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INTERNATIONAL 



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The World’s Daily Ne wspaper 

Key Puzzle 
In Mideast: 
Who’s First 
To Blink? 

Dangerous Dynamic 
Now Driving Arafat 
And Netanyahu 

By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Se rvice 

JERUSALEM — More t han three 
weeks after a suicide bombing shattered 
a Jerusalem market, the stances main- 
tained by Israel and the Palestinians 
alike have begun to set in motion a 
dangerous dvn ami r 

In insisting that the Palestinian Au- 
thority mount a widespread crackdown 
on Islamic militants. Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu has set a high bar 
for Yasser Arafat, who thinks he cannot 
accept such dictates. Rather than make 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

more than a token effort to jump it, Mr. 
Arafat has now turned for support to 
some of the militants whom Israel wants 
in prison, making it even less likely that 
Mr. Netanyahn will modify his de- 
mands. 

With U.S. backing, Mr. Netanyahu 
has argued that both sides can win if Mr. 
Arafat begins to combat terrorism in 
earnest. But the public way in which 
Israel has pressed its demands — and 
backed them with economic sanctions 
— may have led Mr. Arafat to conclude 
that if Israel is seen to win, he will 
certainly lose. 

As a top adviser to Mr. Netanyahu 
conceded Thursday: “It’s becoming a 
who-blinks-first kind of thing.” 

And by Thursday morning, when 
photographs of Mr. Arafat's embrace of 
a Hamas leader were flashed across the 
front pages of Israeli newspapers, the 
two sides appeared less willing to badge 
than at any time since the explosion on 
July 30 began to break apart what was I 
already a fragile partnership. 

“Israel will not be toyed with,” Mr. 
Netanyahu was quoted as having told an 
Israeli cabinet meeting Thursday. An 
official communique reported that the 
prime minister said that Mr. Arafat and 
his advisers “must change the course 
they have taken” in rebuffing an Israeli 
call for a security crackdown. 

But for a second day, Mr. Arafat 
spent Thursday in the company of the 
kinds of Palestinians who make Mr. 
Netanyahu 's blood boil. 

Having apparently concluded that to 
bow to Israeli pressure would under- 
mine his own stature, Mr. Arafat seems 
to believe that his only other option is to 
put on a show of Palestinian unity. That 
calculation has led him to hold public 

See ISRAEL, Page 6 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

R Paris, Friday, August 22, 1997 

Aboard MiG-29, a Glimpse Into the Other Side 

German Pilots Test 
Former Foes’ Best 

By Joseph Fitchet! 

international Herald Triltu ne 

LAAGE AIR BASE. Germany — 

Hurtling a few hundred yards down a 
nmway, the needle-nosed fighter ta k ^ s 
off almost vertically, showing the 
thrust of its twin jets before it flashes 
out of sight across the rolling fields of 
northern Germany and out over the 
Baltic Sea. 

“For a pilot, it's the perfect ma- 
chine. says the wing commander of 
Fighter Wing 73. Colonel Rhinehard 
Mack, 48. 

In the cockpit, a sighl-and-shoot hel- 
met is linked by lasers to missiles un- 
der the wing so that the pilot can simply 
stare at an enemy for two seconds and 
fire, without need to manuever. 

^ ^ e ? tern ^ orces * airj»wer during the Cold War, these training phase when the Berlin Wall livexed on its promise of insight 

. * .k ^ not ^ er singular fea- planes are at the center of a debate fell and a re-united Germany inherited the capabilities of Russian aircra 

lure me MiG-J? interceptor. Now in about what kind of weapons should a Soviet-built air force. being delivered around the work 

tne gray paint of the Luftwaffe, two equip countries such as Poland that are Bonn kept 24 of the former East “We're a sought-after sparring 

squadrons of these aircraft have been going to become members of NATO. German MiG-29s, partly as a cooper- ner,” according to the wing corns 
incorporated into Fighter Wing 73 and When they rolled out of Soviet fac- ative gesture to Moscow and partly er. He has flown mock dog 
. i 10 * ?Hv, SIar Performers in the cones, the MiG-29s were expected to because Germany wanted to try at least against the top guns from every 

air but also highly political warplanes be top-of-the-line defenders for the temporarily integrating Soviet-made NATO air force, enabling allied 
on the ground ... Warsaw Pact well into the next cen- weapons into its arsenal and into al- to get experience against the id 

Besides offering new insights into tury. Delivered to East Germany in the liance operations, 
the strengths and limitations of Soviet late 1980$, the planes were still in the Clearly the experiment has de- See MIGS. Pane 12 



training phase when the Berlin Wall 
fell and a re-united Germany inherited 
a Soviet-built air force. 

Bonn kept 24 of the former East 
German MiG-29s. partly as a cooper- 
ative gesture to Moscow and partly 
because Germany wanted to try at least 
temporarily integrating Soviet-made 
weapons into its arsenal and into al- 
liance operations. 

Clearly the experiment has de- 


livered on its promise of insights into 
the capabilities of Russian aircraft still 
being delivered around the world. 

“We're a sought-after sparring part- 
ner,” according to the wing command- 
er. He has flown mock dogfights 
against the top guns from every other 
NATO air force, enabling allied pilots 
to get experience against the kind of 

See MIGS, Page 12 


A Papal Entreaty From the Heart of Paris 



icmac Ddiy/Tfcr Ajcuctuod Prw 


Pope John Paul II reading a prayer Thursday across the Seine from the Eiffel Tower, assisted by young 
worshipers. Some 500,000 pilgrims cheered him as he started his first visit to Paris since 1980. Page 6. 


Kidnap Insurance Giving Executives Peace of Mind 


By Joseph B. Treaster 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The worst day for Thomas Hargrove 
was the day the guerrillas mistakenly killed the cow. 

That blunder sent the leader of the tiny band that bad 
kidnapped Mr. Hargrove into a rage. The man stomped 
around the encampment in the cold, wet mountains of 
Colombia, shooting at rocks and trees, his mind fuzzy 
with whisky and cocaine. The guerrilla leader came up 
behind Mr. Hargrove, then in his early 50s and the 
head of communications at an international research 
center near Cali, and pressed the steel barrel of his rifle 
against the American’s^kull. He pulled back a couple 


of inches and fired — into the sky. 

**I was very close to dying,” Mr. Hargrove said. 

It would be months before Mr. Hargrove's wife, 
Susan, and his two college-age sons could negotiate 
his freedom with a ransom of several hundred thou- 
sand dollars. 

Tethered on a short chain and kept alive with cold 
rice and sometimes a few beans, he came out of 
captivity in August 1995 a walking skeleton of 125 
pounds (57 kilograms). 

Nightmarish experiences like these, while rare, are 
driving flourishing sales in a special kind of insurance 
policy: coverage against kidnapping. The insurance is 
for expatriate executives, corporate road warriors and 


even those who stay at the home office. 

The policies not only provide money for ransom, 
but also pay for such things as the costly fees of kidnap 
negotiators — which can run to $ 15,000 a week — and 
follow-up psychiatric treatment for victims and their 
families. 

America’s biggest multinational corporations have 
quietly carried coverage against kidnapping for years. 
But as U.S. businesses stretch ever farther around the 
globe, much smaller companies are now signing up for 
the protection in rapidly growing numbers. And 
throughout the world these days, insurance companies 

See KIDNAP, Page 12 


agenda 

MCI Shares Fall on Doubts Over Merger 


Shares in MCI Communications 
dropped sharply Thursday amid signs 
that British Telecommunications was 
seeking a lower purchase price for the 
U.S. telecommunications company. 

The two concerns confirmed that 
talks were under way on the “eco- 
nomic terms” of the merger. MCI 
said Wednesday that the transaction 
was in jeopardy. MCI had stunned BT 
and investors in July by disclosing 
that its local phone business would 
lose $800 million this year, twice 
earlier estimates. Page 13. 


PAGE TWO 

Sowing the Seeds for Mideast Peace 

AMERICAS ***»• Z 

A New Naval Battle in Pearl Harbor 

Books ~ Pa R e ^- 

Crossword 

Opinion — 

Sports Pages 20-21. 

The Intermarket Page 7. 


The 1HT on-line http:A f w ivvv.iht.com 


China’s Inflation-Taming 6 Greenspan 9 

After Cooling Overheating Economy, Zhu Takes Aim at Higher Office 




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Antilles 12.50 FF Morocd) ■■■■■■TBLJ 

Cameroon. 1600 Cf A Qatar 

Egypt. EE5.50 

France 10.00 FF Saui 5 " 

Gabon 1.100 CFA Senegal 1.100 £FA 

"a*- 5^00 Lw Spain 

Ivwy Coast. 1250 CFA Tuftaa 'jj* “J 

Jwan 1250JDUAE 

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PM I- 836 * 

pound 1-592 

Yen 117225 

FF 6.1855 


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By Steven M.ufson 

Washington Post Smii'c 

BEUING — Think of him as the Alan 
Greenspan of China- 

Deputy Prime Minister Zhu Rongji, 
the country’s top economic policy- 
maker, has engineered a remarkable soft 
landing for the Chinese economy — 
and. in the process, made himself a key 
figure in China's leadership. 

Three years ago, the annual retail 
inflation rate in China was running at 25 
percent; food prices were soaring 43 
percent annually. China was danger- 
ously close to an inflationaiy spiral that 
could have broughl instability at a time 
when it was clear the country’s senior 
leader, Deng Xiaoping, was near death. 

Now inflation has come to a virtual 
halt. The annual rate of consumer in- 
flation is barely 3 percent, well below 
government projections issued in 
March. While typical inflation-fighting 
measures may often send a country into 
recession, Chinese officials estimate 
that during their "slowdown,” the 
economy will still grow at an annual rate 
of more than 9 percent. Even with a dose 
of skepticism ahout the numbers — the 
makeup of China’s official inflation- 


measuring basket is kept secret — few 
analysts doubt that Mr. Zhu’s achieve- 
ment is substantial. 

The consequences are huge. For one 
thing, the curbing of inflation will prob- 
ably catapult Mr. Zhu, a former Central 
Planning Department bureaucrat who 
was purged in 1957, into the post of 
prime minister next year. For another, it 
has helped ensure social calm during the 
sensitive political transition period fol- 
lowing Mr. Deng's death on Feb. 19. 

How has Mr. Zhu done it? 

The approach has been double- 
barreled, reflecting both his determi- 
nation to make China’s economy more 
open and market-oriented and his ex- 
perience with central planning. On the 
one hand, he has used price controls 
over some key food prices and raised 
food subsidies. On the other hand, he 
has pursued policies that have stabilized 
the currency, inspired investors, shut the 
spigot of state-bank loans, pushed do- 
mestic industry to be more competitive, 
opened up new retail and distribution 
channels and slightly lowered tariffs. 

State-owned enterprises, which once 
churned out products at fixed prices that 
piled up in inventories, are now slashing 
prices to win customers. Instead of 


poorly stocked state-run shops and street 
vendors, new private retail stores and 
grocery chains are vying for customers. 
Computer stores ate cutting prices to gain 
market share. Travel agents are bargain- 
ing over fares. Commercial rents in many 
major cities have sagged. And foreign 
investment has spurned new products and 
standards that have put price pressure on 
more stodgy domestic competitors. 

“Inflation is and always will be a 
monetary phenomenon.” said Huang 
Yasheng, an associate professor at Har- 
vard Business School. “So Zhu has to 
get the credit for inflation control be- 
cause he has pursued a relatively tight 
monetary policy.” 

Yet China faces a problem of over- 
supply. It seems that as huge us China's 
market is. it is not big enough. Chinese 
industries already produce more tele- 
vision sets, washing machines, auto- 
mobiles. steel and consumer goods than 
the Chinese want to buy. And if China 
joins the World Trade Organization and 
cuts tariffs, competition from imports 
will be more intense than it is now. 

The example of the television in- 
dustry brings into dear focus the down- 

Scc ZHU, Page 12 


Smoke Alarm: 
Philip Morris 
Chief Admits 
Possible Harm 


By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — TTie chairman of 
Philip Morris Cos. said Thursday that 
thousands of Americans “might have” 
died of diseases caused at least in part by 
smoking. 

The unexpected concession by a to- 
bacco industry leader, Geoffrey Bible, 
comes in a year when the industry, 
battered by lawsuits and throttled by 
new legal restrictions, finally agreed to a 
sweeping $368 billion settlement that 
will limit its sales and marketing but 
also restrict its legal exposure. 

The comment by Mr. Bible, long one 
of smoking’s roost pugnacious defend- 
ers. came during a pretrial deposition in 
West Palm Beach, Florida. Tne state is 
seeking $123 billion for the public cost 
of treating smoking-related illnesses. 
The statement also caused Philip Morris 
shares to fall 23 percent in late trad- 
ing. 

Industry leaders long denied any link 
between smoking and serious illness. In 
recent years, they began to admit that it 
was a risk factor but refused to call it a 
primary cause. 

In his deposition, Mr. Bible conceded 
only that deaths could have been caused 
“in part” by smoking. 

Still, Ron Motley, a lawyer repre- 
senting Florida in the hearing, called 
Mr. Bible's statement a breakthrough. 

Bennett LeBow. chief executive of 
Liggett Group, the smallest major 
American cigarette maker, last year 
stated that cigarettes are addictive and 
cause disease, something no top tobacco 
executive had done before. 

Mr. Bible’s comment, coming from 
the head of a company that makes nearly 
half the cigarettes sold in the United 
States, was “a step in the right di- 
rection, 4 ’ said John Coale, a Washing- 

See SMOKE, Page 6 


No. 35,606 


Sfaajp-Up 

In Taiwan 
As Leader 
Steps Down 

New Prime Minister 
Is Expected to Push 
For Better China Ties 

CunpIrdtoOwSktfFmnDuparha 

TAIPEI — Prime Minister Lien Chan 
announced his resignation Thursday, 
clearing the way for his designated suc- 
cessor, Vincent Siew, to try to fulfill his 
promise to improve the island's rela- 
tions with China. 

President Lee Teng-hui's office said 
that Mr. Siew, 58, a former diplomat and 
trade minister, was told to prepare to 
take over from Mr. Lien on SepL 1 . 

“The normal development of cross- 
strait relations is very important,” Mr. 
Siew said, referring to China, shortly 
after he was named by President Lee. 
“We hope to search for breakthrou ghs 
in relations.” 

Mr. Lee's office said that Mr. Slew’s 
appointment would be made formally at 
tne end of this month, after the annual 
congress of the governing Kuo mintang . 
or Nationalist Party. The switch has 
been in the works for months, with Mr. 
Siew viewed as the Nationalists’ best 
hope for recovering ground lost in local 
elections. 

Mr. Lien had come under criticism 
for a spate of recent violent crimes on 
the island, including the kidnapping and 
murder of the daughter of a popular 
actress in April. 

But Mr. Lien is considered likely to 
remain a prominent force as vice pres- 
ident and Mr. Lee's possible successor. 
He has been prime minister since Feb- 
ruary 1993 and is expected to be the 
Nationalist candidate in the 2000 elec- 
tion for president of Taiwan, which 
holds the third- largest foreign currency 
reserves in the world. 

Mr. Lien said at a farewell news 
conference that he was proud of the 
economic strength and political reforms 
achieved during his term, but regretted 
the breakdown of a gradual improve- 
ment in relations with China. 

He said he would continue to press 
for more international recognition for 
Taiwan, despite China’s insistence that 
Taiwan is a renegade province with no 
right to separate diplomatic status. 

“We’re not trying to challenge 
China,” he said. “How can they shut us 
out in this age of the global village?” 

Ties with China have improved this 
year with a succession of visits by mid- 
level officials. But Beijing has yet to 
revive negotiations that it suspended in 
June 1995 in outrage over Mr. Lee’s 
visit to dae United States. 

Mr. Siew used to run China policy for 
the cabinet, and Beijing may see his 

See TAIWAN, Page 12 


Russian Pair 
Set for Crucial 
Repair of Mir 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — Pavel Vinogradov, a 
rookie cosmonaut who is the flight en- 
gineer on the ailing Mir space station, 
once wrote instruction manuals for 
space ships. On Friday, he will ny to fix 
one floating in orbit. 

Mr. Vinogradov is to spend about 
four hours inside a cramped, dim can- 
ister 250 miles (400 kilometers) above 
Eanh, attempting to reconnect 1 1 elec- 
trical wires needed to salvage the 
stricken Mir. Just outside the canister 
will be his experienced partner, the Mir 
commander. Anatoli Solovyov. 

If they are successful. Mir will have a 
bit more power than it does now. Since it 
was rammed June 25 by a crewless 
cargo vessel, Mir has been running with 
about 50 percent of its original electrical 
power. If Mr. Vinogradov can reattach 
the wires. Mir’s power will increase to 
about 70 percent, and Russian officials 
said it may even be more. 

That additional electricity could be 
crucial in preserving both Mir as a sci- 
entific platform and Russia’s interna- 
tional role in space exploration. It would 
also keep the longest continuously 
manned space station aloft a little 
longer. 

Only if the Mir has enough power to 
support scientific experiments can Rus- 
sia continue to expect cooperation, and 
money, from the United States and 
Europe for hosting astronauts on board. 
Most of the additional three kilowatts of 
power that Mr. Vinogradov hopes to 
gain from-the-new connections will be 
devoted to the scientific experiments. 
U.S. officials said. 

“If they get nothing, then 1 think we 
would have to very carefully evaluate 
whether we could, in fact, continue a 

See MIR, Page 6 








PAGE TWO 


Camp in Colorado / Encounters for Polestimons and Israelis 


Sharing a Tent With a Mideast Stereotype 


By James Brooke 

New fork Tunes Service 


I DAHO SPRINGS, Colorado — Huddled to- 
gether on a cafeteria bench, Maayan Geva, an 
Israeli, and Rawan Asali. a Palestinian, puzzled 
over unfamiliar street names and neighbor- 
hoods until they finall y concluded that their homes 
in Jerusalem are one mile apart. 

“Although it’s physically close, it’s very far," 
said Maayan. 16, acknowledging the cultural and 
political chasms that have kept the two high school 
girls apart 

They met only by flying halfway around the 
globe and then dnving up an unmarked forest road 
to a summer camp here, 1 0,000 feet (3,000 meters) 
high in the Colorado Rockies. 

The camp, called Seeking Common Ground, is 
pan of a fledgling movement by Americans to foster 
direct contact and. it is hoped, friendships among 
members of the next generation of the Middle East’s 
long-running enemy groups, the Palestinians and 
the Israelis. 

“Let's get these people together and talking to 
each other." said Melodye Feldman, the camp’s 
founder. 

Now in its fifth summer, the camp arranged this 
month for 27 Israeli and Palestinian high school 
girls to come for two weeks of encounter sessions 
that are intended to break down barriers and pro- 
mote understanding. Follow-up meetings will be 
held in Israel during the next year to nurture the 
friendships forged in summer. 

"We don’t want to just give them a three-week 
experience, but to keep this going in their lives," 
Ms. Feldman said of the project which is supported 
by private donors in the Denver area. 

On the East Coast a similar camp. Seeds of 
Peace, is proving so successful that it just signed a 
20-year lease on 150 acres (60 hectares) in Maine 
that will allow it to triple its summer sessions for 
young Arabs and Israelis. 

Noting that 1 ,000 people showed up last week for 
the camp's dedication. John Wallach. the president 
and a veteran of U.S.-Soviet exchanges of the 
1980s, said: “It reflects the desire of the ordinary' 
public to do something. The peace treaties don’t 
mean anything if there is not peace at the human 
level." 



Few Grouse Over Fees 
At U.S. Public Lands 


p 


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By Timothy Egan 

New York Times Service 


\mn lorl 


“ Behind the word 'Palestinian*’ l now know there is a person, a person 
/ hugged with, a person I cried with, a person I shared a tent with," 
says an Israeli teenage girl at a summer camp high in the Colorado Rockies . 
The camp is called Seeking Common Ground 


F! 


OR many girls here, this quiet patch of 
Colorado pine forest affords their first op- 
portunity to talk to someone from the ‘ 'other 
side.” 

“I had never really met an Israeli," said Mima 
Shikaki. a 17-year-old Palestinian from a village in 
the West Bank. “I had been over there to shop, but 
never to talk to them." 

Tal Cohen. Muna’s 18-year-old Israeli "buddy” 
in the camp’s pairing system, said similar feelings 
pushed her to come. Seated next to Muna at the 
camp's arts and crafts center. Tal said: "I didn't 
know any Arabs. I thought that there are probably 
more to the Palestinians - than those who bomb the 
buses." 

Over meals, on hikes and on sleep-overs in tents, 
the girls say they have traded points of view, face to 


face, in a way that seems impossible at borne. 

“It opens up your mind to different perspect- 
ives,” said Muna. whose grandfather lost his farm 
to Jewish settlers. “Now 1 realize that a lot of Jews 
in the Arab states were also treated badly.” 

Tat said of the Palestinians: “They are in the 
same situation as we were in 1947. They are trying 
to build a state while surrounded by enemies.” 

"Behind the word 'Palestinian.’ " she added. "I 
now know there is a person, a person I hugged with, 
a person 1 cried with, a person I shared a tent 
with.” 

While Seeking Common Ground has all the trap- 
pings of a traditional summer camp — pine log 
cabins, archery targets and a corral of riding horses 
— conversations are often serious and tense. The 
reality of the Middle East is never distant. 

On a recent day. in an exercise to build trust, 
mixed pairs of girls felt each other's pulse by 
placing a hand on each other’s wrist, neck and 
chest. 

They met in a hall named Qiryat Shemona, after 
a village in northern Israel. A few hours later, the 
real Qiryat Shemona was hit by dozens of rockets 


from Lebanon. Last month, a week before the 
Palestinian and Israeli girls were to gather at Tel 
Aviv's airport for the flight to the United States, two 
Palestinian suicide bombers blew up a Jerusalem 
market, killing 15 people and wounding at least 
170. 


II 


SRAEL immediately halted virtually all traffic 
from areas under control of the Palestinian 
Authority. "Ir was only on the last day that we 
, got permission for the Palestinian girls to go to 
Tel Aviv." said Ms. Feldman. 

She spent a frantic week talking to Israeli jour- 
nalists and diplomats to try to win an exemption for 
the Palestinian participants at the camp. Eventually 
she was successful. 

Unsure that she could travel to Israel.Muna chose 
to fly to the United States from Syria. 

"Muna and I joke that I will let her in more 
easily.” said Tal. who is to report next month for 
duty in the Israeli .Army. 

.Already assigned to a combat unit, she said she 
expected to perform checkpoint dun . either in Gaza 
or the West Bank. 


GOOSE PRAIRIE, Washington — It 
still costs more to catch the latest action 
film at the local octoplex than to launch 
a boar under a volcano in Northern 
California, watch brown bears paw at 
salmon in Alaska or stroll along the 
Trail of the Ancients at the A n a sazi 
Heritage Center in Colorado. But for the 
first time, most of America’s natural 
wonders are no longer free. 

From the White Mountains of New 
Hampshire to the William O. Douglas 
Wilderness area here in the Cascade 
Mountains, the backpacker trails, wild- 
life refuges and historic sites cm more 
than 500 milli on acres (200 hectares) of 
American public land now come with an 
admission price. 

As of this summer, it costs $6 a car to 
catch the view from 14,000 feet (4,250 
meters) on the highest paved road in 
North America in the Arapaho National 
Forest of Colorado, S8 a head to visit 
Mount Sl Helens in this state and S3 a 
day to hike in the Sandia Mountains east 
of Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

But while some people complain 
about an admission charge to enjoy land 
where logging, grazing and mining are 
still heavily subsidized by die federal 
government, most recreational users 
seem willing to pay something for using 
public land, according to preliminary 
surveys across the country. 

In national parks, most of which have 
long charged admission fees, there has 
been a 5 percent increase in the number 
of visitors thus far this year over last, 
despite a doubling of fees at some of the 
most popular sites and the introduction 
of fees at some previously free areas. 

It is on Forest Service land, refuges 
run by the Fish and Wildlife Service and 
the arid country managed by the Bureau 
of Land Management — the big open 
land that was always free to visitors — 
that federal officials most feared a back- 
lash to the new pay-per-see policy that is 
being tried out for die next three years. 

The idea of charging S4 a head to 
watch buffalo chew grass in the National 
Bison Range in Montana, for example, 
struck some people as a violation of the 
home-on-the-range spirit of public land. 

Free use of public land is the essence 
of the American West, some critics of 
the new policy have said. As Bill Hall, a 
columnist for The Tribune of Lewiston, 
Idaho, wrote recently: “A river that 
belongs to everyone should not have an 
admission charge. Thar’s like charging 
people a fee to use their own homes." 

Most of the money from the new fees 
goes into funds to maintain the sites 
where the fees are being collected. For 


0 


Leo Jaffe, 88, Who Ran Columbia Pictures for 2 Decades, Dies 


_ LM 


By James Stemgold 

.Vrn Y> rk Tunes Sen ;ce 


NEW YORK — Leo Jaffe, 88. well 
known for decades as an influential 
dealmaker in Hollywood and as a phil- 
anthropist, died Wednesday at his home 
in New York City after a long illness. 

In a world where executives often 
move from one studio to another, Mr. 
Jaffe was noteworthy for spending his 
entire career at one company, Columbia 
Picrures. He ran the studio in the 1960s 
and 1970s and he helped build it into one 
of the strongest in the industry, based in 
part on his friendships with some of 


Hollywood's most powerful producers 
and directors. 

During his days at Columbia Pictures 
it produced such classic films as 
"Lawrence of Arabia." "On the Wa- 
terfront," "Porgy and Bess,” "Lord 
Jim." "A Man for All Seasons” and 
"Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner." 

Mr. Jaffe was also active in numerous 
philanthropies. Among others, he re- 
ceived honors from several Jewish or- 
ganizations, New York University, the 
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and 
Sciences, the White House and several 
mayors of New York City. 

Mr. Jaffe was bom in New York City 


on April 23. 1909, and took his first job 
at Columbia in the summer of 1930 
while he was still an undergraduate 
studying business at New York Uni- 
versity. He joined the studio's auditing 
department shortly afterward and began 
working his way up in the financial 
department. Mr. Jane retired in 1981, 
when he became chairman emeritus. 

Yuri Nikulin, 75, Actor 
And Moscow Circus Director 
MOSCOW (AP) — Yuri Nikulin, 75, 
Russia's most beloved comic actor and 
director of the Moscow Circus, died 
Thursday at a Moscow clinic where he 


had undergone heart surgery , doctors 
said. 

Mr. Nikulin, bom in 1921 in 
Smolensk, was a veteran of World War 
II who became a Moscow Circus clown 
in 1950. He was appointed the circus’s 
director in 1984. a post he held until his 
death. 

Nikulin owed much of his country- 
wide popularity to his movie roles, well 
known to generations of Russians. His 
typical role was that of a slightly silly, 
average guy. witty but never mean-spir- 
ited. Children called him Yuri. 

William Humphrey. 73. whose 


highly acclaimed first novel, "Home 
From' the Hill.” and other books dealt 
wiih the play of small-town family life 
in the scrub oak and cotton country of 
northeast Texas, died Wednesday of 
cancer at his home in Hudson, New 
York ... 

Diooys Mascolo. 81. a French writer 
and leftist intellectual who was the com- 
panion of the author Marguerite Duras 
and the father of her only child, died 
Wednesday at a Paris hospital. 

Serge Peretti, 92. the ItaJian-bom 
French dancer and choreographer, died 
Wednesday in Chatou, France. 


that reason, random interviews indicate, 
people seem not to mind having to pay. 

There have been some protests, 
mainly by local people who are used to 
treating the public land in their back- 
yards as an extension of their own prop- 
erty. The word "tax” has been scrawled 
onto posted notices of the new fees. 

It costs $14 a night to camp at RusseU 
Pond in the White Mountain National 
Forest in New Hampshire, and another 
S5 to use the pond, a source of some 
complaints. , 

“In a state with a slogan like ‘Live 
Free or Die,’ we have had some trou- 
ble," said Greg Super, a recreation 
economist with the Forest Service. 

The government decided to charge 
for using public land after millions tf? 

‘A river that belongs to 
everyone should not have - 
an admission charge,’ 
one critic wrote. ‘That’s . 
like charging people a fee ’ 
to use their own homes.’ 


discovered what a bargain such 

were, straining the maintenance 

budgets. With little hope of increased 
funding, the agencies embraced having 
the people who use the lands most pay 
for their upkeep, an idea backed both by 
the administration and Congress. 

Though the land agencies still devote 
the bigger portions of their budgets to 
subsidizing logging, grazing and mining, 
recreational users like hikers, hunters, 
bird-watchers and mountain-bikers are 
the biggest single users of public land. 

Last year, the Forest Service recorded 
829 million visits to die 191 million 
acres ran by the agency, an all-time 
high. The Park Service, Bureau of Land 
Management and Fish and Wildlife also 
registered a record volume of visitors. ' 

"We have suffered from a public 
perception that all we're really about is 
timber-cutting," said Jim Lyons, un- 
dersecretary for natural resources at the 
Agriculture Department, which runs the 
Forest Service. "Timber is not die 
agenda of the future. Recreation is.” ' 

Still, many chafe at paying user fees 
when Congress has authorized spending 
another $200 million for subsidized 
road-building into national forests to 
benefit the timber industry. 

4 ‘People accept these new user fees, v 
said Dan Nelson, a spokesman for the 
Washington Trails Association, which 
represents 4,000 backpackers in this 
state, ‘ ‘butthat vote to continue building 
new roads for loggers really ticked off a 
lot of our members. ’ ’ 

Iri ’this> the- first full year of die fee 
experiment, die Forest Service expects I \ 
to collect about $13 million in user fees. 

The Bureau of Land Management es- 
timates it will take in $3.8 million — on 
just a handful of sites — while Fish and 
Wildlife Service has projected revenue . 
of $2.5 million. 

. Atthe end of the three years. Congress 
will decide whether to end, expand or 
modify the fees program. Ihemooeylsa 
small fraction of the overall budget for 
public land agencies. But because a full 
1G0 percent of the foes collected by the 
Bureau of Land Management and 80 
percent of those collected by the Forest 
Service and Fish and Wildfife are sup- 
posed to go back into the sites where they 
were collected, the money can have a big ^ _ 
impact in certain overused areas. In some,:.* 
places, a working toilet is a sea change- ^ "" 


Ex 


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Tm worried 
about the kid, 
honey!” 


"Don't worry. I’ve got him covered!" 



[Ac twdv pfcipJc ct^ia ihor freedom. Wiih bwu-iiur Worittojde HraWi Insurance CmJ 


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TRAVEL UPDATE 


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Warning About Latins Withdrawn 

MIAMI i AP) — American Airlines has withdrawn a train- 
ing manual that warns pilots that Latin passengers are often 
unruly and sometimes call in fake bomb threats when running 
late for a flight. The airline also promised to investigate how 
the manual got printed in the first place. 

"As a Latino myself, I was offended," said Peter Dolara, 
vice president for Latin American operations. "It has dam- 
aged me as an employee of .American Airlines." 

The manual was made public during pretrial hearings on 
lawsuits against American over a crash on Dec. 20. 1995. in 
CalL Colombia, that killed 159 people. The airline is the 
dominant U.S. carrier in Latin America, carrying about 6 
million passengers a year on 200 scheduled flights a week in 
the region. 

Russia Allows Arms on Israeli Craft 

MOSCOW (AP) — The government has given Israeli 
civilian planes the right to have armed guards on board when 
they fly into Russia. 

The agreement was signed by Interior Minister Anatoli 
Kulikov and his Israeli counterpart. Avigdor Kahalani. ac- 
cording to Russian news agencies. Mr. Kulikov said Moscow 
understood Israel’s concerns about the security of its cit- 
izens. 

Israel is the only country allowed the privilege, the reports 
said. 

Bus service was disrupted and businesses reported that 
many workers stayed home as a series of one-day strikes by 
South Africa’s largest labor federation affected Gaureng. 
North-West and Northern provinces on Thursday. The Jo- 
hannesburg metropolitan bus service said many routes were 
canceled during morning service. (AP) 


Europe 


TbdSiy 

Tomorrow 


Htgti 

LovtW 

High 

LowW 


OF 

C/F 

OF 

or 

Algarw 

29,84 

1966 S 

2S.TC 

1664 pc 

Amarmtem 

24,75 

16/61 c 

27.80 

19- 56 pc 

Ankara 

23.73 

6/43 pe 

24/75 

7:44 pc 

Amera 

24,75 

1 7 -62 pc 

£8/82 

19/66 pc 

DareOtor* 

28/82 

sacape 

27.80 

19/66 PC 

Berate 

27.80 

12/53 s 

26/79 

14157 pC 

Berlin 

30/86 

14/571 

24,75 

15/59 pc 

Briiswfo 

26.75 

16/61 c 

2*82 

1&64 pc 

Budapest 

27/00 

14/57 £ 

2679 

1559 pc 

Copenftagen 

27.M 

16/61 pc 

24/76 

1654 pc 

Caste Dal Sot 

31/88 

21.70 S 

31/80 

21 70 pc 

Chian 

21/70 

14,57 5 

£3,73 

1651 pc 

E/Mmrgn 

21-70 

13/55 pc 

24.75 

16/61 pc 

FVirwice 

26.79 

15/59 e 

29.84 

17/62 pc 

Frankfurt 

2984 

17/82 pc 

26/79 

17.-62 pc 

Geneva 

31/88 

16/61 pc 

2B82 

16.61 pc 

hetsMU 

23/73 

14. 57 s 

23m 

14/57 pc 

Istanbul 

28/83 

1864 pc 

2780 

18/64 sn 

Kiev 

£3/73 

1365 c 

22/71 

1SV53 pe 

Las Pfltmas 

2780 

19.56 pc 

2679 

19-66 PC 

baton 

29/04 

19/68 s 

27.80 

18/64 pc. 

Lorefon 

2Sf77 

1454 Sh 

2882 

1*64 s 

UxHd 

93/91 

17/82 PC 

3483 

1864 pc 

MalHca 

31/88 

18 64 pc 

3188 

16-06 pc 

kHan 

28/82 

17/82 pc 

30/88 

2088 pc 

»>OT 

2*68 

1253 pc 

£1,70 

12-53 pc 

Munich 

S4/76 

13/55 pc 

2475 

15 S9 pe 

tear 

2-'W 

21/70 pc 

2682 2271 pe 

Oslo 

2577 

1881 Sh 

23/73 

16/61 DC 

Pans 

2/.K0 

1481 pc 

27-80 

16-61 pc 

Prague 

27/80 

14/57 s 

£577 

135!:. pc 

Reykjsvlk 

11/52 

6/43 i 

11/52 

6.43 pe 

Riga 

2879 

1*81 S 

£173 

1 &S 1 pc 

Rome 

£882 

10/84 pc 

28/82 

17/62 pc 

St Petertfurg 23/73 

17.82 pc 

2475 

17/82 S 

StorWmhn 

24,75 

18/61 a 

23.73 

1 6/01 pc 

Smtirang 

W88 

1864 pc 

2684 

1064 pc 

Tatem 

2173 

1509 s 

23/73 

1061 pc 

TWIfat . 

27 00 

1762 c 

29/84 

1966c 

Ve*e 

25/77 

17/B2 pc 

£8/82 

19/60 pc 

Yunna 

27.80 

14/57 pc 

2679 

IE/59 ah 

Warsaw 

Z8/B2 

1ZS3 PC 

24/75 

13/55 ah 

Zurich 

27/80 

16/61 S 

£679 

1064 pc 

Middle East 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu Weather. 



■toisiwm 

North America Europe 

A storm will bring heavy Showers and a thunder- 
ram to Maine and ihe storm m London Saturday. 
Canadian Marihmes. but some sun and nice Sun- 
the rest of New England day. then showers Mon- 
and the Nortfteasf will be day. Paris will be humid 
dry and pleasant with sun- with a shower or thunder- 
shine. Hot in the South- storm possible each day. 
wes i with monsoon thun- Central and Eastern 
derstorms m New Mexico Europe wilt be dry and 
and Arizona. Steamy with comfortably warm, but 
thundeistorms in (he soaking rains are headed 
Southeast for Norway. 


Asia 

Beijing and most oi north- 
eastern China wilt be 
sunny, hot and dry Satur- 
day through Monday. 
Showers and thunder- 
storms with heavy down- 
pours will reach from Hong 
Kong to Hainan Island. 
Thunderstorms in Seoul 
Saturday, then warm with 
some sun. Tokyo could 
have showers each day. 


North America 


Today 


AbuDhedi 

Barm 

Coin 

Damascus 

Jerusalem 

Luror 

Riyadh 


42.107 2S7W x 
2*7? I9rfl8s 
wm amx 

29*4 13/55 i 
24/75 13/55 9 
4V105 aWfia 
41/106 2373 s 


42/107 

27.90 

31-89 

3301 

irrao 

38/100 

41/106 


2WB4 pc 
23 70 pc 
19/66 pc 
15/58 pc 
14.-57 pe 
2271 pc 
27/80 pc 



ngh 

LowW 

Mfltl 

Low W 



C/F 

C/F 

C/F 

C/F 


Anchotags 

1ft 84 

11.53 sh 

1752 

n/52 pe 


Atlanta 

29/84 

1*57 s 

2479 

17412 pc 

Montreal 

Beaton 

19.66 

17/ffic 

2475 

16/61 pc 

Naaeau 

Chicago 


12/53 pc 

£3/73 

tanspc 

New Yom 


31/88 

21.70 1 

34-03 20/68 CC 

Ortanao 

D«mr 

31/88 

1&61 9 

3WBS 

i ass pc 

Ptnenbr 

Pete* 

21/7U 

1 1. 52 sh 

Z271 

12/53 pc 

San Fran. 

HoiwtulU 

30/86 

2373 pc 

33/91 

24/TSpp 

Sestoe 

Ho /Otto 

34.93 

2373 pe 

31.-88 20/88 pc 

Toronto 

Loa Angates 

3289 

2170* 

34.-93 

1681 pc 

Vaneouvw 




3188 

24/75 r 

Waarangion 


Today 

High Low W 
OF Cff 
24.75 1355s 
17/62 9/48 sh 

3289 2V739 
2679 17/62 pc 
32/89 21/70 r 
40/104 27,80 pc 
26/79 13/55 g 
24/75 13/56 pc 
1064 0/48 an 

1 3/66 13/65 c 
26/79 1&61 K 


Tomorrow 
High Low W 
OF OF 

25/77 14/57 pc 
20/BS 10/50 Wl 
3289 24/75 pc 
24/75 1*61 pc 
32/89 22,71 t 
41/106 28/82 pc 
24/75 15 58 pc 
23/73 11/52 ah 
18/64 7l44c 

21/70 KVSOah 
26/79 16/81 pc 


Asia 


Today 

Tomorrow . 


«0h 

LowW 

High LowW 


OF 

OF 

C# OF ‘ 

AJmntj 

338)1 

17/62 « 

31/88 ITrapC 

Bsi 

30-58 

21.70 a 

29,-84 2271 pc 

Bangtail 

31/88 

24/75 r 

33/81 2679 pc- 


37/98 

28/92 a 

36197 27/80 a - 

Bcvnbay 

29184 

24/7ST 

30/86 2577 pt 

CteanzB 

3086 

23/73 ah 

31/88 2577 pe. 

ChbmoU.H 

32/09 2271 ah 

32W 2*75 pc 

Cctomho 

2*484 

2475 pc 

30/86 2679 pc 

Hewn 

31/88 

2577 6h 

31.-88 2579 c ’ 

H 0 CWMM 1 

31/80 

23/73 r 

32/89 2679c 

Hong Kong 

28/82 

2577i 

29/B4 2579 ah- 

tateraaisKt 

39.102 

27/80 » 

36/97 24/75 r • 

Jakarta 

3086 

2271 pc 

31/88 2*75 pc- 

Karachi 

36/67 

28/82 pc 

33/91 27/80 pc. 

K. Lnupur 

32IB9 

2271 pc 

3Sm 24/75 pc .? 

K. MrUtutu 

31/08 

2271 pc 

31, -B6 2475 pc. . 

Mama 

28/82 

24751 

31/88 2475 pc - •- 

N*er Dalhl 

3S9S 

2475 pe 

3*93 £577 ta 

Phnom Ponn 

30/86 

2475 r 

3&B9 25/77 pc 

Pnuket 

31/88 

2475 r 

33/SI M/7Bpc- 

Rangoon 

29/04 

2373 r 

29.-84 2475 pC- 

Seoul 

33/09 

2170 a 

31.-88 2373 a • 

Shanghai 

3&B9 

2577 pc 

31.88 2577 pe- 

Seroxm 

31/08 

2271 pc 

31.88 2475 pc; 

Ta*« 

33/91 

24/75 pr 

3288 2579 pc. 

Tokyo 

28/02 

2475 c 

29/B4 24,75 pc 

Wmoane 

3086 

2271 r 

31.88 2475 e . 

Africa 

Algtara 

34/53 

ifl/84 a 

31/88 1804 pC 

Cape Town 

16/01 

948 pc 

2170 11 /52PS" 

CasaUanca 

2679 

IMS pc 

28/79 13/86 C 

Harare 

27/00 

12/53 3 

2579 M/57pc 

Law* 

28/82 

2373 c 

28/82 2373 pc 

Naaotrl 

27J0O 

10-50 pc 

2*75 12/53 pc. 

Tiria 

30% 

17/62 pc 

30/86 1884 pe 


Latin America 


Legend: s-sunjj/. pe-pwtfy caxioy. octtidy. ah-aiwwts. I -thunderstorms, r-raki. si-snow Suites, 
sn-snow. uca. w-waaher Mmapt, tomewt* ate dw priw«*d by AiwjWBothe/. Inc. C 


Buenos Akes 

14/57 

5/41 s 

1061 

8/48 3 

Caracas 

27/00 

10*38 pc 

27/80 20/68 pe 

u™ 

20/68 

17/62 pe 

2170 

1782 pc 

Mexico City 

2373 

13/Sapc 

2373 1253 pc 

HtodaJarwtm 2577 

IWGpc 

2373 

1&6I pe 

Sam ago 

11/02 

3137 fa 

15/59 

3/37 s 

Oceania 




■*, 

Auctdand 

11/52 

5141 pc 

13® 

6/43 pc * 

Sydney 

18/64 

S/48 • 

19/96 

SMB pc 


— 4 


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‘lie T 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


RAGE 3 


^ ari( k -* F° r Pearl Harbor, New Battle Over 2 Ships 


By William Claiborne 

WashiHgtm, p on Sen-ice 


ar ^ Arizona in its resting place. task for the manner in which it notified the com- 

— — ® ntroosphere is solemn and silent, with only peting cities of new criteria that it had decided io 

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii — Two ereat U «? !k?, a es ^ ls P 85 ** 1 ® by- Visitors often com- stipulate in the final stages of the four-city com- 

Navy battleship are involved in a conflicthere ace ^ aimosl like a church. petition. Because of these changes, the Hawaii 

World War D ended on die deck of one. with the savthe n? r f 01 ^ 1S brought Mo P !ace - critics group’s application got the highest score and 


. : jY°rld War D ended on thedeck ofone. with die JfS “H* ■ » into place .critics group’s application got tnc tugnesi score ana 
signing of the Japanese surrender in ToWoTartSr Se p l CIUre wU1 <*“*« ■ bow of knocked Bremerton out of first place. 

The other battleship was sunk here bv Jananese im, ar K S ip> w hich is three football fields in According to Roger Hauerstein, a navy veteran 
aircraft on Dec. 7. 1941, brineme y ‘ ienfith whose superstructure rises 120 feet (37 in Seanle who is collecting documents on behalf of 

the U.S. into the war. - the planned lawsuit by the Bremer- 

A plan by a nonprofit Hawaii TToSna wo, c l.’ , _ _ ton-based group, Missouri On the 

booster organization to tow the de- U8m ® ""Snips as symbols of the start and end of war, Mainland, the navy also failed to 

commissioned Missouri here and a plan is under way to tow the USS Missouri sHj- nf prepare a plan to mitigate the po- 

moor it next to the site of the sunken r 5 i ft ,. ’ uw tne Missouri, Site Ot ten Dally negative impact on the 

Arizona would seem to be an un- Ja P an 3 surrender, to Pearl Harbor and anchor it Arizona Memorial before it award- 

controversial idea. Backers of the Mosp »n a . * » . . , ed the Missouri to Pearl Harbor, 

project say that nnninp thr 0 J “ zona ” sunk in the Japanese surprise raid. “The law says there has to be a 

'.'Mighty Mo” near the Arizona plan to protect the dignity and in- 

monument. iSfdfdM 

, DeroitethetotarieSSSJSSfVh-.iic M . feet from the bow of *e sunfan Arizona. Hauerstein said. “That’s our smoking gun.” 

dedsmna yearSo?o accordm § 10 P*m, toe Mis- A former Bremerton mayor, Eugene Nelson, 
to Pearl Harbor Ls ^S. w 1 ou,d £ e ™ v , ed to a permanent berth farther president of Missouri On the Mainland, called the 

There are two main S r?“ 8 Ford klan, L where another battleship, transfer a * ‘political deal” between Navy Secretary 

process bvwfaci, pSfrl the bidding the ^California. was sunk during the Japanese raid. John Dalronand SenarorDanid K. Iaouye, Demo- 

three comoetine mainl»nH a ^!^ Wa \ Se ^c 7 te< * over Opponents of the plan say that, apart from the crat of Hawaii, who was instrumental in nego- 
a^ d ZSfiSZSF 0 5!i ysica! overshadowing of the Arizona Memorial, nations for bringing the Missouri to Pearl Hartor. 

Washinpton a mai’nr ^ Bremerton, the noise from thousands of visitors on the Mis- Senator Inouye called the criticism “just a lot of 

The other issue^invniv^! fk!^' f s decks— and, possibly, from tour narratives nit-picking" and said the Missouri and the Arizona 

^red.through loudspeakers- would destroy the “ar? a perfect match for us.” 
attraction that solemnity of the memorial. Although the Park Service has remained of- 

men ^nm ^ memorial to tbe crew- Angered by the navy’s decision not to keep the ficially neutral in the site selection, die Arizona 

In all li 77 * ■ ,. Jp**®* 111 ? B reraenon, where it is now moored in Memorial superintendent, Kathy Billings, said in an 

durinJ^iri«T2? rl n A™ 001 °re w «5ed the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, or to move it to San interview: “hi every lener to the navy we have said 

a^™f.Sr^^°wIi g K Pearl i H 5S 0? ’ at ““ k L wl f n Francisco or Long Beach, one group is threatening a we’re concerned about the impact of what basically 
•diin’c frw^rri ex P lode ^ 111 the battle- lawsuit to block the transfer to Pearl Harbor. will be a huge tourist attraction right next to a place 

hL P i«h^^ “amumuon magazine, sending die The group asserts that Pearl Harbor unfairly won given to a somber, reflective ex^ience.” 
bameship to the bottom in less than nine minutes, the bid and that the U.S. National Historic Pre- “We don’t object to tbe Missouri coming to 
All that is above the surface now is a white stone servation Act would be violated because of adverse Hawaii.” she said. “It’s just that nutting it so dose 
blg e ? 0Ugh v ab( ? ut , 150 visi , tors “C" 00 tfae Arizona Memorial . to the Arizona Memorial will change the character 

brought out by navy launch. There is a large hole in These critics ate a report issued by the General of this place. Will they visitors, still be able to 
me middle ol the platform thar allows people to Accounting Office on June 3 taking the navy to reflect on the loss of life here in the same way?” 


I5JP? “J ™ putting the 
Mighty Mo near the Arizona 







process by which Pearl Harbor was selected over 
three competing mainland ports — San Francisco 
and Long Beach, California, and Bremerton, 
Washington, a major naval port. 

The other issue involves tbe appropriateness of 
creating a fee-charging tourist attraction that 
would overshadow a solemn memorial to the crew- 
men entombed in the Arizona. 

In all. 1,177 members of the Arizona crew died 
during the early-morning Pearl Harbor attack, when 
an annor-piercing bomb exploded in the battle- 
ship’s forward ammunition magazine, sending die 
battleship to the bottom in less than ning minutes. 

All that is above the surface now is a white stone 
platform, just big enough for about 150 visitors 
brought out by navy launch. There is a large hole in 
{he middle of the platform that allows people to 


“are a perfect match for us.” 

Although the Park Service has remained of- 
ficially neutral in tbe site selection, die Arizona 
Memorial superintendent, ICathy Billings, said in an 
interview: “In every letter to the navy we have said 
we’re concerned about the impact of what basically 
will be a huge tourist attraction right next to a place 




P<*ilmju H» rw 

Governor Edgar and his wife, Brenda, after he announced his plan to retire. 


* , , , uiv. rui&wuu ITIWUIUIIOA mu buiuigs uiw wuuitM.u.i 

These critics ate a report issued by the General of this place. Will they visitors, still be able to 
^counting Office on June 3 taking the navy to reflect on the loss of life here in the same way?” 


Ex-GIs Aid Drug Lords, Congressman Says 


” By Richard A. Serrano 

• • Los Angeles Times Ser vice 

WASHINGTON —A 
member of Congress with 
years of law enforcement ex- 
perience along the U.S.-Mex- 
ico border is raising a new 
specter in the fight against 
drugs: Former American sol- 
diers are being lured by big 
money to provide security 
and other high tech support 
for Mexican drug cartels. 

2 The congressman. Repre- 
sentative Stives tre Reyes, a 
longtime Border Patrol offi- 
cial in Texas and now a 
Democrat from El Paso, said 
in an interview that former 
U.S. counterintelligence of- 
ficers and Green Berets were 


being drawn into the service 
of Mexican drug gangs be- 
cause of their electronic 
know-how for subverting 
U.S. anti-dreg operations. 

“Ar this point, there’s not 
any real way for us to evaluate 
how widespread this is.” Mr. 
Reyes said. ‘ ‘But it exists. It's 
out there.” 

His comments drew a 
sharp rebuke from officials ar 
several key federal agencies. 
Both the military and the 
White House drug policy of- 
fice said that although there 
might be some cases, the 
problem was not wide- 
spread. 

Ensign Kevin Stephens, a 
spokesman for the Pent- 
agon's task force that co- 


irst 



■ Now, Many Men and Women 
Insist on Prenuptial Contracts 

By Lisa W. Foderaro 

Nr*- York Times Sen ice 

NEW YORK — Donald and Marla are not the only 
ones signing them. 

Prenuptial agreements, contracts. that spell out who 
gets what in the event of a divorce, are gaining in 
popularity even among the not so fabulously wealthy and 
not so famous, divorce lawyers say. 

Increasingly, couples embarking on marriage make 
premarital agreements to proiect inherited property, real 
and anticipated assets, trust funds and interests in family 
businesses. And increasingly, it is professional women 
who are coming to the table as tfae partner with the assets 
worth protecting.' .... , , 

The prenuptial type used to be thought of as an older, 
divorced man worth millions of dollars, betrothed to a 

* younger, nomnoneyed woman. But that mold is crack- 

ino 

• Helene Brezinsky, a Manhattan lawyer, handled an 
agreement for a couple in their 30s who are typical of the 
changing prenuptial breed. The wife was an accountant, 
the husband a graphics designer. It was the first mamage 
for both, and neither was independently wealthy. But the 
wife, a principal in her firm, wanted to protect her mt«est 
in the business, while the husband wished to safeguard his 
earnings made before the marriage. 

In another case, a woman in her 20s whose rather had 
made a fortune signed a prenuptial agreement at her 
parents’ behest to protect three trust funds in her name. 
William Zabel. the Manhattan lawyer who handled the 
agreement, said the parents signed the contract, too, so the 
newlyweds could not nullify it after the wedding. 

For a Manhattan psychotherapist in her 50s, signing a 
prenuptial agreement was “sort of like having your teeth 
drilled, but necessary.” . 

“It is tough for the simple reason that you are in fact 
negotiating a divorce before you get married, she said- 
Prenuptial agreements, which can carry legal fees from 

SS5 ’££S&tEi£S2i8" 

nwrecirenuptial agreements this year than a decade ago. 

cs ragtf gg 

had begun divorce ear^^^o give her 

ment, which is to expire m a y - ^ -jfno&et 

between $1 million and % neT WO rth. estimated 
change compared with M^nimps net 
fiom $450 million, by Forbes magazae, toasmneo as « 

billion. acrording to M^Trun^s^ * call 

AS JjgE 

money,” said J esented ex-wife, 

rucclrfui sort to wrest mom 
1116 anwer “ 

possibly.” _______ 


ordinates anti -drug efforts 
with law enforcement, re- 
sponded to Mr. Reyes's ac- 
cusation with derision. “I 
guess there’s no reason why 
the Mexicans wouldn’t use 
Wal-Mart employees either 
for their highly trained mar- 
keting skills.” he said. 

But other officials ac- 
knowledge that in a world of 
fast money, anyone — in- 
cluding those in the U.S. vet- 
eran community — is prone 
to temptation, particularly 
when they could potentially 
sell expertise for as much as a 
half a million dollars a year. 

“Drugs cut through 'every 
segment of society, ’ ’ said one 
federal drug enforcement 
source here. “Every drug 
dealer is a mercenary in his 
own right, so of course 
they’re hiring” veterans. 

Mr. Reyes declined to re- 
veal any names or specific - 
cases where former military 
officials might now be in- 
volved in helping die Mex- 
ican drug franchises. He said 
U.S. intelligence and other 
operations could be jeopard- 
ized were he to do so. 

“We have arrested mili- 
tary people involved in drug 


smuggling,” he said. 
“They’re often individual or 
anecdotal cases. We are also 
getting intelligence that in- 
cludes former soldiers from 
throughout the world being 
hired by the Mexicans.” 

Mr. Reyes said that along 
the Texas border with Mexico, 
U.S. agents had found that 
“individuals with miliary 
training” had been used to 
scout illegal crossing areas and 
jam U.S. electronic sensors. 

In addition, he said, U.S. 
ageDts have had their police 
radio traffic intercepted. In 
other cases, he said, former 
soldiers have been hired for 
their expertise with explo- 
sives and their understanding 
of how to translate secret U.S. 
police communiques. 

Mr. Reyes said he had 
known of this problem since 
he was chief of the Border 
Patrol in Texas, beginning in 
die mid-1980s. But now, with 
Texas soon to see a tripling in 
the number of federal agents 
at the border, he said he 
thought it important to raise 
the issue publicly from his 
forum in Congress. 

As a member of the House 
National Security Commit- 


tee, he suggested that Con- 
gress might have to look for 
new ways to beat the Mexican 
drug lords if they continue to 
use former U.S. military of- 
ficials. 

"Congress may have to 
act,” be said. 

Peter Lupsha, a retired 
political science professor at 
the University of New Mex- 
ico who has written exten- 
sively about Mexico’s drug 
organizations, agrees that il- 
legal traffickers have been 
hiring former U.S. military 
personnel. He noted that the 
proximity of the Fort Bliss 
army post to the border would 
provide a pool for Mexican 
drug operatives to recruit. 

He added that he knew of a 
recent case in which a former 
U.S. Air Force officer had 
sold his electronic skills to the 
Mexicans and that, even 
when the government learned 
of it, he was not prosecuted. 

Don Maple, a deputy di- 
rector in the White House Of- 
fice of National Drug Control 
Policy, said he was skeptical 
that a noticeable number of 
former soldiers bad slipped 
over to the other side, bur con- 
ceded that it could be true. 


Govern or Stuns Illinois 
By Planning to Retire 

CHICAGO — - Confounding political ex- 
perts in Washington and Illinois — and 
throwing Illinois politics into frenzied dis- 
array — the state’s immensely popular gov- 
ernor. Jim Edgar, has said that “it’s time to 
move on.” and announced that he would 
retire from politics next year, at the end of 
his second term. 

Tbe governor’s decision, a secret said to 
be so guarded that not even his wife and 
closest aides knew for sure until Wednes- 
day afternoon, means that a Republican 
who has been hotly sought after as a na- 
tional candidate is stepping out of the polit- 
ical picture. 

Mr. Edgar said he did not know about his 
plans. “I’ve got 16 months to mull that 
over,” he said, adding. “I don’t intend to 
retire and just go to Honda and live in a 
condo or something like that.” 

His announcement especially disap- 
pointed Republican Senate leaders in 
Washington. They had wooed Mr. Edgar to 
run against Senator Carol Moseley-Braun, a 
Democrat who is considered one of tbe 
most vulnerable incumbents in the Senate 
and whose large state would be a Repub- 
lican trophy. 

Until Wednesday afternoon, Mr. Edgar. 
51, who was mentioned as a possible vice 
presidential running mate for Bob Dole last 
year, had held open the possibility that he 
would run against Senator Moseley-Braun 
and he bad met in Washington with the 
Senate majority leader. Trent Lott, and in- 
structed aides to check out the Washington 
real estate market. (AfiTj 

Back Home in Chicago 

CHICAGO — Dan Rostenkowski is 
back home, not in his old neighborhood or 


even the congressional district that he rep- 
resented for 36 years bur in a single room in 
a brick building four blocks from the United 
Center, home of the Chicago Bulls and site 
of the 1996 Democratic National Conven- 
tion. 

