventurous young, and 
its lack of appeal among the old. The state’s median age - 
is almost 31. compared with nearly 35 nationally. 

The population's mobility is also striking. More than 
h3lf of Anchorage's residents have lived there less than 
10 years. And the state's population is growing. In 
— 1995, the last year for which census figures are avail- 
able. the population was 603,6 17. an increase of 9.7 percent 
over the 1 990 figure of 550,043, and nearly double the 1 970 
population of 302.583. 

Many .Alaskans also mentioned the powerful every-man- 
for- himself spirit that still pervades me state's economics. 
Alaska has no income tax or sales tax and generally keeps 
taxes so low that it is far and away rhe nation's least taxed 
state. A great many people come ro Alaska simply to make 
a pile of money’ and leave, said Mr. Stout, the pilot. 

For all that," Alaskans who have been here more than a 
decade or so. those veteran enough to recall the days when 
they saw television shows two weeks after they were, 
broadcast in the lower 48 and when tapes of national news 
were flown in and broadcast a night late, have a hard time 
buying into the frontier line. 

Even young residents like Jeremiah Odom, the 19-year- 
old counterman at the Pit Stop Espresso booth on the lonely 
highway between Anchorage and Palmer, do not feel any of 
the deprivations that once characterized distant frontier life. 

True. Mr. Odom spent part of his childhood in a cabin in 
the bush (the family left because his mother tired of life 
without appliances).’ and must lug in several tanks of water 
every evening to make the coffee for lack of running water. 

But he has his cell phone to keep him company and a 
menu of espresso shots, syrup flavors and designer coffees to 
equal any in Seattle. "I feel like we’re modernized here just 
like anywhere else.” Mr. Odom said, * 'though if you want to 
feel the last frontier, you can just grasp it in the bush.” 


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In this Saturday’s 



Where Have All 
The Tigers Gone? 



look at the problems 
of the Asian Tiger 
economies plus four 
new Tigers for the 
millennium. 



ptlUBBED C7TY TVS NTT TOD fDO AXD TVS Vl9lU.ll.im POT 

THE WORLD'S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


This way to 


THE INTERMARKET 








Don’t miss it. A lot happens there. 


TRAVEL UPDATE Volcano Engulfs Old Hawaiian Temple 


Portuguese Pilots Turn Up the Heat 

LISBON (Reuters) — TAP Air-Portugal canceled three 
international flights Thursday — to Barcelona. Brussels and 
Madrid — as a war of nerves with pilots over working hours 
intensified. 

With the Portuguese state airline preparing for its busiest 
weekend of the year, a warning by pilots that they could 
demand special medical tests before flying threatened to 
plunge the company into chaos. About 1 70 union members — 
nearly half of the 430 pilots employed by the company — have 
agreed to demand the tests. 

TAP has asked the counties civil aviation authority to 
decree an emergency increase in flying hours to cover the peak 
summer period, but the pilots’ union has warned that (he 
company's actions were putting the safety of passengers at 
risk because of the extra strain on crews. 


Accn.c Fuih-t-Pn-ssc 

HILO, Hawaii — Lava from Kilauea 
volcano has engulfed a 700-year-old 
temple, believed by some to be the most 
sacred of ancient Hawaiian temples. 

The Waha'ula temple on a remote site 
along the Puma coast of Hawaii's Big 
Islaiicl had survived eruptions in 1989 
and 1990. but was allied over on Mon- 
day, said a Volcanoes National Park 
ranger, Terry Reveira. 

“So much lava flowed over it that it 
appeared chat it was actually sinking." 
she said. 

According to Hawaiian legend. 


Waha'ula was built by the priest Pa'ao. 
who came to Hawaii from islands to the 
south in the 13th century. 

Buried under lava is Hawaii's oldest 
and most treasured heiau. where cer- 
emonies and prayers for the chiefs took 
place. It was also a site of human sac- 
rifices. said Ms. Riveira. 

The heiau contained images of the 
gods and priests' quarters. Most of the 
carvings and paintings paid homage to 
the cod Pele. the goddess of volcanoes. 

“PeOjple here are saying that it was 
unused tor so long that Pele decided to 
cover it up." Ms. Reveira said. 


Business 
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in The Intrarnarket. 

Til advertise contact Nina Nkii 
in our L< mill in office: 

Tel: +44 171 4200325 
Fax: +44 1 71 420 0338 
or your nearest IHT office 
or representative. 




WEATHER 


Japan Hopes to Double Tourism - Europ . 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday as provided by AccuWeather. 


Asia 


TOK Y O ( AFP) — Japan hopes to lure more foreign tourists 
to the countryside as part of a plan to double the number of 
visitors by 2005. Transport Ministry officials said Thursday. 

In the year ending in March, only 3.8 million foreigners 
visited Japan while nearly 17 million Japanese traveled 
abroad. Foreign tourists mainly visit major cities such as 
Tokyo. Osaka and Kyoto and few venture to rural areas. 

Swimming has been banned along a two-kilometer sec- 
tion of the French coast near the southern city of Toulon 
because of a bacterial pollution of sea water, the search and 
rescue service in Toulon said. (AFP) 

German roads are the deadliest in Western Europe for 
children, with 358 killed and 48.000 injured in road accidents 
last year, officials in Bonn said. {AFP) 

Thailand hopes to use its weak currency to win back 
foreign tourists in a two-year “Amazing Thailand” pro- 
motion that could earn the country one trillion baht ($32 
billion). f Reuters) 

The entrance fee to the Great Wall has been standardized 
for Chinese tourists and foreigners alike at 25 yuan ($3). 
marking the start of a single-price system for ail Chinese 
monuments, the China Daily reported. {AFP) 

Despite a doubling in admission fees at many U.S. na- 
tional parks, to S 10 for a carload from S5 last year, 1 1 2 million 
people visited the 374 federal parks, monuments and historic 
sites during the first six months of 1997 — an increase of 4.7 
percent over the same period last year, the National Park 
Service said. (AP) 



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^Ontario Shuts 
Many Nuclear 
Plants After 
Critical Report 

By Howard Schneider 

- gfttWgWW Post Sen-tee 

urm2^v ,T ? ~ ^ * ai 5 e « electric 

North America is shutting down 

*? nuclear reactors after an 
mremal study documented widespread 
management problems, years of uiad- 
cquate maintenance and safety practices 
that were only marginally acceptable. 

y Kupcis. president and chief ex- 

ecutive officer of Ontario Hydro. 

?? *** eve °f * e public release 
or the highly critical srudy conducted by 
a °‘ nuclear-power experts. 

The study concludes that while public 
safety was never directly threatened, 
operators of Ontario’s 19 nuclear re- 
aC L. or ? 1 roufine iy ignored maintenance 
schedules and pushed the operating ca- 
pacity of the plants to their limits with- 
out regard for leaky tubes, and valves 
and other deteriorating conditions. 

A release of water contaminated with 
heavy metals into Lake Ontario was dis- 
covered at one Ontario Hydro plant in the 
early 1980s, but provincial environmen- 
tal authorities were never notified. 

An earlier investigation found man- 
agement so lax that it said employees 
wen? sleeping on the job or playing video 
'f games on control-room computers. 

" In response to the report’s findings, 
seven of Ontario Hydro’s 19 reactors 
will be "laid up” over the next year and 
will be brought back on-line only after 
an estimated $1.2 billion is spent on 
repairs. 

The Ontario government is studying 
whether to eliminate Ontario Hydro’s 
monopoly and open the province’s large 
electricity industry to competition. If it 
does, the utility may find, as have sev- 
eral of its U.S. counterparts, that the cosr 
of repairing aging nuclear plants is too 
high to keep them competitive. 

Until that decision is made, Ontario 
Hydro plans to increase power produc- 
tion at existing coal and other stations 
and reopen some retired facilities, a step 
that environmentalists say will add to 
Canada's already high level of emis- 
sions of so-called greenhouse gases. But 
‘ Hydro officials say there is no aitern- 
t ative in a province that relies on nuclear 
power for 60 percent of its electricity 
and is about to lose a substantial amount 
of its nuclear generating capacity. 

“The people of Ontario probably 
thought our nuclear industry was better 
than we now know it is,' 'said the Ontario j 
Hydro chairman, William Farlinger. who 
was appointed interim CEO after Mr. 

K ape is resigned Tuesday night 
• "The nuclear unit was operated as 
though there was some special nuclear 
cult” of technicians and engineers who 
alone understood how to ran the nuclear 
facilities, he said. 

. Many of them helped build, in the 
1960s and 1970s, what was then con- 
sidered a state-of-the-art nuclear-power 
system in Ontario based on Canadian- 
developed Candu reactors. But the en- 
gineers and builders proved to be inept - 
managers and ignored basic operating 
principles for years. I 

Many senior executives have been i 
replaced over the. past year, and Mr. < 
Farlinger said more people were likely 
to be nred ' 

— - — - ( 

^Free-Lancers Lose ‘ 
Case on Electronic 1 
Use of Their Work ! 

The Associated Press < 

" NEW YORK — Publishers may re- « 
produce articles by free-lance writers in s 
electronic data bases and on CD-ROMS i 
without their permission, a U.S. judge 1 

has ruled. \ 

It is not the fault of publishers Chat i 
technology bad provided them an un- < 
expected way to make money in a man- 
ner unforeseen by Congress, U.S. Dis- J 
trict Judge Sonia Sotomayer said 

^Wednesday. lawsuit brought i 


POLITICAL NOTES 



New Dietary Guidelines 
Seen as Major Overhaul 

U.S. Panel Boosts Calcium Recommendations 


Rfcdi V- P - . 


IN THE HOT SEAT — Samuel Hanoura, a one-year-old with asthma, with Mr. and Mrs. Clinton as the 
president ordered drug-makers to test whether the medicines thev sell to adults are safe for children. 


Clinton Sets Rules on Religion 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton issued new 
executive guidelines Thursday that are intended 10 protect 
religious expression in the federal workplace — as long as 
ir does nor diminish job efficiency or appear to be gov- 
ernment endorsement of a particulsu faith. 

The guidelines do not break new legal ground, but they 
lay out a virtual how-to handbook for federal workers to 
navigate a highly controversial area of constitutional law. 

They clarify that federal workers are allowed to wear 
religious medallions over their clothes, conduct lunchtime 
prayer sessions in unused conference rooms, distribute 
proselytizing brochures to colleagues and keep the Bible or 
Koran on their desks to be read during breaks, according to 
the near-final draft. 

Among other things, the guidelines make clear that 
agencies must adjust work schedules to accommodate an 
employee's religious holidays, as long it will nor "impose 
an undue burden on the agency.” and allow employees to 
wear religious garb, as long as it "does not unduly interfere 
with the fimerioning of the workplace. ” <WP) 

Talks on Altering Tobacco Deal 

WASHINGTON — Representatives of cigarette compa- 
nies and state attorneys general have met in Washington in 
. an effort to renegotiate pans of the S368.5 billion tobacco 
settlement proposal and pre-empt further criticism of the 
plan by a special White House task force. 

Since June, when state officials and tobacco companies 
agreed on the proposal, critics have argued that the plan 
undercuts the power of federal officials to regulate nicotine 


and fails to sufficiently penalize cigarette companies if they 
fail to cut smoking by young people. 

A special White House task force appointed by Mr. 
Clinton to examine the proposal has echoed those criticisms 
and is still examining the plan for other shortcomings. 

But tobacco company officials and the plan's hackers 
have been waging a quiet counteroffensive to keep the 
settlement on track. The meeting Wednesday was part of 
that process. Industry officials appear to be against changes 
that would significantly increase the plan’s overall cost or 
force individual companies to pay fines. * MT i 

Federal Housing Jobs to be Cut 

WASHINGTON — Housing and Urban Development 
Secretary Andrew Cuomo and the American Federation of 
Government Employees have agreed on a major reor- 
ganization of the department that will entail the con- 
solidation of operations and a loss of more than 27 percent 
of the department's jobs. 

The parties agreed, among other things, to allow the final 
implementation of the previously announced staff reduc- 
tions to be delayed by two years until 2002. i WP j 


Quote /Unquote 


Kathleen Willey, a former White House employee, in a 
motion to a federal judge to quash an effort by attorneys for 
Paula Jones to question her in Ms. Jones's sexual har- 
assment suit against Mr. Clinton: "The initiation of a 
lawsuit does not grant the plaintiff an unfettered right to 
rummage unchecked through the private affairs of anyone 
they choose.” fAP) 


By Sally Squires 

HUifiw.yViui Post Sen ut 

WASHINGTON — The National 
Academy of Sciences is urging that 
many children and older women get 
more calcium in their diet to protect 
their bones, pan of the first step in a 
major overhaul of the well-known "re- 
commended dietaiy allowances.” 

Under new guidelines, die allow- 
ances. or RDAs, will be used to promote 
optimal health by combating chronic ail- 
ments such as heart disease, osteoporosis 
and cancer. Since being introduced in 
1941. the RDAs have been designed 
largely to prevent illnesses caused by 
nutritional deficiencies, such as scurvy, 
beriberi and rickets, once common but 
now rare in industrial countries. 

The change represents "a major leap 
forward in nutrition science.” said Ver- 
non Young, professor of nutritional bio- 
chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology and chair of the 30- 
member committee that wrote the new 
RDA report for the Institute of Medi- 
cine, an arm of the academy. 

The RDAs are being updated, ex- 
panded and reshaped to include new 
categories and to reflect compelling ev- 
idence for use of some nutrients and the 
limited knowledge base for others. The 
project, the first revision of the RDAs 
since 1989, is so large that it is being 
done in seven stages and will not be 
completed until 2000. In the first round 
issued Wednesday, new recommenda- 
tions were for the five bone-building 
nutrients — calcium, vitamin D, phos- 
phorus. magnesium and fluoride. 

Prompted by the fad for megadoses of 
vitamins and minerals, sometimes with 
serious consequences, the committee 
set upper limits for the first rime for 
certain nutrients, such as vitamin D. 

"This is the first time that we have 
recognized publicly that nutrients can 
be unsafe at too high levels." said San- 
ford A. Miller, former director of Food 
and Drug Administration's Center for 
Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and 
a member of the committee. 

Because of changing demographics, 
the new recommendations include two 
new age categories, those 5 1 to 70 years 
old and people 70 and older. 

In another first, the latest RDAs are a 
joint U.S -Canadian effort. "If we can 
work with our Canadian colleagues so 
that we all agree on these nutrient needs, 
it makes it much easier under NAFTA, ’ * 
Mr. Miller said, referring to the North 
American Free Trade Agreement. 
"Now if you’re going to sell in Canada 


and in the United States, you have to 
have different kinds of labels. This is an 
attempt to get us together.” 

But in overhauling the RDAs, some 
critics say, the committee added layers of 
unnecessary complexity. The new' RDAs 
technically arepart of a broader category 
called Dietary Reference Intakes iDRIs), 
which also includes such terms as Ad- 
equate Intake (AD, Estimated Average 
Requirements (EAR) and Tolerable Up- 
per Intake Level (UL). 

Calcium is one of the nutrients given 
an Adequate Intake level rather than an 
RDA because "sufficient scientific ev- 
idence is not available to estimate an 
average requirement.” The AI calls for 
a daily calcium intake of 1.300 mil- 
ligrams — about the amount in a quart 
of skim milk — beginning at age 9. The 
1989 RDAs set the intake for this age 
group at 800 milligrams .Recommenda- 
tions for calcium intake also were in- 
creased for adults 5 1 years old and up. In 
these age groups, the committee urged 
that levels reach 1,200 milligrams daily. 
400 milligrams more than had been re- 
commended in 1989. 


Away From Politics 

• An Arizona canyon renowned for its 

narrow, twisting limestone walls be- 
came a trap for 12 hikers when a flash 
flood filled it with a wall of water 1 1 feet 
(3.5 meters) high. The guide for several 
of the hikers survived. fNYT) 

• The average score on the ACT en- 

trance examination for college rose to 
21 out of a possible 36 for incoming 
college freshmen this year, up from 20.9 
in 1996. It was the fourth year in five 
that scores inched upward. Scores were 
20.6 in 1990. (API 

• Federal prisoners can purchase 

Playboy and Penthouse magazines 
again, a federal judge ruled, saying that 
an attempt by Congress to ban sexually 
explicit publications from prisons vi- 
olated the First Amendment rights of 
inmates and the publishers of the 
magazines. fFFPj 

• A New York City police officer has 
been charged with assaulting and bru- 
talizing a Haitian immigrant in a Brook- 
lyn station house toilet after arresting 
him in a street scuffle, and Mayor 
Rudolph Giuliani said that other officers 
might also be arrested. The victim of the 
alleged assault was hospitalized. (NIT) 


6 Big 9 Subpoenas Enrage 
Targets of Finance Probe 


By Katharine Q. Seelye 

Nfw York Times Sen icc 

WASHINGTON — Many of the non- 
profit advocacy groups subpoenaed by 
the Senate committee investigating 
campaign finance, among them some of 
Washington's most influential lobbies 
on the left and the right, are angry at the 
scope of the demand for documents, 
contending invasion of privacy and sug- 
gesting that they may not fully comply. 

The documents sought by the Senate 
committee include confidential strategy 
memorandums, correspondence with 
candidates and all material related to 
publicly debated issues. 

Among the 26 organizations sub- 
poenaed are, on the right, the Christian 
Coalition, the National Right to Life 
Committee, die Heritage Foundation 
and the Better America Foundation, cre- 
ated in 1993 by Bob Dole, last year’s 
Republican presidential nominee, and 
disbanded in 1995. Groups on the left 
include the National Education Asso- 
ciation, the Sierra Club, the American 
Trial Lawyers Association and Emily's 
List, advocates for abortion righis. 

One staff investigator called the sub- 
poenas a "fishing expedition," saying 
that neither the Democrats nor tbe Re- 
publicans on the committee were sure 
what they were looking for. Rather, he 
said, each side is simply hoping to find 
new abuses that it can exploit to em- 
barrass the other when the public hear- 
ings resume in September. 

But other Senate aides suggested that 
die subpoenas were justified by news 
wmrtnc that thev said had included ac- 


The AFL-CIO, for example, told the 
committee in a letter this week that 
Congress did not have "a license to 
rummage through all of the papers of 
individuals or their associations.” 

One legal question is whether any of 
the groups coordinated their activities 
with the political parties. If so. they are 
subject to federal election laws’ and 
would be required to disclose who gave 
diem money and how they spent it. 
disclosures that many of the groups 
have refused to make. Another question 
is whether any of the tax-exempt groups 
violated that status by advocating for 
specific candidates or for the parties. 

The subpoenas demand that most of 
the documents be delivered to the com- 
mittee by Aug. 25. But in its letter, the 
AFL-CIO said that it would formally 
object to "many of the demands of the 
subpoena on the grounds that the de- 
mands exceed the scope of the com- 
mittee’s mandate” and violate not only 
the First Amendment, which protects 
free speech, but also the Fourth, which 
bars unreasonable search and seizure. 

Arthur Spitzer, legal director for the 
ACLU in Washington, said the infor- 
mation sought included "internal 
memos about what positions they 
should take on issues, how to write their 
public statements, private communica- 
tions with other people in sympathetic j 
groups about how they can work to- 
gether and internal budget decisions on ! 
how to allocate their resources. ' ’ i 

"Giving this information to the Con- 
gress," Mr. Spitzer said, "is virtually 
the same as giving it to your enemies. 
Many of the groups are very concerned. 
And Congress is not going to get 
everything they’ve asked for in these 



1 VnHn* came in a lawsuit brought that neither the Democrats nor me xe- snorno taxe on issues, now to wn.c u.eu 
The ruling ^ came mi a ia ^ publicans on the committee were sure public statements, private commumca- 

Co^SEy Inc., what they were looking for. Rather he rions with other people in sympathy 
S e 1°, Th? AtLratic Sv Co. said, each side is simply hoping to find groups about bow they can work to- 
L^^iwVntS^Coro and Uni- new abuses that it can exploit to em- gether and internal budget decisions on 
Mead Data barrass the other when the public hear- how to allocate their resources, 

versiry Micro Wins me. resume in September. * ‘Giving this informanon to the Con- 

Jonaiban Tasuu. preset of* Bat other Senate aides suggested that gress," Mr. Spitzer said, "is virtually 

tional _Wn«r s Union tbeieaa ^ wm j ustifed by news die same as giving it lo your enemies, 

plaintiff, said the writers were stu ymg ^ jjj ey sajd had included ac- Many of the groups are very concerned . 

grounds for appeal. n^iinnc ahout each of the groups. And Congress is not going lo get 

"The fight for a fair share c ' Lawyers for several of the groups everything they've asked for in these 
ues,”hesak“Wbenmultttttdhon^L po]incall/mo£ subpoenaswiihoutafuss." 

lar media companies doLI^rrora thattranscen- The subpoenas "are very big. he 

the sweat of tneir contribute • ^ ^ committee’s scope and violated said, "but it s also August, and eveiy- 

those creators deserve to share in ^ 0 reanizarions’ constitutional rights, one is on vacation. 

profits/^^ m M n— « * » 

Accused Soldier Plays Some Hardball 

. , for the welfare of the array’s 410,000 enlisted troops and 

Hew York Tunes him access to the disposition of cases that his 

WASHINGTON —The highest-ranking lavUyerf threatened Wednesday to expose. 

; has threatened through his defense threat, made during a break in a preliminary 

® misconduct charges his defense loco determine whether there was enough evidence to 

W ^We wiil ^G^^.“ e “nf= re nc e after Ac hearing 

of the army. ^*5*. _ .. HoW can the army say they are as .. white officers "got no punishment 


Athenee Palace Bucharest Hilton. October 29-30, 1997 

Romania is increasingly attracting the attention of the international, investment 
community. To assess future investment potential and to highlight the reforms Romania 
is putting in place in a bid to position itself as one of the more exciting investment 
opportunities in the world, the International Herald Tribune will convene a major 
investment summit in Bucharest on October 29-30, 1997. 

President Emil Constantinescu will give the opening keynote address of the Romania 
Investment Summit. He will also host a special dinner for speakers, delegates and guests 
on the evening of October 29 at Cotroceni Palace. 

The feet that President Constantinescu has agreed to support this summit as an integral 
part of the Romanian government's efforts to attract foreign investment is a measure 

of the importance of the summit. 


Summit Sponsors 


INGjltiBARINGS 


CONNI 


ROMANIAN DfVSLOFMCNT AGENCY 


SC.-;\'£Ck£* VtYk & .^AxSQN 


Corporate Sponsors 


ASS 


EUR) ROMANIA 


LOCKHEED MARTIN 


at a preliminary "fcSZ against the sergeant r 

going to have a history of not doing so said the accusations against the officers 

major of the am# v^neu senior officers? included sexual harassment and adultery and were made 

with officer — * been accused by six women of mclu ed^s x officers, whom he did 

Mr. McKinney, who ^ ^ dod ^ has again*™* McKinney is accused of assault, mil- 

t s-sSasssysssasw 

rgUSSlSSk-ess&eSSS _ 

_ major of the army, a position^ — ' 


Full program details are now available 


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THE nORMrti D-ttl.V XgWSBtflg 


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PAGE 4 


ASIAIPACIFIC 


Sihanouk Denies Giving 
Blessing to New Leaders 


King Appears to Back Ranariddh Claim 


tr. Our Sutf Fitwh Dtifaxln 

BEIJING — King Norodom Sihan- 
ouk denied Thursday that he had given 
his blessing to Phnom Penh’s new gov- 
ernment during a meeting in Beijing 
with Ung Huot, the new first prime 
minister. 

"I never gave him the title of first 
prime minister that, in full legality, still 
belongs to you,'* King Sihanouk wrote 
to his son, Prince Norodom Ranariddh, 
who was toppled by Second Prime Min- 
ister Hun Sen last month. 

“I made this clear to His Excellency 
Ung Huot himself." the king said, 
adding, “His Excellency Ung Huot 
replied that he understood." 


Cambodian 


Plans an Airline 


Abater Frunce-Prcssc 

PHNOM PENH — A prominent 
Cambodian businessman who once 
shot out a tire on a Boeing 737 in 
Phnom Penh because the service 
displeased him plans to start his own 
carrier, a report said Thursday. 

Theng Bunina plans to take ad- 
vantage of Second Prime Minister 
Hun Sen’s new “open skies" 
policy established after First Prime 
Minister Prince Norodom Ranar- 
iddh was deposed last month, the 
Cambodia Daily said. 

The airline, to be named Apsara 
in honor of traditional Cambodian 
dancers, is being planned by Mr. 
Bunma, the president of the Phnom 
Penh Chamber of Commerce, and a 
cousin of his who has business in- 
terests in the United States, the paper 
said, citing a civil aviation official. 

Keo Sophal, director general of 
the civil aviation authority, said the 


The letter was released in Beijing as 
Mr. Ung Huot said in Phnom Penh that 
the king, the formal head of state, had 
approved the new government Tues- 
day. 

“During the audience and the lunch 
on August 12. 1997," the king wrote, "I 
never gave my ‘blessing* to these Cam- 
bodian ‘guests.' At the above-men- 
tioned lunch, I only raised my glass, 
saying to them, ‘To your health.’ This 
conformed to our tradition." 

Mr. Hun Sen and Mr. Ung Huot re- 
turned Thursday to Phnom Penh, hail- 
ing their Beijing trip as “very, very 
successful.*' 

"The king gave us his blessing," Mr. 
Ung Huot said, adding, "He was happy 
to learn that we will cooperate together 
forpeace and stability.” 

Tne visitors said the fact that the king 
had received them and toasted them 
during an official lunch constituted de 
facto recognition of the Hun Sen gov- 
ernment 

The king also said Thursday that he 
would return to Cambodia by the end of 
the month to attend a Buddhist cer- 



Thais Confer l r 
With Military *'■' 
About Cuts to 


T i 


Heal Economy 


k;' 1 


ApdwWim*agg/Rctties\ 

Soldiers loyal to Prince Norodom Ranariddh retreating Thursday from the northwestern border community 
of O Soriach with their possessions and families as the forces of Hun Sen began to close in on the town. 


emonv. 

“My departure for Siem Reap- Ang- 
kor will occur before the end of August 
1997." the king wrote in the margins of 
a news article about his meeting with 
Mr. Hun Sen and Mr. Ung Huot. Si- 
hanouk often conveys his opinions by 
distributing copies of his handwritten 
comments about news articles. 

The king, who left Cambodia in late 
February for medical care in Beijing, 


BRIEFLY 


Ians for the airline were still pre- 
nary and that no license had yet 


plan 

limi 


been granted. 

Mr. Bunma admitted in April to 
having shot out a front lire of a 
Royal AirCambodge Boeing 737 in 
Phnom Penh because of what he 
called poor service. Late last month, 
witnesses said, he briefly displayed 
a handgun to staff on an Orient Thai 
Airlines L-1011 after demanding 
that the carrier delay its Phnom 
Penh-Bangkok flight for some 
friends who had not yet arrived. 


plans to fly io Siem Reap for the cer- 


emony and to inaugurate humanitarian 
projects paid for with fnnds from the 
royal budget f Reuters , AFP) 


Hun Sen Orders an Assault 


Mr. Hun Sen on Thursday ordered his 
army to take the last remaining strong- 
hold of Prince Ranariddh, Agence 
France-Presse repotted from Phnom 
Penh. 

“I have given orders to General Ke 
Kim Yan to take O Sraach tomorrow 
and end Prince Ranariddh's forces for 
me,” Mr. Hun Sen said upon his return 
from Beijing. 

Deputy Chief of Staff General Meas 
Sophea said troops loyal to Mr. Hun Sen 
had closed to within five kilometers 
(three miles! of 0 Smach. a hamlet on 
Cambodia's far northern border with 
Thailand. “We have captured six ranks 
and an armored personnel carrier since 
the fighting began last week," he said. 


Seoul Ships Food to the North 


SEOUL — South Korea on Thursday began shipping 

ider 


an 


50,000 tons of food for starving North Koreans tin 
agreement reached in July, Red Cross officials said. 

A ship carrying 2,000 tons of flour, 4 tons of powered 
milk and 70,200 gallons of cooking oil left Inchon. Other 
shipments will follow by ship and by railroad via China to 
complete delivery of the 50,000 tons of food, mostly corn, 
by the end of September. 

Officials of the International Committee of the Red 
Cross are to distribute the food to children and other North 
Koreans who are suffering near-famine food shortages, the 
agency said. <AP) 


Interior Minister Lin Feng-cheng to step down. Prime 
Minister Lien Chan did not say immediately whether he 
would approve the resignation. Mr. Lien and his cabinet are 
due to resign Aug. 2 1 as pan of a shake-up, a government 
spokesman announced Thursday. (AP, AFP ) 


Night Flights to Guam Halted 


Taiwan Police Chief Resigns 


SEOUL — Korean .Air announced Thursday that it will 
suspend night flights to Guam until the caitse of the crash 
that killed 226 people aboard Flight 801 last week is 
determined. 

Dozens of workers are still picking through the mangled 
fuselage of foe Korean Air jetliner in Guam for remains of 
victims. Workers said that they had probably recovered 
about 200 of the 226 people, but that only 58 bodies have 
been identified. ' (AP) 


TAIPEI — Taiwan’s police chief resigned Thursday 
after three most-wanted suspects were accused of com- 
mitting another kidnapping despite an islandwide hunt for 
them. 

Yao Kao-chiao said he would step down to take re- 


Tung Will Visit Washington 


sponsibility for failing to arrest the suspects. The police said 
the three men, wanted for the April kidnapping and murder 


of foe teen-age daughter of a popular entertainer, kidnapped 
a businessman last week and freed 


him after obtaining a 

$140,000 ransom. 

The April case, coming on top of two other high-profile 
unsolved murders, provoked a public outcry and forced 


HONG KONG — The chief executive of Hong Kong, 
Tung Chee-hwa, will make his first trip to Washington next 
month as part of a series of foreign visits aimed at showing 
confidence in the territory after is handover to China, the 
government announced Thursday. 

Mr. Tung is to visit the United' States from Sept. 9 to 1 1, 
and will then move on to Washington and New York. He is 
to attend the opening ceremony of the new Hong Kong 
Economic and Trade Office in Washington. (AFP) 


Agence France-Presse 

BANGKOK — The governor of the 
Bank of Thailand, Chaiyawat Wibul- 
swasdi, met with military leaders Thurs- 
day amid speculation that foe defense 
butiget would take the brunt of cuts 
planned under a rescue plan of foe In- 
ternational Monetary Fund. 

The meeting followed heightened 
public criticism of the government's 
economic management, and rumors — j*. 
repeatedly denied by army and political ^ 
figures — that foe military might at- 
tempt a coup. 

The supreme commander of- the 
armed forces. General Mongkon Am- ■ 
pompisit, said after foe meeting that Mr. 
Chaiyawat had said the economic plight 
was a consequence of the country s pat- 
tern of spending beyond its m ean s. 

"We will have to find new sources of 
income to exceed our expenses and , 
spend less than before," foe general 
said. _ 

Finance Minister Thanong Bidaya 
has said the country's foreign currency 
debt amounts to $89 billion, of which 
S73 billion involves private sector • 
loans. 

The cabinet will meet next week to 
consider cuts of 50 billion to 75 billion 
baht (S 1 . 6 billion to S2.4 biflionj in foe M 
budget to SepL 30. 1998. in line with ‘-4J 
austerity terms accompanying a S16 bil- 
lion IMF assistance package. 

Defense spending was said to be a 
major target because the International 
Monetary - Fund recommended that big 
allocations for education, social welfare * 
and infrastructure development should 
be left untouched. 

Thailand signed a letter of intent on 
Wednesday, and the package was ex- 
pected to be approved next week by foe 
IMF board in Washington. 

Mr. Chaiyawat, foe bank governor, 
said the military leaders had asked about 
the troubling economic data. He added 
that they understood that everyone had 
to cooperate to solve foe troubles. 

General Monkgon called on foe Thai 
people to build savings and reduce de- 
pendence on foreign capital. “If every- 
one — officers, civilians and business- 
men — joins together to economize, 
everything will improve," he said. 

Finance Minister Thanong and foe 
bank governor took questions from the 
public over foe telephone during a 90- 
minute broadcast lare Thursday, 


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Remembering 


for the future 


It is as difficult to explain the terrors of wartime to people who have known 
only peace as it is for an ailing patient to explain his pain to a person who 
has never been sick . But they must be made to see how horrible it is so that 
they can exert their best efforts to prevent its recurrence. 

— from Pence Is Our Duty 


With each passing anniversary of the end ofUbrld War II, more people forget. 


If one thing is proven by experience, it is this: Those who don’t know history are apt to repeat it. Only if we 
remember the lessons of the past— raw and painful as they may be — can we secure a peaceful liiture for humanity. 


The Antiw ar Publication Committee, a group of volunteer members of rhe Soka Gakkai in Japan, began in 1974 
recording the experiences of war survivors. As of 1991, over 100 volumes of these experiences had been published 
in a series called “To the Generations Who Do Not Know War." 


Since 1985 student members of the Soka Gakkai have conducted surveys among their college peers to assess the 
prevailing consciousness and attirudes towards issues of war and peace. According to the most recent survey of 
Japanese and American college students, only 20.6% lapanese and 53.S% American students believe that a world 
without war can be achieved. Among the other findings: 


Of rhe Japanese college students polled in 1994, 24.4% said thar they had heard war- 
rime experiences from their parents. In 1997, the number dropped to 16.5%. 

In 1997, 43.9% of the American students and only 5.1% of the Japanese students said 
that they had participated in organized peace activities. 

More than 60% of Japanese srudents agreed with the L T nited Nations Commission on 
Human Rights recommendation that the Japanese government provide individual com- 
pensation to wartime “comfort women.” Approximately 1S% agreed with the Japanese 
government assertion thar it has no such obligation. 


The voices of the young are the voices of the future. 
Give voice to the past by voicing its truths. 


For more informal ton. pfcu-v contact the Office «{ Puwie Relations. Sufca GafcUl Iniernatirtiral. Tii* Soka Gakkai International (SGI1 
support? erass-umi- urair. i-duotlonal ami '.uliaral act Mi if? baud <«3 the tona-siandini’ principle o; Buddhist humanism 


The* Peace Education Protect 

O/Jkf “l Public RWafiott- 
i.'idUai Inii'rnailurul 
1 5 - i Samnn-ihn. S1 ii:i|uKu-Ku 
T'ik\n mu. Japan 


Ylsll The Peare Education Project nn lhv internet ai; v> tow >g).ura ; j.<eai»’_? Ju 


‘In Japan. 'i.inm *:uilcni< at W uni^r-iUe > thr-mati-nii utc < ounirx w**rc *uir>?'l t<> qut-siiunndire. In the l .S.. researchers 
in te rue wed 3(ttl random!} <f(enni siudeni- ai 1*17 jnr.erMde? in 10 ^Graphical areas. 


Pakistan Offers 
Peace With India 


>7- 


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OmpUed !r. Our Suf Fnm Dupjrrirt 


ISLAMABAD — Pakistan 
marked its 50fo anniversary 
Thursday by calling for peace 
with India. 

Tens of thousands of 
people jammed streets in ma- 
jor cities in an outburst of 
golden jubilee celebrating. 

In a flag-raising ceremony 
in the capital. Prime Minister 
Nawaz Sharif said Pakistan 
had initiated dialogue with 
India because of what he 
called a growing realization 
on both sides that foe 50-year- 
old Kashmir dispute should 
be resolved. 

“The Kashmir problem 
was masterminded by vested 
interests to keep people of this 
region backward," Mr. 
Sharif said in an address to the 
National Assembly. 

Urging India to dismantle 
foe main obstacle to bilateral 
ties and regional peace by 
resolving the issue, he said 
foe dispute bad triggered an 
arms race in South Asia. 

“I hope that India would 
also respond with foe same 
sincerity by withdrawing its 
forces from occupied Kash- 
mir and putting an end to 
atrocities there and hence 


pave foe way for establish- 
ment of lasting peace in foe 
region,” be said. 

But he also said Islamabad 
would continue to back rebels 
in foe Indian-controlled pan 
of Kashmir. 

* ‘Pakistan will continue to 
provide moral support to 
them," he said. “Our inde- 


I 0k 

V- y • 

.*5- .» ' 


■ ■- 


pendence will be complete on 
Kaf' 


foe day all our Kashmiri 
brethren join us in celebrating 
independence.” 

Pakistan, which holds one- 
foird of foe Himalayan region, 
denies Indian accusations that 
it arms, trains and finances the 
guerrillas in mainly Muslim 
Kashmir, whose insurgency 
has cost an estimated 20.000 
lives since it erupted in 1990. 

Mr. Sharif called on foe 
Pakistani people to help build 
their country imo another 
"Asian tiger.” a reference to 
foe economies of Malaysia 
and Singapore he hopes to 
emulate. 

He noted that some believe 
the country's 140 million 
people have little to celebrate. 
Religious and political clashes 
have left almost 400 dead 
since the start of foe year. 




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who 

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foe-. • — 


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«. 7 


Saecil Kbantaffffice Framt-hwe 


tart of foe year. Prime Minister Sharif hoisting the flag Thursday in 

(AFP. AP. Reuters) Islamabad to celebrate n half century of independence. 


Style, Sounds, 
Dining, Arts. 


Hemlines, jazz, restaurants and art - the 
past year’s articles from the IHT can be 
found on our site on the World Wide 
Web. 


http://www.iht.com 


Khan Agrees 
To Blood Test to 
Decide Paternity 


Reuters 

LONDON — Imran Khan, 
the Pakistani cricketer- 
turaed -politician whom a 
U.S. judge ruled to be the 
father of an illegitimate five- 
year-old girl, offered Thurs- 
day to rake a blood rest to 
decide the paternity issue. 

He also pledged to abide by 
foe decision of a Pakistani 
court on foe matter. 

"Imran Khan is foe father 
of foe child,' ' Anthony Jones, 
a Los Angeles Superior Court 
commissioner, said Wednes- 
day after hearing evidence 
from the child's mother, Sita 
White, the daughter of the late 
British industrialist Lord 
Gordon White. 

_ Mr. Khan, defeated in his 
bid to become prime minis ter 
of Pakistan in February, did 
not appear in the court. In a 
statement issued through a 
London publicist he said be 
wanted to "present my side” 
of the story in a Pakistani 
court. 


* WI-VVHU-U,, 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13. 1997 


PAGE 5 


EUROPE 


; h, : 


, '?! c «t s 7 


6 




U.5. Contends Russian Lawyers Stole $500,000 in Office Equipment 



{S 


By Daniel Williams 

W*M»gtu» p M( AVn-ay 

-- Two and a half veare ago, a 

nro?iA^°“S R M S ,- ian bw ? ers was assembled, 
of dollars in operating 
ft* ft*® U s - government and the World 
task of helping create a solid 
foundation of law for Russia’s developing mar- 
ket economy. w 

r J rou P s n ^ rTie ’ ihe Institute foT a Law- 
oased Economy, implied a righteous approach 
mat was rare m a country whose nascenr de- 
mocracy and capitalist economy were riddled ar 
all levels with corruption. 

But that image was eclipsed this week bv an 
unseemly tug of war between the institute and its 
American sponsor, the U.S. Agency for Inter- 
na Uonal Development. 

1 1 officials say the lawyers' group stole 

u-b. -funded office equipment worth 5500,000. 

hai!i - Ussian r retort thar rhe equipment is being 
neid m "safekeeping’' pending talks over its 
nnaJ disposition. The tussle is an outgrowth of a 
scandal from a broader U.S. aid program — 
overseen by rhe Harvard Institute for Interna- 
tional Development — that was intended to 
stimulate economic reform. 


TJe scandal, which came to light in May. led 
to the ouster from the program of two Harvard 
University-affiliated advisers amid charges, 
which the advisers denied, that they used inside 
information from the Russian government for 
private gam. 

The Instirure for a Law-Based Economy had 
operated within the Harvard-run procram and 
was implicated in the alleged ‘ 
insider dealings, which U.S. of- _ 

ficials say broke the rules of I hey 1 UT 
bortj the ttid agency and Har- tte ^ 

Now, the Agency for Inter- 
national Development officials are trying to re- 
possess computers, desks, telephones, files and 
books that institute employees removed from the 
Harvard program office in central Moscow on 
Fnday and transported to their own offices a 
short distance away. 

"If s valuable stuff, and they just decided to 
take it." a U.S. Embassy official said, “it's not 
theirs. 

The institute's director. Sergei Shishkin, said 
the equipment was listed on his organization's 
books and. therefore, belongs to it under Russian 
law. Nevertheless, he said he was willing to 
discuss a compromise with the American of- 


ficials who, he said, were’*trying to create an 
earthquake out of nothing.” 

"They haven’t been able to pin anything on us 
over the stuff, so now they’re trying this." Mr. 
Shishkin said in an interview. By "stuff." he 
was alluding to the earlier conflict over insider 
trading. 

Whatever the outcome of the affair, it rep- 


‘They haven’t been able to pin anything on us 
the stuff, so now they’re trying this.’ 


resents another smudge on Russia’s tarnished 
economic reform credentials. Insider dealings, 
in particular, have been much in die news re- 
cently. 

Last month, well-connected Russian tycoons 
squabbled publicly among themselves and with 
the government over how to divide the moun- 
tains of natural resources still wholly or partially 
under state conrrol. The conflict highlighted how 
a few financial barons with government ties can 
dominate the bidding for such assets. 

Such controversies give reform opponents 
ammunition in their persistent assault on the 
nation's privatization efforts. 


The effect on the public is hard to gauge, 
although polls show a lack of mist in the pro- 
tend reform government of President Boris 
^ elisin. 

In any event, allegations of profiteering aimed 
at the Harvard advisers seem likely to confirm 
widespread Russian suspicions that Americans 
are here to help themselves. 

— And the removal of the office 

equipment by the lawyers will 
°' er almost certainly reinforce a 

feeling in foreign business 

circles that Russians rely on 

strong-arm tactics rather than 
law in adding dispuies. 

An inquiry into the Harvard-run program by 
the U.S. aid agency centers on two Americans — 
Andrei Shleifer. *an economist, and Jonathan 
Hay. a legal expert. Both went to Harvard. 

The Harvard operation closed down here at 
the end of July, except for a tax-reform project 
that is to continue until the end of the year. 

The Harvard oversight mission was" canceled 
by Finance Minister Anatoli Chubais, who 
American officials say. was upset that Mr. Hay 
and Mr. Shleifer had come under fire. 

Both had been Chubais associates since the 
earlv 1990s. 


Cologne Faces Reality of Nazi Past 


By Alan Cowell 

A m Yuri Times if e 

COLOGNE — Cities, like spies, 
have their legends, and the one most 
favored here is the one offered by Kon- 
rad Adenauer, Cologne’s prewar mayor 
and the first postwar chancellor of West 
Germany. 

Of all Germany’s major cities. Mr. 
Adenauer said’ in 1946, none had been 
so battered by the Allies and "none had 
deserved it less." Indeed, he com- 
plained, "nowhere was Nazism resisted 
so openly until 1 933 ’ * — the year Hitler 
came to power — “and nowhere was 
there so much spirirua] resistance after 
1933." 

Since June, however, a new perma- 
nent exhibit sponsored by the city au- 
thorities in the former Gestapo 
headquarters here has subjected Co- 
logne’s History in the Nazi era to un- 
accustomed scrutiny. 

And the outcome, for some, has been 
the conclusion that Mr. Adenauer's ver- 
sion was one-sided, to say the least 

"He built .the legend that die Rhine- 
land is liberal. Catholic and resistant to 
every dictatorship," said Barbara 
Kirschbaum. a secretary at the exhibit 
"This proves that the legend is not 
true." 

For others who have seen the exhibit 
from a look at former Gestapo cells in 
the basement to a documented histoty of 
the city’s persecution of Jews. Gypsies 
laborer^ the lessons re late as 
much -to postwar Germany’s tangled 
relationship with its history as to the 
past itself.' 

■ ‘ ‘My mother never spoke to me about 
this time," said Christine Monheim. 
who was bora in 1941 and grew up with 
her mother in Cologne after her father 
was killed on the front lines. 

• "People were ashamed,” she said. 
"My grandfather, uncles and aunts all 
lived in this time. And I have to assume 
they were all supporters of Hitler. So, 
when the war ended, their support 


turned to hopelessness, and they didn't 
want to tell us." 

The soul-searching seemed all the 
more poignant in this city — Germany’s 
fourth largest, with a" population "of 
around 1 million — that has taken as its 
emblems the huge trade-fair buildings 
on the east bank of the Rhine and the 
extravagant annual carnival that under- 
pins Cologne’s self-image as a place 
with a liking for irreverence. 

But in the exhibit here, along walls that 
have been stripped hare of ail posrwar 
decoration down to their prewar plaster 
and paint, a contrary view emerges. 

The vast halls of the crude fair, it 
seems, were used by the Nazis to house 
prisoners of war and slave laborers. In the 
1937 carnival parade, one horse-drawn 
float was filled with Germans made upas 
bearded caricatures of Jews. A hand- 
painted banner proclaimed 1 them to be 
‘ ‘the last to leave" the city at a time when 
Jews faced increasing persecution. 

* ’To this day. Cologne thinks of itself 
as the liberal heart of the Rhineland," 
said Blanks Balfer, a 33-year-old muse 
who was visiting the exhibit for the first 
time. "Well, that’s not true." 

Indeed, said Ms. Kirschbaum, the 
secretary, "the history of this building 
was suppressed for a long time” while 
other cities more closely associated with 
Nazism, notably Munich and Berlin, 
had little choice but to acknowledge 
their history. 

The widely accepted argument 
among most people in Cologne was that 
this city had been far less receptive to 
Nazism than most others. 

Electoral results from 1928 on show 
that Cologne lagged behind the national 
average in its support for Hider. In the 
March 1933 vote — the last before Hitler 
rook power — the Nazis won 43.9 per- 
cent of the national vote, but scored only 
31.1 percent of the ballot in Cologne. 

Even so, photographs at the exhibit 
display just how rapturously Hitler was 
received here during a visit in 1936, 
when Cologne was described in one 


CHINA, HONG KONG, TAIWAN, INC. 

• The Dynamics of a New Empire 

By Willem ran Kemenade. Translated from Dutch by Diane 
Webb. 448 pages. $2 750. Alfred A. Knopf. 

ASIA’S WEALTH CLUB 

By Geoff Hiscock. 312 pages: £16.99. Nicholas Brealey 
Publishing. London; Allen A Unwin, Australia. 

Reviewed by Philip Bowring 

nnHE themes of these two books might seem to have been 
1 totally exhausted. Can there really be anything more to be 
said about about topics that have been m publishing vogue for 

the last four years, at least? , J _ 

m Perhaps not. But Willem van Kemenade and (less am- 
bitiously) Geoff Hiscock say things uncommonly well and 
with a dispassion that has become unusual. The former is 


BOOKS 

worth half a shelf of other recent China books, and Hiscock is 
concise about a subject — Asia's megamillionaires — that is 
normally dealt with in terms more gushing than accurate. 

Bodi authors are journalists, and both write from the 
perspective of many years' experience in their subjects and a 
clear desire to inform rather than to shock, argue or attract the 
attention of buyers of movie rights. 

Van Kemenade’s book has two main strengths. It looks ar 
Hong Kong and Taiwan as well as the mainland, and thus at how 
these three very different Chinese social and political cultures 
may interact in the future. Second, by leading the reader through 
the evolution of die three entities, he brings out the complexities 
of today ’5 situation and the uncertainty — particularly now that 
Deng Xiaoping is gone — over the future. Contrary to Deng's 
expectations, cross-straits trade and investment have boomed, 
along with karaoke bars, and the political gulf has widened 
while China’s sense of restored military might has altered its 
perceptions of resolving the Taiwan issue. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

T WO Americans repre- 
senting the United States 
in the World Junior Team 
Championships in Hamilton, 
Ontario. Canada have die 

gods of the game smiling on 

Stem. Tom Carmichael, 23, or 

Mjddletown.NewJersey^nd 

Joel Wooldndge.18. of Wd- 
liamsvtile, New York. were 
comending for 
Imp Pairs ride at the Amer- 
ican Contract Bndge 
League’s Summer Nationals 
in /Jbuquerque. New Mexico. 
Leading with a round re 

maining were Linda and Robb 

Gordon of Manharon- Bn'™ 

sfeassass 


P 2 books 

SYllH t» 7-ia «**-'■* 

’ lafltj 


of first. Carmichael and 
Wooldridge snatched the title, 
with Dick Bruno and Kenji 
Miyakuni of Chicago second. 