The 69-year-old former chairman of the 
House Ways and Means Committee, who is 
serving a 17-raonth prison sentence, walked 
out of a minimum security federal prison in 
Oxford. Wisconsin, on Tuesday. He was 
driven to Chicago, where he checked into 
the Salvation Army Freedom Center, which 
serves as a halfway house for federal pris- 
oners who are nearing the end of their 
sentences. 

In April 1996. Mr. Rostenkowski 
pleaded guilty to two counts of mail fraud in 
the operations of his House office, cul- 
minating a stunning downfall from the pin- 
nacle of political power. 

Once thought unbeatable, he was in- 
dicted on federal corruption charges in June 
1994 and was defeated that November by a 
neophyte Republican. Michael Patrick 
Flanagan, who held the seat on Chicago’s 
Northwest Side for one term before sur- 
rendering it to another Democrat. Repre- 
sentative Rod Blagojevich. 

Mr. Rostenkowski ’s new, temporary 
place of residence is in a once-seedy neigh- 
borhood that is rapidly undergoing gentri- 
ficarion. He could remain there until Oct. 
15, when his sentence officially ends, al- 
though he might be allowed to spend the last 
weeks of his sentence under confinement in 
his own home in Chi cago. f H Pi 

Quote/Unquote 

Barry Toiv. deputy White House press 
secretary, responding to reporters desperate 
for news as President Bill Clinton vacations 
in Massachusetts: “Rumors that Barbra 
Streisand is going to many Princess Di on 
Martha’s Vineyard this weekend have not 
been confirmed.” (NYTl 


Justice Dept. Reviews 
A Donor’s $25,000 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — A 
Justice Department task force 
is reviewing an allegation that 
a businessman donated 
$25,000 to die favorite char- 
ity of Hazel O’Leary when 
she was energy secretary so 
that a businessman could 
meet with her. Attorney Gen- 
eral Janet Reno said Thurs- 
day. 

Representative Gerald So- 
lomon, Republican of New 
York, called on Ms. Reno to 
seek court appointment of an 
independent counsel “to in- 
vestigate the serious allega- 
tion that .Ms. O’Leary vio- 
lated federal criminal law.” 

But Ms. Reno said at her 
weekly news conference that 
it was too early id tell whether 
that step was warranted. 

“We’re reviewing that in- 
formation now," she said. 

The dentation was appar- 
ently unrelated to any polit- 
ical campaign. 

If die task force determines 
that the contribution is out- 
side its responsibility, the 
matter will be reviewed by 
other prosecutors in the crim- 


inal division, Ms. Reno said. 

Justice Department offi- 
cials said the task force was 
taking the first look at the 
matter solely because it 
already bad been looking at 
the involvement of the busi- 
nessman, Johnny Chung, in 
political donations. 

He told NBC News that a 
lobbyist and an aide to Ms. 
O'Leary suggested he make 
tbe donation while he was try- 
ing to set up the meeting. The 
charity was not identified. 

Ms. O’Leary told USA 
Today that she never author- 
ized any agency employee 
“to request or accept a check 
in exchange for a meeting.” 

Mr. Chung is refusing to 
cooperate with congressional 
investigators of campaign fi- 
nancing unless he receives 
immunity from prosecution. 

Brian Sun, his lawyer, 
made no mention of the 
O'Leary episode when he dis- 
cussed with Senate investi- 
gators what his client might 
reveal at hearings if he were 
granted immuni ty, said a Sen- 
ate source who spoke on con- 
dition of anonymity. 


Away From 
Politics 

•Rodney King is serving a 
90-day jail sentence for 
spousal abuse, authorities 
said. In April 1991. Mr. King, 
who is black, was beaten by 
police who stopped his car. A 
videotape of the beating en- 
raged people in Los Angeles, 
and three days of riots broke 
out when four white police- 
men were acquitted of crim- 
inal charges a year later. M A/ 

• Two Union Pacific trains 

collided head-on. killing two 
crew members and settingoff 
a spectacular fire in Fort 
Worth, Texas. (AP) 

• Twenty people were in- 
dicted in New York for smug- 
gling more than 50 deaf and 
speech-impaired Mexicans in- 
to the United States and mak- 
ing them virtual slaves. (LAI) 


U.S. Court Upholds ‘Megan’s Law’ 


By Jennifer Preston 

Ncn York Times Service 

TRENTON, New Jersey 
— A federal appeals court has 
upheld New Jersey’s 
“Megan’s Law,” clearing 
the way for county prosecu- 
tors to begin notifying local 
residents and community 
groups next month about pa- 
roled sex offenders in then- 
neighborhoods. 

It was tbe highest federal 
court to rule on the consti- 
tutionality of community-no- 
tification laws, enacted in re- 
cent years by almost every 
state in the nation. 

The Third U.S. Circuit 
Court of Appeals in Phil- 
adelphia rejected a challenge 
from public defenders who 
contended that New Jersey’s 
law inflicted extra "punish- 


ment’ ’ on paroled sex offend- 
ers after they served jail time 
for their offenses. 

In a splir ruling, a three- 
judge panel concluded that 
dissemination of information 
about paroled sex offenders 
was not punitive and did not 
violate the U.S. Constitution. 

“The fundamental premise 
of Megan's Law is that re- 
gistration and carefully 
tailored notification can en- 
able law enforcement offi- 
cials and those likely to en- 
counter a sex offender to be 
aware of a potential danger 
and to stay vigilant against 
possible re-abuse,” the court 
said. “This is not an unreas- 
onable premise.” 

The conrt did ask the state 
to change procedures for clas- 
sifying paroled sex offenders. 
The law, which established 


different categories of of- 
fenders, requires broader no- 
tification for more dangerous 
offenders. 

The court asked that the 
state, not the paroled sex of- 
fender. shoulder the burden of 
proof during risk-assessment 
proceedings, making it easier 
for sex offenders to challenge 
the state’s determination of 
the degree of risk they pose. 

Edward Barocas, special 
counsel for New Jersey’s of- 
fice of the public defender, 
which challenged Megan's 
Law, said that Wednesday's 
federal court decision would 
be appealed. He said that the 
public defender’s office 
could ask all 12 justices of the 
Third Circuit to hear the case 
or ask the U.S. Supreme 
Court to consider their ap- 
peal. 




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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 




Prince’s Forces 


Hold Ground 
la Cambodian 
Showdown 


The Associated Press 

CHONG CHOM PASS, Thailand — 
Troops loyal to Prince Norodom Ranar- 
iddh, die deposed first prime minister, 
hung on Thursday to the besieged bor- 
der town of O’Smach despite shelling 
by Cambodian government soldiers. 

Thai soldiers along the frontier re- 
ported gunfire, apparently from troops 
backing Second Prime Minister Hun 
Sen, who forced Prince Ranariddh from 
power last month. 

The shelling was lighter than on 
Wednesday, however, when several 
rockets landed on Thai soil, prompting 
Thailand to return warning snots. 

In Phnom. Penh, Mr. Hun Sen said 


Thursday that the government was pre 

' 3 lae 


paring to capture Anlong Veng, the last 
stronghold of Khmer Rouge guerrillas, 
by year's end. He also asserted that 
O’Smach had already fallen to troops 
from his Cambodian People's Party. 

Mr. Hun Sen had cited Prince Ranar- 
iddh’s negotiations to win the surrender 
of Khmer Rouge guerrillas at their 
northern base as a justification for his 
July 5-6 coup. The guerrillas last week 
announced they had formed a military 
allianc e with Pnnce Ranariddh’s resis- 
tance forces, and Khmer Rouge soldiers 
have been seen at O'Smach. 

Many Cambodians — about 35,000 
this week — have fled O'Smach for 
refuge inside Thailand. 

Thai officers also have said that the 
Hun Sen forces have suffered many 
casualties while advancing slowly. 



Rights Units Oppose 
niLa 


New Pakistani Law 


D>laa VUnioei)Re>sen 

Thai soldiers maintaining a lookout at a makeshift refugee camp where 
thousands of Cambodians fleeing fighting are being held temporarily. 


Since they coup, they have pushed 
ridh’s 


Prince Ranarridh's troops back more 


than 60 miles in northwest Cambodia. 

In Phnom Penh. United Nations hu- 
man rights investigators defended their 
probing into atrocities allegedly com- 
mitted during the coup last month, say- 
ing they would issue a report this week 
backing up the claims. 

Mr. Hun Sen contended Wednesday 


that the UN Center for Human Rights 
had failed to provide evidence on the 
alleged slayings and executions. 

“We are just doing the work thar the 
second prime minister asked us to do 
following the righting on July 5-6." said 
Kyle Gillespie, the agency's acting 
chief. 


Dismissal of Singapore Suit Asked 


The Associated Press 

SINGAPORE — The attorney defend- 
ing a Singapore opposition leader asked a 
judge Thursday to take the “serious 
step" of dismissing a defamation suit 
filed by Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong 
and 10 other ruling party members. 

Members of the Peoples Action 
Party, which has ruled Singapore for 3S 
years, are not known to have ever lost 
one of their defamation cases. 

“It is time for a court in Singapore to 
ring down the curtain on claims of this 
kind." which “are not only totally ill- 
conceived, but orchestrated" to inflict 


maximum financial damage on oppo- 
nents even when politicians have not 
been harmed. George Carman, the at- 
torney. said. 

Mr. Caiman spoke for the leader of 
the Workers Party. J.B. Jeyaretnam. 71. 
in a defamation suit riled by Mr. Goh. 
Senior Minister Lee Kuan Yew and nine 
other politicians. 

They charge They were harmed by a 
statement Mr. Jeyaretnam made at a Jan. 
1 campaign rally, saying a colleague had 
riled police reports against "Goh and 
his people." 

“I know I am asking the court to take 


a serious step" in dismissing the case 
“when the claim is brought by the prime 
minister." Mr. Carman said. “But when 
a case is misconceived, it is miscon- 
ceived. and we are all equal before the 
law." 

Mr. Carman also told Judge S. Ra- 
jendran that Mr. Goh’s attorney had no- 
tified him early Thursday thar additional 
damages would be sought from Mr. Je- 
yaretnam because of the manner in 
which he. Mr. Caiman, had cross-ex- 
amined the prime minister on Tuesday, 
and because of the way it was reported in 
the international news media. 


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ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — The Hu- 
man Rights Commission here and two 
other rights groups urged the govon- 
ment Thursday to repeal' a new law 
designed to crack down on violence 
and terrorism. 

4 ‘This law is against the fundament- 
al rights of the people," the commis- 
sion's chairwoman, Asma Jehangir, 
said at a news conference. 

Parliament passed the law last week 
amid opposition protests. The law gives 
the government sweeping new security 
powers, including the right for security- 
forces to shoot suspected terrorists on 
sight and organize speedy trials. 

Representatives of two womcn-sup- 
port groups also criticized the law, 
which has beat attacked by opposition 
parties and lawyers' associations. 

‘ This is not going to solve the prob- 
lem of sec tarianis m," Ms. Jehangir 
said. “Rather, it is going to target in- 
nocent people.’' 

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif said he 
introduced the legislation to tight a 
wave of Muslim violence in his home 
province of Punjab, where more than 
140 people have been killed in tit-for- 
tit attacks between rival groups from 
the majority S unni and the minority 
Shiite sects. (Reuters) 


China Adopts Fines 
Against Performers 


BEIJING — China unveiled a set of 
regulations Thursday as part of an 
Stepped Up campaign a gains t unortho- 
dox music and drama at profit-making 
artistic events. 

The regulations, approved by the 
State Council, or cabinet, on Aug. 1, 
call for a tine of up to 10.000 yuan 
(SI ,200) to be levied against singers, 
actors and actresses who stage profit- 
making performances without getting 
official approval. 

The rules, published in the official 
People's Daily, also give the author- 
ities the power to stop unauthorized, 
profit-making performances, revoke 
the licenses of performers and seize 
proceeds. 

All singers, actors and actresses are 
required to renew’ their licenses from 
Ocl 1, when the new regulations go 
into effect. 

The regulations appear to be aimed 
at rebel artists, like China's most fa- 
mous rock and roll star. Cui Jian. a 
music expen said. i Reuters t 



BiWU MiiqBaVIhe AMtMUUd Proa 

DOVE’S AWAY — Former President Corazon Aquino releasing a 
dove Thursday in Manila during the unveiling of a statue of her 
husband, Benigno, a senator who was assassinated 14 years ago. His 
death sparked protests that led to the ouster of Ferdinand Marcos. 


Aquino Joins Chorus 
Against 2d Mandate 


MANILA — Former President 
Corazon Aquino urged Filipinos os 
Thursday to block the return of dic- 
tatorship by refusing to allow consti- 


tutional changes that would enable her 
successor. Fidel Ramos, ro run for a 
second term.- 

Mrs. Aquino, pushed to power in 
1986 in a popular revolt that ended the 
dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos, 
joined a growing list of prominent 
Filipinos who fear that a second term 
for Mr. Ramos could revive author- 
itarian role. 

The scar them city of Cagayan de Oro 
was paralyzed recently when thou- 
sands of transport workers went on 
strike to protest attempts ro change the 
constitution, which was rewritten to 
limit presidents to one six-year term 
after Mr. Marcos was deposed. 

Mrs. Aquino, a 64-year-old widow, 
said attempts in Congress to change the 
constitution and lift Ihe term limits for 
an incumbent president were remin- 
iscent of tactics used by Mr. Marcos to 
ensure that he stayed in office. 

“Marcos said "it was good for the 
economy, but yon and I knew he just 
wanted to stay tn power." Mrs. Aquino 
said, referring to Mr. Marcos’s dec- 
laration of martial law in 1972. 

Mr. Ramos has repeatedly denied 
any intention of staying on and has said 
he wiD step down when his term ends in 
Mav : 998. i Reuters) 


Taleban Reports 


epor 

It Stopped Offensive 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Af- 
ghanistan 's Taleban movement said its 
forces had repulsed a major opposition 
offensive north of the capital Kabul on 
Thursday, a Pakistan-based Afghan 
news service repotted. 

Forces loyal to the ousted military 
commander, Ahmed Shah Masoud, 
launched die attack Wednesday along 
the front line, including die town of Mir . 
Bachcheh Kowt, about 25 kilometers 
(15 miles) from Kabul, the Afghan _ 
Islamic Press said. 

The agency quoted a Taleban 
spokesman in the southern town of 
Kandahar as saying thnt the attack had 
been repulsed and that Mr. Masoud's 
forces had suffered heavy casualties, 
leaving behind 30 dead fighters. 

’ ‘It was an attack the opposition had 
been announcing for die last ' two 
weeks, but we have driven it back." the 
Taleban spokesman was quoted as say- 
ing. Bnt opposition sources said their 
forces had advanced and captured the 
village of Kharoti, north of Kabul 

( Reuters ) 


V# - 


Genii* 


Tokyo Negotiators Aim at a Schedule 
Of North Korean Normalization Talks 


Reuters 


day. 


BEIJING — Japanese and North 
Korean negotiators decided Thursday to 
extend with a late evening session their 
talks on restarting the long-stalled pro- 
cess of normalizing relations. 

The North Korean team left the Jap- 
anese Embassy in Beijing after com- 
pleting a round of afternoon talks. 

Discussions were aimed at setting a 
schedule for resumption of the formal 
normalization talks, stalled for nearly 
five years over bitter bilateral disputes. 

Japanese officials declined to com- 
ment on whether progress had been 
made in the First two sessions, saying 
only that discussions would resume 
later in the evening. 

They declined to say where the third 
session might take place. 

It was unclear whether the talks 
would stretch into a second day on Fri- 


Officiais of the two sides smiled and 
shook hands before sitting down for 
their first morning round in a room in 
the North Korean Embassy hung with 
portraits of North Korea’s late leader. 
Kim U Sung, and his son and successor. 
Kim Jong fl. 

The Japanese delegation was led by 
Kunihiko Makita. deputy director- gen- 
eral of the Japanese Foreign Ministry's 
Asian Bureau. The North Korean del- 
egation was headed by Kim Ryon Gil 

Mr. Kim opened the meeting with 
small talk, remarking that the beautiful 
sunny weather in Beijing augured well 
for the negotiations. 

“We totally agree," replied Mr. 
Makita. “There is not a cloud in the 
sky." 

Japanese officials have indicated that 
successful talks would clear the way for 


Tokyo to join global relief efforts fa 
North Korea, where millions are 
threatened with famine, after a series of 
natural disasters and years of failed farm 
policies. 

Eight rounds of similar talks on nor- 
malizing ties between Japan and the 
northern half of the Korean Peninsula 
ended abruptly in November 1992, 
when Communist North Korea stormed 
out of the negotiations after Tokyo 
raised allegations that Pyongyang 
agents had kidnapped Japanese nation- 
als. 

Tokyo alleges that North Korean 
agents abducted od seven occasions a 
total of 10 Japanese in the 1970s and 
1980s. mostly from beaches on the Ja- 
pan Sea coast facing Korea, to use them 
to train operatives in Japanese lan guag e 
and customs. North Korea vehemently 
denies that it kidnapped the Japanese. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. AUGUST 22, 1997 


PAGE 5 


EUROPE 


Russians Balking on Bosnia Plan 

1hey Object to Allied Supervision of Elections in Serb Area 


By Raymond Bonner 

Nm York Timrs Service 

■ \®^A — In a closed-door meet- 
ing here. Russia put the brakes Thursday 
on a proposal to have an international 
organization supervise elections that the 
Bosnian Serb president, Biljana Plavsic 
has called id her power struggle with the 
Serbian hard-liners’ leader, Radovan 
Karadztc. 

. The. Russian action is a setback for 
the Clinton administration, and major 
European governments, which have 
openly sided with Mrs. Plavsic in her 
political war, including her call for elec- 
tions ih die Serb-controlled territory of 
Bosnia. 

TTie Bosnian Serb president has for- 
mally requested the Organization for 
hecunty and Cooperation in Europe to 
supervise the elections, which she 
would like to be held in October. 

At an meeting of the 54-member or- 
ganization here, its first since the sum- 
mer recess, support for Mrs. Plasvic’s 
request was virtually uninamous, said 
diplomats who attended the meeting. 
Except for Russia. 

While continuing to apply behind-the- 


scenes diplomatic pressure on Russia 
diplomats here made an effort to gloss 
over the Russian opposition in public. 

The tactic is to not embarrass the 
Russians, which could be counterpro- 
ductive, said an official with the security 
organization. 1 

Ala news conference after a meeting 
of the security organ ization. no mention 
was made of the Russian position in the 
opening statements by seniurdiplumats, 
including Robert Frowick. a former 
American ambassador who is the head 
of the secruity organization's mission in 
Bosnia. 

When asked specifically about the 
Russian position, Carlos Wesiendorp, a 
Spanish diploma i who is the High Rep- 
resentative in Bosnia, said. “Russia 
fully shares the need For holding elec- 
tions _ and for the European security 
organization to supervise them. 

But when speaking on the condition 
that they not be identified, senior dip- 
lomats told a different story. 

Reading from his notes of the meet- 
ing, one senior Western diplomat said 
that although the Russian delegation 
professed support for Mrs. Plavsic, it 
said there were “unresolved questions” 


about the elections and the role of the 
security organization. 

The Russians did not say what spe- 
cify what the questions were, diplomats 
who attended the meeting said. 

An effort to get a comment from the 
Russian delegation after the late after- 
noon briefing was unsuccessful; the per- 
son answering the phone at the Russian 
mission to the OSCE said no one would 
be available until Friday. 

Russia has long been the Serbs' major 
outside ally, and is reluctant to get 
caught in a struggle between Serbs. 

■ UN Searches Serb Posts 

NATO troops remained in control of 
five police buildings in this Bosnian 
Serb town on Thursday as United Na- 
tions officials continued an investiga- 
tion into human-rights abuses and il- 
legal arms caches, news reports from 
Bosnia said. 

British and Czech troops from the 
NATO-led Stabilization Force, backed 
by armored vehicles, stood guard at the 
police headquarters, an academy and 
three stations tio support UN policemen 
inside the buildings. The united Na- 
tions investigators*’ were collecting in- 


BRIEFLY 



7V Au.u»c«J Op- 

Jovo Rosie, a top Bosnian Serb judge, detailing Thursday how two men 
beat him as they demanded that he vote against dissolving Parliament 


formation on the arms find and indi- 
cations of human-rights violations.' 

"We’re in a supporting role of the 
UN International Police Task Force,” a 
spokesman said. “When the IPTF have 
told us they've completed their inves- 


$ 


U.S. Congressman Defends Swiss 

ZURICH — U.S. Representative Tom Lantos, a Holocaust 
survivor, said Thursday that Switzerland should not be tarred 
as a whole for the unsavory conduct of some of its citizens 
during and after World War IL 

Mr. Lantos, a 69-year-old California Democrat, said in a 
telephone interview he had called a news conference in Bern 
to express his admiration for the Swiss diplomat Karl Lutz, 
who was instrumental in saving Jewish lives during the war. 

He said he also wanted to express his dismay at what he said 
was a collective-guilt approach toward Switzerland's wartime 
role. “My hope in calling the press conference is perhaps to 
begin the process of restoring Switzerland's image," Mr. 
Lantos said. 

"I feel very strongly it is utterly unfair to use a broad brush 
of collective guilt, which is beginning to seep into the dialogue 
in this issue.” He said that, “clearly, the overwhelming bulk 
of Swiss men and women in the 1940s and since have had 
nothing to do with either the failure of the government to save 
persecuted people, or with the outrageous behavior of some 
bank executives.” 

Swiss bankers have been accused of, among other things, 
failing to make a real effort to restore the assets of Holocaust 
victims to the rightful owners and heirs. ( Reuters ) 

German Urges Africa Aid Link 

BERLIN — Gerhard Schroeder, a possible challenger of 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl in next year’s legislative elections, 
Thursday called for aid to African countries to be linked to 
their willingness to retake nationals expelled by Germany. 

Immigrants often cannot be expelled after committing 
criminal acts because they will not give their identity or have 
destroyed their. Identity papers, Mr. Schroeder, a Social 
DeitiocratJ 'told die newspaper Berliner Morgenpost. 

“Unfortunately', a number of countries are not very co- 
operative. This must change,” he added. 

Mr. Schroeder is chief minister of die northern state of 
Lower Saxony, who may be nominated by the Social Demo- 
crats as their candidate for September 1998 legislative elec- 
tions if he wins state elections due in March. 

“We can expect countries which we assist to take into 
account our interests,” he said. (AFP) 

3 in East Europe to Meet on NATO 

WARSAW — The prime ministers of the Czech Republic, 
Hungary and Poland wall meet in Warsaw on Friday to discuss 
membership of NATO and the European Union, the Polish 
Foreign Ministry announced. 

Vaclav KJaus, Gyula Horn and Wlodzimierz Cimoszewicz 
will examine preparations ahead of negotiations with dw 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the EU. They will 
* ‘establish a program of tripartite political contacts and work- 
ing meetings with experts, ’ the ministry said. 

On July 8, NATO officially invited the three East European 

countries to join an expanded Western military alliance m 



lian«i-t.uill«> \grni' 

Rescuers searching for victims Thursday after the explosion of a grain silo in Blaye, France. 


tigations we will leave with them:” 

British soldiers seized the five police 
stations on Wednesday , effectively wip- 
ing out the local power base of Radovan 
Karadzic, the Bosnian Serb leader who 
is wanted on war-crimes charges. 


Death Toll Rises to 6 
In French Silo Blast 

The Aixuciufcii Press 

BLAYE, France — Search teams 
found five more bodies Thursday in the 
rubble of a large grain silo that exploded 
a day earlier, bringing the death toll to 
six. Six other people remained trapped. 

Hundreds of rescue workers aided by 
dog teams worked overnight in this port 
□ear Bordeaux, braving a violent storm 
before dawn, as they picked through the 
twisted concrete and steel in hopes of 
finding more survivors. 

The workers for the cereal storage 
company Semabla were loading a ship 
when the explosion took place Wednes- 
day morning. Some witnesses said it felr 
like an earthquake. 

The 42-meter-high (137-foot-high) 
silo full of barley on the Gironde River 
north of Bordeaux collapsed onto the 
company's office in the blast, trapping 
workers, office personnel and a fish- 
erman. 

On Wednesday, one body and six 
survivors were pulled from the tons of 
wreckage. One of the injured was hos- 
pitalized with a broken leg, the police 
said. 

But a day later,- five more bodies were 
found and the search was continuing. 


Belarussian 
Tells Russia 
To Apologize 
For Remark 

Ci wpilcJ h Our Swff Fnwi CufW hn 

MINSK — The Belarussian 
president, Alexander Lukashenko, 
called Thursday for a Russian apo- 
logy after tough remarks by the 
Kremlin's chief spokesman about a 
growing conflict between the two 
countries. 

The Interfax news agency 
quoted Belarussian officials as say- 
ing the release of an Russian state 
television crew — one of two teams 
being held — had been put on hold 
to make clear Minsk's displeas- 
ure. 

The Russian presidential spokes- 
man. Sergei Yastrzhembsky, told 
the radio station Mayak earlier 
Thursday that Minsk's relations 
with Moscow would suffer if the 
journalists were not freed by the 
end of the day. 

One of the Russian crews was 
arrested last month while crossing 
the Belarus-Lithuania border. A 
court case is pending. 

The second crew was held after 
trying to cross the border at the 
same place. It was the second crew 
that was to be freed. 

President Lukashenko said on 
state television that he would with- 
draw all his promises about releas- 
ing the men if Mr. Yastrzhemb- 
sky 's remarks turned out to 
represent official Kremlin policy. 

“I will not allow discussions to 
'take place with Belarus from a po- 
sition of suength or sanctions.” he 
said. “I won't tolerate black- 
mail.” 

* ‘Russia should apologize or dis- 
tance itself from Yastrzhembsky 's 
remarks today.” he said. 

The four employees of ORT tele- 
vision were detained last Friday. 

International human-rights 
group have condemned the case as 
part of a crackdown on journalists. 

In Moscow, some people have 
criticized the Russian government 
for failing to act to protect jour- 
nalists. Moscow has signed a treaty 
with Belarus, and Russian leaders 
appear reluctant to enter into open 
confrontation with the Belarussian 
leader. 

President Lukashenko, who has 
imposed a tight regime on Belarus, 
has often complained about Rus- 
sian television. { Reuters . AP) 


Sweaty Roman Breaks Bernini Fountain, and Smirks 


By Celestine Bohlen 

Vw York Times Service 


1999. NATO's 50th birthday. 
During their meeting in Wa 


/arsaw, the three leaders will also 
'discuss “the development of relations with countries in the 
region that were not invited to join the first wave of NATO and 

, EL/ enlargement.” ^ . 

The Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland are currently 
«*= XT a*tv> questionnaire on the state of their armed 


forces. 

Austrians Reject Gold Payments 

VTF.NNA Austrian Jewish leaders and the government 

on Thursday rejected a call for tons of the country's gold 

! reS erves to be used to help survivors of the Holocaust. 

* xbe director of the Simon Wiesenthal center in Los 
Angeles, Rabbi Marvin Hier, said last week that the Austnans 
should use some of the gold gamed dunng and after World 
Warn to help Jewish victims of Nazi deatii camps. 

He claimed the country had collaborated with «he N^is, as 
Shown by the 99 percent vote m favor of a union between * 
two countries in 1938. Hisrorians generally believe the figure 

-™^emo y f" S t rian Jewish Q— y. Paul 

G ™I Z do re n“ , SlrSui S a 0 t'ft is°ri^“m^ate the victims of 

a theftby "to — "S s,olen *“ S ° m “ ne ^ 
he said. 

” And : 

“The gold tiu i « i*~“* — ,, 

SaSSSSaatssag 

of the gold Stolen from it returned. 

M rfUiT^tM^ation Lena's Vienna 

a t - & * Rabbi H,er 15 no1 

th Tte , ADU an American organi^on^np to fight^ann- 

vemitom. has jusi opened its 


ROME — The first news flash last Tuesday 
was that someone, described as a youth and a 
tourist, had gone for a dip in the Bernini 
fountain at the center of Piazza Navona. and 
broken off the piece of a marble dolphin's 
tail 

Damage to one of Rome's most beloved 
outdoor monuments was bad enough, but 
the news got worse. The culprit, it turned 
out, was neither young nor a tourist — but a 
43-year-old Roman who not only will not 
say he’s sorry, but also now wants to sue the 
city for damages. 

“It was a whim, like eating watermelon,” 
said the Roman, Sebastiono Inrili, dressed in 
flowered pants and open shirt when he and his 
two companions were booked on vandalism 
charges. “I climbed up on the tail, 1 dove in 
and die statue broke. Then I climbed up again, 
and dove again. I even hurt my foot.” 

And so che story of the damaged Fountain 
of the Four Rivers, which began as another 
episode in Rome's war against vandalism, 
quickly become another kind of yam — this 
one not about the city's monuments, but 
about its street life, about men like Mr. Inrili 
and his two 3 3 -year-old friends Giovanni 
Pisano and Mario Giorgini, all three un- 
employed, who spend their summer days 
either on the piazza or at the beach. 


“We wanted to take a dip, just like we did 
when we were kids,’ ’ Mr. Pisano, who lives in 
a Vatican-owned building in the center of 
Rome, told one newspaper reporter. 

“Are you all crazy .’ f Mr. Giorgini, speak- 
ing in a broad Roman dialect, told the news- 
paper Repubblica in an interview about his 
life in a high-rise on Rome’s outskirts. “We 
didn't kill anyone. My friend was hot, that’s 
all.” 

The tail fell and broke into six pieces, three 
of which were recuperated when the fountain 
was drained of water. 

Restorations experts say it will cost 15 
million lire ($8,400) to repair, and Culture 
Minister Walter Veltroni is promising that it 
will be done by October. 

In a city like Rome that is an open-air 
museum, protecting monuments by such mas- 


ters as Gian Lorenzo Bernini, whose Baroque 
sculptures grace Rome's museums as well as 
its fountains, is difficult. 

Episodes like the damage to the Piazza 
Navona dolphin (some describe it as a sea 
monster) only cause more debates about how 
to prevent vandalism, deliberate or accident- 
al. 

The city's first move has been to raise the 
fines for bathing in its fountains, a popular 
practice that predates scenes from Federico 
Fellini movies, from 150,000 lire to 1 mil- 
lion. 

Rome's mayor, Francesco Ruteili, has pro- 
posed making vandals go to work to fix the 
damage they have caused; noted art historians 
have discussed creating a corps of student 
volunteers to patrol outdoor monumenrs, 
while the film director Franco Zeffirelli sug- 


gested corporal punishmenr for such van- 
dals. 

Asked to assess the damage, Vittorio 
Sgarbi. a member of Parliament who lives on 
Piazza Navona, said most harm would be 
done to Italy's image. 

“Everyone abroad will know about the 
damage caused by these gentlemen,” he said. 
“We don’t cut a very bella figura." 

But meanwhile, AJdo Ceccarrelli, a lawyer 
famous around the Roman courthouse for his 
colorful language, argued Thursday that his 
latest client, Mr. Inrili, who spent last night in 
jail, had jumped into the Piazza Navona foun- 
tain at great personal risk, and should be 
awarded 10 million lire in damages. 

“The fountain is in a decrepit state,” the 
lawyer said. “These things should not be 
kept this way.” 


Albania Says NATO Will Supply Provisions and Equipment for Its Army 


Reuters 

TIRANA — A visiting NATO delegation 
told Albania on Thursday that the Western 
military allian ce would help rebuild the Bal- 
kan country's shattered army after months of 
chaos and unrest, state television reported. 

“We are determined to help Albania and 
will work to agree important assistance ro its 
array,” Georges Katairdakis, head of the 


NATO delegation, was quoted as telling 
Perikli Teta, Albania's state secretary for de- 
fense policy. 

The army’s resources were heavily de- 
pleted in March when thousands of Albani- 
ans, enraged by the collapse of pyramid in- 
vestment schemes, looted military barracks of 
about one million weapons. 

Albanian television said that the delegation 


had invited the country's authorities to co- 
operate with what it called "NATO's clear- 
inghouse,” a forum that would coordinate 
monthly requests for the provision of nec- 
essary equipment to Albania’s army. 

NATO would advise the military on how to 
secure army barracks and would help to re- 
organize the armed forces with the aim of 
bringing them up to Western standards. 


No-Confidence Bid Gains in Poland 

Ruling Ex - Communists Face Defeat in Advance of Elections 


by giving in ci n 

{' F ore ign Ministry spokesman, Florian Krenkel.said: 
Lid came from the reserves of the Central Bank. It has 


The Associated Press 

WARSAW — The biggest opposition 
party in Parliament has switched gears and 
declared support for a no-confidence motion 
launched by the Polish Peasant Party nearly a 
month before elections. 

The Freedom Union's decision, announced 
Jate Wednesday, means that the ruling Demo- 
cratic Left Alliance, the former Communists, 
could be defeated by a slim margin when 
lawmakers vote on the motion Tuesday. 

With legislative elections set for Sept. 21, a 
no-confidence vote against the government 
would have linle immediate consequences, 
but in the long term, it could strengthen the 
Peasant Party's position as a swing player in 

forming the next coalition. 

While the Peasant Party had been expected 
io form another government with the ruling 


party, it now could join forces with the op- 
position Solidarity bloc. 

The Peasant Party, the Democratic Left’s 
junior coalition partner for the past four years, 
started their no-confidence campaign after 
Prime Minister Wlodzimierz Cimoszewicz 
refused to discuss increased state grain pur- 
chases in the immediate aftermath of the 
country's disastrous floods. 

The Freedom Union’s support was a sur- 
prise, because the party has previously crit- 
icized the no-confidence motion as an attempt 
by the Peasant Party to gain popularity with 
farmers before the elections. 

President Aleksander Kwasniewski has 
said he would refuse to dissolve the gov- 
ernment if it loses the motion, and has urged 
the Peasant Party to withdraw from the co- 
alition if it disagrees with his policies. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIB UNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL . 


500,000 Young People Cheer Pope as He Opens Visit to Paris 


By Craig R. Whitney 

Nm York Times Service 

PARIS — Pope John Paul n began his 
first visit to Pans since 1980 on Thurs- 
day on a vast esplanade named for the 
god of war in a festive encounter with a 
crowd of 500,000 young people from 
around the world whom Roman Catholic 
Church authorities invited here to meet 
him and ponder the Christian message 
for the modem world. 

The Pope, 77, looking stooped in his 
white cassock under the 30-degree cen- 
tigrade (90-degree Fahrenheit) heat 
from a scorching summer sun but re- 
freshed by the warm welcome from the 
flag-waving, singing, cheering masses 
gathered on the Champ de Mars, asked 
them to meditate on how-to put their 
beliefs to the service of others. 

On this, the sixth trip he has made to 
France during his papacy, John Paul 
flew into Orly International Airport and 
rode by helicopter into the city. 


Israeli Is Hit 
In Lebanon 
By Shellfire 
Of Hezbollah 


", Reuters 

MARJAYOUN, Lebanon, — One Is- 
raeli soldier was wounded Thursday in 
Hezbollah shelling inside Israel's south 
‘ Lebanon occupation zone, pro-Israeli 
militia sources said. 

The soldier was taken to Israel for 
medical treatment, they added. 

They said Hezbollah guerrillas fired 
mortar shells into the Israeli outpost of 
Jabal Blat in the western sector of the 
zone. 

Earlier, the pro-Iranian group said its 
fighters attacked an Israeli patrol in the 
same area with machine guns and rock- 
et-propelled grenades. 

The reported attack took place amid 
heightened cross-border violence be- 
tween Lebanon and Israel. Since Mon- 
day at least 1 0 civilians have been killed 
in south Lebanon by pro-Israeli militia 
shelling and bombs planted by uniden- 
tified assailants. 

On Wednesday. Israeli planes staged 
three air raids into Lebanon a day after 
Hezbollah guerrillas fired rockets into 
northern IsraeL 

The violence has somewhat over- 
shadowed a war of wills between Israel 


President Jacques Chirac welcomed 
him with a speech evoking the problems 
of unemployment and uncertainty the 
young face these days in Europe and 
many other regions. 

“Their generation seeks not only a 
minim um of material necessities,” the 
Pope responded, “but also for reasons 
for living and goals that will motivate 
their generosity." 

• "They realize that they will only be 
happy if they are well integrated into a 
society where human dignity is respec- 
ted and fraternity is genuine.” the Pope 
said 

John Paul then went to the Square of 
Liberty and Human Rights on the 
heights of Trocadero square, looking 
across the Seine to the Eiffel Tower, to 
ray homage to die memory of Joseph 
W res ins Id, a French priest who sup- 
ported the right of people in the poorest 
countries to the dignity of a decent ex- 
istence. 

On Friday, the Pope will preside over 


a beatification ceremony in Notre Dame 
Cathedral for Frederic Ozanam, a 19th 
century French Roman Catholic layman 
and intellectual whose calls for social 
justice inspired the creators of die mod- 
em Christian Democratic movement in 
Europe and the charitable Saint Vincent 
de Paul societies associated with the 
church around the world. 

Beatification will put Ozanam one 
step short of sainthood 

Many of the young pilgrims wore 
souvenir T-shirts designed by Jean- 
Charles de Castelbajac, a couturier who 
is one of many official sponsors of the 
weeklong World Youth Day program. It 
will end Sunday with an open-air Mass 
celebrated by the Pope. 

The masses in the Champ de Mars, 
with a sign on the Eiffel Tower now 
counting 863 days until the year 2000, 
greeted die Pope enthusiastically in a 
welcome full of pageantry. 

John Paul read the list of the more than 
100 countries that had dispatched del- 


egations to the gathering, which includes 
hundreds of separate daily meditation 
vigils, and then read messages to many 
of the delegations in their own lan- 
guages. 

Despite the images of fervent belief, a 
poll taken for a French Catholic news- 
paper, La Croix, and French television 
Thursday found that religion played no 
significant role in die lives of 63 percent 


of French people between die ages of IS 
and 30, according to a sample of 500 
people who were asked how important it 
was to them. 

The poll found that 77 percenr of 
French youth believed the cburch ex- 
ercised a negative influence in thedebate 
over abortion, and 64 percent thought 
the same of its role in me fight agains t 
AIDS and other sexually transmitted 
diseases. 

Several dozen anti -abortion demon- 
strators eallfag themselves the Jerome 
Lejeune Foundation fenced their way 
Thursday huo the comtyard of die Am- 


brose Pare Hospital in suburban Bou- 
logne-Billancourt, near the Longcharap 
racetrack where the Pope will celebrate 
Mass oriSunday, before the police ejec- 
ted them. 

Mr. Lejeune, who died in 1994, was a 
genetics professor who opposed abor- 
tion. The Pope plans to make a private 
visit to his grave in a southern suburb of 
Paris late Friday, but the Lejeune family 
and a foundation name d for him both 
condemned die demonstration Thurs- 
day. saying they had no connection with 
it. 

Some critics blamed the Pope for the 
hot weather. 

Bringing so many people to Paris dar- 
ing a hear wave increased air pollution, 
they wanted, and ozone levels soared so 
high Thursday and Wednesday that the 
authorities cut fares an the Paris mass 
transit system in half to encourage 
people to leave cars at home. Most of the 
young people travel by subway or bus 
anyway. - 


Paris Has a 2d Day 
Of Pollution Alerts 

Reuters 

PARIS — Ozone pollution 
reached alert level in Paris for the 
second straight day Thursday, even 
though the authorities halved faro 
on buses, the subway and local 
trains to encourage motorists to use 
public transport. . 

Airparif, which monitors the 
quality of air in die French capital, 
said pollution again reached ‘level 

two" in a continuing heat wave. A 
"level three” alert requires man- 
datory curbs on private cars and free 
public transport in large cities. 

Environment Minister Domin-- 
ique Voynet told French radio she 
would order alternate car traffic if 
level three was reached, banning 
cars wbose license plates end with 
an even- number on one day, and 
those with odd numbers on die next 
day. Paris has been plagued for a 
week by high ozone levels. - 


per 


#;| * 





13 Western Nations Urge 
Kenya to Open Dialogue 


HOUSE ARREST — Tatiana SuszkiiL, an Israeli artist who depicted the Prophet Mohammed as a pig, 
being led in handcuffs from court in Jerusalem on Thursday after she was released on $14,000 bail and 
ordered to remain at home. Disorders in the West Bank and Gaza were blamed on the incident. 


and Yasser Arafat's Palestinian Author- 
ity over a crackdown on Islamist mil- 
itants opposed to peace with Israel. 

An Israeli official criticized Mr. Ara- 
fat on Thursday for playing host at “na- 
tional unity talks” with the militants 


and told him to choose between em- 
bracing their leaders or making peace. 

On Wednesday. Abdelaziz Rantissi, 
a prominent leader of the Muslim mil- 
itant Hamas movement, embraced Mr. 
Arafat during a meeting of Palestinians 


in the Gaza Strip. “He is two-faced.” 
said Danny Naveh, a senior adviser to 
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. 
“On the one hand he says he is against 
terrorism, and afterwards he runs to hug 
the killers of women and children.” 


Conqxiat by Oar Stu^Fm* Papatehn 

NAIROBI — Thirteen Western na- 
tions on Thursday urged government 
and opposition in Kenya to enter a dia- 
logue in order to ensure that elections to 
be held later this year are free and fair. 

In a joint statement issued by the U.S. 
Embassy here, they condemned an out- 
break of violence in the coastal region of 
the East African country and urged all 
parties not to allow the violence to de- 
flect them from dialogue. 

The statement: by the 13 embassies 
urged both sides “to enter into dialogue 
in the s pi ri t of compromise and with a 
commitment to agree on reforms nec- 
essary to ensure free and fair elec- 
tions.” 

“This dialogue should be given suf- 
ficient time to achieve this objective 
prior to the general elections,” said the 
statement, which was issued on behalf 
of the embassies of Austria, Belgium, 
Denmark. Finland, Germany, Japan, the 
Netherlands, Norway. " Sweden. 
Switzerland and the United States and 
the High Commissions of Canada and 
Britain. 

The French Embassy in Nairobi did 
not subscribe to the statement. 

The government of President Daniel 
arap Moi and the opposition have ac- 
cused each other of responsibility for 
die mayhem, which has since subsided 
after the arrest of several hundred 


people suspected involved. 

In Mombasa, however, thugs con- 
tinued to attack) people from non- 
coastal tribes on Thursday while tourists 
kept off die streets in their hotels. 

“More than 30 men invaded our 
compound,” said Ruth Aoma, a Luo 
woman who ran up to an Agence 
France-Presse reporter as heavily aimed 
paramilitary policemen arrived at the 
village of Ujamaa, south of Mombasa. 

They had guns and pangas, she said, 
using the local words for machetes. 
“We ran,” she said. “They know me 
now; they amid even kill me.” 

Ms. Alima and her sister were slaying 
the village with friends from the inland 
Kikuyu tribe. Their own tribe is based in 
western Kenya around Lake Victoria. . 

Dozens of heavily armed policemen 
in camouflage fatigues, who drove up in 
four-wheel-drive vehicles and tracks, 
searched houses and the nearby bush, 
arresting 3bout 20 young men. 

The accused included Amir Humki 
All Banda, from Markaz mosque in 
Ukunda south of Mombasa, and Aii Said 

fTii ffynnri n^ rihafr man nf fhftnnr ffgig Mwd 

National African Democratic Union. 

A total of 62 suspects in Mombasa 
court were accused Thursday of robbing 
Likoni police station on Aug. 13, killing 
a policeman, stealing weapons includ- 
ing 40 rifles and damaging property. 

(AFP, Reuters) 


ISRAEL: A Dangerous Dynamic Begins Driving the Latest Crisis With the Palestinians 


Continued from Page 1 

meetings with the leaders of such 
militant groups as Hamas and Is- 
lamic Jihad and to begin to adopt 
some of their rhetoric. 

On Wednesday, Mr. Arafat went 
so far as to warn that the Palestinians 
were prepared to resume their vi- 
olent revolt against Israel. 

‘ ‘There was an uprising for seven 
years," he said. "Seven years. We 
can erase and do it all over again 
from the beginning. There is nothing 
far from us. All options are open to 
us.” 

In response, Danny Naveb, Is- 
rael’s cabinet secretary, accused Mr. 
Arafat on Thursday of being “two- 
faced.” 

“He says he is against terror- 
ism," Mr. Naveh said, “and af- 


terward he runs to hug the killers of 
women and children.” 

Two weeks ago. when the U.S. 
special envoy. Dennis Ross, con- 
cluded an emergency mission to die 
region, he said he believed he had at 
least “stopped the deterioration" in 
Israeli-Palestinian relations. Indeed, 
under American auspices, Israeli and 
Palestinian security officials have 
resumed regular meetings, including 
a session due Thursday night. 

With CIA officers present to re- 
assure both sides that they will not 
be falsely accused of holding back, 
the Israeli and Palestinian officials 
have exchanged information related 
to the July 30 attack, in which two 
suicide bombers killed themselves 
and 14 others. The attack remains 
essentially unsolved. 

Even Mr. Arafat met this week 


with Ami Ayalort, the head of Shin 
Bet, the Israeli security service. That 
may have been merely an attempt to 
persuade the United Slates that he is 
acting in good faith or it could have 
been a sign that he is less in- 
transigent in private than in public. 

But the Palestinian leader has re- 
peatedly said that he will “not bow' ’ 
to Israeli demands, which include 
the arrests of more than 200 Islamic 
militants, the disarmament of many 
more and further s teps that Israel has 
said are necessary to crumble the 
infrastructure of terrorism. 

If Mr. Netanyahu and his aides 
had not spelled out their demands so 
explicitly, there might have been 
more room for compromise. 

That might have also been the 
case if the prime minis ter had heeded 
U.S. appeals to resume immediately 


payment of tens of millions of dol- 
lars that Israel owes to the Pales- 
tinians but has withheld since the 
bombing as a punitive gesture. 

Mr. Netanyahu apparently calcu- 
lated that with his main source of 
revenue cut off, the Palestinian lead- 
er would have to do as Israel asked. 
The prime minister has repeatedly 
defended the use of the economic 
sanctions by comparing diem to 
those the United States imposes on 
Iran, Iraq and Libya to punish their 
support of terrorism. 

Instead, the measure appears to 
have left Mr. Arafat feeling even 
more cornered. 

To the open dismay of Israeli 
officials, Mr. Arafat has all but ig- 
nored demands for a wider security 
crackdown. Rather than arrest the 
militants named on lists provided by 


IsraeL the Palestinian Authority ap- 
pears in some cases to have 
provided them with bodyguards to 
protect them from possible Israeli 
capture, according to Mr. Netan- 
yahu's communications director. 
David Bar-Hlan. 

The partnership between Israel 
and the Palestinians had fallen to 
such a low point by the time Mr. 
Ross arrived here Ang. 9 that it may 
still be true that it has not deteri- 
orated farther. 

But what has happened since the 
envoy departed five days larer ap- 
pears only to have deepened the im- 
passe: Palestinian policemen have 
begun for the first time to enforce a 
boycott of certain Israeli goods, halt- 
ing commercial vehicles to search 
for products that the Palestinian Au- 
thority has ordered banned. 


A WEEK 
IN THE LIFE 
OF THE IHT 


MONDAY 

Tuesc 


Monday 

DAY SPORTS 


Tuesday 

STYLE 


Wednesday 

STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 

iiS 

Thursday 

HEALTH/SCIENCE 

‘A... 

Friday 

LEISURE 


MJLIt: 2 Cosmonauts Get Set for Crucial Mission to Repair Mir - and Rescue a Space Program 


Continued from Page 1 

science program” with the existing 
power, said Jim Van Laak, deputy 
director of the U.S.-Russian Shuttle 
Mir program. To. obtain a marginal 
boost in power, however, Mr. So- 
lovyov and Mr. Vinogradov have to 
cany out a difficult “internal” 
space walk that has its own peculiar 
challenges. They will leave the pres- 
surized Mir and, wearing Orion 
space suits connected with 33-foot 
(10-meter) umbilical cords, they 
will explore the airless Spektr re- 
search module, which was punc- 
tured in the accident, installing a 
specially constructed new hatch and 
connecting wires to it. 

Waiting for them in the Soyuz 
escape capsule nearby, docked to 
the core of the Mir, will be the 
American astronaut, Michael Foale, 
ready with food, supplies and space 
suits for a possible descent to Earth. 
Mr. Foale will be in shirtsleeves, not 
wearing his space suit, NASA of- 
ficials said, but he could put it on if 
need be. He will be sitting in the 


descent module that would be used 
in case of an emergency escape. In 
the worst-case scenario, if the repair 
job goes rerribly awry, the Russians 
will retreat to' the Soyuz, change 
their space suits, slide into seats next 
to Mr. Foale and abandon Mir. 

As they awake Friday morning 
and prepare to start the repair mis- 
sion, Mr. Vinogradov and Mr. So- 
lovyov face myriad technical haz- 
ards: using their pressurized glove- 
hands for delicate maneuvering in 
an airless environment, tethered by 
clumsy umbilical cords, floating in a 
tin can possibly filled with shards of 
glass or dangerous chemicals. 

The object of their attention is the 
Spektr research module, launched 
from the Baikanour Cosmodrome in 
Kazakstan in 1995 and docked with 
Mir. It was serving as the living 
quarters for Mr. Foale — - his sleep- 
ing bag was tied up to one wall — as 
well as housing numerous American 
and Russian experiments. When the 
Spektr was punctured in the acci- 
dent, the air seeped out. No one 
knows for sure what's now floating 


around inside the abandoned cham- 
ber. 

In the first phase of the mission, 
Mr. Vinogradov and Mr. Solovyov 
will move into a small, round room 
known as the transfer node, con- 
necting the base block of the Mir to 
the Spektr. They will have with 
them tools and a special hermet- 
ically sealed replacement hatch, 
with 23 electrical connectors run- 
ning through it, which was made on 
the ground weeks ago. 

Once inside the transfer node, the 
cosmonauts will let out the air. They 
will be surviving in space suits with 
umbilical cords carrying oxygen, 
power, communications and cool- 
ing. The space suits are pumped up, 
so they can be awkward ana bulky, 
but Russian and American officials 
say the cosmonauts have used them 
extensively. 

Mr. Vinogradov will then open 
the hatch to the crippled Spektr. His 
first job is simply to look around and 
see if anything has changed since the 
craft was deserted two months ago. 
Chemicals and glass from ruined 


experiments are the chief worry. 

"It will be dark in the Spektr,” 
said Gregory Harbaugh, manager of 
the spacewalk project office for the 
National Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration and a veteran space- 
walker, who added that Mr. Vino- 
gradov would put some lanterns 
nearby to help illuminate the cham- 
ber, and will wear a helmet lamp on 
his suit. “So, it wiUbea little bit dark, 
kind of like going into a dark closet 
but not real dark. You know, there are 
no monsters in there that they need to 
wony about or anything. 

Mr. Vinogradov will then slide 
carefully through the hatch feet -first 
into the Spektr, just deep enough so 
that his bead is near the opening. 

One of the potential problems is 
the umbilical cord, which could get 
tangled or snagged. Mr. Solovyov 
will remain in the transfer node, 
paying out the umbilical like a 
garden hose. If the cords get cut or 
twisted up, Mr. Vinogradov could 
by hand detach it from his space suit 
and would have 30 minutes or more 
to get back into the transfer node and 


SMOKE: Philip Morris Chairman Says Smoking Might Have 9 Caused Deaths 


Continued from Page 1 

ton attorney who was a lead ne- 
gotiator in die recent tobacco talks. 

Tobacco companies, said Mr. 
Coale. who represents private class- 
action suits against the companies, 
have long maintained that a caus- 
ative link between smoking and dis- 
ease had "not been proven, and here 
he has said it might have." 

Shares in Philip Moms fell 
SI. 1 25 each in late trading, to 
S44.625. 

In the deposition. Mr. Motley 
asked Mr. Bible: 

"Would Philip Morris agree that 
a single American citizen who 


smokes their products for 30 or 
more years, a single one, has ever 
died of a disease caused in part by 
smoking cigarettes?" 

Mr. Bible answered. "I think 
there’s a fair chance ihat one would 
have, might have.” 

Mr. Motley then asked, "How 
about a thousand?” 

Mr. Bible said, “Might have.” 

Mr. Motley continued, "How 
about 100.000?” 

Mr. Bible responded, “Might 
have.” 

Mr. Motley said later on CNN: "I 
salute Philip Morris for the first time 
in 40 years being forthright and can- 
did." 


Suits like Florida’s were a major 
factor in pressing tobacco makers to 
agree earlier this' year to a $368.5 
billion proposal under which they 
would establish a fund to settle in- 
dividual lawsuits, and accept sub- 
stantial limits on the sales and mar- 
keting of their products, but obtain 
immunity from further class-action 
and similar suits. 

The agreement awaits congres- 
sional action, which is expected by 
the end of the year. The Clinton 
administration is debaring whether 
to recommend some tightening of 
the terms of the accord. Federal 
health officials estimate that the set- 
tlement. as il stands, could cause (he 


number of American adults who 
smoke to drop from 50 million to 
39.5 million by 2002. 

About 450,000 Americans die 
each year from tobacco-related ill- 
nesses. health officials estimate. 

Legal pressures on U.S. tobacco 
companies have been growing fast 
in recent years. RJ. Reynolds, for 
example, faced 234 active lawsuits 
from individual smokers and their 
relatives as of the end of last year, up 
from 54 cases at the end of 1 994. 

Like Philip Morris, most tobacco 
firms expect to lose U.S. sales but plan 
to raise foreign sales. In the past de- 
cade, Philip Morris has doubled the 
volume of its foreign cigarette sales. 


reattach the cords before running 
out of air, NASA officials said. 

Likewise, the Russian space suits 
could be tom or snagged, which in a 
severe case would be fataL But the 
officials said the suits can sustain a 
small puncture for about half an 
hour, giving the cosmonaut time to 
retreat to safety. 

Once inside Spektr, the plan calls 
for Mr. Vinogradov to take a break if 
he needs it Overall, the two cos- 
monauts have seven hours of oxygen 
on hand, for an operation estimated 
to take four hocus and 15 minutes. 

The most difficult phase comes 
nexL Mr. Vinogradov must find and 
connect 1 1 wires inside the Spektr 
that will run through the replace- 
ment hatch. Eight of the wires will 
bring electricity from Spektr solar 
panels, one will help point the Spek- 
tr's solar arrays toward the sun, and 
the other two are spares. 

Of the 1 1 cables, four of them are 
expected to be particularly difficult 
to reach and attach, because they are 
located behind another hatch, and 
Mr. Vinogradov will be moving his 
bulky, gloved hands in from each 
side. He will have to fed his way 
along. The Americans have provided 
the cosmonauts with a special con- 
nector tool, but the Russians have 
decided to try the repair by hand. 

Mr. Harbaugh said. "It takes a 
certain amount of dexterity to mate 
or de-male connectors.” He said, 
"It’s not as simple as just putting a 
plug in a socket on the wall. You 
actually have to bring two pieces 
together and apply a torque or a twist 
to them. And now these connectors 
are fairly friendly that way." Bui, he 
said, when the maneuver is done in a 
pressurized suit, "it is more difficult 
to move the fingers. It makes it all 
the more difficult to squeeze the 
hand. And you have to squeeze the 
hand to grip the connector to do the 
mating and de-mating operations 
that are being anticipated here.” 


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ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. AUGUST 22. 1997 


PAGE 7 




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Access pool and club house Asking- 
FF55M T^ -33 (QM 93 75 24 S5 

5 mins NICE AIRPORT. ST LT. harbour 
French barter owner sells hnunous 
4 -room » sq m. ta - 300 svn- 
rounding e>ctic garden. - baths large 
equpped tfenen ceflar 2 JW9» 
FFi W. Tel -33 t0l4 « 0» g 

A/atbte NOW QUIET LDVaf F1ACE 


SPAIN 


LUXURIOUS VILLA 

agaissr 

wtlt Mated svflmnng pool USS 2 , 000,000 
HVmoofailDMrsS AteB^knABv. 
mflBvCnarws CKijii GeoewS^ewrtaw 
Buc«-41.az.34aP631 


APARTMENT NEAR CANNES, 3 rams. 

2 f batirWC tOO sq m.. gs^an. exclu- 
sive private resort 2 pods 2 lentK 
5mss owner French Francs 12 mn 
Fax +41 1 381 8340. Tel 38i 835C> 

CAP FERRAT, beautiful vikiapartimm 

3 bedrooms 3 baths living ■ drum 
room, ftf+plaee. lovely garter periling 
conoerge Tel omwi +33 ton 33761028 

ST PAUL DE VENCE. ptopeny on 1 lev- 
el 4 bedrooms 4-cai basemsm 3 too 
sq.m park pool pulei. FF2 950 000 
LV.C Tetrax +33 [0)4 93 20 22 44 


Germany 


FIRST CLASS CONDOUWAJU 
located c an OLD CASTLE sunoutded 
by a 100 year old part near DwssrtW 
(15 km|, 261 sq.ni - 2 hyng rooms 
3 bedrooms wih marbled battrooms, 
tachen t&cuy. 2 garage point 
spates sow by owner USS BOQ.CCO 
Ml 0043 21S9 80206 Fax 61792 


Greece 


NA0USSA PAROS CYCLADES 

Unique 17th century house cn the sea, 
compleirty restored by archaect owner 
200 aym (Found & 1st floor. 

U 5290.000 Coread C Cusefc 
fteoussa Paros. Greece. 

Teh +30 0284 51006, Fax: 0284 51902. 


MYCONOS CYCLADES Exclusive wa- 
lertTom land. 1 200 sq m Next Id New 
yacti harbor Tourtos -30 28S 22968 iW) 
26'3i t 41 22 7B8 6042 (Iran 31/B| 


FLORENCE (San Gemle). wondertul 
and quel Vfla 1 Mandorf surounded by 
vineyard and seoiar trees on the his ol 
Charti Puno rrih an exceruonai view on 
Monteauto Castle. About 900 sqm bufld- 
ings 8 300 sqm of whe & (aim cdais 
at should be hi.y restored plus 3 ha ol 
land Historical description m G. Lansi 
OrtancAnt Cardni, Le viHe dl Firenze 
(1957) By the owner only to dreefly m- 
teresiBd parties. Mail nhai enquty id 
CAS ELLA PUGUADIGE 331 VcenzaMy 

MONTEFIORE, ASO VALLEY 
From owner for sate ancfenf manson. 
over 12 icons. 4 baits, party restored 
with hand paintings and decorations 
4500 sqm garden and orangene 1 hour 
south ol Ancona port'eiipofl, 7 miles 
trom sea. Please contact Mr Segeno. 
Concierge. Suvrette House. Si Morttz. 

Fate +41-81-833 85 24 

Tel: +41-81-832 11 32 

RQME-COUSEVM Apartment with ex- 
cspDonrt and unqw re* on Cotseun 
Antique building. Living, tfirtnn 2 bed- 
rooms. 2 baths, office, kitchen finished 
and decorated by famous ercMed Air 
conftoned. Fax +33 tOjl 47 04 42 61 


London 


LONDON TOWNHOUSE 

6 FLOORS 
South AuMey Street 

2 Living rooms. 2 Master Battown sufles 
1 Lhaty. 2 Urge Bechroms 
1 Dffitng Room. Many Brthroans 
BEAUTIFUL GARDEN 

US53iMflltON 
FAX: +{212)968-4629 USA 


BELSCE PARK 
(2 min walk from tuba) 
2 -bedroom gaden fa to salt 
Exceflentiv decorated, lunwhed 

tw HARfiOOS 3t sarfefl *- 

PJ75.0® irtumi5hadG2».O0Q luntaied. 
llobfiK +80 (0)9456 1044 / +44 (0)171 
483 2315 / +44 (0)171 792 4817. 


HOMESEARCH LONDON Let US 
search tor yoa We Imd homes : ®ts 
to buy and rant and provide corporate 
relocation services For mdnnduajs 
and companies Tel. +44 171 
1066 Fax + 44 171 630 '077 
idp/nnm homeseqich co Ahom 


Paris and Suburbs 


8th, CLOSE CHAMPS ELYSEES 

and roe Fg St Honors, fa sate in 19th 
cent Haussmamaytedara^buiUng: 
OFFICES a HIGH CLASS apartment a 

he refilled (presently fined as offices). 
About 300 sqm per level Part^gte 
o£sUe. VERY GOOD OPPORTUNITY 
Cctsad owner dreci on 
Fax +33 MS 58 20 01 6B 
Teh +33 m 07 65 65 19 


78 ■ FEUOCBOUES - 
15 MINS PARIS LA DEFENSE 
17th cent HOUSE, LISTS) 
By owner US5S5ML 
Tel: +33 (0)1 30 M 53 96 


FRANCE 


1 ^FORSAVEj 
, TBIANGUe' D'OR 

1 Bedroom apartm^ni plus tone room 
win iireplace. Ijicher. baihrocm 
ano mad s room. 

4 Avenue Matignon. 5th Floor. 
Cc+naa ijxiomru. Mme Row 

-t cali Urn. P.rriria ..n’ 

(00)54.1 306.9524 (Argcndiu) 


7th, NEAR BtVAUDES. modem apan- 
meni. 150 sqm Large reception xnth 
martle floor 2 bedrooms. July snapped 
kneh+n 2 showers, terrace Garage 
available LVRHOLM Te< +33 «0|l 
39622266 Fan +33( 0)1 39120973 

PLACE des VOSGES 100 sqm 3rd How 
> W. tern con bujqing htfy renovated 
hen class Minos. Ownar «jji 4470 8872 

Switzerland 


□ LAKE GBEVA &ALPS 

S* to foreigners authorced 
our speciamy since 1S75 

AmariNe propetues. overtooWng view 
t to 5 bedrooms (rom SFr 2JO1XO 

REVAC 5A 

52, Uontbtmam CH-1211 GENEVA 2 
Tel 4122-734 15 46 Fax 734 12 20 


OLD TOWN OF LAUSANNE. A unique 
charming t9th century properly three 
any house with exceptional guden and 
garden pavifion Gallery attached 10 
house Newly leoovaeo. Suitable lor 
private and < 01 protessnnal use Tel. 
+41 21 320 3013 

VULARS-OLLON: Invnedate sale. 2 br. 
2 bah. McHenette tong room. Indoor 
pool 300.000 SF Monaco 37793500933 


USA Residential 


\}& Estate: Bdidcfleburg, Virginia 
With liflerrattma! Chansma near Lepfloi 
and Im'l Airport. Mountain Vista, 97 
Aaes. Gemolngisi'5 Haven Historian's 
Enctoramere. Anist's Arre Le Pres Aux 
Certs For Sole By Owner Aaan Hean 
set m French Desjvi only S3 5 moon 
true vteue ansdsrabtv yeater Suitable 
tor famrly.-tonteience center Car butts 
5 car garage one with cash bay. dram, 
hoi 6 cold high pressure system hno 
length Tel 54u’364-?5.55 E-Uad- 
b_Fteur_EnidHirueeianpiisave.com 
hnpi/wvm mridtebagonkne comtemaa 


CLASSIC CONTEMPORARY 
ROUND HILL AREA 
GREENWICH. CT 

5 bedrooms € 1.2 bams, mdoor pool, 
terms arm. ei-antojoned wfte rtom 
B 12 acres nscnftcsnt oafens praper- 
r/. Sate by owner. 203-625-8678 USA 

COCONUT GROVE/MIAMI, FLORIDA 

Fabulous Tfqtsra.T6a.-i h;m? nestled on 
176£- sqt S3 4 3s*ocms-35 Eahs + 

2 guest ncuses. Gated pirate secure 
Ecmmunr; Ctramr^. rerciaed S reecv 
to move si 59T Pas ans Assoo- 
ates Ire Ashe.. =rr^- ,zjz- E5i-4(B3 
c Mai - A5rtg.. , .fe Z i-jrr- 

COUASUS OHO, L.-1 G: r . 
Course -r.oe ‘Gee;?®.'. . "age ol 
hemes an Vi Acar. xiw, ai* 

Si 17EL1 CrSsseii Banker ST Petty 
Zutt. 545afc RZ«cit3l14SAOLcom 
Fa r 6i4^:-Sc4 fa oeafe 

MIAMI BEACH (BALHARBOURISurf- 
site) Oceentora peryte^e Nw 2 won 
2 ifi bath. 1B0 soitv Marble floor Gren- 
ae bar S385K T« 3&9£5-:ol4 

NAPLES. FLDHOA - GOLF 
Beach, terns, yacht 3 bedroom. 3 brth. 
msduten & mommg mums. US S1.45M 
Teny Warren iDcwmg^rye Pealyi Tet 
941-434-8049 Fax' 941-434-7324 

RQXBUHY, CT Dream countiy retreat 
colonial ana 1760. 3 batcom + guest 
house, pool tennis. 23 acres, baautfrt 
rofcg I*. S3SW Tet Z12-SBMS1 

Real Estate 
for Rent 


Holland 


RfflTHOUSE WTERNADONAL 
No i in Hofend 

tor (semj hmhsd tuuses%& 

Tet 31-206448751 Fax 31-206465909 
Wtaren 19-21. 1083 Am Amsterdam 

HOMEFINDERS INTL Hwengratitt «t 
1015 BH Amsterdam Ta +312DG392252 
Fax. 6392252 E+naiwoonsste<a€#prt 


Ireland 

DUBLIN - K1LLWEY 3.000 sq ft house 
on 0 75 acres. Direct access to beach, 
sea views Irish £2.700 monthly. Tet 
+353 11) 450 S577 I work) Fax. 450 4819. 


ROME MAGNJHCBNT LUXURY VELA. 
Excelent central location 1000 sqjn. 
spacious moms vwh W bath 5 jacuzzi. 
gym seperata maids quarters. 2500 
sqjn. landscaped garden, swirmring 
pool, centra! an-coratfronrq 4 car n- 
ra» securty system. US S3iM. 
Tet 2 12-31 9 6802 Fax. 212-644-8796 


London 


SHORT STAY APARTMENTS 
Luxury 5 star hotel spartments m Itaida 
vale, nth axtensne health ctub and 
sxAwwg pool cerera) ganien and car 
Mrtora To lei Iran 1 day to 3 mortea 
Cal Haza Estates 44 10)171 372 0(57 


tUlBTtit HOLIDAYS 


GREAT BRITAIN 

-Shakespeare's county— 

STRATTORO-ON-AVON 

Alt of IB«0 monwrr, hovic gn priwgfe trJoto 

1 1 nrntei from SnstonL Royd teaming Bn 

Spa. Warwick Ca-Je and 65 nuln bum 
Lsndon MagnificBnl Drawirc/Knlng rocm. 
fuly equipped Lithcn/brsaiJeay ram wiA 
mafbfewjHitopr, guest doobuom. 

£ bedroomi. 3 berinraoms Secluded 
gartfen. Dwpose bu>h summer home Quality 
xA fun! ihingi Price: £245.000. 

_ Tel./Fax. +44 {0)1*26 64! 1*7 _ 

KENSlNGT0N-UILU0NAIflE'5 HOUSE 

Huge gaiden 2 tour,' bedroom suites. 

30 it rkfpticff) ternu^ iiiage Stvxt ter 
flJXkwk. Tet -A i0i 571 602 5941 


LOMBARDY PLACE. BAYSWATER W2 
BeaJiii 34x0 mm house £3i» per a*. 
Garage, small aatden sKumy anils Tel 
0171 221 5038 to 0t7t 2296339 


Paris Area Furnished 




S' i 



Meet acctiirmodatcn snxfc-5 t>eqi'>3iTs 
Quatev and servee assurW 
READY TO HOVE IN 
Tel +33(0)143129300 Fax 1O11 431^906 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
Tel: +33 (0)1 47.20.30.05 


CAPfTALE * PARTNERS 
Handtartad quakty apanments 
all sizes Paris and sutmos 
Tel: +33 (OR 42 68 35 66 
Fat +33 (0)1 42 68 35 61 
Hfe help you best 1 


16th MUETTE 

tecepion. 5 bedrooms, 
parking Highly kounois 
EMBASSY, Tat +33(0)1 47 20 30 05 


PARS STUDIO, 18 Bid Beaumarchais, 

23 sqm modem kitchenette Rem 
FFJ50& month Purchase also posstof*. 
Tet & Fax —41 62 349 tS 15 


14ft, darning 2-bsdrcom furnished Ha. 
nrepiace dtsmeasher. toundr; private 
rard “SOCimo Call Anne l-5332C-lo2 


16ft. AYE KLQEfi, stumng flat tu- 
bfe tK^fliMi 3-4 neoroorrs FF2-J 500 
Tel -32:0il47:5?0cr 

MONTPARNASSE 2 rooms kcctren 
calm, charming, neatei elevator 6 COD 
rf. +33 <Ll.ll 47073334 teire message 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


LUXURY APARTMENTS 
To let. deal fa compm mpresetmes 
8th - 17ft AREAS 
APEN INTERNATIONAL 

Mis Joan Berawt +33 (0)1 53 31 10 20 


Switzerland 


GENEVA, LUXURY FURNISHED apart- 
ments From studos b 4 bedrooms Tel 
♦41 22 735 6320 Fax +41 22 736 2571 


NAPA VALLEY, BEAUTIFULLY 
tunwnecL 3 bedim 4 bath tome neat 
Meadwood Resort, 51 Helena. 3 880 
sq it Large rooms great spaces tor 
enertamng Fit? race Large deck. Gar- 
dena Cable Fully equcped k lichen. 
Otiet setting n the trees. Ava&bfe tor 3 
months or longer Contact Melody or 
Dotty rt Morgan Lane, 707-944-4431 
Fax 707-944-9555. 

NYC. spauous B-room uppei West srte 
apartment. 3 bachroms en-sute train, 
country French kitchen Walk to certrai 
par*, (jncoto ceraer Broadway Door- 
man eievaw mzn. Mmanm i war. ha- 
ntehed or reforested, even baby grand 
para Tet +33 ton 42 67 M M 

NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS. 1 
week to i year Great Locations Can 
Pat/CWqui 212-448-9223. Fax. 212- 
44042$ E-Mai momoGutm. 


Real Estate Wanted/Exchange 


PARIS FLAT-Couple on ejiended 
vadion seek 2-bedroom wen furmshed 
apartment with modem kitchen m 5th. 

6th or <ft airomfesement from early 

Sept tor 3-4 months Write Box 370. 
I.HT. 63 Long Acre. London WC2E 9JH 


+ sJ - J f 


HcnOb^Sribunt 

■rug trainy mm -vFUaPxreH 

PLANNINGTO ^ your tid. You wllbeinfonried of the cost 

will appear witfitn jifhwrc- All major Credit Cards Accepted. 


EUROPE 

M& pa 3 OlJj? 1 ,.^ 9355 - 

Fa* 10114! £2 5/L- 
E-mail OamfeJ&mcW" 

ANXX0UL- Afdr^o b VUb 
Tel 607913 

GB8WWY ? A10BA 6 CB>nBAL EUSOFfe 

FioJkjn 

V K»5‘97l250u 
F®. tfiSV] 571 

6mau»6Uoa»«piw , 7 

v io2) 344-250®. sor: jAiO 1 ‘7 
Fa* +32) 246-535? 

G8EKE A CYP»& 
b- »;/w5; 5+-- 
PO 331/e£iS55T 

fMAND’.Hs-'knli 

258 <• eOS 529 
h* 258«:--55Ci 


nw.Y.Mfc«. 

tel. *3315738 
For 503 20936 
»£jHESLA7®S: Amwdcm, 
tau 3120 6081374 

N0 m^.SWB»(4DB«W«: 

sreis®B ■ 

Fe* (AT] 55 913072 

F ;B-I4f7,’3fl 
tel 4571858 

& 4586074 

fkU 728 3051 


WFSSmOTlitt 

Fp- 247 931 5 
iiw^ HNGDOMi lajdon 
2. 0171 8M -802 
Z. 262009 fa. 42003^ 

MIDDLE EAST 

■ffWSfcw* ' 

972-9^ 586246 
Fee 97^99-585685 

UUDI ARABIA: 

“*? 71036^2 
Fax. 71 240+254 

QDUTH AFWCA 

"yf^SSao 

fe C7ii|W3*50* 


NORTH AMERICA 

NEW YORK: 

tel. 1212) 752-3890 
W fc. 18001 572-7212 * 

Fee (212) 755-0785 

ASIA PACIFIC 

HONGKONG: . 

H 185212922-1165. 

Rx. 61170 HTH7. 

F®. 1852)29221190. 

WANL-fek™. 

V 32010210 
■ Ibc J33673 Fee 32010209 

SWGAFOBE, BRIMt Sr^pcre, 
U 2236478. 
foe 3250842 
Ik 28749 IH1SN 


HOTELS 


PARIS 

LES SUITES SAINT-HONORE 

★★★★ 

13* rue D'Aguesseau, 75008 Paris 

)ust off the Faubourg Saint-Honore and The Eli/see Palace 

A LUXURY APARTMENT HOTEL RESIDENCE 

Very exclusive, located in one of the most prestigious neigh- 
bourhoods: Faubourg Saint-Honore and Champs Elvsees. 
Thirteen personalized large apartments up to 1200 so. feet 
completely restored in 19°2 v\ith fullv equipped kitoiens. 


Ideal for both family holidays and business trips, a perfect 
"pied-a-terre". 

All hotel services. Daily maid service. Air condi tionning. 
Underground parking. Complete securih-. 

For mote information or ivscnvfions. please fax directly to: 

+33 (6) 1 42 66 35 70 or call +33 (0)1 44' 51 16 35 ' 


Bed & Breakfasts 


MANHATTAN LODGINGS. NYC. Shon 
Stay luxurv cparuTh*ras. siywiHjr £4 3 
registru mar.v lacanons 
t+l 2i:-4:->:-?so Fa< ;-2-;r<c« 
iswy. narjiaartjdgrigs com 


Lebanon 


HOTEL AL BUSTAN. East ol Beirur 
5 star artae E»L>Txsrat tratten secu- 
nr,- comlon. line Cu&me ennvennons 
busin+fk services satellite TV 18 mm 
uarsfer horn airport tree UTELL ?a» 
l»li 4-972439 l-33l (0H-47M007 


Holiday Rentals 


Caribbean 


ST. BARTHELEMY, F.W.L.. OVER 200 
PRIVATE VACATION VILLAS ■ beach- 
trom to hiilsidr rath pools Our agents 
have inspected alt visas personally For 
reservaiiC'r6 on Si Bans. St. t4aron Arv 
jjfe. Barbados Uustique. the Vuqin 15- 
landj. Call WlMCO<'.'SlBAflTH • US 
|40li349-80i2da* 847-6290 from 
FRANCE 05 90 16 20 - ENGLAND 0 
■3CC--ES-63tS 


GENERAL 


READERS ARE ADVISED 

that tha ' International 
Horald Tribunm cannot bo 
hold responsible for loss or 
damages incurred as a 
result of transactions stem- 
ming from advertisements 
which appear in our 
paper. It is therefore rec- 
ommended that readers 
make appropriate inquir- 
ies before sanding any 
money or entering into 
any binding cammftrnents. 


Announcements 


BAREME AS 24 

AU 22 AOUT19B7 
Pis Hnra TVA «t devise locals 
(traduction rfisponWe sir demands) 
Rernplacs bs baremes artereirs 

FRANCE (fora C) en FFfl - TVA 2ft6% 
GO: 178 FOD*: 220 

SC97: 552 SCSR. 5.41 

UK en A - 'TVA 175% (Trod B%) 

GO: 05580 FOO" 03876 

AUEMAGNE (zone <) DUI - TVA 1S% 
ZONE l-G: 


GO: 1.10 

ZONEII-I: 

GO: 1.06 

ZONE a - F : 

GO 155 
ZONE IV • F : 

SCSP: 1.45 
ZONE IV-G: 
GO: 1.08 


SCSP: 1.44 
SCSP: 1.45 


FOO 0,70 


BELGIQUE en FS1 - TVA 21% 

GO 22(31 FOD: 1102 

SC97: 3455 SCSP: 32.73 

H0LLANBE (zona2) NLGA - TVA 175% 
G ft 1544 FOD: D818 

SCfl7: 2309 SCSP: 1549 

LUXEMBOURG en UJR1 - TVA 15% 

GO: 19,48 

ESPAGNE (zona A) en PTASfl-TVA 16% 
GO: 8655 

SC 97: 10345 SCSP: 10759 


HcralbS^Sribimc 

ibl «*H l ilr. inm iihwh » 
SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SERVICE: 
For mestuns or queries about toe deliv- 
ery a you nenspoper. the status ol you 
sutKcnofton or afioul orteiing a sutserp- 
tton. (toe call the Mowing numbers. 
EUROPE, HDOLE EAST AM> AFRBA: 
TOLL FREE ■ Austria 0660 8120 Bel- 
gum 0800 17538 Fiance 0800 437437 
Germany 0130 848585 Italy 167 780040 
Luxembourg 0800 2703 Netherlands 06 
02251 58 Sweden 020 797039 Switzer- 
land 155 5757 UK 0800 895965 856- 
where 1-33) 1 4143*361 THE AMERI- 
CAS: USA Itoll-lreei 1-800-8822884 
Elsewhere f+1j 212 7523890 ASIA: 
Hong Kong 3C2 U7i indw«ia 809 
1328 Japan ttoHrael D120 464 ££7 
Korea 3672 0044 Malaysia 221 7055 
PtVHR)ln« 695 4946 Singapore 325 
0834 Taiwan 7753456 Thailand 277 
4485 Elsewhere f+£2) 29221171 


Auto Rentals 

RENT AUTO DERG1 FRANCE Weekend 
F500. 7 days FF1500 Tel Pans +33 
[011 4368 5555 Fax (0)1 4353 95S 


Autos Tax Free 


EUROPE AUTO BROKERS, INC 

TetHonand 3ti0|3O6064494 Fnjecsw 


Directly on the OoaatvHoRywood. FL 

t t.2 bem 'uwiisheo. ommg kiichen. 
Carkxr.g -4 r,r sKuffy Seasonal Ter 
9?44rc-:251 =ax 305-SWwB USA 


Boats/Yachls 


Why No) Cnise The UerfiterraHen 

(or its iwttj abroad you own i35m 
i-i4 tti sating yam 7 7ns caretofiy 
martamed custom oesroned steel cutter 
i«rth a pfol houst-.i butt by bay class 
/ccnvei mame m 1998 s the deal home 
aket tor a couple sedung adveraure 
ivithout sacnl«rq rarrtort & safety 

There s an 0WP Sabre Engine. 92 KVA 
ijottraiof. waei dssakfoor hood 
evmasi man fridge freezer tracrouave 
waste dryer, teak rtenor & decks 
to) etedrontes & much, much more 
USS25Q.OOO Tet +80 242 243 2592 
or Fax +90 242 259 1182. 

Attrc TWELFTH OF NEVER. 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


Legal Notices 


THE USTOFEMVDENDSh 
bankruptcy procedures of Cubonla 
B.V. nflh head office at Deventer, 
the Netherlands, Duuifledemg 23017, 
end brandi office at Gert Beljum, 
Patf^esstraar 248, is fled tor 
Inspetdlnn as of 25 August 1997 end 
ctatig ten dsyi fteraanr at the 
court ragfelrai of the Zutphen 
ifstrid court, Maispocrtteaal no. 9, 
Zutphsn. ihe Nathertands. and the 
cantomal courts at Gera. Belgium, 

71h Kanton. KoopttiandeEspkain 21-22, 
9000 Gent, and Deventer, the 
Netherlands. Brink 12. 

I*. J.R. Baverstois 
reeavar 

TeL +31 (0)570 ■ 613015 


L egal Services 

DIVORCE HAY CERTIFED 
Cal w Fax 17141 9600685 Wne 1B7B7 
Beach Bhtf. 4137. Hurmgton Beach CA 
92648 U SA - s+nail - wstormCjuu corn 

DIVORCE IN 1 DAY. No travel. Wrfo. 
Box 377 Sudbury. MA 01776 USA. Tel 
506-4438387. F arc 50&'443^B3 


Business Opportunities 

OFFSHORE BANKS 
C0UPAN1ES & TRUSTS 
1HHIGRAT10N/PASSP0RTS 

BaikmAccouning-Secrelanal 
Va BeqistiMion-invocrg 
Mat-Phon-lw Services Wwdmde 

Aston Corporate Trustees 

Aston House, bmigtaa. Isle of Hat 
Tel: +44 (0) 1©t 628591 
Fax +44 (0) 1624 625126 

London 

Tel: +44 (IQ 171 233 1302 
Fax: +44 (0) 171 233 1519 

E Mail: aston6entefprise.net 

wwwjston4oou1einoiuo.uk 

OFFSHORE COMPANIES. Hi Metro- 
chure u ahfflte Tel London 44 181 741 
1224 Fax 44 I0t 748 6556-6338 
vrawjppl eionro.A 

OIL A ENERGY: thdugWul nsi^ls & 
prcfteNf racormendabora. Robert n*. 
04 ) Czeschii. editor. Free report lax 
-1-fii2«M996. 


with correspondent relationship. 

Class A commercial license. 
Unmediate deKvery. US $60,000. 
Nassau, Bahamas 

Hal: (242) 334-7080 Rue (342) 394+7062 

Agents Wawtd Worldweie 


rfl/eco/nmim/cstfofw 


CTl - htomaBonal 
IntemefaHi Prepaid Card® 
EarameJy Corapetfve Pricing 
Tet 39-81-5CB6243 Fax: 3M1-5O06Z72 
3422 Old Capial TnL Side 670. 
Wlraigtoa Delaware 1 3*6-61 92. USA. 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 



■ Le salon de l'Hfltel des Marronnieis *** 
21, rue facob - 7500c PARIS 
Tel: 33 (O) 1 43 25 30 60 Fax: 33 (0)1 40 46 83 56 
And very dose by. under the same management 
• L' Hotel des Deux Continents *** 

25, rue Jacob - 75006 PARIS 
Tel: 23 (0)1 43 26 72 46 Fax: 33 (0)1 43 25 b7 60 

• L'Hfitel de Seine 
52, rue de Seine - 75006 PARIS 
TeL 33 (0) 1 4t» 34 22 SO Fax: 33 (O) 1 46 34 04 74 

THREE CHARMING LITTLE HOTELS 
IN THE HEART OF THE ANIMATION 
OF SAINT GERMAIN-DES-PRES. 


HOTEL ‘JtESTDE^ipL HEH$J TV’” 

Between the Seine and the Pantheon in the heart of The Latin quarter 
• Charming room* and apartments- giving onto the square 
Paul-Lange\ tn, equipped with kitchenette fideal tor long stays) 
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FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1997 

EDITORIALS /OPINION 


INTERNATIONAL 




KBLIMIH, Bmi THE Sh« A I IRK TlMTJj 


Back to Mideast Fundamentals: Peace or Not? 


Make Flying Safer 


nosedive 

•™ , of Valu J et Night 592 last year 
~fii c re ? l * It °f supervisory failures 

au up and down the line, from federal 
regulators to airline executives in the 
noardroom to workers on the shop 
room floor." That is the chilling con- 
clusion of the National Transportation 
gaiety Board, whose investigators 
round, among much else, that the Ever- 
glades disaster in which all 1 10 aboard 
were killed might not have occurred 
nad the Federal Aviation Administra- 
tion followed a decade-old recommen- 
dation of the board to require fire de- 
tection and suppression systems in 
aircraft cargo holds. 

They found as well a breakdown of 
the self-checking, testing and oversight 
systems in the industry and govern- 
ment supervisory procedures, together 
with loose controls on maintenance 
contractors and inadequate training in 
handling hazardous materials. 

In the end. with a violent Fire raging 
aloft, flight controls failed in the ex- 
treme heat, investigators say. with 
smoke or hear possibly incapacitating 
the crew in the final seconds. Had there 
been smoke detectors in the cargo hold, 
and fire suppression equipment as 
well, the board thinks that there likely 
would have been time to land safely. 
In the board’s view, if the FAA had 
responded adequately to fire safety 
recommendations made as early as 


1988. the Valujet flight "would likely 
not have crashed." 

Since the crash, the FAA has ex- 
amined the way it regulates aviation 
and, officials say, made some major 
improvements. The agency has a pro- 
posed rule to require fire detection and 
suppression systems, as well as more 
inspectors, and it has ordered new pro- 
cedures for handling hazardous cargo. 

But the follow-ups have been slow 
— and the explanations about the time 
that federal rule-making requires and 
the difficulties of obtaining and phas- 
ing in new safety equipment rightly 
strain the patience of an increasingly 
air-safety -conscious public. 

The new FAA administrator. Jane F. 
Garvey, has pledged to press for 
swifter action. Safety improvements 
that in the past may have been con- 
sidered too expensive must also be 
reassessed. 

Right alter Valujet 592 crashed, 
then Transportation Secretary Fed- 
erico Pena rushed to assure the public 
that "This airline is safe." He added. 
"If Valujet was unsafe, we would 
have grounded it.” How haunting this 
claim so quickly became. 

Stonewalling, hedging and statistics 
about the relative safety of aviation 
won’t wash with a public that now 
relies on air travel as another form of 
mass transit, 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Latin Dishonor 


For the last three weeks. General 
Jose Francisco Gallardo has been in 
solitary confinement in a Mexican mil- 
itary barracks. He is now in his fourth 
year of prison after accusing soldiers of 
Involvement in killings, torture and 
drug deals. Senior officers in Peru and 
Colombia have also been imprisoned 
or disciplined for blowing the whistle 
on military abuses. The reprisals 
against them reveal the true character 
of three governments that claim to pro- 
tect human righis. 

General Gallardo made enemies 
through the unlikely avenue of his 
master's thesis in political science. His 
1993 paper recommended that a ci- 
vilian-appointed ombudsman investi- 
gate reports of military crimes, and 
detailed several cases where he be- 
lieved the army was involved. A small 
magazine printed pans of the thesis, 
and General Gallardo was arrested for 
defaming the honor of the military. 
He was acquitted and now awaits trial 
for corruption, a charge which he ar- 
gues is trumped up. 

This January the Inter-American 
Commission on Human Rights, part of 
the Organization of American States, 
condemned the Mexican government 
for jailing General Gallardo and re- 
commended his immediate release, 
payment of damages and investigation 
of’ those who jailed him. The gov- 
ernment not only refused, it has 
locked him in solitary confinement, 
perhaps to silence his ongoing reports 
about prison torture. 

Retired General Rodolfo Robles of 


Peru has been more fortunate. In 1993 
he was the third-ranking officer in 
Peru's army. That May he accused a 
group of intelligence officers of the 
notorious kidnapping and murder of a 
professor and 10 students the year be- 
fore. He said that Peru's strongman 
Vladimiro Montesinos, who runs the 
National Intelligence Service, had dir- 
ected the death squad. Last year Gen- 
eral Robles accused rhe same group of 
bombing a television station. 

Both accusations brought charges, 
first of insubordination and then of in- 
sult. The first time he fled the country. 
Last year a public outcry persuaded 
Presidenr Alberto Fujimori to grant him 
amnesty after he served II days in 
prison. He has brought his case for 
restitution and return to active duty be- 
fore the Human Rights Commission. 

In Colombia. Colonel Carlos Al- 
fonso Veldsquez was cashiered after he 
criticized the army’s tolerance of right- 
wing paramilitary death squads. In the 
last 15 years, dozens of top military 
men have been credibly linked with the 
paramilitaries. . , 

Meanwhile. Colonel Velasquez, 
who was considered an incorruptible 
leader of the army's anti-drug task 
force' in Cali, works as a security spe- 
cialist for a Bogota business. 

All three of these governments re- 
peatedly insist that their militaries fol- 
low' the rule of law and punish officers 
who do not. By punishing whistle- 
blowers instead. 'the militaries dishon- 
or themselves. 

— THE SEW YORK TIMES 


Banning Land Mines 


Long after wars end in many parts of 
the world, one particular kind of weapon 
goes on exploding. Land mines are 
clieap. lethal — and long- lasting. More 
than 100 million of them are buried in 
current and former bottle zones, with 
another 2 million being laid each year. 
That is far more than are being un- 
covered and disarmed. Most often the 
victims of these weapons are civilians, 
frequently children, who are most likely 
to skip away from a trodden path and 
find themselves suddenly legless. 

The horror of this carnage has 
sparked a popular movement to abolish 
land mines altogether, a movement to- 
ward which official Washington has 
shown ambivalence. 

U.S. companies do not make, and 
U.S. forces no longer deploy, "dumb" 
mines, which last forever. On the other 
hand, many in the Pentagon are re- 
luctant to forswear "smart” mines, 
which are programmed to self-destruct 
after a few days and which, tacticians 
argue, can be useful in channeling en- 
emy forces. Bui mine opponents fear 
that any exceptions would weaken the 
chances of a worldw ide ban. 

Now the weight of opinion within 
the Clinton administration is shifting 
appropriately tow ard a ban, and tow ard 
the argument that most military func- 
tions assigned to mines can be assumed 


by other weapons and revised tactics. 
Ibis week the administration took a 
useful step toward abolishing land 
mines when it agreed to participate, 
beginning on Sept. Lina disarmament 
conference sponsored by Canada. 

This so-called Ottawa process is a 
voluntary, nonbinding, one-country- 
at-a-iime effort intended to build mo- 
mentum tow ard a mine-free world and 
to shame those nations that won’t at 
first participate. More than 100 coun- 
tries have signed on already. The 
United States has not yet promised to 
endorse full prohibition: it wants ex- 
ceptions for its forces in Korea and, 
less justifiably, for certain narrowly 
defined classes of weapon. But its 
agreement at least to enter the process 
represents a welcome sw itch. 

Meanwhile, the United States will 
rightly continue pressing in Geneva for 
a more formal, binding, verifiable 
treaty. This forum has the advantage of 
involving all nations — including ma- 
jor exporters such as Russia and China, 
which have shown no interest in the 
Ottawa declaration. Its reciprocal dis- 
advantage is that any single nation can 
slow or stymie progress. Movement in 
the Ottawa process can only help push 
Geneva along. The United States is 
right to pursue both tracks. 

— THE WASHiXGTOK POST 


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B INI CALAF. Menorca, Spain — 
The prospects for an Israeli-Pal- 
estinian peace are not fading, they are 
dead. At this point, it will take a 
whole new launch, at least as far-reach- 
ing as Oslo, to resascitaie them, and it 
will be harder than before because of 
the disillusion. 

The Israeli government and the Pal- 
estinian leadership made the Oslo 
breakthrough by themselves, under 
Norwegian auspices but without out- 
side intervention. Now it appears that 
The United States will have to provide 
the initiative, and h clearly is not yet 
prepared for that 

Before going to the Middle East, 
Secretary’ of State Madeleine Albright 
needs to make a fundamental assess- 
ment of where the two sides stand and 
their ultimate expectations, to reveal 
what if any common ground now ex- 
ists. It is no longer much use to focus on 
specifics — how many suspected ter- 
rorists Yasser Arafat's police must ar- 
rest, which road Palestinians may 
travel and when. 

Benjamin Netanyahu says he still 
wants peace, bur security must come 
first. So Mis. Albright should sit down 
with him and ask, then what? What is 
his long-term strategy? Just what kind 


By Flora Lewis 

of neighborly coexistence does he en- 
visage for the two societies, and how 
does he propose to achieve it? 

She should sit with Yasser Arafat and 
ask the same questions. What does self- 
government mean? What mutual con- 
straints are acceptable and enforceable? 

Who has the gift of peace in his 
bands to give? Who will be the prime 
beneficiary? To most people, the ob- 
vious answer is both sides. But to those 
who say it is the other side, peace means 
only a victory that is impossible to 
achieve and that the United States can- 
notguarantee no matter what it does. 

Tne time provided by the Oslo for- 
mula for incremental steps to build 
confidence for a final compromise has 
gone by. It has not brought any con- 
fidence. On the contrary, there is much 
less confidence than five years ago. But 
that does not mean dial plunging 
straight into "final negotiations'' on 
the most contested issues would bring 
any better results than edging up to 
them has done. 

Judging by his recent decisions. 
Prime Minister Netanyahu's plan for 
Palestinian self-government appears to 


be a disconnected set of enclaves on a 
minimum of territory which can be 
disrupted, surrounded, denied any 
chance of viability at the sole discretion 
of Israeli authority. 

He refuses to consider an independ- 
ent or even federated state, with Jordan, 
whatever the constraints on arms and 
security, which is the minimum defin- 
ition of peace for Palestinians. Oth- 
erwise, they quite reasonably consider 
themselves still to be living under oc- 
cupation even if the Israeli soldiers are 
only at town limits and notpa trolling or 
destroying houses anywhere they see 
fit within Palestinian areas, as they did 
before the start of autonomy. 

It is a mistake to focus on a suc- 
cession of individual knots in this ter- 
ribly tangled web of aspirations, fears 
and needs — now street-by-street rules 
for Hebron, now a list of prisoners — 
and to proclaim that “progress” is 
being made in the "peace process." It 
only distracts from a requisite clarity 
of purpose. 

It does not really matter whether the 
two suicide bombers of Jerusalem’s 
central market were living within the 
borders of mandated Palestine or in- 
filtrated from a Palestinian camp out- 
side. They represent an extremist 


danger which Israel cannot fully 'elim- 
inate among its own citizens as 
shown by the assassination < of Prune 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin or die Hebron 
massacre by the American-bom Israeli 
Baruch Goldstein. 

Fanatics are always a danger, and 
their societv needs incentives to isolate 
and defang them. Mr. Netanyahu is 
relying on fierce collective punishment 
to provide the incentive, but it won t 
work Such is the dialectic of guemila 

W \And then, what if Mrs. Albright puts 
the right questions and gets no forward- 
looking, usable answera. only more 

self-justifying polemics. At least the 
United States will know the reality with 
which it is dealing and stop stumbling 
along from disappointment to disap- 
pointment. , , 

The Unired States has guaranteed me 
survival of IsraeL It must and will stand 
by that. But the commitment implies a 
right to ask what kind of Israel, based 
on what intentions toward its neigh- 
bors, what is to be expected and what is 
the goal. If, after all the hopes, there is 
no current basis for achieving a peace- 
ful settlement, then U.S. policy must 
tflirrt that candidly into account. 

■ (£> Flora Lewis. 




if : 


The Dow Is Way Up, but American Democracy Is in Trouble 


W ASHINGTON — The 
Dow-Jones average has 
climbed above the 8,000 mark, 
and American unemployment 
has continued to hover around 5 
percent. But the income chasm 
between the rich and the non- 
rich is at its widest since the 
1920s. and the homeless pop- 
ulation is likely to grow because 
of unintended effects of the new 
welfare law. 

The crime rate is modestly 
down in several major Amer- 
ican cities. But the Lhuted 
States still has by far the highest 
crime rate and the largest in- 
carcerated population of any 
major democracy. 

Some social indicators are up 
— for instance, test scores of 
liigh school students in math 
and science. But more than half 
of New York public school 
third-graders who have English 
as their native language are nor 
reading at grade level. 

Only about a third of die spate 
of church-burnings have proved 
to be racially motivated But 
perhaps more than 100 racially 
motivated church burnings 
might be seen as too many. 

Possibly because of these and 
several other factors — dissem- 
bling at the White House by 
various presidents beginning 
with Lyndon Johnson, the rise 
of television as an atomizing 
and fragmenting force in so- 
ciety, various shocks to the 
political system starting with 


By Curtis Gans 


has been the largest and longest 
in the country's history. While 
affecting all classes, ages, in- 
comes and races, it has not been 
uniform. Since 1988 it has been 
heavily concentrated in the 
lower-income strata, and since 
1972 among the young. 

The participation rates of 
those with incomes under 
$15,000 declined by 20 percent 
in the period from 1990 to 1994. 
Most in this bracket are voting 
at a rate below 10 percent in 
midterm elections. 

The participation rates of 
young people aged 18 to 24 has 
fallen from a high of 42 percent 
in 1972 to below 30 percent in 
the most recent presidential 


election and 16 percent in the 
1994 elections. 

Tie gap between the partic- 
ipation rates of African-Amer- 
icans and whites, which had nar- 
rowed in the aftermath of the 
Voting Rights Act to just slightly 
more than five percentage points 
in 1984. widened again to more 
than 10 points in 1994. 

Faith in the major institutions 
of tiie polity — Congress, the 
press, the political parties, 
among others — hovers around 
a 60-year low, according to 
most public opinion polls. And 
partisan registration figures in 
the 24 stares that compel and 
compile such identification 
show a decline of 25 percent in 


Democratic registration in the 
past 30 years, a decline of 10 
percent in Republican registra- 
tion outside me South, and a 
more than 400 percent increase 
in third-party and independent 
registration in the same period. 

The danger to democracy in 
all of this should be evident. 

Because voting is a lowest- 
common-denominator political 
act — that is, people woo don’t 
vote tend not to participate' in 
any other societaUy useful ac- 
tivities — decline means both 
diminution of social capital and 
‘a polity increasingly dominated 
by the self-interested and the 
zealous. 

Without strong and publicly 
supported integrating institu- 
tions, coherent political debate 


and sound public policy be- 
come increasingly hostage to 
organized factions. . 

And while it is true, as Waiter 
Lippmann suggested, that the 
citizen's eyes glaze over when 
confronted with public policy 
detail, both the durability and 
the legitimacy of policy and 
leadership are threatened when 
only a third of the citizenry 
l. those who vote in midterm 
elections) or half f those who 
vote in presidential elections) 
participates in the shaping of 
tiie country's general direction. 

The writer directs rhe non- 
partisan Committee for the 
Study of the American Elector- 
ate.' He contributed this com- 
ment to The Washington Post. 


Sorry, Banning Land Mines Is Not a Good Idea 


B russels — S ome 26,000 

people a year are killed or 
maimed by leftover anti-per- 
sonnel land mines, the U.S. 
State Department estimates. 
Public pressure is mounting for 
a ban. It would be a mistake. 

A ban is unlikely to obtain 
universal agreement. It would 
be difficult to control and im- 
possible to enforce. It would 
bind only nations which, when 
they use mines, do so in an 
orderly and therefore not sub- 


By Frederick Bonnart 


political system starring with orderly and therefore not st 
Vietnam, the atrophying and sequently damaging fashion, 
misalignment of the major Confusion about the rnea 


political parties, and the in- 
creasingly execrable conduct of 
American campaigns — cit- 
izens have been turning away 
from politics for reasons that 
are anything but benign. 

Voter turnout, the minimal 
act of civic engagement, fell 
below 50 percent last year for 
the first time since 1924. The 
United States, if one counts 
both its presidential and mid- 
term elections, has the lowest 
participation rate of any ad- 
vanced democracy. 

The decline in participation 


uoniuston about me means 
to achieve desired nonviolence 
is not new. It was prevalent in 
the anti-nuclear campaign dur- 
ing the whole confrontation 
period with the Soviet llnion. 

It is not the weapon that is the 
root of the evil. The terrible 
damage inflicted on multitudes 
of human beings in places like 
Rwanda and Algeria with 
knives, sticks or stones shows 
the need for very different in- 
ternational arrangements. 

Lack of consensus at the 61- 
nation United Nations disarm- 
ament conference in Geneva re- 


sulted in an initiative by Canada 
for willing countries to sub- 
scribe to a ban on land mines. 
Overcoming previous reluc- 
tance. President Bill Clinton 
agreed on Tuesday to partic- 
ipate in the preparation of such a 
draft treaty, due to be intro- 
duced in Ottawa on Dec. 2. 

But the American side will 
attach several conditions, in 
particular the right to retain land 
mines on the Korean Peninsula 
and a strict verification regime, 
which do not satisfy others. 

Land mines are a highly ef- 
fective defensive weapon. They 
are light, easily transported and 
concealed; quickly laid and dif- 
ficult to detect. Covered by gun 
fire, they can create a formi- 
dable obstacle. 

Although modem warfare is 
increasingly mobile, positions 
would still have to be held in 
combat Mines provide a 
powerful means for troops to 
protect themselves rapidly. 

No major conflicts arc on the 
horizon, and mine fields have 


New York Has a Police Problem 


N EW YORK — Zachary 
Carter, a former judge 
and now the U.S. attorney tor 
the Eastern District of New 
York, which covers Brooklyn, 
is one of the most important 
figures in the swirl of inves- 
tigations and other initiatives 
that have followed the attack 
on Abner Louima in the 70th 
Precinct station house. 

Mr. Carter has begun a pre- 
liminary’ investigation to 
determine if (here is a pattern 
of abusive behavior by New 
York City police officers, and 
whether such behavior has 
been tolerated by the people 
who run the department. 
Referring to the Louima 
case, he said: "A lot of things 
come out of crisis and tragedy, 
and I think this event is one 
that is so extreme and so static 
that there cannot be any rea- 
sonable disagreement about its 
seriousness or the possibility 
that it might be a symptom of a 
problem that is not confined to 
this particular incident.’’ 

Mayor Rudolph Giuliani 
and Police Commissioner 
Howard Safirhave been tough 
in their response to the attack 
on Mr. Louima. And the cre- 
ation of a mayoral task force 
designed to lessen the hostility 
between police officers and 
local residents makes sense. 
But thus for, neither the mayor 
nor the police commissioner 
has been willing to publicly 
acknowledge what must be 
obvious to. ihem both: that 
there is a great deal of in- 
defensible brutality in the po- 
lice department. 


By Bob Herbert 


Each time I hear that the 
attack on Abner Louima was 
an aberration, I think of 
Carlton Brown, who was left 
paralyzed from the chest 
down after officers drove his 
head like a battering ram into 
the bulletproof glass doors at 
the entrance to Brooklyn's 
63d Precinct station house. 

I think of Lebert Folkes. 
who had to have a plate in- 
serted into his head to hold his 
eyeball in place after he was 
shot in the face at point-blank 
range for no apparent reason. 

I think of the parents of 
young people killed by brutal 
officers, the sense of utter des- 
olation that 1 have seen in the 
faces and the voices of moth- 
ers and fathers who have not 
yet learned to speak of their 
children in the past tense. 

I think of the individuals I 
have interviewed who no 
longer speak as clearly, or 
think as sharply, or walk as 
well as they did before en- 
countering a sadistic, brutal 
cop. Individuals who had 
done nothing wrong. 

Many voices have been 
raised against the use of ex- 
cessive force by the police, but 
for the most part they have 
been ignored. 

Amnesty International re- 
leased a study last year into 
allegations of “ill-treatment, 
deaths in custody and unjus- 
tified shootings" by New 
York City police officers. The 
authors were highly critical of 


the department and urged the 
city to conduct its own in- 
vestigation into ‘ ‘the extent to 
which police officers resort to 
excessive force amounting to 
torture or other cruel, inhuman 
and degrading treatment.” 

Mr. Safir criticized the re- 
port as “short on facts and 
long on hype.” Mr. Giuliani 
said it was a "scattershot re- 
port, not a real analysis." 

One of the reasons it has 
been so hard to stop police 
brutality is that it has been 
tolerated for so long by high- 
ranking officials, both in and 
out of the department, who 
refuse to see it as a cr iminal act 
committed by criminals. 

In an interview last week, 
Mr. Safir said he had recently 
begun a program in which all 
cops who are the subject of 
more than three excessive- 
force complaints are mon- 
itored to determine if they 
should be taken off the street. 
And both he and the mayor 
indicated that stronger anti- 
brutality steps are to come.- 

We will see. Meanwhile, 
there remains the quiet pres- 
ence of Zachary Carter. He 
said he had received the full 
cooperation of the police de- 
portment and he expects that to 
continue. His office is fielding 
complaints and gathering data 
from a variety of sources. 

But he is not likely to be 
heard from for awhile. That’s 
the way he operates. He is not 
drawn to the spotlight. All he is 
interested in is a thorough and 
complete and honest inquiry. 

The New York Tunes. 


no application in peacekeeping 
operations. But nations still 
spend a significant part of an- 
nual income on defease, for 
which they continue to acquire 
lethal equipment. It would be 
illogical to exclude land mines. 

In addition to the former bat- 
tlefields where their widespread 
use now causes such spectac- 
ular damage to innocent by- 
standers. they were laid in more 
recent conflicts — in Bosnia, in 
die Gulf War, in the Falklands. 

Unlike nuclear, chemical or 
biological weapons, which re- 
quire scientific and technical 
knowledge and capabilities, as 
well as large-scale manufactur- 
ing and storage facilities, basic 
Land mines are easy and cheap 
to manufacture. Regardless of 
any ban, rogue regimes or ir- 
regular forces will always ac- 
quire and use them if they feel 
they need them. 

■ Regular forces of law-abid- 
ing nations bound by a treaty 
would be deprived of them. So 
it is not surprising tbar military 
establishments responsible for 
die defense of such countries 
advocate their retention. As a 
result, it may not be possible to 
obtain an agreed treaty. 

Another, more limited objec- 
tive would be achievable. Re- 
cords can be made easily and 
quickly of mines laid while an 
operation is in progress; die 
mines can be Lifted- shortly 
thereafter. This is normal prac- 
tice in regular forces, since such 
mines left behind create a 
danger to their own troops. It 
would also be in the interest of 
less organized elements, and 
could therefore become univer- 
sally accepted practice. 

Prompt mine clearance could 
be enforced by the victors in any 
conflict. A tragic omission was 


made at die conclusion of the 
Golf War. The cease-fire 
; should have been made con- 
ditional on Iraqi forces clearing 
their own mine fields in Kuwait 
as well as in their country. 

All nations could commit 
themselves to die provision of 
records of mines laid, and to 
their removal immediately after 
use. Similarly, they could agree 
to a prohibition on their sale or 
transfer; mines ' economic value 
is minimal, and considerable 
stigma would result from public 
exposure of transgressions. 

Consensus could be obtained 
for elimination of the most dan- 
gerous system, the equipment 
for indiscriminate mechanical 
scattering of large quantities of 
undetectable plastic mines. 
Such commitments are in the 
interest of ail, and should there- 
fore be readily acceptable. 

This solution is not ideal, but £*n 
it is realistic. It would consid- ^ 
erably reduce, and perhaps 
eliminate, the subsequent con- 
sequences of which so many 
tragic examples have recently 
been in evidence. Such a treaty 
could excel not only in its easier 
international acceptance but 
also in the universal adherence 
to its provisions. 

In other spheres and on other . 
platforms, more intensive ac- 
tion needs to be undertaken to 
ensure that the requirement to 
deploy such weapons is per- 
manently eliminated. It means 
the inhibition by whatever 
means are available of armed 
conflict between groups of hu- ^ 
man beings — but that is not the 
subject of this article. 

The writer is editorial direc- 
tor of -NATO 'S Sixteen Nations, 
an independent military jour- 
nal. He contributed this com- 
ment to rhe International Her- 
ald Tribune. 





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IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1897: Wild Wheat homer earlier in the game. Bu 


NEW YORK — The wild spec- 
ulation in wheat continues. The 
rise is ostensibly based on higher 
prices in Liverpool and an al- 
leged sbortage in spring-grown 


homer earlier in die game. Bur 
two homers in a day! It was too 
much to ask. However, the Babe 
complied with the entreaties of 
die rooters and obligingly lifted 
the ball over the fence. Thus the 
Yanks dug their spurs more. 


A powerful pool of Wall finnly mI o“,he fet pl^ 

Street and Chicago operators is ^ > 

now bulling the September op- t , . 

tion, which carries the whole * * JCWlSn Anger 
market with it Europe is being JERUSAI FM Rrito - ^ 
flooded with cables reporting 1 cSon = s de ' 

short crop in the NorMfet idtoesbadcS rv!L Exodus 
marker and it is suspected that receded !Sfh was 

the Liverpool market! rigged “v T am 
by the clique from this sidef^ 

1922: Babe's Save “S'S 

NEW YORK — While the 

crowd at the Polo Grounds was limited to ** 

resigning itself to seeing the Already HaSna^ L^ nthly - 

Yanks lc»e yesterday afternoon defenJ oroSJL* . Jt : wis * 


ball stories, stepped to the plate the remnant of ^nging ' 
in Pic ninth inning wilh two our to Palestine ,ewrv 

and two on base. He bad hi. a gandl^Brifeh g** * 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. AUGUST 22, 1997 


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PAGE 9 


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ili Ick < 


OPINION/LETTERS 


It s Time for Congress 
To Think About Work 

By E.J. Dionne Jr. 

A. Orient J 22 ond ? T* faU-tirae job, and of the hard 

iSmKtaSftfiES"* r° fk * ey had done *« «* 

?[ ob ?“ P>*4<iby very humi voices. 




VIEYE REALLY 
GPT THIS THINS 
-.MOVING! 


Let’s Measure the Garage to See 
If a i Need 9 Would Overfill It 


By Richard Ford 


■ HINOOK, Montana — Last week. I for a 


wants to be perceived as only excessively 
practical. And it is not so far from there to the 
rationale — ideal for the excessively acquis- 
itive — that being able to transport whatever 


few moments found myself hunkered you own becomes the best excuse for owning 


more immediate to the lives 
°/ m ° re Americans. What are 
; they? Here is a clue: the 
.United Parcel Service strike 
and the reasons it captured so 
much attention. 

The strike was the most im- 
port 3 ™ labor battle since 
President Ronald Reagan 
took on the air traffic con- 
trollers in 1981. but with a 
very different result and les- 
son. This time the public was 
clearly on labor's side. And 
this time labor not only sur- 
vived but did well. 

The union drove home a 


As Greg Tarpinian of the 
pro-union Labor Research 
Association told The New 
York Times, the Teamsters 
“used the part-time issue to 
communicate with the gen- 
eral public, which is feeling 
insecure about their jobs." 

For labor, the strike was 
important because it gave 
dramatic {and televised) ev- 
idence that in a time of eco- 
nomic change, unions can 
give employees some voice 
on issues tbai matter: pan- 
time work, pensions and 
health coverage. It involved 



7^ •» ' 



About 60 percent of the economy’s growing ser- 
UPS jobs are part-time, and vice sector, not the old and 


.the base pay for the workers 
■in them, S8 an hour, had not 
;gone up since 1982. More 
than 80 percent of the jobs the 
'company created in recent 
years are part-time. 

The point is not that UPS is 
a bad company. In labor 
terms, it is better than many. It 
pays its top end workers quite 
well. The union message res- 
onated anyway. 

The union's public rela- 
tions effort worked not be- 
cause of slick advertising, but 
because it was easy to identify 
’with rank-and-filers who 
spoke of their yearning for a 


traditionally unionized man- 
ufacturing sector. And the 
strike went on long enough to 
make its point, but not so long 
as to arouse public hostility. 

But even if this strike Gives 
labor new openings, the' fact 
remains that only one private 
sector worker in iOhasaunion 
card. The widening income 
disparities between skilled 
and unskilled workers, under- 
scored by the UPS strike, are a 
problem across the economy. 
Here is where Congress could 
do some thinking. 

It might start with the 
thoughts offered here by Dav- 


id Ellwood to the Aspen In- 
stitute's Domestic Strategy 
Group. It is often said thar 
government cannot do much 
that would be effective for 
low-wage workers. Not so. 
says Mr. .Ellwood. who is a 
Harvard professor and a 
former assistant secretary of 
Health and Human Services. 

He points to four areas 
where action is possible: 
policies to ensure “a living 
wage," to “increase job 
availability.” to improve 
“long-run .opportunities” 


ilies are also being helped by 
the increase in the minimum 
wage. Mr. Ellwood asks how 
far such policies can be 
pushed without running into 
economic problems. ' He 
would also find ways to ex- 
pand health and child care 
benefits for low-paid and 
part-time workers. 

He says we need to take a 
new look at how trade and 
immigration policies affect 
workers at the low end. and at 
whether payroll tax cuts might 
spur job creation and increase 


~ HJj [iu^ down on the grimy concrete floor of my garage 

1 1 Ski a tape measure, calibrating the distance 

yl from the back cinderblock wall to the wooden 
. VSJWJ sliding door, all for the sole purpose of de- 
fjg termining if an enormous, 1 8-ana-a-half-foot 

§p ■ i* (5.64-meter) Chevrolet Suburban might ac- 

J | i ■ tually fit inside in such a way that I could get 
the Jtoor closed. If, in more consequential 

Earlier that morning I'd passed by my 

|^g|3BEE^55* friend Ned's place of business, B&N Motors 

— though only in the harmless way Amer- 
mmmm j cans frequently do. I was window shopping 

people with “capital ac- MEANWHILE 

counts for spending on edu- 

cation or training, to be repaid — seeking innocent pleasure from pointless 
later in life. speculation about some sort of commercial 

He also asks whether busi- offering. (I understand this as a form of ab- 


and to encourage "shared re- . bike-home pay. 


wards and shared burdens" in 
the new economy. 

Some things are already 
being done, such as the 
earned income tax credit, 
which uses the tax system to 
get money to lower-income 
working families. Those fam- 


His recipes for enhancing 
opportunities should appeal 
to a president and a Congress 
that claim great interest in 
education. 

Mr. EU wood's intriguing 
ideas include youth entitle- 
ment grams to provide young 


later in life. 

He also asks whether busi- 
ness. government and worker 
groups might cooperate in cre- 
ating “career ladders" for 
those currently in dead-end 
jobs. Working at McDonald’s 
should be a first step toward 
something better. As for 
spreading this economy's new 
bounty more widely, he pro- 
poses, among other things, that 
profit sharing be expanded. 

Mr. Ellwood does not pre- 
tend to provide a definitive set 
of answers. He is suggesting 
that government, often in co- 
operation with business, could 


stract thinking made concrete.) 

For the past year. I’ve been mulling the 
purchase of a used pickup — for burning 
purposes, something suitable for off-road, 
where I often go. Nothing fancy. Yet Ned 
remembered that I’d once exhibited talking 
interest in a Suburban. So last Tuesday he 
walked me outside into the warm, flapping 
breeze to show' me a used Suburban on ms lot 
alongside U.S. Highway 2. 