The deal that proved that 
the winners had divine favor is 
shown in the diagram. Most 
partnerships would gallop into 
the obvious three no-trump 
with the North-South cards 
and make a fortunate 1 1 tricks, 
but Carmichael as North had 
to open one club, since one no- 
trump would have been weak 
in thepannership style. After a 
one-spade overcall and a two- 
diamond bid by Wooldridge 
as South, there was a series of 
misunderstandings. 

After finding their club 
"fit," North was trying for a 
three no-trump, white his part- 
ner was on a cue-bid track. Four 

diamonds was intended, to be 
diamond support, but taken by 


South to be Kickback, an ar- 
tificial request for key cards 
with clubs as the agreed suit 
Five diamonds was meant to be 
a sign off, but South thought it a 
request for kings. The six-dia- 
mond bid revealed that the 
wheels had come off and South 
passed in some conftision. 

Wooldridge won the spade 
lead, took dummy’s diamond 
winners and crossed ro die 
heart queen. He cashed the dia- 
mond long, and was happy 
when the jack appeared. He 
then cashed dummy’s heart 
winners, and that suit split fa- 
vorably, allowing him to throw 
his spade loser. All that re- 
mained was to find West with 
five clubs including ihe king 

and queen, and it was just so: A 

spade ruff and a low club 
forced West to win and return 
the suit, giving Wooldridge the 


jack and the ace. The winners 
gained 10 imps en route to the 
title. 

NORTH ID) 

* J76S 
c ARB* 

* AQ 

* J42 


WEST 
♦ 10 9 
<?&63 
<■ J8 3 
4 K Q ID 98 


EAST 
♦ K Q 8 3 2 
C- J 10 5 
0762 
ATS 


SOUTH 
»A4 
•? Q7 2 
s'- K 10 B 5 J 
*A53 

Neither side was vulnerable. Tbe 
bidding: 


North 

East 

South 

west 

1* 

14 

2o 

Pass 

24 

Pm 

34 

Pass 

33 

Pass 

34 

Pass 

4 * 

Pass 

4N.T. 

Pass 

5$ 

Pass 

5 N.T. 

Pass 

8$ 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 

West ted the spade ten. 





contemporary account as resembling "a 
sea of flags." 

In 15 rooms, the exhibit of photo- 
graphs. newspaper clippings, docu- 
ments and such artifacts as the prewar 
radios thar carried Nazi propaganda 
traces the city's history from the found- 
ing of a Nazi Party branch here in 1921 
to the end of World War II. when Co- 
logne lay in ruins. 

The exhibit records the systematic 
deportation of Cologne's Gypsies and 
Jews, and the deaths of thousands in 
concentration camps. 

Equally, though, the exhibit records 
the terror inflicted on civilians in ihe 
city by the vast Allied air bombardment, 
while the resistance to the Nazis is also 
chronicled. 

In some ways, the former Gestapo 
headquarters itself offers the most stag- 
gering testimony to, and symbolism of, 
die postwar anxiety of some Germans 
about the country’s past. 

The five-story building ar the Ap- 
pellhofplatz near die city center 
emerged unscathed from Allied bomb- 
ing that wrecked 90 percent of Co- 
logne’s buildings. Because it was un- 
damaged, it became a complex of public 
administration offices. 

And in the basement, 10 narrow cells 
that once housed Gestapo prisoners 
awaiting interrogation and death — 
Russian. Polish and French captives 
from the ranks of slave laborers — 
became storage rooms for the files of the 
city bureaucracy. In the process, the 
racks of files covering the walls phys- 
ically obscured the last messages 
scribbled on them by the prisoners. 

Only after pressure from left-wing 
activists in the 1970s were the bureau- 
crats’ files removed. When the cells were 
opened to the public in 1981, the mes- 
sages from the Nazi era were still there. 

“The hours pass like years," reads 
one inscription in German from Cell 4. 
"This room knows only sighs. Laughter 
yields to grief. The sun no longer srnnes. 
When will this torture end?" 



mm- 

WjmZ — •* ' j 

’ .:i 



' 

• ■* : 

: . .. .. 


8e«i KcTrnnfnili/Reav-n 


Peace Talks in Georgia Begin 

Vladislav Ardzinba, left, leader of die breakaway region 
of Abkhazia, and Eduard Shevardnadze, the president of 
Georgia, taking a break Thursday in Tbilisi, the Georgian 
capital, after the opening round of the first direct peace 
talks since a secessionist conflict began in 1992. 


Van Kemenade mostly lets the facts speak for themselves. 
In the process he reveals a China that, for all its internal 
problems, retains a clear sense of its national objectives, even 
when interests conflict. 

On the other hand, the West comes across as cynical or 
pompous. China’s ability to buy the Western business elites 
with baubles and flattery may be well known in Hong Kong 
and Beijing but is periiaps less appreciated in the home 
countries. Europe is cynical. The United States is preachy, 
vacillating between condemnation and desire to coven China 
to the American way. 

If van Kemenade has committed one major fault, its with the 
title of the book, which makes it sound like an investment 
bankers’ prospecrus extolling the imminent juncture of main- 
land size, Taiwanese manufacturing prowess and Hong Kong 
capital and service industries in one giant economic bloc. This 
is certainly not die conclusion to be drawn from the book as a 
whole. 

And though the author rightly sees Hong Kong’s reversion 
as weakening Taiwan’s position, he overstates Taipei’s de- 
pendence on the mainland, and ihe business pressures on 
government for direct links. 

Indeed, van Kemenade's grasp of economic issues is less 
firm than his grasp of politics. In particular he gives in- 
adequate -attention to the interlinked questions ot private 
ownership, state enterprise reform and the role of the party. 
Will the nomenklatura privatize to its own advantage? Or keep 
die state sector and a centralized banking system as levers of 
political power? 

Bur contemporary China is so diverse that no book can 
handle past, present and future in all aspects. Van Kemenade 
has done a fine job in making the complexities compre- 
hensible to newcomers to the subject, and reminding older 
hands of the origins of the current issues. 

Hiscock has rather more limited objectives. "Asia's Wealth 
Club" is defined by its subtitle: " Who ’s^ Really Who in 
Business — - the top 100 billionaires in Asia." The brief, rwo- 
to three-page portraits of leading business figures and their 
companies range from Japan to India. 

The book may be overfocused on Southeast Asian Chinese. 
But it is a useful primer, even if the information is basic and 
many of the numbers must be treated as best guesstimates. 
You will not find here much inquiry as to how some of these 
men got to be superrich. In a few cases it may be dangerous 
even to ask such questions, let alone provide the answers. But 
if Hiscock lacks investigative spirit, he is free of hyperbole. 
This is the best current reference work on its subject. 

hueniatiotuil Herald Tribune 


Do YOU LIVE EV A3HENS? 

For a hand-delivered subscription on the day 
of publication call 00 33 1 4143 9361. 


As for the office equipment. Harvard pro- 
posed that it be divided up — some going to the 
tax project, some to oiher .AID programs in 
Russia and some ro the institute — but it dis- 
appeared before any deal could be worked out. 

Mr. Shishkin, the institute director, said he 
had notified AID officials of his group's in- 
tentions for the equipment. The agency said it 
sent him a letter banning its transfer. 

Mr. Shishkin said the letter did not reach him 
until the day after it had been moved. ' ‘Anyway, 
we are pledged ro take care of the equipment," 
he said. "AID is welcome to inventory it, if they 
like." 

Mr. Shishkin said his group and the U.S. 
agency have been at loggerheads over an Amer- 
ican request to audit Che institute's books. 

He said he agTeed to an audit of accounts 
related to .AID matters, but not ones related to 
other donors or private companies. 

The Institute for a Law-Based Economy 
began as a nonprofit venture and eventually 
received 58 million in U.S. assistance and 54 
million from the World Bank. 

The group soon added a profit-making arm 
called ILBE-Consulting, which .AID officials 
endorsed on the grounds it would give lawyers 
practical experience in advising clients. 


BRIEFLY 


Kohl Rules Out Changes Soon 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut Kohl was quoted Thurs- 
day as saying he saw no need for a cabinet shuffle at this 
time, but did not rule out the possibility before general 
elections in September 1998. 

"I have no reason to be dissatisfied with my cabinet 
colleagues.” Mr. Kohl told ZDF Television in 'the tran- 
script of an interview released ahead of transmission. 

" We’re talking here about topical political matters and 
for me at this moment there is no cabinet reshuffle." 

Asked whether "ar rhis momenr" meant he was ruling 
out changes for this year and next, Mr. Kohl replied: 
"There I am still completely open. But I don’t want to 
expound now on what 1 am going to do before the 
election." - 

Finance Minister Theo Waigel on Thursday repeated a 
call for a cabinet shuffle soon, saying a shake-up would 
make Mr. Kohl’s 1 7-member cabinet more effective in 
advance of the elections. t Reuters) 

Danish Neo-Nazis Set to March 

COPENHAGEN — Danish and foreign neo-Nazi 
groups are ro march in a Danish town Saturday to mark 
the 10th anniversary of the death of Hitler's deputy. 
Rudolf Hess, and the police fear a bloody dash with leftist 
counterdemonstrators. 

A force of 800 officers will stream into the usually quiet 
cathedral town of Roskilde, west of Copenhagen, to keep 
up to 400 neo-Nazis and 1.000 of iheir opponents apart. 
Jonni Hansen, head of the Danish National Socialist 
Movement said he expected 200 to 400 participants 

.A 1995 march in the town after the arrest of the 
American neo-Nazi leader Gary Lauck turned into a rout 
when neo-Nazis were scattered by a far larger group of 
leftists. ( Reuters ) 

Pensioners Protest in Belgrade 

BELGRADE — Thousands of angry pensioners took 
to the streets of Belgrade on Thursday to protest delays in 
the payment of their state pensions. 

"We have sunk to the lowest possible level. Wie are 
fighting for subsistence." Milan Djuric, president of the 
Serbian Independent Pensioners’ .Association, rold the 
protesters. "They owe us rwo-and-half months’ pension 
while forcing us to pay all our bills regularly.’’ 

Mr. Djuric said more than 250,000 pensioners could 
not pay their monthly bills while at least 600,000 could 
not even afford basic needs. (Reuters) 

Synagogue Desecrated in Nice 

NICE — Thirty-two swastikas, four gallows and Nazi 
slogans like "Heil Hider" and "Jews out of Europe” 
were found scrawled on the walls of a synagogue in Nice 
on Thursday, the police said. 

The symbols and slogans, scrawled overnight in black 
marker pen, appeared a day after racist slogans were 
found written on the walls of a local school, they said. The 
police have opened an investigation, they added. 

.Another slogan found on the synagogue walls was 
"white zyklon-B," referring to the gas the Nazis used to 
murder Jews in concentration camps. (Reuters) 

Turkish Amnesty Bill Approved 

ANKARA — Parliament on Thursday approved an 
amnesty bill that should free at least a few of the 89 
journalists in Turkish prisons. 

The bill suspended the sentences of managing editors 
serving jail terms for publishing articles seen as a threat to 
the country’s national security. But if the editor is con- 
victed of a s imilar crime within the next' three years, the 
suspended sentence would be added to any new one. 

Most erf the journalists in jail are reporters who were 
charged with crimes related to a terror campaign by 
Kurdish separatists. 

At least one editor who became the symbol of jailed 
journalists in Turkey was expected ro benefit from the 
amnesty. Ocak Isik yurtcu, who was managing editor of 
the defunct pro-Kurdish daily Ozgur Gundexn, is serving 
the fourth year of a 16-year sentence for publishing 
“separatist propaganda." He will be released after Pres- 
ident Suleyman Demifel approves the bill and the official 
gazette publishes it IAP) 1 


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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL 


Suspicions Cramp Bids 
To Ease Mideast Crisis 


By Neil MacFarquhar 

New York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — Prodding by the 
U.S. special envoy, Dennis Ross, per- 
suaded Israel and the Palestinians to take 
the Erst delicate steps toward resolving 
the crisis in their peace deal, a senior 
U.S. official said Thursday, but the 
biggest obstacle to further progress is the 
suspicions that have mushroomed be- 
tween the two camps of negotiators. 

Among tentative steps taken Thurs- 
day by Israel was the slight easing of the 
blockade around two major West Bank 
population centers, allowing Palestinian 
residents of Hebron and Ramailah to 
leave their cities for the Erst time in the 
two weeks since two snicide bombers 
killed 14 people in a Jerusalem marker. 

The Palestinian leader, Y asser Arafat, 
called the measures inad e qua t e, saying 
that the continued refusal by Israel to let 
tens of thousands of Palestinian workers 
from Gaza and the West Bank into Israel 
and the refusal to turn over money owed 


DNA: 


to the Palestinian Authority indicated 
that the Israeli government was intent on 
wrecking the peace agreement 

Meanwhile, in Washington, a spokes- 
man for Secretary of State Madeleine 
Albright said she would definitely travel 
to the Middle East soon, but that the date 
of the. trip might slip to September. 

The spokesman, James Rubin, said: 
“The ‘when* is linked to the kind of trip 
she wants to have and the kind of results 
that we see in the area of security.” 

Mrs. Albright said Aug. 6 that she was 
prepared to go to the Middle East at the 
end of August if the security situation 
improved there. 

Mr. Arafat, responding to die easing 
of the travel ban Thursday, said: “Tliey 
are allowing a few people to move from 
one home to the other, but they are not 
letting through cement, steel and vege- 
tables. They are not permitting any eco- 
nomic life.” 

Tax revenues collected by Israel con- 
tinue accumulating, with at least $40 
milli on collected from Palestinians and 
owed to the Palestinian Authority now 
frozen in a Tel Aviv bank account. 

“We say, ‘Is this government really 
ready to work with us to preserve the 
peace process and protect it? Is it really 



Vasili Tsibliyev, left, and AJexander Lazutkin sitting on the ground Thursday after their landing in Kazakstan. 


D M/f J #TT a! peace process ana protect nr is u rcauy 

^ ^ answer is no,” Mr. Arafat said in a MIR: 2 Russians Return Hi )me After Star-Struck Space Mission 

Continued from Pane 1 separate speech Thursday. 


Continued from Page 1 

been no progress in the case since then 
and Caroline’s father, John Dickinson, 
has accused the French authorities of 
incompetence and of excessive secrecy. 

Genetic testing of blood, semen or 
saliva provides an individual “print” of 
a person’s DNA, an identification that 
has almost no chance of replicating an- 
other. It is widely used around the world 
on suspects in continuing investigations 
and, on occasion, has cleared those pre- 
viously convicted of crimes. 

But the testing of subjects not sus- 
pected of die crime is much less fre- 
quent In the United States, the Fourth 
Amendment of the constitution requires 
that probable cause be established — in 
practice meaning a warrant must be ob- 
tained before saliva or blood samples 
can be taken, said Mark Kappelhof of the 
American Civil Liberties Union. 

In France, said Danielle Lochak, a law 
professor, the law is vague. Normally, 
consent is required for such civil cases as 
paternity suits. Only in criminal cases 
can DNA testing be done without the 
subject’s permission. 

For the men of Pleine-Fougercs, pop- 
ulation about 2,000, die tests are “vol- 
untary,” but the implication by the court 
and the police is that anyone who does not 
cooperate will be viewed with suspicion. 

“Testing men who are not suspects 
and against whom no charge has been 
filed seems to me quite a dangerous 
precedent.” Miss Lochak said. 
“They’re saying, ‘We don’t know who 
it is, so we will test everyone.’ That’s 
what’s shocking.” What happens to the 
samples after the tests are complete, she 
asked: Might they be stored and used in 
later, unrelated investigations? 

The Dickinson family’s lawyer, 
Herve Rouzaud Le Boeuf, said he hoped 
the court's decision would lead to a 
debate on the subject in France. There 
was no particular reason he knew to 
suspect anyone in particular among the 
village’s male population, he said, but 
the idea was to get the investigation 
restarted after a year of no results. 

"I don’t think the localpop ulatioa 
will be hostile,” he said. "They will be 
happy to be relieved of suspicion. ” 

In Pleine-Fougeres, there was less en- 
thusiasm. At the local bar, the owner 
growled that testing “will not change a 
single thing. We are trying to forget 
about this." 

“Why not extend tests to all the pop- 
ulation of France?” asked a woman who 
answered the phone ai city ball. She 
pointed ont that abont 250 local res- 
idents, such as hostel employees, 
already have undergone DNA testing. 

The night Caroline Dickinson was 
killed, an intruder entered a hostel in 
Saint-Lunaire, 27 miles (43 kilometers) 
away and tried to molest a sleeping 
English girl. In that case, other students 
awoke and the man fled. 


urged that sanctions not 
directly related to security be lifted, ar- 
guing that measures like holding the Pal- 
estinian funds were counterproductive. 

Israel detained seven Palestinians in 
the West Bank overnight and its bull- 
dozers tore down two Palestinian bouses 
Thursday that had been erected without 
pennits. bringing the total of houses 
knocked down since the bombing to 18. 
The closure around Bethlehem remained 
in effect, and Palestinians from the West 
Bank were not allowed into Jerusalem. 
Gaza also was sealed off. 


Continued from Page 1 

whether to circle the space station, Mr. 
Tsibliyev said, “It's useless.” 

About three hours later. Soyuz 
plunged into the atmosphere, its fall 
eventually broken by a large black and 
yellow-striped parachute. The cosmo- 
nauts were sc had u led to fly to Moscow 
on Thursday evening. 

Mr. Tsibliyev, who was commander 
of the mission, was at the center of 
controversy about what went wrong 
with Mir. He was at the controls June 25 


when a practice docking went awry and 
the Progress cargo ship smashed into 
Mir. Observers on the ground, including 
President Boris Yeltsin, attributed the 
accident to “human error,” in effect 
pointing the finger at Mr. Tsibliyev. a 
veteran cosmonaut. 

Shortly after the collision, he suffered 
an irregular heartbeat, and ground con- 
trollers effectively ordered him out of 
action. In the past month, the crew has 
been described as tired and over- 
wrought. 

The collision was only one of the 


harrowing problems that has bedeviled 
Mir. The station’s core component is 1 1 
years old, and its aged life- support sys- 
tems are deteriorating. 

During Mr. Tsibliyev 's and Mr. 
Lazutkin’s stay, a fire broke out, oxygen 
generators broke down twice, a cooling 
system malfunctioned and someone on 
board pulled a computer plug that shut 
down power throughout the station and 
caused it to drift out of control for a time. 
“This was not a space expedition, but one 
incessant problem.” said Olga Kozer- 
enko, a Mission Control psychologist. 


EUROPE: Cherished Continental Tradition of Long Summer Vacations Begins to Fade 


Continued from Page 1 

Dies are trying to make, in work rules and 
production methods, to become more 
competitive on the world stage. 

The shift on summer shutdowns 
began for the most part with carmakers, 
but it has been spreading to other in- 
dustries, including electronics and food 
processing, that also have extensive 
overseas operations. 

“Yon have to keep producing 12 
months of the year,” said Lamberto 
Prati, tiie assistant to the president of 
Barilla SpA, an Italian group that is the 
world's largest pasta maker. 

The move to a working August, while 
still in its early stages, is beginning to 
have ripple effects throughout the Con- 
tinent 

Suppliers are finding that they also 
have to stay open to keep their cus- 
tomers’ factories humming. 

The change is also helping to transform 
the vacation habits of Europeans, who are 
moving in increasing numbers — and 
often happily — to the American-style 
approach of taking shorter breaks several 
tunes a year, rather than one long summer 
holiday. With fewer people away in Au- 
gust tiie pace of summer life in many 
company towns is picking up: instead of 
pulling in the sidewalks and going on 
their own vacations, retailers, restaurant 
owners and others are finding a reason to 
keep their businesses open as welL 

The change can be seen almost every- 
where. East of here, in Milan, Italy's 
business and finance capital, the local 
division of Nestle S A the Swiss-based 
food giant is keeping its corporate 
headquarters open all summer for the 
first tune, ending the practice of sending 
its 700 employees on vacation in Au- 
gust. In Germany, Volkswagen AG, 
which in the past shut its factories for 
four weeks every summer, is likewise 
keeping them open for the first time. 

“Everything is changing,” said Mr. 
Viberti, on a coffee break between shifts 
at Fiat “Summer is now a hot time, in 
every sense of the word. " 

The change is most striking in the 


automobile industry. Volkswagen ex- 
ecutives say the decision to keep open 
the company's five factories in Ger- 
many, which in peak periods employ 
about 96,000 workers, is part of a 
strategy to create what they call a 
"breathing factory," in which produc- 
tion expands and contracts with demand, 
like a living organism. 

Instead of sending workers off all at 
once, Volkswagen now offers a “va- 
cation corridor” stretching from late 
June to late September in which em- 
ployees can take their vacations. Rather 
than using the summer shutdown to re- 
tool for new models, VW will do this 
while production continues, Mr. Meurer 
said. 

Auto suppliers that never got into tire 
habit of closing in the summer say they 
are delighted by the carmakers’ shift to 
year-round production, which elimin- 
ates bumps in demand. The surge that 
came each year when the auto industry 
cranked up after its summer break is now 
largeLy gone, said Ingrid Ledertheil, a 
spokeswoman for Dynamic Nobel Kun- 
s ts toff GmbH, which makes plastic com- 
ponents, like bumpers and dashboards, 
for all the major car makers. 


Production no longer shuts down, as it 
once did, at the big plant north of Paris 
where BASF AG, a German chemical 
giant, employs 1,000 people making 
paints for the auto industry. “Working 
conditions have changed, * ’ said Philippe 
Krasnopoiski, a company officer, who 
added that the change was forced by new 
manufacturing techniques. “It's all just- 
in-time deUveiy,” he said. 

August factory closings are occurring 
“less and less in France," he said, al- 
though the change has not been as sharp 
in Italy, where BASF factories continue 
to close in August 

Maurizio Magnabosco. the bead of 
human resources at Fiat’s automobile 
unit, says globalization is the key that 
has kept the doors open at his company. 
Fiat is a major manufacturer in South 
America, for example. “Down there, it’s 
winter,” Mr. Magnabosco said. “If 
they’re working, we have to work, 
too.” 

Of course, not everyone is part of the 
movement yet. Broad swaths of Euro- 
pean business are continuing to roll up 
their assembly lines this month. This 
year, as every year. Bayerische Motoren 
Werke AG, or BMW, the German auto- 


maker. closed its big factory in Munich 
for a month, sending 1 0.000 workers on 
vacation. In France. Renault did like- 
wise. So widespread are the closures in 
France’s textile industry, which 
provides fabric for much or European 
fashion, that production slumps by two- 
thirds in August from midwinter. 

In European capitals like Paris, Rome 
and Madrid, thousands of small stores 
selling everything from neckties io 
necklaces are closed, their owners hap- 
pily sitting on Mediterranean beaches. In 
Rome, the closure is still so complete 
that newspapers publish lists of food 
stores that remain open to help those left 
behind find provisions. 

Nor have the changes altered the fact 
that in nonmanufacturing industries, like 
tourism, many Europeans work longer in 
summer than at any time of the year. 

In Spain, according to estimates by 
Banco Santander, the largest Spanish 
bank, the gross domestic product during 
the peak tourist months of July and Au- 
gust is 15 percent to 20 percent higher 
than the yearly average. As tourists pour 
into Spain, bank offices remain open 
Sundays to meet the demand for ser- 
vices. 


FOOTPRINTS: 

Ancient Human Stroll 

Continued from Page 1 

issue of the National Geographic 
magazine and in the current issue of the 
South African Journal of Science. 

The most famous ancient footprints, 
made some 35 million years ago, were 
left by two adults and a child, presum- 
ably members of the Australopithecus 
afarensis species, who walked across a 
plain now known as Laeioli in Tanzania. 
The long track of prints was discovered 
in the late 1970s by an expedition led by 
Mary Leakey, the noted Kenyan fossil- 
hunter. The prints provided further ev-' 
idence that human ancestor species were 
walking upright long before they started 
making stone tools. 

Earlier this year, another palcoantbro- 

pologist at the University of Witwaters- i 

rand. Ron Clarke, found ankle and foot \ 
bones of a 3 _5-miIli on-year-old prehu- 
man ancestor, which are giving scien- 
tists their best evidence yetof the sirelet- 
al transition that facilitated upright 
walking. This individual, and presum- 
ably the Laetoli walkers, had a human- 
like ankle but an apelike foot 
Other known prehuman footsteps' 
were left 1 .5 million years ago by Horno- 
erectus, a predecessor species, at the' 
Koobi Fora site in Kenya. 

But until now, no one had found any 
tracks of modem humans from the tran- ’> 
sition period before 100,000 years ago. ~ 
"We don’t have any footprints in this 
time period,” said Ian Tattersall, an au- 
thority on human origins at die Amer- 
ican Museum of Natural History in New 
York City. “So, it’s interesting to find 
these -and see that they are modem- 
looking, but not surprising." 

David Roberts, a South African geo- , 
logisti was the fust to lay eyes on the' 
three footprints in rock within 20 feet (6 
meters) of the edge of Langebaan La- 
goon, about 60. miles (100 kilometers) 
north of Cape Town. He was acting on a 
hunch. He had been picking up rock 
fragments that had apparently been 
chipped by human ancestors. And die 
surrounding gray sandstone was marked 
by animal tracks. 

“I began searching for honrinid foot-1 
prims — and found diem.” he said. 
“Hundreds of people had walked over 
that area, including scientists, and not 
noticed the prints.” 

The human track extended only five 
feet before disappearing at the base of a 
stone wall. Two of the prints are well., 
preserved, revealing in detail the. shape 
of the big toe, ball, arch and JbeeL In ; 
every aspect, Mr. Berger said, these 
were die prints of modem human feel 
Several different dating techniques 
were applied in analyzing the rock bear- 
ing the prints, and they all agreed on an * 
age of 1 17,000 years, give or take a few - 
thousand years. 


- w 


Waigel Asserts Immigrants Sharpen German Unemployment 


Reuters 

BONN — Finance Minister Theo 
Waigel said Thursday that foreign work- 
ers were partly to blame for record un- 
employment in Germany and demanded 
a crackdown on illegal immigration. 

"We need tax reform and the reform 
of the social welfare system,” Mr. 
Waigel told the newspaper BUd in re- 
sponse to a question about how to tackle 
joblessness. “But I want to draw at- 
tention to something else: We have the 
highest immigration rate in the world.” 

“We must be resolute with the return 
of illegal foreigners living here and also 
stop the flow of immigration where it is 
possible and justified,” he said. “The 
deportation of asylum seekers who have 


been refused asylum should be the norm 
rather than the exception." 

There were 4.37 million people out of 
work in Germany in June and unem- 
ployment for the year is expected to 
average a postwar record of 4.3 mil- 
lion. 

In January, Mr. Waigel, chairman of 
Bavaria's Christian Social Union, said it 
was “grotesque” that millions of Ger- 
mans were unemployed while so many 
foreigners were working here. 

The issue looks set to become a central 
campaign issue in next year’s general 
elections, with the leading potential chal- 
lenger to Chancellor Helmut Kohl last 
month saying foreigners convicted of 
crimes were not welcome here. Gerhard 


Schroeder, Social Democratic (SPD) 
premier of Lower Saxony, said his party 
spent too much time looking at the causes 
of crime and not enough time fighting it. 

Mr. Waigel blamed SPD- ruled re- 
gional states for delaying the return of 
refugees who flocked to Germany during 
the war in the former Yugoslavia. “The 
return borne of civil war refugees must 
be pursued more energetically, in par- 
ticular in the SPD-Ied states," he said. 

Mr. Waigel also hinted that countries 
that did not cooperate in the return of 
refugees could risk losing development 
aid. “We will not tolerate that particular 
states will not take back their own cit- 
izens and still thank us for development 
aid," he said. 


foot size, 8!6 inches (22 centimeters) 
long, the individual was no more than 5 . 
feet, 6 inches ( 1 .67 meters) tall. probably : 
shorter. Scientists said the person could 
have been a female or a juvenile or a : . 
s mall male. 

Not much to go on, but enough for 
scientists to conjure up a gossamer im- 
age of the long-ago moment, soon after a 
rainstorm. An individual walked down 
the slope of a dune, approaching the 
lagoon at an angle and leaving tracks in 
the wet sand. Was tins a casual stroll? Or 
someone combing the beach for food 
washed up by the storm? Nothing in the 
steps betray purpose or destination. But 
when the dime dried out, wind filled the 
footprints with sand, protecting them for 
eventual petrification and then discov- 
ery last year. 

After finding the tracks, Mr. Roberts 
uncovered a number of stone tools that .. 0j 
must have been made and used by the 
same people to kill and batcher prey and 
prepare skins. These tools included 
blades, scrapers, a projectile point and a 
large rock core from which flakes wore 
struck. Other exploration in the region 
produced pieces of ocher pigment; the 
person who left the prints may have 
painted her or his body. 

Although some of the most spectac- 
ular recent fossil finds have been in 
Ethiopia and Kenya, South African sci- 
entists have been steadily gathering ev- 
idence suggesting that the modem hu- 
man species emerged in their part of 
Africa and then spread north, eventually 
migrating to Asia and Europe. 


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TEETH: Bundesbank's Budget Stand Shows It’s No Paper Tiger 


Continued from Page 1 

er than that of the first half. Bloomberg 
News reported from Berlin. ] 

Bundesbank officials in past weeks 
have made clear they are willing to pick 
fights with Germany's enfeebled gov- 
ernment as long as such disputes ensure 
that Germany adheres to the letter and 
spirit of the budget guidelines for the 
European currency union. 

This week’s implied threats of im- 
minent interest-rate increases shows that 
the central bank, far from being a paper 
tiger, is willing to risk, the outrage of 
crucial partners like France if it means 
defending the Deutsche mark. 

"They have been quite upset at being 
called those things and I think they will 
show that they have the power to act if 
necessary,” said Gemot Nerb. an econ- 
omist in Frankfurt for Salomon Brothers 
Inc. The Bundesbank “is fighting 
back,” Mr. Nerb said. "Actually, it is 
biting back.” 

Exhibiting its independence on in- 
terest-rate policy, another central banker 
Thursday hardened the Bundesbank's 
warnings that it is willing to tighten 
German lending rates, a move that is 
certain to be unpopular elsewhere in 
Europe. 

Noting that inflation is a cause for 
concern, a Bundesbank vice president, 
Johann Wilhelm Gaddum. sola the bank 
“retains foil leeway" in setting the level 
of its repurchase rate. 

The repo rate, currently 3 percent, is 
charged on short -term loans to banks 
that post government securities as col- 


lateral and is used by the Bundesbank to 
guide the German money markets. 

With the advent of a proposed Euro- 
pean central bank to replace the Bundes- 
bank, and a euro to supplant the mark, 
investors assumed that the German cen- 
tral bank's allegiance to Europe ham- 
strung its traditional role of setting in- 
terest-rate benchmarks for the entire 
continent. 

Accordingly, traders recently bid the 
German currency to its lowest level 
against the dollar in eight years. They 
reckoned that Germany could not risk 
the son of bold interest rate increase that 
would upset its European neighbors, 
who would be forced to follow to defend 
their currencies. 

This week, the Bundesbank prevailed. 
With signals that rates would be 
tightened far sooner than had been ex- 
pected. it won a showdown with the 
markets: The dollar has fallen more than 
Five pfennig in the past week, to an 
official midday Thursday fixing of 
1.8340 DM. 

Frankfurt's money men know that 
Europe's planned central bank can only 
be as credible as the Bundesbank, on 
which ii deliberately is modeled. Thai 
prompts them to do all they can to assure 
that ihe Bundesbank, which celebrated 
its 40th birthday on Aug. 1, takes its 
place in history with a reputation for 
stubborn hard-money independence in- 
tact. economists said. 

Prior to the mark's recent slump, 
monikers like “paper tiger" were vir- 
tually unknown to the Bundesbank. 
"Not all Germans believe in God. but 


they all believe in the Bundesbank,” '. 
Jacques Delors, former president of the J 
European Union commission, once " 
said. 

• Stephen King, who called the Bundes- 
bank “truly impotent” in an economics 
report for HSBC James Capel, conceded 
that tiie central bankers had “responded 
to the lame-duck argument and they have 
tried to show they have some teeth." 

Yeti the Bundesbank has certainly 
shed its bully image. Gone are the days 
of former President Helmut Schlesinger, 
a man accustomed to hurling pronounce- 
ments into gyrating markets like Zeus 
throwing thunderbolts. 

in those days, Germany’s high in- 
terest rates and the mark’s bullish 
strength appeared to threaten European 
integration. One of Mr. Schiesinger’s 
indiscretions is credited with the ejec- 
tion of the British pound from the Euro- 
pean currency grid in 1992. 

Nowadays, the Bundesbank shows a 
kinder, gentler side. Hans-Juergen 
Koebnick, another council member, said 
Iasi month that the Bundesbank would 
consult its European partners in the run- 
up to each new interest rate move. 

The Bundesbank's credibility was put 
to the test in June, when the central bank 
waged a bitter public-relations battle 
against Finance Minister Theo Waigel’s 
attempt to plug his 1997 budget deficit 
with revaluation gains from the central 
bank's gold reserves. The Bundesbank 
denounced the move as a raid on its 
independence. 

After an unprecedented public feud, 
Mr. Kohl backed down. 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, AUGUST 15. 1997 


PAGE 7 


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ROME-COUSEUN Aparfmert with ex- 
cepMiai and irtyie vew on Cofeeim 
Artique butflng. Luring, rtiung. 2 bed- 
rooms. 2 bate dto, Wcten. Frnwhed 
arid decoraied bv famous archilea Af 
coreffiwted r» +33 (0)1 47 04 42 61 


ISOLE TREMm: VILU. BieatrtaUng 
mew. crysial dear waer. 5 min to 
beach 1000 sqm pine taea Pur- 
nishea By owner Lit B50 rtvUior 
TeVFax +43 ( 1 ) 470 96 73 


Beautiful spacious modem apartmani m 
the head at VENICE tt Vemce is n ytwr 
hean Caf fir d«a* +39 4? 529 08 55 


Paris and Suburbs 


78 - FEUCHEROLLES - 
15 IONS PARS LA DE FENS E 
17th cent HOUSE, LISTED 
By owner USS695.00U 
Tel: +33 (W 30 54 S3 98 


Spain 

COSTA BRAVA t SEA FRONT. Maqrrit- 
c*tl luxury vAa ot very high quatty stan- 
dard Ap$ a Fure prime location bm-een 

Uotei and Tossa de Mar rfd siunrir^ 

5«a riw. Pw iri5 sqm. tiving area 

45(i sqm Pnvale sale. L6S 8S0H00 ne- 
gflaWe Fax 18521 2S53-9H9 

Switzerland 


praLAKEGENEVA&AU’S 

L J Sate to foreoiff5 aixhorzed 

Anracme properties, overiookrg views 

1 to 5 bedrooms. Irom SFr ao,0QC. 

REV ACS A. 

52. Montbraant CH-1211 GENEVA 2 

Tat 4122-734 15 40 Fax 734 12 20 

OLD TOWN OF LAUSANNE A unique 
charming tSih century property three- 
story house with exceptional garden and 
garden pavftfton. Gafery attached to 
house Newly renovaiea Suitable lor 
pm-aie and/or professional use. Tel. 

+4T 20 320 3013 

GRYON/VULARS (UES ARSETS), 

BfM&or 4.000 a u non Vaud SE l&e 
Geneva. 2 bedroontt bath 56m2 Chalet 

Condo 30 mm. Mortreux, 90 inn Gene- 
ris. ftregn itoi-Swissf Sak? A tehorced 
- $120,000 US. O' best otter. Owner 
(318) 226-0700 USA Banv5pm CST 

VtlLARS-OLLON: bnmedlak sate, 2 hr, 

2 bath, titohenefle. htng room, indoor 
pool 300.000 SF Monaco: 37793500933 

USA Residential 

NYCIPak Ave73rdSr. 1 Bertoom 

LOCATION, CHARM, PREWAR 

1000 sqm? teel consisting at l 
Bedroom if Cstta, Liwnrj Room, Dtrwig 

Room. kPcren. y.twow m eusry room, 
g uer = pteasanr. ideal Pied-A-Terre. 

Julia Camacho 

212-8&1-7D22 

DOUGLAS ElilMAN 

Real Estate 
for Rent 


French Provinces 

Be a Chatetain in Loire Valley 

fndepenSOT aste d suntetfwd Casae 

4 rooms. 4 baths, tetge receaon, pmoo 
tumsure 00 nans from Paris by TGV. 
FFB-KJXO/mto or mjXOlweek 

OH 

Aunt Agatha’s Delcious CMtege 

Middle tt mm: 3 rams, 3 hates, 
targe wing, towAr tuntere. 
FFeiOMnonfll FftOIXVwei 

Tet +33(19548211502. Fax (0^548853885 

London 

SHORT STAY APARTMENTS 

Usury 5 star hotel apartments in Mate 

Kale, tiifli extensive heath cUb and 
sMumra pool centre! garden and car 
parting To let torn i day d 3 months. 

CaB Pan Estates 44 (tyi7I 372 0057 


KENSWGTON-HLLJONAlRirS HOUSE 
Huge garden. 2 ksuy bedroom suites. 
30 9 reception, terrace, garage. Short la 
El^OOhA. TBL +44 (0) 171 602 5941 


CAPITAL Apartments i Houses (or rem 
srv-h'crx) stay iw see cm leceigs a uk 
or letepriisw ++44 i7i 794 £702 


Holland 


REHTHOUSE INTERNATIONAL 

to I n Hbfend 

tor iscfmi turehed tousesMtas 
Tel 3l-2f>-64i675l Fan 31-20-64655-K 
N'hotwD 1WI JC63 Am Amsf»dam 


HOIEFINDER5 INTL HerengractJ Ui 
1015 BH Amsienlam Tet -3i 206392S2 
Fax. 639226C E-mai-iwcnsetecienj ri 


Paris Area Furnished 





Ideal arxommodaum: au4o5 bedrooms 
Guastv and service assured 
READY TO DOVE «f 
Tel +33(0)1 43129900 Fax (0|i 43129808 


READY TO MOVE M - BeaiiMy deco- 
iae<L 3 bedroom. 2 1/2 bath a Av Mon- 
lagw near Hotel Plaza Albenee Tet: 
212-638-2266 USA SSSOOfmortlh US. 


South of Luxembourg garden. 

its sqm.. 3 bedrooms, doubts Ihnng. 
balcony on garden. Free now FF 13500. 
Tt* +33 (0)1 40 097465 / (0)1 4331 142B 


PARIS STUDIO, 18 BU Beaumarchais, 
28 sq.m, modem kitchenette Rent 
FHSOO'morth Purchase also possible. 
Tab & Fat Ml 82 849 13 15 


MONTMARTRE. 3 rooms. 70 sq.nL sun. 
WBy equ*ped. 27a 10 27/12 USS 1000 
+ unities. Tet *33 (0)1 46 06 94 75 


Switzerland 


GENEVA, LUXURY FURNISHED apart- 
ments From studios to 4 bedrooms Tel- 
+41 22 735 6320 Fax +41 22 736 2671 


Thailand 


BANGKOK - THAILAND. Fumed gar- 
den home. Stfmunwt 93. near express- 
iwy. 2 sfcnas, 3 botawns, 2 1 C bate 
telephone, car -parting. US51.200 per 
month Phone 0041 - 338225478 


USA 


NAPA VALLEY, BEAUTIFULLY 
furnished, 3 bedroom, 4 bath home near 
Meadowood Resort, SL Hetena. 3,880 
sq. Il Lugs roora nih gnssi spaces tor 
ertertabinq. Ftataca. lirge deck. Gar- 
dener. Cute. FuSy equipped Uchen. 
Quiet setfeg to te trees. AvateMe for 3 
months or longer. Cortaci Melody or 
at Morgan Lane. 707-944- 
Fax’ 


NYGASth ST. between MarSeon 8 Park 
Ava Newly renowled, chamwig town- 
house apartment High csAngs. workmg 
fxepbco. 8 mo -2 yrs. Sukabte for execu- 
trvivcoiM. S5000 tumWied^WO urtw- 
ntshed Cal Owner 212-9884307. 


NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS. 1 
week to 1 year. Great Locations. Cat 
PaUChqut 212-448^223. Fax: 212- 
448-8226 E-Mai athomenraCadcom 


Real Estate Wanted/Exchange 


AMERICAN COUPLE on extended 
vaction seek 2 -bedroom wee lumisriad 
apartment wtih modem kitchen in 5Ih. 

6 W 1 or TUi anonUssment. from esrty 
Sept, (or 34 monte Wrhe Box 370. 
IKT, S3 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH 



ncv/i»w* ■ ■ — — 1 1 1 1 — 

•F8SITIW 

Market liaison and 

PR Manager 

-'camp am?. 

The Body Shop 

-• ' 

Gill Lowden 

Human Resources 

The Body Shop International Pic, 
Watenanead. LiOlehampion 

West Sussex. BN 17 6LS, UK 

General Manager 

Conair 

Ann Marie Goffi 

Vice President, Human Resources 
Conair Corporation 

1 Cummings Point Road 

Stamford, CT 06904, l SA 

of the National Opera 

Hellenic 

Ministry of Culture 

Hellenic Ministry of Culture 
Personnel Dept, Section B 

20 Bouboulinas str. 

106 82 Athens 

Greece 

- — 

Societe Internationale 

Boite postale 367 

ntoeteur des Trasan* 

International Herald Tribune 

92521 Neuillv Cedes 

France 

*0*0*2? 

Plant Snper «*«* 

Castelchiara 

Castelchiara 

38 Mario Pagano 

St. Milan 

Italy 


HOLIDAYS 


2 


DISCOUNT TRAVEL 



HOLIDAY RENTALS 


Atf—g fe Hgnyt€fl&fg& 


DefigWiit SKKenrfi century cottage. 

|Usl refurbished, in praxy hamlec in 

torttrE Dales l^iional Park Sleeps 5 + 1. 

AvaJabteAugust/SepiEniberiOctobcr. 

Details: 

TbT. +44 1836813763. 

. Fax. +44 1636 816624 > 


SIGHTSEEING ITALY 


D PaHo <S Stem 

Bepart of the only true 
PaEo inltalv. 

Witness this Medieval 
horse race that began 
700 years ago. 

Celebrated July 2 and August 16 
Infk'rinaajn £ bcirt^pnvaie baktffvvwwTnjj 


& 




Holidays and Travel 



HONG KONG OOLPMNWATCK. 

Day Dte wci lunch, id see endangered 
Bnk dctfuis. Tet f£52) 2964-104 
tar 1352) 2953- 8509. 
hTp?ww\v 2 ianaironvdoiphBB 


Bed & Breakfasts 


MANHATTAN LODGINGS, NYC. Short 
stay krxuiy apartmeras. supenor B & 3 
registry many locations 
Tet 212475-2090 Fax 212477-0420. 
E-Mail rrtoGmanftttankxl0ngs.com 


Hotels 


Lebanon 


HOTEL AL BUSTAN. East ol BstauL 
5 star deluxe Exceptional location, secu- 
rity. comfort, fine cuisine, conventions, 
bushe&s services, sfflsBe TV. 18 mki 
transter from airport free l/TELL Fate 
(961) 4-972439 / (+33) 10)147200007 


Holiday Rentals 


French Riviera 


CLOSE TO SAOTT TROPEZ, superior 
penthouse, overlooking te port with 3 
bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, ai cortSknra 
fi private pool. Tet +33 (0)4 94 64 24 30 
or Tel l Fax: +33 (OH 94 64 00 03. 


HOTELS 


YOU DESERVE 
JffT A BREAK 
^TVfrom THE ORDINARY, 

’ 

V 

?ics> g ‘.iont-Blanc - 
1 " T.m from Ganei '2 
Tr.e mnkeere’ awarts you 
Tel: 04 50 41 54 07 
, Fax: 04 50 41 90 61 — J 


NIGHTLIFE 



SAINT TROPEZ. m Jet on seetfv tasa. 
< room fiat a-nn separate kitchen, al 
crtM, a; cciditofwig Balctny over- 
(coteg pr. 7e> -33 (OK X 64 24 30 
'i 7a Fa* |D)4 gc 6» M 03 


South of France, near ferns, owner 
rods quft touty modem irtte irth pool, 
lar Ml rereis rtwn 228 » 69 Tet 
+23 (3*4 W2S2X. Fax <6>! 93129295 


Caribbean 


ST. 8MflTHELEIfY, F.WJ-. OVER 200 
PRIVATE VACATION VILLAS - beach- 
iroru to hjfcnte with pools Our ageras 
have inspected fill vias personaiy. For 
reservations cn Si Barts. St Matin. An- 
gu«a. Barbados. Miaxjue. te VXgki te- 
tendS.. Can WIUCOvSISARTH - U S 
1401 1B49-8Q1 2rtax 847-6290, horn 
FRANCE 05 M 16 20 ■ ENGLAND 0 
-80O&8319 


Paris & Suburbs 


NYLOFT STYLE, eerier of Paris, 2 bed- 
rooRis, 2 baths, modem kseften. duplex, 
top floors, grea flgte. jrtage SeprttaL 
S300fltno. Fa*Tet +33 (0)1 « 96 18 81 


Switzerland 


SWSS CHALET, NWunvGtsnia, 70 hm 
S. of Zurich. Beautrhi alpine scenery, 
ideal tor Iddna, Mono, swimming and 
apnetonfl; sting 3 Mftxms. steeps 
7. Fas +4t 55 640 79 03 


THREE CHARMING 
PARISIAN HOTELS 
EACH WITH A COURTYARD 



HOTEL DE L' ABB AYE 

Saint-Germain 

10. rue Cassette A 

75006 Paris 

Tel.: {1)45.44.38.11 

Cable Abotel 

Pax: (1) 45.4S.07.86 

An ism century rawfiou&e oatween 

courtyard and garden offenng a refined 

mixture ol traefiton and modem comfort 

m the heart of the fashionable Left 

Bank quarter. 44 rooms. 4 of which are 

suites with private terraces 

SELECT HOTEL 
1 pi. de la S orbonne 
75005 Paris .7^ 

Tel.: (1) 46.34.14.80 ' 

Fax: (1)46.34.51.79 
E-mail ^elecLHotel 6 wanadoo.fr 
Contemporary elegance in the heart 
of the Larin Quarter. 67 rooms + 1 
duplex suua offenng the perfect mix 
cl modern comfort end Old World 
charm. The mienor garden and 
fountains add a scorning touch to 
trus special hotel 

UNION HOTEL ETOXLE 

44, rue Hameiin. 

75016 Paris 
Tel.: (1) 45.53.14.95 
Tlx: 611394F 
Fax: (1)47 55 94 79 4^! 

42 large, pretty rooms and 
residential apartments overlooking a 
private garden on a small, calm 
street near Etoile The perfect spot 
for business, entertainment and 
shopping. Private bar. Excellent 
service. 



HOTEL ^ESI'ETSKpE WEP&J W’"* 

Between the Seine and the Pantheon in the heart ol The Latin quarter 
Charming rooms and apartments gi\ inc onto the square 
Paul-Lan^evin, equipped with kitchenette (ideal for long stays! 
• Rates from ^OO FF tr 1,2(41 FF per day 

-.■UTR.4GE DISCOUiVTS FOR HERALD TRIBUNE READER5- 

■\T -XTUEVT 
Aeoisr 

800 FF 
2.100 FF 
3,400 FF 


Le*JCTHoFsTV. 

1 dav 

5 daVs 

6 days 


H-.X’m 

Ku 
700FF 
1^00 FF 
3^100 FF 


Room 

AlCLST 

oOOFF 
1,600 FF 
iSOOFF 


Ar sur-it. -T 
J’-’-y 
WO FT 
VOOFF 
4^00 FF 


for via!- o'er c Jdui :r hilu.Auc iJ II U Kt'tobhV Hrvn J\ ‘ for yrtf-MeHil rot i>. 

50, t des Benuudins, 75005 Paris - Teh ++33(0) 1 M 41 31 81-Farc +3310) H6 339322 
s M. RER St Michel Notxe Dames - Parking nearby. 


GENERAL 


Personals 


GfcH- AS USUAL EVERYTHING 
is greaL Now that M n at te 
half wn matfc w fust want to Ml you 
Evoyihln la Grett WE LOVE YOU! 
LOVE II and E 


"MON AMOUR, (mm here to te moon 
and back. Always, ANl LEDODl VE DO- 
DtLT.' 


THANK YOU SACRS) HEART ol Jesus 
and Saw Jude lor specW prayore an- 
swered Sityied D.W. 


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DINING OUT 




, — 

PARtS 6th 

MBS 17th 

LE BHBOGHHET 

-sig^a. 

Oariwwnkd rouu at a iwaSaoeUt prica. 
IX lua ScfinHhmL T. Ol 4548.8TJB4. 

ALGOLDENBERG 

Jtalnm-tataB-OionihHHlingaj 
end bxhnaradi -Owmctka A sKhtlrari. 

JbwWi k W A v. VtoBW.. , , 

Ui01 42J7iUV.EnrrdfiyDplBmidDi^i 

VBVNA 

PAMS 7th 






PAGE 8 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribune. 


Pf'BLISHEU WITH THE NEW II IRK TIMES AND TUE WUHCWIO' POST 


Toward India’s Destiny 


For a people whose culture was 
defined two mi llennia ago. five decades 
may seem only the flick of an eyelid. 
But for modem India, at taining the 
nervous dignity of 50 is an occasion for 
celebration and self-examination. Both 
responses reverberate among nearly a 
billion Indians at home and abroad, 
some of whom outspokenly decry the 
shortcomings of a country they per- 
ceive as poor, corrupt and divided. Yet 
this eloquent dissent, no less than fire- 
works and parades, suggests that this 
anniversary is truly worth remarking. 

This ambivalence is owed in part to 
the unrealistic hopes and inflated 
promises that heralded the end of Brit- 
ish rule on Aug. 15, 1947. India, in the 
words of irs founding prime minister, 
Jawaharlal Nehru, had a “tryst with 
destiny” as it stepped from the old to 
the new. and the long-suppressed soul 
of the nation finally found utterance: 
"At the stroke of the midnight hour, 
when the world sleeps. India will 
awake to life and freedom/' 

Mohandas Gandhi, whose words 
and example energized the liberation 
struggle, went further. Once rid of the 
colonial incubus, the Mahatma said, 
India was certain to rid itself of poverty 
and illiteracy. He believed that this was 
bound to happen despite the division of 
British India that led to the simul- 
taneous creation of Muslim Pakistan, a 
step that Gandhi had long opposed.' 

the awakening was rude and im- 
mediate. No leader. Indian or British, 
anticipated the horrific massacres that 
turned railroad trains into vehicles of 
death. As many as a million lives were 
lost in communal carnage or in the 
onieky exodus of Muslims fleeing to 
'akjsian and Hindus fleeing ro India. 
This sowed the enmity responsible for 
recurrent wars, a reckless aims race and 
borders still closed to the free move- 
ment of kindred peoples. Among the 
casualties was Gandhi himself, slain by 
a Hindu fanatic who believed that he 
had given too much away to Pakistan. 

Longer-term promises proved as 
elusive, in part because India is a free 
society. Communist China on paper 
has a higher literacy rate, but this result 
is achieved with the same coercive 
power that denies Chinese free access 


E 


computer engineers are in demand the 
rldo 


world over, and Bangalore is emerging 
as Asia's innovative computer center. 

John Kenneth Galbraith once spoke, 
half admiringly and half accurately, of 
India as “functioning anarchy.” Fifty 
years on. India’s devotion to personal 
freedom remains its greatest asset, and 
it is not unreasonable to hope that its 
tryst with destiny is still to come. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


New Voices in Cuba 


A drama of democracy and courage 
is playing out in Cuba. In mid-July, 
four dissidents petitioned the govern- 
ment — through the lone channel avail- 
able to them, the international press — 
for a broad program of political and 
economic liberalization. The regime 
promptly took the occasion of some 


unexplained Havana hotel bombings. 
:h the four condemned, ro arrest 


whicr 

them, along with a Cuban journalist, 
for "couDter-revolutionary activities." 
The evident purpose was to associate 
independent speaking with bombings 
tied, but with no show of proof, to exile 
“terrorist" groups in Miami. 

This is not just the familiar tale of an 
ugly Communist police regime at 
work. The four — Felix Bonne, Rene 
Gomez Manzano, Vladimiro Roca and 
Martha Beatriz Roque — were per- 
forming a particular service. As mem- 
bers of a small dissidents’ working 
group unbeholden to the Communist 


authorities, they meant to present to the 
Communist Party con- 


forthcoming 
gress in Havana a picture of contem- 
porary Cuba's current difficulties as 
essentially self-made, not, as Fidel 
Castro likes to say, American-made. In 


a free society, they would be accepted 
as the opposition, a designation, they 
noted, that the government ignores in 
its characterization of all who do not 
share its political stance as enemies. 

It is hard to read the document ‘ ‘The 
Homeland Belongs to Us All’’ for 
which these activists are now im- 
prisoned without asking if they do not 
represent the wave of a democratic 
Cuba’s future. They seek ‘ ‘a consensus 
freely reached by the citizenry ... If. as 
its leaders assert, the citizenry in gen- 
eral supports the Communist Party, 
there is no reason not to hold inter- 
nationally supervised, free elections, 
which would serve to silence all die 
detractors of the system.” 

At the end of July the Havana regime 
put on one of those international youth 
congresses that are a staple of Com- 
munist diplomacy. One can imagine 
what version of Cuban reality the 
guests heard from their hosts. It is a pity 
they did not also hear the version of the 
dissidents, so that they could use their 
presence in Cuba to test some of die 
differences. The Cuban people deserve 
no less an opportunity themselves. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Digs Closer to Home 


In a summer of science news dom- 
inated by the Mars landing, it is ex- 
citing to hear of equally wondrous dis- 
coveries being made relatively nearby. 
.Archaeologists, siereotypically a quiet, 
ingrown and academic lot, have broken 
through with a series of finds that res- 
onate in the popular mind. 

A dig near Astoria. Oregon, shows 
promise of locating the fort where the 
exploration team of Lewis and Clark 
spent the lonely winter of 1805 before 
heading back across the continent to 
their historic reward. In Athens, ar- 
chaeologists identified a 5th century 
B.C. cemetery that may contain the 
graves of Pericles. Solon and others 
from the city's Golden Age. And last 
month, underwater explorer Robert 
Ballard — the Indiana Jones of the 
National Geographic Society who is 
famous for finding the Titanic and the 
Bismarck — announced that he had hit 


upon a fleet of 2,000-year-old Roman 
shipwrecks under the Mediterranean 
oft the coast of ancient Carthage. 

All these finds are testament to 
group and individual tenacity, years of 
study and risk-taking as well as some 
nifty new technology. Mr. Ballard’s 


deep-sea Jason vehicle, for example. 

)ikin: 


working with a U.S. Navy nuclear sub 
and a support ship, permits diving to a 
depth or 6,000 meters. He has only 
begun applying it to the hunt for an- 
cient ships, which more typically have 
been found only at 60 meters or less. 
Although few in the community of 
scientists would detract from the glor- 
ies of the space program, we suspect 
that many would join in congratulat- 
ing today's archaeologists for remind- 
ing us of the intriguing mysteries still 
out there whose solutions are a bit 
closer at hand. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


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EDITORIALS /OPINION 


to books and newspapers. Being a free 
society has brought risks and costs as 
well as benefits for India. 

Nehru 's daughter and grandson both 
served as prime minister, and both were 
assassinated. The long-ruling Congress 
Party is a jumble of factions that cre- 
ated an opening for a Hindu nationalist 
party whose rise has been slowed by its 
own scandals and corruption. As self- 
critical Indians are quick to add, violent 
score-settling has been chronic in a 
country with five major religions and 
scores of ethnic groups speaking 17 
recognized languages. Nor has free- 
dom loosened the shackles of caste for 
millions scorned as "untouchable/’ al- 
though last month India for the first 
time elected an untouchable, K. R. . 
Narayanan, as president 

Little wonder, asserts Salman Rush- 
die, bom in 1947 and author of “Mid- 
night's Children,” that Indians react 
with “shoulder-shrugging sourness" 
to the anniversary. Nevertheless, writ- 
ing in Time mag azin e. Rushdie, a 
Muslim from Bombay, confesses that 
he feels like celebrating. A decade ago 
he traveled through all India and found 
everywhere that ordinary people, de- 
spite their diversity, considered them- 
selves Indian. 

It is a monumental achievement that 
India has survived as a nation united by 
a commitment to free elections and 
free speech — a commitment vindic- 
ated in the country's reaction to the 
“emergency" of 1975-1977, when In- 
dira Gandhi ruled as an autocrat and 
was thrown from power by the voters. 

It speaks well for India’s vitality and 
resilience that its own sons and daugh- 
ters are its most articulate critics, when 
they are nor writing novels devoured by 
readers everywhere. India trails China 
in economic indicators, but Indian 


To Help India’s Poor, Focus on Creating Wealth 

j- _ UIJ.I 1 P.noIich-SDea 


"VTEW DELHI — Gandhi and Nehru 
1^1 guided India to independence 50 
years ago. The voyage of self-discovery 
since has been one economic shipwreck 
after another, or so if often seems. 

What would have been Gandhi's and 
Nehru’s emotions if they were told that, 
50 years on, India would have the 
largest number of poor and illiterate in 
the world? Gandhi promised that with 
independence, tears would be wiped 
from every eye. 

The legacy of the Nehru dynasty in- 
cludes the most successful program of 
poverty multiplication in H uman his- 
tory. As a result, countless millions of 
tears are still flowing. And for rich and 
poor alike, heavy industrial plants — 
Nehru’s new temples — have shrouded 
the nation’s capital in some of die most 
poisonous air pollution in the world. 
Democracy as practiced in India has 


By Raxnesh Thaknr 

This is the second of two articles. 


ports, foreign 


produced an equal and opposite com- 


munal reaction^ Equity became the en- 
emy of nation-buildii 


lding. 

The Hindu-Muslim conflict in India 
is endemic, intense and pervasive. It 
brings civil politics into collision with 
primordial loyalties. It damages India’s 
bilateraL regional and international re- 
lations. It also undermines India’s pos- 
ture as an exemplar of high principles 
and good governance. 


Diplomatically and economically, 
nonaligned India was on the margins of 


been a disillusioning and dispiriting 
'Tedded to tl 


experience for many. Wedded to the 
rhetoric of Gandhian austerity, law- 
makers live in magnificent bouses in 
the most exclusive parts of Delhi. In 
recent years, a spate of corruption scan- 
dals has soiled Indian democracy, tar- 
nished the country's image abroad and 
made its citizens cynical. 

Yet, hearteningly, the flaws of In- 
dia's rulers have been exposed by the 
workings of its democratic institutions, 
in particular the press, judiciary and 
opposition parties. 

The democratic process has accen- 
tuated the divide between the qualities 
needed to capture political power and 
the skills required to exercise it wisely 
and well. Public policy, captured by 
special interest groups, has lost sight of 
the national interest 

Preferential policies introduced after 
independence were meant to reduce 
and eliminate social and economic dis- 
parities. Instead they created and nur- 
tured vested interests. As the govern- 
ment framed public policy in a caste- 
conscious way, groups suffering rel- 
ative deprivation responded along 
caste Lines. Every' affirmative action 


the defeaied and the losers in the Cold 
War. India's very prickliness on sov- 
ereignty issues, such as economic na- 
tionalism and its right to develop nu- 
clear weapons, is evidence of fragile 
self-confidence and low world esteem. 

Delhi's ambiguous nuclear posture 
is a self-inflicted wound that will not 


The Nehru dynasty 
bequeathed the most 
successful program of 
poverty multiplication 
in human history. 


heal so long as India neither acquires 
nor renounces nuclear arms. What may 
originally have been principled and 
clever has degenerated into casuistry 
and inderisiveness. 

India should emulate C hina and ex- 
plore how best to enhance its market 
power. Colonization left India with an 
underdeveloped economy and marker 
institutions. Imperfect markets were 
pushed aside in favor of public sector 
industries. Imports were disdained in 


favor of autarky. 

te told industrialists what to 


The state 

produce, where and how much. Im- 


ige ana 

prices were controlled. Banks and in- 
surance companies were nationalized. 

The achievements of planned de- 
velopment were genuine and substan- 
tial. in just 40 years, infant mortality 
was halved, life expectancy nearly 
donbled and adult literacy almost 
trebled. But by East Asian standards 
India's record is unimpressive. Policy 
failures were reflected m a falling share 
of world output and exports and a de- 
preciating currency. 

Although meant to benefit the poor, 
state subsidies were hijacked by the 
rich and powerfuL Dirigisme created 
and nurtured organized interests in an 
unholy alliance” of bribe-seeking and 
influence-peddling politicians, bureau- 
crats. industrialists, trade unionists and 
large landlords. 

The spur to economic reforms in 
1991 was a major balance of payments 
crisis that became an opportunity to 
revamp policy. The pace of change was 
sustained until 1993. But its beneficial 
impact is being weakened by the con- 
sequences of inaction since 1994. 

The public sector is still large, sub- 
ject to bureaucratic and political in- 
terference, and infects many pans of 
the economy. India's place on the lad- 
der of global competitiveness slipped 
from 35 in 1994 to 45 in 1996. 

The key to Ease Asia's economic 
success has been foreign investment. 
India's investment remains stuck well 
below the levels flowing into other 
emerging markets. The difference is 
sp iking in the foreign direct investment 
for the period 1 990- 1996: S6 billion for 
India, compared with SI 57 billion for 
China. S3 6 billion for Singapore and 
S3 1 billion for Malaysia. 

Despite this lag. India’s competitive 
advantages among the emerging eco- 
nomic pow ers include grass-roots capi- 
talism from which a healthy market 
economy can grow, a rudimentary' but 
still solid financial system, a self-suf- 
ficient consumer base, a large profes- 
sional class, an education system with 


established links to the English-speak- 
ing world, a well-developed system of 
property rights and commercial law, an 
independent judiciary and a free press. 

In a renewed effort to build on these 
strengths, the present Indian finance 
minister, Palaniappan Chidambaram, 
is using East Asia as the benchmark for 
economic and trade reforms. In his 
most recent budget, which was clearly 
pro-growth and business-friendly, he 
pied to shift India from a proscriptive 
regime that forbids growth to one in 
which the stare facilitates growth in 
targeted sectors. 

But the 13-party governing coalition 
under Prime Minister Under Kumar 
Gujrai seems too fragile politically to 
make the tough economic decisions. 
Continuing debate between free traders 
and economic nationalists in die cab- 
inet creates confusion. 



Investors remain wary, fearing polit- 
Iabor law 


fcal paralysis, inflexible labor laws, 
protracted litigation, exchange rate 
risks, land acquisition problems, layers 
of red tape, and the high economic cost 
of state subsidies. A study presented to 
Parliament in May showed that such 
subsidies amounted to nearly $39 bil- 
lion in the financial year 1994-95, or 
about 14.4 percent of GDP. 

Investors are also frustrated by woe- 
fully inadequate infrastructure, includ- 
ing congested roads, slow-working 
seaports, frequent power failures and 
broken telephone lines. 

India needs foreign investment to 
make its economy more efficient and 
internationally competitive. It should 
concentrate on the business of creating 
wealth. East Asia's experience shows 
clearly that this is the best way to start 
reducing poverty. 


The writer, who was born in India, 
heads the Peace Research Center at the 
Australian National University in Can- 
berra and is author of "The Govern- 
ment and Politics of India" He con- 
tributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 




(J 


inf] 

null 


i v.v 


Gloomy? But the Prognosis for Postmodern Europe Is Good 


. 1 / 


P ARIS — This is again a 
period of Euro-morosity. In 
a way it is worse than previous 
spates of pessimism because of 
increasing expressions of doubt 
about the very keystone of the 
European Union. French-Ger- 
man solidarity. 

It is axiomatic that the 
French-German partnership is 
the absolute essential to hold 
the great enterprise together. If 
that should founder,” the rest 
would crumble. 

But more and more books 
and articles are coming from 
both countries about the dif- 
ferences in outlook and inten- 
tion that can bring strains, es- 
pecially if the suiprise election 
of a new Socialist government 
in France last spring were fol- 
lowed by the fall of Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl in German elec- 
tions due next year. 

The latest is by the Reach 
philosopher Andfe Glucks- 
mann, who is of German origin 
and fully grounded in both cul- 
tures. He feels that these peo- 
ples whose histories are so en- 
twined are growing apart, in- 


By Flora Lewis 


different to each other's con- 
cerns. Entitled “Good and 
Evil" (Le Bien et Ie Mali, the 
book voices the widespread 
feeling lhai ihe once stirring vi- 
sion of Europe has degenerated 
into a technocratic, bureaucrat- 
ic maze, no longer capable of 
generating allegiance. 

Mr. Glucksmann came to 
prominence during the student 
revolts of 196S, when the at- 
titudes of French and German 
youth were very similar, but he 
moved away from radicalism to 
a pragmatic but intensely moral 
base for guidance. He worries 
that it isn't shared in consumer 
society. 

“In order not to die or be 
killed by ideology, do we have 
to live without ideas?" he asks. 
“Does Europe still have a soul? 
Is it once again an idea?" 

Of course, the miracle of 
French-German reconciliation 
in the 1950s was never so per- 
fect as proclaimed. There were 
always crucial differences 
which came to a head now and 


then. They were always sur- 
mounted by foil recognition on 
both sides that there is no tol- 
erable alternative. 

But the magical awe of this 
historic transformation has 
waned. Now the posi-Cold War 
world and the reaction spawned 
bv German reunification is 
challenging the principle on 
which it was built. 

Essentially, the two pillars 
were German economic 
strength and French nuclear 
power. These symbols of each 
country’s self-confidence are 
fading. Nuclear weapons don’t 
mean much when there is no 
dear common enemy, and the 
Deutsche mark is to’ disappear 
inro the euro, a single common 
currency. Will the bargain then 
come unstuck? 

No. says Robert Cooper, a 
British diplomat who has pro- 
duced a striking analysis of the 
evolution of the European state 
system. He sees change as sig- 
nificant as the 1648 Treaty of 
Westphalia which ended the 


Thirty- Years War and produced 
the nation-state on which the 
world system is now based. 

Entitled “The Post-Modem 
State and the World Order." his 
essay holds that there are now 
really three different systems 
operating simultaneously in dif- 
ferent pits of the world. 

One is the chaos of failed and 
incompetent stares, a condition 
which in the past led to empire. 
But empire no longer offers a 
solution to disorder because 
competent states see only bur- 
den and no resources to be 
gained by overlordship of re- 
sentful peoples. 

An ironic footnote to this ob- 
servation is the current crisis in 
the Republic of the Comoros, 
off Madagascar. 

When the time of decolon- 
ization came, one of the islands, 
Mayotte, chose to remain 
French and the other three de- 
clared independence. Now two 
of these demand to be under 
French sovereignty' again. But 
Paris will have none of it and 
refused even to mediate, re- 
lieved that the Organization of 


Big Trouble Ahead if Clinton Doesn’t Get Serious 


P ARIS — The Middle East 
policy of the United States 
has changed, but not that much, 
and the change may have come 
too late. 

Secretary of State Madeleine 
Albright’s speech to the Nation- 
al Press Club last week em- 
phasized the primacy of securi ty 
in the Middle East but also said 
that “unilateral acts which pre- 
judge or predetermine issues re- 
served for permanent status ne- 
gotiations" are unacceptable. 

That implicit criticism of Is- 
rael’s current policy on expand- 
ing Jewish settlements and 
preempting Arab-owned land in 
Jerusalem was a significant de- 
parture from past Clinton ad- 
ministration policy. 

Mrs. Albright also proposed 
folding the so-called interim dis- 
cussions. now suspended, into a 
speeded-up final negotiation on 
a permanent settlement between 
Palestinians and Israel. 

An editorial in The New 
York Times the next day ap- 
proved her comment on Israel's 
policies, and endorsed her ad- 
vice "io resume negotiations 
and move on quickly to the 
hardest but most important is- 
sues of a permanent settlement, 
including the status and shape 
of a Palestinian state.” 

That endorsement of Mrs. 

' Albright’s support for a future 
Palestinian state will have 
caused dismay in Jerusalem. Is- 
rael’s Prime Minister. Ben- 
jamin Netanyahu, and his gov- 
ernment oppose the creation of 
a Palestinian state. 

Mr. Netanyahu told the in- 
ternational press in February, at 
die World Economic Forum in 
Davos, that the Palestinians 
must content themselves with a 
form of local autonomy in the 
territories given up to them by 
Israel. These territories would 
be self-governing entities with- 
in a larger West Bank area un- 
der continuing Israeli security 
control. Jewish colonies would 
be free to expand, and would be 


By William Pfaff 


linked together by a network of 
secure highways. 

The Palestinian authority 
would be held responsible for 
preventing terrorist attacks on 
Israel, but would not have the 
attributes of a state, and would 
not possess sovereignty as in- 
ternationally defined. 

The Palestinians naturally re- 
gard this as a plan to confine 
them in a form of Bantu scan, on 
the South African model. They 
have believed, however, that 
the United States would even- 
tually force Mr. Netanyahu to 
yield, so as to give them a sov- 
ereign state. 

Before the July 30 suicide 
bombings in Jerusalem, Bill 


Clinton bad privately told some 
I Jewish contacts that 


of his liberal, 
administration policy was about 
to change. These friends in turn 
told him that the unconditional 
backing hitherto given to Mr. 
Netanyahu by the American 
Jewish community was break- 
ing up, a fact of considerable 
electoral significance to Mr. 
Clinton and to his chosen suc- 
cessor, Vice President AJ Gore. 

American Jewish opinion is 
reacting to the blocked peace 
process and to recent attacks 
made by Orthodox rabbis in Is- 
rael on the Conservative and 
Reform Jewish communities, to 
which most American Jews be- 
long. There has been a dramatic 
falloff in contributions to the 
major Jewish Federations in the 
United States, connected to this 
shift in opinion. 

However, Dennis Ross, the 


Letters intended for publi- 
cation should be addressed 
“ Letters to the Editor" and 
contain the writer's signature, 
name and full address. Letters 
should be brief and arc subject 
to editing. H'c cannot be re- 
sponsible for the return of un- 
solicited manuscripts. 


president’s emissary, arrived in 
Israel last weekend with a man- 
date to deal only with the se- 
curity question. This meant 
U.S. endorsement of Mr. Net- 
anyahu’s argument that Yasser 
Arafat had to take the first step 
to restore the negotiations 
broken off earlier this year, after 
Israel launched new housing 
construction for Jews in largely 
Arab East Jerusalem. 

An American who saw the 
Palestinians after their first 
meeting with Mr. Ross reports 
that they were furious. They 
considered the American pos- 
ition not only an echo of Israel *s 
demands but an abdication of 
the role of honest broker. 

Mr. Arafat nonetheless 
agreed on Monday to re-estab- 
lish security cooperation, 
broken off since the Jerusalem 
bombings. He did so because he 
is pinned between the extrem- 
ists in his own camp and the 
demands of Mr. Netanyahu. His 
only hope is to get Mrs. Al- 
bright to the Middle East and 
convince her to force Mr. Net- 
anyahu to give the Palestinians 
the political concessions he has 
adamantly refused. 

Mr. Arafat, himself, pos- 
sesses no bar gaining power. 
Without the United States, he is 
at the mercy of Mr. Netanyahu. 

The Israeli prime minister 
demands that Mr. Arafat crush 
the extremists and deliver their 
leaders to Israel. The Palestin- 
ian leader is incapable of doing 
that, and would be destroyed if 
he tried, since Mr. Netanyahu 
insists that whatever Mr. Arafat 
does. Israel will make no sub- 
stantive political concessions 
and will permit no Palestinian 
state to exist. 

If we are to believe what 
President Clinron and Mrs. Al- 
bright have most recently said 
about the American role. Mr. 
Arafat s hopes are illusions. 
They still insist that the Israelis 


and Palestinians must settle all 
this between them. The United 
States “will work with them to 
facilitate” their dealings, but 
“cannot choose” for them. 

In that case there probably 
will be no settlemenL Mr. Ara- 
fat cannot agree to wbat Mr. 
Netanyahu wants. The extrem- 
ists will therefore take over 
from him. The Israelis will re- 
impose military control over the 
West Bank, and possibly re-in- 
tervene in Gaza. 

There will be an explosion in 
the region. All the Palestinians, 
and ail the Israelis, will find 
themselves much worse off 
than they ever were before. As 
for what is important in Wash- 
ington, Mr. Gore may lose the 
election. 

International Herald Tribune. 

Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


African Unity took on the task. 

The second system is the fa- 
miliar modern state, with its 
ambitions, its coalitions, its 
search for a balance of power. >^| 
And foe third is foe postmodern * 
state, open societies, ruled by 
law and willing to pool impor- 
tant aspects of sovereignty to 
assure cooperation. 

It is unprecedented and dif- 
ficult to achieve, this system, 
but it guarantees that its mem- 
bers will never go to war with 
one another and will resolve 
disputes politically. 

Accompanying this evolu- 
tion is a true change in the mind- 
set of foe peoples involved, 
whether that is a cause or an. 
effect of joining foe postmodern 
system. The crowds show it. 

In Iran, in Algeria, in parts of 
Lebanon, essentially part of the 
modem state system, theyjump, 
shout, gesticulate rhythmically, 
in unison, always repeating 
simple slogans. These are the 
kina of crowds that heiled Hitler 
in self-induced mass hypnosis 
or saluted a beaming Stalin with 
clenched fists. 

You don ’t see thatin the post- 
modern states, although people A 
do pour into the streets ro ex- ■ 
press a shared emotion. 

In Belgium recently, they 
marched solemnly with white 
balloons to show their anger at 
foe pedophilia scandal after two . 
girls died. In Spain, vast crowds 
marched wearing blue ribbons 
in prorest against Basque ter- • 
rorisra. In France, there was a 
huge, raucous, nearly nude in- ■ 
temational gay parade deliber- ; 
ately dying to shock and not 
really succeeding. 

There is no guarantee that foe . 


m: 


n * ™ - " 
v c -" '. 


i- -- : 


Js:::. 


postmodern system will work. 


Cooper says. “We have to . 
get used to foe idea of double 
standards,” eschewing force 
with each other but prepared to 
use it with * ‘those who still live 
in foe 19th century world of 
every state for itself.” 

That isn 't an ideology but it is 
an idea, an offer of progress for 
a Europe seeking its soul in 
human decency. 

€> Flora Lew is 



IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Imperial Visit 


ST. PETERSBURG — The ar- 
rival of the Emperor William II 
here cannot but be regarded as 
an event of the highest impor- 
tance. General opinion, so often 
expressed recently among all 
classes of Russian society, 
rightly regards this event as sig- 
nifying a new and precious 
pledge of universal peace. 
Throughout the imposing char- 
acter of the official receptions 
and foe splendor of foe re- 
joicings organized in honor of 
foe Imperial visitors is felt foe 
solemnity of a most important 
historical event. 


ator of numberless magazines, 
periodicals, newspapers and 
other publications, who started 
life with no other assets than his 
brain and his energy and for 
twenty years was the dominant 
figure in foe newspaper world, 
was fifty-seven years old. In 
1896, he established a morning 
newspaper on entirely original 
lines, the “Daily Mail/’ which 
revolutionised ” British daily 
journalism. The standpoint of 
foe "Daily Mail" was inde- 
pendent and Imperial. 


1947: Paraguay Rebels 


4, i 


1922: Journalism Loss 


LONDON — After lingering 
on the verge of death for several 
weeks. Viscount Nonhcliffe. 
probably the most dominant 
newspaper power of foe age, 
succumbed this morning [Aug. 
15]. Lord Nonhcliffe. the cre- 


BUENOS AIRES — The Para- 
guayan revolutionists have 
smashed into Asuncion after a 
three -day siege and are working 
their way through the heart of' 
foe capital. The rebels, seeking to 
overthrow Dictator President I 
Higrno Morinigo have penet- ■ 
rated to the workers' district and 
are advancing toward foe center 
of the city. 




u 


U 


Ft 


S.^u-Y 
















ntiiifr jr 


ef >hh I 


Some Bow to Beijing, 
But Others Stand Up 


» V } 


> !* Gi 


By A.M. Rosenthal 

NJJr w Y ? RK — Lovely Mr. Carter commits others: 
KA“ yailheshore ’ warmed Chinese policies are 
y the sun and the thought of shaped by fear of chaos from 
nting about certain young ‘■unrestrained” dissidents. 
Americans struggling for the Who? What have they done to 
liberty of persecuted people create this fear except ask for 

rar away. Then Jimmy Caner minimal freedoms? 
appears, bringing the shadow He says “the tragedy of 
that travels with him now. Tiananmen' * aborted discus- 
Once the 39th president sions that he says he had ar- 
pnded himself on making hu- ranged between Beijing and 
man rights a priority in his Tibetans. What was the 
administration. But he has be- tragedy — the peaceful 
come part of the great change protest by students or the 
that Beijing has brought about murderous attack on them 
If — turning so many of the ordered by the Communist 
American elite into its polit- leaders he treats with such 
ical and economic servitors, oozing respect? Why did 
■ He appeared in a column he China not allow talks in four 
wrote for The New York decades of occupying Tiber 
Times on Sunday (IHTOpin- before Tiananmen — and in 
ion. Aug. 12). It is a classic the 10 years since? 
example of propagandist I believe that Mr. Cane rand 


ical and economic servitors, oozing respect? Why did 
■ He appeared in a column he China not allow talks in four 
wrote for The New York decades of occupying Tiber 
Times on Sunday r IHTOpin- before Tiananmen — and in 
ion. Aug. 12). It is a classic the 10 years since? 
example of propagandist I believe that Mr. Cane rand 

China’*; Politburo are both in- 
, , creasingly worried about rhe 

Crll/ICf hdS turned rising power of the American 

SO mmrv nf the> public protest against perse- 

su many OJ me culion of Chinese Christians. 

American elite So I take a cleansing shower 

■ , .. .... * by thinking of the Americans 

info its political who want to help the perse- 

and economic cuted, not deny them. 

. .Almost every day letters 

Servitors . arrive: What can I do, one 

person alone, to fight perse- 

cution? I have never taken 
J technique — manipulating pan in political action, but 
v truth to produce falsehoods, these are suggestions from 
The most skillful specimen Americans who have: 
by Mr. Carter amounts to a 1. Take every opportunity 
denial of the millions of available in a democracy to 
Chinese Christians who fight the individual: Write or call 
for their religious freedom, elected officials, editors. 


truth to produce falsehoods, these are suggestions from 
The most skillful specimen Americans who have: 
by Mr. Carter amounts to a 1. Take every opportunity 
denial of the millions of available in a democracy to 
Chinese Christians who fight the individual: Write or call 
for their religious freedom, elected officials, editors, 
and of their suffering: “Al- broadcasters and business- 
though congregations must men in the China trade about 
still register with the govern- what kind of legislation, sanc- 
ment, membership in Chris- lions, news coverage or in- 
ti an churches is booming.” vestment policy you seekas a 

The first half of that sen- citizen and consumer. Keep 
tence treats the “registra- writing and calling, 
non” of Christian churches as 2. Refuse to remain 
if it were a formality, like get- alone. Work with your con- 
ting a peddler’s license. The gregation, union, clubs, 
truth, documented repeatedly professional association to 
by the U.S. government, is get legislative action and 
that registration means sub- business responsibility, 
mitring to full control by a 3. Vote and buy on your 


specifically atheistic branch convictions. 

^ of the Communist apparatus. 4. Search out organizations 
* Control includes appointment already set up to ngnt 


Control includes appointment 
of clergy, including bishops 
and cardinals. Catholic rejec- 
tion of papal authority, ban- 
ning of certain teachings like 
the second coming of Christ 


already set up to ngm 
persecution. 

The young Americans 
I mentioned have formed 
Students for a Free Tibet in 
high schools and universities. 


uie sccunu vvMiuug v* -"c- - „ --hu-vir 

and forbidding proselytizing They are part of a network 
bvforeiane^ of students, actors and 

part is a false- musicians who *ve the* 
hood for what it does not say; energies, talents and Imonej, 
Millions of Christians refuse to arousmg Amencans 
to be part of the registered the slaughter of Tibet- 
-nffirS 1” churches. They Untmng .protest by _ the 


MeneDy.com 


INTERN ATIONAL HERALD TRIBU NE. FRID AY, AUGUST 15, 1997 

opinion/letters 


The Legacy Thing 


PAGE 9 


Stop Wasteful Fishing 
And Save Marine Life 


m WITH MNJCE 
M TOWARD NONE 
ANP CHARITY 

TOWARD ALL... 




SPEAK 
\ SOFTLY 
J AND CARRY 
K A BIG 
fcs\ stick- 


=fp- -V5 

4; 


WE HAVE 
NOTHING 
^ TO FEAR 
, BUT FEAR 
ITSELF... 


By Joshua Reichert 


ASK NOT WHAT 
TOUR COUNTRY 
CANDOR)RTOU, 
BUT ASK W 
flD YOU CAN DO 
f W FOR YOUR 
A-Sif COUNTRY 



NR.G0RBACHEy. 
TEAR DOWN 
THAT WALL. 


mm 

tv* 


XT T ASffiNCjTON — Few 
VY people are aware that 
for every pound of shrimp 
they throw on the barbecue 
grill or dip into cocktail 
sauce, an average of five 
pounds of other marine life is 
deliberately destroyed. 

In a world where many 
fisheries are in double, thou- 
sands of fishermen are losing 

meanwhile 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Subcontinent Needs Help On Weld and Marijuana 


“official” churches. They Untiring prouai 
wSp in underground group * an important nraron 
churches that the police try to why the Holiday Inn chain 

S5S*55m: tota*. ° So, Bei]bigruJere are doing 


ZTl d,,, it is in the un- So, Beijing ruiere 

Sb^ss SSs 

greatest “boom member- J creating mil- 


greaicM ^ — * “ j^ d ^ey ^ creating mu- 

SSSss aigs^-ni 


India and Pakistan are commemorating 
50 years of independence, but without 
great cause for celebration. The subcon- 
tinent. with its vast potential of human 
and material resources, has not blos- 
somed after the end of the colonial era as 
was hoped and expected. Instead of look- 
ing to the future, it has been focusing on 
reliving the past. It has been bypassed by 
history as other Asian countries have sur- 
passed it politically and economically. 

President Bill Clinton summed up the 
situation at a press conference last week 
when he implied that the region was not 
a hot issue for the United States, but was 
a source of concern because India and 
Pakistan had not been able to work 
through their differences. 

Most disturbing is the baggage of 
hatred and distrust carried by the two 
countries. Notwithstanding the admit- 
tedly adverse impact of their colonial 
past", the fault lies largely with India and 
Pakistan themselves. They have 
squandered precious resources and dis- 
sipated them by fighting each other, 
rather than addressing domestic needs. 
Instead of resolving divisive issues, both 
seek constant confrontation. 

Now a costly arms race has begun. The 
• fact that both countries have nuclear ca- 
pability increases the danger of conflict, 
either by design or by miscalculation. 

Perhaps no two neighboring counmes 
have done more to undetmine each other 
than India and Pakistan. 

Yet they cannot be ignored or ten to 
themselves to drift further toward eco- 
nomic despair and a nuclear abyss. The 
United States and other nations should 
not look the other way. They shoirid 
actively engage in helping to resolve the 
conflict ana to prevent a crisis similar to 
that in the Balkans or the Middle East. 

The Indian subcontinent has the po- 
tential to become a major economic play- 
er and a contributor to peace on the world 
scene. It must be helped to help itself. 

MTJNTR AHMED KHAN. 

Amsterdam. 

The writer is former chairman of the 
Paldstan Atomic Energy Commission. 


As a loyal overseas American. I was 
troubled to read of the bad blood between 
Senators Richard Lugar and Jesse Helms 
concerning the nomination of William 
Weld as U.S. ambassador to Mexico. 

It seems that Mr. Weld favors the 
legalization of marijuana for medical 
purposes, which is anathema to Senator 
Helms. For the life of me, I couldn’t 
figure out why. Then it dawned: 
Marijuana is smoked. Someone lighting 
up a joint is not using tobacco, and this 
constitutes a threat to thousands of to- 
bacco farmers in North Carolina. 

There is. however, a happy solution. I 
recall an old movie in which a well- 
meaning .American housewife inadvert- 
ently threw a fistful of marijuana into a 
batch of cookies she was about to bake. 

It should be brought to the attention of 
Mr. Helms that this form of admin- 
istration of cannabis constitutes abso- 
lutely no threat to the North Carolina 
tobacco farmers. 

PHILIP HOLZBERGER. 

Logrian, France. 

Mr. Helms claims that William 
Weld’s sympathy for medical marijuana 
disqualifies him from being U.S. am- 
bassador to Mexico. Mr. Weld would 
send a confusing message to the Mex- 
icans, who somehow’ deserve an am- 
bassador who is “tough on drugs. But 
maybe it’s time we started treating the 
Mexicans like neighbors — what better 
mission for an ambassador than that. 

PAUL WOLF. 

New Paltz, New York. 


Regarding "We Don't WtiJif a Drug 
Lcgatizer " i Opinion . July SI i tty A.M. 
Rosenthal: 

Mr. Rosenthal uses the Weld-Helms 
debate as a pretext to rehash his anu- 
drug beliefs. Latin American and Asian 
drug lords reap huge rewards from the 
continued criminalization of drugs. Mr. 
Rosenthal is also silent on the subject of 
alcohol, whose effects are arguably 
worse than those of marijuana. 

PHILIP GLOUCHEVrrCH. 

South Royal ton. Vermont. 

German Anthem's History 

I don’t think Hagen Graf Lambsdorff 
needs to be so patronizing about Samuel 
Abt's designation of the German na- 
tional anthem as “Deutschland Uber 
Aiks" i Letters. July 30). After all, die 
new lyrics are merely ihe third verse of 
the same poem. . 

It is interesting that the very musical 
nation of Germany, since its unification 
in 1871, has had two national anthems, 
and both with melodies borrowed from 
other nations. First was ”Heti Dir in 
Siegeskranz,” sung to what is better 
known as “God Save the King/Queen, 
of old but uncertain origin. In 1922. it 
was replaced by “Deutschland. 
Deutschland Uber Alles” set to Haydn s 
melody, which he wrote in 1797 as Aus- 
tria’s “Kaiserhymne 

Even the late German Democratic Re- 
public managed to produce a homegrown 
national anthem, by the composer Hanns 
Eisler — bur I suppose that is now lost in 
history’s rubbish neap. 

GEORGE SELKIRK. 

Paris. 


Marijuana is not the real issue here. 
It is William Weld's tolerance of ho- 
mosexuals and of women s right to 
control their bodies — a rejection ot 
the dogma of those who currently 
control the Republican Party. 

Mr. Weld might actually make a de- 
cent president, which is what Jesse 
Helms and his ilk are really afraid of. 
Americans have had a lot worse. 

BOB GROSS. 

Paris. 


Cosmic Rays Do Hit Earth 

Regarding "Are Laptops an In-Flight 
Peril?" i Features. July 4): 

It is wrong to say cosmic rays “rarely 
penetrate beyond” 40,000 feet from 
Earth. Cosmic rays are high-energy 
particles permanently bombarding Earth. 
Some, the neutrinos, even go through it. 

ROGER ANTHOINE. 

, Geneva. 


their livelihood and millions ai 
of people routinely go o 
hungry, we have every reason 
to ensure that our ocean b 
resources are carefully hus- n 
banded and wisely used. k 
Regrettably, they are not. e 
According to the United h 
Nations Food and Agriculture n 
Organization, roughly 27 
million rons of fish and other c 
marine life are thrown back o 
dead or dying into die sea d 
each year* by fishing fleets d 
that do not want everything 
that comes up in their nets or r 
on their lines. f 

That tonnage is equal to r 
about one quarter of the entire 
global fish catch in recent s 
years. These inadvertently i 
captured species are referred t 
to as “bycatch.” < 

Fish are sometimes un- i 
wanted because they are i 
inedible or too small to mar- 
ket. In other cases, they are i 
discarded simply because 1 
they are not what the boat 1 
operator is looking for. This 
is particularly true for boats 
targeting valuable species 
such as cod or pollock. 

In some instances, fish are 
not kept because of govern- 
ment regulations that bar 
the taking of juvenile fish, 
endangered species or fish for 
which the season is closed. 

In addition to fish, millions 
of other creatures, including 
sea birds, endangered sea 
turtles, dolphins, sea lions, 
whales ana other marine 
i mammals, fall victim to the 
i brutally inefficient methods 
■ now employed in most large- 
1 scale commercial fishing 
t operations. In the Southern 
. Hemisphere, for example, it 
s is estimated that tens of 

- thousands of wandering al- 
batrosses are killed each year. 

- hooked and drowned in the 
n long lines of tuna fishermen. 
s Aside from the ethical 
n issues related to the needless 

killing of so. many marine 
creatures, the huge number 
of organisms that are need- 
lessly destroyed in fishing 
operations undermines ef- 
forts to protect endangered 
it species, restore weakened 
fisheries and preserve a 
y healthy ocean ecology, 
n The bycatch problem is 
y not, however, insoluble. The 
i. Food and Agriculture Orga- 
nization estimates that the 
discard of unwanted fish 
could be reduced by about 60 


percent by 2000 through a 
variety of efforts. 

These include dosing to 
fishing particular areas where 
targeted and non- targeted 
species both occur in signif- 
icant numbers’, modifying 
fishing gear in ways that 
reduce the likelihood of 
catching unwanted species: 
developing incentive pro- 
grams that encourage fisher- 
men to reduce the ratio of 
unwanted to targeted species: 
and placing limits or quotas 
on bycatchthai are enforced. 

Some progress has already 
been made. The use of drift 
nets up to 30 miles (50 
kilometers! long that entangle 
everything in their path 
has * been abandoned in 
most fisheries. 

In the eastern Pacific, 
changes in tuna fishing meth- 
ods have dramatically re- 
duced the number of dolphins 
drowned each year in nets. 

Turtle excluder devices on 
nets used in some shrimp 
fisheries have reduced the 
mortality of sea turtles. 

And at the end of its last 
session, the U.S. Congress 
passed amendments to 
the Magnusson bill on fishery 
conservation and manage- 
ment, requiring a reduction 
in bycatch. 

While importanL the steps 
taken so far represent only the 
beginning of a solution to the 
by catch problem in U.S. wa- 
ters. much less elsewhere in 
the world where little or noth- 
ing is being done. To ad- 


Inadvertently 
captured species 
make up about 
one quarter of 
the entire global 
fish catch. 

equately protect the world’s 
marine environment and help 
restore fisheries and the jobs 
they provide, governments 
and international bodies will 
have to take decisive, sus- 
tained action to monitor, con- 
trol and reduce bycatch to far 
lower levels than exist today. 

Government action alone, 
however, will noi end the 
problem of bycatch. Unless 
fisheries operators and fish- 
ermen themselves recognize 
that their livelihoods are 
threatened by so much w r aste 
and act to stop iL this needless 
destruction will go on. 

Mr. Reichert directs the En- 
vironment Program of the Pew 
Charitable Trusts, one oJ the 
largest foundation supporters 
of marine conservation in the 
United States. He contributed 
this comment to the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 




Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 

and Saturdays are 


A i 


INTERMARKET 


days. 




MONDAY > S Estate, . 

WEDNESDAY ^ 

FRIDAY Holidays, ^^n^tional Meeting Point, Nannies & Domestics. 




A 
. I 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBU1VE 
FRIDAY, AUGUST 15, 1997 


PAGE 10 





}("■ 1 


50 Years of Freedom: India, the Past to Present 


This Birthday Without Party 
Can Be a Liberation for Visitors 


By John F. Bums 

New York Times Sen ice 

N EW DELHI — The 50th an- 
niversary of India’s indepen- 
dence in August 1947 was 
still a couple of years away 
when the American ambassador to In- 
dia, Frank Wisner. hit on an idea he took 
ro p.V. Narasimha Rao, who was then 
the country's prime minister. If India 
were to use the occasion as a vehicle for 
celebrating democracy, Wisner sugges- 
ted. the United States would lend its 
support, and organize events of its own 
that would hail India's tradition of elect- 
ing its governments. 

Rao, who once told an interviewer 
that he would like to be remembered for 
perfecting the art of what he called 
“masterly inactivity,” was not galva- 
nized. According to an aide to Wisner, 
who left New Delhi in July to begin a 
new career in New York, the Indian 
leader, then 74 years old, regarded the 
American envoy balefully. then passed 
on ro other matters. “It looked as though 
Rao was saying to himself. 'What on 
earth is this fellow talking about?* ” the 
.ambassador's aide recalled. 

For Rao, the issue then was not so 
much celebrating democracy as finding 
ways to hang on to his Job, a struggle he 
lost in the general elecnon of May 1 996. 
Since then, Indian politics has been a 
revolving door. With the constant threat 
of following Rao into political oblivion, 
no one has had much time to think 
largely about India's half-century as an 
independent nation, or about ways the 
anniversary could be used ro renew the 
spirit of men like Mohandas K. Gandhi 
and Jawaharial Nehru, who led India to 
what Nehru called its “tryst with des- 
tiny” at midnight on Aug. 14, 1947. 

As an occasion for a party, the an- 
niversary looks like something of a bust, 
to the extent that the committee respon- 
sible for organizing the celebration was 
forced to announce, with only weeks to 
go to the anniversaiy . that it was shifting 
uie calendar and declaring the August 
date to be the beginning, not the cul- 
mination. of the anniversary year. As for 
events over the next 12 months, the 
committee has so far been vague, saying 
that while it will be staging cultural and 
other events that give the anniversary a 
national flavor, it expects the celebra- 
tions to be organized mainly by the 25 
Indian states and in the country’s 
650.000 villages. 

The Reasons to Celebrate 

Gandhi, who had opposed until al- 
most rhe last moment the partition of 
British India into the separate nations of 
India and Pakistan, said at the time that 
he found nothing to celebrate in the 
moment of independence. Many think 
that Gandhi would find little to celebrate 
in the country's currant state, with levels 
of poverty, illiteracy, disease and cor- 
ruption that mock many of the Ma- 
hatma's hopes for his country. 

India's political malaise is noT the 
only reason the country has not so far 
been seized with enthusiasm and nos- 
talgia. Unlike Westerners, Indians are 
not much inclined to celebrate an- 
niversaries of any kind, and in any case, 
for a people who trace their civilization 
back 4,000 years, 50 years can seem but 
a blink in time. 

Still. India’s seeming lack of enthu- 
siasm is no reason for others not to find 
their own ways of marking the birth of a 
nation that was a watershed not only for 
India, but for the world as well. India 
was, after ail, the first, and the most 
populous, of the dozens of countries that 
broke free from colonialism in the post- 
war era. and it was. and still is. a bell- 
wether for free peoples in the poorer 
pans of the earth. Nelson Mandela, freed 
from 27 years in South African prisons, 
made one of his first overseas trips to 
India, telling audiences here that his 
struggle had been profoundly influenced 
by India's example. 