And by dint of one thing leading to another, 
it had become his view that not only was this 
'94 pale-blue-and-white Suburban’ with the 
original plastic shrink-wrap still encasing the 
luggage compartment a good buy at plus or 
minus $22,000. but also that this vehicle was 


do more than it is doing to the very one I ‘ ‘needed. ’ ’ 


grapple with the problems that 
the UPS strike brought home. 

The Washington Past. 


something even more difficult to transport — 
several sets of bag pipes, for instance, or a pair 
of blooded Scottish deerhounds. 

Of course, this analysis does not apply to 
the rich, who can own 20 such oul-of-all- 
proportion vehicles, or 20 of anything else 
they please, and not have it mean something. 

I remember, when I was a boy in Arkansas, 
being taken by my grandfather ro Winrhrqp 
Rockefeller’s farm on Mount Petit Jean 
and standing in a hoi barnyard until Gover- 
nor Rockefeller himself drove up in a purple, 
dust-caked, brand-new Cadillac Coupe 
DeVille. which he happily referred to as nis 
“Jeep" — i.e. his practical car. The rich are 
different from you and me, if only because 
they have less to answer for. 

In these days of millennial anxiety, it may 
be hard for those of us who aren’t yet rich to 
know what we really want, as opposed to what 
we actually need, or as opposed to what the 
strenuous forces outside ourselves — societal 
forces, “the culture." my friend Ned — need 
us to want. 

As things currently stand in my life, I have 
no plans to haul around eight-roan construc- 
tion crews: nor am 1, a childless fellow, ever 
going to be father of a rough V nimble brood 
of six-footers in need of spread-out room. 

I do not delight in getting 14 miles per 
gallon on the road. I don’t wish to generate 
even dirtier emissions than I generate in my 
'94 Lincoln Continental. And I’m not 
heartened to know that in case of an accident, 
a Suburban is likely to inflict more damage on 
a lighter vehicle than that vehicle can hope to 


It was after this impromptu assessment of inflict on me and mine. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


my need that I went home to my garage and 
tape measure. I can. of course, cut well beyond 
the chase here. I did not buy the big blue 
Suburban that Ned felt fairly certain I needed. 
It would not fit inside my garage. (I'm not at 


Plus, my wife hates Suburbans; they seem 
patently Republican in character. They offer 
optional equipment that embarrasses me (a 
separate rear-seat air-conditioner). 

I read not long ago that an automotive 


all sure if I even wanted it to or noL) Bur ar manufacturers' spokesman said it was 


The Kerameikos She Refugees in Canada 

Regarding the Aug. 12 re- Regarding the Aug. U re- 
port " Archaeologists Shudder port “ Canada Tries to Balance 


at Athens Metro Project": 

As field director of the Ker- 
ameikos excavation. I would 
like to comment on a few 
points. 

The Kerameikos site is full 
of grave precincts of noble 
Athenian families of the clas- 


Inmignmts and Liberties " ; 

The implicit suggestion 
that Canada may be harboring 
large numbers of potential ter- 
rorists cannot be supported. 

Of the hundreds of thou- 
sands of refugees Canada has 


essentially in the same pos- 
ition — stalled and handi- 
capped by the absence of a 
proactive U.S. policy to bury 
the past and forge normal re- 
lations. There has been pro- 
gress, but ar the rate of move- 
ment it could be several more 
years before complete nor- 
malization is achieved. 

Vietnam is not a perfect 


sical period, surrounded by decades, the vast majority are 
their original walls. Nowhere law-abiding and making their 
else can the history and de- best efforts to manage in their 
velopment of a Greek new homeland. 


accepted in the last couple of place, but it is a vibrant and 
decades, the vast majority are exciting country, inexorably 


'cemetery be studied so easily. 

For their protection, many 
sculptures have been trans- 
ferred from the site to the Ker- 
'ameikos Museum, but not all. 
Remaining originals are the 
•famous bull from the precinct 
’of Dionysios from Kollyios 
and the marble relief showing 
■Demetria and Pamphiie. 

Apart from the sculptures, 
all stelae standing on the site, 
with inscriptions of utmost im- 
portance, are original. 

Excavations brought to 
light a major part of the de- 
fensive system of Athens cre- 
ated in the fifth century B.C. 
■with the city walls, two gates, 
. private houses and workshops. 
■All this needs to be protected 
so that future generations, just 
like ourselves, can profit from 
'Greek history: 

What we fear for the Ker- 
ameikos site has happened at 
other places in Athens during 
'Metro runnel woiks. In May 
1996, part of the Third Cen- 
TUTy A.D. city wall situated in 
the National Park collapsed 
while a runnel was being 
built. In September 1996, 
around above the tunnel in 
Nikis Street next to Syntagma 
Square collapsed. 

JUTTA STROSZECK. 

Athens. 


The fact that many refugees 
may hold political beliefs in 
opposition to the government 
in their country of origin is not 
surprising. A “well-founded 
fear of persecution for reasons 
of political opinion' 1 is a 
ground for granting refugee 
status under the 1951 Con- 
vention Relating to the Status 
of Refugees. 

Those who wish to .take 
their political beliefs and act- 
ivism into the realm of crim- 
inal activity or terrorism will, 
if the system works, be iden- 
tified and dealt with under the 
relevant laws. Such are the 
challenges of maintaining the 
civil liberties of all persons in 
our form of democracy. 

BRIAN GORL1CK. 

New Delhi. 

The U.S. and Vietnam 


linked to the United States. It 
is deserving of a normal re- 
lationship with the United 
States. 

The appointment of .Am- 
bassador Pete Peterson, a 
former prisoner of war. 
should set an example of for- 
giveness for all Americans. 
MLA maners are being settled 
by the Joint Task Force. The 
search should continue. 

Establishing a normal trad- 
ing relationship will go a long 
way toward putting behind us 
the wounds of war. A waiver 
of the Jackson- Vanik amend- 
ment to allow U.S. companies 
to compere for market share is 
a good beginning. In parallel. 
U.S. trade negotiators can 
continue their mission to 
reach a fair and equitable trade 
agreement with Vietnam. 
This should not be rushed. 

hi the meantime, let us take 
other steps to move the re- 
lationship forward. This will 
be in the interests of both 


The recognition by Con- Mr. Glassman's slash and 
gress of the need ro index the bum approach to government 
foreign-earned income exclu- ignores society’s need for re- 
sion ro inflation is great news sponsible governance to 
and the move is long overdue, provide for those unable to 
The Association of Americ- share in wealth and oppor- 
ans Resident Overseas has (unities, to protect die corn- 
worked for years trying to monweal and to promote na- 
convince Congress of the in- tional prosperity, 
equity of double taxation. Clearly, the writer’s view 

In fact, if the $70,000 ex- is Washington-warped. Na- 
clusion had been indexed tional government engenders 
when it was first set, more than outrage, not yawns. Americ - 
a decade ago. it would now be ans are fuming about the 
$ 1 00.000. Raising it gradually political rot in the capital and 
to $80,000 is a partial remedy the infestation of those profit- 
for this discrimination against ing from it. 

.Americans overseas. But it is JOHN OTRANTO, 

nou as you call it in your bead- Munich, 

line, a “tax break." 

GREGORY GOOD. JOHN “ 

DAVIDSON. STEPHANIE 
SLMONARD. ROBERTA 
BEARDSLEY. 

Suresnes. France BAUHAUS: 

The writers arc members of Crucible of Modernism 


6,000 pounds (2,700 kilograms) unloaded, if 
it h'ad fit, it might also have broken through the 
garage-floor concrete and pulled my whole 


4 ‘comforting perspective’ ’ (and agood selling 
point) that eventually, by driving these be- 
hemoths on wheels, we will all be able to get 


house, me included, in on top of ir. 1 suppose I into car crashes and nor even feel iL Which is 


got lucky not to need iL 

Yet since last week. I’ve been wondering 
exactly what one wants (or needs) when one 
desires or owns a massive sport utility vehicle 
of this sort. 

On the one hand, to own one is, for a normal 
person, an unmistakable gesture reflecting a 
particular kind of human excess. 

A Suburban, at 145.9 cubic feet (4. 13 cubic 
meters ) of raw cargo room, no matter how it’s 
fitted oul virtually shouts: “Hey, I’m too big, 
but I’m real practical! I’m able to do 
everything for you that your snazzy BMW 
won't. Or can't. Hold this. Tow that. Ford 
whatever stream you choose.” 

A Suburban is for an excessive person who 


good, I guess: practicality and need expressed 
as insulation from hands-on experience. 

The flip side of this species of millennial 
angst, I suppose, is dramatized in die novel 
“Crash,” in which the characters all want to 
get into collisions, and enjoy it when they do. 

Finally, it may be just the nature of the 
millennial moment not to know the difference 
between want and need, not to know, when 
great forces collide, if we’d rather feel the 
shock or not. 

' The writer is author of the short story 
collection " Women With Men ” and the novel 
”, Independence Day." He contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


In 1995, at die opening of countries and will help us 
the U.S. Embassy in Hanoi, move toward a future of 


the American business com- 
munity was heartened to hear 
from Secretary of State War- 
ren Christopher that econom- 
ic normalization was “just 
around the comer." Two 
years on, and billions of dol- 
lars of lost contracts later, 
most in the American business 
community find themselves 


shared interests in regional 
prosperity and stability. 

GREIG CRAFT. 
Hanoi. 


A Partial Remedy 

Regarding "Americans 
Abroad to Get a Tax Break" 
(July 31): 


the board of the Association 
of Americans Resident Ox er- 
seas. 

Children at Risk 

“Germany's roads are the 
deadliest in Western Europe 
for children.’’ according to a 
Travel Update item in your 
Aug. 15 issue. At the risk of 
seeming an apologist for Ger- 
man motorists: Young chil- 
dren in Germany are out of 
school by noon. Many roam 
the streets on bicycles. Other 
countries keep their children 
longer in the safety of the 
classroom. 

KARLRAAB. 

Strasbourg. 

Just Make It Good 

Regarding " Heartland to 
Washington. You Just Don't 
Matter f Opinion . July 30). 
bv James K. Glassman: 


BOOKS 

BAUHAUS: however, with the an the Bauhaus pro- 

Crucible of Modernism doccd-Raiher she focuses on Ac poUdcaJ 

turbulence unleashed by Gropius s uto- 
By Elaine S. Hochman. Illustrated. 371 pjan ideas. Her emphasis is apt. Unlike 
pages. $29.95. Fromm International. the International Style derived from its 

o j u . tt„_] „ xa. formative ideas, the Bauhaus was com- 

Reviewed by Herbert Muschamp mined as firmly to social as to aesthetic 

E LAINE S. HOCHMAN'S great reform. Or. more accurately, Gropius re- 
theme is the fragility of the liberal garded the two as indivisible. He had 
imagination. In two fine books, Hocb- other things, on his mind than well-de- 
man has examined this subject through signed chairs and teapots, handsome as 
the lens of modem German architecture, many of those objects turned out to be. 
Her 4 4 Architects of Fortune,” published His goal was to transform modem life, 
in 1989, cast a glaring light on Ludwig Gropius’s contemporaries were no 
Mies van der Rohe's attempts to cut deals more comfortable with the idea of polit- 
with the culture czars of the Third Reich, ical art than many people are today. A 
In her new book, “Bauhaus: Crucible of popular “come to the cabaret” myth 
Modernism,” Hochman chronicles the holds that Weimar Germany was a 
fluctuating political fortunes of the cen- golden age of creative freedom that 
rury’s most influential art school. ended only when the Nazis stormed into 

Founded ia 1919 by the architect Wal- power. The truth is that the era’s artistic 
ter Gropius, the Bauhaus was originally flowering took place amid opposition 
based in Weimar, and later in Dessau, that makes our culture wars look like the 
The school operated for only 14 years, Pepsi Challenge, 
its life span corresponding precisely to Based on the precedent of the British 

that of the Weimar Republic. Like the Arts and Crafts movement, the Bauhaus 
theater of Brecht or the drawings of promoted itself as a model vehicle for 


CROSSWORD 


George Grosz, the Bauhaus came to 
stand for the Weimar period’s heady 
creative ferment. 

Bauhaus roll call! Count off now! Paul 
Klee! Lyonel Feininger! Oskar Schletn- 
mer! Wassily Kandinsky! Ludwig Mies 
van der Robe! Marcel Breuer! Theo van 
Doesburg! Josef Albers! Laszlo Mo- 


educational reform. To us, this objective 
may seem unexceptionably benign. In 
Weimar Germany, it was a red flag. 


uments the efforts of government of- 
ficials to intervene in the school 's policies 
and describes die intricate ruses Gropius 
devised to forestall and placate them. 

She also details the constant uproars 
within the school itself. Kandinsky and 
other artists opposed Gropius’s plans to 
market the products of the school’s 
workshops. Students and faculty mem- 
bers fought over the profits from these 
sales. Campaigns were waged against 
designers like van Doesburg, who pre- 
ferred abstraction to technology. Student 
newsletters ridiculed Gropius's denials 
that he was creating a Bauhaus style. 

It's chilling, of course, to follow this 
account of idealistic artists, knowing the 
fate that awaits them: In April 1933, 
three months after Hitler became chan- 
cellor, the Gestapo moved in and shut 
the school down. 

W HAT is the legacy of the Bauhaus 
today? Hochman ’s only major 
stumble occurs ar the end of die book, 
when she tries to answer this question. 
Somewhat lamely, she praises Richard 
Meier and Frank Gehry for "continuing 
to refine, re-examine and reinterpret the 
modernism the Bauhaus came to exem- 


So, too, the school’s machine aes- 
thetic was unmistakably a symbolic ex- 


ACROSS 

. i Telepathy and 
clairvoyance, 

e.g. 

s Diamond 
M.V.P., 19B0-61 

io “Star Trek" 
regular Waller 


12 Courtroom alibi, 
perhaps 

i« Issuing, as from 
a source 

is “A Christmas 
Story* co-star 
Dillon 


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holy-Nagy! These are just a few of the pression of solidarity with industrial 


eminent artists who taught, not always 
happily or for long, at the schooL 

Painters like Kandinsky and Klee 
were second-rate citizens here. Though 
the school’s predecessor institution, die 
Weimar Art Academy, was known for 
training in the fine arts, under Gropius 
the school shifted its focus to archi- 
tecture, the applied aits, and crafts. In the 
workshops and studios of Gropius, Mies 
van der Rohe, Breuer, Mart Stam and 
Marianne Brandt, the school developed 
the refined, machine-age aesthetic with 
which it became synonymous. 

Hoc hman is not primarily concerned. 


Bauhaus from formalist preoccupations, 
to find its author limiting the school's 
contribution to matters of form. 

If Gropius left one enduring idea, it is 
workers. The very notion of transform- that artists should not distance them- 
ing an academy of fine arts into a crafts selves from their times. They should 
school was an' act of social leveling. It leap into die fray and see what good they 
was recognized and resented as such. can accomplish there. 

To paraphrase Gropius, modem Apol- 

H OCHMAN’S account is factual, not los want to make it in the marketplace; 

essayistic. She is better than Joseph An artist’s integrity stands to be 
McCarthy at pinning down the exact strengthened, not compromised, by 
number of Bauhaus students who be- reckoning with the social reality. This 
longed to die school's Communist cell belief may be every bit as utopian as the 
(IS, about 10 percent of the student socialist dream of remaking the world 
body); she examined the banners they through art. And why not? 

de sign ed for street demonstrations, and — 

records Gropius’s ambivalent feelings to- Herbert Muschamp is on the staff of 

ward their political activities. She doc- The New York Times. 


belief may be every bit as utopian as the 
socialist dream of remaking the world 
through art. And why not? 

Herbert Muschamp is on the staff of 
The New York Times. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


Padi ay mnk Longa 

©New York Tunes/Edited by Will Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of Aug. 21 


BOBS DEO QHSnQQ 

bbob asa sanasg 
aEBonomo ornaona 
Ban moBsasnBQQQ 
BDB DEO DBOS 
bbob nmaaa anan 
BunnEE BBsa asa 
BnaEH amn ssaan 
bob sana asoaso 

BBBQ DQBHCL 0003 
U3BC3B QOO HBE 
QBOEnEanaos aaa 
bqdcjeb onQBaama 

HOBOBB OBB QBQB 
nHOEBB EBB BBEJB 


The prog rams can be asked When Q Plus defended, the 
post-mortem questions: lead was the spade deuce. 

What would you have done Dummy played low and East 
if ...?” Q Plus was given a hand 


At the American Contract 
Bridge League’s Summer 
Nationals in Albuquerque, 

New Mexico, computers 
were tested against human 
opponents and one another, ponent had played low, it said 
There were three programs it would have played the ace 
from the Unitea States: and finessed on the way back. 
Bridge Baron 7; Meadowlark On the diagramed deal 
Bridge, and GIB, together from the Imp Pairs, Q Plus 
with Micro Bridge S from Ja- and GEB both reached three 
pan and Q Plus Bridge from no-trump. In defense. GIB 
Germany. Q Plus, designed played passively, leading a 
by Johannes Leber, defeated heart and continuing the suit 


if...?”QPluswasgivenahand made an expert play: the 
involving the suit combination spade six. The contract was 
A-3-2 in the dummy with K-J- now unmakeable, for the de- 
10 in the closed hand. Ir made fense took three spades, a dia- 
the correct play of the jack and mood and a club. 


NORTH 

*J95 

P7fiJ 

4K94 

IAQ104 


persuaded a human to cover 


reasoning behind 


with the queen. Asked what it East’s third-hand-low play is 
would have done if the op- advanced. West can be as- 


WEST 
4 A 104 2 
985 
08785 
*873 


the others in an Imp Pairs 
contest, but lost a final play- 
off to Tom Throop’s Bridge 
Baron'7 by 20 imps. 


after winning the diamond 


sumed to have a four-card 
suit, and South must have at 
least one top honor. Without 
one, he could not have 
enough strength for his open- 
ing. U Sooth has a doubleton 
king, the low play is essential. 
If South has a doubleton ace it 
will make no difference. In 
that case, it must be ace-eight; 


EAST 

4Q783 

9J10&4 

0A2 

4K62 


ace. Q Plus took three tricks in with another doubleton ace, 
hearts, diamonds and clubs to the nine would have been 


SOUTH (D) 

+ K8 
9AKQ2 
4 Q J 10 3 
4 J94 

North and South were vulnerable. 
The bidding: 

South Vest North East 
1 N.T. Pass 3 N.T. Pass 
Pass Pass 


make three no-trump. 


played from the dummy. 


West led die spade two. 




international herald TRIBUNE 
FRIDAY. AUGUST 22, 1997 




Moscow Cleans Up Its Act 

850th Anniversary Includes $50 Million Face-Lift 



their first 


By Alessandra Stanley 

Vi ii Kirfr Timet Sen itr 

oscow — 

Visitors are of- 
ten pleasantly 
surprised by 
jlimpse of down- 
town Moscow. Outer districts 
are still dehumanized by 
huge, bleak concrete high- 
rise apartments that epitom- 
ize Soviet planning. But the 
city center is a latticework of 
curving, narrow streets, pas- 
tel I sTh- and 1 9th-cenrurv 
mansions, stately museums, 
gold-domed Russian Ortho- 
dox churches and, starting in 
the lust few years, gleaming, 
modern offices. 

There are parks, fountains, 
tree-lined boulevards and the 
always startling St. Basil’s 
Cathedral on Red Square, that 
madly colorful. Byzantine 
swirl' of onion domes and 
towers that instantly gives 
visitors a giddy feeling that 
Western civilization ends here. And this 
fall, downtown Moscow will have even 
more to offer. The Russian capital cel- 
ebrates its 850th anniversary in Septem- 
ber with a three-day orgy of concerts, 
television specials, black-tie galas, 
parades, fireworks, regattas, folk fes- 
tivals. sports events and street fairs that 
promises to combine capitalist excess 
with some of the regimented boosrerism 
of the 1 980 Moscow Olympics. 

Creating Moscowland 

The city’s popular, iron-willed may- 
or. Yuri Luzhkov, wants to show Rus- 
sians and the world that he can create 
Western-style prosperity, with a fillip of 
old-fashioned Soviet order and discip- 
line. Over the past 18 months, the capital 
has been sandblasted, scrubbed, re- 
paved. repainted, replanted and rebuilt 
to sparkle like a shining theme park 
rcinvemion of itself — Moscowland. 

By Sept. 5. prostitutes, drunks, beg- 
gars and other undesirables w ill have 
been dragged off subways and street 
comers and deported beyond the city- 
limits. So far this year, crime is down 20 
percent, and Luzhkov has bullied all 
shop owners in the city center to clean 
their storefronts and put up red. blue and 
white anniversary displays. Cleaning 
crews will be scrubbing cement pave- 
ments until they sparkle. To show he can 
even browbeat nature. Luzhkov has 
ordered that on each day of the an- 
niversary. special military planes seed 



Gtef Knunbn In Tin 


The gilded Russian coat of arms makes a comeback. 

the clouds above Moscow to avert rain. 

Even with all the special anniversary 
events, the real windfall for foreign 
tourists is a chance to see the city after a 
S30 million face-lift. 

Those who hare crowds and un- 
friendly police officers telling them to 
move along may prefer to wait to take 
the city’s pulse until after the closing 
ceremony on SepL 7. By then, tourists 
will be able to stroll through the Kremlin 
gardens and see fountains gushing, 
flower beds packed with gladiolus and 
roses, and pathways swept of the usual 
litter and bottle shards. 

The opulent, neo-classical facade of 
the Bolshoi has been restored: the soar- 
ing Christ the Savior Cathedral, razed 
by Stalin in 1931, has been rebuilt, as 
have the Resurrection Gates, the czars’ 
ceremonial entryway to Red Square. 

The Tretyakov .Art Gallery, closed for 
seven years for repairs, reopened two 
years ago with marble floors, a museum 
shop and a cafeteria as well as a vasr 
collection of Russian an. from medieval 
icons to 19th-century portraits. 




ISTORY is the celebration’s 
main theme, but the artistic leg- 
acy of the writers Anton Chek- 
hov- and' Alexander Pushkin, the 
grandeur of the czars and the glory of the 
Russian Orthodox Church will take pre- 
cedence over the more recent past. 

Most of the obvious symbols of So- 
viet power, the grandiose monuments to 
Lenui and Marx, have been pulled 



Mariltex 







down. (Though not all: In the 
middle of Oktyabrskaya 
Square, a looming statue of 
Lenin still glares accusingly 
at the future — in this case, a 
neon-lit American diner 
nestled in a prime location at 
hisfeeL) 

The Cold War atmosphere 
of fear has dried up now- and, 
particularly during the an- 
niversary. Russia's totalitar- 
ian past w-ill be airb rushed out 
of promotional brochures. 
For those curious about what 
life W3S like behind the Iron 
Curtain, Lenin’s Tomb in Red 
Square is the simplest way to 
experience a frisson. 

insidi TH1 TOMB Russians 
no longer line up for hours in 
front of the mausoleum to pay 
their respects to the father of 
the Bolshevik Revolution. 
Fierce-looking honor guards 
no longer goose-step in front 
of the tomb. But tourists are 
still escorted single file 
through the huge granite mausoleum 
into the room where Lenin's body lies, 
embalmed with a concoction that re- 
mains a state secret Cameras are con- 
fiscated at the door. Visitors are for- 
bidden to speak — guards angrily hush 
even a whispered comment. Inside the 
glowing, red- lighted room, the sight of 
■Lenin m a glass case is aw esome and 
somew-har grotesque. 

A key factor in the collapse of com- 
munism sits right across Red Square in 
die sprawling 19th-century department 
store GUM. which after 70 years of neg- 
lect is now- bustling with shoppers in a 
Gaieties Lafayette store, an Estee Lauder 
boutique and other pavilions of the bour- 
geois decadence that the Bolsheviks were 
singularly unable to rout. 

By September, a vast underground 
shopping and office complex beneath 
Manezh Square, next to the Kremlin, is 
expected to open as a testament to the 
new' Russian wealth. So is the fancy new 
Ameri can-style Marriott Grand, a' 390- 
room hotel. It is managed by Marriott, but 
owned by Russian companies. Like the 
other nine luxury' hotels in the capital, it is 
not cheap: Rooms start at S300 a night. 

Bur there is more to modem Moscow 
than mammon. The city has more than 
400 churches. -One of the most inter- 
esting is Novodevichy. next to a small, 
lovely park on the Moscow River. Foun- 
ded as a convent in the early 16th cen- 
tury. Novodevichy was partly modeled 
on the Kremlin, and its fortified walls, 
crenellated towers and gold cupolas 
lend it an exotic look — spiritual and 
menacing at the same time. 

The grounds include a cemetery 
where many famous Russians are bur- 
ied. The graves of Chekhov, the w riter 
Mikhail Bulgakov. Stalin's unfonunate 
second wife Nadezhda Alliluyeva, and 
Nikita Khrushchev — who was re- 
moved in a coup and denied a burial on 
Red Square — can be visited. 

But the park, which curves pleasantly 
around a large green pond, is d haven 
from history, a place where generations 
of ordinary 7 Russians have spent their 
Sundays walking their dogs or playing 
with their children. Foreign correspon- 
dents would sometimes meet dissidents 
there, hoping that the trees were not 
bugged. Now, the paths have been taken 
over by joggers and men sipping their 
vodka in the fresh air. 


W "'V ■ 

.u— J 


M' I — . i Gi-Mv — M,... MTh: I^Tiec 

The Cathedral of Christ the Savior. demolished under Stalin, is rising again as Moscow undergoes [ace-lift. 

Painting the Town, Well, Not Red 


Bv Marina Lakhman 

vn r n-t i i, i- 


O* Kinuteki't fiT The Nr* YuffcTm 


The ornate GUM department store getting an anniversary touch-up. 


A S for getting around town, many 
of Moscow's grandiose metro 
stations are as awe-inspiring now 
as when they were built in the '30s. The 
Mayakovskaya station, with soaring 
marble pillars and arches and stained 
glass ceilings, looks like a palace. 
Ploshchad Revolyutsii (Revolution 
Square 1 , opened in 1938, is equally grand 
and lined w'ith marble nicnes bearing 
bronze statues representing the heroes of 
die New Socialist Order — soldiere. ath- 
letes, factory workers and fanners. 

Heroes of the New Capitalist Order 
can be seen in the flesh at any of Mos- 
cow’s 70 casinos, where businessmen, 
mobsters, models and scantily clad 
ladies of the night gather around roulette 
wheels and blackjack tables, reveling in 
Russia's new lawlessness. Casinos and 
nightclubs are not highlighted as pan of 
the official anniversary, but that is 
where much of the money that helped 
transform Moscow into a modem 2uth- 
cenruiy city gets thrown around. 


M OSCOW — Awake after a 
deep Soviet slumber, with 
renew ed appreciation of its 
spiritual history and com- 
mercial promise. Moscow will try to show 
itself off next month as it has never been 
seen before: as a modem European city. 

The Russian capital is marking the 
850th anniversary of its founding w :th a 
celebration $ept."5 to 7 that v. ill "include 
a concert by Luciano Pavarotti in Red 
Square, an "outdoor multimedia extra- 
vaganza by the French performer-com- 
poser Jean-Miche! Jarre, a commis- 
sioned work by the Bolshoi Ballet and a 
parade along freshly paved streets. 

The celebration, u iih the theme 
*‘ Moscow: Yesterday. Today and To- 
morrow.” will evoke moments in the 
city’s history from its founding — tra- 
ditionally credited to Prince Yuri Dol- 
gorukv of Suzdal in 1147 — to its current 
membership in the community of demo- 
cratic European states, and will provide a 
glimpse of what the festival’s organizers 
see as the city’s bright future. 

Officials are expecting 30.000 tourists 
in rhe capital of Russia along with 
10.000 invited guests from around the 
world, including the mayors of major 
cities (New York Mayor Rudolph Gi- 
uliani is not expected, although Vice 
President Gore may drop ini. fora party 
that has been more than a year and a half 
in the making. The celebration s high- 
lights are open to all tourists and res- 
idents of Moscow, although space is 
limited, particularly for the opening and 
closing ceremonies. 

Dragons on Red Square 

The opening ceremony on Sept. 5 will 
be at Tverskaya Square ’near the monu- 
ment to the city’s founder (who was nick- 
named Dolgoruky — "Jong-handed” — 
because of his conquest of vasr Russian 
lands). Later that day at Cathedral Square 
near the Kremlin, tfie Bolshoi Theater 
will perform excerpts of operas that de- 
pict Russian history’, including Mus- 


sorgsky’s "Boris Godunov." based on 
the" drama by Pushkin, and Borodin’s 
"Prince Igor." After that, the filmmaker 
Andrei Konchalovsky will direct "Our 
Ardent Capital." The performance, on 
Red Square? will not include any historic 
figures*, instead choosing the Russian 
“Ivan" and “Ivancshka” to represent 
the Russian people as they encounter 
enemies in the ’form of dragons and 
snakes that attempt to destroy 'their city 
and break the people's spirit. 

Moscow’s spiritual history has been 
buried beneath communism for much of 
the las: SO years. Today, with the city 
constantly under construction, the most 
common sigh: is w orkers restoring Rus- 
sian Orthodox churches and cathedrals. 

T HE grandest of these projects is the 
Cathedral of Christ the Savior. 
Built by rhe czars in the 19th cen- 
tury ro commemorate Russia’s victory 
over Napoleon, the cathedral was de- 
molished by Siaiin in 1931 and siood in 
ruins as a symbol of communism’s vic- 
tory over religion. Tw o years ago on the 
Russian Orthodox Christmas. Jan. 7. res- 
toration of the cathedral began with 
Moscow’s 850th anniversary as the tar- 
get finishing dare for its facade. 

Although work on the interior will 
continue into the next cenrury. the 
gleaming gold dome is already finished, 
and the cathedral along the' Moscow 
River will serve as the backdrop for 
3.000 singers and musicians who will 
perform religious and folk music. Or- 
ganizers say the two-hour spectacle will 
recall the czarist tradition of staging 
conceits next to the cathedral. 

The celebration of contemporary 
Moscow will spill into the recently re- 
furbished streets as a parade with large 
floats showcases workers, students and a 
city that serves as the world's gateway to 
Russia. The parade w'ill also feature 
floats from Russia’s 88 republics, re- 
gions and territories, and commercial 
ventures, from Volvo to Samsung, that 
are both domestic and foreign — in- 
dicating a country eager to welcome the 
West’s products and investments. 

In 1947. the citv marked its 800th 


anniversary with a parade showcasing 
the achievements of communism. Fifty 
years later, the parade will meander for 
2-1/2 half miles (4 kilometers) from City- 
Hall on Tverskaya Street to the popular; 
shopping street of Novv Arbat. And 
while the anniversary in 1947 celebrated 
Soviet artists who were deemed accept- 
able to the state, Russia's own per- 
formers take a back seat 50 years later as 
Moscow shows itself offas a city that can 
attract internationally known artists. 

For Day Two of the celebration. Jarre- 
has conceived an elaborate laser show set 
to new-age music outside the main build- 
ing of Moscow State University, a 1953 
structure that embodies the architecture 
of Soviet realism (it was duplicated six 
times because Stalin liked it so much). 

The tw o-hour show will touch on Rus-_ 
sian history, including the battle with 
Napoleon, the Bolshevik Revolution and 
the cultural and political upheavals that 
began under Mikhail Gorbachev, it will 
also evoke Russia's achievements in' 
sports, science and the arts, including, 
space conquests beginning with Yuri 
Gagarin. .Although Jane had hoped that 
the Russian cellist and composer Mstis- 
lav Rostropovich would take part, he is 
unlikely to appear because of a pre- 
viously scheduled engagement. 

Pavarotti and puoacneva Earlier 
in the day. groups from Russia's neigh-.' 
bors will perform in Red Square in a 
concert titled "The Slavic World Greets 
Moscow." The magician David Cop- 
perfield will also perform. 

The next day. Pavarorti rakes the stage • 
in Red Square for a 90-minute perfor-; 
mance. with a 70-memher Russian or- 
chestra. that is expected to attract a mil- 
lion people. For the closing ceremony at.' 
Luzhniki Stadium, stars like the Russian 
pop queen Alla Pugacheva, Yosef 
Kabzon (the "Russian Frank Sinatra") 
and Oleg Gazmanov are expected to sing', 
renditions of the many songs that have 
been written about Moscow*! 

Officials say every art form will also- 
be represented, including Films about 
Moscow and museum exhibitions ded- 
icated to the city's history. 


Conspiracy Theory 

Directed by Richard Dormer. U.S. 

If you believe the CIA killed Marilyn Monroe, ihen the 
lumbering "Conspiracy Theory” will make those itty-bitty 
transmitters in your teeth tingle. Others will be put off by this 
all too glib political thriller about a New York cabbie tor- 
mented by selective amnesia, psychedelic flashbacks and the 
awful belief that he is the puppet of some sinister, government 
cabal. Mel Gibson, who is reunited with director Richard 
Donner of the superior "Lethal Weapon’ ’ series, builds on the 
role he played in the buddy action pictures. Only in this case, 
he's not just a little bent from busting bad guys, he’s clearly in 
enormous psychic pain for all the laughs his paranoid ob- 
sessions bring. By day, the reckless cabbie Jerry Fletcher 
shares his outlandish suspicions in regard to the Vatican, 
freemasons, fluoridated water and Oliver Stone's secret in- 
volvement with George Bush with his hapless, most often 
terrified passengers. At night, he combs the newspapers for 
evidence of conspiracies, which he exposes in his own news- 
letter, Conspiracy Theory. In addition to the paper’s five 
subscribers. Jeny confides in Alice Sutton (Julia Roberts), a 
sensible attorney with the Justice Department who describes 
him as * 'a restraining order waiting to happen." Alice, who has 
repeatedly thrown him out of her office, invariably pooh-poohs 
his amusing, seemingly implausible predictions. All that 
changes, however, when Jerry’ is kidnapped, drugged and 
tortured by the cold-blooded Dr. Jonas (Patrick Stewart), a 
government psychiatrist who seems to believe that leny knows 
something and is determined to extract it from the terrified taxi 


MOVIE GUIDE 


driver even if he has to drive the audience — which is likewise 
bombarded with strobe lights — insane in the process. Brian 
Helgeland's screenplay is intriguing, often funny, but it drags 
on too long. With it’s many knotty connections and complex 
exposition, the movie is definitely something of a muddle, but 
for that matter so are most conspiracy theories. On the other 
hand, it does air a pervasive and not unfoundedpublic pre- 
occupation with government accountability. The CIA's illegal 
experiments with LSD, the Iran-contra affair, campaign funny 
money, they're all part of the film’s subtext, which happens to 
be its greatest resource. It never hurts to be reminded that just 
because you ’re paranoid, it doesn’t mean that they’re not out to 
get you. (Rita Kemp ley. WPi 

Kiss Me Guido 

Directed by Tony Vitale. U.S. 

How’s this’ for a’wacky movie premise? New York apartment- 
hunter answers ad from "GWM seeking same to snare fully 
furnished apartment.” Only our hero thinks that “GWM” 
means "Guy With Money” and not "Gay White Male." On 
top of that, the clueless oiie just happens to be a homophobic 
Italian stallion from the Bronx. Just imagine the comic pos- 
sibilities for misunderstanding as the naive outsider encounters 
the sophisticated downtown world of Manhattan's gay en- 
claves! Sadly. none of these possibilities is realized in “Kiss 
Me Guido.' ’ an unfunny comedy by Tony Vitale that is enacted 
not by fleshed-out characters but by hackneyed stereotypes. 
There are so many sexual and ethnic caricatures, it’s hard to 
know which is most offensive. { Michael O' Sulli van .WPi 


Marquise 

Directed by Vera Belmont. France. 

Time to rise and shine in Louis XIV’s court: The Sun King is 
on his throne, or rather, his chamber pot, surrounded bv the 
usual cast of characters — coquettes, courtiers, jesters and 
those who have come to curry favor, such as Moliere: Lully 
lurks in the wings, Racine is out by the fountains with 
Marquise, the star of the 1660s. Sophie Marceau plays 
Marquise, who started our as a dancing girl with oomph and 
ambition — she WILL play "Andromaque” — and sleeps 
her way to the top. As long as it’s a vehicle for Marceau, this 
period romp is fun, but when it tries getting serious, it’s 
positively silly. As several characters keep reminding Mo- 
liere, "You’re good at comedy, but don’t touch tragedv." 
Bernard Giraudeau acts Moliere. simpering, kowtowing, 
like a besotted Precieuse Ridicule. Lambert Wilson comes 
off better as Racine, too much of an eager beaver to be 
credible, but such a good profile. As for Thierry Lhermitte’s 
Louis, he can barely keep a straight face as the constipated 
monarch. Vera Belmont reportedly had a nightmare shoot 
with her actress, which doesn't transpire on screen, except 
that Marceau runs away with the movie. She is not the 
Adjani of our day. but rarher the Bardot, all animal spirits 
and sexy petulance, until she is crossed. The actress, who has 

just about lost her puppy fat, cannot deliver anything less 

or more — than healthy good looks: unhappy, undone by a 
rival, she crumples, which seems to be the theme of this 
movie. She’s another one who can’t hack ir as a tra- 
gedienne. iJoan Dupt'iir. IHT\ 



Roberts and Gib. 




y\ oo \jX & 


PAGES' 







Poor Service Mars Belle Epoque Brasserie 


By Patricia Wells 

iMenuiwnal Herald Trih 


me 


P r^i-T Jb ere 316 institu- 
tions. like Brasserie Upp, that 

people love to hate. And then 

.l t ““ ^ those, like Bofmger. 
hai one loves ro love. But sometimes, 
love gets in the way. 

I’ve stopped counting how many 
tunes, over the years, I’ve returned to 
r»iu c F ’ a ghstening movie set of a 
Epoque brasserie imbued with 

carefree tum-of-the-century joie de 

vivre and the modem sounds of good 
times Almost always, I left saying I 
wou d never return. No matter how 
lovely, no matter how historical, the 
s apdash service and slapdash food were 
•always too much. 

I don t think this is the way Frederic 
Bofmger thought it should be when as a 
young refugee from Alsace-Lorraine, 
he opened Paris’s first brasserie on Rue 
de la Bastille in 1864. He was the first to 
serve freshly brewed beer on tap — ' ‘a 
la pomps ' — and kept the restaurant 
open 24 hours a day. City folks came to 
down gratineed onion soup and platters 
of sausages and sauerkraut, known as 
ihoucroHtc. 


yCafS ’- lhe menu remained 
constant, generations of celebrated 
diners from Maurice Chevalier io rhe 
Cumonsky came and went. 

h J 0 i V,n ^ door of owne * em- 
bellished and enlarged. What we see 

today — the sparkling glass roof, the 
voluptuous ceramics, the frivolous 
tuhp-shaped lamps, the undulating 
wrought iron staircase — is pure 1919 , 
preserved and restored in 1982. 

So enter Jean-Paul Bucher, brasserie 
king, the man who transformed Bras- 
serie Ho during the 1968 Paris riots and 
went on to create a worldwide empire of 
brasseries and food emporiums. A year 
ago. he took over this 134-year-old in- 
stitution. vowing to “change nothing.” 

AT HAST THE FOOD IS BETTER Change 
he did. And change he didn't. First for 
the food: Thank goodness, it’s better. 
On my last Bofinger visit a few years 
back, I would not have wanted to serve 
the famed tartare de boeuf to a dog, and 
after a multiweek sampling of all the 
top-rated choucroute platters in Paris. 
Bofinger’s version landed at the bottom 
of the list. 

A few recent return visits — one in the 
company of Bucher himself and another 


as a civilian diner stuffed in an Anglo- 
phone comer on a sweltering Paris night 
— suggest that the cuisine is on its way 
out of a slump. 

Suddenly, the food appears clean, 
sparkling, original (but nor too much so) 
and satisfying. Fresh sardines are mar- 
inated ever so lightly, then teamed up 
with a salad of legumes croquants that 1 
would call deliciously updated cole 
slaw, adapted by a French palate. 
Minute bits of cabbage and carrots are 
bathed in light sauce and molded in a 
very French timbale. 

Daily specials — such as calamars 
(squid) sautSed with tomatoes and pep- 
pers, or cubes of veal saut6ed and bathed 
in a light stock — arrive fresh, well- 
seasoned and convincing. The menu 
justifiably keeps such classics as Baltic 
herring in cream and dill, but also offers 
a refreshing, richly flavored cold tomato 
soup dotted with cubes of monkfish and 
showered with fresh leaves of basil. 

The compact wine list offers quite a 
few worthy wines at Jess than 150 francs 
(S24), including Guigal’s 1994 red 
Cotes du Rhone at 104 francs, his Tavel 
at 12 1 francs, and Faiveley 's white Bur- 
gundy, the 1993 Montagny, at 148 
francs. 


Service is another story. On a given 
night, you may be ushered to youri table 
by one waiter, handed the "menu by 
another, have your order taken bv a 
third, and be served by a fourth. 


T 


HIS means that when you wave 
your hand, put in a second request 
for an aperitif, or simply flail your 
arms in impatient rage, no one is re- 
sponsible — no one is in charge. ■ 

Democracy is also not a word to be 
found in Bofinger’s dictionary. Neigh- 
boring diners who arrive after you mav 
be served well before you. Some diner’s 
are given olives with their aperitif, some 
a bowl of pretzels. Some rabies are 
offered petiis fours with coffee, others 
are nor. 

Small beer, you say? Restaurateurs 
think diners don't notice what's going 
on at the next table. But with so much 
time on one's hands wailing for results 
from the staff, you bet they'do. 

Bofinger. 5 Rue de la Bastille. Paris 
4; tel: OJ -42-72-87-82: fax: 01-42-72- 
97-68. Open daily unril I AM. Credit 
cards: American Express. Diners Club. 
V7ja. 169-franc menu including stn ice 
and half-bottle of wine. A la cane, 230 
francs, including service but nor wine. 




Style and Performance : 
Peugeot Coupe Has It All 


By Gavin Green 


Cambodia Coup Flattens the Tourist Trade 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Service 


P HNOM PENH — * ‘It’s zero,” 
said Nongnuj Dobbs, Phnom 
Penh office manager for the 
East-West travel agency, de- 
scribing tourism to Cambodia after last 
month's coup. 

“It’s nil,” said Meng Hieng. man- 
aging director of the Pich Tourist Co. 

Chen da Sophea Sok. undersecretary of 
state in the Ministry of Tourism, agreed. 
“Those images of evacuation planes 
killed us. killed the industry,” he said. 

Since political tensions erupted in 
fighting in early July, almost no one is 
visiting Cambodia for pleasure. Al- 
though both the fighting and the evac- 
uation flights have ended, it could be 
months before the industry recovers. 

Hotels are nearly empty. Airlines have 
cut back on flights. Restaurants and 
nightclubs have fallen dark, and casinos 
have closed. Tour operators, drivers. 


waiters, chambermaids, vendors, guides, 
hawkers and ladies of the evening are 
mostly out of work. The National" Mu- 
seum in Phnom Penh opens its dooiseach 
rooming, stands empty all day, then 
doses on schedule in the evening. Al- 
most no one travels to visit die great 
temples at Angkor Wat. where gunfire 
could be beard in mid-July. 

Political instability and, in remote 
areas, persistent banditry have always 
been pan of the landscape for visitors. 
But the country’s small tourism industry 
had begun to grow in recent years. 

A Question of Security 

Since the coup, security is in question 
again. The fighting of early July has 
ended in the capital, and Angkor Wat 
appears secure, too. But the possibility 
of renewed fighting remains in the 
country's western and northern regions. 
The most recent U.S. State Department 
warning, issued Aug. S, recommends 


that U.S. citizens defer nonessential 
travel to Cambodia and that those who 
must go not travel outside Phnom Penh, 
specifically mentioning Siem Reap 
province, site of Angkor Wat. 

Chenda said be was optimistic abour 
the future. ‘ ’ I don 't worry, because by the 
end of die year everything will be nor- 
mal,' * he said, * ‘even better than before. ’ ' 
But tourism may not recover so soon. 

“I think it is O.K. to go to Angkor 
Wat,” Dobbs said. "It is very quiet 
now. But as a tour operator we cannot 
guarantee that nothing will happen." 
Even though factional fighting has 
ended, she said, the possibility of ban- 
ditry seems to have grown. 

“My father wants to go there,” she 
said. “I recommended to him not to 
cam’ money, not to cany anything valu- 
able. Even a small camera — if someone 
wants to take it. just give it to them.” 
This advice is much the same as always. 
Cambodia is a destination for tbe ad- 
venturous, and much of its attractiveness 


has been its underdevelopment. But it is 
desperately in need of commerce; even 
the S20 visa fees paid by tourists have 
been a significant contribution. 

The shock of the coup, which has set 
back foreign aid and investment across 
the board, has been a severe blow to the 
economy. In an economy as primitive as 
this one— where most of the population 
still toils in rice fields — the tourism 
industry was disproportionately signif- 
icant. Until the coup it accounted for 
about one-third of foreign investment. 


HENDA said it had been growing 
last, from a very small base. In 
1993. he said, just 90,000 rourist 
visas were issued. By last year the num- 
ber had risen to 220,000. 

“We were expecting an increase of 
10 to 15 percent in our business this 
year,” Meng Hieng said. "Unfortu- 
nately, Cambodia has this kind of fight- 
ing. and this has caused us a good deal of 
annoyance.” 


B RITAIN 


London 

National Gallery, tel: 1171) 747- 
2885, open daily. Continuing/ To 
Sept. 28: "Seurat and the 
Bathers.” Early works by the 
French painter (1859-1 891 ). 
Royal Academy of Arts, tel: (171 ) 
439-7-138. open daily. Continu- 
ing/ To Sept. 28: "Hiroshige: Im- 
ages of Mist. Rain, Moon and 
Snow.” 

Tate Gallery, Id: (171) 887-8000, 
open daily. Continuing/ To Nov. 30: 
"Mondrian: Nature to Abstraction." 
80 works by the Dutch painter. 


DENMARK 


Copenhagen 

Ordrupgeard, tel: 39-64-11-83. 
closed Mondays. To Oct 19: "Vil- 
hem Hammershoi." A selection of 
paintings by the Danish artist 
(1864-1916). Best known for his 
interiors. Hammershoi is also a fig- 
urai. architectural and landscape 
painter. 


FRANCE 


Musee dee Baaux-Arts, tel: 03- 
80-74-53-59, dosed Tuesdays. 
Continuing/ To Oct: 13: "1900- 
1938: Prague. Capital Secrete des 
Avant-Gardes." 300 paintings, 
sculptures, photographs, objects 
and architectural drawings, from 
Art Nouveau to Surrealism. Much a, 
Kupka. Munch and Picasso are 
among the artists represented. 

Paw* 

Centre Georges Pompidou, tel. 
I 01 44-78-12-33, closed Tuesdays. 
* Continuing/ To Sept. 29= 
"Fernand Leger." Highlights the 
French painter’s affinity with archi- 
tecture, his work in cinema, liter- 
ature and the ballet, and his strong 
political commitment. The exhib- 
ition features 220 paintings and 
drawings and will travel to Madrid 
and New York. 

rueh-Mauiaison 

Musee National du Chateau de 

Matmaison, tefc 

dosed Tuesdays. To Oct. 6: Lim- 

pera tries Josephine ettesSaenoes 

Naturetes.” Documents the in- 
terest of Josephine de Beau- 
hamais, Napoleon's fosl 
botany and zoology. Features Re- 
douts's paintings of roses, lb- 
sWs drawings of 

rontBmporaryw'ewsofUMjrnate- 

a on where Josephine H«d after her 
jfccflvwttfrom Napoleon m 1809. 

Bf » 1 R MAW T m 

Bremen 

- Nates Museum Watarbuia M 
(421) 598-390, dosed Mondays. 
To Sept 7; "Arte Povera. From 
the Goetz collection in Munich. 

. selection of pictures, sculptures 
and installations made 


1936). Inspired by King's words "I 
am a Man.” the artist pictures not 
the masses but the individual, his 
gestures, and his expressions of 
rage or happiness. 

■ ITALY 

P i nam ep 

Forte di Belvedere, tel: (55) 234- 
24-25. Continuing/Tb Sept 30: 
“Phffllp King." Located high above 
Florence, foe Fort offers Its interior 
gafleries and its terraces to more than 
90 sculptures, drawings and prints by 
the British sculptor (bom 1934). 

Rome 

Galleria Nazkmale d’Arte Mod- 
em a, tel: (6) 32-29-81. dosed 
Mondays. To Sept 28: “I Capola- 
vori della Collezione Estorick." 
This foreign collection of 20th-cen- 
tury Italian art Indudes works by the 
Surrealist artist Giorgio de Chirico 
(1 888-1974), and by Umberto Boc- 
doni (1882-1916) and Carlo Carra 
(1881-1966). both members of foe 
Futurist movement. 

a „«TH.. t AKPjI 

Amsterdam 

Rijksmuseum, tel: (20) 673-2 121. 
open daily. To Nov. 9: "Whistler en 
Holland." Following several visits 
to The Netherlands after 1863. foe 
the American painter (1834-1903) 
produced etchings of Amsterdam, 
and watercolors of Zeeland and 
Dordrecht. Some of the works of 
Whistler’s Dutch followers are also 
featured in the exhibition. 

Rotterdam _ 

Kunsthal, tel: (10) 440-031. 
dosed Mondays. Continuing/ To 
Oct. 5: “Monet, van Gogh, Picasso 
and Others.” 

■ SFAIH ~ 

Madrid 

Museo de la Ciudad, tel: (1 ) 588- 
6599. dosed Mondays. To Aug. 31 : 
“Solo: Arte Conceptual Amer- 
icano.'' A survey of conceptual art 
that brings together 150 paintings, 
sculptures, videos and photo- 
graphs by more than 30 artists liv- 
ing In the United States. Features 
works by Pilar Cocsro, Robert 
Glenn Ketchum and Hiromltsu 
Morimoto. 

Museo Thyssen-Bontemlsza, tei 

(1) 420-39-44, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/To Sept. 14: “George 
Gross Los Anos de Beilin. The 
German satirist (1893-1959) trans- 
lated political activism into art be- 
fore he fled Nazi Germany for 
America in 1933. Features pay- 
ings. works on paper, pamphlets, 
books and photographs. 


tion. Landscapes, portraits and still 
lifes are on show. 

■ UNITED STATE'S" 
Fort Worth 

KImbetl Art Museum, tel: (817) 
332-8451. dosed Mondays. Con- 
tinuing/ To Sept. 7: “Monet and 
foe Mediterranean." 70 works cre- 
ated by Monet during his several 
trips to foe French and Italian Rivi- 
eras between 1883 and 1908. 

New York 

Museum of Modem Art, tel: (21 2) 
708-9400, dosed Wednesdays. To 
Sept. 2: “Paris: The 1 8 90s." Prints 
created in foe 1990s by Bonnard. 
Maurice Denis. Renoir. Signac. 
Toulouse-Lautrec and Vuillard, as 
well as advertising posters, polit- 
ical journals, theater programs and 
sheet music. Features 200 works 
by 26 artists. 

WASHINGTON 

National Gallery of Art, tel: (202) 
737-4215, open dally. Continu- 
ing/ To Sept 28: "Millenium of 
Glory: Sculpture of Angkor and An- 
ctent Cambodia." Approximately 
90 sculptures and representations 
of gods, guardians and female 
dancers, as well as bronzes for 
rituals, dating back to the 6th cen- 
tury. 

■ European tour 

Dallas Symphony Orchestra. 
Directed by Andrew Litton, the or- 
chestra is touring Europe, with a 
mainly American program. The it- 
inerary indudes Zurich (TonhaJle, 
Aug. 22), London (Royal Albert 
Hall. Aug. 24). Amsterdam (Con- 
es rig© bo uw, Aug. 28 and 29), Dub- 
fin (National Concert Hall. Sept, i ). 
Locarno iChlesa San Francesco, 


From the “. Josephine " exhibition at Rueil-Malmaison. France. 


TYLE sells. Even with humble, 
everyday sedans, research 
shows that people buy on looks 
more than any other quality, 
apart from previous experience. 

With sporty coupes, style is not just 
important — it’s everything. Coupes 
actually make no sense: They're usually 
cramped, hard to see out of, cost more 
than sedan equivalents, go no faster and 
handle no better. People buy coupes for 
one reason, and one reason only: be- 
cause they like the look of them. 

On which basis, there should be lines 
forming outside every Peugeot dealer 
around the world, eagerly waiting to 
snap up the prettiest, most visually feel- 
good coup£ we’ve seen in years — the 
406 coupe. And should you be a rare 
coupd buyer who also cares how the car 
goes. I’ve got news for you: The answer 
is, very well. 

The suspension and floor pan may be 
based on tbe everyday, but excellent, 406 
sedan. But other than that, this is a coup£ 
designed from the outset as a coup6 
(rather than merely a sedan with a couple 
of doors less, a bit more visual pizzazz 
and an enormously inflated price). 

The engine, on the test car. was 
Peugeot’s new 3.0-liter V6. which 
sounds musical when revved, is creamy 
smooth, and goes hard. The only down- 
side is that it’s thirsty. The body is die 
work of the Italian design house Pin- 
infarina. better known for designing all 
the best Ferraris and for quiie a few 
handsome Peugeot coupes and convert- 
ibles of yore. 

Chrome and Leather 

The dashboard is borrowed from the 
sedan — although the fake wood has. 
thankfully, been replaced by plastic dial 
looks like fake metal. It’s better than it 
sounds. Little chrome bezels ring the 
instruments, adding that touch of class. 
The best pan about the cabin is the 
optional leather seats. The rest car’s 
were in tan and were as beautiful to the 
eye, and to the touch, as die finest de- 
signer label leatherwear. 

Other touches include the alloy gear- 
shift lever and knob, which give a cool. 


metallic touch — hard engineering 
meets designer fashion — to the hand- 
stitched leather chairs. The low-rent 
Peugeot switches look a little out of 
place in this testament to leather and 
alloy, but the overall effect is still pleas- 
ing. You feel you're in a car every bit as 
classy and expensive as competing 
BMW and Mercedes coupes. 

On the move, the 4(fe coupl also 
compares well with top-brand two-door 
cars. The V6 engine gives great per- 
formance (the standard 2.0-liter four is a 
bit coarse and leisurely) and handles in a 
fluid, easy-going mann er. The bigger 
tires and firmer springs, all pan of im- 
buing the car with sporty qualities, make 
for more bump-thump' on broken city 
roads than the standard, supple 406 
sedan. The sreering, too. is a little an- 
esthetized for my liking; it lacks feel. 
But it is light, easy to twirl and is con- 
nected to a lovely leather-rimmed steer- 
ing wheel. On the road, the car is every 
bit as good as a BMW 328i coupd or a 
new Mercedes CLK coup£. And, in 
most markets, it’s much cheaper. 

TNI SNOB-APPEAL PROBLEM Herein 
lies Peugeot's biggest problem. The 
highly illogical car market is not only 
unduly influenced by style, it is also 
beholden to the vagaries of snob appeal. 
BMW, Mercedes, Jaguar and, increas- 
ingly, Audi are the peers. Peugeot — 
despite the excellence of its everyday 
cars — is down with the proles, with 
Ford and Opel and Fiat and Renault, and 
all the Japanese makers. 

The 406 coup6 may buck the trend. Its 
gorgeous style, classy cabin and fine 
driving ability should lift it into the 
coupfi first division, where it should 
make life difficult for those who may- 
have better brands, but don't necessarily 
make better cars. 

• Peugeot 406 Coup6 V6. About 
$40,000. V6 engine, 2.946ce. 194 B HP. 
Front-wheel drive, five-speed manual 
transmission (four-speed automatic op- 
tional). Top speed: 235 kph (146 mph). 
Acceleration (MOO kph in 7.9 seconds. 
Average fuel consumption: 10.9 liters/ 
100km. 

Next: The Ford Puma 


Gavin Green is rhe editor in chief of 
Car magazine. 


Sept 5) and Lucerne (Halle von 
Moos Stahl. Sept. 7 and 8). 

CLOSING SOOM 

Aug. 24: "Durer, Holbein, Grune- 
wald: Old Master Drawings of foe 
German Renaissance from Berlin 
and Basel." Kunstmuseum, 

Basel. 

Aug. 24: "Peintures de I’Age d’Or 
du Danemark." Musee National 
d’Hlstoire et d'Art, Luxem- 
bourg. 

Aug. 24: -German Photography: 
The Impact of a Medium 1870- 
1970." Kunst- und Ausstellung- 
shalte (for Bundesrepublik 
Deutschland, Bonn. 

Aug. 25: "The Secret of the Golden 
Tiara: Works of Israel Roucho- 
mevsky. " The Israel Museum, Je- 
rusalem. 

Aug. 25: “Sean Scully: Works on 
Paper." Whitworth Art Gallery, 
Manchester, England. 

Aug. 29: “Rosa Bonheur. 1822- 
1899." Musee des Beaux- Arte. 
Bordeaux. 


*WITI»UHP_ 


Musee *d’Art et cTHIstoire. tel: 
f5»2)4l 8-2600, dosed Mondays. 
gLZfflo Sept 28: ™ 

rflmiten Fafeificalio^topu^ 
«»iu iwaioiKuiuiis __ firms Pestiche 5 - A setectionoi 4U 

motfy-avaltaWe matena iL?lSg o{ paintings of the ftaflan 

^photographs by the artists o j-J^ttrocento that were created at 

Arte Povera movement £ ^ turn of foe century. 


1900s. Works by Anselmo. Pas- 
calf-Fabra, Kouneilis and Pisto 


du Fauv- 

35?" Soii.man i«ES*C 


AFtfSawftaFonint F ™ nK 2^ t ^j Cam 1965 : 
■^29r17-26,dosedMonda^To gn^ de Cezanne* 

™pl£l: ' "Benedict J. Fernandez. 1 * ■ More than 100 

Am a Man :* Martin Luther f£ te |s and drawings g™o™ n 9 

and the protest marches of foe pajnt W s contribution to foe 

1W0s are the main themes otW jJ^Unerit 
show of 60 black-and-white Ph of Cubism anti a 

^graphs by Fernandez 


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Pamper Yourself... You Deserve It. 

ask ABOl T OL R SPA ASD FAMILY PACKAGES. 

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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. AUGUST 22. 1997 



The Prolific Snow Goose Is the Villain in a Canadian Tundra Crisis 


By Howard Schneider 

IViMAinjtriM Post Service 


CHURCHILL, Manitoba — It has been 6,000 
years since the Keewatin ice cap retreated from 
the coastal marshes around this Hudson Bay 
village, and for much of that time a prolific 
□umber of plants and animals shared what sub- 
Arctic Canada had to offer. Plants evolved with a 
type of organic antifreeze in their cells, and each 
summer’s thaw revealed lush spreads of marsh 
grass, sedges and flowers; birds trimmed and 
fertilized the lawn, and foxes ate the birds. 

It was, say scientists who have studied the area 
intensively for 30 years, a system both finely 
balanced and broadly diverse, given the climate, 
from dozens of species of plant life to the top 
local predator, the polar bear. 

Today, however, there’s trouble on the tundra. 
In the past three decades, an explosion in the 
population of snow geese has reduced thousands 
of acres of once thickly vegetated salt- and fresh- 
water marsh to a virtual desen, driving out other 


species and threatening to overwhelm an eco- 
system that would take decades to rebound. 

The deteriorating situation has been tracked in 
detail by a team of scientists who have manned a 
field station deep in the Manitoba marsh each 
summer since the late 1960s. The situation is so 
serious that they want to call out the cavalry. At 
this point, they say, the only way to save the 
tundra is to kill the geese — lots of them. 

The population has escaped hunters’ control 
and predators’ control, and there is no sign of its 
doing anything else but increasing, said Robert 
Jefferies, a University of Toronto botanist who 
has been part of the field research team at La 
Perouse Bay since 1974. Mr. Jefferies and other 
members of a joint U.S.-Canada panel have re- 
commended killing at least half the continent’s 
snow geese through increased hunting in the 
United States, where the birds spend the winter, 
and in Canada, where they return in summer to 
breed and rear their young. 

Under the proposal being studied by the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service and its Canadian coun- 


terpart, hunters would be allowed to shoot the 
distinctive white birds all year, as many as they 
want. They would be allowed to bait migrating 
flocks into fields, use electronic calling devices 
to lure the birds, and possibly even enter Amer- 
ica's network of national wildlife refuges in 
search of their prey. ...... 

And if hunters cannoi kill enough of the birds, 
officials say. there has been serious discussion of 
asking for’ help from the military, or even in- 
troducing disease to “depopulate” a species that, 
resistant so far to sickness and other natural pop- 
ulation controls, has climbed from fewer than a 
half-million in the 1960s to more than 3 million. 

The birds may be majestic in flight and their 
annual arrival anticipated — along Maryland s 
Eastern Shore, the plains of Iowa and the swamps 
of Louisiana and Texas — as one of nature s 
grand events. But on the ground, in the marshes 
where thev breed, they have become a pest, 
fattened for the winter on .American grain, clus- 
tering farther south to avoid high-Arctic weather 
and increasing their numbers with an annual 


population growth rate of 5 percent. 

"They are very successful nesting birds, and 
they have shown the ability to devastate en- 
vironments.” said Paul Schmidt, chief of mi- 
gratory bird management for the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, and co-chairman of the Arctic 
Goose Joint Venture, a panel of scientists and 
regulators established to study the snow goose. 

The damage is obvious to the few hundred 
humans who live in this area year-round. "We’re 
expecting the geese to land on the city square any 
day,” said John Bilenduke, deputy mayor of 
Churchill, which once buzzed with military per- 
sonnel stationed at a U.S. missile testing range 
but now relies on polar bear toois and a grain 
elevator to stay afloat 

It is obvious from outer space, where satellite 
photos show the goose damage as a wide, red 
snip around the coast of the Hudson Bay. "Any 
effect you can see from orbit I would argue is a 
big one." said Peter Kotaneo, a University of 
Toronto botany professor. 

Mr. Schmidt said wildlife officials plan to 


conwlt v-iih public interest groups and bold 

S over me next year. They hope to bare 
^SuL for dealing wth the geese in place- by 

"^elractical issues are 
like Canada seese, snow geese are not a pramed 
oamespecies- Many hunter* don .1 thmk they 
SaTas good. Refuge managers said it also may 
be difficult for hunters alone ro control the pqp- 
ulation because the birds travel in large flpctes, 
quickly learn to avoid decoys and wiUnt« say m 
one place long enough to be killed in large 

DU BioU**ists estimate that if 15 pefcAt of adult 
snow ceese are killed each year, the overall 
population could be cut in half in several seasons, 
with little danger of overkill or Other miscal- 
culation. It is better to wait for a natural pop- 
ulation crash as the geese run out of food and 
acceptable habitat, responded Susan HagmxLan 
analyst for the Humane Society of the United 
States, than to guess about how many birds 
should die. 




ot 

ft 


ftf 




KIDNAP: Soaring Market for Insurance 


Continued from Page 1 

and their security experts are becoming a 
crucial lifeline for American execu- 
tives. 

* *' When something happens, your First 
call is to the insurance company, not the 
embassy or the Marines," said Hugh 
Rosenbaum, an executive in London for 
Tillinghasi-Towers Perrin, an American 
insurance consulting firm. 

While globe-trotting executives are 
the archetypal customers for kidnap in- 
surance. security experts say that do- 
mestic banks often buy the coverage, 
too. because the money in their vaults 
makes their personnel tempting prey for 
kidnapping and extortion, which is also 
covered by the policies. 

Professional sports teams also buy 
kidnap insurance as do many of the best 
known names in Hollywood. 

With tens of thousands of companies 
signed up for these policies, and sales 
rising at 1 5 percent to 20 percent a year, 
more insurers are beginning to offer 
kidnap coverage. 

Cigna Corp.. a large insurance com- 
pany . has just entered the field. And J&H 
Marsh & McLennan, a big insurance 
brokerage, is expected to come out with 
a policy soon that, among other things, 
has a maximum ransom payment of S60 
million. S10 million more than most 
competing policies. 

“Companies used to buy* this cov- 
erage only for their most senior people," 
said Mack Rice Jr., a senior vice pres- 
ident at Marsh & McLennan. "But as 
companies are working much more in the 
Third World, " he said, "virtually all 
their employees, anywhere in the world 
are being covered. Family members and 
even guests of employees are covered" 

Kidnapping is a moneymaker for in- 
surance companies because there is a lot 
more fear of kidnapping among the prime 
customers — international business 
people — than there is kidnapping itself. 
While kidnapping is on the rise — se- 
curity expens estimate there were more 
than 1 0.000 around the world last year — 
most victims are wealthy residents of 
such countries as Colombia. India. Mex- 
ico, Pakistan and the Philippines. 

"In Mexico. Colombia and Brazil, they 
clearly prefer locals," said E. C. Ack- 
erman, a former CIA operative who runs 
Ackerman Group Inc., an international 
security firm in Miami. "In Europe." he 
said, "the kidnappings almost always in- 
volve wealthy Europeans.” 

In the United States, kidnapping of 
executives and other prominent people is 
one of the least common crimes, security 


experts said. That’s because kidnappers 
here are almost always caught ana long 
prison sentences are the rule, they said 

Nevertheless, American corporations 
buy kidnap insurance for peace of mind. 
Some policies are relatively cheap. For 
example, S 1 million worth of coverage 
for three years, the customary period for 
these contracts, can cost as little as 
51,000, according to Mr. Rice of Marsh 
& McLennan. But many large multina- 
tional corporations, the premium is often 
in the range of $25,000 to $50,000. 

For the same amount of coverage 
against fire, wind and other hazards, me 
cost is considerably higher for busi- 
nesses. And protection of directors and 
officers against civil litigation of all 
kinds is even more costly. 

As kidnappers demand bigger 
ransoms — one of the largest was more 
than S30 million for a Mexican business 
executive a few years ago — the in- 
surance becomes an important bulwark 
of a company's financial stability, par- 
ticularly for smaller companies. "If 
you’re a Fortune 100 company you can 
afford to pay a ransom yourself," Mr. 
Ackerman said. 

“And you can afford to hire security 
consultants to help get your employee 
back. Bur I ’ve worked some cases where 
small companies really had to strain to 
come np the ransom money." 

The ransom is the most obvious ex- 
pense of a kidnapping. Policies also pay 
for interpreters, travel expenses, lost sal- 
ary and the cost of hiring a replacement. 
They even cover the victim's financial 
losses, such as the failure to exercise 
stock options and renew insurance 
policies. They pay for a vacation after 
the victim is reunited with his family 
and if needed cosmetic surgery. The 
policies also cover the costs of defending 
legal suits that might arise from a kid- 
napping — including cases where the 
wife of a victim sues the company be- 
cause she thinks that it did not do enough 
for her husband. 

Should the ransom money somehow 
get hijacked on the way to the kid- 
nappers. the insurance company takes 
care of that, too, with a new bundle of 
money. 

Often the insurance company is the 
only place the family can turn for help. 
"In many countries, the police are in- 
competent or corrupt,” said Brian Jen- 
kins, the deputy chairman of Kroll As- 
sociates. an international security firm in 
New York. Sometimes, he said the po- 
lice turn out "to be part of the kidnap 
gang, or they shake down the kidnappers 
for a share of the ransom." 



ZHU: China’s ‘Greenspan’ Tames Inflation. 


h tier.- *-sA-'s Nr* Y.-kT-M. 

Thomas Hargrove and his wife, Susan, at his home in Galveston. Texas. In 
1995, he was kidnapped in Colombia by teenagers who kept him on a short 
chain. Experiences like his have fueled demand for kidnapping insurance. 


For the families of kidnap victims, the 
issue is not whether to pay a ransom, but 
how. * ‘You pay the ransom or you die." 
said Susan Hargrove. 

One condition of kidnap policies is 
that people who are insured must promise 
not to tell anyone they have the coverage. 
That's because, ihe insurance companies 
say, simply having a policy makes clients 
look like gold-plated targets. 

To guard against accidental disclos- 
ures. Mr. Rice of Marsh & McLennan 
said that companies often do not even tell 
employees that they are covered against 



TAIWAN: Prime Minister to Be Replaced 


Nan£}ii*orn»c'\f»-c.>- Krra^-I’lvw 

Mr. Siew at his news conference. 


Continued from Page 1 

appointment as a sign of renewed in- 
terest in mending relations. 

Mr. Lien's cabinet resigned with him 
and a new one will take office Sept 1 . the 
mass-circulation United Daily News re- 
ported. Foreign Minister John Chang 
will be promoted to deputy prime min- 
ister, the newspaper said. 

The resignation of Mr. Lien had been 
expected but was delayed by fears that 
his successor would not survive a con- 
firmation vote in the fractious legis- 
lature. Constitutional changes passed 
last month abolished such votes. 

Taiwan's prime minister is appointed 


by the president, who retains most de- 
cision-making powers. The prime min- 
ister’s main task is to shepherd legis- 
lation through Parliament. 

Embarrassed by scandals, crime and 
comiption. the Nationalists will be re- 
lying on the popular Mr. Siew to shore 
up their image before county and may- 
oral elections, where the Nationalists 
have lost seats to the opposition Demo- 
cratic Progressive Party, including con- 
trol of Taipei, the capital. 

Mr. Siew said he would continue Mr. 
Lee and Mr. Lien’s emphasis on raising 
Taiwan's international competitiveness 
in preparation for joining the World 
Trade Organization. (AP. Reuters ) 


kidnapping. The policies themselves are 
handled like top-secret documents. 

"When ue issue a policy. . you are 
given a number." Mr. Rice said. “We 
don't even put the company name on the 
file. The policies are locked in a- drawer 
and only one person has the key." 

Nearly every company that buys the 
insurance heeds the advice of the se- 
curity consultants to set up a simple plan 
of action in advance. More than one 
regional manager has complicated the 
release of the victim. Mr. Jenkins of 
Kroll said, by trying to resolve a kid- 
napping on his own without calling 
headquarters. 

When Mr. Hargrove was kidnapped, 
he was driving to" work ar his research 
center on the outskirts of Cali. He had 
decided to take the scenic route that 
morning and was gazing at ihe emerald 
hillsides when he spotted what he 
thought was an army road block. He 
realized he was in trouble when he saw 
the men were wearing ski masks. 

With rifles drawn, the abductors 
forced him into the back of a pickup 
truck and sped off. It was nearly a year 
before he saw his family again. 

"You never knew if it would ever 
end.’ ‘ he said. * ’The people who took me 
were not ideologues. They were semi- 
literate teenagers, not smart enough to 
understand the implications of their ac- 
tions. You never knew what they might 
do." 


Continued from Page 1 

ward pressure on prices. Chinese man- 
ufacturers have the capacity to produce 
more than 30 million color TV sets a 
year, but Chinese consumers only bought 
18 million in 1996. That left about 35 
percent of Chinese color TV plants idle. 
Reductions in import tariffs and cheaper 
imports from places like Malaysia 
brought new competitive threats. 

The largest TV manufacturer in China. 
Sichuan Changhong Electronics Group 
Corp- was not willing to watch its fac- 
tory' sit idle. So in March 1996, it became 
one of the first Chinese companies ever 
to cut prices, slashing them between 10 
percent and 15 percent. Other producers 
soon followed Sichuan Changhong’s 
lead, and the manufacturer has led two 
more rounds of price cuts since then. 

The outcome; Consumers now pay 
about 25 percent less for the typical 21- 
inch color television set than they did one 
and a half years ago, according to Simon 
Hua. a Shanghai-based analyst for Nikko 
Research Center. Sichuan Changhong. 
which used to make radar equipment for 
the military, raised its share of the 
Chinese television market to 27 percent 
in 1996. op from 21 percent in 1995. 

In the past, many state-owned enter- 
prises have been able to avoid price cuts 
because they could compensate for poor 
sales results by borrowing money from 
government-owned banks that they 
would never be forced to repay. But Mr. 
Zhu has tightened bank lending and ended 
that form of corporate life support. 

Foreign investors say they feel re- 
assured by Mr. Zhu’s presence, and for- 
eign investment, which totaled 540 bil- 
lion last year, has contributed to the 
plentiful supply of many goods. 

In the real -estate sector, ihe construc- 
tion boom has creaied a glut of new 
commercial office space in major eastern 
cities. 

• ' In Shanghai, there is a massive over- 
supply of office and. to a lesser extent, 
residential structures," said David 
Faulkner, a partner in Brooke Hillier 
Parker, an international real estate firm. 
He said rents have fallen by a third or 
more in top quality office buildings. 

For die average Chinese person, the 
most important inflation factor is not 
luxury office space but food. There, too, 
Mr. Zhu has managed to rein in prices. 

"There is do inflation," said Zhang 
Lixin. a Beijing street vendor selling 
melons from China’s far west, grapes 
from the eastern region of Shandong and 
peaches from just outside Beijing. 
"Prices have been stable recently." 

Mr. Zhu has added a hefty dose of 
government subsidy to help keep food 
prices steady. Central government food- 
price subsidies, which had peaked in 
1990 and started to decline, changed 
course again in 1993. Over the next two 
years, central government food subsi- 
dies soared 22 percent. Figures for 1996 
have not been published. 

A policy of making city governments 
responsible for affordable food forced 
local officials to add their own subsidies. 

Mr. Zhu’s next task will be to srep up 
the overhaul of state-owned enterprises. 

Cutting off the free flow of credit and 
cutting government subsidies to state 
industries are only the first steps. Now 
the government must restructure those 
firms while generating enough jobs for 
laid-off workers, new school graduates 
and the army of unemployed rural mi- 
grants flocking to the cities. 


MIGS: Flying Agile MiG-29s Gives German Pilots Sense of JFhat Might Have Been if the Cold War Had Gone Hot 


Continued from Page 1 

MiG that they might have to face in some war. 

Perhaps even more important for the future, the 
Mig-29 experiment in Germany has heated up 
debate about the armaments of new NATO mem- 
bers to the east. 

Will prospective NATO members buy Western- 
made arms now as they prepare to join the alliance? 
Or could Poland. Hungary and the Czech Republic 
start out with the Soviet-made warplanes and tanks 
they have and postpone big weapons purchases 
until their economies have strengthened? 

In Germany, civilian and military policy-makers 
argue vigorously for the slow road, citing Fighter 
Wing 73 as evidence that Soviet model warplanes 
can operate comfortably in tandem with Western 
weaponry. Indeed, Fighter Wing 73 now pairs its 
MiG-29s with its F-4 Phantoms, a U.S. -built war- 
horse whose modernized radars offer long-range 
protection lacking in the Soviet-built interceptors. 

New NATO members should copy this mix-and- 
match approach. German officials said this week in 
interviews, concentrating on communications and 
training, nor on new Western -made hardware. 

"The important thing is to be able to cooperate 
effectively, and it can be done with Soviet-made 
equipment if the people who are flying it and 
organizing it understand the NATO system and 
speak the NATO language," according to an aide 
to. Defense Minister Volker Ruhe. 

Not everyone agrees, starting with U.S. defense 
Contractors. They see a S 10 billion-market for 300 
warplanes in Central Europe over the next five 
years. Defense Secretary William Cohen, on a visit 


to Budapest, urged Hungary to raise its defense 
speading. including on up-to-date weapons. 

Officials in Bonn described Mr. Cohen’s state- 
ment as a scarcely concealed message to the Hun- 
garians to buy U.S. arras as a way of ensuring 
Senate votes ratifying NATO enlargement 

"l see evidence that the Poles, for example, -are 
starting to think this way after only a year ago 
insisting on buying F-16s and getting rid of their 
Soviet stuff," according to a general in the Defense 
Ministry in Bonn, who asked not to be identified 
because he is involved in negotiations with allied 
armed forces. 

The biggest uncertainty about the future of So- 
viet-made equipment is the ability of Russian fac- 
tories to maintain their products over the next 
decade, according to a Luftwaffe logistics officer. 
At one point. Fighter Wing 73 lacked a vital lub- 
ricant for its MiG-29s because the only factory 
making it was destroyed in Chechnya. 

“It’s a problem teaching them how to think 
about spare parts; their system was to pre-stock 
whole engines or whole planes, not deliver pieces 
when you need them," the Luftwaffe specialist 
said. 

German officials made no secret of their dis- 
appointment about the irregularity, mysteriousness 
and world-class high prices of after-sales service 
from Rosvooruzheniye, Russia’s amis-export 
monopoly. 

An apparent acknowledgement of that orga- 
nization's shortcomings came from Moscow on 
Thursday, when President Boris Yeltsin announced 
that it was being reorganized under a new head. 
Yevgeni Ananyev, 48, currently chairman of the 


board at a bank linked to the MiG manufacturers. 

German officials stressed that for the next few 
years both Fighter Wing 73 and central European 
air forces can be confident of keeping their MiG’s 
combat-ready with existing stocks. 

At Laage, German MiG-29 pilots concurred in 
the general view that NATO's top priority should 
be training, not hardware — that what matters is not 
the plane you fly but how you fly it. 

Even while they champion the MiG-29’s best 
features, the German pilots also stressed that the 

§ lane demonstrates the deep shortcomings in the 
oviet system and the problems to be overcome in 
any effort to integrate ex-Soviet military forces into 
the NATO system. 

"We fly the MiG-29 so well that we can beat 
almost any Wejtem warplane in a close dogfight, 
but it’s taken us six years to get the fornier East 
Germans to the point where we can fly joint mis- 
sions with a U.S. squadron," a Lufrwaffe major 
explained at Laage. 

Another officer said that “they are good pilots 
now" after Luftwaffe retraining, but he added that 
airmen whose first thousand hours were in Soviet- 
style air forces "will never make squadron leaders 
because they lack the initiative, the leadership skill, 
the aggressiveness — in the good sense." 

The MiG-29 embodies the problem, they said, as 
a plane that fit the Warsaw Pact concept of defense 
but could never really work in a Western system of 
airpower. Put simply, the Mig-29's aerodynamics 
make it a unique killing machine, but the plane 
lacks the range of a modern Western warplane. 

"In a dogfight. 1 can beat anything, even an F- 1 5 
is easy, except ihe latest-model F-I6C," the wing 


commander said. The MiG- 29 can accelerate in a 
turn as tight as the pilot can stand without blacking 
out — a feat no Western jet can match. 

The trouble is that U.S. warplanes no longer wait 
to get into visuaj contact to down enemy planes. 
Instead, the kill is made by long-range radar and 
missiles — of which the MiG-29 has none. 

In the Soviet system, the MiG-29 was supposed 
to go into combat with every decision being made 
by controllers on the ground. "They could even jig 
the radar so the pilot didn’t see 10 enemy planes 
coming at him. only the one he was supposed to 
shoot," a Luftwaffe pilot explained. 

To eliminate any initiative by pilots, the MiG-29 
was designed to be short range, with only pre-set 
radio frequencies, a navigation system that shuts 
down after a set flying time. A pilot, in the Soviet 
system, could not Fire a missile without an elec- 
tronic release from the ground. 

"It was the only pan of the plane we didn’t get. 
the black box of controls for the plane, which East 
German technicians were never allowed to touch 
and which the Soviets took home with them." Mr 
Mack said. 

So could the MiG-29 be used by a NATO air 
force? Yes. the Luftwaffe logistics expert said, 
estimating that central European air forces could 
refit the planes with new radars, navigation systems 
and radios for as little as 5500.000 each — a 
fraction of the cosl of a new warplane. 

- lli! 131 re fi* enabled them to operate along- 

side NATO planes, the MiG's would still face bin 
problems in becoming operational in combat con- 
ditions alongside allied airmen trained for Westem- 
sryle performance in their wincmen. 



•<lr 


# r 


TAflm WrMS filter Fr^pr— Prnmr 

Deputy Prime Minister Zhu Rongji. 


Pretoria Puts Off 
An Amnesty Case 

PRETORIA — Officials of die 
Truth and Reconciliation Commis- 
sion acted Thursday to postpone a 
legal bid by the kilLrs of a South 
African Communist hero. Chris 
Haiti, to gain amnesty until late 
November. 

Commissioner Hassan Mall said 
the amnesty hearings, which opened 
Aug. 11 with written confessions by 
two men. would reconvene on Nov. 
24 at an as-yet unnamed site. 

The hearings have been delayed 
by legal arguments over whether 
statements by the admitted assas- 
sins — a Polish immigrant, Janusz 
Waius, and a conservative politi- 
cian. Clive Derby-Lewis, should be 
admitted as evidence. I AFP} 

Germany Foresees 
A Thaw With Iran 

BONN — A new start in the 
strained relationship between the 
European Union and Iran is possible 
after a new government has been 
formed in Tehran, Foreign Minister 
Klaus Kinkel said in an interview 
Thursday. 

’"Hiere is a possibility for a new 
start in the relationship between EU 
nations and Iran." said Mr. Kinkel. 
adding that the European Union was 
ready for talks. 

Relations soured after EU mem- 
bers recalled their ambassadors 
when a Berlin court ruled in April 
that top Iranian leaders were linked 
to the 1992 murder of four Kurdish 
Iranian dissidents in Berlin. (AP) 

British Plan to Aid 
Victims of Volcano 

LONDON — Britain announced 
emergency cash aid on Thursday for 
people who want to leave the vol- 
cano-devastated Caribbean island 
of Montserrat for other countries in 
the region. 

Bur the package fell far short of 
the amount demanded by local gov- 
ernment officials in "the British 
colony after it became clear that the 
Soufriere Hills volcano could 
threaten the whole island and the 
4,000 to 5,000 people still on it. 

Adul ts moving to other countries 
in the Caribbean would get £2,400 
($3,820) over the next six months, 
provided they did not have savings 
and assets valued £10,000. Those 
under 1 8 would get £600. ( Reuters ) 

Compensation Set 
For Argentines 

BUENOSAIRES — The Argen- 
tine government has announced that 
it will issue $3 billion in bonds next 
year to compensate relatives or the 
people who disappeared in Argen- 
tina's "dirty war/’ ^ 

With its announcement, the gov- 
ernment look a step toward rec- 
onciling with families of thousand, 
of people who disappeared under a 
crackdown by the military dictat 
orship on suspected leftists and 
political dissidents. 

From 1 976 to 1 983. at least 9 fi, K , 
people disappeared. Human-rioh, ' 
groups c!a, m as many as 30 Om 
people never reappeared. 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1997 


IMF: Worst 

Of the Thai 
Crisis Ends 

Fund Approves Loan 
Totaling $4 Billion 

Caap/Jei by Our Sa^ Float Dbfarka 
WASHNOTON - The worst of 
ItoUand s economic crisis, which has 
P«nmeled the Thai baht in recent 
weeks, is past, the managing director of 
the International Monetary Fund, 
Michel Cazndessas. said Thursday. 

I strongly believe that, yes. we have 
seen the worst of the crisis, provided this 
program is implemented with persever- 
ance, which should match the boldness 
of the measures, which have been adopt- 
ed, Mr. Camdessus said, referring to a 
package of IMF loans approved late 
Wednesday. 

The fund approved a $4 billion loan 
for T h a ilan d, part of a multinatio nal 
rescue package of $16.7 billion being 
provided by seven other Asian coun- 
tries, the World Bank and the Asian 
Development Bank. 

The bailout is the largest since the 
IMF and the United States loaned Mex- 
ico $50 billion in 1995 to help it over- 
come a currency crisis. 

Thailand’s economy, the world’s 
fastest-growing between 1985 and 
1995, is suffering from the slowest 
growth since the 1960s, a depreciated 
currency and the closure of 58 failing 
financial institutions. 

The Thai bailout package will bolster 
T h ai lan d’s foreign currency reserves, 
which were severely depleted when the 
government tried to fight off specu- 
lators’ attacks on its currency. The 
country’s net foreign reserves shriveled 
to as low as $6.6 billion from almost $40 
billion in October. 

The governor of the Bank of Thai- 
land, Chaiyawat Wibulswasdi, said 
Thursday that the reserves at the end of 
July totaled $30 billion. The govern- 
ment owes $23.4 billion of that on for-, 
eign-currency contracts used to support 
the baht and due by August 1998. 

Under the IMF package approved 
Wednesday, Thailand will have access 
to $1.6 billion immediately and an ad- 
ditional $810 milli on will be allocated 
after Nov. 30^provided Thailand meets 
economic performance targets. 

Subsequent disbursements will be 
quarterly, provided the targets continue 
to be met, the fund said. • 

To meet conditions to Obtain the cred- 
its, the Thai government announced it 
would reduce spending and increase the 
national sales tax. to 10 percent from 7 
percent 

The decision by the fund’s executive 
board, which represents its 181 member 
nations, followed an international meet- 
ing Aug. 12 in Tokyo at which the 
details were hamm ered out 
Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin 
called the IMF package a ’’significant 
step" toward establishing economic 
stability in Thailand. 

The devaluation of the baht on July 2 
triggered speculation against other cur- 
rencies in southeast Asia. When it was 
all over, the baht bad lost more than 20 
percent of its value against the dol- 
lar. {Bloomberg, AP) 

■ IMF Reopens Kenya Talks 

The IMF is reopening negotiations 
with Kenya over a $216 million loan 
program suspended July 31, Mr. Cam- 
dessus said Thursday. Bloomberg News 
reported. 

The loan program was halted because 
the country "fell short” of meeting 
IMF-required government reforms, the 
IMF said at the time. 

Mr. Camdessus said he spoke' with 
President Daniel arap Mai on Wednes- 
day, ‘‘and told him we are always ready 
to speak, and that my keenest wish is to 
find the conditions for allowing the IMF 
to restart its financing." ... 

He said he agreed to send an IMF 
negotiating team to Nairob i afte r Mr. 
Moi offered “very strong determination 
to tty to address" die issues raised by 

the IMF. _ . . . 

• ‘if it appears," Mr. Camdessus said, 
that Mr. Moi ‘‘can go far enough in die 
right direction, then I would be de- 
lighted to start again our cooperation 
with them." 



PAGE 13 


MCI Shares Plunge 
Amid Takeover Doubt 

Analysts Say BT Seeks Price Cut 


An Indonesian farmer scrutinizing his black pepper plants on the pepper-producing island of Bangka. 

Low Stocks Spice Up Pepper Prices 


Reuters 

LONDON — A recent rally has 
sent pepper prices to their highest 
level in a decade, and spice traders say 
supply is so tight that the market could 
get even hotter. 

Prices may hang on such diverse 
factors as how many Indians will use 
more chili instead of pepper in their 
cuisine and the unpredictable impact 
on world weather and agriculture of an 
El Nino current in die Pacific Ocean 

Black pepper prices have soared in 
recent months to $5,000 per ton and 
almost $6,000 per ton from about 
$2,000 at the beginning of 1997, 
mainly because of a low harvest in 
India, which is the biggest exporter. 

Traders reckon world output this 
year may be some 120.000 tons. 
agaiDSt demand at 160,000. 

"You usually make up a deficit in 
pepper from stocks." said Peter 
Knight at the food importers Cham- 
bers and Knight in London. ‘ Pepper 


keeps well. So people stock it until the 
price goes up,” he added. 

But he said it was possible that 
speculators who have hoarded pepper 
may have emptied much of what they 
had in their warehouses. 

“We think stocks have got much 
smaller," Mr. Knight said. “The key 
to the future then becomes what India 
does next year." 

Imponderables include not only the 
size of India's early 1998 harvest but 
also the use of chili in India which 
consumes about 30,000 tons of pepper 
a year. Lower demand at home would 
allow India to increase exports. 

But elsewhere drought caused by 
the El Nino weather pattern could 
damage pepper vines. 

Indian black pepper for September 
and October delivery was quoted in 
London on Wednesday at $5,900, com- 
pared with $5,450 last week. Traders 
say one reason for the jump may have 
been a Russian demand for 600 tons. 


Besides being sold in supermarkets 
for home consumption, pepper is used 
throughout the food industry.- Mark- 
ups along the supply chain mean there 
is scope to cushion the impact of high 
world prices to the consumer. 

After India, the biggest producers 
are Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam and 
Brazil. Indian traders said the country 
has forecast a production of 55,000 
tons for the year to Oct. 31, compared 
with 62,000 tons last season. 

The intergovernmental Internation- 
al Pepper Community has revised 
down its forecast for Indonesia to 
38,000 tons in 1997 from 39.200 in 
1996. 

“We’re seeing this rally because of 
the worldwide shortage in pepper sup- 
ply,” said a spokesman for the Pepper 
Marketing Board in Kuching. Sarawak 
in Malaysia. 

“There has been lower production 
forecast from us, India, Indonesia and 
all others this year." 


Campdnttn far Staff Firm Ou/orkn 

NEW YORK — Shares in MCI Com- 
munications Corp- dropped sharply 
Thursday amid signs that British Tele- 
communications PLC was seeking a 
lower purchase price for the U.S. tele- 
communications provider. 

The two companies confirmed Thurs- 
day that talks were under way on the 
“economic terms” of the deal. MCI 
issued a statement late Wednesday night 
indicating that the deal was in jeopardy. 

When it was announced in Novem- 
ber, the transaction — which would be 
the biggest takeover of a U.S. company 
by a foreign one — was hailed by some 
as giving BT an added advantage in 
Europe’s telecommunications market, 
which is to be deregulated next year. 

Others said it could add the finishing 
touch to the British company’s world- 
wide expansion plans. Still, some ana- 
lysts had warned that BT was overpaying 
for MCI, which faced changing regu- 
lations at home and brutal competition. 

Then MCI stunned BT and investors 
in July by disclosing that its local phone 
business would lose $800 milli on this 
year, double die earlier estimates, and 
that growth in its main long-distance 
business was slowing. 

Still, analysts said Thursday that BT 
and MCI were expected to complete the 
deal to create a new company called 
Concert PLC because bom have too 
much at stake. MCI needs BT’s deep 
pockets to push into the $100 billion-a- 
year U.S. local phone market, while BT 
needs MCI to give it a foothold in the 
United States and help it compete in- 
ternationally. 

Under current terms, BT would pay 
MCI investors $23.7 billion in cash, 
stock and assumed debt for the 80 percent 
of the company it does not already own. 

BT’s original offer values MCI at 
$41.78 a share, based on Thursday’s 


closing price for BT's American de- 
positary receipts, or ADRs. 

British Telecommunication's ADRs 
rose $4.25 to $66.25 amid expectations 
it would get better terms. In London, BT 
stock closed at 410 pence ($6-52), up 27 
pence. MCI’s stock price fell $6.06, or 
17 percent, to $30,625, while 

Daniel Zito, an analyst at Legg Ma- 
son Wood Walker Inc., said that he 
expected the price paid by BT to come 
down, perhaps by as much as 20 per- 
cent. “It can’t just be candy,” he said. 
“They’ve got to change this substan- 
tially.’’ 

Neither company would comment on 
the specifics of the renegotiations. 

“We shareholders have been battered 
by confusion on this one. but it appears 
that there will be discussion on the 
price," said a manager at a fund that 
bolds BT and MCI. Such a move could 
put the deal on hold for months, he 
said. 

The U.S. Federal Communications 
Commission said Thursday it had ap- 
proved the purchase, subject to con- 
ditions and safeguards that ensure the 
combination will enhance competition 
in the United States. 

BT began a review of the proposed 
alliance last month, amid pressure from 
its holders after MCI issued its profit 
warning. 

If one of the companies were to call off 
the transaction, it would have to pay die 
other a $150 million termination fee, 
according to a filing with the Securities 
and Exchange Commission. 

(Bloomberg. AFX, Reuters) 

■ U.S. Stocks Slump 

Stocks fell Thursday as bond juices 
slumped and investors saw few reasons 
to buy after three consecutive 100-point 

See DEAL, Page 14 


Lease Terms Force PAL 
To Halt Flights to N.Y. 


In a First, UPS Cuts Value of Its Stock 


CcrnfUtd by Our SatfJFwm DupocAa 

ATLANTA — United Parcel Service 
of America Inc. cut the value of its stock 
by $285 million following a Teamsters 
onion strike, the first such reduction in 
the delivery company’s 90-year his- 
tory. 

The. UPS board Wednesday reduced 
the value of each of its 570 million 
outstanding shares, which are not pub- 
licly traded, by 50 cents to $30. 

The directors cut the value of the 
stock as many of the company’s trucks 
began rolling across the United States 
for the first time since the walkout 
began Ang. 3. A letter to the company’s 
stockholders Thursday attributed the 
cut “to die strike." said Mark Dickins, a 
spokesman for fee Atlanta-based com- 
pany. 

the move is an embarrassment for 
the world’s largest package-delivery 
company, which has raised the value of 
its stock each quarter since early 1995 
when it was at $23.50. Most of the 
company’s stock is held by UPS ex- 
ecutives, retirees and trusts established 
by the family of its founders. 

The UPS chairman, James Kelly, said 
the walkout by 190,000 Teamsters un- 
ion members employed by the company 
cost it about $650 million. During the 
strike, the company moved about 
500,000 parcels a day, far less than the 
prestrike average of 12 million that ac- 
counted for about 80 percent of the U .S. 
ground package-delivery market. 

While the company said it expected 
volume to pick up now that the strike is 
over, it saia more than 15,000 jobs could 
be cut because of permanently lost busi- 
ness. 

“All of our jobs depend on our 


volume level," the UPS spokesman, 
Rick Warlick, said. ‘ ‘Certainly as we go 
back to work, as our volume picks up, 
we will add workers. Any businesses 
that have gone away as a result of the 
strike may mean fewer jobs. 

Thirty-five percent of the 4,671 
workers in UPS’s offices in several 
Southern states were laid off Wednes- 
day. said Doug Ashcraft, a manager in 
Little Rock. Arkansas. 

About 1,200 part-time workers also 
were laid off in Massachusetts and 
Rhode Island- In Oregon and southwest 
Washington, 684 workers — 257 of 
them foil-timers — were laid off 
Wednesday. A handful of Atlanta 
drivers were also turned away. 

In Charlotte, North Carolina, only a 
email number of the 800 UPS employ- 
ees were called back to work. Rows of 
idle trucks were parked in foe expansive 
parking lot. 

“There’s not enough work for 
them,” said Norman Bellow, a super- 
visor. 

More than 11,200 members of the 
Teamsters union in the Chicago area 
remained on strike Thursday while try- 
ing to reach a separate contract. 

Most of the drivers, sorters and other 
staff who were involved in the strike 
will be unaffected by the stock-price 
cut, according to the union’s spokes- 
man, Steve Tross. He said teamsters 
union members own less than 3 percent 
of the stock. 

According to an annual filing with the 
Securities and Exchange Commission, 
UPS “has not followed any predeter- 
mined formula” for establishing the 
value of its stock. 

Instead, the company’s “decisions 


have been based primarily on the judg- 
ment of the board of directors as to the 
long-range prospects of UPS rather than 
what die board considers to be the short- 
range trends relating to UPS,’ ’ the com- 
pany said. 

In January, UPS distributed about 
6.27 million shares of UPS stock to 
26,428 managers and supervisors under 
a management-incentive plan. A year 
earlier, UPS distributed 6.3 million 
shares of its stock to 27,223 manageis 
and supervisors. 

The company said it earned $1.1 bil- 
lion in 1996 on revenue of $22.4 bil- 
lion. 

Full-time UPS employees at the com- 
pany for at least a year are allowed to 
purchase its stock either with cash or 
through an individual retirement ac- 
count or payroll deduction, the com- 
pany said. 

Part-time employees with the com- 
pany for at least a year received the 
opportunity to buy in starting in Decem- 
ber 1996. Since the shares are not pub- 
licly traded, employees who want to sell 
their shares must sell to the company at 
the price it sets. (Bloomberg. AP) 


CempUrdby OwSvffFnmt tkspju hes 

MANILA — Philippine Airlines Inc. 
said Thursday it would suspend flights 
to New York because U.S. regulations 
requiring the carrier to hire U.S. pilots 
and maintenance workers were causing 
“staggering losses.” 

The carrier said the final leg of its 
flights from Manila to New York via 
Vancouver would be halted on Sept. 2, 
but that it would retain its three flights 
per week to Canada. 

Philippine Airlines said it had lost 
money because of a requirement that 
forces the airline to use only aircraft, 
pilots and crew leased from a carrier 
designated by the U.S. govemment. 

Under so-called category two restric- 
tion, the U.S. carrier. World Airways, 
provides and charges Philippine Air- 
lines for aircraft, crew, maintenance and 
insurance costs. Philippine Airlines also 
pays for the pilots flying these leased 
planes. 

“The U.S.-imposed category-two re- 
striction serves to benefit only the U.S.- 
designated carrier and forces the Phil- 
ippine carrier into an insoluble catch-22 
situation,” Philippine Airlines said. 

* Philippine Airlines did not give a 
figure for the losses, other than saying 
they were “staggering.” 

In a letter to the Civil Aviation Board 
officially informing it of the move, the 


airlines said U.S. carriers would con- 
tinue to “enjoy the liberty to exercise 
their rights to the Philippines.” 

“By contrast, the Philippine flag car- 
rier has been prevented firm exercising 
the hard-won rights established” in a 
1995 bilateral agreement, the statement 
said. 

Philippine Airlines has been leasing 
four MD-11 passenger planes from 
World Airways Inc. of Herndon, Vir- 
ginia. After suspension of the New York 
leg, the aircraft will be used for foe 
Manila-Vancouver flight for the re- 
mainder of foe lease, foe carrier said. 

World Airways and Philippine Air- 
lines have been haggling over lease pay- 
ments since early last month. The Phil- 
ippine carrier claimed that World 
Airways had not met unspecified ob- 
ligations under its lease contract, thus 
causing delays in its flights. World Air- 
ways denied foe allegations. 

Philippine Airlines, which is con- 
trolled by foe tobacco magnate Lucio 
Tan. posted a net loss of 1.4 billioa 
pesos ($46.28 million} for the first 

? [uarter to March, the latest for which 
igures are available. 

The loss came despite an 8 percent 
jump in revenue from the previous 
quarter, to 7.9 billion pesos, 
rose 9 percent, to 8.9 billion 

(Bloomberg, AFP) 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Brawls 


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Aug. 21 

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Saxnr Revtsfi 


WALL STREET WATCH 


French Oil- Service Firm Rides a Wave 


By Robert Hurtado 

New York Tunes Service 


NEW YORK — Bouygues Off- 
shore, one of a handful of oil-service 
companies benefiting from foe global 
quest for new supplies through deep- 
sea drilling, was already starting to 
catch analysts' attention. When Elf 
Aquitaine, the French oil concern, an- 
nounced a major find Tuesday off foe 
shore of Angola and its shares surged, it 
also lifted foe share price of Bouygues 
Offshore, one of its suppliers. 

Based in France, Bouygues Off- 
shore was formed in 197S as a wholly 
owned subsidiary of Bouygues SA. 
one of the world’s largest engineering 
and construction companies. 

In November, the unit, which builds 
offshore platforms, completed an initial 
public offering at $12.38 for each 
American depositary receipt, which 
represents half of an ordinary French 
share; the offering cut the parent’s stake 
to 60 percent. In late trading Thursday, 
the ADR was up 81.25 cents, al 
$19.8125; it closed Tuesday at $17.25. 

But the prospects for Bouygues Off- 
shore are by no means limited to Elf. 
Such companies as Exxon Corp. and 
Mobil Corp- have intensified their 
search for new reserves, particularly in 
previously unreachable locations, con- 
tracting with the company to build float- 
ing drilling platforms and related equip- 
ment. Also among its largest customers 
are Royal Dutch/Shell Group, Chevron 
Corp-, Texaco Inc. and Total SA. 


Last year, 58 deepwater floating 
platforms operated worldwide, and foe 
number is expected to reach 107 within 
the next couple of years, according to 
Paul Chambers of Lehman Brothers. 

“In the last couple of years, design 
and engineering advances in oil-plat- 
form construction have enabled foe in- 
ternational energy companies to ex- 
plore and drill for deepwater reserves 
that heretofore were beyond their 
grasp,” he said. 

“Bouygues Offshore is trading at a 
significant 30 percent discount to its 
peer group,” said J. Michael Gallipo of 
Van Eck Funds, a mutual fund group in 
New York. 

“Our investment rationale is that we 
consider Bouygues a good play on foe 
West African market, which has been 
one of foe hotter exploration areas over 
foe past few years,” he said. One rea- 
son it trades at a discount, he said, is its 
lack of a presence in the Gulf of Mex- 
ico, where other oil-service companies 
— and foe American money managers 
investing in them — have focused. 

Mr. Gallipo forecasts that the com- 
pany will earn $1 to $1.05 a share this 
year and about $ J .30 fo $ J .35 in J 998. 
He set the target price at about $22 per 
ADR and called that conservative, 
adding that the company's growth po- 
tential was exceeding expectations. 

Though the company is seeing rising 
earnings from operations, the growth is 
masked by a cut in financial-related 
income, including interest income and 
currency exchange. As a result, the 


company earned $1 .06 a share in 1996, 
down from $1.24 a share in 1995. 

Technological advances are signif- 
icantly contributing to growth oppor- 
tunities. Tens of thousands of fixed 
platforms are perched atop offshore oil 
and gas sites, but the largest fixed 
platform- can drill down only about 
1,000 feet (300 meters). But since the 
1980s, floating platform systems have 
made it possible to drill up to one mile 
<1.6 kilometers) deep in the ocean., 
unlocking oil and gas reserves once 
considers unreachable. 

Drilling depth is not the only ad- 
vantage. “Because of their mobility,” 
said Ivan Replumaz. chairman of 
Bouygues Offshore, said, “floating 
platforms can be reused after the de- 
pletion of an ocean field.” 

One of foe world's top locations for 
deepwater drilling is West Africa, 
where Bouygues Offshore dominates. 
Ip 1996, 55 percent of the company’s 
$634.4 million in sales were derived 
from customer contracts in West 
Africa. The company also has a sizable 
presences in the North Sea and Asia. 

New contracts are considered the in- 
dustry's life blood, and within the 
couple of months Bouygues Offs! 
has won four, with a combined value of 
$175 million. 

Many of its previous contracts are 
entering the more profitable phases of 
fabrication and installation, said Dan 
Pickering of the research firm Simmons 
& Co. and the company is bidding on 
contracts worth about $1.4 billion. 




PAGE 14 


Investor’s America 


The Dow 


7200 

6400. 



30-Year T-Bond Yield 


720 

620 

6.40 



Dollar in Deutsche marka ® Dollar in Yen 


1.70 

l.W 



M A 
1997 


M J J A 


130 

120 

no 



M A 
1997 


BccKengs 

NYSE 

Index 

TheDow 

Thursday 
^ 3.30 PM 

7896.04 

Prev. 

Close 

8021.23 

% 

Change 

-1.56 

NYSE 

S&P500 

92SJ34 

939.39 

-1.44 

NYSE 

S&P too 

901 2A 

914.65 

-1.47 

NY SE 

Composite 

479.92 

485.68 

-1.19 

U& 

Nasdaq Composite 1611.73 

1628.64 

-1.04 

AMEX 

Market Value 

646.09 

646.76 

-0.10 

Toronto 

TSE Index 

6752.20 

6771.40 

-0^8 

SSo Pairio 

Bo vespa 

10S30.78 

10841^8 

+1^9 

Mexico City 

Bdsa 

5074.49 

5123.04 

-0.95 

Buenos Aires Merva) 

852.47 

866.57 

-0.47 

Santiago 

IPSA Caenerai 

5638.17 

5654.20 

-0.28 

Caracas 

Capital General 

9332.89 

S305.99 

+0.29 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, AUGUST 22. 1997 

THE AMERICAS 

Oldsmobile at 100 Gets Face-Lift 

Centennial Celebrations Dampened by Long Slide in Sales 



r'<ca. 


Source: Bloomberg. Reure’s 


lnL.Tn4it.1uI Herald Tribune 


Reuters 

DETROIT — Oldsmobile, the 
oldest surviving American car 
brand, marked its 100th birthday 
Thursday in the midst of a massive 
product overhaul aimed at halting a 
dozen-year sales slide. 

The General Motors Corp. divi- 
sion, based in Lansing, Michigan, 
marked the occasion with festivals 
and a parade of more than 2,000 
Oldsmobiles from nearly every 
model year, but it was not able to 
crow about a sales increase in Its 
centennial year. 

Lost production because of model 
changeovers and strikes are expected 
to hold its 1997 U.S. sales below the 
33 1 ,287 vehicles sold in 1 996, Olds- 
mobile's worst year since 1961. 

In 1985, Oldsmobile sales peaked 
at 1 .07 million cars, when its midsize 
Cutlass models reigned supreme. But 
a lack of new products and a muddied 
marketing image led consumes to 
think of it as a maker .of plain, tra- 
ditional American cars for aging 
buyers, the opposite of its “Not Your 
Father's Oldsmobile'* advertising 


campaign in die late 19S0&. 

Founded by Ransom E. Olds on 
Aug. 21, 1897, in Lansing. Olds- 
mobile once had a well-deserved 
reputation for technological inno- 
vation. Its 1901 Curved Dash model 
became one of the industry's biggest 
early hits, helped by an order by the 
U.S. Postal Service for use as the 
first motorized mail truck. 

Oldsmobile became the first GM 
car division to offer a fully automatic 
transmission, in 1 940. and the first to 
offer front- wheel- drive, in the 1966 
Toronado. Along with Cadillac, it 
ushered in the era of high-compres- 
sion V-8 engines in 1949. offering 
acceleration that earned it the nick- 
name of GM’s “Rocket” division. 

Its 442 muscle car and Cutlass 
models led to huge volume growth 
in the 1960s and 1970s. but by the 
1980s. Olds had begun to lose its 
luster. Sales declined, buyers aged, 
and by 1992, there was speculation 
that GM’s board of directors would 
kill off Oldsmobile to simplify the 
automaker’s confusing array of 
overlapping products. 


But John Rock, the plain-iaikisg 
Oldsmobile general manager 
charged with saving ihe division, 
quickly squelched the rumor: b» 
staging an early unveiling of ine 
Aurora, a sleek luxury sedan '-hat 
would help reposition Oldsmobile 
as an upscale competitor to Japanese 
imports. 

GM approved several “centen- 
nial” products to follow, including 
the all-new Cutlass sedan, which 
entered production last year, an ail- 
new Silhouette minivan, and the 
midsize Intrigue, just reaching 
showrooms now. 

In 1998, Olds will drop its 
Achieva compact car. now sold only 
to fleet buyers such as car rental 
companies and corporations, in fa- 
vor of the more upscale Alero. and it 
will replace the '88 model in time 
for the 2000 model year. 

“We're on our way back.” said 
Randy Fox, an Oldsmobile spokes- 
man, adding that Olds could sell 
363.000 cars, minivans and sport 
utility vehicles in 1998. assuming 
GM meets its production goals. 




*?.r 


- .r ,?! ! ' 

ijii ri 'y 

** ii,n ! 

f ¥■ 


4M 


||J*‘ VUnt/nir twufcd ftew 

An antique Olds parked before the capital in Lansing, Michigan. 


Very briefly: 


Fed Eases Bank Rules on Securities 

WASHINGTON t Bloomberg) — The Federal Reserve 
Board voted Thursday to make it easier for banks to un- 
derwrite securities by loosening rules that restrict bank hold- 
ing companies from working with their securities affiliates. 

The change, proposed in January, eliminates most of the 
remaining restrictions that complicate banking companies’ 
management of their securities affiliates. For example, banks 
will now be able to offer credit guarantees to customers of 
their securities affiliates. 

Comverse Buys Boston Technology 

WOODBURY, New York (Bloomberg) — Comverse 
Technology Inc. said Thursday that it had agreed to acquire 
Boston Technology Inc. for about S85S.5 million in stock, 
raising its profile in the market for telecommunications equip- 
ment and software. 

Each Boston Technology share will be worth 0.65 of a 
Comverse Technology share, and Comverse Technology share- 
holders will own about 59 percent of the combined company. 

• Chrysler Corp. will halt assembly of Neon cars for two weeks 
Monday, idling 2.SQ0 workers, because of sluggish sales. 

• Barnes & Noble Inc/s second-quarter loss narrowed 50 
percent, to Si. 37 million, on higher sales at its superstores. 
The top U.S. bookseller said it would split its stock 2-for-l. 

• The American Medical Association, stuns by public crit- 
icism. is moving to reverse its decision to endorse health care 
products, with top executives calling for sharply scaling back 
an exclusive deal with Sunbeam Corp. 

• SmithKline Beecham PLC is being sued by 37 major 
health insurers, who accuse its clinical laboratory division of 
overbilling them by hundreds of millions of dollars. 

• President Bill Clinton has imposed a 60-day cooling-off 

period to try to avoid a strike by 2,500 Amtrak track- 
maintenance Workers. ’ \P. BlmmKrz. vjt 

AMEX 


Dollar Slips as Bundesbank Keeps the Market on Its Toes 


Cjwnpthrd fov Our Staff Fnm DUruskn 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against the Deutsche mark on 
Thursday after the Bundesbank 
signaled it could raise interest rates 
at any time to defend the German 
currency. 

A slide in U.S. markets also con- 
tributed to the dollar's falL 

The German central bank left its 
floor discount rate unchanged at a 
historic low of 2.50 percent and its 
ceiling Lombard rate steady at 4.50 
percent. It said it would set the se- 
curi ties- repurchase rate each Tues- 
day from now on, enabling the bonk 
to alter the rate before its next meet- 
ing, on Sept. 4. 

For the past three years, Lhe 
Bundesbank has either announced 
(he terms for its weekly repurchase 
auctions after each twice-monthly 
council meeting or let the repo rate 
float in line with market demand. Its 
change in stance was a necessary 
step to stop the mark from rumbling, 
putting the country's low inflation 
rate at risk, analysis said. 

“It's a very clever step.” said 
Ulrich Beckmann, an economist at 
Deutsche Bank AG. "It’s good to 
keep the currency markets on then- 
toes. and the Bundesbank is a master 
at that.” 

While many traders do not expect 


the Bundesbank to raise interest 
rates in the immediate future, a re- 
spected German research group said 
the bank was likely to do so by the 
end of the year. 

In 4 P-M. trading, the dollar slid to 
I.S365 DM from 1.8564 DM. It also 
fell io 117.225 yen from 117.680 
yen. 

The dollar was also dragged 
down as U.S. slock and bond mar- 
kets reversed three days of g ains . 
Global investors selling U.S. assets 
often convert profits into their home 
currencies. 

* ‘The dollar's trading off the back 
of weak asset markets.” said Karl 
Halligan, chief currency trader at 
CIC Bank New York. “Traders bad 
a sense of relief with three good days 
for stocks, but now they're getting 
superstitious.” 

The dollar began its descent in 
European trading after the Bundes- 
bank announced its policy and Ger- 
many’s influential ffo research in- 
stitute forecast the central ban); was 
likely to raise its repo rate by half a 
percentage point by early 1 998. 

“The Ifo’s report took a little 
cream off the dollar.” Mr. Halligan 
said. 

An increase in German rates 
would prop the mark by making 
some mark-denominated "assets, in- 


cluding bonds, more alluring. For 
weeks, Bundesbank officials have 
hinted they might raise interest rates 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

to keep the dollar from extending its 
20 percent climb against the mark 
this year. 

StilL, most traders said that they 
thought high unemployment and 
lower- than-expected tax revenues in 
Germany would make a rale rise 
unlikelv’in the near future. 


The dollar fell against the yen 
amid concern over the U.S. trade 
deficit with Japan- 

“The widening trade deficit made 
people afraid of pushing the dollar to 
the 1 20 yen level,” said Ben Strauss, 
a trader's! Bank Julius Baer. 

Meanwhile. President Jacques 
Chirac of France held a “long con- 
versation” by phone with Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl of Germany on 
Thursday morning, and both men 
reaffirmed their commitment to the 
launch date and criteria for Euro- 


pean monetary union, an official at 
Mr. Chirac’s office said. 

"They had a long conversation. 
On EMU, they both made a point of 
reiterating their determination to re- 
spect the timetable and the criteria 
and their total convergence of views 
on these subjects,” the official said. 

Against other European curren- 
cies. the dollar fell to 6. 1 855 French 
francs from 6.2535, and to 1.5143 
Swiss francs from 1.5235. The 
und slipped to S 1.5920 from 
1.5935. (Bloomberg. Reuters) 


f 


E 


DEAL: MCI Shares Drop Amid Doubts Over RFs Purchase 


Continued from Page 13 

jumps in the Dow Jones industrial 
average. Bloomberg News reported 
from Sew York. 

Wells Fargo fell 8 to 259 .50 on 
repons that Warren Buffett, the 
bank’s largest shareholder, had so id 
his entire 'stake during the second 
quarter. The bank denied the re- 
ports. saving Mr. Buffet remained a 
“substantial shareholder." 

' ‘What is going on in the markets 
is this August choppiness.” said 
Sykes Wilford of C EXT Investment 
Management Corp. in New York. 


“We had some great days in equit- 
ies, so people are going to sell. We 
won't get much of a pattern until 
September.” 

The Dow finished 127218 points 
lower, at 7.893.95. 

Bond prices declined as signs of 
strong growth raised concern that 
inflation could accelerate. 

The price of the 30-vear Treasury 
bond slid 25/32 to 97 3/32. pushing 
its yield up to 6.60 percent from 6.54 
percent. 

The Nasdaq Composite Index fell 
21.94 points, to 1.606.76. dragged 
down by the sharp drop in MCI 


shares. Standard & Poor’s 500 index 
dropped 14.30 points, to 925.05. 