Americans, too, have much in India's 
anniversary to celebrate and something, 
too, in which to take pride, since Amer- 
ican pressures, including some that 
were applied by President Fr anklin D. 
Roosevelt during his wartime meetings 


with Winston Churchill, played their 
own part in persuading Britain’s post- 
war government to end the British Raj. 
There is, too, the fact that the 1 990s have 
seen a mm toward the congenial re- 
lations between India and the United 
States that seemed natural in 1947, but 
that evaporated amid the tensions that 
accompanied India’s alliance with the 
Soviet Union, and U.S. ties with 
Pakistan, during the Cold War. 

The improving relationship has been 
accompanied by rising numbers of 
American visitors to India, who have 
recovered from the shock of the plague 
scare of 1994, and are once more 
crowding the country's overstretched 
hotels, planes and trains during the Oc- 
tober-through- April high season. Partly 
because of the anniversaiy, the tourist 
season that will begin once the current 
monsoons end in September is expected 
to be the busiest ever. 

Although this may mean more than the 
usual difficulty in making reservations in 
the best hotels, it may not be too serious 
a problem for travelers who would like to 
take independence as their motif. For 
them, the absence of grand events, the 
fact that this is to some extent a birthday 
without party, cake or candles, can also 
be a liberation. For the history being 
marked is accessible almost wherever a 
visitor travels, not only in the museums 
and sites that can be found in any good 
guidebook, but also in die living testi- 
mony that is offered by Indians them- 
selves ro the instinct for freedom that 
found expression in 1947. 

A SUM foundation For while de- 
mocracy may be going through a rough 
passage in New Delhi and the state 
capitals, the democratic spirit elsewhere 
is thriving. A visitor who stops in any 
teahouseror on any village corner, soon 
finds that India's political institutions 
rest on a sure foundation, the deter- 
mination of everyman to have his say. 

Despite levels of poverty that have 
small children banging on car windows 
at urban traffic lights for small change, 
there are few places that travelers visit 
in India, outside of Kashmir and other 
border regions affected by separatist 
uprisings, where they will be at any 
appreciable risk. Even theft is relatively 
unusual, with the poorest of Indians 
often quick to return a dropped wallet or 
a mislaid bag. 

Foreigners arriving unheralded in a 
village, or clambering aboard an over- 
crowded train, will generally be over- 
whelmed by generosity, goodwill and 
good humor. These qualities rarely flag, 
even when the subject is the two cen- 




Taking to the Cooling Hills 
For a Colonial- Style Getaway 


By Barbara Crossette 

AV*« KM Tur.es Senice 


Vji. Dcvir-rii — n. 


The Mani Bhavan. Gandhi’s house in Bombay. 


K ODAIKANAL, India — A 
century or two ago, there was 
not much glamour or fan in 
r unning the British empire in 
India, with its sweltering cities and 
small towns h airing an the plains. Men. 
women and children were struck down 
by cholera, malaria and other fevers 
with no names or cures. 

Overdressed and overfed in a foolish 
attempt to keep up the habits of Home 
— the word was usually capitalized — 
these servants of the Raj-frened and 
fainted away, their tempers and lives 
shortened. Some sank into depression, 
some went mad. Early in the I9th cen- 
tury, however, they happened on a cure 
for their ills: the hills. 

After British soldiers fighting the 
hardy Gurkhas of Nepal for control of 
the foothills of the Himalay as dis- 
covered that higher-altitude missions 
made theutfeel better, it did nor take too 
long to extend the benefit to civilians. 
By the lS20s. the British were building 
what they called hill stations. 

By the end of the colonial era, there 
were dozens of them in India, perched 
on ridges or nestled on cool mountain 
plateaus, above the reach of malarial 
mosquitoes and mobs. Some became 
official summer capitals of provinces or 
of East India Company regions known 
as Presidencies. Simla, die largest of the 
hill stations, was the capital of British 
India for part of every year and the 
headquarters of the imperial army. 


RvUdelrtiM MiKcum of An 

“Street Acrobats . Bombay . " 1 981 
{detail), by Mary Ellen Mark. 


tunes of British rule. Although most In- 
dians are keenly aware of the indignities 
and deprivations, few nowadays speak 
disparagingly of die British, while many 
recall die better things they bequeathed 
— the world's most extensive railways, 
an elaborate administrative system that 
made governing such a vast countiy pos- 
sible. the rule of law and, perhaps es- 
pecially, cricket, an Indian passion. 

For those who would like a more 
tangible experience of what Indians call 
their freedom struggle, the choices are 
endless. 

N EW DELHI is an obvious ston- 
ing point, although the place 
that saw much of the crucial 
action in the months before indepen- 
dence, the former palace of Britain’s 
Viceroys, now known as the Rashtrapati 
Bhavan, or Presidential Palace, is not 
normally open to the public except by 
special application. It was in this mag- 
nificent red sandstone edifice, between 
March and August 1947. thar Lord 
Louis Mountbatren. the last of the vice- 
roys, negotiated with Nehru, Gandhi 
and Mohammed Ali Jinn ah, the Muslim 
leader, on the terms that Jed to the 
partition and independence. 

Three other houses in New Delhi are 
rich in associations with the indepen- 
dence movement. At the Birla House, a 
whitewashed industrialist's mansion in 
the leafy pan of New Delhi that Britain 
develowsd for the residences of its senior 
officials, visitors can pause at the site 
where Gandhi was assassinated by a 
Hindu nationalist. Nathuram Godse. on 
Jan. 30. 1948. Now a museum, the house 
includes the Spartan room where Gandhi 
spent his last night and footsteps, picked 
out in concrete, that follow his last walk 
out into the garden. Nearby is Teen Murri 
Bhavan, Nehru’s official residence dur- 
ing his 17 years as prime minister, now a 
museum, with a bedroom only slightly 
more indulgent than Gandhi’s, as well as 
a study and reception room preserved as 
they were in Nehru's time. 

Another short walk away at 1 Saf- 
daijung Road, is the residence where 
Nehru 's daughter, Indira Gandhi, prime 
minister fori 5 years, was assassinated 
by Sikh security guards as she walked 
through the garden in October 1984. 
The house is preserved as a museum to 
Mrs. Gandhi and to her son, Rajiv 
Gandhi, her successor as prime min- 
ister. who was killed by a Sri Lankan 
Tamil suicide bomber in May 1991 
while electioneering outside Madras. A 
few miles away, on the banks of the 
Yamuna River, are the ghats, or crema- 
tion sites, where Gandhi, Nehru, his 


daughter and his grandson were placed THE SOCIAL SEASON 


atop sandalwood pyres; they are re- 
membered now with memorials. 

Bur perhaps the greater pleasure lies in 
visiting the places where the freedom 
struggle was fought and won. A traveler 
could spend months following the traces, 
but a few sites stand out. In Amritsar, 
near the Pakistan border 250 miles (400 
kilometers) northwest of Delhi, there is 
the Jallianwala Bagh, now a memorial 
garden, where a British general, RJE. 
Ch er, ordered troops to open fire on a 
protest gaithering in April 1919. killing 
400 people and wounding hundreds 
more, and lending momentum to the 
freedom movement that was never lost. 

In Allahabad, 350 miles southeast of 
Delhi, an ancient city on the Ganges that 
retains much of its old elegance and 
charm, is the An and Bhavan,. the mag- 
. mficent verandaed mansion that was the 
family home of the Nehrus. Given to the 
nation by Mrs. Gandhi, who grew up 
there, this house, too, may be seen by- 
visitors much as the family left it. with 
simple bedrooms and the book-lined 
study where Gandhi. Nehru and other 
Congress Party leaders held crucial 
strategy sessions. 

Gandhi Country 

For those especially interested in 
Gandhi, there is Ahmedabad. 450 miles 
southwest of Delhi, headquarters for the 
Mahatma after he returned from South 
-Africa in 1915. and siteoftheSabarmati 
Ashram where he taught his followers. 
Here, and in Gandhi's home nearby, 
where his spinning wheel, desk and 
personal belongings remain, visitors 
can capture the Spartan simplicity of his 
life style. It was from the ashram, in 
March 1 930. thar Gandhi ser out to walk 
240 miles to the Arabian Sea at Dandi, 
where he and his followers symbolized 
resistance to British rule by making salt, 
defying colonial laws that imposed 
taxes on salt-making and other indig- 
enous industries. 

Just about every city and town has its 
own statue, memorial or museum. But 
Gandhi would almost certainly have 
told visitors to India in the golden ju- 
bilee year of its independence to seek 
the heart of the countiy where he found 
it, in the villages where three-quarters of 
the population still lives. If it is part of 
free India's failure that too little has 
been done to alleviate the grinding hard- 
ships of its poorest people, it is also part 
of the country's allure that the simple, 
down-to-earth life of many has been left 
largely untouched, accessible to anyone 
with rime and energy to seek it out. 


Apart from die sanitarium or con- 
valescent home that gave many of these 
towns a reason for being, there were cozy- 
cottages, churches, clubs, schools, librar- 
ies anti gardens where European flowers 
grew-, tothejoy of homesick imperialists. 
Fragrant evergreens scented the air. 

Social events were unending, and 
with social life often came discrimi- 
nation. not only against Indians, but also 
against one another, according to rank. 

"Two hill stations were a little dif- 
ferent. at least in their origins. Kodai- 
kanal. in the Palni Hills of the southern 
state of Tamil Nadu, was the only one 
founded by Americans — Congrega- 
tionalist missionaries. And Kalimpong, 
in the eastern Himalayan foothills, was a 
wool-trading post on the road from 
Tibet to the Gangeric Plain thai was 
wrested from the kingdom of Bhutan. 

One element in rite atmosphere of 
Kodajkanal would by itself distinguish it 
from strictly British hill stations: a strong 
egalitarianism. There was no official 
British presence exceptfbr the ubiquitous 
government representative known as the 
Collector and civil servants on leave. 
There was no milirarv cantonment. 


Except in the highest tourist season 
— from April to June, when buses - 
bringing Indians from the plains below 
jam the town and multiply its population 
manv times over— Kodaikanal remans 
a relatively small place, with its 19th- • 
century man-made lake and a good deal 
of its surrounding forest cover intact. • 

People come to Kodaikanal to walk: 8 
around the lake, around the town and its rf 
old steepled churches, or along Coak- 
er ’s Walk, a footpath with panoramic 
views. Some climb Perumal Malai, a 
cone-shaped mountain more than 8,000 * 
feet high. Others rent boars and row 
lazily around, enjoying views of a still 
recognizable low skyline. 

PONIES AND MONKEYS And Of 

course, there are pony rides. Hill sta- 
tions all over Asia have horses and 
ponies for hire; they once were the only 
means of transportation. There are a 
couple of natural wonders nearby. But 
these — Pillar Rocks, granite towers 
partly framing a view of the plains, and 
Suicide Point (renamed Green Valley 
View), with its broad vista — are often . 
overrun by hordes of sightseers, 
vendors of snacks and souvenirs, and M 
monkeys. Hill stations are famous for ▼ 
monkeys, which have no inhibitions 
when it comes to relieving you of your 
picnic or a stray piece of clothing. 

Kalimpong. in the eastern Himalayan 
foothills a couple of hours by road from 
Darjeeling, the more famous hill station 
in West Bengal, is different in almost 
every way. 

Like most other northern hill towns, - 
Kalimpong was built along a ridge, with 
commanding views of the plains. Hill 
stations on ridges have serious envi- 
ronmental problems. When trees and 
other vegetation are cm haphazardly 
and not replaced, erosion and a lowering 
of the water supply is swift Kalimpong, 
still a favorite or many Calcutta families 
as well as Bhutanese royalty, was once a 
big village with tree-lined avenues and 
Buddhist temples. It is now a fairly ugly - 
pile of modem buildings arrayed along a A 
few streets jammed with shops. ‘X 

I TS native Lepcha people and 
Buddhists with roots in Bhutan. 
Sikkim and Tibet have long been 
outnumbered by ethnic Nepalis, who 
call themselves Gurkhas. A decade ago, 
they mounted a violent campaign for a 
separate Gurich aland in this strip of In- 
dia. Tourists fled. 

The hills are quiet now, the Nepalis 
enjoy some political autonomy and 
tourists are back in significant numbers. 
There are still Bhutanese Buddhist 
temples. Tibetan in inspiration, to see in 
Kalimpong, as in Darjeeling, which was 
once part of the kingdom of Sikkim. But 
most people come for the bracing elim- 
inate and the extraordinary views of the 
Himalayas. 


t H t ’ * 


Peril 
















Afield of tea in the hills of the state of Sikkim. 


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MOVIE GUIDE 




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Harrison Ford as the president of the United States in " Air Force One.’ 


Air Force One 

Directed by Wolfgang Petersen. U S. 
Harrison Ford makes such a dynamic 
president in 1 ‘Air Force One. ’ * you may 
find yourself favorably weighing his 
odds in Iowa and New Hampshire. As 
President James Marshall, he's one pan 
bleeding heart, two parts Sergeant Fury. 
A Medal of Honor winner, this chief 
executive flew countless missions in 
Vietnam, speaks his mind publicly 
(sending his national security adviser 
and handlers into a cowardly dither), 
cares about other nations, loves his wife 
and daughter and — most importantly 
for this kind of movie — can rough- 
house with die best of them. “To those 
who use atrocity and terror.” declares 
the chief executive in a from- the -heart 
speech while traveling in Moscow, 
“your days are over.” This challenge is 
moments away from being tested. Not 
long after the president, first lad}' 
(Wendy Crewson). their daughter (12- 
year-old Liesel Matthews), and the en- 
tire Air Farce One entourage board the 
plane. Communist radicals, led by a man 
named Korshunov (Gary Oldman), take 
command of the aircraft. While the ter- 
rified passengers huddle at gunpoint, 
and the White House contingent in 
Washington — led by Vice President 


Kathryn Bennett (Glenn Close) — at- 
tempts to negotiate, Korshunov makes 
his demands known: Release their lead- 
er, General Alexander Radek (Juergen 
Prochnow). from Moscow jail or a hos- 
tage will be shot every half hour. On the 
most immediate, visceral level — which 
is all that most people ask of their sum- 
mer movies — "Air Force One” does 
exactly what it’s supposed to. It thrills 
you constantly and gives you a guided 
tour through the innermost sanctum of 
American hegemony. One of the most 
anticipated releases of the summer, it's 
one of the few that truly fulfills ex- 
pectations. With Ford at the helm, these 
are the makings of a late summer land- 
slide. (Desson Howe. WP) 

187 

Directed by Kevin Reynolds. U.S. 

As Trevor Garfield ( Samuel L. Jackson) 
bicycles energetically to his reaching 
job at a tough Brooklyn high school, it's 
easy to imagine where he's going: to 
students who swagger at first, then melt 
at the sound of Shakespeare. To ad- 
ministrators who resist change, then ad- 
mit the errors of their ways. To parents 
who are eternally grateful for the way a 
dedicated teacher can turn lives around. 
Not quite. In the strong and sinisrer 


”187.” directed by Kevin Reynolds 
with much more insinuating flair than he 
gave "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves” 
or “ Waterworld.” things are not simple 
for an idealistic high school teacher. 
Trevor falls into a world as stylishly 
murky as that of the macabre “Seven.’"’ 
a place where the power of righteous- 
ness hasn ’t even a dim chance to prevail. 
“187“ stakes its claims to authenticity 
with a title taken from the California 
state penal code ( it means murder) and a 
closing title reading, ”A teacher wrote 
this movie." The screenwriter, Scott 
Yagemann, has had experience writing 
for shows like “Love Connection" and 
"Jeopardy.” along with time spent sub- 
sume teaching in the Los Angeles pub- 
lic school system, and the film often 
works overtime to exaggerate its street 
credibility. But ‘ ‘ 187“ is genuinely dis- 
turbing in its vision of fearless students 
and powerless teachers locked in 
struggle. Beyond Jackson's fine, smol- 
dering performance as a good man 
pushed beyond reasonable limits, the 
film's emphasis is on visual stvie. As 
evocatively photographed by Ericson 
Core (who has much experience in mu- 
sic video), it unfolds in a suliurous at- 
mosphere with sharp intimations of 
doom - (Janet Maslin. NYT 1 


Spawn 

Directed by Mark AX. Dippe. U.S. 
Bleaker than Batman and crisper than 
bacon, the deep-fried superhero of 
"Spawn" takes on the Devil himself in 
this muddled revenge fantasy inspired 
by Todd McFarlane’s best-selling 
comic book. The film, like the comic 
book and the animated series, draws . 
heavily on religious doctrine, but itpfr;: 
doesn t skimp on the visually enhanced 
flatulence jokes. The movie opens as 
A1 Simmons (Michael Jai White), a 
crack CIA operative, is set afire by 
corrupt colleagues, dies, spends five 
years in Hell and finally is resurrected 
as Spawn. Before returning to Earth, he 
signs a pact with the Devil, promising 
to lead his army in exchange for one last 
visit with his beloved wife (Theresa 
Randle). Among his opponents is the 
Clown (John Leguizamo in 20 pounds 
su PPlying both gas ana comic 
relief. Spawn then confronts his former 
CIA boss, Jason Wynn (Martin Sheen). 
a , me 8" 0n ianiac who, dub, plans to 
take over the world. Unfortunately,^ 
., J" 1 * 11 * evi ^oer is a couple of watts W 
short of a bulb. For that matter, so is 
Spawn with its thicket of narrative, 
punctuated by repetitive action se- . 
quences. (Rita Kempley. WP) 


C'l- ,w fc, 1. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. AUGUST 15. 1997 


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lit ♦ Good-Bye Schizoph 


LEISURE 


By Alan Cowell " 

— Ar<( York Times Server 

* ears af Germany’s 
issUM S. * e ««t i" Berlin 

LnIS ecl( y‘ Iself . Gorkin progress 

■he place lSuiff 0 a „f es f; m S same: VlLnwil 
cavLns - 

bilS^oTfi"' ^ ^ured 

SSS ^d b lhe d B^H°^h 

liarSj tsnnt 1 l i!!S n i s ^ ed “ * e German Par- 
wTSon SC 1 h ? ulcd 10 complete its move here 
from Bonn until ihe year 2000 — the new city is 

g^gvPamaiJarlym the Mine district stretch- 
l “S* 181 V° m wh ere the Berlin Wall once ran. 
inonl 6 \ nvesi01 * have doggedly created spanfc- 

wSl rtievV^'S’ hDte !f and sh °PP in 8 arcadS^at 
compete with the glitter 
or me Kurfuerstendamm shop and hotel district 

"isimr.r 51 ' wt(k , h stiu r T esems fm ™»y 

m ? sr ? h,c P 20 ^ or he city. 
aftirS - ^ < H* tric *» hy contrast, is eerily empty 
after business hours, with few people out on the 
I*™, aroomi the Galeries Lafayene on 
rnednehstrasse — a thoroughfare envisaged as 
Berlin s answer to Rome’s Via Condorti. 

But compared with the old Communist days, 
there is glamour and fun to be found in an array 
of bars and restaurants. And this year the eastern 
part of the city won back its prewar status as hosr 
jo one of Germany’s grandest hotels: the Adlon 
Kempinski, looking out directly onto the Brand- 
enburg Gate. 

Berlin also has its sights set on becoming a 
•cultural metropolis, with two new galleries hous- 
. mg private collections of modem art from Pi- 
casso to Andy Warhol. And September offers a 

P acked program of classical music in the Berlin 
estival Weeks. 

In some ways Berlin is a series of villages, each 


renia, Hello Glamour: New Berlin Emerging 


with its own flavor. In the west, the area around 
havignyplatz offers bookstores, bars and res- 
taurant. A feu- years back, the “alternative’* 
center of Berlin was Kreuzberg, in the west, still 
known as a hangout for the young and for its 
foreign shops and restaurants, mainly Turkish. 
But since reunification the Prenzlauer Berg dis- 
tnct in the east has come to the fore as the place 
tor hectic street life around bars and restaurants. 

Come the fall, there is a full program of music 
from such world-class orchestras as 
auu ® Philharmonic conducted by Claudio 
Abbado and the German Symphony Orchestra of 
Berlin conducted by Vladimir Ashkenazy, both 
at the Philharmonic. 

The German Symphony Orchestra opens its 
1997-98 season on Aug. 24 with Ashkenazy 
conducting and Nigel Kennedy as the soloist in 
Beethoven’s Concerto in D for Violin. Tele- 
phone (49-30) 029-8413: tickets $9 to S39 
(prices calculated at 1.67 marks to $1). 

The 47th Festival Weeks 

September brings the 47th Berlin Festival 
Weeks, to be opened by the Berlin Philharmonic 
on Sepr. 6 with a program of Franz Schubert and 
Wolfgang Rihm. Call (49-30) 2548-9254; tickets 
S15 to 572. Other highlights of the Festival 
Weeks, running through Sept. 30, include the 
Berlin Philharmonic conducted by Daniel Bar- 
enboim with Thomas Zeheimair as violin soloist 
in a program featuring the music of Mozart, 
Schumann and Bemd Alois Zimmermann on 
Sept. 22. On Sept. 28 ( 1 1 A.M.) and Sept. 29 (8 
P.M.) Gary Bertini conducts the German Sym- 
phony in Mahler's Symphony No. 1 and “Ju- 
dische Chronik," composed in 1960 — one year 
before the building of ate Berlin Wall — by Karl 
Amadeus Hartmann. Paul Dessau. Rudolf Wag- 
ner-Regeny and Hans Werner Henze — the only 
piece for which East and West German musicians 
came together to depict their common past. 

Strauss's “Rosenkavalier" (Sept. 3 and 14), 






jrj 

i&Pk 

F ’ 7-.fi 


m 


z i 


Gurnet S-itncUtr 'or die Nrn Tone, 

Car sculpture in a Berlin shopping arcade. 

Wagner's “Tristan und Isolde" (Sept. 7) and 
Verdi’s “Aida" (Sept. 20] are on the schedule 
for the Deutsche Oper. (49-30) 341-0249; tickets 
S10 to S85. 

The Staatsoper has a busy program that in- 
cludes “The Magic Flute" Aug. 30 and 31 and 
Sept. 2, 4 and 6, and Mozart’s unfinished and 


rarely performed "Zaide” on SepL 20, 21, 23, 
25, 27 and Oct. 7 and 13. (49-301 2035-4555; 
tickets from $7 to 569. 

On Sept. 1 1, the Komische Opex will present 
"Don Giovanni." then "Cosi Fan Tune" Sept. 
13. i49-30l 2026-0360; S8 to S56. 

Two big street parties: On Aug. 30. from 7 
P-M. to midnight. 500 models will walk the 
world ‘5 longest catwalk, a kilometer on the 
Kurfuerstendamm, to present designer collec- 
tions in a happening called the Big Q; on Sept. 20 
and 21. Unter den Linden will hold its 350th 
birthday celebration. 

history, glorious and otherwise Berlin 
is noi a good walking city, because it is so big and 
because the construction sites make it extremely 
difficult to cross streets. Brochures for walking, 
bus and bicycle tours can be found in most big 
hotels, and a day ticket for all of Berlin's public 
transport costs S4.50. State-owned museums, 
like the Pergamon, are free the first Sunday of 
each month and closed Mondays. 

Among the city's privately run museums is the 
Haus am Checkpoint Charlie, with labels in 
German, English. French and Russian. Among 
the objects displayed are paraphernalia used in 
various attempts to get under, around or through 
the wall. Watchtowers and pieces of the wall are 
a block north. Open 9 A.M. to 10 P.M.; ad- 
mission S4.50 and 52.70. 

For a look into ihe future (the end of 1998. by 
current estimates'), the Info Box at the Potsdamer 
Platz offers a raised viewing gallery overlooking 
Europe's biggest construction site and a wealth 
of exhibits about the buildings that will rise ax the 
hean of the new Berlin, including office towers 
for Sony and Mercedes. 

Just across the way, in the direction of the 
Brandenburg Gate, is a small, fenced-off grassy 
mound, the site of Hitler's bunker. It is not 
marked or open to the public lest it become a 
shrine for neo-Nazis. More obvious reminders of 
that era are the villa on the Wannsee where the 


“final solution" was formalized in January 
1942, at 56-58 Am Grossen Wannsee (Tuesday 
through Friday 10 to 6 . weekends 2 to 6 ), and the 
Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp, a 45- 
minute train ride, at 22 Strasse der Nationen. 
Oranienburg (daily except Monday, 8:30 to 
5:30). 

Germany's painful recent history seems to 
intrude ar every nun in Berlin. One prominent 
memorial is the Topography of Terror site, a 
large open space and small exhibition center 
surrounded by Niederkirchnerstrasse, Wil- 
helmstrasse and Anh alter Strasse in the former 
East Berlin. It covers the area once occupied by 
Gestapo headquarters and the SS offices. Access 
is limited because of building work, but it still 
produces a shudder. Open dally 10 to 6. 

The walk along Unter den Linden takes the 
visitor from the gracious, classical architecture of 
imperial limes, such as the churches of the Gen- 
darmenmarkt, to the angular, concrete construc- 
tions of the Communist era. The broad boulevard 
leads from the Brandenburg Gate to the Al- 
exanderplatz with its spirelike television tower. 

It's a hike but it leads to such classic offerings 
as the Museum Island and the Pergamon Mu- 
seum — with a magnificent array of antiquities 
that includes the Pergamon .Altar and the mo- 
numental gate to the Roman market of Miletus. 
The Pergamon. at 1-3 Bodestrasse, is open Tues- 
day through Sunday, 9 to 5: admission S2.40. 

Two relatively new galleries house private 
collections of modem art The Berggruen col- 
lection — with 120 works by Picasso and other 
modernists — can be seen at 1 Schlossstrasse in 
the Charlotte nburg district between 9 and 5 
Tuesday through Sunday; admission S4.80. 

Artists ranging from Warhol to Joseph Beuys 
and Cy Twombly are represented among the 1 80 
paintings and sculprures in the Marx collection at 
the Museum of the Present at the Hamburger 
Bahnhof, 50 Invalidenstrasse. Open 9 to 5, Tues- 
day through Friday, and 10 to 5 weekends; 
admission S4.80. 


THE FREQUENT TRAVELER 

Perils and Joys of Globe-Trotting 


ARTS AGENDA 


By Roger CoIJis 

Inrenu/iioiijl Herald Tribune 

R OAD warriors of the millen- 
nium are ambivalent about 
globe-trotting. Travel has be- 
come pan of the job for many 
people. Some crave the challenge, die 
adventure of the road and the break from 
daily routines. Others miss their fam- 
ilies and worry about work piling up on 
• their desks. (Executives get an average 
11.6 e-mail messages and 10.4 voice- 
mail messages per day when they are our 
of the office.) 

Taking off on a business trip used to 
mean getting away from it all. Bot 
corporate downsizing and new tech- 
nology (which allows you to be wired at 
all' tunes) has forced travelers to be 


peered to do two jobs — one on the road 
•and one back in the office. For many, 
the most stressful part of business 
travel is the “re-entry syndrome" — 
catching up with family and work when 
they get home. 

These are the findings of a survey, 
/ ‘Take Offs and Trade Offs: The Life of 
Today's Business Traveler." commis- 
sioned by Hyatt Hotels Corp. of 500 
American executives, ranging from 
CEOs and presidents to managers and 
sales representatives. The average trav- 
eler was away more than 50 days a year 
whtie some logged close to 100 days a 
year on job-related travel. 

There are several psychological types 
of traveler to choose from; 

GLOBE-TROTTERS (17 percent of the 
sample) are sociable and outgoing. They 
love life on the road which they regard 
as an antidote to humdrum routines, 
relishing a break from the office (96 
percent) and from home and regular hfe 
(90 percent). Compared with other 
•groups, they are more likely to say they 
. feel adventurous (67 percent) and that 
business travel makes them feel sue- 




. >4 


cessful (95 percent), excited (87 per- 
cent) and important (69 percent). 

Globe-Trotters are more likely than 
Other groups to be single (25 percent 
versos 1 3 percent of all respondents) and 
female (29 percent) and least likely to 
have young children. A majority hit the 
bote] bar or lounge (51 percent), where 
they try to strike up conversations with 
people of the same sex (51 percent) and 
the opposite sex (44 percent). They are 
the most flirtatious group: Thirty per- 
cent say they enjoy flirting with 


Four distinct types of 
traveler emerge from 
the survey of 500 
American executives. 


strangers and 30 percent say they tend to 
think about sex more when on the road. 

TORN travelers (a quarter of the 
sample) enjoy business travel and be- 
lieve it is important for their career, but 
94 percent have qualms about being 
away from home (65 percent have chil- 
dren under IS); 53 percent say they are 
homesick when they are away and two- 
thirds travel with family photos. But 
they also secretly welcome the break (59 
percent') and are more likely than av- 
erage to say they feel successful (91 
percent) and important (two-thirds) 
when they are away on business. 

Torn Travelers indulge in guilty pleas- 
ures when away from their families: Fifty 
percent say they spend more on things 
they would not normally buy at home. 
Close to three-quarters go off their diets 
when traveling and 39 percent (higher 
than average) say they drink more than at 
home. Perhaps this is because their fam- 
ilies don’t make life any easier for them 

72 percent say that they have to cope 

with complaints from family about their 


CROSSWORD 


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YOUR REAL HSTATc 
AGENT IN PAfl,S 
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phrase to give 
the devfl his 
due - 

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21 Sewer of logs 
23 Author with a 
book subtitled 
■The Saga o( an 
American 
FamBy" 

23 Dinner wear 

24 Imposes 
without 
invitation 

a — z 

(everything) 

» “Ypu can't 
mean me!?’ 

30 Word of the 
Prophet 
32 Retreat 
35 Preceding . 
periods 

'37 W.W. li enlistee 

» Refrigerator 

• oar? 

41 Many ABA. 
martthers 

43 Hia test work 
was -pocketful 
0 t Mirades,' 
1861 

45 Get up worts 
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45 Kind of delivery 
48 Token 

so Succeeded 

53 UkeCheenGS 
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surprise 

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today 

54 tend ot dog 


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5 End piece 
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updated 

7 Tom 

■July 4th event, 
briefly 

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io Sculptor Henry 
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coach Fred 
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18 Singles' grp.? 
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sa Utter failure, in 
slang 
28 Davis of 


absence and one in 10 worries that busi- 
ness has harmed their marriage. Three in 
10 say they would give up traveling if 
their career permitted. 

smooth bailors (15 percent of the 
sample) are travel veterans. Business 
navel is a way of life, an intrinsic parr of 
their jobs and it neither bothers nor 
excites them. They are less likely to feel 
that business travel affects their health 
or diet and they tend not to pamper 
themselves when they are away. Thirty- 
seven percent say business travel is not 
at ail stressful, and they are least likely 
to miss family (23 percent) or to believe 
that travel has adversely affected their 
personal lives. They are the oldest (av- 
erage age 51), most experienced group 
— 43 percent have been traveling on 
business for more than 20 years. The 
majority (87 percent) are married, but 
fewer than average (30 percent) have 
children under 18. 

WORLD wearies (24 percent of the 
sample) are the most stressed and re- 
luctant travelers, finding business trips 
intrusive and disruptive to their lives. 
Sixty-eight percent say they would stop 
traveling on business if they could. 
Many feel burned out after having 
traveled on average for 14 years on 
business. More than 75 percent find the 
travel stressful and 57 percent say ir is 
the least favorite pan or their jobs. 

World Wearies worry about family 
and work when they are away. They 
describe themselves as tired (92 percent), 
lonely (81 percent), homesick (77 per- 
cent) and tense (73 percent). They also 
seem to be the most accident-prone — 71 
percent have had baggage lost, 34 percent 
have had an in-flight emergency, and 18 
percent have had to go to the hospital. 

World Wearies are the group most 
likely to say that technology has made 
business travel more stressful. They are 
more loaded down with electronics than 
other travelers — 64 percent carry 
laptops, and 59 percent, mobile phones. 



ibyJMHMtm 

© New York TimealEdited by iEiU Shorts. 


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49 churchiH 
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50 Winter wear a 

51 Four before a 
slash 

52 wild Asian d°9 


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Solution to Puzzle of Aug. 14 


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■ AUSTRIA 

Vienna 

Austrian Museum of Applfed 
Arts (MAK), tel: (1 ) 71 1 -36, closed 
Mondays. Continuing/ To SepL 7: 
"Japan Yesterday." Art from an- 
cient Japan: cult objects from 
Buddhist temples, silk screens and 
pen-and-ink drawings. 

Mb Rl TA MR 

i-OHDOH 

Tate Gallery, tel: (171) B87-8000. 
open daily. Continuing/ To Nov. 
30: "Mondrian: Nature to Abstrac- 
tion." More than 80 works tracing 
the artist's evolution from his early 
atmospheric paintings to full ab- 
straction in the 1920s. 

M FRANCE 

Bordeaux 

Musee des Beaux- Arts, tel: 05- 
56-10-17-18. closed Tuesdays. 
Continuing/To Aug. 29: “Rosa 
Bonheur, 1622-1899." Bonheur 
visited markets, slaughterhouses 
and fairs to study the animals she 
would later depict in her paintings. 
The exhibition brings together 64 
paintings, 49 drawings and water- 
colors and 9 sculptures and will 
travel to Barbizon. near Paris, and 
New York. 

Giverny 

Musee d* Art Americain, tel: 02- 
32-51-94-65, dosed Mondays. To 
Oci. 31 : “Un Regard Americain sur 
Paris." More than 30 works by 
young American artists who came 
to study m Paris at the end of the 
79th century. Features works by 
Mary Cassatt, James McNeill 
Whistler, Chiide Hassam and 
Maurice Prendergasl. 

Paris 

Jeu da Paume, tel: 07-47-03-12- 
50. closed Mondays. Continuing/ 
To Oct. 19: "Cesar; Retrospect- 
ive." An overview ol the French 
sculptor's work: from the welded 
animals and nudes to the com- 
pressions and expansions of the 
1960s and 70s. 

■ GERMANY ~ ~ 

Munich 

Kunsthalle der Hypo-Kufturstff- 
lung, tel: (89) 22-44-12, open 
daily. To Sept. 14: "Markus Lu- 
pertz.” An exhibition of pictures, 
drawings and sculptures by tiie Ger- 
man artist (bom 1941). Although he 
work can be said to represent mod- 
ernist styles, Lupertz does not aban- 
don traditional subjects such as 
landscapes, still lifes and figures. 
Neue Pinakothek, tel: (B9) 559- 
1490, dosed Mondays. To Aug. 31 : 
“Durch die Blume: Natursymbollk. 
um 1600." The use ot naturalistic 
botanical detail developed north ot 
the Alps, tn Dutch panels, in 15th- 
century miniatures, in wateredors 
and In the prints of Durer and his 
school. Examples of these tech- 
niques are on display here. 

■ 

Jerusalem 

The Israel Museum, tel: (2) 670- 
881 1. open daily. To Dec. 30: “Har- 
old Edgerton: In a Rash." The In- 
ventor of stroboscopic photo- 
graphy, Edgerton (1903-1990) 
captured moments that are too fast 
or too complex for the eye to catch, 
such as a bullet piercing an apple 
or water splashing into a glass. 

Z 1ZI 

Tokyo 

Hara Museum, tel: (3) 34454)651 , 
closed Mondays. To Oct. l2:''AraW 
Retrographs." The Japanese pho- 
tographer (bom 1940) captures 
the flavor of everyday life In street 
scenes and portraits, and at other 
times shocks the public with sexual 
Images. “Sentimental Journey," 
exhfbfted here is a photographic 
narrative of the daily banalities of 
his married life. 

■ M E TH E~R L A M PT~ 

Amsterdam 

Van Gogh Museum, tel: (20) 570- 
5200, open dally. Conttnulng/To 
Oct. 12: "Vlncem van Gogh: The 
Drawings." Features drawings of 
peasants working on the land, 
women spinning and weavers, and 
landscape drawings created In 
Nuenen between 1 883 and 1885. 



Rosa Bonheur s "Course de Chevaux Salvages" is part of the Bordeaux show. 


■ SWEPEM 

Stockholm 

Nationalmusewn, tel: (8) 666- 
4250, closed Mondays. Continu- 
ing/ To Oct 19: ‘'Cad Faberge: 
Goldsmith to the Tsars." Some of 
the famous eggs, enameled cas- 
kets. picture frames as well as 
smalt animal sculptures and 
flowers by the jeweler .and gold- 
smith to the czar in the last de- 
cades of the Empire. 

■ swTtzi rlanp^ 
Lausanne 

Fondation de rHermitage, tel: 
(21) 320-50-01. dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/ To Oct. 5: "Charles 
Camoln, 1879-1965: Sous le 
Signe de Cezanne et du Fauv- 
Isme." More than 100 landscapes, 
portraits and still lifes show the 
French painter's contribution to the 
development of Fauvism. 

■ UNITED »TATiS~ 
New York 

Museum of Modem Art, tel: (21 2) 
708-9480. closed Wednesdays. 
Continuing/ To Sept 2: “Objects 
of Desire: The Modem Still Life." 
Features 150 paintings, sculp- 
tures, and objects created by more 
than 70 artists, including Picasso 
and Matisse, the Surrealists, Pop 
artists and contemporary artists, 
such as Christo, Cindy Sherman 
and Dan Ravin. 

Washington 

National Museum of African Art 

tsl: (202) 357-2700, open daily. To 
Oct. 19: "Treasures from Ter* 
vuren." From the Belgian collec- 
tion of Central African art as- 


IT 1 Special n| 
Summer Rates! t \ 
Slogla/Double $139 
1 Badraom 
Suites $169 ' 

7 Ju* ;-S«* I,’97 « 


isimst w i 


sampled by government officials 
and missionaries, more than 120 
objects-of royal regalia, masks, fig- 
ures that hold medicine and figu res 
representing kings and chiefs. The 
exhibition will travel to New York. 
Dussaldorf and Barcelona. 

Clouho Soon 

Aug. 16: "August San der. "Gallery 
of Photography, Dublin. 

Aug. 17: “Warhol, Beuys; Bruce 
Nauman, Gerhard Richter." Bank 
Austria Kunstforum, Vienna. 
Aug. 17: "Alberto Bunt." Palais 
dee Beeux-Arts, Brussels. 

Aug. 17: “Marc Riboud in China: 
Forty Years of Photography." Bar- 
bican Art Gallery, London. 

Aug. 17: "Rhapsodies In Black: Art 


ot the Harlem Renaissance." Hey- 
ward Gallery, London. 

Aug. 17: The Rose Madonna and 
Other Masterpieces from Utrecht." 
Museum of Foreign Art, 
Sinebrychoff, Helsinki. 

Aug. 17: “Sechager Jahre: Die 
Neuen Abenteuer der Objekte." 
Museum Ludwig, Cologne. 

Aug. 17; "Jasper Johns: A Ret- 
rospective." Museum of Contem- 
porary Art, Tokyo. 

Aug. 17: "Costumes de I'Opera de 
Paris." Tokyo Metropolitan Teien 
Art Museum, Tokyo. 

Aug. 17: “Nan Go /din: i'll Be Your 
Mirror." Stedelijk Museum, Am- 
sterdam. 

Aug. 18: "Arts du Nigeria." Musee 
National des Arte d’Afrique et 
d’Oceanle, Paris. 


INDIA ON SHOW 

Two American museums are presenting exhibitions 
devoted to Indian history and culture: 

Philadelphia 

Philadelphia Museum of Art tel: (215) 684-7860. closed Mon- 
days. To Aug. 31: "India: A Celebration ol Independence, 1947- 
1997," More than 250 photographs made in India since the pro- 
clamation of its independence in August 1 947, including images by 
Sunil Janah, Cartier-Bresson and Sebastiaa Salgado. The ex- 
hibition will travel to New Delhi and to London. 

Washington 

Sadder GaBery, tel: (202) 357-2700, open daily. In observance of the 
50th anniversary of the Independence of tnefia and Pakistan, two 
exhibitions explore the rule of 17th-century Mogul emperor Shah 
Jahan, an extravagant patron of the arts who bust the Taj Mahal as a 
tomb for his wife. To Feb. 1 998: "The Jewel and toe Rose." Paintings, 
textiles and objects created undenhe reign of Shah Jahan, as well as 
the 141 -carat Taj Mahal emerald carved with a fioraJ design. To Oct. 1 3: 
"King ot toe World: A Mughal Manuscript from the Royal Library. 
Windsor Castle." Mora than 40 pages from an Btumlnaled manuscript 
that chronicles the first decade of Shah Jahan's reign. 


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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 15, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Mastermind Recalls Plot to Kill South African Communist 


Far-Righlist Says Accomplice Acted Alone 


By Suzanne Daley 

New York Times Service 


PRETORIA — The man convicted of 
masterminding the murder of one of 
South Africa's most popular black lead- 
ers on die eve of this country’s transition 
to a multiracial democracy said that it 
took him 24 hours to realize that he had 
even been involved in the 1 993 killing of 
Chris Hani. 

The man, Clive Derby-Lewis, admitted 
that be had long plotted to kill Mr. Hani 
and had given his accomplice, Janusz 
Walus, an *‘un traceable" gun for the as- 
sassination. But the two men had agreed 
not to kill Mr. Hani over Easter weekend, 
and so, when Mr. Derby-Lewis heard that 
Mr. Hani had been gunned down in his 
driveway the day before Easter, he as- 
sumed it was someone else’s doing. 

After hearing of Mr. Haiti's death, he 
and his wife finished their tea and went 
shopping for the afternoon. 

“1 thought that something had come 
to our rescue where we didn't have to do 
what I thought we had to do," Mr. 
Derby-Lewis told South Africa’s Truth 
and Reconciliation Commission. “Then 
the following day I saw the jpapers, and I 
knew what had happened.' 

“Quite honestly, I was in a state of 
shock,” he said. 

Mr. Derby-Lewis’s testimony before 
the commission Wednesday was the fust 
time he had spoken of his role in the 
assassination, which sent shock waves 
through the country. Polls showed that 
Mr. Hani. at the time the leader of the 
Communist Party, which was working in 


a close alliance with African National 
Congress, was second only to President 
Nelson Mandela in popularity. 

At his trial. Mr- Derby-Lewis, a 
former member of the far-right Con- 
servative Party, had maintained his in- 
nocence and declined to take the stand. 
But Mr. Derby-Lewis is now applying 
for amnesty from the commission, 
which was created to investigate atroc- 
ities of the past, and for him to qualify, 
the commission must determine that he 
has confessed all and proved that he had 
a political motive for his actions. 

His application is likely to be one of 
the commission's toughest decisions. 
The Hani family, the Communist Party 
and the African National Congress are 
fiercely opposed to freedom for either of 
the men involved in Mr. Ham’s death. 
And so far, the bearings have been far 
better attended than most others. 

They began on Monday, but much of 
the commission's time since then has 
been used up on legal wrangling over the 
admissibility of evidence the Hani family 
lawyer, George Bizos, would like to use 
to show that Mr. Derby-Lewis and Mr. 
Walus have not told the whole truth. 

After still another delay Wednesday, 
Mr. Derby-Lewis apologized for the 
wrangling and said he was ready to go 
forward with the hearing. 

Mr. Derby-Lewis said he and Mr. 
Walus had settled on Mr. Hani as a target 
because his death was most likely to 
plunge the country into chaos, allowing 
the right wing to seize power. He said be 
furnished Mr. Walus with Mr. Hani's 
address, which he had gotten from a list 



Jodi NgHHOftfRcaM 

Janusz Walus, left, and Clive Derby-Lewis, far right, standing before South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation 
Commission on Thursday in Pretoria, where they testified about the 1993 killing of Chris Hani, a Communist. 


his wife had obtained while researching 
articles. 

Pressed as to why certain people were 
on the list, Mr. Derby-Lewis' answers 
often elicited widespread laughter from 
the audience. For instance, one well- 
known Afrikaans- language newspaper 
editor had apparently been included on 
the list because be had studied at Har- 


vard University where, Mr. Derby- 
Lewis said, he had undergone “sys- 
tematic brain- washing.” 

He said that a former cabinet official 
on the list was an American- spy. Still 
another editor, he said, was probably on 
the payroll of the Communists. 

Mr. Derby-Lewis said he first got an 
unlicensed automatic pistol from a 


friend for his own protection. He said he 
had it fined with a silencer during a trip 
to Cape Town. 

On his return, Mr. Walus asked him 
for an untraceable weapon. The coin- 
cidence. Mr. Derby-Lewis said, made 
him think ii was some sort of sign that he 
was doing the right thing in plotting Mr. 
Hani's assassination- 


INDIA: 50 Years After Independence 


Continued from Page 1 

the independence anniversary in Kai th- 
wart. The village's 5,000 residents in- 
clude a dominant minority of landown- 
ers, upper-caste families who still rule the 
roost, but it also has low-caste families 
who have found a small measure of 
prosperity that their families had never 
known. There is also a large block of 
families, at least a third of the village, 
who are still desperately poor. 

Mr. Chand is an obvious case of suc- 
cess. The son of an illiterate cattle trader, 
he won a lower-caste scholarship from 
the government to attend college in Meer- 
ut, an old British garrison city close to this 
village in western Uttar ftadesh state, 
then returned home after graduation to set 
up his business. His income from the shop 
and running a village post office is $130 a 
month, a fortune to the village's poor. 

But among Mr. Chand’s neighbors, 
there are some who have never traveled 
outside the village, never used a tele- 
phone and never had anybody in their 
family who stayed in school long enough 
to learn to read or write. 

In one muddy courtyard, a group of 25 
Muslims, in rural India often poorer 
even than the poorest Hindus, said that 
the four generations of their family were 
living off a combined income of $50 a 
month, and that none of them had owned 
even a bicycle, a sewing machine or a 
radio, the first luxuries for India's poor. 

For these villagers, the India of 1997 
seems much too much like the India of 
half a century ago, a place where Gandhi 's 
name is ritually invoked by politicians on 
great public occasions but where his 
memory is mocked by some of the real- 
ities of a country he did not live to see. 

Although Gandhi was assassinated by 
a Hindu nationalist on Jan. 30, 1948. five 
months after independence, Indians 
everywhere still like to muse over what 
he would make of India if be were to 
return today. 

.Among the poorest in Kaithwari, 
there is a ready answer. “What is the 
mahatma to us today?" asked Mo- 
hammed Yunus, 48, who works .in the 
fields for the upper-caste Hindus who 
own 90 percent of Kai thwart’s land- Mr. 
Yunus said modem India was little dif- 
ferent than the India of his forefathers. 

"The mahatma brought us freedom, 
but after that, what?” he asked. 

For many Indians, the answer to that 
question lies in accomplishments they 
say have been overlooked in the breast- 
beating the anniversary has provoked. 

They hail three achievements in par- 
ticular: the resilience of democracy de- 
spite a two-year lapse when Indira 
Gandhi assumed dictatorial powers in 
1975; the country's success in feeding a 
population nearly three times larger than 
in 1947, and India's survival as a nation 
despite protracted insurgencies in the 
Punjab, Kashmir and the remote border 
states of the southeast. 

"India can only be compared with 
India,” argued Yogendra Singh, a so- 
ciology professor at JawaharlaJ Nehru 
University in New Delhi, a sentiment 
shared by many of India's optimists. By 
that measure, there is much to celebrate. 

"Poverty now is not at all what it was 
in 1947." said Mr. Singh, who grew up 
poor and low-caste in a village in Uttar 
Pradesh. "Then, 80 to 90 percent of the 
people had no proper clothing; now, al- 
most everybody is properly dressed. 
Then, many people were emaciated; now, 
just about everybody gets two meals a 
day. Then, life expectancy was about 30, 
and it’s more than 60 now. These are 
tremendous changes, so I don’t think we 
have any reason to hang our heads." 