Jeffrey Applegate, chief invest- 
ment strategist at Lehman Brothers, 
said he recommended shunning 
stocks in telecommunications ser- 
vice providers, whether long-dis- 
tance, local or cellular. * ‘They're all 
overvalued,” he said. “Deregula- 
tion is going to be great for con- 
sumers and awful for sharehold- 
ers.” - - 

Harley-Davidson shares rose 2 to 
56 after the motorcycle maker set a2- 
for-1 stock split, payable Sept 26 to 
shareholders of record on SepL 12 


■ 



TforfCJ' ■** 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursday’s 4 P.NL Close 

The fop 250 mcsl cdive shares, 
up ;a the closing an iV* -tree?. 
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931613 807109 7B4 2 47 78935S -12778 

2937.19 7917.36 792175 2932-32 

731 85 232J6 229.11 Z794I 3.15 

246138 MM 45 244683 2*56.93 


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Standards Poore 

P ruo OT Todar 

High Low Clou 4 PJVL 
Industrials 11OSJ51067J31 105JS lOSSJfl 
Transp 66636 &S5JZ3 66596 665-S3 

UNihcs 199.19 19BJ5 199.12 19644 

Finance 106^5 106.65 108J4 10641 

SPOT 93* Js 924^8 939J5 925.05 

SP100 934^5 899M2 *14*5 925.05 


NYSE 

Com posit* 
inaustnow 

T roust, 

U*»» 

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Comps** 

Induwnls 

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Insnionce 

Finance 

Tramp. 

AMEX 


HI** IM Uj»t 

486.00 4783)2 479.76 
41527 604J2 6OT.K 
44 IDO 438J4 640.03 
78087 205.19 206.0a 
*5iSS 44655 446.12 


HlflD Low LOO 

1637.15 160U2 1606.77 
1387.10 1777.96 177339 
1719^2 1 71154 1714.73 
1717^7 I6WJ5 1707.9V 
705050 ID32J7 7037 05 
103143 101400 ICI400 


Hlgn Un> Unt 
640.44 64581 64456 


Dow Jones Bond 

20 Bonds 
ra Utilities 
10 Industrials 


□dm 

10307 

101^0 

106JS 


»«- 
■5.94 
-7 77 
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250 
■5.99 


■71.93 

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3895 5 34’, 34 ii*-. : 

J46W !J- IJi. IJ « ■'« 

35674 «0*i 30‘r3«i« 

34530 47, JO-’rJI!. -f e 


Aug. 21, 1997 

Hj ^.1 Iff a. tale*. Ccje 

Grams 

CORN fCBOTJ 

5.X0 tu n.eniun. a-h oc’Sl’ST:,. 


U -V- urns ■>» r ? r.’. 


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'i305as.. arr-j 
Scr=7 je.K O.V1 UJX. 

cc ’Z27 

:^ C S “ - .13! ,-X C33 ZSSc 

VJT 9? *14: :-i: * • v .743 ir— 

Si: » « -t-XC .’.iii sesi 4-c: 

■■•tn raw - iL'ii ^ Si* 

Metals 


VOL 

610219 32-» 


Low Laa 

301, *0*, 


153846 101 la W r -» 98 : 
90765 88-;* 85*a B5'« 

85615 1BV> 176. iff* 
85575 52H «v* 5\ ; i 

7862) 7?b 77 77-: « 

78605 1470 13T, 138 

S936I 41** 39*a 40'* 

58499 *86* 471. 47' l 
58480 37ft 35*, ITt 
J7576 £4 51 '* 57«» 

56728 107*4 1044a 104*4 
54851 W, 7 7*. 


9oL High 
53583 94*4 
50437 4* 
8516 61* 

7533 44* 

72M 
6734 
6401 1241 

SV4B 33 
5871 6% 

5654 94* 


BPV* 277"* 

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NOIL(CBOT) 




Aug 97 

WjC 

oajo 

-ia* 

1.164 

cenls per to 




Sep or 

i*:c 

OiCO 

■Ml -3=.= 

’5.77a 

23.00 

22-72 

2195 

+0.83 

17.897 

Off 97 

IBCliO 

99.55 

W^5 -«L=0 

LOT- 

7120 

22Ai 

7310 

+080 

14.140 

Nov 97 

99 j0 




2160 

7i/i 

2145 

♦0 83 

-0441 

Etc 97 

IWOO 

K.*) 


11,92; 

2175 


7170 

-090 

7.766 






7197 

2175 

7197 

+ 088 

6499 

Feb 93 

90 00 


18*5 -C 77 


2*20 

7311 

2*M 

-0 90 

1.950 

Mar 08 

osoo 

9130 

OU0 -C-'i 

2.735 

1X0W Weds sates 10059 


Apr OS 

9B40 

07 75 

4;;s -$0* 

Z92 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 


■4* 


Athraneea 
Oecinea 
Undmnged 
Tata) raswn 
NewHigm 
New Low* 


AMEX 

Adamant 

DediDBd 

ifndiaroed 
TflttU bsoes 
NewHIatK 
New Laws 


911 

1936 

541 

3388 

126 

10 


250 

304 

173 

777 

31 


1956 

W3 

542 

Ml 

1B9 

18 


360 

227 

157 

739 

37 

6 


Nasdaq 

Athancea 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Tim nsues 
New HtotB 
New Lows 

Market Sales 


NYSE 

Amen 

Nasdaq 

fnmSSons. 


1556 

1721 

7097 

SKO 

130 

56 


2537 

161* 

1596 

5752 

246 

56 


Teds, 

400 

504.99 

27.73 

660.73 


633.18 

35.00 

71153 


Ess sales 70 000 iVeCs sates y Z *5 
■••ods each irt M1.714. us 20237a 

SOYBEAN MEJU. 1CBOTJ 

lOO Ictis- denar* per Ian 

SCO 97 217 JD 23210 23670 *-100 26C83 

007* 214J0 21230 213.00 -3-ST. i5.:42 

D« 97 2Bo 00 20730 20200 -1.00 4il43 

Jan 08 X2.SC 19940 IW40 -2.10 6*50 

7Anr9B 198.00 195 JO 195.^1 *140 8670 

May 98 19BJM 19440 19511 -220 2074 

EsI soles 20JHQ Vwd s sates 201.254 

Wed s ppen In* I0&24& up 404 


5ep 97 
00 97 
Dec 97 
Jan 98 
War 98 
76ay 98 
E it. sale 
WOO'S open im 95.202. up 505 

SOYBEANS [CBOT1 

5.000 tra minimum- cents per Bushel 

Sop 97 461 645 o5fl", +12*. 13346 

NOV 97 625 610 624 -|4 81539 

Jan 98 638I* 618 *25’. *12 17JI9 

Mares 637 629!; 6341* +ll'» 6.918 

wares w tl) M *■»’« 54.74 

Ed sales 3&000 Weds salrv 21,154 

YJMs open ini 134.583. up 838 

WHEAT (CfiOn 

5000 bunantmum-centa pec bushel 

Sop 97 370 3&3 1 ; 3wJI* *6'« 22443 

Dec 97 3115 3809: 384'.* +7 57^82 

Mar 98 39714 391 39*1: ,7>; 14^577 

f Any 08 399 1 * J9J*, J99’., +7*. 1.B76 

Est sates 1&000 Weds sates 19.085 

Weds open Ini 106.77a up 1.242 


Livestock 

CATTLE fCMERJ 

41000 lbs.- toils per Bl 

Auu*7 *7.00 6*40 66 95 + 0J7 1.29? 

Ocl 97 69J15 frtso 68.57 4J37 49.1*3 

Dec 97 70.75 70J77 7035 -015 22516 

Feb 98 *1 85 T23S 7242 -OJOT 11,137 

Apr 9a 7-L80 7425 74J7 41)2 51751 

Jun 98 7152 H17 71.25 -0.17 12« 

Esi sates 12416 wen* safes 17^42 

Weds open bit 93.225. off 95 


GOLSlNCNDO 

2173 cj - 5; ^ per =. 

Aus J .' 3I4CC 

134 

SfE 

12LK -* »: 

; 

Cff97 

r_'-: “45: 3:45; -* =•; 

-5-715 

Dec 77 

3”.;: r. 27*rC -•.» ; 

::.zts 

Frt -= 

2:s“ 3H5-; --.so 

■4144 

Jff'92 

=o:c r::: e:.;: -i» 

ir?: 

J'.m 4= 

—7-57 -7.7-7 

"-457 


3US -ISC 

1123 

Cff»3 

ZH.7Z -Z3C 

11! 


Esl soles N.A. •%« s soles 13^- 
wens open m! !9f.£r. rr* F r,» 


HI GRADE COPPER fNCMW 
25.0% lbs ■ cems re* ft 


H.5J1 urn Lntesl Chge OpM 
Pw. eper* <n~- 786^71 ofl 1-092 

: 0-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS UWAT1F) 

=F530.003-=!s=f;00pcJ 

super we* nat: -002 isus9 

•>£<C?9;: 0932 99.14 - 002 Til 32 
■.to?S 9941 9146 9t« -002 0 

Si’ , sates 79 535. 

Cser.n-tbdJTlcRl.OU 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (L1FFE) 

!TL IK nr.COon - pts DtlOOnd 

Sep a: IJ6.95 13653 13655 -O.I7 100609 

Dec 77 1C857 ICS. 66 10859 -0.15 17,987 

E-J setes 4 iW Pits’, sates: 79,236 

= i« 3peni.iL- liaw» up 7419 

LIBOR I -MO NTH tCMEKJ 

S3 imu.cn- prt aflOOpcL 

Sen 97 9436 9455 9456 OimclL 15,945 

Off 97 M 35 9i3J 9453 -001 0157 

No* «7 945CI *ua 9459 4101 7476 

Es). sales NA Weds sates 3.712 

■.VcdS open ml 38409. sff 16.743 


High Uw Lite) Ohga OpM. 


Sep 97 
Dec 97 
Mar 98 
Jim 98 
Sep 98 
Dec 98 


9130 9357 93J9 UnOi. 97503 

93.70 93A6 9347 -002 «ZBa 

9400 9196 93.97 —002 5*07* 

94 25 94.18 9452 +O0T 43.972- 

0658 9452 9456 *002 37,326 

94.45 9441 9442 *001 29.057, 

ESI. ate: 3&06« FNmr. sates- 57408 
Rev. open intj 381498 off 1444 

industrials 

COTTON 2 CNCTNJ 
50000 lbs.- cents per Bl 

Off 97 7400 7345 73.79 +014 &173. 

Dec 97 7405 7375 7389 *014 42466 

Mar 98 7555 7SXM 75.10 +007 11^86 

Mar 98 75.93 7575 7505 +007 4840 

Jul «8 76.75 7640 7640 *008 4437. 

Est sales 6500 Wed’S sates 7,304 
Weds open Ini 79.305* o« 284 

HEATING OIL (NMER) 

42, 000 gal cents per gal 
Sep 97 SUM 5400 54.00 +0 5] 30690 
5525 5525 5525 +0 87 36.785 

56.91 5520 5523 -158 19,444 

57.71 56.10 56.18 -123 20767 

5825 56.70 56.78 -123 15716 

5826 5688 5688 -148 &7S9 

57J0 56.03 56.03 -1. 


Ocl 97 
Nov 97 
Dec 97 
Jan 98 
Feb 98 
Mar 98 


Dividends 

Company 


Par Amt Rec Roy Company 


IRREGULAR 
AmerFstPrepM 2 


REGULAR 


Grupa Radio 
Mattie 


_ .1089 8-31 9-30 
b .1884 8-2S - 

Petrol _ ^4368 8-31 9-28 

STOCK SPLIT 


SI 22 ‘v TT** 22 


121 
1 26 
IB 
199 
Iff 
ns 
1193 


in 

IIYa 

irs 

12va 

J'-l 

lla* 

n-> 


isv. 

17*4 

75. 


Advanced Fbre 2 For I split. 
Barnes & Noble 2 for I spM. 
Hailey Davidson 3 far 1 split. 
Summit Bancorp 3 tor 2 split. 


11 h 

3+ 

1I*» 

22te 

JT'. 

4*4 

I** 

1*4 

?6». 

n*-. 

io>* 


13ft. 

T* 

no 

3M 
» 
n» 
i«e. 
If* 
21 “k 
12»* 
II'* 
384* 
irt» 

is*. 

17V» 

2ft 


IV* 

17V; 

46 1 


Community Bk 
Phoenix EmraBd 
Phoenb Hi YM B. 
Phoenix USGv A, 


INCREASED 

0 20 9-15 10-10 

M .145 B-20 8-21 
M .066 8-30 8-31 
M .05 8-20 8-21 


INITIAL 


Abrams Ind 
AmentBank 
Asno-Med Inc 
Conodlub REIT g 
Champion inti 
Coiran Bancorp 
Crass Timber Oil 
EMC Insurance 
Enerphrs Resaurg 
FL East Coast 
Fs* Fin corp WL 
Genuine Parts 
Horace Mann 
Huntington Bnc 
Mitchell Bncp 
MMcheU Energy A, 
MITche* Energy B. 
Natl City Bncohn 
Soanal 


-,** Bednanl Bnqi n 
Hortey Davidson n 
Summit Bncp n 
Western Bncp 


_ .17 9-15 9 26 

. j035 9-12 9-26 

. 27 10-9 11-3 

.. .15 9-10 104 


Skvwestlnc 
VabparCorp 
a-aa noat (Mvproxknate amaarit per 
sbatWADR; g-payaHe In Cenattan funds; 
m-raonlMyi q-qiwterly; s-scait-annool 


FEEDER CATTLE ICMER] 

SDM0 ibs- cenb per ID. 

Per Amt Rec Pay *ug 97 9025 aais B022 *020 xsn 

Sep 97 7925 79J12 7927 *0.20 3730 

Od97 7925 78.75 79.47 +015 6253 

NO»97 8IJJ2 80Jt> 80.77 -0.10 1969 

Jan 98 81 95 81 10 81.42 -44S 111? 

Mm 98 8125 80.30 H125 -020 1.106 

EsI salev 4.691 Weds sales 4783 
Weds open W 21.770. ofl Mil 

HOGS-Lean (CMERJ 
40,000 lbs.- cenh per to. 

Off «7 7027 70 00 70.25 -0.12 17.903 

Dec 97 6737 67.10 67.15 -010 6,268 

Feb 98 66J0 662d 66-32 -0.15 £713 

Apr 98 6£70 6220 4220 4.10 1.620 

Jlffl 98 67.15 66.97 67 05 +0 07 843 

EsL sates 4171 Wads sales 6,910 
Weds open hd 30321, up 870 

PORK BELLIES ICMER) 

■40000 lbs.- eertfs per h. 

Aug 97 86-4U 8340 86.40 +225 558 

FM 98 71.70 70J7 7125 +0.25 3231 

Mar 98 71 JO 71 JO 7140 +0.40 715 

Est sates 90S Werfs sales 1.195 
Wed's open Ini *454 ofl 88 


Q 

-04 

9-5 

9-19 

0 

.14 

8-29 

9-15 

Q 

.04 

9-19 

10-3 

M .0866 

8-29 

9-5 

Q 

JH 

9-19 

10-17 

Q 

.04 

9-15 

10-1 

O 

J155 

9-30 

10-15 

Q 

.15 

9-4 

9-18 

M (D25 

9-1 

9-15 

Q 

.10 

9-S 

9 19 

O 

.15 

9-15 

9-30 

0 

J4 

9-5 

10-1 

0 

.135 

8-29 

9-15 

0 

JO 

9-16 

10-1 

„ 

JO 

8-28 

9-10 

Q 

.12 

9-10 

10-1 

O .1325 

9-10 

10-1 

O 

.16 

9-23 

IO- 7 

Q 3775 

9-10 

10-1 

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9-30 

10-14 

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10-1 

10-15 


Esi. soles NA. •Tod's sales l".,9?9 
Wetfs, open M is .'62, up iff 

SILVER (NCMTO 

4000 lra» cents per tray az. 

Aug 97 449.90 -I.SO 2J 

Sep 97 45420 44620 45020 +120 42*27 
Off 97 441 20 +120 78 

Dec 97 4*1JX1 45520 457.30 +leD 25.5?o 

Jon 98 45890 +160 22 

MarlB 46520 463JJ0 463.90 +1 70 10.77? 

May 98 +a8 10 -180 34176 

Jill 98 472J0 +1.90 1120 

Esl sales N A Weds sates 16.905 
Weds open ini B94J09,'up 77 

PLATINUM (NMER) 

50 iray ct- dollars per Iray at 

Off 97 41700 41020 41100 +1.60 10255 

Jan 98 411.00 406.00 40620 +110 1*32 

Aorta 40620 401 JU 401.00 +1 10 475 

Jff^ 397 JX) +U0 2 

Est. sates 1.134 Weds sates 1.876 

Weds open ml 1X714 off 129 

Clast- Premous 

LONDON METAI2 (LME) 

Dadois per metric Ian 
UoadnDtHMiGnte) 

Spot 160500 1688.00 166400 166640 

wrwrtl 1631 DO 163100 1629 DO 1O0D0 

Copper Cathodes (High Grade) 

Spal 2192 DO 7195.00 218000 218100 

Forward ?18?JW 2183 iW 7177.00 JlTaoo 

Lead 

Spol *05 DO 606 00 507 00 7>3W 

Forward 617.00 61800 606 ft 607 00 

NiC*el 

5p« 659000 660000 06*5.00 667500 

Forward 6690 00 670000 6765.00 677500 

Tin 

Spol 5335.00 534500 534000 534500 


ZM (Special High Grade] 

Spot 164500 
Forward 1488 00 U89DC isdOOO 1502.00 

High Low Ooie Chge Clplnl 


EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

Si mflncn-pti of 100 pel 

Sep 97 «42S 9426 9427 Oundu 4851882 

Off 97 9420 9418 9418 -OSH *197 

Dec 97 9412 9408 9409 -004 48X196 

Mar 98 9406 9*00 9*01 005 34X292 

Junes 93.95 9309 9390 4105 280600 c* 

Sop 98 9307 9X80 9181 -006 219014 22? ^ 

Dec ®8 9Z 75 ®3a 3 9170 -005 18*208 “P® 11 r** 1 151892. up 1669 

Mai 99 «372 9166 91*8 -0JJ5 130073 

Jun 99 9X67 93.6J 9362 -006 101227 

Sep 99 9164 9159 9129 -0D6 0*847 

Dec 99 9126 9327 9X52 -OOfr 71*09 

Marin 9326 9321 7152 -005 6*097 

Est. sates NA Weds sates 25*047 
•.Verts open W 2,7*7.271 off 2X201 


! 

4 

1 : 


7.349 


BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

67200 pounds. S per pound 

Sep 97 12988 12833 1-5916-00010 50354 

Dec 97 12870 1 5790 12863-00010 1.182 

Mar 98 12798 4 0010 208 

Est sates NA Vtars sates 7,747 

Weds open ml 51,745. up 1.972 

CANADIAN DOLLAR [CMER} 

100000 dffiart S per Cda dir 

Sep 97 .7199 .7171 .717S-OOQ11 5IU62 

Dec 97 7237 .7306 .7212 -0 0013 5*111 

Mar 98 . 72 65 7230 .7241 -O.0O13 *98 

Esl. lotos NA Weds sates 7.19J 

Wads open Ini 6* 735, up 371 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

1 3S4W0 martvs. 5 per mart 

S*p97 2455 2385 24J7 + 0 0050 UK. 930 

Dec 97 2484 2428 2J 78 -0 0050 468* 

Mm 98 2504 2504 2509-00050 1J7B 

Est sates NA Weds sates Xi^Wi 

Weds, open W 109.10*. up ■ 

JAPANESE YEN ICMER] 

(75 m Alton *wv J per JiM yen 
Lcp97 85*6 8498 85*0 -0 0077 7 5702 

Dec 97 6678 .6632 8*7.’ -00078 2.47P 

WWr 99 8788-0 0029 537 

Esl. sates NA Weds sates 19.922 
WedS open Ull 7X718. ad 2251 


N« 97 
Dec 97 
Jt*l99 
Fet» 98 
Mar 98 


LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 

LOOT bbL- dotera per bbi 
Off 97 19.70 1966 19 JO 4121 107,705 

2023 1920 19.7B 4123 45.7D6 

JUS 1920 19.85 -051 49.875 

2022 1928 1988 -0.49 30715 

20J2 19.89 1929 -0 48 1*774 

20J8 1909 1909 4).* 9,028 
Esl. sates 111.584 Weds soles 110418 
Weds open In) 419.900. off I5J319 

NATURAL GAS [NMER) 

11000 mm bhrs. s per mm Hu 
Sep _97 2.474 ism 2-367 -0.062 J*5S5 

2210 2380 3.398 -0.080 49247, 
1M5 2220 2232 -OJ072 UUD5 

2- 7 *S 1650 2262 -0.068 19.203 

2^80 2*75 2*7J -(L005 1&617 

La50 2480 2495 -0055 1X925 

Esl sdos 7 1,695 Wecfs sales 72^50 
WftTs open inf 32X894 up 974 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 

4-000 gal cenls per gal - 

Sop 97 69 75 66.90 67.15 -Iff Tito* % 

22. m ™ ,S 4,0150 60 -19 -1 76 304^ r 

Nov 97 5800 5730 57 J9 -1^* 11.1*3 

S7D0 S6.60 56.79 -13* 12501 

P-M 5*60 S4A9 -1.21 U.12S 

®05 5675 56.99 -121 J4J2 

57*9 -131 4*54 

60.14 -121 *327 

Esrsate* 44OM Weds sates 39.9*5 
Weds open im 111.25a op ix3j 

gasoil (IPE) 

U i dollars per metrtc ton ■ lets at 100 tens 
5*P97 ITliM 1*875 1*9.00 -2JS 22.111 
22.” 1^75 170.75 171 DO -225 It KB 

(£:« !Sif !2r!! x™ 


Off 97 
Nov 97 
Dec 97 
Jan 98 
Feb 98 


Cwc 97 
Jan 98 
Feb 98 
Mar 98 
Apr 98 


SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

1 2X000 francs, s per Inane ::+•■• — /.54a 

K- ^ ^7, ■%£ rss ^ ^ JSS m2 z\£ 'l™ 

Fdnmua^B^^njOOO 539000 539£..« Mar 98 6754 D7S4 A758+ffi LQ58 ^ Jgg ™ -175 XTO9 



Financial 

US T BILLS (CMER) 

SI AilBlon- pts 0(100 pel 
Sep 97 94 9J 94 90 94.91. -001 7JI3 

Dec 97 94D2 94.79 J4.79 O.04 2137 

M«r98 94.75 94J3 94 73 -005 1.027 1-MONTH STE RUNG (LIFFE) 


Esl solos NA Mteds soles 1X183 
'Weds open ml 5*751. up 1.859 

MEXICAN PESO ICMER) 

5O6W0 peso* 5 per peso 

Sep?7 1 2800 1 3*WJ .12890 - 00567 22935 

Dec 97 11310 .12205 12210 00652 11713 

Marie 11880 liras .iitw-wus £377 

ESI sates N 6 Weds solos *851 

Weds open ltd 4189< off Jl 5 


Esl vfle-v mj70 . F*rev. sales : 11 944 

Pra* open InL 81.589 <<« II 


COCOA (NCSEl 


Food 


10 metric tons- 1 par km 
Sep 97 1607 1574 

1605 

+ 55 

1-353 

Dec 97 

1630 

■ 585 

1618 

+49 

38LS89 

Iftoroa 

IMB 

1612 

UAt, 

+ 49 

2*493 

Moves 

1664 

1633 

1*64 

+ 49 

1X40A 



1648 

16B4 

• 49 

2.564 

Sep 08 

1706 

1475 

1706 

+49 

X944 


Slock Tables Explained 

Sdes figures ore unoffleid Yeaity highs aid lows relied lhe previous 52 weeks phis lhe cunenl 
weeto but not Ihe icfcstttHflng tiny. WhcroaspBarstod(dhildM*dPm(>urinnglP2Sperairtgrniire 
nos been potet the yean high-mv range and dMdendaiesnnrn tor the new stocks only. Untess 
ffherwise nctei mes of **tends are ram ual ffsbursaments based an toe lofcsf deda ration, 
a - dividend also extra Is), b - annual rale of dividend plus stock dividend, c - liquidating 
dhrfderid.ee -PE exceeds OT.ffd- called, d- new yearly low. dd- loss In tin last 12 months, 
e - dividend declared or paid in preceding 12 months, f - annual rain Increased on lust 
declaration, g - dividend In Canadian funds, subject to 15% non-residence fax. I - dividend 

declared after split-up or stock ttvidend. j -dividend paid this year, omitted, deferred, or no Ete«97 1*900 15*50 i*i^5 •*.(» 


Esl sffc-i 12*96 Weds »*= *477 
Weds open ini 99.675. up 7*1 

COFFEE C(NCSE) 

37.500 lbs.- cents per lb. 

Sep 97 181.00 16*00 171.55 -0 85 


2178 

9.7*0 


I to JJS IT - -! 


UW 

S 

II >* 

14 . 


-a action token al latest dividend meeting, k - dividend declared or paid this year, an MorPfl I WOO ur 75 1*750 -*5a xv*; 

accumutoNve issue wfln dividends in arrears, m- annual rale, reduced Ml last deffaralion. jf^o ISso lario +700 ’+2 

’■ n - "aw issue m Hie past 52 week* The high -tow range begins with the start of trading. EvL *01^*399 11.793 

ito nd-next day deBvery.p- initial dividend, annual rate unknown. P/E - price-eamings ratio, werrs open ml 18*92 off 807 
.1 q - closed-end munial fund, r- dividend deffarad or paid in preceding 12 months, phis slock 

.■ dividend, s - stock splil. Dividend begins with date of split, sis - sates, t - tbvidend paid in ijjuhoSs - cenls per£ EI 

stock in preceding 1 3 month* estimated cash value onex-dhndendor ex -distribution dale. Ocl 97 iiJ3 I1JV1I60 -009 99.150 

■ u - new yearly high, v - trading halted, vl - in bankruptcy or recetirershlp or being reorgonLred !!•!? {]■£! J2f 

.* under the Bankruptcy Ad or securities assumed bysuch companies, wd- when dhtrlbuled. {{“ li.w -009 1S010 

'• wi - when issued/ ww - wnh warrants, x - ex-divldend or ex-rights. xiRs - ex-distribution. Est wuosm 435 we<ta sates 3974 

• xw-wittrairf warrants.?- ex -dividerui and vale* in tall yld- yield, z- sales hi tuH. weds open int 701 124 ofl 1Q5 


Esi. sales N A Weds sates 410 
Wod s open 10110477. off 3 55 

5 YR TREASURY (CHOT) 

SlOaaOO prin- pis S Mflts of 100 pci 
SepW 107-08 106-53 I Or- 58 -13 198.203 

Dec 97 106-55 105-37 106-41 IS 7X051 

Esl sates 5X000 Y/ed-s sates 2fl.no 
Weds upon M 221.25* ofl 1*02 

10 YR TREASURY (CBOTJ 

sioaooo pmv pis & 32ni, of 10a pa 

Sep 97 109-20 109-04 109-07 -13 321.898 

Dec 97 109-10 108-27 108-28 -13 81210 

Mar 98 100-17 14 1.944 

Esi sales 10*401 Weds sales *53*s 

«ud+, open M 407.052 off I I.SI? 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT1 

(8 pff-SIHUnOsHs * 37nds 01 lOOp-dl 

top 97 113-31 113-05 1 1 3-07 -C 492814 

Dec 97 113-18 112-75 112 57 . ?J 66,047 

Ma(9g 113-07 il?.|7 1I2-I7 -22 Tia;, 

■Am 98 I I2-0S 52 2138 

EM sates 3554)00 Weds sales 286725 

Weds open ml 5*6169. up 1.I87 

LONG G4LT (LIFFE] 

EMJMO Bis * Tliuh t4 IQQpcI 
Sep 97 115-09 114-30 ll4-» —o+k, 164.538 
n«97 114-30 114.51 114-19 - 0-OS 10452 
Esf. sales 52070 Prcv sale* s**.’3 
Pnj» open Ini l’XTOj 0 h s 

GERMAN GOV. BUND tLIFFEl 
DM25O4W0 pis Of 100 pel 
Sep 97 102 79 103 S8 10! *J -O 10 259.480 
Dec 97 101 9? 101 74 lot 7* O \ 2 
Esl soles- 9*447. Pn-v sales. 1*3.834 


UOQlOOO ' pts m 100 prl 
toP^ «?75 91-71 92.71 -6JU 107.979 

D«97 97*2 925* 92J7 —0.05 15*606 

MOiW 92J8 9354 92-54 Ifl04 ^504 


Stock Indexes 

SP COMP INDEX (CMER) 

500 » Imtea 

E*L»tes NA Weds sak-s *2035 
wwri open ini 30(1371, up *040 

FT5E IM (LIFFE) 

£25 per Index point 


M S 5? as US « ar 

Frev open Int.. 78599 off 5*4 ’ 

CAC 40 (MATIF) 

FF2W per Index paw 

top 97 JOQ8 5 29M.A 29730 — ++X . 

DfC97 3030 0 3030.0 2*970 -2lS 3 *28 
Mar /8 3034 0 3034 0 30520 - 
Es). sales; 1&C13. 

OP™ 75J73 up j.731. 


Jun 99 93Afl 9+.T7 95.78 -0J11 32S8O 

Sep 99 *2.80 92.78 92J8 — a 01 23.036 

Esl sales. 77333 Fhev. sates *8,178 
PTOV.opm tnl- 636183 up 1710 

EUROMARK (LIFFEl 
DM1 irtlton - pis of 100 pd 

S 6 ?! 9t ' 61 9*,*; —0 02 34*155 
CJff 9, 9fri5 9* 55 9*J5 —0415 1 053 

16 ,6 - 4j —002 79I.+34 

9*J2 9*77 9* 29 —0 02 276783 

96 11 9605 9*08 — 0411 711037 

9591 95 85 95J» IJ)m Jiiu£ 

95 68 9562 95*4 -002 15*703 
95 49 9 5 44 9 5 4* ^L02 2*9tt 
95 34 95-79 9 S J1 

I 7 * 184 Prev. sites- 21IBSO 
™v open ail 1.680.741 up 9089 

2-MONTH PI BOH iMATtFl 
FF 5 mlBon o's at igo pa 


Mar 98 
Jun 98 
Srp '*8 
Dec 98 
Mar 49 
Jun 99 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's 
Reuters 
DJ.F inures 
CRB 


Close 
1,555.00 
1.690 JO 

148.75 

737.75 


SE 23 SSrffl «5 


Previpus 
j-^6-50 
1.905*0 

147.58 

Associated Pnzc., 

exchanged™*'”' 


MarM 9*75 9* 7 | _5,5 ^ 

£l rl 2 ’+ 9407 94.10 — 0 02 76A97 

topfls 9 S o+ 95.73 ri9*-0O2 305*2 

Esl sates 4ft079. 

Oponlnl 2*7.818 up 3.191. 

3-MONTH EUROURA lUFFEI 
11L I mlOten • pis ol 100 pel 


^ Siv hi ir 

^duration 

ItrirriHark,-! 


<t 





PACES 



CM \ § 


. -mu iifci: w ruv ccniv 


Biaar r M»c ft IL, lW? 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1997 


% 


% 


S 



PAGE 15 


Swissair 
Swings 
To Profit in 
First Half 

Bloomberg News 

ZURICH — SAir Group, ihe 
parent company of Swissair, 
said Thursday it had returned io 
profit for the first-half, with 
ramrngs of 109 million Swiss 
francs ($71.41 million) as the 
franc weakened and Swissair 
earned more passengers and 
freight 

SAir, which also has catering 
and hotel businesses, said it re- 
versed the 3 million-franc loss it 
posted for the first half of 19%. 

“The results were very pos- 
itive." said Gerard Huesler, a 
fund manager at Union Bank of 
Switzerland. 

SAir shares rose 5 francs to 
1 ,955 francs on Thursday. 

While some analysts raised 
their price targets for the share, 
others said that the stock has 
soared 80 percent this year, out- 
performing other European air- 
line stocks. 

“The performance of the 
share today shows that the mar- 
ket had discounted the result 
even though it was above ex- 
pectations," said Beat Kunz of 
Bank Julius Baer. 

The company is benefiting 
from an upturn in business as 
prices continue to fall and Euro- 
pean economies begin to 
emerge from a recession, ana- 
lysts said. Austrian Airlines 
AG, in which SAir holds a 10 
percent stake, said Tuesday it 
swung to an operating profit in 
the first half. 

SAir said its first-half sear- 
load factor, or percentage of 
seats filled, rose 9 percentage 
points, to 68 percent. 

Last year SAir posted a re- 
cord net loss of 497 million 
francs, after taking a charge of 
567 million francs to write off 
losses at Sabena SA of Bel- 
gium. SAir said Sabena's first- 
half loss narrowed 38 percent, 
to 42 million Swiss francs and 
that its first-half seat-load 
factor rose to 68 percent from 
61.8 percent 


North European Banks Burst With Profit 

ABN Squelches Talk of Acquisition Danes Gain on Portfolios and Loam 


Camlalt* Ov'SktfFmnDnwfa 

AMSTERDAM — ABN AMRO 
Holding NV posted a 20 percent 
increase in first-half earnings Thurs- 
day and gave a positive forecast for 
the full year, but the Netherlands* 
largest bank dampened speculation 
that it planned a big acquisition. 

- Net profit rose to 2.04 billion 
guilders ($975.8 million) from 1.70 
billion in the year-earlier period 
The bank raised its dividend 1 8 per- 
cent to 53 Dutch cents per share. 

Jan Kalff. the company's exec- 
utive-board chairman, nail e d th e re _ 
suit, but the market took a different 
view, and ABN's shares slipped 2 7 
guilders, to 45.40. 

ABN is the biggest foreign bank 
operating in the United States, and 
therefore gained from the rise in the 
dollar. The dollar averaged 1.97 
guilders in the first half, compared 
with 1 .68 a year earlier. 

ABN sold its securities arm. 
MeesPierson NV, last year, but has 
since expanded in the United Stares 
through the acquisition of Standard 
Federal Bancorp and Chicago Corp. 

European acquisitions included 
Hungary’s Magyar Hitel Bank at the 
end of 1996, and two small French 
banks, Banque Demachy and 
Banque de Phenix, which it acquired 
in June 1997. 

“After the successful first half we 
expect that, barring unforeseen cir- 
cumstances, the second-half net 
profit will also be up compared to 
the same period last year." the bank 
said. 

Mr. Kalff denied persistent ru- 
mors that ABN would buy British 
insurer Commercial Union PLC. 

“You can also take that to mean 


we will not pursue any acquisitions 
in the field of insurance," he said. 

He also refitted speculation that 
ABN was sizing up Britain’s Na- 
tional Westminster Bank PLC and 
Commerzbank AG of Germany. 

Mr. Kalff said the bank had al- 
most ruled out an acquisition in Ger- 
many, adding it might not make 
another big U.S. purchase for many 
years but was considering Compag- 
nie Finanriere de CIC, a French 
banking group. 

“Underlying growth has been 
much better and they've taken 
ample provisions for the introduc- 
tion of the euro,' ' said Jean-Paul van 
Bavel, analyst at F. van Lanschot 
Bankiers. "But the bottom line is 
disappointing. The outlook for the 
second half is not very bullish." 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


CimipintbrOtirSii^FimDiipiaclin 

COPENHAGEN — Den Danske 
Bank A/S, and Unidanmark A/S, 
Denmark’s two largest banks, re- 
ported be tter-th an -expected pretax 
profits Thursday as they benefited 
from large increases in their invest- 
ment portfolios and significant 
drops in provisions for bad loans. 

Pretax profit for Den Danske 
Bank rose 30 percent, 3.06 billion 
kroner ($435 million), while Uni- 
danraark’s pretax profit jumped 89 
percent, to 2.43 billion kroner. 

Both banks saw tbeir investments 
in bonds and stocks soar as Danish 
and international markets rose in the 
first half . Denmark' s blue-chip 
stock index rose 26 percent in the 
first half, while the Danish 10-year 
benchmark bond yield fell 22 basis 
points as prices rose. Danish ac- 


Halifax Ponders Its Surplus Capital 


Reuters 

LONDON — Halifax PLC, the 
biggest British mongage lender, 
posted a 9 percent increase in first- 
half profit on Thursday and said it 
would return surplus capital to 
shareholders if it could not find suit- 
able acquisitions. 

First-half earnings rose to £802 
million ($1.27 billion) from £737 
million a year ago. 

Halifax, formerly a mutually 
owned building society, converted 
io bank status and became a public 
company in June and said it would 
pay its first dividend, for the full 
1997 year, in May 1998. 

Mike Blackburn, chief executive, 


said that the company would return 
capital to shareholders if it could not 
spend its £3.5 billion surplus on 
acquisitions. Mr. Blackburn said 
that returning the capital could take 
the form of higher dividends or 
share buy-backs. 

Mr. Blackburn said Halifax was 
constantly looking at acquisition 
prospects but said that prices of fi- 
nancial assets looked high. 

“We are carrying a pretty sig- 
nificant amount of surplus capital," 
Mr. Blackburn said. “But any ac- 
quisition has to meet two criteria: 
firstly they have to fit strategically, 
and secondly they have to enhance 
value for the shareholders." 


YIAG Earnings Get 28% Boost from Takeovers 


CompHttl by Ow Staff Fma Disposes 

MUNICH — VIAG AG's stock 
price rose 5 percent Thursday after 
the German utility said first-half 
fire tax profit rose 28 percent, to 
1504 billion Deutsche marks 
($811.9 million), helped by acqui- 
sitions and one-time gains. 

Like Germany's other large util- 
ities, VIAG has not been able to rely 
on energy sales to increase earnings 
significantly this year because of 
milder weather and lower prices. 
Instead, VIAG profited from cost- 


cutting at its Bayemwerk energy 
unit and from one-time gains from 
recent acquisitions and the sale of 
several activities. 

VLAG’s first-half sales rose 12 
percent, to 23.76 billion DM from 
the year-earlier period, as the com- 
pany consolidated acquisitions. Not 
including acquisitions, sales rose 7 
percent One-time gains of about 
300 million DM lifted first-half 
profit, the company said. 

VIAG’s shares rose 40 DM, to 
close at 818 DM in Frankfurt 


For the full year, operating profit 
will rise “about” 10 percent in 1997 
from 2.4 billion DM last year. Chief 
Executive Georg Obermeier said. 
Sales will reach 50 billion DM, an 18 
percent increase from 42.5 billion in 
1996. 

VIAG sold its 50 percent stake in 
Thyssengas to RwE AG in ex- 
change for a 25 percent stake in 
Isarwerke GmbH, a Munich elec- 
tricity supplier. The company also 
rofited from the sale of Schmal- 
i-Lubeca AG’s metal-pack- 


aging activities. VIAG also bought a 
majority stake in Goldschmidt AG, 
a chemicals maker. 

Mr. Obermeier said the -com- 
pany’s telecommunications venture 
was proceeding according to plan. 

VIAG is working with British 
Telecommunications PLC and Tel- 
enor A/S of Norway in the VIAG 
Interkom joint venture and is build- 
ing its network to take part in the 
deregulation of the German market 
— set for Jan. 1 — by next sum- 
mer. (Bloomberg. AFX, Reuters ) 


counting laws require companies to 
calculate the realized and unrealized 
gains on their investments. 

"Unidanmark has reported a 
sharp drop in loan losses reflecting 
the turnaround in asset quality," 
said Anik Sen, a banking analyst at 
SBC Warburg. “We are optimistic 
on the development of the life, pen- 
sion and asset management busi- 
nesses of Den Danske Bank and we 
have both stocks on a buy." 

Den Danske Bank's shares 
dropped to 7 10 kroner from 715, but 
Unidanmark stock jumped 15 to 455 
kroner. 

Provisions and charges for bad 
debts at Den Danske Bank fell 38 
percent, to 21 3 miiiitfn kroner, while 
Unidanmark’s fell 55 percent to 245 
million kroner, a “historically low 
level/’ Unidanmark said. 

Profits from price adjustments, 
investments in securities, currencies 
and other investments for Den 
Danske bank almost doubled, to 
1.049 billion kroner from 585 mil- 
lion kroner a year ago. Unidan- 
mark’s investment profits rose more 
then threefold to 1 .079 billion kron- 
er from 354 million kroner. Danish 
accounting laws require companies 
to calculate realized and unrealized 
gains on their investments on the 
last day of the accounting period. 

Knud Soerensen, Den Danske 
Bank's director, said the first-half 
results were very satisfactory, but 
said that it would not be so easy to 
keep up the high returns if loan loss 
provisions begin to rise from their 
current low levels. 

Some analysts warned that the 
h anks must concentrate more on 
core eanungs.( Bloomberg. Reuters) 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

QAX 


London: 


pAC4Q.-- 


4500 

to'™ ~ ■ 

3250 

.4200 -- • 

A. 5000 

3100 

3900 

j ■ : 4600 at 

2950 

3600 —fit 

: 45oo_ — ./Vyv . :• 

2800 

mfor- • 

— ; 440Q*y 

2550 


JJA ■ MAM JTa' 

2500 


1997 


1997 


■ - -I w.s’.:...,.r.;; «; 



i »« y i » m i nmm tit T 


2&M. 








osto i y, 


London 




i^fsraEW 




Sfifcwi:; 






A* * - 1 '* 


sew 








Vtenoa 




Source: Tefekurs 


[nsrmlxxul HcnldTrihtnc 


Very briefly: 


• Deutsche LuAbansa AG said it had settled its legal dispute 
with Modi loft of India and would engage in no further 
dealings with its former joint venture partner “above those 
deemed normal in the industry.*’ 

• Marks & Spencer PLC plans to take over three department 
stores in Germany next year, following the success of its 
Cologne outlet, and work toward having 10 stores by 2000. 

• Compaq Computer Corp, is forming CompaqCapital 
Europe LLC with AT &T Capital Corp. to provide financing 
for equipment leases to European business customers. 

• Chevron Corp. is closing its only European refinery and 
selling its 450 gas stations as it pulls out of the British 
downstream oil sector by the end of the year. 

• Britain's economy grew 0.9 percent in the second quarter 
over the like quarter of 1 996, res ul tin gin an annual growth rate 
of 3.4 percent, the second of three official estimates showed. 

• MAID PLC said it was dose to acquiring Knight-Ridder 
Information Inc, which could expand die reach of the British 
on-line business information provider. 

• Boosey & Hawkes PLC said Cart Fischer Inc, which owns 
38 percent of die British music publisher and instrument maker, 
was still holding talks on selling itself. A buyer in such a sale 
would be required to make a full bid for Boosey & Hawkes. 

• Royal Boskalis Westminster NV's first-half net profit rose 
22 percent over the first half of last year, to 335 million 
guilders ($16 million). The world’s largest dredging company 
said profit for die year would increase fay at least 20 percent 

• Canal Plus SA is likely to bid on a film catalogue being sold 
by Consortium de Realisation, a unit of Credit Lyonnais, 
according to a film industry source. 

• Marieberg Tidnings AB’s first-half net rose to 857 million 

kronor ($106 million) from 52 million kronor, as the top 
Swedish publisher took a 900 million-krona one-time gain from 
selling half of its Duni AB unit Bloomberg, Reuters, AFX. AFP 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Thursday Aug..2f . 

Prices In local currencies. 
Totokurs 

High Lew dose Pre*. 


Amsterdam 


ABN- AMRO 

Aegon 

Ahold 

Also Nobel 

Boon Co. 

Bofc«tesscva 

CSMan 

Dorttedw Pel 

DSM 

Elsevier 

FwflsAmw 

Getrwrics 

G-Bjdccvo 

Hawmeyer 

Hemken 

Hooaowracvo 

Hum Douglas 

ING Group 

KLM 

KNP8T 

KPN _ 

Ned Boyd Gp 
Nutrtoa 
OceGrtnten 
PtiSps Sec 


I Hdg 

Robeco 
Rodamco 
RoBiko 
R orento 
Rond Dutch 
Untevercvo 
Vendee loti 
VNU 

Waders KJ cvn 


4M0 
156J10 
6050 
339 JO 
151 JO 
41,40 

niSo 

mso 

3170 
9039 
MOT 
61 A0 

rep 

35> 

134 

9-UO 

99OT 

78 

4X50 

8030 

tsaoo 

363 

25650 

167.90 

115 

91 

20430 

6590 
MS. 10 
11X30 
11370 

466 

112 

4730 

26640 


45 
153 
57 JO 
336J0 
14580 
4020 
10070 
11050 
205 
3170 
88 
6530 
6060 
10540 
34150 
13010 
93J0 
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7680 

47.10 
7850 
6670 

35350 

251 

15090 

112.10 

8610 

203 

6130 

205 

118 

11030 

45750 

109.10 

4660 

25050 


AEXMHC 95029 
Pnvfcm; 95079 
4550 48.10 
15620 15340 
SB S9.90 
33850 337 

14680 14080 
4030 4050 
103 102 

111X0 11930 
20750 206 

3390 33 

BOTH B9JB 
6540 6950 
61 61 
W650 107 

344 34930 
13250 130 

93J0 93M 
9640 9050 
7740 7740 
4790 4750 
80 79 

6670 67 

354.90 35950 
25120 2S6 

15950 15840 
11290 11460 
8650 9040 
203 200 

Also 44JD 
205 20220 
118 117JD 
111 111.70 
45750 460.10 
10990 112J0 
46 4560 
26090 265 


Bangkok 

Adv Into Sue 
BqinjkoK0 *F 
K/ihwTJhjI Bk 
PTT tuptor 
Stom Cement F 
Siam Com BkF 
Teteramasra 
Thai Airways 
Thai Rum Bk F 
UtdCamm 


208 

228 

2025 

m 

624 
111 
41 
47 JS 
127 
111 


i':-. 


To Our Readers 


Brussels 


Bvcolnif 

BBL 

CBR 

tiriroyt 

Defcaize Lion 
EWrabd 

EVctrafina 
Fanis AG 
Gewsri 

GEL 

Cm Banque 

Kmfiebwnlt 

Ftelrofliw 

Paraffin 

Rotate Beige 

SocGeiBeta 

Snhoy 

T relabel 

UC8 


1710 

wm 

906*1 

3340 

18775 

1870 

7600 

3535 

7590 

3410 

5680 

14500 

14875 

14300 

4920 

10425 

3495 

2117S 

14825 

128700 


1695 

7A® .... 

8960 9020 
3210 3210 

18«5 
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356 

354 

355 

357 

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143 

146 15230 

392 

386 389OT 

383 

11330 

111 

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112 

157OT 

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157 

157 

10190 101JO 1OU0 70130 

4S0 

4® 

4S1 

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9350 9050 93 9150 

74 7220 73 7395 

687 682 685 676 

1029® 101.90 101 90 10150 
1335 1320 1321 1330 
— - 37J5 36.15 


3725 37.10 


53950 533 53X5® 

5*5 85950 


S37 


High Low dOM Prer. 

Deutsche Bant 121'TIEOT 11950 TTS.W 
Deut Telekom 40.15 3990 40 3V JO 

Dreamer Bar* KUO 8090 0090 81.10 
Fiwenfus 
FruentosMi 
Fried. Kiupp 
Me 

HehMbgZm 
Hotter pM 
NEW 
Hochtief 
ttaechst 
Kanfcxfl 
Lrriutwyer 
Undo 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

ftfatooesmani 910 883 

MetaflgeseBsdtafl4180 4150 SIX 4IJ5 
Metre 95 93 933 9350 

Munch -RuedcR 618 610 «Q 613 

Pnnaiag 558 545 552 54650 

RWtE* 8650 8430 MOT B4J0 

SAP aUt 44 0 43430 439 JO 430 

Schema 1WOT 19750 19695 191UQ 

SGLCaroan 234 232 232 235 

Siemens 12430 12250 123OT 12175 

Springer (A»0 1625 1600 1620 ISM 

Suedzudief 917 905 905 919 

45Q juaH 447 JO 446 
107 JO 105.40 105.70 10440 
573 573 573 574 

Vtaa 821 B15 818 778 

VOKmagen 1410 1382 1385 1375 


Helsinki hex 


SET latex: 58184 
PlHriMS 51641 

197 200 197 

204 210 Z16 

2*75 26J5 27 JS 

362 362 366 

516 616 612 

103 103 105 

3950 4025 4025 

44J0 45 4550 

117 124 121 

102 111 101 


En»A 
HuMomdUl 
Kemlro 
Kesko 
Merita A 

MeS-SeriaB 

t^Wn A 
Orion-YWvmae 
Outokumpu A 
UFMKymmefiB 
Vtdmet 


v. Due to technical problems 
at the source, the Bombay 
stock prices were unavail- 
able. 




17!Q 1690 
765* 7700 
“ B940 
3340 

18425 18575 18425 

1825 ma IBs 

7530 

3515 3530 3515 
MW 7410 74OT 
3370 3400 3385 

5610 S62G SWD 
14350 14350 14425 
14625 14625 14800 
14100 1 4225 14125 
4890 4900 4950 

10250 10400 10225 
343Q 3455 3460 

210 W 2 woo am 

14700 14775 14825 
127000 13745) 126600 


Hong Kong 

Cottioy FodHC 13.90 

Doo Hong BA 
Fksl PncSc 
Hong Long D« 

Haig Seng Bk 
Hendenon lm 
HemteannlJl 
HK China Gas 
KK Electric 

HKTeteMimi 
Hapewd Hdgi 

HSBCW. 

Hutchison »th 

Oriental Press 
peart Oriental 

Ska Land CO- 
S9i CMnn Pori 

Stake Poe A 
Wharf Hdgs 
Whedock 


930 

9.10 

1530 

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107OT 

tl)7OT 

9 JO 

X95 

72 

6573 

17 

1630 

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7X70 

1X60 

17.9(1 

5 

675 

2® 

162 

8035 

7730 

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7X50 

23 

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57 

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7.75 

130 

137 

101 

95Ji 

475 

4® 

8 

7J0 

735 

693 

68.75 

67 

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30 

IX® 

1/35 


18 

483 

763 


Klgb Law Oom Prev. 

SA Breweries LG 141 141 14075 

Samnncar 39.70 37 38.70 39.79 

Satol 61 6025 6075 m 

SBiC 22075 220 220 230 

Tiger Oats 7725 76 7A2S 76J50 


Kuala Lumpur cwipa a eiw^ 


High Law Close Pm. 


AshaM 
Bk Inti MO" 
BkNegtn 

GudangGmn 

WOOBwrt 

mdofcod 

Rtakwit 

Sampow naH M 
Screen . 

TeteUXBiirwoM 


Frankfurt 

AUB B 1830 

Adicka 737 

MSomHdg 437 

ABons 149 

BkfierSn 4850 

BASF 67 JO 

MWHypoBl 7015 

. MtVerranbar* 9960 
riBorer 74 90 

■jwmdort 87 

IS P S 

CKADCalHU 168 50 

ywnenbonk 7340 

14150 

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DAX-4253J7 

1790 1030 
73550 Ml.® 
UtSO 421.® 
147 10 '5 

MM 47.90 

6650 OT50 

17 a b/S 

»40 

1385 1390 

166 167* 
70.70 72-40 
K.iao 143-50 


™i Bks 

«ngio«iiCail 

AngtaAnhCoff 

AngteAmGaU 

AnakAitlnd 

AVMtN 

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De Beers 

Dtetort* 

FstNutlBk 

Genu* 

GFSA 

Imperil HOTS 

IngweCaai 

JJISOf 

Jtfyimesbufl 

UbertY Hdgs 

SEsa 

Minorca 
HOi^wk 
Nerioor _ 
Rembrandt Gp 
RtrirroanJ 

RnstPbMum 


3225 

366 


32 3125 3110 
ZM 764 266 36125 

252 24950 24950 250® 

-’ 1 ^ '££ SS 

lijo 152 15l§ in^ 

S IBB 

9SJ5 9fcio 9475 
^ 42J5 6425 63Ji 
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143 


66JS 65 
S75 370 

145 141® 


lltd UtOfies 
Veutaaie L* life 
Vodafone 
y/hflhrcart 
WOTam Hdgs 
Woh etey 
WPP Group 

Zeneca 


7.10 

705 

7JJ5 

797 

499 

492 

492 

699 

333 

123 

3J1 

122 

BJ3 

B27 

X27 

&30 

X® 

336 

X® 

X® 

471 

640 

6« 

665 

293 

235 

X72 

292 


AMMB Hrigs 
Genflng 
Mol Banting 
Md Inti Ship F 
PefenwGaa 
Pintoa. 
PutdcBfc 
Reaang 
Resorts Warid 
R oth mans PM 
Sine Darby 
Telekom Mol 
Tonga 
Ukl Engineers 

m 


.13 

7090 

24 

6J0 

9J0 

M0 

152 

3J4 

7J0 

27 

ROT 

9.10 

9.90 
1660 

6.90 


12 12 
laso vno 

21 OT 22 
SOT 6.15 
9.15 9 JO 
8 8OT 
146 148 
126 SOT 
748 7JSS 
26 26J5 
IS 0 7.9S 

&60 860 
960 9.65 

1550 16 

645 4OT 


12J0 

vuo 

24 

6 

945 

BJ0 

342 

130 

745 

27 

8 

8.90 

9OT 

1640 

6J5 


OE 3557 JO 

PnyfeOS: 2559 J> 

50 49 49 SO 

225 223 224 225 

50 48 48 49 

7350 Tl&» 73 73 

2170 2120 2120 2360 
171 167.10 167.10 171 

5150 50 » SI 

141 140 141 W 

47150 462 462 ^0 

189 187 W 187 

98J8 96 97 98 

1395(1 136® WOT 136.10 
8150 80 80.10 8040 


How Seeg: 1565410 
Piwfeas: 158SL67 

845 845 

SOOT SOOT 
1130 1130 
8150 B8J5 
2SJK 25^ 

3940 39 JO 
4540 4420 
^431 44.40 


London 

Abbey Natl 
ASedDanecq 
AngBan Water 


Assoc 8r 
BAA 
Bodays 
Boss 
BAT Old 
Bank Scotland 
Blue Clide 
BOC Group 
Boatt 
BPS tad 
BritAaasp 
Bril Airways 
BG 

Brit Land 
BritPefliB 

BrtSeel 
BrtlTdeaen 
BTR 


139 

477 

775 

645 

1-55 

5.15 

577 

14® 

845 

124 

425 

427 

UM 

845 

342 

1447 

641 

244 

198 

9JJ7 

442 

177 

457 

222 


Buonati Carfrol llits 


Burton Gp, 
Cable wmrim 
“ < Scfiw 


165 
31 50 
1385 
B950 
26 
41 
4670 
44.40 
935 
7490 
104 
BOT 
7CJ5 
16® 
2940 
1830 

4.90 
264 

77.25 

2440 

21 ® 

20® 

51® 

280 

463 

7.90 
6.95 

6725 

3080 

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CarttoaCamra 
Omni Union 

SKS? 

Dhons . 

Elcdrocampaaeids 490 
EMI Group 555 

- 428 

7 JO 
177 
948 
191 
12 


Gent Accident 
GEC 
GKN 

Gtaa WteOcame 1277 
GronadaGp 9JS 
Grand Met 
GRE 

GnenaUsGp 
Guianess 
GUS 


HSoCHIdgs 

KJ 

Impl Tobocro 


Laid Sec 

L^GadGrp 
Ltayris T5B Gp 

LiKBS^nfty 

MarioSpenaer 

MEPC 


588 

287 

494 

584 

642 

6.15 

2148 

1046 

420 

74B 

243 

9OT 

ITS 

4S 

747 

101 

197 

477 


Jakarta 


8425 6300 6325 61® 

13® 12® 12® >2® 
1H5 1175 1200 11® 
97® 93® 9375 9125 

3925 35® 3700 3875 

4400 4000 4400 3950 
raw 7400 7425 7275 
6100 77® 7900 7500 

3625 3500 3600 3250 
3650 3525 3525 3525 


Nail Power 

NaWfcst 

Nat 

Norwidt Uflten 
Orange 
PW 
PanrOTn 


Asset 11® 
Grid 272 


395 W 
3® 3® 

390 » — 

“tgSS Johannesburg 

242 E9 

740 730 

707 706 

990 #» 

387 38f 

435 435 

455 440 


HSS - 

ftBHradLGp 

Roik GIWP 
ReduttCobn 
Redkrd 

Routers Hrigs 


3 

65® 

370 

IBM ’iMO UM 


RTZW 

RMC Group 

RofcR'?® 

BKKi 

SrifeW 
SotasOury 
Sditode n _ 
Sod Newcastle 
SaitP«ta*r 

Seartwr ■ 

Sertwlred 

She* TifflispR 

cube 

Sracm Nephew 

SnithK6ne 

Sndtastod 

Sera Etec 
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Tale & Lyle 
Tesco 

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lltd Me** 


FT-5E 100: 497188 
Piwtoas i riUMO 


in 

8.07 

7.77 

342 

117 

451 

748 

148 
7.76 
545 
686 
787 
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114 
583 
273 
649 
197 
10.14 
1048 

149 
577 
549 
188 
448 

1880 

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2.90 

155 

440 
11-08 

180 

1143 

135 

476 

7.11 

1064 

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472 

7.97 

493 

S.93 

373 

1848 

441 
7.19 


122 879 

465 477 

743 749 

637 640 

1® 144 

SJfl 5.15 
5J0 573 

14-05 1426 
777 132 

5.10 5.17 

415 419 
4.18 4.19 

11J5 HOT 

787 8 

345 348 

1447 1451 

641 6® 

248 2-59 

5.94 595 

884 8.98 

437 430 

174 1.75 

383 410 

Z15 116 
1083 10.97 
1J6 1-26 

570 579 

SS6 iW 
504 514 

13M 7M 
627 630 

125 329 

640 643 

482 482 

547 5S5 

623 627 

684 697 

176 176 

9 JO 940 
343 381 
1175 1183 
12OT 1176 
510 614 

578 587 

283 286 

486 487 

575 576 

6J5 437 

&JS2 415 
2490 21.15 
1037 1040 

m 3.90 
733 744 

2.52 243 

9.15 9JB 
272 273 

447 454 

729 7-M 

187 187 

586 588 
472 *73 
1347 

245 272 

543 547 

788 883 

743 748 

132 340 

113 2.« 

746 


6 

741 


141 

744 775 

537 545 

5.98 404 

780 780. 