Many Indians are particularly proud 
of the persistence of their democracy, 
and contrast their country with P akis tan, 
the nation carved out of British India 
when Muslim leaders demanded a sep- 
arate state. 

Although Pakistan has been ruled by 
elected governments for the last nine 
years, it has been under military dic- 
tatorship for nearly half of its hair-cen- 
tury as a nation. 

On the one occasion that Indian de- 
mocracy was imperiled, Mrs. Gandhi’s 
declaration of emergency and suspen- 
sion of civil rights in 1975, voters out- 
raged by the imprisonment of thousands 


of leading politicians and intellectuals 
turned on" her in the 1977 general elec- 
tion and ousted the Congress Party from 
power for the first time since it led the 
independence struggle. 

In recent years, a wave of corruption 
and criminality in Indian politics has 
caused some Indian commentators to say 
that democracy is facing a new and more 
insidious peril. In the assemblies of many 
of the 25 Indian states, and even in the 
Parliament in New Delhi, the indepen- 
dence generation has been replaced by a 
breed of ambitious and acquisitive politi- 
cians, some little more than gangsters. 

For years, hardly a day has passed 
without a scandal involving a politician 
accused of selling favors. More than a 
dozen cabinet ministers who served in 
the Congress Party are under investi- 
gation for corruption, including a former 
prime minister, P. V. Narasimha Rao. 

In Bihar state, India's poorest, the 
low-caste, politician who headed the 
state’s government until he was arrested 
last month, Laloo Prasad Yadav, has 
been jailed- on charges of scamming 
$280 million from the state's animal 
husbandry funds. 

While each scandal swallows money 
that might have gone to developing the 
country, some have had a direct impact 
on everyday life. Millions of Indians are 
paying the price for a decision in the 
early 1990s to rebuild the country’s tele- 
phone system. 

Telecommunications Minister Sukh 
Ram, a former postal clerk who rose 
through Congress Party ranks, awarded 
contracts for a $40 billion scheme that 
was to have brought the country 10 
million new phones, more than double 
the number then installed, by the end of 
the decade. 

But according to investigations that 
began after the Rao government’s defeat 
in a general election last year, Mr. Ram 
rigged the bidding process and took 
large sums in payoffs. 

In the wake of the scandal, the project 
to modernize the country's antiquated 
telephone system has effectively stalled, 
with not a single new handset anywhere 
to show for the plans announced by Mr. 
Ram. 

Even shadows like these have not per- 
suaded most Indians that democracy it- 
self is at fault, only that abuses are in- 
evitable with an electorate of nearly 600 
million people, half of them illiterate. 

Some say that political trends that 
have ended the Congress Party's role as 
India's natural ruling elite have pro- 
duced new political forces, and that 
some of these, including such low-caste 
parties as Mr. Laloo’s in Bihar, have 
been under pressure to generate slush 
funds that can be used to bind the parties 
together and give their leaders a lifestyle 
their followers can admire. ■ 

Others say that India's greatest tri- 
umph is simply that it still exists. In 
British times, half of the country con- 
sisted of nearly 600 princely states, 
mostly ruled by maharajahs under Brit- 
ish control. While most of these states 
were successfully integrated soon after 
independence, strong separatist tenden- 
cies have^mlled at the country’s seams. 



The .VvnMsd Prrtv 


Jawaharlal Nehru, left, India's first prime minister, and Mohandas K. Gandhi, who led the nation to 
independence, laughing together at the All-India Congress committee meeting in Bombay on July 6, 1946. 


avenue used every January for a military 
parade. 

But many say that erecting a statue 
would be hypocrisy anyway, since the 
country, in their view, has betrayed 
Gandhian ideals. 

Among these is Khushwam Singh. 82, 
an author and columnist who covered the 
independence struggle and wrote "Train 
to Pakistan,” a novel that gave a searing 
account of the 1947 partition. 

Resisted by Gandhi to the last, the 
division resulted in the migration of at 
least 10 million Hindus and Muslims 
across the new frontier, and as many as 
500,000 of them, according to Mr. 
Singh’s estimate, being killed in the 
bloodletting that ensued. 

Those passions have not abated; Mr. 
Singh spoke from the apartment where 
he has lived under armed guard since the 
1980s, when he angered Sikh militants 
with articles condemning a separatist 
insurgency in his native Punjab. 

“Gandhi gave the world an illusion 
that all Indians were like him, inspired 
by a missionary concern for nonviolence 
and the plight of the poor.” he said. 
"But I'm sad to say that it has turned out 
that hardly any of us are.” 

Government surveys offer plentiful 
ammunition for such dismal views: the 
350 million Indians who live below the 
official poverty line; the 48 percent of 
the population who are illiterate; the 100 
million city-dwellers living in vast, dis- 
mal slums known as jhuggis, where 
homes are mostly structures of metal and 


timber scrap; the 70 percent of Indians 
with no access to toilets; the 30 percent 
with no supply of safe water, and the 
millions who fall victim eveiy year to 
rates of infant mortality, diarrhea, tuber- 
culosis. malaria and AIDS that are 
among the highest in the world. 

Conditions like these contribute heav- 
ily to a culture of violence that some 
Indians say is the country's worst fail- 
ure. Outside India, the best-known ex- 
ample has been the cycle of riots be- 
tween Hindus and Muslims, about 8,000 
of which have been recorded since 1947. 
But far more Indians have died from 
other causes. 

In big cities like Bombay, thousands 
of murders go unsolved, and for the most 
part barely investigated, every year. In 
the villages, the situation is much the 
same. According to Indian human rights 
groups, 5.000 women are killed every 
year in disputes over dowries, mostly by 
men. but only a handful of cases ever 
result in convictions. 

"As a 16- year-old in Bombay in 
1947, I felt there was nothing to stop 
India from doing whatever it wanted.” 
said S.L. Rao. an economist who has 
been an key adviser on the economic 
reforms of the 1990s. "But the fact is, 
we haven't delivered the people of India 
what we promised. We are far, fa: be- 
hind. and our only choice is ro admit it, 
buckle down, and see what we can ac- 
complish in the next 50 years." 

At first glance, visitors to Kaithwari 
could think that little in the village has 


changed from 50 years ago. Buffaloes 
wander down cobbled pathways, hi the 
sunlight after the rains, old men draw 
quietly on hookahs, the brass water pipes 
that are traditional in rural India. At 
street-comer pumps, young girls giggle 
as they wash shoulder-length hair. Bare- 
foot children scamper, chasing goats, 
while Muslim women move silently 
along lanes gathering buffalo dung for 
fuel. 

But villagers are eager to list the 
things that have improved. For some, it 
is the paving of once-muddy roads lead- 
ing to Meerut, 15 miles (24 kilometers.) 
away; for others, the villages' three 
schools, with enrollments accounting for 
90 percent of all village children; for 
others still, electricity that flows three or 
four hours on most days, long enough to 
power pumps that irrigate fields, raise 
water from wells, and power television 
sets that many better-off villagers now 
own. 

"When we sit in our homes at night, 
we see pictures on our television sets of 
the rich man's life, with cars, refriger- 
ators, air-conditioners, eveiy thing we 
don’t have," said Mohammed Rafiq, 28, 
a Muslim who makes his living selling 
vegetables. 

Mr. Rafiq held out what he said was 
his most treasured possession, a watch 
he bought for 120 rupees, about $3.40. 

And then he added: “So naturally we 
think: Why is it that God caused us to be 
bom here? Is it our fate to live always as 
we do?" 


Acquittals 
For Murder 
Stir a Furor 
In Brasilia 


By Diana Jean Scherno 

New York Tones Service 

SAO PAULO— A federal judge 
in Brasilia has dismissed murder 
charges against four young men ac- 
cused of dousing an Indian leader 
with gasoline and setting him on 
fire, saying they did not intend to 
kill him. 

The decision outraged human 
rights activists, who said it demon- 
strated die impunity enjoyed by the 
upper-middle class and by politi- 
cians. One defendant is the son of a 
federal judge and another defen- 
dant’s stepfather is a former judge 
of the electoral tribunaL 

The victim, Galdino Jesus dos 
Santos of the Pataxo tribe in South- 
ern B ahia, had traveled to Brasilia in 
April to join the largest demon- 
stration ever in support of the rights 
of indigenous peoples. 

Unable to find his rooming house 
after the demonstration, Mr. dos 
Santos, 44, fell asleep at a bus stop, 
where the young men set him on 
fire, the prosecutor said. 

While the four young men — 
Max Rogerio Alves, Antonio Nov- 
ely Cardoso de Vilanova, Tomas 
Oliveira de Almeida and Eron 
Chaves de Oliveira — and an un- 
named mino r admitted setting Mr. 
dos Santos on fire, their lawyers 
contended they were playing and 
did not realize the consequences of 
their actions. 

The judge, Sandra de Santis 
Mello, agreed. 

“As ignoble as the irresponsible 
conduct of those accused was. they 
did not want, not even eventually, 
the death of Galdino," the judge 
ruled Tuesday. “Fire can kill, 
which is what happened, bnt un- 
doubtedly, that is not what normally 


lice reports and eight wit- 
nesses said that, seeing Mr. dos San- 
tos asleep, the defendants went to a 
gas station and bought two liters of 
gasoline They poured die fuel over 
Mr. dos Santos and threw a match at 
him, then fled by car. Witnesses 
took down their license numbers, 
and eventually they were tracked 
down. 

Paulo Machado Guimaraes, one 
of several lawyers representing the 
victim's family and a coordinator of 
the Human Rights Committee of the 
Brazilian Bar Association, called 
the ruling "totally absurd." 

"It serves the interests of a par- 
ticular class in society,” he said, 
"and the country sees that very 
clearly." 

Jose Gregori, the federal secre- 
tary of h uman rights, said that he did 
not agree with the judge’s decision 
and that he expected it would be 
overturned on appeal. 

Judge MeUo did not return re- 
peated calls to her chambers 
Wednesday. 

Maria Jose Miranda Pereira, the 
prosecutor in the case, vowed to 
appeal tile judge's decision to re- 
duce the charges from murder to 
bodily harm, which carries sen- 
tences of eight mouths to two years 
after automatic reductions. 

"Bodily harm is the charge if 
somebody slaps another person, 
who falls down, bangs his head and 
dies." Miss Pereira said. "How 
could these kids imagine that a per- 
son in flames won’t die?" 

The prosecutor recalled a conver- 
sation with Judge Mello in which the 
judge described the boys as "good 
kids from working families." 

"I guess what constitutes ‘good’ 
varies from person to person,” Miss 
Pereira said she replied. The judge’s 
answer, she said, surprised her. 

She said the judge responded: 
"But they could be our kids. They 
fool around without understanding 
the consequences of what they're 
doing.” 

Saulo Feitosa, executive secre- 
tary of the bidigenist Missionary 
Council, described the judge smil- 
ing over photos of Max Alves with 
his dog at a pretrial hearing. “She 
said the dog was so cute, and that 
anybody who could love a dog so 
much had to be a good person.” Mr. 
Feitosa said. 


BRIEFLY 


setting off a series of ethnic, religious 
and linguistic insurgencies. So far, none 
I, and few Indians expea 


has succeeded, 
that any will. 

"You must remember that people 
were writing books in the 1950s and 
1960s asking whether India could sur- 
vive," said MJ. Akbar, a biographer of 
Nehru who is the founding editor of The 
Asian Age, a new newspaper that has 
quickly become one of India's most in- 
fluential. 

“In 1947, it was very difficult to see 
how a seething mass of hungry and 
mostly illiterate people could keep this 
nation together. But now. the country’s 
survival is taken for granted. You hardly 
hear anybody questioning it anymore." 

While views like these are widely 
held, the official mood at the anniversary 
has been heavily influenced by the skep- 
tics. The government of Prime Minister 
Inder Kumar Gujral has deferred the 
placement of a statue of Gandhi on Ra- 
jpath, the ceremonial avenue at the heart 
of New Delhi, expressing reluctance to 
have Gandhi, the apostle of nonviolence, 
installed where he would stare down an 


13 Slain in Kenya Attacks 

MOMBASA, Kenya — Armed men raided two 
police stations here, stole firearms and killed 13 
persons, the police said Thursday. Six of those killed 
were police officers. Scores of people were wounded 
in the attack. 

The state-owned Kenya Broadcasting Corp. re- 
ported that about 100 attackers also burned down the 
Likoni police station as well as a large container used 
as an office by a police unit charged with protecting 
tourists in this Indian Ocean port. It reported the 
raiders carried off relatives of police officers in the 
attack Wednesday night, but gave no numbers. 

A police spokesman, Peter Kimanthi, who flew in 
from Nairobi, said it was too soon to say whether the 
attackers' motives were criminal or political- Mom- 
basa is the gateway to Indian Ocean resorts. (APi 

10 Italians Seized in Yemen 

ROME — Ten Italians have been abducted in two 
separate incidents in Yemen, the Italian Foreign 
Ministry said Thursday. 


A ministry official said a two-family group of six 
persons was kidnapped in the south of the country on 
Wednesday afternoon while on their way to the Gulf of 
Aden coasL He said they had been taken to the interior 
of the country. "We have spoken to one of them and 
they are well, they are being treated well,” he said. 

The official said four more Italians were kidnapped 
near Khamir, some 100 kilometers (60 miles) north of 
San ‘a. on Thursday morning, but he said he had no 
further details. 

The incident was the third of its kind in recent 
weeks. An Italian kidnapped by tribesmen earlier in 
August was released last Sunday after several days. 
Two other Italian tourists were abducted in late July 
and freed after one day. (Reuters ) 

Rioting in Johannesburg 


JOHANNESBURG The police arrested more 
than 100 rioting street peddlers in Johannesburg's 
inner city Thursday after they broke shop windows 
and smashed trading stalls in a second day of anti- 
foreigner protests. 

A police spokesman. Captain John Du Toil, said 
several hundred hawkers marched through the city 


center to protest against foreign vendors, especially 
Nigerians, trading in the city. 

Captain Du Toitsaid the marchers, who began their 
protests Wednesday, "went on harassing immigrant 
hawkers and causing damage” to trading stalls until 
large numbers of police descended on them. 

Eight arrests were made in the center and more than 
100 arrests in the neighboring inner city suburb of 
Yeoville, Captain Du Toil said. 

On Wednesday, police and rioters clashed several 
times in downtown Johannesburg and a number of 
robber bullets were fired. At least six of the rioters 
were arrested. (AFP) 

Tanzania Bus Crash Kills 14 

DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania — Fourteen people 
died and 51 were seriously injured in a road accident 
involving three buses in Tanzania, news reports said 
Thursday. The accident occurred Wednesday when 
one bus was overtaking another and collide^ head-on 
with a third bus traveling in the opposite direction 
police said. The crash was in the Morogoro region 
200 kilometers (125 miles) west of the capital Dar a* 
Salaam. {AFPi 




* 


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KWESet 

To Reduce 
Cities’ Role 

Utility's Stock Rises 

On News of Plan 


FRANKFURT _ RWE AG's 
Pnces soared Thursday after 
*7? company announced plans to 
58.9 peicaf^ng 
JJghte that municipalities hold in 
lj ™ any s largest utility. 

RWE, the most heavily traded 
share, rose 7 Deutsche marks to 
close at &7 ($47.06). 

The plan, which must be ap- 
proved by shareholders at the com- 
pany s annual meeting in Decem- 
oer, calls for converting registered 
?hares with multiple voting rights 
into bearer shares with single vot- 
ing rights. The actual number of 
shares will be unchanged 

‘‘There have been similar offers 
in the past, and the municipalities 
• have rejected them every time,” 
Peter Antes, analyst at Bayensche 
Vereinsbank AG in Munich, said 

The multiple voting rights held by 
the municipalities have long been 
viewed by analysts as an obstacle to 
institutional and private investors 
seeking to buy RWE shares. 

Mr. Antes said that as far as he 
knew, Germany was the only coun- 
try in the European Union that had 
such a system in place, adding that 
with the deregulation of the Euro- 
pean electricity market the utilities 
would probably have to change to 
be in line with the other countries. 

“But it will still not be so easy,” 
be said “The local authorities have 
hitherto held many management 
positions at RWE and have always 
tried to put the brakes on any 
change.” 

Undo' the proposed model, an- 
nounced late Wednesday, holders 
of preference shares would have the 
option to convert their shares into 
common stock with a simple voting 
right, and would have to pay a 
conversion premium. 

This premium would be passed 
on to the holders of registered 
shares in compensation for the loss 
of then’ multiple voting rights. 

■ : Theimptementation of a restruc- 
turing of die voting rights requires 
shareholder approval, RWE said 

HelgaBalensiefer, analyst at DG 
Bank, welcomed the announce- 
ment, saying “the proposal sounds 
very intelligent because everyone 
nets something.” 

She added, “The local author- 
ities get cash to bolster their cash- 
strapped finances, and toe prefer- 
ence shareholders get to buy voting 
rights for a premium.” 

Mr. Antes said; “The fina n cial 
distress of the municipalities has 
increased considerably. If the mu- 
nicipalities are financially com- 
pensated for giving up their voting 
rights, they are likely to go along 
with it” 

Even though local authorities 
own less toan 30 percent of RWE's 
shares, toe voting rights give them 
the power to place many of their 
representatives on man age m ent 
and supervisory boards. In addi-. 
tion, they have prevented the utility 
from cutting costs. 

“If toe plan does go through, I 
would see it as positive for RWE in 
toe long term, ’ Mr. Antes said 
“Many of toe municipalities have 
representatives in toe RWE lead- 
ership who act from a civil-servant 
point of view. 

“If they lose influence, RWE 
would become more efficient in toe 
Jong term.” 

While the news bodes well for 
the future and offers short-term 
speculative buying opportunities, 
Mr. Antes rated the move as neutral 
to toe market He said he would not 
• his recommendation until 
of toe offer become clear.” 
(AFX, Bloomberg . Reuters ) 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 15, 1997 


PAGE 13 




U.S. Consumer Prices 
Climb at Snail’s Pace 

But Stock Market Still Has Jitters 


Eany Mnataartlrsirn 

1 Gede Putu Ary Suta, left, chair- 
man of Bapepam, Indonesia’s cap- 
ital-markets supervisory agency, 
conversing with the governor of 
the central bank, Sudradjat Ji- 
wandono, in Jakarta on Thursday. 


Indonesia Lets Its Currency Float 

With Rupiah Under Attack, Jakarta Abandons Trading Band 


By Philip Segal 

Special fo the Herald Tribune 


HONG KONG — Following the lead 
of its Southeast Asian neighbors, In- 
donesia’s centra] bank abandoned ef- 
forts to control the level of its currency 
Thursday, eliminating a 1 2 percent fluc- 
tuation band against toe dollar that spec- 
ulators had punctured twice in toe pre- 
vious two days. 

While the governor of the central 
bank, Sudradjat Jrwandono, said he re- 
served the right to intervene in toe mar- 
ket from time to time, as do central banks 
elsewhere, be indicated that a new era 
had dawned for toe foreign-exchange 
markets of the region; 

“We are adjusting to the new real- 
ities,” he said, adding that these in- 
cluded toe Boating of currencies in toe 
countries belonging to the Association 
of South East Asian Nations. 

The rupiah lost 4 percent of its value 
against toe dollar during toe day as the 
U.S. currency rose to 2,762 JO rupiah 
from 2,650.00 rupiah Wednesday. It 
traded as high as 2,789 JO after toe In- 
donesian announcaneiit, which also hurt 
the stock market The Jakarta Composite 
Index fell 237 percent, to 643.01. 

In toe Philippines, meanwhile, toe 
peso fell as much as 2 percent after 
having stabilized in recent weeks. lt fell 
on toe news about thermnahas well as a 
four-percentage-point drop in toe Phil- 
ippine central bank's overnight ram. The 
currency has been weak since Manila 
loosened its support last month after 
Thailand’s decision to float toe baht. 
The dollar closed al 29.20 pesos, up 
from 28.90. 


The announcement by Indonesia 
came just a day after the central bank 
pledged to continue to defend the cur- 
rency and put into effect a one-per- 
centage-point increase in interest rates 
that failed to halt the rupiah's slide. 

Analysts have applauded toe general 
shift to floating exchange rates in In- 
donesia and across Southeast Asia. 

“This is the new Asia, but it's good 
news, not bad news,” an economist at a 
European securities house said. “If yon 
hold your currency steady versus the 
dollar, you give up toe right to run your 
own economy.” 

Alan Butler- Henderson, head of re- 
search at ING Barings in Hong Kong, 
said: “Will it make things more un- 
predictable for investors? Yes. currency 
volatility in Asia does make for a new 
element. But compared to toe European 
currencies, those in Asia haven't been 
nearly as weak this year.” 

In toe past year, the Deutsche mark 
has fallen by around 20 percent against 
toe dollar, and toe french franc has lost 
24 percent, while the Malaysian rin gg it 
has dropped 1 1 percent and the Phil- 
ippine peso 12 percent. 

The rupiah — like other Southeast 
Asian currencies — began falling after 
toe de facto devaluation of the Thai baht 
July 2, as local and foreign speculators 
focused on similar if less severe eco- 
nomic problems across the region: big 
cnrrem-account deficits and rapid loan 
growth in toe property sector. Tfre In- 
donesian central bank has spent $1.5 
billion over the past six weeks in its 
efforts to prop up toe currency, a third of 
that on Wednesday alone. 

Now that the currencies of Malaysia, 


toe Philippines, Thailand and Indonesia 
are floating free of currency pegs and 
trading bands, economists predict that 
they will find steadier levels within toe 
next two months, but they say that mar- 
kets tend to overshoot what eventually 
are proven to be fundamental values. 

“At some stage sooner or later people 
are going to realize toe rupiah is an 
awfully cheap currency and buy it,” said 
Amp Raha, strategist at Lehman Broth- 
ers. He praised Indonesia’s economic 
managers for having kept inflation under 
control, toe current-account deficit man- 
ageable and economic growth robust. 

Ultimately, say economists, curren- 
cies hold their valne not because of a 
nominal rate fixed by a central bank but 
became their countries' economies re- 
main competitive. “The key is dereg- 
ulation, not managing currencies,” said 
Clive McDonnell, economist at Soc- 
Gen -Crosby Securities in Hong Kong. 
“If you want to be more competitive, 
you have to deregulate.” 

hi toe meantime, although there will 
be no attempt to keep toe rupiah within 
its previous 12 percent trading band. 
Finance Minister Mar’ie Muhammad 
said Indonesia would maintain a tight 
monetary policy to keep die currency 
from felling too quickly. Indonesia’s 
overnight interbank interest rate surged 
16J percentage points, to 36 percent 

Angus Armstrong, regional econo- 
mist for Deutsche Bank in Singapore, 
predicted recovering exports across Asia 
next year as more competitive curren- 
cies found their market levels and al- 
lowed governments to cut interest rates. 
Thar will mean lower borrowing costs 
and better corporate profits, he said. 


Caifiltd by Our Stiff Fnm Deposits 

WASHINGTON — U.S. consumer 
prices are rising at their slowest pace in 
1 1 years, while toe economy continues 
to grow at a rate that is likely to keep the 
Federal Reserve Board from increasing 
interest rates for some time to come, 
government figures showed Thursday. 

“When you wrap it all up, it means all 
is well on toe American scene,” said 
Robert Dederick, an economic consult- 
ant at Chicago’s Northern Trust Co. 
‘ ‘Growth is sedate, and inflation is very 
ranch in check.” 

The consumer price index rose 0.2 
percent in July, toe Labor Department 
said. Increases in food, transportation 
and housing costs outpaced a decline in 
energy prices — and it was the first time 
health-care costs did not show a 
monthly increase in almost 22 years. 

While July's increase in the CPI was 
larger than June's 0.1 percent rise, it 
translated into a 1 J percent annual in- 
crease for toe first seven months of this 
year — the smallest rise for that period 
since 1986, down from a 3.4 percent 
increase in the first seven months of 
1996. 

Separately, the Federal Reserve said 
industrial production slowed to a 02 
percent increase in July from June's 03 
percenr rise. The July gain was in line 
with expectations, and toe plant-use rate 
— another gauge of inflationary pres- 
sures — declined to 83. 1 percent in July 
from 833 percent a month earlier. 

Bond prices advanced in response to 
the economic data. The Treasury's 
benchmark 30-year bond rose 28/32 to 
97 2 1/32, pushing down toe yield to 6 J5 
percent from 6.63 percent Wednesday. 

But the stock marker continued to 
gyrate. After a morning rally, toe Dow 
Jones industrial average spent most of 
toe day in negative territory but dosed 
13.71 points higher at 7,942.03. 

The Standard & Poor's 500-stock list 


was up 2.75 at 924. 77. Hie Nasdaq Com- 
posite Index rose 3.27 to 1,586.67. 

"We are just seeing a little nervous- 
ness in toe market ahead of toe Fed 
meeting next Tuesday,” Barry Berman, 
head trader for Robert W. Baird & Co. 

The Commerce Department figures 
showed inventories of goods at U.S. 
businesses rose 0.7 percent in June to a 
seasonally adjusted $1,026 trillion. It 
was sixth consecutive monthly increase 
and is the largest since a 0.8 percenrgain 
in April 1995. 

The inventory buildup “has crucial 
negative implications for economic 
growth in the second half,” said Bruce 
Steinberg, chief economist at Merrill 
Lynch in New York. Because invent- 
ories were larger than toe Commerce 
Department assumed in its first gross 
domestic product estimate for toe 
second quarter, “inventory building 
will be revised enormously higher,” 
Mr. Steinberg said. 

The increase in inventories could be 
as much as $95 billion, be said, which 
would be a record rate of inventory 
' accumulation and a boost to second 
quarter GDP. As a consequence, 
though, this large level of unsold goods 
“will drag down GDP and production 
growth’ ’ in the second half of toe year, 
Mr. Steinberg said. 

The Labor Department also said 
weekly claims for state unemployment 
benefits rose 12,000 to 316,000 last 
week, in line with expectations. 

U.S. workers' average weekly earn- 
ings adjusted for inflation and seasonal 
variations fell 1.0 percent in July, after 
rising a revised 0.8 percent in June. 
Average weekly hours worked de- 
creased in July from June. 

Lucent Technologies rose 1 11/16 to 
8414 after it said it expected to take a 
fourth-quarter charge of $950 million. 

See DATA, Page 14 


Hixon Gold Shares Plunge 
On Charge of Faked Tests 


Doubts Plague Credit Suisse’s Stock 


Bloomberg News 

ZURICH — Credit Suisse Group’s 
shares have fallen 10.7 percent this 
week amid doubts that its mnltibilti on- 
franc acquisition of Winterthur Insur- 
ance AG will bring significant bene- 
fits. 

Switzerland’s second-largest bank 
said Monday that it would offer 7.3 
Credit Suisse shares for each Winterthur 
share. That valued toe offer for Switzer- 
land’s second-biggest insurer at 133 
billion francs ($8.79 billion). But toe 
value has fallen about 1 billion francs as 
Credit Suisse shares have declined. 

The acquisition would create a com- 
pany with total assets of 700 billion 
francs and the same amount under man- 
agement, Credit Suisse said Monday, 
and would generate savings of between 
300 million and 350 million francs with- 
in three years. Thai estimate that dis- 
appointed some analysts. 

“People are asking whether this 
whole thing makes sense,” says Hans 
Kaufmann, an analyst at Bank Julius 
Baer. ' ‘Is it wrath it for synergies of 300 
or 350 million francs'? 

Credit Suisse feU4francs to 18635 in 
a falling Swiss market Thursday, bring- 
ing its decline to 10.7 percent since toe 


takeover was announced. Winterthur 
fell 44 francs to 1 ,372, bringing its de- 
cline to 9.4 percent. The benchmark 
Swiss Market Index fell 4.8 percent in 
toe same period. 

Credit Suisse follows other financial 
companies in expanding their range of 
services to try to become more com- 
petitive. ING Group, the largest Dutch 
financial company, said last month it 
would buy Equitable of Iowa Cos. for 
$2.6 billion, doubling its U.S. life in- 
surance and retirement saving business. 

The jury is still out, however, on 
whether such mergers of insurers and 
hanks into one-stop financial services 
make bottom-line financial sense. 

“The idea of cross-selling seems to 
be a type of black magic,” said lan 
McEwen, an analyst at Lehman Broth- 
ers. “If you look at deals in toe past it’s 
hard to pinpoint why they succeed and 
why they don’t. ” 

Analysts say toe popular comparison 
with ING does not make sense in Credit 
Suisse's case because the Dutch finan- 
cial company generates about 55 per- 
cent of pretax profits with insurance, 
whereas insurance makes np only 20 
percenr of Credit Suisse Group and 
Winterthur's profit before tax. 


Investors say they are not convinced 
toe concept of one-stop financial shop- 
ping is really toe answer to boosting 
profitability significantly. 

“Although what die companies are 
after is asset management, they’re still 
two different businesses in toe end,” 
said Daniel Hnnzaker, a financial man- 
ager at Union Bank of Switzerland. 

Winterthur’s biggest shareholder, the 
Swiss financier Martin Ebner, said last 
week he told Winterthur earlier this year 
he was aiming for a majority stake in the 
insurer. Mr. Ebner said his foods and 
clients held “about 30 percent” of Win- 
terthur. 


Bloomberg News 

- VANCOUVER, British Columbia — 
Hixon Gold Resources Inc.'s shares 
plunged more than 90 percent Thursday 
after a three-month trading halt was 
lifted, a day after toe company's Ghana 
gold results were alleged to have been 
Falsified. 

Hixon shares, which traded at 6.40 
Canadian dollars ($4.59) os May 14 
before being halted by toe Vancouver 
Stock Exchange, changed hands at 57 
cents at midday Thursday when trading 
was stopped, after having dropped as 
low as 41 cents. 

On Wednesday, a consultant's report 
was highly critical of initial claims of 
high gold values at a property in Ghana 
owned by Hixon and Golden Rule Re- 
sources Ltd. In its review, toe Alberta- 
based Associated Mining Consultants 
Ltd. said it had been unable to reproduce 
toe results first claimed by Golden Rule 
and Hixon. Golden Rule owns about 41 
percent of Hixon. Each Calgary-based 
mining company owns 50 percent of toe 
Stenpad property in Ghana. 

“By a process of elimination, based 
on information reviewed to dale, it 
would seem that sample tampering is 
the most probable cause of the reported 
high values.' ’ Associated Mining said 


Golden Rule shares fell 1 9 cents to 91 
cents in midday trading in Toronto. Un- 
like Hixon, Golden Rule had not been 
suspended from trading for any exten- 
ded period 

Golden Rule's shares soared to 13.80 
dollars in late January after the company 
reported what analysts called spectac- 
ular initial drilling results. Hixon shares 
rose at the time to 13.95 dollars. 

But Golden Rule's stock lost almost 
half its value after a mining consultant 
repotted in mid-May that there was less 
than a gram (0.03 ounce) of gold per 
metric ton of ore in an area of toe 
property it had checked compared with 
the 16 grams claimed by Golden Rule 
and Hixon. Trading in Hixon shares 
were halted before toe release of this 
first report 

Golden Rule’s stock fell to 85 cents in 
mid-July after the company said its own 
review of its initial results had found 
them “unreliable.” 

The incident was another setback for 
Canada's mining industry. This year, 
Bre-X Minerals Ltd.’s claims of having 
made toe world’s largest gold discovery 
in Indonesia were proved to be a fraud. 

Associated Mining did not .say who 
might have been involved in the alleged 
tampering. 



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WALL STREET WATCH 


Fast Footwork in the Wake of IPOs 


By Floyd Norris 

Wm York Times Service 


N EW YORK — D.H. Blair 
Investment Banking, a New 
York-based securities firm 
that has promoted itself as 
the top underwriter of new stock issues 
among small companies, has based its 
reputation on toe performance of its 
issues after they begin trading. 

On Wednesday, a firm associated 
witoBlair agreed to pay a$2 million fine 
and to reimburse customers $2.4 million 
for overcharging them dining toe first 
few days of trading in such issues. 

NASD Regulation, the regulatory 
arm of the National Association of 
Securities Dealers, announced toe fine 
against DJL Blair & Co., toe broker- 
age arm of the D.H. Blair complex. 

The charges, which D.H. Blair & 
Co. settled without admitting or deny- 
ing guilt, said the fiim had charged 
excessive mark-ups in selling secu- 
rities to its clients in the days afro* 16 
initial public offerings underwritten by 
D.H. Blair Investment Banking in 1993 
through 1995. In addition, D.H. Blair 
was accused of pushing up prices of 
two 1994 offerings, in Skyline Mul- 
timedia and Video Update, even 
though it did not have orders to indicate 
there was demand for toe securities. 
The regulators raid the price ap- 
preciation had provided an artificial 
profit for selected customers. 

In a statement issued Wednesday, 
D.H; Blair said toe issues were “very 
complicated” and that settling the case 


would permit toe company to save time, 
expense and toe “distraction of a legal 
battle which could have taken years.” 

The statement went on to say that 
D.H. BJair “provides public venture 
capital for growing companies and in 
so doing offers investors outstanding 
investment opportunities.” 

At least in most of toe cases cited by 
the NASD, however, the investment 
opportunities have been better for 
those who got out fast than for those 
who invests! for the long term. While 
all 16 issues traded above toe initial 
offering price in toe first few days, 
investors in 1 1 of the 16 have losses 
now, and those losses are much greater 
cumulatively than the profits in the five 
others — and that has happened in one 
of the greatest bull markets ever. 

D.H. Blair Investment Banking is 
owned by toe firm’s longtime boss, J. 
Morton Davis , whose office declined to 
comment. DiL Blair & Co. is owned 
by Mr. Davis’s family and by exec- 
utives of the firm, a spokesman said. 
The two films were separated in 1992. 

D.H. Blair is unusual in that it has 
been selling low-price stocks to toe 
public for decades, and those who 
learned the business there have gone on 
to set up other firms that sought toe 
same kind of business. Some of those 
firms, including AR. Baron and FJV. 
Wolf, have gone out of business amid 
accusations of improper conduct by 
regulators or prosecutors. 

Joseph Borg, the director of toe 
Alabama Securities Commission, said, 
“Individuals involved with D.H. Blair 


found their way into a number of 
broker-dealers that are suspect with 
respect to sales practices, particularly 
involving initial public offerings.” 

But toe firm bad relatively linje by 
way of regulatory problems until last 
year. In December, it was censured by 
the New York Stock Exchange for hav- 
ing failed to put into place methods of 
‘sing brokers, and it was fined 


■ Mrs. Gingrich Turns a Profit 

Marianne Gingrich, toe wife of 
Newt Gingrich, speaker of the House 
of Representatives, has made a quick 
killing in small stock dealings, and toe 
owner of toe underwriting fum for her 
trades reportedly is a big contributor to 
Mr. Gingrich’s political action com- 
mittees, The Associated Press reported 
Thursday from Washington. 

DJL Blair Investment Banking un- 
derwrote the initial public offerings in 
three highly speculative stocks from 
which Mrs. Gingrich made between 
$5,203 and $1 1 ,000 in three months last 
year. A spokesman for the Gingriches 
was not available for comment. 

The firm is owned by J. Morton 
Davis, an acquaintance of Mrs. Gin- 
grich and a big contributor to her hus- 
band’s political action comminees, 
Money magazine reports in its Septem- 
ber issue. It also reported that at the 
time of Mrs. Gingrich’s profitable 
trades, Mr. Davis was lobbying law- 
makers for a tax break for investors 
who put money into toe type of small 
companies underwritten by his fum. 


p 





PAGE 14 


The Dow 



30-Year T-Bond Yield 


/ 750 — -S-; 





M A M J J A 
1997 


110 M A M J J 
1997 








ISBOtwgei. : : . iPS^Qaneftrf 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TR IBUNE, FRIDAY. AUGUST 15, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


UPS Strike Puts Teamsters in a Tight Spot 


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Source: Btaombetg. Reuters imenwiaoj hctw Tribune 

Very brief ys 

CUC to Buy Hebdo Mag of France 

STAMFORD. Connecticut (Bloomberg) — CUC Inter- 
national Inc. said Thursday that it had agreed to buy Hebdo 
Mag International Inc. of France, a publisher and classified- 
advertising distributor, for $440 million in stock. 

Hebdo Mag, a privately held firm in Paris, has more than 
1 50 titles in 1 2 countries. It is managed by its founders, Louise 
and John McBain, who own 50 percent of the voting stock and 
92.6 percent of the nonvoting stock. 

Tors tar Corp. of Canada owns the other 50 percent of die 
voting stock and the r emaining 7.4 percent of the nonvoting 
shares. CUC said the acquisition would be an important ad- 
dition to its stable of consumer services, which include discount 
clubs to sell airline tickets, cars, appliances and insurance. 

In May, CUC agreed to merge with HFS Inc., a hotel, 
property and car-rental group, in an SI 1.4 billion stock swap. 

• Cali Realty Corp. said it had agreed to buy the office assets 
of Mack Co. and Patriot American Office Group, both 
private real-estate concerns, in a SI. 2 billion transaction. 

• Tuesday Morning Corp., the Dallas-based retail c hain that 
sells discounted designer-label merchandise, agreed to be 
bought by Madison Dearborn Partners for about $325 
million, or S25 a share. 

• Sprint Corp. plans to scale back its plan to compete with the 
regional U.S. telephone companies in offering local phone 
service because the Baby Bells have made it difficult to resell 
calling time on their networks. 

• Gap Inc., the clothing retailer that operates Gap, Old Navy 
and Banana Republic stores, said earnings for the quarter that 
ended Aug. 2 rose 6 percent, to S70 million, as sales increased 
20 percent, to $1 J5 billion. 

• Wool worth Corp. said its second-quarter profit was flat 
from a year earlier, at $26 million, as both sales and costs 

fell. Bloomberg. Reuters 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Tones Sen-ice 

NEW YORK — To United Par- 
cel Service of America Inc. offi- 
cials, one of the mysteries of the 11- 
day-old Teamsters' strike is the un- 
ion’s opposition to die company's 
proposal to set up a new pension 
plan that UPS says would increase 
monthly pension benefits by an av- 
erage of 50 percent. 

Ron Carey, president of the In- 
ternational Brotherhood of Team- 
sters, has denounced the proposal as 
* ‘a greedy pension grab’ and ques- 
tioned the company’s assertions 
that pension benefits would in- 
crease significantly under its offer. 

The company has called for set- 
ting up a UPS-only pension plan 
and. withdrawing from 31 multiem- 
pioyer Teamster pension plans 
across the United States. 

[The Teamsters and United Par- 
cel Service resumed informal talks 
late Thursday, and the company 
suggested that there was room for 
compromise. The Associated Press 
reported from Washington. 

[If the informal talks yield pro- 
gress, UPS’s chief, James Kelly 
said, the company was willing to 
begin formal negotiation on a con- 
tract that would be substantially dif- 
ferent from what UPS has insisted 
was its “last, best and final” of- 
fer. 

‘There are dozens of important, 
very serious issues that have not 
been resolved.’ ’ he said. “If they're 


all resolved, we all recognize that 
some of them would change.”] 

The company's proposal has 
placed Mr. Carey in a tight spot in 
the strike by 1 85,000 UPS workers. 
On the one hand, labor analysts say, 
many strikers are attracted to the 
company’s proposal and may be 
seething if Mr. Carey rejects it 

On the other hand, many Team- 
sters not working for UPS might 
want his bead if he lets the company 
withdraw from multiemployer 
plans because they fear that if UPS, 
the plans’ largest contributor, pulls 
out it will weaken the plans and 
jeopardize their pensions. 

“Carey's in a real jam,” said 
Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, a professor at 
Emory University who serves as a 
UPS consultant “It’s definitely: 
Which poison does he take? ’ ' 

At Labor Secretary Alexis Her- 
man’s urging, the two sides re- 
sumed b»llra in Washington on 
Thursday. The pension issue, along 
with the company’s widespread use 
of part-time workers, were expec- 
ted to be at the top of agenda. 

In some ways, the tug of war over 
pensions goes to core notions about 
union solidarity — the dispute pits 
the interests of the 185,000 Team- 
sters at UPS against the interests of 
hundreds of thousands of Team- 
sters at other companies. 

This helps explain why the union 
asserts that the company's heavy 
use of part-time workers is the main 
issue in the strike, while Teamsters 
officials acknowledge that the UPS 


Latest Cuts at Apple Show 
Steve Jobs Is in Control 


The Associated Press 

CUPERTINO, California — 
Citing the “egalitarian, entrepre- 
neurial" heritage of Apple Com- 
puter Inc., the company’s 
cofounder Steve Jobs is axing 
sabbaticals, ending cash bonuses 
for executives and cutting sev- 
erance pay. 

Mr. Jobs, who has become 
Apple's de facto leader, announced 
the chang es in an electronic mail 
memo to employees Tuesday. 

The memo, signed “Steve and 
the Executive Team,” also calls 
for more modest travel arrange- 
ments and more layoffs. 

The message, reported by news- 
papers and on-line publications, is 
the latest evidence that Mr. Jobs is 
essentially running die company 
he cofounded 21 years ago — de- 


spite his refusal to be chairman or 
chief executive officer. 

Apple has been struggling 
against financial losses, disap- 
pointing sales and an eroding 
market share. Last month, the 
board of directors ousted its chair- 
man, Gil Amelio, and last week 
Apple replaced most of its board 
and announced an allianc e with 
Microsoft Corp. 

“Today we are taking a few 
more steps which will begin to 
take Apple back to its roots as a 
more egalitarian, entrepreneurial 
company," Mr. Jobs said in the 
memo. Apple, he said, would end 
cash bonuses for executives, re- 
placing them with stock options, 
and reduce severance pay from 
one month to one week of salary 
fur every year at Apple. 


pension proposal is a deal-breaker, 
a central obstacle to a settlement. 

The union, labor specialists say, 
insists chat low-paid part-time 
workers are the overriding issue be- 
cause the Teamsters know that that 
issue resonates with its members 
and the public. The company insists 
that pensions are the main issue, 
they say, because it recognizes that 
it is losing public relations points 
over the part-time issue, while its 
pension proposal sells well with 
.-many of its workers. 

Each year UPS pays name than SI 
billion into the multiemployer plans 
— about one-sixth of the total con- 
tributed by all the trucking compa- 
nies belonging to the plans. The 
plan’s $60 billion in assets are used 
to pay benefits to retired Teamsters. 

UPS executives said that a full- 
time driver from the Midwest who 
had worked 30 years would receive 
$2,500 a month in pension benefits 
under the Central States multiem- 
ployer plan but would receive 
53,000 under the company’s rejec- 
tedproposal. 

The company said with a UPS- 
only plan it could pay higher benefits 
with the same amount of contribu- 
tions because it bad helped subsidize 
benefits received by non-UPS work- 
ers in the multiemployer plans. 

The Teamsters' rank and file 
generally favor multiemployer 
plans because those who move from 
one trucking job to another can re- 
main in the same plan. In addition, 
the plans provide some insurance 


becanse if a Teamster’s trucking 
company goes out of business, con- 
tributions from other companies 

"“IflS^is allowed to pull out. it 
would be a signal for other em- 
ployers that they could pull out, 
too,” said Gregory Taipinian, ex- 
ecutive director of the Labor Re- 
search Association, a New York- 
based group that serves as a con- 
sultant to many unions. 

“That doesn’t look so bad when 
the stock market is rising, but it’s 
terrible if the stock market falls,” 
he said. “The whole purpose of 
multiemployer pirns is to pool the 
risk. It would result in a wholesale 
shift of the risk from employers to 
workers.” 

Mr. Carey has repeatedly raised 
doubts that the Teamsters’ pensions 
would rise as much as UPS prom- 
ises under its plan. He contends that 
the company is demanding the shift 
to its plan becanse it wants to con- 
trol it and siphon money from it 
whenever a boom in investment in- 
come creates a surplus. 

“The company's interest,” Mr. 
Carey said, “is to get its hands on the 
investment incrane and funnel that 
back into their pockets, not back into 

members who wrakedEani” 

UPS officials say that Mr. 
Carey's criticism of their plan is 
overheated rhetoric. Federal regu- 
lations, they maintain, prevent 
companies from talcing a pension 
funcTs surplus for their own use. 


DATA: Consumer Prices Climb Slowly 


Continued from Page 13 

or about S1.47 a share, fra the pur- 
chase of Octel Communications. 
The company also said goodwill re- 
lated to the acquisition would re- 
duce Lucent’s profit by 5 cents a 
share a year over seven years. 

Oil drilling companies fell on 
speculation that profits may decline. 

US. STOCKS 

The tumble came after Unocal de- 
cided to use a less costly d rilling rig 
from Global Marine in the Gulf of 
Mexico, Yves Siegel, an analyst at 
Smith Barney, said. Schlumberger 
fell. Global Industries, and Cooper 
Cameron dropped. 

Retailers gained after reporting 
strong earnings. Kmart climbed 
1 3/16 to 12 15/16 after it said profit 
from continuing operations rose 35 
percent to S31 million on strong 
sales of housewares, home decor- 
ating items and cosmetics. Gap rose 


after it reported earnings of 26 cents 
a share, also better than forecast. 

B erkshir e Hathaway rose $100 to 
544,700 after it said second-quarter 
net income jumped 45 percent be- 
cause of strong earnings at its Geico 
Corp. insurance unit, a dividend pay- 
ment from US Airways Group Inc. 
and the inclusion of earnings from 
recently acquired Flights afety Inter- 
national Inc. The holding company 
controlled by the investor Warren 
Buffett reported net income of 
S277.8 million for die quarter, or 
$225 a share, compared with $191.2 
million, or 5159 a share, a year earli- 
er. (Bloomberg. AP) 


To Our Readers 

Wednesday's editions contained 
U.S. stock juices from 2 P.M. in- 
stead of the close because an in- 
ternational telecommunications line 
was cut off by bad weather. The line 
has been restored. 


Dollar Gets 
Lift From 
Economic 
Reports 

Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — Hie dollar 
rose against the yen and other 
major currencies after U.S. eco- 
nomic reports showed the econ- 
omy was still growing without 
generating mnch inflation. 

‘ ‘The economy is strong, and 
growth differentials with Japan 
and Germany are huge,” said 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

Ramon Bauza, a senior foreign- 
exchange salesman at Bank- 
Boston. “That’s going to keep 
the dollar strong.” 

The dollar’s rise against the 
yen was also fueled by expec- 
tations that weaker Southeast 
Asian currencies would hurt 
Japanese competitiveness and 
that regional problems might 
distract the Japanese govern- 
ment from reviving its own 
sluggish economy. 

Hie dollar was at -117.850 
yen in 4 P-M. trading, up from 
115.655 yen a day earlier, and 
at 1.8397 Deutsche marks, up 
from 1.8345 DM. It also 
climbed to 1.5163 Swiss francs 
from 1.5115 francs and to 
6.2025 French francs from 
6.1870 francs. The pound was 
at $1.5910, up from $15835. 

Some traders said that in 
coming days the dollar could 
break die recent hi gh of 1.8905 
DM it reached Aug. 6. 

“The dollar has a good 
chance to come back up again,” 
said Hans Boman, a trader at 
Swedbank. “Nothing has 
changed fundamentally in the 
economy. It’s right on track." 

The Indonesian rupiah’s 
tumble, meanwhile, and foe de- 
cline in other Southeast Asian 
currencies could hart foe com- 
petitiveness of Japanese ex- 
ports, traders said. 

“The Indonesian situation 
has reminded people that Japan 
will lose out to the Asian econ- 
omies that have devalued their 
currencies,” said Chris Iggo, a 
currency strategist at Barclays 
Bank. “That could have a neg- 
ative implication fra Japanese 
economic growth.” 


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U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursday’s 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 most odive shares 
up to the dosing on Wrf Sired. 

The Associated Press. 


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Trans 2925-43 2931-48 2877.89 289553 -21.00 


_ Standard & Poors 


Nasdaq 


MM Lh la I 

1709.19 170*10 170576 
17ljjB 1701-54 17MLM 
30 Wm 202774 2040,97 

102177 101670 1019.01 


442-44 639-41 44078 


Daw Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 
leuwfes 
10 Industrials 


Trading Activity 


TduliWH 
NroHgiH 
New Lows 


Undmaed 

TMdinwM 


Ode Fund 
Latin Am Eq Fd 
Lofln Am lm Fd 
UuniVest Fd 
Zeneca GipAOR 


- J6 9-12 9-26 

. .16 9-12 9-26 

. 71 9-12 9-26 

- -QSCfl 8-IB 8-28 
b J998 9-19 11-10 


STOCK SPLIT 
US Indirat 3 tar 2 sp«. 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Princeton Denial 1 farSrewsa spIH 
OPO Carp itor 20rmene spn. 

INCREASED 

Am RlEstlnv Q 718 8-22 9-4 

HarterwllleNII Q 73 9-12 M0 

MDU Resources O 787S 9-11 10-1 


SPECIAL 

- 75 8-28 9-15 


Hastings Mlg 


REGULAR 

Automatic Data O .115 9-12 10-1 

Barclays P1X x .0732 8-22 10-2 

Cadmus Commuti O 75 8-22 9-5 

Cardinal Hill Q 725 10-1 10-15 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


Industrials 1101761077751084-73 
Tramp. 67270 66272 66451 

Unities 19976 197-69 19779 

Finance 107-45 10544 10598 

SPOT 935J7 916-54 92272 

SP 1D0 91057 88957 89673 


Compos* 48279 SUM 47945 +1J3 

IndDsHab 60957 401-73 40618 +159 

Titos. 44140 «L4» 41577 -119 

UBr 29071 287.18 288J9 +038 

mama 441.14 444.18 2SM +LM 


Nasdaq 


vra. Mas 

130995 8#ft* 
125120 45 

57192 44V. 

m 

4803 549. 

45625 59V. 
43415 58ft 
47646 32*. 
40195 ft. 
37721 10ft 


w. m*. 

119784 97ft 

■145* 194* 
76084 101ft 
7<m3 34V. 

49411 55ft 
64372 77V. 
64184 Blft 
57175 13(0. 
55488 23 
47648 (ft 
47417 33 
40958 58 
31748 24t* 


B3M 84ft 
41ft 45 
. 12 

11*. 31*. 
45*. 46V. 


531. 54 

m* Tjv. 

46 (6ft 
57V. Sift 
57 57ft 
32ft 329. 

ft. ft. 

10V. 10ft. 


44ft 4514 
IMk JW> 
WlklOOft. 
33*14. 33*. 
54ft 551* 
75ft 77 
80ft 81 
134ft 134ft 
19ft 20 ft. 
Ift 8ft 
32V. 31ft 
56ft. 57ft 
22 ft. 23 


32232 93V. 9l«fti 92ft. 

8498 30ft 28ft 29*. 

7475 ft. ft. ft 

TTO lift, lift lift 

6893 29ft 2Bft 28ft 

6I4B 44ft 4W» 46V. 

6173 44ft 47ft 42ft. 

5681 3ft 3*k 3*. 

5484 39ft 30ft SOU 

5479 2ft TV* 7ft 


Nasdaq 


Total mow 
Now Mate 
Mew Loan 

Martlet Sales 


NYSE 
Amec 
Nasdaq 
In miBions. 


1804 2107 

lMi mo 

2)00 1695 

5447 5767 

111 146 

71 41 


521129 71029 

7122 3092 

51651 448,37 


Dividends 

Company Per Amt Rec Pay 

IRREGULAR 

Asia Sat Tetec b JJ72 9-IS 11-12 


ChosierBncp 

Gon Hausmmics u jua r-io 
dobed HI Inco DEr M .106 0-22 8-: 

H uiitei'' — 1 " ”■ "" ■* 

lLPwr .. 

WnwaCOiiJ 
Indastrl Sdentit 
InsbanCotp 
Liberty Tram 99 
Uncota Nil Corp 
Lowes Cos 
Maytag Corp 
MeiMHonRn 
MamBtiiCotp 
MMmatti Bncp 
Mbs Volley Bnc 
ManlsundFd 
NationwdRn5vc 
PodflCorp 
Partner Re 

BBSS. 

Serration Envtran O .055 8-26 9 

Sthwst Bncshre ~ " “ 

Storage Tr 
SunTrus! Bks 
USUFE Inco Fd 
iHnwob b-appradeMte onowit per 
statfADRr g-payoHe to ComnSon randu 
m i h ion tid y , q-qoarteflns- ie n ti - c nn u al 


Per Amt Rec Pay 

O SO, 8-25 w 
Q 3W 9-16 9-30 
M .106 8-22 8-29 

a .10 9-25 10-7 

- -75 10-115 11-1 
a -31 10-10 11-7 

- JU 8-25 9-2 

O JU 9-5 9-26 
M .035 B-22 9-2 

Q .49 10-10 11-1 
Q .055 10-17 10-31 

3 .16 9-1 9-IS 

22 8-IB 8-28 
a .065 8-29 9-15 
Q J06 9-15 10-1 
Q .14 9-15 10-1 
M .0427 8-18 8-28 
Q -04 10-1 10-15 
Q 27 10-22 11-17 

8 .18 8-22 9-2 

.02 8-25 9:9 

Q .13 B-77 9-10 
Q J155 8-26 9-2 

Q .19 8-26 9-9 

O 435 9-15 10-15 
O 22S 9-2 9-15 

0 .19 S-2S 9-3 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sales figure am unoflktaL Venty highs aidlom rased Ibe prevtaos 52 weeks plus the ament 

week bid ncflhekeeatrafng day. When a spit or siodidMdendamourNng to 25 percent or mare 
ha boon paid fie yean hi09taw range raid dvkknd araoliomi tor the new stoda ordu Unless 
cdtieiwise noted, rales of Addends is* annual iSsbroemenls based an Ihe tafcsl dedtoralfan. 
a - dMdend aba etdia <s). b - annum rale of dhridend plus stock dMdend. e - DquMaling 
dhrideniL cc - PE exceeds 99.dd - mOed. d - new yearty law. dd - lass in the last 12 months. 
• - dhrtdend declared or paid ta preceding 12 months, f - annual rata Increased on last 
declaration, g - dMdend in CanaiSan funds, subjectlolS'Xiiioiwestoence fax. I -dividend 
deda red after spfit-up or stock dividend, j -dMdend paid ttris year, ami Red, deterred or no 
action taken at latest dMdend meeting, k - dMdend doctored or paid ibis year, an 
aocumulalFM Issue wBh dividends In arrows- m - annual rale, reduced on last declaration, 
n - new issue in the past 52 weeks. The high-law range begins wtti Ihe start of trading, 
ad - next day detarary. p - Inltal dMdend. annual rale unknown. P/E - prtawamtags ratio, 
q - closed-end mutual fund, r - dividend declared or paid m preceding 12 months, ptos stock 
dhridwid-s- stock spit Dhrtdend begins with date o( spfit- sis • sales, t - tSvMend paid In 
stock hi preceding 12 mraittift estimated cash value an ac-dividend or ex-tflstrlbvttoa date, 
u - new yeartylilgh. v- tradng trailed. m - in banknipitcy or ncalvefstilpar being reorganized 

underthe Bon krnplcy Act or securities assumed by such companies- wd- when dtstributed. 

wl - when tesu«Vww- wDtt warrants, x - ex-dtvidend or ex-rights, nfls- ex-dMrfbutlon. 
xw- without wanants.y-(K-<ftvidetid and sales in fulLyht-yWd- 1 - 801 ®* infuR- 


Aug. 14,1997 

High Low Latest Cbge Opiot 

Grains 

CORN (QK7T1 

4000 bu minUnum- eenb per bushel 
Sep 97 265 2ft0fe 26414 v3 43001 

Dec 97 268ft 264ft 2»8 +1(6 159.100 

Mar 78 276ft 271ft 275ft +2 37.736 

may 78 280ft 277ft 280 +ft 94)61 

Jut 98 283ft 278 282ft +ltt 15.188 

Sep 98 266 363ft 263ft -1 1,568 

Dec 98 245 262 264ft -ft 74»4 

EsL safes 72MB Weds sales 1174)72 
Utah open M Z75638. up &H57 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT3 

100 tans- doBais per ton 

Aug 97 25850 25470 25850 +190 7552 

5ep97 22950 22430 22120 +070 24217 

Oct 97 207-30 20450 207 JO -0.70 1S136 

Dec 97 202JX) 197.00 20080 -110 414)20 

Jan 98 19750 19400 1975X3 -020 4215 

Mar 98 19450 19200 193.00 -1-20 8,779 

Est. sales 20000 Weds sales 25.245 

Weds open tail 109,171 up 1,257 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT1 
60000 oss- cents per lb 

Aug 97 2112 2152 2112 *0.17 l,l«4 

Sop 97 2127 21.70 2127 +024 20030 

Oct 97 2254 2187 2144 +022 111 16 

Dec 97 22-80 32.15 2179 +029 44343 

Jan 98 2301 2140 2302 +030 7571 

MnrTB 23JS 2167 23J5 +030 4944 

Est. sates 1M00 Weds solas 15,799 
weds open ini 90471 ofl 914 

SOYBEANS CCBOT) 

&ooo bu minimum- amts par bushd 
Aug 97 793 748 772ft -Oft 5794 

Sep 97 662 646 655ft -4ft 15096 

Nov 97 614 605 611ft -3ft 79533 

Jon 98 617ft 610ft 614ft -3U 14560 

Mar98 629 618 624ft -3ft 4079 

Est sates 44000 Weds soles 44137 
Weds open M 1 31 .901 ofl 537 

WHEAT (caon 

MOO bu minimum- cents per bushel 

Set) 97 361ft 355 355U 4 28480 

Dec 97 377ft 370 370ft -7 S5562 

Mar 98 387 91 382 ft -6ft 15476 

May9B 389 387ft 385ft -jft 154a 

EsL sales 21000 Wed. sales 24063 

WUds open W 104703 up MSS 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMER) 

40000 Krt.- asils per to. 

Aug 97 66.70 4425 6657 +4L3S 4603 

Ocf97 19.97 6955 6953 4)52 51580 

Dec 97 7140 7110 7122 -0.10 2L131 

Feb 98 7350 7155 7362 -0.15 10895 

Apr 98 75J5 75-07 7517 tQ.07 4640 

Am 98 71M 71.90 71.92 4L12 1848 

EsL sales 9JS3 Wwto sales 11480 
Wad. open ilk) 97557. Dfl 1314 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

50500 Rte- rants per lb. __ 

Aug 97 80.90 8030 8055 -0.07 5203 

Sep 97 8150 90.10 8057 +057 4230 

53 97 8157 0060 8085 +052 4959 

NOV 97 8140 8150 81.92 +052 4019 

Jan 98 8150 8250 810S +0.15 2503 

Mar 98 81.90 81.72 1150 +050 963 

EsL sales 1659 WMs sales 7576 
Wad's open tat 23.901, up 246 

HOSS-LCHCCMER) 

40500 Pmp- cants porta. _ 

Aug 97 7955 79.05 79.15 -4L05 5531 

Od97 7117 7210 7107 +1.10 14816 

Doc 97 4950 6860 69J0 +1.05 6Z74 

Feb 98 4450 67-55 6860 +QJ7 1578 

Apr 98 6415 6X25 6412 *052 1523 

Esl total 7582 Weds soles 6.161 
Weds open tat 34204 off 102 

PORK BELLIES (CMER) 

40500 lbs.- cents per ». 

Ado97 8637 8450 8555 +1.10 818 

Ft*W 7120 7400 7462 *057 1523 

Mar 98 7450 7130 7450 +155 171 

EsL sates 1.172 Weds sales 1544 
Weds open H 451 2, iv 31 


High Low Latest Chge Octal 


COCOA (HCSEl 


tea- 5 per tan 
1504 14K 

1485 

-M 

8.774 

1532 

1511 

1516 

•11 

34658 

1559 

1542 

1547 

-10 

mg 

1579 

1567 

1570 

■9 

12.250 

1598 

1589 

1590 

X 

2X71 

1411 

1610 

1612 

X 

1721 


Est. Hlas 8502 Wads 4628 

Wtods open kd 100367. oil 1504 

COFFEE COKSE) 

K 18455 +165 
DK«7 14425 16400 16405 +455 

Mm 98 5250 1C50 149.20 5.10 

MmW 14625 14360 14X70 4160 

jjll* 14200 139-70 139.70 4130 

EsL rain 452* Weds soles 7,178 
Weds open W 20534 ofl 343 

SUCABWORLD 11 (NCSE) 

+b» 

sis™ \\% 

J698 1168 1162 1168 +006 

Ed iotas 9587 WMVMtasl&SS 
Wads open M 188.254 up 1.1*1 


ORANGE JUICE (NCnO 


High Low Latest Cbge optat 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 


High Low Latest Chge OpM 
Mar 98 9355 9350 9353 +052 54117 


15500 tai.- cents per lb. FRnaaW-BtsellOOpd Jun98 9411 940# 9459 +052 42602 

Sep 97 7960 6960 6965 -960 14043 Sep 97 12966 12942 12954 +020 165,714 Sep 98 9424 9421 9423 +4152 34672 

No* 9) 81-50 76.10 76.10 -550 10884 Dec 97 9862 98.46 9852 + 058 11617 em uum. irnvi Pih «Wh- R liMII 

Jon 98 83JD 7880 7850 -5.00 5X38 f.tor98 97.98 97.98 9752 +028 0 


Mar 96 8445 8150 8150 -550 3557 £v. soles: 75*894 . 


Est sales 13X00 Weds sales 2515 
Weds open M 34700 off 507 


“ l £y C 5^^ a npertmrat ?> X %> ’“Z? 1< 2? 1 ISI't? VPA ^ ^ ^ 

Aug 97 32490 17170 32420 -260 638 , ^ arW ^ ,oa -*5 +019 106547 Mar 98 7650 756® 7553 -044 12561 


Open mu 177531 aB 5671 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND CUFFS 
ITL 200 mfflton - pit af 100 pd 
135.11 11566 


Sep 97 135.75 


Pmv.<gwi taU 384624 alt 334 

Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NCTN) 

50000 Rml- cents per Hl 


+053 10U56 Od97 7464 7435 7468 -036 10027 


Sep 97 32490 -2.70 2 EsL sales: 30162 Pmv.sdtas: 65547 

Oct 97 229.10 32460 32410 -170 15615 PrW- Open W.: 104*347 off 1086 
Dec 97 331.40 32460 328.00 -2.70 114532 

Feb 98 33250 32870 229.90 -170 12672 UBOg 1-MONTH (CMER) 

Apr 98 332.90 33150 33150 -250 5*342 S3 iMOon- pis o(I00 pd. 

Jim 98 335.90 33190 33190 -270 7521 Aug 97 9456 9435 9435 +0-01 19674 

Aug 98 33420 -270 111! Sep97 9454 9454 9454 imeh. 11696 

OcT9B 33850 -270 107 00 97 9452 9451 9431 +OX1 4876 

EsL staes 41000 Weds sales 51884 Est. safes MA Weds sales 1525 

Weds open tail 201.194 up 4509 Weds open Ini 51351 up 558 


May 96 7651 7422 7653 4L44 4696 

•M 98 77.15 7445 76*93 -027 3699 

E*L sales 1500 Weds sates 7667 
Weds open M 78684 ofl 170 

HEATING OIL (HMEI0 
42600 gaL cenls per gW 
Sep 97 5455 55.74 5567 4X17 34296 

Oct 97 5755 5457 5473 4X15 32661 

Nov 97 58.10 5768 5768 4X15 1B188 

Dec 97 5865 5853 5851 4L15 11979 

ton 98 5955 58J3 5853 -020 15*431 

Feb 98 5920 5823 58.73 4L30 8047 


™ E ^™ h WCMX1 M 5WS ffl23 023 525 SSl 

Aug 97 10450 10160 -160 2285 Aug9T 9427 94^ 9426 +061 17.918 B60 5TJ2 57 73 4135 7145 

Sep 97 10660 10320 10360 -125 21.108 Sep 97 94J6 9424 9425 +OX1 502,955 f 35 1A4S 

0097 10445 10160 10360 -165 1,762 Oa9J 9418 9417 9417 +002 1529 Ell. sales 21616 Weds soka 27613 

No* 97 10180 10280 10260 -075 1686 Dec97 9410 0406 9409 +063 479651 Weds open Ini 1, oil 147635 

Dec 97 10400 10225 10240 4L50 8607 Mar 98 9402 9197 9402 +0X5 342643 

ton 98 10210 -055 673 JunW W.B6 9190 +0X5 274,90+ LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NME1D 

Feb 98 10160 4X30 606 SfPW M 91K 9360 +065 224*4» 1600 M4- Mian per bbl 

Mar 98 10160 10120 10120 4X10 1450 9144 W69 +065 184*003 Sep 77 2061 XM 20J0B ■ 4111 64654 

Apr98 100.90 10050 10050 undL 402 +S-®* 135694 Ocl 97 2066 2028 2030 4X09 80196 

Est sales 11600 Weds sates 4*258 SI? SS ’SJS? K?*? 7 *^3 2038 4X09 40857 

Wads open tat 43.961. up 482 wjl SS wia tSS ^21 20.71 2040 2061 4X09 51686 

Decw 9354 0348 9153 +066 71591 Jon 98 20.70 2060 2061 -OJ» 30314 

SILVER (NCJUUO Est writs ItA Weds «tin 842661 Feb 98 2062 2060 2060 4X09 14748 

1000 tray cents per tray ac Weds opal W 2612607, up 724 Esl. wrioi nun r*. ,,,,,. 


Est soles 11600 Wads 90t» 4*258 
Wads open bit 41961. up 482 


SILVER (HOVUO 

1000 tray ae+ cents per tray eg. 

Aug 97 43950 -1020 


Dec97 20.71 2060 2061 4X09 51686 

ton^S 20.70 2060 2061 -0J» 30314 

Feb 98 2062 2060 2060 4X09 14768 

Est. Mas 111231 Weds soles 111715 
Weds open W I, ofl 440687 


Sep 97 452X0 43650 44050 -1020 49689 BRITISH POUND (CMER) ™*upoiini i,onaem»r 

0097 44420 -1020 78 «500 pounds. * per pound usnieii utnucm 

Dec 97 45860 44360 447X0 -10J0 21.285 Sep 97 15884 15740 15870*0X050 51643 ™*2* RAI -** S WMER) 

ton 98 44840 -10.3S 20 Oec97 158» 15750 15014+OXCio 1667 1“?®"*" Spormai btu 

Mor9B 46300 452X0 4S1« -1060 10658 Mor98 15758+06050 209 J3S 2620 2621 


ton 98 448.40 -1020 20 Dec 97 15820 15750 15816+ 

Mar 98 46300 45260 45140 -1060 10458 «nr98 15758+ 

Moy98 462.00 45760 457.40 -1040 1023 ESL sates NA HtadS sales 7,994 

M98 46120 -1050 2.160 WerTs open In) 52. 719. off 1,283 

Est. scab 32X00 Weds sales 21068 

Wads open M 90136, ofl 2X93 CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 


iiUHimai otu*. spormai btu 
Sep97 2550 2620 2628 -0JM4 44569 
Ocl 97 2570 2640 2657 4X106 40514 

Nov 97 2650 2560 2560 -0638 16633 

Doe97 2750 2650 2665 4)628 19241 
tom 98 1760 2670 1695 -0610 10764 

Feb 98 1600 2540 2540 -0610 11687 


PLATINUM (NMER) 

S) tray doSan per (ray at. 


Od 97 431.00 42IJ0 427.80 -X30 11,787 Mor98 J267+0.0013 

ton 4T8X0 41110 418X0 -2X0 2587 EsL coles NJL Weds sales 12X46 

Apr9B 41350 48760 41350 -2X0 415 Weds open M 591234 up 1,134 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER1 ££S 3 iS TVS, 1 

IO&OOO (Mian. ipvCdn.dk ZflW 2 - 5 * 1 7 - s *> 

Sep 97 .7209 .7188 .7202+06011 51570 Esl- sates N A. Weds sales 64X41 

Dec 97 . 734c, .7228 J23B+0X0I2 4726 Wecrs open M 1, off 2T&5B6 
Merf8 5267+0X013 685 


UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 


Est iotas NA Weds sates 1,206 
Weds open M 1. oH 14862 


Clou Previous Sep97 5475 5423 5443 4X001B 114583 

LONDON METALS OME) Dec 97 5499 5457 5475-0.0018 4074 

Dalian per metric Ian Mm98 5526 5490 55064X0020 1654 

AhiielMi WMMW „ Ed. sates NAWodi sates 51,919 

Spot 1721X0 ]ra.00 1697 60 16*960 Weds open Ml 19X18. oH 625 

Fbrwad 1707.00 170860 169560 169400 

SEP" JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

SP 01 , ?™°° 125 raffion yens per 100 yen 

Forward 228560 2288X0 229060 229260 Sep 97 £696 X500 XS10 -6177 70633 

K2? any, any, ml , Dec 97 .8732 J620 X621 -X180 Z3S-S 


Sep 97 67x0 65.90 6653 41X25 34*4168 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) Ocl 97 6150 60X0 60^ 4X25 24855 

1 25*000 matte, S per mark Nav97 59X5 5BJ0 4X35 10607 

Prwriom S*p97 5475 5423 5443 4X0018 114583 Dec 97 SBJ0 5750 57X5 -4135 9,950 

Dec 97 -Sera 5457 547541.0018 4.074 ton 98 5875 57 55 57,5s Jixa 8,954 

Mm98 5526 5490 55064X0020 1X54 Fob 98 58.70 57X5 57X5 4X45 3508 

Ed. sates NAWods sates 51,919 58X5 -050 4673 


« 58X5 -050 4673 

*P r « 60.95 4»J0 1158 

EsL sates 38X55 Wbds sates 48X64 
Wads open M 1, off 99X94 


rg* J 5?|9? -X1W 7 O0 SP COMP IHDOUCMER^* 68 

SS!? 11 4lm 41100 “M" 60700 Ed. ante. NJL Weds sates 21521 SOOsInckni 

6W W 657100 6485X0 6495X0 «eds open W 7X52Z up 166 Og* 9*60 ^gJO ^ ^ 186,793 

Ftawart 6*70X0 6680X0 45*00 6402.00 SWISS FRANC (CMER) M-9S 946ri0 Ul! 

sss ssss ETB?'2"a3a w aasKasrrar 

Spot 1633X0 163BJK1 158860 159160 I??"® ^ ^ X7494UW31 1X65 FT5E 1U0 QJFFE) 


: (SpMM Htyk Grade) 
t 1633X0 16381 


163860 1588X0 159160 


i5i7*o .51.00 ,«» 


— — — ^ ° ,w SBSSSBJfSS" --it - « zns -iu 

s i :^"s£v c,al s ” iss iss s:.s ss as 

W* 00 on I'sn -”«« .11872+60191 5159 

M*98 9472 9471 9472 +005 JW WodS open kd 44429, Ofl 40 +1-200 pertato poW 

WteteSSiltalOHw'Stto" 1-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 

■ open ■” yaflr/e off 339 £50(1000 -pfi of 100 pd 

IXaSSTSSRetmua fes SS SS t&So iSuB 

SErSTaaias 1 M 2% 

Weds open M 234911. up 9541 Mar99 92.76 92.73 92.76 *665 37X99 

10 YS TREASURY rrjum Ed. sales: »W2 . Pnw. sales: 1 14215 

i!0MO0^ta?SSI?5SIL _ Pta. open Ini : .27400 up 705 


C25 per Index pahs 

Sep 97 50756 50736 50026 -186 73X39 
Decw 51206 51206 50680 -186 iS 
Mar 98 N.T H.T S11S0 —inn **5? 


3- MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 

£500000 -pfsaHOOpd 

Sep 97 927B 92.77 9177 


FF200 per bides palid 
*“9 W 2M1 6 2915.0 29216 - 360 249** 

B4iS 79170 39296 -tS &9W 
DOC 97 2973.0 30aA S Mc+n 5x1 *3,957 


DOC97 2973.0 2966J 29S40-1M 
92X7 +061 100454 Ed. eatas: 12X78 


SSS nx? 92X0 no! Open (nLi WX97 up 848 


EU-Irtas 'O LqqaWMh' rate, 79x08 Dec9I 9271 92X8 92X1 +065 

Weds open M 23491). up 9.541 Mar 99 9176 9172 9176 *4165 

WSffRWmmm 

S3 Rssssg ‘li 3 ^ 

weds open bU 408741, op 4579 Od97 N.T. N.T. 945* -061 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's 
Reuters 
□J. Futures 
CRB 


“?™£*SiraY BONDS <C BOD 


SepW 9665 96X2 96X4 +801 257,140 . g B»4 - v ***£ ASSI 

0097 N.T. N.T. 9656 -061 1,753 inrlfinonaa] Future! 

Dec97 9645 96x2 9444 unch. 304132 PetMeum EsOtonge. 

™ 9428 9630 -061 289637 

ton 98 9611 9fc67 9609 UiKtL 211,158 I 




Dec 97 tf? “ * 35 532X34 5eo98 9S91 95X6 95X9 +061 151983 

112-30 112 in mi’tS + J? ,SjB WAS Unde 156013 

S ® « 8ff S3 Its 


L6NGGILTIUFFE) 

‘ ol 10a pd 


Ed. solos: 154728 Prav. soles. 394041 
Prev.anenW: 1,701715 up 24447 

HWONTH PI BOB (MATIF) 


S«>W 114-28 114-18 I FFSmIBan. ptaallOOpc? 

R-jiaRapria" 1 s s m r w *“ “ 


GERMAN GOV. BUND (LlFFPi 
DM250000- Btsof ltt B Jr FFO 


Mar9g 96JT 9818 94.19 +062 38931 

JWIW 9669 9605 9667 *063 2i«8 

Sep 98 95.95 95.91 95.93 +063 34592 

Ed- sates: 30X64 
Open M • 264597 up 285. 


Sii* uur 

Entertain vnrnt 

r’vrry Wi-dup M | uv 

in Thf Inli'miarkrl 


“““““■P'sonoopa Ed sates: 30X64 

S?97 SS {S? 1 *0 0 765*351 °P“ « ‘ «**597 up 285, 

M»9* N.T NT tSixS +040 1Ml6 3-MONTH EUR6URA (UPPC) 

PW*m in^' 384n5"^ S i a V SJJ8 ^97 lBh tSi5 , *9rw P WX2 *062 99X05 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 15, 1997 



Rise in BASF’s Taxes 
* Held Profit Growth 
To 3% in First Half 


I 


° m ^^(^5^FnnDi VV ri iat 

FRANKFURT — BASF ap ™ 
Thursday that first-half net 
P 61-06111 as benefits 

fS^S >ngdoilarwereoffscrb y 

^"-^a^peeted tax charge 

rmS said net 

I® 0 ™ *0®? to 1-42 billion Deutsche 
to^($768.1 million) as sales in- 
10 27-80 billion 

U1 J’™ D ®e first half of 1996 

s , tro “S dollar, improving 
306 agrochemicals 
w gas businesses 

have aD boosted growth,'* said An- 


New Markets 

Lift Profit at 
WPP Group 

C&'Vfcdty Oar S*tf From DbpatdKS 

LONDON — WPP Group 
PLC, the world’s largest ad- 
vertising concern, said Thurs- 
day that its first-half pretax 
profit rose IS percent as it won 
new billings and expanded into 
developing markets in Asia and 
Latin America. 

WPP reported pretax earn- 
ings of £783 million ($123.7 
million) for the six-month peri- 
od ended June 30, up from 
£68. 1 million a year earner. But 
revenue dipped to £830.6 mil- 
lion from £833.2 milli on a year 
earlier, as the strong pound cut 
the value of overseas sales. 
WPP derives about 80 percent 
of its sales and profit from ac- 
tivities outside Britain. 

WPP, parent erf the adver- 
tising agencies J. Walter 
Thompson Co. and Ogilvy & 
Mather Worldwide, said sales 
f from developing markets in 
Latin America and Asia rose 
10.6 percent, while sales from 
North America rose 7.8 per- 
cent Sales rose S3 percent 
from Europe, and 1.6 percent 
from Britain. (AP, Bloomberg) 


gony Cox of Dresdner Kleinwwt 
Benson m London. “But it looks like 
the company had a higher-than-ex- 
pected tax charge of about 45 percent, 
and this may dampen full-year net.” 

Oiief Executive Juergen Strube 
said Ae tax rate was 40 percent in 
the first half, compared with 35 per- 
cent or 36 percent a year earlier. 

“Last year we had a loss carry- 
forward," he said, "and this can’t 
be used this year.” 

Mr. Stiube said he did not know 

what the full-year tax rate would be. 

The company said it expected 
earnings for the foil year to exceed 
those of 1 996 and sales to surpass 50 
billion DM, compared with 48.8 bil- 
lion DM in 1996. 

^ The stronger dollar is fueling a 
German export boom. The dollar 
has risen about 20 percent against 
the mark since the beginning of the 
year, fueling a 19.1 percent increase 
in BASF’s North American sales. 

But profit from U.S. units, where 
a stronger dollar has a negative ef- 
fect, fell amid lower margins on 
polystyrenes, alcohol and acrylic 
acid products. Operating profit in 
North America plunged to 293 mil- 
lion DM from 639 million DM in the 
first half of 1996. 

The company said its Knoll phar- 
maceuticals unit, which bears the 
fount of its research and develop- 
ment costs, was unlikely to report a 
profit for the foil year. ' 

“Our plastics and fibers busi- 
nesses were also substantially below 
target,’ ’ Mr. Strobe said 

Sales in Germany rose 14 percent, 
to 3.62 billion DM, on strong 
growth in BASF's oil and gas unit 

BASF stock finishwi down 333 
DM, at 68.67, while shares of the top 
German chemicals company, 
Hoechst AG, fell 4.90 DM to 76.10 a 
day after its midyear earnings re- 
port 

“BASF has been disappointing, 
and so was Hoechst, and now the 
avalanche is rolling," said Peter En- 
sel, a trader at Frankfurter Spar- 
kasse. “The chemical industry is 
now under pressure.” 

Hoechst said Wednesday that op- 
erating profit rose an adjusted 7 per- 
cent, also helped by the strength of 
die dollar. 

(AFX. Bloomberg , AP Reuters) 


Forestry Firms 9 Profits Sprout 


BUnvnhcrx News 

HELSINKI — Europe's largest 
forestry companies have posted 
mostly better-than-expected earn- 
ings for the second quarter as a 
recovery in demand started to feed 
through to higher prices. 

UP M - Kymmene Qy. Europe's 
largest forest-products maker, said 
Thursday that second-quarter 
profit more than tripled, after 
Svenska Cellulosa AB. the 
second-largest, said profit 
doubled. Of the eight major Scan- 
dinavian forestry companies re- 
porting in the past two weeks, six 
had bctter-than-expected results, 
and two were in line with fore- 
casts. 

"The forestry industry is going 
better and better,” said Mikka 
Haekkila, portfolio manager of 
Arctos Funds. ' ‘We are in no hurry 
to sell our UPM shares.” 

Forestry companies saw their 
1996 earnings collapse as bench- 
mark pulp prices fell by almost 


half from about $1,000 a ton in 
1995. But the price of pulp, used to 
make higher-grade products such 
as paper and tissues, rose 10 per- 
cent w the second quarter of this 
year on the Helsinki Futures and 
Options Exchange. It recently 
traded at $583.19 a ton. 

Analysts warned, however, that 
the rebound was fragile. If the re- 
covery in major European econ- 
omies such as Germany falters, the 
advance in pulp prices could slow, 
delaying pnee rises expected late 
this year for fine paper and news- 
print, they said. 

“The results are better, but it's 
not prices but volumes that are 
better,” said Katarina Ahlstedt, an 
analyst at Deutsche Morgan Gren- 
fell. "You haven’t seen price in- 
creases in paper yet. That would 
mark the real turnaround.” 

Profit at UPM tripled to 1.62 
billion Finnis h markkas ($292 
million), largely on one-time gains 
from selling shares. Operating 


profit rose to 1.23 billion markkaa 
from 943 mi I lin n nvykkafl last 
year, in line with expectations. 

Mo & Domsjoe AB, a Swedish 
forestry company, said Thursday 
that pretax profit fell a less-than- 
ex peered 44 percent to 917 million 
kronor ($114 million) in the first 
half, largely on losses from cur- 
rency he dging 

'‘Given the sector’s recent his- 
tory is so bad, a lot of invesiors 
may take the first chance to get 
out,’ ’ said Christian Georges, ana- 
lyst at Credit Lyonnais Securities. 

■ Cellulosa Seeks Rest of Unit 

Svenska Cellulosa has offered 
335 Deutsche marks (5182) a share 
for the remaining shares of Papi- 
erwerke Waldhof-Aschaffeuburg 
AG, Agence France-Presse report- 
ed from Stockholm. Svenska Cel- 
lulosa has owned 75 percent of 
Papierwerke since early 1995 and 
holds call options covering a fur- 
ther 4.6 percent of the shares. 


Investor’s Europe 


4500 — 5200 3250 

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M AM JJA" M AM J J A 

1997 ? 1997 



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1997 


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Source: Totekurs 


tnierasoona) HmU Tribune 


Restructuring Costs Weigh on Aker 


Very briefly! 


CnaptM hr OtarS* rffFmm DufUKhrs 

OSLO — Aker RGI ASA, a Nor- 
wegian holding company, said 
Thursday that first-half pretax profit 
rose 1 1 percent, while it posted an 
operating loss because of a reor- 
ganization charge a l its subsidiary 
Norway Seafoods ASA. 

Pretax profit rose to 284 million 
kroner ($37.1 million) from 257 mil- 
lion kroner in the same period last 
year. The operating loss totaled 237 
million kroner, narrowed from 288 


million kroner a year ago. 

Year-ago figures are adjusted for 
a merger that cook place between 
Aker and RGI earlier this year when 
Aker ASA acquired Resource 
Group International. 

h is now Norway’s third- largest 
group after the energy companies 
Norsk Hydro A/S and Statou A/S, 
and has operations in engineering, 
construction, oil production ami 
fishing industries. 

The company’s three main hold- 


ings are the oil equipment company 
Aker Maritime ASA, in which it 
holds a 75 percent stake, the cement 
company S concern AB, in which it 
holds a third, and Norway Seafoods, 
in which it holds 60.7 percent. 

Since November, the group has 
undergone major restructuring. 
Properties worth 3.7 billion kroner 
have been sold, it said. 

AkerRGI’s shares closed down 1 
krone at 135 kroner on Thursday. 

(AFP. Bloomberg) 


Layoff. Fight at Irish Fruit of Loom 


Reuters 

DUBLIN — The managing director of Fruit of the 
Loom Inc.'s unit in Ireland, Willie McCarter, plans to 
fight a layoff notice served to him by his American 
bosses, Irish media reported Thursday. 

The high-profile Derry-born businessman, his broth- 
er John and the finance director Seamus McEleney were 
laid off by the U.S. parent company. 

The dispute appears to have been growing since the 
beginning of the year when some of Mr. McCarter’s 
responsibilities were transferred to the United States, 
media reports said. 

In 1986, U.S. Fruit of the Loom bought Mir. Mc- 
Carter's Irish interests in Derry and Donegal, and Willie 


McCarter was appointed managing director of the Irish 
operations in 1987. 

The company, which now has seven plants, two in 
Deny and the rest in Donegal, is one of the largest 
employers in manufacturing in Ireland, with about 
3300 workers. 

Media reports said files at die Company Records 
office show that Fruit of the Loom in Ireland had a pre- 
tax loss of 133 million Irish punts ($9.4 million) in 
199S, reversing a profit of 5.8 million pants in 1994. 

On Wednesday, the McCarter brothers and Mr. 
McEleney applied for injunctions against the redund- 
ancy notices in the High Court in Dublin. 

The case will be heard in two weeks. 


• Hanson PLC, a British building-materials supplier, said 
first-half operating profit rose 9 percent, to £121 million 
($191.2 million), on a pro-forma basis as the buoyant econ- 
omies in the United States and Britain helped fuel growth in 
the construction industry. The company spun off its chem- 
icals, energy and tobacco units this year. 

• MAID PLC, a British on-line business-information pro- 
vider, said its second-quarter net loss narrowed 79 percent, to 
£394,000 ($624,000), as sales rose and operating costs re- 
mained stable. 

• Soaete Rationale d ’Exploitation Industrielle des Tabacs 
& des Allumettes SA’s first-half sales rose 4.6 percent, to 
8.89 billion French francs ($1.44 billion). 

• Tulip Computers NY’s first-half loss narrowed to 6.8 
million guilders ($3.3 million), though costs and problems 
with opening a new factory cut into sales. The Dutch computer 
maker said it expected a profit for the full year. 

• Westdeutsche Landesbank Girozentrale, Germany's 
third-largest bank, said first-half operating profit rose 23 
percent, to 749.6 million Deutsche marks ($4053 million), as 
trading profit increased. 

• The European Commission bas warned Telefonica de 
Espana S A against moving ahead with its purchase of a stake 
in Antena 3, a television channel, without European Union 
approval. 

• Fokus Bank ASA, Norway's fifih-largest bank, said 
second-quarter profit fell 18 percent, to 1 18.8 million kroner 
($153 million), because of a one-time charge for two failed 
takeover bids. 

• Credit Lyonnais SA said it was sounding out investors on a 

loan securitization plan for 40 billion francs of securities as the 
state-owned bank sought to lighten its cost of funding and 
Secure its return to profitability. Bloomberg. AFX, Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Thursday Aug. 14 

Prices tn loan currencies. 
Tatekws 

M|gh Law dm Pm 


Amsterdam 


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4® ,646 

1172 n.n 1JJ1 

176 1,5 IJj 

1171 ll® 1129 

843 844 88? 

443 643 444 

670 685 674 

10® 10® TOff 

611 616 6W 

611 620 673 
786 7JZ J® 

i i | 
its & “ 
}g MS i" 


Madrid 

AcataeK 

AC£SA 

AowsBoKeian 

Aroentaria 

BBV 

S33i£5*J 

BankMnr 

BaQnriroHrtp 

BmPapukr 

BcnSatomkr 

CEPSA 

Coannwiso 

issSf p * B 

FECSA 

GnNutain) 

toanMa 

Pryea 

Repral 

smflanaEtoc 

Tabacatoa 

Trttfcrica 

IMmAhori 

WencCttMal 


Baba tadea: 58945 
PmtoaB 91043 


moo 26800 
1IQ0 1800 
5820 5680 
I960 7840 
4190 4140 
1435 1405 
79m 7490 
5840 5730 

34410 34010 
4230 4180 

4775 4625 

3390 3260 
B690 8500 
32® 3185 

1270 12® 

6720 6600 

1835 1805 

msfl 2955 
6180 61® 
1420 I4W 
7780 75JB 
4105 4000 

1225 1205 

2770 27® 


26870 27020 
mo 1805 
5770 57® 
7910 7960 
4W0 
1420 1430 
7520 7540 
57® 5820 
34020 34200 
4230 4205 

4735 4750 

3340 3340 

8500 8580 
3220 JWQ 
1270 1265 

66® 6620 
1820 1835 

2965 2970 

61® 6140 
1405 1410 

7600 7660 

4095 4090 

1220 12® 
Z740 2765 


976 

220® 

940 

829 

415 

740 

'496® 

279 

11 ® 

39® 

262 

326 

679 

952 


Accor 
AOf 

AirUqyMe 
AkxAH Atatt 
Ajo-VAP 
Bancalre 
BK 
BMP 

Canal Ptas 
Qnefbnr 

Cmlna 

CCF 
CoWmn 
OutaflanDtar 
CLF-MoFnn 573 
CiKSAgrta* 1265.10 
Danone 935 

BM4Ufe*M> 662 

ErtdanfaSS 844 

- “ 8 ® 

7.10 
72S 
394 
867 
429 
1165 
23® 
1479 


326 

670 

948 

560 


Gen. Eon 


inwlol 

Lofcage 


LVMH 
MkteftiB 

ParibasA «N 

Pernod RScard 303-60 
PCUBBOtOt 
Ptoautf-Rrinl 


Manila 


AfnSeB 

AwlaLand 

BmUptei 

CLPHoroee 

ManioBecA 

Meta Book 

Petal 

FaBniik 

PM Long DU 

SanMIpKlB 

SMPltnwHdg 


17 

2075 

145 

9® 

BM 

515 

5® 

no 

875 

57 

7® 


PSEtedne 249M9 
PnvtawU27® 

16® 16® 17 

1975 19® 1975 
143 144 145 

940 9® 9® 

81® 81® 83® 
5® 505 510 

570 570 570 

m m 210 

865 870 875 

56 56 57 

7® 7® 7® 



CAG-4te2921-M 
P ur i ne s: 2926M 

943 M6 971 
216® 220 217 

931 932 936 

813 82V 818 

41 030 412.10 411 JO 
724 726 7® 

482 49CS 486 
273® 275® 279® 
WM6 1076 1093 
3897 3898 3916 

778.10 2®® 2® 

37170 325 

665 673 

937 MS 
561 571 

12651265.101265.10 
923 928 932 

648 655 658 

825 826 821 

B® 8® 8® 

6® 7.10 7.10 

721 722 

385 38670 
B5& 862 

415® -426® 426® 
1121 1721 1151 

2301 2320 2334 

1446 1467 1460 

362.10 367-W 364 

44570 446® 448® 
30138 301.50 30570 

707 788 719 

2637 24K 2499 
2154 2177 2192 
164 16630 164® 
1618 1658 1625 
24QJ3 242® 240® 
598 <03 


Ete cAo to i B 

EriasonQ 

Homes B 

taceofneA 

InveskrB 

MoDoB 

Nanflmiken 

PharmrtJrtohn 

SmMB 

Scania B 

SCAB 

5-E BankenA 
StamdSa Fan 
SkansSnB 
5KFB 

IA 

JA 

SvHandtesA 
VUWB 


620 

362 

324 

760 

419 

302 

775 

282 

258 

218® 

197 

91® 

335 

336 
225® 

188 

142® 

265® 

229 


602 

353® 

315® 

750 

<10 

291® 

265 

273® 

254 

215® 

191 

as® 

32S® 

332 

223 

182 

139 

250 

226 


<07 

355 

317 

751 

415 

296 

267 

280® 

258 


413 

3» 

318 

763 

<17 

297 

270 

277 

253 


217 214® 
193 192® 
86 90 

329 333 

336 335 

225 222 

183 187 

139® 141 

260 264® 
227® 228 


706 

385 

B49 


Sydney 


Amcor 
Al ‘ 

BH 

Bom 


_.|CSF 15430 

TOMB 593 

UMnor 113® 

Valeo 369 



tad. 


jAmofl 
Gates Myer 
ComokD 

Fasten Brw 

GaafenanFM 

KlAudrofla 

Lend Lean 

MIMHdgs 

MafAusfBQrtt 

NatMtauatlMB 

NowCnip 

padflcOuntop 

Ptooeertan 

PubBroadcmt 
R*o two 
Sf George Bon* 

WMC 

WestpacBUng 

WmdsUePet 

Woodwrtta 


AIOtaewteR2«Z7® 

PiertanSiMM® 

8® 110 113 174 

10® 9.96 WJJ2 .10 

17® 17.11 17® 17.13 
185 180 371 184 

2679 2164 2680 2171 
1670 16® 16® 1678 
U94 14® UB6 14® 
649 642 647 6® 

&j6S 6J65 649 652 

497 4» 492-4.96 

163 2® 241 157 

1® 1® 1.96 1® 

1278 12® 1277 1184 
29® 3875 28.97 2876 
ITS 1® 174 1.72 

1987 1878 1891 I8JM 
109 107 2® MB 

5.99 585 5® IK 

157 150 3-53 

4® 474 ASS 474 

8JJ3 8 84)3 7.90 

21.18 21 21® 21.17 

B42 8® 872 878 

7® 771 771 741 

875 8.18 872 119 

11.10 1092 1Q.94 11 

4.17 4® 4.11 416 


The Trlb Index 

Phase as o f 3:00 PM Now York time. 

Jan i. 1932 - loo. 

Level 

Change 

%ciiBngs 

year to data 

World Index 

174.54 

-1.32 

-0.75 

+17.03 

Regional fextaen 





Asia/PadBc 

129.92 

-1.07 

-0-82 

+5-26 

Europe 

183.45 

-1.02 

-0.88 

+13-80 

N. America 

203.65 

-2.06 

-1.00 

+25.78 

S. America 

170.46 

-0.08 

-0.05 

+48.96 

Industrial kndoxas 





Capital goods 

225.88 

-2.47 

-1.08 

+32.16 

Consumer goods 

188.66 

•0.04 

-0.02 

+16.87 

Energy 

195.13 

-2.49 

-1-26 

+14^0 

Finance 

133.57 

-1.29 

-086 

+14.69 

Miscellaneous 

18960 

-128 

-0.67 

+17.20 

Raw Materials 

187.75 

-6.07 

-3.13 

+7.05 

Service 

164.72 

-1.77 

-1-06 

+19.95 

Utilities 

167.36 

■0.08 

-0.05 

+16.66 

Tbe International HerM Tribune WprU Stock tndnCmda dw L/.& rioter vahras o4 

2S0 Wematfcnaiy invoataWs stocks ftwn 25 countries. For mom Momutona tree 

booklet is avattabla by writing to Trie Trib IndeKlOl Avenue Charles de Grata, 

1 8Z5B1 Netidy Cede* France. 


ampmioyaoomaoroNom. | 

HUB 

Lew dose Prav. 


High Lew 

Chne Prw. 


Mexico 

CbbkCPO 

BvModeini 

GpaGoaaAl 

GpoFBcomer 

GpoFta Induisa 

KfcMCkefcMas 

Televisa 0*0 

TeiMtxL 


66.10 

24® 

4115 

14.14 

4100 

59® 

378 

36.10 

37® 

134® 

20® 


Beta bdac 50M5S 
PmvfeeKSBIi® 

65® 65® g® 
2400 2410 2390 
41® 41® 41® 
14® 1414 1398 
4258 4190 42® 
58® 58.5$ 58® 
346 148 370 

36® 3605 36® 
37® 37® 37® 
133® 133® 13150 
20.10 20.15 2070 


Sao Paulo Bm«MtolUH1f 

Frortaov 11 85070 


BradescoPfd 
BrohranPM 
CeentaPW 
CESPPM 
Capet 
EMnbras 
ItnuUmoaPfd 
ISenlchn 


Milan 




W" 

GcnwoRAste 
M 
INA 


MMohenco 

MoMMfcon 

OOwffl 

Minted 

PWI 

RA5 

RalaBtaB 

S Paata Tarite 

Tckcam Nate 
TIM 


MlBTetamdSeroMteSM 


’SS ’3555 

5650 5510 

1583 1551 

267® 26230 
3625 3520 
B525 8330 

10220 100® 

5710 S<05 

37100 363® 
1«® 14470 
2656 2605 

53*5 5325 
7910 7810 
115BS 11410 
HO 110 
665 654 

26® 210 
aw 47« 

150® 14690 
218® 21050 
13800 132® 
11115 1091S 
61® 5980 


14615 

4550 

55S0 

750 

262® 

3610 

8420 

10075 

5630 

3*8® 

14490 

2620 

5355 

7815 

11465 

1113 

655 

2435 

4745 

148® 

2139) 

M 

1094S 

6005 


14890 

4465 

5525 

1S57 

26300 

3540 

B30Q 

I0I78 

5705 

36450 

14400 

2615 

5315 

7880 

11350 

1115 

653 

2590 

4718 

MM 

20800 

13403 

10M0 

6010 


J PM 

PouBstoLuz 

SdNadcnol 

SouaCroz 

TetefamPfd 

Teton® 

Tetesp PSd 
UnBranoo 
IhtattnsPM 
CVRDPM 


11® 11® 
8ia® mam 
57418 55® 
B5® 8300 
1775 17® 
S#® 52S® 
mm *renn 
525.10 520® 
467® 46495 
•wnq n 315,08 
210JJ1 209® 
3630 3620 
11® 11® 
148® 144® 
194® 191® 
15SU» 1549B 
348.00 34230 
3949 39® 
1155 11® 
28.19 2L51 


11® 11.10 
mioo 811.99 
56® 55.98 
8350 B2J0 
1775 17.02 
S2SM' 542.17 

630.00 650® 

570.00 572 -W 
465® 467® 
3U® 306® 
209® 210® 

3670 3670 
II® II® 
145® 144® 
191 ill 192® 
1.%® 157® 
345® 33HJJ! 
39® 3979 
11® 1175 
2651 27.71 


Taipei 

oniarLHeliB 

ChongHwo Bk 
ChlaoTungBk 
CMna Deretand 
CWnn Steel 
Phi Bon k 
fdnnasa Staflc 
HuaHanBk 
tall Gann Bk 
NanYa Plenties 
SMn Kong Life 
T®ean5enl 


Stack MaW todec9632J4 
Pretaoroc 9556.12 


UWL... _ . 