343 JM 
970 W8 
101 110 
521 57< 

2.17 272 

627 446 

28B 2.97 

1085 IO.® 
1040 1042 
245 247 
S87 

540 848 
181 385 

440 466 

1555 1845 

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iOT 432 
2OT 283 
842 W 
4J4 438 
1088 1182 
lOT 1.7B 
HOT 11^ 

820 534 

X® 459 
s.99 78-j 
1037 1ft® 
ilfl 421 
418 4M 
783 7-» 

4*7 488 
S75 5.92 

1840 18® 
434 435 

T.06 7.17 


537 

*71 

774 

441 

149 

502 

572 

1404 

841 

60S 

417 
428 

HOT 

504 

152 

1449 

643 

2J8 

593 

SOT 

435 
178 
383 
Z18 

1387 

1J8 

570 

SS6 

5IH 

7J7 

630 

333 
636 
485 
549 
427 

498 
176 
9J7 

382 
12 

1246 

888 

581 

281 

490 

529 

437 

603 

2178 

1074 

196 

740 

2-51 

972 

272 

446 

743 

198 

592 

475 

1166 

245 
540 

781 

7JB 

334 
2-13 
539 
7® 
146 
740 
543 
401 
779 
343 
974 

3 

575 

118 

643 

190 

1080 

1073 

246 
599 
5J9 

383 

441 

1870 
7 40 
433 
289 
847 

436 
10.97 

180 

1137 

BOT 

488 

499 
1842 

418 
41B 

788 

492 

583 

373 

18® 

645 

787 


Madrid 

Aflerinok 

ACESA 

Agues Barcdon 

Araentarin 

BBV 

Banesta 

BarWnJer 

BcaCmrimHIsp 

Ba» Popular 

BcaSaitosHkr 

CEPSA. 

Critato 

FECSA 
Gas Natural 
Ibenhata 
Piytn 
Repsd 

SevtBnna Elec 
Ttaiacalani 
Tetotanlca 
UrtamFenosa 
Vafenc Cement 


26560 

1820 

5640 

8000 

4220 

1640 

7960 

5 m 
34890 
4560 
4630 
34« 
8580 
3305 
1245 
6850 
1810 
2995 
6280 
1385 
8100 
4130 
1215 
2765 


263® 

1790 

5490 

7910 

4125 

1415 

7840 

5840 

34510 

43® 

4500 

3335 

8300 

3180 

1220 

6760 

1785 

2925 

6170 

1365 

8010 

4055 

1195 

2735 


Manila 


AyotoB 
H Lord 
till 
1 Hoiks 
MonBaBecA 
Meta Bo* 


■ UHH 

Ayala 

Apt 


PO Bonk 
Phi Lang DW 
5anM2gudB 
SM Prime Hdg 


1775 

18.75 

143 

9.10 

81 

500 

SOT 

198 

905 

55-50 

7® 


Mexico 

Alfa A 
Bonocd B 
Cemex CPO 

OtaC 

EmpMadana 

GpeCanoAt 

Gpo F Banner 

GauRnlnbuno 

KfinbCtartMex 

TdevtaCPO 

TtriMexL 


6450 

2535 

4330 

1474 

43OT 

60OT 

374 

3575 

3730 

13230 

20® 


Milan 

A ri mi BoAsstc 

BcaCranltol 

Ben FUeuraa 

Bad Remo 

Benefloa 

Cmfitolktaano 

Eto 

ENI 

Rat 

GewreH Assfc 

m 

INA 


Atedobma 

A/tontaUsoo 

arrow 


PM 
RA5 

RatoBcBim 
5 Paolo Torino 
TefeoamlWa 
TIM 


14795 14560 
4555 4420 
5995 5855 
1630 1500 

2471)0 26350 
3660 3625 

8320 81® 
10545 10180 
5800 SOT 
37300 347® 
16270 15920 
2645 2600 
5450 5355 

7810 76® 

11500 11270 
1119 1093 
718 685 

2655 2625 

4905 47SB 
15095 1471® 
22600 22000 
12975 12670 
10970 10715 
6090 5840 


Ba Mob Cam 
Cdit Tire A 

CdnUflA 
CTFWSK 
Cm Metro 
Gt-WeftLHeca 
ta m ca 
ImeStonGrp 
LeUawCas 
Nall Bk Canada 
Power Corp 
Power FW 
QuebecorB 
RogenConaiB 
Royal BkCdu 


5X90 

5045 

5044 

27 

2X85 

77 

3M 

3X70 

38m 

44 

ifl® 

4195 

1835 

18 

1&10 

33M 

3110 

m 

4145 

41.15 

41 J0 

3495 

3465 

3495 

20M 

2040 

2016 

18 

1770 

17.95 

39.85 

3914 

39® 

a 

3TJ5S 

38 

VM 

2X55 

2630 

1X45 

1035 

1X10 

6314 

6216 

62*r 


Oslo 


AfcerA 


DgjtoSOTBk 

HaMmdA 

KraantaAsa 

Norsk Hydro 

NankeSlragA 

ttycamedA 

OridaAsoA 

PdfinCwsSrc 

5agaPeflatA 

SStoded m 

Transocean On 

SwebrondAio 


133 

208 

2570 

3QJ0 

140 

46 

420 

410 

289 

1® 

547 

439 

15230 

129 

670 

51 


126 

204® 

2550 

2940 

137 

46 

411 

404 

284 

155 

541 

427 

14830 

125 

655 

930 


155 

545 

431 

15130 

126 

670 


Paris 


High Low don Prav. 


CAC-TO: 2957-22 
Previous: 297977 


Htf.uraCta.Pra*. The Trib |ndox 


1945 1734 1934 19OT 


Balia Mem 589.19 
Prartow: 59330 


Accor 

m- 

9® 

WO 

970 

AGF 

22930 22X80 22350 22X90 

AlrUqutrte 

AknEdAtsSi 

946 

826 

925 

807 

925 

809 

942 

827 

Axo-UAP 

411 

406 

410 4 trot 

Banartie 

734 

715 

718 

722 

BIC 

512 49X® 49X70 

503 


26560 26400 
1790 1815 
5580 5630 
799 79® 
4155 4185 
1420 1430 
7880 7940 
5850 58® 
34570 34S5G 
4410 4S20 
4600 45® 

3360 3300 
8300 84® 

■3m 3265 

1 230 1235 

67?® 6740 

T7B5 1800 
2940 2930 

6200 6240 

1370 1385 
8040 BOOT 
4065 4110 
1200 1215 

2765 27® 


BNP 

Guiirf Plus 

Crerefour 

Casino 

CCF 

Cetetan 

ChristianDior 

CLF-Oada Fran 


29X70 28730 28830 291-70 
1034 1015 1024 1072 

40® 3931 395* 4025 

287 JO 28X10 284® 285OT 
338.90 311 324 33460 

685 676 680 684 

9S4 941 9S1 

579 562 563 


Credit Agrioote 1270.101270.101270.10 


Danom 
ElMnuBaine 
ErktonfaBS 
Eurodsnev 
EuidiHaiH 
GenEaux 
Havas 
ftnHW 
Latarge 
Legnnd 
[Seal 
LVMH 
WUdteSiiB 
PatoasA 


726 m 
716 723 

814 827 

830 870 

630 6.90 

705 M 
383 38*90 
873 863 865 

418 412 417.90 

1173 1135 1137 

23*7 2309 2321 
1472 1453 1456 

36490 356J0 3 SIM 
4 ® 442.70 4444® 


944 

732 

B36 

8J5 

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39090 


945 

5® 

1267 

9144 

721 

843 

BOT 

7 

713 

385 

MS 

41 SOT 
11 ® 
2344 
1458 

36230 

447 


Pernod Heard mso 298 29930 29020 


' PSEtodw 2459.84 
Pierhws: 240006 

1630 17.75 16J5 

18 1830 17J5 

1® 141 1® 

BOT 9 

BOOT ®>J0 

490 m 

530 5OT SOT 

197 197 19B 

890 B95 

SS 55 

7 JO 740 


Peugeot at 
Pkwutt-Prtnt 
Pnmudes 
Renault 
RekbI 


71B 690 691 

2790 2720 27® 

2239 7176 2196 

169.90 16630 169 

1740 1655 1725 


70S 

27® 

2225 

167OT 

1739 


Rh- Poulenc A 255.® 247JC 24BOT 25470 


BOT 

80 

495 


880 
54 
7 JO 


Sanofi 
Sduietaef 
SEB 

SGSTlnmsan 

SteGeneroto 

Sodexho 

StGabtan 

SuezlCW 

SwLranEow 


ToMB 

Ushur 

VUea 


6 io art 4« 

347 33430 33470 
1009 988 995 

615 601 604 

809 788 794 

2885 2846 2869 

888 874 876 

1630 16J0 1630 
675 658 667 

m 7® 7® 

CSF 151.90 149OT 150 

632 617 621 

115OT 11110 114OT 
383 37130 375OT 


605 

3C 

1008 

60S 

799 

Ofl/C 

4DOJ 

885 

1535 

655 

753 

1® 

625 

113 

37480 


Bc6ratadta5077OT 

Pnm«h:512416 

65OT 65J0 66.10 
2410 2440 2495 
4230 42J0 4X25 
14® t«2 14J» 
4230 4190 43OT 
S9OT 99.70 6030 
337 167 3J3 

3430 35.10 3430 
3645 3630 3730 
131 OT 131. « 133OT 
7035 20.50 2035 


Sao Paulo 


Brodescu PM 
BrahroaPfd 
CnntgPfd 
gSPPtri 
Cupel 
Eta h u bwi 
Baubanco PM 
ISenktos 


732OT 

52.B0 

7HJM 

1530 

4MOT 


1030 

72181 

5030 

7600 

1530 


MIB TstaneflCO: T4347OT 
Pievtous: 14SHLJ0 


14650 14600 
4440 45® 

9960 5900 

1580 1612 

366®} 262® 
36® 36® 

81* B270 

imu 10490 
5980 5725 

36900 36600 
16200 16000 
2615 2645 
5355 5400 

76® 7780 

11400 11375 
1093 1099 
687 AW 
2550 26* 
47® *05 

14730 14965 
22158 22200 
12710 12820 
10770 10800 
5840 5955 


! Pfd 
PsuteSn Luz 
SdNadonal 
Satan Cnre 
TefchrosPM 
Telearia 
TtSfft 
TetoqiPM 
IhAancD 
Usiminas PM 
CVRD Pfd 


487.10 
43X00 

moo 

imoo 

3569 

1055 

137® 

175.00 

145.10 
32X01 

39.00 

11OT 

2660 


48X00 

410OT 

2B2OT 

187-50 

35OT 

9J1 

I33J30 

17100 

14300 

32200 

3870 

11.10 

25OT 


105® 10OT 
73001 72500 
50.® 53.20 
7640 7600 
1555 1599 

48400 47600 
640.01 6*00 

48401 48300 
411.00 41400 
28X00 »00 
18730 18700 

35JQ 3500 
991 9 00 

I34J0 1313® 
17300 17130 
14300 14300 
324» 32006 
3X90 3876 
11.10 1138 
2620 2570 


Seoul 

Dacaa 

Daewoo Heavy 
Hyundai Eng. 
KfeMrsfftis 
Korea El Pwr 
Korea ExchBk 

LG Sam km 
PohonfllranSt 
Sronsung Kstoy 
Samsung Elec 
Shinhmmj* 
SKTdteoom 


Carepasit iadtt 739-07 
PiwtaM: 74423 

91000 90000 90200 90200 
7710 7550 7990 7WS 

saaio am 

33100 12700 12700 1331® 
2S8GO 25300 2SS00 25600 
5500 5330 5330 54® 

49000 £W® 49000 

61500 60800 AlOOO 61588 
48200 47600 47700 48000 
735D0 72000 72000 72800 

9500 9300 9400 WO 

507000 502000 504000 504000 


Singapore *"*£"£]«§* 


Montreal "«~S2EK 


Mb Poe Brew 
CoebosPoc 
OtyDcvfc 


50Vi 

27 


m 

41i» 


38 


6316 


CvdeCorriow lijo 

Ptanr Farm tat’ 090 

DBSfaeian 1X10 


DBS! 
Fraeer&Nearo 
HKLand* 
JardMathesn* 
Jard Strategic* 
KeppelA 
KegpdBanfc 
KeppeiFeb 
I Land 


OBX todn: 6I9J7 
PiwtaatiSMJS 


>32 m 
206 50 20730 
5530 2570 
29OT 30 
138 138 

46 46 

414 40X50 
404 40830 
286 


05 Union 0k F 
Parkway Hdp 
Sembawang 
Stag Air taretft 1X90 
Stag Land 
Sing Press F 

SingTedilnd 
sawTeteoanun 
Tat lot Bulk 
imtnductrtal 
UMOSeoBkF 
Wing Tai Hdgs 

’:ini/SdaAMs. 


150 

530 

SOT 

482 

460 

4® 

HOT 

11OT 

HOT 

HOT 

hot 

HOT 

090 

049 

190 

1X10 

17® 

1730 

434 

412 

412 

905 

190 

MO 

138 

124 

128 

7OT 

SOT 

7J5 

402 

198 

402 

X15 

& 

6.10 

170 

338 

1® 

430 

428 

4® 

436 

408 

408 

1150 

1190 

12.90 

835 

&I5 

BOT 

645 

635 

6® 

695 

6OT 

X9S 

1190 

1230 

1230 

735 

7OT 

7J5 

2530 

24 

2410 

& 

154 

2® 

160 

242 

177 

175 

2J6 

1.07 

1J11 

1JD4 

1440 

1390 

1410 

174 

342 

363 


SOT 

4® 

HOT 

11J0 

087 

1730 

428 

BOT 

3J8 

7OT 

402 

615 

170 

464 

422 

1110 

X* 

645 

480 

12-60 

745 

2490 

338 

244 

2J6 

1.06 

UM 

166 


157 

547 

426 

149 

128 

652 


Stockholm sxumkmmot 

PmtoK: 354939 


5030 5030 


AGAB 
ABBA 
AsstDaun 
Astra A 

AltOS COPCO A 

Autoliv 


HOOT 10830 10930 10930 
13730 12330 124® 126 

252 2® 247 250 

137 13230 133 13450 

258 250 25130 257 

313 304 305 311 OT 


EtodnriaxB 
Ericsson B 
Hermes B 
incentive A 
Investor B 
M0O0 B 
Hantbaoken 
Phantaliplahn 
SandvkB 
ScmtiaB 
SCAB 

S-E Banker A 
SbndfaRn 
SkamkaB 
SKFB 

Sprebanlen A 

SnraA 

SuHandesA 

VWwB 


608 

362 

334 

744 

418 

287 

254 

284 

251 

228 

190 

B7 

340 

333 

228 

1B9OT 

14130 

256 

2S30 


598 

353OT 

310 

737 

m 

28130 

248 

279 

247 
226 

18030 

85 

32839 

330 

315 

183 

138 

248 
21730 


604 604 

35430 3*8 

318 32730 
744 738 

40930 413 

28130 286 

253 253 

280 279 

249 24930. 
22650 22450 
182 18450 
B4 8630 
3» 33* 

33230 33130 
224 22630 
184 185 

139 14030 
249 256 

218 21930 


Sydney 

AKMMrtro:26«OT 
PrMM£ 243X70 


X47 

830 

BOT 

BOT 

ANZBUng 

1X23 

1X13 

1X13 

1X10 

BHP 

1737 

l/OT 

7731 

t/JS 

Borol 

199 

190 

197 

X87 


2X60 

2X20 

28® 

2X10 

CBA 

1576 

1X56 

1156 

1542 

CCAnulB 

15® 

15® 

IS® 

1535 

Coles Myar 

644 

6® 

6® 

449 


6OT 

i® 

S,® 

445 

C5R 

592 

697 

499 

490 


244 

74! 

244 

2® 


199 

1.98 

1® 

1.99 

ICI AustraSa 

13.90 

1334 

1236 

12® 


3X15 

29OT 

3X09 

2945 

MIMHda 

1OT 

19J9 

1.71 

1935 

IJI 

19J7 

1-71 

19 

Nat Mutual Hdo 

2.12 

2.10 

111 

111 


592 

SM 

SOS 

SOT 


142 

3® 

341 

3® 


477 

666 

468 

476 


XIII 

R04 

XI0 

X02 

RtoTWo 

3X89 

20.72 

2X/4 

2X70 

St George Bank 

8OT 

831 

831 

832 

WMC 

7® 

7OT 

736 

7.28 

WestpacBking 

WooGdePet 

Wbotworths 

BOT 

11OT 

418 

X12 

11.25 

413 

X17 

HOT 

417 

X09 

1125 

4)0 

Taipei 

Stock Market todac 10025.13 
Piwimrei 89855,1* 

ll 

92W 

1® 

118 

83 

145® 

114® 

SO 

145® 

115® 

82 

145 

114 

80 


13/® 

135 

135 

132® 

Ch«to Stoat 

3X90 

3X20 

3X20 

30® 


118 

114® 

115® 

IM 

PbmouPtosflc 

65 

61® 

64® 

62® 

Htw rare Bk 

12430 

120 

122® 

118® 

tofiOamniBk 

56® 

55 

Si® 

55 

Non Yd Pkntics 

77® 

74® 

77® 

/3® 

SWn Kong Life 

102 

165 

98® 

161 

9# 

164 

98 

157 

UWMscroElec 

46 

1® 

45J0 

134 

137® 


UM World Orin 

64® 

63 

XL® 

63 


Tokyo 

Agnamoto 

AlNlpfxuiAJr 

towny 

AWhiBaik 

AsatriCham 

Asahl Glass 

Bk Tokyo M»su 

Bk Yokohama 

Bridgestanw 

Canon 

OiUbuBK 

OhmoKuEIk 

MtewPtw 

Dtaei 

□oHcHKang 
Data Bunk 
Dahn Haase 
Delta Sec 
DOi 
Denso 

East Japrei Ry 
Eton 
Fanuc 
iBank 
I Photo 


HacbguniBk 
Hitachi 
Honda Motor 
1BI 
IHI 

Itochu 

Ito-Ybkada 

JAL 

Japan Tetaeoo 
JlBCO 

KoNo 
Kanul Bk 
K ao 

Kawasaki Huy 
Kawa Steel 
KoduNippRy 
Kirin Brawny 
Kobe Steel 
Konotai 

SSL 

EC" 3 ” 

Mmbeiri 

Maori 

Matsu Comre 
Matsu Eteclnd 
Matw Elec Wk 
MfeubUti 
Mitsubishi a> 
Mitsubishi El 
Mitsubishi Eta 
Mitsubishi Hvy 
MdsOTWii Mol 
MltsahWiTr 
Mitsui 



Mdrei 22Se 19157.12 


Pievtous: 1925223 

HU 

11® 

1170 

11® 

715 

70S 

3®D 

710 

3400 

33S0 

3350 

920 

095 

905 

B77 

6® 

632 

660 

617 

986 

952 

953 

982 

2358 

2316 

2320 

2320 

530 

518 

SO 

515 

282B 

2770 

2800 

27® 

•ucn 

3S® 

HI 

3CT0 

2040 

2020 

20® 

1950 

1930 

19® 

19® 

2800 

27® 

2770 

27® 

882 

860 

063 

887 

1510 

1480 

1480 

1490 

6B6 

6® 

669 

685 

1500 

1.418 

1430 

1380 

770 

761 

767 

761 

7300a 

7080a 

7250a 

7090a 

2BS0 

2790 

5350a 

2790 

7830 

5440a 

5380a 

5420a 

2530 

2500 

2500 

25® 

4920 

47® 

4750 

4900 

1520 

I590 

1590 

1580 

4920 

4770 

4790 

4900 

16® 

1630 

1630 

1630 

1170 

11® 

1170 

1170 

1250 

1220 

1230 

1230 

3700 

3610 

3620 

3700 

17® 

1730 

1750 

1730 

376 

367 

374 

370 

508 

500 

504 

497 

69® 

6900 

6920 

6920 

480 

465 

473 

476 

9780a 

9430a 

9480a 

9690 a 

3430 

33® 

3430 

3380 

671 

646 

666 

636 

22® 

2220 

2230 

22® 

18® 

1790 

1810 

1810 

482 

476 

2? 

474 

308 

301 

301 

304 

690 

685 

688 

690 

1010 

980 

980 

987 

1B1 

177 

179 

IN 

834 

810 

834 

809 

500 

488 

496 

4»1 

8990 

8710 

6730 

8930 

1970 

1940 

1970 

19® 

618 

59? 

409 

613 

435 

423 

427 

435 

19® 

1880 

1920 

1920 

4630 

4570 

4580 

4550 

2331 

2290 

2300 

2330 

13® 

1330 

1330 

13® 

1270 

12® 

1250 

1270 

309 

305 

307 

306 

590 

570 

583 

sao 

1690 

16® 

1190 

1680 

815 

807 

810 

809 

72S 

695 

700 

720 

1750 

1720 

1720 

17® 

1070 

1060 

1050 

10® 


Frees as of 3.00 PM Now York lima. 


Jan. 7. 1992 - 700. 

Lwwri 

Change 

% change 

par to data 
%changa 
+1725 

World Indue 

175.01 

-0-21 

-0.12 

RatfaMl hum 

Assa/Padtic 

129.13 

-0.07 

-0.05 

+4.62 

Europe 

184.76 

+0.68 

+0.37 

+14.62 

N. America 

206.40 

-1.68 

-0.81 

+27.48 

S. America 

162.11 

+0.47 

+029 

+41.87 

industrial Mum 

Capital goods 

229.27 

-0.53 

-0-23 

+34.14 

Consumer goods 

189.49 

-1.19 

-0.62 

+1728 

Energy 

198.35 

•0.24 

-0.12 

+16.19 

Faience 

133.79 

+0.30 

+0-22 

+14.88 

Miscellaneous 

187.09 

+0.59 

+022 

+15.64 

Raw Materials 

187.22 

+0.11 

+0.06 

+8.75 

Service 

isaii 

+0.44 

+027 

+18.78 

utmes 

161.84 

+0.38 

+024 

+12.81 


The International Horald Tribune World Slack Index O tracks tfw U.S OaSar values of 
280 bvematlonaBy imastaMB stocks /rare PS countries. For mom rtormatton. a tree 
booklet Is nvatait'to by wrtiiriq roThoTrto tntiax. 131 Avenue Crw/tos de GauOe. 
B252lNeunyCeam, Franco. CompHoc/byBloornOorgNmm. 



Sekbuil 
5ekhu» House 
Seven- EtaMti 
Sharp 

ShBariaiG Pwi 

SHmau 

Shfn-etauQi 

Strisdda 

StafauriuBL 


Sony 
Sum Homo 
Sumitomo Bk 
SumttQiein 
Sumflmrio Dec 
Sum# Metal 
SumB Trust 
Tataria Phann 
TakBria Chem 
TDK 

Tutorial B Pwr 
Talari Bank 
Toksa JtarisK 
Tokyo El Pra 
Tokyo Bectron 
Tokyo Gas 
Tokyo Qkp. 

Tanen 

Toppan Prirt 
Tcnnlnd 
Toshiba 
Tostem 
Taya Trust 
Toyota Motor 

Ynnmnoudil 

ax mbit IMP 


High 

Low 

dOM 

Pre*. 

1470 

14® 

14® 

14® 

730 

m 

710 

723 

5600 

5600 

5*00 

56® 

1610 

15® 

1570 

I6UI 

2440 

2370 


23® 

61B 

60S 

60S 

613 

10200 

105U0 

1IMU 

107® 

7® 

749 

774 

7® 

543 

531 

543 

525 

309 

:«3 

306 

310 

752 

735 

747 

m 

200 

194 

194 

m 

1680 

1650 

16.® 

1440 

11708 

1150b 

1170b 

1160b 

S470U 

5390b 

545® 

5390b 

610 

®! 

603 

603 

273 

270 

270 

273 

1900 

1870 

1870 

1860 

14000 

13900 

14000 

137® 

803 

778 

795 

7.® 

mJo 

®10 

41® 

3WU 

1590 

1590 

16® 

4® 

456 

466 

4641 

8610 

8508 

84® 

8710 

5600 

55® 

55ffl 

5600 

1070 

IQ® 

10® 

10® 

1200 

tiro 

1170 

1170 

8930 

R890 

89® 

MW 

13® 

1310 

1330 

1330 

1940 

1970 

1930 

1920 

664 

647 

6® 

63/ 

3190 

31.® 

31/0 

31® 

22® 

21® 

2190 

21® 

12® 

1710 

1230 

1230 

5790 

56® 

5720 

5730 

11700 

114® 

11400 

1I4J0 

1030 

row 

10® 

1020 

1920 

1890 

1910 

1W0 

470 

457 

470 

4® 

1940 

1920 

two 

1930 

78S 

2ft) 

283 

784 

1220 

1190 

1190 

I2UI 

31® 

31® 

3120 

31® 

3540 

3500 

35® 

3530 

98® 

96® 

97® 

98® 

1960 

1950 

1VS0 

19® 

1040 

1030 

1040 

1030 

1470 

1441 

14® 

14® 

2270 

7J® 

2270 

27® 

7580 

7750 

74® 

7340 

m 

282 

2KI 

288 

64* 

635 

640 

627 

1210 

tl® 

11.® 

12® 

1880 

18® 

18® 

IB® 

B14 

797 

809 

792 

737 

m 

730 

744 

74® 

74® 

7480 

7480 

1030 

999 

1010 

986 

327(1 

3130 

71.® 

3WI) 

3000 

2930 

29® 

2990 


High Lore Claw Prav. 


Mctoane* 

Mow; 

Newbridge Net 
NonmdaDic 
Morom Energy 
Nttiem Tdecam 
Nava 
Onat 

Panatn Peltm 
Petra Cda 
Placer Dame 
PacoPeUnt 
Potash Sask 
Renatuance 
RJa Algom 
Kcgras canfel B 
Seagram Cb 
SheuCdoA 
Suncar 
T^rautEfly 

Tdegtobe 
Tabs 
Themaa 
TofDori Bmk 
Tramrito 

TrmuCda Pipe 
TrtnaikHnl 

isisr 

WestcaastEny 

Weston 


1X10 

2890 

M 

2830 

34H 

14JL® 
1135 
31 JO 
2670 
2» 
2480 
1335 
HM 
361* 
34 
2816 
®.10 
rm 

4695 
45OT 
2714 
4835 
27OT 
3X15 
41 OT 
17.70 
26® 
66 
3X10 
745 
2640 
96 


1195 

28W 

66M 

2735 

3615 

14X30 

hot 

3135 

2610 

2X35 

2445 
13W 
10115 
3670 
33* 
2735 
49OT 
w» 1 
4645 
4444 
2716 
4835 
2635 
3X90 
41.15 
1730 

7*35 

65W 

3190 

72’> 

26tt 

95 


12 11.95 
MM 2X85 
66M 67 

281* 27.90 
341k 3445 
143V4 14670 
HOT 114 
31 JO 3130 
26W 2630 
25OT 25W 
2435 2620 
1X55 m 
10390 10610 
Kit5 KM 
33W 3X85 
2735 27.90 
49.90 » 

2230 22OT 
4665 4630 
4.495 4680 
27W 2745 
4835 4830 
2735 26* 

33 3X20 
4135 4130 
1735 17 JO 
2645 2635 
65 Vi 65.90 
3X05 32J35 
7 OT 7U 

2620 
95 9X95 


Vienna muraintn 

Prari asst 140643 

Boehtef-lMdeh 103X15101 X® 102110 1027 

Oedrianst Pfd 613 588 95® 608JQ 

EA-Generofl 32«S5 3130 3W 3200 

EVN 16X157745 1579 1628 

RughafenWlen 522 512 514 S20 

QMV IBM 1780179090 1795 

OeslEtekMz 870 861® 8® 86115 

VA Stahl 589 S75 575 588 

V A Tech 239930237615 2393238330 


Toronto TCElMtesMoftoirtOOT 


AWfiWCons. 
Atoerta Energy 
AkanAkm 
Andaraod Etqri 
Bk Montreal 
BkNow5atia 
BantdiGoKI 
BCE 

BCTekareim 
Biochra W«m 
Bombardier B 
Camera 
CISC 

CdnNaflRai 
CdnNaJRes 
CdnOcdd Pet 
Cdn Pacific 
Coretoco 
DctOKO 

Doaitv 

Donohue A 
Du PetoCda A 
EdperBroscan 
FuroHevMng 
Fairfax Frt 
FatawKxKfge 
RetoherChofl A 
Franca Newuto 
Gotf CdaRa 
linpgftol Oi 
Inra 

I PL Enemy 
LokllawB 
Laewen Group 
MaanteBM 
Magna 1® A 


Wellington 

AJrNZeoWB 
Briertylred 
Carter Hal orri 
FtetdiOlBUg 
FtefchOiEny 
HekhCti Foret 


lion Nathan 
Tetecwn NZ 
Wason Horton 


445 

440 

445 

4® 

1 M 

139 

139 

139 

X® 

346 

347 

ass 

435 

430 

433 

433 

532 

541 

532 

540 

1.96 

1.93 

1OT 

1.94 

346 

1® 

344 

142 

407 

401 

407 

400 

747 

738 

745 

738 


11OT 11.90 11.90 11.90 


25.90 

2 » 

ran. 

25H 

25JQ 

Zurich 


5PI Index: 364X75 

Prevton: 3*4812 

JIM 

31 M 

JIOT 

31 OT 






51 J» 

50.70 

5X70 

51OT 

ABBB 

2445 

239* 

342/ 

700 

17.70 

17OT 

17OT 

1735 

AdeceoB 

565 

549 

564 

54* 

569- 

5490 

54® 

5X55 

AlusuisseR 

1418 

1390 

1J9S 

14UII 

6420 


6315 

6410 

Ares-SeronQ B 

2550 

74® 

25® 

■2500 

32J0 

32.15 

32 <6 

32.1U 

AMR 

m 

870 

B80 

tSSJ 

4140 

®.vt 

®4S 

41.10 


2315 

22 ® 

230U 

9215 

pXTj] 

33.90 

34W 

3415 

BatoiseHdoR 

4205 

4095 

4135 

41® 


IRIK 

Wi 

3SJ0 

BXVisi® 

1140 

1130 

11 ® 

1135 

|Myl 

2714 

27.W 

28 

CBM Spec Chem 

1 ® 

13650 13730 

139 35 

50.70 

5030 

St® 

*n/x 

ante: f? 

1 093 

1075 

1084 

1082 

3840 

3714 

3780 

3840 

Cri Suisse GpR 

19X50 

187 18930 

19530 

n .90 

nvi 

70M 

7045 


.539 

537 

539 

538 

37415 

J7Vi 

37V> 

3745 


6820 

67® 

6005 

*S0C I 

3M4 

36.15 

3*20 

36M 

E5ECHdg 

46® 

4600 

4630 

4®y 

42.1 S 

41,90 

42.05 

42V. 

Hdderbank B 

1338 

1320 

1336 

1325 

a 

37VS 

3 F& 

3830 

LkchtonstLBB 

58* 

586 

58* 

588 

30OT 

29M 

29.90 

3045 

NestteR 

1895 

1868 

IBM 

IB/I 

12 

HOT 

11.9S 

UX5 

NnnfisR 

2317 

22 ® 

22/6 

2302 

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PAGE 16 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1997 



PAGE 17 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


S&P Lowers Outlook 
For 5 Malaysian and 
Indonesian Banks 


KUALA LUMPUR _ Standard 
& Poor s Corp downgraded its 
CTedit-ralmg outlook Thursday for 
fi-ofthe largest hanks in Malaysia 


Thailand, whose banking system has 
shuddered under the weight of bad 
debt invo ving the property market. 
Die dollar was at 2,705 rupiah on 


ms3S=Sb 5 sSa&sS! 


— comes amid mounting concern 
that increased interest rates in the 
countries win slow economic 
growth and erode bank profits. 

“It’s like there’s no faith ieft ” 
said Angie Ang. bank analyst at 
Research (Malaysia) Sdn 
“S&P s cut is a reflection of their 
concern about our economy.” 

The Indonesian rupiah and the 
Malaysian ringgit have plunged 
against the dollar, and investors 
have sold shares of companies in 
Jakarta and Kuala Lumpur in recent 
months amid concerns that the coun- 
tries ' problems resemble those of 


Seoul Taps 
Reserves to 
Protect Won 

CmtpiM h iV Stqff Front Pnjwrte 

SEOUL — South Korea 
rushed to thwart attacks on its 
currency Thursday, officials 
said, dipping further into its for- 
eign-currency reserves. 

■ The Finance Ministry also 
pledged special measures to en- 
sure a sufficient supply of for- 
eign currency to troubled banks 
as the market remained nervous 
over the won's sudden depre- 
ciation, ministry officials said. 

Hie dollar rose to 898.8 won 
on Thursday, from 895.0 on 
Wednesday. It began the week at 
890.5 won. 

Traders say Seoul spent up to 
SI billion In reserves on Tues- 
day alone to defend the won. 

Officials dismissed fears of a 
currency crisis, saying that Seoul 
had ample foreign currency re- 
serves and citing its sh rinking 
current-account deficit 

South Korea's foreign cur- 
rency holdings are estimated at 
S53.7 billion, and the Finance 
Ministry said Thursday it 
would increase the reserve to at 
least $36 billion by the end of 
the year. ( AFP, Bridge News) 

■ Pace of Change Faulted 

Trade Minister Lim Chang 
Yuel blamed delayed corporate 
restructuring for aggravating 
South Korea's economic woes, 
Agence France-Presse reported. 
He urged companies to enhance 
competitiveness by reraiinating 
unprofitable businesses, redu- 
cing debts and making manage- 
ment more efficient. 

Despite noting fears among 
South Koreans that foe nation is 
losing "many things” in re- 
vamping its industries, Mr. Lim 
said the government would ac- 
celerate deregulation and push 
for change in “financing, man- 
power and other factors that 
have caused high costs and low 
efficiency." 


of 3,035 rupiah on Tuesday before 
retreating after the central bank dra- 
matically raised interest rates. 

S&P cut its outlook to ‘'negat- 
ive” from “stable" for Malayan 
Banking fihd., the largest bank in 
Malaysia, and Arab-Malaysian 
Merchant Bank Bhd In Indonesia it 
did the same for PT Bank Negara 
Indonesia. PT Bank Danamon and 
PT Bank Umum Nasional. 

The actual credit ratings of the 
five banks are unchanged, S&P said. 
But it said it was concerned that 
further drops in the value of the 
rupiah or the ringgit might force 
banks to shoulder unhedged foreign 
loans taken our by their customers. 

Malaysia has also ratcheted up 
interest rates in its defense of the 
ringgit, which has been floated. The 
higher rates in both countries, S&P 
said, will lead to a slowing from the 
' breakneck pace of economic growth 
in the post decade and could result in 
a credit crunch in the real estate 
industry. 

“S&P is sounding to investors 
that both economies are going to 
slow inevitably and they have to be 
more cautious," said Alfred Ho of* 
Invesco Asia Ltd. “This is a pre- 
cautionary move. ’* 

Malaysian stocks fell Thursday; 
the benchmark Composite index of 
100 stocks finished dowh 20.33 
points at 909.24. 

Malayan Banking fell 2 ringgit to 
22. AMMB Holdings Bhd., which 
owns Arab-Malaysian, fell 80 sen to 
12 ringgit 

But stocks rose in Jakarta as the 
government's plan to abolish mono- 
polies on key commodities sparked 
optimism that the economy would 
be made more efficient The Stock 
Market Composite index gained 
9.89 points to 603.06. 

Meanwhile, S&P said it would 
not decide for about six- weeks 
whether to confirm or downgrade its 
rating on Thai sovereign debL On 
Aug. 1, itjput Thailand's “A” long- 
term foreign credit rating on review 
for a possible downgrade. 

S&P analysts just completed a 
visit to Thailand to gather fresh data, 
the company said, and are analyzing 
the information. . 

Hie credit review was to be com- 
pleted by the end of August. 

(Bloomberg. AFP. Reuters) 

■ Jakarta Threatens Traders 

Justice Minister Utoyo Usman of 
Indonesia has said that charges of 
subversion, which carry a maximum 
penalty of death, could be applied to 
currency speculators, the official 
Antara news agency said Thursday, 
Reuters reported from Jakarta. 

“If indeed they cause disorder in 
the national economy, of course, it 
can be categorized as a subversive 
criminal action because economic 
criminal acts are included in the 
formulation of that law,” Mr. Us- 
man was quoted as saying. 

Human rights groups have 
strongly criticized Indonesia’s 1963 
subversion law as too broad. 



A CRACK AT THE CONSTITUTION? — A gas-station attendant in Bangkok offering a 
customer the choice of two free eggs or a copy of Thailand's new constitution in exchange for a 
purchase of gasoline Thursday. With an economic crisis raging, most customers chose the eggs. 


C.vtfuM tn- Oitr Staff Fnu n Dapatth^ 

SYDNEY — Joseph Gutnicfc. the 
Australian entrepreneur whose 
Great Central Mines Ltd. has been 
the subject of recent takeover spec- 
ulation. launched unexpected bids 
on Thursday for two smaller mining 
companies, bankrolled in part by the 
far larger Normandy Mining Ltd. 

Mr. Gutnick said that Great Cen- 
tral was bidding to buy Wiiuna 
Mines Ltd. and Eagle Mining Ltd. 
for a total of 333.6 million" Aus- 
tralian dollars ($247.7 million). 

Great Central would be buying 
Wiiuna shares at 65 cents each, Mr. 
Gumick said, valuing the Western 
Australian gold mine at about 104.9 
million dollars. The company was 
buying Eagle Mining shares at 3.00 
dollars each, valuing the company at 
228.7 million dollars. 

Great Central raised 62 million 
dollars by issuing shares to Nor- 
mandy, while Normandy would 
lend it as much as 155 million dol- 
lars. This could see Normandy, Aus- 
tralia's largest miner of gold, 
emerge with as much as 25 percent 
of Great Central. 

Wiiuna and Eagle each own a 
gold mine near Great Central 's gold 


operations in the eastern goldfields 
of Western Australia state. 

“Potentially it is not such a stupid 
move,” said Neil Boyd-Clarke, who 
helps manage 5.6 billion dollars at 
Norwich Australia Investment Man- 
agement He said that for Normandy 
“there could well be a lot of up- 

Gibson Says Ecolab 
Bought 14% Stake 

Reuters 

MELBOURNE — Gibson 
Chemical Industries Ltd. said it be- 
lieved Ecolab Inc. of the United 
States had bought 14 percent of its 
shares after the market officially 
closed Thursday. 

Gibson said about 3 million 
shares were bought in special trades 
for 8 Australian dollars ($5.94) 
each. Gibson’s shares closed at 7.84 
dollars, up 44 cents. 

Ecolab produces chemicals and 
systems for cleaning, sanitation and 
maintenance. 

“Gibson Chemical Industries an- 
ticipates discussions with Ecolab will 
take place shortly,” Gibson said. 


Overseas Sales Lift Honda’s Profit 


CarpUed by Oar Stuff Fwm Dupaschei 

TOKYO — Honda Motor Co. 
said Thursday that brisk sales of cars 
and motorcycles in North America 
and Europe helped raise its net profit 
by 36 percenr to 62.25 billion yen 
($525.1 million - ) in the quarter 
ended June 30. 

Cost-cutting efforts and the weak- 
ness of the yen against the dollar also 
contributed to profit, Honda said. 

"Vehicle sales were steady in the 
first quarter, led by sales in North 
America and Europe," Honda said. 

The fbrst-quaner figures came after 
net profit more than tripled to a record 
221.17 billion yen in the previous 
year, which ended in March 1997. 

Honda used a dollar rate of 121 
yen to calculate its results, com- 
pared with 105 yen in the year- 


earlier quarter. 

Honda’s overall sales, which in- 
clude cars, motorcycles and power 
products, grew 15 percent from the 
year-earlier quarter to 1.42 trillion 
yen. Of the total, sales of vehicles 
alone rose 14percent,to 1.11 trillion 
yen. the company said. 

The weaker yen, which makes 
Japanese products more competit- 
ive abroad, lifted Honda’s group 
sales in North America by nearly 33 
percent and in Europe by 25 percent 
on a year-on-year basis. 

Strong overseas sales helped off- 
set the negative impact of weak 
sales at borne, where consumers 
tightened their purse strings after an 
increase in the national sales tax in 
April to 5 percent from 3 percent. 

Honda said that its domestic sales 


slumped 6.1 percent in the first 
quarter, to 418,07 billion yen. 

But a Honda executive said the 
company was maintaining its do- 
mestic sales target of 800,000 cars 
for the year. 

But analysts said things could get 
tough in Japan, where the market 
was expected to shrink this year. 

* ‘Their exports have been huge,’ ' 
said Fuyuki Fujiwara, auto analyst 
at BZW Securities (Japan) Ltd. 
“That’s been a huge plus for them. 
The primary concern is what is hap- 
pening in the domestic market' ' 
Separately. Honda recalled all 
65,782 Logo mini-passenger cars in 
Japan, saying their brake systems 
could fail because of a defect that 
causes brake-fluid leaks. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg. AP ) 


U.S. Set to Impose Penalties on NEC 


Canpdri by Our Sag From Dbpmeha 

TOKYO — The United States is 
likely to slap stiff duties on super- 
computers made by NEC Corp. after 
finding it sold machines in the 
America at prices so low that they 
violated an international agreement, 
an executive of the Japanese elec- 
tronics company said Thursday. 

NEC said foe penalties could 
force it to give up selling super- 
computers in the United States. 

The Commerce Department is ex- 
pected to impose a tariff of 454 per- 
cent on NEC supercomputer sales m 
the United States, said NEC’s ex- 
ecutive adviser, Yukio Mizuno. 

The department, reacting to a 
complaint by NEC's rival, Cray Re- 
search Inc., was to announce the 
penalties later Thursday, NEC said. 
The Japanese company said it would 

continue to appeal. • 

NEC appealed unsuccessfully to 
the U.S. Court of International 
Trade, based in New York, to block 
the tariff. It was the first time the 
court examined foe propriety of a 
Commerce Department investiga- 


tion. Had it ruled in NEC’s favor, it 
could have ordered special oversight 
of foe investigation or could have 
asked the department not to bear the 
matter at alL 

The court turned down the re- 
quest Wednesday, NEC said. 

NEC shares fell 30 yen to 1,570 
($13.24). fj . 

The United States could also im- 
pose a 400 percenr tariff on su- 

- hv FniitSU Ltd.. 



UiOHA.1, U Ulw . - . 

Commission ruled that it sold su- 
percomputers in America at unfairly 
low prices, Nikkei English News 
reported. 

“We haven’t sold very many su- 
percomputers in the U.S. market, so 

it wouldn't hurt os very much, said 

a Fujitsu spokeswoman, Yun MO- 
momoto. ‘ T think it’s American con- 
sumers who will be hurt the 
Fujitsu shares were unchanged at. 

1,630 yen. . - . 

In a preliminary ruling m Marcn, 
the Commerce Department said 
NEC violated anti-dumping regu- 


lations by trying to sell four su- 
percomputers to the U.S. govern- 
ment for less than the cost of one. 

Cray Research Inc. filed a com- 
plaint with the U.S. government in 
July 1996 after NEC won a contract 
from foe National Center for At- 
mospheric Research in Boulder, 
Colorado, for w eather-forecas rin g 
computers. The center is an affiliate 
of the federally funded National Sci- 
ence Foundation. 

Cray said the *$35 million price 
tag on NEC’s computers was less 
than one-fourth of their fair value. 
NEC said foe price was nor only 
greater than foe cost of manufac- 
turing the machines but that it in- 
cluded a profit margin. The dispute 
centered on how much of the com- 
puters’ development costs should be 
factored into their price. 

The dumping duties will become 
permanent if the International Trade 
Co mmis sion determines NEC's ac- 
tion hurt U.S. companies. The 
agency is expected to announce its 
final ruling in early October. 

(AP. Bloomberg. AFX.) 


Japanese Data Indicate 
Slow Economic Recovery 

Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — A closely warched economic indicator released Thurs- 
day indicated that a sluggish recovery in consumer spending and 
capital investment after higher taxes would continue into the fourth 
quaner. foe Economic Planning Agency said. 

The so-called diffusion index of indicators for June was 35.0, down 
from a revised 50.0 in May, the government said. June was the sixth 
straight month the index had remained at or below foe boom-bust line of 
50, a record for the current recovery, which started in November 1993. 

The agency said Japan 's economy was continuing to recover, and few 
economists thought a recession was in the offing, yet many questioned 
the government’s claim that foe post-tax slowdown was temporary. 

“we’ll just about avoid a recession this time, but foe economy will 
certainly remain weak through the end of the year," said Richard 
Jerram. economist at ING Baring Securities (Japan) Ltd. 

The diffusion index, on a scale from zero to 100, is based on 13 
economic indicators which suggest economic conditions three to six 
months in the future. A diffusion index above 50 suggests foe economy 
is healthy , according to the Economic Planning Agency, while a figure 
below 50 indicates a weak economy. 

The Bank of Japan has said foe economy would slow after April 1, 
when the national sales tax was raised to 5 percent from 3 percent, and 
2 trillion yen (SI6.9 billion) in income-tax rebates were revoked. 

The government previously insisted foe slowdown would last only 
three months, yet in its August monthly outlook it said consumer- 
spending was still weak. 


ii Raises Offer for Amdahl Shares by 3 % 

loomberg Sews spokeswoman for pr ^jtaJ hid said te ^rigin^ offer had a 

Ltd. said Thurs- lawsuits were L ^ um 

JSfS'foTsharesof shares dipped as low as $9.75 the week 

not already own by dozen ^court in SanS before foe acquisition agreement was 

$878 million, to settle Conri and -Peeking to stop the announced. , 

Tminct the our- Clara, California, secw“£ w r Fujitsu shares were unchanged at 

iwsuits agams acquisition. , Amdahl’s di- 1,630 yen. Amdahl shares were up 43.75 

t d f-rs - s“,a“ • 

s&as-s aw— « 

j, said Yuri Momomoto, a was just ^ 


Sw our 

Arts and Antiques 

i.'vm Saturday 



Investor’s Asia 


ttongKong 

Hang Seng. 

17000 

16000- 
I53D0 
14000 
13000' 

“mamjja 

1997 


Singapore 
Shafts Timas v 


Tokyo • 
Nikkei 225 ■ 



M A M J J 
1997 


M AM J J A . 
1997 


Australian Miner Bids for Gold 

Great Central Unexpectedly Seeks 2 Smaller Companies 


Exchange 

HongKbbg 


Thufsday Prw; %... 

Otose : Ctese ' : Cfy*age 
15,884.03 T5.S55.67, *1-27 

Singapore 


1*9^57;. ; 1<M3.92; 

Sydney 

. All poflnafies 

.. 2,630.70 .+0.72 

Tokyo 

Niktet.2S5 : .:y 

49,157.12 19.25223 -0.49 

Kuala ; ■ 

. 90&24: S2&57 -2.19 

Bangkok ' 

S6t! 

. S8&04 • $8641 -0.57 

SboeeI 



Telpei 

■Stock Market Index 1 8,025.13 9.855.16 +1.72 

Manila 

PSB -: ■ 

42:12 

TrtEi mil _u 

jaKana 

Cofi&oslte index 

603.06 583.17 ' . +1;67 

Woffington 

NZSE-40- 

2,516.85 ' 2,502.79 +0.56. 

Bombay 

.SensfiivBtndox : 

4,156.16 4,234.63 -1:85 

Source : Telekurs 


Inunuli-tiul Herald Tntmno 

Very briefly: 


side." 

Eagle Mining's shares surged 19 
percent, 50 cents, to 3.20 dollars, 
while Wiluna’s shares rose 16per- 
cent, 1 1 cents, to 68 cents. Grreat 
Central’s share prices rose 5 cents to 
2.53 dollars, while Normandy's 
share prices closed . unchanged at 
1.63 dollars. 

Normandy Mining said Thursday 
that it had no immediate plans to buy 
our Great Central Mining, ft saw its 
backing for Great Central's bids for 
Eagle Mining and Wiiuna Mines as 
a partnership rather than a launch 
pad for a takeover of its own. 

Colin Jackson. Normandy’s cor- 
porate general manager, said that 
Normandy's stake in Great Central 
would not stop Barrick Gold Corp. 
nor Placer Dome Inc.. North Amer- 
ican companies, from bidding for 
Great Central. 

Mr. Gumick said that Nor- 
mandy’s chairman. Robert Cham- 
pion de Crespigny, would join foe 
Great Central board. 

Great Central’s share price rose 
last month on market speculation 
that Banick Gold of Canada would 
launch a cash bid for Mr. Gutnick's 
company. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


• Japan’s government auctioned 700,000 shares of Central 
Japan Railway Co., which operates foe Tokyo-to-Osaka 
bullet train, for an average of 358.771 yen ($3,026) a share. 

• Japan and China said they would hold talks in Tokyo on 
China’s bid for membership of the World Trade Organization, 
focusing on reducing China's tariffs, scrapping nontariff 
barriers, such as import bans and liberalizing services. 

■ PT MaLuhari Putra Prima share prices fell 19 percent to 
2525 rupiah (89 cents) after Indonesia’s largest retailer cut 
1997 profit forecasts by 43 percent because of foe decline in 
foe rupiah. 

• Texas Instmments-Acer Inc., a Taiwan computer chip- 
maker, posted a loss of 667 million Taiwan dollars ($23.2 
million) for foe six months to June as prices dropped for 
dynamic random-access memory chips 

• Keppel Corp., a Singapore ship repair, property and bank- 
ing company, posted a 2.1 percent gain in first-half profit to 
102.2 million Singapore dollars ($68 million) from the year- 
ago period, helped by increased profitability from Keppel 
Bank and Keppel Land. 

• Telstra Corp., Australia's telecommunications carrier, an- 
nounced that Ziggy SwitkowskL foe former boss of its rival 
Optus Communications Pty!. had joined the company to 
lead Telstra's Business and International unit. 

• Toshiba Corp. said it would start mass production in 
September of digital videodisk read-only memory drives for 
notebook-type personal computers and would launch rwo 
sample models of DVD random-access memory drives. 

• Indonesia announced a crackdown on illegal imports of 
video compact disks after claims that more than 90 percent of 
the disks sold in Indonesia were pirated versions of films from 
Hong Kong. Japan and the United States. 

• Vietnam’s State Securities Commission, regulator of the 
planned stock exchange, will present plans of the exchange ’s 
organization and operating structure on Monday. 

Bloomberg. AFX. AFP. AP 


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PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1997 


NASDAQ 


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The Communicator. 


NOKIA 





PAGE 20 



FRIDAY. AVGUST 22, 1997 



England batsman Mark But- 
cher hitting the baD on to his 
wicket against Glenn McGrath. 


English Crumble 

cricket Glen McGrath, an Aus- 
tralian pace bowler, took seven 
wickets for 76 runs Thursday as 
England was all out for 180 on the 
first day of the sixth and final test at 
The Oval in London. Alec Stewart 
was top scorer for England with 36. 

Australia reached 77 for two 
wickets by the close. ( Reuters ) 

Karlsruhe Must Replay 

SOCCER The German soccer fed- 
eration Thursday ordered a first di- 
vision match between Munich 
I860 and Karlsruhe replayed be- 
cause of a disputed refereeing de- 
cision. 1860 had complained about 
Karlsruhe's 87th minute equalizer 
in the 2-2 draw on Aug. 5. It said the 
goaf should not have been allowed 
because Michael Malbranc, the ref- 
eree. had already blown his whistle 
for a foul. 

• Anderlecht said Thursday it 
would not challenge its 2-0 defeat 
by Brussels neighbor RWD MoJen- 
beek which made too many sub- 
stitutions in a Belgian league game 
last Saturday. 

“We wanted to make a sporting 
gesrure. Anderlecht did not deserve 
the three points,' ’ said Robert De Pot 
said. Anderiecht’s deputy manager. 

Molenbeek made a fourth sub- 
stilion two minutes from time. An- 
derlecht said it would have been 
awarded the game 5-0 if they had 
pursued the case. ( Reuters \ 

England Seeks Coach 

RUGBY union Bob Dwyer, the 
former Australia coach, and 
Richard Hill, who coaches the 
Gloucester club, on Thursday said 
they were among those who do not 
want to coach the England team. 

Dwyer said he was approached 
earlier this year by the Rugby Foot- 
ball Union. The RFU had talked to 
several coaches but was apparently- 
caught by surprise when Jack Row- 
ell, the man it was seeking to re- 
place as national coach, resigned 
Wednesday. {Reuters, AFP) 



HEAD START — Australian 
swimmers Michael Klim, top, 
and Susie O'Neill modeling the 
“Speed mask" which, its 
maker says, reduces drag from 
the eye sockets by 53 percent 


Portugal Keeps Cup Dreams Alive 


Realm 

Portugal kept alive its hopes of reach- 
ing next year’s World Cup finals with a 
3-1 victory over Armenia in a European 
Group 9 qualifying match in Setubal. 

The Portuguese dominated Wednes- 
day’s at-home match and squandered a 
number of easy chances to add to their 
tally in the second half. 

But victories for group rivals Ukraine 
and Germany left the Portuguese in 
third place in the group. Only the nine 
European group winners and the best 
second-place team qualify automatic- 
ally for the finals in France. The eight 
other group runners up will then com- 
pete for four more places in France. 

Portugal scored after 22 minutes, 
when Domingos Oliveira, unmarked 
close to the goal, tapped the ball home. 

Luis Figo scored a second goal eight 
minutes later with a dipping shot from 
just outside the penalty area. 

Eric Assadourian scored for Armenia 
in the first minute of the second half. But 
Pedro Barbosa made the game safe in the 
54th minute when be intercepted a poor 
back pass to score from close range. 

Portugal is level on points with Ger- 
many, two points behind Ukraine. But the 
Germans have a better goal average and 
have played one less game than Portugal. 
The two countries play in Germany on 
Sept. 6. 


For 4 Teams, 

Reuters 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Peru. Uruguay 
and Ecuador revived their chances of a 
place at next year’s World Cup with 
precious victories in qualifying matches 
on Wednesday, while Colombia virtu- 
ally assured itself of a place in France. 

Argentina and Paraguay look likely 
to join Colombia, which beat Bolivia, 3- 
0, but the race for the last of South 
America’s qualifying places in next 


In Belfast, Germany trailed Northern 
Ireland with time running out — but 
Oliver Bierhoff, a substitute, scored 
three times in six minutes to earn a 3-1 
victory. 

Ukraine, the group leader, needed a 
goal three minutes from time by Serhiy- 
Rebrov to beat Albania. 

When Ireland and Lithuania drew 0-0 
in Dublin in Group S they decided the 
first European qualifier for the finals: 


European Soccer 


Romania. Romania had beaten second- 
place Macedonia 4-2 in Bucharest earli- 
er in the evening, its seventh viciory in 
seven qualifying matches. 

Ireland and Lithuania have both 
played one less game than Macedonia, 
either could have drawn level Mace- 
donia with a victory. Now none of the 
three can catch Romania. 

Elvir Bolic converted two penalties to 
give Bosnia a surprise 3-0 victory over 
previously unbeaten Denmark, the 
Group 1 leader, in Sarajevo. Bosnia 
cannot qualify for the finals but dealt a 
blow to Denmark’s chances of going. 

Edin Mujcin opened the scoring in the 
18th minute. The spot kicks were award- 
ed after skipper Meho Kodro was twice 
felled. The Danes bead the group but 
still have to play Greece and Croatia 


year's World Cup was thrown open by 
Uruguay ’s 1-0 victory over Chile. 

The gap between fourth-placed Chile 
and eighth-placed Uruguay was reduced 


South American Soccer 


to two points as three teams in the lower 
half of the table won. 