UH Worid CMi 


149 145J0 

146 

147 

116 

114 1R50 

115 

76 

73 

76 

72 

ra 

118 

119 

1® 

31® 

®JS0 

31.10 

31.10 

117 

114 11450 Hi® 

43 

42 

4150 

62 

121 

117 

117 119® 

57 

56 

suo 

56 

73 

71® 

72 

72® 

100-50 

98 

W 

96 

145 

1® 14150 14150 

4SJ8 

4540 

4570 

46® 

1® 

117 123-50 

120 

64JS0 

63 

63® 

43® 


Tokyo 


Seoul 

Oaoon 

Daewoo Heavy 

Kami El PW 
KnRsEKbBk 
LGSeroioan 
Petaig dm St 
Sbhsoih) twtaf 
lEVc 


Caera rage Sera m 755J8 
Previa**: 74273 

97500 951® 95500 97500 
81® 7910 7950 81® 
21« Z14S0 21.SSS 215® 
141® 133® 133® 135® 
267® 259)0 257® 26808 
57® 5540 5640 5510 

480® 453® 455® 481® 
632&B <09® fiW 61900 
45SSS 457® 487® 

74S30 725® 73500 747® 
W BW 9550 9510 
5090® 497®0 5000® 5000® 


I Nippon Air 
Amroy 

AsaWBat* 
AnaM Chan 
AsahtSote 
flkXokjrtAMto 
Sk Yokohama 
Biidfleatone 
CanaO „ 
ChohuElec 


OP Pitt 

D&ltang 

DahwBcnk 

OateaHowe 

DotwaSec 


Singapore 


Montreal 

Bar Mob Cora 

QtaTncA 

QtaUtBA 

CTFWSw 

GazMdn 

a-WestLSecn 

bnOfOs _ 

UweStacGip 

LaMawtin 

Nad Bk Canada 

KS 

Ou£bC£0TP 
Rogers Conn B 
RoyteBkCda 


IwtatTttMreJgLe 

PlWtottL363CB 


51 

5835 

2716 

27.15 

39-45 

3970 

44 

4316 

1845 

m 

32Vb 

32 

41£ 

4116 

3» 

2065 

17® 

A 

3880 

37 

36b 

2735 

26b 

11 

11 

64 

4345 



43Vi 4385 
18K 1WS 
32* 3245 
4m 4i® 
3511 3U0 
20V) 20* 
1775 17VS 
3US 3*75 
37 37 

27 2735 
J1 1» 


DBS I 

FraserLNawe 
HKLml* 
JardMatben- 
JardShtagic* 
KepfitiA 
K*peJBank 
KcppeiFete 
-- 'Umd 


Oslo 

S 


Ss. 


OffiaASA 

PetaGeoSvc 

3£S2r A 

TmraooeoAQft 

StatanridAea 


137 

205 

26® 

31® 

153 

46 

<78 

415 

3® 

159 

S58 

437 

15U0 

131 

KT. 

50 


OBXMtaT 

Pittas 71873 

130 >35 136 

201 204 302 

2530 25® 26^ 
31 31® 31® 
147 147 149 

45® 45® 46 

471 473 478 

4W 412 411 

293 293 295 

155 156 159-50 

550 558 555 

417® 42550 425 

149® 19 152 

128 128 131 

M.T. K.T. 620 
49® 47® 49® 


OS Union ft F 
PMmarHri® 
Seaifannna 
SngAirttt*® 

5SnffL®d 

Stag Pres* F 
Stag Tech tad 


iBank 

UtdlndusbU 

UMOS®BkF 

MagTatHdgi 

"-bus**** 


i 

5Mb Ttaac 119) J7 


PlHfow 187538 

MS 

540 

5® 

140 

525 

5.15 

5.15 

410 

1270 

11® 

12 

11® 

11® 

1148 

11® 

11® 

aw 

a 9i 

195 

m 

17.16 

16JS 

17 

17® 

4® 

431 

m 

442 

9,10 

m 

380 

an 

344 

124 

138 

124 

745 

770 

7® 

7® 

472 

404 

418 

400 

585 

5® 

5® 

55 

170 

3® 

342 

370 

444 

4® 

444 

452 

474 

4.12 

4.18 

412 

1340 

12® 

12® 

13® 

830 

7® 

885 

155 

645 

635 

635 

645 

6® 

670 

675 

635 

12 

11® 

11® 

12® 

7 45 

6M 

7 

7.10 

25.90 

2410 

2470 

3M0 

370 

344 

370 

370 

2® 

246 

246 

148 

276 

274 

274 

274 

1® 

145 

187 

187 

13® 

12® 

12.M 

1170 

176 

370 

170 

3® 


t Japan Ry 


Fanuc 


stocltholm “ASSESS 

AGAB 111 1® Hi 109® 

ABBA 119 116® 119 117,58 

fflr 1^13^13^?^ 

■a 



HMadlSSel 


Pminis: 1 

10® 

1040 

10® 

708 

6V5 

702 

3400 

34® 

3470 

m 

BS2 

860 

618 

600 

Ml 

1070 

inuu 

1020 

7300 

rm 

7300 

5W 

516 

529 

27IW 

2700 

27® 

37® 

3600 

37® 

2040 

2«0 

20® 

1940 

19® 

1940 

2/M 

2720 

2760 

855 

850 

m 

14*0 

1440 

14® 

589 

575 

583 

1430 

1330 

ICO 

IU 

751 

764 

7320b 

7070a 

7170a 

2870 

77« 

7850 

5530a 

WOa 

66Uia 

MW 

ms 

WO 

5190 

i960 

5090 

MU 

1529 

•1540 

4830 

4700 

4810 

17W 

16N 

1100 

11® 

11® 

11® 

12S1 

12® 

12® 

3780 

36® 

3780 

17® 

1720 

17® 

391 

365 

W 

530 

511 

520 

6650 

<600 

66® 

475 

46/ 

4® 

9430a 

9370B 

MK)a 

3420 

33® 

3400 

m 

SB 

607 

2190 

7160 

2190 

1770 

1730 

1770 

47 4 

466 

471 

330 

» 

320 

683 

675 

682 

ff 

975 

175 

980 

179 

817 

785 

815 

483 

475 

476 

92® 

1960 

8990 

1920 

926U 

I960 

575 

®5 

sn 

m 

431 

446 

1900 

1870 

IWi 

4800 

4600 

4790 

2410 

am 

2400 

13® 

1330 

1340 

1320 

1290 

1300 

309 

300 

m 

«8 

583 

AW 

ino 

16® 

1700 

B14 

001 

004 

m 

670 

m 

17® 

1700 

17® 

10» 

1070 

1090 


690 


862 

621 


527 



6116 

29.70 



Vienna ATxiedRi 3 nj 5 

PiataeWH 

BoeNeMJddeti 1028.® 10® 1006 101 2® 
CmflknHtPfd 590 57490 576 588 

EACeneml 3189® 3171 3753 3US 

EVN 16)0-801 57X50 15K5M 1 605-E' 

'Ftagmaen Wien 521.90 sob® 51150 an 
OMV 1787 17321736-90176555 

On! BddlSz 876 S7a® 875 877 

V A State 574 546 5565S 560 

V A Tech 2092375.10 239020130 

Wlenertafg Bov 3*5 6 25002569.75 7656 


Wellington 


060 Tartan , 
lia Toro Tina 
584 TOyota Matos- 
1330 Yomanmnn 

term*! MOO 



NZSE-41 tadae 241271 
Piwtooe: 245072 

4® 455 4® <55 

176 176 1® 1® 

140 373 374 136 

425 470 475 4.21 

540 5.33 578 572 

1J5 1® 171 1-91 

370 371 373 126 

194 191 192 193 

744 7® 742 7® 

rt.T. *LT. N.T. 11.95 


365 

513 


472 


583 


457 

305 

678 

999 

173 

781 

476 

9070 

1970 

550 

438 


296 

593 


812 

657 


Toronto 

AMMCam. 
Alberta Energy 
Man Atom 
Andersen Eta 
Bk Stated 
Bk Now Scotia 
BamckGota 
BCE 

BCTriecann 
Staten Rum 
BOfflixiidterB 
Coraeoo 
CtBC 

CdnNaURte 

CdnKatRes 

CdnOtcWPri 

Cdn Pacific 

Coaikwo 

Dtecca 

Dontar 

Donohue A 
DuPonlCita A 
EdperBrasan 
Em-rviln Mag 
Fairfax Fud 

FaloonMdge 
FletetarChaBA 
Franco Newda 
GUICdoRes 
bnoerkdOII 
toco 


TSEtetastritai 06475 
P rotate *791 J2 


UMkral 
Laewen Group 
UoanBIBId 


Moon 


MM 

76 

2<u55 

25b 



37W 

57M 

32 

51® 

32 

51® 

32b 

52.® 

Zurich 


in 

1775 

1/® 

17.90 


2317 

56.95 

5*40 

«<n 

66® 

ABBB _ 

64® 

63® 

63X5 

63.90 


5» 

33 

3210 

37.® 

32.10 

AtoufeseR _ 

1404 

4040 

®65 

39.70 

®05 

Ares-SennoB 

2710 

3SU 

35 

35 

35 

AtdR 

B55 

36 

32® 

36 

SS 

36 

3745 

36 

3265 


2284 

3995 

54 

5320 

6476 

BK Vision 

1200 

m 

3U0 

‘JIM 

J/76 

Oba Spec Own 
aariortft 

136 

m 

68® 

t»M 


10® 

37b 

3770 

3/® 

3/® 

Crd 5uisseGp R 

1V275 

36. A) 

3575 

mb 

3575 

EMdroMHB 

538 

6810 

4775 

12® 

4» 

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®li 

4275 

38 

2995 

42® 

38 

30.15 

4270 

38 

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1195 

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n.n 

LtadfaWLBB 

S99 

3415 

34 

34 

347D 

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1907 

3135 

32b 

3276 

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ttaartbR 


m 

23 

& 

MW 

Oeifftn Sued R 

161 

23b 

23 

23b 

ParuesaHldB 

1920 

m 

379 

382 

3B2L45 

M10 

PhcirnViHi B 

966 

mw 

2790 

77.90 

RctemtA 

BOO 

24® 

Mill 

74,10 

2430 

RnfliPC 

340 

341* 

33b 

33.70 

34 

ReeteHdgPC 

13820 

1A45 

1070 

HI 36 

1DJD 

SBCR 

419® 

75 

4145 

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«® 

HAS 

mm 

74b 

«9S 


19® 

30® 

SI® 

Si 05 

SI 70 

51.® 

SMHB 

900 

71.10 

M® 

m 

».n 

Sutter R 

1225 

44b 

43b 

44 

Sffikw fcift". R 

2194 


1886 

19 

18® 

SaOssteR 

19® 

nm 

UAO 

8780 

UBS 6 

1596 

M 

11** 

1195 

12b 

WorihurR 

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29 

29.16 

28® 

Zurich AssurR 

605 


5PUaragc3SK® 
PrevleuL 364095 


2285 2304 
548 550 

1375 1375 

2620 2620 
850 850 

2205 2210 
3810 3860 
1132 ■ 1155 
132 135® 
1036 1047 
1® 1B67S 
537 537 

6745 6810 
46® 46® 
1231 1264 

m 593 
1886 1897 
2203 2219 
1® IS 
1890 19® 
917 917 

21® 2185 
328 339® 
13350 13390 
410 410 

1930 19® 
3020 30® 
882 894 

1199 1219 
21® 2164 
19® 19® 
1542 1555 
1371 1372 

991 594 


2287 

555 

i.m 

2695 

851 

2270 

3990 

1198 

1® 

1052 

19075 

537 

68 ® 

4780 

1273 

595 

19® 

2279 

IS 

1925 

9® 

7100 

340 

13770 

415 

19® 

3020 

898 

12 ® 

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1946 

1595 

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PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDA*, AUGUST 15, 1997 


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Hopewell’s Shares Leap 12.8% 

P ulation About an Investment From Beijing Sets Off Surge 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. AUGUST 15, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


page it 


Share* 


in 


HONG KONG-'-' 

^^rdon^Wu'^osenei-fv'i'’ 011 ' 11 b ' V 

siakeiocJS? 2 ■ t ° mpan - v ma >' sell a 
10 '-nmese interests. 

hour Sf SS Stane ? 10 sur " e in the filial 

Kongdou^a u I" d4d 5 3 2 Hon ® 

Horewdi ,r U ,K PUI ^structuring and 
rhe^l to 8 eth ?. r - you'll see a jump in 
sednr^, Pn “- said Kent Sorter. 

rS H ^ ? f. m / na I er aI Nikk0 Secu - 

£?'*<*; I Lid • Bui a takeover would 

, h . a ™“' the k on| y thing that L-ould drive 
the shares thai much.” 

benriES* 11 has . ,a ^ ed Hon S Kong’s 

™5?3 k * ,ock mdex for rhe 

ujupie of years, dogged bv debt prob- 

nTnJU't ltS ma . bllit y ^ get a S3 .7 billion 
Bangkok transit project on track. 

fi T hursda >'- «s shares had risen 

r P ercem this year while the Hana Seng 
index was gaining 23 percent. “ 
i he shares only started to climb in 



Hopewell's chief. Sir Gordon Wu. 

recent weeks on growing speculation 
that Chinese parries, including China 
Travel International Investment Hong 
Kong Ltd. and China Everbrighi Hold- 


ings Ltd., would buy a stake in the 
company. 

Hopewell executives were not avail- 
able for comment. 

Sir Gordon, chairman and managing 
director of Hopewell, reported last 
month to Thailand's transportation und 

communications minisier. Suwat Lip- 
topallop, that his company would not be 
able to open the first phase of a planned 
S3. 7 billion elevated transportation net- 
work in Bangkok for the Asian Games 
in December ! 998 as promised. Sir Gor- 
don blamed Thailand's economic and 
currency crisis. 

Thailand said Aug. 1 that the com- 
pany had missed a deadline for sub- 
mitting revised plans for the project, one 
of ihree transit systems aimed at easing 
traffic congestion in Bangkok. 

■ Three Gorges Dam Contractor* 

Chinese authorities are e\pected to 
announce in ihe next few days the 
names of foreign contractors for t he first 
14 turbines and generators for the Three 
Gorges dam on the Yangtze river. 
Agence France-Presse reported from 
Beijing. 


New Zealanders Cleared in ‘Wine Box’ 


C.’uttlr.l h"0„r 5 ;jn f r . w «r> 

WELLINGTON — A 30-month par- 
liamentary inquiry ended Thursday after 
no corporate fraud or conspiracy was 
found to be behind the tax-avoidance 
maneuvers of companies usine the Cook 
Islands as a haven in the 1980s. 

The so-called wine- box inquirv 
named after a box of stolen corporate 
papers that sparked the investigation, 
found New Zealand's tax commission- 
er. David Henry, and the director of its 
Serious Fraud Office. Charles Stun, in- 
nocent of unlawful conduct, impropri- 
ety or incompetence. 

The former chief justice who headed 
the inquiry. Sir Ronald Davison, said 
there was no proof of corporate fraud in 
any of the four transactions examined at 
the hearings. He also concluded there 
was no evidence of a conspiracy by 
corporations or individuals to defraud 
the tax system. 

Several corporations were alleged to 
have cycled tens of millions of dollars 


through the Cook Islands, where bosus 
tax-payment certificates were allegedly 
provided in return for cash donations to 
the Cook islands ‘ government between 
1984 and 1988. New Zealand compa- 
nies. such. as Brierley Investments Ltd.. 
and Japanese financial institutions were 
implicated. 

The inquiry' panel's ruling said that the 
tax transactions found in the wine box 
showed “clearly that they were imple- 
mented by corporates intent on escaping 
the impact of the heavy taxes imposed on 
their activities at that rime.” 

The deals were "only a few of the 
many transactions undertaken by banks, 
financial institutions and corporates 
throughout New Zealand during the lat- 
ter part of the 1980s. 

“One might question the ethics of 
seeking to escape the impact of heavy 
taxation.” the ruling said. ”bur the real- 
ities were that tax was regarded as a cost 
of doing business and something to be 
minimized to the extent possible within 


the letter of the law.” The original al- 
legations against the corporations and 
senior officials were made in 1993 by 
Winston Peters, who now i> New Zea- 
land's deputy prime minister and treas- 
urer. but was then an opposition politi- 
cian. 

Using Parliament's protection 
against slander. Mr. Peters accused Mr. 
Henry and Mr. Stun of a conspiracy to 
cover up corporate lax fraud. 

The panel said Mr. Peters “grossly 
overplayed his hand” in alleging that 
some companies committed fraud in 
using the Cook Islands as a tax haven. 

When Mr. Peters was asked whether 
he would apologize to the two senior 
officials he had accused, he replied: 
“Most certainly not.” He also said he 
would “consider all the options” for an 
action to overturn the findings of the 
inquiry. Opposition-party legislators 
demanded that Mr. Peters resign for 
what one described as “vicious” and 
“baseless” allegations. (AP. Bloomberg) 


Singapore Leads 
Japan Business's 
Asia Rankings 

Agrnrr Frunce-Pressr 

TOKYO — Japanese executives 
find Burma. Cambodia, Laos and 
Vietnam “extremely backward” 
places to do business, while In- 
donesia. the Philippines and Thai- 
land pose ‘ 'occasional 

hindrances,” according to a re- 
gional survey. 

The survey by the Nikkei In- 
dustrial .Daily also found that the 
executives had "no particular 
complaints” with either Malaysia 
or Brunei. 

Singapore was deemed an "ex- 
cellent” place to do business and 
easily ranked first out of the 10 
Southeast Asian countries covered 
in the survey of 34 Japanese 
companies with operations in the 
region. The companies surveyed 
included electrical-machinery 
manufacturers, automakers and 
trading houses. 

Brunei, ranked second overall, 
has no particular problems except 
in human resources, technology, 
living conditions and administra- 
tive transparency, where respond- 
ents cited occasional obstacles to 
doine business. 

Laos and Cambodia, ranked 
ninth and 10th, are perceived as 
extremely backward in all areas. 
Cambodia had the most backward 
financial system among all the 
countries surveyed, according to 
the respondents, and was the most 
underdeveloped nation in tenns of 
administrative efficiency and 
transparency. 


Hyundai Motor Blames Strikes 
For Sharply Lower First-Half Net 


“ .'•xrtU.t f». OtrS’jp Fnm: Oupji. ha 

SEOUL — Hyundai Motor Co. re- 
ported weaker-than-expected first-half 
results Thursday and said strikes had hurt 
its profit. 

Hyundai Motor, South Korea's 
largest carmaker, said first-half net 
profit fell 85 percent, to 28.16 billion 
won ($314.9 million) from 191.2 billion 
won a year earlier, as its sales slipped to 
5.42 trillion won from 5.56 trillion. 

On Tuesday, another leading car- 
maker. Kia Motors Coip.. said its half- 
year net loss had more than tripled, to 37 
billion won from 10.3 billion won a year 
earlier. 

Hyundai Motor said its profit had 
fallen because of a strike in January and 
sluggish sales at home and abroad. 

“A weaker yen against the dollar in 
the early part of the first half also neg- 
atively affected sales abroad.” a Hy- 
undai spokesman said. 

Yang Tong Ki, an analyst at Dong- 
bang Peregrine Securities, said he ex- 
pected the auto industry to perform bet- 
ter in the second half amid the 
introduction of a range of new models 
and signs of an economic recovery. 

“The economy is unlikely to become 
worse io the second half,” he said. 
“Exports will recover gradually, and 
new models to be unveiled should boost 
their sales to a great extent.” 

“Overall, automakers are likely to be 
on the path toward a recovery next 
year,” Mr. Yang said. 

Separately. Korean Air said its net 
loss narrowed nearly 50 percent, to 
134.4 billion won, in the first half as 
freight revenue jumped. 

Sales rose 14 percent, to 1.9 trillion 
won, lifted by a 30 percent increase in 
cargo transport, which genera: ed 492 


billion won in sales. Bui the carrier still 
posted a loss as operating costs includ- 
ing fuel prices rose and foreign-ex- 
change losses swelled because of the 
weakness of the won against the dollar, 
said Lee Kyu Min. a finance official at 
the company. 

In other earnings news. Samsung Co., 
South Korea’s largest trading house, 
said its net profit rose 2.3 percent, to 
18.9 billion won. in the first half. 

Samsung Co. said sales grew 14.4 
percent to 13.29 trillion won in the peri- 
od. But Samsung Electronics Co. said its 
net profit for the six months declined to 
123.2 billion woo from 453.4 billion 
won. Sales rose slightly, to 8.91 trillion 
won from 8.71 trillion won. 

Meanwhile, a report said that South 
Korean public companies so far had 
posted an 8.4 percent drop in. first-half 
earnings, with banking and electronics 
companies leading the slump. 

Daewoo Economic Research Insti- 
tute said a survey of preliminary results 
from 323 companies had shown average 
earnings per share failing to 61 0 won in 
the fust six months of 1997 from 686 
woo a year earlier. 

The profit decline underscores how 
the country's slowest economic growth 
in four years is affecting South Korean 
companies. Five of the nation's top 40 
conglomerates have either collapsed or 
been placed under bankruptcy protec- 
tion by their banks this year, and analysts 
say they see little sign of improvement. 

“Many large companies are suffering 
financial difficulties,” said Eugene 
Yun, managing director of Deutsche 
Morgan Grenfell in Seoul. “Moreover, 
an anticipated economic pick-up in the 
second half will be minor.” 

( AFP. Bloomberg) 


Offi cials Confirm Bre-X Suicide 

The Associated Press 

mi r.ARY Alberta — The investigation into the gold 
dine Bre-X Minerals Ltd. has yet to result in 
scanchJ smr 8 Hian investigators said they had finally 

%££$?£*** company's chief geologist com- 

Mr. de Guzman W £££“, compini y ^ wen , hank- 
involving Br e -X m aunV x old ^ on Borneo — once 

legist who ran ihe P™]“‘ /go-rams) of gold bought from a 

w Earnings Nearly Double 

JAKARTA - £SE 

International, said the firsts* months of 1997. 

Salesrose 10.4 percen , » ^ automotive, heavy 
AS* £ etecttonks.totc 

equipment and timber mdus ^ ifasscmbles^ Toyota. Daibat 
industry and financial sen- L •«, ve hicics in Indone* 

Peugeot, Isuzil Nissan and BM 



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Central Tokyo, a new interest for Li Ka-shin 


o' 


Hong Kong’s Li 
Invests in Japan 


Zf/.s'wi/'oi 1 .\<iu 

HONGKONG — Li Ka- 
shing. one of Hong Kong’s 
most astute traders and in- 
fluential businessmen, has 
made his first move into 
Japan, spending SI 87.5 
million for almost half of a 
project being developed by 
his son in central Tokyo. 

"We see this as a" very 
good opportunity for us io 
further diversify our over- 
seas property portfolio." 
Laura Cheung, a spokes- 
woman for* Hutchison 
Whampoa Lid.. said 
Wednesday. Huichison 
Whampoa is the company 
controlled by Mr. Li that 
made ihe investment. 

Mr. Li appears to be bet- 
ting that prices for Tokyo 
commercial property, which 
have fallen 70 percent from 
their peak in 1991. are ready 
for a rebound. 

Huichison, whose in- 
terests span Hong Kong. 
China. Britain, Canada, 
Panama and the Bahamas, 
is getting the stake in rhe 
development near Tokyo 
Station at a'substantial dis- 
count to whai Mr. Li's son. 
Richard, paid. 

Pacific Century Group, 
the privately held Singa- 
pore-based property com- 
pany controlled by Richard 
Li, who is also deputy 
hairman of Hutchison. 


paid ihe equivalent of S753 
million at current exchange 
rales. Hutchison's 45 per- 
cenr stake v alues the proj- 
ect at about $417 million. 

Li Ka-shing. an adviser to 
Chinese leaders and a folk 
hero among Hong Kong 
Chinese. controls four 
companies on the bench- 
mark Hang Seng Index. His 
flagship. Cheung Kong 
Holdings Ltd. is one of the 
biggest property developers 
in ihe territory and owns al- 
most half of Hutchison. 
Hutchison's interests include 
propeny. ports, retailing and 
telecommunications. 

■ Jardine Seeks Data 

The Kesw ick family . 
which controls the Jardine 
business empire, has asked 
large shareholders to dis- 
close their stakes in three of 
its holding companies. 
Agence France-Presse re- 
ported Thursday, quoting 
local reports. 

Investors with at least a 3 
percent stake in the units 
were asked to reveal their 
holdings, the Chinese-lan- 
guage newspaper Oriental 
Daily News said. The fam- 
ily denied die move had 
been aimed at flushing out a 
possible takeover bid after 
Li Ka-shing acquired a 3 
percent stake in two units 
last week. 


1 

II Investor’s Asia H 

Hong Kong 

Singapore 

Tokvo 

— 

Hang Seng 

Straits Times Nikkei 225 


■T7ffl£t 

- 275-- — 

- — 22030 


,6000 

-f as*- — - 

21030 • - 

- - _ 

15000- -~ A 


— • 290K-- j uV 

'Vi- 

MOO — /I 

2050 

L. JC005 J_ _ 

...L 

13000 Vj/ — 

— - 197= — I- 

iso&jyy - 


120CC - 

l6A1 MAM 

J j A M 'A M 

jTa ,,ck m am 

J j A 

J997 

1997 

1997 


Exchange 

Index 

Thursday Prev. 

% 



Close . Close 

Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

16,497.71 16,482.93 +0.09 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

1,891.77 1.875.38 

-t-0.87 

Sydney 

AH Ordinaries 

2,627.40 2,623.60 

+0.14 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

19,222.62 19,008.60 +1.13 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

918.54 808.83 

+1.07 

Bangkok .. 

SET 

628.69 632.73 

-0.64 

Seoul 

Composite Index 

755.73 762.73 

-0.91 

Taipei 

Stock Market Index 9,632.34 9.558. 1 2 

+0.B0 

Manila- 

PSE 

2y493.49 2.527.08 

-1.33 

Jakarta 

Composite Index 

643.01 658.60 

-2.37 

Wellington 

NZSE-40 

2.452.01 2.450.92 

+6.04 

Bombay 

Sensitive Index 

4,320.97 4.370.13 

-1.12 


Source: Telekurs 


lii'irrnjUMnjJ HrrjM Tnl'iin. 


Very briefly: 


• China's central bank governor. Dai Nianglong, forecast fast 
economic growth and low inflation over the next three years, 
providing a platform for major structural reforms until 2000. 
“China's gross domestic product for this year w ill approach 
10 percent, and I can say with confidence that price rises will 
be under 4 percent." Mr. Dai said. 

• China will contribute SI billion to an emergency credit 
package for Thailand, joining more than a dozen other 
nations in a rescue led by the International Monetary Fund. 

• India plans to phase out controls on prices of petroleum 
products and introduce a free-marker mechanism within four 
years, senior officials said. 

• SM Summit Holdings Ltd.'s shares leaped in heavy trading 
to close at 76.5 Singapore cents (51 U.S. cents), up *11. after 
executives denied allegations of software copyright violations 
made by the Business Software Alliance, a trade group. 

• Brierley Investments Ltd. of New Zealand formed a joint- 
venture investment company with its 20 percent shareholder, 
Ca merlin Group Bhd. of Malaysia. The company, to be 
known as BIL Camerlin Ltd., will have initial capital of S150 
million. Brierley will invest S105 million and Camerlin will 
provide S45 million. 

• Moody's Investors Services Inc. said a report written in 
July saying that Westpac Banking Corp.'s bad loans were 
rising had been wrong and that problem loans had actually 
fallen. 

• Cable & Wireless PLC of Britain will be allowed to take 
control of Australia's Optus Communications Pty., Peter 
Costello, Australia's treasurer, said. 

• Hong Kong Dragon Airlines Ltd. said it would upgrade its 
Airbus fleet and that the fleet could more than double in size in 
the next four years. The airline plans to start replacing its seven 
leased Airbus A320-200s with new leased Aa20s in 1998. 

• Citibank agreed with the government-backed Shanghai 
Bund Buildings Function Transformation Corp. to buy 
prime space in Shanghai’s historic Peace Hotel on the Bund, 
the citv’s traditional financ ial district. Reuters . AFP. Blt-mha >\ 


REPUBLIC OF LEBANON 
MINISTRY OF HOUSING AND COOPERATIVES 
THE PUBLIC COOPERATION FOR HOUSING 
Invitation for Tender 
for the 

Finance, Design, Build & TYansfer 
of 10,000 Tlirnkey Dwelling Units 

The Lebanese Government wishes to build 10.000 turnkey dwelling units as part of its plan to 
fulfill housing sector. 

The Ministry of Housing & Cooperatives, represented by the Public cooperation for housing 
(P.C.H.) invites applications from suitably, capable qualified Lebanese. Arab or International Institutions 
wishing to undertake this vital project to participate for design, execute, finance & deliver 10.000 turnkey 
dwelling units. 

The work includes the following main elements: 

Residential Units: the (P.C.H.) program includes residential complexes that will accommodate around 
10,000 dwellings units (with a total built up area of 1.000.000m2). The 10.000 dwelling units will be 
allocated on sites appointed by (P.C.H.J on the Lebanese Territory with a minimum of 200 dwellings in 
each site. 

Activities & Public Buildings: T he (P.C.H.) program includes, also, shops, workshops complexes, schools 
and administrative buildings (with a total built up area of 40,000m2). 

The Road Network: A complete internal road network that- serves the dements in each location and 
connects the location with the nearest existing roads network. 

The Public Utility Netw orks to be execuled are; 

• Water network including the main and secondary distribution networks and house connections. 

• Stormwater network including water inlets, collection network, culverts, inspection manholes for the 
primaty and secondary network. 

• Sewage network to include main and secondary collectors, house connections where applicable, as well 
as the trunk collector leading to the main pumping station which will be constructed as part of another 
contract. 

• The electrical distribution network which includes medium and low voltage cables, transformer 
stations and house connections to be installed only in the planned residential, commercial and workshop 
developments. 

• Telecommunication network to include telephone exchange, inspection, chambers and manholes. 
Telephone cables will be laid by M.P.T. (Ministiy of Post and Telecommunications). 

• The street lighting network which also extends to public gardens and open spaces and which includes 
the installation of fighting poles and associated electrical distribution network. 

• Landscaping of roads and open spaces to include soft and hard landscaping and associated irrigation 
works. 

Participation Criteria; All participates shall meet the following criterias: 

• Average annual turnover (defined as billing for work in progress and completed) over the last five years 
of USD 50.000,000 (Fifty Million). 

• Successful experience as prime Constructor in the execution of a similar project of a nature and 
complexity comparable to the proposed contract with a value not less than 100,000,000 USD. 

• Should demonstrate that he has access to or has available resources to finance the construction of this 
project which reach 500.000,000 USD, according to the required time &. conditions as follow: 

The time for Completion of the works is 3 years (Three). 

Companies can bid for. 

Complex of Houses in any Location or locations 
or 

Complex of Houses for the Whole Project 

Applicants may obtain further information from, examine and acquire the tender documents at: 
the office of the Employer starting Wednesday August 20, 1997. from head quarter of the Public 
Cooperation for Housing- (P.C.H) At Adlieh Area - Nasr Bldg., Beirut. Lebanon. Tel. (01) 426284 
Facsimile (01) 426277. 

Tender documents may be purchased by interested applicants on application to the above office, and upon 
payments of non-refundable fees of 5,000 USD by certified cheque to the order of the (P.C.H. ). 

All must be accompanied by the Tender Security, which will be Ten Million U.S. Dollars 
(US$ 10.000,000) or (USS 200,000) for each package of 200 dwelling units, or any amount that will be 
proportional to the number of dwelling units that the contractor intends to submit for. and must be 
delivered to the address given above at or before 12:00 noon of Thursday October 30, 1997. Tenders will 
be opened at 12:30 PM the same date in the presence of Applicant representatives who will choose to 
attend. 


V 


v 








































































































































































































PAGE 20 



^ Hcralb^KSnbunc 

Sports 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 15, 1997 


Daly Tames Course With 66 for Early PGA Lead 


i 


Kite Ties Azinger and Leonard 
At 68; Woods and Els Shoot 70 


Mark Phifippoussxs, the No. 3 
seed, serving to David Wheaton 
at the Pilot Pen on Thursday. 
Wheaton won 6-7 (2-7), 6-3, 6-4. 

Agassi Wins Again 

TENNIS Andre Agassi is finally 
starting to see something positive in 
his game. 

After three straight first-round 
tournament losses and a slide to No. 
74 in the latest ATP Tour rankings, 
the former No. 1 player in the world 
reached the third round of the RCA 
Championships at the Indianapolis 
Tennis Center on Wednesday. 

Agassi had to rally from a slow 
start before beating Olivier Delaitre 
of France, 7-6 (7-3;. 6-1. Agassi, 
the No. 14 seed, was trailing. 2-5 
love-40, before he saved seven set 
points and took the opening set. 

The victory sends him into the 
third round, die first time he's ad- 
vanced that far in a tournament 
since ApriL He'll play third-seeded 
Alex Corretja of Spain, who ad- 
vanced with a 6-2, 6-7 (5-7), 6-2 
victory over Armaird Boetsch of 
France. 

Pete Sampras made a successful 
debut in the tournament by beating 
qualifier Joshua Eagle of Australia, 
6-3, 7-5, in a second-round match. 
Sampras had a first-round bye. 

“ft’s always tough playing your 
first match on this court," said 
Sampras, who struggled at times 
against Eagle, ranked 585th in the 
world. 

• Monica Seles, the top seed, 
outfought Sabine Appelmans of 
Belgium, seeded No. 16. 6-3, 7-5 
Wednesday to advance to the 
quarterfinals of the du Maurier 
hardcourt tournament in Toronto. 

• Sergi Bruguera beat Byron 

Black of Zimbabwe, 6-3. 6-2 an the 
second round pf the Pilot Pen In- 
ternational in New Haven, Con- 
necticut. ( AP ) 

U.S. Wins Admiral’s Cup 

sailing The United States over- 
took defending champion Italy at 
the end of the Fastnet Race on 
Wednesday to win the Admiral's 
Cup for the first time since 1969. 

Italy appeared poised for victory 
after its big boat "Madina Milano' ’ 
crossed First ahead of "Flash Gor- 
don 3" of the United States in the 
605-mile (974 kilometer) race — 
the final event of die nine-race 
regatta. 

But a sudden drop in wind ma- 
rooned Italy's mid-class and al- 
lowed the United States to seize 
victory in the annual competition 
from teams of three yachts off the 
south coast of England. (AP) 

Phoenix Park Shooting 

baseball Mary Rose Wilcox, 
supervisor of Maricopa County, 
Arizona, was shot and wounded by 
a gunman angry over her support of 
a new major league ballpark in 
Phoenix. The injury was not life- 
threatening. 

The gunman said he shot Wilcox 
because she supported a sales lax to 
partially pay for the Arizona Dia- 
mondbacks' new ballpark, being 
built in downtown Phoenix. (AP) 


Scoreboard 


By Leonard Shapiro 

Washington Past Service 

MAMARONECK, New York — 
With most of the pretoumament talk 
focusing on the emergence of a new 
generation of bright and shining young 
golfers, the toughest and oldest lu- 
minary at the 79th PGA Championship 
— the golf course itself — had been 
largely forgotten by the time the com- 
petition teed off Thursday morning. 

But the Winged Foot course soon 
grabbed everyone's attention as the 
gnarly six-inch (15 centimeter) rough 
flexed its considerable muscle against 

PGA Got* 


some of the game's greatest players. Its 
victims included die youthful and glam- 
orous threesome of the Masters cham- 
pion, Tiger Woods, the U.S. Open win- 
ner, Ernie Els, and the British Open 
tithst, Justin Leonard. 

Halfway through the first round, die 
game’s longest hitter was the surprising 
leader in the clubhouse. Considering that 
John Daly had walked off the U.S. Open 
course at Congressional Country Club in 
Bethesda. Maryland, two months ago 
after 27 holes because of alcoholism- 
related shakes, his 4- under round of 66 
was a rather remarkable achievement in 
only his third event since then. 

Daly, who has lost almost 40 pounds 
(18 kilograms) since March, had seven 
birdies — including the last three holes 
— and three bogeys on his card and said 
that, to keep his ball in play, he only 
used his driver four times all day. Using 
3-woods off the tee on the last three 
boles, he hit a 9-iron to get within five 
feet (1.5 meters) at No. 16, a wedge to 
within four feet at 17 and a 9-iron to 
within a foot at the last. 


"Hie key to the round was that I made 
a lot of putts and hit a lot of fairways," 
said Daly, whose career was launched 
when he won die 1991 PGA at Crooked 
Stick near Indianapolis. “We bad some 
rain yesterday and the greens softened 
up. In the practice rounds they were a lot 
faster. The course rewards a guy for 
hitting it straight. I was able to do that" 

Tom Kite, the U.S. Ryder Cup captain, 
asked about die chances of picking him- 
self to play on the team, had said before 
the tournament that he would have to 
play extremely well this week to impress 
himself enough.. He did just that at least 
for one day, shooting a 2-under 68. the 
same scree posted by Paul Azinger, die 
1993 PGA champion and Bob Tway. 

Leonard, who also finished with a 68, 
quickly found out about the rough after 
hitting his drive on the firet hole into grass 
so thick and p unishing dial several, mar- 
shals searching for the ball didn’t find it 
until Leonard bad walked the 230 yards 
from die first tee. He couid only hack it 
out into die fairway about 30 yards, then 
learn the hard way bow unforgiving 
Winged Foot's greens can be. 

Leonard’s dura shot landed about 10 
feet below the hole, but it spun back 
slightly, then found a downslope that 
carried it 40 feet away from the pin. He 
two-putted for bogey there, then had 
three birdies in a stretch of four holes in 
the middle of his round to get himself 
headed toward the top of the board. 

Els was cruising along nicely at 3- 
under after seven boles, when he ad- 
vanced a ball about six feet in dense 
rough and ultimately had to settle for a 
double bogey that bounced him off the 
leaderboara. He finished with a birdie at 
18 for an even-par 70. 

Woods also was playing well at 3- 
under after his first 11 holes until he 
found the rough on the 540-yard 12th 


Rosenborg’s Late Strike 
Turns Lights Out on MTK 


CctnpUrd Ik Oar Suiff Fwm Dujvtchrj 

Rosenborg Trondheim of Norway 
made the most of its second chance 
Thursday in a European Cup prelim- 
inary first leg match against MTK in 
Budapest. 

The match had originally kicked off 
on Wednesday night and Rosenborg had 

European Soccer 

thrown away a 2-1 lead and trailed 3-2 
after 67 minutes when the lights went 
out 

Engineers restored power after a 40- 
minute stoppage, but the restarted game 
lasted only two more minutes before 
another blackout 

Turkish referee Ahmed Cakar then 
called off the match. It was replayed on 
Thursday and this time the Norwegian 
champion did not give its opponent the 
time to fight back. Sigurd Rushfeldt 
scored the only goal of the game in the 
88th minute with a header after a 
comer. 

The winners in the qualifying round, 
played over two legs, will advance to the 
Champions League. 

In Barcelona, Skonto Riga, the cham- 
pion of Latvia, twice led Barcelona, the 
Spanish league runner-up, before los- 
ing, 3-2. 

The Spaniards, former winners of the 
competition, fell behind after 25- 
minutes when Skonto striker Babichev 
slid the ball under the body of Bar- 
celona’s reserve keeper Hesp, replacing 
injured Vitor Baia. 

Giovanni, one of Barcelona’s Brazili- 
an strikers, leveled less than two minutes 
later. He received a pass with his back to 
the goal and spun round to score. 

Hie Latvians went ahead again a 
minute after the break when Mikholap 
shot from a tight angle. 

The game looked set for a shock 
result, but Giovanni found the net once 
more after 70 minutes. 


Barcelona scored the winner after 
Skonto defender Stepanovs handled in 
his own penalty area four minutes into 
injury tune. Without any Barcelona 
challengers nearby, he stuck his hand in 
the air and made contact with the ball. 
Stoichkov converted the penalty. 

Newcastle United, the runner-up in 
the English Premier League, also 
struggled to win at home. John Beres- 
ford’s controversial second goal gave it 
a 2-1 victory over Croatia Zagreb. With 
the score at 1-1, Fanstino Asprilla ap- 
peared to foul Dazen Ladic, the Zagreb 
goalkeeper, as they jumped for a high 
ball close to the goal line. Falling back- 
wand, Ladic pushed the ball down to 
Beresford, who tapped it in. Igor 
Cvitanovic scored the Zagreb goal. 

Enrico Chiesa scored three goals as 
Parma gained a 3-1 victory at Poland's 
Widzew Lodz. 

Galatasaray of Turkey beat Sion, 4-1 . 
in Switzerland. Milton scored a fourth 
minute own goal and Arif Erdem. Ad- 
rian Hie and Suat Kaya added additional 
goals for die Turks, while Johann Lonfat 
scored for Sion. 

Feyemoord of Rotterdam, which won 
the competition in 1 970, routed FC Jazz 
of Finland, 6-2. Germany’s Bayer 
Leverkusen crushed Georgia ’s Dynamo 
Tblisi, 6-1. 

England Paul Ince, the England 
midfielder, scored on his home debut for 
Liverpool, but his team, one of the 
Premier League favorites, lost, 2-1, to 
Leicester City. 

Matt Elliott caught the Liverpool de- 
fense unaware to give Leicester the lead 
after 72 seconds. 

Graham Fenton tapped home a re- 
bound seven minutes from the end to put 
Leicester 2-0 up. Ince scored from the 
edge of the penalty area a minute later. 

Manchester United, the reigning 
champion, gained a hard-fought 1-0 
home victory* against Southampton. 
David Beckham, an England midneld- 


Major League Standings 


EAsrnmsxMi 



W 

L 

PCL 

GB 

Baltimore 

73 

42 

435 

— 

New York 

70 

48 

■593 

4'h 

Toronto 

58 

60 

492 

16M 

Boston 

58 

63 

479 

IB 

Ornreif 

56 

63 

471 

19 

CENTRAL DIVtSWN 



Cleveland 

60 

56 

-517 

— 

Cfttcogo 

58 

59 

496 

2* 

flUwoukee 

57 

60 

487 

3* 

Minnesota 

SI 

68 

429 

lOW 

Kansas aty 

49 

67 

422 

11 

WESTDIVIS»H 



Seethe 

A6 

52 

-559 

— 

Anaheim 

66 

53 

.555 

’A 

Texas 

58 

62 

483 

9 

Oakland 48 73 J97 

wmoMimow 

19% 


EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

PCL 

GB 

Aha nto 

75 

47 

415 



Florida 

69 

50 

-5*0 

4S 

New York 

66 

S3 

-555 

7V5 

Montreal 

60 

58 

SM 

13 

PMadelphla 

42 

75 

359 


CENTRAL EBVH»N 



Houston 

65 

56 

537 

— 

Pittsburgh 

59 

bl 

492 

54 

Sf. Louis 

54 

66 

454 

10 

Qndnnatt 

& 

66 

441 

>t'A 

Chicago 

49 

72 

405 

16 


west mvrstON 



SanFrandsca 

67 

54 

JS4 

— 

Los Angeles 

65 

55 

sa 

TA 

San Diego 

57 

63 

47 S 

9*A 

Colorado 

57 

64 

47) 

to 


WEDNESDAY'S imSCONtt 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Kansas City ON 021 >00-3 11 1 


New Yurt 111 011 *0-9 12 0 

Belcher, Whbenanf (6), Carrasco (71. J- 
Walker (8) and Madarlane; Irabu, Mendoza 

(6) , Nelson (7), Uoyd (9) and Gfenrfl. 
W— Irabu, 3-2. I_— Befcher, 11*11. 
Hte-Kamas atr. C Oovfs CIO- New V art, 
T. Martinez 09). CWeui Cl 71. 

Brat Game 

Detrail 000 312 070-13 17 0 

demand 110 HO »T 0-3 9 0 

Biale. M. Myers (9) and Walbedo Smttey. 
Storey (6). A. Lopez <81 and Borden. 
W— Blair, 125. L— Sroltay. 1-2 

HRs— Detroit Easley 081. Kevin <61. 
HiggJnson 2 (23). 

jtonfl goM 

Detrail on 100 000—1 7 4 

demand 201 100 osx— 9 M 0 

□ talma n, KeogJe (4), MioeU (6), M. Myers 
(81. Braced (8) and Casanova Hetslitaer. 
Jerome (6>. plunk 16). Assenmocfter (7). 
Mesa (9) and S. Atom®. W— Hcnhtacr 10-5 
L — O is tenon 1-1. 

Tests 330 010 800-7 7 O 

Boston 901 920 390-9 IS 9 

Stortzm Bata (6). Hefting (61, Gunderson 

(7) . Patterson (7). Wenekmd (91 and 1. 
Rodriquez Avery. Bumdenfaury (3). Manor 
151. B. Henry (8) and H t iffsbcrg. W— Sfurtre, 
1-0- L-Arery, 6-3. 5v— Wettotand. (26). 
HRs— Terns, Ju-Ganzalez 2 (281. Boston. 
Jh.Volenttn (Ml. Content (15). 

Minnesota ooi 100 000—2 13 ■ 

Toronto 290 OH HI-3 10 I 

Hawkins, Trombley (91. Guardado (7) and 
D. Miller; YV.Willioms, QuantriU |BJ and B. 
Santiago. W — OuantrtIL 5-4. L— Trombley. |- 
2. HRs— Minnesota. KnoMouch (9). Toronto. 
Carter (IB). 

AaaMai «Z OH 088-Z 8 0 

Chicago ago (MO ois— S 7 a 

Watson. James (7). Hooz (81. P. Hants 18} 
and Kmifeii Eyre. N.Crez (6). Karctow (8) 
and Pena Fabregns 19). W-Ejre. 1-2 
L— Watson 10-7. Sv— KardBKT (51. 

HRs — CWc- Cameron CIO), F .Thomas (27). 


Oafetaed Mi 100 008-4 8 1 

Baffiawra MB HO 000-3 8 I 

Imran* TJ .Mathews (6). Groom ( 7 ), A. 
Small (81, Taylor (9). Mahler (9) and Moyne 
Mussina Rhodes 16), Mins (9), Orosco (9) 
and Hailes, W— Lorraine, 1-0. L— Mussina 
13-5. S v Mol tlr (1). HRs— Oakland. J. 
McDonald (3), Beflhom (4), Moyne (3). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
PbaadefcMa 002 240 002-12 17 2 

Celaiado 020 022 002-8 13 0 

M. Letter. Sprodfci (6), Bottofico (8) and 
Ueberthafc Jm.Wright Hutton (5), S. Reed 
(7), Leskanic (8). 5wtft (91 and JeAeed. 
W-M. Lefler. 8-12 L— Jm.Wright, 68. 
HRs— PhitatJdphia, Lieberthal 071- 
C otero da Burks (30), Gehurago 012, 
Je.Reed (10). 

Chicago 900 202 200-6 18 8 

San Fraactacs 981 200 110—5 10 8 
JeGoruMez. Bettoofreld (71 Patterson (71. 
T. Adams (9) and Houston Senate ( 4 ); 
Gardner, Tovnrez (71, D. Henry (8), 
RJTodriguez (9) and B. Johnson. 
W— Je.Gonzatoz, 94. L— Gardner; 12-6. 
Sv— T. Adams no). HRs— Chicago. Sosa 
061. DOark (41. One (7). San Ftmcbco. 
MueBer (5), Javier (7). 

Ktotagt oto oio oao—x 7 3 

Attests (MO ON 100—1 6 0 

Ueoer. Rincon (7). Loheto (9) and 
Kendall; Smoltz and JJjopez. W— Lteher, 7- 
12 L-Smnrtz. 11-10. Sv— LoteeOe (20). 
Boride 000 804 MM 14 2 

Houston 210 OH 201—6 11 3 

AArnandes; P owe l l (8), Nrn (9) and 
Zaurs Reynolds. Mognarrie (6). Lima <71. R. 
Springer (B), T. Martin (SI, B. Wagner (9) and 
Animus. W— A. F e r nand e z. 15-8. L— Lima, 
i-n Sv— Nen C3A. HRs-Howten OeSeffl 
(9). BogwuU (33). 

New York 300 010 OH 1—5 )1 0 

SL Loots 200 HI 010 8-4 13 1 

Bahama McMtehoel (7). Rojos (8). Lidte 
(9b Jo -Franco (101 and Hundey; 
Stott lemytR Benton (Bl. Froscatore (8). 


Fosses 00), Clang (10) and DifeSce. 
W— Udie 6-1. L — Fosses I S. Sv—JoJiwkv 
(30). HRs — SL Louts, McGwire 2 (41. 
Ctacteafi OH 101 006—2 6 fl 

Saa Diego HO OH 008-8 1-0 

Morgan, Belinda (8), Shaw (91 and J. 
Ofiven P -Smith. D. Veras (7). HWorrad (9) 
and Romero. W— Morgan 4-10. L— P. Smith 
4-3. Sv— Shaw {231. 

Montreal ON HI 080—1 4 8 

Les Angeles 010 ago ii*-3 9 1 

C Perez. KBne (81. Telford (8) and Fletcher; 
Condbm Osuna (BL To.Worrefl (91 and 
Piazza. W— Condlatn 9-4. L— C Perez 11-8. 
Sv — To. Warren (281. HRs— Montreal 

Lansing 05). Los Angeles. Zeft* (2J1. 

Japanese Leagues 


Yakut) 58 37 

Yokohama 50 42 

Hiroshima 47 46 

Cluroicto 46 52 

Hansftto 43 57 

Yomwrt 40 56 


58 37 1 All — 

50 42 — -543 6J 

47 46 — -SOS 100 

46 52 — 469 115 

43 51 I AS7 I4J 

40 56 — .417 185 


W L T Pa. GB 
OrfX SO 37 3 J75 — 

ScBni SI 41 2 -554 15 

Daiei 47 49 — ,490 75 

Nippon Ham 46 SO 1 .479 B_S 

Lotte 41 47 3 466 95 

KUltetw 42 53 2 442 120 

imNMrtuwin 
CENTRAL LEAGUE 
Yoked 2 Hcnshtn 2 
Yokohama A ChanfcJil 5 
Hiroshima 2 Yomlurt 6 

PACIFIC LEAGUE 
Kintetsu 4.0ifcl 
SeSra l Daiet 2 



Tiimslij I3*ty/ \(rere fijm— IVw 

Tiger Woods hitting out of a sand trap at No, 3 during the opening round Thursday at Winged Foot Golf Club. 


hole. His fourth shot landed above the 
hole in high grass, and his fifth, a flop 
shot, also found a downslope away from 
the pin, and he could only manage a two- 
putt from 35 feet. Woods also finished at 
70. 


Nick Faldo, still trying to earn a spot 
on the European Ryder Cup team, 
struggled to a front-side 39. starting off 
with a bogey at the first bole after hook- 
ing his bail in the left rough. From then 
on. he said, he began hitting many off 




• > " A 
\ . A ’ . 















Lwl' BthfttfRiriarr* 

JVfini Jakobsen of Rosenborg Trondheim, left and Laszlo Farkashazy of 
MTK Budapest tussling Thursday in a replayed European Cup pre- 
liminary round first leg match. Rosenborg of Norway triumphed, 1-0. 


er, came on as a substitute and scored 1 2 
minutes from time. But United was 
pushed off the top of the league on goal 
difference by Blackburn Rovers which 
woo, 4-0. at Asion Villa. 

Leicester and West Ham, two clubs 
expected to be fighting at the lower end of 
the table, have also won both their games 
and are level on points with Blackburn. 


Les Ferdinand scored his first goal for 
Tottenham since joining from New- 
castle but Spurs lost, 2-J, at West Ham. 
and are bottom of the league 3fter losing 
their first two games. 

Derby’s first home match at its new 
Pride Park ended in the second half in 
floodlight failure with the home team 2- 
1 up against Wimbledon. \AP. Reuters ) 


shots to the right, and admitted "it's all a 
bit of a mystery right now" when he 
walked off the course after posting a 75. 

At wondrous, and at tiroes wicked. 
Winged Foot, he was not alone in hav- 
ing problems he could not solve. 


Brazil Is Blase i 
On Cruzeiro’s 
Cup Victory 


Renters 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Cruzeiro of 
Brazil beat Sporting Cristal of Peru, 1-0, • 
to win the Libertadores Cup, but the 
victory was hardly welcomed by 
Brazil’s traditional soccer centers. 

Cruzeiro, from the country’s third 
largest city, Belo Horizonte, has been 
looked down on by the Brazilian soccer ’ 
establishment for years simply because 
it does not come from either Rio de 
Janeiro or Sao Paulo. 

A goal by Elivelton in the 75th 
minute of Wednesday's second leg was 
the only one the two well-drilled but - 
uninspiring teams managed to produce 
between them in 180 minutes of soccer 
after last week's first leg ended 0-0. 

Cruzeiro players rarely make tile na- 
tional ream and the club's campaign this 
season in the Libertadores Cup, South ! 
America’s top club competition, was 
almost completely ignored in the two ' 
cities that consider themselves Brazil’s 
main soccer centers. 

Brazilian soccer fans were not able to 
watch Cruzeiro's games on television, 
the country’s networks preferring to 
show run-of-the-mill Brazilian cham- 
pionship games involving teams from 
Rio or Sao Paulo. One station finally 
relented Wednesday for the second leg 
of the final and decided Cruzeiro was 
worthy of national viewing. 

The match Wednesday drew a crowd 
of 95.000. but Cruzeiro is not even the 
most popular team in its own city, where 
the masses prefer Atletico Mineiro. 

Cruzeiro has won the Libertadores 
Cup twice, the South American Su- 1 
percup twice and reached the final of 
each tournament on other occasions. 

The four major Rio de Janeiro clubs 
have managed one Libertadores title 
among them, when Flamengo lifted the 
trophy in J 981. 


,,.r«*r 4,1 

■ t-ll* 

I# 1 , , H 


wii' 


ter 

tfcflL r ■ 
4SL-J 
1st--..' . 


i. K- 






Dynamo Batumi vs. Annul Yerevan 
Matefi pp < 1 due fa wotorfoggetf pfltti. 
TaiBnno sadran l. BdsMno Bobros* I 
Zolglite Vilnius a Hopoel Beerehoba o 
LevskJ Sofia 1. Stovan BrotfeJaval 
Stoga Jogomognat I. NK Zagreb 2 
Dinaburo Oaugavpib ). Kaaaz Ganjo 0 
Prlmofjo AKkrftono2 Union Linembauig 0 
iWlOHAN 0BP 
MB.MMARV ROWO. H*ST LEG 
IFK Gothenburg 3, Rangvre 0 
SV SalztiiitB a Sparta Prague 0 
Betar Jenisatem a Sporting Lisbon 0 
FK Kosice 2 Spratak Moscow 1 
Sleaua Bucharest 2 Parts SI Germain 2 
Besfttos a Martoor Branlk 0 
Fevanoanl A Jazz Port 3 
Anarttrosb Famagusta 2 Lieree Sfc a 
Otymptokos Piraeus 5. MPKCMozyrO 
Boyw Levertrosen A Dynamo TWisi I 
Widzew Lodz 1. Parma 3 
Brondby 2 Dynamo Kiev 4 
Newcastle United 1 Croatia Zagreb I 
MTK Budapest a Rosenborg Trondheim I 
Sion I. Gatotasoray 4 
Borceteita 1 Skonto Riga 2 
Torehavn 1. Apod Nicosia 1 

—push w— mow 

Aston VBfa a Btockbom a 

DeAy 2 Wimbledon 1 

Match obtradoned due to floodltghl Failure. 

Liverpool 1. Letcesler2 

Manchester United 1, Southampton 0 

Sheffield Wednesday 1. Leeds 3 

West Ham 2 Tottenham t 

Ciyitert P^OW a Barnsley 1 

tTWMOr- BlackbUTTi & Mondresler 

United 6. West Horn 6. Leicester 6. Leeds 4. 
AraenolA Nowawtle 3. Ballon 2 Bamsloy 3. 
Crystal Potoee 1 Coventry * Wimbledon l. 
Liverpool I; Oiefsea a Everton a Derby 0. 


Southampton a Sheffield Wednesday a Tot- 
lenhoro a Aston VWoO. 


WMUUNKMCS 

World gad ran tongs based on players' 
performance throughout zhe world through 
Aug. 11. sanotoned by (ha Royal end An- 
crentGoll Chib of St. Andrews. Ttw ranking 
te comp med on e thm-year roCHng baste 
wetgtrted toward (he current year, Players 
earn points based an tournament grade, 
finish and strength of fold: 

>• Tiger Woods. U.S. 10.93 pointer 2 Ernie 
Eb. South Africa 10-22 3. Greg Norman. 
Avstralia, 10.12 4. Nick Pnce. Zimbabwe. 
947. 5 . Conn Monteomertc. Smttand. 941: e. 
Toro Lehman. US. 854 7. Ptrtf AUckefstn 
U.S. B29. & Jumbo OzaU Japan. 7.98: 9. 
Mon O'Meara U-S- 7J7; la Fred Coupkrs. 
U5.&74 1 1. Brad Faun U5. 6J(t 12 Nick 
Faldo, England, 6.6* 13. Steve Elkingioa 
Australia 6.S&- 14 Sam Hoclt U.S. 6J(t IS, 
Jesoer Pomevb. Sweden 6t* 1* Justin 
Leonard, U.S. tJ3S: 17. Davis Love 111. U-S- 
5.73. 18. vrmv smote Flfc 5.62; 19. Bernhard 
Longer. Germany. 559: Jft Ian Woasnam 
Woles. 540. 


WDMU 

AHEHIC4H LEAGUE 

CLEVELAMD -ActtvaJed RHP Orel Her 
stwer Irom 15-day Asabled Itat. Put RHP 
Afcic Loan an the 15 day disabled fcL 

8 An S as— A ctivated op Jermaine Dye hom 
I S-tkiy dtaabied list. Put OF Joe Vltteloan 1 5- 
dav disabled rw 

MILWAUKEE -Agreed to terms with DH 
Julio Franco. 


NEW YORK -Recalled RHP Hideki Irabu 
from Columbus, JL. Optioned RHP Jhn Medr 
to Columbus. Acquired DH-C Mike Stanley 
and INF Randy Brown from Boston Red 5a» 
tor RHP Tony Armas and player to be 
named. 

Oakland -Put RHP Bred Rigby on 15 - day 
dtaobted list retroactive to Aug & Recalled 
LHP Andrew Lorraine from Edmonton. 
PCL 

TEXAS -Assigned OF Mike Simms outright 
to Oklahoma City. AA. 

TOMMTO —Recalled OF Shannon Stewart 
and INF Tomas Perez from Syracuse. I[_ Put 
SS Atex Gonzalez on 1 5-day dtaobted list 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Colorado -Signed INF Terry Shumpeit 
and assigned tom to New Haven. EL 

UK ANGELES -Sent RHP Mott Merges to 
San Antonia TL- 

SAH DIEGO -T ratted OF Rickey Henderson 
to Anaheim Angels far RHP Ryan Hancock, 
LHP Stevenson Agasfo and player to be 
named. Activated OF Ruben Rivera from so- 
day dtaobted Hst. 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

NFL— Fined Dororar Broncos LB BtS Ro- 
manowsU smooc lor illegal Ml on Carafina 
Panthers' QB Kerry Collins in presen son 
game Aug. 9. 

Chicago —Released LB Dome*. Brown- 
low. 

DALLAS -Pul CB John Reece on Injured 
rosenra. 

DENVER -Released SB Joe AbduHata LB 
Ken Brawn. TE Jeremy Burkett CB Dolton 
Simmons, DT Sylvester Stanley, DE Km ro- 
fama and DB Robert Turner. 

NEW ENGLAND -Released WR Chris Ortiz. 
WR Shown Turner. QB Chris Brcsnahoa LB 
Chad Reeves and CB Dwayne Provo. Signed 
CB Altai Jackson. 

n.v. JETs-Oohned K Joe Nedncv off 
watveis ham Miami Dolphins. 


„ ?l ^“OE^HM-Retoosed WR Akm Allen 
FB Brad Baxter. DE Damian Cooper, DT 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY AUGUST 15 . 1997 


PAGE 21 


SPORTS 


In a Matter of Hours, 

3 World Records Fall 

Zurich Plays Host to History 


'i*. 


'» ■ The Asstviuied Press 

ZURICH — No records fell at the 
V nine-day track and field world charo- 
.. pionships that ended Sunday in Athens, 

Jp *“ feU m one night at the Zurich 
' weltklasse meeting. 

Wilson Kipketer, who was bom in 
Kenya but is now a citizen of Denmark, 
broke me oldest world record in track and 
^ field Wednesday i„ the SOO-meteTevem! 

Wilson Boir Kipketer. who is not related 
r : _&to me 800-meter runner, shaved one- 
• ’tf-temh of a second off the '3,000-meter 
,r steeplechase record, and Haile Gebr- 

• selassie shattered the 5,000-meter re- 

!jl cord. 

Wilson Kipketer broke Sebastian 
Coe’s 16-year-old record in the 800 
' r meters with a time of 1 minute, 41 24 

; seconds. 

j “Everything was perfect today — the 
... • weather, the pace, the crowd,” the 24- 

t. | year-old runner said. “I am very sat- 

-•t 1 isfied — for now-. It wasn ’r easy after the 

) worlds, I came here tired.*' 

: x | Patrick Nduniri of Kenya was second 
! 1:42.62, and Rich Kenah of the 

<, j United Stares was third in 1:43.38. 

Wilson Boit Kipketer ran the 3,000- 
meter steeplechase in 7:59.08. The old 
mark was 7:59.18 set by a fellow 
Kenyan, Moses Kiptanui, on the same 
1 track in 1995. 

3jr * ‘1 didn ’t expect the record. I just felt 

I good and ran.” said Boit Kipketer, who, 
like the other two record breakers, was a 
gold medalist in Athens. 

Each of the three record breakers re- 


ceived SSO.OOOanda kilogram of gold as 
a bonus for smashing the world marks. 

One difference between Athens and 
Zurich was that the Zurich races had 
pace makers. Joseph Tengelei of Kenya 
led the field in the 800 meters, running 
the first 400 meters in an astonishing 
48.10. compared to Coe’s 49.7 when he 
set the record. Kenyans also $er the pace 
in the 5,000 meters and a Kenyan, Barn- 
abas Bannao, acted as a ‘’rabbit/* in the 
3,000 meters. Kenyans took the first six 
places. 

Haile Gebrselassie, a 24-year-old 
Ethiopian, pulverized his own record in 
the 5,000-meter event with a rime of 
12:41.86, improving on his 1995 mark 
of 12:44.39. 

Daniel Komen of Kenya, the world 
champion, finished second in 12:44.90, 
a national record, while his compatriot 
Paul Tergal was third in 12:49.87. 

In Athens, young runners seized both 
the 100 meters titles. In Zurich, the old 
guard hit back. Frankie Fredericks of 
Namibia, who was fourth in Athens, 
clocked 9.98 to beat Maurice Greene of 
the United States, who ran 9.99. 

In the women’s 100, Merlene Ortey. 
37. proved again that she can win when 
no medals are at stake. A disappointing 
seventh in Athens, the Jamaican beat all 
three medalists on Wednesday. 

She posted a time of 10.96. edging 
world champion Marion Jones of the 
United States, who clocked 10.97. 
Olympic champion Gail Devers of the 
United States was third in 1 1.06. 



Irabu Returns to Yanks 
And Pitches 9-3 Victory 


“t 

•a- r 


ifvtKe Fuiki-Pr-.* 

Wilson Kipketer of Denmark, center, on the way to setting a world record 
in the 800 meters In Zurich in 1:41.25. He is flanked by two Kenyans, 
Patrick Konchellah, right, who placed fourth, and Joseph Tengelei. 


TALL: NBA Is Drooling Over North Korean Giant, but Politics Keep Him on the Bench 

Continued from Page 1 
NBA, but we also have to deal with 


■ . t _-T T 
' • ■» 


international politics,” said Wayne 
: [. MacKinnon, chairman of the Ottawa- 
{ based Evergreen Sports Management. 

• which is lobbying the U.S. government 
• 1 on Ri’s behalf. 

“I’m very optimistic/’ MacKinnon 
said. “We have to play this very, very 
carefully, but I think it’s working, ff 
things go well, I think he'd be there by 
the time NBA famps open in early Oc- 
tober.’’ 

But the NBA has sent a memo to its 
. teams instructing them not to have any 
■ • contact with Ri or his representatives. 
y Jeffrey Mishkin, the NBA’s executive 

> vice president and chief legal officer. 

. .. - ^ said the league would not push the State 
■ lr or Treasury departments to admit Ri. 

■ a*Jj ) “We have comprehensive embargo 
. . i sanctions against North Korea that pro- 

* Mbit employment of nationals by the 

.. U.S.." said a Treasury Department of- 

ficial familiar with Ri’s case. 

So for now, Ri remains cloistered in 

— this town 20 miles (32 kilometers) wessi 

- — of Ottawa, with an amiable Canadian 

i coach, a bubbly 16-year-old Sonth 
Korean interpreter, two grim-faced 

North Korean handlers and the hope that 

,i — 'T' . . if he can enter the United States and the 

NBA he will realize a personal goal, 
-ill 1 MUD •; £3^ minions of dollars and, perhaps, do 
his small part to improve international 

> relations. 

But before Ri can change the world, 
he has to change his jump shot 
• - ;• After he finished his Stainnaster 
- 1 T. workout. Donohue and an assistant 
coach, Michael Hickey, ran Ri through 
“his daily baskeiball exercises at nearby 


Algonquin College. “Follow through, 
Michael.’ Follow through on your 
shot!” Donohue barked as Ri practiced 
typical big-man exercises: the so-called 
Mikan drill (shooting the ball quickly 
from alternate sides of the basket) 
named for the NBA Hall-of-Famer 
George Mikan, and the sky hook, orig- 
inated by Kareem Abdul- Jabbar. 

As Ri continued his workout, two 
men in slacks and short-sleeved dress 
shirts dribbled awkwardly and attempt- 
ed two-handed set shots at a nearby 
basket. John Kim and Carl Lee — a pair 
of 5 foot, 3 inch North Korean officials 
who refer to themselves as "the del- 
egation" — have been sent to oversee 
Ri’s stay. They never let Ri out of their 
sight, following him to the masseur, 
dentist, grocery store, health club and 
anywhere else he goes. 

Kim and Lee strictly limit Ri's access 
to the Kanata and Ottawa communities, 
particularly their South Korean pop- 
ulation of about 150 families. 

After Ri’s basketball workout at Al- 
gonquin College. Kim and Lee agreed to 
allow him to be interviewed by a re- 
porter for- the first time. Then they 
promptly sat down with Ri on one side 
of an outdoor picnic table in die col- 
lege’s quadrangle. Sixteen-year-old Ar- 
um Hong,, a South Korean emigrant, 
translated Ri's words. 

Ri spcke about growing up in Pyong- 
yang, where he has a younger brother and 
younger sister, a father who is an elec- 
trician and a mother who is a home- 
maker. He said he learned about the NBA 
when he saw videotapes two years ago. 

He said, that he felt some culture 
shock when he arrived in C anaria , but 
that he “tries not to think about any- 


thing other than basketball now at this 
stage where 1 am training to ger into the 
NBA. Of course. I do miss North Korea, 
but doesn’t’everyone?” 

But when Ri was asked how he felt 
about the U.S. government blocking his 
entrance ro the NBA, Kim interrupted 
and said he. nor Ri. would answer that 
question because he was the “head of 
delegation." 

“Sports should be pure, and it should 
be just pure athletes who come in to play 
without any other interference,” Kim 
said. “And that is why sports is played 
all over the world. So right now, the way 
the North Korean government is think- 
ing is they’re lending the land, the coun- 
try to play so that they can compete with 
other players." 

About a year ago, Ri was unknown to 
the international basketball community. 
But last August, Pyongyang sent a team 
to an Asian basketball tournament, held 
in Taiwan, for the first time in 1 8 years. 
RI scored 27 points in a losing effort 
against a U.S. team of elite college 
players. 

That performance got the attention of 
a sports-management group in Clev- 
eland, which sent an application to the 
Treasury Department in an effort to 
represent Ri in the NBA draft last June. 
Treasury vetoed it. 

Then MacKinnon, a lawyer, heard 
about Ri. He persuaded investors to 
finance Ri’s training — - estimated 10 
cost more than $1,000 a day — and 
negotiated with the Canadian and North 
Korean governments to get Ri to 
Kanata. 

Upon his arrival, Ri Myong-Hun took 
the name Michael, after his idol, the 
Chicago Bulls' star Michael Jordan. Ri 


came with better basketball skills than 
his hosts had expected — but also with 
more body fat (18 percent), less vertical 
leaping ability (12 inches) and less 
strength (he could lift a mere 95 pounds, 
or 43 kilograms, from a squat). 

“He was awful,” said Loren Golden- 
berg, a trainer for the Ottawa Senators of 
the National Hockey League. “But I’ve 
never seen an athlete make such amaz- 
ing gains in such a short tune." 

Goldenberg put Ri on a high-protein, 
bigh-carbohydrnre diet that has in- 
creased his weight from 240 to 280 
pounds. He said Ri's body fat has de- 
creased to less than 15 percent, his ver- 
tical leap has increased four inches and 
he could now squat 260 pounds. 

Ri’s basketball skills have sharpened 
along with his conditioning. 

Meanwhile, NBA teams are wafting 
to pounce on him if they are ever al- 
lowed. Ri is too old to enter the draft 
under NBA rules and would be a free 
agent, available to any team that could 
woo him. 

‘ ‘I don ’t know much about him, other 
than that he’s big," said Bob Zuffelato. 
the Toronto Raptors' director of player 
personnel. "But of course a guy of that 
size would be signed. You can’t teach 
size." 

Mishkin said the NBA wonld wait 
until Ri was cleared to enter and play in 
The United States before allowing teams 
to deal with him. Although the NBA's 
commissioner, David Stem, regularly 
talks about the global reach of the 
league, Mishkin said it would not push 
the State and Treasury departments to 
admit Ri. 

“We don't think the NBA is an ex- 
pert on foreign policy," Mishkin said. 


The Assix iJied Pros 

Hideki Irabu came back, and so did 
his fastball. 

After two starts in the minors, Irabu 
won in his return Wednesday to ibeNew 
York Yankees. Tino Martinez backed 
the Japanese right-hander with his ma- 

Baseball Roundup 

jor league-leading 39th homer, and New 
York beat the Kansas City Royals, 9-3. 

“I thought he was a lot better.” New 
York's manager, Joe Torre, said. '’He 
was aggressive, he threw good splitters. 
He didn't look like he was uptight in any 
way. Thai ‘ s what we wanted, to dear his 
head oul" 

Irabu ( 3-2 ) allowed three runs and six 
hits in 5 vi innings, struck out five and 
walked two at Yankee Stadium. The 
right-hander struck out four of the firsr 
five batters and took a shutout into the 
fifth, when he appeared to tire. 

“The biggest difference/* Irabu said 
through bis interpreter, “is that (he first 
time I left here I had a lot of things to 
overcome. I had to get velocity on the 
fastball back and throw a ‘live' ball." 

Kansas City's manager, Tony Muser. 
was impressed with Irabu. 

“Boy. he has a good arm, a real good 
arm.” Muser said. “We stayed close, 
but he had a good live fastbaU. It didn't 
seem like he could get the breaking ball 
over, a little erratic with his command. 
But he has a real fine arm. a major- 
league arm.” 

Tigers 1 3, Indians 3; Indians 9, Tigers 

i Orel Hershiser came off the disabled 
list ro give Cleveland a split of its 
doubleheader against Detroit 

Bobby Higginson hit two homers, and 
Damion Easley and Phil Nevin added 
one each as Detroit won the opener. 

Rangers 7, Red Sox 6 Juan Gonzalez 
wenr3-for-4 with two homers and batted 
in five runs at Fenway Park in Boston. 
Texas had two six-run leads before the 
Red Sox closed to 7-6 in the seventh. 

Athletics 4i Orioles 2 Oakland hit 
three home runs off Mike Mussina in 
Baltimore, and rookie Andrew Lorraine 
gained his first major-league victory, 
sending Baltimore to just its fourth loss 
in 16 games. Lorraine, making his first 
major- league appearance since 1995, 
allowed one earned run and six hits in 
five innings. 

white Sox 5, Angels 2 Mike Cameron 
and Frank Thomas hit back-to-back 
homers in a four-run fifth in Chicago as 
the White Sox won their fourth straight 
to pull within 2Vi games of firsr place in 
the American League Central. Scott 
Eyre (1-2), a rookie, got his first major 
league victory, allowing two runs and 
six hits in five innings. 

Blue 'lays 3, Twins 2 Jose Cruz Jr. hit a 
run-scoring single with one our in the 
ninth as Toronto sent Minnesota to its 
fifth consecutive loss. 

In National league games: 

Merlins 8, Astros 6 AJex Fernandez 
survived a shaky first inning to win his 
fifth consecutive start as Florida won in 
Houston. Fernandez who has not lost 
since July 18, tied his season high with 
10 strikeouts in seven innings. He al- 
lowed five runs — three earned — and 
nine hits, walking three. 

Fernandez has pitched at least seven 
innings in each of his last five starts. 

‘‘Fernandez just battled his tail off,” 
Florida manager Jim Ley land said. “He 
was a tittle wild early , but he bung in there 
and gave us some innings. It was a gutsy 
effort. It was a gutsy 'effort for ail of us, 
actually. This has been a tough trip.” 

Jeff Conine hit a two-run single in the 


eighth after consecutive homers by- 
Derek Bell and Jeff Bagwell gave the 
Astros a 54 lead in the seventh. 

Phillies 12, Rockios 8 In Denver. 
Mike Lieberthal had four hits, including 
a three-run homer, and Mark Leiter. the 
winning pitcher, contributed a two-run 
single as Philadelphia matched a season 
high with its fourth straight victory and 
12th in 15 games. 

Larry Walker was 0-lbr4. and his 
average fell to .377. 

Cubs 6, Giants s In San Francisco, 
Sammy Sosa homered and had a two-run 
double in a game that featured a bench- 
clearing brawl and two ejections. The 
fight began in the fourth when Jeff Kent 
was bir in the chest by a pitch from Jeremi 
Gonzalez. Kent, who ridiculed Gonza- 
lez's pitching lasr week, was ejected 
along with Chicago’s Tyler Houston. 

Pirates 2, Braves 1 Jon Lieber won for 
the first time in more than a month, 
allowing one run and five hits in 6'A 
innings for Pittsburgh in Atlanta. John 
Smoltz lost despite' pitching his sixth 
complete game, a seven-hitter with nine 
strikeouts. 

Mats 5, Cardinals 4 Pinch hitter Butch 
Huskey singled home the go-ahead run 
in the 10th as the Mets overcome two 
homers by Mark McGwire ai St. Louis. 
McGwire raised his home-run total to 
38 with his 40th career multihomer 
game. He hit a 455-foot upper-deck shoi 
in the first, the longest of the year at 
Busch Stadium. 

Reds 2, Padros o Mike Morgan was 
perfect for 6'.'.i innings before Mark 
Sweeney singled for San Diego's only 
hit. 

Dodgers 3, Expos 1 in Los Angeles, 
Tom Candiorti allowed three hits in 
seven innings, and Adam Riggs singled 
home the go-ahead run for his first ma- 
jor-league run batted in. 

■ Henderson Goes to .Angels 

For the third time in his career, 
Rickey Henderson was traded during a 
season, this time from the San Diego 
Padres to the Anaheim Angels for three 
prospects. His previous two trades took 
him to the eventual World Series win- 
ners. 

The deal comes a day after the An- 
gels' leadoff hitter, Tony Phillips, was 
charged with felony possession of co- 
caine and benched pending a meeting 
with doctors. 

“I’m happy to be an Angel,” said 
Henderson. 38. baseball's career stolen 
base leader. * Tm the type of player who 
likes to be in this situation — with all the 
marbles on the table, can you rise to the 
occasion? I seem to be one of the guys 
who rises to the occasion.” 1 



TAJJIWnic •■■Mini Pit* 


The Yankees' pitcher Hideki Ir- 
abu, winding up against the Royals. 



V DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 



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PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, AUGUST 15, 1991 


POSTCARD 


Parking in Patagonia 


By Philip Benson 


S AN CARLOS DE BAR- 
ILOCHE, Argentina — 
Over the last year or so. it has 
seemed that nature and man 
were conspiring against Pa- 
tagonia and its tourist-de- 
pendent economy. 

First, forest Fires raged 
through national paries in 
February 1996. This was fol- 
lowed by one of the smallest 
snowfalls in recent memory: 
bad news for the ski slopes. 
Hopes for a summer recov- 
ery were dashed when the 
hanta virus, a rodent-borne 
disease, broke out south of 
Bariloche. In the ensuing 
hysteria, tourists stayed 
away in droves, further dam- 
aging the economy. 

But this year something 
more irksome and insidious 
has appeared, driving rhe lo- 
cal residents to distraction: 
There is no more free parking 
in downtown Bariloche. 


Residents have sought out 
parking areas just outside the 
city center to avoid the reach 
of Altec, but these are dis- 
appearing quickly. 

First to go was the long 
stretch of sidewalk bordering 
Lake Nahael HuapL Altec put 
up wooden posts with signs 
declaring the area a no-park- 
ing zone. These were all 
knocked down by an uniden- 
tified free-parking advocate. 
Altec responded by cement- 
ing in metal posts. 

In June, the five-minute 
tree parking stretch by the 
post office was made off lim- 
its to all. Tow trucks remove 
cars and fines are assessed. 


□ 


□ 


Beginning last December, 
crews painted lines on the 
streets and began to erect 
signs indicating where one 
could and could not legally 
park. Then a Bariloche-based 
company, Altec, was contrac- 
ted to set up one of Latin 
America’s most sophisticated 
parking collection schemes. 

Eight little electric cans si- 
lently drive down the streets 
and scan computer strips that 
car owners must put on their 
rear side windows. One's ac- 
count (which costs S10 to 
open but does not include any 
parking time — that’s extra) 
is automatically debited. 

Or drivers may go to a post 
on a street comer and. with a 
special magnet, dock in and 
out. This also debits one's ac- 
count. Parking fees range 
from SO cents to a dollar an 
hour, depending on zone. 


So intricate and all-encorn- 

P assing is the plan that one 
atagonian, Hans Schulz, 
said, “I think Kafka invented 
the whole thing.” 

Laissez-faire Patagonia is 
not used to such determined 
efforts by the authorities, and 
the usually placid inhabitants 
have responded by threaten- 
ing to boycott the scheme, 
attack the offices of Altec — 
or write their congressmen. 
Words like ‘■evil” and 
“conspiracy” flow when the 
subject comes up in conver- 
sation. 

The manager of Altec in 
Bariloche, Carlos Cattini, re- 
sponds that Argentines are 
undisciplined people and that 
the parking used to be * ‘chaot- 
ic. " He thinks that the furor is 
diminishing and predicts chat 
.Altec will sell its sophisticat- 


ed product abroad. 
Watcl 


tetch out. world. Cattini 
reports that there have been 
serious inquiries from cities 
in the United States. Israel 
and Brazil. 


Philip Benson, a teacher 
and writer on Larin America, 
wrote this for the Internation- 
al Herald Tribune. 


Rapp ing With Grym Reaper and the Rzarector 


By Mike Zwerin 

InrerruiuonJl Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — “A lot of hip-hop 
deals with what those big bad 
rappers are going to do to you,' ’ said 
Pnnce Paul, talking about his group. 

“The Gravedlggaz rap about die 
kind of stuff you do to yourself,” 

He bears no resemblance to a big 
bad anything. The Gravediggaz 
second album, “The Pick, the 
Sickle and the Shovel” [Gee 
Street/V2). is about to be released. 

Prince Paul predicts that “Six Feet 
Deep,” their first, will be certified 
gold at about the same time. Big 
□umbers, bat in this business only 
the fame of a few lasts even as long 
as Andy Warhol’s famous 15 
minutes. 

Prince Paul joined Stetsasonic in 
1984. He signed a contract for 
$600. To him this was a fat number. 

“It probably wasn't even legal. I 
was 17. Oh well, I was able to buy 
my first VCR.” 

While in his 20s (he’s 30 now) he 
produced gold and platinum al- 
bums for the hot group De La SouL 
Basically, "that meant money but 
not much leverage.” There’s a lot 
of irony in Prince Paul's story- 
telling style: ‘ ‘I could go right up to 
the president of the company and get another $600 anytime 
I wanted to.” 

He was nominated for Grammies. People spoke of him as 
producer of the year. And Def Jam Records, which was on a 
roll of its own. made him an offer: “Paul. We want to start a 
label with you.” 

Last month, he was recalling his career to date, sitting in 
the Parisian office of his distributor, V2. Prince Paul was 
absolutely drowning in irony by now (maybe it was the heat 
wave): " ‘We’ll give you this, we’ll give you that,' they said. 
'Do it do it do it.’ I didn't know what to say. I just wanted to 
make my own records. " 

His New York accent is engulfing. .The way the words 
tumble out sometimes says more than what they mean. That 
much heat can be expressive by itself. The speed is a tale of 
its own. 

Finally he decided to “do it” and he spent two years 
recording other people's songs. When it came time to put all 
that stuff out on the market, he didn't even like it any more. 
He didn't want to listen to it any more. He had ‘ ‘lost two years 
at the peak of my career. No records by me came our. ’ ’ 
How can someone who just mined 30 know that the peak 
of his career has already passed? Well, in the context of rap. 
15 minutes of fame can be reduced to something like two. 



Gravediggaz in Paris: Fniitkwan, left, Prince Paul, center, and Poetic, a-l^a, 


“A year in a rapper’s life.” Prince Paul said, “is like a dog’s 
year." 

Money wasn't the problem; he was being paid. Bat it 
wasn't his music. He was losing his touch 'on the street. 
“Rappers come and go,” he said. “The public is. like, 
fickle. If you're wearing last year’s sneakers, forget iL 
Maybe you're only selling 100,000 copies” — only!? — 
“that ain’t worth it to the record company. They drop you. 
Rap labels are not interested in artist development” 

Sure enough, he was dropped. He was "devastated, de- 
pressed, angry.'’ He “hid out” in his basement studio in 
Amilyvjlle, Long Island, writing sad songs. * *Whar happened 
to me?” he thought “I’m this guy who used to put out all of 


these gold and platinum records.” So hecalled _his rapper 


friends Poetic, Fruitkwan and Rza a/k/a Prince Rakeem. It 
turned out that the three of them had also been dropped. 

They all felt slighted and forgotten. Poetic was even home- 
less for awhile — Prince Paul had to call his family to get in 
touch with him. “Instead of just sitting around getting bitter/’ 
he told his friends, “Yo! Let’s put a group together.” 

On paper, the Gravediggaz concepr goes like this: “We 
each chose a character. Poetic is the Grym Reaper, he brings 
them in. Prince Paul. The Undertaker, prepares them. Fruit- 
kwan’ s the Gatekeeper; he sees who's going through the gate 


and decides whether to let them bum 
or bring them to Rza Rakeem. the 
Rzarector, the antidote who makes 
them see what's really going on.” 

They made a demo that combined 
elements of Stetsasonic. De La Soul 
and Wu Tang Clan, a band with a 
future Rakeem had joined. Grave- 
diggaz is, they said, “saturated with 
ground-breaking production, witty 
thymes, biblical references and ad- 
ept poetry.” 

In all modesty, Rza called it “a 
new form of literature. * ' A parr of ir 
went like this: 

Society got to be reminded of my 
diary, cause 

tragically I carry the misery of 
centuries sent 
to me not coincidentally 
intentionally cause 
mentally i represent the key. but it's 
a double 

edged sword see, trying to be 
Godly is hard. . . 

Hard indeed. They shopped a 
demo. One record company said, 
“It’s a little too poetic for us.” Just 
as they were all about to give up one 
last time. Gee Street Records came 
through. 

People called them the Horror- 
Core. One critic said. “Gangsia rap 
will kill you, the Horror-Core will 
bury- you.” Not bad. Their publicity reads: “Fresh as the 
earth of a newly turned Grave." 

As far as hype is concerned, rap appears to be gening 
dangerously close to professional wrestling. Sounding sur- 
prised for some reason. Prince Paul said, “We were kind of 
pigeon-holed into this horror stuff/’ 

Rza “The Rzarector” Rakeem has become a millionaire 
through his association with Wu Tang Clan. Fruitkwan has a 
clothing line called Diggawear. Poetic started his own label. 
Prince Paul has written a script for a movie “with pos- 
sibilities.” 

And he also has an idea for more profitable and ecological 
sampling. Sampling is digital copying, filtering, speeding np 
and so on of previously recorded material and paying 
royalties to die original creators. Recently, he had to pay 
S20.000 for just one sample. 

Now Prince Paul gets older musicians who play like die 



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old guys whose samples he wants to use. They replay die 

il Not only 


same old runes and licks using outdated equipment. ! 
is it cheaper, it gives guys work. 

“You change a few notes here and there/' Prince Paul 


explained, ‘ ‘so now you're close but not close enough to get 
sued. Now it’s my sons. I can save $600 and buy a new 


VCR.” 


CULTURE 


PEOPLE 


Battles Over Arts Funding Engulf U.S. Cities 


O computer can compare with the 


By Judith H. Dobrzynski 

iVnr York Times Sen-ice 


N EW YORK — The bitter cultural 
conflict that reached a showdown 
over continued financing of the Na- 
tional Endowment for the Arts is start- 
ing to spread to towns and cities around 
the United States. 

In some places, the battle over wheth- 
er to finance, or not to finance, the arts 
with public money is engulfing arts in- 
stitutions that have nothing to do with 
the quarrel. 

Consider Charlotte, North Carolina, 
one of the most extreme examples. 
Commissioners in surrounding Meck- 
lenburg County voted this spring to cut 
off funds to the Arts and Science Coun- 
cil of Charlotte after conservative 
groups protested the production of Tony 
Kushner’s "Angels in America: A Gay 
Fantasia on National Themes/' at a 
theater the council helped finance. 

Now, schoolchildren must pay S2.75 
to go to the science museum Instead of 
getting in free; the North Carolina 
Dance Company’s ballerinas will per- 
form the “Nutcracker” Suite to taped 
music next winter instead of with the 
Charlotte Symphony, and minority stu- 
dents have no summer workshop at Op- 
era Carolina. 

Programs at 12 other nonprofit or- 

f anizations are also doing without the 
2.5 million from the council that they 
all had shared. 

The Charlotte situation is unnerving 
arts proponents and anti-censorship 
groups and providing inspiration to oth- 
ers who are disturbed by the content of 
art that receives local public financing. 

“It’s the new battleground,” said 
Meg Phee, a staff member at Americans 


to closely review' how it is spent, though 
each one failed. 

In each case, angry protesters forced 
the issue onto the local legislature's 
agenda, framing the issues much as they 
have been defined in the endowment 
imbroglios. 

“We will see more of these local 
battles,” predicted Paul Boyer, a pro- 
fessor of American cultural history at 
the University of Wisconsin at Madis- 


as taring for the arts,” said Matthew 
Freeman, a senior vice president of 
People for the American way, a civil 
liberties organization in Washington 
that promotes liberal causes. 

To Boyer, it is no mystery why art 
dealing with homosexuality or using 


nudity or profanity is prompting people 
affended to fight tack locally. 


on. "The people who oppose funding 
‘ ibly 


are probably encouraged by the success 
they’ve achieved at the NEA." 

Until recently, conflicts over artistic 
freedom and government money have 


‘This is clearly a period 
of tremendous backlash 
against what some people 


who are of 

"This is clearly a period of tremen- 
dous cultural backlash against what 
some people see as excesses of all kinds 
of cultural movements," he said. 
“People who feel helpless in com- 
batting larger trends often tend to focus 
on individual instances." 

Campaigns against public financing 
are' increasingly popular for practical 
reasons, said Allen Wildmon, the 
spokesman for the American Family As- 


sociation in Tupelo, Mississippi, a con- 
' ' ’~ J bytheRev- 


see as excesses. 


servative Christian group led 
erend Donald Wildmon, his brother. 


usually focused on a specific work of 
ait, or, in the last decade, on the National 
Endowment. Since the mid-1980s, con- 
servative groups have campaigned to 
abolish the endowment, strongly crit- 
icizing many of its grants and ques- 
tioning its mission. This year the House 
of Representatives voted to virtually 
eliminate it. The Senate later voted to 
give the agency $99.5 million, the same 
amount it received for the current fiscal 
year. The two houses must now rec- 
oncile their differences. 

At the local level, a similar concern 
for protecting public morals and the 


"The Supreme Court says you can't 
lid. "The only 


) ns with programs that offend spec 
may suffer, just by happen- film 
tfany of them are already living to w 



for the Arts, a nonprofit advocacy or- 
l Washington. 


ganization based in 
Anchorage, Alaska, and Greensboro, 
North Carolina, have also been through 
heated fights over arts funds this year, 
also triggered by programs with gay 
themes. Governments in at least a half 
dozen other places, including Clearwa- 
ter, Florida; San Antonio, Texas, and 
Santa Ana, California, have also con- 
sidered measures to withhold money or 


Chris- 
tian Coalition of Alaska, believes that 
the government has no business paying 
for art that is objectionable to a large 
segment of the public. He and his or- 
ganization have challenged grants to a 
theater that stages productions by gay 
groups. 

“They have a right to do that, but I 
have a problem with them taking my tax 
dollars to do that," he said. 

Expecting these disputes to spread. 


control content," he said, 
solution is to stop all funding." 

The court has frequently held that 
government cannot regulate speech 
based on its content, but it has not yet 
spoken definitively on whether the state 
can condition financing on content. 

In some cities, as in Charlotte, some 
institutions with programs that offend 
no one 

stance. Many of them ; 
precariously. 

As federal arts financing has declined 
in the last few years, spending on the 
arts by local governments has risen, but 
not enough to close the gap, said Randy 
Cohen, the director of research at Amer- 
icans for the Arts, the advocacy group. 

This year, Cohen said, agencies in the 
50 largest cities contributed nearly S2 1 1 
million to the arts, up about 5 percent 
from last year. For all cities, Cohen 
estimates, the total would be about $675 
million. 


‘sensation of ink on paper,” John 
Updike once insisted. Words on a 
screen, he said, are “just another 
rassing electronic wriggle." Now, die 
Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist has lent 
his name, and his words, to an on-line 
collaborative writing contest in which 
Web surfers contribute a few lines each 
to a mystery story with an opening para- 
graph written by Updike. Hie 44-day 
contest ends SepL 12, when Updike will 
write the conclusion of the stoiy, "Min- 
der Makes the Magazine." The contest 
is sponsored by the on-line bookseller 
Amazon.com. Thousands of e-mailers 
have been competing to come up with 
the latest piece of the stray. One win- 
ning entry is selected each day and is 
added to the narrative; each day’s win- 
ner gets $1,000. The story follows the 
adventures of Tasso Polk, a 43-year-old 
employee of the Magazine. Updike be- 
gins by having Polk step off the elevator 
"onto the olive tiles of the 19th floor 
only lightly nagged by a sense of 
something wrong." E-mailers have 
since added several characters, includ- 
ing the heroine's eccentric Uncle James, 
her elephantine boss, William Ever- 
more and her reclusive publisher, Mari- 
on Hyde Memweather, whose myster- 
ious death she is investigating. 




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A FAREWELL TO FUR? — A soldier wearing a “busby” bearskin hat 
standing guard in London as a model is being made up. Britain’s defense ak 
minister. Lord Gilbert, wants the army to find synthetic alternatives to for. 




□ 


By comparison, the National Endow- 
lent for the Arts is expected to 


itpectmg 

arts groups fear many casualties/ 

“The potential could be quite dev- 


ment for the Arts is expected to get its 
S99.5 million for the next fiscal year if 
the Senate holds sway over the House of 
Representatives — but that is down 
sharply from about $170 million in the 
early 1990s. 


:culation that her romance witlt the 
producer Dodi al Fayed will lead 
to wedding bells. “I haven't taken such 
a long time to get out of a bad maniage 
to get into another one," she 
was quoted as telling the 
Daily Mail on Thursday. 
Meanwhile, after reports that 
Diana had consulted a psych- 
ic over the new man in her 
life, tabloids promptly hired 
their own clairvoyants to 
forecast the future. The 
omens were not good. The 
Israeli psychic Uri Geller 
told the Mirror ' 'I think their 
friendship will iasr a Jong 
time but I'm not sure if their 
love relationship will last.” 

And Daphne, billed as 
America’s top celebrity 
psychic, said, "They will go 
down a long road together 


but I don’t feel that a marriage will be 
forthcoming." 

□ 

Perhaps John Kennedy Jr. should be 
chiding his father’s “bad behavior" 
along with that of his cousins. ABC’s 


"20/20” will air an interview Friday 

Swedish 


Elvis: ‘ You’ll Think He's Back’ 


Agence Fwnce-Presse 


EMPHIS, Tennessee — Tens of thousands of Elvis 


Presley fans from around the world are gathering in 
Memphis for the spectacular memorial bash marking the 
20th anniversary of his death. 


The "Elvis Week” tribute will climax Saturday night 
with an “Elvis in Concert” extravaganza in a local 


coliseum featuring the King singing hits like “Hound 
Dog” and "Don't Be Cruel." Through the miracle of 
video technology. Elvis will be “there on the big screen, 
singing lead and hovering above the live orchestra and 
cast,” said Todd Morgan, director of creative resources at 
the Graceland complex. “You'll think he's back.” 


with GuniNa von Post, 65, a 
woman who, the netwoik says, “speaks 
for the first time about her love affair 
with John F. Kennedy more than 40 
years ago.” Von Post says she mer 
Kennedy in the summer of 1953 on the 
French Riviera. He was a 36- 
year-old senator from Mas- 
sachusetts; she was- 21. She 
says they fell in love, and 
Kennedy confessed early on 
that he was engaged to an- 
other woman. That Sep- 
tember, Kennedy married 
Jacqueline Bouvier. "I was 
hurt. Hun. A bit angry, too, l 
guess," von Post tells ”20/ 
20's” Lynn Sherr. “I didn't 
understand . . . how you can 
feel strong for one person, 
and go and marry somebody 
else/' She also claims that 
she and Kennedy spent a 
"magical week" together in 
Sweden in August 1955. 


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