In addition to Uruguay, Peru won, 3- 
0, in Venezuela, the bottom team, while 


Sweden scored twice in the last 15 
minutes to beat Belarus 2-1 in Minsk in 
Group 4. Per Zenerbeig scored the win- 
ner in the 85th minute. The home team, 
already out of contention for the finals in 
France next year, took the lead when 
Sergei Gurenko beat Thomas Ravelli 
from close range in die 38th minute. 
Kenner Andersson, a second-half sub- 
stitute, equalized. 

Sweden re mains third in the group, 
two points behind Scotland, which has 
played a game more, and one point 
behind Austria. Anion Polsier scored a 
second-half hat trick as Austria beat 
Estonia 3-0. 

Norway, the Group 3 leader, crushed 
its closest challenger. Finland, 4-0 in 
Helsinki to tighten its grip on the group. 
Hungary and Switzerland drew 1-1 in 
Budapest, leaving Norway six points 
clear. Even if its rivals do not slip up, 
Norway needs only to win in Azerbaijan 
on SepL 6 or to draw at home with 
Switzerland four days later in its last 
match to win the group. 

Turkey kept alive its slim chances in 
Group 7 by beating Wales 6-4 in a 
remarkable game in Istanbul. Hakan 
Sukur scored four goals. 

Lyuboslav Peaev hit the only goal 
after 69 minutes in Sofia to take Bul- 
garia country to the top of Group 5 and 
end Israel's hopes of qualifying. 


Ecuador came from behind to win, 2-1, 
a gains t Paraguay, which could have 
gone top of the single South American 
group if they had won in Quito. 

Argentina, which had the night off, 
still tops the table with 25 points, fol- 
lowed by Colombia with 24 and 
Paraguay with 23. Chile and Peru have 
19, Ecuador 1 8. Bolivia and Uruguay 17 
and hapless Venezuela just 3. 

Each team has three games left, apart 
from Colombia, Ecuador and 
Venezuela, which have only two. 

Argentina and Colombia are both one 
victory' away from qualifying to go to 
France and as Colombia’s next game is 
at home to Venezuela, it appears 
strongly placed. 

A spectacular volley by Marcelo 
Otero gave new life to two- time world 
champion Uruguay, which has em- 
ployed three different coaches during 
qualifying and depended heavily on 35- 
year-old veteran Enzo Francescoli in an 
erratic campaign. Chile was missing the 
injured striker Ivan Zamorano. 

In Venezuela, the heat in the town of 
Barinas, on the edge of the Orinoco 
basin, did not prevent Peru gaining a 
comfortable victory after Manuel Mar- 
engo had given them a 14th-minute 
lead. The Brazilian-bom striker Julinho 
and substitute Flavio Maestri added 
second-half goals for Peru, which had 
four goals disallowed and were defied 
on several other occasions by goalkeep- 
er Dudamel. 

In Barranquilla. a first-minute strike 
by Antony de Avila, a penalty by the 
veteran captain Carlos Valderrama and 
a header that. was Faustino Aspriila's 
first international goal in a year gave 
Colombia victory. 



t'-'in.l Vram — IVr...* 


Faustino AspriUa and his Colombian teammates celebrating victory. 


World Cup Draws Nearer 



Alexander Popov, winner of the 100- meter freestyle event in the Euro- 
pean championships in Seville, diving at the start of his heat Thursday. 


Popov Marks Comeback 
With Top-Speed Victory 

Year After Stabbing, He Grabs 100 Freestyle 


SEVILLE, Spain — Alexander Pop- 
ov. stabbed in the abdomen on a Moscow 
street a year ago. celebrated a triumphant 
return to top competition on Thursday 
with a commanding victory in the men's 
IQO-merer freestyle event in the Euro- 
pean Swimming Championships. 

It was his fourth consecutive Euro- 
pean championship victory in the event 
since he won his first major interna- 
tional tide in Athens in 1991 . 

Popov won in 49.09. the fastest time 
in the world this year — beating the 
mart; set by Michael Klim. Popov’s 
Australian training partner, who was 
docked in 49.15 tw o weeks ago. 

Lars Forlander of Sweden was 
second in 49.51. 

It was Popov's firs; big race since he 
was stabbed by a watermelon vendor 
jus! weeks after winning two Olympic 
gold medals in Atlanta. 

“I wasn't very happy with my time in 
the heats this morning, but I'm amazed 
at ray speed this afternoon, especially in 
the last 50." Popov said. “When I saw 


the time I said ‘Wow!’. This is a real 
renaissance.” 

Dagmar Hase of Germany, the stiver 
medalist behind Michelle de Bruin — 
the former Michelle Smith — izr At- 
lanta, took her revenge in the women’s 
400-meter freestyle to slop de Bruin’s 
bid for five individual gold medals: 

De Bruin had already won the 200- 
meter freestyle and 400-meter individu- 
al medley. 

Hase. 27. the 1992 Olympic cham- 
pion in the 400 freestyle, won in 4 
minutes 9.52 seconds. She pulled past 
de Bruin in the final 100 meters after 
swimming just behind the Irish woman 
for the first 300. Smith finished in 
4:10.50. , ■ 

“I think the three races is three days 
wore me down a little." said the Irish 
swimmer. “Otherwise I think 1 would 
have been there in the end.’’ 

De Bruin, 27, sitil has a chance to 
match the record of four individinl 
golds shared by East Germany's Lite 
Geweniger in 1981 and Hungary’s 
Kriszrina Egerszegi in 1993. 


Skeptical Buenos Aires Awaits Word on Its Olympic Bid 


By .Anthony Faiola 

Washington PvM Serviie 

B UENOS AIRES — A banner bearing a 
majestic blue bird in full flight, the five 
Olympic rings floating underneath it, waves 
proudly over the major thoroughfares in this me- 
tropolis. It is the symbol of Olympic spirit, and of 
local optimism in bringing the Olympic Games to 
the land of the brooding gaucho. 

“Oh, please," says Maria Caunedo. a 17-year- 
old student passing through Recoleta Park, waving 
a hand dismissively at the city’s Olympic bird. 
Roughly translated, her response: “I’ll believe it 
when I see it.’’ 

Pity the poor Portenos, as the residents of this 
city are called. Indeed, their city holds the dubious 
title of unsuccessfully bidding for the Olympics 
more times than any other city in the world. Four 
times this place has entered. And four times, that 
Olympic bird has laid an egg. 

‘ It is enough to make anyone a bit pessimistic — 
and random interviews on the streets indicated a 
big dose of local skepticism at the cify 's chances of 
being the winner when the International Olympic 
Committee announces the site of the 2004 Games 
on Sept 5. The attitude is totally Argentine. This is 


a culture that traditionally revels in negativity. 

This time Buenos Aires has made the final five. 
The arguments in favor of sending the world’s 
athletes down to the Western Hemisphere's south- 
ernmost capital are actually quite strong, said 
Mario Enrique Frigerio, who heads the Buenos 
Aires Department of Industry, Commerce and 
Tourism, spearheading the Olympic bid. 

Argentina was one of the founders of the In- 
ternational Olympic Committee in 1894. It is the 
only one of the original members that has yet to host 
the Olympics, say Argentine officials. No South 
American country has never hosted the Games. 

Of all the cities in the region, Buenos Aires is in 
many ways the most obvious to host the Olympics. 
It is the safest major Latin American city, claiming 
a crime rate in the lowest 20 percent of world cities. 
It also has been undergoing an economic renais- 
sance over the last two years, spurred by economic 
reforms and privatization. 

“No other city can offer what we can.” Frigerio 
said. 

The logistics of Buenos Aires's proposal appear 
sound. With a population of 12 .5 million, it is the 
largest metropolis among the finalists, the city also 
possesses an enormous amount of existing arena 
space. Almost 75 percent of the stadiums and sites 


needed to host the Games are already built, in- 
cluding the 60.000 seat River Plate Stadium, sire of 
the 1978 World Cup final. The plan is io add 5,000 
seats in time to dub it the new Olympic stadium. 
Only a few other major arenas need to built, among 
them a 1 2,000-seat basketball stadium. 

Arenas for 24 of the 38 Olympic sports are 
within a five-mile radius, nestled near a band of 
attractive green park land dial straddles the edge of 
the Rio de la Plata. 

“If you had all the Olympic athletes and spec- 
tators hold hands, they could form a ring around the 
area where we are proposing to host the Games,” 
said Roberto Eguia, press spokesman for the 
Buenos Aires Olympic Committee. 

Buenos Aires, known for its Old World elegance 
and grand European-style architecture, also pos- 
sesses a relatively complete, if not new. rapid 
transportation system. A new subway line, planned 
for completion before the 2004 Games, would 
assist in shuttling visitors and athletes to their 
destinations. Six billion dollars in infrastructure 
improvements to ihe airport, highways, and tele- 
phone communication systems '’are also planned 
before the Games. 

But nor everything is perfect. The organizers 
could be better organized. Several officials did not 


know, for instance, the deta i Is of their own financing 
plan to bring the Olympics to Buenos Aires. 

The government has guaranteed the estimated 
$ 1 -2S billion cost of the Games, but they are hoping 
that only S168 million of that will come from 
national and local government subsidies. The bulk 
ot the money is expected to come from television 
rights, which the Argentines hope will be es- 
pecially lucrative since Buenos Aires is only one 
hour ahead of eastern standard time. 

Private companies and entrepreneurs also are 
helping Buenos Aires promote its Olympic bid. 
George Soros, the billionaire who is one of the 
largest foreign investors in Argentina, is offering to 
put up a “substantial amount” toward the con- 
struction of the Olympic Village. Eguia said. But 
there are drawbacks. There is, for instance, the 
question of cost. Lodging and restaurants here, 
though of top quality, are extremely expensive. 
And that s once you get here — which isn't quick 
or inexpensive. 

Even though the International Olympic Com- 
nutue awarded the 1992 games to Seoul and the 
-000 Olympics to Sydney, the Argentines fear that 
the distance from major western capitals, and a 
perceived Eurocentric attirude by the IOC. will 
count against Buenos Aires. 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Stamdinob 

AHUUBCAM UUMMJI 



EAST DIVISION 




w 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Baltimore 

79 

44 

A42 

— 

New Yam 

75 

50 

400 

5 

Boston 

44 

63 

J04 

17 

Toronto 

40 

65 

■480 

20 

Detroit 

58 

47 

.464 

22 


CENTRAL DIVISION 



Cleveland 

45 

58 

-528 

— 

Milwaukee 

42 

63 

.496 

4 ' 

Chicago 

42 

64 

.492 

4V* 

Kansas Cily 

52 

71 

423 

13 

Minnesota 

S3 

73 

416 

14 


WEST DIVISION 



Seattlo 

70 

54 

854 

— 

Anaheim 

49 

58 

343 

1'4 

Texas 

40 

67 

473 

Iff/i 

Oakland 

SO 

77 

J94 

2ff.v 

NUIONAL L1AOUE 



EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Atlanta 

78 

49 

414 

— 

Florida 

73 

52 

-584 

4 

New York 

47 

57 

840 

9’s 

Montreal 

41 

63 

492 

15'4 

Philadelphia 

45 

77 

349 

30V, 


CENTRAL OnnSIOM 



Houston 

64 

40 

-524 

— 

.Piltsbuigh 

63 

43 

SO 0 

3 

.SI. Louis 

58 

67 

464 

7V, 

Cincinnati 

55 

69 

443 

10 

Chicago 

50 

77 

J94 

16'. 


west DIVISION 



Son Francisco 71 

56 

S59 

— 


Los Angeles 

48 

Colorado 

61 

Son Dleg° 

60 


sr sis 2 

bS Mi 9V, 

66 .476 Iff* 

wmuuri unscons 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Boston 000 070 000-7 11 O 

Oakland. 100 130 OOO— S n l 

WakeflekL Mahay (6). Brandenburg io), a 
Henry (7) and Hasefcnan; Haynes. □. 
Johnson (5), C Reyes (51. Groom (61. A. 
Small (8) and Moyne. W— Wakefield 8-14. 
L— Haynes 1-3. Sv— B. Henry (6). 

HR— Oakland. Canseco 1271. 

Second Game 

Boston 010 OM 012 000 1—5 16 I 
OOHaiid IBS 000 000 OH 0—4 B 1 
(13 innings) :Suppan, WOsdln (4), Coni [81. 
Mahay (11). Hudson (111. Gordon <13> and 
Hafteberg. Hasdman HO); Oqutst Groom 
(6). T. J .Mathew (73. Tayfar (8), Wengerl 
(101 and Modrra. Moyne 01). W-Hudsan 2- 
0. L— Wengert S-lO. So— Gordon (1). 
HR— Oakland. Gtamni (15). 

New York Wtt 003 000-7 12 1 

Anaheim 001 000 002—3 6 0 

Gooden, Mendoza (7) and Posada lOOH 
OaMay (6) aid Td-Greene. Kreuter (51. 
w — Gooden7-4.L — K. HiU 6-10. Sv — Mendo- 
2a(2) JHR&— N.YJ*osada(2)AHenderson (1). 
Second Game 

New York 230 ODO 030-8 12 1 

Anaheim 010 100 120— S 9 3 

Irabu. Return (71. Srantan (8|. M. Rtvera 
(9) and Girordc Langston. Hasegawa (2), 
Holtz {8).Jonws TO and Kreuter.w— Irabu 4- 
2. L— Langston 2-4 Sv— M. Rtvera (39). 
HRs— New York, Jeter 7 (7), Sanchez (I). 
Anaheim. Salmon (24), Edmonds (20). 
Minnesota 041 033 000-11 14 0 

Detroit 001 000 010-1 3 1 


Radke. Aguilera (9) and Stdnbach. D. 
Millar [9J;5JamJeri Soger (33, Oishman (5), 
Go Word (8). M. Myers (9) and WMbecft. 
W— Radke. 17-7. L— S. Sanders. 4-11. 
HRs — Minnesota Lawton (81, stetnbo tf t 
(12), Hocking (21. Detroit Nieves (17). 
Bathroom 000 103 000—4 B 0 

Kansas City 010 000 010-2 5 I 

Key. A. Benitez (B), RaJMyere (9) and 
Hmles; Rusdi Olson (81, J Montgomery (9) 
and MLSweeney. W— Key 14-7. L — Rirecft 5- 
9. Sv — RaMyefi (371. HRs — Baltimore, R. 
Palmeiro 2 08). Kansas City. Y .Benitez 151. 
Toronto 000 1BD 131-4 12 0 

Chicago 102 720 OOx—12 14 0 

Person. Crabtree (*}, Janren (71 and B. 
Santiago? Baldwin. CCasfiBo (81, N. Cruz (91 
and Fobregas. W — Baldwin 9-13. L— Person 
5-9. HRs— Tarwita R. Perez (2). C. Detgada 
Q6). Chicago. Belle (24). 

Milwaukee 004 011 000—4 to Q 

Texas 000 001 HI— 2 1 1 

Plane. Widuiwn (81, OoJones 19) and 
Mctheny; Te.Ctark. Bailee (7) and I. 
Rodriguez. W— Flarie 4-4. L— Te.Clarh 1-5. 
Sv — DoJones (27). HRs — Milwaukee, Vina 
[3L Bumttz 1221- 

Cleveland OH 0M 000—0 2 I 

Seattle OH 100 He— 1 9 1 

Nagy, M Jackson (8) and S. Afomae 
RaJohnson. Timlin (7), Charlton (8). 
Slocumb (8) and Da. Wilson. W— RaJahmon 
17-4. L— ftogy 12-9. Sv— Slocumb (20). 
HR— Seattle. E. Martinez (22). 

NaTONal LEAGUE 

Colorado 010 Ml 210-8 9 0 

Ctnanati OH OH 120—3 5 0 

F-Cnslffla Holmes (8). Ditxrto (9) and 
Marrwarwg, GWhflfc Suffivan (6), 
Fe Rodriguez (Pi, Tanaka (9). Belinda (9) 


and Taubensae. Fontyoe (4). W — F. CostiHo. 
10-10. L— G. White. 1-1. Sv— Olpoto (9). 
HRs— Colorado, Burks (23), Casfflla (321. 
Cincinnati. Edu. Perez (13). 

Sat Diego 100 008 082—3 7 2 

Pittsburgh HI 002 31 ft -7 14 D 

Ashby. Bochtter (7L Cunnane (8) and 
Flaherty; Schmidt Lofeelto (9) amt Kendal 
W— Schmid! 88. L— Ashby 6-9. 

St. Laois 0M OH 231—4 8 I 

Montrwd 0M Ml 110—3 10 2 

Ay bar, C King (7). Fossas (8), Eckeisley 
19) and Pagnazzl Lampkjn (71; 
P J .Martinez, Tel font (7). KHne IS). Bu Ringer 
(9) and Fletcher. W-C King 80. L— Kline 0- 
1. Sv— EtSuersley (30). HR— SI. Louis. 
Lamp*, in (6). 

Chicago 200 003 BOO-8 1! 0 

Florida 329 1M 00*— 6 9 0 

Tapani Batista (41. Ptsdotta (6J. Patterson 

(8) , T. Adams (8) and Scrunb. Houston (3); 
L Hernandez. F. Heredia fej. Vostxng (7). 
Powell (7), Non (91 and Zaun. W— L 
HemafWw 7-0. L— Tapani 2-A S v— Hen (31). 
HRs-CNcogo. L Johnson (3). Florida 
Sheffield (14). 

AHanta HI 100 too-3 4 0 

Houston 0M OH OlO-l 4 O 

Gtavine C For (8), Embreo (B1. Wohlers 

(9) and J. Lopez; Reynolds T. Martin (8), 
Lima (9) and A asm us. W — GtavHre 11-4. 
L- Reynolds 6-8. 5 v- Wohlers (31). 
HR— Affanta J. Lopez (19). 

Japanese Leagues 


Yokult 

Yokohama 


H/ro-Ztimo 


S3 47 0 J25 6’i 


Chuniclii 

47 

56 

1 

457 

13't 

Hanshin 

44 

56 

| 

441 

15 

Yomlurl 

44 

57 

a 

434 

lS'.V 

PACIFIC LEAGUE 




W 

L 

T 

Pet 

.GB 

Orix 

S3 

39 

3 

574 



Seibu 

54 

44 

3 

-550 

2 

Nippon Ham 

SO 

51 

1 

495 

7!4 

Doiei 

49 

52 

a 

485 

816 

Kintetsu 

46 

54 

2 

461 

11 

Latte 

41 

53 

2 

438 

13 


nakiMrs result 

CENTRAL LEAGUE 
Yotruiiri 6. Hanshin ) 

Yokohama 4, Yakut! 1 
Hiroshima 1 Chunfchi 2 

PAORC LEAGUE 
Seftu S. Lotte 4 


CRICKET 


■HOUND V 0 . AUSTRALIA 
SIXTH TEXT. FUST DAT 
THURSDAY. IN LONDON. ENGLAND 
England: ISO all out 
AiistraPa: 77 Ear two 


World Cup 


W L T Pet .GB 

59 41 1 58 - 

54 43 0 -557 S 1 '! 


Colombia 3. BoflvtaO 
Ecuador 2. Paraguay 1 
Uruguay I. ChileO 
Venezuela 0. Peru 3 


STANomosi Aigenlina 25; Colombia 24- 
Paraguay 23; Chfte 19s Peru 19: Ecuador 18f 
Boflvta 17; Uruguay 17; Venezuela 3. 

HI COPIAH ZONE 

GROUP t 

Bosnia 1 Denmark 0 

STAMEN MOS: Denmark 13 point* Greece 
lCfc Croatia 9s Bosnia 6s Slovenia I. 

GROUP a 

Finland a Norway 4 
Hungary 1, Switzerland I 
standi Mas: Norway U points; Hungary 
B: Switzerland 7; Finland 7; Azertwi)on 3. 

CROUPS 

Austria 3. Estonia 0 
Belarus 1. Sweden 2 

standing 8r Scotland 17 points; Austno 
14; Sweden IS Latvia 7; Estonia 4 Belarus 4 
GROUP 5 

Bulgaria 1, Israel 0 

STANDINGS: ; Bulgaria 15 points; Russia 
I* Israel 1% Cyprus 4 Luxembourg 0 
GROUPS 

Czech Republic 2. Faroe Islands 0 
standings: Spain 20 points; Yugoslavia 
1% Slovakia 12: Czech Republic 7; Faroe is- 
lands 6; Malta a 

group T 

Turkey 4 Wales 4 

STANDINGS: Netherlands 15 points: Bd- 
3*1 ml 5 Turkey Iff Wales 7; San Marino 0. 

GROUP ■ 

Liechtenstein a Iceland 4 
Romania 4 Macedonia 2 
Ireland 0. Lithuania 0 
CTMlDCNast Romania 21: Macedonia 
■4 Ireland ) I; Lithuania 1!; Iceland 4.- (jecH- 
onstetafl. 

GROUP « 

Ukraine 1. Albanian 


Northern Ireland l, Germany 3 
Portugal 1 Armeraa i 

STANDINGS: Ukraine 17; Germany IS; 
Portugal IS- Northern Ireland 7.- Armenia £ 
Albania 1. 

SPANISH Him cur 

WEDNESOAX. IN BARCELONA. FIRST LEG 
Barcelona 2. Real Madrid 1 

UUTW HDST DIVISION 
Rada JC Kerkrade I. Utrecht 0 
Sparta Ratter. I. Grtxrtschap Doetindwm 1 
Groningen 1 VaJendam 0 
Willem II Tilburg 1. NEC Nilmegen 2 
PSV Eindhoven 5. RKC Waahvtfk I 
Heeremreen 3, NAt Breda 1 
Twentr Enschede 4, Fortune SWard I 
Ajar Am sterd am S Vitesse Arnhem 0 
INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLY 
WEDNESDAY. M ST. PETERSBURG. RUSSIA 

Russia a Yugoslavia 1 




BASEBALL 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

ahaheim — A ctivated LHP Mark Langston 
from disabled list. Pul C Todd Greene on 1 5- 
day disabled Ibt. 

DETROIT- Signed RHP Todd Jones to 2- 
year contract. 

MA TTLE— Acquired OF Roberta KcKy from 
Minnesota (or playur to named toier. 

RATIONAL LEAGUE 

CHICAGO- Signed RHP Michael Wuertz 

jt. louis— P ut ib John Mobiy on 15-day 
dfeabltt! list. Recalled I B Dmitri Youna (rom 
Louisville. AA 


NAHONAL BASKETSAU AS! 
Miami— S igned F Terry M Sis. 

FOOTBALL 
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LI 
NFL- Fined Carolina Panthei 
Lathon MO000 far his hit k. ft 
Kansas Qtv quarterback Rich & 


NATIONAL HOCKEY LE, 
Colorado— Signed D Paso 
and F Jason Simon. 

NEW YORK ISLANDERS— Nami 
Crinnnon assistant coach . 

NEW YORK HANCERS-SIgned 
inton. Agreed to terms wltl 
VasJUev. 

PHILADELPHIA— Acquired c t 
I’romjhc Tampa Bay Lightning 
round draft okks and re-acquire 
lar F Mikael Ron berg and D Kai 
PHOERU -Signed D John Slo; 
contract. 

Pittsburgh —Announced ai 
Dkice players with Vaneouw 
American Hockey League atfiim 
cine Crunch. 

_ San jwe -A cquired G Mite t 

Win ® 5 far ^ 
5™* «*Wifwwt l*i a 
draft pick. Signed Vernon to 3-„ e 

—Agreed to £ 
Adam Oates on 3-year conlroci* 

COLUgi 

ball coach, tamuit.Scl^' 





’Yi o« \£L£k 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1997 


PAGE 21 


He s the Best in Football 
And Nobody Knows Him 


SPORTS 


C HANK 


By Chris Dufresne school fight Those two mistakes ended anv 

Angeles Tuna Semce hopes Moss had for major college expert- 

-His™— 

"No 5' he says, sitting* a desk wearing a jnst ataZo* 11 " ’ ' says ' '' I,,s 

forme ’’ * e T " Shlrt ' “ Thele ' s no *“S here Moss was in heaven the day None Dame sem 

The TQ_v(*ar^-»iH ■ j a questionnaire. There would be no re- 

bv S r ICCmm ““S war. Moss was going to South Bend 

.? ame . l aild J State — now Bui then came March 24 . 1995 . As the story 

practices in a railmaH rnu/n a«i o PiaI /4 e - _ ■ » , . y 


THa . a i nere would 

hv M^r^ d r once Kcruite ^ cnn&ng war. Moss was goin° to Sou 

by Notre Dame and Florida State — now Buithen came March 24 1995 / 

S^eet^m a ^H?mt'° Wn “w fidd 8 ,° es ’ a b,ack friend of boss’s was sitting * 

r!,^ e c e f. fiom Huntington Hose and Hy- class when a white student carved a racial insult 

Th* h act „ • „ . . „ ?» 3 desktop and showed it to him. Moss's 

K , P ^ y - m 9°^ e 8 e football once friend challenged the kid to a fight after school 

bcked a teen-ager in the stomach as he lay and asked Randy, also black, ro provide sup- 
helpless on the ground. port v v 

" ‘I 1 was . j“« !Dce my temper took over," he Moss says of the 700 students at his high 

recounts, like I was another person.” school, only about 40 were black. He says 

I he best player once smoked pot and did racism was and remains a problem, 
jail time. 

He remembers nights by himself in his cell, m he fight was one-sided. Mos 
thinkmg * ‘how much hate I have for people," I knocked the white student to l 
and how “the hate ' s always going to be there, X. and kicked him relentlessly. 

{««*■ “te fact that people can’t let a person mits to kicking the student too. tw 
be their own person and go on. I think people fight was ending. The boy wound 
ro see me fail. ' * hospital with a torn spleen. 

The best player has two strikes against him Moss's friend was not charged wi 
and is hiding out in the Appalachians ro avoid because he was a juvenile. But Mra 



he fighr was one-sided. Moss’s buddy 
knocked the white student to the around 


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f ii \ ictorv 

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T he fighr was one-sided. Moss’s buddy 
knocked the white student to the ground 
and kicked him relentlessly. Moss ad- 
mits to kicking the student too. twice as the 
fight was ending. The boy wound up in the 
hospital with a tom spleen. 

Moss's friend was not charged with a crime 

_ . , r because he was a juvenile. But Moss had just 

^ truce _s. unce gregarious and approachable, turned 18 and was slapped with a felony, 
he has pur up a wall of insulation. He does not “malicious wounding." 
go out nights for fear that his name will end up Although charges were later reduced to 
in the paper. misdemeanor batteiy. Moss was sentenced to 

The best player in college football is not 30 days in jail. 

Tennessee’s quarterback, Peyton Manning, How much did those two kicks cost? 

who passed up millions to return for his senior Moss had signed a letter of intent with 

Notre Dame, but suddenly the Irish were not 
The best pl ayer is Randy Moss, a wide interested. Notre Dame officials insist that he 
receiver who returned for his sophomore sea- was not accepted because of academic de- 
son at Marshall University only because the ficiencies. Moss did turn in his application 
school is upgrading to Division I- A, joining late and produced an admittedly woeful effort 
the Mid-American Conference, and Moss on the required essay, 
wants to show NFL scouts that last year’s one- Moss says that was a disappointment, but it 

man stampede through I-AA competition was was not the end. Holtz called Florida State and 
not a fluke. suggested that Bowden take a chance. Florida 

For Manning, perhaps, college is a love State administrators agreed to admit Moss in 
affair. For Moss, it’s a holding cell. 1995, provided he would sit out his fre shman 

"If I can have a decent year, half as good to season. He did, then turned in a spectacular 
the year I had last year, there would probably spring practice in 1996 before returning home 
be nothing left to prove,” Moss says. to finish his sentence at Charleston's South 


- rj\ 


be nothing left to prove,” Moss says. 

Last year, exiled from Division I-A after 
Notre Dame had tamed him away and Honda 
State had given him the boot. Moss led Mar- 
shall to the Division I-AA tide with 78 re- 
ceptions for 1,709 yards. His 28 touchdown 
catches broke the all-divisions NCAA record 
of 27 set in 1 984 by Jerry Rice at Mississippi 
Valley State. 

"I think the competition for I-AA was not 
all that good,' ’ Moss says. “It had its ups and 
downs." 

Friends call him “the Freak" because of 
his athletic skills. At 6-feet-5 (2 meters) and 
210 pounds (98 kilograms). Moss has Rice's 
size and Deion Sanders’s speed. 

“Runs likeascalded dog,”Bobby Bowden, 
the Florida State coach, said of Moss. 

Lou Holtz, the former Notre Dame coach. 


said- * ‘Randy Moss was the best high school Moss can’t wait to leave Marshall, 
football player I’ve ever seen." He dreams of cashing an NFL paycheck 

After Moss madea mockery of the I-AA title and buying a big house on a hill somewhere 
game against Montana, Wayne Hogan, the not in West Virginia, overlooking water. 


Central Regional Jail- 

Two days before he entered. Moss admits, 
he smoked dope with friends. 1 ‘That was really 
a pretty dumb mistake, smoking marijuana," 
Moss says. “It was during my probation. 

His probation was revoked, Florida State 
kicked him off the team and be was sentenced 
to an additional 90 nights in jail on a work- 
furlough program through spring and summer 
of 1996. The sentence was later reduced to 
time served through July 26. 

His jail time completed. Moss called Bob 
Pruett who had just taken over as coach at 
Marshall 

In his year in Huntington, Moss has be- 
haved himself. 

“We’d not had any problems with him," 
Pruett says. “I think he s got a bad rap." 

Moss can’t wait to leave Marshall. 

He dreams of cashing an NFL paycheck 


The Associated Press 

The really good news for the Seattle 
Mariners came after their 1-0 victory 
over the Cleveland Indians. Randy John- 
son, it seems, is all right. 

Johnson was forced to leave Wednes- 
day nighr's game in Seattle in the sev- 
enth iiining because of a bruised middle 

AL Roundup 

finger on his left, or pitching, hand. He 
aggravated an injury that he sustained 
Aug. 3 when he caught a ball with his 
bare hand. 

“It’s a little sore and a little swollen," 
Johnson said. “But hopefully it’ll get 
taken care of in the next five days" or 
before his next pitching start 

Johnson (17-4) allowed two hits and 
struck out eight His victory, coupled 
with Anaheim’s 7-3 and 8-5 double- 
header loss to New York, gave the Mar- 
iners a 1 14-game lead over the Angels in 
the AL West 

Edgar Martinez hit his 22d homer, 
connecting in the fourth inning off 
Charles Nagy for the only run of the 
game. 

Johnson, who leads the majors with 
264 strikeouts, gave up a double by Matt 
Williams in the fifth and an infield single 
by Tony Fernandez to start the seventh. 
'Mike Timlin. Norm Charlton and 
Heathcliff Slocumb combined for three 
innings of hitless relief. 

During the game, the Mariners made a 
trade to get outfielder Roberto Kelly 
from Minnesota for a player to be 
named. Kelly is expected to play left 



Dm LcnneMfener Fnnrr-Piwc 

Randy Johnson, despite a bruised 
finger, pitching a shutout victory. 

field, the spot Jose Cruz Jr. held before 
he was traded to Toronto on July 31 fra: 
two relievers. Paul Spoljaric and Tim- 
lin. 

Twins 11, Tigars 1 Minnesota stopped 
its 10-game losing streak as Brad Radke 
beat Detroit at Tiger Stadium. 

Radke (17-7) allowed three bits in 
eight innin gs. He is the top winner for the 
Twins since 1991, when Scott Erickson 
won 20 and Jack Morris 18. 

Denny Hocking. Terry Steinbach and 
Matt Lawton homered for the Twins. 

Scott Sanders (4-11) fell to 1-5 with a 
6.95 earned run average in seven starts 


Phillips Set to Suit Up Again 


game against Montana, wayne Hogan, me _ _ 

Montana athletic director and a former Florida “where I can just look out and about, where 
State associate athletic director, sent a note to I’m separated from everybody else; get me 
Bowden: “If you hadn’t kicked him off the some big land, fence around it, and be my own 
team, we’d both be national champions." person-’’ , , ^ ,, . „ 

Don’t think Moss hadn’t considered it. Moss knows he s different at Marshall. 

He watched Florida's drubbing of Florida He says he senses some resentment on the 


State in the Sugar Bowl and wondered if he 
could have been the difference. f 

He would have been in the Setninoles’ 


person. 

Moss knows he’s different at Marshall. 

He says he senses some resentment on the 
trem and thus chooses to keep his distance. 

All he wants now is to be left alone until 
he’s in the NFL, when there will be ample 


bid 


- starting lineup, had it not been for Strike 2. his time for talk and gawk. 

* testing positive for marijuana in the spring of “I can t do the things or go the places that I 

^995 while he was serving jail time for Strike would have done in Honda, Moss says. 

, n* ? _■ I, an assault charge stemming from a high “Now it’s time to keep to myself. 


Los Angeles Times 

ANAHEIM, California — Tony 
Phillips was scheduled to be back in an 
Anaheim Angel uniform Thursday 
night after an independent arbitrator 
overruled the team s decision to sus- 
pend the player who has been charged 
with cocaine possession. 

After the three-hour hearing 
Wednesday in New York, flew from 
New York to Los Angeles. Phillips 
was arrested Aug. 10 and charged with 
felony possession of cocaine. 

It seemed likely that Phillips would 
start as designated hitter in Thursday 
night’s series finale against the New 
York Yankees. 

The Angels had decided Monday to 
suspend Phillips with pay after he 


refused the team's request to enter an 
inpatient drug-counseling center. 

Players' union officials said the 
suspension was a violation of base- 
ball’s drug policy. Arbitrator Richard 
Bloch ordered the Angels to reinstate 
Phillips, ending a legal skirmish the 
union considered superfluous. 

“I read where Angel officials said 
they expected to lose, so why did they 
go through with it?" said Gene Orza, 
associate general counsel for the Major 
League Baseball Players Association. 

Orza said he was upset because he 
felt the Walt Disney Co., which op- 
erates the Angels, was more concerned 
with its reputation as a promoter of 
family values than with following 
baseball’s rules. 


since the Tigers acquired him from 
Seattle on July 18. 

Yankees 7, Angels 3; Yankees 8, An- 
gels 5 Hideki Irabu threw his best game 
in a while — plus his glove and a tantrum 

— as New York swept the Angels at 
Anaheim. 

Irabu, told earlier this season by man- 
ager Joe Torre to tone down his temper, 
kicked hard at the rubber in the seventh 
inning after being called for his second 
balk. 

The second base umpire, John 
Hirschbeck, yelled at Irabu, prompting 
Torre to come out onto the field. 

In the fourth, Irabu (4-2) fumbled a 
bunt single tty Dave Hollins and tossed 
his glove at the ball — an illegal gesture 

— as it rolled into the dugout. 

Derek Jeter homered twice and drove 
in four runs in the second game. 

New York won the opener as rookie 
Jorge Posada hit a three-run homer to 
help Doc Gooden. 

White Sox 12, Bluo Jaya 6 Albert Belle 
homered, doubled twice and drove in 
five runs as Chicago beat Toronto at 
Comiskey Park. 

Belle matched his season high for runs 
batted in, going 3 for 3 with his 24th 
home run. His two-run double high- 
lighted a seven-run fourth inning. 

Rod Sox 7, Athletics 5; Rod Sox 5, Ath- 

ietica4 Mo Vaughn hit a pair of two-run 
doubles to lead Boston’s doubleheader 
sweep at Oakland 

In the opener, Vaughn’s double was 
the highlight of a seven-run fifth inning. 
In the second game, he hit a tying double 
with two out in die ninth, and the Red 
Sox won in the 13th on John Valentin’s 
run-scoring single. 

Boston relievers pitched a total of 14 
scoreless innin gs in die doubleheader. 

Jose Canseco, sidelined since Aug. 1 
because of lower back spasms, homered 
and drove in four runs for Oakland in the 
opener. 

Oriofos4, Royals 2 Rafael Palmeiro hit 
two home runs and went 4 for 4 for 
Baltimore in Kansas City. 

Palmeiro has 28 homers this season, 
five against the Royals. He also con- 
nected Tuesday in the first game of a 
doubleheader at Kansas City. 

Jimmy Key (14-7) won for the first 
time since July 21. Randy Myers got his 
37th save, tying the team record set by 
Gregg Olson in 1990. 

Brawwrs 6, Hangars 2 Bryce Hoiie 
kept Texas hitless for 5 VS inn i ng s and 
Milwaukee won for the fifth time in six 
games. 

Florie made his seventh start after 1 34 
career relief appearances in the majors. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


Robtn tiwWThr teartnnl Pnw 

Athletics' Jason Giambi feeling rundown as he was unable to elude the tag by Nomar Gardapanra of the Red Sox. 

Mariners Get a Fright and a Shutout 

Johnson Wins, Then Dismisses Bruise on Pitching Hand as Minor 


Glavine 
‘Finally 5 
Rewarded 
For Effort 


The Associated Press 

For most pitchers, a loss and 
four uo-decisions wouldn’t be 
remarkable. Tom Glavine, 
however, isn’t most pitchers. 

Glavine stopped his 
longest winless streak in sev- 
en years, winning for the first 
time since July 16 as he led 
the Atlanta Braves over the 
Houston Astros, 3-1. 
Wednesday night. 

“Finally, a month later." 
Glavine said. “I've actually 
pitched pretty well lately and 
not gotten anything out of iL 

NL Roundup 

Pitching well, you can only 
take that so far and it gets 
frustrating. It's hard when 
you're pitching well and not 
winning, especially when the 
team is not winning." 

Glavine ( 1 1-6) has won six 
straight at Houston since a 1-0 
loss on June 25, 1991. 

Glavine allowed two hits 
and five walks in seven in- 
nings and struck out a season- 
high nine. He also drove in a 
run with a squeeze bunt as the 
Braves completed a two-game 
sweep following a slump that 
saw them lose four of five. 

Javy Lopez went 3-for-4 
and hit his 19th homer. 

Marlins 6, Cubs S Livan 
Hernandez (7-0) won at 
Miami despite allowing four 
runs and six hits in 5*5 in- 
nings. Gary Sheffield hit his 
14th homer as Florida im- 
proved to 7-0 this season 
against Chicago. 

Cardinals 6, Expos 3 Brian 
Jordan doubled off Steve 
Kline to break a 2-2 tie during 
a three-run eighth, and vis- 
iting Sl Louis won its third 
straight 

Pedro Martinez struck out 
13 in 6% innings, fanning 
seven straight batters in the 
middle of the game. He al- 
lowed three hits and two un- 
earned runs 

Pirates 7, Padres 3 Jason 
Schmidt won his fourth con- 
secutive decision since July 
20 and broke an 0-for-26 
slump with a key run-scoring 
single as the Pirates went 
ahead in the sixth and won for 
the sixth time in eight 
games. 

Rockios 5, Reds 3 Vinny 
Castilla and Ellis Burks 
homered, and Larry Walker 
took one away from the Reds 
with a sensational catch. 

In the sixth. Walker 
reached over the right-field 
wall to take a two-run homer 
away from Jon NunnaUy; 
then threw to first to complete 
a double play. 

• Los Angeles's game at 
New York was rained out; 
and die teams were scheduled 
to play a doubleheader Thurs- 
day. San Francisco's game at 
Philadelphia also was post- 
poned by rain, to Sept. 1 1. 


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PAGE 22 


POSTCARD 


•5 


America Gets ‘Cubanitis 


By Peter Wairous 

Sev YorliTur.es Sen u.e 


N EW YORK — Cubans call if 
“Cubanitis,” a cultural virus that 
affects outsiders. The signs are obvious: 
Foreigners — sometimes. U.S. citizens 
— get lost in the culture and try to 
become Cuban, wearing beads from the 
Santeria religion, learning the newest 
dances, even marrying a Cuban. 

But Cubanitis does not just affect 
individuals. The old romance between 
the United States and Cuba, changed by 
the Cold War. is stirring, ahead of any 
political rapprochement. 

This new interest in Cuban culture is 
still far from the mainstream. It can be 
counted in record sales in the thousands, 
not millions, and in a growing number of 
visits by Cuban musicians for concerts 
and club dares in a few major cities. 

This summer the United States has 
welcomed some of Havana's best per- 
formers. including NG La Banda. Pablo 
Milanes and Issac Delgado. They tour 
the country, drawing large audiences. 
And a loophole in the Helms-Burton Act 
allows U.S. record companies to license 
recordines by Cuban musicians, circum- 
venting the embargo on trade with Cuba. 
Much of the best contemporary Cuban 
music is available or soon will be. 


On a smaller scale, too. interest in 
Cuban culture is expanding quickly. Ar 
Caribbean Music and Dance, a San 
Francisco-based organization that spe- 
cializes in educational tours of Cuba, 
business has flowered. 

“We did one workshop in Cuban 
folklore six years ago when we started: 
now we do 11 events." said Melissa 
Daar, the company’s president. “The 
first one had 30 people from the Bay 
Area, and now we have 300 people a 
year from all over the country- The kinds 
of people have also changed. The in- 
terest is broader, and people want to go 
to ail the major cultural centers, like 
Matanzas and Santiago. They're getting 
more sophisticated."' 

At Descarga. a mail-order company 
in Brooklyn that specializes in record- 
ings from the Caribbean, business has 
tripled over the last three years. 

"I sell as much as 1 can set." said 


Bruce Polin. the owner. “But I can’t get 
enough stock. I’m always sold out of 
Cuban material, and I could sell, for 
example, 2.000 copies immediately of a 
new Los Van Van if I had it And I’m just 
a mail-order company." 

Intellectuals and celebrities are mak- 
ing the pilgrimage to Havana, flying first 
to Cancun. Mexico or the Bahamas to 
avoid the U.S. regulations against travel 
to Cuba, using the annual Havana Film 
Festival, which features work from 
across Latin America, as an excuse, or 
going to the Havana Biennial, an art show 
with a steadily growing reputation. 

□ 

“When I lived in Havana, between 
the years of 1993 and 1995, 1 saw a huge 
increase in Americans coming to 
Havana, writing pieces and researching 
books.” said Jon Lee Anderson, an 
American who lives in Spain. He is the 
author of “Che* ’ (Grove Press), a recent 
biography of Che Guevara, the Argen- 
tinian radical who helped propel the 
Cuban revolution. 

"Tourism tripled while I was there, 
•but there was this ever-growing river of 
journalists and academics pounding on 
our doors to get at the story.” 

American visitors to Havana often 
find themselves wandering into what 
seems like a parallel universe with a 
highly intelligent population, but one 
oddly untouched by modernity. There is 
a sense that, for all of its problems, the 
place has some sort of prelapsarian in- 
nocence, one that could vanish with the 
fall of Fidel Castro. 

“There's a sense there of something 
we’ve lost,” Anderson said. “It's so 
undeveloped, it has avoided the Latin 
shantytown syndrome, the American 
cultural death due to monoculturalism, 
the spread of the subdivisions and the 
rampant overdevelopment of coasts, all 
the things that have devastated our own 
country.” 

Daar agrees. “My experience with 
tours is that the Americans are always 
impressed at how little everyone has. and 
how they make their lives as full and rich 
as possible, especially compared to us, 
who have everything, but our lives aren *t 
almost as rich*” she said. “They fell in 
love with the country . the people and the 
music, and thev don't want to leave.” 


Into the Hot Pot: A Searing Experience 


By Seth Faison 

Nw York Tunes Service 


C HONGQING, China — For a 
professional pool player. 

Meng Lang was pretty clumsy 
with chopsticks. He kept losing his 
grip cm the chunks of pig’s brain, 
which fell back into the iron pot of 
boiling oil and hot chili peppers. 

Not that it mattered. The whole 
point of “hot pot,” a tongue-sear- 
ing experience that is a summer 
favorite in this city, is to bathe the 
morsels in a special hot. hot. hot 
concoction for as long as a diner 
can bear. 

It may sound odd, but it’s true: 

The hotter it gets outside, the more 
people in this comer of China like 
to eat tiie hottest food imaginable. 

There is no better way, many 
swear, to fight the sweltering heat. 

“If you' want to stay cool." 

Meng murmured between bites, 
once he finally got a handle on the 
food, “you have to get hot.” 

As China hurtles down the path 
of fast economic growth, so evident 
in the mish mash of construction 
underway in a smoggy and over- 
crowded city like Chongqing, some 
residents seem glad to cling to a few 
traditions. One of the most beloved, 
many residents say, is earing hot 
pot at the height of summer. 

One recent evening. Meng met 
some friends for dinner shortly 
after sundown, as the temperature 
drifted not far from the day's peak 
of 39 degrees centigrade ( 102 de- 
grees Fahrenheit) and an unbear- 
able humidity hung in the air tike a 
giant hot towel. For most mortals, 
simply walking down the street was enough to drench 
them in sweat.' 

Inside the Jin Jianglan Hot Pot Center, it was even 
hotter. There was no air-conditioning, on purpose, and 
tile hearth at each table was tike a small furnace. The 
experience was somewhat like being in a sauna, only 
one where people are eating. 

Meng and his pals took off their shins and hung 
them on a hook on the wall, as though it were time to 
get down to business, which in this case simply meant 
eating and sweating. So accustomed are they to the 
ritual, however, that none of the friends show ed more 
than a thin bead of forehead perspiration until well 
into the meal. 


7=S 



“There is no way you can feel hot when you leave 
here, because every' place else feels cool,” said Li 
Xiaogang. who described himself half-jokingly as 
Meng's apprentice at the pool table, but who is also his 
business manager. “Here, try some cow's throat.” 

The choice of edibles at any traditional hot pot can 
seem daunting — calT s liver’ pig’s brain, and cow's 
throat are Li’s favorites, though he’ll sample a few 
vegetables, too. But the uninitiated may have dif- 
ficulty distinguishing much, in terms of taste, beyond 
hot chili. 

* 'The main thing is to put enough chili peppers in 
with the oil, so that it's hot.” said Tang Mmrang, the 
restaurant's manager, in a mild understatement. 


“Anv traditional place will also 
add a splash of pig *s blood, to give 
it body." 

The recent appearance ot fancy. 

air -conditioned eateries with red 
chintz drapes and pink tablecloths 
advertising themselves as hoi pot 
restaurants seemed to offend Tang 
as deep!) as if he were a proud 
guardian of a cultural relic. 

“That’s nor real hot pot," be 
said, quite sternly. “They're trying 
to use the name of Chongqing hot 
pot. but it's all fake. They know; 
nothing of real hot pot." 

According to local lore, 
Chongqing hot pot evolved early 
this century among coolies whose 
back-breaking labor involved tug- 
ging riverboais upstream against 
the strong current of the V angtze 
River, working in teams on the 
riverbanks. Underpaid and over- 
worked, cooties could afford little 
for meals and often gathered 
around a fire and a common, pot. 
into which they dipped any food 
they could geT their hands on. 

People in Chongqing, translit- 
erated as Chungking when it was 
the wartime capital of China s Na- 
tionalist government, have been 
eating hot pot ever since. Tang 
said. 

Back at the pool players' table, 
the conversation turned to impor- 
tant issues, like a future tourna- 
ment 

“Is Fat Wang coming?” asked 
Meng, as he fished around in the 
pot for yet another misplaced an- 
imal part. “We have to make sure 
u- wiht don’t go op against him.” 

Meng’s wife came in and 

1 down on a seat beside her husband. 

I ou haven’t starred sweating. Just begin?” she 
asked, as though this was a standard way to judge 
progress in a meal. 

Another friend explained quietly that Meng’s wife 
is the daughter of the district head of police, a big 
cheese by any measure. By extension . so is she, and 
since she married him last year, so is Meng. 

Yet as they' took toms dipping their chopsticks into 
the cauldron of hot sauce, Meng and his wife looked 
tike any other Chongqing residents, preparing to 
sweat up a storm. 

“Everyone likes hot pot," she said. “It’s best in 
the summer, when it’s hot.” 


r v4l 


ART AND POLITICS 


PEOPLE 


At 95, Hitler’s Favored Director Still Provokes 

' President Bill Clinton ana House 


By Alan Cowell 

.Vm Yuri Tunes Ser m 


H AMBURG — Leni Riefenstahl 
turns 95 on Friday, and if she imag- 
ined that the years w : ouId diminish the 
stigma she accumulated 60 years ago and 
more as Hitler’s favored moviemaker, 
then she was — apparently — wrong. 

When an exhibit of her work — the 
first in postw ar Germany — opened here 
last week, the focus was on those de- 
nouncing her roois in the Third Reich 
and on a debate about a particularly 
troubled corollary': Can an that grew in 
such soil ever transcend its origins? 

“The discussion is. in fact, more in- 
teresting than the exhibit." said Andreas 
Schlueter. who arranged the exhibition 
of 50 postwar color photographs and 
prewar black-and-white film clips at his 
second-floor gallery close ro Hamburg's 
main railroad station. 

Riefenstahl has staked out her own 
position in the debate. “Can art be sep- 
arated from politics?” she said in a tele- 
phone interview from her home on the 
Starnbergersee in Bavaria. “If an artist is 
possessed by his art, then he does not 
nave the possibility to do anything 
else.” 

An admiring Hitler sought out Riefen- 
stahl to direct what has been termed the 
most notorious documentary ever filmed 
— 4 ‘Triumph of the Will ” — a depiction 
of the Nazi Party rally that became a 
central motif of Hitler’s dictatorship. 

In scenes that have chilled subsequent 
generations, the documentary shows the 
massed banners and uplifted faces of 
Hitler’s devoted followers marching by 
his podium. Yet, Riefenstahl insisted this 
week, “It was only a documentary. It 
could be used for propaganda purposes, 
but I didn’t make it as propaganda. ' The 
film, she recalled, won a major award as 
a documentary in Paris in 1937. 

“Triumph of the Will” was followed 
by her renowned documentary coverage 
of the 1936 Berlin Olympics, “Olym- 
pia,” cementing her reputation as a 
documentary maker entwined with the 
Nazi ideology of Aryan supremacy. So 
close was the association that Time 
magazine, she recalled, once referred to 



Ou,«r Fma-tTh- Pi-»- 

One of Leni Riefenstahl’s photos. 

her erroneously as Hitler’s girlfriend. 

At the core of the argument over the 
exhibition is postwar Germany’s unre- 
solved fixation with its history. Almost 
routinely, the past rears up — in high- 
school courses and histories — with the 
warning that it should not be repeated. 

At Schlueter’s galleiy. the discussion is 
tinged with a further question: Is there a 
statute of limitations, so to speak, for 
those, like Riefenstahl, who spent three 
years after World War H in American and 
French internment camps and who un- 
derwent the process known as denazi- 
fication in which Germans were suj 
to equip themselves to begin anew? 

“This is really a significant ques- 
tion, ’ ’ Schlueter, 36, said in an interview 
during which he acknowledged deep ad- 
miration for Riefenstahl’s work, first as a 
filmmaker in the 1930s and then as a 
photographer in the postwar era. (Even 
today, despite her years, she is working 
on a deep-sea video reflecting her fas- 
cination with submarine themes. She 
learned to dive more than 20 years ago 
when she was in her 70s. Three days after 
her birthday, she plans a diving trip 


to Hawaii to work on her next film.) 

“For 50 years. Leni Riefenstahl has 
been working with photography.” 
Schlueter said. “There is a postwar per- 
son here and perhaps one can make a 
distinction” between that person and the 
prewar filmmaker. 

Even then. Riefenstahl challenges the 
stereotype of herself as what Schlueter 
described as “a synonym for the Third 
Reich.” Of the Holocaust, she says: “I 
did not know what was going on. I did 
not know anything about these things.” 

Riefenstahl’s rise to preeminence 
among German filmmakers began in 
1932 when she directed “The Blue 
Light.” the story of an innocent moun- 
tain girl, which reflected the interest in 
mountain themes she had discovered 
starring in Arnold Fanck’s dramatic 
movies. It was that film that caughr 
Hitler’s eye and led him to ask her to 
make “Tnumph of the Will.” 

Riefenstahl says she began to have 
doubts about Hitler, w'hom at first she 
greatly admired, in 1937 because his 
views on an conflicted with hers. The 
war, in effect, ended her filmmaking. 

During her detention from 1945 to 
1948, she said, she repeatedly insisted to 
her captors that she had not been a Nazi 
Party member and had "never unered an 
anti-Semitic phrase and was never a rac- 
ist.” Nonetheless, her past caught up 
with her: No one would hire her to make 
movies. And even when she turned to 
color photography and traveled to the 
Sudan to take a series of photographs of 
Nubians, which appeared in book form 
in the 1970s, she was again accused of 
pursuing the “fascist aesthetic” of glor- 
ification of the male body. 

Critically, the current exhibit has in- 
spired a huge surge of interest in Riefen- 
stahl and her work. She has been in- 
terviewed for most of Germany’s major 
weekly publications — Der Spiegel, 
Stem and Die Zeit, for instance. But the 
attention has not always been flattering. 
Interviewers have again pursued her as- 
sociation and fascination with Hitler, and 
critics have challenged the merit of her 
photography. But other, older Germans, 
Schlueter said, have left the exhibit in a 
nostalgic and sympathetic mood. 


Speaker Newt Gingrich exhibit leaner 
profiles as a result of dieting this year. 
Clinton shed about 15 pounds (7 kilo- 
grams) after his knee injury in mid- 
March. bringing his weight down to 
about 200 pounds. The oresidect, who 
celebrated nis 51st birthday Tuesday, 
has tried to cut out desserts and limit 
himself to tw o meals a day by skipping 
breakfast, a spokesman said. Asked how 
the First Dieter is doing in resisting his 
penchant for fast food, the spokesman 
said, “I haven’t seen a lot of it around.” 
Gingrich, meanwhile, told the late-night 
talk show host Jay Leno that he has lost 
about 25 pounds from a top weight of 
250 pounds. But Gingrich, 54, said that 
the last stretch of recent budget talks — 
which included deliveries of stacks of 
pizzas — may nave added z few pounds 
that will have to be trimmed. 


Princess Diana has left Greece after 
eluding reporters during a quiet six-day 
cruise around the Aegean Sea. Diana and 
a friend, Rosa Monckton. renamed to 
Athens and left aboard a private jet that a 
Greek television network said belonged 
to Hanods. xhe London department store 
owned by Mohammed al Fayed. Ac- 
cording to the crew of the charter yacht 
Della Grazia, al Fayed ’s son Dodi, Di- 
ana’s apparent new beau, did nor join her 
on the cruise. “She was calm, happy and 
nor at all depressed,” said the yacht’s 
captain, Kostas Vardaios. 

“The only times she got very 
upset was when she read the 
newspapers.” 


fc 



CHRISTMAS IN AUGUST — Santa Claus and the Rockettes in an 
annual summer performance outside Radio City Music Hall in New York. 


forest, is aboard a yacht with the film star 
Dustin Hoffman and their families. 


Chancellor Helmut Kohl and Pent- 
house have reached an out-of-court set- 


And speaking of yachts, the 
British pop star Sting, cruis- 
ing along Turkey's Aegean 
and Mediterranean coast, 
urged the country to keep sea- 
side development in check. 
“Such unique bays, beautiful 
sea, greenery and sun cannot 
be found all over the world,” 
Sting told the Anatolia news 
agency. Sting, who has toured 
the globe giving concerts to 
raise money for the preser- 
vation of die Amazon rain 


The Beat Comes to Brasilia 


Agence Frunce-Presse 

B RASILIA — For four days, Brasilia will try to shake its 
reputation as Brazil's somewhat bureaucratic, sleepy- 
capital when it launches an off-season carnival that is 
expected to bring 350.000 people onto the city’s streets. 

Sponsors said die event, called the Mic3recandanga. 
will have partygoers dancing to the beat of “axe" music 
from the more traditionally dance-crazed region of south- 
west Brazil. The mini -carnival, running until Sunday, is 
designed “to make sure that the wait for the real Carnival 
in February doesn’t become too long and tiresome," 
according to Sergio Monday, a festival organizer. 

Among the main events is’ a procession through the city, 
accompanied by music from dozens of floats. 


dement after the German leader sued the 
magazine over publication of a can-’ 
carure depicting his wife, Hannelore, 
draped across the hood pf a Mercedes in 
a lascivious pose. A spokesman for the 
Chancellery in Bonn said Thursday that 

the magazine's publisher, 

Petri Verlag. and its chief ed- 
itors had assured Kohl that, 
they never intended to insult 
him or his wife. Penthouse is 
to pay undisclosed compen- 
sation, which will be passed' 
on to a charity. 


□ 

Madrid’s Opera is reopen- 
ing in October with a glit- 
tering season including a 
world premiere starring 
Placido Domingo. After nine 
years of refurbishment, the 
opera now has the best stage 
in the world, according to 
Madrid's regional president, 
Alberto Ruiz GaJJardon. 






in the springtime. 


Every country' has its own AT&T Access Number which 
makes calling home or to other countries really easy. 
Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country you're 
calling from and you'll get the clearest connections 
home. And be sure to charge your calls on your AT&T 
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f up to 00°o ). Check the list for AT&T Access Numbers. 





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AT&T Access Numbers 


EUROPE 

Austrfa*o 

022-903-011 

Belgium* 

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France 

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Germany 

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172-1011 

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Russia* ^ (Moscow) • 

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900-99-01-11 

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510-0200 

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Ghana .. . 

0191 

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0-800-99-0123 


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